(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



COMPRISING THE 



$Iante of t\)t 2&opal tSarfceitt of Heto, 

AND 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN ; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.L 

P.E.S., F.L.S., etc., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT Of THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 

VOL. LIIL 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

( Or Vol. CXXIII. of the Whole Work.) 




' Thanks to the human heart, by which we live, 
Thanks to its tenderness, its joys and fears, 
To me the meanest flower that blows can give 
Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears." 

WobbswObTH, Imit. of Immortality, u. 



LONDON : 
L. REEVE & CO., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1897. 

[All rights reserved.] 

,. Bet. Garden, 
1898. 



LONDON : 

PRINTED BY GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, LIMITED, 

ST. JOHN'S HOUSE, CLERKENWELL, B.C. 



TO 



ERRATA 

In Vol. LIII. of the 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



Plate 7548 should ?•? 754-9 
„ 7549 >. 7548 

„ 7570 „ 7571 

„ 7571 .. 7570 

And should be placed opposite their respective Letterpress. 



TO 



A. B. FREEMAN-MITFOKD, ESQ., C.B., F.L.S. 

Late Secretary H.M. Office of Works, fyc. 

My dear MlTFORD, 

Duty and pleasure alike prompt me to offer you 
the dedication of Vol. CXXIII. of the Botanical 
Magazine, giving rrie, as it does, the opportunity of 
recalling the years of our cordial official co-operation, when 
the Royal Gardens profited so greatly in every department 
through your energy, foresight, and love of plants. 

To this claim I must surely add the service you have 
rendered to horticulture and botany by your labours in 
introducing, cultivating, and studying the hardy Bamboos, 
of which your charming work, " The Bamboo Garden/' is 
the first-fruits. Nor can I omit an allusion to your own 
garden, unrivalled as it is amongst the private collections 
of hardy plants in Europe for extent, scientific interest, 
and beauty. 

Believe me, my dear Mitford, 

Affectionately yours, 

J. D. HOOKEK. 

The Camp, Sunningdale. 
Dec. 1st, 1897. 



liii.—ja: 



No. 625. 

Price St. 6d. colow 
OH NO. 1319 OF THE EWTIM WORK. 



CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

COMPRISING- 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

OF OTHER BOTANT\T potibtioti^™ 

ulAiV ''- lL ^fABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BR 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 
Br 

Sib JOSEPH HALT ON HOOKER, m.d. 5 K.aai, cm, F.H.s, r 

Tate Btreaor of tfcr iT.anal botanic ffianww of mm. 







LON J. 
L. REEYE and CO., 6, HENRIETTA Sj 

1897, 



', CO 




How ready, price 2s. 6d. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

* v ,„^ w <? TR T II HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
A Lecture delivered by biR J. u. tf.uua.Ein., ^ » 

for the advancemeat of Science at Nottingham, August 27, l»bb. 



BRITISH FERNS: 

Coloured Figures aud Descriptions of the Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland. 
By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 8vo. 66 Coloured Plates, £2 2s. 

GARDEN FERNS: 

ed Figures and Descriptions of a Selection of Exotic Ferns, adapted for 
Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, and Conservatory. 
By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 8vo. 64 Coloured Plates, £2 2s. 

FILICES EXOTICA: 

Coloured Figures and Descriptions of Exotic Ferns. 
By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 4to. 100 Coloured Plates, £6 lis. 

dition 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 
tieBev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 

al vol.,roy;. - case, £6 6*. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D... F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S. 
rms a larg "■ 60 plfttes > b y 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 
to or Naturalised in the British fsles. 

GE BENT HAM, F.U.S. 



ILLUSTRATIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, 
Dk v. H.FI'i W.Q. SMITH 

fining an Illu 

L. I i ETTA STREET, C< VBDEN. , 



Z57J 




M.^.de 



lit Brookes, Day BtSoalmp 



l Reeve & > ! ', landon 



Tab. 7512. 
ARISTOLOCHIA clypeata. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. AEiSTOLOCHiACKit). 
Genus Aeistoloceia, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 123.) 



Akistolochia (Gymnolobus) clypeata ; caule crasso, cortice profunde 6-sulcato, 
foliis longe petiolatis orbiculari-ovatis cnspidatis basi truncatis v. leviter 
cordatis palmatim 5-nerviis, floribus racemis brevissimis caulinis dispo- 
sitis uno solum ssepissime evoluto, perianthii utriculo clavato gibboso 
multicostato intus glaberrimo, ore annulo processuum intus spectantium 
instructo, collo refracto intus laxe piloso in lamiuam amplam orbicularem 
concavamanticebifidam maculis substellas-formibus rubro-purpureis dense 
aspersam ampliato, laminas ore postice fascia lata villorum instructo, 
columna oblonga sessili cylindracea, autheris 6 lineari-oblongis approxi- 
mates, styli lobis 6 insequilongis lineari-elongatis erectis antheras 
superantibns, marginibus stigmatosia crassis basi confluentibus. 

A. clypeata, Andre in Illustr. Hortic. vol. xvii. (1870) p. 223, t. 40. Gard. 
Ghron. (1892) vol. i. p. 443. Gartenfl. (1893) p. h66, fig. 117. Watson in 
Gard, & Forest, vol. viii. (1895) p. 444. 



A. clypeata is another of the ever-increasing host of 
tropical American Aristolochias. Its nearest ally is A. 
Duchartrei, Andre (tab. 5880) a native of the Upper 
Amazons, a much smaller-flowered species, with terete 
branches, many-flowered racemes, and broad, short, 
triangular stigmatic lobes. In the size of the flower it 
approaches A. gigantea, Mart. (Tab. 4221) and A. Gigas, 
Lindl., species with long-tailed perianths. 

It was discovered in the botanically rich, but notoriously 
unhealthy Cauca Province of New Grenada, by the in- 
defatigable botanical collector, Mr. E. G. Wallis, and 
introduced by him into Mr. Linden's establishment in 
1868, where it flowered in 1869. In 1892 plants of it 
were obtained from Messrs. F. Sander & Co., of St. 
Alban's, for the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, which flowered in 
a stove in October, 1895. The flower-buds are developed 
very numerously from the old stems, but fall off in foggy 
weather, one only usually developing. It has been 
distributed in England as A. gigantea. 

Bescr. — A tall climber, with a woody stem, covered with 
January 1st, 1897. 



a thick grey layer of cork, that is deeply cleft into about 
six ribs that are triangular in section. Leaves tbree or 
four inches broad, long-petioled, broadly deltoidly or 
orbicularly ovate, or ovate-cordate, acuminate, palmately 
5-nerved from the base, bright green above, pale blue- 
green beneath, and there strongly reticulate between the 
main-nerves ; petiole two to three inches long, terete. 
Racemes an inch long, from the axils of cauline leaves, or 
from close beneath the scars left by the fallen leaves, short, 
horizontal, green, with usually only one perfect flower, 
and several arrested buds ; bracts an eighth of an inch 
long, lanceolate, green. Flowers pendulous; peduncle with 
ovary nearly three inches long. Utricle of perianth three 
inches long, clavate, gibbous, about ten-ribbed, glabrous 
and smooth within, except at the constricted mouth, which 
has a fringe of minute processes pointing downwards ; 
tube of perianth short, infundibular, dark purple and 
hairy within, rapidly dilating into a concave, nearly 
circular limb six to ten inches in diameter, bifid anteriorly 
to nearly half way down, with a narrow sinus, many-nerved 
and coarsely reticulate externally, internally quite smooth, 
pale yellowish, closely studded with dark red-purple, 
irregularly shaped spots ; mouth with an anticous semi- 
circular belt of white, fleshy filaments. Column sessile ; 
anthers six, linear, close together; stigma six-cleft, the 
lobes unequal, narrow, erect, with much thickened 
stigmatose margins that are confluent below. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Vertical section of the utricle and perianth-tube, of the natural 
size ; 2, column, enlarged. 



7513 




LRe« 



Vmcei 



Tab. 7513. 
CYNOGLOSSUM nervosum. 

Native of the Western Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. BoraginE;E. — Tribe Borages. 
Genus Cynoglossum, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 848. 



Cynoglossum: nervosum ; elatum, ramosum, strigilloso-hirsutnlum, foliis 
radicalibus et inferioribus elongatis petiolatis anguste oblanceolatia 
subacutia utrinque hirsutalis, nervis aubtus validis, superioribus oblongia 
lanceolatiave sessilibus acuminatia, racemis demum elongatis 3-6-polli- 
caribus laxifloris, pedicellis calvcem floriferam subaequantibua fructiferis 
lougioribna, calycis segmentis oblongia obtusis corollas tubum subcampa- 
nulatum aaquantibua v. paullo brevioribu8, corollas limbo fere ^-poll. lato 
intenae coeruleo, lobi8 oblongo-rotnndatis, faucia squamis emarginatia 
purpureis baai setulosiB, antheriB incluais, nuculia late ovatia margiaatia 
glochidiatia. 

C. nervoaum, Benth. ex Clarke in Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iv. p. 158. 



The largest flowered Himalayan Cynoglossum, and a 
very handsome plant, native of the temperate and sub- 
alpine regions between Kulu and Kumaon, at elevations of 
10,000 to 13,000 ft. 

It was first found by Edgeworth, in the Jalauri Pass in 
Kulu, and has been in cultivation in England for some 
time, as there are specimens in the Kew Herbarium from 
Mr. Wilson's garden at Wey bridge, dated 1888. Mr. 
Duthie has collected it at Kumaon and Garwhal, and Dr. 
Watt at Pangi in Kumaon. The Kew plant from which 
the accompanying drawing was made, was raised from 
seed received from Mr. Duthie in 1894 ; it flowered in the 
open ground of the Royal Gardens in May, 1896, and 
fruited in the following June. 

Descr. — A tall, erect, branching herb, attaining three 
feet in height, more or less shortly strigillosely pubescent all 
over, the hairs being more or less spreading on the stem, 
and appressed on the foliage ; those of the upper surface of 
the larger leaves arise from small tubercles. Radical and 
lower leaves six to ten inches long, narrowly oblanceolate, 
acute, narrowed into a petiole two or three inches long, 
upper surface pale green, lower paler, with six or more 
pairs of strong scabrid nerves that form a very acute angle 

Jasit art 1st, 1897. 



with the midrib, and after running parallel to the margins in 
their upper parts, anastomose with the nerves above them. 
Racemes many, axillary and terminal, three to six inches 
long, loosely many-flowered ; pedicels as long as or longer 
than the calyx, erect in flower, decurved in fruit. Calyx 
about one-sixth of an inch long; lobes oblong, obtuse, 
dull purplish. Corolla-tube rather longer than the calyx, 
campanulate ; limb nearly half an inch across, very deep 
cobalt blue ; lobes broadly oblong, almost rounded ; scales 
in the throat short, two-lobed, thin, pale purplish blue, 
tips exserted, their margins below ciliate. Stamens in- 
cluded, connective of anther emarginate. 'Ovary of four 
globose lobes; style stout, one-third of an inch lono-, 
base narrowly pyramidal. Nutlets of fruit broadly 
ovate, obtuse, suberect, margins thickened and surface 
glochidiate. — J. D. H. 



* F - ig ;., 1 '^ C , aly . x; 2> corolla laid °pen ; 3, anther; 4, scale of mouth of corolla • 
5, pistil ; 6, fruit :— All enlarged. 







\Sncent Brooks pay &. SonJmp 



LRe< 



Tab. 7514. 

BERKHEYA Adlami. 
Native of the Transvaal. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Arctotide/e. 
Genus Berkheya, Ehrh.; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 460.) 



Beekheya Adlami; caule elato alato, alis angustia undulatis-spinulosis, foliis 
inferioribua subsessilibus sesquipedalibua obovato-oblongia obtusia 
sinuato-lobatis supra scabridis lagte viridibua brunneo macubitis subtus lana 
appressa niveis, nervia utrinque 20-30 aetosis reticulars, foliis superiori- 
bua linearibus pinnatifido-lobatis, lobis rotundatis setoso-spinulosis 
sinnbus recurvis, capitulis subcorymbosia 2>\ poll. diam. aureis, involucri 
bracteis lanceolatis patenti-recurvis marginibus apiceque spinuloso- 
ciliatis, receptaculo profunde alveolato, fl. radii sub-biseriatis linearibus 
3-denticulatis sterilibua, fl. disci nnmerosisaimis, corollse tubo anguato 
puberulo, antheria basi sagittatia, stigmatis ramia linearibus revolutis, 
acbeniis cuneiformibus, pappi squamis brevibus oblongis ciliatis. 

B. Adlami, Hook.f. 



This is by far the largest species of Berkheya of 
which I have any knowledge. The genus contains about 
thirty species, natives of tropical and chiefly southern 
Africa. They vary in size from small plants about the 
size of a Daisy, to the tall and stout species here repre- 
sented, from glabrous to cottony, and from unarmed to 
spinulose. The flowers of both disk and ray are yellow 
in all. Berkheya belongs to the tribe of Arctotidese of 
Composite, which is almost exclusively South and tropical 
African, and is the representative of the Thistles (especially 
the Carlinas) of Europe and North Africa. The best 
known representative of the tribe in gardens is Arctotis ; 
but three species of Berkheya are figured in the early 
volumes of this magazine, when the culture of Cape plants 
was in vogue. These are B. (Stobsea) pinnata, Less. t. 
1788; B. grandiflora, Willd., t. 1844, and B. unifiora, 
Willd, t. 2094. 

B. Adlami was raised from seeds sent to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1895, by R. W. Adlam, Esq., of Johan- 
nesberg, plants raised from which flowered, some in a 
greenhouse, and others in the open air in June, 1896. 

As stated under t. 2094, the genus was named by 
Jancart 1st, 1897. 



Ehrhart in recognition of Johann Francq Van Berkhey, 
the learned author of a treatise on the structure of the 
flowers of " Composite Plants," published in 1760. 

Descr. — Stem attaining six feet in height, simple or 
sparingly branched, herbaceous, narrowly spinulosely 
winged by the decurrent leaf-bases. Radical leaves very 
large, eighteen inches long by seven broad, obovate-oblong, 
tip rounded, sinuate-lobed, margins undulate and spinu- 
losely toothed, base narrowed into a winged petiole, scabrid 
and green above, beneath snow-white with appressed 
cottony pubescence ; upper leaves three to six inches 
long, linear or oblanceolate, sinuate-pinnatifid, spinulosely 
toothed, margins of sinus often recurved, above dark 
green and scabrid, with brown blotches and spots beneath, 
as are the cauline. Heads subcorymbose, three and a half 
inches in diameter; peduncles suberect, terete, green, 
scabrid. Involucre broadly campanulate; bracts half as 
long as the ray-flowers, squarrosely spreading, lanceolate, 
green, tips red-brown and spinescent, margins ciliate. 
Receptacle flat. Ray-flowers very many, an inch long, 
primrose-yellow, spreading and recurved, neuter, tube 
slender, quite glabrous, tip of ligule 3-crenulate. Dish 
flowers excessively numerous, forming a convex golden- 
yellow mass, nearly two inches in diameter ; corolla tubular, 
5-cleft. Achenes short, obconic, ten-ribbed, top thickened ; 
pappus of oblong ciliate or serrulate scales shorter than 
the achene. — J. D. R. 



Fig. 1, Portion, of the receptacle with a ray-flower, and two achenes sunk 
in the alveoli ; 2, disk-flowers ; 3 scale of pappus ; 4, stamens ; 5, style-arms ; 
6, achene : — All enlarged. 



7515 



%&- 




TmceniBrcokr 



Tab. 7515. 
CROTON ELUTERIA. 

Native of the Bahama Islds. 

Nat. Ord. Euphobbiace^e.— Tribe Cbotoneje. 
Genus Cboton, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 293.) 



Crotos- (Eluteria) Eluteria; frutex v. arbuscula lepidota, ramia gracilibua, 
foliis longiuscule petiolatis ovato-cordatis obtuse acuminatia utrinque 
subtus precipue argenteo-lepidotia penninerviis marginibus subcrenatia, 
petiolo gracili eglanduloso, stipulis obsoletis : Jf. mosc. calycia laciniis 5 
patnlis ovato-oblongia obtnsis, petalis calyce dnplo longioribus sub- 
spatholatis obtusis utrinque pubeacentibua, staminibus 10-12 petalia 
longioribus, fl. foem. : calycia tubo hemispberico, lobia 5 late ovatis 
obtusia erectia ciliolatia, petalis maris, disci glandulia 10 minutis, 
staminodiis paucis, ovario globose- glanduloso, stigmatibus 3 seasilibas 
maltifidis. 

C. Eluteria, Benn. in Jbum. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. iv. (1860) p. 29. Baniell in 
Journ. Pharm. Soc. Ser. 2, vol. iv. p. 145, cum Ic. Mull. Arg. in DO. 
Prodr. vol. xv. para. IT. p. 516. Bentl. & Trim. Med. PI. t. 238. Griseb. 
FL Brit. W. Ind. p. 39 (partim). 

C. homolepidus, Muell. Arg. I. c. 518. p 

C. cascarilloides, Griseb. Cat. PI. Cub. 17 (Herb. Wright, n. 1971)? (nan 
Geisel.). 

Clutia Eluteria, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 1042 (excl. Syn.). 

0. Eluteria a. Cascarilla, Wbodv. Med. Bot. p. 633, t. 223, fig. 2. 

Elutheria, Linn. Hort. Cliff, p. 486. 

Elutheria Providentise, folio cordato, &c, Petiv. Coll. (1747) 4, n. 276. 



This interesting plant, the " Sweet-wood " of the 
Bahamas, yields the " Cascarilla Bark " of commerce, 
which has been from a very early period imported into 
Europe from Nassau, New Providence; though it wa3 
not till comparatively recently (1860) that it was distin- 
guished from several congeners with which it had been 
confounded. It seems to have been in cultivation in 
Europe upwards of a century and a half ago, for it is 
enumerated by Linnaeus in his " Hortus Cliffortianus," 
published in 1737, and according to Dr. Daniell it was 
introduced into England (probably from Holland) by 
Phillip Miller, though I do not find any mention of it in 
that author's " Dictionary of Gardening." Its identification 
as the Linnasan Elutheria Providentise by the late Mr. 

Januabt 1st, 1897. 



Bennett, of the British Museum, is due to the specimen 
of the Hortus Cliffortianus being in that institution. 

C. Eluteria is a native of all, or almost all, the islets 
of the Bahamas Archipelago ; and probably also of Cuba, 
for the Croton homolepidus of the latter island is hardly, 
if at all, distinguishable from it (by dried specimens). The 
bark is exported in the form of quills, and having an 
agreeable aromatic odour when burned, is an ingredient 
in the manufacture of incense and pastilles, and is also 
used to flavour tobaccos. Its taste, on the other hand, is 
warm and nauseously bitter, which is against its employ- 
ment as a drug, for which it is recommended in cases of 
chronic diarrhoea, dysentery, and some forms of dyspepsia. 
The annual export of the bark, which has been during the 
last twenty years, on an average, 100,000 lbs., is now 
decreasing, and this has led the Governor of the island, 
Sir "W. F. Haynes Smith, K.C.M.G., in a dispatch dated 
May 6th, 1896, to address a request to the Secretary of 
State for the Colonies, "that the authorities of Kew 
would assist him in framing regulations for the gathering 
the • Cascarilla Bark ' on the Crown lands of the Colony." 
In this dispatch Sir W. Haynes Smith points out " that 
the sources of supply have been improperly drawn upon, 
to the destruction of the plant and the quality of the 
bark," and that the latter " might be improved, and its 
use in commerce largely increased. He adds, that " the 
best quality is gathered at Atwood's Cay, containing about 
6500 acres, which is altogether Crown property, where 
licenses to gather have hitherto been granted, but where 
there are no regulations on the subject of gathering, 
or revenues derived from it, while the supply is de- 
teriorating." 

In accordance with this request, in the following June, 
Dr. Morris, the Assistant Director of Kew, who had 
visited the Bahamas, drew up a Report, indicating the 
proper measures to be taken for increasing both the 
quantity and quality of the bark in future, and other 
matters for consideration in connection with the subject. 

It is only of late years, and after a prolonged corre- 
spondence, that living plants of this Croton have been re- 
introduced into Europe. This was in May, 1887, when a 
case containing three was received at the Royal Gardens 



from F. E. Taylor, Esq., son of the Colonial Secretary of 
the Bahamas. The plants grew very slowly, and did not 
flower till 1896, when male flowers matured in March, and 
were followed by females in May. The plant has proved 
to be very difficult of propagation. The name is that of 
one of the Bahama Islets (Eleuthera). 

Mr. Morris describes the odour of the flowers as 
deliciously sweet. 

Descr. — A shrub, rarely small tree, attaining twenty 
feet in height, with a trunk eight inches in diameter ; 
branches few, suberect, wiry; bark fissured ; twigs, petioles, 
leaves beneath, and inflorescence densely covered with 
minute peltate, orbicular, lepidote scales with fimbriate 
margins. Leaves one and a half to two inches long, de- 
Hexed, alternate, petioled, stipulate, ovate-lanceolate, 
narrowed to the obtuse apex, subdenticulate, penninerved, 
base rounded or cordate, upper surface dull pale or dark 
green, under surface dull silvery, the scales obscuring 
the nerves. Flowers monoecious, in erect, short, simple 
or branched axillary and terminal racemes, very small, 
globose ; bracts shorter than the pedicels. — Male ft. calyx 
hemispheric, lobes broadly ovate, obtuse. Petals very 
small, longer than the calyx-lobes, obovate-spathulate, 
obtuse, pubescent, white. Stamens 10-15, filaments 
glabrous, anthers oblong. Pistillodes 0. — Fem.fl. at the 
base of the inflorescence. Petals hardly longer than the 
calyx-lobes. Stamens few, very short, imperfect. Ovary 
subglobose, styles multifid. Capsule about a quarter of an 
inch in diameter, subglobose ; valves crustaceous, silvery- 
lepidote. Seeds orange-brown, shining, dorsally flattened, 
laterally compressed, raphe keeled. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Male flower ; 2, the same spread open ; 3, lepidote scales from do.; 
4, petal ; 5, stamen; 6, female flower; 7, ovary and staminodes of the same; 
8, ovary bisected vertically, showing the ovules : — All enlarged. 



IS 16. 










LRa 






Tab. 7516. 

BIGNONIA buccinatoria. 

Native of Central Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. BignoniacEjE. — Tribe Bignonie^c. 
Genus Bignonia, Linn.; {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1033. 



Bignonia buccinatoria ; alte scandens, ramis teretibtis v. subangulatis, foliis 
2-foliolatis, petiolo apice nudo v. cirrhifero, foliolis petiolulatis ovato- 
oblongis ellipticisve obtnsis v. cuspidatis basi cuneatis rotundatis 
cordatiave pellucido-punctatis glabris v. subtus secus nervos pilosis, 
petiolulis £•-$ poll, longis, racemis axillaribus terminalib usque 
racbi pedicellis crassis calyceque subfurfuraceo-tomentosis, floribus 
pendulis, calyce poculaeforme ore truncato 5-dentato basi rotundato, 
corollas 4-pollicaris tomentellas tubo brevi tiavido in faucem bucciniformeni 
sanguineam lente curvam sensim attenuato, lobis 5 amplis rotundatis 
bifidi?, filamentis glabris, antberis vix exsertis loculis e basi divaricatis 
linearibus incurvis, connectivo dorso mucronato, disco crasso, ovario 
pubescente. 

B. buccinatoria, Mairet, ex DO. Prodr. vol. ix. p. 195. Helms. Biol. Cent,-. 
Amer. Bot. vol. ii. p. 490. 

B. Cherere, Linoll. Bot. Beg. t. 1301, excl. Syn. (non B. Kerere Aublet.) 

B. Kerere, Sort. 

Pithecoctenium buccinatorium, DC. I.e. D'Ancona, in Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 
vol. xiii. (1888) p. 272, t. xi. 

Phaadranthns buccinatorius, cinerascens, exsertus & Lindleyanus, Mien, in 
Proc. B. Sort. Soc. vol. iii. (1863) p. 182, 183. 



B. buccinatoria was introduced into the Gardens of Drop- 
more upwards of sixty years ago, by the Earl of Granville, 
by whom specimens were forwarded to Dr. Lindley, who 
figured it in the Botanical Register as B. Cherere, supposing 
it to be the B. Kerere, Aubl., of Surinam, a species with 
much smaller and yellow r flow 7 ers. It is a native of 
elevations of 6000-8000 ft. in Central Mexico, and must 
have been discovered in the last century, for there is a 
specimen from Pa von in Bentham's Herbarium now at 
Kew. In later years it has been collected by various 
botanists in the same country, and by one, Bilimek, at 
Puebla in South Mexico. 

There are several South American species of Begonia 
closely allied to B. buccinatoria, includiDg the above 

Januaby 1st, 1897. 



mentioned B. Kerere of Aubl. ; but the whole genus is in 
a state of confusion, many of the species in herbaria being 
undescribed ; and few of these being known in a fruiting 
state, the important characters of the capsule and seeds 
are unascertained. 

The specimen of B. buccinatoria here figured was sent by 
Thomas Hanbury, Esq., F.L.S., from his magnificent 
botanical garden at Palazzo Orengo, La Mortola, near 
Ventimiglia, in July. The flowers are of a far deeper 
blood-red colour than they are represented to be in the 
other figure of the plant. 

Descr. — A tall, woody climber, with more or less 
obtusely angled branches. Leaves bifoliolate, petiole usually 
ending in a branched tendril ; leaflets two to three inches 
long, elliptic or ovate-oblong, cuspidate or obtuse, thinly 
coriaceous, dotted with pellucid glands, glabrous above 
and beneath, or with scattered hairs on the nerves beneath, 
base rounded cuneate or subcordate ; petiole short, 
petiolule one-fourth to three-fourths of an inch long, 
terete, and rachis of raceme scurfily tomentose ; nerves 
about six pairs, arching ; a pair of very small elliptic 
leaflets is often present at the very base of the petiole, 
and on the joints of the rachis of the raceme. Flowers 
pendulous in terminal racemes ; rachis of raceme erect, 
stout, thickened and sometimes leafing at the nodes, few- 
flowered ; pedicels one half to three-quarters of an inch 
long, decurved, stout, green. Calyx half an inch long, 
and nearly as broad, green, cup-shaped, terete ; mouth 
truncate, irregularly 5-toothed ; base rounded. Corolla 
four inches long, finely tomentose, with a short pale 
yellow tube, gradually dilating into the long dark blood- 
red clavate or trumpet-shaped throat and lobes, slightly 
curved ; lobes half an inch long and broad, bifid, spreading. 
Filaments slender; anthers hardly exserted, of two narrow 
sausage-shaped divaricate cells, the very small connective 
produced into a short dorsal spur. Dish annular, thick, 
raised. Ovary ovoid, tomentose; style slender, puberulous ; 
lobes of stigma narrowly ellipsoid. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx halved, showing the disk and ovavy ; 2 and 3, anthers: — AU 
enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL. AND FOREIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK on of the 

Flow one to, < ><• ritish 

Isles THAM, 

F.R.S. 6th Edition, revised bv Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown Sv< 

ILLUSTRATION S of the BRITR of Wood 

s, with Di^ m Drawings bv W. H. 

Fit. u F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L 
to Bentham's " Handbook," aud other I 

rintrs, 3rd Edition, revised and enlarged, 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductoi 

Local Floras, By George Bentham, F. U.S., President of the Li 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wi 

localities of the less common species. By E 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 1 6.? . 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MO- otaining all thai 

known to be natives of the I M. J. Bekkilt.ey,. 

M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21.*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, com. 

all the Genera and S 
Britain aud Ire 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Famili< 

British Mosses, illustrated 

with 45 i 

XIV,,"*. PariXV.,6*. Part XVI..-. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. I). 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. f?<i. each. Parts 2 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9h. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI.. 36«. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentuam, F.P. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., : 
under the auspices of the s> 

FLORA of MAURIT I the SEYCHEJ ' 

tion of the Flowering Plan 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 <r< 
Coloi.inl Government of Mauririus. 

FLORA 0APENS1S: a Sy sterna t: 
the Cape C Sraria, and Port 

F.B 
Vol VI.) Parts I. and 1 1 

FLOi 

IIAIn 



FLO] 






BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 625, JANUARY, 1897. 

A. 

.— CROTON ELUTE: 

[en. 



FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G,, F.R.S. 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and 3*atal. 

Vol*. I. to III. 1SS8. each. 

By WILLIAM H of Botony m ^ 

Dublin, 

DBR,Ph.B. 

FLORA OF BRITISH IND : 



THE HEMIPTERA HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 



THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 



^ ow : I., with 8 15 s 

LEPIDOPTERA ITVDICA 

F. MOORE, F.Z 

Vol. 1., containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 

£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s n half morocco. 



No. 626. 



VOL. LTIL— FEBRUARY. 



Price 3#. 6d. coloured, 
OB NO. LOJlXJ or THE ENTIBE WOBK. 



CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



coHPBisnre 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, Wl' 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIO. 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., kc.s.l, c.B., F.R.S., f. 

Tate Itrrctor of tf» ISapal botanic ©arBcns of licta. 




and Art to adorn the ] 
And flowers ea 



LONDON: 
L. REEVE and CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE NT G. 

1897. 
[All rights reser 



Now rea 1 . 6d*. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



BRITISH FERNS: 

>loured Figures and Descriptions of the Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland. 
By Sir W. «T. Hookek, F.R.S. Royal 8vo. 66 Coloured Plates, £2 2.?. 



GARDEN FERNS: 

■d Figures and Descriptions of a Selection of Exotic Ferns, adapted for 
Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, and Conservatory, 
sir W. J. Hookeb, F.R.S. Royal 8vo. 64 Coloured Plates, £2 2s. 



FILICES EXOTIC/E: 

Coloured Figures and Descriptions of Exotic Ferns. 
By Sir W. J. Hookeb, F.R.S. Royal 4to. 100 Coloured Plates, £6 lis 



Now ready, Second Edition 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 
By the Rev, M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21 s. 



Now ready, complete in 1 vol., royal 4to, in handsome clotfc. case, £6 6*. not ; in half morocco, 

£7 net. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.8. 

The whole forme a large and handsome volt me of between J0O and 400 pages, with 60 Plates bv 
P. W. FROWHAWK, beautifully coloured by hand. ' ' 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

/ Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE NT II AM, F.R.S. 

6th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookeb,C.B.,K:.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10*. Qd. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn bt W. H, FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
rming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Mandbook;' and other British Floras. 
3rd Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 10*. 64. 

L. REEVE & CO,, 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN, 



Tab. 7517. 

MYRMECODIA Antoinii. 

Native of Torres Straits^ 



Nat. Ord. Rubiace^e. — Tribe Psychotrie^. 
Genus Mykmecodia, Jack. ; (Benlh. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 132.) 



Mi'rmecodia Antoinii ; tubere subgloboao ecostato sublacunoso spinul's 
brevibua simplicibus pungentibns aspero, caale robusto simplici v. 
ramOBO tetragono regulariter clypeolato, clypeolia £ poll. diam. aeriebns 
4 superpositis imbricatis orbiculatis bidentatis ambitu dense peotinafcira 
spinulosis, foliis elliptico-ovatis oblongis v. obovatis acutis in petiolum 
lamina ter quaterve breviorem angnatato, floribus | poll, longis rimia int^r- 
clypeolaribus sessilibus albis, calycis tubo tereti, limbo trancato obscure 
4-dentato, corollae tabo calyce ter longiore intus 4-costato et infra 
medium aunulo pilorum inatructo, lobis 4 oblongis, staminibns ore coroll;e 
insertis, filameutis brevibua crassis, antheris ovatis, stylo gracili, stigmate 
infundibulari truncato crenulato. 

M. 'Antoinii, Beccari, Malesia, vol. ii. p. 116, t. xix. figs. 2-4. 

3d. echinata, Antoine in Bot. Zcitschr. vol. ixxii. (1882) p. 317, cum Ir. 

F. Muell. Fragment. Fl. Austral, vol. vii. p. 45 ; Syst . Census of Austral. 

PL vol. i. p. 75 ? non Gaud. 



Under M. Beccarii, figured at t. 6883 of this work, 
mention is made of two other species, natives of Torres 
Straits, ore of which is the subject of the accompanying 
plate. It is a much more remarkable plant than M. 
Beccarii, on account of the size of the tuber, the stoutness 
of the stem, and the linear arrangement in four ranks of 
the very remarkable scutelliform spinulose persistent 
stipular organs, which almost conceal the stem. It was 
at first described as M. echinata, Gaudichaud, of the 
Islands of Rawak and Wagiou ; but that species has 
ribbed tubers, and larger leaves with much longer 
petioles. 

The first specimen of this singular plant imported into 
Europe was obtained from Thursday Island, Torres 
Straits, by Dr. Moskovicz of Batavia, who gave it to the late 
Ferd. Bitter von Hochstetter. The latter gentleman sent 
it to Vienna, where it was described by Antoine as cited 
above. The magnificent specimen here figured was pre- 
Febjruary 1st, 1897. 



sented in 1893 to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Prof. Stewart, 
F.R.S. (late President of the Linnasan Society), Conservator 
of the Museum, and Hunterian Professor of the Royal 
College of Surgeons. It flowered in a stove in January, 
1896, and ripened its seeds in the following spring. 

Descr. — Tuber (of the Kew plant) nineteen and a half 
inches in circumference, of a dull iron grey colour, and 
with a shallowly lacunose surface, loosely covered with 
small acicular spines rising from scattered tubercles. 
Stem eight and a half inches long by four and a quarter in 
circumference, inclined and flexuous, deeply four grooved, 
the ribs between the grooves closely covered with a series 
of imbricating orbicular woody shields (indurated stipules) 
which are half an inch in diameter, depressed in the middle 
and bifid at the top with diverging short lobes, and studded 
with short spinules round their margins. Leaves at the 
top of the stem, four to five inches long, elliptic-ovate 
oblong or obovate, acute, bright green on both surfaces, 
narrowed at the base into a stout, terete petiole ; nerves 
four to six pairs, arched. Flowers half an inch long, 
white, sessile, inserted on the ribs below the stipular 
shields, which conceal the calyx and lower part of the 
corolla-tube. Calyx broadly oblong, terete, truncate ; 
limb very short, obscurely 4-toothed. Corolla clavate, 
four-lobed in the upper fourth ; tube terete ? four-ribbed 
within, and with a ring of hairs below the middle ; lobes 
oblong, tips obtuse, thickened, incurved. Stamens inserted 
below the meeting of the lobes ; filaments short, stout, in- 
cluded ; anthers broadly ovate, exserted. Disk tumid. 
Ovary four-celled. Style stout, dilated into an infundibular 
truncate stigma. — J. 1). H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of upper leafing stem and leaves; and 2 of lower flowering, 
both of the natural size; 3, stipular shields; 4, flower ; 5, corolla laid open ; 
6, ovary, style and stigma -.—All enlarged; 7, seedling of the natural size; 
8, view of whole plant greatly reduced. 







\; 






Tab. 7518. 

MAXILLARIA Sanderiana. 
Native of Ecuador. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^. — Tribe Vande.e. 
Genus Maxillaria., Ruiz & Pav. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 555.) 



Maxillaria (A.caules) Sanderiana; pseudobulbis brevibus fere orbicularibua 
compressis, vaginis lanceolatis acuminatis rigidis brunneis caducis, foliia 
oblanceolatis^ cuspidatis in petiolum validam angustatis coriaceia supra 
saturate viridibus subtus pallidis, costa valida, nervis pauciB obscuris, 
scapo robusto rnbro-purpureo vaginis oblongia obtusis brunneis fere 
velato, flore maximo, sepalis petalisque albis basin versus sanguineo- 
purpureis,_ sepalo dorsali 2-2§-polhcari oblongo obtuso, lateralibus 
triangulari-ovatis obtusis basi in mentutn latum rotundatum conniventibus, 
petalis sepalis multoties minmbus late ovatia acuminatis, labelli tubo 
atro-sanguineo intus appeudice clavato applanato instructo, lobis 
lateralibus parvis, terminali rotundato flavo margiuibus crispatis, columna 
alba sanguineo-purpureo raaculata, anthera aurea. 

M. Sauderiana, Reichb.f. in Sander, Reiohenbaohia, vol. i. (1888) p. 57, t. 25. 
Journ. Hortic. Ser. III. vol. 2b', t. 495, fig. 89. Rev. Hortic. (1894) p. 326, 
cum Ic. Warner, Orchid Album, vol. i. t. 463. 



This, which is rightly regarded by M. Andre as the finest 
known species of the genus, was discovered by Mr. Edward 
Klaboch in the Andes of Peru, according to whom it 
inhabited an elevation of 4000 ft. ; but according to 
M. Andre, it is more probably a native of Ecuador ; and 
having regard to the fact that it nourishes in a cool 
Orchid House, it may be expected to inhabit a much 
higher elevation than that assigned to it. 

The nearest ally of M. Sanderiana is M. grandiflora, 
Lindl., which has much narrower sessile leaves, a more 
slender green scape with green bracts, and a pure white 
flower, except the lip, which is streaked with purple. 
M. venusta, Lindl. (Tab. 5296) is another allied species, 
remarkable for the long, narrow, pure white, acuminate 
sepals and petals, the lip of which has a purple spot on 
each side of the tube, and a yellow midrib. 
^ M. Sanderiana was first flowered by Baron Schroder 
(in 1885). The specimen here figured is from the cool 
February 1st, 1897. 



Orchid House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowers 
annually. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs clustered, sessile on a very short, 
rarely elongated rootstock, one to one and a half inches 
long, from orbicular to broadly oblong, rounded at top and 
base, compressed, smooth, pale green ; sheaths few, up to 
three inches long, lanceolate, acuminate, striate, dark 
brown, rigid, caducous. Leaves few, six to ten inches 
long, oblanceolate, cuspidate, narrowed into a stout 
petiole, coriaceous, dark green, smooth and shining 
above, pale beneath with a raised green midrib, and three 
or more pairs of very faint nerves. Scapes two to three 
inches long, ascending from the base of the pseudobulb, 
very stout, red-brown, clothed with oblong obtuse brown 
sheaths, of which the median are an inch long, the lower 
shorter, and the uppermost longer. Floivers four inches 
broad across the lateral sepals, which and the petals are 
pure white, except towards the base, where they are of a 
purplish-red colour, broken upwards into blotches. Dorsal 
sepal oblong, obtuse, concave, arched ; lateral triangular- 
ovate, obtuse, conniving at the base into a broad rounded 
mentum. Petals much smaller than the sepals, broader 
below, and narrowed into acute triangular tips. Lip with 
a very dark purple tube, on the disk of which within is a 
flattened club-shaped adnate smooth appendage; lateral 
lobes hardly any ; terminal rounded, bright yellow, with a 
crisped border, which is faintly streaked with purple. 
Column white, spotted and streaked with red-purple. 
Anther orange-yellow. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Base of lip with adnate appendage; 2, column: 3, pollinia :— All 
enlarged. 



r s\d 




bchBh 






T D =*.„,» «,POT„.,J r 



Tar. 7519. 
LIGUSTRUM coriaceum. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. OleacejE. — Tribe Oleineje. 
Genus Ligttstrum, Tourn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 679.) 



Ligustrum coriaceum; frntex glaberrimas, subtortaosus, ramulis robustis, 
foliis confertis breviter petiolatis crasse coriaceis ovato-rotundatis orbi- 
calaribusve supra convexis saturate viridibus lacidis margiaibus anguste 
rubro-purpureis, paniculis breviter pedunculatis, pedunculo rachi ramisque 
validis, floribus in capitula dense congestis brevissime pedicellatis sessili- 
busve, bracteolis minutis subulatis, calyciscupularis limbo truncato, corollaa 
tubo lobis ovatis obtusis aequilongo, filamentis brevibus, antheris oblongo- 
rotundatis, baccis pisiformibus, 

L. coriaceum, Carriere in Rev. Hortic. (1874) p. 418, n>. 56, and (1888) p. 439, 
fig. 101. Fl. & Pomol. (1876) t. 65. Forbes & Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. vol. xxvi. (1889) p. 90. Dippel Haadb. Laubholz vol. i, p. 130. 

L. lucidum, var. a coriaceum, Decne in Fl. des Serres, vol. xxii. (Ser. II. vol. 
xii.) (1877) p. 8. 

L. japonicee forma difformis, Blume Mus. Bot. Lugd. Bat. vol. i. p. 313, in 
nota. 

PL. coriaceum, Nois. Hortul. " Species ignota," DC. Prodr. vol. viii. p. 294. 



Ligustrum coriaceum is one of the most distinct-looking 
of the puzzling genus to which it belongs, and though 
reduced by Decaisne to a variety of L. lucidum (t. 2565) it 
is so different in habit and foliage from that plant, that 
until connecting links between them are found, it may 
well be kept as specifically distinct. Blume with less 
reason regarded it as a deformed condition of L.japonicum, 
a species with spreading pedicels and obovoid berry. 

There are some doubts as to the native country of 
L. coriaceum. It was introduced into England about 1860, 
by Fortune, who, according to Standish (then the recipient 
of Fortune's plant), sent it from Japan. Probably it was 
procured, like so many other plants sent home by Fortune, 
from a Japanese garden, for there are no indigenous speci- 
mens of it in the Kew Herbarium, except a mere scrap, 
collected by Oldham, and ticketed " Japan, Korean Archi- 
pelago," and it is not enumerated in Franchet and Savatier's 

February 1st, 1807. 



enumeration of Japan plants, or in Miquel's " Prolusio 
Floras Japonicee." 

At Kew it was first obtained, in about 1879, from 
the Jardin des Plantes, amongst a collection of species 
of Ligustrum sent by M. Decaisne shortly after he 
enumerated those known to him, in the " Flore des 
Serres." Though it stood out of doors at Kew for several 
years, it suffered from cold winters, and never throve. 
In Cornwall, however, it is quite hardy. The figure here 
given is of a specimen kindly sent in 1889 to the Royal 
Gardens by Mr. Rashleigh of Menabilly, which flowered in 
the Temperate House in June of the present year. 

Descr. — A rigid, closely branched, evergreeu, rigid shrub, 
three to six feet high, perfectly glabrous ; branches and 
branchlets stout, leafy. Leaves two to two and a half 
inches long, shortly, stoutly petioled, orbicular or orbi- 
cular-ovate, tip rounded, rigid, coriaceous, dark green, 
convex and shining above with a very narrow red-purple 
border, paler beneath, nerves very slender and faint. 
Panicle two to four inches long ; peduncle, rachis and 
spreading branches stout. Flowers collected in globose, 
terminal and lateral clusters or heads on the panicle, sessile 
or very obscurely pedicelled, white ; bracteoles minute, 
subulate. Calyx cupular, limb truncate, obscurely toothed. 
Corolla one-quarter of an inch in diameter, tube about as 
long as the ovate spreading and recurved lobes. Stamens 
normally two, but three to four occur ; filaments very 
short. Ovary globose, style stout, stigma 2-lobed. Berry 
globose, the size of a small pea, black. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower aud bracteoles ; 2, bracteole, calyx and ovary ; 3 and 4 
stamens: — all enlarged ; 5, fruit of the natural size ; 6, calyx and berry, and 
7, seed, both enlarged. 



, ; .. '■ . > - 



7520 



■•■:. 






. •: •:- -• 



l.Reev 



Tab. 7520. 
PARACARYUM heliocarpum. 

Native of the Western Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Boraginej:. — Tribe Bohagk*. 
Genus Paracaryum, Boiss.; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 849.) 



Paraca'jtum: heliocarpum ; elatum, cano-pubescens, foliia radicalibus longe 
petiolatis elliptico-lanceolatis aeutis triplinerviis, caulinis oblongia 
lanceolatisve sessilibus, floribus subpaniculatim cymosis, cymis elongatia 
gracilibua demum diasitifloria apicibua decurvis, pedicellia gracilibus, 
calycis lobis oblongis obtusia tubo corollae aequilongia, corollas tubo 
brevi, limbi campanulati lobis brevibus orbiculatia oblatiave azureis, 
antberis linearibus, fornicibus, inclusis elongatis ciliolatis apice 3-lobia 
quam stamina altiua insertis, stylo gracili elongato, nuculis orbiculatia 
dorso depressis echinulatis marginibus incurvis peotinatim glocbidiatis. 

P. heliocarpTm, Kerner in Beo. Naturw. Vers. Innsbruck, vol. i. (1870) p. 105. 
{Nov. PI. Sp. ii. p. 9.) Clarke in Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iv. p. 161. 

P. ancbusoides, Benth. fy Hook.f. ex Aitchis. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. 
(1881) 80. 

Cynoglossum ancbusoides, Lindl. in Bot. Reg. vol. xxviii. (1842) t. 14. DC. 

Prodr. vol. x. p. 151. 
C. Emodi, Schouw Ind. Sem. Rafn Coll. (1846) 4. 
C. Emodum, Schouw in linnsea xxiv. (1850) 160. 
C. macrostylum, Bunge Reliq. Lehm. (1847) 236. 
Lindolfia ancbusoides, Lehm. in Linnxa, vol. xxiv. (1851) p. 216. 
Eohinospermum, No. 1, Herb. Strachey & Winterbottom. 



The genus Paracaryum is distinguished from the 
typical species of Cynoglossum by the nutlets of the fruit 
being more erect on the gynobase, and their bases not 
being rounded or subacute, characters of scarcely appre- 
ciable value, and which may probably disappear on a 
revision of the genera of J^oragijiese, in which case the 
original name of Cynoglossum anchusoides will be restored 
for this plant. 

P. heliocarpum was introduced into the Gardens of the 
Royal Horticultural Society by seed sent from the North- 
Western Himalaya in 1840, but had long since disappeared 
from cultivation. It ranges over a wide extent of mountain 
country, at elevations of 7000 to 11,000 ft., from Lahul 
and Kashmir northwards to Tibet, westward into Afghan- 
istan, and as far east as the Tibetan region north of 

Febrcart 1st, 1897. 



Kumaon, where it was collected by Strachey and Winter- 
bottom, at probably 15,000 ft. elevation. It reappears in 
Bokhara, having been found near Samarkand by the 
traveller, Lehmann. The specimen figured was raised from 
seed sent in 1894 by Mr. Duthie, F.L.S., Director of the 
Botanical Department of Northern India. It flowered in 
the herbaceous grounds of the Royal Gardens in May of 
the present year, and is perfectly hardy. 

Descr. — A hardy perennial, one to three feet high, 
clothed with an appressed hoary or subsilvery pubescence. 
Stem stout below, slender and sparingly branched above, 
the branches bearing slender terminal at length elongate 
drooping cymes. Radical leaves, eight to eighteen inches 
long, by one-third of an inch to three inches broad, 
elliptic lanceolate, acute, three to five-nerved, and penni- 
nerved ; cauline leaves few, linear. Cymes very slender, 
long-peduncled, many-fld., ebracteate ; flowers remote, 
except towards the apex of the cymes, half an inch long, 
nodding or drooping, slender pedicels half to three- 
quarters of an inch long. Sepals one-fourth of an inch 
long or less, oblong, obtuse, green, pubescent. Corolla 
rose-purple, with bright blue limb ; tube as long as the 
calyx ; limb longer, infundibular-campanulate, lobes short, 
orbicular, or broader than long. Stamens included, in- 
serted below the mouth of the" tube, rather lower down 
than the scales, which are ciliate, 3-lobed at the tip. 
Style half an inch long. Nutlets orbicular, with a de- 
pressed echinate or tubercled disk and incurved pectinately 
glochidiate coriaceous margins. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and style ; part of corolla laid open ; 3, scale of corolla ; 
4, very young nutlets ; 5, ripe fruit : — All enlarged. 








A ? 











Tab. 7521. 

HEMIPILIA AMETHYSTINA. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. OrchidejE.— Tribe Opurtde^:. 
Genua Hemipilia, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 628.) 



Hemipilia amethystine, ; folio sessili terree appresso ovato-cordato sabacuto 
apice decurvo pallide flavo-viridi maculis pallide brunneis submarmorato, 
scapo gracili vaginis 2 linearibus instructo racbique racemi viridibus 
fusco-rubro punctulatis, racemo laxo multifloro, bracteis ovato-lanceolatis 
ovariis ffiquilongis brevioribusve, sepalia ovato-oblongis obtusiusculis 
viridibus, petalis oblongis apicibus rotundatia ainethystinis, labello 
obovato apice dilatato breviter 4-lobo marginibus undulatis albis, disco 
ametbystino basin versus puberulo breviter bicarinato, calcare sepalis 
a?quilongo corniformi obtuso compresso, columna brevi, rostello porrecto 
trullseformi recurvo, staminodiis glandulajformibus, polliniis dorso infra 
medium alatis. 

H. amethystina, Eolfe in Serb. Kew. 



Only three species of Hemipilia have hitherto been 
recorded, H. cordifolia, Lindl., of the Western Himalaya, 
H. flabellata, Fran eh. and Sav., H. Henry i, Reichb. f., both 
of Western China, and H. calophylla, Parish and Reichb. f. 
(see Tab. 6920) a native of Moulmein. From the first 
of these H. amethystina differs in the shape of the lateral 
sepals and lip, and in the longer spur ; and from H. calo- 
phylla in the broad, deeply cordate leaf, stouter scape, 
many-fld. raceme, and smaller flowers. 

Mr. Rolfe informs me that H. amethystina was intro- 
duced with Cypripedium Charlesworthii, from the Shan 
States of Eastern Burma, by Messrs. W. L. Lewis & Co., 
of Southgate, to whom the Royal Gardens, Kew, are 
indebted for the specimen here figured, which flowered in 
June of the present year in a stove. 

Descr. — Glabrous. Leaf four by two and a half inches, 
ovate, subacute, deeply cordate, horizontal, appressed to 
the ground, seven-nerved, pale yellow-green, blotched or 
almost marbled with pale brown irregular spots, tip de- 
curved. Scape with the raceme eight inches long, slender, 
dark green speckled and streaked with red-brown ; sheaths 

February 1st, 1897. 



two or three, linear-lanceolate, appressed to the scape, and 
coloured like it. Raceme many- and lax-flowered ; bracts 
ovate-lanceolate, as long as the ovaries or longer ; ovaries 
half an inch long, erecto-patent. Flowers half an inch 
across the lateral sepals, and about as long from the base 
of the dorsal sepal to the tip of the lip. Lateral sepals 
ovate-oblong, obtuse, green, spreading ; dorsal smaller, 
erect. Petals oblong, erect, white, tip obtuse, amethyst 
purple. Lip about half an inch long, cuneately-obovate 
from a broad base, side lobes obscure ; terminal rather 
dilated, shortly 4-lobed, margins white, undulate ; disk 
amethystine, puberulous towards the base, with two 
short obscure ridges ; spur laterally flattened, white, 
obtuse, brown, about as long as the sepals. Column short, 
stout, with promineDt sides ; rostellum prominent, trowel- 
shaped, upcurved, with deflexed sides ; staminodes repre- 
sented by two sessile glands ; anther suberect, with the 
cells incurved below. Pollinia pyriform, pedicel produced 
into a dorsal wing along the lower half ; glands small. — 
J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Front view of flower, with the sepals, petals, and half the lip 
removed ; 2, side view of the same ; 3 and 4, pollinia ; — All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLON IAL, AND FO REIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L. S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 3rd Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7 s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By R. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Part XVII., 6s. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. each. 
Part XX.. 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9*. each. Vols. I. to IV, 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36«. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24*. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authority of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENS1S : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Hahvey,M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wii.helm Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d. each. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Maiesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the 8 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 
Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George Bentham, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. Hakck, 21*. 
Published under the authority of Her 31ajesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, separately, It. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA ; its Origin, Affinities, aid 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. 10s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

to a Winter Flota of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Trahermk Moggridgk. Royal 8vc. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63*. 

L. IJEEVE & CO., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 626, FEBRUARY, 1897. 

Tab. 7517.— MYRMECODIA AN OINTI, 
„ 7518— MAXILLARIA SAXDERIANA. 
„ 7519.— LIGUSTRUM CORIACEUM. 
„ 7520.— PARACARTUM HELIOCARPUM. 
„ 7521.— HEMIPILIA AMETHYSTINA. 

L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Now Ready, Vol." VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d. each. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XXLI., 9s. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 

Now ready, Part VIII., with 2 Coloured Plates, 5s. (completing the work) 

THE HEMIPTERA HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
Complete, with 2 Structural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates 43*. 

Now ready, Part XXXVI., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. I. 12*. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s. ; large paper, with 46 Coloured Plates, 63s. 
Vol. III. 12s.; large paper, with 50 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may be had on application to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVI., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s 

By F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Vol. I., containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each, 

£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 

Prospectus, with First List of Subscribers, can be had on application to the Publishers. 

L. Reetb & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

MIMED BT GILBERT AffD BIVlaBTOiT, L»., «T. JOHK'S HODS*. CLESXSSWIU, I.O. 



VOL. LIIL— M 



Cfyirtt Series. 

No. 627. 

Price 3*. 6d. coloured, 2s. Gd. plo 
OR NO. lo^il OF THK ENTIKB WOEK. 



CDETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



Sib JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., k.cs.l, c.B., F.R 

"Eau JBttfctot of the IRonal Botanic ©arucns of TSLttn. 








LONDON: 
L. REEVE and CO., 6, HENRIET'i 




ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIEH ARRANGEMENTS, 1897. 

EXHIBITION OF SPRING FLOWERS, Wednesday, March 31st. 
GREAT SUMMER EXHIBITION OF PLANTS AND 
FLOWERS, Wednesday, May 19th. 

SPECIAL FLORAL FETE AND CHILDREN S PARADE. 

Date will be annoum 

RHODODENDRON EXHIBITION daily during June. 

IMPERIAL FETE AND FANCY FAIR. To commemorate the 
60th year of Her Majesty's Reign. In aid of the Victoria 
Hospital for Children, Chelsea. June 21st to June 25th. 

NATIONAL VIOLA SOCIETY'S EXHIBITION in June. Date 

to be announced. 
EXHIBITION OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS early in November. 
BOTANICAL LECTURES, Fridays in May and June. 
MUSICAL PROMENADES in June, July, and August, 



Now ready, price 2s. 6<J. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sie J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



Now ready, Second Edit'. 

HANDBOOK OP BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 
By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21 s. 



Now a 1 vol., royal 4to, in handsome cloth case, £6 6*. net ; in half morocco, 

kl net. 

Foreign Pinches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S. 

The whole forms a large and handsome volrme of between 300 and 400 pages, with 60 Plates, by 
P. W. FROWHAWK, I .loured by hand. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

6tli Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookeb, C.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10*. Gd. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
nq an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook" and other British Floras. 
4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 10*. 6i. 



L. REEVE & CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



£522 











Ymcer i ; 



Tab. 7522. 

WISTARIA ohinensis, var. multijuga. 
Introduced from Japan. 



Nat. Ord. LeguminosjK. — Tribe GalegejE. 
Genus Wistaria, Nutt.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 499.) 



Wistaria, chinensis, DG. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 390. Bunge Enum. PI. Chin. bor. 

p. 20. 
W. Consequana, Loud. Sort. Brit. p. 315. Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. vii. p. 127. 
Glycine sinensis, Sims Bot Mag. t. 2083. Bot. Beg. t. 650. 
Var. multijuga, nob.; foliis longioribus, foliolis ad 8-10 jugis majoribns, 

racemis duplo longioribus laxifloris, floribus fere duplo minoribus, legumine 

3-7-pollicari. 
W. multijaga, Van Houtte Fl. des Serres, vol. xix. (1869-70) p. 126, t. 2002. 
W. ? floribunda, DG. I. c. 

W. chinensis, Sieb. Sr Zucc. Fl. Japon. vol. i. p. 90, t. 44. 
Glycine floribunda, Willd. Sp. PI. vol. iii. p. 1066. 

Dolichos polystachyos, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 281 {in part, excl. Syn. Linn ). 
Too vulgo Fudsi, Kcempf. Amom. Acad. fasc. v. p. 856. 



There are two very different-looking plants known as 
Wistaria chinensis ; one, that upon which De Candolle 
founded the species, is an undoubted native of China. 
The other doubtfully referred to the genus, was founded 
also by De Candolle on the badly * described Dolichos 'poly- 
stachyos, Thunb., as W. ? floribunda, which has hitherto 
been known only in Japan, as a cultivated plant reported to 
have been introduced from China. To this last is, I think, 
clearly referable the W. multijuga, Van Houtte, not only be- 
cause of its country, but because Thunberg describes it as 
having a very long raceme (racemis longissimis), a term 
which can hardly be applied to the raceme of W. chinensis 
proper, but which is singularly applicable to var. multijuga. 
Siebold and Zuccarini cite IV. ?jloribunda, as a synonym 

* In bis diagnosis Thunberg says of the pedicels that they are geminate ; 
but in the description following that they are scattered opposite and alternate. 
Then as regards the legume, he describes it as e'ther glabrous or pubescent, 
probably confounding the pod of W. japonica with that of chinensis. 

March 1st, 1897. 



of W. chinensis. Their figure is an admirable representation 
of the variety. 

The genus Wistaria, as at present constituted, appears 
to me to waut reconsideration, for I feel sure that had 
Bentham, when describing it, either seen fruits of W. 
chinensis, or the figure of that organ in Siebold & Zucca- 
rini's Flora, he would not nave retained it in the same 
genus with the American W. speciosa without remark, if at 
all. Wistaria was founded by Nuttall in 1818 on Glycine 
frutescens, Linn., a plant of which the pods are correctly 
described in the " Genera Plantarum " as elongate, toru- 
lose, with hardly coriaceous convex valves, and reniform 
seeds. On the other hand, the pods of W. chinensis 
are of a totally different character, being oblanceolate, 
flattened, narrowed from the upper third or higher 
to the base, with rigid plane, thinly woody valves, 
densely velvety without and puberulous within; and 
the seeds are orbicular and flattened. On the other 
hand, there is what I regard as a true Wistaria of the 
American type in Japan, namely, W. japonica, Sieb. & 
Zucc. (1. c. p. 88, t. 43), with cylindric glabrous torulose 
thin-valved pods, and small turgid seeds. This plant, 
however, A. Gray refers to the neighbouring genus 
Millettia (Mem. Amer. Acad. N. S. vol. vi. (1859) p. 
386), and Bentham (Gen. Plant. 1. c.) regards it as inter- 
mediate between Wistaria and Millettia, the latter a badly 
circumscribed genus, to which W. chinensis may possibly 
prove referable. Should, however, it prove advisable to 
refer W. chinensis to a genus independent of both the 
American Wista.ria and of Millettia, the choice of names 
for each may give rise to controversy, for Rafinesque's 
Kraunhia frutescens in Med. Repos. N. York, vol. v. 
(1808) 352, is ten years earlier than Nuttall's Wistaria. 
In this case I would suggest, as requiring the smallest 
change, the resumption of Kraunhia for NuttalFs plant, 
and adopting Wistaria, DO. non Nutt., for W. chinensis. 

W. chinensis true is apparently a common plant in N. 
China, whence it was brought to this country in about 
1881 by a Captain Welbank, and first figured in this work. 
There are many indigenous specimens in the Kew Her- 
barium ; from Bunge collected on mountains N. of Pekin ; 
from rocks and ruins of the Summer Palace, and from 



throughout the district of Ningpo f rom W. Hancock, Esq., 
F.L.S. J and from Ichang, Dr. Henry. There are also 
cultivated specimens from Hong Kong ; and from Nagasaki 
in Japan. Of var. multijuga there are Japanese specimens 
from Maximo vicz (cult.), and Dr. Albrecht, and from 
Nagasaki, Oldham. The specimen here figured was from a 
plant obtained in 1874 from M. Van Houtte, which flowered 
in the Arboretum of the Royal Gardens in May, 1896. 

Descr. — A luxuriant, woody, branched climber, the 
branches attaining many yards in length; bark brown. 
Leaves eight to twelve inches long, young silkily hairy, old 
nearly glabrous ; petiole slender, swollen at the base, sub- 
terete; leaflets eight to ten pairs, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
membranous, pale green; stipules ovate-lanceolate; stipelhe 
subulate. Racemes two feet long and more, pendulous ; 
rachis slender, nearly glabrous, lax-flowered; pedicels about 
an inch long, slender ; bracts obsolete. Flowers when ex- 
panded about an inch long from the tip of the standard to 
that of the keel. Gahjx shortly campanulate, pubescent, 
green and purple, five-toothed, dorsal tooth subulate, rather 
longer than the triangular lateral, anterior teeth confluent in 
a very short two-toothed lip. Standard orbicular, one half 
to two-thirds of an inch in diam., very pale violet, yellow 
towards the notched base, where there is a bifid tubercle. 
Wing-petals about a third shorter than the standard, 
obovate-oblong, violet-blue, tip rounded, base excised with 
a cusp, claw slender. Keel-petals shorter than the wings, 
obovate, almost hatchet-shaped, violet-blue, base narrow 
rounded. Anthers minute. Ovary pubescent. Legume 
four to nine inches long, suboblanceolate, flattened, 
narrowed from the upper third to the base, top acute or 
cuspidate ; valves thinly woody, clothed externally with a 
dense brown velvety pubescence, internally with a thin 
puberulous white corky layer, twisted after dehiscence, 
margins not thickened. Seeds one half to three-fourths of 
an inch in diameter, orbicular, flattened, dark brown, 
smooth. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Flower with petals removed ; 2, base of standard; 3, wing-petal ; 
4, keel-petal ; 5, ovary ; — All enlarged. 




'523 



M.S.dfil.J.N.Fitch]itJi 






Tab. 7523. 

HOLOTHRIX ORTHOCERAS. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Ophkyde-E. 
GenuB Holotheix, Rich. ; (Bentli. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 623.) 



Holotheix orthoceras ; foliis 2 sessilibus ovatis orbicularibus cordatisve 
patenti-recurvis supra luride viridibus nervis albidis trabeculars, scapo 
ovarioque piloso apice multifloro, floribus subsecundis, bracteis ovato-lan- 
ceolatis ovarium subsequantibas, sepalis erectis ovato-lanceolatis acumi- 
natis glaberrimis, lateralibus basi labello adnatis, petalis erectis quam 
eepala ter longioribua lanceolatis caudato-acuminatis puberulis, labelli 
ampli puberuli lobis lateralibus parvis obtusis recurvis, terminali sub- 
quadrato antice truncato 3-5-dentato, dentibus obtusis intermedio paullo 
longiore, calcare limbo sequilongo v. breviore gracili stricto, columna 
brevissima, anthera hemispherica. 

H. orthoceras, Reichb.f. Otia Bot. Hamburg, p. 119. 

Tryphia orthoceras, Harv. Thes. Cap. vol. ii. p. 14, t. 105. 



The genus Holothrix, now for the first time figured in 
this magazine, is a large South African one, containing 
about thirty known species, a few of which are tropical 
African, three having been found as far north as Abyssinia. 
Mr. Bolus in his " Orchids of the Cape Peninsula " (p. 113) 
describes six as natives of that region. H. orthoceras is 
closely allied to if. Lindleyana, Reichb., also a native of 
Eastern South Africa, which differs, amongst other 
characters, in the involute spur. There is a good sketch 
of a clump of H. Lindleyana in the Gardeners Chronicle, 
1888, vol. i. fig. 55, 56. 

In the above mentioned work Mr. Bolus describes the 
petals and lip of Holothrix as always glabrous, but they 
are decidedly, though very minutely, puberulous in H. 
orthoceras. 

II. orthoceras, though not hitherto found in the Cape 
Peninsula, has a wide distribution in South Africa, from 
the South Western districts of Uitenhage and Albany, 
northward to Natal and the Transvaal, whence tubers 
were presented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mrs. Deglon 
of Barberton. These were received in June, 1895, im- 
Mabch 1st, 1897. 



bedded in a tuft of Asplenium cuneatum. The leaves were 
developed in January of the following year, and the flowers 
in March. The lip probably varies in the lobing, for the 
middle lobe is figured by Harvey as only trifid. 

Descr. — Leaves two, radical, equal, about two inches 
long, spreading and recurved, ovate, acute, glabrous, above 
dull green and trabeculate with white nerves, beneath 
pale green with a stout costa. Scape four to five iuches 
high, slender, pale red-brown, and with the ovaries softly 
laxly hairy. Spike three inches long, erect ; flowers very 
many, half an inch long, rather crowded, subsecund, white, 
with a few red-purple streaks on the lip. Bracts as long as 
the ovary, lanceolate, all green, or tipped with red. 
Sepals erect, ovate-lanceolate, long-acuminate, glabrous; 
lateral adnate to the base of the lip. Petals half as long 
again as the sepals, erect, ovate-lanceolate, caudate- 
acuminate, puberulous. Lip twice as long as the sepals, 
broad, decurved, puberulous; side-lobes small, linear- 
oblong, obtuse, recurved; midlobe quadrate, anterior 
margins three to five-toothed, with the mid-tooth longest ; 
spur shorter than the ovary, straight, slender. Column 
very small, low ; anthers horizontal, incurved. — J. D. H. 

Fig 1, Front and 2 side view of the flower ; 3, column aad base of perianth : 
% pollimum : — Atl enlarged. 



7524 




'.Mtcklith 



■ 



Tab. 7524. 
GREVILLEA Hilliana. 

Native of Eastern Australia. 

Nat. Ord. Proteace^e. — Tribe Grevillie^e. 
Genus Grevillea, Br. ; (Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 180.) 



Grevillea (Cjcloptera) Hillii ; arborea, ramulis touientellis, foliis petiolatis 
supra glabris penninerviis et reticulatia subtus argenteo-sericeis, inferiori- 
bus elongatis 2-3-lobis pinnatifidisve lobis 3-5 elongatis obtusis, superiori- 
bua integris lineari-oblongis oblanceolatisve, racemis spiciformibus 
elongatis cylindraceis multi-densifloris, rachi pedicellisque brevibus 
puberulis, floribus parvis albo-virescentibus, perianthii \ poll, longi 
subsericei tubo breve lobis revolutis, toro recto, glandula semi-annulari, 
ovario stipitato glabro, stylo gracili, stigmate sublaterali, capsula polli- 
can ellipsoidea acuta paullo compressa lasvi, Beminibus ambitu anguste 
aJatis. 

G. Hilliana, F. Muell. in Trans. Phil Inst. Victoria, vol. ii. (1858) p. 72. 
Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. v. p. 463. Bailey Cat. Queensland Plants, 
p. 40; Syn-vs. Queensland Flor. p. 487. Maiden, Useful Native PI. 
Austral, p. 355. 



Grevillea is the largest genus of Australian Protectees, 
and the second largest of Phenogams in that continent, 
where it is surpassed in numbers by Acacia alone, which 
contains 313. There are 156 species of Grevillea in 
Bentham's " Flora Australiensis " (1870), and in Mueller's 
last " Census of Australian Plants " (1889) there are 161. 
The only extra Australian members known are a few from 
New Caledonia, and one from New Guinea. As with so 
many large genera, it is difficult of subdivision into well 
defined groups, though the species are in the whole remark- 
ably constant, and their synonymy is more due to 
misnomers and duplication of names than to the erecting 
of varieties into species. In this respect, as well as in the 
limitation of the species by brief diagnoses, Grevillea com- 
pares favourably with Eucalyptus, as is evidenced by a 
comparison of the spaces required for the diagnoses of the 
species of those genera respectively in Bentham's Flora. In 
that work Grevillea, with 156 species, occupies only eight 
pages, whilst Eucalyptus with only 124 species occupies 
ten and a half. 

G. Hilliana is the twentieth species figured in this 
March 1st, 1897. 



magazine. Unlike its congeners, which are, as a rule, local, 
it extends along the Eastern coast of the continent, from 
the Clarence River in New South Wales (lat. 29^°), to 
Rockingham Bay in Queensland (lat. 18° S.) a distance, 
following the coast line, of nearly 900 miles. The speci- 
men here figured was contributed by T. Hanbury, Esq., 
F.L.S., from his garden at the Palazzo Orengo, Vente- 
miglia, in July of last year. There is a plant of it in the 
Temperate House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, eight feet 
in height. 

In Australia it is known as the Silky Oak, and its 
timber is durable, beautifully grained, and useful for 
cabinet work. The name, Silky Oak, is (according to the 
Official Guide to the Timbers in the Kew Museum, 1893) 
also given to G. robusta, Orites excelsa, and Stenocarpus 
salignus. 

Descr. — A large tree, attaining seventy feet in height, 
branchlets minutely tomentose, pale reddish brown. 
Leaves very variable, all petioled, bright green above, and 
glabrous, with pinnate nervation, silvery silky beneath, 
the lower on the branches up to a foot long, usually 
broadly obovate in outline, tapering below the middle 
into a narrowly cuneate base, above it 3-lobed, or pinna- 
tifid, with about five broadly linear obtuse lobes, three to 
five inches long, by half an inch or more broad, of which 
the terminal is the largest ; uppermost leaves undivided, 
four to six inches long, obtuse or subacute. Flowers 
small, in a cylindric, spiciform, erect, slightly curved pale 
green, very dense-flowered raceme, six to eight inches 
long, and one Lo one and a half inches in diameter ; rachis 
and pedicels pubescent. Perianth appressed silky, about 
one-fourth of an inch long, with a short tube and revolute 
lobes. Anthers small, didymous. Dish semi-annular. 
Ovary stipitate, glabrous; style slender, incurved; stigma 
discoid, sublateral. Capsule one to one and a quarter 
of an inch long, ellipsoid, acute, somewhat compressed 
laterally, quite smooth. Seeds orbicular, narrowlv winded 
all round.— /. D. H. J ° 

Fig. 1, Flower; 2, two lobes of perianth ; 3, section of ovary and disk -.—All 
enlarged ; 4, fruit of the natural size (from Herbarium specimen). 




r 525 



u 



)ay&S 



1 1 Reeve A C ° London . 



Tab. 7525. 
DENDROBIUM sarmentosum. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Oechide^;. — Tribe Epidendre-E. 
Gen vis Dendrobitjm, Swartz- (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dendbobium (Stachyobium) sarmentosum ; caulibua gracilibus elongatia 
ramosis pendulis, internodiia l-l|-pollicaribus teretibus cylindraceis 
vaginis albidis tectis, nodis non incrassatis, foliis deciduis 2-pollicaribn8 
elliptico-oblougis obtuaia, floribus ad nodoa aolitariia v. 2-3 pedunculo 
brevi confertis 1-poll. latia albis labello baai roaeo striato, bracteia ovato- 
oblongis, sepalia ovatis apice rotnndatia, dorsali angustiore, petalia sepalia 
lateralibas consimilibua sed paullo latioribus, mento corniforme recurvo 
virescente, labello aepalia aequilongo v. paullo longiore late oblongo 
obtuso, lobis lateralibua parvis rotundatis, intermedio disco villoso, 
antbera subdidyma marginibus erosis. 

D. sarmentosum, Bolfe in Orchid. Rev. vol. iv. (1896) p. 72. 

D. fragrans, Sortul. 



Though differing in many respects from the type of the 
section Stachyobium, and especially in the lateral subsessile 
few-fld. inflorescence, I am disposed to follow Mr. Rolfe 
in placing this species in that group, and near to D. bar- 
batulum, Lindl. (see tab. 5918), and D. Fytcheanum (tab. 
5444, under the name of barbatum). It differs from both 
these species in the long, very slender branched stems, but 
agrees in the hairy disk of the flat lip, and the minute 
coloured lateral lobes of the latter. The colour of the lip 
appears to be variable, for Mr. Eolfe describes its side lobes 
as pale green, with light brown radiating nerves. 

D. sarmentosum is a native of the Shan States of Upper 
Burma, where it was discovered by Mr. R. Moore, when 
Officiating Assistant Superintendent of the Upper Shan 
States, who alludes to it in a very interesting paper con- 
tributed to the Orchid Revieiv (vol. iii. (1895) p. 171) on 
the Orchids of those states as one of thirty-five Orchids 
(eighteen of them Dendrobia) occurring within a radius of 
thirty miles round Lake Inle. 

It first flowered in the collection of Messrs. W. L. 
Lewis & Co. early in 1895. The specimen here figured 

March 1st, 1897. 



was received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1895, from 
Mr. Curtis, F.L.S., Superintendent of the Botanic Gardens 
and Plantations of Penang, who had received it from 
Burma. It flowered in the Orchid House in February, 
1896, and the leaves were perfected in the following May. 
The flowers were deliciously violet-scented. 

Descr. — Stems very slender, eighteen inches long and 
upward, by one-tenth to one-eighth of an inch in diameter, 
pendulous, branched ; branches elongate ; internodes one 
to one and a half inches long, clothed throughout their 
length with the white appressed old leaf- sheaths ; nodes 
hardly enlarged, often rooting. Leaves produced before 
the flowers, one to two inches long, oblong, obtuse, bright 
green, coriaceous, nerves obscure. Flowers from the 
upper nodes of the branchlets, solitary, or two or three 
together on a very short peduncle, very shortly pedicelled, 
about an inch in diameter, white, with the side-lobes and 
base of the mid-lobe of the lip golden yellow, the side- 
lobes streaked with red ; bracts small, ovate. Sepal and 
petals spreading, of nearly equal length, ovate-oblong, tips 
rounded ; dorsal sepal rather the narrowest, and petals 
rather broader, and more oblong than the sepals. Lip a 
little longer than the sepals, lateral lobes small, rounded, 
incurved ; terminal broadly ovate-oblong, tip rounded or 
subacute, disk minutely villous ; mentum produced into a 
recurved spur as long as the lip. Anther two-lobed at the 
top, margins erose. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ovary and lip ; 2, column ; 3, anther ; 4, pollinia :— All enlarged. 



7526 




Tab. 7526. 

DIDYMOCARPUS halayana. 

Native of Penang ? 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace/E. — Tribe Ctetandre^. 
Genus DiDYMOCARrus, Wall.; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1022.) 



Didymocarpus (Heterobaea) malayana ; acaulis, ccespitosa, foliis radicalibus 
breviter petiobitis ovatis obtusis basi rotundatis cordatiave utrinque 
Bericeo-pilosis navo-viridibus subtus pallidi8 nervis utrinque costse 6-8 
arcuatis, scapis gracilibus laxe patentim pilosis apicem veraas 2-4-floris, 
floribus breviter pedicellatis nutantibus, bracteis parvis oblongis obtusis, 
calycis 5-partiti laciniis linearibua obtusis pubescentibus, corolla? H- 
poliicaris extus pubescentis tubo subdecurvo in faucem longiorem in- 
fundibularem gibboso-inflatam producto, limbi subbilabiati lobis rotundatis 
snbsequalibus patulis aureis, staminibus inclusis filamentis curvis 
glaberrimis, antberis scutiformibus cohaerentibus, connectivo dorso 
2-corniculat, staminodiis 3 miuutis papillseformibns, disco breviter 
cjlindraceo, ovario angusto styloque toto elongato glanduloso-pubescen- 
tibus, stigmate capituto, capsula 1^-pollicari anguste lineari fere recta, 
valvis ad basin liberis. 

D. malayana, Hoolc.f. in Gard. Chron. (1896) vol. ii. p. 123, fig. 24. 



A beautiful member of a large Eastern Asiatic genus 
which contains, including one doubtful Madagascar plant 
seventy-two species, according to Clarke's Monograph of 
the CyrtandreaB (in Alph. DC. Monogr. Phanerog. vol. v. 
pt. I.) to which must be added, besides that here figured, 
seven Malayan species described by Mr. Ridley in the 
Transactions of the Linneean Society, Ser. II. vol. iii. (1893) 
p. 328, and twelve in the Journal of the same Society, 
vol. xxxii. (1896) p. 505. D. malayanas belongs to the 
section Heterobcea of Bentham (Gen. Plant. 1. c. 1022) 
characterized by the five narrow calyx segments, subven- 
tricose elongate corolla, two stamens with coherent 
anthers, a cupular disk, and few-flowered scapes. It 
differs, however, from all the previously described plants 
of that section in being stemless. Its nearest ally is pro- 
bably D. crinita, Jack, (Tab. 4554) also a native of 
Penang, with which it agrees in the form of the corolla, 
and in the connective of the anther3 being provided with 
two similar but much shorter projections. In other 
March 1st, 1897. 



respects, and especially in habit, the two plants widely 
differ, D. crinita being an erect caulescent species, clothed 
with shaggy purple hairs, and having oblanceolate, 
strongly serrate leaves, purple beneath. The character of 
the connective common to these two species is found in a 
few others, notably in the Himalayan D. aurantiaca, 
Clarke. 

The fine specimen of Didymocarpus mdlayana here figured 
was sent to Kew by Messrs. Veitch in Jane of last year, 
with the information that it was received by Mr. Curtis, 
F.L.S., Assistant Superintendent of Gardens and Forests 
in that island, of which I assume it to be a native, but it 
may have come from a neighbouring region. 

Descr. — Densely tufted, softly pubescent. Leaves spread- 
ing from the root, crowded in unequal pairs, two to three 
inches long, shortly stoutly petioled, broadly ovate, tip 
rounded, base rounded or subcordate, upper surface pale 
yellow-green, lower still paler, both surfaces and margins 
villous with appressed silky white hairs; nerves six to 
eight pair, arched, raised beneath. Scape two and a half 
to three inches high, slender, softly hairy, three- to four- 
flowered towards the summit ; pedicels very short ; bracts 
as long or longer than the pedicels, oblong, obtuse. 
Flowers nodding or drooping, about two inches long. 
Sepals one-third to one half an inch long, linear, obtuse, 
pubescent. Corolla with a slender terete tube, dilating 
into an infundibular-campanulate ventricose throat, pale 
straw-coloured and pubescent externally ; limb an inch in 
diameter, subbilabiate, of five nearly equal orbicular 
golden-yellow spreading lobes. Stamens inserted at the 
top of the corolla- tube, included in the throat ; filaments 
sigmoidly curved, quite glabrous; anthers scutelliform, 
coherent by their faces, connectives with two divergent 
short horns; staminodes three, minute. Disk shortly 
cylmdnc. Ovary narrow and long included straight 
style glandular-pubescent, stigma capitellate. Capsule 
one and a half inch long, very slender, straight, valves 
free to the base.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and style ; 2, lower half of corolla laid open with stamens and 
stami nodes ; 4 ovary and diak ; 5, transverse section of ovary -.-All enlarged ; 
o, capsule of the nat. size. 



BRITISH, COLONI AL, AND FO REIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.E.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Tcwnsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Eev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkikk, F.L.S., &c, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By E. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50s. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Part XVII., 6s. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. fid. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. each. 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV., 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36*. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.E.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.E.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Descrip- 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the antlioiity of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Uahvey.M.D., 
F.E.S., and Otto Wilhelm Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d. each. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Maiesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.E.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grjsebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secie- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS : a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George Bentham, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. Hance, 21s. 
Published under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA ; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker, F.E.S. 10s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

to a Winter Floia of the Eiviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Trahermk Moggridge. Eoyal 8vo. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Platee, 63s. 

L. REEVE & CO., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 627, MARCH, 1897. 

Tab. 7522.— WISTARIA CHINENSIS, var. MULTIJUGA. 
„ 7523 — HOLOTHRIX ORTHOCERAS. 
„ 7524.— GREVILLEA HILLIANA. 
„ 7525.— DENDROBIUM SARMENTOSUM. 
„ 7526.— DID YMOCARPUS MALAYANA. 

L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Now Ready, Vol. VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d. each. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 
Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XXII., 9s. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
Now ready, Part VIII., with 2 Coloured Plates, 5s. (completing the work). 

THE HEMIPTERA BOMOPTEM OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
Complete, with 2 Structural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates, 43s. 

Now ready, Part XXXVII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. 1. 12s. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s.; large paper, with 46 Coloured Plates, 63s. 
Vol. III. 12s.; large paper, with 50 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectw may be had on application to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVI., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s. 

LEPIDOPTERA IJXMOA. 

By F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Vol. I., containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each, 

£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 

Prospectus, with First List of Subscribers, can be had on application to the Publishers. 

L. Re eye «k Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

MUSTKD B¥ BILBERT AND BIVINOTOS, IB., »T. JOHIf'B HOITSB, CLJM»JWE1I, K.C. 



CfjtrD gtvits. 

No. 628. 

VOL LIII.— APRIL. Priee &# M# coloured, 2s. 64. j>7am 

OB No. 1322 OF THE EKTIBE WOBK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



COMfBIBING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN tiREAT BRITAIN, WIT 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, m.d., k.c.s.l, c.B., F.K.&, f.l. 

%Ate IBirtctor of tfct -Kopal 13otanic (Gartens of 'Bea. 




L. REEVE and CO., 6, HE 



ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY ARRANGEMENTS, 1897. 

EXHIBITION OF SPRING FLOWERS, Wednesday March 31st. 

GREAT SUMMER EXHIBITION OF PLANTS AND 
FLOWERS, Wednesday, May 19th. 

SPECIAL FLORAL FETE AND CHILDREN'S PARADE, 

Wednesday, June 9th. 

RHODODENDRON EXHIBITION daily during June. 

IMPERIAL FETE AND FANCY FAIR. To commemorate the 
60 th year of Her Majesty's Reign. In aid of the Victoria 
Hospital for Children, Chelsea. June 21st to June 25th. 

NATIONAL VIOLA SOCIETY'S EXHIBITION, July 17th. 

EXHIBITION OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS early in November. 

BOTANICAL LECTURES, Fridays in May and June. 

MUSICAL PROMENADES, Wednesdays in June, July, and August. 

Now ready, price 2s. 6d. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, Angnst 27, 1866. 



•' ready, Second Edit'' 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 

i. J. BERKELEY, MX, F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 2ls. 

£6 6*. net ; in half morocco. 

Foreign Pinches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S. 
Thewfcole forms a la^ ^d^d^™ ^: Ig^'*^ 60 Plates, by 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 

Br GEOKGrE BJENTHAM, F.R.S. 

6th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. \0s. 6rf. 

ELUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLOBA: 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. PITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, P.L.S. 
US an Illustrated Companion to Beniham't « Mandbook," and other BritUh Floras. 
4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 10#. 6i. 

L. REEVE & CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVEN T GARDEN. 



7527 










Tab. 7527. 
AGAVE Haseloffii. 

Native of Mexico, 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllideje. — Tribe Agavejb. 
Genus Agave, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook.f, Gen. Plant, vol. in. p. 738.) 



Agave (Littsea) Haseloffii; acanlis, foliis 30-40 dense rosulatis lanceolatis 
viridibns subcarnosis ad basin vix angustatis spina terminali baud 
pungente aculeis marginalibus parvis crebris deltoideis apice corneis 
nigris, pedunculo valido arcuato bracteis multis adpressis praedito, rloribns 
geminis sessilibns, in spicam densam dispositis, bracteis propnis magni^ 
scariosis linearibus basi deltoideis, ovario oblongo, periantliii tubo brevi 
campanulato, lobis oblongis bruaneo-viridibus, staminibus lobis 4-5-plo. 
longioribus, antheris linearibus parvis, stylo demum antheras superante. 

A. Haseloffii, Jacobi Monogr. Agav. (1864) p. 244; in Hamb. Gartcnzeit, vol. 
xxii. (1866) p. 220. Baker in Gard. GAron. 1877, p. 683 : Handb. Amarvllid. 
p. 189. * * 



This Agave belongs to the section Aloidese, in which the 
leaves are more fleshy, and not rig-id in texture as in the 
better known Americans and Rig idee and the marginal 
prickles always numerous and minute. The species of 
this group are comparatively rare in cultivation. The 
present plant has been grown at Kew for many years, but 
flowered for the first time in the summer of 1895. The 
species was originally described by Jacobi in 1864, and 
was named by him after the gentleman in whose garden 
he saw it. 

Descr. — Leaves thirty to forty, in a dense sessile rosette, 
lanceolate, rather soft, and not very thick in texture, a 
foot and a half or two feet long, three inches broad at the 
middle, very little narrowed towards the base, pale bright 
green, the end spine not horny nor pungent, the marginal 
prickles very close and small, tipped with black. Peduncle 
arising from the base of the rosette of the leaves, stout, 
arcuate, three feet Jong, with numerous ascending bract 
leaves, the upper scariose and long-pointed. Flowers in 
sessile pairs, forming a dense spike, which is five or six 
inches in diameter when they are fully expanded ; bracts 
Aran 1st, lft97. 



large, scariose, linear from a dilated base. Ovary green, 
oblong, an incb long. Perianth-tube very short, cam- 
panulate ; lobes of the limb oblong, greenish-brown, half 
an inch long. Stamens above two inches long, inserted at 
the throat of the perianth-tube ; anthers linear, small. 
Style finally overtopping the stamens. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Edge of leaf; 2, complete flower, cut open ; 3, front view of anther; 
4. back view of anther ; 5, apex of style, all more or lest enlarged ; 6, whole 
plant much reduced. 










L Reeve C ljond-on 



Tab. 7528. 
GENTIANA tibetica. 

Native of tlie Eastern Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Gentiane^. — Tribe Sweeties. 
Genus Gbntiana, Linn.; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 815.) 



Gentiana (Pneumonanthe) tibetica; glaberrima, caule eesquipedali robusto 
folioso, foliis 6-18- pollicaribus basi in vaginam cylindricam per paria 
connatis lanceolatis acuminatis crasse coriaceia snpremis confertis quasi 
verticillatis marginibas undulatis,8ub septemplinerviis supra laete viridibus 
subtus pallidis, floribus in axillis supremis confertis subsessilibus polli- 
caribus, calycis tenniter membranacei spathacei tubo brevi ore truncato 
5-denticulato, corolla? calyce duplo longioris tubo cylindraceo paullo 
inflato pallide plumbeo-purpureo, limbi 5-fidi lobie ovatis pallidis fauceque 
rubro-punctulatis sinubus plica brevi simplici triangulari instructis, 
glandulis nectariferis 0, filamentis inclusis basi pnberulis, antberis 
parvis, ovario sessili oblongo, stylo brevi, stigmatibus linearibus, 
capsula sessili ellipsoidea inclusa, seminibus reticulatis exalatis. 

G, tibetica, King in Hook. Ic. PI. t. 1441. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iv. 
p. 733. 



A tall, robust Gentian, placed in the section Chondro- 
■phyllum in the " Icones Plantarum " where it was first 
described, but falling under Pneumonanthe in Clarke's 
arrangement of the Indian species (in the " Flora of 
British India ") where the latter section is distinguished 
from the former by the reticulate testa of the seeds. Its 
nearest ally is G. robusta, King (1. c. t. 1439) which has 
narrower leaves, linear teeth on the margin of the calyx- 
tube, and a long style. These two differ from all other 
Himalayan species (except G. stylophora which attains 
six feet) by their size and robustness. They both inhabit 
elevations of about 11,000 feet in a remote triangular 
corner of the interior Himalaya, bordering Tibet, between 
bikkimand Bhotan, called Chumbi; a region remarkable 
tor its dry climate, being cut off by lofty ranges from the 
southerly ram-bringing winds. Owing to its climate not 
a tew plants unknown in Sikkim have been found in 
Chumbi ; notably Finns excclsa, and more may be expected 
when it shall be visited by Europeans, who have up to the 
Apeil 1st, 1897. 



present time been jealously excluded by the Tibetan 
authorities. Hitherto its botany is known only through 
native collectors, who have been sent there from Dar- 
jeeling under Dr. King's authority, and who thus obtained 
both seeds and dried specimens. On a ticket attached to 
the latter the corolla is said not to be epunctate, but it is 
decidedly dotted in the specimen here figured. 

6r. tibetica has been in cultivation in Europe previous to 
1883, at which date flowering specimens were sent to the 
Royal Gardens by Herr Max Leichtlin, and are preserved 
in the Herbarium. It has been in cultivation in the open 
air at Kew for some years, from seeds sent from the 
Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta. It flowers in July. 

Descr. — Stem very stout, eighteen inches high and up- 
wards, fistular ? stout, erect, unbranched, leafy to the tip. 
Leaves up to eighteen inches long, by four broad, lan- 
ceolate, acuminate, very thick and leathery, bases of 
opposite pairs connate, margins undulate, channelled 
in the upper bright green surface by five to seven pairs of 
nearly parallel sunken nerves, midrib beneath very stout. 
Flowers crowded in the axils of the crowded upper leaves, 
shortly stoutly pedicelled ; bracts small, lanceolate. Calyx 
short, membranous, tubular, splitting to the base on one 
side, truncate, the mouth minutely five-toothed. Corolla-' 
tube nearly an inch long, more than twice as long as the 
calyx, slightly inflated ; lobes a quarter of an inch long, 
ovate, dull straw-coloured, speckled with black ; folds in 
the sinus short, acute. Stamens included ; anthers linear- 
oblong. Ovary subsessile, ovoid-oblong, with short, re- 
curved styles. Capsule dehiscing at the tip. Seeds 
ellipsoid ; testa reticulated, not winged. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, iFlower with the corolla closed ; 2, corolla laid open ; 3, stamen j 
4, ovary : — All enlarged. 



7529 




•tchhth 



\incenLBrodksDiy &Sor>I>KP 



Tab. 7529. 
TRISTANIA laurina. 

Native of Eastern Australia. 

Nat. Ord. Myrtacejj. — Tribe Liptos?erme.«. 
Genus Tbistania, Br. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 708.) 



Tbistania (Eutristania) laurina; ramulis foliisque novellis sericeis, folils" 
alternis breviter petiolatis laticeolatis obovatis- v. oblongo-lanceolati* 
obtusis acutis acuminatisve subcoriaceis penninerviis basi angustatis, 
supra laete viridibus, subtus pallidis primum sericeis demum glabris 
costa valida, nervis perplurimis, cymis axillaribus breviter valide pedun- 
culatis, pedicellis calyce paullo longioribus, bracteis parvis deciduis, 
calycis semisuperi campanulati pubescentis lobis triangularibus, petaHs 
parvis ellipticis aurantiacis, staminum pbalangibus brevibus pclyandris, 
ovarii vertice hemispberico hirsuto, capsula parva subglobosa infra 
medium bemispberica, vertice in valvulas 3 obtusaB hiantes dehiscente, 
seminibus oblongis. 

T. laurina, Br. in Ait. Hort. Kew Ed. II. vol. iv. p. 417. DC. Prodr. vol. iii. 
p. 211. F. Muell. Fragment, vol. i. p. 81. Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. iii. 
p. 264. Bailey, Synop. Queensland Flor. p. 182. Maiden, Useful Nat. 
PI. Austral, p. 609. 

Melaleuca lanrina, 8m. in Trans. Linn. Soe. vol. iii. (1797) p. 275. 



Tristania laurina is remarkable both for its great 
variability in habit, and for its wide range in distribution. 
In form it passes from that of a scrubby bush in dry 
places, to a stately tree seventy feet high with a trunk one 
to two ft. diam. in moist forests ; whilst in geographical 
distribution it ranges from the temperate regions of Gipps' 
Land in latitude 38° S., to the subtropical in Moreton 
Bay, lat. 27° S. The wood is described by Maiden 1. c. as 
hard, close-grained, dark colrd., and difficult to season, 
and is used for tool-handles, cog-wheels, &c. It has 
various colonial names, " Bastard Box," " Swamp Maho- 
gany," « Water Gum," and " Beech." 

The genus Tristania is confined to Tenasserim, the 
Malayan Peninsula Islands, Eastern Australia, and New 
Caledonia. It contains about twenty species, of which 
T. laurina is the most southern. Only one has been pre- 
viously figured in this magazine, T. nerlifolia, of New 
Atril 1st, 1897. 



South Wales (Tab. 1058 Melaleuca), which belongs to a 
different section of the genus, having opposite leaves. 
The specimen here figured of T. laurina was communicated 
by Mr. Hanbury from the Mortola Gardens in July, 1896. 
A plant of it has been for many years in cultivation in the 
Royal Gardens of Kew, and is now in the Temperate 
House, where it flowers occasionally. 

Descr. — A shrub, or small or large tree, attaining seventy 
feet in height ; branchlets and young leaves and old leaves 
beneath at first, clothed with silky appressed hairs ; branch- 
lets and petioles stout, red-brown. Leaves very variable, 
three to four inches long, from lanceolate to oblong- 
lanceolate or obovate-oblong, obtuse, acute or acuminate, 
dark green above, very pale beneath ; midrib stout ; nerves 
very numerous and slender ; base narrowed into a short 
stout petiole. Flowers orange-yellow, in small, shortly 
stoutly petioled axillary cymes, about one-third of an inch in 
diameter ; pedicels short, stout ; bracts very small, brown, 
caducous. Calyx turbinately campanulate, semi-superior, 
pubescent ; lobes 5, triangular. Petals one-eighth to one- 
sixth of an inch long, elliptic, very shortly clawed. 
Stamen in five short bundles of about twenty each. Ovary 
with a hemispheric hirsute crown. Capsule small, obtusely 
three-valved above the middle. — J. D, H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, calyx lobes, bundle of stamens and petals ; 3, anther ; 
4, base oE calyx and ovary ; 5, transverse section of ovary ; 7, immature seed : 
— all enlarged ; 6, fruiting cymes of the natural size. 



7530 




M.S.del,J^.FitchlLth. 



AfijicentBrookspay*. Son Imp 



X Reeve &C° London 



Tab. 7530. 
GONGORA tricolor. 

Native of Costa Rica. 

Nat. Ord. OrchidEjE. — Tribe Vande^. 
Genus Gongora, Ruiz & Pav.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii.p. 549.) 



Gongoea tricolor; pseudobulbis ovoideis alte costatia interstitiis concavis, 
foliis ovato-oblongis acnminatis 5-costatis, racemi rachi compressa et 
angulata fusco-rubra, sepalis lateralibus reflexis ovato-lanceolatis acumi- 
natia rubro-purpureis maculisqne paucis pallidis variegatis, marginibua 
recurvis, costa pallida, sepalo dorsali ultra columnam lanceolato, sepaJis 
lanceolato-eubulatis incurvis apicibus setaceis, petalis parvis, labelli 
aurei bypochilio cuneiforme saccato a latere compresso basi dorso bitu- 
berculato apice truncato, angulis superioribns acutis infra apicem 
aristatis, epichilio hypochilio aequikmgo infundibulari apice in rostrum 
recurvum produco, columna basique elongata sepali dorsalis robro- 
punctatis. 

Gongora tricolor, Beichb.f. in Bonplandia, vol. ii. (1854) p. 93 ; in Walp. Ann. 

vol. vi. p. 594. 
G. maculata, var. tricolor; Lindl. Bot. Beg. vol. xxx. (1844) Misc. n. 40; et 

vol. xxiii. (1847) t. 69. 



In systematic botany there is no more difficult task than 
that of accurately and intelligibly describing the floral 
organs of Orchids, and I think that the maximum of diffi- 
culty is reached in the case of Gongora. This arises from 
the confluence of the lower half (long claw) of the narrow 
dorsal sepal with the lower half of the long column into a 
pillar carrying the bases of the small subulate or horn-like 
petals adnate to it, almost to its summit ; to the reflexion of 
the lateral sepals, which are quite unlike the dorsal ; and to 
the complicated structure of the comparatively small Up, 
which is attached by a mere point to the summit of the 
ovary, and is directed backwards horizontally from the 
rest of the perianth. These characters give a dislocated 
appearance to flowers, the forms and relations of whose 
organs can hardly be understood without a good drawing. 
Add to these difficulties that of defining the shades of 
colours of the often parti-coloured floral organs, which in 
the case of Orchids is necessary for systematic purposes. 

There are several tropical S. American Gongoras so 
closely allied to G. tricolor in every detail of the structure 

Apr'l 1st, 1897. 



of the lip, that intermediates between some or all may be 
expected to occur. Of these the type is G. quinquenervis, 
Ruiz & Pav., which, according to Reichenbach, is a widely 
distributed species from Guatemala to Peru and Guiana, 
and for which that author cites (in Warp. Ann. 1. c. 595), 
G. maculata, Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1616 ; Bot. Mag. t. 3687 ; 
G.fulva, Bot. Reg. vol. xxv. (1839) t. 51; G. maculata, 
var. alba, Bot. Reg. vol. xxvii. (1841) Misc. n. 101, and 
G. bufonia, var. leucocliila, Bot. Reg. (1847) t. 17 as 
synonyms. 

The specimen of G. tricolor here figured was received at 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, in September, 1894, from Mr. 
R. Pfau, of San Jose, Costa Rica. It flowered in the 
warm Orchid House in February, 1896. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs ovoid, two to two and a half inches 
long, deeply sulcate, with about six obtusely keeled ribs 
and rounded interstices. Leaves six inches long, ovate- 
oblong, acuminate, deeply five-grooved above, with as 
many stout ribs beneath, bright green. Raceme pendulous, 
long-peduncled, six to ten inches long, lax-flowered ; 
peduncle and rachis slender, pale green, speckled ; rachis 
compressed and angled ; bracts a quarter of an inch long, 
lanceolate ; pedicel with ovary one and a half to two inches 
long, spreading and decurved, speckled like the rachis. 
Flowers about two inches long from the tip of the dorsal 
sepal to that of the lip. Sepals very unequal, dorsal 
narrow, adnate for half its length to the back of the 
column, the free portion as long as the adnate, lanceolate, 
margins revolute, tip recurved ; lateral sepals reflexed, 
ovate-lanceolate, dull red-purple, with revolute margins, 
and a stout pale midrib. Petals adnate to the sides of 
the column for their lower halves, the free portions 
spreading and upcurved, lanceolate, acuminate, speckled. 
Lip golden-yellow, projecting horizontally; hypochilium 
cuneiform, saccate, truncate anteriorly, with acute angles 
and an awn on each side ; base with two dorsal tubercles ; 
epichichilium as long as the hypochilium, broadly funnel- 
shaped, with a spur-like speckled tip, base dorsally gibbous. 
Column slender, speckled. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Lip ; 2, column and petals ; 3, top of column and anther ; 4, poll-nia : 
-All enlarged. 



\ r >'dl 




XS.delJNFitdi.lith. 



lucent Bxo oksj) ay &- Son in 



L Reeve &. C° London 



Tab. 7531. 
SENECIO Smithii. 

Native of Soitth Chili and Fuegia. 

Nat. Ord. Composite.— Tribe Sbnecionide^c. 
Genus Senecio, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 446.) 



Senecio Smithii ; caule simplice herbaceo valde robusto fistuloso folioao foliis- 
que amplis araneosis, foliia crassiusculis radicalibus petiolatia ovatis 
basi cuneatis cordatis bilobisve, apice obtusis acutisve grosse crenato- 
dentatis aubtus nervoais costa craasa,petiolo crasso antice concavo basi dila- 
tato vaginante, caulinis oblongis, capitulis in corymbos terminales basi 
foliosos valide pedunculatoa dispositis, involucri campanalati caljculati 
araneosi bracteis angustis linearibus acntis viridibus, fl. radii ligulia 
mimeroais brevibus v. elongatis linearibus 3-dentatis albis, styli ramis 
brevibus linearibus obtuais, fl. dieci anreia 5-dentatis, styli ramis brevibus 
apice dilatatis, acheniis linearibus glaberrimis sulcatis, pappi setis 
achenio paullo longioribus subacaberulis. 

S. Smitbii, DC. Prodr. vol. vii. p. 316. Hooh.f. Fl. Antarct. vol. ii. p. 316. 

0. Gay, Fl. Ghil. vol. iv. p. 198. 
S. verbascifoliua, Hombr. & Jacqtiin. Voy. au Pole Sud. Bot. Dicot. Phan. 

t. 12. 
Cineraria gigantea, Smith, Exot. Bot. vol. ii. p. ii. t. 65. 
C. leucantbema, Banks 8f Sol. mss. in Herb. Mus. Brit, cum Icone. 
Brachypappus ? Smithii, Schult. Bih. in Hohen. PI. Lechler Magell. Ejcaicc. 

n. 1238. 



This noble Senecio was discovered in January, 1769, 
during Cook's first voyage, by Banks and Solander, -when 
on their disastrous botanizing excursion in Good Success 
Bay in Tierra del Fuego. Since that time it has been 
collected by every naturalist who has visited the Straits 
of Magellan and western coast of South Chili, along which 
it extends as far north as the Island of Chiloe, according 
to a specimen so ticketed by Captain King in the Kew 
Herbarium. Quite recently it has been found in the 
Falkland Islands by Mr. A. Linney of the Government 
Gardens, Stanley Harbour, who sent seeds of it to Kew 
in 1895, describing it as a coast plant. It would be in- 
teresting to know which of the two Falkland Islands the 
plant inhabits, for not only is the flora of the group a 
singularly scanty one, but there is a botanical difference 
between the Eastern and Western Islands, exemplified by 
April 1st, 1897. 



the fact that the only true shrub in the flora, Veronica 
elliptica, Forst. (see Tab. 242, V. decussate, Ait.) has been 
found in the Western Island only (that nearest to Fuegia), 
where, as I have been informed, it is local, and confined 
to the Southern and Western coasts. It may be mentioned 
here that V. elliptica is one of the very few shrubs that is 
common to Chili, Fuegia, New Zealand, and the islands 
West and South of the latter. 

Senecio Smithii varies a good deal in height, robustness, 
number of flower-heads, and length of the ray-flowers, 
which are sometimes very narrow and short. The speci- 
men figured is of a plant raised from seeds sent by Mr. 
Linney in 1895, which grew vigorously, and flowered in 
an open border in June, 1896, and has attained three feet 
in height, with the stem as thick as the thumb. 

Descr. — A robust perennial, green, leafy herb, three to 
four feet high, more or less clothed with a loose cobwebby 
indumentum. Stem as thick as the thumb below, and as 
the middle finger about the middle. Lower leaves eight 
to ten inches long, ovate or oblong, acute or obtuse, 
coarsely crenate-toothed, thickly leathery, pale green ; 
base cuneate, rounded-cordate, or 2-lobed ; midrib very 
stout below, with prominent nerves ; petiole very stout, 
concave in front ; upper leaves sessile, oblong. Heads 
many, in a leafy, terminal corymb, pedicels long or 
short, stout. Involucre one half to two-thirds of an inch 
long, campanulate ; bracts very narrow, acute, green. 
Hay-flowers twenty to thirty, white, very variable, one- 
fourth to three-fourths of an inch in length, linear, tip 
three-toothed ; style-arms short, linear. Dish-flowers 
yellow, 5-toothed; style-arms short, recurved, tips dilated. 
Achene about one-third of an inch long, very narrow, 
deeply grooved, glabrous ; pappus rather longer than the 
achene, white, rather rough. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Bay- flower ; 2, disk-flower; 3, par>pus-hair; 4, stamens ; 5, style-arms 
of disk-flowers ; 6, achene ; all enlarged; 7, whole plant greatly reduced. 



BRITISH, COLONI AL, AND FO REIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA j a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in ' the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L. S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linna?an 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By R. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Part XVII., 6s. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. each. 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV., 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authority of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Harvey.M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelm Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d. each. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Majesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Maoquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the anspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS : a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George Bentham, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. Hance, 21s. 
Published under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. 10s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

to a Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Traherhk Moggridge. Royal 8vc. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

L. REEVE & CO., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTENTS OF No. 628, APRIL, 1897. 



Tab. 7527.— AGAYE HASELOFFII. 
„ 7528 —GENTIAN A TLBETICA. 
„ 7529.— TRISTANIA LAURINA. 
„ 7530.— GONGORA TRICOLOR. 
„ 7531.— SENECIO. SMITHII. 

L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
Now Ready, Vol. VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6(2. each. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director af the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XXII., 9s. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 



Now ready, Part VIII., with 2 Coloured Plates, 5s. (completing the work). 

THE HEMIPTERA HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
plete, with 2 Structural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates, 43s. 

Now ready, Part XXXVIII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. 1. 12s. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s. ; large paper, with 46 Coloured Plates, 63s. 
Vol. IIT. 12s.; large paper, with 50 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may be had on application to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVII., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s. 

LEPIDOPTERA IPCI>IO^V. 

Br F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Vol. I., containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 
£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 

Prospectus, with First List of Subscribers, can be had on application to the Publishers. 
L. Reetk k Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

PBIHTKD BT SILBgBT AND EIVIXSTOS, LB., »T. JOIN 1 ! UDLSI, CLEKKXN WELL, B.C. 



YOL. LTII,— MAY. 



Cfjirfc Attics. 

No. 629. 

Price 3s. 6d. coloured, 
OB NO. 1323 OP THE ENTIRE WOEK. 

CU BUS'S 1 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



COMF1 I8IVG 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WJ 

SUITABLE DESCRIFITONS ; 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., K.c.s.1., c.B. 

Tate Etrrctcr of tfjr Bonal botanic GarBtna of l\ea. 







L. R ) CO., 6, H; 



[Al 



ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY ARRANGEMENTS, 1897. 

GREAT SUMMER EXHIBITION OF PLANTS AND 
FLOWERS, Wednesday, May 19th. 

SPECIAL FLORAL FETE AND CHILDREN'S PARADE, 

Wednesday, June 9th. 

RHODODENDRON EXHIBITION daily during June. 

IMPERIAL FETE AND FANCY FAIR. To commemorate i*e 
60th year of Her Majesty's Reign. In aid of the Victona 
Hospital for Children, Chelsea. June 21st to June 25th. 

NATIONAL VIOLA SOCIETY'S EXHIBITION, July 17th. 

EXHIBITION OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS early in November, 

BOTANICAL LECTURES, Fridays in May and June. 

MUSICAL PROMENADES, Wednesdays in June, July, and Au< 



isrus 



Now ready, price 2s. 6d. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 

Now ready, Second Editi 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 

. RKEL El 24 Coloured Plate? .. 



adsome ■ 



Foreign Pinches in Captivity. 

ARTHUB G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S. 

■SOO and 40 
F. W. FROWHAWK, beanuf >nd. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

/ Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous .- 
to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

CrE BE NT HAM, F.li.S. 
i. D. Hooseb, C.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10«.6d. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

f Wood Engraving is, of Br 

DBi FITCH. W. G. SMITH, 

" Handbook" an 
L. K ETTA STREET, C< 'BDEJ 



75:v: 




Vincent Brooks Day t 



Tab. 7532. 
agave kkwbnsis. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide.e. — Tribe Agaves. 
Genus Agave, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738.) 



Agave (Euagave) keicensis ; breviter caulescens, foliis 30-40 laxe rosulatis 
oblongo-lanceolatis carnoso-coriaceia viridibus, spina terminali debiii vir 
pungente spinalis marginalibus parvis deltoideis brunneis, pednnculo 
valido elongato foliis multis rudimentariis Ianceolatia praedito, floribua in 
paniculam laxam dispositis, ramis patulis apice multifloris, pedicellis 
brevibus, bracteis parvis ovatis scariosis, ovario cylindrico, perianthio 
lutescente tubo brevi infundibulari, lobis ovato-lanceolatis, staminibus 
lobis 2-3-plo longioribus, stjlo staminibus longiore. 

A. kewensis, Jacobi Monogr. Agave, p. 242. Baker in Gard. Chron. 1897, 
vol. i. p. 68 ; Handb. Amaryllid. p. 242. 



The present Agave belongs to the group with com- 
paratively fleshy leaves, the species of which are less 
hardy and much rarer in cultivation than A. americana, 
A. rigida, and their allies. Of this group it is the finest 
and largest species which is known. When General 
Jacobi visited the Eoyal Gardens at Kew in 1865 he at 
once recognized it as a new and well-marked species, and 
shortly afterwards described it in his monograph under 
the name of Agave Icewensis. It did not flower till 1895, 
and then proved to have the americana type of panicle. 
The plant did not perfect seed, and died after flowering, 
but the peduncle was cut and kept, and fortunately, as it 
was the only plant known, developed a number of bulbillce 
after the flowers faded. These have been planted, and it 
is hoped that a number of young plants raised from them 
will shortly be ready for distribution. 

Descr. — Trunk produced to a length of half a foot 
below the leaves. Leaves oblong-lanceolate, thirty or 
forty in a rather lax rosette, three or four feet long, 
seven or eight inches broad at the middle, narrowed 
gradually to four inches above the dilated base, bright 
green on both surfaces, concave on the face in the middle ; 
end spine weak and scarcely pungent ; marginal spinules 

May 1st, 1897. 



small, deltoid, brown. Peduncle fifteen feet long, acci- 
dentally forked in the present specimen, with many ascend- 
ing lanceolate reduced leaves. Inflorescence laxly panicled, 
rather shorter than the peduncle ; branches spreading, 
bearing a cluster of many flowers at the apex; pedicels 
short ; bracts small, ovate, scariose. Ovary cylindrical, 
an inch long. Perianth yellowish; tube short, funnel- 
shaped ; lobes ovate-lanceolate, ascending, nearly an inch 
long. Stamens more than twice as long as the perianth- 
lobes ; anthers linear. Style overtopping the anthers. — 
J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Marginal spinules ; 2, front view of anther ; 3, back view of anther ; 
4, apex of Btyle ;—aU enlarged; 5, whole plant, much reduced. 



7631 




^.JNJitchlith 






Tab. 7533. 
MAXILLARIA Houtteana. 

Native of Guatemala and Venezuela. 

Nat. Ord. Obciiide.5:. — Tribe Vandf,.£. 

Genus Maxillakia, Ruiz & Pav.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 555.) 



Maxillaria (Caulescentes) Houtteana; rhizomate elongato suberecto vaginis 
lanceolatia acuminatia brunneis tecto, vaginis superioribus pseudobnlbum 
supremum asquantibus, pseudobulbis lineari-oblongis compressis lajvibus 
monophyllis, folio sessili sei-pollicari lineari obtu80 medio profunda 
canaliculate pedunculo cum ovario 1-1^ pollicario suberecto, florea 
erecto sub 2-poll. latio, sepalis ovato-lanceolatis acatis aureo-marginatis 
intus rubro-purpureis, basin versus aureis, dorsali panllo latioro 
fornicato, lateralibns patenti-recurvis, petalis erectis sepalis concoloribus 
apicibus conniventibus, labello late oblongo apice rotundato pubernlo 
aureo ultra medium sangnineo maeulato, lobie lateralibus obsoletis, disco 
atro-purpureo fasciato callo tumido instructo, columna maculata, antliera 
couico-hemispherica papillosa, polliniis obovoideis cohaerentibus, glandula 
transverse elongata arcuata. 

M. Houtteana, Beichb. f. in Hamb. Gartenz. vol. xiv. (1858) p. 212. Beget, 
Gartenfl. vol. vii. (1858) p. 286. 



M. Houtteana is very nearly allied to M. tenuifolia, 
Lindl. (Bot. Reg. t. 1986 (in note), and vol. xxv. t. 8) of 
Mexico, differing chiefly in the longer narrower pseudo- 
bulbs, and broader bright green leaves. The specimen 
figured was obtained from the Brussels Botanical Garden 
in 1891. It flowers annually in the cool Orchid House 
of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in April ; the flower lasting 
for a month or more. 

Descr. — Rhizome erect or ascending, stout ; internodes 
an inch long or less, clothed with brown, lanceolate sheaths, 
the uppermost of which are as long as the young pseudo- 
bulbs, lower successively shorter. Pseudobulbs two to two 
and a half inches long, sessile, linear-oblong, compressed, 
smooth, pale green. Leaf solitary, sessile, six inches long 
by half to three-fourths of an inch broad, linear, obtuse, 
somewhat curved, dark green above, with a deep median 
channel, beneath paler and keeled. Peduncle with the 
ovary, one and a half to two inches long, up-curved, stout, 

May 1st, 1897. 



green, clothed at the base with acute brown sheaths. 
Flower nearly two inches broad across the lateral sepals, 
suberect. Sepals dirty yellow without, within of a rich 
red purple, with golden margins, the lateral ovate- 
lanceolate, spreading and recurved, and with a yellow area 
towards thebaseand lower margins streaked with red-brown ; 
dorsal sepal oblong, acute, fornicate. Petals rather smaller 
than the sepals, coloured like the dorsal, oblong, acute, 
incurved, tips connivent. Lip rather shorter than the 
sepals, oblong, puberulous, tip rounded, side lobes none ; 
disk with a low, broad, ill-defined, tumid callus, golden- 
yellow, with red-brown spots in the distal half, and purple 
streaks towards the base. Column yellow, spotted red- 
brown. Anther conico-hemispheric, papillose. Pollinia 
pyriform, coherent ; gland bow-shaped. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Top of ovary, lip and column; 2, column; 3, anther; 4 and 5, 
pollinia : — All enlarged. 



7634 




ael.XN.Htchlith. 



Tfincent Brooks J)ay&. Sonlmp 



L.Reeve &C° London. 



Tab. 7534. 
SYRINGA amurensis. 

Native of North China and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Oleaceaj. — Tribe Syringed. 
Genus Syrikga, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 675.) 



Syringa (Ligustrina) amurensis; arbuscula erecta, glaberrima, ramosa, 
foliosa, cortice rubro-brunneo, foliis breviter petiolatis late ovatis rotun- 
datisve obtuse cuspidatis glaberrimis v. sparse pilosis, supra saturate 
viridJbus lucidis, Bubtus pallidis, nervis utrinqne ad 6-8 patentibus, 
paniculis magnis subpyramidatis, ramis patulis oppositis, floribus 
numerosissimis in capitula globosa terminalia dispositis breviter 
pedicellatis albo-stramineis, caljce campanulato glaberrimo margine 
breviter dentato, corollse tubo brevissimo, lobis ovatis patentibus, fila- 
mentis exsertis, capsulis oblongis obtusis pustulatis, seminibus oblongo- 
lanceolatis ventre excavatis. 

S. (L'gustrina) amurensis, Rupr. in Bull. Phys.-Math. Acad. 8c. Peterab. 
vol. xv. (1857) p. 371 ; in Maxim. Prim. Fl. Amur. pp. 193, 474. Carr. 
in Rev. Sortie. (1877) p. 453 (non 1861, p. 353). Decne in Nouv. Arch. 
Mu8. Paris, Ser. 2, vol. ii. p. 43. Sargent, Garden $r Forest, vol. i. (1888) 
p. 222. 

S. iaponica, Bene. I.e. p. 44, t. 3. Sargent in Gard. Chron. (1886) vol. ii. 
p. 560, fig. 123; Gard. & Forest. I.e. & vol. ii. (1889) p. 291, figs. 114. 
115. 

S. ligustrina, Sort, ex C. Koch Bendrol. vol. ii. p. 272. 

S. petinensis, Eupr. I c. Dtcne I. c. p. 431. Sargent in Gard. 8r Forest. I. c. 

PS. rotundifolia, Bene. I. c. 

Ligustrina amurensis, Pupr. Beitr. Pfl. Buss. Reich, vol. ii. p. 72; Bee. PI. 
Amur. t. 9. Maximov. Mel. Bot. Bee. xix. p. 395, cum var. manchurica, 
pekinensi & japonica. 



Syringa amurensis is a very remarkable plant, which no 
one seeing it in flower would suppose to be a Lilac, or 
anything but a Privet; whereas when in fruit it could 
not be taken for a Privet, or anything but a Lilac. This 
combination of the characters of Lilac and Privet induced 
its first describer, Dr. Ruprecht, to propose the sectional 
name for it of Ligustrina, which he subsequently raised to 
generic rank. It was introduced from Japan into America 
by Prof. Sargent, who sent plants to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, from the Arnold Arboretum. His account of its 
introduction is as follows : — " In 1876, Mr. W. S. Clarke, 
President of the Agricultural College at Sapporo, in Japan, 
Way 1st, 1897. 



sent me seeds of a tree identified with Syringa japonica, 
Dene. The plants raised from these grew with great 
rapidity, attaining fifteen to sixteen feet in height in 1886, 
with a clear, straight stem, light red, thin, smooth bark, 
coriaceous leaves five to six inches long, and bearing in 
July immense compound panicles eighteen to twenty- 
four inches long by sixteen to eighteen inches broad, of 
small white flowers, almost destitute of smell. The tree 
continues long in bloom, and the leaves fall early, without 
changing colour. It promises to be one of the most 
magnificent of all the flowering trees that are hardy in 
this climate (Massachusets)." The only exception I have 
to make in this description is that in the Kew plant the 
flowers had a sweet heavy smell, like those of Privet. 

The geographical range of 8. amurensis is very wide, 
from Manchuria and North China to Oorea and Japan, 
presenting slight varieties which have been formulated by 
Maximovicz, and which depend chiefly on the amount of 
or absence of the very sparse hairs on the under-surface 
and margins of the leaves ; to which in the case of var. 
pehinensis may possibly be added a difference of habit, for 
of a specimen of that plant he says (writing in 1888) that 
it formed a slender, tree-like shrub, ten feet high, with 
long, flexuous, graceful branches. The Kew plant of this 
variety does not, however, conform to that character, but 
resembles a dwarf specimen of S. amurensis. Decaisne 
describes, as a fourth species of the section Ligustrina, 
8. rotundifolia, of Manchuria, a plant I have not seen, but 
which is most probably another variety of S. amurensis. 

There are indigenous specimens of 8. amurensis in the 
Kew Herbarium from the Amur River, collected by 
Maximovicz ; from Peking, Bretschneider ; top of Mt. 
Conolly, T. L. Bullock ; and the Yalu River, Corea, 
H. E. M. James, Esq. In the Arboretum of the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, it forms a shrub flowering in June. 

Deser. — A shrub or small tree, with red-brown bark, 
quite glabrous, or sparsely hairy on the back and margins 
of the leaves. Leaves three to six inches long, shortly 
petioled, broadly ovate, or almost orbicular, obtusely 
cuspidate, coriaceous, dark green and shining above, paler 
beneath ; nerves six to eight pairs, divergent. Panicles 
attaining one to two feet in length, and sixteen to eighteen 



inches in breadth, subpyramidal ; branches spreading, and 
branchlets terminated by globose heads of very shortly 
pedicelled very pale cream-colrd. ebracteate flowers about 
one-third of an inch broad. Calyx campanulate, mouth 
shortly, obtusely, irregularly toothed. Corolla-tube very 
short ; segments ovate-oblong, obtuse, spreading. Fila- 
ments about as long as the corolla-lobes. Ovary glabrous ; 
style exserted ; stigma 2-fid. Capsule an inch long, linear- 
oblong, obtuse ; valves thin, brown, pustulate. Seeds 
lanceolate, obtuse at both ends, dorsally convex, ventrally 
excavate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Fascicles of flowers ; 2, antber ; 3, ovary; all enlarged; 4, capsules, 
and 5, seeds (from Rupr. Dec. 1. c.) of nat. size. 



75S5 




■ S.dfiLJ.'N.FitchlitK. 






1 Reeve <5i.C?Londc 



Tab. 7535. 
DIMOBPHOTHECA Eckloxis. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Calendulaceje. 

Genae Dimobphotheca, VaiU. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. 

p. 453.) 



Dimobphotheca Eclclonis; suffruticosa, erecta, robusta, ramosa, tenuiter 
scaberula v. glabrata, foliis obovato-oblongis oblanceolatis linearibusve 
integerrimis paucidentatis v. inferioribus basi sinuato-lobatis, apice 
rotundatiB acutis v. mucronulatisj costa crassa, capitulo longe peduncu- 
lato solitario, involucri bracteis sub 2-seriatis Janceolatis acuminata 
marginibus scariosis, ii. radii tubo brevi puhescente, ligula elougata 
alba dorso violaceo-striata, fl. disci azareis, corollae lobis dorso sub apice 
incrassatis, acheniis radii oblongo-pyriformibus triquetris lateribus 
rugulosis dorso convexis. 

D. Ecklonis, DC. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 71. Harv. fy Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. iii. 
p. 419. 



The plant bere figured, after a careful examination by 
Mr. N. E. Brown, is referred by him, I think correctly, 
to the species above-named ; though in the absence of 
fruit, which has not matured in this country, the absolute 
determination is not arrived at. De Candolle places it in 
the section Osteospermopsis, characterized by the sterile 
disk-flowers, the achenes of the ray-flowers being ovate- 
oblong, trigonous, smooth or subtubercled at the top. 
All the species of this section he regards as doubtful 
Dimorphothecce, and perhaps more allied to Osteospermum. 

Six species of Dimorphotheca have been figured in the 
earlier volumes of this work, namely D. aurantiaca, DC. 
(Calendula Tragus, t. 408) ; D. Tragus, DC. (C. Tragus, t. 
1981) ; D. cuneata, DC. (Arctotis glutinosa, Sims, t. 1343) ; 
D. chrysanthemifolia, DC. (Calendula, t. 2218) ; D. gramini- 
folia, DC. (nudicaulis, DC. t. 5252); and D. Barberise, Harv. 
t. 5337. From all these D. Echlonis differs in its shrubby 
stem and branches, in this respect coming nearest to D. 
fruticosa, DC. the stem of which is woody, but at the base 
only. 

The only authentic specimen of D. Echlonis in the Kew 
May 1st, 1897. 



Herbarium is a starved one, with very small leaves and 
flowers, from the channel of the Zwartkop River in Uiten- 
hage. Ecklon's type of the species was from the Coega 
River, near Elandstroom. There are good specimens in 
the Herbarium, collected at Port Elizabeth by Mrs. 
Holland, with peduncles five to eight inches high. The 
specimen here figured was raised from Port Elizabeth seeds 
presented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mr. William 
Armstong in 1895. It was grown as a summer bedding- 
out plant, attaining eighteen inches in height, and flowering 
in July. 

Descr. — Stem branching, shrubby, with herbaceous, 
scaberulous, leafy branchlets, and terminal axillary 
peduncles. Leaves three to five inches long, oblanceolate, 
subsessile, acute obtuse or apiculate, sparingly serrate or 
toothed, nearly glabrous, pale green, midrib beneath very 
stout; nerves few, erecto-patent ; uppermost leaves linear- 
oblong, obtuse, quite entire, lowermost sinuate-lobed. 
Read three inches in diameter. Involucral bracts half an 
inch long, appressed, lanceolate, acuminate, green. Bay- 
florets about sixteen, tube very short, hispid ; limb one to 
one and a quarter inches long, oblanceolate, white above, 
violet-blue and striate beneath, with a broad white border ; 
style very short. Disk small, florets azure ; corolla-tube 
setulose; lobes very short, much thickened dorsally. — 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Base of corolln,, immature acheue and style of ray-flower ; 2, disk- 
fluwer ; 3, corolla-lobe of do. ; 4, stamens ; 5, style -.—All enlarged. 



7536. 







Vincr- 



J, Reeve C° London. 



Tab. 7536. 

GOMPHOCAEPUS setosus. 

Native of Southern Arabia. 

Nat. Ord. Asclepiade.e. — Tribe Ctnanche/B. 
Genus Gomphocaepus, Br.\ (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 753.) 



Gomphocaepus setosus; suffruticosus, ramulis incano-tomentellis, foliiy 
linearibus obtusis acutis apiculatisve glaberrimis in petiolum brevem. 
angustatis pedunculis 1-2-pollicaribus 6-8-floris peciicellisque sub- 
aequilongis pubeacentibus, corolla? rotata* segmentis elliptico-ovatis 
subacutis reflexis stramineis, corona? squamis gynostegium ajquantibus 
poculiformibus truncatis viridibus, oris angulis posticis panllo arrectis 
crenulatis, folliculis ovoideis rostratis setosif. 

G. setosus, Br. in Mem. Wern. Soc. vol. i. (1809) p. 38; Boem. $■ Sck. SyH. 
vol. vi. p. 87 ; Decnc in Ann. 8c. Nat. Ser. II. vol. ix. (1838) p. 324 ; et in 
DO. Prodr. vol. viii. p. 557. Kew Bullet. 1894, p. 335. 

G. fruticosus, Herb. JZxsicc. Arab. Schiveinf. n. 810. 

Asclepias setosa, Forsk. Fl. 2Egypt. Arab. p. 51. Vahl, Symb. Bot. p. 23, 
t. viii. 



The plant here figured is of more interest botanically 
than horticulturally. It belongs to a very large genus, 
containing upwards of sixty species, closely allied to 
Asclepias, differing from that genus only in the want of a 
ligulate process within each of the cup-shaped bodies that 
form a corona round the column of anthers. The majority 
of the species are natives of the hot, dry regions of Arabia, 
and of North and especially of South Africa, one extending 
to the Mediterranean region. The genus was supposed to 
be confined to those countries until Bentham, when re- 
organizing the Order Asclepiadese for the " Genera 
Plantarum," found that it was impossible to exclude from 
Gomphocarpus most of the species of the American genus 
Acerates, Ell., thus adding upwards of a dozen to the 
former. 

G. setosus is most closely allied to G. fruticosus, Br. of 
the Eastern Mediterranean region, and North Africa, 
which has white corolla lobes with hairy margins, and two 
teeth on each side of the posterior margins of the coronal 
cups. 

Seeds of G. setosus were collected on hills near Bir 

May 1st, 1897. 



Backban in the Hadramaut, by Mr. Lunt, one of the staff 
of the Royal Gardens, who, as botanical collector, accom- 
panied Mr. Bent on bis interesting excursion into that 
country in 1893. The plants raised flowered in a green^ 
house in April, 1896. 

Descr. — A small shrub ; branches slender, branchlets, 
peduncles and petioles clothed with a hoary pubescence. 
Leaves two to three inches long, linear, obtuse acute or 
apiculate, quite glabrous, yellow-green above, paler beneath, 
base narrowed into a very short petiole. Cymes unbelli- 
form, inserted between the petioles, six- to eight-flowered ; 
peduncles and pedicels about one and a half inch long, 
slender, pubescent, pale red-brown; bracts minute. 
Flowers nearly an inch broad. Sepals small, lanceolate. 
Petals elliptic, subacute, glabrous, straw-colrd., reflexed. 
Scales cup-shaped, green, mouth truncate, margins be- 
hind on each side, produced a little upward, with three 
crenatures. Fruit an ovoid beaked follicle, three to four 
inches long, clothed with scattered, erect bristles — 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Corona with the base of the corolla below it; 2, a cup-shaped scale 
of the corona ; 3, the same, with one side removed ; 4, etarninal column with 
the coronal cups removed ; 5, pollinia -.—All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONI AL, AND FO REIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bh 
tt -r -r^'S.?.- ™ h EdJdon » revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10a. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawing by W. H 
Fitch. F.L.S., ard W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
^T^ m f ravings ' 4th E<iition > revised and enlarged, crown 8vo. 10s. 6& 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Beniham, F.R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, 1*. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townse.nd, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Kev. M. J. Bebkblby 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates,"21s. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Geneia and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkihk, F.L.S., &c, &o. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

• British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By B. Bbaithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Part XVII., 6s. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. I). Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s each 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36#. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Benthak, F.K.S., F.L.S., aBsiei 
Muellkr, F.It.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. 
under the auspices of the several Gov* 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYC1 

fcion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baj 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authority of 
Colonial Government of Maurii i 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plant 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Harvey, M.D. , 
F.E.S., and Otto Wit.helh Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— 
Vol VI.. Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d each. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.l; 

S. Vols. 1 

HANDBOOK of the NE' 

FLORA r INDT 

Dr. 

FLORA H0> ■ a Description of the Flowei 

Plants ai 
F.L.S. V 
Pub! 

Col' 

ON the FLORA of 

to THE 

to 8 

■ 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 629, MAY, 1897. 



Tab. 7532,— i ENSIS. 

„ 7533.— MAXILLARIA HQUTTEANA. 
AMUR] 

-DIMORPHOTHECA ECKLONIS. 
7536.— GOMPHOOARPITS SETOS 



L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Now Ready, Vol. VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d. each. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Edited by W. T. TH18ELT0N-DYER, C.M.G,, F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 
Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 
■VILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 
University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph. 



Now ready, Part XXI j 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Yol "Vol. VI., 36s. 

Now readv Part VIII., with 2 Colours •>■ (completing- the w< 

THE HEMIPTERA HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

Br JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
2 Structural Plates, 12s. ; Lar r . with 28 Coloured Plates, 

Now ready, Part XXXIX., with 4 Coloured Plates 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.i 

arge paper, with 40 Coloured Pla 
u'ge paper, with 46 Coloured PI 

to the Publishers. 



'art XXVII., with 8 C Los. 

LEPII>OPTERA lIVI>IO^. 

i*IOORE, F.Z 
Vol. I., containing 9* Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 
£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 



J.B., sr. JOBS 



VOL. Mil.— jux: 



CI)irto Merits. 

No. 630. 

Price 3*. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d 
OR NO. X3Jj4i OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 



CU BUS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



Sib JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., K.C.S.L, C.B., F.E.S., 

3Catt Birector of tfje Hlopal 33otanu ffiartrens of Item. 




ciie page cam 
our nor 



LONDON: 

L, REEVE and CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE 

1897. 
[All rights reser 



B0Y1L BOTANIC SOCIETY ARRANGEMENTS, 1897. 



SPECIAL PLOBAL FETE AND CHILDREN'S PARADE, 

Wednesday, June 9th. 

RHODODENDRON EXHIBITION daily during June. 

IMPERIAL FETE AND FANCY FAIR. To commemorate the 
60th year of Her Majesty's Reign. In aid of the Victoria 
Hospital for Children, Chelsea. June 21st to June 25th. 

NATIONAL VIOLA SOCIETY'S EXHIBITION, July 17th. 

EXHIBITION OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS early in November. 

BOTANICAL LECTURES, Fridays in May and June. 

MUSICAL PROMENADES, Wednesdays in June, July, and August. 



Now ready, price 2s, Gd. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



Now ready, Second Edition. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 



Now res :s in 1 vol., royal 4to, in handsome cloth case, £6 6». net in half morocco, 

£7 net. . 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 



By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S. 

b and handsome volume of between 300 and 400 p 
PROWHAV/ 



forms a large and handsome volume of between 300 and 400 pages, with 80 Plates by 
P. W. PROWHAWK. beantif i.nd. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEOiJUE BENT HAM, F.R.S. 

6th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookbe, C.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10*. 6d. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
iwn by W. H. F ITCH, F.l W. G. SMITH, F. !. 

r» Illustrated Ccmpanv ■ Handbook;' and other British Floras. 

4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings. 10« 6i. 



HENRIETTA STREET. COVERT GARDEN. 

;"*i AHB WV IJTtM no, l.u., si. tv uu w ■■■ ■ »» | ii i ni i n ■ »!■ ; » 



7537 










Tab. 7537. 
RENANTHERA Storief. 

Native of the Philippine Islands. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Vande^e. 
Genus Kenantheka, Lour. ; (Renth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 577.) 



Renantheka Storiei; caule robuBto elongato ascendente, foliis distich is 
obloDgis lineari-oblongisve carnosis caiinatis apice 2-lobis, pedunculo 
pedali folio opposito valido, panicula pendula ampla pedali ramis patulia 
multifloris, bracteis parvis triangularibus viridibus, pedicellis cum 
ovariis 1-1^-pollicaribus roseis, floribus 2^-3 poll, longis, sepalo dorsali 
erecto lineari sub«patbulato obtuso rnbro-aurantiaco sanguineo irrorato, 
lateralibus pendulis basi subconnatis rhombeo-v. 6pathulato-obovatis 
obtusis undulatis pallide coccineis plagis sanguineis ornatis, petalis 
sepalo dorsali asquilongis concoloribusque erecto-patentibus oblanceolatia 
falcatis, labello parvo sessili, lobis lateralibus erectis quadrato-oblongia 
sanguineis basi extus anreis intus anreo striatis, intermedio daplo 
minore ovato obtueo sangnineo basin versus 2-calloso, calcare conico 
apice rotundato anreo. 

R. Storiei, Beichb. f. in Garrl. Chron. 1880, vol. ii. p. 296. Warner & 
Williams, Orchid. Album, t. 513. Williams, Orchid Growers' Man. 
Ed. 7, p. 694. 

Vanda Storiei. Storie ex Beichb. f. 1. c. 



This magnificent plant, though in every respect so 
much a finer species, differs less botanically from the 
well-known R. coccinea, Lour. (Tab. 2997, 2998), than 
would at firs/) sight be supposed. The flowers are much 
larger, of far more vivid colouring, the dorsal sepals and 
petals broader, and the lateral sepals more undulate, 
with bright, velvety blood-red blotches, the side-lobes 
of the lip are larger, and the midlobe obtuse. The column 
and the pollinia with their gland and stipes are the same 
in both species. 

Benanthera Storiei is a native of the Philippine Islands, 
and was first described in 1880 by Reichenbach. The 
plate here given is from a magnificent plant which 
flowered at Burford Lodge, by Sir Trevor Lawrence, in 
June of last year, and which was kindly lent for the 
purpose of being figured, together with a sketch of the 
whole plant. There is a good specimen of it in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, which has not flowered as yet. 

June 1st, 1897. 



Descr. — Stem ten to twelve feet high, as thick as a 

swan's quill. Leaves eight to ten inches long, from 

oblong to linear-oblong, alternate, distichous, fleshy, 

keeled, bright green, tip two-lobed. Peduncle a foot long, 

leaf-opposed, pale reddish brown. Panicle a foot long, 

and nearly as broad, pendulous ; branches spreading, the 

lower many-fid. ; bracts small, triangular, green ; pedicels 

with the ovary rose-colrd., one and a half inches long. 

Flowers two and a half to three inches long from the tips 

of the dorsal to those of the lateral sepals. Dorsal sepal 

erect, linear, widened towards the obtuse tip, orange-red, 

mottled with crimson ; lateral sepals pendulous, sub- 

rhomboidly or spathulately obovate, undulate, crimson 

with large blood-red blotches. Petals erecto-patent, sub- 

spathulately linear, obtuse, falcate, coloured like the 

dorsal sepal. Lip very small ; side-lobes quadrately oblong, 

erect, blood-red, bases externally golden-yellow, internally 

streaked yellow and red ; midlobe rather shorter than the 

side-lobes, ovate, obtuse, blood-red, with two oblong calli 

at the base ; spur broadly conical, tip rounded. — J. D. H. 



Fip. 1, Lip and column ; 2, side view of do. ; 3, top of column ; 4 and 5, 
pollinia with strap and gland -.—All enlarged; 6, reduced view of top of 
stem and leaves. 



753S 




KSdeUNFitdilKK. 



1 Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 7538. 

STROBILANTHES callosus. 
Native of the East Indies. 

Nat. Ord. Acanthace>e. — Tribe Ruellie.e. 
Gonns Strobilantees, Bl. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1086.) 



Strobilantiies (Bracteatae) callosus; frutex erectus, caule robuato subpoly- 
gouo tuberculis aeriatis parvis instructo, foliis 6-9-pollicaribua elliptioo- 
lanceolatis caudato-acuminatis subserrulatis ciliolatis in petiolum 
ekmgatum ad medium alatum angustatis, nervis utrinque costaa 8-16, 
supra lineolatis et sparse pilosis, subtus glabratis, floribus amplis in 
spicas strobiliformes dispositis, bracteis late scaphaeformibus obtusis 
berbaceis, bracteolis 0, aepalis linearibua obtusis, corollaB subsymme- 
tricae tubo brevi, fauce inflato calyce duplo longiore intus piloso, limbo fere 
2-poll. _ lato lobia subasqualibua patentibus orbicularibas undulatis 
violaceis, ore pallido, filamentis pilosis, antberia oblongis, ovario glabro, 
stylo piloso, capsula f poll, longa 2-sperma, seminibus obovatis acutia 
appresae villosis. 

S. callosus, Nees in Wall. PI. As. Bar. vol. iii. p. 85 ; et in DC. Prodr. vol. 

x. p. 185 (pro max. pari.). T. Anders, in Journ Linn. Soc. vol. is. 

(1867) p. 469. Clarke in Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iv. p. 451. Kirtilzar in 

Journ. Bomb. Nat. Hist. Soc. vol. vii. (1892) p. 64, t. A. Date. Sf Gibs. 

Bomb. Fl. 188 (ere/, descr. semin.). Constable in Kew Bullet. 1896, 

p. 98. 
S. Grabamianus, Wight. Ic. t. 1520. Dalz. & Gibs, I. c. 188. T. Anders. I.e. 
Ruellia calloaa, Wall. Cat. n. 2359. 



A native of Western India, abundant below the Ghats in 
Concan, Canara, and in the Central Provinces ; also extend- 
ing northward to Mt. Abu in Rajputana, there forming a 
shrub six to eight feet high, said to flower in its third year 
of growth, from June to September. When fully grown the 
stems are cut to the ground, and used with mud in making 
the walls of cottages, &c, new stems coming up from the 
stools. The leaves are used in native practice as a tonic, 
febrifuge, antispasmodic, stimulant and purgative, but 
according to Surgeon- Major Kirtikar, when used fresh, 
the hairs have an irritating action on the stomach. 
Recently dried flower-buds have been sent to the Director 
of Kew by Mr. P, C. Constable, with the following infor- 
mation: "I was walking on a steep mountain side (in 

Jine 1st, 1897. 



Khandalla) through half a mile or more of these trees, 
close together, simply laden with buds. There was in the 
air a sweet resinous, pleasant odour from the buds. My 
hands were covered with what they exuded, and — this is 
the point — though I washed my hands three times, the 
pleasant scent remained." Th^ buds sent by Dr. Kirkitar 
were transmitted to Messrs. Piesse & Lubin, who reported 
that " the odour somewhat resembles Patchouli, but is not 
so good, and w r ould be likely to be used in the soap-trade." 
Kew Bulletin I. c. 

Seeds of 8. callosus were received at the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1888, from the Botanical Gardens of Saharanpur. 
They were collected on Mt. Abu, where Mr. Duthie in- 
forms me the shrub is supposed to flower about every 
ninth year. The plants raised at Kew flowered in a warm 
greenhouse in August, 1896, that is in the eighth year after 
the seeds were sown. 

Descr. — An erect shrub. Stems erect, strict, simple or 
branching, six to eight feet high, as thick as the thumb, 
obscurely polygonal, with small tubercles on the angles. 
Leaves six to nine inches long, elliptic-lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, subserrulate, base narrowed into a long, slender 
petiole, which is winged down to the middle, bright green 
and lineolate above, margins ciliolate, pale beneath ; 
nerves many, puberulous. Flowers sessile, large, pale 
violet-blue, in short globose or oblong, catkin-like spikes, 
one to two inches long, with broadly boat-shaped or 
hemispheric green imbricating bracts. Sepals linear, 
obtuse. Corolla-tube very short, dilated into a subcam- 
panulate throat twice as long as the calyx, and hairy 
within; limb nearly two inches in diameter; lobes orbi- 
cular, undulate. Filaments with spreading hairs ; anthers 
short. Ovary glabrous ; style filiform, glandular-hairy. 
Capsule oblong, 2 -seeded. Seeds obovate, appressedly 
villous.—/. D. II. 



Tig. 1, Portion of stem of nat. size; 2, calyx; 3, base of corolla laid open 
with stamen ; 4 and 5, stamens ; 6, ovary aad disk -.—All enlarged. 



7539 




TsCS.del JJWFitchlith 



"Vincent Bro oks^Day &.Son . 



3l C° London. 



Tab. 7539. 
VERONICA DIOSMvEFOLIA, var. trisepala. 

Native of New Zealand, 



Nat. Orel. ScrophularinejE. — Tribe DigitalejE. 
GenuB Veronica, Linn. ; (Bentk. 4" Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. n. p. 964.) 



Veronica (Hebe) diosmsefolia ; fruticulus erectus subcorymbosim ramosua 
glaberrimus, ramulis et inflorescentia puberulis, ramis gracilibus cicatri- 
catis, cortice fusco-brunneo, foliis subconfertim decussatis patulis coriaceia 
^-1 poll, longis lineari-oblongis acutis integerrimis subcarinatis, racemia 
brevibus apices versus ramalorum corymbosis breviter pedunculatis, 
floribus pedicellatis ad |-poll. latis pallide lilacinis, bracteis parvis 
pedicellis multo brevioribus, caljcis parvi corolla tubo brevioris lobis 
brevibus latis ovato-oblongis obtusi?, corollae tubo brevi infundibulari, 
lobis obtusis postico majore late ovato, antico lineari-oblongo, filamentis 
elongatis, antheris apiculatis, stylo gracili deflexo, capsulis j poll, longia 
ovoideis calyce rnulto longioribus glaberritnis. 

V. diosmEefolia, R, Cunn. in B<d. Mag. sub t. 3461 (1836) diosmifolia) 
Benth. in BO. Prodr. vol. x. p. 460. A. Cunn. in Ann. Nat. Hist. vol. i. 
(1838) p. 459 ; HooJc.f. Fl. Nov. Zel. vol. i. p. 193 ; Handb. N. Zeal. Fl. 
p. 209. Kirk in Trans. N. Zeal. Instil, vol. iii. (1870) p. 168 ; et vol. 
xxviii. (1895) p. 525. Armstrong I. c. vol. xxii. (1881) p. 351. 

Var. trisepala ; gracilior, foliis ecarinatis, calycis lobis 3 supremo emargi- 
nato. V. trisepala, Golenso in Trans. N. Zeald. Instit. vol. xv. (1882) 
p. 326. V. diosmsefolia, var. trisepala, Kirk I. c. vol. xxviii. p. 525. 



Veronica is now known to be the largest genus by far 
of New Zealand flowering plants. Banks and Solander in 
1769 procured 3 species. Allan Cunningham in 1838 
published 10 ; the additions being due to the indefatigable 
labours of himself and brother Richard, during their visit 
to the Bay of Islands, Allan in 1826, and again in 1838, 
and Richard in 1834, collecting in both cases for the 
Sydney Botanical Gardens. My " Flora Nova? Zelandiee " 
(1853) contains 24, the principal additions being from the 
mountainous interior of the Northern Island, and the 
previously unexplored Middle Island. In my '* Handbook 
of the New Zealand Flora" (1867) there are 40. Mr. 

Ji-NE 1st, 1897. 



Armstrong's enumeration (in the " Transactions of the New 
Zealand Institute," 1. c. 1881) gives 60. And this by no 
means exhausts the list of species known to exist in the 
islands, for several have been discovered since the last date, 
and I have drawings of others (species or varieties) that 
have flowered in the Royal Botanical Gardens of Edinburgh, 
from seeds of indigenous plants, which I am unable to 
identify with any described ones. 

Veronica diosmsefolia was discovered at the Bay of 
Islands by Richard Cunningham in 1834, where it occurs 
as far south as Tekawaki, and it has since been found at 
Nelson by Bidwell, and at Canterbury by Sinclair and 
Haast. It was described by its discoverer as having white 
flowers, whereas those of the specimen here figured are 
pale lilac. Mr. Kirk, F.L.S. (of Wellington, N.Z., now 
happily engaged on a Flora of New Zealand), to whom I 
submitted the drawing, informs me that he regards it as 
" a variety of diosmsefolia with the inflorescence mostly 
reduced to short, simple racemes which are further re- 
moved from the apex of the branches than usual ; with 
calyx-segments rather broad, and leaves less acute than 
in the type." It is identical with specimens of V. trisepala, 
Colenso, which Mr. Kirk has referred to V. diosmasfvlia as 
var. trisepala. 

The specimen here figured is from the Royal Botanical 
Gardens of Edinburgh, where it flowered in June, 1893. 

Descr. — A dwarf, erect, much corymbosely branched 
evergreen bush ; branches covered with very dark brown 
bark. Leaves one half to one inch long, in rather crowded 
pairs, linear-oblong, acute, quite entire, nerveless, bright 
green above, pale and keeled by the midrib beneath ; 
petiole very short. Flowers towards the end of the 
branches, in short subcorymbosely disposed minutely pube- 
rulous peduncled racemes an inch long ; bracts minute, 
much shorter than the pedicels. Calyx minutely puberu- 
lous, rather shorter than the corolla-tube, deeply 4-lobed • 
lobes oblong, obtuse, two sometimes connate (var. trisepala). 
Corolla white or pale lavender blue ; tube shortly funnel- 
shaped ; limb one-fourth to one-third inch across ; lobes 
unequal, obtuse, posticous largest broadly ovate, lateral 
ovate, anticous much smaller, oblong, or linear-oblong. 
Filaments as long as the corolla-lobes ; anthers pale, 



apiculate. Ovary glabrous ; style slender, deflexed. 
Capsule about one-sixth of an inch long, ovoid, obtuse, 
turgid, much longer than the calyx-lobes. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of raceme; 2, pedicel, bract and calyx ; 3 and 4, anthers ; 
5, ovary and disk ; 6, portion of fruiting raceme : — All enlarged ; 7 and 
8, portion of branchlets and leaves, of nat. size. 



7540 




if S. del. J J 



Tfinccnt BrooKs^a^ Soi^S 



L. Reeve A. C°Londori 



Tab. 7540. 

BEGONIA Baumanni. 
Native of Bolivia. 

Nat. Ord. Begoniacejs. 
Genus Begonia, Linn.; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol.1 p. 841.) 



Begonia (Lemoineas) Baumanni; rhizomate magno globoso, caule robusto 
folioso sparse piloso roseo, foliis crasBe petiolatis carnosis reniformibus 
duplicato crenatis palmatim nervosis utrinque marginibusque sparse 
setosis, supra saturate viridibus subtus pallidis roseo-suffusis nervis 
validis hispidulis, floribua maximis roseis suaveolentibus in racemum 
terminalem nutantem pauciflorem dispositis longe pedicellatis, bracteis 
brevissimis incisis, rachi pedicellisqne roseis sparse pilosis, fl. 
masc. : petalis 4 subcnneatim rotundatis, staminibus in globum com- 
pactis, filamentis liberis, antheris pyriformibus ; fl- fern. : petalis 5 
inasqualibus cuneato-rotundatis, ovario carnoso triptero sparse piloso 
viride, aliscrassis unica cuneiforme, capsula 3 loculari, placentis 2-partitia, 
segmentis utrinque ovuliferis, stigmatibus latis undulatis et convolutis 
secus marginem truncatam stigmatosis. 

B. Baumanni, Lemoine ex Wittm. in Gartewfl. vol. xl. (1891) p. 47; et 281, 

t. 1348, xylog. 6g. 62. Neubert in Gart. Mag. (1894) p. 775. 
Begonia de Cocnabamba, Sacc. in Rev. Hortic. vol. lviii. (1886) p. 347. 



Begonia Baumanni belongs to the tuberous-rhizomed 
group of the genus, which includes B. Veitchii, Hk. f. (Tab. 
5663), B. ClarTcei, Hk. f. (Tab. 5675) and B. rostrflora, 
Hk. f. (Tab. 5680), and some of which have proved to be, 
as I ventured to predict in publishing B. Veitchii in 
1867, amongst the most ornamental of border plants. 
They have been referred by myself and others to tho 
section Huszia, A.DC, which contains species with 
different types of stigmas; those of B. Veitchii, for in- 
stance, having the arms elongate, with a spiral line of 
stigmatic papillae, whilst those of B. rosseflora and 
Baumanni have short, broadly truncate stigmas, cleft on 
the ventral side, but not 2-lobed, with undulate convolute 
margins, and the papillae are confined to the truncate upper 
margins. Recently M. Fourier has proposed (" Bull. 
Soc. Centr. d'Hortic. de France," Ser. 3) (1879) a new 
grouping of the tuberous Begonias, according to which B. 
Baumanni is placed in section Lemoinese^ characterized by 
June 1st, 1897. 



the monoecious flowers, males with 4-8 petals, fern, with 5, 
stigmas persistent, with horse-shoe shaped arms (hardly 
the case in B. Baumanni) and 2-fid placentas. It includes 
the sections Huszia, Eupetalum, and Banjo, of A. de 
Candolle. 

B. Baumanni is a native of Cochibamba in the Eastern 
Andes of Central Bolivia, the capital of which (of the 
same name) is 8396 ft. above the sea. From thence 
seeds were sent to Herrn E. N. Baumann of Bolivia, in 
honour of whom the plant is named. The drawing here 
given was made from a plant which flowered in a cool 
greenhouse of the Royal Gardens in September, 1896. 
It succeeds also in summer in the open air. 

Descr. — Rootstock globose, attaining the dimensions of a 
middle-sized melon ; stem petiole and branches of in- 
florescence and pedicels bright rose-red, sparsely hairy. 
Stem one to one and a half feet high, stout, leafy. 
Leaves stoutly petioled, three to five inches broad, fleshy, 
reniform, doubly crenate, palmately nerved, sparsely 
hispidulous on both surfaces, and on the margins, and on 
the stout flabellate nerves beneath, bright green above, 
paler beneath, and often suffused with red ; petiole four 
to six inches long. Flowers monoecious, very large, rose- 
red, in a lax terminal nodding few-fid. raceme, very 
sweet-scented ; bracts lacerate ; pedicels one to three 
inches long, stout. Male flowers upward of three inches 
in diameter. Petals four, subcuneately orbicular. 
Stamens crowded in a globose mass ; filaments short, 
free ; anthers obovoid. Fern, flowers about two and a 
half inches in diameter. Petals 5, unequal, cuneately- 
obovate or -orbicular. Styles 3, short, broadly cuneate, 
truncate, convolute, and undulate, stigmatose along the 
upper margins only. Ovary fleshy, green, hairy, with 
three thick wings, two of them rounded, the other 
cuneiform, three-celled; placentas bipartite, segments 
ovuliferous on both faces. — J. D. H. 



Fisr. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, ov-ary and styles; 4, transverse section of ovary 
— All enlarged. 



7541 




MS.ael.J.NFitchMi 



^vin£eittBrool<sDa ) r&-£ 



L Reeve &.C°london, 



Tab. 7541. 

LiELIA longipes. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Okchide^.— Tribe Epidendre^;. 
Genus L^lia, Lindl.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii.p. 533.) 



L&lia longipes; pseudobulbis' 2|-3- pollicaribus lineari-oblongis unifoliatis, 
vaginis albis ecariosis liueatie imbricatis pseudobulbo arete appressis, 
folio 3-6-pollicari sessili erecto elliptico-oblongo obtuso carnoso supra 
concavo laete viridi subtus pallidiore obtuse carinato, pedunculo erecto 
flexuoso pancifloro folio breviore, bracteis minutis triangularibus, pedi- 
cello cum ovario 2-3-pollicari arcuato v. flexuoso, floribus ad 2 poll. 
diam. roseis labello aureo, sepalis (lateralibus paullo latioribus) petalis- 
que consimilibus patentibus lineari-oblongis obtusis, labelli parvi lobis 
margine crispatis, lobis lateralibus subrotundatis marginibus recurvis, 
intermedio subquadrato, columna breviuscula, anthera fere globosa. 

L. lougipe3, Beichb.f. mss. in Herb. Mus. Reg. Berol. ex Xen. Orchid, vol. 
ii. p. 29. Cogniaux & Gross. Diet. Icon. Orchid. Lselia, t. II. Gard. 
Chron. 1897, vol. i. p. 110. 

L. Lucasiana, Bolfe in Orchid. Review, vol. i. (1893) p. 265. 

Bletia longipes, Beichb. f. Xen. Orchid. 



One of the smallest species of the beautiful genus Lselia, 
and not remarkable for any redeeming character that 
would recommend it to the horticulturist. It is a native 
of Brazil, where it was discovered by the traveller Sellow ; 
and was first described from his dried specimens by 
Reichenbach. 

The sepals and petals are represented as nearly white 
by Cogniaux and Grossens in their " Dictionnaire Icono- 
graphique des Orchidees," the pseudobulb short, and the 
leaves of a very dark colour. Its nearest ally is L. cris- 
pilabia, A. Rich., from which it is distinguished by its 
yellow lip. Though not common in cultivation, it 
flowered in Sir Trevor Lawrence's collection in 1892, and 
in that of C. J. Lucas, Esq., of YVarntaim Court, Horsham. 
The specimen here figured was received at Kew from 
Messrs. Sander & Co. in 1893, and flowered for the first 
time in July, 1896. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs two and a half to three inches long, 
linear-oblong, as thick as the little finger, smooth, green, 
clothed with appressed white or pink membranous striated 
June 1st, 1897. 



sheaths. Leaf solitary, sessile, three to six inches long, 
by three-quarters to one and a quarter inches broad, 
narrowly elliptic-oblong, obtuse, thickly fleshy, concave 
above, obtusely keeled beneath, pale green on both surfaces. 
Peduncle shorter than the leaves, erect, flexuous, naked, 
two- to three-flowered, green ; bracts minute, triangular ; 
pedicels with the ovary two to three inches long. Flowers 
two inches broad across the petals, sepals and petals spread- 
ing, pale, mauve-purple, lip golden-yellow. Sepals linear- 
oblong, obtuse. Petals as long, but rather narrower. 
Lip rather shorter than the sepals, 3-lobed ; side-lobes 
broadly oblong, erect, margins recurved crenate and un- 
dulate ; midlobe ovate, obtuse, sides involute crisped and 
waved, disk sometimes stained with brown towards the 
base. Column short, streaked with purple. Anther 
hemispheric — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Lip; 2, side, and 3, front view of colnmn; 4, anther ; 5, pollinia : 
— All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONI AL, AND FO REIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. '6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Geokge Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Bekkeley, 
H.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and SpecieB (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c, &c New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. Bv R. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50s. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Part XVII., He. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. each. 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV., 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
FLORA AUSTRAI JENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 
Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authonty of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. # 

FLORA CAPENS1S: a Systematic Description of the .Plants ot 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H Harvev.M.D , 
F.R.S.; and Otto Wii.helm Sondf.r, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI. , Parts I. and II., 7s. 6^. each. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Maiesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macqnarrie s Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. iwt . fl ,, 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secie- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George Bentham, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. Haxck. 
Published under the authority of Her JMajeBty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, aid 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hookkk. F.B.S. 10s. „„-„_ 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MINI ONE. and 

to a Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles- to 
Genoa. By J. Trahebne Moggridge. Royal 8vo. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

L. IlEEYE & CO., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Gaiden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 630, JUNE, 1897. 



Tab. 7537.— REN ANT HERA. STORIEI. 
„ 7538 — STROBILANTHES CALLOSUS. 
„ 7539.— VERONICA DIOSMiEFOLIA, var. TRISEP ALA. 
„ 7540.— BEGONIA BAUMANNI. 
. 7541.— LiELIA LONGIPES. 



L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
Now Ready, Vol. VI., Parts I. and II., 7s. 6d. each. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria. 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hop< 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in th< 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XXII., 9s. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA, 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

VoIb. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
Now ready Part VIII., with 2 Coloured Plates, 5s. (completing the work). 

THE HEMIPTERA HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLAND 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
Complete, with 2 Structural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates, 4E 

Now ready, Part XL., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. 1. 12*. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s.; large paper, with 46 Coloured Plates, 6'ds. 
Vol. TIT. 12s.; large paper, with 50 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may be had on application to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVII., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s. 

LEPIDOPTERA IIVI>ICL^. 

By F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Vol. I- containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Vol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 

£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 

ProspecUiSyWith First List of Subscribers, can be had on application to the Publishers, 

L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

FBIHTED BT eiLBKRT AMD EIYUTBTOff, LB„ ST. JOHN'S HOUSE, CLEBKENWE"., B.C. 



VOL. UII.— JULT. 



Cijt'rtJ £erus. 

No. 631. 

Price 3». 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
OB NO. 132 Q OF THE ENXIEB WOEE. 



CDRTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPRIS3HG 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GAEDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



Sib JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., K.C.S.I., C.B., F.R.S., F.L. 

Xate Dtrmor of tf)t 3&ot?al ISotanu ©arDens of IXeta. 




Nature snd Art to adorn the page cor 
And flowers e> 



LONDON: 
L. REEVE and CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, OOVENT GARDE: 

1897. 

[All rvjhts reserved.] 



ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY ABRAHGEMENTS, 1897. 



NATIONAL VIOLA SOCIETY'S EXHIBITION, July 17th. 
EXHIBITION OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS early in November. 
MUSICAL PROMENADES, Wednesdays in July and August, 



Now ready, price 2s. 6d. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sm J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



Now ready, Second Edition. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing ail that are known to be natives of the British Isies. 
By the Kev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 



i eady, complete in 1 vol., royal 4to, in handsome cloth case, £6 6a. net ; in half morocco, 

£-7 net. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUE G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., P.Z.S., F.E.S. 

ile forms a large and handsome volume of between 300 and 400 pages, with 60 Plates br 
V. W. FROWHAWK, beautifully coloured by hand. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

6th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookbb, C.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10*. 6d . 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
awn by W. H. FITCH.. F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

■ Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 
4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 10*. Qi. 



L. REEVE & CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVEN T GARDEN. 



7542, 




"*>■ ■■ 






Tab. 7542. 
zamia obliqua. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. CYCADEiE. — Tribe Eucepualarte^e. 
Genus Zamia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 447.) 



Zamia. (Euzamia) obhqua; trtmco gracili lajvi, prophyllis triangulares 
longe acuminatis fuscis infra comam imbricatis, foliis longe petiolati*, 
petiolo gracili lana fusca detergibili primum operto, rachi nudo v. raris- 
sime hie illic aculeolato, foliolis sub 6-jugis 4-6-pollicaribus ovatis ovato- 
oblongis lanceolatisve acuminatis caudiculatisve basi in petiolulum 
crassum angustatis crasse chartaceis ultra medium spinuloso-serrulatis, 
nervis gracillimis creberrime lineolatis, strobilo fcemineo 6-poll. longo 
2| poll. diam. breviter crasse pedunculato, pedunculo prophyllis lineari- 
lanceolatis fuscis dense vaginato cylindraceo vertice conico apice pungente, 
peltis G-senatis transverse hexagonis fusco-tomentosis vertice planis v. 
leviter depressis. 

Z. obliqna, A. Braun in Monatsb. Alcad. Berlin, 1875, p. 376. Begel, Cycad. 
Bevis. 1875, p. 42; in IUustr. Sortie, vol. xxiv. (1877) p. 140, t. 289. 
Dyer in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. i. p. 461, fig. 72. 



Z. obliqua is a very distinct species of a germs, which, 
when founded by Linnseus, in 1763, contained but one 
representative (Z. pumila, of the West Indies), but of 
which nearly forty are now enumerated ; though of these 
probably only thirty or so are really well characterized. 
All are tropical or subtropical American. Seven 
are now figured in this magazine, of which two are 
nearly related to Z. obliqua, namely, Z. furfuracea, Ait. 
(t. 1969) of Mexico, and Z. Skinneri, Warz. of the Isthmus 
of Panama (t. 5242). Z. obliqua was discovered by Dr. 
Seemann,in 1847, when he was botanist toH.M.S. Herald, 
a ship commissioned by the Admiralty under Captain 
Kellett, K.N., to search for Sir John Franklin's Expedi- 
tion along the Western polar shores of the American 
continent. On their way North in the Pacific Ocean, Dr. 
Seemann had an opportunity of collecting in New Grenada, 
where he found Z. obliqua on Cape Corrientes. Unfor- 
tunately he did not distinguish it from Z. Skinneri, and 
in the Botany of the Herald's Voyage, p. 202, amongst 
the habitats given for the latter plant is Cape Corrientes ; 
July 1st, 1897. 



a blunder consequently perpetuated under the description 
of Z. Skinneri in this magazine (Tab. 5242). Z, obliqua 
was subsequently (in 1875) collected in the same locality 
by Gustav "Wallis, by whom living specimens were sent to 
Messrs. Veitch. It was first described by Prof. A. Brauu, 
from flowerless specimens cultivated in the Berlin 
Botanical Gardens. The fine plant here figured was 
procured by the Koyal Gardens, Kew, from Mr. Bull in 
1880. It flowered for the first time in 1896. 

Descr. — Trunk slender, attaining eight feet in height, 
crowned beneath and amongst the leaves with imbricating 
subulate-lanceolate tomentose entire prophylla an inch to 
an inch and a half long. Leaves two to three feet long ; 
rachis and petiole unarmed, or with very few scattered 
spinules, when quite young clothed with a light brown 
wool. Leaflets about six pairs, four to six inches long, 
petiolulate, ovate, ovate-oblong, or -lanceolate, usually 
caudate-acuminate, sharply subspinulosely toothed from 
the middle to the tip, thickly chartaceous.. bright green on 
both surfaces, striate with close-set nerves ; petiolule half 
an inch long or less, base swollen. Female cone shortly 
peduneted, about six inches long, by two and a half in 
diameter, cylindric, terminated by a broad conical crown 
with a small apical mucro. clothed all over with a thin 
pale brown tomentum. Scales in six series of about ten 
each, transversely oblong, about an inch in transverse 
breadth, and one-third of an inch in thickness, hexagonal, 
with a truncate flat or slightly concave top ; peduncle 
stout, an inch long, clothed with prophylla like those on 
the trunk, longer than itself. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Scale; 2, ovule; both enlairjed. 



7&3 







Tab. 7543. 
CATTLEYA elongata. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^. — Tribe Vandeje. 
Genus Cattleya, Lincll. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. Hi. p. 531.) 



Cattleta elongata ; caulibus 1-2-pedalibus e basi decumbente ascendentibus 
strictisve simplioibus cylindraceis sulcatis, internodiis 1-2-pollicaribus 
non incrassatia, foliis apices versus caulorum paucis oblongis obtusis 
crasse coriaceis rigidis dorso carinatis saturate viridibus, racemo Ionge 
pedunculate* erecto 6-10-flore, rachi valida viridi, vagina ad basin 
pedunculi lineari-oblonga carinata, bracteis parvis, pedicellis cum ovario 
3-pollicaribus viridibus, fioribus erectis 4-poll. expans., sepalis petalisqne 
obtusis undulatis rufo-aurantiacis, sepalo dorsali lineari, lateralibus 
lineari-oblongis, petalis sepalo dorsali conBimilibus sed crispato-uodulatis, 
labelli rosei lobis lateralibus dimidiato-ovatis, intermedio flabelliforme 
2-lobo, columna clavata. 

C. elongata, Bodrig. Gen. fy Sp. Orchid. Nov. vol. i. (1877) p. 72. B >Ife in 
Orchid. Rev. vol. vii. p. 206. 

C. Alexandra, L. Linden fy Bolfe in Gard. C'hrun. 1892, vol. i. p. 522 ; in 
Lindenia, vol. viii. t. 357, 358. 



A remarkable and very beautiful species, distinguished 
for its very long peduncle, and the peculiar colour of 
the sepals and petals. Its nearest ally, as pointed out by 
Mr. Rolfe, is with G. Leopoldi. In the specimen described 
in the Gardener's Chronicle, there were ten racemes, with 
peduncles fifteen to eighteen inches long, each bearing six 
to ten flowers. It was flowered by Messrs. Linden & Co., 
of Brussels, in 1892. The specimen here figured was 
purchased for the Royal Gardens, Kew, at an auction sale 
in 1893. It flowered in the Orchid House in October, 
1893, and proves to be a finer variety than has hitherto 
been known. 

Descr. — Stems erect, or ascending from a decumbent 
rooting base, one to two feet high, as thick as the little 
finger, terete, sulcate, pale; internodes one to two inches 
long, naked, not swollen ; nodes marked by a transverse 
brown line. Leaves few at the top of the stem, sessile, 
about six inches long by one and a half broad, oblong, 
obtuse, thickly and rigidly coriaceous, dorsally keeled, 
dark green above. Peduncles many, up to eighteen inches 

July 1st, 1897. 



long, stout, erect, green ; basal sheath three inches long, 
linear-oblong, keeled. Raceme rather short, six- to ten- 
fld., erect ; bracts small, triangular; pedicel with ovary 
about three inches long, strict, erect, green. Flowers 
about four inches in diameter; sepals and petals undulate, 
obtuse, ochraceous- or rufous-orange. Dorsal sepal two 
and a half inches long, linear, lateral linear-oblong. 
Petals like the dorsal sepal, but sides more crispedfy 
waved. Lip rose-colrd. ; side lobes dimidiate-ovate, pro- 
jecting forward, tips obtuse; midlobe much larger, flabelli- 
form, 2-lobed or very broadly deeply obcordate, lobes 
rounded. Column clavate. Pollinia 4, cohering in pairs 
by their straps, and the straps cohering at the base by a 
lobulate viscus — J. D. H. 



enlarged. C ° lumn5 2 ' anther "Cap; 3, pollinia; 4, one pair of pollinia -.-All 



7544 




lel.J.K 1 









Tab. 7544. 

POLYGONUM EALDSCHFANICUM. 
Native of Bokhara. 



Nat. Ord. Polygonace^:. — Tribe Eupolygone^e. 
Genus Polygonum, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 97.) 



Polygonum (Tiniaria) baldschuanicum ; frutex volubilis, foliis inferioribti3 
oppositis longe petiolatis ovato-hastatis cordatisve acutis obtusis acumi- 
natisve obsolete crenulatfs marginibus scaberulis, ochreis brevissimis cito 
evanidis, foliis supremis minoribus angustioribus, paniculis axillaribus et 
terminalibus folia euperantibus laxe ramosis, racbi an^ulata, bracteis 
minutis, floribus roseis subsolitariis fasciculatisve, pedicellis gracilibus 
supra basin articulatis, sepalis hyalinis 3 exterioribus ovatis, petalis dorso 
alatis, alis in pedicellum apicem versus trialatum decurrentibus, 2 interio- 
ribus Bubobovatis suberectis exalatis, staminibus 8, filamentis liberis basi 
pilosis, glandulis perigynis 0, stigmate sessile magno capitato 3-Iobo, 
calyce fructifero paullo aucto late 3-alato, alis subundulatis, achienio 
triquetro nigro nitido, cotyledonibus accumbentibus. 

P. baldschuanicum, Begel in Act. Hort. JPetrop. vol. viii. (1884) p. 684, t. 10, 
et Descr. Plant. Nov. Beg. Turkest. fasc. ix. p. 44, t. 10. H. Zabel in 
Garten-flora, vol. xxxvi. (1888) p. 409, t. 1278. L. Henry in Le Jardin, 
vol. ix. (1895) p. 231, cum ic. 



A very beautiful hardy climber, belonging to tlie same 
section of Polygonum as the notorious pest of cultivated 
grounds, P. Convolvulus, L., but differing from it in the 
perennial stem, colour of the flowers, and broadly winged 
fruiting perianth. It is much more nearly allied to the 
Chinese and Japanese P. multiflorum, Thunb., which is chiefly 
distinguished by its tuberous rootstock, armed stems, and 
much smaller flowers. P. baldschuanicum is one of the 
many discoveries of Albert Regel, who found it in 1883 
on the banks of the River Wachsch, at the Eastern foot of 
Mt. Sevistan in Bokhara at an elevation of 1200-1700 ft. 
The specimen figured is from a plant six feet high, raised 
in the Royal Gardens, Kew, from seeds sent from the 
Imperial Botanical Garden of St. Petersburgh, which 
flowered in September, 1896. 

Descr. — Stem very slender, woody, branched, scandent, 
up to twenty feet high, half an inch in diameter at the 
base ; bark pale, lenticellate. Leaves long-petioled, ovate- 

July 1st, 1897. 



or hastate-cordate, acute obtuse or acuminate, pale green, 
margins scaberulous. Panicles axillary and terminal, 
effuse, branches slender, angular ; flowers in small fascicles, 
rose-colrd., nearly half an inch broad ; bracts minute ; 
pedicels slender, one-eighth to one-fourth of an inch long, 
trigonous above, jointed above the base. Sepals hyaline ; 
three outer ovate, spreading, dorsally winged, wing de- 
current on the angles of the pedicel ; three inner more 
obovate, suberect, not winged. Stamens 8 ; filaments 
about as long as the sepals, hairy towards the base. 
Ovary small, triquetrous ; style ; stigma large, capitate, 
3-lobed. Fruiting calyx broadly 3-winged, wings rather 
waved. Achene triquetrous, black, shining. — J. D. R. 



Fig. 1, Portion of panicle with bracts and flowers ; 2, stamens ; 3, ovary :— 
All enlarged. 



7&5 



JUK^ 




M.S.delJtfFr 



e^-BrooteP^f 



I, Reev. 



Tab. 7545. 

IIELTANTHUS tuberosus. 

Native of North America. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Heliantkoide.e. 
Genus Helianthus, Linn.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 376.) 



Helianthus tuberosus; radicibus tuberiferis, caule elato superue ramoso 
pubescente v. hirsuto, foliis inferioribas oppositis ovato-cordatis v.- 
lanceolatis attenuato-acnminatis grosse v. minute dentatis in petiolum 
elcmeatum alatum angustatia supra scaberulis subtus puberalis, superiori- 
bus alternis oblongis sessilibus, involucri bracteis laxe imbricat : s lanceolatis 
attenuato-acuminatis glabris hirsutulis v. pubescentibus, receptaculi con- 
vexi squamis dorso hirsutis, radii ligulis 12-20 elongatis, disci corollis 
flavis, acbeniis apice marginibusque puberalis. 

H. tuberosus ; Linn. 8p. PL Ed. i. p. 905 {excl. hahitat.) Ait. Hort. Kew. 
Ed 2, vol. v. p. 127; DC. Prodr. vol. v. p. 590. Jacq. Hort. Vvnaob. 
vol.' ii! p. 75, t. 161. Schkuhr Handb. vol. iii. p. 250, t. 258. A. Gray 
Synopt. Fl. N. A m. Gamopet. p 280. Trumbull $r Gray in Am. Journ. 
8c. Her. 3, vol. xiii. (1877) p. 374. Decne in FL des Serves, vol. xxiii. 
(1881) p. 112. Turpin in Mem. Mus. Paris, vol. xix. (1830; p 12, t. 41. 
G. Meyer, in Bericht. Deutsch. Bot. Geselsck. vol. xiv. (1882) p. 347. 

H. doronicoides ; Ton: & Gr. Fl. N. Am. vol. ii. p. 327 {in part). A. Gray, 
Man. Bot. N. Vn. St. p. 257 (now Lamck.). 

Flos Solis Farnesianus ; Golonna, Ecphrasis, vol. ii. p. 33, t. 13 (1616). 

Chrysanthemum latifolium Brasil ; Bauh. Prodr. p. 70 (1620). 

Flos tuberosus Solis sen Flos Fames. Fab. Column ; Aldinus, Cesenat. Deser. 
Bar. PI p. 91 (1625). 

Battatas de Canada, or Artichoke of Jerusalem ; Parkins. Parad. p. 517, fig. 4, 
518 (1629) ; Theatr. Bot. p. 1383 (1640). 

Adenes Canadenses ; P. Laurent. Apparat. Plantar. (1632). 

Flos Solis pyramidalis ; Johnson in Gerard Herball, p. 763 (1633). 

Pernanus Solis Flos ex Indiis tuberosus, Hernand. PL Mex. Hist. {Becehi) 
p. 878, 881 (1651). 

Canada, Artischoki sub terra ; Vallot, Hort. Per,. Paris {ex Baulau). 

Heleniam indicum tuberosum ; Bauh. Pinax, p. 277 (1671). 

Chrysanthemum canadense, F. Schuyl, Cat. PL Hort. Lugd. Bat. (1672). 

C. perenne majus, Moris. Plant. Hist. vol. iii. p. 28, t. 6 (1699). 

Helenium Canadense; P. Amman, Char. PL Nat. p. 280 (Ed. 1085). 

Helianthemum radice tuberosa ; Linn. Hort. Cliff, p. 419 (1737). Mill Card. 
List. Ed. 4, Vol. ii. 

Specimens of the Jerusalem Artichoke, raised from un- 
doubtedly indigenous tubers, which have been kindly 
forwarded by the Rev. C. Wolley Dod, from his rich garden 
of herbaceous plants, afford me the opportunity of giving in 

July 1st, 1897. 



the Botanical Magazine a sketch of the early history of 
this valuable esculent. For the means of doing this I am 
much indebted to " Notes on the History of Helianthus 
tuberosus" by J. Hammond Trumbull and Asa Gray, con- 
tributed to the American Academy of Sciences in 1877. 

The said History may, like that of mankind, be regarded 
under three divisions, a traditional, an early botanical, and 
a mediaeval and modern. Of these the traditional resolves 
itself into the fact of its having been cultivated as an 
article of food by the Indians of North America before the 
settlement in that country of Europeans. The earliest 
evidence of this cited by Mr. Trumbull, is that derived 
from Ghamplain, who in 1605-6, observed that the Almon- 
chiquois Indians (of New England) had " force des racines 
qu'els cultivent, lesquelles ont le gout d'Artichaut." To 
this Mr. Trumbull adds, that it is to these roots that 
Lescardot alludes (" Hist, de la Nouv. France " (1612) 
when, speaking of the same Indians and their country, he 
says that the latter contains a kind of roots " grosses 
comme naveaux, tres excellent a manger, ayans un gout 
retirant aux cardes, mais plus agreable, lesquelles plantees 
multiplient en telle facon que c'est merveille." Following 
these is Sagard Theodat, who, in his " Histoire des 
Canada " (1636) mentions the roots which we, the French, 
call " Canadiennes, or Pommes de Canada." 

Proceeding now to the mediaeval history, or that of the 
cultivation of this plant in Europe, it seems to have been 
introduced into England very shortly a-ter, if not before 
it had attracted the attention of travellers as being pro- 
pagated by the Indians in America as a food product, for 
in the year 1617 Mr. John Goodyer of Maple Durham, 
Hampshire, received two small roots of it from Mr. 
Franquevill of London, which being planted, enabled him 
before 1621 " to store Hampshire." In October of the 
same year Mr. Goodyer wrote an account of it for T. 
Johnson, who printed it in his edition of Gerard's " Her- 
ball," which appeared in 1636, where it is called 
"Jerusalem Artichoke." Previous to which, in 1629, it 
had been figured and described under that name by 
Parkinson in his " Paradisus " and " Theatrum." 

From the last given date to the present time the Jeru- 
salem Artichoke has been extensively cultivated in Europe, 



but rather as a garden vegetable than a field crop, and 
has extended into India, where it is making its way 
amongst the Natives under Hindoo, Bengali, and other 
native names. In Kathiawar, according to "Watt (" Diet, 
of Economic Products of India ") it is boiled in milk, and 
considered by the natives to be a strengthening vegetable. 
Aitchison states that it is grown in gardens of Herat and 
Meshed under the Persian name of Seb-i-zamini-angrez. 
(Notes and Products of W. Affghan. and N.E. Persia in 
" Trans. Bot. Soc. Edinb." vol. xviii.) 

It is very curious that the native country of a plant 
so well known in gardens and in a wild state throughout ' 
the length of the Central United States and in Canada, 
should have for upwards of 250 years been considered 
doubtful. This was owing mainly to the vague indica- 
tions of its origin given by the early authors, Brasil 
(following Bauhin) by Linnaeus in the " Species Plantarum," 
Canada by Parkinson, and by Linnaeus in his " Hortus 
Cliff ortianus," and Peru according to Hernancles. In 
De Candolle's " G-eographie Botanique " (vol. ii. p. 983) 
it is referred to the list of " Especes inconnues a l'etat 
sauvage," and subsequently (p. 988) as " probably 
North America." Even in the body of the third edition 
of his admirable " Origine des Plantes Cultivees " (p. 34), 
published in 1886, he regards the question as unsettled ; 
and in the additions and corrections cites Gray's erroneous 
opinion that it is the Helianthus doronicoides, Torr. & Gr. 
And yet, though there have been no lack of indigenous 
specimens in European Herbaria, identical with the 
cultivated, no one seems to have thought of going to the 
Herbarium to solve the difficulty. 

In 1855 Asa Gray's attention was drawn to the subject 
from having received some long narrow tubers, which he 
considered to be Helianthus doronicoides, Lamk., with the 
statement that it had been found to be good food for hogs. 
These were planted in the Cambridge (U.S.) Botanical 
Gardens, and were found to produce, after two or three 
years, thicker and shorter tubers, which, when cooked, 
resembled Jerusalem Artichokes in flavour, though coarser. 
This led Dr. Gray to conclude that H doronicoides was 
most probably the original of H. tuberosus, an opinion which 
was strengthened by subsequent observations published in 



the second edition of his " Manual of the Botany of the 
N. Un. Sts. (1856)." Matters, however, did not end here, 
for it was discovered that the H. doronicoides, Lamk., as 
described by American botanists, included two species, 
that so called, and the true H. tuberosus, Linn., and .it was 
not till the publication in 1 884 of the Order Composita3 in 
Gray's " Synoptical Flora of N. America " that H. tuberosus, 
Linn., was definitely restored to its rank as a substantive 
species, and the origin of the Jerusalem Artichoke. I 
may add that II. doronicoides differs from tuberosus in the 
leaves being all, or nearly all, opposite, sessile, elliptic, 
never cordate, obscurely crenate, the rays much 
broader, and the ovary and achene glabrous. It is figured 
in this work, t. 2778, under the erroneous name of H. 
jmhescens, Vahl. 

It remains to add that H. tuberosus is indigenous in the 
Lake region of Canada, as far west as the Saskatchewan, 
and from thence southward to Arkansas and the middle 
parts of Georgia, Another near ally is H. giganteus, Linn., 
of which a figure has been prepared for this work, which 
will shortly appear. 

Descr. — Helianthus tuberosus is distinguished from all 
its congeners, by the sum of the following characters : roots 
tuberous ; stem tall, pubescent, branched above ; leaves 
petioled, ovate, acuminate, serrate, scabrous above, puberu- 
lous beneath, the upper alternate; heads large; invol. 
bracts, lanceolate, acuminate ; receptacle convex with 
dorsally hirsute scales ; disk and ray-flowers both yellow, 
the latter 12-20 in number ; achenes with pubescent tips 
and margins.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1 Involucral bracts ; 2, achene pappus and base of rav-flower • 3 scale 

a W^anLrf JftJTS 1 6 > * ta ^ 6, style of disk-flower % ripe 
aciiene : all bnt 1 enlarged ; 8, root-tubers half of the natural size. 










L.ReevR & ( 



Tab. 7546. 
LISSOCHILUS milanjianus. 

Native of Central Africa. 

Nat. Ord. OBCH1DE.E. — Tribe V"ande2e. 
Genus Lissochilus, Br. ; (Benth. So Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 536.) 



Lissochilus malanjianus ; pseudobulbis catenatim dispositis amorphis 
ovoideis oblongisve, foliia hysterantbiis linearibtia elongatis acummatis 
3-nervii8 coriaceis supra canaliculars, racemo multifloro, scapo rachique 
robustis viridibus, bracteis lanceolatis ovarium sub-aequantibus, floribus 
lj-poll. expans., sepalis subaequalibus oblongis apiculatis iiitus rubris, 
lateralibus basi labelli insertis, petalis amplis orbicularis cuspidatis 
nervosis extus aureis intus sanguineis, labelli sessilis_ lobis lateralibus 
parvis rotundatis extus pallidis intus sangnineis, terminate ovato infra 
medium 5-cristato cristis aureis, dein ad apicem eanguineo, calcare late 
infundibukri obtuso. 

L. milanjianus, Eendle in Trans. Linn. Soc. Ser. 2, vol. iv. (1894) p. 46. 

Eulophia bella, N-E. Br. in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. ii. p. 210. 



Lissochilus milanjianus was discovered in 1861, by the 
late C. J. Meller, Esq., F.L.S., when accompanying Dr. 
Livingstone in his second expedition to the Zambesi ; the 
habitat given is Manganja Hills, which I take to be a 
range on the Western side of Lake Nyassa, in about lat. 
12° S. It was next found (in 1890) in Uganda, under the 
line, in British Central Africa, by the late Mr. Buchanan, 
C.M.G., who sent plants to the Royal Gardens, Kew, that 
flowered in September, 1892. More recently it has been 
found by Mr. Whyte in the Milanji Hills, not far from 
Blantyre, south of Lake Shirwa, in lat. 16° S. ; and much 
further south, near Umtala, in Mashona Land, lat. 18° S., 
long. 32i° East, by a hospital nurse, who gave the tubers 
from which the flowering specimen here figured was 
raised, to P. F. Garnett, Esq., of South Bank, Grassen- 
dale, Liverpool. The plant has been twice independently 
described in 1889, by Mr. N. E. Brown as a Eulophia, and 
in 1894 by Mr. Rendle under the name here adopted. Mr. 
Garnett's plant flowered in March, 1896 ; Mr. Buchanan's, 
as above stated, in September, 1892. The tubers and 
leaves here represented are thoBe of Mr. Buchanan's plant. 
Jult 1st, 1897. 



Mr. Brown's description was taken from a specimen 
flowered by Mr. Gumbleton, who received it from Mr. 
O'Brien of Harrow. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs forming subterranean chains, broadly 
ovoid, oblong, or amorphous, one to two and a half inches 
in diameter or more, emitting very stout worm-like roots. 
Stein short, base sheathed. Leaves few, produced after 
flowering, a foot or more long, by three-quarters of an 
inch broad, rather thick, linear, acuminate, bright green 
and deeply channelled in the middle above, pale and 
strongly three-nerved beneath. Scape one to two and a 
half inches high, stout, all green, or mottled with purple ; 
sheaths acute, lower crowded, upper distant. Raceme 
erect, ten- or more-fld. ; rachis stout, strict ; bracts lan- 
ceolate, green, about an inch long, that is as long as the 
pedicel and ovary. Flowers one and a half inches across 
the spreading petals. Sepals about half an inch long, 
subequal, oblong, apiculate, green without, dull red within. 
Petals orbicular, three-quarters of an inch in diameter, 
apiculate, strongly veined, golden-yellow without, carmine 
with darker nerves within. Lip sessile at the foot of the 
column, including the spur funnel-shaped ; spur pale, 
slightly incurved, obtuse ; side-lobes rounded, pale without, 
carmine within ; mid-lobe short, ovate or broadly tongue- 
shaped, decurved, basal half golden-yellow with five 
smooth keels, tip blood-red. Column short, stout. Anther 
obtusely beaked. Pollinia globose, on the top of a short, 
stout stipes, which is attached to a broad disciform gland. 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Column ; 2, anther ; 3 and 4, pollinia -.—All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIA L, AND FO REIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of BeginuerB and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.B-S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook/' and other British Floras. 1315 Woe I 
gravingB. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.K.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley. 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Groat 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, Ac. 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By E. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6<2. Part XVII., 6s. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S,. 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. i 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV., 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36*. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G, Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s, Published under the authority of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plan 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By Willia m H. Harvey.M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelm Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. i 
Vol VI., 24s. m 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.l 

F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the autlu 
First Commissioner of Her Majesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systei. 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the 
Kcrmadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Island*- 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete 

FLORA of the BR; DS. By 

Dr. Grisebach. F.L >*s of the Secre- 

: les. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS : a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By GeoBge Bentham, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Is ement by Dr, I 

Published under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supv . 6d, 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. J). Hookee, F.R.8. 10s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. 

to a Winter Flota of the Riviera, including the coast from Mareev 
Genoa. By J. Tbabebne Moggbit 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

L. REEVE & CO., 6, Her ovent Ga, 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. &31, JULY, 1897. 



Tab. 7542.— ZAMIA OBLIQUA. 
„ 7543.— CATTLEYA ELONGATA. 
„ 7544.— POLYGONUM BALDSCHUANICUM. 
„ 7545.— HELIANTHUS TEBEROSUS. 
„ 7546.— LISSOCHILUS M1LANJIANUS. 

L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
Now Keady, Vol. VI., Parts I.— III., 7.*. 6<2. each. Vol. VI., Cloth, 24*. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Ro'/al Gardens, / 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 
Vols. I. to IXI. 18s. each. 
WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 
University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XXII., 9s. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA, 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, P.R.S., &c. 

Vole. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
dy, Tart VIII , with 2 Coloured Plates, 5s. (completing the work). 

THE HEMIPTERA BOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
■uctural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates, 43s. 

Now ready, Part XLII., with 4 Coloured Platea, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. I. 12s.; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s. ; large paper, with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 
Vol. II L 12s.; largo paper, with 50 Coloured Plates, ,63s. 

Prospectus may be had on application to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVII., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s. 

LEPIDOPTERA INDICA. 

By F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Vol. I« containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 

£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 

r List of Subscribers, can be had on application to the Publis' 

L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, 



PalSTED BT 6ILBKBT 4KB RIVIlTaTOjr, H>„ 81. JOHSS HOES*,' CLEEK KXWEH., K.C. 



Cljt'rtr 'dertra. 

No 632. 

VOL. LIU.— AUGUST. p nc< , 3,. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plaii*. 

OB NO. JoJo OF THE ENTIBE WOBK. 

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPEI8ING 
THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OP OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

Sm JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., K.C.s.i, c.B., P.E.S., P.L.S. 

"Eate director of the Kopal botanic ffiarttns of "Stto. 




And tic 



>rthern clime. 



LONDON: 
EEVE and CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARDEN, 

1897. 

eights reserved.] 



BOYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY ARRANGEMENTS, 1897. 



EXHIBITION OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS early in November. 
MUSICAL PROMENADES, Wednesdays in August. 



Now ready, price 2s. Bd. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sia J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Scienoe at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



Now ready, Second Edition. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 
By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 2ls. 



Now ready, complete in 1 vol., royal 4to, in handsome cloth case, £6 6*. net ; in half morocco, 

£7 net. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.8. 

Tne whole forma a large and handsome volume of between 800 and 400 pages, with 60 Plates, by 
V. W. FEOWBAWK, beantifully coloured by hand. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.K.S. 

6th Edition, Bevised by Sir J. D. Hookeb. C.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10*. 6d. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

■ Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Florae. 
4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 10*. 6i 



L. REEVE & CO., 6, HENRIETTA GOVEflT GARDEN. 



7,547 













Tab. 7547. 

lycoris squamigera. 

Native of Japan and China. 



Nat. Ord. Amaryllises. — Tribe Amarylles. 
Genus Lycoris, Herb. ; {Benth. Sf Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 627.) 



Lycoris squamigera ; bulbo globoso maguo tunicis membranac-eis brunneis 
rolns vernalibus loratis obtusis viridibus flaccidis glabris, floribus umbel' 
latis post folia productis, scapo elongato robusto solido tereti, umbellis 
4-8-flons, pedice lis brevibus, spatba? valvis parvis ovato-lanceolatis 
scanosis, perianthn rosei tubo subcyliudrico squamis 6 truncatis ad 
fancem prasdito, lobis oblanceolato-oblongis tubo 2-3-plo loneioribus 
stammibus declmatis lobis paulo brevioribus, stylo exserto. ' 

L. squamigera, Maxim, in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. vi. (1835), p. 79 Baker 
Handh. Amaryllid. p. 40. S Wats, in Garden & West, vol. iii. (1890) 
p. 1--6, fig. 32. Gard. Ghron. 1897, vol. i. p. 137, fig. 38. 

Amaryllis Hallii, Sort. Hovey. 



i The genus Lycoris is nearly allied to Hippeastmm, and 
differs from Amaryllis mainly in its seeds, which have an 
opaque black testa, and are more or less compressd. All 
the species inhabit Japan and China, whilst Amaryllis is 
confined to the Cape, and Hippeastrum to tropical America. 
The present plant in habit and the colour of its flowers 
much resembles Amaryllis Belladona. We have in the 
Kew Herbarium a cultivated specimen collected bv 
Maximovicz near Yokohama in 1862. It is figured in the 
SomoJwu-Zusetsu, a series of coloured figures of Japanese 
plants in many volumes by the Japanese artist Yokoussai, 
under the name of Jagatara-Suisen. In consequence] 
however, of there being an English numbering of the 
figures, and a Japanese numbering of the folios of thafc 
work, Maximovicz cites the Japanese name of L aurea 
Vol. v. fol. 61, for his species (fol. 63). There is al?o a 
good figure of this species in the Hongo Zufu vol vii 
fol. 34, recto. 

L. squamigera was introduced in a livino- state from 
China by Dr. G. Hall of Bristol, Rhode" Island, and 
was sent out widely by Messrs. Hovey of Boston 

August 1st, 1897. ' 



under the name of Amaryllis Hallii. Dr. Hall Lad it 
in his garden at Shanghai before 1860, and states that 
it is often used by the Chinese to decorate their ceme- 
teries. Our drawing was made from plants that 
flowered in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1897. It was 
first received from Mr. Max Leichtlin in 1885. In 
J 895 a large supply of bulbs was purchased from a 
Japanese nurseryman, and these were planted in an open 
border against the south wall of a stove, where they have 
flourished and flowered freely. 

Descr. — Bulb globose, two inches in diameter; outer 
tunics brown, membranous. Leaves fully developed in 
April, lorate, obtuse, bright green, glabrous, rather fleshy, 
a foot and a half long, dying down at the end of summer. 
Peduncle _ developed in July, stout, solid, terete. Flowers 
four to eight in an umbel ; pedicels short ; spathe-valves 
two, small, ovate-lanceolate. Perianth bright pink, three 
or four inches long ; tube subcylindrical, with six small 
truncate scales at its throat, just above the insertion of 
the stamens ; lobes oblanceolate-oblong, obtuse, spreading 
from above the middle. Stamens declinate, rather shorter 
than the perianth-limb. Ovary globose; style declinate, 
simple, protruded beyond the anthers.—/. G. Balcer. 



Fig. 1, perianth-segment, with stamen, natural size; 2, front view of 
lther; 3 back view of anther - t 4, apex of style; 5, horizontal section of 
arv : all ewlnrnprJ 



ovary : all enlarged. 



-.;/, 



A J5#* 




• Brooks Day.S 



IRaeve &. C°Iondcn. 



Tab. *540: h&«* 

GASTERIA FtJSCO-PUNCTATA. 
Native of Cape Colony. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^e.— Tribe Aloine_!. 
Genus Gasteria, Duval; (Bentk. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii.p. 775.) 



Gasteria fusco-punctata ; breviter eaulescens, foliis 20-30 dense rosulatis 
lanceolatis strictis brevibus viridibus maculis copiosis fuscis decoratia 
latere dextero duplicato-marginatis, racemis multis laxisin paniculam 
amplam dispositis, pedicellis brevibus cernnis, bracteis lanceolatis 
minutis, periantbii tubo oblongo ventricoso rubello, limbi lobis linearibua 
viridi tinctis, staminibus inclusis, ovario cylindrico, stylo ovario longiore. 

G. fusco-punctata, Baker in Jonrn. Linn. Soc. vol. xvi. p. 195 ; Fl. Cap. vol. 
vi. p. 390. 

This is one of the finest of all the Gasterias. In its 
multifarious rosette of long leaves and ample panicle it 
resembles G. Croucheri (Aloe Croucheri, Hook. f. in Bot. 
Mag. tab. 5812), but the flowers are much smaller, and 
the leaves conspicuously spotted with brown. It was 
not known to Salm-Dyck and Haworth, and it is here 
figured for the first time. It was discovered by Mr. Thomas 
Cooper about 1860, but the precise locality is not known. 
Our drawing was made from a plant flowered at Kew last 
July, which has a more compound panicle than the one 
which I first saw in the collection of the late Mr. Wilson 
Saunders at Beigate about the year 1870. In cultivation 
it needs the same treatment as the other members of the 
genus, which contains about fifty species, and is entirely 
restricted to the Cape. 

Descr. — Stem shortly produced below the rosette of 
leaves. Leaves twenty or thirty, forming a dense multi- 
farious rosette, lanceolate, a foot or more long, three or 
four inches broad low down, tapering gradually to the 
deltoid-cuspidate apex, very smooth, dull green, with 
copious irregularly scattered superficial brown spots, 
furnished with a conspicuous double border on the right 
hand side, looking upwards from the base. Peduncle with 
panicle three or four feet long. Racemes lax, cylindrical ; 
pedicels short, cernuous; bracts lanceolate, minute. 
August 1st, 18; -7. 



Perianth an inch long, bright pink ; tube oblong, ventri- 
cose ; lobes of the limb linear, more or less tinged with 
green. Stamens shorter than the perianth ; anthers oblong, 
small. Ovary cylindrical, trigonous ; style longer than 
the ovary. Capsule cylindrical, nearly as long as the 
perianth. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower; 2, back view of anther; 3, front view of anther; 
4, pistil : all enlarged ; 5, whole plant, much reduced. 



75 %9 




~Vmc« 






Tab. 7£4£; 7S'4<f 
DENDR0B1UM denudans. 

Native of the Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^.— Tribe Epibenbre^. 
Genus Dendrobium, Sw. ; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Denbrobium (Stachyobium) denudans ; dense coaapitosum, caulibus elongatis 
internodiis subpseudobulbosis ioliosis, folris deciduis lineari-oblongis- 
lanceolatisve apice acutis v. 2-dentatis, racemis axillaribus terminalibusque 
elongatis gracilibus nutantibus mnltifloris, sepalis e basi ovata lanceolatis 
acuminatia v. caudato-acuminatis, petalis angustioribus oblanceolatis, 
mento incurvo obtuso, labello sepalis dimidio breviore, lobis lateralibus 
incisis, intermedio ovato marginibus incurvis crispato-undulatis et crenato- 
dentatis, disco 2-lamellato. 

D. denudans, B. Bon Prodr. Fl. Nep. p. 24. Wall. Cat. n. 2014 (partita). 
Lindl. Gen. 8f Sp. Orchid 84; in Bot. Peg. 1838, Misc. p. 84, and 1844, 
p. 61 ; in Journ. Linn. Soc vol. iii. p. 19. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. v. 
p. 715; in Ann. Boy. Bot. Gard. Calcutt. vol. v. p. 4, t. 6. 



Dendrobium denudans is one of three very closely allied 
species, natives of the temperate regions of the Himalaya, 
■which, indicate the westernmost limit of the vast Asiatic 
genus to which they belong. Judging from dried 
specimens and drawings all three, namely, D. alpestre, 
Royle, D. eriseflorum, Griff., and the plant here figured, 
are very variable in size, in the length of the raceme, and 
number of flowers, and in the size and coloration of the 
latter, from pure white, with a little purple on the lip, to 
a decided green. 

D. denudans was discovered by Dr. Wallich in Nepal in 
1821. It was introduced, probably from the Khasia Hills, 
into the Duke of Devonshire's garden at Chatsworth by 
Mr. Gibson, when collecting in India for the Duke. It 
flowered there in 1838, and was described by Lindley 
as bearing a profusion of green and white nodding 
racemes. In 1844 Lindley again describes it, as a species 
most variable in size, but always to be distinguished by 
the loose membranous sheaths which persist on the stem 
after the leaves fall off; the sepals and petals elongate, 
pale, yellow-white, or greenish-white, lip green, whole- 
coloured. 

Arc I'M- 1st, 1897. 



The same sheaths may, however, be observed in D. 
alpestre and eriseflorum, the former of which is distinguished 
by its small size and erect few-fid. peduncles; and 
D. eriseflorum, which abounds in the Khasia Mts., and is 
common in Sikkim, by the short scapes, and much shorter, 
broader, green sepals and petals. 

There are copious specimens of D. denudans in the Kew 
Herbarium from various localities, extending from Kumaon 
to Sikkim at elevations of 4000-550.0 ft. The specimen 
here figured was collected on oak trees near Mussoorie in 
Garwbal at 5-6000 ft. elevation, and sent to the Royal 
Gardens by Mr. Duthie, Director of the Bot. Depf., 
N. India. It flowered in September, 1896. 

Descr. — Stems densely tufted, four to sixteen inches 
long, leafy, clothed with membranous sheaths ; internodes 
more or less pseudobulbous. Leaves two to three inches 
long, Jinear-oblong or oblong-lanceolate, acute, or tip 
2-toothed, pale green, membranous, deciduous, paler be- 
neath, and keeled by the midrib. Flowers in terminal and 
axillary very slender nodding many-fid. racemes three 
to six inches long ; bracts lanceolate, shorter than the 
pedicels. Sepals spreading, lanceolate from an ovate 
base, subfalcate, finely acuminate, white or pale green. 
Petals shorter, and much narrower than the sepals, 
oblanceolate, white. Mentum short, incurved, tip rounded. 
Lip about one-third shorter than the sepals ; side-lobes 
short, inciso-serrate, white or greenish, streaked with 
red ; midlobe ovate, strongly recurved, sides incurved, 
undulate, crisped and crenate, white or pale green, with 
purple margins. Column entire. Anther with the margin 
minutely erose in front. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Column and lip ; 2, column ; 3, anther; 4, pollinia :— All enlarged. 




ch.lith 



Vincent Broo*ts,Day £ 



-L Reeve u 



Tab. 7550. 

FICUS erecta, var. Sieboldii. 
Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. UfiTicEiE. — Tribe Artocarpe*. 
Genus Ficus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 367.) 



Ficus erecta var. Sieboldii; frutex v. arbuscula, ramulis glabris puberulisve, 
foliis lineari-oblongis-lanceolatisve acuminatis integris v. hie illic lobula- 
tis basi rotundatis truncatis cordatisve supra glabris subtus puberulis v. 
asperulis, stipulis ovatis acuminatis, receptaculis solitariis geminisve 
loDge peduncnlatis globoso-pyriformibns coloratis in stipitem elongatum 
basi contractis, bracteia ad basin stipitis 3 minutis triangulari-ovatis, fl. 
mase. in eodem receptaculo cum galliparis subsessilibus 1-3-andris, sepahs 
31anceolatis acuminatis, fl. fertil. subsessilibus, sepalis 4, stylo crassiusculo, 
stigmate 2-lobo. 

F. erecta, Thunb. Diss. Ficus, p. 9 ; in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. ii. p. 327. 
Xing, Annals Bot. Oard. Galcutt. vol. i. p. 141, t. 178. 

Var. Sieboldii, King, I. c. p. 142, t. 178, f. B. 

F. Sieboldii, Miquel, Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd. Bat. vol. ii. p. 199, et iii. p. 295- 
Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Petersb. vol. xi. p. 327. 



According to Dr. King's account of Ficus erecta in his 
invaluable monograph of the Eastern Asiatic Figs, it is an 
extraordinarily variable plant, and but for the evidence he 
adduces it would be difficult to believe that the forms he 
figures belong to one and the same species. In habit 
F. erecta varies from a shrub to a small tree, with nearly- 
glabrous, pubescent, or almost strigose branchlets, leaves 
and receptacles. The leaves vary from broadly ovate, 
obovate, elliptic, or subrhomboid, to the narrow form of 
those of var. Sieboldii, and are quite entire, or here and 
there lobulate, or rather coarsely toothed above the 
middle. The receptacles are solitary, or in pairs, glabrous 
or hispidulous, peduncled or subsessile on the branchlets, 
either globose and not stalked, or pyriform and narrowed 
into a long stalk. 

Of F. erecta Dr. King makes 2 varieties, namely — 
Var. Beecheyana, King (F. Beecheya.no, Hook, et Arn. 
Bot. Beech. Voy. p. 271), a native of Japan, Formosa, 

August 1st, 1897. 



and Hong Kong, of which specimens in Kew Herbarium 
from the Loo Choo Islands have leaves ten inches long by 
two and a half inches broad, and fruits two-thirds of an 
inch in diameter. 

Var. Sieboldii, King, of which there are two sub varieties : 
a Japanese, that here figured ; and one (which I have not 
seen) from the Sikkim Himalaya, and Khasia Hills in 
Bengal, with the leaves hispidly hairy beneath. 

The specimens of var. Sieboldii here figured are from a 
large bush in the Temperate House of the Royal Gardens, 
received in 1878 from the late Dr. Schomburg, Director 
of the Adelaide Botanical Gardens, and which fruits in the 
summer months. 

Descr. of var. Sieboldii. — A bush or small tree, glabrous, 
or with the branchlets and leaves slightly hairy. Leaves 
six to eight inches long, linear- or oblong-lanceolate, 
acuminate, thin, smooth or slightly scabrid, dark green 
above, entire, or rarely with a lobe on one or both margins ; 
base rounded, cuneate, or cordate, and three to five-nerved. 
Fruit solitary or binate, long-peduncled, half an inch in 
diameter, globosely pyriform, narrowed into a peduncle as 
long as itself, yellow and red. Peduncle one and a half 
inches long, green, with 3 minute bracts at the top. — 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Vertical section of fruit ; 2, female fl. ; 3, ovary '.—All enlarged. 



7551 







rvne &.C? London. 



Tab. 7551. 

CYNORCHIS PUEPPRASCENS. 

Native of -thi' Mascarene Islands 



Nat. Ord. Obchide^;. — Tribe Ophryde.i:. 
Genus Cynorchis, Thou.; (Benth, & Hook .f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 628.) 



Cynorchis purpurascens ; tuberibus cylindraceis, folio solitario (v. 2, 
unico parvo) sessili lanceolato v. lineari-oblongo acuminato 7-oo nervi 
basi convoluto vagina brunnea truncata appressa instructo, nervulis 
trabeculars, scapo 2-10-floro medio vaginato, bracteis lanceolatis setaceo- 
acuminatis haud inflatis, ovario gracili 2-pollicari sparse glanduloso- 
piloso, sepalis concavis, dorsali hemispherico roseo, lateralibus duplo 
majoribus oblongis apice rotund atis viridibus, petalis erectis oblongo- 
lanceolatis obtusis insequilateralibus roseis, labelli ampli rosei ungue lato 
lobis lateralibus dimidiato-ovatis, intermedio obovato lateralibus paullo 
longiore ad medium bifido, calcare labio sequilongo apice fusir'orme, 
clinandrio reclinato, rostello decurvo, antheras tubulis rostello longioribus, 
loculis dorso ad basin columnar affixis, polliniarum caudiculis filiformibus. 

Cynorchis purpurascens, Lindl. Gen. Sf Sp. Orchid. 331. Baker Fl. Maurit. 

p. 337. 
0. Lowiana, Reiclib.f. in Gard. Chron. 1888, vol. i. p. 424. 

Cynosorchis purpurascens, Thou. Orch. Ins. Jfric. Ic. t. 15 ; tab. 8. p. 1 
purpurea), 

Gymnadenia purpurascens, A. Rich, in Mem. Hist. Nat. Par. vol. iv. (1828) 
p. 27, t. 6, f. 1. (anal, erron.) Bojer, Hort. Maurit. p. 311. 

The genus Cynorchis is so closely allied to Habenaria 
that it appears to me to be doubtful how far it may prove 
to be distinguishable when the latter genus shall be either 
dismembered or divided into stable groups. The character 
chiefly depended on for Cynorchis is the large complicate 
midlobe (so called) of the 3-lobed rostellum, which organ, 
in the species here figured, does not well answer to this 
description, for what I take to be the side-lobes of the 
rostellum I should refer to the sides of the column, 
the true rostellum being a triangular, decurved and 
concave, but not plicate body. A more important dis- 
tinction from Habenaria may prove to be the reclinate 
clinandrium, with the pollen-cells placed at the very base 
of the back of the column. To understand, however, the 
complicate nature of the latter organ in 0. purpurascens, 
it is necessary to refer to the analyses here given, which 

August 1st, 1897. 



are explained in the reference to the plate at the end of 
the description. The apex of the column (e in figs. 3 
and 4) varies greatly in length, in one specimen I found 
it produced into a spur at the back of the column. 

C. purpurascens is a native of Madagascar, Bourbon, and 
formerly of the Mauritius, where it is probably now ex- 
tinct. It varies greatly in stature, robustness, breadth of 
leaf, and number of flowers, from two to ten ; and in the 
size of these, to somewhat larger, or a third smaller than 
are those here represented. The specimen figured was 
procured by the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Messrs. Hugh 
Low & Co. in 1894. It flowered in a stove in November, 
1896. It was described as C. Lowiana eight years pre- 
viously by Reichenbach, but Mr. Rolfe has pointed out its 
identity with the plant of Thouars, figured in 1822. 

Descr. — Leaf solitary (or with a reduced second), six 
to eight inches long, by one to three broad, lanceolate or 
oblong-lanceolate, finely acuminate, seven to many-nerved ; 
base convolute, and wrapped in a cylindric, red-brown, 
truncate sheath. Peduncle stout or slender, six to ten 
inches long, with a lanceolate sheath, red-brown, two to 
ten-flowered ; bracts about an inch long, erect, lanceolate, 
tip setaceous. Ovary with the very short pedicel two 
inches long, slender, curved, sparsely glandular-hairy. 
Sepals membranous ; dorsal about a quarter of an inch 
long, galeate, hemispheric, green and red ; lateral half an 
inch long, oblong, concave, obtuse, pale green. Petals as 
long as the dorsal sepal, and conniving with it, ovate- 
lanceolate, obtuse, unequal sided, rose-colrd. Lip one and 
a quarter inch long or less, obovate from a broad claw, 
bright rose-red, three cleft ; side-lobes dimidiate-ovate, 
obtuse ; mid-lobe obovate, cleft to the middle ; spur as 
long as the lip, slender, green, tip clavate. Column short, 
rose-pink. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Lateral sepal; 2, petal; 3, front, 4, side, and 5, dorsal view of 
column ; a. rostellum, b. side-lobes of column (or of rostellum), c. glands of 
caudicle of pollinia, d. stigmatic lobes, e. apex of column,/, glands represent- 
ing staminodes, g, mouth of spur : — All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL,^AND_FOREIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10*. 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L. S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," aud other British Floras. 1315 Wood En» 
gravings. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6<i. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 
Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, 1*. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Euition, 24 Coloured Plates. 21.*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA . Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By B. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II.. 42s. 6d. Part XVII., (is. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. each. 
Part XX.. 7s: 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV., 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36*. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. Bv G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspice* of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Bakkr, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authority of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Svetematic Description of the Plants of 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Harvey.M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelm Bonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18*. each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, i .R.S. , 

F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Maiesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham , 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's. Macquarrie's Islands. By 

Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published nnder the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST IND1 

Dr. Ghisebach, F.I I ublished nnde- the a 

tar'. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowei 

Plai I the Island of Hongkong. By George 

F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and i 
authority 
Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. By Sir J. D. Hi 5. 10s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

to a Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Trahernk Mogohidge. Royal 8vc. Complete in 1 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

L. REEVE & CO., 6, I 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 632, AXTGUST, 1897. 



Tab. 7547.— LYCORIS SQUAMIGERA. 
„ 754.8 — DENDROBIUM DENUDANS. 
n 7549.— GASTERIA FIJSCO-PUNCTATA. 
„ 7550.— FICUS ERECTA. 
„ 7551.— CYNORCHIS PURPV fS. 

L. Rkeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Govent Garden 
Now Ready, Vol, VI., Parts I.— III., 7s. 6<2. each. Vol. VI., Cloth 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, K 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 
Vols- I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 
University of Dublin, and . 

OTTO WILHBLM SONDER, Ph.D. 



ready, Part XX 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
Now ready, Part VIII., with 2 Coloured Plates, bs. (completing the work). 

THE HEMIPTERA BOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

Bt JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
, with 2 Structural Plates, 12«. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates, 

Now ready, Part XLIII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. 1. 12*. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s.; large paper, with 46 Coloured Plates, 63s. 
Vol. III. 12*. j large paper, with 50 Coloured Platee. 

Prospectus may be had on application to the Publish 
Now ready, Part XXVII., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s. 

LEPIDOPTERA IIVI>IO^L. 

By F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Yol. I., containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 

£9 5s.. cloth ; £9 ISs., half morocco. 

Prospectus, with Fir ere, can be had on application, to the I 



L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
runio bt eiL.Bit- isa bivix&tov, lb., it. johk's hocsi, tiKsssswiu, *.c> 



€I)trtf §?ttits. 

No 633. 

VOL. LTII.— SEPTEMBER. Price 3*. 6d. eol *red, 2s. 6d. plain. 

OB NO. lo27 OP THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPBIBIHG 

THE PLANTS OF THE I10TAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS 'N GREAT BRITAIN, W 

S U IT A BLE DESCRIPTION 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., k.c.s.l, c.B., 

Hate JBtmtor of the Bonal liotantr ffiarfiens of '■ 



M/gB. ttti mi 




Satuiv 

And flowers ei 



LON DO 
30., 6, HENRIETTA 






PREPARING FOB IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 
ALFRED FRYER. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The object of this work is to supply a icing-needed set of good and reliable Illus- 
trations of British Potamogetons. Both Descriptions and Illustrations will inclnde 
the varying forms and states as well as the generally recognized species. The 
Synonymy, though not aiming at absolute completeness, will be ample for all 
workiug purposes. An attempt will be made towards a natural arrangement of the 
species founded on the changes of form in their progressive stages of growth rather 
than on the comparatively limited distinctions afforded by the fruit, illustrations of 
which will form a special feature. 

,vork will be issued in 15 monthly parts : prospectus on application. 



Ice 2s. 6d. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture deliver^;! by Sie J. D. HOOKER, C.B.. before the British Association 
for thp advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY P.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 



loth case, £$ 8«. u 

uet. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity, 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S. , F.Z.S., F.E.S. 

« a large and htvndsom i>3tween 300 and 400 pages, vith 60 Plates, 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 
to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 
GEUKGE BE NT HAM, F.E.S. 

v Sir J. D. Hookek, C.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &e. 10*. 6d. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W.H. FITCH, F.L.S., ani> W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

in Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other Brih 
4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 10*. 6i. 



L. REEYE & CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVES T GARDEN. 



755Z 











1 






ViiicentBroaks,Day& 




lUihlith 



Vmoen.tBrooks.'Day &Son Imp 



* ' "° T "don 



Tabs. 7552, 7553. 
SCHEELEA kewensis. 

Native of tropical America. 

Nat. Ord. Palme*. — Tribe Cocoine*. 
Genus Scheelea, Karst.; (Benth. & JTook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 947.) 



Scheelea kewensis; trunco robusto obscure annulato infra folia basibus 
petiolorum vetustorum onnsto, foliis 25-pedalibus breviter petiolatis 
patenti-recurvis pinnatisectis, segmentis decurvis 2|— 3-pedalibus 1-1^ poll. 
Iatis ad basin versus rachi Bubsolitariis medio subternis apicem versus 
subquaternis longe acnminatis basi incrassatis supra carinatis laete 
viridibus subtus pallidioribus, nervis obscnris, rachi valida pentagona 
dorso rotundata appresse purpuracea, floribus in spatbis diversis 
monoici, spatbis 2^ pedalibus breviter crasse pedunculatia erectis 
cymbiformibus rostratis fnscis lignosis, spadicibus simpliciter ramosis, 
masc. ramis densissime fasciculatis 4-6-pollicaribus strictis deflexis, 
racbibus flavis ad basin floriferis, floribus confertis, sepalis minutis 
ovatis, petalis elongato-cylindraceis apice rotundatis fere \ poll, longis 
purpureis, staminibus 6, filamentis aequilongis antbera lineari brevioribus ; 
fl. fern, quam masc. multo majoribus subsessilibus ovoideis, bracteola 
lanceolata paucidentata suffnltis, sepalis ovatis obtusis crassis, petalis 
paullo latioribus, disco cnpulari, stylo crasso, stigmatibas brevibus 
recurvis, fructu 3 poll, longo, ovoideo breviter crasse rostrato basi disco 
sepalis petalisque valde auctia vaginato ab^rtu 1-spermo. 



The larger Palms so rarely produce flower, and still more 
rarely fruit in our tropical Palm Houses, that it appears 
to me expedient to figure such as fulfil these con- 
ditions in the Royal Gardens, Kew, even when, as in this 
case, T am unable to identify them specifically. That the 
Palm here figured belongs to the genus Scheelea, which 
was founded by Karsten on the species of Maximiliana, 
Mart., with long narrow petals, is obvious. A near 
congener is 8. Princeps, Karst., in Linnasa, vol. xxviii. 
p. 269 (Attalea Princeps, Mart., PaJmet., Orbign., p. 113, 
t. 31), in which, besides other differences, the fruit is not 
beaked. It has flowered but once, when it produced two 
spathes, the lower male (of which the pollen was kept) in 
August, 1895, and the upper female (to which the pollen 
was applied) in the following October. The fruit did not 
completely ripen. 

September 1st, 1897. 



As regards the history of this fine Palm, which has been 
tor many years growing in the Palm House of Kew, I can 
throw no further light than that it has always borne the 
erroneous name of Maximiliana regia, and is hence, no 
doubt, one of three plants so called in J. Smith's " Records 
ot the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew," for which he gives 
as their origin, "ex Hort. Belg. Van Houtte, 1847; 
y Q e .™- Schomburg and Boughton, 1847 ; Para, Yates, 
1847. The only other remark on this subject is at p. Ill 
of the same work, where (writing in (1880) the author says, 
under M. regia, " similar in habit and mode of growth 
to Attalea amygdalina, plants with leaves ten feet in 
length." 

Descr.—Whole plant twenty-five ft. high from the ground 
to the level of the coma; trunk from the ground about 
eight ft. to the lower leaves, three ft. in girth, dark 
brown, or nearly black, clothed with the bases of old 
petioles. Leaves very many, spreading and decurved, 
twenty-five feet long, very shortly petioled ; leaflets 
crowded, in three ranks, spreading and decurved, with 
pendulous tips, solitary towards the base of the rachis, in 
threes to fives towards the middle, and solitary near the 
top, about three feet long, by one to one and a half in. 
broad, finely acuminate, base thickened, bright green 
convex and keeled above, pale beneath ; rachis stout, five- 
angled, about an inch broad in the middle part, dorsally 
rounded and clothed with a fine closely appressed grey- 
purple scurf, sides flat green, upper" surface concave 
3l g r' Wlt ^ edges and a median low ridge. 
fP^s two, unisexual, (Palways), in the axils of the 
leaves an upper fern, and lower male, shortly stoutly 

shortlv 1 ,7° T d i , a half feet l0 "S' e/mbiform! 
^Zfl/t y ■ b f k i' W ° 0d ?> ^llow-brown. Male 
1 f^f T/ nCh i S , ° ng ' erecfc ' densely clothed with 
W.J ^ eX ed ^cided branches, the rachis and racheoke 

tZt^l »**!? fl —? * bright vinous 



nil „„i„ . , a ° •> ~ ""» " Liyj "uwci» a urignt vinous 
CSt\T\ e ^, c J owded r the brancnes ° f ^e spadix 

4ill SJ meS i° ngCT ' "^'adric, rugulose, tip rounded. 
Stamens three, anthers abont half the llngth of the petals, 
and twice as long as their filaments. Few,, ffl. much 
larger than the male, very shortly stoutly pedicelled, 



ovoid, yellow, each with a lanceolate, more or less serrate 
bract as long as itself. Sepals broadly ovate, obtuse, 
fleshy. Petals shorter, broader. Disk fleshy. Style very 
stout, stigmas short, recurved. Fruit three in. long, 
elongate-ovoid, beaked, 1-seeded, surrounded at the base 
by the greatly enlarged sepals, petals, and disk. — J. D. B. 



Tab. 7552, Portion of rachis of leaf and leaflet of nat. size ; 2, male spathe 
aud spadix one-third nat. size; 3, branch of do. nat. size; 4, male fl. ; 
5, stamens; 6 and 7, front and back view of single stamen : — All enlarged. 

Tab. 7553, Reduced fig. of whole plant ; fig. 1, fern. fl. and bract ; 2, the 
same, side view; 3, fem. petals style and stigma; 4, disk with ovary; all 
enlarged. — 5, two fruits; 6, transverse, and 7, longitudinal section of fruit; 
8, seed ; 9, embryo : — All of nat. size. 



7554 




-itchith 



VmcentBrooks^ay &. Sambap 



T. Reeve &C° London 



Tab. 7554. 
CIRRHOPETALUM Curtisii. 

Native of the Stiaits of Malacca. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Epidendre^s. 
Genus CirbhopetalTTM, Lindl. ; (Benth. So Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 504.) 



Cirrhopetalum (Unjbellatse) Curtisii ; rhizomate elongato repente, pseudo- 
bulbis parvis ovoideis vaginia brunneis tectis, folio lineari-oblongo apice 
subacuto recurvo utrinque pallide viridi dorso vix carinato, scapo a basi 
pseudobulbi erecto gracili infra medium vaginis paucis parvia instructo, 
floribus vix £ poll, longis confertim umbellatis deflexia roaeis, bracteia 
aetaceis, pedicellis floribua brevioribua, aepalo doraali fere orbiculari ciliato 
apice longe ariatato, arista ciliata, lateralibus lineari-oblongis obtusis 
ultra basin in laminam late oblongam recurvam convexam conserentibus, 
petalis sepalum dorsale sBquantibus longe ciliatis, labello ovato-oblongo 
obtuso aurantiaco, columna apice truncata sublobata. 



Cirrhopetalum Gurtisii belongs to a very distinct section 
of the umbellate flowered species of the genus, charac- 
terized by the ciliate and awned dorsal sepal and petals. 
The only species of this section previously figured in this 
work is G. Cumingii, Lindl. (Tab. 4996) of the Philippine 
Islds., a much larger plant, with long, narrow, acuminate 
lateral sepals. There are, however, three described Indian 
species much more closely allied to G. Gurtisii, namely, G. 
Roxburghii, Lindl. (Hook. Ic. PI. 1. 1057 A), C. gamosepalum, 
Griff. (Ann. Bot. Gard. Calcutt. vol. v. p. 17, t. 26), and 
G. concinnum t Hk. f. (Hook. Ic. PL t. 2060 B), all which 
differ in the colour of the flowers, and except in the case 
of the last named species, in their much larger size. To 
these must be added an unpublished species, G.pulchellum 
Ridley mss.. in Herb. Kew, from Singapur, with smaller 
broadly ovoid pseudobulbs, fewer differently coloured 
flowers in the umbel, and longer lateral sepals than has 
G. Gurtisii. 

G. Curtisii was sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew in 

1895, by Mr. Curtis, F.L.S., Superintendent of the Garden 

and Forest Department, Penang, bearing the ticket 

"Cirrhopetalum, Sp. Panga " (perhaps the Island of 

September 1st, 1897. 



Panyang on the coast of Malacca). It flowered in a stove 
of the Royal Gardens in December, 1896. 

Descr. — Rhizome flexuous, about one-eighth of an inch 
in diameter, clothed with appressed brown scales. Pseudo- 
bulbs about an inch apart, two-thirds of an inch long, 
ovoid, green, clothed with brown sheaths. Leaf four to 
four and a half inches long, by nearly an inch broad, 
linear-oblong, tip subacute recurved, very coriaceous, 
yellowish green on both surfaces, midrib sunk above, 
hardly keeled beneath. Scapes solitary from the base of 
the pseudobulbs, three to four inches long, very slender, 
decurved, pale green, with a few small scattered sheaths 
tipped with brown below the middle. Flowers numerous, 
in a crowded umbel, hardly half an inch long, dorsal sepal 
and petals bright rose-colrd., lateral sepals paler, fading 
into white beyond the middle ; lip bright yellow. Dorsal 
sepals and petals very small, of nearly equal size, sub- 
orbicular, long-ciliate, tip of dorsal sepal long-awned, awn 
ciliate, about one-third of an inch long. Lateral sepals 
linear-oblong, obtuse, coherent from beyond the base into 
a very convex, broadly oblong, recurved blade, notched at 
the rounded tip. Lip ovate-oblong, recurved, grooved 
down the centre. Column truncate, tip obscurely 
lobed.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower seen in front; 2, the same from the side; 3, petal; 4, column 
and lip ; 5, anther ; 6, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



7555 




■ 



LKHtchlith 



■ t Brooks Day &..V 



L Reeve & C°La 



Tab. 7555. 
HELIANTHUS gigantbus. 

Native of North America. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Helianthoide.e. 
Genus Helianthus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 376.) 



Heuanthus giganteus; 6-10-pedalis, asperulus, superne ramostis, rhizomate 
repente radicibus incras satis, foliis alternia sessilibus v. breviter petiolatis 
lanceolatis oblongo-lanceolatisve acuminatis basi angustatis serratis 
subserratisve penninerviis, capitulis 2§-3f poll, latis subcorymbosis, 
involucri bracteis subasqualibus lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis laxe 
appressis hispidis, receptaculi squamis dorso pubescentibus, radii ligulis 
15-20, 1-li pollicaribus, ft*, disci aureis glaberrimis. 

H. giganteus, Linn. Sp. PL 905. Ait. Sort. Kew. vol. ii. p. 409. DG. Prodr. 
vol. v. p. 589. Torr. Sf Gray Fl. JY. Amer. vol. ii. p. 325 (excl var. /3). 
Rook. Fl. Bor. Am. vol. i. p. 312. A. Gray, Bot. N. Un. St. Ed. 5, p. 256 ; 
Synojpt. Fl. N". Am. ; Gamopet. p. 276. 

H. altissimus, Linn. Sp. PI. Ed. 2, vol. ii. p. 1278. Jacq. Sort. Vinci, t. 162. 

H. gigas, Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. vol. ii. p. 141. 

H. fol. lanceolat. sessil., Gronov. Fl. Virgin, p. 104. 

Chrysanthemum virginicum elatius, &c. Pluk. Phytog. pars. iii. t. 159, f. 5, 

et Almagest, p. 99, t. 159, f. 5. 
C. virginicum altiss., &c. Morison Plant. Sist. vol. iii. p. 24, t. 7, f 66, 67. 



Helianthus giganteus is a very old inhabitant of such 
English gardens as were devoted to the cultivation of 
exotic plants. The earliest mention of it that I have found 
is in Plukenett's " Phytographia," published in 1692 ; 
and it is included by Morison in his " Plantar um Historia 
Universalis Oxoniensis," published in 1699, but who does 
not state whether it was then cultivated in England. 
Gronovius, in his account of the plants collected by J. Clay- 
ton, who went to Virginia in 1705, gives a terse diagnosis 
of it ; and its introduction was possibly due to Clayton, for 
Aiton states that it was cultivated in 1714 by the Duchess 
of Beaufort. In North America it has a very wide range, 
from the St. Lawrence to Louisiana, and in the West from 
the Red River and Saskatchewan southward. It so 
strongly resembles 11. tuberosus (Tab. 7545), having 
similar roots, that a low northern form, the " Indian 
Potato of the Asiniboine tribe " has been confounded with 

September 1st, 1897. 



that plant, which differs in the broader leaves, the lower 
opposite, the longer petioles, and the loose invol. bracts. 

H. giganteus has been cultivated in the Royal Gardens 
probably from their first establishment, but the specimen 
here figured was from the rich Herbaceous collection of 
A. B. Freeman Mitford, C.B., of Batsford Park, Moreton- 
in-Marsh, Worcestershire. It flowers in September. 

Descr. — Bootstoch creeping, with fusiform cylindric roots. 
Stem three to ten feet high, strict, erect, red-brown, sub- 
corymbosely branched, and more or less hispidly hairy above, 
more glabrous beneath. Leaves three to five inches long, 
alternate, subsessile, lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, serrate or nearly entire, penni-nerved, base cuneate, 
pale green, sparsely hispid nlous above, more so beneath. 
Heads two and a half to three and a half inches broad. 
Involucral bracts linear-lanceolate, finely acuminate, loosely 
imbricate, dark green, hispid. Bracteoles of receptacle 
with entire acute pubescent tips. Flowers of the ray fifteen 
to twenty ; ligule about an inch long, elliptic-lanceolate, 
rather pale yellow, tips acute, entire. Disk flotvers narrow, 
puberulous, rather darker yellow than the ray. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Involucral bracts; 2, achene and base of ray-flower; 3, scale of 
receptacle ; 4, flower of disk ; 5, stamens ; 6, arms of style : — all enlarged ; 
7, reduced vipw of wbole plant. 



7556 







-■: ;t.Brooks r Day& Sonltttp 






Tab. 7556. 

VERONICA Balfoukiana. 
Native of New Zealand. 

Nat. Ord. ScRoriiULAKiNE^. — Tribe Digitale^. 
Genua Veronica, Linn.; {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 964.) 



Veronica (Hebe) Balfouriana ; frutex erectus, ramoaus, flexuosus, fere 
glaberrimus ramulis, fusco-purpnreis, foliia laxe approximates uniformi- 
bus ad £ poll, longis subsessiiibus patentibus et decurvis elliptico-ovatis 
integerrimis obtusiusculis acut. coriaceis Uate viridibus rubro-fusco mar- 
ginatis, racemis axillaribus pedunculatia multi-densi-floria^ bracteis 
pedicellos subasqnantibus oblongis obtusia calycibusque puberulis, sepalis 
oblongo-lanceolatis acutis tubum corollas snbasquantibuB, corollas ^ poll, 
diam. violaceas tubo brevi, lobis rotundatis antico minore, filamentia lobos 
corollas aubcequantibua, antheria fusco-rubria loculia basi rotundatis, cap- 
sula parva late ellipaoidea sepalis longiore. 



Under Veronica diosmsefolia (Tab. 7444) I have alluded 
to having drawings of at least six species or varieties of 
Veronicas raised from New Zealand seeds at the Royal 
Botanical Gardens of Edinburgh, which I was unable to 
identify with described congeners. These and other 
drawings I sent to my friend, Mr. Thomas Kirk, F.L.S., 
Wellington, N.Z., who is engaged upon a Flora of New 
Zealand, in the hopes that he might aid me in determining 
them. This he did in the case of some, but for others, 
including that here figured, he could give me no name. 
Of it he says, "Apparently new, the acuminate calyx- 
segments, and the large corolla, with equal broad seg- 
ments, are striking characters. Although showing affinity 
with V. Traversii, it can hardly be a form of that species." 

Comparing specimens of V. Balfouriana and Tracersii 
as they grew alongside one another in my garden near 
Sunningdale, I find that Balfouriana differs in habit, not 
tending to form a rounded bush, in the smaller, paler 
green leaves, with red-brown margins., the longer racemes 
with very much larger violet (not white) flowers, in the 
long acuminate sepals, which are nearly as long as the 
short corolla tube and as the capsule, and in the obtuse 
bases of the cells of the shorter broader red-brown anthers. 
I regret to add that V. Traversli is much the hardier of 

o 
September 1st, 1897. 



the two, it having (with some damage, however) resisted 
the effects of the coldest winters, to one of which V. 
Balfouriana succumbed. The figure is from a plant that 
flowered on a rockery in my garden in June, 189-5. It 
was received in the previous year from the Royal Botanic 
Garden of Edinburgh. In the Royal Gardens, Kew, it has 
proved quite hardy. 

Descr. — An erect, glabrous shrub, three feet high, with 
dark brown bark and suberect flexuous purpli brown or 
reddish branches. Leaves subsessile, one half to three- 
fourths of an inch long, in loosely approximate pairs, 
spreading and decurved, elliptic-ovate, obtuse or subacute, 
quite entire, coriaceous, bright pale green and shining 
above, with narrow brown margins. Racemes opposite, 
axillary from the base of the last year's shoots, two to three 
inches long, erecto-patent, very many-fld., peduncle stout; 
flowers crowded; pedicels about as long as the calyx, 
puberulous ; bracts ovate, acute or obtuse, about as long- 
as the pedicel. Sepals about one-sixth of an inch long, 
obtuse or acute, ciliolate. Corolla pale violet-blue, half an 
inch in diameter, tube as long as the sepals ; lobes 
rounded, three upper subequal, the lower narrower. 
Stamens as long as the corolla lobes or shorter ; anthers 
red-brown, bases of cells rounded. Capsule ellipsoid, 
about one-third longer than the sepals or less. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower, pedicel and bract ; 2, pedicel, bract, calyx and style ; 
3 and 4, anthers ; 5, ovary and disk : — All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONI AL, A ND FOREIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Islea. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Be? 
F.R.S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. B. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s 6d 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Pitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Lir. 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Town-send, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Bekkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarei 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, I 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d, 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By R. Bbaithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50s. Vol. II., 42s. 6c. Part XVII., 6s. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.L 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to Xl>; 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36*. 

FLORA ATJSTR ALIEN SIS: a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S. , F.L.S., assi? 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. esch. Vol. VII., 24s. 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. PublisLed under the authority oi 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plan 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. IJa- 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelu Sondes, Ph.D." Vols. I.— Hi., 
Vol VI., 24s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Maiesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a S\ 

; of the Native Pis I, and the 

rd Auckland'?, CampbellV 

shed under the ai 
nlete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INT); 

Dr. Grisebach ablished under the u 

tary of State for the 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 
Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By Gkobge Bbnthav 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. H 
Pnbli rity of Her Majesty's Secretary of St- 

Supplement, separately, 2s. fid. 

ON I >RA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

T. D. Hooker, F.R.S 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

to a Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Trahernk Moggeibge. Royal 8vc. Complete in 1 vol . 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

L. REEVE & CO., 6, Henrietta 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 633, SEPTEMBER, 1897. 



Tab. 7552.— SCHEELEA KEVTENS 
„ 7553— „ 

„ 7554.— CIRRHOPET ALUM CURTIS II. 
„ 7555.— HELIANTHUS GIGA^TEUS. 
;-, 7556.— VERONICA BALFOURIANA. 



L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Corent Garden. 
Now Ready, Vol. VI., Part* I.— HI., 7s. 6d. each. Vol. VI., Cloth, 24j. let. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caifraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Keiv. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good H>pe 

and Natal. 
Vols. I. to III. ISs. each. 
ILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 
University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 



Now ready, Part XXII. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 3,s,. Vol. VI., 36s. 
w ready, Part, VIII., with 2 Coloured (completing the vork) 

THE HEMIPTERA HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
motural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured PI 

Now ready, Part XLIV., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

Br CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.ES. 
Vol. I. 12*. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Pla 
Vol. II. IS | aper, with 46 Coloured PJ 

to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVIII., with 8 Coloured I 

I.EPIDOPTERA IXDICA. 

By F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Vol. I., containing 93 Coloured Plates ; Yol. II., with 96 Colo ired Plates, each 

£9 5s. cloth ; £9 iSs., half morocco. 

L. Rests & Co., 6, Henrietta Street. 



er, id., si. JOHjr's housj 



Cijirfc £mes. 

No. 684. 

VOL. LIIL— OCTOBER. p r i ee 3,. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6 

OB NO. I0J0 OF THE ENTIBE WORK. 

CURT IS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMFKI81NG 
THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRLPTIONS; 

BY 

Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., K.C.S.I., C.B., F.E.s, F.L.& 

TLmt Director af the Bonal botanic Gartens of Item. 






/a»- gufiiwr 



1 and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON? 
L. REEVE and CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAR] 

1897. 



PBBPABING FOB IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

ALFRED FRYER. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The object of this work is to supply a long-needed Bet of good and reliable Illus- 
trations of British Potamogetons. Both Descriptions and Illustrations will include 
the varying forms and states as well as the generally recognized species. The 
Synonymy, though not aiming at absolute completeness, will be ample for all 
workiug purposes. An attempt will be made towards a natural arrangement of the 
species founded on the changes of form in their progressive stages of growth rather 
than on the comparatively limited distinctions afforded by the fruit, illustrations of 
which will form a special feature. 

The work will be issued in 15 monthly parts : prospectus on application. 

Now ready, price 2s. 6d. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sik J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866, 



Now ready, Second Edition. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 

be Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 



a 1 voL, royr; cloth case, £6 6«. net; ; in half morocco. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUK G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S. 

-us a large and handsome volume of between 300 and 400 pages, with 60 Plates, by 
F. W. FROWHAWK, beautifully coloared by hand. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE NT HAM, F.R.S. 

6th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, O.B., K.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10*. 6d. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., ajto W. G. SMITH, F.L 

i Illustrated Companion to Bentham't " Handbook," and other British Floras. 
4th E i 1315 Wood En<- 



• BYE & CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COYENT GARDEN. 



issy- 







— — 



"Vincent B r o oks,D ay &. S cm Imp 



Tab. 7557. 
C I B R HOPET ALUM robustum. 

Native of New Guinea. 



Nat. Ord. Oecuide^;. — Tribe Epjdendre.e. 

Genus Cirbhopetaliim, Lindh; (Benih. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 504.) 



Ciekhopetaltim CRacemosae) robustum; grande, pseudobulbis coespitosis 
3-pollicaribus ovoideis alte costatis, folio 8-10-pollicari oblanceolato crasae 
carnoso, pedunculo pseudobulbo breviore crasso ascendente, racemo breve 
dense- multi-floro, bracteis §-poll lougia oblongis acuminatia reflexia 
pallide viridibus, pedicellia robustis, floribus 3 poll, longis, sepalis rlavo- 
viridibns basin versus pallide rufescentibus dorsali pollicari oblongo 
cuspidato, lateralibus 2-pollicaribus lineari-oblongis obtusis ad apicem 
fere cobaerentibus, petalis oblongis cuspidatis, labello sanguineo glaber- 
rimo, columna aurea 2-cornuta. 

C. robustum, Rolfe in Orchid. Rev. vol. i. (1893), p. 175. Masters in Oard. 
Chron. 1895, vol. i. p. 771. 

C graveolens, Bailey, Contrib. Queensl. Flor. Bullet, xiii. (1896) p. 33. 
Orchid. Rev. vol. iv. (1896) p. 308. Kevo Bullet. 1896, App. ii. p. 48. 



Oirrhojpetalum robustum, though by far the largest, and 
a truly massive species, departs in no respects from the 
genus in any character. It belongs to the group in 
which the inflorescence is truly racemose, and its nearest 
ally known to me is the comparatively dwarf C. refractum, 
Zoll., figured in King's "Annals of the Calcutta Bot. 
Gardens," vol. v. t. 28, and vol. viii. t. 119, a native of 
the Himalaya, Tenasserim Mts., and Java. ^ Besides the 
enormous difference in size, G. refractum is distinguished, 
amongst other characters, by the membranous leaves, 
lanceolate and ciliate dorsal sepal and petals, and the 
long, slender, decurved spurs of the column. 

C. robustum was discovered in British New Guinea by 
Sir W. Macgregor, K.C.M.G., the Governor and inde- 
fatigable explorer of that great island ; and plants from 
thence were brought to the late Colonel Trevor Clarke, of 
"Walton Place, Daventry, by his nephew, Captain Clarke. 
These flowered in March, 1893, and were described by 
Mr. Rolfe under the name of G. robustum. In 1896 the 
same plant was described by Mr. Bailey, Government 

October 1st, 1897. 



Botanist of Queensland, as C. graveolens, also from Sir "W. 
MacGregor's specimens. Mr. Bailey observed that flies are 
attracted by the strong, heavy scent of the flowers, and, 
being entrapped between the lip and column, perish 
there. The specimen here represented was presented to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Col. Clarke, in 1893. It 
flowered in a tropical house in March, 1897, producing 
five racemes. 

Descr. — Bootstoch stout, woody. Pseudobulbs clustered, 
two to three inches long, ovoid, compressed, green, with 
two keels and four strong, dorsally rounded ribs, quite 
smooth. Leaf solitary, eight to twelve inches long, by 
three to- three and a half broad, oblanceolate, acuminate, 
narrowed into a very short, stout, cylindric petiole, thickly 
coriaceous, bright green and nerveless above ; beneath 
paler, mottled with minute darker spots, bearing a stout, 
rounded midrib, and several pairs of slender nerves. 
Peduncle ascending from the base of the pseudobulb, three 
inches long, as thick as a goose-quill, green, with one or 
two short ribbed green sheaths. Racemes an inch long, 
many-fid. ; rachis stout ; bracts one half to three-fourths 
of an inch long, oblong, acute, membranous, spreading and 
reflexed ; pedicels stout, with the ovary one to one and 
a half inch long. Flowers three inches long from the 
tip of the suberect dorsal sepal to those of the lateral. 
Sepals yellow green, suffused or streaked with rose to- 
wards the base ; dorsal oblong, cuspidate, concave, seven- 
nerved ; lateral two inches long, linear-oblong, coherent 
beyond their divergent bases, tips free, rounded. Petals 
oblong, cuspidate, yellow, suffused with pale rose. Lip 
nearly half an inch long, ovate-oblong, obtuse, fleshy, 
recurved, blood-red, smooth, with a central furrow, and 
two keels towards the pubescent base. Column short, 
stout, yellow, with short, stout, recurved arms. — J. T>. 3. 



Fig. 1, Petal ; 2, lip and column ; 3, anther ; 4, pollinia -.—All enlarged. 



1558. 




MS del. J.N "Pitch Jith 



l&u;ei L tBroQksPa>r&Son.Im5- 



L.Reevp fc.f? T.rm^lr 



Tab. 7558. 
AG- AVE Bouohet. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. AiiARTLLiDEiE. — Tribe Agaves. 
Genua Agave, Linn. ; (Bentk. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 733.) 



Agave (Littsea) Bouchei; candiee brevi cylindrico polyca rpico, foliis 30-40 
dense rosulatis oblongo-lanceolatis facie conoavis adultis utrinque viridi- 
bus junioribus leviter glaucescentibus spina brevi vix pungenle terminals, 
spinnlis marginalibus crebria minutis deltoideis castaneis, pedunculo 
valido brevi, tioribus geminis in spicam densam aggregates, bracteia 
linearibus elongatia, bracteolis parvia deltoideis, ovario oblongo, perianthii 
tubo brevi late infundibulari, lobia oblongis, filamentis lobis quadruplo 
longioribus, antheris linearibus, fructu parvo oblongo. 

A. Boucbei, Jacobi, Monogr. Agave, p. 120. Baker in Gard. Chron. 1877, 
p. 717 ; Handb. Amaryllid. p. 191. 



This Agave is one of the few species that have a firm, 
woody trunk, and do not die after flowering. It belongs 
to the group called Carnoso-coriacese, in which the leaves 
are less rigid and more fleshy than in the best-known 
species of the genus, such as A. americana and rigida, and 
which are much less frequent in cultivation. The present 
plant was introduced into the Berlin Botanic Garden in 
1861, and after it had flowered in 1864 was named by 
General Jacobi in compliment to Inspector Bouche. It 
has been in the Royal Garden at Kew for at least twenty 
years, but has never flowered till the summer of 1896. 

Descr. — Peduncle stout, woody, polycarpic, nearly as 
long as the leaves, bearing in the Kew plant, two rosettes 
of leaves crowded at its apex. Leaves thirty or forty in a 
dense rosette, oblong-lanceolate, rather fleshy in texture, 
a foot and a half or two feet long, three or four inches 
broad at the middle, concave all down the face, a sixth of 
an inch thick in the centre, green on both surfaces when 
mature, slightly glaucous when young ; end spine short 
and weak; marginal teeth very smalt, crowded, deltoid, 
red-brown. Peduncle short and stout. Spike dense, two 
feet long in the Kew plant ; flowers in pairs, subtended bv 
a long bract, and a pair of small bracteoles. Perianth 

BKR Lst, 1897. 



greenish-yellow, an inch and a half long, including the 
ovary; tube short; lobes of the limb oblong. Stamens 
inserted at the throat of the perianth -tube, two inches 
long; anthers linear, half an inch long. Style finally 
overtopping the anthers. Capsule small, oblong.— J. G. 
Baker. 

Fig. 1, Back view of anther; 2, front view of anther; 3, apex of style, 
all enlarged ; 4, whole plant, much reduced. 




1559. 




M3ael.J.N.p;tcnij f h 



^Snc entBro oks ,U ay i. Sen. inp . 



L Reeve &C<?Lamian. 



Tab. 7559. 

PRIMULA sinensis. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. PrimoxacEjE.— Tribe Primulejc. 
Genus Primula, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 631.) 



Primula sinensis*, Sabine ex Lindl. Coll. Bot. t. 7. HooTc. Exot. Flora, t. 
105. Bot. Mag. t. 2564. Hance in Journ. Bot. N. 8. vol. ix. (1880) 
p. 262. Garcl. Ghron. 1889, vol. i. p. 115, fig. 16; 1890. vol. ii. p. 564, 
fig. 119 ; 1891, vol. i. p. 209; 1892, vol. i. p. 13, fig. 2. Hemsl. Sf Forbes in 
Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. (1889) p. 42. Sutton in Journ. Hort. Soc. 
vol. xiii. (1891) p. 99. 

P. prasnitens, Ker-Gawl. in Bot. Beg. t. 539 (1821). 

P. setulosa, Kiehxf. in Mem. Soc. Linn. Par. vol. iv. (1826) p. 31, t. 3. 

P. semperflorens, Loisel ex Steud. Nomencl. Ed. 2, vol. ii p. 296. 

P. mandarina, Hoffm. in Otto 8f Dietr. Allg. Gartenz. vol. iii. (1835) p. 194, 

t. 1. 
Oscaria chinensis, LUja, in Lindbl. Bot. Notiser. 1839, p. 39, ex Linnsea, 

vol. xxii. (1849) p. 259. 



The recent flowering of specimens of Primula sinensis 
raised from freshly imported seeds taken from indigenous 
plants, and the receipt of herbarium specimens, affords 
the opportunity of recalling the history of this familiar and 
beautiful green-house ornament, which, though so loug 
known under cultivation, has only within comparatively 
few years been collected in a native state. This has been 
effected first, according to Mr. Sutton, in J 879, by a Mr. 
Walters, and more recently by two travellers who have, 
whilst working independently, clone more towards making 
known the botanical riches of China than have all previous 
collectors put together ; they are the French missionary 
Abbe Delavay, and H.B.M. Consul Henry, both of whom 
found Primula sinensis in limestone rocks fully exposed 
to the sun, at Ichang on the River Yangtze Kiano-, a 
thousand miles above its mouth. There Mr. Henry describes 
it as growing in extremely dry rocks, where there is 
practically neither soil nor moisture, flowering in December 
and January, and known as the Rock or Winter Prim- 
rose. Mr. Walters, on the other hand, describes it as 

October 1st, 1S<>7. 



growing in shade. All the specimens collected by the Abbe 
Delavay and Mr. Henry are small, some quite dwarf, with 
short, woody rootstocks ; all have glandular (slightly 
sweet-scented) leaves, peduncles, and calyces, and very 
small flowers, with simply obcordate corolla-lobes. 

According to a statement in the Gardening World, 
December 17th, 1887, quoted by Mr. Sutton in his paper, 
the Chinese Primrose was first made known by a drawing 
sent in 1819 to the Horticultural Society of London by 
John Reeves, Esq., F.R.S., when Inspector of Teas for the 
Honourable East India Company at Macao. This led to 
the Society's requesting Mr. Reeves to procure living 
plants or seeds, which he did. Seeds of two varieties 
were sent, both from Chinese gardens, one of which pro- 
duced small flowers, and simply obcordate corolla-lobes ; 
in the other these were wavy and crenate. At about the 
same time a living plant was brought home by a Captain 
Rawes, who gave it to Thomas Palmer, Esq., of Bromley, 
Kent. This flowered in 1821, and was figured as Primula 
print itens by Mr. Ker-Gawler, in the Botanical Register of 
that year; it has crenate corolla-lobes. In the same year 
Lindley published a figure of the same plant in his 
" Collectanea Botanica " as P. sinensis, Sabine. The form, 
with entire obcordate corolla-lobes, was first figured in 
1823, in Hooker's " Exotic Flora," from a specimen that 
flowered in the Edinburgh Botanical Gardens, obtained 
from the Horticultural Society of London. The same form 
was again figured in 1825, in this Magazine, with the 
observation that it was introduced by T. C. Palmer, Esq. 

Turning now to the specimen here figured, I am indebted 
for its history to Dr. Masters, who informs me that it is 
one of some seedlings which he saw in 1891, at Lady Hutt's, 
Appleby Towers, Ryde, and which he at once recognized 
as being of the wild Primula sinensis. On inquiry he 
was told that the seedlings were raised from seed sent, 
it was believed, from Ichang. Having been given some of 
the seedlings, he passed them on to his friend Mr. Edmund 
Hyde, of Ealing, who was in 1892 the first to flower the 
wild plant. In the Gardener's Chronicle for that year Dr. 
Masters has given an excellent figure of this as "The wild 
form of Primula sinensis after one year's cultivation." 
Being a first year's plant, no stem is represented ; this, 



however, is conspicuous in the specimen here figured, which 
was kindly sent to the Royal Gardens by Mr. Hyde in 
December, 1896, and is hence a plant of five years' growth. 
The most remarkable feature of both figures is the startling 
change from the miserable starved condition of the wild 
state, as shown by Mr. Henry's specimens, to the great 
size and robust habit of the -firstborn offspring ; that is 
supposing that the plants raised at Lady Hutt's were from 
the seeds of such dwarfs, for it must not be forgotten 
that Mr. Walters describes the wild Chinese Primrose as 
he found it to be growing in shade, and hence probably 
differing much in size from Mr. Henry's, which grew on 
sun-scorched rocks. 

Comparing the figures in the Gardener' 's Chronicle and 
that given here with any of the numerous ones of Primula 
sinensis that have appeared since 1822, the difference 
between them is very manifest, in robustness of habit of 
the former, compactness of inflorescence, and other 
characters difficult of putting into words, but all suggestive 
of a feral form. 

For information upon the garden varieties of this plant, 
their cultivation and propagation, together with other in- 
teresting matter, I must refer to Mr. Sutton's valuable 
paper in the journal of the Horticultural Society cited 
above. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calvx; 2. bisected corolla-tube laid open, with stamens and ovary ; 
3, stamen : — All enlarged. 



7560 




M".S del,JKFitchlith. 



lfinceni.Br odks ,1>ay & Son Imp 



X Reeve &C° London. 



Tab. 7560. 

CALATHEA eufibaeba. 
Native of Brazil ? 

Nat. Ord. Scitamine^e. — Tribe Marante^s. 

Genus Calathea, G. F. W. Met/.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 653.) 



Calathea (Eucalathea) rufibarba ; acaulis, tota floribus exceptis pilis longis 
flaccidis pailide brunneis induta, foliis distichis longe petiolatis lineari-. 
lanceolatis acuminatis marginibus undulatis supra laete viridibus subtus 
pallidioribus violaceo tinctis, scapo brevi robusto petiolo multo breviore 
et robustiore, spica breviter oblonga, floribus congestis longe exsertis 
aureis, bracteis spica brevioribus ovatisacutis spiraliterconvolutishirsatis, 
sepalis angustis acuminatis pilosis, corolla? tubo sepalis longiore fere 
nnciali cylindraceo piloso, lobis subaaquilongis lineari-oblongis obtusis 
dnrsali ovato-oblongo, labello lobo dorsali subsimili apice 2-lobulato 
concavo lateribus incurvis, staminodio galeato, galea basi calcare subulato- 
lanceolato horizontali instracta, ovario glabro. 

C. rufibarba, Fenzl in Gartenfl. vol. xxviii. (1879) p. 294. Petersen in Mart. 
PI. Bras. vol. iii. pars III p. 91. 



A very well marked member of a large tropical genus, 
containing nearly seventy known species, all, except a few 
African ones, natives of America, especially of Brazil. Of 
those figured in this work that which is most nearly allied 
to G. rufibarba is 0. villosa, Lindl. (t. 4973), which differs 
a good deal in habit, having very large oblong leaves, a 
long scape, and flowers nearly two inches in diameter, but 
in which the hooded staminode bears a similar spur. 

G. rufibarba was established on specimens cultivated in 
the Imperial Garden of Vienna, by Professor Fenzl, and 
is supposed to be a native of Brazil. Specimens of it 
flowered by Messrs. Sander & Co. in 1894, are preserved 
in the Kew Herbarium, of which the leaves were purple 
beneath. The Royal Gardens, Kew, are indebted to the 
Imperial Gardens of St. Petersburg for the plant here 
figured, which was received in 1891. It forms tufts of 
leaves as grown in a pan in a stove, and flowers freely 
every few months. 

Descr. — Stemless, clothed every where but on the flowers, 
October 1st, 1897. 



with long, lax, spreading rufous-brown hairs. Leaves 
distichous, long-petioled, five to seven inches long, linear- 
oblong, or -lanceolate, acuminate, margin strongly waved, 
base rounded or cuneate, thin, bright green above, beneath 
pale blueish green with a violet blush, and a stout 
midrib ; petiole nearly as long as the blade, red-brown, 
strict, erect. Scape two inches long, very stout. Spike 
two to three inches long, and nearly as broad, dense fid. ; 
bracts (the lowest one inch long), hirsute, ovate, spirally 
convolute, much shorter than the inflorescence. Flowers 
golden-yellow, exserted far beyond the bracts. Sepals 
three, very slender, acuminate, pilose, shorter than the 
corolla-tube, which is terete, hairy. Corolla nearly an inch 
across the limb ; lobes linear-oblong, obtuse. Lobes of the 
androecium much broader than the petals, upper and 
lower (or lip) subequal, the latter concave, 2-fid at the 
tip, with involute margins ; appendage of the staminode 
helmet-shaped, with a horizontal subulate spur at its base. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, lip of sepal seen from within; 3 and 4, staminode; 
5, androecium : — All enlarged. 



7561 




Vincent Bro oks.D ay & Son Imp 



X Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 7561. 
PTEEISANTHES polita. 

Native of the Malayan Peninsula and Islands. 



Nat. Ord. AmpelidEjE. 
Genus Pterisanthes, Blume. ; (Benth. 4" Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 387.) 



Pterisanthes polita; frutex scandens, gracillimus, fere glaberrimus, foliis 
late ovatis ovato-cordatis v. elliptico-oblongis acutis basi subcordatis 
remote dentatis cbartaceia nitidis, cirrhis bitidis crure altera simplice 
altera florifera, receptaculo 4-5-pollicari longe stipitato lineari- 
oblongo piano basi apiceque insequilaterali apice caudato sublanu- 
ginoso luride fusco-rubro utrinque norifero, costa valida, floribus aliis 
disco receptaculi immersis perfectis, aliis marginalibus longe pedicellatis 
foemineis v. stetilibus, calycis brevissimi obscure 4-lobi tubo bracteis 
rudimentariis annulato, baccis pisiformibus 2-3-locularibus, pericarpio 
tenui, locnlis 1-2 spermis " albumiue fissnris 2 isnbtrilobato." 

P. polita, M. Lawson in Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. i. p. 663. Planck, in A. DC. 
Monogr. Phanerog. vol. v. p. 416. 

VlTis polita, Miq. Ann. Mug. Lugd. Bat. vol. i. p. 95. 



Pterisanthes is one of the most singular of plants in 
respect of its inflorescence, which consists of the trans- 
formation of a branch of a tendril into an elongated broad 
or narrow disk, bearing the flowers sessile on one of its 
faces, and with sometimes others pedicelled on its margins. 
Extreme as is this modification of the inflorescence of Vitis, 
there are species of the latter genus with spicate flowers, 
and the flowers sunk in the rachis of the spike, that show 
a marked transition to Pterisanthes, and perhaps justify 
Miquel in considering the two genera as one. Four 
species of Pterisanthes have been described, all Malayan 
(of which, one, the present, is also Burmese), most of 
which have compound leaves. 

On making an anatomical study of the flower of 
Pterisanthes polita, Dr. Stapf recognized the presence of 
rudimentary bracts on the calyx, to which Griffith, in 
describing another species, P. cissoides (Embamma caudi- 
gerum, Notul. iv. 694; Ic. PI. Asiat. t. 695), alludes as 
" a roundish brownish cicatrix " of the nature of which he 
is uncertain. As bracts or bracteoles are present in species 
October 1st, 1897. 



of Vitis, Dr. Stapf's explanation is no doubt the correct 
one. 

Pterisantlies polita is a native of the Malayan Peninsula 
from Moulmein, in Burma, where it was found by Lobb, 
to Singapore ; and also of Sumatra and Borneo. The 
Royal Gardens, Kew, received plants of it from those of 
Singapore in 1894, which flowered in a stove in November, 
1896. 

Descr. — A tall, slender climber, glabrous, except in the 
sparsely woolly surface of the receptacle. Leaves simple, 
four to six inches long, broadly ovate, or ovate-cordate, 
acuminate, shortly, distantly toothed, chartaceous, bright- 
green and shining above, pale beneath ; nerves six to 
eight pairs, arching ; basal sinus closed ; petiole one to two 
inches long. Receptacle occupying the middle of one 
branch of a bifid tendril, four to five inches long, by one 
to one and a half broad, dark red-brown, very unequal- 
sided at both ends, tip with a capillary tail ; rarely the 
receptacle is lobed or interrupted on one side ; midrib 
stout ; peduncle (naked portion of cirrhus) three to four 
inches long. Flowers about an eighth of an inch in diam., 
some bisexual, sessile, scattered over and sunk in both 
surfaces of the receptacle ; others female or neuter, mar- 
ginal, on stout pedicels about half an inch long. Calyx 
tube very short, limb obscurely four-lobed. Petals four, 
rounded. Dish broad, fleshy. Stamens 4. Style very 
short, conical. Berry pisiform. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of receptacle with sessile and pedicelled flowers ; 2, pedicelled 
female flower ; 3, vertical section of the same, showing the bracts, calyx, and 
petals ; 4, larger marginal female flower with the calyx and petals removed ; 
5, vertical section of the same; 6 and 7, stamens from sessile flowers; 8, ver- 
tical section of ovary of sessile flower -.—All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S. , President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By R. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I v 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Part XVII., fis. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d*. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. each. 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV., 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36*. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authority of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants ot 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Harvey.M.D. , 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelm Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. __„ 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

F.L.S- Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Maiesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macqnarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George Bentham, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. Hance, 21s. 
Published under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. 10s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

to a Winter Flora of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Trahernk Moggbidge. Royal 8vo. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

L. REEVE & CO., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 634, OCTOBER, 1897. 



Tab. 7557.— CIRRHOPETALUM ROBUSTUM. 
„ 7558.— AGAVE BOUCHEI. 
„ 7559.— PRIMULA SINENSIS. 
„ 7560.— CALATHEA RUFIBARBA. 
„ 7561— PTERISANTHES POLITA. 



L. Beeve &, Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Now Ready, Vol. VI., Parts I.— III., 7s. 6d. each. Vol. VI., Cloth, 24*. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XXII., 9s. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
Now ready, Part VIII., with 2 Coloured Plates, 5s. (completing the work). 

tflrHEMIPTEM HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 

Complete, with 2 Structural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates, 43s. 

Now ready, Part XLV. , with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 
THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. I. 12s. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s. ; large paper, with 46 Coloured Plates, 63s. 
Vol. III. 12s.; large paper, with 50 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may be had on application to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVIII., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s. 

LEPIDOPTERA INDICA. 

Br F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Vol. I., containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Vol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 
£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 

Prospectus, with First List of Subscribers, can be had on application to the Publishers. 
L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

raiNTED BT 6ILB1B.T ISO BIVIN&TOH, LD., ST. JOH.x's HOUSI, CLEKKBH WEIL, B.C. 



CbfrU Jjfries. 

No. 635. 

VOL. LTII.— NOV EM Price 3*. 6d. cor 

OH No. 1320 OF THE ENTIBB WOEK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, \\ 

CRIPTION 



PH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., K.es.i., c.B, F.R.s., F.L 

iSLhu Dimtor of tfte Bona! 13o:a 




JO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, 



PHEPAF IJffG FOB IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

BEITISH ISLES. 

W xh Descriptions op all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

ALFRED FRYER. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

x'he object of this work is to supply a loDg-needed set of good and reliable Illus- 
-rationa of British Potamogetons. Both Descriptions and Illustrations will include 
the varying forms and states as well as the generally recognized species. The 
Synonymy, though not aiming at absolute completeness, will be ample for all 
working purposes. An attempt will be made towards a natural arrangement of the 
species founded on the changes of form in their progressive stages of growth rather 
than on the comparatively limited distinctions afforded by the fruit, illustrations of 
which will form a special feature. 

The work will be issued in 15 monthly parts : prospectus on application. 



Now ready, price 2s. 6ct. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



uly, Second Edit) 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles, 
the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. ?4 Coloured Plates, 21. s. 



! vol., royal ito, in >,se, £6 1 



Foreign Pinches in Captivity, 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., P.Z.S., F.E.S. 

:a8 ft large a o volume of bet v. ages, with 60 Plates 

F. W. PE< , ,ud. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

■ A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 
to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 
By <>E BE NT HAM, F., 

6th E I . D. Hookeb, C.B., K.C.S.I., F.I; , s . &i. 



ILLUSTRATIOIfS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, -with Dissections, of British Plants. 
D* FITCH, F.L.S., a*i> W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

i Companion to Bentham'a "Handbook," and other British Floral 
L. REEVE & CO., 6, B " k STREET, COVEST GARDEN. 




ml 



_ - ~ 

- *^ 

« ^ I ■ - * 4 

p 


















"\5ncent I . Saalnip 



j ve &, C° London 



Tab. 7562. 

MAMMEA AMERICANA. 
Native of the West Indies. 

Nat. Ord. G-uttifer-s:. — Tribe Calophylle.*:. 
Genns Mammea, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 176.) 



Mammea americana ; arbor dumosa, ramosissma, foliis crasse petiolatis ovatis 
obovatis v. obovato-oblongis obtusis basi rotundatis cuneatisve tenuiter 
coriaceis saturate viridibus, nervis numerous patentibus nervulis reti- 
culatis prominulis, floribus solitariis 2-3-nisve breviter pedicellatis 
1| poll. diam. 4-6-meris suaviter odoratis, sepalis obovato-oblongis con- 
cavis pallide viridibus, petalis paullo longioribns late obovatis demum 
recnrvis albis, staminibus perplurimis, filamentis filiformibus, anthems 
linearibus connectivo apiciilatis, ovario lagenseformi in stylum breve 
crassum angustato, stigmate bilabiato, labiis crassis rotundatis recurvis, 
loculis minutis, drupa magna globosa 1-4-sperma cortice fusco tenui, 
came fibrosa flavida, seminibus magnis compressis, testa crassa fibrosa, 
cotyledonibus magois agglutinatis. 

M americana, Linn. 8p. PL p. 512. Jacq. Stirp. Am. Hist. p. 268, t. 181, 
fig. 82 ; Select. Stirp. Ic. Pict. vol. i. t. 248. Vahl, Eclog. vol. n. p. 40. 
Willd. Sp. PI vol. ii. pars. IT. p. 1157. Ait. Hort. Kew, Ed. 2, vol. ni. 
p 297 Lamh. Encycl. Suppl. vol. iii. p. 582 ; III. t. 458. Lunan, Hort. 
Jamaic. vol. i. p. 431. Descourl. Fl. Med, Antill. vol. i. p. 561. DC. 
Prodr. vol. i. p. 561. Tussuc, Fl. Antill. vol. iii. t. 7. Maycoclc, Fl. 
Barbad, p. 227." Macfad. Fl Jamaic. vol. i. p. 135. Planch. & Tnan. 
Mem Guttif. pp. 12, '212. Tnan. Sf Planch- Fl. Nov. Granad. p. 28o. 
Griseb. Fl Brit. W. Ind. p. 108. Engler in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. xu. 
pars. I. p. 395, t. 79. A.DG. Origine PI. Cult. p. 150. 

Mamay, Dalechamps, Hist. Gen. PI, 1536. 

Arb. Ind. Mamei diet., Bauh. Pinax, p. 417. 

Mam. Laest. Hist. Nouv. Monde, p. 356. 

Mamay arb., &c, Bauh. Hist. PI Univ. vol. i. p. 172. 

Mains persica maxima, Ac, Sloane, Hist. Jamaic. vol. ii. p. 123, t. 217, p. 3. 

Mammei, magn. fruct, Ac., Plum. Nov. PI Gen. p. 44 ; Icon, t, 170. 

The Mammee tree, Hughes, Hist. Barbad, p. 133. 

Mamme fol. oval, &c, P. Browne, Hist. Jamaic. p. 249. 

Abricoteiro de Brasil, Apricotier dAmerique. 



The Mammee, a tree cultivated for its edible fruit in the 
tropics of America, is undoubtedly indigenous in Cuba, 
Jamaica, and other of the West Indian Islands; in Jamaica 
indeed it is said to be one of the commonest trees. I find 
no evidence of its being a native of the continent of South 

Novbmber 1st, 1897. 



America, and Ernst, (in Seeman's Journ. Bot. 1867, p. 
273) says that it is not indigenous in Oaraccas. It has 
been introduced into Western Africa, and I have eaten 
the fruit in the Cape de Verd Islands ; but curiously 
enough I can find no record of its having been ever 
cultivated in India, into which country the Portuguese 
must have endeavoured to introduce so conspicuous a 
plant, and one so easily grown from seed ; nor is it in- 
cluded in Watt's '* Dictionary of the Economic Products 
of India." 

The Mammee apple varies in size from that of a small 
orange to almost a child's head. There is an excellent 
painting of its foliage and fruit in the North Gallery at 
Kew (n. 64). A rough, leathery, bitter rhind, and a 
thinner interior one enclose a firm, somewhat spongy 
white pulp, soon turning yellowish, of a hard, fibrous con- 
sistence, sweetish taste, and slightly aromatic flavour. 
This surrounds one to four large brown, oblong, rather 
compressed, rugose nuts, with a hard, fibrous coat, and 
oily, fleshy cotyledons. The seeds vary greatly in size. 
Opinions as to the gratefulness of the flesh of the Mammee 
apple differ much. Sloane writes of it, as " one of the 
most pleasant and grateful to be met with in Jamaica," 
adding, that swine get extremely fat on it. No other 
verdict on it that I have met with is so flattering, and the 
fact that it is not admitted amongst the table fruits of the 
tropics is proof of disfavour. My own opinion of that 
which I ate was, that it was comparable to a good turnip, 
flavoured as above, i.e. sweetish, and faintly aromatic. 
By the Portuguese and earlier British residents in the 
West Indies, the fruit was cut in slices, and eaten with 
wine and sugar, and also candied. A liqueur is obtained 
by distillation from the flowers infused in spirits of wine, 
called Eau de Creole, and Creme des Creoles. The bark 
yields an acrid, resinous gum, of great value for the extir- 
pation of chigoes. The cotyledons yield a hair oil. The 
wood is poor ; but the tree, with its brilliant green leaves 
and deliciously scented flower, is so handsome an object 
that de Tussac eulogizes it as " la Sirene vegetale." 

The earliest notice I find of the Mammee apple is in 
Dalechamp's " Historia generum Plantarum," published 
m 1586 ; but in this, as in other old authors, it is perhaps 



confounded with the Marmalade plum of the West Indies, 
Lucuma mammosa, Gsertn. The first good account of it 
is in Sloane's " History of Jamaica." It was introduced, 
according to Aiton's " Hortus Kewensis," into England 
before 1737, and it has long been in cultivation at the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, where there is, in the Economic 
House, a tree of it ten feet high. This flowered (but did 
not form fruit) in August, 1896, and from it the accom- 
panying figure of the foliage and flower is taken ; that of 
the fruit is from a specimen preserved in fluid in the 
Economic Museum (No. 2) of the Royal Gardens, presented 
by C. D. Sturge, Esq., of Montserrat. The seed figured 
is an abnormally large one, such as occur when one only 
is developed in the fruit. 

Descr. — A large, umbrageous tree, sixty to seventy feet 
high, with a stout trunk, and dense coma ; branchlets 
stout, covered with a dark brown bark. Leaves ter- 
minating the stout branchlets, three to five inches long, 
oblong, obovate, or obovate-oblong, obtuse, variable in 
breadth, thinly coriaceous, bright green and shining 
above, paler beneath ; base rounded or cuneate ; nerves 
very numerous, spreading, with close set cross nervules ; 
petiole about half an inch long, stout, channelled above. 
Flowers solitary, or 2-4-nate on the wood of the branches 
at the axils of fallen leaves, about one and a half inches in 
diameter, sweet-smelling ; pedicels about half an inch long, 
stout, green, ebracteate. Sepals four to six, orbicular- 
obovate, obtuse, concave, very pale green, and obscurely 
spotted. Petals a fourth or less longer than the sepals, 
broadly obovate, recurved, white. Stamens very numerous, 
in many series; filaments filiform ; anthers linear, apiculate. 
Ovary broadly flaggon -shaped, narrowed into a very stout 
style, with two orbicular, spreading, recurved, fleshy 
stigmas. Fruit from the size of an orange to a child's 
head, spherical, or nearly so ; rhind thick, flesh yellow, 
pulpy, stringy around the large seeds. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, Stamens ; 3, ovary ; 4, longit. section of do. ; 5, transverse 
section of frnit ; 6, seed ; 7> ditto, with testa removed ; 8, transverse section 
of embryo : — All but fig?. 5, 6, and 7 enlarged. 



7563 







Vb\centT3rool(s,Bay&.SonIirLp 



L Reeve & C ? London 



Tab. 7563. 
taint a penangiana. 

Native of Penany. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Efidendrejs. 
Genus Tainia, Blume; (Beuth. So Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 515.) 



Tainia penangiana; pseudobulbis crassis ovoideis vaginatis, vagina in tubnm 
elongatum petiolum amplectente producta, folio lanceolato longe 
petiolato, scapo e basi pseudobulbi erecto j^etiolum longe snperante 
gracili basi vaginis brevibus late ovatis imbricatis tecto, racemo 
laxifloro, bracteis lanceolatis pedicellis sequilongis, floribus 2 poll, expans., 
sepalis petalisque consimilibus lanceolatis acuminatis flavidis rubro 
striatis, labelli albi lobis lateralibus obtusis columnam amplectantibus, 
intermedio parvo orbiculari v. rhombeo cuspidato, disco lamellis 3 ornato, 
calcare sacciforme lobulato, columna alata. 

T. penangiana, Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 820 ; in Hook. Ic. PI. t. 2089. 



The genus Tainia was founded by Blume on a Malayan 
plant, T. speciosa, which was for many years the only 
recognized species. To this three, also Malayan, were 
added by Reichenbach, and one by Teijsmann and Beinnen- 
dyke. These five are all that were known at the date of 
publication of the Index Kewensis ; since which upwards 
of a dozen species have been recognized, chiefly British 
Indian, and it may be confidently anticipated that there 
are not a few yet to be discovered. One only has hitherto 
been published in this magazine, namely T. viridifiisca, 
Benth. (Calanthe viridifiisca, Hook., t. 4669.) 

T. penangiana was first described in the "Flora of 
British India " from very imperfect herbarium specimens, 
in which no pseudobulb was present at the base of the 
petiole, and the midlobe of the lip had crisped margins, no 
doubt from contraction in drying. The plant figured was 
received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Penang, where 
it was discovered growing on damp rocks by Mr. C. Curtis, 
F.L.S., Assistant Superintendent, Gardens and Forest 
Department. It flowers annually in March, in a warm 
house. 

Bescr. — Pseudobulbs clustered, two inches long, ovoidly 
flagon-shaped, clothed with brown, scarious sheaths, the 
November 1st, 1897. 



inner of which is prolonged into a long tube sheathing the 
petiole ; old pseudobulbs one and a half inches in diameter, 
red brown, furrowed. Leaf a foot long, elliptic-lanceolate, 
acuminate, plicate, many-nerved, narrowed into a slender, 
green petiole, as long as the blade, or shorter. Peduncle 
nearly twice as long as the petiole, arising from the base 
of the pseudobulb, green, clothed at the base with closely 
imbricating, ovate, acute, brown sheaths, half an inch long, 
and bearing upwards a few distant appressed, brown, 
obtuse sheaths. Raceme erect, few- and lax-fid. ; bracts 
lanceolate, brown, about equalling the pedicel, which, with 
the ovary, is about half an inch long. Perianth about two 
inches broad across the sepals. Sepals and petals spreading, 
subequal, lanceolate, acuminate, pale yellow, with five to 
seven slender, red nerves. Lip nearly white ; side lobes 
elongate, obtuse, embracing the column ; midlobe small, 
rhomboidly orbicular, abruptly acuminate ; disk with three 
lamellae that are prolonged on to the midlobe, and there 
become much deeper ; spur a lobulate sac. Column white, 
winged. Anther subquadrate, tip truncate ; pollinia eight, 
in two superposed pairs of four each. — /. D. H. 



Pig. 1, Lip; 2, column, spur and lip of ovary; 3, anther; 4, pollinia : — All, 
enlarged. 



7564 




.dfil,JK.Fitchlith 



Tiiv.entBrooks Day&.SonImp 



I "Reeve &C°L<mcton 



Tab. 7564. 

CYNORCHIS GRANDIFLORA. 
Native of Madagascar. 

Nat. Ord. Okchide^e. — Tribe Ophryde^:. 
Genus Cynoechis, Thou. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 628.) 



Cynoechis grandiflorus ; caule sesquipedali valido 2-pluri-floro, foliis radi- 
calisms paucis pedalibus elongato lineari-Ianceolatis a medio ad apicem 
sensim angustatis supra glauco-viridibus subtus pallidioribus carinatis 
utrinque sed subtus precipue hie illic sanguineo striatis, bracteis 3-polli- 
caribus cylindraceis subinflatis acuminatis striolatis, ovario cum 
pedicello 4-pollicari rufo maculato, floribus fere 2 poll, expans., sepalis 
oblongis obtusis dorso viridibus sauguineo maculatis, petalis sepalis 
paullo minoribus falcato-oblongis obtusis albis, labelli ampli purpurei 
marginibus basi columnae adnatis, lobis lateralibus late cuneiformibns 
basi unidentatis, intermedio loogiore in segmenta 2 linearia obtusa 
divaricata fisso, sinu acut<\ calcare crasso recto labello duplo longiore 
infra medium paullo inflato, antherarum tubulis rectis, columna dorso 
rostelloque retuso puberulis. 

Cynosorchis grandiflora, Ridley in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xx. (1884) p. 332, 
et vol. xxi. p. 514 (Cynorchis). 



Though no doubt a congener of Gynorchis purpurascens, 
recently figured in this work (t. 7551), G. grandiflora 
differs from that plant remarkably, not only in habit, but 
in the margins of the base of the lip being connate with the 
column, and forming with it a tube leading into the spur. 
Until the other species of the genus (of which there are a 
dozen described, and some undescribed in the Kew Her- 
barium) are critically examined, it is impossible to say 
what value should be given to this latter character. 

Gynorchis grandiflora was first described by Mr. Ridley, 
F.L.S., from specimens in the Britsh Museum, collected 
in Madagascar, at Ankafana, by Mr. Deans Cowan. It 
has since been found on damp rocks in various places in 
the central part of the island, by Dr. J. T. Fox, the Rev. 
R. Baron and Mr. Scott Elliott. Mr. Ridley describes 
two varieties as follows : — Var. a, purpurea, inodorous, 
lip purple, spotted at the base ; /8, albata, odoriferous, lip 
white, base purple. The nearest ally is G. uniflora, Lindl. 
(which often bears several flowers) the bract of which is 
very much smaller. The plant here figured was obtained 

NOYBMEEE 1ST, 1897. 



by the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Messrs. Lewis & Co., 
Southgate, in 1893. It flowers annually in the Orchid 
House in July, where it is treated with tropical Ha- 
benarias. 

Descr. — Stem up to two feet, attaining a thickness of 
a swan's quill, and as well as all green parts streaked 
with blood-red in broken lines. Leaves a foot long and 
more, about half an inch broad, linear, or narrowly linear- 
lanceolate, finely acuminate, narrowed from the middle to 
the base and apex, dorsally keeled. Peduncle stout, erect, 
two or more-fid. Bracts two to three inches long, tubular, 
with a lanceolate, acuminate tip. Ovary with pedicel three 
to four inches long, strict, erect, puberulous. Flower one 
and a half to one and three-quarters in. broad. Sepals 
oblong, obtuse, green without and blotched with red. 
Petals erect, forming a hood with the dorsal sepal. Petals 
linear- oblong, obtuse, subfalcate, gibbous on one side, 
white. Lip longer than the sepals, bright purple, base 
connate with the sides of the column ; lateral lobes large, 
broadly cuneate ; midlobe cleft to the base into two linear, 
obtuse, divaricating segments; spur one and a half to one 
and three-quarter i nch long, stout, strict, pale, lower half 
somewhat inflated, tip 2-lobed. Column with a bifid, 
puberulous rostellum. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Petal ; 2, column with baae o£ lip and lip of spur ; 3, column seen 
in front ; 4, pollinium : — All enlarged. 



7565 




itch litK 






I.HeevB &.C? London 



Tab. 7565. 
DKIMIA Cole^i. 

Native of Somali-land. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace-e.— Tribe Scille*. 
Genus Drwia, Jacq. ; (Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 808.) 



Drimia Colese ; bulbo magno globoso, tunisis membranaceis brunneis, foliis 
synanthiis sessilibus oblongis acutis subcarnosis glabris facie pallide 
viridibus maculis saturatioribus decoratis dorso concoloribus pallide viri- 
dibus, pedunculo foliis breviori, racemo cylindrico laxo, pedicellis 
breyibus, bracteis minutis, perianthio viridi, tabo brevi campanulato, 
Iobis linearibus recurvatis, staminibus perianthio brevioribus, antheris 
parvis oblongis, filamentis saturate purpureis, ovario digciformi, stylo 
elongate 



This very distinct new species of Drimia was brought 
home from the Golis range in Somali-land two years ago 
by Miss Edith Cole, and flowered by her last October. 
The expedition on which it was obtained was made in the 
winter and spring of 1894-5, under the leadership of Mr. E. 
Lort-Phillips. The two ladies who took part in it, Mrs. E. 
Lort-Phillips and Miss Cole, both occupied their leisure in 
making botanical collections, and on their return presented 
them to Kew, where they were worked out. The two col- 
lections contained together 350 species, of which between 
sixty and seventy proved to be new. These were described 
in the Keio Bulletin for 1895, pages 211 to 230. There 
are no specimens of the present plant in the dried collection. 
Six other species of the same genus are known in Tropical 
Africa, and between twenty and thirty at the Cape, but 
many of the plants called Drimia in gardens really belong 
to the section Ledebouria of the genus Scilla. 

Descr. — Bulb globose, two inches in diameter ; outer 
tunics membranous, brown. Leaves contemporary with 
the flowers, sessile, oblong, acute, half a foot long, by 
nearly half as broad, rather fleshy, pale, glaucous green on 
the upper surface, spotted with darker green, concolorous, 
and pale green beneath. Peduncle erect, shorter than the 
leaves, pale green, spotted with claret-brown. Raceme 
November 1st, 1897. 



lax, cylindrical, five or six inches long ; pedicels short ; 
bracts minute. Perianth green, half an inch long; tube 
short, campanulate ; lobes linear, reflexing. Stamens rather 
shorter than the perianth ; filaments subulate, bright 
mauve-purple ; anthers small, oblong. Ovary disciform, 
very broad, and short ; style subulate, overtopping the 
anthers ; stigma small, capitate. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower, with bract and pedicel ; 2, an entire flower, fully expanded ; 
;{, segment of perianth, with stamen; 4, pistil; 5, transverse section of ovary, 
all more or less enlarged. 



7566 







AftncantBro aks D ay &. S on. Imp 



I Reeve &. C° "London 



Tab. 7566. 
SCOLIOPUS Bigelovii. 

Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. Liliacea:. — Tribe Medeole.e. 
Genua Scoliopus, Turcz.; (Benth. & Sool'.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 832.) 



Scoliopus Bigelovii ; herba nana, fere acaulis, glaberrima, caule brevissimo 
basi radicibus fasciculatis crassis onusto, et vestigiis vaginarum gtipato, 
foliis binis sessilibns late elliptico-ovatis basi vaginantibus post anthesin 
valde accrescentibua supra saturate viridibus nigro maculatis, subtus 
pallidis striato-nervosis, pedunculis 3-12 unifloris erectis pallidis rubro 
irroratis post anthesin valde elongatis decurvis et tortis, floribus erectis, 
sepab's patente-recurvis ovato-lanceolatis pnrpureo striatis, petalis sepalis 
requilongis linearibus obtusis erectis purpureis, filamentis brevibus 
erectis, antberis oblongis extrorsum debiscentibus, ovario sessili trigono 
in stylum brevem fructu persistentein attenuato, stigmatibus 3 elongatis 
patentibus apice glandulosis, capsula ellipsoidea triquetra membrauacea 
irregulariter rupta polysperma, seininibus oblongis, testa granulosa, raphe 
alata. 

S. Bigelovii, Torr. in Pacif. Sail. Rep. {Whipple Exped.) vol. iv. p. 14~>, t. 22. 
S. Wats, in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. p. 272 ; Bot. Calif, vol. ii. p. 180. 
Regel Gartenfl. vol. xxiv. (1875) p. 227, t. 834. Gard. Ghron. 189 i, vol. i. 
p. 267, fig. 8. 



Of the singular genus Scoliopus, only two species are 
known, that here figured, which is a native of the coast 
ranges of California, from Humboldt County to Marin, and 
the imperfectly known S. Hallii, S. Wats, of Oregon. It 
clearly belongs to the tribe Medeolese of Liliacex, as deter- 
mined by Bentham, but is not very closely allied to any 
congener in that group, thoup;h the linear, erect petals 
recall those of Paris. The different aspects of the plant 
in its flowering and fruiting stages are, as shown in the 
plate, very striking, the leaves in the latter attaining 
fifteen inches in length, and the strict flowering peduncles 
lengthening to six inches, and becoming decurved and 
twisted (whence the generic name). The flowers emit a 
curious scent, like that of decaying seaweed. In the 
Gartenflora the leaves are represented as unspotted. 

Scoliopus Bigelovii was introduced into Europe by Messrs. 
Haage & Schmidt, of Erfurt, in 1879. The specimen here 
November 1st, 1897. 



figured was purchased for the Royal Gardens from F. H. 
Horsford, Nurseryman, of Charlotte, Vermont. It flowered 
in a cold frame in February, 1896. 

Descr. — A glabrous, dwarf herb. Stem very short, 
stout, clothed with brown, torn sheaths, and emitting from 
a short rhizome fascicles of stout, simple root-fibres. 
Leaves two, one and a half to two inches long in the 
flowering state, greatly enlarged thereafter, attaining eight 
inches, sessile, base sheathing, ovate, obtuse, or apiculate, 
very dark green above, with black blotches, paler beneath, 
and striate. Peduncles few or many, fascicled at the top 
of the stem amongst the leaves ; flowering two inches long, 
erect, strict, white, mottled with red; fruiting greatly 
elongating up to six inches, decurved and twisted. Flowers 
an inch and more in diameter, erect ; perianth deciduous. 
Sepals spreading and recurved, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
white, closely striped with red-brown. Petals as long as 
the sepals, erect, linear, obtuse, red-brown. Stamens 
short, filaments subulate ; anthers small, oblong, opening 
extrorsely. Ovary trigonous, three-celled, narrowed into a 
short style, with three linear, spreading stigmas. Capsule 
two-thirds of an inch long, ellipsoid, terminated by the 
persistent style; pericarp thin, bursting irregularly. 
Seeds many, oblong, rough, with a narrowlv winged raphe. 
—J.B.H. " * 



Fig. 1, Sepal ; 2, flower with sepals removed ; 3, anthers ; 4, ovary ; 5, seed ; 
— All enlarged; 6, leaf and fruiting pedicels of the natural size, 



BRITISH, COLONI AL, AND FO REIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.B.S. 6th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, ]0s, 6d. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 4th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s. 6d. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townbend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Bekkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By E. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Part XVII., fia. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. I). Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Parts I. to XIII., 10s. 6d. each. Parts XIV. to XIX., 9s. each. 
Part XX., 7s. 6d. Parts XXI. and XXII., 9s. each. Vols. I. to IV., 32s. 
each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36*. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
nnder the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Barer, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authoiity of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENS1S: a Systematic Description of the Plant 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Harvey, M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelm Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. ■ 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S. , 

F. L.S. Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the 
First Commissioner of Her Maiesty's Works. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of Sew Zealand, and the 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Mao. By 

Sir J. D. Hookek, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. ._ 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the S 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HOiNGKONGENSIS : a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George B*nthaw, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. Hance, 2 Is. 
Published under the authority of Ber Majesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, peparately, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Ho* S. 10s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

to a Winter Flota of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J- Tbahernk Moggbidge. Royal 8vc. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

L. KEEVE & CO., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 635, NOVEMBER, 1897. 



Tab. 7562.— MAMMEA AMERICANA. 
„ 7563.— TAINIA PENANGIANA. 
„ 7564.— CYNORCHIS GRANDIFLORA. 
„ 7565.— DRIMIA COLE.E. 
„ 7566 — SCOLIOPUS BIGELOVII. 

L. Reeve & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
Now Ready, Vol. VI., Parts I.— III., 7s. 61. each. Vol. VI., Cloth, 24*. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Edited by W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.6., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Keiv. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XXII., 9s. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
Now rendv, Part VIII., with 2 Coloured Plates, 5s. (completing the work) 

THE HEMIPTERA BOMOPTEM OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By JAMES EDWARDS, F.E.S. 
olete, with 2 Structural Plates, 12s. ; Large Edition, with 28 Coloured Plates, 43s. 

Now ready, Part XLV. , with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. I. 12s. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vol. II. 12s. ; large paper, with 46 Coloured Plates, 63s. 
Vol. III. 12s.; large paper, with 50 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may he had on application to the Publishers. 
Now ready, Part XXVIII., with 8 Coloured Plates, 15s. 

LEPIDOPTERA ITSTMOA.. 

Br F. MOORE, F.Z.S. 

Yol. I.« containing 94 Coloured Plates ; Vol. II., with 96 Coloured Plates, each 

£9 5s., cloth ; £9 15s., half morocco. 

Prospectus, with First List of Subscribers, can be had on application to the Publishers, 



L. Reetk & Co., 6, Henrietta Street, Coveut Garden. 

PBISTED BY SILBEB-T ASD BIVISSTOS, LB., ST. JOHJTB HOUBB, CLERKEN WEIL, B.C. 



C^trtJ Series. 

No. 636. 

VOL. L1IL— DECEMBER. Price 3s. €d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 

OH NO. IB 30 ° y THE ENT1EB WOKK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPBISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



Sm JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, m.d. g.c.s.l, c.b., f.r.s., f.l.s. 

Tate Eirrctor of the 3T\ot>al Botanic ©atojns of llcffi. 




Nature 
And tie 



L O N D H : 
L. REEVE and CO., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GABDEN 

97. 



PREFAHING FOB IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 
"With Descriptions op all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The object of this work is to supply a long-needed set of good and reliable Illus- 
trations of British Potamogetons. Both Descriptions and Illustrations will include 
the varying forms and states as well as the generally recognized species. The 
Synonymy, though not aiming at absolute completeness, will be ample for all 
working purposes. An attempt will be made towards a natural arrangement of the 
species founded on the changes of form in their progressive stages of growth rather 
than on the comparatively limited distinctions afforded by the fruit, illustrations of 
which will form a special feature. 

The work will be issued in 15 monthly parts : prospectus on application. 



Now ready, price 2s. 6d. 

INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 



.Now ready, Second Edition. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 
By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 



Now ready, complete in 1 vol., royal 4to, in handsome cloth case, £6 6s. net ; in half morocco 

£7 net. ' 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S. 

The whole forms a large and handsome volume of between 300 and 400 pages, with 60 Plates bv 
F. W. FROWHA WK, beautifully coloured by hand. ' 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENT HAM, F.R.S. 

6th Editiou, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookee, C.B.. G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 10s. Gd. 



ELUSTRATIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, -with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook;' and other British Floras. 
4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 10*. 6i. 



L, REEVE & CO., G, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



16G1 




Vincent Broolcs, Day & Sonlmp 






Tab. 7567. 

AGAVE SchoHtii. 

Native of Arizona. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide^e. — Tribe Agaves. 
Genus Agave, Linn. ; (Benth. & Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738.) 



Agave (Littaea) Schottii ; acaulis, foliis dense rosulatis e basi ovata linearibua 
rigidis apice piingentibus facie canaliculars dorso carinatis margine 
filiferis, scapo elongato gracili, floribus in paniculam laxam subspicatam 
subsecundam di^positis, bracteis parvis ovatis cuspidatis, pedunculis 
pedicellisque brevibus clavatis, perianthio citrine- tubo elongato infundibu- 
lari, lobis oblongis tubo brevioribus, staminibus vix exsertis supra 
medium tubi insertis, antheris magnis linearibus, fructu duro parvo 
oblongo. 

A. Schottii, Engelm. Notes on Agave, p. 17. Collected Works, p. 315. Baker 
Handb. Amaryllid . p. 307. Miss Mulford in Report Missouri Gard. 
vol. vii. (1896) p. 72, t. 29. 

A. geminiflora var. ? Sonora, Torrey in Bot. Mex. Bound, p. 214. 



This very distinct Agave resembles A. Jiliferd and 
A. schidigera in having leaves the edges of which break 
away into fibres, but differs from them widely in its lax 
subsecund inflorescence, bright yellow flowers and short 
stamens. It is very abundant on the mountains of 
Southern Arizona, at an elevation of about five thousand 
feet above sea-level. Professor Tourney reports that it 
so thickly covers large areas, miles in extent, on the 
southern slopes of the mountains of Santa Catalina that 
it is almost impossible to travel through it. It is called 
Amole in its native country, and the rootstock is sold as 
affording a substitute for soap. It was first collected by 
the late Dr. Arthur Schott in 1855. The Kew plant was 
purchased at the sale of the collection of Mr. J. T. 
Peacock in 1889, but did not flower till March, 1897. 
There is a dwarf variety with serrulate leaves which 
extends further south than the type. 

Descr. — Rootstock two inches in diameter, thickly clothed 

with the fibrous relics of old leaves. Leaves forming a 

dense sessile rosette, linear from an ovate base, a foot 

long, pungent at the apex, channelled down the face, 

December 1st, 1897. 



acutely keeled on the back, with edges breaking up into 
fine fibres. Scape slender, four or five feet long. In- 
florescence a lax, subspicate, subsecund panicle a foot long ; 
bracts ovate, cuspidate, very small ; peduncles and pedicels 
very short and stout. Perianth bright yellow, two inches 
long; tube funnel-shaped, longer than the oblong lobes. 
Stamens scarcely exserted beyond the perianth-lobes, in- 
serted above the middle of the tube. Capsule oblong, 
coriaceous, half an inch long. — J. G. Baker. 

1, Portion of raceme and flower with perianth laid open; 2, anther; 
6, top of style and stigma :— all enlarged ; 4, whole plant greatly reduced. 



7668 




Q- 




MS.delJHFrtdihth. 



BrooJcs.Ilai'ri 



L Reeve &.C?Landon. 



Tab. 7568. 

QUILLAJA Saponaria. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Quillajieje. 
Genus Quillaja, Molina; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 614.) 



Quillaja saponaria ; arbor mediocris, glaberrima, sempervirens, cortice 
sanonaceo, ramulis gracilibus, foliis sparsis breviter petiolatis ellipticis 
oblongisve obtusis integerrimis v. marginibus sinuatis coriaceis ner- 
vosis stipulis parvis, floribus polygamo-dioicis in paniculas paucinoras 
terminates et axillares dispositis, lateralibus masculis, fcerminali fertili, 
pedicellis 2-bracteolatis, calycis inferi coriacei tomentosi tubo brevi, lobis 
5 ovatis valvatis, petalis 5 parvis spatbulatis, disco crasso tnbum calycis 
vestiente et in lobos 5 crassos lobis calycinis adnatos emarginatos dilatato, 
staminibus 10, 5 fundo disci insertis petalis oppositis, 5 alternis apicibus 
lobornm disci msertis, filamentis subnlatis, antberis brevibus, carpellis 
5 fundo calycis sessilibus axi cohaerentibus tomentosis multi-ovulatis, 
stylis 5 stigmatibus dilatatis depressis, ovulis complanatis biseriatim 
imbricatis, folliculis 5 basi cobserentibus calyce persietente suffultis 
oblongis coriaceis, stylis subventralibus stellatim patentibus, seminibus 
imbricatis compressis superne longe et late alatis exalbuminosis, testa 
membranaca, cotyledonibus convolutis, radicula infera. 

Q. Saponaria, Molina, Sagg. Stor. Nat. Chili, vol. ii. p. 175, 354 (1782) ; ed. 
Angl. vol. i. p. 291. H.B.K. Nov. Gen. # Sp. vol. vi. p. 236 in nota. 
B. Bon in Edinb. New Phil. Journ. vol. xi. (1830-1) p. 230. Lamk. III. 
t. 774. Poir. Encycl. vol. vi. p. 33 ; Suppl. vol. iv. p. 638. C. Gay, Fl. 
Ghil. vol. ii. p. 273. Kohler, Mediz. Pflanz. vol. ii. p. 189, cum. ic. pict. 
Garriere in Rev. JEortic. 1873, p. 254, fig. 27. 

Q. ? Molinse, BC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 547. 

Q. Poeppigii, Walp. Sep. vol. ii. p. 52. 

Q. Smegmadermos, St. Laz. in Ann. Soc. Bot. Lyon, vol. vii. (1880) p. 133. 

Smegmaria Saponaria, Willd. Sp. PI. vol. iv. p. 1123. 

Smegmadermos emarginatns, Ruiz fy Pav. Fl, Per. et Chil. Prodr. p. 144, 

t. 31 ; Syn. Veg. Fl. Per. Sf Chil. p. 288. 
Cullay, Molina ex Steud. Nom. Ed. II. vol. i. p. 452. 
Qnillay, Frezier, Voy. South Sea, p. 118 (1717.) 



Quillaja Saponaria is a common tree in the hills and 
valleys of Chili, between the parallels of 31° and 38° S., 
ascending to 6500 ft. above the sea, and flowering from 
December to February. Its wood, though not procurable 
of any great size, is valued for its hardness, and is chiefly 
used for props in mines, and for making stirrups. Of 
greater account is its bark, which, when pulverized in 
water, foams like soap, and is used as an efficacious sub- 

D^CEMBSft lsx, 1897. 



stitute for that article, as also for dressing the hair. 
Both Chilians and Araucanian Indians attribute the 
luxuriance of this ornament of their persons to its 
use. There is a considerable import of the bark into 
England ; and it appears annually in the trade lists, the 
wholesale price being 6d. per pound, and pulverized Is. 
A detergent hair-wash is prepared from it, and it has been 
extensively used to produce a head on stale beer. 

There is but one other species of the genus, Q. brasiliensis, 
Mart., of South Brazil. 

The figure here given was made from a specimen kindly 
sent by Thomas Hanbury, Esq., F.L.S., which flowered in 
his celebrated garden of La Mortola, Ventigmiglia, in 
February of this year. 

Descr. — A small tree, thirty to forty feet high, sparingly 
branched, with ashy bark ; branchlets slender, glabrous. 
Leaves one and a quarter to two inches long, very shortly 
petioled, elliptic or oblong, tip obtuse or rounded, margin 
entire or undulate; stipules two, small. Flowers about 
two-thirds of an inch broad, few together in a small 
panicle, greenish yellow, shortly pedicelled, the terminal 
in the panicle fertile, the lateral male. Calyx-tube short ; 
lobes five, ovate, valvate. Petals five, small, spathulate. 
Disk fleshy, occupying the base of the calyx, and pro- 
jecting five lobes which are adnate to the surfaces of the 
calyx-lobes. Stamens 10, five opposite the petals inserted 
in the bottom of the disk, and five on the lobes of the 
disk; filaments subulate, anthers small. Carpels five, 
cohering by their bases, tomentose, many-ovuled ; styles 
short, stigmas dilated. Fruit of five obovoid, coriaceous, 
tomentose, stellately spreading follicles, seated on the 
persistent withered calyx. — /. I). H. 

W taSil Fl0Werj 2 and 3 * stamens;4 ' P istil ! 5 > *ip« ^uit; 6, seed -.-All 



7569 




M- S del, J.N Fitch. lith 



Afincent Broote.Day &. Son Imp 



L Reeve &.C° London 



Tab. 7569. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM ketusum. 

Native of Peru. 

Nat. Ord. ORCHiDEiE.— Tribe VandejE. 

Genus Odontoglossum, H.B.K. ; {Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 561.) 



Odontoglossum (Myauthum) retusum ; pseudobulbis ovoideis compressis 
Isevibus nudis, foliis anguste lineari-lanceolatis obtusis, scapo gracili 
elongato vaginis subulatis instructo, paniculaa elongatse anguste rachi 
ramisque remotis paucifloris gracilibus brunneia, bracteis ovatis acutis 
membranaceis pallidis, pedicellis cum ovariis -£-§ poll, longis coccineis, 
sepalis petalisque aurantiaco-coccineis oblanceolatis acuminatis, sepalo 
dorsali § poll, longo porrecto, lateralibus longioribus subparallelis 
deflexis et paullo recurvis, petalis sepalo dorsali aubsequi longis elliptico- 
lanceolatis acuminatis, labello sessili fere quadruto aureo undulato 
apice truncato cuspidate, lobis lateralibus basilaribus parvis rotundatis, 
disco basi ruguloso et callis geminis magnis subglobosis instructo, 
columna crassa late 2-alata, alis porrectis. 

O. retusum, Lindl. in Benth. PI. Hartweg. p. 152 ; Fol. Orchid., Odontoglossum, 
p. 13. Whip. Ann. vol. vi. p. 837. 



The section Myanthum was established by Lindley (Fol. 
Orchid., p. 11), for the reception of a few species^ of 
Odontoglossum, in which the lateral sepals, instead of being 
widely spreading, are more nearly parallel and deflexed 
more or less under the lip, and the lip is sessile, or nearly 
so ; the lateral sepals should further be manifestly clawed, 
but this is not the case in the plant here figured. 

0. retusum was discovered by Hartweg in 1841, on 
rocks in the mountains of Saraguru, near Loxa, in Ecuador 
(not Peru, as stated by Lindley) in no doubt a temperate 
climate, the Loxa valley being 6-8000 ft. above the sea. 
It was imported into this country upwards of fifteen years 
ago, as there are specimens in the Kew Herbarium received 
from Messrs. Veitch in 1884. There are also others re- 
ceived from Messrs. Sander & Co. in 1891, and in the 
same year from Mr. Linden's establishment (L'Hortic. 
Internationale) in Brussels. The specimen figured was 
communicated by E. H. Woodall, Esq., of St. Nicholas 
House, Scarborough, in April, 1897. 

Decembeb 1st, 1897. 



Descr.—Pseudobulbs one to nearly two inches long, 
ovoid, compressed, pale green, quite smooth, with two or 
three lanceolate, brown, basal loose scales. Leaves soli- 
tary on the old pseudobulb, and two to three together in 
the new flowerless shoots ; those from the pseudobulbs 
six to eight inches long, narrowly linear-lanceolate, 
obtuse, dark green and channelled down the middle above, 
paler with a distinct midrib beneath. Scape tall, slender, 
pale brown, enclosed below by the long narrow sheath of 
a linear leaf. Panicle a foot long or more, narrow ; 
rachis slender, pale brown ; branches one to two inches 
long, distant, spreading and recurved, three- to five- 
flowered; bracts ovate, acuminate, pale, membranous; 
pedicels with ovary one half to two-thirds of an inch 
long, scarlet. Flowers about an inch broad when spread 
open. Sepals 'and petals orange-scarlet, with paler margins, 
oblanceolate, acuminate ; dorsal sepal arched, two -thirds 
of an inch long, lateral longer, deflexed and recurved ; 
petals about equalling the dorsal sepal. Lip shorter than 
the sepals, golden yellow, broadly trulliform, undulate, 
basal lobes short, rounded ; apex truncate or retuse, cus- 
pidate; disk rugulose towards the base, where are two 
large globose, prominent calli. Column short, stout, with 
two broad, prominent wings. — /. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Lip and column ; 2, pollinia -.—Both enlarged. 



:.■-.: 




"M.S. del, JN Htchlith. 



"Vincent Bro oks ,Day & Sonln 



L Reeve &C? London. 



Tab. 7570. 

KNIPHOFIA BREVIFLOEA. 
Native of Natal and Orange Free State. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^:. — Tribe Hemerocallidea;. 
Genus Kntphoeia, Mmneli. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 775.) 



Kniphofia brevijlora ; foliis linearibus longe acuminatis integris sordide 
viridibus dorso acute carinatis, pedunculo stricto erecto foliis requilongo, 
racemo oblongo-cylindrico supra basin denso, pedicellis brevibus, in- 
ferioribus cernuis, bracteis lanceolatis, perianthio parvo subcylindrico 
pallide luteo lobis ovatis, staminibus demum leviter exsertis, stylo 
starninibns longiore, fructu parvo globoso. 

K. breviflora, Harv. ; Baker in Journ. Linn. Soe. vol. xi. 361 ; Fl. Cap. vol. vi. 
p. 277.) 



There are now thirty-five species of this genus known 
at the Cape, and thirteen species in Tropical Africa, only 
one of which is common to both areas. The present is 
one of the smallest known species, being nearly allied to 
K. modesta, Baker (Bot. Mag. tab. 7293), but with the 
flowers bright yellow, instead of white. It was first 
gathered in 1862 by Mr. Thomas Cooper in the Orange 
Free State, and was named in manuscript by Professor 
Harvey shortly before his death. It was again collected in 
Natal in 1895 by Mr. J. Medley Wood, and by him intro- 
duced into cultivation through Mr. Max Leichtlin of 
Baden Baden. Our drawing was made from a plant that 
flowered at Kew in October, 1896. As it was found in 
Natal at an elevation of between five thousand and six 
thousand feet above sea-level, no doubt it will be perfectly 
hardy. The Natal plant is rather more robust, and the 
flowers are a little larger than in that from the Orange 
Free State, but I think they can only be regarded as 
forms of a single species. 

Descr. — Leaves narrowly linear, one foot and a half or 

two feet long, tapering gradually to a long point, dull 

green, acutely keeled on the back, entire on the margin. 

Peduncle stiffly erect, as long as the leaves. Raceme 

December 1st, 1897. 



dense above the base, oblong- cylindrical, three or four 
inches long; upper flowers ascending, lower drooping; 
pedicels very short ; bracts scariose, lanceolate. Perianth 
bright, pale yellow, subcylindrical, a quarter or a third of 
an inch long; lobes short, ovate. Stamens finally just 
exserted. Style finally overtopping the anthers. Fruit 
small, globose— J. G. Baler. 



«#Si. lf C nT f Ct - i0n °, f leaf ; 2 ' bract ; 3 ' an entire flow er; 4, front view 
of anther ; 5, back view of anther -.-All more or less enlarged. 







'.KtcJiith 



"Vincent Bra ote, D ay &SonImp 



L Reeve &.C?Lcmdca-L 



Tab. 7571. 

HABENARIA rhodocheila. 

Native of Southern China. 

Nat. Ord- Obchide^:. — Tribe Ophkyde^e. 
Genus Habenabia, Willd. ; (Benth. Sf Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii, p. 624.) 



Habenabja (Platyglossa) rhodocheila ; tuberibus caraosis, caule folioso, 
foliislineari-oblongis acuminatis undulatis, basi amplexi-caulibus, racemo 
laxo multi-floro, bracteis lanceolatis infimis ovario gracili curvo aaqui- 
longis, sepalis viridibus, dorsali hemispherico, lateralibus deflexis oblongia 
obtusis apfcibus tortis, petalis lineari-spathulatis viridibus erectis, labello 
sepalis_ 2-3-plo longiore unguiculato rubro-aurantiaco lobis lateralibus 
oblongis obtusis patenti-decurvis, intermedio minore breviter unguiculato 
bipartito segmentis dimidiato-ovatis obtusis, calcare valido labello duplo 
longiore incurvo flavido infra medium subinflato apice acuto, ore lamella 
ungue labelli orta clauso, antheras tubulis suberectis, rostello brevi 
triangulari, stigmatis processubus crassis decurvis. 

H. rhodocheila, Hance in Ann. Sc. Nat. ser. v. vol. v. (1866) p. 243. 



Habenaria rhodocheila was made known by the late 
Dr. Hance, F.L.S., when resident at Whampoa, and de- 
scribed by him from specimens collected by Dr. Sampson 
in 1864 on rocks near the Buddhist monastery of Fi-loi- 
tsz, on the banks of the North River, above Canton. It 
belongs to a section of the genus of which there are 
many Asiatic species, characterized by the deflexed lateral 
sepals, erect petals forming a hood with the dorsal sepal, 
the long, tubular anther-cells and prominent stigmatic 
processes. Dr. Hance regarded it as most closely allied 
to H. crinifera, Lindl. (Wight fc. PI. Ind. Or. t. 926), but 
that species differs much in habit, being scapigerous, with 
the leaves nearly all radical, and has crenate and caudate 
lobes of the lip. It is much more nearly and indeed very 
closely allied to H. militarw, Reichb. f., of Cambogia. 

Tubers of H. rhodocheila were received at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from Mr. Chas. Ford, Superintendent of 
the Gardens, &c, of Hong Kong, in January, 1895, 
which flowered in a warm house in June, 1897. The 
species varies greatly in the colour of the lip ; Hance 
describes it as deep rose-colrd., in the Kew plants it 
varied from orange-red to madder yellow. 
December 1st, 1897. 



Deser. — Tubers cylindric, fleshy. Stem including the 
raceme, a foot high and upwards, leafy throughout, 
terete, green. Leaves, lower spreading, four to six inches 
long, by nearly one broad, linear-oblong, acuminate, undu- 
late, base amplexicaul ; upper much smaller, suberect, 
lanceolate. Raceme three to five inches long, rather lax- 
fld. ; bracts lanceolate, acuminate, green, of the lower 
flowers as long as the ovary, of the upper shorter. Ovary 
an inch long, slender, curved, subrostrate. Sepals green, 
less than half an inch long, dorsal hemispheric ; lateral 
oblong, obtuse, tips deflexed. Petals linear-spathulate, 
green, erect, margining the dorsal sepal. Lip twice as 
long as the sepals or more, shortly clawed, from rose-red 
to deep orange-red, side-lobes shorter than the mid-lobe, 
pointing forward, oblong, obtuse, mid-lobe smaller, clawed, 
deeply 2-lobed ; spur nearly twice as long as the lip, stout, 
incurved, dirty yellow. Anther-tubes ascending, tips 
coloured. Rostellum small, triangular. Stigmatic processes 
stout, sausage-shaped, decurved, of the colour of the lip. 
— /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Side view of sepals, petals, and column; 2, front view of column 
and base of lip : — Both enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORAS- 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA f the 

Flowering' Plai 

Isles. For the use 

F.R.S. 6th E v Sir J. D 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA . 

to B 

^ravings. 4th Edition, revised ar 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, r V to 

Local Floras. ntham, F.R.S. , 

Society. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wi 

localities of the less common 
With Coloured Map 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that 

known to be natives of 

,. F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 I 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH M< ontaining Descri: 

all the Genera and Species (wit ! 

Britain and Ireland. By P. Hobkih 

Ed: 1 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Mon. 

British Mosses, illustrated by 1 

icture. By R. Biu< 
with 45 Piatt ■'. II., 42s. &£. Part XVII., 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA 

and others. Complete in 7 Voi - 

FLORA AUSTRALIANS 

Australian Territory. Bv 
Tinder the 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHEL1 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of 
F.L.S. . Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published an 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENS1S: a Systematic Description 

the Cape C I I , and Port 3 

F.B. v/ilhelm Solder, Ph.D. Vole. 

Vol VI. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRi 

F.L.S. Vols. 3 
First Commissi' 

HANDBOOK of 

Descr 
Kermadec 

at Colony. Cot'.. 

FLORA of the BRITI!- 

Dr. Gki- 
tary of Si 

FLORA BONGKOS 

Plar 
Pus 

ON the FLORA 
Pi p 



B0TA1S ICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENDS OF No. 636, DECEMBER, 1897. 

IOTTII. 

ffARIA. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 
and Port N<. 

Edited by W. T. THI8ELTON-DYER, C.M.G,, F.R.S., 

"• overtime; Cape of Good Hope 

■ Natal. 
Vols. I. to III. lJ^s. ejich. 



FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

THE HEMlrltRA HOMOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS, 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 



^K1 J H >< >P r Ii:ilA I MilCA. 



Colo aped Piatt 



INDEX 

To Vol. LIII. of the Third Series, or Vol. OXXIH. of 
the whole Work. 



7558 Agave Boucbei. 

7527 „ Haseloffii. 
7532 ,, kewensis. 
7567 „ Schofctii. 

7512 Aristolochia clypeata. 
7540 Begonia Baumanni . 

7514 Berkbeya Adlami. 
7516 Bignonia buccinatoria. 
7560 Calathea rufibarba. 
7543 Cattleya elongata. 

7554 Cirrhopetalum Curtisii. 
7557 „ robustum. 

7515 Croton Eluteria. 

7513 Cynoglossum nervosum . 

7564 Cynorchis grandiflora. 
7551 „ purpurascens. 

7548 Dendrobium denudans. 

7525 „ sarmentosum. 

7526 Didymocarpus malayana. 

7535 Dimorpbotheca Ecklonis. 

7565 Drimia Coleas. 

7550 Ficus erecta, var. Sieboldii. 

7549 Gasteria fusco-punctata. 

7528 Gentiana tibetica. 

7536 Gomphocarpus setosus. 
7530 Gongora tricolor. 
7524 Grevillea Hilliana. 
7571 Habenaria rhodocbeila. 

7555 Helianthus giganteus. 
7545 „ tuberosus. 
7521 Hemipilia amethystina. 



7523 Holothrix ortboceras. 
7570 Kniphofia breviflora. 

7541 Laelia longipes. 

7519 Ligustrum coriaceum. 

7546 Lissocbilus milanjianus. 

7547 Lycoris squamigera. 

7562 Mammea americana. 

7533 Maxillaria Houtteaua. 
7518 „ Sanderiana. 
7517 Myrmecodia Antoinii. 
7569 Odontoglossum retusum. 

7520 Paracaryum beliocarpum. 
7544 Polygonum baldschuanicum. 
7559 Primula sinensis. 

7561 Pterisanthes polita. 
7568 Quillaja sapotiaria. 

7537 Renanthera Storiei. 
7552 Scbeelea kewensis. 
7553 

7566 Scoliopus Bigelovii. 
7531 Senecio Smitbii. 

7538 Strobilanthes callosus. 

7534 Syringa amurensis. 

7563 Tainia penangiana. 
7529 Tristania laurina. 
7556 Veronica Balfouriana. 

7539 n diosmsefolia, var. 
trisepala. 

7522 Wistaria chinensis, var. multi- 
juga. 

7542 Zamia obliqua.