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Modem Materia Medica 



(Revi»«d to Jaonary t«t, 1906.) 



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THE 

MODERN MATERIA MEDIGA 



The Source, Chemical and Physical Proper tiest 

Therapeutic Action^ Dosagfe, Antidotes 

and Incompatibles of all Additions 

to the Newer Materia Medica 

that are Likely to be Called 

for on Prescriptions, 



NEW YORK: 

The Druggists Circular 

loo William Street 
1906 



r=T?;- !Vjf?f?-'> 



Copyright, 1906, by The Druggists Circular. 



INTRODUCTION. 

' It Is practically impossible for the pharmacist 
of to-day to keep pace with the developments in 
modern chemistry as regards new remedies. Hun- 
dreds and hundreds of new therapeutic agents are 
introduced and advertised yearly, some meri- 
torious and of permanent interest, others of but 
passing importance. 

With a view of affording a source of accurate 
and unbiased information concerning the newer 
additions to the materia medica, The Druggists 
Circular some time ago began the publication of 
an extended descriptive list of new remedies, in- 
cluding some older substances newly brought to 
the attention of the medical profession, and also 
a number of nutritives specially designed for use 
by the sick and convalescent. 

In conjunction with the regular alphabetical 
continuation of the list from one issue to another 
of the Circular, all the remedial agents that were 
introduced from time to time during its publica- 
tion were described in supplemental lists, thus 
constantly bringing the matter up to date. 

These lists were completed in the issue for No- 
vember, 1905. They have since been revised and 
rearranged, so that all their items appear in con- 
tinuous alphabetical order, and are now presented 
in the following pages. 

It is confidently believed that "The Modern 
Materia Medica" is the most complete and reliable 
book of its kind now obtainable and that it will 
prove a valuable addition to the reference library 
of the pharmacist. 



Abilena is an American natural cathartic 
water, the saline ingredients of which are stated 
to consist mainly of sodium phosphate (98 per 
cent.) and magnesium sulphate (2 per cent.). 

Abrin (also known as jequiritin). — The ac- 
tive principle of jequirity seed (abrus preca- 
torius). It is a yellowish or brownish powder, 
soluble in sodium chloride solution. While ex- 
tremely poisonous when introduced into the cir- 
culation, it Is believed to be harmless when swal- 
lowed. It is used in 1:500,000 solution in place of 
jequirity infusion, in pannus, chronic conjuncti- 
vitis, and the like. Great care should be exer- 
cised in handling it; It is very dangerous in the 
nose, eyes or on wounds. Its solutions should be 
prepared fresh as wanted. 

Abrotanol Is a chocolate-coated pastille con- 
taining extract of artemisia abrotanum and men- 
thol and used as a stomachic and intestinal 
astringent. 

Acerdol. — A trade name for calcium perman- 
ganate. 

Acestoria. — Described as a 1 per cent, solution 
of cocaine in a volatile oil, containing some nitro- 
glycerin and hyoscyamine. It is employed in 
dentistry as a local anesthetic. 

Acetal (diethyl-acetal; diethyl-aldeJiyde ; 
ethylidene-diethyl ether). CH3.CH: (OC2H5),.— 
Occurs as a colorless, volatile liquid of the spe- 
cific gravity 0.831 at 20° C, of pleasant odor, 
and agreeable after-taste. It dissolves in about 20 



6 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

parts of water and 25 of chloroform, and is misci- 
ble In all proportions with alcohol or ether. It is 
used as a hypnotic in doses of 2 to 3 fluid drams. 

Acetamido-ethyl-salicylic Acid. — A synonym 
of benzacetine. 

Acetmethylanilid is the chemical designa- 
tion of exalgin. 

Acetocaustin. — A 50 per cent, solution of tri- 
chloracetic acid, used as a caustic on warts, 
corns, etc. 

Acetoform is a brand name for acetone chloro- 
form, a product better known as chloretone; see 
this title. 

Acetone Alcohol is a trade name given to a 
brand of 7)iethyl alcohol. 

Acetone Chloroform is chloretone; in saturated 
aqueous solution, aneson or anesin. 

Acetone-collodion is the same as filmogen 
which see. 

Acetonal is a 10 per cent, solution of aluminium 
and sodium acetate, obtained by dissolving 82 
parts of anhydrous sodium acetate in 4,050 parts 
of solution of aluminium acetate (Ph. G.). It 
is used as an antiseptic. 

Acetone-salicylic Acid Ether. — More general- 
ly known by its trade name of salacetol. 

Acetophenone. — The chemical name of hyp- 
none. 

Acetopyrin is better known as acopyrin, which 
see. 

Acetotoluid, ortho-, also designated as acetor- 
tho-amidotoluol or orthotolyl-acetamide, CjHuNO, 
occurs as colorless crystals which are freely sol- 
uble in alcohol or ether and sparingly soluble in 
water. It is antipyretic in action; dose, 3 to 8 
grains. 

Acetozone (CaHsCO.O.O.COCHj), formerly 
known as henzozone, and chemically definable as 
benzoyl-acetyl peroxide, was discovered by Profs. 
P. C. Freer and F. G. Novy, of the University of 
Michigan. In the pure state it dissolves in 1,000 
to 10,000 parts of water, 20 of oil, is slightly 
soluble in alcohol, fairly so in ether or chloro- 
form, but slowly decomposing in all these sol- 
vents excepting petrolenm oil; it is decomposed 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 7 

by contact with alkalies and organic matter of 
all kinds. It is marketed only as a 50 per cent, 
mixture with an inert absorbent powder, which 
occurs as a light, cream-colored powder of pecu- 
liar odor and pungent taste. In the presence of 
water it gives off HjOj by hydrolysis. Acetozone 
is a germicide that has been used chiefly in ty- 
phoid fever, internally, though to some extent 
also in surgery and gynecology, externally. It 
is generally used in a solution of 30 grains to 
the half gallon, the insoluble portion being al- 
lowed to settle and the clear liquid decanted; 
and in this form it is given internally, 2 to 6 
ounces every 4 hours. It is also used topically 
in 10 per cent, triturations with boric acid, 
talcum, etc.; and internally, freely diluted with 
milk sugar, in capsules, 3 to 5 grains 3 times a 
day. Its solutions should be kept in the re- 
frigerator. 

Acet-para-amido-salol, or acet-paroramido- 
phenyl-salicylate is salophen. 

Acet-para-phenetidin and acet-phenetin are 
synonyms of phenacetin. 

Acet-theocin-sodium is a double salt contain- 
ing 651^ per cent, of theocin, introduced by Dr. 
J. Meinertz as a soluble form of theocin (di- 
methyl-xanthin). It occurs as a white powder 
soluble in about 22 parts of water yielding an 
alkaline solution from which theocin is precipi- 
tated by acids. It is a powerful diuretic. Dose, 
3 to 5 grains 3 or 4 times daily, in solution, after 
meals. 

Acetyl-paraethoxy-phenyl-urethane. — See 
thermodin. 

Acetyl-paraoxyphenyl-urethane is marketed 
as neurodin. 

Acetylphenylhydrazin, also known as hydra- 
cetin and pyrodin, CsHmNjO, occurs as a white, 
crystalline powder, odorless and almost tasteless, 
readily soluble in alcohol or chloroform, melting 
at 128° C, and slightly soluble in cold water or 
ether. While possessed also of antipyretic and 
analgesic action, and hence used to some extent 
in rheumatism and febrile affections, acetyl- 
phenylhydrazin is now employed chiefly in 



8 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

psoriasis, externally, in 10 per cent, ointments. 
It Is rather toxic. The dose as an antipyretic is 
% to 3 grains a day; in sciatica and articular 
rheumatism, 3 to 5 grains daily. 
.. Acetyl-salicyl-phenetidin Is the chemical dei- 
Ignation for thermol. 

Acetyl-tannin is a synonym of tannigen. 

Acid, Acetyl-m.ethylene-d.isalicylic is known 
in the trade as urasol. 

Acid, Acetylsalicylic is better known as as- 
pirin. 

Acid, Acrolein-sulphurous. — See solvosal. 

Acid, Agaric, Agaricic, or Agaricinic is pure 
agaricin. 

Acid, Alpha- toluic (and Alpha-toluylic) are 
synonyms of phenyl-acetic acid. 

Acid, Anilinsulphonic is better known as sul- 
phaniUc acid. See this. 

Acid, Aseptic or Aseptinic, is described as a 
solution of boric acid and salicylic acid in water. 

Acid, Beta-Phenylacrylic. — See acid, cinna- 
mic. 

Acid, Cacodylic, or dimethylarsenic acid, 
(CH3)2AsO.OH, is an organic compound of ar- 
senic brought to' the notice of the medical pro- 
fession by Prof. A. Gautier in 1897, on account 
of its relative non-toxicity in spite of its 
high content in arsenic (54 per cent.). It forms 
white, odorless crystals, that are soluble in water 
or alcohol. It has been used in psoriasis, dia- 
betes, leucocythemia, and Basedow's disease, in 
doses of % to 1 grain 3 or 4 times a day in mix- 
ture flavored with syrup of orange, and pep- 
permint oil. Latterly cacodylic acid has been 
largely superseded by its sodium salt. Its iron, 
guaiacol, mercury, and quinine salts are also in 
vogue for special indications. It imparts a gar- 
licky odor to the breath and perspiration. Some 
authors explain the relative non-toxicity of caco- 
dylic acid on the score that only 2 or 3 per cent, 
of it is absorbed, the remainder being eliminated 
unchanged with the urine. 

Acid, Camphoric, CioHiaOi, is obtained from 
camphor by oxidation with nitric acid. It occurs 
as colorless, odorless crystals of feebly acid taste, 



THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 9 

slightly soluble in water but freely soluble in 
alcohol, ether or fatty oils. While used to some 
extent externally as an antiseptic and astringent, 
its chief employment is in night-sweats of phthi- 
sis. Dose, 10 to 30 grains, maximum dose 1 dram 
daily. Externally it is applied in 2 to 6 per cent, 
hydro-alcoholic solutions. 

Acid, Cathartic, is in reality a mixture of the 
calcium, magnesium and potassium salts of ca- 
thartinlc acid as they exist in senna leaves. It 
occurs as brownish-black granules or scales, solu- 
ble in water. It is used instead of senna chiefly 
in children. Dose for a child, 1^ to 3 grains; 
adults take 2 to 3 times as much. 

Acid, Carbazotic, is picric acid. 

Acid, Cinnam.ic {cinnamylic or Tyeta-phenyl- 
acrylic), CH.Oj, is prepared synthetically or ob- 
tained from storax, balsam of tolu or cinnamon 
oil. It forms white or yellowish leaflets, soluble 
in alcohol and fatty oils. It was introduced 
some years ago by Landerer as a remedy for 
phthisis and lupus, to be used intravenously or 
by parenchymatous injection in 5 per cent, oily 
emulsion containing 0.7 per cent, of sodium chlo- 
ride, of which 2 to 15 minims were injected two 
or three times a week. Latterly it has been prac- 
tically superseded by its sodium salt, which is 
neutral and freely soluble. Hoff a few years ago 
recommended it internally in phthisis, combined 
with arsenous acid and opium extract, in doses 
of 1/20 to Ys grain thrice daily. 

Acid, Cinnamyl-cacodylic is used like the 
cacodylates, but especially in tuberculosis. No 
definite statements regarding the exact propor- 
tions of its constituents have thus far been pub- 
lished. 

Acid, Diiodosalicylic, has the composition 
C8H2L(OH)COOH, and occurs as yellowish crys- 
tals that are soluble in alcohol or ether. It has 
been employed to a very limited extent as an 
antipyretic, analgesic and antiseptic, chiefly in 
rheumatism and gout. The dose is 8 to 20 grains. 

Acid, Ellagic is the chemical equivalent of 
gallogen. 



10 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

Acid, Qlycerinophosphoric, C,H.(0H).0.H,P03, 
Is a colorless liquid of the specific gravity 1.125. 
It was introduced as a directly assimilable 
nerve tonic, but is now used only in the form of 
its salts — calcium, iron, potassium, quinine, 
sodium, strychnine, etc. 

Acid, Glycocholic, C^oH^NOe, is the principal 
constituent of ox gall, used therapeutically in the 
form of its sodium salt, which see. 

Acid, Iodic, HIO,, is derived from iodine by 
oxidation with nitric acid, and appears as a 
white crystalline powder, readily soluble in wa- 
ter but only slightly soluble in alcohol, ether or 
glycerin. It is employed externally as a caustic 
and astringent, and internally as a substitute for 
potassium iodide and as a hemostatic and anti- 
emetic in gastric hemorrhage; also used as an 
oxidizer and a reagent for morphine. Dose, 1 
to 3 grains, well diluted, thrice daily. It is quite 
poisonous. 

Acid, Laricinic is pure agaricin. 

Acid, Methylene-di-salicylic is marketed un- 
der the name of formosal. 

Acid, Methylene-hippuric. See Mppol. 

Acid, Naphthylamine-sulphonic (naphthionic 
acid), CioHj.NHj.SOaH, was recommended by 
Prof. Riegler in iodism, in nitrite poisoning, and 
In bladder trouble caused by strong alkalinity 
of the urine. It occurs as a white powder spar- 
ingly soluble in water. Dose in iodism, ^'^^ 
grains half hourly up to 45 grains; in bladder 
disease, the same quantity in wafers three or 
four times a day, associated with irrigation of 
warm 1:1,000 solution. 

Acid, Osmic, known also as osmium tetroxide 
and perosmic acid, OsO*, is prepared by heating 
finely powdered osmium in oxygen. It occurs in 
yellow, deliquescent needles; odor pungent and 
suffocating; and the vapor Is strongly irritant 
to the air passages. Soluble in water; decomposed 
by alcohol and ether. Antineuralgic, discutient, 
antiepileptic. Used internally, in muscular rheu- 
matism and neuralgia; and externally, for the re- 
moval of tumors. Employed in microscopy as a 
stain. Dose: 1/60 grain 3 times a day. Injection, 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 11 

1/20 to Vq grain daily in 1 per cent, solution. 
Incompatible with organic substances; phos- 
phorus; ferrous sulphate; iodides. 

Acid, Oxynaphthoic (AlpJia), also known as 
naphtholcarbonic acid, CioHj.OH.COOH, appears as 
white crystals that are soluble in alcohol and 
oils. It is used as an intestinal disinfectant in 
doses of 1 to 3 grains, and as an antiparasitic 
externally in 10 per cent, ointments. It is rarely 
pi-escribed at the present time. 

Acid, Oxynaphthyl-ortho-oxytoluylic is the 
chemical name of the article marketed as epi- 
carin. 

Acid, Para-amido-benzol-sulphonic is com- 
monly known as sulphanilic acid which see. 

Acid, Para-anilin-sulphonic. — See sulphanilic 
acid. 

Acid, Para-amidobenzoic Ethyl Ester, is a 
synonym of anesthesin. 

Acid, Pepitzahoic is synonymous with perezol 
which see. 

Acid, Perosmic, is a synonym of osmic acid. 

Acid, Phenylacetic (alphortoluic or alpha- 
toluylic acid), CHjCHj.COOH, was introduced as 
an intestinal antiseptic and antitubercular agent, 
but is very little heard of now-a-days. It forms 
white leaflets, soluble in alcohol and ether. Dose, 
10 to 15 drops of a 1 in 6 hydro-alcoholic solu- 
tion three times daily. 

Acid, Salolorthophosphinic is the chemical 
name of solvosal. 

Acid, Sulphanilic (para-anilin-sulphonic or 
para-amido-benzol-sulphonic acid), NH2C«HiS0,+ 
2HaO, is obtained by heating anilin with fuming 
sulphuric acid, and appears as white, efflorescent 
crystals slightly soluble in water but freely so In 
alcohol. It is used internally in coryza, catarrhal 
laryngitis, etc. Dose, 10 to 20 grains once or 
twice daily, in solution with sodium bicarbonate. 

Acid, Trichloracetic, CCljCOOH, is obtained 
from glacial acetic acid by the action of chlorine 
and sunlight, or by the oxidation of chloral. It 
occurs as very deliquescent crystals of a pungent 
odor and freely soluble in water or alcohol. It is 
used chiefly as a caustic, pure or in 50 per cent. 



12 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 

solution, in nevi, warls and nose and throat 
lesions; it is also employed as an astringent and 
styptic in 1 to 3 per cent, solutions (in gleet, 
etc.). It is a sensitive test for albumin in urine, 
used in substance or 33% per cent, solution. 
Strong solutions should be dispensed only in 
glass-stoppered bottles. 

Acid, Trinitrophenlc is picric acid. 

Acidol is a trade name for hetaine hydrochlor- 
ate (lycin), CeHuNOj.HCl. The drug occurs as 
white crystals, of fruit-acid taste, and readily sol- 
uble in water. It contains 23.8 per cent, of hy- 
drochloric acid, and is employed as a substitute 
for the latter as a digestive. Dose. 7% to 15 
grains, well diluted (it is slightly caustic in un- 
diluted form). Marketed also as 7%-grain pas- 
tilles, 

Acoin (di-para-anisyl-monopfienetyl-guanidine 
hydrochlorate) is one of the newer local anes- 
thetics. It appears as a white, odorless, very 
bitter powder, soluble in 17 parts of water while 
dissolving freely in alcohol. It is very sensitive 
to alkalies, so that special precautions are nec- 
essary in preparing solutions of it, and these are 
readily affected by light. The product has hence 
not met with much favor. It has been recom- 
mended for Schleich's infiltration anesthesia in 
1/10 per cent, solution containing 0.8 per cent, of 
sodium chloride; and Darier uses it in 1 per cent, 
solution to render subconjunctival injections pain- 
less, 1 to 3 drops being added to the medicated 
solution to be injected (mercury cyanide, etc.). 
It is now used mostly in conjunction with co- 
caine on the eyes. 

Aconitine is perhaps no longer a new remedy, 
but so much confusion and lack of definite infor- 
mation regarding it exists in the medical and 
pharmaceutical professions, that a brief refer- 
ence to it here appears imperative. There are 
two distinct modifications of "aconitine" on the 
market, differing widely in chemical constitution 
and still more so in physiological activity and 
toxicity. Amorphous aconitine, the kind sup- 
plied by wholesale druggists on unspecified or- 
ders for "aconitine," is a mixture of the various 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 13 

amorphous bases of aconite, and is only about 
1/15 as active as crystalline aconitine. Its dose 
is 1/60 to 1/16 grain; externally it is used in % 
to 2 per cent ointments or solutions. The other 
form of aconitine is the crystalline, a highly po- 
tent and poisonous definite alkaloid from aconite, 
about 15 times as powerful physiologically as 
amorphous aconitine. Crystalline aconitine is 
given in doses of l/bOO to 1/200 grain; it is rarely 
prescribed in ointments, oleates, or solutions. 
It is obvious that the use of amorphous aconitine 
when the crystalline modification is intended by 
the prescriber will lead to disappointment, while 
the dispensing of the crystalline when the 
amorphous variety is meant is fraught with the 
most serious danger, and may be attended by dis- 
astrous results. Hence the necessity of carefully 
discriminating. The antidotes are tannic acid (3 
grains every half hour), atropine and stimulants, 
emetics hypodermically; and artificial respira- 
tion is generally resorted to. 

Acopyrin {acetopyrin or antipyrin acetyl-salicy- 
late) is a sort of combination of aspirin and anti- 
pyrin. It forms a white powder of a faint acetic 
odor, readily soluble in alcohol or chloroform, but 
very slightly soluble in water; it possesses the 
reactions of antipyrin and gives a red coloration 
with ferric chloride. Acetopyrin, as appears 
from its composition, is an antipyretic, antineu- 
ralgic, and antirheumatic, its chief use being in 
the last-named capacity. It is advertised as free 
from the untoward effects of the salicylates and 
of antipyrin. The dose is 8 to 15 grains 
singly, and 45 to 90 grains a day, best given In 
cachets. 

Actol is the name under which silver lactate 
was introduced a few years ago but which has 
since been abandoned, as far as this market is 
conceraed, in favor of the plain chemical desig- 
nation, under which it will be referred to in 
these columns. 

Adhsesivnm is a thick, flesh-colored, perfumed 
liquid, stated to consist of zinc oxide, collodion 
and carmine. When applied to wounds it quickly 
dries to an elastic coating which is not removed 



14 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

by washing in the ordinary way with soap and 
water. 

Adhsesol is a solution of copal, benzoin, tolu 
balsam, oil of thyme, and alpha-naphthol in ether, 
recommended as an antiseptic paint in treat- 
ing diphtheritic sore-throat, tuberculous ulcers, 
etc. 

Adipatum is an ointment base consisting, ac- 
cording to reports, of lanolin, petrolatum, paraffin 
and water. 

Adnephrin. — See under adrenalin. 

Adonidin is a glucoside obtained from adonis 
vernalis. It is an amorphous, light-brown, ex- 
tremely hygroscopic powder of intensely bitter 
taste; soluble in water or alcohol, insoluble in 
ether or chloroform. It is employed therapeuti- 
cally as a cardiac tonic and mild diuretic, espe- 
cially in mitral and aortic regurgitation. It is 
used also in nicotine poisoning and chronic dif- 
fuse nephritis. Dose, 1/16 to V^ grain four times 
daily, as tablet-triturate or in solution with a 
little chloroform and ammonium carbonate 
(Stem); maximum dose V2 grain. Its antidotes 
are the same as those of digitalin. 

Adonis ^stivalis tincture was brought for- 
ward as a harmless antifat. The dose is 10 to 20 
drops three times daily, usually in lithia water. 
It acts also as a cardiac tonic and diuretic. Lit- 
tle has been heard of It during the past few 
years. 

Adorin is a foot powder containing parafor- 
maldehyde. as its active ingredient. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 

Adrenalin is believed to be the active principle 
of the suprarenal gland or capsule. It was first 
isolated by Dr. J. Takamine in 1901. It occurs 
as tiny white crystals that are difficultly soluble 
in water and very prone to oxidize, in view of 
which the article is marketed as "solution adren- 
alin chloride" — a 1 in 1,000 solution of its hydro- 
chlorate in normal salt solution, to which % per 
cent, of chloretone is added as a • preservative. 
Adrenalin has been much written on in medical 
literature, and it is employed in a wide range of 
diseases; its fundamental physiologic action is 
that of a vaso-constrictor. Its chief uses are to 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDIC A 15 

render minor surgical operations on the eye, 
nose, throat, etc., bloodless; in hay fever or 
coryza, and in internal hemorrhages (gastric, in- 
testinal, cystic, etc.). It is applied externally in 
1 in 1,000 (the strength marketed) to 1 in 10,000 
solutions, and it is administered internally or 
hypodermically in doses of 5 to 30 minims every 
two to four hours. It has also been recom- 
mended as a cardiac stimulant, especially in 
chloroform syncope, and in conjunction with co- 
caine injections to enhance their action and di- 
minish their toxicity. Its dilutions are generally 
prepared with normal salt solution (0.6 per 
cent.), not with plain water. (A 1 in 1,000 solu- 
tion of the active principle of the suprarenal cap- 
sule is also marketed under various other names 
— aclnephrin (formerly called adrenol), hemo- 
statin, suprarenalm, etc.] 

Adrenamine is a European trade name for the 
active principle of the suprarenal capsule. 

Adrin is the trade name applied by a Philadel- 
phia firm to what is claimed to be the active prin- 
ciple of the suprarenal capsule. See under adre- 
nalin. 

^SCO-Quinine, also known as "neutral quinine 
aesculinate, Fliigge," is described as a compound 
of quinine with the glucosides of horse chestnut; 
a yellowish, amorphous, bitter powder contain- 
ing 50 per cent, of quinine; insoluble in water 
but rendered soluble by acids. It is marketed in 
0.1 gram sugar-coated tablets, one of which given 
three to five times daily constitutes the usual 
dose. It is used in coryza; colds In the respira- 
tory tract; also as a nerve tonic. 

^scorcin. — See escorcin. 

^thacol is identical with the article better 
known as gucethol, which see. 

.iEthol is a trade name for cetyl alcohol. (See 
alcohol, cetyl.) 

^tho-Methyl is a mixture of ethyl and methyl 
chlorides used as a local anesthetic by spray- 
ing. 

.(Ethoxycaffeine. — See ethoxycaffeine. 

Aftanin is a brownish liquid said to consist of 
a vegetable infusion containing 5 per cent, of 



16 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 

glycerin and ll^ per cent, of formaldehyde. It 
is used in foot-and-mouth disease of cattle. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Agaricin, in the pure stMe identical with 
agaricic, agaricinic, or laricic acid, and also 
known as laricin, is the active constituent of 
white agaric (polyporus oflBicinalis). It occurs 
as a white or yellowish powder almost Insoluble 
in water but soluble in alcohol or alkali solu- 
tions. It is recommended as a remedy for the 
night-sweats of phthisical subjects. Dose, % to 
1 grain; maximum dose, 1% grains. 

A g a t h i n isalicyl-alpha-methyl-phenyl-hydra- 
zone) results from the interaction of molecular 
equivalents of asymmetrical methylphenylhydra- 
zin and salicylic aldehyde. It forms yellowish 
or whitish crystals that are soluble in alcohol or 
ether but insoluble in water. It was Introduced 
some ten years ago as an antineuralgic and anti- 
rheumatic. Dose, 2 to 8 grains two or three 
times daily. It should be kept in the dark. 

Agniadin is a glucoslde recently introduced 
as a remedy for intermittent fever. It is believed 
to be identical with plumiarid. Dose, 2 to 4 
grains. 

Agopyrin Is a specialty marketed In tablets 
containing 0.025 gram each of cinchonine sul- 
phate and ammonium chloride, and 0.25 gram of 
salicin. 

Agurcarina is a trade name for saccharin. 

Agurin is the terse name for theobromine-so- 
dium and sodium acetate, CTHyNtOjNa+NaCjHjOj. 
It occurs as a white, hygroscopic alkaline pow- 
der, readily soluble in water and decomposed by 
acids. It is employed as a pure diuretic said 
to be without action upon the heart — chiefly 
in dropsy of cardiac origin. Dose, 5 to 15 grains 
three or four times a day, usually in peppermint 
water. It must be kept securely stoppered and 
in a dry place, and its solutions freshly prepared. 
Rubbed with chloral hydrate, carbolic acid or 
piperazin, agurin yields a mass. 

Aiodin (aiodon) is an odorless and tasteless 
dry preparation of the thyroid gland, 1 part of 
which represents 10 parts of the fresh gland and 
contains 0.4 per cent, of iodine. It is marketed 



THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDICA 17 

also in 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 gram pastils, and is used 
in myxedema, cretinism, obstinate psoriasis, etc. 

Airofonn and Airogen are synonyms of airol. 

Airol, formerly marketed also as airoform and 
airogen, is bismuth oxyiodogallate. It results from 
the action of hydriodic acid upon bismuth subgal- 
late or of gallic acid upon freshly-precipitated bis- 
muth oxyiodide. It is a grayish-green, very bulky. 
Impalpable, odorless, insoluble powder, contain- 
ing 20 ner cent, of iodine. Its principal employ- 
ment is as an an odorless substitute for iodoform 
in wounds, ulcers, abscesses, bums, etc., but it is 
also used in various ocular, naso-pharyngeal, 
gynecological, and venereal diseases. It has 
a strong drying action which is wanting in iodo- 
form. It is prescribed pure or mixed with tal- 
cum, boric acid, and the like; also in 5 to 20 
per cent, ointments, pastes, or suspensions (In 
equal parts of glycerin and water). Airol should 
be kept in a dry place and away from light. It is 
incompatible with calomel, tending to form red 
mercuric iodide therewith. 

Ajacol Is described under gucethol, with which 
It Is identical. 

Akaralgia is a granular effervescent salt made 
according to the formula of Dr. Rachford, of 
Cincinnati, 0. (dried sodium sulphate 30 grains, 
sodium salicylate from wintergreen oil, 10 grains, 
magnesium sulphate 50 grains, lithium benzoate 5 
grains, tincture of nux vomica 3 drops, and dis- 
tilled water to make 4 ounces.) It is prescribed 
especially in migraine, particularly the chronic 
form. 

Alapurin is a pure grade of wool fat, of a light 
color and non-pronounced odor. 

Albacids are substituted albumins containing 
bromine, chlorine, and iodine respectively. See 
bromalbacid, chloralbacid and iodalbacid. 

Albargin is a compound of gelatose with sil- 
ver nitrate, occurring as a voluminous, yellowish 
powder containing 15 per cent, of silver and 
readily soluble in water. Its chief employment 
is in gonorrhea, though it is also used in in- 
fectious eye diseases, bladder trouble, and mem- 
branous colitis; usually in 0.1 to 0.2 per cent. 



18 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDIC A 

solutions, though sometimes a 2 per cent, solution 
is prescribed, or 10 to 20 per cent, glycerin solu- 
tions. It Is also marketed In 3 grain tablets. 
Distilled water should preferably be used in mak- 
ing solutions, and these should be dispensed in 
dark-amber or black bottles. If ordinary water 
is used, the water should gradually be added to 
the albargin with gentle shaking, and not the 
reverse lest the solution become turbid. 

Alboferrin is an iron-albumin preparation oc- 
curring as a light-brown, almost tasteless and 
odorless powder, soluble in water and containing 
0.68 per cent, of iron, 0.324 per cent, of phos- 
phorus, and 90.14 per cent, of albumin. It is in- 
tended as a hematinic. 

Albopixol is a superfatted white tar soap in- 
tended as a dermic. 

Alcarnose is a readily soluble nutrient said to 
contain In a predigested form all the substances 
necessary for the nourishment and invlgoration 
of the body. It is a light-brown powder of pleas- 
ant odor and taste. Dose, 1 to 3 tablespoonfuls, 
in hot milk or soup. 

Alcho is the name recently given to aluminium 
carbonate. 

Alcohol, Amylic, Tertiary. — See amyJene hy- 
drate. 

Alcohol, • Cetylic, also known by the trade name 
of (Bthol and the chemical designations normal 
primary hexadecyl alcohol and palmityl alcohol, 
though not a new product has only in recent 
years come to the fore as a skin emollient in 
chaps, prurigo, and weeping eczema. It forma 
white crystals soluble in alcohol and ether. It 
is generally used mixed with boric acid in pro- 
portions varying from equal parts to 1 in 5. It is 
derived from spermaceti by saponification with 
potash. 

Alcohol- silver Ointment consists of 0.5 per 
cent, of collargol, 70 per cent, of alcohol, soda 
soap, wax and a little glycerin, and is recommend- 
ed by Lowe as the best form for using colloidal sil- 
ver (collargol), because the hyperemia caused by 
the alcohol considerably Increases the absorbing 
power of the skin and thus enhances and hastens 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 19 

the action of the drug. It is used in infectious in- 
flammations, old ulcers of the leg, severe burns, 
chronic eczema, etc. 

Aldesar. — See under nehulates ' 

Aldol, CH3CH(0H)CH,CH0, is a thick, odor- 
less liquid obtained by permitting diluted hydro- 
chloric acid to act upon ethyl aldehyde for several 
days, then neutralizing with sodium carbonate, 
shaking with ether and evaporating the latter. It 
readily polymerizes, is miscible with two parts of 
water as well as with alcohol and ether, and, ac- 
cording to Dr. Camurri, is a serviceable hypnotic. 

Aldthyform is defined as a 25 per cent, solution 
of thymol with 10 per cent, of formaldehyde used 
as a disinfectant. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Aleptone is the name given to Iron-manganese 
tablets intended as a cheap substitute for solu- 
tion of iron and manganese peptonate. P-alep- 
tone contains collodial iron and manganese pep- 
tone, and s-aleptone consists of colloidal iron and 
manganese saccharate. Each tablet contains 0.05 
gram of iron and 0.008 gram of manganese. 

Aleuronat is a by-product in the manufacture 
of wheat starch, introduced as a dietetic. It is 
marketed also as soup aleuronat, a tablespoonful 
of which in a cup of water yields a soup; and as 
tannin-aleuronat, mildly astringent and hence 
employed for cholera infantum and chronic In- 
testinal catarrh. 

Aleuronat Flour is a vegetble albumin used 
In the preparation of diabetic bread, and in sur- 
gery, owing to its intense chemotactic action 
upon leucocytes, to bring about union of severed 
surfaces. It occurs as a yellowish-white, taste- 
less powder, 

Alexine Is a synonym of tuberculoddin 
(Klebs). 

Algadine is an inorganic poultice "composed of 
silica, magnesia, alumina, and ferrous carbonate, 
together with eucalyptol, menthol and thymol in 
a menstruum of solution of boroglyceride." 

Alginoids are metallic salts of alginic acid, 
CTfrHeoJ^J^jOjj, discovered by Stanford a few years 
ago. Only the iron alginoid or alginate has been 
used therapeutically. In the dry state this Is a 



20 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

brown, tasteless, insoluble powder, containing 
about 10 per cent, of iron, and recommended by 
the introducer as an easily assimilable and non- 
irritating hematinic in doses of 2 to 10 grains. 

Alkasal is the name applied variously to 
aluminium and potassium salicylate and to alVr 
minium and potassium acetate, both used as anti- 
septics and astringents. 

Alka-thyptol is an alkaline antiseptic solution 
containing oils of eucalyptus and wintergreen, 
thymol, menthol, borax, sodium bf-nzoate and gly- 
cerin. It is used particularly in nose and throat 
affections, diluted with one to several parts of 
water. 

Allyl Sulphocarbamid is a synonym of thio- 
sinamin. 

Almatein is a compound of hematoxylin and 
formaldehyde, advertised as an antiseptic. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Alpha-Eunol is a compound of alpha-naphtol 
and eucalyptol heralded as an antiseptic. Fur- 
ther data are wanting. 

Alpha-Guaiacol is synthetic crystalline guaia- 
col. 

Alpha-Naphtol Salicylate, or Alpha-Naph- 
tol Salicylic Acid Ester, is better known as ah 
pJiol, which see. 

Alphol (alpha-naphtol salicylate, or alpha- 
naphtol salicylic acid ester), C«H4(0H)C00.- 
CioHt, results from heating alpha-naphtol-sodium 
and sodium salicylate with phosphorus oxycblo- 
ride. It is a reddish-white crystalline powder, sol- 
uble In alcohol, ether, and fatty oils. It is em- 
ployed as an internal antiseptic in gonorrheal 
cystitis, summer diarrheas, typhoid fever, etc., 
and in rheumatism. Dose, 1 to 15 grains several 
times daily. It is prone to darken with age and 
exposure. 

Alphozone is the trade name applied to suc- 
cinic peroxide, (C00H.CHj.CH2.C0)A- The arti- 
cle occurs as a white, fluffy powder, having a 
characteristic taste that is described as not un- 
pleasant in dilutions, soluble on agitation in 30 
parts of water, stable, and non-explosive. It is 
employed as a germicide and antiseptic; external- 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 21 

ly on wounds or ulcers, in tonsilitis, leucorrhea, 
etc.; internally in typhoid fever, infectious diar- 
rhea, abnormal fermentation and like intestinal 
disturbances. 

Alsol is a trade name for aluminium acetotar- 
trate. 

Alumformasal is the aluminium salt of meth- 
ylene-disalicylic acid (formasal), used chiefly as 
an astringent dusting powder in naso-pharyngeal 
catarrh and ozena. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Aluminixim Acetotartrate, also known as 
alsol, is an astringent and disinfectant employed 
in 1^ to 2 per cent, solutions as a nasal douche 
in affections of the respiratory tract, in 1 to S 
per cent, solutions as a substitute for solution 
of aluminium acetate, in concentrated solution 
as a lotion in frost-bite and balanitis, and as a 
snuff with boric acid in ozena. It occurs as col- 
orless or yellowish crystals, freely but exceed- 
ingly slowly soluble in water, and insoluble In 
alcohol and ether. 

Aluminium Boroform.ate, AljOa.BOjHs.HjCOj-j- 
SH.O, may be obtained by dissolving alumina in 
a solution of 2 parts of formic acid and 1 part of 
boric acid, evaporating and crystallizing. Used 
as a disinfectant. There is risk in formates it 
must be noted, if used medicinally, as formic acid 
is probably the ultimate cause of blindness and 
death from wood alcohol, being formed from 
that in the system. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Aluminium Caseinate is a product obtained 
by adding solution of aluminium acetate to milk 
freed from albumin and sterilized. It forms a 
yellowish, tasteless, insoluble powder, and is em- 
ployed as an intestinal astringent. Dose, 3 to 5 
grains. 

Aluminium Carbonate, AI2 (003)3, it was hith- 
erto impossible to prepare in a way that it would 
not immediately become decomposed into alumin- 
ium hydrate and carbon dioxide. Gawalowski has 
now succeeded in making a stable carbonate. This 
occurs as a chalky, white, readily pulverizable, 
tasteless substance, and has been recommended 
as a mild styptic, astringent, and antidiarrheal, 
in hematemesis, excessive perspiration, skin dis- 



22 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

eases, etc., analogous to aluminium acetate, burnt 
alum, etc. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Aluminium Gallate is described under gallal. 

Aluminium Salicylate, (CeH,.OH.COO),.Al,+ 
SHjO, also known by the trade name salumin, 
occurs as a reddish-white powder, insoluble in 
water or alcohol but soluble in alkalies and am- 
monia. It is prescribed as a dusting-powder in 
nasal and laryngeal catarrhs, particularly in 
ozena. 

Alumnol (aluminium heta-naphtol sulpho- 
note), [Ci3e.0H.(S0,),]3Al„ is obtained by the 
interaction of barium beta-naphtol disulphonate 
and aluminium sulphate; a white or pinkish pow- 
der, readily soluble in water or glycerin but 
sparingly soluble in alcohol. Its action is that of 
an astringent antiseptic, and it is used chiefly in 
gonorrhea (% to 2 per cent, solutions), leucor- 
rhea (in 1 to 5 per cent, solutions), as a dusting- 
powder In the nursery (1:4 to 1:9 of talcum or 
starch), and in abscesses (10 per cent, solution). 
It has also been employed in nose-bleeding, cer- 
tain inflammatory skin diseases, purulent wounds, 
etc. Its aqueous solutions are incompatible with 
alkaline liquids and solutions of ammoniacal 
compounds. 

Alypin is a new substitute for cocaine hydro- 
chloride as a local anesthetic. According to Drs. 
E. Impens and F. Hofmann, it is equally active 
but less toxic than cocaine, causes no mydriasis 
nor vaso-constriction (on the contrary, vaso-dila- 
tation), and its solutions bear boiling for from 
five to ten minutes without decomposition. Chem- 
ically it is defined as benzoyltetramethyldiamin- 
ethyldimethylcarbinol hydrochloride. It is a 
crystalline substance, melting at 169 °C., and 
freely soluble in water yielding neutral solutions 
that are quite stable when of more than 2 per 
cent, strength; weaker solutions get mouldy in 
time. Alypin is employed mostly in 2 to 4 per 
cent, solution, just like cocaine hydrochloride. 

Amidopyrin is the same as pyramidon. 

Aminoform is one of the many trade names 
for hexamethylenetetramine (urotropin, formin, 
etc.). 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 23 

Aminol is a disinfectant and deodorizing 
liquid said to consist of calcium hydrate, sodium 
chloride, and trimethylamine. 

Amiotone is an alterative dietetic prepared 
from sea weeds rich in bromine; a fine, yellowish 
powder, partly soluble in water. 

Am.m.onio-forinaldehyde is one of the many 
synonyms of hexamethylenetetramine. 

Ammonium Embelate, NHiCjHisOj, is the am- 
monium salt of the acid contained in the fruit of 
embelia, ribes. It is a grayish-violet powder, sol- 
uble in diluted alcohol. It is used as a teniafuge, 
chiefly in children, in the dose of 3 grains with 
syrup or honey, proceeded for three days by a 
milk diet and followed by a dose of castor oil. 

Ammonium. Fluoride was recommended a few 
years ago by Dr. Lucas in enlargement of the 
spleen, and later also in goiter and flatulent dys- 
pepsia. It is given in doses of ^ to % grain 
after meals, either in pills, or (more frequently) 
well diluted in solution (10 grains in 6 oz.; a 
teaspoonful to a tablespoonful for a dose). Only 
the purest, medicinal or arsenic-free quality 
should be dispensed on prescriptions. 

Ammonium Supholeate is what a Bremen 
pharmacist calls his analogue of icMhyol. 

Ammonium Sulphobituminolate. — See bit'W- 
minol. 

Ammonol is a composite antipyretic and anal- 
gesic, consisting, according to reports, essential- 
ly of acetanilid, sodium bicarbonate, ammonium 
carbonate, and traces of mentanil yellow. It 
forms a white powder, only partly soluble in 
cold water or alcohol. When rubbed dry with 
resorcin, thymol, carbolic acid, or chloral hy- 
drate, it yields a mass or a liquid, according to 
the proiKtrtions used. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Anamo-phenin is an "ammoniated phenylace- 
tamide" — a mixture analogous to ammonol, anti- 
kamnia, etc. Dose, 5 to 10 grains. 

Amsco Salts is "an effervescent combination of 
lithium, sodium sulphate and phosphate, with po- 
tassium carbonate." It is used as a laxative and 
antacid, in biliousness, constipation, heartburn, 
rheumatism, etc. Dose, a teaspoonful. 



24 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Amygdophenin (ethyl-amygdophenin, pheneti- 
din mandelate) occurs as a grayish- white powder 
or leaflets, easily soluble in alcohol, sparingly so 
in water. It was introduced as an analgesic and 
antirheumatic, claimed to be free from by-effects; 
but it has latterly not been reported on, and is 
not now obtainable in this market. Dose, 15 
grains. 

Amyl Salicylate was recently brought to the 
fore as a remedy in acute and subacute rheuma- 
tism by a French physician, Dr. M. B. Lyonnet, 
under the name amjdenol. It is a faintly yellow- 
ish liquid of salol-like odor; soluble in alcohol, 
ether, or chloroform, but insoluble in water. Ex- 
ternally 30 to 45 minims are painted on the af- 
fected joint and this dressed with impervious 
material so as to prevent too rapid evaporation; 
internally 30 minims are given in the course of a 
day, in capsules generally. According to H6non, 
it also acts well applied externally in hepatic 
colic. 

Amylarin is iso-amyl-trimethylammonium 
chloride, which according to C. Jacoby, is a toxic 
substance combining the action of curare and 
muscarine. Further data are wanting. 

Amylene Hydrate, chemically known also as 
tertiary amyl alcohol and dimethyl-ethyl-car- 
binol, is a light, colorless, oily, hygroscopic 
liquid, of ethereo-camphoraceous taste and odor, 
soluble in about 8 parts of water and miscible 
with alcohol, ether, or chloroform in all propor- 
tions. It was introduced by Prof, von Mering as 
a hypnotic and a nerve sedative, half as powerful 
as chloral hydrate and claimed to be less dan- 
gerous. Dose, 30 to 90 minims, usually pre- 
scribed in aqueous solution with extract of li- 
quorice. 

Amylenol is a French name applied to amyl 
salioylate. 

Amylocarbol is a disinfectant fluid reported to 
be a mixture of crude carbolic acid, green soap, 
amyl alcohol, and water. 

Amyloform is a condensation product of starch 
and formaldehyde, occurring as a white, odorless, 
insoluble powder. It is recommended as a surgi- 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 25 

cal antiseptic, pure or in mixtures with boric 
acid, etc., just like iodoform. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Amyloiodoform should not be confounded 
with amyloform. It is a blackish-blue combina- 
tions of starch, iodine, and formaldehyde. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Amyrol is an alcohol obtained by E, Liotard 
from West Indian oil of sandalwood; an isomer 
of santalol, and a colorless liquid of the spe- 
cific gravity 0.980. It is intended as a substitute 
for the oil, but no clinical data are as yet extant. 

Anadol is a pulverulent antipyretic and anal- 
gesic of undivulged composition — probably anal- 
ogous to the score of mixtures of acetanilid on 
the marl^et under various names. Dose, 5 to 15 
grains. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

Anaemin is an iron-pepsin saccharate used 
especially in anemia attended with dyspepsia. 

Anaemorenin is a preparation of the supra- 
renal capsule, which is recommended by Dr. Hol- 
ler as a dental anesthetic. 

Anaemose Milk is a buttermilk preparation 
containing 0.15 per cent, of ferrous iodide with- 
out any aromatics or preservative, and intended 
as a milk food for the use of anemic patients. 

Anaesthol or anaestyle or anestile is a solu- 
tion of methyl chloride in ethyl chloride, recom- 
mended as a local anesthetic in tooth-extraction 
and for the relief of rheumatic and neuralgic 
pains. It should not be confounded with the 
following inhalation anesthetic recently intro- 
duced under the name "ansesthol." 

Anaesthol is the outcome of efforts at improv- 
ing general anesthesia on the basis of Schleich's 
principle (adapting the boiling point of the nar- 
cotics to the temperature of the body), and is the 
logical supersedant of Schleich's ether-chloro- 
form-benzin mixtures first advocated about seven 
years ago. It Is regarded by its introducer. Dr. 
Weidig, as a chemical combination or "molecular 
solution," and consists of 17 volumes of ethyl 
chloride, 35.89 of chloroform, and 47.1 of ether. 
It is a colorless liquid of agreeable odor, specific 
gravity 1.045, and boiling point 104° F. Anaesthol 
has been recommended as an agreeable and rela- 



26 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

tively safe Inhalation anesthetic, usually without 
untoward after-effect. It is generally adminis- 
tered by the "drop" method; and some physi- 
cians give a dose of morphine hypodermically 
about hglf an hour before beginning with the 
anesthetic, and this is said to enhance the action 
and reduce the quantity required for narcosis. 

Analgen is better known on this market as 
quinalgen and will be described under the latter 
head. 

Analgesine is one of the numerous B3monyms 
of antipyrin. 

Analgesine CafPeino-Citrate Is migrainin. 

Analgia is a combination similar to antikamnia 
and the like, used as an antipyretic and analgesic. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Analgine is an analgesic and antipyretic de- 
fined by its manufacturers as "acetyl-amldoben- 
zol trimethyl-xan thine" (hence probably a mix- 
ture in which acetanilid and caffeine are the 
chief ingredients). Dose, 5 to 15 grains. Mar- 
keted also as tablets, plain and in various com- 
binations. 

Anaspalin is an ointment base stated to con- 
sist of a mixture of wool fat and petrolatum. 

Anedemin is described as a combination of 
apocynum, strophanthus and squill, with sambu- 
cus, and is used as a diuretic in dropsies. 

Anemonin or Pulsatilla camphor, CjoHsOi, oc- 
curs as yellowish-white crystals, insoluble in wa- 
ter or cold alcohol, and employed as an antispas- 
modic and anodyne in asthma, whooping cough, 
orchitis, dysmenorrhea, etc. Dose, ^4 to 1 grain 
twice daily; maximum dose, I1/2 grains. 

Aneson or Anesin Is a saturated aqueous solu- 
tion of acetone chloroform or chloretone, which 
was introduced a few years ago as a local anes- 
thetic for use in nasal, laryngeal, and minor sur- 
gical operations, but apparently withdrawn from 
the market since the appearance of chloretone 
crystals. 

Anesthesin is chemically para-amidobenzoic 
acid ethyl ester, CoH4.NH,.COOCi,Hb, a white, odor- 
less, tasteless powder, sparingly soluble in water, 
but readily soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform, 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 27 

fats or oils. Prof. C, v. Noorden recommends it 
as a local anesthetic and sedative in gastric hy- 
peresthia, ulcer or cancer of the stomach, and 
dysphagia; and it is also used locally in laryn- 
geal tuberculosis, painful hemorrhoids, etc. It is 
applied pure or mixed with an inert powder, in 
ointment, alcoholic or ethereal solution, or emul- 
sion, or as suppositories and bougies. Dose, 5 to 
10 grains two or three times a day, on an empty 
stomach, or % to % grains more frequently (in 
laryngeal troubles). Anesthesin is marketed in 
a number of forms and combinations; and a fluid 
form of it has very recently been put forward as 
"anesthesin soluble." 

Anesthesin Para-Phenolsulphonate Is the 
chemical designation for subcutin, which see. 

Anestile. — See anaesthol. 

Angioneurosin is nitroglycerin. 

Anilin Sulphate occurs in white crystals sol- 
uble in water and alcohol. It has been employed 
as a nervine in chorea and epilepsy, and as an 
analgesic and deodorant in carcinoma. Dose % 
to 11/^ grains, and up to 6 grains a day. It is 
quite poisonous. 

Anilid Meta-arsenite. — See atoxyl. 

Anilipyrin is an antiseptic and analgesic pre- 
pared by melting together 188 parts of antipyrin 
and 135 parts of acetanilid. It occurs as a white 
powder, readily soluble in water, and is employed 
chiefly in grip, articular rheumatism, and neu- 
ralgias. The dose is 5 to 10 grains which may be 
given three or four times daily. An alpha- and a 
tetOr anilipyrin are distinguished. 

Aniodol is a French disinfectant reported to 
consist of formaldehyde, glycerin, tincture of 
mustard, alcohol and water. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Annidalin is a synonym of aristol. 

Anodynicum is, according to Jungclaussen, a 
wool fat ointment containing acetanilid. 

Anodynin is another synonym of antipyrin. 

Anodynone is a trade name of ethyl chloride. 

Anozol is described as powdered iodoform 
mixed with thymol. It is used like iodoform. 

Antacetin is a trade designation for calcium 
saccharate. 



28 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDIQA 

Antemesin is the fanciful designation for cap- 
sules containing l^, grains of anesthesin and 
hence used as an anodyne in gastric ulcer, 
nervous dyspepsia, etc. 

Anthraglucorhamnin, Anthraglucorhein, An- 
thraglucosagradin, and Anthraglucosennin are 
glucosides isolated oy Tschirch from frangula, 
rhubarb, cascara sagrada and senna respectively. 
They all occur as brown powders that are soluble 
in alcohol, and possess cathartic action; but dose 
statements are wanting. 

Anthrarobin {anthro-arobin, dioxyanthranol, 
leuco-alizarin) is obtained from alizarin by re- 
duction with zinc dust. It forms a yellowish 
granular powder, soluble in hot alcohol and in 
solutions of the alkalies, and was introduced as a 
substitute for chrysarobin in psoriasis, herpes 
and other skin diseases. It is generally pre- 
scribed in 10 to 20 per cent, ointments; some- 
times in alcoholic solution. 

Anthrasol is described as a purified and de- 
colorized tar; a light-yellowish oil of tarry odor, 
soluble in about 20 parts of 90 per cent, alcohol, 
and miscible in all proportions with absolute al- 
cohol, acetone, fatty oils, liquid paraffin, or vaso- 
gen. It is said to penetrate the skin readily and 
thus has a deep action, to have more marked anti- 
pruritic effect than ordinary tar, and to be less 
irritating. It Is used in skin diseases, in place of 
common tar, in 1:5 to 1:15 ointments or solutions 
in absolute alcohol. 

Anthro-arobin is a synonym of anthrarobin. 

Antiarthrin is a condensation product of sali- 
genin containing 50 per cent, of salicin. It oc- 
curs as a brown powder, soluble in alcohol and 
alkalies, and is employed chiefly as a remedy In 
gout. Dose, 6 to 10 grains a day, in powders or 
pills. Dispensing it with other chemicals has 
been cautioned against, on account of its slight 
content of hydrochloric acid. 

Antiarin is a glucoside obtained from antiaris 
toxicaria, a plant growing in Dutch India and 
employed by the natives for poisoning arrows. 
According to Dr. Rumke, it is a heart tonic simi- 
lar to strophanthin; it is very poisonous. Dose 
statements are wanting. 



THE MODEBN MATEKIA MEDICA 29 

Antibacillare is a mixture of creosote, codeine, 
sodium arsenlte, tolu balsam and glycerin ex- 
tolled by Dr. Garofalo as a remedy in phtbisis. 

Antibacterin is stated to be a mixture com- 
posed of commercial aluminium sulphate and soot. 

Antibakterian is, according to Aufrecht, a mix- 
ture of boric acid, solution of ferric chloride, and 
chloric ether. It is used in infectious diseases. 

Anticancrin is a serum obtained from sheep 
treated with erysipelas cultures. It was recom- 
mended by Emmerich for use in cancer. 

Anticeltin is mercury and urea in combina- 
tion. It is employed in iritis and keratitis by 
subconjunctival Injection in solutions of 1 in 
2,000. While it is reported that this remedy is 
non-irritating, the claim is made that It Is fully 
equal to corrosive sublimate in antiseptic power. 

Antichlor Pills (not antichlorine) contain, ac- 
cording to Kahm, 0.05 gram each of ferrous sul- 
phate, sodium carbonate, quinine sulphate, and 
extract nux vomica, with 0.002 gram of arsenous 
acid. They are used in anemia. Dose, 1 or 2 
pills two or three times daily. 

Antichlorin is reported to consist of glucose, 
basic bismuth formate, and sodium bicarbonate. 
It has been brought forward as a remedy for 
anemia. As to a risk in the use of formates see 
formaldehyde. 

Antichlorose is stated to contain fluid hemo- 
globin, glycerin and sherry wine, with taste corri- 
gents. It is also marketed as "antichlorose with 
guaiacol," which contains l^^ grains of potassium 
guaiacol sulphonate (thiccol) in a teaspoonful. 

Anticholerin is a metabolic product of cholera 
bacilli, introduced by Klebs as a remedy in ch» 1- 
era; a brownish-yellow, thick fluid of peculiar 
odor. 

Antichoren is a peptonized mercuric chloroio- 
dide (Hgl3-l-2HgClo), resulting from the action 
of mercuric iodide and peptone upon mercuric 
chloride and occurring as a dark-brown, soft mass 
soluble in water. It is given in syphilis, inter- 
nally as 1/6 grain pills or subcutaneously as 2 per 
cent, solution (15 minims per injection). 

Antidiabetikum of Lindner is better known as 
glycosolvol, which see. 



so THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDICA 

Antidiabetin is a French specialty for dia- 
betics' use, consisting of mannite with saccharin 
mixed in three different proportions and desig- 
nated as antidiabetin No. 70, No. 10, and No. 1 
respectively. 

Antidiphtherin Is a name applied to various 
preparations used in diphtheria. Antidiphtherin 
Klehs is obtained from cultures of diphtheria 
bacilli in a fluid medium, and is applied with a 
brush to the affected parts. Antidiphtherin 
Wittstein is said to consist essentially of the 
resinous acids of olibanum, with salicylic acid, 
carbolic acid and menthol; it is a dry pow- 
der, employed by fumigation. Finally there is a 
third antidiphtherin, made in Berlin; a powder 
stated to consist of potassium chlorate and ferric 
chloride, 

Antidol is a mixture of citric acid, caffeine, 
salicylic acid, and antipyrin, used as an anti- 
neuralgic and antipyretic. Dose, 15 grains. 

Antidysentericum of Kohler is said to consist 
of logwood, pomegranate and simaruba barks. 
Used in dysentery. 

Antidysentericum of Schwarz, also known as 
"Indian pills," is a remedy for dysentery, consist- 
ing, according to reports, of pelletierine, myroba- 
lans, extract of pomegranate, extract of rose, and 
gum. Six to nine pills, acording to the number 
of stools, constitute the daily dose. 

Antidyspepticum is a preparation used In sea- 
sickness, described as a mixture of "a tartaric 
double-salt with sodium bicarbonate, magnesia, 
ammonium chloride, and quinine." 

Antifebrin is a trade name for acetanilid. 

Antiflurein is a German specialty used In leu- 
corrhea. 

Antifungin Is a fanciful name for magnesium 
borate. 

Antigermin is a disinfectant said to be a com- 
pound of copper with a weak organic acid; an 
odorless, greenish-yellow, semi-solid mass, soluble 
in about 200 parts of hot water. According to Dr. 
Weisenberg, It strongly hinders decomposition 
and exhibits marked bactericidal power. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 31 

Antihemicranin is stated to be a mixture or 
caffeine, antipyrin, and sugar, given in doses of 
10 to 30 grains chiefly in migraine. 

Antiherpin is a herpes remedy consisting, ac- 
cording to the manufacturer, of liquid tar, oil of 
rape seed and Peru balsam. 

Antikamnia is a well-known composite anti- 
pyretic and antineuralgic, said to consist of ace- 
tanilid, sodium bicarbonate, and a small quan- 
tity of caffeine; a white powder, of slightly pun- 
gent and bitter taste and alkaline reaction, difiB- 
cultly soluble in water and incompletely soluble 
in alcohol. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. It is marketed 
also as tablets, plain and in various combinations. 

Antikol was brought forward some years ago 
as an antipyretic and analgesic, but has latterly 
not been mentioned in the medical or pharmaceu- 
tical press. It was described as a mixture of ace- 
tanilid, sodium bicarbonate, and tartaric acid. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Antilupia is a combination of lupulin, acetan- 
ilid, caffeine and sodium bromide. It is pre- 
scribed as an antipyretic and analgesic. Dose, 5 
to 15 grains. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets 
and in combinations as tablets. 

Antimarin is a sea-sickness remedy, marketed 
in the form of tablets consisting essentially of 3 
grains of anesthesin, and hence analogous to 
antivom pills. 

Antimellin is what R. Borsch of Berlin calls a 
substance he has isolated from jambul fruit. It 
occurs as a light-yellow powder of sweetish-bitter 
taste, and enters into a very complex antidiabetic 
mixture the discoverer puts out under the same 
name. 

Antimorphin is a preparation introduced by 
Dr. A. Fromme of Stellingen, Hamburg, as a 
remedy for chronic morphinism. According to 
the statements made in a circular issued by the 
manufacturers, it consists of a mixture of several 
bitter tinctures, quinine, and a number of wines. 
Prof. Fischer and E. Merck claim to have found 
in it from 1 to 2 per cent, of morphine, or at 
least of a base closely analogous to morphine, 
and the preparation has hence not been heard 



32 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

about latterly. Another "antimorphin" was once 
on the market which, according to Dr. Heffel- 
mann was a solution of sodium phosphat"*. 

Antineon is a German gonorrhea remedy 
stated by the manufacturer to be an alcoholic ex- 
tract of sarsaparilla, veronica, and portulacca. 

Antinervin or salbromalid is a composite seda- 
tive and analgesic introduced by Radlauer, and 
composed of salicylic acid, ammonium bromide, 
and acetanilid. Dose, 5 to 10 grains. 

Antinosin (nosopJieti-sodium) is the sodium 
salt of nosophen (tetraiodophenolphtalein), oc- 
curing as a blue, amorphous powder of a faint 
iodine odor; soluble in water. It is used as a 
surgical antiseptic, also as a disinfectant in 0.1 to 
0.5 per cent, solution in nose and throat troulsles, 
cystitis, etc. On exposure to the air, it is very 
prone to become decomposed into nosophen and 
sodium carbonate and become insoluble; hence 
it should be kept securely stoppered. 

Antiparasitin is a 1 per cent, solution of di- 
nitrocresol-potassium ( antinonnin ) . 

Antiphlogin is a trade name for antipyrine. 

Antiphlogistine is a poultice said to consist of 
powdered kaolin, glycerin, boric acid, salicylic 
acid, ferric oxide, iodine, and the oils of pepper- 
mint, wintergreen and eucalyptus. 

Antiphthisin, Weber is a purified paraffin oil 
intended especially for hypodermic injection. 

Antiphthisin, Klehs is better known as tuber- 
culocidin, which see. 

Antiputrol is a brownish, viscid liquid of car- 
bolic odor and soluble In water in any proportion. 
It is said to contain 65 to 70 per cent, of phenol 
and its homologues, and is used as an antiseptic. 

Antipyonin is a fanciful name given to finely 
powdered "neutral tetraborate of sodium" ob- 
tained by melting together equal parts of boric 
acid and borax. It is employed by insufflation as 
an antiseptic in otorrhea, corneal and conjuncti- 
val inflammations, etc. (See also sodium tetra- 
borate, neutral.) 

Antipyreticum is a trade name for antipyrin. 

Antipyreticum Compositum is a pulverulent 
mixture corresponding to migrainin but made by 
a competing firm in Berlin, 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIC A 33 

Antipyrin Acetylsalicylate is the chemical 
dssignation of acetopyrin. 

Antipyrin Amygdalate is marketed as tiissol, 
which see. 

Antipyrin Carbolate was marlieted as plieno- 
pyrin some years ago, but has apparently been 
withdrawn from the market. 

Antipyrin-collodion is a 20 per cent, solution 
of antipyrin in collodion, recommended by Dr. 
Terson as a styptic for use on small wounds, 
either alone or with the addition of other medi- 
caments. 

Antipyrin Iodide is known In the trade as 
iodopyrin. 

Antipyrin Salicylate is salipyrin. 

Antipyrin-salol is a brownish fluid obtained 
by melting together equal parts of antipyrin and 
salol. It is employed as a hemostatic, chiefly in 
uterine hemorrhage, applied on tampons. 

Antipyrin Tannate is marketed as tannipyrin. 

Antirheumaticum is a combination of sodium 
salicylate and methylene blue, occurring as dark- 
blue crystals of faintly bitter taste. It is pre- 
scribed in doses of 1 to li;^ grains several times 
daily. 

Antirheumatin and Antirheumin are snyo- 
nyms of fluorrheumin ; which see. 

Antirhinol is described as a mixture of tannic 
acid, salol, and oil of sandalwood. 

Antirin is a German coryza remedy reported 
to contain cocaine and boric acid. 

Antisclerosin is a remedy marketed in tablet 
form and corresponding to Trunecek's serum. It 
is employed in calcification of blood-vessels and 
in certain nervous diseases. 

Antiscrofulin is said to contain potassium- 
guaiacol sulphonate, potassium iodide and hemo- 
globin, and is employed in scrofula and phthisis. 

Antisepsin is the name applied to two entirely 
different products. The commoner article, also 
known in some quarters as asepsin, is monobrom- 
acetanilid or bromanilid, C8H<BrNH(C2H30), and 
occurs as white crystals that are soluble in alco- 
hol or ether but sparingly soluble in water. It Is 



34 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIOA 

used externally as a surgical antiseptic in 1:10 
ointment and internally as an antipyretic and 
anodyne, in doses of i^ to 1% grains. Antiseiv 
sin, Yiguerat is a lymph obtained by injecting 
solution of iodine trichloride into abscesses and 
gathering the exuding serum. 

Antiseptin, Radlauer, also designated as zinc 
boro-tJiymol-iodide, is a mixture of zinc sulphate, 
thymol, zinc iodide, and boric acid. It is used as 
a vulnerary. Antiseptin, Schwarzlose, a veter- 
inary prophylactic and remedy, is said to be a 
solution of zinc sulphate and alum in water. 

Antiseptoform is a very recent formaldehyde 
compound used as an atmospheric disinfectant 
and deodorizer. 

Antiseptol is the trade name of cinchonine 
iodo-sulpJiate or cinchonine herapathite. The ar- 
ticle occurs as a bulky, reddish-brown powder, 
containing 50 per cent, of Iodine and introduced 
as a substitute for iodoform externally and in- 
ternally. Dose, 1 to 5 grains. It has been but 
very little heard of during the last few years. 

Antispasmin is the fanciful name given to 
)iarceiTie-sodium and sodium salicylate, CjaH^gNOB- 
Na+SCeH^.OH.COONa; a white, hygroscopic, un- 
stable powder containing 50 per cent, of narceine, 
soluble in water when freshly made but becoming 
insoluble and dark-colored with age and expo- 
sure. It is employed as an antispasmodic, par- 
ticularly in whooping-cough of children, in doses 
of % to % grain three or four times a day, 
usually given in sweetened solution. Antispmas- 
min must be kept well protected against light 
and air. 

Antispirochetic Serum. — See under serums. 

Antisputol is a perfumed mixture of peat, solu- 
tion of copper sulphate and formaldehyde, which 
is intended especialy as a disinfectant for spit- 
toons, etc. 

Antistaphylococcus Serum and Antistrepto- 
coccus Serum. — See under serums. 

Antistreptococcin is Marmorek's antistrepto- 
coccus serum; which see. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 35 

Antisudorin, a specialty for use In excessive 
sweating of the feet, is said to be a mixture of 
salicylic, boric, and citric acids, with glycerin, 
diluted alcohol and flavoring ethers. 

Antitaenin is a tapeworm remedy consisting, 
according to the makers' statements, of extract 
of male fern, kousso, and podophyllin. 

Antitetanus Serum. — See under serums. 

Antithermoline is analogous to antiphlogis- 
tine. 

Antithyroidin is a thyroid serum introduced 
about three years ago by Prof. Moebius. It is 
obtained from the blood of sheep from which the 
thyroid gland has been removed six weeks pre- 
viously, and contains 14 per cent, of carbolic acid 
as a preservative. It is used in Basedow's dis- 
ease (exophthalmic goiter), usually per os in 
doses of 8 minims gradually increased to 70 
minims thrice daily; sometimes it is given hypo- 
dermically, 15 to 30 minims per dose daily. 

Antitoxin, Diphtheria, is regarded by many 
physicians as the best constitutional means for 
the treatment of true diphtheria. It is obtained 
from the blood of horses that have been im- 
munized against the disease by successive inocu- 
lations with the specific poison of diphtheria. It 
is prepared in various concentrations, and put 
up in variously devised and dated tubes, bulbs, 
etc., containing a specified number of "immunity 
units," and usually contains carbolic acid or some 
other antiseptic as a preservative. It is used al- 
most exclusively subcutaneously; some have 
given it intravenously and others per os, with re- 
ported good results. The ordinary dose injected 
is 2,000 to 3,000 immunity units, but as much as 
20,000 units have been given as the initial dose in 
exceedingly severe cases, and 60,000 units have 
been employed successfully in treating the same 
case. While employed generally in diphtheria, 
this antitoxin has latterly also been recom- 
mended for use in severe scarlet fever cases 
and in the broncho-pneumonia and other second- 
ary pneumonias complicating the various infec- 
tious diseases of children. Diphtheria antitoxin 



36 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIC A 

should be kept cool and be disturbed as little as 
possible; when it has reached the age-limit in- 
dicated on the labels, it should be exchanged for 
a fresh lot. 

Antitoxin, Hay Fever. — See pollantin. 

Antitoxin, Tetanus, as introduced and pre- 
pared by Tizzoni and Cattani, is a dry powder 
put up in vials of 5 grams, which represents 
5,000,000 immunity units and constitutes a full 
dose. It is employed subcutaneously or intraven- 
ously. The contents of a vial are dissolved in ten 
parts of sterilized water, and of this half is in- 
jected at once, and the remainder in four por- 
tions on the following days. 

Antitussin, as known on this market, is a 5 
per cent, ointment of difluordiphenyl (F.CoH^.- 
CgH^.F), which is prescribed chiefly in whooping- 
cough but to a small extent also in tonsilitis 
and in inflammatory pharyngeal affections. The 
dose per inunction is 5 grams. 

Antityphus (Antityphoid) Extract of Dr. V. 
Jez is a preparation of the spleen, marrow, and 
brain of rabbits immunized against typhoid 
fever; a reddish, alkaline liquid given In dosea 
of a tablespoonful every 1 to 3 hours until febrile 
movement is entirely wanting, then thrice dally 
for several days more. 

Antivenin is a snake-bite antitoxin prepared 
according to Dr. Calmette; it will be described 
under serums. 

Antivom is the name applied to 3 grain anee- 
thesin pills, that are prescribed in sea-sickness 
and nausea. Dose, 1 or 2 pills before meals. 

Antorin is a mixture containing boric acid, 
tartaric acid, oil of wintergreen, fruit essence and 
spirit of rose. It is used to arrest excessive 
perspiration. 

Anusol is defined as "bismuth iodoresorcinsul- 
phonate," the chemical formula and method of 
preparing which is not generally known. It is 
marketed only as suppositories having the com- 
position; anusol 7.5 grams, zinc oxide 6 grams, 
Peru balsam 1.5 grams, cacao butter 19 grams, 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 87 

simple cerate 2.5 grains, for twelve suppositories. 
These are used in hemorrhoids and fissured anus. 

Anytin is a 33% per cent, aqueous solution of 
ichthyolsulphonic acid, which is used to some ex- 
tent in 1 to 2 per cent, solutions as a surgical 
disinfectant but chiefly as a means of rendering 
water-insoluble medicaments soluble in water. A 
number of such solutions are marketed under the 
generic name "anytoles," the principal ones being 
eucasol and metasol; the former is a 25 per cent, 
solution of eucalyptol in anytin, and metasol is a 
40 per cent, solution of meta-cresol. Besides 
these two, there are made anytoles of cresol (50 
per cent, cresols), creosote (40 per cent.), guala- 
col (40 per cent.), benzol (20 per cent.), pepper- 
mint oil (25 per cent.), wintergreen oil (20 per 
cent.), turpentine oil (15 per cent.), camphor 
(15 per cent.), and iodine (10 per cent.). 

Apallagin is the mercury salt of nosophen 
(tetra-iodophenolphtalein) ; a yellow powder, sol- 
uble in ether. It is intended as a surgical anti- 
septic, particularly on venereal lesions; but little 
or nothing has been heard of it in medical litera- 
ture. It must be kept protected against light. 

Apergols are capsules containing apiol, ergotin, 
savine oil, aloin, and aromatics. They are pre- 
scribed in amenorrhea and dysmenorrhea, 1 to 2 
capsules thrice daily. 

Aphthenol is an alleged prophylactic against 
foot-and-mouth disease of cattle. 

Aphthisin is a combination of 9 parts of potas- 
sium guaiacolsulphonate (better known as thio- 
col) and 1 part of petrosulfol (Austrian ich- 
thyol). It Is marketed as a syrup (6 per cent), 
and as 4-grain capsules; the dose of the former 
Is a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful; of the cap- 
sules 1 to 4, three or four times a day. 

Aphrotin is, according to Aufrecht, aromatized 
oat-flour containing small quantities of iron, 
sodium bicarbonate, and calcium phosphate. It 
is intended as a tonic. 

Apioline is described by Chapoteaut, its intro- 
ducer, as the active principle of parsley and quite 
different from apiol. It is obtained from ethereal 



88 THE MODEBIT MATEBIA MEDICA 

oil of parsley seed by distillation and saponifica- 
tion, and occurs as a thick, reddish liquid of the 
specific gravity 1.113 and readily soluble in al- 
cohol. It is prescribed in amenorrhea and dys- 
menorrhea. Dose, daily 2 or 3 of the 3-grain cap- 
sules in which form only the preparation is mar- 
keted. 

Apitezo is a food stated to contain approx- 
imately 0.1 per cent, of metallic iron and 0.2 per 
cent, of phosphorus organically combined. 

Apocodeine Hydrochlorate, CisHiaNOj.HCl, is 
the salt of a derivative of codeine; a yellowish- 
gray to greenish-gray, hygroscopic powder, freely 
soluble m water. In action it is in the main anal- 
ogous to codeine, and has hence been used as an 
expectorant and sedative, chiefly in chronic bron- 
chitis; but latterly it has come into prominence 
as a subcutaneous laxative, 30 to 40 minims of a 
1 per cent, solution being the usual dose per 
injection for this purpose. Dose per os, ^4 to 1 
grain. 

Apolysin Is a substance closely related to 
phenacetin, a citro-paraphenetidin, or monocitryl- 
paraphenetidin. It occurs as a white powder of 
faint odor and acidulous taste; moderately solu- 
ble in water, more freely so in alcohol or glyc- 
erin. It behaves as an acid (monophenetidin- 
citric), and is employed therapeutically as an 
antipyretic and analgesic claimed to be compara- 
tively non-toxic and non-cumulative. Dose, 10 to 
30 grains. 

Apomorphine Bromomethylate or Methyl- 
bromide is described under its trade name eupo- 
phiti. 

Apomorphine Hydrochlorate, as is known, 
was heretofore used only as an emetic and in 
smaller doses as an expectorant. About four 
years ago, however, Dr. C. J. Douglass drew at- 
tention to its remarkable sedative and hypcotle 
powers, and since then it has been largely em- 
ployed subcutaneously as an antispasmodic and 
nerve sedative in hiccough, hystero-epilepsy, 
acute alcoholism, angina pectoris and puerperal 
convulsions; small doses, short of producing 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 39 

nausea, are given (1-30 to 1-20 grain). The solu- 
tion for injection should always be prepared 
fresh as wanted, with freshly boiled distilled 
water. 

Aqua Ferro-Calcea (Terlik) Is a preparation 
consisting of iron pyrophosphate, calcium phos- 
phate, glycerin and an aromatic tincture, and em- 
ployed in anemia, rickets, whooping cough, etc. 
Dose, a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful. 

Aquasanin is used for sterilizing drinking- 
water. It consists of four kinds of tablets that 
are said to generate ozone and hydrogen dioxide 
in the water. 

Aquinol is a disinfectant reported to consist 
of potash soap, glycerin, thymol and formaldehyde. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Arabella Water is a Hungarian bitter water, 
consisting essentially of magnesium sulphate (22 
grams per liter), sodium sulphate (15.4 grams), 
calcium sulphate (1.5 grams), magnesium chlor- 
ide (0.8 gram), and magnesium carbonate (1.26 
grams). 

Arbutin, CuHjeOT+^HjO, is a glucoside or bit- 
ter principle residing in uva ursi; white, odor- 
less crystals, quite freely soluble in water or al- 
cohol, but insoluble in ether. It is used in place 
of uva ursi preparations as a diuretic and cystic 
demulcent. Dose, 3 to 10 grains three or four 
times daily; maximum dose, 15 grains. 

Arecoline-Eserine is a mixture of equal parts 
of arecoline hydrobromate and eserine sulphate, 
intended for use as a myotic or in veterinary prac- 
tice as a cathartic similar to its components. Dose 
(horses), % to 1^> grains hypodermically. 

Arecoline Hydrobromate, CgHuNOj.HBr, is a 
salt of the alkaloid of areca nut, occurring as 
white crystals easily soluble in water and alcohol. 
It is used chiefly in veterinary medicine, as an 
active cathartic similar to eserine in action; 1 
to 1^ grains is injected subcutaneously in horses 
in cases of colic. In human medicine it serves as 
a myotic, a few drops of a 1 per cent, solution 
being instilled at a time, and as an a anthelmintic 
(1/15 to 1/10 grain). 



40 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Aresin is a not closely characterized remedy 
for gout. 

Argenol is an albuminoid of silver, occurring 
in small brown crystals containing 10 per cent, 
of silver and readily soluble in water or glycerin. 
It is used as an astringent bactericide just like 
protargol (in gonorrhea, eye affections, etc.). 

Argentamine is one of the first attempts at the 
modern organic compounds of silver; a 10 per 
cent, solution of silver nitrate in 10 per cent, 
ethylenediamine solution. It occurs as a color- 
less, alkaline liquid, which does not give precipi- 
tates with sodium chloride or albuminous fluids, 
and is freely miscible with water. Its chief use 
is as an application in gonorrhea and in purulent 
or follicular conjunctivitis; but it has been given 
internally, a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful of a i/^ 
to 1 per cent, solution containing a little glycerin 
every two or three hours, in phthisical diarrhea 
and obstinate enterocolitis. It is applied in gon- 
orrhea in ^4 to 4 per cent, solutions; in eye dis- 
ease, in 2 to 5 per cent, solutions. It should be 
preserved in dark-glass bottles; discoloration is 
said not to affect its activity, and usually to be 
removable by filtration through paper. 

Argentol, or silver quinaseptolate, is a com- 
pound of silver with oxyquinolinedisulphonic 
acid, of the formula CjHsN.OH.SOsAg; a fine in- 
soluble powder used externally in 1 to 2 per cent, 
ointments or dusting-powders in syphilitic ulcers, 
etc., in 1:1,000 to 3,000 mucilage suspensions in 
gonorrhea, etc. Internally it is prescribed as an 
intestinal disinfectant. Dose, up to 15 grains 
per day. It must be kept well protected from the 
light. 

Argentose is a synthetic compound of silver 
and a nucleo-proteid, containing 30 per cent, 
of silver. It occurs as black scales, freely soluble 
in water or glycerin. It is used chiefly in gonor- 
rhea (2 to 20 per cent, solutions) and purulent 
eye disease (up to 50 per cent, solutions). 

Argonin {silver-casein) results from the inter- 
action of casein-sodium and silver nitrate. It is 
a white powder containing 4.25 per cent, of silver 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIO A 41 

and readily soluble in hot water. It is employed 
principally in gonorrhea, in 2 to 5 per cent, solu- 
tions, which should always be prepared fresh and 
dispensed in dark-amber bottles. Latterly a sol- 
uble modification has been marketed, which con- 
tains 10 per cent, of silver and is readily soluble 
in water; its uses are the same as those of the 
regular argon in, but it is twice as powerful. 

Argyrine has nothing to do with silver, but is 
an alkaloid obtained from horse chestnut, that is 
used internally in hemorrhoids. Dose, % grain. 

Argyrol is an organic compound of silver (sil- 
ver-vitellin) introduced two years ago by Dr. A. C. 
Barnes. It contains 30 per cent, of metallic sil- 
ver, and is soluble in water to almost any degree. 
The claims are made for this article that it is 
perfectly non-irritating even when used in con- 
centrated solution and that its solutions keep 
without deteriorating. Its therapeutic uses are 
the same as those of the older silver salts — in 
gonorrhea, infectious diseases of the eye, naso- 
pharyngeal affections, etc. It is applied in 2 to 
5 per cent, injections in urethritis, and in 5 to 50 
per cent, solutions in some other ailments. Very 
recently the name "argyrol" has been given to a 
different silver compound, of French manufac- 
ture, and defined as silver nucleinate; further 
data being still wanting and the article as yet 
unknown in the American market. 

Arheol is an alcohol of the formula CisHjeO, 
derived from santalwood oil of which it con- 
stitutes 60 to 90 per cent. It occurs as an oily 
liquid, and is marketed in 3 grain capsules, which 
Ravasini has used internally in gonorrhea and its 
sequels in the dose of 6 to 12 per day. It seems 
to have precisely the same action as oil of santal, 
but stated to have less tendency to upset the 
stomach. It also appears to be identical with 
santalol. 

Arhovin is described as the addition-product 
of diphenylamine and thymyl-benzoic acid ester, 
obtained by estering thymyl-benzoic acid with 
alcohol and combining the ester with diphenyla- 
mine. It is a liquid of the specific gravity 1.055, 



42 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

and of aromatic odor and burning taste; insoluble 
In water; soluble In ether, chloroform, or alcohol. 
It is used internally in gonorrhea; several 0.25 
gram capsules (the only form in which it is mar- 
keted) are given per day. 

Aristochin or aristoquin, chemically definable 
as diquinine carbonic ester or neutral carbonic 
ester of quinine, occurs as a white practically 
tasteless powder containing 96 per cent, of qui- 
nine alkaloid, easily soluble in chloroform, alco- 
hol, or acids, yielding bitter solutions; diflScultly 
soluble in ether, and insoluble in water. It is 
heralded simply as a tasteless form of quinine 
which but seldom irritates the stomach or pro- 
duces cinchonism and the other toxic effects of 
ordinary quinine. Its dosage is the same as that 
of the usual quinine compounds. It is largely 
used for children, especially in whooping-cough. 

Aristol is chemically dithymol diiodide or 
diiodo-dithymol, and is also known in different 
markets by the trade names thymotol and annid- 
alin. It occurs as a reddish-brown, voluminous 
powder of faint aromatic odor and containing 45.8 
per cent, of iodine; insoluble in water and glyc- 
erin, slightly soluble in alcohol, readily so in 
ether, chloroform, collodion, and oils. It is em- 
ployed as a succedaneum for iodoform externally, 
and is applied in the same way. It should not be 
brought into contact with hydroxides, carbonates, 
metallic oxides, ammonia, starch, corrosive subli- 
mate or other substances for which iodine has 
any chemical affinity. In dissolving aristol, heat 
must be avoided; solutions are properly made by 
trituration at a low temperature. The solutions, 
as well as the drug itself, should be preserved in 
dark bottles. 

Aromatin is an albuminated ferric pyrophos- 
phate in liquid form and an effervescent sodium 
pyrophosphate in powder form. Dose, a table- 
spoonful of the fluid after each meal, followed by 
a powder dissolved in a small wineglassful of 
water and drunk while effervescing. 

Arrhenal is a French trade name for disodium 
methylarsenate or sodium methylar senate, and 



THE M0DEBI7 MATEBIA HEDICA 43 

will be referred to under the former chemical 
designation. 

Arrhenal-Lithium is defined as lithium chlor- 
liydromethly arsenate, and recommended as a 
readily assimilable arsenical compound. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Arsen-ferratin is an arsenated ferratin con- 
taining 0.06 per cent, of arsenous acid; a red 
powder of peculiar odor. Dose, 5 to 10 grains 
three times daily. 

Arsen-hemol is hemol containing 1 per cent, 
of arsenous acid; a brown, insoluble powder, em- 
ployed as an alterative and hematinic in skin dis- 
eases, neuroses, etc. Dose, 1% to 5 grains, two 
or three times a day, generally prescribed in pills. 

Arsitriol is a name given by Schlagdenhaufen 
to calcium glycerino-arsenate, used as a readily 
assimilable nerve tonic. 

Arsycodile is a trade name for sodium cacody- 
late marketed abroad in tubes containing 0.05 
gram in sterilized solution intended for hypoder- 
mic or rectal use, and as 0.025 gram pills. Fer- 
or terro-arsycodile is iron cacodylate in pill form 
(0.025 gram each), 

Arsylin (arsen-protylin) is an arsenic, phos- 
phorus and albumin compound containing 0.1 per 
cent, of arsenic acid and 2.6 per cent, of phosphor- 
us. It occurs as a yellowish-white, odorless pow- 
der, of faint acidulous taste, and absorbed only 
on reaching the intestines. It is prescribed as an 
alterative tonic. 

Arsynal is another trade name for disodium 
mcthylarsenate. 

Artemesin or oxysantonin, CisHisOi, is a body 
existing beside santonin in the seed of artemisia 
maritima; white crystals soluble in chloroform 
and hot alcohol, but insoluble in cold water. It 
is marketed in France, combined with quassin 
and ferrous oxalate, as "drag6es de fer Briss," of 
which the dose as a bitter tonic and appetizer is 
2 pills before each of the two chief meals. 

Arthriticin is a German specialty defined as 
the "nitrile of the ethyl cresol of amido-acetic 
acid and diethylenimine" (piperazin), and ex- 



44 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

tolled as a gout and rheumatism remedy. Noth- 
ing further seems to be known about it. 

Arvenol is a coryza remedy said to consist of 
an ethereal solution of menthol, thymol and cam- 
phor, used by inhalation through a tube contain- 
ing some cotton impregnated with a few drops of 
the liquid. 

Asaprol is chemically calcium betanaphtol-al- 
phamonostilphonate, CaCooHi^SjOs+SHjO, and is 
obtained by heating 5 parts of beta-naphtol with 
4 parts of concentrated sulphuric acid until the 
resulting mass dissolves clearly in water, saturat- 
ing the solution with calcium carbonate, and 
evaporating the filtrate to dryness. In the fresh 
state it is a faintly reddish, neutral, odorless pow- 
der that is readily soluble in water; with age it 
darkens, and becomes less soluble. It is used as 
an antiseptic, antipyretic and analgesic in tuber- 
culosis, rheumatism, etc., in doses of 5 to 15 
grains several times a day. It also serves as a 
test for albumin in the presence of albumose and 
peptone. Combining it with antipyrin, quinine 
salts, potassium iodide, sodium bicarbonate or sul- 
phates has been specifically advised against. 

Asepsin is the name of two different substances 
described here under antisepsin and gaultherine 
respectively. 

Aseptol (sozolic acid) usually means a 33% per 
cent, aqueous solution of ortho-sulphocarbolic 
acid; a yellowish or brownish fluid, specific grav- 
ity 1.155, and soluble in water or alcohol. It is 
used chiefly as an external antiseptic, in 1 to 10 
per cent, solutions, in skin diseases, throat af- 
fections, etc., but to some extent also internally, 
in the same doses as salicylic acid. In chemistry 
it serves as a test for albumin and for bile in 
urine. Latterly a preparation has been intro- 
duced in Norway under the name of "aseptol," 
which is said to consist of chinosol, soap, and 
water, with or without various aromatic sub- 
stances such as terpineol. 

Aseptolin is a preparation introduced some 
years ago by Dr. Cyrus Edson as a remedy for 
tuberculosis and malaria. It is described as an 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 45 

0.02 per cent, aqueous solution of pilocarpine 
carbolate containing 2.75 per cent, of carbolic 
acid in addition. It is used hypodermically, 1 to 
2 drams being injected once a day. The article 
has been very little heard of recently. 

Asparol is a fluid extract of asparagus tops, 
used in diabetes and kidney disease. 

Asphalin Tea (species myrtilli comp.) consists 
essentially of the leaves and blossoms of huckle- 
berry, and is used in diabetes. 

Aspirin is the trade designation for acetylsali- 
cylic acid or salicylic acid acetic ester which oc- 
curs as white needles that are difficultly soluble 
in water but readily so in alcohol or ether. It is 
decomposed in solution and is incompatible with 
alkalies; hence it should be administered by 
itself in powder form. It is extolled as an agree- 
able and efficient substitute for sodium salicylate 
in rheumatism, phthisical fever, diabetes, etc., 
and is given in the same doses as the latter drug. 

Asterol is a double salt of mercury paraphenol- 
sulphonate (sulphocarbolate) and ammonium tar- 
trate, of the formula CuHioOsSjHg.iCiH^OeCNH*), 
-fSHjO; a yellowish powder, containing 15 per 
cent, of mercury, and soluble in hot water, the 
solution remaining clear on cooling. Ammonia 
and alkalies do not precipitate the mercury from 
solutions. It is claimed to possess all the advan- 
tages of corrosive sublimate as a disinfectant 
without its drawbacks, it is used in 2 to 5:1000 
solutions; also by intramuscular injection in 
syphilis, 15 minims of a 4 or 5 per cent, solution. 
It is marketed also as 0.2 gram tablets. 

Astra is an infants' food with 12.7 per cent, 
albumin content. 

Atoxyl, chemically meta-arsenous acid anilid or 
anilid metorarsenite, occurs as a white, odorless, 
tasteless crystalline powder readily soluble in 
water. It is claimed to be less poisonous than 
the ordinary arsenical compounds. Used in skin 
diseases, cachexias such as accompany carcinoma, 
etc. It is generally administered subcutaneously, 
1 to 3 grains per day; it is said not to impart a 



46 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

garlicky odor to the breath, perspiration, and 
dejections as the cacodylates do. 

Atrabilin is described as a light-yellow, stable 
liquid preparation of the suprarenal gland, which 
is used chiefly in ophthalmology to produce my- 
drasis and anesthesia and to relieve congestion. 
It is generally prescribed in 1:5 dilution with 
distilled water or rose water containing 4 per 
cent, of boric acid. 

Atropine Methylbromide, or methyl-atropine 
hromide, CisHjeNOsBr, was recently introduced by 
Dr. L. Vaupel as a mydriatic, antihidrotic, and an- 
tlsialogogue, similar to atropine but more speedy 
and evanescent in action than the latter. It crys- 
tallizes in white leaflets containing 21 per cent, 
of bromine, and readily soluble in water and 
diluted alcohol. It is applied in 1 per cent, solu- 
tion. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Atropine Methylnitrate is better known by the 
trade name eumydrin. It occurs as a white pow- 
der, soluble in water, and is used like the pre- 
ceding atropine salt but principally only as a 
mydriatic. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Atroscine is an optically inactive form of hyo- 
scine, and forms colorless crystals Insoluble in 
water but soluble in alcohol, ether or chloroform. 
It has been prescribed as a mydriatic in 1 per 
cent, solution in castor oil, and internally as a 
sedative like hyoscine. 

Attritin is the name applied to a sterilized so- 
lution of sodium salicylate (17.5) and caffeine 
(2.5) in distilled water (80), recommended by 
Mendel and Behr for use by intravenous or intra- 
muscular injection in cases of rheumatism, sci- 
atica and the like, where the employment of sali- 
cylic acid or its salts by the mouth or topically 
is contraindicated. It is marketed in ampullas 
containing 2.25 c.c, which constitutes the dose, to 
be given once every 12 hours to 3 days. 

Aulicin consists of pills said to contain iron 
peptonate, freshly precipitated ferric oxide, anise, 
blessed thistle, quinine hydrochlorate, and juniper 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 47 

extract. It is prescribed for anemia and neu- 
rasthenia. 

Auramine is a name applied to pyoktanin yel- 
low, an anilin dye used as an antiseptic in certain 
eye diseases. (See pyoktanin.) 

Autoplast Is a collodion-like liquid used as an 
antiseptic-protective paint in burns and wounds. 

Auxil is a German specialty intended for use 
in varicose ulcers, burns, etc., and consisting ol 
three preparations; a bath powder, a dusting- 
powder for wounds, and a blood-purifying tea. 

Avenine, formerly defined as a alkaloid but lat- 
terly more correctly described as a resinoid, is an 
extract of avena sativa claimed to contain the 
alkaloidal principles present in oats. It occurs as 
brown, friable masses of aromatic odor, and sol- 
uble in alcohol. It is used as a nerve stimulant 
in doses of 1/120 to 1/60 grain several times 
daily, given in pills. 

Avenose is a mixture of oat flour and soluble 
acorn-malt extract. 

Azymol, according to Aufrecht, is a red-colored 
and aromatized alcoholic solution of salicylic 
acid, saccharin, and menthol, which in diluted 
form serves as a mouth and wound antiseptic. 



B 

Babaln is a new compound of antipyrin and 
salicylic acid, the exact composition of which Is 
not divulged. 

Bacillol is a soap solution of cresols, similar to 
the liquor cresoll saponatus Ph. G. iv. and lysol, 
containing about 52 per cent, of cresols; a dark- 
brown, clear, thick, oily fluid of faint alkaline 
reaction, specific gravity of 1.100, odor reminding 
of carbolic acid but less pervasive and persistent. 
It Is freely misclble with water, yielding almost 
perfectly transparent solutions. It has been em- 
ployed as a medicinal disinfectant in 1 to 2 per 
cent, solutions and particularly extolled in veter. 
inary practice; it has been withdrawn from the 
market. 



48 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Barium Chloride was recommended a few 
years ago as a reliable purgative, given intraven- 
ously, in the colic of horses — 6 to 20 grains dis- 
solved in 21^ drams of water. Very recently Dr. 
Schedel pointed out its usefulness in human medi- 
cine as a cardiac tonic similar in its indications 
to digitalis. He gives % to % grain twice daily, 
with a little milk sugar, two hours after the prin- 
cipal meals. The maximum dose is 3 grains. 

Barmenit is a name given to sodium chloro- 
borate. 

Barutiu is the name applied to the double salt 
harium-theobromine and sodium salicylate occur- 
ring as a white, faintly alkaline, water-soluble 
powder containing 25.5 per cent, of theobromine. 
According to Dr. B. Bibergeil, it is an efficient diu- 
retic. Dose, 5 to 10 grains, in sweetened solution; 
acid syrups should be avoided. As the product is 
very susceptible to the influence of carbon dioxide, 
which decomposes it, it should be kept well stop- 
pered. 

Basedowsan is a serum obtained from the 
blood of goats and sheep from which the thyroid 
gland has been extirpated. It contains 0.5 per 
cent, of carbolic acid as a preservative, and is 
used in Basedow's disease (exophthalmic goiter), 
internally and hypodermically. Dose, 15 to 60 
minims after meals; subcutaneously 4 to 15 
minims. The preparation is very similar to if not 
identical with Moebius' antithyroidin. 

Basicin is a compound of quinine hydrochlo- 
rate and caffeine, containing 60 per cent, of 
quinine and 30 per cent, of caffeine; a white 
crystalline substance soluble in 1 part of water, 
and, according to A. Kreidmann, is thrice as pow- 
erful as quinine yet free from its by-effects. It 
is employed per os and subcutaneously in mi- 
graine, chronic rheumatism, influenza, etc.; 3 to 
8 grains per dose. Basicin oil consists of dried 
basicin 5, chloroform 37.5, alcohol 12.5, and olive 
oil 45; it is used as a liniment as an adjunct to 
the internal use of the drug or where the latter 
is not borne well per os or subcutaneously. 

Basol is a Swiss liquid disinfectant containing 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 49 

50 per cent, of cresol and intended as a substitute 
for lysol. It is very similar to the liquor cresoli 
saponatus of the Ph. G. 

Bavarol is analogous to the preceding article. 

Bebeerine must not be confounded with ber- 
berine. The former is an alkaloid from nectandra 
or pareira brava of the formula C18H21NO3, and 
is given in doses of 1/12 to 1^2 grains, according 
to the indications. Berberine is the colored alka- 
loid of berberis vulgaris and some other plants, 
of the formula C20H17NO4, and is administered in 
doses of 1 to 15 grains. 

Benesol is a dental local anesthetic said to be 
a sterile solution of eucaine, cocaine hydrochlo- 
rate, carbolic acid, menthol, eucalyptol, and amyl 
nitrite. 

Benzamido-semicarbazide is the chemical des- 
ignation for the article marketed as cryogenin, 
which see. 

Benzanalgen Is synonymous with guinalgen. 

Benzanilid {benzoyl-anilin or phenyl-benza- 
mide). C.HjNH.CO.CoHj, occurs in white to red- 
dish crystals, readily soluble in alcohol but nearly 
insoluble in water. It is used as a mild anti- 
pyretic, especially in the infectious diseases of 
children, in doses of I14 to 6 grains; adults re- 
ceive 10 to 15 grains per dose. 

Benzene or benzol is used to a limited extent 
as an antispasmodic and anticatarrhal in whoop- 
ing cough, influenza, etc., in doses of 2 to 10 
minims every three hours, taken in emulsion, in 
capsules, or on sugar. Maximum dose, 45 minims. 

Benzo-Eugenol {benzoyl-eugenol or eugenol 
benzoate) results from the action of benzoyl chlo- 
ride upon eugenol-sodium, and occurs in white, 
odorless crystals which are soluble in alcohol and 
ether but insoluble in water. It is prescribed in 
tuberculosis in place of benzosol, also in neuralgic 
headache. Dose, 8 to 15 grains. 

Benzoic Acid Benzyl Ester is peruscabin. 

Benzoic Acid Sulphinid. — See saccharin. 

Benzoiodhydrin results from the interaction of 
benzoyl iodide and epichlorhydrin. It is a crys- 
talline substance containing 38^ per cent, of 



50 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIC A 

iodine, unctuous to the touch and soluble in 
ether, alcohol or chloroform. It is said not to 
produce iodism and smaller doses of it to have 
the same therapeutic effects as potassium iodide. 
Dose, 2 to 5 grains, usually prescribed in sugar- 
coated pills. 

Benzonaphtol (naphtol ienzoate), C«H,.COO.- 
CioHj, is obtained by melting together equal 
parts of beta-naphtol and benzoyl chloride. It 
forms a whitish powder, soluble in alcohol and 
chloroform, almost insoluble in water; it darkens 
with age. It is given as an intestinal antiseptic 
In diarrheal affections. Dose, 5 to 10 grains sev- 
eral times daily, up to 75 grains a day; children 
receive 10 to 30 grains in the course of a day. 

Benzosol is guaiacol benzoate or tenzoyl-gua- 
iacol, CcHj.OCHj.COO.CsHb, a compound of guaia- 
col in which a hydrogen atom of its hydroxyl is 
replaced by benzoyl. It occurs as a white powder 
of slight odor and taste; readily soluble in hot 
alcohol, ether or chloroform; insoluble in water; 
guaiacol content 54 per cent. It is employed 
chiefly as an intestinal antiseptic; also in dia- 
betes, cystitis, etc. Dose, 4 to 10 grains after meals. 

Benzoylacetyl Peroxide is the chemical desig- 
nation for acetozone. 

Benzoyl-Anilin is a synonym of benzanilid. 

Benzoyl-Eugenol. — See benzo-eugenol. 

Benzoyl-Guaiacol. — See benzosol. 

Benzoyl Peroxide {benzoyl superoxide), CgH,. 
CO.O.O.CO.CbHb, is prepared by treating commer- 
cial sodium peroxide (5 parts) with an equimo- 
lecular quantity of benzoyl chloride (9 parts) at 
about 4°C. The resulting precipitate is filtered off 
and recrystallized from hot alcohol. It occurs bm 
permanent, non-deliquescent, white, odorless 
prisms melting at 103.5°C., slightly soluble in 
water, more readily soluble in alcohol, and dis- 
solving in 35 to 50 parts of olive oil. According 
to Dr. Loewenhart, benzoyl peroxide is an indif- 
ferent substance when taken internally, but a 
mild anesthetic and powerful disinfectant when 
applied externally. It has been used as a wound 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 51 

antiseptic and dermic pure or in 10 per cent, oint- 
ment, or as concentrated solution in olive oil- 

Benzoyl-Pseudotropeine is the chemical desig- 
nation of the article marketed as tropacocaine. ' 

Benzoylsodium-thymol Oxybenzoate is known 
in the trade as pyran or pyrenol. 
Benzozone is the old name for acetozone. 
Benzyl-morphine. See peronin. 
Bertolin is a Berlin remedy for gout, rheuma- 
tism and malaria, said to be essentially a fluid 
extract of the root of nicotiana bertolinii, con- 
taining some tannin and other ingredients but no 
colchicine or salicylic acid. 
Beta-Eucaine. — See eucaine. 
Beta-Lysol is a trade name for liquor cresoli 
saponatus of the German Pharmacopoeia. 

Beta-Naphtol Benzoate is described under 
henzonaphtol. 

Beta-Naphtol-Bismuth is better known as 
orphol. 
Beta-Naphtol Salicylate is 'betol. 
Betel, also known as naphtalol, napMol^salol, 
salinaphtol, salicylic acid heta-naphtol ester, beta- 
naphtol salicylate, C5H4.OH.COO.C10H,, Is obtained 
by heating beta-naphtol-sodium and sodium sali- 
cylate with phosphorus oxychloride, and occurs 
as as a white, glistening powder, soluble in hot 
alcohol, insoluble in water. It is used in intes- 
tinal disorders, gonorrheal cystitis, articular 
rheumatism, etc. Dose, 4 to 10 grains three or 
four times daily given in wafers or with milk. 

Betulinar is an antiseptic toilet wash consist- 
ing, according to Aufrecht, of menthol, salicylic 
acid, cumarin, borax, glycerin, alcohol and water. 
Betulol is a liniment containing oil of betula 
as its chief ingredient and employed externally 
in rheumatism and gout. 

Bilein is described as "the active principle of 
bile." It probably is either sodium taurocholate, 
sodium glycocholate, or sodium choleate (purl- 
fled and dried oxgall). It is marketed in tab- 
lets. 
Biodal is defined as mono-iodO'dibiamutfi-methr 



52 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

ylene dicresotinate. It Is used as a dusting-powder 
on wounds. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Biodolin is a fine, brownish-red, almost taste- 
less powder, having a slight odor like that of 
peach kernels, practically insoluble in water, 
ether or alcohol, decomposed slowly by dilute 
alkalies (resulting in the liberation of iodine and 
chinoline), and containing 53 per cent, of iodine, 
30 per cent, of bismuth, and 17 per cent, of chino- 
line. It is used externally as a substitute for 
Iodoform, and internally as an intestinal disin- 
fectant and astringent. Dose, 2 to 6 grains. 

Bioferrin is a hemoglobin preparation which is 
administered as a blood-builder to children in 
doses of 1 to 4 drams per day, and to adults in 
daily quantities of % to 1 oz. 

Biogen is said to be magnesium peroxide 
(MgOj) and described as an odorless, tasteless, 
permanent, insoluble, white powder, which is used 
"whenever the system vitality is reduced from 
any cause, when there is temporary or protracted 
failure on the part of the organs to perform their 
functions, and when it is required to increase 
nutrition," etc. Dose, 5 to 15 grains every three 
or four hours. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

Bioguaicol. — See guaiacol phosphate. 

Bioplasm is a so-called "tissue food" contain- 
ing "nuclein, lecithin, diastase, trypsin, fibrino- 
gen, and other organic ferments." It is a light- 
gray powder of sweet taste and soluble in aqueous 
fiuids. It is usually given in 5 to 15 grain doses 
several times a day, and allowed to dissolve in 
the mouth, and the patient is enjoined to drink 
water freely during the day. The article must be 
kept securely stoppered; moisture and light de- 
compose it. It is marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

Bioplastica (Sereno) is a solution of lecithin 
specially prepared for subcutaneous use. 

Bioplastin is what Simriani calls a nutrient 
and tonic preparation consisting essentially of 
lecithin, iron and the phosphates of yolk of egg. 

Bios is a predigested nutrient containing albu- 
min in the form of peptones and albumoses. 

Bioson is described as an albumin-iron-lecithin 



THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 53 

compound, made from casein and containing 0.24 
per cent, of iron and 1.2 per cent, of lecithin. It 
occurs a brownish-gray powder, not unpleasant 
in taste and almost completely soluble in water. 
Dr. M. Heim recommends it as a nutritive. Dose, 

1 to 2 ozs. per day, in milk, beef-tea, etc. 
Bis-fonna-sal is a name constructed from bis- 
muth, formoldehyde and saUcylic acid, from 
which the product Is made. Chemically, the arti- 
cle is defined as bismuth methylene disaliscylate, 
and forms a white, odorless, insoluble powder. 
It is prescribed as an intestinal antiseptic and 
astringent; also as a vulnerary. Dose, 10 to 20 
grains. See caution under formaldehyde. 

BIsmal is chemically bismuth methylenedigal 
late, 4CitHi20,r,+3Bi(OH)3, and occurs as a gray- 
ish-brown, voluminous powder insoluble in the 
ordinary solvents, and employed as an intestinal 
astringent, chiefly in chronic diarrheas. Dose, 

2 to 5 grains three to six times a day. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Bismolan is a paste containing bismuth oxy- 
chloride. 

Bismon is colloidal bismuth oxide, "a. peculiar 
compound of lysalbin- and protalbin-sodium and 
bismuth meta-hydroxide." It occurs as a reddish 
powder, freely soluble in water. According to 
Dr. Kinner, it is a good gastro-intestinal tonic 
and antidiarrheal; he gives children 4 to 8 grains 
three to six times daily. 

Bismutal or bismutol is described as a mixture 
of soluble bismuth phosphaJ^e and sodium salicy- 
late, which serves as a wound-antiseptic as well 
as antidiarrheal: one oi Radlauer's preparations. 

Bismutan is an antidiarrheal remedy consist- 
ing of bismuth, resorcin and tannin, and occur- 
ring as a yellow, odorless, slightly sweet powder, 
which is insoluble in water. Dose for adults, 8 to 
15 grains, taken as powders or in shake mixtures. 

Bismuth Agaricinate, neutral, has the for- 
mula (Ci„Hos05)3Bi,,, and forms a white, tasteless 
powder, practically insoluble in water. It has 
been introduced as a remedy for intestinal ca- 
tarrh and night sweats. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Bismuth. Beta-Naphtolate is better known on 



54 THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDICA 

this market as orphol and will be referred to 
under that heading. 
Bismuth Chrysophanate. — See dermoh 
Bismuth Cinnamate is better known by the 
trade name hetoform, which see. 

Bismuth Dilactotannate is the chemical desig- 
nation for lactannin, which see. 

Bismuth Dithiosalicylate is a synonym of 
thioform. 

Bismuth Formic Iodide, according to the de- 
scription given by the manufacturers, appears 
to be a mixture of glutol (formaldehyde-gelatin), 
aristol, and bismuth oxyiodide. It is employed 
as a surgical antiseptic and siccative on wounds, 
ulcers, burns, skin diseases, etc. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 

Bismuth Gallate, Basic, will be described un- 
der bismuth subgallate. 

Bismuth Lactogallate is used like the subni- 
trate but chiefly in diarrhea. Dose 5 to 15 grains. 

Bismuth Loretinate or loretin-bismuth, or 
bismuth meta-iodo-ortho-oxyguinoline-ana-sulpho- 
nate, occurs as a yellow, insoluble powder. It is 
used internally as an intestinal astringent and 
antiseptic, chiefly in the diarrhea of phthisis; ex- 
ternally, in substance, ointment or dusting-powder, 
as a siccative wound antiseptic. Dose, usually 
8 grains several times daily. 

Bismuth Methylenedigallate is described un- 
der bismal. 

Bismuth Methylenedisalicylate is the chemi- 
cal name of bisformasal. 

Bismuth-Naphtalin Benzoate will be referred 
to under intestin. 

Bismuth Oxide, Colloidal, is marketed as bis- 
mon, which see. 

Bismuth Oxyiodogallate is the chemical desig- 
nation for' airol, under which heading it is de- 
scribed. 

Bismuth Oxyiodomethylenedigallate is iodo- 
muth, v/hich see. 

Bismuth Oxyiodomethylgallate is described 
under iodogallicin. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 55 

Bismuth Oxyiodotannate is the chemical syno- 
nym of ibit; which see. 

Bismuth Phenolsulphonate. — See l)ismuth sul- 
phocarbolate. 

Bismuth Phosphate, Soluble (Hsol) is a water- 
soluble bismuth compound containing besides 
some sodium phosphate, 20 per cent, of bismuth 
oxide. It forms a white, odorless powder, of 
faintly alkaline taste, and is prescribed as a 
gastro-intestinal astringent in doses of from 3 
to 8 grrains several times daily. 

Bismuth Proteinate is a synonym of Hsmu- 
tose, which see. 

Bismuth Pyro gallate, [C.H, ( OH ) ,0] ,BiOH, 
also known as helcosol and pyrogallol-bismuth, 
occurs as a yellow or greenish-yellow, odorless, 
and tasteless powder, soluble in acids but insolu- 
ble in the usual solvents; it contains 60 per cent, 
of BijO,. It is employed internally as an intes- 
tinal disinfectant and astringent, and externally 
in certain skin diseases similarly to bismuth sub- 
gallate. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Bismuth Resorcinate, or resorcin-'bismutTi, Is 
a compound of somewhat variable composition 
but containing about 40 per cent, of BijOj; a yel- 
lowish-brown powder insoluble in water. It is 
used in gastric catarrh, abnormal gastric fermen- 
tation, and the like. Dose, 2 to 8 grains several 
times daily. 

Bismuth Sub-Benzoate, or bismuth henzoate, 
basic, Bi(CTH502)3.Bi(OH)3, occurs as a white 
powder containing about 70 per cent, of BijOj 
and insoluble in water. It is prescribed as a sur- 
gical antiseptic like iodoform, but chiefly for use 
in syphilitic ulcers. 

Bismuth Subgallate, also known as dermatol 
and basic bismuth gallate, C,H,(OH),COj.Bi(OH)„ 
is obtained by precipitating a dilute solution of 
bismuth nitrate in glacial acetic acid by means 
of a solution of gallic acid. It occurs as a yellow, 
odorless, and tasteless powder, insoluble in the 
ordinary solvents but soluble in dilute solutions 
of the alkalies. It is used externally as a sicca- 



56 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 

tive antiseptic, mostly pure or mixed with starch 
or talcum, and internally as an astringent in 
diarrhea, gastric ulcer, etc. Dose, 4 to 20 grains 
four or more times daily. 

Bismuth Sulphocarbolate, or 'bismuth sulpho- 
phenate or phenolsulphonate, occurs as a pale 
reddish powder, partially soluble in water. It 
has been recommended by Dr. Hugh Woods in 
fever patients with fetid breath and coated 
tongue, and in fermentative dyspepsia and ty- 
phoid fever. Dose, 3 to 8 grains three or four 
times a day. 

Bismuthal is a brand name of a "lac bismuthi 
cum pepsino" used chiefly in diarrhea. This ar- 
ticle must not be confounded with bismutal, or 
bismutol. 

Bismutose (bismuth proteinate) is a bismuth- 
albumin compound that occurs as a yellowish- 
white, fine, odorless and tasteless powder; insolu- 
ble in water or alcohol, but soluble in solutions 
of the alkalies. It is used principally as an intes- 
tinal astringent and a protective to the mucosa 
of the gastro-intestinal canal, chiefly in children; 
to a limited extent externally in intertrigo and 
burns. Dose, for children under 6 months of 
age, 15 to 30 grains hourly; older children take 
a teaspoonful at a dose. On exposure to light, 
bismutose gradually assumes a slate-gray color; 
it should hence be kept protected from light. 

Bisol is described under bismuth phosphate, 
soluble. 

Bitum.inol (ammonium sulphobituminoleate) is 
a very recent analogue of ichthyol, made by a 
Breslau (Germany) firm. 

Blennostasine is the trade name applied to 
cinchonidine dihydrobromate, CiaHjaNaOCHBrj). 
The article occurs as light-yellow, odorless, deli- 
quescent, and very bitter prisms, that are readily 
soluble in water, less so in alcohol, and insoluble 
in ether or chloroform. It is employed chiefly in 
acute coryza, "colds" in the head, and hoarseness 
from catarrhal hypersecretion, in which affec- 
tions it has a drying up effect like belladonna. 
Dose, 1 to 5 grains every hour according to the 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 57 

effect desired. It is also marketed as 1, 3, and 
5-grain pills. 

Blood Salt. — See physiologic nutritive salt. 

Blutan is an alcohol-free, carbonated solution 
of acid-albumin, iron and manganese peptonate, 
containing 0.6 per cent, of iron and 0.1 per cent, 
of manganese. It is used as a hematopoietic. Mar- 
keted also combined with iodine and bromine: as 
iodoblutan, carrying 0.1 per cent, of iodine; and 
as hromohlutan, carrying 0.1 per cent, of bromine. 
Dose, a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful. 

Boldol is a product of the fractional distilla- 
tion of boldo oil, intended for use internally in 
gonorrhea and hepatic affections. Further data 
are yet wanting. 

Boliformin is a veterinary remedy described 
as being a condensation product of formaldehyde 
with aluminium silicate. It is used as a dusting- 
powder on wounds. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Bonducin is a bitter principle obtained from 
bonduc seeds. It is prescribed as a febrifuge, in 
doses of 1 to 3 grains. 

Boracetanilid, as its name implies, is an inti- 
mate mixture of boric acid (75) and acetanilid 
(25). It is used as a wound antiseptic in the 
pure form. 

Boral is the name given by Leuchter to an 
aluminium borotartrate occurring as white crys- 
tals that are clearly soluble in water and have 
a sweet-astringent taste. It is employed as a dis- 
infectant astringent, chiefly in diseases of the 
nose and throat, in substance (finely powdered) 
by insufflation or in solution containing some 
glycerin as a paint. 

Boralid is said to be a mixture of equal parts 
of boric acid and acetanilid. It is used as a 
dusting-powder, principally in eczema and 
chafing. 

Borneol Isovalerianate, also known as borny- 
val, is a liquid used in nervous disorders and 
functional neuroses. Dose, 4 minims, in cap- 
sules. 

Bornyval. — See borneol isovalerianate. 

Boro-Chloretone is a combination of boric acid 



58 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIO A 

and chloretone, intended for use as a dusting- 
powder on wounds. 

Boroform is probably a mixture of boric acid 
and formaldehiyde. It is used in substance as a 
dusting-powder, or in 10 per cent, ointment, in 
place of iodoform. See caution under forraal- 
dehyde. 

Borogen (boric acid ethyl ester) is a prepara- 
tion used by inhalation through a special appara- 
tus in the treatment of diseases of the nose, 
throat and lungs. It is said to become decom- 
posed into its components by the moisture present 
in the pharnyx, lungs, etc. 

Borol is an antiseptic said to be obtained by 
fusing a mixture of boric acid and sodium bisul- 
phate. It occurs as odorless, colorless, glass-like 
lumps, soluble in water. It is used externally in 
1 to 2 per cent, solutions, in diphtheria, gonor- 
rhea, ozena, etc.; internally in erysipelas, diph- 
theria, croupous bronchitis, etc. Dose, 5 to 10 
grains five or six times daily. This name has 
also been applied to an antiseptic solution of 
different constitution, each fluid ounce of which 
is said to represent sodium borate 12 grains, 
sodium bicarbonate 12 grains, sodium benzoate 5 
grains, glycerin 90 minims, eucalyptol % minim, 
thymol 5/16 grain, menthol % grain, and oil of 
pinus pumilio "q.s." It is applied to wounds, etc., 
in full strength; it is used as a gargle or 
irrigation diluted with 5 to 10 volumes of 
water. 

Borolan is a dermal balm consisting of boro- 
glycerin and lanolin. 

Boro-methylate is "an antiseptic salt prepared 
of formalin, boric acid, carbolic acid, thymol, 
methyl salicylate, menthol, eucalyptol, sodium bi- 
borate and sodium bicarbonate; very soluble and 
slightly alkaline." See caution under formal- 
hyde. 

Borotartrol is a product prepared from boric 
acid and neutral sodium tartrate. 

Borosal is an aqueous solution of alum, borax, 
glycerin, and salicylic acid. It is employed as an 
antihidrotic externally. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 59 

Borsalyl is said to be a mixture of boric acid 
and sodium salicylate; an antiseptic. 

Borsyl is a powder used in excessive perspira- 
tion; it is reported to consist of boric acid, alka- 
line borates, and cetyl alcohol. 

Borophlogine consists, according to the manu- 
facturers, of "potassium iodide, glycerin, thymol, 
eucalyptol and menthol, combined with a spe- 
cially prepared and purified base composed of 
silica, magnesia, and alumina." It is a smooth, 
plastic, surgical dressing, intended as a substi- 
tute for the ordinary poultice in the topical treat- 
ment of congestions and inflammations. 

Brandsanal is a burn remedy consisting, ac- 
cording to the manufacturers, of carbolic acid, 
picric acid, water and glycerin. 

Brenzcain is the terse name applied to guaiacol 
benzylic ether or pyro{brenz)catecMn methyl- 
henzyl ether. It occurs in white crystals, soluble 
in alcohol, ether or vasogen; insoluble in water. 
It is said to possess the advantages of guaiacol 
without its irritant action. It is used, however, 
chiefly in the production of local anesthesia by 
cataphoresis. 

Breiiz(pyro)catechin Dimethyl Ether. — See 
veratrole. 

Brenz(pyro)catechin Ethyl Ether is a syno- 
nym of guethol, and will be referred to under that 
title. 

Brenz(pyro)catechin Methyl-benzyl Ether is 
described under brenzcain. 

Brenz(pyro)catechin Mono-methyl Ether is 
the well-known guaiacol. 

Bromacetanilid is described under antisepsin. 

Bromalbacide is a bromine substitution com- 
pound of albumin. It occurs as a yellowish-white 
powder, soluble in water; and is used as a sub- 
stitute for the alkali bromides wherever these are 
not well borne. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Bromalin, or 'bromethylformin, or Jiexamethyl- 
enetetramine hromethylate, (CH2)oNi.C2H5Br, re- 
sults from the action of ethyl bromide upon hexa- 
methylentetramine. It occurs as white crystals, 
soluble in water. It is used as a substitute for 



60 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

the alkali bromides in doses of 30 to 60 grains 
Several times daily. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Bromamide is chemically trihromanilin hydro- 
bromate, CoHiBrgN.HBr. It forms colorless, odor- 
less, tasteless needles, soluble in chloroform, 
ether, or oils, insoluble in water, and sparingly 
soluble in cold alcohol. It has been employed as 
an anodyne and antineuralgic in doses of 10 to 
15 grains. 

Bromanilid is referred to under the synonym 
antisepsin. 

Bromdiethylacetamide. — See neuronal. 

Brom-Eigon will be described under the col- 
lective title eigons. 

Bromelin is a digestive enzyme obtained from 
the pineapple (bromelia ananas), stated to be 
similar in action to pepsin and papain. 

Bromethylf ormin is a synonym of bromalin. 

Brometone is the terse name applied to tri- 
brom-tertiary-butyl alcohol, CBr3.2CH3.COH, re- 
sulting from the action of caustic alkali upon a 
mixture of bromoform and acetone. It occurs as 
fine, white crystals of camphoraceous odor and 
taste, readily soluble in alcohol, ether or chloro- 
form, and but slightly soluble in water. It is 
used as a nerve-sedative and antispasmodic. Dose, 
5 to 10 grains, in capsules or syrup. 

Brominol is a brominized sesame oil, like 
hroviipin, introduced by Wm. Martindale of Lon- 
don. 

Bromipin is a bromine addition product of 
sesame oil, in which the unsaturated fatty acids 
or their glycerin esters are partly transformed 
into saturated bromine-substituted fatty acids or 
their glycerides. It occurs as a yellow, oily liquid 
in the main similar in physical properties to 
sesame oil, and is recommended as an efficient 
substitute for the alkali bromides in epilepsy, 
cardiac palpitation, etc., whenever the latter drugs 
give rise to disturbances. It is made in two 
strengths: 10 per cent, and 33% per cent., that is 
to say, containing those proportions of bromine. 
The dose of the former is 1 to 4 drams, three or 
four times daily; that of the stronger preparation. 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 61 

one-third as much. It is generally prescribed in 
capsules (marketed also as such). Bromipin gets 
turbid when exposed to a low temperature, and 
should hence be kept in a moderately warm 
place in winter. 

Brom.lecithin is a compound of bromine and 
lecithin containing 30 per cent, of Br, occurring 
as nearly colorless, waxy masses, and claimed to 
be more assimilable than lecithin pure besides 
having sedative action. It is used in nervous 
diseases. Dose, 1 to 3 grains three times a day. 

Bromo-Albumin is described under its more 
common designation, hromosin. 

Bromochinal, or acid dibromsalicylate of qui- 
nine, C2eH24N„Oj(C,HjBrj.OH.COOH)j, forms yel- 
lowish, bitter crystals that are sparingly soluble 
in water, alcohol, or ether. According to its in- 
troducer, Prof. V. Noorden, 0.6 to 0.75 gram given 
twice daily lowers elevated temperature similarly 
to 0.5 gram of quinine hydrochlorate, and It has, 
besides, a soporific effect in febrile patients. 

BromocoU is a bromine-tannin-gelatin com- 
pound containing 20 per cent, of bromine organi- 
cally combined. It forms a yellowish, odorless, 
tasteless powder; insoluble in the usual solvents, 
but soluble in alkaline fluids. It is another of 
the many modern succedanea for the alkali bro- 
mides being used in epilepsy and other nervous 
affections; it is also used externally as an anti- 
pruritic in various skin diseases, and is hence 
marketed also as a 20 per cent, ointment (with 
resorbin as the base), 10 per cent, solution (ef- 
fected with the aid of borax 6, to 10 of bromo- 
coll), dusting-powder, suppositories, and soap. 
BromocoU, soluble contains borax as the solvent 
adjunct. 

Bromof arina is a flour containing bromide and 
used for making the bread known as bromopan. 

Bromof orm (formyl or methenyl tribromide; 
tribrom-methane) , CHBr,, is obtained from ace- 
tone with bromine. It occurs as a colorless, heavy 
liquid (sp. gr. 2.83), of an odor and taste similar 
to chloroform, almost insoluble in water, but 
soluble in alcohol or ether and in about 80 parts 



62 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

of glycerin. It acts as a nerve-sedative and 
antispasmodic, and has come into prominence in 
recent years as a remedy in whooping cough. 
Dose, for children, as many drops (not minims) 
as the child is years of age, three or four times 
daily; best given in emulsion or hydro-alcoholic 
solution. Owing to its heaviness and insolubility 
in water, it is dangerous to dispense it in aqueous 
mixture. Bromoform is so extremely volatile 
that the vials rapidly lose in weight on keeping; 
it should hence be procured only in limited quan- 
tity at a time, and kept in a cool place and pro- 
tected from light. All prescriptions for bromo- 
form should be carefully scanned; physicians 
sometimes forget that a single dram of this sub- 
stance contains a large number of drops — one 
minim equals 5 drops. Poisoning by bromoform 
is usually treated by applying the stomach pump, 
injecting camphor and ether hypodermically, and 
resorting to artificial respiration. 

Bromohemol, or hemol bromide, is hemol with 
2.7 per cent, of bromine; a brown, insoluble pow- 
der, introduced as an easily assimilable nerve 
tonic and sedative. Dose, 15 grains three times 
a day. 

Bromol. — See tribromphenol. 

Bromolein is the name applied to a sterilized 
addition-product of the unsaturated fatty acids of 
almond oil. The article occurs as a yellow, odor- 
less, oily liquid, containing 20 per cent, of bro- 
mine, and used subcutaneously where bromides 
are ordinarily employed. Dose, i^ to 2 drams. 

Bromopan is bread made from bromofarina and 
containing 1 gram of bromide to the loaf. It is 
intended for use by epileptics. 

Bromophenacetin, CgHa.Br.OCzHj.NHCOCH,, oc- 
curs as colorless crystals melting at about 115° C, 
readily soluble in alcohol, and sparingly so in 
water. It was introduced as a sedative and anal- 
gesic, but little mention of it has as yet been 
made in literature. Dose, 10 to 20 grains. 

Bromo-protoline is a compound of albumin and 
bromine (10 per cent.), occurring as a granular 
powder insoluble in the ordinary solvents but 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 63 

soluble In alkaline solutions. It is used in place 
of potassium bromide when tbis is not borne 
well, and in similar doses. Marketed also as 5- 
grain tablets. 

Bromopyrin is a designation applied to two 
different articles. The commoner is chemically 
monobrom-antipyrin, CnHuBrNjO, occuring as 
white crystals soluble in alcohol or chloroform 
but insoluble in water; it is occasionally pre- 
scribed as a sedative and antipyretic, in place of 
antipyrin, and in the same dose. The other bromo- 
pyrin is of French origin, and consists of a granu- 
lar effervescent mixture of caffeine hydrobro- 
mate, antipyrin, and sodium bromide. Dose, 1 to 
2 drams. 

Bromosin {hromo-albumiji) is a compound of 
bromine and albumin, containing 10 per cent, of 
bromine; a yellowish-white powder, intended to 
replace the alkali bromides in certain cases. Dose, 
1^ to 2 drams. 

Bromothymin is a whooping cough remedy 
stated to consist of ammonium, potassium and 
sodium bromides, bromoform, and compound 
syrup of thyme. 

Brompeptone (peptobromeigon) will be re- 
ferred to under the eigons. 

Bromphenol, or monobromphenol, will be re- 
ferred to under the latter title. 

Brom-Protylin. — See under protylin. 

Bronchitin is a cough remedy consisting of 
syrup of thyme and thiocol, and recommended 
particularly in phthisis and chronic bronchial 
catarrhs. Dose, daily three to five teaspoonf uls ; 
for children, one to three teaspoonfuls per day. 

Bryonin is a glucoside of bryonia alba, first 
isolated by Walz. It forms an amorphous, brown- 
ish-yellow, bitter powder, soluble in water or 
alcohol. Formerly it was very generally consid- 
ered physiologically inert, but more recently some 
investigators have ascribed laxative and altera- 
tive properties to it, and have used it in hepatic 
congestion, chronic inflammation of the serous 
membranes and convalescence after acute infec- 
tious diseases. Statements as to the dose vary 



64 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

considerably. Some say give 1-32 grain every two 
hours until some effect on the bowels is produced, 
then 1-64 grain every three or four hours there- 
after; others say % to Va grain. 

Butylchloral-hydrate-pyramidon will be de- 
scribed under the trade name "trigemin." 

Butyl-hypnal, or butyl-chloral-antipyrin, CuHir 
N2O.C4H5Cl3.H2O, is a compound of butyl-chloral 
hydrate and antipyrin occurring as colorless, 
transparent needles that melt at 70° C. and are 
soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform, or water 
(about 30 parts). It was introduced as a hyp- 
notic and analgesic, but has not met with much 
favor. Dose, 10 to 30 grains. 

Butyromel is a mixture introduced as a suc- 
cedaneum for cod liver oil and is stated to be 
composed of 2 parts of fresh unsalted butter and 
1 part of honey. 

Buxine is a synonym of 'bebeerine. 

Bynin is a thin malt extract of English manu- 
facture. 

Bynol is a malt extract with cod liver oil made 
by the same firm that makes bynin. 



Cacodol, also designated as "cacodylate of iron 
compound," is a liquid preparation, each fluid 
dram of which "contains the equivalent of one- 
twelfth grain of cacodylic acid and one-twentieth 
grain of iodine." It is prescribed as an alterative 
in various chronic diseases. 

Cacodyliacol is a contraction of guaiacol caco- 
dylate, which see. 

Cad-formasal is the cadmium salt of formasal, 
or cadmium methylene-disalicylate. It is used as 
an ointment (1 in 7 of lanolin) in the treatment 
of scrofulous glands, frostbite and chronic in- 
flamed joints. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Cadmium Salicylate, CdCC^HjOJi+HoO, occurs 
as white needles, of sweet, astringent taste, and 
soluble in water or alcohol. It is used as an 
astringent in eye diseases and gonorrhea. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 65 

Cadmium Sulphocarbolate, sulphophenate or 
para-phenolsulphonate, Cd(CeH,S04),+H30, oc- 
curs as white crystals, soluble in water or alcohol. 
It was introduced a few years ago by Baldacini 
for use in certain eye diseases, but nothing has 
since appeared on it in medical literature. 

Caffeine Sodiocinnamate, or caffeine-sodium 
and sodium cinnamate, Is obtained by evaporat- 
ing a solution of 10.6 grams of caffeine and 8.5 
grams of sodium cinnamate (hetol) in 40 c.c. of 
warm water, as a white, odorless, bitter, alkaline 
powder, soluble in 2 parts of water and 50 of 
alcohol. It is Intended to replace the well-known 
caffeine sodiosalicylate hypodermically. The ar- 
ticle is also known as hetol-caffeine. 

CafFeoresorcin is a compound of caffeine and 
resorcin as yet not more fully described. 

Caf-formasal is defined by the manufacturers 
as "caffeine methylene-disalicylate of an alkali;" 
minute white crystals which are readily soluble 
in water, moderately so in alcohol. It is pre- 
scribed in chronic nephritis, and in rheumatism 
and gout associated with a weak heart action; 
also in lithemic headache. Dose, 5 to 20 grains. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Calcalith is a mixture containing calcium and 
lithium salts together with colchicine in aromatic 
combination. 

Calcidin is a new trade name applied to the 
old-fashioned iodized lime so long used in croup. 

Calcinol is a fanciful name of calcium iodate, 
under which heading it will be described. 

Calcium Beta-Naphtolsulphonate, — See asa- 
prol. 

Calcium Borate is a light, white powder, solu- 
ble in hot water. It is used internally chiefly in 
diarrhea of children and externally in weeping 
eczema, fetid perspiration, chafing, etc., in 10 to 
20 per cent, ointments or dusting-powders. Dose, 
for children, 1 to 5 grains. 

Calcium Cacodylate, or calcium dimethyl-ar- 
senate, has the formula [(CH,)jAs02]2Ca-faq., 
and forms a white powder soluble in water. It is 



66 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 

employed as an alterative similar to arsenous 
acid. Dose, ^^ to 2 grains. 

Calcium Carbide, CaCj, which, as is known, is 
used chiefly for generating acetylene gas, has 
been recommended by some in the treatment of 
inoperable cancer of the cervix and vagina. For 
this purpose a piece as large as a pea to a nut 
is left in the vagina overnight. The usefulness 
of this treatment has been disputed by many. 
Calcium carbide must be kept well protected 
against moisture, as water decomposes it, evolv- 
ing acetylene and leaving slaked lime. 

Calcium Chloride, CaClj, is familiar to phar- 
macists as far as physical properties are con- 
cerned. While formerly employed internally only 
in rachitis, arthritis, and chronic itching, it has 
in late years come into prominence as a means 
of arresting persistent bleeding, internally as well 
as topically. For this purpose it is given in doses 
of 10 to 20 grains several times daily, and applied 
locally in 1 in 15 solution. 

Calcium Dimethylene-arsenate is a synonym 
of calcium cacodylate, which see. 

Calcium Eosolate, (CDH7S30i2)2.Ca3, is the cal- 
cium salt of trisulpho-acetyl-creosote. It is a 
grayish powder, of slightly pungent and ethereal 
odor, and acrid empyreumatic taste; soluble in 
about 10 parts of water, very slightly soluble in 
alcohol, but insoluble in chloroform, and readily 
soluble in hydrochloric, citric and some other or- 
ganic acids. It represents approximately 25 per 
cent, of creosote. It has been used by Dr. H. 
Stern in diabetes and ulcerative phthisis. Dose, 
5 to 20 grains three times a day. 

Calcium Glycerino-Arsenate is described un- 
der arsitriol. 

Calcium Glycerinophosphate, PO.OjCaO.C3HB- 
(0H),+2H,0, also known by the brand name 
neurosin, occurs as a white powder, soluble in 
about 40 parts of cold v/ater, and almost Insoluble 
in boiling water or in alcohol. It is the salt of 
glycerlnophosphoric acid most used — in rickets, 
wasting diseases, and convalescence from infec- 
tious diseases. Dose, 2 to 5 grains three times 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 67 

daily in syrup or simple solution. It should not 
be dispensed in solution with carbonates, phos- 
phates or lead salts, as decomposition is likely to 
ensue; and its solutions do not keep well and 
should hence be prepared only in small quantities 
at a time. Citric acid increases the solubility of 
the compound. 

Calcium lodate, Ca( 1 03)2+61120, is also known 
by the trade name calci7iol. It occurs as a white 
powder or small crystals, soluble in about 400 
parts of water and insoluble in alcohol. It is em- 
ployed as an internal antiseptic in cystitis and 
gastro-intestinal fermentation, and externally in 
diphtheria and in ulcers and other lesions in 
which iodoform is usually applied. Dose, 3 to 5 
grains three times a day. 

Calcium Grtho-Guaiacolsxilphonate is guai- 
acyl, which see. 

Calcium Permanganate, also known as monol 
and acerdol, was introduced as a more agreeable 
and yet more powerful substitute for the potas- 
sium salt as a mouth-wash and internal disinfec- 
tant in diarrheas of children. It occurs as brown- 
ish-violet, very deliquescent crystals, readily sol- 
uble in water. Dose for children, % to 2 grains. 

Calcium Peroxide or Superoxide (or gorit), 
CaOj+4H20, occurs as a yellow powder, slightly 
soluble in water with the evolution of oxygen. 
It has been recommended as an antacid and disin- 
fectant in acid dyspepsia and summer diarrhea 
in children. Dose (children's), 3 to 10 grains per 
day, according to age. It is used also as a topical 
application in diphtheria. 

Calcium Salicylate, (C7H50s)sCa+2H20, occurs 
as a white, odorless, tasteless powder or crystals, 
sparingly soluble in water, more freely so in car- 
bonated water. It is prescribed chiefly in gastro- 
enteritis and summer diarrheas of children, in 
doses of 5 to 20 grains. 

Calcusol is described as a combination of 
piperidine parasulphaminebenzoate and potas- 
sium carbonate, and is intended as a remedy for 
rheumatic gout. 



68 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIOA 

Calliandrein is defined as a glucoside of cal- 
liandra grandiflora, a Mexican shrub. It is a 
white, odorless, water-soluble powder, whose 
aqueous solution froths on shaking and emulsi- 
fies many substances. It has been used in inter- 
mittent fever; ten %-grain pills in the course of 
twenty-four hours. 

Calmin is described as a compound (?) of anti- 
pyrin and heroin, and is extolled for use in 
whooping-cough, asthma, dymenorrhea, etc. 
Dose, 8 to 15 grains; for children, % to 5 grains 
according to age. 

Calodal or kalodal is a dietetic prepared from 
meat, and intended for use subcutaneously or by 
enema as well as per os. It contains 95 per cent, 
of readily soluble albuminous substances, and 
small quantities of meat salts (especially phos- 
phates, traces of iron, and 0.2 per cent, of NaCl). 
It forms a yellowish-brown powder, which is eas- 
ily but slowly soluble in water and almost odor- 
less and tasteless. Dose, about 1 dram. 

Calomelol, or colloidal or soluble calomel, is a 
whitish-gray, odorless, tasteless powder, soluble 
in alcohol, ether, benzene and water, and yield- 
ing therewith a milk-like fluid. It contains 80 
per cent. HgCl and 20 per cent, albuminous sub- 
stances. It is recommended by Galewsky as a 
dusting-powder in syphilitic ulcers, as moist 
2 per cent, dressings, and as 30 per cent, ointment 
by inunction in syphilis (1 to 1% drams per in- 
unction). 

Calomelol-Opium Tablets contain % grain of 
calomelol (colloidal or soluble calomel) and 1/10 
grain of opium, and are used in syphilis. 

Camphacol is stated to be a condensation 
product of camphoric acid, formaldehyde and gua- 
iacol, or the camphoric acid ester of methylene- 
diguaiacol. It is a crystalline substance, intended 
for use especially in phthisis, but also employed 
in pneumonia, broncho-pneumonia, and cystitis. 
Dose, 5 to 20 grains; maximum daily dose, 2 
drams. It is marketed also as 2i^ and 5-grain 
tablets. See caution under formaldehyde. 



THE MODEEN MATEEIA MEDICA 69 

Camphoid is a substitute for collodion intro- 
duced by Martindale, and said to consist of a solu- 
tion of pyroxylin and camphor in absolute al- 
cohol. 

Camphoric Acid Phenetidid is a remedy com- 
bining the properties of camphoric acid and phen- 
acetin, and hence used as an antihidrotic and 
febrifuge. Dose, 8 to 20 grains. 

Camphorin is artificial camphor. 

Camphoroform is a combination of camphor 
and iodoform, also known as iodoform-camphor 
or yellow camphor; a yellow powder in which the 
odor of iodoform predominates. It is recom- 
mended as a surgical antiseptic, and has also 
been used in diphtheria, whooping-cough and in- 
fluenza. 

Camphoroxol is a 3 per cent, solution of hydro- 
gen peroxide containing some alcohol and 1 per 
cent, of camphor to enhance its antiseptic power 
and at the same time render it more stable. It Is 
used (generally in 10 to 15 per cent, dilutions) 
in ozena, pharyngitis, otitis and in other affec- 
tions in which ordinary hydrogen dioxide solution 
is employed. 

Camphossil is the designation that has been 
applied to a condensation product of camphor and 
salicylic acid, of Italian origin. The article oc- 
curs as a white, crystalline, fatty, deliquescent 
mass, of camphoraceous odor, almost tasteless, 
and insoluble in water. It is administered in 
doses of 8 grains as an antipyretic and internal 
disinfectant (principally in typhoid fever and 
infectious diarrhea). 

Candol is a dry extract of malt claimed to be 
unusually rich in diastase, and hence recom- 
mended as a digestive addition to tonics. Dose, 
1^ to 2 teaspoonfuls thrice daily. 

Cancroin is a serum introduced by Prof. 
Adamkiewicz as a remedy in cancer. According 
to Heermann, it is essentially a carbolized solu- 
tion of neurine citrate; cancroin II consists of 
equal parts of cancroin (I) and distilled water; 
and cancroin III of 1 part of cancroin (I) and 3 
parts of distilled water. While the introducer 



70 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

has reported some remarkable curative effects 
from the use of his preparation, Nothnagel, von 
Eiselberg, Poten and others have failed to observe 
any such action from its employment. 

Cannabine Tannate is obtained from Indian 
hemp, after removal of the ethereal oil by distil- 
lation with steam, by extraction with water and 
precipitation with tannin. It is a brownish pow- 
der of slightly bitter but very astringent taste; 
soluble in alkalinized water or alcohol. It is used 
as a mild hypnotic and a nerve sedative. Dose, 
8 to 15 grains; maximum dose, 20 grains. 

Cannonin is a disinfectant mixture of unknown 
composition. 

Capillin is what Mindes calls a condensation 
product of tannin, chloral hydrate and resorcin, 
which is intended as a succedaneum for captol. 

Caprenalin is what a Philadelphia firm calls 
its brand of the supposed active principle of the 
suprarenal capsule; see adrenalin for properties, 
uses, etc. 

Capsiphor is a capsicum plaster for dental 
purposes. 

Captol is a condensation product of tannin and 
chloral. It occurs as a brown, amorphous, hygro- 
scopic powder, which is soluble in hot water or in 
alcohol; alkalies decompose it. It was introduced 
by Eichhoff as an antiseborrheal remedy as well 
as a prophylactic, and is used mostly as a com- 
pound spirit (so marketed in this country), con- 
sisting of a solution of 2 parts each of captol, 
chloral hydrate, and tartaric acid, and 1 part of 
castor oil, in 200 parts of 65 per cent, alcohol. 

Capudine is a liquid headache remedy of un- 
divulged composition. 

Carboformal Is a German disinfectant remedy 
oonsistin? of carbolic Rcid and formaldehyde so- 
lution. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Carboformal Briquets ("Qliihblocks") are hex- 
agonal coal-briquets containing a cavity filled with 
para-formaldehyde. When lighted, they glow, 
whereby the chemical is reconverted into formal- 
dehyde gas. 



THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDIC A 71 

CarboUysoform is a new disinfectant prepara- 
tion stated to consist of 2 parts of lysoform and 
1 part of crude cresol (Ph. G.), and to be an 
efficient germicide in 3 per cent, solution. 

Carbonol Is a wtiite, clear, odorless brand of 
liquid petrolatum. 

Cardine is a liquid extract of cardiac muscle 
used by Dr. Hammond in chronic affections of 
the myocardium and in asytole. 

Cardiol is said to be an alcoholic extract of 
squill, lobelia, strophanthus and nux vomica 
with guaiacol. 

Carniferrin (iron phosphosarcolactate) is pre- 
pared from meat, and contains about 30 per cent. 
of iron end 1 per cent, of phosphorus in combina- 
tion. It occurs as a reddish-brown, tasteless pow- 
der, soluble in dilute acids or alkalies. It has 
been recommended aa an easily assimilated hema- 
tinic for use in anemia and chlorosis. Dose, 1 
to 5 grains three times daily. It appears to have 
been withdrawn from this market. 

Carniferrol Is an aromatic liquid preparation 
containing 10 per cent, of meat peptone and 0.4 
per cent, of iron. 

Carnigen Is a soluble nutrient in pulverulent 
form. According to Denayer, it consists of 52 
per cent, of albuminoids, 24 per cent, of meat ex- 
tractive, and 4 per cent, of meat salines. (It is 
not to be confounded with camogen, a liquid 
preparation of bone-marrow, used as a "blood- 
builder.") 

Carnose is a nutritive extract prepared from 
yeast and malt. 

Caroid is a brand of the active digestive prin- 
ciple of the juice of the papaw (carica papaya), 
which substance is on the market also under vari- 
ous other trade names. It is active in acid, neu- 
tral, or alkaline media, but particularly so in the 
last-named. Dose, 2 to 5 grains. It Is also mar- 
keted as tablets in various combinations. 

Carol is a mouth-wash similar to the older odol. 

Carvacrol Iodide will be described under its 
more usual title of iodocrol. 



72 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Casanthrol Is the name applied by Unna to a 
mixture of his casein ointment with 10 per cent, 
of "extractum lithanthracis" (that is, the ether- 
and benzol-soluble constituents of coal tar). It 
occurs as a thick emulsion which is soluble in 
water; applied to the skin, it forms a dry, elastic 
coating. It is used in eczema, prurigo, etc. Min- 
eral acids, acid salts and other substances that 
coagulate casein, should not be mixed with it or 
at most to the extent of not more than 1 per cent. 

Cascarin is a substance isolated by Leprince 
from cascara sagrada and considered by him as 
the active principle of the drug. It occurs as 
odorless, tasteless needles, insoluble in water but 
soluble in alcohol. It is given to adults in doses 
of 2 to 5 grains, usually in pills; children in pro- 
portion. 

Casein-albumose Soap is a neutral, super- 
fatted soap recommended by Delbanco as a base 
for other medicated soaps as well as per se as a 
dermic in eczema, etc. 

Casein-Silver is argonin. 

Casein-Sodium is a food marketed as "nu- 
trose," under which heading it will be described. 

Caseoiodine is what Liebrecht calls an iodine 
derivative of casein, occurring as a white powder 
that is insoluble in the usual solvents but soluble 
in dilute alkalies and contains about 8 per cent, 
of iodine. According to Prof. Kocher, it is of 
service in goiter. 

Caseon is a synonym of plasmon. 

Cassaripe is the name applied to the inspis- 
sated juice of the root of manihot utilissima or 
bitter cassava, which is used in corneal ulcers 
and certain other eye diseases (pure or in 10 per 
cent, ointment). 

Casumen is an English food product which, 
according to Coblentz, consists wholly of casein. 

Catharol is a 3 per cent, solution of hydrogen 
peroxide. 

Cayaponine is an alkaloid obtained from caya- 
pona globulosa and credited with purgative prop- 
erties; nothing further seems to be known 
about It. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 73 

Cearin is an ointment base consisting, accord- 
ing to different statements, of wtiite carnauba 
wax and liquid paraffin, or of carnauba wax, 
casein, and liquid paraffin. 

Cellotropin {monotenzoyl-ar'butin) , Ci,H„Og, 
results from action of benzoyl chloride upon ar- 
butin in neutral solution. It is a white, odorless, 
tasteless powder; soluble in 1300 parts of water, 
easily so in alcohol, and insoluble in ether or 
chloroform. It is intended for use in infectious 
diseases (especially tuberculosis and scrofula). 
Dose, 4 to 8 grains 3 times daily. 

Cephaeline Hydrochlorate, CnHuNOo.HCl, is 
Che salt of a second alkaloid found by Dr. Paul 
in ipecac. It occurs as a yellowish powder, solu- 
ble in water or alcohol, and is recommended as 
an emetic in doses of 1/12 to % grain. 

Cephalin is reported to be a mixture of anti- 
prin, roasted coffee, and sodium salicylate; a 
headache remedy. Dose, 5 to 10 grains. 

Cephalopin Is an oily extract of fresh nerve 
substance, containing the myelin, lecithin and 
other oily constituents of the nerve tissue. It ia 
used subcutaneously in strychnine poisoning: 
internally in neurasthenia, neuralagia, etc. 

Cerebrin, or opocere'brin, of Prof. Poehl, is an 
extract of the gray matter of the brain, used in 
chorea, hysteria, and other affections of the 
nervous system and in alcoholism. Dose, 3 to 
5 grains three times a day. Marketed also as tab- 
lets of 3 and 5 grains each. (It is not to be con- 
founded with the definite nitrogenous, phos- 
phorus-free constituent of brain matter known 
as "cerebrin," which has the formula CgoHjaoNjOn 
and is not used therapeutically.) 

Cerebrine is the name given to an antineural- 
glc mixture consisting essentially of an alcoholic 
solution of antipyrin, caffeine and cocaine. 

Cerevisine is a medicinal yeast, "prepared from 
the cells of the saccharomyces cerevisise at a low 
temperature and in a vacuum." It is recom- 
mended for use internally in boils, tuberculosis, 
and diabetes, and locally in leucorrhea, vaginitis, 



74 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

etc. Dose, a teaspoonful, given In water with a 
little sugar. 

Cerolin is described as the fatty substance of 
yeast, and has been recommended for internal 
use in furunculosis, acne and the like. It is mar- 
keted as 0.1 gram pills, 3 to 5 of which constitute 
the daily dose. 

Cetiacol. — See palmiacol. 

Cetrarin, or cetraric acid, C30H30O11. is the bitter 
principle of Iceland moss (cetraria islandica). It 
occurs as a white crystalline powder or very 
small needles, sparingly soluble in water, more 
freely in solutions of alkali carbonates. It is pre- 
scribed chiefly in anemia and chlorosis. Dose, 1 
to 3 grains several times a day. 

Chelidonine Phosphate and Sulphate are salts 
of the alkaloid of chelidonium, which has the 
formula CooHieNOB+H^O. Both occur as white, 
crystalline powders soluble in water. They are 
used as mild narcotics, particularly in children — 
in gastric and intestinal pains; also in gastric 
ulcer and cancer of adults. Dose (adults'), 1 to 3 
grains. 

Chibromanco, Chlorbromeco, Chloreusar, and 
Chloriokreo. — See under nebulatea 

Chielen is described by the manufacturers as 
an oily extract of tulip bulbs,, and extolled in 
various skin diseases. According to others, it is 
essentially a superfatted, strongly alkaline soda 
soap, and "chielen cream," a mixture of zinc 
oxide, talcum, chielen, wool fat, tincture of ben- 
zoin, water and glycerin. 

Chiferrin or cMnaferrin is a tonic preparation 
said to contain iron in organic combination and 
the active principles of cinchona and condurango. 

Chinalgen is quinalgen. 

Chinaphenin, chemically quinine carbonic-acid 
phenetidid, is obtained by the reaction between 
quinine and para-ethoxyphenyl isocyanate or para^ 
ethoxyphenylcarbaminic acid chloride. It occurs 
as a white, tasteless powder, readily soluble in 
alcohol, ether, or chloroform, but sparingly sol- 
uble in water. It forms salts with acids. Prof. 



THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 75 

von Noorden places it between quinine and ace- 
tanilid or phenacetin in promptness of action as 
an antipyretic. He has used it in wliooping- 
cough, typhoid fever, malarial neuralgia, etc. It 
is given in the same doses as quinine sulphate. 

Chinaphtol, or quinine hetOrnaphtol-monosul- 
phonate, will be described under guinaphtol. 

Chinaseptol, or quinaseptol, is better known by 
the trade name diaphtol, and will be referred to 
under that title. 

Chinoform is said to be obtained by precipltat- 
ing a cinchona extract with formaldehyde and 
concentrated hydrochloric acid. It constitutes an 
antiseptic compound of cincho-tannic acid and 
formaldehyde. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Chinoformin is the trade name of formin 
(hexamethylenetetramine) quinate, which com- 
pound is better known here as chinotropin ; which 
see. 

Chinopyrine (quinine-antipyrin) is what Dr. 
G. Santesson calls a combination of 3 parts of 
quinine hydrochlorate and 2 parts of antipyrin. 
It occurs as a white powder, readily soluble in 
water and hence recommended for subcutaneous 
use in malaria. 

Chinoral is described as an oily, very bitter 
fluid, soluble in water or alcohol, and consisting 
chiefly of chloral and quinine. It is used in- 
ternally In delirium tremens, and externally as an 
antiseptic. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Chinosol is the trade name applied to potas- 
sium oxyquinoline-sulphate or oxyquinoUne-alum, 
CsHjN.OSOjK. It occurs as a yellow powder, of 
faint aromatic odor and unpleasant astringent 
taste; soluble freely in water, insoluble in alcohol 
or ether. It is intended for use as a surgical and 
household disinfectant chiefly, but has been used 
In a very small way internally in gastro-intestinal 
diseases. It is applied in 1 in 100 to 1 in 2,000 
solutions. Alkalies decompose chinosol; and with 
corrosive sublimate, iron and other metallic salts 
It forms highly-colored compounds having stain- 
ing properties. It is marketed also as tablets of 
0.25 gram and 1 gram. 



76 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Chinotropin {urotropin or hexamethylenetetra- 
mine quinate) occurs as a white powder readily 
soluble in water. It is employed in gout and 
bacilluria, similar to the older urotropin (formin, 
aminoform, cystogen, hexamethylenetetramine, 
etc.), but is said to liberate formaldehyde in the 
system more freely than the latter. Dose, 10 to 
20 grains two, or three times daily, usually taken 
in a glassful of plain or carbonated water. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Chirol is a yellowish fluid stated to consist of 
a solution of certain resins and fatty oils in a 
mixture of readily boiling alcohols and ethers. 
It is intended mainly as a hand disinfectant in 
surgical and obstetrical practice. Applied to the 
skin, it forms a thin impermeable coating. 

Chloral-Acetone-chloroform is described un- 
der cloran. 

Chloral-Acetophenone-oxime forms colorless 
crystals that are readily soluble in alcohol or 
ether but insoluble in water. It is recommended 
as an antispasmodic and nerve sedative. 

Chloralamide Is the trade name for chloral- 
formamide, or formamidated chloral Ph. G. IV, of 
the formula CC1,.CH(0H).C0NH,. It is a com- 
pound of equal molecules of anhydrous chloral 
and formamide, and occurs as colorless, odorless, 
slightly bitter crystals that are soluble in about 
20 parts of water and 1% parts of alcohol, and 
decomposed by hot solvents and alkaline liquids. 
It is prescribed chiefly as a hypnotic. Dose, 15 to 
45 grains; maximum dose, 1 dram. Marketed 
also as an elixir containing 30 grains to the fluid 
ounce. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Chloral-Antipjrrine. — See hypnal. 

Chloralbacid is defined as a chlorine substitu- 
tion product of albumin, containing 3 per cent. 
of chlorine intramolecularly combined. It occurs 
as a yellowish-white powder, easily soluble in 
water and without unpleasant odor or taste. It 
Is used in gastro-intestinal affections character- 
ized by insufllcient secretion of hydrochloric acid 
or abnormal formation of organic acids, or by in- 
sufficient intestinal absorption or peristalsis. 



THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIOA 77 

Dose, 15 to 30 grains before meals. Marketed 
also as 0.5 gram tablets. 

Chloral-Formamide, or chloral formamidated, 
is described under chloralamide. 

Chloral-Hy droxylamine. — See c7i lorosonine. 

Chloralia is a liquid hypnotic, sedative and 
sudorific preparation, containing in each fluid 
ounce 5 grains of kalarine, 96 grains of chloral 
hydrate, and 1 grain each of extracts of conium, 
hyoscyamus and cannabis indica. Dose, 30 to 60 
minims. 

Chloralimide (not chloralamide), or trichlor- 
ethylidene-imide, CCl3.CH:NH, results from heat- 
ing chloral-ammonium, or chloral hydrate with 
dry ammonium acetate. It forms white, odorless, 
tasteless crystals, soluble iu alcohol, ether, or 
chloroform; insoluble in water. It was intro- 
duced as an agreeable hypnotic and analgesic 
especially in insomnia due to headache or fever, 
but it has been practically abandoned in this 
country. Dose, 15 to 45 grains; maximum daily 
dose, 90 grains. 

Chloral-Orthoform Is a compound of molecular 
quantities of chloral and meta-amido-para-oxyben- 
zoic ester (orthoform, or [formerly] orthoform 
"new"). It forms yellow, tasteless crusts that 
can easily be reduced to powder; soluble in ether 
or hot alcohol, insoluble in water. It is intended 
as a hypnotic. Dose not stated. 

Chloralose, chemically anhydro-gluco-chloral, 
CgHiiClaOa, is obtained by heating anhydrous 
chloral and glucose together. It occurs as small 
white crystals, of disagreeable, bitter taste; read- 
ily soluble in alcohol or ether, sparingly so in 
water. It has been recommended as a hypnotic 
Dose, 3 to 10 grains; maximum dose, 12 grains. 

Chlorethoform (chloraethoform) is the name 
proposed for pure chloroform admixed with % 
per cent, of ethyl chloride, which addition is 
claimed to yield a preparation less dangerous 
than chloroform alone as a general anesthetic. 

Chloretone is the American trade name for 
acetone-chloroform or tertiary trichloriutyl alco- 
hol, in crystalline form. It results from the inter- 



78 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

action of chloroform, acetone, and an alkali; and 
occurs as small, white crystals, of camphoraceous 
odor and taste, soluble in strong alcohol or glyc- 
erin, very sparingly so in water. It is employed 
chiefly as a hypnotic, and as an anodyne and seda- 
tive (chiefly In nausea, seasickness, and gas- 
tralgia). Dose, 5 to 20 grains. Marketed also In 
3- and 5-grain capsules, as an inhalant, and as 
boro-chloretone. 

Chlorobrom is an English specialty consisting 
essentially of an aqueous solution of potassium 
bromide and chloralamide, and used mainly in 
seasickness, but also as a hypnotic. Dose, a table- 
spoonful. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Chloro-bromon, originally called bromo-chlo- 
ron, is defined as a -hypobromo-chlorite of lima 
of the formula BrClOaCa; an unstable, alkaline 
compound, marketed as a concentrated solution 
(in 20 c.c. vials) "containing in their nascent 
condition bromine, chlorine and free oxygen." 
It is used as a germicide and antiseptic — topi- 
cally pure or diluted, and internally in the dose 
of several glassfuls per day of a dilution of 20 
c.c. with 1 gallon of lime water. 

Chloroiodolipol is defined as a chlorine substi- 
tution product of phenol, creosote and guaiacol, 
which is used by inhalation in chronic affections 
of the respiratory tract. 

Chlorol is a French liquid disinfectant consist- 
ing in the main of corrosive sublimate, sodium 
chloride, hydrochloric acid and copper sulphate, 
in aqueous solution. 

Chlorolin is a liquid disinfectant containing 
about 20 per cent, of mono- and trichlorphenol 
and used in % to 3 per cent, solutions on wounds. 
Marketed also as pills each containing 1/30 grain 
of chlorphenol for employment in tuberculosis. 

Chlorosonine (cTiloral-hydroxylamine) is a 
compound of chloral hydrate and hydroxylamine, 
which separates into its components in the pres- 
ence of water. It is intended as a hypnotic, but 
definite data are yet wanting. 

Chlorphenol Salicylate. — See chlorsalol. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 79 

Chlorsalol (chlorosalol or para-chlorsalol) , 
CsH^.OHCOOCeH.Cl, results from reaction between 
phosphorus pentachloride and a mixture of para- 
chlorphenol and salicylic acid. Chemically it may 
be defined as salicylic-acid-pnra-chlorphenol ester. 
It is used in cystitis, diarrheas, etc., in place of 
salol. Dose, 1 to l^^ drams in the course of a 
day. 

Cholelitlimin (Marpmann) is essentially a 
weak alcoholic solution of the salts and albumin- 
ous constituents of bile. It is used in gall-stone 
colic. 

Cholelithon is a "gall-stone salt" the exact 
composition of which is not stated. 

Cholelithurin is a preparation of the fresh bile 
of animals fed with the biliary secretion; es- 
sentially a weak-alcoholic solution of the bile 
acids and albuminoids. It is intended for use in 
gallstone colic. 

Cholelysin is said to be a mixture of 10 to 
15 grams of eunatrol (sodium oleate), 30 drops 
of pineapple essence, 5 grams of validol, 10 grams 
of tincture of valerian, and 200 grams of pepper- 
mint water. 

Cholera Serum will be referred to under 
serums. 

Chologen is the name applied to three different 
preparations, in tablet form, known respectively 
as chologen 1, 2, and 3. These are said to be 
different "combinations of mercury with veg- 
etable laxatives and cholagogues (podophyllin) 
and carminative and antispasmodic drugs and 
oils (melissa, camphor, caraway)." They are in- 
tended for use in gall-stone disease. 

Chresylatin is an alkaline, aromatic liquid, 
said to contain resin soaps, naphtalin and cresol, 
and heralded as a succedaneum for carbolic acid. 

Chroatol is defined as terpine iodhydrate, and 
is used in certain skin diseases. 

Chrysarobin Oxidized is obtained from the ac- 
tion of sodium peroxide upon chrysarobin sus- 
pended in water. It occurs as a dark-brown pow- 
der, soluble in benzene, chloroform and hot alco- 
hol, but insoluble in water. It is employed by 



80 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Unna like chrysarobin, In 5- to 10-per-cent. oint 
ments; it is considered milder in action than 
chrysarobin. 

Chrysoform, or dibroino-diiodo-TiexametTiylene- 
tetramine, occurs as a fine, yellow powder, of a 
faint iodine odor, insoluble in the ordinary sol- 
vents. It is used in France as a wound antiseptic, 
chiefly in veterinary medicine. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Chrysolein is the name of a French prepara- 
tion of sodium fluoride used as an antiseptic. 

Chuchuarine is an alkaloid resembling strych- 
nine, obtained from semecarpus anacardium, and 
occurring as white crystals of pungent taste. It 
is believed to possess aphrodisiac properties; but 
no definite data are extant. 

Cicutine Hydrobromate is a synonym of 
coniine hydrobromate. 

Cinchonine lodosulphate, also known as anti- 
septol, iodised cinchonine sulphate, and cincho- 
nine herapathite, occurs as a light, reddish-brown 
powder, containing 50 per cent, of iodine, soluble 
in alcohol or chloroform but insoluble in water. 
It has been recommended as a substitute for 
iodoform internally as well as externally. Dose, 
1 to 5 grains 

Cinchonine Sulphocarbolate and Cinchonine 
Sulphocresote have been introduced as antipy- 
retics, antiseptics, and antiperiodics. Nothing 
further seems to be known about them. 

Cineol is a synonym of the official eucalyptol. 

Cineol Arsenate is a very recent arsenical 
preparation combining the alterative properties 
of arsenic with the antiseptic virtues of euca- 
lyptol (cineol). Dose-statements are wanting. 

Cinnaraine is not derived from cinnamon oil 
or from cinnamic acid, but is a tonic mixture, 
the exact composition of which is not divulged. 

Cinnamyl-Eugenol (eugenol cinnamic ester), 
CeH,.C3H,.O.CH3.0CO.(CH)2.CeH5, forms colorless 
crystals, very slightly soluble in water, more 
freely so in alcohol, ether or chloroform. It is 
employed chiefly in phthisis. Dose, 5 to 10 grains 
several times daily. 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIC A 81 

Cinnamyl-Meta-cresol. — See hetocresol. 

Cinnamyl-Quinine Hydrochlorate is the salt 
of the cinnamic ester of quinine, and is Intended 
as an antipyretic and antiperiodic. No further 
data appear to be extant. 

Citarin, chemically sodium anhydrometJiyJene 
citrate, is a white, slightly hygroscopic powder, 
of not unpleasant acidulated saline taste; soluble 
in 1^ parts of water, but insoluble in alcohol or 
ether. It has been recommended as a solvent of 
uric acid deposits in gouty conditions. It lib- 
erates formaldehyde in the blood, and this is 
said to form very soluble combinations with the 
uric acid present in the system and thus favor its 
elimination; but this entails a serious risk as the 
formaldehyde may be converted In the system to 
formic acid, and it has been suggested that the 
deadly and sight-destroying power of wood alco- 
hol is due to its decomposition in the system into 
formic acid. See further under formaldehyde. 

Citon Tablets, white, contain 0.1 gram of phe- 
nolphtalein, 0.5 gram of sugar and 0.01 gram of 
menthol. The trown consist of 0.1 gram of phe- 
nolphtalein, 0.5 gram of sugar, 0.002 gram of 
vanillin and 0.1 gram of cacao. They are taken 
as laxatives. Dose. 1 to 5. 

Citramin-oxyphen is a trade name for hexa- 
menthylenetetramine methylene citrate, better 
known as helmitol. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Citramine Oxyphenylate (perhaps identical 
with "citramin-oxyphen," according to Zernik, la 
a mixture of equal parts of hetralin (hexamethy- 
lene-tetramine-resorcin) and helmitol (hexame- 
thylene-tetramine methylene-citrate). Dose, 8 to 
20 grains. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Citric-Acid Triparaphenetidin is citrophen. 

Citronal Pills contain per 100, according to 
the manufacturer, 0.5 gram of quinine hydrochlor- 
ate, 4 grams of extract of huckleberry leaves, 10 
grams of citric acid, 6 grams of buckthorn ex- 
tract, and powdered liquorice and liquorice ex- 
tract q. s. They are used in gout, rheumatism, 
etc. Dose, 5 pills thrice daily. 



82 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Citro-Paraplienetidin is the chemical designa- 
tion for apolysin; neutral citro-phenetidin the 
chemical equivalent of citrophen. 

Citrophen, or neutral citro-phenetidin, para- 
phenetidin citrate, or citric-acid triparapheneti- 
din, (C„H,.OC2H5-NH.CO)s.C3Hi.OH, occurs as a 
white, crystalline powder, of tart taste, and solu- 
ble in 40 parts of water. It was introduced as 
a succedaneum for phenacetin in all its uses. 
Dose, 8 to 15 grains; maximum daily dose, 90 
grains. Mineral acids decompose it. 

Citrovanille is an antineuralgic preparation 
containing iso-pyramidon citrate as its active 
component. 

Citrozon is described as a mixture containing 
in 100 parts 30 of effervescing soda powder and 
1/200 vanadic acid, together with sodium chloride 
and sodium citrate. It is said to stimulate 
metabolism. Dose, a teaspoonful 6 to 8 times 
daily. 

Citrurea Is the trade name applied to tablets 
consisting of urea, citric acid and lithium bro- 
mide. 

Cittosol is an ichthyol emulsion not completely 
described. 

Clavin is a proximate principle of ergot which 
has been isolated by Prof. Ernst Vahlen, of the 
University of Halle, Germany. The formula. On 
HaaNoOj, has been assigned to it, and it occurs as 
a microcrystalline substance soluble in two parts 
of water, insoluble in absolute alcohol, ether or 
benzin. It does not form salts. According to the 
discoverer, clavin represents the full oxytoxic vir- 
tue of ergot, causes no irritation when injected 
hypodermically, keeps for a long time in the dry 
state, and its solutions can be boiled without de- 
composition setting in. Its aqueous solutions, 
however, on keeping in a warm place for any 
length of time, develop a fungous growth. It is 
marketed also as clavin-salt tablets, each contain- 
ing 0.02 gram of clavin and 0.08 gram of sodium 
chloride, and intended specially tor subcutaneous 
use dissolved in 1 c. c. of water; and as clavin- 
sugar tablets, each carrying 0.02 gram of clavin 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 83 

and intended for use by the mouth. Dose, % to 
1 grain. 

Cloran (chloral-acetone chloroform) is de- 
fined as a condensation product of chloral hy- 
drate and acetone chloroform (chloretone), and 
occurs as white crystals of nonpronounced 
camphoraceous taste, easily soluble in diluted al- 
cohol and soluble in 100 parts of water; sulphuric 
acid decomposes it into its components. It is 
advertised as a hypnotic. Dose, 8 to 20 grains. 

Cocaine-Aluminium Citrate is described as a 
compound of 3 molecules of aluminium citrate 
and 1 molecule of cocaine alkaloid; difficultly sol- 
uble in water, and acting first as an astringent 
then as an anesthetic. Further data are want- 
ing. 

Cocainol does not contain cocaine, as its name 
would seem to imply, but aneethesin (see this). 
It is marketed as "drops," "lanolin," "dusting- 
powder," etc. 

Cocapyrine is said to be a mixture of 1 part of 
cocaine hydrochlorate and 99 parts of antipyrine, 
which is marketed in 3-grain tablets intended for 
use in throat affections. 

Codesol is a syrup containing 2 per cent, of 
guaiacol and 0.2 per cent, of codeine, and em- 
ployed in coughs and other respiratory diseases. 
Dose, 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls. 

Colaetina is the collective name given to lano- 
lin-caoutchouc plasters made by a firm in Vienna. 

Colalin is described by the manufacturers as 
"the amorphous active principle of bile"; prob- 
ably amorphous cholalic acid, CziHjoOj. It is 
marketed only as dosimetric granules, which are 
used in hepatic torpor and as a solvent of gall 
stones; dose, 2 to 10, preceded by or combined 
with an active cathartic. 

Colchicine Salicylate is not a true salt of col- 
chicine, as this principle is not known to combine 
with organic acids, but rather a mixture contain- 
ing 20 parts of colchicine to 7 parts of salicylic 
acid; a yellow powder, soluble in water, alcohol, 
or ether. It has been employed by Thompson and 



84 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

Tobias in gout and rheumatism. Dose, 1/100 to 
1/60 grain every four liours. 

Coley's Fluid is a mixture of erysipelas and 
prodigiosus toxines, recommended by Dr. M. B. 
Coley for the treatment of malignant neoplasms, 
particularly sarcoma. It is injected into the 
tumor itself or hypodermically, in doses of % to 
2 minims or more (sufficient to produce appro- 
priate reaction). 

Collaform is a pulverulent compound of for- 
maldehyde and gelatin, analogous to glutol but 
made by a Swiss firm. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Collargol (colloidal silver or soluble silver) is 
an allotropic form of metallic silver, and occurs 
as a black crystalline substance, completely sol- 
uble in about 20 parts of distilled water, yielding 
a solution which keeps for quite some time with- 
out especial protection from light or heat. Though 
used to a small extent in certain skin, surgical 
and eye diseases, and infectious gastrointestinal 
disturbances, its chief employment is intraven- 
ously in the treatment of septicemia and pyemia; 
1 to 2 grains in 2- to 5-per-cent. solution every 
12 to 24 hours. Topically it is used mostly as 
"unguentum Cred§" (see this) ; per os, in solution 
or pills, % to 1 grain daily. To prepare collargol 
solutions, put the drug into a perfectly clean 
brown bottle, add the necessary amount of distilled 
water, and allow to stand until softened; then 
shake vigorously until complete solution is ef- 
fected. It need not be filtered. It should have 
a clear brown color; if gray and turbid, it Is de- 
composed. A very warm temperature Is apt to 
decompose it. 

Collaurin is a trade name for colloidal gold, 
which is administered internally in cancer, syph- 
ilis and scrofula in doses of i^ to 1 grain. 

Colligamen is a collective term applied to med- 
icated adhesive bandages introduced by E. 
Dieterich. Mull bandages are coated on the one 
side with different glue-glycorin solutions. For use, 
the bandages are quickly immersed in cold water, 
applied with the adhesive surface upon the part 
to be dressed, and covered with cotton or an 



TEE MODEBN MATERIA HEOIOA 85 

ordinary bandage. They are employed in place 
of Unna's glue dressings. 

Collosin, acetone-collodium, or fiJmogen, will 
be described under the last-named heading. 

CoUoxylin is a synonym of pyroxylin (soluble 
guncotton ) . 

Coniine Hydrobromate (cicutine or conicine 
hydrobromate) , CgHi-N.HBr, occurs as white 
needles or powder, soluble in 2 parts of water or 
alcohol and soluble also in chloroform. It is 
employed as an antispasmodic and antineuralgic, 
chiefly in traumatic tetanus, sciatica and whoop- 
ing-cough. Dose (per os), 1/60 to 1/30 grain three 
or four times daily; children, 1/600 to 1/60 grain. 
Hypodermically (in tetanus) as much as 1/20 to 
Vq grain has been injected at a time. The anti- 
dotal treatment generally consists in giving 
tannin, then emetics, enemas of vinegar, strych- 
nine or atropine hypodermically, etc. 

Contratussin is a compound elixir of thyme, 
used in whooping-cough and bronchial catarrh. 

Convallamarin, CjjH^Oij, is a glucoside from 
convallaria majalls, occurring as an amorphous, 
yellowish powder, soluble in water or alcohol. 
It is used as a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic. 
Dose, % to 1 grain, three to six times daily; hypo- 
dermically, 1/12 to % grain. Maximum dose, 1 
grain single, 5 grains daily. Antidotal measures: 
Emetics, stomach pump, camphor, wine, etc. 

Convulsin is a saccharated extract of eucalyp- 
tus, introduced by Kowalewski, for use in coughs, 
asthma, etc. Dose, a tablespoonful. 

Copper Arsenite a few years ago came to the 
fore as a remedy in cholera infantum and other 
infectious diarrheas; 1/120 grain is administered 
in water every half hour until relieved, then half- 
hourly. It is also prescribed occasionally in 
dymenorrhea and in whooping-cough. Maximum 
dose, 1 grain. 

Copper Citrate, like the preceding, is not a new 
introduction, but has only recently been em- 
ployed therapeutically. Two years ago Dr. F. von 
Arlt recommended it as a substitute for copper 
sulphate in trachoma, and it is also known as 



86 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

cuprirCitrol. It forms a green powder, very slight- 
ly soluble in water. It is prescribed as 5- to 20- 
per-cent. dusting-powders, pencils or ointments. 

Copper Cyanide, a light, whitish powder al- 
most insoluble in water or alcohol but soluble in 
ammonia water or solution of potassium cyanide; 
was introduced by the famous ophthalmologist 
Galezowski as a remedy in the treatment of 
trachoma. 

Copper Methylene-Disalicylate. — See cuforma- 
sal. 

Copper Nucleinate or Nucleide. — See cuprol. 

Copper Sulphocarbolate (para-phenol-sulpho- 
nate), also known as cupriaseptol, CuCCoHjSJj 
+6H^0, occurs as green crystals, soluble in water 
or alcohol. Gawalowski recommends it as an 
astringent antiseptic. It is used mainly in \i- to 
1-per cent, solutions. 

Copra Oil, a suppository base, is probably co- 
coanut oil from which the constituents with low 
melting-points have been gotten rid of. 

Cordol or tribromsalol, CaHj.CrHjBrsOj, is an 
intestinal antiseptic and antirheumatic that oc- 
curs as a crystalline powder insoluble in water 
and only slightly soluble in alcohol or ether. 
Dose, 8 to 20 grains three or four times daily. 

Cordyl is acetylated cordol, of no therapeutic 
importance. 

Coriamyrtin, CaoHjjOio, is a bitter principle ob- 
tained from the leaves and fruit of coriaria myr- 
tifolia. It forms colorless crystals, soluble in 
water, alcohol, chloroform or ether, and is used 
in conditions of collapse, particularly those due 
to weakening of the respiratory and vascular 
centers. Dose, 1/120 to 1/60 grain, subcutaneously. 

Cornesin, extolled for use in eye diseases, is 
stated to be simply cod liver oil or seal oil. 

Cornutine Citrate is the salt of an alkaloid of 
ergot, which, according to Kobert, has the active 
contractile principle of the crude drug, but, ac- 
cording to Tanret, is a more or less decomposed 
ergotinine. It is prescribed as an oxytocic and 
hemostatic in obstetric practice, but latterly 
more often in spermatorrhea. It occurs as a 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 87 

brownish-black, very hygroscopic powder, soluble 
in alcohol, sparingly and incompletely soluble in 
water. Dose, in hemorrhage, 1/20 to % grain; 
in spermatorrhea, 1/20 grain twice daily, in pills. 
Maximum dally dose, % grain. 

Cornutol is described as a stable, aseptic, non- 
irritating liquid preparation of ergot, especially 
adapted for hypodermatic use, and 2^^ times the 
strength of the official fluid extract of ergot. 
Dose, 10 to 30 minims. Marketed also in 2 c.c. 
hermetically sealed bulbs. 

Coronillin is a glucoside contained in the seeds 
of coronilla scorpioldes; a yellow powder, soluble 
in water or alcohol, and employed as a heart- 
tonic and diuretic analogous in action to digi- 
talin. Dose, 1 to 2 grains 4 to 6 times daily. 
Maximum daily dose, 10 grains. 

Corticin is a new trade name for the quinine 
and caffeine compound heretofore known only as 
basioin. See the latter title. 

Coryl is a solution of methyl chloride in ethyl- 
chloride, analogous to anaesthol or anaestile. 

Cosaprin (sodium acetyl-sulpJianilate) , CsH^.- 
NH(CO.CH3).S03Na, which was introduced a few 
years ago as an innocuous substitute for anti- 
febrin, v/hich could be employed also hypodermi- 
cally, occurs as a white, hygroscopic, crystalline 
substance, freely soluble in water, less readily 
so in alcohol, and almost insoluble in ether. 
Dose, 10 to 30 grains. Little has been heard of it 
since its introduction. 

Cotargit is a double salt of cotarnine hydro- 
chlorate (stypticin) and ferric chloride; ruby- 
red crystals, freely soluble in water and intended 
for use as a styptic. 

Cotarnine Hydrochlorate is the chemical name 
of the article known in the trade as stypticin; 
see the latter heading. 

Cotarnine Phtalate is the chemical designa- 
tion of the hemostatic marketed as styptol, which 
see. 

Cotoin is the active principle of true coto bark; 
a yellow powder of pungent taste, and soluble in 
alcohol, ether, or chloroform, but very slightly so 



88 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

in water. It is used some to arrest night-sweats, 
but chiefly as an antidiarrheal in dysentery, etc. 
Dose, 11^ to 3 grains, in wafers; maximum dose, 
5 grains single, 15 grains per day. Contraindi- 
cated when there is tendency to intestinal hem- 
orrhage. 

Crealbin or creolalMn is a compound of creolin 
and albumin intended as a form of administering 
creolin internally. It is a brown powder, repre- 
senting 50 per cent, of creolin, and used as an 
intestinal disinfectant and astringent in doses of 
5 to 15 grains. 

Crelium is a cresol-soap solution something 
like lysol. 

Creoform or kreoform or creosoform or kreoso- 
form is a condensation product of creosote and 
formaldehyde; a greenish-yellow, odorless, taste- 
less powder, becoming light-yellow on exposure 
to air; insoluble in water or ether, slightly solu- 
ble in alcohol, and readily soluble in a mixture of 
alcohol and chloroform and in alkaline solutions. 
It is intended to replace creosote in tuberculosis 
and diarrheas. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Creosal or tannosal is a combination of creo- 
sote and tannin. It occurs as a brown, hygro- 
scopic powder, readily soluble in water, alcohol 
or glycerin, and containing 60 per cent, of creo- 
sote. It is used as a substitute for creosote in 
tuberculosis, also as an intestinal astringent (es- 
pecially in phthisical diarrhea). Dose, 10 to 30 
grains. Marketed as 6.6 per cent, solution and 
as 5-grain pills. 

Creosapol is a disinfectant analagous to the 
well-known creolin. 

Creosin is a yellow liquid said to contain creo- 
sote, iodine, calcium hypophosphite, and balsam 
of peru as the therapeutically active components; 
it is used in phthisis. 

Creosoform or kreosoform is the same as creo- 
form. 

Creosolid or kreosolid is the magnesium com- 
pound of the bivalent phenols of creosote, and 
forms a white powder of slight odor and taste. 
It is usually given in doses of 8 grains four times 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 89 

daily as a substitute for creosote or guaia- 
col. 

Creosotal is a trade name for the so-called 
creosote carbonate, which see. 

Creosote Camphorated is a compound of equal 
molecules of creosote and camphor, which is used 
chiefly as a sedative. Dose, 3 grains three or four 
times daily, in capsules (so marketed). 

Creosote Carbonate, so-called, but which should 
be designated carbonated creosote, being a mix- 
ture, is better known as creosotal. It occurs as a 
yellow, viscid, clear, oily liquid, of faint odor 
and slightly bitter taste; insoluble in water, but 
soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform and oils. It 
contains about 92 per cent, of creosote. It is used 
principally in phthisis. Dose, 1 to 4 drams daily. 

Creosote Oleated. See oleocreosote. 

Creosote Phosphate, so-called, will be referred 
to under phosote, and Creosote Phosphite under 
the heading phosphotal. 

Creosote Tannate, so-called, is described un- 
der creosol and Creosote Tannophosphate, so- 
called under taphosote. 

Creosote Valerianate, so-called, is better known 
as eosote and will be described under that head- 
ing. 

Creosotide is said to be a combination of creo- 
sote and iodine. It is usedly chiefly in tuber- 
culosis, scrofula, enlarged glands, etc. It forms 
a brownish powder of weak creosote odor and 
taste and insoluble in water; iodine content, 
25 per cent. Dose, % to 1 grain with meals. It 
is marketed only as % and %-grain sugar-coated 
tablets and as compound tablets. 

Creosotine is a palatable preparation of beech- 
wood creosote containing 1 minim of this drug 
in each fluid dram. Dose, a teaspoonful to a table- 
spoonflil or more three times a day. 

Cresegol is mercury ortho-nitro-cresol-para- 
sulphonate ; a brownish-red, readily soluble pow- 
der intended for use as a surgical disinfectant. 

Cresolin is a mixture of cresol with resin soap, 
and is hence chemically between creolin and 
lysol. It is employed as a disinfectant. 



90 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Cresol Iodide {ortJio-cresol iodide) will be de- 
scribed under traumatol. 

Cresylone is a liquid disinfectant containing 50 
per cent of cresylic acid (cresol), making a clear 
solution with water in all proportions. It is used 
chiefly as a surgical antiseptic and deodorant. 

Crurin is the trade name for quinoUne-Msmuth 
sulphocyanide (rhodanide), of the formula 
(C8HjN.HSCN)2Bi(SCN)s. The drug occurs as a 
reddish-yellow, stable powder of non-pronounced 
quinoline odor; insoluble in water, alcohol or 
ether. It is prescribed as a siccative antiseptic, 
chiefly in ulcers of the leg, in 20- to 50-per-cent. 
dusting-powders; in 0.5-per-cent. suspension in 
water with a little glycerin it is occasionally em- 
ployed in gonorrhea. Marketed as a 50-per-cent. 
dusting-powder (with starch). 

Cryogenine or kryogenin, chemically metahen- 
zamino-semicarbazide, occurs as a white, odorless, 
bitterish powder soluble in alcohol, chloroform, 
or ether and in about 40 parts of water. It has 
been recommended by several French physicians, 
in doses of 5 to 15 grains, as an antipyretic in 
phthisis and typhoid fever. 

Crysol is a product analogous to lysol. 

Crystalline or kristalUn is a protective similar 
to collodion. It is said to consist of pyroxylin 
(1), methyl alcohol (4), and amyl acetate (15). 
A flexible modification is obtained by adding cas- 
tor oil (5) and balsam of fir (10). The same 
name has been given to a liauid resembling lis- 
terine. Methyl alcohol should be avoided in ex- 
ternal as well as internal preparations, as it pos- 
sesses deadly and sight-destroying power. See 
under formaldehyde. 

Crystallose is a brand of crystalline, soluble 
saccharin (sodium-benzoylsulphonicimide) . 

Cuformasal is the copper salt of formasal 
(methylene-disalicylic acid), occasionally pre- 
scribed in ulcerative diarrhea and venereal ulcers 
or gonorrhea. Dose, 3 to 6 grains. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 

Cupragol is a compound of protein and cop- 



THE mod3;bn materia medic a 91 

per, intended for use as an astringent and germi- 
cide. 

Cupratin is a copper-albumin compound con- 
taining 6.4 per cent, of copper and stated to be 
non-toxic alterative and nervine; a brown, pul- 
verizable mass, insoluble in water. Dose, not 
stated, but probably ^ to 1 grain thrice daily. 

Cupriaseptol is what Dr. Gawalowski called 
copper sulphocarbolate (phenolsulphonate) ; see 
this. 

Cupricin. — See copper cyanide. 

Cupricitrol is a fanciful name applied to cop- 
per citrate, under which heading it is here de- 
scribed. 

Cuprohemol or cuprated Jiemol is hemol with 
2 per cent, of copper organically combined. It 
occurs as a dark-brown, insoluble powder, and Is 
used in place of the older copper compounds in 
tuberculosis, scrofula, etc. Dose, 1^^ to 3 grains 
thrice daily. Maximum dose, 8 grains. 

Cuprol {copper nucleinate or nucleide) is de- 
fined as a chemical compound of copper with nu- 
cleinic acid, containing 6 per cent, of copper. It 
forms a green powder, soluble in water; its solu- 
tions do not coagulate albumin and are not pre- 
cipitated by alkalies. It is employed pure or in 
10-per-cent. solution as an astringent and anti- 
septic, largely in eye diseases. 

Curaril is a preparation of curare, employed 
subcutaneously in tetanus. Dose, 2 c. c. in- 
creased every 2 or 3 hours, if no effect is pro- 
duced, by 0.2 c. c. until effective, which dose 
is then repeated as necessary (every four hours 
or so). Boehm asserts that it is practically a % 
per cent, solution of curare. 

Curarine, also known as tuhocurarine, is the 
alkaloidal principle of curare (tubocurare). It 
forms a brown, deliquescent powder, soluble in 
water and alcohol, and recommended by Hoff- 
mann and Hacke in tetanus. Dose, hypodermi- 
cally 1/60 to 1/12 grain. The antidotal treatment 
usually consists of applying atropine, strychnine, 
artificial respiration and stimulants. 



92 THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDIOA 

Cutal is aluminium boro-tannate, a light-brown 
powder containing 76 per cent, of tannic acid, 
13.23 of alumina, and 10.71 of boric acid; insolu- 
ble in water, soluble in solutions of tartaric acid. 
It is used mainly as an astringent and antiseptic 
in skin diseases; pure or diluted, or as ointment. 
With tartaric acid it combines to form soluble 
cutal {aluminium ioro-tanno-tartrate) , which is 
used in solution in certain skin diseases, gonor- 
rhea, etc. 

Cutolin is a styptic pencil made of aluminium 
biborate, used for checking minor hemorrhages. 

Cyllin is described as a creolin four times as 
concentrated as Pearson's creolin; prepared in 
London. 

Cypridol is described as "a 1-per-cent. solution 
of mercuric iodide in an aseptic oil." It is used 
in syphilis. Marketed in capsules containing 
1/32 grain of HJ,, and in graduated tubes for sub- 
cutaneous injections. 

Cyssatite is a species of infusorial earth. 

Cystam.ine and Cystogen are trade names for 
hexamethylenetetramine. 

D 

Damholid is a hemoglobin preparation used in 
hematuria of cattle. Damholid liquid contains 
40 per cent, of hemoglobin and a little carbolic 
acid. Dose, 25 c.c. Must be kept in a cool place. 
Damholid I is a granular, blackish-brown, odor- 
less powder, nearly completely soluble in 8 parts 
of water. Damholid II is a fine, brownish-red 
powder more difficultly soluble than the No. I. 
Dose of the two latter, 10 grams in solution. 

Davosin, used abroad in various pulmonary 
affections, is said to consist essentially of choco- 
late containing 5 per cent, of guaiacol carbonate. 

Decalcifying Tablets ("Entkalkungstablet- 
ten"), employed in arterio-sclerosis, contain per 
dose 0.5 gram of sodium chloride, 0.05 gram of 
sodium sulphate, 0.02 gram of sodium carbonate, 
0.02 gram of sodium phosphate, 0.02 gram of mag- 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 93 

nesium phosphate, and 0.05 gram of calcium glyo- 
erinophosphate. Dose, one to several tablets. 

Deciquor is a stable, tenfold solution of pep- 
tonized iron and manganese, from which the or- 
dinary solution is made by adding to each 100 
grams the same quantity of alcohol and 800 grama 
of water. 

Delpho-curarine is an alkaloid discovered by 
G. Heyl in various species of delphinium but 
especially in delphinium scopulorum. Dr. A. 
Lohmann has made physiological experiments 
with the hydrochJorate (a yellowish-white, amor- 
phous powder, readily soluble in water or al- 
cohol), and states that it is calculated to super- 
sede the commonly unreliable curare therapeu- 
tically; clinical data are yet wanting. 

Dercin Oil is the name now applied to what 
has been recently described as floricin oil. 

Derival is a mixture of spirit of mustard, spirit 
of ammonia, and oil of turpentine, which is used 
as a liniment in rheumatism. 

Dermalin is an ointment-base analogous to 
lanolin. 

Dermasot is not a skin remedy but a prepara- 
tion for use in excessive sweating of the feet and 
consisting (according to Weber) essentially of a 
solution of aluminium acetate, colored with 
fuchsine and odorized with butyric or acetic 
ether. 

Dermatin is a toilet powder consisting of sali- 
cylic acid, starch, talcum, silicic acid and alum- 
ina; also a substitute for gutta-percha tissue. 

Dermatol is described under its chemical 
name, bismuth subgallate. 

Dermocrucin is defined as an ointment contain- 
ing 50 per cent, of "Kreuznacher Mutterlauge" 
salt. 

Dermogen. is a faintly yellowish, odorless, taste- 
less, water-insoluble powder, said to contain 55 
per cent, of zinc peroxide (ZnO..) and to give off 
oxygen on contact with wound surfaces which 
acts as a disinfectant and stimulant. 



94 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 

Dermol, though defined by Trojescu as 6i«- 
muth chrysophanate, BiCCjjHsOJ.BijOa, appears 
in reality to be a mixture of chrysophanic acid 
and bismuth hydroxide. It occurs as a yellow, 
amorphous powder, insoluble in the ordinary sol- 
vents. It is used as a drying antiseptic in skin 
diseases (especially psoriasis), in 5- to 20-per- 
cent, ointments. It has not met with much favor. 
Latterly a complexion cream has been placed 
upon this market under the name "dermol" by a 
Chicago firm. 

Dermosapol is a superfatted soap that readily 
takes up creosote, potassium iodide, thiocol, and 
other medicaments and favors their absorption 
through the skin. It thus forms the basis of 
a number of dermosapol preparations containing 
different active drugs. 

Dermozone is a lanolin and hydrogen peroxide 
toilet cream. 

Desichtol is a deodorized ichthyol obtained by 
Helmers by passing steam through ichthyol, 
whereby the volatile oil (about Vz per cent) is 
driven off. Physically it resembles ichthyol, but 
whether it has the same therapeutic virtues is an 
open question, 

Desinfectin, a brownish-yellow liquid miscible 
with water, is said to be prepared from the resi- 
dues left in the distillation of crude naphta 
(masut). It is intended as a general disin- 
fectant. 

Desodor is a mouth-wash containing formalde- 
hyde as its important ingredient. See warning 
under formaldehyde. 

Desoxy-alizarin is anthraroHn, which see. 

Dextroform is a condensation-product of dex- 
trin and formaldehyde, occurring as white, 
almost odorless and tasteless powder, soluble in 
water or glycerin but insoluble in alcohol, ether 
or chloroform. It is intended as a wound anti- 
septic like iodoform, and has been recommended 
by Prof. Claassen in gonorrhea in 2% to 5 per 
cent, solution. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Dextro-saccharin is said to be a mixture of 
glucose and saccharin. 



THK MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 95 

Diabetic Serum. — See under serums. 

Diabetin is a trade name for levuloso, which 
a few years ago came into vogue as a substitute 
for cane sugar in diabetes. See levulose. 

Diacetyl-morphine is the chemical better 
l<nown as heroin. 

Diacetyl-rufigallol-tetramethyl. — See exodin. 

Diaphtherin is the fanciful name applied to 
oxyguinaseptol or oxyquinoline phenolsulphonate, 
forming by uniting 1 molecule of ortho-penolsul- 
phonic acid and 2 molecules of ortho-oxyqulno- 
line. It occurs as a yellow powder, soluble in 
water or diluted alcohol. It was introduced some 
years ago as a nox-toxic surgical antiseptic as 
well as anti-rheumatic, but has not been men- 
tioned in literature latterly and has been with- 
drawn from this market. Dose, 8 to 15 grains a 
day; applied externally in i^ to 2-per-cent. solu- 
tions. 

Diaphtol (quinaseptol, chinaseptol, or crtJio- 
oxyquinoline-metasulphonic add), CjHbN.OH.- 
SO3H, occurs as yellowish crystals or powder, 
slightly soluble in cold water. It was introduced 
by Guignard as a urinary disinfectant, to replace 
salol. Dose, same as of salol. 

Diastin is a brand of diastase, prescribed 
chiefly in amylaceous dyspepsia in doses of 5 
grains. 

Diatheion is "pure and freely diffusible sul- 
phur in a bland medium; also contains infini- 
tesimal traces of silicic, fluoric, and formic 
acids." 

Diathesin is the name applied to synthetically 
prepared (from carbolic acid and formaldehyde) 
saligenin (ortho-oxy-benzyl alcohol, CtHsOj) 
which was formerly obtained from salicin by 
hydrolysis. It occurs as fine, white leaflets, 
slightly bitter in taste, soluble in about 15 parts 
of water and freely so in alcohol or ether. Min- 
eral acids and alkalies decompose it. It is em- 
ployed in place of the salicylates in rheumatism, 
tonsillitis, etc. Dose, TY2 to 20 grains. 



96 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIOA 

Dibromo-diiodo-hexametliylenetetramine is re- 
ferred to under its trade name chrysoform. 

Dibromo- gallic or Dibromo-trioxy benzoic 
Acid is bettter known as gallobromol ; see this. 

Dibromo-salicylic Acid Methyl Ester is the 
chemical designation of salibromin, which see. 

Didymin is a trade name applied to the dried 
and powdered fat-free testicular substance of the 
bull. It is marketed as tablets each representing 
5 grains of the fresh organ and constituting the 
dose. It is used as an aphrodisiac. 

Didymium Salicylate is referred to under its 
trade name dymal. 

Diethyl-acetal and Diethyl-aldehyde are syn- 
onymous with acetal. 

Diethylamide Valerianate is valyl. 

Diethyl-barbituric Acid is a chemical equiva- 
lent of veronal. 

Diethylenediamine is the chemical designation 
for piperazine. 

Diethylglycocoll-guaiacol Hydrochlorate is 
the chemical name of gujasanol; see the latter. 

Diethyl-ketone, also known as proprione, 
metacetone, and ethyl-propionyl, is obtained from 
the distillation of sugar with an excess of lime. 
It forms a thin, colorless, light liquid, smelling 
like acetone, and freely soluble in alcohol or 
ether, less readily so in water. It was recom- 
mended by Dr. G. Noera as a hypnotic and seda- 
tive (in mania) in doses of 10 to 40 minims. 

Diethyl-malonyl-urea is better known as 
veronal, which see. 

Diethyl-sulphone-methyl-methane and Di- 
ethyl-sulphone-methyl-ethyl-methane are the 
chemical appellations for sulfonal and trional 
respectively, 

Difiuordiphenyl is described under antitussin. 

Digalen Is a ^lutle digitoxin obtained by 
Cloetta from digitalis by a very complicated pro- 
cess, and said to be identical chemically with the 
well-known crystalline digitoxin, but differing 
physically from it in being soluble in water and 
hence more rapidly absorbed. Dr. Naunyn rec- 
ommends it as a cardiac tonic and sustainer. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 97 

Dose, 1/300 to 1/100 grain, one to three times 
daily. Maximum dose, 1/50 grain. It is marketed 
in aqueous solution (with 25 per cent, glycerin), 
each c.c. of which contains 1/200 grain of digalen. 
Digitalin is another drug about which con- 
siderable confusion exists among pharmacists as 
well as physicians. Four different digitalins are 
known: (1) DigitaUn French Amorphous, also 
desig^nated as "digitaline chloroformique" or 
"Homolle's amorphous digitalin," a yellowish 
powder soluble in chloroform or alcohol but in- 
soluble in water and given in doses of 1/250 grain 
rapidly increased until 1/40 grain is taken daily; 
(2) Nativelle's Crystalline Digitalin, which is 
practically identical with digitoxin and hence em- 
ployed in the same doses; (3) Digitalin Kiliani 
or so-called "digitalinum verum," a water-insolu- 
ble product administered in doses of 1/30 to 1/10 
grain several times daily gradually increased to 
V^ grain; and (4) Digitalin German, a yellowish- 
white powder soluble (though incompletely) in 
water or alcohol and almost insoluble in chloro- 
form. It appears to be practically the only digi- 
talin known to American physicians, probably be- 
cause it has repeatedly been referred to during 
the past few years in the American medical press. 
As regards the dose of this digitalin, this was 
formerly stated to be from 1/64 to T/32 grain sev- 
eral times a day. A few years ago, however. Dr. 
Henry Beates, Jr., of Philadelphia, made a thor- 
ough clinical investigation of German digitalin 
and arrived at the conclusion that the proper 
dosage is 1/10 to % grain three or four times 
daily, and latterly he has given as much as 1 
grain at a dose. The so-called "digitalin crystal- 
lized" is in reality digitin and identical with 
crystalline digitonin, and thus lacks the specific 
cardiac action of digitalis. 

Digitalone, according to its introducer, Dr. B. 
M. Houghton, is the outcome of attempts to ob- 
tain a uniformly active, sterile and non-irritating 
preparation of digitalis adapted for subcutane- 
ous as well as internal use. It is a non-alcoholic 
liquid, 10 parts representing 1 part of the crude 



98 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

drug, and containing about 0.6 per cent, of chlores- 
tone as a preservative. Dose, 5 to 30 minims. 

Digitalysatum Biirger is a standardized pre- 
paration of fresli digitalis leaves, each gram of 
which represents a gram of fresh or 0.2 gram of 
dried digitalis leaves. It is employed internally 
and subcutaneously, in doses of 5 to 15 minims 
several times daily; the maximum daily dose be- 
ing 75 minims. 

Digitoxin, CagH^eOio, is the most active gluco- 
side of digitalis. It occurs as a white, crystalline 
powder, almost insoluble in water or ether but 
soluble in alcohol or chloroform. It has been 
recommended as a heart tonic of uniform activity 
owing to its well-defined chemical nature. Dose, 
1/250 to 1/60 grain three times daily. Incompati- 
ble with acids and vegetable infusions. 

Diiodo-beta-naphtol, CkiHjIjO, a yellowish- 
green powder of faint iodine odor and readily 
soluble in chloroform, was introduced a few 
years ago as a substitute for iodoform; it is 
known also as "naphtol-aristol." 

Diiodo-carbazole, CuHalj.NH, results from the 
action of iodine upon diphenylimide (carbazole). 
It forms yellow, odorless leaflets, insoluble in 
water but soluble in ether. It is intended as a 
substitute for iodoform as a wound antiseptic. 

Diiodo-dithymol is a chemical synonym of 
aristol. 

Diiodoform, chemically ethylene per- or tetra- 
iodide, or iodoethylene, CJi, is obtained from ace- 
tylene iodide and an excess of iodine. It occurs 
as yellow needles, odorless when first made but 
assuming a characteristic odor on exposure to 
light, soluble in chloroform, slightly so in alcohol 
or ether, and insoluble in water. It was intro- 
duced in France as a substitute for iodoform; it 
contains 95 per cent, of iodine. 

Diiodo-para-phenolsulphonic Acid. — See so- 
zoiodole. 

Diiodo-salol (diiodo-salicylic acid phenyl es- 
ter) occurs as colorless crystals insoluble in 
water and soluble in alcohol. It is intended as 
a substitute for iodoform externally, and for the 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 99 

salicylates and iodides internally. It has not met 
with favor. 

Diiodo-thio-resorcin, CoHjO^LSj, is another 
wound antiseptic that has not gained prominence. 
It forms a brown powder, soluble in alcohol, and 
used in powders and ointments Ijke iodoform. 

Dimethyl-arsenic Acid is a synonym of caco- 
dylic acid. 

Dimethyl-ethyl-carbinol is better known as 
amylene hydrate. 

Dimethyl-oxy-quinizine is a chemical name 
for antipyrine. 

Dimethyl-sulphone-dimethyl-methane. — See 
methonal. 

Dimethyl-xanthine is theobromine. 

Dimethylethylcarbinol-chloral. — See dormiol. 

Diomorphine is the name given by Dr. Briigel- 
mann to a 10-per-cent. solution of dionin with 1 
per cent, of morphine hydrochlorate, which he 
injects hypodermically during paroxysms of 
asthma. Dose, 5 to 10 drops. 

Dionin (ethyl-morphine hydrochlorate), C^Hir 
N0(0H)(0C2H,).HC1+HA is prepared from 
morphine analogously to codeine (methyl-mor- 
phine). It occurs as a white, bitter, odorless 
powder, soluble in about 7 parts of water, 1% 
alcohol, or 20 syrup, but insoluble in ether or 
chloroform. It is used chiefly as a substitute for 
morphine. Dose, % to 1 grain. 

Diopyranum is said to be identical with pyra- 
midon. 

Diosmal is a ligroin-alcoholic extract of buchu 
which is administered in doses of 5 to 10 grains 
thrice daily. 

Dioxogen is a trade name for a certain brand 
of hydrogen peroxide solution 3 per cent. 

Dioxyanthrol is described under anthrarobin. 

Dioxybenzene (-benzol), Meta-, is rescorcin; 
Para-, hydroquinone ; and Ortho-, pyrocatechin. 

Dioxymethyl-anthraquinone is chrysarobin. 

Dioxybenzene - hexamethylenetetramine is 
marketed as hetralin, which see. 

Di-para-anisyl-monophenetyl-guanidine Hy- 
drochlorate is the chemical designation for acoin. 



100 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Diphtheria Antitoxin. — See antitoxin, diph- 
theria. 

Diphthericide of Bergmann is chewing-gum in 
the form of pastilles containing gutta percha, 
gum damar, sodium benzoate, thymol, and sac- 
charin, and intended for use as a preventive of 
diphtheria. 

Diquinine Carbonic Ester or Ether is better 
icnown as aristochin. 

Disinfectine is a disinfectant soap of unknown 
composition. 

Disinfectol is a disinfectant liquid brought 
forward by Lowenstein, consisting essentially of 
resin soaps, tar oils, and sodium cresols. 

Disodium Methylarsenate, or sodium methyl- 
arsenate, OAsCHaO.Nas+SHaO, results from the 
action of methyl iodide upon sodium arsenite in 
the presence of an excess of alkali. It forms 
colorless, efflorescent crystals of alkaline reaction 
and taste, readily soluble in water, sparingly so 
in alcohol, and insoluble in ether or oils. It is 
considered an improvement on sodium cacodylate 
(mono-sodium di-methylarsenate), not imparting 
a garlicky odor to the breath and perspiration as 
the latter does. It is used as a substitute for the 
inorganic compounds of arsenic in tuberculosis, 
malaria, skin diseases, etc. Dose, % to 1 grain. 
The drug is also known by various trade names 
such as arrhenal, neo-arsycodile, arsynal, steno- 
sine, etc. 

Dispermine is synonymous with piperazine. 

Dispnon Tablets each contain 0.25 gram of 
diuretin, 0.1 gram of agurin and 0.1 gram of ex- 
tract of quebracho. They are employed in asth- 
matic affections. Dose. 2 tablets three or four 
times daily. 

Dithan is a brand name for the chemical 
known better as trional. 

Dithion is a mixture of sodium alpha- and beta- 
dithiosalicylates; a yellowish-gray powder solu- 
ble in water and used in foot-and-mouth disease 
of cattle in 2%- to 5-per-cent. solution. 

Dithymol Diiodide. — See aristol. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 101 

Diurazin is defined as theobromine acetyl- 
wethylene-disalicylate. It is brought forward as 
a diuretic. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Diuretal is theobromine-sodium. 

Diuretin is a brand of theobromine-sodium and 
sodium salicylate or theobromine and sodium 
salicylate as it is more commonly called; see this. 

Divinal is a compound of silicic acid, alumina, 
ferric oxide, lime, chalk, magnesia, and magne- 
sium carbonate. It is used as an addition to 
baths in gout, rheumatism, nervous affections, etc. 

Djoeatin is a synonym of antimellin, which see. 

Dormiol is chemically amylene-chloral or di- 
methyl-ethyl-carbinol-chloral, CCl3.CHOH.O(CH3)2- 
CjHb, a colorless, oily liquid, of the specific grav- 
ity 1.24, pungent, camphoraceous odor and cool- 
ing taste; soluble very slowly but freely in hot 
water, and miscible in all proportions in alcohol, 
ether, chloroform or fatty oils. It is prescribed 
as a hypnotic in doses of 8 to 30 minims, in water 
or capsules. Marketed as 50-per-cent. aqueous 
solution, and as 0.5 gram capsules. 

Dormitiv is a hypnotic said to consist of an 
alcoholic extract of lactuca sativa with anise oil 
and sugar. 

Ductal. — See guaiacol carbonate. 

Duotonol is a mixture of pure calcium and 
sodium glycerinophosphates in eq'ial proportions, 
a white, granular powder, freely soluble in water. 
It is used as a nerve tonic. Dose 5 to 10 grains 
3 times daily. 

Duran is described as a preparation containing 
calcium and magnesium carbonates and phos- 
phates, in combination with albumin; a white 
powder, marketed also as chocolate-coated tablets, 
and intended for use in rickets and other cachec- 
tic diseases of children. 

Durana is a collective name for gutta percha 
plaster mulls prepared according to Unna's prin- 
ciples by Drs. Degen and Kuth, of Diiren (Rhein- 
land). 

Dygestiv is a cordial of bromelin, the sup- 
posed digestive principle of pineapple juice, and 
papain, the digestive ferment of the papaw. It 



102 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

is prescribed as a digestant and also as a vehicle 
for bromides, etc. Dose, 2 to 4 teaspoonfuls, im- 
mediately after meals. 

Dymal is essentially didymium salicylate, 
Di2(CeHj,0H.C00),; a fine odorless, pinkish-white, 
insoluble powder, introduced by Prof. Kopp as a 
siccative wound antiseptic, to be employed pure 
or as 10-per-cent. dusting-powder or ointment. It 
is a by-product in the manufacture of incandes- 
cent mantles. 

Dymol is an intestinal remedy of undivulged 
composition. Dose, 1 to 3 grains. 

Dynamogen is a blood preparation similar to 
Hommel's haematogen and used like it in anemia. 

Dyspeptine, according to Dr, Kipp, is "nat- 
ural gastric juice of healthy pigs, rendered sterile 
without addition of foreign substances and pre- 
served in sterilized flasks." Dose, 1 to 3 table- 
spoonfuls after meals, in dyspepsia. 

E 

Echafolta is an eclectic preparation of the 
drug echinacea angustifolium, intended as an in- 
ternal antiseptic and alterative. 

EcMdine is said to be a combination of iodine 
with the active principles of echinacea and 
thuja. It is an anti-purulent and alterative, used 
Internally (chiefly) and externally. Dose, 2 to 5 
minims, well diluted, two to six times daily, 
before meals. Applied to syphilitic ulcers, ab- 
scesses, etc., in full strength or diluted. 

Ecthol is a liquid internal antiseptic and "anti- 
purulent," said to contain the active principles 
of echinacea and thuja. 

Egols are compounds defined by Gautrelet as 
OTtho-nitrophenol-, cresol-, or <7i2/moZ-para-sulpho- 
nates of mercury respectively, which are known 
as "phenegol." "cresegol," and "thymegol." See 
these headings. 

Eigons are a group of bromine and Iodine com- 
pounds of albumin. Jodo-eigon, also known as 
"alpha-eigon," occurs as a light-brown, odorless 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 103 

and tasteless powder, containing 20 per cent, of 
iodine in chemical combination, and insoluble 
in water; it is used like iodoform externally. 
Pepto-iodo-eigon, also known as "beta-eigon," is 
a yellowish, odorless, nearly tasteless powder, 
containing 15 per cent, of iodine and soluble in 
water; it is intended as a substitute for the 
alkali iodides internally and is given in similar 
doses. lodo-eigon-sodium or sodium iodo-albu- 
minate, is a yellowish, odorless, almost tasteless 
powder, containing 15 per cent, of iodine, and 
completely soluble in water, diluted alkalies or 
acids; it, too, was intended for internal use but 
has latterly been abandoned in favor of pepto- 
iodo-eigon. Brow-eigon is a compound of bro- 
mine with albumin, containing 11 per cent, of 
bromine; a whitish, almost odorless and taste- 
less powder, insoluble in water. It was employed 
chiefly as a dusting powder in ozena and other 
catarrh, and internally as a succedaneum for 
the alkali bromides; but it has latterly been 
practically superseded by pepio-firom-eigon, a 
whitish, faintly acid powder of peptone-like odor 
soluble in water, and containing 11 per cent, of 
bromine. Dose, same as of potassium bromide. 

Eka-Iodoform is a pure iodoform prepared by 
electrical synthesis and sterilized with 0.05 per 
cent, of paraformaldehyde. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Ektogan is a yellowish-white, odorless, taste- 
less powder, insoluble In water; it is essentially 
impure zinc peroxide (ZNOJ, giving off O on 
contact with wound-secretions and hence recom- 
mended as an antiseptic applied pure or as oint- 
ment. It is also used for preparing HjOj. It 
should be kept in glass-stoppered bottles. 

Elchina is a Swiss elixir of cinchona contain- 
ing 0.32 per cent, of quinine, 2 per cent, of sodi- 
um glycerinophosphate, and 1 per cent, of tinc- 
ture of nux vomica. 

Electron is said to be ozonized olive oil. 

Elkossan is a preparation obtained from the 
seeds of brucea sumatrana and used as an anti- 
dysenteric and hemostatic. It is marketed as 
tablets, 6 to 8 of which constitute the daily dose. 



104 IHE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

Elytrones are antiseptic, astringent vaginal 
suppositories containing boroglyceride, hydras- 
tine, thymoline, zinc sulpliocarbolate and acetan- 
ilid. Formula B contains iclithyol in addition. 

Emenah is "a liquid emmenagogue containing 
champaca, abromafastuosa (?), ferrum, ruta and 
apiol," marketed in 4-oz. bottles. 

Emetine (alkaloid) of the market is not a 
simple homogeneous body but the total alkaloid 
of ipecac, consisting according to Dr. Paul of 
emetine proper and cephaeline. The emetic dose 
is 1/12 to Yd grain; the expectorant, 1/60 to 1/30 
grain several times daily. Emetine hydrochlorate 
(Paul), CisHoiNOo.HCl, is a white powder, solu- 
ble in water or alcohol, and sensitive to light. 
It is used mostly as an expectorant, 1/12 to % 
grain per dose. 

E m o d i n ( trihydroxymethyl-anthraquinone) , 
C,4H402.CH3(OH)3, is a reddish-yellow powder, 
soluble in alcohol and alkalies but insoluble in 
water. It acts as a cathartic in the dose of 1% 
grains best given in pills. It is the purgative 
principle of rhubarb and many other drugs. 

Emol is a flesh-colored kind of steatite (a nat- 
ural magnesium silicate chemically close to tal- 
cum) found in England, used as a vulnerary 
usually in combination. 

Emollientine is not an emollient, but an anti- 
septic and astringent ointment consisting of 
aluminium hydrate, carbolic acid, isarol (ich- 
thyol), lead oxide, corrosive sublimate, zinc oxide 
and the base. It is used in eczema, psoriasis, 
favus, pruritis and other skin diseases. 

Empyroform is a combination of birch tar and 
formaldehyde; a dark grayish-brown, almost odor- 
less powder. It is intended for use in place of tar 
in skin diseases, in 1 to 20 per cent, ointments, 
paints or liniments. An empyroform soap is also 
made, 5 per cent, and 10 per cent. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 

Emulgates is the generic name applied to solid 
emulsions — triturations of oils, oleoresin of male 
fern, and other fluid drugs, with roborat (lecith- 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 105 

albumin). The products contain 50 per cent, of 
roborat and 50 per cent, of the fluid medicament. 

Endermol is a "compound of stearamide with 
hydi'ocarbons of tho paraffin series"; a neutral, 
odorless ointment base, and claimed to be more 
rapidly absorbed than other ointment bases and 
to be non-irritating. Endermol should not be con- 
founded with ettdermol. 

Endomentol is a 0.1 per cent, ointment of nico- 
tine salicylate, recommended in scabies, and ap- 
parently similar to eudermol. 

Energetenes are fresh juices of various medi- 
cinal plants that are prepared (in France) with- 
out alcohol or heat and reported to contain the 
active principles in unaltered form. They occur 
as brownish liquids possessing the odor and taste 
of the respective plants. Convallaria, colchicum, 
digitalis and valerian "energetenes" have been 
prepared. 

Energin Is a nutrient consisting essentially 
of the proteins of rice; a fine, almost odorless 
and tasteless grayish-white powder, slightly 
soluble but swelling in water. 

Enesol is the fanciful name applied to what is 
defined as mercury salicyl-arsenate, obtained by 
the action of 1 molecule of methylarsenic acid 
on 1 molecule of basic mercurj"- salicylate. It oc- 
curs as a white powder, soluble in about 25 parts 
of water, yielding solutions that do not give the 
usual reactions of arsenates or of mercury. It 
contains 38.46 per cent, of mercury, and 14.4 
per cent, of arsenic, and was introduced by Dr. 
Goignet for hypodermic use in syphilis. Dose, 
not stated. 

Ensemin is a dental local anesthetic, said to 
consist of a 1 per cent, solution of cocaine hydro- 
chlorate with adrenalin chloride and a little 
chloretone. 

Enterin is a compound of hexamethylenetetra- 
mine and proteid, intended as an intestinal disin- 
fectant, particularly in typhoid fever. Dose, 10 
to 20 grains. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Enterokinase is a peculiar digestive ferment 



106 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 

isolated by Pawlow from the mucous membrane 
of the duodenum. 

Enterol or Enterokresol is described as a mix- 
ture of the three isomeric cresols from coal tar 
oil, and hence would appear to be identical with 
trikresol (tricresol). A so-called carionate of it 
has also been prepared. 

Enterorose is a dietetic recommended in diar- 
rheas and gastric diseases. It is said to consist 
of vegetable albumin impregnated with a meat 
solution and containing diastase, and occurs as 
a yellowish powder that mixes well with water. 

Enwekain is a brand of purified wool fat. 

Eosolates are "a series of sulpho-acid salts of 
the aliphatic creosote esters," introduced by Dr. 
G. Wendt of Berlin. See calcium eosolate and 
quinine eosolate. 

Eosote is the name applied to the so-called 
creosote valerianate; a yellowish, oily liquid, 
of smoky-aromatic taste and odor; insoluble in 
water, readily soluble in alcohol or ether. It is 
used chiefly in phthisis, but to a limited extent 
also as a gastro-intestinal disinfectant. Dose, 3 
to 10 minims three times a day, in capsules (0.2 
gram), or in milk or alcoholic solution. 

Ephedrine Hydrochlorate, CioHibNO.HCI, is 
the salt of the alkaloid of ephedra helvetica; 
white needles, readily soluble in water or alco- 
hol, and employed in 10 per cent, solution as a 
mydriatic (1 or 2 drops per instillation). 

Epicarin is the trade name applied to 1)eta- 
oxynaphtyl-ortho-oxy-meta-toluylic acid. The drug 
forms yellowish needles soluble in alcohol, ether, 
vaselin or olive oils; insoluble in water, slightly 
soluble in chloroform. It is employed in para- 
sitic skin diseases (scabies, herpes tonsurans, 
etc.), chiefly in ointments (10 to 20 per cent.), 
10 per cent, solutions made with sodium car- 
bonate, and in 10 to 15 per cent, alcoholic solu- 
tions. Solutions in other oils than vaselin or 
olive, or in vaselin and lanolin, can be made with 
the addition of a little ether. Veterinary epicarin 
is an impure grade intended for veterinary prac- 



THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDICA 107 

tice; a reddish-brown powder, used the same way 
as the medicinal quality. 

Epidermin is a name applied to two different 
preparations; one an ointment consisting of 
fluorpseudocumol (1), difluordiphenyl (4), an- 
hydrous wool fat (85), and petrolatura (10), and 
used on wounds; the other is an ointment base 
composed of white wax, water, acacia, and 
glycerin. 

Epinephrin is one of the various trade names 
for the therapeutically active principle of the 
suprarenal capsule, which article is fully de- 
scribed under adrenalin. 

Epiosin is a derivative of morphigenin, occur- 
ring as transparent prisms that are easily sol- 
uble in water or chloroform, but insoluble in 
ether or water, and used as an anodyne and seda- 
tive in doses of li^ to 2 grains. 

Epirenan is a 1 : 1000 solution of a brand of the 
active principle of the suprarenal gland, which 
remedy is referred to fully under adrenalin. 

Erasin is a syrup of potassium guaiacol sul- 
phonate and ethylmorphine hydrochlorate, made 
in Alsace. 

Ergone is a new liquid preparation of ergot 
for internal or hypodermic use; 1 c.c. is said to 
represent 1 gram of ergot. 

Ergotina Styptica (Egger) is, according to L. 
Hajos, a fluid extract of ergot containing 5 per 
cent, of stypticin and recommended in disturbed 
cerebral circulation and in neuroses accompany- 
ing or following menstrual disturbances. Dose, 
10 to 15 drops. 

Ergotinol is a hydrolyzed, dialyzed fluid ex- 
tract of ergot, 1 c.c. of which is said to equal 0.5 
gram of extract of ergot Ph. G. IV. Dose, 3 to 10 
minims. 

Ergotole Is a liquid preparation of ergot 2i^ 
times as strong as the U. S. P. fluid extract and 
used chiefly hypodermically. Dose, 5 to 20 
minims. 

Ericin is stated to be identical with mesotan, 
which see. 



108 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Ericolin is a glucoside of ledum palustre (wild 
rosemary) and various other ericaceae; a brown 
mass, soluble in water, and credited with astrin- 
gent and tonic effects. 

Erosan is a syrup of potassium sulphoguaico- 
late (1:15) containing also ethyl-morphine hy- 
drocblorate (1:500). It is used in phthisis and 
chronic bronchial catarrh. 

Erosin is a resinoid obtained from chadami- 
cum luteum; a pale-yellow mass, soluble in water 
or alcohol, and reported to have diuretic, seda- 
tive and anthelmintic actions. 

Erysimin is a glucoside obtained from the 
seeds of erysimum and possessed of the physio- 
logic properties of digitalin. 

Erythrol Tetranitrate (tetranitrol ; nitrated 
erythrol), C4Ha(N03)4, forms colorless leaflets, 
easily soluble in alcohol but insoluble in water, 
and exploding on percussion; hence marketed 
only as chocolate tablets (i^ grain), 1 or 2 of 
which every 4 to 6 hours constitute the dose. It 
is a vaso-dilator and antispasmodic like nitro- 
glycerin, and is thus used in angina pectoris, 
heart diseases, etc. 

Erythrophleine Hydrochlorate is the salt of 
the alkaloid of erythrophleum guineense (sassy 
bark); a yellowish- white hygroscopic powder, 
soluble in v/ater or alcohol, and employed as a 
local anesthetic (chiefly in eye diseases) in 
1:2000 to 1:400 solutions and as a heart tonic 
(1/30 to 1/15 grain). 

Esanofele is an antimalarial in pill form, con- 
sisting of quinine hydrochlorate, iron citrate, ar- 
senous acid and a vegetable extract. 

Escorcin {cfscorcin), CgHgO,, is derived from 
esouletin, a cleavage product of esculin (from 
horse chestnut bark). It occurs as whitish, 
water-soluble crystals, and was recommended by 
Dr. Frohlich for diagnosing corneal defects — 1 
or 2 drops of a 10 to 20 per cent, aqueous solu- 
tion instilled into the eye stains the lesions red. 

Eserine-Pilocarpine is a simultaneously crys- 
talized mixture of eserine salicylate and pilocar- 
pine hydrochlorate (1:2), occurring as a white 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 109 

powder, soluble in water and alcohol, and used 
as an anodyne and cathartic in colic of horses 
(3 to 6 grains per dose by injection). 

Ester-Dermasan is a soft soap containing 10 
per cent, of free salicylic acid besides 10 per cent, 
of salicylic acid esters of phenyl and benzoyl 
radicles. It is used topically in rheumatic af- 
fections, 5 to 10 grams per inunction 

Ether, Chloromethylmenthylic. — See forman. 

Ether, Glycerino-salicylic, is referred to un- 
der glycosal. 

Ether, Hydriodic, is the well-known ethyl 
iodide. 

Ether, Methyl-diiodosalicylic, is better known 
as sanoforvi. 

Ether, Hydrobromic, is ethyl bromide. 

Ether, Salicylic, was recently brought forward 
by Dr. A. Voswinkel as a succedaneum for meso- 
tan as a topical antirheumatic. It is clearly sol- 
uble in castor oil and olive oil. 

Ethol {cethol) is a trade name for cetyl alco- 
hol. 

EthoxycafEeine (wthoxycafteine) , CgHj.OCoHs.- 
N4O2, is obtained by boiling monobrom-caffeine 
with an excess of alcoholic potassa solution, and 
forms white crystals, soluble in ether and hot 
alcohol. It is used in migraine and neuralgias, 
4 grains several times daily in wafers. 

Ethyl- Amy gdophenin is the same as amygdo- 
phenin. 

Ethyl Carbanilate. — See euphorine. 

Ethyl Chloride (monochlor-ethane) , CoHjCl, is 
a gas at ordinary temperature and pressure; but 
when compressed, as marketed, it is a colorless, 
very volatile, highly inflammable liquid, of the 
specific gravity 0.918, and soluble in alcohol. 
Owing to its low boiling-point (12.2° C), it is 
marketed only in hermetically sealed tubes with 
capillary points, or tubes closed by various pat- 
ented devices. It is employed as a local anesthetic 
in minor operations, neuralgias, etc., as a spray, 
the heat of the hand grasping the tube forcing 
out the stream. Ethyl Chloride is marketed also 



110 THE MODEEN MATEKIA MEDICA 

under a number of trade names {kelene, ano- 
dynone, antidolorin, ethylol, etc.) 
Ethyl Sublimate. — See mercury-ethyl chloride. 
Ethylene Bromide (dibrom-ethane), CHjBr.- 
CH.Br, occurs as a slightly brownish, heavy 
liquid (sp. gr. 2.189), of chloroform odor, and 
soluble in alcohol. It is used as a nerve sedative 
in doses of 1 to 2 minims two or three times 
daily, in emulsion or capsules. It should be kept 
protected against light; and it should not be con- 
founded with the relatively non-poisonous ethyl 
bromide. 

Ethylenediamine-Mercury Sulphate is de- 
scribed under sublamine. 

Ethylene Period! de {tetraiodide) . — See diiodo- 
form. 

Ethylenediamine-Silver Phosphate. — See ar- 
gentamine. 

Ethylenediamine-Trikresol is better known as 
kresamine ; see this. 
Ethylene-imine is a synonym of piperazine. 
Ethyl-morphine Hydrochlorate is described 
under dionin. 

Ethyl-narceine Hydrochlorate \fi the chemical 
designation for narcyl. 
Ethylol is a trade name of ethyl chloride. 
Ethyl-Propionyl. — See diethyl-ketone. 
Euarol is an ointment consisting of aristol, 
europhen and petrolatum. 

Eubiol is described as pure hemoglobin with 
the important salts and albumins of the blood; 
an odorless powder, soluble in water; and eubiol 
liquid, as a 1:1 solution of eubiol in glycerin 
prepared in vacuo. 

Eubiose is defined as a concentrated, glycerin- 
free hematogen rendered permanent by treat- 
ment with carbonic acid. 

Eucaine, Beta-Eucaine, or Eucaine Hydro- 
chlorate B, is the hydrochlorate of benzoylvinyl- 
diacetone-alkamine, and occurs as a white, neu- 
tral powder, soluble in 33 parts of cold water. 
It is used like cocaine as a local anesthetic, and 
is claimed to be less toxic, and sterilizable by 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA HI 

boiling without fear of decomposition. It is ap- 
plied mostly as 1 to 5 per cent, solutions, which 
aro conveniently prepared in a test-tube with 
boiling water. It is also marketed as 1% and 
5 grain tablets. Alpha-eucaine appears to have 
been withdrawn from the market. 

Eucaine Acetate is a new salt of the above 
mentioned base, differing from the preceding in 
that it is very freely soluble in water — 1 in 3. In 
other respects, it is similar to eucaine. 

Eucaine Lactate is a new salt of benzoyl-vinyl- 
diacetone-alkamine, whose action and uses are 
the same as those of eucaine hydrochlorate but 
used chiefly as a local anesthetic in eye practice. 

Eucaldin is a local anodyne, and an internal 
antiseptic, antispasmodic, and antimalarial, pre- 
pared by the fractional distillation of eucalyp- 
tus globulus and pinus sylvestris. Externally (in 
sciatica, sprains, rheumatic pains, etc.) it is ap- 
plied pure, the part (if an extremity) being cov- 
ered with rubber sheeting or a dampened towel. 
Dose, 10 to 20 minims in water, 3 or 4 times a 
day, or every half hour if necessary for four 
doses. 

Eucalypteol, chemically eucalyptene hydro- 
chlorate, is obtained from oil of eucalyptus and 
is intended to replace the latter as an internal 
antiseptic (gastrointestinal diseases, phthisis, 
etc.). It forms yellowish, hygroscopic crystals of 
camphoraceous odor and peculiar taste, and sol- 
uble in alcohol, ether, chloroform or oils. Dose, 
20 to 30 grains per day, in capsules or wafers or as 
confection. Eucalypteol must not be confounded 
with the official eucalyptoi. 

Eucasin or casem-ammonia is a nutritive rec- 
ommended in anemia, gout, gastric and lung dis- 
eases. Dose, a tablespoonful two to four times 
daily in soup, etc. 

Eucasol. — See under anytin. 

Euchinal is what L. Dokkum calls the car- 
boxy-ethyl ester of quinetum (a natural mixture 
of the cinchona alkaloids). It is intended as a 
"bitterless quinine." 

Eudermol is the name applied to nicotine sali- 



112 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

cylate, which forms colorless crystals soluble in 
water and alcohol and of a faint empyreumatic 
odor. It is used as a 0.1 per cent, ointment in 
scabies, and as a 1 per cent, ointment in veteri- 
narj' practice (sarcoptes mange). EuAermol 
should not be confounded with the ointment base 
endermol. 

Eudrenine is a local anesthetic marketed in 
capsules of 0.5 c.c, containing 1/12 grain of eu- 
caine and 1/4000 grain of adrenalin hydrochlo- 
ride. It is used as a local anesthetic, chiefly in 
dentistry. The contents of one or two capsules, 
according to the number of teeth to be extracted, 
are injected into the gums ten minutes before ex- 
tracting. 

Eudoxine is the bismuth salt of nosophen 
(tetraiodophenolphtalein), occurring as a red- 
dish-brown, odorless, tasteless powder, insoluble 
in water and employed as an intestinal antiseptic 
and astringent in doses (adult) of 5 to 15 grains 
3 to 5 times daily. 

Euformol is a liquid antiseptic containing as 
the active ingredients oil of eucalyptus, oil of 
wintergreen, thymol, menthol, boric acid, fluid 
extract of wild indigo, and formaldehyde solu- 
tion. It is used diluted with two to ten parts of 
water. See caution under formaldehyae. 

Eugallol is defined chemically as pyrogallol 
monoacetate. It is marketed only in 66 per cent, 
solution in acetone, which is a dark-yellow, 
syrupy liquid soluble in water and acetone and 
intended as a succedaneum for pyrogallic acid in 
psoriasis, etc. It is usually applied pure, once 
daily, followed in half an hour by zinc oxide 
powder or paste. 

Eugenoform (eugenol-carbinol-sodium) occurs 
as colorless crystals, readily soluble in water but 
sparingly so in alcohol. It is prescribed as an 
intestinal disinfectant, 8 to 30 grains twice a day. 

Eugenol Benzoate is described under benzo- 
eugenol. 

Eugenol Cinnamic Ester is better known as 
cinnamyl-eugenol, which see. 

Eugenol Iodide. — See iodo-eugenol. 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 113 

Eugol is an English liquid antiseptic consist- 
ing essentially of beta-naphtol, eucalyptol, salol, 
menthol, boric acid, extract of witchhazel and 
foimaldehyde. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Euguform is acetylized methylene-diguaiacol ; 
a grayish-white, nearly odorless powder, insol- 
uble in water, and used as a dusting powder or 
5 to 10 per cent, ointments on wounds, burns, etc. 
Soluble euguform is a 50 per cent, solution of 
euguform in acetone, and is applied pure, or as 
paste or ointment. See caution under formalde- 
hyde. 

Eukinase is a digestive ferment isolated by 
Hallion and Carrion from the duodenum of the 
pig as a yellow powder, and recommended in in- 
testinal indigestion. Pankreatokinase is a mix- 
ture of eukinase with pancreatin and intended to 
be used in cases where pancreatin was hitherto 
employed Both products are marketed in hard- 
ened gelatin capsules that pass the stomach un- 
acted upon. The hardening is probablj^ done by 
formaldehyde. See caution regarding this latter 
substance in the description of formaldehyde else- 
where in this book. 

Eukodin is the fanciful name given to codeine 
hromomethylate or codeine methylbromide. The 
product occcurs as colorless crystals, freely solu- 
ble in water, and is prescribed chiefly as a cough 
sedative in phthisical patients. Dose, 3 to 5 
grains. 

Eulactol is described as a pulverulent nutrient 
prepared from milk and vegetable albumin, "con- 
taining all the nutritive substances necessary to 
life in the rational proportions." 

Eulyptol (ulyptol) is an antifermentative rem- 
edy consisting of salicylic acid, carbolic acid and 
eucalyptus oil. 

Eumenol is the trade name applied to the fluid 
extract of the root of tang-kui, kau-kui, man-mu, 
or schan-ki, a Chinese araliacea. It is employed 
as an emmenagogue and uterine sedative, partic- 
ularly in nervous amenorrhea and dysmenorrhea. 
Dose. 1 fluid dram three times daily in sweetened 
water. 



114 THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDIOA 

Eumorphol is an antimorphine serum intro- 
duced by Dr. Hirschlaff for use in the treatment 
of morphine poisoning and morphinomania. 

Eumydrin. — See atropine methyl-nitrate. 

Eunatrol is a trade name for sodium oleate of 
the formula (Ci,HssOj)3Naj, which occurs as a yel- 
lowish-white powder soluble in water and alcohol. 
It is prescribed as a cholagogue, chiefly in gall 
stone disease. It is marketed only as chocolate- 
coated pills (0.25 gram), 4 of which are taken 
twice daily. 

Eunol, Alpha- and Beta-, are described as 
condensation products of alpha- and beta-naphtol 
respectively, but their composition is not further 
stated. They are soluble in alcohol and olive oil ; 
insoluble in water. They are intended as wound 
antiseptics and dermics. 

Euphorine (phenyl-urethane ; phenyl-ethylure- 
thane; phenyl-ethyl carbamate; ethyl carbani- 
late), CO(NH.CoH,) (OC^H.), forms a white, faint- 
ly odorous powder, of clove taste, soluble in alco- 
hoi or ether, almost insoluble in water. It is pre- 
scribed as an analgesic and antiseptic — externally 
as dusting-powder on wounds, etc.; internally in 
rheumatism, sciatica, etc., in the dose of 8 to 15 
grains two or three times daily. Incompatible on 
trituration with camphor, monobromated cam- 
phor, carbolic acid, chloral hydrate, menthol, 
resorcin, salol, thymol, and urethane. Euphorine 
should not be confounded with europhen. 

Euphthalmin Hydrochlorate, CnH,5N03.HCl, is 
the salt of the mandelic acid derivative of n-meth- 
yl-vlnyldiacetone-alkamine; a white powder, read- 
ily soluble in water or alcohol. It is used as a 
mydriatic in 2 to 10 per cent, solutions; its ef- 
fects pass away quickly. 

Euporphin is the fanciful name applied to apo- 
morphine bromomethylate or methylbromide, 
obtained by alkalyzing morphine with dimethyl 
sulphate, and treating the resulting methylsul- 
phate with a saturated solution of potassium 
bromide. It occurs as colorless needles or scales, 
easily soluble in water or alcohol. It is intended 
to supersede apomorphine hydrochlorate, espe- 



THE MODEEKT MATEBIA MEDICA 115 

cially as an expectorant; its solutions are far 
more permanent to air and light. 

Euprotans are dry albuminous nutritives pre- 
pared from blood. An alpha- euprotan and a 
beta- euprotan are marketed, the former, owing 
to its cheapness, being recommended especially 
for hospitals and dispensaries. 

Eupyrine {vanillin-ethyl-carhonate-parorphene- 
tidin) occurs as greenish-yellow, tasteless needles 
of vanilla odor, readily soluble in alcohol, ether 
or chloroform, slightly so in water. It is a mild 
antipyretic, used especially in children and weak 
subjects. Dose (adult), 15 to 30 grains; for chil- 
dren, 5 to 15 grains. 

Euquinine is chemically quinine carbonic ether, 
and occurs as light, white, fleecy, practically 
tasteless conglomerations of needles; readily sol- 
uble in alcohol, ether, or chloroform; sparingly 
soluble in water Its solutions are bitter. It has 
been recommended as a complete substitute for 
ordinary quinine, less apt to produce cinchonism 
and other disturbances. Dose, same as of quinine 
sulphate, in plain powder or as tablets. 

Eurobin is chrysarobin triacetate, introduced 
as a succedaneum for chrysarobin in dermatol- 
ogy. It forms a reddish-yellow powder, insoluble 
in water but soluble in chloroform, acetone, or 
ether. It is used in 2 to 20 per cent, solutions, 
which do not stain linen. 

Euresol is resorcin monoacetate, a yellow semi- 
solid of pleasant odor, readily pulverizable, and 
employed in place of resorcin in skin diseases in 
5 to 20 per cent, ointments. 

Europhen is defined as diisobutyl-cresol iodide 
or iodo-diisobutyl-orthocresol, and occurs as a 
bulky, yellow powder of faint saffron odor; sol- 
uble in alcohol, ether, chloroform and fixed oils; 
insoluble in water. It is employed mainly as a 
wound antiseptic like iodoform, as dry powder, 
ointment, etc. It has been occasionally used by 
injection in syphilis, i^ to 1^^ grains once daily 
in oil. It should not be dispensed with starch, 
metallic oxides (zinc and mercury in particular), 
and mercurials, as decomposition is liable to en- 



116 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 

sue; and it should be pi-otected from light, heat 
and moisture, 

Eurythrol is an inspissated extract of the spleen 
of cattle, recommended for use in anemia — one to 
two teaspoonfuls daily in bouillon or soup. 

Eusemin is a preparation used by injection as 
a dental anesthetic and containing as active in- 
gredients cocaine and suprarenal extract. 

EuBoma is a reddish-brown liquid of faint odor 
and pungent taste, said to contain in each fluid 
dram the principles of 15 grains of echinacea an- 
gustifolia, 2 grains of thuja occidentalis, and 4 
grains of baptisia tinctoria. It is used as an anti- 
septic and alterative externally and internally. 
Dose, a teaspoonful three to six times daily. 

Eutannin is an aromatic, unsaturated oxy-acid 
the formula and exact chemical nature of which 
have not as yet been published. It is readily sol- 
uble in alcohol, insoluble in cold water and acid- 
ulated liquids, but soluble with decomposition 
(tannin being liberated) in alkaline solutions. It 
is intended as an intestinal astringent in diarrhea 
of various origins. It is marketed mixed with an 
equal part of milk sugar, the dose of which tritu- 
ration is 8 to 20 grains two or three times a day. 

Euterpen. — See under nebulates, 

Euthymol is similar to euformol but contains 
no formaldehyde. 

Exalgin is methyl-acetanilid or methyl-phenyl- 
aeetanilid, CoHjN.CHj.COCH,; white crystals, sol- 
uble in alcohol, sparingly soluble in water. It is 
prescribed chiefly as an antineuralgic, in doses of 
2 to 5 grains. Maximum dose, 8 grains. 

Exodin is the trade name for diacetyl-rufigallic- 
acid tetramethyl ether. The drug occurs as a yel- 
low, odorless, tasteless powder; insoluble in wa- 
ter. It was introduced by Prof. W. Ebstein of 
Gottingen as a laxative. Dose, 15 to 23 grains; 
children usually 71^ grains. Marketed only as 
7% grain tablets, which are best taken disinte- 
grated in water. Exodin should not be confounded 
with exodyne, a mixture of aeetanilid, sodium 
bicarbonate and sodium salicylate. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 117 

Extracts. — A few extracts that have been intro- 
ducd in recent years will be here briefly men- 
tioned. Arenaria — from arenaria rubra; used in 
bladder troubles, 30 grains every three hours in 
sweetened water. Aspidium spinulosum (common 
wood-fern) — an ethereal extract employed as a 
tapeworm remedy in doses of 1 dram after fast- 
ing and followed in a few hours by a cathartic. 
Erodium — from erodium cicutarium, and used as 
a uterine hemostatic; dose, 2 to 5 grains every 
2 or 3 hours, as pills or solution. Qalega officinalis 
(goat's-rue) — a galactagogue in doses of 8 to 30 
grains two to four times daily in syrup, mixture 
or pastilles. GJaucium luteum, fluid — % to 1 tea- 
spoonful three times a day in diabetes. Periploca 
(climbing dog's-bane), fluid — used as heart tonic; 
dose, 5 to 10 drops. Psidium pyriferum (guava; 
djamboe), fluid — employed as an intestinal astrin- 
gent and hemostatic, 15 to 30 minims in water 
every 2 hours. Sorbus acuparia, fluid — prescribed 
as a laxative; dose 30 to 240 minims two hours 
after a meal. Suprarenal capsule, hemostatic — 
brown particles soluble in water with turbidity, 
and employed as vasoconstrictor topically (10 to 
30 per cent, solutions), hypodermically, or intra- 
venously; dose, 1 to 2 fluid drams of 1 per cent, 
solution. 

Extract Dichondra Brevifolia is said to have 
proved a good remedy in diphtheria. One part of 
the extract is dissolved in three parts of glycerin, 
and a tuft of cotton is impregnated with this 
solution and gently brushed over the pseudo- 
membrane every two to six hours, according to 
the severity of the case. According to Dr. Ara- 
mian, this extract destroys the diphtheria bacilli 
and may be employed in conjunction with anti- 
toxin. 

Extract Thyme, Saccharated. See pertussin. 

Exudol is "an ointment consisting of ichthyol, 
gi'een soap and analgesics." 



F 

Fagacid is a substance isolated from beech tar, 
of pitch-like structure and color, acid reaction, 
soluble in alkali solutions forming salts there- 
with, soluble in water, but not in alcohol, and 
possessing antiseptic properties. It is intended 
for an internal antiseptic; but it is also used 
in soaps, plasters, dietetic products, etc. 

Faguline is a solution containing potassium 
paraguaiacolsulphonate and used in diseases of 
the respiratory organs. 

Fagusol is defined as a salt of guaiacol. It 
occurs as a pink, odorless, crystalline powder, of 
a mild bitter-acrid taste, soluble in water and 
diluted alcohol, insoluble in ether. It appears to 
be potassium-guaiacol sulphonate (thiocol) col- 
ored red. It is used in tuberculosis and chronic 
bronchitis chiefly, but also in gastro-intestinal 
fermentation. Dose, 5 to 10 grains three or four 
times daily, in capsules, solution or powders. 

Fango or "Mineral Liniment" is the mud of the 
hot springs at Battaglia, Italy. It is applied as it 
is or as baths in rheumatism and female com- 
plaints. 

Fascol is a bituminous mineral consisting of 
calcium oxide, carbonic acid, ferrous oxide, silica, 
nitrogen and sulphur. It is marketed only as 1.25 
gram hemorrhoidal capsules containing besides 
fascol, resorcin, bismuth subgallate, senna, olive 
oil, wool-fat, and althea ointment. 

Fellitin is described as a nearly odorless, nat- 
ural, medicinal soap, prepared from purified ox 
gall and used in frostbite. 

Fenthozone is an English disinfectant consist- 
ing essentially of acetic acid, carbolic acid, men- 
thol, camphor, and oils of eucalyptus, lavender 
and vervain. 

Ferasquin Capsules each contain quinine sul- 
phate 2 grains, iron ferrocyanide 1% grains, ar- 
senous acid 1/200 grain, and piperin % grain. 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 119 

They are prescribed in malaria, acute or chronic. 
Dose, 1 to 3 capsules every four hours or three 
times daily. 

Fercao is a ferruginous dietetic consisting es- 
sentially of saccharated ferric oxide and cacao. 

Far Cremol is a compound of the coloring mat- 
ter of the blood and iron (3 per cent.), occurring 
as a brown, almost tasteless powder, soluble in 
very dilute ammonia water and prescribed as a 
hematinic in doses of 10 to 20 grains thrice daily. 

Fer- or Ferro-arsycodile. — See arsycodile. 

Ferformasal is iron dimethylenesalicylate, used 
in anemia of gouty or rheumatic subjects. Dose, 
5 to 10 grains, in capsules. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Fergon is described as a sterilized organic iron 
solution, similar to liquor ferri albuminati but 
permanent. 

Fermanas Capsules each contain iron albumi- 
nate 2''^ grains, manganese peptonate 1 grain, 
strychnine sulphate 1/60 grain, arsenous acid 
1/100 grain, and capsicum ^4 grain. The mixture 
is prescribed as a general tonic. Dose, 1 or 2 cap- 
sules after meals. 

Fermang is a solution of iron and manganese 
peptonate, containing 0.6 per cent, of Iron and 0.2 
per cent, of manganese. 

Fermangol is an elixir of iron and manganese 
peptonate, containinig 0.5 per cent. Fe, 0.1 per 
cent. Mn, besides glycerinophosphoric acid. 

Ferralbumose is a Dutch meat peptone and 
iron preparation; a powder, containing 10 per 
cent, of iron. 

Ferramat is an iron pill containing also bitter 
extracts and spices. 

Ferratin (ferralbumin) is a synthetic ferric 
acid albuminate containing about 7 per cent, of 
iron, and forming a brown, almost odorless, taste- 
less powder. It is employed as a hematinic. Dose, 
4 to 8 grains three times daily. 

Ferratogen is an iron nucleinate obtained by 
growing yeast in a ferruginous medium; a yellow- 
ish-gray, palatable powder, insoluble in water, 



120 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

and recommended by Cloette as a readily ass'mi- 
liable iron compound. Dose, 5 to 10 grains. 

Ferratose is a solution of ferratin, liquor ferra- 
tini, containing 0.3 per cent, of iron. Dose, 3 or 
4 tablespoonfuls per day. 

Ferrhaemin is an organic compound of fresh 
ox blood and iron (0.124 per cent), containing 
20 per cent, of strong Spanish wine. 

Ferricodyle is a trade name for iron cacody- 
late; see this. 

Ferrichtol is a compound of iron and ichthyol, 
"iron sulphoichthyolate," occurring as a brownish- 
black, nearly odorless and tasteless powder, insol- 
uble in the usual solvents as well as in diluted 
acids and alkalies, and containing 3% per cent, 
of iron. It is prescribed in anemia and chlorosis. 
Dose, 3 to 10 grains, in tablets (marketed as 
such). 

Ferridine is an iron, iodine and arsenic prep- 
aration, extolled as a remedy in phthisis, syphilis, 
anemia, etc. 

Ferrinol is another iron nucleinate or nucleide, 
containing about 6 per cent, of iron. It forms a 
brown, tasteless powder, soluble in warm water. 
It is prescribed as a blood-maker, 3 to 6 grains 
three times a day. Marketed also as 3 grain 
tablets. 

Ferripton is defined as a concentrated, artifi- 
cially digested, liquid iron preparation made with 
egg albumin. Dose, several drops in water. 

Ferrissol is defined as a compound of cinnamic 
acid and guaiacol, to be used in phthisis; a white 
powder soluble in water. Dose, per os, 15 to 30 
grains per day; by intramuscular injection, 15 
to 45 minims of 10 per cent, solution once daily. 

Ferripyrine or Ferropyrine {ferric-chloride- 
antipyrin is a compound containing 64 per cent, 
of antipyrin 12 per cent, of iron, and 24 per cent, 
of chlorine. It occurs as an orangerred powder, 
soluble in 5 parts of water, also soluble in alcohol 
but insoluble in ether. It is used as a hema- 
tinic, styptic and astringent — internally, 5 to 10 
grains, in solution or as powder; externally, In 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 121 

1 to 20 per cent, solutions. It is incompatible 
with alkalies, carbonates and bicarbonates. 

Ferrocolin is a mixture of peptonized guaiacol- 
iron albuminate with syrup of thymol, employed 
in scrofula, phthisis, whooping-cough, etc. 

Ferroleum is a 50 per cent, emulsion of cod 
liver oil containing in addition iron phosphate. 

Ferromannin is a liquid preparation described 
as a "saccharo-mannite" of iron, "containing 1 
grain of iron expressed as FeO" to the table- 
spoonful. 

Ferrose is an iron-proteid-formaldehyde com- 
pound, containing 10 per cent, of Fe. Dose, 5 to 
10 grains after meals. See caution under formal- 
deJiyde. 

Ferrosol, also known as "liquor ferri oxydati 
natronati saccharati," is a hematinic containing 
0.77 per cent, of iron and stated to be quite pep 
manent and not altered by acids, alkalies or tern 
perature changes. Dose, tablespoonful thrice daily. 

Ferro-Somatose, also designated as iron-soma- 
lose and iron-aWuminose, is a tasteless, odorless 
powder, readily soluble in water, and said to con- 
tain the "nutritious elements of meat" with 2 per 
cent, of iron organically combined. The quanti- 
ties prescribed could contain very little nutri- 
ment. 

Ferrostyptin is a double salt of hexamethylene- 
tetramine hydrochlorate and ferric chloride, of 
the formula (CHJeH^.HCl.FeCU. It occurs in 
yellowish-brown crystals, containing 15 per cent. 
of iron and readily solulDle in water. It is used 
as a styptic and antiseptic, chiefly in dental 
practice. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Ferrozone is ferrous vanadate, introduced by 
Dr. B. Rohden and marketed as 3-grain sugar- 
coated pills. It is used as an alterative tonic. 
Dose, 1 or 2 pills three times a day. 

Ferrugine is a solution of iron and manganese 
peptonate. 

Fersan is claimed to be the iron compound 
present in the erythrocytes of fresh ox blood: 
chemically, a paranucleoproteid compound of 
iron. It is employed as a nutrient and tonic, in 



122 THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDIOA 

doses of 30 to 90 grains per day. Marketed as 
powder and tablets, also as iodo-fersan tablets. 

Fervin is a meat extract with iron, marketed in 
gelatin capsules. 

Fetron is an ointment base introduced by Prof. 
Liebreich, in physical properties being between 
lanolin and petrolatum and containing 3 per cent, 
of stearic acid anilid. 

Fibrolysin is a double-salt of thiosinamine (2 
mols.) and sodium salicylate (1 mol.), introduced 
by F. Mendel as a succedaneum for thiosinamine 
hypodermically. As is known, thiosinamine is 
but slightly soluble in water, so that alcoholic 
solutions have to be employed and these are quite 
painful. The new compound occurs as a white 
powder easily soluble in water. Its solutions, 
however, are readily decomposed by air, and 
hence the medicament is marketed in ampullas 
containing 2.3 c. c. of a sterilized 15 per cent, so- 
lution (equal to 0.2 gram of thiosinamine). It 
is applied in lupus, chronic glandular swellings, 
to remove scars, etc. 

Filmaron is the amorphous acid isolated by 
Kraft from oleoresin of male fern and regarded 
as the anthelmintic principle of the latter. It 
appears as a brownish-yellow powder, insoluble 
in water, slightly soluble in alcohol, but freely 
soluble in the remaining usual solvents. Dose, 
8 to 12 grains, followed by a purgative. 

Filmaron Oil is a 10 per cent, solution of fil- 
maron, regarded as the active principle of male 
fern, in castor oil, marketed for greater conven- 
ience in dispensing, as filmaron in the dry state 
readily cakes and becomes difficult of manipula- 
tion. Dose (as an anthelmintic), 75 to 120 
minims. 

Filmogen, also known as acetone-collodion, col- 
losin, and liquor adhwsivus, is a solution of 
pyroxylin in acetone and a fatty oil intended for 
use as a protective as well as a vehicle for 
dermic remedies. 

Flavoiodin is a quinoline derivative credited 
with antipyretic and antiseptic properties. 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 123 

Florlcin is a product obtained from castor oil, 
which is miscible with mineral oils, and is in- 
tended, aside from technical uses, as an ointment 
and liniment base. It is a yellowish-brown, 
fluorescent liquid resembling castor oil; almost 
insoluble in alcohol and acetic acid, but takes up 
water readily and yields an ointment-like mass 
when triturated with a little water and an un- 
stable emulsion when rubbed up with much water. 

Fluinol ifluorpinol) is an alcoholic extract of 
pine needles impregnated with ethereal oils, used 
as an addition to baths, gargles and washes, also 
for inhalation and by atomization in various af- 
fections. 

riuoralbin is the name applied to water-sol- 
uble, flexible vaginal suppositories containing 
zymin (a dried medicinal yeast) and used in 
leucorrhea (fluor albus). 

Fluoroformol (fluoroform water; fluoryl) Is a 
2.8 per cent, aqueous solution of fluoroform gas 
CHFI3; a nearly tasteless and odorless, non-irri- 
tating liquid, recommended by Dr. Stepp in tuber- 
culosis of various forms and used also in pneu- 
monia. Dose, tablespoonful four times a day. 

Fluorol is sodium fluoride. 

Fluoryl. See fluoroformol. 

Fluorrheumin, also designated as antirheumin 
and antirheumatin, is a 5 per cent, ointment of 
fluorphenetol, employed in rheumatism, lumbago, 
neuralgias, etc., 5 grams being rubbed in several 
times a day. 

Fom.itin is a cold-prepared fluid extract of the 
fungi fomes cinnamomeus and fomes igniarius; 
a reddish-brown, alkaline liquid of fungoid odor 
and slightly bitter taste, used in diseases of the 
bladder, dysmenorrhea, hemorrhoids, etc. Dose, 
1 to 4 tablespoonfuls several times daily. 

Formaldehyde (formic aldehyde, oxymeth- 
ylene) is marketed in the form of an aqueous 
solution of about 35 per cent, strength under 
various trade names, the chief ones being forma- 
lin, formocJiloral and formol. The disinfectant 
power of formaldehyde is well known; like most 
of the efficient disinfectants it is highly poison- 



124 THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDICA 

ous. But few experiments have been made to 
utilize the solution as an internal disinfectant, 
but numberless formaldehyde compounds have 
been brought forward for medicinal use which 
are supposed to depend for what action they may 
have on the liberation of formaldehyde in the 
system. The proposed medicinal use of formal- 
dehyde in any form opens an extremely grave 
question as to a certain ultimate effect. It has 
been suggested that the deadly and sight-destroy- 
ing power of wood alcohol which is now well 
known, is due to its decomposition in the system 
into formic acid, this acid being the destructive 
agent. If this be so, may not formaldehyde be ex- 
pected to yield the same destructive acid, it being 
an intermediate product in the change of wood 
alcohol to formic acid; in other words, by further 
oxidizing wood alcohol (which is methyl oxide 
more commonly known as methyl alcohol) 
we get formic aldehyde (oxymethylene) and by 
still further oxidation this is converted to formic 
acid; so that formaldehyde may afford a start- 
ing point for the development of the acid, without 
going back to wood alcohol. A most frightful fea- 
ture in wood alcohol poisoning is destruction of 
sight, which has so often occurred; and this 
feature should naturally cause the utmost care 
as to the introduction into the system of anything 
which may yield the same result; or even the 
slightest impairment of vision. Slight changes 
In that respect which might be caused by medi- 
cine might easily be overlooked or ascribed to 
some other cause. In view of the facts and 
possibilities here presented, it has been thought 
necessary to add to descriptions of articles which 
may yield formaldehyde in the system by decom- 
position ("splitting up"), a caution referring to 
this paragraph, and in these have been included 
those with the methylene group, and formates 
from which formic acid might be set free; such 
cautions may possibly have been in some cases 
overlooked so the reader will do well to be on 
the alert in regard to the subject here as 
well as in other literature. Applications, it must 
be remembered, will introduce a medicament 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDIC A 125 

into the system as well as usual internal admin- 
istration. 

Formaldehyde-Casein, also known as formal- 
humin, was a condensation product of formalde- 
hyde and casein introduced a few years as a 
wound antiseptic, but latterly withdrawn from 
the market. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formaldehyde-Gelatin. — See glutol. 

Formaldehyde, Para-. — See para-formaldehyde. 

Formaldehyde-Tannin. — See tannoform and 
formatan. 

Formaldehyde-Thiolin is a compound analo- 
gous to if not identical with ichthoform; see the 
latter. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formamine is another of the numerous trade 
names for hexamethylenetetramine (hexamethyl- 
enamine U. S. P.). 

Formamint Tablets contain formaldehyde and 
menthol. They have been brought out as internal 
antiseptics. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Forman (chloro-methyl-menthyl ether) is a 
chlorinated methyl ether of menthol of the for- 
mula CioHi9.C.CH,.Cl, and occurs as a colorless, 
slightly fuming, oily liquid, decomposed by water 
into formaldehyde, menthol and hydrochloric 
acid. Brought forward as an inhalant in catarrh. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formanilid (phenyl-formamide), CeHjNH.- 
CHO, is a reaction product of anilin and formic 
acid; colorless or yellow crystals, soluble in water, 
alcohol, glycerin, or oils. It is brought forward 
as a local anesthetic and for insufflation in ca- 
tarrh. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formasal is described as a condensation 
product of formaldehyde and salicylic acid, or 
methylene-disalicylic acid. It is used chiefly in 
the form of its salts, alum-formasal, bisformasal, 
etc. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formatan is a condensation product of formal- 
dehyde and tannin, apparently identical with the 
older tannoform. It is used chiefly as an intes- 
tinal astringent and antiseptic, in doses of 5 to 
15 grains several times daily, but it is serviceable 
also to arrest excessive perspiration. Marketed 
also in tablets. See caution under formaldehyde. 



126 THE MODEBN UATEBIA MEDICA 

Formatol is a disinfectant dusting-powder said 
to contain about 12 per cent, of formaldehyde. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formazol is an "antiseptic, oxydizing inhala- 
tion remedy" for use in phthisis and bronchial 
catarrh; tablets containing according to reports 
about 80 per cent, of paraformaldehyde and small 
quantities of iodoform, chloral hydrate, terpinol 
and menthol. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formic Aldehyde. — See formaldehyde. 

Formicin {formaldehyde acteamide) is a very 
hygroscopic substance, and hence marketed only 
as concentrated solution — a colorless, syrupy 
liquid specific gravity 1.240 to 1.260, miscible in 
all proportions with water, alcohol or chloroform, 
readily soluble in glycerin, sparingly soluble in 
ether, decomposed by acids and akalies readily 
and by water gradually, formaldehyde being lib- 
erated. It is used as a disinfectant and deodor- 
ant in abscesses, purulent wounds, cystitis, sur- 
gical tuberculosis, etc., in 2 per cent, solution. See 
caution un^cr formaldehyde. 

Formin is one of the many brand names for 
hexamethylene-tetramine, which see. 

Formochlorol is a brand of formaldehyde solu- 
tion that is used in the Trillat autoclave for gen- 
eral disinfection purposes; it contains some cal- 
cium chloride, ostensibly to make it give off the 
HCOH more satisfactorily. 

Formoforin is a foot powder stated to consist 
of formaldehyde, thymol, zinc oxide, and starch. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formolid is an antiseptic solution consisting of 
formaldehyde solution, acetanilid, borogylceride, 
sodium borobenzoate, eucalyptol, thymol, menthol, 
wintergreen oil, alcohol and extract of witchhazel. 
It is generally used more or less diluted with 
water externally; internally in doses of % to 2 
teaspoonfuls diluted, several times daily. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Formopyrine (methylene-diantipyrin) is ob- 
tained by heating 5 parts of antipyrin with 4 
parts of formaldehyde solution for several hours. 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIOA 127 

It forms white crystals soluble In alcohol and 
Insoluble in water. It acts as an antipyretic and 
antiseptic. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formosapol is essentially a soap solution im- 
pregnated with formaldehyde, a product similar 
to lysoform. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Form.ylphenetidin {formphenetidin, para-oxy- 
ethyl-formanilid), CsH4.OC2Hj.NH.HCO, is made 
by heating para-phenetidin hydrochlorate with 
anhydrous sodium formate and formic acid. It 
is used as an antispasmodic. Dose, 3 to 6 grains. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Formyl Tribromide is bromoform. 

Formysol is a trade name for a formaldehyde 
mixture containing also methyl alcohol, which 
latter is highly poisonous and causes blindness. 
See further caution under formaldehyde. 

Formysols are, according to Schlieben, faintly 
yellow, liquid glycerin-potash soaps, containing 25 
per cent, of formalin (equal to 10 per cent, of for- 
maldehyde gas) and 10 per cent, of formalin (rep- 
resenting 4 per cent, of formaldehyde), resp«c- 
tively. They are used for disinfecting the hands 
and surgical instruments, as well as on wounds 
and in parasitic skin diseases. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Fortoin is the name applied to methylene-dico- 
toine, a condensation product of formaldehyde 
and cotoine of the formula CH2(Ci4Hii04)2, and 
forming yellow, tasteless crystals or powder of 
faint cinnamon odor and readily soluble in chloro- 
form and alkalies, sparingly so in alcohol or ether, 
and insoluble in water. It is used internally aa 
an antidiarrheal, and externally as an astringent 
antiseptic (0.6 to 1 per cent, solutions). Dose, 4 
to 8 grains three times a day. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Fortossan is a nutritive for small children con- 
sisting of the soluble vegetable phosphorus prep- 
aration known as phytin and milk sugar. It is 
marketed as 2.5 gram tablets. 

Fossilin is a brand of petrolatum. 

Fucol is a succedaneum for cod liver oil pre- 
pared from iodine-containing algae and vegetable 



128 THE MODEBN MATEEIA MEDIC A 

oils; an olive-green, oily liquid, of a faint taste 
like that of roasted coffee. It is intended to 
serve also as a vehicle for medicaments ordinarily 
exhibited with cod liver oil (phosphorus, creosote, 
ferrous iodide, etc.). 

Furol is a dried beer yeast and used in boils, 
certain skin diseases, etc. Marketed also as a 
25 per cent. soap. 

rurunculin is a dried beer-yeast introduced by 
H. de Pury and employed internally in general 
furunculosis, certain eczemas, dyspepsia, etc. 
Dose, 10 to 30 grains three times daily, with milk 
or beer, immediately before meals. 

G 

Gabianol is a brown oleaginous liquid obtained 
from bituminous shale and used in pulmonary 
diseases in the dose of 4 minims four to six times 
daily, in capsules. 

Gacamphol. — See guacamphol. 

Gaiacophosphal is guaiacol phosphite, a white 
powder of pungent taste, soluble in alcohol, gly- 
cerin, chloroform or water (moderately). It is 
employed as an antitubercular. Dose 3 to 15 
grains three times daily. 

Gajacyl. — See guaiacyl. 

Gallacetophenone, also known as trioxy-aceto- 
phenone, alazarin yellow, and methylketo-trioxy- 
tenzene, CeH2(OH)3.CO CH3, is a brownish-gray 
powder soluble in alcohol, ether and glycerin. 
It is used in parasitic skin diseases (chiefly 
psoriasis) in 10 per cent, ointment. 

Gallactogen is a German nutritive made from 
casein. 

Gallal is a trade name applied to basic alumin- 
ium gallate, which occurs as a brown powder in- 
soluble in water but soluble in hydrochloric and 
tartaric acids. It is used as a drying antiseptic 
(mainly in ozena). 

Gallanol (gallanilid, gallic acid anilid, or gal- 
linol), C6H,.NH.CO.C„H,(OH),-f2H,0, is obtained 
by heating gallic acid with anilin and occurs as 
brownish crystals or powder soluble in alcohol, 



THE MODEEN MA1T:BIA MEDIC A 129 

chloroform and ether, and used as a substitute 
for pyrogallol in skin diseases (5 to 20 per cent, 
ointments, solutions or dusting powders). 

Gallianin is a "solution of 5 volumes of ozone 
In 1 volume of harmless vehicle," recommended 
by French veterinarians in infectious pneumonia, 
influenza, etc., of horses, cattle and dogs. Dose, 
1 to 20 c.c. once daily, intravenously 

Gallicin or gallic add methyl ester, CeH2(OH)3- 
COO.CH3, forms a grayish-white crystalline pow- 
der soluble in alcohol or ether, and is employed 
as a dusting powder in eye diseases (chiefly con- 
junctivis). 

Gallic Acid Anilid. — See gallanol. 

Gallic Acid Methyl Ester is referred to under 
gallicin. 

Gallinol is a synonym of gallanol. 

Gallobromol or dil)romogallicacid,CiBT^{Oii.)z- 
COOH, is made by rubbing together 1 part of gal- 
lic acid and 2% parts of bromine and re- 
crystallizing from water, and forms a light-brown 
powder soluble in water, alcohol or ether. It is 
used internally as a nerve sedative and externally 
as an antiseptic astringent in 1 to 4 per cent, solu- 
tion (in gonorrhea and cystitis), or as dusting 
powder or paste (in skin diseases). Dose, 10 to 
30 grains, generally in solution with an acid 
syrup. 

Galloformin, or formin (hexamethylenetet- 
r amine gallate) occurs as hard needles that are 
difficultly soluble in water, alcohol, ether or gly- 
cerin, and insoluble in chloroform or olive oil. 
It is intended for use internally and externally 
as an astringent antiseptic. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Gallogen {ellagic acid), Ci^HgOs, occurs as a 
yellow, odorless, tasteless powder, insoluble in all 
acid or neutral media, but soluble in alkalies. 
It is prescribed as an intestinal astringent. Dose, 
15 grains; children 5 to 8 grains. Supplied also 
as 3-grain chocolate tablets. 

Garantose is one of the many trade names for 
henzoylsulphonic imide (better known as sap- 
charin). 



130 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Gasterin is a gastric juice obtained by Fremont 
from dogs. 

Gasterine is a French bismuth phosphate. 

Gastrin Tablets are said to consist of linden 
charcoal, magnesium carbonate and cascara 
sagrada. 

Gastricin is a digestive powder reported to 
contain ammonium carbonate, ammonium chlor- 
ide, potassium bitartrate, sal rochelle, crab's eyes, 
magnesium carbonate, magnesium citrate, mag- 
nesium lactate, sodium chloride, sodium sulphate, 
and sodium bicarbonate. 

Gastrosote is defined as a digestant containing 
in 10 parts, 1 part of pepsin and 1 of hydrochloric 
acid combined with albumin. Dose, 4 to 8 grains. 

Gaultherine (asepsin) is the "sodium salt of 
methyl salicylate," silky needles, of wintergreen 
odor and freely soluble in water, and used as 
antiseptic (1 to 2 per cent, solutions) and anti- 
zymotic. Dose, 1 to 5 grains well triturated with 
powdered liquorice. 

Gazeol is stated to be a mixture of carbolic 
acid, acetone, benzin (of each 10 grams), tar (90 
grams), naphtalin (1 gram) and concentrated am- 
monia water (1 liter), which when made is 
let stand for a week with occasional shaking and 
then decanted. It is used chiefly in whooping- 
cough, a little being poured into flat plates and 
allowed to evaporate. 

Gelanthum is a water-soluble vehicle for der- 
mics, a colorless paste consisting of equal parts 
of gelatin and tragacanth, together with suffi- 
cient of a mixture of equal parts of glycerin and 
rose water, besides a little thymol (as a preser- 
vative). 

Gelasepsin is the name applied to a supposedly 
sterile solution of gelatin in physiological salt 
solution used hypodermically to arrest hemor- 
rhage. Tetanus germs may exist in gelatin and 
are difficult to destroy. Fatal cases have resulted 
from imperfectly sterilized solutions. 

Gelatin solutions have been used hypodermic- 
ally In hemorrhage ; this use, and possibly uterine or 
rectal injection also is attended with risk of tetanus 
infection. See gelasepsin. 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIC A 131 

Gelones and Tegones are plasters recom- 
mended by Bauer; the former are glycerin and 
gelatin preparations with which various medica- 
ments are incorporated and which stick well on 
being moistened with water. Agar-agar serves as 
the vehicle in the tegones. 

Gelatose-Silver is better known as albargin; 
see this. 

G«lsem.in and Gelseminine are two prepara- 
tions from gelsemium, concerning which con- 
fusion exists among physicians as well as phar- 
macists. GeJsemin is a resinoid, occurring as a 
brownish-yellow powder. Gelseminine, Cj^HjjNjOg, 
is an alkaloid and forms white crystals. Both 
articles are soluble in alcohol but insoluble in 
water; and their physiologic action is the same 
in kind but vastly different in degree. Gelsemin 
(resinoid) is given in doses of i^ to 1 or even 2 
grains. The single dose of gelseminine (al- 
kaloid) is 1/120 to 1/30 grain, and its maximum 
daily dose % grain; as antidotal treatment 
emetics, atropine, or strophanthin are used, be- 
sides artificial respiration. 

Genoform, from the literature extant on the 
subject, appears to be a condensation product of 
acetyl-salicylic acid and formaldehyde intended 
for use in gout and rheumatism, neuralgia, etc. 
It occurs as a white powder of slightly acid taste, 
sparingly soluble in cold water, but freely soluble 
in alcohol, ether and hot water. It is split up in 
the intestines into salicylic acid, acetic acid, and 
formaldehyde. Dose, 6 to 8 grains every two or 
three hours, as powders usually. See caution un- 
der formaldehyde. 

Gentianin is the crude bitter principle (gen- 
tianic acid or gentisin) of gentian; a dark-brown 
extract soluble in alcohol and given in doses of 
4 to 15 grains thrice daily as a tonic. 

Geoform, which has several trade aliases, will 
be described under its chemical designation, 
methylene-diguaiacol. 

Geosote is guaiacol valerianate or valeryl-guai- 
acol, C6H,(OCH3)O.CO.C4H„; a yellowish, oily 
liquid, of smoky odor and burning taste, soluble 



132 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 

in alcohol or ether. It is used as an antituber- 
cular and an intestinal disinfectant. Dose, 3 to 
10 minims, in capsules or milk, three times daily. 
Marketed also as 3-minim capsules. 

Gerdal is described as a combination of beef 
Juice, albumin and sugar; a grayish-yellow pow- 
der, used as a nutrient in doses of 3 teaspoonfuls 
three times a day, with other food or drink. Do 
not boil it. 

Qermol is an English disinfectant, a dark 
liquid, consisting of crude cresols. 

Glandulen is prepared from the bronchial 
glands of sheep; a yellowish powder, which is 
marketed as 0.25 gram tablets, each of which rep- 
resents 0.25 gram of fresh gland and which are 
employed in phthisis. Dose, 1 to 3 tablets three 
times daily. 

Glidin is a wheat albumin containing 96 per 
cent, of pure albumin, 1 per cent, of salts, and 1 
per cent, of lecithin. It occurs as an odorless 
and tasteless powder that swells but does not dis- 
solve in water. It is intended especially for pa- 
tients v/ith diabetes or kidney disease, being used 
in making cake and bread or as an addition to 
the victuals. Dose, 2 to 3 tablespoonfuls per day; 
children, 1 tablespoonful daily. 

Globon is a nutritive representing a combina- 
tion of vegetable and animal paranucleins; a 
yellowish, odorless, and tasteless powder, insol- 
uble in water but soluble in alcohol (particularly 
in the presence of a small quantity of organic 
acid). Dose, 1 to 3 teaspoonfuls, in soup, milk, 
etc. 

Globularetin, C„HoO, is a cleavage product of 
globularin, possessed of purgative and diuretic 
properties. 

Globularin, CjtHjoOg, is a glucoside of globu- 
laria alypum and vulgaris. It occurs as a brown- 
ish-yellow powder soluble in alcohol, and acts like 
caffeine upon the heart and nervous system. It 
is used in rheumatism, gout, uremia, etc., gener- 
ally combined with globularetin in the form of 
the French teinture prosoide (globularin 0.5, 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 133 

globularetin 0.7, alcohol [60 per cent.] 20.0; dose, 
8 to 20 drops twice dally). 

Glucochloral or glycochloral. — See cMoralose.. 

Gluside is a synonym of saccharin. 

Glutannol is a compound of vegetable fibrin 
and tannic acid, prescribed as an intestinal as- 
tringent without action in the stomach (owing 
to its insolubility in water and acid liquids). 
Dose, 10 to 30 grains, in powders or suspension. 

Qlutektones are gelatin pencils medicated with 
alpha-eigon, zinc oxide, salicylic acid, or ichthyol, 
and used in eczema by rubbing over the wetted 
skin until a thin coating has been formed. 

Glutoform is gluiol. 

Glutoid capsules are gelatin capsules hardened 
with formaldehyde and supplied in three degrees 
of resistance to gastric juice — weak, medium and 
strong. They are intended to be used for drugs 
that are to act only in the intestine. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 

Glutol (glutoform, formaldehyde-gelatin) oc- 
curs as a white to yellowish, odorless, powder, 
which is used pure as a wound antiseptic liberat- 
ing formaldyde on contact with the wound secre- 
tions. See caution under formaldehyde, 

Gluton is a soluble, nongelatinizing dietetic 
made from gelatin. Dose, 40 grams per day, 
with fluid food. (Stir to a paste with a little 
water, add some more water, and heat gently 
until dissolved.) 

Glycerinophosphates. — See under calcium, 
iron, lithium, magnesium, potassium, quinine, 
etc., glycerinophosphate. 

Glybolid is a paste of glycerin, boric acid and 
acetanilid employed topically on pustules, ab- 
scesses, and the like. 

Glycerin Salicylate. — See glycosal. 

Glycocoll-phenetidine Hydrochlorate is better 
known as phenocoll hydrochlorate, which see. 

Glycoform or glycoformal is a solution of 
formaldehyde containing about 15 per cent, of 
glycerin, which is used in a special generator for 
generating formaldehyde gas for disinfecting pur- 
poses. 



134 THE MODEBN MATEBIA. MEDICA 

Glycogen, 6(CeHi„0,)+HaO, is the final prod- 
uct of the digestion of starch and a constituent 
of normal livers. It forms a yellowish-white pow- 
der, soluble in water. Though formerly only of 
physiologic interest, glycogen has latterly been 
recommended by French physicians as a roborant 
in tuberculosis, emaciation, convalescence, etc. 
Dose, % to 21^ grains three times daily in pills. 

Glycogenal is a substance related to glycogen, 
occurring as a yellowish powder soluble in water 
but insoluble in alcohol or ether. It is used as a 
tonic and bactericide in tuberculosis, puerperal 
fever, diabetic coma, etc. Dose, 5 to 8 grains 
twice daily; subcutaneously, 1 grain; by enema, 
30 grains with 8 grains of ammonium carbonate 
and 2 ounces of water. 

Glycophal is a compound syrup of glycerine- 
phosphates, containing the glycerinophosphates of 
calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and iron, 
together with pepsin and diastase. Dose, a tea- 
spoonful to a tablespoonful. 

Qlycophenin is a brand of saccharin. 

Glycosal is the trade name for salicylic add 
glycerin ester or ether, also known as glycerin 
salicylate, C,HiOH.COO.C3Hj(OH)j. The article 
forms a white powder readily soluble in alcohol, 
soluble in 100 parts of water, and moderately 
soluble in ether or chloroform, while being mis- 
cible with glycerin; alkalies and their carbonates 
readily saponify it. It is employed internally in 
place of sodium salicylate; also externally, as 20 
per cent, alcoholic solution applied as a paint in 
articular rheumatism. Dose, 2 to 3 drams daily. 

Glycosine is a brand of saccharin, claimed to 
be 550 times as sweet as cane sugar. 

Glycosolvol (antidiabeticum) is a diabetes 
remedy obtained "by mutual chemical action of 
oxyproprionic acid (CeHA) "Pon chemically 
pure peptone, and of sodium theobrominate upon 
the zymogen of the trypsin obtained from the 
pancreas of the sheep and the ox." It is mar- 
keted in two combinations that are used side by 
side: (1) glycosolvol with powdered jambul seed 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 135 

and aromatics, with which a decoction is pre- 
pared fresh each time a dose is to be taken; (2) 
glycosolvol dissolved in a compound fluid extract 
of myrtle, the dose of which is a teaspoonful. 

Olykaolin is a paste of glycerin and kaolin, 
that is used in the place of the old-fashioned 
flaxseed poultice. 

Qlyzine is the name applied to what appears 
to be a mixture of extract of glycyrrhiza and fluid 
extract of yerba santa, flavored with oils of nut- 
meg and coriander, and used as a vehicle for 
quinine, cascara, opium and other nauseous drugs. 

Qomenol is the essential oil of melaleuca viridi- 
flora, and hence closely analogous to oil of caju- 
put. It is used internally, chiefly in phthisis 
and bronchial and laryngeal affections; external- 
ly, by inhalation or spray (10 to 50 per cent, 
strength), in respiratory ailments. Dose, 4 to 8 
minims several times daily, in capsules or syrup. 
Marketed also as 0.25 gram capsules. 

Gonorol appears to be identical with gonal, 
santalol, and arMol, and is described under the 
latter title. 

Gonoryl Tablets are said to contain as their 
active constituent 33 per cent, of ranjan (ixora 
coccinea, an Indian rubiacea the root and twigs 
of which are employed in dysentery, fever and 
gonorrhea). They are employed in gonorrhea, 8 
tablets per day being the ordinary dose. 

Gonosan, also known as kawa santal, is a 20 
per cent, solution of resin of kava kava in East 
India oil of sandalwood. It is marketed only as 
0.3 gram capsules, 2 to 4 of which are given sev- 
eral times daily in gonorrhea. 

Gorit is described under calcium peroxide. 

Goudrogenin is a French dry wood-tar, occur- 
ring as brown chips or leaflets completely and 
readily soluble in water, forming therewith a so- 
lution possessing according to Dr. Goris all the 
properties of ordinary tar water. 

Graminin is a new hay-fever serum. 

Griserin is "loretin rendered soluble by the 
addition of alkalies and thus more suitable for 
internal administration" — probably sodium lore- 



136 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

tinate (or sodium-loretin) . It has recently been 
brought forward as a remedy in tuberculosis, as 
well as diphtheria, scarlet fever and other infec- 
tious diseases, boils, etc. Experiments by Drs. 
Friedberger and Oettinger with it in tubercu- 
losis have given negative results. Dose, 3 to 10 
grains three times a day. 

Guaiacacodyl is a trade name for guaicacol 
cacodylate. 

Guacamphol is the terse name for guaiacol 
camphoric acid ester or guaiacol campTiorate, Cg- 
Hi.CCOO.CeH^.O.CHa)^. The drug occurs as white 
needles without odor or taste; insoluble in water, 
moderately soluble in alcohol or chloroform. It 
is employed in tuberculosis, to arrest the night- 
sweats and diarrhea. Dose, 3 to 15 grains at 
bedtime. 

Guaiacetin or guacetin is the trade name for 
sodium pyro {brens) catecMn-monoacetate or so- 
dium phenone acetate, CoHi.OH.OCH^COONa. The 
remedy occurs as a white, odorless, slightly bit- 
ter powder, which is soluble in 30 parts of wa- 
ter. It is employed in phthisis. Dose, 7% to 15 
grains three times daily, as powder or tab- 
lets. Marketed also as 0.5 gram tablets. Little 
or nothing has been heard of the article the past 
few years. 

Guaiacol Benzoate is better known by the trade 
name tenzosol, under which it is described. 

Guaiacol Benzylic Ether. — See brenzcain. 

Guaiacol Cacodylate (cacodyliacol) occurs as 
white or reddish-white crystals, soluble in water, 
alcohol, glycerin or oil, insoluble in ether, and of 
pungent taste. It is used subcutaneously in oily 
solution in tuberculosis. Dose, 14 to 1 grain. 

Guaiacol Camphoric Acid Ester is described 
under guacamphol. 

Guaiacol Carbonate, also known by the trade 
name duotal, (C9H,OCH3),.C03, is obtained by 
passing gaseous carbon oxychloride through a 
solution of guaiacol in caustic soda solution. It 
forms a white, odorless, tasteless powder, repre- 
senting 21% per cent, of guaiacol and slightly 
soluble In alcohol but insoluble in water. It is 



THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDICA 137 

prescribed chiefly in phthisis, but also as an in- 
testinal antiseptic in typhoid fever. Dose, 5 to 
20 grains several times daily, though as much as 
90 grains per day is often given; best taken as 
powders or tablets. Marketed also as 414 and TV2 
grain tablets. Guaiacol carbonate is incom- 
patible with alkalies. 

Guaiacol Cinnamate. — See styracol. 

Guaiacol Glyceryl Ester is guaiamar. 

Guaiacol Ethyl. — See guetJiol. 

Guaiacol, Ethylenated, CHsO.CeH«O.CjH«.OC8- 
H^OCHs, occurs as colorless needles, that are 
sparingly soluble in water but easily so in alco- 
hol. It is prescribed in phthisis, like other 
guaiacol compounds. Dose, 7^ to 15 grains two 
or three times daily. 

Guaiacol Ethylene Ether. — See guaiacol, 
ethylenated. 

Guaiacol Iodoform is described as a solution 
of 1 part of iodoform in 4 parts of guaiacol and 
1 part of almond oil; a reddish-brown, thick 
fluid, used diluted with 16 parts of olive oil by 
French physicians by injection in surgical tuber- 
culosis and pleurisy — 3 c.c. of the dilution per 
dose. 

Guaiacol Monoglycerinic Ether is referred to 
under its trade name, oresol. 

Guaiacol Phosphate (phosphoric acid guaiacyl 
ether), occurs as a white powder soluble in al- 
cohol or chloroform but insoluble in water. It is 
an antitubercular. Dose, li/^ to 3 grains three 
times a day. It is also known as biogaicol. 

Guaiacol Phosphite is described under its 
trade designation, gaicophosphal. 

Guaiaform (geoform) is referred to under 
methylene-diguaiacol. 

Guaiacol Piperidine. — See guaiaperol. 

Guaiacol Salicylate (guaiacol salol), CbH^O- 
CHj.CjHjOa, forms white, tasteless crystals of 
salol odor and soluble in alcohol. It is used as 
an antitubercular and intestinal disinfectant. 
Dose, 15 grains several times daily, up to 214 
drams per day. 

Guaiacol Tanno-cinnamate. — See guatannol. 



138 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

Guaiacol Valerianate is described under its 
trade name, geosote. 

Guaiacolin Is another of the recently intro- 
duced syrups of potassium-guaiacol sulphonate or 
sulphoguaiacolate. 

Guaiacyl or gajacyl is calcium ortho-guaia- 
colsulphonate, (C„H3[OH].[OCH3]S03)2.Ca; a blu- 
ish-gray powder soluble in water or in alcohol. 
Its 5 per cent, aqueous solution is violet-red, and 
is used hypodermically in quantities of 8 to 24 
minims as a local anesthetic. Sometimes a 10 
per cent, solution is employed. 

Guaialin is defined as the "benzoic acid ester 
of methylene-diguaiacol, the empiric formula of 
which is C24H18O4." It occurs as an odorless, 
nearly tasteless, greenish powder, containing 60 
per cent, of guaiacol. It is employed as an inter- 
nal antiseptic and antitubercular. Dose, 15 to 30 
grains several times a day. Also marketed as 5 
grain tablets. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Guaiamar is the trade name for guaiacol 
glyceryl ester, CeH^.OCHa.OCsHA, which is ob- 
tained by the action of guaiacol upon anhydrous 
glycerin. The drug occurs as a white powder, of 
bitter aromatic taste; soluble in 20 parts of wa- 
ter, in alcohol, chloroform, or ether; decomposed 
by alkalies. It is prescribed as an intestinal anti- 
septic and antitubercular. Dose, 3 to 15 grains. 

Guaiaperol or guaiaperon is a trade name ap- 
plied to guaiacol-piperidine or piperidine guaia- 
colate, CbHiiNH.0H.CcH,.0CH3. The medicament 
occurs as colorless crystals that are soluble in 
water, alcohol or ether, and decomposed by acids 
or alkalies. It is used chiefly in phthisis. Dose, 
2 to 5 grains several times a day. 

Guaiaquin {quinine guaiacol-Msulphonate) is 
said to consist of equal molecules of quinine and 
guaiacolsulphonic acid; a yellow, bitter, sour pow- 
der, soluble in water, alcohol or diluted acids. It 
is prescribed as an antipyretic and antituber- 
cular. Dose, 2 to 10 grains. 

Guaiaquinol or guaiakinol is chemically qui- 
nine dibromoguaiacolate, a substance freely 
soluble in water and combining the therapeutic 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 139 

properties of quinine, bromine and guaiacol and 
hence used as an antipyretic, sedative, and anti- 
tubercular. Dose, 8 to 20 grains. 

Guaisotol Is described as a "permanent, non- 
alcoholic syrup of guaiacol, containing 16 grains 
of guaiacol to the fluid ounce." Dose, 1 to 4 fluid 
drams. 

Guayarsin is a syrup containing in each 10 
grams 0.005 gram of arsenous acid and 0.2 gram 
of guaiacol combined with cinnamic acid and cal- 
cium hydrochlorophosphate. It is used in con- 
sumption chiefly. 

Guderin is the name applied in Germany to 
Gude's elixir of iron and manganese peptonate 
( "pepto-mangan" ) . 

Guatannol or guatannin is chemically guaia- 
col tannocinnamate, a substance insoluble in the 
usual solvents and employed in phthisis and 
bronchial catarrh in the form of 0.5 gram pills 
(so marketed), 2 to 10 at a dose. 

Guethol, chemically pyrocatechin mono- 
ethyl ether or guaiacol-ethyl, CoH^.OC.HbOH, is 
known also as wthacol, ajakol, homo-cresol, and 
thanatol; a nearly colorless, oily liquid, of aro- 
matic odor and crystallizing in the cold, and 
soluble in alcohol, ether or chloroform. It is 
intended as a succedaneum for guaiacol. Dose, 
4 to 8 minims several times a day, in pills. 

Gujasanol is the hydrochlorate of diethylglyco- 
coll-guaiacol, CeH,.OCH30.CO.CH2.N(C,H,),.HCl, 
occurring as white crystals of faint guaiacol odor 
and a salty, bitter taste, readily soluble in water, 
sparingly soluble in alcohol and insoluble in 
ether. It is used in tuberculosis. Dose, 15 to 45 
grains, in wafers, or subcutaneously in 20 per 
cent, solution. 

Gurmin is an antitoxic serum used in glanders 
of horses; it contains i^ per cent, of carbolic 
acid as a preservative. Dose, subcutaneously, 25 
to 50 c.c. 

Gynaicol is the name applied to tablets of un- 
divulged composition, intended for use in profuse 
menstruation. 



H 

Haeminol is said to consist of hemoglobin, 
paroglobulin and tlie pliosphates of blood, but 
free from fibrin and urates. 

Haemadurol is represented to be an alcohol- 
free iron and manganese preparation. 

Haemalbumin (Dahmen) is an iron compound 
prepared from blood, consisting of hematin, 
hemoglobin, serum albumin and paraglobulin, to- 
gether with the mineral salts of blood. It occurs 
as a blackish-brown powder of cinnamon odor and 
soluble in hot water and diluted alcohol. It is 
used as a blood builder. Dose, 15 to 30 grains 
thrice daily. 

Haeman is a liquid peptonized iron sulpho- 
cyanate (rhodanide), introduced by M. Baum as 
a readily absorbable iron preparation. 

Haemanutrid is a fluid form of sanguino 
(which seems to be inspissated blood), said to 
contain 70 per cent, of hemoglobin, 20 per cent, of 
glycerin, and 10 per cent, of cognac. 

Haemartol is an iron preparation similar to 
haematogen and used like the latter. 

Haematacid is a preparation analogous to 
haemalbumin. 

Haematogen (Hommel) is essentially germ- 
free evaporated blood obtained by a very tedious 
process. It is marketed only as an elixir con- 
taining in each pint 4 oz. of glycerin and 2 oz. of 
Malaga wine. It is intended as a "blood-builder." 
Dose, a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful two or 
three times a day before meals. 

Haematol is a sterilized pure hemoglobin. 

Haemoantitoxin is the name applied to a 20 
per cent, solution of Prof. Maragliano's tubercle 
antitoxin. The article occurs as a clear, red 
liquid, containing besides the active antitoxin, al- 
cohol, glycerin, hemoglobin and aromatics. Dose, 
a tablespoonful three or four times daily, before 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 141 

meals. It is advertised as specially serviceable 
as a prophylactic of tuberculosis. 

Haemoferrogen is what Sneek calls an article 
obtained by shaking defibrinated blood with ether 
so as to remove the fat, evaporating in vacuo, 
drying and powdering; a dry, odorless powder, 
150 grams of which correspond to 1 liter of 
haematogen. 

Haemoferrum is an aromatic solution contain- 
ing 4 grains of oxyhemoglobin to the teaspoonful. 
It is intended as a "blood-builder." Dose, 1 to 2 
teaspoonfuls thrice daily. 

Haemoform is the name given by Libbertz to 
his hematogen, a reddish-brown powder soluble 
on stirring in water, and marketed in dry, in- 
spissated and liquid forms. 

Haemogen is a "neutral, aromatic solution of 
peptonized manganese and iron, with free pepsin 
and hemoglobin;" a "blood-producer," given in 
doses of a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful three 
or four times a day, before meals. 

Haemomaltin or oxyhaemogloMn-maJtose is 
stated to consist of the active constituents of 
haematogen and rf malt. 

Haemoprotagor. or haematoprotagon is a 
homolecithin said to consist of nerve substance 
and hemoglobin and marketed as tablets. 

Haem.ose is dried, pepsinized and hydrochlo- 
rated blood-albumin; a light reddish-brown, al- 
most odorless and tasteless powder, soluble in 
alkaline solutions. It is used as a nutritive. 
Dose, a teaspoonful two or three times daily, in 
cold milk; hot liquids must be avoided. 

Haemostat is a Swiss nosebleed remedy con- 
sisting of quinine sulphate, tannic acid, and ben- 
zoinated lard. 

Haemostyptic Briininghausen is a fluid extract 
of a mixture of two parts of ergot and one part of 
golden seal, prepared with alcohol, ether and glyc- 
erin, in vacuo under pressure. It contains 2.6 
per cent, of total alkaloid, and is given as an in- 
ternal hemostatic in the dose of 30 drops four 
times daily. 



142 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIOA 

naemotropllin is a generic name for a line of 
hemoglobin preparations containing also glycer- 
inophosphates — plain, arsenated, ferrated, gauia- 
colated, and iodized haemotrophin. 

(For other articles whose names may some- 
times be spelled with hae, see under he.) 

naloform is a menthol-formaldehyde prepara- 
tion, which is used like forman in coryza. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Hardiella is a disinfectant similar in composi- 
tion to the liquor cresoli saponatus of the Ger- 
man Pharmacopeia. 

Hedonal (methylpropylcarbinol-urethane) oc- 
curs as a white powder, almost insoluble in wa- 
ter but soluble in the remaining organic solvents, 
and of faint aromatic odor and taste. It is pre- 
scribed as a mild hypnotic. Dose, 15 to 30 grains, 
as powders or in capsules or wafers. 

Helcosol is described under Msmuth pyrogal- 
late. 

Helfin is a vermifuge prepared by Dieterich 
from oleoresin of male fern and castor oil, put up 
in capsules, and accompanied by a set of cap- 
sules containing oil of turpentine and castor oil. 

Helmitol is chemically hexamethylenetetra- 
mine anhydro-methylenecitrate, CiHgOrCCHj),^., 
forming colorless crystals or white powder sol- 
uble in 15 parts of water, almost insoluble in 
alcohol and ether. It is used as a urinary 
disinfectant and acidifier, chiefly in cystitis, 
urethritis, and phosphaturia. Dose, 15 grains 
three or four times daily, in water. Acids slowly 
decompose it. Alkalies very easily so, with the 
formation of formaldehyde. Helmitol is identi- 
cal with new urotropin. See caution under for- 
maldehyde. 

Hemapoine is an "easily assimilable blood- 
making tonic, indicated in all cases of anemia." 

Hemarobin is a tonic and reconstructive, rep- 
resenting 25 per cent, of cod liver oil, combined 
with the hypophosphites of sodium, calcium, 
potassium, iron and manganese, with pepsin. 
Dose, 2 to 8 drams. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 143 

Hemicranin is a mixture of 5 parts of 
phenacetin, 1 caffeine, and 1 citric acid, and used 
as an analgesic and dental obtundent. Dose, 
10 to 15 grains. 

Heminal is a "blood-iron albuminate, free from 
fibrin, urea, and all excretory products, and con- 
taining 0.25 to 0.3 per cent, of metallic iron in 
soluble and assimilable form;" a dark-brown pow- 
der, of faintly acid taste. Dose, 5 to 15 grains 
thrice daily, in capsule or warm water. 

Hemisine is an English trade name for what 
is claimed to be the active principle of the supra- 
renal capsule, marketed as soloids and tabloids. The 
action and uses of this principle were described 
under adrenalin. 

Hemogallol is derived from hemoglobin by 
reduction with pyrogallol, and occurs as a red- 
dish-brown, insoluble powder. It is advertised as 
an assimilable organic iron compound. Dose, 4 
to 8 grains before meals, in powders with sugar 
or as 4-grain tablets (marketed also as such). 

Hemol is hemoglobin deoxidized by zinc, a 
dark-brown insoluble powder employed as a 
"blood-builder" in doses of 2 to 8 grains. 

Hemol, Arsenated. — See arsenhemol. 

Hemol Bromide is described under bromo- 
hemol. 

Hemol, Cuprated. — See cuprohemol. 

Hemol, Iodized, is referred to under iodo- 
hemol. 

Hemostatin of this market is a 1:1000 solu- 
tion of the active constituent of the suprarenal 
gland. (See adrenalin.) Abroad the name ap 
plies to a tribromphenol-bismuth like xeroform 
but containing less bromine. 

Henriettol, also designated as creosote-calcium 
oxysulpTiuret, is a tuberculosis remedy marketed 
as dragees. In the system it is said to give off 
hydrogen sulphide that destroys the virulence of 
the bacilli, and to form CaOCl, which latter, it is 
maintained, imparts alkalinity and resisting 
power to the blood. 

Heparaden is a dried extract of pig's liver, 1 
part of which represents 2 of the fresh organ. 



144 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

It Is used chiefly in jaundice. Dose, 30 to 60 
grains thrice daily, as tablets. 

Heritine is an ether-soluble alkaloid isolated 
by Gehe from heritiera japonica, which is indi- 
genous to the Sunda islands. It is said to act as 
an anodyne and nerve-sedative, but no dose- 
statements are given. Heritine Marpmann is a 
liquid extract of the root of heritiera, containing 
about 45 per cent, of alcohol, and without special 
taste or odor. Dose, 5 to 10 drops before break- 
fast. 

Hermitine is a French disinfectant solution 
said to be obtained by the electrolysis of sea 
water. 

Hermophenyl is the name adopted for mer- 
cury-sodium phenoldisulphonate, CaHj.OHg ( SO3- 
Na);, which occurs as a white powder contain- 
ing about 40 per cent, of mercury, soluble in 5 
parts of water, and insoluble in alcohol. It is 
used as an antiseptic, in 0.1 to 2 per cent, solu- 
tions, and internally and by intramuscular in- 
jection in syphilis. Dose by mouth, 14 to 1^ 
grain thrice daily; by injection, 30 to 60 minims 
of a 1 per cent, solution once a day. 

Herniarin, CjiHsaOm, is a glucoside of hernia- 
ria glabra, believed by Grein to be the active 
principle and a strong diuretic. 

Heroin Hydrochloride or Hydrochlorate, is a 
salt of the diacetic ester of morphine (diacetyl- 
morphine), of the formula CxjH„NO.O(COCHs).0- 
(C0CH3).HC1. It occurs as a white, neutral, bit- 
ter powder, soluble in 2 parts of water. It is 
used as a succedaneum for morphine, more par- 
ticularly in coughs, dyspnea, and morphinism. 
Dose, 1/24 to 1/12 grain, in solution. It should 
not be dispensed with sodium bicarbonate, am- 
monium carbonate or other alkaline bodies, be- 
cause of precipitation ensuing; and in preparing 
hypodermic solutions, the water should be steril- 
ized. The use of heroin is reported to have been 
followed in some cases by persistent vomiting, 
Antidotes, the same as of morphine. 

Heroline is a SZ% per cent, emulsion of pe- 
trolatum, containing besides in each fluid ounce 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 145 

heroin hydrochlorate 1/16 grain, calcium hypo- 
phospliite 8 grains, and sodium hypophosphite 8 
grains. It is used mainly in phthisis and chronic 
bronchitis. See caution as to heroin under the pre- 
ceding title. 

Hetocresol is ci7inamyJ-m.eta-cresol or meta- 
cresol cinnaviic acid ester, and occurs as a white 
to yellowish powder, insoluble in water but 
soluble in chloroform, ether or hot alcohol. It is 
used locally in surgical tuberculosis, as dusting- 
powder, or as ethereal spray with or without 
iodole or iodoform. 

Hetoform is bismuth cinnamate, which see. 

Hetol will be described under its chemical 
name, sodium cinnamate. 

Hetol-caffeine is a trade name for caffeine 
sodiocinnamate, which see. 

Hetol-sanguinal Pills contain besides san- 
guinal 1 milligram of hetol (sodium cinna- 
mate) each, and are used in tuberculosis — 1 
gradually increased to 6 daily. 

Hetralin is the trade name applied to dioxy- 
benzene-hexamethyJenetetrami7ie, or resorcin- 
hexamethylenetetramine, CH^COH) j. (CHJbN^, 
which occurs as white, permanent needles that 
are soluble in 14 parts of water and contain 60 
per cent, of hexamethylenetetramine (urotropin, 
formin, etc.). Dr. R. Ledermann introduced the 
article as a urinary disinfectant like urotropin. 
Dose, 8 grains three or four times a day. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Hexamethylenetetramine, (CHJaN^, is a con- 
densation product of ammonia and formaldehyde, 
known by various trade names — aminoform, am- 
monia-formaldehyde, cystamine, cystogen, formin, 
hexamine, uristamine, uritone, urotropin, etc. It 
occurs as a white, alkaline, crystalline powder, 
readily soluble in water but sparingly so in al- 
cohol. It is prescribed as a urinary disinfectant 
in cystitis, bacteriuria, urethritis, etc., sometimes 
as a uric acid solvent in gout and rheumatism. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains two or three times daily, well 
diluted, before meals. Hot water and acid syrups 
should be avoided lest decomposition of the drug 



146 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

ensue. It is marketed also as 5 and 7% grain tab- 
lets by different manufacturers. See caution 
under 'formaldehyde. 

Hexamethylenetetramine Anhydro-Metliyl- 
ene Citrate is better known as helmitol and new 
urotropin, and is described under the former 
title. 

Hexamethylenetetramine Bromethylate is a 
synonym of bromalin; see this title. 

Hexamethylenetetramine Citro-silicate. See 
silin. 

Hexamethylenetetramine Gallate. — See gallo- 
formin. 

Hexamethylenetetramine Oxymethylsulpho- 
nate is referred to under its trade name, thiol. 

Hexamethylenetetramine Salicylate. — See 
saliformin. 

Hexamine is one of the numerous trade names 
for hexamethylenetetramine, which see. 

Hippol is what A. Nicolaier, the introducer of 
urotropin, calls methylene-hippuric acid, which 
product is, however, not really an acid, but prob- 
ably an ester of hippuric acid, of the constitution 
CoH5.CO.N:(CH,)2.CO.O. It forms colorless, 
odorless and tasteless prisms, soluble in about 500 
parts of water and readily soluble in chloroform. 
It is recommended as a urinary disinfectant, read- 
ily splitting off formaldehyde in the system. Dose, 
15 to 30 grains three or four times daily. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Hirudin is a preparation of the leech, said to 
contain the constituent of leeches' heads that in- 
hibits coagulation of the blood, 1 milligram 
of which suffices permanently to keep 7.5 c.c. of 
blood uncoagulated without affecting its composi- 
tion. It occurs as brown scales or masses, soluble 
in water but insoluble in alcohol or ether. It is 
used in certain diseases of women, generally % 
grain dissolved in 30 minims of distilled water or 
physiologic salt solution; also technically. 

Histogenol is a mixture of 5 parts of disodium 
methylarsenate and 20 parts of nucleinic acid de- 
rived from herrings. It has been recommended 
by French physicians in tuberculosis. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 147 

Histosan is a consumption remedy, the chief 
constituent of which is a guaiacol-albumin com- 
pound, 

Holocaine Hydrochlorate is a salt of para- 
diethoxyethenyl-diphenylamidine, of the formula 
OC2H5.CoH,.NH.C.CH3.N.C8H,.O.aH„.HCl; a white, 
odorless, bitter powder, soluble in 50 parts of 
water, and freely soluble in alcohol. It is used as 
a local anesthetic, like cocaine, chiefly on the eye 
(in 1 per cent, solution). It is extremely sensi- 
tive to alkalies, hence its solutions should be 
made in porcelain capsules and kept in porcelain 
containers or in bottles that have been treated 
with hydrochloric or sulphuric acid (to remove 
the alkali present in the glass as far as possible) 
and thoroughly rinsed in distilled water; only 
distilled water should be used. 

Homocresol is a synonym of guethol; see this 
title. 

Honthin is a keratinized tannin albuminate 
used as an intestinal astringent; a grayish-brown 
odorless, tasteless, insoluble powder, slowly de- 
composed by alkalies. Dose, 5 to 30 grains sev- 
eral times daily. 

Hopogan is the German equivalent of Mogen. 

Huminal is a fluid, alkaline bog-earth extract 
used locally in rheumatism, gout, etc. 

Huxsal is described as "a double salt, partially 
a chemical combination and partially a mechani- 
cal mixture of antiseptic materials, which in 2 
per cent, solution is equal as a germicide to mer- 
cury bichloride." 

Hydracetin. — See acetylphenylhydrazin. 

Hydragogin is a vegetable diuretic consisting 
of "tincture of digitalis 1.5 parts, tincture of 
strophanthus 2.5 parts, scillipicrin and scillitoxin, 
the active principles of squill, and 0.5 part of 
oxysaponin;" a dark-brownish liquid which foams 
on being shaken. Dose, 7 to 15 drops every three 
or four hours, in sweetened water. 

Hydrargol is a trade name for mercury suc- 
cinimide, marketed in tubes containing 1 c.c. of 
solution corresponding to 7 milligrams of metal- 



148 THE MODEKN MATERIA MEDICA 

lie mercury. The article is said to cause no pain 
when injected intramuscularly. 

Hydrargotin is a brand name for mercury 
tannate. 

Hydrarg3rrol is mercury para-phenolsuJpho- 
nate, CeHi.OH.SOsHg; reddish scales, of pepper- 
mint odor and soluble in water and glycerin. It 
does not react with the ordinary tests for mer- 
cury or phenol nor coagulate albumin. It is 
recommended as a substitute for corrosive sub- 
limate. 

Hydrastine, C2iH2iNOe, is the white alkaloid 
of hydrastis canadensis (golden seal); small 
white crystals soluble in about 2 parts of chloro- 
form, 85 of ether, 120 of alcohol, and very slightly 
in water. It is used as a tonic and uterine 
hemostatic. Dose, ^4 to 1 grain, in pills. Maxi- 
mum dose, 11/^ grains. Its hydrochlorate is a 
white powder freely soluble in water, and hence 
used also externally as an astringent in skin, 
genito-urinary, and eye inflammations, in 0.1 to 
1 per cent, solutions or ointments. 

Hydrastone is "an alkaline digestive repre- 
senting the digestant properties of hydrastis, 
xanthoxylum, etc., in alkaline medium." It 
should not be mistaken for hydrastine, the white 
alkaloid of hydrastis. 

Hydrocerin is an ointment base consisting of 
wax, petrolatum, and water. 

Hydrocine is a pancreatized compound syrup 
of various essential oils, thymol, and cinnamic 
aldehyde, extolled for use in tuberculosis. 

Hydrogen Peroxide in powder form is the 
designation applied to a compound said to have 
the composition B204Na2.2H202, 25 grams of which 
dissolved in 1 liter of water at ordinary tempera- 
ture yield a solution containing between 2 and 3 
per cent, by volume of HA. For stronger solu- 
tions warm water is required. The solubility is 
increased by magnesium or potassium sulphate. 

Hydronal is another name for viferral. 

Hydrosol is an aqueous solution of collargol 
(colloidal mercury). 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 149 

Hypnal is the terse name for chloral-antipyrin, 
or monochloral-antipyrin, CCl3.CH.(OH)j.CuHi2- 
NjO; colorless crystals, soluble in 15 parts of wa- 
ter. It is used as a hypnotic and analgesic. Dose, 
15 to 30 grains, one to three times daily. 

Hypnalgine is an antipyretic and anodyne de- 
scribed by the makers as a coal-tar product, 
occurring in white, crystalline powder of slightly 
sweetish taste and soluble. Its chemical compo- 
sition is not fully stated. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 
Marketed also as 5-grain tablets and in combina- 
tions. 

Hypnoacetin is chemically acetopJienone- 
acteyl-para-amidophenol ether, a condensation 
product of para-acetamldophenol with phenol and 
glacial acetic acid. It occurs as shining leaflets 
readily soluble in water, insoluble in alcohol, and 
employed as an antipyretic and hypnotic. Dose, 
3 to 5 grains. 

Hypnone (acetophenone, phenyl-metJiyU 
ketone, or henzoyl-methide) , C0H5.CO.CH3, occurs 
as a colorless, oily liquid, of pungent taste, specific 
gravity 1.028, and soluble in alcohol, ether, 
chloroform, or oils; insoluble in water. It acts 
as a hypnotic, but is not often prescribed nowa- 
days. Dose, 2 to 6 minims, in capsules or emul- 
sion. It becomes crystalline on exposure to a low 
temperature. 

Hypnopyrin, originally defined as a chlorine 
derivative of quinine, is, according to French au- 
thorities, a mixture of certain quinine salts. It 
is very bitter, and soluble in water, alcohol, and 
acids. Dose, 4 to 8 grains thrice daily. 

Hyrgolum {colloidal or soluble mercury, mer- 
cury colloid) is a nearly black substance, quite 
freely though not completely soluble in water, in- 
soluble in alcohol or ether. It is used as a suc- 
cedaneum for the mercurials internally as well 
as by inunction (10 per cent, ointment). Dose, 
1^ to % grain thrice daily, in pills; children, 3 
to 20 drops of a 1 per cent, solution. 

Hysterol is another trade name applied to 
bornyl valerianate; see hornyval for properties, 
etc. 



laline is advertised as "a liquid disinfectant 
containing 25 per cent, of tar acids, besides otlier 
antiseptic properties." 

latrol is a "combination of iodine with coal tar 
derivatives" introduced some years ago here as 
a succedaneum for iodoform as a wound antisep- 
tic; a grayish-white, odorless powder. 

Ibit is chemically bismuth oxyiodotannate ; a 
greenish-gray, odorless, tasteless, insoluble pow- 
der, used like iodoform as a wound antiseptic. 

Ibogaine Hydrochlorate, obtained from the 
root of tabernanthe iboga, an apocynea indig- 
enous to the western coast of tropical Africa, has 
been recommended by French physicians as a 
powerful nervine of service, administered in 
dragees or pills, in neurasthenia, influenza, car- 
diac affections, and diphtheria. Dose, daily, % to 
1/^ grain. 

Ichden is the name of a Swiss product claimed 
to be identical with ichthyol. 

Ichthalbin (ichthyol albuminate) is a com- 
pound of ichthyol and albumin, 4 parts of which 
correspond to 3 parts of commercial ichthyol. It 
occurs as a grayish-brown, odorless, nearly taste- 
less powder, insoluble in the usual solvents. It 
is used chiefly as a succedaneum for ichthyol in- 
ternally, but also as a vulnerary (pure). Dose, 
10 to 30 grains two or three times daily. Mar- 
keted also as 5-grain tablets. 

Ichthammon is the name adopted for a German 
product purporting to be identical with ichthyol. 

Ichthargan (ichthyol-silver, silver sulpho- 
ichthyolate, silver thiohydrocarburosulphonate) 
occurs as a brown, odorless, hygroscopic powder, 
containing about 30 per cent, of silver, and sol- 
uble in water, glycerin or diluted alcohol, but 
insoluble in chloroform or ether. It is used as 
an astringent, antiphlogistic, and bactericide, 
mostly in % to 5 per cent, solutions or 1 to 10 per 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 151 

cent, ointments, or pure. Dose, 1/24 to i/4 grain, 
in solution. Its solutions should be dispensed 
in amber-colored bottles. 

Ichthermol {ichthyol-mercury, mercury sul- 
phoichthyolate) is a dark, odorless powder, in- 
soluble In water and intended as a wound anti- 
septic as well as internal antisyphilitic. It con- 
taina 24 per cent, of mercury. 

Ichthoferrin is synonymous with ferricMol. 

Ichthoform (ichthyol-formaldehyde) is a 
blackish-brown, almost odorless and tasteless, pul- 
verulent, insoluble compound of ichthyol and 
formaldehyde, used chiefly as an intestinal disin- 
fectant, but to a limited extent also as a wound 
antiseptic. Dose, 15 to 30 grains three or four 
times a day, in wafers or powders. Applied ex- 
ternally pure or diluted with talcum, etc. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Ichthogen is another product stated to be the 
same as ichthyol. 

Ichthosin is a compound of ichthyol and eosin 
intended to yield flesh-colored skin ointments. 

Ichthosote Pills each contain li^ grains of 
ichthyol and % grain of carbonated creosote fla- 
vored with peppermint oil. Used in tuberculosis. 

Ichthyol is a drug defined as "ammonium sul- 
pJioichthyolate" yet not sufficiently characterized 
chemically and the source of which is the dis- 
tillation product of a bituminous shale; a thick, 
brown, liquid, of disagreeable bituminous odor 
and taste, and somewhat variable composition — 
according to reports, containing besides the ac- 
tive constituent about 50 per cent, of water, 5 to 
7 per cent, of ammonium sulphate and 1 per cent, 
of a volatile oil to which the penetrating odor is 
due. It is soluble in water, insoluble in undi- 
luted alcohol or ether, and miscible but not 
soluble in glycerin or oils. It is used, as is 
known, mostly in skin diseases and gynecological 
affections, pure or in 5 to 50 per cent, ointments, 
paints, etc., and to a small extent also internally 
in phthisis, rheumatism, etc. (It has a horrid 
taste and produces disagreeable eructations). 
Dose, 3 to 30 minims three times daily, in capsules 



152 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

or pills. Ichthyol gives precipitates with metallic 
salts, acids, and alkaloidal salts, and is decom- 
posed by alkali hydrates and carbonates, and by 
iodine in ointment form. 

Ichthyol Albuminate. — See ichthalMn. 

Ichthyol, Austrian, is petrosulfol. 

Ichthyol-formaldehyde. — See ichthoform. 

Ichthyolidin {ichthyol-plperazin, piperazin 
sulphoichthyolate) is a blackish-brown powder, 
of faint tarry odor and bitter, unpleasant taste, 
and almost insoluble in the usual solvents. It 
was introduced by Dr. F. Dorn as a gout remedy. 
Dose, 15 grains three or four times daily, in 0.25 
gram sugar-coated tablets (so marketed). 

Ichthyol-iron. — See ferrichtol. 

Ichthyol-mercury is ichthermol. 

Ichthyol-piperazin, — See ichthyolidin. 

Ichthyol-salicyl is the generic name for three 
ichthyol mixtures containing respectively 25, 
3314, and 50 per cent, of sodium salicylate, and 
occurring as light-brown to dark-brown hygro- 
scopic powders or masses not clearly soluble in 
water; they are used in rheumatism, tuberculo- 
sis, etc., externally and internally. Dose of 50 
per cent., 15 to 30 grains per day. 

Ichthyol-silver is better known as ichthargan. 

Igazol is a mixture of paraformaldehyde and 
some iodine compound, used by Prof. Cervello by 
inhalation in phthisis. It is vaporized in a spe- 
cial apparatus; under the influence of heat for- 
maldehyde and iodine are given off. Two to 9 
grams are used to an ordinary room. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 

Imidiod is obtained by heating para-ethoxy- 
phenyl-succinimide with potassium iodide and 
iodine in diluted acetic acid, and occurs as a 
blackish powder that is used as a wound anti- 
septic like iodoform. 

Indoform {salicyl-methylene acetate) is ob- 
tained by the action of formaldehyde upon acetyl- 
salicylic acid, and occurs as a white powder, of 
sweetish, astringent taste, sparingly soluble in 
cold water. In the intestine it is said to liberate 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 153 

formaldehyde, and is intended for use especially 
in gout and neuralgias. Marketed as 0.5 gram 
tablets, 1 to 3 of which are taken thrice daily with 
meals. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Infantin is a German infant food. 

Intestin is described as a mixture of naphtalin 
(50), bismuth benzoate (50) and vanillin {^), 
that is used as an intestinal antiseptic in doses of 
8 to 15 grains several times a day. 

lodalbacid {iodized albumin) is an iodine 
substitution compound of albumin, containing 10 
per cent, of iodine. It occurs as yellowish pow- 
der, soluble in water, and is used in place of al- 
kaline iodides internally. Dose, 15 to 45 grains 
thrice daily, in tablets. 

lodalgin is the name applied to a French odor- 
less, water-soluble succedaneum for iodoform, 
containing 50 per cent, of iodine. 

lodalia is a saccharated iodine-tannin com- 
pound of French manufacture. It occurs as yel- 
low, vermiform concretions, of a faint balsamic 
odor and purely sweet taste, soluble in water, and 
containing 1.2 per cent, of iodine. It is intended 
as an efficient yet pleasant form of iodine for in- 
ternal administration in cases of syphilis, scrof- 
ula, arterio-sclerosis, tuberculosis, etc. Dose, 1 
to 2 teaspoonfuls three times a day. 

lodam^yl is iodized starch. 

lodamyloform is a compound of starch, for- 
maldehyde and iodine, and is used as a wound 
antiseptic. See caution under formaldehyde. 

lodan is defined as a solution of iodine in goose 
oil (adeps anserini), introduced by Dr. E. H. 
Shields as a readily penetrating and easily assim- 
ilable iodine preparation for topical as well as 
internal use. It is marketed in two strengths: 
10 per cent, designed for external use; and 25 
per cent., intended for internal use, and supplied 
in 5-minim and 10-minim capsules, 4 to 12 of 
which constitute the ordinary daily dose. 

lodcartan and lotan. — See under nehulates. 
Iodine Trichloride, IClj, occurs as a yellow, 
volatile, deliquescent powder, of very irritating 
odor, and soluble in water or alcohol. It is oc- 



154 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

casionally prescribed as an antiseptic solution or 
as an antifermentative; externally, in 1:1000 to 
1:200 solution; internally, in the dose of a tea- 
spoonful of a 1:1000 solution. Its solutions 
should be dispensed in dark-amber bottles. 

lodine-vasogen. — See under vasogen. 

lodipalms are iodized fat preparations, analo- 
gous to iodipin and containing 10, 20, and 30 per 
cent, of iodine respectively. They are employed 
as succedanea for the alkali iodides — subcutane- 
ously, internally or by enema. Dose per os (10 
per cent.>, 1 to 4 drams in emulsion, thrice 
daily. 

Iodipin is an iodine addition product of the 
fatty acids of sesame oil marketed in two 
strengths, containing 10 and 25 per cent, of 
iodine respectively, and occurring as thick, yel- 
low to brownish-black oils. They are prescribed 
as substitutes for the alkali iodides where these 
are not borne well. The 10 per cent, article is 
mostly given internally, while the 25 per cent, 
strength is used chiefly subcutaneously and by in- 
unction. The ordinary dose of the former is 1 to 
i fluid drams three or four times a day; of the 
25 per cent., 20 to 60 minims. Iodipin is best 
kept exposed to light. In the cold it gets turbid. 

lodoacetone is a solution of 2 parts of iodine 
in 5 of acetone, recommended by Prof. Chan- 
temesse locally in place of iodine tincture, par- 
ticularly in the treatment of boils. When freshly 
made it looks like iodine tincture, but in a fort- 
night it becomes black and thick. A new product 
is more irritating than an old one. 

lodocasein is a compound of iodine and casein 
occurring as a yellowish powder and used as a 
wound antiseptic. 

lodocin is one of the many succedanea for 
iodoform. 

lodocol or iodokol is a compound of iodine and 
guaiacol that is used in phthisis, chronic bron- 
chitis, etc., in doses of 3 to 6 grains four or five 
times a day. 

lodocresine. — See traumatol. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 155 

lodocrol {carvacrol iodide) is analogous chem- 
ically to aristol but made from carvacrol instead 
of thymol. It occurs as a light, odorless powder, 
soluble in ether, chloroform and oils, and is used 
as a substitute for iodoform. 

lodo-eigon. — See under eigons. 

lodo-ethylene is described under diiodoform. 

lodo-eugenol {eugenol iodide) was introduced 
by E. Liotard as a succedaneum for aristol of 
more powerful disinfectant action. It forms a 
reddish powder, of slight eugenol odor, insoluble 
in water, slightly soluble in alcohol, and quite 
readily so in ether and fatty oils. 

lodoferratin is ferratin with 6 per cent, of 
iodine; a reddish-brown, neutral powder, which 
is prescribed in scrofula, rickets and other ail- 
ments in which iodine and iron are indicated. 
Dose, 4 to 10 grains. 

lodoferratose is a 5 per cent, syrup of lodofer- 
ratin, intended to replace syrup of ferrous iodide. 
Dose (adult), lablespoonful two to four times 
daily. 

lodo-fersan Pastilles each contain 0.1 gram of 
potassium iodide and 0.4 gram of fersan. (See 
fersan. ) 

lodoformal (iodoformin ethyl iodide) results 
from the action of iodoformin on ethyl iodide, 
and forms a heavy, yellow powder of faint iodo- 
form odor and intended for use like iodoform. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Iodoform Album.inate. — See iodoformogen. 

lodoform-anilin is a solution of iodoform 
in pure anilin ("anilin oil"), recommended by 
Dr. A. A. Gray in suppurating ear catarrh; 4 or 
5 minims (not more) are introduced on cotton 
two or three times a week, the pledgets being 
removed in five minutes. It should be kept in 
dark-amber bottles; when of a crimson color from 
age, it is unfit for use. 

lodoforruin is iodoform-hexamethylenetetra- 
mine, CHl3(CH2)oN4; a whitish powder, with a 
slight iodoform odor, and insoluble in water, al- 
cohol, or ether. It contains 75 per cent, of iodo- 
form, which is liberated on contact with wound 



156 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

secretions. It is used as a wound antiseptic. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

lodoformin Ethyl Iodide is iodoformal. 
lodoformogen {iodoform albuminate) is a fine, 
yellow powder, smelling slightly of iodoform, of 
which it contains 10 per cent, combined with 
albumin. It is used as a dusting powder on 
wounds in place of iodoform. 

lodogallicin is chemically defined as bismuth 
oxyiodomethylgallate, and occurs as a light, 
dark-gray, odorless powder, containing about 23 
per cent, of iodine and 38 per cent, of bismuth, 
and insoluble in the usual solvents. It is in- 
tended as a drying wound antiseptic like airol. 

lodogelatin or iodized gelatin Bruschelli pre- 
pares with 3 parts of gelatin, 2 potassium iodide, 
1% iodine, 100 water, 2 sodium hypophosphite. 
and 2 calcium hypophosphite. It is a clear, color- 
less liquid, recommended as a well-borne iodine 
compound for internal use. Dose, 15 to 60 min- 
ims several times daily. 

lodogenol is described as a compound of pep- 
tonized albumin and iodine, intended as a sub- 
stitute for the alkali iodides internally where 
these are not tolerated. Dose, 10 to 30 minims 
several times a day, in water. 

lodoglobulin. — See thyroglandin. 

lodo-guaiacol Tablets consist of guaiacol car- 
bonate, strontium iodide, arsenic iodide, iron and 
manganese peptonate, pepsin and nux vomica, 
and are used in phthisis. Supplied in "full" and 
"half" strengths. (See also iodocol.) 

lodohemol or iodized hemol occurs as a brown, 
insoluble powder, containing 16 per cent, of 
iodine. It is used as an alterative in place of 
potassium iodide. Dose, 3 to 10 grains three 
times daily, in pills 

lodole (tetraiodo-pyrrole) , CJ^NH, is one of 
the oldest of the modern succedanea for iodoform. 
It occurs as a light, fine, grayish-brown, odorless, 
tasteless powder, containing 89 per cent, of iodine, 
easily soluble in alcohol, in 3 parts of ether, 15 of 
oil, and 50 of chloroform, only slightly soluble in 
water. Used chiefly externally, like iodoform, but 



THE MODEBN MATEEIA MEDICA 157 

to some extent also internally as an alterative. 
Dose, 1 to 3 grains thrice daily. Maximum daily 
dose, 15 grains, 

lodolecithin is an iodized lecithin prepared by 
a rather elaborate process. It forms a brownish- 
yellow, wax-like mass resembling ordinary leci- 
thin; readily soluble in ether and warm alcohol, 
swelling in water, and decomposed by alkalies 
into choline, glycerino-phosphoric acid and 
iodized fat acids. It is used chiefly in scrofula 
and syphilis. The regular article contains about 
8 per cent, of iodine, but stronger grades are also 
made. 

lodolen {iodole-albumin) is a yellowish, coarse, 
odorless, tasteless powder, insoluble in the usual 
solvents. lodolen externum contains 36 per cent, 
of iodole, and is used as a dusting powder on 
wounds. lodolen internum contains 10 per cent, 
of iodole, and is used instead of alkali iodides. 
Dose, 10 to 30 grains thrice daily. Keep well- 
stoppered. 

lodolin, CgHjNCHsCl.ICl, results from the inter- 
action of quinoline iodomethylate and iodine 
chloride in solution with hydrochloric acid. It 
forms a yellow powder, soluble in alcohol, in- 
soluble in water, and is used in place of iodoform 
on wounds. 

lodomuth is defined as bismuth oxyiodo-mefhyl- 
enedigallate of the formula BIjIjCibHuOij, and oc- 
curs as a reddish-brown, fii>e, odorless, tasteless 
powder, containing about 25 per cent, of iodine. 
It is prescribed as a drying wound antiseptic, ex- 
ternally, similar to iodoform, and as an astrin- 
gent internally (phthisical diarrhea chiefly). 
Dose, 5 to 30 grains. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

lodonaftan is an iodiz»d naphtha product, an 
ointment similar to naftalan, and containing 3 
per cent, of iodine. It is employed in skin 
diseases. 

lodo-nucleoid is a compound of iodine with 
nuclein; a reddish-brown powder, of faint iodine 
odor and taste, insoluble in the usual solvents 
and acids but soluble in alkaline liquids; iodine 



158 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIC A 

content 9i^ per cent. It is used in place of the 
alkali iodides. Dose, 10 to 60 grains three times 
daily. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

lodopetrox is a product analogous to iodine- 
vasogen, containing 6 per cent, of iodine in pet- 
rox ("oxidized petroleum"), and used chiefly by 
inunction (i,^ to 2 drams daily) to produce iodine 
effects on the system. 

lodophen was formerly a synonym of noso- 
phen but has latterly been applied to a compound 
of bismuth and aluminium with diiodophenol, 
which forms an orange powder of faint phenolic 
odor, insoluble in alcohol, ether, and water, but 
soluble in fats and diluted acids. It is used as a 
drying wound antiseptic and astringent. 

lodophenin or iodophenacetin, CjoH^jIsNaOi, re- 
sults from precipitating a solution of phenacetin 
in hydrochloric acid by means of potassium 
iodide. It occurs as a brown powder, soluble in 
alcohol and insoluble in water, and employed as 
a wound antiseptic and antirheumatic. Dose, 8 
to 15 grains. 

lodo-pheno-chloral is a mixture of equal parts 
of iodine tincture, carbolic acid, and chloral hy- 
drate, which is used as a paint in parasitic dis- 
eases. 

lodopyrin (iodoantipyrin ; antipyrin iodide), 
CiiHiiINjO, occurs as colorless crystals, soluble in 
alcohol, slightly soluble in water. It is used as 
an analgesic and alterative in tuberculosis, 
asthma, migraine, etc. Dose, 5 to 15 grains three 
or four times daily. It has been withdrawn from 
this market. 

lodor is described as a liquid, containing iodine 
organically combined and claimed to be free from 
the bad effects of alkali iodides. Dose, 15 to 45 
minims; children, 5 to 20 minims. 

lodose is a compound of nucleoproteid and io- 
dine (10 per cent.), occurring as a reddish pow- 
der insoluble in the usual solvents and acid 
liquids, but soluble in alkaline fluids. It is in- 
tended as a substitute for the alkali iodides 
where these are not borne. Dose, 10 to 30 grains, 
before meals. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 159 

lodosin is an iodine-albumin compound con- 
taining 15 per cent, of iodine, and marketed also 
as solution (0.25 per cent. I) the dose of which 
is 1 to 2 tablespoonfuls three times daily. It is 
used instead of the alkali iodides. 

lodosolvin is a preparation similar to iodine- 
rasogen, "containing 15 per cent, of iodine in oily 
emulsion-like form." It is used chiefly externally, 
but also internally. Dose, 5 to 10 drops; by in- 
unction, 1 dram. 

lodosyl is an iodine compound of the formula 
CeHJ.(OI)COOH, and occurring as a red, nearly 
odorless powder, insoluble in water and slightly 
soliible in alcohol, chloroform or ether. It is pre- 
scribed as a wound antiseptic, in place of iodo- 
form. Marketed also as gauze, ovoids, ointment, 
pencils, and conoids. 

lodoterpin is a compound of equal weights of 
iodine and terpin hydrate; a thick, black liquid, 
of faint terebinthinous odor and aromatic taste, 
and soluble in ether, chloroform, and alcohol, and 
miscible with water to yield a brownish-red 
liquid. It is readily absorbed by the skin, and is 
employed as a substitute for iodoform and iodine 
tincture externally (as ointment, or dusting- 
powder with kaolin). 

lodotheobromine (Prof. Rummo) consists of 
40 per cent, of theobromine, 21.6 of sodium iod- 
ide, and 38.4 of sodium salicylate. It occurs as a 
white powder, soluble in hot water, and used 
chiefly in aortic insuflaciency. Dose, 5 to 10 
grains two to six times daily. 

lodothym-oform or iodothymoloform is a yel- 
low, almost odorless powder, intended as a 
wound antiseptic. One of its elements — thymolo- 
form — is a formaldehyde combination. See cau- 
tion under formaldehyde. 

lodothyrine (thyroiodine) is a lactose tritura- 
tion of the supposed active principle of the thy- 
roid gland, 1 part representing 1 part of fresh 
thyroid; a whitish, sweet, stable powder, pre- 
scribed in struma, myxedema, certain chronic skin 
diseases and other affections in which the thyroid 



160 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 

gland is indicated. Dose, 15 to 30 grains daily 
in tliree doses. Marketed also as 5-grain 
tablets. 

lodothyroidin is a preparation analogous to 
Ihyroidin. 

lodozen is defined as a chemical combination of 
methyl salicylate and iodine; an amorphous 
powder of pleasant odor, used as an antiseptic 
like iodoform. Marketed also as 10 per cent, 
ointment. 

lodozole is identical with the better known 
sozoiodole, which see. 

lodylin is a light-yellow powder of faint iodine 
odor, chemically definable as bismuth iodosalicyl- 
ate and used as a drying antiseptic in sur- 
gery. 

lodyloform, is a compound of Iodine with gela- 
tin, occurring as an odorless, yellowish-brown 
powder containing 10 per cent, of combined 
iodine, and insoluble in water, alcohol or ether. 
It is prescribed principally as a wound-antiseptic 
similar to iodoform, but also internally as a sub- 
stitute for potassium iodide in doses of 5 to 30 
grains. 

lothion (diiodohydroxypropane) Is a yellowish, 
oily liquid of the specific gravity of 2.4 to 2.5, sol- 
uble in about 80 parts of water, 20 of glycerin, 
and 1% of olive oil, and miscible in all propor- 
tions with alcohol, ether, chloroform, vaselin and 
lanolin. It contains 79 to 80 per cent, of iodine. 
It is employed by inunction to secure the consti- 
tutional effects of iodine, pure, or diluted with 
oil, vaselin, or lanolin. Dose, per inunction, 15 
to 60 minims. The same name has been applied 
to an iodized and sulphurated sesame oil. 
Iron-albumose. — See ferro-somatose. 
Iron-Ammonium Arseno-citrate is a double- 
salt of ferrous arsenite and ammonium citrate, 
containing 1.4 per cent, of arsenous acid and 
about 15 per cent, of iron. It forms green scales 
freely soluble in water, and is used chiefly in 
pernicious anemia and malaria of children. 

Iron Cacodylate (ferric) or iron dimethylar- 
senate, [(CH3)2AsO.J3Fe, occurs as a grayish-green 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 161 

powder, moderately soluble in water, less freely 
so in alcohol, and containing 32 per cent, of ar- 
senous acid and 45 per cent, of ferric oxide. It is 
used subcutaneously or internally in chlorosis, 
lymphadenitis, etc., where both arsenic and iron 
are indicated. 

Iron Caseinate or Nucleo-Albuminate results 
from the action of calcium caseinate upon a fresh- 
ly made solution of ferrous lactate and forms an 
odorless, tasteless powder, containing 2 1^ per cent. 
of lerric oxide, insoluble in water, but soluble In 
weak solution of caustic soda or ammonia. It was 
recommended by Dawydow as a readily absorbed 
iron compound. Dose, 3 to 10 grains. 

Iron Dimetliylarsenate. — See iron cacodylate. 

Iron Glycerino-arsenate, also known as mar- 
sitriol, is prescribed by French physicians as an 
assimilable arsenical in doses of % grain three 
times daily. 

Iron Gly cerinophosphate, FePOiCaHj ( OH ) ,- 
-f2H20, occurs as greenish-yellow, odorless scales 
or powder, soluble in water or diluted alcohol and 
employed in chlorosis, neurasthenia, etc., in doses 
of 3 to 10 grains thrice daily as pills or in solu- 
tion. Its solutions do not keep long, and conse- 
quently they should be prepared in small quan- 
tities at a time and always with freshly sterilized 
water. 

Iron Hydrocyanate is a preparation lauded in 
recent years in the treatment of epilepsy and 
other neuroses, and given in doses of % to 2 
grains two or three times daily, in pills or tab- 
lets. No chemical description is published by 
the manufacturers; physically the article re- 
sembles regular iron ferrocyanide (Prussian blue, 
insoluble) and is perhaps identical with the lat- 
ter. 

Iron Nucleinate is marketed under several 
trade names, the best known of which is ferrinol; 
see this. 

Iron Paranucleinate. — See triferrin. 

Iron Phosphosarcolactate is described under 
earniferrin. 

Iron-Protylin. — See under protylin. 



162 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Iron Somatose. — See ferro-somatose. 

Iron Succinate (ferric succinate) occurs as a 
reddish-brown powder, nearly insoluble In water 
but soluble in acids. It is used chiefly in gall- 
stone disease. Dose, 10 to 60 grains after meals, 
10 drops of chloroform being given at the same 
time four to six times daily. 

Iron Sulphoichthyolate. — See ferricMol. 

Iron-Tropon consists of 911/^ per cent, of pep- 
tonized tropon (a compound of iron and albumin 
[% meat and % vegetable]), 6 per cent, of cocoa, 
and 21/2 per cent, of iron, and forms a soluble, 
palatable powder, which is given as a ferruginous 
food in doses of a teaspoonful three times daily, 
in milk, water, etc. 

Iron-Vitellin. — See oviferrin. 

Isarol, formerly known as ichthodin, is defined 
as ammonium sulphoichthyolate Pharm. Helv., 
and would hence appear to be identical with 
ichthyol. 

Iso-amyl-trimethylammonium Chloride is 
amylarin. 

Iso-butyl-orthocresol Iodide. — See euro- 
phen. 

Isoform is the name applied to para-iodo-anisol, 
CeH4.OCH3.IO2, obtained by oxidizing iodo-anisol. 
The drug forms silvery scales, slightly soluble in 
water, and insoluble in alcohol or ether. It is 
intended as a wound antiseptic like iodoform, and 
is marketed only as dusting-powder (with an 
equal weight of calcium phosphate), paste (1:1 
glycerin), gauze (1 to 10 per cent.), and cap- 
sules (for internal use). 

Iso-naphtol is heta-naphtol. 

Iso-physostigmine is an alkaloid obtained 
from the ether-insoluble portion of the alcoholic 
extract of calabar bean used in the preparation of 
physostigmine (eserine). It has the same chem- 
ical formula as the latter base, but it is insoluble 
in ether; and, according to Prof. Ogiu, similar 
also physiologically, but more intense, rapid, and 
lasting in action than eserine, both in local as 
well as internal use — 0.75 gram of iso-physostig- 
mine correspond to 1 gram of physostigmine. 



THE MODEEN MATEBIA MEDICA 163 

Dose of the sulphate or salicylate, 1/150 to 1/60 
grain; applied as a myotic in 0.1 per cent, solu- 
tion, which should be dispensed in amber bottles. 
Antidote, atropine. 

Isopral is chemically trichlor-isopropyl alcohol, 
CCl3.CH.(0H).CH„ a crystalline, volatile, sub- 
stance of camphoraceous odor and burning taste, 
and soluble in alcohol, ether or water (about 30 
parts). It is prescribed as a hypnotic, in doses of 
10 to 30 grams, given in solution. It should not 
be dispensed in paper, on account of its volatility, 
and it should be kept in a cool place. 

Iso-pyramidon Citrate. — See citrovanille. 

Isson is described as a palatable, permanent 
liquid preparation of iron, containing 0.2 per 
cent, of ferrous saccharate. Dose, Y^ to 1 teas- 
spoonful; children take 10 to 30 drops. 

Isutan is described under bismutan. 

Itrol was the name formerly applied to a cer- 
tain brand of silver citrate then also desig- 
nated as "antiseptic Cred6," but it has lat- 
terly been abandoned in favor of the chemical 
appellation, under which it will be described in 
these pages. 

Ixodin is an extract of wood cells prepared 
with physiological solution of sodium chloride. It 
is said that it prevents the coagulation of the 
blood. 

Izal is a natural mixture of resin soaps and 
tar oils rich in cresols, obtained as a by-product 
in the distillation of coal. It is claimed to be a 
strong, relatively non-poisonous disinfectant. 
Dose (in intestinal diseases) 5 to 10 drops, in 
capsules. 



Jamrosin is a fluid extract of an East-Indian 
myrtacea, used in France in diabetes. Dose, 6 to 
10 drops three times daily. 

Jatrevin is stated to be a condensation product 
of menthol and isobutyl-phenol; a clear, color- 
less liquid, of peppermint-like odor, and readily 
soluble in alcohol but only slightly soluble in 



164 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIOA 

water or ether. It is used by spray-inhalation 
(2^ to 5 per cent, solutions) in phthisis and 
respiratory catarrhs. 

Jecorin Tablets each contain 45 grains of cod 
liver oil, with powdered extract of malt, cocoa, 
sugar and glycerin, and serve as a palatable form 
of giving cod liver oil. Abroad the name jecorin 
is applied also to a substitute for cod liver oil, 
20 grams of which are stated to contain 0.1 each 
of calcium hydrochlorophosphate and calcium lac- 
tophosphate, 0.05 each of bromine and iodine, 
0.075 of iron iodide, and "extract artemisia com- 
pound." 

Jecorol is a brand name for the extractives of 
cod liver oil (known also by the names morrhuol, 
gaduol, etc.) It is applied in Switzerland to an 
emulsion of cod liver oil containing chocolate and 
flavoring principles, and marketed also in various 
combinations — with guaiacol (2 per cent.), with 
iodine (10 per cent, iodipin), and with lecithin 
(0.6 per cent.). 

Jequiritol is a sterilized, standardized prepara- 
tion of jequirity seed introduced by Prof. Roemer 
for use in certain chronic eye diseases in which 
jequirity infusion was formerly employed. It 
contains 50 per cent, of glycerin, and is market- 
ed in four strengths: Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Jequiritol Serum is an antitoxin prepared in 
accordance with Behring's principles, and said to 
be capable of promptly arresting the action of 
jequiritol, for which purpose it is solely used. 

Jodalbacid, Jodipin, and other "jod" deriva- 
tives, see under /. 

Jodkresol. — See traumatol. 

Johimbine. — See yohimbine. 



K 

Kalagua Extract is said to be prepared from a 
South American plant. It has a garlicky odor 
and taste, and has been introduced as a remedy in 
phthisis. It is marketed only as pills; dose, 1 to 

4 three times daily. 

Kalarine is a coal tar antipyretic and analgesic, 
claimed to be "free from depressing effect" — 
probably a mixture consisting essentially of ace- 
tanilid with some caffeine (intended to counter- 
act the depressing effect of the former). Dose, 

5 to 10 grains. 

Kalendol is an odorless astringent and anti- 
septic dusting-powder containing calendula, ich- 
thyol and boric acid in combination with "iml- 
citin, a synthetic coal tar product with an iodine 
base." It is soluble in water or glycerin, and in a 
mixture of alcohol and water, but insoluble in 
oils, pure alcohol or ether. 

Kamokosin is a tapeworm remedy consisting 
essentially of kamala and koussein (kosin). 

Kastanol, also known as PflUgge's extract of 
horse chestnut, is described as containing the ac- 
tive principle of horse chestnut with 8 per cent, of 
camphor. It is used by inunction or as a paint 
in rheumatism, neuralgia, and other painful af- 
fections. 

Katharin is a name applied to carbon tetra- 
chloride, which is used, as is known, us a local 
anesthetic. 

Katharol is said to be an aromatized solution 
of hydrogen peroxide intended as a mouth-wash 
and disinfectant. 

Kavakavin Tablets, employed in diseases of the 
urinary tract, contain extract of kava-kava and 
hexamethylenetetramine. See caution under for- 
maldehyde, the last named article beiug a con- 
densation product of formaldehyde. 

Kawa Sandal. — See gonosan. 



166 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

Keimol is a recently introduced liquid disin- 
fectant of the listerine type, the active constitu- 
ents of which are salol, thymol, oil of winter- 
green and menthol. It is used externally from 
full strength down to a 1:4 dilution. Dose, 1 
fluid dram diluted. 

Kelene is a brand of ethyl chloride, marketed 
in automatic tubes, plain and in various combina- 
tions (cocaine, formaldehyde, etc.) designated as 
"autosprays." See caution as to formaldehyde 
combinations under formaldehyde. 

Kelene-methyl is a mixture of compressed 
ethyl chloride and methyl chloride, used as a lo- 
cal anesthetic. 

Kephalopin is a cold-prepared oily extract of 
fresh brain substance that is used per os or hy- 
podermically in hysteria, neurasthenia and other 
nervous diseases. Dose, 2 to 5 c.c. 

Keramin Soap (Unna) is a soda-potash soap 
containing balsam of peru and flavored with oils 
of clove and cinnamon. It is employed chiefly 
in eczema and other skin diseases. 

Kermelol is the name applied to keratinized, 
silver-coated capsules, 25 of which contain 7.5 
grams of extract of male fern and 0.15 gram of 
santonin, and which are prescribed as an an- 
thelminitic. 

Kil is a grayish-white mineral mass consisting 
chiefly of silicic acid, alumina, ferric oxide, chalk 
and magnesium carbonate, and used for aseptic 
dressings in skin diseases and as a plaster and 
soap base. 

Kineurin is a trade name for quinine glyeeri- 
nophosphate. 

Kolanin is a glucoside discovered by Knebel 
and considered by him as the active principle of 
kola. It is marketed as 3-grain tablets; dose, 1 
to 3. 

Korpulin, Krealbin, and some other remedies 
whose names are often spelled with a "K," see 
under G. 

Koryl is defined as a combination of "ortho- 
phenolsulphone-borosalicylic acid with iodomen- 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 167 

thol (1 per cent.);" a white powder, used as an 
antiseptic. (Must not be confounded with coryl, 
a solution of methyl-chloride in ethyl chlor- 
ide.) 

Eresamine (kresolamine ; trikresolamine) Is a 
clear, alkaline, watery solution containing 25 per 
cent, each of ethylenediamine and trikresol, 
of carbolic odor, and soluble in all proportions in 
glycerin, up to 33 per cent, in water, but in- 
soluble in petrolatum. It is used in tuberculosis 
by inhalation (25 to 36 per cent, solutions, in 
skin diseases (4 to 20 per cent, ointments), 
wounds (% to 1^ per cent, lotions), etc. Ex- 
posure darkens the article. 

Kresapol or kresosaponate is a disinfectant cor- 
responding to liquor cresoli saponatus Ph. G. 

Kreso is a coal-tar product consisting largely 
of cresols and the higher phenols, and hence 
analogous to creolin. It is used in the same 
strengths as carbolic acid as a disinfectant, de- 
odorant and parasiticide. It is marketed also as 
a "dip" for parasitic diseases of animals. 

Eresochin consists of neutral quinoline tri- 
cresylsulphonate and a loose compound of quino- 
line with trikresol; it contains 33 per cent, of 
quinoline and' 17 per cent, of trikresol, and oc- 
curs as a fluid soluble in 20 parts of water, and 
used as a surgical disinfectant in 2 to 5 per 
cent, solutions. 

Kresolamine. — See kresamine. 

Kresosolvin was formerly known as creolin 
Ahrens, in contradistinction to creolin Pearson, 
the article generally known on this market sim- 
ply as creolin. See creolin. 

Kresotina is defined as a "derivative of repeat- 
edly purified creosote, which is then combined 
with benzoic acid in presence of CO,." It has a 
pleasant, aromatic odor, and is intended as a 
substitute for creosote. 

Kresulfol is a cresolsulphonic acid obtained by 
mixing 2 volumes of crude cresol with 1 volume 
of crude sulphuric acid. It is employed as a dis- 
infectant, in 3 per cent, aqueous solution. 

Eristallin. — See crystalline. 



168 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 

Kryofine, methoxy-acet-para-phenetidin, CH»- 
OCH2.CONH.CgH4.OC.H5, is a condensation prod- 
uct of para-phenetidin and methylglycholic acid; 
fine, colorless, odorless, tasteless crystals, freely 
soluble in alcohol, ether or fixed oils, and spar- 
ingly so in cold water (600). It is prescribed as 
an anodyne and antipyretic. Dose, 4 to 7% 
grains. Marketed also as tablets of these sizes. 

Kryogenin. — See cryogenine. 



Labordine will be referred to under guinal- 
gen. 

Lactagol is a dry extract of cottonseed; a fine, 
yellowish-white powder, insoluble in water but 
forming a sort of emulsion therewith. It was in- 
troduced by Dr. B. Beckman of Hamburg as a 
galactagogue. Dose, a heaping teaspoonful three 
or four times daily, in milk. 

Lactanin is a bismuth dilacto-monotannate, oc- 
curring as a yellowish, odorless, tasteless, insol- 
uble powder, and prescribed as an intestinal 
astringent. Dose, 5 to 15 grains several times 
daily. 

Lactocresol is a coal tar disinfectant analogous 
to creolin — a dark, thick liquid, forming a milky 
emulsion with water. For surgical purposes it is 
used in % to 2 per cent, solutions. 

Lactogen is the name applied to pills contain- 
ing extracts of saw palmetto, goat's rue, coca, 
kola, and peptonized iron, and used in anemia 
and neurasthenia. Dose, 2 pills before meals and 
at bedtime. 

Lactophenin (lactyl-para-phenetidin) , CgHi.O,- 
C2H,.NH.CO.CH(OH)CH3, differs chemically from 
phenacetin only in having a lactic acid in place of 
the acetic acid constituent. It occurs as colorless, 
odorless, slightly bitter crystals, soluble in al- 
cohol, and in 300 parts of water, and decomposed 
by acids or alkalies. It is an antipyretic and 
analgesic. Dose, 8 to 15 grains. Marketed also in 
0.5 and 0.25 gram tablets. 



THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 169 

Lactoserum. — See under serum. 

Lacto-Somatose is a compound of tannin with 
milk albumose, occurring as a tasteless, odorless 
powder, soluble in water, and containing 5 per 
cent, of tannic acid. It is used as a food, especi- 
ally in children with intestinal diseases. Dose 
(child) 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls per day. 

Lactylphenetidin is lactophenin. 

La-Kama is a tapeworm remedy marketed as 
weak, each capsule of which contains 1.25 grams 
of kamala and 0.1 gram of dried extract of pome- 
granate root bark; and as strong, each capsule 
containing 1.5 grams of kamala and 0.1 gram of 
dried extract of pomegranate. 

Lanagen and Lanain are brands of adeps lance 
hydrosus. 

Lanesin is said to consist essentially of 
adeps lanffi and aluminium acetate, and is used 
on insect bites. 

Lanthyol is a burn and inflammation ointment 
composed of lanolin, carbolic acid, ichthyol, alum, 
oil of thyme "a stimulating base" (probably the 
manufacturers' aristoform). 

Lanum is a brand of hydrous wool fat. 

Largin (protalHn-silver) occurs as a gray pow- 
der containing 11 per cent, of silver and soluble 
in 10 parts of water, also soluble in glycerin but 
insoluble in alcohol. It is prescribed as an 
astringent and bactericide in ^ to 5 per cent, 
solutions. Internally it is occasionally pre- 
scribed in gastric or intestinal ulceration. Dose, 
5 to 8 grains in pills. Its solution should be dis- 
pensed in dark-amber bottles. 

Laricin is a synonym of agaricin; see under 
this title. 

Laurenol is a French disinfectant, marketed as 
No. 1 (medicinal, and consisting of a solution of 
copper sulphate, zinc chloride, alum, hydrochloric 
acid, picric acid, glycerin and water) and as No. 
2 (solution of zinc chloride, alum and copper sul- 
phate, intended as a general disinfectant). 

Lavalum is an antiseptic, astringent wash 
consisting of zinc sulphocarbolate 10 per cent., 
alum 15 per cent., ichthyol 1 per cent., and 



170 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

thymol, eucalyptol and oil of wintergreen. It is 
used diluted with 5 to 10 parts of water. 

Lavoderma is a freely soluble soap containing 
about 30 per cent, of mercury caseinate and em- 
ployed in the treatment of parasitic skin diseases. 

Laxan is a laxative tablet containing 0.1 gram 
of phenolphtalein and 0.3 gram of vanillated cacao 
mass. 

Laxatol is the name applied to several laxative 
preparations, both here and abroad. One con- 
sists essentially of phenolphthalein and is sup- 
plied in three strengths; another of a mixture of 
vegetable laxatives, etc. 

Lecin is described as a stable elixir of neutral 
iron albuminate, containing % per cent, of iron, 
20 per cent, of alcohol, 10 per cent, of sugar, and 
aromatics. It is prescribed as a hematopoietic. 
Dose, a teaspoonful to a dessertspoonful, after 
meals, in water. 

Lecithan is the name given by a Swiss firm to 
its lecithin. 

Lecithcerebrin is a lecithin compound obtained 
from brain substance, and employed as a nerve 
sedative and hypnotic. 

Lecithin (lecithol) is a phosphorus constituent 
of animal and vegetable tissues, more especially 
of nerve substance and yolk of egg. Chemically 
it is choline distearophosphoglyceride, CjHgjNPO,. 
That on the market is made from egg yolk and 
is hence known also as ovilecithin; a yellow, 
waxy, hygroscopic mass, soluble in acohol, chlor- 
oform, ether and fatty oils, and swelling up but 
not dissolving in water. It is used as a nerve 
tonic. Dose, 1 to 2 grains three times daily, in 
pills; subcutaneously, 15 to 45 minims of 5 per 
cent, solution in olive oil. Marketed also as 0.05 
and 0.1 gram pills. 

Lecithinogen is a secret mixture recommended 
for various affections, said to consist of 90 per 
cent, of "liquor ethyl, hypophosphor." and 10 per 
cent, of cane sugar. 

Lecithmedullin is a lecithin preparation made 
from bone marrow, and prescribed chiefly in car- 
diac neuroses, pulmonary edema, etc. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 171 

Lecithol. — See lecithin. 

Lecitogen {Jafte's lecithin-cacao) contains in 
each tin 3 grams of lecithin mixed with pure 
cacao. It is used as an invigorating food es- 
pecially in nervous and diabetic people. 

Lemon Tea ("zitronenthee" in German) is a 
golden-brown tea of pleasant aromatic-acidulous 
taste, prepared by drying lemons deprived of 
seeds by a special process that does not entail 
any loss of the juice or impairment of the aroma 
of the fruit. It is used for the so-called "lemon- 
juice cures," and makes a palatable drink. 

Lenicet is a sparingly soluble anhydrous 
aluminium acetate, containing 30 per cent, of 
aluminium oxide. 

Lenigallol {pyrogallol triacetate) occurs as a 
white powder, insoluble in water, and was intro- 
duced as a mild substitute for pyrogallic acid 
(pyrogallol) in skin diseases, chiefly chronic ec- 
zema, to be applied in i^ to 10 per cent, ointments 
or pastes. It does not stain. 

Lenirobin or chrysaroMn tetra-acetate was 
launched as a succedaneum for chrysarobin, to be 
used like the latter but less poisonous and non- 
staining. It is soluble in chloroform, insoluble 
in water. 

Lentin is a trade name latterly applied to 
meta-phenylenediamine, recently recommended 
as an antidiarrheal in children. 

Lepine is a French antiseptic solution contain- 
ing mercuric chloride, carbolic, salicylic and ben- 
zoic acids, calcium chloride, bromine, chloro- 
form and quinine hydrobromate. 

Leprolin is a lepra antitoxin prepared by B. R. 
Rost, and used subcutaneously in the same man- 
ner as tuberculin. 

Letalbin or lecithin albuminate occurs as a yel- 
low, stable powder containing 20 per cent, of 
lecithin. It is recommended as a "nerve nutrient" 
and reconstructive. Dose, 5 to 10 grains three 
times daily. 

Leucrol is advertised as "prepared from a tropi- 
cal plant unknown In the markets and to botan- 



172 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

ists," in the form of fluid extract and pastilles. 
It is intended for internal use in leucorrhea. 

Leuco-alizarin. — See anthraroMn. 

Levulo-Chloral is described as being a com- 
pound of levulose and cliloral that is soluble in 
water and in alcohol, and has hypnotic action. 
Dose, 2 to 10 grains; maximum dose, 15 grains. 

Levulose {fructose; fruit sugar; diabetin) is 
a sweetening agent especially intended for dia- 
betic subjects. In the pure state it forms a white 
powder, freely soluble in water, and of a purely 
sweet taste. Dose, 3 drams to 2 ounces per day. 

Levurargyre is a mercury nucleinate intro- 
duced by Trillat, made with the nuclein of yeast, 
and is analogous to mercurol. It is without me- 
tallic taste and is not attacked by sulphuretted 
hydrogen. It is prescribed in syphilis. Dose, % 
to 2 grains. 

Levuretin is a powdered, dried beer-yeast 
recommended by Dr. Goliner in diabetes, furun- 
culosis, and chronic eczema, internally. Dose, a 
teaspoonful three times a day, before meals, in 
water. 

Levurine is another dried yeast prepared 
specially for medicinal purposes, and used like 
the preceding article. 

Levurinose is a beer yeast that has been dried 
in a current of cold air. It is used internally like 
levuretin, in diabstes, furunculosis, chronic ec- 
zema, etc. Dose, a teaspoonful three times a day. 

Lianthral (extractum olei Uanthracis) is a 
thick, benzol extract of coal tar, used in skin af- 
fections instead of the older liquor and tinctura 
lithanthracis, in the form of ointment, tincture, 
spray, soap, paste, etc. 

Libanol is the ethereal oil of cedrus atlantica, 
of agreeable odor and taste, soluble in alcohol, 
and insoluble in water. Some consider it a val- 
uable remedy in chronic catarrhs of the respi- 
ratory tract, as well as in gonorrhea and cystitis. 
It is said not to disturb the stomach or irritate 
the kidneys as oil of sandalwood does. Dose, 15 to 
30 minims three times daily, in capsules, or with 
cod liver oil. 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 173 

Lienaden is a dried extract of the spleen, 
which is administered in malaria and hypertro- 
phied spleen in quantities of 2 to 6 drams per 
day. 

Lignosulphite is a volatile aromatic fluid ob- 
tained as a by-product in the manufacture of cel- 
lulose, and containing besides sulphites the 
ethereal oils, resins and balsamic constituents of 
the wood. It is used by inhalation in tubercu- 
losis and chronic bronchial catarrh. 

Linadin is a dry extract of the spleen, occur- 
ring as a dark-brown, almost odorless powder of 
marked cod liver oil taste, containing about 1 per 
cent, of iron and 0.023 per cent, of iodine, and 
insoluble in water. It is prescribed in anemia, 
scrofula, enlarged spleen, etc. Dose, 1 to 3 tab- 
lets (only so marketed), washed down with 
water. 

Linimentum Carragheni is described by Wille 
as an unctuous mass soluble in water, prepared 
from Irish moss and intended to serve as a sub- 
stitute for vaselin and oil as a vehicle for anti- 
septics and other drugs. 

Linogen is what Mindes calls his analogue of 
vasogen. 

Lipiodol and Lipobrom.ol are iodized and 
brominized oils, containing respectively 40 per 
cent, of iodine and 33% per cent, of bromine or- 
ganically combined. Lipiodol is specially intend- 
ed for subcutaneous use where a pronounced 
iodine effect is desired. Lipobromol is a pale- 
yellow liquid soluble in ether or chloroform but 
insoluble in alcohol or water. It is intended as 
a substitute given per os and hypodermically, 
for potassium bromide. Dose, 15 to 60 grains. 

Lipogenin is a new Russian ointment base, 
made in solid and liquid forms. The former oc- 
curs as a porcelain-like, odorless mass of crystal- 
line structure, which instantly melts at body 
temperature. Liquid lipogenin is a colorless, 
odorless, oily, neutral liquid crystallizing in the 
cold. 

Liquor adheesivus. — See fllmogen. 



174 THE MODEBN HATEBIA MEDICA 

Liquor Ammonii Ergotinici is a clear, brown 
liquid, 1 c.c. of which contains 0.3 gram of am- 
monium ergotinate (equivalent to 3 grams of er- 
got). It is used for the same purposes as ergot, 
internally or subcutaneously. Dose, 10 to 30 
minims. 

Liquor H8em.ino-albumiiiatus is an analogue 
of hemalbumin, consisting of an aromatized 3 
per cent, solution of ferralbumin (Harras). 

Liquor Th.iophosphini is a syrup of potassium 
guaiacolsulphonate (known on this market aa 
thiocol) containing also some calcium salts. 

Liquor Thyreoideee Oonservatus Is defined as 
a stable liquid preparation of the thyroid gland 
of animals which have been treated for some time 
with potassium iodide or some other iodine com- 
pound. Six cubic centimeters represent one 
thyroid gland. It is used in goiter, obesity, myxe- 
dema, etc. Dose, 3 drops three times daily, grad- 
ually increased. 

Liquor Triferrini. — See triferrol. 

Lithion Diuretin is theobromine-lithium and 
lithium salicylate, or, as it is commonly desig- 
nated, theobromine and lithium salicylate; see 
this. 

Lithium Agaricinate is a white powder read- 
ily soluble in water and administered in doses of 
1^^ to 3 grains at bedtime to arrest phthisical 
night-sweats. 

Lithium Arrhenal is defined as lithium chlor- 
hydromethylarsenate, and forms very deliquescent 
crystals soluble in water. Dose, 1 to 3 grains 
twice daily, with meals, in water or as pills. 

Lithium Citro-quinate is a gout compound in- 
troduced by Dr. A. Voswinkel of Berlin, some- 
thing like urosin (defined as lithium quinate). 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Lithium-Ferrosol is ferrosol containing also a 
lithium salt. 

Lithium Glycerinophosphate (glycerophos- 
phate or phosphoglycerite) has the formula 
LijP04C3H5(OH)2 and occurs as a white powder 
readily soluble in water. It is used chiefly in 
gout associated with nervous weakness. Dose, 5 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 175 

to 15 grains three times daily, as powders, syrup, 
or solution. Its liquid preparations do not keep 
but a few days; they should be prepared with 
sterile water, and in small quantities at a time. 

Lithium-Mercury Iodide (lithiomercuric io- 
dide, mercuricide) is a double salt containing 34 
per cent, of Hg. 65 of I. and one of Li, frealy solu- 
ble in water, not precipitated by fixed alkalies, 
hence not decomposed by the blood, and claimed 
to be a stronger germicide than the older mercuric 
salts in general yet less toxic (because it con- 
tains less mercury). 

Lithium Quinate (chinate) is described under 
its trade name, urosin. 

Lithium Vanadate {lithium meta-vanadate) , 
LiVOs, occurs as a yellowish powder, soluble in 
water. It has been used in gout— 1/15 grain per 
day every two or three days, in water. 

Lithyol is an Austrian product claimed to be 
identical with ichthyol. 

Lofotin is so-called "hydroxyl-free cod liver 
oil." Marketed also combined with 0.01 per cent, 
of phosphorus. 

Lcfotol is cod liver oil impregnated with car- 
bon dioxide gas, whereby the natural taste of the 
oil is destroyed. 

Loretin is chemically meta-iodo-ortho-oxy-guin- 
oline-sulphoniG acid, CeHiN.I.OH.SOaH, and forms 
a yellow, nearly odorless powder, only slightly 
soluble in water or alcohol, almost insoluble in 
ether or fatty oils, and containing 36.2 per cent, 
of iodine. It is used as a wound antiseptic in 
place of iodoform — as powder, ointment, collo- 
dion, etc.; recently recommended also in tubercu- 
losis and other infectious diseases, 3 to 8 grains 
three times a day. (See also griserin.) 

Loretin-Bismuth. — See bismuth loretinate. 

Loretin-Sodium, — See griserin. 

Losophan is a tri-iodo-meta-cresol, CsHIj.OH. 
CHj, which results from the action of potassium 
iodide upon sodium ortho-oxy-para-toluylate. It 
occurs as colorless needles, contains about 80 per 
cent, of iodine, is easily soluble in ether, chloro- 
form or fatty oils, sparingly soluble in alcohol, 



176 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDIC A 

and insoluble In water. It has been used in 1 to 
3 per cent, ointments or paints in fungous skin 
diseases, but is rarely prescribed nowadays. 

Lozon is a brand of solution of hydrogen per- 
oxide. 

Lucilline is a brand of petrolatum. 

Lutein is the name applied to "tablets con- 
taining 0.3 gram of the dried yellow substance of 
cows' ovaries." The article is used in certain 
female complaints. Dose, 1 to 3 tablets three 
times daily. 

liycetol is the terse name for dimethyl-pipera- 
zin tartrate, (C.H4)j(NCH3)j.C4HA- The drug 
occurs as a white powder of pleasant, acidulous 
taste, and readily soluble in water. It was in- 
troduced as a substitute for piperazin in gout 
and gravel. Dose, 4 to 8 grains four times a day 
in mineral water. 

Lygosine is the name by which Fabinji intro- 
duced di-ortho-cumar-ketone or di-ortho-oxydi- 
benzyl-acetone, a condensation product of salicy- 
lic aldehyde and acetone, but now given to the so- 
dium salt of the latter. This crystallizes in 
glossy, greenish prisms that dissolve in about 16 
parts of water at room temperature, to form a 
red solution; acids decompose it. It is prescribed 
as an antiseptic astringent (in gonorrhea chiefly) 
in 2 to 5 per cent, solutions. 

Lykresol is a solution of crude cresol made by 
the aid of soap, and used as a disinfectant. 

Lymphol is a cod-liver oil emulsion containing 
also "chinacinnol," an aromatic extract of cinna- 
mon and cinchona. 

Lysargine is another trade name for colloidal 
silver, which is better known here as collargol; 
see this. 

Lysidin (ethylene-ethenyl-diamine hydrochlo- 
rate), CiHgNj.HCl, is a red, crystalline, very hy- 
groscopic mass, having a mousy odor. It is mar- 
keted only in 50 per cent, solution, a pinkish- 
yellow liquid which is claimed to be a uric acid 
solvent. Dose, 15 to 75 minims per day, In car- 
bonated water. Incompatible with mercuric 
chloride and iodide, and ferric chloride. 



THE MODEBN MATEEIA MEDICA 177 

Lysitol is analogous to lysol, but of Austrian 
(Bohemian) origin. 

Lysoform is essentially a perfumed solution 
of a potash soap impregnated with formaldehyde; 
a clear, yellowish, foaming, oily liquid, soluble in 
all proportions in water or alcohol, but insoluble 
in chloroform, benzene, etc. It is used to disin- 
fect and deodorize the hands, in 2 to 3 per cent, 
solutions. Marketed also as carbol-lysoform 
(33% per cent, of carbolic acid) and lysol-lyso- 
form (83% per cent, of lysol). Lysoform is also 
called veroform. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Lysol is obtained "by dissolving in fat and sub- 
sequently saponifying the fraction of tar oil that 
boils between 190 and 200° C." It contains 50 
per cent, of cresols, and is a clear, brown, oily 
liquid, of carbolic-creosote-like odor, and soluble 
in water, alcohol, glycerin, or chloroform. It is 
employed as a surgical and gynecological anti- 
septic. In 1/^ to 3 per cent, solutions. Lysol pills 
oontain lysol with Blaud's mass. 

Lysolveol is a disinfectant said to contain be- 
sides water, 44.5 per cent, (by vol.) of cresols 
and 33 of linseed oil potash soap; a brown liquid, 
soluble in water, and used like lysol. 

Lysopast is a brown, transparent, soft mass, 
consisting of 90 per cent, of lysol and 10 per 
cent, of a neutral soap. 

Lysxilf ol is defined as a compound of lysol con- 
taining 10 per cent, of sulphur; a thick, black 
liquid, completely soluble in water. It is em- 
ployed in skin diseases. 

liythol is a liquid antiseptic the active ingre- 
dients of which are eucalyptol, thymol, oil of 
wintergreen, and borates. It is used from full 
strength down to a 1:6 dilution. 



M 

Maciin Pastilles, for reducing flesh and puri- 
fying the blood, consist essentially of iron lactate, 
quinine hydrochorate, potassium citrate, sodium 
sulphate, and guaiac wood. 

Magnesium Cacodylate, an arsenical com- 
pound, said to be comparatively non-toxic, occurs 
as a white powder soluble in water. It is used 
chiefly subcutaneously — 8 to 15 minutes of a 5 
per cent, solution daily. 

Magnesium Perhydrol is what a Darmstadt 
(Germany) firm calls a mixture of 15 to 25 parts 
of magnesium peroxide and 75 to 85 parts of mag- 
nesium oxide. The article occurs as a white 
powder insoluble in the ordinary solvents. It is 
used as a disinfectant and oxidizer in abnormal 
gastric or intestinal fermentation, and is also lax- 
ative. Dose, % to 1 teaspoonful in water three 
times daily. 

Malakin is salicyl-para-phenetidin, CgH^.OCj- 
HjN.CH.CaH^.OH+HjO, a condensation product of 
salicylic aldehyde and para-phenetidin. It forms 
fine, yellow needles, insoluble in water, slightly 
soluble in alcohol, and quite freely soluble in 
solutions of alkali carbonates. It is an antipy- 
retic and antineuralgic; also a taenifuge. Dose, 
8 to 15 grains several times daily. 

Malarin {acetophenone-phenetidid) , CaH,C- 
(CHj) :N.CeH«OC,H». is a condensation product of 
acetophenone and para-amidophenetol; light-yel- 
low crystals, insoluble in water, slightly soluble 
in alcohol. It acts as an antipyretic and antineu- 
ralgic. Dose, 6 to 10 grains two or three times 
daily. 

Mallein is a glanders serum used as a diag- 
nostic of glanders in horses. It is marketed in 
liquid as well as dry (Dr. Foth) form. Dose, of 
liquid, 1 c.c. per injection; of dry, % to % grain. 

Malonal is another name for veronal, which 
see. 



THE MODEEIT MATEBIA MEDICA 179 

Maltin is an old-time synonym of malt 
diastase. 

Maltogen is a non-hygroscopic, scaly extract of 
malt. 

Mandragorine is an alkaloidal substance iso- 
lated from mandragora offlcinarum, and at first 
believed to be a dislnct alkaloid but later de- 
clared by Thorns and Wentzel to be an impure 
hyoscyamine, consisting predominantly of the 
latter alkaloid and a base belonging to the piper- 
idine series, the properties of which have as yet 
not been determined. 

Manganese Albuminate D. Vitali prepares by 
stirring the whites of three eggs with water, set- 
ting aside, straining through linen, carefully stir- 
ring in 1 fluid ounce of 5 per cent, solution of 
potassium permanganate, and evaporating the 
solution on glass plates at 30° C. It occurs as 
brown, nearly tasteless scales, slowly soluble in 
cold water, and said to keep well in solution and 
to be very assimilable. 

Manganese Glycerinophosphate, MnPOiCjHg- 
(OH)2+H20, is a yellowish-white powder, soluble 
in water and employed in the same dose and for 
the same purposes as iron glycerinophosphate. 

Mannin is the name selected for a substance 
claimed to be identical with orthoform. 

Marach, also known as Denver mud, is a steril- 
ized, antiseptic poultice material, analogous to 
antiphlogistine. 

Maretin is a carbaminic acid meta-tolylhy- 
drazid, a methylated acetanilid in which the 
acetyl group has been replaced by the group 
NH.NH.CONHj. It forms white, shining, nearly 
tasteless crystals, soluble in 1050 parts of water 
or 95 parts of alcohol, almost insoluble in ether 
or chloroform. It is prescribed as an antipyretic, 
chiefly in phthisis. Dose, 3 to 8 grains once or 
twice a day. 

Marina is a filtered, carbonated sea water, em- 
ployed first by Dr. G. Fodor in chronic gastro- 
intestinal catarrh, dyspepsia, diabetes, etc., also 
as a mild purgative, in doses of ^ to ^ tumbler- 
ful. 



180 THE MODEBIT MATEBIA MEDIOA 

Markasol is defined as bismuth torophenate of 
the formula BiABCCeHs) (C03),.H,0. It occurs 
as a white powder smelling strongly of camphor 
and having a burning taste. It is intended chiefly 
as a surgical antiseptic instead of iodoform. 

Marmorekin is a new name for the well-known 
Marmorek's antistreptococcus serum, which is 
used subcutaneously in erysipelas, puerperal 
fever, tuberculosis, etc., in doses of 5 to 20 c.c. 

Marrol is an English dietetic consisting chiefly 
of malt extract, bone marrow and calcium phos- 
phate. 

Marsitriol is a trade name for iron glycerino- 
arsenate, which see. 

Marsyle is a French trade name for iron 
cacodylate; see the latter. 

Meconarceine is what Laborde calls a sub- 
stance obtained from opium, free from morphine 
and soluble in water. It is used as an anodyne. 
Dose, 1/10 to % grain. Marketed in solution put 
up In hermetically sealed tubes and containing 
camphor as a preservative. 

Mediglycin is a fluid glycerin soap serving as 
a vehicle for camphor, thlgenol, naphtol and 
other dermic remedies. 

Medulladen is a pulverulent extract of bone 
marrow, used In anemia, chlorosis, etc. Dose, 30 
to 45 grains thrice daily, as tablets, or in jam or 
gruel. 

MeduUin Is said to consist of 500 parts of cod 
liver oil, 250 of honey, 62 of Peru cognac, 70 of ex- 
tract of black currant leaves, 50 of extract of 
juniper berries, and 18 of lemon juice. It is de- 
signed for use in asthma, consumption, etc. 

Mekambo, Meniocar, Mezi and Mezico. — See 
under nebulates. 

Melan is a preparation of melilotus coeruleus; 
a blackish-brown, oily fluid, of pungent, aromatic 
odor. It is used pure or as ointment on ulcers, 
burns, etc. 

Melioform is a liquid disinfectant consisting of 
25 per cent, of formaldehyde solution, 15 per cent, 
of aluminium acetate, and a number of indifferent 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 181 

substances. For use, it is diluted with 250 vol- 
umes of water, that is, a teaspoonful is added to 
a quart of water. See caution under formalde- 
hyde. 

Menthalcal is a pastille used in throat troubles, 
consisting essentially of menthol and the con- 
stituents of Ems water. 

Menthoform is analogous to forman, which 
gee. 

Menthol-Iodole is a mixture of 1 part of men- 
thol and 99 parts of iodole, used principally in 
throat affections and ozena, by insufflation. 

Menthol Valerianate. — See validol. 

Menthophenol is a compound resulting from 
heating 1 part of carbolic acid with 3 parts of 
menthol, and occurring as a clear liquid of aro- 
matic odor and taste, almost insoluble in water 
or glycerin, freely soluble in alcohol, chloroform 
or ether, and readily taking up iodine, iodoform 
or aristol. It is used as an antiseptic and an- 
algesic locally either pure, or in 3 to 5 per cent, 
mixture with warm water. 

Menthorol is para-chlorphenol with menthol 
(added as a corrigent of taste and odor), which 
is used in 5 to 15 per cent, solution in glycerin 
as a paint in laryngeal tuberculosis. 

Menthoxol is a 3 per cent, hydrogen peroxide 
solution containing 1 per cent, of menthol, used 
in 5 to 10 per cent, solution as a gargle in in- 
flammatory throat troubles. In cold weather the 
menthol is liable to crystallize out; warming the 
solution dissolves it again. 

Mercolint (mercurlint) is a cotton fabric im- 
pregnated with 90 per cent, mercurial ointment, 
worn over the chest in syphilis. Apron No. I 
contains 10, No. II 25, and No. Ill 50 grams of 
mercury. 

Mercuralgam, formerly known as mercuriol 
(not mercurol), is an amalgam of mercury with 
aluminium and magnesium, admixed with chalk; 
a gray powder containing 40 per cent, of mer- 
cury, and intended as a substitute for mercury 
with chalk internally and (chiefly) for mercurial 



182 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

ointment externally in syphilis (5 grams carried 
in pouches worn over the chest daily). 

Mercuramine, or mercury ethylenediamine 
citrate, is a solution of 10 parts of mercury 
citrate, 4 of ethylenediamine, and 86 of water, 
which is used in 0.3 per cent, dilution instead of 
a 1:1000 solution of corrosive sublimate for dis- 
infecting the hands in surgery, etc. It must be 
kept in a dark place. 

Mercuran is a 50 per cent, mercury ointment 
made with a specially prepared goose oil and con- 
taining 1 per cent, of carbolic acid as a preserva- 
tive. It is intended for the inunction treatment 
of syphilis, and, according to Dr. B. H. Shields, 
is rapidly absorbed through the skin, requires less 
time than ordinary mercury ointment for its ap- 
plication, and is less irritating than similar prep- 
arations of mercury on the market. It is supplied 
in soft gelatin capsules containing 4 grams, which 
quantity constitutes the inunctionary dose. 

Mercurcolloid (mercury colloid) is a soft ointr 
ment of blackish-gray color and aromatic odor, 
containing 10 per cent, of colloidal mercury. It 
is intended for external and internal use, in 
place of blue ointment or blue pill. Dose per ofl, 
2 to 5 grains three times daily, as pills, made 
with aluminium hydrate (marketed also as 
such). Mercurcolloid should not be confounded 
with colloidal mercury (hyrgol). 

Mercuricide. — See lithium-mercury iodida. 

Mercurivanillin is a preparation containing 40 
per cent, of mercury and employed in syphilis. 

Mercuro-iodo-hemol (mercuro-iodized Tiemol) 
is a brown powder containing 12.35 per cent, of 
mercury and 28.6 per cent, of iodine, with hemol. 
It is prescribed in syphilis accompanied by 
anemia or scrofula. Dose, ly^ to 2 grains, th:ee 
times a day, usually in pills, sometimes given 
subcutaneously. 

Mercurol (mercury nucleide, mercury nuclein- 
ate) forms a brown powder containing 10 per 
cent, of mercury, and soluble in water. It is an 
antipurulent, astringent, and alterative, claimed 
to be less irritating and of greater penetrating 



TH3 MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 183 

power than the usual mercury salts. It is used 
topically in ophthalmia, specific gonorrhea, con- 
junctivitis, etc.; internally in syphilis. Dose, % 
to 3 grains three times a day, in pills (marketed 
as such, chocolate-coated). Aplied in ^^ to 5 per 
cent, solutions or ointments. 

Mercury - ammonium Tartro - phenolsulpho- 
nate is better known as asterol; which see. 

Mercury Anilinate, Hg(C|,H4NHj)„ occurs as a 
white, odorless, tasteless powder, containing 52 
per cent, of Hg, and insoluble in water. It is 
employed In syphilis — by inunction, in 30 to 35 
per cent, ointments; by intramuscular injection, 
rubbed up with vaselin oil; as % to 3 per cent, 
ointment on wounds; and internally % to % 
grain three times a day, in pills. 

Mercury Cacodylate (mercuric cacodylate or 
methyl-arsenate) , [(CH3)2As02]2Hg, occurs as a 
white, hygroscopic, crystalline powder, soluble in 
water, and used by intramuscular injection in 
syphilis. Dose, % to 1 grain daily. 

Mercury, Colloidal or Soluble. — See hyrgol. 

Mercury Gallate, Hg[C,H2(OH)3COJi„ forms a 
grayish-brown powder, containing 37 per cent, of 
mercury. Insoluble in water, but soluble in solu- 
tions of the alkalies. It is prescribed as an anti- 
syphilitic. Dose, 1 to 3 grains per day, in pills 
with extract of cinchona. 

Mercury lodocacodylate is obtained in solu- 
tion by dissolving 1 gram of mercury cacodylate 
and 2 grams of cacodylic acid in 75 grams of dis- 
tilled water, adding a solution of 1 gram of so- 
dium iodide in 3 grams of distilled water, neu- 
tralizing with dilute soda solution, and adding 
distilled water to make 100 grams. This liquid 
Is said to be stable and sterilizable, and is used 
by Injection in syphilis — 1 to 2 c.c. daily or every 
other day. Keep from light. 

Mercury Imidosuccinate. — See mercury suc- 
cinimide. 

Mercury Kakodylate. — See mercury cacody- 
late. 

Mercury Nosophen. — See apallagin. 

Mercury Oxycyanide, HgO.Hg(CN)„ Is ob- 



184 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

talned by dissolving the mercury oxide freshly 
precipitated from 10 grams of mercuric chloride, 
and 9.5 grams of mercury cyanide in 100 grams of 
water. It forms a white or faintly yellow pow- 
der, soluble in water. It is used as an antiseptic, 
It is applied in 0.2 to 2 per cent, solution. 

Mercury Para-phenolsulphonate is hydrargy- 
rol. 

Mercury Salicyl-arsenate is referred to under 
enesol. 

Mercury Salicylate, HgC,HiO„ is a white pow- 
der containing about 59 per cent, of mercury, and 
soluble in solution of sodium chloride or alkalies, 
insoluble in water or alcohol. It is used in 
syphilis and gonorrhea. Dose, % to 1 grain; 
applied to ulcers, etc., in 1 per cent, ointment or 
powder; injected in gonorrhea in 1:300 suspen- 
sion every second or third day. 

Mercury-sodium Phenoldisulphonate is de- 
scribed under hermophenyl. 

Mercury Sozoiodolate. — See sozoiodole-mer- 
cury. 

Mercury Succinimide, (mercury irnidosuo 
cinate), Hg(C4H4N02)2, occurs as a white powder, 
soluble in about 25 parts of water with the aid 
of heat, slightly soluble in alcohol. It has been 
recommended as an agreeable antisyphilitic by 
injection — % to % grain daily in 1 to 2 per cent, 
solution. 

Mercury Sulphoichthyolate is described under 
ichtJiermol. 

Mercury Tetraiodophenolphtaleinate. — See 
apallagin. 

Mesotan is the trade name for salicylic acid 
methyloxymetfiyl ester, CoHi.OH.COO.CHjOCH,, 
which occurs as a clear, yellow fluid of aromatic 
odor, specific gravity 1.2, miscible with alcohol, 
ether, chloroform and fatty oils. It is used in 
the main locally in articular and muscular rheu- 
matism, 30 minims, mixed with the same quan- 
tity of olive oil. being rubbed in two or three 
times a day. It is speedily absorbed. After four 
days its use is generally suspended for a day or 
two, on account of its irritant action on the skin. 



THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 185 

Meta-arsenic Acid Anilid is described under 
its trade name, atoxyl. 

Meta-benzamido-semicarbazide. — See cryo- 
ffenine. 

Metacetone is referred to under diethyl- 
ketone. 

Meta-cresol Cinnamic Acid Ester is known in 
the trade as hetocresol, which see. 

Meta-iodo-ortho-oxyquinoline - anasulphonic 
Acid. — See loretin. 

Meta-Kolin Tablets contain 1 gram of solid 
cresol soap, and have the advantage over lysol 
and liquor cresoli saponatus of being convenient 
to carry. They are readily soluble in water, hot 
or cold. 

Meta - phenylenediamine (meta-diaviido'ben- 
zene) Hydrochlorate was heretofore used only as 
a test for nitrites and for technical purposes. Lat- 
terly Dr. Unverricht uses it as an antidiarrheal. 
Dose, 1% grains three times daily; children, % 
to 1 grain. 

Metaplasma is a new dressing material in- 
tended for use in the endermic application of 
salicylic acid and other remedies. It consists of 
an inner layer of fat-free cotton impregnated with 
the medicament, and an outer layer of impervi- 
ous, non-medicated cotton not deprived of its fat 
and intimately united to the inner layer. The 
principal metaplasms thus far made are that of 
menthol and capsicum, which is employed as a 
rubefacient, and that of salicylic acid, which is 
used in rheumatism, lumbago, pleurisy, etc. 

Metasol. — See under anytin. 

Metharsinat is a French trade name for 
disodium methylarsenate (not sodium dimethyl- 
arsenate or cacodylate). 

Methaform is the name of a new brand of 
acetone chloroform or tertiary trichlorhutyl alco- 
hol, better known as cJiloretone. See this 
title. 

Methenyl Tribromide is a synonym of 'bromo- 
form. 

Methethyl is a mixture of ethyl chloride and 
methyl chloride, employed as a spray from the 



186 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIC A 

special tubes in which it is marketed, as a local 
anesthetic in neuralgias, pains in the joints, etc. 
It is said to have a more intense and more rapid 
action than ethyl chloride alone. 

Methonal {dimethyl - sulplione - dimethyl- 
methane), (CH3)jC:(SOj.CH3)2, is obtained by 
condensing methyl mercaptan with acetone and 
oxidizing with permanganate. It occurs in color- 
less crystals, and is used as a hypnotic. Dose, 
15 to 30 grains. 

Methozine is a synonym of antipyrin. 

Methyl-acetanilid or methyl-phenylacetamide, 
is described under its trade name, exalgin. 

Methyl Acetyl-salicylate. — See methyl as- 
pirin. 

Methyl Aspirin or methyl acetyl-salicylate, 
C8H4.COOCH3.OCOCH3, is a methyl salicylate in 
which an H has been replaced by an acetyl group. 
It forms colorless crystals, soluble in alcohol, 
glycerin, chloroform and fats, insoluble in water, 
and decomposed by alkalies. It is prescribed as 
an antirheumatic. 

Methyl -atropine Bromide. — See atropine 
methyl-bromide. 

Methyl Chloride (chloro-methane) , CH3CI, is 
a gas of ethereal odor, obtained by distilling 
methyl alcohol, salt and sulphuric acid. It is 
marketed only compressed to a liquid in metal- 
lic cylinders, and is employed as a local anes- 
thetic in neuralgias, etc., as a spray. 

Methyl Gallate is referred to under gallicin. 

Methyl Sulfonal is the name given to trional 
in the German Pharmacopoeia. 

Methyl-xanthine, Methyl-xanthine and So- 
dium Acetate, and Methyl-xanthine and So- 
dium Salicylate are facsimiles respectively of 
theobromine, agurin and diuretin. 

Methylene is a trade name applied to the old 
"methyl bichloride" of Richardson, a general 
anesthetic consisting of a mixture of 1 volume of 
methyl alcohol and 4 volumes of chloroform. 
A.8 this preparation contains methyl alcohol, now 
known to be an active poison and to produce 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIC A 187 

blindness, it sliould, of course, never be 
used. 

Methylene Blue is an anilin product which is 
used as an antimalarial and a urinary disinfect- 
ant, and to a very limited extent also as an anal- 
gesic (subcutaneously). It is soluble in about 50 
parts of water, and is incompatible with caustic 
alkalies, potassium iodide, potassium bichromate 
and reducing agents. Dose, 2 to 4 grains three 
or four times daily, in capsules, with a little 
powdered nutmeg. Care should be taken to dis- 
pense only the medicinal grade of methylene 
blue, which is chemically tetramethyl-thionine 
hydrochlorate; the ordinary dye contains zinc 
and arsenic, and is not fit for medicinal use. See 
caution under formaldehyde. 

Iffethylene-creosote is referred to under 
pneumin. 

Methylene-diantipyrin. — See formopyrin. 

Methylene-dicotoin is better known as fortoin; 
see the latter. 

Methylene-diguaiacol is known by several 
trade names: geoform, guaiaform, and pulmo- 
form. It occurs as a yellow, tasteless powder, 
with a faint vanilla-like odor; soluble in alcohol. 
Insoluble In water. It is used in consumption 
chiefly. Dose, 5 to 15 grains three or four times 
a day, as powders. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Methylene-diguaiacol, Acetylated. — See eugu- 
form. 

Methylene-diguaiacol Benzoic Acid Ester is 
the chemical designation for guaialin. 

Methylene-diguaiacol Camphoric Acid Ester 
is marketed and here described under the name 
camphacol. 

Methylene-ditannin is tannoform. 

Methylene-hippuric Acid, CbHb.CO.N: (CHj),- 
CO.O, is intended as a urinary disinfectant and 
uric acid solvent; it readily splits off formalde- 
hyde in the system. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Methyl - glycocholic-acid - phenetidid Is a 
chemical designation for kryofine. 



188 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA. 

Methylketo-trioxybenzene is referred to un- 
der the title gallacetophenone. 

Methyl-propyl-carbinol XJrethane, or methyl' 
propyl-carbinol carbamic-acid ester, is marketed 
as hedonal, which see. 

Methyl Rhodin is a trade name for methyl- 
acetyl salicylate or acetyl-salioylic acid methyl 
ester, better known as methyl aspirin; see the 
latter heading. 

Metroglycerin is defined as a supposedly sterile 
liquid, containing 10 per cent, of glycerin, 2 per 
cent, of gelatin, and minimal quantities of resin 
acid esters. It is used by intrauterine injection 
as a uterine contractor and hemostatic. Tetanus 
germs may exist in gelatin and are difficult to 
destroy. Imperfectly sterilized solutions have 
in hypodermic use caused fatal infection and 
there may be risk from uterine or rectal in- 
jection also. 

Microcidin is a trade name for sodium beta- 
naphtolate, which is used as a surgical disin- 
fectant in 3 to 5 per cent, solution. 

Migrainin, also called phenazone-caffeine 
citrate, is a mixture of antipyrin (phenazone), 
caffeine and citric acid, occurring as a white pow- 
der soluble in water and alcohol. It is used in 
migraine, headaches, neuralgias, etc. 

Migrol is said to consist of equal parts of so- 
dium-pyrocatechin acetate (guaiacetin) and caf- 
feine-pyrocatechin acetate. It is prescribed in 
migraine, headache, and the like. Dose, 8 grains 
once to three times daily. 

Migrosine is a 5 per cent, solution of menthol 
in acetic ether, used as a liniment in migraine, 
etc. 

Mikrosol is a disinfectant consisting essen- 
tially of crude copper sulphate (75 per cent.) 
and copper sulphocarbolate (10 per cent.), and 
of the consistency of a paste. 

Mildiol is a mixture of creosote with mineral 
oils, employed as a disinfectant. 

Miracolo is a cancer remedy consisting essen- 
tially of a 16 per cent, solution of formaldehyde 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 189 

in diluted alcohol. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Mirmol Is an antiseptic used in cancerous and 
other ulcers, consisting in the main of a 0.3 per 
cent, solution of carbolic acid in formalin (for- 
maldehyde solution). See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Mitin is a white, smooth, easily triturated 
ointment base; "a superfatted emulsion with a 
high content (EO per cent.) of serum-like fluid." 
It is marketed in various forms and combina- 
tions. 

nCollln (sapo unguinosus) is a superfatted 
potash soap made from cocoanut oil and admixed 
with glycerin. It was introduced some years 
ago as an ointment base, but is seldom called for 
now-a-days on this continent. 

Mollisin or mollosin is an ointment base ob- 
tained by melting 1 part of yellow wax in 4 
parts of liquid paraflBn. 

Monoacetyl-pyrogallol is a synonym of 
eugallol. 

Monobenzoyl-arbutin. — See cellotropin. 

Monobrom-acetanilid is a synonym of asepsin. 

Monobrom-antipyrin is described under the 
title hromopyrin. 

Monobrom-ethane is ethyl bromide. 

Monobrom-phenol, Ortho-, also known as 
hromphenol and monobromated phenol, CoH^Br.- 
OH, is a reddish-yellow, oily liquid of strong odor, 
soluble in 100 parts of water and in ether or 
chloroform, and used in 1 to 2 per cent, oint- 
ments in erysipelas, wounds, etc. 

Monochloral-anti pyrin. — See hypnal. 

Monochlor-ethane is a chemical designation 
for the substance more commonly known as ethyl 
chloride. 

Monocitryl-paraphenetidin. — See apolysin. 

Monoiodo - dibismuth - methylene Dicresoti- 
nate is known in the trade as biodal; which see. 

Monol is a French trade name for calcium 
permanganate. 

Monophenetidin Citrate is a synonym of 
apolysin. 



190 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIOA 

Monosalicylic Acid Glycerin Ester or Ether is 
referred to under its trade name, glycosal. 

Morpliine-bismuth Iodide is a double salt of 
bismuth iodide and morphine hydroiodate, 
recommended by A. Robin as an analgesic dust- 
ing-powder for wounds. As much of it is added 
to cinchonidine-bismuth iodide (erythrol) as 
will make about 0.025 gram of morphine per ap- 
plication. 

Morphine Diacetic Ester is a chemical 
synonym of heroin. 

Morrhual (not morrhuol) is a cod liver oil 
emulsion containing 0.05 per cent, of iodine (in 
the form of iodipin) and the hypophosphites of 
calcium and sodium. 

Morrhuine, CiaHj^Nj. is one of the alkaloids 
found in cod liver oil; a thick oil, soluble in al- 
cohol or ether. It has been used as a digestive. 
Dose, 15 grains per day; children up to 8 grains 
daily. 

Morrhuol is the analogue of gaduol and other 
brands of the extractive of cod liver oil, 1 part 
representing 25 of oil. It is marketed only in 
0.2 gram capsules, 1 to 3 of which are given in 
place of cod liver oil thrice daily. 

Mucin is the mucous substance (glycoproteid) 
of bile, probably consisting, as marketed, of a mix- 
ture of serum globulin, true mucin, and bile 
salts. It occurs as a yellow to greenish-gray pow- 
der, soluble in water. It is used internally in 
gastric ulcer, and topically (in 1 per cent, solu- 
tion in equal parts of lime water and sterilized 
water, with 1 per cent, of sodium bicarbonate and 
% per cent, of menthol) as a spray in rhinitis 
and pharyngitis, and as an injection near the 
site of cancers. Dose, 10 grains with 10 grains of 
sodium bicarbonate at the beginning of meals. 

Mucogen is defined as a chlorine compound of 
dimethyl-phenyl-para-ammonium - beta - oxynapht- 
oxyamine. It occurs as blue crystals, soluble 
in alcohol and alkaline solutions, and almost in- 
soluble in water. It is put forward as a cathartic. 
Dose, 1% to 5 grains. 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 191 

Mucol is described as a 1:30 solution of salicy- 
lic acid in alcohol and glycerin with a little men- 
thol, and is used as a paint in infectious mouth 
and throat diseases. 

Mueglitzol is a liquid remedy for perspiring 
feet, the active constituent of which is said to be 
a formaldehyde-evolving compound of formalde- 
hyde and ichthyol. See caution under formalde- 
hyde. 

Muiracithin is a combination of inspissated 
fluid extract of muira puama and lecithin. It is 
used chiefly in sexual neurasthenia and nervous 
impotence. Marketed as silver-coated dragees. 

Multitoxine is a mixture of tubercle alexines 
(10), formaldehyde (1), and water (19), used in 
tuberculosis — 1.5 c.c. hypodermically at a dose. 

Musarina is flour obtained from unripe 
bananas, and used as a nutrient in gastro-intes- 
tinal diseases. 

Musculose is raw muscle juice recommended 
in tuberculosis. 

Musin was originally a tamarind jam, used as 
a laxative. This product is no longer made. 
Musin now consists of 55 per cent, of castor oil 
and 45 per cent, of a mixture of levulose, albumin, 
egg yolk, and sugar, it is employed as a laxative. 

Musol is a diabetes remedy reported to consist 
simply of salol put up in 1 gram cachets. 

Mutase is a nutritive prepared from legumins 
and vegetables; a yellowish, odorless powder of 
spicy taste, and containing 58 per cent, of vege- 
table albumin and 2 per cent, of phosphoric acid. 
Dose, a small teaspoonful several times a day, 
pure or stirred into bouillon, milk, etc., and al- 
lowed to boil up and drunk when sufficiently 
cooled. 

Mycodermine is a Parisian yeast extract em- 
ployed in boils, etc., like beer yeast and its va- 
rious preparations on the market (levuretin, cere- 
visine, zymin, etc.). Marketed as tablets and 
pills, four of the latter equalling a tablespoonful 
of natural beer yeast. 

Mydrine is a combination of ephedrine and 
homatropine hydrochlorates (100:1), occurring 



192 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIOA 

as a white powder soluble in water, and employed 
in 10 per cent, solution as a mydriatic of tran- 
sient effect. 

Mydrol (iodo-methyl-phenyl-pyrazolon) is a 
white powder readily soluble in water. It has 
been recommended as a mydriatic, in 5 to 10 per 
cent, solution. 

Myelene is a thick, red, liquid preparation of 
bone marrow, used in scrofula, rickets, etc. 

Myelocene is an ethereal extract of bone mar- 
row, in vogue in England, 10 drops of which are 
instilled warm in deafness and other ear 
troubles. 

Myogen is an albumin preparation obtained 
from the blood serum of freshly killed cattle; a 
fine, odorless, brownish-gray powder, tasting 
somewhat like glue, insoluble but swelling con- 
siderably in water, and containing 83.25 per cent, 
of animal albumin. It was introduced by Dr. 
Plonnis as a readily assimilated nutrient. Mar- 
keted also as biscuits containing about 25 per 
cent, of albumin. 

Myronin is an ointment base prepared from 
wax, stearin, potash, and oil. and containing 
about 12 per cent, of water. 

Myrrholin is a solution of myrrh in castor oil, 
used as en application to wounds. 

Myrtillin is the name applied to Prof. Winter- 
nitz's extract of huckleberry, which is used chiefly 
as a paint in skin diseases. 

Myrtol is the fraction of essential oil of myrtle 
which distills between 160 and 180° C; a clear, 
colorless liquid, of pleasant odor, and soluble in 
alcohol. It is employed internally in chronic 
bronchitis, tonsillitis, cystitis, etc., and externally 
in parasitic skin diseases. Dose, 1 to 5 minims 
several times a day, in capsules or on sugar. 



N 

Nafalan is a recent analogue of naftalan (de- 
scribed below), having the same properties and 
action as the latter. It is marketed also as domes- 
tic nafalan (with zinc oxide), as adhesive plas- 
ter, hemorrhoidal cones, soaps, and cream. 

Naftalan (naphtalan) is obtained by the dis- 
tillation of a naphta free from resin and asphalt, 
derived from Naftalan in the Caucasus. It occurs 
as a blackish-green, ointment-like mass of empy- 
reumatic odor, soluble in ether and chloroform, 
miscible with fats, and insoluble in water and 
alcohol. It is used in skin diseases — as 5 per cent, 
emulsion or ointment, 2 to 3 solution in olive oil, 
etc. Its stains on the linen may be removed with 
benzin. 

Nalicin is described as a liquid containing 1 
per cent, of nitroglycerin, 1 per cent, of cocaine 
hydrochlorate, "compound spirit of thymol," so- 
dium chloride, formaldehyde, carbolic acid and 
distilled water. It is intended for use as a local 
anesthetic in dentistry. See caution under for- 
maldehyde. 

Naphta Saponata is the name given by P. 
Hentschel to a naftalan substitute. 

Naphtasapol is another product claimed to be 
the same as naftalan. 

Naphtalol and Naphtosalol are synonyms of 
betol. 

Naphtoformin is a condensation product of 
hexamethylenetetramine (formin, etc.) and 
naphtol; a white, crystalline substance soluble in 
water or alcohol, insoluble in ether or oils. It is 
employed in dermatology. Its solutions should 
be prepared with cold solvents. See caution un- 
der formaldehyde. 

Naphtol, Alpha, C,oHj.OH, is an isomer of the 
official (beta-) naphtol, occuring as colorless or 
pinkish prisms or powder, of pungent, irritating 
odor and taste, soluble in alcohol and ether, 



194 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

almost insoluble in water. It is used chiefly as 
an intestinal antiseptic and antifermentative, 5 
to 15 grains in wafers or castor oil; to a small 
extent also externally in erysipelas, smallpox, 
etc., in 10 to 20 per cent, oily solutions. 

Naphtol Aristol. — See diiodo-heta-naphtol. 

Naphtol Benzoate is described under benzo- 
naphtol. 

Naphtol Bismuth is referred to under its trade 
name, orphol. 

Naphtol, Camphorated, (naphtol-camphor ; 
naphtylated camphor), is obtained by heating a 
mixture of 2 parts of camphor and 1 of beta-naph- 
tol until it melts. It forms a thick liquid soluble 
In alcohol. It is used as an antiseptic — with 
cocaine as a paint on tuberculosis processes, di- 
luted with oil in coryza, scabies, etc. It should 
be protected against light. 

Naphtol-charcoal is wood charcoal admixed 
with beta-naphtol and used abroad as an intes- 
tinal disinfectant. Dose, a small teaspoonful sev- 
eral times a day. 

Naphtol-eucalyptol results from melting to- 
gether equimolecular quantities of either alpha- or 
beta-naphtol with eucalyptol. Both kinds have 
a strong aromatic smell and very bitter taste, are 
Insoluble in water, and easily soluble in alcohol, 
ether and chloroform; also soluble in olive oil. 
They are intended to be used as surgical anti- 
septics and dermics. 

Naphtol Salicylate {naphtol salol). — See hetol. 

Narceine-sodium Sodium Salicylate. — See 
antispasmin. 

Narcotile is an anesthetic obtained by the ac- 
tion of hydrochloric acid upon ethyl and methyl 
alcohol, intended especially for use in dental 
practice. 

Narcotine (opian; narcosine) is an alkaloid of 
opium formerly believed to be possessed of nar- 
cotic properties but more recently proved to be 
rather without such action and hence renamed 
anarcotine. It is prescribed in malaria and mi- 
graine, chiefly as its hydrochlorate. 



THE MODERN MATEHIA MEDIC A 195 

Narcyl Is the terse name given to ethyl-nar- 
ceine hydrochlorate, CasHaiNOg.HCl. The drug oc- 
curs as silky, flossy prisms, readily soluble in 
alcohol or chloroform and in 120 parts of water, 
slightly soluble in ether; salts of benzoic, cin- 
namic and citric acids increase aqueous solu- 
bility. It is used as an antispasmodic and cough 
sedative, in whooping-cough, asthma, etc. Dose, 
up to 1 grain per day; hypodermically, % grain 
daily. 

Nargol (nuclein-silver ; silver nucleinate or 
nucleide) is a combination of silver with yeast 
nuclein, occurring as a brownish-white powder 
readily soluble in water. Its solutions are not 
precipitated by dilute organic acids, sodium 
chloride, alkalies or albumin, but by dilute in- 
organic acids. It is used in ^^ to 20 per cent, 
solutions, in eye diseases, gonorrhea, etc. Its 
solutions should be dispensed in a dark amber 
bottle. 

Narkine is described as "an opium preparation 
from which all deleterious qualities have been 
eliminated;" an unsupportable claim as all opiates 
and other hypnotics are essentially deleterious. 

Narkogen is a mixture containing chloral hy- 
drate, potassium bromide, hyoscine hydrobromate 
and "narkine." It acts as a nerve sedative and 
hypnotic. See remark on narkine, above. 

Natro-phen is a white, odorless, sweet powder, 
moderately soluble in cold water, and con- 
taining apparently sodium salicylate and acetani- 
lid (phenylacetamide). It is prescribed as an an- 
tipyretic and anodyne. Dose, 3 to 10 grains, in 
capsules or powder. 

Nebulates are fluids that are intended to be 
atomized by air pressure in a special apparatus 
and inhaled in different affections of the throat 
and respiratory tract. Fifteen different combina- 
tions are marketed, named, respectively, mezi, 
mekamco, pijokreo, iotan, chibromanco, menio- 
car, mezico, pizikreo, iodcartan, aldesar, chlor- 
bromeco, chloriokreo, euterpen, chloreusar, lat- 
schenol (German=ol. pini pumilionis). 

Nectrianine is a culture of nectria ditissima, a 



196 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIC A 

parasitic growth found on trees; used by Bra and 
Mongour as a remedy in cancer. 

KTeo-arsycodile is one of the various trade 
names for disodium methylarsenate, which see. 

Ueodermin is an ointment containing 85 per 
cent of lanolin, 10 per cent, of petrolatum, 4 per 
cent, of difluordiphenyl, and 1 per cent, of fluor- 
pseudocumol, and having a decided aromatic 
odor. It is used in burns and various other skin 
lesions, pure. 

Neo-Saccharin is a trade name for saccharin. 

Tfephroson is a diuretic elixir of sourwood, 
wild hydrangea, eupatorium, hair cap moss, water 
eryngo, corn silk, all green drugs, with tincture 
of bees, lithium benzoate and juniper spirit. 
Dose, a teaspoonful every 1 to 3 hours. 

Nercibus is a syrup of glycerinophosphates pre- 
pared by a Philadelphia firm. 

Nervitone is a nerve tonic containing the ac- 
tive constituents of cinchona and cola with cal- 
cium glycerinophosphate and iron, made by a 
Dresden firm. 

Nervocidine is the name applied to the hydro- 
chlorate of an alkaloid derived from gasu-basu, 
an Indian plant. The article occurs as a yellow, 
hygroscopic powder, readily soluble in water, and 
sparingly soluble in alcohol or ether. It is used 
chiefly as a dental local anesthetic, in 0.1 per cent, 
solution, but also on the eye, in 0.01 per cent, 
strength. 

Nervol is a compound of effervescent sodium- 
vanadium citro-chloride (citrozone) and lithium 
bromide (10 per cent.). It is prescribed as a 
nerve sedative and tonic. Dose, a teaspoonful. 

Nervosin Pills consist, according to Gutt, of 
alcoholic extract of valerian, alcoholic extract of 
angelica, aqueous extract of chenopodium, and 
oils of valerian, angelica and bitter orange. They 
are prescribed as a nerve-sedative, chiefly in 
hysteria. 

Neuracetin is an English antipyretic and an- 
algesic, marketed as powder and 5-grain tablets. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Neurodin is the trade name for acetyl-para- 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 197 

oxyphenyl-urethane, CgH^. (OCO.CH3) .NH.CO.OC- 
H5, which chemical appears as colorless, odorless 
crystals, slightly soluble in water. It is used as 
an antineuralgic and antipyretic. Dose, 5 to 25 
grains. 

Neurogen is a bath salt said to consist of 73 
per cent, chlorides, 25 per cent, sulphates, and 2 
per cent, of a compound of ferrous oxide and 
glycerin. 

Neurol or neuron is a nutritive consisting ac- 
cording to reports of 3 per cent, of hypophos- 
phites, 17 per cent, of peroxides, 5 per cent, of 
iron compounds, and 75 per cent, of carbohydrates 
and nitrogenous principles. It is employed in 
nervous debility, rickets and scrofula. Dose, 4 
to 6 teaspoonfuls per day. 

Neuro-lecithin is lecithin derived from fresh 
brain and spinal cord. It is identical in action 
and uses with the regular lecithin obtained from 
yolk of egg. 

Neuronal is the trade name applied to 'brom- 
diethyl-acetamide, BrCCjHJ^.CO.NHj, a crystalline 
substance readily soluble in alcohol, ether or 
chloroform, and dissolving in 115 parts of water 
at ordinary temperature. It is used as a hypnotic. 
Dose, 8 to 30 grains. 

Neurosin is the name applied by two manu- 
facturers to different products. The one is a 
tablet containing caffeine and nitroglycerin, and 
used in cardiac neuroses, hemicrania and the 
like; neurosin Prunier is a syrup, granules, and 
cachets of calcium glycerinophosphate. 

Neurotone is an elixir of the glycerinophos- 
phates of calcium and sodium. Neurotone capsules 
contain 5 grains of the combined salts, with 1/64 
grain of strychnine nitrate. Marketed also in 
ferro-arsenated form in capsules. 

Neurotropin is an abbreviated appellation for 
the German "neu-urotropin" (new urotropin). 

New Sidonal. — See under sidonal. 

New Urotropin is a brand name for hexameth- 
ylenetetramine methylene citrate, described un- 
der helmitol. 

Nickel Bromide, NiBrj, was brought to the 



198 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

fore a few years ago as a nerve sedative, chiefly 
in epilepsy. It occurs as a greenisli-yellow deli- 
quescent powder, soluble in water, alcohol or 
ether. Dose, 2 to 8 grains in solution. Maximum 
daily dose, 24 grains. 

Nickel Sulphate, green crystals of sweet, as- 
tringent taste and soluble in 3 parts of water, 
has also come somewhat into vogue latterly as a 
remedy in malarial migraine. Dose, % to 1 
grain three times daily. 

Nicolicin was a complex galenical preparation 
brought forward a few years ago as a remedy 
for morphinomania, but found on analysis to 
contain morphine, and hence since abandoned by 
the medical profession. 

Nicotine Salicylate. — See eudermol. 

Nieraline is a French brand of the active con- 
stituent of the suprarenal capsule. (See adren- 
alin.) 

Nirvanin is the hydrochlorate of diethyl- 
glycocoll-para-amido-ortho-oxybenzoic acid me- 
thyl ester, a white powder, of bitter, metallic 
taste, and readily soluble in water or alcohol; 
brought forward as a substitute for cocaine as 
a local anesthetic, and claimed to be less toxic. 

Nizo-lysol is lysol with an improved odor 
(pleasant, aromatic), and hence specially adapted 
for disinfecting the hands and the sick-room. Its 
physical properties are otherwise the same as 
those of lysol, and it is prepared according tc 
the same process and contains the same propor- 
tion of cresols, but further purified. 

Nodusan is defined as dithymol-iodo-metadioxy- 
benzene-hismuth, and is used in suppositories in 
hemorrhoids. 

Noitol is an eczema lotion of undivulged com- 
position. 

Nori is a nutrient prepared from sea algae. 

Normalin is an alterative tonic containing 
"hemoglobin and serum albuminate of arsenic" 
and used in skin diseases and various diatheses. 

Norvargan is the fanciful name given to a 
freely soluble organic compound of silver con- 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 199 

taining 10 per cent, of the metal and analogous 
pharmaceutically and therapeutically to protargol. 

Nosol is not a nose remedy but a dental anti- 
septic and anodyne consisting of eugenol (4), 
clove oil (4), eucalyptus oil (4), winter green oil, 
(1), cinnamon oil (2), and thymol (2). 

Nosophen, formerly known as iodophen, is 
chemically tetraiodo-phenolphtalein, CjflioOJ.i, re- 
sulting from the action of iodine upon phenol- 
phtalein. It occurs as a brownish-yellow, nearly 
odorless, tasteless powder, containing 60 per cent, 
of iodine, soluble in ether or chloroform, insolu- 
ble in water, and sparingly soluble in alcohol. 
It is used chiefly as a surgical antiseptic in place 
of iodoform, but to some extent also as an in- 
testinal antiseptic. Dose, 4 to 10 grains. 

Nosophen-bismuth. — See eudoxin. 

Nosophen-mercury. — See apallagin. 

Nosophen-sodium. — See antinosin. 

Novozone is a mixture of magnesium peroxide 
and magnesium carbonate, employed as an alter- 
ative and antizymof.ic, analogously to biogen. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Nuclein as in vogue in this country is nu- 
cleinic acid derived from yeast, generally con- 
taminated with some albumin and carbohydrates 
of the yeast cells. It occurs as a grayish-white, 
amorphous powder, soluble in dilute alkalies, 
slightly soluble in water, and insoluble in alcohol 
or ether. It acts as a germicide, and increases 
the white corpuscles of the blood. It is used in 
tuberculosis, chronic ulcers, puerperal fever, etc. 
— per OS in capsules or solution (2 to 4 grains 
three times a day, between meals) or hypodermic- 
ally in 5 per cent, solution in alkalinized water 
(10 to 60 minims diluted with the same quantity 
of physiological salt solution freshly boiled) for 
which use a special, albumen-free article 
only is eligible. Marketed also in 2-grain cap- 
sules, and in 5 per cent, solution for oral and 
for subcutaneous uses. (According to Dr. 
Vaughan, quinine, the coal tar antipyretics and 
atropine are contraindicated during nuclein 



200 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

treatment.) Trillat has prepared nuclein com- 
pounds of mercury (see levurargyre) , iron, man- 
ganese, vanadium, silver, arsenic, iodine, bromine, 
and fluorine. 

Nuclein Horbaczewslii is prepared from spleen 
pulp, and forms a brownish-gray powder soluble 
in alkaline solutions, and used like nuclein from 
yeast. 

Nucleol is a pure grade of nuclein; a white 
powder rather easily soluble in warm water. 

Nucleose is an albuminous nutritive prepared 
from vegetable nucleo-albumins. 

Nural (nutrol) is a "pre-digested" starchy 
food for invalids; according to Beythien, essen- 
tially a starch syrup containing small quantities 
of pepsin and hydrochloric acid. 

Nutricine is a nutritive prepared by mixing 
and boiling stale bread with raw meat and form- 
ing the mass into tablets. 

Nutrin is a saccharated fatty albuminate de- 
rived from olive oil, of which it contains 51 per 
cent., and characterized as a palatable, digestible 
roborant and cholagogue, and substitute for cod 
liver oil. (The nutrin formerly marketed, a 
meat-albumin preparation, has been withdrawn 
from the market.) 

Nutritive Roborin is a fine powder intended as 
an addition in baking. It contains 10 per cent, of 
roborin, 2 per cent, of eggs, wheat flour, cacao and 
sugar. 

Nutrose (casein-sodium) is an invalid food 
prepared from casein of milk with the aid of 
alkali; a white, nearly tasteless powder, com- 
pletely soluble in water. Dose, % to % ounce, 
in soup, milk, oatmeal, etc. 

o 

Obalgo is a dental local anesthetic of undi- 
vulged composition. 

Obtundo is a dental local anesthetic contain- 
ing chloretone, cocaine, nitro-glycerin, thymol. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 201 

menthol, and oils of eucalyptus, wintergreen and 
cloves. 

Oculin is a sterilized glycerin extract of the 
ciliary body and vitreous humor of bulls' eyes, 
admixed with 0.6 per cent, of sodium chloride. 
It is used internally and subcutaneously in de- 
tachment of the retina. 

Odda is an infant food introduced by Prof, von 
Mehring, and prepared from whey, flour, sugar, 
cacao butter and yolk of eggs, the two latter 
in place of butter, which often gives rise to ab- 
normal butyric fermentation in the system. The 
dose is 20 grams per day for each kilo of the 
child's weight. 

Odol is a mouth-wash extensively advertised 
abroad, consisting of an alcoholic solution of salol, 
saccharin, oil of peppermint, and traces of oils of 
clove and caraway. 

Odos is a substitute for meat extract, prepared 
from oats. 

Oenase is the ferment of raisins, and used in 
dyspepsia, anorexia, etc. Marketed only as 0.5 
gram tablets, 2 to 6 of which are given daily. 

Oil, Arbor, is described as a neutral product 
consisting of various cresols, phenols and anthra- 
cene. With an equal volume of ether it forms a 
liquid reputed to be of service in certain skin 
diseases, rheumatism, etc. It seems to be similar 
to naftalan. 

Oil, Aristol, is a 10 per cent, sterilized solution 
of aristol in sesame oil, and occurs as a clear, 
reddish-brown, permanent liquid that has been 
recommended for use in various eye diseases. 

Oil, Digitalin, or huile digitalique Nativelle, 
is an oily solution of Nativelle's digitalin (prac- 
tically identical with digitoxin), containing % 
milligram in each c. c, and used slightly warmed 
by subcutaneous injection as a heart stimulant. 
Dose, 1 c. c. once or twice daily. 

Oil, Margosa, is an oil obtained from the In- 
dian lilac or "neem" tree. It is employed in 
leprosy, rheumatism, suppurating glands, etc.; 
also in mange of dogs. 



202 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Oil, Melaleuca viridiflora, is referred to under 
its trade name, gomenol. 

Oil, Mercuriol, is a 45 per cent, trituration of 
mercuriol (mercuramalgam) in equal parts of 
lanolin and almond or olive oil. It is used sub- 
cutaneously in syphilis. 

Olan is a generic name given to vasoliniments, 
a class of substances that are intended to be used 
like the vasogeiis. These substances are paraffin 
preparations that form perfect, stable emulsions 
with water ("oliments"), and are removable from 
the skin or body linen with water. Camphor, 
guaiacol, iodine, mercury, naphtol, and other 
olans are marketed; also a solid olan ("unguen- 
tum naftae"). 

Olbios is a yellowish mass intended as a food 
and roborant, the composition of which is un- 
known. 

Oleac is an eczema remedy made from pine 
needles, oil of cade, stavesacre seed, and cloves. 

Oleocreosote (so-called creosote oleate) is ob- 
tained by the action of phosphorus trichloride 
upon a mixture of equal quantities of pure oleic 
acid and creosote. It forms a yellowish, nearly 
odorless oil of nonpronounced creosote taste. A 
few yeart, ago it was in vogue as a substitute for 
creosote, but since the introduction of creosotal 
it has been but little heard of. Dose, 15 to 45 
minims three times a day, in capsules or emul- 
sion or with cod liver oil. 

Omal is the terse name applied to trichlor- 
phenol or phenol trichloride, CsH^OHCla; white 
crystals soluble in alcohol and ether; slightly 
soluble in water. It is used in 5 to 10 per cent, 
ointments or solutions in erysipelas, diphtheritic 
ulcers, etc., and by inhalation in tuberculosis. 

Omoform is a fine, brownish-yellow, odorless 
powder, of undivulged composition, and insoluble 
in the ordinary solvents. It is intended as a 
substitute for iodoform in surgical practice, and 
it is marketed also as suppositories, lozenges (2 
grains), ointment (5 per cent.), and gauze. 

Oophorin is i dry preparation of the ovaries 
of pigs and cows, marketed in 0.3 gram tablets 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 203 

and used In climacteric disorders of women, 
chlorosis, and the like. Dose, 1 to 3 tablets three 
times daily. 

Ophthalmol, heralded as a remedy for granu- 
lar eyelids, is, according to F. Frank, simply 
sterilized peanut oil. 

Opian is a synonym of narcotine. 

"Opo" is a prefix used in connection with a 
line of dry organo-therapeutic preparations intro- 
duced by Prof. A. von Poehl of St. Petersburg. 
These products are said to contain the active 
constituents of the respective organs in the most 
concentrated form possible, the tissue structure 
and precipitable albuminoids, that are without 
therapeutic action, having been removed. One 
part represents 10 to 20 parts of the fresh organ. 
Opo-cerebrin is made from the gray matter of 
the brain, and is prescribed in nervous affections, 
slow heart, etc., in doses of 3 to 5 grains thrice 
daily, as tablets (so marketed). It comes also in 
liquid form for injection. Opo-hepatoidin is 
made from livers and is used in jaundice, cir- 
rhosis, etc.; 8 to 20 grains three times a day. 
Opo-tiypopTiysin, from the pituitary body (hypo- 
physis cerebri), is prescribed in acromegalia; 
dose, % grain. Opo-lienin is made from the 
spleen, and employed :n enlarged spleen, leu- 
cemia, etc.; dose, 30 to 90 grains twice a day. 
Opo-medullin, from red bone-marrow, is used in 
pernicious anemia, neurasthenia, chlorosis, etc.; 
dose, 3 to 15 grains three times a day. Opo- 
ossiin, from yellow bone-marrow, is prescribed 
in rickets and osteomalacia; dose, 3 to 15 grains 
thrice daily. Opo-suprarenalin is derived from 
the suprarenal capsule, and employed in diabetes 
insipidus, Addison's disease, change of life, etc ; 
dose, 3 to 6 grains twice daily. Opo-thyroidin, 
from thyroid gland. Is prescribed in mjrxedema, 
cretinism, obesity, etc.. In doses of % to 1% 
grains three times a day. Opo-orchidin is pre- 
pared from bulls' testicles, and used in spinal 
diseases and other nervous disorders; dose, 8 to 
15 grains three times daily. Opo-ovuUn, from 
ovary substance, is employed in climacteric dis- 



204 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

turbanees of women, hysteria, etc.; dose, 3 to 12 
grains three times a day. Opo-prostatin is em- 
ployed in hypertrophy of the prostate gland; dose, 
3 grains three times a day. 

Opyine is a preparation of opium claimed to 
be free from all objectionable constituents — an 
unsupportable claim, as we have said in reference 
to a similar preparation, as all opiates and other 
hypnotics are essentially deleterious. 

Orangeine is a mixture of acetanilid, caffeine 
and sodium bicarbonate, with small proportions 
of podophyllin, nux vomica and blue flag. Its 
action is that of an antipyretic and analgesic. 

Orchidin is a liquid extract of bulls' testicles, 
free from albuminous material, and used subcu- 
taneously in neurasthenia, senility, etc. 

Orchipin is an Italian specialty, an oily extract 
of fresh bulls' testicles heralded as an efficient 
antidote in atropine poisoning and as a nerve 
tonic in neurasthenia, etc. 

Oresol is defined as guaiacol glycerin (or 
glyceryl) ether, and thus appears to be identical 
with guaiamar. which see. 

Orexine was the name originally applied to 
phenyl-dihydro-quinazoline hydrocMorate, intro- 
duced by Prof. Penzoldt in 1890. Three years 
later it was applied to the pure base, phenyl-di- 
hydro-quinazoline, which product, because pos- 
sessing less of the pungent taste and irritating 
properties of the hydrochlorate, superseded the 
latter. Now the name applies to the tannate of 
the same base, introduced by Dr. Steiner in 1897. 
This preparation occurs as a yellowish, odorless 
and practically tasteless powder, insoluble in 
water and only slightly soluble in alcohol. It is 
prescribed as an appetizer and stomachic, as well 
as for sea-sickness and vomiting of pregnancy and 
that following narcosis. Dose, 8 to 12 grains 
twice daily, 1 hour before meals, with water. 
Marketed also as 4-grain tablets. Incompatible 
with iron compounds. 

Organosol is an alcoholic solution of colloidal 
silver (collargol). 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 205 

Origos Tablets are said to contain glutin and 
"all the substances necessary to the development 
of the body" — probably calcium phosphate and 
fluorides — in soluble form. It is used as a nu- 
tritive in debility, arrested development, etc. 

Orphol {naphtol-Msmuth; bismuth heta-naph- 
tolate) is a compound of 80 per cent, bismuth 
oxide and 20 per cent, beta-naphtol, occurring as 
a grayish-yellow, almost odorless powder of non- 
pronounced taste, and becoming darker and more 
odorous with age; insoluble in water, slightly 
soluble in alcohol It is prescribed as a gastro- 
intestinal disinfectant and astringent. Dose, 8 
to 30 grains three times daily; children, 2 to 10 
grains. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

Ortho-Bromphenol. — See monobrom-phenol. 

Orthocol is defined by the manufacturer as "an 
alkaline salt of guaiacol," soluble in water, lack- 
ing odor and distinctive taste — probably potas- 
sium-guaiacol sulphonate (better known as thio- 
col). It is the main ingredient of "elixir of 
orthocol comp." ("benzo-guaiacol"), which con- 
tains in each 2-teaspoonful dose 4 grains of the 
drug with 2 grains of terpin hydrate and 1/12 
grain of codeine phosphate. It is used in phthisis 
and chronic bronchitis. Dose, 5 to 10 grains three 
times daily. 

Ortho-Cresol Iodide is better known as 
traumatol. 

Ortho-Ethoxy-monobenzoyl - amido-quinoline 
is a chemical designation for quinalgen. 

Orthoform^ as now marketed is the methyl ester 
of meta-amido-para-oxybsnzoic acid, CoHj.NH^. 
OH.COOCH3. It occurs as a white, bulky, odor- 
less, tasteless powder, slightly soluble in water, 
readily so in alcohol, ether or collodion. It is 
prescribed as a local anesthetic and antiseptic, in 
painful wounds, ulcerated larynx, etc., in 5 to 20 
per cent, ointments, paints or dusting powders, 
or purs; internally in ulcer and neuralgia of the 
stomach. Dose, 8 to 15 grains. Orthoform hydro- 
chloride is identical in action with the base, but 
freely soluble. It has been used hypodermically, 
but found rather Irritating, and hence has been 



206 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

practically abandoned. Orthoform must not be 
exposed to light. It is incompatible with an- 
tipyrin, bismuth subnitrate, mercuric chloride, 
silver nitrate, zinc chloride, and potassium per- 
manganate. 

Ortho-Oxy-benzyl Alcohol. — See diathesin. 

Ortho-Oxybonzyliden-para-phenetidin is a 
synonym of malakin. 

Ortho-Phenolsulphonic or Ortho-Sulphocar- 
bolic Acid. — See aseptol. 

Ortho-Oxyquinoline-meta-sulphonic Acid is 
described under its trade name, diaphtol. 

Osmium Tetraoxide. — See acid osmic. 

Osmosine is an eye drop of undivulged com- 
position. 

Osmosum is a preparation of aluminium sili- 
cate, glycerin, etc., similar to antiphlogistine and 
used in the same way. 

Ossagen is said to consist of the calcium salts 
of the fatty acids of bone marrow. It is given in 
rickets and osteomalacia. Dose, 30 grains three 
times a day. 

Ossalin {adeps ossium) is a greenish-white fat 
prepared from bone marrow and recommended 
as an ointment base, taking up twice its weight 
of water. 

Ossin is a saccharated emulsion of cod liver oil 
made without gum, permanent, and readily mis- 
cible with water. Another ossin is a dark-brown, 
liquid extract of bone marrow used chiefly in dia- 
betes in doses of % to 1 teaspoonful after meals. 

Osta preparations of Dr. Kleinsorgen contain 
organic bone salts. There are marketed osta bis- 
cuits, carrying 1^2 per cent, of osta salts, osta bis- 
cuits powdered and sweetened for adding to in- 
fants' food, osta chocolate containing 7% per cent, 
of osta salts, and osta pastilles carrying 10 per 
cent, of osta salts. 

Osteogen is a syrup of iron and calcium phos- 
phate, used in rickets and the like. 

Ovadin is a pulverulent preparation of ovary 
substance, analogous to ovariin. 

Ovaraden is a standardized dried extract of 
ovary, 1 part representing 2 parts of the fresh 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 207 

gland; a grayish, nearly odorless, sweetish pow- 
der, administered in disorders accompanying the 
menopause or following ovariotomy, chlorosis, 
etc. Dose, 15 to 30 grains three times daily, 
usually as tablets. 

Ovarial is a synonym of ovariin. 

Ovarigen is another preparation of fresh ovary 
substance. 

Ovariin (ovarial) represents the dried ovaries 
of the cow, 1 part equalling 8 parts of the fresh 
organ. Its uses are the same as those of ovara- 
den. Dose, 3 to 6 grains three times a day, in 
pills or tablets. Marketed also as 3-grain tablets. 

Oviferrin is a red, neutral, odorless, tasteless 
solution of an organic iron compound to which 
the formula C^NnSHsFegOij has been assigned; 
each tablespoonful is equivalent to 1 grain of 
elementary iron. It is described as a "blood 
builder." Dose, ^ to 1 tablespoonful in water or 
milk before meals and at bedtime; children, 1 to 
2 teaspoonfuls. 

Ovo-Iecithin. — See lecithin. 

Ovo-maltin is a dry preparation of malt ex- 
tract, eggs, milk and cacao, recommended as a 
roborant. 

Ovo-protogen is the same as protogen. 

Ovos is a yeast extract intended to serve as 
a substitute for meat extract, though lacking the 
stimulating properties and the salts and bases of 
the latter. It is obtained by boiling yeast in 
steam, and evaporating the resulting liquid in a 
vacuum pan to the consistency of an extract. It 
yields a cloudy solution with water, is feebly 
alkaline, salty in taste, and has a faint odor. 

Oxaphor is a 50 per cent, alcoholic solution of 
oxycamphor, doHigO., a white, crystalline powder, 
of peppery bitter taste and easily decomposing 
when exposed to light or water. It is used 
chiefly in dyspnea, emphysema, and asthma. 
Dose, 15 minims two or three times a day, well 
diluted, in sweetened mixture usually. 

Oxychlorine is represented to be a double salt 
of sodium and potassium tetraborate with boron 
oxychloride giving off oxygen. It is recommend- 



208 THE MODEKN MATERIA MEDICA 

ed as an antiseptic in ulcers and diseased tissues. 

Oxydasine is a mixture of 1 volume of 1:2000 
solution of vanadic acid and two volumes of 
glycerin, employed externally as an antiseptic in 
carbuncle, tuberculous lesions, skin diseases, etc., 
in 10 to 33 per cent, dilution in glycerin; internal- 
ly as an alterative in place of vanadic acid. 

Oxy-dimethyl-quinazine is antipyrin. 

Oxydol is a brand of hydrogen peroxide solu- 
tion. 

Oxymethyl-allyl-sulphocarbamid. — See pyolu- 
ene. 

Oxymethylene. — See formaldehyde. 

Oxynaphtyl-ortho-oxy-toluylic Acid is epi- 
carin. 

Oxypepsin is a preparation similar to oxytu- 
berculin, made from a culture of the sputum of a 
tuberculosis patient with high fever. 

Oxyquinaseptol is described under diaph 
therin. 

Oxyquinoline-alum. — See chinosol. 

Oxyquinoline Phenolsulplionate or Sulphocar- 
bolate is diaphtherin. 

Oxysantonin. — See artemesin. 

Oxysparteine, CibH^N^O, is an oxidation pro- 
duct of sparteine, occurring as white or faintly 
yellowish crystals soluble in most of the usual 
solvents. It is used in heart failure, generally 
as its hydrochlorate, subcutaneously. Dose, ^^ 
to 1% grains. 

Oxytuberculin is what J. O. Hirschfelder calls 
an oxidized tuberculin. 

Oxy-toluol-tropine or Oxy-toluyl-atropeine is 
ho7tiatr opine. 

Ozog'en is a trade name for a 3 per cent, solu- 
tion of hydrogen peroxide. 

Ozonoform. is a disinfectant mixture of un- 
known composition. 



Palmiacol or cetiacol is a derivative of guaia- 
col, for which the formula CaHwO, is given, and 
which has been defined chemically as cetyl-guaia- 
cyl or pyrocatechin-methyl-acetyl ether. It is 
marlieted as a liquid of non-pronounced taste, 
insoluble in water but soluble in the remainder 
of the ordinary organic solvents, and put up in 
pearls containing 3 minims each. It is intended 
as a substitute for guaiacol and creosote intern- 
ally, chiefly in tuberculosis and chronic bron- 
chitis. Dose, 1 to 3 or more pearls three or four 
times daily. 

Pancreaden is a lactose trituration of dried 
extract of the pancreas, 1 part of which repre- 
sents 2 parts of the fresh gland. It is used in 
diabetes mellitus. Dose, 15 to 60 grains three or 
four times daily. 

Pankreato-kinase. — See under eukinase. 

Pankreon is a compound of pancreatin with 
10 per cent, of tannin, that resists the action of 
the gastric juice; a fine, grayish-red powder, of 
a peculiar nut-like odor and not unpleasant taste, 
and insoluble in water and dilute acids. It is 
prescribed in pancreatic diabetes, intestinal indi- 
gestion, etc. Dose, 7% grains thrice daily. Mar- 
keted also as 0.25 gram tablets. 

Panzyme is a combination of diastase, pancre- 
atin, pepsin and rennin, together with carmina- 
tives and aromatics. It is employed as a diges- 
tive. 

Papain, Papayotin, Papoid, Caroid and Vege- 
table Pepsin are various names applied to the 
digestive ferment contained in the juice of the 
fruit and leaves of carica papaya (papaw). The 
drug occurs as a whitish-yellow, slightly hygro- 
scopic, odorless powder, soluble in water and 
glycerin, but insoluble in alcohol. It is active 
in alkaline, neutral or acid solution, especially 
in the first-named. It is used externally as a sol- 



210 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 

vent of false membranes, and in fissured tongue, 
etc. — 5 per cent, solution in equal parts of glycerin 
and water; internally as a digestive. Dose, 2 to 5 
grains. 

Para-Acetphenetidin is a synonym of phenace- 
tin. 

Para-Amidobenzoic Acid Ethyl Ester is the 
chemical designation for anesthesin, which 
see. 

Para-Acetamido-phenetol is phenacetin. 

Para-Chlorsalol. — See chlorosalol. 

Para - Diethoxy - ethenyl - diphenyl - amidine 
Hydrochlorate. — See Jiolocaine. 

Paraform or Para-Pormaldehyde, more cor- 
rectly trioxyviethylene, and also known as trifor- 
mol, is polymerized formaldehyde; a white pow- 
der, insoluble in alcohol or ether, and giving off 
formaldehyde at ordinary temperature and more 
rapidly when heated. It is used chiefly for the 
generation of formaldehyde gas for disinfectant 
purposes, also on warts (10 per cent, suspension 
in collodion) ; it is occasionally prescribed as an 
intestinal disinfectant in diarrhea, and it is em- 
ployed in dentistry for disinfecting root canals. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Paraganglin is a liquid extract of suprarenal 
gland, made in Italy; a clear, yellowish fluid of 
sweetish taste. It is employed in gastric dilata- 
tion, intestinal atony, skin diseases of gastro- 
intestinal origin, etc. Dose, 5 to 10 drops several 
times daily; in constipation, 30 to 50 drops as 
enema. 

Parahemoglobin is a Viennese preparation 
made from blood, containing 0.39 per cent, of 
iron; a brown, odorless, and tasteless powder, 
insoluble in water but soluble in weak solutions 
of the alkalies. Dose, 5 to 10 grains 3 times a 
day. It is marketed also as iron parahemoglobin 
(5 per cent. Fe) ; copper parahemoglobin (0.4 per 
cent. Fe, 2 per cent. Cu) ; manganese parahema- 
globin (0.4 per cent. Fe, ly^ per cent. Mn) ; 
bromine, iodine and mercury parahemoglo- 
bin. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 211 

Paranephrin is what a Darmstadt firm calls 
its 1:1000 solution of the active principle of the 
tuprarenal gland in 0.6 per cent, solution of so- 
dium chloride. For uses, see adrenalin. 

Para-Oxy-ethyl-acetanilid is phenacetin. 

Para-Phenetidin Citrate is a synonym of citro- 
phen. 

Para-Phenetidin Salicyl-acetate. — See phen- 
osol. 

Paraplasta is what Dr. P. G. Unna of Hamburg 
calls a new plaster mass spread on closely woven 
cotton fabric, resembling gutta percha mull. It 
adheres well to the rskin, and is marketed medi- 
cated with zinc oxide, mercury, chrysarobin, sali- 
cylic acid, etc. 

Parietin is identical with the well-known 
chrysophanic acid. 

Parisol is an odorless antiseptic, disinfectant, 
and deodorant, for use in the sick-room, ambu- 
lances, barracks, etc. Nothing has been published 
regarding its composition. 

Parodyne is one of the numerous synonyms of 
antipyrin; also the name of a French tablet con- 
taining antipyrin and sodium bicarbonate. 

Parolein is a pure liquid petrolatum containing 
from 1 to 5 per cent, of menthol and used in a 
special atomizer as an abortive of f'oryza. 

Pasterin Tablets, for use in whooping-cough, 
are said to consist of codeine, sodium salicylate, 
sodium bromide, and extract of elecampane. 

Pasteurine is a preparation of formaldehyde 
and boroglyceride. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Pedon i3 a preparation for preventing chafing 
and for diminishing excessive sweating of the 
feet. Its composition is unknown. 

Pegnin is a lactose trituration of rennin, which 
when added to milk precipitates the casein in 
soft curds that are easily broken up and distrib- 
uted through the milk by shaking. It is intended 
as an addition to milk, to render it more easily 
digestible. 



212 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIO A 

Pelagin is an elixir containing ether, antipy- 
rin, caffein and cocaine, recommended in sea- 
sickness. 

Pelletierine Tannate is referred to here mere- 
ly on account of the disparity in the dose-state- 
ments found in various works of reference. While 
some authors give the dose as from one to a few 
grains, and the maximum dose as 8 grains, others 
more recently advise giving from 8 up to 24 
grains at a dose. The tannate of pelletierine 
being almost insoluble in water, is probably not 
absorbed to any extent, and hence relatively non- 
toxic. 

Pellitol is an antiseptic ointment used in ec- 
zema and other skin diseases. 

Pellotine is the alkaloid of the Mexican cactus 
anhalonium Williamsii, "pellote." It is marketed 
only as its hydrochlorate, colorless crystals solu- 
ble in water. It is used as a hypnotic and nar- 
cotic. Dose, % to 1% grains. 

Pelosine Is a synonym of hebeerine. 

Pemzed is a mixture of milk sugar, calcium 
hypophosphite, and sodium chloride, Intended as 
a nutrient addition to milk. 

Pepsin, Vegetable. — See papain. 

Peptenzyme is stated to combine the enzymes 
(ferments) of seven glands concerned in the di- 
gestive functions, and is hence prescribed as an 
all-round digestive. Dose, 3 to 10 grains. 

Pepto-iodo-eigon. — See under eigons. 

Peptolactine is a preparation similar to the 
time-honored lactopeptine — consisting of pepsin, 
pancreatin, maltose, diastase and lactic and hy- 
drochloric acids. Dose, 5 to 10 grains. Marketed 
also as tablets and elixir. 

Pepto-medullin, Pepto-ovarin and Pepto-thy- 
roidin, are peptonized extracts of bone marrow, 
ovary substance, and thyroid gland respectively, 
marketed in dry and syrupy forms. 

Perborate Is a medicinal alkaline perborate in 
powder form, intended as a convenient means of 
making solutions of hydrogen peroxide extem- 
poraneously as well as an antiseptic and bleach- 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 213 

Ing constituent of tooth powders. When dissolved 
in water it is split up into hydrogen dioxide and 
borax. 14 grams of perborate dissolved in 100 c.c. 
of water yield a 10-volume solution of HjOj. 

Percalmin is a syrup of thyme and eucalyptus, 
used in whooping cough and other affections of 
the respiratory tract. Dose, a teaspoonful to a 
tablespoonful. 

Perco (peru-cognac) is described as a 1:40 solu- 
tion of balsam of peru in cognac, advertised as a 
remedy for tuberculosis. 

PercoU is a new form of adhesive plaster, in 
which the adhesive mass is spread on parchment 
instead of on linen or muslin. For use, the back 
of the plaster is moistened with water, which 
gives it pliability; on drying, it becomes stiff 
again. 

Percutilan is the name given to a readily ab- 
sorbed ointment base, the composition of which 
has not as yet been divulged. It forms the base 
of prsevalidin. 

Perdynamin is Dr. Theuer's hemogloMn acu- 
minate, prescribed as a "blood-builder." 

Perhydrol is the trade name of a 30 per cent, 
(by weight) solution of hydrogen peroxide, 
claimed to be chemically pure and free from acid. 
Its medicinal uses are the same as the oflBcial 
(3 per cent.) solution. 

Periplocin, CaoH^gOij, is a glucosid© obtained 
from periploca graeca. It occurs as a whitish to 
yellow powder or crystals, soluble in water and 
alcohol, slightly soluble in ether. It was intro- 
duced a few years ago as a cardiac tonic, especi- 
ally for subcutaneous use — 1/60 grain dissolved in 
physiological salt solution once daily or every 
second day. 

Peronin is the arbitrary name given to 'benzyl- 
morphine hydrochlorate, Ci7HigN02.0.CH2.C2H6.H- 
Cl; a white, bitter powder, soluble in water and 
diluted alcohol, introduced as a substitute for 
morphine but latterly largely superseded by 
heroin (diacetyl-morphine) and dionin (ethyl- 
morphine hydrochlorate). Dose, ^ to 1 grain. 



214 THE MODEBK MATEBIA MEDICA 

Peroxols are 3 per cent, hydrogen peroxide so- 
lutions containing in addition 1 per cent, of cam- 
phor, menthol, or thymol, respectively, in alco- 
holic solution. See camphoroxol, menthoxol, and 
thymoxol. 

Persodine is the name applied to a 1:75 solu- 
tion of sodium persulphate, NajSjOg. It is used 
chiefly as an internal antiseptic and oxidizer, in 
tuberculosis, cancer, etc. Dose, a tablespoonful 
in water before the two principal meals. 

Pertussin {extractum thymi saccharatum) is 
defined as a sweetened fluid extract of thyme 
(1:7) containing also Vz per cent, of potassium 
bromide. As its name indicates, it is a whooping- 
cough remedy. Dose, (children), a small tea- 
spoonful to a tablespoonful, according to age, 
four times a day. 

Perugen is synthetic ialsam of peru. 

Peruol is a 25 per cent, solution of peruscabin 
in castor oil, used as a paint in scabies. Mar- 
keted also as soap, containing 40 per cent, of 
peruol. 

Peruscabin is synthetic benzoic acid benzyl 
ester; a nearly colorless liquid, of peculiar not ex- 
actly disagreeable odor, and soluble in alcohol 
and ether; speciflc gravity 1.12. It is used in 
scabies and other parasitic skin diseases, in oily 
solution — generally as peruol. 

Petrogen is a "modified mineral oil" readily 
emulsifying with water and said to be possessed 
of great penetrating power when applied to the 
skin. It is used as a vehicle and solvent for io- 
dine, creosote, iodoform, guaiacol, menthol, etc., 
analogously to vasogen, and is marketed combined 
with these drugs. Its combinations are used 
topically to produce the constitutional effects of 
the drugs they contain. 

Petro-kreosote is not a kind of creosote but a 
combination of petrolatum, beechwood creosote, 
gentian tincture and sherry wine, used in pul- 
monary aifections. 

Petroline is "an odorless, colorless fluid ob- 
tained from the fat of the wool of sheep [lanolin] 
and petroleum." Petroline compound is a spray 



THE MODEBN MATEEIA MEDIC A 216 

for nose and throat, containing, dissolved in 
petroline, camphor, hydrastine hydrochlorate, 
menthol, eucalyptol, thymol, oil of wintergreen, 
cocaine, and sanguinarine nitrate. 

Petromol is another of the many preparations 
claimed to be the same as ichthyol. 

Petrosapol or petrolan is a saponified petro- 
leum residue, of brown color and ointment con- 
sistency, odorless, and intended as an ointment 
base of high melting-point (gO'C), which en- 
ables medicaments incorporated with it to form a 
lasting coating on the skin; also as a succe- 
daneum for naftalan. 

Petrosulfol is Austrian ichthyol (ichthyolum 
austriacum). 

Petrosulfol, Albuminated, is an Austrian ana- 
logue of ichthalMn. 

Petrovasol is a substitute for ichthyol-vasogen, 
employed locally in various inflammatory pro- 
cesses. 

Petrox is a mixture of paraffin oil (4), oleic 
acid (2) and spirit of ammonia (1), intended as 
a substitute for vasogen in dermic medication. 

Phaselin is defined as "the active principle of 
the bean of dilkos mexicano," suggested as a di- 
gestant active alike in alkaline or acid media — 
analogous to papain. Dose, 3 to 10 grains. 

Phecine forms a white, odorles^s powder, solu- 
ble in water and alcohol. It is prescribed as an 
antiseptic astringent, largely in skin diseases. 
(It has been claimed that this is not a homogene- 
ous chemical, but a mixture of resorcin and zinc 
sulphocarbolate.) 

Pheualgin is "ammoniated phenylacetamide" 
(phenylacetamide being acetanilid), occurring as 
a white powder of slightly pungent odor but non- 
pronounced taste, and nearly insoluble in water. 
Its action is that of acetanilid — antipyretic and 
antineuralgic. Dose, 5 to 20 grains, usually as 
tablets (21^ grains) or capsules (5 grains). 

Phenalin (not to be confounded with pheno- 
lin) is the name applied to tablets each contain- 
ing 0.05 gram of phenolphtalein and having laxa- 
tive action. Dose, 1 to 4 or more. 



216 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Phenamine. — See phenocoll hydrochloride. 

Phenatol is a composite antipyretic and anti- 
neuralgic, consisting essentially of acetanilid, 
caffeine and potassium tartrate. Dose, 5 to 20 
grains. 

Phenetidin Amygdalate or Mandelate. — See 
amygdophenin. 

Phenetidid Quinine-Carbonic-acid Ester is 
described under chinaphenvn, its trade name 

Phenetidin Tartrate will be referred to under 
tartrophen. 

Phenocoll Hydrochloride (ainido-acet-par(t- 
phenetidin or glycocoll-phenetidin hydrochlorate ; 
phenamine), CJi.iOCja,) (NH.CO.CH,.NHo).HCl, 
is a white, crystalline powder, of sweetish-bitter 
taste, soluble in alcohol and in 17 parts of 
water. It is used as an antipyretic and anti- 
malarial. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. Incompatible 
with alkalies, ferric chloride, and piperazin. 

Phenolactin is a synonym of lactophenin. 

Phenol-Bismuth (bismuth carbolate) is a 
white, neutral, non-caustic powder, of slight odor 
and taste, containing 80 per cent, of bismuth 
oxide and 20 per cent, of phenol. It is employed 
as a gastro-intestinal disinfectant. Dose, 5 to 15 
grains, several times daily. 

Phenolid is an antipyretic and analgesic con- 
sisting, according to reports, of equal parts of 
acetanilid and sodium bicarbonate. Dose, 5 to 
10 grains. 

Phenolphtalein was heretofore known only as 
a reagent, but recently came into vogue as a 
laxative, chiefly under the trade name purgen or 
purgo. Dose, 1% to ly^ grains, as powder or 
tablets. 

Phenopast is a preparation consisting of 50 
per cent, of carbolic acid and a neutral soap. 

Phenopyrin (antipyrin carbolate) is a com- 
pound of 1 part of phenol and 2 parts of antipy- 
rin; an oily, colorless and odorless liquid, solu- 
ble in alcohol and ether, but insoluble in water. 
It is used chiefly externally, as an anodyne; in- 
ternally as an antiseptic. Dose, 3 to 15 grains. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIO A 217 

Fhenosal (para-phenetidin salicyl-aeetate) oc- 
curs as a white powder, having a sour-bitter taste, 
and sparingly soluble in water, alcohol and ether. 
It has antipyretic and antineuralgic action. Dose, 
5 to 15 grains several times daily, in powders or 
tablets. 

Phenosalyl (saliphenol) is a composite anti- 
septic in vogue in France but no longer on the 
American market. Various formulas have been 
given for it, the most generally accepted one 
being: carbolic acid (90), salicylic acid (10), 
lactic acid (20), and menthol (1), mixed by the 
aid of heat. It is used mostly in ^4 to 1 per cent, 
solutions. 

Phenosuccin. — See pyrantin. 

Phenyl-benzamid. — See 'benzanilid. 

Phenyl-dimethyl-pyrazolon is a chemical 8301- 
onym of antipyrin. 

Phenyl-ethyl-urethane and Phenyl-ethyl 
Carbamate are synonymous terms for the product 
marketed as euphorine. 

Phenyl-methyl-ketone. — See hypnone. 

Phenylon is one of the numerous synonyms of 
antipyrim,. 

Phenyl Salicylate is saloJ. 

Phenyl-urethane. — See euphorine. 

Phesin (not phecine) is a sulpho derivative of 
phenacetin, of the formula CHj . O . C.Hs • SOaNa . - 
NH.CO.CH,; a reddish-brown, odorless powder, 
of slightly pungent and salty taste, readily soluble 
In water, and prescribed as an antipyretic and 
antineuralgic. Dose, 7^^ to 15 grains. The ar- 
ticle is not on this market. 

Philoral is the name adopted for throat pas- 
tilles consisting essentially of suprarenal gland 
substance, anesthesin and coffee extract, and used 
in painful affections of the throat. 

Phoenixin is the fanciful name recently applied 
to carbon tetrachloride, the drug being employed 
as a local anesthetic in neuralgias, etc. 

Phorxal is a nutritive preparation made from 
blood; a fine, odorless, tasteless powder, soluble 
in aqueous liquids. Dose, Vz to 1 ounce daily, 
with soup, warm milk, etc. 



218 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 

Phosferrol is a "blood and nerve tonic," each 
fluid ounce of which represents 2 drams of cod 
liver oil, extract of malt, 8 grains of calcium glyc- 
erinophosphate, 4 grains each of sodium and potas- 
sium glycerinophosphate, 2 grains of organic iron, 
1/20 grain of strychnine nitrate, and aromatics. 
Dose, 2 drams three times daily. 

Phosote or Phosphote is a phosphated creosote 
occurring as a nearly colorless, syrupy, heavy 
liquid, of faint creosote odor and taste, and con- 
taining 80 per cent, of creosote and 20 per cent, of 
phosphoric anhydride. It is prescribed in tuber- 
culosis, etc., instead of creosote, usually hypoder- 
mically — 15 to 45 minims daily — sometimes per os 
in capsules. 

Phosphergot is described as a mixture of equal 
parts of sodium phosphate and powdered ergot, 
advertised as a tonic in tuberculosis! 

Phospho-albumin is a complex organic product 
prepared from the testicles, brain and spinal cord 
of young bulls. Its active constituents are leci- 
thin, spermine and nuclein. It is employed as a 
"nerve tonic." Dose, a tablespoonful of the liquid, 
or 1 tablet (o-grain), after meals. 

Phospho-guaiacol. — See guaicophospJial. 

Phospho-nuclein is a product analagous to 
phospho-albumin, marketed as 5-grain tablets and 
in combinations. 

Phosphorin is the name given to chocolate pas- 
tilles each containing 1/250 grain of phosphorus. 

Phosphotal is a phosphited creosote, occurring 
as a thick, reddish-yellow, oily liquid, of creosote 
odor and pungent taste, soluble in alcohol, chloro- 
form, oils, and glycerin, and containing 90% per 
cent, of creosote. It is used in phthisis, etc., in- 
stead of creosote. Dose, 3 to 15 minims three 
times a day, in milk, jelly, cod liver oil emulsion, 
etc. 

Phthisin Tablets contain 0.27 gram of fresh 
bronchial gland substance and are employed in 
various diseases of the lungs. 

Phthisocan is a substitute for sirolin (syrup of 
thiocol), a solution of potassium-guaiacolsulphon- 



THE MODEBN MAXEBIA MEDIC A 219 

ate in syrup of orange reinforced by tincture of 
bitter-orange peel. Dose, one to two teaspoon- 
fuls. 

Phthisopyrine is a tablet containing aspirin 
(0.1 gram), sodium arsenite (0.00025 gram), and 
camphoric acid (0.1 gram), used as an antipyretic 
and antidiaphoretic in phthisis. Dose, 2 to 8 tab- 
lets two to four times a day, after meals, in cold 
milk or lemonade; alkaline beverages should be 
avoided. 

Physiological Nutritive Salt or Blood Salt Is 
what Naegeli calls a mixture of potassium chlor- 
ide, phosphate and sulphate; sodium phosphate, 
chloride, and carbonate; calcium phosphate and 
fluoride; magnesium sulphate; manganese sul- 
phate; iron sulphate and phosphate; and silicic 
acid — all in the proportions in which they exist 
in the blood. It is marketed only in 0.1 gram 
tablets, and is used chiefly in arterial sclerosis. 
Dose, 2 or 3 tablets per day. 

Physol (physiological solvent) is, according to 
M. I, Wilbert, an efficacious and stable pepsin so- 
lution, consisting of pepsin (50), menthol (0.5), 
eucalyptol (0.5), oil of wintergreen (0.5), alcohol 
(10), glycerin (50), diluted hydrochloric acid 
(20), and distilled water (to make 1000). 

Phytalbumose is a synonym of afirtn. 

Phytin is described as the calcium and magne- 
sium double salt of anhydro-oxymethylene-diphos- 
phorio acid, occurring in the seeds of various 
plants; a white, odorless, nearly tasteless powder, 
containing 22.8 per cent, of phosphorus and solu- 
ble in water. It is prescribed as a nerve and 
bone nutrient in children. It is marketed as 0.25 
gram capsules, 4 of which constitute the adult 
daily dose; 1 to 2 that for children. 

Picratol (silver picrate; silver trinitropheno- 
late), C9H„.0.(N02)3Ag-fH20, Is a yellow, floccu- 
lent substance, containing 30 per cent, of silver, 
soluble in 50 parts of water and 60 of alcohol, and 
also soluble in glycerin, ether, or chloroform. It 
is used, like argyrol, protargol, and the other re- 
cent organic compounds of silver, In gonorrhea. 



220 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

eye disease, nose and throat troubles, etc. ; mostly 
in 1^ to 2 per cent, solutions. 

Picrol is chemically potassium diiodo-resorcin 
monosulphonate, CeHI,(0H),.S03K, and occurs as 
a white, odorless bitter powder, soluble in water 
and glycerin, and containing 52 per cent, of io- 
dine. It is an external antiseptic, analogous to 
sozoiodole. 

Pijokreo and Pizikero.— See under nebulates. 

Pilocarpine Carbolate or Phenylate. — See 
aseptoUn. 

Pilocarpinum Compositum is what Carossa 
calls tablets containing % milligram of pilocar- 
pine hydrochlorate together with adjuvants and 
drugs reducing the reflexes. It is intended to be 
used in phthisis during the incipient stage. Dose, 
1 to 3 tablets several times daily, 

Pineedol is an insomnia remedy of undivulged 
composition. 

Pinesyl is an English antiseptic and disinfec- 
tant making an emulsion with water and in other 
respects similar to creolin. 

Pinol is a trade name for ethereal oil of pinus 
pumilio, which is used in chronic pulmonary af- 
fections. 

Piperazin {diethylene-diamine; pyrazin hexa- 
hydride; piperazidin; ethylene-imine) , results 
from the action of ammonia upon ethylene chlor- 
ide. It occurs as colorless, deliquescent needles, 
soluble in water or alcohol. It is employed as 
a supposed solvent of uric acid in gouty condi- 
tions. Dose, 15 to 30 grains per day, in water. 
It should be kept well stoppered and in a dry 
place, as it readily absorbs moisture and carbonic 
acid from the atmosphere. It precipitates many 
alkaloids from solutions of their salts, owing to 
its alkalinity. This may be avoided by first neu- 
tralizing the drug in solution. Marketed as watei 
(15 grains in a quart) and 1-gram tablets (10 In 
a tube). 

Piperazin Ichthyolsulphonate. — See ichthyoU- 
din. 



THE AfODEBIT HATEBIA MEDICA 221 

Piperazin Quinate (or cMnate) is the chemi- 
cal designation for sidonal; see this title, 

Piperazin Sulphoichthyolate is described un- 
der its trade name, ichthyolidin. 

Piperidin Bitartrate is intended as a uric acid 
solvent. Dose, 10 to 15 grains three times 
daily. 

Piperidin Guaiacolate. — See guaiaperol. 

Piral is pyrogalUc acid in crystals. 

Pix-cresol is defined as "a salt obtained either 
from tar or guaiacol; CsHgN.SO; non-toxic, non- 
volatile; a powerful deodorizer, and medicinal 
antiseptic." 

Pixol is a mixture of 3 parts of wood tar, 1 of 
potash soap and 3 of 10 per cent, potassa solution ; 
a clear, thick, dark-brown liquid miscible with 
water. It is used as a disinfectant, in 2 to 5 per 
cent, solutions. 

Plantan is a mixture of paraformaldehyde and 
powdered charcoal, meant to be ignited for the 
generation of formaldehyde gas for general disin- 
fectant purposes. 

Plantose is plant albumin derived from rape 
seed; light-yellow, tasteless powder containing 12 
to 13 per cent, of nitrogen and insoluble in water. 
It is used as a nutrient, in quantities of 1 to 3 
ounces per day. 

Plasment is a mucilage prepared from Irish 
and Iceland mosses, with the addition of glycerin 
and benzoin, and intended as a vehicle for ureth- 
ral injections. 

Plasmon, also known as caseon and Siehold's 
milk albumin, is an albuminous nutritive pre- 
pared from casein; a faintly yellow, odorless, 
slightly sweetish, granular powder, soluble in hot 
water. Dose, one or more teaspoonfuls, with 
soup, etc., or as biscuits. 

Plesioform is said to be an analogue of thiol. 

Plesiol is one of the numerous organic sulphur 
compounds claimed to be the same as ichthyol. 

Pneumin is methylene-ct-eosote, a yellowish, 
odorless, tasteless powder, used in tuberculous 
affections. Dose, 0.5 to 1 gram 4 to 8 times daily, 



222 THE MODEBN MATERIA KEDICA 

as tablets (so marketed). See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Pollantin is tlie name applied to Dunbar's hay 
fever antitoxin, which is marketed in powder and 
liquid forms, and used for the relief of attacks 
of hay fever and rose cold and as a preventive. 
The liquid is used mostly on the eye, the powder 
in the nose. 

Polychloral is a compound of pyridine and 
chloral, slowly soluble in cold water, more rapidly 
in hot water or in alcohol, with the formation of 
chloral hydrate or alcoholate respectively. Alka- 
lies decompose it into chloroform and formic acid. 
It possesses hypnotic and anesthetic properties. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Polyformin is obtained by dissolving resorcin 
In formaldehyde solution and adding an excess of 
ammonia without cooling. It forms an odorless, 
yellowish-brown amorphous body, insoluble in the 
usual solvents, and intended for use as a substi- 
tute for iodoform externally. Polyformin soluble 
is diresorcin - hexamethylenetetramine [CeH^- 
(OH)2]2. (CHj)8H4, and results from combining 2 
molecules of resorcin with 1 of hexamethylene- 
tetramine. It occurs as a white crystalline sub- 
stance, soluble in water or alcohol and insoluble 
in ether or oils; hot water liberates formaldehyde 
and changes the drug to an insoluble product. 
It is used externally in skin diseases; internally 
as an antifermentative. See caution under for- 
maldehyde. 

Porcherine is a substitute for cane sugar — ap- 
parently a solution of saccharin in glycerin. 

Potassacol is a trade name applied to potas- 
sium-guaiacol sulphonate (better known on this 
market as thiocol). It is one of the ingredients 
of triacol. 

Potassium Copaivate, CjoHjiO^K, is a thick, 
reddish-brown, alkaline liquid, of acrid, peppery 
taste and copaiva odor; soluble in alcohol, ether 
or chloroform, decomposed slowly by water. Dr. 
L. Kolipinsky has recommended it in place of 
copaiba. Dose, 50 to 150 grains per day, in cap- 
sules. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEOICA 223 

Potassium Glycerinophosphate, C^HjOaPO- 
(OK)j+H,0, is marketed as a 75 per cent, aque- 
ous solution — a colorless to yellowish, viscid 
liquid, soluble in all proportions in water. It is 
used as a nerve tonic and reconstructive, chiefly 
subcutaneously. Dose, hypodermically, 3 or 4 
grains once daily in sodium chloride solution; per 
OS, 4 to 10 grains thrice daily as solution or syrup. 
Its liquid preparations are prone to spoil on keep- 
ing, are hence best prepared in small quantities 
at a time. A drop or two of chloroform to the 
fluid ounce renders them far more stable. 

Potassium Oxyquinoline- sulphate is better 
known as chinosol, which see. 

Potobonum is a bean-husk tea used in gout, 
rheumatism and diabetes. 

Praevalidin is what W. Koch calls a readily ab- 
sorbed camphor ointment intended to be used by 
inunction instead of hypodermic injections of 
camphor. It has been used in phthisis, emphy- 
sema, chronic bronchitis, etc. It consists of percu- 
tilan with 10 per cent, of camphor and a little 
balsam of peru, oil of eucalyptus and oil of rose- 
mary. 

Prasoid. — See under "globularin." 

Primon is a lecithin obtained from vegetables. 

Probilin Pills consist of salicylic acid, sodium 
oleate, and "suflacient phenolphtalein and menthol 
to mildly stimulate the gastro-intestinal tract 
and insure greater tolerance." They act as a 
cholagogue, and are used in diseases of the biliary 
passages — particularly in gall-stone disease. Dose 
in the latter affection, 3 or 4 pills with about a 
pint of hot water before breakfast and at bedtime 
for twenty consecutive days, hot applications to 
the hepatic region being made at the same time 
in the beginning, then for twenty days more 3 or 
4 pills are taken either morning or evening the 
same way as before. 

Proferrin (iron nucleo-proteid) is an organic 
compound of iron to which the astounding for- 
mula CeiBHjssjNjeoSgPsOgnFeu is assigned by the 
manufacturers. It occurs as a reddish-brown 
powder, insoluble in water and acid liquids, but 



224 THE MODEBK MATEBIA MEDIOA 

soluble in weak alkaline fluids such as the intes- 
tinal secretion. It is intended as a readily assinai- 
ilated, non-astringent and well tolerated form of 
iron. Dose, 5 to 10 grains three times a day, as 
powders or tablets. Marketed also as chocolate- 
coated tablets (1, 21^ and 5-grain), and as com- 
pound tablets (3 grains, with 1/60 grain of stron- 
tium arsenite and 1/100 grain of strychnine phos- 
phate). 

Propione. — See diethyl-ketone. 

Propionyl-phenetidin is the chemical designa- 
tion for the article marketed as triphenin, which 
see. 

Propionyl-salicylic Acid, CaH^OC.O.CH^.CHj.- 
COOH, has been recommended as a remedy in 
gout and rheumatism. It occurs as white, shin- 
ing leaflets that are sparingly soluble in water, 
more readily soluble in ether or chloroform, and 
are decomposed by alkalies. Dose, 10 to 20 
grains. 

Propol (propolisin-vasogen) is a mixture of 
propolisin and vasogen. It is intended to be 
used as a disinfectant of wounds as well as of 
surgical instruments. 

Propolisin is a reddish-brown, oily liquid of 
characteristic but not unpleasant odor, reported 
to be essentially identical with crude oil of amber 
and to be employed as an antiseptic, especially in 
tuberculous wounds. 

Prostaden is a saccharated dried extract of 
prostate gland, 1 part of which represents two of 
the fresh gland. It is employed in prostatic hy- 
pertrophy. Dose. 10 to 40 grains per day, as 
tablets usually. 

Protalferrin is deflned as "an organic combina- 
tion of iron, protein, albumin and a small per- 
centage of sodium chloride," and is extolled as a 
readily assimilated form of iron. It is marketed 
as capsules, each containing 5 grains of protal- 
ferrin and 1/12 grain of extract of nux vomica. 
Dose, 2 capsules three times a day. 

Protan {tannin nucleo-proteid) is a brown, 
odorless powder, containing 50 per cent, of tannic 



THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDIC A 225 

acid and sparingly soluble in water or acid solu- 
tions, but readily, though slowly, soluble in alka- 
line fluids. It is recommended as an intestinal 
astringent in diarrhea; it passes the stomach 
scarcely acted upon, and acts chiefly only on 
reaching the intestines. Dose, 10 to 30 grains 
every hour to several hours, as powders or tablets. 
Marketed also as 2y2, 5 and 7%-grain tablets and 
in various combinations. 

Protargol (silver-proteid) is the best-known of 
the various modern organic compounds of silver. 
It occurs as a yellowish, light, neutral powder 
containing 8 per cent, of metallic silver, readily 
soluble in water or glycerin, and not precipitated 
by alkalies, alkali sulphides, albumin or sodium 
chloride. It is used externally as an astringent 
bactericide — chiefly in gonorrhea and purulent 
eye diseases, but also in nose and throat troubles. 
ulcers, etc. In gonorrhea ^4 to 2 per cent. 
solutions are employed; in eye diseases l^ to 5 
per cent, solutions; in ear, nose and throat trou- 
bles 2 to 10 per cent, solutions; and on ulcers, etc., 
5 per cent, ointments or dusting powders. There 
would probably be the same risk of permanent 
discoloration of the skin from any internal use 
of this preparation as from silver nitrate. Its 
solutions must be made with cold water, and kept 
in dark bottles; and contact with metallic objects 
must be avoided. To prepare solutions, place the 
drug in a glass or porcelain mortar containing a 
little cold water; stir into a thick paste, and grad- 
ually add more water, according to the strength 
desired. Or sprinkle the powder gently upon the 
surface of the required quantity of cold water, 
then cover the vessel and set it aside until solu- 
tion has been effected. If it be desired to rub 
down protargol in a mortar, the latter as well as 
the pestle should be moistened with a drop of gly- 
cerin. Bougies and suppositories of the remedy 
are made by various firms. Keep the bottle in a 
dry, cool place, and protected against light. Pro- 
targol stains on the linen when fresh readily dis- 
appear on washing with soap and water. Old 
stains should be treated with solution of potas- 
sium iodide, sodium hyposulphite, etc. 



226 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

Proteinum pyocyaneum Honl Is an extract of 
cultures of the bacillus pyocyaneus; a greenish- 
yellow, faintly alkaline liquid of an odor remind- 
ing of tilia flowers, that retains its efficacy for a 
long time if kept in a cool, dry, and dark place. 
It has been used by Dr. Janowsky in ulcers of the 
leg, pure on gauze tufts. 

Proteol is a formaldehyde-albumin compound 
of not clearly defined constitution. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 

Protogen {ovo-protogen ; methylene-albumin) 
is obtained by heating egg albumin with formal- 
dehyde, and occurs as yellow powder. This is 
put forward as a nutrient notwithstanding the 
fact that formaldehyde is a poison and that there 
is risk from any of its compounds. There is a 
risk also of blindness from it. See further under 
formaldehyde. 

Proton (not protan) is a nutritive prepared by 
Jost from milk; a white powder containing 90 
per cent, of albumin and soluble in water, and 
hence closely similar to plasmon. 

Protonuclein is "a combination of all the nu- 
cleins in the body, separated in unchanged form 
from the lymphoid structures of healthy animals 
without the use of chemicals." It is used inter- 
nally or hypodermically as a tissue-builder and as 
an antitoxin in infectious diseases, and topically 
on surgical lesions. Dose, 3 to 10 grains three or 
four times daily, before meals. Marketed also as 
3-grain tablets, 2-grain special tablets, and special 
powder. 

Protozone is a lotion for eczema and other skin 
affections, the composition of which is given as 
"thymol-sodium benzoate, sodium salicylate, 
citronol (?), glycerin, and alcohol."' It is applied 
pure as a rule. 

Protylin (phosphorus-alhumin) is a synthetic 
proteid, an organic compound of phosphorus and 
albumin, containing 2.7 per cent, of the former 
element. It occurs as a white, odorless, tasteless 
powder, insoluble in water but soluble in alkaline 
liquids. It is advertised as an assimilable, non- 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 227 

toxic form of phosphorus, in place of lecithin and 
the glycerinophosphates in cases of neurasthenia, 
rickets, scrofula, etc. Dose, 10 to 20 grains three 
times daily, in soup, broth, etc.; children, 4 to 15 
grains. It must not be boiled with the food. 
Brom-protylin (bromated phosphorus-albumin) 
contains 2.7 per cent, of phosphorus and 4 per 
cent, of bromine organically combined with al- 
bumin, and is employed as a nerve-nutrient and 
sedative in hysteria, epilepsy and other neuroses. 
It is a faintly yellowish powder, of slight bromine 
taste and odor, not perceptible when mixed with 
food. Dose, 10 to 20 grains three or four times 
a day. Iron-protylin (ferrated phosphorus-albu- 
min) is protylin with 2.3 per cent, of iron. It 
forms a white, odorless and tasteless powder, 
soluble in alkaline fluids and prescribed as a 
constructive and hematinic in doses of 10 to 20 
grains thrice daily, in soup, broth, etc. Protylin 
and its combinations are marketed also as 0.25 
gram tablets. 

Pmnitura is a plum extract syrup used abroad 
as a purgative. 

Pseudo-hyoscyamine is an alkaloid existing 
beside hyoscyamine, in duboisia. It is used as a 
sedative chiefly in the insane. Dose, 1/120 to 
1/60 grain; in the insane, 1/30 to 1/10 grain sub- 
cutaneously. 

Pulmoform is a trade name for methylene- 
diguaiacol, which see. 

Pulmonin (pulmogep.) is an extract of fresh 
calves' lung, heralded as a remedy In various pul- 
monary affections. It is marketed as 0.25 gram 
tablets, 5 to 10 of which constitute the daily dose. 

Pulvis cuticolor Unna consists of zinc oxide 2 
parts, magnesium carbonate 3, white bole 3, red 
bole 2, and rice starch 10. It Is used in certain 
skin diseases. 

Punicine Is a synonym of the well-known pel- 
letierine. 

Pural is a disinfectant consisting, according to 
Rosenthal, of powdered charcoal impregnated 
with carbolic acid, menthol and benzoic acid, and 
marketed compressed into cylinders which are 



228 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

ignited at one end and placed on saucers, thus 
giving off the disinfectant vapors. 

Purgatin (purgatol) is the trade name applied 
to anthrapurpurin diacetate or anthrapurpurin 
diacetyl ester, a yellow, tasteless powder insoluble 
in water and diluted acids but dissolving with a 
dark-red color in alkali solutions. It is used as 
a mild purgative in habitual constipation. Dose, 
10 to 30 grains at bed-time. Marketed also as 
chocolate tablets containing 0.3 gram of the drug. 
It imparts a blood-red color to the urine. 

Purgella is a palatable, effervescent laxative 
consisting of phenolphtalein, rochelle salt, fruit 
oil-sugar, and tartaric acid. 

Purgen {pur go) is a tablet consisting essen- 
tially of phenolphtalein, a chemical heretofore 
known only as an indicator, and now recom- 
mended as a mild purgative. Purgen, for adults, 
contains in each tablet 0.1 gram, hahy purgen 0.05 
gram, and strong purgen 0.5 gram, of phenolph- 
talein. 

Puro is a clear, dark-red, semi-solid mass pre- 
pared under pressure from fat-free meat. It is 
employed as a dietetic. Dose, 3 or 4 teaspoonfuls 
daily, in milk, bouillon, etc. 

Puroform is a disinfectant solution said to 
consist of zinc chloride, formaldehyde, thymol, 
menthol and eucalyptol. See caution under for- 
maldehyde. 

Puronal is a mixture of acetanilld (97.6) and 
bismuth oxyiodide (2.4), employed as a wound 
antiseptic. 

Pyoktanin is the name given by Prof. Stilling, 
of Strassburg, to pure methyl violet, which is 
penta- and hexa-methyl-para-rosanilin hydro- 
chlorate; a violet powder, soluble in 75 parts of 
water, 12 of alcohol, and 50 of glycerin, but in- 
soluble in ether. It is occasionally prescribed as 
a surgical antiseptic and discutient, chiefly in 
veterinary practice; its disagreeable staining 
properties have caused it to be abandoned largely 
in human medicine. It has also been given in- 
ternally in gastric and other visceral cancer. Used 
pure or in trituration with boric acid, or as oint- 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 229 

ment, or as a "pencil," or in 1:1000 to 1:100 solu- 
tions. It Is incompatible with corrosive subli- 
mate. Its stains may be removed by rubbing well 
with soap and washing with alcohol. 

Pyoktanin-mercury {pyoktanin and mercuric 
chloride) is a violet powder diflBcultly soluble in 
water or alcohol, containing 16 per cent, of mer- 
cury, and used in gonorrhea (1:2000 solution), 
burns (with an equal part of starch), favus, etc. 

Pyoktanin, Yellow. — See auramine. 

Pyoluene {oxy-methyl-allyl-sulp'hocar'bamide) 
is described as a bactericide equal to corrosive 
sublimate yet non-toxic, and soluble in water, al- 
cohol, glycerin or ether. 

Pyraloxin is the name given by Dr. P. G. Unna 
to oxidized pyrogallol, and recommended by him 
as a substitute for pyrogallic acid in skin dis- 
eases. It occurs as a black, insoluble powder and 
is said to be non-irritating. 

Pjrramidon (dimethylamido-antipyrin) is a de- 
rivative of antipyrin in which an H atom is re- 
placed by a dimethylamido group; a yellowish- 
white, almost tasteless powder, soluble in 10 
parts of water. It is an antipyretic and anal- 
gesic, largely used in the fever of consumptives. 
Dose, 4 to 10 grains, as powders or in solution. 
Incompatible with ferric chloride and spirit of 
nitrous ether. Pyramiidon camphorate, neutral, 
consists of 52 parts of pyramidon and 23 of cam- 
phoric acid, and has some antihidrotic action, 
though the antipyretic action predominates; dose, 
8 to 12 grains. Pyramidon camphorate, acid, is 
a compound of 47 parts of pyramidon and 32 of 
camphoric acid, that has still greater sweat- 
arresting power than the neutral camphorate, and 
used in phthisical fever. Dose, 12 to 15 grains. 
Pyramidon salicylate is specially intended for use 
in rheumatism and neuralgias; dose, 8 to 12 
grains. 

Pyrantin (phenosuccin; para-ethoxy-phenyl-suo- 
cinimide) is obtained by melting the hydrochlor- 
ate of para-amido-phenetol or phenacetin with 
succinic acid, and forms colorless needles soluble 
in 1317 parts of water, insoluble in ether. Soluble 



230 THE IfODEBN MATEBIA KEDICA 

pyrantin Is the sodium salt of pyrantin. Both 
preparations are antipyretics. Dose, 5 to 15 
grains. 

Pjrranum. — See pyrenol. 

Pyrazolonum Phenyldimethylicum Is the Ger- 
man Pharmacopoeia name for antipyrin. 

Pyrazolonum Phenyldimethylicum. Salicyli- 
cum is the designation of the German Pharma- 
copoeia for salipyrin, which see. 

Pyrenol (originally called pyranum) is de- 
fined as "benzoyl-thymyl-sodium benzoyl-oxyben- 
zoate; a compound of benzoic acid, salicylic acid 
and thymol in the form of a water-soluble sodium 
salt." It occurs as a white, slightly hygroscopic 
powder of aromatic odor, and soluble in 5 parts 
of water and In 10 of alcohol. It is prescribed as 
an antipyretic and anodyne in pulmonary affec- 
tions, rheumatism, etc. Dose, 8 to 30 grains, with 
cold water; hot solvents should be avoided. Mar- 
keted also as 0.5 gram tablets. 

Pyretin Is a mixture of acetanilid, caffeine, 
calcium carbonate, sodium, bicarbonate, and 
potassium bromide, possessed of antipyretic and 
anodyne power. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Pyridine Tannate is Intended for a uric acid 
solvent; also an intestinal astringent and wound 
antiseptic. It is a powder, sensitive to light. 

Pyrocatechin Methyl-benzyl Ether. — See 
hrenzcain. 

Pyroctin is another of the numerous composite 
antipyretics and anodynes, the base of which is 
acetanilid. Dose, 5 to L5 grains. Marketed also 
as 5-grain tablets, plain and in combinations. 

Pyrodin. — See acetyl-phenyl-hydrazin. 

Pyroform (^bismuth oxyiodo-dipyrogallate) is 
obtained by treating bismuth oxylodide with ox- 
idized pyrogallol (pyraloxln), and has been intro- 
duced as a relatively non-toxic substitute for py- 
rogalllc acid in dermatology. It occurs as a gray, 
insoluble powder. 

Pyrogallol-bismuth is described under bit- 
muth pyrogallate. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 231 

Pyrogallol Diacetate. — See saligallol. 

Pyrogallol Mono-acetate. — See eugallol. 

Pyrogallol, Oxidized. — See pyraloxm. 

Pyrogallol Triacetate. — See lenigallol. 

Pyroglycerin is a synonym of nitroglycerin. 

Pyrolin is a disinfectant consisting essentially 
of magnesium acetate. 

Pyrosal is the trade name for acid antipyrin 
salicylate, an antineuralgic occurring as a white 
powder, of bitter-acidulous taste, sparingly solu- 
ble in water, and split up Into its components in 
the intestines. Dose, 8 to 15 grains two to six 
times daily, in powders or as tablets (also so 
marketed). 

Pyrozone is a trade name for 3 per cent, solu- 
tion of hydrogen peroxide. Pyrozone, caustic, is 
a 25 per cent, solution of hydrogen peroxide. 



Q 

Quartonol Tablets consist of the four "tonols" 
(glycerinophosphates) of calcium (2^4 grains), so- 
dium (2^4 grains), quinine (% grain), and 
strychnine (1/200 grain). They are prescribed as 
nerve and tissue nutrients. 

Quassone is a liquid nerve-sedative stated to 
be non-alcoholic, the composition of which is un- 
known. 

Quinacetine is a base of the formula C27H31NO2. 
Its sulphate, the only salt marketed, occurs as 
white, lustrous needles adhering in tufts, of a 
slightly astringent and bitter taste, and readily 
reduced to powder. It forms freely soluble acid 
salts, incompatible with metallic hydrates and 
with carbonates. Its action and uses are the same 
as that of quinine sulphate. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Quinalgen (also known as analgen, henzanal- 
gen,SLnd. labordine) is chemically ortho-ethoxy-ana- 
monobenzoyl-amido-quinoline, C9H5N (OCjHb) NH.- 
CO.CgHj, and forms a white tasteless powder solu- 
ble in hot alcohol and in slightly acidulated water, 
but insoluble in pure water. It is prescribed as 
an analgesic and antipyretic, in neuralgia, rheu- 



232 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

matism, febrile affections, etc. Dose, 5 to IB 
grains 2 or 3 times a day; maximum daily dose, 
45 grains. 

Quinaphtol (cMnapJitol) is the name given 
to quinine beta-napMol-monosulphonate, CjiHmNj- 
02.(CioHeOH.S03H)2. The drug occurs as a yellow 
powder slightly soluble in hot water or alcohol, 
and containing 42 per cent, of quinine. It is em- 
ployed as an intestinal antiseptic and as an anti- 
pyretic. Dose, 8 to 15 grains. 

Quinaseptol. — See diaphtol. 

Quinetum Carboxy-ethyl Ester is described 
under eucliinal. 

Quinine Acetylsalicylate {quinine-aspirin) oc- 
curs as white, bitter needles of the composition 
CjoHjiN.Oo.CeH.O.C^HjO.COOH, and smelling of 
acetic acid (probably from decomposition of the 
acetylsalicylic acid). It is intended chiefly as an 
antineuralgic and antirheumatic. Dose, 8 to 20 
grains several times daily. 

Quinine Acid Dibromosalicylate is known In 
the trade as hromochinal, which see. 

Quinine Aesculinate. — See wscoguinine. 

Quinine-Antipyrin. — See chinopyrine. 

Quinine-Aspirin. — See quinine acetylsalicylate. 

Quinine Beta-Naphtol-monosulphonate is re- 
ferred to under its trade name, quinaphtol. 

Quinine-Bismuthi Sulphocyanate is described 
under its trade name, crurin. 

Quinine Carbonic Ester. — See euquinine. 

Quinine Carbonic Ester, Neutral, is better 
known as aristochin ; see this title. 

Quinine Dibromoguaiacolate is described un- 
der guaiaquinol. 

Quinine Dibromosalicylate, Acid, Is hromochi- 
nal. 

Quinine Eosolate, C8H7S30i2.(C2oH24N202)s, is 
one of a series of sulpho acid salts of the aliphatic 
creosote esters introduced by Dr. G. Wendt. It 
combines the antipyretic properties of quinine 
with the disinfectant and alterative action of 
creosote, and is hence used chiefly in tuberculosis 
with fever. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Quinine Esculinate. — See cesco-quinine. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 233 

Quinine Qlycerinophosphate, C3H,03P03(C.oH24- 

NjOj), occurs as a white powder, sparingly solu- 
ble in water, more freely soluble in alcohol and 
containing 68 per cent, of quinine. It is used 
chiefly in malaria associated with nervous dis- 
turbances. Dose, 3 to 10 grains, usually in pills, 
three times a day. Liquid preparations of it do 
not keep well, but may be rendered more stable 
by the addition of a drop of chloroform per fluid 
ounce. It should not be prescribed with carbo- 
nates, phosphates or lead salts, lest decomposition 
ensue; and hot solvents should be avoided. 

Quinine Glycyrrhizinate is a brown powder 
containing 25 per cent, of quinine, and only slight- 
ly bitter in taste. It is intended especially for 
children's use. Dose, about double that of quinine 
sulphate. 

Quinine Guaiacol-bisulphonate. — See guaia- 
quin. 

Quinine Lygosinate, CO(CH=CHC6H,OH.C2o- 
K^i'N.Oi).^, is a fine, yellow powder, with a bitter 
taste and hardly perceptible aromatic odor; spar- 
ingly soluble in v^ater, readily soluble in alcohol 
or chloroform; quinine content 70.8 per cent. It 
is used as an antiseptic and styptic on wounds, 
as dusting-powder, gauze, court plaster, etc. 

Quinine Salicylic Ester, — See saloguinine. 

Quinine Sulphoguaiacolate is sulphoguaiacin. 

Quinine- TTrethane is a soluble compound of qui- 
nine obtained by heating together 2 parts of qui- 
nine hydrochlorate, 1 of urethane and 2 of water. 
It is intended especially for subcutaneous or in- 
travenous injection. 

Quinochloral. — See chino7-al. 

Quinoliv is "a palatable powder of pure sul- 
phate of quinine with olive oil as a disguisant," 
used just like ordinary quinine sulphate. 

Quinopyrin. — See chinopyrine. 

Quinosol. — See chinosol. 



R 

Rachitol Tablets (Dr. Stoltzner) each ccutain 
1/12 grain of dried suprarenal gland and are pre- 
scribed in rickets (rachitis), 1 to 3, according to 
the weight of the child, per day. Maximum dose, 
6 or 7 tablets. 

Badal is the fanciful name applied to a 20 
per cent, solution of protargol. See the latter. 

Badiophor is what Dr. Axmann has named a 
relatively cheap radio-active mass that is said to 
retain its radio-activity in sufficient strength in- 
definitely. The mass is directly applied to the 
skin, to tumors or in cavities; it is also used on 
sounds, catheters, etc. For cutaneous lesions an 
area of a square centimeter is treated with radio- 
phor, ready spread, and this is kept in place by a 
bandage or rubber. 

Bamkulin is a collective name for three "blood- 
purifying" preparations, the chief constituent of 
which is described by the manufacturer as 
"ramkulin extract, an organo-vegetable extract 
prepared from large, round-leaved spinach and 
carrots." There are marketed ramkulin pills, 
ramuculin liquid and ramculin cascarinated. 

Bamogen (Biedert) is a nutritive said to con- 
tain 1 part of albumin, 2 of fat, 4 of sugar, and 1/5 
of salts. It is not the same as Biedert's cream 
mixture. 

Beclus' Ointment consists of iodoform (1), 
salol (2), boric acid (5), antipyrin (5) and 
vaselin (40). 

Bemarcol Is a brand name for sodium fluoride. 

Benaden Is a lactose tritu'ration of dried ex- 
tract of pig's kidneys, 1 part representing 2 parts 
of the fresh organ. It is prescribed in Bright's 
disease and uremia. Dose, SO to 120 grains per 
day. 

Benaglandin is described as a "concentrated 
solution of the suprarenal gland." It is used as a 



TEE HODEBN MATEBIA. MEDICA 236 

hemostatic, in the s&m« classes of cases as adren- 
alin. 

Benoform Is a coryza snuff consisting of a mix- 
ture of powdered boric acid and milk sugar with 
2 per cent, of dried extract of suprarenal gland. 

Besaldol, C„Hi40,.(CHgC0)j, is an acetyl deriva^ 
tive of the condensation product of chlormethyl- 
salicylic aldehyde and resorcin (saloform). It oc- 
curs as a very light, yellowish-brown powder of 
very astringent taste, insoluble in water, but solu- 
ble in alkali solutions. It is intended as an in- 
testinal antiseptic, especially in tuberculosis of 
the intestines. Dose, 45 to 75 grains per day, in 
wafers or as enemas. 

Besalgfin is the name applied to antipyrin re- 
sorcylate, (CuHijN30)2.CtH,04, which chemical oc- 
curs as colorless crystals freely soluble in water, 
and intended as an antiseptic. 

Resineon (ethereal pitch oil) is the distilla- 
tion product of crude tar oil distilling at 148° C. 
It has been recommended in a 1:8 ointment in 
chronic skin rashes. 

Eesol is a crude disinfectant obtained by sapon- 
ifying wood tar with caustic potash in presence of 
wood alcohol. 

Resopyrin (resorcin-antipyrin resorcinopy- 
rin) results from mixing solutions of resorcin 
and antipyrin. Colorless crystals soluble in al- 
cohol, insoluble in water. It is an antiseptic and 
an antipyretic. Dose, 10 to 20 grains. 

Besorbin, as its name implies, is a readily ab- 
sorbed ointment-base, consisting of oil of sweet al- 
monds, soap, white wax, lanolin, and a solution of 
gelatin. It is used as a vehicle in the endermic 
administration of mercury, iodine and other 
drugs. Marketed also as resorcin-mercury, 33% 
per cent, and 50 per cent. 

Besorcin- Antipyrin. — See resopyrin. 

Besorcin- Camphor is obtained by melting to- 
gether equal parts of resorcin and camphor, and 
forms a colorless oily fluid recommended for use 
in pruritus and parasitic skin diseases (especial- 
ly for lice). 



236 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

E.esorcin-Eucal3rptol is a white powder, easily 
soluble in alcohol, sparingly soluble in water. Its 
solutions are used by inhalation in phthisis, fetid 
bronchitis and the like, and in ointment it is 
used on wounds, skin lesions, etc. 

Resorcin - Hexamethylenetetramine is de- 
scribed under hetralin. 

Resorcin Monoacetate. — See euresol. 

Resorcinol (not simple resorcin, also called 
resorcinol, particularly in England) is obtained 
by melting together equal parts of resorcin and 
iodoform. It occurs as a brown powder of iodine 
odor and iodoform taste, and was introduced as a 
vulnerary and dermic; to be applied as a 20 per 
cent, dusting-powder or as 6 to 12 per cent, oint- 
ments. Keep from light. 

Resorcin-Salol, obtained by melting resorcin 
and salol together, was introduced some years ago 
as an intestinal antiseptic, but never met with 
much favor because offering no advantages over 
a simple mixture of its ingredients. Dose, 3 to 10 
grains. 

Retinol (rosinol, rosin oil) is a thick, yellow 
oil obtained by the distillation of rosin; specific 
gravity, 0.900; soluble in oils, ether, and alcohol. 
It is used as an ointment or liniment In skin dis- 
eases; technically as a solvent of phosphorus, 
salol, camphor, gums, etc. It has also been sug- 
gested as an excipient for phosphorus. 

Rexotan (methylene-tannin-urea) is a con- 
densation product of tannin, urea, and formalde- 
hyde, to which the formula CuHnNjOio has been 
assigned. It occurs as a yellowish-brown, odorless, 
and tasteless powder; insoluble in the usual sol- 
vents and acid liquids, decomposed by alkalies 
with the liberation of formaldehyde. It is pre- 
scribed as an intestinal astringent and disinfec- 
tant. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Rheol ovules consist of a preparation of yeast, 
and are used in leucorrhea. They are coated with 
paraffin, in order to protect the yeast against at- 
mospheric influences. 

Rheumacilate is a brand of synthetic methyl 
salicylate, exploited as a topical remedy in rheu- 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 237 

matism, 30 to 60 minims being rubbed in at a 
time. 

Rheuman is a medicated paper employed in 
rheumatism and neuralgia. 

Rheumaphen (acetyl-salicylic acid methyl 
ester) is intended for use in cases of rheumatism 
that do not bear acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin) 
well on account of hyperacidity of the stomach. 
Dose, the same as of aspirin. Marketed also as 
tablets. 

Rheumasan is a superfatted salicylic acid soap 
containing 10 per cent, of free salicylic acid. It 
is used by inunction in rheumatic affections, 
sciatica, etc., 2 to 4 drams per dose, usually in 
the evening. 

Rheumasol (salicylated petrovasol) consists of 
80 per cent, of vasol and 10 per cent, each of pe- 
trosulfol and salicylic acid. It is used as a paint 
or inunction in swollen glands, lumbago, rheu- 
matism, etc. 

Rheumatin is the name applied in Germany — 
and up to two years ago also here — to saloquinine 
salicylate; see this title. 

Rhinalgin suppositories consist of alumnol, 
menthol, valerian oil, and cacao butter. They are 
used in coryza. 

Rhinosclerin (Pawlowski) is a hydro-alco- 
holic extract of the bacilli that cause the nasal 
affection known as rhinoscleroma, and is intended 
as a remedy for the latter. 

Rhodallin is a synonym of thiosinamine. 

Rhomnogyre is the mercury salt of rhomnol, 
hence mercury nucleinate and thus analogous to 
mercurol, which see for properties, uses, etc. 

Rhomnol is a French nuclein derived from the 
thymus gland, and marketed as pills and granules. 
For properties and uses, see nuclein. 

Rhomnoline is a nervine and dietetic, the ac- 
tive ingredient of which is the calcium salt of 
rhomnol (i. e. calcium nucleinate). 

Ringolin is a paste consisting of equal parts 
of cod liver oil and glycerin in combination with 
0.3 per cent, of zinc oxide and balsam peru. It is 
used in eruptions and intertrigo of infants; also 



238 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

as a vehicle, because readily miscible with tar, oil 
of cade, salicylic acid, etc. 

Robol is described as a digestive powder and 
tonic at the samfc time. Its composition is un- 
known. 

Boborat is an albuminous nutrient occurring as 
a whitish, odorless, and nearly tasteless powder. 
Dose, daily 2 to 4 tablespoonfuls mixed with 
food. 

Boborin is a black, granular, nearly tasteless, 
odorless powder, prepared from blood and rec 
ommended for anemia, scrofula and general de- 
bility. 

Bobuston is a dried extract of malt and milk, 
that keeps well and is recommended as a palatable 
nutritive. 

Bodagen is a 50 per cent, lactose trituration of 
a substance obtained from the milk of thyroidec- 
tomied goats and used as a remedy in Basedow's 
disease (exophthalmic goiter). Dose, 75 to 150 
grains per day, 

Bonozol is brand name for a series of salts 
identical witn the older group of preparations 
designated as sozoiodole. See the latter heading. 

Bubidium salts have come into some vogue in 
recent years as substitutes for the corresponding 
potassium salts, the claim being made that they 
do not affect the stomach or heart deleteriously. 
Chief among them are the following: Rubidium 
bromide, RbBr, colorless crystals or a white pow- 
der, soluble in water. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. RUr- 
bidium iodide, Rbl, white crystals freely soluble 
in water. Dose, 2 to 10 grains. Rubidium and 
ammonium bromide, RbBr.SNH^Br, a yellowish- 
white powder soluble in water. Dose in epilepsy, 
60 to 100 grains per day. 

Bubrol is a solution of thymol and boric acid 
in a coal tar derivative of unknown composition 
It is employed in gonorrhea, 

Bufigallic Acid Tetramethyl Ester, — See exo- 
din. 

Eussol is a gout and rheumatism liniment con- 
taining methyl salicylate, capsicin, colchicum, 
chloroform and mustard spirit. 



s 

Saccharin will be but briefly referred to, only 
such statements being made as may not be gen- 
erally known to pharmacists and physicians. It 
is chemically definable as benzoyl-sulphonic 
imide, ortho-sulphamine-'benzoic anhydride, ben- 
zoic-acid sulphinide; and is known in the trade 
also as agucarina, garantose, gluside, neosaccJiar- 
in, saccharinol, saccharinose, saccharol, saxine, 
sycose, toluol sugar, zuckerin, etc. The refined 
or regular saccharin is an acid, sparingly soluble 
in water (1:400), but dissolving in 30 parts of 
alcohol. Soluble saccharin {crystallose, etc.) is 
the sodium salt of saccharin pure, containing 
about 90 per cent, of the latter. While its uses 
are chiefly as a sweetening agent, it is occasion- 
ally prescribed as an acidifler of the urine in 
cystitis, as it is eliminated from the system un- 
changed. Dose, 2 to 5 grains in solution. 

Saccharinol, Saccharinose, and Saccharol are 
synonyms of saccharin. 

Saccharosolvol is an organo-therapeutic prep- 
aration obtained by the action of salicylic acid 
upon the diastatic ferment of pancreatic juice 
and spinal marrow of cattle. It is employed in 
diabetes. Dose, a teaspoonful three times a day. 

Sagradin is a 20 per cent, solution of bitter- 
less extract of cascara, to which 2 per cent, of 
peppermint spirit has been added. Dose, ^ to 1 
teaspoonful. 

Sagradol is a bitterless extract of cascara sa- 
grada with 2 per cent, of quinine. 

Sal Ansestheticum Schleich is used for "infil- 
tration anesthesia" as introduced by Dr. Schleich 
of Berlin. It is marketed as tablets, in three 
strengths: strong, containing cocaine hydro- 
chlorate 0.2 gram, morphine hydrochlorate 0.025 
gram, and sodium chloride 0.2 gram; normal, 
containing cocaine hydrochlorate 0.1 gram, mor- 
phine hydrochlorate 0,0^5 gram, and sodium 



240 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

chloride 0.2 gram; and weak, containing cocaine 
hydrochlorate 0.01 gram, morphine hydrochlorate 
0.005 gram, and sodium chloride 0.2 gram. For 
use, 1 tablet is dissolved in 100 c.c, of sterilized 
water. 

Sal-Ethyl is a trade name given to pure ethyl 
salicylate or salicylic ether, recently recom- 
mended as a substitute for methyl salicylate and 
wintergreen oil internally in rheumatism, tonsil- 
litis, neuralgia, etc. It occurs as an almost color- 
less liquid, specific gravity 1.184, and soluble In 
alcohol and oils. Dose, 5 to 15 minims several 
tim.es daily, in capsules or globules. Marketed as 
5-minim globules. 

Sal Gregory is a mixture of morphine hydro- 
chlorate (971/^ per cent.) and codeine hydro- 
chlorate (2% per cent); a white powder freely 
soluble in water and employed like morphine 
hydrochlorate and in about the same doses. 

Sal Physiologicum Poehl is a white powder, 
readily soluble in water, and containing all the 
active constituents of blood serum. A 1.5 per 
cent, solution corresponds in saline content to 
blood serum. It is used for transfusions, also in 
irrigations and sprays for catarrhal inflamma- 
tions (coryza, cystitis, etc.). 

Sal Purgans is what artificial Carlshad salt 
(sal Carolinum factitium) is called in Austria. 

Sal Benaline is a laxative salt containing as 
a base "the active salts contained in European 
bitter waters, sodium phosphate, lithium phos- 
phate and renaline" (hexamethlenetetramine). 
It is used mainly in gout, rheumatism and 
Bright's disease. See caution under formalde- 
hyde. 

Salacetin is defined as "a combination, with 
heat, of salicylic and glacial acetic acids with 
phenylamine" (anilin) — perhaps the same as sal- 
ifebrin, which is obtained by melting salicylic 
acid and acetanilid together. It is an antirheu- 
matic and analgesic, used principally as an ingre- 
dient of "sal-codeia" (salacetin 5 grains, codeine 
% grain). 
Salacetol (salicylacetol; salantol; acetol-sali- 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 241 

cylioacid ester), CsH^.OH.COO.CHj.CO.CH,, occurs 
as white to faintly reddish, fluffy, bitter needles, 
readily soluble in alcohol, chloroform, and ether, 
but sparingly soluble in water. It is prescribed 
as an intestinal antiseptic and antirheumatic 
Dose, 15 to 45 grains, often with 1 ounce of castor 
oil. 

Salactol is described as a solution of sodium 
salicylate and sodium lactate in 1 per cent, solu- 
tion of hydrogen peroxide. It is used chiefly as a 
paint in diphtheria; also internally. 

Salam.id is an amide derivative of salicylic 
acid, closely resembling the latter in therapeutic 
properties, but tasteless, and more soluble, and 
more powerful. Dose, 10 to 15 grains per day. 

Salantol. — See salacetol. 

Salazolon is a synonym of salipyrine. 

Salbromalid is antinervin. 

Salen is a mixture of the methyl and ethyl acid 
esters of salicylic acid; an odorless, oily fluid 
used as an inunction in rheumatism. 

Salhypnon is the name applied to benzoyl- 
methyl-salicylic acid ester, which forms color- 
less needles, slightly soluble in alcohol and ether, 
and insoluble in water. Its action is analogous 
to that of salacetol. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 

Salibromine is, chemically, salicylic acid 
methyl ester, and is employed as an antipyretic 
and antirheumatic in doses of 8 grains four to 
ten times daily. 

Salicol is a French cosmetic antiseptic, con- 
sisting of a solution of salicylic acid and winter- 
green oil in methyl alcohol and water. The methyl 
alcohol, it is now well known, is highly poison- 
ous, and causes blindness, and It may injure the 
eyes even by its vapor. 

Salicyl-alpha-methyl-phenyl-hydrazon is the 
chemical designation of agathin. 

Salicylamide, CeH,.(0H)C0NH3, is obtained 
by causing dry ammonia to act upon methyl sal- 
icylate. It occurs as colorless or yellowish, 
tasteless plates, soluble in alcohol, ether or chlor- 
oform, only sparingly soluble in water. It is used 
mainly as an analgesic, in rheumatism, gout, etc. 



242 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Dose, 21^ to 5 grains every 3 or 4 hours, in solu- 
tion. Maximum daily dose, 15 grains. 

Salicylanilid is a synonym of salifebrin. 

Salicyl-formaldehyde. — See formasal. 

Salicylic Acid Acetyl-para-amidophenol Ester. 
—See salophen. 

Salicylic Acid Amyl Ester is a synonym of 
amyl salicylate; see this title. 

Salicylic Acid Beta-Naphtol Ester is referred 
to under betol. 

Salicylic Acid Glycerin Ester. — See glycosal. 

Salicylic Acid Methoxy-methyl Ester is a 
chemical designation for the article marketed as 
mesotan. 

Salicylic Acid Methyl Ester is described un- 
der salithymol. 

Salicylic Acid Para-chlorphenyl Ester. — See 
chlorsalol. 

Salicylic-acid-para-phenetetid is better known 
by the trade name, phenesol. 

Salicylic Acid Phenyl Ester is salol. 

Salicylos is a granular effervescent salt, each 
dessertspoonful of which contains 5 grains each 
of strontium and ammonium salicylates, with 2 
grains of lithium bitartrate, and an excess of 
non-irritating alkaline salt. It is prescribed in 
rheumatism, gout, neuralgia, lumbago, etc. Dose, 
1 to 2 dessertspoonfuls every 2 hours or so, in 
half a glass of water, taken during effervesc^ice. 
Keep securely stoppered and in a dry place. 

Salicyl-para-phenetidin is described under its 
trade name, malakin. 

Salicyl-phenetidin is given as a synonym of 
saliphen. 

Salicyl-quinine. — See saloquinine. 

Salicyl-resorcin-ketone {trioxyphenone) , CuH„ 
O,, occurs as white or reddish-white leaflets, 
slightly soluble in water and alcohol, and used as 
an intestinal antiseptic and antirheumatic, in 
doses of 5 to 15 grains, 3 or 4 times daily. Maxi- 
mum dose, 15 grains, or 60 grains per day. 

Salifebrin (salicylanilid) is advertised as a 
condensation product of salicylic acid and acetan- 
ilid (antifebrin), but is said to be probably a 



THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIC A 243 

fused mixture of the two components. It is pre- 
scribed as an anodyne and antipyretic. Dose, 5 
to 15 grains. 

Saliformin {formin salicylate; Jiexamethyl- 
enetetramine salicylate), CaH10N4.CaH1.OH.COOH, 
occurs as a white powder of acidulous taste, and 
readily soluble in water and alcohol. It is pre- 
scribed as a genito-urinary disinfectant and gout 
remedy. Dose, 5 to 10 grains 3 or 4 times daily, 
in water. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Saligallol {pyrogallol diacetate) is a resinous 
solid marketed in 33% per cent, solution in 
acetone, which is miscible with acetone and 
chloroform. It is a skin varnish of mild pyrogal- 
lol effect, but used chiefly as a vehicle for other 
dermics, such as eugallol and eurobin. Applied 
in 2 to 15 per cent, solutions. 

Saligenin. — See diathesin. 

Saligenin Tannate is described under anti- 
arthrin. 

Salinaphtol is a synonym of hetol, which see. 

Saliodin is said to be an "iodated aceto-sali- 
cylate, with adjuvants; a combination of salicylic 
acid, iodine, acetic acid, aconite, bryonia, col- 
chicum, capsicum and gaultheria." It occurs as a 
grayish-pink powder, soluble in 3 parts of water. 
It is used in rheumatism, gout, syphilis, and 
other diseases in which salicylic acid and iodine 
are indicated. Dose, 10 to 30 grains. 

Saliphen (not salophen), also designated as 
saliphenin and salicyl-phenetidin, occurs as color- 
less crystals readily soluble in alcohol and almost 
insoluble in water. It is occasionally prescribed 
as a mild antipyretic and analgesic. Dose, 8 to 20 
grains. 

Saliphenol. — See phenosalyl. 

Salipin is an ointment containing 10 per cent, 
of salicylic acid and 10 per cent, of ethereal oils, 
used as an inunction in rheumatic affections. 

Salipyrine (antipyrin salicylate; salazolon; 
salipyrazolon) , CnHuNjO.CTHeO.,,, is a white, 
odorless powder, of sweetish taste with bitter 
after-taste; soluble in 250 parts of water, readily 
in alcohol, chloroform and ether. It contains 



244 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIOA 

57.7 per cent, of antipyrin and 42.8 per cent, of 
salicylic acid. It is an analgesic and antirheu- 
matic prescribed largely in grip, neuralgia and 
rheumatic affections. Dose, 8 to 30 grains in 
cachets or capsules, or as mixture rubbed up with 
a little glycerin and flavored with raspberry 
syrup. 

Salit is the terse name given to iorneol sali- 
cylic acid ester, CioHnO.COCaHiOH. The article 
occurs as an oily liquid mlscible in all propor- 
tions with alcohol, ether and fatty oils, slightly 
soluble in glycerin, and insoluble in water; alka- 
lies decompose it into salicylic acid and borneol. 
It is prescribed as a topical antirheumatic and 
anodyne, usually diluted with an equal part of 
olive oil, which mixture is marketed as "salitum 
solutum." Dose, as a paint or by Inunction, 20 
to 40 minims twice daily. 

Salitannol is a condensation product of sali- 
cylic and tannic acids, of the formula ChHioO,, 
and occurring as a white powder Insoluble in the 
usual solvents, but soluble in caustic alkalies. It 
combines the antiseptic action of salicylic acid 
with the astringent action of tannin. It is used 
on wounds and in intestinal catarrh. Dose, 15 
grains three or four times daily. 

Salithymol {thymyl salicylate; salicylic add 
thymyl ester) results from the action of phos- 
phorus oxychloride or trichloride upon sodium 
thymolate and sodium salicylate. It forms a 
white, sweetish powder, almost insoluble In 
water, but readily soluble in alcohol and ether. 
It is employed as an intestinal antiseptic In the 
same doses as salol. 

Salochinin. — See saloquinine. 

SalocoU (phenocoll salicylate), CiTHjoNjOb oc- 
curs as white needles of a sweetish taste and 
soluble in hot water. It is prescribed as an anti- 
pyretic and anodyne in fevers, rheumatism, neu- 
ralgias, etc. Dose, 10 to 20 grains several times 
dally. 

Salocreol is defined as a compound of the vari- 
ous phenols of beechwood creasote with salicylic 
acid, forming esters; so-called creosote salicylic 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 245 

acid ester. It occurs as a brown, oily, nearly odor- 
less, neutral liquid, readily soluble in olive oil, 
alcohol, ether and chloroform, insoluble in water, 
and saponified by alkalies, alcohol or glycerin on 
prolonged contact. It is used topically in facial 
erysipelas, chronic rheumatism, adenitis, lum- 
bago, etc., as a paint or by inunction, in quantities 
of 45 to 180 minims one or more times daily, up 
to 1 fluid ounce per day. The skin should be per- 
fectly dry before applying the salocreol, else an 
emulsion will be formed that prevents the pene- 
tration of the drug. 

Saloform is described as a chemical compound 
of hexamethylenetetramine (formin, urotropin, 
etc.), salicylic acid and lithium. It is used as a 
uric acid solvent and urinary disinfectant, in 
gout, cystitis, etc. Dose, 10 grains four times 
daily. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets and elixir 
(teaspoonful per dose). See caution under for- 
maldehyde. 

Salol-Camphor {camphorated salol) Is a mix- 
ture of 3 parts of salol with 1 part of camphor; 
a yellowish, oily liquid, soluble in alcohol, ether, 
chloroform and oils. It is used almost wholly 
externally, chiefly as a local anesthetic in tooth- 
ache, neuralgia, etc., but also in certain skin 
diseases and otorrhea. Dose, 3 to 10 grains (in 
typhoid fever, etc.). It should be kept well stop- 
pered. 

Salophen (salicylic acid acetyl-para-amido- 
phenoj ester; acetyl-pura-amido-salol ; aoet-amido- 
salol; acetyl-para-amido-phenyl salicylate), C,!!*. 
OH.COO.C,H,NH.COCH„ is obtained from sali- 
cylic acid nitrophenylic ester by reduction and 
acetylization. It forms a white, odorless, taste- 
less powder, practically insoluble in water, but 
readily soluble in alcohol, chloroform and ether; 
it contains 51 per cent, of salicylic acid. Alka- 
lies decompose it, and should hence not be dis- 
pensed with it. It is used as an anodyne, anti- 
pyretic, and antiseptic, in rheumatism, grip, ty- 
phoid fever, etc. Dose, 10 to 15 grains three or 
four times daily. Maximum dose, 20 grains. 

Saloquinine (salochinin; salicyl-quinine ; qui- 



246 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

nine salicylic add ester) has the formula CoH*. 
OH.CO.O.CioHasNjO, and occurs as a whitish, 
tasteless powder, insoluble in water, readily sol- 
uble in chloroform and hot alcohol, sparingly sol- 
uble in ether and cold alcohol. It is an analgesic, 
antiperiodic, and antipyretic, analogous to qui- 
nine. Dose, 15 to 30 grains, one to three times 
daily, as powders usually; in fever, it is often 
followed by a little hydrochloric acid and water. 

Saloquinine Salicylate, known abroad also as 
rheumatin, occurs in the form of white, tasteless 
needles, sparingly soluble in water. It is recom- 
mended as an antirheumatic and antineuralgic, in 
doses of 15 to 20 grains three times daily. 

Saloricol is the name given to soft capsules 
containing 5 grains of salol and 5 grains of castor 
oil. 

Salosantal {oleum salosantali) is a 33% per 
cent, solution of salol in oil of sandalwood and 
a little peppermint oil. It is used internally In 
gonorrhea. Dose, 5 to 15 minims, in capsules or 
on sugar. Marketed also in 0.3 and 0.5 gram 
capsules. 

Salozon is a bath salt, advertised as being dis- 
infectant and stimulating to the skin. 

Salubrin is a liquid antiseptic and astringent 
composed of acetic acid (2), alcohol (50), acetic 
ether (25), and water (23). Dose, a teaspoonful 
in water, four times a day. Applied externally 
pure or in 1 in 10 solution. 

Salubrol is chemically methylene-tetrabrom- 
diantipyrin, C23Hj<Br4N40.,. It occurs as a perma- 
nent, almost odorless powder, soluble in alcohol. 
It is employed as a wound antiseptic like iodo- 
form. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Salufer is a name sometimes applied to sodium 
silicofluoride. 

Salumin is described under aluminium sali- 
cylate. Soluble salumin is aluminium and am- 
monium salicylate. 

Salutine is described as "a combination of 
'carbonyphenylacetates,' from oil of betula lenta 
with the active principles of parilinia sorbilis 
and theobroma cacao." It occurs as colorless 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 247 

crystals, of slightly bitter-acidulous taste, practi- 
cally insoluble in water and dilute acids, but sol- 
uble in alcohol and alkaline liquids. It is in- 
tended as a succedaneum for sodium salicylate. 
Dose, 5 to 20 grains three or four times a day, 
before meals. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

Salvin is a creamy emulsion of a compound of 
silica and -wax, which when applied to the skin is 
said to penetrate rapidly and form a thin coat- 
ing on the epidermis that prevents infection dur- 
ing operations, examinations, etc. It is used also 
In intertrigo, eczema, bed-sores, etc. 

Sanal (Miiller) is a reddish-brown ointment 
consisting of litharge, red bole, calamine, balsam 
of peru, yellow wax, and vaselin. It is employed 
in rheumatism, gout, etc. 

Sanatogen is a glycerinophosphated sodium- 
casein, readily soluble in water, and recom- 
mended as a food and a nerve nutrient. It con- 
sists of 5 per cent, of sodium glycerinophosphate 
and 95 per cent, of casein. Dose, 1 to 1^ ozs. 
daily, in warm milk, etc. 

Sanatol (not sanitol, a preparation used as a 
mouthwash) is a general disinfectant occurring 
as a dark brownish-black fluid smelling of crude 
carbolic acid and sulphurous acid. Its solutions 
in water are turbid. 

Sanatolyn is an Austrian crude disinfectant 
similar to sanatol. 

Sangalbumin is an acid, peptonized blood- 
albumin, soluble in water, and claimed to be 
identical with the better-known haemalbumin. 

Sangan is a name applied haeman. 

Sangogen Capsules are said to contain iron, 
arsenic, manganese, and strychnine — "all in or- 
ganic form, all predigested." These are prescribed 
as a blood and nerve tonic. Dose, 1 or 2 after 
each meal. 

Sangostol {liquor calcii iodo-ferrati) is an 
iron and lime preparation intended for use chiefly 
for rachitic and scrofulous children. Dose (chil- 
dren), V> to 1 teaspoonful after meals. 

Sanguiform is a liquid hematinic obtained 
from fresh ox-blood. It is advertised as contain- 



248 THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 

ing in each fluid ounce "2% grains of natural or- 
ganic iron, together with all the albuminous and 
saline constituents of 1^4 ounces of normal 
healthy blood." Dose, 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls, in 
water. 

Sanguinal, Krewel, is a hematinic prepared 
from blood, and consists, according to the manu- 
facturers, of pure crystalline hemoglobin 10 per 
cent., natural salts of the blood 46 per cent., and 
freshly prepared peptonized muscle albumin 44 
per cent., with a trace of manganese. Marketed 
only as pills, each representing 5 grams of 
blood; also in pills combined with guaiacol car- 
bonate; with creosote; with rhubarb extract; with 
hetol; with quinine, etc. Dose, 2 to 5 pills three 
times a day, before meals. 

Sanguine Tablets are stated to contain all the 
iron salts, albumins, fats and carbohydrates ex- 
isting in the animal organism, in the form in 
which they occur in the blood, but in 5 times 
the propoition; apparently simply evaporated 
blood. Dose, 2 to 4 tablets before meals. 

Sanguinoform is a reddish-yellow powder, said 
to be prepared from "embryonic blood-forming 
organs" (bone-marrow, spleen, etc.), with the 
addition of cacao and peppermint oil. It is em- 
ployed as a "blood-builder" and invigorator in 
chlorosis, rickets, convalescence, etc. Dose, '^ 
teaspoonful three times a day. 

Sanguinol is the name of two entirely different 
preparations. The St. Petersburg article is a 
dark-brown, odorless powder, soluble in water, 
obtained from calves' blood, and used as a hema- 
tinic in doses of 5 to 15 grains. The American 
sanguinol is a liquid petrolatum combined with 
sanguinarine and antiseptics, prepared according 
to a formula of the Brooklyn Throat Hospital, 
and used as a spray in diseases of the nose and 
larynx. 

Sano is barley flour dextrinized by means of 
heat; a food containing in 100 parts, according to 
Aufrecht, 12 of proteids, 65 of starch, 4 of soluble 
carbohydrates, 1^/^ of fat, and 14 of water. 

Sanoform {diiodO'Salicylic acid methyl ether) 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 249 

results from the action of iodine upon winter- 
green oil. It forms a white, odorless, and taste- 
less powder, soluble in ether, hot alcohol, and 
vaselin oil; and contains 62.7 per cent, of iodine. 
It was recommended a few years ago as a substi- 
tute for iodoform in surgery. 

Sanogen is a disinfectant, essentially a saponi- 
fication product of different tars, combined with 
calcium chloride, magnesium chloride and so- 
dium chloride. 

Sanosal is an effervescent laxative salt, said to 
contain besides taste-corrigents the ingredients 
of the Hungarian bitter waters. 

Sanose is a food for the sick and convalescent, 
containing 80 per cent, of casein and 20 per cent, 
of albuminose. It occurs as a white, odorless and 
tasteless powder, that readily forms an emulsion 
when stirred with water. It seems to have been 
withdrawn from the American market. 

Sanosin, later called also thieukalyptol, was 
heralded in 1903 as a cure for consumption, Drs. 
Danelius and Sommerfeld being the introducers. 
It consists of the ethereal oil of eucalyptus macu- 
lata citriodorus, powdered leaves of the same 
plant, flowers of sulphur and powdered charcoal. 
The powder is heated on a plate in a special ap- 
paratus that goes with the remedy. It has not 
been referred to in medical literature during the 
past year, and seems to have fallen into disuse. 

Sanatalol. — See arheol. 

Santalol-Formaldehyde is a condensation pro- 
duct of the two components, intended as a urinary 
disinfectant in nephritis and cystitis. See cau- 
tion under formaldehyde. 

Santalsol is advertised as "a water-soluble ex- 
tract of sandalwood oil (?), copaiba balsam, cu- 
beb oil, peru balsam, buchu, and pimenta oil; each 
fluid dram represents 4 minims of oil of sandal- 
wood, 2 minims of oil of cubeb, 2 minims of co- 
paiba, 1 minim of pimenta oil, and 20 minims of 
fluid extract of buchu." It is prescribed in gon- 
orrhea, cystitis, etc. Dose, 1 to 2 fluid drams. 

Santheose is a French trade name for theo- 
hromine. A "santheose phosphat6e" (sodium 



250 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

phosphate 1, theobromine 2) and a "santhgose 
ilthln6e" (lithium carbonate 1, theobromine 2) 
are also marketed. 

Santoninoxim, Cu,H,A(NOH), is a derivative 
of santonin obtained by the action of hydroxy! 
amine hydrochlorate upon it in presence of so 
dium hydroxide; a white powder, sparingly solu 
ble in water, freely soluble in alcohol and ether 
It is used as an anthelmintic, chiefly in children 
Dose, % to 2 grains, in 2 portions taken 1 to 2 
hours apart; adult dose, 5 grains, in wafers or in 
water, and repeated for 2 or 3 days. It should be 
protected against light. 

Sanus is a 36 per cent, solution of formalde- 
hyde gas. See caution under forinaldehyde. 

Saparaform is a paraform (para-formaldehyde 
or trioxymethylene) soap, obtained by dissolving 
paraform to the extent of 3 to 5 per cent, in a 
liquid potash soap. It is a clear, yellow liquid, of 
faint formaldehyde odor, rapidly evolving for- 
maldehye gas when diluted. It is used for disin- 
fecting the hands, skin, etc. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Sapocarbol 00, 0, and I are soap solutions con- 
taining crude cresol. Sapocarbol II is a mixture 
of resin soap with tar oil rich in cresols. They 
are used as general disinfectants and deodorants. 
Sapo cinereus is a potash soap made from lard 
and impregnated with mercury. It is intended as 
a readily penetrating substitute for mercurial 
ointment. 

Sapocresol is claimed to be identical with 
lysol. 
Sapocresotin is said to be similar to creolin. 
Sapodermin is a superfatted soap containing 
mercury in the form of caseinate. It has a 
greenish-slate color and a faint and not unpleas- 
ant odor. It is used in parasitic and syphilitic 
skin diseases. Two strengths are furnished, Ys 
and 1 per cent, of mercury respectively. 

Sapoform is a formaldehyde soap solution 
brought forward as a disinfectant. See caution 
under formaldehyde. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 251 

Sapokarbolin is saponified coal-tar creosote 
oils; a product analogous to if not identical with 
creolin. (See the latter.) 

Sapol is a solid soap spirit invented by Dr. R. 
Falck, of Breslau (Germany), intended especially 
for disinfecting the surgeon's hands, but also as a 
vehicle for medicaments used by inunction. It 
consists essentially of alcohol (70 per cent.), 
soda soap (15 per cent.) and water (15 per cent.). 
It does not melt in the hand. 

Sapolau {naphtasapol ; napMa saponata) is a 
blackish-brown ointment consisting of lanolin, 
soap and a substance obtained by fractional dis- 
tillation of crude naphtha; a product analogous 
to and Intended for the same purposes as naf- 
talan. 

Sapolentum. Hydrargyri is a superfatted 
potash soap containing 33% per cent, of mer- 
cury. It is soluble in water, and hence is con- 
sidered better than gray ointment in the inunc- 
tion treatment of syphilis. It is marketed in 
capsules, the contents of one of which constitute 
the ordinary application. Similar products are 
Unna's sapo hydrargyri cinereus, and Schuster's 
sapo mercurialis. 

Sapo Natrii Peroxydati Unna is used in acne 
and pustular rosacea as an emollient and decolor- 
izing remedy. The biise consists of 3 parts of 
liquid paraffin and 7 of white soap; and the 
amount of sodium peroxide added varies accord- 
ing to the case from 2 to 20 per cent. 

Sapophenol is an analogue of lysol, made by a 
Belgian firm. 

Sapophtalum {sapo ophthalmicus neutrale) is 
what P.v.d. Wielen calls a cocoanut oil soap base 
intended for medicinal purposes. 

Saposilic is a new soap for the mechanical dis- 
infection of the hands and field of operation, and 
for use in acne. It is milder than marble dust 
soap, and does not scratch. The characteristic 
constitutent appears to be silica. 

Sapozol is a saponified cresol containing ap- 
proximately 50 per cent, of cresol and thus proba- 
bly identical with liquor cresolis compositus U. 



252 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

S. P. 1900 and liquor cresoli saponatus of the 
German Pharmacopoeia. It is miscible with 
water, alcohol or glycerin, and is used in 1 to 3 
per cent, solution as a surgical and gynecological 
disinfectant. 

Saprol is a mixture of crude cresol and hydro- 
carbons of high boiling-point, intended as a gen- 
eral disinfectant. 

Sarcogen Pills contain the extracts of cin- 
chona, wormwood, coca, and saw palmetto, and 
exsiccated blood and reduced iron. They are pre- 
scribed in chlorosis, anemia, etc. Dose, 2 after 
meals. 

Savonal is an ointment soap, a solid olive oil 
and potash soap spirit, that mixes clearly with 
water, glycerin, and alcohol, and readily takes up 
ichthyol, sulphur, resorcin, tar, and other dermic 
remedies. A savonal combined with 20 per cent, 
of oleum rusci, one containing 20 per cent, of 
lianthral, and one combined with 5 per cent, of 
sulphur ("thiosavonal") are on the market. 

Scabiol is a reddish-brown, thin, odorless 
liquid, consisting essentially of storax (20 per 
cent.), soap and alcohol. As the name indicates 
it is employed in scabies. 

Scavaline Pills are bluish sugar-coated laxa- 
tive pills containing phenolphtalein, extract of 
cascara sagrada, and compound extract of rhu- 
barb, each 0.05 gram. 

Schistiol is another of the numerous articles 
regarded as identical with ichthyol. 

Scillipicrin is a bitter principle of squill; a 
yellowish to reddish-yellow, hygroscopic, granu- 
lar mass, soluble in water and employed as a di- 
uretic hypodermically. Dose, % to 1 grain once 
daily. 

Scillitin is a bitter principle of squill, occur- 
ring as a blackish-brown mass or powder admin 
istered as a diuretic in doses of % to % grain. 

Scillitoxin (scillain) is a glucoside obtained 
from squill; a yellowish-brown powder, soluble 
in alcohol, and prescribed as a diuretic in doses 
of 1/60 to 1/20 grain several times daily, in pills. 
Maximum daily dose, % grain. 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIC A 253 

Scoparin, C2oH,oOio, is a bitter principle derived 
from scoparius, a yellowish, odorless, tasteless 
powder, soluble in alcohol, hot water and dilute 
alkalies. It is used In dropsy. Dose, per os, 5 to 
10 grains; hypodermically, % to 1 grain, dis- 
solved in water containing a trace of ammonia or 
in glycerin and water. 

Scopolamine, the alkaloid of scopolia atro- 
poides and other varieties of scopolia, about 
which there formerly was considerable contro- 
versy regarding its relation to hysocine, is now 
conceded to be identical chemically, physiolog- 
ically and clinically, with Jiyoscine. 

Sedatin or sedatine is a synonym of antipyrin; 
and of valeryl-phenetidin. (The drug in the lat- 
ter instance is used as a nei've-sedative and anti- 
neuralgic in doses of 4 to 10 grains.) 

Segarin is a disinfectant pastille of unknown 
composition, used in place of creolin, etc. 

Selenin is an antitubercular serum prepared 
by Prof. E. Klebs from cultures of diplococcus 
semilunaris, a germ present in lymphatic glands, 
skin, and organs affected with tuberculosis. Sele- 
nin A is obtained by precipitation with alcohol, 
selenin B by precipitation with sodium-bismuth 
iodide, and selenin H by precipitation with hy- 
drogen peroxide. They are used locally and in- 
ternally. Dose, 1 c.c. 

Seiminc is a white, odorless powder, soluble in 
water, stated to be essentially a mixture of sali- 
cylic acid (2) and boric acid (3). 

Senval is an antidiabetic that does not, it is 
claimed, necessitate a rigid diet. It consists of 
(1) a compound fluid extract of senecio, valerian, 
wormseed and castoreum, (2) a powder contain- 
ing alkaline salts and sponge charcoal. The action 
of the powder is disinfectant and antacid anti- 
zymotic. 

Sepdelen is a palatable syrupy fluid containing 
Yi per cent, of ferrous iodide, and used in scrof- 
ula, chlorosis, rickets, etc. Dose, for adults, 1 to 
2 tablespoonfuls after meals. 

Septicidin is a serum used in swine plague 



254 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

and chicken cholera. Septicidin A is chiefly for 
fowls; septicidin B for swine. 

Septoforma is a disinfectant, deodorant and 
antiparasitic, consisting of "the condensation 
products of formaldehyde with terpene, naphta- 
lin and phenol groups," perfumed with melissa 
and geranium oils. It is soluble in water and al- 
cohol, its solution foaming when shaken. Ap- 
plied in 2 to 5 per cent, solutions. Marketed also 
as a 15 per cent. soap. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Sequardine is the name by which Brown- 
S6quard's testicular fluid Is known in France. 
As is known, the article is used in impotence, 
cachexias, debility, etc. Dose, subcutaneously, 1 
to 3 c.c. 

Seraphthin is a prophylactic remedy of undi- 
vulged composition for foot-and-mouth disease of 
cattle. 

Serthymin (Dr. Roth) is an extract of thyme 
containing 20 per cent, of sugar and employed in 
whooping-cough, laryngeal catarrh, etc. Dose, a 
teaspoonful three to six times daily, in sweetened 
water. 

Serum, Bichloride (Ch6ron), is a solution of 
mercuric chloride 1, sodium chloride 4, carbolic 
acid 4, and sterilized distilled water 400 parts. 
It is used subcutaneously in syphilis. 20 c.c. a 
week. 

Serum, Blondel's, also known as lactoserum, 
is obtained by coagulating milk M'ith acid, neu- 
tralizing the filtrate with soda and passing it 
through a porcelain filter, and impregnating with 
carbonic acid. It is used subcutaneously in dis- 
eases dependent upon arterial sclerosis. Dose, 
10 c.c. twice daily. 

Serums or antitoxins are modern remedial 
agents based on the proposition that each toxin 
causative of a certain disease gives rise to a dis- 
tinct antitoxin that is curative of the affection. 
Those most in vogue are the antidlphtheritic (de- 
scribed under antitoxin, diphtheria), antistrepto- 
coccic or streptolytic, antituberculous, antite- 
tanic, antivenomous, and thyroid. Besides these, 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDIC A 255 

however, anticarbuncJe, anticholera, antidiabetic, 
antifatigue, antipneumonic, and antistaphylo- 
coccic serums are made. Antistreptococcic or 
streptolytic serum is used in scarlet fever, ery- 
sipelas, puerperal fever, and other diseases 
caused by infection with streptococci; dose, 10 to 
40 c.c. hypodermically. Antituberculous serum 
was first recommended by Prof. Maragliano; 
dose, 1 to 4 c.c. every other day to once weekly. 
Antitetanic serum is marketed in liquid and dry 
forms, the latter being several times as powerful 
as the former; the dose of the liquid as made by 
American manufacturers is 10 to 30 c.c. every 12 
to 24 hours. Antivenemous serum, introduced by 
Calmette, has been described under the name 
antivenin. Thyroid serum was referred to here 
under antithyroidin (and basedowsan) . Yer sin's 
serum is used in bubonic plague, in mild cases 
hypodermically, in severe cases also intraven- 
ously — 150 to 300 c.c. together at the outset. 

Serums, Artificial Blood, are various mixtures 
of salts used subcutaneously in arterial sclerosis 
and affections dependent upon it (hemiplegia, 
paraplegia, etc.), as well as in collapse from pro- 
fuse bleeding, etc. BardeVs serum consists of so- 
dium chloride 1, sodium sulphate 2, sodium phos- 
phate 3, carbolic acid % and sterilized distilled 
water 96% parts. CantanVs serum consists of so- 
dium chloride 2, sodium carbonate 1, and water 
500 parts. Cheron's serum No. 1 consists of so- 
dium chloride 3, sodium phosphate 4, sodium sul- 
phate 8, carbolic acid 1, and hot water 100 parts. 
Chcron's serum No. 2 is the same as the former 
but without carbolic acid. Crocg's serum con- 
sists of sodium phosphate 1 and water 50 parts. 
Dujardin-Beaumetz' s is made up of sodium car- 
bonate 1, potassium sulphate 1, sodium lactate 1, 
sodium phosphate 0.5, sodium chloride 3.1, and 
water 1000 parts. Oaube's antiarthritic serum 
consists of potassium chloride 154, calcium chlo- 
ride 60, sodium chloride 22, magnesium chloride 
15, calcium iodide 5, casein (dry) 80, and cherry- 
laurel water 200 parts. (Dose, 1 to 3 c.c. one to 
three times weekly.) Hay em's serum No. 1 con- 



256 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

sists of sodium chloride 1, sodium sulphate 2, 
and water 200 parts. Hayerri's serum No. 2 is 
composed of sodium chloride 0.75 and water 100 
parts. Huchard's serum consists of sodium chlo- 
ride 2, sodium phosphate 4, sodium sulphate 1, 
and water 40 parts. Huchard's modified or No. 2 
serum is made up of sodium chloride 3, sodium 
phosphate 10, sodium sulphate 2.5, carbolic acid 
1.5, and water 100 parts. Kronecker and Lichten- 
steiri's serum is composed of sodium chloride 7.5, 
sodium carbonate 0.1. and water 1000 parts. 
Latta's serum consists of sodium chloride 3.5, 
sodium carbonate 1.7. and water 3400 parts. 
Leclerc's serum is made up of sodium chloride 4, 
sodium phosphate 0.5, sodium sulphate 0.5, and 
hot water 100 parts. Luton's serum consists of 
sodium chloride 4, sodium phosphate 4, sodium 
sulphate 10, and boiling water 100 parts. Ma- 
tJiieu's serum is composed of sodium chloride 1, 
sodium phosphate 4, sodium sulphate 6, and boil- 
ing water 100 parts. Quinton's serum is obtained 
by diluting sea water to a little below the spe- 
cific gravity of the blood. Renzi's serum consists 
of iodine 1, potassium iodide 3, sodium chloride 
6, and water 1000 parts. Sapeliers serum is com- 
posed of sodium chloride 6, sodium phosphate 
0.45, sodium carbonate 3.1, potassium chloride 
0.5, potassium sulphate 0.35, and boiling water 
100 parts. Schiess's serum consists of sodium 
chloride 7.5, sodium carbonate 5, and water 100 
parts. Schwarz's serum is made up of sodium 
chloride 6, and water 100 parts, with 2 drops of 
liquor sodse to each 100 grams. Sydmann's se- 
rum is composed of sodium chloride 6, sodium 
carbonate 1, and water 1000 parts. TruneceTc's 
serum consists of sodium sulphate 0.44, sodium 
chloride 4.92, sodium phosphate 0.15, sodium car- 
bonate 0.21, potassium sulphate 0.4. and water 
95 parts. 

Servatol Soap Is a neutral soap containing 1 
per cent, of mercury oxycyanide and used for dis- 
infecting surgeons' hands. Servatol-marile soap 
Is a yellowish-white mass consisting of a neutral 
potash soap with 55 per cent of coarsely pow- 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 257 

dered marble and 2 per cent, of mercury oxycyan- 
ide. It is used as a detergent, antiseptic soap. 

Sesamin is a palatable emulsion of sesame oil 
intended for use in place of cod liver oil emul- 
sion. Marketed also in combinations with fer- 
rous iodide, guaiacol, oil of sandalwood, and cam- 
phor. Dose, % to 2 tablespoonfuls. 

Sextonol Tablets consist of the six "tonols" 
(glycerinophosphates) of lime (2 grains), soda 
(2 grains), iron i^> grain), manganese (^4 
grain), quinine (i/4 grain), and strychnine (1/200 
grain). These are employed as blood, nerve, 
and tissue nutrients. 

Sicco is a dry haematogen, an odorless, reddish- 
brown powder, derived from blood and employed 
as a "blood-maker," pure or as an elixir. Dose, 
5 to 20 grains three times daily. 

Siccogen {haematogen duplex) diluted with an 
equal quantity of water is said to yield a product 
Identical with haematogen, a dark-red, clear, per- 
manent preparation of pleasant taste. 

Siccoles ("dry oils") are dry triturations of 
non-palatable drugs, such as castor oil, extract of 
male fern, oil of sandalwood, creosote, etc., rep- 
resenting 50 per cent, of the drug. 

Siccose is desiccated meat juice, made from 
beef. 

Siderin Pills are a German make of BJaud's 
pills. 

Sidonal is a trade name for piperazin quinate 
(chinate), which drug occurs as a white powder 
of pleasant, slightly acidulous taste; freely 
soluble in water. It is prescribed in gout, renal 
calculi, and other manifestations of uric acid dia- 
thesis. Dose, 75 to 120 grains in the course of the 
day, divided, with plenty of water. 

Sidonal, New, is a cheaper yet equally active 
variety of sidonal — chemically, quinic anhydride, 
a white, odorless, tasteless powder, soluble in 
water, alcohol, ether or chloroform. Dose, 15 to 
30 grains three to six times daily, with copious 
draughts of water. 

Silberol is a trade name for silver sulphocar- 
bolate, which see. 



258 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 

Silin (^hexamethylenetetramine (dtrosilicate) is 
Intended to be used in conjunction with alkalies 
in the uric acid diathesis (gout, gravel, etc.), and 
is hence marketed as "silin spring water," 1 liter 
of which contains silin 3 grams, sodium chloride 
8 grams, sodium carbonate 2 grams, calcium car- 
bonate 2 grams, magnesium sulphate 0.5 gram, 
and free carbonic acid 4.5 grams. Daily dose, one 
750 c.c. bottle. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Silver-casein. — See argonin. 

Silver Chinaseptolate. — See argentol. 

Silver Citrate {Credo's antiseptic, known 
abroad and formerly also on this market as Urol), 
AgsCsHjOj, has come into vogue as a bactericide. 
It is claimed to be exceedingly powerful yet non- 
poisonous and non-irritating. It occurs as a 
white, odorless powder requiring 3800 parts of 
water for solution. It is applied pure or in 1 to 
2 per cent, ointments on wounds, ulcers, etc., and 
in 1:4000 to 8000 aqueous solutions in gonorrhea, 
stomatitis, etc. Its solutions should be prepared 
in small quantities at a time (a pint or a quart), 
and kept in dark-amber bottles. See caution un- 
der silver iodate. 

Silver Eosolate is defined as the neutral salt 
of trisulpho-acetyl-creosote, containing 50 per 
cent, of silver and 20 per cent, of creosote, and 
soluble in water and glycerin. It is used as an 
astringent antiseptic, on wounds, in gonorrhea, 
etc., in 1 to 5 per cent, solutions, in ointments, or 
pure. To make solutions, rub up the salt with a 
little glycerin and water to a paste, then add the 
rest of the water and heat gently. 

Silver Fluoride (known in Italy as tachiol), 
AgFl, occurs as very deliquescent crystals rapidly 
changing on exposure to light and air to a yellow 
color and finally to a black crystalline mass. It 
is freely soluble in water, and said to be the most 
powerful antiseptic among the silver salts. Ap- 
plied in 1:1000 to 1:5000 solutions chiefly; some- 
times in 1 per cent, solutions. Its stains on linen 
may be removed by washing with weak solutions 
of potassium cyanide, or with a solution of cor- 
rosive sublimate 1, water 2000, salt 25. 



THE MODEBN MATF.RIA MEDICA 259 

Silver lodate, Ag IO3, is a white powder almost 
insoluble In the usual solvents, and used chiefly 
In chronic diarrhea. Dose, 1/12 to 1/6 grain, as 
pills, several times daily. There is probably the 
same risk of permanent discoloration of the skin 
from internal use of this as from silver nitrate. 

Silver Lactate, formerly known also as actol, 
AgC.HA+HjO, forms a white, odorless and 
nearly tasteless powder, soluble in 15 parts of 
water. It was introduced by Cred§ as an anti- 
septic for subcutaneous Injection in certain in- 
fectious diseases (anthrax, erysipelas, etc.) and 
for disinfecting wounds, abscess-oavities, etc. Em- 
ployed :n 1:500 to 1:200 solutions. Dose, by in- 
jection, % to 3 grains a day, singly or divided. 
The solutions should be prepared fresh with 
boiled, distilled water, and kept in black-glass 
bottles. See caution under silver iodate. 

Silver Nucleinate is described under nargol. 
(Compare also "argyrol" of French manufacture.) 

Silver Picrate is described here under its trade 
name, picratol. 

Silver-protalbin is better known as largin, 
which see. 

Silver Quinaseptolate. — See argentol. 

Silver Sulphocarbolate {silberol; silver phenol- 
sulpJionate or sulphophenate) , CgH^.OHSOjAg, oc- 
curs as a white powder, soluble in water and alco- 
hol. It is used as an antiseptic and astringent in 
ophthalmology and surgery, mostly in 1:500 to 
1:100 solutions, which are sensitive to light. 

Silver Thiohydrocarburosulphonate Is a syno- 
nym of ichthargan. 

Silver Trinitrophenolate. — See picratol. 

Silver-vitellin is described under the title 
argyrol. 

Sinapol is a French neuralgia liniment consist- 
ing of alcohol (78), castor oil (12), menthol (3), 
mustard spirit (3), and aconitiue (0.04). 

Siris is an ethereal yeast extract intended as a 
substitute for meat extract, rich in nucleins but 
without the stimulating properties and the salts 
of meat extract. 



260 THK MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Sirocol (liquor kali sulphoguaiacolici comp.) is 
a cleai', syrupy liquid containing 7 per cent, of po- 
tassium guaiacolsulphonate (thiocol) and 7 per 
cent, of calcium salts. It is used in phtliisis and 
chronic bronchitis. Dose, a teaspoonful to a ta- 
blespoouful three times daily. 

Sirolin is a 10 per cent, by volume (equal to 7 
per cent, by weight) syrup of thiocol (potassium 
guaiacolsulphonate), prescribed chiefly for 
chronic bronchitis and pulmonary tuberculosis, 
in doses of a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful three 
times a day, after meals. 

Sirsol (formerly sirosol) is a preparation sim- 
ilar to if not identical with sirolin, made by an 
Alsatian firm. 

Sitogen appears to be an extract of yeast. It is 
intended to supplant extract of beef as an addi- 
tion to soups, etc. 

Socotrin is a veterinary preparation consisting 
essentially of ethereal tincture of valerian and 
tincture of aloes. 

Sodacol is a proprietary term for sodium guaia- 
colsulphonate. which forms one of the ingredients 
of a mixture known as "triacol." 

Soderal is the name applied to bonbons con- 
sisting of sugar, malt extract and the ingredients 
of the mineral spring No. 12 at Soden on the 
Jaunus. 

Sodiformasal is the sodium salt of formasal 
(methylenedisalicylic acid), hence sodium methyl- 
enedisalicylate, of the formula Ci3H,oOo(CO.ONa)j. 
It occurs as an almost white powder, readily sol- 
uble in water, soluble also in alcohol, but insolu- 
ble in ether. It is used in migraine, neuralgia, 
I'heumatism, chorea, etc. Dose, 5 to 20 grains, 
incompatible with ferric salts. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Sodium Acetyl-sulphanilate. — See cosaprin. 

Sodium Agaricinate, CnH;^OH(COONa)j. oc- 
curs as a white, tasteless powder, freely soluble 
in water. Dr. H. Schneider has used it in phthis- 
ical night sweats. Dose, 1% to 3 grains, as pow- 
ders, to be taken with water. Carbonic acid pre- 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 261 

cipitates an acid agaricinate; mineral acids lib- 
erate agaricinic acid. 

Sodium Anhydromethylenecitrate is described 
under citarin. 

Sodium Bisulphate (acid sodmm sulphate), 
NaHSO^+H.O, is no new chemical, but has only 
recently been brought to the fore as a remedy in 
typhoid fever by Dr. H. G. McCormick, of Wil- 
liamsport, Pa. It occurs as colorless crystals 
soluble in water. Dose, 15 grains in 4 ounces of 
water several times daily. 

Sodium Brenzcatechln-mono-acetate is the 
chemical designation for guaiacetin, which see. 

Sodium Bromovalerianate is referred to under 
valerobomine. 

Sodium Cacodylate or dimethy'lar senate, (CHg), 
AsO.ONa+SHjO, occurs as an amorphous, white 
powder soluble in water. Used largely of late in 
place of the alkali salts of arsenic, because far 
less toxic than the arsenates. Dose, by mouth, 
Vi to % grain one to five times daily; subcutane- 
ously, daily % to 1% grains. It imparts a gar- 
licky odor to the breath and perspiration. 

Sodium Cinnamate ( ftef oO , C.HsCHrCH.COjNa. 
is a white crystalline powder soluble in water. 
Used by intravenous injection in pulmonary tu- 
berculosis. Dose, 2 to 15 minims of a 5 per cent, 
solution three times a week. 

Sodium Diiodosalicylate, C8H,(0H)Ij.C00Na+ 
2i^HoO, occurs as colorless leaflets or needles sol- 
uble in 50 parts of water. It is used as an anal- 
gesic and antiseptic. Dose, 3 to 10 grains one to 
four times daily. Applied externally like iodo- 
form, chiefly in parasitic skin diseases. 

Sodixim Fluorbenzoate {sodiAim para-fluorten- 
zoate), CgH^FlCOONa, occurs as a white powder 
soluble in water. It is recommended as an inter- 
nal antiseptic and antizymotic, chiefly in lupus 
and other tuberculous processes. Dose, 8 grains 
three times daily. 

Sodium Formate, NaCHOj+HjO, occurs as a 
white, water-soluble powder, and is employed ex- 
ternally in surgical tuberculosis (% to 2 grains in 
solution once weekly), and internally in pneu- 



262 THE MODERN MATEEIA MEDICA 

monia (1 to 3 grains every 2 hours in infusion of 
adonis vernalis). See caution under formalde- 
hyde. 

Sodium Glycerinophosphate, Na2C3H,PO,+ 
THjO, is marketed as 75 per cent, solution only, 
owing to its extreme deliquescence. It is put for- 
ward as an "assimilable nerve nutrient." Dose, 
by mouth, 3 to 10 grains, three times a day, as 
syrup or solution; hypodermically, 3 or 4 grains 
once daily. Its solutions and syrups do not keep 
well, and should hence be prepared in small quan- 
tities at a time. For hypodermic injections the 
water used should be boiled, distilled water. 

Sodium Glycocholate, NaCooH^NOe, is a con- 
stituent of bile, occurring, in the pure state as a 
yellowish, very bitter powder soluble in water or 
alcohol. It has recently been recommended as an 
eflScient cholagogue, particularly in hepatic colic 
and cholelithiasis in general. Dose, 5 to 15 grains 
three times daily, in capsules with a few grains of 
magnesia to prevent nausea. An impure salt is 
also on the market in the form of a semi-solid. 

Sodium lodate, NalOj, is a white powder, solu- 
ble in water. It is used in the main as a substi- 
tute for potassium iodide internally, and for iodo- 
form externally. Dose, 5 grains three times a 
day, in pills; subcutaneously (in muscular rheu- 
matism), 1 to 1% grains. Applied externally in 
1% to 10 per cent, solutions or ointments, or as a 
pencil (in corneal ulcers, trachoma, etc.). 

Sodium Lygosinate. — See lygosine. 

Sodium Meta-vanadate. — See sodium vana- 
date. 

Sodium Methyl - arsenate. — See disodium 
methyl-ar senate. 

Sodium Nucleinate, the sodium salt of yeast 
nuclein, forms a white powder, almost completely 
soluble in water. It is used subcutaneously to 
stimulate nutrition the same as nuclein. ( See the 
latter.) 

Sodium Ossalinate is a sodium compound of 
the fatty acids in bone marrow. It is intended as 
a substitute for cod liver oil as an alterative and 
nutritive. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 263 

Soditun Para-fluorbenzoate. — See sodium fluor- 
benzoate. 

Sodium Para-sulphobenzoate. — See sodium 
sulphohenzoate. 

Sodium Perborate, NaB03+4H,0, which in 
aqueous solution evolves hydrogen peroxide, has 
proved a good wound antiseptic in the hands of 
Dr. Kischensky. It is used as dusting-powder, 
or in freshly prepared solutions. It is also put 
forward as an intestinal antiseptic. Dose, 5 to 
15 grains. 

Sodium Persulphate, NajSaOg, is used chiefly 
in the solution known as persodine. See this. 

Sodium Phenone-acetate is a chemical equiva- 
lent of guaiacetin, which see. 

Sodium Phenylpropionate (sodium hydrocin- 
namate), CHsCCCOONa, differs from sodium 
cinnamate by having 2H less in its formula. It 
is put forward as a remedy, like the latter, in 
laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hot 
V2 to 3 per cent, aqueous solution is inhaled twice 
a day, half an hour each time. A 25 per cent, 
solution is marketed as tUermiol. 

Sodium Pyrocatechin-mono-acetate is guaia- 
cetin, which see. 

Sodium Silicofluoride or fluorsilicate, also 
known as salufer, NaSiF,, occurs as a white, gran- 
ular powder, slightly soluble in water. It is pre- 
scribed as an antiseptic and astringent, for 
wounds, cystitis, gonorrhea, aphthae, etc., in 
1:1000 solution mostly. 

Sodium Sozoiodolate. — See under sozoiodole. 

Sodium Sulphanilate (sodium anilinosul- 
phate). CeH,NH2.S020Na+2HiO, occurs as white 
glistening leaflets, soluble in water. It is em- 
ployed in acute catarrhs and iodism; it is be- 
lieved to convert the nitrites present in the nasal 
secretion and saliva into indifferent diazo sub- 
stances. Dose, 15 grains, in water, six times daily. 

Sodium. Sulphohenzoate. — Under this title a 
preparation has been brought forward as an in- 
ternal antiseptic which is said to be produced 
by boiling molecular quantities of sodium sulpho- 
carbolate and sodium formate together in dis- 



264 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

tilled water and cooling. Should the supposed 
interaction be incomplete, sodium formate would 
be present. For an important caution regarding 
formates, see formaldehyde. 

Sodium Sulphosalicylate, NaCTH,0,SOs, forms 
white crystals or powder, soluble in water and al- 
most insoluble in alcohol or ether. It is used as 
an antirheumatic, antiseptic and antipyretic, like 
sodium salicylate, in rheumatism, neuralgia, cho- 
rea, pleurisy, etc. Dose, 10 to 30 grains. 

Sodium Sulphuroso-benzoate Heckel (sodium 
sulphite-benzoate) is a white, crystalline powder, 
soluble in water, used as an external antiseptic in 
about % per cent, solution. 

Sodium Tellurate, Na^TeO^+SHjO, occurs as a 
white powder soluble in water. It is prescribed 
chiefly to arrest phthisical night-sweats, but also 
in typhoid fever. Dose, % to % grain in elixir. 

Sodium Tetraborate, Neutral is the designa- 
tion applied to a fused mixture of equal parts of 
borax and boric acid, occurring as transparent 
glass-like masses soluble freely in water, and re- 
commended as a non-irritant, powerful antiseptic 
in diseases of the nose, ear, and eye. Applied in 
keratitis and conjunctivitis in substance finely 
powdered; in ear and nose affections, in saturated 
aqueous solution (about 16 per cent). 

Sodium Vanadate {sodium meta-vanadate) , 
NaVOj, occurs as a greenish-white, almost taste- 
less powder soluble in hot water. It is used as a 
nerve tonic and alterative in affections caused by 
sluggish metabolism and deficient oxidation — 
chlorosis, chronic rheumatism, diabetes, phthisis, 
etc. Dose, 1/60 grain in water, before meals, for 
two or three days of the week. 

Soleine is "a natural, odorless petrolatum." 

Solphinol is a mixture of borax, boric acid, and 
sulphites, employed in France as an antiseptic. 

Sol-Sul is a water-soluble sulphur compound 
used like ichthyol in skin diseases, catarrhs, 
chronic rheumatism, ulcers, etc. It occurs as a 
thick, yellow liquid, smelling of sulphuretted hy- 
drogen. Dose, 3 to 10 grains. Applied mostly in 



THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDIC A 265 

5 to 20 per cent, ointments, or 2 to 5 per cent, so- 
lutions. 

Solurol, also called thyminic acid, is described 
as "a nuclein derivative possessing the property 
of holding uric acid in solution and thus prevent- 
ing its deposition in the tissues." Dose, 4 to 
8 grains three times daily, in tablets or elixir (so 
marketed). 

Solution of Sodium Chlorobromide (MitchelVs 
fluid), latterly recommended by Dr. H. W. Mitch- 
ell, of New York, for ulcerative processes includ- 
ing pulmonary tuberculosis, is prepared by adding 
to a suitable quantity of water, 3 per cent, of so- 
dium chloride, 0.1 per cent, of bromine, and 0.5 
per cent, of pure hydrochloric acid, and subject- 
ing the mixture to the action of an electric cur- 
rent until chemical reaction has been completed. 
It is a pale-amber liquid, with a strong odor of 
chlorine, a slightly acid taste, and a specific grav- 
ity of 1.022. It should be kept in amber-colored 
bottles, in a cool place, and tightly corked. It is 
used pure on ulcers and other wounds; internally 
(in phthisis, etc.) in doses of 1 to IVz fluid ounces 
four times daily, on an empty stomach. 

Solutol is a water-soluble disinfectant, consist- 
ing of an alkaline solution of cresols in cresol- 
alkali, and containing 60 per cent, of cresol. A 
crude and a pure solutol are marketed. The 
former has a tarry odor, and is used for coarse 
disinfectant purposes. The pure solutol is used as 
a medicinal and household disinfectant. 

Solveol is a neutral solution of cresols with 
sodium cresotinate, containing about 25 per cent, 
of free cresol. It mixes clearly with water, and 
its tarry odor is not perceptible in dilutions. It 
is employed as a surgical disinfectant, like car- 
bolic acid. 

Solvin is a saccharated extract of thyme analo- 
gous to pertussin and used like it in pertussis 
and allied affections. 

Solvosal-lithium {Uthium salol ortho-pJiosphin- 
ate), CaHi.O.P.O.OLiOH.COOCoHB, is a water solu- 
ble antipodagric and diuretic, used mainly in 



266 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

gouty conditions. Dose, 4 to 8 grains three or 
four times daily. 

Solvosal-potassium (potassium-salol ortho- 
phosphinate) is soluble in 20 parts of water, and 
Is used as an antarthritic and diuretic in gouty 
manifestations. Dose, 4 to 8 grains several times 
daily. 

Solykrin Pills consist of a mixture of 15 parts 
of solveol, 5 of lysol, and 2 of creolin, and are 
employed in puerperal fever. Dose, 1 to 3 pills. 

Somaferrol is an iron and manganese elixir 
containing also somatose. It is prescribed as a 
hematinic and nutrient, especially during con- 
valescence after acute diseases. Dose, a dessert- 
spoonful to a tablespoonful. 

Somatose is the name applied to deutero- and 
hetero-albumoses derived from meat albumin by 
a special process. The article occurs as a light- 
yellow, granular, odorless, almost tasteless pow- 
der, soluble in water and all ordinary fluids. It 
is prescribed as a nutrient and reconstructive for 
the sick and infants. Dose, 150 to 240 grains per 
day; children up to 100 grains daily. The powder 
is poured into about half a glassful of hot water 
and let stand undisturbed until solution is ef- 
fected. It is then added, if desired, to broth, 
soup, etc. It is best taken before meals. 

Somatose biscuits, somatose chocolate, and som- 
atose cacao all contain 10 per cent, of somatose. 

Somatose, Iron. — See ferro-somatose. 

Somatose, Milk, is described under lacto-somor 
tose. 

Somatose, Liquid, is marketed as sweet and 
spiced, the former having a mildly aromatic, 
sweet taste, the latter a spicy taste reminding of 
soup greens. Dose, a tablespoonful three times a 
day, before meals. 

Somdine, or Barnes' concentrated tincture of 
passiflora incarnata, is used as a soporific, ano- 
dyne and nerve stimulant. 

Somnal is an alcoholic solution of chloral- 
urethane; see the latter. 

Somnin is not a hypnotic, but an antiseptic 
consisting of boric acid and phenols. 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 267 

Somnoform is a local anesthetic used In den- 
tistry. It is said to be a mixture of ethyl chloride 
(60), methyl chloride (35), and ethyl bromide 
(5). 

Somnos is defined as "a definite chemical prod- 
uct formed by the synthesis of chlorethanal with 
a polyatomic alcohol radical." It is marketed in 
solution, the dose of which as a hypnotic is 1 to 
2 tablespoonfuls, best taken in water or warm 
milk. 

Sophol is a readily melting pulverulent suc- 
cedaneum for mesotan as a topical antirheumatic, 
reported to be less irritating but also less eflica- 
cious. Dose, 30 grains per inunction. 

Sorbilin is an analgesic, antipyretic, and ano- 
dyne of undivulged composition. Dose, 5 to 15 
grains. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

Sorisin is a 10 per cent, solution of sodium- 
guaiacol sulphonate in syrup of orange peel, used 
in pulmonary affections. Dose, 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls 
three times daily. 

Soson is, according to the manufacturers, pure, 
dry muscle albumin. It occurs as a grayish-white, 
fine, odorless and almost tasteless powder, insolu- 
ble in water. It is used as a nutrient. Dose, a 
teaspoonful, with soups, etc. 

Sozal is the trade name applied to alumin- 
ium para-phenolsulphonate or sulphocarboJate, 
(C8H4.0H.S03)3Al2. The drug occurs as brownish, 
cyrstalline granules, readily soluble in water, 
glycerin or alcohol. It is used in 1 per cent, solu- 
tion on suppurating ulcers, in cystitis, local tuber- 
culosis, etc. 

Sozoboral is a mixture of aristol, sozolodole 
salts and borates, used in coryza. 

Sozolodole is the generic name adopted for salts 
of diiodo - para - phenolsulphonate (sozoiodolic 
acid), CsHJj.OH.SOsH+iyaHjO. The latter occurs 
as white crystals, readily soluble in water, glyc- 
erin, and alcohol and employed in 2 to 3 per cent, 
solution on wounds. Mercury sozolodole occurs as 
a very fine, orange-yellow powder, soluble in so- 
dium chloride solution, but insoluble in water or 
alcohol. It is employed in 10 per cent, ointment 



268 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

in parasitic and syphilitic skin diseases, and in 1 
per cent, dusting powder in intertrigo, leg ulcers, 
etc. Dose, % to 1^4 grains. Potassium sozoiodole 
occurs as a white, odorless powder, which is solu- 
ble in 50 parts of water; it contains 52.8 per 
cent, of iodine. It is used externally in scabies, 
impetigo and other skin diseases, in gonorrhea, 
rhinitis, diphtheria, etc. Applied in 5 to 10 per 
cent, ointments or dusting powder, or in 25 to 
50 per cent, insufflation powder. Sodium sozoio- 
dole occurs as colorless, odorless needles, solu- 
ble in 15 parts of water, 20 of glycerin and in al- 
cohol. It is used internally as an antiseptic and 
antidiabetic, and externally in syphilitic lesions, 
gonorrhea, rhinitis, whooping cough, etc. Dose, 
2 to 10 grains. Externally in 2 to 8 per cent, solu- 
tions, 10 to 25 per cent, powder or ointment, etc. 
Zinc sozoiodole occurs as colorless, odorless nee- 
dles, soluble in 25 parts of water, freely soluble in 
alcohol or glycerin. It is used largely in nasal 
catarrh (5 to 10 per cent, powder or 3 per cent, 
solution), in gonorrhea (% to 1 per cent, solu- 
tion), and in skin diseases (5 to 10 per cent, oint- 
ment). Aluminium, ammonium, barium, lithium, 
magnesium and lead sozoiodoles are also mar- 
keted, but are not in vogue with the medical pro- 
fession. 

Sperm^ine Poehl is the hydrochlorate of a base 
existing in the testicles and other glands of the 
animal economy, C5H14N0. It is said to act upon 
the entire nervous system uniformly, as a tonic 
and stimulant, and is used in neurasthenia, loco- 
motor ataxia, diabetes, phthisis, cachexias, etc. 
Marketed in 2 per cent, solution for subcutaneous 
use, dose 15 minims daily or every other day; and 
as elixir ("essence"), a 4 per cent, aromatized, al- 
coholic solution of the double salt spermine-so- 
dium chloride; dose 10 to 30 drops in alkaline 
water in the morning. 

Spermine Marpraann is described as a dilute- 
alcoholic solution of the soluble substances of 
fresh bullocks* testicles, containing 2 per cent, of 
the base C5H14N3 (spermine) together with albu- 
mins (absent in spermine Poehl). It is used in 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 269 

marasmus, convalescence from infectious diseases, 
etc., like Poehl's spermine, but given by the 
mouth. Dose, 5 to 20 drops two or three times 
daily. 

Sphagnol is a distillation product of peat, con- 
sisting essentially of anthracene, benzene, phenol 
and cresols. It is used as a succedaneum for 
balsam of peru, tar and ichthyol in skin diseases. 
A heavy sphagnol, the oil with all its parafllns, 
and a turbid sphagnol, the oil deprived of its 
paraffins, are distinguished. 

Sphymogenin is a brand name for the active 
principle of the suprarenal capsule. See adrenalin, 
under which heading this principle is fully de- 
scribed. 

Spinol is an organic iron compound derived 
from spinach, marketed in two forms: syrupy, 
dose 5 to 10 drops for children and i^ to 1 tea- 
spoonful for adults; and spinol dry, an amorp- 
hous, brownish-green powder of pleasant odor 
and bitterish-salty taste, insoluble in the ordi- 
nary solvents, dose 2 to 8 grains three times 
daily. 

Spleniferrin is obtained from the spleen of 
cattle, and is brought forward as an organic iron 
compound for use wherever iron is indicated. It 
occurs as a brown powder, but is marketed only 
as pills. 

Splenin is an English splenic extract, like 
spleniferrin. 

Stagnin is a preparation obtained by Hirsch 
by autolysis of horses' spleen. Originally a yel- 
lowish-brown, water-soluble powder, it is mar- 
keted only in solution, containing a little chloro- 
form as preservative. It has been recommended 
by Dr. Theo. Landau as a hemostatic in gj^neco- 
logical practice; by intramuscular or subcutane- 
ous injection. Dose, 1 to 3 c.c. daily. 

Staphisagrine, CsaHgaNOs, is an alkaloid of 
delphinium staphisagria. It occurs as an amor- 
phous, bitter powder, soluble in alcohol and very 
sparingly in water. It is less toxic than delphi- 
nine, and is without action on the heart. It is 



270 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

used as an antidote to strophanthin. Dose 1/30 
to 1/15 grain. 

Staphylase is supposed to be the active con- 
stituent of beer yeast. It is used In staphylo- 
coccus infection. 

Starch, Iodized (iodamyl) is a bluish-black 
powder, soluble in alcohol, and containing 2 per 
cent, of Iodine. It is used internally in diarrhea, 
typhoid fever, etc., and externally in ointment 
form as a substitute for iodine tincture. Dose, 3 
to 10 grains. 

Stenosine is a trade name for disodium methyl- 
arsenate, which see. 

Steresol Berlioz is a solution of 270 parts of 
shellac, 10 of benzoin, 10 of balsam of tolu, 100 of 
carbolic acid, 6 of cinnamon oil, and 6 of sac- 
charin in alcohol to make 1000 parts. It is used 
as a paint in diphtheria, in tuberculous ulcers of 
the skin, etc, 

Steriform Chloride consists of 5 per cent, of 
formaldehyde, 10 per cent, of ammonium chloride, 
20 per cent, of pepsin, and 65 per cent, of milk 
sugar. It is used internally in infectious diseases 
chiefly. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. See caution under 
formaldeliyde. 

Steriform Iodide consists of the same ingredi- 
ents as the preceding, save that it contains am- 
monium iodide instead of ammonium chloride. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Sterisol Oppermann is a general disinfectant 
containing the salts of milk besides menthol and 
0.3 per cent, of formaldehyde. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Sterisol Rosenberg is a solution of milk sugar 
saturated with formaldehyde of undivulged con- 
centration. It is employed internally in tubercu- 
losis and diphtheria chiefly. Dose, ^ to 1 grain. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Stili B-esinosi Unna are pencils consisting of 
rosin and 10 per cent, of yellow wax. They are 
used as a depilatory, heated and pressed upon the 
hirsute surface. 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 271 

Stili Spirituosi Unna consist of so-called solid- 
ified alcohol and soda soap, put up in collapsible 
tubes or as pencils. To prepare them, 6 parts of 
sodium stearate are dissolved in a mixture of 2 
parts of glycerin and 100 parts of alcohol and the 
mixture poured into forms and allowed to cool. 
They are used as a protective skin varnish. 

Stomacin is a mixture of sodium bicarbonate, 
bismuth salicylate, powdered rhubarb and aro- 
matic powder. It is used as a stomachic, carmina- 
tive and antizymotic. Dose, 15 to 30 grains. 

Stomatol is a wound antiseptic consisting of 
2 parts of soap, 45 of alcohol, 2 of aromatic sub- 
stances (oil of peppermint, etc.), 5 of glycerin, 
and 42 of water. 

Stomosan is methylamine plwspliate intended 
as a remedy for gall-stone disease. 

Stovaine (amylene hydrochlorate) is a new 
local anesthetic like cocaine hydrochlorate, but 
claimed to be less toxic. It occurs as glistening 
scales freely soluble in water or alcohol. It is 
used mainly in 4 per cent, solution subcutane- 
ously; internally in ^ per cent, syrupy solution. 

Stronform.asal is defined as strontium methyl- 
enedisalicylate, and reputed to have a tonic value 
in anemic rheumatic cases. Dose, 20 to 30 grains 
three or four times daily. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Strontium Acetate occurs as a white powder 
soluble in water. It has come into use as an 
anthelmintic. Dose, 45 grains in water sweetened 
with glycerin, morning and evening for five days. 

Strontium Arsenite, Sr(As02)2+4HjO, forms a 
white powder soluble in water. It is employed as 
an alterative, chiefly in malaria and skin diseases. 
Dose, 1/30 to 1/15 grain. 

Strontium Ferrate occurs as a dark-red pow- 
der, slightly soluble in water, but decomposing 
rapidly with the evolution of oxygen and the 
formation of iron and strontium bromides. It is 
used as a hematinic and nervine. Dose, 5 to 15 
grains. 

Strontium Salicylate, Sr(CjH,03)+2HA oc- 
curs as white crystals, soluble in water and alco- 



272 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

hol. It is prescribed as an antirheumatic and ano- 
dyne in doses of 10 to 15 grains two or three times 
daily. 

Strophanthm is the active glucoside of stro- 
phanthus seed. It occurs as a white or yellowish, 
intensely bitter powder, soluble in about 40 parts 
of water, freely in alcohol, and almost insoluble 
in chloroform or ether. It is prescribed as a 
heart tonic and sustenant, like digitalin, but is 
without diuretic action. Dose, 1/300 to 1/60 grain 
three times daily. Antidotes are atropine or mus- 
carine subcutaneously, camphor, or picrotoxin. 

Strychnine Arsenate occurs as a white powder 
soluble in water. It is used chiefly in tuberculous 
skin diseases and malaria. Dose, 1/60 to 1/15 
grain; subcutaneously, 4 to 16 minims of % per 
cent, suspension in liquid paraffin. 

Strychnine Cacodylate, recommended as an ap- 
petizer and alterative in phthisis, occurs as a 
white powder soluble in water. It is a very un- 
stable salt, which quickly decomposes in solu- 
tion, the strychnine depositing. Such a liquid 
would of course be extremely dangerous, as the 
patient might get a fatal quantity of strychnine 
in a dose from the last portion of it; the drug 
should not be dispensed in solution. Dose, 1/30 
to 1/4 grain, three times daily. 

Strychnine Glycerinophosphate occurs as a 
white, crystalline powder soluble in water. It is 
used as a reconstructive nervine. Dose, 1/60 to 
1/20 grain. 

Strychnine lodate, C21H22N2O2.HIO3, occurs as 
colorless needles, soluble in water. It is employed 
mostly subcutaneously in certain paralyses, anes- 
thesias, etc. Dose, 1/20 to 1/10 grain. 

Strychnine Nitrate occurs as white needles sol- 
uble in 90 parts of water. It is used largely in 
dipsomania, hypodermically. Dose, 1/60 to 1/20 
grain. 

Stypticin, CijHisNOi.HCl, is cotarnine hydro- 
chlorate, the base of which is an alkaloid obtained 
from narcotine by oxidation. It occurs as a yel- 
low, crystalline powder, of bitter taste, and read- 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 273 

ily soluble In water and alcohol. It is used as a 
uterine hemostatic and sedative, and as a styptic 
in dental and nasal hemorrhage. Dose, in violent 
bleeding, 1\^ to 4 grains, several times a day; in 
menorrhagia, % to 1% grains four or five times 
daily, in tablets or elixir. Externally it is applied 
in substance or in strong solution, or as gauze or 
cotton. Marketed also as % grain sugar coated 
tablets, as dental tablets, and as gauze. 

Styptol is neutral cotarnine phtalate, and thus 
related to stypticin. It occurs as a yellow, bitter 
powder, freely soluble in water. It is used like 
stypticin, and in the same doses. Marketed also 
as %-grain sugar coated tablets. 

Styracol is the cinnamic ester of guaiacol or 
guaiacol cinnamate, occurring as a white, odor- 
less powder, devoid of guaiacol taste, and insolu- 
ble in water. It is used in place of guaiacol in 
phthisis and intestinal tuberculosis and catarrh. 
Dose, 15 grains three or four times daily, as pow- 
ders with sugar; for children from 4 to 8 grains 
per dose. 

Styrosapon is a neutral potash soap containing 
25 per cent, of styrolin, the active ester of storax, 
and credited with antiseptic and antiparasitic 
properties. 

Subcutin is the name applied to anesthesin 
parorphenolsulphonate, which occurs as a white 
powder soluble in 100 parts of water. Its solu- 
tions are not decomposed by boiling, and it is 
used subcutaneously in 1 per cent, solution in 
physiological salt solution as a local anesthetic in 
place of anesthesin. 

Sublamine is the trade name for ethylenedia- 
mine-mercury sulphate. The substance occurs as 
a white powder readily soluble in water. It is 
recommended for disinfection of the hands in 
surgical and gynecological practice, and as a sub- 
stitute for corrosive sublimate hypodermically in 
syphilis, in eye diseases and other cases wherein 
mercuric chloride is used. It is said to be less 
irritating than the latter, and not to cause stoma- 
titis or diarrhea. Dose, 15 minims of 1 to 3 per 
cent, solution subcutaneously. It is also applied 



274 THE MODERN SIATERIA MEDICA 

externally in 1:500 to 1:5000 solution. For hand 
disinfection a 1:1000 solution is used. It is also 
employed as a fixative for anatomical, patholog- 
ical and histological purposes (5 to 10 per cent, 
solutions). 

Succinyl Dioxide or Peroxide. — See alphozone. 

Sucramin is the ammonium salt of saccharin, 
or ammonimn ortho-sulphamine benzoate or am- 
monium benzoic sulphinide. It occurs as a white, 
freely soluble powder of intensely sweet taste, 
and is intended as a substitute for soluble sac- 
charin (sodium-benzol-sulphonic imide) as a 
sweetener. 

Sudol is a local remedy for excessive perspira- 
tion, consisting of .3 per cent, of formaldhyde in a 
mixture of wool fat and glycerin, and perfumed 
with oil of wintergreen. See caution under for- 
maldehyde. 

Sudoral is another remedy used in excessive 
sweating of the feet. It contains boric, benzoic, 
and tartaric acids, and alum, in solution. 

Sugerol is a brand of benzosulphinide (sac- 
charin). 

Sulfammon is the counterpart of icJithyol made 
by a competing firm. 

Sulfinid is a German brand of benzosulphinide 
(saccharin). 

Sulfoguaiaciu {quinine sulphoguaiacolate or 
guaiacol-sulphonate) occurs as small, yellow, bit- 
ter scales, soluble in water and alcohol. It is pre- 
scribed in phthisis, intestinal catarrh, scrofula, 
etc. Dose, 5 to 15 grains three times daily. 

Sulfonal (sulphonmethane; diethylsulphon-di- 
methyl-methane) has the formula (CoHjSOJj.C. 
(GH^).^, and occurs as colorless, odorless, tasteless 
crystals, soluble in 360 parts of water, 47 of alco- 
hol, and 45 of ether. It is prescribed as a hyp- 
notic and nerve sedative. Dose, 15 to 40 grains, in 
powder or dissolved in boiling water and cooled. 

Sulfosote is the potassium salt of the diphenols 
and diphenolic esters contained in creosote. It is 
a brown, syrupy fluid, freely soluble in water, and 
extremely hygroscopic, in view of which it is 
marketed only as a 10 per cent, syrup that lacks 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 275 

the odor of creosote and is palatable. It Is 
cheaper than sirolln, and Is used, like the latter, 
In consumption, chronic bronchial catarrh, etc., in 
the dose of 1 to 4 fluid drams. 

Sulfurol is claimed to be the ammonium sul- 
phoichthyolate of the Swiss Pharmacopoeia, and 
would hence appear to be identical with ichthyol, 
which see. 

Sulphogen is advertised as an antiferment, ant- 
acid, and stomachic, and said to contain "in each 
fluid dram 1 grain of sulphur, 3 grains of mag- 
nesia, and the active principle of genista, with 
aromatics." It is used in acid dyspepsia, flatu- 
lence, and the like. Dose, a teaspoonful three to 
six times daily, after eating. 

Sulpholythin is defined as the sulphophosphite 
of sodium and lithium. It is a granular, non- 
effervescent alkaline salt, sparingly soluble in 
cold water, but readily soluble in hot water. It 
is used as a hepatic stimulant and eliminant, in 
chronic constipation, auto-intoxication, rheumatic 
and gouty conditions, etc. Dose, a teaspoonful in 
hot water at bedtime or before breakfast. 

Sulphonmethane and Sulphonethylmethane 
are the U. S. P. designations for sulfonal and tri- 
onal respectively. 

Sulphophenol-silver. — See silberol. 

Supradin is an iodized dried extract of the 
suprarenal gland. Dose, 2 to 5 grains. 

Suprarenaden is a dried extract of suprarenal 
gland, 1 part representing 2 of fresh capsule. It 
is used in diabetes, Basedow's disease, etc. Dose, 
TVz grains two or three times daily. 

Suprarenal Gland Dried usually represents 
five times its weight of fresh suprarenal capsule. 
It is prescribed as an alterative and nervine, in 
Addison's disease, diabetes insipidus, climacteric 
disturbances, etc. Dose, 3 to 6 grains, after meals. 
The active principle of the suprarenal gland is 
known by various trade names and is described 
under adrenalin. 

Suprarenalin and Suprarenine are brand 
names for the therapeutically active constituent 
of the suprarenal gland. Both articles are mar- 



276 THE MODERTT MATEBTA MKDICA 

keted in 1:1000 solution, physiological salt solu- 
tion being the solvent. See adrenalin. 

Suprarenine Borate occurs as white crystals 
readily soluble in water; 1.3 parts equal 1 part of 
suprarenine. Action the same as suprarenine. 
It is used as a hemostatic in tooth extraction. 
Marketed as tablets, each containing 1/500 grain 
of suprarenine borate, % grain of cocaine hydro- 
chlorate, and approximately % grain of sodium 
chloride, used in solution of 1 tablet in 1 c.c. of 
sterile water. 

Sycose is a trade name for the article com- 
monly known as saccharin and now oflBiCial under 
the name of benzosulphinide. 

Synthol is described as a chemically pure syn- 
thetic substitute for absolute alcohol. 



T 

Tablets, Antiepileptic, contain per hundred 1 
gram of validol, 24 grams of compound efferves- 
cent powder (?), 30 grams of potassium bromide, 
30 grams of sodium bromide, and 15 grams of am- 
monium bromide. 

Tablets of Extract Fucus Vesiculosus (reduc- 
ing tablets) are chocolate-coated tablets contain- 
ing 1 grain of extract of bladder wrack, 1^ grains 
of dried bitterless extract of cascara sagrada, l^^ 
grains of extract of frangula, and milk sugar to 
make 7% grains. Dose, 1 tablet two or three 
times daily. 

Tachiol is an Italian trade name for silver 
fluoride, which see. 

Tachysan is a colorless liquid, of strong men- 
thol-like odor, described as a distillation product 
of equal parts of the wood of the camphor tree 
and the whole moxa and peppermint plants. It 
probably contains camphor dissolved in wormseed 
and peppermint oils, and is used as an embroca- 
tion in headache, rheumatism, lumbago, etc. 

Taka-Diastase (Koji), obtained by J. Taka- 
mine by the action of aspergillus oryzse (Cohn) 
upon steamed rice, occurs as a brownish, hy- 



THE MODEBN liATEBIA MEDICA 277 

groscopic, nearly tasteless powder, soluble in 
water but insoluble in alcohol. It is used in 
amylaceous dyspepsia, 1 part digesting 100 parts 
of dry starch. Dose, 2 to 5 grains, after meals. 

Tallianine is an aqueous solution of an ozon- 
ized terpene, said to liberate on contact with the 
blood 6 volumes of ozone per unit volume. It is 
used by intravenous injection in pulmonary tuber- 
culosis, pneumonia, infectious endocarditis, septi- 
cemia, etc. Dose, 5 c.c. once daily or every sec- 
ond day. Marketed in 5 c.c. tubes; also as vet- 
erinary tallianine, in 10 c.c. tubes. 

Tanformal is a compound of tannic acid, 
phenol, and formaldehyde, occurring as a brown 
powder of slight aromatic odor and taste. It is in- 
soluble in water, and decomposed by alkalies into 
its components. It is employed as an intestinal 
astringent and disinfectant. Dose, 10 to 30 grains. 
See caution under formaldehyde. 

Tanichthol Suppositories contain carbolic acid, 
ichthyol, tannic acid, extract of belladonna, ex- 
tract of stramonium, extract of witch-hazel, with 
or without (1 grain of) opium. They are used in 
hemorrhoids and anal fissure. 

Tannal is a trade name applied to basic alumin- 
ium tannate, a light-brown powder insoluble in 
water and employed in nose and laryngeal affec- 
tions by insufflation as an astringent antiseptic. 
Soluble tannal is aluminium tannotartrate, a yel- 
lowish-brown powder soluble in water, employed 
as a gargle or douche in throat and nose troubles, 
in 1 to 5 per cent, solution. 

Tannalbin {tannin albuminate exsiccated) oc- 
curs as a brown, odorless, tasteless powder, con- 
taining 50 per cent, of tannic acid. It is insolu- 
ble in the ordinary solvents, but soluble with de- 
composition in alkali solutions. It is employed as 
an intestinal astringent, in diarrheas of various 
forms. Dose, 15 to 30 grains, as powder or loosely 
compressed tablets. 

Tannalborin is defined as a compound of alum- 
inium subgallate with sodium polyborate, and is 
used as an intestinal astringent in veterinary 
practice. Calves receive a teaspoonful, fowls a 



278 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIOA 

tablespoonful, dogs 15 to 45 grains, two or three 
times daily. 

Tannigen (acetyl-tannin or tannic acid acetic 
ester) occurs as a light-gray, nearly odorless and 
tasteless, somewhat hygroscopic powder, soluble 
in alcohol, solution of sodium phosphate, borax, 
or soda, but insoluble in water. It is used as an 
intestinal astringent in non-infectious diarrhea. 
Dose, TY2 to 15 grains three to six times daily, as 
powders. Decomposed by alkalies. 

Tannin Aleuronat. — See under aleuronat. 

Tannipyrine {antipyrin tannate) Is a conden- 
sation product of tannic acid and antipyrin em- 
ployed as a styptic in nosebleed, etc. 

Tannobromine is obtained by the action of 
formaldehyde upon dibromtannin. It occurs as a 
reddish or yellowish-gray powder, containing 25 
per cent, of bromine, soluble in alcohol, slightly 
soluble in water, readily soluble in alkaline 
liquids. It is employed as a nerve sedative in 
place of the alkali bromides, and, externally, as 
an antipruritic. Dose, 15 to 60 grains three times 
daily. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Tannocasum results from the action of tannic 
acid and formaldehyde upon casein in alkaline 
solution. It occurs as a gray powder, insoluble 
in the ordinao' solvents, and used as an intes- 
tinal astringent like tannalbin, etc. Dose, 10 to 
30 grains. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Tannochrom is a combination of chromium bi- 
tannate and resorcin, marketed as an ash-gray in- 
soluble powder containing 50 per cent, of the sub- 
stance, and as a 50 per cent, solution readily mis- 
cible with water, alcohol, glycerin, etc. The pow- 
der is used in ointments in ulcers, eczema, etc.; 
the liquid in % to % per cent, solution in gon- 
orrhea. 

Tannocreosoform is an odorless, tasteless com- 
pound of tannic acid and creosote with formalde- 
hyde; used as an intestinal antiseptic and astrin- 
gent, particularly in tuberculous enteritis. Dose, 
8 to 20 grains. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Tannoform (tannin-formaldehyde, methylene- 
ditannin) is a condensation product of tannic acid 



THE MODERN MATERIA MEDIC A 279 

and formaldehyde, occurring as a whitish-red, 
odorless powder, soluble in alcohol, and in 
alkalies, but insoluble in water. It is employed as 
a drying antiseptic and deodorant in sweating 
feet, weeping eczema, etc., and as an intestinal as- 
tringent and disinfectant. Used externally pure 
or in 10 to 25 per cent, dusting powders. Dose, 
4 to 15 grains; for cattle, 5 to 10 drams. See cau- 
tion under formaldehyde. 

Tannoguaiaform is an odorless, tasteless com- 
pound of tannic acid, guaiacol and formaldehyde, 
employed as an intestinal astringent and disin- 
fectant, especially in intestinal tuberculosis. 
Dose, 8 to 20 grains. See caution under formal- 
defiyde. 

Tannon is a name by which tannopine was 
known some time ago. 

Tannopine is chemically hexaniethylenetetra- 
mine-tannin. It forms a faw^n-colored, odorless, 
tasteless powder, insoluble in the ordinary sol- 
vents, but soluble with decomposition in alkaline 
liquids. It is prescribed as an intestinal astrin- 
gent and disinfectant, in diarrheas of various 
kinds. Dose, 10 to 15 grains four times daily, as 
powders or tablets. Marketed also as veterinary 
tannopine. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Tannosal is described under the name moat 
commonly employed: creosal. 

Tanocol is a compound of tannin and gelatin, 
occurring as a grayish-white, odorless powder, 
containing about 50 per cent, of tannic acid, 
nearvly insoluble in water, but soluble with decom- 
position in alkaline liquids. It is prescribed as 
an intestinal astringent. Dose, 15 to 30 grains, in 
barley gruel or the like. 

Taphosote (also called creosote tannophos- 
phate, which is incorrect, as creosote is not a 
simple base), is said to be formed from the creo- 
sote phosphoric acid ester of tannin (another im- 
possible proposition), occurs as a grayish-yellow 
syrupy liquid, and is used as a substitute for creo- 
sote, particularly in tuberculous and other chronic 
diarrheas. Dose, 15 to 30 grains three times daily. 



280 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

in pearls or capsules, or with milk. Marketed as 
0.5 gram pearls. 

Tarolin Capsules contain salol, oil of sandal- 
wood, and extract of cubebs, and are employed in 
gonorrhea, cystitis, and other catarrhal affections, 

Tartarlithine is a trade designation for lithium 
bitartrate, small white crystals or crystalline pow- 
der, soluble in water, and employed largely in 
gouty and suppurative gingivitis. Dose, 5 to 10 
grains three times daily. 

Tartrophen is phenetidin tartrate, a product 
analogous therapeutically to citrophen (phen- 
etidin citrate), and used like it as an antipyretic 
and analgesic. Dose, 7% to 15 grains. 

Tebecin Marpmann is an alcoholic liquid ex- 
tract of blood coagula from calves and horses im- 
munized against tuberculosis. It is employed in 
consumption. Dose, 5 to 15 drops, thrice daily, 

Tegmin is an emulsion of wax, acacia and 
water, containing 5 per cent, of zinc oxide and a 
little lanolin. It is used as a skin varnish or pro- 
tective, and as a vehicle for skin remedies, 

Tegones, — See under gelones. 

Testaden is a lactose trituration of dried ex- 
tract of bull's testicles, standardized so that 1 part 
represents 2 of fresh organ. It is used in spinal 
and nervous diseases, in impotence, neurasthenia, 
etc. Dose, 15 to 30 grains. 

Testidin is a preparation of fresh bull's testi- 
cles in extract form; and testin is a similar prod- 
uct in tablet form. Their action is analogous to 
that of testaden. 

Tetanus Antitoxin. — See under serums (anti- 
tetanic). 

Tetraiodophenolphtalein. — See nosophen. 

Tetraiodophenolphtalein - bismuth. — See cu- 
doxin. 

Tetraiodophenolphtalein-mercury is described 
under apallagin. 

Tetraiodophenolphtalein-sodium is antinosin. 

Tetraiodopyrrole is ofBcial in the U. S. P. under 
the name iodole; see this title. 

Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide, (CjHO^N- 
OH, is marketed only as 10 per cent, aqueous so- 



THE MODEBN KAXEBIA MF01CA 281 

lution, which is colorless, alkaline, bitter, and 
caustic; turning pinkish with age. It is used in 
rheumatism and gout. Dose, 10 to 20 minims 
three times daily, well diluted. 

Tetramethylthionine Hydrochloride is the 
new pharmacopceial designation for pure, medi- 
cinal methylene blue, under which common name 
it has been described. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

Tetranitrol is a terse synonym of erythrol tet- 
ranitrate. 

Tetronal or diethylsulphonediethylmethane, 
(C2HJj.C.(C2Hj.S02)2, occurs as shining leaflets 
readily soluble in alcohol, sparingly soluble in 
water. It was introduced as a hypnotic and 
nerve sedative like sulfonal, but has been with- 
drawn from the American market. Dose, 15 to 30 
grains. 

Teucrin Mosetig is a sterilized extract of teu- 
crium scordium, marketed in 3 c.c. hermetically 
sealed tubes, and used in old abscesses, fungous 
adenitis, lupus, etc. Dose, 3 c.c, injected near the 
diseased part. 

Thallium Acetate (thallous acetate), TlCjHjOj, 
occurs as white crystals, soluble in water and al- 
cohol; used in syphilis and in phthisical night- 
sweats. Dose, iy2 to 3 grains at bedtime. Often 
causes the hair to fall out. 

Thanatol. — See guwthol. 

Theobromine Acetylmethylenesalicylate is de- 
scribed under its trade designation, diurazin. 

Theobromine and Lithium Benzoate, also 
known by the trade name uropherin B, occurs as 
a white powder, containing 50 per cent, of theo- 
bromine, and soluble when fresh in 5 parts of 
water, but readily decomposing on exposure. It is 
used as a diuretic. Dose, 5 to 15 grains, in pow- 
ders or capsules. 

Theobromine and Lithium Salicylate, also des- 
ignated uropherin 8, occurs as a white powder, 
decomposing on exposure, and used in the same 
cases and doses as the preceding article. 

Theobromine Salicylate, CjHgN^Oj.CjHgOa, is 
claimed to be a true salt of theobromine. It forms 



282 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

white needles, sparingly soluble in water without 
decomposition. It is used as a diuretic and 
urinary antiseptic. Dose, 7% to 15 grains. 

Theobromine-sodium and Sodium Acetate. — 
See agurin. 

Theobromine-sodium and Sodium Salicylate 
{theobromine sodio-salicylate ; theobromine and 
sodium salicylate) occurs as a white, odorless 
powder, decomposing on exposure. It is used as 
a diuretic, especially in post-scarlatinal nephritis. 
Dose, 15 grains 5 or 6 times daily, in powder with 
water. Also marketed as diuretin. 

Theocin is the trade name for synthetic theo- 
phyllin (dimethylxan thine 1:3). The article oc- 
curs as a white, odorless, bitter, crystalline pow- 
der; soluble in 180 parts of water, sparingly sol- 
uble in alcohol, insoluble in ether, and readily 
soluble in dilute alkali solutions, forming salts 
with the alkalies. It is employed as a diuretic. 
Dose, 3 to 5 grains, three or four times dally, in 
hot liquids, after meals. 

Theocin-sodium Acetate. — See acet-theocin-so- 
dium. 

Theophyllin is an alkaloid contained in tea 
leaves, dimethylxanthine 1:3, an isomer of theo- 
bromine (CjHgN^O.). It is described under the- 
ocin. 

Theophyllin- sodium is the sodium salt of the 
preceding, somewhat more freely soluble in water, 
and used for the same purposes, but in slightly 
larger doses (6 grains). 

Theophyllin-sodium and Sodium Salicylate is 
a still more readily soluble compound of theophyl- 
lin, given as a diuretic in doses of l^i grains 
three or four times daily, in solution. It and 
theophyllin-sodium are said to irritate the stom- 
ach less than does theophyllin itself. 

Theophyllin, Synthetic. — See theocin. 

Therapogen is the fanciful name of a disin- 
fectant and deodorant, defined as "the water-solu- 
ble compounds of various terpenes with the naph- 
talin group;" an oily, saponaceous liquid of pleas- 
ant odor and used on wounds in 30 per cent, solu- 
tion. 



THE MOOEBN MATEBIA MEDICA 283 

Thermiol is a 25 per cent, solution of sodium 
phenylpropiolate ; see the latter heading. 

Thermodin is the terse name for acetylpara- 
ethoxyphenylurethane, CgHi. (C2HbO)N.CO;.C;H5.- 
CO.CH3. The drug occurs as colorless, odorless 
crystals, soluble in 2600 parts of water, and is 
used as an antipyretic and analgesic, like acetani- 
lid. Dose, 7% to 20 grains, as powders. 

Thermofuge is an antiseptic poultice composed 
of aluminium silicate, glycerin, boric acid, men- 
thol, thymol, oil of eucalyptus and ammonium io- 
dide, and used in inflammations. (An analogous 
product is now official under the name cataplasma 
kaolini.) 

Thermogene is a counter-irritant and anodjnie 
cotton impregnated with the active principles of 
capsicum frutescens. It is employed in respira- 
tory colds, lumbago, rheumatic pains, etc. 

Thermol is defined as acetyl-salicyUphenetidin, 
and occurs as a white, odorless, tasteless, crys- 
talline powder. It acts as an antipyretic and 
analgesic. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. Marketed also as 
tablets of various sizes. 

Thial is the trade name of hexamethylenetetra- 
mine oxymethylsulphonate, a chemical occurring 
as a white, odorless powder, readily soluble in 
water. It is used as a disinfectant and deodorant, 
in % to 2 per cent, solutions, medicinally and for 
general use. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Thialion is a "laxative compound of lithium," 
used in gouty conditions, cystitis, etc. Dose, a 
heaping teaspoonful in hot water, usually before 
breakfast. 

Thiderol is a syrup containing 2 per cent, of 
guaiacol and employed in laryngeal and pul- 
monary affections. Dose. 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls, 
three times daily. 

Thieukalyptol is the name latterly applied to 
sanosin, which title see. 

Thigenol is defined as the sodium salt of the 
sulphonic acid of a synthetic sulpho oil (derived 
from oil of sweet almond); a dark-brown syrupy 
liquid, containing 10 per cent, of sulphur organ- 
ically combined, specific gravity 1.062, of faint, 



284 THE MODERN MATERIA MEOIOA 

sulphurous odor and empyreumatic taste; solu- 
ble freely in distilled water, diluted alcohol, glyc- 
erin or chloroform; miscible with oils and oint- 
ment bases. Hard (calcareous) water and acetic 
or mineral acids cause precipitation in its solu- 
tions. It is used in skin and female diseases, and 
internally, like ichthyol; its applications are odor- 
less. Dose, 3 to 10 grains, in peppermint water, 
three times daily. 

Thilanin is a sulphurated wool fat containing 
3 per cent, of sulphur and employed in eczema and 
prurigo. 

Thiocol {potassium ortho-guaiacolsulphonate or 
sulphoguaiacolate) , C8H8.(OCHa)OH.S03K, occurs 
as a white, odorless powder, of slightly bitter 
taste and sweetish after-taste; soluble readily in 
water or syrup, slightly in alcohol, and insoluble 
in ether or oils. It is used as a palatable, odorless 
substitute for guaiacol, in tuberculosis, typhoid 
fever, etc., internally. Dose, 5 to 20 grains, three 
times daily, in syrup or tablets (marketed also in 
these forms). 

Thiocolin consists, according to the manufac- 
turers, of potassium guaiacolsulphonate 6 parts, 
bismuth loretinate 1 part, distilled water 60 parts, 
and a "compound syrup" 33 parts. It is used in 
chronic bronchitis and phthisis chiefly. Dose, a 
teaspoonful to a tablespoonful thrice daily. 

Thiodine is a combination of ichthyol, iodine, 
boroglycerin, hydrastine, carbolic acid and 
glycerin, marketed in the form of elastic suposi- 
tories containing 10 per cent, of the mixture. It 
is used in gynecological affections (pelvic celluli- 
tis, cervical erosions, vaginitis, etc.), one supposi- 
tory being inserted daily or two or three times a 
week. 

Thioform, basic bismuth dithiosalicylate, 
(S.C,H3.0H.COOBiO),-fBi03.2HA occurs as a yel- 
lowish-brown, odorless powder, containing 72 per 
cent, of bismuth oxide, and insoluble in the com- 
mon solvents. It is used chiefly as a drying wound 
antiseptic and dermic; also as a gastro-intestinal 
astringent and antiseptic. Applied externally like 
iodoform. Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 285 

Thiol is obtained by sulphurating certain par- 
affin oils and neutralizing with ammonia. Liquid 
thiol is a 40 per cent, aqueous solution of the 
anhydrous ammonium sulpho salt, occurring as a 
brownish-black liquid of faintly bituminous odor 
resembling that of Russia leather; soluble freely 
in water or glycerin, moderately in alcohol, and 
sparingly in ether. Dry thiol is the liquid form 
evaporated to dryness and pulverized; of bitumin- 
ous odor, and bitter, slightly astringent taste. 
The liquid form is used pure or in ointments or 
solutions in skin and female diseases, like ich- 
thyol, also internally. Thiol powder is employed 
chiefly in intertrigo, weeping eczema, discharging 
wounds, etc., usually pure. Dose, 3 to 10 grains, 
three times daily, in peppermint water or pills. 

Thiolan, also designated as unguentum sulfura- 
turn mite, is a sulphur ointment in which the sul- 
phur is partly dissolved and partly suspended. 
Dr. Vomer has used it with good results in vari- 
ous skin diseases. 

Thiopinol for baths is said to consist of alco- 
hol, ethereal oil of pine, sulphur or a sulphide, 
and glycerin. The contents of one bottle is used 
to prepare a sulphur bath of pleasant odor. 

Thiopinol Ointment, used in cutaneous affec- 
tions, is said to consist of 18 per cent, of ethereal 
oil of pine, 1.75 per cent, of "thiopinol," 1 per 
cent, of glycerin, 0.75 per cent, of beta-naphtol, 
and 78.5 per cent, of a mixture of lanolin and 
petrolatum. 

Thioresorcin is obtained by the action of sul- 
phur on resorcin-alkali. It occurs as a yellowish- 
gray powder, slightly soluble in alcohol or ether 
and insoluble in water. It is used in place of iodo- 
form as a dusting powder or ointment (5 per 
cent.). 

Thiosapol is a generic name for soda soaps con- 
taining sulphur chemically combined with unsat- 
urated fatty acids and used in skin diseases. The 
corresponding potash soaps (thiosavonals) are de- 
scribed under savonal. 

Thiosavonal. — See under savonal. 

Thiosinamine (allylsulphocardamide ; allylsuh 



286 THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDICA 

phourea), CS(NHj)NHC3H„ occurs as colorless, 
bitter crystals, of garlicky odor; soluble in about 
3 parts of alcohol, moderately in ether, and slight- 
ly in water. It is prescribed internally, and hypo- 
dermically as a resolvent, in cicatrices, strictures, 
corneal opacities, chronic deafness, etc. Dose, % 
to 2 grains, in capsules or tablet triturates three 
times a day, or subcutaneously two or three times 
a week in 10 or 15 per cent, alcoholic solution 
with 20 per cent, of glycerin. 

Thiosinamine and Sodium Salicylate. — See 
fibrolysin. 

Thiovinal, recommended in affections of the 
respiratory tract, consists, according to the man- 
ufacturers, of guaiacol (6), extract of thyme (20), 
distilled water (40), and a compound (?) syrup 
(34). Dose, 14 to 2 teaspoonfuls, after meals. 

Thorium Nitrate, Th(NOa)44-4H20, occurs as 
white, crystalline conglomerations, readily soluble 
in water. Dr. S. Tracy latterly uses it by inhala- 
tion in tuberculosis, and as a 25 per cent, paste 
in parasitic skin diseases. 

Thymiodide is a combination of thymol iodide 
( Bristol ), bismuth oxyiodide, and boric acid, oc- 
curring as a salmon-colored, odorless powder, only 
partly soluble in the usual solvents. It is em- 
ployed as a wound antiseptic in place of iodoform. 

Thymobromal is a syrup of bromoform, extract 
of thyme, extract of chestnut leaves, compound 
extract of senega, and bromal hydrate, each fluid 
dram containing four drops of bromoform. It is 
advertised as a remedy for whooping-cough. 

Thymoform or thymoloform is a condensation 
product of thymol and formaldehyde, occurring 
as a yellowish, tasteless powder of faint thymol- 
like odor; readily soluble in ether, alcohol, chloro- 
form or olive oil; insoluble in water or glycerin. 
It is used as a wound antiseptic, in place of iodo- 
form. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Thymol-urethane. — See thymotal. 

Thymotal (thymol carbonate; thymol-ure- 
thane; tyratol) is an odorless, tasteless, white, 
neutral substance, used as a vermicide. Dose 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 287 

(children), 7% to 15 grains three or four times 
daily for four days, followed by a laxative. 

Thymomel Scillse is a honey extract of thymus 
serpyllum and squill, used in whooping-cough, 
laryngeal and bronchial catarrhs, etc. 

Thymotol is a brand of dithymol diiodide. 

Thymoxol is a 3 per cent, solution of hydrogen 
peroxide containing also 1 per cent, of thymol in 
alcoholic solution. It is used in 10 to 25 per cent, 
solution as a disinfectant and deodorant. 

Thjrraden is a lactose trituration of dried ex- 
tract of thyroid gland, 1 part of which represents 
2 parts of fresh gland. It occurs as a light-brown- 
ish, sweetish, nearly odorless powder, employed 
as an alterative and antifat (myxedema, struma, 
obesity, etc.). Dose, 2 to 8 grains three times 
daily, as powders or tablets (marketed also as 
such). 

Thymyl Trichloracetate occurs as water- 
soluble crystals, soluble also in alcohol and ether. 
It is employed as a caustic and antiseptic, on 
new growths, indolent ulcers, etc. 

Thyrein is synonymous with iodothyrine. 

Thyreodectin is a dried thyroid serum obtained 
from thyroidectomied animals; a reddish-brown 
powder employed in exophthalmic goiter. Dose, 
5 to 10 grains, three times a day, in capsules 
(marketed as such). 

Thyroid Gland has come into vogue as a rem- 
edy in struma, myxedema, obesity, hematuria and 
visceral hemorrhage. Dose of the fresh gland 
(administered in dried form), 5 to 15 grains 
thrice daily, as tablets. 

Thyroid Serum. — See antithyroidin. 

Thyroidin is a dried extract of sheep's thyroid, 
1 part of which repesents 6 parts of fresh gland. 
See thyroid gland. Dose, y^. to 2 grains three 
times daily, as tablets (so marketed). 

Toluol Sugar is a trade name for saccharin. 

Tolypyrine (tolyantipyrine ; paratolyl dimethyl- 
pyrazolone), C,H,.CHs.N.CH,N.CH8C:CH.C0., oc- 
curs as colorless crystals, soluble in 10 parts of 
water, readily soluble in alcohol. It is used as an 



288 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

antipyretic and analgesic. Dose, 7% to 15 grains, 
two to four times daily. 

Tolysal is tolypyrine salicylate; colorless crys- 
tals readily soluble in alcohol, sparingly soluble in 
water. It is prescribed as an antirheumatic and 
analgesic. Dose, 45 to 90 grains per day. 

Tonogenum Suprarenale is a German analogue 
of adrenalin chloride solution. 

Tonol is a collective brand name for the glycero- 
phosphosphates. 

Traumatol {iodocresine ; cresol iodide) is a 
compound of cresylic acid and iodine, occurring 
as a violet-red, voluminous, odorless powder, con- 
taining 54 per cent, of iodine, insoluble in water 
or alcohol, slightly soluble in ether and freely 
soluble in chloroform. It is used as a wound anti- 
septic, in place of iodoform. 

Triacol is an aromatic, non-saccharine solution 
of the sodium, potassium and ethyl-morphine salts 
of guaiacolsulphonic acid, which salts have been 
named sodacoly potassacol, and ethacol. It is used 
in phthisis and other chronic pulmonary affec- 
tions. Dose, 1 to 2 dessertspoonfuls three times 
daily. 

Tribromanilin Hydrobromate is the chemical 
designation for bromamide. 

Tribromomethane is better known as hromo- 
form. 

Tribromphenol (bromol), CeHj.BrsOH, forms 
white to reddish crystals, soluble in alcohol, 
chloroform, glycerin or ether, insoluble in water. 
It is used as an external and internal antiseptic, 
in diphtheria, putrid wounds, typhoid fever, 
cholera infantum, etc. Dose, 1 to 3 grains, chil- 
dren in proportion. Applied externally in 4 to 
10 per cent, paints, ointments or powders. 

Tribromphienol-blsniuth. — See xeroform. 

Trichlorethylenenimide is chloralimide (not 
chloralomide). 

Trichlorisopropyl Alcohol. — See isopral. 

Trichlorphenol Crystallized is described under 
omal. 

Trichophytin is the filtered culture of tricho- 
phyton (a genus of fungoid organisms parasitic 



THE MODERN MATEBIA MEDIC A 289 

upon the hair), freed from fungous elements and 
containing i/4 of 1 per cent, of carbolic acid as a 
preservative. It is used in trichophytosis, herpes 
tonsurans and similar diseases of the hair, 

Triferrin is iron paranucleinate, and forma a 
reddish powder, containing 22 per cent, of iron, 
21^ per cent, of phosphorus, and 9 per cent, of ni- 
trogen. Soluble in weak solution of sodium car- 
bonate; insoluble in the common solvents. It is 
prescribed as a hematinic, in anemia, chlorosis, 
convalescence, etc. Dose, 5 to 10 grains, three 
times daily. Marketed also as 5-grain tablets. 

Triferrol is an elixir of triferrin containing 1% 
per cent, of triferrin. Dose, a tablespoonful. 

Triformol. — See trioxymethylene. 

Trigemin results from the action of butyl- 
chloral hydrate upon pyramidon. It occurs as 
long, white needles, of faint, aromatic odor and 
slight taste; soluble freely in water. Dr. Over- 
lach recommends it in migraine, facial neuralgia, 
headaches from overwork, etc. Dose, 7l^ to 15 
grains once or twice daily. It is hygroscopic and 
prone to turn yellow to brown in color, when it 
is said to cause gastric pain and hence Is no 
longer eligible for use. 

Trikresol is a natural mixture of para-, meta-, 
and ortho-cresol. It occurs as a colorless, oily 
liquid, specific gravity 1.045, soluble in about 45 
parts of water and freely soluble in alcohol. It 
is used chiefly as a surgical disinfectant and anti- 
septic dermic, in y^ to 1 per cent, solution. 

Trlkresolamine. — See kresamine. 

Trinophenone is an aqueous solution of picric 
acid (trinitrophenol), used in burns. 

Trional ( diethylsulphonemethylethylmethane; 
sulphonethylmethane U. S. P.) is obtained by con- 
densation of ethyl sulphydrate (ethylmercaptan) 
with methylethylketone, and oxidation of the re- 
sultant mercaptol with potassium permanganate. 
Its formula is CHo.C2H5=C=(SOAH5)„ and it oc- 
curs as colorless, odorless, bitter scales, soluble in 
47 parts of alcohol, 45 of ether, 16 of chloroform, 
and 195 parts of water, at 25° C. It is prescribed 
as a hypnotic and nerve sedative. Dose, 15 or 20 



290 THE MODEBN MATEBIA HEDICA 

grains, Triturated with chloral hydrate it yields 
a soft mass or a liquid. 

Triosine is being advertised in the medical 
press as "a combination of the most desirable 
principles of triticum and pelosine with saline 
and herbal diuretics; a diuretic for use in 
nephritis." Dose, tablespoonful three or four 
times daily. 

Trioxyacetophenone. — See gallacetophenone. 

Trioxymethylene, commonly but erroneously 
called paraformaldehyde and paraform, also tri- 
formol, is a polymer of formaldehyde occurring as 
a white powder evolving formaldehyde even at 
ordinary temperature but more rapidly when 
heated. It is insoluble in water, alcohol or ether; 
and is employed chiefly to generate formaldehyde 
gas by heating, and used only to a slight extent 
as an intestinal disinfectant in infectious diar- 
rheas and externally, as a wart destroyer. Dose, 
5 to 15 grains. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Triphenin (propionyl-phenetidin) is obtained 
by boiling a mixture of paraphenetidin and pro- 
pionic acid, and occurs as a white, odorless pow- 
der, of faintly bitter taste, soluble in 2000 parts 
of water, more readily in alcohol and ether. It is 
used as an antipyretic and analgesic, similarly 
to phenacetin. Dose, 5 to 20 grains. 

Tritoles are triturations of oils with substances 
capable of effecting minute subdivision of the 
oils. Malt extract is used largely, because it ex- 
cellently emulsifies the oils and makes stable 
emulsions. Castor oil, male fern oleoresin and 
cod liver oil tritoles are among the combinations 
marketed. 

Tropacocaine Hydrochloride ( benzoylpseudo- 
tropeine hydrochloride), CgHMNOCdHjO), is a 
salt of an alkaloid found in certain varieties of 
coca, but prepared also synthetically. It occurs 
as white needles freely soluble in water. It is 
employed as a local anesthetic in place of cocaine 
hydrochloride, the claims being made for it that 
it is less toxic and its solutions more stable than 
those of cocaine hydrochloride and sterilizable by 



THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 291 

boiling without decomposition. From 3 to 5 per 
cent, solutions are used. 

Trophonine is advertised as a nutritive and in- 
vigorator for invalids, "composed of beef, nucleo- 
albumiu and wheat gluten, together w^ith the 
enzymes of the digestive glands." It is given in 
teaspoonful doses frequently. 

Trygase is defined as a pefectly pure yeast. It 
occurs as a light-gray powder, having the odor 
and taste of yeast and insoluble in water. It is 
intended for use like other yeast preparations. 
(See levurin.) 

Trypsogen Tablets contain the sugar-oxidizing 
ferments of Langerhans' glands, trypsin, ptyalin, 
and amylopsin, combined, 5 grains; also gold bro- 
mide 1/100 grain and arsenic bromide 1/200 grain. 
They are employed in diabetes. Dose, 1 to 3 tab- 
lets thrice daily. 

Tubocurarine. — See curarine. 

Tuklin is defined as an acid formalin alcohol 
ether, and is employed mixed w^ith ethereal oils 
by inhalation in diseases of the throat and respir- 
atory tract. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Tumenol (tunienolsulphonic acid) is derived 
from bituminous mineral by dry distillation and 
subsequent treatment with sulphuric acid and 
alkalies. Three modifications are marketed: 
tumenol paste, from which the tumenol oil and 
powder are obtained. The oil is a dark-yellow 
viscid liquid, insoluble in water, but freely so in 
ether or alcohol. The powder is soluble in water. 
Tumenol is used in skin diseases chiefly; the oil 
pure or as spirit; the paste in 5 to 10 per cent, 
ointments or tincture, and the powder in 2 to 5 
per cent, solutions (on compresses) or with zinc 
oxide as dusting powder. Incompatible with 
ferric salts, potassium permanganate and corro- 
sive sublimate. 

Tumenol-ammonium. is an improved tumenol 
that yields better ointments than the older forms 
Dr. Klingmiiller states that it irritates less than 
the older preparations, while being equally effica- 
cious. See tumenol. 

Turicin is defined as a "chemical compound of 



292 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

tannic acid and glutenin;" a flesh-colored powder, 
of unpronounced odor and taste, insoluble in 
the ordinary solvents but dissolving in dilute 
alkali solutions; tannin content about 21 per 
cent. It is used as an intestinal astringent. Dose, 
10 to 30 grains. Marketed also as baby turicln, 
which consists of 20 per cent, of turicin, 70 per 
cent, of aleuronat, starch and corrigents. 

Tussiculin is a cough remedy, said to contain 
the ethereal oils of serpyllum and persica vulgaris, 
besides cajuput oil and the active principles (?) 
of alkanet. 

Tussol (pJienylglycolantipyrin ; antipyrin 
amygdalate or mandelate), CeHjCH.OH.COOH.- 
CuHijNzOj, occurs as a white powder readily sol- 
uble in water and decomposed by alkalies and 
milk. It is prescribed as an antispasmodic, 
chiefly in whooping cough. Dose, % to 7% grains, 
according to age, four to six times daily, in sweet- 
ened solution. 

Tutulin is a pure vegetable albumin, occurring 
as a whitish, water-soluble, nearly odorless, taste- 
less powder, employed as a nutritive. Dose, tea- 
spoonful or more per day in soup or other liquid 
food. 

Tyalid is a combination of ptyalin, pancreatin 
and malt diastase, used particularly in amyl- 
aceous dyspepsia. Dose, 5 to 10 grains. Marketed 
also as tablets and elixir. 

Typhase is another name for Klemperer's ty- 
phoid fever antitoxin. 

Typhoin is a sterilized culture of typhoid 
bacilli, used hypodermically in typhoid fever. 
Dose, 0.15 to 0.25 c.c. daily. 

Tyratol is described under thymotal. 

Tyrosal is a trade name for antipyrin salicyl- 
acetate, described under acopyrine. 

Tysin is a trade name for a solution of formal- 
dehyde. See caution under formaldehyde. 



u 

TTliuaren is defined as a natural mixture of the 
salicylic acid esters of certain higher aliphatic 
alcohols. It forms a heavy, yellowish-red, refrac- 
tive liquid, of faint, salol-like odor, readily solu- 
ble in alcohol, difficultly soluble in ether and chlo- 
roform, and insoluble in water. It contains 75 
per cent, of salicylic acid, and is used locally in 
rheumatism, neuralgia and gout, as a paint undi- 
luted or in 30 per cent, ointment with lanolin con- 
taining 5 per cent, of menthol. Dose per applica- 
tion, 45 to 60 minims. 

TJlyptol is an antiseptic consisting of a mixture 
of carbolic acid, eucalyptus oil and salicylic acid. 

Unguentole is a preparation similar to the 
older unguentine — "a non-irritant alum ointment 
with omoform 5 per cent., carbolic acid 3 per 
cent., ichthyol 5 per cent., with solidified petro- 
line as a base." It is used in burns, ulcers, and 
other cutaneous affections. 

TJnguentum Caseini is a skin varnish used by 
Unna, consisting of alkali caseinate, glycerin, 
and petrolatum. It dries quickly and is easily re- 
movable by means of water. All sorts of medica- 
ments save acids, which coagulate the casein, can 
be easily incorporated with it. 

TJnguentum Crede is a 15 per cent, ointment 
of collargol, 5 per cent, of water, 10 per cent, 
of white wax, and 70 per cent, of benzoinated lard. 
It is used by inunction in mild cases of puerperal 
sepsis, in phlegmon, carbuncle and other infec- 
tions; also as a prophylactic of septic infection 
after childbirth, etc. Dose, 45 grains per inunc- 
tion. 

TJnguentum Durum is what P. Miehle calls an 
ointment base consisting of hard paraffin 4 parts, 
wool fat 1 part and liquid paraffin 5 parts. 

TJnguentum Formentoli contains 5 and 10 per 
cent, of formaldehyde, and a little menthol, in a 



294 THE MODEEN MATERIA MEDICA 

glycerin and starch base, and is employed in ex- 
cessive sweating of the feet. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

TJnguentum Gynocardicum is a mixture of 1 
part of chaulmoogra oil and 3 pai'ts of petrolatum. 
It is used in chronic rheumatism, leprosy and 
gout. 

TTnguentum. Heyden is an ointment containing 
45 per cent, of calomelol (colloidal calomel) and 
2 per cent, of free mercury. It is of smooth con- 
sistence, nearly odorless, and of a pale-gray color. 
It is used by inunction in place of mercurial oint- 
ment in syphilis. Marketed in special tubes with 
graduated labels. 

XJnguentum Molle of F. Miehle is a mixture of 
22 parts of hard paraffin, 10 parts of wool fat and 
68 parts of liquid paraffin. With an equal weight 
of glycerin it yields a homogeneous, smooth oint- 
ment, and readily takes up its own weight of 
water. 

Unguentum Psoriaticum is what Rosenberg 
names a mixture of 5 parts of chrysarobin, 2 
of ichthyol and 3 of "unguentum Zymoidini." As 
its name indicates, it is used in psoriasis. 

TJnguentum Vegetabile is an ointment base 
consisting of an emulsion of wax and oil. 

Uraline or uralium is chloral urethane, CCls.C- 
(0H)H.N0.C02.C,Hb, occurring as a white powder 
insoluble in cold water and decomposed by boiling 
water. It is occasionally prescribed as a hypnotic. 
Dose, 30 to 45 grains. 

Uranium Nitrate occurs as yellow crystals, 
soluble in water, alcohol or ether. It is used in 
diabetes. Dose, 1 to 2 grains, gradually in- 
creased to 15 grains, two or three times daily. 
Incompatible with chloral hydrate or lead acetate. 

Urea (carbamide), CH^NjO, though by no 
means a new substance, has only in recent years 
come into vogue as a therapeutic agent. As is 
known, it is a constituent of urine; but it is also 
formed artificially by heating a solution of am- 
monium cyanate. It occurs as white crystals, sol- 
uble in water and alcohol, and it is prescribed as 
a diuretic, antilithic and antitubercular — chiefly 



THE MODEBN MATEBIA MEDIC A 295 

in renal calculus and phthisis. Dose, 10 to 20 
grains, In solution. 

Urea-formaldehyde. — See uroform^ 

Urea Quinate {chinate). — See urol. 

Urea Salicylate is described under ursal. 

TJresin is the name applied to the double salt 
lithium and hexamethylenetetramine citrate, a 
white powder soluble in water, intended as a 
uric acid solvent in gout, gravel, etc. Dose, 5 to 
15 grains several times daily. (Not to be con- 
founded with urosine. See caution under formal- 
dehyde. 

XJrethane, though but little used by American 
physicians, has been officialized in the United 
States under the name ethyl carbamate; it is also 
known as ethyl urethane, and as carbamic acid 
ethyl ester. It results from the action of alcohol 
upon urea or one of its salts, and occurs as color- 
less, nearly odorless crystals of saline taste, sol- 
uble in 1 part of water, 0.6 of alcohol, 1 of ether, 
1.3 of chloroform and 3 of glycerin. It is pre- 
scribed as a hypnotic, antispasmodic and nerve 
sedative, in insomnia, eclampsia, tetanus, strych- 
nine poisoning, etc. Dose, 10 to 30 grains, in 
solution. Incompatible on trituration with anti- 
pyrin, butyl-chloral hydrate, camphor, carbolic 
acid, menthol, naphtol, resorcin, salol or thymol; 
also with acids or aklalies. 

Uricedin is a yellowish compound consisting of 
sodium citrate, sodium sulphate, sodium chloride, 
sodium acetate, sodium tartrate, sodium malate, 
iron, sodium pectinate and extractives. It is 
employed as a uric acid solvent in gouty mani- 
festations. Dose, % to 1 teaspoonful in hot water 
before breakfast. 

Uricene is a uric acid solvent in tablet form of 
undivulged composition. It is advocated for use 
especially in rheumatism. 

Uriform, advertised as a "urinary disinfectant" 
is said to be a mixture of hexamethylenetatra- 
mine, saw palmetto, sandalwood, damiana and 
coca. The preparation must not be confounded 
with uroform. See caution under formaldehyde. 

Urisolvin is said to be a mixture of urea with 



296 TIIE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

lithium citrate. It is claimed to be a uric acid 
solvent. Dose, 30 grains every 3 hours. 

Uristamine and Uritone are two of the numer- 
ous trade names for hexamethylenetetramine. 

Urocitral is the name applied to the double 
salt, theobromine sodium and sodium citrate oc- 
curring as a white alkaline powder of saline-bitter 
taste. It has diuretic effect. 

Urocol is a trade name for tablets, each con- 
taining 0.5 gram of urea quinate (urol), 0.9 gram 
of milk sugar and 0.001 gram of colchicine. The 
article is used in gout. Dose, 3 to 5 tablets per 
day. 

Uroform is a compound of urea with formalde- 
hyde, also known as urea-formaldehyde. See cau- 
tion under formaldehyde. 

Urol {urea quinate) is a compound of two 
molecules of urea and one molecule of quinic acid, 
of the formula C;H,.08.(CO)2(NH2)2. It occurs as 
white prisms of acid reaction and readily soluble 
in water and alcohol. It is prescribed in gout, 
gravel and other morbid conditions ascribable to 
excess of uric acid. Dose, 15 to 30 grains. 

ITrolysin is a compound of vanadium-sodium 
citi'o-chloride with quinic acid (10 per cent.), 
combined as an effervescent powder. It is pre- 
scribed in gout. 

TJron is a trade name for hexamethylenetetra- 
mine. 

Uropherin. — See theohromine-lithium and lith- 
ium benzoate and salicylate respectively, 

Uropural is the fanciful name applied by Wer- 
ler to an extract of uva ursi with or without other 
drugs. The article is marketed as Tablets No. I, 
containing 0.25 gram of the extract alone (equal 
to 1 gram of the leaves) ; Tablets No. II, consist- 
ing of 0.25 gram each of the extract and of salol ; 
Tablets No. Ill, containing 0.25 gram each of 
hexamethylenetetramine and the extract of uva 
ursi; and Tablets No. IV, each containing 0.25 
gram each of aspirin and the extract. Used in 
cystitis, etc. See caution as to No. Ill under 
formaldehyde. 

Urosine, advertised as lithium quinate, is in 



THE KODEBN HATEBIA MEDICA 297 

reality a mixture in tablet form of 0.5 gram of 
quinlc acid, 0.15 gram of lithium citrate and 0.3 
gram of sugar per tablet. It is readily soluble in 
water, sparingly in alcohol and insoluble in chlo- 
roform or ether. It is intended as a uric acid 
solvent in daily quantities of 4 to 10 tablets. 
Marketed also as effervescent urosin, a small tea- 
spoonful of which represents 15 grains of urosine. 

TJrosterile Tablets No. I each contain 0.25 gram 
of dried extract of pichi-pichi; No. II contain 0.25 
gram of the pichi-pichi extract with 0.125 gram 
each of salol and tannic acid. They are employed 
in diseases of the urinary organs. 

Urotropin is a trade name for the most com- 
monly used brand of hexamethylenetetramine, 
which title see. 

TJrotropin New is urotropin methyleneeitrate, 
a chemical described under the commonly known 
trade name, helmitol. 

TJrotropin and Lithium Citrate. — See uresin. 

TJrotropin Quinate (chinate). — See chinotro- 
pin. 

TJrsal is urea salicylate, and is used in rheu- 
matism and gout in the same dose as sodium 
salicylate. 

TJrsin is described as a compound of lithium 
and quinic acid analogous to if not identical with 
urosin. It is marketed in 50 per cent, solution 
and as effervescent powder. 

TJrstyamine is described chemically as hexa- 
tnethylenetetramine and lithium benzoate; a 
white powder easily soluble in water. It is em- 
ployed in gout, rheumatism, cystitis, etc. Dose, 
15 grains every morning in carbonated water. 
(Not to be confounded with uristamine.) See 
caution under formaldehyde. 



V 

Valenta's preparations are mixtures of ich- 
thyolsalicyl with various medicaments. The fol- 
lowing compound "absorption pills" of Dr. 
Valenta are marketed: No. I, containing ichthyol- 
salicyl with "diuretic mass"; No. II, ichthyol- 
salicyl-atoxyl pills, used in tuberculosis, diabetes, 
etc.; No. Ill, ichthyolsalicyl-hetol pills, that is, 
pills of ichthyolsalicyl and sodium cinnamate, em- 
ployed in tuberculosis; No. IV, ichthyolsallcyl- 
lithia pills, prescribed in gout, gravel, etc. 

Valerobromine is a French specialty defined as 
sodium hromovalerianate, but presumably a mix- 
ture or double salt of sodium bromide and sodium 
valerianate. It occurs as a crystalline, water- 
soluble mass, and has the combined action of 
valerian and the alkali bromides. Dose, 7% to 
20 grains. 

Valerydin (para-valerylpTienetidin) , also 
known as sedatin, CoH4(OCjH5)NH.CbHbO, results 
when valerianic acid is heated with para-pheneti- 
din, and forms needles soluble in alcohol. It is 
employed as a nerve sedative and antipyretic in 
doses of IVz to 15 grains several times daily. 

Valerylphenetidin. See valerydin. 

Validol is defined as valerianic acid menthyl 
ester or mentTiol valerianate, CioHig.CjHuOa. to 
which 30 per cent, of free menthol has been 
added, it occurs as a thick, colorless, clear 
liquid, of mild, pleasant odor, and cooling, slight- 
ly bitter taste. It is used as a nerve sedative, 
analgesic and carminative, in hysteria, gastralgia, 
seasickness, syncope, etc. Dose, 10 to 20 drops, on 
sugar or in capsules. Camphorated validol is a 
10 per cent, solution of camphor in validol, used 
in debilitated conditions as a stimulant, and as a 
dental anodyne in toothache from carious teeth. 

Valofin is an aromatized liquid of pleasant 
taste when diluted. It is offered as a substitute 
for infusion of valerian and the like as a nervine 



THE MODERN JlATEBIA MEDIC A 299 

and antispasmodic. Dose, 10 to 25 drops, in hot 
sweetened water. 

Valose is an albuminous nutritive prepared 
from meat. 

Valsol is an English analogue of vasogen, 
which see. 

Valyl is the trade name for valerianic acid 
diethylamide, C4H9.CO.N(C2Hj)2. The article oc- 
curs as a colorless liquid, of a pungent and dis- 
agreeable odor, and a burning, valerian-like taste. 
It Is prescribed as a nerve sedative and antispas- 
modic, in hysteria, cardiac palpitation, migraine, 
menstrual pains, etc. Dose, 2 to 4 minims, two or 
three times daily, in 2-minim capsules (so mar- 
keted). 

Vanadin (Weber) is a solution of a vanadium 
salt (?) with sodium chlorate. It is used as an 
antiseptic in pulmonary tuberculosis. Dose, 6 to 
30 drops daily. 

Vanadine is a trade name latterly applied to 
vanadic acid (vanadium pentoxide), VjOb, a 
brown powder insoluble in the ordinary solvents. 
The product is used in disturbances dependent 
upon sluggish metabolism, particularly in tuber- 
culosis. Vanadine-sanguinal pills each contain 
1/650 grain of vanadic acid and 1% grains of 
sanguinal. Dose, 2 or 3 pills before meals. Van- 
adine dusting powder consists of vanadic acid and 
zinc peroxide, and is intended as a wound anti- 
septic. 

Vanadiol H^louis, is not, according to Prescher, 
a vanadium compound, but a solution of sodium 
hypochlorite; probably nothing but Labarraque's 
solution. 

Vaseloxyne is another analogue of vasogen. 

Vasenol is an emulsion of petrolatum, contain- 
ing 25 per cent, of water; a yellowish-white, 
smooth, ointment-like substance which can take 
up several times its weight of water and is misci- 
ble with fats, salts, powders, etc. Vasenol liquid 
is a white, neutral emulsion of paraffin oil con- 
taining ZZVs per cent, of water, readily emulsifia- 
ble with aqueous fluids, and employed as an emol- 
lient base for liniments, creams, etc., to be used 



300 THE MODEBN MATERIA MEDICA 

on burns, as well as a lubricant for catheters, etc. 
Vasenol powder carries 10 per cent, of vasenol. 
Vasenol mercury is a smooth 33% per cent, mer- 
curial ointment. Tasenol-formalin is an antihy- 
drotic foot-powder, consisting of vasenol powder, 
5 to 10 per cent, of formaldehyde solution, and 1 
per cent, of salicylic acid. It is well rubbed into 
the feet after previous ablution with 1 per cent, 
alcoholic solution of salicylic acid. See caution 
regarding formaldehyde compounds under for- 
maldehyde. 

Vasogen is defined as oxygenated vaseline. It 
is a faintly alkaline, yellowish-brown semi-liquid 
mass, forming emulsion-like mixtures with iodine, 
creosote, quinine, salicylic acid and other water- 
insoluble medicaments, which are readily ab- 
sorbed through the skin. It is hence employed as 
an inunctionary vehicle in endermic medication. 
It is marketed in combination with naphtol, cam- 
phor-chloroform, guaiacol, ichthyol, iodoform, 
menthol, methyl salicylate, and thiol respectively, 
besides the drugs named above; also as solid vaso- 
gen (of ointment consistence), mercury-vasogen 
ointment, and capsules of a number of combina- 
tions (creosote, iodine, etc.). 

Vasol is, according to Kottmeyer, a product 
similar in every respect to the better-known vaso- 
gen, and marketed also as iodovasol, a clear, 
brown fluid containing 7 per cent, of iodine. 

Vasolimentum, proposed as a succedaneum for 
vasogen, is essentially an emulsion of ammoniacal 
oil soap, alcohol and paraffin. The liquid form is 
prepared from liquid paraffin, oleic acid and spirit 
of ammonia; the solid vasolimentum from hard 
paraffin, oleic acid and spirit of ammonia. Simi- 
larly to vasogen, it readily takes up water-insol- 
uble drugs and easily penetrates the skin. Com- 
binations of vasolimentum with creolin, with 
chloroform and camphor, juniper tar, eucalyptol, 
guaiacol, mercury, iodoform, ichthyol, iodine, 
creosote, menthol, naphtol, tar, salicylic acid, 
sulphur and thiol are also made. 

Vasopolentum is described as an olein-paraffln 
which in the solid form serves as an ointment 



THE MODEBX MATEBIA MEDICA 301 

base and in the liquid form as a solvent, and 
vehicle for various medicaments, and thus in« 
tended as a substitute for vasogen and its com- 
pounds. The solid variety is also marketed com- 
bined with mercury (40 per cent.). 

Vasothion is a preparation analogous to thiosa- 
pol and thiosavonal, containing about 10 per cent, 
of organically combined sulphur. It is made from 
vasogen. It is used in skin diseases, as ointment 
or emulsion. 

Vasoval is a counterpart of vasogen, employed 
as an inunctionary vehicle in endermic medi- 
cation. 

Vellolin is a brand name of wool fat. 

Velopurin is an ointment base obtained by dis- 
solving 60 to 150 grams of oil soap in 1000 c.c. of 
alcohol, filtering, and thoroughly Incorporating 50 
to 100 grams of olive oil, continuing energetic 
trituration until a homogeneous mass results. 

Veratrol (pyrocatechin dimethyl ether), CgHj- 
(OCH3)2, occurs as a liquid soluble in alcohol, 
ether and fatty oils. It is used externally as a 
paint in intercostal neuralgia, and combined with 
potassium iodide topically in orchitis, as well as 
internally in tuberculosis. Dose, 2 drops three 
times daily, in capsules. 

Veratrone is a clear, amber-colored, non-alco- 
holic, aqueous fluid extract of veratrum viride, 
having a pleasant odor and a slightly bitter taste. 
It is one-fourth the strength of the oflBcial fluid 
extract of veratrum. Chloretone is added as a 
preservative. It is intended especially for hypo- 
dermic use, being far less irritating than the 
older liquid forms of veratrum. It is recom- 
mended in particular for the treatment of eclamp- 
sia. Dose, 10 to 20 minims. 

Veroform. — See lysoform. 

Veronal is the trade name for diethylmalonyl- 
urea or diethylbarbiturio acid, (C2H,)j.C.(CO)2.- 
(NH)j.CO. The compound forms small, colorless, 
odorless, slightly bitter crystals, soluljle in 145 
parts of water, more readily soluble in alcohol. It 
has come into vogue as a hypnotic and nerve seda- 



302 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

tive, particularly in cases of insomnia and excita- 
tion not due to violent pain. Dose, TVs to 15 
grains. 

Vetrinol is a veterinary unguentine. 

Viferral is a polymer of anhydrous chloral, re- 
sulting from the action of pyridine upon chloral, 
and occurs as a white powder, of unpleasant taste, 
melting at 153° C, slowly soluble in cold water 
and decomposed by hot water. It is prescribed as 
a hypnotic, especially in nervous insomnia where 
there is much excitement and no pain. Dose, 15 
to 30 grains, in wafers or tablets (swallowed 
quickly). Marketed also as 1-gram tablets. 

Vioform (iodochloroxyquinoline) , CsHgNOH- 
IHCl, occurs as a greenish-yellow, practically 
odorless, very bulky powder, insoluble in the com- 
mon solvents and employed as an antiseptic vul- 
nerary similarly to iodoform. Marketed also as 
gauze, iVz and 5 per cent. 

Viscin is described as a glutinous substance 
obtained from viscum aucuparium and resembling 
bird-lime. It is employed as a vehicle for cu- 
taneous remedies. 

Vitalin is a disinfectant mixture of resin soda 
soap and resin oil. It has a strong, bituminous 
odor. 

Vitogen is a mixture of boric acid with other 
antiseptics, employed as a vulnerary and cica- 
trizant, undiluted. 

Vitose is an ointment base described as being 
"glycerin and oil albuminate; odorless, neutral, 
non-irritating, and not becoming rancid." Incom- 
pletely soluble in chloroform, benzene, or ether; 
takes up almost any proportion of water, oil, or 
other fats; melting point, 28°C. 

Vixol is a remedy for asthma, hay fever, etc., of 
undivulged constitution. It is used in an atom- 
izer. According to analysis, it contains atropine. 

Volesan capsules are said to contain 0.3 gram 
of carbonated creosote, 0.0025 gram of heroin, 0.25 
gram of tolu balsam, and 0.065 gram of camphor. 
They are used in diseases of the respiratory tract. 
Dose, 3 to 6 capsules per day. See caution re- 
garding heroin under lieroin hydrochloride. 



THE MOUEKN MATEBIA MEDICA 303 

Vulnoplast is a dressing material for wounds, 
consisting of three closely compressed layers, 
the undermost of which is mull, upon which an 
ointment with a gelatin base is spread. Dr. 
Benario has selected as the medicaments 10 per 
cent, of protargol and 5 per cent, of xeroform, 
which act as antiseptics and astringents. The 
middle layer is absorbent cotton and the outer 
one muslin or cheese cloth. 

w 

Wilburine is a brand name for yellow petro- 
latum. 

Wismol is a mixture of magnesium peroxide 
with bismuth oxide (about 25 per cent.), occur- 
ring as a white, odorless, fine powder, insoluble 
in the ordinary solvents. It is heralded as a sub- 
stitute for iodoform externally, readily liberating 
oxygen on contact with wound secretions. 

Wuk is an aqueous yeast extract, occurring as a 
light-brown powder of feeble odor and freely solu- 
ble in water. It is intended to serve as a substi- 
tute for meat extract, though lacking the salts 
and bases of the latter as well as its stimulating 
properties. 

X 

Xanol is a trade name for caffeine sodio-sali- 
cylate, a double-salt of caffeine freely soluble in 
water and hence adapted for subcutaneous injec- 
tion. 

Xanthopicrit is a trade name for berberine. 

Xeroform. (tribromphenol-bismuth, Msmuth 
tribromophenate) , BiA(C6H«Br,OH)BiOH, oc- 
curs as a yellow, nearly odorless, tasteless powder, 
containing 50 per cent, of bismuth oxide and in- 
soluble in the ordinary solvents. It is used ex- 
ternally as an antiseptic and drying vulnerary and 
dermic; internally as an intestinal astringent and 
disinfectant. DosCi 10 to 15 grains several times 
daily. 



304 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Xylene {xylol; dimethylbenzene) , CsHi (CH3) .,, 
occurs as a colorless liquid of peculiar odor and 
is used internally in small-pox in doses of 10 to 
20 drops four to six times daily until the exan- 
thema has disappeared. 



Yanatas is said to be a 1 per cent, solution of 
chloral hydrate in water colored red. It is ex- 
tolled as a remedy for sea-sickness. 

Yoghourt is a Turkish fermented milk made 
from milk boiled down to two-thirds or one-half 
its original volume. It is said to be a good nutri- 
tive as well as diuretic. 

z 

Zinc Alumnol is described under the title zinol. 

Zinc Cyanide, Zn(CN)j, occurs as a white 
powder soluble in potassium cyanide solution and 
insoluble in water or alcohol. It is administered 
in doses of 1/12 to % grain several times daily in 
epilepsy, hysteria, whooping-cough, carcinoma of 
the stomach, etc.; also in cardiac affections. 

Zinc Formasal is the zinc salt of formasal 
(methylene disalicylic acid). It is used in the 
treatment of skin affections. See caution under 
formaldehyde. 

Zinc Gallate (zinc subgallate) is a grayish- 
green powder insoluble in the ordinary solvents. 
It is prescribed in intestinal fermentation, phthi- 
sical night-sweats, eczema, gonorrhea, etc. Dose, 
1 to 4 grains several times daily; applied exter- 
nally pure, or as 10 to 20 per cent, dusting pow- 
der or ointment. 

Zinc Hemol is a compound of hemol with 1 per 
cent, of zinc; a dark-brown powder, insoluble in 
the usual solvents. It is used in chlorosis, chronic 
diarrhea, etc. Dose, 5 to 10 grains three times 
daily. 

Zinc Perhydrol is a white, odorless, insoluble 
powder, consisting of 50 per cent, of zinc peroxide 



THE MODERN SIATERIA MEDICA 305 

(ZnOa) and 50 per cent, of zinc oxide. With acids 
it develops hydrogen peroxide, which acts as a 
disinfectant and antibacterial. It is hence in- 
tended for use on wounds, ulcers, in skin diseases, 
uterine diseases, etc. It is applied as dusting 
powder with tartaric acid, or in 10 per cent, oint- 
ment. 

Zinc Permanganate, Zn(Mn04)2+HoO, forms 
almost black crystals, readily soluble in water. 
It is used as a disinfectant and astringent in gon- 
orrhea (1:4000 solution), eye diseases (Ito 2:1000 
solution), etc. It should not be brought into con- 
tact with extracts, with alcohol, glycerin or other 
organic solvents, lest explosion occur. 

Zinc Peroxide. See dermogen and zinc perhy- 
drol. 

Zinc Peroxide Soap, ten per cent, is said to 
be powerfully antiseptic, yet non-irritating to the 
skin. It is intended both for dermatological and 
surgical purposes. 

Zinc Salicylate, Zn(C6Hi.OH.COO),+3H,0, oc- 
curs as white needles soluble in water and in al- 
cohol. It is used externally in dermatological 
practice in substance or as "Itallie's zinc-gelatin," 
and internally as a nervine analogously to zinc 
valerianate. Dose, 1/2 to 1 grain three times 
daily. 

Zinc Sozoidole. See under sozoiodole. 

Zinc Sulphocarbolate {zinc sulphophenylate 
or phenolsulphonate) , Zn(CgH«0HS03)-f SH^O, 
forms colorless or faintly pinkish prisms soluble 
in water or alcohol. It is employed as an antiseptic 
and astringent externally, in gonorrhea and on 
wounds, in y, to 1 per cent, solution; as an anti- 
zymotic and disinfectant in typhoid fever, etc. 
Dose, 2 to 4 grains. 

Zinc Tannate (sel de barnit), Zn3(C27Hi80i7)2, 
occurs as a gray powder insoluble in water and 
alcohol, soluble in diluted acids. It is used as an 
astringent internally in doses of 1 to 3 grains 
several times daily; externally in gonorrhea, in 
1:1500 to 5:1500 suspension in thin mucilage. 



306 THE MODERN MATERIA MEDICA 

Zinol (sine alumnol) is an external anti-gon- 
orrheal remedy consisting of 1 part of zinc ace- 
tate and 4 parts of alumnol; employed in solu- 
tion. 

Zitronenthee (German). See lemon tea. 

Zomol is a desiccated meat juice extolled for 
use in tuberculosis. It occurs as small, red, very 
hygroscopic scales, almost completely soluble in 
water. It is administered in bouillon, milk, wa- 
ter, etc. Dose, 10 to 30 grains. 

Zuckerin is a trade name for saccharin. 

Zymin is a dried, sterilized yeast, marlceted in 
powder form, tablets and bougies. The powder 
is used on wounds and cutaneous lesions. The 
tablets are employed internally in furunculosis, 
obstinate skin diseases, etc. Dose, 15 grains (one 
tablet) three times daily. The bougies consist of 
40 per cent, of zymin, 40 per cent, of sugar, and 
20 per cent, of a water-soluble indifferent ex- 
cipient. They are intended for use in gonorrhea 
of women. 



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(IBASS HAKK) 

A Saecharo-Mannite of Iron 
CisHKOiaFe+CsHuO-Fe 
Contains one grain of Iron, expressed as FeO, to the 
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SAPOZOL 

(TBADB MARK) 

Liquor Cresoli Saponatus 
SAFOZOL has the consistency of Lysol. Has its thera- 
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IDEAL DISINFECTANT AND ANTISEPTIC. NOTHING LIKE IT IN OBSTETRICS, 

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