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CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPEIS1NG THE 



plants of tf)t Eopal #aroen£ of &eto, 

AND 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., K.O.SJ., 

F.R.S., F.L.S., etc., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 

VOL. XLVIII.Q 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

(Or Vol, CXVIII. of the Whole Work.) 

missourT 




" These rosea for my Lady Marian : these lilies to lighten 
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INDEX 

To Vol. XLYIII. of the Thied Series, or Vol. CXVIII. of 
the whole Work. 



7270 Aganisia ionoptera. 

7271 Alloplectus discolor. 

7237 Althaea ficifolia. 
7231 Beaufortia sparsa. 
7219 Begonia glaucophylla. 

7247 Bomarea frondea. 
7264_ Calochortus Kennedyi. 

7248 Capparis flexuosa. 

7263 Carludovica raicrocepliala. 

7222 Cereus giganteus. 
7265 Chamaedorea stolonifera. 
7261 Cheiranthera parviflora. 

7213 Chirita depressa. 

7225 Chrysanthemum rotundifo- 

lium. 
7259 Cirrhopetalum Makoyanum. 
7229 } , ornatissimum. 

7214 ,, Thouarsii. 

7223 Dianthus callizomis. 
7236 Didymocarpus lacunosa. 
7256 Disa Cooperi. 

7243 ,, inearnata. 

7238 Eria marginata. 
7267 Fernla tingitana. 

7250 Furcrasa pubescens. 

7224 Gongora gratulabunda. 

7244 Gynura sarmentosa. 
7228 Habenaria longecalcarata. 
7218 Hydnophytum Forbesii. 

7215 Iris Fosteriana. 

7251 ■ Lortetii. 



7269 Ivniphofia paucifiora. 

7234 Lilium Grayi. 

7232 „ Lowii. 
7227 ,, primulinum. 

7257 „ sulphureum. 
7226 Lysimachia paridiformis. 

7245 Masdevallia leontoglossa. 
7268 Microstylis Scottii. 
7260 Monodora grandiflora. 
7262 Moorea irrorata. 

7212 Mora?a Eobinsoniana. 
7221 Neobenthamia gracilis. 

7252 Xicotiana tomentosa. 
7249 Pasithea caerulea. 

7235 Pitocarpus pennatifolius. 

7240 Porana paniculata. 

7258 Potentilla Salcsoviana. 

7246 Primula Forbesii. 
7217 „ imperialis. 
7216 „ Poissoni. 
7266 Kanunculus carpaticus. 

7233 Bestrepia striata. 

7241 Rosa pomifera. 

7239 Senecio (Kleinia) Galpini. 

7254 Stemona Curtisii. 
7230 Streptocarpus Galpini. 

7242 Synandrospadix vermitoxicus 

7253 Tulipa Billietiana. 

7255 Yernonia podocoma. 
7220 Vicia narbonensis. 



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L.Reew 



Tab. 7212. 
moriea robinsontana. 

Native of Lord Howe's Island. 

Nat. Ord. IniDEM. — Tribe Mor^e^:. 
Genus Moe^ea, Linn.; {BentJi. et HooJc.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 



MoJifiA Robinsoniana ; elata, densissime coe.spitosa, foliis radicalibus ensiforwi- 
bus longe acuminatis, pedunculo valido basi folioso paniculatim raraoso, 
bracteis inferioribus elongatis foliaceis acuminatis, superioribus oblongis 
subacutis, supremis ovarium vaginantibus, floribus amplis breviter pedi- 
cellatis albis, perianthii segmentis patentibus breviter unguiculatis e basi 
liberis, 3 exterioribus late ovatis obtusis basi primulinis et macula auran- 
tiaca 2-loba notatis, 3 interioribus paullo minoribus oblongis obtusis con- 
coloribus, filamentis liberis antbera liaeari brevioribus, connective in 
apionlum obtusum producto, styli ramis, late oblongis 2-lobis denticulatis, 
lobis rotundatis, crista brevi erosa, capsula clavata obscure hexagoaa. 

M. Robinsoniana, Moore & Muell, in F. Muell. Fragment, vol. vii. p. 153 
Bentli. Fl. Austral, vol. vi. p. 409. 

Iris Robinsoniana, F. Muell, I.e. ; G. Bonn, in Gard. Chron. 1872, 393, 
fig. 123, 124; Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. xvi. (1878) 117; IF. Watson in 
Gard. Chron. 189] , i. 457, 459, fig. 94, 95. 



Perhaps the most! curious point in the history of this 
magnificent plant is the difficulty hitherto experienced in 
flowering it in Europe. The first person who called atten- 
tion to its existence was the late Dr. Foulis, of Sydney, a 
gentleman who had resided in Lord Howe's Island, and 
who informed Mr. Moore, of the Sydney Botanical Gardens, 
and Dr. G. Bennett, of that city, that he had discovered it, 
and had introduced it some years previously into his garden 
(at Sydney) where it had died without flowering ; he 
further added that it was known to settlers in Lord Howe's 
Island as " the Wedding flower." Dr. Bennett's account 
of it was communicated to the Gardener's Chronicle (1872, 
p. 393), together with a sketch of the whole plant, and of 
a flower, by Mr. E. Bennett. The first botanical account 
of it is that contained in Mr. Moore's " Report on the 
Vegetation of Lord Howe's Island," dated September, 
1869, where it is described as an Iridaceous plant resembling 
a large species of Morcea (but which would probably prove to 
be a new genus) with leaves six feet long by two or three 
Jantauy 1st, 1892. 



inches in breadth ; a candelabra-like flowering stem six 
feet high, and flowers four inches in diameter ; and where 
it is further stated that it would be published by Baron 
Mueller and dedicated to Sir Hercules Robinson, K.O.M.G., 
Governor of New South Wales. Mr. Moore introduced the 
plant into the Sydney Botanical Gardens, where it flowered 
in December, 1871. The next accounts of its flowering 
are respectively in the Botanical Garden of Hakgala, in 
Ceylon, in 1885, under the management of Mr. Nock ; 
in Mr. Dorrien Smith's garden in the Scilly Islands, in 
1888, and in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in June, 1891. 

Morcca Mobinsoniana has, as will be seen by the citations 
under the description, been referred both to Morcea and to 
Iris, genera which differ but slightly in botanical cha- 
racters, but most markedly in geographical distribution. 
Fortunately our plant is a Morcea, on both counts, for the 
perianth segments are sessile on the top of the ovary, and 
not united into a tube, as in Iris, and whereas there are no 
species of Iris in the Southern hemisphere, Morma is almost 
confined to Africa and South of the Tropics, a few species 
only reaching Abyssinia. M. Bobinsoniana is the only 
extra African species, and is one of the many proofs of 
affinity between the Australian and the Cape Floras. 

The native country of M. Bobinsoniana is an islet 
only six and a half miles long by three quarters of 
a mile in average width, lying between Australia and 
New Zealand, in Lat. 31° S., Long. 158° E., about four 
hundred miles east of Port Macquarie. In its vege- 
tation the islet partakes of those of Australia, New 
Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, with a most remarkable 
predominance of endemic forms, especially of Palms, three 
species of which are peculiar to it. 

The plant figured was received at Kew from Mr. Chas. 
Moore, F.L.S., of the Sydney Botanical Gardens, in about 
1873, and flowered for the first time on June 20th, 1891, 
continuing to bloom till the beginning of the following 
October, and having had in the interval four hundred 
and fifty-seven flowers, all borne by three branches of 
the panicle, and which remained open only one day, o-iving 
out a delicious odour. — J. D. //. 



Fig. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, arm of style -.-enlarged. 



7213. 











/y 




drook^Day &SonImp. 



L. Reeve A. C? London. 



Tab. 7213. 

CHIRITA DEPEESSA. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace.*:. Tribe CrRTANDREiE. 
Genus Chirita, Sam. (BentJi. & Ilook.f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 1022.) 



CniBiTA depressa; humilis, surculifera, foliis rosulatis breviter late petiolatis, 
late ovatis obtusis obtuse serratis penninerviis utrinque sericeo pubemlis 
subtus niveis nervis crassis, cymis paucifloris breviter peduncuJatis, 
floribus 1| pollicaribus calycis pubescentis et glanduloso-pilosi laciniis 
5 inajquilongis linearibus erectis tubo corollas multo brevioribus, corolla? 
violacese tubo subinflato lobis rotundatis triplo longiore, staminibus 
medio tubo insertis, filamentis incurvis glaberrimis, antheris parvis co- 
baarentibus nudis oblongis parallelis, staminodiis 2 flliformibns incurvis 
glandulosis capitellatis, tertio minrmo erecto demissius inserto, disco 
annulari sinuato glaberrimo, ovario styloque valido apice incurvo pubes- 
centibus et sparse glandulosis. 



The habit of this Ghirita is quite unlike that of any other 
of the genus known to me. A very short stout rhizome 
bears a tuft of rosulate leaves, and sends out all round from 
below the insertion of the leaves stout green surculi, as 
thick as a swan's quill, that root at the apex and form 
plants similar to the parent. The whole forming a dense 
mass of foliage that quickly fills a pan. The plant is very 
succulent, of a pale green colour, except the under sides of 
the leaves, which are clothed with an almost snow-white 
pubescence. The flowers, which are abundantly produced, 
are disposed in bibracteate cymes terminating very short, 
stout peduncles, so short that the flowers appear nestled 
amongst the leaves. Its nearest congener is 0. ebumea, 
Hance (Journ. Bot. vol. v. 1883, p. 168), a< native of the 
same province in China, which has similarly thick almost 
fleshy leaves, with broad petioles and covered with the 
same very fine pubescence, but the leaves are quite entire, 
and instead of being many- and penni-nerved the nerves 
are very few and irregularly disposed and branched. The 
flowers of G. ebumea are similar to those of G. depressa in 
form, but its cymes are on long ascending peduncles, thei 
January 1st, 18^2. 



corolla is ivory-white streaked with red, the bracts are very 
large and broad, the anthers are densely bearded at the 
back, and amongst the numerous specimens in the Her- 
barium at Kew none show any signs of having been in- 
creased by slickers from the rootstock. EJ. eburnea is a very 
handsome species, and it is to be hoped that Mr. Ford, who 
has sent dried specimens, will procure living plants of it. 
It must be observed that the drawing here given of 
G. depressa was taken from a very young specimen, the 
first that flowered, and it conveys no idea of the dimension 
which the plant attains ; nor does it show the mode of 
increase by suckers, for this is in all states (as grown at 
Kew) concealed by the dense foliage. 

G. depressa is a native of a district on the North river 
of the Canton (Kwantung) Province of China, where it 
was procured by Mr. C. Ford, Superintendent of the Hong 
Kong Botanical Gardens, who sent living plants of it to 
Kew in 1889, which flowered in June, 1891.—/. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Portion of leaf showing the pubescence of the surface ; 2, calyx and 
style ; 3, tube of corolla laid open ; 4, top of pedicel, disk and ovary ; [>, traus- 
verse section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



72/4. 




M. S.dBl, J X Fitch, lith. 



Hteevt 



Tab. 7214. 
CIRRHOPETALUM Thouarsii. 

Native of Mauritius and the Pacific Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Okchideje. — Tribe Epidendke^. 
Genus Ciurhopetalum, Lindl.; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 505.) 



Cibkhopetalum ^Umbellate) Thotiarsii ; pseudobulbis ovoideis alte costatis 
denium nudis, foliis lineari-oblongis obtusis in petiolum brevem angus- 
tatis supra medio profunde sulcatis eosta subtus valida, marginibus 
recnrvis, scapo elongato gracili decnrvo vaginis 2-3 brevibus appressis, 
umbella pluriflora uriilaterali, bracteis subulatis pedicellis dimidio bre- 
vioribus, floribus pallide flavis, sepalo dorsali hemispherico glanduloso- 
punctato in caudam longiorem filiformem apice subincrassatam repente 
constricto, lateralibus dorsali pluiies longioribus cohserentibus impunctatis 
lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis enerviis supra convexis, petalis sepalo 
dorsali Eequilongis ovatis aristatis glanduloso-punctatis pilis elongatis 
ciliatis, labello aureo breviter stipitato recurvo linguseformi obtuso basi 
dilatato puberulo marginibus recnrvis cronulatis, column® brachiis 
elongatis subulatis erectis, anthera antice erosa. 

C. Thouarsii, IAncll. in Bot. Reg. sub t. 832 ; Gen. & Sp. Orchid. 58, partim. 
(non JBot. Beg. 1838, t. 11, nee Bot. Mag. t. 4237) ; Rolfe in Oard. Citron. 
1891, vol. ii. p. 69. 

C. umbellatum, Hoolc. et Am. Bot. Beech. Toy. p. 71 (excl. cit. Reinvj.). 

Bulbophyllum longiflorum, Thouars Orchid. Afr.i. 98; (non S. Moore in Baker 

Fl. Maurit, 346) ; Guillem. in Ann. Sc. Nat. Ser. 2, vii. (1839), p. 179 ; 

Seem. Fl Viti, p. 301. 

Epidendrum umbellatum, Forst. Prodr. 323. 

Cymbidium umbellatum, Spreng. Syst. Veg. vol. iii. p. 723. 



A very interesting plant, as being that upon which the 
genius Cirrhopetalum was founded by Lindley in the 
Botanical Register in 1824. Subsequently, in the " Genera 
and Species of Orchidece " Lindley identified it with the 
Mauritian plant of Thouars, three others from very distant 
countries, namely the Zyloglossum umbellatum, Reinw., of 
Java, the Epidendrum umbellatum, Forst., of the Society 
Islands, and a Philippine Island plant, afterwards figured 
in the Botanical Register (vol. xxiv. t. 11) and in this 
work (t. 4237) as C. Thouarsii. Referring to the vast 
distances between these localities, Lindley observes that 
in respect of its distribution G. Thouarsii has no parallel 
amongst Orchideous plants. Such would no doubt be the 
January 1st, 1892. 



case if proved, but considering the difficulty of identifying 
orchids from herbarium specimens, and the very scanty 
materials at the great orchidologists' disposal fifty years 
and more ago, it appeared to me that so remarkable a 
statement required confirmation, and T have therefore 
carefully investigated the subject with the aid of the more 
numerous and better specimens now accessible at Kew, 
with the result, that if not wholly reliable, Lindley's con- 
clusion was so in the main. 

Of the Mauritian G. Thouarsii, Lindley had to depend 
solely on the plate in Thouars' work, and for the supposed 
Javan plant he no doubt relied on a meagre description, 
for a copy by Lindley of a drawing by Reinwardt himself 
of his Zyloglossum umbellatum, which I find in Lindley's 
Herbarium (and which was no doubt obtained after he had 
referred the species to G. Thouarsii), shows that it is a very 
different species, with a broadly elliptic leaf, obtuse lateral 
sepals, and no awn to the dorsal sepal, while the petals are 
quite glabrous ; further it is a native of the Celebes, not of 
Java. With regard to the Philippine plant, which was 
afterwards published as G. Thouarsii in both this Magazine 
and in the Botanical Register, it differs from the Mauritian 
m the numerous flowers, the dorsal sepal is smaller and 
narrower, the petals are sharply serrate, not fringed with 
long hairs, and the arms of the column are much shorter, 
ine bociety Island plant remains. I have examined speci- 
mens of it from the Tahiti, the Fiji, and Society Islands and 
tail to nnd any difference between them and the Mauritian. 
Thus confirming Dr. Lindley's statement in the main, 
though not m detail. I have only to add that the colour of 
the flower varies in both the Mauritius and Pacific Islands 
specimens from yellow to a reddish brown. 
TW,1 ."It \T Se ^ t0 the Royal Gardens by Mr. E. E. 
a Z p ' ° f th f *?" 0riental Ba *k Corporation; Mauritius, 

thf M wl W 1 ° if" taken U P the St 4 of t^ Bota ^ °* 

much nf int T 1 n ° d °. Ubt b ^ dili ^ fc exploration add 
mucn or interest to its flori • if fl^L^ i • ±i x> 1 

Gardens in July, 189 l.lj \n ,'ff Qowered m tlie Ro ^ 1 



W5 










Tab. 7215. 
iris fostebiana. 

Native of Afghanistan. 

Nat. Ord. IfilD&X. — Tribe MoBJERK. 
Genus Iris, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 686.) 



' 



IEIS (Xiphion) Fosteriana; bulbo oblongo-cylindrico tunicis mcmbranaceis 
bruimeis, ribris radicalibus crassis, foliis 4-6 confertis rigidulis falcatis 
lanceolatis acuminatis pallide viridibus marginibus incrassatis, pedunculo 
brevi saspissime monocephalo, spathns valvis ventricosis subscariosis pal- 
lide viridibus, perianthii tubo producto segmentis exterioribus luteis 
obovatis iu limbo ungui lato breviori, segmentis' interioribus pendulis 
lilaciuis obovato-unguiculatis, styli cristis magnis oblique ovatis. 

I. Fosteriana, Aitch. et Baker in Trans. Linn. Soe. Ser. 2 Bot. vol. iii. p. 114. 

This new species of bulbous Iris belongs to the same 
group as L orchioides (Bot. Mag., tab. 7111), and L sindjar- 
ensis (Bot. Mag., tab. 7145). From a horticultural point of 
view it differs from all its allies in the diversity in colour 
of the different parts of the flower. It was discovered in 
1884 by Surgeon-Major Aitchison, F.R.S., whilst acting 
as naturalist to the Afghanistan Delimitation Commission, 
growing plentifully at Badghis in dry soil on the low hills 
at an elevation of three thousand feet above sea-level. 
These spring-flowering bulbous Irises of Central Asia are 
very difficult to cultivate in our comparatively damp sun- 
less climate, but here, as in so many other cases, Professor 
Foster, after whom the species was named, has surmounted 
the difficulty, and our drawing was made from^ specimens 
which he sent from Cambridge this present spring. 

Desck. Bulh oblong-cylindrical, about an inch in diameter, 
with brown membranous outer tunics produced above its 
neck and many fleshy root fibres. Leaves four to six, con- 
temporary with the flowers, crowded, falcate, lanceolate- 
acuminate, firm in texture, pale green, channelled down 
the face, strongly ribbed and furnished with a pale thickened 
horny boarder. Peduncle very short, bearing usually one 
rarely two clusters of flowers. Spathes ventncose, about 

January 1st, 1892. 



two inches long; valves subscariose and pale green at the 
flowering time. Perianth-tube reaching to the top of the 
spathe or slightly exserted ; outer segments bright yellow 
with a spreading obovate blade streaked with black, shorter 

dnlL £ a ¥fn mg u aW; iimer se 2 ment s shorter, pen- 
l7' b ;^ ^ obovate-nnguiculate. Styles above an 
inch long ; crests large, obliqne, ovate. Anther about as 
long as the filament.—/. G. Baker. 

4^^Ja^Sfe 2 ' ^ View ° f anther ^ 3 ' ^ ° f ^oid 



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„ 7213.— (Til RITA DEPRESSA. 
,, 7214.— CTRRHOPETALTJM THOUARSII. 
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1216 




Tab. 7216. 

PRIMULA PoissoNr. 

Native of China. 



Nat. Ord. Primulace^. Tribe Pjumule^e. 
Genus Pbimula, Linn.; (Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant., vol. ii. p. G31.) 



Pbimtjla Poissoni; elata, robusta, glaberrima, efarinosa, _f oliis rigide coriaceis 
glaucescentibus obovato-oblongia apice rotundatis argute dentatis, 
costa valida in petiolum latissimum vaginantem dilatata, nervis ascen- 
dentibus gracillimis, scapo valido foliis multoties longiore tereti, floribus 
perplurimis amplis in verticillos snperpositos congestis, bracteis lanceo- 
latis erectis berbaceis pedicellos asquantibus, calyce j poll, longo tereti 
supra medium 5 fido basi rotundato lobis erectis ovato-lanceolatis sub- 
acutis, corolla? tubo infnndibulari calyce paullo longiore intus puberulo, 
limbo explanato roseo, lobis obcordatis crenulatis, ore annulo crenato 
aureo instructo, antheris parvis basin versus tubo corollas sessilibus, 
ovario globoso, stylo breve stigmato capitato, capsula obovoidea late 
umbonata calyce fere asquilonga. 

P. Poissoni, Franchet in Bull. Soc. Bot. Fr. vol. xxxiii. (1886) p. 67; Pax 
Monogr. Prim, in Engl. Jahrb. : Forbes & Hemsl. in Jour n. Linn. Soc. 
vol. xxvi. (1889) p. 41. 



On Tab. 5916 is figured Primula japoniw, which may be 
considered as the type of the Asiatic species with superposed 
whorls of flowers; and at Tab. 6732 another species with 
similar inflorescence, P. prolifera, Wall., under which 1 
classed the Javanese P. imperialis, Jungh. {Cavlmema 
chrysantha, De Vriese), an error which I hasten to acknow- 
ledge, and shall shortly atone for by the publication of the 
true P. imperialis, which has flowered at Kew, and of which 
a drawing has been made for this work. Recent discoveries 
in the interior of China have added several other species 
with the same inflorescence, including the subject ot the 
present plate, which differs from both those first mentioned 
in the much more coriaceous pale subglaucous leaves, the 
funnel-shaped tube of the corolla, and especially in the 
capsule, which is not globose but shortly obovoid. 

Seedlings of P. Poissoni were received at the Royal gar- 
dens, Kew, from the Jardin des Plantes, Pans m 1890 
plants from which flowered in a greenhouse m April, and 



January 1st. 1892. 



continued to bloom all summer. Mr. Watson informs 
me that the plant here figured produced eight scapes 
ot flowers, and in fact flowered itself to death as 
did several other specimens ; and that many of the 
corollas were six-lobed. This tendency to overflowerino- 
under cultivation must be constitutional, for Messrs. 
Lemome and Sous, of Nancy, had a plant which bore 
twelve coeval scapes. The native specimens are quite 
small, with leaves two to three inches long, and a solitarv 
Render scape with few flowers in a whorl ; whereas in the 
Kew plant the sca pe is two feet high, almost as thick as a 
goose quiiUf a dark green, and sometimes spotted with 



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Tab. 7217. 
PRIMULA IMPERIALISM 

Native of Java. 

Nat. Ord. Peimulace,b. Tribe PmmclevE. 
Genus Pkimula, Linn.; {Benin, et JTooh.f. Gen. Plant., vol. ii. p. 631.) 



Primula imperialis ; elata, robusta, sub-efarinosa, foliis elongato-obovatis spa- 
thulatisve anguste deaticulatis apice rotundatis subcoriaceis, inter nervos 
depressos creberrime bullato-reticulatis, subtus pallidioribus dense lacu- 
nosis glandnlis minimis globosis obsitis, costa ampla crassa, scapo valido, 
verticillis dense multi-floris,bracteis numerosis erectislineari-subnlatisbasi 
confluentibns quam pedicellos suberectos brevioribus, calyce cupulari ad 
medium 5-fido basi rotundato, lobis triangularibns erectis obtusis. corolla 
ocbraceae tubo calyce duplo longiore, fauce subinflato crenulatim annu- 
lato, lobis fere rotundatis 2-fidis, ovario globoso, stylo gracili, antheris 
parvis, capsula globosa calyci a^quilonga late umbonata, seminibus 
miDutis obtuse angulatis papillosis. 

P. imperialis, Jungh. in Tijdschrift. Nat. Gesch. vol. vii. p. 298 ; Miquel Fl. 
Ind. Bat. vol. ii. p. 1001 ; Watson in " The Garden" xl. 266, cum Ic. 
Oankrienia cbrysantha, Be Vriese in Jaarb. der Maatch. van Tuinhow. 
1850, p. 30 {cum Ic. in Flore des Serres i'erata) ; Plant. Jungh. vol. i. 
p. 80. 

As I have elsewhere stated (under P. Poissoni, Plate 
7216), I erred when figuring and describing the Himalayan 
P. prolifera (Plate 6732), in referring the Javan P. im- 
perialis to that species. Comparing the figures now 
accessible of the two plants, as hitherto grown in this 
country, their union would seem to be hardly excusable, 
but a reference to the wild Javanese specimens of 
of P. imperialis, preserved in the Herbarium, and a com- 
parison of these with those of P. prolifera, will modify that 
opinion, so different are some of the native specimens of 
the former from the gigantic robust plant that has flowered 
at Kew, and so large are some of those of P. prolifera 
which even rival its congener. Nor must it be overlooked, 
as bearing on the subject, that recent investigations have 
proved that many Javanese and other Malayan mountain 
plants, once supposed to be endemic, are absolutely 
identical with Himalayan. On this matter I have only 
further to say,- that a most careful re-examination of the 
Avild forms of the two species elicits as the only apparent 
distinctions the more robust habit, the thicker texture, 
broader mid-rib, close reticulate nervation, and bullate 
surface of the foliage of the Javanese plant and its 
deeper coloured flowers. 
Fejsruar* 1st, 1892. 



In size, form, and denticulation, and glandular under- 
surfaces the leaves are identical, though the toothing is 
usually smaller and more regular in imperialis (in both the 
leaves are sometimes quite entire), and both have a slender 
scape and far fewer flowers with more slender pedicels 
than in the cultivated P. imperialis. Both species have 
fruited at Kew, and I have closely examined their seeds, 
hoping therein to find distinctive characters ; but in vain, 
their differences are hardly appreciable. In both the seeds 
are papillose and obtusely angled, those of P prolifera are 
slightly the larger, and their papilla? somewhat shorter. I 
may here observe that P. Poissoni (Tab. 7216), the wild 
and cultivated forms of which are as widely different as are 
the analogous conditions of P. imperialis, has ripened its 
seeds at Kew, and these are very small, subcubical, acutely 
angular, most minutely pitted, but not papillose. 

To clear up the history of these " Imperial " Primroses, 
it will be necessary to cultivate plants of P. prolifera from 
Wallich's original habitat of the Khasia Hills in Eastern 
Bengal, altitude four thousand to six thousand feet, where 
I collected it myself in 1849, and sent seeds to Kew, which 
(as m the case of so many trials of P. imperialis) did not 
germinate. The Khasian may prove distinct from the 
Himalayan plant, which grows only at elevations twelve 
thousand to sixteen thousand feet, and may prove to be 
the same as the Javan, or a third species. 

P. imperialis is a native of the summits of the loftiest 
Javan mountains at eight thousand to nine thousand feet 
elevation, where it was discovered by the Dutch botanist 
ot the Buitenzorg Gardens, upwards of half a century acr 
and was more recently figured by De Vriese, with the 
name ot banknenia chrysantha, under an erroneous view of 
the structure of the fruit. The Kew plants were raised 
from seeds sent by Dr. Traub from the Buitenzorg Gardens 
m 1839. Mr. Watson informs me that the seeds were 
soaked m hot water and sown in tropical heat, and the 
seedlings ; removed into a greenhouse as they germinated. 
-Also that a plant was placed in the open border in mid- 
summer last which is alive up to this date (January 15, 
1892) and which, though damaged as to the foliage, looks 
as it it might survive the winter.— J. D. H. 

u/S«^ *— •! 5, ova iT :- 



1218. 




MSdel,J.N.PAcKWh- 



Wneartl 



L Rsove & C° London. 



Tab. 7218. 
HYDNOPHYTUM Forbesii. 

Native of New Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. RtrwACEiE. — Tribe Psychotrie*. 
Genus Hydxopiiytum, Jack. ; {Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 132.) 



Hvdnophytum Forbesii ; rhizomate tuberoso lob*to echinato, caulibus bre- 
vibus teretibus, foliis subsessilibus obovatis obtnsis v. aubacufcis, floribus 
axillaribus brevissime pedicellatis, calycis tubo brevissimo ore truncato, 
corollje tubo elongato gracili cylindraceo lobig ovatis pluries longiore 
extus lobisque glaberrimis, fauce exannulato tubique parte saperiore 
villosis, filamentis antheria brevioribus, stylo gracili, stigmatibus 2 in- 
clusis, drupa ellipsoidea umbonata, pyrenis 2 obovoideo-oblongis com- 
pressis apice 2-lobis inter lobos longe rostratis. 



I must refer to Plate 6883 (Myrmecodia Beccarii) for 
some general observations on the wonderful group of 
epithytic plants to which Signor Beccari has given the very 
appropriate name of " Piante ospitratice," from their 
tuberous rootstocks affording nests for certain species of 
ants. Of these there are two principal Asiatic genera, 
natives of the Malayan and Pacific Coasts and Islands, 
both belonging to the order Ruhiacea, and closely allied 
to one another. These are Myrmecodia, with eighteen 
species, and Hydnophytwm with thirty, most of the species 
of both of which were discovered by Signor Beccari him- 
self and are admirably described in detail and figured by 
him in his capital work " Malesia," a work now abandoned 
through lack of the requisite funds to carry it on ; and 
with respect of which abandonment it may truly be said 
that the glory of Italian Botany has for the present departed. 

I can nowhere find amongst the species hitherto 
described, any with which H. Forbesii can be confounded ; 
it is the' only one hitherto described with an ecbinate 
rhizome, that character being hitherto supposed to bo 
confined to Myrmecodia. In its long slender corolla tube 
it resembles the Pacific Island species alone, of which there 
are six or seven, all differing in other characters ti-om 
E. Forbesii. Its foliage so closely resembles that of the 

February 1st, 1892. 



II. formicarium (the only British Indian species as yet 
known) that in a dried state they are indistinguishable ; 
but the rhizome of II. formicarium is unarmed, the corolla 
tube is very short and glabrous within, the fruit is crowned 
with a cup-shaped calyx-limb, and the pyrenes have no horn. 
H. Forbesii was discovered in New Guinea by Mr. Forbes, 
author of a "Naturalist's Wanderings in the Eastern 
Archipelago," who, in 1886, sent the plant here figured to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowered in July, 1889, 
and fruited in the following October, and again in 1891.— 
J. D. H. 



o Jn B -' 4 (Wif°? ° f ¥i*°h ""d A ™"- 8 i. 2 . H°<«™ : 3, portion of corolla laid 
TL fyTe^LTJ. e ' ^ and fr ° nt V ' eW ° f W™» ' 7 ' seod I 8 > «"»T„ : - 



7219 




MS. del, J.N.HtchMh 



Vmcertt Bro oks,T)ay 



i. Reeve 4 C? London. 



Tab. 7219. 
begonia glaucophtlla. 

Native country unknown. 

Nat. Ord. Begoniace^:. 
Genus Begonia, Linn. (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 811.) 



Begonia (Gaerdtia) glaucophylla ; glaberrima, caulibus elongatis pendulis 
ramosis albo-maculatis, foliis petiolatis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis 
marginibus tindulatis penninerviig, basi rotuudatis v. cordatis, supra laste 
subtus pallide viridibus, paniculis effusis pedunculatis amplis multifloris 
uutantibus pendulisve,bracteis amplisovatis floribusquemagnis Jseteroseis ; 
fl. masc. sepalis 2 late ovatis obtusis, petalis 2 sepalis multo minoribus 
lineari-oblongis obtusis incurvis, staminibus numerosis toro parvo insertis, 
filamentis brevissimis liberis quam antheras lineari-obovatas apice 
retusas mnltoties brevioribus ; fl. foem. sepalis 4 late ovatis obtusis con- 
cavis, styli ramis 3 brevibus, fasciis papillarura bis tortis cinctis, ovarii 
placentis 2-fid.is segmentis extus solum ovuliferis, capsula late 3-alata, alis 
rotandatis roseis sepala asquantibus, ala uaa ceteris multo majore. 



It is with hesitation that I propose the establishment as 
a species, of a Begonia of which neither the fatherland nor 
the history is known ; and which moreover may possibly 
be a hybrid. It seems however that so fine a plant as that 
known at Kew and long cultivated and widely distributed 
as J9. glaucophylla should be represented by a good figure, 
such being the only means of insuring the recognition of a 
member of this enormous and difficult genus. That it 
belongs to the American section of the genus Gaerdtia, 
A.DC? (genus of Klotzsch), is I think certain, though 
differing °from the character given in the Prodromus and 
by Klotzsch, in having only four sepals in the female flower, 
all others hitherto described having five. Two species of 
the section Gaerdtia are figured in this work. The one 
B. undulata, Plate 2723, with leaves a good deal like those 
of B. glaucophylla, but very small white flowers and narrow 
wino^s to the fruit ; the other, B. Kunthiana,'P\a,te 5284, is 
totally different in habit and foliage, and has few large 
white flowers with obovate male petals. 

The nearest described ally of B. glaucophylla is probably 
B. mactdata, Raddi, better known as B. argyrostigma, 

February 1st, 1892. 



Fisch., under which name it is figured in the Botanical 
Register (Plate 666) ; this differs in its deeply unequally 
cordate leaves purple beneath, with white ocellate spots 
above, and a stout cartilaginous margin ; the flowers too 
are quite small, and very pale pink, with five male sepals 
about a quarter of an inch long, and narrow subequal 
wings of the fruit. The white spots in the stem of glauco- 
phylla indicate to me the possibility of its being a hybrid 
between the B. maculata and some other species. 

B. glaucophylla, grown in a basket, is a magnificent 
plant, from its long pendent branches, bright shining leaves, 
and copious clusters of highly ornamental flowers; as 
stated above it has for years been in cultivation at Kew. — 

j. b. 11. 



Figs. 1 and 2, Front, and 2, back view of stamen ; 3, style arms ; 4, trans- 
verse section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



7220. 




M.S.aeLJlTIitdhlitlt 



cant Brooks ,Day A 



L .Reev* & C9. London 



Tab. 7220. 
vicia narbonensis. 

Native of Eastern Europe and Western Asia. 



Nat. Ord. Legcminose^e. — Tribe Vicie.e. 
Genus Vicia, Linn.; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 524.) 



Vicia narbonensis ; annua, robnsta, glabra v. sparsim pilosa, caulibus 4-gonis 
angulis incrassatis, stipulis auriculaeformibus dentatis pectinatisve, foliis 
inferioribus uni-superioribus2-4-jugis,rachi valida apiceramoso-cirrhifera, 
foliolis oblongis v. ovato v. oblongo-obovatis crassiusculis integris v. den- 
tatis nervis impresses, floribus 2-5 in racemum brevem dispositis, calycis 
lobis subulato-lanceolatis recurvis, corolla calyce triplo longiore sordide 
rubra v. violacea stri ita, stylo infra apicem barbato, legumine late lineari 
compresso apiee incurvo breviter rostrato, margine utroque setifero setis 
basi bulbosis, seminibus globosis v. oblongis laavibus v. rugulosis. 

V. narbonensis, Linn. Sp. PI. 737 ; DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 364 ; Koch, Synqps. 
Fl. Germ. 215. 

V. serratif'olia, Jacq. Fl. Austr. App. t. 8 ; Sturm, Flora Deutschl. vol. viii. 

t. 32. 
V. narbonensis et serratifolia, Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. ii. pp. 577, 578. 



The chief interest attaching 1 to Vicia narbonensis rests in 
its having been supposed to be the origin of the common 
Bean {Vicia Faba, Linn. ; Faba vulgaris, Moench.). For this 
supposition the two weightiest arguments are (1) that the 
two plants belong to, and are the only species of one and 
the same section of Vicia ; and (2) that V. Faba is said 
to have been found wild within the same area as that 
covered by V. narbonensis, viz. the desert of Mungan, in 
Mazanderan on the southern shores of the Caspian Sea, 
where it was collected by Lerche, a Russian traveller, 
whose specimen is preserved in the Herbarium of the St. 
Petersburgh Botanical Gardens. With regard to the first 
argument, it is much invalidated by the fact of the 
differences in almost every organ of the two species, 
especially in the strongly nerved, usually serrated leaflets 
of V. narbonensis, with many very spreading nerves and 
strongly reticulate nervules, and its flattened pod.s, 
which are remarkable for the little bristles with bulbous 
bases along both sutures; and of which bristles 1 And no 
traces in the cultivated V. Faba. On the other hand, 

FEBRUAKT 1st, 1892. 



V. narbonensis, which has an immense geographical range, 
in cultivated and virgin soil, from Southern France to the 
Caucasus, and from North Africa to Arabia, Persia, and 
North India, is a variable plant, the stipules being some- 
times almost entire, the number of leaflets varying from two 
to eight and from quite entire to acutely deeply toothed. 
Their nervation too varies, though I never find the few 
almost straight nerves of V. Faba, the leaflets of which are 
three-nerved from the base. Then again, though V. Faba 
was no doubt found apparently wild by Lerche, there is 
no evidence that it was indigenous ; and Boissier, whose 
knowledge of the Oriental Flora was unrivalled, expressly 
says that he never saw it in an indigenous state. The only 
author who expressly claims to have seen V. Faba wild is 
Munby, who includes it in his " Catalogus Plantarum in 
Algeria sponfce nascentium," as being found at Oran. His 
specimen is in the Kew Herbarium, and ticketed by him- 
self, " Vicia Faba, L., spontanea in pascuis argillosis, 
Figuia, Oran, Maii, 1865," but Cosson, whose knowledge of 
Algerian plants ranked with Boissier's of Oriental, affirms 
that he has never seen a wild specimen from North Africa. 

For some of the above information I am indebted to 
M. De Candolle's valuable " Origine des Plantes Cultivees," 
where all the very earliest authorities for the history of 
the cultivated bean are given, together with much interest- 
ing information. This author does not favour the 
hypothesis of Vicia narbonensis being the origin of the 
Bean; but rather appears to consider the two plants 
as generically distinct. On the contrary, Bentham, 
who made the Leguminosas a life-long study, says in the 
" Genera Plantarum " (vi. p. 525) that V. Faba only differs 
from narbonensis in the thicker subfleshy or coriaceous 
pericarp, and is perhaps a race of that species produced 
by cultivation. 

The specimen of V. narbonensis here figured was raised 
from seed by Messrs Sutton and Co., the eminent seeds- 
men, and sent by them to Kew for determination in June 
of last year. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Standard; 2, wing; 3, keel; 4, stamens; 5, portion of ovary and 
ovule: — all enlarged. 



7221 



\ y 







L.Ree 



Tab. 7221. 

NEOBENTHAMIA gracilis. 
Native of Eastern Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. OrcuidejE. — Tribe Vanbi: k. 
Genus Neobexthamia, Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. ii. p. 272. 



Neobenthamia gracilis ; terrestris, caulibus elongatis ramosis flexuosis sar- 
mentosis foliosis, foliis lineari-elongatia acuminatis basi vaginantibus 
recurvis, floribus in racemum brevem strictum terminalembreviter pedun- 
culatum dispositis patentibus albis longe pedicellatis, bracteis parvis 
setaceis, perianthii campanulati sepalis petalisque latioribus oblon^is 
obtusis apicibus recurvis, labello a basi patente sepalis paullo longiore 
sessili obovato-oblongo subtruncato marginibus crispatis, disco medio 
aureo et maculis rubris 2-seriatim dispositis ornato basi puberulo, 
columna breviuscula crassa mutica, clinandrio parvo, anthera subhemi- 
spberica umbonata, polliniis 2 globosis inaequaliter 2-fidis (v. 4 herai- 
sphericis uno cujusvis paris minore) glandula rotundata squamaeformi 
breviter stipitatis. 

N. gracilis, Rolfe, I.e. 



A very singular terrestrial orchid, differing much in 
habit from any hitherto described, though clearly I think 
belonging to the tribe Vcmde&, subtribe Gymbidese, as Mr. 
Rolfe has determined. The long tufted stems, which attain 
four feet, are branched sparingly and are clothed with leaves 
almost throughout with grassy flaccid leaves. They do not 
root but apparently rest for support on neighbouring bushes, 
for under cultivation they require to be tied to a stake. 
The leaves are subdistichous, and droop, much as in some 
narrow-leaved Gymbidia. and the raceme is terminal as in 
that genus, from which Neobenthatnia differs conspicuously 
in the shorter hardly spreading perianth and the lip not 
being erect, nor embracing the column, but spreading from 
the base and slightly recurved beyond the middle. The 
position of the genus in the " Genera Plantarum " should 
I think be next to Gyperorchis, a genus with difficulty 
distinguishable from Gymbidium, but of which the Jong 
perianth segments do not spread except at the tips. 

In naming this plant Neobenthamia , Mr. Rolfe has paid 
a well-merited tribute to the excellency of my late colleague 

February 1st, 1892. 



Mr. Bentham's work, especially as regards the revision of 
the Orchidex in the " Genera Plantarum," which has been 
justly described as "a masterpiece of research and 
scientific taxonomy." The u neo " was very judiciously 
added, in order to avoid confusion with the two previously 
founded (though abandoned) genera named Benihamia, one 
of which (which still bears in all gardens the honoured 
name) being a species of G or mis ; the other is a Herminium, 
which genus again will I doubt not in a future " recensi 
Orchidearum" have to be merged into Habenaria. 

Neobentliamia is one of Sir John Kirk's many discoveries 
in the Zanzibar kingdom ; living plants of it were sent by 
him to the Royal Gardens in 1884, which flowered in a 
stove in February, 1890.—/. B. E. 



Fig. 1, Lip and column; 2, front view of column; 3, anther; 4 and 5> 
pollinia : — all enlarged. 



v 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTENTS OF No. 566, FEBRUARY, 1892. 



Tab. 7217.— PRIMULA IMPERIALIS. 
„ 7218.— HYDNOPHYTUM FORBESII. 
„ 7219.— BEGONIA GLAUCOPHYLLA. 
„ 7220.— Y1CIA NARBONENSIS. 
„ 7221.— NEOBENTHAMIA GRACILIS. 

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HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA: 

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By GEORGE BE NT HAM, F.R.S. 

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ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
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mpanion to Btu Handbook," and other British Floras. 

THE COLEOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. 



Structural 

iden. 

r»D BT OILBIRT ilD 1IVISGT0K, LD., CLBBKKHW EIX, K.C. 




M S del, J.N.FitdOrth, 



Vincent Brook^Day I San Imp 



IBeeve 8lG9 London 



Tab. 7222. 

CEREUS GIGANTEUS. 
Native of Southern California. 

Nat. Orel. Cacte.«. — Tribe EcuiifocACTEjB. 
Genus Cebeus, Haw. ; (Benth, & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 819.) 



Cebeus (Lepidocereus) giganteus ; erectus, cylindricus, simplex v. parce 
ramosus et candelabriformis, basin et apicem versus attenuatus, ramis 
paucis erectis, vertice applanato tomentoso, costis infra sub 13 sursum 
18-21 rectis acutatis, sinubus acutis, areolis prominulis ovato-orbiculatis 
junioribus albido-tomentosis, aculeis rectis basi bulbosis tenuiter aulcatis, 
radialibus 10-16, inferioribus brevioribus, summis 4-5-cEBteris mul- 
toties longioribus validis, floribus apicem versus caulis aggregatis, ovario 
ovoideo, sepalis oblongo-ovatis obtusis imbricatis nudis v. parce aeuleatis 
tecto, calycis tubo mediocri, sepalis lineari-oblongis obtusis arete imbri- 
catis inferioribus in axillis lanigeris,!intimis 10-15 apicibus undulatis 
spathulatis, petalis 25-35 obovato-spathulatis convexis recurvis albis, sta- 
minibus numerossisimis, antheris dense congestis, stylo incluso, stig- 
matibus 12-18 linearibus obtusis, bacca obovoidea v. pyriformi, pericarpio 
demum 3-4-valvi, pulpa coccinea, seminibus numerossisimis oblique 
obovoideis lucidis exalbuminosis, cotyledonibus foliaceis tramatis. 

C. giganteus. Engehn. Cact. of Emory Rep. p. 22 (1848) ; in Am. Journ. Sr. 
& Arts, Ser. ii. vol. xiv. (1852) p. 335 ; Si/nops. of Qactese of XJ. States, in 
Proc. Am. Acad. Arts & Sc. vol. iii. (1856) p. 287 ; in Pep. of Whipple's 
Railroad Surv. vol. iv. (1856) p. 36 ; in Rep. of Emory Mitx. Boundary 
Survey, vol. ii. pt. i (1859) p. 42, t. LXL, LXTl., et Tab. Front. Treleaie 
&A. Gray, Rot. Works of G. Enqelm. pp. 113, 122, 125, 140, 161, 202, 
t. LXI. LXIL ; Rot. Zeit. 1854, p. 616. 



The flowering of this wonderful plant in England must 
be considered one of the triumphs of Horticulture. It has 
been long known to science, very imperfectly at first, from 
accounts brought by W. H. Emory of a gigantic Cactus 
which he saw in 1847 during his military reconnaisance 
from the Missouri River to San Diego in California, and 
who figured it in several plates that accompany his Report 
(pp. 72 — 79). From seeds brought by Mr. Emory to Dr. 
Engelman, of St. Louis, that botanist pronounced it to be 
probably a species of Gcreus, but it was not till Dr. Parry 
accompanied a second expedition to the same regions, in 
1852, that the plant was scientifically known. From Dr. 
Parry's notes Dr. Engelman was enabled to describe the 

March 1st, 1892. 



species botanically in the American Journal of Science and 
Arts (November, 1852), when he named it G. giganteus. 
In that account he observes that " it is no doubt the same 
plant of which Humboldt makes mention in his work on 
New Spain (vol. ii. p. 225), where he says that the Spanish 
missionaries found at the foot of the Californian mountains 
nothing but sand or rocks, on which grew a cylindrical 
Cactus (Organos del Tunal) of extraordinary height." In 
a subsequent account of the plant in the Report of 
Whipple's Expedition on a route along the thirty-fifth 
parallel, at p. 37, doubts are expressed as to the probability 
of Engelman's surmise being tenable, on the ground of 
Humboldt having given no other characters for his 
" Organos del Tunal " beyond its size and edible fruit; 
but surely if it be granted, as it must be, that G. giganteus 
is the tallest of all Cadi, and bears an edible fruit, it is 
natural to suppose that it is that referred to by Hum- 
boldt's informants, and that to this illustrious traveller 
we owe the first allusion to its existence. 

G. giganteus inhabits the dreariest and most torrid 
deserts of the American continent, in Southern California 
and Arizona, from the William's and Gila rivers to 
Sonora, Lat. 35° to 28"- N. There trees of it are 
described as " giving the landscape a very peculiar ap- 
pearance. As far as the eye can reach, in the valleys or 
on the mountains, little else but rocky boulders, and the 
stately yet awfully sombre aspect of this Germs can ba 
seen." Individual plants are said to attain a height of 
sixty feet, with scarcely a branch, and nearly two in 
diameter, and as if to add to their uncomeliness the thick 
fleshy substance of the upper part frequently rots away, 
exposing a woody interior framework, which breaks up 
into a crown of brush-like fragments that wave about in 
the wind. Young plants are globose and very slow of 
growth, they are found only under the shade of the " Green 
bark Acacia," Gerridium floridanum, a starved bushy tree 
that is scattered over the desert. Dr. Engelman mentions 
having one such infant Cereus of this species which he 
believed to be eight or ten years old, but which was only 
nve or six inches in diameter. 

The flowers, which are produced when the plant attains 



a height of ten or twelve feet, appear from May to July, 
and are succeeded by pear-shaped fruits three inches long, 
which burst open by three or four valves, exposing a bright 
red pulpy edible core full of seeds ; this core falls to the 
ground, the valves being retained on the tree and reflexed, 
when they resemble the petals of a scarlet flower. The 
pulp is sweet, somewhat resembling a fig, and is greedily 
eaten by the Indians, both raw and made into a kind of 
molasses and conserve. The flesh of the plant itself is 
bitter, in this respect differing from that of most Cacti, of 
which the flesh is acidulous. The Indian name of the 
plant is Suwarrow or Saguara, and the Mexican Pitajaya. 

For the above information I am indebted to the notes 
and observations of Drs. Engelman and Parry, scattered 
through the various Reports and papers cited above. 

The stem of the Kew plant is fourteen feet high and 
four and a half in girth, at the thickest part ; on its arrival 
it weighed twelve hundred weight and had no roots. It 
was purchased from Messrs. A. Blane and Co., Nursery- 
men, of Philadelphia, who own a piece of land in Mexico 
where this species grow. On arrival in 1890 it was potted 
and placed in the south end of the Palm House, where it 
flowered in July, 1891.— J. D. 11. 



Fig. 1, Apex of lower sepal ; 2, inner sepal ; 3, stigmas -.—all enlarged. 




7223 



1 



M.S.tHJ.ttRtchlrth. 

^1 



^5ncentBrooksJ)aj&SonIinp 



____ 



Tab. 7223. 

DIANTHUS callizonus. 
Native of Transylvania. 

"Nat. Ord. Caeyophtlle^e. — Tribe Silene.e. 
Genus Dianthus, Linn.; (Benth. et HooJc.f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 144.) 



Dtanthes (dentati) eaUizonus ; perennis, glaberrimus, multicaulis, caulibus 
ad apices fere foliosis, foliis patulis glaucis linearibus v. lineari-lanceolatis 
acuminatis v. obtusis carinatis uninerviis margine integerrimis laevibus 
v. scaberulis, floribus amplia solitariis breviter pedunculatis roseis zona 
interiore rubella albo punctata, bracteis 2-4 ovato-lanceolatis obtusis 
v. acutis berbaceis erecto-patentibus calyce paullo brevioribus y. sequi- 
longis, calycis cylindracei rubro striati lobis brevibus ovatia cilio- 
latis v. glabris acutis v. subaristatis petalorum lamina calyce longiore 
late cuneata striata apice crenata basin versus pilis erectis longis laxe 
barbata, sty lis brevibus inclusis. 

D. callizonus, Schott et Kotschy, tx Schott in Bet Zeit. vol. ix. (1851) p. 192 ; 
Walp. Ann. vol. iv. p. 275- 

D. nitidus, Baumg. Knum. Storp. Transylv. vol. i. p. 390 (non Kit.) ex Nym 
Ansp. 101. 

This lovely pink is a native of the calcareous alps of 
Transylvania, called Piatra Krajuluj, at an elevation of 
six thousand to seven thousand five hundred feet above the 
sea, where it was first made known by the celebrated 
botanical collector Kotschy. According to Nyman, how- 
ever, it is the D. nitidus of Baumgarten's Transylvanian 
Flora, published in 1816, who cites as the habitat of 
D. nitidus the very mountains and elevation which 
D. callizonus inhabits. The affinity of D. callizonus is with 
D. alfinus (Plate 1205 of this work) which has similarly 
solitary flowers, bracts, calyx, crenate petals with long 
hairs on the surface, and a deep red zone of colour at their 
bases speckled with white; butD. callizonus is a very much 
finer and more robust plant, with larger flowers and more 
glaucous leaves, like those of D. czesius ; the flowers, too, 
are of a paler colour, though JVIr. Dewar informs me that 
they do occur of a brighter colour than they are repre- 
sented in the figure here given, which faithfully represents 
the plant as placed before the artist. 

Mauch 1st, 1892. 



According to a note by the late Mr. Ball, in his 
Herbarium now at Kew, that able European botanist who 
had botanized in Transylvania, regarded D. callizonus as 
hardly different from D. nitidus, which is a much taller, 
more slender plant, with much smaller flowers. 

D. callizonus was purchased from F. Sundermann, of 
Bavaria, in 1889, and flowered in the Rockery of the Royal 
Gardens in June, 1891, where, as Mr. Dewar informs me, 
it flourishes in an Eastern exposure. — J. D. H. 



Fi?. 1, Bracts and calyx, of the natural size; 2, petal; 3, stamens and 
pistil ; 4 and 5, anthers -.—all enlarged. 



1224. 




MSieLJ-UTilcJiMh. 



, Day &. Scmlmp 



LHeeve&C Landar 



Tab. 7224. 
gongora gratulabuxda. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. Orchideje. — Tribe Vande.*. 
Genus Go.vgora, Ruiz. & Pav ; (Bentk. et Hook.f. Gen. PL vol. iii. p. 549.) 



Gongora gratulabunda ; pseudobulbis oblongis alte acute costatia, foliis 
oblanceolati8 caudato-acuminatis 5-nerviis, racemo laxifloro, pedunculo 
rachi pedicellisque elongatis rut'o-f uscis, bractaia parvulis, floribus pen- 
dulis flavidis fusco rubro creberrime maculatis, sepalorum margin ibu« 
revolutis, dorsali oblongo-lanceolato acufo erecto, lateralibus reflexis 
ovato-lanceolatis acutis, petalis cultriformibua acuminatis columna bre- 
vioribus, labelli hypochilo cuneiforme tumido biaristato basi ecornuto, 
epichilo hypochilo sequilongo et aquilato ovato tumido undulato baai 
dorso saccato. 

G gratulabunda, Beichb. f. in Bot. Zeit. L. (1857) 157 ; Xen. Orchid, vol. ii. 
p. 169, t. 170, f. 3. 



Of the species of Gongora hitherto described and figured 
G. gratulabunda, appears to me to be most nearly related to 
G. bufonia, LindL, Bot. Reg. v. xxvii. (1841) t. 2, and v. 
xxxiii. (1847) t. 17, differing in the much larger and very 
differently coloured flowers ; those of G. bufonia being more 
or less of a vinous red and unspotted. In the form of the 
lip, from which the chief specific characters in the genus 
are taken by both Lindley and Reichenbach, they entirely 
agree, except that the gibbosities at the base of the 
hypochile in G. bufonia are entirely absent in G. gratula- 
bunda. In this respect the latter agrees with G. portenUm 
(Tab. 6284) a species with very broad sepals, and with 
the epichile of the lip reduced to a subulate process. Other 
very closely allied forms of the species are figured by 
Reichenbach in his Xenia Orchidacea, as G. retrorsa, rfeno- 
glossa, Seideliaua aromatica and superjlua, all natives of the 
Northern States of South America, and very difficult to 
distinguish. 

G. gratulabunda is, according to Reichenbach, a 
doubtful native of New Grenada. It was discovered by 
Warscewicz, and was flowered in January of 1857 by the 
March 1st. 1892. 



famous collector of Orchids, the late Consul Schiller, of 
Hamburg. 

The drawing "was made from a plant procured from 
Messrs. F. Sander and Co., of St. Albans, which flowered 
in the Royal Gardens in June of last year, in a tropical 
house. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Column with petals ; 2, lip ; 3, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



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7225. 







/incent BrooTaJJay & 



Reeve ScC?. London. 



Tab. 7225. 
CHRYSANTHEMUM rotundifolium. 

Native of Hungary. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. Tribe Aktuemide^:. 
Genus Chrysanthemum, Linn. (Bent/i. & Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 424.) 



Chrysanthemum (Pyrethrum) rotundifolium ; perenne glabriusulum caule 
acute 5-6-gono, foliis radicalibus longe petiolatis ovato- v. cordato-sub- 
rotundis crenato-dentatis, caulinis ovatis serratis in petiolum latum 
angustatis supremis floralibusque sessilibus lanceolatis argute dentatis, 
floribus corymbosis, pedicellis elongatis acutangulis, involucri bracteis 
oblongis -late scariosis margine nigris denticulatis, floribus glaberrimis. 
ligulis albis pollicaribus linearibus apice 3- denticulatis, acheniis teretibns 
striatis cupula membranacea lacera coronatis. 

C. rotundifolium, Waldst. et Kitaib., ex Willd. Sp. PI. vol. iii. p. 2144, ef 
PI. Par. Hungar. vol. iii. p. 262, t. 236; Wahlenb. Fl. Carpat/i. 27o, 
n. 889 ; Baumgart. Enum. Strip. Transylv. vol. iii. p. 107. 

C. montanum, Geners. Fl. Scepus. Elench. n. 808 (non Linn) 

Leucanthemum rotundifolium, DO. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 46. 

Matricaria rotundifolia, Poir. Diet. Suppl. vol. iii. p. 608. 

Pyrethrum ? Waldsteinii, Janka, Adat. Fiume Floraz. Ismeret. 1874, 177, ex 
Nym. Gonsp. 372. 

Tanacetum "Waldsteinii, Schultz Bip. ex Nym. I. c. 



Chrysanthemum rotundifolium is a very showy Hungarian 
Michaelmas Daisy, differing much from those in general 
cultivation by its strict rigid habit, acutely angled stem 
and branches, corymbose many-flowered inflorescence and 
broad leaves. In habit it belongs to the section Pyrethrum 
(genus Pyrethrum of Gasrtner), which includes most of the 
perennial white-flowered species of Chrysanthemum, but it 
differs from that section as defined by modern authors, in 
the terete, not ribbed or angled achene, and in the cupular 
pappus, and it accords with no section as hitherto defined. 

C. rotundifolium is a native of the mountain valleys of 
Hungary, Transylvania, and Bucovina. It is rather a low- 
orowing species, not exceeding two feet high in the Royal 



March 1st, 1892. 



Gardens, where it flourishes both in the Herbaceous ground 
and in the Rockery, flowering freely throughout the 
summer. The plant was procured from F. Sundermann, 
of Bavaria, in 1890.— J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Involucral bract; 2, ray-flower; 3, achene of the same; 4, disk- 
flower ; 5, stamens ; 6, style of disk-flower : — all enlarged. 



7226 




Vincent Brooks .Day &So 



L-Beeve &.CSLCH 



Tab. 7226. 
LYSIMACHIA pabidiformis. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Prijiulace^. Tribe Lysimaciiie/e. 
Genus Lysimachia, Linn.; (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant., vol. ii. p. 635 ) 



Lysimachia (Tridynia) paridiformis ; erecta, sparse puberula, caule basi 
simplici nudo superne verticillatim ramoso, foliis verticillatis sessilibus 
ellipticis v. obovato-lanceolatis acuminatis subtus glaucescentibus 
floribus in capitula pedunculata mullibracteata congestis majusculis 
aureis, sepalis subulato-lanceolatis glandulis linearibus notatis, corolla 
campanulata 5-loba, tubo intus pulvereo loins ovatis obtusis, filamentis 
inaaquilongis infra medium in tubum pulveream confluentibus, antheris 
oblongis inclusis, ovariio fere globoso. 

L. paridiformis, Francli. in Bull. Soc. Linn. Paris (1884) p. 433 : Forbes 
& Hemsl. in Joum. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. (1889) p. 55. 



The genus Lysimachia is more numerously represented 
in China than in any other country of the globe, no fewer 
than thirty-five species being enumerated in Forbes and 
Hemsley's enumeration of the plants of that country, to 
which, no doubt, many more are to be added. Proceeding 
eastward or westward from China the number rapidly de- 
creases to nine in the whole continent of North America 
fourteen in British India, six in the Oriental region of 
Boissier, and eight in Europe proper. 

L. paridiformis belongs to the section Tridyida as adopted 
by Asa Gray in his Botany of the Northern United States of 
America, and which is characterized by the opposite or 
whorled sessile gland-dotted leaves, yellow corolla marked 
as well as the calyx by glandular streaks, unequal filaments 
monadelphous below, without interposed staminode3, and 
few seeded five-valved capsules. Of described species it is 
perhaps nearest to L. quadrifolia of the Eastern United 
States, which has leaves in whorls of three to six and 
foliaceous bracts amongst the flowers, but in that species 
the flowers are very small, and have long axillary filiform 
pedicels. 

L. jjaridiformis was raised at the Royal Gardens from 
seeds sent by Dr. Henry, from Ichang, in China, on the 

March 1st, 1892. 



Yangtse Kiang river, in 1889, and the plants raised 
from them flowered in the open border in July, 1891. 
It appears to be perfectly hardy. It has the habit, Mr. 
Dewar informs me, of losing its basal leaves when coming 
into flower. — /. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Calyx; 2, section of flower with stamens and pistil; 3 and 4. 
stamens ; 5, pistil : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7227. 
ltlium 1'rimulinum. 

Native of Upper Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^:. Tribe Tulipe^i. 
Genus Lilidm, Linn. (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 816.) 



Limttm (Eulirion) primulinum ; bulbo magno globoso squamis lanceolatis, 
caule stricto erecto 3-4-pedali, foliis sparsis dissitis sessilibus lanceolatis,' 
floribus paucis corymbosis vel umbellatis pedicellis longis cernuis] 
periantbio infundulari primulino-luteo immaculato 5-(5-pollieari, seg- 
mentis oblanceolato-oblongis subconformibus diraidio superiori subrecurvls 
staminibus perianthio paulo brevioribus, antberis linearibus brunneis 
stylo stamina longe snperante. 

L. neil gherrense, Gollett et Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol xxviii p 138 non 
Wight. 

L. claptonense, Hort. Low. 



This is another new Lily which has been imported by 
Messrs. Hugh Low & Co., from the Shan States, in Upper 
Burma. Its nearest allies are L. nepalense, Bot. Mag., 
tab. 7043, and L. neilgherrense, Bot. Mag., tab. 6332. 
From the latter it differs by its shorter and more open 
tube, brown anthers, and style as long as the perianth 
segments. It is mentioned in Collett and Hemsley's paper 
in the Journal of the Linnean Society under the name of 
neilgherrense, as having been collected at Boni, in the Shan 
States, by Mr. Boxall. It forms a connecting link between 
the two sections Eulirion and Martagon by having the 
perianth-segments subrecurved in the upper half. Our 
drawing was made from a specimen flowered by Messrs. 
Hugh Low & Co , in September, 1891. 

Descr. Bulb large, globose ; scales lanceolate. Stem 
stiffly erect, glabrous, three or four feet long. Lea res 
scattered, lanceolate erecto-patent, sessile, glossy, bright 
green, three or four inches long. Flowers about three, 
arranged in a corymb or umbel, on long cernuous pedicels 
with a large lanceolate leaf at the middle. Perianth 
openly funnel-shaped, pale yellow, unspotted, tinted out- 

April 1st, 1892. 



side with green in an early state, five or six inches long ; 
segments oblanceolate-oblong, the outer and the inner nearly 
uniform, above an inch broad at the middle, conmvent in 
an open funnel in the lower half, sub recurved in the upper 
half. Stamens rather shorter than the perianth ; anthers 
linear, brown. Style much overtopping the anthers and 
reaching to the very tip of the perianth-segments.— J". G. 
Baker, 

Tig. 1, An anther, front view ; 2, an anther, back view ; 3, pistil complete :— 
all enlarged. 




M.S.ad,JH £ - 



Vincent Brooks, Qay * Soixlmp 



.ve & CSliC 



Tab. 7228. 
HABENARIA longecalcarata. 

Native of the Western Ghats of India. 

Nat. Ord. Oechide^;. — Tribe Ophrydb^. 
Genus Habenasia Willd. ; (Benth. et Boole, f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 624. 



Habexaria longecalcarata; foliis radicalibus patulis oblongis acutis v. 
acuminatis, scapo vaginato 1-2-floro, floribus longe pedicelfatis, bracteis 
elongatis pedicellos vaginantibus eosque aequantibus v. superantibus 
oyario elongato curvo alte costato, sepalo dorsali oblongo obtuso concavo' 
viridi, lateralibus longioribus reflexis falcatis obtusis pallidevirescentibns, 
petalis erectis sepalo dorsali sequilongis lineari-oblongis obtusis viridibus 
labello sepalis multoties longiore cuneato trilobo albo, lobis lateralibus 
cuneatis truneatis 'erosis, marginibus recurvis, intermedio parvo paullo 
breviore lineari obtuso, calcare longissimo viridi labello 3-4 plo longiore, 
ore constricto, antherse obtusa cruribus incurvis, rostello magno erecto 
obtuso, polliniis oblongis corvis stipite bialato, glandula minima, pro- 
cessubus stigmatosis porrectis decurvis. 

II. longecalcarata, A. Rich, in Ann. Sc. Is at. Ser. 2, vol. xv. p. 71, t. 3 ; Wight 
Ic. PI. Ind. Or. t. 925 ; Dalz. & Gibs. Bomb. Fl. p. 268 ; Hook. f. Fl. Brit. 
Ind. vol. vi. p. 141 inpart, et p. 197. 

H. longicorniculata, Grah. Cat. Bomb. PI. p. 202. 



This is one of three closely allied long-spurred Habe- 
narias confiued to the Western Ghats of the Peninsula of 
Jndia, and characterized by their large flowers and the 
great length of their spurs, and which have been much con- 
founded in botanical works. They are (1) H. longicomu, 
Lindl. (H. montana, A. Mich, in Ann. Sc. Nat. Ser. ii. vol. 
xv. t. 73), which has acuminate leaves, bracts shorter than . 
the long-beaked ovary, three to eight-flowered scapes, the 
lip not longer than the lateral sepals, and the spur about 
twice as long as the ovary ; (2) H. decipiens, Wight 
Tc. PI. Ind. Or. vol. v. Pt. i. p. 14 (H. montana, Wight 
I. c. t. 927, not of A. Rich.) with more numerous (six to ten) 
smaller flowers, very short pedicels, the lip rather longer 
than the sepals, and a spur four or five times as. long as 
the beaked ovary ; and (3) the plant here figured. This 
latter I assume to be the same as H. longicorniculata of 
Graham in his " Catalogue of Bombay Plants " (though his 

ApKit 1st. 1892. 



description might apply to any of the three species), because 
he gives as its habitat, Kandalla (a suburb of Poona), in 
the South Concan, where Dalzell had collected H. longe- 
calcarata. 

H. longecalcarata has been found along the whole 
range of the Ghats, from Poona to Travancore, ascend- 
ing to about five thousand feet, growing in open places. 
The specimen here figured was communicated by the 
Rt, Hon. Sir Mountstuart Grant Duff, Bart., G.C.S.I., 
F.R.S., late Governor of Madras, who flowered it at his 
residence, York House, Twickenham, in September, 1891. 
I may remind readers that the garden of this same York 
House was, when occupied by His Royal Highness the 
Comte de Paris, famous for its collection of terrestrial 
Orchidese, see Orphrys Speculum and 0. lutea, Plates 5868 
and 5941, and Serapias Lingua, Plate 5868, all of this work. 
H. longecalcarata has the merit of remaining long in 
flower. The specimen here figured was received in flower- 
ing state in September, 1891, and was still flowering in the 
cool orchid house of Kew in the following November. — 
J. D. E. 

Fig. 1, Petal ; 2, front view of column, showing its ascending arms tipped 
with the glands of the pollinia, the interposed rostellum, and the lip of the 
anther behind, also the two stigmatic appendages one on each side of the 
contracted mouth of the spur ; 3, side view of the same ; 4, the same with 
the rostellum removed; 5, a pollinium :— all enlarged. 



7229. 




.ith. 









Tab. 7229. 
CIKRHOPETALUM ornatissimum. 

Native of Assam and the Eastern Himalaya. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. Tribe Epldendee£i. 
Genus Cikrhopetaltjm, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant., vol. iii. p. 504.) 



Cirehopetalum ornatissimum ; rhizomate robusto, pseudobulbis ovoideis 
tetragonis, folio elliptico-lanceolato, seapo suberecto paucifloro, bracteis 
subulato-lanceolatis, floribus magnis pallide carneis rubro-striatis, sepalo 
dorsali ovato-lanceolato basi truncato pilis rubris longe ciliato, lateiali- 
bns dorsali dnplo longioribus attenuato-acuminatis, petalis ovatis fasciculo 
palearum sanguinearum terminates, labello breviter stipitato oblongo 
obtuso incrassato recurvo, columna longiuscula apicem versus utrinque 
arista porrecta decurva instructa. 

C. ornatissimum, Beichb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. ii. p. 424 ; Warner 
Orchid. Album, t. 369 ; Hook./. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 773. 



The general resemblance of this remarkable plant to 
the still more remarkable C. Collettii figured in this work 
in October of last year (Plate 7198), is obvious, notwith- 
standing the marked difference in their pseudobulbs and 
mode of growth ; the pseudobulbs in this organ being in 
ornatissimum ovate and four-sided, in Collettii subglobose 
and deeply four lobed ; and the scape in this being erect 
and arising from the side of the pseudobulb as usual in 
the genus, but in Collettii it is pendulous and arises 
from the young growths before the new pseudobulbs are 
developed. Other differences are to be found in the longer 
leaves of C. ornatissimum, the truncate base of the dorsal 
sepal, which is not tipped with a bunch of paleas; in the 
shorter lateral sepals, and especially in the much less 
highly developed paleaa of the petals, in the scabrid ridges 
of the lip, and in the bristle-like appendages at the tip of 
the column not being strongly decurved. 

G. ornatissimum was first described from specimens 
stated to have been received from Assam, the reputed 
native; country of the specimen here figured ; but as, ac- 
cording to a figure in the collection of drawings belonging 
to the Botanical Gardens of Calcutta, it is a native of 

April 1st, 1892. 



Sikkim, its more exact locality is probably the outer 
ranges of the Himalaya Mountains, from Sikkim east- 
wards. In the above-mentioned figure the sepals and 
petals are yellowish- green, and the red streaks are broken 
up into purple dots. In the plate given in Warner's 
Orchid Album the leaves are broadly elliptic with rounded 
retuse tips, dark green with no yellow margin, the 
bracts are longer and the flowers much larger, of a dull 
purplish blue, the lateral sepals end in longer tails, and the 
petals have an almost black purple centre and greenish 
border ; it doubtless represents a variety. 

G. ornatissimum was received at Kew from the Ro} r al 
Botanical Gardens of Calcutta in 1 890 (under the erroneous 
name of BulbophyUum Mannii), and flowered in the tropical 
orchid house of Kew, in September, 1891.— J". I). H. 



Fig. 1, Dorsal sepal; 2, palese of the petals; 3, column and lip; 4, lip; 
5, anther : — all enlarged. 



7230. 




M.3.dd 



a Brooka.Day&Son.Imp 



1 . Hhhvk & C ° London. 



Tab. 7230. 
STREPTOCARPUS Galpini. 

Native of the Transvaal. 

"Nat. Ord. Gesnerace^:. — Tribe Cyrtandre^e. 
Genus Streptocarptts, Lindl.; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 1023.) 



Streptocarpus Galpini ; folio solitario radicali sessili ovato-oblongo obtuso 
integerrimo basi subcordato supra sericeo-villoso inter nervos profunde 
impressos tnmidis, subtus cameo nervis validis rubris, scapis plurimis 
pedicellis calycibus ovariisque dense glanduloso-pubescentibus, floribus 
racemosis, pedicellis robustis elongatis erectis v. patulis, calycis 5-partiti 
segmentis linearibus obtusis tubo corolla? raulto brevioribus, corolla? sub- 
campanulatffi! violaceae tubo lente incurvo, lobis 5 a3qualibus patenti- 
recurvis orbiculatis tubo aequilongis, filamentis pilosis, anthens reni- 
i'ormibus, staminodiis filiformibus glabris, stylo breviglanduloso stigmate 
simplici. 

S. Galpini, Hook.f. in Hogg Journ. of Horticulture, N.S. No. 593 (November 
5, 1891, p. 388), fig. 76. 

The plant here figured is the eleventh species of Strepto- 
carpus that has appeared in this Magazine, and it differs 
from all previously described in the very short broad corolla 
tube, rendering the corolla almost campanulate, though 
with a curvature in the tube. In all other species the 
corolla has a cylindric and more or less elongate or a 
funnel-shaped tube, usually much longer than its lobes. 

8. Galpini is one of the species of which the solitary leat 
is developed from one of the cotyledons of the embryo, as 
described under 8. Dunnii, Tab. 6903, and as is the ewe 
in 8. Sandersii, Tab. 5251, and 8. polyanthus Tab. 4boU ; 
and like them is a native of the Eastern South Africa It 
was discovered in the Transvaal by Mr. Ernest E Galpin, 
of Barbertown, to whom the Royal Gardens are under great 
obligations for many new plants both living and p Jied 

In a letter to Mr. Watson, Assistant-Curator of the Royal 
Gardens, Mr. Galpin describes this Streptocarpus as grow- 
ing in crevices of cliffs and under rocks only on the tops 
of the mountains, just below the brows of the highest 
peaks, as on the « Bearded Man," which forms one oT the 
boundaries of Swazieland, thirty miles from Barbeiton. 

Aphil 1st, 1892. 



Mr. Galpin mentions a crimson-flowered species with 
leaves eighteen inches long by thirteen wide, and numerous 
flowers, as growing in profusion on the same mountain. 
Can this be S. Dunnii, mentioned above, which was found 
on the Spitzkop at three thousand six hundred to six 
thousand feet elevation ? and the leaves of which attain, 
under cultivation at Kew, three feet in length and the 
flowers of which are bright rose-coloured. 

The seeds of S, Grilpini were received from Mr. Galpin 
in May, 1890, and the plants raised from them flowered 
in October of the following year in the Succulent House 
of the Royal Gardens. Mr. Watson has planted a row of 
this species along the margin of the Aloe bed in the same 
house, which will no doubt have a brilliant effect in the 
coming season. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and ovary; 2, base of corolla, stamens, and staminodes ; 
3, stamen; 4, ovary; 5, transverse section of ditto: — all enlarged. 



7237. 



'N* 














'dxlith. 









Vincent Brooks.Eay&Son.Imp. 



I Reeve &C°L<mdan. 



Tab. 7231. 
BEAUFORTIA spabsa. 

Native of Western Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Mybxhcejc. — Tribe Leptosperme^e. 
Genus Beaufortu, Br. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 705.) 



Beaufortia spama ; frutex, inflorescentia excepta glaberrima, foliis £-£ polli- 
caribus sparsis patulis elliptico-ovatis v. -lanceolatis subacutis nervosis, 
spicis axi centrali ramorum enactis oblongis densifloris, rachi calycibusque 
glabris v. pubescentibus, calycis tubo \ poll, longo, lobis tubo subasqui- 
longis rotundatis, petalis orbicularibus sepalis duplo longioribus, sta- 
minum fasciculis cujusvis floris ad 5 pollicaribus coccineis, ungue filiformi, 
antheris ad 7 longe stipitatis minutia globosis, connective) crasso, valvis 
parvis orbicularibus, ovario 3-loculari vertice depresso villoso, stylo 
filiformi apice deflexo, loculis 1-ovulatis. 

B. sparsa, Br, in Ait. Hort. Kew, Ed. 2. vol. xiv. p. 419 ; DO. Prodr. vol. iii. 
p. 211 ; Schauer in Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. vol. xxi. p. 14 (errore 18), et >i< 
Lehm. Plant. Preiss. vol. i. p. 149; Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. ii. p. l':i<5 ; 
Illustr. Horticole. 1886, t. 594. 

B. splendens, Paxt. Brit. Fl. Gard. vol. xiii. p. 145, cum Jr. 



This brilliant shrub was discovered at the close of the 
last century by Archibald Menzies, F.L.S., Surgeon and 
Naturalist to Vancouver's Expedition, in King George's 
Sound, South Western Australia, now the site of the town 
of Albany, a locality abounding in rare and beautiful plants, 
and especially noted as the single habitat for Geplialotus 
follicularis. The genus Beaufortia consists of twelve 
species, and is a member of the subtribe Heaufortise of 
Myrtacem, which is confined to Western Australia. The 
only other species that have been introduced into cultiva- 
tion is B. decussata, Br., also a native of King George's 
Sound, and figured at 1. 1733 of this work, and B. Dampieri, 
A. Ounn., t. 3272. 

The curious inflorescence of this and allied Aus- 
tralian genera, and which presents the appearance of a 
spike the axis of which is produced beyond it into leafy 
branches, is the result of a consecutive series of closely 
contiguous leaves being reduced to bracts and bearing each 
a flower in its axil, the whole being hidden by the cataract 

April 1st, 1892. 



of pendulous bundles of stamens. In the case of B, sparsa 
there are about five bundles of stamens in each flower, and 
each bundle consists of a thread about an inch long bearing 
about eight long- stalked diverging filaments, of which two 
are opposite and placed considerably below five that 
terminate the thread ; the filaments each bear a minute 
globose anther with a thick clavate connective and two 
lateral orbicular valves. In B. Dampieri the bundle of 
stamens is flattened, dilated above, and cleft into nine to 
fifteen filaments. This last is a most interesting plant, as 
being one of the first brought from Australia to Europe, in 
the little Herbarium formed by the great and accomplished 
navigator Dampier, at Shark's Bay, in 1699. In 
B. decussata again the bundle of filaments branches at the 
extremity into seven or more, and the anthers have 
conical or almost horn-shaped valves. 

B. striata was introduced into England upwards of half 
a century ago, and is much less frequently cultivated than 
it deserves to be. It has long been a resident of the 
Temperate House at Kew. The plant from which the 
drawing is made is a compact shrub four feet high which 
flowered in September, 1891. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Leaf ; 2, bract ; 3, flower ; 4 and 5, anthers ; 6, pistils -.—all enlarged. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTENTS OF No. 568, APRIL, 1892 



Tab. 7227. — L ILIUM PRIMULINUM. 

., 7228.— HABENARIA LOXGECALCARATA. 

„ 7229.— CIRRHOPETALUM oRXATISsl MUM. 

„ 7230.— STREPTOCARPUS ( ; ALPI NI. 

„ 7231 — BEAUFORTIA 8PARSA. 

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Tab. 7232. 
LILIUM Lowir. 

Native of Upper Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Lii,iace.e. Tribe TVlipejE. 
Genus Lilium, Linn. {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 816.) 



LlLlUM (Bulirion) Loivii; bulbo magno globoso squamis lanceolatia, canle 
stricto erecto glabro 3-4-pedali, foliis perpluribus sparsis linearibua ses- 
Bilibus, floribus circiter 3 cernuis longe pedunculatis, perianthio late infun- 
dibulari 3-4-pollicari segmentis oblongo-lanceolatis supra medium recurvis 
extus albis intus dimidio superiori albis immaculatis dimidio inferiori 
flavo viridi tinctis punctis pluribus minutis rubro-purpureia decoratis, 
genitalibus perianthio paulo brevioribus, antheris brunneis, stigmate vix 
antheras eminente. 

L. nepalense, Collett et Heinsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxviii. p. 138, t. 22, 
non D. Don. 



The exploration of Upper Burma has brought to light a 
new field for Lilies, and we are much indebted to Messrs. 
Hugh Low and Co. (after whom the present species is 
named) for the pains they have taken to bring them into 
cultivation. The nearest allies of the present plant are 
L, nepalense and L. Bakerianum. The former has been 
figured lately in the Botanical Magazine (tab. 7043), so 
that the two plants may easily be compared. The latter 
differs by its erect flowers, shorter stamens, and inner 
segments of the perianth much broader than the outer. 
It is figured (tab. 22), and the country where these new 
lilies grow is fully described, in a paper by General Collett 
and my colleague, Mr. W. B. Hemsley, F.R.S., in the 
twenty-eighth volume of the Journal of the Linnean 
Society. The collection made in this region by General 
Collett in 1887-88 contained 725 species of flowering 
plants, representing 460 genera and 109 natural orders. 
It appears that no less than four of these Burmese lilies 
are new species. Our drawing was made from a specimen 
flowered by Messrs. Hugh Low and Co. in July, 1891. 

Desce. Bulb globose, two inches in diameter; scales 

May 1st, 1892. 



small, lanceolate. Stem glabrous, stiffly erect, three or 
four feet long. Leaves very numerous, scattered, sessile, 
linear, erecto-patent, two or three inches long. Flowers 
about three, corymbose or umbellate, on long cernuous 
peduncles with a linear leaf at the middle. Perianth openly 
funnel-shaped, three or four inches long ; fully expanded 
limb three inches in diameter ; segments oblong-lanceolate, 
the inner and outer nearly uniform, an inch broad at the 
middle, white with a slight greenish tinge on the outside, 
white without any spots inside on the spreading upper 
half, tinged with yellowish-green on the connivent lower 
half and covered except in the centre, with minute spots 
of claret-brown. Stamens about an inch shorter than the 
perianth; anthers large, linear, brown. Stigma just 
overtopping the anthers. — /. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, An inner segment of the perianth, life-size ; 2, stamens and pistil ; 
3, a Bingle anther; 4, ovary, more or less enlarged; 5, whole plant, much 
reduced. 



'233. 




'S.de^J.N.R 



ooks,Da.y&i ; 



e & C°Loivdor.. 



Tab. 7233. 

RESTREPIA steiata. 
Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. Tribe Epidendre,e. 
Genus Eestkepia, Humb.&Bonpl.,- (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant., vol. iii.'p. 491.) 



Eestrepia striata; caespitosa, caulibns vaginis cymbiformibus pallidis striatis 
tectis, folio sessile late ovato subacuto v. apiculato v. 2-denticulato crasse 
coriaceo pallide viridi marginibus subrecurvis pallidioribus, floribus 
1-4 graoile pedicellatis, bractea parva ovario asquilonga, sepalo dorsali 
pollicari lanceolato in filum apice clavellatnm angustato albo rubro 
fasciato, lateralibus in laminam lineari-oblongam apice bidentatara 
auream creberrime sanguineo striatam cohasrentibus, petalis sepalo 
dorsali consimilibns sed triente brevioribus, labello lineari apice 2dobo 
basi auriculis incurvis apicibns subulatis falcatis instructo grosse papilloso 
rubro-brunneo striato, columna gracili basi bigibbosa. 

E. striata, Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1891, vol. i. p. 137 ; Hogg in Journ. Sortie. 
1892, p. 275, fig. 45. 



Mr. Rolfe remarks of this little species, that, unlike 
the majority of the genus, the lateral sepals instead of being 
spotted are striped with seven sharply defined maroon lines 
on a yellow ground. The former is the case with the three 
species previously figured in this work, namely, the type 
of the genus B. antennifera, Humb. and Bonpl. (Plate 
6288, long the only known species, and considered one of 
the most singular of plants), B. elegans, Karst. (Plate 
5966), and B. Lansbergii (Plate 5257), which should 
bear the name of B. xanthopthalma, Reichb. f. (in Hamb. 
Gartenz. xxi. (1865) 300), a native of Guatemala, the true 
B. Lansbergii (Reichb. f. and Wagen. in Bonpland. ii. 23) 
being a native of Caraccas in Venezuela. 

B. striata was first known from the drawing of a flower 
in Kew Herbarium bearing the ticket, Schlim No. 68, and 
no doubt made from a new Grenadan specimen, from the 
Cauca range in which country Messrs. H. Low, of Clapton, 
sent specimens to Kew in 1892 ; but not till after the 
plant from which the accompanying drawing was made, 

Hay 1st, 1S92. 



which was sent in February, 1889, by Mr. Moore from the 
Glasnevin G-ardens (still, as heretofore, in his father's 
time), so justly celebrated for its Orchid collection.— 
J. D. H. 



Ffc. 1, Pedicel and flower ; 2, column and lip ; 3, lip ; 4, column ; 5, anther ; 
6, pollinia : — all enlarged. 







"Vincent Brooks. Day& So;: 



L. Reeve &c° London. 



Tab. 7234 

LILIUM Gkayi. 
Native of the Mountains of Virginia and Carolina. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace<e. — Tribe Tulipe^e. 
Genus Lilidm, Linn.; (Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 816.) 



Lilium (Martagon) Grayi ; rhizomate late repente bulbos parvos_ annuos 
globosos squamis parvia crassis ferente, canle gracili erecto, foliia pleris- 
que verticillatis sessilibua oblongo-lanceolatia acutia viridibus glabris, 
floribus 1-3 longe pedunculatis horizontalibus vel subcernuis, perianthio 
infundibnlari rubro vel luteo tincto, aegmentis oblongo-spathulatis cus- 
pidatis intua maculis rubro-brunneis decoratia flore exp mso leviter recur- 
vatis, staminibus periantbio distincte brevioribus, stylo clavato apice 
stigmatoso leviter trilobato ovario sequilongo. 

L. Grayi, 8. Wats, in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. pp. 256 and 302 ; 
Garden & Forest, vol. i. (1888) pp. 19, 56, and 256, fig. 4 ; Man. Bot. 
North Unit. States, edit. vi. p. 529. 



The present plant is nearly allied to Lilium cana- 
dense (Bot. Mag., tabs. 800 and 858), but was considered 
to be a distinct species by the late Dr. Sereno Watson and 
other American botanists who have watched it carefully 
under cultivation. It was first gathered by Dr. Asa Gray, 
in 1840, near the summit of Roan Mountain, one of the 
Alleghanies of North Carolina, and was refound at the 
same place in June, 1879, by Dr. Gray and Professor 
Sergeant. It has been found by Mr. A. H. Curtiss on the 
Peaks of Otter, in Virginia, and by Mr. A. H. Kelsey on 
the banks of the Linville river, at the foot of Grandfather 
Mountain, in North Carolina. As. compared with L. 
canadense, the flowers are smaller, less pendulous, and 
more open at the base, and the segments recurve very 
little, and are narrowed more suddenly at the apex. In 
the plant from which our drawing was made, which 
flowered at Kew for the first time in an open border in 
the summer of 1891, the flowers were entirely red ; but 
they are said to be often tinged with yellow, especially on 
the inside towards the base. The plant, as grown in the 
Harvard botanic garden, has proved to be perfectly hardy, 

May 1st, 1892. 



and as amenable to cultivation as L. cam-dense and 
superbum. 

Descr. Bulbs small, globose, annual, arising from a 
wide-creeping perennial rootstock ; scales small, thick, 
ovate. Stem slender, erect, glabrous, two or three feet 
long. Leaves typically, in about four whorls each of 
four to eight leaves, which are sessile, oblong-lanceolate, 
bright green, glabrous, two or three inches long and 
spread horizontally. Flowers, one, two or three, long- 
stalked, horizontal or rather drooping, red or tinged with 
yellow towards the base, especially inside. Perianth, 
openly funnel-shaped, two or three inches long ; segments 
oblong-spathulate, spotted more or less copiously with 
claret-red inside, narrowed suddenly at the apex to a small 
cusp, spreading very little when fully expanded. Stamens 
half an inch shorter than the perianth ; filaments flattened ; 
anthers oblong. Ovary oblong ; green, half an inch long ; 
style as long as the ovary, thickened gradually upwards ; 
stigmatose apex faintly three-lobed.— J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Back vio-w of anther ; 2, front view of anther; 3, pistil :— all more or 
less enlarged. r 






723S. 



U S del 




Vine em. Brooks Day & ! 



Tab. 7235. 

PILOCARPUS PENNATIFOLIUS. 
Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Rutacejs. — Tribe Zanthoxyle^e. 
Genua Pilocarpus, Vahl. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 299.) 



Pilocarpus pennatifolius ; arbuscula, ramulis paniculisque glabris v. rufo- 
puberulis, foliis alternis impari-pinnatia 1-1-J pedalibus, foliolis 2-3- 
jugis 3-9-pollicaribtis oblongis apice rotundatis v. emarginatis basi in 
petiolulum brevem angustatia coriaceis glabria v. subtus puberulis pel- 
lucido-punctatis laate viridibus, floribua in racemum spiciformem pedalem 
longe pedunculatum multiflorum rachi valida dispositis, pedicellis hori- 
zontalibns validis viridibus minute 2-bracteolatis, bracteolis dentiformibus 
alternis a basi longe distantibus, calyce minuto 5-dentato, corolla rotata 
\ poll. diam. rufo-brunnea, petalis ovatis acutis apicibus valvatis fila- 
mentis brevibus, antberis aureis, ovario 5-carpellari, stylis 5 brevibus 
coha3rentibus carpellis maturis 3-5 subcompressis dorso rotundato 
carinatis, seminibus solitariis reniformibus altis nitidis. 

P. pennatifolius, Lemaire Jard. Fleur. vol. iii. t. 263 ; Engler in Mart .• Fl. 
Bras. vol. xii. part ii. p. 137; Wa?p. Ann. vol. iv. p. 411; Bentley & 
Trimen, Med. Pi. vol. i. t. 48 : Van Hall in Siebold Flore des Jardins, 
vol. iii. 1860, p. 113, cum Ic.pict. 

P. trijugatus, Lem. (olim.) ex Walp. I. c. 

? P. Selloanus, Engler, in Mart. I. c. p. 136, t. xxx. 



Pilocaiyus pennatifolius is the source of one and that 
now regarded as the typical Jaboramli, a drug used, as 
are many others bearing the same vernacular name, in 
Brazil as a sialogogue and diaphoretic, but not introduced 
into the pharmacopoeas of Britain, India, or the United 
States. According to the excellent account of the plant 
given by Bentley and Trimen, its determination as the 
source of the ordinary Jaborandi of commerce was made 
early in 1875 by Professor Baillon of Paris, who, from an 
examination of the leaves alone, was able to refer it to the 
genus Pilocarpus, and with less certainty to P.. pennati- 
folius. In the same year Mr. Holmes, F.L.S., of the 
Pharmaceutical Society, from an examination of the fruit, 
confirmed its generic position, but in the absence of good 
flowering specimens was unable with certainty to refer it 
to pennatifolius. 

Mat 1st, 1892. 



Messrs. Bentley and Trimen go on to say that in 
Engler's revision of the genus for Martius' Flora Brasil- 
iensis, a plant from Southern Brazil described as P. Sel- 
loanus, agrees still more closely with Jaborandi, but its 
fruit also is unknown. It differs in the longer, thinner, 
and less horizontal pedicels, and is collected near Assomp- 
tion (in Paraguay) for export to Europe. Mr. Baillon 
concludes that both plants, whether species or varieties, 
yield the drug : and Dr. Trimen places P. Selloanus as a 
doubtful synonym of pennatifolius. 

Other plants called Jaborandi, and having the same 
medicinal properties, are yielded in Brazil by, amongst 
others, six species of Piperacece, an Aubletia, Rich. (Mon- 
niera, Linn.), and a Xantlioxylon. 

As a drug the P. pennatifolius was introduced into 
European practice by Dr. Coutinho, of Pernambuco, who 
gave specimens of it to Professor Grubler, of Paris, 
who tested it and found it to be an energetic sialogogue 
and diaphoretic. The parts used, are the dried leaves, 
which leave in the mouth a somewhat aromatic very slightly 
bitter and warm taste. They contain an oil and alkaloid, 
both volatile, the latter termed pilocarpine. 

P. pennatifolins was introduced into Europe by M. Libon, 
as an ornamental plant, found by him in the forests of the 
province of St. Paul in 1847, and was figured and described 
as such in 1852 in the Jardin Fleuriste. It was again in 
1860 figured in the Flore de Jardins, still in ignorance of its 
being one of the Jaborandis of commerce. It is a widely 
spread plant in Brazil, being found both in the southern 
province of St. Paul, and in the northern provinces of 
Ceara and Piauhy, and especially in the neighbourhood of 
Pernambuco ; and, as above stated, is also a native of 
Paraguay. In Kew Herbarium there is a specimen sent 
by M. Gibert from Assompcion in Paraguay, in 1858, who 
described it as a tree of considerable height. 

The figure here given is from a plant that flowered in 
the Economic House at Kew in November, 1891, where it 
has long been cultivated. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Bud and pedicel ; 2, vertical section o£ flower ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 
*>, ovary ; 6, transverse section of do. ; 7, ripe fruit :— all of the natural size. 



7 23 (si 




ItS ie 



Vir.ceiit Brooks ,I)ay. 



Tab. 7236. 
DIDYMOCARPUS laounosa. 

Native of Penang. 



Nat. Ord. Gesnbeace^;.— Tribe Ctrtandhe^e. 
Genus Didtmocarpus, Wall; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 1021.) 



Didymocarpus (Heteroboea) lacunosa ; subacaulis, tomentosus, foliis confertis 
petiolatis oblongis v. ovato-cordatis crenulatis lacunosis, pedunculis 
elongatis 2-pluri-floris, bracteis lanceolatis pedicellis decurvis brevioribus, 
floribus secundis nutantibus, calyce 5-partito v. -fido segmentis lanceolatis,' 
corollae saturate violacese tubo pollicari postice medio gibboso-inflato! 
lobis brevibus late rofcundatis recurvis integris, filamentis antherisque' 
glaberrimis, ovario lineari pubescente in stylum mediocrum angusfcato, 
atigmate bifido. 

A lovely little plant, with intensely violet-blue nodding 
flowers, introduced by Messrs. Veitch from Penang, and of 
which Herbarium specimens were sent to the Royal 
Grardeus in 1888 by Mr. Charles Curtis from damp rocks 
near the coast, in the Island Langkawi, on the west side 
of the Malayan Peninsula, north of Penang. It is 
probable indeed that Messrs. Veitch's plants were procured 
by Mr. Curtis at the latter locality, though shipped from 
Penang. 

The tribe Heteroboea of Clarke consists of eight (now 
nine) known species, all Malayan, and that to which D. 
lacunosa is perhaps most nearly allied is D. crinita, Jack, 
(Clarke in Fl. Brit. Ind., vol. iv. p. 351), figured at Plate 
4554 of this work, which is a native of Penang, Singapore, 
and the adjacent islands of Borneo and Sumatra ; it differs 
in being caulescent with a hirsute stem, longer leaves, and 
pale yellowish flowers with a much longer narrower tube. 
The native specimens of D. lacunosa have a short very 
stout rootstock and longer petioles and leaves than the 
cultivated, and the old leaves and petioles and nerves 
beneath are more shaggy with rusty brown hairs ; the 
flowers are identical. 

I am indebted to Messrs. Veitch for the loan of the 
specimen here figured, which was sent to Kew to be named 
in July of last year. — /. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Calyx and ovary ; 2, section of tube of corolla and stamens ; 3, trans- 
verse section of ovary : — all enlarged. 

May 1st, 1892. 



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Tab LOW 1 1. 

7233.— RESTREPIA STRIATA. 
.. 7234.— LILIUM GR \Y1. 

[LOCARFUS PENNATIFOLIUS. 
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L. Ill Covent Garden. 



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7237. 




MS deLJN.Hteh.litK 



L .Reeve & C° London. 



lucent, Brooks Day & Son.lmp. 



Tab. 7237. 

ALTHAEA picifolta. 

Native of S.E. Europe and the East. 

Nat. Ord. Malvace.e. — Tribe Malvejc. 
Genus Althaea, Linn.; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 200.) 



Aith^a (Pterocarpse) ficifolia ; catile erecto simplici aetis simplicibua stella- 
tisque saepius reflexis hispido in racemum laxiflorum abeunte, foliis ambitu 
orbicularibus profunde cordatis palmatim lobatis v. partitis viridibua 
supra pilosia subtua stellatim hispidulis, lobis 5-7 ovatis v. oblongia 
crenato-dentatis apicibua rotundatia, pedunculis calyce subaaquilongis, 
involucri calyce fere duplo brevioria lobia triangularibus, calycia lobis 
triangularibua acutis, corolla ampla pallide flava, carpellis dorao cana- 
liculars rugosis marginatis v. auguste alatis hirsutis, facie glabris v. 
hirtis. 

A. ficifolia, Cav. Diss. vol. ii. p. 92, t. 28, 12; DG. Prodr. vol. i. p. 437; M. Bieb. 
Fl. Taur. Gauc. vol. ii. p. 142 ; Ledeb. Fl. Alt. vol. iii. p. 236 ; Fl. Boss. 
vol. i. p. 433. 

A. rugosa, Alef. in Oestr. Bot. Wochen. 1862, p. 254. 

A. Froloviana, Fisch. ex Ledeb. Fl. Boss. vol. i. p. 433. 

Alcea ficifolia, Linn. Sp. PL p. 687 ; SMuhr Eandb. t. 191 ; Lamh. Illustr. 
1. 191 ; Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. i. p. 833 ; Besser Enum. p. 28. 



A very handsome Hollyhock, long known in cultivation, 
if, as is supposed, it is the Malva arborea of the Herbarium 
Blackwellianum, vol. i. t. 54, which, though agreeing in 
foliage and calyx, &c, has bright rose-coloured flowers. 
Boissier, in the Flora Orientalis, cites Linnaeus's Hortus 
Cliffortianus, p. 348, as the authority for Alcea ficifolia, 
on the authority of Linnaeus himself in the first edition of 
the Species Plantarum (p. 687); but it appears to me to 
be impossible to say what the Alcea foliis palmatis of Hort. 
Cliff, is, for Linnaeus cites as a synonym Malva rosea foliis 
ficus of Bauhin's Pinax, p. 313, and adds that it is hardly 
distinct from A. rosea, the common Hollyhock of our 
gardens. The only difference between Althaea rosea and 
A. ficifolia is, the usually narrow lobing of the leaves of the 
latter, and this is so variable a character that though I have 
seen no specimens of the rose-flowered Hollyhock with the 

June 1st, 1892. 



leaves offoifolia 9 the latter "has sometimes the leaves as broad 
and little lobed as those of A. rosea. Dr. Stapf , who knows 
both in the East, informs me that the Oriental Althreas 
have been too much multiplied, and that considering that 
A. ficifolia, like rosea, is very much a plant of cultivation, 
occurring in corn-fields, &c, it may well be a derivative 
form of such a plant as A. rosea, or vice versa. 

As a weed of cultivation A. ficifolia extends from Persia to 
Siberia, South Eussia, Syria, and Egypt. Dr. Stapf thinks 
its origin is most probably North- West Persia. It varies 
greatly in habit and size, from a few inches to five feet high, 
and in colour of flower from pale yellow to purple. The 
var. glabrata of Boissier is a dwarf form, to which the names 
fiavo-virens and tabrisiana have been given by Boiss. and 
Hohenacker. 

The specimen drawn is from the Herbaceous ground of 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowered last in July, 
1891, and fruited in the following September. — J. D. H. 



Figs. 1 and 2, Stamens; 3, ovary of the nat. size ; 4, fruit of the nat. size; 
5, carpel : — enlarged. 



7238. 




M.S. del, J.N.Fitek,lulL. 



Vincent Brooks Day& Son,Imp. 



L Reeve &C° London. 



Tab. 7238. 
eria mabg1nata. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. Tribe Epidendke^e. 
Genus Eria, Lindl.; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant., vol. iii. p. 509.) 



Ekia (Hymeneria) marginata; caulibus coespitosis e basi tenui clavatis tereti- 
bus striatis, foliis 3-5 subterminalibua lineari-oblongis lanceolatisve acumi- 
natis emarginatisve, pedunculis brevibus 2-floris albo-tomentosis, bracteis 
magnis ovato- v. oblongo-cordatis flavis patenti-recurvis, sepalis lateralibus 
lanceolatis falcatis acutis 5-nerviis petalisque lineari-oblongis obtusis 
7-nerviis albi3, mento rotundato, labelli recurvi pubescentis flavi rubro- 
marginatilobislateralibus rotundatis, terminale longiore rotundato, disco 
tomentoso costa crassa ad basin lobi medii tumida percurso, et callis 2 inter 
lobos lateralis instructo. 

K. marginata, Eolfe in Gard, Chron. 1889, vol. i. p. 200; Hook. /. Fl. Brit. 
Ind, vol. v. p. 800. 

A little known plant, described originally from a solitary 
specimen, believed to have been introduced from Burma. 
As in almost every case of a species of Orchid, founded on 
a single individual, subsequently procured specimens are sure 
to present differences in character from what the original 
possessed. In the present case the petals are not flushed 
with pink ; the stem is fully eight inches high, instead of 
three ; the leaves lanceolate and not linear-oblong, acumi- 
nate and not obtuse, the lateral sepals are not oblong or 
triangular-lanceolate, but simply lanceolate, nor are the 
lateral lobes of the lip uncinate, though a little incurved. 
In other respects the plant here figured agrees well with 
Mr. Rolfe's characters. 

E. marginata belongs to a small group of the section 
Hymenolxna, with a cylindric or clavate stem, few sub- 
terminal leaves, short peduncles, and large coloured bracts. 
It is perhaps most nearly allied to the Khasian E. clavi- 
caulis, Wall., which has a small rounded midlobe ot the 
lip, margined with purple ; and to the Ceylon E. Lmdleyi, 
of which the lateral lobes of the lip reach almost the same 
length as the terminal. 

Juke 1st, 1892. 



The specimen figured was sent by Mr. O'Brien, of 
Harrow-on-the-Hill, an ardent cultivator of Orchids, in 
November, 1891. It was delicately sweet scented.— 
J. D. H. J 



Jig 1, Column and lip ; 2, lip; 3, column ; 4, anther ; 5 and 6, pollinia :— 

all enlarged. 




7239 







M.S.del. JNFixch,lith. 



Vincent Brooks Day&SonJmp. 



L. Reeve & C? London. 



Tab. 7239. 
SENECIO (Kleinia) galpini. 

Nat. Ord. Composite.— Tribe Senecionide^b. 
Genua Senecio, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 446.) 



Senecio (Kleinia) Galpini-, subfrutex erectus, carnosus, glaucus, caule 
ramisque teretibus, foliis oblanceolatis acutis integerrimis baai angus- 
tata semiamplexicauli, capitulis magnis homogamis basi foliis linearibus 
lanceolatisve dissitis involucro brevioribus cinctis, involucri teretiusculi 
bracteis ad lOapicibus liberisacutis erectis.floribuslsete saturate aurantiacis 
longe exsertis hemisphaerium involucro duplo latiorem efficientibua, corolla 
tubo lobis linearibus obtusis dorso sub apico gibbis duplo longiore, styli 
ramis elongatis appendicula oblonga terminatis, acheniis striatis. 

S. Galpini, Hook. f. in Journ. of Horticulture, 1892, p. 3. 



In a horticultural point of view the suppression of the 
genus Kleinia of Haworth may be regrettable, but in a 
botanical it has no claims upon recognition other than that 
of a far from well denned section of the vast horde of 
plants included under Senecio. Bentham indeed says 
(Gen. Plant, ii. 450) that the Kleinias with a short broad 
appendage to the style arms, show a transition to Notonia, 
DO. a genus only distinguished from Senecio by this 
character and the homogamous discoid head. Under this 
definition S. Galpini is clearly a Notonia, where I should 
probably be compelled to place it had I under review a 
critical investigation of Senecionidese, and been obliged to 
retain that genus. There is this, however, to be considered, 
that the Notonias are Indian, and not succulent, and the 
Kleinias all succulent and African. Bentham indeed 
says, under Notonia, that it is hardly separable from the 
section Kleinia of Senecio, and should perhaps either form a 
section of that genus with those Kleinias that have similar 
style arms, or a genus apart, but closely allied. He adds, 
however, as a further distinction, that the corollas of 
Notonia are yellow, but of most species of Kleinia white, 
which again places S. Galpini in Notonia together with 
$. fulgens. 

June 1st, 1892. 



The species of Kleinia hitherto figured in this work are 
8. (Kleinia) Anteuphorbium (Tab. 6099) supposed at the 
date of publication to be S. African, but now known to be 
a native of Cape Juby in N.-W. Africa, it has pale yellow 
flowers ; 8. (Kleinia) pteroneur a (Tab. 5945) from Morocco, 
with many white flowers, and 8. (Kleinia) fulgens (Tab. 5590) 
of Natal, the most beautiful of all known species, from the 
vivid red of its flower heads. It is to the latter that 
8. Galpini is most nearly allied, differing in the entire 
narrower leaves, involucrate, much larger heads and colour 
of the flowers. 

8. (Kleinia) Galpini was raised at the Royal Gardens 
from seeds sent by E. E. Galpin, Esq., of Barbertown in 
the Transvaal Republic, in May, 1890, and which were 
collected on a cliff at the summit of Saddleback Mountain, 
altitude five thousand feet. The plant raised flowered 
in the Succulent House in October, 1891, and the stems 
died with the flowers. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, hair of pappus ; 3, stamens :— all enlarged. 



7240 




M 3. del JN JStchhth 



Vincent Brook 



Tab. 7240. 
porana paniculata. 

Native of the East Indies. 

Nat. Ord. Convolvulace.*:. — Tribe CoNvoivuLEiB. 
Genus Pohana, Burnt.; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 876.) 



Pokana paniculata ; ramulis foliis subtus inflorescentiaque pubescenti- 
tomentosis, foliis ovato-cordatis acuminatis basi 7-nerviis, cymis 
paniculatis multifloris subebracteatis, floribus parvis, corolla infundibalari, 
stylo abbreviato, stigmate 2-lobo, calycis fructiferi segmentis 3 valde auctis 
ceteris immutatis. 

P. panictilata, Roxb. Cor. PI. vol. iii. p. 31, t. 235 ; Fl. Ind. vol. i. p. 464 ; 
Ed. Carey & Wallich, vol. ii. p. 39 ; Don Prodr. Fl. Nep. p. 99 ; Wall. 
Cat. n. 1325 ; Chois. Convolv. n. 107 ; in DC. Prodr. vol. ix. p. 436 ; 
Brand. For. Fl. p. 342 ; Kurz. in Trimen Journ. Bot. 2873, 137 ; For. 
Flor. Brit. Burm. vol. ii. p. 220; Clarice in Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. 
vol. iii. p. 222. Dinetua paniculatus, Sweet. Sort. Brit. Ed. 2, p. 373. 



This species of Porana, of which there are eight in India, 
are amongst the most beautiful hedge-plants of that 
country. Two of them are specially abundant, the present, 
which may be met with anywhere from the base of the 
Himalaya throughout its length, to Ceylon and Burma, 
reappearing in Java ; and P. racemosa, the " Snow 
Creeper " of Anglo-Indians, which is more confined to the 
Himalayan slopes, where its masses of dazzling white 
flowers have been well likened by Mr. Clarke to snow 
patches in the jungle. The latter is the only species which 
had hitherto been figured in Europe from cultivated plants, 
being the Dinetas racemosus of Sweet. Brit. Fl. Gard. t. 
127. Another very beautiful species well worth cultivation 
is P. grandi flora, Wail., which ascends to eight thousand 
feet in the Sikkim Himalaya, and has mauve flowers an 
inch long. 

P. paniculata is a very tropical species, never ascending 
above three thousand feet in the Himalayan hot valleys, 
where it climbs trees to a height of upwards of forty feet, 
sending down showers of pendulous flowering branches 
from above, and it is equally abundant in low jungles and 
June 1st, 1892. 



on the walls of the ruinous towns of Bengal. It is one 
of the smallest flowered species, and differs from its 
congeners in the short style and solid stigma, which latter 
though usually stated to be entire or nearly so, is strongly 
2-lobed, as described by Roxburgh. 

The plant from which the specimen here figured was 
taken, was raised in the Cambridge University Botanical 
Gardens by Mr. Lynch, A.L.S., from seeds given by Dr. 
Bonavia, then of Etahwah in the North-West Provinces of 
India, in 1885. The plant flowered in October, 1892, in a 
stove.—/. I). H. 



laX^^T^J 2, calyx laid open, showing the ovary; 3, tube of corolla 
:£7™££;™T'' 4 ' StameU; *>™*J"***: i vertical section of 







Vim art Bioote,Day-&.Santmp 



Reeve &.CS L 



Tab. 7241. 

rosa pomifeea. 
Native of Europe. 

Nat. Ord. Eosaceje. Tribe Eose^e. 
Genus Eosa, Linn. (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 625.) 



Eosa ( ViIIosjb) pomifera ; frutex erectus, ramis arcuatis, aculeis sparsis rectis 
aequalibus gracilibus, foliolis snbduplo longioribus quam latis copiose 
duphcato-serratis tenuiter griseo-pubescentibus infra inconspicue glan- 
dulosis, floribus solitariia paucisve, pedunculis brevibus dense aciculatis 
sepalis adscendentibus dorso dense glandulosis persistentibua majoribus' 
saepius copiose pinnatis, fructibus globosis v. pyriformibus prsecorcibns 
disco nnllo. 

E. pomifera, Hermm. Diss. Bos. p. 171 ; Gmel. Fl. Bad. Als. vol. ii. p 410 • 
Lange in Fl. Ban. vol. xvii. p. 8, t. 2907 ; Koch Syn. Fl. Germ.' Fd. 2, 
p. 253 ; Dumort. Bos. p. 48 ; Desegl. Monogr. Bos. p. 129 ; Fries Novii. 
Fl. Suec. vol. ii. p. 150 ; Mant. vol. iii. p. 39 \ Boiss. FL Orient, vol. ii. 
p. 681 ; Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xi. p . 210 ; Gard. Chron. 1886 
vol. i. p. 237, fig. 45. 

E. villosa, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 491, pro maxim, part. Ed. ii. p. 704; Swartz in 
Palmstr. Svensk Bot. vol. v. t. 313. 

E. villosa, Var. pomifera, Desv. Journ. Bot. vol. ii. p. 117; Bedoufe Ros. vol. i. 

p. 1 , t. 67, vol. ii. p. 40 ; Hartm. Handb. Skand. Fl. p. 274 ; Lindl. Eos. 

Monogr. p. 74 ; Smith Engl. Bot. t. 583, descript. nonlc. (quod E. Sabini.) 
E. villosa var. a pomifera, Linn. Fl. Suec. Ed. ii ; Huds. Fl. Anal. Ed 2 

p. 219 ; DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 628. * ' 

E. sylvestris pomifera, Dalech. Hist. Plant, p. 127; Lobel. Stirp. 1c. vol. ii. 
p. 211 ; Parkins. Theatr. But. p. 1021 ; Bay Gat. PI. Angl. Ed. 1, p. 266.' 
E. sylvestris pomifera major, Bauh. Pinax, p. 484. 

E. ciliatopetala, Bess. En. PI. Volhhyn, p. 66 ; Beichb. Fl. Germ. Excurs. vol. 
ii. p. 616 (non Koch). 

E. resinosa, Sternb. in Beich. Fl. Germ. Fxcurs. vol. ii. p. 616 (non Desegl). 

Great Apple Eose, Parkins. Paradis.-p. 418. 



Opinions are divided as to whether this fine Rose should 
be regarded as a variety of B. villosa, or the type to which 
villosa is referable, either as a synonym or as a variety 
with smaller fruit. I have followed the best authorities, 
amongst whom must be classed Koch, Boissier, Fries' (in 
the Novitiae) and Baker, in taking Hermann's name, as 
the oldest, and of which Fries says that it is also the most 
significant. On the other hand it has been doubted 
Ji-ne 1st, 1892. 



whether the large fruited state, to which alone the name 
" Great Apple Rose " applies, occurs anywhere truly wild, 
it having been cultivated for so long a period for the size 
and fleshiness of its hips, in which respect it surpasses all 
other Roses. It has even been supposed to be indigenous 
in the north of England, but upon very questionable 
authority ; and of the Scandinavian habitats none, perhaps, 
are above suspicion, though Fries (Mantiss hi. 39) con- 
siders it to be undoubtedly spontaneous in the Alpine 
Valley of Romsdalen, Norway. Ray, who clearly refers 
to it in describing its fruit as of the size and form of a 
small pear beset with spines, gives the northern parts 
of York and Westmoreland as localities, but as Mr. Baker 
observes, he doubtless did not distinguish B. mollissima and 
tomentosa as distinct from it. In a broad sense, as B. villosa, 
it inhabits the whole of Europe. 

As cultivated at Kew the fruits are not so large or 
prickly as they are in the beautiful specimen figured, which 
was sent by Mr. Burbidge, M.A. (Curator of the Botanical 
Gardens, Trinity College, Dublin), from Mr. Walpole's 
garden, Mount Usher, co. Wicklow, with the information 
that it was found in an old garden site in the Devil's Glen, 
co. Wicklow, some years ago, and that it there forms very 
handsome glaucous leaved bushes with a sweet-briar like 
scent. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Fragment of margin of leaf ; 2, ditto of petal ; 3, ovary ; 4, achene : 
— all enlarged. 



12-12 




VwcrrO Bi-oolfK^D.iy .1 



L Rec . 



Tab. 7242. 

SYNANDROSPADIX vekmitoxicus. 

Native of Tucuman. 



Nat. Ord. AuoiDEvE. — Tribe Dieffenbaciiie.e. 



Svnanbkospadis vermitoxicus ; foliis floribus coetaneis hastato-cordatis aeutia 
undulatis nervis intimis approximatis v. basi connuentibus, petiolo 
canaliculate pedunculo robustiore tereti loagiore, spatha late cymbii'ormi 
basi apiceque caudato exceptis late aperto raarginibus recurvis extus 
sordide viridi intus pallide purpurascente liaeis brevibus saturatioribus 
striolata, spadice crasso spatha paullo breviore basi nuda, intlorescentia 
foem. brevi spathse late adnata, inflor. raasc. quam foem. pluries longiore 
et crassiore cylindracea obtusa luride purpurea; fl. masc. stamini- 
bus 3-5 iu capitulum louge crasse stipitatum counatis rimis ex- 
trorsum deliiscentibus ; fl. foem. paucis sparsis superioribus interdum 
hermaphroditis, staminodiis 4 ovatis obtixsis carnosis interdum in 
stamina totidem nlamontis dilatatis evolutis, ovario 3-5doculari in stylum 
gracilem stigmate pulvinari attenuate, loculis 1-rarius 2-3-ovulatis, 
ovnlis erectis orthotropis, baccis 3-5-sulcatis et -locularibus, loculis 
1-spermis, Bemine majusculo, testa crassiuscula, albumine copioso, 
embryone recto. 

S. vermitoxicus, Engler in Bot Jahrb. vol. iv. p. 62 : Jr. Arac. ined. No. 25. 

A^terostigma vermitoxicum, Griseb. PI. Lorrentz, p. 199 ; Symb. Fl. Argent. 
282; Engler in A.DG. Monog. Fhanerog. vol. ii. p. 517. 



This noble aroid affords, according to Engler, an almost 
unique instance of erroneous description ; if indeed it be, 
as he asserts, and I have no valid grounds for rejecting his 
opinion, really the Asterostigma vermitoxicum of Grisebach. 
The latter plant is described by its author as having a 
deeply bipinnatifid leaf, a spathe twice as long as the spadix, 
with male flowers below and female at the top, and a conical 
style with radiating stigmas decurrent to its base. Of these 
characters that of the bipinnatifid leaf is accounted for 
by Engler, after an examination of Grisebach's specimens, 
by the leaf having been mutilated by insects, and the 
reversal of the position of the male and female flowers 
is, as it appears to me, explained by his having mistaken 
the male flowers for the female, when the anthers 
might represent the decurrent stigmas. Engler's descrip- 
tion of the plant in his Monograph of Aroids is excellent ; 
it is illustrated by a lithographed drawing from a dried 

July 1st, 1892. 



specimen, issued as one of an invaluable series of Aroid 
figures distributed by that eminent botanist to all the 
principal Herbaria and Botanical Libraries. 

S. vermitoxicus is a native of the Eastern Andes, in the 
province of Tucuman, where it inhabits hedges and shrub- 
beries. It was first found by Lorrentz on road-sides near 
Lules, who gives it the name of " Sacho-col," and who 
describes the tubers as attaining four pounds in weight. 
Two tubers were received at Kew early in 1891, from Mr. 
J. S. Floyer, of Sherborne, St. John, Basingstoke, with the 
information that they were collected by his daughter, Mrs. 
Glynne Williams, in Tucuman, and that it is there called 
" Cana brabo," ferocious cane, because the plant blisters 
the hands. Of these two tubers that here figured flowered 
in October of the same year, and the other in March of 
this year. — J. D. II. 

Fig. 1, Portion of spadix and spathe, showing the insertion of the former; 
2, male ti. ; 3, iem. fl. ; 4, staminode ; 5, vertical section of fern. H.; 6 and 7, 
transverse section of ovaries; 8, ovule; all bnt fig. 1 enlarged.— The leaf 
figured is half the natural size. 




M. S. del J.N Frtch,]ith 



Vincent 






L. Re eve & C P L on don 



Tab. 7243. 
disa incarnata. 

Native of Madagascar. 

Nat. Orel. Okcjiide,e. — Tribe Ofhbtd&s. 
Genus Disa, Berg.; {BentJi. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 630.) 



DlSA(Eudisa)tncarnata; canlibus i'uliosis,foliis lineari-elongatis subtns 5-costatis. 
scapo vagiaato, spica subdensiflora, bracteis oblongo-lanceolatis spathaceis 
ovaria aequantibus, floribus anrantiacis, sepalo dorsali erecto lateralibus 
late oblongis obtusis minore medio dorso calcare laminaa aequilongo tenui 
instructo, petalis dimidiato-ovatis infra apicem latere interiore appendice 
erecto lineari concavo instructis, labello angusto lineari deflexo sepalis 
aquilongo stigmate 2-lobo, polliniarum glandulis dissitis. 

D. incarnata, Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orchid. 348 ; Bolfe in Gard. Chron. 1892, i. 619, 
Fig. 88. 

Habenaria incarnata, Lyall ?nss., ex Lindl. I. c. 328. 



In his admirable work, "The Orchids of the Cape 
Peninsula" (off-print from Trans. S. Afr.Phil. Soc, 1888), 
Mr. Bolus well remarks of the genus Disa that in the 
variety of its perianth it is only excelled perhaps by that 
of Habenaria and Catasetum, and is scarcely equalled by 
that of any other genus in the vegetable world. To this I 
would add that after a careful study of a large proportion 
of the species of Habenaria, including upwards of one 
hundred Indian, I find their flowers to be morphologically 
uniform as compared with those of Disa ; nor does this 
remark apply to the perianth only, it extends to the column 
and its appendages, and even to the pollinia ; for whereas 
in Disa, the glands of the latter may be either distinct and 
in separate pouches of the rostellum or connate and con- 
tained in one pouch, this character actually alone sepa- 
rates Uabenaria from Orchis. I quite believe that had Disa 
been a European genus, it would have given rise to at least 
as many genera as Orchis and Habenaria have, that is about 
thirty-five, instead of the five included in it by Bolus, and 
upon much more marked structural characters. From 
such a dismemberment Dim has been saved by its remote 

July 1s>t. 1892. 



geographical position, far from the haunts of systematic 
botanists, and by the sagacity of those orchidologists 
(Lindley and Bolus) who have devoted themselves to its 
study. 

In the species here represented there is a remarkable 
deviation in the structure of the petals from any other that 
I find described, and that is in the erect linear concave 
appendages or horns, which, arising from below their tips, 
at the back of the anther, cross one another over the top of 
the latter. These did not escape Lindley's observation, 
who introduces them into the specific character. 

D. incarnata is a native of Madagascar, where it was 
found some seventy years ago by Mr. Lyall, a correspondent 
of Sir W. J. Hooker, and more recently in 1881 by 
llililebrancit, in the Ankarsatra mountains, in the centre of 
the Island, and at Arevommamo by G. F. Scott Elliott in 
loJO. 

It was introduced into cultivation by Messrs. W. L. 
Lewis and Co., of Southgate, who exhibited it at the 
meeting of the Koyal Horticultural Society in April last, 
and to whom the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, are indebted for 
the specimen here figured. With regard to the colour of 
the flower, Lindley is the authority for the name incarnata, 
'eiying on the MbS. name Habenaria incarnata of Mr. 
Lyall, winch was, however, attached to that collector's 
^aniens of Bonatea incarnata, and not to those of the 

cab u,,Ml Tl V d u ? CribeS tlle flmver as cinnabar 

coloured. They probably vary much.—/. I). H. 



7244. 




\ 



r 

MS del, J.N.FitcKlith. 



Vincent Brooks.Day&Son.Imp 



L Reeve & C° London, 



Tad. 7214. 

gynura babmentosa. 

Nativt of the Malayan Peninsula and Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionide.e. 
Genus Gyxvra, Cass.,- (JBenik. et Hooh.f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 445.) 



GrTNU k.v sarmentosa ,- fere glaberrima, caule tenui ramoso estriato laxe volubili 
BCandente unacum panicalae ramis involncroqne parpareis, foliis 
petiolatis v. supremis sessilibus ovatis elliptico-ovatis laticeolatisve 
integerrimis remote denticulatis v. sinuato-dentatis, capitulis laxe pani- 
culatis ramis pedicellisque gracilKmis, invomcro anguste cylindraceo 
glabra bracteis externis ad 8 aoqualibus circumdato, bracteolis paucis 
linearibus, antheris basi rotundatis, styli ramis 'elongatis recurvis apicibus 
subulatis hispidis, acheniis glaberrimis multi-costatis. 

G. sarmentosa DG. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 298 ; Hook. f. Ft. Brit. Ind. vol. iii. 
p. 335. 

G. Finlaysoniana, DC. I. c. 299 ; Deless. Ic. Select, vol. iv. t. 55. 

Cacalia cylindriflora, reclinata et Finlaysoniana, Wall. Cat. n. 3150, 3151, 
3162. 

Soncuus volubilis, Rumjph Herb. Amb. vol. v. t. 103, f. 2. 

V C. reclinata, Roxb. Fl. Lid. iii. 412. 



A very elegant climber, with richly coloured stem 
branches and involucres, but, from its lax habit of growth, 
not likely to become a horticultural favourite, except in 
tropical gardens where space is at its disposal. It is a 
common plant in the Malayan Peninsula and Islands, 
extending to the Moluccas and Philippines, and is quite 
the most graceful member of the rather coarse genus to 
which it belongs, and of which G. bicolor figured at 
Tab. 5123 is a better representative. Altogether about 
twenty species of the genus are known, all tropical Asiatic 
and African, with one Australian. 

G. sarmentosa was received at Kew from the Botanical 
Gardens of Singapore iu 1891, under the name of G. 
aurantiaca f DC (Cacalia aurantiaca, Blume), a Javan species 

July 1st, 1892. 



with a scabricl stem and deeply irregularly toothed leaves • 
bearing bulbous based bristles, of which the upper have 
dilated aniplexicaul bases. It flowered in a stove in the 
lloyal Gardens, Kew, in April of the present year, not 
having as yet assumed its climbing habit,—/. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, hair of pappus ; 3, stamens : — all enlarged. 



724-5. 




M.Sdel, J.NIitdih^. 



Tab. 7245. 
MASDEVALLIA leontoglossa. 

Native of Kew Grenada. 



Nat. Ord. Orchid em. Tribe Epiden-dre.e. 
Genus Masdevallia; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant., vol. iii. p. 492.) 



Masdevallia leontoglossa; coespitosa, foliis breviter petiolatis crasse coriaceis 
lanceolatis apicibus acutis recurvis basi angustatis dorso costatis 
fusco-rubris marginibus recurvis, peduneulis radicalibus 1-floria brevibus 
crassis sigmoideo-recurvis basi breviter vagiuatis, floribus magnis decurvis, 
bracteis spathaceis ovario brevioribus, sepaZis lanceolatis longe acumi- 
natis coriaceis basi in saccum costatum postice gibbum (lateralibus 
altius) connatis extus pedunculoque viridibus rubro-purpureo punctatis, 
intus rufo-purpureis plagis saturatioribus maculatis, dorsali recurvo, 
])etalis pallidis oblongo-lanceolatis acutis margine antico gibbis, labello 
oblongo obtuso supra saturate purpureo apicem versus scabrido. 

M. leontoglossa, Reichb. /. in Bonplandia, vol. iii. (1855), p. 69 ; in Gard. 
Chron. 1881, i. 234. 



The genus Masdevallia is now swollen to indeterminable 
dimensions by the multiplication of supposed specific forms, 
many of them almost undistinguishable, round several 
well-marked types. These await a master band in 
Orchidology to reduce them within definable specific 
limits. Of such types one of the oldest is that represented 
by M. coriacea, published in 1845 by Lindley in the 
" Annals and Magazine of Natural History " (vol. xii. 
p. 257), from specimens brought by Hartweg from Bogota, 
and which has been figured from native specimens by 
Karsten in the " Flora of Colombia," and by Mr. Rolfe in 
" Lindenia " (vol. vii. t. 295). According to Karsten's 
figure and that in Lindenia, M. coriacea differs conspicuously 
from leontoglossa in the tall erect strict scapes, and this is 
confirmed by native specimens ; but the plate in " Lindenia " 
shows much shorter and stouter scapes than that in 
the Flora of Colombia. Other characters of M. leonto- 
glossa are the longer tails to the sepals, especially that 
of the dorsal, the colour of the flowers, and the 
tendency to a dark purple epidermal covering of the leaves 

July 1st, 1892. 



beneath. On the other hand the petals of leontoghssa 
appear to be identical with those of coriacea, as is the lip, 

and especially as regards its scabrid distal end, which 
suggests the name of Lion's tongue. 

M. odontoglossa is a native of the mountains of New 
Grenada (alias the Umted States of Colombia), which 
separate that kingdom from Venezuela. 

The plant figured was presented to the Royal Gardens by 
F. Wigan, Esq., of Clare Lodge, East Sheen, the possessor 
of the best collection of Phalsenopsis near London. — 
J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Petals, lip, and column ; 2, petal ; 3, lip ; 4, column ; 5 anther ; 
, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



7246. 




M.Sdel,J.N.FitcK,lith. 



Viaceat Brooks Day&Scn,Imp 



L. Reeve & C° London 



Tab. 7246. 
PRIMULA Forbesii. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Primulace^e. Tribe Pbimule^. 
Genas Primula, Linn. ; {Benin. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 631.) 



Primula Forbesii ; annua, gracilis, pilosa, foliis longe petiolatis ovato-cordatis 
obtusis margine irregulariter lobulatis crenato-dentatisque, inter nervos 
utrinque costae 3-4 convexis, scapo gracili puberulo superne et inflores- 
centia farinaceis, floribus longe pedicellatis roseis in verticillos 2 remotos 
paucifloros dispositis, bracteis parvis verticillatis pedicellis multoties 
brevioribus, calycis infundibularis farinacei lobis ovatis subacutis, corollae 
hypocrateriformis tubo angusto calyce paullo longiore lobis patentibus 
obcordatis, ore obtuse 5-dentato dentibus inflexis, antheris sessilibus 
brevibus, ovario globoso, stylo gracili, stigmate capitellato. 

P. Forbesii, Franch. in Bull. Soc. Bot. France, vol. xxxiii. (1886), p. 64 ; Pax 
Monogr. Prim, in Engler Bot. Jahrh. vol. x. p. 171 ; Forbes & Hemsl. in 
Joum. Linn- Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 38; Collett & Hemsley, I.e. vol. xxviii. 
p. 81. 



Primula Forbesii is one of the only two known species of 
the genus which are strictly annual, in so far as that they die 
after first flowering, though they may perhaps more accurately 
be designated as monocarpic, if, as is probable, they form 
seedling plants the first year and flower and die in the 
following. Upon this character M. Franchet has founded 
the section Mo7bocarpicas to include P. Forbesii, and the 
allied Chinese species, P. malacoides, adding that it forms 
the transition between Primula and Androsace. 

P. Forbesii adds another to the long list of Primulas 
lately discovered in the mountain districts of the interior 
of China. It was first found by the French missionary 
Delavay, in marshy ground near Tali in Yunnan ; and 
latterly by General Sir H. Collett, K.C.B., F.L.S., in great 
abundance on the hills of the Shan States in Eastern 
Burma, at elevations of three thousand feet, which thus 
brings it into the limits of the British Indian Flora. 

The specimen here figured was exhibited at a meeting 

July 1st, 1892. 



of the Royal Horticultural Society of London, in December, 
1891, by M. Vilrnorin, of Paris, who afterwards presented 
it to Kew. It flowered beautifully in the Alpine House of 
the Royal Gardens in March and April of the present 
year. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx ; 2, portion of corolla laid open, showing the inflexed teeth at 
the mouth of the tube and stamens ; 3, ovary : — all enlarged. 



7247. 











M 







Vincent Brooks J% <". 



L Peeve St C° London. 



Tab. 7247. 
BOMAREA FBONDEA. 

Native of the Columbian Andes. 

Nat. Old. Amaryllide.e. Tribe Alstrojierie/e. 
Genus Bohaeea, Mirbel ; (Bent/i. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 736.) 



Bomarea frondea ; caule elongato sarmentoso pubescente, foliis patulis laxe 
dispositis lanceolatis vel oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis dorso pubescenti- 
bus, umbellis simplicibus densis multifloris, bracteis parvis ovatia, pedi- 
cellis pubescentibus flore brevioribus, porianthii anguste infundibalari 
splendide luteo segmentia ingequilcmgis, exterioribus oblanceolato- 
oblongis immaculatis dorso rubro-brunneo tinctis, ihterioribus longioribus 
intus rnbro-brunneo punctatis apice latia truncaris minute cuspidatis in 
unguem sensim attenuates, genitalibus perianthio subsequilongis. 

B. frondea, Masters in Gard. Chron. n.s. vol. xvi. p. 669, rig. 102 ; Baker 
Haudb. Amari/ll. p. 157. 



The present is one of the finest of all the species of this 
large genus that have been introduced into cultivation. 
Eighty species are now known, which fall into two main 
groups as regards inflorescence, one of which has simple and 
the other compound umbels ; and two groups as regards 
the structure of the perianth, in one of which the segments 
of the inner row scarcely exceed those of the outer row in 
length, and the other in which they are decidedly longer. 
Our present plant has simple umbels and unequal perianth- 
segments. Its nearest ally amongst the plants previously 
known in cultivation is B. Galdasiana, Herb. (Alstromeria 
Caldasii, Bot. Mag. t. 5442). Like that species it has the 
valuable habit of remaining in flower for many months at a 
time, the stems sending out successive clusters of flowers. 
It inhabits the woods of the western slopes of the Andes 
of Columbia at an altitude of from six thousand to ten 
thousand feet above sea-level. It has been collected in a 
wild state by Holton, Schlim, Triana and Lehmann, and 
was introduced into cultivation by Messrs. Shuttleworth 
and Carder in 1882. Our drawing was made from a plant 
which they presented to the Boyal Gardens, which was in 
August 1m, L892. 



flower for many months on the rafters of the Cactus-house 
last winter. 

Descr. Stem wide-climbing 1 , moderately stout, terete, 
pubescent. Leaves laxly disposed, spreading, lanceolate 
or oblong-lauceolate, acuminate, moderately firm, pubescent 
beneath, reaching a length of half a foot, resupinate at 
the base. Umbel dense, simple, many-flowered, half a 
foot in diameter ; bracts small, ovate ; pedicels pubescent, 
an inch or an inch and a half long. Perianth narrowly 
funnel-shaped, bright yellow ; outer segments oblanceolate- 
oblong, obtuse, an inch and a half long, unspotted, more 
or less tinged with red-brown on the back ; inner segments 
half an inch longer, bright yellow with minute spots on 
the face, with a broad truncate apex, with a small cusp in 
the middle, narrowed gradually into a slender claw. 
Stamens nearly as long as the inner segments of the peri- 
anth ; anthers, oblong, small. Style slender, with three 
spreading cusps at the stigmatose tip. — /. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Front view of anther; 2, back view of anther: 3, pistil :— all 
enlarged. 



7248. 




M.S.ae^J.N.FitdiMk. 



Vincent Brooks, Day A\.SoTJinp 



L Reeve «<.C London 



Tab. 7248. 

CAPPARIS FLEXUOSA. 
Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. CAPPARiDEiE. Tribe Cappare.e. 
Genus Capparis, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 108.) 



Capparis (Capparidastrum) flexuosa ; fructiosa, glaberrima, inermis, foliis per 
intervalla aggregatis petiolatis eglandulosis oblongis v. oblongo-lanceolatis 
obtuse acuminatis basi rotundatis, supra nitidis nervis arcuatis impressis, 
subtus pallidioribus, stipulis minutis caducis, pedunculis elongatis pauci- 
bracteolatis puberulis, corymbis terminalibus niultifloris, bracteis deci- 
duis minutis, alabastris snbglobosis, sepalis brevibus insequalibus 
oblongis obtusis puberulis marginibus erosulis, petalis albis orbiculari- 
bus revolutis, staminibus numeiosis patulis petalis multoties longioribus, 
toro brevi, gynophoro gracili staminibus multo breviore, bacca oblongo- 
cylindracea torulosa bivalvi. 

C. flexuosa, Vellos. Fl. Flum. vol. v. t. 108 ; Eichler. in Mart. Fl. Bras. 
v. xiii. part i. p. 280 ; W al_p. Hep. Bot. vol. i. p. 200 ; Ann. Bot, vol. iv. 
p. 225 ; Lemaire, Jard. Fleur. vol. iii. t. 323. 



A native of the province of Rio de Janeiro, first made 
known through a plate in the extraordinary work of J. 
Velloso de Miranda, entitled " Flora Fluminensis," which 
consists of eleven large folio volumes, containing 1676 rude 
uncoloured lithographed plates of Rio plants, published in 
Paris in 1827, the curious history of which is oiven by 
Von Martius in the German " Flora," for 1887, Beibl. 
vol. ii. p. 9 — 13. The fate of the larger number of copies, 
which were stored in Rio de Janeiro, is noteworthy ; they 
are reported to have been used as wadding for guns during 
the revolutionary war of 1820. 

0. flexuosa is rather a curious than a beautiful plant, 
but has its value in the delicious fragrance of the flowers, 
the stamens of which expand suddenly and rapidly assume 
their great length, separating and forcing back the con- 
volute petals, which at once become revolute. The small 
oblong sepals are unusual in the order, and opposed to 
the sectional character of Capparidastrum, in which they 
should be more orbicular. The species has been placed 

Ai (.isT 1m, 1892. 



by some authors in Sect. Cynophalla, but in that the sepals 

are still broader, and broadly imbricate in two series. 

The introducer of C. flexuosa into cultivation was a M. 
Miiser, who sent it in 18o0 to M. de Jonghi, of Brussels. 
The specimen here figured was procured from the Royal 
Botanical Garden of Brussels in 1888, and flowered in a 
stove of the Royal G-arden, Kew, in April of the present 
year. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Flower bud ; 2, corolla, torus, gvmphose and ovary ; 3 aud 4, anthers ; 
5, transverse section of ovary -.—all enlarged. 




r NFitd\tth. 



Vincent Brooks.Day&Scmlmf 



T. Rppvp. X rp 1 m j m 



Tab. 7249. 

PASITHEA OERULEA. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^:. — Tribe Asphodel em. 
Genus Pasithea, D. Don ; (Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 791.) 



Gen. Char. (Emend.) Perianthii patuli segmenta post anthesis contorta ; 
tubus brevissimus, ovario adnatus. Sepala oblonga, obtusa, medio teauiter 
5-nervia. Petala paullo majora, nervis 3 crassis percursa. Stamina 
6, perigyna, alterna breviora, suberecta, filamentis basi incrassatis et 
puberulis ; antheras oblonga?, versatiles. Ovarium semisuperum, globo- 
snm, 3-loculare ; stylus gracilis, staminibus longior, inclinatus, stigmati- 
bus 3 brevibus apice stigmatosis ; ovula in loculis4, superposita. Capsula 
globosa, membranacea, sub 3-loba, loculicide 3-valvis. Semina loculis 
subsolitaria, subglobosa, testa Crustacea nitida atra, albumine carnoso. — 
Herba perennis, scapigera, data, glaberrima, rhizomate brevi fibris vestito. 
Folia anguste linear ia, graminea, attenucUo-acuminata, basi vaginata, 
raginis distichis, costa valida cariuala, nervis tenuissimis. Scapus 
gracilis; panicula erect a, laxe ramosa, ramis gracilibus, ererto-patentibus, 
apices versus floriferU ; braetem svhulatse. Flores cierulei, 1-poll. diam. 
breviter gracile pedirellati. Capsula par va. 

Pasithea cserulea, D. Bon in Edinb. New Phil. Journ. vol. xiii. (1832) p. 237 ; 
Kunth Enum. PI. vol. iv. p. 6;>5 ; C. Gay Fl. Ghil. vol. vi. p. 133 ; Baker 
in Journ. Linn. Soe. vol. xiii. p. 320. 

Antiiericum cseruleum, Ruiz & Pav. Fl. Peruv. vol. iii. p. 67, t. 299. 

Phalaxgium caeruleum, Pers. Syn. vol. i. p. 368. 

Stypandra? caerulea, R. Br. Prodr. p. 279 ; Hook, et Am. Bot. Beech. Voy. 
49. 

Cyanella IUus, Molina, Sag. Chil. Ed. 2, p. 130 (Ed. 1, 1782). 

Bermudiaxa cfBralea, Phalangii ramosi facie, FeuillSe Journ. Obs. Phys. 

&c, vol. ii. p. 715, t. 8 (1714). 
> — _ . > 

I have given above a full generic description of this 
beautiful plant, those hitherto published being more or less 
deficient or inaccurate, especially as regards the stamens, the 
filaments of three of which are very much shorter than the 
others; and the ovary, which is described in the " Genera 
Plantamm " as small in a concave torus, is really adnate 
to the perianth-tube for half its length, as described by 
Endlicher and others. 

P. cserulea was discovered and described by Feuillee, a 
Franciscan friar, mathematician and botanist, born at 
Mane, in Provence, in 1060, who was commissioned to 
Auqum 1st, 1892. 



travel in South America for scientific purposes by Louis 
XIV. He published in 1714 the account of his travels 
and discoveries, calling himself " R. P. Feuillee, Religieux 
minime, Mathematicien, Botaniste de sa Majeste." His 
description of the plant is a short one, but the figure is 
good, and he gives it the native name of "Illus," adding 
that it inhabits the mountains of Chili in " latitude 37° 
from the South Pole." Feuillee first visited the West 
Indies, and then went down the Western Coast of South 
America, travelling in Peru and Chili, where he discovered 
Datura arborea. On his return to France he was liberally 
pensioned by the King, who built an Observatory for him 
in Marseilles, where, worn out by his labours, he died in 
1742. He is said to have been a man of modest, simple 
character, as becomes an ecclesiastic and true philosopher. 
His original drawings, many of which are unpublished, 
are preserved in the Bibliotheque Rationale in Paris. 

Since its discovery P. casrulea has been collected by 
many travellers, one "of whom, Bridges, states that it is 
called by the Chilians, " Espuela de Galun," the gallant's 
spur, but does not account for the name. Ruiz and Pavon 
gave it, the vernacular name of " For de Cuentas," and 
state that the root smells like that of Iris florentina. Ac- 
cording to Molina the " bulbs " are excellent food, boiled 
or roasted, and make a pleasant soup. The specimen here 
figured was received from Herr Max Leichtlin in 1889, and 
flowered in the Succulent House of the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in April of the present year.—/. D. H. 



Fig 1, Flowers with their perianth segments removed ; 2, ovary and bas# 
ox caiyx ; d , immature capsule with one valve removed :— all enlarged. 



7250. 




M.S.del,J.N.Fitch3th 



L. Reeve & C9, London. 



Tab. 7250. 
FURCHiEA pubesoens. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. AmaryllidejE. — Tribe Agaves. 
Genus Furch^ia, Bent. ; (Benth, et Houk. f. Gen. PL vol. iii. p. 739.) 



Fvrcbmx pubescens ; acaulis, foliis 12-20 valde recurvatis lanceolatis coria- 
ceis glabris viridibus leviter undulatis, spina terminali vix pungente, 
aculeis marginalibus deltodeis parvis, pedunculo stricto gracili elongato, 
floribus in paniculam laxam rhomboideam dispositis bulbillis copiosds 
iDtermixtis, pedicellis brevissimis, bracteis deltoideis parvis, ovario viridi 
pubesceote, perianthii segmentis oblongis extus pnberulis viridi tinctis, 
genitalibus segmentis brevioribus. 

F. pubescena, Baker Handb. Amaryll. p. 201. 

Fonrcroya pnbescens, Todaro Sopra Nuov. sp. Fourcroya, Palermo 1879, 
pp. 14, with 3 figures. 



These Furcrseas have excited a great deal of attention 
lately as fibre-yielding plants. It is quite evident that the 
species which is best worth cultivating for economic pur- 
poses is F. gigantea (Bot. Mag. tab. 2250). In the 
present plant the leaves are much shorter and the texture 
is not nearly so firm. One great difficulty in describing 
and ascertaining the limits of the species arises from their 
putting on such a different character when they are 
cultivated in Enghsh conservatories, and when they are 
grown in the open, either in their native home in America, 
or in gardens on the shores of the Mediterranean. Last 
November and December I paid a visit to the Hiviera to 
study in their full development the species which are 
grown in Mr. Thomas Hanbury's garden at La Mortola, in 
the Jardin d'Acclimatation at Hyeres, and in the other 
gardens in that region. A full report on this subject will 
be found in the number for January, 1892, of the Kew 
Bulletin. 

Our plate of the present plant looks very different 
as regards luxuriance of growth from that of Todaro, 
and yet no doubt they both represent forms of the same 
species. It was first flowered in the Botanic Garden 

August 1st, 1892. 



at Palermo in the year 1877, and as it produces copious 
bulbillse, is easily propagated. The Kew plant, from 
which the drawing was made, and from which my descrip- 
tion is entirely drawn up, was received from St. Peters- 
burg in 1887, and flowered for the first time in the 
Cactus-house at Kew in November, 1891. 

Desce. Acaulescent. Leaves a dozen or more in a 
rosette, lanceolate, much recurved, coriaceous but not 
rigid, rather wavy, about a foot long, two inches or two 
inches and a half broad at the middle, bright green and 
smooth on both sides, scarcely pungent at the tip, margined 
with small deltoid prickles. Peduncle straight, wandlike, 
three or four feet long, bearing only three or four small 
ovate bract leaves. Panicle rhomboid, shorter than the 
peduncle ; branches erecto-patent, the lower under a foot 
long ; each node bearing usually a single drooping flower 
and a bulblet ; pedicels very short ; bracts deltoid, very 
small. Ovary cylindrical, green, densely pubescent, an 
inch long. Perianth segments oblong, above an inch 
long, the three outer broader than the three inner, pubes- J 
cent and tinged with green on the outside. Stamens 0vi A 
shorter than the segments of the perianth ; filament much 
swollen at the middle. Style dilated and deeply three- 
lobed below the middle, overtopping the anthers. — /. G. 
Baker. 

Fig. 1, A single stamen ; 2, style ; both enlarged'; 3, whole plant, much 

1 

c K.T- 



7251. 





-- 




S del, J.NJ ? a'tch,lith 



Vincem 



L. Reave & C°X.arido 



Tab. 7251. 
iris loetetii. 

Native of Syria. 

Nat. Ord. Iride^:. — Tribe Mohmeje. 
Genus Iris, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Oncoyclus), Lortetii ; rhizomate brevi crasso, foliis radicalibus 4-5 
ensiformibus falcatis glaucscentibus, caule brevi unifloro, spathsB valvis 
magnis ventricosis pallide viridibus, pedicello brevi, ovario cylindrico- 
trigono, perianthii tubo cylindrico ovario aequilongo, segmentis exteriori- 
bus reflexis obovatis pallide albo-lilacinis punctis minutis rubro-brunneis 
decoratis, ore atro-brunneo. ungue pilis glanduliferis conspersis brnnneis 
proedito, segmentis interioribus incurvatis orbicularibus distincte ungui- 
culatis pallide lilacinis immaculatis, styli ramis latis dorso convexis 
cristis magnis quadratis. 

I. Lortetii, Barbey in Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. v. p. 131; Herhar. Levant, t. 7. 



This section Oncocyclus of the genus Iris has received 
great attention of late years, and now we are acquainted 
with a dozen distinct species. It belongs entirely to the 
hot arid regions of Western Asia and the species therefore 
require special care in an English garden. Professor 
Foster dealt fully with this question in a lecture which he 
delivered during the present summer, which will be pub- 
lished shortly in extenso in the Journal of the Royal 
Horticultural Society. The present plant occupies an 
intermediate position between I. susiana and I. iberica, both 
of which have been figured in the Botanical Magazine, the 
former on tab. 91 and the latter on tab. 5847. It was 
first found by Dr. Lortet, after whom it is named, about 
the year 1880, in dry thickets on the slope of the southern 
part of the Lebanon range, at an elevation of about two 
thousand feet above sea-level. Our drawing was made 
from a plant flowered last May by H. J. Elwes, Esq., 
F.L.S., of Colesborn, Andoversford, Gloucestershire. We 
have it at Kew and it is doing well . 

Desce. Rootstod' stout, short-creeping. Leaves four or 
five in a basal tuft, ensiform, weak, glaucous, falcate, 
under a foot long at the flowering time. Stem one-flowered 
August 1st, 1892. 



about as long as the leaves. Spathe very ventricose, three 
or four inches long ; outer valves lanceolate, pale green ; 
pedicel short. Ovary cylindrical -trigonous, an inch long. 
Perianth tube cylindrical, about as long as the ovary ; 
limb three or four inches long ; outer segments obovate, 
much reflexed, two inches broad, pale grey lilac with 
darker stripes, copious minute red-brown dots, a dark 
red-brown throat and a broad claw below it with scattered 
gland-tipped brown hairs ; inner segments incurved, 
orbicular, three inches broad, narrowed suddenly to a 
distinct claw, plain pale lilac. Style branches above an 
inch long, convex on the back ; crests large, quadrate. 
- 1 nt her pale yellow, linear, about as long as the flattened 
brown filament. — J. G. Balcer. 



Fig. 1, Anther; 2, apex of style-branch, with crests -.—both enlarged. 




itxh.hth 



"Vincent J3roaksI5ay & Sanjmp 



1 Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 7252. 
jS t ICOTIAJN t A tomentosa. 

Native of Peru. 

Nat. Ord. Solanace.e. — Tribe Cestrixe^e. 
Genus Nicotiana, Linn. ; (Benth. et Ilooh.f. Gen. Pi. vol. ii. p. 907.) 



Nicotiana (Lehmannia) tomentosa ; elata, ramosa, glanduloso-pubeseens, 
foliis amplis obovato-ohlongis acumiixatis in petiolum latum basi 
aniplexicaulem attenuatis, floribns in paniculas amplas laxe ramo^as 
dispositis, calycis tubo terete cylindraceo lobis subulatis obtusis, corolla 
basi tubulosa superne oblique gibboso-campanulata, lobis ovatis obtusis 
patentibus, staminibus longe exsertis, ovario glaberrimo, stigmate 2-lobo. 

N. tomentosa, Ruiz & Pav. Fl. Peruv. et Chil. vol. ii. p. 16, t. 129, f. a. 

Lehmannia tomentosa, Spreng. Anleit. zur Kentn. Geto. ed. ii. 1817, 
458 ; Don. Gen. Syst. 467 ; Dunal in DG.Prod. vol. xiii. pt. i. p. 572. 

N. colossea, E. Andre in Rev. Sortie. 1888, p. 511, and 1891, p. 75 and 290; 
F. Abel in Wiener Illustr. Gartens. 1890, p. 72 and 472, fiV. 92 j Godefroy 
LebcBuf in Le Jardin, 1889, p. 274, cum Ic. ; Gard. Ghron. 1891, vol. i. 
p. 84, f. 25. 



The history of the introduction of this giant Nicotiana 
is, as given by M. Andre in the Revue Horticole, as follows. 
" In the first rank amongst new foliage plants exhibited 
at the Trocadero in 1889, must be placed N. colossea. 
Its history is sufficiently remarkable. Some years ago I 
sold to Madame D. de Saint-Germain-les-Corbells some 
fine plants of Brazilian Orchids. The gardener, M. 
Mason, one of the most able cultivators that I am 
acquainted with, took the precaution of placing in the 
propagation house the detritus and dust removed from 
them during the cleaning of specimens. From this he 
raised various plants, and amongst others Nicotiana 
colossea" 

In an article in the Le Jardin, from the pen of M. 
Godefroy Leboeuf, the plant has in France attained the 
stature of ten feet, and its leaves of three feet three inches 
and a breadth of twenty. The latter are described as 
being of a violet red colour when young, passing eventu- 

SEriEMBER 1st, 1892. 



ally into a deep polished green. Unlike all other Nico- 
tianas in cultivation this does not flower in the open air, 
and it is multiplied by cuttings. 

I have no hesitation in referring N. colossea to Ruiz and 
Pavou's Nicotiana tomentosa, poorly figured in their great 
work, but of which there are excellent specimens in the 
Kew Herbarium, sent to Sir W. Hooker by Mr. Matthews, 
as a large shrub growing in the Quebrader of Paria 
Mianca in Peru ; again from Yucca in Bolivia, Lat. 13° 
S., by Mr. Pentland ; and by Lobb from New Grenada. 
It has also been collected by Mandon in the Bolivian 
Andes (No. 448), who describes it as occurring every- 
where in hedges near Sorata, at an elevation of eight 
thousand five hundred to nine thousand five hundred feet 
above the sea. N. tomentosa has been erected into a genus 
(Lehmannia) on account of the form of the corolla, which 
however does not materially differ from that of Nicotiana, 
in which it must remain. 

The plant here figured was obtained from M. Godefroy 
Lebceuf in 1889, and was planted out in the central bed 
of the Conservatory (No. 4) of the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
where it rapidly reached the roof (ten feet), and had to 
be topped, which no doubt accounts for its bushy habit as 
represented in the reduced figure in the plate. It flowered 
in April of the present year. 

Desce. A majestic herb, attaining ten feet in height, 
branched diffusely from the base upwards, viscidly glandular- 
pubescent; branches terete, ascending, leafy. Leaves ten 
to eighteen inches long, by four to six broad in the speci- 
men figured, obovate-oblong, acuminate, narrowed into a 
very broad undulately winged petiole with an amplexicaul 
base, pale green above, paler beneath with stout midrib 
and principal nerves and reticulate nervules. Panicles 
terminal, a foot long and broad ; branches slender terete 
green ascending, lax-flowered, tubercled at the articulation 
ot the pedicels; bracts narrow, caducous; pedicels half to 
two-thirds inch long. Flowers inclined, one and a half 
inches long. Calyx broadly terete, half inch long, smooth, 
green, base rounded; lobes unequal, narrow, obtuse, 
shorter than the tube. Corolla slightly incurved, pale 
green and pubescent externally; tubular portion rather 
longer than the calyx lobes ; lobes ovate, obtuse, spreading, 



about as long as the inflated portion yellowish flushed 
with red within. Stamens suberect, twice as long as the 
corolla lobes, filaments yellow, anthers linear-oblong. 
Ovary conical, glabrous, style longer than the stamens, 
reddish ; stigma oblique, two-lobed. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and style; 2, portion of corolla and stamens; 3, ovary; 
4, transverse section of the same : — all enlarged. 




.J-NJHxhH 



"VmcarftBro oTis Day &S 






Tab. 7253. 

TUL1PA BlLLIETIANA. 
Native of Savoy. 

Nat. Ord. Ltliace.35. — Tribe Tulipe.e. 
Genus Tulipa, Linn. ; (Ben/h, ef Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 818.) 



Tulipa Billietiana ; bulbo ovoideo tunicis exterioribus brunneis intus parce 
adpresse strigosis, foliis subglaucis nndulatis glabris hand eiliatis, inferior! 
oblongo-lanceolato, pedunculo elongato glabro, perianthio campanulato 
magno citrino segmentis exterioribus acutis interioribus obtnsis, antheris 
nigris, rilamentis basi glabris, stigmatibus magnis. 

T. Billietiana, Jord. et Four. Icones, p. 8, t. 18. 

T. Didieri var. Billietiana, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. p. 283. 



The Didieri group of Tulips are allied to the Gesnerimice 
in stature, in the size of the flower and in the glabrous 
leaves and peduncles, but they differ by having the three 
outer segments of the perianth subacute. There are four 
principal forms, Didieri, mauriana,planifolia and Billietiana, 
which differ from one another principally in the colour of 
the flower. They flower a little earlier than the Gesnerianse 
and are found wild in the neighbourhood of St. Jean de 
Maurienne in Upper Savoy, whence we received a supply 
of bulbs at Kew in 1889. These at first produced a fine 
yellow flower, but next year it was tinged with red. Our 
plate was drawn from a plant that flowered at Kew in the 
last week of May, 1891. We have received from Mr. H. J. 
Elwes a form with a black spot at the base of the perianth- 
segments and black instead of yellow filaments. 

Descr. Bulb ovoid, bearing many accessory bulbs ; outer 
tunics brown, with only a few adpressed hairs inside. 
Leaves four, subglaucous, much undulated, not hairy on 
the surface nor ciliated on the edge, the lower one oblong- 
lanceolate, six or eight inches long, the others smaller. 
Peduncle long, glabrous, erect. Perianth campanulate, 
above two inches long; segments pure bright lemon-yellow, 

SErTKMBER 1st, 1892. 



the three outer subacute, the three inner obtuse. Stamens 
under an inch long ; filaments linear, yellow, glabrous at 
the base ; anthers black, linear. Ovary as long as the 
anthers ; stigmas very large. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower with the perianth-segments taken away -.—enlarged. 



7254 






<M 




Tab. 7254. 
STEMONA Ouetish. 

Native of Penang. 

Nat. Ord. KoxBUEGHiACEiB. 
Genus Stemona, Lour. ; (Benth. et Sook.f. Gen. PI, vol. iii. p, 747.) 



Stemona Curtisii; caule gracili volubili, foliis alternis ovatis caudato- 
acuminatia profunde cordatia 9-11-nerviis, pedunculia axillaribus pauci- 
floris, perianthii foliolis 1 poll, longis roseis, antheris flavis, appendice 
loculia subaBquilongo obtuso intua lamellato. 

S. Curtisii, Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 298. 



A very interesting plant, as belonging to a most peculiar 
group of petaloid monocotyledons that has been regarded 
as an Order distinct from Liliacese, but the genera of which 
may more properly be regarded as forming two distinct 
sections of that great family, so much do its members differ 
from one another, whilst agreeing in most others with the 
Liliaceae. Of this order, Boxburghiaceas, the type is 
Stemona tuberosa, Lour., better known as the Boxburghia 
gloriosoides of Sir W. Jones (in Roxburgh's Coromandel 
Plants, t. 32), and well figured on Plate 1500 of this 
magazine as Boxburghia Gloriosa, Pers. It is a widely 
distributed species in Eastern Bengal, Assam, the Khasia 
Hills, and the Deccan Peninsula, extending into Siam and 
China. It differs conspicuously from 8. Curtisii in its 
much larger always opposite leaves, greenish flowers one 
and a half to two inches long, and in the appendages of 
the anthers being yellow-green, elongate-subulate, and 
almost twice as long as the scarlet cells. No other species 
of the genus was known till the late Mr. Kurz, an Assistant 
in the Calcutta Botanical Garden, published his 8. Grif- 
fithiana, a Burmese species, with an erect stem, flowering 
before leafing. To these has within the last few weeks 
been added in the recently published Part xviii. of the 
Flora of British India, two other species, S. minor, 
Hook, f., a native of Malabar and Ceylon, resembling a 
small state of 8. tuberosa, but with alternate leaves, and 

Seftember 1st, 1892. 



S. Gurtisii, the subject of the present plate. I cannot 
recall any Liliaceous genus in which the stem is erect in 
one species and scandent in others, the leaves opposite in 
some and alternate in others, and with the flowers appear- 
ing with the leaves in their axils in most of the species, 
but in one appearing on leafless stems ; nevertheless, the 
above named plants are undoubtedly congenerics. When 
describing 8. Gurtisii for the Flora of British India, I found 
the only three flowers available for analysis to be unisexual, 
but as both ovary and stamens are formed in the flower of 
the Kew individual, the plant is probably polygamous. 

The only other genera of the group Boxburghiacex are s 
Croomia, Torr. and Gr. of Florida and Japan, and my 
Stichoneuron, a plant of the Khasia Hills ; both resemble 
Stemona in the consistence and nervation of the leaves, 
but differ wholly in their minute flowers with simple oblong 
or didymous anthers, without appendages, and in the more 
important character of the ovules being pendulous from 
the top of the cell of the ovary. These differences suggest 
that Moxburghiacese should be broken up into two tribes of 
one Order, or perhaps better form two tribes of Liliacex, 
probably to be placed near Uvulariese or Medeolese, but 
differing from both in the introrse dehiscence of the anthers. 
8. Gurtisii was discovered by Mr. Curtis, Superinten- 
dent of the Penang Garden, where it grows near the 
Waterfall. He sent Herbarium specimens to Kew in 1888, 
but the plant figured was received from the Botanical 
Garden of Singapore in July, 1891. I am not informed as 
to whether it is a native of the Malayan Peninsula. It 
was received at Kew in July, 1890, and flowered in a stove 
in April of the present year. — J". D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower -with the perianth removed ; 2, stamens seen in front ; 
3, ovary ; 4, transverse ; and 5, longitudinal section of the same : — «" 
enlarged. 




1255 



L Reeve &. C° London 



Tab. 7255. 
VERNONIA podocoma. 

Native of Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. Tribe Vernonie^;. 
Genus VJBBNOKIA, Schreb. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 227.) 



Veenonia ( Stroboca lyx) podocoma ; frnticosa, raniulis teretibus striatis, foliis 
magnis petiolatis elliptico-ovatis acutis integris v. sublobatis argute 
dentatis supra glabrescentibus subtus pubescentibus v. incano-tomeni 
paniculis amplis polycephalis, capitulis parvis fasciculatis breviter-pedi- 
cellatis 4-5-floris. involucri cylindracei pubescentis bracteis ovato- 
rotundatisviridibusarcte imbricatis interioribuspatentibus deniumc iducis, 
receptaculo augnsto, corollas tubo longe exserto, antheris basi breviter 
cordatis, connective apice ovato, achaenio piloso, pappi scabridi setis 
extimis brevioribus. 

V. podocoma, Schultz Bip. in Schvjeivf. Beitr. Fl. JEthiop., Aufzaehl. p. l!n7, 
n. 2660, nomen. ; Oliver Fl. Trop. Afric. vol. iii. p. 296. 

V. cylindrica, A. Rich. Fl. Abyss. Tent. vol. i. p. 374 (non Schultz Bip., fide 
Vaike in Linnsea, vol. xxxix. (1875) p. 476. 



Although this plant forms a poor subject for a botanical 
plate, it is a very effective one in a warm temperate house, 
from its height, large foliage, and broad corymbose panicles 
of rose-colrd. heads of flowers. It is a native of subtropical 
and tropical Eastern Africa ; and, like so many plants of 
that region, has a very wide geographical range, from 
Abyssinia to the Zambesi, where it was found by the late 
Mr. Mellor on the Manganja Hills, and where it bears the 
native name of Foutra, 'flowering in September, and from 
thence it extends to Natal. It appears to be very common 
in the Shire Highlands, and to occur on the opposite side 
of the Continent, in Angola, in a much more tomentose 
form. The plant here figured was raised from seeds sent 
to the Royal Gardens by Mr. Ernest E. Galpin, in March, 
1890, and flowered in the Succulent House last winter, 
where it attained a height of ten feet. The panicle of 
flowers attains three feet in length and two and three- 
quarters in breadth. The leaf in the plate is reduced to 
half its natural size. 
September 1st, 1892. 



Descr. A tall shrub or undershrub, ten feet high as cul- 
tivated at Kew, branches and leaves beneath pubescent or 
tomentose, as are the branches of the panicle and involucres. 
Leaves eight to twenty inches long by a foot broad or less, 
variable in breadth, much smaller in Abyssinian and 
Angolan specimens, margin sometimes lobulate, always 
acutely toothed. Heads in corymbosely panicled clusters, 
two to three feet broad, subsessile. Involucre half-inch 
long, cylindrical before the upper scales spread and fall 
away; scales broadly ovate, obtuse, green, coriaceous. 
Flowers four to five; corolla pink, tube twice as long as 
the involucre ; anthers and stigmas yellow. Achenes ten- 
ribbed, thinly hairy when ripe, glandular between the ribs. 
Pappus scabrid, double, pale yellow or white, outer hairs 
very short. — /. D. U. 



Fig 1 Head of flower; 2, flower; 3, pappus hair; 4, stamens -.—all en- 
larged ; 5, reduced figures of whole plant. 



1256 



&S.dfll,J.N 




ASncerttBroolcsLay &.SonIia; 



LRppvp A r°\.c 



Tab. 7256. 
DISA Cooperi. 

Native of Natal. 

ISTat. Ord. Orchide^e. Tribe Ophryde^e. 
Genus Disa, Berg. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 630.) 



Disa (Eudisa) Coo-peri ; robusta, foliis lineari- v. elliptico-lanceolatis v. oblan- 
ceolatis subacutis infimis in petiolum augnstatis, scapo vaginato, spica 
robusta multiflora, floribus odoris, bracteis magnis herbaceis ovario 
longioribus cymbiformibus apicibus elongatis subulatie sphacelatis rubro- 
castaneis, sepalo dor.-ali iafundibulari pallido in cornu aseendente gracili 
ovario multoties longiore atteauato, lateralibus oblongis reflexis roseis, 
petalis dolabriformibua retuais. labello unguiculato flavo-viridi late ovato 
sub apice rotundato obscure trilobo, anttiera postica, polliniis pendulis 
glandulis dissitia, stigmate ? magno tumido. 

D. Cooperi, Beichb.f. in Flora, lxiv. (1881) 328. 



Under D. incamata (Tab. 7243) I have alluded to the 
extraordinary diversity that obtains between the same 
organs of the various species of this supremely polymorphic 
genus. Compared with D. incamata, putting aside the 
obvious difference between them in the forms of the mem- 
bers of the perianth, there is a yet greater one in the 
anther, which is in the former species erect with the 
rostellum and its pouches placed immediately above the 
stigma, and the pollinia erect, but in this the anther is 
thrown back, or as it were turned over, with the rostellum 
and its pouches rising high above the stigma, and the 
pollinia are pendulous. In the one case the anther faces 
the lip, in the other it faces the dorsal sepal. Another 
singular feature in D. Cooperi is the great size of what 1 
take to be the stigma, and which forms a fleshy rounded 
boss at the base of the very short column, overhanging the 
claw of the lip, and at least twice as broad as the rest of 
the column. A similarly resupinate anther occurs in other 
species, as in D. obtusa, LindL, figured by M. Bolus in his 
" Orchids of the Cape Peninsula," p. 153, Plate 34, which 
is otherwise a widely dissimilar species, in every floral 
organ. In various other species the anther is horizontal, 
or mora or less incliued backwards or forwards. 

September 1st, 1892. 



Disa Cooperi is a native of the North-Eastern districts of 
extratropical South Africa, having been discovered many 
years ago in the Orange Free State by Mr. Cooper, a col- 
lector employed by the late "W. W. Saunders, Esq., F.R.S., 
of Reigate. It has been found in the Transvaal, at Syden- 
burg by Dr. Atherstone, and in Natal by Mrs. Fannin. 
From this last country the specimen here figured was im- 
ported by Messrs. Sander and Co. of St. Albans, who 
exhibited it at a meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society 
in February last and then presented it to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew. It has a strong scent of cloves. — /. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Flower with the sepals removed; 2, column, and stigma?; 
3, pollinium : — all snlarged. 



7257 




; 



' 



Vincent Brooks D ay & Sonlntp 



Tab. 7257. 
lilium sttlphueeum. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^. Tribe Tulipe^e. 
Genus Lilium, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 816.) 



Lilium (Eulirion) sulphureum ; bulbo globoso magno, caule erecto 6-7-pedali 
apice cerauo, foliis pluribus sparsis linearibus viridibus, superioribu8 
sensim brevioribus basi bulbilliferis, floribus 1-3 corymbosis, perianthio 
infundibulari pallide sulphureo segmentis oblanceolato-oblongis parte 
tertia superiore recurvatis exterioribus extus rubro-brunneo suffusis, 
staminibus perianthio distincte brevioribus, antberis lineari-oblongis, 
polline rubro-brunneo. stylo staminibus superante stigmate magno. 

L. Wallichianum var. superbum, Hort. Low. ; Baker in Gard. Chron. 1891, pt. 2, 
p. 480. 

L. ochroleucum, The Garden, 1891, vol. ii. p. 338, non Wallich. 



The recent exploration of Upper Burma by General 
Collett and others has resulted in the discovery of four 
new Lilies. Of these, L. primulinum (tab. 7227) and 
L. Lowii (tab. 7232) have already been figured in the 
" Botanical Magazine." The present plant is the third 
species. The fourth, L. BaJcerianum, which has erect 
broadly funnel-shaped flowers, has not yet been brought 
into cultivation, but is figured from the dried specimens 
gathered by General Collett in the twenty-eighth volume 
of the "Journal of the Linnean Society," tab. 22. For 
the introduction into cultivation of the other species 
we are indebted to Messrs. Hugh Low and Co. Of the 
Lilies previously known, the present plant is most nearly 
allied to L. Wallichianum (Bot. Mag. tab. 4561), which 
inhabits Kumaon and Nepaul. It resembles Wallichianum 
closely in its leaves and general habit, but the Himalayan 
plant has pure white flowers, more slender anthers with 
bright yellow pollen, and does not produce bulbillas in the 
axils of the upper leaves. Our drawing was made from a 
plant presented by Messrs. Low to the Eoyal Gardens, 
Kew, which flowered in the Temperate House last October. 

October 1st, 1892. 



Desce. Bulb large, globose. Stem erect, cernuous at 
the apex, six or seven feet long, green throughout. Leaves 
numerous, scattered, spreading, linear, bright green, the 
lower three or four inches long, the upper growing gradu- 
ally shorter, and many of them producing bulbillas in their 
axils. Flowers usually two or three, pendent on long 
peduncles, fragrant, sulphur-yellow, tinged outside with 
claret-red. Perianth funnel-shaped, seven or eight inches 
long, the oblanceolate-oblong segments permanently con- 
nivent in the lower two-thirds, recurving in the upper 
third ; outer segments but little over an inch broad ; inner 
nearly two inches broad. Stamens an inch and a half 
shorter than the perianth-segments; anthers above 
an inch long, with red-brown pollen. Style much over- 
topping the anthers, curved at the apex ; stigmas large. — • 
J. G. Baker. 



Fijr. 1, Front view of an anther ; 2, back view of an anther ; 3, pistil : — 
all life-size. 



7258 







mm 



.-5s: 



-. -s*^>--' 



/ 










1 






MS,a£lJNftbA«h. 



\5iic«nt Brooks,Da 



1, 'Reeve 8tC9 London 



Tab. 7258. 
POTENTILLA Salesoviana. 

Native of Kashmir and the Altai Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. Kosace^e. Tribe PoTENTiLLEiE. 
Geims Potentilla, Linn. ; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen, Plant, vol. i. p. 620.) 



Potentilla (Trichothalamus) Salesoviana ; suffruticoaa, sericeo-pilosa, caule 
robusto ramoso fusco-rubro, foliis pinnatis, foliolis 7-9 oblongis obtusis 
coriaceis grosse crenato-serratis subtus argenteo-serieeis, stipulis amplis 
membranaceia acuminatia fuscis, floribus amplis cymoso-paniculatis, 
calycia lobis ovatis v. ovato-lanceolatis acuminatia utrinque sericeis, 
bracteolis parvis linearibus v. lanceolatis, petalis albis spathulato-rotun- 
datis calycem vix ercedentibus, receptaculo globoso strigoso, acheniis 
villosis, stylo gracili ventrali. 

P. Salesoviana, Steph. in Mem. Soc. Nat. Mosc. ii. (1809) 6, t. 3 ; Willd. Fnum. 
PI. Kort. Berol. i. p. 552 (Salesovii) ; Nestler Monog. Potentill. p. 31; 
Lehm. Monogr. Potentill. p. 35, t. 1 ; Bevis. Potentill. p 13 (Salessovii) ; 
DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 583 ; Ledeb. Fl. Alt. vol. ii. p. 233 ; Hook. f. Fl. 
Brit. Ind. ii. 348. 

P. discolor, Cambessi. in Jacquem. Voy. Bot. 53, t. 65. 

Comakum Salesovi, Bunge, Ind. Sent. Kort. Dorpat. 1839; Ledeb. Fl. Ross. 
vol. i. p. 63. 



Potentilla Salesoviana was discovered in the Altai moun- 
tains early in the century, and published under the above 
name ; and it has since been found abundantly in the drier 
N.W. Himalaya and Western Tibet, at eleven to fourteen 
thousand feet elevation; and in the Thian-Schan moun- 
tains. In 1839 it was cultivated in the Botanical Garden 
of Dorpat, when Professor Bunge rede scribed it, referring 
it to the genus Comarum, under which name it is very 
generally cultivated in European gardens. The reason 
for this transference of the plant to Comarum was no 
doubt the strongly elevated receptacle (a very variable 
organ in Potentilla) for in no other character does P. 
Salesovi resemble that genus (or section of Potentilla as it 
is now held to be) which is a marsh plant, with a woody 
rhizome, very small purplish brown acute petals, a downy 
receptacle, and glabrous achenes. 

On the other hand, P. Salesoviana is a typical member of 
the section Trichothalamus of Potentilla, characterized by the 

Octobzr 1st, 1892. 



long stiff hairs of the receptacle, which conceal the achenes. 
Its near ally is the beautiful P. fruticosa of Europe and 
the Himalaya, with which indeed, according to a note in 
Nestler's monograph of the genus, the elder De Candolle 
was almost disposed to unite it. I fancy, however, that 
there must be some misunderstanding here of De Candolle's 
view, for P. fruticosa has subdigitately pinnate leaves, 
bracteoles exceeding the calyx-lobes, and golden petals. 
Curiously enough Lehman describes the petals of P. 
Salesoviana as white in his "Monograph" of the genus, 
but red in his subsequent " Revision " of it. 

P. Salesoviana has long been in cultivation at Kew, but 
for the fine specimen here figured I am indebted to the 
Rev. Canon Ellacombe, of Bitton Vicarage, with whom it 
flowered in June last. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Section of flower with petals removed ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, pistils ; 
5, achene; 6, the same with half of the pericarp removed, showing the seed :— 
all enlarged. 



7259. 




it* uth 



L. Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 7259. 

CIRRHOPETALUM Makoyanum. 

Native of the East Indies. ? 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^:. — Tribe Epidendee^e. 
Genus ClBKHOrETALTJM, Lindl. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 504.) 



Cikehopetalttm (Umbellatse) Malcoyanum ; rhizomate robusto repente, pseudo- 
bulbis sparsis anguste ampulla? formibus sulcatis nudis, folio oblongo- 
oblanceolato subacuto, scapo gracillimo erecto rufo-brunneo 2-vaginato, 
vaginis parvis inferiore tubulosa appressa superiore subulata patula, 
umbella 12-14-flora, bracteis setaceis pedicellis brevibus brevioribus, 
fioribus 1£ poll, longis stellatim patentibus aureis rubro-punctatis, sepalo 
dorsali ovato acuminato decurvo ciliato, lateralibus dorsali multoties 
longioribus anguste linearibus in laminam subcylindraceam elongatam 
acntam basi dorso gibbam cobaerentibus, petalia sepalo dorsali paulo 
brevioribus ovatis caudato-acuminatis ciliatis, labello breviter stipitato 
ovato-lanceolato pallido, columna ecalcarata subbialata, alis superne 
dilatatis truncatis, pede brevi. 

C. Makoyanum, Beichh.f. in Gard. Chron. 1879, i. 232. 



Cirrhopetalum Malcoyanum was described about twelve 
years ago by Dr. Reichenbach in the Gardener's Chronicle, 
and named by him after the eminent nurserymen and 
importers of exotic plants, the Messrs. Makoy, of Liege. 
According to its importers it was found in the province of 
Minas Geraes in Brazil, a localization which Dr. Reichen- 
bach very naturally hesitates to accept, the affinity of the 
plant being clearly with the Asiatic species of Cirrhopetalum, 
and especially with the Bombay B. fimbriatum (Bot. Mag. 
t. 4391), which differs in having globose pseudobulbs, 
broader, longer and flat lateral sepals, and two strong 
teeth at the top of the column. It is perhaps nearer to 
G. gamosepalum, Griff., a native of Burma and the Malay 
Peninsula, which has a filiform rhizome, and a three- 
toothed column with a long foot. In the unarmed 
column it agrees better with another of the same group, 
C. Gumingii (t. 4996), which has red flowers, flat linear 
abruptly acuminate lateral sepals, and a prolonged 
foot to the column. These all belong to a very consider- 

October 1st, 1892. 



able section of the genus, with many flowers in a flat 
umbel, and ciliate dorsal sepal and petals, which is confined 
to the Old World ; to which quarter of the globe no doubt 
G. Malcoyanum is to be assigned. 

The distinctive characters of G. Malcoyanum are the 
stout rhizome, the pale yellow flowers dotted with red, and 
the revolute margins of the lateral sepals, which being 
coherent, together form a slender tube narrowing from the 
base to the apex, the very short foot of the column, and 
its truncate wings. 

The Royal Gardens are indebted to Fredk. Wigan, Esq., 
of Clare Lodge, East Sheen, for the specimen here figured, 
which flowered in January, 1892, in the Orchid House. — 
/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, lip and column; 3, lip; 4, column; 5 and 6, side and 
front views of anther ; 7, pollinia ;— all enlarged. 



7260, 




MS. del, J.N .Fitch, lith. 



"VmcentBrooksDay & San,Imp. 



L. Beeve & C^ London. 



Tab. 7260. 

MONODORA GRANDIFLORA. 
Native of Western Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Anonace^:. — Tribe Mitrephore,e. 
Genua Monodora, Dunal ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. PI v 1. i. p. 26 ) 



Monodora grandiflora ; arborea, foliis oblongis obovato-oblongiave acutis baai 
rotundatis obtusis cordatisve, pedunculis v. ramulis hornotinia supra 
medium 1-bracteatis, sepalis lanceolatia acuminatia undulatia, petalis 
exterioribus 3-4-pollicanbus lanceolatis criapato- undulatia aure'is rubro 
maculatis, interioribas duplo minoribus unguiculatis latissime ovato- 
cordatis angulis basi inflexis ciliatia, ovario turbinato, stigmate lobulato 
fructu 6 pod. diam. pericarpio crasao aubsulcato. 

M. graudiiiora, Benth. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 474. 

M. Myristica var. grandiflora, Oliver Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. i. p. 38. 

Xylopia uudulata, Beauv. Fl. Oware et Benin, vol. i. p. 27, t. 16 (excl. 
fruct.) ? 



The genus Monodora was founded on a tree at that time 
known only as cultivated in the West Indies, where it is 
called the American or Calabash Nutmeg, and of which 
the fruit alone had been previously described and figured 
by Gaertner (Fruct. vol. ii. p. 194, t. 125, f. i.) as 
Anona Myristica. The specific and popular name being 
due to the fact of the seeds containing an aromatic oil 
resembling in flavour but less pungent than that of the 
Nutmeg, and used for the same purposes, in food and as 
medicine. This, for long the only known species, was 
supposed in Jamaica to have been brought from the 
Continent of America. It is figured at tab. 3059 of this 
Magazine, and fully described by Dr. Bancroft from livino- 
specimens, accompanied with observations by the editor of 
the Magazine, who supplies a note to the effect that Robert 
Brown considered it more probable that it was brought by 
the negroes from the West Coast of Africa. 

Nothing further was known of the genus till a second 
species, that here figured, was described by Mr. Bentham, 
from specimens collected by Mr. G. Mann (late Conservator 
of Forests in Assam) in tropical Western Africa, and which 
he identified with the Xylopia undulata, Beauv. of Benin, 
together with two others, M. tenuifolia, Benth., and M. bru- 

Octobek lsi, 1892. 



vipes, Benth., all natives of the Bight of Benin. Mr. Ben- 
tham also indicates three insufficiently known species, M. 
angolensis, Welw. (Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. iii. p. 151) ; a 
second from the Niger river ; and a third from the Zambesi. 

Mr. Bentham doubted whether his M. grandiflora, of 
which he had seen only Herbarium specimens, might not 
be the same as M. Myristica ; and Professor Oliver has, in 
the Flora of Tropical Africa, placed it as a variety under 
the latter. A comparison of the plates 7260 and 3059 
would seen to negative this, for if Dr. Bancroft's figure is 
to be trusted, the flowers of M. Myristica are not half the 
size of those of grandiflora, the proportions of the outer 
and inner sepals differ greatly, as does their colouring, and 
the position of the bract on the peduncle of the flower. 
On the other hand, Dr. Bancroft says that the flowers vary 
much in size, and the position of the bracts in the genus is 
far from constant. Beauvois' figure is too bad to admit of 
its being identified with M. grandiflora ; and he represents 
as actually growing from the stem, the fruit of a totally 
different genus. Nor must it be overlooked that 
Gaertner's fruit of M. Myristica is not half the size of that 
of M. grandiflora, its seeds are much smaller, and the 
pericarp is comparatively thin. 

I have only further to remark that the corolla of the 
genus has not hitherto been accurately described; the 
petals are completely confluent below ; and the base of the 
hence gamopetalous corolla is raised in the centre of the 
flower forming an erect columnar tube that supports the 
torus ; this column is nearly terete in the newly opened 
flower, as represented at fig. 2, but becomes at length 
grooved, as shown at fig. 1. 

M. grandiflora has been long cultivated at Kew, having 
probably being sent by Mr. Mann about the year 1860. 
It has attained in the Palm House a height of fifteen feet, 
where it flowers in spring. Mr. Watson informs me that 
it loses its leaves in autumn, and forms new ones in 
spring of a glossy rose purple when young, turning to a 
glossy green when mature.—/. D. H. 



\. ? S 'a I e ? f corolla ' lowing the erect columnar portion stamens and ovary, 
backed by an inner petal ; 2, column from a newly expanded flower; 3 and 4, 
anthers; o, transverse section of ovary; 6, ovule -.—all but Jig. 1 enlarged. 



7261. 




-*S.del,J.N.FiT.dh;A-h. 



Vincent BrodksDay * So 



X Reeve 5c C° London.. 



Tab. 7261. 
CHEIRANTHERA parviflora. 
Native of Western Australia. 

Nat. Ord. Pittospore^. 
Genus Ciieirantheka, A. Cunn. ; (Benth. etHook.f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 133.) 



Cheiranthera parviflora; caule gracili volubili glabro v. puberulo, foliis 
subsessilibus linearibus v. oblongo-ovatis lanceolatisve acutis obt'usisve 
marginibus recurvis, floribus solitariis terminalibus longe pedunculatis 
sepabs minutis, petalis obovato-oblongis apiculatis, antheris filamentis 
aequilongis, ovario in stylum incurvum attenuate 

C. parviflora, Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. i. p. 128. 



A very elegant twiner with interlaced branches, as 
shown in the figure here given of a plant grown at Kew, 
but according to the description in the Flora Australiensis' 
having sometimes a less twining habit with short leafy' 
branches. The plant also varies extremely in foliage, with 
leaves from one half to one and a half inch long and from 
broadly oblong-lanceolate to linear. In habit it much 
resembles the well-known green-house favourite, Sollya 
heterophylla (Tab. 3523), from which the genus Chetr- 
anthem differs in the stamens not forming a cone round 
the pistil, but being bent to one side of the flower (as in tho 
section Pleurandra of Hibbertia) facing the incurved aspect 
of the ovary. 

G. parviflora is a native of Western Australia, in the 
King George's Sound district, where it was discovered 
half a century ago by Mr. James Drummond, the inde- 
fatigable explorer of the Botany of the Swan River Colony, 
and T have seen no other native specimens than those sent 
by him to Sir W. Hooker nearly half a century ago. The 
plant here figured was raised from seeds sent by G. \\ r . 
Leake, Esq., Q.C., Member of the Legislative Council of 

October 1st, 1892. 



Western Australia, a valuable contributor to the Royal 
Gardens, where it flowered in a cool greenhouse m July of 
the present year. — /. D. H. 



^ Fig. 1 , Calyx and ovary ; 2, petal ; 3, stamens and ovary ; 4, stamen ; 
5, ovary with half of pericarp removed showing the ovules ; 6, transverse 
section of ovary ;— all enlarged. 



7262. 




KS.de], J.N Fitch, lith 



Vin.centBrooksDay& Son,Irup. 



L. Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 7262. 
fl£ o MOORE A ieeoeata, Uolfe. 
Native of the Andes of South America. 



Nat. Ord. Ouchide^e. Tribe Vande.e. 
Genus Mookea, Uolfe in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. ii. p. 7. 



Gen. char. Sepala subasqualia, libera, patentia. Petala sepalis subsimilia, 
eed basi angustiora. Lahellum sepalis minus, cum basi (pedi brevissimo) 
crasso columnar articulatum, sessile, profunde trilobum, lobis lateralibus 
majusculis auriculssformibus obtusis_, iutermedio subulato lateralibus 
paullo longiore porrecto, disco bicornuto inter coruua 3-calloso. 
Columna incurvo-erecta, robusta, basi incrassata, exalata. Anthera ter- 
minalis, hemispherica, incumbens ; pollinia 4, subreuiformia, paribus 
valde inasqualibus, apice stipitis anguste linearis basi viscosi affixa, glan- 
dula ; rostellum ineonspicuum ; stigmate transverso. — Herba pseudo- 
bulbosa, elata. Pseudobulbi ovoidei, sulcati, diphylli. Folia maxima, 
(3^ pedalia), petiolata, elliptico-lanceolata, acuminata, plicata. Scapus 
inter pseudobulbos enatus, validus, erectus, foliis multo brevior, vaginatus. 
Flores ampli, laxe racemosi, breviter pedicellati ; bracteae cymbiformes, 
acutse, ovario breviores, coriacese, persistentes. Sepala et petala eoriacea, 
ockraceo-brunnea, basi pallidiora. Labelli lobi laterales straminei, pur- 
purei transverse striati, intermedio basi aureo apice purpurea ; cornua disci 
suberecta, obtusa, aurea rubro-punctata. Columna et antbera pallide 
straminese. 

M. irrorata, Uolfe in Gard. Chron. 1. c. and 1892, i. p. 489, tig. 73. 



A very "handsome Orchid, closely allied to Houlletia, but 
generically distinguished by its author, Mr. Rolfe, by the 
lip being without a claw and articulate with the base or 
foot of the column, and by its mid-lobe or epichile not being 
articulate with the hypochile. It is named in honour of 
Mr. F. W. Moore, Curator of the Glasnevin Botanical 
Gardens, who worthily upholds the condition of those 
Gardens (so celebrated for the cultivation of Orchids) to 
which his father raised them. Unfortunately the native 
country of Moorea is only approximately known, it was 
bought by Mr. Moore at a sale of Orchids, and was pro- 
bably imported by Messrs. Shuttleworth, Carder & Co., 
from the Andes of New Grenada or Peru, those gentlemen 
having sent a flowering raceme, together with a leaf, to 
November 1st, 1892. 



Kew in December, 1889, a few months before others were 
received from Mr. Moore, though the fact was not known 
until later. 

The plant figured was flowered bj Mr. Moore in March 
of the present year. 

Desce. Pseudobidbs one and a half inches long, ovoid, 
grooved, green. Leaves two, attaining three feet in length 
by eight inches broad, elliptic-lanceolate, acute, plicate, 
with five principal nerves, narrowed at the base into a 
petiole of variable length. Scape from the base of the 
pseudobulb, much shorter than the leaves, suberect, as 
stout as a swan's quill, terete, green ; sheaths three to five, 
rather distant, one to one and a half inches long, brown. 
Raceme erect, six to ten inches long laxly many-fld. ; 
rachis stout, terete, green ; bracts one to one and a half 
inches, eliiptic-cymbiform, acute, thinly coriaceous, persis- 
tent ; pedicel and ovary one and a half inches long, stout, 
ascending or decurved, green. Flowers two inches in 
diameter. Sepals and petals subsimilar, spreading, con- 
cave, elliptic-ovate, acute, orange-brown, pale at the base. 
Lip much smaller, sessile, articulate on the very short 
broad foot of the column, broader than long, deeply three- 
lobed ; lateral lobes ear-shaped, yellow banded and spotted 
with purple ; mid-lobe styliform ; disk with a horseshoe- 
like erect appendage, consisting of two linear-oblong obtuse 
yellow arms spotted with red, between which are three 
collateral oblong calli. Column stout, pale, incurved. 
Anther hemispheric; pollinia of two very unequal oblong 
pairs on a slender linear strap that terminates below in 
an acute glandular tip, and bears no defined gland ; the 
strap projects far beyond the anther and obscure rostellum, 
and overhangs the broad stigmatic depression. — /. D. S. 



Fig. 1, Lip spread open ; 2, processes and calli of the disk of the lip ; 3, column ; 
4 and 5, anther; 6 and 7, pollinia -.—all enlarged; 8, view of whole plant, 



about one-fourth of the natural size. 



7263. 




M. S del j;N.Fitioh,iAh 



A/mcentBrodk3"Day& Sonjmp. 



L.Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 7263. 

CARLUDOVIOA microcephala. 

Native of Costa Rica. 

Nat. Ord. Cyclanthe^. — Tribe Carludovice^:. 
Genus Carludovica, Ruiz & Pav. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 953) 



CARxrDoyicA rnicrocepha la; humilis, caule brevi valido erecto, foliis parvis 
gracile petiolatis unicostatis infra medium furcatis, laciniis knceolatis 
acuminatis sub-8-nerviis, vagina brevi coriacea, spadice gracili peduncu- 
lato parvo oblongo, spathis ad basia spadicis binis late ovatis apice 
attenuatis, cadncis, A. masc. perianthii lobulis 1-seriatis oblongis, filamen- 
tia mamillasformibus brevissimis apicnlatis, fl. fern, perianthii lobis bre- 
vissimis latis, staminodiis simplicibua filiformibus. 

C. microcephala, Sort. Berol. 



Except that it was sent to the Eoyal Gardens of Kew 
from that of Berlin in 1880, I have no information as to 
this curious dwarf species of Carludovica, beyond what has 
been kindly communicated by Dr. Wendland, to whom I 
sent the drawing together with that of Ghamasdorea 
stolonifera (Plate 7265). That excellent botanist informs 
me that it is a native of Costa Rica, where it has been 
found by both Warsewicz and himself; and, that like 
C. atrovirens, H. Wendl., it belongs to a section of the genus 
with two spathes below the spadix. I do not find the 
name C. microcephala in the Index of all known flowering 
plants now being printed at Kew, nor does the plant agree 
with the description of any published species. In the 
stem it resembles the young plant of various scandenfc 
species, but as it has now been twelve years at Kew, 
throwing out no lateral roots (indicative of a climbing 
habit), and flowering repeatedly, it is presumable that it 
belongs to the short-stemmed group of the genus. Its 
near ally would appear to be C. ensiformis, figured at 
t. 6418 of this w T ork, which has a very short stem, bifid 
leaves, and a similar small oblong spadix ; but in that 
plant the leaves are distichous, with very stout petioles, 
are more deeply divided, and the segments are ensiform 
November 1st, lb92. 



and only four-nerved, with the nerves very distant. In 
the structure of the male and female flowers these two 
species are very closely allied. 

G. microcephala flowers annually in a stove at Kew in 
the spring months. 

Descb. Stem three and a half inches high, subclavate, 
narrowing from one and a quarter inch in diameter at the 
top to two-thirds inch at the base, throwing out subter- 
ranean suckers, green crossed with about twelve broad 
brown scars of fallen leaves. Leaves numerous at the top 
of the stem, ten to eighteen inches long, dark green, split 
to below the middle into two lanceolate finely acuminate 
plicately about eight-nerved segments ; petiole very slender, 
dilated at the base into a fleshy purplish open sheath. 
Peduncle two to four inches long, slender, naked, green, 
furnished at the base with narrow brown lanceolate 
appressed sheaths about one inch long. Spadix three- 
fourths inch long, oblong, obtuse, with about eight groups 
of flowers, subtended by two opposite pale green ovate 
spathes one to one and a half inches long, with long green 
tips. Malefl. with one row of many short oblong perianth 
lobes; filaments subglobose with short tips; anthers 
shortly oblong. Fern. fl. : perianth-lobes four, very short, 
much broader than long; staminodes one and a half inch 
long, simple, filiform. Stigmas subglobose.— J. R H. 



Fig. 1, Male fl. ; 2 and 3, stamens; 4. fern. fl. : 5, transverse section of 
ovary -.—all enlarged. 



7264. 




\ 



VmcervtBrodkeDay & Sorv.Imp. 



mdon. 



Tab. 7264. 
CALOCHOETUS Kennedyi. 

Native of California and Arizona. 

Eat. Ord. Liliace.e. — Tribe Tulipe^e. 
Genus Caiochortus, Pursh. ; (BentJi. et HooTc.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 820.) 



Caxochorttjs {Mariposa) Kennedyi; bulbo ovoideo, caule gracili 1-4-floro 
recto vel flexuoso, foliis linearibus, pedunculia brevibus vel elongatis, 
sepalis lineari-oblongis intus pallide citriuis baai macula castaneo-atra 
prseditis, petalis cuneatis splendide coccineo-luteis uugae nigro-castaneo 
foveola centrali dense hispida praadito, staminibus petalis 2-3-plo breviori- 
bus, ovario cylindrico-trigono stigmatibus falcatis. 

C. Kennedyi, Porter in Coulter Bot. Gaz. vol. ii. p. 79; 8. Wats, in Proc. 
Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. p. 265 ; Bot. Calif, vol. ii. p. 171. 



The genus Calochortus is distinguished from all the 
other Liliacese by its distinctly dichlamydeous perianth. 
Whilst Tulipa is entirely restricted to the Old World, 
Calochortus belongs exclusively to America, being confined 
to Mexico, Arizona, California, British Columbia and the 
Rocky Mountains. Since I monographed the genus in 1875 
in the fourteenth volume of the " Journal of the Linnean 
Society," a large number of new species have been dis- 
covered. Of these the present plant is the most showy. 
It entirely agrees in structure, foliage, and general habit 
with G. luteus, sjolendens, and venustus, but the petals are 
brilliant scarlet with a dash of yellow in it, with a dark 
claw and a very distinct, very hispid, nearly basal nectary. 
It has been found in Arizona and several places in 
Southern California. Our drawing was made from a 
plant that flowered in Kew Gardens last June. The bulbs 
were sent to Kew by Mr. Charles R. Orcutt, of San Diego, 
the editor of the " West American Scientist." At 
Kew it flowered freely in an open border, and appears 
to be as hardy as the other species of the section Mariposa. 

Descr. Bulb small, ovoid, producing the new one close to 
itself. Stem slender, terete, straight or flexuose, simple or 
branched. Leaves linear, produced in a tuft from the fork 
if the stem is branched. Flowers one to four ; peduncles 

Novembeb 1st, 1892. 



ascending, long or snort. Sepals linear-oblong, an inch 
long, pale yellow inside, with a round brown-black spot at 
the base. Petals cuneate, as broad as long, placed nearly 
edge to edge in the expanded flower, rounded to a minute 
cusp on the outer margin, bright scarlet with a dash of 
yellow, ciliated towards the base with a few large brown- 
black bristles ; claw brown-black with a very distinct 
densely hispid brown-black nectary in the middle. Stamens 
less than half as long as the petals ; filaments much 
shorter than the pale yellow linear anthers. Ovary 
cylindrical-trigonous, narrowed to the base and apex ; 
stigmas spreading, sessile. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Base of petal, showing nectary and bristles ; 2, a stamen ; 3, pistil : 
— -all enlarged. 




7265. 



M.S.del.J.N.FitchJit2\ 



VuicentBrooksDay 8= Son Jmp. 



L.Reeve & 0° London. 



Tab. 7265. 
CHAMJBDOREA stolonifeea. 

Native of South Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Palmes. Tribe Arece je. 
Genus Cham^dorea, Willd. ; (Bentk. & Koolc. f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 910.) 



Cham^drea (Collinia) stolonifera; caudice tenui valde atolonifero, foirfs 
bifurcatis, laciniis late oblongis margine exteriore superrte gro«se 
crenato-serratis utrinque 9-nerviis, spadicibus masculis 5-6-ramo9ig, 
foemineis simplicibus, corolla mascula et fceminea trifida bruunea demam 
aurantiaca, fructibus oblongo-globosis. H. Wendl. mss. 



I am indebted to Dr. Wendland for the above diagnosis 
of this previously unpublished species, as the Royal 
Gardens are for the plant figured, which was received from 
Herrenhausen in 1882, and flowered in the tropical Aroid 
house in the spring months. Dr. "Wendland refers it to 
his section Collinia (genus of Martius) characterized by the 
flowers of both sexes being trifid with valvate lobes ; and 
to which also belongs C. elegans, Mart., figured at Plate 
4845 of this work, a native, like G. stolonifera t of Mexico. 

A striking character of G. stolonifera is its excessively 
stoloniferous habit, resulting in the stems forming dense 
clusters amongst the bases of which the stolons creep, some 
however radiating out horizontally and giving rise to 
young plants at some distance from the old stems, as shown 
in the plate. 

Descr. Stems slender, a yard high, hardly so thick as 
the middle finger, growing in dense tufts with interlaced 
stolons, green, rather closely annulate. Leaves terminal, 
ten inches long, bright green, shortly petioled, obovate in 
outline, cleft to below the middle into two dimidiate-oblong 
subacute nine-nerved many-nervuled segments ; outer 
margin of the segments crenately toothed, inner slightly 
convex; petiole one to one and a half inch, slender; sheath 
short. Spadices infra-foliar ; males shorter than the 
leaves, subcorymbosely five to six-branched ; branches 
three to five inches long, spreading and flexuous, green ; 
November 1st, 1892. 



peduncle five inches long, clothed up to the branches of 
the spadix, with three to five brown lanceolate acuminate 
imbricating convolute sheaths. Male fl. rather loosely 
scattered on the branches of the spadix, sessile by a broad 
base, globose, about one-eighth inch diameter, at first 
brown, then orange-yellow. Calyx annular, membranous, 
obscurely toothed. Corolla thickly coriaceous, three-lobed 
to the middle, lobes valvate. Stamens with the filaments 
confluent in a fleshy broad six-toothed ring ; anther-cells 
divaricate below, linear, marginal as it were on the teeth 
of the ring. Pistillode columnar, with a three-lobed 
stigma. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Portion of branch of spadix and flowers ; 2, lobe of corolla ; 3, ring of 
stamens and pistillode ; 4, portion of do. with, one anther : — all enlarged. 



7266. 




( 



M.S.ael.J'N.Fitch.liih. 



VincerctErodksDay 8c Son.,Imp 



L. Reeve & C!> London 



Tab. 7266. 
RANUNCULUS cabpaticus. 

Native of Transylvania. 

Nat. Ord. RanunculacejE. — Tribe Rant;ncule.e. 
Genus Ranunculus, Linn. ; (Benth. et-Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. i. p. 5.) 



Ranunculus carpatieus; rhizomate horizontal! crasso, caule simplici erecto 
1-3-folio 1-2-floro basi appresse piloso, foliis sparse pilosis, radicalibus 
longe petiolatis palmati-partitis segmentis fissis et crenato-dentatis, 
caulinarum inferiore breviter petiolato radicalibus subsimili, superioribus 
sessilibus amplexicaulibus, summo 3-5-partito segmentis integerrimis, 
sepalis patulis patentim pilosis, petalis duplo longioribus aureis, toro 
spherico setoso, acheniis reniformi-obovoideis subcompressis glabris rostro 
hamato pubernlo duplo longioribus. 

R. carpatieus, Herbich. Sel. PI. Bar. Gallic. 15 ; Walp. Rep. i. 34 ; Schott. 
in Bot. Zeit. 1851, 393. 

R. Gouanii, Willd. Sp. PI- vol. ii. p. 1322 ex parte ; Baumg. Enum. Stirp. 
Magn. Transylv. indig. ii. 125. 

R. montanus, var. dentatus, Baumg. I. c. 124. 



B. carpatieus is confined to subalpine forests in the moun- 
tains of Eastern Hungary, bordering Roumelia, at eleva- 
tions of four thousand to five thousand feet, where it 
represents B. montanus, Willd., and Gouanii, Willd., of 
the more western Alps and Pyrenees. It is a much larger 
flowered plant than either of these, and is indeed one of 
the largest flowered European species, though in this 
respect it varies a good deal, the flower of some specimens 
in the Herbarium at Kew being nearly double the size of 
others. 

Professor Janka, on the ticket of a specimen received at 
Kew Herbarium in 1864 has given B. aduncus, Gren. and 
Godr. JTl. Franc, (vol. i. p. 32) a native of the Alps, as a 
synonym, but that plant is described as never having 
amplexicaul leaves, and it has petiolulate leaf-segments, and 
a much longer beak of the achene. 

The specimen figured was received at the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1891, from Professor Romer, of Kronstadt, in 
Hungary, and it flowered in the Herbaceous ground in 
May of this year. 

Novembee 1st, 1892. 



Descr. Whole plant more or less softly hairy with 
appressed or more or less spreading hairs. Rootstock one 
to three inches, creeping, as thick as the little finger or 
less, yellowish. Stem eight to twelve inches high, as thick 
as a crow-quill, erect, one to two-leaved above the middle, 
one to two-fid. Leaves ; radical long-petioled, orbicular in 
outline, five inches broad or less, bright green, copiously 
hirsute, deeply palmately lobed almost to the base ; seg- 
ments cuneately obovate, lobulate and crenate-toothed, 
nerves deeply impressed] lower cauline leaf sessile or shortly 
petioled, like the radical but narrower ; uppermost leaf 
greatly reduced, amplexicaul, five-lobed, lobes lanceolate 
entire. Flowers stoutly peduncled, one to two inches 
diameter ; peduncle two to three inches, appressedly, 
hairy. Sepals half inch long or less, oblong, obtuse, 
spreading, sparsely hirsute, yellow green. Petals orbicular- 
obovate, golden yellow ; basal scale broad, truncate. 
Stamens very many, filaments longer than the anthers. 
Head of carpels globose. Achenes tumid, glabrous, nar- 
rowed into a strongly hooked puberulous beak not half as 
long as the body. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, Stamens ; 3, achene : — all enlarged. 







Fitch Wh 



Vincej •& Bfo ol<s r D ay~& S o n frii^» 



L Reeve 8uC°londor 



Tab. 7267. 

ferula tingitana. 

Native of Northern Africa- and Syria. 

Nat. Ord. Umbellifer*. — Tribe Peucedane.e. 
Genus Ferula, Linn.; {Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. PL vol. i. p. 917). 



F. tingitana; glabra, caule robnsto elato inferne folioso, foliis amplia viridibua 
glaucescentibus lucidis triangulari-ovatis quarternatim pinnatiaectia, 
segmentis in petiolnlum brevem angustatis oblongis in lacinias breves 
oblongas obtusas pinaatipartitis, superiorum vaginis dilatatia, bracteis 
ramornm basin oblongis cymbiformibus membranaceia deciduia, umbellis 
globosia aureis, fructu elliptico caesio margine aemine quadraplo angus- 
tiore cincto, jugis tenuibus prominentibus, valleculas 3-vittatis, com- 
missure 4-vittata. 

F. tingitana, Linn. Sp. PL p. 247. Gaerln. Fruct. vol. ii. p. 28, t. 85, f. 1. 
Ait. Sort. Kew, ed. 2, vol. ii. p. 137. Lamk. Encycl. vol. ii. p. 455. Illustr. 
Gen. t. 205, f. 2. Desf. Fl. Atlant. vol. i. p. 251. DO. Prodr. vol. iv. 
p. 173. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. ii. p. 992. Ball in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xvi. 
474. 

F. sancta, Boiss. Biagn. PI. Or. vol. i. pt. X, p. 39. 

Ferula tingitana foliis lucidis, &c. Breyn. Hist. Prodr. Fasc. Bar. PI. vol. i. 
p. 62 (1680). Sutherland Hort. Med. Edijib. Cat. (1683). Bay. Hist. PI. 
vol. iii. p. 253 (1624). Hermann Parad. Batav. p. 165, cum Ic. (1698). 
Rivin. Introd. Gen. in rem Herbar. t. 256 (1699). Ord. Pl.fi. Pentapet. 
Ic. (1699). Morison Plant. Hist. Univ. Oxon. sect. x. p. 309, t. 15 (1699). 
Boerk. Ind. Alt PL Hort. Lugd. Bat. p. 65 (1720). Linn. Hort. Oliff. p. 95 
(1737). 

The chief interest attached to this noble Umbellifer is 
that it has long been supposed to be that which produces 
the Gum Ammoniac of Northern Africa, and which article 
is still largely exported to Europe and the East from the 
Maroccan ports of Mogador and Mazagan. For this 
supposition Lindley is the first authority, according to the 
late Dr. Pereira, who says (Mat. Med. Ed. 3 (1853) 
p. 1713), "African Ammoniacum, in Arabic Fasogh or 
Fashook, is, Dr. Lindley assures me, the produce of Ferula 
tingitana" In this opinion he has been followed by 
Fluckiger and Hanbury, and Bentley and Trimen (under 
Dorema Aucheri, Medicinal Plants, vol. ii. No. 129). It is 
singular that none of these authors seems to have com- 
pared the leaves of F. tingitana with the only authoritative 
figure of those of the Fashook, or African Gum Ammoniac 
December 1st, 1892. 



plant, namely that given in " Jackson's Account of the 
Empire of Morocco " (Ed. iii. 1814, p. 136, plate 7), and 
which represents an entirely different species of Umbellifer. 
That Jackson's figure represents the true Fashook is now 
proved by a living specimen at Kew, procured by Mr. 
Hunot, H.B.M. Vice-Consul at Saffi, from the interior of 
Marocco, in 1886, and which, Mr. Watson informs me, now 
shows signs of flowering. This latter plant more nearly 
resembles the foliage of the Canarian F. Linhii, Webb, 
than those of F. Ungitana. I should add that Mr. Ball 
and I, when in Marocco, vainly sought for the Ammoniacum 
plant, which the natives assured us grew only in the 
interior districts inhabited by predatory and fanatical 
Moors, to the north of the city of Marocco. Mr. Ball 
(judging from Jackson's figure) was decidedly of opinion 
that it would prove to be a species of Elaeoselinum, of 
which genus we had found a small species with somewhat 
similarly cut leaves on the road to Marocco, where the 
Fashook had been reported to have been seen (see 
"Marocco and the Great Atlas," p. 386). I have only 
further to remark that Lindley's opinion was founded on 
specimens of the gum which he received from Marocco, 
together with others of F. Ungitana, as the plant believed 
to produce it, and that I hope in due time to be able to 
figure the true plant in this work. 

Mr. Ball (Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xvi. p. 474) observes 
that in specimens of F. Ungitana gathered by us at 
1 angiers, the central umbels had peduncles five to six 
inches long, that both involucres and involucels were some- 
times absent, or that the involucres present consisted of 
three to four long setaceous bracts, and the involucels of 
many short setaceous bracteoles. 

F. Ungitana is a native of the whole coast of Northern 
Africa, from Marocco to Tripoli, as also of the Islands 
of Rhodes and Chios, and of Syria. Specimens from the 
last-named country, having leaves more glaucous and with 
more obtuse segments of the leaflets, were described at first 
byBoissieras a different species, F. sancta, but subsequently 
referred by him to the African plant, not even as a variety. 
ihe obtuse leaflets of the specimen here figured may in- 
dicate its being the Syrian form, but unfortunately nothing 
is known of its origin, it having been in cultivation at Kew 



for many years. According to Morrison the species was 
introduced into England before 1680 by Mr. Alex. Balaam. 
Linnaeus, in Hortus Cliffortianus and Sp. Plant, (citing 
Tournefort Institutes, p. 321), gives Spain as a habitat, 
but this, though repeated in Hortus Kewensis, has never 
been confirmed. — J. D. II . 



Fig. 1, Male flower; 2, fem. do. with the petals and calyx-limb removed; 
3, head of ripe carpels ; 4, transverse sections of mericarps; 6, whole plant : — 
all enlarged except fig. 3, which is of the natural size, and 6, which is greatly 
reduced. 



7268 




MlS.'del,J.NritA.li«K 



gSHjjjSg*! y 



Vincer\tBrool<B Day& Sorting 



L Reeve &.C?Loi\ilan.. 



Tab. 7268. 
MICROSTYLIS Soottii. 

Native of Pegu and the Malayan Peninsula. 



Nat. Ord. OrchldEjE. Tribe Epidendre^. 
Genus Microstylis, Nutt. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 494). 



Microstylis Scottii; foliis2-5 sessilibus oblique ovatis acuminatis marginibus 
undulatis, supra brunneis fascia lata marginali pallida brunneo punctata, 
scapo elongato acute tetragono colorato, racemo elongato stricto multi- 
floro, bracteis Ianceolatis reflexis ovarium breve subraquantibus, floribus 
parvis subsessilibus, sepalis lateralibus late oblongis marginibus recurvis, 
dorsali petalisque longioribus et angustioribus, labello viridi suborbiculari, 
auriculis erectis laminae rotundatao apice constrictae et 2-lobae aoquilongis. 

M. Scottii, Hook.f. Ft. Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 687 ; et in Hook. Ic. PI. t. 2001. 



When, only two years ago, I described this remarkable 
species from a drawing belonging to the Calcutta Botanical 
Gardens, and observed that it was " eminently worthy of 
cultivation," I little anticipated being so soon able to figure 
it from living specimens grown in the Royal Gardens, 
Kew. The drawing above referred to represents a speci- 
men with the blade of the leaf of a lustrous dark bronzed 
hue, the broad dotted margin as more defined and cream- 
coloured; the waving of the margins of the leaves as if 
they were crenated, the scape as red, and the lateral sepals 
not half the length of the dorsal and petals. There are 
also minor differences, as in the large size of the foliage of 
the Kew plant, and others which may be seen from an 
inspection of the copy in the " Icones Plantarum " of the 
Calcutta drawing, but none that militates against its 
specific identity with that from Calcutta. It must be 
borne in mind, that the latter drawing was made by a 
native artist in the Botanical Gardens, from a cultivated 
specimen ; and also that the original came from Rangoon, 
in Pegu, a widely distant locality from that of the plant 
here figured, which was sent from Singapore ; the distance 
between these localities being upwards of a thousand miles. 

December 1st, 1892. 



M. Scottii belongs to a rather large section of the genus 
(Crepidium, Blume) with the sides of the lip produced 
upwards into two elongate auricles, to which section also 
belong M. metallica (Tab. 6668) and M. JosepMana (Tab. 
6325). 

The Royal Gardens are indebted to those of Singapore 
for the specimen here figured, which was received from 
Mr. Ridley in October, 1891, and flowered in the tropical 
orchid house in May of the present year. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1> Front, and 2 side view of flower ; 3 and 4, column ; 5, anther ; 6, pol- 
linia : — all enlarged. 



7269 




M.S.dfil.J.NP^h.WT. 



3rooks.D<y<5iScn.lmp 



t is m 2. I-O T, 



Tab. 7269. 
KNIPHOFIA pauciploea. 

Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^e. — Tribe Hejieroc allege. 
Genus Kniphopia, Moench. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 775.) 



Knipiiofia pauciflora; fibris radicalibns gracilibus, foliis paucia Iinearibus 
firmulis viri'dibus pedalibus vel sesquipedalibus utrinque acute carinatis 
margine Iambus, pedunculo erecto gracili foliis aaquilongo, racemo laxo 
paucifloro, pedicellis brevibus apice articulatis, bracteia lanceolatis 
scariosis pedicellis aequilongis, perianthio anguste infundibulari pallide 
citrino, lobis brevibus ovatis obtusis, genitalibus omnibus demum distincte 
exsertis. 

K. pauciflora, Baker in Journ. Bot. 1885, p. 280 ; et in Gard. C/iron. 1889, 
vol. ii. p. 65, fig. 10. 

Of late years the number of known species of Kniphofia 
lias increased very rapidly. In 1842, when Kunth mono- 
graphed them in the fourth volume of his " Enumeratio 
Plantarum," only seven species were known, and now they 
have increased to forty. They occur, not only outside the 
tropic in Cape Colony and Natal, but there are endemic 
types in the mountains of Madagascar, Angola, Abyssinia, 
and Zambesi-land. The present plant is readily distin- 
guished by its slender habit, narrow leaves, lax racemes 
and pale yellow flowers. It was first gathered in 18G0 by 
Mr. Sanderson, and was refound two years ago and intro- 
duced into cultivation by Mr. J. Medley Wood, A.L.S., 
the energetic Superintendent of the Botanic Garden at 
Durban. So far it has been grown at Kew under cover, 
and has been irregular in its time of flowering. This year 
it opened out first in March and flowered again in July. 
It is doubtful whether it will prove hardy, but it is very 
ornamental in a small pot in a cool conservatory. Our 
drawing was made from a specimen that flowered in sum- 
mer in the herbaceous department of the Royal Gardens. 

Descr. Boot-fibres slender. Leaves few to a tuft, linear, 
green, firm, a foot or a foot and a half long at the flower- 
ing time, tapering gradually to the point, acutely keeled 
on both surfaces, not at all serrated on the margins. 

December 1st, 1892. 



Peduncle slender, terete, as long as the leaves. Raceme 
lax, few-flowered, three or four inches long ; flowers 
drooping when expanded, pale lemon-yellow ; pedicels 
short, articulated at the apex ; bracts lanceolate, scariose, 
as long as the pedicels. Perianth narrowly funnel-shaped, 
under an inch long ; lobes short, ovate, obtuse. Stamens 
and style finally distinctly exserted ; anthers small, oblong. 
— J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Section of leaf; 2, a single flower; 3, front view of anther; 4, back 
view of anther ; 5, pistil ; 6, apex of style : — all enlarged ; 7, whole plant : — 
much reduced. 




7270 



ttS.dd ' 






X.. "Reove, &c C? X aruion. 



Tab. 7270. 

aganisia ionoptera. 

Native of Peru. 

Nat. Ord. Obchideje. Tribe Vande^e. 
Genus Aganisia, Lindl. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. iii. p. 544.) 



Aganisia ionoptera ; pseudobulbis coespitosis ovoideia monophyllis, folio 
angnsto elliptico-lanceolato acuminato 3-nervi, scapo elongato erecto 
simplici, floribua laxe racemosis coeruleis cernuis, bracteis parvis ovatis, 
sepalis late ovatis subacutis violaceis apicibus albis, petalis consimilibus 
sed minoribus deflexis, labelli albi lobis lateralibus auriculajformibus 
sanguioeo striatis terminali transverse oblongo lineis 2 concentricis san- 
gaineis notato, disco inter lobos lateralea 2-calloso, polliniis glandulam 
triangularem sessilibus. 

A. ionoptera, Nichols. Dictionary of Gardening, vol. i. p. 35 (1885). Rolfe in 
IAndenia, vol. vi. t. 287 (1891). 

Koellensteinia ionoptera, Linden and Reichb.f. in Gard. Ohron. 1871, p. 1451. 



The genus Aganisia was established by Lindley in the 
Botanical Register (1839, Misc. No. 65, and 1840, t. 32) 
on a single Bemeraran species (A. pulchella) . Lindley says 
of the genus, " if its column were produced into a foot, 
and the lower sepals unequal at the base, it would be a 
Maxillaria." To this are added by Bentham in the Genera 
Plantarum, and Reichenbach in various publications, about 
eight other species. As these present great differences in 
habit, and have never yet been all brought together in one 
work, I shall enumerate them here in the interest of 
Orchid ologists. They are: — 1. The above-named J. pul- 
chella with the pseudobulbous one-leaved habit of A. 
ionoptera, but with long creeping rhizome, a short scape, 
and white flowers with a yellow lip ; the plant resembling 
a small Ccelogyne. 2. A. jimbriata, Reichb. f. in Gard. 
Chron. 1874, ii. 452 and 804, a native of Demerara, with 
white petals, and a blue saccate fimbriate lip. 3. A. ccerulea, 
Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1876, ii. p. 226, a blue-flowered 
Brazilian species, also with a saccate fimbriate lip. 4. A. 
lepida, Linden and Reichb. f. in Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. vol. 
xxxv. pt. ii. (1876), p. 15, t. 5, and Beitr. Orchidk. p. 15, 
Decemukk 1st, 1892. 



t. 5, with one- or two-leaved pseudobulbs, and white? 
flowers ; it is a native of tropical America. 5. A. Oliveriana, 
Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1878, vol. i. p. 558, from Brazil, 
with pseudobulbs and blue flowers. 6. A. Kelneriana, 
Benth. in Gen. PL vol. i. p. 544, which is the type of 
Reichenbach's genus Koellensteinia, figured in his " Xenia 
Orchidacea," t. 24. 7. A. cyanea (Warrea cyanea*, Lindl. 
Bot Beg. 1844, Misc. No. 3 ; 1845, t. 28, Zygopetalum 
tricolor, Lindl. I. c. 1846, sub t. 64), a native of New 
Grenada, with the tufted leaves of A. graminea, no pseudo- 
bulbs, white sepals and petals, and blue lip. 8. A. graminea, 
Benth. 1. c. (Koellensteinia graminea, Beichb. f. in Bon- 
plandia, vol. iv. p. 323 (1856); Book. Bot. Mag. t. 6338; 
Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 552 ; Maxillaria graminea, Lindl. in 
Bot. Beg. 1836, sub t. ( 1802) ; Promenaea graminea, 
Lindl. I. c. 1843, Misc. 13), a Demeraran species with a 
tufted habit, no pseudobulbs, tufted leaves, and small 
yellow flowers. 9. A. venusta, Rolfe in Herb. Kew 
(Zygopetalum venustum, Ridley in Trans. Linn. Soc. Ser. 
ii. Bot vol. ii. p. 283), from Demerara. — The A. cyanea, 
Reichb. f. in Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. xxxv. pt. ii. (1876) p. 13, 
t. 4, is Acacallis cyanea, Lindl. Fol. Orchid., a closely allied 
but much larger flowered genus. 

A. ionoptera is a native of Peru, where it was found by 
the collector Wallis, who sent it to Linden, from whom the 
plant here figured was obtained at the International 
Horticultural Exhibition of Brussels in 1891. It flowered 
in the Royal Gardens in June, 1892.— -J. R H. 



Fig. 1, Lip and column; 2, side view of the same; 3, dorsal and ventral 
view of anther ; 4 and 5, pollinia :— all enlarged. 

* W. carnea, by misprint, in Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 544. 




7271. 



W.S.dal.JNPit*.!^ 



oks^Day^ 



L Reev 







Tab. 7271. 
ALLOPLECTUS Lynchei. 

Native of New Grenada f 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace-s:. — Tribe CyrtandrejE. 
Genus Alloplectus, Mart. ; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 1008.) 



Alloplectus Lynchei ; caule robusto, foliis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis 
inaequaliter crenato-serratis in petiolum brevem crassum angustatis supra 
flavo-viridibus costa nervisque sanguineis, subtus sanguineo-purpureis, 
floribus confertis breviter pedicellatis, bracteis lanceolatis calyce breviori- 
bus, calycis pilosi segraentis ovato-lanceolatis obtuse acuminatis pallide 
carneis, corollae tubo subcylindraceo albo pilis rubris laxe villoso, gibbo ima 
basi parvo, fauce vix constricta, lobis subsequalibus rotundatis paten tibus 
primulinis ciliatis, filamentorum tubo ovario styloque pilosis, stigmate 
2-lobo lobis rotundatis. 



A beautiful species and very distinct from any hitherto 
figured or described, as known to me. Its nearest ally is 
perhaps A. tigrina {Heintzia tigrina, Tab. 4774), a native 
of Venezuela, which has a similar broadly cylindric corolla- 
tube with subequal rounded spreading lobes, but which 
differs in the long petioled leaves, solitary axillary longer 
pedicelled flowers, in the very broad toothed calyx-seg- 
ments with cordate bases, in the very short style with a 
simple stigma, and in the colouring of both the foliage and 
flowers. It also a good deal resembles A. semicordatus. 
Poepp. and Endl. (Nov. Gen. and Sp. vol. iii. p. 5) a 
Peruvian scarlet-leaved species, which has very coriaceous 
or fleshy leaves, with long points, and very different cordate 
bracts. 

Of Alloplectus there are about fifty recorded species, but 
though affording good specific characters, they are difficult 
to determine from herbarium specimens, owing to the 
fleshy nature of the large bracts and calyx of most. Still 
I have no difficulty in recognizing as A. Lynchei a dried 
specimen of a plant which was sent to Kew without any 
information in 1885; as also another received from Mr. 
Lynch in J 890, with the information that it was introduced 
by Linden ; and a third received from the late Sir George 
Macleay. Mr. Lynch informs me that in his desire to 

December 1st, 1892. 



have the species determined he sent a specimen to Mr. 
Linden, and that the name returned was that of a totally 
different plant ; and further, that he (Mr. Lynch) has very 
recently received it from St. Petersburgh as Sinningia 
purpurea, an equally impossible identification if the latter 
is a true Sinningia, a genus with inferior ovary, a 
tuberous rhizome and five glands on the disc. 

Under these circumstances I have ventured to describe 
the present plant as new, and to name it after Mr. Lynch, 
through whose good offices this and so many other fine 
plants have been sent to me from the Cambridge Botanical 
Gardens, for figuring in the Botanical Magazine. There 
are good specimens of it at Kew, of which Mr. Watson 
informs me the leaves become red purple on both surfaces. 

The plant here figured flowered in the Cambridge 
Botanical Gardens in July of the present year. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Corolla ; 2, base of ditto, laid open, with stamens ; 3 and 4, anthers ; 
5, disk, gland, and ovary with style and stigma : — all enlarged.