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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CUKTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPBIS1NG THE 



plants of tfoe liopal (gartiens; of &eto, 

AND 

OP OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., K.C.S.T., 

F.R.S., F.L.S., etc., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., COBHESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 

VOL. III. 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

( Or Vol. CXXII. of the Whole Work.) 




" Among the distant mountains flower and weed, 
Which thou hast taken to thee as thine own, 
Making- all kindness registered and known." 

WOBDSWOBTH. 



LONDON: 
L. REEVE & CO., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1896. 

[All rights reserved.] 



Bot. Garden, 

1898. 



iosboH : 

PltlNIKB IT GILBERT AND HTVIKGTOW ID. 
BT. JOHJi'8 BOCSS, CUSIOWJH, HOAD, B G. 



TO 



ME. GUSTAV MANN, 

Late Assistant Conservator of Forests, Assam. 

My deae Me. Mann, 

Your name recurs so frequently during a succes- 
sion of years in the Botanical Magazine, as the discoverer 
of interesting and beautiful Tropical African Plants, that 
the dedication to you of a volume of this work is a duty 
and pleasure on the part of your old friend the Editor. 

To this claim must be added the greater one of your 
epoch-marking contribution to Botanical Geography ; for it 
was by means of the admirable collections of plants which 
you made during your arduous and perilous exploration of 
the Cameroons Mountains and Fernando Po, that the 
presence of a European element in the Flora of the 
mountains of Western Tropical Africa was disclosed. 
Believe me, 

Very sincerely yours, 

J. D. HOOKER. 

Tee Camp, Sunningdaie. 
Dec. 1st, 1896. 



No 613. 

VOL, LII.-— JANUAR Price 3s, Gd. e 

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CITRUS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

.• PEI8IN9 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KE\ 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMEN I REAT BRITAIN, 

(TABLE DESCRIPTIO 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKF 

ICatc ©itcctor of tfee &onal botanic ©artrens 




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UTH, F.L.S 

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Tab. 7452. 
STANHOPEA Haseloviana. 

Native of Peru. 

Nat. Ord. Obchideje. — Tribe Vandeje. 
Genus Stanhopea, Frost; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 549.) 



Stanhopea Haseloviana; pseudobulbis ampullasformibus, foliis petiolatia 
oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis sub 7-nerviis, racemis 3-5-8oris, pedunculo 
bracteis scaphaaformibus sepalisque dorso nigro punctulatis, floribus 
maximis, sepalis elliptico-rotundatis petalisque intus pallidis maculis 
magnis rubris ambita irregulariter crenatis conspersis, lateralibas reflexis, 
dorsali angustiore arcuato, petalis erectis v. reflexis obovato-oblongis 
acuminatis pallide roseis, labello elongato sigmoideo-flexuoso vix unguicu- 
lato purpureo maculato, hypochilio lato carnoso basi saccate- sacco intns 
fimbriate-, epicbilio 3-partito, segmentis lateralibus corniformibus, inter- 
medio late unguiculato ovato-rotundato obtuse- euspidato, columna 
purpureo maculata supra medium acguste alata apice bifida lobis acutis. 

S. Haseloviana, Reichb. f. Xen. Orchid, vol. i. p. 123, 196, t. 72, et in Ott & 
Dietr, Algem. Gartenz. 1855, p. 322 (errore HaselofBana). 



The flowers of certain Orchids are amongst the largest 
in the vegetable kingdom. Referring to Mr. Rolfe on 
this subject he has given me the following as the most 
gigantic of Orchid flowers in his experience, namely, 
Sobralia manantha, Lindl. (t. 4446), and Coryanthes 
Fieldingii, Lindl., both nine inches in diameter ; Cat- 
tleya Warsceiviczu, Reichb. f., eight inches ; Stanhopea 
tigrina, Batem. (t. 4097) seven inches ; and he has found 
the petals of Selenipedium caudatum, Reichb. f., to measure 
thirty-five. Of the seven species of Stanhopea figured in 
this magazine 8. Haseloviana is most nearly allied to 
S. oculata, Lindl. (Tab. 5300), which has similar annular 
spots with crenulate margins on the petals and sepals, but 
which besides its much smaller size, differs in the long 
acuminate bracts, very long ovaries, narrow pale yellow 
sepals and petals, and in the lip, which has not the double 
flexure of S. Haseloviana. The form of the epichile is the 
same in several other species of the genus. 

8. Haseloviana is a native of Northern Peru, where it 

January 1st, 1896. 



was discovered by the indefatigable collector, Warscewicz, 
half a century ago. 

The specimen figured was obtained from the celebrated 
establishment of M. Linden at Brussels, " L'Horticulture 
Internationale" in 1893. It flowered in the Koyal 
Gardens, Kew, in July, 1894, and perfected its leaves in 
March, 1895. 

Descr. — -Pseudobulbs two to two and a half inches long, 
flagon-shaped. Leaves ten inches long by four broad, 
oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, about 7-nerved, margins 
undulate ; petiole two to three inches long. Eaceme three 
to five-flowered ; peduncle, bracts, ovary and back of the 
sepals covered with minute black dots ; bracts on the green 
peduncle and at the base of the ovary one to two inches 
long, boat-shaped, obtuse, dirty yellow; ovary two inches 
long, grey. Flowers six inches long from the tips of the 
reflexed sepals to that of the lip. Sepals three inches long, 
lateral nearly orbicular, obtusely cuspidate, pale greydorsally, 
ventrally dull yellowish, and covered with scattered annular 
pale rose-colrd. spots one-eighth of an inch in diameter, with 
dark red irregular crenulate borders ; dorsal sepal rather 
narrower, arched over the column, margins recurved. 
Petals nearly as long as the sepals, obovate-oblong, obtusely 
cuspidate, spotted like the sepals. Lip as long as the 
sepals, pendulous, fleshy, curved with a double flexure, 
pale neutral-tint with dark purple spots ; hypochile sub- 
quadrate, saccate at the base, and with three smooth 
ridges in front ; sac fimbriate within ; epichile as long as 
the hypochile, tripartite; lateral segments curved like 
horns ; terminal broadly orbicular- ovate, suddenly narrowed 
into an obtuse cusp. Column as long as the lip, spotted 
with purple, narrowly winged from the middle upwards, 
top bicuspidate. Anthers shortly obtusely beaked. Pol- 
linia narrowly pyriform, about as long as the strap ; gland 
ovate-oblong. — J. D. H. 



Fi#. 1, Top of column; 2, anther; 3 and 4, pollinia : — All enlarged; 
5, reduced fig. of whole plant. 



7453. 




\ Son Im 



i C° London 



Tab. 7453. 
DENDROBIUM Hildebeandti. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. OfiCHiDEiE. — Tribe Epidendre-e. 
Genus Dendrobium, Swartz. ; (Benth. fy Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dendrobium (Eudendrobium) Hildebrandii ; caule elongato robusto compres- 
so sulcato flexuoso basi folioso, foliis lineari-oblongis inaequaliter obtuse 
2-lobulatis coriaceia deciduis, vaginis persistentibua papyraceis, racemis 
pluribus axillaribus 3-4-floris decurvia, pedunculia brevibus, bracteis 
brevibus tubulosis pedicello appressis, pedicellis cum ovariis 1^-pollicari- 
bus, floribuB 3^ poll, diam., sepalis petalisque patulis lineari-oblongis 
snbtortis obtusia v. apiculatis, labello late tubaaformi incurvo longiore 
quam lato primulino tubo dorso gibbo pubescente, limbo explanato 
cordato marginibus erosulis, disco velutino, mento brevi conico obtuso, 
anthera pubescente margine fimbriata. 

D. Hildebrandii, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin (1894), p. 182, and in Orchid. 
Review, vol. iii. (1895), p. 49, cum. Ic. Oard. Chron. (1895), vol. ii. p. 93, 
f. 18. 



A native of the mountainous Shan States in East 
Burma, where it was discovered at an elevation of 1500 
ft. by H. H. Hildebrand, Esq., in 1893, who sent living 
specimens to Messrs. Hugh Low & Co. of Clapton. 
It is said to grow in huge masses, upon one of 
which its discoverer counted one thousand five hundred 
blossoms. Mr. Rolfe considers it to be most nearly allied 
to D. signatum, Reicbb. f., a native of the neighbouring 
country, Siam, and which belongs to the type of the genus 
most familiar to Indian botanists. In colour the flowers 
of D. Hildebrandii vary considerably, and Mr. Watson in- 
forms me that the one here figured is the palest that he 
has seen. Mr. Hildebrand collected specimens with three 
varieties of colour ; one with sepals and petals pale green, 
and lip sulphur-yellow ; another with sepals and petals 
creamy pink, and the lip yellow, and a third like the last, 
but with two dark chocolate blotches in the throat. 

The specimen figured was obtained from Messrs. Low. 
It flowered in the Royal Gardens in May of the present 
year. 

Descr. — Stem twelve to eighteen inches long by upwards 
of half an inch broad, compressed, flexuous, deeply grovecl, 

January 1st, 1896. 



yellow green ; internodes about an inch long, clothed for 
half their length with the white papery sheaths of the old 
leaves, which are edged with brown. Leaves on young 
stems four to six inches long, linear-oblong, tip obliquely 
obtusely 2-lobulate. Racemes many, axillary, decurved, 
three to four-fid. ; peduncle very short, green, half im- 
mersed in the sheaths ; bracts tubular, closely appressed to 
the pedicels, obliquely truncate, white ; pedicel with ovary 
one and a half to two inches long, slender, curved, white 
or pale pink. Flowers three and a half inches across the 
petals. Sepals and petals subsimilar, linear-oblong, obtuse 
or apiculate, and more or less twisted. Lip shortly 
trumpet-shaped, incurved, sulphur or primrose-yellow, 
fading to white round the margins ; tube pubescent exter- 
nally, gibbous dorsally ; limb cordate in outline, with re- 
curved erose margins, disk velvety; mentum short, 
broadly conical, obtuse. Anther hemispheric, pubescent, 
with a fringed anterior margin. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Side and front view of column; 3, anther; 4, pollinia :— All 
enlarged. 



7454. 







Tab. 7454 

ALBERTA magna. 

Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Kubiace.k. — Tribe Alberte^e. 
Genus Alberta, E. Met/. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 109.) 



Alberta magna ; frutex v. arbor fere glaberrima, ramulis teretibus, foliia 
obovato-oblongis obtusis integerrimis coriaceis lucidis in petiolum brevem 
crassum angustatis, costa valida, nervis utrinque 8-10 gracilibus, stipulis 
interpetiolaribua triangularibus aeutis din persistentibm, paniculis 
amplis terminalibus puberulis ramis oppositis inferioribua deflexis, 
bracteis minutis persistentibus, floribus erectis, calycia parvi lobis ovatis 
2 ceteris majoribus demum accrescentibus, corollas pollicaris coccineas tnbo 
superne paullo infiato lobis parvis triangularibus, antheris sessilibus dorso 
hirsutis, calycia fructiferi lobis 2 foliaceo-dilatatis obovato-spathulatis 
reticulatis. 

A. magna, E. Mey. in Linnsea, vol. xii. (1833) p. 258. Harv. Sf Sond. Fl. 
Cap. vol. iii. p. 15. Harv. Th.es. Cap. t. 45. 



Alberta is a small South African and Madagascar genus, 
founded by Meyer in 1838 on the species here represented. 
It was named in honour of Father Albertus Grotus, a 
Dominican Friar, afterwards Bishop of Cologne. He was 
born in Swabia about the year 1200, and being reputed a 
prodigy of learning and genius, the epithet Magnus 
was conferred on him by his contemporaries. Alberta 
belongs to a group of Bubiacese containing seven genera, 
all African, and chiefly tropical. A. magna forms a shrub 
or small tree in the rocky mountains of Natal, at eleva- 
tions of 3-5000 ft., where it forms a conspicuous and 
beautiful object from the glossiness of its evergreen leaves, 
and the beauty of its flowers. There are specimens in the 
Herbarium of Kew from Inanda (Gerrard), from precipices 
of the Great Noodsberg Mt. (Wood) ; and from the Kak- 
loof Falls (Scott). It was discovered by Drege in 1832, 
" between Omsancaba and the great waterfall." 

A. magna was raised in the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, from 
seeds sent in 1889 by Mr. Medley Wood, A.L.S., Curator 
of the Botanical Gardens, Natal. Mr. Watson informs 
me that it flowered for the first time in February, 1895, 

January 1st, 1896. 



and that this was in the Temperate House, where it grows 
freely, and promises to form a large laurel-like shrub. 

Descr. — An evergreen shrub, or small tree, attaining 
thirty feet in height ; branches terete, bark pale. Leaves 
four to five inches long, obovate-oblong, obtuse, quite 
entire, narrowed into a short stout petiole, coriaceous, 
bright green and glossy above, paler beneath ; midrib 
stout, lateral nerves slender ; stipules triangular, acuminate, 
brown. Panicle terminal, strict erect, subpyramidal, six 
inches high, and nearly as broad at the base ; rachis stout, 
and spreading or decurved opposite branches puberulous ; 
bracts very small, ovate, persistent ; pedicels one-sixth to 
one-fourth of an inch long, erect or ascending. Flowers 
erect. Calyx small, pubescent ; lobes erect, ovate, sub- 
acute, two longer than the others. Corolla an inch long, 
bright red ; tube terete, slightly ventricose in the upper 
half, hairy below the middle within ; lobes five, very 
small, triangular, recurved. Anthers sessile, inserted below 
the throat of the corolla, dorsally hirsute, bases bearded, 
connective apiculate. Disk small, tumid. Ovary 2-celled ; 
style long, slender, exserted, tip contracted acutely bifid. 
Fruit a smal 12- celled ovoid deeply grooved drupe, about 
a quarter of an inch long, with persistent calyx-lobes, of 
which two are produced into spathulately obovate coriaceous 
veined wings about an inch long. — J. D. H. 



Pig. 1, Calyx and style ; 2, Section of corolla laid open ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 
r>, vertical section of ovary : — all enlarged ; 6, fruit of the natural size. 



7455 













Tab. 7455. 
GAZANIA pygmjEA. 

Native of South East Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Arctotideje. 
Genns Gazania, Gsertn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 459.) 



Gazania pygmsea ; perennis, foliis anguste lineari-oblanceolatis obtusis in- 
tegerrimis v. remote denticulatia rarius subpinnatifidis supra viridibus 
margines versus scaberulis, subtus tomento appresso uiveis, acapia 
ssepius aphyllis, capitalis amplis, involucrt campanulati basi plus- 
minusve intrusi bracteis linearibus liberis v. in tubum connatis apicibus 
liberis, floribus radii albis dorso medio purpureo vel violaceo fasciatis, 
disci aureis, acheniis filis elongatia flexuosis crinitis, pappi setia aubulatis 
denticulatis. 

G. pygmaea, Sonder in Linnsea, vol. xxiii. (1850) p. 69. Harvey in Harv. Sf 
Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. iii. p. 478. N. E. Br. in " The Garden," April 27th, 
1895, cum Ic. pict. 

G. canescens, Harv. I. c. 

G. nivea, Leichtl. in Wien. Illustr. Gartenz. (1894) 81, f. 21. 

G. bracteata, N. E. Br. in Gard. Chron. (1894) vol. i. p. 620. 



In a revision of some of the species of Gazania by Mr. 
N. E. Brown, contributed to " The Garden," that botanist 
observes of the genus, that "it is one of the most perplex- 
ing that a botanist has to deal with." It includes between 
twenty and thirty species, and is exclusively African in 
so far as at present known, and chiefly South Eastern 
African, though outlying species have been found as far 
north as Abyssinia. The chief difficulties that are en- 
countered in the study of the species are owing to the 
great variability of the foliage of many, from quite entire 
and very narrow to pinnatifid and bipinnatifid, and in the 
case of G. pygmsea to the extraordinary diversity in the 
amount of confluence of the involucral bracts, from being 
nearly free, to forming a campanulate cup. 

Gazania pygmsea has a very wide range of distribution 
in South Africa. It was discovered by the eminent South 
African traveller, Dr. Burchell, the earliest explorer of 
the regions it inhabits, who collected it in various localities 
in Bechuana and Griqua Lands, between the years 1811 and 

Jaxuauy 1st, 1896. 



1814, and it has since been found by many botanists and 
collectors at elevations of 4-5000 ft. in the Transvaal, the 
Orange Free State, and as far north as Matabele Land (by 
the Eev. W. Elliott). The earliest information I have ob- 
tained as to the date of its introduction in Europe is from 
specimens in the Kew Herbarium, sent by Mr. Max Leichtlin 
of Baden Baden in June, 1893 ; and in the same year by 
Mr. Gumbleton, who raised them from seeds sent him from 
Natal by Mr. Adlam. Living specimens sent by the latter 
gentleman flowered in the open air at Kew, and from these 
and others also sent by Mr. Gumbleton, the accompanying 
figures were made. 

Descr. — Root fusiform, sometimes as thick as the thumb, 
giving off many flowering and leafing crowns. Leaves three 
to five inches long, narrowly oblanceolate, obtuse, quite en- 
tire or distantly minutely denticulate, bright green above, 
white with appressed wool beneath, margins recurved, sides 
above and surface more or less scaberulous. Scapes longer 
than the leaves, stout, pale brown or pinkish, naked, or 
with one reduced leaf. Flotver heads two inches and upward 
in diameter. Involucre campanulate, glabrous, brown, base 
rounded or intruded ; bracts linear, obtuse, confluent below 
and spreading above, or all confluent with a campanulate 
or subcylindric cup with four greenish tips. Bay-jl. very 
numerous, elliptic-oblong, obtuse, white with a broad 
dorsal violet or purple band. Disk-fls. yellow. Achenes 
clothed with long flexuous hairs. Pappus hairs subulate, 
rigid, erect, denticulate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. A, Plants that flowered at Kew ; B and C sent by Mr. Gumbleton : — 
fig. 1, fl. of disk ; 2, achene and pappus ; 3, bristle of pappus ; 4, stamens : — 
All enlarged. 



7456 







t"Br oriVs T) av & Son imp 



LHae 



Tab. 7456. 
as arum maximum. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Akistolochiace^i. 
Genus Asartjm, Linn. ; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 122.) 



Asartjm: maximum ; robustum, glabrum , foliis amplis longe petiolatis late ovatis 
acutis basi cordatis lobia incumbentibus divaricatisve supra saturate 
viridibus subtus pallidis costa nervisque elevatis, floribus subsessilibus 
2% poll, latis, perianthio basi obconico dein annulo crasso cincto, superne 
latissime canipanulato 3-lobo, lobis rotundatis intus atropurpureis, singulis 
basi disco fungoso flavo lobo conformi instructis, fauce transverse rugosa 
purpurea, antheris subsessilibus obloDgis obtuse appendiculatis, sty lis 
brevibus connatis, stigmatibus oblongis obtuse 2-coronatis. 

A. maximum, Hemsl. in Gard. Chron. (1890) vol. i. p. 422, and in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. vol. xxvi. (1891) 359. 



The genus Asarum is remarkable for the very great 
differences it exhibits in the form of the perianth, stamens 
and styles, whilst preserving a great similarity in the habit 
of its species. A. maximum differs from all its allies, not 
only in the size of the flowers, which far exceeds (almost 
doubles) that of any other hitherto described species, but 
in the spongy cushions of the bases of the perianth-lobes, 
which cushions together form a three-lobed sort of crown 
in the centre of the flower, of a pale primrose colour, in 
strikng relief against the dark maroon-purple of the rest 
of the lobes. Another notable character is the thickened 
ring girdling the tube of the corolla on a level with the 
top of the ovary. 

Referring to the four species previously figured in this 
work, these illustrate well the great diversities of form in 
the perianth of the genus, diversities so great as to suggest 
their being of generic nature. Thus in A. canadense 
(t. 2769) the corolla lobes are triangular and subcaudate, 

January 1st, 1896 



the tube smooth within, the anthers shorter than their 
filaments, with very long caudiform tips, and the styles are 
united in a column 4-cleft at the top with short truncate 
stigmas. In A, macranthum (t. 7022), the very large flowers 
have the perianth-lobes lobulately undulate, its tube pre- 
sents an inflexed curtain in the throat, above which 
are thickened folds like those of A. maximum, and below 
it, around the organs of fecundation, the walls are can- 
cellated by square pits ; the stamens are very short, the 
styles free with large capitate stigmas. In A. caudigerum 
(t. 7126) the perianth-lobes are shortly triangular, and 
narrowed into long flexuous tails, the surface of the tube 
within is quite even and hairy, the filaments long and 
anthers short, the styles united below, the stigmas short, 
simple and recurved. In A. geophilum (t. 7168) the 
mouth of the perianth is nearly closed, its tube even and 
setulose within, the stamens much as in A. maximum, and 
the very short styles united in pairs with linear stigmatic 
surfaces. Lastly, in A. Thunbergii (Heterotropis asaroides, 
t. 3746) the perianth and stamens are nearly of the 
structure of A. macranthum, but the style and stigmas 
more confluent. 

Some of the above characters and others in the habits 
of the species have been utilized by Duchartre in his 
monograph of the genus (DC. Prodr. vol. xvi. pt. I. 
p. 422) ; but now that the genus is known to contain 
upwards of twenty species, of which he knew only ten, it 
is not surprising that his sections should require both 
modifications and additions. Owing, however, to the 
texture of the flowers which suffer much in drying, it is to 
cultivated specimens rather than to the Herbarium that 
recourse is to be had in elucidating the genus. 

A. maximum is a native of China, where it was dis- 
covered by the indefatigable botanist, A. Henry, Esq., 
F.L.S., in the gorge of the Yang-tse Kiang river, 
1000 miles from its mouth. That gentleman says of it: — 
" Occurs in glens about the Ichang gorge, on sides of 
cliffs, always some distance up. It is the Ma-ti-hsiang 
(i.e. horse-hoof fragrance) of the Chinese, and the root is 
used in medicine." 

Living plants were received in 1894 from Mr. Ford, 



F.L.S., Superintendent of the Botanical Gardens of Hong 
I mg, which flowered in a stove in the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in March of the same year. Mr. Watson informs me 
that the flowers remained fresh on the plant for about a 
- nth.—/. D. H. 



:'ig. 1, Section of the tube of the perianth ; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, styles 
and stigmaB : — All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORAS 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description c 

Flowering: Plants and Ferns indigenous to, c 

Isles. For the use of B- mateure. By George Bentham, 

F.R.S. 6th L. -, Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 10s. 6<L 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., ii "Companion 

to Bentham's " Handbook," an I other British 1315 Wood En- 

dings. 3rd Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 10s 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Gkorge Bt e Linnaean 

Society, New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. T< 
With Coloured Hap and two Plates, 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that 

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Tab. 7457. 
begonia tjmbeacultfera. 

Native of Urazil. 

Nat. Ord. Begoniace.e. 
Genus Begonia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f, Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 841.) 



Begonia umbraculifera ; caulibus elatis robustis indivis, foliis apicem 
versus caulis alteruis distichis longe petiolatis reniformibus v. orbieu-' 
laribus et peltatis denticulatis, stipulis magnis ovatis caducis, cyrais 
supra-alaribus dicliotomo-multifidis, pedunculis valde elongatis basi inter- 
nodio connuentibus, floribus polygamo-monoicis; fl.masc. sepalis 2 orbicula- 
ribus, andrsecio compresso, antheris filamentis liberis longioribus; fl.fcem. 
sepalis 5 ovatis 2 extimis majoribus, ovario 3-loculari, placentis integris, 
stylis 3 brevibus liberis, stigmatibus reniformi-2-Iobis undique jjapillosis, 
capsula asqualiter 3-alata ; fl. hermaph. perianthio stylis stigmatibusque 
fl. fem., similibus staminibus basi v. superficie ovarii 2-5-locularis sine 
ordzne insertis. 

A very remarkable plant in habit, and the second only 
(in so far as is known to me) of the vast genus to which 
it belongs, in which hermaphrodite flowers have been 
observed. The other is B.frigida, A.DC.* (Tab. 5760), 
also a native of Brazil, in which the ovary of the fem. fl. is 
inferior, and 3-4 quetrous, but that of the hermaphrodite 
fl. consists of 3-4 free superior carpels, surrounded by a 
few liypogynous stamens. 

I have sought in vain amongst the sections of the genus 
established by A. De Candolle in the Prodromus, for one 
under which this singular plant should be placed ; and I 
have compared it, also in vain, with all the drawings and 
descriptions to which I have access, in search of any 
species of similar habit, namely, as having a perfectly 
simple, stout, erect stem, with few distant distichous reni- 
form orbicular peltate fleshy leaves, and very long- 
peduncled supra- axillary cymes, the peduncle of which is 
confluent at the base with the internode above it. Befer- 
ring to the key to De Candolle's sections of the genus 
w T hich 1 have given in " The Genera Plantarum," it falls 
into the last group of American ones, those with entire 
placentas and style-arms papillose all over, and amongst 

* For observations on B.frigida see Gard. Ghron. 1860, pp. 146 and 171; 
1661, p. 1092, and Masters, Vegetable Teratology, pp. 199, 303. 
Fejjkuaky 1st, 1896. 



these Wageneria is that into which may for the present 
be placed, though differing from that section in habit and 
foliage, and in having four male perianth-segments. In 
habit it approaches nearest to B. dichotoma, Jacq. Ic. t. 619. 
Mr. Watson informs me that B. umbracnlifera was im- 
ported amongst some Orchids from Brazil by Messrs. F. 
bander & Co., from whom a plant was obtained in 1893* 
and that by far the greater majority of the flowers 
throughout the plant are male. It flowered in the " Begonia 
House of the Royal Gardens in March, 1895. 

t Descr.— Stems six from the root, four feet high, quite 
simple, erect, half an inch in diameter, terete, smooth, pale 
brown, leafing towards the tip only, marked with narrow 
annular scars of fallen stipules. Leaves alternate, fleshy 
tour to six inches m diameter, lower reniform, upper peltate 
obliquely orbicular, retuse, one side more or less produ 
into a broad low auricle, bright pale green and glossy above, 
pale beneath, with eight to ten radiating nerves; margins 
obscurely denticulate. Stipules an inch long, green, cadu- 
cous. Cymes large, supra axillary, diehotomously branched : 
peduncle many times longer than the petiole, confluent at 

and rjtl / mt T°f G ab ° Ve -^ rose - c °lrd. i branches 
and short slender pedicels rose-red. -Flowers crowded in 
small corymbs, chiefly male, with a few female and bi- 
sexual flowers. Mole ji. one inch diam., ebracteate • 
sepals 2, orbicukr, white; stamens about twenty Tn a 
compressed bundle; anthers oblong, obtuse, w£ than 

g b^f 2 celL inl entS; (™* r A an imperfect ub- 
*W 5 11* • i 0var 7 ls formed in the male fl ) 

ihZ'o P ' *{ ^ two outer ratLer the West ' stvles 
celled; V^S ^^tTet^YT'f' % 

onK' «V C C^!',teJ^h^te».pI™di«. flowera, both 
of tie «*.; 4, l«l..phrod ™ .th'l'J;' *•*«■•«■! 3, section of ovary 

6, section of its ovary , hi mufgJ^'Z'JTj^ !' , OTar ^ from i "- 

j i, rmuceu view { whole plallt _ 



7458 




MS.del.J.N.Htxhlith. 



Ifincent Brooks,Da.y & S 



L Reeve &.C 



Tab. 7458. 
SCUTELLARIA fokmosana. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Labiate. — Tribe Nepete;e. 
Genus Scutellaria, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1201.) 



Scutellaria (Vulgares) formosana; fruticulns erectus, ramis tetragonig 
glaberrimis canisve violaceis, foliis breviter petiolatis ovatis v. ovato- 
lanceolatis acaminatis glaberrimis remote subserratis basi cuneatia 
subtus glanduloso-punctatis et remote pilosulis, racemo terminali erecto 
aphyllo laxifloro, floribus oppositis, bracteia minutia pedicelloa breves 
subajquantibus v. brevioribus, calycis paberuli lobis late ovatis, galea 
parva fere orbiculari. corollas erecta? glanduloso-pubescentis tubo f- 
polbcari infra medium gracili viridi intns annulo stellatim pubescente 
cincto, supra medium iuflato limboque saturate violaceo, limbi labio 
superiore integro inferioris lobia lateralibus parvis iutermedio fere 
orbiculari, filamentia pilosis, antlierarum Ioculi8 ciliolatis, gynophori 
magni gibbi collo glanduloso, nuculis granulatis. 

S. formosana, N.E. Br. in Gar A. Ghron. (1894) vol. ii. p 212. 



Amongst the tropical Asiatic skull-caps there is one to 
which S.formosana is nearly allied, and that is S.javaTierms, 
Jungh., which differs in the repand-toothed leaves, in both 
surfaces of these and the racemes being hispidulous in the 
rose-lilac or scarlet corolla, and in the fruiting calyx being 
much longer than that of formosana would (judging from 
immature fruit) probably be. Of S. javanensis, a native of 
Java at an elevation of about (5000 ft., I have seen only 
indifferent specimens. It may prove the same as a 
Sumatran plant in Herb. Kew (probably S. sumatrana, 
Miq.) ; or, as Mr. Brown has observed in his careful 
description of S. formosana cited above, all the three '* may 
be local forms of one species ; but until more is known 
concerning them I deem it best to retain the present 
plant as if distinct, it being clearly distinguishable from 
S. javanensis, and for horticultural purposes worthy of 
distinction." 

8. formosana was, according to a specimen in the Kew 
Herbarium, introduced by Messrs. Veitch from Formosa, 
The specimen here figured is from a plant sent to the 

February 1st, 1896. 



Royal Gardens, Kew, from the Island of Hainan in 
Southern China, in 1894, by Mr. C. Ford, F.L.S., 
Superintendent of the Hong Kong Botanical ' Gardens. 
It flowers freely in a cool greenhouse in early summer. 

Descr. — Stem two to three ft. high, sparingly branched, 
tetragonous, quite glabrous or hoary with a minute 
pubescence, pale violet-blue. Leaves two and a half to 
three inches long, shortly petioled, ovate or ovate-lan- 
ceolate, acuminate, faintly distantly serrate, quite glabrous, 
base cuneate, dark green and shining above, pale green or 
violet beneath, covered with minute glandular dots, and a few 
very short scattered hairs ; nerves six or eight pairs ; petiole 
one-sixth to one quarter of an inch long. Raceme terminal, 
lax-fld., flowers subsecund, opposite, very shortly peduncled; 
bracts very small, green, about as long as the very short 
pedicels ; rachis, bracts, pedicels and calyx puberulous. 
Calyx small, lobes short, triangular, obtuse ; galea small, 
orbicular. Corolla an inch long, glandular-pubescent, tube 
narrow and green below the middle, surrounded above 
the base within by a band of stellate hairs, above the 
middle ventricose and dark violet-blue ; upper lip hooded 
quite entire ; lower 3-partite, lateral lobes small rounded, 
mid-lobe orbicular. Filaments sparsely hairy ; anthers 
didymous, puberulous. Gynophore globose, gibbous, con- 
tracted into a short neck which is girt with glands. 
Nucules granulate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of nnder-surface of leaf; 2, calyx, pedicel and bract; 
3 corolla laid open ; 4 and 6, anthers of median, and 6, of lateral stamens 

Lint « PI* 7 ! 8 / ^ - U ° f fruitin S raceme ' 9 ' nucule J All enlarged, 

except o, which is of nat. size. u ' 



745$ 




M.S.del, J.NRtd-.Ut 



"YLncentBrooTts^ay &. Sonbttp 



L Reeve &C<? London. 



Tab. 7459. 
STERNBERGIA maorantha. 

Native of Western Asia. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide^e. — Tribe Amarylle2B. 

Genus Sternbebgia, Waldst. et Kit. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 721.) 



Stebnbebgia macrantha ; cormo globoso magno tunicis exterioribus mem- 
branaceia brunneia, foliis hysteranthiis vernalibus loratis obtusia aub- 
erectis glaticeacentibus obscure cai-inatia, floribus autumnalibus luteis 
inodoris, pedunculo brevi occulto, spatha membranacea univalvi inferne 
cylindrica apice fissa, perianthii tubo cylindrico elongato, limbi lobis 
oblongia subacutis tubo longioribus, staminibus limbo duplo brevioribus, 
fructu oblongo, seminibus globosis. 

S. macrantha, J. Gay in Balans. Plant, Orient. JSxsicc. 1855, No. 827. 
Baker Handb. Amaryll. p. 33. 

S. Cluaiana, Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. v. p. 148, non Ker. 

S. stipitata, Boiss. et Haussk, FL Orient., vol. v. p. 148. 

S. grandiflora, Boiss. in Kotscky Plant. Gilic. Exsice. No. 344. 

S. latifolia, Boiss. et Haussk. PI. Orient. JSxsiec. 1867. 



This is much the finest of all the Sternbergias, and 
although it is widely distributed in a wild state, extending 
from Smyrna eastward to the west of Persia, and southward 
to Jerusalem and the Sinaitic peninsula, it has only been 
recently introduced into cultivation. From the familiar 
S. lutea it differs in its larger flowers, long perianth-tube, 
and the leaves being produced in spring, instead of with 
the flowers in autumn. At Kew it was received in a living 
state for the first time in 1894 from Mr. E. J. Whittall of 
Smyrna, to whom the Royal Gardens are indebted for so 
many rare and interesting bulbous plants. It has grown 
successfully, both in a sheltered border, in the open air, 
and in pots in a cool conservatory. It is so fine a plant 
that no doubt it will become generally popular. 

Descr. — Corm large, globose ; outer tunics membranous, 
brown, extending three or four inches above its neck. 
Leaves about eight in a rosette, produced in spring, 
lorate, obtuse, suberect, finally a foot long, and 
nearly an inch broad. Peduncle short, hidden inside the 

Febiiuaky 1st, 1896. 



produced outer corm- tunics, always one-flowered. Spathe 
white, membranous, three or four inches long, cylindrical 
in the lower half. Flowers bright yellow, inodorous, pro- 
duced in autumn. Perianth-tube slender, about two inches 
long; limb three inches long; lobes oblong, subacute. 
Stamens inserted at the throat of the perianth-tube, half 
as long as the lobes; anthers linear, dorsifixed. Style 
reaching to the tip of the anthers. Capsule oblong, an 
inch and a half long. Seeds subglobose.— J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Front view of anther; 2, back view of anther ; 3, apex of stvle — 
All enlarged, J ' 



_> 



7460 




M.S., 









Tab. 7460. 

HECHTIA ARGENTEA. 
Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. BEOMELiACEiE. — Tribe Pitcairnie^:. 
Genus Hechtia, Klolzsch ; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 667.) 



Hechtia argentea ; acaulis, f oliis perpluribus dense rosulatis ensiformibus 
rigide coriaceis recurvatis utrinque dense persistenter argenteo-lepidotia 
e basi ad apicem acuminatum sensim attenuatis acaleis marginalibus 
magnis corneis pallidis, pednnculo elongato, foliis bracteiformibus multos 
ovato-lanceolatis integris scariosis adpressis, floribus in glomerulos multis 
globoses sessilos aggregatis, bracteis primariis parvis ovatis scariosis, 
bracteis floriferis ovatis brunneis scariosis flori subaequilongis, sepalis 
ovatis acutis, petalis oblongis obtusis albis calyce vix longioribus, floribas 
femineis ovario ovoideo, stigmatibus tribus sessilibus falcatis, staminibus 
rudimentariis. 

H. argentea, Hort. Beaucame ; K. Koch Wochenschrift , 1864, p. 176. Baker 
in Bot. Mag. sub t. 6554 ; Handb. Bromel. p. 139. 



Hechtia is distinguished from all the other genera of 
Bromellacese by its small white subnnisexual flowers. 
About ten species are now known, all of which inhabit 
Mexico and the Southern United States, and can be easily 
grown in a cool conservatory. The present plant, with its 
dense tufts of persistent silvery leaves, is the most striking 
of all of them, and often attracts the attention of the 
visitors to the' Cactus House at Kew, where this same 
plant has lived for at least a quarter of a century. It grows 
slowly, and flowers but rarely. It flowered first in 1870, 
and the present drawing was partly made then, and was 
finished in 1895. The first notice I can find of the plant 
is of its being exhibited by M. Beaucarne at the Inter- 
national Horticultural Exhibition at Brussels in 1864. 
There are no wild specimens in the Kew Herbarium. 

Descr. — Leaves very numerous, forming a dense sessile 
rosette, recurved, ensiform, acuminate, rigidly coriaceous, 
narrowed gradually from the base to a long point, per- 
sistently silvery on both surfaces, reaching a length of two 
or three feet, armed with copious pungent, pale, horny, 

FsBfiUAAY 1st, 1896. 



marginal prickles. Peduncle three feet long, furnished 
with many adpressed entire scariose ovate-lanceolate bract- 
leaves. Flowers subunisexual, aggregate in many globose 
sessile clusters ; branch-bracts ovate, not longer than the 
clusters ; flower bracts ovate, brownish, about as long as 
the flowers. Sepals ovate, one-sixth of an inch long. 
Petals white, oblong, obtuse, spreading, little longer than 
the calyx. Ovary large in the female flowers, with three 
spreading stigmas, and at its base six rudimentary stamens. 
— J. G. BaJcer. 



Fig. 1, 2, A complete flower; 2, corolla cut open, to show the ovary and 
rudimentary stamena ; 3, horizontal section of ovary, all enlarged ; 4, entire 
plant, much reduced. 




M S.de. 



T *iacent,Broote,Day &Son.irop 



L Reeve &. 0? T.nnHr 



Tab. 7401. 

BIFRENARIA tyrianthina. 
Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidia. — Tribe Vande/k. 
Genus Bifrenaeia, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 546. 



Bifrenaria tyrianthina ; psendobulbis magnis ovoideis trigonis subcancellatis, 
folio sessili elliptico-oblongo, pedunculo valido 3-5-flora decurvo, bracteis 
spathaceis tubulosis brunneis, pedicellis crassis, floribus amplisrubro-pur- 
pureis, marginibus sepalornm et petalorum subcrispatis, sepalis oblongo- 
rotundatis dorsali erecto, lateralibus dorsali multo majoribus latioribnsqae 
ope pedis columnaa in mentum fere bipollicarem rectum obtusum connatis, 
petalis sepalo dorsali paullo minoribus subtrapezoideo-obovatis retusis 
basi cuneatis, labello sepalis multo minore tnbo infundibulari, lobis 
lateralibus rotundatis, terminali lato revoluto intus pilis albis hirsuto, 
callo tubo incluso crasso carnoso subclavato hirsuto apice truncato, 
columna brevissime in pedem elongatum hirsutam producta, polliniarum 
stipitibus liberie. 

B. tyrianthina, Reichb. f. Xenia, vol. i. p. 61 and 223. Begel Gartenfl. vol. 

xiii. (1864) p. 4, t. 422, f. 2. Rolfe in Lindenia, vol. x. t. 416. 
B. Dallemagnei, Hort. Linden. 

Lycaste tyrianthina, Lodd. Cat. ex Loud. Hort. Brit. Ed. 1850, Suppl. p. 582. 
Maxillaria tyrianthina, Sort, ex Baxt. in Loud. I.e. Josst, Beschr. u. Cult. 

Orchid, p. 272. 



The history of Bifrenaria tyrianthina has been given by 
Mr. Rolfe in " Lindenia," cited above. It was introduced 
by Messrs. Loddiges from Brazil about sixty years ago, and 
according to Loudon appears in one of Loddige's catalogues 
as a Lycaste, but in which of the catalogues (there were 
several of the plants of that celebrated nursery) does not 
appear, nor can I find it in any to which I have access. 
There is a specimen of it in Lindley's Herbarium (now at 
Kew) ticketed as from "Mr. Hedges, the Castle, Wal- 
lingford," without date, but obtained probably not long 
after its introduction. Lindley supposed it to be a purple 
flowered variety of B. inodora, Lindl. (B.fragrans, Rod- 
rig.) to which it is very nearly allied ; but according to 
Mr. Rolfe, besides the difference of colour of the flowers, 
the lip is more velvety, the callus more truncate, and the 
mentum longer and stouter. A further difference is that 
B. inodora, though so named by Lindley, is said by Rod- 

February 1st, 1896. 



rigues to be very fragrant, and was subsequently named 
B. fragrans by the latter author. The resemblance of the 
flowers to those of B. Harrisonix (Maxillaria Harrisonise, 
Lindl. (see Tab. 2927) is very strong, in all but the colour 
of the sepals and petals which in that plant are of a pale 
brown. Amongst other differences are the pollinia, which 
in B. Harrisonise are subsessile on a very short broad 2- fid 
strap. 

The plant here figured was obtained in 1893 from the 
establishment of M. Linden, " L' Horticulture Interna- 
tionale," under the name of Bifrenaria Dallemagnei. It 
flowered in a cool house in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
June, 1895. 

Descr. — Psendobulbs three inches long by two and a half 
broad, ovoid, compressed, trigonous, the sides marked with 
many shallow depressions, top dark brown. Leaf about 
six inches long, by two to three broad, sessile, elliptic 
— oblong, suberect, dark green, many-nerved. Scape de- 
curved, then ascending, very stout, about three-fld., green, 
streaked with brown ; sheaths few, and spathaceous bracts 
brown ; pedicel with ovary two inches long, green. 
Flowers three inches broad across the sepals, nearly three 
and a half from the tip of the dorsal sepal to that of the 
mentum, red purple ; margins of sepals and petals obscurely 
crimped. Dorsal sepal broadly oblong, erect ; lateral much 
broader, rounded, connate at their bases with the long 
hairy foot of the column, forming a straight, spur-like 
mentum an inch and a half long. Lip much smaller 
than the sepals, stoutly clawed, three-lobed ; tube funnel- 
shaped ; lateral lobes rounded, erect ; mid-lobe short, very 
broad, revolute, undulate, bright red purple, clothed with 
white hairs ; callus forming a very stout, broad hairy 
cushion between the lateral lobes and ending in a truncate 
boss- Column very sbort. Pollinia each on a straight 
columnar strap, which is seated on an oblong, retuse 
gland.— J. D, H. 

Fig. 1, Lip with one side-lobe removed; 2, column and mentum ; 3, anther- 
cap ; 4, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORAS. 

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7462 










Tab. 7462. 
INCARVILLEA Delavayi. 

Native of China, 

Nat. Ord. BignoniacejK. — Tribe Tecomejb. 
Genus Incarvillea, Jms. ; (Benth. & Sooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1049.) 



Incaevillba Delavayi ; glaberrima, caule brevi erecto robusto, f oliis pedalibns 
lineari-oblongis pinnatis, rachi valida, foliolis suboppositis remote 8-10- 
jngis sesBilibus lanceolatis obtasis crenato-lobulatis supremis confluenti- 
bus, nervia subtus validis, scapo elongato robusto nudo apicem verBua 
plurifloro, bracteis setaceis, floribus magnis breviuscule pedicellatis, calycis 
tubulosi alte 5-costati puberuli dentibus acuminatis, corollse rosaefB 
tubo 2-pollicari curvo, limbi 3-polL diam. lobis rotundatis margine 
undalatis, antberarnm loculiB glabris. 

I. Delavayi, Bur. 8f Franch. in Morot Journ. Bot. (Paris), (1891), 39. Rev. 
Sortie. 1893, p. 544, fig. 173. Journ. Sortie. Ser. 3, vol. xxx. p. 449, f. 1. 
Gartenflor. vol. xliii. (1894), t. 1398. Baillon Sistoire dea Plantes, vol. x. 
p. 52. 



This superb species of the central Asiatic genus 
Incarvillea was discovered by the Abb<S Delavay in pastures 
of the lofty mountains of Yunnan in West China, at eleva- 
tions of 8000-11,500 ft. It was first published by the 
authors cited above in a paper on the plants of Tibet and 
China, chiefly collected by Prince Henri d' Orleans, during 
his and M. Bonvalet's adventurous journey across Central 
Asia. In the same paper the authors give diagnoses of 
eight species from the same region, which, with those 
previously described, makes ten now known, whereas at 
the date of the publication of the Bignoniacese in the 
" Genera Plantarum" (1876), the genus consisted but of 
one. The only species previously figured in this work is 
I. Koopmanni, Lauche (Tab. 6593), a native of Turkestan; 
as to which the late Dr. Kegel informed me by letter that 
I was right in my supposition as to its being only a variety 
of I. Olgse, Reg. 

The plant of I. Delavayi from which the accompanying 
figure is made, was received from Mr. Max Leichtlin of 
Baden Baden, in 1894, and flowered in a cool greenhouse 
of the Royal Gardens in May, 1895. Handsome as it 

Makcu 1st, 1896. 



is it falls far short of the magnificence which the plant 
attains, for Mr. Thompson of Ipswich informs me that 
it flowers with him in an open border much more 
luxuriantly than in a house, one specimen having two 
scapes with nine and ten leaves, and twelve to thirteen 
flowers respectively, and that it withstood the cold of last 
winter (1895) without the slightest protection. 

Descr. — Rootstock stout, lobed. Stem very short, simple, 
or very sparingly branched. Leaves few, radical, twelve 
to eighteen inches long, pinnate; rachis stout, nearly 
terete; leaflets six to eight rather distant pairs or 
fewer, four to five inches long, sessile, subopposite, lan- 
ceolate, subacute, spreading and decurved, unequal-sided, 
coarsely unequally crenate or lobulate, midrib strong, 
lower margin, sometimes slightly decurrent, terminal 
more or less confluent; petiole as long as the blade. 
Scape as long as the leaves or longer, erect ; as thick as a 
goose-quill, naked, three- to thirteen-fld. ; bracts small, 
lanceolate; pedicels half an inch long. Calyx an inch 
long, tubular- campanulate, green, five-angled and -lobed, 
puberulous ; lobes shorter than the tube, ovate-lanceolate, 
acuminate. Corolla bright rose-red ; tube three inches 
long decurved, glabrous within, base within the calyx 
cyhndric, above it slightly inflated ; limb three to three 
and a half inches broad, lobes rounded, margins undulate, 
recurved. Stamens included, filaments glabrous ; anthers 
glabrous, cells divaricate, dorsally spurred. Dish cupular. 
Ovary cylmdric; style included, stigma large, peltate. 
Capsule one and a half to two inches long, tetragonous, 
valves corrugated Seeds flattened, broadly obovate, 
winged, rugose. — J. D. H. 



JOSL }'■ , Portion ?* ca }y x l aid open, showing the disk and ovarv • 2 base of 
corolla laid open with stamens ; 3 and 4, anthers -.-All enlarged ' ' 



14& 







Tab. 7463. 
COMANTHOSPHACE japonica. 
Native of Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Labiate. — Tribe Satureine.e. 

Genua Comanthosphace (Spenser Moore in Lond. Journ. Bot. vol. xv. (1877), 

p. 293.) 



Comanthosphace japonica; suffruticosa, ramnlis tetragonis inflorescentiaque 
plus minus cano-tomentosi?, foliis petiolatis ovatis ovato-lanceolatisve 
grouse serratis, verticillastris multifloris in racemum strictum erectum 
bracteatum dispositis, bracteis amplis membranaceis rotundatis concavis 
rostratis v. acuminatis caducissimis, floribus breviter pedicellatis flavidis, 
calycis tubulosi enervis dentibus brevissimis obtusis, corolla? pnberulae 
tubo exserto intns annulo pubescente cincto, limbi lobis 2 posticis brevi- 
bus rotundatis erectis, lateralibus paullo majoribus, antico duplo majore 
bemispherico deflexo, staminibus deflexis, filamentis glaberrimis, antberis 
minutis globosis, disco annulari, nuculis oblongis truncatis glandulosia. 

C. japonica, barbinervis, sublanceolata & stellipila, Sp. Moore, I. c. 

Pogostemon japonicus, Benth. in Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. 
°p. 1180. 

Elsboltzia japonica, barbinervis, sublanceolata, & stellipila, Miquel Ann. 
Mus. Lugol. Bat. vol. ii. p. 103 (Prolus. Japon. p. 36). Franch. $ Sav. 
Enum. PI. Japon. vol. i. p. 364. 

The genus Comanthosphace was established upon four 
species of Japanese plants, first described under Elsholtzia 
by Miquel, and subsequently referred (as one species, 
on the authority of Maximovicz) to Pogostemon by Bentham. 
That the affinity of Comanthosphace is with Pogostemon is, 
1 think, unquestionable, as is shown in the structure of 
the anthers, but it differs from all species of that genus 
in the form of the corolla, which is 5-lobed, and strongly 
bilabiate, with a prominent hemispheric lower lip, whereas 
in Pogostemon the corolla limb is nearly equally 4-fid. As 
Mr. Moore observes, Comanthosphace approaches Elsholtzia 
in the form of the corolla which is somewhat two lipped 
in that genus ; but there is a wide difference between them 
in this organ, and a still wider in the anthers, those of 
Elsholtzia being ovoid or oblong, and distantly 2-celled, 
and the cells 2-valved, while in Comanthosphace, as in 
Pogostemon they are subglobose, imperfectly 2-celled, and 
2-valved. In bis description of the genus Mr. Moore, by 

March 1st, 1896. 



oversight no doubt, describes the flowers as obscurely 
bracteate, but the bracts are very large, as shown in the 
figure ; they are, however, very caducous. 

ComanthospJiace japonica was raised at the Royal 
Gardens from seeds sent by Professor Sargent, Diiector 
of the Harvard Arboretum, Massachusetts, in 1893 : plants 
raised from which flowered in the open air in the Kevv 
Arboretum in October, 1894. 

Descr. — A small undershrub, with hoary branches and 
inflorescence. Stem 4-gonous. Leaves three to five inches 
long, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, serrate, dark green and 
subrugosely reticulated above with sunk nerves, pale 
beneath with raised nerves, base narrowed into a short 
stout channelled petiole. Spikes terminal, strict, erect, 
very shortly peduncled ; rachis stout ; flowers very shortly 
pedicelied in small bracteate verticillasters, about half an 
inch long ; bracts half an inch long, orbicular or ovate, con- 
cave, beaked, very caducous, pale brown. Calyx tubular- 
campanulate, 5-toothed, green. Corolla very small, yellow, 
tube cylindric, girt within with a pubescent ring, lobes 
small ; upper lip obtusely 4-toothed ; lower projecting, 
orbicular, concave. Stamens 4, filaments very long, far 
exserted, subequal, glabrous ; anthers minute, 1-celled, 
2-valved. Disk annular. Nucules truncate. Style long, 
exserted, stigma 2-fid. — J". D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, corolla laid open with stamens; 3 and 4, top of 
filaments with anthers ; 5, disk and ovary: — All enlarged. 




7i ncenl Br o 6Usfia.y & Son tap 



1. Reeve -1C? London 



Tab. 7464. 

DIPODIUM PALUDOSUM. 

Native of the Malayan Peninsula. 

Nat. Ord. Okchide^;. — Tribe Vandejb. 
Genua Dipodium, Br. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 539.) 

Dipodium: paludosum; caule stricto robuato erecto, foliia diatichia erecto- 
patentibna strictia enaiformibua acutia carinati8, vaginis equitantibua 
costatis, acapo eloDgato erecto, racemo laxifloro, bracteis parviB ova t 19 » 
ovario elongato, floribua longiuscule pedicellatia albia (intua pallide) 
purpareo maculatia, aepalia petalisqae consimilibus liueari-oblongis ob- 
tuaia patulia demum reflexis, labello aepalia sequilongo anguste lan- 
ceolato subcymbiforme acuto baai v. altiua bidentato conduphcato mtua 
marginibua coataque medio villoaia dorao glabro, columna brevi craaaa 
lateribua rotundatia antice basin veraua excavatum pubeacente, anthera 
parva terminali, polliniia aegregatim ope caudicularum glaudulae magnss 
orbicalari affixia, caudiculia pone pollinia calcaratia. 

D. paludoaum, Eeichb. f. Xen. Orchid, vol. ii. p. 15 ; in Walp. Ann. vol. vi. 
p. 648. Hooh.f. Ft. Brit. Ind, vol. vi. p. 19. 

Grammatophyllum paludoaum, Griff. Notul. vol. iii. p. 344 ; Ic. PI. Asiat. t. 
323. 

Waileaia paludoaa, Beichb.f. in Bonpland (1854), p. 93. 



Dipodium is one of a few remarkable genera of Orchids 
in which the species are divisible into two groups of 
absolutely opposite mode of growth, habit, foliage and 
inflorescence, but of similar floral structure. It was 
established by Brown on an Australian leafless plant, with 
fleshy roots, and no other stem but a scaly flowering scape ; 
to which was added by Reichenbach two Malayan p ants 
with the habit of that here figured. Except some slight 
difference in the pollinia, and in the length of the column, 
that of the leafless species being much longer than ot 
the leafy, I can point out no character beyond that ^ot 
habit to distinguish these two forms genencally. ^ notner 
species, D. pictum, Reichb. f., a native of the Malayan 
Peninsula, but first described from Java, has an elongate, 
scandent, epiphytic stem, from a terrestrial root. It is 
the Leopardanthus scandens of Blume, and, like D. pictum, 
has flowers blotched, in this case with crimson, hhould 
the two forms of the genus be dissociated in name, 
Leopardanthus should be taken for the leafy forms, 
having precedence by one year (1848) over Wailesia, 

March 1»t, 1896. 



which Lindley proposed (Journ. Bort. Soc. iv. (1849) 262 ; 
Paxt. Mag. Bot. xvi. 321, with fig.) for the plant described 
by Blume. 

D. paludosum is a native of marshes in the Malayan 
Peninsula. There are specimens of it in the Kew 
Herbarium from Griffith, who was its discoverer (in or 
about 1841), and Perak ones from Wray. Griffith found 
it growing in similar localities to those frequented by 
several species of Nepenthes, Rijpericum and Lycopodium 
cemuum. 

The specimen here figured wa<? sent in 1893 from the 
Royal Gardens of Glasnevin, Dublin, by their keeper, 
F. VV. Moore, A.L.S., to Kew, where it flowered in July, 
1895, in a stove. 

Descr. — Wbole plant two to three feet high. Stem 
erect, rooting at the base, stout, simple or sparingly 
branched, densely leafy. Leaves strict, erecto-patent, ten 
to twelve inches long, by an inch broad, eusiform, sub- 
acute, distichous, coriaceous, channelled above, keeled 
beneath, bright green, margins recurved, articulate upon 
the short green sheath which is very strongly ribbed. 
Scape axillary, twelve to sixteen inches long with the 
raceme which occupies half its length, erect, terete, 
smooth, green ; sheaths appressed. Flowers loosely 
racemed; bracts very small, ovate, brown. Peduncle with 
ovary about an inch long, white, spreading. Perianth 
two inches in diameter, very pale straw colour, or nearly 
white, with small purple blotches in the backs of the 
sepals and petals, which are faintly seen in front. Sepals 
and petals similar, linear-oblong, spreading and recurved, 
subacute, rather fleshy. Lip as long as the petals, elon- 
gate cymbiform, two-toothed at the base (the teeth repre- 
sent lateral lobes) ; tip acuminate, recurved ; base within 
and margins broadly villous, dorsally glabrous, with rows 
of purple blotches. Column very short and stout, pubes- 
cent in the deeply concave front. Anther small. Pollinia 
oblong, each seated on a rather stout pedicel, which is 
prolonged into a dorsal spur, and at the base is inserted 
on a large orbicular gland. — /. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Lip; 2, column; 3 and 4, pollinia: — all enlarged; 5, reduced view 
of whole plant. 



7465 









! 

















L Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 7465. 

MASSONIA JASMINIFLORA. 
Native of Orange Free State. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Allied. 
Genus Massonia, Thunb. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 806.) 



Massonia jasminiflora ; foliis binis synanthiis patulis humifusis suborbiculari- 
bus lsevibus glabris viridibus verticaliter multiatriatis, floribus albia 
suaveolentibuB in nmbellam centralem sessilem diepositis, pedicellia 
brevissimis, bracteis membranaceis albis apice viridibus exterioribus 
ovatis periantbii tubo brevioribns, perianthii tubo subcylindrico, lobia 
ovato-Ianceolatis patulis tubo duplo brevioribns, staminibua lobis 
brevioribus, filamentis linearibus baai connatis, antheris oblongis parvis. 

M. jasminiflora, Mori. Burchell ; Baker in Joum. Linn. Soc. vol. xi. p. 390. 



This genus Massonia, -which was named by Thunberg in 
commemoration of the botanical explorer, David Masson, is 
entirely confined to Cape Colony. About thirty species are 
now known, but they are very rarely seen in cultivation. 
The present plant was discovered at the beginning of the 
century by the celebrated traveller Burchell, but up till now 
it has only been known from a single specimen dried from 
his garden at Fulham in 1818, and preserved, like the rest 
of his Cape and Brasilian plants, in the Kew Herbarium. 
It was sent alive to the Royal Gardens in 1892 by the 
Rev. P. 0. Miles of Almonbury, Bristol, who had received 
it from the Orange Free State. All the species of the genus 
agree closely in general habit. This one belongs to a 
small group in which the stamens are shorter than the 
perianth-lobes. It is probable that it is the plant upon 
which Salisbury founded his genus Podocallis. 

Descr. — Bulb ovoid, tunicated. Leaves two to a bulb, 
spreading on the surface of the ground, suborbicular, 
minutely cuspidate two or three inches long and broad, 
glabrous, smooth, dull green, with about fifteen distinctly 
marked vertical ribs. Umbel sessile in the centre of the 
two leaves, many-flowered; pedicels very short; bracts 
ovate, small, membranous, white, tipped with green. 
Perianth white; tube subcylindrical, half an inch long; 

March 1st, 1896. 



lobes ovate-lanceolate, spreading, half as long as the 
tube. Stamens inserted at the throat of the perianth- 
tube, rather shorter than the lobes ; filaments linear, 
connate at the base ; anthers oblong, small. Ovary am- 
pullseform, narrowed gradually into the short style. — 
J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Bract ; 2, flower, cut open ; 3, front view of anther ; 4, back view of 
anther ; 5, pistil ; 6, horizontal section of ovary : — All enlarged. 




iel ei J\' : .;tchliLh 



Vincent Bro oks Da 



I Reeve &C°Loaaan. 



Tab. 7466. 

UTRICULARIA janthina. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Lentibularie^. 
Genus Utricularia, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 987.) 



Uteicularia (Oligocista) janthina ; folio Ionge petiolato reniformi integerrimo 
undulato, scapo 6-8-floro petiolo longiore, bracteis tripartitis pedicellis 
elongatis multoties brevioribus, laciniis lanceolatis intermedio longiore, 
floribus amplis, sepalis subaequalibus cymbiformibus obtusis, corollas 
pallide violaceae labio snperiore bemispberico inferiore bilabellato labello 
Buperiore erecto rotundato valde convexo fasciis 2 aureia verticalibus in- 
strncto, inferiore multo majore dilatato transverse oblongo lateribns 
rotundatis medio plicato, calcare elongato incuryo plica labelli incluso 
apice exserto, ovario ovoideo, stigmate 2 labiato labio snperiore parvo 
acuto inferiore amplo plicato. 

U. janthina, Hook.f. 



The nearest allied species of TJtricidaria to TJ. janthina 
is TJ. reniformis, St. HiL, and I long hesitated before 
venturing to regard the former as anything but a variety, 
differing notably in the colour of the flowers, those of 
TJ. reniformis being described as rose-colrd., with two 
darker lines on the palate ; observations which must have 
been made on the living plant by the author, who was 
also the discoverer of the species. Nor is it easy to 
reconcile the characters of the corollas of the two 
plants, that of reniformis being described as having the 
upper lip truncate emarginate, the lower 3-lobed, the 
lateral lobes broad, the mid-lobe much shorter, and hardly 
produced. In all other respects the two plants seem to 
agree in botanical characters. They also inhabit the same 
country, the Province of Minas Geraes in Brazil ; but 
they differ remarkably in choice of conditions under which 
they were respectively found, for TJ. reniformis is described 
as inhabiting sphagnous swamps, and TJ. janthina the 
axils of the leaves of a Vriesia, probably V. Glaziovii. 

Mr. Sander, by whom U. janthina was introduced into 
England, informs me that this and TJ. longifolia, Grardn., 
both grow on Vriesias, and are very difficult of importation, 

March 1st, 1896. 



for they require that water should frequently be poured 
over them during the voyage. Also that the Central 
American and Roraima (Guiana) species are comparatively 
much easier of importation. 

Plants of U.janthina were received atKewfrom Messrs. 
Sander in 1892. Mr. Watson informs me its first formed 
leaves were twice as large as those here figured. It 
flowered for the first time in Europe in a stove inthe Royal 
Gardens, in July, 1895, the scape being eighteen inches 
long. 

Descr— Leaves two to four inches in diameter, reniform, 
quite entire, undulate, suddenly contracted at the cordate 
base into a slender dull red petiole four to six inches long, 
pale green on both surfaces ; nerves flabellate, very obscure. 
Scape twice as tall as the petiole, green, about six-flowered, 
naked, except for one to two lanceolate, green bracts 
about half an inch long. Flowers racemed; pedicels 
slender, one to one and a quarter inches long; bracts 
much shorter than the pedicels, erect, herbaceous, green, 
three-cleft ; lobes, lanceolate, lateral half as long as the 
central. Sepals two, subequal, boat-shaped, obtuse, her- 
baceous, green. Corolla pale blue ; upper lip hemispheric, 
arching over, and enclosing the upper labellum of the lower 
hp, which is rounded, convex, with two vertical golden 
bands edged with dark violet, lower labellum much larger 
very broad, transversely oblong, one and a half inches 
broad, quite entire, folded down the middle, sides rounded - 
spur elongate, incurved, lodged in the fold of the label- 
lum, and protruded shortly beyond it. Ovary ovoid, pro- 
duced into a short, stout style, which is dilated into a 
lobed stigma, with a short, incurved, spur-like upper lobe 
and a broad, undulate lower one.—/. I). H. 



enhlfel' F ° Tti ° n ° f Wr Hp ° f C ° r ° lla ' with ' stamens ; 2, ovary : -£oth 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORAS. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLO 

Isles 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA of Wood 

] British Plants, 

i, F.L, S.,fi Illustrated Companion 

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Tab. 7467. 
POSOQUERIA macropus. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Kubiace^.— Tribe Gardenie.k. 
Genus Posoqueeia, Aubl. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 83. 



Posoqueeia macropus; ramulis petiolis foliis subtus panicula? ramis calyci- 
busque pubescentibus, foliis breviter petiolatis ovatis acutis y. acumt- 
natis supra Isete viridibus inter nervos profunde impressos tnmidis, subtus 
pallidis nervis prominulis, stipulis triangularibus acutis v. longe 
acuminatis, panicula breviter pedunculata multiflora, bracteis minutis, 
calycis lobis brevibus obtnsis, corollas tubo 5-pollicari, ore villoso, limbi 
alabastro-erecti ovoidei lobis pollicaribus lineari-oblongis apice rotun- 
datis sinistrorsum contortis, antheris lineari-oblongis connectivo crasso, 
loculis margine pilosubs, stigmate bioruri cruribus recurvis glandulosia 
pilosis. 

P. macropus, Mart, in Flora, xxiv. (1841) Beihl. II. p. 79. Mart. Fl. Bras. 
vol. vi. pt. vi. p. 336, t. 140, f. 1. 

P. multiflora, Lemaire Illustr. Hortic. vol. xvi. (1869) t. 597. 



Posoqneria is a tropical American genus, which is 
described as having the limb of the corolla when in 
inclined and gibbous; but this is not the case in P. 
macropus, nor in several other species which I have 
examined. All are shrubs or small trees, most of them 
with large glossy very coriaceous leaves. P. macropus is 
one of the only two described species in which the leaves 
are pubescent beneath. The other is P. palustris, Mart., 
with narrowly oblong leaves, and subcoriaceous calyx- 
lobes. 

P. macropus was described by Martius in 1841, with 
the habitat and collector's name of " Minas ?, Schiiclc." 
In his great " Flora Brasiliensis," cited above, the 
additional habitats are given of S. Brazil, and Campo3 of 
Rio de Janeiro, Glaziou. More recently it has been 
found in the Province of Sta. Catharina, by M. Gautier, 
who sent plants of it to Messrs. Verschaffelt of Ghent, 
when it was published as P. multiflora, by Lemaire. It 
is fairly well figured in the " Flora Brasiliensis," but 
evidently from a poor dried specimen; the corolla lobes 
are represented as too narrow, and the hairs at the mouth 
are omitted, otherwise the figure is very characteristic. 

April 1st, 1806. 



The plant has been for many years in cultivation in the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, having in all probability be*en 
obtained from Messrs. Verschaffelt's establishment, one of 
the oldest surviving correspondents of the Royal Gardens of 
Kew. It forms a bush in a tropical house three to four 
feet in height, flowering in May. The flowers are very 
fragrant. 

Vescr. — A much-branched bush ; branchlets, leaves be- 
neath, petioles and branches of the panicle hispidulously 
pubescent. Leaves four to five inches long, shortly 
petioled, ovate or ovate-oblong, subacute, dark green and 
glossy above, swollen between the eight to ten pairs of 
deeply sunk nerves, paler beneath with raised nerves ; base 
rounded ; margins recurved ; sti/pules triangular, brown, 
acute, or acuminate. Panicle many-flowered, very shortly 
peduncled ; branches short, opposite ; bracts minute ; 
pedicels short, stout. Calyx hispidulous, one-sixth of an 
inch long ; tube hemispheric ; lobes 5, short obtuse. 
Corolla pure white ; tube five inches long, quite glabrous, 
slender, not or obscurely dilated towards the summit, limb 
oblong and erect in bud, with the lobes overlapping to 
the left, five-partite, lobes spreading and recurved, linear- 
oblong, convex, tip rounded ; mouth villous with white 
cellular hairs. Stamens five, inserted at the mouth of the 
corolla, erect ; filaments very short, glabrous ; anthers 
linear-oblong, margins of the cells villous. Ovary two- 
celled, crowned with a fleshy disk; ovules many; style 
very long, filiform ; stigma of two revolute, narrow, hispid 
lobes.— J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and style ; 2, vertical section of calyx and ovary ; 3, portion 
of limb and upper part of tube laid open ; 4 and 5, stamens : — All enlarged. 



7468 




I Reeve &. C 



Tab. 7468. 
HYPOCYRTA pulohea. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace^e. — Tribe Cyrtandre.e. 
Genus Hypocyrta, Mart. ; (Benih. & Hook.f, Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1010.) 



Hytocyrta pulchra ; tota hirtula, caule erecto robusto annulato, foliis 
petiolatia ovatis subacutis basi rotundatis v. aub-cordatis serrulatis, 
aupra fuaco-viridibus bullatis setuloaia (setulis albidia tuberculis globoaia 
insertis) nervia arcnatia utrinque 10-12 pallidioribua, aubtus rubria nervis 
nervulieque prominalis hirtelli8 reticulars, petiolo terete valido, pedun- 
culia solitariia axillaribus petiolia longioribua erectis validis auperne 
incraaaatis, sepalis amplia late ovatia cinnabarinis costa valida, corolla 
calyce duplo longiore ampullaaformi hirsuta, tubo basi gibbo flavido, ore 
constricto, lobia 5 parvia cinnabariais recurvis, ataminibus 4, filamentia 
auperne tortia basi dilatatis et in vaginam poatice fissam basi corollas 
insertam conflnentibus, antheria didymis, disco erecto postico, ovario 
hirsuto, stylo glabro. 

H. pnlchra, N. E. Br. in Gard. Chron. (1894) vol. ii. p. 244; in Kew 
Bulletin, 1895, App. II. p. 44. 



Of the eighteen or twenty known species of Hypocyrta, 
none equal H. pulchra in brilliancy of colouring. Some 
idea of the more usual appearance presented by the species 
may be gained by a reference to two published in this 
magazine, II. strigillosa, Mart. t. 4047, and H. glabra, 
Hook. t. 4346. These, like H. pulchra., are plants of erect 
habit with opposite leaves, solitary axillary flowers, large 
sepals, and an urceolate more or less gibbous corolla with 
a constricted mouth and small recurved lobes. All have 
the filaments dilated at the base and confluent in a broad 
lamina. Of two other plants published in this magazine 
as belonging to Hypocyrta, one, H. gracilis, Mart., belongs 
to the genus Codononthe, Hanst., and the other, H. leuco- 
stoma, Hook., to Besleria. 

The nature of the very short pubescence of the upper 
surface of the leaves of H. pulchra is very curious (see fig. 
1). The whole epidermis is covered with close-set minute 
globose papillas each surmounted by a short bristle. 

Hypocyrta pulchra is a native of New Grenada, whence 
it was imported by Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, from whom 
the plant figured was obtained. It flowered in a stove of 
the Royal Gardens in June, 1895. 
Arjin 1st, 1896. 



Descr. — Stem very stout, erect, columnar, five inches 
nigh, and half an inch in diameter in the specimen figured, 
annulate, with minute buds at the lower nodes, dull grey 
green below, clouded with pale brown, vinous red above, 
and minutely pubescent. Leaves four to five by three and 
a half inches, ovate, subacute, base cordate, rather 
fleshy, serrulate ; upper surface bullate, dull green, clouded 
with brown, and clothed with tubercle-based setulse; beneath 
vinous-red hispidulous, lacunose, midrib pale above; 
nerves about twelve pairs, arching, sunk above, very pro- 
minent beneath, with prominent reticulating nervules ; 
petiole about half an inch long, very stout, vinous red. 
Flowers axillary, solitary. Pedicels one to one and a half 
inch long, erect, stout, pubescent, rather thickened up- 
ward, scarlet. Sepals half an inch long, ovate-cordate, 
erect, pubescent, scarlet. Corolla nearly an inch long, 
urceolate, hirsute except at the glabrous base, pale yellow ; 
mouth constricted, lobes very short, broadly ovate, re- 
curved, scarlet. Filaments dilated below, and confluent in 
a deep lamina. Dish oblong, placed behind the ovary. 
Ovary pubescent ; style glabrous ; stigma capitate, his- 
pidulous. — J. D. B. 



Fig. I, Superficial papillae and hairs of the leaf: 2, corolla; 3, base of 
corolla and stamens ; 5, ovary and disk : — All enlarged. 




H0.> 



MS.de; JN.Rtchhth. 



"VincentJ3roo)<B,Dffl ' 



L Reeve 3. C? London. 



Tab. 7469. 
OLYRA concinna. 
Native of Costa Rica. 

Nat. Ord. Geamine.e. — Tribe Panice2B. 
Genus Olyba, Linn.; {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 1110.) 



Oi/nu. concinna ; gramen nanum, dense crespitosum, glabemmum, culmis 
filiformibus simplicibus decurvis pendulisqne fohosis, foliis omnibus 
conformibus confertis distichis parvulis ovatis cuspidato-acummatis 
inaequilateris basi rotundatis marginibus ciliolatis, costa tenui, nervis 
creberrimis, vaginis lamina multoties brevioribus apice 2-aunculatis, 
auricula altera longius producta, ligula brevi rotundata, spicis axillanbus 
et terminalibus brevibus, rachi nliformi stricta, spicuha 3, fem. 2 
brevissime pedicellatis majusculis altera basi altera apice racheos elongataa 
inserta, masc. solitaria minuta basi spicaB inserta longe pedicellata : spic. 
mase. : gluma solitaria oblonga obtusa 1-nervi, palea glumaa aaqnilonga 
binervi, staminibus 3, lodiculis 3 minimis ; spic. foam. : glumis 3, I et II 
lanceolatis acuminatis 3-nerviis herbaceis, III paulo breviore breviter 
stipitata obtusiuscula coriacea pallida marginibus involutis, palea glumas 
fere aequilonga, lodiculis 3 ovato-rotundatis, ovario in stylum elongatum 
capillarem angustato, stigmatibus 2 brevibus. 

O. concinna, Hook.f. 

Olyra is rather a large genus of tropical grasses, all 
except one or two African, being American. It is re- 
markable for the great variety it displays in habit, foliage, 
inflorescence, and sexuality of the spikes, and in the forms 
of the spikelets and their glumes, which has necessitated 
the lengthy description given above. The majority of the 
species are tall, often branched, or even suffruticose plants, 
with broad, flat, coriaceous leaves often petioled on their 
sheaths ; but a few are of the humble growth of 0. concinna. 
Amongst the latter I find none described to which 0. con- 
cinna could be referred, but there is in the Kew Herbarium 
a flowerless specimen of a species which, if not the same, 
must be very closely allied to it. This last differs in having 
rather longer and narrower leaves, and somewhat hairy leaf- 
sheaths; it was found by Dr. Traill, F.R.S. (uow Professor 
of Botany at Aberdeen) in the Rio Jarua, an affluent of 
the Upper Amazons river, in 1874. Of the described 
^necies the nearest in habit and foliage to 0. concinna is 
O^&hpodioides, Trin. (Doell in Mart, Fl. Bras. ii. n. 327, 



t. 45, f. 1), which, with similar habit, differs totally in 
inflorescence and spikelets. 

0. concinna arrived at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
1891, in a box of filmy-ferns, sent by Mr. C. Winkle, from 
San Jose in Costa Rica. It flowered in January, 1895, and 
forms a very elegant evergreen pot-plant. 

Descr. — A dwarf, densely tufted, perennial grass, quite 
glabrous. Stems six to ten inches long, filiform, at first 
erect, then decurved and drooping, clothed with leaves, 
except the erect basal portion. Leaves an inch long, uni- 
form in disposition and form throughout the stems, dis- 
tichous, sessile in the very short sheaths, almost imbri- 
cating, ovate, cuspidately acuminate, unequal-sided, striate 
with close-set nerves, midrib faint, base rounded, margins 
ciliolate, dark green above, often at length rufous 
towards the tips, pale beneath ; sheaths slightly com- 
pressed, mouth unequally two-auricled, ligule short, 
rounded. Spikes rather shorter than the leaves, terminal 
and axillary ; peduncle enclosed in the leaf-sheaths and 
rachis very slender, strict, rigid, compressed. Spikelets 
three, two fern, and one male. Fern, spikelets very distant, 
one at the top, the other half an inch below it at the base 
of the spike, lanceolate, about half an inch long; gl. I 
and II herbaceous, lanceolate, acuminate, 3-nerved, margins 
incurved, III shortly stipitate, coriaceous, margins in- 
volute ; palea like the gl., but imorter and 
narrower. Lodicules 3. Style very long and slender, 
stigmas short. Male spikelets solitary in a long filiform 
pedicel inserted at the base of the lower fem. spikelet ; 
very minute ; gl. solitary, 1-nerved ; stamens 3, with 3 
minute lodicules at their bases. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Leaf and spike; 2, male spikelet; 3, its glome; 4, stamens and 
lodicules; 5, fern, spikelets with gl. I removed; 6, palea; 7, stipes of gl. Ill 
with lodicules and style and stigmas ; 8, lodicule : — All enlarged. 



stf 



7410 







IReeve&.C G . 



Tab. 7470. 
CATASETUM Ranmi (Mate.), 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. OECHiDEiK. — Tribe Vandeje. 
Genus Catasetum, Rich. ; (Benth. & Hodk.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 537.) 



Catasetum (Myantbus) Bandii (Masc ) ; pseudobulbis oblongis, foliis oblorigo- 
laneeolatis acuminatis, scapo ascendente plurivaginato vaginis brevibns 
obtasis, racemo masculo erecto multifloro ; flmbus masculis 2| poll, latis, 
sepalis petalisque subconsimilibua patentibus lanceolatia acutia subun- 
dulatia marginibua incurvia pallide viridibns purpureo-macalatis, labello 
parvo infero trilobo, lobia lateralibus brevibus fimbriatis, basi inter lobos 
lateralea crista compressa erecta lamellata lamellia fimbriatis instructo, 
lobo termiuali angasto lineari porrecto basi dilatato et dorso tumido- 
marginibus fimbriatis, dein integro apice truncato denticulato, 
disco basin versus setia elongatis penicillato, columna clavata tereti, 
antennia deflexis incnrvis, anthera longe rostrata, polliDiis obovoideis, 
caudicnla lineari, glandula orbiculari floribus fcem. subglobosis, sepalia 
petalisque oblongia recurvis, labello supero urceolari hemispberico, 
columna brevissima crassa rostrata. 

C. Eandii, Rolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1891, p. 394; 1895, App. II. p. 36. 



Mr. Rolfe, who first distinguished and published this 
species, observes that its nearest, and indeed very near 
ally, is (as a reference to the figures at t. 7069 of this maga- 
zine shows) 0. Garnettianum, Rolfe, a native also of the 
Amazons. Indeed, except from its much larger size, more 
spotted perianth, and the far more complicated appendages 
of the lip, Eandii might be regarded as an exaggerated and 
more highly developed form of Garnettianum, which suggests 
that intermediates connecting them may be discovered. 
The pollinia of the two are identical. Under the above 
cited plate I have described the affinities of Garnettianum 
with its other allies, to which I must refer for information 
on this point in respect of G. Eandii. I have in the same 
article given Mr. Rolfe's sections of the genus Catasetum, 
founded on their sexuality and the position of the lip ; where 
these dioecious species with deflexed antenna? on the male 
column, an anticous lip of the male, and a posticous lip of 

An; ii. 1st, 1896. 



the female, form the section Myanthus. This, of course, 
includes both Randii and Oarnettianum. 

The drawing of the male plant here reproduced, was 
made from a specimen sent by E. S. Rand, Esq., of Para, 
to whom the Royal Gardens are also indebted for G 
Lemosn, Rolfe, figured at Tab. 7444 lb arrived in 1894 
and flowered in a stove in March, 1895. Figure 5, represent- 
ing a female flower, was drawn from a specimen preserved 
m alcohol, also sent by Mr, Rand. The precise habitat of 
both is the Upper Amazons, above Manaos. 

Iteacr.— Male plant. Pseudobulbs about four inches 
long, oblong, obtuse, compressed, sulcate. Scape four to 
five inches long, ascending, stout, with four to five short 
tubular obtuse sheaths. Raceme many-fld., inclined, 
flowers rather crowded, about two and a half inches broad'. 
Bracts lanceolate, lower half an inch long; pedicels with 
ovary spreading, about twice as long as the bracts. 
Sepals spreading, lanceolate, acute, with incurved margins, 
rather flexuous, pale apple-green, with small transverse! 
purple-brown spots. Petals like the sepals, erect, with 
recurved tips Lip not half as long as the sepals, three- 

obed ; lateral lobes short, broad, deeply fimbriate, with a 
large erect lamellate and fimbriate crest on the disk of 

rf.5 be ^ ee * them ; mid-lobe longer than the lateral, 
dilated and fimbriate on each side towards its base, then 
linear truncate and crenate at the tip, base with a lar<re 
dorsal rounded knob, disk towards the base with a brush of 
long fleshy filaments. Column stout, terete, speckled with 
purple, beaked at the tip ; antenna? deflexed, and a little 
incurved. Anther long-beaked. Pollinia obovoid, caudicle 
linear; gland orbicular.— Fem. plant; flower subglobose • 
sepals and petals linear-oblong, revolute ; lip posticous! 
pitcher-shaped ; column very short and stout, cuspidate.— 



*%<*•*&£ C0,Umn ° f malei 3 and4 ' fObh, 5, f„. flower .-AH 




iiilmp 



L.Reeve & ( \ 



Tab. 7471. 
PHALERIA ambigua. 
Native of Java. 

Nat. Ord. Thymel;eace.e. — Tribe Phalerie^e. 
Genna Phaleria, Jack.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 199.) 



Phaleria amligua-, arbuscula scandens. glabra, rarnuhs teretibus_ fuscis, 
foliis breviter petiolatis ellipticis apice cuspidato-acuminatis base 
acutis, nervia utrinque ad sex, nervulis gracillimis, supra saturate 
subtus pallide viridibus, capitulis axillaribus et pseudo-terminalibus 
sessilibus multi-densifloris, involucri i'oliolis ovato-oblongis obtusis .viri- 
dibus, floribus albis flavo pallide suffusis puberulis, perianthii tubo $- 
pollicari gracili superne vix ampliato, limbi lobis i-pollicaribus late 
ovatis apice rotundatis, staminibus 8, filamentis filiformibus glabris y. 
ima basi puberulis lobis perianthii longioribus 4 fauci 4 ore corollas insertis 
erectis antheris parvis connectivo dorso glanduloso. 

Drymispermum ambiguum, Meissn. in DC. Prodr. vol. xiv. p. 605. Miguel 
Fl. Ind. Bat. vol. i. p. 886. 

D. lancifolinm, Zoll. Gat. Verz. vol. ii. p. 117. 



The species of Phaleria are extremely difficult of dis- 
crimination, from Herbarium specimens especially, and the 
Javanese botanists have, in the magnificent Botanical 
Gardens and Herbarium of Buitenzong, the only full 
materials for the elucidation of its Malayan members. 
ODe has been figured in this work, P. laurifolia, Benth., 
Tab. 5787, Urymispermum laun 'folium (Decne.), from a 
plant received from the Botanical Gardens of Ceylon, and 
which came from Buitenzorg, under the latter name; 
though its correctness is far from satisfactorily established, 
as pointed out by Bentham in the " Flora Australiensis " 
(vol. vi. p. 38). P. amhigua, here figured, was sent, so 
named, to the Royal Gardens, Kew, from those of Buiten- 
zorg in 1894, but it does not altogether agree with 
Meissner's description of that plant, which has an eight- 
flowered head, and nine to fifteen pairs of nerves in the 
leaf, characters of relative importance probably, and not 
specific. In so far as I can ascertain from the published 
descriptions and Herbarium specimens, the plant here 
figured (whether or no rightly named) differs from all other 

April 1st, 1896. 



hitherto described. Upwards of twenty species of the genus 
are known, all, with the exception of an Indian one, natives 
of the Malayan Archipelago, Australia, and the Pacific 
Islands ; some, of them under the generic name of Drimy- 
spermum, Reinwardt (altered to Drymispermum by Reichen- 
bach) all agree in the short involucral leaves, numerous 
flowers in a head, broadly ovate pubescent perianth- 
lobes, and perhaps also in the climbing habit, which last 
character, however, I do not find to be attributed to the 
genus, or to any described species of it except P. ambigua. 

The Royal Gardens, Kew, are indebted to Dr. Treub, 
Director of the Buitenzorg Botanical Gardens, for many 
interesting plants, including the above, which flowered in 
a stove in May of the present year, and was, like its 
allies the Daphnes, deliciously fragrant. 

Descr. — A climbing, glabrous shrub, branches terete, 
bark brown. Leaves four to five inches long, shortly 
petioled, elliptic, cuspidately acuminate, base acute, light 
green above, pale and yellower beneath, nerves about six 
pairs, rather slender. Heads of twelve to fifteen flowers, 
axillary, and subterminal ; involucral bracts ovate, obtuse, 
herbaceous, green. Perianth pure white, or faintly flushed 
with dull yellow, minutely pubescent ; tube three-quarters 
of an inch long, slender, hardly dilated upwards ; limb as 
broad across the broadly ovate obtuse lobes. Stam,ens eight, 
four inserted in the throat of the perianth, and four at the 
mouth ; filaments rather longer than the perianth-lobes, 
slender, erect, faintly pubescent at their insertion ; anthers 
all reaching the same level, very small, broadly oblong ; con- 
nective dorsally thickened and glandular. Dish crenulate. 
Ovary very small, ovoid, style slender ; stigma nearly on a 
level with the anthers, very large, depressed-capitate. — 
J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Upper part of perianth laid open, with ataraens in situ; 2 and 
3, front and back view of anther ; 4, disk and pistil :— All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7472. 

OSTROWSKIA MAGNIJTIOA. 
Native of Central Asia. 

Nat. Ord. Campanulacejj. — Tribe Campanuiej!. 
Genus Ostrowskia ; (Begel in Act. Sort. Petrop. vol. viii. (1884) p. 686, t. 1.) 



Ostrowskia magnijica; radice tuberoso, caule 3-5-pedali simplici robusto 
fistuloso, foliis breviter petiolatis verticillatis ovatia dentatis, floribus 
amplis in racemum terminalem pauciflorum dispositis erectis, calycis 
tubo turbinate sulci's per paria limbi laciniis alternantibus in- 
Btructo, limbi lobis 5-9 lineari-lanceolatia, corolla late campanulata, tubo 
15-24 costato, lobis 5-9 brevibus latis, staminibus 5-9, filamentis brevibus 
basi dilatatis et pilosis, antheria lineari-elongatis demum tortis, ovario 
5-9-loculare, stylo crasso, stigmatibus 5-9 linearibua reenrvis primum 
in columnam fusiformem cohajrentibus, capsula pergamenea turbinata poria 
lateralibua magnis oblongis dehiacente, seminibus ovoideia compresais 
anguste alatis. 

O. magnifica, Begel Descr. PI. Nov.fasc. ix. (1884) p. 46, t. 1. Gartenfl vol 
xxxvi. (1887) p. 639, fig. 160. Andre Bev. Sortie. (1888) p. 344, f. 72 •" 
(1893) p. 343. Gard. Chron. (1888) vol. ii. p. 65, f. 6. Illustr. Sortie. 
vol. xxxv. t. 71. Journ. Sortie. Ser. III. vol. xxvii. 1893, p. 535 Le 
Jardin (1888) p. 175. 



This stately plant is one of the many botanical dis- 
coveries in Central Asia made by Albert, son of the late 
Dr. de Kegel, so long the able and energetic Director 
of the Imperial Botanical Gardens of St. Petersburgh. 
During a long residence in Western Turkestan, where he 
served in the Imperial Army, and made some remarkable 
exploratory journeys, the then young Albert Kegel devoted 
himself with great success to enriching the collections 
under his father's charge, and Ostrowskia is one of the most 
striking of the results of his labours. Its precise locality 
is the Khanat of Dharwar in Eastern Bokhara, where it was 
found at an elevation of 7000 ft. above the sea. 

Botanically Ostrowskia is almost too closely allied to Cam- 
panula, from which it is distinguished by the whorled leaves, 
the numerous divisions of the calyx and lobes of the corolla 
of the cells of the ovary and stigmas, and by the pores 
of dehiscence of the capsule being double the sepals in num- 
ber. Ostroivslaa, as Dr. de Kegel states, commemorates 

May 1st, 1896. 



the services of an illustrious patron of science, N. ab 
Os trow sky. 

The drawing of this noble plant was made from a 
specimen kindly communicated by F. Ducane Godman, 
Esq., F.R.S., in whose rich garden at South Lodge, 
Horsham, it flowered in June, 1895. It was one of eight 
stems about five feet high, borne on the same plant. 
Plants of it had flowered in the Rock Garden of Kew 
some years previously, and in many continental gardens. 

Descr. — A tall, strict, stout, erect, glabrous herb. Boot 
tuberous. Stem four to five feet high, as thick as a goose- 
quill, quite simple, terete, pale green speckled with red- 
brown. Leaves in distant whorls of four to five, except 
the lowest, which are opposite, four to six inches long, 
ovate, acute, toothed, narrowed into a short winged petiole, 
pale green, subrugose above; midrib and five to six pairs 
of nerves prominent beneath. Flowers three to six, in a 
terminal corymbif orm raceme ; pedicels stout, erect, terete, 
bracteate at the base and middle ; bracts small, lanceolate, 
acute, withering. Flowers erect, very large, four inches 
across the mouth of the corolla. Calyx-tube turbinate, 
with a pair of oblong parallel depressions between the 
lobes ; lobes two inches long, linear-lanceolate, acuminate, 
green, spreading and recurved. Corolla broadly cam- 
panulate, pale lilac ; tube two inches long, terete, with 
three ribs opposite each lobe ; lobes very short, broadly 
triangular, broader than long, spreading and recurved. 
Stamens as many as the calyx lobes, very short ; filaments 
short, flat, suddenly dilated into a fleshy, hairy, tumid 
base ; anthers very narrow, half an inch long, at length, 
twisted. Ovary 5-9-celled, style very stout, short, pubes- 
cent ; stigmas 5-9, at first coherent in a fusiform column. 
Capsule turbinately pyriform, crowned with the calyx- 
lobes, dehiscing, by 10-24 lateral pores. Seeds ovoid, 
compressed, narrowly winged — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1. Flowers with corolla removed, the anthers withered, and tumid bases 
of the filaments shrunk ; 2, stamens : — Both enlarged. 



7 4 73 




Vincent BrooV 



L "Reeve 8c C°. London 



Tab. 7473. 

PITTOSPORUM ERIOCAKPLTM. 

Native of the Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Pittosfore/K. 
Genua Pittosporum, Banks; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 131.) 



Pittosporum eriocarpum ; arbor parva, ramtilis subverticillatis, foliis janioribus 
et inflorescentia floccoso-toraentosis, foliis ovatis oblongis v. oblongo- 
obovatis obtasis acutisve basi cuneatis utrinque tomentosis supra deaiura 
glabratis costa subtus nervisque ntrinque 12-15 validis, paniculis ad 
apices ramolorum corymbosis breviter pedunculatis multifloris, floribus 
breviter pedicellatis, sepalis ovatis ovato-lanceolatisve tomentosis, 
corollae flavai petalis in tubum sepalis quadmplobreviorem cohserentibus, 
ovario tomentoso, capsnla globosa tomentosa polysperma, valvis lignosis. 

P. eriocarpum, Royle Illustr. Bot. Himal. p. 77. Hoolc.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. i. 

p. 199. Brandis, For. Flor. N. W. Ind. 19. 
Pittosporum, Wall. Oat. n. 8129, 8131. 
Solanum ? Wall.Cat. n. 9074. 



The genus Pittosporum contains not a few handsome 
shrubs and small trees that, but for the winter cold of 
England, should thrive in our gardens. Of these only- 
four, as appears from the " Handbook of the Kew Arbore- 
tum," have as yet been introduced into Kew, and proved 
more or less hardy. They are the long established P. 
Tobira, Ait., of China and Japan (Plate 1396) ; P. crassi- 
folium i Soland. (Plate 5978) which flourishes in the south- 
west of England, and especially in the Scilly Islds. ; P. 
Undulaium, Vent, of S.W. Australia ; and P. tenuifolium, 
Banks and Sol. of New Zealand, which is certainly the 
hardiest of the four, as it well may be, from its inhabiting 
the whole length of the New Zealand islands as far south 
as Otago. 

P. eriocarpum is a native of the Western Himalaya in 
the provinces of Kumaon and Garwhal, at elevations of 
3000-5000 ft. Of the ten Indian species it is the only 
one that may prove hardy in this country, especially if the 
-seeds were obtained from plants at the highest level of its 
range. Of the twelve or more New Zealand species there 

May 1st, 1896. 



are several of the mountain regions of the Southern Island, 
that might succeed in England. 

The specimen here figured of Pittosporum eriocarjoum 
was sent to be named at the Herbarium of the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, by Thos. Hanbury, Esq., F.L.S., from his 
celebrated garden of the Palazzo Orengo, La Mortola ; 
and there was no difficulty in identifying it with the above 
named Himalayan plant. The flowers were rather heavily 
sweet-scented. 

Descr. — A small tree, ten feet high or more ; branches 
spreading, more or less whorled ; branchlets, young leaves 
and panicles covered with a white flocculent deciduous 
tomentum that adheres for some time along the midrib 
and nerves of the leaves above. Leaves three to six inches 
long, shortly petioled, very variable in shape from obovate- 
oblong to ovate-lanceolate, narrowed to an obtuse tip, 
coriaceous, at length glabrous and dark green above, be- 
neath pubescent, with a pale brown tomentum; midrib 
and twelve to fifteen pairs of nerves strong beneath; 
petiole half an inch long, stout. Flowers in terminal 
panicles that are corymbosely collected at the extremities 
of the branches, golden yellow, sweet-scented. Panicles 
two to three inches long, shortly peduncled ; branches 
and branchlets short, stout, tomentose ; bracteoles at the 
base of the pedicels minute. Sepals ovate-lanceolate, sub- 
acute, tomentose, three-fourths shorter than the corolla- 
tube. Corolla-tube a third of an inch long ; lobes ovate, 
recurved, not half as long as the tube. Filaments glabrous ; 
anthers linear, red-brown. Ovary tomentose, style stout. 
Capsule half an inch in diameter, globose, woody, many- 
seeded, crowned with the persistent style. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower with the corolla removed ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, ovary ; 
5, transverse section of do.: — All enlarged; 6, capsules from the Herbarium, 
of the natural size. 



7-/7-7 




-dilith 



Ymcan t Bra o"ks,I 



Tab. 7474. 
COCHLIODA Noezliana. 

Native of Peru. 

Nat. Ord. Ohchide^e. — Tribe Vande^:. 
Genns Cochlioda, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 560.) 



Cochlioda Noezliana; pseudobtilbia conferfcis ovoideo-oblongis compresais 
rugulosis, folio sessili lineari-oblongo obtuso carinato, scapo euberecto 
plurivaginato, racerao elongato natante laxe multifloro, bracteia pedi- 
cellia duplo brevioribas, floribus l—\\ poll, latis roseia, sepalis late ovatia 
acutis, dorsali erecto, lateralibus recarvia v. fere revolutis, petalia 
angustioribua oblanceolatia rectis, labello sepajia breviore, ungae erecto 
columnse adnato, lobis lateralibu8 rotundatis reflexia, lobo medio obcordato 
defiexo, disco callis 2 lineari-oblongis instructo, columna leviter incurva, 
clinandrio membrana angusta 3-loba circamdato, antbera subhemiapherica 
obscure roatrata, polliniis oblongis stipite crassinsculo obovato, glandula 
depreasa postice appendiculata. 

C. Noezliana, Rolfe in Lindenia, vol. vi. (1891) p. 55, t. 266. Orchidophile 
(1892) 272 (Noetylana). Rev. Sortie. Belg. vol. xviii. (1892) p. 49, t. 5. 
Werner Orchid. Alb. vol. xi. t. 509. Gartenfl. (1894) t. 1403. Gard. 
Chron. (1894) vol. ii. p. 71, fig. 11. Veitch Man. Orchid. Ft. ix. p. 187. 

Odontoglossnm Noezlianum, Hort. ex Gard. Chron. (1892) vol. ii. p. 570, 
602. Journ. des Orchid, vol. i. p. 294. 



The characters and limits as then known of the genus 
Cochlioda were first accurately determined by Bentham, 
and laid down by him in the " Genera Plantarum," where, 
to the solitary species on which Lindley founded the genus, 
five are added, most of them taken out of Mesospinidium and 
Odontoglossum. Three of these have been already figured 
in this work as Odontoglossum roseum, Lindl. (Plate 6084) ; 
Mesospinidium sanguineum, Reichb. f. (Plate 5627) ; and 
M. vulcanicum, Reichb. f. (t. 6001). All are natives of 
Peru or Ecuador, and all, including G. Noezliana, are in 
cultivation at Kew. 

G. Noezliana was discovered by Mr. John Noezli, and 
sent by him in 1891 to Messrs. Linden, by whom it was 
distributed. It has also been independently introduced 
into England by Messrs. Charlesworth, Shuttleworth and 
Company, who informed Messrs. Veitch that it was col- 
lected in Northern Peru, near the locality in which G. 
vulcanica is found. The latter plant was discovered by 
Spruce in 1871, on the volcanic mountain of Tunguragua, 

Mat 1st, 1896. 



where it grows amongst the scoriae of the crater at 10,000- 
11,000 ft. elevation. The specimen of G. Noezliana here 
figured was purchased at an auction sale in London, and 
flowered in a cool house of the Royal Gardens in July, 
1895. J 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs clustered, one and a half inch long, 
oblong, compressed, dark blueish green, wrinkled. Leaf 
solitary, three to four inches long by nearly one broad, 
linear-oblong, narrowed at the base, but not petioled, 
obtuse, dorsally keeled, bright green above, paler beneath. 
Scape six inches long or more, slender, inclined, purplish 
green, with many lanceolate sheaths about half an inch 
long. Raceme six inches long, inclined or drooping, loosely 
many-fld. ; bracts lanceolate, not half the length of the 
pedicels, which are half to three-fourths of an inch long. 
Flowers an inch and a quarter in diameter, dark rose-red, 
suffused * with golden-yellow on the tip. Sepals free, 
broadly ovate, dorsal erect, lateral recurved, almost revo- 
lute. Petals narrower, oblanceolate, spreading. Lip 
shorter than the sepals ; claw adnate to the column, limb 
deflexed, lateral lobes rounded, recurved, midlobe obcor- 
date; disk with two parallel linear-oblong golden-yellow 
calli. Column elongate, arched ; clinandrium broad, girt 
with a narrow 3-lobed crest or wing. Anther hemi- 
spheric. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Front view of column and lip; 2, back view of do. ; anther; 4 and 
5, pollinia : — All enlarged. 




M Sdd JNFitchhth 



WicentBrooks,Day&. Sonlwp 



1 Reeve 8c C° London 



Tab. 7475. 
coffea stenophylla. 

Native of Sierra Leone. 

Nat. Ord. Rubu.ce,e. — Tribe Ixoue^. 
Genus Coffea, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 114.) 



Coffea stenophylla ; foliis breviter petiolatis ovato- v. oblongo-lanceolatia 
oblanceolatisve obtuse caudato-acuminatis glaberrimis lucidia nervia 
gracilibus axillia glandulosia, Btipulia triangulari-ovatia acuminatis, 
floribus axillaribus et terminalibua breviasime pedicellatis, bracteia 
linearibua, calycia margine brevissimo eroso, corollas tubo lobis C-10 
linearibu8 stellatim patentibua multo breviore, ataminibus 6-10 fila- 
mentia brevibua erectis, antheris elongatia lineari-subulatia baccia 
globosia. 

C. atenophylla, G. Don Gen. Syst. Gard. vol. iii. p. 581. Hiern, in Oliver, Fl. 
Trop. Afric. vol. iii. p. 182. Kew Bulletin, 1893, p. 167. 

C. arabica, Benth. in Hoolt. Niger Flora, p. 413, in part. 



Coffea stenophijlla is an interesting plant, as being one 
of the two * indigenous West African species which, in 
point of commercial value, may prove a formidable rival 
of the Arabian. It was discovered by Afzelius upwards 
of a century ago ; but was not published till 1884, when G. 
Don described it from specimens collected by himself at 
Sierra Leone. It was regarded by Bentham, perhaps 
rightly, in the " Niger Flora " as a variety of C. arabica 
(Plate 1303). The following notice of its occurrence in 
West Africa is extracted from the report of Mr. G. F. 
Scott Elliott, F.L.S., on the Botany of the Sierra Leone 
district traversed by the Anglo-French Boundary Commis- 
sion in 1892, issued by the Colonial Office, and reproduced 
in the Kew Bulletin I. c. 

" Coffea stenojphylla, the narrow-leaved ' wild,' ' bush,' 
or * native Coffee,' is sometimes found wild in the hills, 
and is more often cultivated than the Liberian. It grows 
very freely, and appears to yield quite as much as the 
Liberian, but is somewhat longer in coming into bearing. 

* 0. liberica, Bull. ; Hiern, 1. c. 
May lix, 1896. 



Both tbe natives and French traders at Freetown say that 
it has a superior flavour, and prefer it to the Liberian. In 
fact, latterly a certain amount has been exported to a 
wholesale French dealer, who is said to sell it at 4 frs. 50 
cents, a lb. as 'best Mocha.' Considering that it is 
worth at Freetown 6d. a lb. this should be a fairly pro- 
fitable trade, and a trial shipment should be made by the 
English merchants to find out exactly what the market 
value in Liverpool would be. The plant appears to thrive 
best in the higher hills about Sierra Leone on gneissose or 
granitic soil, and can be grown at from 500 to 2000 ft." 

Mr. Scott Elliott's specimens are of a very slender 
state, with lanceolate leaves only two to two and a half 
inches long by one-third of an inch to two-thirds of an 
inch broad, very different from that here represented, and 
these together favour the opinion entertained by Bentham, 
that both are forms of C. arabica, Linn. 

Coffea stenojphylla was raised at the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
from seeds sent in May, 1894, by Sir W. H. Quayle Jones, 
late Chief Justice of the West African Settlements, and 
acting Governor of Sierra Leone, and the plant here figured 
was raised therefrom, and flowered as early as September, 
1895, in a tropical house. Supplies of the seed have been 
distributed from Kew to the Botanical Gardens of India 
and the Colonies, from whence, if the plant resists the 
coffee disease, and proves to be as excellent a coffee as 
the French merchants declare it to be, good results may 
be expected. 

Descr.— An evergreen shrub, or small tree, up to twenty 
ft. high, perfectly glabrous, with brownish bark, and 
green, terete branches ; youngest leaf-shoots and leaves 
pink. Leaves four to six inches long by one to one 
and a half inches broad, shortly petioled, ovate- or 
oblong-lanceolate or oblanceolate, obtusely caudate-acumi- 
nate, bright green and glossy, paler beneath; nerves six 
to ten pairs, very slender, with small glands at the axils, 
which are white, and perforated in the upper surface, 
green on the under; stipules triangular-ovate, acuminate. 
Fluivers very shortly peduncled, solitary or 3-nate, ter- 
minal and axillary, one to one and a half inch across the 
corolla-lobes ; bracts linear, caducous. Calyx limb erose. 
Corolla-tube about a third of an inch long, lobes 6-10, 



linear, obtuse, stellatelj spreading. Stamens 6-10 ; anthers 
linear-subulate. Berry half an inch in diameter, globose. 

Seeds hemispheric, with a narrow ventral furrow. 

J. D. H. 

Fig 1, Portion of leaf, showing npper tmrface and glands; 2, ovary, style 
and st.gmas j o, portion of corolla with stamens laid open ; 4, vertical section 
of ovary, exposing ovules ; 5, berry (from the Keto Museum) , 6, seeds ; 7, trans- 
verse section of seed ; 8, vertical section of do. ; 9, embryo :-All but No 5 



74 :e 







^O-llTOp 



>ve &. 



Tab. 7476. 
MASDEVALLIA coeniculata, var. inflata. 

Native of New Grenada. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Epidendre*:. 

Genus Masdevallia, Ruiz # Pav. ; ( Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant vol iii 

p. 492.) 



Masdevallia (Cucullatse) corniculata, var. inflata ; folio oblongo obtnso in 
petiolum sulcatum angustatosubtua carinato.bracteaampla tuboperianthii 
aequilonga cymbiformi rostrata viridi; corollae aurantiacae tubo inflato 
urceolari 6-costato extus et intas rubro punctulato, lobis aureis e basi 
triangulari longe filiferis, petalis erectis carnosulis lanceolatis basi in- 
aequilateris apices versus dentati«, labello petalis aequilongo breviter 
crasse unguiculato lanceolato obscure 3-lobo disco papilloso apice denti- 
culato, columna gracili, anthera apice truncata 2-dentata, ovario 3-alato, 
alis undulatis. 

R. inflata, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron. (1881) vol. ii. p. 716. Godefroy in 
Orchidophile (1881) p. 172. 

R. corniculata var. inflata, Veitch Man. Orchid, pt. v. p. 37. 



Masdevallia corniculata, belongs to a small group of the 
genus characterized by the solitary leaf-stalk and 1-fld. 
scape being enclosed in a long tubular scarious sheath, and 
by the very large cymbiform green bract that arches over the 
flower. Up to the present time only two other species of 
the group are known, M. cucullata, Lindl., and M. 
macroura, Reichb. f. All are natives of the temperate 
regions of the New Grenadan Cordillera. M. corniculata 
was introduced in 1877 by Messrs. Backhouse, and is well 
figured in the Marquess of Lothian's fine work, " The 
Genus Masdevallia," in which unfortunately the plates are 
not numbered, or the descriptions paged. A reference to 
that figure shows that var. inflata differs from it most 
conspicuously in the paler colour, and much smaller spots 
of the perianth, and in the broader perianth-lobes, which 
are of a golden-yellow colour within, not orange-brown 
bordered with yellow, as in the figure cited of M. corni- 
culata. The lip, too, is more narrowed to the toothed 
apex, and has rounded (not acute) side-lobes. The var. 
inflata first appeared in Mr. Bull's collection in 1881, and 
Mat 1st, 1896. 



a specimen of it was sent in 1887 to the Herbarium of the 
Eoyal Gardens by Mr. Moore from the rich orchid collec- 
tion of Glasnevin. The plant figured was presented to Kew 
in 1891 by S. Courtauld,. Esq., of Braintree, where it 
has flowered annually in a cool house in the month of 
October. 

Descr. — Stems tufted, very short • petiole enclosed for 
half its length in three superposed scarious, tubular 
cylindric sheaths, with truncate mouths, of which the lower 
are short, the uppermost an inch long, more inflated, and 
half an inch in diameter. Leaf solitary, three to five 
inches long, by one to one and a quarter inches broad, 
linear-oblong, obtuse, coriaceous, channelled above, and 
bright green, paler beneath, with a prominent keel, nerve- 
less till dried, then 5-nerved, base narrowed into a stout 
channelled petiole two inches long, enclosed for the most 
part in the sheaths of the stem. Scape three inches long, 
stout, erect, 1-fld., enclosed for half its length in the 
upper sheath of the stem, and with minute sheathing 
bracts at its base. Bract cymbiform, beaked, one and a 
half inches long, erect, green, base rounded. Corolla- 
tube urceolate, base gibbous in front, 6-ribbed, orange- 
yellow, speckled with red without and within ; limb yellow, 
of three triangular-ovate lobes tapering into slender tails 
one and a half to two inches long, upper erect, two lower 
pendulous flexuous. Petals erect, lanceolate, margins un- 
dulate, shortly broadly unguiculate, toothed towards the 
tip, base excised in front. Lip erect, shortly clawed, 
lanceolate, dilated in the lower half, papillose, tip toothed. 
Column rather slender ; anther truncate and 2-toothed in 
front.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ovary, petals and column j 2, petal; 3, lip; 4, column; 5, anther ; 
6, poJlinia : — All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7472.— OSTROWSKIA MAGNIFICA. 

„ 7473 — PITTOSPORCJM ERIOCARPUM. 

„ 7474.— COCHLIODA NOEZLIANA. 

n 7475.— COFFEA STENOPHYLLA. 

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INFLATA. 

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7477. 




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VLnceii.iBrooks,Dacy* Son-Imp 



Tab. 7477. 

AGrAVE LAXIFOLIA. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide.ze.— Tribe Agaves. 
Genus Agave, Linn. ; (Bentk. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738.) 



Agave {Euagave) laxifolia; breviter caulesceng, foliis 20-30 Iaxe rosnlatis 
oblongo-lanceolatis crassis coriaceis facie sordide viridibus dorso pallide 
viridibus spina parvabrunnea pungente terminatis, spinulis raarginalibus 
parvis deltoideis apice brunneis, peduuculo valido elongato, floribus in 
paniculam laxam ramis corymbosis dispositis, bracteis parvis deltoideis, 
pedicellis apice elongatis, ovario cylindrico. perianthii tubo infundibulari 
limbi lobis lanceolatis basi deltoideis, staminibus limbo 2-3-plo. longioribus, 
antheris linearibus magnis. 

A. laxifolia, Baker. 



This Agave has been cultivated for many years in the 
Royal Gardens at Kew, and flowered for the first time in 
the summer of 1895. It was received as a variety of A. 
mexicana, but it differs widely from all the forms of that 
species by its laxly disposed rosette of leaves, which are 
green on both sides even in an early stage, and by its 
smaller spinules. Its place is in the section Rigidas, in the 
neighbourhood of A. excelsa, Jacobi. The flowers give out 
a smell exactly like that of mice. As in many other species 
the style does not grow out to its full length till after the 
anthers of the same flower are faded. 

Descr. — Shortly caulescent. Leaves twenty or thirty in 
a lax rosette, oblong-lanceolate, firm in texture, one and a 
half or two feet long, three inches broad at the middle, by 
half as much above the dilated base, above which they are 
half an inch in thickness, dull green on the face, paler 
green on the back, without any glaucous tinge, even in an 
early stage, with a small brown pungent end-spine, and 
copious small deltoid marginal spinules, tipped with brown. 
Peduncle stout, four or five feet long. Inflorescence a lax 
panicle about as long as the peduncle, with corymbose 
branches; bracts small, deltoid; pedicels half an inch long, 
articulated at the tip. Ovary cylindrical, green, an inch 
and a half long. Perianth-tube funnel-shaped, half an inch 

June 1st, 1896. 



long; lobes green, half as long again as the tube. Stamens 
inserted at the throat of the perianth-tube, two inches 
long ; anthers large, linear. Style finally overtopping the 
anthers. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, a flower cut open ; 2, front view of anther; 3, back view of anther: — 
All enlarged ; 4, entire plant, much reduced. 



74 18 




M.S.dd,J.N.Fitch;ith. 



"Vincent Brooks, Day &SonImp 



L Reeve kC? London 



Tab. 7478. 
HABENARIA Elwesii. 

Native of the Nilghiri Hills. 

Nat. Ord. ObchidEjE. — Tribe Ophb.yde.2e. 
Genus Habenabia, Willd. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 625.) 



Habenabia (Ate) Elwesii; laete virescens, tuberibus oblongis, caule folioso, 
foliis erectis ovato- v. elliptico-lanceolatis acuminatis, vaginis teretibus, 
racemo laxifloro, bracteis floribus aequilongis lanceolatis acuminatis 
scaphif'ormibus marcescentibus, Horibus 2-poll. longis flavo-viridibus, 
pepalis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis lateralibus deflexis, petalis e basi 
lata profunde in lacinias elongato-subulatas divaricatas falcatas sepalis 
longioribus pilosas sectis, labelli glaberrimi limbo lineari in segmenta 3 
elongata filiformia limbo multoties longiora fisso, calcare gracili pedicello 
aequilongo ore lingula calcariformi recurva instracto, columnalata obtusa, 
staminodiis erectia clavatis apice glandulosis, antheris dirergentibus 
tubulis brevibus clinandrio adnatis, rostello late deplanato, processubua 
etigmaticis corniformibus divaricatis. 



Eabenaria Elwesii, though horticulturallj devoid of 
beauty, is a very interesting plant botanically, as being 
the first that has been cultivated in this country of a 
curious Indian group of that immense genus, which I have 
characterized as Ate, in which the petals are bifurcate. 
The type of the group is H. barbata, Wight, upon which 
Lindley founded the genus Ate, taking for its character 
the presence of a recurved process on the lip at the mouth 
of the spur, on the side opposite the column, and which is 
seen in fig. 2 of the accompanying plate. This process is 
present or absent in very closely allied species, all having 
divided petals, and I therefore, in the " Flora of British 
India," took the latter character as that of the group Ate, 
bringing under it fourteen plants of obvious near affinity. 
The function of the above-mentioned process of the lip is to 
guide the proboscis of an insect into the spur, whilst it 
brings its head or part of its body into contact with the 
glands of the pollinia, and thus removes these. This was 
first pointed out by Roland Trimen,* who was induced by 

* Jo urn. Linn. Soc. vol. ix. (1867) p. 156, t. 1. 
June 1st, 1896. 



Darwin's account of the organization of the Cape plant 
Bonatea speciosa* which has a similar process in the same 
position at the mouth of the spur, to examiue living 
specimens of that plant. By a curious coincidence Bonatea 
has the cleft petals of " Ate, 91 and is otherwise so near to 
Habenaria that Lindley referred the Indian Habenaria tri- 
nervia, Wight;, to Bonatea, as B.punduana; and subsequently 
both he and Reichenbach have reduced all the Bonatese to 
that genus. Mr. Bolus in his Orchids of S. Africa (Tab. 
16) also reduces a species of Bonatea to Habenaria. _ The 
principal character of the former genus as distinguishing 
it from the Ate group, is the enormous helmet-like rostellum, 
the staminodes reduced to papillae on the sides of the ros- 
tellum, and the long tubular stigmatic processes ; but how 
far these characters differentiate Bonatea from other 
Habenaria s I am unable to say. The fact is that the 
modifications of staminodes, anthers, rostellum and stig- 
matic processes of Habenaria are so extraordinarily great, 
even in apparently allied species, that when working up the 
Indian species I hoped to have been able to use them for 
sectional purposes ; but, like Bentham before me, I failed 
in the attempt. 

H. Elwesii is most nearly allied to H. digitata, Lindl., 
(-BT. trinervia, Wight Icon. Plant. Ind. Or. t. 1701), differing 
in the much larger flowers, hairy petals with much longer 
divisions, long lobes of the lip, and spur-like stigmatic 
processes. The only other species with hairy petals is H. 
barbata, Wight (Ate virens, Lindl. ; Wight Ic. t. 928), 
which has small Rowers with shortly bifid petals, a scabrid 
lip cleft at tip only into short subulate segments, and 
clavate stigmatic processes. H. Elwesii is a native of 
Nilghiri Hills, whence it was sent to the distinguished 
naturalist and horticulturist whose name it bears by Mr. 
Proudlock, Curator of the Gardens and Parks of Ootaca- 
mund. It flowered in Mr. Elwes' garden at Colesborne, 
Gloucestershire, in July of last year. — J. D. H. 



Fig. I, Petal; 2, front and 3 side views of column; 4, pollinia:— All 
enlarged. 



PP 



* On the ContiivanceB by which Orchids are fertilized by Insects, Ed. ii. 
: 87, &c. J 




TO 



fttchit} 



VincentBrooks.Day & SonTmp 



X Reeve &C° 



Tab. 7479. 

PHAJUS MISHMBNSIS. 
Native of the Eastern Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Okchide.e. — Tribe Efidendre^. 
Genus Phajus, Lour.; {Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 512.) 



Phajtjs mishmensis ; caulibus fastigiatia erectis elatis basi vix paeudobulbosis 
superne foliosis, foliis alternis quaquaversia elliptico-ovatis -lanceolatisve 
acuminatis 5-nerviis, scapis axillaribus gracilibus elongatis erectis laxe 
plurifloris, floribns erecto-patentibus roseis, bracteis pedicellia gracilibuB 
aequilongis lanceolatis acuminatis concavis herbaceia caducis, sepalis 
petalisque lineari-oblongis acutis apicibus subrecurvis, labelli lobis latera- 
libtis amplia rotundatis recurvis terminali brevi explanato trilobulato 
lobulis obtusis, iutermedio 2-fido, calcare gracili incurvo sepalis dimidio 
breviore, disco crista ciliata instructo, columna gracili supra medium 
dilatata, apice 2-loba, anthera hemispherica pilosula. 

P. mishmeusis, Beichb.f. in Bonplandia, vol. v. p. 43 ; in Walp. Ann. vol. vi. 
pp. 922, 928. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 817, and in Ann. Boy. 
Bot. Gard. Gale. vol. v. pt. I. p. 25, t. 37. 

P. roseus, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin (1893) 6, and (1894) 182 (mishmensis). 

Limatodes mishmensis, Lindl. & Paxt. Fl. Gard. vol. iii. p. 36. 



There are considerable differences in the habit of growth 
of the species of Phajus, of which I took advantage in 
dealing with the Indian species in " The Flora of British 
India ; " and it remains to be seen how far the grouping 
there adopted is applicable in the African and other extra- 
Indian species. In P. Wallichii, Lindl., better known as 
P. hicolor, Lindl. (Tab. 4078), the flowering scape arises 
from the side of the pseudobulb. In P. callosus, Lindl., 
of the Malay Peninsula and Java, from the top of the 
pseudobulb. In P. mishmensis the one or more scapes 
are axillary; and in P. albus, Lindl. (t. 3991) the in- 
florescence terminates the leafy stem, which latter character, 
and the bifarious leaves, are those which that species 
was raised to generic rank as Thunia by Reichenbach. P. 
mishmensis was discovered in the Mishmi Mts. in Upper 
Assam by Griffith in 1 836, and was first published by Lindley 
as a Limatodes from Griffith's Herbarium specimens. It 
has recently been collected in the Sikkim Himalaya by 
Mr. Clarke and other botanists at elevations of 4-5000 ft. : 

June 1st, 1896. 



and in Lower Burma at 6000 ft. by Mr. Boxall, when 
collecting for Messrs. Hugh Low and Sons of Clapton. 
Very recently it has been described as P. roseus, under the 
misapprehension that it was an undescribed species of 
Western tropical Africa. The specimen here figured was 
presented by the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Scarborough to the 
Royal Gardens in November, 1895, who collected it himself 
during his visit to India. 

Descr. — Stems two to three feet from a tuberous lobed 
base, terete, green, leafless and sheathed below, leafy 
above. Leaves six to ten inches long, elliptic-lanceolate, 
acuminate, plicately five-nerved, margins rather waved, 
dark green above, paler beneath with prominent nerves ; 
sheaths with acutely angled ribs. Scapes one or more, 
axillary from the lower leaves, one to two feet long, to- 
gether with the loose, erect raceme slender, green, with a 
few scattered appressed lanceolate sheaths towards the 
base and middle. Raceme eight- to ten-fld, ; bracts about 
an inch long, as long as the slender erecto-patent pedicel and 
ovary, lanceolate, acuminate, concave, herbaceous, dark 
green, caducous. Flowers nearly two inches broad when 
expanded, pale or dark rose-colrd. ; lip paler and speckled. 
Sepals acuminate, with recurved tips, keeled, linear-oblong ; 
dorsal more oblanceolate, concave. Petals narrower than 
the sepals. Lip nearly as long as the sepals, three-lobed ; 
side lobes broad, orbicular, margins recurved, midlobe sub- 
quadrate, truncately 3-lobulate ; side lobules rounded, 
median much smaller, 2-fid ; disk of lip with a median 
hairy ridge ; spur one half to two-thirds of an inch long, 
rather slender, incurved, yellow, tip 2-lobed. Column lono\ 
rather slender, the sides dilating above the middle into 
narrow wings, top 2-lobed ; anther hemispheric, sparselv 
hairy.— J.D.E. 

Kff. I, Section of the lip 5 2, column and spur j 3, anther ; 4 and 5, pollinia : 
— Ail enlarged : 6, reduced figure of the whole plant. 



7460 




M.S.del,JJJ.Rtdilitti. 



T/in.caritBroo'ksPay&.Sonlmp ' 



XReeve 5.0° London 



Tab. 7480. 
ERANTHEMUM keticulatum. 

Native of the Melanesian Islands ? 

Nat. Ord. Acanthace,*:. — Tribe Justiciejk. 
Genus Euanthemum, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1097.) 



Erantiiemu:\i refo'cttfaiwra ; sufliruticosum, glaberrimum, foliis ovato-lanceo- 
latis obtusis in petiolum alatum angustatis marginibus undulatis, 
senioribus luride viridibna nervis aulphureia, jnnioribus angustioribus 
pulcherime anreo viridique reticulatis, racemis axillaribus terminalibus- 
que erectis, pedicellia bracteatis, bracteis parvis subulatia, calycis seg- 
mentis anbaequalibus anguatis, corollae hypocrateriformis tabo calyce 
plusquam duplo lougiore, limbo explanato subbilabiato albo orm versus 
sanguineo adsperso, lobis apice rctundatis 2-posticis oblongis 3 anticis 
majoribus latioribus, filamentia breviusculis, antheria oblongia rufo- 
brunneis. 

E. reticulatam, Sort, ex Gard. Ghron. (1875) vol. i. p. 619. 

E. Scbomburgkii, Hort. ex Illustr. Sortie, vol. xxvi. (1879) t. 349. 

E. aureo-reticulatum, Sort. 



Though well known in cultivation in England for up- 
wards of a quarter of a century, the native country of the 
beautiful plant here figured is unknown, and its names 
are of " garden " authority. In the earliest notice 
that I can find of it, that in the Gardener's Chronicle, 
nothing is said of its origin ; but four years later, in the 
" Illustration Horticole," it is stated to have been received 
from Australia, and the adoption for it of the name Schom- 
hurghii would imply that the late Director of the Botanical 
Gardens of Adelaide (Richd. Schomburgh) was concerned in 
its introduction. The figure in the latter work is accom- 
panied with a note to the effect that it is "apparently 
Melanesian." 

E. reticulatum has been long cultivated at Kew, where 
it has attained a height of four feet, flowering in autumn 
in a stove. 

Descr. — A small, erect, leafy, evergreen shrub ; branches 
obtusely four angled. Leaves opposite, lower six to ten 
inches long, ovate-lanceolate, dark green above with arch- 
ing golden nerves, pale beneath, margins undulate, tip 
rounded ; base cuneiform, rounded or subcordate, narrowed 

June 1st, 1896. 



suddenly into a stout petiole about an inch long ; upper 
leaves narrower, beautifully reticulated with golden or 
sulphur-yellow and green. Panicles in the upper leaf- 
axils and terminal, strict, erect ; branches, bracts, and 
sepals pale green ; pedicels one-fourth inch long, or of the 
lower flowers longer, slender, bracteate at the base and 
middle, bracts small, subulate. Calyx a third of an inch 
long, narrow ; segments linear, acute, subequal, erect. 
Corolla salver-shaped, white, tube more than twice as long 
as the calyx, straight, narrow, white, speckled with red at 
the shortly funnel-shaped top ; limb an inch and a half 
broad, pure white, speckled with blood-red round the 
mouth of the tube, sub 2-lipped, lobes oblong tips rounded ; 
two posticous smallest, suberect, of the three anticous the 
middle is the broadest. Stamens 2 ; filaments short, erect, 
each with a minute 2-fid staminode at its base ; anthers 
oblong, red-brown. Ovary glabrous, seated in a rather 
long annular disk ; style slender, stigma 2-fid. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and style ; 2, portion of throat of corolla and stamens ; 3 and 
4, anthers ; 5, ovary and disk : — All enlarged. 




7481. 



MSdaLJ.N.Fitchiith 



Vmaent Br o oks J)ay Si 



LReeve &.C°london. 



Tab. 7481. 

EPISGIA DENSA. 
Native of Dernerara. 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace^e. — Tribe Cyutandhe^e. 
Gemis ErisciA, Mart. ; (Benth. & Hook, f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii, p. 1006.) 



Episcia (Centrosolenia) densa ; caule robusto brevi puberulo atque petiolis 
foliis subtus sepalis extns sanguineo-rubris, foliis longe petiolatis ovato- 
oblongia subacutis crenato-serralatis basi rotuudatis v. subcordatis, supra 
laete viridibus pilosulia subtus glabris costa nervisque validis, petiolo semi- 
cylindrico, floribusln. racemulis axillaribus congestis, pedunculis pedicellis- 
que brevibus, bracteis parvis, calycis urceolaris segmentis oblorigis obtusis 
ciliolatis iutus viridibus postico parvo libero ceteris connatis, corolla fere 2- 
pollicari subcylindracea hirsuta straminea basi dorsa gibba dein paullo 
inflata, lobis 5 brevibus patentibus planis rotundatis intus primulinis. 
staminibus inclusis.filamentis glaberrimis.antberis didymis per paria apices 
versus cohaerentibus, ovario hirsuto, stigmate capitellato 2-lobo, disci 
glandula solitaria postica. 

E. densa, 0. H. Wright in Kew Bulletin (1895) p. 17. 



E. densa belongs to the Centrosolenia section of the very 
considerable genus Episcia, characterized by the short 
stem, crowded flowers, narrow calyx- segments, and by the 
gibbously saccate base of the tube of the corolla. Amongst 
those figured Mr. Wright considers its nearest ally to be 
E. erythropus, Hook, f., Tab. 6219 of New Grenada. 

It is curious that though the upper or exposed surface 
of the leaves are green, and the under crimson, the cor- 
responding surfaces of the sepals are, the outer red and 
inner green. Episcia densa was received in 1895 from M. 
Jenman, F.L.S., Govt. Botanist and Superintendent of the 
Botanical Gardens of Georgetown, Dernerara, who dis- 
covered it on the banks of the river Masouria. It flowered 
in a stove at Kew in October of the same year. 

Descr. — Stem short, as thick as the middle finger, 
cylindric, puberulous, dull purplish-crimson. Leaves few, 
crowded, six to ten inches long, ovate-oblong, subacute, 
crenate-serrulate, base cuneate, rounded, or subcordate, 
above bright green slightly pubescent, beneath bright 
June 1st, 1896. 



blood-red, quite glabrous, with very stout midrib, and 
many arching nerves ; petiole three to four inches long, 
stout, semi-cylindric. Racemes of flowers crowded on the 
arrested nodes of the stem, very short. ; peduncles and 
pedicels short, red-purple ; bracts minute. Calyx two- 
thirds of an inch long ; lobes oblong, erect with recurved 
tips, coloured externally like the undersurface of the 
leaves, green to the base within, margins ciliate; dorsal 
lobe smallest, free, the rest connate to above the middle. 
Corolla nearly two inches long, slightly decurved, tubular, 
hirsute, pale straw-coloured, posticously gibbous at the 
very base, contracted above it, and then somewhat inflated ; 
lobes very short, orbicular, expanded, flat, primrose-yellow. 
Stamens included ; filaments quite glabrous ; anthers didy- 
mous, each pair adhering by their tips. Ovary ovoid, 
hirsute ; style slender ; stigma capitellate, 2-lobed, included. 
Disk-gland solitary, posticous, 2-lobed. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Section of calyx showing disk and piatil; 2, corolla laid open; 
3, base of corolla ; 4 and 5, anthers : — All enlarged. 



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V 






Tab. 7482. 

LOURYA CAMrANULiTA. 
Native of Cochin-china, 

Nat. Ord. HjEmodoracejE. — Tribe Ophiopogoxe.*:. 
Genus Lourya (B&ill. Bull. Soc Linn. Paris, No. 93, p. 743.) 



Lourya campanulata ; rhizomate brevi, foliis radicalibus longe petiolatis 
oblongo-lanceolatis utrinque acuminatia nervis elevatia subplicatis, 
petiolis basi vagiais membranaceia atipatia, floribua in racemos brevea 
breviter pedunculatos densifloroa dispositis, bracteis ovatie acuminatia 
membranaceia, pedicellia brevibua, perianthii late campanulati maraces- 
centia lobis 6 2-seriatis subaequalibua patentibus subacutia flavidis, 
exterioribua late ovatia, interioribus late oblongo-ovatia, ore membrana 
torizontali antherifera fere clausa, antheris 6 erectia late oblongis 
2-locularibus, ovario infero late obconico depreaao 3-loculari, stigmate 
parvo pyramidato obtuse trilobo, o-vulia in loculis paucis baailaribus erectiB 
anatropia, bacca ovoidea ccerulea. 

L. campanulata, Baill. I. c. Garriere in Rev. Sortie, vol. lxi. (1889) p. 128 
fig. 32. 

A very curious plant, with the habit of Curculigo and 
Peliosanthes, differing from the former of these genera in 
the stamens and basal ovules ; and from Peliosanthes in 
the baccate fruit, the pericarp of which is not burst open 
when in a young state by the enlarging seeds, and thus 
necessitating the maturing of the latter in a freely exposed 
condition. I have unfortunately been unable to figure or 
describe the seeds of Lourya from the fruit of the Kew 
plant having been destroyed by insects on ripening. 

The specimen here figured was obtained from a French 
nursery in 1892. It flowered in a stove of the Royal 
Gardens, first in December, 1894, and again in January, 
1896, when the fruit of the former year was approaching 
maturity. 

Descr. — Rootstoch stout, shortly creeping underground, 
and throwing up tufts of leaves and flowering stems, the 
petioles and peduncles of which are enveloped in long, 
lanceolate, pale yellow-brown membranous sheaths, two to 
four inches long. Leaves (with the petiole) ten to twenty 
inches long, by three to four broad, erect, inclined or 
drooping, oblong-lanceolate, acute at both ends, narrowed 

July 1st, 1896. 



into a terete, stiff, green petiole, three to six inches long, 
dark glossy green above, paler beneath, plicate and 
traversed by ten to twelve prominent nerves, which are 
united by transverse nervules. Raceme radical, shortly 
peduncled, sub-corymbiform, about three inches long, very 
dense-fid. ; bracts membranous, as long as the flowers, 
ovate, acuminate. Flowers half an inch in diameter, shortly 
pedicelled, nodding, pedicel jointed above the middle. 
Perianth broadly campanulate, pale yellow, with a dark 
purple disk formed of the confluent filaments ; tube very 
broadly obconic ; limb superior, of six broad spreading 
membranous lobes in two series, outer broadly ovate, inner 
oblong-ovate. Filaments united in a horizontal dark purple 
membrane, nearly closing the tube, but leaving a hexagonal 
opening over the stigma; anthers small, erect. Ovary 
inferior, 3-celled, surmounted by a small sessile central 
pyramidal 6-lobed obtuse stigma ; ovules several in each 
cell, basal, erect, anatropous. Fruit an inch long, ovoid, 
obtuse, terete, dark blue, smooth, shining, surrounded at 
tne base by the withered perianth. — /. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Bracta and flower-bud, of the natural size; 2, section of flower- 
3. portion of staminal ring ; 4, stigma .—All enlarged. ' 



1483. 




TfincentBrooks Day &.SonImp 



V 



L Reeve &. C° Xcndan.. 



Tab. 7483. 
PILOCARPUS Jaborandi. 

Native of Pernambuco. 

Nat. Ord. Kutace^e. — Tribe Zanthoxyle^. 
Genus Pilocarpus, Vahl.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 299.) 



Pilocarpus Jaborandi ; ramis ramulis petiolisque hirtellis, foliis alternis, 
foliolis 4-5-jugis oppositis breriter petiolulatia coriaceis ellipticis oblong- 
iave obtasia v. retusis glanduloso-punctatis, supra luride viridibus subtua 
flavo-viridulis, racemia gracilibus decurvia, pedicellis medio minute 
bracteolatis, floribus parvis pentameris, calycia tubo hemispherico, limbo 
brevisaimo obtuse 5-lobo, petalia lanceolatia acutia 1-nerviis roseis basi 
marginibuaque luteis, disco undulato glanduloso-punctato, carpellis 
maturi8 3-5 tenuiter coriaceia apice rotundatis lateribus 8ulcis concentricia 
exaculptis, seminibns ovoideo-oblongia nigris nitidis. 

P. Jaborandi, Holmes in Pharmaceut. Journ. Ser. III. vol. xxiii. (1893) 

p. 1008 ; Ser. IV. vol. i. (1895) pp. 520, 541. 
P. pennatifoliua, Bentl. & Trim. Medic. Plants, t. 48, figs. 6-11 tantum. 



The name Jaborandi has been applied indiscriminately to 
drugs produced by Brazilian plants of various natural 
families and genera, the properties of which are diaphoretic 
and sialogogue ; but it was not till comparatively recently 
that the one has been introduced into medical practice in 
Europe, which now is understood by that name. This 
was sent from Pernambuco by Dr. Coutinho of Pernam- 
buco to Prof. Gubler of Paris, who tested its properties, 
and confirmed Dr. Ooutinho's statement as to their power- 
ful effects. A sample of the drug, which consisted of dried 
and broken leaves, was communicated to Prof. Baillon, who 
referred it to the genus Pilocarpus, Vahl. of Rutacese ; an 
opinion which was almost simultaneously confirmed by 
Mr. Holmes from an examination of some dried fruits 
which he had received from Pernambuco. Its specific 
determination, however, remained indeterminable until 
complete specimens should be obtained, and it was in the 
meantime doubtfully referred to Pilocarpus pennatif alius, 
Lemaire, a native of Paraguay and San Paolo in South 
Brazil (see Tab. 7235 of this Magazine). This identifica- 
tion was, however, disposed of by Prof. Oliver, who, after 

Jult 1st, 1896. 



a careful comparison of the leaves of P. pennatifolius with 
those of the Pernambuco plant (see Kew Bulletin, 1S91, 
p. 179) pronounced them to belong to different species. 
Fortunately, in 1882, ripe seeds of what has proved to be 
the true plants of Pernambuco, were presented by Dr. J. L. 
Paterson, of Bahia, to the Eoyal Botanic Gardens of 
Edinburgh, from which plants were raised and distributed. 
One of the latter, given to the Cambridge Botanic Gardens, 
flowered there in 1893. From it Mr. Holmes was enabled 
to draw up a full description; and finding it to be a new 
species, named it very appropriately Pilocarpus Jaborandi. 
The drawing here given was made from a plant com- 
municated to the Eoyal Gardens from Cambridge, which 
flowered in a stove in January, 1896. 

Descr. — A bush or small tree ; branches, branchlets, 
petioles and rachis of the leaves hirtellous. Leaves alter- 
nate, pinnate; petiole short, and rachis terete, stout; 
leaflets 3-4 pairs with a terminal one, three to three and a 
half inches long, opposite, shortly petiolulate, oblong or 
elliptic, obtuse, retuse, or emarginate, coriaceous, quite 
glabrous, dark green and shining above, yellow green 
and glandular-dotted beneath, base slightly unequal; 
nerves about eight to ten pairs, slender, arching. Racemes 
axillary, a foot long, slender, shortly peduncled, many- 
flowered, rachis terete, reddish-green ; pedicels about half 
an inch long, slender, spreading, with a minute triangular 
bract at the base, and two very inconspicuous rudiments 
of bracteoles above the middle. Flowers a third of an inch 
broad. Calyx broadly cupular, obscurely broadly 5-Iobed. 
Petals lanceolate, 1 -nerved, dark rose-colrd., with golden 
margins and base. Filaments erect, about as long as 
the petals ; anthers oblong. Disk undulate. Ovary de- 
pressed, top 5-lobed, stigma very short, 5-lobed. Fruit 
about an inch broad, of three to five suborbicular free, 
thinly coriaceous or sub-crustaceous, dehiscent carpels the 
sides of which are marked with concentric ridges Seeds 
lew, broadly oblong, testa black shinino- __/ j) % 



5 IlLl' m 7n r ' h f an ? P E dice !, ; 2 ' flower > 3 > ™ ] y*> di «k and ovary ; 4 and 
fOZbZdi IdZ 7 "^f ^nd /, fruit and seed of the natulal size ; 
», greatly, educed view of the flowering portion of a young plant. 



7-M4. 




Tab. 7484. 
ASPIDISTRA typica. 

Native of Tonkin ? 

Nat. Ord. Liliace*. — Tribe Aspidistbe^e. 
Genus Aspidistra, Ker. ; (Benth. & LTook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 772.) 



Aspidistra typica ; foliis longe petiolatis elliptico-laneeolatis acuminatis basi 
subinasquilateralibus utrinque laete viridibus sub-7-nerviis, nervulis tranB- 
versis creberrimis, petiolo gracili canaliculate* viridi dorso rotundato, 
floribus numerosis longe pedunculatis, pedunculo robusto prostrato v. 
geniculatim decurvo flexuoso vaginato purpureo maculato, vaginis sparsis 
brevibusovatis obtusis ilavidis, floribus 2-bracteatis, bracteie perianthio 
snppositis late ovatis acutis paten tibus purpureo- variegatis, perianthio 
crasse coriaceo globoso breviter 6-fido extus pallide purpureo punctulato 
intus saturate purpureo, lobis ovatis obtusis erectis asstivatione valvatis 
apicibus imbricatis, antberis 6 parvi3 basi perianthii sessilibus, ovario 
brevi 3-loculari loculis 2-ovulatis, stylo brevi crasso stigmate umbraculi- 
forme margine 6-lobo. 

A. typica, Baill. in Bull. Soc. Linn. Paris, No. 143 (1894) p. 1129. Wiener 
Illustr. Gartenz. (1894), p. 266. Kew Bulletin (1895) App. II. 34. 



The remarkable plant here figured differs from its con- 
geners in the apparently constantly trimerous parts of the 
flower, the arrangement in the other species being normally 
tetramerous ; though a departure to the trimerous is known 
to occur in one of these. In fact the genus Aspidistra was 
established on a trimerous flowered state of A. lurida, as 
will be found on referring to the original description of 
the genus by Ker in the Botanical Register (t. 628) ; the 
tetramerous state of which species is figured at t. 2499 of 
this magazine. It is this reversion in A. typica from 
the tetramerous state (which is abnormal amongst Mono- 
cotyledons) to the typical trimerous of this class, that the 
species owes its name. Another member of the genus, 
A. punctata, var. albo maculata, is figured at t. 5886 of this 
work. It has also tetramerous flowers ; as has A. punctata, 
Liudl. (Bot. Beg. t. 977). These two plants, if specifically 
the same, which is, I think, doubtful, differ from A. 
luvida and typica in their stigma, which is not a simple 
umbrella-like 6-lobed organ, but has a much divided circum- 
ference of 6 teeth alternating with as many reflexed lobules. 

M. Baillon has described {Bull. Soc. Linn. Paris, I. c.) 
Jolt 1st, 18%, 



a curious modification of the flower of a Javan species, 
A. elatior, Blume, which has the stigma of A. punctata. 
In this the inner walls of the tube of the perianth are 
perfectly smooth till the stigma has attained its greatest 
diameter, when folds are formed on the inner walls, 
that fit into the spaces between the marginal teeth of 
the stigma, thus enclosing the mature anthers in a 
sealed chamber, requiring force to open it. Referring to 
the enlarged view of a flower of A, punctata laid open, at 
fig. 1 of t. 5386, it appears to me possible that access to 
the closed chamber in this species may be provided by the 
reflexion of the folds between the teeth of the stigma, 
after the maturation of the anthers, for the admission to 
these of insects or their organs. And if, as I suspect, the 
stigmatic surfaces, which are punctiform, occupy the tips 
of the reflected lobes, the arrangement would be adapted 
for cross-fertilization of the plant, because any insect 
seeking access to the anthers must brush past a stigmatic 
surface. It remains to be observed during its next flower- 
ing, whether the perianth-tube and stigma of A. typica 
undergo modifications analogous to those of A. elatior. 

A. typica was obtained by the Royal G-ardens, Kew, 
from the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, in 1895, and it 
flowered in a stove in September of the same year. 

Descr. — Rootstock stout, creeping. Leaves twelve to 
eighteen inches long, long-petioled, elliptic-lanceolate, 
nerves about 7, with many cross nervules, base acute, 
unequal; petiole longer than the blade, channelled in 
front. Flowers very many, radical; peduncles two to 
two and a half inches long, stout, flexuous, prostrate 
or geniculately decurved, purple with darker blotches; 
sheaths few^ distant, oblong, obtuse. Flowers two-thirds 
of an inch in diameter, thickly coriaceous, globose, six- 
cleft, base closely embraced by two ovate spreading 
purple bracts, dirty white or greenish speckled with red, 
dark purple within ; lobes one-third to one half the length 
of the perianth, biseriate, ovate, subacute, erect, then 
spreading. Stamens six ; anthers reniform, sessile on the 
base of the perianth. Ovary very short, crowned with an 
umbrella-like six-lobed stigma.—/. D. E. 

Fig. 1, Flower with portion of perianth removed; 2, portion of perianth and 
stamen; o, ata.rn.en:— All enlarged;—!, reduced view of whole plant, 



7485 




MS. del, J.N Fitch lith 



"ftncent Bi-ooks J)sf & Semi 



L Reeve & C?Xondor 



Tab. 7485. 

AKEBIA LOBATA. 
Native of China and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. BEBBERiDEiE. — Tribe Labdizabaleje. 
GenuB Akebia, Bene. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 42.) 



Akebia lobata ; frutex alte scandena glaberrimns, ramulia cylindraceia lenti- 
cellatis cortice brunneo, foliia gracile petiolatia 3-foIioiatis racemisque 
gemmi8 lateralibus enatis, foliolia gracile petiolnlatia late ovatis obtnsia 
repando-lobulatia apice retusis apicnlatia pallide viridibua, racemia 
gracilibna nutantibus pendnlisve ; fl. masc. parvia namerosia confertia 
pallide purpnreia breviter pedicellatia, bracteia subulatia, aepalis ovatia, 
antheria anbaeasilibna loenlia linearibna extrorsi8, connective) craaao ; fl. 
fcem. paucia mnlto majoribua longe pedicellatia, sepalia concavia coriaceia 
purpureia, ataminodiia 6 minntia, carpellia 3-6-viridibus, stigmatibua 
purpureia, baccia oblongi obtnsia polyapermia, seminibus atria pulpa aquoaa 
immeraia. 

A. lobata, Dene, in Ann. Sc. Nat. Ser. II. vol. xii. (1839) p. 107 ; & in. Archiv. 
Mus. Par. vol. i. p. 195, t. 13, B. Walp. Pep. vol. i. p. 99. Sieb. <§• Zucc. 
Fl. Jap. vol. i. p. 145, t. 78. Miguel Prolus. Fl. Jap. p. 197. Franch. 
& Sav. F.num. PI. Jap. i. p. 21. Forbes 8f Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. 
vol. xxiii. (1886) p. 30. ToHo Eort. Bot. vol. ii. t. 2. 



One species of Akebia, A. quinata (Tab. 4864) has 
been long known in European gardens, having been intro- 
duced from China or Japan (of both which countries it is 
a native) half a century ago ; but though three other 
species from the same country have been described, it is 
only quite lately that a second, the subject of the accom- 
panying plate, has been imported. This latter differs a good 
deal in habit from A. quinata, in having more woody 
branches, and trifoliolate leaves with broad lobulate very 
pale green more membranous leaflets, the flowers too are 
smaller, though of the same structure and colour; and, 
as in A. quinata, the females are fewest, much the largest, 
and placed below the males in the raceme. 

A. lobata is a native of Japan and N. China, and is 
apparently common in both countries ; in the former 
specimens have been collected in various localities between 
Hakodadi and Yokohama ; and in the latter from the pro- 
vinces of Kiang-su, Szechuen, and Hupeh. Of two other 
July 1st, 1896. 



Japanese species, A. quercifolia, and clematifolla, Sieb. & 
Zucc., Count Ito has made a note in the Kew Herbarium, 
that they may be only varieties of A. lobata. 

The drawing here reproduced was made from a plant 
that flowered in a greenhouse of the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
in January of the present year, and which was received 
from Mr. F. Takagi, nurseryman of Tokio. The fruit is 
described from the Japanese work cited above, which con- 
tains an excellent figure of the species. 

Descr. — A tall glabrous climbing shrub ; branches 
cylindric, woody, flexuous, as thick as a goose-quill, bark 
brown, covered with scattered lenticels ; buds at the rather 
distant internodes, covered with oblong obtuse green and 
purple herbaceous deciduous scales, and sending forth 
leaves and flowers from an arrested axis. Leaves long- 
petioled, trifoliolate, three to five inches long ; petiole two 
to three inches long, very slender; leaflets petiolulate, 
petiolule of lateral one-eighth to one-half inch, of terminal 
nearly one inch; blade one to two inches long, broadly 
ovate, repand-lobulate, tip retuse and apiculate, almost 
membranous, pale green above, paler and bluer green 
beneath ; nerves few, very slender. Raceme with its long 
peduncle three to four inches long, slender, nodding or 
pendulous. Male fl. very numerous, one-sixth inch 
diameter, shortly pedicelled, crowded, pale purple ; bracts 
minute. Sepals ovate, acute, incurved. Anthers 6, sub- 
sessile, cells linear, extrorse ; fern. fl. few, below the males, 
distant from one another, one half to nearly an inch in 
diameter, pedicels half to two-thirds of an inch. Sepals 
orbicular-ovate, concave, dark vinous purple. Staminodes 
b minute of imperfect anthers alternating with the carpels. 
Carpels three to six, green with purple stigmas. Fruit 
ripens after frost, three inches long, oblong, cylindric, 
slightly curved, rounded at both ends ; pericarp thin. 
Ws^ew or many, black, immersed in a white pulp.— 



-^^^rf^'*™" -dpistillode; 3, stamen; 4, carpels 



1486 




M.Sdel. JNF- 



T&ioentBrodks^ayacSontop 



L "Reeve &C° London . 



Tab. 7486. 

HAEMARIA Dawsoniana. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Oechideje. — Tribe Neottie^e. 
Genus Haemaria, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Jlook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 601.) 



Haemaeia Dawsoniana ; caule robusto basi nudo, foliia ovatia acutis in 
petiolum roseum angustatis glaberrimis snpra Itiride viridibus nervia 
nervulisque reticulatis sangaineis, subtaa roseis, scapo pallide viridi, 
racemo ovariisque laxe pilosis, vaginis lanceolatis, floribua spicatis, 
bracteia ovario paallo brevioribus lanceolatia albia roseo-tinctia, 
perianthio 1 poll. diam. albo, sepalia late ovatia obtusia, poatico minora 
erecto, lateralibua patentibus, petalis linearibus falcatis sepalo poatico 
subcohaerentibus, labelli albi basi aaccati ungae lineari, limbo atipitato 
2-Iobo, lobis oblongis truncatis divaricatis, sacco 2-lobo, columna clavata 
aurea, rostello furcato, anthera rostrata. 

H. discolor var. Dawsoniana, Beichb.f. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. iix, (1874) 

p. 142. Sook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 102 (in note). 
Anoactochilua Dawaonianaa, Low ex Beichb. f. in Gard. Chron. (1868) p. 1038. 



Haemaria is a small genus of Asiatic Orchids, of which 
only two species are as yet known, II. discolor, Lindl. 
(Goody era discolor, t. 2055), and the plant here figured. 
These two are so closely allied that Reichenbach from im- 
perfect specimens of II. Dawsoniana described it as a 
variety of discolor, at the same time overlooking the fact 
that it had already been published as an Anoectochilus by 
Low in 1868, also under the name of Dawsonianus. 

Referring to the plate of H. discolor cited above, or 
better to a figure in the Bolanical Register, t. 271, it 
will be seen that it is a much more robust, more 
glabrous plant, with very dark green whole-coloured 
leaves edged with red, and having smaller flowers. The 
genus is allied to Anoectochilus, but the sac of the lip is 
concealed between the bases of the lateral sepals, other- 
wise the genera are exceedingly alike. 

H. Dawsoniana is a native of Burma, where it was dis- 
covered, I believe, by the Rev. Mr. Parish in the Moolmain 
district. Living specimens have been received at the 

July 1st, 1896. 



Royal Gardens, Kew, from those at Calcutta. It flowers 
in a stove in the month of January. 

Descr. — Whole plant eight to ten inches high. Stem as 
thick as a goose-quill, leafless below, but bearing one or 
more tubular membranous sheaths, pale green. Leaves 
two to four inches long, petioled, ovate, acuminate, dark 
green above and tessellated with nine to twelve pairs of 
longitudinal and oblique transverse blood-red nerves, 
margins blood-red, beneath rose-colrd. ; base narrowed into 
a stout, rose-colrd. deeply concave petiole. Scape with 
spike six inches long, slender, together with the bracts and 
ovaries pubescent with flaccid hairs ; sheaths few, lanceo- 
late. Spike many-fld. ; bracts as long as the ovaries, 
lanceolate, pale greenish, or white suffused with rose. 
Flowers horizontally spreading, about one inch in diameter, 
pure white, with the column and anther yellow. Ovary 
sessile, two-thirds of an inch long. Sepals ovate, obtuse, 
lateral spreading ; dorsal smaller, erect. Petals erect ; 
coherent with the dorsal sepal, linear, falcate. Lip as 
long as the sepals, base saccate ; claw broadly linear, sud- 
denly contracted into a short stipes for the limb, which 
consists of two divergent, oblong, truncate lobes ; sac 
globose, two-lobed. Column stout, tip turned to one side ; 
rostellum forked. Anther lanceolate, beaked. Pollinia 
narrowly clavate, of about six rows of flattened granules, 
stalked ; stalks inserted o*n an oblong gland. — /. D. H. 



■ F !u' \' ? lower 5 2 aud 3 > column and lip viewed from opposite sides, show- 
ing the twist of the top of the column ; 4, rostellum and anther ; 5 pollinia : 
— All enlaraed. 



— All enlarged 



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Tab. 7482.— LOUR YA CAMPANULATA. 

n 7483 —PILOCARPUS JABORANDI. 
„ 7484.— ASPIDISTRA TYPICA. 
„ 7485.— AKEBIA LOBATA. 

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1487. 







Vincent Brooks. Day &oon.lmp 



L.Ueeve & C° I 



Tab. 7487. 

SANSEVIERIA Roxbtjrghiana. 
Native of the Hast Indies. 

Nat. Ord. Hjemodoeace^. — Tribe Ophiopogones. 
Genus Sanseviebia, Thumb. ; (Bentk. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 679.) 



Sansevieria Roxburghiana; foliis2-2£ pedalibus anguste lineari-ensiformibus 
strictis erectis a basi ad apicetn teretem obtusum sensim angustatis 
d ? r .so rotundatia 7-9-costatia, aupra (apice excepta) concavis striatis 
vindibus f'asciatis rubro anguste marginatis, scapo foliis breviore, vaginis 
appressis acuminatis, racemo elongato gracili strieto anguste cylindraceo 
subdensifloro, fioribua secua racbim teretem fasciculatis, fasciculis 3-6- 
flons, pedicellis brevibus basi bracteolatis, perianthii pallide flavo- 
yirescentis, tubo i-pollicari gracili lobis linearibus obtusis revolutis 
longiore. 

S. Koxburghiana, Sckult. fit. Syst. Veg. vol. vii. p. 357. Kunth Enum. PI. 

vol. v. p. 18. Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. (1875) p. 519. Hook f 

Flora Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 271. 

PS. lanuginosa, Willd. Sp. PI. vol. ii. p. 160. Kunth I. c. 19. Baker I. c. 

S. zeylanica, Roxb. Corom. PI. vol. ii. p. 45, t. 184 ; Flor. Ind. vol. ii. p. 161 (non 
Willd.). 

Sansevieria, Wall. Cat. n. 5054, et p. 215. 

PKatu Kapel, Kheede Mort. Malab. vol. xi. p. 83, t. 42. 

Miirva, Jones in As. Research, vol. iv. p. 271. 



It is a curious fact, that except Roxburgh's excellent 
figure and description in the "Plants of Coromandel," 
published a century ago, and of which the description is 
repeated in his "Flora Indica," I can find no reliable 
account of this remarkable and economically useful plant 
in any Indian botanical work. Nor can this be accounted 
for by Roxburgh's having assumed it to be the very different 
8. zeylanica of Willdenow, for as far as India is concerned 
the history of that plant is as obscure as is that of 
S. Roxburghiana. A third Indian species (real or sup- 
posed) of Sansevieria, is S. lanuginosa, Willd. (Baker, 1. c.) 
for which the only authority is Rheede's " Hortus Mala- 
baricus," where it is figured (vol. xi. p. 83, t. 42), and 
described as having leaves with dorsal woolly stria?, a 
character unknown in any other species of the genus, and 
hence open to suspicion. In general appearance the 

August 1st, 1896. 



figure of S. lanuginosa accords with 8. Roxburghiana, as 
does the inflorescence ; but what is very singular is, that 
Rheede, though dwelling on the medicinal value of the 
leaves of his plant, says not a word of its uses as yield- 
ing a fibre. Rheede gives as its habitat, Malabar in 
sandy places. Roxburgh says of his plant that in 
Coromandel it grows very commonly under bushes in thin 
forests, in almost every soil, flowering from January till 
May; and adds an account of its cultivation, and the pre- 
paration and uses of the fibre. Referring to the Kew 
Herbarium, I find a specimen from Rottler's Herbarium 
named 8. lanuginosa, Willd., with perfectly glabrous leaves, 
and aecording, in all respects, with 8. Roxburghiana ; and 
others from the Island of Antigua, where it is naturalized. 
In the many works on the economic products of India in 
which the native Sansevieria is mentioned as a cordage- 
yielding plant, it is impossible to say whether 8. Rox- 
burghiana or zeylanica is meant. The latter, of which a 
good figure is given in the Botanical Register (t. 160) is a 
reputed native of Ceylon, and is said to be cultivated for 
its fibre in India. Mr. Baker informs me that 8. zeylanica 
is a native of South and probably also of Tropical Africa. 
In conclusion, it must be left to Indian botanists to clear 
up the history of the Indian Sansevierias, a plant which 
may prove of great value, now that the fibre-yielding Aloes 
Agaves and their allies are attracting so much attention in 
the British market. 

The specimen of 8. Roxburghiana here figured, and which 
precisely accords with Roxburgh's description and the 
drawing in his unpublished Icones at Kew, was received 
by Messrs. Veitch from Burma, and flowered in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in July, 1895. 

Descr. — Stem very short. Leaves about 8-9 in a tuft, 
two to two and a half feet long, by one inch broad 
towards the middle, suberect, rigid, dagger-formed, con- 
cave above, and ending in a terete point nearly two inches 
long, pale green fasciated with darker green narrowly 
bordered with red, upper surface concave, striated, lower 
rounded, about a quarter of an inch thick from back to 
front, margin thin, lowest leaves shorter and broader. 
Peduncle a foot long, cylindric, green. Raceme one to one 
and a half feet long, by one and a half to two inches in 



diameter, strict, erect, cylindric. Flowers in fascicles of 
three to six, suberect, very shortly pedicelled ; bracts 
minute, ovate, acute, pale green. Perianth very pale 
greenish white, tube narrow, half an inch long, cylindric ; 
lobes about as long as the tube, linear-oblong, obtuse. 
Filaments as long as the perianth-lobes ; anthers oblong. 
Ovary trigonous, 3-lobed, lobes pitted at the top; styles 
filiform, exserted, stigma minute. Fruit, according to 
Roxburgh, of two to three pisiform, orange-coloured, 
1 -seeded berries. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, portion of do. laid open ; 3 and 4 anthers ; 5, ovary : — 
All enlarged. 



1488. 




N Rtchiti 



VincentErooks.Day & Son.Invp- 



LReeve & C? London 



Tab. 7488. 

CYRTANTHUS Huttoni. 
Native of the Gape Colony. 



Nat. Ord. Amaryllide^. — Tribe Amartlle^;. 
Genns Cyrtanthus, Ait. ; (Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 729.) 



Cyrtanthus Huttoni ; bulbo globoso, tunicis exterioribus membranaceis brun- 
neis, foliis circiter 4 synauthiis eusiformibus glabris viridibus suberectis 
scapo brevioribus, scapo valido tereti elongate umbellis 6-10-floris, 
spatbas valvis 2 ovatis bruuneis membranaceis, pedicellis elongatis, peri- 
antbio anguste infundibulari rubro intus luteo lobis ovatis tubo duplo 
brevioribus, staminibus prope faucem tubi insertis filamentis brevissimis, 
stylo elongato. 

C. Huttoni, Baker Hancth. Amaryllid. p. 55. 



This recently introduced GyrtantJius is much more robust 
than C. angustifolius (Bot. Mag., tab. 271), and its numer- 
ous allies, but is not nearly so large in its flowers as G. 
obliquus. It was first flowered at Kew in May, 1864, from 
plants sent by Mr. J. Hutton from the south-eastern district 
of Cape Colony. A specimen was sent to Kew from Glas- 
nevin in 1884; and from the province of Somerset East, 
from Mr. James O'Brien in 1890. The plants now grown 
at Kew were raised from seeds received from the Edin- 
burgh Botanic Garden in 1892. Like all the other species 
it requires the shelter of a cool frame in an English garden. 
The flowers are not scented. 

Descr. — Bulb globose, an inch or an inch and a half in 
diameter. Leaves about four to a bulb, contemporary 
with the flowers, ensiform, bright green, arcuate, glabrous, 
above a foot long, nearly an inch broad. Peduncle stout, 
terete, a foot and a half or two feet long. Flowers six to 
ten in an umbel ; spathe-valves two, ovate, brown, mem- 
branous ; pedicels an inch or an inch and a half long. 
Perianth narrowly funnel-shaped, an inch and a half long, 
bright red outside, yellow within ; lobes ovate, half as long 

August 1st, 1896. 



as the tube. Stamens inserted near the throat of the 
perianth-tube ; filaments very short ; anthers small, obloug. 
Style about as long as the perianth-tube. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower cut open ; 2, front view of anther ; 3, back view of anther ; 
4, pistil, complete : — All enlarged. 



7489. 




M-S.deUNRtcb.lith 



Vineem.Brooks,T>ay&.:' 



L.Reeve & CP London 



Tab. 7489. 
SARCOOHILUS hainanensis. 

Native of the Island of Hainan. 



Nat. Ord. OrchidejE. — Tribe Vande^e. 
Genus Sarcochixus, Br. ; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 575.) 



Saecochilus (Cuculla) hainanensis ; caule elongato radicante robusto, foliis 
4-5-pollicaribus lineari-oblongis obtusis, vaginis brevibus, racemis 
secundis patentibus et decurvis crasse pedunculatis compressis, bracteis 
racbi adnatis brevibus disticbe imbricatis ovatis obtusis carnosis, floribus 
2-pollicaribus, periantbio angusto falcato aureo, sepalis petalisque con- 
similibus anguste linearibus falcatis conniventibus, labello parvo sacci- 
forme puberulo, lobis lateralibus parvis triangularibus obtusis, terminali 
crasso conico obtuso basi intus squama parva obtusa instructo, sacco 
late conico apice rotundato 2-lobo intus basi villoso, columna brevi, 
antbera bemispberica, polliniis oblongis. 



The genus Sarcochilus is a very large tropical Eastern 
Asiatic one, the species of which have never been reduced 
to a system, and, being polymorphous, may offer characters 
for the establishment of several genera. In the " Flora 
of British India " I brought thirty-five species, more than 
half of which were new, and some of the rest taken out of 
genera to which they did not belong, under Sarcochilus, 
dividing them into nine sections. Of these sections Cuculla, 
to which S. hainanensis belongs, is one of the best marked, 
on account of the compressed rachis of the raceme, with 
pectinately arranged, imbricating, persistent bracts. The 
flowers appear to come out two at a time in the species 
here figured, one from each of two adjacent bracts, 
the rachis of the raceme probably having a very long 
duration. 

The plant here figured was one amongst a collection of 
Orchids made in the Island of Hainan in Southern China, 
which was sent in 1894 to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by the 
Director of the Botanical Gardens of Hong Kong. It 
flowered in a stove in July of the same year. 

Descr. — Stem (in the specimen figured) six inches high, 
erect and leafy, but probably attaining a much greater 
length, and becoming pendulous, as thick as a goose-quill, 

August 1st, 1896. 



flowering or rooting, or both, towards the middle of almost 
every internode, the peduncles or roots bursting through 
the leaf-sheaths ; internodes one-half to three-quarters of 
an inch long, wholly sheathed. Leaves about four inches 
long, by three-quarters of an inch broad, linear-oblong, 
obtuse, coriaceous, dark green above, deeply furrowed, 
paler and keeled beneath, margins subrecurved. Peduncles 
together with the racemes about as long as the leaves or 
shorter, horizontal and decurved, stout, cylindric ; rachis 
of raceme stout, compressed; bracts confluent with the 
rachis, about half an inch long, ovate, obtuse, distichous, 
green, tipped with brown, closely imbricate, except to- 
wards the base. Flowers one and a half inch long, 
pendulous on short white pedicels, falcate. Sepals and 
petals similar, very slender, narrowed from the base to the 
subacute tip, golden -yellow. Lip very small, white 
sprinkled with pale red, sessile on the base of the column, 
saccate, puberulous ; side lobes very short, erect, triangular; 
midlobe short, conical, obtuse, with a small scale at its 
base within ; sac or spur hardly longer than the midlobe ; 
base broadly 2-lobed villous within. Column very short. 
Anther hemispheric. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Column and lip ; 2, the same, with the lip bisected ; 3, column ; 
4, anther ; 5 and 6, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



7406 




. 3anlmp 






Tab. 7490. 

adonis amurensis. 

Native of Manchuria and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Eanusculace^. — Tribe Anemones. 
Genus Adonis, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 5.) 



Adonis (Consiligo) amurensis \ perennis, robusta, glabra v. sparse pilosa, 
caule basi aphyllo longe vaginato snperne folioso, foliis (spuriis e. fol. 
2-3 confluentibus constantibus) caulinia petiolatis (supremis sessilibus) 
amplis ambitu fere orbicularibus 3-sectis segmentis pinnatisectis, pin- 
nulis anguste oblongis argute pinn.atifid.is, petiolo (axi seoundario) robusto 
vagina elongata membranacea instructo, floribus breviter pedunculatis 
amplis, sepalis oblongis obtusis, petalis 20-50 sepalis paullo longioribus 
anguste obovatis subspathulatisve versicoloribns, carpellis subglobosis 
stylo elougato recurvo, maturis dense pubescentibus stylo uncinato. 

A. amurensis, Hegel & Badde, Bot. Abtheil. Badde Sets. Sud-Ost Sibir. vol. 
i. (1861) p. 33, t. 2, f. 1. 2 ; et in Bull. Soc. Nat. Mosc. (1861) vol. ii. p. 35, 
t. 2, f. 1, 2. F. Schm. Reis. in Amurl. et Ins. Sachal. pp. 30,104. Franch. 
in Bull. Soc. Philom. Paris. Ser. 3, vol. vi. pp. 84, 88. Hemsl. in Qard. 
Chron. (1887) vol. ii. p. 491. 

Fu Ku Jus5 Shin Dsu. (Figures of varieties of Adonis amurensis). 
A. apennina, var. y f dahurica, Maxim. Prim. Fl. Amur. p. 491. 



Adonis amurensis was discovered on or near the Bareya 
Mts., on the right bank of the lower Amur river, Lat. 
50 N. 9 in what are now called the Amur Provinces of 
Russia ; and it has since been found in Islands of Sachalin, 
Jesso, and in the north of Nippon. It was first described 
by Maximo vie z from a very imperfect specimen as a variety 
of A. apennina, but was subsequently discriminated by 
Regel and Radde, and still more recently studied by 
Franchet, in a valuable paper cited above, and entitled 
" on the perennial species of Adonis and their geographical 
segregation." In this paper Franchet points out that the 
apparent petiole with, trisect leaf is really an arrested axis 
bearing two or three leaves, of which the petioles resemble 
the divisions of a single petiole, and were mistaken for 
them. The so-called leaf is therefore a branch, inserted 
in the axis of a leafless or almost leafless sheath. This 
arrangement Franchet regards as common to most pro- 
bably all the species of the Consiligo group of Adonis ; they 
Auausx 1st, 1806. 



are in fact branching herbs, though, as in A. amurensis 9 
the main axis may be the only flowering one. 

The Japanese work cited above consists of twenty-one 
figures of varieties, or more probably garden sports of 
A. amurensis, of all sizes, with single^and double flowers, 
white, grey, yellow, green, purple, rose-colrd. and scarlet. 
Some are double, like " bachelor's buttons ; " others have 
five laciniate petals, like a Dianthus. The sepals are 
often represented as ovate, acuminate, and very dark-colrd., 
and there are deviations from the type which might excite 
suspicion as to the good faith of the artist. 

The figure of the plant here given is from a specimen 
that flowered in a cool house of the Royal Gardens in 
February of this year. The red flower, fig. 3, is from the 
Japanese work. 

Descr. — A glabrous or sparsely hairy perennial-rooted 
herb. Stem eight to eighteen inches high, simple or 
branched, as thick as a swan's quill, leafless below, but 
clothed with long membranous pale sheaths an inch long 
and more, the upper of which have sometimes foliaceous 
tips. Gauline leaves (really 2-3 connate leaves) three to 
six inches long and broad, the lower stalked, the upper 
sessile, orbicular- ovate in outline, trisect to the base ; 
segments (true leaves) pinnatisect to the base ; segments 
crowded, linear-oblong, pinnatifidly acutely incised, dark 
green above, pale beneath ; petiole (a branch or secondary 
axis) of the lower leaves three inches long or more, very 
stout, connate with, or in the axil of a linear membranous 
sheath. Flowers two inches in diameter, shortly stoutly 
peduncled, golden-yellow, white, rose-colrd., or bright red. 
Sepals oblong, obtuse, concave, greenish or brownish dor- 
sally. Petals twenty to fifty, rather longer than the sepals, 
narrowly oblong-obovate, or subspathulate, tip rounded 
entire or erose. Stamens very many, about one-third the 
length of the petals ; anthers small, oblong, yellow. Carpels 
in a globose head, subglobose, pubescent; style as long as 
the ovary, recurved ; ripe carpels globose, densely pubes- 
cent, style uncinate and recurved on the ovary. — /. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Stamen ; 2, carpels : — both enlarged ; 3, flower from the plate in the 
Fu Ku Jus5 Schin Dsu, of the natural size. 



7491 




VmcentBrooks.Day & oon Imp 



1 Reeve JlC°L oridon . 



Tab. 7491. 
SOLANUM cernuum. 

Native of South Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. SoLANACEiE.— Tribe Solane.e. 
Genus Solaxuji, Linn. ; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 888.) 



Solanum (Pachystemonum) cemuum ; arbuscula orgyalis, caudice valido 
erecto apice ramoso ramis crassis petiolis costa foliorum subtus cymaeque 
rarnis ramulisque pilis flexuosis brunneis undique dense crinitis, foliis 
amplis oblongis obovatisve acnminatis marginibus undulatis basi rotun- 
datis in petiolum brevem crassum angustatis supra kevibus nervis utrinque 
6-10, marginibus undulatis, subtus nervosis tomentoso-leprosis albido- 
spadiceis, junioribus utrinque sparse stellato-pubescentibus, racemis 
suboppositifoliis decurvis pedunculo brevi ramisque crassis, floribus 
confertis brevissime pedicellatis pollicem diametro albis, calyce brevi 
subcampanulato insequaliter 4-5 lobo post anthesin inflato baccam 
tegente, lobis ovatis obtusis stellatim pilosis, corolla 5-partita, antheris 
oblongis poris introrsum spectantibus, ovario apice piloso, bacca globosa 
hirsuta. 

S. cemuum, Velloz. Fl. Flum. p. 84, III. vol. ii. t. 103. Mart. Seise, vol. i. 
p. 282 ; Syst. Mat. Med. Veg. Bras. p. 10. Bendtn. in Mart. Fl. Bras. 
vol. x. p. 42. 

S. paleatum, Schott mss. in Herb. Vind. n. 5419.; 

S. jubatum, Dunal mss. in Herb. Banks ex DO. Prodr. vol. xiii. pars. i. p. 132. 
Wawra Bot. Beis. Br. Saxe-Coburg, vol. i. t. 66. 



A very-singular looking plant, from its stout habit and 
the dense clothing of long flexuous chaffy, sometimes 
secund hairs resembling the fur of an animal, and giving 
rise to the Portuguese name of Bolsa de Pastor, or 
" Braco de Preguica," arm of the ant-eater. It is a native 
of the provinces of Rio and Minas G-eraes, growing in stony 
soil in the deciduous forests, and is a reputed sudorific of 
the Brazilian Pharmacopoea. The drawing here reproduced 
gives no idea of the size and robustness which the branches 
and petioles attain, or the length and breadth of the leaves, 
or size of the cymes, which are sometimes as large as the 
fist. 

Dunal in De Candolle's Prodromus, adopted jubatum, a 
ms. name of his own, for this plant, in place of the earlier 
cemuum of Vellozo, and this though Vellozo's had been 
taken up by Martius and by Sendtner. Dunal gives as 
his only reason that Vellozos's name was not sufficiently 
August 1st, 1896. 



applicable (" non satis congruens.") I suppose that he 
overlooked the decurved or drooping inflorescence, which 
is represented in Vellozo's figure, as well as in that of 
Waura, and of this work, from any of which it may be 
seen that the name cernuum is very appropriate. 

Descr. — A small tree or subarboreous shrub, with an 
erect cylindric stem or trunk, six to eight feet high, naked 
below, and furnished with short branches at the top ; 
upper part of the stem, branches, midrib of leaves beneath, 
branches of the cyme and calyces crinite with long brown 
flexuous chaffy hairs, nearly a quarter of an inch long. 
Leaves up to two feet long, broadly oblong or obovate, 
acuminate, base rounded or narrowed below into a very 
stout petiole, margins undulate, above bright green and 
shining with eight or more pairs of arching nerves, be- 
neath white, with scattered or appressed silvery or brown 
scurf and stellate hairs ; young leaves stellately hairy on 
both surfaces. Cymes drooping, sub-leaf-opposed; peduncle 
short, and branches stout, green except for the brown 
hairs ; flowers an inch in diameter, subsessile, pure white 
with golden anthers. Calyx subcampanulate, crinite, very 
unequally three to five-cleft ; lobes obtuse, or if of connate 
lobes then fewer and cleft at the apex. Corolla-lobes ovate, 
acute. Stamens short ; anthers oblong, lobes obtuse, pores 
towards the apex opening towards the style. Ovary oblong, 
top hairy ; style slender, stigma narrowly clavate. Berry 
(as described by Martius) globose, hirsute, enclosed in the 
enlarged calyx. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Stellate hairs from the undersurface of the leaves; 2, calyx; 
3, anthers ; 4, pistil : — All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7487.— SAXSEVIEEIA ROXBURGHIANA. 
„ 7488— CYRTANTHUS HUTTONI. 
M 7460.— SARCOCHILUS HAINANENSIS. 
n 7490.— ADONIS AMURENSIS. 
n 7491.— SOLANUM CERNUUM. 

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749a 







Vinceiii. Brooks, Day & SaTiImp. 






Tab. 7492. 
OHONEMORPHA macrophylla. 
Native of India and the Malay Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Afocynacee. — Tribe Echitideje. 
Genus Chxwemorpha, G. Don. (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 720.) 



Chonemorpra. macrophylla ; frutex scandens glaber v. pubeseens, ramis 
crassiusculis teretibus, foliis amplis orbicularibu3 ovatis obovatisve cuspi- 
datis basi cuneatis rotundatis cordatisve ssepius pubescentibus, nervis 
utrinque costae 10-12 areuatis nervulisque trarisverais creberrimis pro- 
minulis, cymis axillaribus et pseudoterminalibus breviter-peduncnlatis 
paucifloris, ramis divaricatis, bracteis minutis ovatis, pedicellis crassius- 
culis, calyce oblongo tereti breviter 5-fido demum tabescente brunneo 
medio constricto tubum corollas arete cingente, corollas tubo gracili H- 
poll. longo, limbi 3-poll. diam. lobis trapeziformibus, disco 5-lobo, 
folliculis 12-18-pollicaribus. 

C. macrophylla, G. Don Gen. Syst. Gard. vol. iv. p. 76. A.DQ. Prodr. vol. 
viii. p. 430. Wight Ic. Pi. Ind. Or. t. 432. Brandis For. Flor. N. W. 
Ind. p. 328. Kurz For. Flor. Brit. JBurm. vol. ii. p. 187. Hook.f. Fl. 
Brit. Ind. vol. iii. p. 661. Gamble Trees, fyc, of Darjeeling, p. 56. 

?C. grandiiiora, G. Don I. c 

C. mollis, Miquel Fl. Ind. Bat. vol. ii. p. 444, fide Kurz in Journ. As. Soc. 
Beng. vol. xlvi. pars II. (1877) p. 257. 

Echites macrophylla, Boxb. Fl. Ind. vol. ii. p. 13. Wall. Cat. n. 1657. 

E. grandis, Wall. I. c. n. 1658. Grah. Gat. Bomb. PI. p. 113. Dalz. $ Gib*. 
Bombay Flor. p. 147. 

PE. macrantha, Spreng. Syst. Veg. vol. i. p. 632, A.DQ. I. c. p. 477. 

Epicbysianthus macropbyllus, Voigt Hort. Suburb. Galcutt. p. 523. 

Belutta-Kaka-Kodi, Bheede Hort. Malab. vol. ix. t. 5, 6. 



One of the commonest and handsomest of the white- 
flowered climbing shrubs of Indian tropical forests, ex- 
tending from the foot of the Himalaya in Kumaon, east- 
ward along the whole range, and southward to Travancore, 
Ceylon, the Andaman Islands, Malayan Peninsula, Sumatra 
and Java. Throughout this wide range of distribution it 
presents little variation except in the size and shape of the 
leaves, their hairyness, and somewhat in the dimensions 
of the corolla. In the forests of Sikkim, where it reaches 
an elevation of 6000 ft., it climbs the loftiest trees, often 
covering their tops with a white sheet of flowers. On in- 

SErTEMBER IsT, 1896. 



cision the trunk yields a white coagulable milk, which is 
described by Gamble as " a good sort of Caoutchouc." 

Choriemorpha macrophylla was raised at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from seeds sent from those of Calcutta in 
1884. The plant is trained against a rafter in the Victoria 
Eegia House, where it develops its sweet-scented flowers 
in July. 

Descr. — A very large scandent shrub, more or less 
pubescent, or with the leaves almost hirsute beneath ; 
branches stout, terete. Leaves large, up to ten inches 
long and broad, opposite, shortly petioled, from orbicular 
to ovate or obovate, cuspidate, base cuneate, rounded, or 
subcordate, dark green above with ten to twelve pairs of 
sunk arching nerves, beneath always more or less pubes- 
cent, very pale green, with prominent nerves and cross- 
nervules ; petiole terete. Flowers in subterminal shortly 
peduncled cymes, with widely spreading terete green 
branches and pedicels speckled with red; pedicels one 
half to three-fourths of an inch long; bracts minute, 
ovate, acute, brown. Calyx three-fourths of an inch 
long, tubular, terete, unequally shortly 5-lobed, at length 
on withering red-brown and tightly constricting the tube 
of the corolla. Corolla white, tube proper very short, 
hairy within, produced into a tubular terete throat an inch 
and a half long above the insertion of the stamens ; limb 
three inches broad, lobes broadly obliquely triangular or 
trapezoid from a very narrow base, white, yellowish to- 
wards the narrow mouth. Stamens inserted at the mouth 
of the tube at the bottom of the long throat, filaments 
very short, pubescent ; anthers sagittate. Dish five-lobed. 
Ovary two-grooved, narrowed into a long two- grooved 
style which is hairy at the top and terminated by a 
conical bifid stigma constricted at the base. Fruit of two 
long straight hard trigonous follicles, twelve to eighteen 
inches long. Seeds flat with a long tuft of hair. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Base of calyx and corolla bisected ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, ovary 
and disk :— All enlarged. 



<s 



7493 



m 










TSncentBrookSjDayS : 



* & C° London 



Tab. 7493. 
DENDROBIUM Leonis. 

Native of the Malay Peninsula. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidejs. — Tribe Epidendke^. 
Genus Dendrobium, Sw.; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dend robium (Aporum) Leonis; caulibus coespitosis compreasis foliosis, foliia 
persistentibus distichia equitantibus verticalibaa late ovatis obtusia 
crasse coriaceia enerviia, vaginis brevibua membranacei8 applanatis, 
floribus in apicibus ramorum solitariis, pedicellia brevibas bracteia 
scarioais demnm laceris vaginatis, floribus f poll, longig, sepalis lateralibua 
triangulari-rotundatis aureis basi fuaco-aanguineo striolatia in mentum 
latum rotundatum cum colamna confluentibus, dorsali multo minore ovato- 
rotundato, petalis ellipticis obtusia sepalnm dorsale ajquantibus, labello 
lineari-oblongo recurvo integroecristato, disco paullo incrassato sangaineo 
striato apice late rotundato incrassato hispidulo aureo, anthera vertice 
biloba. 

D. Leonis, Reichb.f. in Whip. Ann. Bot. vol. vi. p. 280. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. 

Ind. vol. v. p. 723; in Ann. Boy. Bot. Gard. Calcutt. vol. v. part I. p. 7, 

tab. 10. 
Aporum Leonis, Lindl. in Bot. Heg. (1840) Misc. p. 59. Griffith in Calc. 

Journ. Nat. Hist. vol. v. (1845) p. 368. 
A. indivisum, Lindl. in Wall. Cat. n. 2081 ; Gen. & Sp. Orchid, p. 70 (non 

Blume). 

The curious Orchid here figured was introduced from 
Singapore sixty years ago by the famous botanical collector 
Cuming, who sent it to Loddiges, under the local name of 
" Lion's mouth," given it from a fancied resemblance of 
the flower to the open mouth of that animal, the lip repre- 
senting its tongue. It had been previously found by Mr. 
Prince, who sent it to Dr. Wallich, then Superintendent of 
the Calcutta Gardens, with a rude drawing from which 
Dr. Lindley erroneously referred it to Aporum indivisum 
of Blume. A. Leonis is probably common in the Malaya 
Peninsula, having been found in Perak, Malacca, Singa- 
pore, and extending thence to Java. Mr. Eidley informs 
me by letter that the flowers are exquisitely scented of 
Vanilla. 

The section Aporum, to which D. Leonis belongs, differs 
widely in habit from other Dendrobias, owing to the 
vertical direction (that is the lateral compression) of the 
evergreen distichous leaves, the anatomical study of which 

September 1st, 1896. 



would be worth undertaking. One species has been pre- 
viously figured in this work, D. anceps, Sw. of Bengal, 
t. 3608, which has axillary flowers with minute bracts. 
In D. Leonis the bracts in some specimens have broken up 
into a brush of brown fibres, out of which the flower 
arises. 

Plants of B. Leonis were received at the Koyal Gardens 
from Mr. Curtis, F.L.S., Assistant Superintendent of the 
Garden and Forest Department of Penang, who procured 
them from Perak in the adjoining Peninsula. One of 
these flowered in a tropical House in April of this year. 

Descr. — Stems tufted with fibrous roots, branching from 
the base ; branches four to six inches long, one and a half 
inch broad across the distichous leaves which clothe the 
branches from base to apex. Leaves about an inch long, 
ovate-oblong, obtuse, equitant and distichously imbricating, 
their flattened scarious sheaths embracing the broad flat- 
tened stem, dark green, hard and fleshy, quite smooth, 
nerveless ; sometimes, when the internodes are lengthened, 
the leaf breaks away from the scarious sheath, and the 
latter presents a truncate face of a pale grey colour con- 
trasting with the dark green of the adjacent leaves. 
Floivers solitary, and very shortly pedicelled at the ends of 
the branches, about three-fourths of an inch long by nearly 
as broad, of a dirty golden-yellow, streaked with dull 
purple at the base of the lateral sepals and lip. Lateral 
sepals much larger than the rest of the flower, very 
broadly ovate, obtuse, connate with the foot of the column 
into a rounded mentum ; dorsal sepal very small, orbicular- 
ovate. Petals about as large as the dorsal sepal, ovate- 
oblong, obtuse. Lip as long as the lateral sepals, linear- 
oblong, undivided, disk with a thickened median band 
terminating in a rounded broad thickened setulose tip. 
Column very short. Anther hemispheric., crown 2-lobed. 
—J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Flower with the lip removed ; 2, lip; 3, anther; 4, pollinia :— All 

enlarged. 



7494 




1 ftrcenLBrooks,Day 3 



I. Reeve A. Ctn.nnHr 



Tab. 7494. 
BAUHINIA Galpini. 

Native of the Transvaal. 

Nat. Ord. LEGUMiNOSEiE. — Tribe Batjhinie,e. 
Genus Bauhinia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f, Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 575.) 



Bauhinia (Phanera) Galpini ; frutex subscandens fere glaberrimus, ramulia 
rufo-puberulis, foliis petiolatis orbieularibus v. transverse late oblongis 
breviter 2-lobis, 7-nerviis, basi rotundatis v. truncatis, lobis rotundatis, 
subtu3 glabris puberulisve, petiolo lamina J v. J breviore, stipnlis parvia 
subulatis, raeemig terminalibus et oppositifoliis 6-10-floris, rachi pedun- 
culis calycibusque ferrugineo-puberulis, bracteis parvis subulatis, calycis 
tubo subpollicari recto, limbo tubo subaequilongo spathaceo, petalis 1-1| 
poll, longis coccineis, limbo orbicnlari cuspidato ungue aquilongo, 
staminibus 3 perfectis caeteris brevibus subulatis, antheris navis, ovario 
pubescente, stigmate capitellato, legumine 3-5-poll. longo lineari-oblongo 
compresso basi attenuato apice decurvo rostrato dorso alte costato, 
seminibus oblongis. 

B. Galpini, N. JS. Br. in Gard. Ghron. (1891) vol. i. p. 728. Oliver in Hook. Ic. 
PI. t. 1994. 



According to a note accompanying dried specimens in 
the Kew Herbarium, Bauhinia Galpini was discovered by 
Mr. W. Nelson at Dorn Spruit Spelunken, under the 
tropic of Capricorn, in 1880. Specimens have since been 
received from other localities in the Transvaal, as Baber- 
ton, the De Kaap Valley, &c, by Messrs. Thorncroft, 
Wood, &c. ; and both seeds and dried- specimens from 
Mrs. K. Saunders of Torgaati, Natal, where the plant is 
cultivated. It advances far into the tropic, Mr. Last 
having found it in the Makua country, Mozambique. At 
Baberton it appears to be a common shrub, clothing the 
hills in great masses five to ten feet high, conspicuous by 
the bright scarlet flowers. 

In the Royal Gardens it has attained a height of eight 
feet in the Succulent House, where it flowered for the first 
time in October, 1895. 

J)escr.—A half climbing shrub, five to ten feet high ; bark 
brown, of young shoots rusty-puberulous. Leaves petio- 
late, one to three inches long, orbicular or transversely 
broadly oblong, broadly 2-lobed from one-fifth to one-half 
their length, 7-nerved, base rounded or truncate, pale 
September 1st, 1890. 



green above, still paler and glabrous or puberulous be- 
neath; petiole about one-fourth of an inch ; stipules minute, 
subulate, deciduous. Racemes leaf-opposed on short 
lateral shoots, 6-10-fld. ; peduncle short, and rachis 
pedicels and calyx rusty-puberulous ; bracts one-eighth to 
one-quarter of an inch, subulate, fugacious. Calyx-tube 
three-fourths to one and a quarter inch long, cylindric, 
limb about as long as the tube, spathaceous. Petals one 
to one and a half inch long, crimson or scarlet, claw as 
long as the orbicular cuspidate limb. Stamens three 
fertile, the remainder reduced to short subulate filaments, 
fertile nearly as long as the petals ; anthers yellow, linear- 
oblong. Ovary long-stipitate, rusty- pubescent ; style 
pubescent, stigma capitate. Pod three to five inches long 
by nearly one inch broad, flat, narrowed into a stipes at 
the base, and into a decurved beak at the apex, convex 
margin with two strong keels. Seeds half an inch long, 
oblong, compressed, dark brown. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower with calyx and corolla removed ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, ovary ; 
— all enlarged ; 5, legume, and 6, seed, both of the nat. size. 



7W5 







L "Reeve &C° London. 



Tab. 7495. 
RHODODENDRON Smibnovi. 

Native of Trans-Caucasia. 

Nat. Ord. Ericaceae. — Tribe Rhodoreje. 
Genus Rhododendron, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii.p. 599.) 



Rhododendron (Eurhododendron) Smirnovi; subarboreum, ramulis robustia 
foliisque subtua latia griseo-alba appressa opertie, foliis lineari-oblongia 
obtusiusculis in petiolum robustum brevem griseum angustatis crasse 
coriaceis marginibus subrecurvis supra saturate viridibus subopacis, costa 
pallida subtus valida nervisque obscuris lana opertis, floribus in corymbum 
magnum globosum dense aggregatis breviterpedicellatis,pedicellis robustis 
calyceque brevi obtuse 5-fido lanatis, corolla ampla infundibulare pallide 
rosea v. alba profunde 5-fida, tubo brevi, lobis amplis patulis rotundatis 
marginibus undulato-crispatis saturatius roseis, dorsah punctato, stami- 
nibus 10 declinatis filamentis roseis infra medium pilosis antheris aureis, 
ovario conico-cylindraceo tomeutoso 5-loculari, stjlo incurvo rubro 
stigmate truncate 

R. Smirnovi, Trautv. ex Begel in Gartenfl. vol. xxxiv. (1885) p. 335, and vol. xxxv. 
(1885) t. 1226, f. 11, d-g. (execrabilis). 



Two noble species of Rhododendron, B. Smirnovi and 
B. Ungerni, showing a marked affinity in foliage with some 
Himalayan congeners, have comparatively recently been 
discovered in the monntains South of the Caucasus by 
Baron Ungern Sternberg of Artwin. Both occupy a 
region intermediate between those of B. ponticum, which 
ascends to 5000 ft., and below that of B. caucasicum, 
which descends to 8000 ft., where they form small bushy 
trees, fifteen to twenty feet high. The more precise loca- 
lity is 100 versts (about sixty-six miles) from Batoum. 
Dried specimens of both were sent by the Baron to M. 
Smirnow, by whom they were communicated to Prof. 
Trautvetter of St. Petersburgh, and were there described 
by Dr. Regel in the work cited above. Later, seeds of both 
were obtained by Massalsky, a collector for the Imperial 
Botanical Garden of St. Petersburgh, a portion of which 
were sent to Kew by Dr. Regel in 1866, and from these 
the plant here figured was raised. It flowered when only 
a foot high, in the early part of May, 1894. Mr. Watson 
informs me that it is perfectly hardy at Kew, forming a 

Sepiejiber ls'i:, 1896. 



compact bush, with thick leathery leaves, and that seedlings 
from crosses with it and other garden forms of the genus 
are now growing at Kew. 

Of the Himalayan species, E. Smirnovi is nearest to B. 
lanatum in foliage, differing from it and from all the large 
Indian species with woolly undersurfaces of the leaves in 
the infundibular corolla. 

Descr. — A small robust tree, fifteen to twenty feet high ; 
branches stout, compact, young clothed with a grey 
felted wool, as are the leaves beneath petioles pedicels 
and calyx. Leaves three to five inches long, by one to 
one and a quarter broad, narrowed into a stout petiole, 
elliptic-oblong, subacute, thickly coriaceous, margins sub- 
recurved, upper surface dark green with a yellowish 
sunken midrib, and very obscure nerves, under grey-white 
or very pale brown, with a stout midrib ; nerves six to 
eight pairs ; petiole half an inch long. Flowers in a com- 
pact globose sessile head six inches in diameter ; pedicels 
short, stout. Calyx a small tomentose 5-lobed cup ; 
lobes broadly ovate, obtuse. Corolla funnel-shaped, with 
a short tube, and very large open corolla, three inches in 
diameter, rose-red ; lobes rounded, with broad crisped and 
curled darker rose-colrd. margins ; upper lobe speckled 
on the disk with scattered oval brownish spots. Stamens 
10, declinate; filaments slender, rose-colrd., hairy in the 
lower half; anthers oblong, yellow. Ovary cylindric- 
conic, tomentose, 5-celled ; style recurved, stigma simply 
truncate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. I, Stamen ; 2, top of style and stigma ; 3, calyx and ovary ; 4, transverse 
section of ovary : — All enlarged. 



7496 




lelJ.NRtditth 



Tab. 7496. 

OBLMISIA Muneoi. 

Native of New Zealand. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe AsTEKoiDEiB. 
Genus Celmisia, Cass. ; (Benth. Sc Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 278.) 



Celmisia Munroi ; caule robusto, foliis perplurimis 3-8-poll. longis |-1| poll, 
latis seBsilibus anguste lineari-oblongis acuminatis coriaceia subplicatis 
marginibus recurvis supra laete viridibus pellicula gossypina argenteo- 
nitidula obtectis enerviis, subtus lana sericea argentea appressa opertis, 
costa crassa, scapo foliis longiore valido gossypino, bracteis linearibns 
nnmerosis elongatis erectis, capitulo 1-2| poll. lato, involucri late cam- 
panulati bracteis numerosissimis linearibus coriaceis tomentosis erectis 
recurvisve, iloscuLis radii perplnrimis confertis 2-3-seriatis, tubo glabro, 
limbi linearis apice 3-crenato, acheniis linearibus obtuse angulatis glabris 
hispidulisve, pappi setis flexuosis scaberulis. 

C. Munroi, Hoolc.f. Handb. New Zeal. Fl. p. 133. 



Celmisia Munroi is one of the handsomest of the genus 
which represents in New Zealand the Asters of other parts of 
the world. Upwards of thirty species are known to inhabit 
the Southern Islands of the Archipelago, only two of which 
are also found in the Northern ; and of these two one, C. 
longifolia, Cass., extends to the Alps of Australia and 
Tasmania. This latter is the only species that ranges 
throughout the whole length of the New Zealand Islands 
from the Bay of Islands to Otago. 

Many attempts have been made to introduce not a few 
of the species of Celmisia into English gardens, but with 
little success. In so far as I am aware, only two have 
been figured from living plants grown in this country, C. 
spectabilis, Hook, f., Tab. 6653, and C. Lindsayi, Hook f., 
Tab. 7134, both of this work. 

Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons are the introducers of C. 
Munroi, as they were of C. spectabilis. The former was 
received at Kew, under the name of C. coriacea, Hook, f., 
a closely allied species with leaves and flowers as large, 
but which differs in the pubescent tubes of the corolla and 
compressed achenes. 

September 1st, 1896. 



Gelmisia Munroi inhabits the northern half of the Middle 
Island of New Zealand, at elevations of 1500 to 4500 ft. 
It was discovered by Dr. Munro of Nelson, in the Upton 
downs of the Marlborough province, and it has since 
been found at various localities about Mt. Cook and 
elsewhere in the Canterbury province. 

The plant here figured flowered in a greenhouse of the 
Royal Gfardens in May of the present year, the flower 
lasting, as Mr. Watson informs me, about a fortnight. 

Descr. — Whole plant except the upper surface of the 
leaves and florets clothed with a snow-white cottony ap- 
pressed wool. Stem short, as thick as the thumb, crowned 
with a thick mass of erect and recurved linear-lanceolate 
leaves, and bearing one or more erect single-fld. scapes. 
Leaves sessile, three to eight inches long by one-third to 
one and a half inches broad, acuminate or subacute, 
coriaceous, subplicate, margins recurved, midrib very 
broad at the base, nerves almost parallel, upper surface 
dark green, clothed with a silvery pellicle, undersurface 
silvery-woolly with a stout midrib. Scape longer than the 
leaves, stout, erect, clothed with erect linear bracts one to 
two inches long, that are green above and silvery-tomen- 
tose dor sally. Head one to two and a half inches broad. 
Involucre broadly campanulate ; bracts many-seriate, erect 
or recurved, linear or subulate, acuminate, dorsally woolly. 
Ray-floivers many, in two to three series, tube glabrous ; 
limb linear, white, two-thirds of an inch long or less, tip 
3-toothed. Disc-flowers golden -yellow, very many, tube 
5-clef t. Achenes linear, obtusely angled, glabrous or sparsely 
hispidulous ; pappus-hairs rigid, rather flexuous, unequal, 
scaberulous. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Involucral bract ; 2, floret of ray ; 3, do. of disk ; 4, hair of pappus ; 
5, stamen ; 6, style-arms of ray floret : — All enlarged. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 621, SEPTEMBEE, 1896. 



Tab. 7492.— CHONEMORPHA MACROPHYLLA 
„ 7493 — DENDROBIUM LEONIS. 
n 7494.— BAUHINIA GALPINI. 
„ 7495.— RHODODENDRON SMIRXOVI. 
H 7496.— CELMISIA MUNROI. 

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Tad. 7497. 

ACTINIDIA POLYOAMA. 
Native of Japan, 

Nat. Ord. Tkrnstrokmiace/K. — Tribe Saubu.UJB«. 
Gonus Actinidia, Lindl.; (Benth.'& Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 184.) 



Actinidia polygama ; frutex gracilis, alte scandens, glaberrimu?, foliis longe 
petiolatis late ovatis ovato-oblongisve acutia v. acuminatis aetuloso- 
serrulatis membranaceis uudulatis basi obtusia rotundatia cordatiave, 
supra laete viridibus subtua pallidis, nervis utrinque costae 6-9, petiolis 
roseis, floribus subglobosis nutantibua in corymboa ' axiltarea breve 
pedunculatoa subtrifloros dispoaitis, sepalis ovato-oblongis obtusis, petalia 
orbicularibua concavia albo-virescentibus, staminibus perplurimis, orariu 

flaberrimo, stylo brevi crasso, stigmatibus ad 20 Iineari-clavatis radianti- 
us, bacca oblonga. 
Actinidia pr>lygama, Planch, in Hook. Lond. Journ. Bot. vol. vi. (1847) 
p. 302, in nota. Franch. & Sav. Enum. PL Japan, vol. i. (18~o) p fAK 
Miquel Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd. Bat. vol. iii. (18b'7) p. 15. Louche in 
Monatschr. Ver. Gartenb. Berl. vol. xxii. (187'J) p. 310, t. 4, fu;. 3-8. 
Bolle in D-utsch. Garten (1881) p. 47, cum Ic. Ito, Koisldk. Bui. G.rr.l. 
vol. ii. t. 20. 

Teochostigma polygamum & T. repandum, Sieh. & Zttec. in ALhandl. A' 
Muench. vol. iii. pars. II. (1843), p. 728, t. II. fig. 2. 



A graceful copiously branched climber, the branches 
festooned with leaves of a delicate consistence, and bright 
pale green colour, thus forming a very ornamental conser- 
vatory plant; flourishing also under a verandah in many 
parts of England, and unprotected in the western 
counties. The genus to which it belongs is confined to 
the Eastern Himalaya, China and Japan, 12 species in 
all being enumerated, of which some may be synonyms, 
as A. arguta, Miq., which is, I suspect, referable to A. 
callosa, Lindl. The name polygama is inappropriate in so far 
as the Kew specimens are concerned, the flowers examined 
being all hermaphrodite. 

The specimen here figured was sent by the Rev. Canon 
Ellacombe, of Bitton, where it flowered in the open air in 
June, 1895. At Kew it has the protection of the Temperate 
House, where it festoons one of the pillars for thirty feet, 
and flowers annually. 

BU Ht, 1896. 



Descr.—A tall climber; stem slender, clothed with 
leafing and flowering branches, quite glabrous. Branch- 
lets slender, terete; bark lenticillate, red-brown; of 
flowering branchlets dull olive-green, contrasting with the 
rose-coloured petioles. Leaves three to four inches long, 
and often as broad, long-petioled, broadly ovate or ovate- 
oblong, acute, setulosely closely serrulate, membranous, 
undulate, bright green, base cuneate rounded or cordate ; 
nerves six to nine pairs, arched ; petiole one to one and a 
half inches long, slender, rose-colrd. Floivers three- 
quarters of an inch in diameter, subglobose, in usually 
three-flowered shortly peduncled axillary cymes, pendulous, 
faintly tinged with green ; pedicels half to three-quarters 
of an inch long, very slender ; bracts at their bases minute, 
setaceous. Sepals about half as long as the petals, ovate- 
oblong, obtuse, green, deciduous. Petals orbicular, very 
concave, incurved. Stamens very many in a whorl round 
the ovary, included ; filaments filiform, glabrous ; anthers 
oblong. Ovary sessile, oblong, terete, very many-celled ; 
cells small, surrounding a broad axis. Style short, stout, 
crowned with about twenty radiating narrowly clavate 
stigmas. Fruit a many-seeded, oblong, fleshy, yellow- 
green berry, nearly an inch long — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of margin of leaf; 2 and '6, anthers; 4, ovary; 5, transverse 
section of do. : — All enlarged. 



7498 




Vincent Broolcs,Dav6cS 



1 Reev« &. C° London 



Tab. 7498. 

alocasia reversa. 

Native of the Fhilippine Islcuids. 

Nat. Ord. Aroide.e.— Tribe Colocasiejb. 
Genus Alocasia, Schotl; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 975.) 



Alocasia (Eualocasia) reversa ; humilis, foliis 5-8 poll, longis deflexis ovatis 
oblongisve acatis cuspidatisve basi cordatis sinu angusto brevi v. ad 
petiolum extenso, nervis utrinque 4 cum basilari reversa, supra griseo- 
viridibua secus costam et nervos late saturate viridibus, margiue anguste 
aureo, subtus pallide viridibus, petiolo 6-pollicari tereti pallide viridi, 
vaginis pallidiB membranaceis apicibus nudis v. subfoliaceis, scapo 4-5- 
pollicari pallido, spatba 2|-pollicari alba, tubo ovoideo, limbo tubo 
duplo longiore oblongo acuto demum revoluto purpureo-marginato, 
epadice 2-pollicari, inflor. masc. f poll, longa alba, fern, i poll, laxiflora, 
staminodiis paucis rubris, appendice fuBiformi ochraceo sinuato-ruguloso, 
ovariis ellipsoideis, stylis elongatis, stigmatibus dilatatis integris v. 2-3- 
lobulatis. 

Alocasia reversa, N. E. Br. in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. ii. p. 38. 



A. reversa is closely allied to A. sinuata, N. E. Br. (in 
Gard. Chron. (1883) ii. 678), also a native of the Philip- 
pine Islands, which differs in its very much larger size, 
and in the sinuate margins of the obtuse differently coloured 
leaves with more numerous nerves ; in both species the 
tendency of the sheaths to bear foliaceous tips is very 
manifest, though more so in A. sinuata. Mr. Brown re- 
marks that the darker shade of colour along the midrib 
and nerves of the. leaf of A. reversa is the reverse of what 
is usual in the genus. In the specimens which he described 
the leaves are cleft to the insertion of the petiole, in those 
here figured the basal lobes are connate almost throughout 
their length. 

A. reversa was imported from the Philippine Islands by 
Messrs. Sander of St. Albans, from whom the specimen 
here figured was obtained. It flowered in October, 1895, 
in a stove of the JRoyal Gardens, Kew. 

Descr. — Stem very short or 0. Leaves five to eight 
inches long by three to four broad, deflexed from the 
petiole, oblong or ovate-oblong, acute or cuspidate, base 
cordate, with a narrow sinus which sometimes extends 

OcTOBJiB 1st, 1896. 



to the insertion of the petiole, grey-green above, passing 
into dark green in broad undefined bands along the midrib 
and nerves, under surface uniformly very pale green, 
margins narrowly bordered with yellow, basal lobes 
parallel obtuse ; nerves four arching pairs, and a pair re- 
versed and running through the basal lobes nearly parallel 
to their inner margins, each giving off two branches ; petiole 
six inches long, terete, pale green, as thick as a goose- 
quill. Sheaths at the base of the petiole elongate, mem- 
branous, very pale, sometimes tipped with green or 
subfoliaceous. Scape three to five inches long, pale green. 
Spathe two to two and a half inches long, white, mem- 
branous, with narrow purple margins ; tube ovoid, half as 
long as the oblong acute revolute limb. Spadix two 
inches long, lower one-third female, with rather distant 
green ovaries ; median portion male, three-fourths of an 
inch long, white, separated from the female by a short 
naked space ; appendix cylindric, rugulose, ochreous. 
Male fl. of many narrow anther-cells together forming 
a cylindric truncate column. Ovaries ellipsoid, style rather 
long, stigma dilated obliquely 2-3 lobed : ovules 4-7, basal. 
—J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Spadix; 2, male flowers; 3, a female flower ; 4, the same bisected 
vertically; 5, ovule : — All enlarged. 







M.S.ad,J.N.Rtdhi'th 



ncentBrooks I 



L Reeve &C° London 



Tab. 7490. 
LATHYRUS undulatus. 

Native of the shores of the Dardanelles. 



Nat. Ord. Leguminos^. — Tribe Victe.e. «. 
Genus Lathyrus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hodk.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 526.) 



Lathtrtjs (Eulathyrus) undulatus; perennis, glaberrimns, caulibus anguste 
»„ alati8, stipulis semisagittatiB 2-partitis segmento antico aubalato-lanceo- 
lato detlexo incurvo, postico parvo subnlato erecto, petiolo angustiss^mo 
alato in stipitem gracilem apice cirrhiferam prodncto, foliolis nnijugis 
ovatis mucronatis 5-9-nerviis marginibua undulatis, subtus glaucia 
nervis prommentibus, flextiosis anastomosantibus, pedunculis folia 
superantibus strictis 5-7-floris, calycis lobis tubo subaequilongia lanceo- 
latis recurvis, corolla purpureo-violacea, ovario pubescente, legamin© 
longe lineari apice incurvo attenuato rostrato sutura superiore carinata, 
seminibua oblongis rugulosis. 

L. undulatus, Boiss. Diagn. PI. Or. Ser. II. pars. ii. p. 41 ; Fl. Orient, vol. ii. 
p. 611. , 

L. latifolius, Sibth. So Sm. Prodr. Fl. Graec. vol. ii. p. 69 (non Linn.). 

L. Sibtborpii, Baker (ex Sort.) in Gard. CAron. (1890) vol. i. p. 704. 



Lathyrus undulatus is a critical species, beirig very 
closely allied to the oriental L. rotundifolius, Willd., and 
to the Western European L. latifolius> Linn., with which 
latter Sibthorp confounded it. Of these L. rotundifolius 
(Tab. 6522) is easily distinguished by its much larger size 
and stouter habit, broader leaflets, much larger broader 
stipules, numerous crowded smaller flowers of a dull rose 
colour, and short calyx-lobes. L. latifolius (regarded by 
some botanists as a variety of L. sijlvestris, L.) has lan- 
ceolate leaflets, and numerous much larger violet-purple 
flowers with a green keel. 

L. undulatus has been long known in cultivation under the 
garden name of L. Sibthorpii (which Mr. Baker has adopted), 
and which seems to indicate that it was introduced by 
Sibthorp, who certainly was its discoverer, into the 
Oxford Botanic Gardens. According to Mr. Hinds of 
Newton Abbot, whose observations are given by Mr. 
Baker in the Gardener's Chronicle, it flowers from a fort- 

OciojBek 1st, 1896. 



night to three weeks before L. rotundifolius, and is a 
much smaller plant, does not grow above three feet high, 
and can nearly or quite support itself without a stick. Its 
geographical area is very restricted, being confined to the 
neighbourhood of Constantinople, and the opposite coast of 
Bithynia, where it grows amongst bushes. According to 
Boissier L. rotundifolius is also a native of Byzantium, and 
extends thence to mid-Russia, Armenia and Persia ; but Mr. 
Baker considers this an error, and that L. rotundifolius will 
prove to be restricted to the Caucasus and Crimea. 

Plants of L. undulatus were received at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from those of Glasnevin in 1895, and from 
one of these the accompanying drawing was made- in May, 
1896. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Stem two to three feet high, 
slender, scandent, narrowly winged. Stipules semisagittate, 
one-half to two-thirds of an inch long, bipartite, with a 
rounded sinus ; segments divaricate, upper short, subu- 
late, erect, lower much longer, subulate-lanceolate, erect or 
deflexed. Leaves with two opposite leaflets, a rather stout 
compressed petiole, about an inch long, terminated by a very 
slender rigid stipes, which bears a trifid terminal cirrhus ; 
leaflets two to three inches long, sessile, elliptic or ovate, 
acute or mucronate, 5-7-nerved, dark green above, pale 
beneath, margins undulate, nerves very slender and 
anastomosing above, prominent as is the midrib beneath. 
Peduncle much longer than the leaves, erect, slender, 
loosely five- to seven-flowered. Flowers about half an inch 
broad, bright rose-purple, fading to violet, inodorous. 
Calyx-tube campanulate, lobes lanceolate, or deltoidly 
lanceolate. Standard orbicular, not callous at the base. 
Wing-petals oblong, tips and basal auricle rounded. Keel- 
petals semicircular, hardly auricled. Ovary pubescent, 
style short, stigma trulliform. Pod two to three inches 
long, linear, flat, glabrous, gradually narrowed from the 
middle to the base, tip incurved, upper suture keeled. 
Seeds oblong, rugulose. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and stamens; 2, wing-petal; 3, keel-petal; 4, ovary : — All 
enlarged. 



7600 




i 









Tab. 7500. 

FRITILLARIA noeilis. 

Native of Armenia. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^e. — Tribe Tulipeje. 
Genus Fritillaria, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. lii. p. &17.) 



Fritillaria (Honocodon) nobilis bulbo globoso, tunicis paucis parvia ovatis, 
caule unifloro brevissimo, nodis foliiferis saepissime 2, foliis erectis in- 
ferioribus oppositis lanceolatis superioribus 3 linearibus, perianthio magno 
campanulato cernuo breviter pedunculato, segmentia oblongis extus con- 
coloribus glaucescentibus rubro-brunneis intus flavo-viridibua maculis 
copiosis rubro-brunneis praeditis supra basin foveolatis, foveola parva 
oblonga, staminibus perianthio duplo brevioribua filamentia glabris 
antheria lineari-oblongig, ovario oblongo-cylindrico, stylo ovario longioro 
apice tricuspidato, fructu oblongo ad basin attenuate 



This pretty little Fritillaria is remarkable for its dwarf 
habit and large dark claret-coloured flowers copiously 
spotted on the inside. It was discovered by Sintenis in 
1890 in the pine-woods of Koessedagh in Turkish Armenia, 
and was imported in plenty in a living state and distri- 
buted by Herr Max Leichtlin, from whom the bulbs from 
which the plants here drawn, which were raised in the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, in the spring of 1896, were received. 
It has been regarded as a variety both of the Caucasian 
F. latifolia, Willd., and the Persian F. Kotschyana, Herb., 
but in my opinion is quite distinct from both of them. 

Descr. — Bulb small, globose, with few small ovate, 
white, fleshy tunics. Stem terete, erect, one-flowered, not 
reaching a height of more than three or four inches above 
the soil, with two leaf-bearing nodes. Leaves erect ; lower 
opposite, lanceolate, about two inches long ; upper usually 
three in a whorl, linear. Flower drooping, shortly 
peduncled. Perianth broadly campanulate, an inch and a 
half long; segments oblong, obtuse, dark plain claret- 
brown, with a glaucous tinge outside, inside copiously 
spotted with the same colour on a ground of greenish- 
yellow. Stamens half as long as the perianth ; filaments 

October 1st, 1896. 



flattened ; anthers linear-oblong. Ovary oblong-cylindrical ; 
style longer than the ovary, with three short ovate cusps. 
Capsule oblong, an inch and a half long, narrowed to the 
base. — /. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Base of a segment of the perianth, with stamen ; 2, front view of 
stamen ; 3, back view of stamen ; 4, pistil : — All enlarged. 



7501 




ckSonl 



L Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 7501. 

parr otia jaoqitemontf an t a. 
Native of the Western Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. H\MAMEIJDEiE. 

Gonna Parrotta, C. A. Mey. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 6ft6.) 



Parrotia Jacquemontiana; foliis breviter petiolatis orbicnlaribna v. snb- 
qnadratia crenato-denticnlatis stellato-tomentellia, stipnlia oblongis, 
bracteis involncrantibns 4-6 amplis orbicularibna obovatisve albia dorao 
mar^inibuaque aquamulis f urfuraceia purpureia conaperais, caljcis dentibua 
parvia,_tubo ovarioqne villosis, staminibua numerosia, filamontia linearibns, 
antbens brevibus oblongis obtusis connective) vix producto. 

P. Jacquemontiana, Decne. in Jacquem. Voy. Bot. p. 73, t. 82. TIoolc. f. 9f 
Thorns, in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. ii. (1858) p. 85. Brandis For. Fl. N.W. 
&Centr. Ind. p. 216, t. 28. Clarke in Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. ii. p. 426. 
Aitchis. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. (1880) 59. Gamble Manual of 
Indian Timbers, p. 174. Stewart, Punjab Plants, p. 110. 

Fotbergilla involncrata, Falconer in Proc. Linn. Soc. vol. i. (1839) p. 18; et 
m Boyle III. Bot. Himal. Introd, p. xxv. 



Though placed in the same genus as Parrotia persiea, 
C. A. Mey. (see t. 5744) P. Jacquemontiana differs in very 
marked characters from that plant, in which there is a 
total absence of stellate hairs, the leaves in late autumn 
turn to brilliant orange-yellow golden and scarlet colours, 
the calyx-lobes are oblong, the involucrant bracts small 
and dark brown externally, the stamens very few, with 
almost capillary filaments, and the anthers narrow, scarlet, 
and mucronate. P. Jacquemontiana is indeed much nearer 
the N. American Fothergilla alnifolia (Tabs. 1341, 1342) 
in foliage, stellate hairs, and the numerous stamens with 
short anthers. There is in fact nothing to distinguish /'. 
Jacquemontiana generically from Fothergilla, but the capitate 
mvolucrate inflorescence, in contrast with the spicate ex- 
involucrate inflorescence of the latter. 

The geographical range of Parrotia Jacquemontiana is 
almost limited to the outer Himalayan ranges between the 
sources of the Ravi in Chamba, and the Indus, where 
it extends often gregariously from Murree to Gilgit and 
Hazara. It was discovered in about 1836 in Kashmir by Dr. 
Falconer, that being the central area of its distribution. 
Its range in elevation is from 2800-8500 ft, It occurs 

October 1st, 1896. 



sparingly in N.E. Afghanistan, as in the Kuram Valley, 
where Dr. Aitchison describes its use in making a wicker- 
work which, plastered with clay, is the building material 
of the inhabitants. According to Gamble its wood, which 
is pinkish-red, hard, heavy, and very close-grained, is 
highly esteemed for walking-sticks, tent-pegs, native bowls, 
&c. ; and the flexible twigs are twisted into thick ropes 
often 300 ft. long, used in the construction of bridges. 

The Royal Gardens are indebted to Mr. Robert Ellis of 
the Forest Department, Panjab, for seeds of this interesting 
plant, received in 1879. The plants raised from these have 
attained eight feet in height, three feet six inches in 
diameter, and are of a, pyramidal form. They flowered in 
the Arboretum in March of the present year. Plants of it 
have also been received from our indefatigable correspon- 
dent, Mr. Max Leichtlin. As implied above, the leaves 
present no bright colours preceding their fall in autumn. 

Descr. — A shrub or small Hazel-like tree, attaining 
fifteen to twenty feet in height, with spreading, flexuous 
branches. Leaves up to four inches long and broad, very 
shortly petioled, orbicular, subquadrate, or very broadly 
obovate, tomentose on both surfaces with stellate hairs ; 
margin crenately toothed, sometimes obscurely lobed ; 
stipules oblong, pubescent. Flowers about twenty, in 
dense globose sessile heads, one-half to three-quarters of 
an inch in diameter, surrounded by four to six orbicular 
or obovate white unequal bracts, the largest half an inch 
diameter, which are sprinkled on the back and margins 
with a red-purple scurf ; stipules oblong, obtuse, pubescent. 
Flowers densely crowded, sessile, appearing as a head of 
golden stamens. Calm a very small toothed pubescent 
cup embracing the pubescent ovary ; teeth small, subulate. 
Petals 0. Stamens about fifteen, filaments a quarter of an 
inch long, linear, erect; anthers shortly oblong ; connec- 
tive produced into an obtuse top. Ovary 2-celled, with 
two filiform sessile stigmas. Fruit a crustaceous 2-beaked 
nut, dehiscing between the beaks. Seeds oblong, smooth, 
polished. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Stellate hairs ; 2, flowers ; 3, calyx and ovary ; 4 a nd 5, anthers ; 
6, section of ovary: all enlarged; 7, head of fruits, and 8, seed, both of the 
nat. size. 



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Tab. 7502. 
CYCNOCHES Haagii. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Okcihde^:.— Tribe Vaxdeje. 
Genus Ctcnoches, Lindl.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 552.) 



Cycnoches Haagii; caule crasso folioso compresso, foliis snbdistichis 6-8- 
pollicaribus lanceolatis acuminatis basi angustatis laefce viridibus, subtus 
pallidioribus carinatis nervis 5-7, vaginis caulinis brevibus lasvibus, 
racemo axillari breviter pedunculato suberecto 6-7-floro, pedunculo basi 
vaginis brevibus obtusis membranaceis instructo, rachi pedicellisque 
teretibus pallide viridibus, bracteis lanceolatis membranaceis brunneis 
pedicellis brevioribus, doribus 2-2£ poll, latis, sepalis oblongo-ovatis 
obtusiusculis concavis petalisque patulis intus sordide flavo-viridibus extus 
lividis, petalis ovatis subacutis, labello carnoso rotundato subacuto con- 
vexiusculo albo maculis paucis runs asperso basi cordato saccato, disco 
ad orem sacci tuberculis 2 conniventibus instructo, columna viridi infra 
medium punctulata, anthera parva. 

C Haagii, Bodrig. Gen. $ Sp. Orchid. Nov. vol. ii. (1881) p. 221, Ic. ined. 
t. 687. ^_ 

The genus Cycnoches, a near ally of Catasetum, now con- 
tains ten or eleven described species, of which four have 
been figured in this magazine (tabs. 3855, 4054, 4215, 
4479). They differ greatly from one another in the size 
and colour of the flower, and especially in the form of 
the lip, but agree in the singular slender arched column, 
and in the structure of the pollinia. All are tropical 
American, 

G. Haagii, which is remarkable for the lurid green of 
its sepals and petals, is a native of the delta of the 
Amazons, and was first described in 1881 by J. Barbosa 
Rodrigues, from specimens procured from the River 
Andira, a tributary of the Amazons in lat. 3° 30' S. and 
long. 57° 38' West. The drawing here given is of a fine 
plant received in May, 1891, from E. S. Rand, Esq., of 
Para, to whom the Royal Gardens are indebted for other 
interesting allied Orchids, notably Catasetum Randii (Tab. 
7470) and G. Lemosii (Tab. 7444). It flowered in a tropical 
house for the first time in October, 1892, and again in the 
same month of 1895. 
November 1st, 1896. 



Descr. — Stem about six inches liigli and one in breadth, 

slighfly compressed, leafy, clothed at the base with old 
brown leaf-sheaths. Leaves subdistichous, lower three to 
four inches long, sessile, oblong-lanceolate ; upper six to 
eight inches long, recurved, lanceolate, acuminate, bright 
green above, paler beneath, with five to seven strong ribs, 
base narrowed into the short smooth green sheath. 
Peduncle short, erect or suberect, clothed with brown 
membranous obtuse sheaths. Racemes five- to seven- 
flowered, inclined; rachis and pedicels pale green; bracts 
half as long as the pedicels, which are about an inch long, 
narrowly lanceolate, membranous. Floivers two to two 
and a half inches broad across the petals. Sepals oblong- 
ovate, obtuse, lividly yellow green, dorsally brown-green ; 
dorsal erect ; lateral deflexed, concave. Petals as long as 
the sepals and of the same colour, ovate, subacute, 
spreading. Lip coriaceous, rather shorter than the sepals, 
orbicular-ovate, subacute, white, or suffused with pale 
rose, sparsely spotted with red-brown ; base cordate, sac- 
cate, disk with two obtuse conniving smooth low conical 
tubercles at the mouth, separated from one another by a 
narrow sinus leading into the sac. Column long, slender, 
arched in a semicircle, green, speckled with red-purple in 
the lower half. Anther small, depressed ; pollinia oblong, 
terminating a long, linear caudicle which is dilated below 
the middle ; gland large. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower with petals and sepals removed; 2, top of column and 
anthers ; 3 and 4, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



7503. 













Tab. 7503. 
RHODODENDRON serpyllifolium. 

Native of Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Ericaceae. — Tribe Rhodore^e. 
Genus Rhododendron, Linn. ; (Benth. & Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599.) 



Rhododendron (Tsusia) serpyllifolium ; fruticulus humilis,erectus, microphyl- 
lus, caule robusto, ramis ramulisque rigidis strigoso-setosis, foliis $-\ poll, 
longis ramulis brevissimis confertis et quasi verticillatis obovatia obtusis 
setulosis eglandulosis et elepidotie, gemmia floriferia terminalibus aphyllis 
1-floris, bracteis oblongis scariosis fulvis, floribua breviter pedicellatis, 
pedicellis paleis lanceolatis byalinis argenteis opertis, calycepatellasformi 
5-lobo, lobis rotundatis ciliatis, corolla infundibulari-rotata intua glaber- 
rirna, lobis ovato- oblongis obtusis, staminibus 5, filamentis exsertia infra 
medium glanduloso-puberulis, antheris parvis, ovario oblongo paleis 
lanceolatis linearibusve integris v. fissis argenteo-hyalinia vestitis 5- 
loculare. 

R. serpyllifolium, Mia. in Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd. Bat. vol. ii. p. 165 (Prolits 
Fl. Japon. p. 97). Maximov. Bhocl. As. Or. p. 42, t. 4, fig. 18-25 (ex Mem. 
Acad. Sc. Petersb. Ser. 7, vol. xvi. (1870) No. 9). Franch. & Sav. Enum. 
PI. Japon. vol. ii. p. 292. 

Azalea? serpyllifolia, A. Gray in Perry Exped. Japan, vol. ii. p. 315; in 
Mem. Amer. Acad. Arts. $ Sc N.S. vol. vi. I. (1857) p. 399. Mast, in 
Gard. Ghron. (1882) vol. i. p. 429. 



With the exception of the little high-alpine Rhododendron 
nivale of Sikkim, R. serpyllifolium is perhaps the most 
inconspicuous species of the genus. Specifically it is 
closely allied to 11. indicum, and especially to the var. 
amoenum (Azalea amoena, tab. 4728), which is a much 
larger species, and has the youngest leaves clothed 
with silvery hyaline setae like those on the pedicel and 
ovary of B. serpyllifolium. Indeed I should not be sur- 
prised if the latter proved to be a very dwarf form of 
E. indicum. The specimens described by A. Gray were 
from a plant cultivated at Simocla, which is the sole 
habitat given for it by Maximovicz, who describes the 
flower as pale lilac. Moseley, during the Challenger Expe- 
dition, collected it in 1875 at Kobe (near Hiogo, on the 
Inland sea). 

The figure in the Gardener's Chronicle is from a plant 
cultivated in Veitch's establishment, and is described as 

November 1st, 1893. 



having the flowers appearing in terminal tufts, white, and 
the filaments glabrous. I do not find the silvery paleae 
of the pedicels and ovary to be described by any author, 
those of the former are one-sixteenth of an inch long, 
twice as long as those of the pedicels ; they are modifications 
of the silvery hairs of B. indicum. 

Plants of R. serpyllifolium were purchased for the Royal 
Gardens from the Yokohama Nursery Company in 1895, 
and are now about a foot high ; they flower in April, and 
though possibly hardy, succeed best when grown in pots, 
and kept in a close frame. 

Bescr. — A very stout, scrubby, much irregularly 
branched, rigid shrub, of low stature ; bark dark brown ; 
branchlets strigose with rigid appressed subulate bristles. 
Leaves deciduous, crowded, sessile, and as if whorled on 
very short lateral branchlets, rarely more than a third of 
an inch long, obovate, ciliate on the margins and surfaces, 
neither glandular nor lepidote, bright green above, pale 
beneath. Flowers solitary, subsessile, from special (leafless) 
buds at the ends of the leafy branchlets, surrounded by 
brown, ovate-oblong, obtuse, yellow, scarious bracts ; pedicels 
very short, clothed with silvery, scurfy lanceolate scales. 
Calyx a small patelliform disk, with five broadly rounded 
ciliate lobes. Corolla about an inch broad, bright rose- 
red; tube very short, funnel-shaped, quite glabrous without 
and within ; lobes five, oblong-ovate, obtuse, spreading. 
Stamens 5, filaments longer than the corolla-lobes, slender, 
glandular below the middle ; anthers small, shortly oblong, 
brown. Ovary oblong, five-celled, clothed like the pedicels 
with linear silvery hyaline scales ; style slender, glabrous ; 
stigma small, capitellate. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Portion of branchlet ; 2, leaves bracts and ovary ; 3, pedicel and 
ovary ; 4, hyaline scales oE ovary ; 5, stamen : — All enlarged. 



7504 







. 



Tab. 7504. 
PENTSTBMON azureus. 

Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. Scb.ophtjlari:ne.e. — Tribe Chelonice. 
Genus Pentstemon, Mitch. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 940. 



Pentstemon (Saccanthera) azureus; perennis, basi frutesceng, glaberrimus, 
glaucescens, foliis lineari-lanceolatiB oblanceolatisve obtusis integerrimis 
v. hie illis serratis radicalibus subspathnlatis, racemis gracilibus secundi- 
floris, bracteis parvis lanceolatis, pedunculis 1-floris supra medium 
bibracteolatis, pedieellis brevissimis, calycis parvi lobis lineari-lanceolatis 
recurvis, corollse pollicaris violacese tubo calyce duplo longiore ad i poll, 
longo in faucem infundibulari-campanulatam semipollicarem sensim 
dilatato, limbo patente majusculo, labii superioris lobis rotundatis re- 
curvis, inferioris latioris 3-Iobi lobis brevissimis rotundatis aaquilongis, 
disco roseo-purpureo, antheris ovato-cordatis loculis post anthesin sub- 
divergentibus recurvis basi saccatis marginibus rimarum pubescentibus, 
ataminodio gracili apice clavato glaberrimo, ovario glaberrimo, stylo 
gracili. 

P. azureus, Benth. PL Harticeg. p. 327; in Journ. Sort. Soc. Lond. vol. v. 
(1850) p. 144. Paxt. Fl. Gard. vol. ii. p. 138, t. 64. Lemaire Jard. Flew. 
t. 211. Moore & Ayres Mag. Bot. (1850) t. 209. A. Gray in Proc. Amer. 
Acad. vol. vi. (1862) p. 75 ; Bot. Calif, vol. ii. p. 561 ; Synopt. Flor. N. 
Am. vol. ii. pars. I. p. 272. 



A common and very variable plant throughout the 
state of California, ascending in a dwarf form to 8000 ft. 
above the sea. A. Gray, in his Synoptical Flora of the 
United States, describes five varieties, with none of which 
does that figured here exactly accord, agreeing best with 
var. ambiguus (P. heterophyllus, Wats., not of Lindley, 
figured at tab. 1899) in stature, habit and upper leaves 
narrowed to the base, but having a much longer corolla. 
Another variety is Jaffrayanus (P. Jaffrayanus of this 
work, tab. 5045), which, with the shorter corolla of var. am- 
biguus, has a stouter habit, much broader lower leaves, and 
the upper leaves broad at the base. P. azureus belongs 
to a comparatively small section of the genus (which 
contains twelve species) distinguished by the structure 
of the anthers, the lobes of which are confluent above, and 
instead of diverging remain nearly parallel, dehiscing in 
their upper halves and across the top, whilst their lower 

November 1st, 1896. 



halves remain closed, and assume a saccate form. In 
reference to this character I find that the neglect of it in 
the drawing of P. syeciosus, Dongl. (P. glaber, Pursh) in 
the Botanical Register, renders it impossible to distinguish 
that figure from P. azureus. The anthers of P. speciosus 
have divaricated cells, as may be seen in Douglas's type 
specimens at Kew, whilst those represented in the Register 
are of exactly the same form as in azureus. 

Pentstemon azureus was raised from seeds sent to the 
Royal Gardens in 1895 by Professor Goodale, Director of 
the Botanic Garden of Harvard University, Massachusetts. 
Plants raised from these flowered in June of the present 
year in the open air. The stems, which become hard and 
woody, were protected in a cold frame in winter. 

Bescr. — More or less glaucous. Stem two to three feet 
high, woody and branching from the base; branches 
erect, slender, green and red-brown. Lower leaves three 
to five inches long, narrowly oblanceolate, acute, quite 
entire, or rarely with one or two lateral incisions, yellow- 
green ; upper leaves gradually smaller, about an inch long, 
linear, narrowed to the base. Flowers secund, in slender 
terminal and lateral racemes, which are sometimes 
branched at the base, bracteate and bibracteolate ; pedicels 
slender ; bracts and bracteoles ovate-lanceolate, one-sixth 
to one-third of an inch long. Calyx, small, lobes ovate, 
with recurved tips. Corolla an inch and a half long, 
bright azure or violet blue, rose-purplish towards the 
base of the tube, and on the disks of the lower corolla- 
lobes ; tube terete, about a third of an inch long, gradually 
dilated into the tubular-campanulate elongate throat ; 
limb broadly two-lipped, three-quarters of an inch broad 
across the tips ; upper lip of two broad retuse recurved 
lobes ; lower broadly transversely oblong, shortly trun- 
cately three-lobed, the lobes retuse. Stamens included, 
filaments quite glabrous; anthers golden yellow, margins 
of cells shortly villous. Staminocles filiform, tip clavate, 
quite glabrous. Ovary and style glabrous. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and ovary ; 2, base of corolla laid open with stamens ; 3 and 
4, anthers; 5, ovary :—All enlarged. 



7505 




Lei J^N-Frttfi hth 



BrooksD«ya 



Tab. 75.05. 
HAWORTHIA xiphiophylla. 

Native of Cape Colony. 

Nat. Ord. LiLiACEiE. — Tribe Aloine.e. 
Genus Hawouthia, Duval; (Benth. et Huok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 777.) 



Hawouthia xiphiophylla ; acaulis, foliis 40-50 dense rosulatis lanceolatia 
pallide viridibas facie planis dorso distincte carinatis e basi ad arista m 
terminalem pellucidam sensim attennatis, aculeis marginalibua magnia 
pellucidis, carina dorsali aculeia consimilibas prasdita, pedunculo semi- 
pedali bracteis vacuia paucis ovatis pallidis prsedito, racemo laxo 10-12- 
flofo, pedicellis brevibus ascendent ibus, bracteis ovatis parvis, periantbii 
albi tubo oblongo-cylindrico lobis lineari-oblongis tubo brevioribus 3 
inferioribns quam superioribus magis recurvatis, genitalibus tubo inclusis, 
antheris subglobosis parvis, ovario oblongo, stylo brevissimo, stigmate 
capitate 



This pretty "little new Haworthia belongs to the small 
section Arachnoidea. Of the old well-known species of the 
same section it differs from H. setata, Haw., by its narrower, 
thinner leaves, and from H. arachnoidea, Haw. (Aloe 
arachnoidea, Haw. (Bot. Mag. tab. 756) by the leaves not 
being at all pellucid or lineate. Like the other species of 
the genus it requires protection in winter. It was sent to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, from the neighbourhood of 
Uitenhage, by Mr. 0. Howie tt, late a member of the 
garden staff at Kew, and now foreman in the nursery of 
Messrs. Smith Brothers, of Uitenhage. It flowered for 
the first time in April, 1896. 

Descr. — Leaves forty or fifty in a dense sessile rosette, 
lanceolate, two inches long, one-third of an inch broad 
low down, tapering gradually to a large pellucid terminal 
awn, fleshy, pale green, not at all pellucid or lineate on 
either surface, flat on the face, acutely keeled on the back, 
margined with large pellucid prickles, which extend to the 
upper part of the keel. Peduncle terete, half a foot long, 
furnished with a few small scariose ovate empty bracts. 
Perianth white, three-quarters of an inch long; tube 
oblong-cylindrical ; lobes linear-oblong, rather shorter than 
the tube, the three lower more reflexed than the three 

Xovembek 1st, 1896. 



upper. Stamens included in the perianth-tube ; anthers 
small, subglobose. Ovary oblong ; style very short ; stigma 
capitate. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A leaf; 2, a flower, complete; 3, portion of the perianth, with 
stamen ; 4, pistil : — All enlarged. 



7506 




ItS.ad 



ASncentBrooksJJayASonlity 



L Reeve ^0° London 



Tab. 7506. 

ACANTHOLIMON venustum. 

Native of Asia Minor. 

Nat. Ord. Plumbagine.e. — Tribe Statice/E. 
Genus Acantiiolimon, Boiss.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 625.) 



Acantholimon (Rhodocalycina) venustum ; laxe coespitosum, fere glaberrimum, 
foliis rosulatis planiusculis et carinatis v. anguste lhiearibua v. aceroBis 
exigue calcareo-squamulatia marginibus scaberulis, scapis remote vagi- 
natis foliis multo longioribus, spica gimplici erecta subrecurva laxiflora, 
floribus secundis 3-bracteatis, bracteis glabris v. pubescentibus acuminatis 
exteriore triangulari ovata v. ovato-lanceolata membranaceo-marginata, 
interi<ribus lanceolatis latius marginatis quam exteriore £-| longioribus, 
calycis tubo pilosulo limbo infundibulari fusco eroso paullo longiore, 
petalis roseis purpureisve. 

A. venustum, Boiss. Diagn. Ser. I. vol. vii. p. 80; Fl. Orient, vol. iv. p. 831 ; 
in DC. Prodr. vol. xiii. p. 631. Tchihatch. Voy. As. Min. pars. III. vol. 
ii. p. 408, t. 37. 

A. laxi riorum, Boiss. in Bourgean, PI. Exsicc. No. 295. 

Statice Olivieri, Jaub. & Spach. 111. PI. Orient, vol. i. p. 168, t. 93. Verlot in 
Bev. Sortie. (1866) p. 451 cum Ic. pict. 

S. venusta, Fenzl. mss. 

S. diantbifolia, Jaub. & Spach. I. c. vol. i. p. 162 (excl. syn.). 

Limonium orientale, &c, Toum. Goroll. Instit. Bei Herb. p. 25. 



Though numbering nearly one hundred described species, 
the genus Acantliolimon has only a couple of representatives 
known to be under cultivation in English gardens, namely, 
A. glumaceum, Boiss., and the plant here figured ; and none 
are figured in any British work devoted to horticultural 
illustrations. The genus is peculiar as being separated 
from Statice by habit alone, which renders it all the more 
remarkable that it should have a very wide yet exceed- 
ingly well defined geographical distribution, abounding 
from Western Asia Minor through Persia to Affghanistan, 
Turkestan, and the Altai Mountains. Only one species 
enters Europe, A. androsaceum, Boiss., which extends 
westward from Cappadocia to Crete and the mountains ot 
Greece ; and one alone crosses the Indus, the A. lycopo- 
dioides, Hook, f., found in Northern Kashmir. Many ot 
Novembeb 1st, 1896. 



the species, including A. venustum, have, in the dry lime- 
stone hills which they inhabit, the leaves and stems coated 
with an incrustation of calcareous matter. 

A. venustum is, according to Boissier, a native of 
mountain ranges of Cilicia, Cappadocia, Catalonia, Anatolia, 
and Armenia, at elevations of 4000 to 7000 ft. That author 
describes three forms of it which pass into one another ; 
venustum -proper, with rather broad plano-carinate leaves ; 
/3. Olivieri, to which the plant here figured is referable, 
with longer narrower leaves ; it extends from Lycia to 
"Western Persia ; and y. assyriacum, with a velvety 
pubescent rachis of the spike and bracts, which has been 
found in Assyria only. The flowers vary from rose to 
purple. The specimen here figured is from a plant in the 
Rock garden at Kew, where it has long been cultivated, 
forming a dense tuft a foot across, and flowering in 
summer. It was introduced into Europe, probably by 
Bourgeau, the French botanical traveller. 

Descr. — Stems densely tufted, forming moss-like green 
patches. Leaves very variable, spreading, an inch long or 
upwards, acicular in the form here represented, bright 
green, rigid, almost pungent, dorsally rounded, ventrally 
concave, margins minutely scaberulous. Floivering stems 
three to four inches long, erect or slightly recurved, 
slender, rigid, green ; sheaths distant, lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, erect, green, margins narrowly hyaline. Spike 
secund, subrecurved, two to three inches long, many-fid. ; 
bracts three, about one-third of an inch long, like the 
stem-sheaths, but with broader hyaline margins, outer 
triangular about a third to a half snorter than the inner. 
Flowers one half to three-fourths of an inch broad. Calyx 
infundibular, scarious, yellow brown, five-lobecl ; tube 
sparsely hairy in the nerves, lobes broadly ovate, acute, 
erose. Petals spathulately oblanceolate, one-nerved, rose- 
coloured. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of leaf; 2, calyx; 3, petal and stamen; 4 and 5, anthers ; 
6, pistil -.—All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7507. 

GRAMMATOPHYLLUM Rumphianum. 

Native of the Moluccas and Borneo. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.*.— Tribe Vande/e. 

Genua Grammatopuyllum, Blume; (Bcnth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 539.) 



Grammatophyllum: Rumphianum; pseudobulbis magnis ovoideo-fusiformibus, 
foliis pedalibus oblongo-oblanceolatis, pedunoulo cum raceuao 3-1-pedali, 
racemo pendulo v. nntante laxe multifloro, rachi viride punctato, bracteia 
parvis ovato-lanceolatis, pedicellis cum. ovario brevi 2£-pollicaribus, 
floribus 3 poll, diam., sepalis petalisque consimilibus obovato-oblongiB 
obtusis undulatis luteo-viridibus plagis magnis rufo-brurmeis ornatn, 
sepalo postico arrecto, labelli parviintus pilosilobislateralibusrotundatn 
incurvis, terminali rotundato, disco aureo lineis 5 purpureis hirsutis 
percurso, columna incurva basi foveolata, anthera pubesoente ambitu 
lobulata. 

G. Bampbianum, Miguel Ann. Mus. Bot. Luqd. Bat. vol. iv. p. 219, t. 8, 9. 
Rolfe in Orchid Rev. vol. iii. (1895) p. 208. 

G. Gulielmi II., Krsenzlin in G-artenfl. vol. xliii. (1894) p. 114. 

G. scriptum, Teysm. 8f Binnend. in Natuurk. Tijdsch. v. Ntderl Ind. vol. xxvn. 
p. 21, excl. Syn. Blume!,. 

G. Seegerianum, JTori. 



Though greatly inferior in the dimensions of all its parts 
to the type of the genus G. speciosum (Tab. 5157), 0. 
Rumphianum must still, taking into account the size of 
the pseudobulbs, rank amongst the most massive ot 
orchids. Its nearest, and indeed very near ally, is U. 
Fenzlianum, Reichb. f. (Xen. Orchid, vol. ii. t, 16), which 
differs in the smaller size of the flowers, with fewer smaller 
spots, and which, being a native of Amboyna, should per- 
haps rather than this, have borne the name of the author ot 
the " Hortus Amboinensis." G. Measuresutnum -is, 1 thin*, 
a garden name for G. FenzUanvm rather than of tivmphm. 

'Two plants of G. Rumphianum flowered simultaneously 
at Kew in June, 1895, of which one was received from 
the Botanic Gardens of Hongkong, with the mfopmatiou 
that it came from Kudah in Borneo. The other was 
obtained from Messrs. Hugh Low & Co., under the name 
of Q. Gulielmi II., Kramzliu. The flowers remain fresh fo. 

December 1st, 1896. 



at least two months. The two lowest of the racemes have 
regular sepals and petals, and a perfect column, but no lip. 
The species is said to be also a native of the Philippine 
Islands. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs six to eight inches long, terete, 
stout, ovoid or fusiform, compressed, dark green. Leaves 
twelve to eighteen inches long, oblanceolate-oblong, ob- 
tuse, midrib beneath very stout, nerves slender. Raceme 
with the peduncle three to four feet long, spreading and 
nodding, or pendulous, shortly peduncled, laxly very many- 
flowered ; rachis as thick as a goose-quill, terete, green, 
speckled with darker green; bracts small, about half an 
inch long, ovate-lanceolate, white, at length pale brown ; 
pedicel white, with the short ovary two and a half inches 
long, as thick as a crow-quill. Perianth three inches broad. 
Sepals and petals similar, obovate-oblong, spreading, undu- 
late, tip rounded, yellow green, covered with very large 
red-brown blotches of irregular outline. Lip very much 
smaller than the sepals, three-lobed ; disk undulate, yellow 
with five purple nerves, more or less hairy all over ; side 
lobes broad, rounded, incurved ; terminal lobe oblong. 
Column incurved, with a deep pit in front of the base, and 
a lobed callus below it on each side. Anther orbicular, 
sides lobulate, pubescent. Pollen subglobose ; strap very 
short ; gland large, cordate. — J. D. H, 



Fig. 1, Portion of lip; 2, column; 3, anther; 4 and 5, pollinia :— All 
enlarged. 



Tab. 7508. 

PRUNUS SUBHIRTELLA. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Prune m. 
G-<mns Pkunus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 60.9.) 



Prunus (Cerasus) subhirtella; arbuscula, cortice pallide brunnea, rami* 
patulis, squamis gemmaruni brevibua coriaceis obtusis, foliis ovatis 
acuminatis caudato-acurninatisve argute duplicate* glanduloso-serratis 
viridibus glabris basi cuneatis v. rotundatis nudis v. 1-2-glandulosis 
subtus secus nervos utrinque 12-14 pilosulis, petiolo brevi hirsuto, Btipulis 
lanceolatis v. subulatis inciso-serratis, floribus prsecocibua 3-5-nis §-§ 
poll, latie, squamis gemmarum intimis herbaceis cniieiformibus 3-lobis 
glanduloso-ciliatis, pedicellia calyce paullo lougioribus pilosulis, calycis 
tubo glaberrimo v. parce piltso basi tumido lobis ovatis subserratia 
ciliolatis longiore, petalis albis ina3qualiter crenatis v. lobulatis, staminil.iH 
2-seriatisi, ovario styloque glaberrimis, fructu iaimaturo ellipsoideo- 
globoso. 

P. subbirtella, Miguel Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd. Bat. vol. ii. p. 91 (Prol. Fl. 
Japon. p. 23). Franch. 8f Sav. Enum. Pt. Japon. vol. i. p. 118. 



The Eastern Asiatic and Japanese species of the 
tribe of Prunese require a much closer study than they 
have hitherto received, nor is it till very recently that 
materials for their full investigation have been received 
in European Herbaria. Forbes and Hemsley in their 
enumeration of Chinese, &c, plants (Journ. Linn. Soc. 
vol. xxiii. p. 218 and seq.) enumerate nine species of 
the tribe as Chinese, of which four are also Japanese ; and 
Franchet and Savatier, in their enumeration of Japanese 
plants, give six as natives of that Archipelago. From 
most of those inhabiting both countries P. subhirtella 
differs in its habit of flowering before leafing; in other 
respects it approaches nearest to P. japonica, Thunb. 
(Amygdalus pumila, Sims, t. 2176). 

Miquel describes a variety of P. subhirtella (oblovgifolia) 
with oblong leaves. Of this there is an authentically named 
specimen in the Kew Herbarium, with leaves three inches 
long. He describes the calyx-tube of P. subhirtella as 
villosulous and only one-twelfth of an inch long. This 
December 1st, 189^. 



organ varies much in length, but in both the cultivated 
specimens and in wild ones collected by Maximowicz, it is 
much longer, and quite or nearly glabrous. P. subhirtella is, 
according to specimens in the Kew Herbarium, enumerated 
by Maximowicz as a native of the mountains of Nippon, and 
as cultivated at Nagasaki. Miquel gives three Japanese 
names for it, Iteo Sakura, Hisakura, and Sakako. 

The specimen here figured is from a small plant received 
at the Royal Gardens in 1895 from Professor Sargent, 
Director of the Arnold Arboretum, Boston, U.S.A., and 
which flowered in the open air in April of the present 
year, and was in full leaf in May. 

Descr. — A small tree ? branches suberect. Leaves ap- 
pearing after the flowering, two to three inches long, 
ovate, acuminate or caudate-acuminate, doubly glandular- 
serrate, dark green above, with twelve to fourteen pairs of 
nerves, paler beneath, base rounded or cuneate, eglandulose ; 
petiole one-sixth to one-fourth of an inch long ; stipules 
subulate, entire; scales of bud and leaves short, obtuse, 
pale yellow brown. Flowers in fascicles of three to five, 
produced before the leaves expand, white, about three- 
fourths of an inch broad ; outer bud-scales as of the leaf- 
buds, inner small, herbaceous, often irregularly three- 
lobed, glandular-ciliate ; pedicels usually rather longer than 
the calyx-tube, laxly hairy. Calyx-tube cylindric, inflated 
at the base, green, laxly hairy ; lobes about a third 
shorter than the tube, ovate-oblong, subserrate, ciliolate. 
Petals more or less irregularly crenate or lobulate. 
Stamens in two series. Ovary and style glabrous. — 
J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Inner floral bnd-scale; 2, flower unexpanded ; 3, vertical section 
of calyx-tube showing stamens and ovary ; 4 and 5, anthers : — All enlarged. 



7509 







London 



Tab. 7509. 

CORIARIA japonica. 
Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Coriarie.«. 
Genus Coriaria, Linn.; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 429.) 



CoRiARiKjaponica; ramis robustis acute tetragonis lenticellatis, foliis breviter 
petiolatis ovatis ovato-lanceolatisve acuminatis, racemia ramulis anno- 
tints enatis monoicis gaspissime 3-nis (unico masculo) 2-3-pollicaribus, 
pedunculis brevibus multibracteatis, bracteis ovatis, fl. masc. parvis, 
sepalis ovatis acutis petalis oblongis snbtriplo longioribus, tilamentis 
elongatis capillaribus, antheris laevibus, piatillodios 0, fl. fern, subglobosis, 
sepalis ovato-oblongis, petalis late ovatis valde imbricatis cerasinis 
corallinisve apicibus rotundatis ovarium superantibus, nuculis £-} poll. 
longis reticulatim S-costatis. 

C. japonica, A. Gray in Mem. Am. Acad. Nat. Sc. vol. vi. (1858-9) p. 383- 
Miquel Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd. Bat. vol. iii. p. 91. (Prolus. Fl. Jap- 
p. 255). Franch. & Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. ; p. 93. Maxim, in Mem. 
Acad. 8c. Petersb. Ser. 3, vol. xxix. (1881) No. III. p. 9; Jc. p. 13. 
Useful Plants of Japan (1895) p. 125. Ic. n. 487. 

Croton Siraki, Sieb. & Zucc. Fl. Jap. Fam. Nat. Sect. i. p. 36, n. 133, nomen. 
(ex Maxim. I. <?.). 

Arbor foliis Rhamni, &c, Thunb. Fl. Jap. 359 ; pi. Obsc. n. 50. 
Doko-utsugi, Jap. 



The most interesting feature of this Coriaria is the 
colour of the flowering and fruiting petals, which varies 
from cherry- to coral-red, that of all other known species 
being black or violet-black. Maximowicz indeed, who 
must have seen the plant in Japan, describes those of 
G. japonica as black, yielding a violet juice, and as there 
is no allusion to colour in Gray's too brief diagnosis of 
G. japonica, or in any other of the works cited above, it 
may be doubted (assuming Maximowicz to be correct) 
whether a black or coloured fruited one should be regarded 
as japonica of Gray. Fortunately a good figure and descrip- 
tion in the little work on the " Useful Plants of Japan " 
(including the poisonous !) referred to above, proves that 
the one here figured is known in Japan as G. japonica, 
for in it the fruit is represented as bright red, and 
described as " round, red, very pretty, but poisonous," 
December 1st, 1896. 



and here the matter must rest for the present, with the 
remark, that some very old withered fruits of the Kew 
plant have been observed to turn black, but this is quite 
exceptional. 

The genus Goriaria, which contains six or more species, 
has been ably monographed by Maximowicz in the Memoirs 
of the !St. Petersburgh Academy, where he divides it into 
two sections ; in one, to which all the old world species 
belong, the racemes are formed on the wood of the previous 
year, and the bracts are rounded, or ovate ; in the other, 
containing two or more species of New Zealand and 
South America, the racemes terminate in the shoots of the 
year, and have subulate bracts. Of the first section there 
are two divisions, one in which the male and female flowers 
are much alike, and the filaments very short, to which the 
European G. myrtifolia and the Himalayan G. nepalensis be- 
long ; the other with very dissimilar male and fern, flowers, 
and very long filaments, includes C.japonica, and the closely 
allied V % sinica, Maxim. The affinities of the genus, 
which are very obscure, Maximowicz regards as closest 
with Simarubeas. 

The figure of G. japonica here given is of a specimen 
which flowered in Canon Ellacombe's garden, Bitton, early 
in June of the present year. Another plant flowered at 
the same time in the Royal Gardens, which was raised 
from seeds collected in Japan by Professor Sargent. Its 
nearest ally is the Chinese G. sinica, Maxim., which 
has the fruiting sepals hardly imbricate, and the ripe 
carpels much smaller, with only three ribs ; the colour of 
the sepals of sinica is not given. 

Descr. — A low branching shrub, with square stem and 
branches, flowering on the red-brown branches of the pre- 
ceding year. Leaves one to two inches long, ovate or 
ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 3-nerved. Racemes springing 
from the opposite leaf-scars of the branches, two or three 
together, all female, or one male, one and a half to three 
inches long, erect or spreading, strict or slightly curved, 
very shortly peduncled, rarely solitary and terminating a 
leafing shoot; peduncle clothed with opposite ovate 
(rarely leafy) green bracts, a sixth to a quarter of an inch 
long. Male racemes more slender, at length drooping ; 
flowers shortly pedicelled. Galyx of five small ovate acute 



sepals. Petals much shorter than the sepals, oblong, 
keeled dorsally. Filaments at first very short, rapidly 
lengthening and capillary ; anthers linear-oblong, smooth. 
Fern, racemes stouter, more strict ; bracts ovate, acute, 
green ; pedicels one-sixth of an inch to one-quarter of an 
inch long. Flowers subglobose, bright rose or coral-red, 
about one-sixth of an inch in diameter. Sepals ovate, about 
half as long as the petals. Petals broadly ovate, longer 
than the ovary, strongly imbricate, tips rounded. Ripe 
carpels an eighth to a seventh of an inch long, subreniform, 
sides with five strong anastomosing ribs. — J. D. E. 

Fig. 1, Male flower ; 2, petal ; 3, fem. flower, pedicel and bract ; 4, ovary ; 
5, section of do., showing the ovules ; 6, ripe carpel ; 7, embryo ; — All 
enlarged. 







Broote,Day,& 



Tad. 7510. 
CYPRIPEDIUM Exul. 

Native of Siam. 

Nat. Ord. OfiCHiDEiE. — Tribe C*pripedie.s. 
Genus Cypripedium, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 634.) 



Cypripedium: (Coriaceae) Exul ; foliis 5-6 loriformibus glaberrimis laete viri- 
dibus, scapo elato robusto unifloro viridi cum ovario sepalisque dorso basi 
pube atro-rubro furfuraceo tomentellis, bractea ampla late cymbiformi 
herbacea glaberrima, ovario trigono rostrato, sepalis petalisque ciliolatis, 
eepalo dorsali amplo late oblongo apice incurvo subacuto marginibus 
undulatis albis, disco viridi maculis atro-rubris asperso, lateralibus iu 
laminam amplam late oblongam pallida viridem obtusam confluentibus 
marginibus recurvis, petalis late loriformibus obtusis undulatis flavidis 
basi sanguineo maculatis, disco fascia rubra fere percurso, labello galeato 
laevi nitido sordide flavo, colamna brevi pubescente, staminodio quadrato 
postice 2-lobo pubescente Havo purpureo punctulato, disco medio umbo- 
nato, stigmate amplo orbiculari peltato. 

C. Exul ; Eol/e in Journ.of Horticult. (1892) vol. i. p. 301 ; in Lindenia, vol. vii. 
p. 81, t. 327 (var. Imschootianum) ; O'Brien in Oard. Chron. (1892) vol. i. 
pp. 522, 523, fig. 77 ; Bolfe in Arch. Rev. vol. iv. p. 271. 

C. insigne, var. Exul; Ridley in Gard. Chron. (1891) vol. ii. p. 94. 



C. Exul so closely resembles G. insigne, Wall., of the 
Khasia Hills (tab. 3412) that it may, I think, well be 
doubted whether Mr. Ridley was not right in referring it 
as a variety to that plant. The chief structural difference 
between them that I can detect, is in the form of the 
staminode and stigma ; the staminode in G. insigne being 
more obovate, narrowed and entire posticously, and its 
stigma is very much smaller. The pubescence is the same 
in both, as is the great glabrous bract, and the scheme of 
colouring of the perianth, though differing in detail. On 
the other hand, G. Exul is much the larger and handsomer 
plant of the two. 

Tonka, in the Siam Peninsula, is the native country of 
C. Exul, whence plants were sent to the Botanical Gardens 
of Singapore and described by Mr. Ridley, as cited above. 
The fine specimen of it here figured was obtained for the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, from Messrs. F. Sander & Co., St. 
Albans, in 1892. It flowered in a warm Orchid House in 
March. 

December 1st, 1896. 



Bescr. — Stemless. Leaves few, six to ten inches long, 
by one to one and a half broad, strap-shaped, tip 2-toothed, 
bright green, dorsally keeled. Scape a foot high and more, 
stout, 1-flowered, green, clothed with a dark red purple 
furfuraceous pubescence, which extends to the ovary 
and bases dorsally of the sepals and petals. Bract nearly 
two inches long by three-fourths of an inch broad, cymbi- 
form, shortly beaked, herbaceous, green, quite glabrous. 
Flowers four inches broad across the petals, and nearly as 
much between the tips of the dorsal and combined lateral 
sepals ; segments ciliolate. Dorsal sepal one and a half 
inches long, upwards of an inch broad, arched, subundu- 
late, white, with a pale yellow green disk spotted with 
red purple ; lateral sepals confluent in a broadly oblong 
subacute herbaceous pale green blade, with recurved 
margins. Petals two inches long, by three-fourths of an 
inch broad, loriform, obtuse, waved, yellow with three red- 
purple median nerves and a few spots of the same colour 
at the base. Lip oblong, galeate, dirty yellow, smooth 
and shining, inflexed margins of the mouth punctate. 
Column short. Staminode quadrate, 2-lobed posteriorly, 
pubescent, disk with a central smooth umbo ; stigma 
broad, circular, peltate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Column : — Enlarged. 



75U. 




vp 






L"Reew 



Tab. 7511. 

iris albopueptjbea, 

Native of Japan. 



Nat. Orel. Ibidem. — Tribe Moe^e.e. 
Genus Ibis, lAnn. ; (Benlh. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. in. p. 686.) 



Ibis (Apogon) alhopurpurea ; rhizomate breviter repente, foliis ensiformibus 
viridibns reenrvatis, pedancalo tereti monocephalo foliis sequilongo, 
spath» valvis ovatis acutis viridibus, periantbii tubo brevi segmentis 
exterioribus recurvatis obovatis albis purpureo maculatis, segmentis 
interioribus erectis oblaneeolatis albis immaculatis exterioribus paulo 
brevioribus, styli cristis magnis margine exteriori rotundatis integris. 



A few plants of this fine new Iris were imported from 
Japan, mixed with a quantity of I. laevigata (I. Eaempferi, 
Siebold.) Till they flowered the two species looked very 
like one another, but when the flowers came out this 
caught the eye at a glance by the outer segments being 
much deflexed, and the inner ones erect, whilst in laevigata 
all the six spread horizontally at one level, a character 
very unusual in the genus Iris. Its Dearest ally is 1. hexa- 
gona, Walt. (Bot. Mag. tab. 6787), a native of the Southern 
United States. Both alhopurpurea and laevigata were in 
flower together in damp ground by the side of the lake in 
front of the Palm House in the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 
the middle to the end of June, by which time nearly all 
the other Irises had faded. 

Descr. — Rhizome shortly creeping. Leaves ensiform, 
green, not very firm in texture, two feet long, nearly an 
inch broad. Peduncle terete, moderately stout, one-headed, 
not overtopping the leaves. Floivers usually three in a 
cluster, opening successively ; outer spathe-valves ovate, 
bright green at the flowering time, two inches long ; pedi- 
cels short. Perianth-tube short, cylindrical; outer seg- 
ments of the limb obovate, deflexed, three inches long by 
half as broad, white, spotted with purple ; inner segments 
erect, pure white, lanceolate, rather shorter than the 

Decembeb 1st, 1896. 



outer, half an inch broad. Crests of the style-branches 
large, rounded, and entire on the outer edge. — J. G. 
Baker. 



Fig. 1, Front view of stamen; 2, back view of stamen: 3, crests of the 
Vie -.—All enlaraed. 



style :— All enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. LIL of the Third Series, or Vol. CXXII. of 
the whole Work. 



7506 Acantholimon venustnm. 

7497 Actinidia polygama. 
7490 Adonis amurensis. 
7477 Agave laxifolia. 
7485 Akebia lobata. 
7454 Alberta magna. 

7498 Alocasia reversa. 

7456 Asarum maximum. 
7484 Aspidistra typica. 
7494 Bauhinia Galpini. 

7457 Begonia umbraculifera. 
7461 Bifrenaria tyrianthina. 
7470 Catasetum Randii (Masc). 
7496 Celmisia Munroi. 

7492 Chonemorpha macrophylla. 

7474 Cochlioda Noezliana. 

7475 Coffea stenophylla. 

7463 Comanthospace japonica. 

7509 Coriaria japonica. 
7502 Cycnocbes Haagii. 

7510 Cypripedium Exul. 
7488 Cyrtanthus Huttoni. 
7453 Dendrobium Hildebrandii. 

7493 M Leonis. 

7464 Dipodium paludosum. 
7481 Episcia densa. 

7480 Eranthemum reticulatum. 
7500 Fritillaria nobilis. 
7455 Gazania pygmaea. 
7507 Grammatophyllum Rumphia- 
num. 



7478 Habenaria Ehvesii. 
7486 Haemaria Dawsoniana. 
7505 Haworthia xiphiopbylla. 
7460 Hechtia argentea. 

7468 Hypocyrta pulchra. 
7462 Incarvillea Delavayi. 
7511 Iris albopurpurea. 
7499 Lathyrus undulatus. 

7482 Lourya campanulata. 

7476 Masdevallia corniculata, var. 

inflata. 
7465 Massonia ja^miniflora. 

7469 Olyra concinna. 

7472 Ostr.>wskia magnifica. 
7501 Parrotia Jacquemontiana. 
7504 Pentstemon azureus. 

7479 Phajus misbmensis. 
7471 Pbaleria ambigua. 

7483 Pilocarpus Jaborandi. 

7473 Pittosporum erioearpum. 
7467 Posoqueria macropus. 
7508 Prunus subhirtella. 

7503 Rhododendron serpyllifolmm. 
7495 „ Smirnovi. 

7487 Sansevieria Roxburghiana. 
7489 Sarcocbilus hainanensis. 

7458 Scutellaria formosana. 
7491 Solanum cernuum. 
7452 Stanhopea Haseloviana. 

7459 Sternbergia macrantha. 
7466 Utricularia janthina. 



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