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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S ' 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 






COMPRISING THE 



Pante of tije ftopi 6artmtss of fttto, 

AND 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN ; 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

IB JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., K.C.S.I., 

F.E.S., F.L.S., etc., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 

VOL. LI. 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

{Or Vol. CXXI. of the Whole Work.) 




' Nor is the mead unworthy of thy foot, 
Full of froah verdure and unnumbered flowers, 
The negligenco of Nutuic wide and wild." 

TnoMsoir. 



LONDON: 

L. REEVE & CO., 

Publisher* to the Home, Oolonial, and Indian Chvemments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVP1NT GARDEN. 
1895. 
[All righto rtmnteK} 



Mo. Bot. Garden, 

189S. 



TO 



HARRY BOLUS, ESQ., F.L.S. 

Sherwood, Kenilworih, Gape Town. 

My deak Mr. Bolus, 

It affords me great pleasure to offer you the dedi- 
cation of the 121st Volume of the Botanical Magazine, 
acknowledgment of the great service you have rendered 
to South African Botany, and especially by your masterly 
works on the " Orchids of the Cape Peninsula," and your 
" Icones Orchidearum Austro-Af ricanarum." I have further 
to beg your acceptance of it as a memento of our friend- 
ship. 

Believe me, 

Sincerely yours, 

J. D. HOOKER. 

Tee Cahip, Sunninguale. 
Dec. lit, 1895. 







L MAGAZ 






Foreign Finches in Captivit 



EE, Ph.D 



THE HYMENOPTERA ACULEATA OF THE BRITISH I 

By EDWARD SAUNDER 

vith 4 PI 
nbscribers 

BRITISH FUNGI, Phycomycetes and Ustilagin 




BRITISH FUNG 



€± "V 



THINGTON G. SWITCH, F.L . ta., with 2 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 



A Dr the Flowering Plants a 

to or Matte 



"• I writ 



V 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

■f Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Pi 
h bt W.H. FITCH, F.L.S., ±hd W*. G. SMITH F 





Ob 

URNAL OF BOTAN1 

■ 



nay b- 






-" 1 *. H 



7392. 




^Hk 



Tab. 7392. 
TALAUMA Hodgsoni. 

Native of the Eastern Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Magnoliace*. — Tribe Magnolie^?. 
Genus Talauma, Juss. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 18.) 



Talatjma Hodgsoni; arbor 50-60-pedalis, foliis amplis obovato-oblongis 
obtusis v. cuspidatis marginibus subsinuatis supra creberrime reticularis 
subtus glaucis, petiolo bipollicari, rloribus amplis solitaris terminalibus, 
pedunculo crasso 1-2-annulato, alabastro ovoideo, bracteis caducis, sepalia 
i3-5-obovato-oblongis obtusis extus laate coeruleo-purpurasceutibus, petalis 
ad 6 sepalis consimilibus albis fructu magno ovoideo, oarpeliis subtetra- 
gonis acute rostratis, rachi profunda excavato foveolis rotuudato- 
quadratis. 

T. Hodgsoni, Hook f. & Thorns. Fl. Tnd/ca, p. 75, et in Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. i. 
p. 40. Hook.f. Illustr. Himal. PI. t. 6. Gamble, List of Trees of Dar- 
jeeling, p. 3, & Manual of Indian Timbers, p. 5. 



Talauma Hodgsoni is one of the noblest of the flowering 
forest trees of the Himalaya, a country which, considering 
its narrow area, contains perhaps more handsome magno- 
liaceous trees than does any other of equal dimensions in 
India, if not of the world. Its forests produce Magnolia 
Campbellii,H.t & T. (Tab. 6793), globom s E.i. & T.; ptero- 
carpa, Roxb., Manglietia insignis, Bl. ; Michelia GathcarHi, 
Hf. & T., M. Ghampaca, Linn., M. excelsa, Bl., M. lanu- 
ginosa, Wall. (Tab. 6179) and M. Kisopa, Ham. Of these 
the prince is, no doubt, Magnolia Gampbellii, and next to it 
is Talauma Hodgsoni, of which I was the fortunate dis- 
coverer in 1848, when I found it forming forests in the 
valleys of Sikkim at an elevation of 5000 to 6000 ft., and 
it was subsequently gathered by Dr. Thomson and myself 
in the Khasia hills. 

As a timber tree T. Hodgsoni is not of much use. Mr. 
Gamble, in his valuable " Trees, Shrubs, and large Climbers 
of the Darjeeling District," says of the wood, that it is 
white, but in very old trees quite black, especially the 
wood of the roots; as also that it is used for the handles 
of weapons and tools, and for other small-wood purposes. 
Its specific name commemorates the services to the 
Literature, Arts, and (Sciences of India of my late dis- 

Januaky 1st, 1895. A 



tinguished friend, the Orientalist, Brian H. Hodgson, 
LL.D., F.R.S., formerly Minister at the Nepal Court, 
my host for many months at Darjeeling, who passed 
away only last year at the great age of ninety-four. 

Two plants of T. Hodgsoni were received at Kew from 

the Botanical Gardens, Calcutta, about twenty years ago, 

and w^ere grown in pots in the Palm House. They were 

subsequently removed to the Temperate House, and 

planted out there, where the tallest is now 25 ft. high, 

with leaves 2 ft. long. Mr. Watson informs me that the 

plant flowered in a sunny position, and that the flowers 

last but a few hours after fully opening. They are at 

first white, then change to creamy-yellow, before fading 

to a dark brown. My attention was first directed to the 

tree in the dense Sikkim forests by seeing the petals in 

the ground, which resembled hen's eggs, and had a spicy 

fragrance. 

Descr. — An erect evergreen tree, with a clean trunk on 
30 to 40 feet high, and three to six feet in girth, flowering 
and leafing together. Leaves 8-20 inches long, by 4-9 
broad, obovate-oblong, cuspidate or obtuse, coriaceous, 
glabrous, margins waved ; costa and nerves strong ; 
nervnles closely reticulate, bright green above, pale, and 
more or less glaucous beneath ; petiole 1-2 inches long. 
Flowers solitary, terminal, fragrant, 6-7 inches in diameter 
across the outspread sepals ; peduncle 1-1^ in. long, stout, 
green, ringed by the caducous bracts ; buds about 3 inches 
long, ovoid. Sepals 3-5, obovate-oblong, concave, thick and 
fleshy, dark vinous purple externally; suffused internally 
with pink. Petals about six, like the petals, but all white or 
faintly rose-colrd. towards the tips. Stamens numerous, 
on a conical torus ; filaments very short, anthers linear, 
red. Fruit ovoid, woody, four to six inches long, muri- 
cate, formed of numerous sharply beaked dehiscent carpels, 
which fall away from a deeply pitted woody central 
column. Seeds one or two in each carpel, orbicular, 
compressed ; outer coat of testa fleshy, red. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Apex of peduncle with stamens and carpels, some of the latter 
removed to show tne convex receptacle: — of the nat. size; 2, stamens; 
3, carpel ; 4, the same laid open, showing the ovules, all enlarged'; 5, reduced 
views of plant in the temperate house, Kew. 



7391 







Tab. 7393. 
ACIDANTHERA 2equinoctialis. 

Native of Sierra Leone. 

Nat. Ord. Ibidem. — Tribe Ixie^. 
Genus Acidanthera, Roclist. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 706.) 



Acidanthera seqninoctialis ; cormo magno, depresso-globoso tunicis exteriori- 
bus scariosis brunneis fibris parallelis, caule stricto erecto elongato, foliia 
pluribus ensiformibus Buperpositis pedalibus vel sesquipedalibus vaginato, 
spicis distichis laxissimis simplicibus 3-6-floris, spathaa valva exteriori 
lanceolata elongata foliacea, periantbii tubo cylindrico apice curvato, 
limbi segmentis ovatis cuspidatis late imbricatis albis basi purpureo 
maculatis flore expanso horizantaliter patulis, genitalibus arcuatis limbo 
paulo brevioribus, fructu oblongo-trigono. 

A. sequinoctialis, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xvi. p. 160 ; JIandb. Irid. 
p. 188. Gladiolus a^quinoctialis, Kerb, inedit. 



This is the tallest and most showy of all the known 
species of Acidanthera, a genus which holds an interme- 
diate position between Gladiolus and Ixia. The present 
species for half a century has been known only from a 
drawing of the spike by Dean Herbert, contained in a 
bound quarto volume of his sketches in the Lindley 
library. It was rediscovered in fruit in 1892 by Mr. 
Scott- Elliot, in the crevices of bare gneiss rocks, near the 
summit of Sugarloaf Mountain, Sierra Leone, at an 
elevation of about three thousand feet above sea-level. In 
this state it was not recognized, and was distributed in 
his dried collection as No. 3904. In 1893 a quantity 
of corms was sent home by Captain Donovan, which was 
handed over to the Royal Gardens at Kew. Those which 
received greenhouse treatment failed to flower, bnt in a 
warm conservatory they found themselves quite at home, 
and came into flower in the month of November. Seven- 
teen species of the genus are now known. One inhabits 
Mount Kilimanjaro, two the mountains of Abyssinia, one of 
them extending to Zambesi land, and all the others belong 
to different regions of the Cape Colony. 

Descr. — Corm large, depresso-globose ; outer tunics 
scariose, brown, with parallel fibres. Stem stout, stiffly 

January 1st, 1895. a 2 



erect, three or four feet long. Leaves many, superposed, 
ensiform, a foot or a foot and a half long, glabrous, 
strongly ribbed. Flowers three to six in a very lax, 
'simple, distichous spike ; outer spathe- valves lanceolate, 
foliaceous, three or four inches long in the lower flowers. 
Perianth tube slender, cylindrical, curved at the top, five 
or six inches long ; limb two inches in diameter ; segments 
ovate, cuspidate, much imbricated, white, with a purple 
spot at the base. Stamens contiguous, arcuate, rather 
shorter than the segments of the perianth. Capsule 
oblong-trigonous, an inch long. — J. Q. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Front view of anther; 2, back view of antber; 3, stigmatic lobes 
and upper part of style ; enlarged ; 4, whole plant much reduced. 



W4 




MS.dei,JNF.tcMrth. 



• ,oks,T3»y* S< " 



Tab. 7394. 
LONICERA Alberti. 

Native of Eastern Turkestan. 

Nat. Ord. Caprifoljace,e. — Tribe LoxiCERiE. 
Genus Lonicera, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 5.) 



Lonicera (Xylosteum) Alberti; fruticolns humilis, rigidns, ramosissimus, 
glaberrimns, foliis sessilibus linearibns obtusis snbtns albicantibus, basi 
sjepissime dentibns acutis 1 v. 2 utrinque auctis, floribus ramulis laterali- 
bus 2-nis, bracteolis in involucrum brevem stipitatum 4-lobum connatif, 
lobis rotundatis, ovariis liberis ovoideip, calycis dentibna 5 inaequalibus 
obtusis, corollse rosea? tubo cylindraceo, lobis tubo intus piloso brevioribns 
8nba3qnalibus ovatis obtusis patentibus, staminibus breviter exsertis, 
stigmate spatbulato recnrvo baccis liberis. 

L. Alberti ,'Regrl in Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. vii. (1880), p. 550, and in Gartenflor. 
(1881), p. 370 and 387, t. 10G5. 



Lonicera Alberti is typical of a considerable number of 
the Xylosteum section of Honeysuckles that inhabit the 
dry mountains of Central Asia from the Altai to the 
Himalaya, where they form stunted, intricately branched 
shrubs. In the Himalaya there are no fewer than eighteen 
such species, of which hardly anyoccur below 6000 ft., many 
are confined to elevations between 10,000 and 12,000 ft!, 
and one ascends to above 16,000 ft. in Tibet, north of 
Sikkim. L. tomentella, figured at t. 6486, is an example of 
one of the larger of the group. For the most part they 
have nothing to recommend them horticulturally, and 
their habit and habitat are all they have to interest a 
botanist. L. Alberti is the most attractive of those known 
to me, from its abundance of bright, rose-colrd. flowers, 
and sweet, though faint odour. It is one of the many 
discoveries of Dr. Albert Regel, a distinguished explorer 
of A\ estern Turkestan, who, during arduous and often 
perilous services in Central Asia, made large collections 
of living and dried plants for his father, Dr. de Regel, the 
late eminent Director of the Imperial Gardens of St. 
Petersburgh. A plant of it was sent to Kew by Dr. Regel 

Januart 1st, 1895. 



from those gardens in 1880, which flowered in May, and is, 
as might be expected, perfectly hardy. 

Descr. — A small, much-branched, quite glabrous shrub 
2 ft. high ; branches divaricate in native specimens, less 
so in cultivated, bark dark. Leaves {— 1J in. long, sessile, 
linear, obtuse, very pale beneath, quite entire, or with one 
or two acute teeth on each side, near the base. Flowers 
in pairs, terminating short lateral branches, fragrant; 
bracts short, rounded, connate into a 4-lobed stipitate cup, 
the ovaries quite free. Calyx-tube ovoid, contracted at 
the tip ; lobes 4, short, obtuse, unequal. Corolla glabrous, 
rose-red ; tube cylindric, hairy within, £-£ in. long ; limb 
\ in. diam., lobes equal, ovate, obtuse. Stamens shortly 
exserted. Stigma spathulate, recurved. — J". J). H. 



Fig. 1, Top of flowering branch and flowers ; 2, ovary and style ; 3 and 4, 
stamens : — All enlarged. 



1395 




c«,« 



Tab. 7395. 
acacia spadicigera. 

Native of Central America and Cuba. 
Nat. Ord. LEGUMiNOsiE. — Tribe Acacice*. 



Acacia (GummiferEe) spadicigera ; frutex rigidus, ramosus, stipulis spine- 
scentibus demum maximis 1—1$ pollicaribus inflatis corneiformibus 
brunneis rectis curvisve basi connatis, pinnis 4-8 jugis, foliolis 1^-20 
-jugis lineari-oblongis obtusis, puberulis costa nunc inappendiculata, 
nunc appendicula fusiformi carnosula caduca apice instructa, spicis 
axillaribus solitariis binisve crasse pedunculatis cylindraceis obtusis 
densifloris, pedunculo basi involucellato, floribus minimis aureis sessilibus 
densissime congestis sqnamulis longe stipitatis peltatis immixtis, calycis 
urceolati lobis brevibus obtusis, corolla calyce paullo longiore 5-dentata, 
staminibus breviter exsertis, legumine sessile oblongo recto v. falcato. 

A. spadicigera, Cham, et Schl. in Linnsei, vol. v. (1830) p. 594. Benth. in 
Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxx. p. 514. Hcmsl. Biol. Cent): Amer. Bot. vol. i. 
p. 355. 

A. cornigera, Willd. Sp. PI. vol. iv. p. 1080, rxcJ. tyn. Ait. Hort. Ketc, Ed. I, 

vol. iii. p. 441. A. Rich. Fl. Cub. vol. i. p. 462. 
A. ? cornigera, DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 460, Eel. S'/jn. 
Mimosa cornigera, Jacq. Select. Stirp. Amer. Hist. p. 266. 



The plant here figured is one of two closely allied species 
of Acacia, A. spadicigera and A. sphasrocephala , remarkable 
for their enormous horn-like stipules. Both are included 
under Mimosa cornigera, Linn. (Acacia cornigera, Willd.), 
which was founded on the Arbor cornigera of Hernandez, 
" De Historia Plantarum Novse Hispanise " (p. 86), published 
in 1651, who unfortunately gives no description of the 
plant, only two rude woodcuts of the leaves and stipules, 
with a brief account of the latter forming the home of a 
stinging ant. 

The history of the twin Acacia coniigerce is horticultuvally 
interesting, one of them having been in cultivation previous 
to 1692, in the Royal Gardens of Hampton Court, under 
the names of the Horrid Acacia, or Curl-old tree, and of 
which a leafing branch with stipules was figured by Pluke- 
net in the " Phytographia " in 1G96, as Acacia America/'" 
. . . aculeis c<>rnv<t bovina referentibus. IMukenet does not 
describe the flowers, but cites Hernandez' plant as a 

January 1st, 1895. 



synonym, relying, no doubt, on the similarity of the 

spines. 

In the following year, 1697, Commelin, " Hortus Medi- 
eus Amstelodamensis " (vol. i. p. 209, t. 207), figures an 
Arbor cornigera, and describes it as having a globose head 
of flowers (as in A. sphserocephala) giving as the habitat 
Cuba and Mexico. He does not figure the flowers, but as 
he cites Breyn's "Prodomus Histories Plantarum Rario- 
rum " (1680), in which the globose heads are mentioned, 
he may have borrowed this particular from Breyn. Re- 
ferring to the latter work, I find a good description of his 
plant, flower, fruit, and seed, with a citation of Hernandez' 
Arbor cornigera ; but he adds that Hermann had stated, 
on the authority of an English nobleman versed in Her- 
baria, that his (Breyn's) plant was not that of Hernandez ; 
from which it maybe surmised that the English nobleman, 
knowing the Hampton Court plant, regarded it, and not 
Breyn's, as that of Hernandez. This would further render 
it probable that the Hampton Court plant was, if either, 
A, spadicigera. 

In 1734. Seba, in his "Thesaurus" (i. p. 213, t. 70, f. 
13) figures spines and leaves of an Acacia cornuta, and 
cites Becchus (the compiler of the Botanical chapters in 
Hernandez) for it; giving also Hernandez' native name, 
Hoitzmamaxatl, together with his description of the ants, 
&c. The figure answers to either species. He says it 
was sent to him by a friend in the East Indies, no doubt 
an error. 

Linnaeus, in the " Hortus Cliffortianus " (1737, p. 208), 
under Mimosa aculeis alarum geminate, cites for it Her- 
nandez, Plukenet, Breyn, and Commelin, with Mexico and 
Cubans habitats, but unaccountably overlooks the de- 
scription of the flowers given by the two last named authors. 
In 17o3 the twins were in the Species Plantarum, included 
under Mimosa cornigera ; all previous authorities, except 
Hernandez, being cited for it. 




while overlooking his description of globose heads. WiUdj- 
now, m " bpecies Plantarum " (iv. 1080) was, I think, tb« 
nrst to refer Mimosa cornigera, Linn, to Acacia, describing 



it as having flowers in cylindric spikes, and in this he is 
followed by De Candolle in the Prodromus, both authors 
citing Commelin, without looking at his description ; I 
have found no work in which the two species were dis- 
criminated earlier than the 9th edition (Martyn's, 1807) of 
Miller's " Gardener's Dictionary," where one appears as 
Mimosa, n. 49, with " flowers in cylindric spikes, yellow," 
and the other, n. 44, with •' spikes globular white." The 
latter, he says, was sent to Europe in 1729, from Vera 
Cruz, but was cultivated at Hampton Court in 1690. 
Lastly, Charaisso and Schlechtendahl, in " Linna^a " (vol. v. 
1830, p. 594) describe the two as Acacia spadicigera and 
A. sphserocephala, names adopted by Bentham in his ex- 
haustive monograph of Acacia, and which will, no doubt, 
be retained; and that of A. cornigera, Willd., be sup- 
pressed, having regard to the fact that, by citing Com- 
melin, Willdenow virtually included both under it. 

Reverting to Hernandez' figure or rather figures, for 
there are two, it is possible that they pourtray both species, 
their " horns " are identical ; but the leaves of the right 
hand figure have short pinnas, with fewer pinnules, as in 
A. spadicigera ; those of the left hand one have pinnae 
twice as long, and very numerous pinnules, as in J. 
sphserocephala. Which the Hampton Court species may 
have been is doubtful. If Commelin's description 
refers to it, it is A. sphaerocephala ; if the English noble- 
man's opinion is worth anything, the plant w r as more pro- 
bably A. spadicigera. In conclusion, it must be remembered 
that there is a third Mexican Acacia, with similar horned 
stipules, namely, A. Jiindsii, Benth., which differs from 
A. spadicigera in having very slender spikes of flowers. 
It may be one of Hernandez's two plants. It is a native 
of the West Coast of Mexico, and hence less likely than 
the others to have been introduced at an early date. 

The plant from which the drawing of A. spadicigera is 
taken was received from M. Linden of Ghent in 1882. 
It is cultivated in a pot on a shelf in the Palm House, 
along with two allied species, A. sphxrocephala and A. 
Hindsii, both of which have large horn-like spines and 
fleshy appendages on the tips of the leaflets. Of these 
A t sphserocephala has since flowered, and a figure of it 
has been prepared for this work. A. spadicigera flowered 



in May of last year, but produced no ovaries in any of 
the flowers examined. There are native specimens of it 
in the Kew Herbarium from Mexico, Central America, 
Panama, and St. Martha, in New Grenada. 

Far more interesting than the synonymy of these horned 
Acacias is the fact that when found they play a wonderful 
part in the economy of nature, by housing and feeding a 
tribe or tribes of ants which find their habitation in the 
stipular thorns, and their food in the fleshy appendages on 
the tips of the leaves ; a hospitality which they repay with 
interest, by waging a successful war against the armies ot 
leaf-cutting ants who would otherwise soon extirpate the 
Acacias. 

This curious subject was carefully studied by the late 
observant Naturalist, Mr. Th. Belt, whose published 
account of it is so interesting, that, feeling sure it will be 
welcome to the readers of the " Botanical Magazine," I 
herewith extract it. — J. D. H. 

" These thorns are hollow, and are tenanted by ants 
that make a small hole for their entrance and exit near 
one end of the thorn, and also burrow through the parti- 
tion that separates the two horns, so that one entrance 
serves for both. Here they rear their young, and in the 
wet season everyone of the thorns is tenanted; and 
hundreds of ants are to be seen running about, especially 
over the young leaves. If one of these be touched, or 
a branch shaken, the little ants (Psewlomyrma bicol»r, 
Ghier.) swarm out from the hollow thorns, and attack the 
aggressor with jaws and sting. They sting severely, 
raising a little white lump that does not disappear in less 
than twenty-four hours. 

"These ants form a most efficient standing army for 
the plant, which prevents not only the mammalia from 
browsing on the leaves, but delivers it from the attacks ot 
a much more dangerous enemy— the leaf-cutting ants. 
± or these services the ants are not only securely housed 
by the plant, but are provided with a bountiful supply of 
lood ; and to secure their attendance at the right time and 
place, this food is so arranged and distributed as to effect 
that object with wonderful perfection. The leaves are bi- 
pinnate. At the base of each pair of leaflets, on the mid" 
nb is a crater-formed gland, which, when the leaves are 



young, secretes a honey-like fluid. Of this the ants are 
very fond, and they are constantly running about from one 
gland to another to sip up the honey as it is secreted. 
But this is not all ; there is a still more wonderful pro- 
vision of more solid food. At the end of each leaflet there 
is, when the leaf first unfolds, a little yellow, pear-shaped 
body, united by a point, and the ants are then continually 
employed going from one to another examining them. 
When an ant finds one sufficiently advanced, it bites its 
small point of attachment ; then, bending it down, it 
breaks it off, and bears it away to the nest. As these 
ripen successively, the ants are kept about the young leaf 
for some time after it unfolds ; and no caterpillar or larger 
animal could attempt to injure them without being 
attacked by the little warriors. The fruit-like bodies are 
about j~ 2 in. long, and are about £ of the size of the 
ants ; so that the ant bearing one away is as heavily laden 
as a man bearing a large bunch of plantains. I think 
these facts show that the ants are really kept by the acacia 
as a standing army, to protect its leaves from the attacks 
of herbivorous mammals and insects. 

" The bull's-horn thorn does not grow at the mines in 
the forest, nor are the small ants attending them found 
there. They seem specially adapted for the tree, and I 
have seen them nowhere else. Besides the Pseudomyrma, 
another ant lives on these Acacias ; it is a small black 
species of Crematog aster, whose habits seem to be rather 
different from those of Pseudomyrma. It makes the holes 
of entrance to the thorns near the centre of one of each 
pair ; and it is not so active as that species. It is also 
rather scarce ; but when it does occur it occupies the 
whole tree, to the exclusion of the other. The glands on 
the Acacia are also frequented by a small species of wasp 
Polybia occidentalis) . I sowed the seeds of the Acacia in 
my garden, and reared some young plants. Ants of many 
kinds were numerous ; but none of them took to the thorns 
for shelter, nor the glands and fruit-like bodies for food ; 
for, as I have already mentioned, the species that attend 
on the thorns are not found in the forest. The leaf-cutting 
ants attacked the young plants and defoliated them ; but 
I have never seen any of the trees out on the savannahs 
that are guarded by the Pseudomyrma touched by them, 



and have no doubt the Acacia is protected from them by 
its little warriors. The thorns, when they are first deve- 
loped, are soft, and filled with a sweetish, pulpy substance ; 
so that the ant, when it makes an entrance into them, finds 
its new house full of food. It hollows this out, leaving 
only the hardened shell of the thorn. Strange to say, this 
treatment seems to favour the development of the thorn, 
as it increases in size, bulg-ing: out towards the base ; 
whilst in my plants that were not touched by the ants, 
the thorns turned yellow, and dried up into dead but per- 
sistent prickles. I am not sure, however, that this may 
not have been due to the habitat of the plant not suiting 
it. 

"These ants seem to lead the happiest of existences. 
Protected by their stings, they fear no foe. Habitations 
full of food are provided for them to commence house- 
keeping with ; and cups of nectar and luscious fruits await 
them every day. But there is a reverse to the picture. 
In the dry season, on the plains, the Acacice cease to 
grow. No young leaves are produced, and the old glands 
do not secrete honey. Then want and hunger overtake 
the ants that have revelled in luxury all the wet season ; 
many of the thorns are depopulated, and only a few ants 
live through the season of scarcity. As soon, however, as 
the first rains set in, the trees throw out numerous 
vigorous shoots, and the ants multiply again with astonish- 
ing rapidity."— Belt., " The Naturalist in Nicaragua," 
p. 218 (1874). 

A^fX? PinUUle; 2 ' P ° rtionof ^e with bracts «a 



7396 




Mfiri«l,IKFn^ ;,»>, 



Tap, 7396. 
OYETOPODIUM yieesobns, Reichb.f. d- Warm. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Orchideje. — Tribe Vande*. 



Genus Cyrtopodiem, Br. ; {Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 541, 
partim, Mxcl. Cyrtopera, Bl.). 



Cyrtopodium vivescens; pseudobulbis fusiformibus annulati?, foliis hyster- 
anthiis anguste laneeolatis acuminatis, scapo elato, vaginis remotis 
acotip, panicula multiflora, floribus basi dissitis, bracteis ovaria requanti- 
bns oblongis acutis rubro punctulatis, floribus breviter pedicellatis 1 poll, 
diam., sepalis late ovatis acutis petaliaque concoloribus ovato- rotunda tis 
primulino-virescentibus purpureo guttatis, labello sepalis breviore carno- 
sulo breviter unguicnlato ambitu quadrato crenato-undulato sub- 
sequaliter .'5-lobo, lobis lateralibus auriculfeformibus rubro-purpurei«, 
terminali 3-lobulato anreo rubro-guttato, disco inter lobos laterales cristis 
erectis crenatis aucto, columna mediocri pallida guttata. 

C. viresoens, Beichb. & Warm, in Edchb.f. O/i" Botcm. Hamb. p. 89. Warm, 
in Ptdmuk. Meddel. Nat. Fr. Kjobenh. (Synth. Fl. Bras.) 18&4, p. 851, 
t. 7, L i. 



Of the American genus (Jj/rtopodium, about thirty 
species have been described, but few have been introduced 
into this country. Such as have been are very handsome 
plants, especially G. punctatum, Lindl., figured at t. 3507 
of this work, wherein also are represented C. Woodfordli, 
Sims, t, 1814, and G. Andersonii, Br. t. 1800, the type of 
the genus. All are terrestrial, pseudobulbous, and flower 
before leafing. In the " Genera Plantarum " the genus 
Gyrtopera is erroneously merged in it, as pointed out 
under Plate 7330 of this work ; the latter genus being 
referable to Eulophia, Br. 

The only recorded locality for G. virescens is that where 
it was discovered by Warming, namely, Lagoa Santa in 
Brazil. The specimen here figured was obtained from 
-Messrs. F. Sander & Co. of St. Albans, and flowered in 
B warm house in the Royal Gardens in December, lfc93. 
It matured its leaves in May of the following year. 

Descf. — Pseudobulbs tufted, 3-4 inches long, fusiform, 
terete, pale green, with 4-6 narrow purple rings. Leaves 
about a foot long, by an inch broad, very narrowly lanceo- 

Jaxi ary 1st, 1895. 



late, acuminate, plicate, bright green. Scape two to four 
ft. high, as thick as a goose-quill, green ; sheaths distant, 
acute. Racemes one to two ft. high, many-fld. ; pedicels 
very short, the lower sometimes two-fld. ; bracts three- 
fourths to one inch long, oblong or oblong-lanceolate, 
acute, as long as the ovary, the lowest green speckled 
with red-brown. Flowers about an inch in diameter. 
Sepals ovate, acute, and rounded petals pale primrose- 
yellow, blotched with dark red. Lip fleshy, very shortly 
clawed, quadrate in outline, with crisped subcrenate 
margins, 3-lobed ; lateral lobes ear-shaped, dark red ; 
terminal 3-lobulate, golden-yellow with dark red spots, 
lobules rounded ; disk between the lateral lobes yellow, 
with erect, parallel, crenate, fleshy keels. Column rather 
stout, spotted. Anther 4-lobed ; pollinia globose, sessile 
on a narrow, transverse membrane. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Lip ; 2, column ; 3, anther ; 4, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



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7397 




Tab. 7897. 
RICHARDIA Pentlakdii. 

Native of Basutolancl. 

Nat. Ord. AroidEjK.— Tribe Piiilodendre^. 
Genus Richardia, Kunth; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 982. 



Richakdia Pentlandii ; elata, foliis immaculatis ovato-cordatis caudato- 
acuminatis sinu aperto, lobis rotundatis, costa crassa, spatha crocea late 
infundibulari tertia parte laxe convoluta intua leviter rugulosa, ore 
expansa, apice abrupte recurvo subulato, marginibus recurvis, ima basi 
intus plaga atropurpurea picta. 

R. Pentlandii, R. Whyte mss. Wats, in Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. ii. p. 123, and 
1894, vol. i. p. 590. 



Of the eight recorded species of Richardia (all of which 
are African) five have now been figured in this magazine, 
namely, the original R. sethiopica, Kunth. (Calla sethiopica, 
tab. 832), G. albo-maculata, Hook. (tab. 5140), G. hastata, 
Hook. (tab. 5176), G. melanoleuca (tab. 5765), and that 
here represented. These fall naturally into two groups, 
according as the leaves are cordate or hastate at the 
base. To the first of these belong R. sethiopica and Pent- 
landii ; to the latter R. albo-maculata, hastata, and melano- 
leuca. The differences in their spathes are well marked, 
that of sethiopica is white, narrow, with a long point ; of 
Pentlandii as given above ; of albo-maculata, like sethiopica ; 
of hastata, greenish yellow, broadly open, with a long 
point, and of melanoleuca white with a purple base, broad, 
quite open, or convolute, at the base only. The spadixes 
of none afford good diagnostic characters. R. Pentlandii 
is much the largest leaved species, is the only one with 
a deeply gamboge yellow spathe within, which is much 
the largest and broadest of any. The other recorded 
species are all imperfectly known, namely, R. angustiloba, 
Schott, of Angola, R. Rehmaniana, Engl., and R. Elliotti- 
ana, Knigt (ex Wats, i Gard. Chron., July 30, 1892, p. 
128), which may be a var. of albo-maculata. 
Frbeuabt 1st, 1895. 



For the following account of the introduction into 
Europe, and of the native country of Richardia Pentlandii 
I am indebted to the articles upon this plant by Mr. 
Watson in the Gardener's Chronicle cited above. He says, 
"This plant was introduced by Mr. Whyte, Pentland 
House, Lee, who flowered it in May, 1892, and exhibited 
it at a meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society, when 
it was awarded a First Class Certificate." Mr. Whyte 
wrote in June, 1892, " I did not import this plant, but 
about two years a^o a friend gave me six tubers, and said 
I should probably find a yellow-flowered one amongst 
them. Two flowered last year, and were only of the 
ordinary type, the third is that which I have called 
R. Pentlandii, and I think there will be another of this, or 
of the other three. In May, 1892, Mr. E. E. Galpia, 
F.L.S., a resident of Barberton, in South Africa, paid a 
visit to Kew, and brought with him six tubers of a yellow- 
flowered Richardia, whcih had been presented to him by 
a gentleman in the Transvaal, who obtained them from 
a Staats artilleryman, who got them from a Basuto chief 
whilst on active service. One of those (that here figured) 
is now (May, 1894), in flower at Kew, and proves to be 
identical with Mr. Whyte' s R. Pentlandii. 

Descr. — Leaves a foot long, subsagittately ovate-cordate, 
caudate-acuminate, broadest across the rounded basal 
lobes, which are separated by a rounded sinus, dark green 
above, unspotted ; costa very stout ; nerves slender ; 
petiole two feet long, terete, quite glabrous, dark green- 
Peduncle longer than the leaves, dark green, quite glab- 
rous. Spathe five to six inches high ; an inch to an inch 
arid a half broad about the middle, and three to four 
inches across the broad mouth, loosely convolute for two- 
thirds of the height, then expanding into a broad, nearly 
horizontal limb, with recurved margins, and suddenly 
narrowed into a recurved, subulate tip; outer surface 
canary-colrd., inner bright gamboge-yellow, and rugulose; 
base within dark purple. Spadix two inches long ; ovaries 
occupying a third of its length.— J. D. H. 



Fip. 1 Base of spathe laid open and spadix ; 2, anthers ; 3, ovary.-^" 
enlarged; 4, reduced view of whole plant. 




^TLcerti^ra 



Tab. 7398. 
APH^REMA spicata. 

Native of South Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Samydaceje. — Tribe Abatie.e. 
Genus Aph^erema, Miers. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 799.) 



Aph>erema spicata ; herbacea, erecta, fere glaberrima, caule terete, foliis 
oppositis breviter petiolatis ovato-cordatis acuminatis serratis exstipu- 
latis, rloribus parvis in racemum spiciformem raultiflorum terrninalem 
erectnm puberulum dispositis aureis breviter pedicellatis, bracteis subu- 
latis, alabastris globosis, petalis 0, sepalis 4 ovatis valvatis persistentibus, 
staminibus 8-16 subperigynis filamentis filiformiUus antheris didymis, 
loculis reniformibus, connectivo dilatato, ovario conico-ovoideo, placeutia 
3-4 parietalibus multiovulatig, stylo perbrevi, stigmate obscure 3-4dobo, 
capsula parva depresso globosa loculicide 3-4 valvi polysperma, seminibus 
oblongis. 

A. spicata, Miers. in Proc. R. ITort. Soc. vol. iii. (1863), p. 294. 



Aphserema is a monotypic genus, founded on a plant 
discovered in South Brazil in the province of S. Paulo in 
1861-2 by Mr. J. Weir, when collecting for the Royal 
Horticultural Society. It was described from Herbarium 
specimens by the late excellent botanist, J. Miers, F.R.S., 
in the Proceedings of the said Society. Since that period 
it has been collected, in so far as I am aware, by only one 
other botanist, Dr. Fritz Miiller, who found it in the 
Province of Sta. Catherina, which adjoins S. Paulo on the 
south. 

The specimen here figured agrees closely with Miers' 
characters, except in respect of the stamens being more 
than eight and up to sixteen, and the capsule being some- 
times 4-valved, with as many placentrs. The genus is 
very closely allied to Iialeighia, of Gardner, if, indeed, it 
is not referable to it. The principal difference between 
them appeared to consist in Ealeighia being stipulate, 
whilst Aphserema is exstipulate ; for the more important 
character of the former genus, that of the stamens being 
very numerous and in several series, whilst Aphmrema 
was supposed to have only eight, is invalidated by the 

February 1st, 1895. 



specimen here figured having sixteen. Nor is the stipular 
character free from doubt. In the " Genera Plantar urn " 
(i. 799) Bahighia is described, on Gardner's authority, as 
having foliaceous, deciduous stipules. But this is an 
obvious oversight, for Gardner describes the leaves as 
exstipnlate, and so I find them in the specimen in the 
Kew Herbarium, and so they are in tbe only other genus 
of the tribe, namely, Abatia, and in a hitherto undescribed 
species of Baleighia. 

Descr. — A slender, glabrons shrub, or nndershrub ; 
branches erect, terete. Leaves opposite, two to three 
inches long, shortly petioled, ovate-cordate, obtusely acumi- 
nate, crenate-serrate ; basal lobes rounded, sinus narrow, 
light green above, paler beneath ; nerves six to eight pairs, 
deeply impressed. Floioers in solitary, terminal, slender, 
peduncled, nodding racemes, three to four inches long, 
shortly pedicelled, J iu. broad, golden yellow ; buds 
globose ; bracts snbulate. Calyx four-partite ; lobes trian- 
gular-ovate, valvate. Petals 0. Stamens 8, 12, or 16, 
perigynous ; filaments slender ; anthers yellow, didymous. 
Ovary broadly conico-ovoid, 3-4-celled ; style short, stigma 
obscurely lobed ; ovules numerous, on three or four parietal 
placentas, anatroprous. — J. D. H. 



"Fig. 1, Rachis of spike, bract, and bud; 2, flower; 3 and 4, stamens; 
5, ovary; 6, the same in transverse section; 7, fruiting raceme ; 8, capsule; 
9, transverse section of do. ; 10, immature seed :— all but tig. 7 enlarged. 




Vincent "Broolc, 



■ ,- 



Tab. 7399. 

aloe beaohystachts. 

Native of Zanzibar. 

Nat. Ord. Liliajoe^e. — Tribe Aloine.e. 
Genus Aloe, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 776.) 



Aloe brarliystachys ; candice elongato simplici, fnliis dense rosulatis ensifor- 
mibns sesquipedalibus vel bipedalibus pallide viridibus imtnaculatis, 
aculeis marginalibus deltoideis concoloribus magnitudine raediocribus, 
pedunculo nexuoso elongate-, racemo detiso simplici, pedicellis eloagatis 
ascendentibus apice articulatis, bracteis orbicularibus parvis, perianthio 
cylindrico pallide rubro apice viridi, lobis lingulatis tubo brevioribus, 
staminibus demum breviter exsertis. 



This new Aloe was sent by Sir John Kirk in 1884 to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Zanzibar. It flowered for 
the first time in the Succulent House in January, 1894, 
and proved to be a new species. It belongs to the true 
Aloes, with a long caudex, and dense rosette of ensiform 
leaves. Its nearest allies are A. abyssinica (Bot. Mag. t. 
6620), and the Angolan A. littoralis, Baker, which has 
not yet been brought into cultivation. The number of 
Aloes known in Tropical Africa has increased very largely 
of late years. 

Descr. — Caudex long, slender, erect, simple. Leaves 
about twenty, crowded together at the top of the stem, 
all except the youngest drooping, ensiform, one and a half 
or two feet long, two inches broad above the dilated base, 
narrowed very gradually to the point, bright green, smooth 
on both surfaces, unspotted, a quarter of an inch thick in 
the middle ; marginal prickles deltoid, middle-sized, not 
brown at the tip in the cultivated plant. Peduncle simple, 
very flexuose, about as long as the leaves. Raceme dense, 
simple, oblong, half a foot long ; pedicels ascending, an 
inch long, articulated at the tip ; bracts orbicular, much 

P'ebruary 1st, 1895. 



shorter than the pedicels, pale green, with 5-7 distinct 
brown stripes. Perianth cylindrical, an inch and a 
quarter long, pale pink, tipped with green; lobes lingulate, 
shorter than the tube. Stamens finally shortly exserted.— 
/. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower, cut open; 2, stamens; 3, ovary, all enlarged; 4 whole 
plant, much reduced. 



Tab. 7400. 

CEPHALANTHUS natalknsis. 

Native of S. E. Africa. 



Nat. Ord. BuBUCUL — Tribe Naucle,£. 
Genus Cepiiai.antiius, Linn.; (Benth. & Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 30.) 



CephaLaxthus nafalemis; fruticulus ramosissimus, ramulis pednnculisqne 
hirtello-tomentosis, foliis breviter petiolatis ovatis acutia obtusis v. 
obtuse acuminatis, stipulis parvis triangularibus, capitulis nutantibus, 
bracteolis calycis tnbo brevioribus clavatis ciliatis dorso glandnliferis, 
calycia tubo brevi, limbo 5-dentato puberulo sinubua eglandulosis, 
corolla; tubo gracili glabro superae infundibulari, limbo obliquo intUI 
lobisque 5 brevibus ovatis pulirscentibus, antheris vix exsertin, connec- 
tivo apice producto, stylo exserto, stigmate clavato, capitulis maturis 
succulentis. 

C. natalensis, Oliver in H(»)k. I>\ PL vol. xiv. p. 22, t. 1331. 



halanthus natalensis is the only described African 
species of the genus, all others being Asiatic and Ameri- 
can ; a supposed Madagascar congener being referable to 
the allied genus Adina, which has more than one ovule in 
each ovarian cell. One species, 0. occidentalis, Linn., the 
American Button-wood or Button tree, was early intro- 
duced into this country by Peter Collinson, in 1735. It is 
a very common North American shrub, extending across the 
whole continent, and remarkable as being the only woody 
plant of the vast natural order to which it belongs, that is 
a native of temperate North America. As far as I am 
aware no properties of economic value have been attri- 
buted to any species of the genus, except the present, to 
the seeds of which the name of Quinine fruit was attached 
by the sender; and the fruit of which is edible. 

' . natalensis is a native of the mountainous regions of 
Natal, the Transvaal, and Basutoland, at elevations of 
3000 to 4-5000 ft. It was discovered by the collector 
Gerrard about .forty years ago, and has since been col- 
lected by Dr. Atherstone, and by Messrs. Medley Wood 
and E. E. Galpin, the latter of whom describes the fruit 
Fkrki'arv 1st. 1895. 



as resembling a strawberry, and edible. It was first intro 
duced by Mr. Bull, who sent a specimen to Kew, to be 
named as a plant yielding a good edible fruit. The plant 
from which our figure was made was raised from seed 
received in 1886 from W. J. Horn, Esq., of Ousley Road, 
tfalham, who collected the seeds with those of various 
other interesting plants, notably the showy Protect rJio- 
dantha, figured t. 7331. Mr. Watson informs me that it 
lorms a compact little shrub, and flowers freely in spring in 
the lemperate House of the Royal Gardens. 

Descr.—A small, much-branched shrub, with rather 
stout terete, hirtellous branches and branchlets. Leaves 
about an inch long, ovate, acuminate, acute, or rarely 
obtuse, dark green, glabrous and shining above, pale be- 
neath with red midrib and nerves, and with hairy glands 
at the axils of the nerves and midrib. Flowers very 
numerous, m globose, terminal, peduncled heads, one to 
one and a half lncheg . n diameter . peduncle one tQtm 

Z,T th? t0n ^ decurved > hirtellous, bearing one or two 
IZlu a ^ raCts> Cal y ces minute > densely packed, 

rlnvnf 0I l a J rece P tacle > surrounded by several short, 

7 J'^; Clhat ;e bracteoles, each of which has an 
ovir^ ?"!? 5 lan ^ tube 0f cal r x Produced above the 
i^ch W f l ' ClUate - C ° rolla ab ° ut one-third of an 
middle +h» if r ? 8e * red . g^brous, slender below the 
within « tt t 0V T df ? arrowl J funnel-shaped, pubescent 

filaments Z 1 ? • lthln the mouth of the corolla; 

obW IZH ^^ lnSerted at the entire base of the 
celled stv e I' f 01 ™**™ shortly produced. Ovary 5- 
ffi^S^^' eX t erted ' Sti ^ a ol^ate ; ovules one in 
U ' P endul0 ^. Fruit succulent, edible.-/. D. H. 

fsta^cal^ceHnd^^ of the nerve and 

head, with 3 ovaries, one Tatl'J'i "ii °? of P ortiou of the receptacle of the 
at the base of the two oth P r It • ^'Showing the ovules, also the bracteoles 
laid open :— AU enlarged 3 ; ' a bra °teole ; 5, upper part of corolla 




MSW.JNPH 



: ■ Brool«.D»y 



Tab. 7401. 
MUSA HILLII, F. Muell 

Native of Queensland. 

Nat. Ord. Scitamine.e. — Tribe Muse,e. 
Genus Musa, Linn.; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. in. p. '355.) 



Musa (Eumusa) Hillii ; caudice elato robusto stolonifero, foliis longiuscule 
petiolatis lineari-oblongia patulis basi cuneatis, spica valida erecta densi- 
flora, bracteis ovatis cymbiforrnibus flavo-viridibus apicibus obtusis 
brunneis, fl. masc. perplurimis 2-pollicaribus, calycis leviter curvi dentibus 
brevibus obtnsis lateralibus majoribus appendice fusiformi ruguloso in- 
structis, corolla lineari-oblonga subacuta, fl. fern, ovario ovoidei 3-gono 
perianthio masculo breviore, stigmate majusculotrilobo, baccis densissime 
confertis ovoideis 3-gonis truncatis, seminibus perplurimis parvis angulo- 
sis valde depressis. 

M. Hillii, F. Muell. Fragment, vol. ix. p. 169. Baker in Ann. Bot. vol. vii. 
p. 217 in Gard. Chron. 1893, ii. p. 743, in Kew Bulletin, 1894, pp. 239, 24G. 



Four species of Plantain are now known to inhabit 
tropical Australia, all of them endemic, namely, M. Bcmksii, 
F. Muell. Fragm. vol. iv. p. 132 (M. BanJcsiana, Kurz in 
Journ. Agr. Hort. Soc. Ind. N.S. vol. v. (1878), p. 164); 
M. Fitzalani, F. Muell. I.e. vol. ix. p. 188 ; M. Charlioi, 
W. Hill, Rep. Brisbane Bot. Gard. 1874 (undescribed), 
and that here figured. Whether any of these are identical 
with described species from the Malay or the Pacific Islands 
is not determinable until these are better known ; and as it 
is only by comparison under cultivation, or by very care- 
fully executed drawings that the members of this noble 
genus can be determined, it will probably be many years 
before this can be realized. Much has been done of late 
towards a knowledge of the Plantains and Bananas by 
summaries of the known species which have been drawn up 
by Mr. Baker, and published in the " Annals of Botany," 
and by a paper in the Kew Bulletin, both cited above. From 
these it appears that about thirty-five species are more or 
less known, though possibly some of them are synonymous, 
or founded in error. Of these nineteen are now in culti- 
vation at Kew, but only six of them have hitherto been 
figured in this magazine. 

February 1st, 1895. 



Seeds of M. Hillii were received at Kew from F. M. 
Bailey, Esq., F.L.S., Colonial Botanist, Queensland, in 
March, 1889, from which the plant here figured was raised. 
It flowered in the Palm House of the Royal Gardens in 
December, 1893. 

Descr. — Gaudex attaining 30 ft. in height, and 18 inches 
in diameter at the base, stoloniferous, cylindric. Leaves 
as of M. sapientum, attaining 15 feet in length, base 
cuneate ; petiole long. Spike erect, three to four feet 
high, cylindric. Bracts six inches long and upwards, 
ovate, obtuse, pale yellow-green, with a brown tip. Male 
fl. very many in a bract, two inches long, narrow, slightly 
curved, sub 4-angled, pale yellowish. Oalyx-teeth short, 
obtuse, two lateral rather the largest, these and the median 
tipped terminating in thickened rugose spindle-shaped 
prolongation of the midrib ; two intermediate much the 
smallest. Petals linear-oblong, obtuse, one-fourth shorter 
than the corolla. Anthers pale pink, about as long as the 
filaments. Fem. fl. pentandrous. Perianth shorter than 
in the male. Ovary short, ovoid, 3-gonous ; style clavate, 
stigma three-lobed. Fruit two to two and a half inches 
long, sessile, ovoid, acutely angled, truncate, fleshy. Seeds 
very many, £-X in. diam., much depressed : testa black.— 
J. D. H. 

Fig. 1 Male flower ; 2, the same, with the calyx narrowed ; 3, anther, all 
enlarged, ; 4, bract and male flower; 5, fem. flower; both of nat. sine; 
b, reduced view of whole plant. 



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7402 




i Scnlwg 



Tab. 7402. 
HEPTAPLEURUM venulosum, var. erythrostachys. 

Native of tropical Asia. 



Nat. Ord. Araliaceje. 
Genus Heptapleurtjm, Gsertn. ; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 912.) 



Heptapleurtjm venulosum; arbor parva erecta v. frutex eubscandens, ramulis 
robustis, foliis digitatis longe petiolatis, foliolis 7-9 petiolulatis elliptico-v. 
ovato-oblongis obtusis acutis v. obtuse subcaudato-acuminatis glaberrimis, 
basi cuneatis rotundatisve, supra lsete viridibus nervulis reticulatis promi- 
nulis, stipulis ima basi petioli adnatis, paniculse amplse pedunculo gracili 
v. robusto brevi v. elongato, ramis verticillatis glabris puberulisve, 
capitulis florum breviter v. longius pedunculatis, floribus 4-5-meris 
brevissime v. longius pedicellatis subpolygamis calycis patellar irmis 
limbo obscure dentato, petalis calyptratim cohajrentibus obtusis, stami- 
nibus 4-5, ovario disco tumido coronato, stylo depresso obscure 4-5-lobo, 
baccis parvis ovoideis flavis 4-5-locularibus. 

H. venulosum, Seem, in Journ. Bot. iii. (1865), 80. Brand. For. Ft. N. W. 
& Centr. Ind. p. 249. Kurz For. Fl. Brit. Burm. i. 533. Clarke in 
Sooh.f.Fl. Brit. Ind. ii. 729. Benth. Fl. Austral, iii. 334. Beddome 
Foresters Man. 8. India, p. cxxii. 

H. ellipticum, Seem. I. c. 

PAKATROPiA.venulosa, Wight & Am. Prodr. Fl. Penins. Ind. Or. p. 377. 
Wight Illustr. PI. Ind. Or. vol. ii. p. 62, t 118. F. Muell. Fragmented, 
vol. iv. p. 121. 

P. elliptica v. macrantha, Miq. Fl. Ind. Bat. i. pt. i. p. 756. 

Hedera macrophylla, terebinthacea et venosa, Wall. Gat. n.n. 4918, 4920 
parti m, 4923. 

Sciadophyllum ellipticum, Blume Bijdr. p. 878. DC. Prodr. vol. iv. p. 260. 

Aralia digitata, Boxb. Hort. Beng. p. 22 ; Fl. Ind. vol. ii. p. 107. 

A. Moorei, F. Muell. 1. c. vol. ii. p. 108. 

UnjaLA, Bheede Hort. Malab. vol. vii. t. 28. 

Var erythrostachys, paniculae robustae ramis ramulis petalisque rubellis 
pedunculis pedicel lisque brevibus. 



Under the name of H&ptapleurum venulosum, one or 
more large species of the genus, ranges from Kumaon, in 
the subtropical Western Himalaya, eastwards throughout 
the range, to Burma, and southwards in moist forests to 
Malabar, the Circars, and Singapore; thence extending 

March 1st, 1895. 



to the Malayan Islands and tropical Australia. It has 
not, however, been detected in Ceylon. As might be 
expected, with so wide a range, it varies much in habit, 
and in the size of the leaves and flowers, and it is very 
possible that more than one species is included under the 
above name. Amongst the very large series of Indian 
specimens that I have examined, I find the greatest 
differences (and they are very great) to be in the stout- 
ness or the contrary of the rachis and branches of the 
panicle, in the length and stoutness of the peduncles of the 
head of flowers, and of the pedicels of the flowers them- 
selves. In the Himalaya the peduncles and pedicels are 
for the most part as represented in the plate, but m 
Malabar, Burma, Penan g, and in Wight's figure all the 
ramifications of the panicle are very slender and distinct, 
the peduncles attain an inch long, and the pedicels half an 
inch. The flowers, too, vary greatly in size. In no case 
do I find any note of the colour of the panicle and its 
ramifications being red, as in the plant here figured ; in 
all that I saw in the Himalaya and Khasia Hills, I 
remember no colour but green. Wight, however, figures 
these as violet-blue, and the flowers as green. 

I regret not being able to give the native country of 
var. erytkrostachys. The specimen figured is from a plant 
cultivated in the Temperate House of the Royal Gardens, 
presented by M. de Falbe, Danish Minister, from the 
Villa Valetta, Cannes. It flowered in April, 1894. The 
species is, as Mr. Watson informs me, not uncommon in 
such gardens as can afford it house-room, but it seldom 
flowers. 

Descr. — A small, diffusely branching tree, or bush, with 
rooting lower branches, or sometimes a woody climber ; 
branchlets stout, dark green, dotted with white. Leaves 
alternate; petiole 4-8 inches long, terete; leaflets 7-9i 
whorled, 5-7 inches long, elliptic- or ovate-oblong, obtuse, 
acute, or subcaudately obtusely acuminate, base cuneate 
or cordate, reticulate on both surfaces ; petiolule 1-1J »*• 
Panicle on a short, stout, slender peduncle, glabrous or 
puberulous; branches subverticillate, 3-6 inches long, 
stout or slender, spreading, bearing throughout their 
length, peduncled, globose heads of flowers about H i "' 
diam. Flowers minute, polygamous; pedicels short or 



long Calyx broadly cupuiar, margin obscurely 5-toothed. 
Petals short, obtuse, cohering in a deciduous operculum. 
Stamens 4-5. Disk tumid, with an obscurely 4-5-lobed 
very depressed central style. — /. D. H. 



Fig. I, Flower; 2, the same with the operculate corolla raised; 3, flower 
with the petals removed ; 4, calyx, ovary and disk showing the style ; 
5, vertical section of ovary : — All enlarged. 




KSdeiJKRtd-Jjth 



VH**nt-Bwol*»?*. 



Tab. 7403. 
disa sagittalis. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidejs.— Tribe Ophryde.e. 
Genus Disa, Berg. ; [Benth. & Sooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 6 30.) 



Disa (Coryphaaa) sagittalis ; foliis synanthiis, radicalibus pluribus oblanceolatis 
acutis, caule erecto vaginis acutia membranaceis arete vestito, racemo 
oblongo cylindraceo v. subcorymbiforme, floribus patentibus puberulia 
pallide lilacinis, bracteis ovario brevioribus, sepalis lateralibus oblongis 
acutis, postico erecto e basi tubuloso repente in laminam patularn alte 
2-lobam recurvam dilatato, Iobis cuneatis basi tortis,calcare recto elougato 
conico, petalis erectis linearibus basi extus in auric ulam magnamdilatatis, 
labello lineari undulato, rostello brevi rotundato concavo, polliniarutn 
glandula 2-loba. 

D. sagittalis, Sic. in Kongl. YetensJc. Acad. Nya Handl. vol. xxi. (1800), 
p. 252. Lindl.Gen. Sf Sp. Orchid, p. 350. Bolus Ic. Orchid. Austro- African, 
i. t. 32. 

Orcbis sagittalis, Linn.f. Suppl. p. 399. 

Satyrium sagittale, Thunh. Prodr. PI. Cap. p. 5. 



No genus of terrestrial Orchids requires for its satis- 
factory elucidation good drawings and analysis more 
than does Disa ; for the species are very numerous, and 
the structural differences and complicated features of its 
column and sepals are greater, I think, by far, than 
in any other genus of the Order. To which must be added 
the difficulty of describing, in intelligible language, the 
irregular and often bizarre and even deceptive characters 
of these organs, which, in dried specimens especially, are 
apt to lead the systematist far astray. Considering his 
materials and opportunities, Lindley's work on the genus 
in his " Genera and Species of Orchids," is remarkably 
skilful ; but until Mr. Bolus took the field and published 
his masterly researches in the " Orchids of the Cape Penin- 
sula " and " Icones Orchidearum Austro-Africanarum " 
hardly a dozen of the 109 described species could be 
said to be satisfactorily known. 

, Disa sagittalis is figured and described in the last men- 
tioned of Mr. Bolus' works, and a comparison of his 
results with those given in our figure shows a remarkably 

March 1st, 1895. 



perfect agreement in all essentials of structure. The 
chief differences are, the greater luxuriance of the cul- 
tivated specimen, its more numerous suberect, oblanceolate 
bright green leaves, its reticulated sheaths on the brown 
stem, its pale lilac sepals and petals ; also the spur of 
its posticous sepal is rather longer and narrower, and the 
lamina is quite entire. The species is referred to the 
section Goryphma, both by Lindley and Bolus, in which 
there should be two glands of the pollinia, whereas a 
single 2-lobed one is (correctly) represented in Bolus 
figures and in that here given. D. sagittalis is a native of 
both the South Western and South Eastern regions of 
South Africa, extending in the East to Natal. The 
specimen represented was sent to the Royal Gardens by 
H. J. Elwes, Esq., F.L.S., from his gardens at Coles- 
borne, Andoversford, which have contributed so many 
rarities to this work, and amongst them more terrestrial 
Cape Orchids than has any other contributor. It flowered 
early in May of the present year. 

Descr. — Tuber fusiform. Leaves radical, 2-4 inches 
long, oblanceolate, bright green. Stem 6-8 inches high) 
dark brown, clothed with membranous, acute, reticulate 
sheaths. Flowers few or many, minutely puberulous, in a 
subcorymbiform raceme ; about § of an inch long from 
the tip of the lip to that of the dorsal sepal, pale lilac, 
with red streaks on the petals and lip ; pedicel spreading, 
with the ovary an inch long ; bracts shorter than the 
ovary. Sepals, lateral oblong, acute, deflexed ; posticous, 
erect, tubular below, and produced into a straight, conical, 
acute spur, expanded above, and 2-lobed, lobes twisted at 
the base, fan -shaped, with the margins recurved and entire. 
Petals erect, linear, with each a broad, rounded basal 
auricle. Lip linear, waved. Column very short, depressed, 
with a short, broad, rounded, concave rostellum. Gland 
of the pollinia 2-lobed. Ovary straight. — /. D. H. 



al • 



Fig. 1, Flower seen in front and 2 from the back; 3, posticous sepal; 
4, petals and lip, 5 dorsal and 6 lateral view of column. ; 7, pollinia >— * 
enlarged. 



7404. 




'.' Pitch lath 



V,n C , J rtBrook,,nay&SoAb«P 



Tab. 7404. 

VERONICA LOGANIOIDES. 

Native of New Zealand. 

t 

Nat. Ord. Scrophularine.e. — Tribe Digitals. 
Genus Veronica, Linn. ; (Be?dh. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 964.) 



Veronica (Hebe) loganioides ; fruticulus humilis, basi decumbens, dein 
erectus, ramis virgatis, cortice fusco, ramulis pedunculisque laxe pilosis, 
foliis \-\ poll, longis laxe densiusve imbricatis patenti-recurvis ovatis 
acuminatis crassiusculis carinatis viridibus integerrimis v. utrinque 
pauci-denticnlatis, floribus in racemulis ad apices ramorum corymbose 
congestis dispositis oppositis brevissime pedicellatis, bracteis ovato- 
oblongis calycibus brevioribus glaberrimis, sepalis oblongis obtusis 
carinatis ciliolatis, corolla | in. diam. alba, tubo brevissimo, lobis ovato- 
rotundatis, filamentis mediocribus, antberis pallidis, ovario glaberrimo 
apice 2-lobo. 

V. lo<?anioides. Armstr. in New Zrahl. Country Journal, vol. iii. et in Trans. 
New Zeafd. Imstit. vol. xiii. (1881) 3b2, and p. 359. 



Veronica loganioides is described by its author as " a 
most singular plant, quite different in appearance from 
any known Veronica * * * the corolla seems to 
approach that of V. linifolia, but the aspect of the plant 
is more that of V. tetragona, though the leaves are not 
connate at the base." And he adds, " until the fruit is 
obtained the position and relationship cannot be deter- 
mined." Judging from the ovary, I think that it may be 
safely referred to the section Hebe, or the subgenus 
Korronika of Armstrong, which includes all the Hebes, 
except those with scale-like, appressed leaves, to which he 
has given the subgeneric name of Pseudo-Veronica. Its 
nearest affinity is probably with V. epacridea (" Handb. of 
N. Zeald. Flora," p. 213), a prostrate, tortuous species, 
with uniform small leaves in opposite pairs, and free at 
the base ; which species, however, differs widely, having 
broadly, obovate-oblong obtuse leaves, and a corolla with 
a long tube. Mr. Armstrong describes the corolla of 
1 . loganioides ns white, with pink stripes; but in all the 
March 1st. 1895. 



cultivated specimens that I have seen they are pure white. 
It appears to be a very rare plant, a native of the Southern 
Island, and the only native specimens in Kew Herbarium, 
were sent to Kew by Thos. Kirk, Esq., F.L.S., of Wel- 
lington. Mr. Armstrong gives as habitats the Rangitata 
Valley, where he collected it himself, and the Clyde 
Valley, alt. 5-6000 ft., Mr. W. Gray. 

The specimen figured flowered in the Rockery of the Royal 
Gardens, in June, 1893, and the same plant has been 
received from the Royal Gardens of Edinburgh, under the 
name of V. epacridea. 

Descr. — A dwarf shrub, six to twelve inches high, with 
many slender, terete, erect branches from a decumbent 
base. Stems hardly as thick as a crow-quill, branched 
above, naked, but annulate with scars below, leafy above, 
as are the branches. Leaves quadrifarious, in opposite, 
rather close-set pairs, about one-sixth of an inch long, 
erecto-patent, ovate-lanceolate, subacute, coriaceous, 
keeled, dull green, shining. Flowers sessile, small, in sub- 
terminal opposite, corymbiform spikes ; peduncle one half 
to two-thirds of an inch long, sparsely hairy ; bracts 
lanceolate, shorter than the calyx. Calyx segments erect; 
linear-oblong, obtuse, coriaceous, margins ciliolate. Corolla 
one-fourth to nearly one-third of an inch in diam., white; 
tube not longer than the calyx ; posticous and lateral lobes 
orbicular-ovate, posticous rather the largest; anticous 
much the smallest, ovate. Filaments about as long as 
the corolla lobes ; anthers oblong, erect, pale. Ovary 
glabrous, style slender.— J. D H 



*ltj]-lta?iaZd° n ° f SPik6; 3 ' CaljX and Styl6; 4 a Qd5 > antberS; 



6, ovary -.—All enlarged 



7405. 







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CONTENTS OF No. 603, MARCH, 1895 



Tab. 7402.— HEPTAPLEUKtTM VENULOSUM. 
t ; 7403— DISA SAGITTALIS. 
M 7404.— VERONICA LOGANIOIDES. 
n 7405.— WELDENIA CANDIDA. 
n 7406.— SCHINUS DEPENDENS. 

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Tab. 7405. 
WELDENIA Candida. 

Native of Mexico and Guatemala. 



Nat. Ord. CommelinacejE. — Tribe Tbadescantie^. 
Genus Weldenia, Schult. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 855.) 



Weldenia Candida ; herba erecta, puberula, tuberosa, caule simplici folioso, 
foliis linearibua oblongisve acutis subsessilibus basi angustatis subtus 
alte 5-oo-coatatis, costis puberulis pallide viridibus supra concavis 
fasciculis pilorum raris albis conspersis, vagina laxa cylindracea mem- 
bran acea, floribus terminalibus fasciculatis sessilibus albis, calycis tubo 
superne risso, limbo 5-fido puberulo, corollae tubo elongato gracili calyce 
duplo longiore, limbi ampli segmentis 3 orbicularibus patentibus, 
staminibus 6 filamentis gracilibus exsertis, antheris oblongis, ovario 

tlineari-oblongo 3-loculari, stylo filiformi, stigmate 3-lobo, ovulis in 
loculis paucis subbiseriatim superpositis. 
. Candida, Schult f. in Flora, vol. xii. (1829), p. 3, t. i. A. Roem. & Sck. 
Si/st. vol. vii. p. 1136. Hassle. Commel. Ind. p. 3. Baker in Journ. 
Linn. Soc. vol. xvii. p. 454. Clarke in DC. Monogr. Phanerog. vol. iii. 
p. 319. Kew Bulletin (1894), p. 135. 

W. Schnltesii, Schleclit. Hort. Salens, p. 14. 

Lampra volcanica, Benth. PI. Hartweq, p. 95 ; & in Hook. Ic. Plant, vol. xiii. 
p. 28, t. 1236. 

Rugendasia majalis, Ehrenb. mss. 



The remarkable plant here figured, which is monotypic, 
was discovered by Ehrenberg, between Chico and Beal 
del Monte in Mexico ; Karwinsky subsequently found it 
in the Nevado de Tolucca, and Schiede on the Cuesta de 
Catingoa. Hartweg, in 1840, collected it in the crater of 
the Volcan de Agua in Guatemala, and specimens from 
the same locality have lately been received at Kew from 
J. Donnell Smith, Esq., an excellent botanist. The fol- 
lowing account is given in the Kew Bulletin cited above. 
" Last year Mr. Audley C. Gosling, Her Majesty's Minister 
to Central America, informed us that his sons had " made 
the ascent of the Volcan de Agua, and at the bottom of 
the crater had found bulbs of the plant which Mr. Donnell 
Smith informs me is Weldenia Candida. ... I have 
planted these bulbs here, and they flower to perfection at 
9000 ft. lower altitude than where found. The daily 

March 1st, 1895. 



range of the thermometer in this city (Guatemala) is from 
9°-22° centigr. (48°-71° Fahr.), and in the crater of de 
Agua it is from —6° to 11° centigr. (21°-51° Fahr.). If you 
have not the plant in cultivation, I shall be happy to send 
you some bulbs. Mr. Gosling's offer was gladly accepted, 
and in September, 1893, the plants were received at Kew, 
where they flowered in April in a cool greenhouse." 

Descr. — Tubers very many, tufted, narrowly fusiform, 
2-3 inches long, fleshy. Slems 1-8 inches high, as thick 
as a swan's quill or less, simple or divided, leafy at the 
tip, the leaves passing below into tubular, hyaline, striate 
pale sheaths. Leaves 2-6 by £— J in., crowded towards 
the top of the stem, spreading and recurved, from oblong 
to linear, or narrowly oblanceolate, acuminate, ecostate 
nerveless smooth above, and glabrous, except for a 
few small scattered superficial tufts of white cellular 
hairs ; beneath pubescent on five or more prominent ribs ; 
sheath loose, cylindric, membranous. Flowers sessile, in 
terminal tufts amongst the leaves. Calyx an inch long, 
tubular, pale green, split to about the middle, tip with 3 
very narrow teeth. Corolla pure white; tube twice as 
long as the calyx, slender, cylindric, white ; limb one and 
a half inches in diameter, 3-partite ; segments orbicular, 
spreading. Stamens 6, inserted at the mouth of the 
corolla, filaments slender, about half as long as its lobes ; 
anthers basiiixed, horizontal, ovate-oblong, yellow, base 
cordate, slits lateral. Ovary sessile, columnar, 3-groved, 
3-celled; style filiform; stigma exserted, 3-lobed, lobes 
papillose ; ovules few in each cell, biseriately superposed. 
— J. D.E. 



Fig. 1, Epidermis of leaves with tufts of hairs ; 2, hairs from the same j 
o, tip of calyx ; 4, stamen ; 5, stigma : 6, ovary ; 7, the same, with one cen 
exposed:— A lien Urged. 



7406. 




MS del. J.N Fitch uth 



Tab. 7406. 
schinus dependens. 

Native of South America. 

Nat. Ord. Anacardiace^e. — Tribe Anacardie.*. 

Genua Schinus, Linn. ; {Bentfi. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. 1. pp. 422, 426.) 

(Schinus et Duvaua.) 



Schinus (Duvaua) dependens; frutex ramis strictis flexuosisve extimis spino- 
sis, foliis parvis breviter petiolatis oblongis obovatisve glaberrimis 
integerrimis v. serrato-dentatis, floribus polygamis in racemos axillares 
folia subaequantes dispositis, bracteis ovatis minutis ciliolatis 1-2-floris, 
alabastris globosis, calyeis lobis ovatis ciliolatis, petalis obovato-oblongis 
unguiculatis, ovario globoso glabro, drupis globosis. 

S. dependens, Ortega, Decad. vol. viii. p. 102. L. March. Anacard. p. 164. 
Engler in Mart. Fl. Bras. 387, et in Alph. DC. Monog. Phanerog. vol. iv. 
p. 339, 538. 

S. Hnygan, Molina, Saqq. Chili. Ed. I. 169, 355. 

S. Bonplandianus, L. March. I. c. 

Duvaua dependens, DO. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 74. Kunth in Diet. Sc. Nat. Tc. t. 
47. Hook. Bot. Misc. vol. iii. p. 176. C. Gay Fl. Chil. vol. ii. p. 42. 
Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1573. 

D. ovata et D. longifolia, Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1568, et vol. xv. (1843), t. 59. 

D. dentata, DO. Prodr. I. c. 

D. cuneata, et D. inebrians, Gill, ex Hook. & Am. in Hook. Bot. Misc. vol. iii. 
p. 176. 

D. fasciculata et D. proecox, Griseb. in Goett. Abhandl. vol. xix. (1874), 
p. 116. 

D. ornata (sphalm. pro ovata) Philipp. f. Cat. PL Vase. Chil. p. 47. 

D. polygama, Kunth in Ann. Sc. Nat. Ser. i. vol. ii. p. 340. 

D. spinescens, Tenore Cat. Ort. Nap. p. 85. 

Amyris polygama, Cav. Ic. vol. iii. p. 20, t. 239. 



Professor Engler, in his able monograph of the Anacar- 
diaceae, has shown that the long-established genus Duvaua, 
of Kunth, can only be regarded as a subgenus of the older 
Schinus. Though previously placed wide apart in the 
Order, the only character by which they could be separated 
was that of leaves simple in Duvaua and compound in 
Schinus, which of itself is insufficient for the establish- 
ment of two genera. 

March 1st, 1895. 



8. dependents has a very wide range in the west coast 
of South America, from Valdivia in latitude 40° S. to 19° 
S. in Bolivia, where it ascends to 13,000 ft. elevation. 
It also extends over a great portion of the Argentine 
Republic, Paraguay and Uruguay. Its northern limit in 
the east coast of America is the province of Rio Grande 
do Sul, in the extreme south of Brazil. According to 
the late Dr. Gillies (confirmed by. C. Gay) the Indians 
of the Mendozan Andes distil an intoxicating liquor from 
the fruit. The bark yields a balsam used as a vulnerary, 
and other parts of the plant afford medicines formerly 
much in use in Chili. Its native name is Huingan. 

8. dependens was introduced into the Garden of the 
Royal Horticultural Society before the year 1833, when it 
was figured in the "Botanical Register" by Lindley, who 
states that it will not bear the climate of London without 
protection from frost, but would probably succeed in 
crevices of rocks in Devonshire and Cornwall. The 
specimen here figured is from a plant raised at Kew from 
seeds sent from the Botanical Gardens of Santiago, Chili, 
in 1885 ; and which has proved to be perfectly hardy. It 
flowers in May. 

Descr.— A shrub or small tree, 12-15 ft. high, abun- 
dantly flowering, with rigid branches, spinous at the tips ; 
or with more or less drooping branches in favourable 
situations; bark brown. Leaves one-third to nearly ODe 
inch long, very shortly petioled, oblong or obovate, more 
or less coriaceous, quite entire or more or less toothed, 
dark green above, pale beneath. Flowers yellow, h in * 
diam., produced in great numbers of axillary, very shortly 
peduncled racemes, about as long as the leaves ; bracts 
minute, ovate, ciliolate, 1-3-fld. ; pedicels about one- 
twelfth of an inch long, glabrous. Calyx minute, 4-lobed ; 
lobes rounded, ciliolate. Petals obovate-spathulate, spread- 
ing. Stamens in the male fl. nearly as long as the petals, 
anthers large ; in the female reduced to minute staminodes. 
Dish urceolate, 8-10 lobed. Ovary glabrous. D^P 
pisiform.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of raceme and flowers : 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, disk :— M 
enlarged. 



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ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Si 



7407. 




■ 



Tab. 7407. 
MACARANGA Porteana. 

Native of the Philippine Islands. 

Nat. Ord. Euphohbiace.e. — Tribe Crotonej:. 
Genus Macaranga, Thou. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 320.) 



Macaranga (Eumacaranga) Porteana: caule erecto cylindraceo cicatricato, 
foliis amplis longe petiolatis peltatis orbiculari-ovatis acutis calloso- 
crenulatis ciliolatis supra laste viridibus nervis aureis, immaturis supra 
araneosis, subtus rufescentibus puberulis costa nervisque validis viridi- 
bus, nervulis transversis perplurimis elevatis rubris, stipulis maximis 
oblongis erectis cymbiformibus pallide fla vo-virescentibus, paniculis 
axillaribus petiolo brevioribus breviter pedunculatis roseis hie illio folii- 
feris, bracteis primariis (basi ramorum inferiorum) pollicaribus ovato- 
lanceolatis acutis, superioribus linearibus, floralibus parvis cymbiformibus 
incurvis, bracteolis linearibus incurvis obtusis, floribus minutis sessilibus, 
masculis perplurimis polyandris, femineia hermaphroditisve ad apices 
ramulorum raris, perianthii segmentis ovatis, staminibus confertis, 
antheris 4-lobis, ovario oblongo, stylis 2 elongatis subulatis stigmatosis. 

M. Porteana, E. Andre in Rev. Sortie. (1888), p. 176, fig. 36. 

Mappa Porteana, Hort. ex W. Wats, in Gard. Chron. (1894), vol. ii. p. 284, 
cum Ic. et Suppl. (1894) Sept. 8th. 



As grown in a large pot standing in the tank of the 
Victoria House at Kew, this forms one of the most 
stately attractions of the many noble plants that sur- 
round it. From a stout erect stem four-and-a-half feet 
high, clothed above with the large erect, pale stipules, 
are given off long bold, bright green petioles, two to three 
feet long, supporting peltate leaves, nearly three feet 
broad, of a lustrous dark satin green colour above, traversed 
by golden nerves ; beneath the young leaves are of a rusty- 
red hue, beautifully reticulate, with strong green nerves, 
and innumerable transverse parallel red nervules ; the 
older leaves are uniformly pale green beneath. The in- 
florescence, consisting of axillary panicles, is of pale red, 
insignificant flowers. 

Macaranga is a large tropical genus, consisting of 
upwards of eighty species, confined to the old world, 
and chiefly Malayan. M. Porteana was discovered in the 
Philippine Islands by M. Marius Porte, a French Botanist, 

April 1st, 189o. 



who collected there in 1860-5, and by him it was introduced 
into the Jardin de Plantes, Paris, whence a young plant was 
sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1892. The latter was 
only a foot high when received, but grew so rapidly as 
to attain the dimensions mentioned above by April, 1893, 
when it flowered. 

Descr.—Stem woody, 4-4^ ft. high in the plant figured, 
erect, cylindric, dark brown, marked with triangular scars 
of fallen leaves. Leaves at the tip of stem, peltate, 
orbicular-ovate, acute, crenulate, dark green above, with 
golden nerves, young rosy beneath ; petiole two to three 
feet long, horizontally spreading, stout, terete, green ; 
stipules three to six inches long, free, concave, lmear- 
oblong, acute, erect, very pale yellowish green, with 
rusty-brown withering edges and tips. Panicles axillary, 
shorter than the petioles, erect, pyramidal, laxly-branched, 
pale reddish, bearing here and there on the rachis small, 
ovate, acute, deeply toothed, reddish leaves, which are not 
peltate ; bracts at the base of the lower branches an inch 
long, ovate-lanceolate, acute, concave, upper gradually 
smaller. Flowers sessile on the suberect branches of the 
panicle, bracteate and bracteolate, all male, except an 
occasional terminal fern, or bisexual ; floral bracts \ in- 
long, boat-shaped, incurved, acuminate, 1-2-fld. ; bracteoles 
two, lateral, much smaller than the bracts, linear, obtuse. 
Male pl. ; sepals 3, ovate ; stamens numerous, filaments 
shorter than the sepals ; anthers 4-lobed, 4-celled. Fm. 
FL. ; perianth of the male ; stamens fewer ; ovary oblong, 
with two long subulate styles. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of branch with male inflorescence ; 2, male branch, 
bracteoles and flowers ; 3, male flowers ; 4 and 5, stamens ; 6, tip of branch 
with four male and a bisexual terminal flower :— All enlarged. 



740$. 




1K„~«„< Rr.lo'kS.D^y*' 



Tab. 7408. 
SAINTPAULIA ionantha. 

Native of Eastern tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace^e. — Tribe Cyktandreje. 

Saintpaulia, Herm. Wendl. in WittmacJc Oartenflor. vol. xlii. (1893), p. 322, 
t. 1391, and Abbild. 66. 



Saintpaulia ionantha; acaulis, hirsutula, foliis petiolatis ovato-v. oblongo- 
cordatis obscure crenatis apice obtusis v. rotundatis, pedunculis radicalibus 
ascendentibus, floribus paucis cymosis nutantibus, alabastris pendulis, 
sepalis 5-7 linearibus obtusis, corollse extus pubescentis tubo brevissimo, 
limbo subrotato violaceo 2-labiato, labio superiore bilobo lobis rotundatis 
inferiore paullo majore 3-lobo lobis obovato-rotnndatis, staminibus 2 
ore constricto corollae insertis, filamentis crassiusculis, antberis conniven- 
tibus reniformi-rotundatis apicibus cobaarentibus, staminodiis 2 minimis 
posticis, disco angusto annulari, ovario- oblongo 1-loculari hirsuto, 
placentis iDtrusis contiguis furcatis secus ramos revolutos ovuliferis, 
stylo brevisculo gracili, stigmate simplicii. 

Saintpaltlia ionantha, Herm. Wendl. ; in Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. (1894), p. 
13, f. 1 ; in Rev. Hort. Belg. (1894), p. 109, cum Ic. Neub. Garten.-Mag. 
(1894), p. 362, fig. 97. 



It does not often happen that a plant newly introduced 
into Europe can claim the honour accorded to the subject 
of this plate, of being within two years of its flowering 
figured in five first-class horticultural periodicals. Over 
and above its attractiveness it is interesting as being one 
of the few ornamental plants that have been intrqduced 
from the hilly regions of Eastern tropical Africa. 'It was 
discovered by Baron Walter von Saint Paul, whose father, 
Hofmarschal Baron St. Paul, of Fischbach in Silesia, 
President of the Dendrological Society of Germany, has 
kindly sent me the following account of its habitats, &c. : 
■ — " The Saintpaulia was discovered by my son, who lives 
in East Africa, where he own3 plantations of Vanilla and 
india-rubber trees. It was found in two localities; one 
about an hour from Tanga, in wooded places, in the 
fissures of limestone rocks, as well as in rich soil with 
plenty of vegetable matter. This place is not more than 
fifty to one hundred and fifty feet above the sea level. 
The second place is in the primeval forest of Usambara, 

April 1st, 1895. 



likewise in shady situations, but on granite rocks, two 
thousand five hundred feet above the sea. It is muck 
more plentiful in the former place. Several varieties have 
been discovered that differ slightly in colour of the 
flowers, but all are blue." Seeds were sent to his father 
by Baron Walter ; from these plants were raised by Dr. 
Wendland at Herrenhausen, which flowered in 1893, and 
were exhibited at the International Horticultural Exhibi- 
tion, held in that year in Ghent. 

The specimen figured here was raised from seeds 
obtained from a continental nurseryman, and flowered in 
the Royal Gardens in July, 1894, under Gloxinia treat- 
ment. 

The affinity of Saintpaulia is, according to Mr. C. B. 
Clarke, who has monographed the Cyrtandrese, to be re- 
garded as doubtful, until the ripe fruit is known. In habit 
and floral characters it perfectly agrees with Boea, Comm., 
a tropical Asiatic genus ; but in that the capsule is long, 
slender, and twisted, whereas in Saintpaulia, judging from 
the immature fruit (fig. 7) it would appear to be short and 
straight. 

Descr. — A perennial, stemless, hirsutely pubescent herb. 
Leaves one and a half to two inches long, shortly 
stoutly petioled, ovate- or oblong-cordate, obtuse, crenate, 
dark green, basal sinus closed ; nerves few, spreading, 
deeply sunk on the upper surface, much raised beneath. 
Flowers in stoutly peduncled cymes, nodding ; pedicels one 
half to one inch long ; bracts small, narrow. Sepals 5-7, 
linear, obtuse, erect, green. Corolla an inch in diameter, 
subrotate, pale blue ; tube much shorter than the sepals ; 
limb bilabiate; upper lip 2-lobed, much the smallest; 
lower spreading, lobes ■ all orbicular, concave, ciliolate. 
Stamens 2, inserted in the contracted mouth of the tube ; 
filaments short, stout ; anthers shortly exserted, didymous, 
conniving ; staminodes minute conical projections in the 
throat of the corolla. Ovary ovoid, hirsute, style filiform, 
stigma purple. Ovules many, on the revolute arms of two 
parietal placentas. Capsule ovoid, hairy. — /. J). H. 



Kg. 1, Calyx and style; 2, tube of corolla laid open and stamen; 3, ovary 
and disk; 4, transverse section of ovary; 5, hair of margin of corolla; 
6, ovules; 7, immature fruit i—All enlarged. 




del J.KFiich 



Vbacnt.Brookspay* 



Tab. 7409. 
IXIANTHES EETZIOIDES. 
Native of the Cape of Good Hope. 

Nat. Ord. Sckophclarine.e. — Tribe CiiELONEiE. 
Genus Ixianthes, Benth. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 937.) 



Ixianthes retzioides; frotex erectus, hirsatus, folios u s, foliis subverfcicillatim 
confertia erectis lineari-oblanceolatis acntis serratis rigidis, floribus 
axillaribns, pedicellis brevibua 2-bracteatis, calycis labio snperiore 3-fido, 
inferiore 2-fido, lobis brevioribus Ianceolatis acutis, corollas salphnreae 
viscido-puberulas tubo inflato gibbo, labio superiore 2-fido erecto lobis 
rotnndatia, inferiore patente 3-fido lobis oblongro-rotnndatis, 8taminibus 
2 corollas basi insertis inclusis, antberarum loculis divaricatis, staminodiia 
2-3, stylo incluso apice emarginato, capsula ovoideo-tetragona septicida, 
seminibus curvis. 

I. retzioides, Benth. in Hook. Comp. Hot. Mag. vol. ii. (18.16), p. 53 ; in DC. 
Prodr. vol. x. p. S35. Harv. Thes. Capens. vol. i. t. 99. Macotcan in 
Gard. Chron. (1889), vol. i. p. 136, f. 19. 



Ixianthes retzioides is described by Professor Macowan, 
F.L.S. (writing from Capetown) in the above-cited article 
in the Gardener's Chronicle, as one of the rarest of Western 
Cape plants. He says of it, " It appears to have been 
gathered by our predecessors Ecklon and Zeyher, and 
long afterwards by the late Dr. Pappe, who died in 1862. 
Mr. Robert Templeman, a nurseryman here, found a soli- 
tary plant in 1882 or 1883, and my colleague, Bolus, 
dropped upon the very same one some year or so after- 
wards, when it was almost destroyed by the cutting of a 
"water- furrow. I have hunted for other examples every 
summer since. This year, after my return from an unsuc- 
cessful raid, the farmer, on whose property the locality is, 
found a small colony of the shrub, some examples being 
five feet high, and magnificently in flower. It grows 
almost in water." There are specimens of it in the Kew 
Herbarium from both Ecklon and Pappe, and from 
Messrs. Macowan and Bolus. The latter give as its habi- 
tat, by streams in the mountains near the waterfall of 

Aphil 1st, 1895. 



Tulbagh, alt. 1200 ft. " rarissima." Ecklon gives also 
the county of Worcester, which adjoins Tulbagh on the 
S.E., as a habitat. ISTo others are recorded. Prof. Macowan 
has sent to Kew dried specimens of a white-flowered 
variety, with the leaves rather more acutely serrated. 

The plant here figured was raised from seeds sent in 
1891 to the Hoyal Gardens, Kew, by Prof. Macowan, 
Government Botanist at Capetown, and which flowered 
in a cool greenhouse in June, 1894. Mr. Watson in- 
forms me that good plants of it were growing in the 
open air during the summer months, but that they would 
not survive the cold of an English winter. 

Descr. — A branching, leafy shrub, attaining seven feet 
in height, all parts except the interior of the corolla pubes- 
cent. Leaves alternate, densely subverticillatedly crowded, 
3-4 inches long, by about one-third of an inch broad ; 
sessile, very narrowly oblanceolate, acute, serrate beyond 
the middle, greyish green above, paler beneath ; nerves 
short, slender, spreading. Flowers 1-3, on short axillary 
peduncles. Calyx three-quarters of an inch long, glandular- 
pubescent, obscurely 2-lipped, deeply 3-lobed, with the 
posticous (or upper lip) broadest, and 3 -fid at the tip ; the 
others lanceolate, acute, all valvate. Corolla sulphur- 
coloured, glandular-pubescent externally ; tube gibbously 
inflated, two-thirds of an inch long ; limb one and a half 
inch broad, 2-lipped, 5-lobed ; lobes orbicular-obovate, 
nearly equal; two upper erect, three lower spreading, 
mouth transversely oblong. Stamens two, included, in- 
serted at the very base of the corolla-tube, with two or 
three interposed setiform staminodes ; filaments slender, 
glabrous, incurved; anthers didymous. Ovary oblong, 
glandular-pubescent ; style filiform, stigma purple. Cap- 
sule ovoid, acute, septicidal, many-seeded. Seeds curved, 
testa lax. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx laid open, showing the two lateral lobes and one of the three 
connate dorsal lobes ; 2, base of corolla, stamen, and staminodes from the 
specimen figured; both enlarged; 3, the same from native specimen :—AU 
enlarged. 



r -n 




M.S.delJU. FltjChllth 



BrnoVs 



Tab. 7410. 
PIPTOSPATHA Ridleyi. 

Native of the Malay Peninsula. 

Nat. Ord. Akoidejs. — Tribe Philodendreje. 

Genns Piptospatha, N. E. Br.; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 855.) 



Piptospatha Ridleyi ; acaulis, foliis petiolatis elliptieo-laneeolatis acutis 
apicibus tubulosis, supra viridibus pallide marmoratis, aubtus pallidiB, 
nervia primariis utrinque 6-8 rabrie, nervulis tenuissimis, petiolo 
vaginisque lanceolatis rubro-fuscis, pedunculo petiolo multo longiore 
rubro-fusco, spatha nutante ovoidea apice repente rostrato recurvo, 
dimidio inferiore luride viridi, superiore roseo striato et punetafco, spadice 
brevi basi annulo organorum neutrorum cincto, parte mascula apice 
rotundata feminea? axjuilonga, antheris sessilibus quadrato-oblongis 
locnlis lateralibus angustis poris terrainalibus dehiscentibus, connective) 
crasso apice hemisphterico, ovario ovoideo, stigmate pulvinato, ovulis 
basilaribns. 

P. Ridleyi, N. E. Br. mss. 



The genus Piptospatha was established in 1879 by Mr. 
N. E. Brown in the Gardener's Chronicle, upon a Bornean 
plant, P. insignis, which has been figured in this Magazine 
(Tab. 6598) ; the generic name taking precedence by one 
year of Engler's Ehynchopyle. It belongs to the tribe 
Philodendrex of Aroidese, and is distinguished by the 
nodding spathe, the limb of which is calyptrately deci- 
duous from the tube, the latter forming a funnel-shaped cup 
around the fruiting spadix ; by the prolonged connec- 
tive of the anthers, which in P. insignis forms a conical 
horn ; and by the unilocular ovaries with basilar or sub- 
basilar erect ovules. The seeds of the species in which these 
have been seen, are remarkable for the testa being produced 
into a tail longer than the nucleus. P. Ridleyi differs 
from P. insignis, in the greater size of the broader foliage, 
in the connective of the anthers forming a pubescent hemi- 
sphere, and in the orbicular stigma distinct from the crown 
of the ovary. The other described species are P. elongata, 
N. E. Br., and P. marginata, N. E. Br., both Bornean, 
and published in Engler's " Bot. Jahrb.," i. (1881), 184, 

Apkil 1st, 1895. 



and figured in Bee cari's "Malesia" (under Rhynchopyle),, 
and there are yet others in the Kew Herbarium hitherto un- 
described. As with other tribes of obscure Malayan Aroids, 
natives of dark tropical forests, they are overlooked by col- 
lectors in search of showy plants of horticultural interest ; 
and it is only when their native habitats are visited by such 
experienced botanists and travellers as Dr. Beccari, in 
the Malayan Islands, and Mr. Ridley in the Peninsula, 
that they are likely to be procured for scientific purposes. 

Piptospatha Bidleyi is a native of Johore, in the southern 
extremity of the Malay Peninsula. It was sent to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1893, by the botanist whose 
name it bears, the Director of the Garden and Forest 
Department of the Straits Settlements. It flowered in the 
Tropical House in June of the same year, and continued 
in flower all the summer. 

Descr. — Basal sheaths of stem lanceolate, acuminate, 
and like the petioles a dark vinous red. Leaves erect, 
six to eight inches long by two broad, elliptic-lanceolate, 
acute at both ends, dark green above, with pale blotches 
between the eight to ten pairs of ascending nerves ; dull 
pale green beneath, with slender midrib nerves, and a 
narrow, intramarginal nerve ; petiole about half the length 
of the blade, grooved in front. Peduncle about as long as 
the leaves, pale reddish brown, as thick as a small goose- 
quill. Spathe two inches long, nodding or decurved, 
ovoid, with a short, upturned beak, closed, except at the 
apex ; base dull green, upper half or more, pink, with 
slender, darker nerves and dots. Sjmdiv sessile, about 
one-quarter the length of the spathe, cylindric,top rounded; 
flowers densely packed; male portion as long as the 
female, the latter subtended by a ring of minute, clavate 
neuters. Anthers quadrately oblong ; cells lateral, opening 
by minute, terminal pores ; connective hemispheric, pubes- 
cent. Ovaries ovoid, 2-celled ; stigma sessile, disciform ; 
ovules many, basal erect, orthotropous. — J". D. II. 



Fig. 1, Top of peduncle and spadix ; 2 and 3, antherB ; 4, nenter or g a . n //' 
5, ovary ; 6, the same cut lengthwise, and 7, transversely ; 8, ovules : * 
enlarged. 



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+"**■'■: - | 



74] 




Tab. 7411. 

MAGNOLIA PARVIFLORA. 
Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Magnoliace.e. — Tribe Magnolie^. 
Genus Magnolia, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 18.) 



Magnolia parviflora ; arbor, ramulis pubescentibus, foliis deciduis petiolatig 
elliptico-ovatis cuspidatis immarginatis basi rotundatis subtus pallide 
viridibus puberulis, nervis utrinque 5-7 arcuatis impressis, floribus foliis 
coetaneis longe pedunculatis 3|-4 poll, diam., sepalis 3 oblongis pallide roseis 
demum reflexis, petalis ad 6 late obovatis concavis albidis, staminibus 
numerosis incurvis, filamentis antheras lineari-oblongas sanguineas 
sequantibus, gynostegio oblongo breviter stipitato, carpellis paucis. 

M. parviflora, Sieb. 8f Zucc. in Abh. Akad. Muench. vol. iv. pt. 2 (1843), p. 187. 
Miq. Prolus.Fl. Japon. p. 146. Franc/i. <Sf Sav. Enum. PI. Japon. vol. i. 
p. 16. Rev. Sort. Belg. (1891), p. 44, 45. Walp. Ann. i. 956. Zeituke 
Ito, Descr. Plant. Bot. Gard. Koishikaiva (Tolcio Sort. Bot.), vol. i. t. 13. 
Kwa-wi Arb. vol. iii. fol. 8. Phonzo Zufou, vol. 82, fol. 9, 10. 

Oyama Renga, Jap. 



Under Magnolia Watsoni, I have in this Magazine (Tab. 
7157) alluded to M. parviflora, and indicated the differences 
between these two species, which consist in the small size 
of all the parts of the latter, the few nerves of its leaves, 
and the long peduncle of its flowers ; to which may be 
added the absence of the yellow margin of the leaves, and 
the fewer carpels. 

M. parviflora is a native of the alpine region of the 
Japanese island of Nippon, and is recorded from Mounts 
Hakone and Hego-san B and from the foot of the volcano 
of Wunyen. The plant from which the drawing is made 
was purchased in 1893, from the Yokohama Gardener's 
Association. It flowered in June, 1894, in the Temperate 
House of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 

Descr. — A small tree ; branches rather slender, glabrous ; 
branchlets pubescent. Leaves four to six inches long, mem- 
branous, oblong or obovate-oblong, shortly obtusely cuspi- 
date, glabrous above, pubescentbeneath, base rounded, nerves 
five to six pairs, light green above, much paler beneath 
April 1st, 1895. 



with yellowish nerves, margins green ; petiole three-fourths 
of an inch long, green, pubescent. Flowers long-peduncled, 
three and a half to four inches in diam. ; peduncle one to 
two and a half inches long. Sepals three, oblong, pale 
rose-colrd., glabrous. Petals about six, obovate, very con- 
cave, white. Stamens very many, strongly incurved; 
anthers about equalling the filaments, blood-red, tips 
obtuse. Carpels few, lanceolate, adnate to the axis of the 
gynophone. Ovules two. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of under surface of leaf; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, young 
carpel : — All enlarged. 



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L R] i 



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CONTENTS OF No. 604. APRIL, 1895. 

Tab. 7407.— MACARANGA PORTEANA. 
„ 7408— SATNTPATJLIA IONANTHA. 
?i 7409.— IXIANTIIES RETZIOIDES. 
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„ 7411.— MAGNOLIA PARVIFLORA. 

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Tab. 7412. 
KNIPHOFIA Northtje. 

Native of Oape Colony. 

Nat. Ord. Lili/lcem. — Tribe Hemerocalle.33. 
Genus Kniphofia, Moench. (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 775.) 



Kniphopia Northise ; breviter caulescens, foliis 30-40 dense rosulatis lanceo- 
latis acuminatis recurvatis glaucescentibus e basi ad apicem Bensim an- 
gustatis, dorso indistincte cannatia margine crebre denticulatis, pedunculo 
valido foliis multo breviore, racemo densissimo oblongo, pedicellis 
brevissimis clavatis, bracteis ovatis navicularibus pedicello Iongioribus, 
periantbio subcyliudrioo supra ovarium leviter constricto citrino ante 
antbesin rubro tincto, lobis brevibus obtusis, staminibus longe exsertis, 
stylo staminibus longiore. 

K. Northise, Baker in Journ. Hot. 1889, p. 43 ; in Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. ii. 
p. 66. 



This is the most robust and aloe-like of all the species 
of this favourite genus. From its nearest ally, K. caides- 
cevs, Baker (Bot. Mag. tab. 5946) it may be easily distin- 
guished by not having any raised keel on the back of the 
leaf. It was first brought into notice in this country by 
Miss Marianne North, who painted it (see the North Gallery, 
No. 367) and brought home a plant which she presented to 
the Royal Gardens at Kew. We are informed by Mr. E. 
Tidmarsh, the Curator of the Botanic Garden at Grahams- 
town, that it was first found in a wild state in the neigh- 
bourhood of that town by Mr. W. Dugmore. It was 
brought to Kew by Miss North in 1883, and flowered for 
the first time in the Succulent House in July, 1889. 
Plants were distributed from Kew, and one of these 
flowered with Mr. W. E. Gumbleton in County Cork in 
1891. For two years a large group of it has been planted 
out in the open air at Kew, on the south side of the 
Orchid House, the plants being only protected in winter 
by a few dry leaves being placed round their collars. 
Under these conditions it grows freely, and this year 
every plant has flowered, so that it may be considered as 
hardy in favourable situations in the south of England 
May 1st, 1895. 



and Ireland. Oar drawing was made from a plant that 
flowered at Kew in June, 1894. 

Descr. — Stem shortly produced below the rosette of 
leaves, two or three inches in diameter. Leaves thirty or 
forty in a dense rosette, lanceolate, acuminate, glaucous, 
four or five feet long, five or six inches broad near the 
base, narrowed gradually to a long point, without any 
acute keel on the back, strongly and closely denticulate 
on the edges. Peduncle very stout, much shorter than 
the leaves. Raceme dense, oblong, half a foot to a foot 
long ; pedicels very short, deflexed, clavate ; bracts ovate- 
navicular, longer than the pedicels. Perianth subcylindri- 
cal, constricted a little above the ovary, an inch or rather 
more long, pale yellow when mature, in an early stage 
more or less tinged with red; lobes short, suborbicular, 
obtuse. Stamens half as long again as the perianth. 
Ovary ovoid ; style very long, overtopping the anthers.— 
J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Margin of leaf; 2, flower, with pedicel and bract; 3, pistil, all 
enlarged ; 4, whole plant, much reduced. 



74 13 




Tab. 7413. 

VACCINIUM ERYTHROCARPUil. 
Native of the Alleghany Mountains. 

Nat. Ord. Vacciniace^.— Tribe Euvaccinie#. 
Genoa Vaccinium, Linn. (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 573.) 



Vaccinium (Oxycoccoides) erythrocarpum, ; fruticulus ramis divaricatis, 
ramulis puberulis, foliis deciduis ovatis ovato-oblongisve acuminatis 
serrulatia sinubus setiferis supra setulosis venosis, floribus solitariis 
axillaribus longe pedicellatis pendulis, calycis tubo obconico limbo 
brevissime 4-dentato r corolla rosea alabastro conica, tubo brevi, lobis 4 
loriformibus revolutis, filamentis villosis, antheris elongatis puberulis 
dorso medio bicalcalcaratis, baccis globosis demum nigricantibus. 

"V. erythrocarpum, Miclm. Fl. Am. Bov. vol. i. p. 227. A. Gray Fl. N. Un. 

St. ed. v. p. 290; Synopt. Fl. N. Am. vol. ii. pt. i. p. 25. Chapm. Fl. S. 

Un. Si. p. 259. 
Oxtcoccus erectus, PursJi Fl. Am. Sept. vol. i. p. 264. DC. Prodr. vol. viii. 

pars ii. p. 577. Wats. Dendrol. Brit. vol. i. t. 31. Loud. Arboret. 

Brit. p. 1171, fig. 994. 

O. erythrocarpus, Pets. Synops. vol. i. p. 419. 



A. remarkable whortleberry, uniting by the structure of 
its flowers, the deciduous leaved species of Vaccinium 
proper, in which the corolla is ovoid, with the true 
Oxycocci or cranberries, which have persistent leaves, and 
a corolla divided nearly to the base into long narrow at 
length revolute lobes. This has led to differences of 
opinion regarding the position of V. erythrocarpum, and 
the validity of Oxycoccus as a genus differing from Vacci- 
nium. Michaax, who, I believe, discovered, and who first 
described the plant, placed it in Vaccinium, while Persoon, 
and following him Pursh, referred it to Oxycoccus. Asa 
Gray, the highest authority for North American plants, 
reduced Oxycoccus, including V. erythrocarpum, to a section 
of Vaccinium, distinguishing the latter from the other 
Oxycocci, the Cranberries by its habit and deciduous leaves. 
Lastly, in the Genera Plantarum, V. erythrocarpum is 
retained in Vaccinium, with the sectional characters of the 
corolla, whilst Oxycoccus is restored for the two cranberries 
(0. palustris and 0. macrocarjms), which differ from all 

Abv 1st, 1895. 



Vaccinia in their mode of growth, and in the flowers being 
produced on erect terminal pedicels from bracteate buds. 

V. erythrocarpum is a native of the higher Alleghanies, 
from Virginia to North Carolina, where it grows gre- 
gariously, flowering in July. I do not find that it has a 
native name. It was introduced into England in 1806 
by Messrs. Loddiges. The specimen here figured was 
from a plant raised from seeds sent by the late Dr. 
A. Gray from Harvard Botanical Gardens in 1886, and 
which flowered in the Arboretum of the Royal Gardens 
in June, 1894. The fruit, which is of a bright red when 
immature, and ripens to a blue-black, is slightly acid and 
insipid. 

Descr. — A shrub three to four feet high, with spreading 
terete branches, and puberulous branchlets. Leaves one 
and a half to two inches long, subsessile, deciduous, ovate 
or ovate-oblong, acute or acuminate, serrulate, with minute 
bristles on the upper surface, and in the angles between 
the teeth, base rounded or subacute, upper surface dark 
green, with sunk veins, under paler, with strong nerves 
and reticulate nervules ; young leaves tinged with red. 
Flowers solitary in the axils of almost every leaf, half an 
inch long, pendulous from slender, minutely bibracteolate, 
pedicels one-fourth to two-thirds of an inch long. Calyx 
obconic, terete ; limb minutely 4-toothed. Corolla conic 
in bud, deeply four-lobed, the lobes linear and revolute. 
Stamens as long as the corolla-lobes, cohering in a trun- 
cate, erect cone ; filaments very short, hairy, orange-red ; 
anthers slender, pubescent, with two short, dorsal, spread- 
ing horns about the middle ; tubes long, connate. Sty* 6 
stout. Berry at first red, ripe blue black, half an inch in 
diameter, smooth, many-seeded. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Portion of upper surface of leaf; 2, flower ; 3, calyx and style; 4 and 
5, stamens : — All enlarged. 



74 n 




Tab. 7414. 
argylia canescens. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat.Ord. Bignoniace^. 
Genus Abgtlia, B. Don. ; (Benth. & Rook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1043.) 



Argtlia canescens ; caudice erecto cylindraceo, caules annuos erectos ascen- 
dentesve simplices ramososve laxe foliatos pilosos subapice emittentes 
foliis altemis diatantibas longe petiolatis pubescentibus rotatim 7- 
foliolatis, foliolis petiolulatis ovatis bipinnatifilis lobis ultimis brevibus 
obtusis, floribus apicem versus caalis subcapitatim corytnbosis breviter 
pedicellatis additis pancis diseitis, bracteis lanceolatis pedicellos 
subajquantibus, sepalis linearibus obtusis laxe villosis, corollae aureaa 
pubescentis tubo infundibulari-campanulato intus rubro striato, limbi vix 
bilabiati lobis 5 subasqualibus late obovatis retusis, capsula lineari 
rostro erecto. 

A. canescens, D. Don in Edinb. K. Phil. Journ. (Apr.- June, 1829), p. 88. 
G. Don Gen. Syst. vol. iv. p. 229. DC. Prodr. vol. ix. p. 235. C. Gay 
Fl. Chil. vol. iv. p. -141. 

A. radiata, Endl. Iconog. vol. xii. p. 71. 



Argylia is a very remarkable genus of Bignoniacese, con- 
fined ibo the Andean region of Chili and Peru. About 
twenty species have been described, but so imperfectly 
that it is impossible to say how few or many of them are 
really distinct. The genus was founded on a plant figured 
by Louis Feuillee,* in his "Journal des Observations 
physiques mathematiques et botaniques, faites par ordre 
du Eoi, sur les Cotes Orientales de 1' Amerique Meridional, 
et dans les Indes Occidentales, depuis 1707-1712," pub- 
lished in 1714, with fifty plates of plants. Amongst the 
latter is an Argylia, a native of Peru, which differs from 
A. canescens in the broader, more entire leaflets, the long 
tube of the corolla and other characters. The genus was 
named in honour of Archibald Campbell, third Duke of 
Argyle (who died 1761), a great lover of plants, and the 
introducer of many American trees and shrubs into 
Whitton Park, Tsleworth, for many years his residence, of 

* A notice of the Life and Labours of Friar Feuillee will be found under 
tab. 7249, Pasithca cocrulca. 

Mai 1st, 1895. 



which the greater part were transferred on his death to 
Kew, but some still remain. 

The genus is here for the first time figured from a 
specimen cultivated in Europe. It was presented to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, by Thomas King, Esq., of Garnett 
Hill, Glasgow, in 1892, along with a collection of bulbs 
and seeds from Valparaiso. It flowered in a cool house 
in July, 1893, and again in 1894. The plant is not un- 
common in Chili, from the latitude of Concepcion to that 
of Coquimbo, ascending to 7000 feet on the Andes. 

Descr. — Candex several inches high, cylindric, three- 
quarters of an inch in diam. or more, contracted at the 
apex, emitting from near the top annual leafing and 
flowering stems ; bark pale, covered with transverse scars. 
Flowering stem strict, erect, twelve to eighteen inches high, 
simple or branched, as thick as a goose-quill, terete, green, 
pubescent. Leaves alternate, distant ; petiole four to eight 
inches long, pubescent, terminated by a whorl of pubes- 
cent, broadly ovate bi-tri-pinnatifid petiolulate leaflets, 
two to three and a half inches long, the segments of which 
are narrow and obtuse. Flowers subcorymbosely disposed 
on the summit of the stem, with a few distantly scattered 
lower down the stem ; bracts lanceolate, green, half an 
inch long, about as long as the pedicels, softly hairy, as is 
the calyx. Sepals one-third of an inch long, linear, obtuse, 
erect. Corolla golden-yellow, with blood-red interrupted 
streaks in the throat opposite the three lower lobes ; tube 
nearly one inch long, glandular-pubescent, narrow at the 
base, then dilated and sub-campanulate ; limb one and 
a quarter to one and a half inch in diam., lobes subequal, 
broadly obovate, retuse. Stamens 4, didynamous, included 
in the corolla tube, inserted at the tip of the narrow por- 
tion ; staminode minute styliform. Dish naked, 4-lobed. 
Ovary oblong, shortly stipitate, pubescent ; style slender, 
stigma of two ovate lamella?. Capsule four inches long, 
deflexed, narrow, cylindric, with a long, subulate, Btraigbt 
beak. Seeds many, minute, subdidymously orbicular, 
beautifully striate. — J. B. D. 



Fig. 1, Calyx, style and stigma; base of tube of corolla laid open, with 
stamens and staminode; 3, anther; 4, disk and ovary; 5, capsule (ot tue 
natural size) ; 6 and 7, seeds :— All but tig. 5 enlarged. 



:4k 




Tab. 7415. 
VERONICA Heotobi. 

Native of Neiv Zealand. 

Nat. Ord. Scrophularine,e. — Tribe Digitale.e. 
Genus Veronica, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 964.) 



Veronica (Hebe) Hectori ; fructiculus robustus, ramosus, rainnlis elongatis 
erectis teretiusculis, foliis per paria connatis appresse imbricatis l*te 
ovatis v. orbiculari-ovatis obtusis crassis pinctulatis dorso convexis 
ecarinatis, junioribus ciliolatis, floribus in capitula terminalia aggregatis 
axillis, summis sessilibus, bracteis foliis conformibus sed panllo latioribus, 
sepalis lineari-oblongis obtasis ciliatis, corollas albas tubo calyce vix 
longiore, limbi lobis 3 oblongis obtusis, antico angustiore, antheris 
rubro purpureis, ovario glaberrimo, capsula sepalis aequilonga. 

V. Hectori, HooJc. f. Handh. N. Zeald. Flora, p. 212. Armstr. in Trans. New 
Zeald. Institute, vol. xiii. (1885), p. 352. 



V. Hectori belongs to the group of New Zealand Speed- 
wells, which includes V. lycopodioides (tab. 7338), V. 
tetragona (Hook. Ic. PL t. 580), and a few others, 
characterized by the short, thickly coriaceous, scale-like, 
densely imbricating leaves, often united by thin bases into 
a two-lipped cup. In most of the species of this group 
the branches are more less tetragonous, from the leaves 
being dorsally keeled, but in V. Hectori the branches are 
nearly terete, from the leaves being dorsally rounded. 
From both the above-named species V. Hectori differs in 
the very small flowers and broader sepals. 

The discoverers of this species, which is confined, as far 
as is known, to the Alps of Otago, in the southern province 
of the Southern Island of New Zealand, were Sir James 
Hector, F.R.S., and Mr. Buchanan, who describe it as the 
largest shrub at elevations of 7000 to 8000 feet in the 
Lake district, growing about two feet in height; and also 
as forming low, rigid, spreading patches, which "crackle 
under the feet." In its native country it flowers in April 
and May, months answering to October and November in 
ours, whereas it flowered in Edinburgh in July ; an apparent 
anomaly probably due to the elevation of its native habitat. 

Mat 1st, 1895. 



The flowers are pink or white. The specimen figured 
was communicated by Dr. Balfour, F.R.S., from the Royal 
Botanic Garden of Edinburgh in July, 1894. 

Descr. — A small woody, tufted, erect shrub, growing in 
patches. Stem terete, brown, woody, as thick as a goose- 
quill below, marked with the close- set scars of fallen leaves ; 
branches erect, sparingly divided, densely clothed with 
decussate closely imbricating appressed scale-like leaves, 
nearly terete, bright green. Leaves one-sixth of an inch 
long, very coriaceous, broadly orbicular-oblong, connate 
to the middle in pairs, dorsally convex, bright green, 
shining; margins of young leaves ciliate. Flowers few, in 
small terminal heads, bracts (the uppermost leaves) rather 
larger than the cauline leaves, ciliate. Calyx four-lobed 
nearly to the base; sepals linear-oblong, ciliate. Corolla 
one quarter of an inch broad, white (or pink) ; tube hardly 
longer than the sepals ; lobes oblong, obtuse, the anticous 
much narrower than the others. Anthers oblong, red- 
purple. Ovary oblong, quite glabrous ; style very slender. 
— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Summit of branch with calyces and styleB; 2, calyx; 3, flower; 
4, ovary : — All enlarged. 



Tab. 7416. 

CYPRIPEDIUM Charlesworthii. 

Native of Arracan. 



Nat. Ord. OrchipEvK. — Tribe Cypripedie^:. 
Genus Cypripedium:, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 634.) 



Cypripedium (Coriacese) Charlesworthii; foliis lineari-oblongis loratisve 
acutis laete viridibus, scapo unitloro hirsutulo virescente rubro maculato, 
bractea ovario breviore obtusa, ovario brevi costis purpureis hirsutis, 
sepalo dorsali magno orbiculari demum convexo roseo nervis sanguineis 
reticulato, sepalis lateralibus in laminam late ovatam obtusam vires- 
centem pubescentem labello suppositam connatis, petalis planis patentibus 
lineari-oblongis obtusis pubescentibns luride flavo-viridibus nervis rufescen- 
tibus, labello petalis concolore saccato auriculis rotundatis, staminodio 
eburneo orbiculari disco tumido in cornu conicum producto, stigmate 
reniformo. 

C. Charlesworthii, llolfe in Orchid Reviciv, vol. i. pp. 303, 355, cum Ic. 
Gard. Chron. (1893), vol. ii. pp. 406, 437, rig. 70. Journ. of Hortic. (1893), 
vol. ii. p. 307, fig. 43. Gartenjlora, vol. xliv. p. 1, t. 1410. Rev. Hortic. 
Beige (1894), p. 253, cum Ic. Lindenia, vol. x. p. 25, t. 443. 



As observed by Mr. Rolfe, Cypripedium Charlesworthii is 
a very distinct species from any hitherto known, most 
nearly allied to G. Spicerianum, Reichb. f. (Bot. Mag. t. 
6490), and G. Drurii, Beddome (Lindenia i, t. 6), but well 
distinguished from both by (amongst other characters) the 
rose-cold, dorsal sepals, and the horned boss on the disk of 
the staminode, in which respects it is unique in the genus. 
It is named in honour of the head of the firm of Messrs. 
Charlesworth, Shuttleworth & Co. of Heaton, Bradford, 
who were the importers of the species. 

The specimen here figured was purchased at an auction 
sale. It flowered in the Orchid House of the Royal 
Gardens in August of last year. It is a free flowerer, and 
the flowers show considerable variation in size and colour. 
Its native country is the province of Arracan, in the Bay 
of Bengal, one of the most unhealthy districts of India, 
and hence unexplored botanically. It was found in com- 
pany with G. bellatulum, Reichb. f., a species the habitat 
of which was previously unknown, and which species is 

May 1st, 1895. 



consequently not described in the Flora of British 
India. 

Descr. — Leaves six to eight inches long by an inch broad, 
spreading and recurved, acute, glabrous, bright green above, 
pale beneath with purple spots towards the base. Scape 
one-fld., as long- as the leaves, stout, hirsute, green, with 
crowded red linear spots. Bract an inch long, oblong, 
obtuse, green, with dull purple blotches. Ovary one to 
one and a half inch long, green, with hirsute, dark purple 
ribs. Dorsal sepal erect, orbicular, two inches in diameter, 
at first flat, at length convex, from the sides recurving, 
rose-cold., reticulated with blood-red nerves ; lateral 
sepals connate in a broadly ovate, obtuse, pale greenish 
blade, with pale, brownish-red nerves. Petals one and a 
half inch long, horizontally spreading, linear-oblong, 
obtuse, pubescent, dull yellow-green, with five to seven 
broad, red-brown nerves. Lip saccate, dirty greenish 
yellow, suffused with brown, mouth wide, truncate, 
margins not recurved, auricles rounded. Staminode sub- 
orbicular, ivory-white, with a central boss ending in a 
short, conical horn; stigma reniform. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Side, and 2, front view of staminode and stigma -. — Both enlarged. 



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SPECIAL FLO! CE— Wednesday, June 12. 

EV1KING FETE— Wedn I dy 10, 8 to 12 p.m. 

CintYSANTHEW in flower during ifovember. 

TCAL PROMEJ m May 22 to Aug) 

Fete days exce] 



VP'i'TTP 



•Fridays in June at i 



ich with G beautifully Coloured ' 



Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

Ry ARTHUR G . Bl , F.Z.S ., . 



THE HYMENOPTERA ACULEATA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By EDWARD SAUNJ 



BRITISH FUNGI, Phycomycetes and Ustilagineffl. 
15 It I T I s H W U1V O O L O O Y. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

Wood En t 



1411 







Tab. 7417. 
CBJNUM Schimpeei. 

Native of Abyssinia. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide;e.— Tribe Amarylle^e. 
Genus Crinum, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 726.) 



Crinum {Codonocrinum) ScMmperi; bulbo globoso magno collo elorigato, foliia 
8-10 linearibus glabris recurvatis facie viridibus dorso glaucescentibus, 
pedunculo valido foliis breviore, umbellis paucifioris, spathae valvis 
2 ovatis, pedicellis subnullis, perianthii tubo cylindrico 4-pollicari brun- 
neo-viridulo primum suberecto demum cernuo, limbo albo tubo asquiloneo, 
lobis oblanceolato-oblongis acutis apice patulis, staminibus declinatis 
limbo brevioribus, stylo declinato staminibus longiore. 

C. Scbimperi, Vatke inedit. ; Schum. in Gartenfbra, vol. xsxviii. (1889), p. 561, 
tab. 1309. 



This fine Crinum belongs to the same group as 
G, latifolium, Linn, zeylanicum, Linn, and longifolium, 
Thunb. (capense, Herb.). In its foliage and general 
habit it closely resembles G. abyssinicum, Hochst. ; but 
the flower is much larger. From G. scabrum, Herb., 
and Sanderianum, Baker, it differs by its pure white 
flowers. The bulbs were sent by Schimper from the 
mountains of Abyssinia, about twenty years ago, to the 
Botanical Garden at Berlin, but it was not recognized 
and described as a new species till 1889, and in the mean- 
time some of the bulbs had been distributed under the 
name of G. abyssinicum, Hochst. The Royal Gardeus, 
Kew, has received it both from the Berlin Botanical Garden 
and Herr Leichtiin. It flowered in an unheated frame 
last July, and seems likely to become one of the favourite 
half-hardy species of this large and difficult genus. 

Descr.—rBulb globose, the size of a man's fist, with an 
elongated neck. Leaves eight or ten to a rosette, deve- 
loped at the same time as the flowers, linear, recurving, 
glabrous on the surfaces and edges, three feet long, two 
inches broad low down, tapering gradually to the point, 
green above, glaucous beneath.. Peduncle arising from 
the base of the rosette of leaves, very stout, terete, two 

June 1st, 1895. 



feet long, brownish. Umbel few-flowered ; spathe-valves 
two broad, ovate ; pedicels very short. Perianth with a 
cylindrical reddish-green tube four inches long, which is 
finally more or less curved, and a pure white permanently 
funnel-shaped limb of the same length, of which the oblan- 
ceolate-oblong acute lobes spread at the tip when the 
flower is fully expanded. Stamens decimate, an inch 
shorter than the perianth- limb ; filaments white ; anthers 
small, whitish. Style decimate, entire, rather longer than 
the stamens. — J". G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Back view of an anther; 2, apex of the style, both enlarged; 
:i, whole plant, much reduced. 



74 18. 




MS.delJ.WFitdilith 



Tap,. 7418. 
TRICHOCLADUS grandiflorus. 

Native of the Transvaal. 

Nat. Ord. Hamamelidea 
Genua Trichocladus, Pers. ; (Bent/i. & Rook. /. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 667.) 



Tbichocladus grandiflorus ; frutex v. arbnscula, ramnlis rubro punctatis 
novellis racemisque stellato-puberulis, foliis petiolatis tenuiter coriaceis 
ovatis subacutis v. ovato-lanceolatis subcaudato-acuminatis apicibus 
obtusis integerrimiB reticulatis supra laefce viridibus subtus pallidioribus, 
racemis subsessilibus brevibus axillaribus et terminalibus, rachi 
robusto, pedicellis brevissimis, calycis clausi demum 2-3-fidi lobis 
triangulari-ovatis, petalis elongatis loriformibas undulatis albis basi 
roseis, staminibus brevibua, filamentis subglobosis, connectivo in cornu 
uncinatum producto, ovario apice birto, stylis snbulatis recurvis intus 
stigmatosis, capsula globosa. 

T. grandiflorus, Oliver in Hook. Ic. PI. vol. xv. p. 64, t. 1481. 



Though differing in some important points from the 
type of the genus Trichocladus, with which it accords in 
habit, and in most of its characters of flowers and fruit, 
it must, I think, be regarded as a congener of it. Of 
these characters Professor Oliver has indicated the 2-3-tid 
calyx, and the adhesion of the ovary to the tube of the 
calyx (which he regards as indications of affinity with the 
Malayan genus Maingaya) ; to which should be added the 
bisexual flowers, and the anthers not being univalvular in 
dehiscence. The fruit, which Professor Oliver had not 
seen when describing the species, altogether resembles 
that of T. crinitus, Pers. 

Five species of Trichocladus have been described, all South 
Africa, T. crinitus, Pers., the type of the genus; T. ellip- 
ticus and T. verticil I atus, Eckl. & Zey. ; T. peltatus, 
Meissn., and that here figured. 

Trichocladus grandiflorus was discovered in the Berg 
Plateau of the Transvaal by Mr. C. Mudd, who sent speci- 
mens to Messrs. Veitch in 1883, by whom they were 
transmitted to the Kew Herbarium. It has since then 
been received from Mrs. Royston, of Moodies, and from 

June 1st, 1895. 



Mr. E. E. Galpin, who collected it in wooded ravines near 
Barberstown, at an elevation of 3500 to 4000 feet. To Mr. 
Galpin the Royal Gardens are also indebted for seeds sent 
in 1 890, a plant raised from which has now attained a height 
of nine feet in the Temperate House, where Mr. Watson 
tli inks it looks as if it would grow into a good sized tree. 
It flowered for the first time in July, 1894. 

Descr. — A shrub or small tree, bark brown ; young 
branches green, with red-purple spots, at first stellately 
pubescent. Leaves three to four inches long, shortly 
petioled, ovate, subacute, or ovate-lanceolate and caudately 
acuminate, dark green above, paler beneath, young bronzy 
brown, stellately pubescent. Flowers an inch and a half 
in diameter, crowded in short, axillary and terminal sub- 
sessile racemes; rachis and pedicels short, and calyces 
stellately pubescent. Calyx a quarter of an inch long, 
green, splitting irregularly into two or three triangular 
deciduous lobes. Petals five, one half to two-thirds of an 
inch long, strap-shaped, undulate, white, rose-colrd. at the 
base. Stamens very small ; filaments subglobose, shorter 
than the two-celled anthers, which dehisce laterally, con- 
nective produced into an incurved horn. Ovary 2-celled, 
adnate to the calyx-tube; styles subulate. Capsule sub- 
globose.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Bud; 2, stellate hairs; 3, tube of calyx and stamens; 4 and 5, 
stamens ; 6, vertical section of ovary -.—All enlarged. 







IfincentBr 



Iceve a 



Tab. 7410. 

ribes bracteosum. 

Native of Western Nortli America . 



Nat. Ord. Saxifrages. —Tribe Ribesie*. 
Genus Ribes, Linn. (Benih. & Hook. f. Gen. .Plant, vol. i. p. 654.) 



Ribes (Ribesia) hracteosum ; fruticosum, inerme, glaberrimurn, glandulosum, 
foliis amplis 5-7-lobatis, lobis ovatis lanceolatisve acutis v. acnminatis 
grosse serratis, petiolis elougatis, race mis elongatis erectis ascendentibusve 
multifloris, bracteis persistentilms linearibus spathulatisve infimis 
foliaceis, floribus flavidis, calycis lobis oblongis obfcusia petalis spatbulatia 
triplo longioribus, staminibus petalis axjuilongis, baccis atris glandulosis 
polyspermis. 

R. bracteosum, Dougl. in Hook. Fl. Bor. Am. vol. i. p. 233. Bonqard Veg. 
Sifc/ia, p. 138. 'Torr. & Gray Fl. N. Am. vol. i. p. 550. Eaton & Wright 
Man. Bot. p. 395. Ledeb. Fl. Boss. vol. ii. p. 201. Roihr. Fl. Alaok. p. 446. 
8. Wats. Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 206. Maximov. in Bull. Acad. Petersb. 
vol. xix. p. 253. (Mel Biol vol. ix. p. 222.) 



It is rather singular tliat so fine and hardy a plant as 
the subject of this plate, which was discovered nearly 
seventy years ago, and is common in what has long been 
an English colony, should never have been figured in any 
work, or found its place in our shrubberies of England ; 
for, so far as I can ascertain, it is in cultivation nowhere 
but at Kew, where there is no history of its introduction. 
It was discovered by David Douglas in 1826, at the mouth 
of the Columbia River in Oregon, and has since been found 
along the Pacific coast of North America from Mendocino 
county in California to Sitka in Alaska, a range of upwards 
of 1200 miles. Not a few other shrubs besides trees and 
herbaceous plants extend through as many or more degrees 
of latitude on that coast, due no doubt to the equability 
of its temperature. 

R. bracteosum forms a handsome shrub when five to six 
feet high, with bright green leaves like those of the maple, 
which attain a breadth of eight to ten inches. It flowers 
at Kew in May. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous, or minutely pubescent on the 
raceme, and sparsely glandular. Stem four to ten feet 

Junk 1st, 1895. 



high, erect, branched, terete, smooth. Leaves three to 
nine inches broad, palmately 5-7-cleft to or below the 
middle, membranous, bright green ; lobes ovate or lanceo- 
late, acute, coarsely serrate, base truncate; petiole 
slender, longer than the blade. Racemes three to six 
inches long, shortly peduncled, erect, many-fld., length- 
ening in fruit often to a foot ; bracts linear or spathulate, 
persistent, lower sometimes foliaceous ; pedicels half an 
inch long, slender. Flowers erecto-patent. Calyx-tube 
turbinate, glandular ; limb a third of an inch diam. ; lobes 
ovate-oblong, obtuse, spreading, golden yellow, with green 
tips and red bases, but probably variable in colour. Petals 
minute, spathulate. Stamens as long as the petals. 
Anthers didymous. Styles slender. Berries erect, globose, 
black, glandular. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Flower, pedicel, and bract; 2, gland; 3, flower with two sepals 
removed; all enlarged ; 4, portioD of fruiting raceme of the nat. size. 



7420 




: - 



■\fincei\tBrooVs, 



Tab. 7420. 
PERAPHYLLUM ramosissimum. 

Native of Western North America. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Pome^;. 

GenuB Peraphyllum, Nutt. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 628 (suh 

Amelanchier. ) 



Pekaphyllum ramosisaimum ; frutex fruticulusve ramosus rigidus, foliis coria- 
ceis anguste oblanceolatis acutis in petiolum brevem angustatis integer- 
rimis vel apicem versus denticulatis sparse sericeo-pubescentibus, floribus 
in corymbos paucifloros subsessiles erectos dispositis, pedicellis crassius- 
culis 2-bracteolatis, calycis tubo turbinato lobis lanceolatis, petalis 
orbicularibus patentibus roseis, staminibus petalis aequilongis, stylis 
elongatis tomentosis, baccis globosis. 

P. ramosissimum, Nutt. in Torr. & Or. Ft. N. Am. vol. i. p. 474. Walp. Rep. 
vol. v. p. 660. Wenzig.in IAmna ". vol. xxxviii. (1856), p. 11"). Brandegee. 
Fl. S. W. Colorado, p. 236. 8. Wats. Bot. Calif, vol. ii. p. 445. Coult, <-. 
Man. Rocky Mt. Bot. p. 89. 



A genus of a single species, so closely allied to Amchnt- 
chier, that it was reduced to the latter in the " Genera 
Plantarum," because the character taken from the fruit 
upon which it was founded, and which had been incor- 
rectly described, did not hold good. This reduction has 
not been accepted by American botanists, and a better 
knowledge of the habit of the plant affords am] tie 
characters for the retention of the genus. In Amelanchier 
the leaves are broad, membranous and serrate, the flowers 
are racemose, the calyx-tube short, and the petals oblong. 
In Peraphyllum the leaves are narrowly oblanceolate, 
flowers in subsessile corymbs, the calyx-tube cylindric, and 
petals orbicular. In both the fruit is globose, fleshy and 
edible. 

PemphyUum ramosissimum seems to have a very inter- 
rupted distribution, being nowhere very common, but 
occupying a wide area, from the Blue Mountains in Oregon 
to S.W. Colorado, Southern Utah, and California. It 
has been grown in the Arboretum of Kew for upwards of 
twenty years, where it forms a shrub about three feet 
high, but was never observed to flower till May, 1894. 
Jttne 1st, 1895. 



It is probably one of Dr.' Asa Gray's seed contributions to 
the Royal Gardens. 

Descr. — A much-branched shrub, two to six feet high ; 
bark grey ; branchlets short, rigid. Leaves one to two 
inches long, obovate-oblong, or narrowly oblanceolate, 
acute, obtuse, or apiculate, narrowed into a very short 
petiole, quite entire, or rarely sparingly toothed towards 
the tip, silkily pubescent, at length glabrescent. Flowers 
three-quarters of an inch diam., erect, in small, subsessile, 
erect, branched corymbs ; pedicels rather stout, one-fourth 
to one half in. long, with one or two small linear bracts. 
Calyx-tube shortly cylindric or subcampanulate, silky ; 
teeth narrow, erect, shorter than the tube, persistent. 
Petals orbicular, spreading, white, with a rose-colrd. disk. 
Stamens many, as long as the petals ; anthers broadly 
oblong, yellow. Ovary 2- or incompletely 4-celled ; styles 
2-3, loDg, silky ; stigmas capitate. Berry pendulous, half 
an inch diam., globose, fleshy. Seeds compressed, acutely 
margined. — J. J). H. 

Fig. 1, Flower with the petals removed; 2, base of calyx and styles; 
3, vertical section of ovary ; 4, fruit r— AH but fig. 4 enlarged. 



m\ 




Tab. 7421. 
ROSA LuciiE. 

Native of Japan and China. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Rose*. 
Genns Rosa, Linn.; (Bentk. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 625.) 



Rosa (Synstylae) Luci<e ; frutex ramis prostratis, ramulis floriferis glabris 
sparse aculeatis, aculeis uncinatis, foliolis 5-9 ovatis elliptico-ovatis v. 
ovato-rotundatis utrinque glabris firmis mucronatis simpliciter dentatis 
superioribus breviter acuminatis, stipulis strictis denticulatis v. fimbriatis 
longe acuminatis rectis v. divaricatis auriculis angustis, petiolo glabro 
nudo v. aciculato v. subglanduloso, floribus solitariis v. subcorymbosis, 
bracteis caducis integris denticulatisve, pedicellis glabris subglandulosis 
v. rarius dense glanduloso-pubescentibus et aciculiferis, calycis tubo obo- 
voideo ellipsoideo v. globoso glabro raro glanduloso-pubescente, sepalis 
ovato-oblongis lanceolatisve breviter v. longius acuminatis candatisve 
integris pinnatifidisve deciduis, petalis $-§ poll, latis orbiculari-obovatis 
retusis albis, disco prominulo, stylis velutinis inferne connatis, fructibus 
parvis globosis laevibus purpureis v. coccineis. 

ft. Lucia3, Frawh. et Bochebr. in Bull. Soc. Bot. Belg. vol. x. (1871), p. 324, 
et vol. xv. (1876), p. 204. Crepin Prim. Monogr. Ros.fasc 3, p. 258 ; et in 
Bull. Soc. Bot. Belg. vol. xiii. (1874), p. 251, & vol. xvii. (1879), p. 285 ; et 
in Comt. Bend. Bot. Soc. Belg. vol. xxv. ii. p. 13. Franrh. & 8av, Eavm. 
PI. Jap. vol. i. p. 135, et vol. ii. p. 344. Forbes & Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. vol. xxiii. (1887), p. 251. 

El, Wicburaiana, Crepin et Desegl. in Bull. Soc. Bot. Belg. vol. xiv. (1876), 
p. 204, et vol. xxvii. (1888), p. 189. J. G. Jack in Gard^ & Forext. vol. iv. 1 
(1891), p. 44, et vol. v. (1892), p. 367. Sargent I. c. vol. iv. ii. (1891), 
p. 570, fig. 89. 

R. Maximovicziana, Regel in Act. Hort. Bot. Petrop. vol. v. (1877), p. 378. 

ii. nioschata, Benth. Fl. Hongkong, p. 106. 



Rosa Lucise is most closely allied to B. mult i flora, 
Thunb., figured at t. 7119 of this work, is as variable, and 
occupies precisely the same geographical area. It differs 
remarkably from that plant in its prostrate habit, much 
smaller, rounder leaflets ; usually much larger flowers, not 
collected in large compound corymbs, and in its pisiform 
fruit. Franchet and Savat enumerate no fewer than eight 
♦Japanese varieties of it, differing in foliage, naked or 
dandular-pubescent pedicels, form and length of sepals, 
ize of the petals, &c. It is so difficult to distinguish 
several of these varieties from those of R. microphyUa, that 

Juxe 1st, 1895. 



M. Crepin suggests the possibility of some of these being 
of hybrid origin between the two species. The plant 
which flowered at Kew, and of which a specimen is here 
figured, is very much larger in all its parts than the in- 
digenous ones in the Herbarium, in some of which its 
flowers are not larger than the area occupied by the 
stamens in the plate, and are in crowded, short panicles, 
with almost glandular-tomentose very short peduncles and 
pedicels and calyx-tube. The sepals, too, of the Kew 
specimen are much shorter, broader, and more ovate than 
in the ordinary state of the plants when they are often 
drawn out into caudate points, and are cut or pinnatifid 
on one or both sides. 

The discoverer of It. Lucias was, according to Crepin, 
M. Callery, whose specimens gathered in China in 1884, 
are in the Herbarium of the Jardin des Plantes. It 
appears to be very common in Japan, where, according to 
Maries, it ascends the mountains to 7000 ft. elevation. 
There are specimens in Kew Herbarium from Corea and 
Manchuria, from various places in East China to as far 
south as Hong Kong ; Hance collected it at Whampoa ; Tate 
m the Quantung Provinces ; and Oldham in Formosa. 

Plants of M. Lucise, were received from Professor Sar- 
gent, Director of the Harvard Arboretum, Boston, U.S.A., 
in 1891,* which flowered freely in August, 1894, in the 
Arboretum of the Royal Gardens, Kew, and fruited in the 
following October. It is, of course, perfectly hardy. 
According to Professor Sargent, who gives a description 
and excellent figure in " Garden and Forest," adding that 
R. Lucise was sent by Mr. Louis Spilth of Berlin in 1888 to 
the Harvard Arboretum, where it produces prostrate stems 
ten to fifteen feet long in a single season, and covers the 
ground as with a dense mat. Also that it has been very 
largely used by the Parks Department of the City of Boston 
" for covering rocky slopes, &c, where its "remarkable 
habit, hardiness, the brilliancy of its lustrous foliage and 
the beauty of its flowers, which appear when most shrubs 
are out of bloom, certainly recommend it to the attention 
ojjhec ultivators of h ardy plants." In another volume ot 

* It must, however, have been introduced into England at an earlier period, 
tor there i 8 a good specimen of it in the Kew Herbarium received from Canon 
Ellacombe in 1880. 



" Garden and Forest " Mr. Jack describes it as " so thickly 
covering the ground with its white flowers as to almost give 
the effect of snow ; and its fragrance as not that of most wild 
roses, but more nearly suggesting the Banksian rose, though 
it is sweeter, and without a certain disagreeable quality of 
the Banksian." 

The name Lucias was given in compliment to Madame 
Lucie Savatier, who accompanied her husband to the far 
East, and actively aided him in his scientific exploration 
of Japan. — J, D. H. 

Fig. 1, Calyx and styles; 2 and 3, stamens : — Enlarged. 



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„ 7418— TRICHOCLAPUS GRANDIFLORUS. 
„ 74.19.— RIBES BRACTEQfSUM. 
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Tab. 7422. 

SENECIO Hualtata. 

Native of Chili and Argentaria. 

Nat. Ord. Composite — Tribe Senecionide^. 
Genus Senecio, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 466.) 



Senecio Hualtata; herba elata, robusta, junior araneosa, caule simplici 
erecto tereti striato, foliis radicalibus l£-2 pedalibus oblongo-ovatis 
obtusis basi ina?qualiter cordatis marginibus undulatis dentatisque 
supra laete viridibus subtus saepe cserulescentibua v. purpurascentibus, 
costa crassa, nervis utrinque 8-10 patentibus, petiolo semipedali crasso 
fistuloso, foliis canlinis paucis sessilibus lanceolatis serratis, capitulis ad 
apices ramorom paniculas amplte coDgestis breviter v. longing pedicellatis 
diam. pollicaribus, involucri brevis pauci-bracteati f oliolis lineari-oblongis 
obtnsis apicibus barbellatis, radiis 12-16 late oblongis apice crenatis 
pallide stramineis, disci corollis aureis, acbeniis glabris. 

S. Hualtata, Bertero, ex DC. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 417. O. Gay Fl. Chili, vol. iv. 
p. 194. Hook. Sf Am. in Hook. Journ. Bot. vol. iii. (1841), p. 340. Griseb. 
Synth. Fl. Argent, p. 206, et PI. Lorentz. p. 145. S. fistulosus, Poepp. 
Jjessing in Linnsea, vol. vi. (1831), p. 246. Cineraria gualtata, Gillies- 
mss. 



Senecio Hualtata belongs to a group of gigantic herba- 
fous Ragworts, which includes S. sagittifolius, Baker 
(Tab. 7322), all natives of extra-tropical South America. 
Five or six species at least have been described ; but it is 
i?npossible to say from Herbarium specimens bow far 
they are all distinct. 8. Hualtata is the best known of 
them, having a very wide distribution, and having been 
collected by many botanists. C. Gay describes it as in- 
habiting the whole Republic of Chili, meaning, no doubt, 
the more temperate parts, for I find no evidence of its 
occurring further south than Valdivia, in lat. 40°. It 
crosses the Andes to the western slopes, where it fre- 
quents water-courses, and where it has been found as far 
north as Tucuman, in lat. 25° S. by Lorentz and Hierony- 
mus ; thus giving it a range of 15° lat. Its native name 
in Chili generally is Hualtata or Gualiata ; but at Valdivia, 
according to Mr. Reed, it is called " Lengua de Vaca." 

The Royal Gardens, Kew, are indebted for seeds of this fine 
plant to Mrs. J. S. Floyer of Basingstoke, whose daughter, 
July 1st, 1895. 



Mrs. Glynne Williams, sent them in 1890 from Vipos, 
thirty kilometres north of the city of Tucuman. The 
Kew plant, after having stood for several years without 
protection, on a slope close to the pond opposite the Palm 
House, in June of last year sent up its flowering stem 
five feet high, and flowered profusely. 

Descr. — A tall, very stout herb, in a young state 
sparingly woolly ; flowering stem five feet high, terete, 
striate. Leaves chiefly radical, twelve to eighteen inches 
long, by four to six broad, oblong-ovate, broadest at the 
unequally truncate or cordate base, bright green above, 
more blue-green or purplish beneath, margin undulate and 
crenate-toothed, midrib very stout ; nerves eight to ten 
pairs, spreading ; petiole about as long as the blade, stout, 
hollow ; upper or cauline leaves much smaller, sessile 
lanceolate, toothed. Head, an inch in diameter, shortly 
pedicelled in crowded clusters at the ends of the naked 
branches of a pyramidal panicle one to two ft. high- 
Involucre cylindric ; bracts linear-oblong, green ; tip 5 
brown, bearded. Ray-flowers twelve to sixteen, limb 
broadly obovate-oblong, pale straw-colrd., tip crenate. 
Disk-jloivers many, golden-yellow. Achenes (ripe, not 
seen) glabrous ; pappus silvery. — J. D. II. 

r Fig. 1, Bract of involucre; 2, fl. of the ray; 3, pappus hairs; 4, fl. of disk; 
o stamens ; 6, style-arms of disk fl. -.—All enlarged : fig. 7, reduced view ot 
the whole plant. 



7423 







'N Fitch IM. 



• ^ooks^ay&^ fro? 



Tab. 7423. 
pyrus ceat^gifolta. 

Native of Italy. 



Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Pome^3. 
Genus PiRTJS, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen, Plant, vol. i. p. 626.) 



Pyrus cratsegifolia; arbor v. arbuscula, ramulis petiolia corymbisque pubes- 
centibus, foliis gracile petiolatis late ovatis acutis subtua lanatis denmm 
glabratis lobulatis, lobulis utrinque 4-6 grosse dentatia, petiolo gracili, 
stipubs brevdbus acutis caducis, corymbia terminalibus laxifloria pubes- 
centibna, pedicellis gracilibus elongatis roseis, calycis tomentosi tubo 
campanulato, lobia laaceolatis deflexis demum deciduis, petalia orbiculati* 
niveis, staminibus ad 15, stylis 4-5 elongatis erectis tomentosis basi 
connatis, baccis ellipsoideis rubris. 

P. crataagifolia, Targ. Tozz. ex Savi Trait. Alb. Tosc. ed. ii. vol. i. (1801), 
p. 169. Archang. Cotnp. Fl. Ital. p. 232. 

P. florentina, Tarq. Tozz. in Mem. Soc. Moden. vol. xx. para. ii. (1829), p. 302' 

t. 20. DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 628 ; Walp. Rep. Bot. vol ii. p. 53. 
P. torminalis B., Penort Sj/ll. Fl. Neap. 243. 
Menpi!us florentina, Bertol. Amain. Ital. p. 29. 

Crataegus florentina, Zuccagn. Cent. Prim. Obs. Bot. Hort. Florent. vol. i. 
(1806), ex Boem. Collect. 142. Bertol. Fl. Ital. vol. v. p. U± 

Sorbus florentina, Nym. Syll. Fl. Furop. p. 266. 



A native of Italy, and apparently a rare plant, growing 
in woods near Florence, Bologna, and Lucca, and a few 
other spots in the north of the Peninsula, but local. Its 
nearest ally is perhaps P. torminalis, from which it differs 
in the more cordate base of the leaves which are ineiso- 
serrate and tomentose beneath, in the simple terminal 
corymb with very long pedicels, and in the four to live 
filiform styles, and in the small, ellipsoid, red fruit. 

J'.'crat.rijifolia forms a bush about four feet high in the 
Arboretum of the Royal Gardens, Kew, flowering in June, 
and was, I believe, raised from seed received from the 
late Mr. Grover of Florence, one of the most acute 
and accomplished of Italian Botanists. 

Descr. — A bush or small tree, with slender branches 
and dark brown bark ; young branches, leaves beneath, 
and young inflorescence copiously woolly, at length glabres- 
July 1st, 189-j. 



cent. Leaves thin, one and a half to two and a half inches 
long, broadly ovate, or almost orbicular in outline, acute, 
base truncate, margins cut into four to six triangular, 
coarsely-toothed, ovate lobes, dark green above, with as 
many sunk nerves as lobes, pale woolly, at length 
glabrate beneath ; petiole one half to two-thirds of 
an inch long, slender, reddish ; stipules small, ovate, 
acute, deciduous. Corymbs terminal, lax-fid., tomentose ; 
rachis and long pedicels rose-pink, pedicels very slender, 
an inch to an inch and a half long 1 . Flowers nod- 
ding, nearly an inch in diameter. Calyx-tube narrowly 
campanulate, produced much beyond the ovary ; lobes 
lanceolate, as long as the tube, reflexed, at length deci- 
duous. Petals inserted in the mouth of the calyx, orbi- 
cular, notched at the tip, pure white, spreading. Stamens 
ten to twenty, filaments glabrous. Styles four or five, 
elongate, villous, united at the base ; stigmas capitate. 
Berry half an inch long, broadly ellipsoid, or elliptic- 
oblong, red. — J. D. H. 



Fip. 1, Flower with the petals removed; 2, vertical section of ovary:— both 
enlarged; 3, berries of the natural size. 



7424. 







Vmrent- BrootajDay 






Tab. 7424. 
AEISTOLOCHIA ungulifolia. 

Native of Borneo. 



Nat. Ord. Aristolochiace^. 
Genus Aristolochia, Linn.; (Benth. & Jlook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 121.) 



Aristolociiia. (Diplolobus) ungulifolia ; volubilis, glabra, foliis amplis ambitu 
suborbicularibas profunde trilobis, lobis oblongisdecurvis sinn rotundato, 
lateralibus oblongis apice rotundatia intermedio oblongo-lanceolato 
obtuso, floribus in racemos breves dispositis, perianthio basi in stipitem 
cylindraceam producto, dein in vesicam late oblongam. dorso bigibbosam 
inflato, ultra vesicam in tubum angustum recurvum producto, ore late 
infundibulari, limbo elongato spathulato erecto villoso marginibus 
revolutis. 

A. ungulifolia, Masters in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. (1875), p. 494 ; in Gard. 
Chron. (1880), vol. ii. p 116, f. 28. 



According to specimens in the Herbarium of Kew, 
A. ungulifolia is a native of Borneo, where it was dis- 
covered by Messrs. Motley and Barber in the province 
of Labuane. It is very distinct from any hitherto pub- 
lished species, and probably unique in the presence of two 
curious swellings in the dorsal surface of the saccate base 
of the perianth. These swellings correspond to depres- 
sions with ciliate margins in the inner surface of the same 
sack, and are presumably concerned in the pollinisation of 
the plant by insects. The Indian ally of A. ungulifolia is 
A. indica, Linn., a frequent plant all over tropical India. 

A. ungulifolia was first described by Dr. Masters, 
F.R.S., from specimens exhibited in 1880 at the Exhibition 
of the Royal Horticultural Society, South Kensington, by 
Mr. Mortimer, gardener to Major Storer, Purley Park, 
Reading. The specimen here figured was received at the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, from E. N. Ridley, M. A., F.L.S., 
Director of Gardens and Forests, Singapore, in November, 
1894, and which flowered in a stove in the following 
November. 

Descr. — A tall, glabrous climber, with slender, terete, 
.Illy 1st, 1895. 



green stems ; branches obscurely angled. Leaves six to 
seven inches long and broad, suborbicular in outline, 
abruptly narrowed into the petiole at the broad hardly 
cordate base, deeply 3-lobed, pale green, and convex on 
the upper surface, with reticulated veins ; lobes sub- 
parallel, decurved, lateral oblong, rounded at the tip ; 
mid-lobe longest, oblong-lanceolate, narrowed at the 
obtuse tip ; sinus between the lobes narrow, base rounded ; 
petiole one to one and a half inch long, deeply grooved on 
the upper side ; stipular leaves none. Flowers about three 
inches long, in few-fid. corymbs. Perianth divisible into 
four sections ; 1, a short, narrow, terete, solid stipes, 
about a quarter of an inch long ; 2, a dull purple, broadly 
obovoid, oblong bladder, nearly an inch long, with two 
collateral, dorsal bosses on the back below the next 
section ; 3, a curved tube, about as long as the bladder, 
expanding into a small, funnel-shaped mouth, with re- 
curved margins, from the dorsal margin of which arises ; 
4, a spathulate, erect, or reclined, tomentose, red-brown 
limb, an inch long, with a terminal apiculus, and revolute 
margins ; inner surface of the bladder and mouths of the 
bosses villous. Column cup-shaped round the six stigmas, 
and with a few hairs at the base. — J. D. II. 



vi F ', g ' *' S P ec * ion of tube °f perianth; 2, column with the ovary and pedicel 
like base of the perianth ; 3, column -.-All enlarged. 



:-. 




Tab. 7425. 

NEUWIEDFA Griffithii. 

Native of Malacca. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide*.— Tribe Apostasies. 
Genus Keuwiedia, Blume; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 635.) 



Neuwiedia Griffithii; foliis lineai'i-lanceolatis acuminatis, scapo breviusculo, 
racemo bispidnlo, bracteis ovato-lanceolatis flores subteqaantibas 
erecti?, periaothio ovoideo albo, filamentia brevibus liberis quam 
antheras oblongas multo brevioribus. 

N. Griffithii, Beirhl. f. Xen. Orcliid. vol. ii. (1874), p. 16. Bolfe in Journ. 
Linn. Soc. vol. sxv. (1890), p. 235. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Jnd. vol. vi. 
p. 176. 

On Tab. 7368 is figured, for the first time, from living 
specimens, the remarkable Malayan genus of Orchidese, 
Neuwiedia, and under the description of it (N. Lindleyi) it 
is stated that another species, N. Griffithii, is also in culti- 
vation at Kew. The latter has since flowered (in Sep- 
tember, 1894), and is here represented. N. Griffithii 
differs from N. Lindleyi in its much smaller size, shorter 
spike, broader bracts, and very small white flowers, which 
are much more pubescent. It was discovered by Dr. Griffith 
in Malacca, and it was subsequently collected there by the 
late Dr. Maingay, and lastly, by Mr. Ridley, to whom the 
Royal Gardens are indebted for living plants, as they were 
to him for those of j\ r . Lindleyi. It has also been found 
in the province of Perak (in the Malayan Peninsula) by 
collectors sent by Dr. King from the Royal Botanical 
Gardens, Calcutta. 

There still remain two Javan species of Neuwiedia, which 
are very imperfectly known, and from dried specimens 
alone, N. veratrifolia and N. Zollingeri, Blume, together 
with N. Gurtisii of Rolfe of Penang, and N. calanthoides 
of New Guinea, all of which require investigation from 
living specimens before the species of the genus can be 
pronounced to be satisfactorily established. With regard 
to N. Lindleyi, I have, with regret, to state that the colour- 
ing of the flower in the plate is of far too bright a golden- 
yellow, and in this respect very far from a faithful repro- 

July 1st, 1895. 



d notion of the artist's drawing, which is (as with all the 
original drawings published in the Botanical Magazine) 
preserved in the Herbarium of the Koyal Gardens for 
verification of the published plates. The true colour is a 
pale primrose. 

Descr. — Whole plant sixteen inches high, quite glabrous, 
except the spike. Leaves four to ten inches long by one 
to one and a half broad, erect, elliptic-lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, many-nerved. Spike shortly peduncled, four to six 
inches long in flower; rachis, bracts, and flowers hispidly 
pubescent ; bracts green, ovate-lanceolate, about as long 
as the very shortly pedicelled flowers. Ovary trigonous, 
produced into a very short neck. Perianth deflexed, one- 
third of an inch long, ovoid, white; sepals boat-shaped, 
pubescent dorsaJly convex, with a short infra-apical beak ; 
petals like the sepals, but glabrous, with a stout dorsal, 
hispidulous keel, produced into a short, blunt spur. 
Anthers short, broad. Stigma obscurely 3-lobed. — J. B. E, 



Fig. 1, Bract and flower; 2, petal viewed from within, and 3 from 
without ; 4, column; 5, anther :— All enlarged. 



:/•:< 



^^ 







Tab. 742G. 

RUBUS LASIOSTYLUS. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe RuBEjt. 
Genus Rubus, Linn.; (Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 616.) 



Rubus lasio&tylus ; frutex suberectus, fere eglanduloaus, aculeatus, caulibus 
teretibus fusco-purpureis pruinosiB demum niveis aculeis gracilibus rectia 
v. lente curvis instructis, ramulia petiolisque glabris pubescentibusve, 
foliis pinnatis, petiolo gracili rubello aculeato, foliolis 3-5 duplicato ser- 
rulatis subtua niveo-tomentosis nervi9 pallide roaeis, lateralibua ovatis 
acutis, terminali multo majore integro v. trilobo basi rotundato v. subcor- 
dato, etipulis oblique lanceolatis acutis submembranaceis, cymis fere 
terminalibus seesilibus v. breviter pedunculatia paucifloria, pedicellia 
elongatia aculeatis, floribua nutautibus, petalis orbicularibus sanguineis 
sepalia lanceolatia recurvis multo brevioribuB, carpellis siccis dense 
lanatia lacunosis, stylia gracilibus rectis lanatis. 

R. laaioBtylus, Focke in Hook. Jo. PI. t. 1951. 



B. lasiostylus is allied to several Asiatic species, all with 
more or less erect stems, wliite-tomentose undersurface of 
the leaves, long calyx-lobes, small red petals, and villous 
carpels. Of these two, B. niveus, Wall., and B. lasio- 
carpus abound in the temperate regions of the Himalaya ; 
both are extremely variable, and their forms have given 
origin to many species, some of which are founded on 
specimens, not even on varieties. In both the ripe carpels 
are either dry or fleshy, and the endocarp of the fruit is 
lacunose; both are usually much more strongly armed 
plants than is B. lasiostylus, but they are very variable in 
this respect. 

B. lasiostylus is a native of China, where it was dis- 
covered in the Province of Hupeh, by Augustine Henry, 
Esq., F.L.S., in 1888 ; since which period Mr. Hemsley in- 
forms me that very large numbers of Chinese species of 
Bubus have been added to the Kew Herbarium, bringing the 
total up to about sixty. Judging from this, and having 
regard to the extent of country in China that is botanic- 
ally unexplored, especially the mountain regions, there can 

July 1st, 1895. 



be no doubt but that this country is the head-quarters of 
the genus, greatly surpassing the Himalaya, whence only 
forty species have been described. Europe may boast of 
a far greater number of recorded species ; but the vast 
preponderance of these are closely allied forms of one 
type, as to the limits of which forms botanists have the 
most divergent opinions, whereas in China and India many 
types of the genus occur that have no allies at all in 
Europe. 

B. lasiostylus was raised at the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
from seeds received in 1889 from Mr. Henry, who during 
his residence at Ichang, on the Yangtse-kiang River, 700 
miles from its mouth, transmitted to Kew magnificent 
botanical collections abounding in novelties. The plant 
flowered in June, 1894, for the first time, and has proved 
to be perfectly hardy. 

Descr. — A suberect shrub, covered with slender, spread- 
ing, straight, or slightly curved prickles, which are stronger 
towards the base of the stem. Shoots four feet high, 
half an inch in diameter and very aculeate at the base, 
covered with a primrose-purplish bark, that turns nearly 
white in winter, young branches and petioles pubescent. 
Leaves pinnate, three to five inches long ; leaflets three to 
five, sharply, irregularly, doubly serrate, dark green 
and rugose above, young suffused with red ; white tomen- 
tose beneath, with prominent pale, reddish nerves, and a 
setose midrib ; lateral leaflets one and a half to two and a 
half inches long, ovate, acute, base acute or rounded, ter- 
minal lobe much larger and broader, often 3-lobed ; petiole 
slender, red, prickly ; stipules lanceolate. Flowers in few- 
fid, subterminal corymbs ; pedicels one to one and a half 
inch long, decurved, red. Stamens an inch across the 
sepals, nodding. Sepals lanceolate, caudate-acuminate, 
brown-tomentpse, or glabrescent; margins pale. Petals 
orbicular-spathulate, about half as long as the sepals, 
bright blood-red. Achenes crowded, woolly, dry, lacunose ; 
style long, straight, villous— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Petal; 2, jouug, and 4, ripe carpel; all enlarged; 3, cyme of rip< 



fruit of the natural size. 



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Tab. 7422.— SENECIO HUALTATA. 
„ 7423— PYRUS CRAT.EGLFOLIA. 
,, 7424.— ARISTOLOCHIA UNGULIFOLIA. 
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7427 




M 



,i BrooUs.Day & 



Tab. 7427. 
PROCHYNANTHES Bulliana. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllideje. — Tribe Agave*. 
Genus Peochynantiies, S. Wats, in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xxii. p. 457. 



Pbochynanthes, Bulliana ; rhizomate tuberoso fibris coronato, foliis radicalibus 
paucis rosulatis oblanceolatis acutis subcoriaceis persistentibus glabris 
margiae denticulatis, pedunculo elongato foliis paucis reductia lanceolatis 
prcedito, floribua geminia sessilibus in spicam laxam elongatara dispositis, 
bracteis ovatis parvis, perianthio purpureo-viridulo ad medium decurrato 
tubo deorsum oblongo sursum campanulato, lobis ascendeatibus sub- 
orbicularibus, staminibus inclu-ds ad medium tubi insertis, stylo 
perianthio aequilongo apice lobis tribus patulis orbicularibus pubescentibus 
stigmatosis praadito. 

Bravoa Bulliana, Baker in Oard. Chron. 1884, vol. ii. p. 328 ; Handb. 
Amaryllid. p. 161. 



This fifth genus of Agavete has been discovered since 
the publication of Bentham and Hooker's Genera Plantar 
rum. It is intermediate between Polianthes and Bravoa, 
differing from both by its more coriaceous persistent leaves 
and greenish-brown flowers abruptly decurved and dilated 
at the middle. The original species, P. viridijlora, S. 
Wats., which was discovered by Dr. Palmer in 1886 in the 
province of Jalisco, has long pedicels, which are articulated 
at the middle. In the present plant the flowers are larger 
and quite sessile. It was imported from Mexico by Mr. 
William Bull, and first flowered by him in the year 1884, 
at which date I described it in the Gardener's Chronicle, 
under the genus Bravoa. Mr. Bull presented a plant to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, and our drawing was made from 
this when it flowered in an unbeated frame last summer. 
This is the first time the genus has been figured, and the 
original species, so far as I am aware, has never been 
brought into cultivation. 

Descr. — Bootstock tuberous, crowned by a dense mass of 
fibres. Leaves few in a radical rosette, oblanceolate, acute, 
subcoriaceous, persistent, bright green, a foot or more 
long, two inches broad at the middle, denticulate on the 
pale horny margins. Peduncle erect, twice as long as the 
August 1st, 1895. 



leaves, furnished with several lanceolate reduced leaves. 
Flowers in pairs, forming a very long, lax, simple spike, 
quite sessile; bracts ovate, small. Perianth brownish- 
green ; tube abruptly decurved and dilated at the middle, 
oblong in the lower half, campanulate in the upper half ; 
lobes suborbicular, ascending. Stamens inserted at the 
base of the dilated upper half of the perianth ; filaments 
filiform ; anthers linear-oblong, versatile. Style as long as 
the perianth ; stigmatose apex of three spreading orbicular 
pubescent lobes.—/. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower cut open to show the stamens ; 2, ovary and style; 
3, horizontal section of the ovary : all enlarged ; 4, whole plant : much 
reduced. 



7428. 




Tab. 7428. 
SACCOLABIUM Mooreanum. 

Native of New Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Tribe Vandeje. 
Genus Saccolabium, Bl. (Benth. & Hook, f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 578. 



Saccolabitjm (Genuineas) Mooreanum ; caule brevi craaso, foliis oblongis 
lineari-oblongisve apice 2-lobis crasse coriaceia, peduaculia robustis 
decurvis viridibua purpureisve, vasfinia retnotis brevibus obtusia pedunculo 
arete appressis bruuneia, spicis densifloria oblongis, bracteia lineari-lan- 
ceolatis, floribus subglobosis pallide viridibua v. roseia, sepalis conniven- 
tibua lineari- oblongis obtusia concavis, petalis obovatis obtusia, labelli 
carnoai 3-lobi lobi8 lateralibua aemi-orbicularibua erectis terminale parvo 
cymbiforme, calcare sepalia duplo longiore dependente clavato obtuao, 
columna brevi antice in brachia 2 truncata producta, anthera galeaeforme 
vertice lobulato. 

S. Mooreanum, Rolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1893, p. 64. 



Mr. Rolfe describes S. Mooreanum as allied to 8. minus , 
Reichb. f., and to M two or three other Polynesian species, 
having a peculiar decurved appendage in front of the 
column, looking down as it were into the spur." This 
appendage, which is well shown in fig. 2 of the plate, 
seems to be a prolongation of the sides of the column or 
its clinandrium, upon the truncate face of which the very 
large gland of the pollinia rests, and may hence be com- 
pared with a rostellum. 

Mr. Rolfe further points out the similarity of this 
" appendage " to what occurs in Uncifera, Lindl., a genus 
I have reduced (Fl. Brit. Ind. vi. 65) to Saccolabium ; in 
which it is seen to be a prolongation of the column itself 
into two parallel arms. This is shown in my drawings of 
both species of Uncifera (Hook. Ic. PI. t. 2134, 2135), m 
one of which, S. acuminatum, the arms are truncate with 
the gland of the pollinia placed exactly as in S. Mooreanum, 
whilst in the other, 8. obtusifolium, they are more acute, 
or rather, more obliquely truncate. In short, except tor 
the beaked anther and incurved spur of the former 
the flowers of S. Mooreanum and acuminatum are 



August 1st, 1895. 



(sepals, petals, lip, spur and column) almost identical; 
and if Uncifera is to be kept up, it claims both these 
species. 

Further, the remarkable characters of the pollinia of 
Uncifera, of the very large gland, and the broad wings 
of the strap, which are recurved when dry, are repeated in 
8. Mooreanum, the only difference being that the pollen 
masses are raised on an incurved stipes on the face of the 
strap iu Uncifera, and sessile in 8. Mooreanum. 

8. Mooreanum was imported from New Guinea by 
Messrs. F. Sander & Co. of St. Albans, from whom both 
forms were obtained by the Royal Gardens, and which 
flowered in the Tropical Orchid House in January of this 
year. 

Descr. — Stem stout, short. Leaves four to six inches long, 
distichous, oblong, 2-lobed, coriaceous ; margins recurved, 
bright green above, paler and mottled beneath. Scape as 
long as the leaves, stout, decurved, green or red-purple 
and speckled; sheaths two or three, distant, short, obtuse, 
brown, appressed ; bracts small, lanceolate. Spike two to 
three inches long, oblong or ovoid, very dense-fld. Flowers 
subglobose, rose-purple or greenish white, one-third of an 
inch in diameter. Sepals conniving, oblong, obtuse, con- 
cave. Petals conniving, obovate-oblong. Lip small, side 
lobes rounded erect; terminal lobe cymbiform, fleshy, 
subacute, thickened transversely at the base ; spur longer 
than the sepals, clavate, dependent, without internal sep- 
tum, or dorsal scale below the column. Column short, 
stout, produced in front into truncate arms, on which the 
gland of the pollinia rests. Anther helmet-shaped, with 
four bosses on the crown ; strap of pollinia trapeziform at 
the apex, with the sides recurved, bearing two sessile 
pollen masses ; gland very large, obtuse.—/. D. H. 



Ivt. 1, Front view of white fid. var. ; 2, lip and column; 3, anther J 
4, pollinia, all from the same; 5, B ide view of red-fid. var. :—All enlarged. 



742d 




3 ii 

Went Brooks,!^;- 



. » r.r, 



Tab. 7429. 

SPIRiEA BEACTEATA. 
Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Spibe.e. 
Genus Spik^a, Linn. ; (Benth. 8f Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vjl. i. p. 611.) 



Spiraea bracteata; glaberrima, ramulia angnlatis, foliis orbiculato-obovatis 
rotundatisve ad apicem rotundatam crenatis subtus glaucia nervia 
gracilibns, petiolis brevibug, corymbis multtfloris hemisphericis foliolosis, 
calycis lobia ovatis fructu erectia, petalis albia truncato-orbiculatis im- 
bricatia, staminibus ad 20 petalis paullo brevioribus, disco elevate- 
crenato, carpellis dorso medio lanatis raaturis stylo demum deciduo 
parum brevioribus, seminibus breviter appendiculatis, testa Jaevi arete 
appressa. 

S. bracteata, Zahel in Wittm. Gartenzeit. vol. iii. (1884) p. 496. Strauch. 
Spirden, p. 45. Dippel Handb. Laublwhk, p. 468. 

S. nippouica, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Peter.sb, vol. xxxi. (1868) p. 39 ; Diagn. PI. 
Xnr. Asiat. [MeL Biol.) vol. xii. p. 934. 

S. media, F. Schmidt, (Estr. Baumz. 53, t. 54. 

S. media, var. rotundifolia, Nichols, in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. i. p. 283, Fig. 
26 ; and Gard. Diet. vol. iii. p. 477. 

S. rotundifolia, fl. albo, Hort. P. F. von Siebold. 



Spiraea bracteata is well distinguished by its nearly orbi- 
cular leaves, its hemispheric heads of flowers, the broad 
imbricating petals of which so closely overlap as to re- 
semble a monopetalous corolla. The name is derived from 
the presence of numerous small leaves on the branches of 
the corymbs, which are concealed by the sweet-scented 
flowers. Another peculiarity is the great size of the 
glands of the disk, which surround the mouth of the 
calyx-tube, and resemble a string of large beads. 

Mr. Nicholson informs me that S. bracteata was intro- 
duced from Japan by Siebold, and distributed from bis 
old nursery at Ley den, under the name of 8. rotundifolia. 
It was described as S. nipponica by Maximovicz, two years 
after it had been published by Zabel, and there are Bp 
mens under that name in the Kew Herbarium, from the 
Imperial University of Japan, collected on Mount Fujiyama, 
and from M. Maries, who found it at elevations of two to 

AuortsT 1st, 1895. 



seven thousand feet in Central Japan. Maximo vicz con- 
sidered that its nearest ally is his 8. mongolica, which differs 
in having triple-nerved leaves. 

The drawing was made from a specimen that flowered 
in the Arboretum of the Roval Gardens, Kew, in June, 
1894. 

Descr. — A small glabrous shrub ; bark on the main 
branches dark brown, young branches bright .red. Leaves 
one half to one inch long and broad, orbicular, or very 
broadly obovate, with a few broad crenatures on the rounded 
tip ; petiole very short, nerves slender, spreading. Corymbs 
two inches in diameter, subsessile, hemispherical; dense- 
fld. ; branches with small green foliaceous bracts concealed 
by the very shortly pedicelled flowers, which vary from a 
quarter to nearly half an inch in diameter. Calyx-lobes 
triangular-ovate, hairy within. Petals orbicular, truncate, 
so closely overlapping as to resemble a cupular broadly 
5-lobed corolla, white. Dish a crenate ring at the mouth 
of the calyx-tube. Stamens shorter than the petals. 
Cartels dorsally woolly about the middle; styles rather 
loug.— J. J). H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx disk and carpels; 2, petal ; 3, stamens; 4, section of calyx, 
showing carpels :— All enlarged. 



7430 




XReev< 






Tab. 7430. 
pyrus sikk7mensis. 

Native of the Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. —Tribe Pome^e. 
Genus Pyrus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Rook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626. 



Ptkus (Malua) sihlcimensis ; arbor parva, ramnlis novellis foliis subtua calyci- 
buaque tomentoaia demuin glabratis, foliis ovatis v. ovato-lanceolatis 
acuminatia serrulatis, lamina petiolo pluries longiore, stipulia setaceia, 
corymbia multifloria, pedunculis elongatis gracilibus, alabastris roaeis, 
calycis tubo ellipaoideo, sepalis lanceolatis reflexis deciduia, petalis orbi- 
cularibus v. late oboTato-oblongia, ungue brevi villoso, staminibus 25-30, 
8tylis glabris basi connatis, baccis parvia obconico-pyriformibua. 

P. aitkimensis, Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. ii. p. 373. 

P. baccata indica, Hort. 



There are in the Himalaya three species of the Malus 
group of Pyrus; 1, the apple, which is indigenous in the 
Western hills, as well as cultivated up to 11,500 ft. in 
Tibet ; 2, the Siberian Crab, P. baccata, Linn., differing 
from the common N. Asian plant only in the smaller sub- 
pyriform fruit, a form of fruit which occurs rarely in 
Siberia, but which is figured in Pallas Flora Rossica. It is 
found from Kashmir to Kumaon, sometimes in a cultivated 
state, and in Bhotan and the Khasia Hills, but has not 
been brought from Nepal or Sikkim ; 3, the plant here 
figured, which differs from P. baccata in the tomentose 
under surface of the leaves and calyx, and glabrous column 
of styles. The fruit also is speckled with white, as in P. 
Pashia, which belongs to the Pyrus proper section of the 
genus, but the spots are much smaller in sihlcimensis. 

The tree from which the specimens figured w T ere obtained 
has existed in the Arboretum of the Royal Gardens for 
many years, and all traces of its history are lost. It is 
evidently a very old plant, in a gnarled condition, bearing 
conspicuous stout branching spurs on the trunk, owing no 
doubt to the poverty of the soil ; and it may be assumed 
to have been raised from seeds sent by myself from Sikkim 
in 1849, now forty-five years ago, before which time no 

August 1st, 1895. 



plants or seeds had been sent from that country. The 
species had, however, been discovered in Bhotan by Griffith 
some years earlier, and fruiting specimens collected by him 
are in the Kew Herbarium. I found it frequently at 
elevations of 7-10,000 feet in the interior of Sikkim, as a 
small stoutly branching tree, twenty to thirty feet high, 
flowering in June and July, and producing fruit of which 
I made an agreeable stew. The Kew tree flowers in May, 
and fruits in September. 

Descr. — A small gnarled tree, bark brown, young shoots 
leaves beneath (and above in a young state) and calyx 
more or less woolly. Leaves three to five inches long, 
ovate, acuminate, serrulate ; petiole much shorter than the 
blade ; stipules subulate. Flowers corymbose, an inch in 
diameter; buds rose-colrd. ; pedicels one and a half to two 
inches long, very slender. Calyx-tube ellipsoid; lobes 
lanceolate, recurved, deciduous. Petals orbicular, white, 
claw very short, tomentose. Stamens very many. Styles 
slender, connate below, glabrous. Fruit two-thirds of an 
inch diameter, broadly subglobosely pyriform, dark-red, 
speckled with white.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and stamens ; 2, petal : — Both enlarged. 



7131 




L.Reevs & C° London. 



Tab. 7431. 
PLEUROTHALLIS Soapha. 

Native country unknown. 

Nat. Ord. Oechide.e. — Tribe Epidendee^. 
Genus Pleueotiialiis, Br. ; (Benth. & Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 



Pleubotiiallis (Acuminata;) Scapha ; glaberrima, caulibus erectis gracilibns 
teretibus internodiis inferioribus maculatis, 1-foliatis, vaginis appressis, 
folio oblongo-lanceolato crasse coriaceo suberecto basi angnstato, dorso 
acute carinato supra saturate viridi subtus pallidiore, racemo folio multo 
longiore pendulo laxirloro, rachi gracillima, bracteis tubulosis albis, 
oblique truncatis, Horibus 2^-3 poll, longis gracile pedicellatis, sepalis 
lanceolatis in caudas filiformes lamina multo longiores recurvas angus- 
tatis, lateralibus connatis albis rubro striatis, dorsali rubro-purpureo, 
petalis sepalis aaquilongis e basi angusta caudato-acuminatis pallidis 
patenti-recurvis, labelli lobis lateralibu3 falciformibus decurvis, interme- 
dio duplo longiore lineari carnoso integerrim glaberrim, columna 
acuta medio dorso incrassata, anthera mitriforme. 

P. Scapha, Bcichh.f. in Gard. Ghron. (1874) vol. ii. p. 162. Xen. Orchid, vol. iii. 
p. 86, 247, t 1. Hemsl. in Gard, Chron. (1881) vol.i. p. 784, f. 139 vol ii 
p. 42. 



Pleurothallis Scapha has been long known in cultivation, 
having been introduced by Mr. .). Day before the year 
1874, when it was described by Reichenbach. It belongs 
to Lindley's section Acuminate, characterized by the leaves 
narrowed at the base, the long racemes and the acuminate 
sepals, and to the subdivision of this with long-pedicelled 
flowers. Its nearest ally is P. insignis, Rolfe (Tab. 
6936) which has much fewer and larger flowers, and a lip 
bearded at the tip. The native country of both these 
species is unknown, but P. insignis has been supposed to 
have been sent from Caraccas. 

The specimen figured was communicated to the Royal 
Gardens by Mr. Moore, A.L.S., Keeper of the Glasnevin 
Gardens, Dublin. It flowered in a cool house in January 
of the present year. 

Descr. — Stem two to five inches high, erect, rigid, terete, 
as thick as a crow-quill ; internodes one to one and a halt 
inch long, lower pale brown spotted with dark red, upper 

August 1st, lH[)i)_ 



(leaf-bearing) one to two inches long, green. Leaf four to 
six inches long, oblong-lanceolate, tip recurved obtuse, 
narrowed to the base, thickly coriaceous, keeled dorsally, 
dark green above, paler beneath, nerves very obscure. 
Raceme six to ten -fid., with the peduncle nearly a foot 
long, very slender, decurved and pendulous ; sheaths 
closely appressed, streaked with brown. Flowers remote, 
long-pedicelled ; bracts green, tubular with obliquely trun- 
cate rather dilated mouths ; pedicels three-fourths to an 
inch long, filform. Ovary one-fourth to half an inch long, 
green, subterete. Dorsal sepal two and a half inches long, 
ovate-lanceolate, narrowed into a filiform tail four or five 
times as long as the convex blade, white with three red- 
purple streaks ; lateral sepals connate into a red-purple 
lanceolate blade which is narrowed into a slender tail, 
like that of the dorsal. Petals with a yellowish blade, 
much smaller than the sepals, but narrowed into as long 
spreading recurved tails. Lip yellow; side lobes sickle- 
shaped, decurved, half as long as the strict linear fleshy 
subacute mid-lobe. Cvlumv very short, stout, acute. 
Anther mitriform. — J. J). H. 



Fig. 1 Lip ; 2, side and 3 front view of column ; 4 anther ; 5, pollinia— All 
enlarged. 



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7432 







i ! ."onlmp 



■ 



Tab. 7432. 
HELIANTHUS debilis. 

Native of the Southern United States. 



Nat. Orel. Composite. — Tribe Helianthoide.e. 
Genus Helianthus, Linn.; (BentA. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 376.) 



Helianthus debilis; annnus, hispidulus, eaulee basi ramoso r ramis gracilibus, 
foliis longe petiolatis ovatis deltoideisve subacutis grosse insequaliter 
crenato-dentatis denticulatisque e basi cuneato 3-nerviis, floribus amplis 
graeile peduuculatis, involucri bracteis patentibus inasqualibus berbaceis 
lanceolatis acuminatis scabridis, receptaculi planiusculi bracteolis truu- 
catis v. insequaliter 2-3-fidis-dentatisve, corollis radii sub 3-seriatis 
elliptico-oblongis 3-5-nervis aureiy, disci corollis cyiindraceis mbro-brun- 
neis, achseniis obovato-oblongis bispidulis, pappi setis brevibus insequali- 
bus coriaceis. 

H. debilis, Nutt. in Trans. Am. Phil. Soc. N.S. vol. viii. (1841) p. 367. Torr. 

& Gray ,Fl. N. Am. vol. ii. p. 320. Chapm. PI. S. JJn. St. p. 229. A. Gray, 

Synapt. PL N. Am., Gamopet. part i. p. 273. 
H. precox, Engelm. & Gray in Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist. vol. v. (1817) 221, and 

PI. Lindh. vol. i. p. 13. 

H. debilis, var. cucumerifolius, A. Gray I. c. Gard. Chron. (1895) vol. i. p. 167, 
fig. 24. 

H. cucumerifolius, Torr. & Gi: Fl. N. Am. vol. ii. 319. 



Helianthus debilis belongs to a small section of the 
genus in which the root is annual, chiefly natives of the 
Southern States of ~N. America, and which includes six 
species, the common H. animus, Linn., being one of them. 
A. Gray says of the whole group that the species are 
" difficult of determination, and apparently confluent." 
He includes under it II. prsecox, as a variety with a more 
hispid stem, but Chapman retains this, describing it as 
erect, B. debilis being more or less decumbent, and 
having 15-20 ray-flowers, whereas he attributes only 
10-14 to H. debilis. Chapman further describes the 
flowers of debilis as small, but Gray says of them that 
they are half an inch or more in diameter. 

II. cucumerifolius, Torr & Gray, is described by Gray 
as another form of debilis, distinguished by its greater 

Seftemisek 1st, 1895. 



size, usually purple-mottled stem, aud more numerous 
broader rays, 15-20 in number, an inch and more long, 
and its irregularly serrate leaves with salient teeth. A 
careful comparison of a suite of authentically named speci- 
mens of debilis, prascox, and cucumerifolius shows that there 
are no good grounds for distinguishing them as varieties, 
they differ considerably, but only in the size of the leaves 
and flowers, those of the specimen here figured are much 
larger than in any of the native ones, and the nearest 
approach to it is labelled H. debilis by Gray. In the 
Gardener's Chronicle H. debilis var. cucumerifolius is de- 
scribed as having stems blotched with purple (as described 
by Gray), and as suited to a perennial border ; but the stems 
of the Kew plant are speckled with white, and the plant 
is an annual. 

II. debilis was raised at Kew from seeds purchased from 
a nurseryman. It is a native of the sandy sea shores of 
Florida, Louisiana, and E. Texas. At Kew the plants 
flowered in an open border in September, 1894 

Descr. — Annual; whole plant hispidulous. Stem branch- 
ing from below ; branches two feet long, slender, green, 
3peckled with white. Leaves, lower opposite, upper alter- 
nate, three to four inches long, ovate or deltoid, subacute, 
more or less irregularly crenate or toothed, or acutely 
sublobulate and denticulate, thin , rough on both surfaces, 
dark green, 3-nerved from the cuneate or truncate base; 
petiole one to three inches long, slender. Flower-heads 
two to three inches in diameter, on slender peduncles. 
Involucre of many spreading unequal herbaceous, lanceolate 
acuminate scabrid bracts. Receptacle nearly flat, with 
narrow unequally toothed or rarely entire chaffy bracteoles. 
Ray-flowers twelve to twenty, bright golden yellow ; limb 
oblong, obtuse, three to five-nerved. Disk-flowers maroon 
brown ; corolla cylindric ; lobes obtuse, suberect, Achene 
obovate-oblong, pubescent; pappus bristles about two, 
very unequal, short, rigid.—/. D. H. 



i ? g 'A °? a ? 7 and base of corolla of ray-fl. ; 2, bracteole of receptacle; 
9, ft, ot the disk ; 4, stamens ; 5, style-arms t— All enlarged. 



Tab. 7433. 
rumex hymenoseralus. 

Native of New Mexico and Arizona. 

Nat. Ord. Polygona.ce;e. — Tribe Rumice^. 
Genus Kumex, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 200.) 



Kumex hymenosepalus ; glaberrima radice tuberoaa, caulibus erectia elatia 
robustis, fohia oblongis ovato- v. lanceolato-oblougia acuminatis in 
petiolum crassum angustatia uudulatis pallide viribidus, reticulatim 
veuoaia, coate crassa, nervia primariia utrinque 6-10, atipulis magnis 
hyalinia caducia, paniculia axillaribua et terniinalibus deniifloris pedi- 
cellis floribua bermaphrodis brevioribua baai versus articulatis, sepalis 
interioribua quam exterioribus multo majoribus amplia orbicularibua veno- 
sis, fructiferis basi cordatia intua e callosia integerritnis, akeniis £ poll, 
longia. 

~R. bymeBosepalua, Torrey Bot. Mexlc. Bound, p. 177. S. Wats. Bot. Calif. 
vol. ii. p. 8 and 479. Am. Joum. P/iarm. 1876, p. 49; Aug. 1889, 
and April, 1893. Kew Bulletin, 1890, p. 63, and 1891 p. 167, 
Joum. & Trans. Pharmac. Soc. 1889, p. 187, and July, 1893, p. 42. 
Nugent in Foreign Off. Report, 1894, n. 1879. 

S. Saxei, Kellogg in Pacif. Rural Press, June, 1879. 



Considerable interest attaches to the plant here figured, 
on account of its tanning properties, which have led to its 
cultivation in the United States' experimental station 
attached to the Agricultural College at Las Cruces, " where 
the evolution of the plant from the wild to the cultivated 
state is being closely watched and recorded." A very 
full account of its history, chemical, and other properties, 
together with the steps being taken in America for its pro- 
fitable culture, will be found in the Kew Bulletin cited above. 
Its native name is Canaigre (or Ganagra), and the tan- 
ning material is contained in the roots in large quantities. 
These roots are described as globular or fusiform, two to 
six inches long, and three inches in diameter, of a dark 
reddish colour, and growing in clusters like sweet potatoes. 
Its properties are said to have been known to the Mexicans 
for more than two centuries. 

E. hymenosepalus is a native of the driest regions of 
Northern Mexico and the South Western States of N. 

Sl.rTEMRF.R 1*T. 1896, 



America, from South California to Arizona, New Mexico, 
and from Western Texas and South Utah. It was 
first known botanically from being collected during 
the United States' Survey of the Mexican Boundary, by 
Dr. Parry, Botanist to that expedition, the results of which 
were published by Dr. Torrey. The stem and leaves have 
a pleasant acidity, and are, according to Watson, used in 
California and Utah, under the name of Wild Pie plant. 

The specimen figured was raised from seeds sent to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1890 by Dr. F. H. Goodwin, of 
Tucson, Arizona, which flowered in the herbaceous ground 
in June, 1894. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Boot of fusiform tubers. Stem 
twelve to twenty-four inches high, stout, terete, leafy, and 
as well as the whole plant perfectly glabrous, pale green, 
suffused with brown. Leaves six to ten inches long by 
two to three broad, oblong- or ovate-lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, narrowed into a stout petiole, pale grey-green on 
both surfaces, rather mottled beneath, reticulately nerved; 
midrib stout ; nerves six to ten pairs. Panicles axillary 
and terminal, subsessile, three to five inches long. Flowers 
nearly half an inch in diameter, crowded, bisexual, green ; 
pedicels a sixth to a third of an inch long, jointed at the 
base, red brown. Outer sepals minute, inner very large, 
orbicular, cordate at the base ; fruiting two-thirds of an 
inch in diameter, pale brown, quite entire, disk without 
a callus. Anthers linear. Ovary very broadly ovoid. 
Achene about one-sixth of an inch long.— J. D. H. 



.JEff" 1 i^ lower 5 2 , and 3, stamens; 4, ovary -.-all enlarged; 5, fruiting 
panicle of the natural size. 



743? 




Tab. 7434. 

CLE YE R A FoRTUNEi. 

Native of Japan ? 

Nat. Ord. Ternstr<emiace;e. — Tribe Terxstrcemie.e. 
Genus Cletera., DO. ; (Benth. & Hook. /. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 183.) 



CiETERA Forttinei ; foliia 4-6-pollicaribus elliptico-v. lineari-oblongis obtusius- 
culis utrinque sensim angustatis lucidis, costa nervisque prominulis, 
pedicellis confertis ^-pollicaribus, floribus § poll, latis, petalis primalinis 
sepalis obtusis ciliolatis triplo longioribus, staminibus 15-20 filamentis 
inasquilongis, antheris oblongis pilosis. 

C. Fortunei, Hook.f. in Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. i. p. 10. 

C. japonica, foliis variegatis, Hort. 

Eurya? Sp. Gard. Chron. 1861, p. 735. 

E. latifolia variegata, Versrhaff. in Expos. Gand 1882, ex Bullet. Fed. Soc. 
Hort. de Belgique (1886), p. 394. 



The first account of this handsome shrub is contained 
ill the Hardener's Chronicle for 1861, where it is alluded 
to as a new Japanese plant, introduced by Fortune, and 
exhibited by Mr. Standish at a meeting of the Royal 
Horticultural Society, as a broad-leaved Eurya. It has been 
in cultivation ever since, but never having been observed 
in a flowering state till comparatively recently, its genus has 
remained doubtful. That it is a Cleyera is evident ; but 
the Asiatic species of that genus are so very closely allied, 
that the establishing a new one, on what is no doubt a 
garden variety, and probably due to Japanese or Chinese 
skill, is a hazardous proceeding. I say Japanese or 
Chinese, for Fortune sent variegated-leaved shrubs from 
both countries, and the absence of any specimen of G. 
Fortunei in the rich Herbarium of Japanese plants at Kew 
is suspicious. 

There are three described C ley eras ; two Indian (per- 
haps varieties of one) C. ochnacea, DC, and G. grandijtofa, 
Hook. f. & Thorns.; the third is G. japonica,* Sieber & 
Zucc, a native of Japan, China, and Formosa, which has by 
some botanists been regarded as a form of C. orlinnrca. The 

* Which must not be confounded with OUjftra japonic*, Thunb., a species 
of T tr iu t ram ia. 

Svman 1st. 1895. 



chief difference between the Japanese and the Indian 
species is the well-marked venation of the leaves of the 
latter ; the nerves of G. japonica being, in the dried leaf, 
very obscure. Both vary in the size of the flowers and 
leaves, and in the form of the latter. The large flowered 
form would appear, from the specimen in the Kew Her- 
barium from all three localities, to be the more common 
of the two. 

C. Fortunei agrees with G. ochnacea and grandiflora in 
the nervation of the leaves, and with the last in the size 
of the flowers ; but differs from both in the longer, 
narrower leaves, and their thinner texture — characters 
that may be due to cultivation ; and if the Himalayan 
species were to prove to be also Chinese (as are so many 
Himalayan shrubs), it would strengthen the suggestion I 
have thrown out, that G. Fortunei is of Chinese, and not 
Japanese origin. 

The above notes appeared in the Gardener's Chronicle 
in January last, and I have nothing to add to them. The 
species must still be regarded as an unstable one, waiting 
further evidence. The specimen here figured was kindly 
forwarded by T. Acton, Esq., J.P., of Kilmacurragh, 
Rathdrum, County Wicklow, in September, 1894. 

Descr. — A glabrous, erect, much-branched shrub. 
Branches stout, bark brown. Leaves four to six inches 
long, elliptic- or linear-lanceolate, subobtuse, narrowed 
at both ends, bright green, variegated with golden-yellow 
and scarlet towards the margins ; midrib and nerves 
slender. Flowers one half to two-thirds of an inch in 
diameter, solitary or fascicled in the axils of the leaves, 
or on nodes of the branches ; pedicels half an inch long, 
stout, green and red. Calyx small, 5-lobed ; lobes shortly 
oblong, ciliolate, red brown. Petals a fourth to a third 
of an inch long, oblong, obtuse, pale yellow, margins in- 
curved. Stamens fifteen to twenty, of unequal length; 
anthers adnate to the filaments, oblong, hairy ; connective 
shortly produced. Ovary shortly, stoutly stipitate, broadly 
OVOid, 2-celled ; style erect, tip 2-fid ; ovules many in each 
cell. — J. l) , iJ. 



4. ™J' - Flow f?" * ith the , petals removed ; 2, petal and stamens ; 3, anther ; 
4 ovary ; ,■>, vertical, and 6, transverse section of do. i—AU enlarged. 



m& 







Tab. 7435. 
ATRAPHAXIS Muschketowi. 

■ Native of Central Asia. 

Nat. Ord. Polygonace^e. — Tribe Eupolygoneje. 
Genus Atraphaxis, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 96.) 



Atraphaxis (Tragopyrum) Muschketoici ; frutex glab»rrimus, rami9 flexuosis, 
foliis l-l|-polliearibus oblongis obtusis crenulatis basi cuneatis v. rotun- 
datis pailide viridibus, nervis gracilibus arcnatis, stipnlis ad medium 
connatis elongato-subulatis, racemis terminalibus breviter peduDculatis 
oblongis, floribus | poll. diam. albis ovario antherisque rubellis, pedi- 
cellis gracilibus penanthio longioribus basin versus articulatis, periauthii 
segmentis exterioribuB 2 ovatis oblusis deflexis quam 3 exterioribua 
erectis dimidio brevioribus, stamiuibus 8-9, stylis brevibus, achaanio 
triquetro. 

A. Mnscbketowi, Krassn. Descr. PI Nov. v. Minus cogn. (1886), 20; Fl. Titian 
Schan. p. 340. 

Tragopyrum lanceolatum, var. latifolium, Regel in Gartenjl. t. 1344 (1894), 
fig. 1-3. 



I have retained for this plant the name under which it 
was published by Krassnov, though expecting that when 
the species of Atraphaxis shall have been critically studied, 
it will prove to be a form of a previously published one. 
It has been referred by Regel to A. lanceolata, Meissn. 
(in DC. Prodr. xiv. pt. i. p. 78) ; (Tragopyrum lanceola- 
tum, Bieb.), which includes the Siberian and Dahurian 
Polygonum fruticosum, Linn. (Fl. Jjpsal. p. 95 ; Sp. PL 
p. 359). Of this (the Linnaean) plant I have examined 
the specimen in the Linnaean Herbarium. It is a very 
small and narrow-leaved species, with small flowers, quite 
unlike Trag. lanceolatum, Bieb., and very different from 
A. MusrJiketoiri. The figure of P. fruticosum, given in the 
Botanical Register (t. ^54), which was taken from a 
specimen that flowered in Fulham Xurseries in 1818 
resembles the Linnaean specimen in foliage, but differs 
in the flowers being rather larger, and in a leafy 
raceme. Atraphaxis micrantha, Jaub. & Sp. (PI. I 'I. 
Or. vol. ii. p. 15), doubtfully referred to A. lanceolata 
by Meissner, is probably P. fruticosum of Lin mens 
Herb. It must further be borne in mind that Linnasus has 
cited under P. fruticosum a Levant plant of Tournefort 
September 1st, 189 



(A. Tournefortii, Jaub. & Sp.), so that his species is, like 
Meissner's, a composite one. Another allied plant is 
A. buxifolia, Jaub. & Sp. (Polygonum crispulum, Tab. 
1065) which has the racemes of A. MuschJcetowi, but the 
pedicels are jointed about the middle, and the perianth 
segments crisped. 

As with so many Central Asiatic shrubs, the leaves of 
the species of Atraphaxis vary extremely, and together 
with the habit of the plant, depend on the aridity or 
moisture of the locality they grow in. A. MuschJcetowi is 
a native of the foot of the Alatau Mts. a member of the 
great Thian Schan range of Central Asia, where it was 
found by Krassnov near the Amatinka river in lat. 43° 0' 
N. and long. 77° 47' E. The specimen figured is from a 
plant sent from the Imperial gardens of St. Petersburg to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowered in May and 
June in the Arboretum. 

Descr.—A dwarf, leafy, spreading, deciduous shrub, three 
feet in diameter ; bark of branches brown. Leaves one to 
one and a half inches long, very shortly petioled, oblong, 
acute, crenulate, pale green, nerves arching ; stipules half 
an inch long, erect, subulate, connate to about the middle. 
Racemes terminal, chiefly in whorls, lateral branches one to 
one and a half inch long, very shortly peduncled, oblong. 
i* lowers about a third of an inch broad, white, with red 
anthers and ovary ; peduncle very slender, longer than the 
perianth, jointed above the base. Perianth 5-partite ; two 
outer perianth-segments oblong, reflexed, about half as 
long as the orbicular, erect, inner. Stamens 8. Ovary 
trigonous ; style very short.—/. I) H 



S "fnth^ St ^ Ule3; 2 ' fls " with Pedicel; 3, perianth, stamen and ovary; 4 and 
i>, anthers ; b, ovary -.—All enlarged. 



7434 




Ro„,„ < 



Tab. 7436. 
RICHARDTA Rehmanni. 

Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. AeoidejE. — Tribe Philodendre*. 
Genus Richardia, Kunth; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 982.) 



Richardia Rehmanni ; foliis anguste elliptico-lanceolatis acuminatis in 
petiolum angustatis plagia elongatis pallidis notatis, nervis omnibus 
tenuissimis, spathae tubo cylindraceo extus pallide vivescente intus 
toto albo, limbo Ianceolato albo plus minusve roseo tincto acuminato 
supra medium revoluto, oris margine recurvo, spadice stipitato. 

It. Rebmanni, N.E. Br. in Hort. Bot. Cantab. Krelagein Gard. Ghron. 1893, 
vol. ii. p. 564, fig. 94 (splialm. Lehmanni), et in Gartenjl. 1894, p. 12, f. 7. 
W. Wats, in Gard. Ghron. 1894, vol. ii. p. 364. 

Zantedeschia Rebmanni, Engl. Bot. Jahrh. vol. iv. (1883), p. 63. 

R. Rebmanniana, nov. in textu, ante sub tab. 7397 (sphalm.). 

De Waals Richardia, Masters in Gard Ghron. 1893, I. c. 



Under Tab. 7397 of this work I have alluded to the 
plant here figured under the name of Richardia Rehman- 
niana, for which I failed at the time to find any authority. 
Its now having flowered at Kew gives me the opportunity 
of clearing up its history, which is somewhat involved. 
In 1888 Mr. Lynch sent a specimen of it from the Botanical 
Gardens of Cambridge to the Kew Herbarium, where it 
was examined and recognized by Mr. Brown to be the 
Zantedeschia Rehmanni of Engler, and a true Richardia. 
This information was communicated to Mr. Lynch by Mr. 
Brown, who may hence be regarded as the originator of 
the name the plant now bears. 

R. Rehmanni was discovered on grassy, stony hills 
near Standerton, Natal, by Mr. Rehmann, and, as stated 
above, was described as a Zantedeschia, Its introducer 
into England was Mr. R. W. Adlam, who sent tubers to 
Mr. Lynch in July, 1888, as a rose-fld. Richardia. These 
tubers, on first flowering at the Cambridge Botanical 
Gardens, had white spathes, without any tinge of rose, 
and on informing Mr. Adlam of this, that gentleman 
answered from Natal :—" The Richardia with pink 
flowers has behaved just the *;\mo here, i.e. flowering 

Septemkek 1st. lH9. r >. 



nearly white, with hardly a trace of pink. Yet when I 
collected it the spathes were nearly of the colour of a 
Homere rose. It grew in crevices of granite rock, not 
in swamps.'' 

For tubers of B. Rehmanni the Royal Gardens are 
indebted to Mr. Medley Wood, Curator of the Durban 
Gardens. These were received in 1893, and the plants 
flowered in the Cape House in October, 1894. The species 
differs from any hitherto described in foliage, colour, and 
the stipitate spadix. 

Descr. — Leaves ten to twelve inches long, narrowly 
elliptic, lanceolate, acuminate, narrowed into and much 
longer than the stout petiole, undulate and recurved, 
bright green on both surfaces, with scattered linear 
blotches of greenish white, parallel to the very numerous 
close-set slender nerves ; midrib stout, pale green. 
Peduncles shorter than the leaves, green. Spathe about 
five inches long, erect ; tube two inches long by about one 
in diameter, cylindric, pale green, white to the base 
within ; limb lanceolate, undulate, acuminate, white, suf- 
fused with pink on the margins, upper third recurved, 
margins of mouth recurved. Spadix two inches long, its 
stipes rather more than half an inch, and as long as the 
female portion. Chary glabrous, stigma sessile — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1 Base of apathe and spadix ; 2, anther: 3, ovary ; 4, vertical section 
of do. ; 5, ovnlo .—All enlarged. 



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II. FIT 

and other British Floi 



7737. 




Tab. 7437. 
ANTHURIITM Gustavi. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. Aroide;e. — Tribe Orontie^:. 
Genus Antiiurium, Schott. ; (Benth. So Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 998.) 



Anthttrium (Cardiophyllum) Gustavi; acaule, foliis longe petiolatis cordato- 
ovatis obtusis, margine undulatis, lobis rotunda tis, sinu oblongo, nervis 
primariis utrinque 10-15 iDferioribus retrorsis, petiolo lamina longiore 
teretiusculo alte costato, geniculo mediocri, spatha cylindracea lente 
curva pedali breviter crasse pedunculata basin versus sensim tumescente 
apice attennata obtusa crasse coriacea luride purpurea laavissima margini- 
bua incurvis, spadice spatha paulo longiore sessili cylindracea obtusa 
purpurea, sepalis linearibus truncatis subtrigonis intus profunde canali- 
culars, filamentis linearibus compressis, antheris late oblongis, ovario in 
stylum crassum elongatum attenuato. 

A. Gustavi, Begel in Gartenfl, v. 1878 (1878), p. 324, nomen, et (1882), p. 67, 
t. 1076. Engler, Monogr. Arac. in DG. Monogr. Phanerogam, vol. ii. 
p. 640, nomen. 



Anthurium Gustavi was discovered by G.Wallis nearBuona- 
ventura, a seaport in the province of Cauca, in New Grenada, 
and was introduced by him into the Imperial Botanical 
Gardens of St. Petersburg in 1878. There it flowered, 
and was figured by Regel in the Gartenfloram 1882, but the 
spathe, according to the description given, was only a little 
over five inches (13 cm.) long; and the petiole is described 
as subterate. The leaves, however, had attained the same 
dimensions as those of the Kew specimen. The plant here 
figured was obtained from Messrs. F. Sander & Co., of St. 
Albans. It is growing in a large pan over the tank in the 
Victoria House of the Royal Gardens, where the leaves 
attain a diameter of three feet, and the petioles a length 
of three and a half feet. The species had previously been 
sent (in 1887) to the Royal Gardens from Herrenhausen, 
Hanover, by Dr. Wendland, but had not flowered. 

Descr. — Stern very short, stout, tuberous ; basal sheaths 
few, small, red-brown, not enveloping the base of the petioles 
and peduncle. Leaves one and a half to nearly four feet 
long, rather longer than their petioles, broadly ovate-cor- 
date, obtuse, thinly coriaceous, bright green above, paler 
October 1st, 1895. 



beneath ; basal-lobes rounded ; sinus oblong ; nerves ten t 
fifteen pairs, pale green or reddish, of which four to s, 
pairs are recurved, and occupy the lobes, all uniting in a 
faint intramarginal nerve ; petiole subterete, with about 
twelve sharply keeled parallel ridges, green, purple at the 
base ; knee at the apex about an inch long, green. Spat he 
cylindric, a foot long, by one and a half inch diameter at 
the rather tumid rounded base, gently curved, elongate 
linear-lanceolate, narrowed at the rather thickened obtuse 
tip, margins incurved ; peduncle hardly an inch long, very 
stout, and like the spathe, dark violet-purple. Spadix 
rather longer than the spathe, an inch in diameter, cylindric, 
gradually narrowed from the sessile base to the rounded 
tip, red-purple. Sepals linear, truncate, deeply grooved in 
front. Filaments linear, flat ; anthers shortly oblong. 
Ovary narrowed into a very stout style, stigma simple. — 



Pig. 1, Section of petiole; 2, flowers; 3, flower with one sepal removed; 
4, a sepal ; 5 and 6, stamens ; 7, section of ovary : — All enlarged. 



74$ 




f-ffHtdUifl. 



■Reeve 4. C '.'.London. 



Tab. 7438. 
MORMODES Rolfeanum. 

Native of Peru. 

Nat. Ord. Obciiide,e. — Tribe Vande^:. 
Genua Mormodes, Lindl. ; (Benth. £f Hook.f. Gen. Flant. vol. iii. p. 552.) 



Mormodes Rolfeanum; pseudobulbis fusiformibus, foliis lanceolatis acurmnatig 
nerviia, pedunculo robusto suberecto paucifloro, bracteis viridibus, floribus 
erectie, sepalis petalisque aureia sanguineo striatis et conspersis, sepalis 
ovatis obtuse acnminatis detiexia, petalia orbiculari-obovatia acutis erectis 
inciirvia lateralibua reflexis, labello sepalis sequilongo erecto forte incurvo 
e basi angusto oblongo apice cnapidato v. rotandato, intaa rubro-castaneo, 
columna alba roaeo pallide irrorata. 

M. Rolfeanum, Linden in Lindenia, vol. vii. p. 5, t. 289. Masters in Gar d, 
Chron. 1892, vol. i. p. 203, fig. 30. 



The genus Mormodes is rapidly increasing in number of 
species. At the date of the publication of the Orehidem in 
the M Genera Plantarum " by Mr. Bentham (1883) fourteen 
species were known. Twenty-four are enumerated in 
Part III. of the "Kew Index," published in 1894, and 
Mr. Rolfe informs me that not a few have since been dis- 
covered. It affords me great pleasure to be able to figure 
so fine a plant, dedicated, as it is, to a late colleague at 
Kew, who has ever most generously given me the aid of 
his unequalled knowledge of the difficult Order to which 
Mormodes belongs, whether in the preparation of the matter 
for the " Botanical Magazine " or of the " Flora of British 
India." 

M. Rolfeanum is not very closely allied to any other. 
Of the eight already figured in this Magazine, it comes 
nearest in some characters to M. Greenii (Tab. 5802), 
especially in the form of the sepals, petals and lip, but 
that is a much larger plant, with a long pendulous many- 
fld. raceme, the sides of the lip are incurved, and its tip 
is bifid and erosely ciliate. The colouration, too, of the 
whole flower is entirely different. 

The plant was obtained from Mr. Linden's establishment, 

Ociobeb 1st, 1895. 



" L' Horticulture International " of Brussels, in 1893, and 
flowered in the Tropical Orchid House of the Koyal 
Gardens in January, 1895. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs three to four inches long, fusiform, 
terete, straight, pale green. Leaves eight to ten inches long, 
by one and a half to two inches broad, lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, light green above ; paler speckled with dark green, 
and strongly nerved beneath ; petiole stout, three to five 
inches long, green and speckled. Scape six inches high, 
stout, erect, pale green, with two or three short obtuse, 
green, appressed sheaths. Raceme terminal, few-fld. ; 
bracts about a third of an inch long, ovate-oblong, ap- 
pressed, green. Floivers erect, four inches long from the tips 
of the deflexed sepals to that of the erect lip ; sepals and 
petals and back of the lip golden-yellow, streaked and 
speckled with blood-red. Sepals broadly ovate, obtusely 
acuminate, deflexed. Petals erect, almost orbicular, obtuse 
or apiculate, rather broader than the sepals. Lip as long 
as the sepals, erect and strongly arched inward, obovate- 
oblong (when spread out) from a subunguiculate base, dark 
red-chestnut within, tip rounded or apiculate, sides revo- 
lute. Column white, clouded with red. — J. D. B. 



Fig. 1, Column ; 2, anther^cap ; 3, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



fc 



- & 



7439 




■ ACUoMcn 



Tab. 7439. 
POLYGALA Galpini. 

Native of the Swaziland. 

Nat. Ord. Polygaleje. 
Genus Polygala, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 136.) 



Polygala Galpini; fruticulua gracillimuB, ramulis flexuosis petiolis foliia 
stibtus racemique rachi hiBpidulis, foliis petiolatis ovatis acuminatia 
ciliolatis basi rotundatia v. subcordatis, racemis axillaribus erectis mnlti- 
florie, floribus majusculis pallide roseo-lilacinis, sepalis deciduis, 3 exterio- 
ribus late ovatia obtuaia cymbiformibua, dorsali lateralibu8 dnplo fere 
longiore, alia obovatis capsula latioribua, corollse lobia lateralibus oblongia 
obtuais, carinse lobis truncatis plicatia, capsiula (immatura) fere orbiculari 
emarginata anguste alata, atylo apice incurvo anguste buccasformi trun- 
cato, atigmate punctiforme. 

P. Galpini, Hooh.f. 



The genus Polygala is very numerous in South Africa, 
as indeed it is in many other countries ; and the species 
have proved to be difficult of limitation, and more so of 
classification. In respect of the first of these obstacles, 
P. Galpini is happily an exception, for there is none to 
which it comes near in habit and foliage ; and as to the 
second it takes its place in the group designated " Hispi- 
dse " by Harvey in the " Flora Capensis," characterized as 
consisting of small, half-herbaceous, or suffruticose plant, 
with ovate or lanceolate (or sublinear) pubescent leaves, 
terminal or lateral erect racemes, and wings of calyx 
broader than the capsule. 

P. Galjnni was discovered by the collector, W. T. Gerrard, 
in Xatal or Zululand nearly half a century ago. Mr. Galpin 
describes it as a shrub three to five ft. high, growing 
amongst shrubs or banks of streamlets and margins of 
woods at Haveloek Concession, Swaziland, and Devil's 
Bridge, in cool places at elevation of 4-5000 ft. In cul- 
tivation its habit is more erect than in the wild state, and 
it forms a very graceful greenhouse ornament. The plant 
figured was raised from seeds sent in 1889 by Mr. Galpin, 

Octobeb 1st, 1895. 



of Barberton in the Transvaal, and flowered in the Tem- 
perate House of the Koyal Gardens, Kew, in September, 
1894, when about a foot high. 

Descr. — A very slender straggling shrub, three to five 
ft. high, with flexuous branches, branehlets, petioles, 
nerves of leaf beneath and inflorescence sparsely hispidulous. 
Leaves two to three inches long, shortly petioled, ovate, 
acuminate, bright green above, paler beneath, margins cilio- 
late ; nerves four or five pairs, sunk above, reddish beneath ; 
petiole one-third to half an inch long, reddish. Racemes 
axillary, erect, three to four inches long, rachis hispidulous ; 
pedicels one-sixth to one-fourth of an inch long, of lower 
flowers decurved ; bracts as long as the pedicels or longer, 
ovate-lanceolate, green, caducous. Flowers nearly an inch 
across the expanded wings, pale rose-lilac. Sepals five, 
three outer about half the length of the wings, broadly 
ovate, cymbiform, obtuse, ciliolate, the dorsal much the 
largest ; wings obovate. Corolla shorter than the wings ; 
two lateral lobes oblong, obtnse, rather shorter than the 
keel, which is tsvo-lobed, the lobes truncate and plicate. 
Upper third of style upcurved, trumpet-shaped, tip truncate, 
with a punctiform stigma in front. Young capsule nearly 
orbicular, very narrowly winged. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, corolla with one petal removed ; 3, top of filament and 
anther ; 4, ovary and disk :— All enlarged. 



1440. 




"Bmart 



A. Santa? 



Tab. 7440. 
TULIPA vroLACEA. 

Native of Persia. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^e. — Tribe Tulipe.e. 
Genns Tulipa, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 818.) 



Tulipa violacea; bulbo ovoideo, tunicis exterioribus chartaceis brnnneis apice 
tautum pilosis, caule glabro uuifloro, foliis 3-5 crebris ascend entibus glabris 
inferioribus lanceolatis superioribus linearibus, pedunculo glabro gracili 
elongato, periantbio campanulato basi cuneato ssepissime splendide 
rubro raro albo-rubello, segmentis conformibus oblongis subacutis basi 
macula nigra albo-marginata prseditis, staminibus nigris, filamentis supra 
basin pilosis, ovario triquetro-cylindrico stigmatibus parvis. 

T. violacea, Boiss. et Buhse Atifzahl Transcauc. p. 211. Baker in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. vol. xiv. p. 290. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. v. p. 199. 



This beautiful tulip is one of the few species that have 
filaments hairy near the base, and bright red flowers. It 
is allied to T. Haageri (Bot. Mag. tab. 6242), and T. pul- 
chella (Bot. Mag. tab. 6304). It was first described from 
specimens gathered by Buhse in 1848 in Northern Persia at 
an elevation of 6000 to 8000 feet. Boissier, writing in 
1881, says that he has seen it cultivated from the neigh- 
bourhood of Teheran. In 1882 it was found by Pichler 
on Mount Elwend, in the neighbourhood of the snow ; and 
in 1890 it was collected by Dr. Strauss in the district 
of Sultanabad in the Raswand Mountains, whence it was 
sent to Leichtlin. Our drawing was made from plants 
grown from bulbs which the latter gentleman presented 
to the Royal Gardens, Kew, and which flowered at 
the end of March, 1895. The flower in these was bright 
mauve-red, not violet, so that the name is misleading, but 
our dried specimens show that it varies to red, with a 
slight flush of red outside. 

Descr. — Bulb ovoid, an inch in diameter ; outer tunics 
dark brown, subcoriaceous, hairy only at the tip. Stems 
one-flowered, under a foot long in the wild plant. Leaves 
three to five, crowded, ascending, glabrous, slightly 
glaucous, the lowest lanceolate, an inch broad, the others 
October 1st, 1895. 



linear. Peduncle long, erect, glabrous. Perianth cam- 
panulate, with a contracted base, fragrant, an inch and a 
half or two inches long, typically bright mauve-red, vary- 
ing to white, with a slight flush of red outside ; segments 
uniform, oblong, subacute, with a large blotch at the base 
of black bordered with white. Stamens half an inch long, 
black ; filaments hairy above the base. Ovary triquetro- 
cylindrical, shorter than the stamens; stigmas small, 
sessile. — /. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Front view of stamen ; 2, back view of stamen ; 3, pistil -.—All 
enlarged. 




MS -<KJJratdvl;th 



Vincent Brooks J)^*- 



Tab. 7441. 
STERNBERGIA Fischeeiana. 
Native of the Caucasus, Persia and Asia Minor. 



Nat. Ord. Amaryllide.e. — Tribe Amarylle^e. 

Genus Sternbergia, Watdst. &Kit.; {Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii, 

p. 721.) 



Sternbergia {Oporanthus) Fischeriana ; bulbo ovoideo, tunicis membranaceis 
brunneis supra colluin productis, foliis 8-9 vernalibus synanthiis lineari- 
bus obtusis glauco-viridibua integria, pedunculis brevibus unifloris, 
spathis magnis membranaceis sa^pissime bifidia, ovario subsessili vel bre- 
viter pedicellate*, perianthii citrini tubo brevi infundibular!, segmentis 
oblongo-spatbulatis tubo multo longioribus, staminibus inajqualibus 
perianthio manifeste brevioribus, antberis oblongis parvis luteis, stylo 
elongato, stigmate capitato. 

Sternbergia Fischeriana, Soem. Amaryll. p. 46. Kunth Enum. PI. vol. v. 
p. 702. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. v. p. 147. Baker Handb. Amaryll. p. 29. 

Oporanthus Fiacherianus, Herb. Amaryll. p. 412, tab. 47, tig. 3. 

Amaryllis lutea, Bieh. Fl. Taur. Cauc. vol. ii. p. 255, non Linn. 



This beautiful Sternbergia closely resembles the finest 
forms of the well-known Sternbergia lutea (Amaryllis 
lutea, Linn., Bot. Mag. tab. 290), but it flowers in spring 
instead of autumn. Sternbergia was separated from 
Amaryllis by Waldstein and Kitaibel, who named it in 
honour of Count Sternberg, the monographer of the Saxi- 
frages. Like S. lutea it is quite hardy in England, and it 
is therefore likely to become a popular garden plant. It 
was first described and figured by Herbert from the 
Caucasus, where S. lutea has not been found. Bulbs of it, 
collected in Persia, were received at the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, from Messrs. Damman in 1894 ; and others from 
the neighbourhood of Smyrna from Mr. E. Whittall in the 
same year. Our drawing was made from plants that 
flowered in a sunny, open border in the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in March, 1895, the bulbs of which were presented 
by the latter gentleman. 

Descr. — Bulb ovoid, one and a half or two inches in 
diameter; outer tunics membranous, brown, produced 
above its neck. Leaves 8-9 to a bulb, vernal, contem- 

October 1st, 1895. 



porary with the flowers, linear, obtuse, glaucous green, 
half a foot long at the flowering season, lengthening out 
afterwards. Peduncles short, one-flowered, two or three 
to a strong bulb. Swathes membranous, white, usually 
bifid. Perianth bright yellow ; tube funnel-shaped, under 
half an inch long ; segments of the limb oblong-spathulate, 
an inch and a half long. Stamens unequal, shorter than 
the perianth; anthers small, oblong, versatile, yellow. 
Ovary subsessile or shortly stalked ; style long, simple ; 
stigma capitate. — J. G. Baker. 



Tig. 1, Front view of stamen ; 2, back view of stamen ; 3, style and stigma: 
—All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7442. 
ANGILECUM Kotschyi. 

Native of East Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Obchide.e. — Tribe VandEjE. 
Germs Axgr^cum, Borg.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 583.) 



Axgk^cum (EuaTigrsecnm) Kotscliyi ; caule brevi, foliis amplia obovatis ob- 
tusis rubro-punctatis, scapo brevi robusto, raceini penduli raohi 
elongato laxifloro brunneo, bracteis brevibus triangularibus acutis, pedi- 
cellis li-pollicaiibus decarvia, floribus 2| poll, diazn. albis, sepalis 
petaliaque patenti-reflexis oblanceolatis acuminatis subtortis apiculatis, 
apiculia bruanei3, labello spathulato explanato cuspidato ima basi 
3-costato, calcari longissimo gracili flexuoso v. torto pallide fusco apice 
anguste fusiformi, columna brevi crassa strarainea, rostello gracili 
porrecto ascendente, anthera bemispherica, polliniis obloagia stipiti 
angusto sessilibus, glandula oblonga majuscula. 

A. Kotschyi, Reichb.f. in Gard, Chron. 1880, vol- ii. p. 456 and p. 693, fig. 
181. O. Schneider in Orchidoph. 1883, Ic. p. 797. Warner & Williams, 
Orchid. Album, t. 179. Veitch Man. Orchid, pt. vii. p. 132, cum Ic, 
Wien Illustr. Gartenz. 1891, Ic. p. 309. 

A. Grantii, Batem. mss. 

As the exploration of tropical Africa advances, acces- 
sions may be expected to the genus Angrxcnm, which will 
probably prove to be the largest of epiphytic Orchids in the 
dark continent and in Madagascar. Unfortunately for 
Orchid growers, its flowers appear to be invariably white, 
or if tinged with colour, green only. I do not remember 
any other genus of epiphytic Orchids containing a con- 
siderable number of species, and many of these large- 
flowered, in which there is this such all but total absence 
of colour. 

Furthermore, judging from the importation of Orchids, 
whether from the east or western coast, or the interior, 
and from the accounts of many intelligent travellers, tropical 
Africa is not only deficient in genera and species of epiphy- 
tic Orchids, as compared with tropical Asia and America, 
but such as have been found are in no respect the repre- 
sentatives of Dendrobium and Catleya, or of such bizarre 
forms as Catasetum and Stanhopea. On the other hand, 
some of the terrestrial tropical African genera, as Phajus 
and Lissochilus, afford species of remarkable beauty and 
variety of colour. 

November 1st, 1895. 



Angrsecum Kotschyi is a native of Eastern tropical Africa, 
where it appears to have a very wide range of distribution. 
It was discovered by Theod. Kotschy (after whom it is 
named) when travelling with Russeger in 1838, growing 
on Capparidese, but the exact locality is not known. It was 
next met with by G. J.Meller inl861,in the valleyof the Shire 
river, not far from its junction with the Zambesi. In 1862 
the oreat explorer Captain Grant found it in the Upper Nile, 
at Gondokoro ; and Hildebrandt collected it, in 1876, on the 
seashore in Zanzibar, whence plants were sent through 
Mr. H. Waller to Messrs. Veitch by Sir John Kirk. These 
flowered for the first time at Chelsea in 1880. Lastly, 
plants were sent to Kew from the Kilimandjaro district by 
Consul C. S. Smith, when acting as British Commissioner 
for the delimitation of the Anglo-German Boundary in 
1892, which flowered in the Tropical House of the Royal 
Gardens in October of this year. The noble raceme here 
figured was kindly forwarded by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bt.; 
the leaves are from the Kew plant. 

Descr. — Stem short ; roots very thick, brown. Leaves 
three to four inches long, obovate, obtuse, pale yellowish 
green speckled with red-brown, margins waved. Scape 
short, with the pendulous raceme a foot to a foot and a 
half long, as thick as a goose-quill, red-brown, decurved. 
Raceme distantly many-fld. ; bracts small, triangular, 
dark brown ; pedicels with the ovary one and a half to 
two inches, flexuous, brown. Flowers white, two and a 
half inches broad across the petals, white with a very 
faint tinge of pink at the bases of the perianth segments. 
Sepals and petals spathulately oblanceolate, apiculate, ex- 
treme tips brown, spreading and reflexed, more or less 
waved. Lip) broadly spathulate, with three short ridges 
at the very base ; limb nearly orbicular, cuspidately acumi- 
nate ; spur attaining a foot in length, very slender, flexuous, 
thickened and pale brown, from one and a half to two 
inches of the apex. Column short, stout ; rostellum long, 
subulate, ascending. Anther hemispheric. Pollinia oblong; 
strap slender, dilated upwards, as long as the pollinia; 
gland obloug. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Lip and column; 2, clinandrmm and anther; 3, anther; 4 and 
5, pollinia with strap and gland :— All enlarged. 



7443 







Tab. 7443. 
SPATHOGLOTTIS Kimballiana. 

Native of Borneo. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Tribe Dendrobieje. 

Genus Spathoglottis, Plume; (Benth. 8c Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. Hi. 

p. 571.) 



Spathoglottis, Kimballiana ; elata, pseudobulbis vestigiis foliorum vestitis, 
i'oliis 2-pedalibus anguste lineari-lanceolatis longe attenuato-acuminatis 
5-7-nervis, bracteis cymbiformibus rafescentibus, floribus amplis, sepalis 
petalisque consimilibas late oblongis obtusis intus aureis, sepaliB extus 
striolis rubris aspersis, labelli lobis lateralibus magnis auricuke- 
formibus incurvis intus basi rubro striolatis, lobo iniermedio angusto 
glabro basin versus lobulis 2 rotundatis glabris basi 2-dentatis instructo 
apice dilatato truncate 

S. Kimballiana, Hort. Sander. 



Under 8. gracilis, Plate 7366 of this work, I have alluded 
to its very close relationship with 8. aurea, Lindl.,* 
of Mt. Ophir, 8. Wrayi, Hk. f. of Perak, and the 
subject of this article, adding, " it may well be doubted 
whether these species are not varieties of one ; and all the 
more from the fact of 8. gracilis and 8. Kimballiana 
having been received from Borneo growing in the same 
clump, by Messrs. Sander." The figure of 8. Kimballiana 
here given, together with those of S. aurea, in Gard. 
Chron., and 8. Wrayi {Hook. 1c. PL t. 2086) and of S. 
gracilis, if they do not solve the doubt, enable the 
botanist to see at a glance the differences between the 
types of all ; but the resolution of the doubt awaits 
a comparison of more specimens of each from other 
localities than that of the types ; for until such are ob- 
tained, the first desideratum, namely, the direction and 
limits of the variation of each, cannot be taken into account. 
In so far as available materials enable me to judge, the 

* The typical S. aurea was introduced by Messrs. Veitch in 18-19, and pub- 
lished in 1850 by Lindiey (in Paxt. Fl. Gard. vol. i. p. 16, and in Jo-urn. Mori. 
Soc. Lond. (1850) 31), but the plant died before being figured. The species 
was again introduced in 1886 from Borneo, by Messrs. Sander, and is described 
by Eeichenbach and figured in the Gardener's Chronicle, 1888, vol. ii. p. 92, 
fig. 9. 

November 1st, 1895. 



following are diagnostic characters of the five above named 
species. 

S. aurea ; surfaces of sepals concolorous, lateral lobes 
of lip linear falcate, basal lobules villous within ; leaves 
three feet long by one and a half inches broad. 

8. gracilis ; surfaces of sepals concolorous, lateral lobes 
of lip oblong-spathulate, or oblong-truncate, basal lobules 
■within and lateral teeth villous, leaves two inches broad. 

8. Kimballiana ; dorsal surface of sepals mottled with 
red-brown striae, lateral lobes of lip broadly ear-shaped, 
basal lobules and teeth glabrous ; leaves one to one and a 
half inch broad. 

8. Wrayi; surfaces of sepals unrecorded, lateral lobes 
of lip linear-oblong, basal lobules and teeth glabrous; 
leaves one and a half inch broad. 

I have not taken into account the form of the terminal 
lobe of the lip, which appears to be very variable. 
Reichenbach says of that of aurea, " mid partition of apex 
of lip subject to greatest variation, narrow and acute, or 
broad, or very broad and simply refuse, or 3-toothed." 

8. Kimballiana was named by Messrs. Sander in com- 
pliment to the late Mr. W. S. Kimball, of Rochester, 
U.S.A., Nurseryman, who is described in the Gardener s 
Chronicle (1895, vol. i. p. 497) as famous for his collections 
of pictures, china, and articles of vertu ; and especially 
for his four hundred species and varieties of Gypripedium. 
" In his great Orchid House, which is open daily to the 
public, five thousand plants of this Order may be seen in 
bloom at one time." 

The specimen of 8. Kimballiana here figured was ob- 
tained from Messrs. Sander & Co. in 1890. It flowers 
every spring in the warm Orchid House of the Roval 
Gardens. — /. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Portion of lip • 2, column ; 3, anther; 4, pollinia :— All enlarged. 



7444 




Vincer. 



Tab. 7444. 
CATASETUM Lemosii. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Oechide.e. — Tribe VandE/E, 
Genus Catasetum, Rich. ; {Benth. 8? Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 551.) 



Catasetum Lemosii ; pseudobulbis elongato-ovoideis pallidis sulcatis, foliia 
oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis undulatis pallide viridibus, scapo ascen- 
dente, bracteis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis viridibus, sepalis pallide 
flavo-viridibus, dorsali erecto oblongo-lanceolato acuto, lateralibus retlexis 
ovato-lanceolatis acutis, petalis flavo-viridibus erectis ovato-oblongis 
acutis, labello galeato crasse coriaceo virescente trilobo ore late obcordato, 
lobis lateralibus quadrato-rotundatis incurvis denticulatis, intermedio 
parvo triangulari recurvo, columna crassa rostrata, antennis gracilibus 
deflexis, polliniis oblongis caudiculae latiusculse sequilongis, glandula 
magna orbiculari. 

C. Lemosii, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin (1894), 394. 

C. roseum, Bodrig. Gen. § Sp. Orchid. Nov. vol. i. p. 128, non Beichb.f. 



As stated by Mr. Rolfe in the Kew Bulletin, Catasetum 
Lemosii is the C. roseum of Don Barbosa Rodrigues, avIio 
appears to have been unaware, when he published it in 
1877, of a previous G. roseum having been described by 
Reichenbach in the Gardener's Chronicle in 1872. For 
this reason Mr. Rolfe has substituted for this the name 
Lemosii, after Dr. Lemos, Superintendent of Schools 
in the Province of Para. In another respect the change 
of name is welcome, for neither in Don Rodrigue's drawing 
of the plant (of which there is a copy in the Kew 
Library) nor in specimens cultivated at Kew, are the flowers 
really rose-coloured. Little dependence, however, can be 
placed on colour in this, as in many other Orchids ; for 
in Mr. Rolfe's description the sepals and petals are 
brownish flesh-coloured, ultimately becoming tawny- 
yellow ; whereas they are rather greenish-yellow in the 
specimen here reproduced. According to Don Barbosa's 
description the sepals and petals should be rosy, the tip 
green behind, and orange-yellow in front. 

Catasetum Lemosii is a native of the Tie de Marajo, 
Province of Para, at the mouth of the Amazons, whence 
plants were procured by Dr. Lemos, who gave them 

November 1st, 1895. 



s 



to Mr. E. S. Rand, by whom a fine specimen was sent 
to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1&94, which flowered in 
March of the present year. The species had previously 
flowered (in 1892) in the collection of M. Robinow, 
Esq., of Hawthornden, Didsbury. Our figure is of the 
male plant ; the female, which (as with its congeners) no 
doubt differs greatly in its flowers, is as yet undiscovered. 
Descr. — Pseudobulbs two to four inches long, elon- 
gate ovoid, deeply grooved, pale grey from the persistent 
appressed leaf-sheaths. Leaves six to twelve inches long, 
oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, pale green ; nerves promi- 
nent beneath. Scape with raceme six inches long, ascend- 
ing, green, with few lanceolate acuminate bracts, about 8- 
fld. ; floral bracts like the cauline, green. Flowers drooping, 
about one and a half inches long and broad (across the 
petals). Sepals and petals subsimilar, acute, pale, dark 
yellowish-green or brown; dorsal sepal erect, lateral at 
length reflexed ; petals erect, as long as the dorsal sepal. 
Lip large, galeate, nearly globose, fleshy, dark green, 
suffused with red posteriorly, three-lobed ; lateral lobes 
rounded, incurved, erose ; midlobe small, triangular, re- 
curved or revolute ; base of lip within with many narrow 
parallel yellow bands. Column stout, beaked, green with 
a transverse red band ; antennas filiform, deflexed ; anther 
beaked.— J. D. E. 



Fig 1, Column viewed laterally, and 2, in front; 3, anther; 4 and 
5, pollmia with strap and gland:— All enlarged. 



Tab. 7445. 
AMASONIA EEECTA. 
Var. Latebracteata. 
Native of tropical South America. 

Nat. Ord. Verbenace;k. — Tribe Verbene/e. 
Genus Amasonia, Linn.f. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1147.) 



Amasonia erecta ; frutex gracilis pubescens, foliia obovato-oblongis obtusis in. 
petinlmn angustatis grosse crenato-serratis glabris v. puberulis laride 
viridibus, floribus racemulosis, racennilis brevibus in paniculam ter- 
minalem elongatam racemiformem dispositis subsecnndis confertis 
bracteatisbreviterpedicellatis, bracteis ovatis v. fere orbicalatis apiculatis 
serrulatis coecineis basi aureis, floribus nutantibus, calycis tubo brevi 
laciniis basi coatiguis ovatis acuminatis, corolla3 pallide flavaa tabo 
elongato piloso, lobis tubo plus quam dimidio brevioribus oblongis 
obtusis rugulosis coccineo-reticulatis ciliatis. 

A. erecta, Linn.f. Suppl. p. 294. Vahl Eclog. vol. ii. p. 51. Schauer in DO. 
Trodr. vol. xi. p. 677. Benth. in Ann. Nat. Hist. vol. ii. (1839), p. 450. 
Bocquill. Rev. Yerbenac. 121. 

A. punicea, Va/il. I.e., Schauer l.c.,et in Mart. Ft. Bras. vol. ix. p. 292. 
Bocquill. I. c. 

A. arborea, Humb. Bonpl. 8f Kunth Nov. Gen. §• Sjp. vol. ii. p. 253. 

Tuligalea campestris, Aubl. Guian. vol. ii. p. 625, t. 252. 

Var. latebracteata, bracteis orbicularibus breviter petiolatis remote denticula- 
tis. Tab. nostr. 7445. 



Amasonia erecta is the type (if the earliest discovered 
species is considered the type) of a small genus of 
Brazilian plants, which, owing to the variability of its 
floral bracts, has been described under two specific names 
by its author, Vahl, and most succeeding ones. Bentbam in- 
deed, upwards of sixty years ago, pointed out that Vahl'sA 
punicea was only a variety of A. erecta, but no subsequent 
author has referred to this, though Schauer in DC. Prodr. 
I. c. says of punicea, " very close to A. erecta, and hardly 
differing, except in the size of the leaves and bracts." An 
examination of a large suite of specimens from many locali- 
ties, extending from Trinidad to Central Brazil (Pro v. 
Piauhy), shows so great variation in the size of the 
foliage and form of the floral bracts, that it would be 
difficult to classify them; the most divergent being those 

November 1st, 1895. 



with more or less erect spreading or recurved lanceolate , 
acutely serrate bracts that do not arch over the racemes, 
and those figured herewith. And between these a 
graduated series of intermediates may be traced. A very 
distinct species, first described and figured in this work, 
A. calycina (Tab. 6915) has been confounded with A. 
punicea, and published as A. punicea [calycina) in the 
Illnstrt. Gartenzeit., 1890, p. 68, fig. 9 ; and as A. punicea in 
Gartenflora, vol. xxxv. (1886) p. 336, fig. 35, in neither of 
which works is the figure in the Botanical Magazine alluded 
to. Lastly, there is an A. punicea, figured by Seghers, in 
L'Hortic. Beige, vol. xx. (1894) which, if a correct repre- 
sentation, must be a very different species from either 
erecta or calycina, having opposite quite entire leaves, large 
lanceolate bracts, the lower opposite, a wholly scarlet 
calyx, and solitary axillary flowers with a small pure white 
corolla. 

The specimen of Amasonia erecta, var. latebracteata, here 
figured was communicated by Messrs. Sander & Co. of 
St. Alban's, who had previously presented living plants of 
it to Kew, and which latter flowered in a stove in the Royal 
Gardens at the same time, namely, July, 1895. 

Dexcr. — A small, slender, sparingly branched shrub a 
few feet high; branchlets red-brown. Leaves alternate 
and subverticillate, four to six inches long, obovate-oblong 
or ovate-lanceolate, obtuse or subacute, crenate-serrate, 
base narrowed into a petiole two to three inches long, dark 
green above, pale beneath. Inflorescence a racemiform 
elongate terminal panicle, with the flowers collected in a 
series of small subsecund drooping few-fid. racemules, 
each arising from the axil of and nearly hidden under a 
broad leafy bract, beyond which the corollas are exserted ; 
peduncle and pedicels very slender, bright red ; bracts an 
inch long, very shortly petioled, elliptic or suborbicular, 
apiculate, remotely denticulate, puberulous, lowest in the 
panicle foliaceous green and longer petioled, the remainder 
bright scarlet, passing at the base into golden yellovr. 
Flotcers drooping, one inch long. Calyx-tube short, hemi- 
spheric, pubescent ; lobes ovate, acuminate, erect, bases 
contiguous. Corolla-tube three times as long as the calyx, 
slightly dilated upwards, covered with spreading hairs, 
pale dull yellowish ; lobes not half as long as the tube, 

fXIU. 



oblong, obtuse, yellow, beautifully reticulate with red 
veins, margins undulate ciliate. Filaments exserted for 
half their length ; filaments at length upcurved ; anthers 
oblong. Ovary hemispheric ; style very slender, slightly 
hairy above ; stigmas slender, recurved — J". D. 11. 
_ — rr _ r _ — ,i 

Fig. 1, Tip of bract; 2, calyx with two lobes removed, ovary and style; 
3, corolla laid open ; 4 and 5, anthers : — All enlarged ; 6, whole plant greatly 
reduced. 



Tab. 7446. 
SELENIPEDIUM Sargentianum. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Tribe Cypripedie*. 

Genus Selenipedium, Beichb. f. ; (Benth. & Hook, f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 635.) 



Selenipedium Sargentianum; foliis radicalibug oblongo-lanceolatis acutis 
basi equitantibua coriaceis aureo marginatia, ecapo robusto hirauto apice 
2-4-f3oro fuaco-rubro, vaginis solitariis bracteisque magnia ovato-cymbi- 
formibus herbaceis obtusia viridibua hirsutis, perianthio hirsutulo, aepalis 
lateralibus in laminam ovatam obtusam 2-nervosam rubro-striatam labello 
auppoaitam connatis, dorsali oblongo obtnso rubro striato, petalia sepalis 
longioribua loriformibus obtuaia subtortia aureis aanguineo striatis et late 
marginatia, labello oblongo aureo apice rotundato lateribua late inflexis 
orem oblongam claudentibus rubro macnlatia marginibus tuberculo 
minuto albo ornatis, staminodio pallido late ovato pubescente. 

S. Sargentianum, Rolfe in Orchid Beview, vol. i. (1893), p. 239. Gard. Chron. 
1894, vol. i. p. 781, fig. 100. 



Under his description of this beautiful plant in" the 
Orchid Revieiv.Mr. Rolfe has pointed out its close relation- 
ship to Selenipedium Lindleyi, Reichb. f., and a comparison 
of the figures of the flowers of the two species shows that 
the forms of all their parts are almost identical. The most 
conspicuous differences between them are the great size and 
robustness of 8. Lindleyi, which attains three feet in height, 
the length of its leaves, upwards of two feet long, the more 
numerous flowers disposed in a raceme, their colour pale or 
light green with red-brown nerves, and the absence of the 
two opposite contiguous white tubercles in the margin of 
the inflexed portions of the lip. The habitats of these two 
species are widely apart, 8. Lindleyanum being (as far as is 
known) confined to Guiana, where it was discovered by 
Sir Robert Schomburgk in grassy swamps of the interior 
half a century ago, whereas 8. Sargentianum is a native of 
the Pernambuco province of Brazil, no doubt from its 
mountainous interior, and probably from the chain of the 
Cariris or Tabatinga, which are clothed with forests. Of 

November 1st, 1895. 



the two 8. Sargentianum is by far the most beautiful, 
indeed it may prove to be the gem of the genus in point 
of coloration. It may be suggested that when the inter- 
mediate tracts of country between Guiana and Pernambuco 
are explored, intermediate forms will be found ; if so, the 
supposed species would fall under the denomination of 
geographical forms. As it is, the intervention of the vast 
low valley of the Amazons between their dwelling places 
appears to me to render such evidence improbable. 
8* Sargentianum was obtained in 1892 by the Royal Gar- 
dens from Messrs. F. Sander & Co. of St. Alban's, who 
imported ib, and with whom it flowered in a tropical orchid 
house in February, 1395. It is named in honour of Prof. 
C. S. Sargent, Director of the Harvard Arboretum, Boston, 
U.S., and editor of " Garden and Forest." 

Descr. — Stem short, tufted, clothed with the equitan 
bases of the distichous leaves, erect ; root of stout fibres. 
Leaves six to eight inches long by one and a half broad, 
oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, coriaceous, bright yellow 
with golden margins, deeply sulcate along the mesial line 
above, keeled beneath, nerves obscure. Scape six inches 
high, as thick as a goose-quill, two- to three-flowered, 
laxly hairy, as are the sheaths ; bracts pedicels and ovaries 
red brown, bracts on the scape and flowers one and a half 
to two inches long, ovate-lanceolate, subacute, green, her- 
baceous. Floivers two to three at the top of the scape, 
three and a half inches broad across the petals. Bursa 
sepal erect, oblong, acute, pale yellow, with five strong 
bright red dorsal ribs united by cross nervules ; lateral 
united into an ovate subacute blade placed under 
the lip. Petals much longer than the sepals, spreading 
and rather deflexed, strap-shaped, subtwisted, undulate, 
ciliate, streaked with red, margins bright red. Lip an 
inch and a half long, slipper-shaped, tip rounded, yellow 
with pale red veins, mouth oblong, sides deflexed in tin 
mouth, lobes meeting by their margins, speckled with red, 
and with a minute white tubercle on the margin of each. 
Staminode broadly ovate, hairy, pale yellow.—/. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Side and 2, dorsal view of staminode -.—Both enlarged. 



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Tab. 7447. 
STREPTOCARPUS Wendlandii. 

Native of the Transvaal. 



Nat. Ord. Gesnerace^;. — Tribe Cyrtandbe^e. 
Genus Sxreptocarpus, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Hoak.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1023.) 



Streptocarpus Wendlandii ; acaulis, hirsutulus, folio solitario radicali 
sessili amplo late ovato-oblongo basi et apice rotundato marginibus 
nndulatis crenulatisque, supra saturate viridi inter nervoa perplurimos 
profande impresses tumido, subtus purpureo rubro pilis albis substrigoso, 
scapis plurimis robustis 2-fidis ramis subpanieulatim multifloris pedicel- 
lisque glanduloso-pubescentibus,pedicellis elongatis solitariis geminisque, 
floribus nutantibus amplis, sepalis linearibus obtusis, corolla? tubo buccse- 
formi decurvo glanduloso-pubescente, limbi 1^ poll, lati lobis 2 posticis 
ovato-rotundatis violaceis, 3 anticis longioribns oblongis albis marginibus 
late violaceis, filamentis apices versus glandulosis, connectivo tumido, 
staminodiis minimis, ovario pubescente, stylo brevi curvo, stigmate disci- 
forme peltato, capsula 3-pollicari angusta cylindracea torta. 

S. Wendlandii, Hort. Dammann ex W. Wats, in Gard. Chron. (1894) vol. i. 
p. 590. Journ. Hort. Ser. III. vol. xxviii. p. 223, fig. 37. 



Streptocarpus Wendlandii far surpasses in size and beauty 
all the previously discovered species of its beautiful genus, 
and no one who saw it amongst other species border- 
ing the centre bed of the Succulent House at Kew, 
during the spring and summer of 1894, can forget the 
magnificence of the display it afforded. Its history has 
been given by Mr. Watson in the Gardener's Chronicle 
above, from which it appears that it is a native of the 
Transvaal, and was first made known by Messrs. Damman 
of Naples, who described it in their catalogue for 1890- 
1891, having imported it from Natal in 1887. In 1888 it 
independently made its appearance at Kew, having come 
up as a seedling amongst some ferns imported from South 
Africa, when it was supposed to be a form or young state 
of 8. Sandersii. 

Mr. "Watson has raised at Kew a hybrid between this 

species and S. Dunnii, Mast. (Tab. 6903) which is of still 

larger dimensions both in foliage and inflorescence than 

either of its parents. Of this, which is known as S. Dyeri, 

December 1st, 1895. 



Wats, (in Garden and Forest, viii. (1895) 5, fig. 1), the 
leaves are two feet long and fifteen inches wide, and the 
inflorescence forms a sheaf of bright red-purple flowers 
nearly two feet high. 

The specimen of 8. Wendlandii here figured, flowered 
in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in April, 1895, and ripened 
its fruit about six weeks afterwards. The species continued 
flowering from June till November. 

Descr. — Stemless, with a rosette of very small leaves at 
the base of the solitary developed one, liirsutely pubescent 
above. Leaf horizontal, attaining thirty inches long by 
twenty-four wide, broadly ovate-oblong, rounded at both 
ends, margins crenate and undulate; upper surface pale 
green, tumid between close-placed parallel deeply sunk 
nerves, which are joined by close-set arched nervules; 
beneath dark red purple, with strongly prominent nerves 
and nervules, and subhispid with white hairs. Scapes 
several, stout, forked at the tip, each fork bearing a many- 
fld. subpaniculate raceme of large solitary or geminate long- 
pedicelled violet-blue and white nodding flowers; bracts 
subverticillate at the fork, short, ovate, herbaceous. Calyx 
small; sepals linear. Corolla-tube nearly an inch long, 
trumpet-shaped, glandular-pubescent; limb one and a half 
inch broad, oblique ; dorsal lobes recurved, nearly orbicular, 
violet, lateral rather larger and oblong, front lobe white, 
with broad violet margin and three violet streaks ; throat 
with a large dark violet mark below each of the dorsal 
lobes. Filaments glandular on and below the tumid con- 
nective; staminodes three minute tubercles. Ovary pubes- 
cent ; style very short, curved ; stigma disciform, peltate. 
Capsule three inches loner, slender, cylindric, strongly 
twisted.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of tube of corolla with stamen and ataminodea ; 2, ovary ; 
-both enlarged ; 3, capsule of t/te natural size. 



7448. 




T.T?f 



Tab. 7448. 
ALOE Luntii. 

Native of Southern Arabia. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^e. — Tribe Aloine^. 
Genus Axoe, Linn. ; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 776.) 



Aloe Luntii ; breviter caulescena, foliis densis primum rosulatia distichis 
demum subrostilatis ensiformibus recurvatis pallide viridibus immaculatis 
supra basin facie canaliculars aculeis marginalibus obsoletis, pedunculo 
stricto erecto foliis longiore, racemis laxis paniculatis lateralibus patulis, 
bracteis minutis, pedicellia brevibus apice articulatis saperioribus ascen- 
dentibns inferioribus cernuis, perianthii cylindrici tubo elongato rnbello, 
lobis lineari-oblongis erectis tubo brevioribus, staminibus omuibus exsertia, 
antberis oblongis parvis, polline rubro. 

A. Luntii, Baker in Kew Bullet. 1894, p. 342. 



This very distinct new Aloe was discovered by Mr. 
W. Lunt, now of the Trinidad Botanic Garden, when he 
was attached as botanical collector to the expedition 
organized by J. Theodore Bent, Esq., in the winter of 
1893-4, to explore the ruined cities of the province of 
Hadramaut, in Southern Arabia. This district had never 
been before explored botanically, and although the time of 
the year was unfavourable, about thirty new plants were 
discovered, of which three proved to be new genera. The 
present plant was found on the hills above Dobiabah, at an 
elevation of three thousand feet above sea-level. Both 
living and dried specimens were brought home, and one of 
the former flowered in the Royal Gardens at Kew last 
November. The leaves have no marginal prickles, and 
the flowers have an unusually long tube, resembling that 
of a Gasteria, but not dilated into a ball at the base. 

Descr. — Shortly caulescent. Leaves seven or eight in a 
dense rosette at the top of the stem, at first distichous, 
ensiform, a foot long, two inches broad at the base, 
narrowed gradually to the point, pale green on both sides, 
without any spots, stripes or marginal prickles, deeply 
channelled down the face in the upper half. Peduncle 
stiffly erect, longer than the leaves. Panicle of four or five 

December 1st, 1895. 



long lax racemes, the side ones spreading horizontally; 
bracts very small ; pedicels short, articulated at the apex, 
the upper ones ascending, the lower cernuous. Perianth 
under an inch long ; tube cylindrical, pale red ; lobes 
linear-oblong, erect, shorter than the tube. Stamens all 
exserted ; anthers small, oblong ; pollen bright red. — J. G. 
Baker. 

Fig. 1, An entire flower ; 2, front view of anther ; 3, back view of anther ; 
4, pistil : — All enlarged ; 5, whole plant much reduced. 



Tab. 7449. 
BUDDLEIA Colvilei. 

Native of the Biklcim Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Loganiace^;. — Tribe EuLOGANiEiE. 
Genua Buddleia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 793.) 



Buddleia Colvilei; arbuscula v. frutex, ramulia foliisque junioribns ferru- 
gineo-tomentosis, foliis laaceolatis acnminatis crenulato-serratis adultia 
glabratis in petiolum brevem angustatis, paniculis terminalibus pendulia 
oblongia multifloria, floribus breviter pedicellatis, calycis pubescentia 
lobis ovatis obtuse acuminatis, corollaa roseo-purpurese v. coccineaa tubo 
cylindraceo superne paullo ampliato intus piloso calyce duplo longiore 
lobis rotundatis marginibus recurvia, ore albo, antheris oblongia, ovario 
pubescente, capsula oblouga, seminibua oblongia, testa laxa 3-alata 
reticulata. 

B. Colvilei, Hook. f. & Thorns, in Hook.f. III. Ilimal. PI. t. 18. Clarke in 
Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. {errore Colvillei) 81. Gamble List of Trees & 
Shrubs, &c. of Darjeeling, p. 56 ; Manual of Indian Timbers, p. 267. The 
Garden, xliv. (1893) p. 482, cum Ic. Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. ii. p. 187. 
Andre in Bev. Hortic. 1893, p. 520, cum Ic. Gamier in III. Hortic. 
Ser. vi. p. 1, t. 10. Journ. Hort. Ser. iii. vol. xxxi. p. 85, cum Ic. 



Buddleia Colvilei is certainly the handsomest of all 
Himalayan shrubs, and it is impossible to exaggerate its 
beauty as seen in the borders of a Sikkim forest, covered 
with pendulous masses of rose-purple or crimson flowers 
relieved by the dark green foliage. Unfortunately, as 
grown and flowered by that enthusiastic cultivator of rare 
plants, Mr. Gumbleton, at Belgrove, Co. Cork, and who 
alone has flowered the plant in Europe, the colour of the 
corolla is considerably paler than in Sikkim. In my " Illus- 
trations of Himalayan Plants," I figured it as crimson from 
a drawing made by myself on the spot in 1849, when I first 
saw it in flower. This colour is confirmed by Mr. Gamble 
(Conservator of Indian Forests), who knew the plant well, 
and who in his " List of Trees, Shrubs and Climbers of 
Darjeeling," and subsequently in his admirable "Manual 
of Indian Timbers," calls it " an extremely handsome tree, 
with, masses of dark crimson flowers, which appear in 
August, and make the tree very conspicuous in its habitat 
on the summits of Tonglo." It will be observed that Mr. 

December 1st, 1895. 



Gamble gives the flowering season as August, and I first 
found it in flower in Sikkim late in July, whereas Mr. 
Gumbleton's plant flowered in June, which and the climate 
of southern Ireland may account for the paleness of the 
colour. On the other hand, the flowers of Mr. Gumbleton's 
plants are rather larger than in any of my Sikkim 
specimens, which averaged little more than an inch m 
breadth of limb. 

B. Colvilei is a native of the temperate regions of both 
the outer and inner ranges of the Sikkim Himalaya, at from 
10,000 to 12,000 ft. elevation. It bears the name of my 
late friend, the Eight Hon. Sir James Oolvile, F.R.S., who 
at the time of its discovery was Puisne Judge of the 
Supreme Court of Calcutta, and President of the Bengal 
Asiatic Society. 

Descr. — A large shrub or small tree, attaining a height 

of thirty feet ; branches spreading ; branchlets, petioles, 

young leaves and branches of the panicle clothed with 

rusty pubescence. Leaves five to seven inches long, 

elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate, crenate-serrulate, narrowed 

into a very short petiole, dark green and rugosely nerved 

above, pale beneath, with fifteen to twenty pairs of elevated 

arched nerves. Flowers in shortly peduncled thyrsiform 

pendulous panicles twelve to eighteen inches long, which 

are leafy at the base ; branches of panicle and pedicels 

short, stout ; bracts linear. Calyx-tube short, hemispheric, 

lobes ovate obtusely acuminate. Corolla rose-purple or 

crimson, with a white ring round the mouth ; tube terete, 

twice as long as the calyx, white and hairy within, scarcely 

dilated above ; limb one to one and a quarter inch diam. ; 

lobes rounded, margins recurved. Stamens very short ; 

anthers green. Ovary oblong, pubescent, 2-celled ; style 

short; stigma capitate, obscurely 2-lobed, green. Capsule 

oblong, many- seeded. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx kid open, showing ovary, style and stigma; 2, corolla laid 
open ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 5, transverse section of ovary -.—All enlarged. 



74c.O. 




■ 



Tab. 7450. 
BARTHOLINA pectinata. 

Native of the Cape of Good Hope. 

Nat. Ord. Okchide^s. — Tribe Ophbtde^b. 
Genus Baetholina, Br. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 623.) 



Baetholina pectinata ; herba gracilis piloBa, tuberibus oblongis, folio eolitario 
sessile terrae applanato orbiculari convexo, basi 2-lobo amplexicauli, scapo 
1-floro, fiore amplo, bractis oblongis cucullatis ovario curvo dimidio 
brevioribus, sepalis erectis lineari-lanceolatis herbaceis pilosis, petalis 
erectis sepalis longioribus lineari- v. subulato- lanceolatis rectis v. falcatis 
albis, labello maximo circumscriptione semi-circulari v. flabellaaformi alte 
trifido segmentis in lacinias 17-23 filiformes patenti-decurvaa sectis, 
calcare lente curvo ovario aequilongo, anthera erecta angasta petalis 
dimidio breviore subacuta, loculis parallelis semi-tortis connectivo dia- 
phano interposito, polliniis oblongis, caudicula gracili, glandula parva, 
stigmate parvo tnmido. 

B. pectinata, Br. in Ait. Hort. Kew. Ed. II. vol. v. p. 194. Lindl. in Bot. Beg. 
sub t. 1653 ; in Hook. Comp. Bot. Mag. vol. ii. p. 210 et in Gen. & Sp. 
Orchid, p. 333. Endl. Lconogr. t. 40. Bolus, Orchids of the Oape Peninsula, 
p. 1 11. (Trans. S. African Phil. Soc. vol. v. (1888). 

B. Burmanniana, Eer-Gawl. in Brand. Journ. Sc. & Arts. vol. iv. (1818), 
p. 204, t. 5, f. 2, & in Journ. B. Instit. London, vol. iv. (1818), 204, t. 6, f. 2. 
Lindl. in Hook. Comp. Bot. Mag. I. c. 

B. Lindleyana, Beichb.f. Otia Bot. Jlamb. p. 119. 

Orchis pectinata, Thunb. Prodr. Fl. Ed. II. Gap. p. 4. 

(). Hurmanniana, Linn. Sp. PL Ed. II. p. 1334. 

Arethusa ciliaris, Linn.f. Suppl. 405. 



One of the most singular of Cape plants, the " Spider 
Orchid " of the colonists, discovered by Burmann nearly a 
century and a half ago, and first introduced into cultivation 
in England in 1787, by Masson, the indefatigable collector 
sent from Kew to S. Africa. It inhabits grassy places 
amongst bushes at the foot of the hills near the sea, from 
Cape Town, eastwards to Grahamstown, and perhaps 
further. It was long supposed to be monotypic, but Mr. 
Bolus about ten years ago described a second species, B, 
Ethelae (Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xx. (1884), p. 472, and 
Orchids of the Cape Peninsula, p. 112, t. 3), which is a 
larger plant, with each of the filiform segments of the lip 
tipped with a flattened cushion, much like those that termi- 
nate the segments of the so-called nectaries of Vaniassm, 

December 1st, 1895. 



and like these apparently non-secreting organs. B. 
Ethelx is a very rare plant, found hitherto in only two 
places, both in the vicinity of Cape Town. 

B. pectinata varies but little, and chiefly in the colour of 
the lip, from white to pale violet. I find no notice of the con- 
vexity of the leaf, which is a marked character in the speci- 
mens cultivated at Kew. The genus was named by Brown 
after Thomas Bartholin, a celebrated Danish anatomist 
and physiologist, born in 1616, Professor first of Mathe- 
matics, and latterly of Anatomy at Copenhagen. This 
Bartholin was himself son of an eminent Anatomist (Caspar 
Bartholina), and father of an illustrious family. His health 
having given way under the stress of work, he retired to 
a small estate which he had purchased in Denmark, where 
in 1670 he lost his library and all his MSS. by fire. He died 
in 1680, leaving five sons, all of whom attained eminence as 
Professors respectively of Anatomy, Antiquities, Theology, 
Mathematics and History ; and of his three daughters one 
acquired distinction as a poet. 

The Royal Gardens, Kew, are indebted to Harry Bolus, 
Esq., F.L.S., of Cape Town, for tubers of B. pectinata, 
which were received in 1892, and flowered in a cool house 
in the following July. 

Descr. — A small tuberous terrestrial Orchid, one-leaved, 
one-flowered, hairy all over, except the petals and lip. 
Tubers ovoid, about a third of an inch long. Leaf lying 
flat on the ground, one half to one inch diam., orbicular, 
convex, deeply 2-lobed, and amplexicaul at the base, dull 
green. Scape three to four inches high, very slender, red- 
brown, with a very small basal tubular sheath ; bract oblong- 
lanceolate, erect, herbaceous, half as long as the ovary. 
Flowers two to three inches broad across the lip. Sepals 
about one-fourth of an inch long, erect, herbaceous, hairy. 
Petals longer, linear-lanceolate or subulate, straight or 
falcate, white. Lip 3-partite, each segment cut to the 
base into numerous spreading threads. Spur as long as 
the ovary, deflexed. Anther long, narrow, erect; cells 
parallel, half twisted. Pollinia oblong, stipes long, gland 
small.— .7. D. If. 



Kg. 1 ' Ti P„of ovary, base of lip, petals and anther; 2, lip; 3, anther i 
V, pollen:— All enlarged. 



7451 




kSonBap 



■ 



Tab. 7451. 

MUSA EUBRA. 
Native of Pegu. 



Nat. Ord. ScitaminEjE. — Tribe MusE/K. 
Genua Musa, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 655.) 



Musa (Rbodochlamys) rubra ; stolonifera, caudice gracili 6-7-pedali, foliia 
oblongo-Ianceolatis acuminatis in petiolum gracilem angustatis, spica 
erecta densiflora, racbi pubernla, bracteis late ovatis obtusia cymbiformibtia 
non revolutis lsete roseis apicibus anreis, fl. masc. unaquaque bractea 3-5 
sesqui-pollicaribus fiavidis, calycia fere recti dentibua aureis, corolla 
calyce multo breviore late ovata acuminata, fl. fem. ovario trigono, 
fructibna sesailibua 3-pollicaribus fuaiformi-trigonis, seminibu8 parvia 
depresso-globosia nitidis. 

M. rubra, Wall, ex Kurz in Journ. Agric. Hort. Soc. Ind. vol. xiv. Part I., p. 
301. Baker in Annals of Botany, vol- vii. (1893), p. 221. Kevo Bulletin 
(1894), p. 258. 



It is only through cultivated specimens that an accurate 
knowledge of the species of Musa is likely to be obtained, 
for it is very difficult to determine their characters from 
dried specimens, and years must elapse before botanists, or 
collectors with descriptive powers, shall have found the 
opportunity of investigating them in their native, often 
most unhealthy, forests. In the case of M. rubra it is 
fortunate that materials are forthcoming for giving an 
account of its habit, flowers and fruit. Of these materials 
the first and second are derived from a specimen that Mr. 
Watson brought into fine flower and immature fruit in the 
Royal Gardens, Kew ; and of the fruit, well preserved 
specimens, with ripe seeds collected by the late Dr. 
M'Lelland, F.L.S., in Pegu, are preserved in the Her- 
barium of the Royal Gardens. And that these latter cer- 
tainly belong to M. rubra is assured partly by their being 
quite like what the cultivated plant has borne, and by 
being accompanied with some male flowers which have 
the characteristic small petal of M. rubra. 

M. rubra is first described in the work cited above by 
M. Kurz, from specimens collected by himself in Pegu. 
It must, however, have been discovered many years earlier, 
for Kurz has adopted a name of Wallich's probably given 

December 1st, 1895. 



by him to plants cultivated in the Calcutta Botanical 
Gardens. Suckers of M. rubra were received at Kew from 
Dr. King in 1889, under the name of Musa rosea, which is 
a different species, more like M. coccinea, with shorter 
much broader leaves, and the petal nearly as long as the 
sepals. Dr. King further states that if. rubra has been in 
cultivation in the Royal Gardens, Calcutta, since 1882, but 
that its origin is unknown : at Kew it flowered freely in 
May. 

Descr. — Stoloniferous. Stem five to seven feet high, 
slender, lower sheaths pale brown, upper green. Leaves 
four to sis feet long, oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, narrowed 
into the petiole, pale green, not glaucous, paler beneath ; 
petiole about one-third the length of the leaf. Spike erect, 
strict, rachis puberulous. Bracts three inches long, broadly 
ovate, cymbiform, bright rose-red, with obtuse golden tips, 
not revolute with age, smooth externally, inwardly trans- 
versely barred between the nerves. Male fl. four to six in 
each bract, about one and a half inches long, nearly straight, 
pale yellow ; teeth of calyx short, revolute, golden yellow. 
Petal about half as long as the calyx, broadly ovate, acumi- 
nate. Anthers pale, yellow-brown. Fem. fl. about one- 
third shorter than the male. Fruit three inches long, 
fusiform, trigonous, many-seeded. Seeds about one-sixth 
of an inch in diameter, depressed globose, with a large 
circular basal hilum, and polished dark testa.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Male fl.; 2, lobes of calyx; 3, petal; 4, anther; 5, rudimentary 
stamens and pistil of imperfect fem. fl. ; 6, fem. fl. ; 7, immature fruit j 8, ripe 
seeds trom Herbarium specimen -.—All enlarged but 7 and 8, which are of 
nat. size. * 



INDEX 

To Vol. LI. of the Third Series, or Vol. OXXI. of 
the whole Work. 



7395 Acacia spadicigera. 

7393 Acidanthera requinoctialis. 

7399 Aloe brachystachys. 

7448 „ Luntii. 

7445 Amasonia erecta, var. late- 

bracteata. 
7442 Angraecum Kotschyi. 
7437 Anthnrium Gustavi. 
7398 Aphasrema spicata. 
7414 Argylia canescens. 
7424 Aristolochia ungulifolia. 
7435 Atraphaxia Muschketowi. 
7450 Bartholina pectinata. 

7449 Buddleia Colvilei. 
7444 Catasetum Lemosii. 

7400 Cephalanthus natalensis. 

7434 Cleyera Fortunei. 
7417 Crinum Schimperi. 

7416 Cypripedium Charles worthii. 

7396 Cyrtopodium virescens. 
7403 Disa sagittalis. 

7432 Helianthus debilis. 

7402 Heptapleurum venulosum, var. 

erythrostachys. 
7409 Ixianthes retzioides. 
7412 Kniphofia Northias. 

7394 Lonicera Alberti. 
7407 Macaranga Porteana. 
7411 Magnolia parviflora. 

7435 Mormodes Kolfeanum. 

7401 Musa Hillii. 



7451 Musa rubra. 

7425 JSTeuAviedia Griffithii. 

7420 Peraphyllum ramosissimum. 
7410 Piptospatha Ridleyi. 

7431 Pleurothallis Scapha. 

7439 Polygala Galpini. 

7427 Prochynanthes Bulliana. 
7423 Pyrus crategifolia. 
7430 » sikkimensis. 
7419 Ribes bracteosum. 

7397 Richardia Pentlandii. 
7436 ,, Rehmanni. 

7421 Rosa Lucise. 
7426 Rubus lasiostylus. 
7433 Rumex hymenosepalus. 

7428 Saccolabium Mooreanuni. 

7405 Saintpaulia ionantha. 

7406 Scbinus dependens. 

7446 Selenipedium Sargentianuin. 

7422 Senecio Hualtata. 

7443 Spathoglottis Kimballiana. 

7429 Spirasa bracteata. 
7441 Sternbergia Fischeriana. 

7447 Streptocarpus "Wendlandii. 
7392 Talauraa Hodgsoni. 

7418 Trichocladus grandiflorua. 

7440 Tulipa violacea. 

7413 Vacciniura erythrocarpum. 
7415 Veronica Hectori. 

7404 „ Joganioides. 

7405 Weldi^uia Candida. 



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