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Full text of "Modern polo"

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MODERN POLO 



BY 

CAPTAIN E. D. MILLER, D.S.O, 

(Late \']th Lancers) 



EDITED BY 

M. H. HAYES, F.R.C.V.S. 

(Late Captain " The Buffs "^ 

Author of "Points of the Horse," "Illustrated Horse-breaking,' 
"Veterinary Notes for Horse Owners," "Riding and Hunting," 

etc. 



SECOND EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED. 



LONDON : 

HURST AND BLACKETT, LIMITED 



NEW YORK : 

CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS 
1902 

All risrhis resei-ved 






PRINTED BY KELLY'S DIRECTORIES LIMITED 
LONDON AND KINGSTON. 



PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION. 



During the six years since the First Edition appeared, 
several hundreds of polo ponies have passed through my 
hands, and I have taken part in many good matches, with 
the result that I have been able, from practical experience, 
to bring out this book in a revised and considerably enlarged 
form. 



E. D. MILLER. 



Tour nay Barracks, 

Alder shot. 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

FIRST STEPS AT POLO. 



PAGE 



Development of modern polo — How to become a polo 
player — How to hit the ball — Forward strokes — 
Back-handers — Riding at polo . . . . i to 23 



CHAPTER II. 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. 

Polo as a scientific game— Duties of No. i — Duties of 
No. 2 — Duties of No. 3 — Duties of Back — 
Captaining a side— Umpiring — Dangers of polo . 24 to 76 



CHAPTER III. 

POLO APPLIANCES. 

Polo grounds — Goal posts — Sticks — Polo dress . . 77 to 84 



CHAPTER IV. 

CHOOSING A POLO PONY §5 tO I07 



viii CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER V. 

TRAINING THE POLO PONY. 

Breaking-in ponies to ride — Riding-school breaking- 
Breaking the pony to stick and ball 



PAGE 



io8 to 130 



CHAPTER VI. 



POLO PONY GEAR 



Bits and bridles — The standing martingale — Saddles- 
Whip — Spurs — Bandages and boots 



131 to 149 



CHAPTER Vn. 



POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. 



Wintering ponies — Conditioning ponies — Stable routine, 
feeding and watering — Bedding — Stables — Using 
polo ponies in harness — Racing and chasing polo 
ponies ........ 



150 to 165 



CHAPTER VHI. 



VARIOUS BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. 



General remarks — English ponies — Arabs — Egyptians — 
Syrians — Barbs — Americans — Argentines — Texans 
— Mexicans — Montana ponies— Gulf Arabs or 
Persians — Indian Country-breds— South African 
ponies — Australasians ...... 



t66 to 220 



CONTENTS. 
CHAPTER IX. 

POLO IN INDIA. 

Remarks- on polo in India — Polo ponies — Stable 
management — The bitting of polo ponies — Indian 
Polo Rules — Necessity for the better training of 
ponies in India ....... 



IX 



PAGE 



221 to 251 



CHAPTER X. 



A RETROSPECT 



252 to 257 



CHAPTER XL 

POLO PONY BREEDING. 

General remarks — Polo Pony Society — Experiences of 

breeders 258 to 272 



POLO IN THE ARMY 



CHAPTER XII. 



273 to 296 



CHAPTER XIII. 

POLO ABROAD. 

United States of America — California — Argentina- 
The Colonies — France — Russia . 



297 to 313 



APPENDIX. 



PAGE 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 

Introduction of Polo — Hurlingham Inter-Regimental 
Tournament — Hurlingham Open Champion Cup 
— Hurlingham County Cup — Hurlingham Social 
Club Cup — Ladies' Cup — Public Schools Cup — 
Ranelagh Open Challenge Cup — Ranelagh Club 
Novices' Cup — Ranelagh Hunt Challenge Cup — 
Ranelagh Club Subalterns' Cup — i\ll Ireland 
County Cup — x\ll Ireland Hunt Cup — All Ireland 
Open Challenge Cup, Dublin — All Ireland Novices' 
Cup — iVU Ireland Regimental Challenge Cup — All 
Ireland Subalterns' Cup — Rugby Tournament — 
Rugby Autumn Challenge Cup — Warwickshire 
Tournament — St. Neots Polo Club — Stratford- 
on-x-\.von Polo Club — Cirencester Polo Tourna- 
ment — Paris International Open Cup — Deanville 
International Tournament — Championship of 
America — Junior Championship of America — 
International Match, i\merica v. England — Indian 
Championship — Indian Regimental Tournament — 
Bengal Cavalry Tournament — Indian Infantry 
Tournament — River Plate Championship . .317 to 332 



Xll 



APPENDIX 



LIST OF POLO CLUBS. 

England — North America — Argentina — West Indies — 
Australasia ....... 

HURLINGHAM RULES OF POLO 
COUNTY POLO ASSOCIATION 
IRISH COUNTY POLO CLUB UNION 
INDIAN RULES .... 
AMERICAN RULES 

LIST OF POLO PONIES. 

List of existing Polo Ponies — Un-named Ponies — Polo 
Ponies measured and registered at Hurlingham, 
1897 — Measured Ponies un-named — Polo Ponies 
measured and registered at Hurlingham, 1898 — 
Un-named Ponies — Ponies that were not passed — 
Polo Ponies measured and registered at Hurling- 
ham, 1899 — Ponies that were not passed — Polo 
Ponies measured and registered at Hurlingham, 
1900 — Ponies that were not passed — Polo Ponies 
measured and registered at Hurlingham, 1901 — 
Ponies that were not passed 

Index .......•• 



PAGE 

333 to 339 
340 to 347 
348 to 350 
351 to 353 
354 to 369 
370 to 378 



379 to 530 
533 



I LLUSTRATIONS 



Rugby winners of the Champion Cup, HurHngham, 1897, 8, and 9 

Frontispiece 

PAGE 

Wooden horse ..... 

Finishing out straightforward stroke . 

Forward drive ; view from the front . 

„ behind 

Hitting under pony's neck to save goal 

Hitting forward on near side ; view from the front 

Ordinary back-hander ; view from the front 
„ „ „ behind . 

Back-hander straight back ..... 

Hitting back-hander under pony's tail facing page 

Hitting back-hander under pony's tail 

Back-hander on near side ; view from the front 

Back-hander on near side .... 

Old Cantab team .... facing page 

The start of the game ..... 

Ball out of play ...... 

Back-galloping for back-hander, hustled by No. i 
18. Blue pulls up ...... . 

19 & 20. No. I (blue) hustling the Back (white) 
21. White No. i hustles blue, leaving his No. 2 to bring 
on the ball ..... 

No. I (blue) keeping out Back (white), who is 
attempting to dash through . 

Hitting out from behind 

A method of placing the side for the hit out, if the 

hitter out be a weak strike ..... 48 



FIG. 

I. 

2. 

3- 

4- 

5- 
6. 

7- 
8. 

9- 
10. 

II. 

12. 

13- 

14. 

15- 
16. 

17- 



22 



24 



8 
II 

T2 
12 

13 

14 

15 

15 
16 

16 

19 

19 

20 

24 
28 
29 

30 
31 

39 

43 

45 
47 



XIV 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



facing page 



FIG. 

25- 
26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 

30- 
31- 
32. 

33-37 

38. "Luna" .... 

39. "Matchbox" 

40. Four-year old weight-carrier 

41. Mr. Buckmaster on "Sunshine " 

42. " Siren " . 

43. The late Mr. J. Drybrough on "Charlton " 

44. Comte J. de Madre's " Mademoiselle " 

45. " Dynamite " ..... 

46. Mr. Walter Jones' " Little Fairy " 

47. Mr. F. J. Mackey's "Rex ". 

48. Lord Shrewsbury on " Conceit " . 

49. The wrong type of thoroughbred pony 

50. Circling pony on foot with long reins, outward rein 

round hind-quarters ...... 

51. Circling pony on foot with long reins, outward rein 

on driving pad .... 

52. Standing martingale on nose-band 

53. Mohawk bridle ..... 

54. Curb with gag snaffle and leather guards 

55. Ward Union bit .... 

56. Short-cheeked curbed bit . 

57. Long „ „ „ . . . 

58. Curb chain protected by india-rubber tube 

leather guard 

59. Jointed Pelham 

60. Gag snaffle 



PAGE 

59 
62 

67 
73 
73 
73 

75 
75 



Blue put offside by six inches, by back (white) . 

Mr. John Watson . . . . fad7tg page 

Hitting out from between the goal posts 

India-rubber Pelham 

Ben Morgan bit ... 

Kerro bridle .... 

Half-moon Pelham 

Side view of half-moon Pelham . 

. Heads of polo sticks ..... 80, 81, 82 

87 
89 

91 
94 
94 
96 

96 
98 

98 

100 
102 
105 

no 







III 






115 


• 




^Z?> 


• 




134 


• 




^zs 


• 




136 


• 




137 


z \ ditto, 


b> 


138 

140 

141 



ILLUSTRATIONS. xv 



FIG, PAGE 

144 



61. Lord Lonsdale's running martingale 



62. Nose band with pad removed . . . . . 145 

63. Nose band and pad ....... 145 

64. Nose band with india-rubber tube to protect pony's 

lower jaw ........ 146 

65. Inside view of Rugby Club polo boot . . . 149 

66. Outside „ „ „ „ „ „ ... 149 

67. Rugby polo boot . . . . . . ' . 149 

68. Ponies being wintered . . . . . . 150 

69. Mr. W. S. Buckmaster's Canadian pony " Bendigo " . 169 

70. Mr. G. A. Miller on " Nip Cat " .... 172 

71. Captain Daly on " Wig " . . . facing page 172 

72. Mr. L. McCreery's " Dennis " . . ?, 5, 172 

73. „ „ "Mickey" . . „ „ 175 

74. Mr. Harold Brassey's " Sailor " . . 55 » 175 

75. A good stamp of light-weight thoroughbred up to 

12 stone ...... .181 

76. A good stamp of a pony up to 1 2 stone 7 lbs. facing page 182 

77. 1 4-hand pony " Snipe " . . . . ,, ,, 182 

78. Mr. Leaf 's " Nancy " . ... „ „ 184 

79. Mr. J. R. Walker's " Spruce " . . „ „ 184 

80. The late Lieut.-Colonel le Gallais on the Arab pony 

"Johnnie" 189 

81. Colonel de Lisle on his white Arab " Snow " . . 191 

82. Mr. T. B. Drybrough's Egyptian pony " Khalifa " . 195 

83. Mr. J. Reid Walker's Syrian Arab pony " Sinbad " . 197 

84. The Syrian Arab pony " Peter " . .... 199 

85. Mr. J. Reid Walker's Barb gelding "Sherry" . . 203 

86. Argentine pony " Yankee " ..... 205 

87. The Honble. William Anson's Texan pony " Rondo " . 206 

88. Texan pony mare " Manita " ..... 207 

89. Mr. C. D. Miller's Californian pony " Santa Romona " 209 

90. The Gulf Arab " Spec " 211 

91. Lieut.-Colonel le Gallais' Indian c.b. mare " Namouna " 213 

92. South African pony " Jess " ..... 214 



XVI 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



FIG 

93- 
94- 

95- 
96. 

97. 



Colonel Kuper's Australian pony " Ophir " 
Colonel de Lisle's Australian pony " Mary Morrison " 
Maharajah of Jodhpur . . . facing page 
Grooming tools ....... 

Spring hook attachment ..... 

98 & 99. Stud attachments ..... 

100. Champion sire "Rosewater," late "Johnnie Day" 

loi. The late Lord Ava ...... 

102. Mr. Foxhall Keene on his American pony " Texina " 

facing page 

T03. Mr. Foxhall Keene's chestnut American pony " Chief" 

104. Mr. Foxhall Keene's American pony " Express" 

105. Prince Serge Belosselsky on his half-bred Arab and 

Russian pony " Negress "..... 

106. Hon. C. Hardinge on his half-bred Cossack pony by a 

thorough-bred horse . . . . . 

107. Rugby Team, 1901 ....... 



PAGE 

215 
217 

221 

250 

251 

251 

271 

296 

298 
307 
309 

311 

531 



MODERN POLO 



CHAPTER I. 

FIRST STEPS AT POLO. 

Development of modern polo — How to become a polo player — How to hit the 
ball — Forward strokes — Back-handers — Riding at polo. 

DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN POLO. 

As my theme is Polo of to-day, I shall not discuss 
the ancient history of the game beyond saying that 
it appears to have been played in Persia 600 B.C., 
and that the loth Hussars had the honour of intro- 
ducing it into England at Aldershot in 1871. It 
has made enormous progress among us as a popular 
sport, and has undergone many changes for the 
better, I venture to think, since the first regular 
match was played in that year, on Hounslow Heath, 
between the loth Hussars and the 9th Lancers. 
On that occasion there were on each side eight 
players, who rode very small ponies. 

The Morning Post in July 1871 gave the following- 
account of that match : — 



2 FIRST STEPS AT POLO. [Chap. 1. 

" Nearly all fashionable London journeyed from 
town to Hounslow on Tuesday, to witness a new 
game called ' Hockey on Horseback ' between the 
officers of the 9th Lancers and loth Hussars. The 
loth are quartered at Hounslow Barracks, and the 
9th came on from Aldershot for the match. 

''The game took place on Hounslow Heath, and 
the various equipages quite surrounded the space 
allotted to the players. 

" Four upright posts some twenty feet apart, 
marked the goals through which the ball (a small 
sphere of white bone) had to be driven by the players 
before either side could claim any advantage. The 
sticks used were like those for hockey, of ash and 
crooked at the end, and with these the ball was often 
struck a considerable distance. The distance between 
the goals was a little under 200 yards, and the players 
having taken up their position in front of their re- 
spective goals, the ball was thrown into the centre of 
the ground by a Sergeant Major of the loth Hussars, 
who then galloped off, when each side immediately 
galloped for the ball at the best pace of their ponies. 
The loth appeared in blue and yellow jerseys and the 
9th in parti-coloured shirts of blue and red, and both 
sides wore mob caps with different coloured tassels 
attached. The game, which has been imported from 
India, and which has for a long time been in vogue 
among the Munipoories, one of the Frontier tribes, 
was watched with the keenest interest by the numerous 
and aristocratic company present. The game lasted for 
an hour and a half with an interval of ten minutes, 
when half time had been played. The players 
numbered eight on each side, and were mounted on 



DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN POLO. 3 

active, wiry, little ponies about 12^ hands high. 
The sides were as follows : — 



9TH Lancers. ioth Hussars. 

Capt. Clayton. Capt. Balthorpe. 
,, Grissell. ,, Bulkeley. 

,, Palairet. ,, St. Quintin. 

Mr. P. Green. ,, Okeden. 

,, R. Moore. Viscount Valentia. 

,, F. Herbert. Mr. Smith Dorrien. 
Lord W. Beresford. ,, J. Woods. 

Mr. W. F. Fife. „ E. Hartopp. 



'' At the end of the prescribed time, the Hussars 
had gained three goals to two gained by the Lancers ; 
and although the general remarks made it evident 
that the new game is the most fitted for cavalry 
soldiers, it was admitted by all who were looking on, 
that it was more remarkable for the strength of the 
language used by the players, than for anything else. 
Mr. Hartopp on the side of the Hussars and Mr. 
Moore on that of the Lancers were much applauded 
throughout the game for their activity and the speed 
of their ponies." 

The first improvement was to reduce the number 
of players to five a side. Soon, regular polo sticks 
replaced hockey sticks, which were first used ; the size 
of the ponies was increased ; and the old-time game 
gradually developed into the fast-galloping, hard- 
hitting, and scientifically-worked combinations which 
now constitute Modern Polo. 

The following are some of the early matches played 
in England, which I think may be of interest to players 
of to-day. 

I* 



4 FIRST STEPS AT POLO. [Chap. I. 

On the 27th June, 1873, at Lillie Bridge, the 
following teams met, and Light Cavalry won 4 goals 
to 2 : — 

Household Cavalry. ' Light Cavalry. 

Marquis of Worcester, R.H.G. R. St. L. Moore, 9th L. 

Lord A. Somerset, R.H.G. Hon. E. Willoughby, 9th L. 

Lord Kilmarnock, R.H.G. Capt. Middleton, 12th L. 

Hon. H. Boscawen, ist L.G. Lord M. Beresford, 7th H. 

Hon. F. Fitzwilliam, R.H.G. E. Hartopp, loth H. 

The first match recorded as having been played by 
the 7th Hussars was in August, 1875, when they 
opposed Staffordshire in Manchester : — 

7TH Hussars. Staffordshire. 

Capt. Hunt. Lord Castlereagh. 

,, Roper. ,, Ingestre. 

,, Shuttleworth. Capt. Hyde Smith. 

Mr. Graham Smith. Sir C. Wolseley. 

,, Atherley. Mr. Barrett. 

Won by the 7th Hussars. 

On the 1 2th June, 1880, the following match was 
played at Hurlingham for a gold cup presented by 
the Prince of Wales, and was won by the Military 
by one goal : — 

Military. Civilians, 

Capt. St. L. Moore. E. Baldock. 

Algernon Peyton. J. JNIcClintock-Bunbury. 

Phipps Hornby. A. Peat. 

L. H. Jones. J. Kennedy. 

F. D. Blacker. J. E. Peat. 

The number of players was reduced to four aside 
in 1 88 1 at Hurlingham, though the Scots Greys won 
the All Ireland Open Cup the previous year with 
four men. 

The Champion Cup (p. 318) was started in 1877, 
and the Regimental Tournament in 1878 (p. 316). 



HOW TO BECOME A POLO PLAYER. 5 

We now play four a side, on ponies varying from 
14 hands to 14.2, which is the standard limit of 
height. In India it has lately been raised from 13.3 
to 14. 1 ; and in America, from 14.0 to 14.2. Instead 
of the old dribbling and scrimmaging game, in which 
every man played more or less for himself with but 
little idea of combination, we have now a carefully 
arranged organisation, in which every player has his 
own particular duties clearly defined, so that the suc- 
cess of a side depends more on the ability to work 
as a whole, than on the individual good play of the 
different members. Formerly, the only player with a 
special office to fill was the goal-keeper, who stayed 
far out of the game, and whose sole duty was to 
defend his goal, while the remainder of the side played 
up in front together. 

HOW TO BECOME A POLO PLAYER. 

A good horseman, whose eye has been educated 
by such games as cricket and racquets, and who 
thoroughly understands football or hockey, the tactics 
and combinations of both of which greatly resemble 
those of polo, will not take long to master the pecu- 
liarities of polo, and ought to be a really good per- 
former after three months of regular play. Here, as 
in all other games which demand quickness of eye 
and skill of hand, assiduous and long-continued 
practice is imperative. At first glance it may appear 
strange to say that many men play polo well in spite 
of being bad horsemen. Hence, the fact that a man 
knows little about riding should in no way deter him 
from giving the game a trial. Indeed, it should be 
an argument all the other way ; for nothing improves 



6 FIRST STEPS AT POLO. [Chap. I. 

one's horsemanship so much as polo. A great ad- 
vantage which polo has over all other outdoor games, 
is that one can begin it comparatively late in life, and 
that one will continue to improve with age and ex- 
perience. The reason for this is that coolness, com- 
mand of temper, horsemanship, knowledge of the 
game, and " head," all of which come with age, are 
far more important factors in making a first-class polo 
player than activity, which is an attribute of youth. 
At football a man is as a rule at his best from twenty 
to twenty-five ; and at cricket, from twenty to thirty 
years of age ; yet there are few really first-class polo 
players in England under thirty. Men of mature 
years are in no way barred from polo. Although I 
have never heard of a first-class cricketer who did 
not learn to play as a boy, many fine polo players 
have begun comparatively late in life. The late Mr. 
Kennedy, who was a remarkably fine player, com- 
menced polo when he was thirty-eight years of age, 
and continued to be in the first flight for at least ten 
years later. Although it is well to commence early, it 
is not always feasible to do so ; for few boys have the 
desired opportunity. 

The fact that the number of polo clubs has been 
more than doubled in England during the last few 
years, proves the advance which the game has made 
in popular favour. Many hunting men see the ad- 
vantage of reducing the number of their horses, and 
filling up the vacancies with polo ponies, so that they 
can have their fun in the saddle all the year round, 
and not only for six months. 

The first want of the novice who is fired with am- 
bition to play polo is a suitable pony, to obtain which 



HOW TO BECOME A POLO PLAYER. 7 

he should seek the aid of an experienced friend, who 
had best make the purchase soon after the polo season 
is over ; for then the supply will exceed the demand, 
and an animal quite good enough for all reasonable 
requirements ought to be procurable for, say, ^50. 
The great point about such a pony is that he must 
be a perfect player. If he fulfils this condition, no 
objection should be taken to him if he be somewhat 
slow. For choice, the pony should have played for 
more than one season ; for the more experience he 
has had, the less likely will he be to learn new tricks, 
such as stopping and shying off the ball. The 
beginner should avoid "green" or tricky ponies; 
for it is impossible for him to learn to hit the ball 
and teach his pony to play at the same time. If 
he cannot get a trained pony, he will no doubt learn 
a good deal on a raw one ; but he must not imagine 
that his teaching will do anything but spoil the 
pony, unless it is a marvel of equine intelligence and 
handiness. 

Apart from the saving of money, it is well for the 
novice to get a steady pony at the end of a polo 
season, so that he may have several months during 
which to practise hitting the ball in every direction 
and at varying speed before he essays to play in 
a game. Most men, even the busiest, can generally 
manage, if they live in the country, to get an hour 
two or three times a week for practice. It usually 
happens that if a man begins playing polo by 
starting straight off in a game, he is put to play 
No. I, and is told to ride the Back and not to mind 
the ball, the consequence being that he does not 
get as much practice in a whole season at hitting 



8 FIRST STEPS AT POLO. [Chap. I. 

the ball, as he would do by himself in a month. 
Even if he were not put to play No. i, he would 
become so hurried and would get so bustled, that 
most likely he would not hit the ball half-a-dozen 
times in a game. If a beginner cannot get, as 
would be advisable, a whole winter's practice, he 
should have at least a month at it by himself before 
engaging in a regular game. Although a good 
level field is an advantage to begin on, it is not 
absolutely necessary ; for any fairly even piece of 
grass, if large enough, will serve the purpose. 
Besides, the practice gained by hitting the ball on 
rough ground will be found invaluable when galloping 
over a smooth surface in a game. The novice will 
receive great assistance by getting a capable friend 
to teach him (as I shall endeavour to do further on) 
how to hold his stick, and how and where to hit the 
ball. From the very commencement, he should 
always try to hit the ball in a certain direction, as 
for instance at a particular tussock of grass, tree, 
mark on. the ground, or other suitable object. 
Also, it is important for him to learn how the 
wrist should be turned when hitting a back- 
hander. An experienced friend can help him not 
only in these points, but can also prevent him 
from acquiring bad methods of play, which, when 
once learnt, are very difficult to rectify. 

Practice on a wooden horse. — By far the best 
method for a novice to learn to hit the ball, even 
before he ventures to handle a stick on a pony, is 
for him to practise on a wooden horse (Fig. i), which 
can be roughly made by any carpenter. No saddle 
is required, and side bars as foot rests can take the 



HOW TO BECOME A POLO PLAYER. 9 

place of stirrups. The height of the seat should be 
about two inches less than the height, at the withers, 
of the pony which is to be ridden. For instance, 
for a 14.2 pony, the seat of the wooden horse should 
be about 14 hands high. 

A few hours' practice under a competent instructor 




Fig. I.— Wooden Horse. 

and with a couple of boys to bowl balls, will greatly 
help the beginner in learning how to make each 
stroke correctly, and has the further advantage of 
saving a living mount from injury ; because a man 
in his first attempts almost always hits his pony's off 
fore leg more or less severely with stick or ball, or 



lo FIRST STEPS AT POLO. [Chap. I. 

with both. Every description of stroke, forward or 
back, stationary or in movement, on either side of 
the pony, can be successfully practised with this 
contrivance. I would extend the recommendation 
of its use to any player (even a first-class one) who 
wanted to get his eye in, or to bring the muscles 
of his right arm into proper trim. Practice on it 
is particularly useful ; because a man can hit the ball 
as often in twenty minutes on a wooden horse as 
he would do in a couple of hours if he had to ride 
a pony after the ball. The best plan is to have 
several dozens of old polo balls lying about the 
ground ; to get a couple of boys to bowl and retrieve 
them ; and to put up goals at different angles, so 
that each stroke may be practised for accurate 
direction. 

HOW TO HIT THE BALL. 

In learning, we should start at a walk, and when 
able to hit perfectly at that pace, we should proceed 
to the slow canter, and end with the fast gallop. 
We should hit always with a straight arm, with a 
good swing, either for a forward or for a back-handed 
stroke, and in a true direction, though not always 
as hard as we can. Accuracy is the great object 
to attain ; for pace will give strength. Consequently, 
when going fast, we should refrain from hitting too 
hard, in attempting to do which we are apt to raise 
our elbow and miss the ball. It is always well to 
have several balls to practise with, so that we shall 
not have to pull our ponies about more than we 
want, by having to turn round every time we miss 
a ball. 



FORWARD STROKES. 



II 



FORWARD STROKES. 

There are four kinds of forward strokes. 

I. Straight forward. — When hitting this stroke, 
which is the first one of all to practise, we should sit 
square in the saddle, and ride the pony up to the 
ball, so as to bring him in such a position that the 
arm may come down straight with full force on to 
the ball. The ball when struck should be about a 



Photo bl/] 




[M. H. Hayes. 



Fig. 2. — Finishing out straight- 
forward stroke. 



foot in front of our right knee, and about six inches 
to the right of it. We should be very careful not to 
hit the pony's fore legs with either stick or ball ; and in 
finishing out a stroke (Fig. 2) should, if anything, hit 
away from the pony, and not towards him. For man- 
ner of holding the stick in this stroke, see Figs. 3 and 4. 
2. To the off {or right) front. — This is a very 
difficult stroke to do with accuracy ; but it must 
be learned by all who aspire to be good players ; 
for it is the one by which the ball is centred by 
the player who makes a run down the side of the 



12 



FIRST STEPS AT POLO. 



[Chap. I. 



ground with the adversary's goal to his right front. 
If he cannot do this, he is sure to hit behind the goal 
line. A certain amount of ''cut" must be put on 
by turning the head of the stick sideways, with 
the inside or short end of the head slightly to the 
front ; and the ball must be hit later than for the 
ordinary forward stroke, i.e., a trifle behind the knee. 
At the moment of hitting, we should turn the pony's 





Fig. 3. ^Forward drive, 
view from front. 



Fig. 4. — Forward drive, 
view from behind. 



hind-quarters a little to the left by a strong pressure 
of the drawn-back right leg, so that the stick may not 
strike the off quarter. 

This stroke should be very frequently practised at 
some object ; the angle made by the direction of 
the ball with the direction in which the pony is 
ridden being gradually increased according as dexterity 
is acquired ; for the greater is the angle, the more 
difficult will be the stroke. Like all other strokes, 



FORWARD STROKES. 



13 



it must first be tried at a walk, and afterwards at 
the canter and gallop. 

3. To the near side, or tinder the ponys neck. — 
The difficulty of this stroke, like that of the preceding 
one, increases with the angle at which the ball is hit. 
When wishing to hit at or nearly at right angles 
to the direction in which we are riding, we can make 
the stroke much easier, if we have got time to do 




Fig. 5. — Hitting under ponys neck, to save goal. 

SO, by turning the pony slightly to the left, in which 
case it will merely be a modification of the forward 
stroke. The difficulty of hitting at, or nearly at 
a right angle, consists in clearing the pony's fore 
legs, to do which we have got to lean very far 
forward. Even the best players are apt to fail by 
hitting the pony's fore legs with stick or ball, or 
with both. It is, however, a useful stroke when the 
ball is in front of goal (Fig. 5), and when we 



14 



FIRST STEPS AT POLO. 



[Chap I. 



are unable to turn our pony's hind quarters to the 
left, in order to hit a back-hander under his tail to 
that side (Fig. lo). The latter, being much the 
easier stroke, should, when practicable, be always tried 
in preference to the former. Under no circumstances, 
when the ball is in front of the goal, should a back- 
hander be hit straight back ; for in that case, by 
leaving the ball in the line of danger, we violate the 




Fig. 6. — Hitting forward on near 
side, view from front. 

essential principle of placing the ball in such a position 
that from it the opposite side cannot make a goal. 

4. On near side. — This is a most useful stroke 
for straightening the ball towards the centre of 
the ground, or for hitting it forward, or for a shot at 
goal, when being hustled on the off side. We should 
be careful to finish up the stroke a little away from 
the pony, so as not to hit his fore legs. The way 
to hold the stick is shown in Fig. 6. 



BACK-HANDERS. 



15 



BACK-HANDERS. 

When hitting a back-hander, careful attention 
must be paid to the correct way of turning the wrist. 
The hand should be slightly turned, so as to bring 
the thumb down the front of the handle with the 
knuckles outwards (Figs. 7 and 8), and the stick 
still held in such a position that the long end of 
the head will be away from the pony. Additional 




Fig. 7. — Ordinary back-hander, 
view from front. 




Fig. 8. — Ordinary back-hander, 
view from behind. 



Strength can be put into the stroke by the support 
which the thumb gives by being held down the 
handle. The arm must be straight and kept as close 
to the side as possible. 

There are four kinds of back-handed strokes. 

I. Straight back. — When hitting straight back, 
the ball should be struck when about one foot 
behind the rider's knee (Fig. 9). 



i6 



FIRST STEPS AT POLO. 



[Chap. I. 



2. To the left rear, or under the p07iy s tail. — The 
ball must be in such a position that even when it is 
struck at right angles, it will go clear of the pony's 
hind legs. It will therefore have to be a foot or more 
behind the rider's knee, and the pony's hind quarters 




Photo 5?/] 



Fig. 9. — Back-hander straight back. 



[M. H. Hayes. 



must be turned to the left by a strong pressure of 
the drawn-back right leg (Figs. 10 and 1 1). 

3. To the off or right rear. — The ball must be 
struck either level with or slightly in front of the rider's 
knee, and the pony's head turned to the left, so as to 
give room for the stick to come down. Or the ball 
must be hit when at a distance of at least two feet 
from the pony. This is much the most difficult 




be 
G 






BACK-HANDERS. 



19 



stroke to do hard and well, and it is impossible to 
put as much strength into it as into the two preceding 




Fig. II. — Hitting back-hander under pony's tail, to save goal. 

kinds of back-handers. It is very useful, especially 

for the purpose of placing a ball for a comrade to 

take on, and is the best stroke 

to use in defending goal, when 

the No. I is riding the Back very 

close, on the near side. It should 

be well practised. 

4. On near side. — This is a 
valuable stroke for getting one 
out of a difficulty, especially when 
one plays Back. For position of 
hand, see Fig. 12. 

When a player who is expert 
at this stroke is being hustled 
on the off side, he can often, 
especially if he has a slight ad- 

., Fig. 12. — Back-hander on near 

vantage m pace, lean to the side, view from front. 




20 



FIRST STEPS AT POLO. 



[Chap. I. 



right, push his opponent away, and get a clear shot at 
the ball on the near side (Fig. 13). 

A good deal of practice should be devoted to this 
stroke, which is very useful for saving a goal. It 
is much easier to do well, than a forward stroke on 




Photo hijl 



Fig. 13. — Back-hander on near side. 



[M. H. Hayes. 



the near side ; although it is harder than a back- 
hander on the off side, which, when practicable, should 
always be preferred in a match. 



RIDING AT POLO. 



Under this heading I shall confine my remarks 
on horsemanship solely with reference to its connection 
with polo. 



RIDING AT POLO. 21 

Most good polo players ride with shorter stirrups 
at polo than they do at any other time, because they 
find that the fact of their doing so increases their 
power when stretching out to reach a ball, or when 
riding off an opponent. 

A pony's head should invariably be left absolutely 
alone when the ball is being struck, 

As the best polo ponies are those which play 
with a slack rein, stop dead at a touch on the 
mouth, and turn to the slightest indication of the 
leg, or weight of the rein on the neck ; our object 
should be to ride our ponies in such a way that 
they may obey these indications readily. If a man, 
when hitting at the ball, keeps hold of the pony's 
head, he is certain by the movement of his body 
to give a jerk to the mouth. Therefore, even if 
a pony be a puller, and it be necessary to keep a 
tight hold of his head when galloping, the reins 
should be invariably loosened at the moment the 
ball is being struck. The reason that very many 
ponies check over the ball, or shy off it, is owing 
to the neglect of this rule. A large number of 
ponies shy off the ball, or lean away from it ; be- 
cause they are not properly ridden up to it, and 
kept in the right direction by a strong pressure 
of the drawn-back left leg. Instead of doing this, 
many players ride their ponies carelessly to within 
about four feet of the ball, and then lean out to 
reach it, which is a method that is open to two 
serious objections : First, the ball when far away 
from the pony cannot be hit with the same 
strength and accuracy as when at close quarters ; 
second, the fact of the weight of the rider being 



22 FIRST STEPS AT POLO. [Chap. I. 

shifted to the right makes the pony lean away or 
shy off to the left. 

The reins should be held rather shorter, and the 
left hand carried somewhat higher, at polo than on 
other occasions ; so that we may be able to apply the 
rein well forward on the neck in turning the pony, and 
stop him quickly even when we are a bit forward in 
the saddle. We should bear in mind that the flexi- 
bility of the neck increases according to its distance 
from the withers. If the hand is held low, the 
lateral pressure of the rein can be employed only 
against that portion of the neck which is immediately 
in front of the withers. 

A fine polo player should be able, like a capable 
jockey when finishing a close race, to get the greatest 
possible speed out of his mount, and like a good 
school rider, to keep his animal at the same time under 
absolute control ; so that when going at full speed, 
he is able to stop or turn and hit the ball where 
he wishes. 

We require a tight seat in order to b6 able to hustle, 
to keep firm in the saddle, to get the best pace out 
of the pony, and to stop him by force, if he won't 
stop by any other means. The question of hands 
is too difficult a one for me to discuss here ; 
although I am aware that there are a few riders, perfect 
artists at the game, who can hold pullers simply owing 
to their having perfect hands. Again, many men, 
otherwise good horsemen, seem to make all their 
ponies pull, on account of their bad hands. I have 
no great faith, as a general rule, in the efficacy, at 
polo, of that magic touch on the mouth which is a gift 
possessed by many of our best jockeys, riders to 



RIDING AT POLO. 23 

hounds, and horse-breakers, and which makes hot 
horses go kindly. Polo is such a rough and tumble 
game that one has not time to put in practice the 
niceties of such a fine art. I think the following 
leading directions are sufficient for general purposes : 
Ride with a loose rein ; stop your pony with a light 
touch on the mouth, if possible ; but stop him. 

We should remember that the pony must be 
made to do his turns by the properly applied 
pressure of the legs (see remarks on school riding in 
Chapter V.) and that the reins are not meant to hold 
the rider in the saddle. 



24 



CHAPTER II. 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. 

Combination — Duties of No. i — Duties of No. 2 — Duties of No. 3 — Duties of 
Back — Captaining a side — Umpiring — Hitting out from between the goal 
posts in consequence of an exacted penalty — Dangers of Polo — Cruelty in 
Polo Playing — Fair Play. 

COMBINATION. 

Polo is one of the most scientific of outdoor games, 
although an uninstructed observer may be able to see 
in it only a medley of galloping ponies, and the ball 
hit here and there, apparently without system or 
combination. Some people, even many of those who 
frequently watch the game played, take this view of 
it. I once overheard a lady in India say, " I don't 
see much in polo. It is nothing but a cloud of dust 
and bad language." Fortunately we have no dust on 
English polo grounds. Strong words are, as a rule, 
used only by a few extra energetic Captains, are 
generally taken in good part by the players, and would 
not signify much, if we were always able to restrict the 
expression of our feelings to particular parts of the 
ground. Unluckily, the strongest expletives have an 
unhappy knack of escaping from our control just 
under the Ladies' Stand. I am glad to say that of late 
years' as great an improvement has taken place in 
" language," as in other departments of the game. 




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COMBINATION. 27 

Before discussing in detail the science of polo, I 
must impress on young players the necessity of 
learning the rules. Although it is manifest that we 
should have at our fingers' ends the rules under which 
we play, many, even good players who have played 
the game for years, are marvellously ignorant on the 
subject of rules, on account of being too lazy or too 
indifferent to learn them from the book, which is the 
only accurate way by which to acquire that know- 
ledge. 

Four a side is the recognised number in all games 
and matches. In club games, when the full comple- 
ment cannot be obtained, three a side will often afford 
plenty of sport ; but the diminution in number will, as 
a rule, entail too much galloping work on the ponies, 
and will render it impossible to carry out the principles 
of the game in their entirety. Three a side is, how- 
ever, much better than five a side, for which there is 
not sufficient room in the present galloping game. 

The places in the game are, Nos. 1,2, 3, and 4 ; or. 
First Forward, Second Forward, Half-back and Back. 

The rough idea of the duties of the different 
players in the Combination game, is that the main 
object of No. I is to interfere with the Back of 
the opposing side, to clear the way for his No. 2, 
and to hit as many goals as possible. No. 2's 
first duty is to attack hard, stop the opposing No. 3, 
and hit goals. No. 3 should assist in the defence 
of his own goal, and serve up the ball to the 
forwards. Back must defend his own goal. In 
practice this rough idea is, of course, subject to 
endless modifications ; for as the game changes, all 
the players in turn will attack and defend. No. i 



28 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. IL 

can assist in the defence of his own goal by pre- 
venting the opposing Back from coming up into the 
game. No. 2 can often save a goal with a back- 




Fig. 15. — The start of the game. 

U, Umpire ready to throw in ball. V. Second Umpire. Players' numbers are shown by arrow-heads. 

hander or by hitting to the side. No. 3 and Back 
will get many chances of scoring on their own 
account. 



COMBINATION. 



29 



The start of the game is shown in Fig. 15. 
The beginner should have the idea firmly impressed 
on his mind that he should play for his side and not 




Fig. 16.— Ball out of play, Umpire U throwing it in from the side. 

for himself; for unless he learns to play entirely 
for the success of his side, his presence will do more 
harm than good in a first-class team, no matter how 
brilliant his individual strokes may be. Besides, 



30 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 



the game is much more enjoyable when all the 
members of a team are trying to help each other, than 
when the whole aim and object of each player is to hit 
the ball as often as possible himself. 

I am sure many players do not obey orders, and do 
not try to learn the scientific and unselfish game 
because they think that they will get more fun if they 



> 



^ 




Photo by] 








[M. H. HAYES. 



Fig. 17. — Back galloping for back- 
hander, hustled by No. i. 



play entirely for themselves, and always have a hit 
at the ball when they get a chance, regardless of 
instructions or exhortations from comrades or Captain. 
I can assure these gentlemen that they make the 
greatest mistake, and that, by being too eager, they 
override the line, and spoil their own sport. Thus, by 
ignoring the grand principle of give and take, each 
man, instead of having only four opponents, will have 



COMBINATION. 31 

six or seven to contend against in his jostle for the ball. 
Such a player should remember that if he plays an 
unselfish game, and leaves the ball to a comrade when 
asked to do so, that comrade will in his turn accom- 
modate him. Consequently, if all the side play 
unselfishly and for each other, not only is the game as 
a whole enormously improved, but each player will get 
far more fun out of it. 

Only a few years ago, polo was taught, especially in 




Photo hy] [J. Wood. 

Fig. 18. — Blue pulls up, instead of hustling white. 

regiments, on rigid, not to say wooden, lines. No. i 
was often made to play without a stick at all, or even 
if he had one, he was not allowed to use it ; and was 
told that his sole object was to nurse the opposing 
Back, and ride him off (Fig. 17) to clear the way 
for his No. 2, who had a real good time, and was 
frequently what we would now call a ''loafer." That 
is to say, he hung about in the wake of his No. i, or 
outside a scrimmage, did no real work, except when 
he got an opening, and would then probably make a 



32 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

most brilliant run, and thus earn all the kudos from 
the on-lookers. Only his own side, and perhaps his 
opponents, would know that he was really the most 
useless man in the team. When I speak of a man 
who does no real work, I refer to one who is always on 
the look-out for openings, and who, when he cannot 
dash in at the ball, canters about and does not try to 
hinder an opponent (Fig. i8). He ought, on the 
contrary, to be always busy, and should never lose a 
chance of hustling any opponent who has the remotest 
chance of getting to the ball. He should be constantly 
on the move, particularly when he occupies the place of 
2 or 3, in which case he should almost invariably gallop. 
No. I has to adapt his pace to that of the opposing 
Back. Back has a more cautious game to play ; for 
while defending his own goal, and watching for his 
opportunity, he must necessarily be often standing still 
or moving slowly. The duties of No. 3 in the old 
game were to stick to his own place at all hazards, to 
back up his No. 2, to support his Back, and to stop the 
opposing No. 2. The Back used to play the part of a 
sort of modified goal-keeper, and hardly ever went up 
into the game. These arrangements were good as far 
as they went, and were undoubtedly a great improve- 
ment on the ancient game of every one for himself. 
We have now made a still further advance by recog- 
nising the fact that to play polo in the best manner, we 
must do so on more elastic lines. In the hurry of a 
hard-fought galloping game it is absolutely impossible 
to always keep our exact place. For example. No. i 
temporarily gets into the place of No. 2, and No. 2 into 
that of No. I. If, in such a case, they are attacking 
hard, and the ball is travelling towards the adversaries' 



COMBINATION. 33 

goal, what can be more absurd than (as we may 
frequently see done) for No. 2 to slow up and shout 
for No. I to come on past him and ride the Back? 
That Is what a selfish, ignorant player often does ; but 
it would be directly opposed to the interest of the 
side ; for the only man who has a chance of catching 
the opposing Back is No. 2, who throws it away. It 
is evident that if No. 2 finds himself temporarily 
in the place of No. i, he should act the part of No. i 
until the circumstances of the game allow^ these tw^o 
players to resume their ow^n proper places. This 
remark applies to every other place in the game. Not 
only should Nos. i and 2 be ready to interchange 
when necessary, but Nos. 2 and 3 should also be 
similarly prepared to act, and No. 3 must be ready 
to instantly take the place of Back. 

A man need not be a brilliant player to play a 
cool game, to be always ready to obey directions, 
and to seize opportunities with intelligence. Be- 
sides, an individually moderate side, which is well 
captained and perfectly drilled, will, by superior 
tactics, often beat four players who, man for man, 
are far better than their opponents, but who do not 
help each other. The remarks I have made about 
interchanging places, apply only to teams of w^hich 
the members are all up to a fairly good standard 
of play. It may, however, happen that the Captain, 
who is probably the Back, is the only fine player 
of the side. Let us suppose that No. 3 is too 
moderate to be trusted to hit a back-hander with 
any degree of certainty ; that No. 2 is fair ; and 
that No. I is a good man at riding ofT, but is of no 
use on the ball. If they meet a stronger team with 

3 



34 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

a very capable No. 2, the Back dare not go up into 
the game ; for he knows that he cannot rely on his 
No. 3. Interchanging places in a game like this 
would do more harm than good ; for if No. i gets 
into No. 2's place, he would probably fail to hit the 
ball, and if No. 3 takes Back's place, he would very 
likely make some disastrous blunder. Although we 
cannot lay down hard and fast rules as to how 
every game should be played, we may take for 
granted that the ideal team would be one in which 
the four players are equally at home in any posi- 
tion in the game. It is evident that when the 
members of a team have arrived at this pitch of 
excellence, it does not matter how often they inter- 
change, so long as there is one man in each place. 
As such a team has never yet been seen on any 
Polo Ground, I am of opinion that, for practical 
purposes, the interchanging of places should be 
worked by the Nos. r, 2 and 3 ; and that the 
Back should only come up into the game when he 
is certain of having the next hit, and of conse- 
quently keeping the ball in front of him. 

Though I lay great stress on the fact that Back's 
chief duty is to defend his goal, it must be borne 
in mind that the best method of defence is a 
strong attack, and that the more the Back can 
force the game with strong forward strokes, the 
better chance will he have of keeping the ball out 
of his own half of the ground. So long as Back 
can keep the ball beyond the half-way line, his 
position remains an easy and comfortable one : his 
troubles never begin till he gets near his own goal. 

The polo tactics of defence differ entirely from 



COMBINATION. 35 

those of attack. If the order of the day is to attack 
strongly, every effort shoukl be made to hit the ball 
in the right direction, that is, towards the adver- 
saries' goal. Wild hitting is of no use, and accuracy 
and direction are of far more importance than 
strength. For instance, we may often see a man 
make a fine run down the side of the ground and 
then smack the ball behind, instead of taking a pull, 
as he often has time to do, and either making a careful 
shot at goal, or middling it to a comrade by means 
of a back-hander. 

In defence, exactly the opposite tactics should be 
employed. Although hitting round generally spoils 
the game, there is nothing for saving a goal like a 
good hard back-hander under one's pony's tail, so 
as to send the ball right out to the side of the 
ground (Fig. 10). A clever Back often turns de- 
fence into attack by hitting under his pony's neck 
from near his own goal to the side (Fig. 5). This 
is a very difficult and risky stroke for any one who 
has not an accurate eye, but it has the advantage 
over a back-hander that it cannot be stopped by the 
legs of the ponies which are galloping behind. It is 
a particularly paying stroke when, as often happens, 
the ball has come from one side of the ground 
towards goal, and the Back hits it under his pony's 
neck towards the other side, but away from his own 
goal (Fig. 5). If he does this successfully, he 
will probably get the next hit at the ball, which would 
save his goal for the time being, even if it does not 
result, as would not be unlikely, in a run the whole 
length of the ground. The objection to a man hitting 
round, is that the other members of his team, not 

3* 



36 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

knowing where the ball is about to go, will be apt to 
get spread-eagled, and the opposite side, by cutting off 
a corner, can usually stop a run. 

In attack, if the ball be near both the side and the 
end of the ground, one member of the team, who will 
usually be the Back, should hang about near the 
centre of the ground, handy for a shot at goal, while 
the remainder of the side should use every endeavour 
to centre the ball out to him. Under these circum- 
stances, if the Back is in the centre of the ground. 
No. 3 must keep ready to take Back's place, and 
after middling the ball to him by means of a back- 
hander, should gallop towards the centre of the 
ground to such a position that he is able to take 
up the duties of defence. Certain risks may be 
taken — especially in the adversaries' quarter of the 
ground — which would not be allowable in defence. 
For instance, the Back, when close to the opposing 
goal, may dash in for a shot at goal and meet the ball ; 
because if he misses it, he will have the whole length 
of the ground in which to retrieve his error. But 
before doing this, he must warn No. 3 to cover him. 
Again, in defence it is never correct for No. 3 to let 
two of the opposing side get on to the Back ; because 
if No. I hustles the Back off the ball, No. 2 will have 
a free shot. When close to the adversaries' goal, 
however, No. 3 can often see where the back-hander 
will be likely to come, and may turn his pony before 
the stroke, in anticipation of a shot at goal. 

If players will keep their eyes open and their wits 
about them, they will often be able to anticipate what 
is going to happen. For instance. No. 3 sees that his 
Back is about to hit a back-hander under his pony's 



• . COMBINATION. 37 

tail, so by turning his pony to the left and moving 
in that direction, he will probably get on to the ball 
before any of the opposing side can do so. This 
principle applies to every phase of the game. By 
careful observation, a player can frequently tell by the 
way the stick is held, and by the angle at which a man 
rides at the ball, where he is going to hit it, and can 
thus save time and get a start. It is well to act on the 
supposition that an adversary will always hit the ball. 
It is not wise to anticipate a back-hander from a 
comrade when defending one's own goal ; for if he 
misses it, the chances are that the fact of having one's 
pony turned for the back-hander, will let an adversary 
loose to have a free hit at the ball. With this ex- 
ception, it is best to take for granted that the ball will 
always be hit, and to try to anticipate future events. 
The player most useful to his side is he who is most 
busy, who is always galloping hard, and who, if he 
cannot hit the ball, is always trying to hinder some 
opponent or the other in every way he lawfully can. 

Except in the very best teams, the back-hand stroke 
is not used nearly often enough ; the passing of the 
ball from the side of the ground to the centre should 
almost invariably be done by this means. 

When one member of the team takes the ball out 
to the side of the ground, one or more of his com- 
rades should make for the centre in anticipation of 
this stroke, which should be made hard and true 
and towards the goal. 

The secret of perfect combination is the accurate 
passing of the ball from one player to another. 
Every stroke should be studied in order to attain 
this result. 



38 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

A ball hit twenty or thirty yards by one player, 
so that a comrade can get it, and in his turn either 
keep possession or pass it again, is much more 
likely to reach the goal than if the striker had sent 
it double or treble the distance, but into the possession 
of an opponent. 

By these remarks, I must not, however, give the 
impression that I undervalue the importance of hard 
hitting. When a team is hitting out from behind, 
or to get the ball out of a position of danger, hard 
hitting is invaluable. Still, accuracy is more im- 
portant than hard hitting. By combining strength 
with accuracy, perfection is attained. 

DUTIES OF NO. 1. 

It is a great pity that more players do not make a 
study of this position, which is unpopular, because it 
demands much self-denial. (Figs. 19 and 20.) Most 
men think that for the first year or two of their 
polo career, they must play No. i a certain number 
of times, and they try to avoid doing so, as often 
as they can. Afterwards, they will never play No. i 
if they can possibly help it. Nos. 2, 3, and Back 
should do their best to make No. I's duties agree- 
able, and should remember that one reason why they 
themselves dislike the position of No. i, is the un- 
pleasantness of having such directions as " Gallop, 
No. I," "Ride the Back, and leave the ball," con- 
stantly shouted at them, with frequent abuse, and 
with but few words of encouragement for their well- 
meant efforts. Therefore, in ordinary games they 
should refrain from what they know they would resent 
if applied to themselves. Even in matches, loudly 



DUTIES OF No. i. 



39 



shouted directions should be left to the Captain, and 
the other members should restrict themselves to in- 
structions given in a quiet tone, and to words of 



encouragement. 



A selfish No. 2 may often destroy the enjoyment 
of a young player for . the whole afternoon, by con- 
tinually giving him directions to "ride the Back " and 






1 

> 




/ 










^^^^^H^^%*^^H 


' jfr ^^^Fv^flHf ^^^^^^^1 


^' y 


^ fw^F^ 


Ihi- 


F W F 


L 


K i 



Photo by"] 



[M. H. Hayes. 



Fig. 19. 



Fig:. 20. 



No. I (blue) hustling the Back (white). 



" leave the ball alone." If, on the contrary, he were 
to allow the No. i to hit the ball w^henever he got a 
fair chance, and w^ere to take his own share of riding 
the Back out of the way of the No. i ; the young player 
would go off the ground encouraged and pleased with 
himself, and ready to play No. i whenever he was 
desired to do so. 

Players should also guard against the too common 



40 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

fault of asking No. i to do impossibilities. Men who ^ 
have seldom if ever played there, do not know how 
much to expect from even a good No. i, and they 
frequently shout at him to do things which are quite 
beyond his power. We all have often seen No. 2 pull 
up, look wildly round, and exclaim in agonising accents 
"Where is that No. i ?" when some exigency of the 
game has made No. i turn his pony in a direction 
which has brought him behind No. 2. Under these 
circumstances, a good No. 2 would, without wasting 
his breath, gallop on and tackle the Back, leaving 
No. I to fell into his place for the time being. 

Good and experienced players and also players who 
are experienced, but not good, should try to make a 
game of Polo as pleasant as possible for everyone, and 
particularly for beginners. 

In ordinary club games, the position of No. i is 
usually given to a young player, or to the worst 
hitter, who, even though he does his best, will gen- 
erally get all the abuse and no credit. Such a practice 
is altogether wrong ; for each player has an equal 
right to enjoy the game. Besides, it is very hard on 
a beginner to be always given a position in which he 
can get but little practice in hitting the ball, and will 
very likely have his young or imperfectly trained 
ponies spoiled. Unless a man has a natural aptitude 
for the place of No. i, and likes it, he should be 
allowed from time to time an opportunity of playing in 
other positions of the game, both for the sake of his 
own practice, and with the object of preventing his 
ponies from becoming sick of the game. It is, of 
course, different when practising a team for a match ; 
for then the men should keep to the places they will 



DUTIES OF No. i. 41 

occupy in the actual contest. Although No. i Is not 
an enviable position for a young player on not the 
best of ponies, there is no better place in the game 
for a fine horseman who is a strong hitter, a good shot 
at goal, and who has plenty of big, blood, handy ponies ; 
provided always that his No. 2 hits the ball well up 
to him, and is ready to take his turn at hustling and 
jostling the Back if he finds himself in No. I's 
place. 

As Back almost always gets a start, he has a great 
advantage over No. i, who has to adapt his move- 
ments to those of Back. For this reason the ponies 
of No. I are particularly liable to get spoiled. No. i 
will have to exercise great vigilance to remain on- 
side, especially with an experienced and tricky Back. 
The chief thing for him to remember is that the only 
way for him to get off as quickly as Back, is to con- 
tinually watch him, to start at the same moment and 
in the same direction as Back, and not to look over 
his shoulder for the ball. If he watches the ball, the 
Back will be certain to slip him. Another great 
advantage which Back has is that, when two players 
are galloping level for a ball, it is much easier while 
being hustled, to hit a back-hander than a forward 
stroke. For these reasons, and also because the ponies 
of a No. I frequently get cunning after a time and will 
not go in and face a back-hander, or jostle unless they 
are well alongside, every allowance should be made 
and abuse withheld from the luckless No. i, who 
often incurs it because he fails to make much impres- 
sion on a slippery Back. No. i should always try 
to come up on the stick side of the back (Fig. 
21), and, if he can, should ride him off and get the 



42 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. 11. 

ball, unless one of his own side behind him shouts 
out " Leave it ! " On hearing this order, which means 
that the man behind has the best chance at the ball, 
No. I must at once devote his energies to riding Back 
off and must on no account trv to hit the ball. 

For two reasons he should if possible come up 
on his adversary's stick side. Firstly, because if he 
succeeds in this, the Back will be forced to hit on 
the near side, and it is much harder to place a near 
side back-hander where one w^ants to, than an off side 
one. Secondly, if he rides his opponent over the ball, 
his No. 2, who ought to be backing him up, can hit 
the ball to No. I's right hand, and very likely give him 
a good opening (Fig. 21). But if No. i was on the 
other side, he would have to make his own hitting on 
the near side, which is much more difficult. 

When the ball is hit out from behind his own goal 
line, he should be as close as possible to the Back, and 
ready to interfere with him if necessary (Fig. 23). 
If the ball, on being hit forward, does not quite reach 
the opposing Back, who may be afraid to dash in. No. i 
must go for the ball, if no one else of his side can 
get it. He should, however, if he has the opportunity, 
delay hitting his back-hander, and should shout to one 
of his own side to gallop past him. He will thus 
be able to place the ball for him If, on the other 
hand, he hits a back-hander at once, the opposing 
Back would be sure to get the ball without any 
difficulty. It is quite an exploded idea that it is 
not necessary for No. i to be a fine hitter. If he 
has good ponies, he will have as many openings as 
any other member of the team, and will probably get 
more chances of hitting goals than any of them. In 



DUTIES OF No. I. 43 

the final of the Open Cup at Ranelagh, 1901, 
Mr. Walter Jones hit five goals out of the six 
secured by his side. No. i must, however, re- 
member that, as the man behind him can see better 
than he does how the game is going, he must on no 
account touch the ball if he is told to leave it. The 
main thing for him to do, is to gallop and to keep the 
Back galloping. Even if he has not the remotest 
chance of catching him, or of stopping the back- 




Photo hij'] [J. Wood, 

Fig. 21. — White No. i hustles blue, leaving his No. 2 to bring on the ball. 

hander, he ought to gallop on after the Back ; because 
in doing so he will hurry him, and will thus render the 
direction of his stroke more or less uncertain. If 
Back were, on the contrary, left to himself, he would 
have time to look round and place his back-hander 
exactly where he wished. If kept at the gallop, 
especially if the ground is bumpy, the Back may miss 
the ball altogether, or, if he manages to hit it, he may 
probably succeed only in hitting it straight back, in 



44 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

which case it will very likely be stopped by the legs of 
ponies coming up behind. 

As a rule, just as the Back is going to hit his back- 
hander, No. I is about half a length to the bad, and 
cannot stop the Back from hitting it. Under these 
circumstances, we constantly see a player ride straight 
at the ball, in the hope that it may be stopped by his 
pony's legs or other part of the animal. If the pony 
escapes being hit by the ball, he will probably be hit 
on the legs or face by the stick, while the stroke is 
being finished. This practice is unfair and cruel to 
ponies, and nothing spoils them so quickly. /\fter 
they have been hit two or three times, they will 
probably either cut it and not try to gallop, or will shy 
away from the stick, when they see the stroke coming. 
The No. I should ride about two feet away from the 
line of the ball, when he finds he cannot get along- 
side, and hit at the ball on the near side, timing his 
stroke to come a fraction of a second later than his 
opponent's back-hander. By this means, if the Back 
hits the ball, the No. i will often meet it, when it has 
gone only a foot or so, and will either drive it forward 
or stop it. With very little practice a player will learn 
to time his stroke properly. This method will be 
found more successful than the plan of riding straight 
into the stroke and trusting to luck for the ball to hit 
the pony, and it will not spoil the animal, which thus 
will escape being hit either by stick or ball. 

If the ball has been hit some way past the Back, 
and No. i has succeeded in getting alongside him. but 
cannot ride him off the ball on account of being 
slightly behind, it will not be much good for him to 
try to do so ; because Back will simply let No. i 



DUTIES OF No. i. 45 

ride him on to the ball, and will then get his back- 
hander in on one side or the other without any 
trouble. It will be much better for No. i to pull away 
about two feet from Back, and come in with a hard 
bump, just as he is going to hit the ball (Fig. 13). If 
this bump is accurately timed, it will seriously incon- 
venience the opponent, and very likely put him off his 




Photo hij] [J. WOOD. 

Fig. 22. — No. I (blue) keeping out Back (white), who is attempting to 

dash through. 

Stroke. But if the two are locked together, the 
amount of shoving No. i can do, will not prevent 
Back from coming on to the ball at the right moment. 
In the foregoing directions, I have tried to instruct 
a No. I how he should play when his own side is 
attacking, and the opposing Back is employed in 
defending. I will now try to explain what he should 
do when his own side is on the defence. 



46 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II 

No. I has a very much better chance of interfering 
with the Back, when the opposite side is attacking, 
in which case his chief business is to constantly try to 
prevent the Back from coming up and forcing the 
game with forward strokes (Fig. 22). Provided he 
has handy, good ponies, he should nearly always be 
able to do this, and will thereby greatly assist his 
side, although he may not get much applause for it, 
as it is not a showy game. He will, however, win 
many a match for his side, and will be fully appre- 
ciated, if his Captain understands polo. 

To succeed, he must stay close to the Back and watch 
him all the time. If he is watching the Back, as soon 
as he sees him try to dart in, he can intercept his pony 
and prevent him doing it. If the game is going fast 
towards his own goal, No. i should be riding along- 
side the Back, but with two feet the best of it, i.e., 
with his knee against the shoulder of his opponent's 
pony. In this position, if the Back wants to dash in 
and get the ball. No. i can always ride him out 
towards the side, even if the Back is a much heavier 
man than himself No. i should not do unnecessarv 
hustling, when the ball is not near, and there is no 
object to be gained. 

When the ball is hit behind the opposite back line, 
No. I should place himself for the hit out, facing the 
man who hits out, rather away from the goal, where 
he thinks the ball will be hit (Fig. 23 and 24). Here, 
his business is to meet the ball if possible, and prevent 
his opponent from dribbling out, by galloping straight 
in immediately the ball is hit over the back line. He 
should always remember, directly the ball is hit behind, 
to at once get to his place, and not stand about and 



DUTIES OF No. i, 



47 



talk, as is too often done. Often through the player's 
slackness, the ball is hit off before he is ready and 
while he has his back turned to the ball. 



JUL 






N) 



t 



m 



Fig. 23. — Hitting out from behind. 



When all the opposing side are behind and hit out 
from between the goal posts, the No. i should face 
the goal on the left of the circle, so as to be able to 



48 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

meet the man who hits out stick to stick, with no 
danger of crossing him. 

In both these cases, it is well for No. i to have his 



r t 




Fig. 24 —A method of placing the side for the hit out, if the 
hitter out be a weak striker. 

pony on the move and well in hand, timing it so as 
to cross the line just as his opponent hits the ball. In 
this way, when the opposite side hits out between the 



DUTIES OF No. i. 49 

goal posts, he should be able to prevent the man who 
hits off from making a short dribble, before he hits 
out hard. (Fig. 27.) 

As I have already explained, No. i must watch the 
Back and not look behind for the ball. He should 
therefore rely on his No. 2 to give him instructions, 
and be always listening and ready to at once do what he 
is told. If the ball is near enough to his adversaries' 
goal for his own side to have a shot, he must try and 
clear the Back away from the goal, so as to leave it 
open. In any case, he should get himself out of 
the way, so that he may not interfere with the shot ; 
because goals are often stopped by the ball hitting a 
pony. 

If No. I gets a chance of hitting the ball and 
receives no instructions from his own side to leave 
it, he should always take his chance and hit it. 

If No. I finds himself temporarily in No. 2's place, 
he should do No. 2's work for the time being, and 
take the first favourable opportunity of changing back 
into his proper position. 

When one of his own side is hitting out from 
behind. No. i should place himself close to the 
opposing Back, with his pony's head turned in the 
direction of the adversaries' goal. When the ball 
is being hit out, all the players should have their 
ponies in hand and collected, as if they were going 
to start for a five-furlong scurry, so that they may 
get off at the gallop with the least possible delay. 

Finally, I would point out to young players that it 
is easier to become good enough to play No. i in 
first-class matches, than to play No. 2, No. 3 or Back ; 
and that there are so few who are really clever in this 

4 



50 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

position, that a young player ambitious of getting 
into a good team, ought to cultivate that place. 

DUTIES OF NO. 2. 

It is a great mistake for a man to invariably play 
No. 2. No matter how brilliant a player he may be, 
he should occasionally play No. i, by doing which 
he will appreciate the difficulties No. i labours under, 
and will learn what No. i can and cannot do. If 
he knows this thoroughly, he will be fully capable of 
helping his No. i with instructions and encourage- 
ment. 

A No. 2 has to look after the oppposing No. 3, and 
his object both in attack and defence should be to 
get the best of him, and always try to be in front of 
him. If he cannot get the ball, he should try to stop 
any of his opponents obtaining possession of it. He 
must be a " busy" player, and constantly on the gallop. 
He must be always on the look out, and try to anti- 
cipate where the ball is going to be hit, and get there 
before his opponents. If he can rely on his No. 3 
or on his Back hitting a back-hander, he should check 
his pace and prepare to turn before the ball is hit, 
when he has made up his mind where it is coming 
to. He should, however, not do this when the ball 
is close to his own goal ; because he should then 
devote his attention to defending, and preventing 
the opposing No. 3 getting a shot at goal. When, his 
own side is attacking, and the ball is in his op- 
ponents' quarter of the ground, he may take more 
liberties and turn sooner in the hope of getting a shot 
at goal. 

One of the chief duties of No. 2 is to give his 



DUTIES OF No. 2. 51 

No. I constant instructions, for which No. i relies 
entirely on him, because he cannot see behind him. 
No. 2 should give as short and plain instructions as 
possible, such as, "leave it," and ''take it," and should 
never use an ambiguous expression, such as, "all 
right," or "goon." The former, which is frequently 
used, may mean almost anything ; and the latter 
may mean that No. i is to go on with the ball, or 
to go on and leave it to No. 2. If No. 2 wants 
No. I to hang over the ball until he can get there, 
the best expression to use is "keep it," by which 
No. I will know that he has to prevent anyone else 
getting it until his No. 2 can do so, and then clear 
out of the way. 

No. 2 should be very careful about the direction of 
each stroke, and when his No. i and the opposing 
Back are in front, he should always hit the ball to 
whichever side his No. i is riding. No. i may 
then get a good opening, and may be able to drive 
the ball forward ; but if No. i only succeeds in 
preventing the opposing Back from getting in a 
back-hander, the ball will still be left there for the 
No. 2 to have another chance at it. If No. 2 hits 
it to the other side, the Back is almost sure to get 
it. This is a most important point, and is not nearly 
enough studied by most men who play No. 2. 

Above all things. No. 2 should not hit round or 
across the ground, except to defend his own goal ; 
but should keep the ball towards the centre of 
the ground and always hit towards his opponents' 
goal when possible. If he finds himself near the 
boards in his adversaries' half of the ground, he 
should hit towards the centre at once, the easiest way 



52 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

to do which is to screw the pony round and hit a 
back-hander under his pony's tail. In a good team, 
the Back and No. 3 will be always on the look- 
out for this stroke, which will give them many an 
opening down the centre of the ground ; unless 
their opponents succeed in frustrating these tactics, 
by taking charge of any player who goes to the 
centre, before the ball arrives. It is most important 
for everyone on the side, when attacking, to hit to 
the centre and not along the boards, and not to wait 
until close to the back line, to send the ball to the 
centre. 

No. 2 should be a dashing player, a hard and 
accurate hitter, and a good shot at goal. Above all 
things, he must do a great deal of work, and must 
devote himself as much to helping his Nos. i and 3 
as to hitting. In attack, he should often clear the 
way for No. 3 in exactly the same way as No. i 
does for him. He should play quite as unselfish 
a game as No. i, and if told by the man behind 
him to leave the ball, he should invariably do so, 
and should gallop on to ride off his next opponent, 
so as to keep the way clear. He must never let 
an opponent ride loose in front of him, and it 
will generally be his business to look after the 
No. 3 of the opposing side. In attack, he must 
always try to be on the ball before him ; and in 
defence, he nmst prevent him getting a dash in 
at goal, to succeed in .which he should always 
endeavour, both in attack and defence, to be in 
front of the opposing No. 3 — never behind him. 
Occasionally we see a No. 2 who, instead of doing 
a lot of real work, waits about to make runs. 



DUTIES OF No. 2. 53 

and when he ought to be hustling an opponent, 
in order to give a comrade an opening, he hangs 
back on the chance of getting the ball himself. 
And yet, because he makes several brilliant runs 
in a match, the on-lookers who do not understand 
the game will probably regard him as the best 
player on his side. I need hardly say he is not the 
sort of man we require when we want to win an 
important match. Moreover, he should thoroughly 
understand the duties of Nos. i and 3, and should be 
able to do their work equally as well as his own, if 
he finds himself temporarily in either of their places. 

No. 2 is often too anxious to try for a goal, however 
difficult the shot may be. He might learn a valuable 
lesson on this subject by observing the fact that in a 
crack football match, no one shoots at the goal until a 
good opportunity arrives. The ball is invariably 
passed rapidly to the centre before the shot is tried. 
The finer the hitter, the greater is the temptation 
to make very long shots at goal. Many goals are lost 
by this practice, for no one can make a certainty of 
a goal at 80 or 100 yards ; and even if the ball is 
sent in exactly the right direction, a quick Back will 
probably overtake it and save the goal. It is, as a 
rule, better to straighten the ball with the first stroke 
and then try with a second stroke to put it through 
the posts. 

When the ball is hit out from behind No. 2's goal 
line (Fig. 23), he should place himself about 10 or 15 
yards farther away from the goal and about 20 yards 
in front of the back line, and should have his pony 
on the move, as soon as Back starts to hit the ball, 
so as to have his pony cantering when the ball is hit 



54 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

up to him. As soon as the ball is past him, he can 
gallop on the line of it, and he will then be in 
possession. It is a great mistake for him to stand 
too far away, and be obliged to wait standing still for 
the ball to come up to him ; and he must be well on 
the outside, so as to enable the Back to hit past 
him without danger of being struck by the ball. 

When the opposing side is hitting out, he should 
place himself facing his adversary's line, and on the 
goal side of where the ball is placed (Figs. 23 and 24). 
If they are hitting out near goal, he should be right in 
front of his adversary's goal. There are two reasons 
for this position : firstly, if his adversary hits the ball 
across his own goal, he should be able to get to it first, 
and prevent the opposing side getting a clear opening ; 
and secondly, if it is hit out to the side, he will be 
ready in front for his own side to pass to him. When 
the opposing side is hitting out from between the goal 
posts. No. 2 should place himself as in Fig. 27. 

DUTIES OF NO. 3. 

No. 3 is perhaps the busiest man on his side, 
whether for attack or defence. In defence he must 
never let the opposing No. 2 gallop loose ; because, if 
he does so, and the opposing No. i rides his Back off. 
No. 2 will have the chance of a clear run. It is No. 
3's duty to attend to the carrying out of the rule that, 
in defence, two opponents should never be allowed on 
to the Back. In attack, and especially when very close 
to goal, liberties in this respect are, of course, allowable. 
In attack, it is No. 3's business to back up his No. 2, 
and if necessary, to make both No. i and No. 2 clear 
the way for him. He must be very quick, and, 



DUTIES OF No. 3. 55 

especially in a sticky game, must be always on the 
turn. If Back goes up into the game, he must drop 
into Back's place like clockwork, particularly if he sees 
Back attempting a risky stroke, such as meeting the 
ball. 

In attack, No. 3 will get many openings, but he 
must remember that his first duty is to prevent the 
opposite side from hitting goals, and, bearing this in 
mind, he should always try to keep the ball in front 
of him. This result cannot be attained unless on 
every possible occasion he passes the ball to the right 
hand of his No. i or No. 2, and resists the temp- 
tation of making runs himself, unless he can make 
a certainty of hitting the ball next. If No. 3 sees 
the opposing No. 2 going to hit a back-hander, he 
should turn where he sees the ball is coming, and 
should not dash in to try to put No. 2 off his stroke, 
unless he sees that his own No. 2 is coming back into 
his place When No. 3 dashes in for an opening, he 
may often get into No. 2's place, in which case he 
should take the first opportunity of changing back into 
his proper place. Though he should make No. 2 clear 
the way for him, his chief object should be to hit in the 
right direction, and place the ball for his No. 2, and 
not merely hit forward, leaving it to chance who may 
get it next. When No. 3 dashes in to get a run, 
which he will frequently do. No. 2 should promptly 
drop back and take his place, so that, if No. 3 fails to 
get the ball or the game turns the other way, there may 
be a man in No. 3's place, ready to defend. 

As No. 3 is generally in the middle of the game, a 
side can be captained from his place nearly as well as 
from that of Back. 



56 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

If No. 3 can hit out from behind equally as well as 
the Back, it is best for him to do so, and to follow the 
ball up, backing up No. 2, so that the advantage of 
having the players in their proper places to begin with 
may be secured. If, however, Back be the stronger 
hitter, No. 3 should place himself slightly in front of 
goal, so as to be able to defend it, if the hit out be not 
successful (Fig. 23). 

When his opponents are hitting out, he should be 
about fifty yards out away from goal, where he thinks 
the ball will be hit, and should not be tempted to meet 
the ball, unless it is stationary and he is certain of 
getting it. His duty is to try to get it before the 
opposing No. 2, and hit a back-hander towards goal to 
his own No. 2. If the opposite side are hitting out 
from between the goal posts, No. 3 places himself as 
in Fig. 24. 

DUTIES OF BACK. 

Back, whose place is the most important one in the 
game, is as a rule the Captain of the side. A first-class 
Back must not only be a fine player, but must also 
be a master of the tactics of polo, cool, resourceful, 
never liable to throw a chance away, and always ready 
to profit by the error of an adversary. He must be 
mounted on perfectly trained and very handy ponies. 
Although great speed is always an advantage in polo 
ponies, it is not so essential to Back as to No. i or No. 
2 ; for he will almost invariably get the start of the 
opposing No. I. 

He should not stay too far out of the game, and 
especially in attack, when close to the adversaries' goal, 
he should be close up, ready to make a dash at goal. 



DUTIES OF BACK. 57 

As a general rule, he should not meet the ball when it 
is travelling towards him ; because, if he misses it, he 
will be going the wrong way, and his opponents will 
get a fine opening. As an exception to this rule, we 
may suppose a case in which a smart No. 3 turns when 
the ball was hit towards his own Back, who will have 
only to shout to his No. 3, "Look out, Back!" and 
can then dash in and meet the ball without risk. This 
is very often the only way to save a goal. The maxim 
that accuracy of direction and knowledge of tactics are 
of more importance in every position of the game than 
powerful hitting, applies particularly to Back, whose 
great object should always be to place the ball so that 
his side can get it. A hard, clean back-hander right 
through the players and up to the opposing Back, is a 
grand stroke to see ; but if the opposing Back repeats 
the performance, not much is gained, and there is 
always the risk of the ball being stopped by its hitting 
a pony's legs. As a rule, it is best to hit a back-hander 
slightly sideways. A good Back generally hits the 
ball slightly under his pony's tail, that is, towards his 
left rear ; the object being that No. 3 may turn to the 
left and get to the ball right-handed, unless there 
is some particular reason for hitting the ball else- 
where. Back should make a habit of hitting his 
back-handers in this direction, because his Nos. 3 
and 2 will then know where to go. Hitting a ball 
back-handed in this way is easier than hitting it away 
from one's pony, and has the further advantage that 
No. 3 gets to it better ; because if he has to turn to 
the right after the ball, he will very likely have to 
take it on the near side, in order to prevent having 
his stick caught. Also, if No. i is in hot pursuit, a 



SS THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

ball hit slightly sideways one way or the other will 
probably miss No. I's pony ; but If hit straight back, 
It may not unlikely get stopped by the legs of that 
animal. 

If we watch the play of one or two of our most 
celebrated Backs, we shall not be as much Impressed 
by the brilliancy and strength of their strokes, as 
bv the extraordinary accuracy with which they place 
the ball so that their own side can get It. Although 
we may often hear remarks about the bad luck of 
a back-hander hitting a pony, the accident In many 
cases is due to the faulty play of the man who hit 
It. In attack the Back should let the No. i get 
close to him, though not so close as to run the risk of 
having his back-hander stopped by the pony. Having 
got the No. I well on the gallop, he can back-hand the 
ball, turn round sharply and have him off-side. It is 
not a bad plan when near the adversaries' goal for No. 
3, particularly if he has confidence In the Back, to let 
No. 2 of the opposing side on to him also, and prepare 
to turn for the back-hander. Then If the Back is very 
nippy, and If he can get them both galloping, he can 
turn quickly, and may be able to dart in and put both 
No. I and No. 2 off-side, In which case there will for 
the moment be four against two. These tactics can 
of course be employed only when a side is attacking 
strongly. In defence no risks of this kind should 
be Incurred. 

The Back should be able to hit back-handers on the 
near side, which is not so easy to do as on the off, 
although It Is not difficult by diligent practice to 
acquire the desired ability. If No. i, who should 
always try to come up on the stick side, succeeds 



DUTIES OF BACK. 



59 



in getting level, the Back will have no option but 
to ride him away to the right, in which case he will 
come in on the ball at the last moment possible, 
in order to hit a back-hander on the near side 
(Fig. 13). Back has here the further advantage that 
he cannot have his stick crooked, as the ball is on the 
far side of his pony from his opponent. The Back 
requires very handy ponies in order to put, as 




Fig. 25. — Blue put off-side by six inches 
by Back (white). 

he should be always trying to do. No. i off-side 
(Fig. 25). The Back should always be on the move, 
popping here and there, and twisting and turning ; if 
he stands still he will be collared by the No. i and be 
unable to take any advantage of an opportunity when 
it presents itself 

From playing in second class polo or against inferior 
Nos. I, many Backs acquire the bad habit of slowing 
up to hit a back-hander. Although, when going slow, 



6o THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

a much stronger and more accurate stroke can be 
made ; the temptation, which I know is strong, should 
be avoided, because the practice of this habit will 
probably make a man miss when going fast. Mr. 
John Watson is the finest exponent I have seen 
of the art of defending goal by, to use his own 
expression, " playing close." When hard pressed 
near goal, he can, by a twist of his wrist, get the ball 
away at right angles, in front of the fore legs of the 
No. I's pony, towards the side of the ground, and 
can place it in such a position, that it will be almost 
impossible to hit a goal. Ten yards in a direction 
of this kind will probably be worth more than one 
hundred yards in front of goal. Finally, the best 
Back is he who has fewest goals hit against him. A 
Back who defends his goal consistently and well, will, 
off his own bat, win far more matches for his side than 
any other individual member of the team. He must 
always bear in mind that it is his duty to defend his 
goal, and to send the ball up to his Forwards, in such 
a manner that they may be able to hit it through their 
opponents' goal, and he must therefore try always to 
keep the ball in front of him. By this I mean, he 
must not dash in on the chance of hitting the ball, 
in which case he may find himself on the wrong side 
of the ball and unable to defend his goal. 

CAPTAINING A SIDE. 

For a Captain of a team to be successful, it is 
essential that his word should be absolute law. There 
should be no arguing or quarrelling in the game, even 
if he makes an error. A good deal of latitude as 
to speaking should be allowed in a match ; but no one 



CAPTAINING A SIDE. 6i 

should shout so as to interfere with the Captain's 
directions. Every member of a team should carefully 
listen for instructions, which, except those given 
by the Captain, may be restricted to, " Ride the man 
and leave the ball," " Backhander here," " Look out, 
Back," '' Leave it," " Take the ball," and a few more 
of the same sort. The phrases used cannot be too 
distinctly uttered, and should be free from all 
ambiguity. As an instance to the contrary, I may 
mention that when a man shouts " All right ! " 
probably meaning that he can get the ball himself, 
and wishes a comrade in front of him to leave it, 
the said comrade may not unlikely imagine that he 
himself is all rio-ht to o-q on and take the ball. 
Again, the shout " Ride him off" means either that 
the man is only to ride the opponent off, or that he is 
also to try and hit the ball. " Leave it " is the best 
expression for general use, as it is short, clear and 
emphatic. Every good player knows that, if he is 
told to ''leave it," his duty is to gallop on at once 
and ride the next man. Many opportunities are lost 
by a player leaving the ball and pulling to one side 
in order to allow the man to whom he leaves the 
ball to take it on past him. On the contrary, he 
should gallop on at once, so as to ride the next man 
off, and in this way to get to the ball before his 
opponent. 

A good Captain, by his energetic directions, by 
the force of his example, and, above all things, by his 
ability to play a losing game, wins many a match 
which has appeared impossible to retrieve. The best 
instance which I can give of such a leader is Mr. 
John Watson (Fig. 26), to whom we are indebted for 



62 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

the modern development of polo.. He has the rare 
gift of being able to animate the most moderate team 
with his own enthusiasm, and to make them play up, 
almost in spite of themselves. In addition to being 
one of the best players ever seen on a polo ground, 
he has the secret of making his team, no matter 
who they are, do their utmost from start to finish, 
and in this way he has pulled more matches out of 
the metaphorical fire than anyone else. He is a 
consummate master of the tactics of polo, and, in 
addition to being the best Captain of a side I have 
ever seen, is a w^onderful instructor to anyone with 
or against whom he plays. Moreover, he plays up 
just as hard and as keenly in an ordinary practice 
game, as in a tight match. 

UMPIRING. 

An Umpire must not only have the rules at his 
fingers' ends and be in constant practice, but must 
also have quickness of eye, decision of character, 
application to his work, confidence in the correct- 
ness of his own opinion, and determination enough 
to stick to it. He should ride a good polo pony, 
work hard, never for a moment take his eyes off 
the game, and give his decisions promptly and 
clearly. His verdict is final, and should be re- 
ceived in absolute silence, no matter what the 
opinion of the players may be. To question his 
decision, either openly or aside, is the height of bad 
form. Even if we think that he has made a mis- 
take, we should loyally keep that opinion to ourselves ; 
for we must give him the credit of doing his best, 
and must remember that the smartest of umpires 



UMPIRING. 65 

cannot always correctly decide a close thing. Indeed, 
in many cases of off-side, when the question is one 
only of inches, no one, except the Back and perhaps 
No. I, can tell who is right and who is wrong. Be- 
sides, infallibility cannot be expected from mortals. If 
umpires be not treated with consideration, and always 
given the credit of doing their best, it will become 
very difficult to find men who will accept the office ; 
in fact, as it is, we have very few really good ones. A 
new rule has been passed, that it is the umpire's 
business to stop the game without being appealed to, 
in case of any dangerous riding ; but it is by no 
means enforced often enough. Backs, especially, are 
often allowed to cross time after time with the utmost 
impunity. Many Backs continually cross in front 
of the opposing No. i to hit an ordinary back-hander 
instead of leaving the line of the ball clear, and taking 
it on the near side. 

Two umpires are necessary, as it is impossible 
for one man to cover the whole ground in a good 
match. The best way to divide the work of 
umpiring is to quarter the ground in the manner 
shown in Fig. 23. The umpires should keep to 
their own respective sides of the ground ; the one 
remaining more or less in quarter H B G F, the 
other in quarter E F K D, so that neither will go 
near the other's goal line. In this manner they can 
both obtain a good view of the game, and there 
will always be an umpire handy to give a reliable 
decision on a close point. If, on the contrary, 
the two umpires get down to one end of the ground, 
and the ball is kept travelling up and down, cases 
needing their decision may occur at points too 

5 



66 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

distant for them to accurately observe what happens ; 
for it is impossible for both of them to keep pace 
with the ball. 

In important matches a referee (see Hurlingham 
Rule, No 4) may be appointed ; but his services 
are really never required except to decide a knotty 
point upon which the umpires have disagreed. 

HITTING OUT FROM BETWEEN THE GOAL POSTS, IN 
CONSEQUENCE OF AN EXACTED PENALTY. 

When hitting out from between the goal posts, 
the hitting out side should arrange themselves to 
the best advantage, according to the direction in 
which the hitter out means to send the ball (Fig. 27). 

Either Back or No. 3 will hit out, and which ever 
of them makes the stroke, the other should follow 
him up, in case of a miss-hit. The striker should 
tell his No. r and No. 2 to which side he 
intends to hit the ball ; for he should never hit it 
down the centre of the ground. Nos. i and 2 should 
have their ponies well in hand, about ten yards 
behind the line, and should gallop up, when the 
striker starts to gallop at the ball, so as to pass the 
line at full speed a fraction of a second later than 
the ball is struck. The Captain of the side will 
make up his mind whether he hits the ball for No. i 
or No. 2 to follow. In Fig. 27, No. i is shown 
on the left, and No. 2 on the right ; but this entirely 
depends on the Captain's wishes. 

The attacking side should divide themselves, so 
that No. I and No. 2 are near the semi-circular line, 
and No. 3 and Back farther out in the centre. It 
is the duty of the opposing No. i to dash in and 



HITTING OUT. 



67 



prevent the striker from dribbling out, which is most 
important ; because the defending side may gallop 
out, if the ball is sent ever such a small distance 
over the line. No. i will place himself so as to be 



J- L 




Fig. 27. — Hitting out from between the goal posts. 

on the stick side of the hitter out, and then he 
will not cross him. He should adapt himself to 
circumstances, and must be very sharp at moving 
about, so as to frustrate the striker. He will 



68 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

generally be able to see in what direction his oppo- 
nent means to send the ball, as soon as he starts to 
hit it. Back and No. 3 will place themselves more 
or less as in Fig. 27, so as to be ready to go to 
either side. 

The defending team must be inside the parallel 
lines A C and B D, and must not advance over the 
back line till the ball has been hit. 

The attacking side are free to place themselves 
anywhere they like, except within the twenty-five yards 
semi-circle, until the ball has been hit. 

DANGERS OF POLO. 

The ordinary idea held by people who have 
only seen polo played, that it is a very dangerous 
amusement, is entirely wrong ; provided that the 
ponies are suitable, that the players adhere to the 
rules, and that they observe ordinary precautions for 
the safetv of others, as well as for themselves. 
There is very little danger in polo, no matter 
how hard the match, if the eight players are good 
horsemen, the ponies well trained, and the men 
play fair, which unfortunately they do not always do. 
Then it is that a strong, determined umpire, a man 
who is no respecter of persons, is required. I regret 
to say that the foulest riders are not always found 
among the worst players. The severe Indian penalty, 
namely, a free shot at goal at fifty yards' distance, 
would not be a bad addition to the Hurlingham rules. 
Well-known Indian players have told me this year, 
that the game, as played in England, is not nearly as 
fair a one as it is in India. I am inclined to agree 
with them. 



DANGERS OF POLO. 69 

The causes of the accidents which occur in polo 
may be summed up as follows : 

I. Faidty potties. — A polo pony should be under 
his rider's control, should be up to his rider's weight, 
should be thoroughly trained to the game, should 
have good shoulders, and should not be liable to 
cross his legs or speedy cut. Many ponies, however, 
are played in fast games before they know their 
work, and even before they are properly broken. 
Consequently they pull, get out of control, and will 
neither stop nor turn. The well-trained ones, on 
the contrary, will stop dead to avoid a collision, will 
turn, as the saying is, on a sixpenny-piece, and, like 
clever Irish hunters, will have a spare leg for every 
emergency. Besides, they will use their weight to 
such advantage that it will be exceedingly difficult 
to knock them over, even if they be charged almost 
at right angles. 

Some people aver that it is more dangerous to 
play on big ponies than on small ones. This, I 
think is wTong ; for apart from the question of 
hardness of ground (see following paragraph), we 
cannot get over the fact that falls from colliding and 
crossing are more frequent in India than in England. 
Besides, big ponies are stronger than little ones, 
bumps take less effect on them, they are up to more 
weight, and consequently they are less likely to fall. 
The old idea that big ponies cannot be made as 
handy as little ones has been entirely exploded. In 
fact many leading English players hardly ever ride a 
pony less than 14.2, and yet I have never seen 
handier ones in India than some of them. Still, I 
am prepared to admit that big ponies take more time 



70 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

and trouble to train, and are not so easy to ride as 
little ones. 

2. Hard gi^ound. — The danger from falls, which, 
with every precaution, will sometimes occur, is pro- 
portionate to the hardness of the ground, a fact 
which I think will account for the many sad acci- 
dents that have happened at Polo in India. Luckily 
in England, where the turf is comparatively soft, 
there have been few serious mishaps. There has 
never been a better regulation framed than the one 
which enacts that players in India must wear sun 
helmets. Considering the hardness of the ground 
in the East, players there should be particular to use 
only ponies which are perfectly trained, well up to 
the weight they have got to carry, and possessed of 
good shoulders and true front action. 

3. Dangerous and reckless riding. — For this there 
is no excuse, as the rule about crossing is so clear 
that its meaning cannot be misunderstood. Some 
men, who are generally the cause of these accidents, 
get so excited that, as soon as they start off gallop- 
ing, they lose their heads, and do not know what 
they are doing. Neither they nor bolting ponies 
should be allowed on a polo ground. 

The whole question of crossing (see No. 16 Hurl- 
ingham Rules) turns on the words : " at such a dis- 
tance that the said player shall not be compelled to 
check his pony to avoid a collision." This is a vast 
improvement on the old wording of the rule, under 
which a great deal of the game of bluff* was played. 
Now a smart umpire will give a cross if a man, from 
reasonable fear of collision, is obliged to check his 
pony ever so little. It must be borne in mind that 



DANGERS OF POLO. 71 

the faster the pace, the more dangerous will be a cross, 
and the more distance will have to be allowed. 

4. IVild Jiitting. — I regret to say that there have 
been lately one or two very serious accidents from 
blows of sticks. Players should be extremely careful 
about the manner in which they wave their sticks, 
and about hitting^ hard in a scrimmao-e. On such 
occasions, dribbling is much more effective, and 
obviates the risk of giving a fearful blow to a man 
on the face, possibly resulting in the loss of an eye, 
or other serious injury. Some men appear to make 
a practice of hitting as hard as they can in a scrim- 
mage, with total disregard of what may happen to com- 
rade or adversary ; and they finish every stroke right 
up in the air, whether or not there happens to be a 
man or pony within striking distance. Such wild, 
dangerous strikers are usually found among second 
or third class players. The umpire should certainly 
give a foul for any accident caused by such practices. 
Players as a rule are not half considerate enough 
about the legs of other people's ponies. 

No man should let drive recklessly, and hit as 
hard as he can, when there is another player in front 
of him. I know some players w^io are most 
dangerous, on account of acting in this manner. They 
seem to think that they may hit where they like, and 
that they are in no way to blame, if they knock a 
man off his pony by a blow on the head at 10 yards 
distance. 1 maintain that if they look where they are 
hitting, the risk of such an accident is reduced to a 
minimum. 

When riding along with an adversary on one's left, 
one is very apt to hit him in the face if one tries the 



72 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

stroke under one's pony's neck, especially with a 
whippy stick. If this occurs, a foul should always be 
given against the striker. 

5. Blows from a ball. — This cause of danger is 
not nearly so fruitful of accident as the other four, 
although the ball occasionally inflicts unpleasant blows. 
A player can obtain great protection from the New 
Polo Cap, which was invented by Mr. Gerald Hardy, 
and can be obtained from Mr. Walter Barnard, of 97, 
Jermyn Street, who has patented it. It should be 
used by every polo player. The Indian helmet is 
even better than the polo cap, as it affords more 
protection if a man falls on his head. As regards 
blows, the cap serves its purpose perfectly. 

CRUELTY IN POLO PLAYING. 

From time to time, ignorant people have talked a 
great deal of nonsense about the cruelty to ponies at 
polo. In well managed stables, there is no descrip- 
tion of horse w^hich has such a good time as a polo 
pony. He gets just enough work to keep him fit ; 
he is fed on the best ; if in tip-top condition, he is 
seldom much distressed by the severest of matches ; 
and he probably has six months' rest out of tw'elve. 
If my readers will compare his lot with that of a hunter 
which has to go through long hours of exposure, 
hunger and fatigue, with a heavy weight on his back, 
from early morning to late in the evening, in every 
description of bleak weather, they will I think admit 
that the pony has the best of it. I am certain that 
many ponies like the game ; in fact I have had 
several which always gave me the impression that 
they enjoyed it as much as I did. 



CRUELTY IN POLO PLAYING. 



73 



There is one way in which a pony can be tortured 
unmercifully, and his game of polo converted from an 
amusement into agony, and that is by his mouth being 
wrenched about with a severe bridle, by a heavy fisted 
rider. The cause which makes a large number of 
ponies pull is simply pain ; for the more they are hurt, 




Fig. 28. — India-rubber Pelham. 




^f r 




Fig. 29. — Ben Morgan bit. 



Fig. 30. — Kerro bridle. 



the more will they pull, until they are driven almost 
mad. Every polo player, if he cannot trust his groom 
to do it, should examine his pony's mouth after every 
game of polo, and should specially look at the bars of 
the mouth and under the root of the tongue. Any 
pony which bleeds at the mouth is wrongly bitted, and 



74 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Char II. 

under such circumstances, immediate steps should 
be taken to prevent a recurrence of this mishap. 
A new and easier bit should be tried, such as an 
India-rubber Pelham (Fig. 28), Ben Morgan (Fig. 29), 
Kerro bit (Fig. 30), or half-moon Pelham (Figs. 31 
and 32), or the bit may be wrapped round with sponge 
or wash-leather. No player should knowingly con- 
tinue to ride a pony which bleeds at the mouth. In 
most cases, the seat of the injury will be found on 
the bars of the lower jaw, just in front of the first 
back tooth. 

Many ponies which will pull desperately in severe 
bits, will play kindly in light ones. 

Men with loose seats should never use severe 
bridles at polo ; because they hang on to their horses' 
heads, and consequently have bad hands. Although 
the effects of sharp spurs, cutting whips and blows on 
the legs from sticks, are far less painful than those of 
severe bits, we should remember that ponies have 
feelings. Reckless hitting into a scrimmage, regard- 
less of ponies' legs, causes quite as much cruelty as 
sharp spurs, which are not allowed at polo. Also, a 
young player should carefully accustom himself not to 
hit his own ponys legs with stick or ball. 

As a good pony is worth a vast amount of trouble, 
the owner should consider his comfort in and out of 
the stable, and should see that he is sound and fit, and 
properly bitted and saddled, before playing him. The 
animal will then last for many years, and will become 
as fond of the game as his master. The long lease 
of playing life enjoyed by the majority of polo ponies, 
is one reason for the enormous prices fetched by first 
class ponies during late years. It is by no means 



FAIR PLAY. 



75 



uncommon for a pony of fifteen years of age to be 
playing as well as ever he did. Most ponies are not 
at their best until they are nine or ten. If a man 
buys a sound, good, six years old polo pony, he will 
in all probability get ten years' play out of him. Mr. 
Rawlinson's pony Redskin, which was registered at 
Hurlingham as an aged pony in 1881, was playing in 
1897, and was consequently at least 23 years of age 
at that time. 




QB2! '8! ..'4LJ5[_ 't>! J7iJBl W 'XLOllU'M 




Fie 



-Half-moon Pelham. 



Fig. 32. — Side view of half- 
moon Pelham (Fig. 31). 



FAIR PLAY. 



I have sometimes heard the question discussed, 
whether polo is a sport or a game. There is no 
doubt that it is a sporting game, and should there- 
fore be played in a sportsmanlike manner. Any- 
thing in the least unfair should be rigidly excluded. 

Such tactics as wasting time in hitting out from 
behind the line, when one goal ahead near the finish 
of a match, or in hitting the ball out at the side 
with the same object, is the very worst of form. 



76 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF POLO. [Chap. II. 

A deliberate foul, even to save a goal In a close 
match, because the umpire is not in a position to 
see, or because he is known to be inexperienced 
and may be bluffed with impunity, is utterly opposed 
to all the principles of fair play. Appeals for off- 
side or for a foul should not be made, unless the 
player is honestly of opinion that the appeal ought 
to be answered in his favour. 

There can be no greater feather in the cap of a 
team, than for the members of it to be able to sav 
that they have won a good cup, without having had 
a single foul given against them. 

For polo to be a good game, every player should 
try his hardest to win ; but nothing should ever 
be done contrary either to the spirit or letter of 
the Rules. There should be no quarrelling, no 
grumbling at the Umpire's decision, and none of 
the '' win, tie or wrangle " element. If played in 
this spirit, there is no game in the world like polo. 



77 



CHAPTER III. 

POLO APPLIANCES. 

Polo grounds — Goal posts — Sticks — Polo dress. 

POLO GROUNDS. 

A FULL-SIZED ground is 300 yards by 200 yards, but 
as a matter of fact, there are few full-sized grounds 
in England. A width of 150 yards on a boarded 
ground is big enough for any game, but a short 
ground spoils the game, and consequently no ground 
should be shorter than 275 yards. Boards, which 
generally vary from 9 to 11 inches in height, 
are a great advantage in making a game fast, 
by preventing a ball from going out of play. They 
save many hard hits, and many strokes which would 
cause the ball to just trickle over the line. Hitting 
round too much, because of the presence of the 
boards, is not advisable, and hitting for the rebound 
off the boards is nearly always bad play. The 
annoyance often experienced in an unboarded ground 
of having a good, hard, straight hit down the edge of 
the oTound from the side roll a few inches out of 
play, owing, very possibly, to some inequality on 
the surface, is saved by the boards. 

A good plan to prevent the ball hanging under the 
boards, is to raise the turf close to them two or three 



78 POLO APPLIANCES. [Chap. III. 

inches, and slope it inwards, so that if the ball touches 
them, no matter how gently, it will roll out again, and 
permit of a clear hit being obtained. 

Great pains should be taken with the turf, which, 
even if not very good at first, will improve in a few 
years to an extraordinary extent, if well manured 
in the winter. Old cattle straw manure is better than 
horse manure for ordinary soils ; but the best of 
all is bone dust, which, unfortunately, is expensive. 
A fair dressing of bone dust is 3 cwt. to the acre ; 
but for the encouragement of turf suitable for polo, 
we need not scruple to spend 5 cwt. on each acre. A 
similar quantity of basic slag, which is excellent for 
producing good turf, may be employed. 

If it is desired to improve an ordinary ground on 
which turf does not wear well, the following process 
may be carried out : Harrow and cross-harrow the 
ground at the end of August or early in September ; 
sow from i to i ^ bushel per acre of Sutton and Son's 
mixture of seeds for grasses for recreation grounds ; 
lightly bush-harrow the seeds in, and well roll down 
twice in different directions. A top-dressing in 
November will greatly help the seeds. Grass seeds 
may be sown at any time between the middle of 
March and the end of September ; but from the 
latter half of May to the beginning of August, dry 
or hot weather often proves destructive to the young 
plants. From the middle of March to the first week 
in May is the best time for spring sowing ; from 
the first week in August to the middle of September, 
for summer or autumn sowing. Should there be 
failure from any cause, more seed should be 
sown the following spring. The seed will probably 



GOAL POSTS. 79 

be more evenly distributed by two sowings than 
by one, however skilful and practised the sower 
may be ; and the second sowing should cross the 
first one at right angles. If it is desired to seed 
down fresh land, about four bushels per acre will be 
required. 

The best time for rolling is generally during the 
first week in March, after about two days of the 
east winds coming on top of the February rains, 
before the wind has had time to make the worm 
casts dusty. Ground should never be rolled when 
the worm casts would make a wet paste on the 
young grass blades, as that would weaken their 
growth. 

Water well laid on is a grand thing to keep a 
ground in good order, but its application in England 
is seldom possible ; for an enormous quantity is 
required to produce a marked effect. When a 
ground has been cut up by play, it should be care- 
fully trodden in before being rolled. Rolling will 
be useless unless the pieces of turf which have been 
cut out are first replaced. A ground which is well 
looked after will stand an extraordinary amount of 
play. 

GOAL POSTS. 

The best kind of goal posts are made of Willesden 
paper, and can be obtained from the Willesden Paper 
and Canvas Works, Willesden Junction, N.W., at 
a cost of ^4 for the set, with a few shillings extra for 
painting in any desired colours. They should be 
erected with a thin post of wood in the centre, and 
a socket of thin iron or zinc for the lower extremities 



So POLO APPLIANCES. [Chap. III. 

of the paper posts to slip into. They can then be 
easily put up or taken down as may be required, it 
broken, they can be repaired with a thin band of zuic 
at the break by any carpenter. Goal posts (Fig. 5) 




Fig- 33-— _ 

Rugby polo stick 

(Salter). 



Fig. 34-— . 
Stick with 4a head 
(Salter). 



thus looked after will last a long time. The advan- 
tages of these posts are immunity from danger to 
player or pony, in the event of colliding against them, 
and the fact that they can be readily seen, either by 
the umpire, when he tries to note on which side of 



STICKS. 8i 



the post the ball goes, or by the player, who has time 
only for a hurried glance before making a shot at 
goal. It is evident that thin wooden posts are 
difficult to see, and that thick ones are dangerous to 
knock up against. 



STICKS. 



A good stick is almost as necessary to the polo 
player as a good pony. As different players require 





^^3r^lJ5l ^01 71 '81 '9! IJO'lll'FirT 

Fig- 35-— Head of stick shown in Fig, 36.— Head of stick shown in 

Fig. 34- Fig. 33. 

different sorts of sticks, no hard and fast rules can be 
laid down as to their length, weight, and shape ; hence, 
each player must find out for himself what kind of 
stick suits him best (Figs. 31,, 34, ^5, 36 and 37). A 
m.an with a muscular arm and a strong wrist can 
obtain the advantage of using a stick with a heavy 
head ; and a man with a long arm can get increased 

6 



82 



POLO APPLIANCES. 



[Chap. III. 



command by using a short one. Also, the shorter 
the stick, the heavier can the head be made without 
altering the balance, and, consequently, the more 
driving power can be obtained. For every inch taken 
off the length of the stick, about half an ounce can be 
added to the weight of the head. 

Care must be taken that the weight of the head is 
proportionate to the strength of the stick. Although 
a certain amount of spring in the cane is necessary 
for the stick to drive well, very whippy sticks are 




Fig. 37. — Dififerent kinds of heads for polo sticks. 

dangerous, as they are apt to curl round and hit an 
opponent in the face, especially if the hit be made 
under the pony's neck. Above all things a stick 
must be well balanced. Fifty-two inches for a 14. i 
pony is a good average length, the limit being about 
two inches either way. The best plan for a 
beginner in search of a good stick is to make a 
collection of the different kinds of sticks which the 
best players of his acquaintance use, and having 
tried them, to find out what sort suits him best. 
He can then order his own sticks from the maker, 



STICKS. 83 

taking the greatest care that he obtains an exactly 
similar article. He need not think that a stick made 
by Salter, Holbrow, or Buchanan can be success- 
fully copied by the village carpenter. A tape loop on 
the handle, to put round the wrist, will often save 
a player from dropping a stick, which accident might 
cause the loss of a match. The loop should readily 
yield (which a strong leather one might not do) to a 
severe pull, so that there may be no risk of hurting 
the wrist, if, for instance, the head of the stick is 
caught in a pony's bridle, and the stick is thus 
violently pulled out of the hand. 

The Back as a rule requires a longer stick than a 
forward player ; because he has often to hit a back- 
hander at some distance from his pony. He also 
needs a stick with a light head, in order to be able to 
play close, and to put in a lot of wrist work when 
being hustled by an opponent. 

The shape of the head of the various sticks in 
ordinary use is shown in Fig. 2^1- The cigar-shaped 
head has somewhat gone out of fashion of late years, 
though a few of the best players still use it. It is, 
however, generally believed that a ball can be hit 
better with a square-headed stick out of heavy ground 
than with a round one. Cigar-shaped heads are 
greatly used in India, where the ground is hard and 
level. The handle of the stick should be oval, not 
round, so that it may not be liable to turn in the 
hand or slip, and in size it must fit the hand of the 
player. To still further prevent such an accident 
occurring, Mr. Salter has invented his *' India-rubber 
grip." Besides, a stick with an oval-shaped handle 
can always be held in the right position for the head 

6* 



84 POLO APPLIANCES. [Chap. III. 

to strike the ball without the player having to look 
at it. 

POLO DRESS. 

For the sake of spectators as well as players, 
it is very important that distinctive colours should be 
worn by opposing teams. The best plan, especially 
when the players are not well known to each other, is 
for one side to wear white, and the other some dark 
colour. Sashes are not distinctive enough, and are 
uncomfortable to wear, unless they fit well and are 
pinned under the left arm. I have found that the 
best thing for the dark side to put on is a linen or 
silk waistcoat of some dark colour. These waistcoats 
are light, do not impede one's movements in the 
slightest, and show, even the spectators, at a glance 
how the game is going. Decided colours, such as dark 
blue, bright red, and bright yellow, are better than 
light shades, which are not very different from white 
at a distance. 



85 



CHAPTER IV. 

CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 

The questions here are : what to buy, and how to 
buy. This problem is greatly simplified if money be 
no object. The best advice for an intending purchaser 
is for him to be always ready to buy a really first-class, 
trained pony. A small number of such animals come 
into the market every year ; but to get the real article, 
a man must be just as ready to buy in November or 
January, as in May or July. A first-class pony is of "^ 
more importance to an ambitious polo player than is a 
first-class hunter to a man who means riding in the 
first flight in the Shires; for many faults of mouth 
and manners may be overlooked in a brilliant cross- 
country horse, but not in a polo pony, which must be 
perfection itself in a game. For instance, a fine 
horseman on a puller which is able to gallop and jump, 
can get across Leicestershire with a fair amount of com- 
fort to himself and safety to others ; but a pony which 
pulls at polo, although it may do well enough in a slow 
game, is perfectly useless, even to the best of horse- 
men, in a first-class match. A single fault, such as 
being a slow starter, shying off the ball, refusing to 
try when alongside another pony, or a little want of 
pluck when facing a back-hander, or when jostling 



86 CHOOSING A POLO PONY. [Chap. IV. 

another pony, immediately puts a polo pony out of 
the first class. Again, on a slow hunter, though per- 
fect jumper, a man who means going the shortest way 
to hounds can, five days out of six, see a lot of fun 
even in the grass counties ; but a slow pony is 
absolutely useless in a first-class polo match. As per- 
fection, without any credit being allowed for com- 
pensating merit, is demanded in a first-class polo pony, 
I do not think that men who have never played polo, 
and polo players who have never ridden a good pony, 
are justified in the remarks they often make about the 
— what they call — absurdly high prices some polo 
ponies fetch. A rich man who means to play polo 
should, however, keep his eyes open, and should never 
miss the chance of buying a pony of this class, if he 
hears of one for sale. He will be much mistaken if 
he thinks that he can provide himself at a moment's 
notice with a stud of first-class polo ponies at the 
commencement of the polo season. 

If a man cannot afford to play on the best of ponies, 
he can, however, get his fun on moderate ones ; but 
in that case must forego the pleasures of first-class 
matches. It is true to a certain extent that price pre- 
vents men playing polo, especially when good ponies 
are wanted all in a moment ; but the fact that training 
greatly enhances the value of a pony, enables many a 
man to play polo who could not otherwise do so. A 
fair player, who is also a fine horseman, need spend 
very little on his polo, if he looks about for likely 
young animals, and if he takes the time and trouble 
to train them when found. More and more good 
ponies are being bred every season, and the number 
of breeders is steadily increasing. Doubtless, the 



CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 



S7 



efforts of the Polo Pony Stud Book Society will 
have a good effect in this direction. As the method 
of training raw ponies is described in Chapter V., 
I will now pass on to discuss the kind of pony we 
ought to select. The recently made limit of 14.2 
answers admirably in England. Experience shows 
that, as a rule, the increase of strength, speed and 




Photo bv] 



[M. H. HAYES. 



Fig. 38.— Mr. W. J. Jones' "Luna." 



weight in ponies over 14.2 does not compensate for 
the loss of handiness, although it is undoubtedly 
possible to make some horses of 15 hands, and even 
more, perfectly handy for polo. Besides, as I have 
already said, it takes far longer to train the average 
big pony than the average small one. 

Not long ago, the Hurlingham Committee dis- 



88 CHOOSING A POLO PONY. [Chap. IV. 

covered that the old rule of challenging a pony by any 
playing member was a failure ; because ponies which 
were known to be over-height were constantly played, 
and there was not a single instance of a pony being 
challenged. The rule was therefore altered, and 
now all ponies which have not played in certain 
tournaments must be measured. During the last 
few seasons I have been fortunate to ride in many 
matches two wonderfully good big ponies, Luna 
(Fig. 38) and Matchbox (Fig. 39), which measured 
nearly 14.3, and were admitted under the rule of 
existing polo ponies. Both of these animals have 
won champion prizes as polo ponies. My experience 
on them compelled me to change my opinion as to the 
height I prefer for my own riding. They are both 
as handy as any 13.3 pony I have ever ridden. They 
are beautifully shaped, up to any weight, and fast. 
I therefore say that for a big man there is nothing like 
a good big pony. On the other hand, animals much 
above 14.2 would give a big man an undue advantage 
over light men on smaller mounts. It is a sound rule 
to strictly limit the height to 14.2, which is the best 
all-round compromise. I am here writing in general 
terms ; for I am well aware that many a 14-hand pony 
is really bigger and heavier than others of i/t.2 which 
attain this height, simply on account of their withers 
being unusually high. The ideal weight-carrying polo 
pony is the miniature 14-stone blood hunter, standing 
on short legs. Provided that he has shape, substance, 
power and scope, it does not matter much whether he 
measures 14. i or 14.2. 

The objection to 14 hands as a limit is not that 
ponies of that height are too small, but that they 



CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 



89 



are too difficult to get of suitable kind. English 
ponies which are fit for polo, have almost invariably at 
least one parent (generally the sire) a full-sized horse, 
and are consequently chance " gets " of a size much 
smaller than the average height of their respective 




Photo by'] 



[M. H. HAYES. 



Fig. 39. — Lieut. -Colonel Fenwick's "Matchbox. 



parents. They are seldom as small as 14 hands. 
Arabs, Syrians, and Egyptians, on the contrary, are a 
race of ponies whose average height may be put down 
at about 14.15^. Hence, a very much larger propor- 
tion of them than of English horses will be 14 hands 
and under. Also in America, owing to the severe 



90 CHOOSING A POLO PONY. [Chap. IV. 

climate, there are, I believe, many very good cow 
ponies not over 14 hands, although they may be at 
least three-quarters clean bred from English stock. 
In Ireland, which, according to my experience, is far 
the best country for ponies, the majority of those that 
are suitable for polo are by thorough-bred hunting sires 
out of well-bred hunting mares, or out of well-bred 
pony mares. The fact that they are ponies and not 
horses is generally due to their growth having been 
arrested by starvation, especially during the first 
winter, too early weaning, parental idiosyncrasy, or 
to their being first foals. Plenty of good 14.2 English 
ponies can be found, but only a few 14. i, and hardly 
any 14 hands. When speaking of English ponies, 
1 of course include Irish, Scotch, and Welsh ponies. 

If the would-be purchaser meets a likely unbroken 
pony, such as that in Fig. 40, I would advise him, 
unless he is anxious to try experiments, not to buy 
it until it is broken, so that he might feel how the 
animal would move under him. If, however, he is 
willing to take the chance of the pony turning out 
well, being probably stimulated thereto by the fact 
that unbroken ponies are cheaper than "made" ones, 
he should not conclude to purchase without looking 
into the pony's pedigree, and, if possible, seeing the 
dam. If she is well-bred and of the proper stamp for 
a polo pony, and if the sire is thorough-bred English 
or Arab, our friend will not do wrong to buy the 
youngster at a fair price ; but if the dam is a com- 
moner and the sire half-bred, he should have nothing 
to do with the pony, no matter how good-looking it 
may be. In fact, I would go further, and say that if 
either the sire or dam was under-bred, the pony would 



CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 



91 



in 



annovino- 



not be worth training, although I might be wrong 
a few exceptional cases. Nothing is more 
than to take a lot of trouble with a 
pony, and then find out that he is too slow for polo. 
Most of the failures which I have had with polo ponies, 
have been due to the fact of my not following out the 
rule which I here lay down. I have never found a 
pony too slow for polo if its pedigree was all right. 




Fig. 40. — Four-year-old Weight Carrier. 



The nearer thorough-bred, the better ; but a pony by 
a thorough-bred out of a dam by a thorough-bred will 
be quite good enough. Breeders in Ireland are very 
particular about pedigrees ; so it will not be difficult, 
if one buys straight from them, to verify the accuracy 
of the breeding. 

The great test by which to judge if a raw pony is 
likely to do well at polo, is the manner in which he 
moves when ridden. If he goes strong and well, 



92 CHOOSING A POLO PONY. [Chap. IV. 

has good shoulders and a nice mouth and manners, 
and is sound, there need not be much doubt about 
him. If he pulls or shows signs of bad temper, it will 
be long odds against him turning out satisfactorily, 
and he should therefore be avoided. 

The chief points of conformation to look for in a 
polo pony are : 

1. Good shoulders which will ride well, and which 
the pony can use with perfect freedom. The best 
way to judge if a polo pony or hunter has good 
shoulders is to gallop him down a sharp incline. If 
he gives us confidence when doing this, we may be 
certain there is nothing wrong with his shoulders. 
If, on the other hand, he travels down hill in stilty 
fashion, and gives us the impression that he may come 
down on his head at any moment, we may conclude 
that his shoulders are faulty, no matter how good they 
may look. We should never judge a pony's shoulders 
simply by their appearance. 

2. A fairly long neck properly set on. The pos- 
session of this desirable point reduces liability to pull. 
I have found that a short thick neck is one of the most 
fatal defects a polo pony can have ; for, as a rule, such 
a pony will be difficult to turn, and will have a bad 
mouth. 

3. A short strong back, with the best of loins, and 
plenty of depth in the middle of the back. The 
strength of the loins can best be judged by their 
width and flatness. Ponies long in the back are 
seldom able to turn quickly or to carry weight. 

4. Good hocks well let down right under him. 
Sickle hocks are no disadvantage, as they enable the 
pony to turn quickly. 



CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 93 

5. Not too heavy a body for his legs. 

6. The best of fore legs, with plenty of bone in 
proportion to the size of the body. The shorter the 
cannon bone is, the better. The fore legs should be 
straight from elbow to fetlock (that is to say, the pony 
should be neither " over" nor " back " at the knees) ; 
the back tendons should be as nearly as possible 
parallel to the cannon bone ; and the suspensory 
ligament should stand out in a sharply-defined manner 
between the cannon bone and back tendons. With 
these conditions, the thicker the cannon bone, sus- 
pensory ligament and back tendons are, the stronger 
will be the leg and the better able will it be to stand 
work. Any increased thickness due to injury will be 
accompanied in the case of the suspensory ligament, 
by the filling up, to a greater or less extent, of the 
spaces between it and the cannon bone and back 
tendons ; and in the case of the back tendons, by a 
more or less puffy condition of the part. The broader 
the fetlock is, compared to the width of the leg just 
below the knee, the less able will the animal be to 
stand fast work. We may see the correctness of this 
remark, if we compare the shape of the fore leg of a 
thorough-bred with that of a cart horse. 

7. Strong, w^ell-sloped pasterns, not too short. The 
shorter and more upright the pasterns are, the worse 
will the pony stand work on hard ground. 

8. The hoofs should be strong, the soles concave, 
and the frogs well developed. 

9. Plenty of quality, combined with substance. 

10. A good kind eye. A pony with a wild staring 
eye seldom makes a good polo pony. 

[The weight borne by the fore legs as compared to 



94 CHOOSING A POLO PONY. [Chap. IV. 

that sustained by the hind limbs, varies in proportion 
to the weight of the rider. Hence, a weight-carrier 
should be proportionately lighter in front than a light- 
weight pony, and on this account will require to have 
his shoulders particularly well sloped, which is a point 
of conformation that will give his back the appearance 
of being very short. For the same reason, he should 
have a comparatively light head and neck. As the 
weight on the fore legs also varies according as the 
height at the withers is greater than that at the croup, 
a pony which has to carry a heavy man should not be 
low in front. This reasoning is supported by the 
fact that the height at the withers as compared to that 
at the croup, is greater in steeplechase horses, and 
especially in hunters, than in racehorses. — Editor^ 

There are two distinct types of weight-carrying polo 
ponies, namely, the miniature 14-stone blood hunter, 
such as Sunshine (Fig. 41), Luna (Fig. 'i^'^ ), Matchbox 
(Fig. 39), Siren (Fig. 42), Charlton (Fig. 43) and 
Mademoiselle (Fig. 44) ; and the miniature weight- 
carrying steeplechaser, such as Dynamite (Fig. 45), 
Little Fairy (Fig. 46), the Californian pony Rex 
(Fig. 47) and Conceit (Fig. 48), all of which are 
up to 14 stone. All these ponies are superlatively 
good ; but as there are ten good ones of the former 
type, to every one of the latter, I strongly recommend 
an intending purchaser to keep the former in his 
mind's eye as his idea of perfection. 

The three following types of handsome ponies 
should be avoided : — 

The first type is very beautiful, but is more suitable 
for hacking than polo, as he is a thorough-bred weed, 
long in the leg, light of bone, narrow between the rider's 




Pholo b>i] _ [M. H. HAYES. 

Fig. 41. — Mr. W. S. Buckmaster on "Sunshine." 




Photo b>j] 



Fig. 42. — "Siren." 



[M. H. Hayes. 




Fig- 43- — The late Mr. W. J. Drybrough on " Charlton." 




Photo l»j] [F. Babbage. 

Fig. 44. — Comte J. de Madre's "Mademoiselle." 



<i I 




Photo bi/] 



Fig. 45. — Mr. J- Peat's "Dynamite, 



[M. H. Have 




Photo bijl 



Fig. 46.— Mr. Walter Jones' "Little Fairy." 



[M. H. Hayes. 



r* 



CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 



lOI 



legs, and deficient of weight and substance (Fig. 49). 
We see this type, but of larger size, on every race- 
course, and many of this kind are bred which are not 
big enough for racing. They are seldom fit for polo, 
because, even if they play well, which they rarely do, 
they are usually not placid enough, and are too light 





dfl^^ '^^HMk^^Hp 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




SSXU^/TBisn's. 


^ -.. ■ , ' 1- • A (-•- •,', _i — i_^_ 



Photo bii] 



Fig. 47.— Mr. F. J. Mackey's "Rex.^ 



[M. H. Hayes. 



to hold their own among the heavy ponies they will 
have to meet. 

The second type is the long-striding, awkward, but 
generally well-bred galloping pony which gives a rider 
who mounts him for the first time the impression that 
the animal requires a forty-acre field to turn in. Even 
if trained to stop and turn, he takes too much out of 
himself when performing these movements, and will 



I02 CHOOSING A POLO PONY. [Chap. IV. 

very rarely become a quick and handy polo pony. He 
is of the horse, and not of the pony type. Even if 
his shape and make is all that is required, a good 
judge will find out his defects the moment he 
rides him. 

The third type is the good-looking coachy pony with 
shoulders which we do not discover to be more suitable 
for the collar than the saddle, until we sit over them. 
I know many such ponies, and have seen some of them 
honoured in the show ring by judges who did not ride 
them. Such ponies are seldom sufficiently fast for 
polo, and even if they have the requisite speed, their 
conformation prevents them turning quickly enough. 

We should bear in mind that substance and w^eight- 
carrying power are essential in a first-class polo pony, 
even for a light man. Weight and strength are 
required to withstand the knocking about and riding 
off by heavy men on heavy ponies. Although a 
light weight may hunt brilliantly on light-weight 
horses, he must have ponies with strength and sub- 
stance if he wants to take his place in good polo. 

The defect which should above all be avoided in a 
polo pony, is the possession of a bad or impetuous 
temper ; because an animal w^hich has this defect 
hardly ever turns out satisfactorily, and is therefore 
not worth the trouble of training. Although it is fre- 
quently impossible to be certain that a pony has this 
vice before feeding him well on corn, we may often 
get a reliable intimation of it, in the first instance, 
by the appearance of the animal's eye, which is his 
most tell-tale feature. When buying a trained polo 
pony or one which has done other kinds of work, the 
intending purchaser will do well to carefully examine 




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CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 



105 



the animal's mouth and lower jaw, in order to find 
marks of old scars on the chin-groove or bruises or 
sores on the corners of the lips, bars of the mouth and 
under the tongue, all of which are generally sure signs 
of pulling, and should therefore be regarded with the 
greatest suspicion. 

Good action is most important, because it means 




Fig. 49. — The wrong type of thoroughbred pony. 



speed and weight-carrying power, and is obtained 
when the movement in all paces is true, straight and 
not too high. We should never buy a pony which 
turns its toes out ; because this defect will probably 
give rise to brushing, and will more or less detract 
from the animal's weight-carrying power. A pony 
that steps high can seldom gallop. A quick striding 



io5 CHOOSING A POLO PONY. [Chap. IV. 

galloper generally makes a better polo pony than one 
which goes in racehorse style ; because he is quicker at 
starting and turning. Many long striding thoroughbreds, 
however, soon learn to shorten their stride as occasion 
may demand, and thus adapt themselves to the game. 

Of course, the purchaser must be. guided by his own 
requirements. If he is buying several for himself, he 
should try to get them as much as possible of the 
same height and character. 

As a rule, suitable foreigners (see Chapter VIII.) are 
not difficult to buy, and are comparatively easy to train. 

The would-be purchaser may also buy well-known 
ponies at Tattersall's. There is no place like an 
auction for a pony to fetch its real value, although 
fancy prices are sometimes given, when more than one 
man is anxious to get the same animal. Polo ponies, 
if properly advertised, will almost invariably fetch their 
full value at Tattersall's in the months of March, 
April, May, June and July. The fact that many 
terrible brutes are sold by auction during the summer, 
under the description of ''good polo ponies," should 
make us very careful, before bidding, to find out all we 
can about the animal which we are thinking of buying. 

The guarantee at Albert Gate is that "a good polo 
pony must be sound in wind and eyes, quiet to ride, 
go to a ball, and be capable of being played." This is 
a great protection to purchasers. To be on the safe 
side, a man should never buy a pony which has been 
trained and played, unless he can trust the seller to 
tell him the truth, or unless he knows all about the 
pony himself or through a friend. Personal trial, if 
possible, in a game is of course the best means of 
finding out the animal's merits and defects ; for what 



CHOOSING A POLO PONY. 107 

will suit one man will not always suit another, and 
even with the best intentions, the seller or friend may 
recommend an entirely unsuitable pony. Besides, it 
the purchaser, after having tried the pony, finds that 
he has made a mistake, he will have no one but himself 
to blame. 

A great many good ponies are missed owing to 
veterinary certificates. By all means I would advise 
that a pony should be examined, particularly for its 
eyes ; but after that ordeal . has been gone through, 
the intending purchaser should personally consult his 
veterinary surgeon, and then act on his own judgment 
in the event of an absolutely sound certificate not 
having been given ; for he must remember that the 
veterinary surgeon must state everything that is 
amiss, and that technical unsoundnesses, which do not 
materially affect the animal's working capabilities, may 
be passed over in the polo pony. Very few ponies 
which have been played for two or three reasons 
would pass a veterinary examination, although, for all 
practical purposes, they might be as sound as a bell. 
In May, 1893, I sold at Tattersall's, for an aggregate 
price of 450 guineas, two ponies which were examined 
by several veterinary surgeons, according to some of 
whose certificates there was hardly one sound leg 
between the two ponies, and yet both of them 
have played for many years without going lame. 

It must be remembered that polo ponies have to 
gallop only for ten minutes on end, and are not sub- 
jected to nearly so much strain and fatigue as hunters. 
An animal which would be considered an absolute 
screw as a hunter, might play polo for years without 
going wrong. 



io8 



CHAPTER V. 

TRAINING THE POLO PONY. 

General remarks — Long rein driving— Turning — Reining back — To stop dead — 
To start into the gallop from the halt — To turn right about or left about at 
the canter or gallop — To change legs before and behind at the canter or 
gallop — Figure of 8 — To go with a loose rein in all paces — -To meet other 
ponies — To hustle other ponies — Breaking the pony to stick and ball. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

I PROPOSE in this chapter to describe a pony's educa- 
tion, from the time he is taken up from grass, until 
he is fit to take his part in a good polo match. 

It is advisable as a rule to break ponies to ride at the 
age of three years ; to have them quietly ridden about 
for from three to six months ; and then to turn them 
out till the autumn of their fourth year. At that time 
their education will have to be begun over again, and 
they should be carefully trained for at least six months, 
in order to make them fit to play hard polo at the com- 
mencement of their five-year-old season. In Ireland, 
many men play four-year-olds, but I do not think it is 
generally good policy to put them into fast matches at 
such an early age. Having a large number of ponies, 
I do not break my young ones until the autumn of 
their fourth year, so as to save the trouble and ex- 
pense of doing the work twice over ; but all the same, 
I think it is a great advantage to break ponies to ride 



GENERAL REMARKS. 109 

at the age of three ; because the younger they are 
taken in hand, the more tractable will they become. 

It is best to start with an unbroken animal in an 
enclosed space ; a riding school for choice. If a school 
be not available, a walled-in enclosure, such as a cattle 
yard, or any place from which a pony can neither see 
the ground outside, nor jump out of, will do. 

To begin with, put a plain snaffle in the animal's 
mouth, buckle on a roller or old saddle, lead him 
quietly about, get him accustomed to be petted and 
handled, and in a couple of days he will probably let 
himself be led without any trouble. On the third or 
fourth day a sack of earth may be strapped on the 
saddle, and the rope twitch can be applied, if the pony 
plays up. 

The method of using this twitch is to jerk it and at 
the same moment shout " steady ! " in a reproving tone 
of voice, which the pony will mentally connect with the 
painful jerk, and in nine cases out of ten he will 
become immediately cowed. This is the best twitch 
I know ; because it does not hurt the animal except 
at the moment of the application of the jerk, the 
severity of the punishment can be regulated with 
exactness, and the pony can be taught to obey the 
voice. When the pony has become quiet with the 
twitch, the sack may be taken off and a man put on 
his back. At first it is best to use a saddle without 
stirrups, and give the man a leg up. In a couple of 
days it will be found that the pony is quiet to ride inside 
the enclosure, and he may then be taken outside on a 
leading rein, and exercised either by leading or 
lungeing him. In a fortnight he should be fit to go by 
himself on quiet country roads. 



no 



TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 



Keeping in view the sound principle that the educa- 
tion of a polo pony should be progressive, we may 
divide it into the following stages : — 

1. Making him quiet to ride. 

2. Mouthing him. 

3. Making him handy in his slow paces. 

4. Making him handy in his quick paces. 



j_ . 



Photo bii] 



Fig. 50.— Circling with long reins. 



[M. H. Hayes. 



5. Breaking him to stick and ball. 

6. Teaching him polo. 

By the statement that each step should be pro- 
gressive, I mean that we should pay particular 
attention to each lesson, so as to thoroughly prepare 
him for the next one. A good horseman w^ill of 
course start making the pony's mouth from the time 
he first gets on his back, and ponies may be broken 
to stick and ball at a walk, as soon as they are quiet 
to ride, and while they are still low in condition. 



LONG REIN DRIVING. 



1 1 1 



LONG REIN DRIVING. 

The quickest method of making a pony handy, is 
with the "long reins" (Figs. 50 and 51). A perfect 
horseman may dispense with their use ; but I woukl 
recommend a few lessons with them in all cases. If 
the long reins, which are about twenty-two feet in 
length and are attached to the rings of the snaffle, are 




Photo l>if\ 



Fig. 51. — Circling with long reins. 



[M. H. Haye= 



used three or four times on a pony which has never 
been ridden, it is long odds that by the end of that 
time he will be so quiet and tractable that he may be 
ridden without any risk. Their use, and that of the 
rope twitch, are fully described in I litest rated Horse- 
Bj^eaking. 

Our object with the long reins is to make the pony 
handy, and to prepare him to obey the indications of 
rein and leg. By this method of mouthing, we are 



112 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

able to teach a pony to answer a feeling of either rein 
with his hind-quarters, as well as w^th his head and 
neck, so that w^e can get him to turn ''all in one piece," 
by the reins alone. We all know^ that when a badly 
broken horse "runs out" at a fence, the fact of the 
rider being able to pull his head round towards the 
obstacle, will have little or no effect in straightening 
him, unless he is made at the same time to bring his 
hind-quarters round, w^hich is a difficulty that is readily 
overcome by the long-rein method. For instance, if 
the breaker who is in a position similar to that of the 
man in Fig. 50, wishes to turn his pony to the right, 
he will take a long step forward with the right foot ; 
will slide the right hand forward on the off rein, while 
holding both reins in the left hand ; and will take a 
steady pull of the off rein with the right hand, by 
which means the animal's head will be drawn round 
to the right and his hind-quarters w^ill be pushed over 
to the left, by the pressure of the rein on them. As 
soon as the turn has been completed, the breaker w^ill 
check the further revolution of the hind quarters by 
feeling the left rein, which will then act in a manner 
similar to that of the drawn-back outward leg of a 
skilful horseman. To obtain a good result with the 
long reins, it is of course necessary that the employer 
of this method should thoroughly understand its 
principles and practice, which he can do only by 
intelligent and assiduous study, and which will be 
greatly facilitated by competent instruction. 

One of the most important lessons to teach a pony 
is to make him rein back collectedly, which can be 
done more easily with long reins, than by any other 
system. If the pupil fights against this movement, 



LONG REIN DRIVING. 113 

I would recommend the breaker to get an assistant to 
stand in front of the pony with a long cane in his 
hand, and, as the pressure of the reins is applied, to 
wave the stick slowly in front of the animal's face, and 
to keep repeating in a drawling tone of voice, the 
word "back!" If the pony continues to fight, the 
reins may be buckled to the nose-band, so as not to 
hurt the mouth, and the assistant may tap the legs of 
the pony alternately before and behind, taking care to 
select the leg which should be the next to move. 

When the pony is quiet at a walk on both circles, 
will turn both ways, and rein back at word of 
command, an assistant may mount him, and the 
breaker may continue to circle, turn and rein him 
back as before, by means of the long reins. 

The pony may now be taught to strike off into the 
canter in circles of gradually decreasing size, until he 
is rendered sufficiently handy and collected. Can- 
tering a pony in small circles, whether with the long- 
reins or mounted, is an admirable practice for calming 
down excitable animals, and for teaching awkward 
ones to go collectedly. We must not consider our 
pupil perfect with the long reins, until we can make 
him change from one circle to the other, whether the 
outward rein be round the quarter, as in Fig. 50, or 
only on the pad, as in Fig. 51. We do this by slack- 
ening out the outer rein, and pulling on the inner one, 
after having first shortened it. 

It must be borne in mind that in all breaking, the 
voice is of great use, and that ponies soon learn to 
know and obey these three simple words of command : 
"whoa !" "back!" "hup!" 

The word "whoa!" should be pronounced sharply 

8 



114 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

and loudly, and followed by a feeling on both reins, 
which should not be done before the word is finished, 
so as to give the pony a chance of stopping of his own 
accord, a thing that he will as a rule very quickly learn 
to do. 

The word "back" is used only for reining back, and 
should be pronounced slowly in a drawling tone of 
voice, while at the same time the pony's mouth should 
be felt with both reins. 

"Hup! "should be used in a loud cheery tone, in 
order to make a pony start into a gallop from the 
rein back, halt, walk, or trot. At the same time, the 
rider should use the pressure of both legs. 

These three are the most important words of 
command, although others may be employed with 
advantage. The same tone of voice should be used 
for each respective word. 

We need only see old troop horses at work in a 
riding school, to recognise the fact that they know 
several words of command. 

After a month or so of the practice I have described, 
we may take for granted that the pony is quiet to ride, 
and that his polo education may commence. 

The pony may now be worked daily for about an 
hour and a half, and should not be given more than 
about 5 lbs. or 6 lbs. of corn, but he may have as 
much hay as he likes to eat. Although under- 
feeding does not pay, it is not advisable to 
give ponies in training much corn. The pony's 
education will be greatly simplified by having a 
riding school, which, however, is not essential, 
because all the exercises I shall describe can be done 
in the open, or between unjumpable fences in a field. 



LONG REIN DRIVING. 



115 



It is so very much easier to control a horse in an 
enclosed space than in the open, that I would re- 
commend any one who trains many young animals and 
has not a riding school, to rail off in the corner of a 
field a rectangular space about thirty-six yards by 
twelve yards, in which to teach them to turn, stop, and 




Fig. 52. — Standing Martingale on nose-band. 



canter in small circles ; but the enclosing fences must 
be unjumpable and solid. 

The programme for the first week may be a lesson 
in the riding school for half an hour, and riding about 
the roads at a walk for an hour. 

8* 



ii6 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

TURNING. 

The first object to aim at is to make the pupil obey 
the rein and leg ; to turn to the right or left ; and to 
rein back collectedly. To begin with, I would recom- 
mend a plain smooth jointed snaffle, and a long- 
standing martingale on the nose-band (Fig. 52). 

It must be remembered that horses turn in three 
different ways. 

1. On the forehand. 

2. On the centre. 

3. On the hocks. 

When a pony, which is going fast, turns to the right 
on his forehand, his hind-quarters will have a strong 
inclination to turn out to the left ; and vice versa. The 
result of this will be that he will not be firm on his 
legs, and through not being collected, will very likely 
slip up and fall. Many ponies turn well on the centre, 
but when turning in this manner, it can easily be 
understood that, if turning to the right, the fore legs 
must come towards the right, and the hind legs go 
towards the left, and vice versa if turning to the 
left ; thus there is no fixed pivot on which to turn. 
But in turning on the hocks, the weight of the pony 
and that of the rider is thrown back on to the hocks, 
and a fixed pivot is made by the inward hind leg. 
This enables a pony to turn in the smallest possible 
space without going on the circle at all, and has the 
double advantage of saving time in the turn and of 
gaining firmness on the legs. 

From the above it may be assumed that a polo 
pony should never turn on his forehand ; that when 
turning on a circle, no matter how small, he should turn 
collectedly on his centre ; and that when it is desired to 



TURNING. 117 

turn really quickly, and to go in the opposite direction, 
the pony must be stopped dead, swung round on his 
hocks and started again at full gallop from the halt. 
It must be remembered that to turn on the hocks, a 
halt must be made, if only for the fraction of a second. 

To turn to the right, take the reins in both hands, 
gently feel the right rein, press the left rein on the 
side of the neck, and apply the drawn back left leg 
behind the girth. For the left turn, the reversed aids 
are to be applied. 

By making the pony describe circles gradually 
decreasing in size, we may get him to turn on his 
centre. We may then take the reins in the left hand, 
and make him go through the same movements by 
simply pressing the right rein on the right side of the 
neck, if we wish him to turn to the left ; and the left 
rein on the left side of the neck, if we wish him to 
turn to the right. At first, the drawn-back outward 
leg should be applied as before described ; but this 
pressure may be gradually withdrawn, according as the 
pony learns to turn in equally good form, by the simple 
pressure of the rein on the neck, which is technically 
called " the weight of the rein on the neck." 

The right leg is '' the outward leg " in the turn or 
circle to the left ; and the " inw^ard leg" in a turn or 
circle to the right. 

The object of the pressure of the outward leg in 
turning or circling, is to prevent the animal's hind 
quarters swinging round, which they are inclined to do, 
owing to the fact that the fore legs bear more weight 
than the hind ones, especially at fast paces — another 
reason why ponies are apt to turn on the forehand 
instead of on the hocks. 



ii8 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 



REINING BACK. 

The rider should lean forward, in order to lighten 
the hind quarters ; and should gently feel the 
reins alternately, according to the fore foot which is 
in advance. For instance, if the off fore is farther 
in front than the near fore, the right rein should 
be felt ; and vice Versa, At the same time, the leg of 
the side opposite to that of the rein should be drawn 
back and applied ; the hands should be kept low on 
each side of the withers; and the word "back" 
should be used in a drawling monotonous tone of 
voice. Too much should not be tried at once ; for 
it sometimes takes several days to make a pony rein 
back even a couple of yards. As soon as an animal 
goes back kindly, he will as a rule give no further 
trouble. 

I do not believe in any pony being first-class at 
polo, if he w^ill not rein back, which is a practice that 
balances ponies to an extraordinary extent. It teaches 
them to use their hocks, to turn on them, and to stop 
more quickly at fast paces, than they would otherwise 
be able to do. 

To make our pupil a perfect polo pony, we must try 
to teach him all the following evolutions, especially the 
first two, because a pony cannot be good unless he 
will quickly start and stop. Most polo players turn 
their ponies to the right-about or left-about on a more 
or less big circle ; whereas a first-class player stops his 
pony, turns him round on his hocks, gallops back 
on his own track, and thus takes the lead of an 
antagonist who turns on a circle. 



TO START INTO THE GALLOP. 119 



TO STOP DEAD. 

Shout "whoa!" in a loud sharp voice; close both 
legs ; feel both reins ; and throw the weight of the 
body back. The reins should not be tightened till 
the word has been shouted, so as to give the pony the 
chance of stopping of his own accord at the word of 
command. 

TO START INTO THE GALLOP FROM THE HALT. 

As a preliminary to this lesson, it is best to begin by 
teaching the pony to break into a canter from the trot, 
then from the walk, and finally from the halt. When 
he has learnt, on receiving the order " whoa! " to stop 
collectedly at the end of a small canter, we may 
quicken the pace, and by using the same aids, teach 
him to gallop instead of canter from the halt. 
Suppose we wish him to strike off from the trot into 
the canter with the off fore leading, we may begin by 
trotting him on a circle to the right, with the reins 
loose. When we wish him to perform the desired 
change of pace, we should (i) sit down in the saddle ; 
(2) turn his head slightly to the left ; (3) feel both 
reins ; (4) lean a little back and to the right ; and (5) 
apply the drawn-back left heel (more or less sharply, 
as may be required) and shout " hup! ". the moment 
he places the near fore on the ground, because at that 
instant the near hind is in the act of being brought 
forward, and a touch of the heel and the sound of the 
rider's voice will tend to quicken its advance, so that it 
may come down before the off fore, and immediately 
after the near fore and off hind are raised. W^ith the 



I20 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

near hind foot on the ground and under the body, and 
the other three feet off the ground, all four legs will be 
in the correct order of movement for the canter. As 
soon as he is in the canter, we should let the reins 
loose. When the pony has learned to answer these 
aids accurately and promptly, the reversed aids can be 
employed to get him to strike off into a canter, with 
the near fore leading, when trotting on a circle to the 
left. As soon as he has attained proficiency in this, 
we may make him change from the trot into the canter, 
with whichever fore leg we wish, when going in a 
straight direction. And then we can teach him to 
change from the walk into the canter, in the same way 
as before, except that the indications of heel and voice 
should be given at the moment the near fore is being 
extended to the front, if we wish him to lead with the 
off fore and off hind ; and vice versa. When he can 
do all these movements properly, we may teach him to 
start into the canter from the halt, and finally convert 
the canter into the gallop, by practice. 

TO TURN RIGHT ABOUT OR LEFT ABOUT AT THE CANTER 

OR GALLOP. 

To turn to the right about, begin with both hands 
on the reins and apply the aids for stopping the pony 
dead. Separate the hands and feel the right rein, by 
drawing the right hand back to the right knee ; press 
the left rein against the left side of the pony's neck ; 
strongly apply the drawn-back left heel, so as to make 
him swing round on his hocks and be ready to strike 
off with his hind legs well under him ; bring the weight 
of the body back and to the off side, in order to fix 



TO CHANGE LEGS. 121 

the off hind leg, which should be his pivot ; and start 
him off as before described. To turn to the left about, 
the reversed aids are applied. 

Turning to the right about at one end of a riding 
school, and to the left about at the other end, while 
keeping as close as possible to one of the long sides 
of the school, makes an elongated figure of 8. By 
turning the pony towards the side of the school, 
it will be found that he can be made to go right and 
left about with very little trouble, as he will not 
like to run his head against the boards. When 
he makes these turns well, he should be taught to do 
them, by simply pressing the rein on the neck, with- 
out applying the outward leg ; and the reins can 
be held in one hand. In doing this figure of 8, great 
attention should be paid to make the pony come round 
with the inward hind as well as the inward fore leg- 
leading. He should change his legs at the moment of 
the turn about, and he can be made to do this by a 
sharp kick of the drawn-back outward heel. 

TO CHANGE LEGS BEFORE AND BEHIND AT THE CANTER 

OR GALLOP. 

This can be taught in the same way as the last 
exercise ; in fact, the aids are the same as those for 
turning. The canter and gallop differ from the other 
paces, by the fact that the leading fore leg, during 
each stride, is extended much more to the front than 
the non-leading one ; and consequently it is impossible 
for a pony to cross his leading fore with the non- 
leading one. Also, it stands to reason that one or both 
inward legs should be the pivot on which he should 



122 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

turn, circle, and change direction. If he makes any of 
these movements with the outward fore leg leading, 
he will be liable not only to cross his legs, but also to 
overbalance himself, especially on slippery ground, in 
either of which cases a fall will be the probable result. 
In fact, more falls occur at polo by ponies thus " going 
false," than from any other cause. The change in 
question is made by the hind legs as well as the fore 
ones. Therefore, when a pony is leading with the 
right fore, he should change all four legs the instant 
he is circled or even slightly turned to the left ; and 
vice versa. Practice at the figure of 8 is the best 
means for teaching him to make these indispensable 
changes. 

FIGURE OF 8. 

As I have already explained how to make a pony 
lead off with either fore leg, we will suppose that he is 
started leading with the off fore and off hind on the 
right circle. He will remain on the right circle until 
he completes it, when a change is made by collecting 
him with both reins, applying a strong pressure of 
the drawn-back right heel behind the girth, pressing 
the right rein on the right side of the neck, and 
throwing the weight of the body to the left, in which 
direction the pony will now proceed, and will form 
the other loop of the figure of 8 by circling to the 
left. The next change is made at the same place 
by reversing the aids. If he will not change, we 
may pull him back into a trot, and make the change 
in one of the corners, by starting him into the canter at 
that spot. 

In doing the figure of 8 with a young pony, it will 



TO MEET OTHER PONIES. 123 

be advisable to canter him in several circles at one 
end of the school, before making him change, as before 
explained ; and when the change has been made, to 
give him several circles on the other rein at the other 
end of the school, before changing him back to the 
original rein. Before trying the figure of 8, a pony 
should be well practised in cantering round the school, 
so that he may get accustomed to lead with the correct 
leg. Ponies very soon learn to lead with the inward leg- 
when going round the school ; because they find that 
they can turn much more easily on it than on the out- 
ward leg. If a pony is leading falsely when going 
along the side of the school, a corner will be the easiest 
spot at which to make the correction. 

TO GO WITH A LOOSE REIN IN ALL PACES. 

I cannot give much advice on this point, beyond 
recommending the rider to accustom the pupil at first 
to walk about with the reins hanging loosely. The 
pony then be gently trotted, and the pace gradually 
increased, so that he may understand that he has to go 
at any pace with the reins loose ; and that when they 
are tightened, he has to reduce his pace proportion- 
ately to the tension exerted by them on the mouth- 
piece of the bit. 

TO MEET OTHER PONIES. 

This may be easily taught by riding the pony to- 
wards two others coming in an opposite direction, and 
passing between them. We should begin at a walk, 
and gradually increase the pace, until the pupil will go 
through the narrowest practicable opening at full pace 



124 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

without flinching. When he is perfect at stick and ball, 
he should be taught to face other ponies whose riders 
are waving sticks in his face. 



TO HUSTLE OTHER PONIES. 

This can be taught in a field, simply by making the 
pony push against another one, at first at a walk, and 
gradually increasing the pace, until he will do it at full 
gallop, when he is at a disadvantage (i.e., when the 
other pony's head is in front of his) ; when he has the 
advantage ; and when the two ponies are level. 

If what I have written on riding school work is too 
technical for an ordinary beginner who has never been 
within the walls of a ^nanige, I would advise him to go 
through two or three times the instructions I have laid 
down, so as to get a general idea of the figures, and if 
no riding school is available, to take his pony into some 
rectangular place, enclosed by mud walls, if in India, 
or by fences, if in England, and devote himself to 
teaching his pony to stop dead at the word " whoa ! " 
shouted very loudly ; to start at a gallop at the word 
" hup ! " ; to turn quickly both ways at any pace ; and 
to turn right and left about, while riding all the time 
with a loose rein. 

The aids for turning may be briefly summed up as 
follows : To turn to the right, apply a strong pressure 
of the drawn-back left leg, feel the right rein, press the 
left rein against the side of the neck, and shift the 
weight of the body to the right. To turn to the left 
the aids are reversed. Ponies soon learn what these 
aids mean, and will then readily obey them. By 
carrying out these elementary instructions, the beginner 



BREAKING THE^PONY.i, 125 

will find that although he may not ride in artistic riding 
school fashion, his pony will become a more handy and 
more comfortable mount, which, after all, is the object 
required. 

BREAKING THE PONY TO STICK AND BALL. 

For this purpose we should employ as large a piece of 
open ground as possible (for choice, a common in 
England, or a 7naidan in India) ; for if the work is 
given in a small field or paddock, the pony will be very 
apt to get so sick of it that he will show temper, and 
constantly try to bore away in the direction of the gate. 
If more than one field be available, we should, if 
possible, never take him to the same field two days 
running. If our only practice field be close to the 
stable, we should always take the animal to and from 
it by a circuitous route, so that he may not associate in 
his mind the pleasurable idea of home with the 
stoppage of work. I feel certain that the bad habit 
displayed by many polo ponies, of bearing away to- 
wards the spot at which they are accustomed to stand 
during the intervals between the periods of play, has 
generally been acquired in the early stages of their 
education by their having been allowed to go straight 
to their stables after practice. Every pony should be 
thoroughly broken to the stick before he is tried with 
a ball. We may begin with a stick, when riding 
along the roads or anywhere else, and waving it about 
in every direction, so as to convince the pony that it 
will not hurt him. 

When he is perfectly quiet with the stick, we may 
commence hitting the ball about at a walk. If the 
pony shows signs of nervousness, it may be necessary 



126 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

to go on for some days quietly tapping the ball 
along, without raising the hand to make a hit. We 
may gradually use more strength, and try back-handers 
and strokes on the near side. When the pony has 
been thoroughly broken to all this at a walk, we may 
put him through the same process, at first at a slow 
trot, then at a gentle canter, and increase the speed 
proportionately to the progress made. When teaching 
the pony to go straight, we shall be greatly assisted 
by having another man on a pony or horse to canter 
steadily about the field in front of the pony upon 
which we are mounted, so that he may follow the 
leader on his own account, with but little assistance 
from us, while we try to accurately hit the ball (not 
a very easy matter in a rough field) in the direction 
taken. We should be very careful to leave the reins 
loose when hitting the ball ; for a job in the mouth 
at that moment will do much to make him "ball- 
shy." Another fruitful cause of making ponies shy off 
the ball, is the habit some riders adopt of not drawing 
back the left leg and pressing it against the pony's 
side (so as to prevent the hind-quarters from swinging 
round to the left) at the moment when they lean to 
the off side and forward, in the act of striking the 
ball. Others, again, make a pony shy off by pulling 
his head round with the rig^ht hand on the rioht rein 
instead of using the weight of the rein on the neck 
with the left hand ; and some always touch the pony 
with the right heel when in the act of striking the 
ball, and thereby cause him to carry his hind-quarters 
away from the ball, and to contract the vice of shying 
off. During the preliminary stages of training, we 
should, when hitting the ball, sit straight in the saddle. 



BREAKING THE PONY. 127 

and ride the pony right up to the spot from which we 
can hit the ball without shifting our seat ; for if we lean 
to the right and forward, the displacement of weight 
will have a greater or less tendency to cause the hind- 
quarters to revolve round the forehand to the left. It 
is most important to observe this precaution in training 
a pony, so that afterwards, in a game, he may not be 
inclined to shy off, no matter how much the rider's 
weight gets shifted in the saddle. 

After hitting a back-hander, we should be careful to 
turn right about and left about alternately, so that the 
pony will learn to turn equally well both ways, and will 
not acquire the bad habit of beginning to stop and turn 
before the ball is hit. This practically constitutes an 
elongated figure 8 ; the turns being made at the 
extremities of the loops, where the back-hander is 
struck. 

Ponies which have been previously handled and 
ridden, generally turn more readily to the left than to 
the right, on account of the custom of handling and 
leading horses on the near side, and of riding them 
more with the left hand than with the right. No 
matter how good a pony may otherwise be, he cannot 
be considered first-class at polo unless he will turn 
equally well on both sides. The best method of 
making a pony turn well to the right on the ball, is to 
canter him in small circles to the right, while the rider 
keeps gently tapping the ball in the same direction. 
If we happen to miss the ball, which we cannot help 
doing sometimes, especially in a rough field, we should 
take the pony a little way past it, before halting and 
turning him ; for if we pull him suddenly over it, we 
will get him into the habit of slowing up and stopping 



128 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

over the ball, which is almost as bad a fault as shying 
off the ball. 

- After a pony has been thoroughly broken to stick 
and ball, he should be played, if possible, in a can- 
tering game ; but should on no account be played 
in a fast match until he is fairly perfect in company 
at a canter. As all ponies go better in company than 
by themselves, it is much better for two or three men 
to train their ponies together than singly. When this 
cannot be done, the owner will find that the education 
of his pupil will be greatly accelerated by getting, for 
instance, a stable boy to canter about with him, even 
if he cannot trust the lad with a stick. 

When training my own young ponies to stick and 
ball, I always practise several of them at a time, hitting 
a ball round and round a big field, and make them pass 
and repass one another, the different riders taking 
their turns to hit the ball. This practice checks the 
tendency which the ponies might otherwise have of 
racing against each other and of pulling. When my 
youngsters are steady at this kind of work, I put them 
into a cantering game, two or three a side, taking great 
care that they do not go out of a collected canter, and 
that they are not frightened by being hit by ball or 
stick. As their education progresses, I increase the 
speed of the games. By being brought on gradually 
like this, they have but little inducement to become 
pullers, or to learn tricks like shying off the ball, being- 
afraid to face other ponies, etc. 

When breaking a pony to stick and ball, it is most 
important to devote all one's attention to the pony, and 
not to one's own practice at the pony's expense. 

I have made the foregoing remarks with reference 



BREAKING THE PONY. 129 

to the training of ordinary English ponies. Some ex- 
ceptional ponies require hardly any training, and will 
play right off; others will take months and months 
of care and patience, and a few will never learn to 
play at all. By adopting the directions I have given, 
the percentage of unplayable ponies will be found to 
be very small. Foreign ponies, such as Arabs, 
Barbs, Egyptians, Argentines, Africans and Americans, 
do not, as a rule, take nearly so much trouble to 
train as English ponies. Generally, they have better 
mouths, and are not so high couraged, or, at least, 
possess more placid tempers. The majority of them 
play polo with very little training. Many Americans 
and Argentines have been used as cow ponies, which 
is about the best training a polo pony can have — 
any good cow pony makes a polo pony at once. 
Geldings, as a rule, are more amenable to dis- 
cipline than stallions, and have just as much, if not 
more, pluck. Entires, particularly Barbs, have often 
an annoying trick of looking round and trying to bite 
any pony which may be alongside, instead of gal- 
loping their best. 

Ponies which have advanced to a certain extent in 
their polo education, but which are addicted to some 
awkward tricks, such as pulling and shying off the 
ball, will, if turned to grass during the winter, often 
forget their tricks of the previous season, although 
they will remember the valuable lessons they received. 
I think the reason of this is that ponies frequently get 
sick and tired of being pulled about and trained to 
polo, and that the tricks they pick up are merely signs 
of temper, or because their mouths get hurt, their legs 
and feet sore, and their health upset. After a winter's 

9 



I30 TRAINING THE POLO PONY. [Chap. V. 

run at grass, they come up cool and sound, and are 
ready to start fair with their lessons, which were 
previously a source of irritation and discomfort. The 
success of this plan, especially in the case of a 
puller, will be greatly promoted by remouthing the 
pony in a light bridle, such as a snaffle or half-moon 
Pelham, when he comes into work again 



131 



CHAPTER VI. 

POLO PONY GEAR. 

Bits and bridles — Saddles — Whip — Spurs — Bandages and boots. 

BITS AND BRIDLES. 

There Is perhaps some truth in the saying, when 
applied to bits, that '' there is a key to every horse's 
mouth," although there are some hot-headed and 
spoiled animals which no bit ever invented could stop, 
if they really mean pulling. Most ponies, I think, 
will go kindly If we can only find the bit which suits 
them ; but therein lies the difficulty. My editor. 
In " Illustrated Horse- Breaking," points out that the 
cause of pulling and other bridle faults lies in the 
brain, and not in the mouth ; and that we would 
employ our time better by trying to remove it by 
breaking, than by seeking after a particular kind of bit. 
The two principal causes which make ponies pull at 
polo are excitability and pain. We see these causes at 
work in a pony which, having got excited in a gallop, 
for Instance, gets pulled up short by a job in the 
mouth, the pain of which adds to the pony's excite- 
ment and prompts him to fight against the bit. In 
the selection of a bridle, our object should be to find 
one which will be powerful enough to stop the pony, 



132 POLO PONY GEAR. [Chap. VI. 

but which will accomplish its purpose with as little pain 
as possible. There are many ponies which will pull 
desperately in severe bridles, but which will go easily 
in light ones. A pony with a perfect mouth can be 
ridden in almost any bridle by a man with perfect 
hands ; the latter, however, being as difficult to find as 
the former. A pony to have a perfect mouth for polo 
must, when going at full speed, be capable of being 
readily turned with a loose rein, and of being halted in 
a stride or two. A pony with an ordinary mouth for 
hacking purposes will be a puller according to the polo 
acceptation of the term ; for although he may bend 
nicely to the rein when going slow, he will catch hold a 
bit (which he ought not to do if intended for polo) at 
top speed. If we cannot get him to go as temperately 
as we wish, it is evident that we must put something in 
his mouth which will stop him. 

The most difficult kind of pony to cure of pulling is 
the hot-headed animal which gets excited whenever he 
goes fast. There are many such ponies which are 
good hacks and are quiet in harness, but which are 
perfectly useless for polo ; because pace has such an 
exciting effect on them that it drives them almost mad. 
Although I have had many hot-headed animals 
through my hands, I have never succeeded in making 
any of them into decent polo ponies ; and consequently 
nothing would now induce me to buy a pony, no 
matter how good-looking he was, if I had any 
suspicion that he was hot-headed. The use of a 
severe bit is of no avail for curing this vice, which in 
extremely rare cases may be conquered by time and 
patience. Defects of the teeth are another cause of 
pulling. A pony's upper grinders often get too long 



BITS AND BRIDLES. 



133 



and rough at the outside edges, which causes them to 
cut the inside of the cheeks, and makes the animal 
irritable, inclined to throw his head about, and pull. 
In such cases, the outside edges of the upper grinders 
require only filing, and when that is done, all irritable 
symptoms will cease. 

Every day, after playing polo, we should carefully 




Fig. 53. — Mohawk bridle. 

examine our ponies' mouths, particularly the bars of 
the mouth and the parts under the tongue, which by 
rough handling are apt to be cut severely, with the 
possible result of an abscess or diseased bone. We 
should also look at the chin-groove, to see if it has been 
hurt by the curb chain ; and at the corners of the lips, 
which are apt to get cut by the snaffle. 

Having, on one occasion, cut the bars of a pony's 
mouth under the tongue by the use of the bit shown 
in Fig. 53, I substituted for it a Kerro bit (Fig. 30), 



134 



POLO PONY GEAR. 



[Chap. VI. 



in which I continued to play the pony, and had him 
well in a week. An animal with a sore chin should be 




CM^'^ '"^ ''^l ^()i '7i '81:1)1 'llO'Ill'Firi! i^! 

Fig. 54. — Curb with gag snaffle and leather guards. 

played without a curb chain, or, if that is not practic- 
able, the curb chain should be provided with a leather 
or felt guard, or passed through an india-rubber tube 



BITS AND BRIDLES. 135 

about 4 inches long. If the corners of the lips become 
chafed, I would recommend a half-moon Pelham to be 
substituted for the double bridle, or leather guards, as 
in Fig. 54, to be used, in order to protect the corners 
of the lips from contact with the rings of the bridoon. 
The curb chain must always hang outside the rings of 
the Pelham (Fig. 31). Besides, this method of 
adjustment has the effect of making the curb chain lie 
in the right place. All half-moon Pelhams should be 
made in this manner. 





Fig. 55. — Ward Union bit. 

The height of the port should be limited to that 
which would be sufficient to relieve the tongue of 
pressure ; and should on no account be so high as to 
touch, let alone hurt, the roof of the mouth. The only 
three legitimate ways for increasing the severity of a 
curb are : (i) tightening the curb chain; (2) length- 
ening the lower arm of the cheek-piece ; and (3) using 
a nose band. With a double bridle, we may increase 
its severity by using a twisted bridoon instead of a plain 
one. 

We should make a careful study of each case, and 
may not improbably have to try half-a-dozen bridles 



136 POLO PONY GEAR. [Chap. VI. 

before the right one is found. The bridle which I find 
most useful, in all ordinary cases, is a bit and bridoon, 
heavy and smooth, with a sliding bar and a low port 
(Fig. 55). It is commonly called a '' Ward Union 
Bridle." Care should be taken that its mouthpiece is 
not too narrow ; for the animal's lips are more apt to be 
pinched by a sliding bar than by a fixed mouthpiece. 
Large leather cheek-pieces (Fig. 54) are as a rule 









C^LIBI '^l '51 '()! '7i '8IJ91 

Fig, 56. — Short cheek Curb bit. 

advisable. The length of the lower arm of the 
cheek-piece of the bit may vary from 3 to 6 inches ; 
that of the upper arm should not exceed i ^ inches. In 
almost every bridle, the upper arm of the cheek-piece 
is made too long, the effect of which is that the curb 
chain when tightened, is pressed against the sharp edges 
of the lower jaw, instead of lying in the chin groove, 
as it will do if the upper arm of the cheek-piece is 
short (Figs. 56 and 57). The height of the port 
should be about i yi inches as a maximum ; and the 



BITS AND BRIDLES. 137 

width of the mouthpiece from 4^ to 5^ inches, 
according to the size of the pony's mouth. The mouth- 
piece should on no account be too narrow ; for it would 
then be apt to hurt the animal's lips. A pony from 14 
hands to 14.2 seldom requires a bit narrower than 5 
inches (inside measurement). The curb chain should 
be heavy, flat and smooth, and will be all the better if 
covered with an india-rubber tube, or a leather 




-^ig- 57- — Long cheek Curb bit. 

guard (Fig. 58). Thin curb chains are an abomina- 
tion. We should always employ a lip strap to keep 
the curb chain in its place, and should have the 
lip strap rings placed about i^ inches below the 
mouthpiece in all bridles, so as to prevent the curb 
chain slipping over the chin and into the mouth of 
the pony. The bridoon should be smooth, round and 
heavy, and should be placed just high enough to 
touch, but not to wrinkle, the corners of the mouth. 
Thin snaffles are very irritating to ponies. A nose 
band, placed low down and tight enough to prevent the 



138 



POLO PONY GEAR. 



[Chap. VI. 



animal from opening his mouth too wide, should be 
used with every pony which is the least inclined to 
pull ; for its presence will give us control over the 
entire of his head, and not only over his lower jaw, as 
we would have without it. With a bridle made and 
applied as I have described, we can obtain great power 
over a pony, especially if we add a standing martingale 
fixed to the nose band, or to the rings of the snaffle. 
The most generally useful bridle for a puller is 



«E11 



ifiii 











y^ . tit : '4{ _^5i ^m'm'Mm lio'iiiiFiE 

Fig. 58. — Curb chain protected by india-rubber tube ; ditto, by leather guard. 

that shown in Fig. 54. It is used with a gag and 
is called the " Stansted Bridle." 

In the first edition of this book I recommended the 
Mohawk bridle (Fig. 53) for polo ; but I regret to say 
that I have been compelled to alter my opinion. My 
remarks had been based on the fact that I had used 
this bit with great success on one or two hard-mouthed 
ponies ; but, later on, I was obliged to discontinue it, 
because I found it cut their mouths badly under the 
tongue and on the bars of the mouth, an injury which I 
found this bit caused to a large number of ponies 
ridden in it. Although it may be a very good bridle 
for hacking and driving, it is too severe for polo, at 



BITS AND BRIDLES. 139 

which game ponies have often to be pulled about very 
sharply. If it is employed as a last resource, its lower 
bar should be covered with india-rubber. 

An india-rubber Pelham (Fig. 28) and the '' Kerro" 
bridle (Fig. 30) will be found useful for light mouthed, 
excitable ponies. The india-rubber Pelham will 
wear better if covered with leather, for ponies are 
apt to bite through the unprotected rubber very soon. 
The leather after a short time becomes soft from the 
saliva of the mouth, and will then prevent the bars 
from becoming bruised, or the lips pinched. The 
"Kerro" bridle is a Pelham. I have not been able 
to find out the name of its inventor. It consists 
of a roller of wood which revolves on a steel bar, and is 
covered with either leather or india-rubber. It gives 
the rider, by reason of its thickness, great power over a 
pony. Besides being a useful bridle for some excitable 
pullers, it is excellent for a pony whose mouth has 
been cut or bruised by a severe bit. 

The Ben Morgan bit (Fig. 29), which consists of a 
half-moon mouthpiece turned downwards, is a most 
useful bit for many pullers ; seemingly because it 
bears on a different part of the pony's mouth to 
that pressed on by the ordinary curb bit. This bit 
is particularly useful, when the bars of a pony's mouth 
have become sore through the action of an ordinary 
curb. 

The half-moon Pelham (Fig. 31), in conjunction 
with a leather curb chain, is especially good for forming 
the mouth of a young pony, or for riding a very 
light-mouthed pony at polo. A curb bridle of some 
kind is almost invariably necessary for a pony at polo. 

Besides the bits I have described, which will be 



140 



POLO PONY GEAR. 



[Chap. VI. 



quite sufficient for the needs of an ordinary steed, 
there are many others that may be used with ad- 
vantage. We may often suit a pony's mouth by 
altering- the height of port and length of cheek of 
the ordinary hunting curb, or by covering the bit 
with india-rubber or leather. Such cruel bits as 
the Segundo and Chifney, should not be used ; 
for although they may be employed, hacking or 




m\ '41 'dl 31 '71 '8! '9! 'IK 

Fig. 59. — Hanoverian Pelham. 

hunting, by , a man who has very good hands ; they 
are too severe for polo, at which game a pony's 
mouth is unavoidably wrenched and pulled about 
a good deal at times. In India, I used severe 
bits a good deal, until, on one occasion, I broke the 
lower jaw of the pony I was riding, and then gave 
them up for ever. After this pony, which was a 
hard puller, had recovered from the fracture, I tried 
him with such success in a short-cheeked hunting 
bridle, with both bit and bridoon wrapped round 
with wash-leather, that he gave up pulling. This is 



BITS AND BRIDLES. 141 

only one of many Instances of ponies pulling from pain. 
The Hanoverian Pelham with a low port (Fig. 59), 
is a useful bit for a pony that gets his head too low. 

One of the worst tricks a polo pony can have is 
that of getting his tongue over the bit, which then 
acts solely on the sensitive bars of the mouth. I 
have never known a pony addicted to this abominable 
trick with a decent mouth. Besides, it is one of the 




Fig. 60. — Gag snaffle. 

most difficult of all vices to cure. Of the many 
contrivances I have tried, including ladder bits and 
tongue layers, the most successful have been an 
ordinary gag (Fig. 60), and tying the tongue. The 
gag has the disadvantage of being too severe for 
some really hot-headed ponies. Tying the tongue is 
done by means of a piece of tape passed over the 
tongue and under the chin. It should be made just 
tight enough not to slip off the tongue. The knot 



142 POLO PONY GEAR. [Chap. VI. 

used is a single knot on the upper surface of the 
tongue, and a double bow knot in the chin groove. 

The most generally useful bits for ponies with good 
mouths are shown in Figs. 28, 29, 30, and particularly 

3i> 55' 56 and 57. 

The standing martingale may be dispensed w^ith at 
polo when the animal is perfectly trained, and, con- 
sequently, carries his head in the right position. 
Without this useful contrivance, very many good 
polo ponies, especially Arabs, would star-gaze, and be 
found difficult to stop or keep under control. With 
ponies which raise and bring back their heads when 
they stop suddenly at full gallop, so as to throw 
their weight on to the hind quarters, this martingale, 
if used at all, should be long enough to allow them 
the free use of their heads for the purpose just 
mentioned, but no longer. 

In breaking a pony, a standing martingale will be 
found useful, except for those which have such 
perfectly shaped necks that they always carry their 
heads in the right position. For this purpose the 
martingale should be of such a length as to prevent 
the muzzle being raised higher than on a level with 
the top of the withers. 

Many good players in England never use a martin- 
gale at all ; but, as a rule, they are the happy 
possessors of ponies with good mouths and with 
beautifully shaped heads, necks, and shoulders. On 
the other hand, in India most of the best players use 
a standing martingale on every pony, because, as far 
as I can see, they ride Arabs, which, unlike well-bred 
English ponies, seldom have their heads and necks 
well put on, or their shoulders sufficiently sloping. 



BITS AND BRIDLES. 143 

The Inference to be drawn from this is that the 
necessity for the use of a standing martingale depends 
on the conformation of the forehand. 

The rule I have laid down about allowing ponies 
which stop best with their heads in the air a long 
standing martingale, cannot be of universal application, 
because such wonderful performers as the famous team 
in India captained by the Maharajah of Jodhpur play 
their ponies with very short standing martingales, tied 
on to the nose band. The bridles they use have only 
a curb rein, and are without bridoons. They ride 
with a slack rein. Their method as regards Arabs 
must be sound ; for no ponies in the world are handier 
or more perfectly trained. 

No definite rule as to the length of a martingale can 
be laid down ; so an intelligent study must be made 
of each pony's requirements, and the owner must find 
out for himself what will best suit particular cases. If 
his pony star-gazes with a long martingale, he must 
shorten it. If, as may often occur, the pony will not go 
up to his bit with a short martingale, it must be 
lengthened. As far as my own experience goes with 
English ponies, I find that I have to ride the majority 
of young ones with a short martingale when training 
them. I lengthen it to play them in a game, and, 
as a rule, dispense with it altogether when they are 
thoroughly trained. 

I have seen very few Arabs which do not go better 
with a standing martingale than without one. I 
once possessed an Arab which I could not keep 
on a polo ground at all until his former owner told 
me that the animal's muzzle had to be strapped to 
within six inches of his chest. I followed his direc- 



144 POLO PONY GEAR. [Chap. VI. 

tions, and was then able to ride the pony In good 
matches with moderate comfort. 




Fig. 6i. — Lord Lonsdale's running martingale. 

When driving with "the long reins" (page 95), or 
when riding either in the school or hacking, this 



BITS AND BRIDLES. 



145 



martingale may be buckled on to the rings of the 
bridoon, which plan is especially useful with a puller ; 
but when playing polo, it is always better to fasten it 




Fig. 62. — Nose band with pad removed. 




□■BIIB! '4i '51 '01 71 '81, 'Ui 'llO'lirFITll '21 '•31 ^! ■'51 'til 71 'R! '91 UiO'lil'Khi'li "21 
Fig. 63. — Nose band and pad. 

to the nose band ; for we thereby save the pony's 
mouth from being hurt in the rough and tumble of 
the game. 

I have not discussed the question of the running 

10 



146 POLO PONY GEAR. [Chap. VI. 

martingale (Fig. 6i), as I do not as a rule advocate 
its use for polo ; the standing one being much more 
effective in every way. 

Nose bands (Figs. 62 and 63) should be made about 
2^ inches broad in front, so that the nose may not 
become chafed ; and should have a pad, or india- 
rubber tube (Fig. 64), behind to protect the sensitive 
edges of the bones of the lower jaw, and buckles at 
each side, so that the nose band may be tightened or 




Fig. 64. — Nose band with india-rubber tube to protect pony's lower jaw. 

loosened, as may be required, without altering the 
position of the pad. 

A standing martingale should be made with large 
long billets, so that it can be buckled comfortably over 
the nose band pad, or to the rings of the snaffle. The 
strap should be i ^ inches wide, and made the same 
shape all along to the division, so that it may pass 
through the buckle, which should be a strong one. 
This arrangement will enable the martingale to be let 
out to such an extent as to prevent a star-gazer hitting 
his rider in the face, or to be taken in so far that the 
pony's head will be practically strapped to his chest. 



SPURS. 147 



SADDLES. 

I think that players as a rule have a tendency 
to use too small saddles. I like a roomy hunting 
saddle (weighing, say, 12 lbs.) in which I can move 
about, when hustling or reaching out for a ball. 
Besides, a big saddle is a great comfort to an in- 
different horseman, and the increase in weight of, say, 
5 lbs., will be more than made up to the pony by the 
extra bearing surface. Every pony should have his 
own saddle specially fitted for him. A leather-covered 
panel is excellent, as it stands wear well, does not soak 
up the perspiration, and does not require renewing 
so often as a serge or linen covered one. A leather 
numnah is a good protection to the back, and saves 
the lining of the panel from wear, and the stuffing 
from becoming wet and caked by sweat. 

WHIP. 

Every polo player should learn to use a whip in his 
left hand while playing ; for the simple fact that the 
rider carries one will make many ponies jump quickly 
into their bridles and gallop kindly. Its presence in 
his hand is no inconvenience if he does not wish to 
use it. 

SPURS. 

Sharp spurs are never allowed in games, but *are 
occasionally useful in training a regular slug. Spurs 
without rowels are generally an advantage with ordi- 
nary ponies for making them start quickly. Keen, 
first-class ponies do not need them, and they often 

10* 



148 POLO PONY GEAR. [Chap. VI. 

cause an excitable one to pull. They are usually an 
assistance to a weak horseman. 



BANDAGES AND BOOTS. 

We can afford protection to the legs of our ponies 
from blows of stick or ball by means of bandages or 
boots. There are two objections to the use of the 
former : first, they require special care in putting on, 
so that they will neither become undone during play 
nor hurt the legs by being too tight ; and, secondly, 
they cannot be arranged so as to effectively protect the 
fetlocks without incurring the risk of their working 
loose. If a bandage on a fore leg becomes undone, 
it will remain attached to the leg by the tapes, and 
there will then be great risk of the pony putting 
a hind foot on it, and thus tripping himself up. To 
obviate this danger, in the event of our electing to 
employ a bandage for work, we should begin applying 
it by leaving the end loose, either at the knee or 
fetlock (according as we wish to commence from above 
or from below), and after having taken two or three 
turns, we should take hold of the loose end, lay it over 
the portion of the bandage which has been already 
applied, and then continue the turns until the bandage 
is ready to be tied on. If a bandage is put on too 
tightly, it is very apt to hurt the back tendons, and 
give the pony a big leg. Boots, made of thin felt, 
are in every way preferable to bandages. They can 
be put on quickly and easily by any stable lad ; and, 
if they are properly made, they will protect the fet- 
locks without interfering with the action of these 
joints, and without lessening the closeness of their 



BANDAGES AND BOOTS. 



149 



adhesion to their respective legs. Those I use on 
my ponies are the Rugby Club Polo Boots, made 
and invented by Mr. T. U. Clarke, of Rugby (Figs. 
65, 66 and 67). I would advise that each pony 




Fig. 65. — Rugby polo boot ; 
inside view. 





Fig. 66. — Rugby polo boot ; 
outside view. 



.Fig 67. — Rugby polo boot. 



should have his own boots, the holes in the straps of 
which should be so marked that anyone can see at 
a glance at what length they ought to be buckled up. 

Boots should not be put on till the pony reaches 
the polo ground, and should be taken off as soon 
as play is over ; ponies should never be walked 
home any distance in boots. 



I50 




Photo by'] 



Fig. 68. — Wintering ponies. 



[M. H. HAYES. 



CHAPTER VII. 



POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. 

Wintering ponies — Conditioning ponies — Stable routine, feeding, and watering — 
Bedding — Stables — Using polo ponies in harness — Racing and chasing polo 
ponies — Treatment of a polo pony on the polo ground after a period of play — 
Saddlery. 

WINTERING PONIES. 

The first question here is, what shall we do with our 
ponies from, say, the ist September to the time it will 
be necessary to begin getting them fit for the ist 
April ? Although their welfare will be our chief con- 
sideration, economy and convenience may also have to 
be studied. Assuming that a pony has been in hard 
work during the preceding season, and that he does 
not require to be kept in a sick box for veterinary 



WINTERING PONIES. 151 

treatment, the best thing for his general health, and 
for the soundness of his legs and feet, is to turn him 
out to grass for September and October, during which 
months the grass will be still growing and the dews 
will be heavy. For that time, supposing the grass is 
plentiful, he will do all the better for having no corn or' 
hay, unless he is old (especially if he has not been 
turned out the previous autumn), delicate, or, if a 
foreigner, unacclimatised, in which cases he may get a, 
couple of feeds of corn daily. The owner should see 
that the supply of grass is plentiful and good, and 
should remember that the larger the run is, the better. 
If the fields or paddocks are small, he should arrange 
to have the pasture grounds changed from time to 
time. He should on no account try the dangerous 
experiment of leaving the ponies to the tender mercies 
of an ordinary farmer, who, generally, has other work 
to attend to, is short handed, and is not well acquainted 
with the requirements of valuable horseflesh. 

Having given our ponies a two months' run at grass, 
we have next to decide what to do with them in the 
winter. We must remember that ponies, as a rule, 
are hardier, sounder, and less liable to go wrong in 
their wind than big horses, and that they do well in 
the open, no matter how cold it may be, provided they 
have plenty of good grass to eat, and enough space in 
which to roam freely about. At the same time we 
must bear in mind that our ultimate object is to have 
our ponies perfectly fit by the ist of April. We are 
here placed in a different position to that which we 
occupied six months previously, when deciding the 
question of summering our hunters, which we were 
able, if we had chosen, to bring gradually into work 



152 POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. [Chap. VII. 

during cub-hunting time, and in the early part of the 
season, when the bHndness of the ditches may be an 
excuse for going slow and prudently. Polo ponies, 
however, have to be as fit as the proverbial fiddle, from 
the very first day of the season ; for in play we cannot, 
without spoiling the game for our comrades, spare our 
animals, beyond playing them for only one ten minutes 
instead of for two or three. Therefore, the wintering 
must be so arranged that any loss in hard muscle and 
wind may be regained, with a large increase of health 
and soundness, before the ist of April. After their 
autumn run of two months, we may take them into the 
stable and have them regularly exercised, which is a 
method to be adopted only by those to whom expense 
is no object ; or we may keep them at grass until it is 
time to get them again into condition. I do not at all 
approve of turning them into loose boxes, as I think 
they would do much better at grass, especially in the 
way of exercise. Whichever method we adopt, we 
must remember that our animals will not thrive as well 
as they ought to do, unless we give them personal 
supervision, or unless we can leave them in charge of 
some perfectly trustworthy person. If we find that one 
or more of the ponies at grass cannot stand the cold 
and exposure, we should put them in a shed or stable 
and have them regularly exercised. Supposing that 
we adopt the sound and economical policy of keeping 
our ponies at grass during the winter, we must not 
forget that, although they will remain in health on 
grass alone, it is not sufficient in itself to enable them 
to keep their muscles in well-developed condition, and 
that the recovery of muscular development will cost 
more than Its retention. Undoubtedly the best plan 



WINTERING PONIES. 153 

of managing ponies which are turned out in the winter 
is to shut them up in a shed at night, and give them a 
feed of corn and a liberal supply of good hay ; another 
feed in the morning ; and at noon a third feed put into 
feeding boxes in the field. Ponies done like this 
during the winter months, should be fit for any kind of 
polo on the ist of April, if taken up on the 22 nd of 
February, and put into work on the ist of March. If 
economy be a great object, the owner can use his 
discretion whether to begin feeding with corn on the 
1st of November, or to wait till later on. In this he 
should be guided by the amount of ''keep '' there is in 
the fields, and on the severity of the season. He 
should bear in mind that the earlier he begins to do 
his ponies well, the less corn and time will they require 
to get fit when taken up and put into work. Feeding- 
is of more importance than shelter. Even when open 
sheds exist in the fields, ponies will not, as a rule, use 
them. Consequently, these buildings are not of much 
advantage, unless the ponies are shut up in them at 
night. It is a curious fact that even in the coldest and 
roughest nights in mid-winter, the majority of ponies 
seem to prefer lying out under a hedge or tree, even 
in the snow, to using the most comfortable shelter 
provided for them. During the very severe winter of 
1892-3, I put six valuable ponies into loose boxes, and 
fed them on the best of hay and oats. At the same 
time I turned six other ponies which I did not care so 
much about into some big grass fields without sheds, 
and gave them nothing in addition to what they could 
pick up, beyond a little rough hay and oat straw. For 
a whole month they had to get their food by shoving 
away the snow with their noses and fore feet, and 



154 POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. [Chap. VII. 

yet they came up In better condition and with more 
flesh and muscle on them than the ponies which had 
been in loose boxes, but which had not been exercised. 
All these twelve ponies, however, took a long time, 
quite two-and-a-half months, to get into polo condition. 
Had the six turned-out ones been well fed during the 
months of December, January and February, they 
would not have taken half that time to have got fit. 
It is really extraordinary how well ponies will condition 
themselves when turned out, if they are fed as liberally 
and as regularly as they would be when in the stable. 
We obtain an excellent proof of the good effect of corn 
on turned-out ponies, from the fact that after the 
morning feed, they will almost invariably have a gallop 
about together; but if they are not fed, they will seldom 
go out of a walk. It is evident that this morning 
gallop is a capital means for maintaining their muscle, 
and keeping their wind clear. 

I have found that the best food for ponies when 
turned out is crushed maize. All the corn should 
be crushed and mixed with a liberal allowance of 
old hay cut up into chaff A good daily ration for 
a pony during November, December, January and 
February, would be 7 lbs. of maize and 10 lbs. of hay. 
If there is plenty of keep in the fields, the ration can 
be cut down in quantity. 

CONDITIONING PONIES. 

When the ponies come up from grass, I like to give 
them a mild dose of physic, say three drachms of aloes, 
after which they will be ready to start regular long 
exercise in about a week's time. Taking a month's 
work as sufficient to get them ready to play on the 



CONDITIONING PONIES. 155 

1st April, I would, therefore, advise that they 
should be taken up about the 22 nd February. Long 
walking exercise on roads is the best thing for con- 
ditioning ponies, especially as regards their legs and 
feet, which, if the animals are gross, will take longer 
to get hard and fit than their bodies. Half the sprains 
and lamenesses which occur at the beginning of a 
season arise from ligaments, tendons, and bones being 
put to unaccustomed w^ork. Besides, when a pony's 
legs have been hardened by exercise, blows take little 
effect on them, whereas a comparatively trivial knock 
may give a pony that is out of condition a big leg, 
which may necessitate the animal being rested and put 
on soft food for about a week, with the result that he 
may get thrown back so much that he will take a 
long time to get fit again. Here we may adopt 
my editor's axiom, that the more work a horse or pony 
gets, the better, so long as his appetite and condition 
continue good, and his legs and feet remain sound. 
The average hunting-stud groom loves to have all his 
work done by nine o'clock in the morning, and then 
shut up his animals in their stable for the remainder 
of the day. His idea of daily exercise is doing about 
eight or nine miles, principally at a walk, with a little 
trotting. The first day the owner goes out, he will 
perhaps ride (or have his horse ridden) ten miles to 
the meet, hunt him three hours, covering, say, sixteen 
miles, and have him ridden back another ten miles. 
This not immoderate amount of walking, trotting, 
galloping, and jumping, which on occasions may 
be easily increased to a total of fifty miles, will be 
more than equivalent to a whole week's work given 
by the stud groom ; and then the owner will be 



156 POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. [Chap. VIL 

astonished to find next morning that the horse's legs 
are filled all round, and that the animal is stiff and 
sore in every joint. The same remarks apply to 
ponies, except that the polo pony groom is, as a rule, 
inclined to give his animals one hour's work instead 
of two. Previous to playing, ponies should do from 
three to four hours' work a day, with a lot of trotting 
during the third week, and should wind up the last week 
with two or three good canters a day. Ponies con- 
ditioned like this will be well fortified against sprains, 
blows, and other accidents from which they would 
be very liable to suffer during the season if they had 
begun to play in an unfit state. I have taken for 
granted that the ponies have continued in lusty health 
all through. If they are thin and poor to start with, 
it will probably take about three months to get them 
up to concert pitch. 

Work, and plenty of it, in addition to that at polo, 
is necessary to keep a pony fit, especially if he is not 
played regularly. Many men who play polo never 
see their ponies, except to ride them, at most four 
times, sometimes only once or twice, a week, for two 
periods of ten minutes each day. Besides the 
question of fitness, the fact remains that many ponies 
are uncomfortable mounts at polo from being too 
fresh. We have, therefore, three good reasons for 
giving our ponies lots of work, namely, to make them 
fit, to keep them sound, and to render them comfort- 
able to ride. Ponies which are somewhat infirm will, 
of course, require more lenient treatment ; but even 
they should be given as much work as they can safely 
stand. Many young, high-couraged ponies are often 
spoiled by being played when too fresh. I have often 



STABLE ROUTINE, FEEDING & WATERING. 157 

heard men complain that they could not play their 
ponies because their animals were too impetuous, 
which was entirely the fault of the respective owners, 
who, if they had given their ponies three or four 
hours' walking exercise in the morning before playing, 
would have had far pleasanter rides. The fact of 
many ponies having to go from six to ten miles to the 
polo ground, has a most beneficial effect on their spirits 
and temper. I always give my own young ponies 
from two to four hours' walking and slow trotting 
exercise every morning up and down a hilly grass 
field, except on the day after playing, when I allot 
them only sufficient to remove their stiffness, for which 
one hour will be quite enough. The good effect on 
legs and feet of this hour's work will be greatly 
increased it the exercise can be given early in the 
morning in a grass field where the herbage is long, 
and while the dew is still on it. Even a better plan, 
if practicable, is to have them first walked about up 
to their knees and hocks in water. 

STABLE ROUTINE, FEEDING, AND WATERING. 

Strict regularity should be observed in the feeding 
of ponies, and the requirements of each of them 
should be separately studied ; for what will suit one, 
may not answer with another. The following- 
arrangement of hours and diet will be found ap- 
plicable to the average pony in hard polo work : — 

6 a.m. : The stable should be opened at this hour, 
and the ponies should get a few go-downs of water, 
(say, a third of a bucket full) and half a feed of 
oats (which, if good, will weigh i J^ lbs.), and a little 
chaff. If a full feed be given, the ponies, as a rule, 



158 POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. [Chap. VII. 

will not have time to eat it while the stable is being 
roughly cleaned and the bedding swept to one side, 
before they are taken out to exercise. Even if they 
are allowed to finish it, they cannot usually digest it 
properly while being worked, as we may see by their 
tendency to scour at this time under such circum- 
stances. Too much water in the early morning will 
also increase their liability to diarrhoea during exercise 
given shortly afterwards. 

6.30 a.m. : Exercise till 9 a.m. or 9.30 a.m. on 
ordinary days, and till 7.30 a.m. on days after playing 
polo. When they come in from exercise, they should 
first of all get as much water as they will drink, 
and then have a feed [lyi lbs.) of corn, and 4 or 
5 lbs. of good old hay. When the groom has given 
this, he should go and have his breakfast, and leave 
the ponies in peace to feed. After he returns from 
breakfast, the ponies should be well dressed, and the 
stable put right. 

1 2 noon : A full supply of water, a feed of oats ; 
but no hay. The groom can now clean his saddlery, 
and hang it up ready to put on before i p.m., at 
which hour he will go to dinner. He can have his 
ponies ready on the polo ground at 3 o'clock, even if 
he has to go four miles to it. If the distance is much 
further than this, he must clean his saddles and bridles 
overnight, and finish his dinner earlier. On non-polo 
days, between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m., the man should give 
his ponies a second good dressing, and exercise any of 
them which have not had sufificient work in the 
morning, or clean his saddlery. 

At 6 p.m. • Full allowance of water, a feed of oats, 
and about 8 lbs. of hay. 



STABLE ROUTINE, FEEDING & WATERING. 159 

In this way, a good groom can look after three 
ponies well during the polo season. Plenty of work 
will keep the men out of mischief, especially if they are 
by themselves in a livery stable. It is much better 
to have one man to three ponies, provided he rides 
well, and to hire a boy every polo day to help to 
hold the ponies on the ground, than to employ two 
men to look after three ponies, and thus encourage 
idleness. Two men will, however, be necessary for 
four ponies which are regularly played. A groom 
who is in charge of three ponies can, at exercise, ride 
one and lead the other two, one on each side, in 
a field. 

Some ponies do well on 9 lbs. (3^ feeds) of the 
best old oats a day ; others require more ; but 1 2 lbs. 
is sufficient for the biggest-framed and hungriest pony. 
From 10 to 12 lbs. of hay, most of it to be given at 
night, is a good allowance. We can give the oats 
mixed with a couple of double handfuls of chaff (hay 
cut up short in a chaff cutter). 

If oats have an undue tendency to make a pony's 
dung loose, we may with advantage bruise the oats, 
and before giving them, allow the pony some hay to 
eat. The precaution of giving hay before feeding, 
giving it at feeding time, mixing it in the form of 
chaff in the corn, and bruising the oats, are adopted 
with the object of making the horse eat more slowly 
and masticate his corn more thoroughly than he 
would othervv^ise do. We can be certain that a pony 
bolts his corn, only by the fact that he does not digest 
it, which we can see if it passes out in the dung with- 
out having been fully acted upon by the digestive 
fluids, or if it produces diarrhoea. Dry bran, say a 



i6o POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. [Chap. VII. 

couple of pounds a day, mixed in the corn, will help to 
check a tendency to looseness in the bowels, probably 
on account of the presence of the bran obliging the 
animal to chew his oats better than he would do if the 
bran was absent. Bran prepared in India contains a 
larger amount of flour than English bran, and appears, 
apparently for this reason, to be more nutritious. The 
good results obtained by giving remounts a large pro- 
portion of bran in their corn, when sending them to 
South Africa on board ship, shows that bran is a 
valuable food. Its mode of administration, and that 
of other feeding stuffs for use in the East, are fully 
discussed in Training and Horse Management in 
India. 

A little meadow or rye grass, clover, lucerne, comfrey 
or carrots may be regularly given with advantage, even 
when a pony is in the hardest work ; but the amount 
should be kept within such moderate limits that the 
green food or roots may not have any tendency to 
unduly distend the stomach and intestines of the ponies 
which eat it, or to make them scour. On Saturday 
nights all the ponies may get a mash made of bran, 
bran and linseed, or boiled barley mixed with them. 

It is a good general rule always to leave water with 
the ponies, so that they can take it when they want it. 
There will then be no doubt about their getting enough. 
In this case, the bucket should be left in a corner of the 
stable away from the manger ; for some horses will slop 
the water all over their corn if the bucket is kept close to 
it. If it is not convenient to have a bucket of water 
always within their reach, they should be invariably 
given as much water as they choose to drink before 
every feed, and whenever they come in from exercise. 



BEDDING. i6i 

Some ponies, like many of ourselves, are fond of taking 
an occasional sip of fluid with their food, which they 
will not relish unless they are allowed to do so. I 
need hardly say that such ponies should always have 
water within reach. 



BEDDING. 

The best kind of bedding is undoubtedly good 
wheaten straw. When economy has to be studied, 
sawdust and moss litter are excellent substitutes. 
Against the use of both of these kinds of bedding there 
is the slight objection that contact with them removes 
the gloss off the coat ; a fact which is not of much 
importance In the case of ponies that are clothed when 
in the stable. Moss litter, and probably sawdust to a 
less extent, are apt to Injuriously affect the soles and 
frogs, unless the feet are frequently (at least, three 
times a day) picked out, and unless the bed is kept dry. 
Neither of these economical substitutes look so well in 
the stable as straw. As they are very absorbent, their 
fouled portions should be removed every morning and 
evening. Moss litter (peat moss) makes an excellent 
manure, especially for grass land, and, unlike straw 
manure, need not be kept to rot. Mixing it with wood 
shavings, which can be procured very cheaply, if not 
for the mere carting away, from the yard of any builder 
or carpenter, is a good way for keeping It dry without 
much attention, and consequendy may be practised 
with ponies which are wintered, or horses which are 
summered on It. Sawdust Is almost useless for manure 
unless kept for a long time to rot, when it should be 
mixed with some other kind of manure. The bedding, 

II 



i62 POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. [Chap. Vll. 

whatever material is used, should be removed, and the 
floor of the stall or box swept clean and dry every 
morning when the stable is mucked out. I like to let 
my ponies stand on the bare floor for two or three hours 
a day, as I think this practice helps to harden their feet. 
The use of peat moss or sawdust is an excellent 
preventive against ponies eating their bedding. 

Apart from the question of gloss on the coat, it is a 
mistake to suppose that a pony dirties himself more on 
peat moss than on straw. The contrary is, I think, 
the case, if we may judge by the fact that a white horse 
does not stain so easily when kept on it, as when 
bedded down on straw. 

STABLES 

Can hardly be too cold, provided there is no draught, 
and that the ponies have plenty of clothing. The 
ventilation should be at the roof or high up in the walls. 
Colds, coughs, influenza, roaring, cracked heels and 
other diseases are far more rare in cold stables than in 
hot ones. It is best for stables to have no drains, 
which, if they exist, should be flushed out with water 
from time to time, and kept clean. As a disin- 
fectant, we may use one part of either crude carbolic 
acid or phenyle in twenty parts of water, or dry 
gypsum. Whitewashing the walls, ceiling and floor 
will keep them in a sanitary condition. 

USING POLO PONIES IN HARNESS. 

Although circling a pony with the long reins on foot 
(Figs. 50 and 51) is much the better plan for keeping 
him in exercise ; still, if it is a matter of covenience, we 



RACING AND CHASING POLO PONIES. 163 

may occasionally use him between the shafts. We 
should remember that harness work is apt to spoil his 
action (particularly if breast harness is employed instead 
of a collar), teach him to pull, and make him heavy in 
front. No young polo pony should be put into harness 
until he has been thoroughly broken in to polo, so that 
he may not acquire too much knee action from trotting, 
and may not become heavy on his fore hand. 
Unambitious polo players, who have only second or 
third class ponies, need not of course be so particular 
about the question of action and mouth as men who 
aspire to play with distinction in first-class matches. 
There are, however, some rare and invaluable treasures 
in pony flesh which no kind of work seems to hurt, and 
which can be moderately driven both winter and 
summer without impairing their efficiency at polo. 
Even their power of resisting deterioration has its 
limits. 

RACING AND CHASING POLO PONIES. 

As a great rule, nothing spoils polo ponies so much 
as racing or steeplechasing them ; for both these sports 
teaches them to pull and to extend themselves in a 
manner w^hich is totally different to that w^hich is 
required even in the fastest gallop at polo, it makes 
them excitable, and diverts their attention from the 
game. Even here, as at harness work, we may 
meet with some exceptionally intelligent ponies 
which recognise the fact that different kinds of 
games require different methods of play, and ac- 
cordingly regulate their movements to suit the 
nature of the work at which they are engaged. The 
best instance of this that I can call to mind is the 

1 1* 



i64 POLO PONY MANAGEMENT. [Chap. VII. 

pony Charlton (Fig. 43), which used to play polo 
equally well the day after a severe race as the day 
before it. 



TREATMENT OF A PONY ON THE POLO GROUND AFTER A 

PERIOD OF PLAY. 

A pony, after ten minutes of hard play, wants 
careful treatment, in order to bring him up fresh again 
for his next turn. 

A couple of quarts of water should be given him, 
especially on a hot day. This will be just sufficient 
to wash his mouth out, quench his thirst, and freshen 
him up. His head, mouth, and nostrils should be 
carefully sponged over, also his dock and sheath. 

The girths must be loosened at once, and a second 
man, if possible, should set to work and scrape him all 
over. He may be then rubbed dry with chamois 
leathers, and should be walked about for a few minutes 
till cool. When cool he should be wiped over with a 
clean cloth, and got ready for his turn. 

This can all be done in twelve minutes, but it is of 
course advisable on ordinary occasions that a pony 
should only play two periods in a match, which will 
give him more than twenty-five minutes' rest. 

After the match he may be freely watered. When 
the pony goes back to his stable, he may have as much 
water as he likes to drink, and should be given a feed 
of hay ; he may be then well dressed and made com- 
fortable for the night, and be fed an hour after his 
arrival in the stable. A mash once a week on Saturday 
night is quite sufficient for polo ponies in ordinary hard 
work. 



SADDLERY. 165 



SADDLERY. 

All girths and linings to saddles for polo should be 
of leather, which can be kept soft and in good con- 
dition with soap and neatsfoot oil. 

The best stuffing for saddles is felt, which, though 
too hard for hunting, acts better than anything else for 
polo. 



1 66 



CHAPTER VIII. 

VARIOUS BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. 

General remarks — English ponies — Arabs — Eg}-ptians — Syrians — Barbs — 
Argentines — North Americans — Californian ponies — Mexicans — Montana 
ponies — Gulf Arabs or Persians — Indian country -breds — South African ponies 
— Australasians — Canadians — Importation of ponies. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

The different breeds of ponies have their respective 
merits, which may be profitably studied by the intend- 
ing purchaser, the nature of whose weight, strength, 
horsemanship or pocket may be better suited by one 
class of animal than by another. Besides, the demand 
for well-bred galloping ponies so far exceeds the 
supply, that various foreign countries are drawn upon 
to meet it. Not only has the number of players 
increased, but the improvement in the game necessi- 
tates the use of a class of pony which will be always 
comparatively difficult to find. 

The principal breeds of ponies now played In 
England are: — (i) English, by which term I wish to 
include Irish, Welsh and Scotch ; and (2) Americans, 
including those from the Argentine Republic, Mexico, 
Texas and Montana. There are also a few instances 
of Arabs, Australians, ISarbs, Syrians, Egyptians, 



GENERAL REMARKS. 167 

Canadians and South Africans or Cape ponies being 
used for the English game. 

During the last few years, Eastern ponies have gone 
very much out of fashion among English players, and 
I have lately noticed an increasing tendency to 
augment the undoubtedly insufficient supply of polo 
ponies, by importations from the Argentine Republic, 
and from the United States, instead of from Algeria, 
Tunis, Gibraltar, Malta, Egypt and India. The 
principal reasons for this change are as follows. 

The number of good well-trained English ponies 
has greatly increased during late years, on account of 
the growing popularity of polo in country parts, w^here 
the members of the new clubs are constantly on the 
look-out for likely ponies, many of which, when trained, 
come into the market. Also, the raising of the height 
to 14.2 is all in favour of the English pony, which as a 
rule is heavier for his height than foreigners ; and 
besides, the bigger he is, the easier it is to get him of 
a high-class blood type. Hence, at 14.2, an Arab has 
little or no chance with him ; although there might not 
be so much difference between them at 14 hands. 
Few Eastern ponies can go through dirt, carry 
weight, or stay ; and it has been found by experience 
that a team mounted on them has but a poor 
chance against another team on English ponies, 
especially in the final twenty minutes of a tight match 
and on heavy ground. They become worn down more 
by the superior weight and staying power, than by the 
greater speed of the English-bred animals. At 
present, there are extremely few Arabs playing in 
England. In 1891, there were more than a dozen 
times the number of men looking out for Eastern 



i68 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIIL 

ponies than there are now. These animals are re- 
garded simply as useful ponies for beginners and for 
riders who cannot play English ponies properly. 

Probably the chief reason which has brought 
Eastern ponies into disrepute, is the reputation they 
have acquired of being liable to fall on the slightest 
provocation. As a rule they are light and weedy, 
have inferior shoulders, and when they fall, they come 
down all of a heap, with scarcely an effort to save 
themselves. On the contrary, English ponies, like 
Irish hunters, seem to have always a spare leg, re- 
cover themselves, and get out of difficulties with 
extraordinary cleverness. Men who have ridden 
Eastern ponies during the last few years, have had 
more than their proper share of bad falls. As the de- 
mand for good polo ponies far exceeds the supply, 
ponies from North and South America have largely 
taken the place of Eastern animals, which is a move 
in the right direction ; because, owing to their large 
infusion of English blood, they more nearly approach 
the home type than any other breed, except Australian 
ponies, which have not yet come into the English 
market in large numbers. The American ponies 
we have seen, are sure-footed and can carry weight; 
but with a few brilliant exceptions, they cannot gallop 
as fast or stay as well as English ponies, especially 
with a heavy weight or in deep ground. 

ENGLISH PONIES. 

The English polo pony is essentially a dwarf hunter 
or dwarf steeplechaser ; and, consequently, he is 
entirely different from the general utility pony or 



ENGLISH PONIES. 



169 



cob. He is without doubt better than any foreign 
breed now used for polo in England. 

The only ponies of foreign blood that I know 
In England from personal experience to be of 
the same class as the best English ponies, are 




Pho/o h>j'] [.M. H. Hayes. 

Fig. 69. — Mr. W. S. Buckmaster's Canadian pony, " Bendigo." 

Mr. Mackeys Californian Rex (Fig. 47), Mr. W. 
McCreery's E'ollow Me, also a Californian, Mr. 
Buckmaster's Canadian Bendigo (Fig. 69), Mr F'oxhall 
Keene's American Texina (Fig. 102), Captain Haig's 
grey Australian pony, and my own Argentine, 
Langosta II. Probably between two and three 
hundred ponies are imported for polo into England 
every year, and this has been going on for several 



I/O BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

years, so I think the superiority of the EngHsh pony 
Is fairly established. 

Any of the old breeds of ponies belonging to these 
Islands, whether Shetland, Welsh, New Forest, Ex- 
moor, or Dartmoor, are perfectly useless for polo by 
reason of their small size and want of pace. I 
would extend the same remark to all common-bred 
ponies of larger size, especially those of Hackney 
blood. The great love of blood entertained by 
breeders in Ireland makes that country the best in 
the world for finding ponies suitable for polo ; 
although I have known but few that have been 
specially bred for the game In that country. As a 
rule, an Irish breeder tries to get a hunter, or failing 
that, a smart trapper ; for his countrymen love to 
drive a bit of blood. From the Irish animals which 
are too small for hunters, we get the large majority 
of our polo ponies. Fortunately, for many genera- 
tions back In Ireland there have been few sires 
which were not practically, If not actually, thorough- 
bred. Even the large majority of the so-called 
half-bred sires, had the letters " h.b." after their 
respective names, only because they or one or 
more of their ancestors, though thoroughbred, were 
not entered in the stud book, in order to get the 
7 lbs. allowance at racing, when that rule was In 
force. Although several Hackney stallions have been 
introduced Into Ireland, there Is not much danger of 
their contaminating the hunter class ; for the Irish 
breeders know their business, and are very conserva- 
tive In their Ideas as regards the value of good blood. 
Up to the present, the majority of attempts at breed- 
ing ponies within narrow limits of height have failed, 



ENGLISH PONIES. 171 

on account of the tendency sires and dams have of 
"throwing back"; the fillies frequently being too 
small for polo ; the colts, too big. For instance, I 
have known a filly by a Barb out of a well-bred 
English mare to be 13.2, and her own brother 14.3 ; 
both parents being 14 hands. 

Another great difficulty our breeders have to contend 
with, is the tendency to increase in size which all 
breeds that are placed under favourable conditions of 
feeding and health in England manifest. Many sports- 
men, led by Mr. Hill, the originator of the Polo Pony 
Stud Book, are endeavouring by careful selection to 
establish a breed of ponies fit for high-class polo. If 
the attempt be possible, these gentlemen are certainly 
making it in the right way. 

The following are instances of first-class English 
polo ponies : — 

Matchbox (Fig. 39), Luna (Fig. 38), Mademoiselle 
(Fig. 44), Siren (Fig. 42), Nipcat (Fig. 70), Wig (Fig. 
71), Sunshine (Fig. 41), Charlton (Fig. 43), Dennis 
(Fig. 72), and Mickey (Fig. J^))^ which are miniature 
14-stone blood hunters; and Dynamite (Fig. 45), 
Sailor (Fig. 74), Conceit (Fig, 48), and Little Fairy 
(Fig. 46), which belong to the miniature steeplechase 
type. 

We all have our own ideas of what is the type for a 
perfect polo pony, but the best polo judges in England 
are agreed that the hunter stamp is the right one ; 
because experience has shown us that, though there 
are some ponies of the miniature steeplechase stamp 
quite as good as those of the miniature hunter type, 
there are twenty first-class ponies of the latter type 
for every one of the former. 



1/2 



BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 



We have seen on page loi that the blood hack is 
''The Wrong Sort" (Fig. 49). 

Matchbox (Fig. 39) and Mademoiselle (Fig. 44) 
are admitted by common consent to be the best show 
ponies of the present time, and next to them probably 
comes Luna (Fig. ;^S). In 1898 Luna, when younger 
and fresher, beat Matchbox for championship honours. 
These three ponies are of the same type, and combine 




Fig. 70.— Mr. G. A. Miller's "Nipcat."' 



the highest quality with substance. They have perfect 
mouths and manners, and that combination of elasticity 
and strength which makes a perfect mount. Match- 
box's polo performances are of the highest class. She 
has played in the winning team of seven open cups, 
four times at Hurlingham, twice at Ranelagh, and 
once in Dublin, and in many other less important 
tournaments. Luna has won six open cups, besides 
many smaller events. Both of them can stay, and 




Photo hii'[ 



Fig. 71.— Captain Daly's "Wig 



[Elliott & Fky. 




I'hoto hii"] 



Y\g. 72.— Mr. L. McCreery's "Dennis.' 



[M. IT. Hayes. 




Phvto bii] 



[:\r. H. HAYE= 



Fig. 73-— ^^^- L. McCreery's "Mickey." 




i" 'g- 74- — -^i''- Han)Ui iJrassey's •' bai 



ENGLISH PONIES. 177 

they always have been ridden for thirty minutes out 
of the sixty in a tight match. 

Siren (Fig. 42) and Nipcat (Fig. 70) are ponies 
of the same class and stamp as the three just men- 
tioned, but they are not so good from a show point of 
view, because they are a trifle short in front and 
carry their saddles a little forward. They have been 
ridden in all the matches played by the Rugby team 
for several years. Nipcat 's performances are quite 
unique. I rode her as a four-year-old in the winning 
team of the Open Cup in Paris in 1894; she has 
played in four winning Champion Cups at Hurlingham, 
in two Open Cups at Ranelagh, and in three Open 
Cups in Dublin. Altogether she has helped to win 
ten Open Cups. In 1901 she played for thirty minutes 
in the final of the Champion Cup at Hurlingham, in 
the Open Cup at Ranelagh, and in the Open Cup at 
Dublin. Siren's performances are as good, but she 
has not been as long at the game. In my opinion she 
is the best forward pony I have ever ridden, as she 
has more pace than those that I have just mentioned, 
and is quite as handy. It is a great pity that we know 
so little about the breeding of these flyers. The 
pedigrees of Matchbox and Luna are quite unknown ; 
Siren is believed to be by Loved One out of a pony 
mare ; Mademoiselle is by Loved One out of Madame 
Angot, a favourite old hunter mare belonging to Mr. 
L' Estrange, of Sligo. Madame Angot was by 
Munster Blazer, grand dam by Woodpecker, by Bird- 
catcher. Nipcat is by Buckshot (the sire of Swan- 
shot, Ardcarn, and many other good horses) out of a 
14-hand pony mare. Luna, Siren, Mademoiselle, and 
Nipcat are Irish. Mickey (Fig. J2)) ^^^ Dennis 

12 



178 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

(Fig. 72) are two other ponies of exactly the right 
stamp for polo. They are short, thick, strong ponies, 
with great pace combined with perfect handiness. 
It is a mistake to suppose that, because a pony is 
short and thick, he has not the same good blood in his 
veins as the long-tailed galloping sort. My experience 
is that these short, thick ponies often gallop just as 
fast, and their conformation enables them to start, 
stop, and turn more quickly than their less closely-put 
together brethren. In a race of half a mile the cobby- 
built animal will probably not have a chance against 
the long-striding thoroughbred ; but at polo, where 
ponies are always turning, stopping, and starting, the 
compactly-built pony does all these movements with 
less fatigue. Also, the harder the game and the longer 
it is continued, the more easily will he turn inside the 
long striding pony, and will repeatedly gallop quicker 
for 50 or 100 yards. Mickey and Dennis are very 
well known as having carried their owner, Mr. 
Lawrence McCrery, in all the important tournaments 
of the last few years, including the winning team of 
the Champion Cup at Hurlingham and of the Open 
Cup at Ranelagh in 1900. Dennis had previously 
distinguished himself in the Regimental Tournament 
when he was the property of Captain Pedder, 
13th Hussars. Wig (Fig. 71), Sunshine (Fig. 41), 
and Charlton (Fig. 43) are heroes of days gone by. 
Wig and Sunshine were perfect types of the miniature 
14 stone blood hunter, but Charlton was perhaps more 
of the steeplechase type ; in fact, she won several races, 
and distinguished herself in many hard-fought tourna- 
ments under the welter weight of the late Mr. " Jack " 
Drybrough. Wig was the property of Captain Daly, 



ENGLISH PONIES. 179 

who rode him in the winning team of the Champion 
Cup in 1894 and 1895. Sunshine was the first pony 
to help Mr. Buckmaster to make his present reputation 
as a polo player. 

Among ponies of the steeplechase type, Sailor 
(Fig. 74) is perhaps the best known living example. 
He won the Champion prize at Ranelagh for the 
best polo pony in 1897. When he was the property of 
Mr. Gerald Hardy, he carried the late Lieut.-Colonel 
le Gallais for the Freebooters, when they won their 
celebrated victory over Sussex in 1894; in fact. 
Sailor helped to secure the winning goal by his ex- 
traordinary speed and clash. Since 1894, he has 
been continually playing in first-class polo. In 1898 
he fetched the record price of 750 guineas for a 
polo pony when he was sold by auction. More 
money has changed hands over him than over any 
other polo pony. His breeder was Captain Cecil 
Featherstonhaugh of the Royal Dragoons. Mr. 
Grogan bought him for ^30, and he subsequently 
fetched on different occasions ^250, ^400, 750 
guineas, 460 guineas, and 410 guineas, making a total 
of ;^2,35i. He is by Lurgan out of a polo pony 
which won many races. His own sister is 15 hands 
high, and his breeder told me that she was never 
worth more than £2^. Sailor is now 12 years old. 

Conceit (Fig. 48), who is by Brag, and was bred 
by a tenant of Mr. L. de Rothschild, is one of the 
most shapely animals playing. She is perhaps the 
best of an extraordinary stud belonging to Lord 
Shrewsbury, who hardly ever buys a short tailed 
pony. All his ponies are of the steeplechase stamp, 
and he never rides a racing weed. His animals 

12* 



i8o BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

have substance as well as quality, and are well up 
to 13 stone. 

Little Fairy (Fig. 46) is one of the few racing- 
ponies I have known to be a success. I bought 
her at Tattersall's for the Champion Cup of 1897, 
and she has played in all the big matches for Rugby 
since, and in the Open Cup at Dublin in 1901, for 
the " Nomads." Her history is curious. She is 
by Glen Dale out of Leonora, and her racing name 
was Tessie. She won a selling race at Newmarket, 
as a two-year-old, and at four and five she bred foals. 
After that she was used as a hack, and was once 
sold at Aldridge's for 16 guineas. I gave 300 
guineas for her when she was 13 years old. She is 
now 17, and although she has been a roarer for 
some years, she is still able to take her place in the 
best of polo. She has the temper of an angel, 
and as she is up to 14 stone, she is very different 
to the ordinary cast-off from a racing stable. 

Dynamite (Fig. 45) is now long past her best 
days. When she belonged to Mr, J. Peat, she was 
generally considered to be the best forward pony in 
England. Certainly I have never seen any No, i 
player as good, or even in the same class as Mr. 
J, Peat, especially when he was riding his favourite. 
Dynamite was never the same pony in other hands, 
probably because of the rule that a pony could 
not be changed, unless at the owner's risk, at any 
time, except the intervals between the 10 minutes' 
periods of play. When Dynamite was at her best, 
a pony could be changed, and ten minutes were 
allowed whenever the ball went out of play. Under 
the old rules, a pony that could not stay was as 



ENGLISH PONIES, 



i8i 



valuable as a pony that could hold out, but nowa- 
days no pony is in the first class unless he can go 
from end to end of a ten minutes' period without 
tiring or pulling, An absolutely first class pony 
never pulls. The large majority of ponies begin to 
pull when they are tired, because they cannot stand 
the constant stopping, turning, and starting afresh. 




Pf^ofo by} [M. H. HATES. 

Fig- 75- — A good stamp of light weight thoroughbred up to 12 stone. 



Fig. 75 is a good stamp of a light weight pony, and 
Fig. 76 of a middle weight pony. Snipe (Fig. 77) is 
a nice type of a 14-hand pony. 

Nancy (Fig. yS), the property of Mr. Leaf, is 
a beautiful Welsh mare, and is a very favourable 
specimen of her breed. Though her pedigree is un- 
known, she looks thoroughbred. I know nothing 
personally about Wales as a place for breeding ponies. 
The few which I have bought out of Welsh droves have 



i82 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

not been a success. Welsh ponies are undoubtedly 
very hardy, and they would produce suitable polo 
ponies if sufficiently crossed with thoroughbred blood. 
I would advise anyone who intended to purchase 
young ponies in Wales for polo, to be very careful 
about pedigree, and to have nothing to say to under- 
bred blood. 

Spruce (Fig. 79), the property ot Mr. J. R. 
Walker, is by Saracen, an imported Syrian ; dam, 
Sprightly, by Awfully Jolly (or The Barb), out of the 
English polo pony, Lady Golightly. Spruce is inter- 
esting from a breeder's point of view, as he shows the 
effect of crossing English pony mares with Barb and 
Syrian blood. His dam's sire, Awfully Jolly, is a 
celebrated polo-playing Barb, which was imported 
by the Earl of Harrington, and lately sold by him 
to the Irish Congested Districts Board, which has sent 
him to stand in the West of Ireland. While standing 
at Elvaston, he got many good ponies ; among others, 
AH Baba, Aunt Sally, which sold for ^200 ; Ally 
Sloper, ;^20o; Abbott, ^150; Antelope, Arthur 
Roberts, Abbess, and many others. 

Spruce is a marvellously speedy pony. He 
stands about 14 hands; has nice shoulders and plenty 
of substance. 

Saracen, the sire of Spruce, is a handsome Syrian 
Arab which Mr. John Walker used for stud purposes 
at Barton, and which he gave me in 1893. I sent 
him to stand in County Sligo. Both Sprightly and 
Lady Golightly were good polo ponies. 




Photo bill [M. H, HAYES. 

Fig. 76. — A good stamp of a pony up to 12 stone 7 lbs. 




Fig. 77- — 14 hand pony, "Snipe." 




Fig. 78. — Mr. Leaf's Welsh mare "Nancy 




Fig. ^y. _.\h. J. K. Walker's "Spruce." 



ARABS. 187 



ARABS. 



We get almost all our Arabs from India, Bombay 
being their port of disembarkation from Bagdad, via 
the Persian Gulf. They generally arrive in Bombay 
during the months of September and October, at 
which time high prices are asked by the Arab dealers 
for anything of good class. In fact, it would be 
difficult to get a newly-imported pony, with bone, good 
shoulders and quality, for less than ^50. 

During November, 1894, I bought ten ponies in 
Bombay, after having had about 500 animals paraded 
before me, and having ridden at least 1 50. I bought 
every pony between 14 hands and 14.2 which I could 
find with good shoulders and sufficient bone. My 
speculation was not a success from a pecuniary point 
of view, because I got only two really good ponies 
out of the ten I brought home. The vast majority 
of animals in Bombay would not be worth £10 
apiece at home ; most of them being coarse and 
leggy, and having bad shoulders and ewe. necks. 
As a rule, these brutes have only a small dash of 
Desert blood. The best time for buying cheaply in 
Bombay, though naturally at a large sacrifice of power 
of selection, is during the months of February and 
March, when the dealers, with the prospect of their 
customers flitting to the hills or England, are anxious 
to sell off, lest their horses be left on their hands 
during the long hot weather. 

Johnnie (Fig. 80) is a chestnut Arab horse which was 
bought in Bombay by the late Lieut. -Colonel le Gallais 
in July, 1 89 1. Unlike most Arabs, he was not easy 



i88 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

to train. Although he played in the winning team 
of the tournaments of 1891 and 1892, his owner did 
not consider him to be a hrst-class player until the 
following year, when he played him at Hurlingham. 
While in India, he grew over height for polo in that 
country ; but coming under the Indian rule for '' Ex- 
isting Polo Ponies," he obtained a certificate and was 
allowed to play. After Captain le Gallais had put 
him on board the troopship, in which the pony went 
with him to England, he received a telegram con- 
taining an offer for the pony of 2,500 rupees, which 
he refused. Johnnie now measures 14.11^. He has 
beautiful shoulders, well-set-on head and neck, sound 
legs, sloping pasterns, and good feet. He looks a 
trifle narrow behind, but his quarters are long and 
strong, his gaskins muscular, and his hocks well 
shaped. Though by no means a showy pony, he is 
a capital type of a well-bred, wear and tear Arab. He 
played in the winning team of the Paris Inter- 
national Tournament, 1894, and of the Champion 
Cup of the same year. I bought him on the day 
of the final of the County Cup, and rode him in 
that match. I afterwards sold him to Mr. John 
Walker. Captain Tilney's Royal, which is one of 
the best Arab polo ponies that ever came to 
England, has had an exceptionally long career at 
the game. I played him in his first tournament at 
Calcutta, in 1888, for the 17th Lancers, which we 
won. He has taken part in almost every match 
played by the regiment since that date, and is 
now (February, 1902) taking his ease in Ireland, 
while his owner is in South Africa. In the last 
match in which I saw him take part, he carried his 



ARABS. 



189 



owner in the winning team of the Irish Regimental 
Cup of 1899. Although he is now 18 years old, 
I hear he is sound and well, and that there is no 
reason why he should not again play. 

Grey Dawn, the property of the late Mr. Kennedy, 
is the best Arab I have ever known in Eno-land. 




Photo by] [Elliott & Fry. 

Fig. 80. — The late Lieut. -Colonel le Gallais on his Arab pony "Johnnie." 



For substance and weight-carrying power, he is more 
like an English pony than an Arab, although he 
clearly shows all the characteristics of his Desert 
origin. In 1894 he unfortunately broke a pastern 
bone and has been sent by Lord Harrington to the 
stud at Elaston. 

Mr. Tilney's Royal, Captain Daly's Cheeky Boy, 
Mr. Kennedy's Umpire, Captain Wise's Seagull, 



190 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

Mr. Nickall's No Name, Captain Burns' Blue Blood, 
and some which Lord Milton imported in 1893, are 
very good specimens of Arab blood. 

Probably the best Arab pony which has played 
in India for some years, is Snow (Fig. 81), 
who belonged to Captain de Lisle, of the Durham 
Light Infantry. He won thirty-one races all over 
India, including the biggest pony steeplechases. He 
won four first prizes in the Bombay Horse Show 
in 1895, including the pony-jumping prize and that 
for heavy-weight polo ponies. He played in the 
winning team of many polo tournaments, and is, 
moreover, one of the best-looking Arabs I have 
ever seen. He is now at the stud in Australia. 

The chief characteristics of the high-caste Arab 
are : — 

1. Long, strong and sloping pasterns. 

2. Long back ribs. 

3. Roundness of barrel behind the girths. 

4. High setting on of tail. 

5. Width of forehead and jowl. 

6. Large eyes and nostrils. 

7. Flat, muscular loins. 

8. Fineness of the hair of the mane and tail. 

9. Thin growth of the hair on the tail. 

10. Habit of carrying the tail in one fixed position 
and generally to one side. 
Their chief defects are : — 

1. Short and heavy shoulders. 

2. Calf knees. 

3. Sickle hocks. 

4. High on the leg. 

However great a fault the possession of sickle 



ARABS. 



191 



hocks may be in a racehorse, I do not object to them 
in a polo pony ; for though it may detract from speed, 
the fact remains that ponies with sickle hocks are 
usually very handy. 

The best Arabs are bred in the Desert, and gener- 
ally bear rope marks just above the hocks. The well- 







j^-fi "<* u. 



Fig. 81. — Lieut. -Colonel de Lisle on his Arab pony "Snow." 

bred ones as a rule belong to the large district of 
Anezah, where are found Humdani Somree, Saklowi, 
Khailan Krush, Yenidji Shumarr, and other castes. 
I may remark that Nejid is a part of Anezah. 
Usually, the name of a caste is taken from, that of 
the foundation stallion of that* breed. If it be a 
double name, the second one is that of the foundation 
mare. Many so-called Arabs have never seen the 



192 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

Desert, and are really Persians, or natives of the 
Euphrates Valley. In India, these animals generally 
go by the name of Gulf (Persian) Arabs. 



EGYPTIANS. 

There are many ponies bred in Egypt, where they 
are called Bellady ponies, to distinguish them from 
Syrians, which are imported in large numbers for 
remount and other purposes. They are so interbred 
with Syrians that it is not always easy to tell one from 
the other. The Syrians, among which we may often 
see Arabs of the highest caste, all conform more or 
less to the Desert type, although some of them are 
coarse. The Egyptian ponies are of all sorts and 
shapes, without any special characteristics of a well- 
defined breed. Egyptian dealers call all their ponies 
Syrians, so as to get more money for them. 

Mr. T. B. Drybrough tells me that each of the six 
Egyptians which he had in his stables at one time, 
differed altogether in type and conformation from 
the other five ; an experience which is similar to that 
which I have had with these animals. He informs 
me that their special characteristic, leaving out ex- 
ceptional cases, is their lithe, flexible style of going, 
and that they glide along in their gallop with the 
smooth motion of a thoroughbred, but without the 
sharp, steel-like spring of the three-quarter bred 
English pony. Many of them drag their hind legs 
behind them, which causes them to lose time in their 
stride. This, which is their most common fault, is due 
to their being weak in the loins. Although they 
vary just as much as other breeds, they are, as a 



EGYPTIANS. 193 

rule, bold enough, and when taught, will hustle well. 
Their individual power of going through deep ground 
depends, of course, on their respective conformation. 
In the Delta they are accustomed to travel through 
very deep sand. Egyptian ponies may not compare 
favourably with high-caste Arabs as regards bone, 
shortness of legs, roundness of barrel and flatness of 
loins ; but they have, as a rule, better shoulders. As 
the Egyptian authorities found that the purchases of 
the English sojourners removed out of the country 
their best horseflesh, and enhanced the increased 
difficulty of obtaining remounts, they issued such 
stringent regulations respecting the export of horses, 
that it is now very hard to get horses out of Egypt, 
although an odd one or two may be exported by 
judicious management. 

In the winter of 1890-91, the ordinary price for 
Egyptians was from ^12 to ^18; and for Syrians, 
from ^5 to ^10 more. Those which had shown any 
racing pretensions fetched from £40 to ^60 ; but 
prices have gone up since those days. Raw ponies 
used to cost just as much as trained ones ; for in nine 
cases out of ten, neither Syrian nor Egyptians gave 
any trouble to train. In 1891, my brother officers and 
I sent home about twenty-five ponies, not one of 
which turned out badly. The majority of them were 
Syrians ; but of those which I know were Egyptians, 
the best were Spring, Magnet, Lancet and Modena. 

Spring, in 1892, unfortunately died. He was the 
best light-w^eight Egyptian I have ever seen, and was 
an extraordinarily good jumper. Captain Renton 
owned and played him for two seasons at Hurling- 
ham. 

13 



194 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

Lancet I bought originally for ^5. He has been 
through many hands since then, and is a good pony. 
He fetched ^175 when sold in 1894. 

Modena, who was only 13.3, was a wonderfully good 
little light-weight pony. 

The Rake, a bay pony, 14.0%, was the property of 
Mr. T. B. Drybrough, who imported him in 1892. 
He won races at Cairo. He was a smart, handy pony, 
had excellent bone, and strong, well let-down hocks. 
Although his hind legs were inclined to stream out 
behind him, this habit did not appear to affect his 
pace or powers of turning. He carried his tail high, 
and looked very like a Syrian. 

Khalifa (Fig. 82) is a chestnut pony 14. i, owned 
by Mr. T. B. Drybrough, who imported him at the 
same time as The Rake. Khalifa cost ^13 up 
country in 1892, in which year he won over hurdles 
at Cairo. He goes well in all his paces, has wonder- 
fully good shoulders, clean, well-shaped legs, and is 
very quick. His Egyptian origin is chiefly betrayed 
by his hocks being very close together. He is rather 
slackly coupled, is a trifle long on the leg, and is 
shaped rather like a mule. 

Both The Rake and Khalifa have carried their 
owner in three County Cup Tournaments, and have 
been on two occasions in the winning team. They 
carried their fourteen stone with ease, and went 
through deep ground well. Hurlingham was like a 
slough in 1893, and was by no means light going 

in 1894. 

All the Egyptian ponies I have mentioned were 
great successes in their time ; but I do not believe 
that any of them would be of much use in first-class 



SYRIANS. 



195 



polo nowadays. The class of pony in ordinary use 
has enormously improved, and I believe there are 
quite twenty good English ponies at present for 
every one that was playing in 1895. 



SYRIANS. 



All the Syrians now in England have been imported 
from Egypt, to which country they are brought from 




Fig. 82. — Mr. T. B. Drybrough's Egyptian pony "Khalifa." 



Beyroot. As the exportation of horses, except to 
Egypt, is prohibited by the Syrian authorities, and as 
the Egyptian Government will not allow them to be 
sent out of their country, the market for Syrians, as 
well as for Egyptians, is closed to English importers, 
unless in exceptional cases, worked by interest or 
bribery. The only feasible way of getting horses or 
ponies out of Syria is via Bagdad, which is far too 
roundabout a route for practical purposes. 
The term " Syrian " includes Desert-born Arabs which 

13* 



196 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

have been brought into Syria, as well as the horses, or 
rather ponies (for they seldom exceed 14.2 in height) 
which have been bred in that country. The true Arabs 
which figure as Syrians, come from the same tribes as 
do those w^hich are shipped to Bombay. In fact, an 
Arab dealer, from whom I bought two ponies in 
Bombay, in November, 1894, swore to me that they 
had been marched from Syria to the Persian Gulf, from 
whence they were shipped to Bombay. Representatives 
of the Yenidji and Saklowi breeds are to be found, 
though not very frequently, in Egypt, where we may 
sometimes see as high-caste Arabs, particularly in the 
possession of rich natives, as in India. The Syrian 
proper is a coarser animal than the Desert Arab, upon 
whose management and breeding more care is 
expended. As far as polo is concerned, I put the 
Syrians proper on a par with true Arabs ; as I have 
found just as large a proportion of good players 
among the former as among the latter. They are, as 
a rule, easier to train than Arabs. Most Syrians show 
the characteristic points of the Arab fairly well, except 
that their heads are bigger, their ears longer, their tails 
set on lower and not carried in such a flag-like manner, 
and they lack quality. As far as looks go, they are 
about half-way between Barbs and Arabs, though they 
are longer from the hip to the hock than Barbs, which 
are inclined to be goose-rumped. 

Sinbad (Fig. 83), having come from Syria to 
Egypt, whence he was imported to England by Mr. 
J. R. Walker, is classed as a Syrian, although it is more 
than probable that he is a true high-caste Arab. 
When the ground was hard, he was one of the best 
light-weight ponies in England ; but, like most of his 



SYRIANS. 197 

breed, he was not so good under a heavy burden and in 
deep ground. In his day he was a briUiant player, 
fast, had a mouth of silk, and was wonderfully quick to 
get an opening, as he was round and off before many 
other ponies would have begun to stop. His only 
defective point is that, like many other Arabs, he is 




Photo by] [M. H. HAVES. 

Fig. 83.— Mr. J. R. Walker's Syrian pony "Sinbad." 



a little short in front ; but this is redeemed by the 
perfect freedom with which he moves his shoulders. 

Peter (Fig. 84) is of a totally different stamp 
from Sinbad, his Arab origin being betrayed only by 
his long, strong pasterns, round barrel, wide forehead, 
large, intelligent eyes, wide nostrils, and well-shaped 
sensible-looking head. He is rather high on the leg 
and long in the back. In the gallop he sprawls some- 
what, and goes much higher than Arabs usually do at 
this pace ; but he has capital shoulders, long quarters, 



198 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

big, well-shaped hocks, perfect fore legs, and plenty 
of bone, I bought him in [890, at Cairo, for £21^ 
and without any preliminary training took him 
straight on to the polo ground, where he played 
perfectly, in a snaffle bridle, on the very first occa- 
sion. I knew him to be an exceptionally hard, good 
animal, and a perfect player ; but as I considered him 
too slow to be first-class at the game, I kept him as 
the slave of the establishment. He often carried me 
six miles down the hard high road in less than half- 
an-hour to the racecourse in the morning, and played 
polo on the same afternoon. I took him home in 
1 89 1, after having added him to the list before starting. 
Thinking that he was not of much value for polo, I 
lent him to a child to hunt all the following winter, and 
sold him early in the spring for £^60. As he proved 
unsuitable to his buyer, he was returned to me, so I 
began to play him again, and soon discovered that, in 
the meanwhile, he had acquired the one thing, namely, 
speed, which he had before lacked to make him a polo 
pony of the highest class. His great improvement in 
pace appears to have been undoubtedly due to his 
having been " well done " all the winter on the best of 
English hay and oats, and having been galloped with a 
light-weight on his back. The practice which he had 
through heavy ground enabled him to go faster on our 
soft English turf. Purchasers of foreign ponies should 
remember that these animals greatly improve on good 
English food, and that they are seldom at their best 
until they have been a year or two in this country. 
The same remark applies to Arab horses in India 
which get into the hands of careful owners. 

In the following spring, Peter fetched 250 guineas at 



SYRIANS. 



199 



auction. He is one of the few foreign ponies I have 
known to be equally good whether the ground is hard 
or soft, and to be able to stay. I have seen him play 
for fifty minutes out of an hour in a tight match, and I 
have ridden him on more than one occasion for thirty 
minutes on end. Although he is not exceptionally 




Photo bi,i] 



Fig. 84. — Syrian pony "Peter. 



[M. H. HAYES. 



speedy, he goes quite fast enough for his rider to be 
able to hold his own, even now in ordinary games 
and in second-class matches. His chief merit, how^- 
ever, is that he knows the game thoroughly, that 
he can play it perfectly by himself, and that he always 
does his best, no matter who is on his back. 

Although Syrian ponies as a rule are not able to 
carry a heavy weight, say fourteen stone, fast and well 
at polo through heavy ground, with strength to hustle 



200 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

and to resist the bumps of big, strong English ponies ; 
they are able, as remounts, to travel under enormous 
burdens in their own country. I used Peter in Egypt 
as second charger, all the squadron being mounted on 
similar animals. Our men in full marching order 
weighed, on an average, i8 st. 7 lbs. 

BARBS. 

Under the term " Barbs " is included all the ponies 
which are bred along the northern coast of Africa 
(especially Algiers and Morocco), excepting Egypt. 
Large numbers are imported from Tunis to Malta, and 
from Algiers and Tangiers to Gibraltar. Almost all 
the ponies at these two English stations are Barbs. 
My experience of ponies of this breed, both personally 
and with those belonging to other people, is that they 
are a good deal inferior to either Arabs or Syrians. 
Out of all the Barbs I have played and seen played in 
1894-95, amounting probably to about seventy, Mr. 
John Walker's Sherry, M. Boussod's Trappist, Lord 
Charles Bentinck's Algiers and Tangiers, and Captain 
Barclay's (loth Hussars) Abdullah are the only five 
which could be called first-class. Among others which 
I saw were the ponies of the Spanish Polo Team of 
the Brothers Larios, who were mounted entirely on 
Barbs in the International Tournament at Paris in 
1894. As they were allowed to be the best team on 
the Rock, we may presume that they were mounted 
on the pick of that place. We had four Barbs in our 
stable in 1893, and six in 1894; but out of all of 
them Trappist was the only first-class player. He 
was imported from Gibraltar by Captain C. Gordon 
Mackenzie, and now belongs to Mr. Ashton of the 



BARBS. 



201 



2nd Life Guards, who was playing him in 1901. 
My Editor, who broke in a large number of ponies 
at Gibraltar and Malta, and who made particular 
inquiries respecting the galloping powders of Barbs, 
shares my opinion as to their inferiority to Arabs. 
He regards them to be, on an average, about three 
stone worse on the flat, say, for a mile, than Arabs of 
the same height ; and looks upon them, in comparison 
to the sons of the Desert, as a particularly sulky. 




Fig. 85.— Mr. J. R. Walker's Barb pony "Sherry." 

spiritless breed. Mr. T. B. Drybrough (and so did 
the late Mr. Moray Brown) thinks highly of Barbs. 
Mr. Drybrough maintains that the reason why few 
Barbs are exported, is that the dealers cannot afford to 
buy really good ones, which the rich natives keep for 
themselves. 

In my opinion the faults of Barbs for polo are : — 

I. Want of speed. 



202 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

2. Inability to go through deep ground, stay, or 
carry weight. 

3. The possession of at least one, if not several, 
vices, such as refusing to face a scrimmage or a back- 
hander, refusing to hustle, looking round and trying to 
savage other ponies instead of doing their best in the 
game, and being sluggish. 

4. Want of courage, and tendency to become jady if 
hurt by ball or stick. 

5. Softheartedness, which is often shown by their 
doing well enough in ordinary games ; but cutting it 
when forced to go faster than they like, and against 
better ponies than themselves. 

6. Lastly and worst of all faults : their liability 
to cross their legs, or be knocked over by heavy 
English ponies. 

Their merits are : — 

1. Soundness, and ability to stand with impunity the 
ill effects of galloping on hard ground. 

2. Handiness, quickness in learning the game, and 
the possession of good mouths. 

3. Cheapness. 

4. Facility for being played by weak or indifferent 
horsemen. 

The Barb is essentially a pony for an unambitious 
player, and does well enough for ordinary club games, 
or in places like Malta and Gibraltar, where they are 
not called upon to meet animals of good class, or 
heavier ponies than themselves. 

Barb blood, for instance. Lord Harrington's Awfully 
Jolly, has nicked with our English mares. I think, 
however, that equally satisfactory results could be 
obtained by a cross with a high-caste Arab. 



ARGENTINES. 203 

The points of Barbs are much the same as Syrians, 
except that they are more goose-rumped. They are 
frequently high on the leg. As a rule, they are cow- 
hocked, narrow, and split up. They have almost 
always excellent legs and feet. 

Sherry (Fig. 85), a bay gelding, is the best and 
fastest Barb I have ever seen. Mr. John Walker, 
who still owns him, bought him from Major Peters (4th 
Hussars), in 1892. He has good shoulders, perfect 
mouth, is marvellously handy, and quick at starting. 




Fig. 86. — Argentine pony. 
ARGENTINES. 

In 1896 and 1897, we had the pleasure of two visits, 
from Buenos Ayres, of polo teams mounted on 
Argentine ponies. As almost every year players come 
over for a holiday from that place, and bring their 
ponies with them, our knowledge of these animals has 
been considerably enlarged. In London and else- 



204 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

where, these teams earned a good reputation for play, 
dash and combination in the game ; but their ponies, 
with a few exceptions, were too slow to allow them to 
compete on even terms with well-mounted English 
teams. Mr. Scott Robson, the Back of both Argentine 
teams, always has big, strong 14.2 ponies, which have 
to be really good to carry their owner, who walks 
nearly sixteen stone. Among his large stud, I liked 
Langosta and Bismarck best. Langosta thoroughly 
justified the high opinion formed of him ; for he turned 
out by far the best Argentine pony we have seen. 
My brother and I played him in the winning team of 
the Champion Cup and Ranelagh Open Cup of 1897, 
after which I sold him to Captain Renton, who has 
ridden him in all the first-class tournaments played in 
London since that time. Langosta has now, in 1901, 
for the second time, come into my possession and has 
played in all the matches of the Rugby team this year. 
I sold Bismarck to the late Mr. "Jack" Drybrough, 
who played him in the Champion Cup in 1898, and 
in many other first-class tournaments. Moloch, a black 
gelding, turned out well, although he is not as speedy 
as the other two. Mr. Spender Clay played him for 
three years in good company. Orsino was another good 
one. He was landed in 1896, was subsequently well 
known as the property of the late Lord Kensington, 
and is still playing well with Mr. Brassey. 

In 1897, ^^' Balfour imported a large number of 
ponies, among which were Slavin and Sandow, that 
were played by my brother in the winning team of 
the Champion Cup of that year. There were many 
other good ponies in that lot, but few of them were fast 
enough to compete against first-class English ponies. 



NORTH AMERICANS. 205 

I look upon Argentines as really good useful 
animals in second class company, especially for 
a beginner ; but with the exception of Langosta 
and Bismarck, I have not found them up to Champion 
Cup form. Their chief drawback, particularly for 
a weak rider, is that they take a great deal of 
driving. Fig. 86 is a good type of an Argentine pony. 



NORTH AMERICANS. 

After English and Australian ponies. North 
Americans are probably the best. Australians 
are of nearly pure English blood, and are reared 
in a splendid horse-breeding country. Consequently, 
there is probably little or no difference between them 
and our home stock. The average North American 
pony seems to have more pace than the Argentine, 
but not so much stamina as the English pony. Only 
the very best of them are up to first-class form. 
Although a large number of them has been imported 
during the last two or three years, very few have 
gained a high reputation. 

Mr. Mackey has brought over several of which I 
think the best are the Californian Rex (Fig. 47), Cap, 
Tom and Brady ; Mr. Mackey has played all these 
ponies continually in first-class matches and they seem, 
with their owner up, to be able to compete with the 
best of English ponies. Mr. Mackey used to own some 
very good English ponies, but he has given them up, 
as he finds the Americans easier to ride. Mr. Foxhall 
Keene has a fine stud of American ponies, of which 
the best are probably Texina (Fig. 102) and Chief 
(Fig. 103). Express (Fig. 104) is also good. 



2o6 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

Although few American ponies are up to tip-top 
form, they are really useful, hardy, handy animals, 
especially those which have been employed after cows, 
as it is almost impossible to knock them off their 
legs. 

Mr. Thorn used to get all his ponies from Texas, 
and is invariably well mounted. He tells me that 




•t Fig. 87. — Texan pony "Ronald." 

many of the ponies there are very well bred, owing 
to the presence of a large number of thorough-bred 
sires. He finds that the best ponies are three- 
quarter pure blood (by a thorough-bred out of a 
dam by a thorough-bred), as in Ireland, or by a 
thorough-bred out of a good broncho. In Texas, 
there is a good deal of racing over short distances, 
and we accordingly find many of these ponies to be 



NORTH AMERICANS. 



207 



extraordinarily speedy. Baron le Jeune is beautifully 
mounted on Texan ponies. 

Rondo (Fig. S^j), the property of the Hon. William 
Anson, of Coleman, Texas, is- one of the best and 
cleverest ponies ever seen in that country. 

Manita (Fig. 88) is a Texan cow-pony, which was 
imported in 1895 by Mr. George P. Millen. My 
brother and I played her in several matches and 




Fig. 88.— Mr. F. ^lenzies' Texan pony "Manita." 

tournaments that season. She is a perfect polo pony, 
and is very easy to play. Though not as fast as some 
English ponies, her extreme handiness makes up for 
a good deal of her deficiency in speed. She is 
good enough to play Back on in ordinary company. 

I wrote the above description of Manita in 1896. 
She now belongs to Mr. Menzies, who has owned her 
for the last two or three years. He finds her quick 
enough to play No. 2 in any company. He is very 



2o8 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

well mounted, and I am inclined to think that Manita 
is his favourite pony ; I suppose she has got faster 
with age ; anyhow I saw her playing well in the 
Champion Cup, Ranelagh Open Cup and Dublin 
Open Cup of 1901. 

CALIFORNIAN PONIES. 

There must be many good ponies in California, when 
we see such examples of the breed over here as Rex 
(Fig. 47), Follow Me, and Santa Romona (Fig. 
89). As a rule, it is not easy to find out from what 
part of the continent American ponies come, but I 
should think it not unlikely that California sup- 
plies a fair proportion. They probably keep most 
of their best ponies for their own use, as Mr. Charles 
Raoul Duval told me he had sold a pony in 
California for ;^300, and that he knew another which 
fetched ^600. 

Rex and Follow Me, I believe to be about as good 
as any English ponies, and I have had plenty of 
opportunities of judging, for I have played against 
them very often. 

Santa Romona, which now belongs to my youngest 
brother, is a marvellously handy pony. She has been 
through many hands ; on one occasion she was sold at 
Tattersall's for fourteen guineas, and on another she 
fetched twenty-six guineas. Her record for 1901, 
however, is a good one. Between May 15th and 
September 7th, she played in 40 matches, in 35 of 
which she was on the winning side ; that is, she 
played on an average five matches every fortnight. 
She played in the winning team of the Champion Cup 
at Hurlingham, the Open Cup at Ranelagh, the Open 



MONTANA PONIES 



209 



Cup In Dublin, and the Public Schools Cup at 
Ranelagh In 190 1. 



MEXICANS 



are very handy, and as a rule have perfect mouths ; 
but they are generally deficient in speed. Mr. 
Escandon kindly lent me two very good ones In Paris 




Plioto by] [M. H. Hayes. 

Fig. 89. — Mr. C. D. Miller's Californian pony "Santa Romona." 

in 1895. They were easy to play, quick and handy, 
but hardly up to my weight, which, with a comfortable 
saddle, is about twelve stone. 

MONTANA PONIES 

are, in Mr. Thorn's opinion, handy and good-looking ; 
but from having been reared in an alkaline district 

14 



210 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

(how that fact affects them, I cannot say), they are 
not good stayers. It is very difficult to get the 
best ones. Mr. T. B. Drybrough, who imported a 
batch, says the same thing about the difficulty of 
obtaining a satisfactory selection. They are generally 
spoiled in breaking. The young ones, being out on 
the ranche, cannot be measured and examined. 
Owners do not like selling a picked one, but expect 
purchasers to take a car load of eighteen or more at 
an average price. On open ranches they are 
handled only once a year. With the thermometer 
at — 40° F., early spring shipments are hard to 
effect. The greatest difficulty is to get on the 
other side a friend who can be trusted to buy the 
proper article. My brother once bought in the 
North of Ireland a pony (Paddy, late Buffalo Bill) 
which was known to be an American only on account 
of the brand on his quarter, and which, in appear- 
ance, speed, and every other requirement, was just 
as good as an English pony. It is therefore probable 
that he comes from Texas, and that he is three- 
quarters thoroughbred. I am certain that out ot 
a batch of raw American ponies, the proportion of 
good ones would not be large enough to make the 
speculation profitable. I am told that really good 
cow-ponies are so rare that their owners will not part 
with them, even at long prices. 

I daresay there are many other districts in the vast 
continent of North and South America where ponies 
are bred ; but the foregoing countries are the only 
pony-breeding ones of which I had been able to get 
any information. 

Before the year 1894, very few American ponies 



INDIAN COUNTRY-BREDS. 



211 



appeared on English polo grounds ; but during the last 
few years, Americans and Argentines have come in 
large numbers, and have completely cut out all other 
foreign breeds in the estimation of our players, on 
account of their nearer approach to the attributes of 
English ponies. They are sure-footed, and many 
are up to weight and fairly fast. For further remarks 
on American ponies, see pages 306 to 308. 




Fig. 90. — Gulf Arab "Spec." 
GULF ARABS OR PERSIANS 

are not as good as Arabs, and in no way suitable for 
importation into England. Spec (Fig. 90) was a 
good pony in his day, but would be of no use now. 



INDIAN COUNTRY-BREDS. 

I know only of three Indian country-breds which 
have been imported into England for polo. One was 



14 



* 



212 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 

a tiny little 12.2 animal which Captain McLaren 
brought home and played during several seasons. 
Several years ago, he used to play him in good 
games and matches, and it was simply marvellous how 
well this pony used to carry him. This little wonder 
was so clever that it could play the game without a bit 
in his mouth. Another animal of the same nationality 
was the mare Nettle, which Captain Tilney, 17th 
Lancers, imported in 1891, and which had played polo 
in India, though too big for tournaments. She was 
very narrow and leggy ; but though perfect in a slow 
game on hard ground, was not fast enough for good 
company, and was no use in heavy ground with any 
w^eight on her back. The third was the chestnut mare 
Namouna (Fig. 91), which the late Lieut. -Colonel 
le Gallais brought home early in 1893, ^^^ which he 
played at Hurlingham for two seasons. She was a 
handsome light-weight, and was not unlike a very 
slight, well-bred English pony, but narrower. 

In India I have known a few country-breds just as 
good as Arabs. Indeed, two of the best polo ponies I 
have ever seen in India were the country-breds, Joe 
and Marguerite, the property of Captain Renton. This 
breed are much more difficult to train than Arabs, 
being frequently tricky, nervous, bad-tempered, or 
pullers. Their vices are, I think, chiefly due to the 
cruel treatment which they receive from the natives 
before they come into English hands. 

In 1889 I owned a couple of exceptionally good 
country-bred ponies, named New Guinea and Pole 
Star. I believe that nowadays it is very difficult 
to get a country-bred which can compete with a good 
Arab at polo. 



INDIAN COUNTRY-BREDS 



213 



Among the distinctive breeds in India we find the 
Kathiawar ponies, which are light-weight, well-bred 
animals, with very little bone. They are usually dun 
in colour, with a dark stripe down the back. The 
Deccan ponies are smart, hardy little animals, but very 
small, being seldom more than 13 hands high. The 
Cutch ponies were the best of the indigenous breeds ; 




Fig. 91. — Indian Country-bred pony "Namouna." 

but their original type has been almost entirely altered 
by the introduction of a large number of Arab and 
English sires into the country. They are very strong, 
tough animals, with plenty of weight-carrying power 
and endurance. The best country-bred racing ponies 
have been bred in the Meerut district, and have had a 
large dash of English thoroughbred blood. 

As a rule country-breds are narrow and very light of 
bone, and would not be of much use in England, as 



214 



BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. YIII. 



they cannot carry weight through heavy ground, and 
few of them are fast enough. 



SOUTH AFRICAN PONIES. 



Very few South African ponies are worth bringing 
to this country ; for they are, as a rule, slow, weedy, 




Photo 6y] \>^- H. HAYES. 

Fig. 92,— Captain Renton's South African pony "Jess." 

and have bad shoulders. From time to time a few 
good ones have come over, such as Idgit, who made a 
name for himself when owned by Colonel Rimington 
of the Inniskilling Dragoons, and Jess (Fig. 92), the 
property of Captain Renton, was good for a small 
pony, though slow. The 7th Hussars owned a couple 
of useful ones. 



AUSTRALASIANS. 



215 



AUSTRALASIANS. 

In Australia, New Zealand, and Tasmania there are 
a large number of well-bred galloping ponies, which 
are essentially of English blood, and which differ but 
little from the home product. They are generally well 
up to weight, and are coming into fashion enormously 




Photo by] [M. H. HAYES. 

I^ig- 93- — Colonel Kuper's Australasian pony "Ophir." 

in India, where they have quite superseded Arabs as 
first-class tournament ponies. 

Colonel de Lisle, a great Indian polo player, and 
Captain of the Durham Light Infantry Polo Team, 
is a warm admirer of Australasian ponies, and prefers 
them to all others for polo in the East. He owned a 
pair of beauties, and tells me that they were quicker 



2i6 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIIL 

starters, and faster, than Arabs. These Australasian 
ponies, with all the good points of English ponies, 
have legs and feet able to stand galloping on hard 
ground. As a rule, Australasian ponies have less bone 
than English ponies ; but they can carry weight. The 
white pony belonging to Captain Neil Halg is probably 
the best Australian pony in England. She shows 
great quality, and can carry her owner's welter weight 
with ease. Ophir (Fig. 93) Is an Australian pony 
which Colonel Kuper, R.A., imported In 1901. This 
pony played in India, but will not commence his polo 
career in England until the coming season (1902). 

In 1895 the best racing pony In India was Comewell, 
an Australian, who beat out there all the English ponies, 
which are the pick of the finest English racing ponies ; 
for good racing ponies fetch Immense sums in India. 
The best Australian pony Captain de Lisle owned 
was a bay mare called Mary Morrison (Fig. 94), a 
winner of twelve races. She played In the winning- 
team of five polo tournaments, and was Imported by 
Colonel St. Quintin, of the 8th Hussars, for the Civil 
Service Cup. Her pedigree Is unknown, but from her 
performances she must have been nearly, If not quite 
thoroughbred. 

CANADIANS. 

Among the very few Canadians which have been 
Imported into this country, the only good one I know 
is Mr. Buckmaster's Bendlgo (Fig. 69), who Is a perfect 
marvel, and is by an imported English thorough-bred. 
Mr. Buckmaster bought him early in 1898, since which 
date he has played him In the finals of nearly every 
important tournament that has taken place in England. 



CANADIANS. 217 

In the final of the Rugby tournament of 1900, he did 
not get off this pony's back for half an hour ; and he 
makes a rule of always playing him for three periods of 
ten minutes in every important match. Bendigo's 
chief merits are great pace, handiness, and a perfect 
mouth. He is so easy to play that he never tires his 
rider. Mr. Lawson brought him to England after 
having won with him, in Canada, 22 races, most of 




Fig. 94. — Colonel de Lisle 's Australian pony " Mary Morrison." 

which were steeplechases : in fact, he is a perfect type 
of a miniature steeplechase horse. Mr. Buckmaster 
got several other ponies from Canada, but none of them 
was of any use. They were good-looking ponies, but 
slow, and had bad tempers as a rule. It would not be 
fair to judge Canadians by one or two small batches, 
and perhaps in the next few years some enterprising- 
sportsmen will pay us a visit from Canada and bring 
their ponies with them. We shall then have a fair 
chance of forming a correct opinion on their merits. 



2i8 BREEDS OF POLO PONIES. [Chap. VIII. 



IMPORTATION OF PONIES. 

As a last word of advice on the subject of bringing 
ponies of any breed into England, I can safely say that 
such a speculation can never pay, unless the shipment 
consists of the best-trained ponies which the country of 
exportation can produce. The risks and expenses of 
travelling and of keep, while raw ponies are being 
acclimatised and trained, would swallow up all the 
profits. Only a small proportion of raw imported 
ponies could possibly turn out good for polo ; and only 
well-trained, capable ponies fetch a remunerative price 
in this country. I have seen batches of green ponies 
brought from India, Australia, the Argentine Republic 
and America ; but I have never heard of such a con- 
signment doing more than pay very moderate interest 
on outlay. In most instances, the result was a con- 
siderable loss. 

For polo in England, English ponies are admittedly 
the best in the world. Therefore, to compete with 
them, only the best tried ponies should be brought 
from other countries. 




O 



ON 






221 



CHAPTER IX. 
POLO IN INDIA. 

Remarks on polo in India— Polo ponies— Stable management— The bitting of 
polo ponies— Indian polo rules — Subsidiary goals — Necessity for the better 
training of ponies in India— Polo pony club— Polo saddlery required for 
India. 

REMARKS ON POLO IN INDIA. 

In India, polo is far more general than in England, 
and enjoys many advantages that cannot be obtained 
in this country. There, ponies are more plentiful, 
cheaper, and easier to train. Polo is played all the 
year round, and is as popular among Anglo-Indians 
as cricket is among Englishmen at home. 

Life in an Indian station must have been very dull 
thirty years ago, before the introduction of polo, lawn 
tennis and golf, which are now played all over the 
country. No wonder that our Indian predecessors 
were afflicted with liver and shortness of temper in the 
piping times of peace. 

To a large section of His Majesty's servants, polo in 
India is not merely an amusement and a game, but is 
also a serious occupation, to which a great deal of time, 
money and trouble are devoted. Polo is now recog- 
nised by the majority of our military authorities as one 
of the most important parts of the training of an officer ; 
for there is no better riding school than the polo ground, 



222 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

and there is no game or sport which calls into play so 
many different good qualities, such as coolness, 
decision, command of temper, pluck, horsemanship, 
strength, condition, tactics, drill and organisation. 
The Captain of a regimental polo team should be 
endowed with all these qualities in no small degree, 
and the remainder of the team should back him up 
well, if they are to take a forward position in the 
annual tournaments. 

There are many more fairly good players in India 
than in England, and faster games can generally be 
obtained there than on the majority of country grounds 
in this country. I think the reason for this is that the 
game is easier to play in India than here ; because the 
grounds are hard, true and level, and the ponies are 
smaller and easier to ride than English ponies. In 
England the grounds when hard are often rough and 
bumpy, owing to their having been cut up in wet 
weather. After rain they are frequently so heavy, 
that it requires much strength and skill to hit the ball 
well. Therefore, although our English ponies have 
more speed than the Indian ones, the ball travels faster 
and easier in India, and players are continually 
trying to overtake the ball at full pace there, in- 
stead of steadying for it as in England. Conse- 
quently there are fewer pauses and scrimmages, the 
ball is not so often missed, and the game as a rule 
is faster and better. I here refer to second-class 
polo, which, after all, is what one usually meets with 
in both countries. With respect to first-class polo, 
I can state that I have had equally good games in 
both countries, and there are on an average just 
as good players in India as at home. Indeed, many 



REMARKS ON POLO IN INDIA. 223 

of our best English players began their polo education 
in the East. 

The Indian game is a looser one than the English, 
and there is much more riding off and hustling in 
it. Indeed, Indian country-breds and Arabs would 
have difficulty in standing up against the bumps of 
which a strong English pony takes no notice, a 
fact that explains why Arabs and country-breds are 
unsuitable for English polo. A few authorities have 
from time to time advocated the abolition of riding off, 
but the riding off game requires more skill than one in 
which riding off would be prohibited. It is self-evident 
that it is easier to hit a goal when we are not 
interfered with, than when we have a man pushing 
against our side with all his strength. Again, if I was 
playing Back and riding off was not permitted, I 
should say to the No. i, " Don't touch me," and I 
should hit a back-hander on the off side, if he came up 
on my near side, and vice versa. As the game is now 
played, the Back, if as well mounted as the No. i, has 
the best of it ; but if riding off was abolished, 
he would have very much more in his favour. 
I once heard a distinguished general officer give 
his opinion on riding off in a speech at an Indian 
polo dinner as follows : " I think the man on the ball is 
like a man after a pig : he should be left alone till he 
misses it." If this gentleman's ideas were carried out, 
the game would often degenerate into a tame pro- 
cession up and down the ground ; for a clever dribbler 
under such circumstances, if he avoided having his 
stick crooked, would be able to carry the ball the 
whole length of the ground, and our present dashing, 
exciting pastime would become about as lively as a 



224 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

funeral. Strange to say, this officer's opinions should 
have been entitled to some weight ; for he was a fine 
horseman, very good after pig, and a first-rate all- 
round sportsman ; but he didn't like being ridden ofif 
at polo. Once when he was playing in a regimental 
game, an excited subaltern, who was coming up behind 
with the ball, shouted: "Ride the General!" A 
furious voice was heard in reply : " Ride the General ? 
By Jove, ride the General ! And what next ? " In 
Station games, and in second-class polo in England, 
the very wrong plan, as I have already pointed 
out, is frequently adopted of not allowing a No. i 
to hit the ball at all ; whereas I maintain that No. i 
should hit the ball whenever he can, unless he is told 
by the man behind him ''to leave it." The No. 2 is 
frequently a selfish player who tells the No. i to " leave 
it," only because he wants to hit the ball himself: a 
man who is guilty of such conduct does not deserve 
to play in a good team. This restriction of No. I's 
duties is entirely opposed to the principle of inter- 
change of places, which is a marked feature of 
scientific polo. It stands to reason that a team in 
which each of the four men will be able in all pro- 
bability to hit a goal, if they get anything like an easy 
shot, will have an advantage over one that contains 
only three men capable of doing so. If a man is 
always playing No. i and is never allowed to hit the 
ball, he will, from want of practice, be unable to hit a 
goal with any certainty when he gets the chance. 
Besides, if the No. i be a better player, a finer horse- 
man, and better mounted than the Back, he will very 
likely get more chances and openings (which it would 
be folly not to take advantage of) than those behind him. 



POLO PONIES. 225 

A writer who carries great weight and whose 
name will always be specially connected with Indian 
polo, is Colonel de Lisle. Indian polo players owe 
him a debt of gratitude, for having proved to 
them the possibility of playing on first-class ponies 
in first-class company for almost nothing. He has 
shown them that a team of novices can by practice, 
care, keenness and discipline, be brought into the very 
front rank ; and he has also written exhaustively for 
their benefit on subjects connected with stable 
management and the training of ponies. 

POLO PONIES. 

The six usual ways of buying a trained pony in 
India are : 

1. When a regiment is going home. 

2. After a tournament. 

3. When the opportunity of buying a pony which 
one knows well, is offered. If a trial is given, so much 
the better. 

4. By advertisement, and by going to see the adver- 
tised pony. 

5. Sending a competent friend to buy an advertised 
pony. 

6. Buying an advertised pony by reputation or by 
the owner's description. 

The first four of these methods are undoubtedly the 
best. If the intending purchaser knows nothing 
about horses, he ought to abide by the advice of a 
competent friend. The sixth method is to be recom- 
mended only when reliance can be placed on the 
accuracy of the description, or when there is no 
doubt that the pony's reputation has not been overrated. 

15 



226 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

If the man In search of a raw pony Hkes the 
appearance of the animal, the first thing for him to do, 
supposing that either he or his friend is a fairly good 
judge, is to get a ride on it. He should, therefore, 
always take a saddle, bridle and martingale with him, 
if he goes to a fair, and having selected the ponies by 
their appearance, he should mount them in order to try 
their paces, mouths, and tempers ; for many of the 
best-looking ones are the greatest brutes to ride. 
These remarks apply just as much to Arab stables in 
Bombay as to up-country fairs. I have ridden thirty 
ponies in a single day in the Bombay stables, and have 
frequently had to reject a beautiful-looking animal, 
only because he could not use his shoulders, which is 
a fault that cannot be ascertained without riding the 
animal. I may here refer my readers to page 190 
for information about the points of an Arab. With 
regard to country-breds, see my remarks respectively 
on them and on English ponies ; for the ideal country- 
bred is a miniature 13-stone English hunter. Though 
such animals are few and far between, I have seen 
them, and have owned more than one. They are to 
be found in India ; because there is a great deal of 
thoroughbred English and Arab blood in that country. 
As regards the respective merits of country-breds 
and Arabs for polo in India, I unhesitatingly plump 
for Arabs. Although some of the best ponies I have 
ever seen in India were country-breds, their average 
of fair polo ponies is much smaller than that of Arabs, 
the majority of which will make really good ones. 
We may find country-breds better than any Arab ; but 
such animals are rare exceptions ; and, as a rule, 
Arabs have more weight, bone, and substance than 



POLO PONIES. 227 

country-breds, and last much longer. Colonel de Lisle 
and most other first-class players prefer Australians 
to anything else for polo in India, and very naturally 
too ; as they seem to me to combine all the virtues 
of the English pony, with better legs and feet. Indeed, 
the best pony I saw in India was an Australian be- 
longing to the Maharajah of Cooch Behar ; and now 
that the height has been raised to 14. i I fully 
expect to see the Australian supersede the Arab 
in first-class India polo, to almost as great an 
extent as the Arab has superseded the country- 
bred. I think I am right in saying that when I 
played for the 17th Lancers at Meerut in r888, 
there was only one Arab pony playing in our team ; 
all the rest being country-breds. In 1895 I played 
at Lucknow against the i6th Lancers, who were 
mounted almost entirely on Arabs, there being only 
one or two country-breds. The only reason that 
Arabs may still continue to hold their own, is that 
Australians are far harder to train ; so that mo- 
derate horsemen, who constitute by far the majority 
of polo players, will always find that Arabs suit 
them best. Australians have the great advantage 
over Arabs, of not being nearly so likely to fall. On 
the whole, I would strongly recommend beginners, if 
they can do so, to stick entirely to Arabs. 

When passing through Bombay, as nearly every 
newcomer does, [the intending polo player should 
buy, or get a friend to buy for him, an Arab pony. 
Although Arabs are 'more expensive than country- 
breds, the increased cost will be more than made 
up by the greater probability of success. I am 
here alluding of course to untrained ponies. Arabs 

15* 



228 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

take a long time to get fit and to learn to gallop ; 
but they are such sensible, hard, sound animals, 
and so easy to train, that it is a real pleasure to own 
them. Country-breds, though sound and tough, are 
often fidgety, excitable, and possessed with a pain in 
their tempers. Regimental polo clubs, if buying a 
batch of raw ponies for different men to train, should 
never touch country-breds ; but should buy Arabs, 
which will pay better, even at double the cost. I 
attribute the great improvement during the last few 
years in the class of ponies played up-country in 
India by good teams, to the employment of Arabs. 

STABLE MANAGEMENT. 

As regards stable management, I cannot do better 
than refer my reader to Training and Horse Manage- 
ment in India, by my Editor, and will limit myself to 
the following hints : — 

J. Ponies should get enough regular work. If 
a pony has only one or two days' play at polo in a 
week, he will require faster work than being merely led 
about by a syce at a walk. I always made my syces 
ride, instead of lead — as is usually the custom in 
India — their ponies ; for I knew that they could not, on 
foot, give them a sufficiency of smart walking exercise, 
which should occupy daily about three hours (say, two 
in the morning and one in the evening), when the 
animals are not ridden on off days by the owner. If 
ponies are not playing polo regularly, they should have 
trotting and cantering exercise, as well as walking ; 
because it puts muscle on, and keeps the wind right. 

2. It is well in India to crush the corn, the best mix- 
ture of which is quarter gram, quarter bran and half 



STABLE MANAGEMENT. 229 

oats. If oats cannot be obtained, we may give equal 
quantities of gram, bran, Indian corn, and parched 
barley. Boiled barley may be given with advantage 
as an evening feed after a game of polo. Indeed, 
whether the pony is playing or not, a feed of boiled 
barley, two or three evenings a week, will be found 
excellent for the animal's coat and general condition. 

3. Lucerne grass should be grown and given by 
every horse owner in India. Sick horses will eat it 
when they will touch nothing else. It is far better as 
a rule than cooling medicine, for horses which are laid 
up from accidents or other causes. Even when in fast 
work a little of it does a deal of good. Several crops 
of it can be grown in the year, and, when once planted, 
it requires only to be irrigated, in order to make it 
last several years. 

4. Doob (called hurryalee in Madras) grass Is the 
most important factor In keeping a pony In good con- 
dition, and getting flesh on him. Care should be 
taken that the grass cutters bring In a sufficient supply 
of it. 

5. Ponies should get every day In their food about 
3 ozs. of salt, or a lump of rock salt should be left 
constantly in their mangers. 

6. Chopped rice straw Is a good addition to a horse's 
corn, as it helps him to digest it, and makes him eat 
slower than he otherwise would do. It Is given like 
hay chaff In England. 

7. Unlimited water should be given to every pony. 
The best plan is to leave a bucket of water In the stall. 
If we find it empty, we shall know that the syce Is to 
blame. 

8. In the cold weather we should see that the 



230 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

animals have plenty of bedding and clothing. Nothing 
knocks off their condition more than to be short of 
these necessaries ; for they feel cold severely, and 
Indian stables are draughty. 

9. xAs drainage is difficult to manage in India, mud 
floors to stables are better than solid ones, which are sel- 
dom well made in that country. The great advantage of 
the mud flooring is that it can be constantly renewed, the 
foul portions being removed every morning, and replaced 
by fresh earth. In damp climates, such as the indigo 
districts, that awful scourge " kumry " (paralysis of the 
loins) would be to a great extent avoided if the floors 
of the stables were raised about three feet above the 
level of the ground. 

10. Syces should be allowed to exercise ponies 
only with big, smooth, unjointed snaffles ; not with 
the thin abominations in ordinary use. When the 
ponies are being led, the mouthpiece should be a 
smooth, round ring, so that, in all cases, more pressure 
will not be put on one side of the mouth than on the 
other. The leading reins should be short enough to 
obviate the danger of the ponies stepping on them, 
and getting tripped up, in the event of the ponies 
breaking away from their syces, as they are often 
apt to do. 

The following would be a good daily programme 
of work, grooming and feeding in an Indian polo 
stable during the hot weather. The only difference 
I would advise for the cold weather, would be that 
the work should begin at daylight. It should be 
remembered that too much attention cannot be paid 
to regularity in the hours of feeding and exercise. 
If the same thing is done every day at the same 



STABLE MANAGEMENT. 231 

hour, syces will soon get into the way of doing the 
work methodically, which is of great importance ; 
because regularity of hours has a very beneficial 
effect on the condition of all horses. 

4.45 a.m. Water; feed with about i lb. of grain; 
pick out the feet ; remove all dung and other foul 
matter from the floor ; take up the bedding and put 
it outside the stable ; remove the clothing ; and rub 
down lightly. 

5.30 to 7 a.m. Exercise ; syces riding. 

7 to 8 a.m. Water on coming in, and give an 
hour's grooming, which should be real hard work for 
the syces. Vigorous grooming is one of the most 
important matters in keeping a pony in condition and 
muscle. If the syces are not looked after, they will 
simply pretend to work, and will only lightly rub the 
animal over with a damp cloth. There should on no 
account be any washing. The syces should be made 
to pay particular attention to picking out the feet 
clean and drying them. The grooming should be 
done systematically with brush and curry comb, 
supplemented by energetic hand and elbow rubbing, 
which natives can do well, if they like. 

8 a.m. Feed with from 2 to 2]/^ lbs. of grain, 
and a small supply of the previous day's grass, which 
should have been very carefully cleaned. Bed down ; 
clear the syces out of the stable ; and leave the ponies 
perfectly quiet, with the chicks down, and the stable 
darkened. 

12 noon. Water and feed with from 2 to 2^^ lbs 
of grain. 

At an hour and a half before the time to start polo 
or for evening exercise, say about 2 o'clock, open the 



232 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

stables, put the bedding out again, and give the 
ponies another real good dressing. 

As soon as the ponies return in the evening, they 
should be watered, dressed and made comfortable for 
the night. A big feed of grass may be left with them 
the last thing. 

THE BITTING OF POLO PONIES. 

I have been surprised, on inspecting the ponies on 
several polo grounds in India to find that the 
majority of them were ridden in Hanoverian Pel- 
hams. I noticed, on one occasion, that out of 
eight ponies, six were thus bitted. The presump- 
tion from this is that such ponies are inclined to 
'' catch hold " a bit, or, at least, that they would do so 
in lighter bridles. Among the eight ponies just men- 
tioned, there was only one standing martingale, which 
was too long, and only one noseband, which was too 
loose to be of the slightest benefit. I am perfectly 
aware that a few ponies which would pull in any other 
bridle, go kindly in a Hanoverian Pelham ; but am 
convinced that, as a general rule, it is better first of all 
to try the effect of a lighter bit, with a properly applied 
standing martingale and noseband, than such a severe 
bit, without these useful adjuncts. The science of 
bitting is less studied in India than in England, al- 
though the need of it is greater in the former than in 
the latter country ; because, other things being equal, 
ponies are not under such control in India as at home. 
One great reason for this is that the ground does not 
give as good foot-hold for stopping and turning as 
springy English turf Another is the smaller size of 
the ponies. It stands to reason that a big, strong 



INDIAN POLO RULES. 233 

English pony, being much better up to his rider's 
weight, is able to stop more readily when going at full 
speed than a pony which is two or three inches 
smaller. 

I would, therefore, recommend Indian polo players 
to pay the greatest attention to the question of bitting, 
which I may briefly define as the proper application 
of the standing martingale and noseband, and the 
intelligent selection and adjustment of a bit which 
gives ample control with the least possible pain. 

These remarks of mine must not be taken as 
applicable to first-class polo in India ; for most of the 
good players I have seen out there, thoroughly under- 
stood the value of having their ponies properly under 
control, and went the right way to work to attain their 
object. 

INDIAN POLO RULES. 

The Indian Polo Rules are under the direction and 
management of the Indian Polo Association. The 
Hurlingham Rules and those of the Indian Polo 
Association are, as regards general principles, almost 
identical, with the following important exceptions : — 

1. Height of ponies. 

2. Penalties for fouls and dangerous ridino-. 

3. Time occupied by a match, and rules for changing 
ponies. 

4. Riding off 

5. Subsidiary goals. 

6. Rules for left-handed players, and a few minor 
differences. 

On account of many serious and some fatal accidents 
having taken place, the Indian authorities, headed by 



234 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

the Commander-in-Chief, drew attention to the 
necessity of making the game less dangerous ; the 
result being the establishment of the Indian Polo 
Association and the enforcement of stricter rules. 

Under the Indian Rules, the penalties for fouls and 
dangerous riding are more severe than under the 
Hurlingham code. 

Height of Ponies'. — The height of polo ponies in 
England is 14.2. In India, no pony is allowed to 
play in a tournament until it has been measured by 
stewards appointed by the Indian Polo Association, 
which publishes a register of all ponies that have 
successfully passed that ordeal. The height has 
been raised to 14. i. 

The rule as regards ridhtg off is, usually, taken in a 
very much more liberal spirit by umpires acting under 
Hurlingham Rules, No. 16, than those guided by the 
Indian Rules. What at home would be looked upon 
as " a fair bump ; a bit of an angle perhaps ; but quite 
safe," would most unhesitatingly be given as a foul by 
any umpire in India ; and quite right too. English 
ponies are so big and strong, and so well able to carry 
their riders' weights, that it is, happily, almost im- 
possible to upset them. 

As regards the prevalence of bad accidents, 
allowance must of course be made for the hardness 
of an Indian ground, on which a fall is a much more 
serious business than at home. I have seen some bad 
falls in India, and have no hesitation in saying that 
they were caused by the ponies not being up to their 
riders' weight ; by being blown or tired ; by the fact 
of the animals being badly trained, wrongly bitted, or 
out of hand ; or by the riders being bad or reckless 



INDIAN POLO RULES. 235 

horsemen. I am perfectly convinced, and am by 
no means alone in my opinion, that these are the 
most fruitful causes of accidents wherever polo is 
played. But I do not believe that an accident has 
ever been due to the fact of a pony being an inch 
or so too big, unless, perhaps, the pony collided 
with some weak little animal which was greatly over- 
weighted. 

Strict limitation of height, not to exceed 13.3, made 
the game much more expensive, as it reduced the 
choice of ponies. There was a very large number of 
animals which were just over the height, and which, 
otherwise, would have been suitable for polo. I know 
nothing more maddening than to take a great deal of 
time and trouble to make a nice pony perfect at polo, 
and then to find that it has, in the meantime, grown 
half an inch too big. The smaller size of the ponies 
handicapped a heavy-weight in India. In England, it 
is rather an advantage at polo to be heavy, provided 
the man can afford to pay for the best of ponies. 
Some of our very best players ride well over 14 stone 
on ponies which are able to carry them with the 
greatest ease ; and can gallop even with the light- 
weights. It was different in India ; for small ponies 
cannot gallop or stop quickly with a welter-weight in 
the saddle. 

With the limit now raised to 14,1, these objections no 
longer exist, and the game will, I think, be safer and 
better for men of all weights. I believe that the raising 
of the height was chiefly due to the good influence of 
the Inspector-General of Cavalry in India, General 
Locke Elliot. He knew that 14. i animals would 
be of far more use than smaller ones, for military 



236 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

purposes, especially as native cavalry and mounted 
infantry remounts and chargers ; and that the army 
would consequently be benefitted by giving encour- 
agement to the importation of Arabs and Australians 
of that height. Also, every Indian polo player 
will be able to ride his ponies hunting, pig-sticking, 
paper-chasing, or in any other amusement or sport 
which may turn up. I know from experience that 14. i 
ponies are quite big enough for chargers in South 
Africa. 

Time occtipied by a match. — In India, a match is 
limited to forty minutes' actual play ; in England, to 
one hour, including all stoppages, except the intervals 
for changing ponies. In India, a timekeeper with a 
stop-watch must be appointed at every match, in order 
to deduct the odd seconds every time the ball goes out 
of play, and to time the longer delays when a goal is hit. 
The result of this is, that matches in India generally last 
longer than in England, where umpires are responsible 
for hurrying up the players without waiting for any- 
one, and where players who change ponies do so at 
their own risk, except at the end of the ten-minute 
periods. In England, no time is deducted except the 
authorised intervals between the periods of play, or 
when a man or a pony is disabled from an accident. 
This plan is certain to be adopted in India before 
long, with modifications as regards time, and limits to 
suit the different conditions of play. 

In India, a match is often protracted to an uncon- 
scionable length ; whereas in England, if men do not 
take too long to change ponies, it will be over in an 
hour and sixteen minutes, or thereabouts. I think 
it would be a much better plan in India to deduct 



INDIAN POLO RULES. 237 

no time except the specified intervals between the 
periods of play. In order to allow for the extra 
time required by this proposed method, an alteration 
in the length of time occupied by a match would 
have to be made. For instance, instead of play 
occupying forty minutes, as is now the rule, sixteen 
minutes more might be given, or fifty-six minutes in 
all, split up into eight periods of seven minutes each. 
This would result in no more actual play than under 
the present arrangement, but matches would be played 
off in less time ; for a great deal more than sixteen 
minutes (in addition to the regular three-minute 
intervals now allowed) is wasted in every match at 
present. Under the existing rule, it is no uncommon 
thing to see a match which, including stoppages, 
should last but little more than an hour, drag itself 
out into a matter of two hours. It must be re- 
membered that in India the ball goes out of play 
much more frequently than on an English ground, 
where, as a rule, there are boards, and where the 
''going" is not so hard, and is consequently not so 
fast. If it were found that seven minutes is too long 
for a pony to play at one time in a really fast match, 
the whole might be divided up into shorter periods 
of play ; or it might be left, as a matter of private 
arrangement, to the Captains of sides in an ordinary 
match, or to the Committee in a tournament, to decide 
into how many periods of play the match, or series 
of matches, should be divided. I feel convinced it 
would make a match more enjoyable both to players 
and spectators, if no time were deducted when the 
ball goes out of play ; because we would no longer 
see players strolling up to the middle after a goa 



238 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

is hit, or casually taking their places, when the ball 
goes out at the side ; because they know that the 
Umpire will not throw the ball in until every player 
is in his place. This plan would have the further 
advantage of removing the uncertainty as to how long 
a match would last, which is no unimportant matter in 
a country of brief twilight. Besides, one official less 
would be required, namely, the man with the stop- 
watch. At present, to manage a match properly on 
any Indian ground, four goal referees, owing to the 
existence of subsidiary goals, are needed : two 
umpires, a scorer, and a timekeeper, amounting in 
all to seven officials, which is a number of kind, un- 
selfish men that is not always easy to find. If the 
stop-watch could be dispensed with, the duties of 
scoring and keeping time could be performed without 
the slightest trouble by one man. At present, it takes 
all the time and attention of one man to keep the 
time accurately. 

SUBSIDIARY GOALS. 

I have no hesitation in saying that subsidiary goals 
are a mistake, and should be abolished. The primary 
object in all polo is to hit goals, and the team which 
cannot do this ought to lose the match. Subsidiary 
goals are a premium on bad goal shooting. We often 
see a stronger side make a score of, say, two goals and 
seven subsidiary ones, against two goals by the weaker 
side, who evidently took advantage of the few opportu- 
nities they received, while their opponents made a mess 
of the numerous chances which their superiority gave 
them. In such cases, it would only be fair that the 
weaker side should have a chance of winning the match 



TRAINING OF PONIES IN INDIA. 239 

by playing it out. It may even happen that a match 
may be won by subsidiaries, without any goal being 
scored by either side. Surely this is not polo ? 

NECESSITY FOR THE BETTER TRAINING OF PONIES 

IN INDIA. 

The bad training of the ponies and bad riding of the 
players is due to the fact that polo is a much more 
general game than in England. Very many men who 
go out to the East without ever having been on a 
horse, or with only very elementary ideas about equita- 
tion, immediately start, like good sportsmen as they 
are, to learn to ride by playing polo. Frequently, not 
being able to buy a trained pony, they begin on one 
which knows as little of the game as they do themselves. 
1 know several grounds in India where no one dreams 
of taking the trouble even to break their ponies to 
stick and ball before putting them into a game ; nor do 
they even think of making their new purchases in the 
slightest degree handy before playing them. If they 
would take the trouble even to bit their ponies properly 
and to teach them to stop and turn, and to change 
their legs, they would make their games of polo a 
pleasanter and safer amusement for themselves and 
their friends. 

In England, as a rule, polo is played by fairly 
rich men, who, if they are bad horsemen, can afford 
the luxury of a trained pony which will not need 
much riding. Those who have not sufficient money 
to buy a really good one, usually content themselves 
with an animal which knows the game, but which 
is perhaps a bit of a screw, or rather troubled with 
the slows. Owing to the absence, as a rule, of special 



240 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

training, such animals can rarely be got, particularly 
up country, in India. 

One day, while riding to an up-country ground, on 
which I had been engaged to play, I apologised to a 
member of my side, by saying: " I fear I shall be of 
no use this time, as my pony has never played 
before." My friend replied: "He is sure to be all 
right ; you will have taken at least the trouble to 
knock a ball about on him." It amused me to find 
that I was regarded as an exception to the general 
rule in that part of India, of not doing anything with 
a pony to make him handy and reliable before 
attempting to play him. 

My remarks on the bad training of ponies apply 
only to many station games. I am quite aware 
that the good polo-playing Rajahs and good polo 
regiments are just as particular about the training 
of their ponies, and have as good players, as one 
ever sees in England. By the Indian Polo Associa- 
tion Rules, in every station where polo Is regularly 
played, a " Station Polo Committee " must be ap- 
pointed ; their chief duties being to see that there is 
'*no dangerous riding," and that ''no pony Is allowed 
to play except It be well broken, properly bitted, and 
under the maximum height." To judge by some 
of the ponies I have seen playing on Indian grounds, 
I do not think that all the Polo Committees are as 
stringent as they might be on the subject of training 
ponies. If they Insisted on double bridles, standing- 
martingales and nosebands being used on all ponies at 
all Inclined to pull, and on all ponies with snaffles being 
ordered off the ground, except a few extraordinarily 
handy ones, they would make the game much safer 



TRAINING OF PONIES IN INDIA. 241 

than It is at present. I am confident that there is not 
one pony in five hundred which does not play better 
in a double bridle than in a snafiie ; 75 per cent, go 
better with nosebands than without ; and the large 
majority of Arabs and country-breds should not be 
ridden without a standing martingale. A noseband 
and martingale may be dispensed with, only when a 
pony is perfectly broken, and when his rider is a really 
fine horseman, but such a combination is rare in an 
ordinary station game. 

An indifferent horseman can make an ordinary pony 
handy enough for safety on a polo ground, by teaching 
him to stop and turn in a riding school. Almost any- 
one in India can get sufficient space for this in his 
** compound," or in some adjoining waste space, where 
he can enclose a piece of ground thirty yards long and 
ten yards wide, with a surrounding mud wall, five feet 
high. Except in the rains, this will answer the 
purpose as well as the most elaborate riding school. 
The floor can be left alone, if it consists of ordinary 
soil, and will merely require to be occasionally raked 
over and levelled. 

Chapter V„ contains information on riding school 
work ; but if the instructions therein given are too 
elaborate for a beginner, he can do a great deal with a 
pony by galloping him round the improvised school, 
cutting figures of eight, turning about sharp both ways, 
and stopping dead, on the loudly-shouted word 
" whoa ! " All the aids may be incorrect and the 
horsemanship bad ; but if the novice gets his pony to 
do all this with a slack snaffle rein, the practice will 
improve his mount in handiness and safety. 

Many a man has said to me, ''My pony won't play 

16 



242 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

in a double bridle." This may be quite true ; but the 
reason probably is that the curb chain is put on too 
tightly or twisted wrongly ; or because the pony has 
not been broken to it. The owner should break his 
pony to a double bridle by substituting a leather curb 
for the steel one, and by protecting the comers of the 
mouth with leather guards. Then in a few days he 
will see what a great improvement his pony will have 
made ; but he must ride him about, and break him 
in this bridle for some days, before taking him into a 
game. Arabs and country-breds are so much easier 
to train than English ponies, that there is really 
no excuse for the large majority of ponies in India not 
being handy enough to do awav with the serious element 
of danger which, I am sorry to say, still exists on 
ordinary Indian grounds. 

Another danger, which is by no means confined to 
India, is the reckless waving of sticks in a scrim- 
mage or at other times, with criminal disregard of 
consequences to friend, adversary or pony. I know 
two cases, within the last year or two, of men who 
have lost an eye from blows of sticks at polo. It can- 
not be impressed too much on all players that they 
should keep their sticks low in a scrimmage, and that 
they should not hit about recklessly. No man should 
allow his stick to finish in the air, if there is another 
player within reach. 

POLO PONY CLUBS. 

The great drawback to polo as compared to every 
other game, is its expense ; because, in the majority 
of cases, it is undoubtedly a costly amusement. If a 
man is capable of training ponies well, there is no 



POLO PONY CLUBS. 243 

reason why the game should cost him much, either in 
India or England. The generality of players, how- 
ever, are far more apt to spoil a young pony than to do 
him good ; and besides, their judgment in the purchase 
of animals is frequently at fault, which fact naturally 
enhances the cost of the game to them. In order to 
help the majority, various systems have been started 
in regiments to lessen the heavy expense which polo 
entails on individual players. I shall now discuss four 
of these systems. 

1st. A fund raised entirely by subscriptions, which 
may vary from Rs. 2 to Rs. 10 a month for every 
officer of the regiment who belongs to the Polo Pony 
Club, in order to pay the travelling expenses of the 
team to and from tournaments. The help thus given 
to members of a team, may prove to be too small to 
enable a poor man to play. 

2nd. A fund raised in the same manner and with 
the same object as the above, but from which in 
addition, money may be borrowed without interest for 
the purchase of ponies by members, subject to the 
approval of the Committee, who have a claim on 
such ponies for tournaments. 

As a rule, this plan works well ; but although it 
enables a man without money to mount himself, it 
may be an inducement to get into debt. 

3rd. The following is the system which has been 
worked with great success by Colonel de Lisle in the 
Durham Light Infantry : 

A sum of money is borrowed for the purchase of 
the first lot of ponies, which are bought raw in the 
Bombay stables, and are distributed to the members of 
the regiment. A monthly subscription of Rs. 2 is 

16^ 



244 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

charged to every officer, and each player is given two 
ponies, whose stable expenses he has to pay. The 
ponies are sold off annually, and the funds of the club, 
which are almost entirely derived from the profit made 
from these sales, are devoted to paying off borrowed 
capital, buying new ponies, and paying the expenses 
of the team to tournaments. 

This system has worked admirably under Colonel de 
Lisle, to whom is due its entire success in the case of 
his team. It is however doubtful that in most 
regiments a man who is a fine judge of the raw article, 
a good buyer, sound organiser, and capable trainer, 
could be found. I think that in ordinary cases a sub- 
scription of Rs. 2 would be too small : because the 
success of a regimental club will generally depend on 
subscriptions, and not on the profit of ponies sold. 
Besides, ponies as a rule should be kept, and not sold 
annually. 

4th. This system is more expensive than the last 
one, but will I think be found to cost players far less 
than if they had to buy their own ponies. Its details 
can vary according to circumstances. If a regiment 
can afford it, the subscriptions should be fairly high, 
and I would point out to any Committee which intends 
to start a club of this kind, that the more money they 
have at their disposal, the less trouble and anxiety will 
they experience. 

Let us take as an example a regiment numbering 
twenty-five officers belonging to the Polo Pony Club, 
of whom fifteen are polo players, and that the club 
is formed with the idea of supplying each player with 
two ponies. Non-players can join, if they like, at 
a monthly subscription of Rs. 5, which will bring 



POLO PONY CLUBS. 245 

in an annual income of Rs. 600, supposing that all 
the ten non-players belong to the club. It is advis- 
able that each player should pay an entrance fee 
of Rs. 100 ; but in any case the subscription should 
not be less than Rs. 10, with an additional Rs. 5 for 
each pony supplied. The entrance fees would bring in 
a lump sum of Rs. 1,500, and the subscriptions from 
players and non-players and the monthly payments 
for the ponies would bring in an annual income of 
Rs. 4,200. If from this we deduct Rs. 1,200 as interest 
at 8 per cent, on Rs. 15,000 borrowed, the yearly balance 
to the good would be Rs. 3, coo, a certain proportion of 
which might go towards paying off capital, and the 
remainder for the purchase of new ponies and tourna- 
ment expenses. This co-operative polo society scheme 
can be worked by any number of players, who would 
find that they could thus play more cheaply than by 
any other arrangement. It would be easier to carry 
out this system in a regiment than elsewhere ; although 
there is no reason why a smart Committee should not 
work it for a county club in England, just as well as 
for a regiment. 

If three men can raise enough money to buy nine 
ponies, and will carry out the system on exactly the 
same lines, entrance fees and subscriptions varying 
according to circumstances and the class of pony 
required, it will be found that they can work it in the 
same manner as if there were twenty or thirty mem- 
bers with fifty or sixty ponies. The only difference is 
that the larger the number in the club, the more good 
management, care and trouble will be required of the 
Committee. One great advantage of this system is 
that a man will know exactly how much his polo will 



246 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 

cost him. If he has two ponies, their stable expenses 
will amount to about Rs. 50 a month, and he will know 
that he is spending under Rs. 800 per annum on the 
game. If he cannot afford this, he cannot play ; but 
anyhow he will not be liable for more than this sum ; 
for the club takes all risk, and he has to find no capital 
for outlay. 

Rich men in a regiment which has a club of this 
kind can help in a very substantial way, by means of 
money, and by making no demands on the club for 
ponies. Every Polo Pony Club should be simply 
a co-operative society, solely for the benefit of its 
members. It should be entirely self-supporting, 
and it should not be considered obligatory on any 
member of the regiment whether a polo player or 
not to join it. 

I have heard that in some parts of India, Polo Pony 
Clubs are forbidden by the authorities, on the ground 
of running of^cers into extravagance, and of forcing 
them to pay unnecessary subscriptions. If the above 
plan were adopted, I do not think that this argument 
could possibly hold good ; in fact, the tendency would 
be rather towards economy. 

For the guidance of those who may wish to try this * 
system, I append the following rules, which can be 
altered according to circumstances : — 

1. The Committee shall consist of three members 
of the club, two of whom shall form a quorum. Their 
decision shall be final on all points. 

2. Entrance fee Rs. 100, and monthly subscription 
Rs. 10, with an additional Rs. 5 a month for each pony 
supplied by the club. 

3. All the stable expenses of the ponies to be 



POLO PONY CLUBS. 247 

borne by the respective members in whose possession 
they are. 

4. The club ponies may not be hunted, ridden pig- 
sticking, or lent to anyone, without special permission 
from a member of the Committee. 

5. All risks to the ponies while playing polo are 
taken by the club. But if the pony is injured or dies 
when not playing polo, his temporary owner may be 
held liable for his full value. 

6. At the option of the Committee, any member of 
the club may purchase a pony from the club at cost 
price ; but such pony may not be sold out of the club, 
without being first offered to the Committee at a 
discount of 10 per cent, for each complete year the 
pony has been in his owner's possession. 

7. Any member of the club having a pony for sale, 
is bound to offer it to the Committee before selling it 
to anyone else. 

8. The Committee may apportion the ponies as 
they think best, and may take a pony away from one 
member at any time and give it to another, if they 
think fit. 

9. The Committee may call on any pony's services, 
for any purpose which they may consider of advantage 
to the club. 

10. The Committee may sell any club pony at any 
time. 

11. x'\ny member of the club who takes a pony for 
the purpose of training it for polo, is charged no sub- 
scription for it, until it has been passed by the 
Committee as a trained polo pony. If no one can be 
found to take ponies, the club bears all expenses of 
keep. 



248 POLO IN INDIA. [Chap. IX. 



POLO SADDLERY REQUIRED FOR INDIA. 

A man can play polo in India with only a small 
supply of saddlery and stable gear. If money be no 
object, nothing conduces more to one's comfort than a 
plentiful supply of stable kit ; and if a man means to 
set up a large stud on his arrival in the country, he will 
find it a great advantage to have an ample assortment 
of bits for his ponies (see Chapter VI.). 

At least the following articles of saddle and bridle 
gear will be necessary : — 

Two saddles complete. 
One snaffle bridle. 

Tv/o double bridles (Figs. 55 and 56). 
One long-cheeked double bridle (Fig. 54). 
Two nose-bands (Figs. 62 and 63). 
Two standing martingales with buckles, so that they 
can be fixed to the nose-band or rings of snaffle 

(Fig- 52). 

One leather saddle cloth. 

One numnah (felt). 

Two pairs of spare stirrup leathers. 

Two curb-chains, with thick broad links, and leather 
guards. 

Three pairs of spare girths. 

For a man to whom money is no object, I give the 
following list, which includes all that is necessary for 
training ponies. Clothing can be obtained in India 
much cheaper than in England, but not nearly so good. 



OUTFIT FOR INDIA. 249 

The follozving is a complete saddlery and bridle 
outfit for India : — Six saddles complete, suitable to 
the height and weight of the rider, and weighing not 
less than ten pounds each. For a man of more than 
twelve stone, I would recommend saddles of at least 
twelve pounds. It is a great convenience to have 
a saddle for each pony on the polo ground, so as to 
avoid changing kit. 

Six pairs of spare stirrup leathers. 

One punch for making holes of different sizes in 
leathers. 

Two bridles as in Fig. 55, 

Two bridles as in Fig. 56, with jointed snaffles in 
addition. 

One bridle as in Fig. 54. 

One bridle as in Fig. 57. 

Two half-moon Pelhams as in Fig. 31. 

One Ben Morgan bit (Fig. 29). 

Six caveson nose-bands (Figs. 62 and 63). 

One jointed snaffle bridle. 

One gag snaffle (Fig. 60). 

Six standing martingales with buckles for attachment 
to nose-band or rings of snaffle (Fig. 52). 

One running martingale (Fig. 61). 

One caveson with bit, etc., complete. 

One driving pad (Figs. 50 and 51). 

One pair of long web reins (Figs. 50 and 51). 

One abscess lancet, similar to those used by 
veterinary surgeons. 

One rasp for filing the teeth. 

One hoof rasp. 

One drawing knife. 

One searcher. 



250 



POLO IN INDIA. 



[Chap. IX. 



One pair of pincers, same as used by blacksmiths. 

One measuring standard. 

One cutting whip. 

One long whip for driving on foot. 

One brass syringe. 

One enema. 

One muzzle. 




Fig. 96. — Grooming tools. 



Three pairs of spare web girths. 

Three pairs of spare leather girths. 

One pair of Australian open work leather girths. 

Grooming tools (Fig. 96). 

The reins and cheek pieces of the bridles should be 
provided with studs (Figs. 97, 98 and 99), which have 
the advantage of allowing the bits to be removed for 
purposes of cleaning and change. If the bits are sewn 
on, the necessary washing will more or less rot the 
stitches, and will thus give rise to an element of danger. 



OUTFIT FOR INDIA. 



251 



The stud principle is very useful when a change of hit is 
required, and looks almost as neat as sewing. Buckles 
on a bridle are of course an eyesore from a fashionable 
point of view. 



Fig. 97. Fig. 98. Fig. 99 

Fig. 97.— Spring hcok attaclimeut. Fig. 98 and 99.— Stud attachments. 



252 



CHAPTER X. 

A RETROSPECT. 

Polo is a game of recent and very rapid growth in 
England. We have seen (p. i) that the first match in 
this land was played in 1871. The first organised polo 
tournament on record took place at Hurlingham, when 
the Royal Horse Guards won the first Champion Cup 
in 1876 ; and the first regimental tournament was 
played in 1878. Since then, the popularity of the game 
and the number of competitions have enormously in- 
creased. In 1 89 1, when my regiment came home from 
India, the only polo club and the only ground in 
London was at Hurlingham, where polo was in full 
swing. Ranelagh was open, but there was no regular 
game there. Hurlingham players used sometimes to 
go to Ranelagh, in order to save their own ground 
after wet weather. 

At Hurlingham there was always a match on 
Saturday, follow^ed by a members' game, and sometimes 
a match on Wednesday ; but at other times, only 
members' games were played, except during the 
progress of the Champion Cup, Regimental Tourna- 
ment and the County Cup, which occupied three weeks 
of the season. The excellence of the members' 
games at Hurlingham was a great advantage which 



A RETROSPECT. 253 

polo players had In those days, but which we seldom 
now enjoy. At present in London, it is a very rare 
occurrence to find eight good players in an ordinary 
game, and we generally take for granted that good 
polo can be found only in matches. But in 1892, I 
often took part in members' games with such masters 
of polo as the Brothers Peat, Mr. John Watson, Lord 
Harrington, Mr. F. Mildmay, and that accomplished 
player, the late Mr. T. Kennedy. They and others 
of the same high class were regular attendants at 
members' games, with the addition of a few really good 
soldier players. 

At the time in question, the only important polo 
events which were contested in England, were the 
three tournaments just mentioned, the annual Autumn 
Tournament at Barton, and an Open Tournament 
at Abergavenny, which is the headquarters of the 
Monmouthshire Club, and the home of the Herberts, 
who were the chief pioneers of English polo in 
its early days, before the Peats had made themselves 
known. 

Within a radius of ten miles from Charing Cross, 
there are at present (1902) no less than ten well- 
patronised polo grounds : namely, two at Hurlingham, 
two at Ranelagh, two at Eden Park, one at Wim- 
bledon, one at the Crystal Palace, one at Kingsbury, 
and one at Cricklewood. L^\j^. 

[in the season of 1901 at Ranelagh 132 members 
played at least once on the ground. Sometimes three 
matches and a members' game have been played there on 
one day. I have counted nearly forty players on the 
two grounds at Ranelagh on a Saturday. Hurlingham 
has similar difficulties to contend with, though to a 



254 A RETROSPECT. [Chap. X. 

somewhat lesser degree. Besides the crowds at 
Hurlingham and Ranelagh, polo w^as going on at 
the same time at the other six grounds already 
mentioned. 

Although there were not more than twenty regular 
frequenters at Hurlingham, now, eleven years later, there 
are always over a hundred men playing at the different 
clubs, in and near London on a Saturday afternoon 
during the season, j As a result of this overcrowding 
at Hurlingham and Ranelagh, the grounds are far too 
much cut up, and it is a great treat, when the London 
season is over, to play on smooth country grounds 
which have been comparatively at rest during the 
months of May, June and July. It is to be hoped that 
in future, polo players will have more room, and that 
London polo may be made still more attractive by the 
formation of a third big club at Roehampton, which is 
close to Ranelagh and which will provide three new 
grounds. 

The constant change of opponents in a series of 
matches gives a charm to London polo which can be 
found nowhere else. All the best players in England 
and most of the best ponies congregate in London ; 
match succeeds match and tournament follows tourna- 
ment to such an extent that, provided a player can get 
into good teams, his fun will be limited only by the 
endurance of his stud. The ball of tournaments is 
generally set rolling in May, with the Social Club Cup 
at Hurlingham, which is quickly followed by the Hunt 
Cup at Ranelagh, the Open Champion Cup, the 
Ranelagh Open Cup, the Regimental Tournament and 
the Subalterns' Cup for soldiers, the Novices' Cup for 
second-class players, the County Cup for county 



A RETROSPECT. 255 

players, and finally In July, the Ladies' Cup and the 
Public Schools Tournament wind up the season of 
competitions, which some say is overdone. There is 
no doubt, however, that it is very difficult to get such a 
hard and exciting match at any time, as in a cup tie ; 
and very few men play absolutely all out, or at all 
events they do not ride only their best ponies, except 
in a near thing during a tournament. 

As a rule, polo players are very slack about 
arranging their own matches, and leave too much 
to the polo managers. They ought to organise 
themselves into teams to constantly play together, 
and should ask the respective polo managers to give 
them a ground, and to get them an opposing side. 
The few men who act thus, and who take their 
teams to play matches at the different clubs, obtain 
far more fun out of the game, even if they are 
moderate performers, than others who simply ask for 
a place in a match, and day after day find them- 
selves playing with different men whose methods 
they do not understand. In this respect, soldiers 
are much better off than civilians, for if they belong 
to their regimental team, or to their subalterns' 
team, they can get as many matches as they want. 

When the season in London is drawing to a 
close, the honorary secretaries of county clubs now 
adopt the plan of arranging -polo weeks on their 
own grounds. I venture to take the credit of 
having started this custom by inaugurating the 
Rugby tournament in 1894, which has been played 
every year since that time. 

Nowadays, if a man likes to take a team on 
tour, he can go and play at St. Neots in the second 



256 A RETROSPECT. [Chap. X. 

week in July, at Stratford-on-Avon in the third 
week, at Leamington in the fourth week, and at 
Rugby in the first week in August. He can then 
proceed to Dublin and play in the Open Cup, 
which is always held at the same time as the 
great Annual Horse Show. In 1891 there were 
comparatively few polo clubs in England, and 
almost all the county grounds were to be found at 
Chester, Barton, Elvaston, Abergavenny, and the 
great military centres. The idea was then common 
that polo was too expensive for people of moderate 
means to take part in, and the game was practically 
confined to London, Liverpool, and Edinburgh. 
Now there are over fifty clubs where polo is 
regularly played, and nineteen of these clubs are 
affiliated to the County Polo Association, and com- 
pete for the County Cup, the preliminary ties of 
which are played off in their own districts : the 
semi-finals and finals taking place at Hurlingham. 
Men have found out that provincial polo is not a 
very expensive amusement, and young country gentle- 
men who ten years ago only thought of hunting, 
are now equally keen to play polo. 

During the last few years, polo has made extra- 
ordinary progress in Ireland, thanks chiefly to that 
great polo player and organiser. Colonel Rimington 
of the Inniskilling Dragoons. I believe I am correct 
in saying that in 1897 there were not more than 
two men in Ireland who played polo regularly, besides 
the soldiers who were quartered there. Now, Irish 
players can be counted by dozens. The County 
Dublin Club started a ground of their own at 
Ashtown, and the only difficulty they had to en- 



A RETROSPECT. 257 

counter was the great number of players for whom 
they had to cater. 

The Irish County Polo Club Union is supported 
by twelve county clubs, and it organises the follow- 
ing tournaments : — The County Cup, which, with the 
exception of the Inter- Regimental at Hurlingham, is 
in my opinion the best and hardest fought competition 
that takes place during the year ; the Novices' Cup ; 
and the Hunt Cup, which is played on the Kildare 
County Ground. 

If polo increases in England and Ireland during 
the next ten years at the same rate as it has 
done since 1891, every county district will have its 
polo club like it has its pack of hounds. 



17 



258 



CHAPTER XL 

POLO PONY BREEDING. 

General remarks — Polo Pony Society — Experiences of breeders. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

I APPROACH the subject of pony breeding with a certain 
amount of diffidence, and must ask my readers to bear 
in mind that I do not wish to pose as an authority on 
the subject ; for any ideas I may have of my own 
about it are more or less theoretical. 

I had a small breeding stud of some half-dozen 
mares in Ireland, but the young stock did not grow 
big enough on the poor land, and I disposed of 
the stud. 

What I propose doing in this short chapter is to 
quote some of the best authorities, and to leave my 
readers to form their own opinions. 

A good deal of interest has been taken during the 
last few years in the subject of the improvement of 
the breed of ponies, and I am certain that great strides 
have already been made in this direction, though much 
remains to be done. At the Royal Agricultural Show 
at Chester, on June 20th, 1893, ^he Polo Pony Stud 
Book Society was formed with the object of improving 
the breed of polo and riding ponies. The first volume 



GENERAL REMARKS. 259 

came out in 1894. It contains the pedigrees and par- 
ticulars of 57 stallions, 316 mares and their produce. 
There are now 6 volumes, no less than 210 stallions 
having been registered and 1,147 iriares. The object 
is a great one, and the thanks and co-operation of 
all polo players are due to those energetic sportsmen 
who have worked hard to make the undertaking a 
success. 

The society is also doing excellent work by having 
shows, at which valuable prizes are given for every 
class of riding pony. The information that can be 
gained by would-be breeders through these shows, and 
through the Society in general, should be the means of 
making vast improvements in the breeds of polo and 
riding ponies in the course of the next few years. 

I presume that the real object of the Polo Pony 
Stud Book is to get a true breed of pony of a definite 
stamp, so that a man may be able, with a fair chance 
of success, to breed a pony of a certain size, quality, 
and appearance by mating a particular mare and 
stallion together. At present the usual theory is that 
there is no certainty as to the result of any particular 
alliance ; most people imagining that the bigger class 
of pony is a manufactured breed, and that either 
sire or dam may throw back to a very much bigger 
ancestor. But men of experience have discovered that 
particular mares and stallions get offspring similar to 
themselves, which is another argument in favour of 
the Stud Book ; for as the years go on and the produce 
of those animals already in the book are entered, we 
shall be able to see which are the stallions and mares 
that reproduce themselves. 



17 



* 



260 POLO PONY BREEDING. [Chap. XI. 



POLO PONY SOCIETY. 

The Polo Pony Society has, during the past three 
years, made excellent progress in membership, and has 
largely extended its influence. Its supporters have 
increased from 200 to 450; it has registered 210 
stallions and 1,147 niares and fillies, and its prizes and 
medals are now in evidence at twenty-three shows, 
besides its own London spring exhibition. This 
successful record dates from the transference of the 
Society's offices to 12, Hanover Square, London (in 
which congenial atmosphere flourish many notable 
examples of the British Breed Society), and is the 
natural outcome of the enthusiasm and determination 
of an energetic council, numbering, among others. 
Lord Arthur Cecil, Sir Walter Gilbey, Bart., Sir 
Humphrey de Trafford, Bart., Mr. John Barker, 
Mr. G. Norris Midwood, and Rev. D. B. Montefiore, 

Following the example of the other horse-breeding 
societies located in London, they have organised a 
spring show comprising all classes of breeding stock 
and made ponies, securing entries of 102' and 141 in 
1900 and 1 90 1 respectively. 

To associated shows offering definite amounts in 
prizes for polo ponies, they have awarded gold and 
silver medals, while the exhibitors of polo ponies at 
the Royal shows are under obligation to the Society 
for the schedule of prizes provided, as since 1897 they 
have raised the necessary funds. Their latest, and by 
no means least successful, movement was to offer 



POLO PONY SOCIETY. 261 

a helping hand to the owners and breeders of 
mountain and moorland breeds of ponies, affording 
them opportunities of registering their best stallions 
and mares in separate sections in the Stud Book, and 
awarding silver medals to the best specimens of each 
sex. That this latest effort is appreciated may be seen 
by anyone who_takes the trouble to attend any of the 
typical shows — the New Forest Pony Association, 
for instance. 

The eagerness of the exhibitors to secure the 
recognition of the Polo Pony Society by taking their 
medal was evident, and the willingness to register 
their ponies placed on the record a score of new sires. 
In Scotland, at the recent Highland Show, the institu- 
tion of a special section for the Highland pony in the 
Stud Book secured upon the spot some ten to twelve 
new members. 

These facts speak for themselves and demonstrate 
the utility of the Society's work, though it is a pity that 
the support from polo players is so small, and that the 
additional money required to finance the London, 
Royal and subsidiary shows should have to be borne 
by the council. A membership of 450, even though 
annually increasing, does not suffice to provide prizes 
on the present year's scale — in London, to the extent 
of ^455 ; and at the Royal amounting to a hundred 
guineas, with contributions to the associated shows 
totalling over ^60. The deficiency has been made 
good by the liberally supported prize funds, with 
which the Society will dispense at the earliest possible 
moment. 

The Stud Book, now in its sixth volume, has become 
practically self-supporting, and the rules for the seventh 



262 POLO PONY BREEDING. [Chap. XL 

volume have been drafted with a special view to the 
all-important question of height. That of type is being 
satisfactorily solved, if the young stock presented for 
competition during the last two years is any criterion. 
The reports of the judges at the Spring Shows 
emphatically endorse this view. The Council have 
now tackled the question of height and the new rules 
for the Stud Book,- and its annual Supplements are 
appended in full. 

ANNUAL SUPPLEMENT FOR 1901 TO THE POLO 

PONY STUD BOOK, VOL 7. 

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY. 

Young Ponies (Colts and Fillies) — Foals, Yearlings, Two-and-Three-year-olds — 

without any limit as to their height will be received for entrj' without a 

number in this Supplement, to be annually issued to members, provided 

they are : — 

Pedigree. — (a) By a registered* Polo Pony Sire out of a registered* Polo Pony 

Dam ; or 

[h) By a Thorough-bred or Arabt Sire, out of a Registered* Polo 

Pony Dam ; or 
(r) By a registered* Polo Pony Sire, out of a Thorough-bred or 
Arab!" Dam. 
Honours. — {a) Or if they have been awarded Honours in Polo Pony Classes at 
the Associated Shows. 
*The term "registered Polo Pony Sire or Dam" covers the Colts and 
Fillies entered in the Supplements. 

t Arab Sire or Dam must be registered either in General Stud Book or Polo 
Pony Stud Book. 



CONDITIONS OF ENTRY IN VOLS. 7, 8 AND 9 OF 

STUD BOOK. 

POLO PONY SECTION. 

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY FOR STALLIONS AND MARES. 

1. Age — No Pony will be admitted to registration and a number in the Stud 

Book until it is four years old,* when its 

2. Height — Must not exceed 14*2, confirmed by the certificate of a qualified 

Veterinary Surgeon, or by Hurlingham certificate. 

3. Pedigree — To be specially considered by the Editing Committee in acceptance 

or rejection of a Pony. 



POLO PONY SOCIETY. 263 

A Pony not fully qualified by pedigree shall, for final acceptance in the 

Stud Book, be in every respect a "high-class riding-pony," or one likely 

to breed such a Pony. 

Inspection — When no pedigree is available such Pony must be inspected by a 

present or past Member of the Council, or by two Members of the Society 

appointed by the Member of Council in the district. 

*N.B. — Ponies, under four years old, are admitted into the Annual 
Supplement by pedigree and honours in Polo Pony Classes. Particulars 
on application to the Secretary. 



MOUNTAIN AND MOORLAND SECTIONS. 
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY FOR STALLIONS AND MARES. 

1. Inspection — The inspection of Ponies from each breed is in the hands of the 

respective Local Committees, of which the Conveners (to whom all applica- 
tions shall be addressed) are : — 

CONNEMARA, — Professor J. Cossar Ewart, The Bungalow, Penicuik, 

Midlothian. 
Dartmoor. — T. H. O. Pease, Skaigh, Okehampton, Devon. 
ExMOOR. — Viscount Ebrington, Exmoor, South Molton, Devon. 
Fell. — W. W. Wingate-Saul, Fenton Cawthorne House, Lancaster. 
New Forest. — Lord Arthur Cecil, Orchardmains, Tonbridge. 
( J. Marshall Dugdale, Llwyn, Llanfyllin, Oswestry. 
( John Jones, Dinarth Hall, Colwyn Bay, North Wales. 
Highland. — ^J. H. Munro Mackenzie, Calgary, Tobermory, N.B. 

2. Type — These Committees are desired to register only Ponies of riding type 

and that, on the dam's side, are of pure pony blood. 

N.B. — The Society considers that the foundation stock of these breeds 
should not be registered unless they contain three-quarters pony blood. 

3. Height — The following heights have been officially accepted by the respective 

Local Committees: — 

New Forest: 12*2 to i3*2. 
Dartmoor: Stallions, 14; Mares, I3'2. 
Highland : Up to \\'2. 
The other heights will be added as received, and incorporated in later 
editions of the Entry Form. 

4. Medals — The Society, being anxious to encourage the breeds of^native Ponies 

by giving Medals, instruct the Committees to make the conditions most 

suited to the breed they represent ; butj 

No pony may compete for a Medal unless already entered in its respec- 
tive section, or passed as fit for entry by a Member or representative of the 
Polo Pony Society, either before or at the Show. 

Briefly, the Supplement will provide an annual 
register of the foals bred from qualified parents, the 



264 POLO PONY BREEDING. [Chap. XL 

prizes awarded to the young stock, statistical state- 
ments of the shows devoting classes and prizes to 
Polo Ponies — in fact a yearly record of the Society's 
work. The Stud Book will recognise and register with 
numbers only ponies which at four years old comply as 
regards height ; pedigree and type being specially 
considered in their acceptance. 

No person however much he may be out of sympathy 
with the Society's work, can object to these rules. A 
breeder can enter his young stock in the Supplement 
with opportunities of submitting them at four years 
old, if of proper height for full registry. Through 
the Supplement it is hoped to fix the type In the 
Stud Book it is proposed to register only animals of 
the authorised height, thereby debarring all young 
animals which exceed it. 

These rules practically bring the rules of registration 
of the Polo Pony Stud Book into line with those 
governing the registration of polo ponies under 
Hurlingham rules. 

These rules aim at encouraging the production of 
the highest type of riding ponies (the polo pony), but 
if the ideal is not attained, the result must be the 
improvement of the riding pony. The benefits to the 
cart and harness breeds of horses, which have followed 
the application of systematic registration by the Shire 
and Hackney horse societies, apply equally to the 
pony, and the increased interest in the riding pony at 
country shows is the outcome of the Society's policy ; 
and the importance of the pony to the Army has 
been forcibly proved during the war in South Africa. 
The Shire, Hackney and Hunter societies obtain the 
support of those who, though not actually benefiting in 



EXPERIENCES OF BREEDERS. 265 

the work of these societies, are interested in the en- 
couragement of the respective breeds, and surely the 
Polo Pony Society may equally claim the support of 
those gentlemen who are interested in the maintenance 
and improvement of the riding pony. 

EXPERIENCES OF BREEDERS. 

Lord Harrington, who is a practical and successful 
breeder, contributed a most able article to " The Polo 
Magazine," in which he gives his experience of 
breeding from the Barb, Awfully Jolly (a 14. i pony), 
and Enelish mares. 



c4.1j.vj. j_-/ lAir iioij. iiicii v^o. 


X LIK^ IKJllKJ V\ 111 


ti cci.L»i\_, yj 1 I v». 


3U1L^ 


very instructive : — 










Sire. 


Dam 




AH Baba, 14. i : 


Awfully Jolly, 14 


.. I. 


I5.I 


Jenny, 14.0: 


55 




13.0 


Abbot, 14. 1 : 


)) 




14. I 


Abbess, 13.3 : 


jj 




14. I 


Aunt Sally, 13.3 : 


jj 


Welsh, 


15.0 


Arthur Roberts, 14.0: 


J J 


Welsh, 


14.0 


Cyclops, 14.2 : 


33 


Thorough -bred. 


15-3 


Ally Sloper, 14.0 : 


53 


Welsh, 


13.2 


Adventurer, 14.0 


33 


Welsh, 


14.2 


Awfully Jolly II., 13.3 : 


33 


Welsh, 


13.2 


Antelope, 14. i : 


33 


Thorough-bred, 


14. 1 



Lord Harrington says : " My own experience is that 
you cannot have a better hunter than a clean thorough- 
bred one that has not been raced, but kept for hunting, 
and I have little doubt that, if it were possible to 
breed ponies which were quite thorough-bred, and had 
substance enough to carry weight, with good temper 
and polo action, it would be impossible to breed better 
polo ponies ; but I am afraid it would be impossible to 
carry out this idea. Choose an ideal thorough-bred 
sire, say, Sir Humphrey de Trafford's Rosewater, put 



266 POLO PONY BREEDING. [Chap. XI. 

him to my thorough-bred mare Dancing Girl, or to the 
thorough-bred Tessie, you would, I think, get an animal 
much over the height. If either of these mares were 
put to the Barb pony Awfully Jolly, that used to 
belong to me, you would get a polo pony." Lord 
Harrington then proceeds to show by the above table 
how very successful Awfully Jolly has been when 
crossed with English and Welsh mares, and also says 
that '' several of these ponies were sold for high prices, 
;^200, £iJo, ^200 and ^150, and all except one, that 
is used up after playing for seven years, and Awfully 
Jolly IL, whom I am keeping to take his sire's place, 
are playing polo now." He lays down the following 
rules for pony breeding : — 

'' I. Use only the best pony mares, and see above 
all things that they have good polo action, that is to 
say, that they appear to go straight when they are 
trotted away from you and when you stand directly 
behind them : it is quite useless to breed from a mare 
or stallion that dishes : if you want a polo pony, see 
that the mare and stallion are well bred ; the more 
breeding they show, the better, so long as they have 
substance. 

"2. If possible, when choosing your stallion, see 
some of his stock. If he is inclined to throw large 
stock, put small mares to him, and, if possible, of 
pony blood (that is to say, by a pony out of a pony). 

''3. If your mare is an accident (that is to say, by a 
large horse out ofa large mare), although she may be 
small herself, she is pretty sure to throw back, and pro- 
duce animals larger than herself For a mare of this 
sort choose a stallion of pony blood. 

"4. In choosing a mare or stallion for polo pony 



EXPERIENCES OF BREEDERS. 267 

breeding see that they have good shoulders, but avoid 
those with high, narrow withers, as these ponies 
measure high, and do not carry weight. 

" Some people think that by putting a small mare 
pony to a large thorough-bred, they may get polo 
ponies ; but this plan is very risky, and these small 
ponies will often throw animals much too large for polo ; 
but there is this advantage common to all misfits for 
polo that are bred from good animals on both sides, 
that you are sure to produce a good, hardy animal, 
that, be he too large or too small, will be available for 
some purpose." 

All the above valuable information appeared in an 
article, written by Lord Harrington, in '' The Polo 
Magazine," of March, 1895, and his opinions carry 
more weight than would those of any one that I can 
think of ; for he has been at the game for many years, 
breeding almost entirely his own hunters and polo 
ponies, and has been most successful with both. 

Mr. Hill's opinion about breeding is that a founda- 
tion stock is required of pure pony blood, and in his 
Preface to Vol. I. of the " Polo Pony Stud Book," he 
writes : "I have no hesitation in saying that there is no 
safer or more appropriate foundation for the object 
which the Society has in view than this pure Welsh 
pony blood. There are several distinct types of these 
ponies. First, the small, hardy, mountain-bred ones, 
standing 11 to 12 hands high ; secondly, those bred on 
the lower grounds, and from 13.3 to 14.2 hands ; and 
thirdly, the cob of from 14.2 to 15 hands. Although 
quite distinct in appearance and height, still they have 
the same family likeness and true ' pony ' character 
action, and hair, perfectly different to that of the 



268 POLO PONY BREEDING. [Chap. XL 

Hackney-bred pony or cob. Their action is remark- 
able for its freedom and dash. The second and third 
I named usually bend their knees, but at the same time 
throw out their legs with a swinging motion straight 
from the shoulder, distinct from the higher and rounder 
action of the Hackney. The hock movement is good, 
though in some instances they go a trifle too wide in 
their fast paces, and the hindquarter is often shorter 
than it should be. The little mountain ponies very 
much follow their larger cousins in action, but many 
breeders do not like too much bend of the knee, 
preferring rather a kind of darting movement, like a 
thorough-bred horse or an Arab. I must say I like to 
see every class of horse bend the knee in the trot, and 
this may be easily distinguished in the riding horse or 
pony, from the more extravagant high movement so 
valuable for those suitable for harness. The indomit- 
able pluck, endurance, and good temper of the Welsh 
pony, together with his substance and dash, will be 
found an invaluable cross for the thorough-bred and 
Eastern-bred ponies. 

" As one of the great difficulties in breeding polo 
ponies is to keep the height within limit, pure, small 
pony blood, especially as foundation stock, becomes the 
more valuable, so that the Dartmoor, Exmoor, New 
Forest, Church Stretton Hills, and Highland-bred 
ponies must not be overlooked, and the worth of these 
breeds cannot be well over-estimated in laying the 
foundation for the breed of the future." 

From the above I understand Mr. Hill's opinion to 
be that a cross of thorough-bred or Eastern blood with 
one of our pure English breeds of ponies is what is 
required. But I very much doubt the possibility of 



EXPERIENCES OF BREEDERS. 269 

any success on these lines within the lifetime of any 
one breeder. 

Mr. J. Anderson, who was Inspecting veterinary 
surgeon in the Bombay Presidency, had charge of 
the Government breeding studs in India for some 
years. He told me that many of the best racing 
ponies In India of which the great Mite was an 
Instance, were sired by very old English thorough-bred 
stallions, out of big mares. So well was this fact 
known, that when the stallions became old, they 
were got rid of, because their stock would not be 
big enough for remounts. When I told him I had 
purchased a 14. i thorough-bred to breed polo ponies, 
he told me that he believed it to be of no use ; 
that probably the pony would throw back ; and that 
he was convinced that the only way to breed racing 
and polo ponies by English sires was to select mares 
of the size required, and to put them to English 
thorough-bred stallions twenty years old or more. 
But this plan would not help us In any way to establish 
a breed of ponies which will reproduce themselves. 

Breeding to height may be a pure lottery, but, like 
Lord Harrington, I feel pretty confident that the young- 
stock will be valuable for some purpose, even if they 
are too big or too small for polo. This impetus to 
pony breeding must be an excellent thing for the 
country. 

The fact that first-class ponies which are nearly 
thorough-bred, are, as a rule, accidents, proves, I think, 
that to get a real pony breed, we must use a stallion 
whose ancestors were small. The right animal, to my 
mind, is the high-caste Arab ; for he is just as well bred 
as our thorough-bred, and though his produce may 



270 POLO PONY BREEDING. [Chap. XL 

increase in size, owing to the nature of English food 
and climate, they are more likely to be of the same size 
as their sire than if they owed their parentage to a 14- 
hand English thorough-bred, which, very likely, was 
sired by a horse 15.2, out of an equally big mare. 

Lord Harrington was very successful with the Barb 
Awfully Jolly, which I believe was an excellent polo 
pony in his day. Personally I do not like Barbs, 
though I would be the last to say there are no good 
ones among them, as I do know a few. Lord Har- 
rington says that he has never been able to find another 
one like Awfully Jolly, a fact I am not surprised at. 
If one is going in for Eastern blood, I am quite certain 
it would be better to use the pure, high-caste Arab than 
any less aristocratic breed. With respect to breeding 
from an Arab, we must remember that not one Arab in 
a thousand has good enough shoulders for the purpose ; 
and that the defect of bad shoulders seems to be more 
hereditary than any other fault. 

Rosewater (Fig. 100) and his son Sandiway, out of 
the polo pony mare Cuddington, both breed ponies, 
and as far as I can hear, the former gets all his 
stock of polo height, but it remains to be proved 
if they will breed first-class performers at the game, 
although I have no doubt that they will succeed. 

Other considerations must be taken into account in 
pony breeding, such as climate, feeding and soil. A 
pony bred on rough mountains, and forced to get his 
living as he can, without care or shelter, is certain not 
to grow as big as he would do, if he was brought 
up on rich pasture, and given oats from the time he 
was a yearling. 

The real difficulty about pony breeding is that we 



EXPERIENCES OF BREEDERS. 



271 



want to breed a pony as near 14.2 as possible. [4.0 
is too small for polo, and 14.3 is too big, so the margin 
of height is practically only two inches, a consideration 
that does not come into the calculations of the breeder 
of any other kind of stock. At present the difficulties 
seem great ; but by the light of experience, and 




Fig. 100. — Champion Sire " Rosewater," late "Johnnie Day." 

through the valuable information we hope to gain 
through the Society, these difficulties may vanish in a 
few years, and I shall hope to see a breed of polo 
ponies spring up that will reproduce themselves as 
surely as does the Thorough-bred, the Shire horse, or 
the Suffolk. 

Of one thing I am sure, and that is that we cannot 
expect to get a really good breed of riding and polo 



272 POLO PONY BREEDING. [Chap. XI. 

ponies unless we breed on both sides from riding stock. 
There must be no admixture of any of the harness 
breeds, such as the Hackney, or of any of the varieties of 
the hairy-heeled cob. Although there may have been 
some good polo ponies owing part of their origin to one 
or other of these strains, I am sure they were the 
exceptions, and not the rule. As I have already said, 
when buying a raw young pony, I always like to get 
him if possible, at least three parts clean bred, and 
this of course means that at least three quarters of his 
origin is derived from horse stock, and that only one 
quarter can be from pony stock. The main difficulty 
which breeders have to contend with, is the fact that 
nearly all the best ponies now playing are by big 
thorough-bred horses. 

To take two or three instances, Sailor is by Lurgan, 
out of a polo pony mare which won many races when 
she was the property of Captain Cecil Fetherstonhaugh, 
of the Royal Dragoons. Mademoiselle is, as we have 
seen (p. 177), by Loved One out of a hunter mare, 
Madame Angot by Munster Blazer, grandam by 
Woodpecker by Birdcatcher. This pedigree, which 
has no pony blood in it, is good enough for a winner of 
the Grand National. Nipcat is by Buckshot out of 
a pony. Attack is by Munchausen outof a pony. In 
fact nine out of ten of the ponies I buy are supposed to 
be by big thorough-bred horses. 



273 



CHAPTER XII. 

POLO IN THE ARMY. 

Polo is par excellence "the soldiers' game." They 
brought it into England from India, and for many 
years it was played almost exclusively by them. Had 
it not been for soldiers, polo would not now be the 
chief summer pursuit of hundreds of county gentlemen 
and civilians in all walks of life. It is in every way 
the most suitable form of amusement for regimental 
officers. 

The following are a few of Its advantages : — 

1. No better riding school exists than the polo 
ground. 

2. To be a successful polo player, a man must be to 
some extent a horsemaster ; for he must know a good 
deal about horses, in order to be able to buy his 
ponies, and to keep them sound and fit. 

3. The qualities which make a soldier succeed in his 
profession, bring him to the front at polo, particularly 
if he has to organise and arrange the regimental polo. 

4. Polo occupies only an hour or two in the after- 
noon, and in no way interferes with an officer's official 
work, provided the ground is not far from barracks. 
Cricket is a splendid regimental institution, but it 

18 



274 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap XII. 

requires twenty-two men and a whole day for its 
performance. Hunting is as good or perhaps even a 
better educational amusement for soldiers than polo, 
because it teaches quickness of eye for a country, 
decision, and promptness to seize an opportunity ; but 
hunting is possible only in a few places where soldiers 
are quartered. Even in England it can, as a rule, be 
indulged in only when an officer is on leave, and in 
any case it occupies the entire day. Well managed 
polo, on the contrary, can be played close to barracks 
in almost every part of the Empire. Besides, polo has 
the inestimable advantage, from a military point of 
view, that it promotes among officers enthusiasm and 
esprit de corps, which is not done by individual 
sports, such as hunting, shooting, pigsticking, or by 
any other game that can be played by the officers 
of a regiment. I do not think that anyone who 
has not belonged to a polo playing regiment can 
exactly understand how keen is this spirit. A polo 
playing officer looks on a place in his regimental 
team in the Hurlingham or Indian Inter-Regimental 
Tournament in the same light as a public school 
boy regards his colours in the school XI. ; a cricketing 
university man, his position in the great match at 
Lord's ; or a university rowing man, his seat in the 
contest from Putney to Mortlake. Esprit de corps 
is keener among officers than even among school 
boys and 'Varsity men ; because the majority of 
officers look on their regiments as their home for life, 
whereas a sojourn at school or college seldom lasts 
more than five years. 

Although the best polo playing regiments may not 
always be the best fighting regiments, they are 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 275 

certainly near the top of the tree In that respect ; and 
well organised polo has assuredly a great Influence for 
good on the officers of any regiment. 

The great advantage of polo over all other outdoor 
games is the fact that it can be played in late middle 
life. One of the best Backs in England Is fifty years 
of age. Consequently, an oflEcer can go on playing at 
his best throughout his whole career in a regiment. 
No better sight can be witnessed at polo than a 
colonel of a regiment playing Back, and urging his 
officers on to victory in a hard fought match, as I have 
seen done by Colonel Lawley of the 7th Hussars, 
Colonel Bablngton of the i6th Lancers, and Colonel 
Ridley of the Manchester Regim.ent. Equally good 
examples have occurred in other instances. 

The only possible objection to polo as an amuse- 
ment for officers is its expense, which, of course, is its 
great drawback as compared to other outdoor games. 
Owing to this cause, military authorities have been 
supposed for some years to have looked askance at 
polo, and many rumours have been current that 
hindrances will be placed with respect to officers 
playing It. One general officer in India has gone so 
far as to prohibit polo clubs in regiments under his 
command, owing to the mistaken Idea that non-players 
have to subscribe for the benefit of members of the 
team ; whereas a well managed polo pony club, which 
is composed only of members of the regiment who 
wish to join It, works the other way, and puts the 
game within the reach of comparatively poor men who 
would otherwise be debarred from It (p. 242 et seq.). 

Polo costs a good deal of money, but its expenses as 
regards the purchase of ponies, keep and wages can 



2/6 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

be ascertained beforehand, and the cost counted. I 
do not think that there is a single authentic case of an 
officer having to leave his regiment by reason of his 
having spent too much money on polo, although the 
high price of polo ponies is often the excuse given to 
parents and guardians for an additional allowance ; the 
truth probably being that the money went on amuse- 
ments of a much less reputable nature which would 
not bear explanation. I came across the following 
instance of this kind a couple of years ago. An old 
gentleman who had formerly commanded an infantry 
regiment, put his son into a cavalry regiment, because 
the boy had passed too low to be able to get a 
commission into the infantry, and recruits at that time 
were badly wanted in the cavalry. The old colonel 
complained to a friend of mine that his son would be 
obliged to leave his regiment, as he had got into debt 
by trying to keep pace with his brother officers, and 
they had told him that if he could not mount himself 
better at polo, he must leave. The father was 
naturally very bitter about this, and as I knew the 
regiment and did not believe the story, I made 
enquiries. I discovered that the boy was a very bad 
horseman, could hardly keep his seat in the riding 
school, had never owned a polo pony or a hunter, and 
was in trouble with his commanding officer for not 
buying a second charger. I was told how his money 
had gone, but the details of its disappearance would 
not bear repetition here. It is probable that the old 
colonel still attributes the ruin of his son's career to 
his extravagance about polo. 

Any opposition to polo which may exist in the 
higher ranks of the Army is probably due to the fact 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 277 

that the game Is of recent growth, and that men who 
have never belonged to a polo playing regiment, often 
pay more attention to its drawbacks than to its more 
than compensating advantages. Fortunately the 
Commander-in-Chief has the interests of polo at heart, 
as we know by the wise legislation he instituted for 
the benefit of the game a few years ago when there 
was an outcry about the prevalence of bad accidents 
in India. He insisted on helmets being worn as a 
head protection, stricter umpiring, severer penalties 
for fouls, and he made the captains of clubs respon- 
sible for the warning off of dangerous and badly 
trained ponies. If any question concerning polo crops 
up at home during the next few years, officers may 
rest assured that Lord Roberts will deal with it as 
ably as he did in India. 

I do not think that the Regimental Tournament 
at Hurlingham will be stopped ; but if it be forbidden, 
some officers will be largely to blame, for the follow- 
ing reason : It is well known that for a polo team to 
become expert at the game, especially if they have not 
played much together, it is necessary for them to get 
practice against good teams. Hence the temptation 
to allow a regimental team to go to London for a 
week or two before the tournament, because as a 
rule they can play only among themselves near their 
barracks. I have known cases of a regimental team 
being practically on leave for a month previous to the 
tournament, living in London, and amusing them- 
selves, while their brother officers were doing their 
work, in the busiest time of the year. This of course 
is altogether wrong. Besides it gives such a team an 
undue advantage over other teams which go to London 



278 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

for the week, and it also has a very bad effect on 
regimental polo, because it deprives the regimental 
polo club of the four best players and very likely all 
the best ponies for a month or more. The other polo 
playing officers may thus find their fun spoiled, and 
may consider that the game is not worth the candle. 
If a team goes up for the Regimental Tournament 
and has perhaps one practice match on the previous 
Saturday, the services of the four officers will not be 
lost for long, expenses will not be heavy, and neither 
regimental work nor regimental polo will suffer. 

Some years ago the Inspector-General of Cavalry 
in India had just grounds of complaint against certain 
regiments, because their chargers were by no means 
up to the mark, although they possessed the best of 
polo ponies. His impression was that some of these 
officers paid more attention to the interests of polo 
than to soldiering. Such cases, which are happily 
very rare, would do more harm to polo in the Army 
than almost anything else. 

The most successful polo regiments of late years 
have been the 13th Hussars and the Inniskilling 
Dragoons, neither of which ride expensive ponies. 
The 13th Hussars have specially distinguished them- 
selves, for they won the Cup in 1892, '94, and '95, 
and were beaten in the final only by one goal in each 
of the years 1896, '98, and '99. They had an ex- 
ceptionally good team in 1897, but they scratched, 
owing to their being in mourning. The 7th Hussars 
won the Tournament in 1899, and bought four or five 
high-priced ponies just before the Tournament, in 
order to win. They had only recently come home 
from India, and had not had the opportunity of getting 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 279 

their ponies together. On this occasion they were 
extra keen to win the Cup the first year they were at 
home, having won it on the last occasion they had 
played for it, namely in 1886, in which year they 
left for India ; and they succeeded in their worthy 
ambition. 

Few officers in the Army can afford to pay big 
sums for their ponies. Many have actually considered 
polo an economy, as it has caused them to give up 
racing and other expensive amusements. Polo can 
be played cheaply in regiments, by the system of 
Polo Pony Clubs (p. 242), if well managed, a fact 
which has been amply proved by Colonel de Lisle of 
the Durham Light Infantry, Captain Egerton Green 
of the 1 2th Lancers, and many others. I have never 
heard of officers in high positions object to polo, 
except on the ground of its expense. They often say 
that a polo pony should not cost more than ^50, and 
that officers should be content to play among them- 
selves in regimental games at the station where they 
are quartered. It is true that the regimental or 
station game is the backbone of polo in the Army ; 
but players would be no more content to go on playing 
day after day among the same set of players, than 
would a cricketer be to play always on the same 
ground in a pick-up game, with no prospect of 
matches against neighbouring clubs. 

The Tournament is the culmination of the season's 
play, and it stimulates a regiment to work and improve 
themselves. The regimental team, especially in India, 
is often a tie which keeps a whole regiment together, 
and prevents them going away in search of individual 
amusements. In England it often keeps officers from 



28o POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

attending every possible race meeting, where they 
would probably lose much more money than what polo 
would cost them, and prevents them seeking more 
expensive and less desirable distractions in London. 

I think we may take for granted that polo has a 
good influence on the education of an officer. At all 
events, the same qualities which bring a man to the 
front at polo are required by anyone who aspires to 
lead men. I think this will be admitted by anyone 
who takes the trouble to read the following list of 
nam.es of lovers of the game, some of them are very 
well known brilliant players, and nearly all have served 
with distinction in the war. These officers are of 
every rank from general to subaltern, and, alas ! we 
shall never again see many of them : — 

Major-General Elliot, C.B., D.S.O., Inspector- 
General of Cavalry in India, was, when I was 
soldiering there, one of the finest horsemen in that 
country, and could give weight to nearly every 
professional on the fiat. He was a good polo player, 
but is specially known for the valuable work he did 
for the Indian Polo Association, and for raising the 
polo height to 14.1, which has had the effect of 
making polo ponies useful animals for Army purposes. 

Colonel C. P. Ridley, C.B., has probably stuck more 
wild boar than any other white man in India, and polo 
held but a secondary place in his estimation ; yet when 
he commanded the Manchester Regiment at Dinapore, 
he got together a regimental team and captained, it 
himself in many matches. Major Eustace Crawley, 
who is a well-known polo player, was Brigade Major 
to Colonel Ridley, and earned a brevet for his services. 

Major-General Smith-Dorrien D.S.O., was a keen 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 281 

polo player when serving with the Derbyshire 
regiment and on the Staff in India. After a suc- 
cessful term in South Africa, he has been made 
Adjutant-General in India. 

Colonel Babington was quite in the first class of 
soldier players when he was in regular play. In 
recognition of his work in South Africa he has been 
given command of the Forces in New Zealand. I saw 
him play Back most brilliantly in 1895 ^^ Lucknow. 
His polo record dates from 1880, when his regiment 
won for the first time at Hurlingham. He repeated his 
success in 1881, and also played in the winning team 
of the Champion Cup in 1882. 

Major-General Lord Chesham, K.C.B., was well 
known as a Master of Hounds and one of the best 
men across country in England before this war 
brought him to the front as a military leader. When 
the loth Hussars and 9th Lancers played in India 
during the late seventies and early eighties, he was 
one of the keenest among an exceptionally good lot 
of polo players. 

Sir R. Pole-Carew, K.C.B., C.V.O., and Major- 
General Baden-Powell, C.B., w^ho played for the 
13th Hussars in India, are two other distinguished 
generals who have been keen on polo. 

Brigadier-General Alderson, C.B., A.D.C., is another 
military commander who is fond of polo, and had as 
his A.D.C. Charlie Beatty, D.S.O., who is better 
known as a fine steeplechase rider, although he was 
one of the six original members of the Rugby Club, 
and has played many matches for it during the last 
few years. General Alderson played in the winning 
team of the County Cup for Kent in 1880. 



282 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

That very successful Brigadier of Cavalry, Colonel 
Broadwood, C.B., A.D.C., has always been fond of 
polo, although he devoted his attention chiefly to 
hunting and steeplechasing, at which he distinguished 
himself by riding his mare Frigate in the Grand 
National. He chose for his staff officers two first- 
class players in Brand, who earned a brevet and was 
the Back of the loth Hussars team which won the Cup 
at Hurlingham in 1893, ^^^ in Aldridge, who got the 
D.S.O., the Back of the Royal Artillery team. 
Aldridge played many times in the Gunner team with 
Major Schofield, who gallantly earned the Victoria 
Cross at Colenso, poor Jack Han well and C. G. 
McKenzie, two among many gallant sportsmen whom 
the Army and the polo world can ill spare. 

Colonel Mahon, C.B., D.S.O., like Ridley and 
Baden-Powell, is perhaps better known for his prowess 
with the spear and big game rifle than as a polo 
player ; yet he often played for the 8th Hussars at 
Meerut, Umballa and Hurlingham, with the gallant 
le Gallais, Henderson, and their commanding officer, 
Lieut.-Colonel Duff. The 8th Hussars have supplied 
for service in South Africa several other good players, 
among them their late commanding officer, Colonel 
Clowes, C.B., and Major Wood, than whom no better 
judge or trainer of a polo pony can be found anywhere. 
Mahon has not been seen on English polo grounds 
lately, because he has spent but little time at home 
since he took to active soldiering about seven years 
ago in the Egyptian Army. 

Lieut.-Colonels Rimington, C.B., and de Lisle, 
D.S.O., are admirable instances of enthusiastic Army 
polo players who have never allowed the game to 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 283 

interfere with their military duties or ambitions. They 
are both men of ceaseless energy, who have won their 
way to the front in their profession in exactly the 
same dogged and determined manner by which they 
brought their regiments into first-class polo with very 
little outlay of money. 

Rimington has never let a chance slip. In 1898 
he disappeared from everyone's sight for six months 
and turned up again in London only just in time to 
steer his regiment to victory in the Regimental Polo 
Tournament of that year. The experience gained 
during those six months has been turned to good 
account during the last two years. Colonel Sir Henry 
Rawlinson, C.B., who has greatly distinguished himself 
both in Egypt and South Africa, is one of the best 
Back players, although he has not lately had much 
time for polo. 

General French has had several polo players on his 
staff. First of all is that brilliant cavalry officer, 
Colonel Douglas Haig, C.B., who is as clever a chief 
of the staff as even General French could wish to 
have. As a polo player his record is exceedingly 
good. He played for the 7th Hussars when they 
won the Tournament at Hurlingham in 1885 and 
1886 ; and in India, when they won it in 1891. 
Among other polo playing staff officers who were 
with General French at different periods of this war, 
are Brevet Lieut. -Colonel the Hon. H. Lawrence, of 
the 17th Lancers, the General's Chief Intelligence 
Officer ; Brevet Major Kenna, who with poor Mont- 
morency won the V.C. in the celebrated 21st Lancer 
charge; the Hon. R. Ward of the Blues; and Captain 
Barry, D.S.O., of the loth Hussars. 



284 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

Lieut.-Colonel Lawrence was captain of the 17th 
Lancer team when we won the Cup at Meerut in 
1889. During recent years, soldiering has monopo- 
lised his time too much to allow him a chance of 
indulging in his favourite pursuit of ten years ago. 
Kenna and Montmorency played together in the 2Tst 
Lancer team. Kenna, though a very brilliant Forward 
player, is better known in India as a first-class steeple- 
chase rider. 

** Reggie " Ward is equally well known in the 
English polo and steeplechasing world. He always 
plays No. 2 in the Blues team. 

Barry is as keen a polo player as there is in the 
loth Hussars. 

Colonel Little, C.B., who commanded the 9th Lancers 
with marked success, was severely wounded when in 
command of the 3rd Cavalry Brigade. He was well 
known for many years as a good and successful polo 
player. His polo record includes many triumphs. 
He formed one of the four who won the American 
Challenge Cup in 1886, the others being Lieut.- 
Colonel the Hon. R. Lawley, now in command of the 
7th Hussars, Captain T. Hone, late of the same 
regiment, and John Watson. He played in the 
winning team of the 9th Lancers at Hurlingham in 
1889 and 1890, and in Ireland in 1892 and 1893. 

The 9th have distinguished themselves on many a 
hard-fought field, and in many a tight polo match. 
In their ranks are included several fine soldiers and 
good polo players. Their best player is Brevet Major 
Lord Charles Bentinck, who was mentioned repeatedly 
during the defence of Mafeking. Major MacLaren, 
D.S.O., of the 13th Hussars, who was badly wounded 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 285 

after doing invaluable work for months under Plumer 
in his gallant attempts to get into Mafeking, Colonel 
Rimington, Lord Charles Bentinck, and Major Poore, 
D.S.O., are four of the best Back players in the Army. 

When the 9th Lancers won the Cup at Hurlingham 
in 1896, the team consisted of David Campbell, 
Captain Jenner (now Major Sir W. K. Jenner, 
D.A.A.G. at the Curragh), G. Ellison and Lord C. 
Bentinck. Poor Ellison, who was a fine polo player 
and good sportsman, has played his last game, and 
his place is hard to fill. Campbell is best known for 
having reached the height of every steeplechase 
rider's ambition, by winning the Grand National on 
Soarer. He rides at polo with the same dash and 
determination as he does over a country. Sir W. K. 
Jenner has more regimental polo triumphs to his credit 
than probably any other man, as, for instance, the 
Inter- Regimental at Hurlingham in 1S89, '90, '91 and 
'96, and the Indian Inter- Regimental of 1883, '84 
and '85. His brother officer. Brevet Lieut. -Colonel 
F. Colvin, runs him close in this respect. 

There are many other good players in the 9th, 
namely, Captain Allhusen, who won the Kadir Cup ; 
Captain Hon. C. Willoughby, who played for his 
regiment when they won at Hurlingham in 1891, and 
in the final in 1893 j Lord Douglas Compton, who 
obtained a Brevet Majority ; and younger players, 
such as Lord F. Blackwood, D.S.O., and Sadleir 
Jackson, D.S.O. The 9th sustained a sad loss in that 
dashing polo player, P. Brassey, who was killed on the 
relief of Kimberley. 

Like the 9th, almost all the 17th, from colonel to 
last-joined subaltern, play polo. Sad to say, they have 



286 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XIL 

suffered very heavily during this war. No one who 
has read the account of the splendid fight and heroic 
resistance made by the 150 men under Sandeman in 
September, 1901, when rushed at Elands River Poort 
by Smuts' Commando, can wonder that I am proud 
of having belonged to that distinguished regiment. 
Lieutenants Sheridan, Morrit and Russel were killed ; 
Major Sandeman and Lord Vivian were wounded ; 
over 30 N.C.O.'s and men killed, and 31 wounded, out 
of a total of 150. Sandeman was an excellent polo 
player in 1888, but he has not played much in late 
years. Sheridan was a promising and dashing player. 
Major Nickalls is a very fine Back player, and has 
played for the regiment several times. He was 
particularly good in India and Egypt, despite his 
welter weight. Captain W. A. Tilney, who has done 
invaluable work in Ladysmith, and subsequently on 
Lord Methuen's staff, is the captain of the 17th Lancers' 
polo team, and he won the Open Cup in Dublin with 
a team consisting of himself. Major Portal, R. S. 
Carden, and A. F. Fletcher, all of whom have served 
in this campaign. The deeply lamented Lord Ava, 
who was killed in Ladysmith, was another well-known 
player that got his education in this regiment. Poor 
Brinsley Sheridan was his cousin, and joined the 
regiment through his advice and influence. 

The Household Cavalry sent many polo players to 
the war. The ist Life Guards contributed Colonel 
Calley, who won his Brevet Colonelcy ; Captain G. F. 
Milner, who, when he was in the 17th, played in the 
winning team at Meerut in 1889 ; the Duke of Teck, 
who played for the 17th in India in 1889, and who 
earned a Brevet Majority ; Captains E. W. Clowes, 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 287 

D.S.O., J. S. Cavendish, D.S.O., Lloyd Phillips and 
Cookson ; the Hon. G. Ward and W. Waring. 
Lord Lovat, late of the ist Life Guards, greatly 
distinguished himself by raising and commanding 
the invaluable Lovat Scouts. 

The 2nd Life Guards' polo players were represented 
by Lord Longford, Captain Brinton, D.S.O., Captain 
de Crespigny, D.S.O., Captain Spender Clay, Lord 
Wicklow, Hon. A. O'Neill, Sir G. Prescott, the late 
Captain R. Peel, and the late Lord Kensington. 

The Royal Horse Guards sent to the war many 
officers, all of whom were polo players, as, for instance, 
Lleut.-Colonel Fenwick, D.S.O., Captains Villiers 
FitzGerald, Mann-Thomson, Hon. R. Ward, Ricardo, 
Lord Tullibardine, D.S.O., the Duke of Roxburghe, 
H. E. Brassey, Hon. D. Marjoribanks, D.S.O., and 
A. Rose, and Vet. -Captain F. E. Drage. Marjori- 
banks, Ward and Drage won the Subalterns' Cup at 
Ranelagh in 1897 and 1898, their captain being poor 
Ernest Rose, who was the only officer the Blues lost 
during this campaign, and who was shot at the head of 
his men. 

Major Bell-Smyth, Captain Lockett, D.S.O., D. A. 
Rasbotham, and many other officers of the K.D.G.'s, 
are keen polo players. 

The Bays, who are on their way to South Africa 
while these lines are being written, have many well- 
known polo players, such as Kirk, Persse, and 
Wilberforce, who won the Indian Regimental Tourna- 
ment in 1892, '93 and '94, and Major V. G. Whitla, 
now of the 3rd Hussars, and Captains C. K. Bush 
and Sykes. 

The 4th Dragoon Guards had lately an excellent 



288 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XIL 

polo team, and are rapidly improving in their play. 
Captains J. H. Lloyd, Sellar, Gaunt and Mathew- 
Lannowe are all good players. Lloyd is a particularly 
brilliant player. 

The 5th Dragoon Guards, like the 4th, has only 
lately been much heard of in the polo world, probably 
because neither of these regiments were formerly on 
the foreign roster, and consequently they did not get 
the advantage of playing in India. Their Adjutant, 
Captain Win wood, D.S.O., Captain Darbyshire and 
Major Eustace are some of their best players. 

Since the Carabiniers were in India in 1887, they 
have also not been known as a polo playing regi- 
ment till lately ; but they have a good prospect 
before them, with Major Leader, Captain Collis, 
D.S.O., W. E. Watson, D.S.O., and other good 
players. Mr. Godfrey Heseltine, who is a brilliant 
player, has been given a Captain's commission in 
the regiment in recognition of his services with the 
Yeomanry in South Africa. 

Captain Makins, of the Royals and Captain Lafone 
of the 4th Hussars, were known as good polo players 
when their respective regiments were quartered at 
Hounslow. Major Hoare, Captain Barnes, Mr. Win- 
ston Churchill, and poor Savory, who was killed in 
Natal, were the members of the 4th Hussars team 
which won the Inter- Regimental Tournament in 
India in 1899. Captain Barnes earned the D.S.O. 
in South Africa, and obtained command of a Yeomanry 
regiment. 

Among the Scots Greys, the names of Lieut. - 
Colonel W. H. Hippisley (their commanding officer) 
and Brevet Lieut. -Colonel Middleton appear as long 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 289 

ago as 1880, in the winning team of the Irish Open 
Cup. Major Adams, Captain Bulkeley-Johnson, and 
the late Tom Conolly were well-known players. 

Among polo playing officers of the 5th Lancers, past 
and present, who have been in this war, are Major C. 
Little and Captain L. H. Jones, of the Lancashire 
Yeomanry who played in the winning team of the 
Regimental Tournament at Hurlingham in 1878 and 
'79, which were its first two years, and in 1882. 
Captain Jones also won the Champion Cup with the 
Freebooters in 1884, '86 and '^j, and the All-Ireland 
Open Cup in 1881. Other well-known polo players 
in the regiment are Major A. C. King, whom I 
remember as an expert at the game when he was in 
the 23rd Fusiliers ; Major Graham, D.S.O. ; Major 
Bailey ; and Captain Collis, who with Captain Daniell, 
of the Cheshire Yeomanry, won the Indian Inter- 
Regimental at Meerut in 1890, F. B. Dugdale, of 
the 5th Lancers, who is a young recruit to polo, won 
the V.C. most gallantly in Natal. 

The Inniskilling Dragoons is one of the best 
regiments at polo ; their three most celebrated 
players being their commanding officer, Lieut.-Colonel 
Rimington, Neil Haig, and G. K. Ansell, with 
C. H. Higgin, Major Paynter, Captain F. A. Fryer, 
Captain E. C. Holland, E. Paterson, D.S.O., and 
others to fall back on. Major Yardley rejoined them 
for the war, and was promoted Major for his services. 
Their triumphs include the Regimental at Hurl- 
ingham in 1897 and '98, the All- Ireland Open Cup 
in 1899, the Irish Regimental in 1897 and '98, and 
the Irish Subalterns' Cup in 1897, '98, and '99. 

The 7th Hussars won the Inter- Regimental at 

19 



290 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

Hurlingham In 1883, '84, '85, '86 and 'gg ; the Indian 
Regimental in 1891 ; and the Subalterns' Cup at 
Ranelagh in 1899. Their commanding officer, Lieut.- 
Colonel Hon. R. Lawley, appears to have first played 
in 1883, and he played for his regiment in 1901. His 
example is followed by all his officers. Their finest 
players are perhaps Colonel Haig, to whom I have 
already referred, Major Carew, D.S.O., Major Poore, 
D.S.O., Major Vaughan, Captain Hon. J. Beresford, 
who represented England v. America in 1900, Major 
Brooke, D.S.O., and Captain Wormald, D.S.O. ; but 
there are many others, such as Major Nicholson, D.S.O., 
Lieut. -Colonel Holdsworth, and Captains Norton, 
Fielden, D.S.O. , Holford D.S.O., and Johnstone. 

Colonel Fisher, who commanded the loth in South 
Africa, played for his regiment when they won the 
Cup in India in 1881 and '82. Lord Airlie, who 
died at the head of the 12th Lancers, was one of this 
team. In late years, the men who represented the 
regiment when they won at Hurlingham in 1888 and 
'93, and are still serving with it, are Major Hughes- 
Onslow, Captain Lord G. Scott, Major Hon. T. 
Brand, Lord W. Bentinck, D.S.O., and Brevet Lieut. - 
Colonel Kavanagh, Captain Hon. J. Dawnay, D.S.O., 
R. Chaplin, S. L. Barry, D.S.O., Major Hon. E. 
Baring and Captain C. Barclay. 

The chief polo players of the 1 2th Lancers are 
Majors Crawley, Wormald, and H. Clifton-Brown, 
all of whom are Brevet Majors for their services in 
this war ; and Captain Hobson. The best known 
player in the regiment was Captain Egerton Green, 
who was formerly Captain of the team, and served 
in the South African war. 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 291 

The 13th Hussars have always been there or 
thereabouts in the final of the Tournament at Hur- 
llngham during the last few years, and they secured 
this coveted trophy in 1892, '94, and '95. Their most 
celebrated team was composed of Captain Pedder, 
J. F. Church, F. H. Wise, and Captain MacLaren. 
J. T. Wigan, Captain Taylor, D.S.O., and A. Symons 
are also well-known players. 

The 14th Hussars were very keen on polo when 
they were in Ireland, and had Captains Murray, 
Eley, Brooksbank, Tottenham, D.S.O., and Stephen, 
besides other good players. 

The 15th Hussars are a very keen polo regiment 
in India. Major de Crespigny and Captain Hambro 
were their best known polo players in England. Lord 
Kensington, who is a member of their present team, 
earned the D.S.O. in this campaign. 

The 1 6th Lancers have been a polo regiment for the 
last twenty-two years. Their team, which won the 
Cup at Hurlingham in 1880, was composed of H. R. 
L. Howard, J. M. Babington, F. G. Blair, J. G. A. 
Baird and W. H. Wyndham Quin. Howard and 
Blair earned the C.B. and Wyndham Quin obtained 
the D.S.O. in this campaign with the Yeomanry. 
Poor Orr-Ewing, who was killed at Kheiss, was an 
old 16th Lancer man, who, though fond of polo, 
was better known in the racing world. Major Gough 
is a particularly good polo player. Lord Fincastle, 
V.C., C. E. Harris, D.S.O., Captain Campbell and 
Captain Tuson formed the i6th Lancer team in 1899. 

The 1 8th Hussars have several good polo players, 
such as Captain Wood, D.S.O., Captain Burnett, 
and A. C. McLachlan. 

19* 



292 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

Perhaps the best polo team ever seen in India was 
that of the Durham Light Infantry, who carried all 
before them from 1894 to 1898. They won the 
Infantry Tournament four times, the Regimental three 
times, and the Championship. Their best teams were 
those in which L. F. Ashburner and W. J. Ainsworth 
played with Captains Wilkinson, Luard and de Lisle. 
The Durham Light Infantry polo players have come 
well to the front in this war, as for instance, Lieut. - 
Colonel de Lisle, whose performances are well known ; 
Major Ross, C.B. ; Captain Ainsworth, D.S.O. ; Cap- 
tain Ashburner, D.S.O. ; Captain Mathew, D.S.O. ; 
Captain Elwes, D.S.O. ; and poor R. E. Rasbotham, 
who was awarded the D.S.O. after he was killed. 
Captains Wilkinson and Luard, and P. W. Nickalls, 
were also in this campaign. 

Brevet Colonel Pilcher, C.B., and A.D.C. to the 
King, of the Bedfordshire Regiment, and Colonel 
Henry used to play for the 5th Fusiliers. 

Brevet Colonel Hon. C. Lambton, D.S.O., of the 
5th Fusiliers, was 5th man for England v. America 
in 1886, and captained his regimental team when they 
won the Infantry Tournament at Hurlingham. He 
twice rode the winner of the Grand Military. 

The Rifle Brigade have always been fond of polo. 
Their 3rd Battalion team (E. W. Bell, G. B. Gosling, 
Hon. G. H. Morris and P. R. Creed) won the Indian 
Tournament in 1900. Rifle Brigade teams were in 
the finals of the Indian Regimental Tournament in 
1 88 1, '82 and '%^. One of their teams, which I saw 
playing well in Dublin and at Rugby in 1899, consisted 
of A. D. Boden, Lieut.-Colonel A. V. Jenner, D.S.O., 
Major A. E. Jenkins, and Captain H. E. Vernon, 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 293 

D.S.O., all of whom were in South Africa. Captain 
Congreve, who won the V.C. at Colenso, is another 
keen Rifle Brigade polo player. 

The Yeomanry have furnished us with many fine 
polo players, such as Major F. B. Mildmay, M.P., 
who won the Champion Cup with the Peats no 
less than seven times ; Major Jenkinson, D.S.O., late 
of the Derbyshire Regiment, who was a well-known 
Lucknow expert in 1885 >" Lord Valentia, C.B., who 
began his polo career in the loth Hussars, and for 
many years has been one of the chief members of the 
Hurlingham Polo Committee ; both he and Colonel 
St. Quintin, also of the loth Hussars, played in the 
first English match (p. 3) ; Lord Alwynne Compton, 
who played for the loth Hussars in 1882 ; Colonel 
F. Meyrick, C.B., who played for the 15th Hussars in 
1890 ; Colonel Burn, C.B. who played for the Royals 
in the final at Hurlingham in 1890 ; Major Gascoigne, 
D.S.O., late of the Blues, where his name appears 
in the Regimental team of 1877 ; Lieut. -Colonel 
Harrison, D.S.O., late of the Scots Greys; Herbert 
Wilson, D.S.O. ; Clive Wilson ; U. O. Thynne, 
D.S.O. ; Godfrey Heseltine, the well-known No. i of 
the Old Cantabs ; Clarence Wilson ; C. G. M. Adam ; 
F. and J. Bellville ; Banbury ; the brothers Gold ; G. 
B. Milne ; and many others. 

The Indian Army has sent many good players to 
this war, as, for instance. Colonel Beatson, C.B., 
w^ho taught the great Jodhpur team how to play ; 
Colonel Younghusband, C.B., who wrote a capital 
book on Polo many years ago ; poor Brazier Creagh, 
whom I knew as a fine player in 1887, when he was 
in the 9th B.L. ; Captain F. A. Maxwell, V.C. and 



294 POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 

D.S.O., of the 1 8th B.L., who played for his regi- 
ment when they won the Bengal Cavalry Tournament 
in 1899. 

The Indian Volunteers furnished a grand con- 
tingent of Polo players with Lumsden's Horse, 
among whom were Captain Rutherfoord, D.S.O., 
Captain Taylor, of the Bengal Cavalry, Sergeant- 
Major Marsham, who earned the Distinguished 
Conduct Medal, his brother H. Marsham, who is 
a very brilliant player, Percy Jones and Sergeant F. 
Macnamara. I have had many good games with 
them m Behar (India). 

The Egyptian Army furnished a strong contingent, 
among them Colonel Maxwell, D.S.O., whom I 
remember as a brilliant player at Cairo in 1890; 
Major J. K. Watson, C.M.G., D.S.O., Lieut.-Colonel 
C. G. Martyr, D.S.O. ; and several others. 

The gallant General Penn Symons, who was beloved 
by every officer and man that served under him, did a 
great deal for polo in India, and at the time of his 
death was President of the Indian Polo Association. 
The late Major Sherston, who soon followed him, was 
Honorary Secretary of this Association. Indian polo 
players owe him a deep debt of gratitude for having 
brought Indian polo, including the revision of the rules, 
into its present state of business-like efficiency. 

The late Colonel Chisholm was well known as a 
brilliant polo player in India and at Hurlingham when 
he was in the 9th Lancers. His name first appears in 
the winning team of that regiment at Meerut in 1878. 

The late Lord Ava, who was the best of sportsmen, 
comrades, and friends, was well known in the Indian 
polo world when he was in the 17th Lancers, and 



POLO IN THE ARMY. 295 

he played in the Regimental team when we won the 
Tournament at Meerut in 1889. He greatly pro- 
moted the success of the Ranelagh Club by taking up 
the secretaryship in 1895. 

The late Lieut. -Colonel le Gallais was probably the 
best polo player who met his death in this war. I never 
played with or against a better No. 3. He played in 
the winning team of the 8th Hussars at Umballa in 
1886 and '^y, and was captain of his regimental team 
for several years. He also won the Paris Open Cup in 
1895 ; and for the Freebooters in the same year, he 
helped to lower the colours of the hitherto invincible 
brothers Peat at Hurlingham, in the Champion Cup. 
If he was a good polo player, he was a still better 
soldier, and when he fell one of the finest young- 
cavalry leaders in the Army was lost to the country. 

Among many other good polo players whose loss 
during this war we have to regret, are Ellison, of the 
9th Lancers, who won the Inter- Regimental at Hurling- 
ham in 1897 ; C. G. Mackenzie, of the Royal Artillery, 
who did much for the Gunners' polo at Woolwich ; 
''Jack" Hanwell, R.H.A., who was an excellent polo 
pony trainer, organiser, and captain of a polo team ; 
Rose, of the Blues, who was No. 3 for many years 
of his regimental team ; Kensington, of the 2nd 
Life Guards, keenest of sportsmen, best of friends ; 
Tom Conolly, of the Scots Greys ; Montmorency, V.C., 
of the 2 1st Lancers; Charles Cavendish, of the 17th 
Lancers ; Lieut. -Colonel Vandeleur, D.S.O. a most 
distinguished young soldier; Bellew, of the i6th 
Lancers ; Captain Legge, D.S.O., of the 20th 
Hussars, and Eyre Lloyd, of the Coldstreams, who 
was well known at Hurlingham for many years. 



296 



POLO IN THE ARMY. [Chap. XII. 



The above list by no means includes all the Polo 
players who have distinguished themselves in this 
campaign. There must be scores of others, especi- 
ally in the Infantry and Royal Artillery, who 
have done most of their polo abroad. I have only 
mentioned those whom I have either played with, or 
have seen playing, or whose names I have found in 
the records. I think I have mentioned enouoh to 
show, if only by the extraordinary large proportion of 
decorations, and Brevets awarded to Polo players, that 
the game has some influence for good in the training of 
an officer, and should therefore be encouraged by our 
military authorities in every possible way. 




Photo bij] 



-M. H. Hayes. 



Fig. loi. — The late Lord Ava. 



297 



CHAPTER XIII. 

POLO ABROAD. 

United States of America — California — Argentina — The Colonies — France — 

Russia. 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

Polo was started in America by Mr. James Gordon 
Bennett in 1876. I see in The Boston Herald, that 
''he and Messrs. Herman Oelrichs, Frederick Bron- 
son, Col. William Jay, Fairman Rogers, F. Gray 
Griswold, G. R. Fearing, W. P. Douglas, Sir Bach 
Cunard, Lord Mandeville, S. S. Howland, Hollis 
Hunnewell, John Mott, W. K. Thorn and others 
practised first in the old Dickel Riding Academy, 
and later on Mr. Bennett's private grounds near 
Jerome Park, Fordham. These gentlemen organised 
the Westchester Polo Club and played at Newport the 
following season, while Mr. H. L. Herbert and Messrs. 
Howard Stokes, W. W. Robbins, C. A. Robbins, 
Arthur Sewell, H. J. Montague, Capt. Grierson, G. 
W. Elder and Adolph Ladenburg established the 
New Brighton Polo Club at Long Branch. The last 
mentioned organisation played also at the Fair 
Grounds, Freehold, N.J., before an audience of some 
5,000 people. Next the members of the Narragansett 



298 POLO ABROAD. [Chap. XIII. 

Gun Club took up the game, Messrs. Pierre Lorillard, 
jun., E. W. Davis and Carroll Bryce being associated 
with Mr. James Gordon Bennett and others. The 
Messrs. Gary and Hamlin, of Buffalo, then organised a 
club, and a branch of the Westchester organisation 
played under the name of the Queen's County Club on 
Long Island, Messrs. August Belmont, F. Gray Gris- 
wold, Herman Oelrichs, Elliott Zobrowski and others 
being among the first to play. 

''The first match between clubs in public was that 
which took place June 21, 1879, i^ Prospect Park, 
Brooklyn, members of the Westchester and Queen's 
County Clubs participating. The game was witnessed 
by upwards of 10,000 persons. The Westchester 
team, which won, consisted of Messrs. Harry Oelrichs, 
August Belmont, Carroll Bryce, William C. Sanford 
and H. L. Herbert. The Queen's County players 
were Messrs. F. Gray Griswold, Herman Oelrichs, 
F. T. Iselin, Pierre Lorillard, jun., and Center 
Hitchcock. 

" The following year saw the opening of the Man- 
hattan Polo Club grounds at Sixth Avenue and One 
Hundred and Tenth Street, New York. This field 
took the place of the old Jerome Park ground for a 
couple of seasons, but this in turn was also given up, 
and local interest in polo, so far as public matches were 
concerned, seems to have ceased for a time. At 
Meadow Brook and Rockaway Country Clubs the 
game had, however, become a great favourite with the 
members, who organised teams and practised assidu- 
ously. A club was also formed at Pelham. Among 
the players at these clubs were August Belmont, jun., 
Thomas Hitchcock, jun., Foxhall P. Keene, Winthrop 




<u 



c 
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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 301 

Rutherford, J. D. Cheever, E. La Montague, Albert 
Francke, R. T. Francke, A. C. Tower, Farley Clark, 
J. S. Stevens, H. L. Herbert, W. K. Thorn, Oliver 
W. Bird, R. D. Winthrop, J. L. Kernochan, Stanley 
Mortimer, Sidney Dillon Ripley, E. D. Morgan, F. O. 
Beach, James M. Waterbury E. C. Potter, C. Oliver 
Iselin and the writer of these lines. 

" Thus the sport in the East stood during the seasons 
immediately prior to 1885, when a team was organised 
at Harvard College by Messrs. Raymond Belmont, 
Edgerton Winthrop, Oliver Bird and Amos French. 
Yale College does not appear to have organised a 
team. 

" It was during the summer of 1885 that polo found a 
footing in the West, the first club being established at 
Lemars, la., by Messrs. Maclagan, Watson, Grayson, 
Moreton, Pardoe and Richards. Mr. Maclagan later 
assisted Messrs. Benson, Dodsworth, Orde and Gray 
to organise a club at Sibley, la., and this was followed 
by the formation of a club at Colorado Springs, Col., 
by Mr. J. S. Stevens, of the Rockaway team, assisted 
by Messrs. Lyle, Braggiotti, and others. In 1886 Mr. 
H. L. Herbert organised a team at Orange, N.J. 
This club formed the nucleus of the Essex County 
oro'anisation. 

" It was in 1886 that the international match occurred 
at Newport between members of the English Hur ling- 
ham Club and a quartet of American players. On the 
English team were Mr. John Watson, Hon. R. Law^ley, 
Messrs. T. Hone and Malcolm Little, with Mr. C. Lamb- 
ton as umpire. The American players were Messrs. 
Thomas Hitchcock, jun., W. K. Thorn, jun., Raymond 
Belmont and Foxhall Keene, their umpire being Mr. 



302 POLO ABROAD. [Chap. XIII. 

E. C. WInthrop, -jun. Mr. S. Sands, jun., was time- 
keeper and Mr. S. H. Robbins the referee. If anything, 
the American players displayed more dash and spirit than 
their competitors, but the superior strategy and com- 
bination play of the visitors so outclassed the work 
of the home team that the result was a victory for the 
former, the Englishmen registering ten goals as against 
four scored by the American players. This game 
demonstrated the necessity of an entire change in the 
character of American polo, and the players, recog- 
nising the advantage of sustained combined effort over 
brilliant individual play, quickly adopted that style and 
have practised it ever since. 

'' Players soon became so numerous and so expert 
that the introduction of a system of handicapping was 
deemed expedient. This was distinctly an American 
innovation, and, as events have proved, is decidedly 
beneficial. It is a very simple arrangement, and con- 
sists of penalising players with a certain number of 
goals commensurate with the degree of dexterity they 
evince in actual play. When the system was inaugu- 
rated in 1888 Mr. H. L. Herbert was, by mutual con- 
sent of the players in the East, appointed official 
handicapper, and for several seasons arranged the lists 
to the satisfaction of all concerned. But as new clubs 
were started and the system extended it was too much 
to expect that one player should be burdened with all 
the work, and so, after a time, the duties of the office 
devolved upon a committee made up of delegates of 
the Eastern polo clubs, who now agree upon the 
handicap changes which, at intervals during every 
season, are deemed necessary. 

'' Following the introduction of the handicap system. 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 303 

the offering of prizes became general, and the forma- 
tion of new clubs took on the nature of an epidemic. 
In the neighbourhood of Boston the Myopia and 
Dedham Clubs were, during 1889, organised respec- 
tively by Messrs. R. M. Appleton, R. L. Agassiz, 
Robert G. Shaw, 2d. G. L. Peabody, A. P. Gardner, 
Samuel D. Warren, C. H. W. Foster, Allan Forbes, 
W. Cameron Forbes and their associates. On the 
Pacific coast the Santa Monica or Southern California 
Polo Club was organised by Messrs. E. Gorham, H. 
A. Winslow, G. L. Waring, J. B. Proctor, W. H. 
Young, J. E. Hoy, Captain Bolton, R. P. Carter, J. 
A. Parker, J. Machell, W. R. Ward and P. Martin. 

'' In 1890 the Philadelphia Club organised, with 
Messrs. J. S. Groom, H. P. McKean, jun., H. G. 
Groom and others. 

*' This year also saw the inauguration of the Oyster 
Bay, L. I., Club, with Messrs. Theodore Roosevelt, 
Francis G. Underbill, W. C. Tuckerman, Elliott and 
others. 

''The year 1890 is notable as that in which the 
American Polo Association was organised. The 
members of a committee, which was formed on the 
2ist May, 1890, were Mr. H. L. Herbert, chairman ; 
Messrs. Douglas Robinson, Oliver W. Bird, E. C. 
Potter and John C. Cowdin. The result was the 
formation of the Polo Association and the adoption 
of rules and regulations and bye-laws. At the first 
meeting held in New York, Friday, June 6, 1890, the 
American Polo Association was duly organised, em- 
bracing, as a nucleus, the country clubs of Westchester, 
Essex County, Meadow Brook, Morris County, Rock- 
away, Philadelphia, and Oyster Bay Polo Clubs, 



304 POLO ABROAD. [Chap. XII I. 

Rules governing play were revised, dimensions of 
grounds agreed upon, implements used in the game 
defined and Association prizes offered. 

" The American Polo Association has accomplished 
wonders during the decade just closed in the matter of 
its membership, clubs having been organised under 
the Association's auspices in almost every State in the 
Union. Its influence has been far reaching, and the 
tournaments held on the grounds of the several clubs 
as mutually agreed upon by delegates at the annual 
conventions have brought about a degree of public 
approval of the sport far greater than its most ardent 
sponsors ever anticipated. Counting the active parti- 
cipants at present included on the handicap lists, and 
the many club members who take part in occasional 
games only, and therefore have expressed a desire to 
be dropped from club schedules, and adding to these 
the many players who are not attached to any regular 
organisation, it is safe to say that fully five hundred 
polo players could, if necessary, be got together in this 
country." 

Mr. W. A. Hazard, of 29, Broadway, N. Y., is now 
the Honorary Secretary of the American Polo Asso- 
ciation. 

During the season 1901 American polo players took 
part in tournaments held on the grounds of twenty 
clubs for thirty-five sets of cups and other special 
prizes, involving one hundred contests. 

"In many respects the season just closed has been a 
most remarkable one. The schedule of one hundred 
games actually played shows an increase of ten over 
what were negotiated last year, and twenty-five more 
than were decided in 1899. Seventy games were 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 305 

played under the handicap system, the novices and 
young players thus being afforded unusual opportun- 
ities to try their strength against experts. Twenty 
contests were conducted regardless of handicap penal- 
ties, and in ten instances teams were rated evenly. 
Ample scope was therefore afforded followers of the 
sport to gauge the ability of individual players as well 
as regularly assigned combinations. 

** Of the meetings which were the most successful, that 
held on Mr. George J. Gould's estate, Georgian Court, 
near Lakewood, N.J., and which practically opened 
the season in the East, so far as public attendance was 
concerned, must be accorded first place by reason of 
the diversity of sport presented, though in the matter 
of actual number of contests decided, the Rockaway 
tournament ranks highest with sixteen, next come 
Jersey, Point Judith, Newport, Westchester, Phila- 
delphia, Meadowbrook, Bryn Mawr, ranking in the 
order named, and so on through the list down to 
Myopia, that wound up the season with a single 
combat." 

For records of championship matches see page 329. 

There are two important differences between the 
rules of American polo and those of English polo. In 
the States there is no off-side, and hooking sticks is not 
allowed ; the result being that in America the game is 
much looser, more brilliant runs are made, and more 
goals are hit than on English grounds. 

On account of the system of blocking, a man in a 
first-class English match is lucky if he hits the ball 
more than twice running ; but in America, if he gets 
away with a clear run, which often happens owing to 
the absence of the off-side rule, his pursuer must over- 

20 



306 POLO ABROAD. [Chap. XIII. 

take him in order to get the ball away from him, and 
is not allowed to put on a short spurt and hook his 
stick. No. I is of course much better off in the 
American game, and competes on even terms with the 
Back, instead of being at a great disadvantage, as in 
the English game. 

Several American players are well known in this 
country as first-class performers, and it is greatly to be 
hoped that a representative international match will be 
played before long. We shall find the Lakewood team 
to be far superior to the one which Hurlingham easily 
defeated in 1886. We should remember that Ameri- 
cans, when trying to take the cup back to their own 
country, labour under the great disadvantage of having 
to play under Hurlingham rules, and they will have 
all the more credit, if they win. 

The best known American players in England 
are Messrs. Foxhall Keene, Lawrence and Walter 
McCreery, F. J. Mackey, and the brothers Eustis, all 
of whom are fine players and good horsemen. The 
more that come, the better pleased will be their brother 
polo players on this side of the Atlantic. 

In a letter which I recently had the pleasure of re- 
ceiving from Mr. Foxhall Keene, he tells me that we 
English polo players are inclined to underrate American 
ponies, which he thinks are as fast as our animals, a 
trifle more handy, and more consistent in their form. 
He considers that superiority in weight is a decided 
advantage in favour of English ponies. To my ques- 
tion, " Can America produce as good ponies as the 
best in England ? " he replies as follows : "I do not 
think, even with the hundreds of ponies that are sent 
to us every year from Texas, Colorado, California and 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



307 



elsewhere, we have yet been able to find the very best 
ponies which our country produces, because very few 
of our men are willing to take the trouble and time to 
seek out these great individuals. There are many 
'quarter horses' (14.2 and 14.2^ ponies) that are 
raced through our West for a quarter or three-eighths 






Photo bij] [C. F. De MOTT. 

Fig. 103. — Mr. Foxhall Keene's chestnut American pony "Chief." 



of a mile, which would make perfect polo ponies, if 
they were properly trained and schooled for four or five 
months. As a rule we do everything over here in such 
a hurry, that the large majority of our players prefer 
inferior ready-made ponies to these flyers." 

The bay mare, Texina, on which Mr. Keene is 
mounted in Fig. 102, is a typical American pony, and 



20 



* 



3o8 POLO ABROAD. [Chap. XIII. 

is generally regarded as the best polo pony in that 
country. The chestnut pony Chief (Fig. 103) is also 
a typical American, and is of the highest class. Ex- 
press (Fig. 104), though not quite as good as his two 
stable companions, is bad to beat. 

CALIFORNIA. 

In California, the Burlinghame Club is the head- 
quarters of polo, although there are many other good 
clubs. Ponies are plentiful and good, as we may see 
from Figs. 47 and 89. Englishmen started polo in 
California, where the game is played under Hurling- 
ham rules, which fact is, I think, a proof of the 
superiority of the English over the American game, 
because Californian players had the opportunity of 
judging which was the better of the two. 

ARGENTINA. 

The Hurlingham Club at Buenos Ayres is the 
leading polo club in the Argentine Republic, where the 
game is vigorously supported whenever eight English- 
men can get together. Even a dearth of our country- 
men does not always stop the game in that part of the 
world ; for some of the owners of estancias have their 
own teams of natives, who play admirably. 

An annual championship (p. 332), and many other 
good tournaments and matches take place. On many 
occasions we have had the pleasure of welcoming 
Argentine players on English grounds. H. Scott 
Robson, the ambidextrous welter weight, is the best 
player who has come from South America ; but we 
have seen many other good performers from that 
country, such as Frank Furber, Frank Balfour, and 



ARGENTINA. 



309 



H. Ravenscroft, the three of whom with Scott 
Robson formed a very successful team in 1897. 
F. E. Kinchant, an extraordinary hard hitter, is a 
very fine player, who came over in 1898. As a rule, 
teams from Argentina are greatly handicapped by .the 
fact that their ponies take a long time to become 
acclimatised. 

Englishmen who live in the Argentine Republic, like 




Fig. 104. — Mr. Foxhall Keene's American pony "Express. 



to Spend their holidays in England, during which time 
they get lots of fun by bringing over with them their 
ponies, which they sell before returning. Although 
they do not make much pecuniary profit on the trans- 
action, the sales somewhat help to pay the cost of the 
good polo which these fine sportsmen obtain. 



3IO • POLO ABROAD. [Chap. XIII. 

THE COLONIES. 

Polo flourishes at all the military stations, such as 
Gibraltar, Malta, Cairo, Alexandria, Wady Haifa, 
Suakim, Khartoum, Samoa, Jamaica, Aden, Singapore, 
Hong Kong and Shanghai ; and soldiers and civilians 
play whenever they can. It is popular in Canada, 
Burma, the West Indies, and British Columbia. All 
over Australia and New Zealand flourishino; clubs 
abound, and hold tournaments and matches. 

The w^ar has stopped polo to a great extent in South 
Africa, where it was played at Cape Town, Durban, 
Maritzburg, Harrismith, Johannesburg, Kimberley, 
Estcourt, Grey town, and many other places. Even 
now, in all standing camps, games are got up as a 
matter of course. An officer in a colonial corps told 
me that he had often taken part in a brush with the 
enemy in the morning, and played polo in the after- 
noon. In the near future South Africa will be a great 
polo country, because good and cheap grounds can be 
obtained in plenty, and the climate is perfect for the 
game all the year round. 

FRANCE. 

Mr. Rene Raoul Duval, who fell in love with the 
game when he was staying with the 7th Hussars in 
India, started polo in Paris in 1892 with a few other 
keen sportsmen, and an international tournament took 
place the following year (p. 328). 

The early pioneers of polo in France were the three 
brothers Raoul Duval, Prince de Poix, Vicomte de la 
Rouchefoucauld, Due de Luynes, M. Boussod, Marquis 
de Villaviega and his two brothers E. and P. 
d'Escandon, Luis d'Errazu, Baron le Jeune, Baron 



FRANCE. 



II 



E. de Rothschild, and a few others, nearly all of 
whom are still playing vigorously. 

Polo is played five days a week during the Paris 
season, and there is no pleasanter place in or near the 
gay city than the charming little club-house and 




Fig. 105. — Prince Serge Belosselsky on his half-bred Arab and 
Russian pony " Negress." 

grounds at Bagatelle on the slopes of the Bois. 
Taking a polo team for the week between the Grand 
Prix and the big steeplechase at Auteuil is a most 
delightful experience. An International tournament 
then takes place ; amusement succeeds amusement with 



312 POLO ABROAD. [Chap. XIII. 

startling" rapidity, and the hospitality accorded to 
English polo players is most cordial in every possible 
way. Many of the French players are well known 
on English grounds, our most frequent visitors being 
the Escandons, Duvals, Baron Rothschild and L. de 
Errazu. The Comte de Madre cannot now be re- 
garded as a visitor, for he has taken up his residence 
in Rugby. 

There are also grounds at Ferrieres, Baron Roth- 
schild's home, which has a perfect ground. An annual 
tournament is held at Deauville in the autumn (p. 328). 

The French cavalry officers have lately started for 
themselves a club near Paris, where they play together 
with great keenness. 

RUSSIA. 

Prince Serge Belosselsky (Fig. 105), who is well 
known at Paris, Pau, and Rugby, as an enthusiastic 
polo player, started the game at St. Petersburg about 
nine years ago, and was greatly helped in this laudable 
project by his father. Prince Belosselsky, who very 
generously presented the Polo Club with a beautiful 
ground on the island of Krestovsky. Among other 
English residents of St. Petersburg, Mr. Tamplin, who 
was well known some years ago with the Brighton 
Harriers, rendered valuable aid to the good cause, both 
as a player and as a manager. The keenest players at 
the Russia capital have been Prince Serge and English 
residents, including members of the British Embassy. 
Grand Duke Boris and Prince Kantacojene joined the 
ranks of keen players, and their good example will no 
doubt be followed by many other Russian gentlemen. 
In 1 90 1, a tournament for an open cup took place, and 



RUSSIA. 



313 



the Hamburg Club, which is managed by Mr. Has- 
perg, of 36, Glasshlittenstrasse, sent a team in a most 
sporting manner. 



The foUowino- teams entered :- 



Hamburg. 
Mr. Beit. 
Mr. Hasperg. 
Mr. Muller. 
Mr. Traum. 



British Embassy. 
Mr. P. de Bathe. 
Mr. R. Graham. 
Mr. H. Beaumont. 
Hon. C. Hardinee. 



St. Petersburg. 
Count Kinsky. 
Prince Serge Belosselsky. 
Mr. Mouranyi. 
Mr. Grabovsky. 



The final was w^on by St. Petersburg by six goals 
to four, after a good game with the British Embassy. 
It is interesting to note that Count Kinsky, who won 
the Grand National on Zoedone, takes part in another 
British sport in a different part of the world. 

Fig. 106 shows a half-bred Cossack pony. 



■* 




Fig. 106. — Plon. C. Hardinge on his half-bred Cossack pony by a 
thorough -bred horse. 



APPENDIX. 



317 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 



INTRODUCTION OF POLO. 

1854. This year INIajor-General Sherar witnessed the game of Chaugan in the 

]Munipoori Valley, and the tea planters of Cachar took it up shortly 

afterwards. 
1859. Major-General Sherar introduced the game to Calcutta by bringing a 

Munipoori team to that city. 
1 86 1. Polo introduced in Punjaub and N.W. P. of India by British officers. 
1867. Polo introduced to Madras and Ceylon ; and became general throughout 

India. 
1869. First polo match in England {see p. 2). 
1872. Captain Herbert started polo at Lillie Bridge, in London. 
1874. Hurlingham Club opened. 

1876. Polo introduced to Australia. 

1877. First year of Champion Cup, Hurlingham. 

1877. First year of Indian Inter-Regimental Tournament. 

1878. First year of Hurlingham Inter-Regimental Tournament. 
1878. First year of Irish Open Cup. 

1885. First year of County Cup, Hurlingham. 



HURLINGHAM INTER-REGIMENTAL 
TOURNAMENT. 

1878. 5th Lancers : J. Spicer, G. R. Tuft on, Cosmo Little, L. H. Jones, Capt. 

R. St. L. Moore. ' 

1879. 5th Lancers : G. R. Tufton, Cosmo Little, L. II. Jones, J. Spicer, Capt. 

R. St. L. Moore. 

1880. i6th Lancers : J. G. A. Baird, W. H. Wyndham Quin, J. Babington, 

F. G. Blair, H. L. Howard. 

1881. i6th Lancers: J. G. A. Baird, W. H, Wyndham Quin, J. Babington, 

H. L. Howard, J. Oswald, W. Browne. 

1882. 5th Lancers : Cosmo Little, L. H. Jones, Capt. Tufton, Capt. J. Spicer. 

1883. 7th Hussars : Hon. R. Lawley, T. Hone, Capt. Hunt, Capt. Roper. 



3i8 APPENDIX. 

1884. 7th Hussars : Hon. R. Lawley, T. Hone, Major Hunt, Capt. Roper. 

1885. 7th Hussars : D. Haig, T. Hone, Major Hunt, Capt. Roper. 

1886. 7th Hussars : Capt. T. Hone, G. A. Carew, D. Haig, Capt. Hon. R. 

Lawley. 

1887. 5th Lancers : L. H. Jones, Capt. C. Little, B. Mundy, Capt. J. Spicer. 

1888. loth Hussars : A. Hughes Onslow, E. W. Baird, Capt. Greenwood, Capt. 

Allsop. 

1889. 9th Lancers : Capt. W. K. Jenner, Capt. Malcolm Little, Capt. F. Colvin, 

Capt. Lamont. 

1890. 9th Lancers : Capt. W. K. Jenner, Capt, Malcolm Little, Capt. F. Colvin, 

Capt. Lamont. 

1891. 9th Lancers: Capt. W. K. Jenner, Capt. Hon. C. Willoughby, Capt. F. 

Colvin, Major Lamont. 

1892. 13th Hussars: E. N. Pedder, D, Robertson Aikman, F. Wise, Capt. 

MacLaren. 

1893. loth Hussars : Lord G. Scott, Capt. Kavanagh, Lord W. Bentinck, Hon. 

T. Brand. 

1894. 13th Hussars : Capt. E. N. Pedder, J. F. Church, F. Wise, Capt. 

MacLaren. 

1895. 13th Hussars : Capt. E. N. Pedder, J. F. Church, F. Wise, Capt. 

MacLaren. 

1896. 9th Lancers : D. Campbell, Capt. W. K. Jenner, G. Ellison, Lord C. 

Bentinck, 

1897. Inniskillings : F. A. Fryer, G. K. Ansell, N, Haig, Major Rimington. 

1898. Inniskillings: H, C, Higgin, G. K. Ansell, N. Haig, Major Rimington. 

1899. 7th Hussars : J, Vaughan, Capt. Hon. J. Beresford, Major Carew, Major 

Poore. 
1900 and 1 901, No Tournament, on account of South African War, 



HURLINGHAM OPEN CHAMPION CUP. 

Conditions : — Open to any Polo Teams. 

The entries, naming colosiu-s, to be made on or before 5 p.m,, on the Saturday 
prior to the week of competition. 

The respective Teams to be drawn, and the said draw to take place on Saturday, 
at 5 p.m., prior to the week of competition. The Captain of each Team to name 
his four players at time of entry. 

In the contest for the Champion Cup, in case one or more of the players should 
be incapacitated from playing, one or more substitutes, not having already taken 
part in the Tournament, may be brought in. 

Unless three Teams contend the Cup will not be given. 

In case of a Tie between two Teams, it must be played off the same day till 
one Team obtain a Goal, always excepting both Teams electing to postpone. 

1877. Monmouthshire and Tyros played a tie : F. Plerbert, R. Herbert, H. Owen, 
J. Mellor, E. Curre ; C. de Murietta, A. de Marietta, Sir B. Cunard, 
E. Baldock, Hon, C. C, Cavendish. 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 319 

1878. Monmouthshire : F. Herbert, R. Herbert, J. Mellor, E. Curre, Sir C. 

Wolseley. 

1879. Hurlingham : E. Baldock, W. Ince Anderton, J. Peat, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1880. Sussex : Earl of Lewes, Phipps Hornby, J. Peat, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1881. Sussex : Earl of Lewes, A. Peyton, J. Peat, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1882. Sussex : J. Peat, Kenyon Stow, A. Peyton, A. Peat, J. Babington. 

1883. Sussex w.o. : Phipps Hornby, J. Peat, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1884. Freebooters : L. H. Jones, T. Hone, John Watson, J. Spicer. 

1885. Sussex : J. Peat, F. Mildmay, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1886. Freebooters : Capt. B. Gough, L. H. Jones, J. Spicer, John Watson. 

1887. Freebooters : Malcolm Little, L. H. Jones, K. MacLaren, John Watson. 

1888. Sussex : J. Peat, F. Mildmay, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1889. Sussex : J. Peat, F. Mildmay, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1890. Sussex : J. Peat, F. Mildmay, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1 89 1. Sussex : J. Peat, F. Mildmay, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1892. Sussex : J. Peat, F. Mildmay, Lord Harrington, A. E. Peat. 

1893. Sussex w.o. : J. Peat, F. Mildmay, A. E. Peat, A. Peat. 

1894. Freebooters : Gerald Hardy, Lord Southampton, Capt. le Gallais, Capt. 

Daly. 

1895. Freebooters : Gerald Hardy, Lord Southampton, A. Rawlinson, Capt. 

Daly. 

1896. Freebooters : Gerald Hardy, Lord Southampton, A. Rawlinson, W. S. 

Buckmaster. 

1897. Rugby : G. A. Miller, Capt. Renton, E. D. Miller, W. J. Drybrough. 

1898. Rugby : G. A. Miller, Capt. Renton, E. D. Miller (and Walter Jones), 

W. J. Drybrough. 

1899. Rugby : Walter Jones, G. A. Miller, E. D. Miller, W. J. Drybrough. 

1900. Old Cantabs : W. McCreery, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buckmaster, L. 

]McCreeiy. 

1901. Rugby: Walter Jones, G. A. Miller, E. D. Miller, C D. Miller. 



HURLINGHAM COUNTY CUP. 

1885. Gloucestershire : E. Kenyon Stow, Lord Harrington, F. G. Matthews, 

T. S. Baxter. 

1886. Gloucestershire : E. Kenyon Stow, Lord Harrington, F. G. Matthews, 

M. Little. 

1887. Derbyshire w.o. : E. Kenyon Stow, Lord Harrington, Gerald Hardy, 

Capt. Herbert, 

1888. Kent : R. Stewart Savile, Capt. Alderson, Major Peters, G. Russell. 

1889. Barton : Gerald Hardy, J. Reid Walker, W. Hall Walker, Lord ILir- 

rington. 

1890. Berkshire : Capt. V. Ferguson, H. T. Fenwick, Hon. W. Lambton, Capt. 

J. Spicer. 

1891. Liverpool : G. H. Pilkington, C. E. Mason, A. Tyrer, W. Hall Walker. 

1892. Meath : Gore Lambai-de, F. Featherstonhaugh, J. O. Jameson, T. Hone, 

J. Watson. 



320 APPENDIX. 

1893. Edinburgh : W. Younger, C. G. Mackenzie, W. J. Drybrough, T. Dry- 

brough. 

1894. Edinburgh : W. Younger, Egerton Green, W. J. Drybrough, T. Drybrough. 

1895. Rugby. Lord Shrewsbury, G. A. Miller, E. D. Miller, Capt. Daly. 

1896. Stansted : Guy Gilbey, G. Gold, A. Gold, VV. Buckmaster. 

1897. Rugby : W. Neilson, K. J. Mackey, Lord Shrewsbury, Capt. Renton. 

1898. Chislehurst : C. Nickalls, H. Savill, M. Nickalls, P. W. Nickalls. 

1899. Stansted : P. Gold, Capt. Gosling, T. Gilbey, G. Gold. 

1900. Rugby : J. Drage, Comte J. de Madre, K. Marsham, Sir H. de Trafford. 

1 901. Eden Park : H. Rich, P. Bullivant, H. Marsham, H. Card well. 



HURLINGHAM SOCIAL CLUB CUP. 

1897. White's Club : Capt. Fitzgerald, Capt. Renton, G. A. Miller, Sir H. de 

Trafiford. 

1898. Raleigh Club : Walter Jones, E. B. Sheppard, W. S. Buckmaster, W. J. 

Drybrough. 

1899. Nimrod Club : Lord Shrewsburj', F. J. Mackey, A. Rawlinson, Capt, 

Renton. 

1900. Pitt Club, Cambridge : W. McCreery, F. AL Freake, W. S. Buckmaster, 

L. McCreery, C. D. Miller. 

1901. Orleans Club : F. Hargreaves, F. Menzies, F. M. Freake, L. McCreery. 



RANELAGH LADIES' CUP. 

N.B. — Entries close Wednesday previous to week of play. 

Conditions : — Thirty-two ladies will be nominated by a committee appointed 
for the purpose. 

Each lady will nominate one player. The nominator is responsible that her 
nominee is available to play on any day from July 1st to July 6th. 

The players will be drawn together in teams. 

The ladies nominating the winners will receive the prizes presented by the 
Ranelagh Club. 

If a team cannot play at the time advertised, that team must scratch ; but the 
Polo Manager will do his best to meet the wishes of Competitors if informed 
before entries close of the most convenient hours. 

1901. "B" Team: Lord Shrewsbury, M. Nickalls, F. M. Freake, Capt. 
Schreiber. 



RANELAGH PUBLIC SCHOOLS' CUP. 

N.B. — Entries close Wednesday previous to week of play. 

Conditions : — Open to any team, the Members of which have been at the same 
Public School. 

No player is eligible to represent his School unless he spent not less than two 
years there. 

The Captain of each team to name his four players, in writing, at the time of 
entry. 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 321 

For a Cup presented by the Ranelagh Club, which will be given to the School 
represented by the winning team. 

An entrance fee of £4 must be paid for each team. The Sweepstakes to go to 
the winning team. 

If a team cannot play at the time advertised, that team must scratch ; but the 
Polo Manager will do his best to meet the wishes of Competitors if informed 
before entries close of the most convenient hours. 

1 901. Old INIarlburians : Capt. L. C. D. Jenner, E. B. Sheppard, G. A. Miller, 
C. D. Miller. 



RANELAGH OPEN CHALLENGE CUP. 

N.B. — Entries close Wednesday previous to week of play. 

Conditions : — Open to any team, club, or regiment. 

The preliminary ties to be played off by all the teams entered, the holders on 
giving notice to that effect before the closing of the entries need only defend the 
Cup in the final. 

The Captain of each team to name his four players, in writing, at the time of 
entry. 

After a team has once pi lyed no substitute for a member of the team will be 
allowed, without the consent of the Polo Manager ; under no circumstances may 
one man play in two teams. 

An entrance fee of ;,^5 must be paid for each team. This fee will be returned 
unless the team scratches, in w^hich case the money thus collected wdll be given 
to the Ranelagh Club Servants' Christmas-Box Fund. 

If a team cannot play at the time advertised, that team must scratch ; but the 
Polo Manager will do his best to meet the wishes of Competitors if informed 
before entries close of the most convenient hours. 
1897. Rugby : Walter Jones, G. A. Miller, C. D. Miller, E. D. Miller. 

1897. Ranelagh : A. Rawdinson, Dokhal Singh, W. S. Buckmaster, W. J. 

Drybrough. 

1898. Freebooters : A. Rawlinson, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buckmaster, John 

Watson. 

1899. Freebooters : J. Vaughan, G. K. Ansell, A. Rawlinson, Capt. Hon. J. 

Beresford. 

1900. Old Cantabs : W. McCreery, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buckmaster, L. 

McCreery. 

1901. Rugby : Walter Jones, G. A. Miller, Lord Shrewsbury (and E. D. Miller), 

C. D. Miller. 



RANELAGH CLUB, NOVICES' CUP. 

N.B. — Entries close Wednesday previous to week of play. 

Conditions : — Open to any polo team, club, or regiment, with the following 
exceptions : — 

No polo player is eligible who has played in the winning team of any of the 
following tournaments : — Champion Cup at Hurlingham ; the Ranelagh Open 

21 



322 APPENDIX. 

Challenge Cup ; the Regimental Tournament, at Hurlingham ; the County Cup ; 
the Regimental Tournament, in Dublin ; the Open Cup, in Dublin ; Inter- 
national Tournament, in Paris ; Rugby Tournament ; the Regimental Tourna- 
ment, in India ; the Subalterns' Cup, at Ranelagh ; the Subalterns' Cup, in 
Ireland ; the Hunt Cup, at Ranelagh ; the Social Club Cup, at Hurlingham ; the 
Champion Cup, in India ; the Hurlingham Tournament, in Buenos Ayres ; the 
Championship, in America ; the Public Schools Cup, at Ranelagh ; and the 
Novices Cup, at Ranelagh, in 1901, or suVjsequently. 

The Novices Cup is confined to Members of Ranelagh, and to one team from 
each county belonging to the County Polo Association, and to one team from each 
regiment. 

The Captain of each team to name his four players, in writing, at the time of 
entry. 

After a team has once played no substitute for a member of the team will be 
allowed, without the consent of the Polo Manager ; vinder no circumstances may 
one man play in two teams. The Captain of each team to name his four players, 
in writing, at time of entry. 

An entrance fee of ;!^5 must be paid for each team. This fee will be returned 
unless the team scratches, in which case the money thus collected will be given 
to the Ranelagh Club Servants' Christmas-Box Fund. 

If a team cannot play at the time advertised, that team must scratch ; but the 
Polo Manager will do his best to meet the wishes of Competitors if informed 
•before entries close of the most convenient hours. 

1896. Fulham Rovers : G. W. Hobson, W. R. Court, L. C. D. Jenner, A. Suart. 

1897. Rovers : Capt. xV. Jenner, L. C. D. Jenner, Dohlal Singh, Capt. Bruce. 

1898. Trekkers : U. O. Thynne, J. Wormald, F. E. Kinchant, P. W. Nickalls. 

1899. Trekkers : Capt. Schofield, L. C. D. Jenner, F. C. Menzies, U. O. 

Thynne. 

1900. Trekkers: B. Wilson, L. C. D. Jenner, A. Stourton, F. Menzies. 

1901. Eden Park : H. Rich, P. BuUivant, H. Marsham, L. Bucknall. 



RANELAGH HUNT CHALLENGE CUP. 

N.B. — Entries close Wednesday previous to week of play. 

Conditions : — Open to any pack of Foxhounds or Staghounds in the United 
Kingdom, or abroad. 

No player is eligible to compete unless he has, for the previous season, sub- 
scribed not less than ^10 to the Hunt he represents, on or before the 1st of 
March of the same year. He must also have hunted on not less than ten 
occasions the previous season with that Hunt. 

No player may represent different Hunts in consecutive seasons unless he is no- 
longer qualified for the Hunt he represented the previous season. 

The Captain of each team to name his four players, in writing, at the time of 
entry. 

The Captain must be responsible that each Member of his team is duly 
qualified. 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 323 

An entrance fee of ^^5 must be paid for each team. This fee will be returned 
unless the team scratches, in which case the money thus collected will be given 
to the Hunt Servants' Benefit Fund. 

After a team has once played no substitute will be allowed without the consent 
of the Polo ^Manager. 

The Challenge Cup is held for one year by the ^Master of the winning Hunt. 

Prizes will be presented to the Winners by the Ranelagh Hunt. 

If a team cannot play at the time advertised, that team must scratch ; but the 
Polo Manager will do his best to meet the wishes of Competitors if informed 
before entries close of the most convenient hours. 

1897. Muskerry : G. W. Hobson, Capt. Clifton Brown, Capt. Egerton Green,, 

F. Wormald. 

1898. Warwickshire : F. Hargreaves, F. J. ^lackey, F. M. Freake, W. J, 

Drybrough. 

1899. Pytchley : C. P. Nickalls, Capt. Renton,W. S. Buckmaster, P.W. Nickalls. 

1900. Pytchley: G. W. Mclvor, Capt. Renton, W. S. Buckmaster, Comte J. de 

Madre. 

1901. Pytchley : C. P. Nickalls, M. Nickalls, W. S. Buckmaster, J. Drage. 



RANELAGH CLUB, SUBALTERNS' CUP. 

N.B. — Entries close Wednesday, July 17th. 

Conditions : — Open to teams of Subalterns from any regiment of the Regular 
or Auxiliary Forces. Infantry Regiments of more than one Battalion may enter 
a combined team. 

The Royal Artillery are eligible to enter as a team. 

The Captain of each team to name his four players, in writing, at the time of 
entry. 

The conditions are, with the above exception, the same as for the Inter Regi- 
mental Tournament, at Hurlingham. 

If the team cannot play at the time advertised, that team must scratch ; but the 
Polo Manager will do his best to meet the wishes of Competitors if informed 
before entries close of the most convenient hours. 

1896. 9th Lancers : F. H. Allhusen, G. Ellison, D. Campbell, Lord Charles 

Bentinck. 

1897. Royal Horse Guards : ) Hon. D. Marj or i banks, Hon. R. Ward, E. Rose, 

1898. Royal Horse Guards : j F. E. Drage. 

1899. 7th Hussars : H. Fielden, J. H. Holford, F. Wormald, J. Vaughan. 

■ ^ c Tournament did not take place owing to South African War. 
1901. 3 r fa 



ALL IRELAND COUNTY CUP. 



Conditions : — See Rules of the Irish County Polo Club Union, 1901 ; page 351. 

Winners. 

1 890. Fermanagh 

1 89 1. Fermanagh 

1892. Fermanagh 

21 



A Maude, C. C. D'Arcy Irvine, E. M. Archdale, J. 
Porter-Porter. 



324 APPENDIX. 

1893. Meath : Shirley Ball, Capt. Steeds, J. O. Jameson, Capt. Hone. 

1895' Sli^o • I ^- ^^- Connolly, C. O'Hara, G. M. Eccles, J. FitzGerald. 

1896. Westmeath : Major Lewis, R. Hudson, Joyce, P. O'Reilly. 

1897. Westmeath : J. H. Locke, R. Hudson, Major Lewis, P. P. O'Reilly. 

1898. Sligo : ( P. W. Connolly, H. G. L'Estrange, C. O'Hara, J. Fitz- 

1899. Sligo : ( Gerald. 

1900. Sligo : P. W. Connolly, W. Campbell, C. O'Hara, J. FitzGerald. 

1901. Sligo : G. M. Eccles, W. Campbell, C. O'Hara, J. FitzGerald. 



ALL IRELAND HUNT CUP. 

This Tournament was promoted by Co. Kildare, and is played on their ground ai 

Castletown. 

Conditions : — Open to teams comprised of Members of any recognised Pack of 
Fox or Staghounds in the United Kingdom. 

1 901. Meath Hunt : R. Houston, S. Watt, Capt. Steeds, Capt. Long (and John 
Watson. ) 



ALL IRELAND OPEN CHALLENGE CUP, 

DUBLIN. 

Conditions : — See page 39, Book of Rules. 

1878. 7th Royal Fusiliers : Not recorded. 

1879. 7th Hussars : Capt. Roper, Capt. Phillips, Hon. R. Lawley, Lord Lumley, 

J. Hunt. 

1880. Scots Greys : W. C. Middleton, W. H. Hippisley, Torrens, Wolfe. 

1 88 1. 5th Lancers : Combe, Tufton, J. Spicer, L. H. Jones. 

1882. All Ireland P.C. : Capt. Montague, Dugdale, G. B. Hone, J. Watson. 

1883. Carlow : W. Edge, Wolfe, T. Hone, J. Watson. 

1884. 5th Lancers: Mundy, Sinclair, Capt. L. H. Jones, Capt. Spicer. 

1885. Freebooters: W. Edge, W. Anderson, J. O. Jameson, J. Watson. 

1886. Freebooters : D. Haig, W. Edge, Capt. Hon. R. Lawley, J. Watson. 

1887. All Ireland P.C. : J. D. Calley, Capt. Babington, J. Locke, J. Watson. 

1888. All Ireland P.C. : J. Reilly, Capt. Middleton, J. O. Jameson, J. Watson. 

1889. Freebooters : Capt. F. H. Featherstonhaugh, J. O. Jameson, H. T. Fen- 

wick, J. W^atson. 

1890. All Ireland P.C. : J. Reilly, Capt. Hone, J. O. Jameson, J. Watson. 

1 89 1. 13th Hussars : Capt. Pedder, F. Wise, D. Robertson Aikman, Capt. 

MacLaren. 

1892. 9th Lancers : Capt. Jenner, Capt. Little, Capt. Colvin, Major Lamont. 

1893. 13th Hussars: Capt. Pedder, F. Wise, D. Robertson Aikman, Capt. Mac- 

Laren. 

1894. 15th Hussars : Capt. Dalgety, Capt. Dundas, Capt. Mundy, Captain de 

Crespigny. 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 325 

1895. Freebooters : Lord Shrewsbury, A. Rawlinson, W. S. Buckmaster, Capt. 

Daly. 

1896. 13th Hussars : Capt. Pedder, J. F. Church, F. Wise, Capt. MacLaren. 

1897. Rugby : C. D. Miller, G. A. Miller, E. D. ^liller, W. J. Drybrough. 

1898. Rugby : F. Hargreaves, G. A. Miller, E. D. Miller, W. J. Drybrough. 

1899. Inniskilling Dragoons : Capt. Paynter, G. K. Ansell, C. H. Higgin, Neil 

Haig. 

1900. Freebooters : F. Hargreaves, Capt. Hon. J. Beresford (and O. Haig), 

F. M. Freake, John Watson. 

1901. Nomads: P. W. Nickalls, Capt. Steeds, G. A. Miller, C. D. Miller. 



ALL IRELAND NOVICES' CUP. 

Conditions : — See Rules of the Irish County Polo Club Union, 1901 : page 351. 
See page 40 — 41, A. I. P. C. Rules, 1900. 

1898. Derry : A. A. Watt, S. Watt, T. F. Cooke, R. P. Uniacke. 

1899. Curragh Rovers : T, G. Gibson, E. Carbutt, Dixon Johnson, Capt. 

Paynter. 

1900. All Ireland P.C. (A Team) : H. Nutting, Capt. Gosling, T. Leonard, T. 

L. Moore. 

1901. North Westmeath : A. M. Rotherham, H. Wilson, P. O'Reilly, R. 

O'Reilly. 



ALL IRELAND REGIMENTAL CHAL- 
LENGE CUP. 

1886. loth Hussars : E. W. Baird, Hon. G. Baring, A. Hughes Onslow, F. 

Bowlby. 

1887. i6th Lancers : E. Beaumont, J. D. Calley, Orr Ewing, G. P. Windham, 

Capt. Babington. 

1888. 3rd Hussars : J. W, Burns, Capt. Oswald, Capt. Patton Bethuse, Capt. 

Chaloner. 

1889. 4th Hussars : R. Hoare, Capt. Kincaid Smith, Major Peters, Capt. 

Baillie. 

1890. 4th Hussars: W. Wigson, R. Hoare, Major Peters, Capt. Baillie. 

1 89 1. 15th Hussars: J. Hargreaves, Dundas, Capt. de Crespigny, Bewicke. 

1892. 13th Hussars: Capt, E. N. Pedder, F. Wise, D. Robertson Aikman, 

Capt. MacLaren. 

1893. 9th Lancers : D. G. Campbell, Capt. M. Little, Capt. Colvin, Capt. Hon. 

C. Willoughby. 

1894. loth Hussars: N. Curzon, Capt. Kavanagh, Lord W. Bentinck, Hon. T. 

Brand. 

1895. 13th Hussars I Capt. E. N. Pedder, J. F. Church, F. Wise, Capt. 

1896. 13th Hussars | MacLaren. 

1897. 6th Inniskilling D. 1 Capt. Paynter, G. K. Ansell, Neil Haig, Major 

1898. 6th Inniskilling D. ) Rimington.' 



326 APPENDIX. 

1899. 17th Lancers: A. F. Fletcher, Capt. W. A. Tilney, Capt. J'ortal, R. J. 
Garden. 

" * No Tournament on account of South African War, 
1 901. ' 



ALL IRELAND SUBALTERNS' CUP. 

1896. loth Hussars : N. Curzon, S. L. Barry, B. C. Meeking, Hon. T. Brand. 

1897. Inniskilling Dragoons : C. H. Higgins, G. K, Ansell, Neil Haig, E. G. 

Holland. 

1898. Inniskilling Dragoons : E. Patterson, G. K. Ansell, Neil Haig, E. G. 

Holland. 

1899. Inniskilling Dragoons : E. Patterson, G. K. Ansell, G. F. D. Johnson, 

Neil Haig. 

toot' I Tournament did not take place on account of South African War. 



RUGBY TOURNAMENT. 

Gonditions : — For a Ghallenge Gup presented by the brothers Miller, open to 
any Polo Glub, Team, or Regiment, with the exception that not more than two 
players who have won the Ghampion Gup at Hurlingham, or the Ranelagh Open 
Ghallenge Gup, may play in the same team. Played during the first week in 
August. 

1893. Rugby : R. Ghaplin, J. Reid Walker, E. D. Tvliller, G. A. Miller. 

1894. Gheshire : M. Walker, W. R. Gourt, W. H. Walker, Lord Harrington. 

1895. Freebooters : Lord Shrewsbury, Lord Southampton, A. Rawlinson, Gapt. 

Daly. 

1896. Rugby : Walter Jones, G. A. Miller, E. D. Miller, Sir H. de Trafford. 

1897. Winwick : G. D. Miller, F. M. Freake, A. Rawlinson, Sir H. Rawlinson. 

1898. Old Gantabs : G. Heseltine, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buckmaster, L. 

McGreery. 

1899. Not finished. 

1900. Rugby: Walter Jones, M. Nickalls, G. A. Miller, P. W. Nickalls. 

1 90 1. Not finished. 



RUGBY AUTUMN CHALLENGE CUP. 

Gonditions : — Open to any Polo Glub, Team, or Regiment, with the exception 
that not more than one man who has played in the winning team of the Ghampion 
Gup at Hurlingham, or the Ranelagh Open Ghallenge Gup, or Inter- Regimental 
at Hurlingham, during the last five years, may play in the same team. 

The GoMTE J. DE Madre presented a Ghallenge Gup to be played for every 
year, to be won three years consecutively by the same Glub, Regiment, or Team, 
before becoming their absolute property. Played in September. 

1900. Deauville : Baron E. de Rothschild, A. Rawlinson, F. A. Gill, Marquis 

de Villaviega. 

1901. Handley Cross : H. Rich, F. J. Mackey, W. S. Buckmaster, F. O- Ellison. 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 327 



WARWICKSHIRE TOURNAMENT. 

Conditions : — Open to any Polo Club, Team, or Regiment, with the exception 
that not more than two players who have won the Champion Cup at Hurlingham, 
or the Ranelagh Open Challenge Cup, may play in the same team. Played in 
July. 

1894. E. D. Miller's team : J. Bellville, P. A. Leaf, H. J. Selwyn, E. D. 

Miller. 

1895. E. D. Miller's team : Walter Jones, L. de Errazu, H. Scott Robson, E. 

D. Miller. 

1896. Rugby : Walter Jones, Lord Shrewsbury, G. A. Miller, E. D. Miller. 

1897. Winwick : Lord Shrewsbury, F. M. Freake, C. D. INIiller, A. Rawlinson. 

1898. Winwick : G. Ansell, A. Rawlinson, Neil Haig, Capt. MacLaren. 

1899. Old Cantabs : W. McCreery, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buckmaster, G. 

Heseltine. 

1900. W. S. Buckmaster's team : F. J. Mackey, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buck- 

master, T^L R. Duval. 

1901. Old Cantabs: G. Heseltine, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buckmaster (and 

C. D. Miller), F. Hargreaves. 



ST. NEOTS POLO CLUB. 

ANNUAL TOURNAMENT HELD IN JULY. 

Conditions : — A Challenge Cup presented by Major Shuttleworth will be 
competed for, to be held by the winning team for the year, but which will 
become the property of the team winning it the second time. 

The team must contain at least two of the original players. Open to any Polo 
Team, Club, or Regiment, with the exception that not more than one man, who 
has played in the winning team of the Champion Cup at Hurlingham, Open Cup 
at Ranelagh, Open Cup in Dublin, during the last five years, may play in the 
same team. 

1900. Handley Cross : H. Rich, F. J. Mackey, L. Bucknell, F. O. Ellison. 

1 901. Handley Cross : H, Rich, G. Lousada, F. J. Mackey, F. O. Ellison. 



STRATFORD-ON-AVON POLO CLUB. 

ANNUAL TOURNAMENT HELD IN JULY. 

For a Challenge Cup presented by Miss Marie Corelli. 

Open to any Polo Team, Club, or Regiment, with the exception that not more 
than one man, who has played in the winning team of the Champion Cup at 
Hurlingham, Open Cup at Ranelagh, Open Cup in Dublin, during the last five 
years, may play in the same team. 

1901. Handley Cross : II. Rich, F. J, Mackey, F. O. Ellison, L. Bucknall. 



328 APPENDIX. 



CIRENCESTER POLO TOURNAMENT. 

Conditions : — Open to any Polo Team, Club, or Regiment, with the exception 
that not more than one man who has played in the winning team of the Champion 
Cup at Hurlingham, Open Cup at Ranelagh, Open Cup in Dublin, or the 
Military Tournament at Hurlingham, during the last five years, may play in the 
same team. Played in August. 

1895. Scots Greys : Capt. Maxwell, Capt. Pringle, Capt. Plarrison, Capt. 

Richards. 

1896. Siddington Wanderers : C. Beatty, Comte J. de Madre, J. Adamthwaite, 

G. B. Milne. 

1897. W. J, Drybrough's team : Capt. Pedder, C. Beatty, Capt. Egerton Green, 

W. J. Drybrough. 

1898. Kemble Scorchers : J. D. Gouldsmith, F. J. ]Mackey, F. M. Freake, C. 

Beatty. 

1899. Cirencester: J. Adamthwaite, H. Rich, D. C. Master, G, B. Milne. 

1900. Cirencester A : B. C. Burdon, H, Rich, R. R. Barker, J. Adamthwaite. 

1 901. Wanderers : P. C. Puckle, F. M. Freake, G. Heseltine, F. O. Ellison. 



PARIS INTERNATIONAL OPEN CUP. 

1893. 17th Lancers: W. A. Tilney, Capt. Renton, B. P. Portal, N. T. Nickalls. 

1894. Hurlingham : Gerald Hardy, J. Reid W^alker, Capt. Le Gallais, E. D. 

Miller. 

1895. Ranelagh : E. Hohler, A. Rawlinson, E. B. Sheppard, W. S. Buckmaster. 

1896. Staffordshire : Lord Shrewsbury, F. J. Mackey, W. Hall Walker, A. 

Rawlinson. 

1897. Rugby : Comte J. de Madre, Capt. Renton, W. S. Buckmaster, W. J. 

Drybrough. 

1898. Paris : J. H. Wright, E. de Escandon, Marquis de Villaviega, M. Raoul 

Duval. 

1899. Paris : J. H. Wright, E. de Escandon, j\L Raoul Duval, Marquis de 

Villaviega. 

1900. Foxhunters : A. Rawlinson, F. J. Mackey, Foxhall Keene, Capt. Daly. 

1901. The Tournament did not take place. 



DEAUVILLE INTERNATIONAL 
TOURNAMENT. 

1895. Ranelagh : G. Heseltine, W. C. Harrild, F. G. INIenzies, E. Hohler. 

1896. Buccaneers : L. Whitburn, Hon. R. Ward, F. G. Menzies, F. Furber. 

1897. Buccaneers : E. H. Bald, Hon. R. Ward, R. McCreery, F. G. Menzies. 

1898. Buccaneers : — Davidson, Hon. R. Ward, F. G. Menzies, Hon. D. 

Marjoribanks. 

1899. P'oxhunters : W. McCreery, F. J. Mackey, F. ^L Freake, A. Rawlinson. 

^ ' > Tournament did not take place. 
1 901. ) ^ 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 329 



CHAMPIONSHIP OF AMERICA. 

1895. Myopia Hunt Club Team, Hamilton, ^Slass. : A. P. Gardner, R. L. 

Agassiz, R. G. Shaw, F. Blackwood-Fay. 

1896. Rockaway Club, Cedarhurst, L.I. : J. S. Stevens, Foxhall P. Keene, J. 

E. Cowdin, G. P. Eustis. 

1897. Meadow Brook Club, Westbury, L.I. : W. C. Eustis, Thos. Hitchcock, 

jun., H. P. Whitney, B. Nicoll. 

1898. Meadow Brook Club, Westbury, L.I. : W^ C. Eustis, Thos. Hitchcock, 

jun., C. C. Baldwin, H. P. Whitney. 

1899. Westchester Polo Club, Newport, R.I., By default : J. M. Waterbury, jun., 

Foxhall P. Keene, J. E. Cowdin, L. Waterbury. 

1900. Dedham Polo Club, Dedham, Mass. : Allan Forbes, E. M. Weld, W. H. 

Goodwin, Joshua Crane, jun. 

1901. Lakewood : C. R. Snowden, J. M. Waterbury, jun., Foxhall P. Keene, 

L. Waterbury. 

JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP OF AMERICA. 

1900. C.C. Philadelphia, Bala, Pa. : J. P. Lippincott, M. G. Rosengarten, jun., 

A. E. Kennedy, J. F. McFadden. 

1901. Rockaway: W. A. Hazard, R. La Montague, jun., R. J. Collier, P. F. 

Collier. 



INTERNATIONAL MATCH, AMERICA v. 

ENGLAND. 

1886. Played in America, at Newport, for Challenge Cup, won by Hurlingham 
by Malcolm Little, T. Hone, Hon. R. T. Lawley, John Watson. 

1900. Played at Hurlingham for Challenge Cup, won by Hurlingham by Capt. 
Hon. J. Beresford, F. M. Freake, W. S. Buckmaster, John Watson. 



INDIAN CHAMPIONSHIP. 

1898. 2nd Durham L.I. : L. F. Ashburner, H. B. Wilkinson, Capt. H. de B. 

De Lisle, Capt. C. C. Luard. 

1899. Patiala : General Pretam Singh, Maharajah of Patiala, Chandu Singh, 

Goorchit vSingh. 
1903. Freebooters: A. Hewlett, Ibrahim, Capt. Watson, Capt. Cotgrave. 
1 901. Ulwar State : Moti Lai, II. H. the Maharajah of Ulwar, Capt. Ricketts, 

Amar Sineh. 



INDIAN REGIMENTAL TOURNAMENT. 

1877. 9th Lancers : Adams, B. Gough, S. Chisholm, Capt. Beatson. 

1878. 9th Lancers : J. Trower, G. A. P. Evans, B. Gough, S. Chisholm. 

tSSo I ■^^ Tournament on account of Afghan Waj. 



330 APPENDIX 

1881. I oth Hussars : Lord Airlie, C. S. Greenwood, R. B. Fisher, H. T. 

Allsop. 

1882. I oth Hussars : Lord A. Compton, C. S. Greenwood, R. B. Fisher, H. T. 

Allsop. 

1883. 9th Lancers : C. Bishop, W. Jenner, Major B. Gough, C. Cameron. 

1884. 9th Lancers : W. K. Jenner, F. F. Colvin, Major B. Gough, Capt. Cameron. 

1885. 9th Lancers : W. K. Jenner, INL Little, J. Lamont, Major Chisholm. 

1886. 8th Hussars : P. W. Le Gallais, Capt. C. N. Yesey, Major Fell, Capt. 

C. E. Duff. 

1887. 8th Hussars : P. W. Le Gallais, Capt. C. N. Vesey, J. F. Henderson, 

Capt. C. E. Duff. 

1888. 17th Lancers: E. D. INIiller, A. Rawlinson, B. Portal, W. G. Renton. 

1889. 17th Lancers : Lord Ava, G. Milner, E. D. Miller, Hon. H. A. Lawrence. 

1890. 5th Lancers : W. E. Collis, A. Daniell, H. V. Bailey, Capt. Beddy. 

1 89 1. 7th Hussars : E. W. Sutton, Capt. D. Haig, Capt. Carew, R. M. Poore. 

1892. Queen's Bays : W. H. Persse, V. G. Whitla, Capt. Kirk, C. K. Bushe. 

1893. Queen's Bays : ) W. H. Persse, H. W. Wilberforce, Capt. Kirk, C. K. 

1894. Queen's Bays : | Bushe. 

1895. 7th Hussars : R. G. Brooke, Hon. J. Beresford, Capt. Carew, R. M. 

Poore. 



1896. Durham L.I. 

1897. Durham L.I. 

1898. Durham L.I. 



I W. J. Ainsworth, Capt. H. B. Wilkinson, Capt. H. de B. 
) De Lisle, Capt. C. C. I^uard. 

L. F. Ashburner, Capt. H. B. Wilkinson, Capt. H. de B. 
De Lisle, Capt. C. C. Luard. 

1899. 4th Hussars : Winston Churchill, A. Savor}', Capt. R. Hoare, R. W. 

Barnes. 

1900. 3rd Rifle Brigade : E. W. Bell, Capt. C. B. Gosling, Capt. Hon. J. H. 

Morris, P. R. Creed. 

1901. 20th Hussars : J. S. Cawley, Capt. Dunbar, Capt. Bayley, Capt. Lee. 



BENGAL CAVALRY TOURNAMENT. 

1883. I2th B.C. : 

1884. nth B.L. : 

1885. 1 8th B.C. : 

1886. 1 8th B.L. : 

1887. 9th B.L. : 

1888. i8th B.L. : 

1889. No Tournament. 

1890. 9th B.L. : 

1891. 9th B.L. : 

1892. 14th B.L. : 

1893. 9th B.L. : Capt. A. G. Peyton, S. F. Crocker, F. W. Angelo, H. L. 

Dawson. 

1894. 9th B.L. : Capt. Crocker, Capt. Peyton, Capt. Angelo, Brasier Creagh. 

1895. 1 8th B.L. : Capt. Swanston, Capt. Chesney, Capt. Pirie, Capt. Grimston. 



CHRONOLOGY OF MODERN POLO. 331 

1896. 1 8th B.L. : F. A. Maxwell, Capt. Grimston, Capt. K. Chesney, Colonel 

Richardson. 

1897. 2nd C.I.H. : A. S. Capper, Ibrahim, Major Campbell, Capt. Cotgrave. 

1898. 8th B.C. : J. R. Gaussen, Capt. Winterley, R. Chaplin, Major Rivett 

Carnac. 

1899. i8th B.L, : F. A. Maxwell, Capt, K, Chesney, A. G. FitzGerald, Jemadar 

Gul G, G. Mowaz Khan. 

1900. 1 8th B.L, : Capt. K. Chesney, Capt. H, W. Campbell, Lt.-Col. A. Money, 

Jemadar Gul G, G. INIowaz Khan, 
1901, 



INDIAN INFANTRY TOURNAMENT. 

1884. 1st King's O.B. : R. H. B. Taylor, G. N. Mayne, J. H, E, Reid, L, 

Gordon, 

1885. 1st King's O.B. : R. H. B. Taylor, G. N. Mayne, Capt. A. E, Headwell, 

J, H, E, Reid. 

1886. 1st Duke of W.R. : Capt, A. J. Wrench, C, D, Bruce, W, J. Anderson, 

Capt. H. Saunders. 

1887. 1st Duke of W.R. : C. D. Bruce, W. J. Anderson, S. Gordfrey, E, G. 

Harrison, 

1888. 1st Duke of W.R. : C. D. Bruce, W. J, Anderson, A, J, Godfrey, W, M. 

Watson, 

1889. 1st King's O.S.B. : Capt. J. H. Reid, Capt, G. N, Mayne, A. S. Koe, 

H. T. Pritchard. 

1890. 2nd Royal LR. : C. W, Garraway, R. O'Kellett, Capt. K. Apthorp, J. E, 

Cullinan. 

1891. 2nd West Y.R. : Capt. H, Vialls, Capt, J. C. Yale, A. J. Stephen, G. G, 

Lang. 

1892. 2nd Gloucester R. : Capt. Capel Cure, Capt. C. F. Baxter, C. J. Venables, 

H. E. Piatt. 

1893. 2nd Gloucester R. : Capt. C. Moss, Capt, C, Baxter, Capt, Capel Cure, 

Capt, H. Tufnell. 

1894. 2nd Durham L.I. : H. B. Wilkinson, Capt. H, de B, De Lisle, C. C, 

Luard, Capt, F, Sitwell. 

1895. 2nd Durham L.I. : W. J. Ainsworth, H. B. Wilkinson, Capt. H. de B. 

De Lisle, Capt. C. C. Luard. 
1S96. 2nd Durham L.I. : D. A, Mander, H. B. Wilkinson, Capt. H, de B, 
De Lisle, C, C, Luard, 

1897. 2nd Durham L.I. : L. Ashburner, H. B, Wilkinson, W, J. Ainsworth, 

D, A. Mander, 

1898. No Tournament. 

1899. 2nd South W,B. : Capt, Cooke, Capt, Smith, A. J. Reddie, F, W, Gray. 

1900. 3rd Rifle Brigade: E. W. Bell, Capt, G, B. Gosling, Capt. Hon. G, H. 

Morris, P. R. Creed. 

1901. 3rd Rifle Brigade : II. R. Sturgis, E. W. Bell, C. Shawe, A. T, Paley. 



332 APPENDIX. 



RIVER PLATE CHAMPIONSHIP. 

October, 1893, at Canada de Gomez. Hurlingham : F. J. Balfour, F. Furber, C. 

J. Tetley, H. Scott Robson. 
IVrarch, 1894, at Hurlingham. The Casuals : R. MacSmyth, P. Talbot, F. 

Robinson, Follett Holt. 
October, 1894, at Hurlingham. Flores A. : J. Bennett, F. J. Bennett, T. Scott 

Robson, H. Scott Robson. 
April, 1895, at Canada de Gomez. Las Petacas : F. Benitez, F. E. Kinchant, 

Jose Martinez, Sixto Martinez. 
October, 1895, at Hurlingham. The Casuals : C. J. Tetley, R. S. Moncriefif, P. 

Talbot, Follett Holt. 



After 1895 ^^h' one championship meeting was held each year. 

1896. Las Petacas : F. Benitez, F. E. Kinchant, Jose IVIartinez, Sixto Martinez. 

1897. [Hurlingham : H. Scott Robson, Follett Holt, F. Furber, ]NL Finlayson. 

1898. The Casuals : F. Hinchcliffe, E. Traill, R. W. Traill, F. S. Robinson. 

1899. Hurlingham A. : F. J. Balfour, F. J. Bennett, T. Scott Robson, H. Scott 

Robson. 

1900. La Victoria : W. Hinchcliffe, J. L. Bury, Magnus Fea, F. E. Kinchant. 

1901. San Carlos : Baron Peers, P. Talbot, J. Carriso, Roque Fredes. 



333 



LI5T OF POLO CLUBS, 

WITH ADDRESSES OF SECRETARIES. 

ENGLAND. 

LONDON. 

HuRLiNGHAM Club, Fulham, S.W. — Polo Manager, G. L. St. Quintin, Esq. 
Ranelagh Club, Barnes, S.W. — Polo Manager, F. A. Gill, Esq. 
RoEHAMPTON Club, Barnes, S.W. — Manager, C. D. Miller, Esq. 
London Polo Club, Crystal Palace, S.E. — Manager, Eustace Blake, Esq. 
Guards' Club, Wimbledon. 

Eden Park, Beckenham. — Polo Manager, Hubert Marsham, Esq., Barton 
Seagrave Rectory and Eden Park, Beckenham. 

List of Polo Clubs Affiliated to the County Polo 

Association. 

Blackmore Vale.— Hon. Sec, H. E. Lambe, Esq., Grove House, Stalbridge, 

Dorset. 
Catterick Bridge.— R. Hague Cook, Esq., Moulton Hall, INIiddleton Tyas, 

S.O., Yorkshire. 
Cirencester.— Hon. Sec, C. C. Gouldsmith, Esq., The Cranhams, Cirencester. 
Cleveland. — 
Cricklewood.— Hon. Sec, C. H. Eiddle, Esq., Upover, Mapesbury Road, 

Brondesbury. 
Eden Park. — Polo Manager, Hubert INIarsham, Esq., Barton Seagrave Rectory, 

Kettering, and Eden Park Polo Club, Beckenham. 
Edinburgh.— Hon. Sec, J. H. Rutherford, Esq., 14, Great Stuart Street, 

Edinburgh. 
HOLDERNESS (Hull).— Hon. Sec, N. P. Dobree, Esq., Beverley, E. Yorks. 
HuTTON.— Hon. Sec, Alexander Ward, Esq., Lockers, Billericay, Essex. 
Kingsbury.— Hon. Sec, Paul Sechiari, Esq., Newlands Grange, Edgware, 

Middlesex. 
Liverpool.— Hon. Sec, G. H. Pilkington, Esq., Wheathill, Huyton, Liverpool. 
MiDDLEWOOD.— Hon. Sec, F. W. Taylor, Esq., Danfield, near Barnsley. 
Oxford University, Oxford. 
Rugby.— Sec, Mr. W. Bryant, 8, Barby Road, Rugby. 



334 APPENDIX. 

Stansted. — Hon. Sec, Treslam Gilbey, Esq., 9, New Bridge Street, E.G. 
Stratford. — Hon. Sec, F. W. Evans, Esq., The Hill, Stratford-on-Avon. 
Tiverton. — Hon. Sec, A. de Las Casas, Esq., Worth House, Tiverton. 
Warwickshire. — Sec, Mr. J. Stanley, Sydenham Farm, Leamington. 
WiRRAL. — Hon. Sec, G. Gordon Lockett, Esq., 6, Commercial chambers, 15, 
Lord Street, Liverpool. 

List of Polo Clubs Not Affill\ted to the County Polo 

Association. 

BowDON. — Hon. Sec, W. Dunkerley, Esq., Bowdon, Cheshire. 

Bedford. — Hon. Sec, T. H. Woodcock, Esq. , Felmersham, Sharnbrook, Beds. 

BuRGHLEY Park. — Hon. Sec, Blundell Williams, Esq., Stamford, Lincoln- 
shire. 

Cambridge University, Cambridge. 

Derbyshire. — Hon. Sec, Revd. C. Prodgers, Thurlaston Grange, near Derby. 

Dulverton. — Hon. Sec, J. C. de Las Casas, Esq., Worth House, Tiverton. 

Eastbourne. — Hon. Sec, Col. W. A. Cardwell, The Moat, Croft, Eastbourne. 

Four Shire. — Hon. Sec, Allan Gott, Esq., Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucester. 

Hertfordshire. — Hon. Sec, M. de C. Elmsdale, Ludwick, Hatfield, Herts. 

Manchester. — Hon. Sec, W. King, Esq., Trafiford Park, Manchester. 

North Wiltshire. — Hon. Sec, H. B. Harrison, Esq., Sutton Benger, 
Chippenham, Wilts, 

Plymouth. — Hon. Sec, Hon. L. Lawbart, R.N., Admiralty House, Devonport. 

South Hants. — Hon. Sec, Michael Gambler, Esq., Basketts Lawn, Totton, 
Hants. 

St. Neots. — Hon. Sec, "Sir. A. Jordan, St. Neots, Huntingdonshire. 

Wellington. — Hon. Sec, Major Vaughan, Staff College, Camberley. 

Wiltshire, South. — Hon. Sec, P. Case, Heytesbury. 

Yorkshire. — 

Polo clubs have also existed lately, but play did not take place in 1900, 
at Brentwood, Chislehurst, Fetcham Park, Ledbury, Ludlow, Abergavenny, 
Harrow-Weald, Woldingham, and Worcester. 

List of Clubs Belonging to the Irish County Polo Club 

Union, 1901. 

Co. Antrim. — Hon. Sec, E. M. Stewart, 14, Donegall Street, Belfast. 

Co. Carlo w. — Hon. Sec, Steuart Duckett, Russellstown Park, Carlow. 

Co. Derry. — Hon. Sec, F. Cooke, Esq., St. Columb's Ct., Londonderry. 

Co. Dublin. — Hon. Sec, F. Perry, Deer Park, Castleknock. 

Co. Fermanagh. — Hon. Sec, C. D'Arcy Irvine, Castle Irvine, Irvinestown, 

Co. Fermanagh. 
Co. Kildare. — Hon. Sec, Captain Hall, Prospect, Sallins, Co. Kildare ; 

Manager, Walter Lindsay, Celbridge. 
Co. Kilkenny. — Hon. Sec, G. Swifte, Swifte's Heath, Kilkenny. 



LIST OF POLO CLUBS. 335 

King's County. — Hon. Sec, H. Gairdner, Birr, King's County."^ 
Co. Sligo. — Hon. Sec, K. Campbell, Cranmore, Sligo. 
Co. Westmeath. — Hon. Sec, J. jMalone, Bryanstown, Mullingar. 
North Westmeath. — Hon. Sec, E. F. Dease, Gaulstown, Coole, Co. West- 
meath. 
Co. Wexford. — Hon. Sec, J. E. Barry, Esq., Summerhill, Wexford. 



NORTH AMERICA. 

CANADA. 
ALBERTA. 



Beaver Creek. — A. G. W. George, Esq., Highfield, Macleod. 

Calgary. — T. S. C. Lee, Esq., Calgary. 

High River. — T. W. Robertson, Esq., High River, Calgary. 

Macleod. — Duncan J. Campbell, Esq., Macleod. 

North Fork. — A. Kennington, Esq., Livingston. 

Pincher Creek. — F. Rimmington Mead, Esq., Pincher Creek. 

Pine Creek. — W. G. Hooley, Esq., Pine Creek. 

Sheep Creek. — 

South Fork. — R. B. Clarkson, Esq., Pincher Creek. 

ASSINBOIA. 
Grenfell. — 
Regina. — Law.son, Esq. 



Moo SOMIN. 

Hamilton. - 
Ottawa. — 



MANITOBA. 
ONTARIO. 



UNITED STATES. 

The Polo Association. — H. L. Herbert, Esq., Chairman, 15, Church Street, 

New York ; W. A. Hazard, Esq., Secretary and Treasurer, 36, Wal 

Street, New^ York. 
Brookline, County Club of. — White, Cherry Hoop a}id Cap. — F. Blackwood 

Fay, Esq., Brookline, Mass. 
Buffalo Country Club. — White, Red Cap and Sash. — R. K. Root, Esq., 24, 

Wells Street, Buffalo, New York. 
Dedham. — White, Yellow Sash and Cap.- — Samuel D. Warren, Esq., Dedham, 

Mass. 
Devon (Pa.). — White, Red Sash. — C. R. Snowden, Esq. 
Essex County. — White Shirt, Orange Cap. — C. A. Munn, Esq., Orange, 

New Jersey. 
EvANSTON Country Club. — W. Bruce Kirkman, Esq., Evanston, 111. 
Meadow Brook. — Sky Blue. — Oliver W. Bird, Esq., Westbury, Long Island, 

New York. 



336 APPENDIX. 

Morris County Country Club. — Green Body, White Cap. — Benjamin NicoU, 

Esq., Morristown, New Jersey. 
Myopia. — Light Blue, White Sash and Cap. — R. L. Agassiz, Esq., Hamilton, 

Mass. 
Onwentsia. — W. W. Keith, Esq., Lake Forest, 111. 
Philadelphia Country Club. — Black Blouse, White Cap. — J. C. Groome, 

Esq. , Bala. 
Point Judith Country Club. — White, Green Sash and Cap. — W A. 

Hazard, Esq., Narraganset Pier, Rhode Island. 
Riding and Driving Club. — R. Wooward, Esq., Brooklyn, New York. 
Rockaway Club. — Dark Blue. — Foxhall Keene, Esq., Cedarhurst, Long 

Island, New York. 
St. Louis, Country Club of. — Lilac Shirt, White Cap. — Chas. Hodgman, 

Esq., St. Louis, Mo. 
Southampton. — White. — R. J. Collier, Esq., Hollywood, N.J. 
Staten Island. — M. W. Smith, Esq., West Brighton, New York. 
Washington. — J. Van Ness Philip, Esq., Washington, D.C. 
Westchester. — Yellow. — Thomas Plitchcock, jun. , Esq., Newport, Rhode 

Island. 
Westchester, Country Club of. — Scarlet and White Cap. — E. C. Potter, 

Esq., 36, Wall Street, New York. 

CALIFORNIA. 

BuRLiNGAME. — San Francisco. 

Riverside. — Red, Black Sash. — C. E. Maud, Esq., Riverside. 

Southern Californian. — Black and Orange. — G. L. Waring, Esq., Santa 

Monica. 
Santa Barbara.— 
Santa Monica. — 
Walla Walla. — Washington. 



ARGENTINA. 

Association of the River Plate. — A. L. Williamson, Esq., 559, Piedad, 

Buenos Aires. 
Bahia Blanca. — J. Hampson, Esq., Loma Amarilla, Bajo Hondo, Bahia 

Blanca, F.CS. 
Belgrano. — Black and White. — F. M. Still, Esq., Piedad, 370. 
Bellaco. — Red and Blue. — T. Murray Lees, Esq., Banco de Londres, Pay- 

sandu, B.O. 
Bellville. — J. C. M. Pinnell, Esq. 
Camp of Uruguay. — Pale Blue. — L. Edwards, Esq., Barrancas, Coloradas 

Colonia. 
Canada de Gomez. — Red and Yellow. — The Hon. F. White, C. de Gomez, 

F.C.C.A 
Casuals. — Crimson and White. — C. J. Tetley, Esq., La Chacra Estacion, 

Halsey, F.C.O., Buenos Aires. 



LIST OF POLO CLUBS. 337 

Cordoba. — Buttrie, Esq., Las Perdices, F.C.N. A. 

GuALEGUAY. — Criiiisoii and French Grey. — H Jewsbury, Esq., Gualeguay, 

Entre Rios. 
HURLINGHAM. — Blue, Red and Yellow. — F. W. Clunie, Esq., 559, Piedad 

Buenos Aires. 
JujUY. — Black. — Norman Leach, Esq., Salta. 
La Colina. — Dark Green and IVhite. — Glynne Williams, Esq., Estancia San 

Anselmo, La Colina, F.C.S. 
La Carlota.— J. C. Todd, Esq., Estacion Villa, Nueva, P\C.V.M.R. 
La Victoria. — Brown and Yellow. — Magnus Fea, Esq., Estacion El Trebol, 

F.C., Central Argentino. 
Laboulaye. — Green and While. — W. J. Grant, Esq., Laboulaye, F.C. P. 
Las Petacas. — Frank E. Kinchant, Esq., Las Petacas, San Jorge, F.C.C.A. 
Locusts. — C. A. Hay, Esq. 

Media Luna. — Pale Bhie with Crescent. — J. Weinberg, Esq. 
Rangers. — J. ^L Mullaly, Esq. 
Rio Negro. — Gold and Black. — F. A. Smeaton, Esq., Estacion Francia, 

F.C.M.U. 
San Jorge. — C. H. Hall, Esq., San Jorge, Estacion Molles, F.C.C., de 

Uruguay, Montevideo. 
Santa Fe. — Red and Blue. — A. J. Dickinson, Esq., Las Castanas Las Rosas, 

F.C.C.A. 
Santa Fe (North). — L. T. Wasey, Esq., Las Limpias, Estacion Carlos, 

Pellegrini, F.C.C.A. 
Santiago Del Estero. — Green. — F. Holt, Esq., La Banda, Santiago de 

Estero. 
TuYU. — H. Gibson, Esq., Los Ingleses, Ajo, F.C.S. 
Venado Tuerto. — Chocolate and Gold. — H. Miles, Esq., Venado Tuerto F.C.O. 

Santa Fe y Cordoba. 
Western. — N. C. Slack, Esq., San Tomas, Carlo Casares, F.C.S. 



WEST INDIES. 

BARBADOS. 



Garrison Polo Club. — 

BRITISH HONDURAS. 

Belize. — T. J. McSvveaney, Esq., Gabouriel Street, Belize. 

JAMAICA. 

Garrison. — 

Kingston. — Frank E. Jackson, Esq., Kingston. 

S7\ Ann's. — S. C. Burke, jun. , Esq., Friendleys Pen, St. Ann's. 



22 



338 APPENDIX. 



AUSTRALASIA. 

AUSTRALIA. 

VICTORIA. 
Victoria Polo Association.— J. C. Manifold, Esq., Camperdown. 
Camperdown. — L. G. McArthur, Esq., Camperdown. 
Caramut.— E. R. De Little, Esq., Caramut. 
COLAC— W. St. L. Robertson, Esq., The Hill, Colac. 
Geelong. — 
Melbourne.— G. H. Whittingham, Esq. 

NEW SOUTH WALES. 
Polo Associaton.— A, J. Dodds, Esq., Hunter Street, Sydney. 
Argyle.— F. J. Curtis, Esq., Goulburn. 
Bland. — 

Broken Hill.— F. W. Pell, Esq., Broken Hill. 
Camden.— Dr. Bell, Camden. 
Coolah.— J. McMaster, Esq., Weetalabah. 
CoOMA. — Charles Hudson, Esq., Cooma. 
DUBBO. — 

Muswellbrook.— E. Price, Esq., Muswellbrook. 
Narandera.— H. L. Cully, Esq., Narandera. 
QuiRiNDi.— P. D. Cox, Esq., Quirindi. 
Rock. — 

Scone.— F. A. Parbury, Esq., Scone. 
Singleton. — 

Sydney.— E. Beadell, Esq., Hunter Street 
Tamarang.— T. J. Finlay, Esq., Bundello, Willow Tree. 
Wagga Wagga.— C. K. Horwood, Esq., Wagga Wagga. 
Wardry. — 

QUEENSLAND. 

Queensland Polo Association.— Claude Musson, Esq., 139, Elizabeth 

Street, Brisbane. 
Brisbane.— Claude Musson, Esq. 
Gatton.— W. Mc.Leod, Esq., Gatton. 
Half Holiday.— Thos. Price, Esq., Toowoomba. 
Ipswich.— W. T. Deacon, Esq., Ipswich. 
Toowoomba.— A. McPhie, Esq., Downs Club, Toowoomba. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 

Adelaide.— Frank H. Downer, Esq., King Urn Street, Adelaide. 
BuRRA.— C. W. Bowman, Esq., The Burra, Adelaide. 
Mount Crawford.— H. E. Barritt, Esq., Gawter, Adelaide. 



LIST OF POLO CLUBS. 339 

NEW ZEx\LAND. 

New Zealand Polo Assocla.tion. — Arthur E. G. Rhodes, Esq., Christchurch. 

Auckland. — W. R. Bloomer, Esq., Auckland. 

Christchurch. — George Gould, Esq., Christchurch. 

Hawkes Bay.^ — Thomas Crosse, Esq., Woodland, Hastings. 

Hawera. — 

horowhenua. — 

Manawatu. — F. W. Sewell, Esq., Box 25 P.O., Palmerston North. 

Mangaheia. — Tokomaru Bay. 

Nomads. — 

Oroua. — J. R. McLennan, Esq., Oroua Downs, Manawatu. 

Poverty Bay. — C. G. Grant, Esq., Gisborne. 

Rangitikel — E. F. Blundell, Esq., Bulls. 

RuATANiWHA. — D. D. Evans, Ashcott, Onga-Onga. 

Te Arai. — Gisborne. 

Waingaro.— Waikato. 

Wellington. — A. D. Crawford, E.sq., Kilbirnie, Wellington. 

Wanganui. — R. Burton Pynsett, Esq., Wanganui. 

Wharerangi. — C. H. Cato, Esq., Napier. 

TASMANL\. 
HOBART Town. — Claud Clark, Esq., Cathedral Chambers, Plobart Town. 

SAMOA. 

British Consulate Club. — W. C. Dean, Esq., Samoa. 



22^ 



340 



HURLINQHAM RULES OF POLO. 



HEIGHT. 

I. — The height of ponies shall not exceed 14 hands 2 inches, and no pony shall 
be played either in practice games or matches unless it has been registered in 
accordance with the Bye-laws. 

No pony showing vice shall be allowed in the game. 

GROUND. 

2. — The goals to be not less than 250 yards apart, and each goal to be 8 yards 
wide. 

A full sized ground should be 300 yards long by 200 yards wide. 

SIZE OF BALLS. 

3. — The size of the balls to be 3 inches in diameter. 

UMPIRE AND REFEREE. 

4. — Each side shall nominate an Umpire, unless it be mutually agreed to play 
with one instead of two ; and his or their decisions shall be final. In important 
matches, in addition to the Umpires a Referee may be appointed, whose decisions 
shall be final. 

NUMBER OF PLAYERS. 

5. — In all matches for cups or prizes the number of players contending to be 
limited to four a side. 

HOW THE GAME COMMENCES. 

6. — The game commences by both sides taking up their position in the middle 
of the ground, and the Manager throwing the ball in the centre of the 
ground. 

DURATION OF PLAY. 

7. — The duration of play in a match shall be one hour, divided into three 
.periods of twenty minutes, with an interval of five minutes between each 
period. 

The two first periods of play shall terminate as soon as the ball goes out of 
play after the expiration of the prescribed time ; any excess of time in either of 
the first two periods, due to the ball remaining in play, being deducted from the 
succeeding periods. The last period shall terminate immediately on the ex- 
piration of the hour's play, although the ball is still in play. 

EXCEPTION. 

In case of a tie the last period shall be prolonged till the ball goes out of play, 
and, if still a tie, after an interval of five minutes, the ball shall be started from 
where it went out of play, and the game continued as before until one side ob- 
tain a goal, which shall determine the match. 



HURLINGHAM RULES. 341 

CHANGING PONIES. 

8. — As soon as the ball goes out of play, after the expiration of the first ten 
minutes of each period of play, the game shall be suspended for sufficient time, 
not exceeding two minutes, to enable players to change ponies. With the above 
exception the play shall be continuous, and it shall be the duty of the Umpire to 
throw in the ball punctually, and in the event of unnecessary^ delay in hitting out 
the ball, to call upon the offending side to proceed at once. Any change of 
ponies, except according to the above provision, shall be at the risk of the player. 

BELL. 

9. — The bell shall be rung to signify to the players that the ten minutes has 
expired, and it shall be rung again when the ball next goes out of play, to show 
the time for changing ponies. 

10. — An official Time-keeper shall be employed in all important matches. 

GOAL. 

II. — A goal is gained when a ball is driven between the goal posts, and clear 
of the goal line, by any of the players or their ponies. 

OVER TOP OF GOAL POSTS. 

12. — If a ball is hit above the top of the goal posts, but, in the opinion of the 
Umpire, through, it shall be deemed a goal. 

TO WIN GAME. 

13. — The side that makes most goals wins the game. 

WHERE BALL TO BE HIT FROM ; POSITION OF PLAYERS. 

14- — If the ball be hit behind the back line by one of the opposite side it shall 
be hit off by one of the side whose line it is, from a spot as near as possible to 
where it crossed the line. None of the attgcking side shall be within thirty 
yards of the back line until the ball is hit off. If, however, the ball be hit 
behind the back line by one of the players whose line it is, they shall hit it off 
from behind the goal line between the posts, and all the defending side shall, 
until the ball is hit off, remain behind their back line and between two lines 
which shall be drawn at right angles to the goal line produced, from points ten 
yards distant from the centre of the goal on either side, the attacking side being 
free to place themselves where they choose, but not within twenty-five yards of 
the centre of the goal posts. The penalty shall not be exacted should the ball 
glance off a player or pony, 

BALL THROWN IN BY UMPIRE. 

15. — When the ball is hit out of bounds, it must be thrown into the ground by the 
Umpire from the exact spot where it went out of play, in a direction parallel to 
the two goal lines, and between the opposing ranks of players. 

NO DELAY ALLOWED. 

There must be no delay whatsoever, or any consideration for absent players. 

RIDING OUT AN ANTAGONIST AND CROSSING. 

16, — A player may ride out an antagonist, or interpose his pony before his 
antagonist, so as to prevent the latter reaching the ball, but he may not cross 
another player in possession of the ball, except at such a distance that the said 
player shall not be compelled to check his pony to avoid a collision. 



342 APPENDIX. 

POSSESSION OF THE BALL. 

(I). Any player who follows the exact line of the ball from the direction from 
which it has been last hit, is in possession of the ball rather than any player 
coming from any other direction. 

The last striker is in possession provided that no other player can, without 
causing the striker to check his pony to avoid a collision, get on the line of the 
ball in front of him. 

No player shall be deemed to be in possession of the ball by reason of his 
being the last striker if he shall have deviated from pursuing the exact course of 
the ball. 

(II). Any player who rides to meet the ball on the exact line of its course is in 
possession rather than any other player riding at an angle from any other direction. 

(III). Any player riding from the direction from which the ball has been hit, 
at an angle to its course, has possession rather than any player riding at an 
angle in the opposite direction — always excepting any player riding as described 
in No. 2. 

(IV). If two players are riding from the same direction, that player is in 
possession whose course is at the smallest angle to the line of the ball. 

N. B. — The line of the ball is the line of its course, or that line produced at 
the moment any question arises. 

CROOKING STICK. 

17. — No player shall crook his adversary's stick unless he is on the same side 
of the adversary's pony as the ball, or in a direct line behind, and his stick is 
neither over nor under the adversary's pony. 

OFF-SIDE. 

18. — No player who is off-side shall hit the ball, or shall in any way prevent 
the opposite side from reaching or hitting the ball. 

DEFINITION OF OFF-SIDE. 

A player is off-side when at the time of the ball being hit he has no one of the 
opposite side nearer the adversaries' goal line, or that line produced, or behind 
that line, and he is neither in possession of the ball nor behind one of his own 
side who is in possession of the ball. The goal line means the eight-yard line 
between the goal posts. A player, if off-side, remains off-side until the ball is 
hit or hit at again. 

ROUGH PLAY. 

19. — No player shall seize with the hand, strike, or push with the head, hand, 
arm, or elbow, but a player may push with his arm, above the elbow, provided 
the elbow be kept close to his side. 

CARRYING BALL. 

20. — A player may not carry the ball. In the event of the ball lodging upon 
or against a player or pony, it must be immediately dropped on the ground by the 
player or the rider of the pony. 

21. — No player shall intentionally strike his pony with the head of his polo 
stick. 

PENALTY FOR FOUL. 

22. — Any infringement of the rules constitutes a foul. In case of an infringe- 
ment of Rules 16, 17, 19, 20, and 21, the Umpire shall stop the game ; and in 



HURLINGHAM RULES. 343 

case of an infringement of Rule 1 8, the Umpire shall stop the game on an appeal 
by any one on the side which has been fouled. On the game being stopped as 
above, the side which has been fouled may claim either of the following 
penalties. 

(a) A free hit from where the ball was when the foul took place, none of the 
opposing side to be within lo yards of the ball. The ball must be struck to 
constitute a free hit. 

(d) That the side which caused the foul take the ball back and hit it off from 
behind their own goal line. 

PENALTY FOR DISABLING A PLAYER. 

23. — In the case of a player being disabled by a foul, the side who have been 
fouled shall have a right to designate any one of the players on the opposite side 
who shall retire from the game. The game shall be continued with three players 
a-side, and if the side that causes the foul refuse to continue the game, it shall 
thereby lose the match. This penalty shall be in addition to that provided by 
Rule 22. 

CHANGING ENDS. 

24. — Ends shall be changed after every goal, or if no goal has been obtained, 
after half-time. 

BALL OUT. 

25. — The ball must go over and clear of the line to be out. 

THROWING IN BALL. 

26. — If the ball be damaged, the Umpire shall, at his discretion, stop the game, 
and throw in a new ball at the place where it was broken, towards the nearest side 
of the ground, in a direction parallel to the two goal lines and between the 
opposing ranks of players. 

N.B. — It is desirable that the game shall be stopped and the ball changed 
when the damaged ball is in such a position that neither side is favoured 
thereby. 

BROKEN STICKS. 

27. — Should a player's stick be broken, he must ride to the place where sticks 
are kept and take one. On no account is a stick to be brought to him. 

DROPPED STICK. 

28. — In the event of a stick being dropped, the player must pick it up himself. 
No dismounted player is allowed to hit the ball. 

GROUND KEPT CLEAR. 

29. — Xo person allowed within the arena — players, umpires, and Manager 
excepted. 

ACCIDENTS. 

30. — If any player or pony fall or be injured by an accident the Umpire may 
stop the game, and may allow time for the injured man or pony to be replaced, 
but the game need not be stopped should the player fall through liis o\\ n fault. 

WHERE BALL THROWN IN. 

31. — On play being resumed, the ball shall be thrown in where it was when the 
game was stopped, and in the manner provided ft)r in Rule 26. 



344 APPENDIX. 



LEFT-HANDED PLAYERS. 

32. — If two players are riding from opposite directions to hit the ball, one of 
these being a left-handed player, the latter must give way. 

DISREGARDING UMPIRE'S DECISION. 

33. — Any deliberate disregard of the injunctions of the Umpire shall involve 
the disqualification of the team so offending. 

umpire's POWER TO DECIDE ALL DISPUTES. 

34. — Should any incident, such as the repeated dangerous use of the stick or 
any other question not provided for in the Rules arise, such incident or question 
to be decided by the Umpire. 



BYE-LAWS. 

OFFICERS ELECTED TO SERVE ON POLO COMMITTEE. 

I. — Every Regiment and every registered Polo Club which is not already 
represented shall have the right to send one officer or member to represent the 
Regiment or Club on the Polo Committee at all meetings where any alteration 
in the Rules or where any questions affecting such Regiments or Clubs are to be 
considered, on which occasion due notice of the Agenda shall be sent to them. 
All such representatives must be members of Hurlingham. 

REGISTRATION OF PONIES. 

2. — A book shall be kept by the Manager in which all ponies shall be 
registered with sufficient particulars for the purpose of identification. 

PONIES TO BE MEASURED. 

3. — All ponies may be registered if adjudged not to exceed the prescribed 
height when measured according to the rules of Measurement. 

TIME SHORTENED. 

4. — In order that all members may play during the afternoon, the Manager shall 
have power to shorten the time, and stop the match or game at the appointed hour. 
If a match is timed to commence at 4, 5.20 shall be the time at which it may be 
stopped. 

TIME. 

5. — On ordinary days, in case of a match taking place before the members 
game, such match must finish at 5, unless by special leave from the Committee. 
This does not apply to the tie games in Cup Competitions. 

REGISTRATION. 

6. — All Polo Clubs must be registered with the Manager on May 15 in each 
year. A Book of Rules and Members of such Club to be forwarded at time of 
Registration. 

PONIES PROPERTY OF CLUB, &C. 

7. — In matches for cups or prizes the ponies must be bond fide the property of 
the Club or Regiment contending. 



HURLINGHAM RULES. 345 



SPURS AND BLINKERS. 

8. — No blinkers, or spurs with rowels, allowed except on special occasions 
when sanctioned by the Committee. 

FOUR PLAYERS. 

9. — Not more than four players on each side are allowed to play ; the members 
arriving tirst at the pavilion to be allowed precedence. 

WHISTLE. 

10. — The Umpire shall be required to carry a whistle, which he shall use as 
required. 

TIME OF GROUND BEING OPENED AND SHUT. 

II. — If, in the opinion of the Manager, the ground is in a fit state for play, it 
shall be opened, for not less than six players, at 3 o'clock each day, Fridays 
excepted, when the ground is closed. Each set of players shall be allowed the 
use of the ground for 20 minutes. All play shall cease and the ground shall be 
cleared by 7.15 p.m. 

COLOURS. 

12. — The colours of the Hurlingham Club shall be light blue shirts. The 
second colours white and red. In members' matches every player shall wear a 
white shirt or jersey, the sides being distinguished by red and blue waistcoats, 
supplied by the Manager. 



RULES OF MEASUREMENT. 

OFFICIAL MEASURER. 

L. — The measurement shall be made by an Official Measurer under the super- 
vision of the Polo Committee. Such Official Measurer shall be appointed by the 
Committee, and shall be a duly qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 

TIME OF MEASUREMENT. 

2. — The Official Measurer shall attend for the purpose of measuring ponies on 
the first day in the season on which the ground is open for play, and on certain 
subsequent days which shall be advertised in due course. 

DESCRIPTION OF PONY TO BE SIGNED AND FEE PAID. 

3. — The person presenting a pony for measurement shall fill up and sign a 
form, supplied by the Club, containing particulars and a description of the pony, 
and shall pay to the Manager at Hurlingham or the Official Measurer at other 
places a fee of 10/- before the pony can be measured. 

AGE OF PONY. 

4. — Ponies aged five years and upwards may be measured and registered for 
life ; ponies under five years can be registered for the current season only. The 
Official Measurer shall determine the age of the pony. 



346 



APPENDIX. 



CONDITION OF PONY. 

5. — A pony shall not be measured if he appears to have been subjected to any 
improper treatment with a view to reduce his height, or if he is in an unfit state 
to be measured. If a pony is rejected under this Rule he shall not be presented 
again for measvirement until the following season. 

STANDARD AND PLACE OF MEASUREMENT. 

6. — The measurement shall be made with a standard approved by the Club, and 
in a box with a level floor specially erected for the purpose. 

ACCESS TO MEASURING. 

7. — Neither the owner of the pony nor his servant shall on any account enter 
the box during the measurement, nor shall any other person be admitted unless 
specially authorised by the Official Measurer, but members of the Polo Com- 
mittee shall have a right to attend the measurement when their own ponies are 
not being measured. 

POSITION OF PONY AND STANDARD. 

8. — The pony shall stand stripped on the level floor and the measurement shall 
be made at the highest point of the withers. 



HURLINGHAM CLUB. 



FORM FOR DESCRIPTION OF PONY PRESENTED FOR MEASUREMENT. • 



Owner's Name. 



Pony's Name. 



Colour. 



Sex. 



Afire. 



Distinctive Marks. 



Date 



Signature of Owner 



HURLINGHAM RULES. 347 



HOLDING PONY. 

9. — The pony shall be held by a person deputed by the Official Measurer. 

POSITION OF THE HEAD. 

ID. — The head shall be so held that a line from the poll to the withers would 
be parallel to the floor. 

LEGS. 

II. — The forelegs from the point of the shoulder and the hind legs from the 
back downwards, shall be as perpendicular to the floor and as parallel to each 
as the conformation of the horse allows. 

HAIR AND SKIN. 

12. — The wither may be shaved, but the mane must not be pulled down, or 
the skin of the neck or wither in any way interfered with. 

SHOES. 

13. — Ponies may be measured with or without shoes, but no allowance shall 
be made. 

APPEAL. 

14. — Any person who is dissatisfied with the determination arrived at may, 
by a written application, presented to the Manager within seven days from the 
time of measurement, apply for a re-measurement. Such re-measurement shall 
take place in the presence of one member of the Polo Committee, and on the first 
convenient day which may be appointed, and their decision shall be final. 



348 APPENDIX. 



COUNTY POLO ASSOCIATION, 1901 

PRESIDENT. 
Sir H. F. De Trafford, Bart. 

COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT. 



C. Adamthwaite, Rugby, 
W. A. Ball, Wirral. 
Col. S. Darley, Eden Park. 
Tresham Gilbey, Stansted. 



C. C. GouLDSMiTH, Cirencester. 
A. M. Tree, Warwickshire. 
Harry Whitworth, INIiddlewood. 



SECRETARY & TREASURER. 
A. B. Charlton, 12 Hanover Square, London, W. 

THE DIVISIONAL HONORARY SECRETARIES.— 1901. 
Northern.— W. A. Ball, 16 Tithebarn Street, Liverpool. 
Midland. — C. Adamthwaite, Rugby Polo Club, Rugby. 

South-Eastern. — Col. Sanders Darley, 155 Ashley Gardens, London S.W. 
South-Western. — C. C. Gouldsmith, The Cranhams, Cirencester. 

RULES OF THE COUNTY POLO ASSOCIATION. 

name. 
I. — That the Association be called the County Polo Association. 

SCOPE. 

2. — The Association shall be open to all County Polo Clubs, and the Univer- 
sities of Oxford and Cambridge. 

delegates. 
3. — Each Club shall be represented by one Delegate. 

management. 
4. — There shall be an Annual General Meeting of the Delegates, to be called 
the Council, of whom five shall form a quorum, who shall elect a Committee of 
Management, to consist of not less than five in number, of whom three shall 
form a quorum. 

SUBSCRIPTION. 

5. — Each Club of the Association shall pay an Annual Subscription of Two 
Guineas. 



COUNTY POLO ASSOCIATIOxN. 349 



MEMBERSHIP. 

6, — Any Club desiring to join the Association shall send in an application to 
the Secretary, who shall bring it before the Committee at their next Meeting for 
consideration. 

RULES. 

7. — Polo Clubs joining the Association shall play under Hurlingham Rules. 

TOURNAMENT. 

8. — A County Cup Tournament shall be held annually, to compete for a Chal- 
lenge Cup, which shall be held by the winning team for the year. The Tourna- 
ment shall consist of Preliminary ties — Semi-finals — and a Final to be played as 
follows : — 

DIVISIONS. 

9. — For the purposes of the Tournament, the County shall be divided into 
four divisions : — ^Northern, Midland, South-Eastern, South-Western, and a map 
with the divisions marked thereon shall be forwarded to each Honorary 
Divisional Secretary. 

DIVISIONAL SECRETARIES. 

10. — Honorary Divisional Secretaries shall be appointed to arrange for ties to be 
played in their respective divisions by the 30th June in each year between all the 
clubs desiring to compete. The semi-finals and final matches to be played at 
Hurlingham in July. 

CLUBS OPEN TO PLAY IN TOURNAMENT. 

II. — The County Cup Tournament shall only be open to Clubs that have joined 
the Association. 

QUALIFICATION OF PLAYERS. 

12. — No one shall be eligible to play for his Club for the Coimty Cup unless 
he has played regularly in games or matches during the current season on his Club 
Ground. The word "regularly" shall mean not less than eight times, or has 
played more frequently on his Club ground than elsewhere, and such attendance 
shall nullify Rule 16. Ponies played in the ties of the County Cup Tournament 
shall belong to a member of the competing Club. 

13. — No one shall be eligible to play who, during the current or previous two 
years, has played in the finals of the following Tournaments : — 
The Champion Cup at Hurlingham. 
The Ranelagh Open Cup. 
The Open Cup in Dublin. 
The Inter-Regimental Tournament, Hurlingham. 

14. — An Officer belonging to a Regiment which has no Polo Team in the 
United Kingdom, but otherwise qualified, may play. 

15- — The fact of an officer being quartered in the neighbourhood does not con- 
stitute a residential qualification, with the exception that an Officer with a 
Militia, Volunteer, Yeomanry or Staff appointment for not less than three years, 
and who has not played for his Regiment in the Regimental Tournament of the 
same year, is eligible to play for his Club. 



350 APPENDIX. 

1 6. — That each player must be a resident in the County, or reside within 
twenty-five miles of his Club Ground. 

17. — The Hon. Sec. of each Club shall be held responsible for the qualifi- 
cations of each member of the team entered from his Club. 

SUBSTITUTES. 

18. — Should any team fall short after the names are once sent in, at time of 
play another Member, properly qualified, may, with the consent of the Divisional 
Secretary, be substituted. All matters connected with the final shall be decided 
by the Committee of Management. 

ENTRANCE FEE. 

19. — There will be an Entrance Fee of £2. 2s. for each team entered. 

SEVERAL TEAMS MAY ENTER. 

20. — More than one team may be entered from the same Club. 

SEMI-FINALS. 

21. — The names of the teams left in for the semi-finals must be forwarded to 
the Secretary of the County Polo Association by the 1st of July. 

PRELIMINARY TIES. 

22. — The Divisional Secretaries must advise the Committee of the dates of all 
matches and the ground where play will take place at least three days before they 
are played, with the names of the players and the Club colours, and also of the 
result immediately afterwards, with names of Umpire and Timekeeper. 

NOT ELIGIBLE. 

23. — The following are not considered as County Clubs for the purposes of 
this Association : — Hurlingham, Ranelagh, Wimbledon, Crystal Palace. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

The Committee do not propose any alteration in the conditions or arrangements 
for the 1901 Tournament. To encourage competition in the Preliminary Ties, 
the Committee will award to the winners in each division a bronze replica of the 
Pony on the Challenge Cup, mounted on ebonised plinth. They will be suitable 
mementos of the Clubs' entry into the semi-finals. The Club declared by the 
Divisional Hon. Secretary as the winner must have played and won at least one 
game against another Club in the division. A "walk-over" will not qualify 
such Club for this divisional Trophy. 

The Hurlingham Club will again present Cups to the Members of the winning 
Team, and will also reserve two dates in July for the Semi-Finals and the Final 
Tie. 

By order of the Committee of Management, 

A. B. Charlton, Secretary. 
March, 1901. 



RULES OF IRISH COUNTY UNION. 351 



RULES OF THE IRISH COUNTY POLO 
CLUB UNION, 1901. 

President :— STEUART DUCKETT. 

COMMITTEE. — One Representative Member of every County Polo Club in 

Ireland. 

HON. SEC. AND TREASURER :—Steuart Duckett, Russellstown 

Park, Carlow. 

I. — The Association be called "'The Irish County Polo Club Union," 
having for its object the promotion of County Polo. 

2. — That it shall consist of bona fide County Polo Clubs in Ireland. 

3. — That each County Polo Club shall pay an Annual Subscription of £2. 

4. — That the Committee, consisting of one representative of each County Polo 
Club, be empowered to transact the business. 

5. — That three Members of such representatives form a quorum. 

6. — That each County Polo Club joining the Irish County Polo Club Union 
shall subscribe £^ towards purchasing the County Polo Club Challenge Cup. 

7.— That the Annual Meeting be held in Dublin during Punchestown Week. 

RULES AND CONDITIONS OF THE COUNTY POLO 
CHALLENGE CUP. 

The County Polo Challenge Cup, value ;^50, is open to all bona fide County 
Polo Clubs in Ireland that have joined the Irish County Polo Club Union. The 
holders of the Cup each year to have the names of the winning team engraved on 
the Cup at their own expense. Entrance for the Cup free. 

The Cup to be played for under the Hurlingham Club Rules of the game. 

To be a bona fide County Polo Club, a Club must have a Club Ground, and 
regular fixed days for play on their ground. 

The Hon. Sec. of each Club must certify, at the time of entry, that each 
member of the Team is properly qualified. 

No player can play for two Counties. 

Each County may enter one or more Teams. 

In all Matches for County Challenge Cup the ponies must be bona fide the 
property of the Members of the Club contending. 



352 APPENDIX. 



QUALIFICATION OF PLAYERS IN A COUNTY TEAM FOR CHALLENGE CUP. 

{a) That he be a resident in the County, or 

{/)) That he owns or holds land in the County, or 

(c) That he resides within 20 miles of the County Polo Ground. 

(d) Officers of Army quartered in a County not to be counted as resident. 

(e) Adjutants of Militia Regiments, Resident Magistrates and officers of 

R.I.C. are counted as residents. 

Members of Clubs not qualified as above, but who are living outside the 
boundary of the County whose Club they support, are members of, and on whose 
ground they play regularly, may play for that County, provided they send their 
names before the Committee of the Irish County Polo Club Union and obtain 
their sanction. 

Each Member of a Team competing for the Challenge Cup must have played 
on the County Club Ground at least six times during the season. A Member of 
a Club playing in a Match for his County Club, previous to the Competition for 
the Challenge Cup, may count it as playing once on his County Ground, though 
the Match was not played on the County Ground. 

Officers of the Army and Navy may play for their native County, provided 
they have played in 12 Games during the Season on the County Club Ground. 



RULES AND CONDITIONS OF IRISH COUNTY POLO CLUB UNION. 
NOVICES' TOURNAMENT, 1901. 

I. — A Novices' Tournament will be held each year, open to Counties belonging 
to the Irish County Polo Club Union. Entrance, £2.. 

II. — Each member of the winning team will receive a cup, to become his 
property. 

III. — Not more than one player is eligible in each team who has played in any 
of the following Tournaments : — Hurlingham — Champion, Regimental or Social 
Cups ; Ranelagh — Open, Subalterns', or Hunt Cups ; Dublin — Open, County, 
Regimental, or Subalterns' Cups ; Paris — International Tournament ; Rugby — 
Rugby Tournament ; India — Regimental Tournament. 

IV. —Same rules and qualifications as laid down for players in a County Cup 
team. 

V. — The Ties to be played on County Club grounds. 

VI. — The following counties to form the Northern Division : — Antrim, Derry 
Fermanagh, Sligo, Westmeath. Manager for Northern Division, C. K. O'Hara, 
Annaghmore, Collooney, Sligo. The following counties to form the Southern 
Division : — Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's County, Wexford. 
Manager for Southern Division, W. Lindsay, Kildraught House, Celbridge. 

VII. — Entries to close with the Managers on June 1st. 

VIII. — The two Divisions to play the ties separately, as directed by the 
Managers. 



RULES OF IRISH COUNTY UNION. 353 

IX.^The final to be played between the winners of the Northern Division and 
winners of Southern Division by the second week in July. 

X. — The grounds on which the ties will be played off will be left to the choice 
of the contending clubs, but should they be unable to decide on what ground the 
matches are to be played, they must notify the same to the manager of the 
Division, who will toss up and thereby decide on which of the two grounds the 
match is to be played. 

XI. — Any Club refusing to abide by this decision will be counted as beaten. 

XII. — Dates to be fixed by the Managers by which ties are to be played off. 
Should contending teams fail to agree as to day on which a tie is to be played off, 
two dates may be sent to the Manager, who will toss up and thereby decide on 
which day the tie is to be played. Any team failing to play on day notified will 
be counted as beaten, 

XIII. — A team having once entered shall forfeit the entrance fee if it fails to 
compete. 

STEUART DUCKETT. Hon. Sec. I. Co. P.C.U. 



23 



354 



INDIA. 

RULES FOR THE REGULATION OF TOURNAMENTS. 

STEWARDS. 

- I. — AH Tournaments played under the Rules of the Indian Polo Association 
shall be under the management of three Stewards, who shall be elected locally. 

RIGHT OF APPEAL TO STEWARDS. 

2. — There shall be a right of appeal to the Stewards upon all questions which are 
not by these Rules declared to be subject to the final decision of some other 
authority, such as umpires, etc. , and the decision of the Stewards in all such 
appeals shall be final. 

QUESTIONS TO BE REFERRED TO STEWARDS. 

3. — Any question which may arise in the course of a Tournament, and which is 
not provided for by these Rules, shall be referred for decision to the Stewards, 
who may, if they think fit, refer the matter to the Committee of the Indian Polo 
Association, whose decision shall be final. 

LIMIT OF TIME AND NUMBER OF PONIES. 

4. — The duration of play, and the number of ponies allowed to be played by 
teams in a Tournament, shall be decided locally : provided that the maximum 
duration of play in any match does not exceed forty minutes, exclusive of stop- 
pages. Each team to consist of not more than four players. 

DRAWING OF TIES. 

5. — In case of the number of competing teams for a Tournament not being a 
power of 2, as 4, 8, 16, etc., all byes to be in the first round. For instance, 13 
teams competing, three are drawn as byes ; the remainder play off, leaving 8 to 
play in the second round. 

6. — The Honorary Secretary of a Tournament will obtain from the Captain of 
each team, before play is commenced, a correct list of the ponies proposed to be 
played in the Tournament by his team. Printed forms will be supplied by the 
Honorary Secretary Indian Polo Association for this purpose. The lists, together 
w^th a short description of the Tournament for record in the calendar, will be 
forwarded to the Honorary Secretary Indian Polo Association, as soon as possible 
after the conclusion of the Tournament. 



•INDIAN RULES. 355 

7. — No pony without an Indian Polo Association certificate or certificate of 
measurement fourteen hands one inch, or under, from an authorised measurer of 
the Association, or from an ofiicial measurer of the Calcutta or Western India Turf 
Club granted since ist April, 1899, shall be allowed to play in a Tournament, 
except when a local measuring is sanctioned. 

8. — The Honorary Secretary of a Tournament will be responsible that a fee of 
Rs. 2 is collected for each pony, with a racing certificate, that has not been pre- 
viously registered as a polo pony, before such pony is allowed to play. 

9. — A measuring of ponies for Indian Polo Association certificates by a selected 
measurer, will be arranged and sanctioned, when possible, on any date, or at any 
place it may be desired. Applications for such measurings should be made to the 
Honorary Secretary, Indian Polo Association, if possible, one month before the 
measuring is required. In the application, the number of ponies for which the 
measuring is requisitioned, should be stated. 

10. — In the case of a tournament where an Indian Polo Association measuring 
cannot be arranged, a local measurer will be appointed, whose measurements will 
be accepted for that Tournament only. 

II. — Any team knowingly playing a pony in a Tournament that has not been 
measured and passed in accordance with these rules, shall be disqualified for that 
Tournament. 



RULES OF THE GAME OF POLO. 
GROUND, ETC. 

SIZE OF THE GROUND. 

I . — The size of the ground shall be as nearly as possible 300 yards long and 200 
yards broad. 

BOUNDARY LINES. 

2. — The four corners shall be marked by flags. The boundary lines joining the 
corner flags shall be spitlocked, except between the goal posts, and inside the 
subsidiary goal marks ; those marking the length of the ground shall be called the 
side lines, those marking the breadth of the ground shall be called the back 
lines. 

MARKING OF SIDE LINES. 

3. — Small flags shall be placed on each side line to mark points, which shall 
be, 30 yards from each back line, 50 yards from each back line, and the centre 
of each side line (centre flags). 

MARKING OF BACK LINES. 

4. — In the centre of each back line there shall be a goal, marked by goal posts, 
which shall be at least ten feet high and twenty-two feet apart. Eleven feet from 
the outside of each goal post, subsidiary goal marks will be shown on the ground 
by a small white line perpendicular to the back line. 

GOAL LINE AND SUBSIDIARY GOAL LINE. 

5. — The line between the goal posts shall be called the goal line. The line 
between the subsidiary goal mark and the goal post nearest to it, shall be called 

23* 



356 APPENDIX. 

the subsidiaiy goal line. For matches, the goal line and the subsidiaiy goal line 
shall be marked by a narrow line of whitewash. 

PLAYERS AND UMPIRES ONLY ALLOWED ON THE GROUND. 

6. — Each team shall consist of not more than four players. No person, other 
than players and umpires, shall come on the ground while the ball is in play. 

THE BALL. 

7. — The ball shall be about four ounces in weight and ten and a half inches in 
circumference. 

DURATION OF PLAY AND GOALS. 

DURATION OF PLAY. 

S. — Each match shall last for not more than forty minutes' actual play, divided 
into periods of five minutes. Time must be called, irrespective of the ball being 
in play, when the game shall have lasted its specified maximum time. 

PERIODS. 

9. — A period will end the first time the ball goes out, after five minutes' actual 
play, except that the penalty- mentioned in rule 17 (7), or the penalty for any 
foul, must be enacted in the same period in which the breach of rules occurred. 
Any excess of time over five minutes, in each period, will be deducted from the 
last period, and if the aggregate of such overtime exceeds five, or ten minutes, 
from the last period but one, or the last period but two, as may be found 
necessary. 

INTERVALS. 

10. — There shall an interval of not more than three minutes between each 
period, and of one minute after each goal. At the conclusion of each interval, 
and, otherwise, whenever the ball goes out of play, the game must be re-started 
as laid down in rule 17. 

A MATCH HOW DECIDED. 

II. — A match is won by the team that scores the greatest number of goals, or, 
in the event of a tie, by the team that scores the greatest number of subsidiary 
goals. No number of subsidiary goals will ever equal a true goal. If at the 
expiration of time, each team has scored the same number of goals and subsidiary" 
goals, the goals shall be widened up to the subsidiary goal marks, and fresh sub- 
sidiar)- goal marks drawn at the usual distance outside them. The game shall 
then be re-started from the centre of the ground {vide rule 17 a), and play shall 
be continued for five minutes. If, at the expiration of this additional five 
minutes, the game is no longer a tie, time shall be called, and the match shall 
end. But if the game is still a tie, time shall not be called until the ball goes 
out of play. The game shall then be continued, with the usual periods and 
inter^-als, until one side scores, when it shall end, or otherwise, until play is no 
longer possible. In the latter case the local tournament committee will settle 
whether the match is to be played over again, or the most equitable way in which 
a decision shall be arrived at. 



INDIAN RULES. 357 



GOAL HOW OBTAINED. 

12. — A goal is obtained if the ball cross oz'er the back line between the goal 
posts, or, if higher than the goal posts, between the goal posts produced perpen- 
dicularly, or, if one or both goal posts have been displaced, between the points 
where the goal posts should stand. 

SUBSIDIARY GOAL HOW OBTAINED. 

13. — A subsidiaiy goal post is obtained in the same way as a goal, except that 
to score a subsidiary goal the ball must pass between the subsidiar}- goal mark and 
the goal post which is nearest to it. After a subsidiaiy goal the ball shall be hit 
oft' in accordance with rule l'J■{€^ or (f). 

GOALS OBTAINED BY UNFAIR PLAY. 

14. — No goals or subsidiar}- goals shall be counted which have been obtained 
by unfair play. Any infringement of the rules constitutes unfair play. 

CHOICE AND CHANGE OF GOALS, 

15. — Sides shall toss for choice of goals. If neither side has scored a goal, 
goals shall be changed at half-time : but after the hrst goal, goals shall only be 
changed after each goal obtained. 

16. — If a game has to be stopped from any cause, for any length of time, before 
the full time of play has been completed, the local committee shall decide when 
the game shall be resumed. 

BRIXGIXG THE BALL INTO PLAV. 

STARTING AND RE-STARTING GAME. 

17. — The umpires shall have the power of ordering play to begin, after the 
time fixed, notwithstanding the absence of any player. 

{a) To start the game, and after each change of goals, the ball shall be 
brought into pla}- between the centre flags, by one of the umpires t^who 
will remain mounted) bowling the ball underhand along the ground, 
close to his pony, as hard as possible, at right angles to the side line 
towards the centre of the ground, between the two sides, who will range 
themselves opposite to each other : no player to be closer to the umpire 
than ten yards. The umpire will bring the ball into play, from a point 
about eighty yards from the side line, and always from the same side of 
the ground. 

{b) The same procedure will be adopted in the case of a broken ball or an 
accident, but in these cases the ball will be brought into play, outwards 
from the autre, at the spot where the ball was broken, or the accident 
occurred. 

{c) When the ball goes out at the side, the ball shall be thrown in at once at 
the spot where it went out, either by the umpire in the manner detailed 
above, or by any one on foot deputed by him to do so, who will bowl it 
in underhand : no player to be within ten yards of the line. The 
umpire will not wait for both sides to form up. 



358 . APPENDIX. 

(d) To re-start the game after a foul has been given, the penally for that foul 

will be carried out. 

(e) When the ball is hit behind the adversary's back line by one of the 

attacking side, the goal referee will place the ball on a spot as near as 
possible to that at which it crossed the line, but behind it. The 
umpires will see that the ball is hit off by one of the defending side 
without delay, and that none of the attacking side approach within 
thirty yards of the back line up to the moment it is hit off. At the 
commencement of a new period, should none of the defending side be 
at the spot, where the ball went behind, ready to hit off, it is the duty 
of the goal referee to at once bowl in the ball underhand, at the spot, at 
right angles, to the back line, as hard as possible. And in this case the 
penalty for an off side shall not be claimed against the attacking side, 
should no one of the defending side be between them and the back 
line. 
C/J WTien the hall is hit, with a stick, behind the back line by one of the 
defending side, one of that side shall hit it off from behind the goal 
line, between the goal posts. All the players of the defending side 
shall stand behind the back line, not outside the subsidiary goal marks 
on each side ; none of the attacking side to be within thirty yards of the 
back line, in each case, until the ball is hit off across the back line. 
The penalty will not be exacted should the ball go behind by reason of 
a glance off a pony or a player. 

BALL IN, AND OUT OF, PLAY. 

1 8. — The ball shall be considered to be in play whenever it has been hit off 
across the back line ; or, in the case of a penalty other than a hit off from 
behind, whenever it has been struck, or struck at, with the intention of hitting 
off ; or whenever it has been thrown in, unless immediately recalled by the 
umpire. The ball is out of play if it goes over and clear of the side or back line 
{zn'de rule 34), or, if these lines are marked by a trench, into that trench. 

ORDINARY FOULS. 

DISMOUNTED PLAYER. 

19. — No dismounted player shall be allowed in any way to take part in the 
game while dismounted. 

LEFT-HANDED PLAY AND CATCHING THE BALL. 

20. — A player must not play left-handed. If any player catch the ball in any 
way during the game, it must be dropped on the ground at once. 

REVIVING THE BALL. 

21. — The ball must be revived, whenever the ball goes out of play, with the 
least possible delay. If unnecessar}- delay occurs the umpire will either revive 
the ball himself in the necessary direction, or give a foul against the offending 
side (v/de rule 36 a. ) 



INDIAN RULES. 359 

CROOKING OR STOPPING STICKS. 

22. — No player shall crook or stop an adversary's stick except when the latter is 
about to strike the ball, and unless he is on the same side of the adversary's pony 
as the ball, or immediately behind. 

ROUGH PLAY. 

23. — No player shall seize with the hand, strike, or push with the head, elbow, 
hand, stick or whip, another player or pony ; but a player may push with his arm 
above the elbow, provided the elbow be kept close to his side. A player who after 
being once warned by the umpire continues to play roughly, renders himself 
liable to be ordered off the ground for " unfair play " under rule 37 {a). 

24. — No player shall intentionally strike his pony with the head of his polo 
stick. 

NO PLAYER TO INTERFERE WHEN OFF SIDE. 

25. — No player, when "off side," shall be allowed to hit the ball, or shall in 
any way prevent the opposite side from reaching or hitting the ball, or in any way 
interfere in the game, intentionally or otherwise. 

DEFINITION OF OFF SIDE. 

26. — A player is " off-side " when at the time of the ball being hit, he has no 
adversary nearer than he is to such adversary's back line or behind that line, and 
he is neither in possession of the ball, nor behind one of his own side, who is in 
possession of the ball. He shall be deemed to remain " off side " until the ball 
is hit, or hit at, again. 

DANGEROUS FOULS. 

DEFINITION OF POSSESSION OF THE BALL. 

27. — The player who last hit the ball, if still following the line of the ball, 
remains in possession of the ball, so long as he can, at the pace at which he is 
moving, reach the ball again before any other player : and the possession of the 
ball only passes to another player, when that other, player, 

{a) Is riding on a line closer and more 7iearly parallel to the line on which the 

ball is travelling than the original striker (example 2) ; 
{b) Can unquestionably reach the ball ^x^l without causing the origijial striker 

to check to avoid a collision (example 3) ; 
(<:) Can fairly " ride off " (rule 29) the original striker (example 4). 
28. — One player crosses another player, 

CROSSING. 

{a) Who, when not entitled to possession of the ball (as defined in rule 27), 
crosses the line on which the ball is travelling, or that line produced, 
and thereby collides with the player in possession of the ball, or causes 
the latter to check to avoid collision (examples 5 and 6) ; 

{b) Who, when in possession of the ball, turns on the ball, except at such a 
distance as to obviate any chance of collision with another player riding 
on the line, produced either way, on which the bail is, or has been, 
travelling ; 



36o APPENDIX. 

{c) Who, when two players {neither entitled to possessioii) start from different 
directions to try and obtain possession of the ball, does not give way to 
the other player of the two who is moving on a line more nearly parallel 
to that on which the ball is, or has been, travelling (example 7). 
N.B. — In no case can a player be made to pay the penalty for a cross, who is so 
ridden off as to be forced across the line of a player who is in possession 
of the ball. In this case the player who caused the danger is to blame 
(example 8). 

FAIR RIDING. 

29. — A player shall be considered to ride off fairly, when, having placed him- 
self abreast of an adversary (after following a line of direction as nearly as 
possible parallel to that in which his adversary is moving), he gradually forces 
him from, or prevents his continuing in, the direction in which he is riding. 

DANGEROUS RIDING. 

30. — Riding into an adversary in any other way than as defined in rule 27, 
or placing a stick, in a dangerous manner, over or under the body, or across the 
legs, of an adversary's pony, constitutes dangerous riding. A player, however, 
who deliberately rides his pony up to an adversary who is in possession of, and 
striking at, the ball ; or who deliberately rides his pony over the ball to prevent 
an adversary striking at it, does so at his own risk. 

PENALTIES. 

PENALTY FOR AN " ORDINARY FOUL." 

31. — The penalty for an " ordinary foul," i.e., for any infringement of rules 
19-26, is either : — 

(i) A free hit from where the ball was when the foul occurred, none of the 
side causing the foul to be within ten yards of the ball. 

(iij The side causing the foul to take the ball and hit it off from behind their 
own back line, as in rule 17 (/). 

; The side which is not the offending one, has the choice of penalties. 

PENALTY FOR A "DANGEROUS FOUL." 

32. — The penalty for a " dangerous foul," i.e., for crossing or dangerous riding, 
is as follows : — 

A free hit from a spot| fifty yards from the back line of the side causing the 
foul, opposite the centre of the goal, or, if preferred, from where the foul 
occurred : all the side causing the foul to be behind the back line until 
the ball is in play, but not between the goal posts, nor when the ball is 
brought into play may any of that side ride out from between the goal 
posts ; none of the other side to be nearer the back line than the ball is, 
at the moment the ball is brought into play. 

UMPIRES, &c. 

UMPIRE STAFF. 

33' — Two umpires, four goal-referees, a time-keeper and a scorer shall be 
nominated for each match. The umpires and goal-referees shall each be provided 



INDIAN RULES. 361 

with a whistle. Each pair of goal-referees shall in addition be provided with a 
coloured flag for signalling goals, and a white flag for signalling subsidiary goals. 
The time-keeper shall be provided with a stop-watch. 

THE WHISTLE. 

34. — Umpires and goal -referees will blow a whistle whenever the ball is out 
of play, as a signal that the game must be stopped. The whistle must never be 
blown to show that the ball is brought into play. 

QUALIFICATIONS OF UMPIRES. 

35. — Umpires must be regular polo players, and must possess a thorough 
knowledge of the rules of the game. They must be mounted on well-trained and 
fast ponies, so as to be able to ride near enough to the ball to give a decision at 
any moment, and yet not to interfere with the players. Their decision is final 
on all questions arising out of the actual play of the game, as well as on questions 
declared by these rules to be subject to their final decision. 

DUTIES OF UMPIRES AS TO STOPPING THE GAME. 

36. — It shall be the duty of umpires to stop the game, when : — 

{a) The ball is sufficiently damaged to interfere with the game ; 

(d) The ball is not brought properly into play ; 

(c) The ball crosses the side line ; 

{d) They see, whether appealed to or not, any infringement of these rules 
constituting an " ordinary foul " or a " dangerous foul." 

(e) Any fall or accident involving danger occurs. 

DUTIES OF UMPIRES AS TO DANGEROUS PLAYERS AND PONIES. 

37. — It shall be the duty of the umpires to order off" the ground : — 

{a) Any player who deliberately plays unfairly or rides dangerously, and he 

shall not be replaced ; 
{d) Any pony, which they may consider dangerous or improperly bitted, or 

which the rider has not under thorough control. 

DUTIES OF UMPIRES AS TO REVIVING THE BALL, &C. 

38. — It is the duty of umpires — 

(a) To see that no delay occurs in reviving the l)all under rule 17 {(f), (e), and 
('/), (z'/de rule 21.) 

(d) To order any player to take off' his spurs, or to use spurs without rowels, 

who, in his opinion, is ill-treating his pony. 

DUTIES OF THE GOAL-REFEREES. 

39. — Goal-referees shall blow the whistle the moment the ball crosses the back 
line at any point. They are the judges of the goals and subsidiaries : but if at 
any time they are in doubt, the umpires must be consulted. In the case of a goal 
or a subsidiary goal, they will at once signal to the scorer, and see that the signal 
is answered. Their duties as to re-starting the game are explaineil in rule 17 {e). 



362 APPENDIX. 



DUTIES OF TIME-KEEPER. 

40. — The time-keeper is responsible that a bell is rung, or a bugle sounded, at 
the conclusion of each period and interval. He will stop his watch whenever 
the whistle is blown. No time shall be counted while the ball is out of play. 



HINTS TO UMPIRES. 

1. Umpires should endeavour to place themselves in the most advantageous 
place for seeing the game, and apportioning the work. One on each side of the 
play, level generally with the back, will be found the best place as a rule for 
attaining this end. 

2. By dividing the ground in two, both lengthways and breadthways, each 
umpire can take one back line and one side line. 

3. There is a tendency on the part of umpires, from natural causes, to watch 
only the play in the immediate vicinity of the ball. For this reason much unfair 
riding by No. I's, when in reality off-side, escapes their attention. This may 
be obviated, by each umpire keeping under special observation the four players 
who happen to be, at any given time, nearer to his own back line. 

4. Umpires should have new balls in their pockets, with which to re-start the 
game at once, if the ball goes out of play. An umpire will find it easy to bowl 
in correctly, if he puts his horse in motion in the direction he wishes to bowl 
the ball. 

5. They, and goal-referees, should blow their whistles loud enough for the 
time-keeper to hear. This point is sometimes forgotten. 

6. They should make up their minds, and give their decisions clearly and 
firmly, refusing to enter into any discussion as to the why, or wherefore, of their 
decisions. 

7. Either umpire should, whether appealed to or not, stop the game if he sees 
a foul, and award a penalty, although it may have happened on the side of the 
game away from him. But he should use his discretion in not adjudging a foul, 
if the other umpire, nearest to the incident and in full view, has evidently taken 
no objection. . 

8. They must bear in mind that if they do not order off" the ground any 
dangerous or unmanageable pony, they more or less make themselves responsible 
for any accident that may occur through that pony. The same applies in the case 
of a player riding dangerously, and repeating the offence after being warned. It 
is their first and most imperative duty to stop dangerous and unfair play of any 
sort or kind. 

9. The special attention of umpires is drawn to the following : — 

(a) As crosses frequently occur in the meeting of the ball, when hit out from 
the back line, the nearest umpire should place himself on the line of the 
ball, produced in either direction {vide example 5). 

(/;) WTien a player is pursuing an adversary with the intent to hook his stick, 
the umpire should see, that when he does so, he is on the same side as 
the ball, or immediately behind. This particular breach of rules often 
occurs in a scrimmage in the vicinity of goal. 



INDIAN RULES. 363 

{c) When a player, with the intention of hitting a backhander, comes in at 
an angle, on the line of the ball, the umpire should see that he is 
entitled to possession under rule 27 ; as if he is not entitled to 
possession of the ball, and the player in possession of the ball has to 
check to avoid a collision, it is a "cross " {vide example 6). 

{a) In all doubtful cases of crossing, t/ie pace at which both playei's are 
moving nmst be carefully considered^ as on this depends the question 
whether the player entitled to possession has to check to avoid collision, 

{e) The umpire should see that none of the attacking side are within 30 yards 
of the back line, when the ball is hit off from behind. 

(/) The umpire should see that none of the players, who have been sent 
behind their back line under rules 17 (/"), 31 (zV), or 32, when the ball 
is hit out, cross that line before the ball. 

{g) Each umpire should watch the position of the back and No. i, under 
his immediate observation, at the moment the ball is hit, or hit at, 
either in front of or behind these two players, as this moment determines 
the question of "off-side." 



STATION POLO. 

1. In every station where polo is regularly played, the players shall elect a 
Committee from amongst the most experienced polo players, to be called the 
" Station Polo Committee." 

2. It is the duty of this Committee to regulate all matters, in the station, con- 
nected with polo, and to see that the station games are played in accordance with 
the rules. Ignorance of the rules by young players tends to a great deal of the 
unfair and dangerous riding often seen in station games, which it is the duty of 
the Committee to stop. 

3. The Committee will arrange for occasional " slow periods " for unbroken 
ponies and beginners. No pony which is not thoroughly broken, and no player 
who is a bad horseman, or who does not know the rules of the game, should be 
allowed to play in a "fast period." 

4. An umpire must be appointed for matches of any sort. But for ordinary 
station games, as it is generally impracticable to provide an umpire, any two 
members of the polo Committee must interpret the rules, and settle any disputes 
that may occur. 

5. The Committee will see that no player plays any portion of a game without 
a polo helmet or lungi. But even this precaution is useless, unless players them- 
selves see that their helmets are firmly secured under their chins with a strong 
strap, which will not break or come oft' in a fall. 

RULES FOR HEIGHT AND MEASUREMENT OF POLO PONIES. 

I. — The maximum height of Polo Ponies shall be fourteen hands and one 
inch. 

2. — All ponies must be measured according to these rules before they can be 
played in a tournament, with the exceptions : — 

{a) Those holding Indian Polo xVssociation Life Certificates. 



364 APPENDIX. 

(b) Those holding Season Indian Polo Association Certificates which are in 

force on the day of playing. 
{c) Those holding Life Certificates from the Calcutta or Western India Turf 

Clubs of 13-2I (or under) up to 31st March, 1899, or 14. i (or under) 

since that date. 
{d) Those holding Season Certificates from the Calcutta or Western India 

Turf Clubs of 14. i (or under) which are still in force. 

3. — At tournaments in which teams wish to play ponies they have had no 
opportunity of bringing before an authorised measurer, a local measurer will be 
appointed, with the sanction of the Indian Polo Association Committee, to 
measure ponies, their measurements being in force for that tournament only. 
Such measurements will be carried out strictly in accordance with these rules, and 
a fee of Rs. 2, payable in advance, will be levied on each pony brought up for 
measurement, and forwarded with the lists of ponies played in the tournament to 
the Honorary Secretary Indian Polo Association. 

4 — A measuring for Indian Polo Association certificates will be sanctioned by 
the Indian Polo Association Committee, at any place and on any date it may be 
required, provided the services of a measurer selected by the Committee can 
be obtained. 

5- — Applications for such a measuring should be made to the Honorary Secretary. 
Indian Polo Association, if possible 30 days before it is required. The probable 
number of ponies which will be brought up for measurement should be stated in 
the application, 

6. — All expenses incurred by the measurer in proceeding to a place to measure 
ponies, veterinary fees and other charges in connection with the measuring will 
be passed and paid by the Honorary Secretary Indian Polo Association. 

7- — When a " measuring " has been arranged and sanctioned, a measuring 
standard and printed forms will be supplied to the measurer by the Honorary 
Secretary Indian Polo Association. 

8. — No person dissatisfied with a measurement can demand, as a right, a fresh 
measurement ; but the official measurer may, on application, re-measure a pony 
which has been measured by him, if the application is made at once, and if he 
considers that the measurement, from the fretfulness of the pony or other cause, 
was not satisfactory. 

When a re-measurement is allowed, the pony, if presented at the time and 
place directed by the measurer, shall be again measured on payment of the 
prescribed fee ; otherwise the original measurement shall stand. 

9. — A measurer shall refuse to measure any pony that is known to have previously 
been measured and declared over 14. i by a measurer authorised to measure by the 
Indian Polo Association Committee, or by an official measurer of the Calcutta or 
Western India Turf Clubs. 

A certificate granted to a pony which has been previously measured will be 
cancelled. 

10. — A pony shall not be measured if he appears to have been subjected to any 
improper treatment with a view to reduce his height, or if he is in an unfit state 
to be measured, and he shall not be aged or measured, if he is unnamed or if all 
the particulars required by the measurer for filling in the forms are not furnished. 



INDIAN RULES. 365 

If a pony is rejected on the ground that he has been subjected to improper treat- 
ment, the measurer may order that he shall not be again presented within a period 
of six months. 

II. — The following fees shall be paid in advance, and shall be remitted by the 
measurer to the Honorary Secretary Indian Polo Association : — 

For every pony presented for measurement Rs. lO. 
For the re-measurement of a pony . . ,, 5. 

12. — A measurer, after entering up the description and ages of the ponies before 
him on the form and in the columns prescribed, shall measure them and pass them 
as polo ponies, provided they are 14. i (or under), certifying to the correctness of 
the measurements by signing the form referred to. 

13. — No person shall take any part in ageing or measuring his own pony, or 
a pony in which he has an interest. 

14. — The following rules shall be strictly observed in measuring ponies : — 

(a) The pony shall stand stripped on a perfectly level platform. 
(d) The head shall be so held that a line from the poll to the wither would 
be parallel to the platform. The forelegs from the point of the shoulder, 
and the hind legs from the back downwards, shall be as perpendicular to 
the platform, and as parallel to each other as the conformation of the 
pony allows. 
(c) The withers may be shaved, but the mane must not be pulled down, or 

the skin of the neck or wither in any way interfered with. 
(a) The pony shall beheld by a person deputed by the measurer, and shall 

not be touched by any one else without his permission. 
{e) The measurement shall be made at the highest point of the wither with a 
measuring rod of a pattern approved of by the Indian Polo Association 
Committee. 
{/) No allowance shall be made for shoes. 
17. — The measurer may direct that any pony, which cannot be properly 
measured within such time as he considers reasonable; within a limit of five 
minutes, shall be brought up again. In such case no additional fee shall 
be charged. 

18. — In ageing ponies a Veterinary Surgeon shall be consulted. He shall be 
entitled to fees on the following scale : — 

Rs. 16 for 12 ponies or less 
» 32 ,, 13 5, to 24 

,, 48 ,, 25 or more. 

19. — Ponies thus measured 14. 1 or under, by a selected measurer, shall be 
entitled to certificates. Certificates so granted shall be life certificates, except 
in the case of ponies under six years old, when the certificates will be available 
for the current season only. 

20. — Any person may, on payment of a fee of Re. i, obtain from the Honorary 
Secretary Indian Polo Association a certified extract of any entry in the register 
of ponies. 



366 APPENDIX. 

THE INDIAN POLO ASSOCIATION 

ANNUAL CHAMPIONSHIP 

TOURNAMENT. 

A Challenge Cup, presented by the Indian Polo Association, will be played for 
each year, as soon as possible after the Inter- Regimental Tournament. 

This Cup, which will remain in the possession of the winning team till the next 
year, cannot be won outright. It will be competed for under the Indian Polo 
Association rules of Polo, with the following conditions : — 

CONDITIONS. 

1. Open to any team. 

2. Number of ponies limited to 24 per team, 

3 Place and date to be decided by the Executive Committee I. P. A. after the 
date of closing of the first entries. 

4. First entries, closed, on 1st December, Rs. 100. 
Second entries, closed, on ist January, Rs. 150. 
Third entries, closed, on ist February, Rs. 200. 

5. After deducting the expenses of the Tournament, the balance of money 
received from entries fees, will be paid to the winning team. 

The right is reserved to the Executive Committee of modifying or altering the 
conditions of the Championship Tournament. 



INTER-REGIMENTAL POLO TOURNA- 
MENT. 

RULES FOR THE REGULATION OF THE TOURNAMENT, 

1 899- 1 900. 

1. Open to any regiment of British Cavalry, Battalion of Infantry, Royal 
Engineers, or Royal Artillery of any one Presidency ; or any two regiments of 
Native Cavalry or Native Infantry of one district may combine to form one team. 
No native shall play in a Tournament. 

2. The entrance fee shall be Rs. 120-0-0. 

First entries to close on 15th June in each ^year. Those regiments entering 
by that date to vote as to date and place where the Tournament shall be held, 
when an Honorary Secretary shall be elected by the British Cavalry Regiments 
stationed at the place appointed. 

Second entries may be made up to within one month of the date fixed for the 
commencement of the Tournament. 

3. A regiment entering for the Inter-Regimental Polo Tournament which has 
not previously subscribed towards the challenge cup, shall pay a subscription of 
;i^io in addition to the entrance fee. 



INDIAN RULES. 367 

4. The Tournament to be played under the Rules of the Indian Polo 
Association. 

5. The Tournament shall be under the management of three Stewards who shall 
be elected by the Honorary Secretary. 

6. There shall be a right of appeal to the Stewards upon all questions which 
are not by these rules declared to be subject to the final decision of some other 
authority, such as Umpires, etc., and the decision of the Stewards in all such 
appeals shall be final. 

7. Any question which may arise in the course of the Tournament, which is 
not provided for by these rules, shall be referred for decision to the Stewards, 
who may if they think fit refer the matter to a Committee of five Members of the 
Indian Polo Association, whose decision shall be final. 

8. This Committee of I. P. A. to consist of a representative of the British 
Cavalry, British Infantry and Native Cavalry nominated by their respective 
branches. The remaining two Members to be chosen by these three. 

9. Any two Stewards and the Polo Secretary shall form a quorum for the 
transaction of all matters contemplated by these rules. 

10. Each team shall be composed of four players who shall not be changed 
during the meeting, unless through any accident, sickness or unavoidable absence, 
any of them are not able to play, when the Stewards shall have the power of 
allowing the team to be made up by other players of the same regiment. 

11. The number of ponies to be limited to twenty-four. No pony shall play 
for two diff'erent regiments during one Tournament. The duration of play shall 
be forty minutes, viz., 8 periods of 5 minutes. 

12. Ponies shall be bona fide and unconditionally the property of the Officers, 
Non-Commissioned Officers, or men of the Regiment or Batteries which the team 
represents. 

13. Captains of teams to certify as to ownership of ponies (if required to do so) 
before play begins. 

14. The order in which the several matches of a Tournament shall be played 
shall be decided in the first instance by drawing lots. The lots shall be drawn 
at such time and in such manner as may be directed by the Stewards. If how- 
ever, by reason of any team being unable to arrive in time for the commencement 
of any Tournament or for any other reason, the order of play decided by the 
drawing of lots cannot be observed, the order of play shall in such case be 
decided by the Stewards, who shall be guided in their decision by what they con- 
sider to be fair, having regard to the interest of all the teams. 

15. The duration of play and the number of ponies allowed to be played by 
teams in a Tournament shall be decided by the local Stewards of each Tourna- 
ment, provided that the maximum duration of play in any match does not exceed 
forty minutes exclusive of stoppages. 



\6S APPENDIX. 



INFANTRY POLO TOURNAMENT. 

BYE-LAWS. 
[As amended by Meetings of loth February, 1895 ^^^ Sth February, 1896.] 

Liicknow, Sitk Feb?-uary, 1896. 

1. The Infantry Polo Tournament will beheld under the rules of the Indian 
Polo Association. 

2. An annual meeting will be held during the week of the Tournament ; no 
alteration shall be made in these Bye-Laws except at that meeting. 

Any proposition or alteration in Bye-Laws that it is intended to bring forward 
should be sent to the Honorary Secretary twenty -four hours before the Meeting. 
A representative from any Regiment subscribing to the current Tournament shall 
have a vote ; no others entitled to vote. 

3. The Infantry Polo Tournament shall be open to a team from any Battalion 
of British Infantry or any Regiment of Native Infantry. 

4. Each team shall be composed of four Officers belonging to the Battalion or 
Regiment, who shall not be changed during the Meeting unless through any 
accident, sickness, or unavoidable absence any of them are not able to play, in 
which case the local Stewards shall have the power of allowing the team to be 
made up by other Officers of the same Battalion or Regiment. Seconded Officers 
shall not be allowed to play. 

5. The entrance fees shall be Rs. 120 per team, of which Rs. 100 shall be paid 
to the winning team and Rs. 20 to a current account for defraying the inci- 
dental expenses of the Tournament from year to year. Donations from teams not 
competing shall be paid to the winning team. 

6. The first entries will close on the 30th October in each year. These entries 
and the votes as to date and place of playing the Tournament to be sent, regis- 
tered, together with the full entrance fee to the Honorary Secretary, Infantry Polo 
Tournament, at the station where the Tournament was played the previous year. 
Second entries can be made up to within a week of the date fixed for the 
commencement of the Tournament. 

7. Only those Battalions or Regiments who enter, pay their full entrance fee 
by 30th October, have a right to vote in deciding the date and the place where 
the Tournament is to be held. This decision will be taken on the votes given 
with the first entries, and an Honorary Secretary in the Station where the Tour- 
nament is to be held shall at once be asked to act by the Honorary Secretary of 
the Infantry Polo Tournament of the previous year. 

In the event of there being a tie between two stations voted for, the Tourna- 
ment shall be held at that station at which it was not held the previous year. 

8. The Honorary Secretary for the year will as soon as possible assemble a 
Committee of three who will decide the date on which the Tournament is to be 
held, in accordance with Bye-Law 7. 

9. No pony shall play for two different teams during one Tournament ; they 
must be bond fide and unconditional property of the Officers, Non-Commissioned 
Officers or men of the Battalion or Regiment which the team represents. 



INDIAN RULES. 369 

Number of ponies for each team is limited to i8. 

10. Each match shall consist of 6 periods of 5 minutes each, 

11. The Tournament shall not beheld under any circumstances at the same 
time as the Inter-Regimental Tournament. 

12. No number of wins entitle any Regiment to obtain possession of the Cup. 



NATIVE CAVALRY POLO TOURNAMENT. 

A Challenge Cup to be competed for annually, by all Regiments of Bengal and 
Punjab Cavalry and Central India Horse. 

This Cup can never become the permanent property of any Regiment. 

The place for the Native Cavalry Polo Tournament for the following year will 
be fixed at the general meeting held during the Polo Tournament Week. 

The date of Native Cavalry Polo Tournament will be fixed by the majority of 
votes of the first entries, closing on the 15th November in the season in which it 
is played. The votes of competing teams only will be considered, and should be 
addressed to the Honorary Secretary as early as possible. 

Competing Teams must play at least three British Officers. The fourth player 
may be a Native Officer or Duffadar. 

Teams are limited to sixteen ponies per team, which must be unconditionally 
and bond fide the property of Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers or men of the 
Regiment which the team represents. 

During the Tournament, games will be played morning and evening as decided 
by the drawing, in order to enable all, both players and spectators alike, to watch 
the Tournament throughout, and to avoid the difficulty experienced, when two 
games are being played simultaneously, of finding the Umpires, etc. 

The games shall consist of 6 periods, of 5 minutes each, actual play. 

Seconded Officers may play for their Regiments. With the above exception, no 
Officer will be permitted to represent his Regiment unless he is actually entitled 
to a portion of the Regimental pay, for the date the match is played. 

In the instance of an Officer being permanent with one Regiment, but officiating 
in another, he is eligible to play only in the team of the Regiment with which 
he is officiating. 

Any Regiment prepared to compete for the Cup at a fixed time and place, vide 
condition (II), can claim to be the winners of the same for that year. 
_ Indian Polo Association Rules to be in force except where otherwise stated. 



24 



370 



AMERICA, 

UNITED STATES OF. 

THE POLO ASSOCIATION, NEW YORK. 



H. L. Herbert (Chairman). 
R. L. Agassiz. 
Geo. J. Gould. 



COMMITTEE. 

I John C. Groome. 

1 W. A. Hazard. 

I Thomas Hitchcock, Jun. 



SECRETARY AND TREASURER. 
W. A. Hazard, 29, Broadway, New York. 

LIST OF AFFILIATED CLUBS. 



Aiken. 

Buffalo. 

Biyn Mawr. 

Camden Country Club. 

Country Club of West- 
chester (of Westches- 
ter, N.Y.). 

Dedham. 

Devon. 

Great Neck Polo Club. 

Jacksonville. 



Lakewood. 

jNIeadowbrook. 

iSIorris County. 

Myopia Hunt Club. 

Onwentsia. 

Philadelphia. 

Point Judith. 

Rockaway. 

Romsen. 

Saratoga Polo Club. 

Somerset. 



Southampton. 

Squadron " A " Polo 
Club. 

Staten Island. 

St. Louis. 

The Country Club, Brook- 
line. 

Washington. 

Westchester Polo Club 
(of Newport, R.I.). 



THE POLO ASSOCIATION. 

CONSTITUTION. 

I. — The Polo Association shall consist of an Association of Polo Clubs, each 
to be represented by one delegate, who shall out of their number elect at the 
Annual Meeting a Committee of five for the term of one year. 

THE COMMITTEE. 

2. — To have the entire control of all matters relating to the Polo Association, 
and shall be the Authority for enforcing the rules and deciding all questions 
relating thereto. They shall have the power to appoint all officials for a term 
not exceeding their own, and to make such changes in the rules and by-laws as 
they may consider necessary. The Chairman of the Association shall be a 
member of the Committee ex -officio. 

ELECTION TO MEMBERSHIP. 

3. — Every Club and its delegate up for election shall be proposed and 
seconded in writing by two delegates, and the election may take place at any 



AMERICAN RULES. 371 

meeting of the Committee. The election to be determined by ballot. One 
black ball in five to exclude. When any Club shall withdraw its delegate his 
successor shall be proposed, seconded and voted for in like manner. 

SUBSCRIPTION. 

4. — Each Club a member of the Association shall pay an annual subscription 
of $75.00. All subscriptions shall become due and payable in advance on May 
1st of each year. The subscription remaining unpaid after the 1st of June is to 
be considered as in arrear, and no Club whose subscription is in arrear shall 
enjoy any privileges of the Association nor take part in any games with members 
in good standing. 

MEETINGS. 

5. —The Annual Meeting of the Association shall be held on the third 
Tuesday in April, at such place in New York City as the Committee may 
designate. The Committee shall meet once a month or oftener, from April to 
September inclusive. Three members to constitute a quorum at the Committee 
meetings. 

PROXIES. 

6. — In the absence of a Club delegate the President or Secretary of such Club 
may furnish a written proxy to be used at the meeting for which it is named. 

MINUTES. 

7. — Minutes of the proceedings of every meeting shall be taken during their 
progress by the Secretary, or in case of his absence, as the Chairman shall 
direct, and be afterwards copied into a Minute Book, to be kept for that pur- 
pose, and after being read at the next meeting, shall be signed by the Chairman 
of that meeting. 

8. — The order of business at the Annual Meetings shall be as follows : — 

1. The noting of the members present. 

2. Reading of minutes of last Annual Meeting, and subsequent special 

meetings. 

3. Reports of Treasurer and other officers. 

4. Reports of Special Committees, and consideration of any resolutions 

attached thereto. 

5. Elections of officers. 

6. Deferred business. 

7. New business. 

The order of business may be suspended, on motion, by vote of two-thirds 
of the members present. 

CONDUCT OF MEMBERS. 

9. — In case the conduct of a delegate be considered injurious to the character 
or interests of the Association, in the opinion of any five members, who shall certify 
the same in writing to the Committee, a meeting of the Committee shall be held 
to consider the case. 

If the member whose conduct is in question shall not explain the same to 
the satisfaction of the Committee, or if the Committee, acting as Judges, 
shall be of the opinion that the member has committed a breach of the Rules of 

24* 



372 APPENDIX. 

Polo, or of the By-Laws, or been guilty of conduct injurious to the interests of 
the Association, which ought not to be condoned, they may call upon such 
member to resign ; or shall request the Club whose representative he is to 
withdraw him and nominate his successor for election, and in event of their 
neglecting to do so, the Committee shall have power to expel him, and his Club 
shall be erased from the list of members ; provided always that such expulsion 
shall only be by a majority of two-thirds, at a Committee Meeting consisting of 
not less than five members. 

In any case where the expulsion of a delegate is deemed necessary, the 
decision of the Committee shall be without appeal, and the Club so expelled 
shall have no remedy against the Committee. 

lo. — A delegate may issue free tickets of admission to members of the Club 
he represents, good for one week at any Club Ground during Association week 
there. 



RULES OF THE POLO ASSOCIATION. 

Revised May 2^, igoi. 



GENERAL RULES. ' 

GROUND. 

I, — -The ground should be about 900 feet long by 450 feet wide, with a ten- 
inch guard from end to end on the sides only. 

GOAL POSTS. 

2. — The goal posts shall be 24 feet apart, at least 10 feet high, and light 
enough to break if collided with. 

BALLS AND MALLETS. 

3. — The ball shall be of wood, with no other covering than white paint, 3^ 
inches in diameter, and not exceeding 5 oz. in weight. 
Mallets shall be such as are approved by the Committee. 

PONIES. 

4. — -The height of ponies shall not exceed 14.2. 

Ponies aged five (5) years and upwards may be measured and registered for life ; 
ponies under five (5) years may be registered for the current season only. Any 
member of the Committee may measure ponies not his own and issue certificates 
of registry. He shall determine the age of the pony. The Committee may by 
vote appoint one or more official measurers, who shall have all the powers hereby 
given the Committee in respect to the measurement of ponies and the issue of 
certificates. 

PERIODS. 

5. — A. In match games between pairs there shall be two periods of fifteen 
{15) minutes each actual play. 

B. In match games between teams of three (3) there shall be three (3) periods 
of fifteen (15) minutes each actual play. 

Under A, and B, two (2) minutes shall be allowed after each goal, and 
intervals of five (5) minutes between periods, unless otherwise agreed. 



AMERICAN RULES 373 

C. In match games between teams of four (4), there shall be four (4) periods 
of fifteen (15) minutes each actual play. Two (2) minutes shall be allowed after 
each goal, and intervals of seven (7) minutes between periods, unless otherwise 
agreed- 

Under A, B and C, time between goals and delays shall not be counted as 
actual play. 

ELIGIBILITY. 

6. — A member of a club which is a men\ber of the Polo Association shall not 
play any match games with or against any club which is not a member of the 
Association, nor shall any player play on the team of any club of which he is not 
a member, except on written consent of the Committee, and the approval of the 
captains of the teams entered. 

7. — A player shall be handicapped with but one club at a time. 

8. — A player shall not play for the same prize on more than one team or pair. 

Any player in his first tournament events shall be handicapped at not less than 
two goals and shall so continue until changed by the Committee. 

ENTRIES. 

9, — Entries for tournament events shall be made in writing, naming the pro- 
bable players and substitutes, and be accompanied by an entrance fee of ten (10) 
dollars for each player, which is to be returned if the team plays, otherwise it is 
forfeited to the Association. Entries absolutely close on the day announced. 
No conditional entries shall be received. 

The entrance fee for Championship events shall be one hundred (100) dollars 
for each team. 

DRAWINGS. 

10. — The drawings for all tournaments shall be made under the Bagnall-Wilde 
system. (This consists of playing a preliminary round to reduce the number of 
contesting teams to two, four, eight or sixteen, thus eliminating the bye at once, 
and putting all contestants on the same footing.) 

UNIFORM. 

II. — Captains shall not allow members of their team to appear in the game 
otherwise than in Club uniform. 

COLORS. 

12. — The Polo Association colors are white and dark blue. 

CHAMPIONSHIP. 

13. — A. There shall be a Senior and a Junior Championship tournament, the 
latter immediately preceding the former. The Senior Championship shall be 
open to teams without limit of handicap. The Junior Championship shall be 
open to teams whose aggregate handicap does not exceed twenty (20) goals, but 
this limit is simply to define the class, and all games in both classes shall be 
played without handicap. 

No player with a higher handicap than five (5) goals on May 15th shall com- 
pete in the Junior Championship. 

The handicap governing eligibility to Junior Championship teams shall be that 
in force May 15th of the year in which the championship events take place. 



374 APPENDIX. 

B. The winner of the Junior Championship events shall have the privilege of 
making a post-entry for the Senior Championship events. 

C. Except as provided in Section B paragraph, a player shall not be allowed 
to play in both classes. 

D. In both classes, the Championship may be won by default, but in such case 
no individual trophies shall be added. 

E. In all Championship events, a player shall not represent a club with which 
he is not handicapped, and a player shall not be handicapped with more than one 
club at a time. Every player in the Association shall elect with what club he 
will be handicapped and the Committee shall be notified in writing prior to the 
fifteenth day of May in each season. 

F. No player shall be eligible to play for his club in Championship events, 
unless he has played on at least six (6) different days during the current year on 
the club ground in practice games or in matches. 

FIELD RULES. 

FIELD CAPTAIN. 

I. — There shall be a field captain for each team who shall have the direction 
of positions and plays of his men. He shall have the sole right to discuss with 
the Referee questions arising during the game, and to enter protests with the 
Referee, provided that a player fouled may claim the foul. Other players shall 
testify only when requested by the Referee. 

REFEREE. 

2. — The two captains shall agree upon a Referee, whose decision shall be final 
in regard to all questions of actual play, but as regards eligibility of players, 
handicaps, and interpretation of the General Rules, an appeal may be made by 
either captain to the Committee, whose decision shall be final. 

DISQUALIFICATION OF PONIES. 

3. — Any pony may be protested on the field under General Rule 4 (if possible, 
before play begins), by the field captain of the side against which the pony is 
offered to be played. Unless a certificate of registry under said Rule 4 is then ■ 
produced, the Referee shall forthwith measure the pony and decide the protest. 
If sustained, the pony shall be ruled off the field for the match. 

The Referee shall exclude from the game any dangerous or vicious pony. 

TIMER AND SCORER. 

4. — The two captains shall agree upon a timer and a scorer who shall perform 
their duties under the direction of the Referee. 

GOAL JUDGES. 

5. — The home captain shall appoint two goal judges, acceptable to the visiting 
captain, each of whom shall give testimony to the Referee, at the latter's request, 
in respect to goals and other plays near his goal, but the Referee shall make all 
decisions. 

SUBSTITUTE. 

6. — Each team should have a substitute in readiness to play in case of accident 
or disqualification. 



AMERICAN RULES. 375 

CLEAR FIELD. 

7. — Only players and Referee shall be allowed upon the ground during the 
progress of the game. 

CHOICE OF ENDS. 

8. — The choice of ends shall be determined by the toss of a coin between the 
field captains. 

CHANGE OF ENDS. 

9. — Ends shall be changed after every goal. 

THROW-IN. 

10. — The game begins when the ball is thrown in by the Referee between the 
contestants who shall each be on his own side of the middle line. 

II. — After an interval, the Referee shall throw in the ball when the proper 
signal is given by the timer, whether all the players are lined up or not. 

GOAL. 

12. — A goal is made when the ball goes over and clear of the line between the 
goal posts, or above the top of the goal posts between centre lines. 

SAFETY. 

13. — Whenever a player, either accidentally or intentionally, gives the ball an 
impetus with his mallet which carries the ball over the goal line he is defending, 
and it touches nothing except the goal post or the ground after leaving his mallet, 
it shall be deemed a safety. 

SCORE. 

14. — {a) A goal counts one. 

(d) A safety counts minus one-quarter. 

(c) A foul counts minus one-half. 

The side wins which is credited with the largest score at the end of the match. 

TIME LIMIT. 

15. — When the time limit of any period (except the last) expires, the signal 
shall be given, but the game shall continue until the ball goes out of bounds or a 
goal is made. Such overtime in any period shall be deducted from the playing 
time of the succeeding period. When the time limit of the last period is 
reached, the signal shall be given and the game shall then cease with the ball in 
its position at the moment of the signal. 

16. — If a goal is made when any fraction of time remains to be played the 
game shall continue. 

17. — When the ball is out of bounds, and the limit of time expires before it is 
put in play, the period ends. 

TIE. 

18. — In event of a tie at the end of the last period, the game shall continue 
(after the usual interval between periods) until a goal or safety is made, or a foul 
is penalised. 

OUT OF BOUNDS. 

19. — When the ball crosses a side line, it is out of bounds, and shall be put in 
play by the Referee throwing it up between the contestants (lined up as at the 



376 APPENDIX. 

beginning of the game) toward the middle of the field, and parallel to the goal 
lines, at the point where it went over the boards. He shall throw from outside 
the side boards. 

KNOCK-IN. 

20. — When the ball crosses an end line it is out of bounds, and the side 
defending the goal at that end is entitled to a knock-in, the ball being placed on 
the line at the point which it crossed, but in no case nearer than ten (10) feet to 
the goal posts or to the side boards. 

21. — A ball must be over and clear of the line to be out. 

22. — When a player having the knock-in causes delay, the Referee may throw 
a ball on the field and call play. No opponent shall come within fifty (50) feet 
of the ball, when placed for a knock-in, until the same has been hit by a 
mallet. As soon as the ball is touched by a mallet after being placed for a 
knock-in, it is in play, and subject to the rules of play. 

PLAYER SUBSTITUTED. 

23. — When a player is replaced by a substitute, he cannot return to the team 
the same day, except to take the place of a player who is disabled or disqualified. 

HANDICAP. 

24. — When a change of players takes place after the game has begun, the 
handicap of the man having the highest number of goals shall be counted. 

FOULS. 

25. — The Referee shall declare any violation of Rules 27, 28, 29 and 30 a foul, 
when seen by him, without waiting to have it claimed ; or, when not seen, upon 
evidence satisfactory to him. He may suspend the player committing the foul 
for the match, but he shall also allow the usual penalty of one-half goal. 

26. — In case of repeated or wilful violation of said rules, especially by conduct 
dangerous to the safety of other players, the Referee shall suspend the player 
guilty thereof for the match. 

27. — In ease of a player being disabled by a foul so that he is unable to con- 
tinue, the side which has been fouled shall have the option, instead of providing 
a substitute, to designate the player on the opposite side whose handicap is 
nearest above that of the disabled player, and the former shall thereupon retire 
from the game. This penalty shall be in addition to those hereinbefore provided, 
and the game shall continue with each side reduced by the above withdrawals. 

DANGEROUS RIDING. 

28. — Careless or dangerous horsemanship or a lack of consideration for the 
safety of others is forbidden. 

The following are examples of riding prohibited under this rule : — 

{a) Bumping at an angle dangerous to a player or to his pony. 

{d) Zigzagging in front of another player riding at a gallop. 

(c") Pulling across or over a pony's forelegs in such a manner as to risk tripping 
the pony. 

RIGHT OF WAY. 

29. — A. The right of way is given to the player who has last hit the hall or to 
the player who has entered safely on the line of the ball between it and the last 



AMERICAN RULES. 377 

hitter, or (as against players not in possession of the ball) to the player who is 
following nearer than any other player the line of direction of the ball. 

CROSSING. 

B. A player shall not cross the player having the right of way, except at an 
unquestionably safe distance ; nor shall he pull up in front of the latter unless he 
is far enough ahead to give the latter unquestionably enough time to pull up 
also ; nor shall he pull up across the latter on any consideration whatsoever. 

MEETING. 

30. — WTienever two players are riding in opposite directions for the ball, each 
shall leave the ball on his off side. 

OTHER PROHIBITIONS. 

31. — A. A player shall not strike an adversary or his pony, with the hands or 
mallet, or strike the ball when dismounted. 

B. A player shall not interpose his mallet to interfere with an opponent's 
stroke. 

C. A player shall not put his mallet over his adversary's pony either in front 
or behind. 

D. A player shall not seize with the hand, strike or push with the head, hand, 
arm, or elbow, but a player may push with his shoulder, provided the elbow be 
kept close to his side. 

E. A player requiring a mallet, pony or assistance from an outside person, 
during the game, shall ride to the end or side lines to procure it. No person 
shall come on the field to assist him. 

F. A player shall not hold the ball in his hand, arm, or lap, nor shall he kick 
or hit the ball with any part of his person. He may, however, block the ball 
with any part of his person or with his pony. 

FINES. 

32. — The Referee shall also have the power to impose a fine (the amount to be 
determined by the Committee) on any team or member of a team failing to 
appear within reasonable time of the hour named for the events for which they 
have entered, or for any misconduct or violation of the rules during the progress 
of the game, and shall report the same in writing to the Committee fo-r 
enforcement. 

PENALTY. 

33. — The Referee may at his discretion award a penalty of half a goal for any 
violation of Field Rules not covered by Rule 24. 

SUSPENSION OF PLAY. 

34.—.-^. When a foul is allowed by the Referee, he may or may not stop the 
game, according to his judgment as to the advantage gained or lost by the foul. 

ACCIDENT. 

B. In case of an accident to a player or to a pony, or to a pony's gear which 
in the opinion of the Referee involves danger to a player, he shall stop the game. 
It shall not be stopped for a broken or lost mallet, stirrup leather, curb chain, or 
martingale (unless liable to trip a pony). 



378 APPENDIX. 



BROKEN BALL. 

C. When a ball is broken or trodden into the ground in a manner to be 
unserviceable, in the opinion of the Referee, or when it strikes the Referee or his 
pony so as in his opinion to affect the game seriously, he shall stop the game, 
and may substitute another ball by throwing it toward the middle of the field 
between the players at the point where the event occurred. 

CHANGE OF PONIES. 

D. In the case of ten (lo) minutes continuous play, the Referee shall stop the 
game for a change of ponies as soon thereafter as the ball goes out of bounds. 
Not exceeding two (2) minutes shall be allowed for this purpose. 

OTHER CAUSE. 

E. The Referee may suspend the game for any other reasonable cause. 

TIME LOST. 

F. Time lost under paragraphs A, B, C, D and E shall not be counted as 
actual play. 

referee's whistle. 

35. — In all the above cases the play is not suspended until the Referee's 
whistle blows, but the game shall be considered stopped at the time the event 
occurred. The ball, when placed again in play, shall be thrown by the Referee 
toward the middle of the field at the point at which the ball was when the event 
occasioning the suspension of the game occurred. 

failure TO FINISH. 

36. — In the event of a game being stopped by darkness, or for any cause which 
prevents a finish the same day, it shall be resumed at the point at which it 
stopped, as to score and position of the ball, at the earliest convenient time, 
unless settled otherwise by agreement between the captains. 



\ 



379 



LIST OF EXISTING POLO PONIES. 



ABBOTT (Mr. N. W. Curzon, loth Hussars), ch g ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (88). 

ACE OF HEARTS (Mr. W^ J. Drybrough), skew g, a; Paris, 
1896 (286). 

ALLY SLOPER (Major W. H. Walker), b g, a ; County Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1895 (108). 

ALUMINIUM (Mr. R. Court), b g, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 

1895 (202). 

AMAZON (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), b m, a ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (287). 

ARAB CHIEF (Capt. Dundas), b h, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 (223). 

ARABI (Mr. J. Porter-Porter), wh g, a; All Ireland Cup, 1895 
(266). 

ARCHEDUC (Baron Lejeune), blk g, a; International Tournament, 
Paris (365). 

ARTEE (Mr. W. D. Watson), b g, a ; Subalterns' Tournament, 
Ranelagh (120). 

AURUM (Capt. the Earl of Longford, 2nd Life Guards), ch m ; 
Irish County Cup, 1894 (74). 

AZUN (Mr. P. E. Bucknell), gr g, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 
(339)- 

BACCHIA (Mr. G. H. Hardy), b m, a; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 
1894-95-96 (167). 

BALLET GIRL (Capt. G. FitzGerald), br m, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (10). 

BAMBOO (Baron Lejeune), br g, a ; International Tournament, 
Paris, (367). 

BANTAM (Major C. Peters), b m, a; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 

1896 (280). 



38o APPENDIX. 

BARD, THE (Mons. R. Raoul Duval), gr h, a; Paris, 1896 (306). 

BARON (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), b g; Open Tournament, 
Ranelagh, 1896 (29). 

BARONET (Capt. Gordon Mackenzie), b g, 5 ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (5). 

BAY RHUM (Capt. Meyrick, 15th Hussars), b g, a; Irish Military 
Tournament, 1895 (150), 

BEAR, THE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b g, a ; Champion Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (127). 

BEDOUIN (Major W. H. Walker), ch g, a; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1894 (109). 

BEESWING (Mr. P. Sechiari), dun m; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (98). 

BEL HASSIM (Mr. Herbert Wilson), gr h, 6; Novices' Cup, 
Ranelagh (209). 

BELL (Capt. R. A. Christie), b m, a; Ranelagh, 1893 (358). 

BELLE (The Marques de Villavieja), b m, a; Paris, 1896 (295) 

BENBOW (Mons. R. Raoul Duval), b g, a ; Paris International, 
1896 (210). 

BENEDICT (Mr. N. W. Curzon, loth Hussars), bg; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (89). 

BIG BEN (Mr. J. G. Fort), wh m, a ; Novices' Tournament, Rane- 
lagh, 1895 (153). 

BILLY (Mr. W. J. H. Jones), ch g, 6 ; Champion Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (53). 

BISMARCK (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), b g, a; Open Tournament, 
Ranelagh, 1896 (30). 

BLACK BELLA (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), blk m, a ; Open 
Cup, Hurlingham, 1896 (24). 

BLACK PRINCE (Mr. F. Menzies), br h; Novices' Cup, 1896 
(352). 

BLACKMAN (Mr. Gerald Gold), blk g; Champion Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1894 (79). 

BLARNEY (Mons. L. de Errazu), blk g, a; Paris, 1896 (304). 

BLAZES (Capt. the Earl of Longford, 2nd Life Guards), br ra; 
Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham (71). 

BLUE BEARD (Mr. R. Court), blue roan g, a; County Cup, 

Hurlingham, 1895 (201). 

BLUE BLOOD (Mr. G. F. Buchan), gr h, a ; Subalterns' Tourna- 
ment, 1896 (351). 

BOMBASTE (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), gr h, a ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1893-94 (165). 

BOS, THE (Mr. W. B. Longdon), blk g ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (III). 



POLO PONIES, 381 

BOY, THE (Mr. J. C. Harrison, Scots Greys), b h, a; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1895-96 (157). 

BRIEF (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), br m, a; Open Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (23). 

BROWN STOUT (Capt. P. Langdale), dark br m, a; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (232). 

BRUNETTE (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), br m, a; Irish C.P.U. Cup, 
1894-95-96 (316). 



CAFE AU LAIT (Mr. Neil Haig), dun g, a; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham (197). 

CARLO (Capt. Garden, ist Life Guards), dun g; Inter-Regimental, 

Hurlingham, 1896 (67). 

CARLOW (Mr. C. S. Schreiber), b m, a; Subalterns' Cup, Rane- 
lagh, 1896 (11). 

CARLOW (Capt. H. A. L. Tagart, 15th Hussars), b g, a ; Irish 
Military and Open Tournaments, 1895 (35). 

CATARINA (Mr. H. J. Selwyn), ch m, a; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1894 (277). 

CATCH-'EM-ALIVE (Mr. W. Harrild), br m, a; County Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1893(235). 

CHANCE (Capt. Dalgety), br g, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh (268). 

CHARLTON (Mr. Wm. Younger), ch m ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1893-94 (75). 

CHATTER BOX (Mr. F. J. Mackey), b m, 6; Novices' Cup, 

Ranelagh (323). 

CHEEKY BOY (Capt. D. Daly), ch h, a; All Ireland Cup, 1895 

(332). 

CHIEF OF ORAN (12th Lancers Polo Club), ch g, a; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1891-95 (212). 

CID, THE (Mr. A. R. Wyndham), gr h ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1894-95 (69). 

CICELY (Major W. H. Walker), b m, a; County Cup, Hurlingham, 

1895 (103)- 

CLINKER (Col. Campbell), b g, a ; Irish CO. Cup, 1895 (240). 

COFFEE (Mr. W. F. Robinson), br m ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 

1896 (93). 

COFFEE (Mr. R. B. Sheridan), b g, a ; Novices' Tournament, 
Ranelagh, 1896 {149). 

COMET (Mr. E. Holland), gr g, a; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 

(258). 

COMMON (Capt. Gordon Mackenzie), gr g, 6 ; Open Cup, Hurl- 
ingham 1895 (S'^. 



382 APPENDIX. 

CORELIA (Hon. T. W. Brand, loth Hussars), ch m ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (83). 

COUNT, THE (Capt. Loder), gr g, a; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1894 {227). 

CUENCA (Mr. Donaldson Hudson), gr g, a; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1893 (181). 

CURACOA (Mr. A. Rawlinson), br m, a ; Paris International 
Tournament (191). 

CYCLONE (Mr. W. S. Buckmaster), b m, a; Champion Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (123). 

CYDER CUP (Capt. G. Milner), br m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 (7). 

DAINTY (Sir H. F. de Trafford), br m, a; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (114). 

DAIRY MAID (Mr. E. Rose), ch m, a ; Open Cup, Ranelagh 
(249). 

DANCING GIRL, THE (Mr. Tresham Gilbey), ch m; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (62). 

DANDY (Capt. C. A. S. Warner, 17th Lancers), chg; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (55). 

DAPHNE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), br m, 6 ; Open Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (15). 

DAYLIGHT (Due de Besacia), b m, a ; International Tournament, 
Paris, 1896 (362). 

DAYSTAR (Mr. W. J. H. Jones), b g, 6 ; Novices' and Open Cups, 
Ranelagh, 1896 (48). 

DAWN (Hon. Dudley Marjoribanks), gr m, a ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh (254). 

DEAN, THE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b g, a ; Champion Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (334). 

DEAREST (Capt. Dalgety), br m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (243). 

DENIS (Capt. E. W. Pedder), gr g ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (133)- 

DOCTOR (Mr. Gerald W. Hobson), ch g, 5 ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh, 1896 (58). 

DOCTOR, THE (Mr. C. P. Foster), rn g, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (220). 

Dr. JIM (Mr. R. Lambert), ch h, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (147). 

DOLLAR (Mr. H. J. Selwyn), b g ; Ranelagh Open Tournament 
(31). 

DOLLY (Hon. T. W. Brand, loth Hussars), ch m ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (84). 



POLO PONIES. 383 

DOROTHY (Major C. Peters), b m, a ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 

1896 (278). 

DOROTHY (Mr. F. Wormald), ch m, a; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1895 (217). 

DRAHAM (Mr. J. D. Watson), ch g, a ; Novices' Cup, 1896 (313). 

DUBLIN (Mr. W. J. H. Jones), gr g, a; Novices' and Open Cup, 
Ranelagh, 1896 (49). 

DUMPS (Capt. Dalgety), br m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (241). 

DWARF (Mr. C. F. Dixon Johnson, Inniskilling Dragoons), ch g ; 
Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (66). 

DYNAMITE (Major W. H. Walker), b m, a; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1895 (104). 



EARLY DAWN (Mr. W. S. Buckmaster), ch m, a; Open Tourna- 
ment, Hurlingham, 1895 (121). 

EILEEN (Capt. M. F. Rimington), b m, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (46). 

ELASTIC (Mr. G. H. Hardy), br m, a ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 
1896 (170). 

ELDUO (Mr. F. J. Mackey), ch g, a ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 

(322). 

EL HELM (Mr. F. A. B. Fryer), ch h, 5 ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (102). 

ELISHA (Capt. Gordon Mackenzie), gr g, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1894 (3). 

ELSTOW (Earl of Shrewsbury), br m, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 
1895 (177)- 

ERCELIA (Capt. E. Green), ch m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (193). 

EVY (Mr. D. Hudson), gr m, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 1894 
(270). 

EXCHANGE (Capt. G. Milner), ch g, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1894 (6). 



FAIR HELEN (Capt. M. F. Rimington), br m, a ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (47). 

FANCY (Capt. Vaughan Lee), br m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (182). 

FAWN (Mr. H. W. H. Lambton), ch m, a ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (45). 

FIDDLES (17th Lancers Club), ch g, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 (137). 



384 APPENDIX. 

FIDDLESTRING (Capt. Eley), b m, a : Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1895 (207). 

FIDGET (Mr. H. Spender Clay), b m, a ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
(267). 

FIDGET (Capt. Renton), ch m, 6 ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 1894 

(173)- 
FIZZ (Mr. W. Walton), b g ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 (99). 

FIZZER (Lord Kensington), b g, a ; (382). 

FLEXIBLE (Mr. N. W. Curzon, loth Hussars), dun m ; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 {8j). 

FLIRT (Sir E. Stracey), ch m, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh (187). 

FLIRT (Sir H. F. de Trafford), b m, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 

1895(113). 

FLO (Hon. T. W. Brand, loth Hussars), b m ; Open Cup, Rane- 
lagh, 1896 (85). 

FOAM (i2th Lancers Polo Club), b m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1891-95 (214). 

FRILLS (Capt. Vaughan Lee), drk b m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1895 (185). 

FUSILIER (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), gr g, a ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham (261). 

FUSSER (Major W. H. Walker), ch m, a; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (107). 

GAMECOCK (Mr. G. H. Hardy), b g, a ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 
1896(168). 

GAYLAD (Mr. Frank Siltzer), b g, a ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 
1894 (158). 

GAZELLE (i2th Lancers Polo Club), ch m, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1891-95 (211). 

GHOST (Capt. N. T. Nickalls, 17th Lancers), b h, a; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1893-96 ; Paris, 1896 (39). 

GIFT, THE (Major J. G. Morris), wh g, a ; Novices' Cup, 1896 

(373)- 
GINGER (Mr. P. E. Bucknell), ch m, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 

(338)- 

GIPSEY QUEEN (Mr. W. Harrild), b m, a; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1893(234) 

GIRL, THE (Mr. P. Hambro, 15th Hussars), ch m ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (65). 

GLUTTON (Capt. Dalgety), ch g, a ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 

(245)- 

GOLDEN HACKLE (Mr. P. E. Bucknell), ch g, a ; Novices' Cup, 
Ranelagh (336). 



POLO PONIES. 385 

GOLIGHTLY (Mr. C. Adamthwaite) ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 

(342). 

GRASSHOPPER (Mr. C. A. D'Estrange), dun m, a ; Irish C.P.U. 
Cup, 1894-95-96 (319). 

GREY FRIAR (Mr. W. Burdon), gr h, 7 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 {269). 

GREYFRIARS (Sir. E. Stracey), gr Arab g, 7 ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh (186). 

GREY LEGS (Sir H. F. de Trafford), ro g, a ; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 (116). 

HAPPY LAD (Mr. F. Freake), g h, a ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 
(345)- 

HATFIELD (Mr. J. G. Fort), b g, 7 ; Novices' Tournament, Rane- 
lagh, 1895 (155)- 

HAWTHORN (Mr. A. A. Longdon), b m, a ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh (112). 

HIPCAT (Capt. Renton), br m, a ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 1894- 
95-96 (171). 

HITTITE (Mr. A. Stuart), ch g, 7 ; Novices' Cup (2 7 2). 

HOUSEMAID (Mr. W. J. H. Jones), b m, 5 ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh, 1896 (51). 

HURRICx\NE (Capt. Vaughan Lee), ch g, a ; Inter-Regimental, 

Hurlingham, 1895 (183)- 

HUSMAM (Mr. M. Ephrusi), gr h, a; Paris, 1896 (292). 
HUSSAR (Mr. C. S. Schreiber), b g, 6 (349). 



INDIAN (Baron Lejeune), b g, a ; International Tournament, Paris 
(366). 

IRISH, GIRL late Alphosine (Messrs. F. D. and G. A. Miller), ch 
m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (36). 



JACK (Mr. P. E. Bucknell), ch g, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 

(337). 
JACK (]\Ir. Herbert Wilson), br g, 7 ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 

(208). 

JACK IN THE BOX (Mr. Percy Bullivant), b g, a ; Novices' Cup, 
Ranelagh (189). 

JACK TAR (Mr. J. Belleville), b g, a ; Novices' Cup (379). 

JANE (Mr. N. W. Curzon, loth Hussars), br m; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1866 (86). 

JANE (Major J. G. Morris), b m, 6 ; Novices' Cup, 1896 (371). 

25 



386 APPENDIX. 

JENNY (Capt. Loder), b m, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 1894 
(224). 

JIM CROW (Mr. Percy Bullivant), roan g, a ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh (190). 

JOCK SCOTT (17th Lancers Polo Club), dark ch g, 6; Open 
Tournament, Ranelagh (238). 

JOE (Viscount Villiers), gr g ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 (126), 

JOHNNY (Capt. Loder), ch h, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 

1894 (226). 

JOHNNY LONGTAIL (Mr. H. Montgomery), gr g, a ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (136). 

JOKER, THE (Mr. J. Watson), br g, 6 ; Open Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (359)- 

KETTLE (The Marques de Villavieja), b m, a ; Paris, 1896 (297). 

KHALIFA (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b m, a ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1892, 1893-94 (164). 

KHEDIVE (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), blk h, a ; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1892 (285). 

KISMET (Mr. J. B. Aldridge, R.H.A.), gr g, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896(143). 

KITTEN (Capt. Lord W. Bentinck, loth Hussars), b m ; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (80). 

LADY (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), b m, 7 ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 
(341). 

LADY BIRD (17th Lancers Polo Club), b m, 10: Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1895 i^37)- 

LADY DIAMOND (Mr. F. J. Mackey), ch m, 6, Novices' Cup, 
Ranelagh (325). 

LADY FULLARTON (Mr. Wm. Younger), ch m ; County Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1893-94 {77). 

LADY GREY (Mr. R. Court), wh m, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 

1895 (200). 

LADY ILEEN (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), b m, a; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1894 (284). 

LADY JANE (Major W. H. Walker), b m, a; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1895 (106). 

LADY'S MAID (Baron Lejeune), b m, a ; International Tourna- 
ment, Paris (368). 

LADY'S MAID (Mr. F. J. Mackey), br m, 6; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh (324). 

LADY'S MAID (Earl of Shrewsbury), b m, a; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1895 (179). 



POLO PONIES. 387 

LADY SUPERIOR, THE (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), b m, a; County 
Cup, Hurlingham, 1894 (283). 

LAM LASS (Mr. F. Menzies), ch m, a; Novices' Cup, 1896 
(354). 

LANCET (Capt. G. FitzGerald), br g, a; Inter-Reguiiental, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (9). 

LANGOSTA (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), br g ; Open Tourna- 
ment, Ranelagh, 1896 (26). 

LANGOSTA (Capt. Renton), blk g, 6 ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 

1894 (175)- 
LARIOS (Mons. R. Raoul Duval), gr h, 11 ; Paris, 1896 (307). 

LIGHTNING (Mr. W. A. Tilney, 17th, Lancers), b m, 6 ; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (20). 

LILLY (Mr. John Watson), gr m, a; Ranelagh (205). 

LITTLE FAIRY (Mr. A. Stuart), ch m, a; Novices' Cup (271). 

LIZZIE (Hon. Dudley Marjoribanks), br m, a ; County Cup Tour- 
nament, Hurlingham (255). 

LOCUST (Mr. C. A. D'Estrange), b m, a; Irish C.P.U. Cup, 1894- 
95-96 (318). 

LORD DALMAHOY (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), gr g, 6 ; County Cup, 
Paris (263). 

LOTTIE (Due de Besacia), b m, a ; International Tournament, 
Paris, 1896 (363). 

LUCKY PENNY (Mr. C. S. Schreiber), b m, 6 ; Subalterns' Tour- 
nament, 1896 (346). 

LUNA (Mr. W. J. H. Jones), b m, a ; Novices' and Open Cups, 
Ranelagh, 1896 (52). 

LYRx\ (Capt. Sir Henry Rawlinson, Coldstream Guards), gr m, a ; 
Champion Cup, Hurlingham, 1895 (i^)- 



MADAM CLARK (Mr. Wm. Younger), b m ; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1893-94 (76). 

MAGIC (Major W. H. Walker), ch h, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 
1894 (no). 

MAGIC SPELL (Mr. W. J. Drybrough) b h, 7 ; County Cup, Paris 

(264). 

MAGNET (Capt. Renton) br g, a; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 1894 
(174)- 

MAHOMET (Hon. Dudley Marjoribanks), dark gr g, a; Novices' 
Cup, Ranelagh (253). 

MAINSPRING (Mr. F. J. Mackey), bi m, 7 ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh (321). 

MARGOT (Major J. G. Morris), br m, 6; Novices Cup, 1896 (372). 

25* 



388 APPENDIX. 

MARY ANNE (Mr. F. H. Wise, 13th Hussars), b m, a; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (138). 

MATCHBOX (Capt. Renton), ch m, 7 ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 
1894 (172). 

MAY BLOSSOM (Mr. P. Hambro, 15th Hussars), ch m; MiHtary 
Tournament, Dublin, 1895 (63). 

MAYFLY (Capt. B. Johnson, Scots Greys), br m, 7 ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (141). 

MICKEY (Capt. E. W. Pedder), dun g, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1892-96 (132). 

MICKEY FREE (Capt. T. G. Collins, 17th Lancers), b h, a; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (56). 

MIDGET (i2th Lancers Polo Club), b m, a; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1891-95 (213). 

MIDNIGHT (Capt. Sydney Mills, Rifle Brigade),br m ; Open Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1894-95-96 (176). 

MISS BUSYBODY (Mr. Gerald W. Hobson), ch m, a; Novices' 
Cap, Ranelagh, 1896 (59). 

MISS EDGE (Sir H. F. de Trafford), b m, a; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 (117). 

MISS McKEEVER (Capt. Dalgety), b m, 8 ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1895 (242). 

MOLLY (Mr. W. Burdon), bl m, 7 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (230). 

MOLOCK (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), blk g ; Open Tour- 
nament, Ranelagh, 1896 (27). 

MONK (Mr. E. B Sheppard), blk g, a; Open Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 
(160). 

MONTE CHRISTO (Mons. E. de Escandon), b g, a; Paris, 1896 
(300J. 

MOONSHINE (Mr. Conolly), gr h, 6 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (239). 

MORLEY (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), blk m, 8 ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1894 (265). 

MOROCCO BOUND (Mr. L C. D. Jenner), b h, a ; Novices' Cup, 
Ranelagh, 1896 (37). 

MOSS MARY (Mr. P. Hambro, 15th Hussars), ch m ; Military 
Tournament, Dublin, 1895 (^4)- 

MUSTAPHA (Mr. J. D. Watson), ch g, 7; Novices' Cup, 1896 
(312). 

MYALL (Hon. Dudley Marjoribanks), br g, a ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh (251). 

MYSTERY (Mr. L. S. Cobham), br m, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896(1). 



POLO PONIES. 389 

NAUGHTY (Hon. Dudley Marjoribanks), b m, a ; Novices' Cup, 

Ranelagh (252). 

NELLIE (Mons. E. de Escandon), b m, a; Paris 1896 (299). 

NELLIE (Mr. John Watson), ch m, 6 ; Ranelagh (204). 

NELLIE (Earl of Shrewsbury), b m, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 
1895(180). 

NIGHT (Mr. Donaldson Hudson), b m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1894-95 (228). 

NIGGER (Mr. W. D. Watson), blk g, a ; Subalterns' Tournament, 
Ranelagh (119). 

NIMBLE (Mr. C. A. D'Estrange), gr m, a; Irish C.P.U. Cup, 
1894-95-96 (320). 

NIMBLE (Major W. H. Walker), b m, a ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (105)- 

NINEPINS (Mr. H. Montgomery), dun m, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hmlingham, 1896 (135). 

NUTMEG (Mr. L. C. Brunton), b g, a; Novices' Cup, 1896 (356). 

OCHRE (Mons. E. de Escandon), b g, a ; Paris, 1896 (298). 

OONAH (Ml. F. Freake) ch m, 6; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (360). 

ORPHAN, THE (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), b g, a ; Open Cup, Rane- 
lagh, 1896 (282). 

ORPHAN MAID (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), br m, a; Irish C.P.U. Cup, 

1894-95-96(315). 

OTTER (Mr. A. S. Dyas), b h, 5 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896(146). 

PADDY (Mons. R Raoul Duval), blk h, a; Paris, 1896 (308). 

PARSON (Mr. E. B. Sheppard), br g, a ; Open Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (159). 

PASHA (Capt. Lord W. Bentinck, loth Hussars), bg ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham 1896 (82). 

PAUL (Capt. Eley), gr g, a ; Paris Tournament, 1894 (206). 

PENNY-A-SHOT (Mr. J. Belleville), b m, a ; Novices' Cup (381). 

PEPPER (Mr. D. Jay), gr m; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 (96). 

PERIWINKLE (Mr. D. Jay), b m ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 

(94). 

PETER (Mr. L. S. Cobham), ch h, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 

1894 (2). 

PETER (Capt. Vaughan Lee), bl g, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (184)- 



390 APPENDIX. 

PETER'S WIFE (Mr. A. Suart), drk ch m, a; Novices' Cup, (274). 

PHARAOH (Mr. F. Menzies), b h, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (355). 

PIGGY (Mr. J. F. Church, 13th Hussars), b g, a; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (144). 

PIPER (Sir H. F. de Trafford), ch g, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 
1896 (118). 

PIQUET (Capt. The Earl of Longford, 2nd Life Guards), b m ; 
Novices' Cup, Ranelagh,i896 (73). 

PLUS (Mr. G. A. Miller), b g, 6 ; Novices' Tournament, Ranelagh, 

1895 (ISO- 
PRETTY GIRL (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), b m, 6 ; County Cup, 

Hurlingham (262), 

PRIDE, THE (Capt. Collins), br g, 6 ; Subalterns' Tournament, 

Ranelagh, 1896 (198). 

PRINCE (Mr. J. Belleville), ch g, a; Novices' Cup (37c). 

PRINCESS (Mr. E. B. Sheppard), b m, a; Open Cup, Ranelagh, 

1896 (161). 

PROFESSOR (Mr. W. Flarrild), b g, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 

1893 (233)- 
PSYCHE (Mr. A. Suart), br m, 7 ; Novices' Cup (273). 



QUEEN OF THE MAY (Mr. Tresham Gilbey), b m ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (61). 

RAKE, THE (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b h, a ; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1893-94 (166). 

RASPBERRY (Lord Southampton), ro m, a ; Open Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (129). 

RASCAL (Capt. Garden), br g, a; Open Tournament, Dublin, 1893 

(57)- 

RAZZLE (Mr. Gerald W. Hobson), gr g, a ; Novices' Cup, Rane- 
lagh, 1896 (60). 

RECOVERY (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), br g ; Open Tourna- 
ment, Ranelagh, (28). 

RED KING (Capt. Hon. E. Baring, loth Hussars), ch h; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (90) 

REDOUTE (Mons. L. de Errazu), ch m, a ; Paris, 1896 (302). 

RED TICKET (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), b g, a; Irish C.P.U. Cup, 
1894-95-96 (314). 

REGINA (Capt. the Earl of Longford, 2nd Life Guards), br m ; 
Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 (72). 

REGULATION (Mons. L. de Errazu), b h, a; Paris, 1896 (301). 



POLO PONIES. 391 

REGULUS (Mr. W. Burdon), b g, 7 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (229). 

ROSE BUD (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), b m, a; Irish C.P.U. Cup, 1894- 
95-96 (317). 

ROYAL (Mr. W. A. Tilney, 17th Lancers), b h, a; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham,i896 (19). 

RUBY (Mr. H. Spender Clay), ch m, a ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 
1895 (134)- 

RUGBY (Sir H. F. de Trafford), ch g, a ; County Cup, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (115). 

RYE (Mr. F. Wormald), ch m, 8 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1895 (216). 



SAB IN (Capt. E. Green), blk m, 8 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1894(192). 

SAILOR (Mr. G. H. Hardy), br g, a; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 1896 
(169). 

SALYCO (Major Butler), gr g, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (148). 

SANFOIN (Mr. Niel Haig, Inniskilling Dragoons), b g, a ; Open 
Cup, Hurlingham (40). 

SATANITA (Mons. M. Raoul Duval), gr m, a; Paris, 1896 (294). 

SAUCY MARY (Mr. Neil Haig, Inniskilling Dragoons), blk m, a, 
Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (44). 

SCOTS GREYS (Mr Niel Haig, Inniskilling Dragoons), wh g, a ; 
Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham (39). 

SEAFIELD (Mons. de Errazu), ch m, 8; Paris, 1896 (288). 

SEAGULL (Capt. Lord W. Bentinck, loth Hussars), gr g ; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (81). 

SEAGULL (Mr. F. H. Wise, 13th Hussars), gr g, a; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (140). 

SEMINADA (Mons. L de Errazu), br m, a; Paris, 1896 (303). 

SERF BEAUTY (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b m, 5 ; Open Cup, Rane- 

lagh, 1896 (14). 
SHABA (Mr, C. Adamthwaite), gr g, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 

(344)- 
SHADAZA (Mr. T. Greenway), gr h; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 

1896 (lOl). 

SHADOW (The Marques de Villavieja), blk m, a ; Paris, 1896 
(290). 

SHORT TAIL (Capt. Loder), b m, a; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1895 (225). 

SILENCE (Mr. M. Ephrusi), b m, a; Paris, 1896 (291). 



392 APPENDIX. 

SILURIAN GREY (Mr. R. Hudson), brm, a; Open Tournament, 
Ireland (130). 

SILVERTAIL (Mr. Niel Haig, Inniskilling Dragoons), dun g, 5 ; 
Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (42). 

SINKAT (Mr. F. Mussenden), gr g, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (195). 

SIR PERTAB (Mr. G F. Buchan), br h, a ; Inter-Regimental 

Tournament, 1894-96 (350). 

SISTER SUE (Mr. E. Holland), b m, a; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham (257). 

SISTER SUE (Mr. C. S. Schreiber), ch m, a ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (12). 

SKIPPING JENNY (Sir E. Stracey), br m, 8; Novices' Cup, 
Ranelagh (188). 

SKITTLES (Mr. G. F. Buchan), rn g, a ; Subalterns' Tournament, 
1896 (347). 

SKITTLES (Capt. D. Daly), b m, a ; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 

1894-95 (331)- 
SLY FOX (Mr. J. Belleville), b g, a ; Novices' Cup (380). 

SNAP SHOT (Mr. M. Ephrusi), b g, a ; Paris, 1896 (293). 

SNOWBALL (Mr. P. E. Bucknell), gr g, 7 ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh 
(340). 

SNOWBALL (Major E. B. Herbert, 17th Lancers , gr h, a; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (21). 

SOLOMON (Mr. F. Menzies), b g, a ; Novices' Cup, 1896 (353). 

SORCERESS (Mr. J. Hargreaves), b m, a; Champion Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (17). 

SPEED OF THOUGHT (Capt. Yardley), gr ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (231). 

SPIDER (Major C. Peters), br m. a; Open Cup, Hurlingham, 1896 

(279)- 

SPINSTER (Capt. H. Farrar), b m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (219). 

SPINSTER (Earl of Harrington), br m, a ; International Tourna- 
ment, Paris, 1895 (374). 

SPRINGHILL (Mr. J. Hargreaves), br g, a; Champion Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (16). 

STAR (Mr. J. G. Fort), b h, a ; Novices' Tournament, Ranelagh, 
1895(154)- 

STAR OF INDIA (Major Duff), b h, 9 ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1895 (250)- 

STARLIGHT (The Marques de Villavieja), blk m, a ; Paris, 
1896 (296). 



POLO PONIES. 393 

SUCCESS (The Marques de Villavieja), blk g, a ; Champion Cup, 
Hudingham, 1896 (289). 

SULTAN (T2th Lancers Polo Club), gr g, a; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurhngham, 1891-95 (215). 

SUNLIGHT (Sir P. Nickalls), ch m, a ; Champion Cup, Hurling- 

ham, 1895 (335)- 
SUNRAY (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), chh, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 

(343)- 

SURPRISE (Mr. E. Rose), b m. a; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (246). 

SUSAN (Capt. Dundas), br m, a; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896 (222). 

SUSIE (Capt. E. W. Pedder), b m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1891-96 (131). 

SWALLOW (Mr. J. Hetherington), br m ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (100). 

SYLVIA (Capt. Hon. E. Baring, loth Hussars), br m ; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (91). 



TAMARA (Capt. Dalgety), br m, 6 ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
(244). 

TARGET (Earl of Shrewsbury), b m, a ; County Cup, Hurlingham, 

1895 (178). 
TEMPEST (Mr. F. A. Belleville), chg, a ; (256). 

TESS (Mr. C. S. Schreiber), b m, a; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896(13). 

THRIFT (Mr. Niel Haig, Inniskilling Dragoons), b m, 6 ; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (43). 

TIT-BITS (Mr. D. Jay), ch m; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 
(95)- 

TOFFY (Mr. P. Sechiari), b m ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 1896 
(97). 

TOM-TIT (Capt. C. A. S. Warner, 17th Lancers), ch g, a; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (54). 

TOMMY (Mr. J. B. Aldridge, R.H.A.), gr g, 6 ; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (142). 

TORNADO, late Fortham (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), br g ; 
Open Tournament, Ranelagh, 1896 (25). 

TOSS UP (Capt. H. Ferrar), ch g, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurling- 
ham, 1896 (218). 

TRAPPIST (Baron Lejeune), gr h, a ; International Tournament, 
Paris, 1896 (364). 



394 APPENDIX. 

UMPIRE (Mr. Niel Haig, Inniskilling Dragoons), ch h, a ; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (41). 



VALENTINE (Capt. Jeffcock), b g ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1896(78). 

VANITY (Mr. E. Rose), b m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 

1896(248). O J b J 

VARMINT (Mr. W. J. H. Jones), br m. 6 ; Novices' and Open 
Cups, Ranelagh, 1896 (50). 

VENDETTA (Mr. J. C. Harrison, Scots Greys), br m, a; Inter- 
Regimental, Hurlingham, 1895-96 (156). 

VENUS (Capt. Paynter), br m, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 
1893 (236). 

VIC (Mr. F. H. Wise, 13th Hussars), b m, a : Inter-Regimental, 

Hurlingham, 1896(139). 

VICTOR (Mr. L. C. D. Jenner), gr h, a ; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (38). / b , . F. b > 

VORO (Capt. Gordon Mackenzie), ch g, a; Inter-Regimental, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (4). 



WARDIE (Mr. W. S. Buckmaster), br g, a ; Champion Cup, 
Hurlingham, 1896 (122). 

WATCH SPRING (Mr. H. C. Eraser, ist Life Guards), b m, a; 
Subalterns' Tournament, Ranelagh, 1896 (162). 

WATER LILY (Mr. A. Suart), br m, a : Inter-Regimental, 

Hurlingham, (275). 

WHIMS (Mr. D. A. Teaast), ch g ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 

1894-95 (70). 

WHITEFOOT (Mr. A. Jones), b g, a; Novices' Cup, Ranelagh, 
1896 (128). 

WHITE ROSE (Mr. R. Court), w h, a; County Cup, Hurlingham 
1895 (199). 

WHITEWINGS (Mr. G. Heseltine), b m. a ; County Cup, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 (163). 

WILD DUCK (Mr. A. Joyce), b m, 7 ; Irish County Cup, 1895 

WITCH, THE (Capt. D. Daly), b m, a; All Ireland Cup, 1895 
(333)- 



YANKEE (Lord William Bentinck), b g, a ; Open Tournament, 
Ranelagh (32). 

YELLOWHAMMER (Mr. J. F. Church, 13th Hussars), dun m, a; 
Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 1896 (145). 



POLO PONIES. 395 

YELLOWHAMMER (Mr. John Watson), dun g. 6; Ranelagh 

(203). 

YELLOWMAN (Mr. E. Rose), dun g, a ; Inter- Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1896 (247). 

YELLOWSTONE (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), ch g, a; Open Cup, 
Ranelagh, 1896 (281). 

ZAZEL (Capt. Hon. E. Baring, loth Hussars), br m; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (92). 

ZINGIT (Major E. B. Herbert, 17th Lancers), br m, a; Inter-Regi- 
mental, Hurlingham, 1896 (22). 



UNNAMED PONIES. 

Mr. A. Joyce, br m : I.C. Cup (310). 

Capt. N. T. Nickalls, 17th Lancers, b h, a ; Inter-Regimental, Hurl- 
ingham, 1893-96, Paris, 1896(33). 

Mr. W. A. Tilney, 1 7th Lancers ; Inter-Regimental, Hurlingham, 

1896 (68). 



397 



POLO PONIES MEASURED & REGISTERED AT 
HURLINGHAM, 1897. 



A (Mr. C. S. Schreiber), br g ; star, snip, near fore and both hind 
fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter (239). 

ABDOOL (Capt. Whida), ch h; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
white off hind leg, near hind fetlock and near fore pastern, girth marks 
(303)- 

ACCIDENT (Lord Harrington), b g ; white star, white strip on 
nose, white near hind pastern (92). 

AEROLITE (Mr. Miller), br m ; star, two white hind heels, saddle 
marks, tan muzzle (34). 

AGAY (Mr. Ashmore), ch m ; star, scar outside off hock (644). 

AIBLENS (Capt. F. H. Milsom), b m ; star on forehead, small snip 
on nose, saddle marks (26). 

ALI HASSAN (Mr. W. D. P. Watson), b h ; star, very narrow 
blaze, near fore and both hind fetlocks white (238). 

AMBASSADRESS (Lord Harrington), br m ; white star, white hips, 
saddle marks (90). 

AMELIA (Sir H. Rawlinson), b m ; black points, saddle marks, 
small white spot near fore shin and near hind shin (446). 

AMERICA (Mr. Neil W. Haig), blk g ; scar near hind quarter, 
brand off hind quarter (337). 

AMY (Mr. F. J. Siltzer), b m ; white hairs tail and mane, near fore 
and near hind pastern white, star and snip (71). 

ANTELOPE II. (Major Robertson Aikman), gr m ; narrow blaze, 
snip, brown patch on face, white off hind fetlock, white mark front off 
hind shin and both fore shins (318). 

ANTIC (Lord Harrington), br m ; white star, saddle marks, white 
spot outside off fore arm (91). 

ARAB CHIEF (Capt. Dundas), b h; four white legs, white marks 
above near hock, small star, snip, saddle marks (125). 

ARAB, THE (Mr. R. F. Glynn), br h ; small star, white off hind 
fetlock, scar inside both hind legs (454). 



398 APPENDIX. 

ARABELLA (Marquis of Waterford), ch m ; white near hind leg 
and ofif foot, star, blaze, snip, girth marks (291). 

ARGENTINA (Mr. F. Pilkington), br g ; small snip, white off hind 
coronet, grey near hind leg, brand near bind quarter (403). 

ARTFUL (Lord Kensington), br m ; white spot on off ribs (156). 

AZUL (Mr. Talbot Rice), gr g ; small snip on nose, both ears 
nicked (51). 

B (Mr C. S. Schreiber), ch g ; star, blaze, grey hairs in flank and 
over back (240). 

BABY (Capt. J. F. Dalgety), br m ; star, white near hind fetlock, 
white near fore heel (134). 

BABY (Mr. H. J. Smith), b m, 4 ; star, saddle marks, white off hind 
pastern, white mark off side off leg ; this year (469). 

BANG (Lord Harrington), b m, 4 ; large star, narrow blaze, snip, 
lower lip white, saddle marks ; for the season (275). 

BANJO (Mr. W. B, Longsdon), ch g, large snip, white off fore pas- 
tern, and white near hind leg (504). 

Bx\NSHEE (Mr. W. Buckmaster), ch m ; small white star, little 
white off hind coronet, (76). 

BANSHEE (Mr. G. A. Lockett), gr m ; dappled, small white circle 
vmder girth near side ; two small scars inside both fore legs (82). 

BARB, THE (Capt. R. A. Christie), ch h (441). 

BARBARA (Mr. C. Wheeler), blk br m ; slit off ear, white spots on 
chest and off side of neck (216). 

BARON (Major Peters), not passed (352). 

BARONESS (Mr. J. M. Walker), br m ; black points, white mark 
back and front of near fore leg (411). 

BiVRTER (Mr. F. Hargreave), br m ; small star, white spot off hind 
heel, saddle marks (33). 

BAY LEAF (Capt. F. Herbert), b m ; near hind stocking white, 
very narrow blaze, small snip, white patch under lip (130). 

BAY QUEEN (Capt. J. F. Dalgery), b m ; black points, scars on 
shoulders (133). 

B. B. (Mr. Stuart Duckett), blk m ; star, very narrow blaze white 
ticks, girth marks (545). 

BEAUTY (Mr. Jameson), b m, 4 ; star, blaze, snip, white inside near 
fore pastern (590). 

BECKETT (Capt. B. Johnson), b g ; white star, black points (209). 

BECKY SHx\RP (Mr. R. Hudson), br m ; star, blaze, snip, black 
points, girth marks, white patch near side ribs (580). 

BELINDA (Air. E. A. Herbert), b m, 4 ; star, faint snip, white 
hind fetlocks, star both sides of back (336). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 399 

BELL (Capt. R. A. Christie), b m ; existing pony (440). 

BELLE (Mr. E. A. R. Shearman), b m ; star, white near hind fet- 
lock, scar oft" hind fetlock (466). 

BELLINDA (Mr. F. Wormald), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, little white 
lower lip, white hind leg (362). 

BEN BOLT (Mr. J. D. Gouldsmith), ch m ; white near fore leg, 
star, blaze, snip (359). 

BENITO (Mr. C. Wheeler), br g ; white off hind fetlock, few white 
hairs oft" side neck (217). 

BERKSHIRE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), br m ; star, white hind heels, 
white mark near side neck (150). 

BIDDY (Mr. Burgess), b br m ; black points, small scar off side 
wither, saddle marks, white hairs in tail (191). 

BIDDY FLANAGAN (Major Rimington), b m ; star, white spot 
near side ribs, girth marks (604). 

BILLY (Lord Crichton), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, brand on near 
shoulder, scar on nose, white near pastern (290). 

BILLY (14th Hussars), b g ; star, white near hind pastern (628). 

BIMETALLIST (Mr. G. Heseltine), gr m ; white spot both sides 
neck (161). 

BIRD OF PARADISE (Mr. C. M. Grenfell), br m ; star, snip, 
black points, small saddle marks ; not passed (499). 

BIRD, THE (Mr. Neil Haig), b m ; black points, very faint star and 
snip, branded near fore and near hind quarters (339). 

BIRTHDAY (Mr. Freake), chm; white off hind pastern, white star, 
white snip centre of nose (45). 

BISCUIT (Mr. J. Scott-Robson), rn g; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
legs, and off" fore leg and near fore fetlock, brand near hind quarter (424). 

BISCUIT (Mr. P. J. Bailey), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip and hind legs and oft" fore coronet, white spots over body (472). 

BISMARCK (Mr. J. Scott-Robson), b g ; white legs, star, blaze, 
snip, white lower lip, white spots on hind quarters, brand near shoulder ; 
not passed (423). 

BLACK BASS (Capt. Bidgood), blk g, 4 ; white off hind coronet, 
small saddle mark off side ; this season only (507). 

BLACK PEARL (Hon. A. Hamilton Russell), blk m ; large star, 
small snip, white spot near fore fetlock, white off" hind coronet (453). 

BLACK PEARL (Capt. Renton), blk m ; faint star, white off hind 
fetlock, white spots over body,brand off hind quarter and oft' side of neck 
(483)- 

BLACK SKIN (Mr. J. H. Locke), br m ; faint star, snip, white hind 
legs, off fore fetlock, and near fore coronet (566). 

BLAZE (Mr. F. J. Siltzer), ch h; star, narrow blaze, snip, white 
near hind stocking, saddle marks (70). 



400 APPENDIX. 

BLAZER (Mr. S. M. Dennis), b g ; small star, white near hind fet- 
lock, large scar near hind quarter (393). 

BLAZER (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), b g ; black points, white ticks 

(674). 
BLEEDAH (Mr. J. W. Archdale), br g; white near hind pastern, 

white mark back of both fore legs (543). 

BLUE JAY (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), gr g; brand W near hind quar- 
ter, scars near shoulder (118). 

BLUE PETER (Sir P. Nickalls), gr h ; white snip, short tail, scar 
on withers, white hind legs (141). 

BLUE SLEEVE (Sir P. Nickalls), gr m ; snip, white lower lip, 
white hind fetlocks, white spots on hocks (143). 

BLUE STAR (Sir P. Nickalls), b m ; star, scar on off hind fetlock 
(142). 

BOADICEA (Capt. Schofield), b m ; white off fore and near hind 
pasterns, star, narrow blaze, snip (233). 

BOBBY (Mr. J. M. Walker), b h; white near fore leg and both off 
fetlocks, white mark front hind shins, scar off hind quarter and near 
shoulder (412). 

BOOMERANG (Mr. Aubrey Price), b m ; small snip, black points, 
white mark on off ribs (489). 

BORAS (Mr. G. K. Ansell), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white near hind 
leg and near fore fetlock, and above near hock (341). 

BOULAK (Mr. G. H. Pilkington),b g; star, blaze, snip, black points, 
white marks on neck and near shoulder (387). 

BRANDY BALL (Mr. G. A. Miller), blk g ; star, white off fore fet- 
lock, brand on off hind quarter (152). 

BRAVE (Mr. J. M. Walker), br g ; ticked with white, star, white 
near fore pastern and off hind fetlock (410). 

BRIDE (Mr. Rourke), gr m ; small scars on forehead, scar off knee 

(549)- 
BRIDEGROOM (Mr. Grogan), gr g; star, narrow blaze, white near 

hind pastern ; this season (532). 

BRIDESMAID (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), gr m ; snip, and white mark 

off side neck (675). 

BRIDGET (Mr. F. C. Pilkington), gr m ; little white both hind heels 

(127). 

BRISTON (Mr. Peel), br g ; white spots all over body, brand mark 
off hind quarter, little white near hind coronet (201). 

BROAD ARROW (Mr. Neil W. Haig), b m ; star, white near hind 
pastern, collar marks (338). 

BROOMSTICK (Earl of Harrington), b m ; large star, narrow blaze, 
snip, scar near side face, black points (276). 

BROWNIE (Mr. W. H. Lambton), br m; black points, very small 

star, fired fore egs (225). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 401 

BROWN STOUT (Mr. D. Rawson), b or br g; narrow blaze, white 
near hind and off fore pasterns and off hind fetlock, white mark top off 
shoulder (539). 

BRUNETTE (Capt. Minchin), br m; small star, white on upper 
lip, scar near side of neck, girth mark off side, saddle marks (175). 

BRUNETTE (Mr. A. M. Knowles), br m ; large star, blaze, small 
snip, black points (214). 

BUMPTIOUS (Mr. J. Belleville), b m; white off hind fetlock, star, 
scar on withers (140). 

BUSTLE (Mr. G. H. Pilkington), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white 
marks near shoulder and front of near hind shin (386). 

BUTTONS (Capt. E. W. Clowes), br g ; both hind pasterns white, 
brand near side shoulder (113), 



Cy^SAR (Mr. E. D. Miller), dk br g; star, blaze, snip, white on 
lower lip, four white legs, brand mark near hind quarter (212). 

CAIRO (Mr. Harrison), gr g; double scar inside arm and thigh 

(244). 

CAP (Mr. Mackey), ch g ; star, snip, blaze, brand C.A.P. on near 
quarter, saddle mark ; American (42). 

CARLOW (Mr. Chinnery), b m ; black points, white marks above 
off hock (482), 

CARLOW (Mr. Church), ch g; star, white near fore pastern and off 
hind fetlock (602). 

CARME (Capt. Hon. E. Pakenham), b h; star, blaze, snip, brand 
near hind quarter, white hind fetlocks (571). 

CARTE DE VISITE (Mr. J. E. Bailie), b m; star, narrow blaze, 
snip, white near hind pastern ; passed for year only (253). 

CASHBOX (Mr. H. C. Higgins), ch g ; star, white mark front of 
near hind fetlock (332). 

CATERINA (Major Rimington), br m, 4; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and off hind leg, scars both shoulders (613). 

CATHERINE WHEEL (Mr. W. Buckmaster), ch m , white near 
hind fetlock and coronet, star, white patch off flank {77). 

CAT, THE (Mr. D. H. Gibb), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
legs, collar marks (344). 

CATTLE QUEEN (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b m ; branded 530, 
near hind quarter, two white hind stockings, large blaze (99). 

CAVERSHAM (Mr. J. Belleville), b g ; blaze and snip, white hind 
fetlock, white near fore coronet (263). 

CHARMER (Mr. A. S. Maude), b m ; white near hind fetlock 
(616). 

CHIP (Mr. J. L. Read), br m ; star, black points, scar on both 
knees (462). 

26 



402 APPENDIX. 

CHLOE (Mr. F. J. Siltzer), b m ; small star, black points, collar 
mark near shoulder, line down spine (245). 

CLEHONGA (Mr. P. W. Game), ch g, 4; star; not passed (653). 

CLOWN (Earl of Airlie), br g; tan muzzle, black points, few white 
hairs near side of face (307). 

COCKLE (Mr. J. Duckett), b g; star, white near fore and both hind 
fetlocks (544). 

COLLEEN (Major Manifold), gr m ; scars off side ribs and brisket 
(190). 

COMBAT (Mr. F. Balfour), br g; brand near hind quarter, fore and 
near hind fetlocks white, faint star, saddle mark ; Argentine (9). 

CONCEIT (Mr. W. J. Drage), ch m; white off hind leg and near 
hind pastern, star, blaze, snip (663). 

CONCHA (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), gr g; branded W, near hind 
quarter, white blaze, snip and lower lip, two large scars on chest (97). 

CONFESSION (Mr. H. Savile), b g; small star, white marks on 
fore shins (147). 

COQUET (Mr. R. St. G. Robinson), gr m ; star, white mark front 
off hock, white spot front chest (509). 

CORONER (Mr. J. C. Harrison), gr g; brand on both withers 
white marks on knees, girth marks (104). 

CORRALES (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), blk g; near fore and near hind 
pasterns white, brand near hind quarter, saddle marks (59). 

COSSACK (14th Hussars' Club), gr g; white marks front of fore 
shins (624). 

COTTON TAIL (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b g; brand J.T. near hind 
quarter, white hind stockings, white hair on flank, star, snip, saddle 
mark (102). 

COUNTY FASHION (Mr. W.Walton), b m; white near hind 
coronet, scar near side ribs, scar off side neck (439). 

CREAM CHEESE (Capt. Dundas), dun g ; blaze, snip, white leg, 
branded W near hind quarter, white hind stockings and fore fetlocks ; 
Argentine (88). 

CREME DE LA CREME (Mr. C. F. Dixon-Johnson), cr m, 4; 
star, blaze, snip, white mane and tail, white near fore and both hind legs, 
and off hind fetlock white, for season (322). 

CREOLE (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b m; white mark nearhip, star, 
branded three lines and 536 on off hind quarter. 

CRUSADER (Mr. H. Wilson), br g; very small star, white marks 
both hind shins, little white near hind heel (267). 

CUDDINGTON (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch m; white fore fetlocks, 
white near hind leg, blaze, snip (149). 

CURATE, THE (Mr. F. A. B. Fryer), ch g; star, blaze, snip, small 
white spot near hind quarter (326). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 403 

DADDY (Mr. R. J. Cunningham), b g; small star, scar off hind 
quarter, saddle marks ; not passed (398). 

DAINTY (Capt, Whitla), b m ; star, blaze, white near hind fetlock, 
little white off hind shin (304). 

DAISY (Mr. Talbot Rice), b m ; blaze, white off hind legs, saddle 
marks (21). 

Dx^ISY (Comte de Madre), bm; star, scar near hind quarter, saddle 
marks (122). 

DAISY (Mr. H. P. Dangan), ch m ; star, snip, off hind leg white 

and inside near hind coronet, black patch near hip (600). 

DAISY (Mr. Lloyd), b m ; white spot near shoulder, black points 
(601). 

DAME MARJORIE (Mr. J. L. Hunter), br m; star, white near 
fore and near hind fetlocks (349). 

DANDELION (Mr. McCreery), ch g, 4 ; little white upper lip, 
white near hind pastern ; passed for season (232). 

DxA-NDELION (Major Alexander), blk g; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
white hind fetlocks, grey off fore pastern, white ticks all over (534). 

DANDY (Comte de Madre), gr h; fiea-bitten on face, white near fore 
fetlocks, docked rat tail, off ear snipped (16). 

DANDY (Mr. R. C. Barton), b g; black points, scar back of off 
hind and near fore legs (554). 

DANIEL (Mr. G. H. Pilkingtcn), br g; star, white hind legs (385). 

DAPHNE (Mr. E. B. Sheppard), b m ; white hairs, black points, 
saddle marks off side (85). 

DAPHNE (Mr. J. M. Walker), b m ; star, black points (415). 

DARLINGTON (Mr. E. Makins), b br g; black points, white mark 
on off fore leg (427). 

DARLY (Mr. Flanagan), b m ; star, white mark front of hind shin 
and back of both fore legs (609). 

DEAREST (Capt. Whida), ch m ; black spot front of near thigh 

(305)- . 
DELIA (Mr. A. E. Batchelor), b m ; black points (270), 

DEVONSHIRE LAD (Mr. W. R. Bindloss), chg; star, blaze, snip, 
white near hind leg and off hind pastern, scars on both sides of neck 
(300). 

DEWDROP (Mr. J. G. Fort), blk g ; faint star, white spot front off 
hind shin and both fore legs (484). 

DIAMOND (Mr. W. Buckmaster), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip, brand near shoulder (418). 

DIAMOND (Capt. Bruce), blk m ; star, black points, saddle marks 
(357). 

DICK (Mr. J. Livingstone), b g, 4 ; star, very narrow blaze, white 
near hind pastern and off hind fetlock ; this season only (557). 

26* 



404 APPENDIX. 

DICK (Mr. H. C. T. Rice), br g ; small scar off hind quarter, scar 

on both knees (667). 
DISPUTE (Mr. F. J. Siltzer), rn m ; black points, two hind pasterns 

white, star, saddle marks (69). 

DOCTOR, THE (Mr. J. C. Harrison), gr g ; brand both withers, 
white marks both knees, girth marks (104). 

Dr. JIM (14th Hussars), ch h ; star, narrow blaze, snip, white marks 
above near knee and hock, white mark hind fetlock (620). 

DODO (Mr. S. Savile), b m ; black points, few white hairs on 
forehead, saddle marks (31). 

DOE (Mr. C. Wilson), wh g ; spotted pink muzzle, small snip, 
blemish above knee (225). 

DOE, THE (Mr. J. Watson), b m ; few white hairs on forehead, 
black points, scar back of near hind leg, over-reach scar both fore 
coronets, black mark down back (236). 

DOLLY (Lord R. Manners), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white off fore 
fetlock, white marks on withers (470). 

DOMINO (Mr. F. Balfour), dun g ; four white legs, white face, 
brand near hind quarter ; Argentine (7). 

DON PEDRO (Mr. W. Buckmaster), b g ; black points, saddle 
marks, girth marks both sides (79). 

DOT (Mr. Ross), b m ; black points, small scar front of chest 

(546). 
DRISSE (Mr. R. P. O'Reilly), b m ; black points, small star, white 

marks off flank (558). 

DROMORE (Mr. Hale), b g ; star, scars on near shoulder, saddle 
marks ; over height (184). 

DRUG (Mr. Spender Clay), b g ; off hind fetlock white, a little 
white near hind coronet, star, narrow blaze, snip, saddle mark (47). 

DUCHESS (Lord Kensington), b m ; star, narrow blaze near fore 
and both hind fetlocks white (157). 

DUCHESS (Dr. Colgan), b m; very small star, white off hind 
fetlock, white mark top of hind quarter (530). 

DUCHESS OF STRATHBLANE (Mr. R. Hudson), ch m; star, 
very narrow blaze, snip, white hind legs (579)- 

DUN, THE (Mr. Aubrey Price), dun m ; star, black points, collar 
marks (487). 

DUNMORE (Capt. Pedder), gr g ; white spots face and lips, white 
off hind coronet and heel (353). 



EASTERN ART (14th Hussars), bg ; long star, narrow blaze, large 
snip, white near fore fetlock and near hind coronet and off hind leg 
(635). 

ECSTASY (Mr. J. W. Murray), dk br g; small star, light brown 
patch on near hip, black points, collar mark near side (562). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 405 

EDINBURGH (Major Rimington), b m ; star, white near hind 
pastern, white ticks, scars both shoulders (612). 

EDWARD (Mr. Hale), b g ; large star, white hind fetlocks, saddle 
marks (183). 

ELIZA (Mr. Ashmore), br m ; long narrow star, scar outside near 
fore leg, white near fore and off hind coronets, white mark front off hind 
shin ; not passed (651). 

EMMA (Capt. Green), b m, 4 ; small star, scar down back tendon 
off fore leg, black points (381). 

EMMELINE (Capt. Wilson), ch m ; scar, white near hind fetlock 
and off hind leg (246). 

ENNISCORTHY (Mr. J. Clerk), dk br m ; few white hairs outside 
near hind coronet, small star (66). 

ERIS (Mr. C. M. Grenfell), b m, 4 ; star, black points ; this year 

(501). 

ESPERANZA (Mr. R. McCreery), ch m ; star, spots of white all 
over near side, brand mark off shoulder and off hind quarter (231 ). 

EXCHANGE (Mr. F. Hargreave), br m ; star, saddle marks, collar 

marks (32). 

EYELASH (14th Hussars Club), b g; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip and legs, brand near hind quarter (623). 



FAIR MAID (Mr. S. L. Barry), b m ; star, very narrow blaze, white 
off hind fetlock (449). 

FALLUCA (Col. Green-Thompson), b m, 4 ; small star and snip, 
white near hind fetlock ; passed for season only (319). 

FASHION (Mr. G. A. Miller), b m ; star, white near hind fetlock 
and off hind heel (153). 

FASHION (Col. Green-Thompson), dun m ; black points, mane 
and tail (317). 

FAUGH A BALLAGH (Capt J. Hanwell), b g; white near hind 

leg and off hind fetlock (242). 

FAWN, THE (Earl of Huntingdon), ch m ; star, white patch top of 
off shoulder, scar on near knee (597). 

FETTLE (Mr. Lloyd), b m ; star, black strip do\vn hind quarter 
(595)- 

FL\SCO (Mr. T. Conolly), b m ; black points, white spot on near 
side under saddle, few white hairs front of brisket (109). 

FIDGET (Mr. Soper Whitburn), b m ; black points, girth marks, 
black stripe down back, white marks below both hocks (379). 

FIDGET (Mr. Gibbs), br m ; scar front of face and off knee, black 
points (646). 

FITZ (Major Fenwick), ch g ; star, snip, white off hind coronet 
(283). 



4o6 APPENDIX. 

FIZZER II. (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white fore 
fetlocks and off hind pastern (673). 

FLASH (Messrs. de Escandon), b m ; black points, white mark off 
hind shin and inside off fore leg (494). 

FLASHLIGHT (Lord Kensington), br g ; brand near hind quarter, 
white off fore heel (158). 

FLEA, THE (Mr. Grogan), gr m ; flea-bitten, large scar near side of 

back (535j. 

FLIRT (Mr. Fairfax Lucy), br m ; few white hairs, white near hind 

heel (261). 

FLITTER (Air. x\dams), b m; white hind coronets (642). 

FLORIO (Mr. Bailley), b m; faint star, black points, scar off side 
ribs (588). 

FLUTE (Mr. E. C. Holland), gr m ; black marks on forehead, 

white spot on lower lip, white fetlocks (325). 

FLUTTER (Mr. Miller), br m ; tan muzzle, small white mark out- 
side and above near hock, scar off side quarter (40). 

FLYAWAY (Capt. W. H. Persse), ch h ; star, white near hind 
coronet and off hind pastern (313). 

FLYER (Mr. J. B. Drage), blk br m ; star (658). 

FOOLISH GIRL (Mr. P. O'Reilly), br m; star white hind fetlocks 

(567). 

FORMINA (Mr. Hargreaves), b m ; few white hairs under saddle 
both sides, small scar near ear (44). 

FRANK BROWN (Mr. F. J. Balfour), skewbald g; star, narrow 
blaze, snip, white under lip, four white legs, white hairs in tail (168). 

FREDDY (Mr. Gouldsmith), b g ; star, narrow blaze, snip, white 
near hind fetlock (38). 

FRIDAY (Mr. H. Blyth), ch m ; star, small scar inside off knee, 
white patch off shoulder ; not passed (421). 



GAIETY GIRL (Mr. E. R. A. Shearman), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, 
white near fore fetlock and off hind leg (481). 

GALWAY (Mr. H. Wilson), ch g ; very faint star and snip (268). 

GEISHA (Mr. G. Heseltine), br m, 4; star, small white mark on 
upper lip, grey hairs on flank ; season only (162). 

GEISHA (Earl of Airlie), br m ; faint star, white near hind coronet 
(306). 

GENESEE (Mr. G. Bland), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white off hind 

fetlock (671). 

GIFT, THE (Mr. J. G. Fort), gr g ; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip, scar point and top of near shoulder (485). 

GILL (Mr. Knowles), br m, a; saddle and girth marks (139). 



POLO PONIES, 189;. 407 

GIMCRACK (Major Fenwick), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white near 
hind pastern and off hind leg (282). 

GINGER (Mr. C. Wheeler), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white off hind 
pastern, brand marks near fore and hind quarter (218 ». 

GINGER (Mr. E. C. Holland), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white hind 

legs, white off fore fetlock (324). 

GINGERBREAD (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch m ; blaze, snip, white 
near hind coronet (148). 

GIPSY (Mr. F. B. Drage), bk g ; white mark on near eye, little 
white above near knee (279). 

GIPSY (Air. J. Lockett), br m ; tan muzzle, black points, few grey 
hairs in mane (407). 

GIPSY (Mr. Gill), br m : small scar back of off thigh (648). 

GIPSY (Capt. Paynter), br m; black points, girth marks (607). 

GLEN (Mr. Miller), b m ; white snip on nose, star, narrow blaze, 
white off fore coronet (39). 

GOOD BOY (Comte de Madre), dk br g, 4 ; star, black points, 
saddle marks (249). 

GOSSOON (Mr. A. Joyce), br g; white spots near side of ribs, 

black points (582). 

GRACE (Capt. B. Daly), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white off hind 
fetlock (583). 

GREEK GIRL (Comte de Madre), b m ; small star, white snip 
near hind coronet, saddle marks (19). 

GREY GHOST (Mr. R. N. Smyth), gr g; white marks front off 
knee, girth marks (345). 

GREY LARK (Capt. F. Herbert;, gr m ; very small snip, two white 
marks on off fore shin, small white mark off hind quarter (131). 

GREY LEGS (Mr. Jameson), rn m ; faint star, white hairs in tail 

(587). 
GREY SISTER (Mr. C. Beatty), gr m; snip (669). 

GREYLING (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), gr g ; flea-bitten, slight snip, 
white under lip (56). 

GREYSTROKE (Mr. F. HcTgreaves), gr h; scar both sides of 
withers, collar marks (57). 

GUN SHOT (Mr. P. W. Connolly), blk br m, 4; star, black points, 
white mark near side of neck ; passed for the season (511). 

GWEN {Mr. E. A. Herbert), br m, 4 : large star, snip, white near 
fore fetlock and near hind leg (334). 

HALMA (Capt. Heygates), b m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, black 
points, saddle marks (207). 

HAPPY BOY (Capt. Loftus), gr g; star, narrow blaze, white hind 
legs, scar outside near knee (552). 



408 APPENDIX. 

HARD TO FIND (Comte de Madre), ch m ; blaze, white near 
hind fetlock, saddle mark (20). 

HARMONY (Capt. L. B. Johnson), b m ; very small star, black 
points, white specks on both hindquarters, saddle marks (Sy). 

HARMONY (Mr. Ross), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, off hind 
pastern white, girth marks (547). 

HAROUN (Mr. E. A. Herbert), b h ; two white spots off hind 
quarter, white marks fore shin (335). 

HARRISTOWN (Mr. J. W. Archdale), br g ; star, white near hind 
fetlock (542). 

HARROW (Mr. P. J. Bailey), br m ; very small star, white near 
hind pastern, white mark both knees, mark hind shin (473). 

HASSAN (Mr. J. L. Lawlorj, b g ; star, white near fore pastern and 
near hind coronet (320). 

HECTOR (Capt. W. F. Collins), b g; star, blaze, snip, brand near 
hind quarter, saddle marks both sides (iii). 

HEREFORD (Capt. H. McMicking), b m; star, black points 

(347). 
HESTER (Mr. T- W. Archdale), ch m ; star, black patch off hip 

(541). 

HONEYMOON (Capt. B. Hartopp), ch m ; scar, blaze, snip, saddle 
marks (50). 

HONEY O (Mr. P. W. Connolly), b m, 4; star, near hind coronet 
white ; this season only (510). 

HOUNSLOW (Mr. T. W. Conolly), b g ; star, few white hairs on 
face, white upper lip, grey hairs in tail, white near hind pastern (211). 



IMPULSE (Capt. W. Kirk), chm; star and snip, white hind fetlock 
and near fore coronet, white patch near hind quarter (295). 

INDL'VN (Mr. C. Wheeler), ro g ; scar near side of neck, brand on 
off side neck and off fore quarter (219). 

INNISKILLING (Major Richardson), b g; star, blaze, snip, white 
hind fetlocks, collar marks (640). 

IRISH GIRL (Mr. A. C. Hamilton), bm ; black points, scar inside 
off thigh, white mark front of off hock, white mark above near knee 
(514). 

ISABEL (Mr. G. A. Lockett), ch m; star on forehead, white off 
hind coronet with chesnut spots on it, saddle and girth marks (81). 

ITALIAN (Mr. Soper Whitburn), br m ; star, white inside near 
hind coronet (417). 



JACK (Mr. Knowles), ch h ; blaze, snip, white near hind pastern 
and near fore pastern, off fore pastern partly white, saddle marks (123). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 409 

JACKO (Mr. Shearman), bg ; star, blaze, snip, black points, girth 
marks (451). 

JACK SHEPPARD (Mr. Neil Haig), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and legs, black patch off cheek, large brand near hind quarter, 
girth marks (617). 

JACKY (14th Hussars Club), b g; star, narrow blaze, snip, white 
near hind fetlock, white mark off hind shin (637). 

JAMRACK (Mr. J. M. Walker), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white near 
hind fetlock, brand near hind quarter (416). 

JELOOLY (Mr. Archdale), b m ; small star, black points, scar over 
near eye (540). 

JENNY (Mr. N. Curzon), br m ; black points, few grey hairs on 
croup (370). 

JERRY (Hon. T. Brand), ch m {:^Ss). 

JESS (Capt, C. D. Bruce), ch m ; star, white hind fetlocks, spots all 
over body (173). 

JEWESS (Lord W. Bentinck), b m ; star, snip, white lower lip, off 
hind leg white, mark on poll (382). 

JIM JAM (Mr. C. Wilson), iron gr m ; white spot each side of neck 
'(254)- 

JINNY (Mr. Stapleton), I) m ; saddle and girth marks, small white 
patch near side of ribs (186). 

JOE (Mr. W. R. Bindloss), b g ; black points (299). 

JOE (Mr. G. K. Ansell), ch g ; very narrow star, blaze, snip, 
white near hind leg, brand near hind quarter (343). 

JOEY (Mr. T. M. S. Pitt), b h; star, snip, white near hind fetlocks, 
large scar top of both shoulders (316). 

JOHNNY LONGTAIL (Capt. Miller), blk g; large star, white 
hind fetlocks, brand near hind quarter, scar near shoulder (170). 

JORROCKS (Mr. D. G. Irvine), b g; black points, small star, scar 
off knee and off side of brisket, girth marks (409). 

JORROCKS (Mr. E. S. Jackson), gr g ; brand off hind quarter, 
large scar off shoulder (328). 

JORROCKS (Mr. Gill), ch g ; very faint star, white off hind fetlock, 
white hairs on off fore shin (650). 

JOSEPH (Mr. A. M. Knowles), skewbald g; off eye white, brand 
near hind quarter, small black spot off hind coronet (215). 

JOSEPH (Mr. L. Flanagan), brg; collar and saddle marks (614). 

JOSEPHINE (Mr. J. Lockett), br m ; black points, scar both sides 
of brisket, collar marks (405). 

JUANITA (Mrs. C. Wheeler), b m ; black points, small white spot 
oft" side of neck (220). 

JUBILEE (Capt. B. Johnson), br m ; star, near hind coronet white, 
white marks inside front of off fore coronet, saddle marks (86), 



4IO APPENDIX. 

JUBILEE (Mr. J. M. Walker), br m ; white near hind pastern and 
off hind fetlock (413). 

JUNO (Mr. L. C. Wynne), b m; small star, white off hind fetlock 
(516). 

KARDIR (Mr. Maurice), wh g ; snip on lower lip, scars near and 
off side of neck and back (189). 

KATE (Mr. F. A. B. Fryer), br m ; faint star, black points, white 
spots above both knees (327). 

KATE (Dr. Colgan), ch m ; small snip, white hairs off side of neck 
(533)- 

KATE (Major Williams), br m; black points, small white mark off 
wither, white marks front of near hind shin and back of near heel (585). 

KATHLEEN (Colonel Parks), b m ; star, black points, saddle 
marks, little white on upper lip (196). 

KATHLEEN (Capt. C. D. Bruce), br m; tan muzzle, small star, 
saddle marks (132). 

KATHLEEN (Mr. L. C. Winn), b m ; white hind fetlocks, white 

patch on wither (515). 

KID, THE {Mr. E. A. Wigan), b h ; star, white near hind coronet, 
white spots over back, scar on near hind quarter (496). 

KILALA (Mr. F. C. Pilkington), br m ; long star, white marks over 
off hock, saddle marks (126). 

KILMOON (Mr. T. Conolly), br m ; white hind pasterns, star, 
saddle marks (108). 

KISMET (Capt. J. Hanwell), gr g ; narrow blaze, snip, white lower 
lip, scar near hind quarter (241). 

KITCAT (J. M. Walker), blk br m ,• star, black points, grey hairs 
over body and tail (414). 

KITTEN (Mr. F. Balfour), ch m, 4 ; star, blaze, snip, white near 
hind leg ; passed for season only (432). 

KITTY (Mr. H. Bentley), b m ; star, snip, white mark outside near 
fore arm, w^hite spot near hind quarter (64). 

KITTY (Mr. Greenwood), br m, 4 ; little white on off hind heel and 
inside both fore heels, star, small snip ; passed for season only (65). 

KITTY (Mr. H. Spender Clay), b m ; small star, three white 
fetlocks, near fore coronet white (135). 

KITTY (Mr. Aldridge), b m ; small white spot on back rib off side, 
faint black mark down back (180), 

KITTY (Mr. Goff), br m ; star, narrow blaze, white near hind 
fetlock, large saddle marks off side ; not passed (204). 

KITTY (Mr. J. H. Locke), b m ; white off hind pastern, small star, 
girth marks (570). 

KITTY (Mr. Flanagan), br m ; faint star, white near hind coronet 
and off hind fetlock, white mark front of fore shin (610). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 411 

KNIGHT, THE (Mr. J. L. Hunter), grh; flea-bitten marks on face 
and neck, blemish off side of neck (350)- 

KRECT CARD (Mr. Long), rn g ; large star, black points, girth 
marks (606). 



LADY ALYS (Mr. F. B. Drage), br m ; faint star, white inside off 
hind pastern (293). 

LADY CLARE (Mr. A. Gold), b m ; star, white near fore and near 
hind fetlock, and grey off hind fetlock ; not passed (420). 

LADY DUNKIRK (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b or br m ; black points, 

black line along back (151). 

LADY FLORENCE (Mr. P. P. O'Reilly), b m ; small star, snip, 
black points, white marks on legs (564). 

LADY FREDERICK (Mr. R. P. O'Reilly), ch m, 4 ; star, blaze, 
snip, white lower lip and hind fetlocks ; this season (577). 

LADY GRxAY (Mr. F. B. Drage), gr m ; white off hind fetlock, 
scar on off knee (294). 

LADY HAUGHTY (Mr. E. W. Edmondson), b m ; small star, 
black points, spot near fore leg (404). 

LADY PERCY (Mr. J. H. Locke), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white off 
hind fetlock, and white mark front of near hind shin (568). 

LADY VIC (Brig.-Surg. Wooley), b m ; black points, star, narrow- 
blaze, girth marks ; not passed (555)- 

LANCER (Major Richardson), gr h ; several small scars both hind 
quarters, white mark off fore leg (639). 

LASSIE (Mr. R. L. Mullens), b m ; star, blaze, snip, brand near 

shoulder, white fetlocks (302). 

LAVENDER (Mr. Goff), gr h ; large snip, white chin, white near 
hind leg and off hind pastern ; over height (206). 

LI (Mr. H. R. Fairfax- Lucy), ch or br g; very small star (260). 

LIGHTFOOT (Hon. D. Marjoribanks), rn g: small star, brand on 

near shoulder (171). 

LILY (Mr. J. Scott-Robson), b m; star, black points, saddle marks 

(425)- 
LITTLE RAKE (Mr. A. T. Neilson), b m ; black points, scar inside 

off hock, white marks front of near fore and off hind shin (390). 

LITTLE WONDER (Mr. H. C. Higgins), b g; star, white hind 
legs with black spots, white near fore fetlock (331). 

LONDON (Mr. R. H. Collis), gr h ; blemish near side loin, white 
mark point of near hock (450). 

LONG SHOT (Mr. P. W. Conolly), drk br g; very small star, 
black points (512). 

LOO (^Nlr. E. C. Judkins), b m, 4 ; star, snip, white mark near hind 
fetlock, collar mark off side (435). Passed for this season only. 



412 APPENDIX. 

LOVE TOKEN (Mr. Symons), b m ; long narrow star, snip, white 
hind and off fore fetlocks (592). 

LUCIFER (Mr. Symo.is), b g; star, white near hind fetlock and off 
hind pastern, white fore heels, girth marks (591). 

LUCY GLITTERS (Capt. Sykes), b m ; white near hind fetlock ; 
white mark front near hind shin and below off hock (314). 

LULLINGTON (Earl of Harrington), ch m; scar outside near knee, 
saddle marks (93). 

LU LU (Mr. H. C. Bentley). white h, Arab; not passed (654). 

MADEMOISELLE (Mr. C. A. L'Estrange), gr m ; small snip, white 
mark inside both knees, girth marks {519). 

MADEMOISELLE NITOUCHE (Mr. T. H. Jackson), br m ; 
white near hind fetlock, collar mark (476). 

MADGE (Mr. M. H. Tristram), blk m ; star, white near fore fetlock 
and near hind coronet (478). 

MAGGIE MURPHY (Mr. G. K. Ansell), b m ; small star, white 
hind fetlocks (342). 

MAGIC (Capt. Maxwell), dun m, 4 ; star, narrow blaze, small snips 
white hind legs, white tail (137). 

MAGPIE (Mr. F. C. Muriel), gr m ; white marks front of both hind 
shins and below both knees ; not passed (355). 

MAHx\RAJAH (Mr. E. H. Wigan), gr h ; small snip, white mark 
off fore leg (497). 

MAID OF KENT (Capt. Schofield), b m ; star, small blaze, black 
points, blemish outside near shoulder, girth marks (278). 

MAJOR (Mr. F. A. Belleville), rng; star, snip, white hairs in tail 

(145)- 

MAKE HASTE (Capt. Renton), b h ; small star, white marks on 
wither, small white spot off side neck (94). 

MANDARIN (Mr. F. Balfour), b m ; brand near hind quarter, 
white spot off flank, saddle marks (8). 

MANGO (Mr. J. Lockett), br h ; very small star, w^hite mark off side 
of ribs, scar front of off elbow (406). 

MANIFESTO (Capt. R. M. Sanders), b h, 4 ; star, narrow blaze, 
snip, white near hind coronet and off hind leg, and white fore leg (442) 

M ANITA (Royal Horse Guards Club), b m ; star white spots, scar 
point of near shoulder and near side of face, G. L. near side of neck, 
A. L. P. near shoulder, scar outside near arm, Z. I. R. near quarter, scar in 
front of near hock (285). 

MANOR FLEECE (Mr. Learmouth), ch m; two small snips, chin 
white, white hind legs, white marks off fore leg, saddle marks (199). 

MARIA (Mr. H. C. T. Rice), blk br m ; small saddle marks (668). 

MARTIN (Mr. F. C. Muriel), br g ; near hind coronet and heel 
white, small star and saddle marks ; not passed (356). 



POLO POxNIES, 1897. 413 

MARVEL (Mr. H. C. Cogswell), br g; star, black points, white 
mark inside both knees (433). 

MATADOR (Lord Villiers), gr g ; blaze and snip, white under lip, 
white hind fetlocks (210). 

MATCHLESS (Mr. W. H. Lambton), bg; star, white near fore 
coronet and hind fetlock, white hairs in tail (221). 

MAVOURNEEN (Earl of Huntingdon), gr m ; white muzzle, white 
marks round eyes, collar marks (594). 

MAY BE (14th Hussars), ro m; star, l:)laze snip, white near hind 
leg and oft" hind fetlock, girth marks (618). 

MAY BOY (Mr. F. J. Siltzer), b g ; black stripe on spine, white off 

hind pastern (72). 

MAY FLY (Mr. C. A. D'Estrange), br m ; black points, scar point of 

oft' hock, girth marks (520). 

MAY FLY (Capt. Loder), b m ; small star, white hind fetlocks, 
white hairs in tail (375). 

MEDDLESOME (Capt. Jenner), b m ; black points, star, off hind 
white, saddle marks (22). 

MEDL\ LUNA (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), d g ; black stripe, white 
socks, ofi^ hind pastern white, star, narrow blaze, brand near hind quarter 

(61). 

MELODY (Mr. H. Fielden), b m ; star, narrow blaze, black points, 
flecked with grey (360). 

MERMAH^ (Capt. F. Herbert), br m ; near hind coronet white, 
scar inside off" hind fetlock, saddle marks (129). 

MERMAID (Mr. F. C. Muriel) ; not passed (354). 

MER?sIAH3 H. (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), br m; star, white 
oft" hind fetlock (656), 

MERISL'MD HI. (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), br m; white hind fetlocks 

(672). 

MERRY LEGS (Mr. S. M. Dennis), b m ; small star, narrow blaze, 

snip, white oft" hind fetlock (394). 

MERRY THOUGHT (Mr. F. J. Balfour), b g ; black points, 
brand near hind quarter (664). 

MICHAEL (Mr. T. A. Clarke), gr g ; large star, white near hind 
fetlock, white marks near flank (384). 

MICK (Mr. C. O'Hara), b g; star, white hind fetlocks, white spot 
off hind quarter (526). 

MICKY FREE (Mr. R. T. Cunningham), dk gr g; saddle marks 

(397^- 

MIDGE (Mr. A. SEYMOUR), dun m ; star, stripe down back, white 
near fore heel (136). 

MIDNIGHT (Capt. \\. Kirk), blk m ; white near hind fetlock, scar 
on near shoulder (297). 



414 APPENDIX. 

MIDNIGHT (Mr. Lloyd), blk m ; scar inside off fore heel, collar 
mark (596). 

MIKE (Mr. Talbot Rice), br g ; off fore and near hind coronets 
white, white marks on off hind coronet, saddle marks, small star and snip, 
brand near hind quarter (53). 

MILKMAID (Mr. Peel) gr m; white off hind fetlock, collar scars 
(202). 

MINNIE (Capt. Askwith), br m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, white off 
hind fetlock, white ticks (475). 

MINOR (Mr. Rourke), b m; black points, very faint saddle marks 

(550). 

MISS BANTAM (Mr. R. Hudson), br m; white patch lower lip. 
white marks, both shoulders, white mark off side flank (581 ). 

MISS BARRY (Major Alexander), b m; scar back of both hocks, 
white near fore heel, girth marks (529). 

MISS FINCH (Mr. A. T. Neilson), b m ; small star, black points, 
white spots on off fore leg (395). 

MISS MAC (Mr. T. M. S. Pitt), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white fore 

legs (315). 

MISS MACKEY (Mr. C. Beatty), b m; star, snip, scar off hip, 
white near fore pastern and near hind fetlock (670). 

MIST (Capt. Nolan), gr m; flea bitten marks on head, scar off side 
wither, saddle marks (192). 

MOMUS (Mr. Russell), gr m ; white snip, little white lower lip, 
white off hind leg (176). 

MONA (Mr. Russell), b m ; white marks front of all four shins, 
saddle marks (178). 

MONK, THE (Mr. Gouidsmith), b m ; white face, two white hind 

fetlocks, saddle marks (37). 

MONTANA BELLE (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b m; brand near 
hind quarter, brand near shoulder, very small star, white spot off shoulder 
(100). 

MOONLIGHT (Capt. A. R. Mosley), gr h ; large blemish both sides 
of withers (323). 

MOONLIGHT (Mr. Anderson), b m ; star, blaze, snip, both flanks 
ticked white (538). 

MOONRAKER (Capt E. W. Clowes), b g ; white hind legs and 
off fore leg, stockings, brand near hind quarter, star, snip, saddle marks 
(112). 

MOSES (Capt. Kennedy), ch g; star, blaze, snip, white off fore 
fetlock, white off fore pastern, white spots near hind quarter, brand top of 
both shoulders ; not passed. 

MOSQUITO (14th Hussars), blk m; white hind coronets, w^hite 
marks on fore legs, scars inside both arms (629). 

Mr. brown (Mr. J. D. Gouidsmith) br g; black points, scar near 
hind quarter (358). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 415 

MUDIR (Major Middleton), br h ; four white legs, white blaze, snip 
and lower lip, branded both sides of neck (96). 

MUSKET (Mr. S. Reynolds), gr g ; snip, white off hind fetlock, 
white scar near side of neck (388). 

MY GIRL (Mr. P. W. Connolly), b m ; star, black points, ticked 
white (513). 

MY LADY (Mr. J. H. Locke), b m ; black points, white near side 
of ribs (569). 

MYSTERY rMr. A. T. Neilson), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white off 
hind pastern (389). 

MYSTERY (Mr. W. Buckmaster), b m; star, white spots on back, 
very short dock (78). 



N (Comte de Madre), b m ; white spot off fore heel, black points, 
star, white saddle marks near side (18). 

NAAIMAN (Capt. Schofield), b h ; star, narrow blaze, snip, white 
near hind leg, white mark near fore pastern and off leg (237). 

NAMELESS (Capt. C< H. Paynter), dun m ; white hind fetlocks 

(330). 

NAMELESS (Sir W. R. Nugent), gr g; white mark front of near 
fore and near hind shins, large white mark near side of back (572). 

NANCY (Mr. Russell), b m ; saddle marks, small spot upper lip, 
docked (177). 

NANCY (Capt. Green), b m ; black points, scar front off hind shin 

(373)- 
NANCY (Mr. H. J. Smith), b m; black points, collar mark 

(467). 
NAP PER (Mr. T. Conolly), ch m ; white near hind fetlock, star, 

saddle marks, inside off hind pastern white, off ear split (107). 

NARRAMORE (Mr. Gill), br m; small star front of off stifle, 
saddle marks (649). 

NELLA 11. (Mr. R. Hudson), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white mark 
near side of ribs, saddle mark (578). 

NELLIE GRAY (Capt. Ellison), gr m; star, both fore coronets 
white, saddle mark (455). 

NEPENTHE (Capt. R. M. Sanders), dk br h; very small star, both 
hind pasterns white, scar inside both fore arms, saddle marks (443). 

NEWBRIDGE (Lord W. Bentinck). b g; star, white near hind 
fetlock and hind coronets, white scar on both knees ; not passed (480). 

NICOTINE (Mr. F. Balfour), blk g ; white near fore 
brand near hind quarter, brown muzzle ; Argentine (3). 

NIGGER (Mr. Mackie), br g ; few white hairs in forehead, both, 
hind fetlocks and near fore coronet and heel white, brand on off shoulder 
and both hindquarters (165). 



4i6 APPENDIX. 

NIGHTLIGHT (Capt. Jenner), blk g ; both hind fetlocks white, 
brand near hind quarter, large blaze (23). 

NIGHTMARE (Hon. R. Ward), rn g ; four white legs, white face, 
brand near hind quarter (288). 

NIMBLE (Mr. Jameson), ch m ; star, faint blaze, black spots over 
body, girth marks (586). 

NINA (Capt. Egerton Green), b m; star, very narrow blaze, snip, 
near hind fetlock white, off hind coronet white, saddle marks (374). 

NORAH (Mr. GofT), blk m; small star, white spot front of off 
shoulder, white marks off flank, white marks front of both stifles (205). 

NORAH (Capt. Ferrars), ch m ; star, white off hind fetlock, white 
mark near shoulder, saddle marks, white spot near eye (208). 

NORVAL (Mr. H. C. Cogswell), br g; star, black pomts, white 

near hind leg ; passed for the season (433). 

NUGGET (Mr. J. Scott-Robson), ch g; very small star, blaze, 
white spot near nostril, white near hind coronet, brand near hind quarter, 
white near side of face and off hind fetlock (426). 



OAK APPLE (Mr. C. M. Grenfell), br m ; star, scar near hind 
pastern, black points (502). 

OLD NICK (Mr. Anderson), b g ; star, scar off side neck (556). 

OPi\L (Mr. Shearman), blk m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind pastern 
and off hind fetlock white, saddle mark (452). 

OSMAN (Capt. F. Herbert), b h ; small star, near hind fetlock 
white, saddle mark (172). 

OSWALD (Mr. F. H. Wise), b g, 4 ; very faint star, white hind 
fetlocks ; passed for season (603). 

OTTO (Mr. Peel), b g ; star, little w^hite on lower lip, off hind 
coronet white, little white on near hind and both fore heels, brand off hind 
quarter, white hairs all over body (203), 

PACHA (Mr. F. Hargreaves), light gr h; branded inside both arms 

and both thighs (58). 

PADDY (Mr. Gill), blk br g ; white near hind fetlock (652). 

PADISHA (Dr. A. Findlater), b g; star, white hind fetlocks, saddle 

marks (437). 

PANCHO (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), dun g; faint stripe on back, 
branded near hind quarter, star, very small snip (62). 

PASTIME (Mr, C. Wilson), ch g ; white hind legs and stockings 

and near fore stocking, off fore coronet white, blaze, snip (257). 

PEDRO (Mr. W. D. P. Watson), gr h; fleabitten face and neck, 
scar off side back, all feet partly white (105). 

PERFECT CURE (Mr. Nickalls), skewbald g; spotted, star, white 
hind fetlocks (666). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 417 

PETACAS (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), b g ; near hind pastern white, brand 
near hind quarter D, under lip white {6o\ 

PETER PIPER (Marquis of TulHbardine), blk m ; Httle white on 
hind heels, saddle marks (286). 

PETTICOATS (Mr. F. Balfour), b m ; blaze, narrow white stripe 
down face, brand near hind quarter, coronet and inside near fore foot 
white, saddle marks ; Argentine (6). 

PHILLIPA (Capt. W. Kirk), dk br or blk m ; near hind coronet 
white, white mark below off hock, saddle marks (296). 

PINTAIL (Mr. J. Drage), br m : near hind pastern and foot white, 
very faint star, small saddle marks ( 15 ). 

PLAY BOY (Major H. T. Fenwick), ch g; near hind stocking 
white, blaze, star, snip, lower lip white, near hind leg white, saddle 
marks (280). 

PLAY BOY (Mr. J. R. M. Malone), b g; star, white hind fetlocks 

(576). 

PLAYFUL (Messrs. Miller), blk br m, 4; black points, few white 
hairs on wither, small saddle marks (659). 

POKER (Mr. H. H. Wilson), br m; small white mark on near 
shoulder, saddle marks, black points (269). 

POLLY (Mr. Talbot Rice), ch m ; white hind stockings, star, blaze, 
snip, saddle marks (52). 

POLLY (Mr. Collis), ch m ; star, narrow black snip, brand 8 near 
hind quarter (465). 

POOKA (Earl of Huntingdon), gr m; white marks near fore leg, 
small scar outside near fore pastern {593). 

PORTFIRE (Mr. E. A. Wigan), br g; faint star, white mark near 
hind pastern and off hind and fore legs, near fore fetlock grey (498). 

POTEEN (Mr. L. Vandeleur), ch m, 4 (247). 

PRATTLE (Major H. T. Fenwick), b m ; star, saddle and girth 
marks (281). 

PRIEST (Mr. Sheppard), gr g; branded near hind quarter (84). 

PRIESTESS (Capt. W. Neilson), b m; black points, collar and 
saddle marks (445). 

PRIMROSE (Sir H. de Trafford), b m ; white off hind pastern, 
very small star, small white mark on off side neck, saddle marks (128). 

PRIMROSE (Mr. R. T. Cunningham), blk g; star, narrow blaze, 
near hind leg white, saddle marks, grey forehead (396). 

PRINCE (Mr. Carbutt), gr g ; blaze, snip, white lower lip, branded 
near hind quarter (187). 

PRINCE CHARLES (Mr. G. A. Lockett), ch g; star, blaze, snip, 
both fore and near hind legs and off hind fetlock white, saddle and girth 
marks (422). 

PROFESSOR (Queen's Bays Club), b g; black points, small scar 
near side of neck and near side of ribs, saddle marks (309). 

27 



4i8 APPENDIX. 

PRU (Capt. Mackenzie), gr g; blaze, snip, scar near shoulder (48). 

PSALM (Capt. Bernard Daly), ch m ; grey hairs on body, faint star 

(584). 
PUBLICAN (14th Hussars), ch g; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip 

and near fore coronet, and near hind leg and ofif hind fetlock (622). 



QUICK SHOT (Capt. Bidgood), b m; black points, star, white 
hairs in mane (506). 

QUICKSILVER (Mr. G. Hardy), gr m ; saddle marks, few white 

hairs off fore heel (29). 

QUICKSTEP (Mr. Bailey), b m; black points, white marks and 
scar on both knees, saddle marks (474). 



RABBIT (Sir W. R. Nugent), ch rn ; star, blaze, snip, white near 
hind leg and off fore coronet ; season (573). 

RACHAEL (Capt. Neilson), br m ; small star, black points, small 
saddle mark off side (444). 

RAGS (Mr. Neil Haig), ch m : star, narrow blaze, snip, white near 
hind leg, black patch both hind quarters ; not passed (372). 

RAINBOW (Mr. J. Watson), b g ; star, black points, faint black 
strip down spine, blemish on near knee (266). 

RANEE (Mr. S. M. Dennis), rn m ; star, off fore and off hind 
fetlocks white (399). • 

RASPER (jNIiller Bros.), bright b g; near hind foot and coronet 
white, white saddle marks (5). 

RATAPLAN (Mr. R. W. Hudson), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and hind legs and ofif fore coronet, saddle marks (364). 

RATTLER (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), br m ; white near hind fetlock, scar 
outside off hock (522). 

REBECCA (Dr. Colgan), b m ; white mark inside off knee (531). 

RED HEART (Mr. Aidridge), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, little white 
hind coronets, saddle marks, black patch off shoulder (179). 

RED PRINCE (Mr. S. Savile), ch g, Arab ; white off fore coronet, 
long star, snip, white marks above near hock (30). 

RED START (14th Hussars), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, large white 
patch off hind quarter (636). 

REGAL (Mr. Winterbotham), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip and inside near hind fetlock, white marks on both fore coronets, saddle 
marks (371). 

REGINA (Mr. L. C. D. Jenner), b m ; blaze, snip, black points, 
mark on withers (258). 

RESTLESS (Mr. G. A. ]Miller), very dk br m ; star, tan muzzle 

(4). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 419 

REX (Mr. R. W. Hudson), b br h ; star, white spot on lower lip, 
white hind and oft' fore fetlocks, collar marks (365). 

REX (Major B. G. Lewis), b g ; faint star, white mark back of legs, 
girth marks (560). 

REY (Mr. Aubrey Price), b m ; star, inside near hind coronet white 

(488). 

ROB ROY (Mr. A. Suart), b g; black points, saddle marks (491). 

ROCFIELD (Capt. Wing), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white hind legs, 
saddle marks (182). 

ROCKET (Mr. J. Harris), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white hind fetlocks 

(321). 

ROEBUCK (Mr. G. Heseltine), rn g; small star, saddle marks, 
white hairs in tail (431). 

ROEDEER (Earl of Airlie), b m ; faint star, snip, white hind fet- 
locks, and near fore fetlock (308;. 

RONALD (Mr. G. A. Lockett), b g ; faint star, snip, white near 
hind heel, saddle marks [S^). 

ROSA BONHEUR (Mr. E. F. Dease), b m ; black points, small 
scar off" hip ; not passed (575). 

ROSAMOND (14th Hussars), b m ; star, white near hind fetlock 
(630) . 

ROULETTE (Dr. A. Findlater), b or ch m; star, blaze, snip, white 
hind pasterns and fore legs, girth marks (436). 

ROULETTE (14th Hussars), b m; very faint star, black points 
(625). 

ROULETTE (Mr. E. S. Jackson), ch m; star, blaze, small white 
spots lower lip, near hind fetlock white, saddle marks (328A), 

RUBICON (i4th Hussars), blkg; white fore pasterns, white hind 
fetlocks, white brand near hind quarter (634). 

RUBRICK (14th Hussars), chg; star, narrow blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and near fore fetlock and hind legs, brand off" hind quarter 

(632). 

RUBY (Capt. Wing), bm; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip and fore 
feflocks and off" hind fetlock, saddle and girth marks (181). 

RUBY (Mr. F. Pilkington), chg; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip 
and all four legs white, brand near hind quarter (402). 

RUFUS (Mr. H. P. Dangan), ch g; white near fore coronet, white 
spots on wither, girth marks (599J. 

RUFUS (Col. Anderson), br g; star, black points (605). 

RUSTIC (Capt. Richards), b m ; star, black points (251). 



SABBATH (Mr. Rourke), br g; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip 
and near hind pastern, while marks above both knees (548). 

27* 



420 . APPENDIX. 

SAGE HEN (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), gr m ; branded, near shoulder, 
near hind foot white, off hind foot partly white (98). 

SAID KHAN (Mr. R. A. D. Fleming), br h; black points, white 
spots all over fore legs, scar both flanks, near ear clipped (43o\ 

SAILOR (Mr. P2. A. Wigan), gr g; faint snip, white lower lip, brand 
off hind quarter (495). 

ST, CLAUS (Dr. Watson), gr h ,- blaze, snip, near fore and hind legs 
white (223). 

SAMBO (Mr. S. M. Dennis), br g ; star, blaze, snip, scar both sides 
of neck and near side of back, white spots on all legs, saddle marks (400). 

SAMBO (Mr. P. W. Nickalls), bg; white hind fetlocks double brand 
near hind quarter, small star, veiy narrow blaze, white saddle marks ; 

Argentine (i). 

SANDOW (Miller, Bros.), bg; all four legs white up to fetlocks, 
brand near hind quarter, star, saddle marks ; Argentine (11). 

SAN FELIPE (Mr. W. McCreery), gr g; very small snip, litde 
white on lower lip, scar under off eye, off side back and front of near fore 
arm (226). 

SANTANA (Mr. W. McCreery), b m ; black points, white spot near 
side of neck, inside off fore arm, and back of off hind quarter, saddle 
marks (229). 

SANTA ROMONA (Mr. W. McCreery), dun m ; star, hind fetlocks 
white, black mark down back, saddle marks (227). 

SANTIAGO (Mr. F. Swetenham), gr g ; brand on hind quarters, 
white legs, snip, lower lip white (262), 

SAPPERTON (Mr. H. T. Timson), ch m; star, blaze, snip, hind 
fetlocks white, saddle and girth marks (367). 

SAVAGE (Earl of Harrington) dun g; star, blaze, snip, brand near 
hind quarter, saddle marks (274). 

SCANDAL (Mr. Grogan), gr m; white near hind leg, white marks 
off shoulder and off side neck (528). 

SCRUMPTIOUS (14th Hussars), b m; star, snip, two white spots 
front off hind coronet (645). 

SEABREEZE (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), ch m; star, blaze, brands 
736 on near hind quarter and X on near forequarter, grey hairs in tail and 
body, scar front of near hock (loi). 

SEAGULL (Capt. F. H. Milsom), gr g; off hind feet and off fore 
heel white, snip near nostril, saddle marks (27). 

SEA PEARL (Mr. D. G. Irvine), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white 
near fore and both off legs and near hind fetlock, collar and saddle marks 
(408). 

SEA PIE (Mr. P. O'Reilly), b m ; black points, star, scar off hind 
quarter, saddle marks (565). 

SEARCHLIGHT (Messrs. Miller), piebald g; star, blaze, snip, 
white lower lip, both hind legs and near fore leg and off hind fetlock 
(660). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 421 

SECOND-HAND (Brig.-Surg. Dooley), b m; black points, few 

white hairs on shoulders, scar ofif side of ribs, saddle marks ; not passed 
(556). 

SECRET (Mr. F. Siltzer), b m; black points, scar off fore shin 
(429). 

SELIM (Mr. W. Lee-Pilkington), ch g; star, narrow blaze, small 
snip, white fetlocks, saddle marks (392). 

SELINA (Col. Campbell), b m ; black points, white mark over off 

eye (518). 

SENTIMENT (Mr. A. Price), b or br m, 4; black points, saddle 
marks ; passed for the season (490). 

SERPOLETTE (Mr. Maurice), br m; star, white near hind coronet 
and heel and off hind fetlock (188). 

SHABA (Mr. A. E. Batchelor), flea-bitten gr g; small collar mark 
near side, saddle mark (271). 

SHARZADA (Mr. Soper Whitburn), gr h; white marks above near 
hock, white near hind fetlock and off fore fetlock, saddle marks (377). 

SHEIK (Mr. A. E. Batchelor), b g; star, saddle marks, small 
blemish off side neck (272). 

SHELLBACK (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), dun g; small star and snip, 
near hind pastern white, brand near hind quarter (63). 

SHELL DUCK (Mr. R. O'Reilly), b m, 4; star, snip, white mark 
on croup, ticked with white hairs ; passed for the season (559). 

SHERLOCK (14th Hussars), gr g; white hind fetlocks (619). 

SHOOTING STAR (Earl of Shrewsbury), br m ; white near hind 
heel, white splash off hind heel, star, saddle marks (2). 

SHOP GIRL (Mr. R. L. Mullens), b m ; star, white hind fetlocks 
and near fore heel, saddle marks (301). 

SHOT SILK (Capt. Bidgood), br m ; star, white hind fetlocks, white 
hairs in tail, ticked white (505). 

SHUCKBORO (Mr. J. Drage), b g; saddle marks, few white hairs 
tgpof wither (67). 

SILVERTAIL (Mr. Tresham Gilbey), b m; star, blaze, snip, white 
hind fetlocks, silver tail and hairs, saddle marks (106). 

SILVER TALLY (Mr. Rourke), gr m ; small scar off side forehead; 
this season only (551). 

SINCERITY (Mr. A. M. Knowles), b h ; long snip, off hind fetlock 
white, saddle marks, scar over off eye (24S). 

SINGEWICK (Capt. H. McMicking), gr m; star, white near hind 
pastern (348). 

SIRMON (Major Galbraith), ch m; white near fore pastern and 
near hind fetlock, scar off hip, girth marks (615). 

SISTER BESSIE (Col. Campbell), b m; star, black points, scar off 

hind quarter {517). 



422 APPENDIX. 

SISTER SUE (Mr. Anderson), blk m; scar over near eye, and 
collar and girth marks (537). 

SKIT (Capt. Hon. E. Baring), b g; black points, two white spots 
off hind shin, small saddle marks (457). 

SKITTLES (Mr. W. R. Bindloss), b m ; scar near hind quarter, 
white mark front of off hind shin, saddle mark (298). 

SKITTLES (Mr. W. Walton), b g ; very small star, off hind fetlock 
white, small saddle mark (438). 

SKYLIGHT (Mr. Learmouth), bg; star, black points, little white 
upper lip, saddle marks, small scar top of withers (200). 

SLAPJACK (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), br g; snip, white hind fetlocks, 
brand near hind quarter (119). 

SLAVE (Mr. F. Balfour), br g ; star, narrow blaze, snip, white lower 
lip and hind stockings, brand on near quarter, saddle marks (169). 

SLAVIN (Miller Bros.), b g ; white off hind pastern and off fore 
fetlock and pastern, white near fore heel, white stripe on nose, brand near 
hind quarter (10). 

SLIGO (Mr. T. Conolly), br m ; grey hairs in tail and body, star, 
saddle marks (no). 

SLIGO (Earl of Harrington), br m ; small star, saddle marks, tan 
muzzle (163). 

SNIP (Mr. F. B. Drage), br m; white hind pasterns, few white hairs 
on near side of face (292). 

SOCKS (Mr. Drage), ch m; three white stars on chest, both hind 

fetlocks white, white stripe (41). 

SODA (Mr. R. W. Hudson), gr h ; long snip, off fore fetlock white, 
scar above off hock and on near hip (363). 

SOUBRETTE (Capt. Hanwell), b m; star, blemish near knee (273). 

SPECULATION (Mr. Smith), b m ; black points, grey hairs off 
side of back, saddle marks (468). 

SPHYNX (Capt. F. Herbert), wh h ; scar on wither, small snip, little 
white on lower lip (174). 

V 

SPITFIRE (Mr. H. C. Higgin), b m; white near hind coronet and 
off hind heel, white marks front of fore shins, saddle marks (333). 

STAR (Capt. Dundas), dun g ; narrow blaze and snip, black legs, 
brands on near hind quarter and off hind quarter, white off hind pastern 

(89). 

STRATHCONAN (Capt. Campbell), gr g, 4; large blaze and snip, 
white chin, four white legs (195). 

STRATHRUIN (Mr. G. Heseltine), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
white near hind stockings, saddle marks (243). 

STRIPES (Mr. F. Bald), dun g ; very small star, brand near hind 
quarter, blemish down front of shoulder (265). 

SULTAN (Mr. W. Lee Pilkington), gr g ; snip, near hind fetlock 
white, collar marks (391). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 423 

SULTAN (Mr. Car butt), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
white off fore coronet and heel and off hind coronet and near hind fetlock, 
saddle marks (iSs). 

SUNBEAM (Mr. R. Beck), b m; narrow blaze, snip, white hind 
fetlocks, saddle marks (144). 

SUNBEAM (Mr. Soper Whitbtirn), ch m; star, white hind fetlocks, 
saddle marks (378). 

SUNRISE (14th Hussars), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
near hind pastern, off hind and off fore fetlocks, white spot near hind 
quarter, scar inside off hock (633). 

SUNSHADE (Mr. Freakes), ch m; white hind stockings, star, blaze, 
snip, saddle marks (46). 

SUNSHINE (Mr. J. H. Gouldsmith), ch m; star, narrow blaze, 
snip, white lower lip, fore coronets and off hind leg, saddle marks (361). 

SURPRISE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch g; star, narrow blaze, snip, white 
near hind fetlock, off hind and near fore pasterns, saddle marks, blemish 
near side of neck ; not passed (259). 

SURVEYOR (Capt. R. N. Smyth), piebald g; star, snip, brand on 
near hind quarter (346). 

SUSAN (Major B. G. Lewis), b m ; star, black points, saddle marks, 
white marks front of near hind shin and back of off fore leg, white hairs 
in mane (561). 

SUSAN (Mr. W. H. Lambton), br m; black points, few white hairs 
for star, saddle and girth marks (222). 

SUSPENSE (Capt. L. K. Jenner), ch m ; blaze, collar and saddle 
marks, white hind fetlocks (24) 

SWALLOW (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), b m ; star, black points, white hairs 
down face, girth marks (521). 

SWEEP (Mr. C. xA-damthwaite), blk g; star, black points, very small 
saddle mark (676). 

SWEETWATER (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), gr g ; branded W near 
hind quarter, scar near flank (117). 

SYREN (Mr. E. Makins), blk m; very small star, black points, 
saddle marks ; not passed (428). 

SYREN (Mr. W. J. Jones), blk m; small star, small saddle marks 
(662). 

TAFFY (Comte de Madre), iron gr g ; white spots outside near 
fore arm and both sides of neck, saddle marks (54). 

TAME CAT (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), b m ; star, white off hind fetlock, 
scar off shoulder (524). 

TARAL (Mr. Clarence Wilson), br g ; big star, streak, snip, both 
hind pasterns white, white fore heels, brand C.T. on near hind quarter 
(256). 

TEAL (Mr. J. Drage), bl br m ; star, tan marks both sides of muzzle 

(14). 



424 APPENDIX. 

TEDDY (14th Hussars), br m ; black points (631). 

TEETOTUM (Mr. C. O'Hara), b m ; star, very narrow blaze, white 
near fore fetlock and near hind leg, black patch on back, girth marks 
(525). 

TELEGRAM (Mr. W. Buckmaster), b br m ; star, black points, 
white marks above knees ; not passed (419). 

TEMPLAR (Mr. Miller), ch g; white near hind coronet, off hind 
sock white, oft' fore leg white, brand near hind quarter (35). 

TERRY (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b g; black points, brand on near 
hind quarter, saddle marks {73). 

TESSY (Comte de Madre), b m ; star, short blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock white, saddle marks (55). 

THUNDERBOLT (Mr. Hunt), b g; star, snip, white fore pasterns 
and near hind fetlock and off" hind heel (611). 

TIMEKEEPER (Mr. J. Watson), br g; black points, few white 
hairs on forehead ; over height (235). 

TIPCAT (Messrs. Miller), blk br m ; white near hind coronet, white 
hairs in tail (661). 

TIP TOP (Mr. H. Lawson), br g; small star, black points, white 
spot off" stifle (213). 

TIP TOP (Mr. Gouldsmith), b g ; few white hairs for star, little 
white on upper lip, black points, slight saddle mark on top (138). 

TOMASSINA (Mr. J. Watson), b or br m; very small star, white 
hind coronets, scar off" shoulder (234). 

TOMMY (Lord R. Manners), br g; white hind coronets (471). 

TOM TAYLOR (Capt. Persse), ch g ; white near hind leg and off 
hind fetlock, white mark near hind quarter (312). 

TOP, THE (Mr. McCreery), b m ; small white spot off shoulder, 
small white marks on wither, black points ; passed for season only (230). 

TOPS (Mr. McCreery), dk ch m ; star, white mark inside near hind 
fetlock, white spot off side of neck and near shoulder (228). 

TREATY (Mr. J. L. Reid), br m ; very faint star, black points 
(461). 

TRES SEC (Mr. A. Seymour), b g; star, very narrow blaze, black 
points (277). 

TRILBY (Mr. E. de Escandon), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
legs, girth marks (492). 

TRIUMPH (Mr. J. Lyons), bg; star, blaze, snip, white outside 
near hind pastern, small white spot off" hind quarter. 

TROUTCATCHER (14th Hussars), b g ; white marks near hind 

and both fore legs, girth marks (638). 

TRUANT (Mr. A. Suart), b m; star, white hind fetlocks (503). 

TULIP (Mr. Chinnery), b g ; white near hind pastern, small saddle 
mark ; for this season (448). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 425 

TURKISH DELIGHT (Marquis of Tullibardine), dk br h ; star, 
very small snip, while near hind fetlock, scar point of off shoulder 

(287). 

TWITTER (Mr. P. P. O'Reilly), b m : white marks back of all four 
legs and front of fore legs (563). 

R 
UNKNOWN (Hon. W. Nugent), b g; branded — near hind 

R 
quarter, small snip, saddle marks (121). 

UNKNOWN II. (Mr. C. D. Seymour), br m; very small star, off 
hind fetlock white, saddle marks (146). 

VALPARAISO (Mr. Learmouth), b g; white near hind leg and off 

hind fetlock, star, narrow blaze, two large brands on near hind quarter 

(194)- 
VAMPIRE (Capt. Schofield), b g; star, narrow blaze, snip, near 

hind fetlock white, near fore fetlock grey, saddle mark, brand near hind 

quarter (376). 

VENTRE A TERRE (Mr. G. K. Ansell), b m; scars front and 
near hind fetlocks, white mark front of off fore shin, black points (340). 

VENUS (Capt. C. H, Paynter), b br m; black points, saddle and 

girth marks (329). 

VERVEINE (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), b m, 4; black points, black 
stripe down back, saddle mark (657). 

VIXEN (Mr. Gills), bm, 4; black points, scar over near eye ; passed 
for season (647). 

WAIF (Lord Kensington), ch m ; w^hite off hind fetlock and near 
hind coronet, saddle mark (155). 

WALLER (Mr. F. J. Mackey), gr g; white legs, branded R near 

shoulder (43). 

WALNUT (Capt. W. H. Persse), light br g ; black points, saddle 
marks '^310). 

WATCHSPRING (14th Hussars), b g ; star, snip, white near fore 
and near hind coronets, white marks fore legs (621). 

WATERFALL (Mr. H. T. Timson), blk m; star, white marks front 
of off fore shin, saddle marks (368). 

WATSY (Capt. Paynter), b br m ; star, white off hind fedock, scars 
point of off shoulder and off hip (608). 

WEASEL (Mr. G. A. Miller), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white near fore 
and both hind fetlocks, brand on hind quarters, white spots all over (154)- 

WEASEL THE (Mr. W. J. Drybrough), b g ; off fore pastern white, 
star, saddle and girth marks (655). 

WELSH MAID (Mr. R. St. G. Robinson), br m ; black points 
(508). 



426 APPENDIX. 

WHANGEE (Mr. W. Buckmaster), b m ; white star on forehead, 
saddle marks (80). 

WHIST (Air. E. C. Judkin), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
near hind fetlock, and off hind leg (434). 

WHITE KNIGHT (Major H. T. Fenwick), grg; flea-bitten, brand 

near hind quarter, white fore fetlocks (284). 

WHITE THORN (Hon. R. Ward), b m ; saddle marks, few white 
hairs on forehead, slight scar above off eye (289). 

WHY NOT (Major Middleton), ch h ; small snip, white fore 
pasterns and near hind stocking, saddle marks (95). 

WILD CAT (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), b m ; very small star, black points, 
scar back of near hock, white mark inside near knee (523). 

WILD DRx^KE (Mr. J. Drage), gr g ; star, near hind leg white to 
fetlock, white on wither ; season only (12). 

WILD DUCK (Mr. J. Drage), gr m; white near hind fetlock, 
saddle marks both ribs, two on off, one on near side (13). 

WILLIAM (Capt. W. Neilson), br g ; black points, tan muzzle 

125). 

WINNIE (Mr. R. W. Hudson), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, near hind 
fetlock white, saddle marks (366). 

WOLFCATCHER (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), ch g ; star, grey hairs, 
branded 60 ne-ar hind and near fore quarters (75). 

WONDER (Comte de Madre), br m ; near white hind fetlock, star 

and faint blaze, tan muzzle (17). 

'WONDER (Capt. A. Richards), br m ; very small star, both hind 
fetlocks white (250). 

WOOD QUEST (Mr. A. Joyce), b m ; black points, white mark off 
side of neck, saddle marks (553). 

WOOD QUEST (Mr. R. W. Hall-Dare), b g ; white off hind 
fetlock (589). 



YELLOW BOY (Mr. W. H. Lambton), dun g ; black points, faint 
black mark down back, saddle marks (224). 



ZAMBRA (Hon. J. Dawnay), br h; star, white hind fetlocks, licked 
with white over body (369). 

ZAZEL (Mr. E. de Escandon), br m ; very faint star, black points, 
white spots on fore and hind legs, girth marks (493). 

ZERO (Mr. J. Drage), br m ; white patches on near hind coronet, 
grey hairs in tail (68). 

ZIGZAG (Mr. S. M. Dennis), b g; small star, black points, saddle 
marks (401). 

ZOEDONE (Mr. C. M. Grenfell), drk brg; star, snip, black points, 
small saddle marks (500). 



POLO PONIES, 1897. 427 



MEASURED PONIES UNNAMED. 

Mr. G. Hardy's ch m ; star, blemish near hind tendon (28). 

Capt. Mackenzie's b g ; brand near hind quarter (49). 

Mr. Brinton's b g ; both fore pasterns white, brand near hind quarter, 
faint star, small snip ; not passed (114). 

Capt. A. D. Miller's b g ; star, near hind leg white, saddle and girth 
marks (115). 

Capt. A. D. Miller's br m ; small star, saddle marks, scar off knee 
(116). 

Mr. J. Moore's b m; very small star, black points, collar scars (193). 

Col. Park's b m ; off hind heel and coronet white, saddle marks, faint 
black mark down back (197). 

Capt. Harrison's gr h ; large snip, white lower lip, near fore and near 
hind legs and off hind coronet white ; not passed (198). 

Mr. E. B. Sheppard's blk m ; star, saddle marks, blemish part of 
near shoulder (252). 

Mr. Clarence Wilson's ch g ; two wliite hind stockings and near fore 
stocking and off fore coronet, blaze, snip (257). 

Earl of Harrington's b m, 4 ; star, blaze snip, white lower lip passed 
for season (275). 

Capt. H. Sykes' ch h ; star, large scar front of chest, white mark 
front of near hind shin (311). 3 

Capt. Ferrar's gr h ; snip, white lower lip, white off hind and both 
fore legs (380). 

Mr. Henderson's b g ; star, snip, brand near shoulder, saddle and 
girth marks (460). ° 

Mr. Chinnery's chg; small star, hind fetlocks white (447). 

Capt. Meyrick's b m ; star, blaze, white mark near hind coronet, 
saddle mark (456). 

Mr. H. B. Cresswell's b m ; black points, off fore coronet white, white 
marks on wither, saddle marks (458). 

Mr. H. B. Cresswell's ch g ; star, blaze, snip, near hind coronet and 
off hind fetlock white, brand both shoulders near stifle (459). 

Capt. Byng's br m ; star, blaze, small snip, near fore and near hind 
fetlocks white, off hind pastern white, saddle marks (463). 

Capt. Byng's b m; star, narrow blaze, snip, both hind pasterns white, 
saddle marks (464). 

Capt. Kennedy's b m ; small star, black points, white mark top of 
near shoulder, saddle and girth marks (477). 



428 APPENDIX. 

Mr. Edge's blk m ; saddle and girth marks (527). 

Mr. W. A. Tilney's gr h ; star, blaze, snip, white near fore leg and 
hind fetlocks, little white on off fore pastern (626). 

Mr. W. A. Tilney's gr h ; few white spots near side of face, scar near 
hip and both sides of back (627). 

Mr. Adam's ch g ; faint star, white hind fetlocks, white brand near 
hind quarter (641). 

Mr. Peel's b g, 4 ; star, white hind fetlocks : passed for season 
(643). 



429 



POLO PONIES MEASURED AND REGISTERED 
AT HURLINGHAM, 1898. 



A I (Mr. L. McCreery), red roan m ; star, large spots on both hind 
quarters. No. 742. 

AARON (Capt. Ramsey), gr h ; blaze, snii3, white lower lip and 
hind legs, black mark near off side of neck. No. 1084. 

ABDUL (Mr. B. Montgomery), ch h ; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
leg and off hind fetlock white, ticked with white off flank, white spots on 
neck. No. 1245. 

ABDULLA (Mr. W. F. Robinson), bay h ; off hind coronet white. 
No. 1085. 

ABSENT FRIEND (Major K. MacLaren), dun g; star, near hind 
coronet white. No. 1086. 

ADELA (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), gr m; white face, collar 
marks. No. 1 261. 

ADOHR (Capt. H. Steed), gr m ; white face, fiea-bitten, collar 
marks. No. 1018. 

AIROSA (Capt. R. Alexander, Rifle Brigade), ch m ; star, white 
hind fetlocks, 4 years, passed for season. No. 1087. 

ALEXANDRA (Mr. W. A. Cooper), drk br m ; white marks near 
and off side ribs. No. 969. 

AMAZON (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, off hind 
fetlock white, scar off shoulder. No. 853. 

ANGEL (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), ch m ; star, snip, white 
near hind leg, off hind coronet and off fore fetlock. No. 1258. 

ANN (Colonel de Robeck), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind fetlock 
white, scar near fore shin. No. 995. 

ARAB STAR (Miss A. Gore-Booth), ch h; star, blaze, snip, 3 years 
(passed for season only). No. 1042. 

ARGENTINA (Sir Thos. Fowler), bg; branded 5 near hind quarter, 
white oft" hind coronet and heel. No. 801. 

ATHOS (Mr. A. E. Batchelor), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
fetlocks, brand near shoulder, scar oft" side of neck. No. 10S8. 



430 APPENDIX. 

ATTACK (Capt. Heygate), b m; star, blaze, white hind fetlocks, 
collar marks. No. 1089. 

AVOCA (Mr. B. Montgomery), b g ; star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 1243. 



BABBIE (Mr. Bernard Kidd), ch m ; star, scar front of near hind 
shin. No. 862. 

BACCHANTE (Mr. E. Lloyd), blk m; small star and snip, grey 
hairs in flank, collar marks. No. 869. 

BAGNAL (Mr. F. J. Balfour), b g; off hind fetlock white, brand 
near hind quarter. No. 928. 

BANJO (Mr. F. J. Balfour), bg; star, blaze, snip, lower lip, off hind 
coronet, near fore leg white, brand off hind quarter. No. 927. 

BANJO (Mr. W. B. Longsdon), ch g; blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
near hind leg, and off fore fetlock, white spots on both fore legs. No. 
1212. 

BANSHEE (Mr. A. Withers), ch m; stars, black spots on hind 
quarters ticked with white. No. 1076. 

BAR]MAID (Mr. R. L. Geanes), b m ; star, snip, white hind and 
near fore fetlocks, 4 years. Passed for season. No. 1091. 

BARNABY (Messrs. Withers), bg; near hind coronets, and off hind 
fetlock white. No. 752. 

BARNIE (Mr. A. C. Master), b g ; white face, lower lip, near and 
off hind legs and off fore fetlock, collar marks. No. 1090. 

BARON, THE (Mr. O. T. Slocock), ch g; star. No. 979. 

BARONESS (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), b m ; faint star, near hind 

fetlock white, brand near hind quarter, saddle and girth marks. No. 

743. 
BARONESS (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), gr m; white spots near hip and 

off shoulder, saddle and girth marks. No. 852. 
BARONET (Colonel de Robeck), br g ; star, saddle marks. No. 

1005. 
BEAN (Mr. Balfour), ch g; star, brand near hind quarter, saddle 

marks. No. S93. 
BECKY SHARP (Messrs. Withers), b m ; star, blaze, snip, off hind 

leg white, scar back of off shoulder. No. 753. 

BELINDA (Mr. H. C. McNeile), gr m; scar off hip, collar marks. 
No. 793. 

BENDER (Mr. James Farmer), 5 yrs., b m ; star, snip, near hind 
fetlock white. No. 802. 

BENDIGO (Mr. W. Buckmaster), b g ; brand near shoulder, scar 

outside near hock. No. 840. 
BERYL (Capt. Loftus), br m ; star, near hind fetlock white. No. 

954- ^ 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 431 

BETTY MARTIN (Messrs. Withers), ch m ; star, white spot near 

shoulder. No. 758. 

BIDDY (Major G. Bouverie), blk m ; star, white spots on both hind 

shins. No. 783. 

BIOGRAPH (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch g ; star, blaze, white spot upper 
lip and near jaw, brand off hind quarter. No. 1201. 

BIRDSEYE (Mr. Balfour), skewbald g; white face, lower lip and 
legs, brand near hind quarter. No. 907. 

BISHMULLA (Major O'Hara), b h; star, blaze, snip, white fetlocks, 
white marks above hocks and knees. No. 1235. 

BLACK BASS (Capt. Bidgood, R.A.), blk g; off hind coronet 
white. No. 1032. 

BLACKBERRY (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), blk m ; small 
star. No. 1265. 

BLACK BESS (Dr. Dooley), drk br m; tan muzzle. Two years 
(passed for season only). No. 1044. 

BLACKBIRD (Mr. R. P. O'Reilly), br m ; star, near hind fetlock 
white. No. 1047. 

BLACKBIRD (Mr. T. G. Gibson, Jr.), blk m ; star, snip. No. 
1092. 

BLACK DIAMOND (Mr. W. H. Jay), blk g; off hind coronet 
white. No. 781. 

BLACKIE (Mr. W. F. Robinson), blk g; white spots near fore leg. 
No. 1 196. 

BLACK JANE (Dr. T. O'Mearn), blk m ; star, blaze, snip, lower 
lip, near hind coronet, and off fore fetlock white. No. 947. 

BLACK LEG (Messrs. E. D. and G. A. Miller), blk g; star, blaze, 
both hind fetlocks and fore coronets white. No. 1266. 

BLACKMAN (Capt. Egerton Green), blk g; faint star. No. 860. 

BLACKWATER (Mr. T. Cradock), b m; star, scar near hind 
quarter. No. 1250. 

BLACK WILLIAM (Capt. Egerton Green), blk g; saddle and 
girth marks. No. 1273. 

BLACK WITCH (Mr. J. Watson), blk b m ; scar off fore coronet. 
No. 1248. 

BOOMERANG (Mr. A. Hugh Bainbridge), br m ; star, white spot 
off shoulder. No. 1080. 

BO-PEEP (Sir Thos. Fowler), 5 yrs., drk b m ; near hind coronet 
white, scar near fore shin. No. 803. 

BOSSEYE (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), b g; white face, lower lip and legs, 
brand off hind quarter, ticked with white. No. 899. 

BOULAK (Mr. T. D. Pilkington), b g; star, blaze, snip, white spots 
over body. No. 866. 



432 APPENDIX. 

BRANDON (Mr. W. A. Cooper), gr g ; star, girth marks, 4 yrs. 
(passedfor season only). No. 970. 

BRIDEGROOM (Mr. F. H. Wise, 13th Hussars), gr g; star, near 
hind fetlock white. No. 1020. 

BROWN MOUSE (Mr. W. H. Jay), br m ; star, near hind fetlock 
and off hind coronet white. No. 776. 

BUCKLE (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), blk m ; star, snip, both 
hind fetlocks white. No. 1260. 

BUCKSHOT (Mr. O. Sullivan), ch g ; star, blaze, near hind fetlock 
white. No. 1064. 

BUEN CRIOLLO (Mr. F. E. Kinchant), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, 
lower lip and near hind fetlock white, scar outside near hind pastern, 
brand off hind quarter. No. 917. 

BUMBLE BEE, late Vie Roack (Mr. S. I. Roack), br m ; star, 

white hind fetlocks. No 952. 
BUNGAY (Mr. Jules Wuidart), b m ; star, white hind fetlocks. 

No. 1093. 

CAHIRMEE, late Catarina (Major Rimington), br m ; star, blaze, 
snip, white lower lip, off hind fetlock and near fore coronet. No. 1012. 

CAPRICE (Mr. E. Lloyd), b m ; star, scar off fore fetlock, collar 
marks. No. 868. 

CAPT. JINKS (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), b g; small star, hind fetlocks 
and fore coronets white, brand on both quarters, saddle marks. No. 686. 

CARMEN (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), b g ; star, lower lip and hind 
leg white, white hairs in tail, brand near hind quarters. No. 685. 

CARTE DE VISITE (Mr. G. A. Miller), drk b m; star, blaze, 
snip, white near hind fetlock. No. 1094. 

CARTON (Colonel de Robeck), br m ; white spot near ribs. No. 

1003. 
CASE SHOT (Mr. W. S. Heather), b m ; star, near hind coronet 

white. No. 1040. 

CASSANDRA (Viscount Belgrave), b m ; star, white near hind leg, 
scar near flank. No. 1095. 

CASTANCE (Mr. Glen Williams), ch g; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
coronets, white marks on jaws, brand near hind quarter. No. 1096. 

CASTOR (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), b roan g ; white face, lower lip, off 
hind and both fore legs, and near hind coronet, white patches both sides, 
brand near hind quarter. No. 929. 

CATCH'EM (Hon. O. Hastings), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white off 
hind leg, scar off shoulder. No. 959. 

CATTERICK (Mr. A. G. Dalgety), 6 yrs., gr g ; dark spot near side 
of ribs, white mark near fore leg. No. 804. 

CHACARERO (Mr. A. J. Stourton), gr g; snip, lower lip white, 
brand near hind quarter, scars both shoulders. No. 741. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 433 

CHANCE (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), ch g; star, small snip, off 
hind coronet and near fore fetlock white, brand off quarter. No. 744. 

CHAPPIE (Mr. C. Innes Taylor), dun g ; white face, lower lip, 
both hind and near fore legs, and off fore fetlock, brand near hind quarter. 
No. 786A. 

CHEEPER (Mr. Balfour), blk g; star, brand near hind quarter, 
saddle marks. No. 895. 

CHELMSFORD (Mr. W. Braikenridge), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, 
white lower lip, off fore coronet and hind legs, 4 yrs. Passed for season. 
No. 1206. 

CHINAMAN (Capt. Egerton Green), br g ; girth marks, small scar 
inside off thigh. No. 767. 

CHOPETTE (Capt. Ramsey), ch m ; white marks both sides of 
ribs, white spot off hind shin. No. 1097. 

CINDERELLA (Hon. F. White), b m ; star, near hind and off fore 
fetlock white, brand near fore quarter. No. 910. 

CIRCE (Air. A. Rawlinson), ch m ; star, white hind fetlocks, white 
mark near forearm. Passed on appeal. No. 1202. 

CIRCUS GIRL (Mr. R, S. Clayton), br m ; star, snip, white lower 
lip, near fore and near hind fetlocks. No. 1098. 

CLEMENTINE (Capt. Loftus Bryan), b m ; scar about point of 
near hock. No. 1226. 

COBNUT (Major Rimington), b m; small white spot near hind 
quarter, white hind coronets. No. 990 

COBWEB (Mr. W. Buckmaster), b m; star, near fore coronet and 
both hind and fore fetlocks white. No. 842. 

COCOA (Mr. A. Pyke), ch g ; star, blaze, off hind fetlock white. 

No. 1099. 

COFFEE (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), dun m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
and near hind fetlock white. No. 740. 

COME-ON (Mr. L. McCreery), br m; small star, snip, collar, girth 
and saddle marks. No. 739. 

COMPETITOR (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), br m ; star, white 
spot off ribs. No. 676A. 

COQUETTE (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), blk m; white hind fetlocks, 
brand near quarter. No. 738. 

COQUETTE (Mr. Leighton), blk m ; near hind fetlock white. No. 

865. 

CORDOVA (Mr. Balfour), br g ; star, brand near hind quarter, 
white patch off side of back. No. 894. 

CORLICAN (Capt. Loftus Bryan), b m ; star, off hind fetlock 
white, white mark below near elbow. No. 1227. 

COUNTESS (Mr. W. H. Jay), b m ; scar on face, girth and saddle 
marks. No. 782. 

28 



434 APPENDIX. 

COUNTESS (Mr. John Nettleton), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, collar 
marks. No. 798. 

CRESCENT (Capt. H. de B. de Lisle), br m; star, snip. No. 
1254. 

CRY HELP (Mr. P. W. Connolly), ch m ; star, white mark off hind 
quarter, 4 years (passed for season only). No. 103 1. 

CRYHELP (Mr. Peel, R.H.A.), b g; star, snip, white hind 
fetlocks. No. 1008. 

CRYSTAL (Capt. A. Butler), blk brg; white spots off ribs. No. 
1 100. 

CROSS-PATCH (Mr. L. McCreery), roan m; star, spotted muzzle, 
off hind fetlock and off fore coronet white, scar off fore shin, large spots 
both hind quarters. No. 737. 

CUCKOO (Messrs. Withers), b m; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
fetlocks. No. 754. 

CURRAGH (Mr. C. de Robeck), b g ; star, near fore coronet white. 
No. 1 22 1. 

Dx\IRIUS (Mr. A. Suart), b g ; star, blaze, snip, near hind coronet 
white. No. 1068. 

DAISY BELL, by Zither (Mr. W. H. Jay), b m; scar off fore 
coronet, white spots off shoulder, collar marks. No. 768. 

DAISY BELLE (Dr. Colgan), drk br m ; star, white marks both 
forelegs. No. 961. 

DANCE (Mr. F. J. Mackey), red roan g ; white face and legs, brand 
off hind quarter and near side neck. No. 736. 

DANDY (Mr. F. A. Gill), br g; girth and saddle marks. No. 
684. 

DANDY (Mr. G. Heseltine), br g; star, snip, off hind coronet 
white, brand near shoulder, and near hind quarter. No. 121 1. 

DAPSTER (Mr. James Farmer), 5 yrs., br g; star, snip, off hind 
fetlock white, collar marks. No. 805. 

DARKIE (Mr. A. C. Master), blk g; star, white hind fetlocks ; 4 
yrs. ; passed for the season. No. iioi. 

DARRY (Mr. G. Doman), b m; star, scars off side rib, and off 
shoulder. No. 1102. 

DAY BOY (Capt. Brooksbank, 14th Hussars), b g; star, off hind 
fetlock white. No. 1016. 

DAWN (Capt. H. de B. de Lisle), ch m ; star. No. 1255. 

DEAR BOY (Mr. Balfour), b g; star, near hind leg white, brand 
near hind quarter, saddle marks. No. 888. 

DEAREST (Capt. T. T. Macan), br m ; scars on neck, faint star, 
white mark off knee. No. 871. 

DEAREST (Mr. P. W. Connolly), bm; star, blaze, snip, off fore 
fetlock white. No. 1037. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 435 

DELIGHT (Mr. G. Doman), br m ; star, ticked with white hairs. 
No. 1 103. 

DEUCE ACE (Mr. G'SulHvan), dun m ; star, blaze, both hind and 
near fore fetlocks white. No. 1052. 

DIAMOND (Mr. A. Rawlinson), drk br m; tan muzzle, white 
mark both knees, saddle marks. No. 735. 

DIANA (Mr. John Nettleton), gr m ; black spots off shoulder and 
ribs, white marks back of hind legs. No. 795. 

DIANA (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), b m ; scar, white mark on neck. No. 

858. 

DICE BOX (Colonel de Robeck), bg; star, blaze, snip, w^hite mark 
inside both knees. No. 996. 

DINAH (Mr. H. D. McNeile), dun m ; black stripe down back, 
scar near shoulder. No. 792. 

DODO (Mr. Charles T. Craig), gr m ; near hind fetlock white, 
white mark front off hind shin. No. 806. 

DOLLY VARDEN (Mr. L. McCreery), b br m ; star, faint blaze, 
scars outside off hind leg, near fore shin and near shoulder, saddle and 
girth marks. No. 734. 

DON, THE (Mr. H. C. Higgin), gr h; white spots on muzzle, black 
and brown spots over body. No. 1 104. 

DONISHALL (Messrs. E. D. & G. A, Miller), b g; near hind 
coronet white. No. 1270. 

DORMILON (Mr. Balfour), br g ; star, snip, off fore and hind 
fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 896. 

DOROTHY (Mr. T. L. Moore), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
fetlocks. No. 1220. 

DUCHESS (Capt. Brooksbank, 14th Hussars), ch m ; star, white 
hind fetlocks, scar near hind shin._ No. 1017. 

DUN, THE (Colcnel W. A. Cardwell), dun m ; scar front off hind 
shin, and back off fore leg, saddle and collar marks. No. 807. 

DUNDALK (Mr. Alfred Withers), gr m ; blaze, snip. No. 1105. 

DUSTER (Mr. H. Scott-Robscn), ch g ; face, lower lip, hind legs, 
and near fore coronet white, brand off quarter. No. 733. 

EASTBOURNE (Mr. H. Lawson), b g; star, white near hind 
coronet. No. 1 106. 

EILEEN (Colonel W. A. Cardwell), br or b m ; scar off fore 
coronet, white mark back of near fore leg, saddle marks. No. 80S. 

EMILY (Dr. T. O'Mearn), br m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind and 
near fore fetlocks white. No. 946. 

EMMA (Capt. Egerton Green), b m ; star, white mark off fore leg 
and off side of neck. No. 764. 

EMPRESS (Mr. John Nettleton), b m ; star, white marks on near 
hind shin, off hind leg and off flank, saddle marks. No. 797. 

28* 



436 APPENDIX. 

ERIN (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), roan m; star, near hind fetlock white, 
white marks outside off hocks. No, 1 107. 

EVA (Mr. Bernard Kidd) ; star, white mark left quarter and both 
shoulders. No. 861. 

EVERGREEN (Mr. W. E. Grogan), gr m ; star, blaze. No. 966. 

EXCHANGE (Mr. W. S. Heather), ch m; star, blaze. No. 1041. 

EXPRESS (Mr. A. Withers), b g ; white spots near hind quarter, 
scar both sides hock, collar marks. No. 1075. 



FAIRY (Mr. F. A. Gill), b m ; star, white spot on withers. No. 
683. 

FAIRY BLAST (Hon. O. Hastings), ch m ; star, white spot near 
flank. No. 974. 

FANCY (Major K. MacLaren), b m ; star, blaze, snip, off hind 
coronet white. No. 1108. 

FARM VIXEN (Capt. E. Makins, ist Dragoons), dan m ; star, 
blaze, snip, white hind fetlocks. No. 788. 

FATMA (Mr. T. Cradock), gr m ; snip, white spot lower lip, near 

hind fetlock white. No. 1251. 

FAUGH- A-BALLAGH (Mr. Rupert S. Gwynne), br or b g; off 
hind fetlock, saddle marks. No. 809. 

FAWN, THE (F. A. Gill), chm ; star, blaze, snip, both hind fetlocks 
white. No. 1272. 

FEO (Mr. C. Innes Taylor), blk g; star, white hind fetlocks and 
fore legs, brand near hind quarter. No. 785. 

FIDGET (Colonel W. A. Cardwell), b g ; faint blaze, snip, fore 
coronets white, saddle marks. No. 810. 

FIDGET (Mr. Charles T. Craig), light b or dun m ; small white 
star, black lines down back. No. 811. 

FIDGET (Capt. Carey), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white spot on lower 
lip, near hind fetlock and off hind coronet white. No. 1109. 

FIGET (Dr. T. O'Mearn), b m; star, snip, white lower lip, brand 
off ear. No. 963. 

FILE, THE (Mr. Balfour), b g ; star, snip, off hind fetlock white, 
brand off hind quarter. No. 890. 

FIREFLY (Capt. A. Butler), ch m ; white face, lower lip and both 
hind and near fore legs, black patch off hock. No. mo. 

FIRST POP (Mr. F. J. Townsend), 4 yrs., b g ; near hind coronet 
white. Passed for the season only. No. 812. 

FIZZER (Mr. W. H. Jay), blk g; off hind fetlock white. No. 
775- 

FLASH (Mr. W. H. Jay), b m; near hind fetlock and off hind 
coronet white, scar on near flank. No. 771. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 437 

FLICKAMAROO (Marchioness of Downshire), br m; scar off side 
of neck. No. nil. 

FLIRT, THE (Mr. E. Targett), b m ; star, 4 yrs. Passed on appeal 
for season. No. 11 12. 

FLIRT (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), blk m; white hind fetlocks, scar 
and brand near quarter. No. 732. 

FOLLOW ME (Mr. L. McCreery), 4 yrs., br m ; small star, small 
white spot off hind quarter. Passed for the season only. No. 731. 

FOLLY (Capt. R. Peel, 2nd Life Guards), b m ; black stripe. No. 

730- 
FOLLY (Colonel de Robeck), b m ; white spot below off hock, off 

hind coronet white. No. 993. 

FOX (Mr. T. F. Cooke), br g; near hind coronet white. No. 1233. 

FRECKLES (Mr. H. Way), b g ; star. No. 1208. 

FREDDY (Mr. A. Robinson), b g ; white marks on both hind and 
near fore tendons, brand near hind quarter. No. 1200. 

FRIDAY (Mr. Herbert Blyth), ch m ; star, white mark off shoulder. 
No. 769. 

FRITZ (Mr. R. R. Baker), 5 yrs., b g ; scar both knees, small 
saddle marks. No. 813. 

FRIVOLITY (Mr. A. Hugh Bainbridge), b m ; dark spot off ribs. 
No. 1 08 1. 

FUSEE (Messrs. Withers), b m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind and off 
fore fetlock white. No. 756. 

GADFLY, late Rourke's Drift (Messrs. Millers), ch m ; star, blaze, 
snip, lower lip, near hind and off fore leg white. 4 years. Passed for 
season only. No. 944. 

GAUCHO (Mr. A. J. Stourton), blk g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
and legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 729. 

GAY BOY (Mr. F. J. Balfour), ch g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip, 
both hind and off fore legs white, brand near hind quarter, white spot near 
ribs. No. 925. 

GEISHA (Mr. Godfrey Heseltine), br m ; star, scar point of chest. 

No. 875. 

GENERAL, THE (Mr. H. C. Talbot Rice), b g; near hind coronet 
white, scar outside near fore leg. No. 1 1 13. 

GEORGIA (Mr. W. Braikenbidge), b g; white spots on hind 
quarters, white spots off knee. No. 1205. 

GIGOLETTE (Mr. Godfrey Heseltine), b br m ; star, upper lip, 
near hind fetlock and off hind coronet white. No. 874. 

GINGER (Messrs. Withers), ch m; star, blaze, snip, scar near fore 
arm. No. 755. 

GINGER (Mr. J. Fulton), ch g ; white face, both hind legs and off 
fore fetlock. No. 11 14. 



438 APPENDIX. 

GIPSY (Mr. T. B. Godman), br m; near hind fetlock white, saddle 

marks. No. 850. 

GITANA (Mr. C. Innes Taylor), ch m ; face, lower lip, both hind 
legs and fore fetlock white, 4 years. Passed for season only (on appeal). 
No. 787. 

GO BANG (Mr. H. Wilson), b m ; star, near hind fetlock grey and 

white, white marks both fore legs. No. i US- 
GO BANG (Mr. L. McCreery), b g ; star, blaze, snip, near hind 

fetlock white, scar off side of back. No. 728, 

GOLD LEAF (Colonel de Robeck), ch m ; white spots both fore 
legs. No. 1002. 

GOOD COMPANY (Capt. Paynter), b m; white hind fetlocks. 
No. 1 1 16. 

GOOD GIRL (Mr. James Farmer), 6 yrs., b m; star, narrow blaze, 
small snip, off hind coronet white. No. 814. 

GOOSE, THE (Mr. W. E. Grogan), gr m ; white hind coronets, 
saddle and girth marks. No. 967. 

GRANNY (Mr. W. C. Symon), gr m ; blaze, white marks on fore 
legs. No. 1210. 

GRASSHOPPER (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), b g ; blaze, snip, lower 
lip and legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 727. 

GREY BROTHER (Mr. J. Clarke), grg; white hind legs, saddle 

marks. No. 726. 

GREY LEG (Mr. R. Robinson), gr g; white eyelids, white spots on 
muzzle, off hind fetlock white, brand near hind quarter. No. 11 17. 

GREY LEG (Mr. A. C. Kenyon Fuller), gr g ; white marks above 
both hocks and fore legs, scar both sides of ribs. No. 1118. 

GREYLING (Capt. Loveband), gr m ; scar near hind fetlock, white 
spot near ribs. No. looi. 

GUNSHOT (Mr. P. W. Connolly), blk m ; star, scar near nostril. 
No. 1030. 

GROUSE (Mr. E. Booth), brg; star. No. 1247. 



HAIDEE (Capt. A. Butler), drk b m; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
fetlocks, white spots front of chest, near shoulder and neck. No. 1 1 19. 

HARLEQUIN (Mr. F. J. Townsend), 4 yrs., ch m ; star, blaze, 
snip, collar marks, white legs, black spot near hind quarter. Passed for 
season only. No. 815. 

HARP STRING (Capt. Loftus), b g; off hind coronet white. No. 

957- 
HEx\THER BELLE (Mr. H. C. Cavendish Fitzroy), ch m; star, 

white spot near and off ribs. No. 843. 

HEIRESS (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), bay roan m; star, blaze, 
snip, near hind leg white, white marks both hind quarters. No. 1268. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 439 

HIGH LIFE (Mr. L. McCreery), 4 yrs., ch m ; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind fetlock and off fore coronet white, scar off quarter. Passed for the 
season only. No. 725. 

HONESTY (Messrs. E. D. & G.A.Miller), blk m; star, blaze, 
snip, off hind fetlock white, saddle marks. No. 724. 

HONEY (Mr. Stanley Mortimer), cr g ; off hind leg and off fore 
fetlock white, brand near hind quarter. No. 876. 



ICICLE (Mr. F. J. Balfour), wh g; black spots over body, brand 
near hind quarter. No. 924. 

IDA (Mr. A. Suart), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, hind 
legs ticked with white hairs. No. 1072. 

INDIO (]Mr. C. Innes Taylor), br g; scar outside of hock, saddle 
marks. No. 786. 

INNISBEG (Mr. E. Booth), ch m ; star, blaze, off hind fetlock 
white. No. 1246. 

INQUISITIVE (Messrs. E. C. & G. A. Miller), b m ; off hind 
coronet white. No. 1267. 

IRISH GIRL (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m ; white spot near 
side of ribs. No. 1269. 

IT (Earl of Harrington), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, off hind coronet, 
near hind and off fore fetlocks white, 4 yrs. Passed for season. No. 
848. 

IVY (Capt. Egerton Green), ch m; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock white. No. 859. 



JACK (Mr. Blois), dun g ; white face, lower lip, jaw, both hind and 
near fore legs and flanks, brand near hind quarter. No. 1 121. 

JACK (Mr. L. A. Howard), blk g; white hairs on face, and collar 
marks. No. 11 20. 

JACK (Mr. J. Richards), b g; near fore coronet white. No. 
1059. 

JACK-IN-THE-BOX (Mr. W. H. Jay), bg ; saddle and girth marks. 
No. 778. 

JACQUETTE (Sir Thos. Fowler), b m : faint star, few white hairs 
on forehead, near hind coronet white, collar marks. No. 816. 

JANE (Mr. W. E. Grogan), b m; star, off hind fetlock and coronet 
white, grey hairs in tail. No. 965. 

JEANNETTE (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), blk m ; near hind coronet 
white, brand near quarter. No. 723. 

JENNY (Major K. MacLaren), dun m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip, near hind and off fore fetlocks. No. 1122. 

JERPOINT (Mr. W. A. Cooper), b m; faint black line down hind 
quarters, saddle and girth marks. No.. 941. 



440 APPENDIX. 

JESSIE (Mr. A. W. B. Spencer, 13th Hussars), ch m; star, blaze, 
snip, lower lip white, black spot near ribs, scar near fore coronet. No. 
1014. 

JEST (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch m ; star, blaze, near hind fetlock 
white. No. 722. 

JESTER (the Duchess of Newcastle), b g ; star, white near hind 
fetlock and near fore coronet, white spots off fore coronet, 4 yrs. Passed 
for season. No. 1207. 

JILL (Mr. Herbert H. Wilson), ch m ; scar near loin, saddle marks. 

No. 749. 

JIMIMA (Capt E. W. Pedder), b m; white spots on fore legs. 
No. 1 123. 

JINNIE (Mr. E. C. Sandars), gr m ; white spots on upper lip, scars 
off ribs, flea-bitten face. No. 1124. 

JINNY (Mr. Gerald W. Hobson), ch m; star, blaze, scar both hind 
quarters, white spots off hind quarter. No. 1083. 

JOE COTTON (Mr. Stanley Mortimer), ch h ; face, lip and legs 
white, white spots over body. No. 880. 

JUANITA (Mr. S. Yearsley), blk m ; brand near hind quarter, white 
marks above both knees. No. 1078. 

JUDITH (Capt. Heygate), roan m ; white face, lower lip and legs, 
white spots over body. No, 1125. 

JUDY (Mr. J. Alexander), gr m; white marks near ribs. No. 
949. 

JUDY (Mr. H. Goodman), b m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind fetlock 
white. No. 1009. 

JUDY (Mr. P. P. O'Reilly), b m ; star, white hind fetlocks. No. 

1055- 

JUMPS (Mr. A. J. Stourton), b g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip and 
legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 949A. 



KATHLEEN (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), br m; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind coronet white. No. 720. 

KICKAMAROO (Mr. T. L. Moore), br m; star, white hind 
coronets. No. 121 7. 

KILDARE (Mr. J. Reid Walker), br m ; star, saddle and girth 
marks. No. 719. 

KINGFISHER (Mr. J. W. Lamont), gr g; white spot on lower lip, 
scar and brown spots on face. No. 11 26. 

KITTIE (Mr, J. E. Cairnes), b m ; star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 1 127. 

KITTY O'BRIEN (Mr. Neil Haig), b m ; star, near hind fetlock 
white, collar marks. No, 1128, 

KLONDIKE (Mr, F, Freke), drk b g; white off hind fetlock, scar 
near hind quarter. No. 1074. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 441 

KLONDYKE (Mr. Balfour), blk g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip, off 
hind fetlock, near hind and both fore legs white, brand near hind quarter. 
No. 905. 



LADY BIRD (Capt. A. M. Balfour, R.A.), br m; star, large scar 
off fore coronet, saddle marks. No. 817. 

LADY BIRD (Mr. James Farmer), b m ; star, snip. No. 818. 

LADYBIRD (Mr. C. P. Stedall), bm ; star, white marks both flanks. 
No. 1 129. 

LADY CICELY (Colonel W. H. Walker), gr m ; star, white spot 
point of off shoulder, 4 years. Passed for season. No. 11 30. 

LADY FREDERICK (Mr. R. P. O'Reilly), ch m ; (re-measured, 
see No. 577). No. 1046. 

LADY GEORGINA (Dr. Dooley), br m; star, blaze, snip, whke 
lower lip and both hind fetlocks, 4 years. Passed for season only. No. 
1051. 

LADY GOLIGHTLY (Earl of Harrington), b m ; star, saddle and 
girth marks. No. 847. 

LADY GOUGH (Mr. A. C. Kenyon Fuller), b m; star, off hind 
coronet, near fore and near hind fetlocks white, white marks off fore legs. 
No. 1 131. 

LADY GOUGH (Mr. R. Hudson), bm; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and near hind leg, white hairs in tail. No. 1053. 

LADY KITTY II. (Mr. S. Yearsley), b m; white spots near hind 
quarter, black line down back, white mark above off hock. No. 1077. 

LADY PAT (Major K. MacLaren), skewbald m ; star, blaze, snip, 
white legs, brand near side of back, collar marks. No. 1 132. 

LADY-IN-WAITING (Mr. J. W. Lamont), b m ; star, blaze, snip, 
near fore and near hind fetlocks, and off fore coronet white. No. 11 33. 

LARKY PRINCESS (Mr. L. C. Wynne), gr m ; near hind fetlock 
white. No. 1036. 

LATCH KEY (Hon. G. Ward), blk m ; star, near hind fetlock 
white, white marks both fore legs. No. 1 1 34. 

LEIVISTA (Mr. F. E. Kinchant), br g; star, snip, near hind and 
off fore fetlocks white and grey, brand near hind quarter. No. 918. 

LIMPIAS (Mr. H. Scott-Robson), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
and near hind leg white, black mark down back, brand near shoulder. 
No. 718. 

LISRYAN (Mr. P. P. O'Reilly), br m ; white spots both hind 
quarters. No. 1054. 

LOBSTER (Hon. F. White), b g ; near hind coronet and off hind 
leg grey, brand near hind quarter. No. 913. 

LOCUST (Mr. Follet Holt), dun g ; star, blaze, near hind and both 
fore fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 886, 



442 APPENDIX. 

LOOK-OUT (Mr. L. McCreery), gr roan g ; star, snip, white hind 
fetlocks. No. 717. 

LUCINDA (Capt. Egerton Green), ch m ; star, white hind legs and 
near fore fetlock. No. 1066. 

LUCY LOCKET (Capt. E. Makins, ist Dragoons), b roan m ; star, 
collar marks. No. 870. 

LUIDA (Mr. John Nettleton), br m; star, saddle and girth marks. 
No. 799. 

LUNA (Mr. Balfour J, piebald g; face, lower lip, hind legs and near 
fore leg white, brand near hind quarter. No. 897. 

LUNATIC (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b g; star white marks front of off 
fore and off hind shin, scars on off knee, near fore shin and off fore arm, 
saddle marks. No. 690. 



McCLAY (Mr. Peel, R.H.A.), b m ; star, blaze, grey hairs in flank 
and tail, off hind fetlock white. No. 1007. 

MACK (Mr. F. J. Balfour), blk g; star, saddle and girth marks, 
brand near hind quarter. No. 926. 

MADELINE (Sir Thos. Fowler), 5 yrs., br m ; small star, off hind 
coronet white. No. 819. 

MAGIC (Mr. O. T. Slocock), b m ; star, near hind coronet white. 
No. 976. 

MAGNET (Mr. D. Hudson), br m; star, near hind legs and off 
hind fetlock white. No. 11 35. 

MAHOMET (Mr. R. S. Clayton), blk g; star, snip, white marks 
above both hocks and off knee, scar near side of neck. No. 11 36. 

MAKEHASTE (Mr. Balfour), bg; face, lower lip and legs white, 
brand off hind quarter, white patch near hip. No. 891. 

MAMELUKE (Mr. H. Scott Robson), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind coronet white, brand near quarter, saddle marks. No. 716. 

MANNERS (Mr. Balfour), b g ; star, both hind and off fore fetlocks 
white, brand near hind quarter. No. 908. 

MAORI KING (Mr. Follet Holt), drk br g; brand near hind 
quarters, saddle marks. No. 885. 

MARCH HARE (Capt. Hare), b g ; star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 1045. 

MARIA (Mr. Innes), b m ; star, snip, off hind coronet white. No. 
998. 

MARIA (Mr. F. Belleville), iron gr m ; star, scar off ribs, grey hairs 
in tail, saddle marks. No. 715. 

MARIOSA (Capt. R. Alexander), b roan m ; star, snip, white hairs 
in tail. No. 1137. 

MARITANA (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), b m ; star, 4 years (passed for 
season only). No. 1029. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 443 

MARJORY (Mr. A. Suart), b m ; star, white hind fetlocks. No. 
1070. 

MARLEY (Mr. CoUins), b m; white hind coronets, white spots off 
fore fetlock. No. 1230. 

MARRON GLACE (Capt. Campbell Johnson), ch m ; star, blaze, 
snip, white hind legs and near fore fetlock, white spots in tail. No. 
1 1 38. 

MARTINGALE (Hon. H. Scott Robson), b br g; star, blaze, snip, 
lower lip and near fore and both hind fetlocks white, brand off quarter. 
No. 713. 

MASTER THOMAS (Mr. John Henry Elliott), b g ; star, white hind 
fetlock, saddle marks. No. 820. 

MATCH BOX (Messrs. Withers), ch m ; face, lower lip, near hind 
leg white, off hind leg partly white, 4 yrs. (season only). No. 763. 

MATILDA (Mr. B. C. Kidd), b m ; star, scar near forearm. No. 

1139- 
MAY (Mr. T. S. Green way), drk ch m ; star, blaze, brand near 

shoulder, white spot near hind quarter. No. 1 141. 

MELBORNE (Mr. W. A. Cooper), ch g; star, snip, white hind fet- 
locks. No. 940. 

MENELIK (Mr. A. J. Stourton), roan g; face, lower lip, lower jaw^s 
and all legs white, large white marks both flanks. No. 714. 

MENZIES (Mr. C. Sheather), ch m; star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 1 142. 

MERCEDES (Mr. R. Hudson), br m ; collar marks, near hind 
coronet white. No. 1229. 

MERCURY (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), gr g; hind fetlocks, near fore 
fetlocks and off hind coronet white, saddle marks. No. 854. 

MERMAID, by Sea Horse (Mr. W. H. Jay), dun m ; star, blaze, off 
hind fetlock, near hind and both fore coronets white. No. 773. 

MERMAID (Capt. J. Hanwell), b m ; star, off hind fetlock white. 
No. 1 140. 

MERMAID (Mr. R. L. Geanes), b m ; off hind fetlock white, 4 yrs. 
(passed for season ). No. 1 143. 

MERMAID (Mr. W. E. Grogan), br m ; star, snip, wart scar near side 
of neck. No. 968. 

MERRY HORN (Mr. Alfred Withers), ch g; star, blaze, near hind 
coronet white, white spot near side of neck and off shoulder. No. 1199. 

MERRY MAID (Mr. A. J. Pilkington), b m; few white hairs both 
sides of ribs, 4 yrs. (passed for season only). No. 1058. 

MERRY THORNE (Capt. Bidgood, R.A.), ch g; star, blaze, snip, 
near hind leg white, 4 years (passed for season only). No. 1034. 

MICKEY FREE (Hon. O. Hastings), b g. No. 977. 

MIDNIGHT (Capt. Campbell Johnston), drk br m ; star, off hind 
fetlock white, white off stifle. No. 1144. 



444 ' APPENDIX. 

MILKMAID (Capt, T. Macan), br m ; scar outside near hock, 
saddle marks. No. 846. 

MINX (Mr. T. F. Cooke), br m ; star, near hind coronet white, 
white mark near fetlock. No. 1232. 

MISS CICELY (Colonel W. H. Walker), gr m ; white spots off hind 
^quarter. No. 1145. 

MISS FORTUNE (Colonel de Robeck), drk br g; star. No. 1004. 

MISS LAX (Mr. R. R. Barker), 5 yrs., b m ; star, large snip, narrow 
blaze, saddle and girth marks. No. 821. 

MISS MEATH (Mr. A. G. Dalgety), 5 yrs., b m ; saddle marks near 
side. No. 822. 

MISS MEGG (Mr. James Farmer), br m ; star, small white spot in 
mane, scar near fore leg, saddle marks. No. 823. 

MISS POLLY (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), b m ; star, blaze, snip, saddle 
and girth marks. No. 855. 

MISS REILLY (Dr. Dooley), b m; star. No. 1050. 

MISS SHARP (Mr. A. Dalgety), 5 yrs., b m ; star, narrow blaze, 
H' snip, few grey hairs in mane. No. 824. 

MISS SULLIVAN (Mr. O'Sullivan), ch m; star, blaze, snip, near 
hind fetlock and ofif hind coronet white. No. 1062. 

MISTER ORD (Mr. Neil Haig), blk g; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and legs, brand near hind quarter. No. 1 146. 

MISTLETOE (Mr. H. Lawson), b m ; star, blaze. No. 1147. 

MOLLY (Mr. R. Lonsdale), b m : star, snip, white lower lip, both 
hind and off fore fetlocks. No, 1033. 

MOLLY PAWN (Mr. A. Topham), blk m ; star, snip, white hind 
fetlock. No. 1022. 

MONA (Mr. James Farmer), 5 yrs., b m ; star, blaze, lower lip white, 
white legs. No. 825. 

MOONLIGHTER (Mr. J. R. Aspinall), gr; blaze, snip, white lower 
lip and near fore and off hind fetlocks. No. 1148. 

MOONSTONE (Mr. R. St. G. Robinson), br g ; tan muzzle. No. 
1026. 

MORGIANA(Mr. C. C. Wilson), ch ; star, blaze, snip, white near 
fore and near hind fetlocks, white mark near hind shin, 4 yrs. (passed for 
season). No. 1204. 

MOSES (Capt. Ramsey), gr g; snip, white lower lip and near hind 
fetlock. No. 1 149. 

MOSQUITO (Mr. Balfour), br g ; snip, near hind fetlock white, 
brand near hindquarter. No. 892. 

MOUSE (Mr. Hamilton Russell), drk br m ; near hind fetlock, off 
hind coronet white. No. 11 50. 

MUFTI (Mr. H. C. Higgin), gr g ; off ear snip. No. 115 1. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 445 

MULLINGAR (Mr. 0'Sullivan),b m; star, near hind fetlock and off 
hind coronet white. No. 1063. 

MUSCIPSULUS (Mr. H. F. Ford), ch m; star, blaze, snip, both 
hind and near fore fetlocks white. No. 864. 

MY GIRL (Mr. J. Gouldsmith), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
fetlocks. No. 992. 

NANCY (Capt. T. Macan), b m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind and 
near fore fetlocks white, scar point of near shoulder. No. 845. 

NAWAB (Mr. A. E. Gostling), br h; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
and near fore fetlocks white. No. 11 52. 

NELLIE (Mr. J. T. Wigan, 13th Hussars), b m; star 4 years 
(passed for season only). No. 1013. 

NETTLE (Mr. E. B. Sheppard), b m; star, off hind coronet 
white. No. 1153. 

NIGHT STAR (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), br m; star, white hind 
fetlocks, collar marks. No. 826. 

NOBBY (Mr. A. E. Gostling), drk bh; star, near hind fetlock and 
off hind coronet white, scars off ribs. No. 11 55. 

NOISETTE (Mr. R.St. G. Robinson), ch m; star, blaze, snip, 
near fore and near hind fetlocks and off hind coronet white, 4 years 
(passed for season only). No. 1025. 

NORA (Mr. T. S. Greenway), dapple gr m ; near hind fetlock white. 
No. 1 1 56. 

NUN, THE (Mr. W. S. Heather;, blk m. No. 1039. 

NUTCRACKER (Major Rimington), drk b m ; star, white marks 
both sides of ribs, scar front of hind fetlock. No. 989. 



OLIVE (Mr. Godfrey Heseltine), b m ; near hind coronet white, 
scars on both hocks. No. 873. 

ON THE HOP (Mr. L. McCreery), ch g ; near hind fetlock white, 
black spot off quarter. No. 712. 

OOFBIRD (Mr. A. Watts), b m; tipped with white both flanks. 
No. 1238. 

OVERO (Mr. Follett Holt), piebald g ; face, lower lip, and legs 
white, brand on both hindquarters. No. 916. 



PATCHWORK (Mr. W. H. Jay), skewbald m ; star, blaze, snip, 
lower lip and legs white, 4 years (passed for season only). No. 777. 

PEARL, late Miss Roark (Messrs. Millers), gr m ; white marks 
both sides of ribs. No. 943. 

PEBBLE (Mr. W. Buckmaster), br m ; saddle and girth marks. No 
841. 



446 APPENDIX. 

PEGGY (Mr. H. Tudor), b m ; star, off hind fetlock white, mark 
down back. No. 1157. 

PEGGY (Capt. L. Bryan), b m ; scars near hind quarter, off ribs and 
near fore pastern. No. 1 214. 

PET (Mr. F. A. Gill), br m ; star, saddle and girth marks. No. 682. 

PETACAS (Mr. F. E. Kinchant), gr g ; black spots over body, scar 
on off ribs, brand near hind quarter. No. 919. 

PETER (Mr. J. Fulton), b g ; star, collar marks, white spot off fore- 
arm. No. 1 158. 

PET FOX (Mr. C. de Robeck), blkg; star, snip, white fore coronet 
and hind fetlocks. No. 1 2 19. 

PHCEBE (Mr. John Henry Elliott), b m ; star, small snip, grey hairs 
on face, off hind fetlock white, saddle marks. No, 827. 

PHCENIX (Capt. T. Macan), b m ; star, white near hind fetlock, 
scar and white mark off fore leg. No. 872. 

PHYLLIS (Mr. Alfred Withers), drk br m ; star, fired both hocks. 
No. 1 1 98. 

PHYSICIAN (Mr. H. Scott Robson), b piebald g; face, lower lip 
and all legs white, brand near quarter. No. 711 

PICASO (Colonel W. A. Cardwell), blk g ; star, blaze, snip, white 
hind fetlocks, brand near hind quarter. No. 828. 

PICQUET (Mr. Wilson), blk br m ; white hairs on poll, white spot 
inside both knees. No. 1 1 59. 

PINTO BILL (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), piebald g ; face, near fore and 
hind legs and off knee white. No. 745. ^^ 

PINWIRE (Major Rimington), b m ; star, blaze, snip. No. 991. 

PLAYFUL (Mr. F. Belleville), br m. No. 710. (Measured last 
year as a 4 year-old. See No. 659). 

PLEDGE (Capt. L. Bryan), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip 
and off fore coronet, white hairs in tail. No. 1 21 5. 

PLOUGHBOY (SirF. Burdett), drkbrg; near hind coronet white, 

scar off shoulder and near flank. No. 11 60. 

PLUNGER, THE (Mr. A. Blyth), b g ; star, blaze, snip, scar on 
forehead, near hind and both fore fetlocks white, black spot on back ; 
passed on appeal. No. 11 63. 

POLICY (Sir H. F. de Trafford), ch m ; star, blaze, off hind coronet 
white. No. 681. 

POLLUX (Mr. J. Ravenscroft), br g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip, off 
hind and both fore legs and flanks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 
887. 

POLLY (Mr. H. Goodman), drk br m ; star, white hind fetlocks. 
No. loii. 

POM-POM (Mr. W. Blumson), gr g ; white legs, brand on both fore 
legs. No. 935. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 447 

POPCORN (Mr. Stanley Mortimer), ch g; white face and lower 
lip, white spots over body, branded near cheek, near, fore, and hind 
quarters. No. 878. 

PORTENO (Mr. F. E. Kinchant), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and legs, branded both hind quarters. No. 920. 

PORTO RICO (Major Porteous), blk g; star, snip, white hind 
fetlocks, brand near hind quarter, white hairs in tail. No. 1 161. 

POTEEN (Capt. H. Clifton Brown), ch m ; scar off fore pastern. 
No. 1 162. 

PRAIRIE FLOWER (Mr. T. Anderson), b m ; star, near hind leg 
and off hind fetlock white. No. 958. 

PRECILLA (Capt. H. de B. de Lisle), b m ; star, near hind fetlock 
white. No. 1257. 

PRINCESS (Mr. H. Scott Robson), b m ; off hind fetlock white, 
brand near quarter. No. 709. 

PRINCESS (Mr. J. Alexander), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip, off fore and off hind fetlock white. No. 980. 

PUCK (Capt. H. de B. de Lisle, bay g ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip, both hind fetlocks white, both fore coronets white. No. 1252. 



QUEEN BEE (Mr. H. N. Magill), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and hind fetlocks. No. 1236. 

QUEEN BEE (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white 
hind legs, white hairs over near ribs. No. 856. 

QUEENIE (Mr. W. Walton), b m ; near hind coronet white, white 
marks above both knees. No. 1164. 

QUICKSILVER (Mr. Balfour), b m ; brand near hind quarter. No. 
884. 

QUIEN SABE (Mr. H. C. Higgin), ch g ; star, blaze, white lower 
lip, both hind and off fore legs, brand near fore quarter, ticked with white 
hairs. No. 1193. 



RAJAH (Mr. A. Watts), gr g ; star, blaze, snip, white spots on 
muzzle. No. 1241. 

RAKE, THE (Mr. E. Coovel), gr g ; white mark near ribs. No. 
746. 

RANGER (Mr. Stanley Mortimer), br g ; white hind heels, star, 
brand near fore and hind quarters. No. 881. 

RAPID RHONE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), roan m ; grey hairs in tail, 
saddle and girth marks. No. 881A. 

RAT, THE (Capt. N. Curzon), drk br g ; near hind coronet white. 
No. 1 165. 

RATTLER (Messrs. Withers), br g ; star, snip, near fore and near 
hind fetlocks white. No. 761. 



448 APPENDIX. 

RECKLESS (Capt. H. de Lisle), gr m ; star, off hind fetlock white. 
No. 1256. 

RED RAG (Mr. D. Hudson), b m; star, snip, near hind fetlock 
white, white marks inside both ears. No. 1 166. 

RED ROBIN (Mr. W. S. Heather), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white 
hind fetlocks. No. 1038. 

REDSKIN (Mr. Follet Holt), b g; star, white hind fetlocks, brand 
near hind quarter, saddle marks. No. 915. 

REDSTART (Mr. Lister), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
near hind fetlock and off fore coronet. No. 1203. 

REGALIA (Capt. H. de B. de Lisle), ch m ; star, blaze, near fore 
and hind fetlocks white. No. 1253. 

RELIEF (Major K. MacLaren), chm; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip and fetlocks. No. 1167. 

RIBBON TMr. E. C. Judkins), blk m ; star, near hind coronet white. 
No. 1 168. 

RISKY (Mr. C. P. Stedall), b g; star, blaze, snip, white fetlocks. 
No. 1 169. 

ROARK VIXEN (Mr. S. I. Roark), br m ; white spot off ribs, 
saddle marks. No. 953. 

ROBIN (Mr. Scott Robson), ch g; star, blaze, snip, near hind leg 
and off fore fetlock white, brand near side chest. No. 708. 

ROBIN GREY (Mr. T. L. Moore), gr g; white spots on head and 
neck. No. 12 18. 

ROCKET (Mr. P. E. Hardwicke, ist Dragoons), ch g; star, blaze, 
snip, white lower lip and hind legs, white hairs in flank. No. 791. 

ROGER (Mr. T. F. Cooke), ch g; white face, lower lip and legs. 
No. 1234. 

RONDO (Mr. Stanley Mortimer), chg; star, blaze, white hind 
fetlocks, brand near shoulder. No. 879. 

ROSA (Mr. H. Scott Robson), roan m ; face, lower lip, flanks and 
all legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 707. 

ROSxAS (Hon. F. White), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white hind legs 
and fore fetlocks, brand near hind quarter. No. 911. 

ROSEMARY (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m. No. 1264. 

ROSETTE (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white 
hind fetlocks, 4 years, passed for the season. No. 11 70. 

ROSIE (Mr. A. Boyd-Rochfort), b m ; star, near hind fetlock white, 
white marks off hock. No. 1043. 

ROYAL BOY (Mr. A. Boyd-Rochfort), b g; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and all legs. 4 years, passed for season only. No. 1061. 

RUBY (Mr. F. J. Mackey), b g; white hind fetlocks, faint black 
mark down back, white mark off shoulder, saddle and girth marks. No. 
706. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 449 

RUBY (Colonel W. A. Cardwell), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, near hind fetlock and off hind coronet white, brand near hind 
quarter, white spots on body. No. 830. 

SAILOR (Mr. W. A. Cooper), ch g; star, white mark off side neck. 
No. 972. 

SALLY (Mr. R. C. Barton), b m ; star, near fore fetlock white. No. 
1056. 

SANDOW (Capt. Loftus), b g; white hairs off coronet, girth marks. 
4 years, passed for season only. No. 956. 

Sx\NDOW (Mr. W. H. Jay), b g; white near hind coronet. No. 

774- 
SARDINE (Mr. Ernest Denly), 6 yrs., bm; near hind fetlock white. 

No. 831. 

SATIRE (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), ch g; star, off hind fetlock and near 
hind coronet white. No. 857. 

SAUCY (Mr. F. A. Gill), gr m ; forehead and hind coronets white, 
scar near fore shin. No. 680. 

SEABREEZE (Mr. A. Suart), br m ; star, blaze. No. 107 1. 

SEAGULL (Mr. A. Watts), g m ; flea-bitten, blaze, snip, collar 
marks. No. 1237. 

SEALIA (Capt. Egerton Green), ch m ; off hind fetlock white. No. 
765- 

SECOND HAND (Dr. Dooley), b m ; scars near hind fetlock and 
off fore shin. No. 1048. 

SECRET (Hon. O. Hastings), ch m ; star, blaze, black spots off ribs, 
black spot near knee. No. 960. 

SECRET (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), ch m ; star, blaze, snip. 
No. 1259. 

SECRETARY (Mr. Balfour), ch g; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock and off hind leg white, brand near hind quarter. No. 889. 

SEE-SAW (Sir Thos. Fowler), 5 yrs., ch g ; white star on forehead, 
white hind fetlocks. No. 832. 

SELIM (Messrs. Withers), ch m ; star, saddle and girth marks. 
No. 757. 

SERF BELLE (Mr. Max Angus), b m; star, blaze, snip, saddle 
marks. No. 705. 

SERPENT (Mr. Herbert H. Wilson), b m ; off hind fetlock white, 
star. No. 748. 

SHEIK (Mr. A. Watts), bh ; near fore fetlock and off fore coronet 
white. No. 1240. 

SHOP GIRL (Mr. H. C. C. Fitzroy), grm; star, white hind fetlocks. 
No. 844. 

SILK (Capt. Egerton Green), b m ; scar on near loin, collar marks. 
No. 766. 

29 



450 APPENDIX. 

SILVER BELL (Mr. James Farmer), 6 yrs., b m ; small star, white 
hind fetlocks and near fore coronet. No. 833. 

SILVERDALE (Mr. A. Topham), drk br g; snip, white hind 
fetlocks. No. 1 02 1. 

SILVERLOCK (Mr. James Farmer), 5 yrs., gr m ; star, narrow 
blaze, snip, white hind fetlocks, white spot near fore leg. No. 834. 

SILVERLOCK (Capt. A. Carstairs), gr m ; blaze, snip, white hind 
fetlocks, white mark near fore leg. No. 1171. 

SILVERLORN (Mr. John Nettleton), b m ; star, ticked with white, 
collar marks, white marks off flank. No. 800. 

SILVERTAIL (Mr. F. H. Wise, 13th Hussars), br m; star, blaze, 
snip, white lower lip and near hind coronet, white hairs in tail, ticked 
with white. No. 1019. 

SINKAH (Mr. A. Watts), ch h ; star, blaze, snip, white spot on 
lower lip, white legs. No. 1242. 

SLIPPERS (Mr. J. Wormald), b m ; off hind fetlock white. No. 
1209. 

SMITH O'BRIEN (Mr. Balfour), ch g ; star, blaze, brand near hind 
quarter, black spots near hind quarter, saddle marks. No. 904. 

SMUTT (Capt Loftus), br g ; star, blaze, near hind coronet white. 
No. 995. 

SNOWBALL (Messrs. Withers), gr g; snip. No. 759. 

SNOVVFLAKE (Mr. B. Montgomery), g h ; flea-bitten, snip. No. 
1244. 

SOAP-SUDS (Mr. A. Rawlinson), gr g ; off hind leg and fore 
coronets white, saddle marks. No. 703. 

SO EASY (Mr. L. McCreery), br m ; star, near hind and fore 
fetlocks white, saddle marks. No. 704. 

SOPHIA (Mr. J. Alexander), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
fetlocks white. No. 962. 

SORCERER (Mr. A. J. Curnick), brg; star, snip, white hind 
fetlocks. No. 1 1 72. 

SOUVENIR (Mr. Ernest Denly), 5 yrs., iron grm; star, white spots 
off ribs. No. 835. 

SPEC (Capt. J. Hanwell), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
hind legs and off fore fetlock. No. 11 73. 

SPINSTER (Mr. O. T. Slocock), b m ; scar off fore shin, 4 yrs. 
(passed for season only). No. 975. 

SPIRTLE (Sir Thos. Fowler), 5 yrs., b m; faint star, near hind 
fetlock white, saddle and girth marks. No. 836. 

SPOT WHITE (Capt. A. M. Balfour, R. A.), blk g; white star and 
snip lower lip, off fore and near hind fetlocks white, white spot off side of 
neck, saddle marks. No. 837. 

SPRIGHTLY rColonel de Robeck), b m ; star, blaze, white hind 
fetlocks, scar over near eye. No. 1225. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 451 

SPRIGHTLY (Mr. Balfour), blk g; white hind fetlocks, brand near 
hind quarter, saddle marks. No. 906. 

SPRINGJACK (Mr. Balfour), drk br g; star, near hind fetlock white, 
brand near hind quarter, scar off fore leg. No. 900. 

SPRING ROSE (Mr. A. Hill), b m ; star, near hind fetlocks and 
fore coronets white. No. 11 74. 

SQUIB (Colonel W. A. Cardwell), ch g; white hairs in mane, scar 
on both hocks, saddle marks. No. 838. 

SQUIRREL, THE (Mr. J. Wormald), ch m ; black spot near cheek, 
white hairs top of withers, near fore coronet white. No. 1067. 

STANDARD (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b m ; star, blaze, snip, off fore 
and off hind fetlocks white, collar marks. No. 1 1 75. 

STAR III. (Colonel de Robeck),) drk br m; star, blaze, white spot 
lower lip, both hind fetlocks and near fore coronet white. No. 1000. 

STEIN (Dr. T. O. Mearn), b m ; star, snip. No. 964. 

STELLA (Mr. C. de Robeck), drk br m ; star, blaze, snip, off hind 
coronet white. No. 1222. 

STELLA (Messrs. Withers), br m ; star, near hind fetlock and off 
hind coronet white. No. 750. 

STELLA (Mr. John Netdeton), ch m : star, blaze, snip, white spots 
near and off hind quarters, flanks ticked with white, saddle and girth 
marks, 4 yrs. Passed for season only. No. 796. 

STITCH IN TIME (Mr. A. C. Kenyon Fuller), bg; scar near 
hind quarter. No. 1176. 

STRAWBERRY (Hon. F. White), roan g ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip and legs, white patches on body, brand near hind quarter, scars 
on neck. No. 912. 

SUDDEN THOUGHT (Mr. Follet Holt), whm; black spots on 
fore quarters and ears, brand near hind quarter. No. 914. 

SULTAN (Mr. Ernest Denly), 4 yrs., blk g ;' small blemish off side 
of neck. Passed for the season only. No. 839. 

SUNRISE (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m; star, small snip, saddle and 
girth marks. No. 931. 

SUNSET (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), br m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
saddle and girth marks. No. 932. 

SUNSHINE (Mr. F. J. Townsend), 5 yrs., ch m ; star, blaze, snip. 
No. 933. 

SWALLOW (Capt. Vernon, Rifle Brigade), blk g ; star, blaze, snip, 
brand near hind quarter, both hind and off fore fetlocks white. No. 
1015. 

SWEEP (Mr. T. B. Godman), blk g; star, snip, white hind fetlocks, 
off fore fetlock and near fore coronet. No. 849. 

SYMPATHY (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m ; star, both hind 
fetlocks white. No. 1263. 

29* 



452 APPENDIX. 

SHE (Earl of Harrington), br m ; small star, scar on wither. No. 
1263A. 

TAFFY (Mr. F. J. Balfour), br g; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
both hind and off fore legs, and near fore fetlock, brand near hind quarter. 
No. 922. 

TARA (Mr. J. E. Cairnes), gr g ; snip, white lower lip and hind 
legs. No. 1 177. 

TARPAULIN (Capt. E. Makins, ist Dragoons), b m ; star. No. 
790. 

'telegraph (Mr. W. H. Jay), ch g ; star, snip, near hind fetlock 
white, collar mark, 4 yrs. Passed for season only. No. 780. 

TELEPHONE (Messrs. Withers), br m ; star, off hind fetlock white, 
scar near fore fetlock. No. 751. 

TEMPE (Mr. H. M. Hardy), br m ; white mark about point of near 
hock. No. 1228. 

TERRE-TERRE (Mr. Glen Williams), skewbald g ; brand near 
hind quarter. No. 1 1 78. 

TERROR (Mr. W. Graham Mclvor), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind leg and near fore coronet white, 4 yrs. Passed for season only. No. 
883. 

TESSIE (Mr. J. E. Cairnes), b m; star, scar off hip. No. 11 79. 

THREE CHEERS (Mr. L. McCreery), ch m; blaze, snip, lower lip 
and off fore leg white. No. 700. 

TINKER (Mr. F. J. Balfour), b g; star, snip, white lower lip and 
hind fetlocks, brand near hind quarters. No. 921. 

TIPPLES (Mr. W. H. Jay), b m ; white hind fetlocks. No. 779. 

TIP-TOP (Sir Thos. Fowler), 5 yrs., blk g ; near hind coronet white, 
scar near hind leg. No. 934. 

TIT BITS (Mr. A. Pyke), drk ch m ; star, white marks on face and 
legs, off hind fetlock white. No. 1197. 

TOM (Mr. F. J. Mackey), blk g ; white hind fetlocks, saddle marks. 
No. 702. 

TOMBOY (Mr. F. J. Balfour), br g ; star, blaze, white lower lip and 
fetlocks, brand near hind quarters. No. 923. 

TOM CAT (Mr. W. C. Symon), b g ; star, white hind legs and near 
fore coronet. No. 1 1 80. 

TOM TIDDLER (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b g; star, white 
spot near side of ribs. No. 1262. 

TOM TIT (Mr. J. Watson), br g; scar with white hair near side of 
neck. No. 1249. 

TOM TIT (Mr. A. E. Gostling), b g ; star, white hind and off fore 
leg. No. 1 181. 

TOM TIT (Mr. J. W. Murray), b g ; star, blaze, snip, near hind leg 
white. No. 1057. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 453 

TONY (Mr. Balfour), skewbald g ; white face, lower lip and legs, 
branded both hind quarters. No. 898. 

TOPPER (Mr. Balfour), b g ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, near 
hind fetlock and off hind leg, brand near hind quarter. No. 909. 

TOPSY (Messrs. Withers), blk m ; faint star. No. 762. 

TORRITO (Mr. A. J. Stourton), b g ; star, brand near hind quarter. 
No. 701. 

TREASURE (Capt. R. Peel, 2nd Life Guards), b g ; star, white 
hind fetlocks, saddle and girth marks. No. 679. 

TRILBY (Capt. A. M. Balfour, R.A.), b or br m; small star, white 
hind fetlocks, saddle marks. No. 936. 

TRIUMPH (Mr. R. Hudson), b g; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
coronet white, scars on neck. No. 1060. 

TRIXIE (Mr. F. Hargreaves), ch m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip and 
hind legs white. No. 699. 

TROOPER (Mr. H. Scott Robson), b g; star, brand near quarter, 
white hairs in tail. No. 698. 

TURCO (Mr. T. F. Cooke), ch h; star, near hind fetlock white, scar 
off ribs. No. 1231. 

TWILIGHT (Mr. A. Suart), b m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind and 
near fore fetlocks white. No. 1069. 



VACUNA (Mr. H. Scott Robson), b g ; face, near fore and both 
hind legs and off coronet white, brand near quarter, white mark near side 
of neck. No. 697. 

VALENTINE (Mr. Balfour), ch g ; white face, lower lip, hind legs, 
off fore leg and near fore coronet, brand near hind quarters, ticked with 
white. No. 903. 

VANITY (Mr. Balfour), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white lower lip, 
hind legs, off fore leg, and near fore fetlock, brand near hind quarter. 
No. 902. 

VENDETTA (Colonel de Robeck), b m; star, near hind fetlock 
and off fore coronet white. No. 999. 

VENTURE (i\Ir. Balfour), blue roan g; near hind coronet and off 
hind fetlock white, black spots over body, brand near hind quarter. No. 
901. 

VERVANE (Mr. J. Drybrough), br m; saddle marks. No. 678. 

VICTOR (Mr. L. O. P. Learmont, R.H.A.), b g; star, white spot 
near hind shin and off fore shin. No. 1006. 

VICTORY (Mr. G. A. Miller), br m; star, scar on off hock. No. 
1 182. 

VIOLET (Capt. A. E. Webb), br m ; star. No. 1223. 

VIVANDIERE (Mr. Innes), ch m ; star, blaze, white hind legs, 
black spot near hind quarter. No. 997. 



454 APPENDIX. 

VIVANDIERE (Mr. E. Burne), dun m ; star, blaze, snip, white 
spot on lower lip, near hind leg white. No. 1183. 

VIXEN (F. A. Gill), b m ; white spots near ribs. No. 1271. 

VIXEN (Mr. Herbert H. Wilson), b m; white spots both sides of 

neck. No. 747. 
VIXEN (Viscount Belgrave), ch m; white hind fetlocks. No. 

1 1 84. 

WALL EYE (Mr. W. Edge), gr g ; off eye white, snip, lower lip 
and both hind legs white. No. 971. 

WALNUT (Mr. Glen Williams), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
and off fore leg, brand near hind quarter. No. 1185. 

WARRIOR (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), ch g; star, blaze, snip, black spots 
both hind quarters. No. 1028. 

WASP (Mr. Glen Williams), b g ; white face, lower lip, hind coronets, 
near fore fetlock and off fore leg, brand near hind quarter. No. 1186. 

WATCHFUL (Mr. James Farmer), 5 yrs., b m ; faint star. No. 

937- 

WATCHMAN (Messrs. Withers), b g ; star, brown spot off hind 
quarter, white spot on poll. No. 760. 

WAVELET (Mr. Glen Williams), b g ; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock white, brand near hind quarter, ticked with white. No. 1187. 

WEASEL (Mr. A. Watts), b m ; star, with bay spot, blaze, snip. 
No. 1239. 

WELSH HARP (Mr. James Farmer), 5 3TS., ch m ; faint star, white 
hind coronets. No. 938. 

WESTBURY (Mr. Stanley Mortimer), b g ; branded near fore and 
hind quarters and cheek. No. 877. 

WHISKEY (Mr. D. Hudson), blk m; white hairs in flank, near 
hind and both fore fetlocks white. No. 11 88. 

WHITESOCKS (Mr. J. Drage), br g; star, blaze, snip, white 
fetlocks, saddle and girth marks. No. 696. 

WHITE STOCKINGS (Mr. C. Sheather), b m; white face, lower 
lip and hind legs. No. 1189. 

WHITE WINGS (Mr. W. H. Jay), gr m ; flea-bitten marks on the 
head. No. 772. 

WILD BOY (Mr. H. Tudor), br g ; star, blaze, snip, white lower 
lip, hind fetlocks and near fore coronet. No. 1 190. 

WILD BOY (Mr. L. F. Archdale j, br g ; near fore coronet white. 
No. 951. 

WILDFLOWER (Capt. L. Bryan), b m ; scar point of near 
shoulder. No. 12 13. 

WILD GIRL (Mr. L. F. Archdale), b m; white spots near ribs, 
white marks off ribs. No. 950. 



POLO PONIES, 1898. 455 

WILLIE D (^Mr. F. J. Mackey), ch g; star, near hind leg white, 
black line down back, white spot off hind quarter. No. 694. 

WINK (Mr. Glen Williams), dun g ; star, scar on face, white hind 
fetlocks, brands near hind quarter. No. 1 191. 

WINNIE (Mr. H. C. Talbot Rice), b m ; scar near knee. No. 
1 192. 

WISDOM (Mr. E. Lloyd), b br m; star, white hind fetlock. No. 
867. 

WISDOM (Colonel de Robeck), b m; star, blaze. No. 994. 

WISE GIRL (Mr. James Farmer), 5 yrs., drk br m ; saddle marks. 
No. 939. 

WITCH, THE (Mr. S. Yearsley;, ch m; star. No. 1079. 

WOODY (Major George Bouverie), bm; star, white marks, both 
hind and off fore shins and near knee. No. 784. 



XX (Major M. F. Rimington), b m; star, white marks on fore 

fetlocks. No. 1224. 



YELLOW FELLOW (Mr. J. Drage), dun g; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind fetlock white, saddle marks. No. 695. 

YELLOW JACK (Dr. T. O'Mearn), ch g; star, snip, off hind 
fetlock white, collar marks. No. 945. 



ZARA (Mr. H. Goodman), b m; faint black line down hind 
quarters. No. 1 010. 

ZELIE (Mr. Leonard), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white spots near side 
of neck and near hind quarter. No. 1216. 



UNNAMED PONIES. 

Mr. J. Bartlett's chg; star, snip, white legs, white spots over body. 
No. 1 1 54. 

Capt. Loftus' gr m; blaze, white spot back of near fore leg, 4 yrs. 
Passed for season only. No. 973. 

Dr. W. O'Mearn's br m ; star, near fore coronet and both hind 
fetlocks white, scar near fore leg. No. 942. 

Mr. J. Drage's gr g. No. 689. 



456 APPENDIX. 



THE FOLLOWING PONIES WERE NOT PASSED. 

CHANCE (Mr. B. C. Kidd), ch m ; star, blaze, near hind fetlock 
white. No. 1195. 

CRESS (Mr. G. Turner), ch m ; star, snip, near hind leg and off 
fore fetlock white. No. 948. 

DOUBTFUL (Mr. F. Hargreaves), ch m ; star, blaze, near hind 
fetlock and off hind heel white, saddle marks. 

DULCIE (Mr. O. T. Slocock), b m ; wart mark near stiffie. No. 
978. 

GOOD BOY (Count J. de Madre). No. 930. 

GREY BIRD (Mr. F. A. Gill), gr g ; snip, lower lip and all fetlocks 
white. No. 677. 

JOEY (Mr. Gerald W. Hobson), ch g; star, blaze, snip, white hind 
legs and near fore fetlock. No. 1082. 

MISS SHOT (Dr.Dooley), drk br m; star. No. 1049. 

OLIVETTE (Mr. A. Suart), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock white, black patch near hind quarter, light and black patch off 
hind quarter. No. 1073. 

POLLY (Mr. E. Folley), b m ; wart marks in flank, 4 yrs. No. 
1027. 

PRINCE THORNE (Capt. Bidgood, R.A.), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, 
near hind fetlock and near fore coronet white. No. 1035. 

SARi\H (Mr. T. S. Greenway), drk b m ; white marks above near 
hock, off hind coronet white. No. 3094. 

SYLVIA (Mr. John Nettleton), br m ; star, snip, both fore and hind 
heels white, white mark near side of neck, saddle marks off side. No. 
794- 

TURNER (Mr. J. Watson), b m ; star, snip, both hind fetlocks 
white, white spots off shoulder. No. 882. 

VARDYA (Mr. E. E. Mason), b m; star, blaze, snip. No. 1065. 



457 



POLO PONIES MEASURED AND REGISTERED 
AT HURLINGHAM, 1899. 



ABBOTT, THE (Capt. Belfield), gr g; near hind fetlock white 
scar in front of near hind fetlock. No. 0299. 

ABDOOLAH (Capt. C. E. G. Morton), grg ; collar mark. No. 0109. 

ACORN (Major G. M. Eccles), br m ; star, narrow blaze, snip. 
Passed for season. No. 0430. 

ACORN (Earl of Harrington), ch g ; star, near fore and near hind 
fetlocks white. No. 0624. 

ACTRESS (Major G. M. Eccles), br m; few grey hairs in forehead, 
near hind leg grey, black patch off side of ribs. Passed for season. No, 
0431. 

ACTRESS (Mr. J. C. Harrison), b m; near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0609. 

ADA (Mr. C. Adamthwaite ), br m; star, few white hairs on face 
both flanks ticked with white, collar marks. No. 0217. 

ADELA (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), gr m; white face, collar 
marks. No. 010. 

AFTER ME (Mr. Ashgill Colville), blk m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
both hind fetlocks white, off coronet white. No. 051. 

AFTER THE BALL (Mr. Leonard Bucknall), b g; star, scar on 
forehead. No. 0157. 

ALI BABA (Capt. Lionel Lindsay), ch h; star, blaze, lower lip 
white, both hind fetlocks white, scars both sides of neck. No. 0676. 

ALLAZAN (Mr. J. Lawson), ch g ; star, scars on all four legs, brand 
near hind quarter. No. 0218. 

ALICE (Miss B. Stafford), ch m: white hairs over head and fore 
quarters. Passed for season. No. 0377. 

ALL FOURS (Mr. A. Withers), blk m ; all four fetlocks white with 
black spots. No. 0329. 

ALMA (i2th Lancers' Pony Club), b g; small star, near hind fetlock, 
off hind coronet white. No. 0145. 



458 APPENDIX. 

AMBERITE (Miss Rawson), ch m; star, small snip, near hind 
coronet white, collar marks. No. 0450. 

AMELIA (Mr. J. B Southey), br m ; star. No. 0488. 

ANCIENT, THE (Mr. T. Anderson), br m; star, narrow blaze, 
snip, both hind fetlocks white. No. 0451. 

ANGEL (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), ch m ; star, snip, near hind 
leg white, off hind coronet white, off fore fetlock white. No. 07. 

ANGELA (Capt. F. Egerton Green), blk br m; faint star, both 
hind fetlocks white. No. 0172. 

ANGELINA (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near 
hind coronet white. No. 094. 

ANTELOPE (Mr. H. Fielden), br g ; both hind fetlocks white. No. 
0112. 

ARAB STAR ( Miss A. Gore-Booth), ch g ; star, narrow blaze, small 
snip. Passed for season. No. 0378. 

AREA BELLE (Colonel de Roebeck), b m; star, near hind fetlock 
white, white marks above off hock, small scar off shoulder. No. 0677. 

ARGENTINE (Messrs. H. C. Richards & Leigh), roan g ; small star, 
small snip, black spots over ribs and hind quarters, faint brand near fore 
quarter. No. 187. 

ATOM (Mr. R. Hudson), b g; star, blaze, snip, grey hairs near side 
face, scar off hind quarter. No. 0361. 

ATTORNEY, THE (Mr. Grogan), br g; near hind and off fore 
coronets white, collar marks. No. 0452. 

"BABETTE" (Mr. A. Withers), b m; star, snip, near hind and 
both fore fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0330. 

BADMINTON (Mr. H.Percy Woodcott), b g; white face, both 
hind legs white, near fore fetlock white, collar marks. No, 035. 

BALLET (Mr. H. J. D. Clerk), b m ; near hind coronet, off hind 
fetlock white. Passed for season. No. 0219. 

BALLS (Mr. D. M. Gray\ gr h ; snip, scar outside forearm, white 

mark near hock. No. 0537. 
BANK HOLIDAY (Mr. W. S. Buckmaster), b m; star, collar 

marks. No. 0124. 

BANKER (Mr. Edge), b g; star, white mark on front of off fore 
and off hind shin. No. 0453. 

BANTAM (The Earl of Harrington), b g ; " H " branded on near 
flank, faint star, (broad), both hind and off fetlocks white, black spots, scar 
off quarter. No. 0625. 

BAROMETER (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), br g; star, snip, near hind 
fetlock white, scars near fore leg. No. 049. 

BARONESS (Major Carew), blk br m; faint star. No. oioi. 

BATTLE (Capt. de Lisle), b m ; few white hairs on forehead, faint 
grey patch off hind quarter, black points. No. 0627. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 459 

BxWLEAF (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), br g ; star near hind 
coronet white, few white hairs front of off fore shin. No. 0188. 

BAYLEAF (Mr. A. C. C. Keyon Fuller), b m ; white spot lower 
lip, near hind fetlock and both fore legs white, white marks above both 
knees. No. 0258. 

BEGGAR'S MAID (Major Alexander), br m; white face, lower lip 
white, both hind and off fore legs white. No. 0454. 

BELINDA (Major Kennedy), br m ; star, few white hairs on face, 
snip, both hind fetlocks white, black spots, near fore coronet white. No. 
0259. 

BELLA (Mr. H. Fielden), b m ; star, white hairs in tail. No. 
01 14. 

BEN AZREK (Mr. Cecil, 8th Hussars), gr h ; white face, lower 
lip white, near hind and near fore legs white, off hind fetlocks white, 
white patch on thighs. No. 0489. 

BENJAMIN BINNS (Mr. C. McNeill), b g ; star, off hind fetlock 
black and white, ticked with white hairs. No. 0675. 

BERTHA (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), b m ; both hind coronets white. 
No. 0626. 

BESS (Mr. Nettleton). br dun m; star, collar mark. No. 0297. 

BESSIE (Mr. A. E. Fair), blk m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, 
near hind coronet white, off fore fetlock white with black spots. No. 
0300. 

BESSIE (Capt. Paynter, 6th Dragoons), blk m ; white hairs both 
sides of neck. No. 0490. 

BESSY (Mr. J. O. Jameson), b m; star, near hind coronet white. 
No. 0538. 

BETSY (Major Kennedy), br m ; star, near hind fetlock and off 
hind coronet white with black spots. No. 0260. 

BETTY (Mr. R. C. Barton), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, lower lip 
white. No. 0362. 

BIDDY (Mr. R. Hudson), br m; star, scar front of near hind 
fetlock. No. 0539. 

BILBERRY (Mr. M. E. M. Ballcra), br m ; small star, near hind 
fetlock white, white marks both fore and both hind legs, collar marks. 
No. 0540. 

BILLY (Mr. N. H. Scott), b h; few white hairs on face, snip, near 
hind fetlock white, flanks ticked with white hairs. No. 0646. 

BILLY BELLEW (Mr. W. S. Buckmaster), b g; star, blaze, snip, 
near hind fetlock white, brand near fore quarter. No. 0291. 

BILLY BOY (Lieut.-Colonel D. T. Hammond), b g; small star, 
snip, both hind fetlocks white. No. 0379. 

BLACKBERRY (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), blk m; small star. 
No. 014. 

BLACK LEG (Messrs. E. I). & G. A. Miller), blk g; star, faint 
blaze, both hind fetlocks and fore coronet white. No. 015. 



46o APPENDIX. 

BLACKBERRY TART (Mr. Tresham Gilbey), drk br m ; star, 
black points, small collar marks. No. 0293. 

BLANFORD (Mr. H. Percy Woolcott), bm; star, white spots over 
face, snip, off hind coronet white, collar marks. No. 033. 

BLAZES (Mr. Goodman), ch m , star, blaze, near hind leg white 
with chesnut spots. No. 0678. 

BLUEBAGS (Mr. C. C. Goldsmith), gr m ; large snip, lower lip 
white, near hind leg white, black patch near flank. No. 0220. 

BLUEBEARD (Mr. G. K. Ansell), blk g; star, few white hairs on 
face, near fore fetlock grey. No. 0541. 

BLUESKIN (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), roan g; star, both hind 
fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0491. 

BOBBY (Mr. Hugh Rainey), br g ; near hind fetlock white, off fore 
fetlock grey. No. 0380. 

BONES (Capt. B. Daly), b m ; faint star, small snip, near hind 
coronet white. No. 0679. 

BOOKMAKER (Capt. Vernon), b g; black points, no distinctive 
marks. No. 0542. 

BOOTS (Mr. G. H. A. White), bg; star, blaze, snip, white spot 
upper lip, both hind and near fore fetlocks white, collar marks. No. 
0301. 

BOUGHTON (Capt. McMicking), b g ; star, bay black legs. No. 
0261. 

BOY, THE (Mr. T. C. Higgins), b g ; star, blaze, snip, black line 
down croup, off hind fetlock white. No. 0381. 

BRANDON (Mr. W. A. Cooper), gr g, white marks on both fore 
heels. No. 0382. 

BRiVT, THE (Mr. Grogan), br m ; small star, small snip. No. 

0455- 
BRAY (Mr. J. Roark), br m ; star, narrow blaze, snip. No. 0456. 

BRILLL^NTINE (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), b m ; star, off hind 
fetlock white, scar oft' fore arm, collar marks, black patches near ribs. 
No. 0189. 

BRODERICK (Mr. Todds), bg; small star. Passed for season. 

No. 0543. 

BROWN PRINCE (Mr. H. F. Wickham), blk br g: ticked with 
white hairs, collar mark. No. 0680. 

BRUNETTE (Capt. C. Grey), blk m ; small white mark outside 
near fore leg. No. 0262. 

BUBBLE (Capt. J. Murray, 14th Hussars), b m; small scar off hip- 
No. 0383. 

BUCK, THE (Mr. T. R. Denny),blk dun g ; star, small snip, white 
spot lower lip, all four legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0544. 

BUCKLE (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), blk m ; star, small snip, 
both hind fetlocks white. No. 09. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 461 

BUDMARSH (Capt. Langworthy), b g ; star, narrow blaze, lower lip 
white. No. 0131. 

BULLET (Capt. Makins), b m; star, collar marks. No. 0127. 

BUSYBODY (Mr. H. J. D. Clerk), ch m; star, few white hairs on 
face, near hind fetlock white, white spot near ribs, ticked white hairs both 
flanks. Passed for season. No. 0221. 

BUTT, THE (Hon. A. Hastings), ch m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, near hind leg white. No. 071. 

CALIPH III. (Mr. W. F. Taylor), ch g; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
fetlocks and off fore coronet white. No. 0222. 

CALM (Mr. J. C. de Las Casas), ch m ; Avhite face, lower lip white, 
both hind legs white, ticked with white hairs on body. No. 0628. 

CARMEW (Mr. C. H. Reade), gr m ; grey legs, white spot near side 
of neck. No. 0457. 

CAROLINE (Mr. A. Withers), b m ; star, near hind coronet white 
with black spots, off hind coronet white. Passed for season. No. 0331. 

CARPENTER, THE (Capt. Wormald), br g; star, faint snip, near 
hind fetlock white. No. 0135. 

CASTLE RANGER (Mr. H. J. Townsend), b m; star, off fore and 
near hind fetlocks white, narrow blaze. No. 030. 

CATCH- A-PENNY (Mr. J. Roark), b m ; star. No. 0459. 

CERBERUS (Mr. Goodman), bg; white face, near hind and off 
fore fetlocks white with black spots, off hind leg white. No. 0681. 

CHANCE (Mr. H. C. Talbot Rice), b g; star, blaze, snip, lower 
lip white, near fore fetlock and hind coronet white. No. 0223. 

CHELMSFORD (Mr. W. Brackenridge), ch g; star, blaze, snip 
lower lip white, off fore coronet white, both hind legs white. No. 0667. 

CHERRY (Mr. M. E. M. Butler), b m ; star, near fore coronet 
white, few white hairs front of near shoulder. No. 0545. 

CHERRY WHISKEY (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), b g; star, narrow 
blaze, snip, off hind fetlock white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0492. 

CHIRGWIN (Mr. Meredith), b m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
fetlocks white, white hairs both flanks. No. 0546. 

CHRISTOPHER (Capt. F. Egerton Green), b g; star, near fore 
and oft' hind fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0668. 

CHROME YELLOW (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), ch g ; white face, 
lower lip white, both hind legs white, near knee white, brand near hind 
quarter. No. 0493. 

CIGARETTE (Sir J. H. P. Hume Campbell), b m ; faint star, 

collar mark. No. 0166. 

CIVILY (R.x\. Polo Club), b m; star, blaze, snip, white mark lower 
lip, both hind fetlocks white, collar marks. No. 0303. 

CLEMENTINE (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind fetlock white. No. 023. 



462 APPENDIX. 

CLEMENTINE (Mr. Symon), b m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, both hind legs white with black spots, near fore fetlock white with 
black spots. No. 0302. 

CLONDA (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), gr m ; scar off hind quarter, faint 
marks above knees. No. 043. 

GLOVER (Mr. J. H. E. Holford), roan m ; both hind fetlocks 
white. No. 01 16. 

COCK OYSTER (Hon. O. Hastings), gr g; star, snip. No. 069. 

COLLEEN (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), b m ; star, blaze, off hind 
fetlock white, same leg grey, collar marks. No. 0190. 

COLWORTH (Capt. Loftus), gr m ; snip, near hind fetlock white, 
off hind and off fore coronets white. No. 0458. 

COMET (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), roan g ; star, blaze, snip, brand both 
quarters, off hind fetlock and off fore quarter white. No. 047. 

COMMODORE (Mr. W. Graham Mclvor), flea-bitten grey g ; large 
white marks, star, blaze, snip, lower lip, white, all four legs white, brand 
near hind quarter. No. 0610. 

CONNOLLY, MISS (Mr. P. W. Connolly), ch m ; star, white patch 
on off quarter. No. 0536. 

CONSTANCE (Mr. J. Richards), br m ; star, ticked with white 
hairs. Passed for season. No. 0363. 

COOMBATTI (Major Longfield), br g; star, both fore and near 
hind fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0163. 

COQUETTE (Mr. P. Leighton), blk m ; near hind fetlock white, 
scar in front off hind shin. No. 0182. 

COQUETTE (Mr. G. Hewson), b m; star, black spot on face, 
small collar marks. No. 0432. 

CORBHEY (Mr. O'Reilly), b m; faint star. Passed for season. 
No. 0682. 

CORDITE (Mr. S. M. Russell), gr g; snip, lower lip white, both 
hind and near fore fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0384. 

CREOLE (Mr. R. St. G. Robinson), b m; white spots on face, near 
hind coronet grey. No. 0433. 

CRESCENT (Capt. de Lisle), br m ; star, snip. No. 03. 



DAFFODIL (Capt. F. J. Dalgety), dun m ; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind fetlock white. No. 0285. 

D AIM AN (Major Longfield), piebald g ; brand near hind quarter, 
Argentine. No. 0162. 

DAN (Mr. A. Withers), b g; off hind fetlock white. No. 0332. 

DAUNTLESS (Mr. Malcolm Moncrieffe), ch g; star, narrow blaze, 
near hind leg white, off hind and both fore fetlocks white ticked grey 
hairs, faint brand, white mark near fore quarter. No. 0191 

DAWN (Capt. de Lisle), ch m ; star. No. 04. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 463 

DAWN (Mr. Malcolm Moncrieffe), gr m ; snip, both lips white, both 
hind fetlocks white, near fore leg and off" fore fetlock white, scar off" fore 
fetlock. No. 0192. 

DAWN (Capt. E. Haygate), b m ; star, faint blaze, snip, white spot 
upper lip. Passed for season. No. 0224. 

DAYLIGHT (Mr. James Farmer), ch g ; narrow blaze, lower lip 
white, off" hind leg up to hock white, black spot on off" hind quarter. No. 
080. 

DEERHOUND (Mr. Malcolm Moncrieffe), gr g ; small snip, brand 
near hind quarter, collar marks. No. 0193. 

DELEICE (Capt. Williams), ch m ; star, white spots over muzzle 
and face, near hind fetlock white with chesnut spots. No. 0583. 

DELIGHT (Mr. R. P. O'Reilly), br m; few white hairs on forehead 
few white hairs in mane. Passed for season. No. 0364. 

DEMON (Mr. J. D. Gouldsmith), blk br m; star, No. 028. 

DESERT KING (Capt. Parsons), br h ; star, scar inside both thighs, 
off" hind fetlock white. No. 0304. 

DEXTER (Mr. Malcolm Moncrieffe), b g; star, few white hairs on 
face, snip, off hind coronet white, slight brand near fore quarter. No. 
0194. 

DIADEM (Sir Thomas Fowler), b m ; faint star, near fore coronet 
white, collar marks. No. 057. 

DIAMOND (Mr. W. Hardcastle), blk br h ; snip. No. 0647. 

DIAMOND (Mr. A. Withers), b g ; off hind fetlock white. No. 
0333- 

DL\NA (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), b m; star, narrow blaze, near hind 
fetlock white. No. 050. 

DIANA (Prince Alexander of Teck), blk m; white spot off flank. 
N^o. 01 18. 

DICK (Mr. Robert Allen), b g ; faint star, white mark above both 
knees. No. 0263. 

DIDO (R.x\. Polo Club), b m ; star, blaze, snip, white spot lower 
lip, near hind fetlock white. No. 0305. 

DILKHUSH (Colonel Henrieques), gr m ; star, blaze, both hind 
legs white, white marks on hind and fore legs. Passed for season. No. 
0306. 

DIOMED (Mr. W. Campbell), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
legs white, off" fore fetlock white. No. 0434. 

DIVES (Mr. Malcolm Moncrieffe), b g; star, both hind legs white, 
scar front of off" fore shin, collar mark, brand near hind quarter. No. 
0225. 

DOATIE (Mr. J. E. Dykes), b m ; star, lower lip white, both hind 
fetlocks and near fore fetlocks white with black spots. No. 0385. 

DOCTOR (Mr. O. T. Slocock), br g ; star, off fore and off hind 
coronet white. No. 0460. 



464 APPENDIX. 

DOLL (Mr. Meredith), br m ; faint star. No. 0547. 

DOLLAR, Miss (Mr. Dixon Johnson), b m ; star, off hind fetlock 
white, ticked with black hairs. No. 0548. 

DOLLY (Mr. W. Prevost, 14th Hussars), br m ; star, snip, near fore 
fetlock white. No. 0494. 

DOLPHIN (Mr. Malcohii Moncrieffe), ch g; star, blaze, snip, 
white, spot upper lip, off hind leg white, ticked white hairs, brand near 
fore quarter. No. 0195. 

DOMINO (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), skewbald m ; star, tan muzzle. 
No. 045. 

DOMINO (Mr. Malcolm Tvloncrieffe), gr g ; snip, both lips white, 
both hind legs and near fore leg white, brand both fore quarters, large scar 
off fore coronet. No. 0196. 

DON, THE (Capt. J. W. Yardley), ch g ; star, near hind coronet 
and off fore fetlock white. No. 0386. 

DONISHALL (Mr. C. H. Reade), b g ; very faint star. No. 0461. 

DONISHULL (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b g; near hind 

coronet white. No. 019. 

DONZEA (Mr. J. Lawson), b m ; near hind fetlock white with black 
spots, white marks off fore leg. No. 0226. 

DORCAS (Mr. Malcolm Moncrieffe), gr m ; brand near shoulder. 
No. 0227. 

DOREEN (Mr. T. Anderson), ch m; star, narrow blaze, snip, both 
hind legs white. No. 0462. 

DOROTHY (Mr. H. Lindemere), b roan m ; star, narrow blaze, 
snip, lower lip white, both hind fetlocks and off fore fetlock white. No. 
0334- 

DORRIS (Mr. J. Roarke), br m ; long narrow blaze, small snip, 
both hind fetlocks white. No. 0463. 

DOUBTFUL SPEC. (Mr. A. Kenyon Fuller), b m ; star, near hind 
and near fore fetlock white, with black spots. No. 0264. 

DOVE, THE (Mr. W. Gillman), gr m; faint snip, near hind coronet 
and off hind fetlock white. No. 0307. 

DOWN (Capt. Hall), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind and both 
fore legs white, off hind fetlock white, scar off side of neck. No. 0495. 

DRAGOON (Mr. Malcolm Moncrieffe), b g ; star, faint snip, white 
spot lower lip, white mark off fore coronet, brand near foi'e and near hind 
quarter, large scar front of chest. No. 0197. 

DRIVEN BACK (Mr. James Farmer), br m ; star, narrow blaze, 
snip, near hind fetlock white. No. 073. 

DROGHEDA (Capt. Langworthy), ch m ; star, very faint blaze, 
white spot near hind quarter, black spots both hind quarters. No. 0133. 

DROMORE (Capt. Hall), br m ; star, snip, white hairs on face, both 
hind fetlocks white, off fore coronet white. No. 0496. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 465 

DRUSILLA (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m ; black points, no marks. 
No. 088. 

DUMPTY (Capt. J. A. Bell Smyth), blk g; star, both hind fetlocks 
white, near fore coronet white, all with black spots. No. 0549. 

DUNWATER (Mr. C. H. Rankin), dun m; star, both hind fetlocks 
white. No. 01 19. 

DURANZA (Mr. J. Lawson), br g; scars on face, brand near hind 
quarter, white marks both fore legs. No. 0228. 



EDITH (Capt. F. Egerton Green), br m ; white marks both fore 
shins. No. 0141. 

EILEEN (Mr. Mort, 8th Hussars), b m ; star, narrow blaze, collar 
mark. No. 0497. 

ELASTIC (Mr. Kenneth Allison), b g; faint star, near hind and 
both fore coronets white. No. 0365. 

ELECTRIC (Sir Thomas Fowler), ch g ; white tail, white marks on 
neck. No. 054. 

EMERALD (Mr. J. B. Dale), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock and oft' hind coronet white. No. 0629. 

ENID (Mr. Todds), b m ; small saddle mark, girth mark off side. 
No. 0550. 

ENNISCORTHY (Mr. L. C. Swifte), bg; star, small snip, scars off 
stifle and fetlock. No. 0597. Re-named from " Rusty Buckle." 

ENNISKILLEN (Mr. A. Withers), b br g ; both fore coronets 
white, near hind fetlock white. No. 0335. 

ERIN (Major Carew), ch m; star, blaze, snip, both hind fetlocks 
white, white patch off" ribs. No. 0171. 

ERRIS (Mr. Erskine Booth), b m ; star, blaze, near hind fedock and 
off hind leg white. No. 0387. 

ETHEL (Mr. A. Withers), br m ; few^ white hairs on forehead and 
face, white spot off forearm. No. 0336. 

EVA (Mr. Hugh Rainey), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind and near 
fore fetlock white. Passed for season. No. 0388, 

EXCELSIOR (Mr. J. L. Sandall), br g; star, narrow blaze and small 
snip, white spot upper lip, ticked with grey hairs, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0389. 



FALSE PRIDE (Mr. A. J. Cunnick), b m ; black spot below off 
stifle, scar front of off fore pastern. Passed for season. No. 0338. 

FANATIC (Capt. C. E. G. Morton) b g; star, narrow, blaze, snip, 
all four fetlocks white. No. 0106. 

FANCY (Mr. Arthur Wrench), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
legs white, oft" fore fetlock tipped with white hairs. Passed for season, 
No. 0390. 



466 APPENDIX. 

FANCY (Mr. J. W. Nolan), b m ; star, both hind fetlocks white 
with black spots, collar marks. No. 0684. 

FAREWELL (Mr. H. Rich), br m ; white spot near side of ribs. 
Passed for season. No. 0337. 

FARRELL, MISS (Mr. Warden), b m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
and off fore fetlocks white with black spots. No. 0551. 

Fi\TIMA (Mr. T. Craddock), gr m ; near hind fetlock white. No. 
0391. 

FAVOURITE (Mr. Threlfall, 8th Hussars), b g; white face, lower 
lip white, black spots upper lip, near hind fetlock and off hind leg white, 
brand near hind quarter, collar mark. No. 0498. 

FAWN, THE (Mr. F. A. Gill), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
fetlocks white. No. 021. 

FAWN, THE (Mr. T. Craddock), b m ; white face with bay spots, 
lower lip white, near hind leg white, white hairs in tail. No. 0392. 

FELIX (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), ch m ; star, blaze, near hind coronet 
white. No. 091. 

FERUS (Mr. R. Hague Cook), br g ; star, both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 0648. 

FETLOCK II. (Mr. Rasbotham), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
and lower jaw white, both hind and near fore legs white, collar marks. 
No. 0552. 

FIGGET (Mr. E. Lloyd), b m; star, narrow blaze, snip, near fore 
and near hind fetlocks white with black spots. No. 0292. 

FIZZER II. (Mr. Wickham), b h; star, snip, both hind fetlock and 
near fore fetlock white with black spots. No. 0553. 

FLIRT (Mr. W. B. Hayes), ch m; star, white hairs down face, near 
hind fetlock white. Passed for season. No. 0393. 

FLIRT (Capt. C. Wilson), ch m ; star, near hind fetlock white. No. 

0394- 
FLORx\ (Mr. H. Rainey), blk or drk ch m ; star, blaze, snip, off 

hind fetlock white. No. 0395. 

FLY (Mr. E. Sullivan), br m ; a few white hairs in mane. No. 
0397- 

FOLLY (Mr. T. O'Meara), b m; star, narrow blaze, snip, white spot 
lower lip. No. 0396. 

FORBIDDEN FRUIT (Major Rimington), b g; star, small collar 
mark. Passed for season. No. 0554. 

FRANK (Capt. J. A. Bell Smyth),, br m ; star, narrow blaze, off hind 
fetlock white with black spots, small white spot near shoulder. No. 
0555- 

FREEDOM (R.A. Polo Club), ch g ; white face, both hind legs 
white, ticked with white hairs. No. 0308. 

FRIAR TUCK (Capt. J. W. Bidgood, R.A.), blk brg; faint star, 
near fore fetlock grey. Passed for season. No. 0435. 



POLO POxXIES, 1899. 467 

FROLIC ( Mr. J. C. de Las Casas), ch m ; star, small snip, near 
hind fetlock white, collar marks. No. 0630. 

FROLIC (Mr. J. F. Church), ch m ; white face, both hind legs and 
ofif fore fetlock white. No. 061 1. 

FULL STOP (Capt. F. Egerton Green), b m; white face, lower lip 
white, both hind legs white. 



GAIETY (Mr. W. K. Carew), br m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white. Passed for season. No. 0436. 

GALLOP ON (Major R. T. Lawley), b g ; star. No. 097. 

GAME BOY (Mr. W. K. Carew), b g ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 

ticked with white hairs, near hind fetlock white. Passed for season. No. 

0437- 
GAME CHICKEN (The Keyasham Stud Company), ch g ; star, 

white hairs down face, white spot off hind quarter, and off fore quarter, 

and near hind quarter. . No. 0398. 

GAMMON (Mr. A. G. Dalgety), b g ; bay, black points, no distin- 
guishing marks. No. 0649. 

GAY LiVDY (Mr. T. O'Brien), b m; star, narrow blaze, snip, both 
hind fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0399. 

GAY MAN (Messrs. Richards and Leigh), bg;star, faint white 
mark off hind coronet, black patch off shoulder, scar near ribs. No. 
10198. 

GEM (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), b m; star, faint black mark down 
croup. No. 0229. 

GENTLE IDA (Mr, Ballactus), b m ; scar near side of neck. No. 
0556. 

GIPSEY (Mr. F. T. Colgan), gr m; small snip, white spots lower 
lip. No. 0465. 

GIPSY LEE (The Polo Club, 14th Hussars), b m ; star, narrow 
blaze, both hind fetlocks white. No. 0500. 

GIPSY MAIDEN (Elmsall Ludwich Stud, Hatfield), blk m ; white 

mark near hip, both flanks ticked white, white marks both fore legs. No. 
0199. 

GIRTON GIRL (Capt. Oldnall), b m ; star, narrow blaze, both 
hind coronets white, scar off side of neck. No. 0309. 

GLADYS (Sir Henry Rawlinson),b m ; star,near hind fetlock white, 
white spots off hind and near fore leg. No. 0176 

GLORY QUALE (Mr. N. F. Archdale), bm; star, near hind fet- 
lock and off hind coronet white. Passed for season. No. 0464. 

GOAT, THE (Mr. A. Bellville), b g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, both hind and off fore legs white. No. 0296. 

GOBANG (Mr. J. Windart), b m ; small star, near hind coronet 
white, collar marks, white marks both fore legs. No. 0339. 

GO BETWEEN (Mr. R. P. O'Reilly;, br g; faint star. No. 0366. 

30* 



468 APPENDIX. 

GOLDEN GATE (Lord Villiers), b m; white mark front of near 
hind shin, scar above off knee. No. 0230. 

GGLDING, MRS. (Mr. W. R. Wyndham), gr m; star, lower lip 
white. No. 0265. 

GGODSPECK (Mr. James Farmer), b m ; white coronet near hind, 
collar marks. No. 079. 

GRAPE SHOT (Capt. J. W. Bidgood), br m; star, off hind 
coronet white. No. 0437. 

GREEDY BOY (Mr. G. K. Ansell), gr g; white mark inside both 
knees and in front of off hind shin, scar off nostril. No. 0557. 

GREEN SLEEVES (Mr. J. Lawson), br m; star, faint snip, near 
hind fetlock white, with small black spots, scars on all four legs. No. 
0231. 

GREY FRIAR (Mr. James Farmer), gr g; snip, near fore coronet 
white. No. 085. 

GREY FRIAR (Mr. T. Hudson), gr g ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
fetlocks white, off fore coronet white. No. 0466. 

GREY GOWN (Mr. J. Lawson), gr g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, off ear split, scar above near knee, brand near hind quarter. No. 
0232. 

GREY LEG (Major D. E. Wood, 8th Hussars), gr g; both hind 
coronets white, collar marks, brand near hind quarter. No. 0499. 

GREY LEG (Capt. Campbell Johnstone), gr g ; blaze, snip, white 
spot lower lip, collar marks. No. 0310. 

GREYLING III. (Mr. M. E. M. Butler), iron gr m; black pDints, 
no distinctive marks. No. 0558. 

GREY PRINCE (Mr. James Farmer), gr g ; near hind fetlock white. 
No. 084. 

GUINEVERE (Mr. G. Heseltine), drk b m ; faint star, small scar 
off stifle. No. 0287. 

HALLELUJAH (Mr. P. R. Denny), gr g; near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0559. 

HEIRESS (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b roan m ; star, blaze, 
snip, near hind leg white, white marks both hind quarters. No. 017. 

HEMIS (Mr James Adamthwaite), b m; off hind fetlock white. 
No. 093. 

HERMIT (Sir Thomas Fowler), gr g; white face, off hind and near 
fore coronets white. No. 059. 

HERON (Mr. James Adamthwaite), b g; star off cheek. No. 
090. 

HIS NIBS (Mr. W. S. Buckmaster), brg; star, both hind fetlocks 
white with black spots, brand near fore quarter. No. 0290. 

HIRUNDO eCapt. Vernon), drk br g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, both hind and near fore legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 
0560. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 469 

HOMECIA (Mr. James Farmer), b m; both hind fetlocks white, 
white marks inside both hind quarters. No. 078. 

HOUSEMAID (Mr. J. D. Gouldsmith), b m; star near hind leg. 
No. 026. 

HOVE (Capt. Grey), b m ; star, blaze, scar inside near fore coronet. 
No. 0266. 

HOVIS (Major E. D. Kennedy), br g ;large collar mark on off side. 
No. 0621. 

HUNTING HORN (Mr. Brennan), ch g ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
all four legs white. Passed for season. No. 0467. 

HUNT THE SLIPPER (Mr. Percy Bullivant), b m ; star, off hind 
fetlock white, off fore fetlock grey. No. 0173. 

HURRIED SHEET (Major Douglas Haig), gr g; star, brand near 
hind quarter. No. 0103. 

HUSHEEN (Mr. Charles B. Toms), ch m; star, blaze, snip, lower 
lip white, oft" hind leg white. No. 0130. 



IN AND OUT (Capt. L. Bryan), b m ; star, lower lip white, all four 
fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0561. 

INQUISITIVE (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m; off hind 
coronet white. No. 016. 

IRISH GIRL (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m; white spot near 
side of ribs. No. 018. 

IT (Earl of Harrington), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, small snip, off 
hind fetlock white, near fore coronet white with spots. No. 0631. 

IZAVE (Mr. E. Ballesty), ch g ; star, narrow blaze. No. 0367. 



JACK (Capt. B. Daley), b g ; star, white hairs top of wither. No. 
0562. 

JACK, MRS. (Capt. C. G. Mackenzie), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, 
snip, near hind fetlock white, off fore fetlock white, faint brand off fore 
quarter. No. 031 1. 

JACKO (Mr. Hugh Rainey), gr g; snip, lower lip white, both hind 
legs white, collar marks. No. 0400. 

JACK TAR (Mr. Wylam, 8th Hussars), br g ; snip, near hind fet- 
lock white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0501. 

JAMES (Mr. H. J. D. Clerk), drk br g ; star, snip, near hind fetlock 
white, small scar near hind quarter. No. 0233. 

JANE (Mr. A. Withers), b m ; small star, collar mark. No. 0340. 

JEDDAH (Capt. Mussenden), b g ; star, small snip, off hind and 
near fore fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0502. 

JILL (R.A. Polo Club), gr m ; scar in front of hind shin. No. 
0312. 



470 APPENDIX. 

JIM (Major L. Haywood, R. A. M.C.), b g ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
off hind fetlock white. No. 0368. 

JIMMY (Mr. C. C. Goldsmith), b h ; star, snip, upper lip white, 
near fore and both hind fetlocks white, off fore coronet white, and collar 
marks. No. 0234. 

JINNET (Mr. John Carpenter), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, off 
hind fetlock white, white patch near hip. No. 0401. 

JOAN OF ARC (Mr. Robinson), b m ; star, blaze, snip, off hind 
fetlock white, white mark front of near hock. Passed for season. No. 
0563- 

JOHN BROWN (Mr. James Farmer), b g ; small scar on front of 
near hind fetlock. No. 075. 

" J.P." (Capt. C. G. Mackenzie), skewbald g; white face and chin, 
all four legs white. No. 0313. 

JUGGINS (Mr. Wainwright), ch g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, 
scar outside near knee. No. 0314. 

KATHLEEN (Mr. C. E. Hunter), b br m ; star, collar marks. No. 
0632. 

KEEPSAKE (Major Longfield), b m ; faint star. No. 0165. 

" K. H." (Hon. C. G. Gore Langton), gr g ; brand near fore shoulder. 
No. 0564. 

KHALID (London Polo Club), gr h ; scar near knee, flea-bitten all 
over body. No. 0122. 

KHALIFA (Mr. Cecil, 8th Hussars), gr m; white mark above off 
hock. No. 0503. 

KHEDIVE, THE (Mr. J. Roark), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, near fore coronet and off hind fetlock white. No. 0468. 

KILGIBBON (Capt. L. Bryan), b g; star, white hairs off side of 
wither. No. 0565. 

KILLACOOLEY (Capt. L. Bryan), b g; star, off hind fetlock white, 
white spots on coronet. No. 0566. 

KITTEN, THE (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m ; white mark on front 
of near fore fetlock, white mark on neck. No. 092. 

KITTY (Mr. John Nettleton), b m; large snip, narrow blaze, star, 
black points, no marks. No. 0148. 

KITTY (Mr. O'Brien, 8th Hussars), br m ; star, near hind fetlock 
white, white mark on croup. Passed for season. No. 0504. 

KITTY^VYNK (Mr. Charles B. Toms), b m; star, scar off hip. 
No. 0139. 

KLONDIKE (Mr. Eyre Lloyd), b m; star, black points, no 
distinctive marks. No. 0633. 

KODAK (Capt. Hall), br m ; black points, no distinctive marks. 
No. 0505. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 471 

LADY ( Mr. A. E. Fair), b m ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, both 
hind and near fore legs white, off fore fetlock white. No. 0315. 

LADY (Mr. G. F. Richardson), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, both hind 
legs white. No. 0402. 

LADY, THE (Mr. James Farmer), blk m; small white spot point 
of near shoulder. No. 097. 

LADY BIRD (Mr. James Farmer), bm; snip, near hind coronet 
white. No. 081. 

LADYE (Mr. W. Graham Mclvor), ch m ; star, blaze, white spot 
lower lip, ofif hind leg and near fore coronet white, white-and-black patch 
near hind quarter. No. 0612. 

LADY GEORGINA (Colonel Dooley), br m; star, blaze, snip, 
lower lip white, both hind fetlocks white, ticked wuth grey hairs. Passed 
for season. No. 0568. 

LADY GIRTON (Capt. Mackenzie), b m; small star. No. 0328. 

LADY GODIVA (Mr. Pando Kirk), dun ch m ; star, blaze, snip. 
No. 0403. 

LADY KISSER (Major Duff, 8th Hussars), br m; collar mark. 
No. 0506. 

LADY LOYE (Mr. F. E. Sanford Pakenham), b m ; collar marks. 
No. 0439. 

LADY OF QUALITY (Mr. Percy Bullivant), br m; faint star. 
Passed for season. No. 0174. 

LADY PAT (Mr. T. Moore), b m ; star, both hind fetlocks white, 
white hairs mane and tail. No. 0569. 

LADY PERRY (Capt. L. Bryan), b m ; small scar off side of jaw. 
No. 0570. 

LADY SOPHIA (Mr. T. D. Pilkington), br m ; lightly ticked with 
white hairs over body, collar marks. No. 0184. 

LADY UXBRIDGE (Major Carew), drk br m ; star, few white 
hairs on forehead, off hind fetlock white. No. 0169. 

LADY YIC II. (Lieut.-Colonel G. F. Dooley), b m; star, snip. 
No. 0369. 

LAMBKIN (Mr. A. Withers), b g; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, 
all four fetlocks white with black spots. No. 0360. 

LANDLADY (Mr. James Farmer), b m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
both hind fetlocks white. No. 083. 

LANGRISHE (Major Rimington), blk br g ; white spots off ribs. 
No. 0567. 

LAURA (Mr. John Nettleton), drk br m ; faint star, faint snip, both 
fore fetlocks white. No. 01 55. 

LEAH (Mr. W, Neilson), br m; white spot near shoulder. No. 
0235. 

LEAVE IT TO ME (Mr. H. S. A. Sandford), ch m ; star, blaze, 
snip, white marks on both fore shins; No. 068. 



472 APPENDIX. 

LEN (Mr. J. J. Stafford), b m; star, both hind coronets white, 
ticked with grey hairs, collar marks. No. 0404. 

LILAC (Mr. C. E. Amphlett, 6th Dragoons), dun m; black stripe 
down back and tail. No. 0507. 

LILLIE (Mr. John Nettleton), br m ; large star, near fore coronet 
white. No. 0153. 

LILLOUTH (Mr. A. Suart), ch m; star, narrow blaze, near hind 
fetlock white. No. 0634. 

LIMA (Mr. A. F. Houlder), b g ; star, white mark lower part of 
face, near hind fetlock white with black spots, brand near hind quarter. 
No. 0341. 

LIMELIGHT (Mr. Hargreaves), br g ; star. No. 0236. 

LIMERICK (Mr. A. Withers), ch g ; star, white hairs on face, both 
hind fetlocks white. No. 0342. 

LIMITED MAIL (Major Rimington), b g; star, narrow blaze, both 
hind fetlocks white, collar marks. No. 0571. 

LITTLE TOM (Miss Langrishe), b g; both hind coronets white. 
Passed for season. No. 0405. 

LIVELY(Mr. T. W. Connolly), b m ; faint black mark down croup, 
black points. No. 0440. 

LONDONDERRY (Mr. G. K. Ansell), b m; black spots on face, 
few white hairs on tail. No. 0572. 

LUCKY (Mr. H. W. Turner), b m ; large scar on face. No. 

0343- 
LUDLOW L,AD (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), b g ; star, near hind 

fetlock white, white mark back of both fore legs. No. 0200. 

MACKBRIGS (Capt. R. Ellison), ch g ; white face, lower lip white, 
near fore and both hind legs white, off fore fetlock white, white marks 
over body. No. 01 61. 

MACKINSTRY (Mr. J. Lawson), br m ; near hind fetlock grey, scar 
front off hock, white collar marks, off ear split. No. 0237. 

MADCAP (Capt. H. Greathed), b m ; star, black points, black line 
down croup, small collar mark. No. 0650. 

MADGE (Mr. John Nettleton), b m ; white face, lower lip white, 
all four legs white. No. 0149. 

MADGE (Mr. H. T. C. Parker), b m ; star, both hind fetlocks white. 

No. 0573. 

MAGGIE (Mr. W. M. Cobbett), mottled br m ; star, white spot 
near hind leg. No. 0651. 

MAGIC (Mr. John Nettleton), br g ; near fore and both hind legs 
white, brand near hind quarter, off hind fetlock white. No. 0151. 

MAGIC (Capt. H. Greathed), b m; star, few white hairs on face, 
off hind fetlock white, off fore fetlock grey and white, white spots off 
hind quarter. No. 0652. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 473 

MAGPIE (Mr. J. Roark), br m; star, snip, lower lip white, off fore 
coronet white. No. 0469. 

MAHDI (Capt. Sir Keith Fraser j, white h ; scar off hind quarter. 
No. 01 II. 

MAIA (Capt. Bell Smyth), ch m ; near fore coronet white with 
chestnut spots, black patches off hind quarter. No. 0685. 

MAIDEN OVER (Mr. W. P. Monkhouse, R.H.A.), b m; star, 
blaze, snip, near hind fetlock white, scar off shoulder. No. 0508. 

MALTESE CAT (Mr. F. H. Wise), b m; star, near hind fetlock 
white with black spots. No. 0574. 

MAINSPRING (Mr. C. McNeill), br m; star, white spots near 
shoulder. No. 0238. 

MANIFESTO (Mr. Leonard Bucknall), b g; star, narrow blaze, 
large snip, lower lip white, near hind coronet, near fore and off hind legs 
white. No. 0156. 

MAPLE SUGAR (Mr. J. Lawson), ch m; star, off hind fetlock 
white, off fore coronet white, collar marks. No. 0239. 

MARCHIONESS (Capt. Brooke), b m; faint star, off hind fetlock 
white, collar marks. No. 0575. 

MARGUERITE (Mr. Lomer, 8th Hussars), dun m ; star, narrow 
blaze, snip, both hind coronets white, white hairs in mane. No. 0509. 

MARION (Lieut.-Col. Sir H. Johnson), drk br m ; faint star, 
faint snip. No. 0576. 

MARQUIS (Mr. A. Withers), br g ; near hind fetlock white. No. 
0344- 

MARY (Mr. Denny), ch m; star, blaze, snip, scar off side of neck. 
No. 0577. 

MARY (7th Hussars' Polo Club), br m; near hind fetlock white. 
No. 01 21. 

MARY, MISS (Mr. R. G. Tarbett), br m ; star, snip, both hind fet- 
locks white. No. 0408. 

MARY MEATH (Major Honner), b m; star, near hind coronet 
white, black spot off fore quarter. No. 0406. 

MASTERPIECE (Mr. H. S. A. Sanford), b g ; star, blaze, snip, 
all four fetlocks white. No. 067. 

MATCHLESS (Mr. W. B. Hayes), br m; star, off hind fetlock and 
near coronet white with black spots. No. 0407. 

MAY (Capt. Brooke), drk br m ; scar both sides of brisket. No. 
0578. 

MAY MORN (Major Rimington), drk br m ; star, near hind fetlock 
white with black spots, near fore coronet white. No. 0579. 

MAY QUEEN (Capt. Bonham), b m ; near hind leg grey on out- 
side, small white marks both fore legs. No. 0267. 

MEDDLAR (Mr. Digby C. Martin), b g; black, bay points, saddle 
marks. No. 062. 



474 APPENDIX. 

MEDIUM (Mr. A. Withers), b br m; faint star, off hind fetlock 
white with black spots. No. 0345. 

MELLON (Mr. Digby C. Martin), b m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
black points, saddle marks. No. 065. 

MERMAID (Mr. A. Withers), b m ; star, near hind coronet white, 
brand near hind quarter. No. 0346. 

MERRIMAC (Capt. de Lisle),br g; star,scar inside off fore coronet. 
No. 0268. 

MERRY ANDREW (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), blk g; star, both hind 
fetlocks white. No. 089. 

MERRY GIRL (Capt. Bell Smyth), b m; star, narrow blaze, both 
hind fetlocks white with black spots, off fore coronet white with black 
spots. No. 0686. 

MERRY MAID (Mr. A. J. Pilkington), b m ; black points, few grey 
hairs in mane. No. 0370. 

MERRY THORN (Capt. J. W. Bidgood, R. A.), ch g; star, blaze, 
snip, upper lip white, near hind fetlock white. No. 0441. 

MICKIE FREE (Hon. O. Hastings), b g ; small scar on front of 
shin ofif hind leg. No. 070. 

MICKIE FREE (Mr. A. Withers), b m; star, short blaze, near hind 
coronet white. No. 0347. 

MIKE (Mr. H. Straker), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, both 
hind legs and near fore fetlock white, collar mark, brand near fore and 
near hind quarter. No. 0654. 

MIKE (Mr. R. Bourke), ch g; star, blaze, small snip, black patches 
near hind quarter. No. 0655. 

MILKYWAY (Capt. Makins), gr m ; white face, lower lip white, 
both fore fetlocks white. No. 0126. 

MILLIE SIMPSON (Mr. A. Kenyon Fuller), ch m; star, white 
marks front of near hind leg and front of ofif fore fetlock. No. 0269. 

MILLY (Capt. B. Daley), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white hairs, out- 
side of ofif hock, scar ofif side neck. No. 0580. 

MINNOW (Mr. H. Percy Woolcott), bg; star, narrow^ blaze, near 
hind fetlock white, ofif fore fetlock grey. iS^'o. 034. 

MINX (Mr. R. F. Courage), br m ; small white spots back of both 
fore legs. No. 0669. 

MISCHIEF (Capt. H. Greathed), gr m ; star, white spots upper lip. 
No. 0653. 

MISFIT (Mr. John Hetherington), b br m ; few white hairs on fore- 
head, both hind fetlocks white with black spots. No. 0348. 

MISS LUSK (Mr. W. Lindsay), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, near fore leg white, ticked with white hairs. No. 0606. 

MISS ROSE (Mr. Burke), b m ; both hind fetlocks and near fore 
coronet white. No. 0581. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 475 

MYSTERY (Mr. Turbetts), b m ; white spot near side of ribs, collar 
marks. No. 0582. 

MODESTY (Mr. Swift), b m ; white spots front of off fore shin. 
No. 0583. 

MOLLY (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), blk m ; star, both hind fetlocks 
white, ticked with white hairs. No, 0510. 

MONA (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m ; black points, saddle marks. 
No. 095. 

MONA (Earl of Leitrim), br m; white muzzle, white eye-lids, scar 
front of chest. No. 0409. 

MONK, THE (Mr. W. M. Cobbett), b g; faint star, brown patch 
off hind quarter, scar off shoulder. No. 0656. 

MONKEY (Capt. C. Grey), roan g ; star, faint black mark down 
croup. No. 0270. 

MOONSTONE (Mr. R. St. G. Robinson), br g ; black points, no 
distinctive marks. No. 0442. 

MOSES (Mr. A. A. Montgomery), b br g ; scar front of off hind shin. 
No. 0316. 

MOSQUITO (Mr. A. Findlater), b m; star, brand near side of neck, 
black line down croup. No. 0349. 

MOSS ROSE (Mr. Digby C. Martin), b m; star, near hind coronet 
white. No. 064. 

MOUNTEBANK (Mr. H. R. Fairfax Lucy), blk m ; faint star, both 
hind coronets white. No. 0134. 

MOUSE, THE (Capt. H. B. Dalgety), br m; star, near hind coronet 
white. No. 0108. 

MUFFIN (Mr. W. Graham Mclvor), piebald g ; black spots on 
muzzle, brand near hind quarter. No. 0613. 

MULATTO (Mr. W. S. Buckmaster), b m ; faint star. No. 0670. 

MULBERRY (Mr. Digby C. Martin), b m ; small star, scar on fore- 
head, white collar mark. No. 066. 

MUSCAT (Mr. W. George Mawer ), b g ; star, blaze, snip, lower 
lip white, off hind fetlock white with black spots, collar marks. No. 
0185. 

MUSKET (Mr. T. D. Piikington), gr g; snip, off hind fetlock and 
near fore fetlock white, scar near side of neck. No. 0183. 

MYRTLE (Mr. Digby C. Martin), b m; star, near hind and off fore 
fetlocks white. No. 063. 

MYSTERY (Mr. D. T. Slocock), b m ; black points, no distinctive 
marks. No. 0470. 



NAAS (Mr. C. de Robeck), b br m ; star, few white hairs on face. 
No. 0584. 



476 • APPENDIX. 

NANCY (Major R. T. Lawley), br m ; small scar on face. No. 
098. 

NARCISSA (Mr. W. Lindsay), b m ; small Avhite spot off shoulder. 
No. 0585. 

NEBULA (Earl of Shrewsbury and Talbot),ch m ; star, off hind fet- 
lock and off fore coronet white. No. 0240. 

NEGOTLA.TOR (Mr. J. Murphy), b g; star, snip, white hairs on 
face, both hind fetlocks white. No. 0586. 

NELLIE (Mr. John Nettleton), ch m ; star, scar on both knees. 
No. 0147. 

NELLY (Mr. J. T. Wigan), b m ; faint star, small scar near stifle, 
small white spot near side of neck. No. 0614. 

NEWBRIDGE (Mr. Tilney, 14th Hussars), grg; both hind fetlocks 
white, brand near fore and near hind quarter. No. 051 1. 

NIGHT EXPRESS (Mr. G. K. Ansell), drk br m ; faint star, near 
hind fetlock white with black spots, off hind coronet white. No. 0587. 

NILE ( Major Bainbridge), b m ; large star, narrow blaze, snip, both 
hind fetlocks white, black spots near hind fetlock, collar marks, white spot 
off side jaw. No. 0180. 

NIPON (Mr. H. Percy Woolcot), bg; star, off hind coronet white. 
No. 036. 

NIPPER (Capt. R. Ellison), bg; star, snip, near hind fetlock white, 
both sides of wither branded. No. 0167. 

NITA (Mr. F. St. Lawrence Tyrrell), blk br m ; star. No. 0443. 

NOISETTE (Mr. W. F. Taylor), b m ; faint star, large scar near 
side of chest. No. 0241. 

NOISETTE (Mr, R. St. G. Robinson), ch m ; star, blaze, snip near 
fore fetlock white, off hind coronet white, all with chestnut spots. No. 
0444. 

NORA (Mr. Stewart Dackett), b m ; faint star, faint snip, near hind 
fetlock white. Passed for season. No. 0471. 

NORAH (Mr. A. Withers), ch m; white hair on forehead, scars on 
face, black spots both hind quarters, collar marks. No. 0350. 

NOVELTY (Mr. Swift), drk br m; star, off hind fetlocks white with 
black spots, collar mark. No. 0588. 

NUGGET (Capt. the Hon. J.Beresford), ch g; star, blaze, snip, star 
behind near shoulder, collar mark. No. 0105. 

NUN, THE (Mr. J. L. Lamont ), b m ; star, faint blaze, small white 
marks near hind leg. No. 0317. 

ORDERLY (Mr. J. Lawson), br m ; star, blaze, snip, white chin, 
both hind legs and near fore fetlock white, collar marks. No. 0242. 

OZONE (Mr. Nettleton), b m ; star, near hind fetlock white with 
black spots. No. 0298. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 477 

PAINT BRUSH (Capt. J. Hanwell), grey g ; narrow blaze, small 
snip, both fore fetlocks white with black spots, off hind fetlock white. 
No. 0186. 

PALEFACE (Capt. Langworthy), roan g ; white face, lower jaw 
white, both hind legs white, white marks both knees. JCo. 0132. 

PALEFACE (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), b g; white face, lower lip 
white, all four fetlocks white, brand near fore and near hind quarter. No. 
0512. 

PANCHITTA (Mr. A. Bellville), b m ; star, narrow blaze, small 
snip, near hind fetlock white. No. 0289. 

PANTS (Mr. W. Lindsay), chg; star, blaze, near hind and near 
fore^fetlock white, off fore coronet white. No, 0589. 

PARMA VIOLET (Capt. F. Egerton Green), br m ; star, snip. No. 
0143. 

PAR:\IA violet (Capt. Williams), b g ; faint black mark down 
croup, white hairs top of wither. No. 0590. 

PATCH (Lord W. Bentinck), b g ; star, both hind fetlocks white, 
white patch near flank. No. 0615. 

PATCH WORK (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), skewbald m ; star, blaze, 
snip, lower lip white, small scar outside near hock. No. 046. 

PATIENCE (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), drk br m ; star, narrow 
blaze, both hind fetlocks and off fore coronet white. No. 0513. 

PATRICIA (Mr. F. H. Wise), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
legs white, scar near hind shin, ticked with white hairs. No. 0591. 

PAVYMAID (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), ch m ; few white hairs on 
forehead, near fore and off hind legs white with chestnut spots. Passed for 
season. No. 0201. 

PEARL (Capt. F. D. Hickman), gr m ; small white spot lower lip, 
both hind fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0446. 

PEARL (Mr. W. Hardcastle), br m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, near 
fore coronet white, near hind coronet white with black spots. No. 0657. 

PEARL, THE (Mr. Guy Gilbey), b m ; both hind fetlocks white 

with black spots. No. 0635. 

PEARLEY (Lord Villiers;, ch m ; star, large snip. No. 0243. 

PEGGY BAKER (Major Rimington), b m; star, white spot off ribs. 
No. 0592. 

PEPITA (Capt. Clifton Brown), b m; few white hairs on forehead, 

near hind fetlock white, white spots both fore and near hind legs. No. 
0616. 

PET, THE (Capt. The Hon, J, Beresford), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, 
both hind fetlocks white, white spots all over body. No. 0104, 

PETER (Mr. J. S. Bakewell), gr g ; snip, white spot on muzzle, 
black spots on face, collar marks. No. 0244. 

PHEASANT, THE (Major E, D, Kennedy), b m ; near hind 
coronet white. No. 0622, 



478 APPENDIX. 

PHIL (Mr. C. E. Hunter), ch g; star, silver mane, few white hairs 
in tail. No. 0636. 

PHILLIPINE (Mr. J. Hetherington), b m ; off hind coronet white, 
faint black line down croup. No. 0351. 

PHOSPHORUS (Sir Thomas Fowler), b m ; black marks, white 
mark near hind shin. No. 056. 

PICKAXE (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), b g ; white face, lower lip 
white, both hind legs white, off fore fetlock and near fore coronet white, 
brand near quarter. No. 0514. 

PIG, THE (Capt. Sir K. Eraser), b m ; faint star, near hind coronet 
white. No. 01 10. 

PINKIE (Mr. T. R. Denny), white g; black spots on body, pink 
muzzle, brand near hind quarter. No. 0593. 

PINTO (Mr. J. Lawson), br m ; white face and lower lip, large white 
patch both flanks, scar front of both hind legs, white marks both fore legs. 
No. 0245. 

PIRATE (Mr. T. Anderson), gr g; narrow blaze, snip, both hind 
and near fore fetlocks white. No. 0472. 

PLUM DUFF (Mr. W. B. Hayes), b g; black points, no distinctive 
marks. No. 0410. 

POLLY (Mr. J. C. Nolan), dk b m ; star, white mark upper lip, few 
white hairs in tail. No. 041 1. 

POLLY IV. (Mr. Wate), br m ; star, collar mark. No. 0594. 

POLLUX (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), roan g; white face, lower lip 
white, both fore and off hind legs white, white patches both flanks, brand 
near hind quarter. No. 0515. 

POST GIRL (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), b m ; star, few white hairs 
on face, snip, white spot upper lip, near hind fetlock white. No. 0202. 

POTEEN (Mr. Erskine Booth), bm; star, near hind fetlock and 
off hind coronet white, both hind legs grey. No. 0412. 

PRECILLA (Capt. de Lisle), br m ; star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 06. 

PRETENDER (Mr. de Las Casas), chg; white face, near hind legs 
white, white spot near hip. No. 0637. 

PRINCE (Mr. R. Brown), ch g ; star, near hind fetlock white, off 
fore coronet white, ticked with white hairs both flanks, white spots off 
hind quarter, and black spot on croup. No. 0445. 

PROFESSOR (Mr. B. A. Wilson), b g ; faint star, ticked with white 
over hind quarter, small black spot near side of back. No. 0286. 

PRUSILLA (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), b m ; scar near flank. 
No. 0203. 

PTARMIGAN (Capt. Makins), gr m ; scar off side of face. No. 
0125. 

PUCK (Capt. de Lisle), b g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, both 
hind fetlocks white, both fore coronets white. No. 01. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 479 

QUEEN (Mr. Robert N. Allen), b m; star, both hind fetlocks white - 
with black spots. Passed for season. No. 0271. 

QUEENIE (Air. John Nettleton), b m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
near hind fetlock white. No. 0152. 

QUEEN OF THE CASTLE (Mr. Farmer), ch m ; star, narrow 
blaze, small white mark near hind coronet. No. 096. 

QUHARRIE (Mr. N. F. Archdale), br g; near fore coronet white 
with black spots. No. 0473. 

QUICKSILVER (Mr. G. P. Sechiary), b m ; black points, no dis- 
tinguishing marks. No. 0352. 

QUIEN SABE (Capt. B Daley), ch m ; star, small scar near hind 
quarter. No. 0687. 

RACHAEL (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), blk m; black points, small 
saddle marks. No. 044. 

RAINBOW (Capt. C. E. G. Martin), b g; star, both hind coronets 
white, brand near shoulder. No. 0107. 

RAINBOW (Capt. de Lisle), b g ; star, snip. No. 0272. 

RAJAH (Sir Thomas Fowler), blk g ; star, both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 058. 

RANDINO (The Hon. A. Hastings), ch h ; star, white mark on off 
fore shin. No. 072. 

RATCATCHER (Capt. G. Wynne), br m ; star, white line on face, 
snip, ticked with white hairs, off hind leg and off fore fetlock white. No. 
0447. 

READE, MISS (Mr. C. H. Reade), b m ; black points, no dis- 
tinctive marks. Passed for season. No. 0623. 

RECKLESS (Capt. de Lisle), gr m ; star, off hind fetlock white. 
No. 05. 

REDFIELD (Major Honner Brannontoun), b g; star. No. 0516. 

RED LANCER (Mr. Montgomery), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, lower 
lip white, off fore and both hind legs white. Passed for season. No. 
0318. 

REDSKIN (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), roan g ; star, both hind and 
near fore fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0517. 

REDWING (Mr. H. Fielden), ch m; narrow blaze, white marks 
both fore legs. No. 01 13. 

REGULICI (Capt. de Lisle), ch m ; star, blaze, near fore and near 
hind fetlocks white. No. 02. 

REJECTED (Mr. J. D. Gouldsmith), b m; star, snip, both hind 
fetlocks white, collar marks. No. 027. 

REVELATION (Sir Thomas Fowler), gr m ; star, off hind coronet 
white. No. 061. 

REVOLUTION (Mr. W. E. Grogan), ch g; star, blaze, snip, both 
hind fetlocks white. No. 0688. 



48o APPENDIX. 

RINGLET (Capt. Vernon), ch m ; star, small snip, lower lip white, 
near hind fetlock white, scar front of off hind shin. No. 0595. 

RODELIA (Mr. G. M. Harris), roan m ; bay face. Passed for 
season. No. 0413. 

ROSE (Mr. John Nettleton), b m ; star, off fore fetlock white. No. 
0154. 

ROSEIAS (Mr. H. Fielden), b g ; star, narrow blaze, near hind 
fetlock white. No. 0115. 

ROSEMARY (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), br m. No. 013. 

ROSETTE (Mr. G. B. Game), b m ; hind quarter ticked white 
hairs, scar off side of ribs. No. 0353. 

ROSETTE (Capt. C. S. Coghill), roan m; star, near hind fetlock 
white. No. 0319. 

ROSS-DROIT (Mr. J. H. Locke), b g ; near fore fetlock grey and 
white. No. 0414. 

ROULETTE (Mr. F. W. Perry), b m ; near and off eyelids white, 
off nostril white, near hind fetlock white with black spots, small collar 
mark. No. 0689. 

ROUSE (Capt. H. McMicking), dun m ; star, blaze, lower lip white, 
dark brown line from wither to tail. No. 0273. 

RUBY (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, 
off hind and near fore fetlock and coronet white, scar on neck. No. 048. 

RUBY (Mr. E. H. Pease), br m ; faint star, black points, white 
mark near hind quarter. No. 0658. 

RUBY (Mr. E C. Holland, fcth Dragoons), b m ; star, near fore 
coronet white. No. 0518. 

RUBY (Major Milton), b m ; small star, small snip, off hind fetlock 
grey, collar mark. No. 0596. 

RUFUS (Mr. H. A. Bellville), ch g; star, narrow blaze, faint snip, 
near hind fetlock white. No. 0246. 

RUPHIS (Mr. J. O. Jameson), ch g; star, near hind coronet white, 
No. 0690. 



SABANITA (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), drk b m ; star, white spots 
off coronet. No. 0204. 

SAINT (Mr. W. Hardcastle), blk brh; faint star, near fore and hind 
coronet white. No. 0659. 

SALOPIA (Mr. P. Leighton), ch m ; few white hairs on lower jaw. 
No. 0146. 

SAMMY (Capt. F. Egerton Green), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, near hind fetlock white, white mark off ribs. No. 0140. 

SAMMY (Mr. A. H. McClintock), gr g; large white patch off ribs. 
No. 0415. 

SAMSON (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b g; star. No. 025. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 481 

SANDY (Major R. T. Lawley), b h ; white spots all over body. No. 
0100. 

SANDY (Mr. de Las Casas), ch g; star, blaze, snip, upper lip white, 
white spots on muzzle, both hind legs and both fore fetlocks white, collar 
marks. No. 0638. 

SAPHIRE (Mr. Hardcastle), b m; star. No. 0671. 

SATAN (Mr. Vander Byl), gr g; both hind legs white, white marks 
both fore legs, scar off side neck. No, 0519. 

SATELLITE ( Mr. A. Withers), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, small 
snip, near hind fetlock white, ticked with white hairs. No. 0672. 

SAUCE BOX (Mr. J. V. Southey), gr g ; snip, lower lip white, both 
hind fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0520. 

SAVERNAKE (Mr. A. E. Gostling), b g; star, snip, scar on 
forehead, both hind fetlocks white, white marks on all four legs. No. 
0354. 

SCOTTY (Capt. F. J. Dalgety), brm; small star, both hind fetlocks 
white with black spots. No. 0284. 

SCRIBE (Capt. Loftus Brien), gr g; snip, near fore and near hind 
fetlocks white. No. 0691. 

SEABIRD (Mr. J. B. Dale), ch m; star, narrow blaze, snip, all four 
fetlocks white. No. 0639. 

SEAL (Major Kennedy), b m ; black points, small collar marks. 
No. 0274. 

SEALE (Mr. H. B. Harrison), br m; white face, and near off hind 
fetlocks white. No. 052. 

SECRET (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, 
small snip. No. 08. 

SELOUS (Major Lawley), br g; white spots all over body. No. 
0170. 

SENTIMENT (Capt. E. Heygate), b m; off ear split. No. 0247. 

SHAKER, THE (Capt. F. Egerton Green), b g ; faint star, faint 
snip. No. 0142. 

SHAMROCK (Lord Radnor), b g ; star, few white hairs on face and 
on pole, white hairs front of chest. No. 0205. 

SHANNON (Capt. Belfield), gr g ; star, blaze, snip, both hind legs 
white. No. 0320. 

SHANNON (Mr. A. Withers), blk g ; star, near hind coronet white, 
scar above off knee. No. 0355. 

SHEBEEN (Lord Radnor), b m ; white hairs back of near hind leg 
5 and back and front off fore leg. No. 0206. 

SHEEN (Lord Radnor), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, both hind legs white, 
near fore fetlock white, collar marks, white hairs mane and tail. No. 0207. 

SHEILAH (Colonel Clowes, 8th Hussars), b m ; star, snip, lower 
lip white, near hind leg and off hind coronet while, near fore fetlock 
white, collar marks. No. 0521. 

31 



482 APPENDIX. 

SHELLFISH (Lord Radnor), b m ; faint star, black line down 
croup, ticked white hairs both flanks. No. 0208. 

SHILELAGH (Mr. G. Bent Ollivant), blk g; few white hairs inside 
both knees. No. 0159. 

SHORT ODDS (Mr. J. Craddock), b g ; near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0416. 

SHOT (Lord Radnor), blk m ; white mark front of off fore and off 
hind shin, collar mark. No. 0209. 

SHROLE (Mr. O. T. Slocock), bg; star, collar mark. No. 0474. 

SHY LASS (Mr. G. N. Midwood), b m ; small star, faint snip. No. 
0417. 

SHYLOCK (Mr. R. H H. Eden), chh; scar above each hock, and 
above each knee, and on near shin, white mark off hip. No. 041. 

SIGNET (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m; collar marks. No. 022. 

SILKWORM (R.A. Polo Club), bg; star, snip, white hairs on face, 
both fore and off hind legs white, brand off hind quarter. No. 0321. 

SILVERLORN (Mr. C. Elliot), b m ; star, black points, scar near 
fore fetlock, collar marks. No. 0660. 

SILVERSTAR (Mr. J. D. Gouldsmith), b m ; star, snip, near hind 
and near fore fetlocks white. No. 029. 

SILVERTAIL (Mr. James Hobbs), b g ; star, blaze, snip, near 
hind and off fore fetlocks white, grey hairs in tail. No. 038. 

SILVERTAIL (Prince Alexander of Teck), b m ; star, blaze, snip, near 
hind coronet white, off fetlocks white, white marks both flanks. No. 01 17. 

SILVERTAIL (Mr. T. P. Godman ), b m ; star, near hind fetlock 
and off hind coronet white, ticked with white hairs. No. 0129. 

SILVERTAIL (Mr. J. D. Gouldsmith), b m; star, off hind fetlock 
white with black spots. No. 0248. 

SIMON (Capt. Henderson), br g ; star, small snip. No. 0522. 

SIMPLICITY (Capt. Deare, 8th Hussars), br m; star, narrow blaze, 
snip. Passed for season. No. 0523. 

SISS (Mr. C. B. Houston), br m; star, narrow blaze, small snip, 
white spots off hind quarter, collar marks. No. 0418. 

SISTER ADA (Ui: W. R. Wyndham), gr m ; white marks, upper 
and lower lips, white mark outside near hind hoof, white spots near flank. 
No. 0275. 

SISTER MARY (Capt. E. Makins), br m ; white face, lower lip 
white, near fore fetlock white. No. 01 28. 

SISTER SUE (Mr. James Farmer), ch m ; star. No. 086. 

SISTER SUE (Mr. O. C. Francis), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, small white 
spot lower lip, near hind fetlock white, small black spot off hind quarter. 
No. 0276. 

SISTER SUE (Mr. T. J. Stafford), b m ; small star, both hind 
coronets white. Passed for season. No. 0419. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 483 

SISSY (Lord Radnor), b m ; faint star, both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 0210. 

SKYLARK (Capt. Fordyce Buchan), br m ; star, with black spot, 
near hind fetlock white and grey with black spots, white spots over fore 
and hind quarters. No. 0322. 

SLAP JACK (Mr. P. R. Denny), ch g ; white face, lower lip white, 
near hind and both fore legs white, brand both hind quarters, white and 
black spots over body. No. 0599. 

SLIGHT MARE (Mr. Leonard), blk br m ; grey patch outside off 
quarter. No. 0600. 

SNAP (Lord Radnor), b g; star, near hind coronet white, spot, few 
white hairs in tail. No. 021 1. 

SOCIETY (Mr. Morris), b m ; white hairs on face, star, all four 
coronets white, white spot off hind coronet. Passed for season. No. 
0601. 

SODA (Capt. Williams), br m ; faint long star, small snip, both hind 
fetlocks white with a black spot, scar point of off shoulder. No. 0692. 

SOLITUDE (Mr. Alex. J. Hutchinson), chm; star, faint black line 
down croup, black patch off hind quarter. No. 0277. 

SOLOMON (Mr. J. S. S. Mowbray), chg; star, snip, both hind and 
off fore legs white, near fore fetlock white. No. 0420. 

SOUTHEY (Capt. Deare, 8th Hussars), b s; : star, white hairs on 
face, faint snip, near hind fetlock and off hind coronet white. No. 0524. 

SPENT (Mr. E. C. Sandars), b m; off' hind fetlock white. No. 

0323- 
SPIDER, THE (Mr. P. Bullivant), ch m; star, both hind legs 

white, scar inside off hind leg. No. 0177. 

SPINACH (Mr. A. G. Dalgety), bm; faint star, few white hairs off 
fore quarter. No. 0661. 

SPINK (Mr. Edge), gr m ; near hind fetlock and oft' hind coronet 
white. No. 0475. 

SPINNING WHEEL (Capt. Henderson, 8th Hussars), b m ; white 
hairs on face, white marks near fore leg. No. 0525. 

SPLASH (Mr. Denny), b m; white face, white mark off fore leg, 
scar off shoulder. No. 0602. 

SPOT (Polo Club. 8th Hussars), ch g ; white face, lower lip white, 
both hind and oft" fore fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 
0526. 

SPOT WHITE (Mr. H. Straker), chg; star, blaze, snip, white spot 
lower lip, near hind leg and off" hind coronet white, scars both sides of 
neck. No. 0662. 

SPRIG (Mr. B. Daly), ch m ; star, both hind legs white, off fore 
fetlock white, collar marks. No. 0421. 

SPRING TIME (Mr. H. A. Robinson), b g; few white hairs in 
forehead, off hind fetlock white with black spots, near hind coronet grey. 
No. 0422. 



484 APPENDIX. 

SPRING JACK (Mr. H. Chippendall Higgin), b g ; star, blaze, 
snip, ofif hind coronet white, near fore fetlock white, white mark near fore 
and off hind leg, brand off fore quarter. No. 0617. 

SQUAW (Mr. O. T. Slocock), ch m; star No. 0476. 

STAFFORD (Mr. H. A. Bellville), gr m; very small scar in front 
of chest. No. 0249. 

STAR (Mr. J. Vaughan), b m; star, off hind fetlock white. No. 
0120. 

STAR (Lord Radnor), b m ; faint black mark down croup, collar 
marks. No. 0212. 

STARLIGHT (Mr. G. D. Armstrong), ch m ; white face, near hind 
white, white spot near shoulder and off side of neck. No. 0158. 

ST. CLOUD (Capt. C. Grey), b m; star, very faint blaze, snip, near 
hind fetlock white. No. 0278. 

STELLA (Capt. Holmes), b m ; near fore and near hind fetlocks 
white. No. 0663. 

STILL TRUE (Mr. H. Mogill), br m; faint star, off hind and off 
fore fetlocks white. Passed for season. No. 0371. 

STONEYBROKE (Mr. Jones, 8th Hussars), blk g; scar near ribs, 
white spot off fore shin. No. 0527. 

STORM (Messrs. Richards & Leigh), b br m ; star, off hind fetlock 
white, scar near fore coronet. No. 0213. 

ST. OSYTH (Capt. F. Egerton Green), b m ; large star, narrow 
blaze, near fore fetlock grey, near hind fetlock white, black patch off hind 
quarter. Passed for season. No. 0673. 

STURDY (Capt. L. Bryan), b g; small snip, both hind fetlocks 
white. Passed for season. No. 0603. 

SULTAN (Mr. Percy J. Trouncer), blk g ; small blemish off side of 
neck. No. 037. 

SULTAN (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), br g ; star, both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 039. 

SUNBEAM (Mr. J. O. Jameson), b m; star, near hind coronet white 
with black spots, faint black mark down croup. No. 0179. 

SUNBEAM (Mr. H. H. Smiley), b m ; star, narrow blaze, off hind 
coronet white, ticked with grey hairs. No. 0423. 

SUN FLOWER (Mr. T. J. Stafford), ch m; snip. Passed for 
season. No. 0424. 

SUNRISE (Lord Radnor), br m ; star, white spot inside near fore 
coronet. No. 0214. 

SUNRISE (Mr. F. M. Freake), b m ; large snip. No. 0252. 

SUNSHINE (Mr. Talbot Rice), b m; faint star, off hind fetlock 
white, near hind coronet white. No. 0250. 

SUNSHINE (Mr. F. A. Bellville), br m; star, blaze, snip, off hind 
fetlock white with black spot, white spot near fore coronet, ticked with 
white hairs. No. 0251. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 485 

SURPRISE (Polo Club, 8th Hussars), b g ; star, blaze, snip, all four 
legs white, white mark on neck, brand near hind quarter. No. 0528. 

SUSAN (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), blk m; very faint star. No. 024. 

SWALLOW (Mr. T. Anderson), iron gr m ; black points, no 
distinctive marks. No. 0477. 

SWEEP (Mr. H. F. Hardy), drk br g; white hairs top of wither. 
No. 0529. 

SWIFT (Mr. Stewart Duckett), b m; scar above near knee, scars 

near cheek. No. 0478. 

SYLPH (Mr. J. Lamont), b br m ; black points, no marks of identity. 
No. 0324. 

SYMPATHY (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m ; star, both hind 
fetlocks white. No. 012. 

SYNTAX (Mr. A. Withers), b g ; star, short blaze, near hind and 
near fore fetlocks white with black spots. No. 0356. 



TAR BOX (Mr. Meredith), b g; small star. Passed for season. 
No. 0604. 

TELEPHONE (Mr. Fairfax), br m; star, off hind fetlock white 
with black spots. No. 0288. 

TELEPHONE (The Earl of Harrington), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, 
near hind and fore fetlocks white, off hind coronet white, collar marks. 
No. 0640. 

THAMES (Mr. H. Rich), b br m ; few white hairs on forehead, off 
hind fetlock and off fore coronet white. Passed for season. No. 0357. 

THURSDAY (Major Kennedy), b m ; faint star, near hind fetlock 
white with black spots, near fore coronet white with black spots. No. 
0279. 

TICK-TICK (Sir Thomas Fowler), ch m ; star, both hind and off 
fore fetlocks white, near fore coronet white. No. 060. 

TILA (Mr. R, H. H. Eden), br m ; star, snip, both hind fetlocks 
white. No. 042. 

TILLY (Mr. Ballesty), br m ; star. Passed for season. No. 
0372. 

TINKER (Mr. J. L. Moore), b g; star, narrow blaze, both hind 
fetlocks and near fore coronet white. No. 0605. 

TIP (Colonel Clowes, 8th Hussars), ch g ; white face, scar outside 
both hocks and inside near knee, colltir marks. No. 0530. 

TOFF, THE (Mr. James Farmer), ch g; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
lower lip white, near hind leg and off hind coronet white. No. 074. 

TOKAR (Major Bainbridge), dun m; star, blaze, snip, white patches 
both ribs, collar marks. No. 0181. 

TOMMY (Lt.-Colonel A. D. Neeld), b g; star, near hind coronet 
white. No. 0160. 



486 APPENDIX. 

TOM TIDDLER (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), blk g ; star, white 
spot near side of ribs. No. on. 

TONY (Captain Brooke), b g; star, blaze, snip, near hind fetlock 
white with black spots. No. 0253. 

TOPSY (Mr. J. Hetherington), gr m ; faint black spot top of near 
hind quarter, scar over near eye. No. 0358. 

TRAVERTY (Mr. J. Craddock), br m; star, near hind coronet 
white with black spot, ticked with grey hairs, collar marks. No. 0693. 

TRICKY (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind leg 
white. No. 0448. 

TRILBY (Miss Norah Kavanagh), gr m ; snip, both hind fetlocks 
white. No. 0425. 

TRILBY (Sir A. Vere Foster) b m : star. No. 0426. 

TRILBY 11. (Mr. James Farmer), b m ; star, off hind fetlock white. 
No. 082. 

TULIP (Mr. Eyre Lloyd), b m ; few white hairs on forehead and 
face, faint black mark down croup. No. 0641. 

TULLOW (Mr. A. M. Swift), b m ; star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0427, 

TULLOW (Mr. J. Murphy), b m; star, faint snip, white hairs in 
tail. Passed for season. No. c 479. 

TWINKLE (Mr. Erskine Booth), b m ; star, blaze, snip, scar point 
of off shoulder. No. 0428. 

UMBRELLA (R.A. Polo Club), ch m ; star, brand near fore and 
near hind quarters, black patch off ribs. No. 0325. 

UNCLE SAM (Capt. Fitzgerald), ch g ; few white hairs on forehead, 
both hind fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0618. 

UNCLE SAM (Mr. H. Straker), b g ; star, scar near nostril, near 
hind fetlock white, brand off hind quarter. No. 0664. 

UNKNOWN, THE (Mr. A. F. Maude), br m ; star, near fore and 
both hind fetlocks white, off fore coronet white. No. 0429. 



VANITHE (Miss A. Gore Booth), ch m; star, narrow blaze, white 
hairs off hind quarter and near shoulder, ticked white hairs both flanks. 
Passed for season. No. 0449. 

VENGEANCE (Mr. T. Anderson), bg; black mark down back, 
black points. No. 0486. 

VERA (Mr. O. J. Wilson), ch m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, 
near hind coronet white, scar off flank. No. 0373. 

VICTORINE (London Polo Club), b m ; star, white spot near hind 
quarter. No. 0123. 

VIOLET (Mr. John Nettleton), ch m ; star, faint snip, white patch 
oft" shoulder. No. 0150. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 487 

VIXEN (Mr. F. A. Gill), h m ; white spots near ribs No. 020. 

VIXEN (Mr. J. Roark), br m ; faint star, faint snip, both hind legs 
white. No. 0480. 

VIXEN (Major D. E. Wood, 8th Hussars), gr m ; all four coronets 
white. No. 0531. 

VIXEN (Mr. R. Hague Cook), ch m ; faint star, large scar off side 
of neck. No. 0665. 

VOUVRAY (Mr. C. C. Goldsmith), dun m ; star, narrow short blaze, 
snip. No. 0254. 



WAIF, THE (Mr. J. P. Godman), br m; star, scar off side of neck. 
No. 0130. 

WALES (Mr. James Farmer), b m ; small white spot near hind 
quarter. No. 076. 

WATER PROOF (Mr. Robert N. Allen), br g; no marks of 
identity. No. 0280. 

WATER RAT (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), gr g; lower lip white, near 
hind leg and off fore fetlock white. No. 040. 

WEARY (Major Longfield), br m ; small star. No. 0164. 

"W." " H." (Mr. F. J. Mackey), b g; brand near shoulder and near 
hind quarter. No. 0255. 

WHALEBONE (Mr. F. J. Barwicke), b m; white mark front of off 
hind and off fore legs, small scar front of near shoulder. No. 0295. 

WHEAT EAR (Mr. A. Withers), ch m ; star, blaze, black spot on 
forehead, near hind fetlock and off hind leg white. No. 0359. 

WHITE FACE (Major Carew), br g ; star, narrow blaze, lower lip 
white, near hind fetlock white. No. 0102. 

WHITE HEATHER (Mr. P. Bullivant), gr g ; narrow blaze, large 
snip. No. 0175. 

WHISPER (Mr. Glynne Williams j, dun g; near hind and near 
fore fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0619. 

WIDOW, THE (Mr. O. T. Slocock), b m ; faint star. No. 0481. 

WIDOW, THE (Mr. O. C. Francis), b m; star, blaze, snip, lower 
lip white, all four fetlocks white. No. 0281. 

WIGRAM (Major R. T. Lawley), b g ; no marks of identity. No. 
099. 

WILDFIRE (Mr. T. B. Drybrough), b m : both hind fetlocks and 
near fore fetlock white, scar above off knee. No. 0178. 

WILD FLOWER (Major Kennedy), b m ; a few white hairs on fore- 
head, snip, off hind fetlocks white. No. 0282. 

WISDOM (Mr. J. J. Roark), br m; star, narrow blaze, lower lip 
white, near hind coronet white, white spot off hind coronet, ticked white 
hairs over body. No. 0482. 



488 APPENDIX. 

WOEFUL (Mr. Glynne Williams), roan g; both hind fetlocks 
white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0256. 

WRETCHED (Mr. H. Rich), blk m; star, blaze, snip, ticked 
white hairs over body. No. 0137. 



ZENITH (R.A. Polo Club), blue roan g; star, black spots,both hind 
and off fore fetlocks white, near fore coronet white, brand near hindquarter. 
No. 0326. 

ZERO (Capt. Vernon), b g; star, narrow blaze, small snip, near fore 
and off hind fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0598. 

ZITHER (Capt. J. W. Hare), b m; star, very narrow blaze, near 
hind fetlock white. No 0374. 

ZODIAC (R.A. Polo Club), blue roan g ; star, blaze, snip, white 
lower lip, both hind fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0327. 



THE FOLLOWING PONIES WERE NOT PA5SED. 

BIDDY (Mr. R. Hudson), br m ; small star, scar near hind fetlock. 
No. 0375. 

BOWINE STAR (Capt. Loftus Brien), br m ; star, near hind fet- 
lock white, off hind fetlock white with black spots. No. 0695. 



CHARTREUSE (Mr. W. E. Grogan), b m ; star. No. 0694. 



DAISY (Mr. F. P. Colgan), gr m ; no marks of identity. No. 
0487. 

DANDY (Mr. Ernest A. Dormer), b g; star, blaze, and with little 
white near fore coronet. No. 053. 

DEMON (Capt. Loftus), blk g; scar near side of face. No. 
0484. 

DUBLIN (Mr. C. de Robeck), br g ; scar, back and sides near knee, 
white mark top of wither, saddle and girth marks. No. 0696. 



GAOLSTON (Earl of Longford), br m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
both hind legs white. No. 0168. 

GINGER (Capt. C. Levita), b g ; small star, collar marks. No. 
0620. 

GIPSY (Capt. i\dams), b m; star, small snip, near fore fetlock white, 
I collar marks. No. 0283. 



POLO PONIES, 1899. 489 

HARE, THE (Mr. F. Eassie), b g ; star, blaze, snip, both hind and 
near fore fetlocks white. No. 0532. 

HORROR (Mr. H. Rich), b m; star, near hind fetlock white. No. 
0121. 



JEALOUSY (Mr. R. Hudson), br m ; scar off hind quarter, collar 
marks. No. 0376. 



KATHLEEN H. (Capt. Deare, 8th Hussars), ch m ; white face, 
both hind fetlocks white, scar outside near fore fetlock. No. 0533. 

KENSINGTON (The Earl of Harrington), b g; faint black line 
down back, small star, black points. No. 0645. 



LIMIT (Mr. Las Casas), br m ; faint star, white marks on all four 
legs. No. 0644. 



MACK (Mr. W. G. Deare), b g; star, near hind fetlock white, 
collar mark. No. 0697. 

MIDGE (Mr. C. de Robeck), br m ; star, white hairs on face, white 
hairs off side of withers. No. 0533. 



NORMANDY GIRL (Mr. H. Percy Woolcott), b m; white marks 
near hind quarter. No. 031. 



PHLEON ( Mr. Nettleton), br m ; scar outside off fore fetlock, body 
ticked with white hairs. No. 0643. 



RABBIT (Mr. G. B. Ollivant), blk g ; few white hairs on forehead, 
brand near hind quarter. No, 0674. 

RAINCLOUD (Col. de Robeck), blk br m ; faint star, both hind 
fetlocks white, black spots both hind coronets. No. 0534. 

ROCKET (Mr. H. Percy Woolcott), br g; star, blaze, snip, both 

hind fetlocks white. No. 032. 



SEAL (Lord Radnor), b m ; star, blaze, snip, near fore leg grey down 
front of shin, faint black mark down back. No. 0216. 

SHYLOCK (Lord Radnor), b g; star, blaze, snip, white spot upper 
lip, both hind coronets white, scar front of off hock. No. 0215. 

SILVER (Capt. Loftus), gr m; snip. No. 0483. 

SIR PATRICK (Mr. C. de Robeck), br g; dun muzzle. No. 
0608. 



490 APPENDIX. 

STELLA (Mr. F. B. Savill), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, near hind 
fetlock white. No. 0294. 

STRABOE (Mr. J. Murphy), b m; faint star, faint snip. No. 
0485. 



TEMPE (Mr. H. F. Hardy, 14th Hussars), br m ; black points no 
marks of identity. No. 0535. 

TOMMY (Mr. G. Heseltine), b g; few white hairs on off shoulder 
and off hind quarter. No. 0642. 



WARRIOR (Mr. C. Butler), b g; near fore coronet white. No. 
0698. 

WATERHEN (Mr. W. Hardcastle), b m; white spots on all four 
legs, fired both fore legs, scars on wither. No. 0666. 

WILD FOX (Mr. Meredith), b br g ; star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0607. 



491 



POLO PONIES MEASURED AND REGISTERED 
AT HURLINGHAM, 1900. 



AMETHYST (Capt. Loftus), br g ; faint star, scars both hocks. No. 
0786. 

ARABSTAR (Miss A. Gore Booth), ch g ; star, blaze, small snip. 
No. 0831. 

ARDAGHOWEN (Mr. W. R. Fenton), gr m; scar on face, scar on 
near ribs and hip. No. 0832. 

^ARGENTINE (Mr. A. J. Palmer), gr g ; white face, lower lip white, 
brand near hind quarter. No. 0700. 

ASTHORE (Mr. F. W. O'Hara), ch m ; few white hairs on face, 
near hind fetlock white, white mark off hind quarter. No. 0833. 

ASTON (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), b g ; faint star, brand near hind 
quarter, white spots on body. No. 0935. 

AU REVOIR(Mr. T.J. Roach), gr m; off hind coronet white, 
white spots off ribs. No. 0787. 

AZIZ (London Polo Club), gh; star, blaze, snip, lower lip white, 
scar near shoulder, off hind quarter and all four legs white. No. 0897. 

BALLET (Mr. H. J. D. Clerk), b m; near hind coronet and off 
hind fetlock white. No. 0737. 

BAYLEAF (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m; star, blaze, snip, 
off fore fetlock white, lower lip white. No. 0738. 

BEAUTY (Capt. C. Trower), gr m ; flea-bitten, small black patch on 
off shoulder. No. 0739. 

BEAUTY BOY (Mr. S. W. Russell), gr g; white face, lower lip 
white, both hind and near fore legs white. Passed for season. No. 0865. 

BELINDA (Mr. W. G. Deasej, b m ; star, faint snip, white hind fet- 
locks. No. 0788. 

BISCUIT (Mr. L. Darell), ch m; star. No. 0936. 

BLACKBIRD (Mr. W. Hardcastle), blk m; star. No. 0731. 



492 APPENDIX. 

BLACKMARIA (Hon. Charles Cavendish), blk m ; black mane, on 
white marks. No. 0740. 

BLACKTHORN (Mr. W. Hardcastle), blk br g ; star, white spot on 
off hind coronet. No. 0732. 

BLOATER (Major Honner), b br m ; star, scar near hind shin. No. 
0866. 

BLUE STOCKING (Mr. W. B. C. Burdan), br m ; star, faint snip, 
lower lip white, all four fetlocks white. No. 0701. 

BOBS (Mr. F. W. O'Hara), br g; faint star, scar each side near fore 
fetlock. Passed for season. No. 0834. 

BOXIANA (Mr. Foxhall Keene), b m ; white hairs on face, snip, 
brand near hind quarter, scar off hind quarter. No. 0937. 

BRAKESPERE (Capt. Loftus Bryan), gr g; near fore and near hind 
coronet white. No. 0789. 



CABMAN (Mr. W. J. Edge), b g; star, snip, off hind fetlock white, 
collar marks. No. 0790. 

C^SAR (Mr. James Farmer), grg; small white patch off shoulder. 
No. 0741. 

CALIPH (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), br g ; white hairs on forehead, snip, 
near fore coronet white. No. 0836. 

CAMERON (London Polo Club), br or dun g ; star, blaze, snip, 
lower lip white, both hind and near fore fetlocks white, off fore coronet 
white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0898. 

CANTLE (London Polo Club), ch g; star, snip, near fore fetlock and 
off hind coronet white, brand off hind quarter, white mark off fore coronet. 
No. 0899. 

CASSIA (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), ch m ; star, blaze,snip,lower lip white, 
off hind leg white, black line down back. No. 0835. 

C. D. B. (Mr. J. A. F. Cochrane), b g ; near hind fetlock white, 
white mark off hip. No. 0867. 

CHAIRMAN (Mr. C. Dillon), ch g; star, blaze, snip, both hind and 
off fore legs white, white spots off side of neck. No. 0868. 

CHAMOIS (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), br m ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, near hind leg white. No. 0837. 

CHARLIE (Mr. A. Gold), b g ; small white spot near side of neck, 
small scar near hind quarter. No. 0927. 

CHE (Mr. F. Daniell), br g ; star, near hind and off fore fetlocks, 
white, near fore coronet white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0928. 

CHUB (Mr. P. Kelly), br m ; star, snip, near hind and near fore fet- 
locks white. No. 0791. 

COFFEE COOLER (Mr. Foxhall Keene), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, 
lower lip white, near hind fetlock white. No. 0938. 

COLUMBINE (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), br m; small scar off side of 
face. Passed for season. No. 0838. 



POLO PONIES, 1900. 493 

COQUETTE (Mrs. Prosper Listen), drk ch m ; star, white hairs in 
mane, collar marks. No. 0869. 

CORKY (Mr. T. J. Longworth), b g ; white hairs on face, collar 

mark, faint black line on croup. No. 0702. 

CRONJE (Mr. W. G. Deane), br g ; near hind fetlock white. No. 
0792. 

CRUSOE (Mr. C. C. Gouldsmith), br g; scar off hind heel. No. 
0703. 

CRYSTAL (Mr. C. Webb), gr m; star, collar marks. Passed for 
season. No. 0839. 

CURDS AND WHEY (Mr. T. J. Longworth), dun m ; star, blaze, 
small scar off shoulder. No. 0704. 

CURRAGH (Mr. W. Hardcastle), bg; ticked with white, star, 
narrow blaze, snip. No. 0733. 

CZARINA (Mr. Frank Newman), drk ch m; star, white hairs off 
hind coronet, scar off hind leg. No. 0913. 



DAISY (Mr. H. B. Harrison), b m ; star, white mark on near ribs. 
No. 0705. 

DAPHNE (Mr. H. W. Montgomery), b br m; star, near hind 
coronet white. No. 0742. 

DENNIE (Mr. Bernard Daly), drk br m ; near hind coronet and off 
hind fetlock white, scar off fore pastern. No. 0870. 

DIANA (Mr. Ernest Deney), br m ; grey hairs over face, near hind 
fetlock and near fore coronet white. No. 0706. 

DICE BOX (Mr. Francis F. Daniell), b g; faint white mark off 
fore fetlocks, scars all four heels. No. 0707. 

DINAH (Mr. Nettleton), br m; star, near hind coronet white, 
white spot off hind coronet. No. 0906. 

DIVARSION (Messrs. Slocock), br m ; blemish inside near fore 
fetlock. No. 0793. 

DO-DO (Capt. Loftus), b m; both hind fetlocks white. No. 0794. 

DON JOHN (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), bg; star, faint blaze, brand near 
fore quarter. No. 0939. 

DUM-DUM (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m ; white face, near fore and 
near hind fetlocks white. No. 070S. 

DUM-DUM (Mr. T. J. Roach), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white spots 
on hindquarters, white mark near forearm and shoulder. No. 0795. 



ECARTE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, wall eye off 
side. No. 0743. 

ECLIPSE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g; faint star, brand near hind 

quarter. No. 0744. 



494 APPENDIX. 

EGRET (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), cream g ; white face, lower lip white, 
brand near hind quarter and near side neck. No. 0745. 

EMPIRE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), ch g; star, narrow blaze. No. 
0746. 

EMPRESS (Mr. P. W. Connolly), b m ; both hind fetlocks white, 
black line down back. Passed for season. No. 0840. 

EMU (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g; both hind fetlocks white, brand 
near hind quarter. No. 0747. 

ENTERPRISE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g ; star, blaze, snip, both 
hind fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0748. 

ERIN (Mr. W. Hardcastle), dun m; small star. No. 0734. 

EXILE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), drk ch g ; white face, lower lip white, 
both hind and off fore legs white, near fore coronet white, brands oif hind 
quarter. No. 0750. 

EXPRESS (Mr. Foxhall Keene), b g ; faint star, all four fetlocks 
white, scar point of near shoulder. No. 0941. 

EXPRESS (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g; off hind fetlock white. No. 

0751- 
EUCHRE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), ch g; star, small blaze, brand near 

hind quarter. No. 0749. 

EVELYN (Mr. W. Brackenbridge), ch m ; star, scar off forearm. 
No. 0940. 



FAIRY QUEEN (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), ch m ; star, blaze, 
snip. No. 0752. 

FILTER (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), br g; star. No. 0709. 

FIRE FLY (Mr. F. D. Hickman), ch m ; star, near fore fetlock 
white. No. 0796. 

FLANAGAN (Mr. J. M. Teid), b g; star, narrow blaze, snip, near 
fore fetlock white. No. 0841. 

FLORA (Mr. John N. Cahill), roan m ; large blaze, near hind leg 
white, white hairs in tail. No. 0S71. 

FORBIDDEN FRUIT (Major A. E. Jenkins), b g; star. No. 
0872. 

FRANCISCO (Mr. Auberon Stourton), b g ; star, small snip, near 
hind fetlock white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0900. 

FRANKIE (Mr. Francis F. Daniell), blk g; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
lower lip w^hite, all four legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0710. 

FRIENDSHIP (Earl of Shrewsbury and Talbot), b m ; white marks 
below off hock. No. 0922. 

FUZZY (Mr. Thomas Anderson), b g ; white hairs on forehead, snip. 
No. 0797. 



POLO PONIES, 1900. 495 

GAIETY (Mr. W. K. Carew), br m ; star, blaze, snip, white spot 
lower lip. No. 0842. 

GAMEBOY (Mr. W. K. Carew), br g; star, white hairs on face, 
snip, near hind fetlock white. No. 0843. 

GIPSY MAID (Mr. John Rich), b m ; faint star, near hind fetlock 
white. Passed for season. No. 071 1. 

GIPSY QUEEN (Colonel Campbell), gr m ; star, white spots over 
body. No. 0844. 

GLORY (Mr. N. F. Archdale), b m ; star, both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 0798. 

GOODENOUGH (Mr. Foxhall Keene), br g ; few white hairs on 
face, both hind fetlocks white, brand near hind quarter, scar off hind 
quarter. No. 0942. 

GOWNBOY (John Jones & Son), ch h ; star, blaze, snip, ticked 
with white hairs. Passed for season. No. 0754. 

GREYWING (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), gr m; both hind 
fetlocks white, near fore fetlock white. No. 0753. 



HAILSTORM (Mr Aubrey Price), ch g; white face, near fore and 
near hind legs white, off fore coronet white, white mark off fore fetlock. 
No. 0755. 

HAILSTORM (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), ch m ; star, blaze, snip. No. 

0943- 
Hx\NDY i\NDY (Dr. Furlong), b g ; small scar near side of neck. 

No. 0799. 

HANDYMAN (Mr. James Farmer), dun g ; white hairs in mane 
and tail, white spot both sides of neck, collar marks. No. 0712. 

HARDBAKE (Mr. L. Darrell), dun m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, off hind fetlock and both fore fetlocks white. No. 0944. 

HELIDON (Mr. Guy Bethel), ch h ; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, both hind legs and near fore leg white, off fore fetlock white. 
Passed for season. No. 0901. 

HOLDUP (Mr. Foxhall Keene), b g; star, both hind fetlocks white, 
brand near fore quarter. No. 0945. 

HYACINTH (Mr. J. D. Gouldsmith), b m; star, narrow blaze, near 
fore and both hind fetlocks white. No. 0713. 



JACK (Mr. xVuberon Stourton), blk g ; white and black head, all 
four legs white, black spot off hind fetlock. No. 0929. 

JAMAICA (Mr. J. Henry Stock), b br m. Passed for season. No. 
0756. 

JEFFRIES (Mr. Foxhall Keene), gr g ; white spots on muzzle, 
brand near fore quarter, scar off hind quarter. No. 0946. 

JET (Capt. Loftus), blk m ; small scar near fore shin. No. 0800. 



496 APPENDIX. 

JOKER (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), chg; faint star, blaze, snip, white spot 
lower lip, both hind fetlocks white. No. 0S45. 

JORROCKS (Mr. James Farmer), dun g ; faint star, near hind 
coronet white. No. 0757. 

JUDGE (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), br g: star, blaze, snip, small spot 
lower lip, white near fore fetlock, brand near hind quarter. No. 0947. 

JUST IN TIME (Mr. C. Buckmaster), ch g; star, narrow blaze, 
faint snip, both hind legs white, scar near shoulder. No. 0930. 

KAKI (Mr. T. Wilson Lynch), gr m : off hind fetlock white. No. 
0873. 

KATHLEEN (late MISS TORMENTOR) (Mr. R. Yerburgh), 
b m ; faint star, near hind coronet white. No. 0758, 

KIERNx\N (Mr. E. A. Shaw), br g; star, off hind coronet white, 
collar marks. No. 0S74. 

LADY ABBESS (Mr. A. F. Maude), ch m ; star, white mark off 
hind quarter. Passed for season. No. 0846. 

LADY BIRD ( Mr. E. E. Cockett), b m ; star, blaze, snip, both 
hind and off fore legs white. No. 0759. 

LADY BOBS (Mr. James Farmer), br m ; star, near hind coronet 
white. No. 0714. 

LADY BROWNFIELD (Mr. Foxhali Keene), ch m ; star, blaze, 
snip, near "hind fetlock white, oft' fore fetlock white, near fore coronet 
white. No. 0948. 

LADY EDIE (Mr. Evan T. Prichard), ch m; white star on fore- 
head, near fore fetlock white. No. 0715. 

LADY OF QUALITY (Mr. Percy BuUivant), br m ; faint star. No. 
0907. 

LADYSMITH (Mr. W. B. Hayes), b m; faint black mark down 
back, scar front of off hind fetlock. No. 0875. 

LENA ( Mr. J. W. Hornsby), ch m ; star, blaze, both hind fetlocks 
white, white spots hind quarter. No. 0949. 

LITTLE FLO (Mr. F. G. TroUope), b m ; scar outside near hind 
fetlock. No. 0760. 

LITTLE PLAYMATE (Mr. A. F. Maude), br m; few white hairs. 
No. 0847. 

LITTLE SHOT (Major G. M. Eccles), br m; small scar near fore 
shin. No. 0848. 

LOCKATT (Mr. John Watson), ch g ; star, near hind coronet and 
off fore fetlock white. No. 0950. 

LOTTY (Hon. Aubrey Hastings), b m ; few white hairs in mane. 
No. 0716. 

LOVE LOST (Mr. P. W. Connolly), br m; collar marks. No. 
0849. 



POLO PONIES, 1900. 497 

LUCILLA (Mr. Nickalls), b m ; no white marks. No. 0761. 

LUCY (Mr. A. Dugdale), b m; small star, both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 0951. 

LYDDITE (Mr. F. Daniell), dun g; star, near hind fetlock white, 
brand both hind quarters. No. 0931. 

MAGIC (Mr. John McDonald), drk b g; star, white hairs on face, 
near fore fetlock and off fore coronet white. No. 0801. 

MAHOMED (Miss A. Gore Booth), b br g; black points, no marks. 
Passed for season. No. 0850. 

MAMIE (Mr. Foxhall Keene), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock and both fore legs white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0952. 

MANGUS (Capt. Fitzgerald), br m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, all four legs white. No. 0908. 

MARGARET (Mr. Nettleton), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, white spot 
lower lip. No. 0909. 

MARIGOLD (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b m ; star, white 
mark off hind shin. No. 0762. 

MAVOURNEEN (Mr. W. Hardcastle), cream m; small star, off 
hind leg white. No. 0735. 

MELODY (Mr. Norris Midwood), b m; black points, no marks. 
Passed for season. No. 0802. 

MERRY MAID (Mr. Nettleton), b m ; star, both hind fetlocks 
white. Passed for season. No. 0910, 

MERRY RATTLE (Mr. P. W. Connolly), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, 
near hind and off fore fetlocks white, off hind leg white. No. 0851. 

MISS CRAFTY (Mr. H. B. Harrison), ch m; white face, 
lower lip white, both hind legs white, black spot near fore coronet. No. 
0717. 

MISS HEALY (Mr. W. C. Meredith), br m ; small star, faint white 
marks off shoulder and neck, white mark ofT hock. No. 0803. 

MISS MURPHY (Mr. P. O'Reilly), b m; star, collar marks, scar 
near side of face. No. 0876. 

MISS SHEPPARD (London Polo Club), b m; faint star, white 
marks lower jaw. No. 0902. 

MISS TAFFY (Mr, W. Redlington), br m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
off hind fetlock white. No. 0763. 

MOLLIE (Mr. J. Cradock), b m ; large blaze, near hind leg and off 

fore fetlock white, white spot front of chest. No. 0877. 

MONEYGOULD (Mr. A. F. Maude), br m; near hind fetlock 
grey. No. 0852. 

MOTHER'S FAVORITE (Mr. James Farmer), b br m ; near hind 
fetlock black and white. No. 0718. 

MOUNTAIN MAID (Mr. Foxhall Keene), b m; star, both hind 
fetlocks white, scars front of both hocks. No. 0954. 

32 



498 APPENDIX. 

MRS. JACK (London Polo Club), ch m ; star, white hairs on face, 
snip, near hind fetlock and ofif fore coronet white, brand off fore quarter. 
No. 0903. 

MRS. O'SHEA (Mr. James Farmer), b m ; both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 0719. 

MY LADY ( Mr. Walter Lindsay), ch m ; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
both hind fetlocks white. No. 0804. 

MY QUEEN (Mr. W. B. Hayes), br m; white face, white spot 
lower lip, both hind legs white. No. 0878. 

NAMELESS (Mr. Aubrey Price), b m; star, white marks on back 
and front of off hind leg. No. 0764. 

NELL (Mr. T. J. Longworth), br m ; white marks both hind 
quarters. No. 0720. 

NO (Mr. A. Boyd Rochford), dun m; both hind fetlocks white, 
black line down back. Passed for season. No. 0879. 

NORA (Mr. Stewart Duckett), b m ; faint star, faint snip, near hind 
fetlock white. No. 0805. 

NOTELESS (Hon. O. Hastings) ch m; star, blaze, snip, white 
spot lower lip, near hind fetlock white, white mark front of off hind 
fetlock, off fore fetlock white. No. 091 1. 



OAK APPLE (Mr. J. Cradock), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
fetlocks white. No. 0880. 

ODDS ON (Mr. J. W. Nolans), b m; near hind fetlock white, white 
spots off shoulder and off side of neck, white mark near ribs. No. 
0881. 

ONYX (Capt. Loftus), br m ; faint star, near fore coronet white. 
Passed for season. No. 0806. 



PA (Earl of Harrington), ch g; white face, lower lip white, near 
hind and both fore legs white, off hind coronet white, white marks over 
body, scar off forearm, brand near hind quarter. No. 0914. 

PADDY (Messrs. Slocock), b g ; white face, lower lip white, wall 
eye. No. 0807. 

PAT (Mr. Herbert A. Gaildene), b br g; off hind coronet white, 
slight collar marks. No. 08S2. 

PATIENCE (Mr. C. Adamthwaite), b m ; faint star, faint snip, near 
fore coronet white. No. 0765. 

PEANUT (Mr. H. B. Harrison), b m; star, off fetlock black 

and white, near fore fetlock grey. No. 0721. 

PEARL (Mr. F. D. Hickman), gr m ; scar off hind , flea- 

bitten marks on head. No. 0808. 

PEELER (Mr. F. Daniell), b br g ; star, white spot lower lip, near 
hind fetlock white, brand near hind quarter. No. 0932. 



POLO PONIES, 19CO. 499 

PEGGY (Mrs. Thompson), ch m; star, near hind fetlock white, 
white patch near ribs, collar marks. No. 0883. 

PETER (Mr. H. B. Harrison), br g; faint star. No. 0722. 

PETTICOAT (Mr. Eastwood Bigger), b m; both hind coronets 

white. No. 0884. 

PILGRIM (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), br g ; faint star and blaze, snip, 
faint collar mark off side. No. 0723. 

PINKEEN (Mr. H. P. Wilson), ch m ; few white hairs on forehead, 
near hind coronet white, off hind and off fore fetlocks white, white spot 
off hind quarter. No. 0885. 

PIPINS (Mr. W. E. Grogan), b m; star, near hind coronet white 
with black spots, off hind coronet white. No. 0809. 

PIRATE (Mr. W. F. A. B. Richardson), b g ; star, blaze, snip, lower 
lip white, white spot off hind coronet, white marks off fore coronet. No. 
0886. 

PLAGUE (Mr. W. E. Grogan), blk m ; star, blemish on face. No. 
0810. 

POST BOY (Mr. W. E. Grogan), ch g; star, blaze, snip, white 
marks near hind fetlock, white hairs in tail. No. 081 1. 

PRESIDENT (Mr. Aubrey Price), b g; star, snip, near fore and 
near hind coronets white, off hind fetlock white, brand near hind quarter. 
No. 0766. 

PRIMROSE (Mr. E. Hodgson), ch m ; star, small snip, off hind 
fetlock white with chestnut spots. No. 0767. 

PRIMROSE (Mr. J. Watson), ch m ; star, white hairs on face, near 
hind fetlock white, collar marks, white marks on hind quarters. No. 
0933- 

PRINCE (Mr. John Carpenter), b g; star, collar marks, off fore 
coronet white. No. 0887. 

PRUDENCE (Mr. C. C. DArcy Irvine), b m; star, blaze, snip, 
near hind leg white. No. 0853. 

QUEEN (Mr. T. L. Moore), b m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind leg 
white. No. 0812. 

QUEENIE (Mr. F. G. Trollope), br m ; white marks front of near 
fore and near hind legs. No. 0768. 

QUICKSILVER (Mr. Frank Newman), grey m; small snip, white 
mark lower lip, collar marks. No. 0915. 



RAGS (Earl of Harrington), b g ; star, small snip, near hind fetlock 
white. Passed for season. No. 0916. 

READCOMBE LASS (Hon. O. Hastings), ch m ; white face. No. 
0725. 

RED LETTER (Mr. H. Barker), ch m ; star, both hind legs white. 
No. 0724. 



500 APPENDIX. 

REDSKIN (Mr. Aubrey Price), ch m ; star, white marks off ribs, 
collar marks. No. 0769. 

REPULSE (Mr. G. A. Miller), ch m; star, narrow line down face, 
snip, white mark front of ofif hock. No. 0923. 

REWARD (Mr. Tresham Gilbey), b m ; star, blaze, scar near hind 
quarter. No. 0770. 

ROLI-POLI (Mr. S. R. Selman), b m; faint star. No. 0771. 

ROSA (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), roan m ; both hind fetlocks white. 
No. 0955. 

ROSx\RY (Mr. Menzies), ch m ; scar near forearm. Passed for 
season. No. 0953. 

ROSEGLASS (Mr. George F. Richardson), b br m; star, collar 
marks. No. 0888. 

ROUGE (Mr. C. Creed), b m ; black points, small white mark on 
back. No. 0854. 

ROYAL SALUTE (Mr. J. Henry Stock), br g ; black streak down 
back. No. 0772. 

ROYALTY (Mr. James Farmer), gr m ; near hind coronet white, 
white marks off hind and both fore coronets. No. 0773. 

ROYALTY (Messrs. Slocock), br m; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, off hind fetlock white. No. 0813. 



SADIE R. (Mr. E. Hudson), gr m; near fore fetlock white and 
black. Passed for season. No. 0774. 

ST. MORITZ (The Keynsham Stud Company), ch g ; star, black 
patches over hind quarters. Passed for season. No. 0778. 

SAMPLE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b m ; small scar outside near hock, 
white hairs off hind quarter. No. 0917. 

SANCHO (London Polo Club), br g ; white face, lower lip white, 
both hind and off fore legs white, white marks all over body, brand both 
hind quarters. No. 0904. 

SAPHIRE (Capt. S. J. Loftus), ch m ; white hairs on face and off 
hind coronet. Passed for season. No. 0814. 

SARAH (Mr. W. A. Rawlinson), b m; star, both hind legs white. 
No. 0775. 

SCENE SHIFTER (Tvlr. C. W. Meredith), ch g; off hind coronet 
white. Passed for season. No. 0815. 

SCHOOL BOY (Dr. Colgan), b g; white hairs on forehead. No. 
0816. 

SEAGULL (Dr. Colgan), gr m; no marks of identity. No. 0817. 

SEAGULL (Mr. H. Straker), gr g ; brand off fore quarter, scar on 
forehead. No. 0956. 

SHOPGIRL (Colonel T. Cuthell), chm : star, blaze, snip, near hind 
leg white, off hind coronet white. Passed for season. No. 0905. 



POLO PONIES, 1900. 501 

SHRAPNEL (Mr. James Farmer), br m ; slight blemish back of 
near hock. No. 0727. 

SILVER (Capt. Loflus), gr m ; snip, white and black spots lower lip. 
No. 0818. 

SILVER SAND (Mr. T. J. Longworth), chg; star, near hind leg and 

oft' hind fetlock white. No. 0726. 

SNOWDROP (Mr. G. A. Miller), gr m ; black spots both shoulders 
and oft' ribs. No. 0924. 

SOCIETY (Mr. A. Rawlinson), br g ; star, blaze, snip, both hind 
fetlocks white. No. 0919. 

SPARKLETT (Mr. H. Thursby), b m ; star, near fore leg grey, near 
hind leg white. No. 0776. 

SPION KOP (Mr. Haskins), ch g; star, collar marks. No. 0819. 

SPOOF (Mr. Francis F. Daniell), bg; star, blaze, snip, lower lip 
white, both hind legs and near fore fetlock white, white marks both ribs, 
brand near hind quarter. No. 0728. 

SPRING ^Messrs. E. D. c^ G. A. Miller), brm; white spots off ribs. 
No. 0777. 

SPRITE (Mr. John Leonard), roan m ; faint star. No. 0820. 

STELLA (Mr. W. Hardcastle), b m ; star, narrow blaze, large snip, 
both hind legs white, both fore coronets white. No. 0736. 

STRAYSHOT (Mr. P. W. Connolly), br m ; small white mark inside 
left knee. No. 0855. 

STRONGBOW (Major Alexander), ch g; white face, lower lip 
white, all four legs white. No. 0821. 

SUGAR STICK ( Miss Alice Kennedy), br m ; star, small collar 
marks ticked with hairs. No. 0889. 

SUNBEAM (Mr. R. St. G. Robinson), b m; off hind fetlock white, 
white spot off hind quarter, ticked with white. No. 0856. 

SUNFLOWER (Mr. T. H. O. Pease), ch m ; star, blaze, snip, off 
hind coronet white. No. 0779. 

SWEEP (Mr. W. A. Rawlinson), brg; star, small snip, both hind 
and near fore fetlocks white. No. 0780. 

SYLVAN LADY (Mr. J. Fitzgerald), ch m ; near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0857. 



TAILER (Mr. C. K. O'Hara), ch g; star, narrow blaze, dark line 
down back. No. 0858. 

TAXIANA (Mr. Foxhall Keene), bm; star, small snip, near hind 
fetlock white, brand near fore quarter, scar near hind quarter. No. 0957. 

TELEPHONE GIRL (Mr. M. Quinn), ch m; star, blaze, snip, 
lower lip white, black spots on body, collar marks. No. 0822. 

TETSY (Mr. N. F. Archdale), br m; off hind fetlock white. No. 
0823. 



502 APPENDIX. 

THE JUDGE (Miss Helen Tyrrell), br g ; both hind fetlocks white. 
Passed for season. No. 0781. 

THE SPY (Mr. Aubrey Price), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, near fore 
coronet white, white mark on croup, collar marks. No. 0782. 

TILLY (Mr. Eugene Ballesty), br m ; star. No. 0890. 

TOAST RACK (Mr. A. R. Fairfax Lucy), gr g; scar front of neck, 
white spot near ribs. No. 0912. 

TO PAY ( Mr. Ernest Brown), ch g ; star, blaze, snip, near hind leg, 
near fore fetlock, and off fore coronet white, collar marks. No. 0891. 

TOSS UP (Mr. P. W. Connolly), dun m ; white hairs on forehead, 
near hind fetlock white. No. 0859. 

TOTTY (Hon. Aubrey Hastings), br m ; star, white hairs on face, 
near hind fetlock white, white marks off ribs. No. 0729. 

TRICKS (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), b m; star, narrow blaze, snip, near 
hind coronet and off hind fetlock white. No. 0918. 

TWINKLE (Mr. L. C.Wynne), br m ; star, both hind fetlocks 
white, white mark off shoulder. No. 0860. 



UTILITY (Messrs. E. D. & G. A. Miller), b br g ; star. No. 
0783. 

VANITY (Mr. H. Stanley), b br m; star, white spot near ribs. No. 
0S92. 

VELVET (Mrs. E. H. Pack Beresford), b m ; star, blaze, snip, both 
hind and near fore fetlocks white, white spots near fore leg. No. 0824. 

VICTORIA (Messrs. Slocock), b m ; star, blaze, snip. No. 0825. 

VIXEN (Mr. H. P. Wilson), ch m; star, blaze, snip, white spot 
upper lip, near hind fetlock, off hind coronet, and near fore leg white. 
No. 0893. 

WANCHEE (Mr. F. G. Trollope), b m: star, faint snip, white 
marks front of near fore and near hind legs. No. 0784. 

WATERFORD (Mr. H. Barker), b g; off hind fetlock and near fore 
coronet white, collar marks. No. 0730. 

WINK (Mr. P. W. Connolly), br h; star, white hairs on face, both 
hind legs white. No, 0861. 

WISDOM (Mr. Aubrey Price), b br m ; near hind fetlock white. 

No. 0785. 

YES (Mr. A. Boyd Rochfort), br m ; off hind coronet white. No. 
0894. 

ZULUKA (Dr. Furlong), br m; faint star, near hind fetlock white. 
No. 0826. 



POLO PONIES, 1900. 503 



THE FOLLOWING PONIES WERE NOT PASSED. 

BLACK WATCH (Mr. John Leonard), blk br m ; near hind fetlock 
white, with black spots. No. 0827, 

BOBBINS (Mr. A. Gold), light ch m; white hairs on face, faint 
snip, near fore fetlock and ofif hind coronet white, white mark off hip. 
No. 0934. 



CERES (Capt. Walker Leigh), b m ; star, blaze, snip, near hind 
fetlock and off hind leg white. No. 0920. 

CHARLIE'S AUNT (Capt. F. Egerton Green), b m ; star, blaze, 
snip, near hind coronet white. No. 0925. 

CHRISTOPHER (Capt. F. Egerton Green), b g; star, near fore 
and off hind fetlocks white. No. o^2b. 



DICKEY (Mr. W. Murphy), b or br g; star, narrow blaze, snip, scar 
near hind fetlock. No. 0S28. 



EL SOVEY (Capt. Loftus Bryan), b m; star, narrow blaze, snip, 
both hind fetlocks white. No. 0829. 



LADY MAY (Mr. A. Suart), b m ; scar off side ribs and outside 
near knee. No. 0958. 

LOTTERY (Mr. W. Buckmaster), b m; faint star, both hind 
coronets white. No. 0921. 



MULDOON (Colonel Campbell), gr g; scar near hind fetlock and 
off hind quarter. No. 0864. 



NO GO (Mr. C. W. Meredith), bm; star, blaze, snip, scar near hind 
coronet, ticked with white hairs on flanks. No. 0830. 



OLIVE (Mr. G. P. Russell), b m; small white spots near hind 
quarter and inside off hind coronet. No. 0959. 



PATBOY (Mr. J. H. Locke), bg; star, white hairs both ribs. No. 
0895. 



504 APPENDIX. 

PHOEBE (Mr. Gerald Hardy), b m ; few white hairs on face. No. | 

0960. 



RASSENDYN (Mr. W. K. Carew), ch g ; star, white hairs on face, 
all four fetlocks white. No. 0863. 

RIGOLETTO (Mr. A. Boyd-Rochfort), b g ; "black points, no marks. 
No. 0896. 



VIVANDIERE (Mr. J- Fitzgerald), br m ; small star, white marks 
off hind quarter. No. 0862. 



505 



POLO PONIES MEASURED AND REGISTERED 
AT HURLINGHAM, 1901. 



ABBESS, THE (Mr. W. E. Crogan), b m; few grey hairs o/h 
Coronet. No. 173. 

ABRAHAM (Mr. Bernard Wilson), b g ; few grey hairs in forehead. 
No. 366. 

ADAM HILL (Captain W. Neilson), gr g ; flea-bitten head, behind 
elbows and in flanks. No. 439. 

ADVANCE (Mr. T. L. Walker), br m ; scar n h heel. No. 572 

ALERT (Messrs. Miller), ch g ; star, race, snip, both fore pasterns 
and backs of fetlocks, both hind stockings. No. 367. 

ALEXANDRA (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), bl m. No. 541. 

ALICE (12th Lancers Club), ch m ; star, snip, scar nh tendon. 
No. 263. 

ALLFOURS (Messrs. Slocock), ch g ; star, race, snip, white legs, 
stripe running up to hock of n/h. No. 490. 

ALLY SLOPER (Mr. A. Hastings), b g ; o h ^ fetlock. No. 379. 

AMELIA (12th Loncers Club), ch m ; blaze, race, snip, o f fetlock, 

n/h stocking, o/h pastern. No. 264. 

AMPELOPSIS (Captain Phipps Hornby), b g ; small spot as star, 
small white mark inside n/f cannon bone. No. 542. 

ANEMONE (Mr. E. Blakiston Houston), br m ; few grey hairs as 
star, double transverse stripe above n/ shoulder point. No. 315. 

ARROW, THE (Captain W. H. B. Long), b m ; faint star n side, 
scar n/ shin, o/h coronet black marks. No. 258. 

ARTHUR'S LOVE (xMr. J. J. Stafford), ch m : blaze face of 
stocking, n/h pastern and up back of fetlock. No. 225. 

ASHTRAY (Mr. E. M. Stewart), b m: star, race, bh i fetlock. 
No. 328. 

ATHANSIA (Mr. W. G. Dease), b m ; few grey hairs forehead. 
No. 491. 



5o6 APPENDIX. 

BABY NIGGER (Mr. O. Hastings), bl g ; permanent irregular, scar 
both sides of wither. No. 380. 

BALD FACE (Mr. E. Rotheram), dk b g ; blaze, broad race, whole 
snip and underlip, b/n fetlocks and b/o pastern. No. 302. 

BALSORROCK (Captain W. Neilson), b m ; star n h pastern, o'h 

heel. No. 440, 

BARBED WIRE (Mr. James Fitzgerald), gr g ; light forehead, of 

coronet, b/h fetlocks upwards to point in front. No. 290. 

BARMAID (Mr. C Adamthwaite), ch m ; long star, snip, small 

white patch n/f heel. No. 5. 

BARMAID (Mr. L. M. Ryan), br m; star, race, few grey hairs o 
hip and small grey spot 0/ quarter. No. 492. 

BAR NONE (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), dark b g ; nh fetlock. No. 
462. 

BAY LEAF (Mr. Allen Gott), b m; star, bh fetlocks, 2 marked 
knees. No. 530, 

BAZAAR (Mr. N. Haig), dark grey m ; light forehead and both 
cheeks, spot 0/ quarter (season only). No. 340. 

BEATLE (Mr. T. J Roark), bl m; star, bh pasterns and back of 

fetlocks. No. 493. 

BEAUTY (Captain Hickman), blk m ; star, race, broad snip of 

coronet. No. 283. 

BEAUTY BAY (Mr. Mortimer Russell), gr g; white face, lower lip 

light, n/f leg and b/h legs light coloured. No. 226. 

BELL (Mr. C. B. Houston), br m; spot bh shins and inside of 
knee. No. 332. 

BELLA (i2th Lancers Club), gr m ; dark patch near side of fore- 
head, n/f fetlock and o/h pastern and back of fetlock. No. 265. 

BENEFIT (Mr. A. Byrne), black m; n h heel and patch in front of 

same coronet. No. 184. 

BENEFIT (Mr. H. B. Harrison), ch m; few grey hairs on forehead, 

n/h heel and inside coronet white. No. 52. 

BERNEY (Mr. John Sandall), b g ; small star inside n h coronet. 
No. no. 

BERNICIA GIRL (Mr. Sandilands), ch m; star and race bh 
stockings. No. 381. 

BERYL (Mr. Neil Haig), gr m ; n h coronet. No. 341. 

BESS (Mr. Evan T. Pritchard), b m; white spot, oh shin. No. 
531- 

BETTY (Mr. Glover), ch m ; small star, faint race, snip b h socks. 
No. 463. 

BIDDY (Mr. R. Maxwell), b m; star (season only) No 281. 

BIJOU (Mr. W. C. Eustis), dun b m ; bald under both eyes. No. 
400. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 507 

BIRDIE (Mr. M. Quinn), br m ; star race, linear scar inside of heel. 
No. 471. 

BIRD OF FREEDOM (Messrs. Slocock), ch m ; blaze face, n f leg 
white. No. 124. 

BITHNER MARE (Mr. W. McCreery), b m; nh coronet and 
heel. No. 368. 

BLACKIE (Colonel H. de Roebeck), bl m; star only. No. 112. 

BLACK JACK (Captain W. Hall), bl g ; star, nh coronet. No. 
III. 

BLACK PEARL (Mr. J. Hornsby), bl m ; white marks top wither, 
spots 0/ side. No. 574. 

BLIND MAN'S BUFF (Mr. Percy BuUivant), b g; small star, n/h 
coronet. No. 399. 

BLUEY (Mr. N. Haig), gr m, " M " n shoulder. No. 424. 

BOUTCHIE (Mr. J N. Malone), gr m ; flea bitten head and both 
shoulders. No. 306 

BRAMBLE (Mr. W. McCreery), dark b g blaze, n h fetlock. No. 

369- 
BRAMPTON (Mr. J. Drage), ch m; star snip. No. 6. 

BRITANNIA (Mr. E. Hughes), br m ; spot for race o h half fetlock 
with black markings. No. 339. 

BROTHER JOHN (Mr. James Farmer), dk br g. No. 53. 

BROWN BETTY (Mr. H. Morris), black m. No. 185. 

BROWN VARNISH (Mr. G. K. Ansell), b g; star, n h coronet 
and heel with black marks in coronet, No. 186. 

BRUNO (R.A. Polo Club), b m; star, bald round eyes. No. 441. 

B & S (Mr. J. M. Richardson), b g ; star, snip n h coronet. No. 96. 

BUCK SHOT (Mr. Dawson), br g ; star, race, snip b h fetlocks, n f 

pastern, and back of.fetlock, brand M. No. 464. 

BUSTER (Mr. L. Morough Ryan), b g; heel and small patch in 
front of same coronet (season only). No. 187. 

BUSTLE (Mr. A. M. Caldecott -Smith), br m ; scar n h heel. No. 
494. 

BUTTERCUP (Mr. A. Stourton), ch m ; star, race, snip. No. 425. 

BUTTERFLY (Messrs. Miller), br m ; few grey hairs as star, per- 
manent scar in front of o/F fetlock and o/h coronet. No. 7. 

BUTTERSCOTCH (Mr. R. G. O. Chesin), ch m ; o knee marked, 
grizzled patch top of n/ quarter. No. 279. 



CAMERON (Mr. J. Hargreaves), b g; star, race, snip b h pasterns. 
No. 543. 

CAPRICE (Mr. J. Hargreaves), 1) m ; star. No. 544. 



5o8 APPENDIX. 

CARLO W (Captain L. Bryan), b g ; star, few grey hairs outside n/f 
heel. No. 472. 

CAROLINA (Captain Egerton Green), b m ; star, snip and n/ 
nostril. No. 342. 

CANTERBURY (T2th Lancers Club), br g; small line as star, few 
white spots about f/ fetlocks. No. 266. 

CAT (Messrs, Slocock), b m; no white. No. 125. 

CHAIN SHOT (Mr. W. K. Carew), b m; little white oh heel. 

No. 227. 

CHALMINGTON (Captain H. L. Lithgow, R.H A ), br g ; grizzled 
star. No. 442. 

CHANCE (Messrs. Slocock), b m ; permanent scar in front of n h 
joint. No. 126. 

CHARITY (Mr. James Farmer), b m ; star, slight race o h coronet. 
No. 54. 

CHARITY (Mr. J. Bellville), gr m ; large scar under n side of 
body. No. 401 

CHARITY (Mr. M. Quinn), br m; few grey hairs for star, patch of 
grey in front of 0/ hock. No. 473. 

CHARLIE (Mr. R. Lonsdale), ch g; star n'h pastern, and ^ fetlock. 
No. 272. 

CHARLIE (Mr. A. F. Houlder), br g : star, snip bh pasterns. 

No. 481. 

CHARLIE'S AUNT (Captain F. Egerton Green), b m ; star, race, 
snip. No. I. 

CHARLTON (Captain Lithgow, R.H.A.), dk br g ; grey mar k,N/ 
shoulder, all fetlock joints. No. 443. 

CHELTENHAM (Captain F. Egerton Green), dk b g ; star, with 
grizzled edge, small snip, n/f, small marking in front of coronet and heel, 
o/f coronet, n/h ^ fetlock (season only). No. 457. 

CHESHIRE (Mr. R. H H. Eden), b m, long star, snip n h coronet, 
o/h fetlock (season only). No. 545. 

CHICKANE (Mr. C. Brownlow), br m ; star, race, snip to o side, 

n/f fetlock, n/h ^ stocking, o/h pastern. No. 319. 

CHICKEN (Mr. F. Barbour), dun m ; star o h coronet. No. 313. 

CHIEFTAN (Mr. A. Stourton), b or br g ; grey hairs on nose, n f^ 
fetlock, b/h fetlocks. No. 455. 

CHIFF CHAFF (Captain Osmaston), br m ; collar marks, o h heel 
and inside coronet. No. 278. 

CHIPS (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), bl g ; oh heel and spot in front of 
same coronet. (Season only.) No. 465. 

CHRISTOPHER (Captain F. Egerton Green), b g ; star, n f 
pastern, and o/h pastern and fetlock. No. 269. 

CLARA (Mr. W. B. Hayes), bl br m ; star, spot centre back. No. 

228. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 509 

CLEMENTINA (Mr. S. A. Watt), bl br m ; star. No 496. 

CLIMBER (Mr. James Farmer), ch m ; star, race, snip, n h coronet 
and heel. No. 55. 

CLIP (Mr. James FitzGerald), ch m; star. No. 289. 

CLOISTER (Mr. J. Hargreaves), bg; small white mark n shin, 
few grey hairs front of o/h leg, just above hock. No. 546. 

CLONMEL (Messrs. Slocock), br m ; star, race, faint snip inside 
both hind coronets. No. 127. 

COCKSHOT (Mr. F. P. Colgan, M.D ), ch g ; blaze, oh fetlock, 

o/h pastern. 

COLLENSO (Mr. J. Eaton Dykes), ch g; blaze, race, snip o,H 
pastern, No. 229. 

COMO. NO. (Mr. R. P. Wilson), b g; star, race, snip, four pasterns 

n/h, one lightest. No. 547. 

CONFIDENCE (Mr. T. L. Moore), br m; star, race, snip, to n/ 
nostril. No. 188. 

COOLIE GIRL (Mr. R. A. Fleming), bl br m; small grizzled star. 
No. 402. 

COUNT, THE (Mr. A. Dugdale), br g; inside ^ of n/h coronet and 
heel. No. 532. 

COUNTESS (Mr. T. Linton), b m; lot of saddle marks and fired 
inside hocks. No. 230. 

COUNTESS (Mr. W. E. Drury), ch m ; broad race n h fetlock, oh 
pastern, ches. markings on coronets, white markings under body. No. 
583- 

COWBOY (Mr. J. Hargreaves), gr g ; almost white. No. 548. 

COWSLIP (Messrs. Miller), bl m ; b f pasterns and n f fetlock, 
wdth black coronet markings. No. 8. 

COWSLIP (Mr. W. B. Hayes), dun m ; faint crescentic star. No. 

497- 
CRAFTY (Mr. James Farmer), b g; small star, grizzled ring round 

it, snip b/h stockings. No. 56. 

CRONEY (Mr. A. Findlatt), b g; grizzled patch for star. (Season 
only.) No. 482. 

CRYSTAL (Mr. C. Webb), gr m; star, bf heels light, legs dark. 
No. 274. 

CRYSTAL (Mr. J. Hargreaves), gr m; dark with light head, o h fet- 
lock, and n/h coronet lighter. No. 549. 

CURRAGH (Mr. A. Price), bl br m ; saddle marks. No. 44. 

CURRANTS (Mr. Owen Wynne), br m ; small star, slightly to n 
side of forehead. No. 276. 

CUSHLA (Mr. Percival), blk m. No. 275. 

CUTTY SARK (Mr. N. Haig), gr m; white, with large scar near 
side of body. No. 343. 



5IO APPENDIX. 

CYMBAL (Captain E. D. Miller), br m ; n h fetlock with bl ring 
round coronet. No. 426. 

DAINTY (Mr. R H. H. Eden), br m; few grey hairs forehead 
snip. No. 550. 

DAIRYMAID (Mr. F. P. Colgan, M.D.), ch m ; oh pastern. No. 
129. 

DAISY (Mr. R. W. Hall Dare), br m ; star, race, snip, underlip, oh 
fetlock, n/h |- fetlock. No. 231. 

DAPPLE (Mr. C. W. Meredith), gr m ; dark legs, star, n f coronet, 
o/F pastern. No. 189. 

DAY (Mr. B. Daly), ch g; blaze, snip, underlip, of pastern, oh 
pastern, and n/h stocking. No. 113. 

DEATH OR GLORY (Messrs. Slocock), b m; star. No. 130. 

DELIGHT (Messrs. Slocock), b roan m; star, slight race, n h fet- 
lock. (Season only.) No. 151. 

DICK'S DAUGHTER (Mr. E. G. Hope Johnstone), ch m ; blaze. 
No. 232. 

DISCORD (Mr. J. Bellville), b g; star inside o shin. No. 403. 

DOCTOR, THE (Dr. Ridd), b g; star long race, b f coronets. No. 
174. 

DOCTOR, THE (Mr. J. Farmer), blk g; star, n h coronet. No. 
86. 

DOLLAR (Mr. P. W. Perry), b m; clot for star, small race snip, 
scar back 0/ heel. No. 474. 

DON, THE (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), b g; few grey hairs forehead, 
broad snip n/ nostril. No. 551. 

DON CARLOS (Mr. H. Learmonth), bl g; blaze, underlip o f and 

n/h fetlocks, angular mark N'F coronet. No. 552. 

DORCHAT (Mr. J. E. Brandt), dk b g ; star, n f coronet and heel, 
and o/h coronet. (Season only. ) No. 97, 

DOROTHY (Mr. A. W. Perkins), ch m; star, race, nh fetlock. 
No. 427. 

DOROTHY (Mr. L. M. Ryan), whole coloured rich dark ch m. 
No. 498. 

DOUBLE X (Mr. G. Heseltine), ch g; star, race, snip, o f pastern, 
n/ fetlocks, large scar inside 0/ hock. No. 456. 

DRAGON (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), b g ; grizzled mane and tail. No. 

553- 
DREAM, THE (Mr. C Death), b m; star. No. 175. 

DRUMFIN (Mr. J. W. Connolly), gr g; star, n f coronet, n h fet- 
lock light. (Season only.) No. 285. 

DUCHESS (Mr. G. S. Reade), b roan m; saddle-marks, girth-marks 
under centre of body. No. 336. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 511 

DUCHESS, THE (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), dun m ; blaze, oh 
stockings. No. 87. 

DUMPS (Captain H. D. O. Ward), gr g ; chestnut, flea-bitten neck 
and shoulders. No. 444. 

DYNAMITE (Mr. W. E. Drury), chg; few grey hairs forehead, spot 
as snip, B/H stockings No. 584. 

EILEEN (Mr. C. Brownlow), dk b m ; star, snip, b f pasterns, n h 
fetlock, o/h outside coronet. No. 318. 

ELDORADO (Mr. N. Learmonth), br g ; star, n rboth hind fetlocks, 
No. 554. 

ELLA (Captain F. Egerton Green), b m; n h heel. No. 267. 

EL LUCERO (Mr. N. Learmonth), br g; star, nf pastern. No. 
555- 

EMERALD (Captain Loftus), br m ; blaze, race, snip n h fetlock, 
o/h heel. No. 500. 

EMIGRANT (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g ; blaze, race, snip n h fet- 
lock, o/h coronet, small white mark. No. 25. 

EMMA (Mr. C. H. T. Reade), b m ; large star, grizzled, snip n h -J 
fetlock, white o/f coronet. (Season only). No. 132. 

EMPRESS (Captain G. B. Gosling), gr m ; of and n h light legs. 
No. 190. 

EMPRESS (Mr. J. Carpenter), br m ; blaze face, n h fetlock. No. 
233 

EMPRESS (Mr. W. B. Hayes), br m ; grizzled race and snip, scar 
outside n/h fetlock. (Season only.) No. 501. 

ENCORE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), br g; blaze, faint race, snip. No, 
26. 

ENID (Captain Egerton Green), b m ; snip n nostril. No. 370. 

ENSLIN (Captain Egerton Green), bl m ; star. No. 344. 

ERIC (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g; star, snip both pasterns. No. 27. 

ESTHER (Mr. W. G. Dease), br m ; large star, n f coronet, b h pas- 
terns. No. 191. 

EVEN MONEY (Mr. O. Hastings), b m ; crescent star, n h coronet, 
o/h pastern. No. 382. 

EXCESS (M. C. Brownlow), b m ; star, race, broad snip. No. 325. 

EXCHANGE (Messrs. Slocock), b g; a few grey hairs on forehead. 
No. 133. 

EXILE (Mr. A. Buchanan Baird), b g; star race, snip to o nostril. 
(Season only.) No. 483. 

FAIRY (Mr. B. H. Nicholson), b m; small star, n f heel grizzled. 
No. 404. 



512 APPENDIX. 

FAIRY, THE (Mr. L. K, Woods), iron gr m; spot on n' side hind 
heels white. No. 176. 

FAITH (Mr. J. Bellville),ch m; star, race, snip. No. 405. 

FANATIC (Captain C. L. Graham), dk b g ; star, of i fetlock, o/h 
fetlock. (Season only). No. 327. 

FANCIFUL (Mr. T. J. Burrows), gr m ; flea-bitten cheeks and fore- 
head. No. 192. 

FANNY (Mr. H. Deering), br m ; b h fetlocks, b;f pasterns, white 
(black coronet markings in all fours). No. 134. 

FANNY (Mr. J. L Walsh), bl m; star, race, snip, oh coronet, little 
white n/h coronet and heel. No. 234. 

FAR FAR (Miss Clare Woolmer), ch m; star, race, snip o'h 

stocking and n/h pastern. No. 3. 

FAVORITE (Sir Vere Foster), b m ; n/h pastern, o/f heel, and 
little in front of coronet. No. 235. 

FESTIVAL (Mr. A. Price), br m ; n f heel, little white outside 
same, coronet grizzled. No. 45. 

FIDGET (Mr. J. T. Burrows), br m ; small star, b h pasterns. No. 

193- 
FILBERT (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g. No. 28. 

FIREFLY (Mr R. H. H. Eden), b m ; oh pastern, white patch n/ 
shoulder. No. 556. 

FIREFLY (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g; blaze, race, broad snip. No. 30. 

FIRST SHOT (Mr. S. H. Wallace), b m. No. 502. 

FLASH (Mr. E. F. Dease), b m ; star, spot on n' side wither. No. 

311- 
FLASHLIGHT (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), ch g ; star, nh fetlock. 

No. 30. 

FLASH LIGHT (Mr. A. Dugdale), b m; scar inside n h coronet. 
No. 533. 

FLICK- A-MAROO (Messrs. Miller), ch m ; blaze, face, underlip, 

n/f fetlock, o/h fetlock, n/h stocking. No. 9. 

FLIP (Captain E. D. Miller), b g; grizzled, star, n/f pastern, o/f and 

n/h ^ fetlock, o/h coronet. No. 406. 

FLIRT (Captain Hickman), b m ; star, n/h pastern, faint ring, small 
patch n/ quarter. No. 282. 

FLIRT (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), rn m ch roan ; faint star. (Season 
only.) No. 557. 

FLORADORA (Mr. J. Farmer), ch m ; star, n h pastern, small 
grizzled spot, o/h water line. No. 57. 

FORGER (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g ; large star, snip nf and b,h 
fetlocks. No. 31. 

FORGET-ME-NOT (Mr. M. Quinn), dun m ; star, n h pastern, o/f 
and b/h socks. No. 475. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 513 

FORTRESS (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), dk b g ; no white, branded bar 
across back of thigh, and cross on outer side, n/ second thigh. No. 32. 

FORTUNE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), dk b g ; snip on n nostril. 
No. ss- 

FOXHALL (Mr. E. H. Baker), b g; few grey hairs o forehead. 
No. 489. 

FRAGMENT (Mr. M Moncrieffe), br g ; few hairs for race, snip 
over n/ nostril. No. 34. 

FRAMPTON (Captain Lithgow, R.A.), blk m; small spot on fore- 
head, o/h coronet. No. 445. 

FRIAR (R.A. Polo Club), b g ; n f coronet, o f pastern, b h fetlocks. 

No. 446. 

FRIAR (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), dk b g ; of pastern, b h pasterns, and 
5- fetlock, n/f coronet. No. 36. 

FRIAR, THE (Mr. B. Blunsome), gr horse; scar above o knee. 
No. 8S. 

FRIDAY (Mr. M.- Moncrieffe), bl br g; bh coronets, black mark- 
ings above hoof. No. 35. 

FROLIC (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), dkbg; blaze, race, snip, nf and 
n/h coronet, o/h fetlock. No. 37. 

FROSTY (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), ch roan m , curved race n h -J stock- 
ing. No. 38. 

FUGITIVE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), ch g; star, race, disconnected snip 
n/f, o/f, and o/h fetlocks, and n/h coronet. No. 39. 

FULLGATE (Mr. R. R. Barker), b m ; b h pasterns, blk spots on 
coronets. (Season only. ) No. 58. 

FURY (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), b g. No. 40. 

FUSEE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), ch g; star, race, disconnected snip. 

No. 41. 

FUSIC (Captain L.Bryan), ch m; star, race, snip oh stocking. 
No. 135. 

FUZZ (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), dk b g; star. No. 42. 

GALLIA (Mr. L. de Las Casas), ch m ; blaze face, of pastern, b h 
^ stockings. No. 407. 

GAMBLER (Mr. J. Leonard), bl g ; few grey hairs on forehead. 
No. 194. 

GAME HEN (Mr O. Hastings), ch m. No. 59. 

GARNETT (Captain Loftus), ch m ; star, race, of pastern, 0;h 
inside coronet. No. 136. 

GAY DECEIVER (Captain Long), b m ; star. No. 195. 

GAUCHO (Mr. N. Learmonth), br g; blaze underlip. No. 558. 

GERALD (Mr. N. Haig), b m; white marks inside o knee and 
shin, small mark inside n/h heel. No. 345. 

33 



514 APPENDIX 

G. G. (Mr. J. W. Nolan), br m; star, n'f and n h coronet, on fet- 
lock. No. 236. 

GINGER (Mr. St. L. G. Stephen), ch horse; many saddle marks, 
grey patch below 0/ hip. No. 484. 

GIPSEY (Mr. E. Bellamy), br m ; star, snip over n/ nostril. No. 
196. 

GIPSEY (Major J. Fowle), br m ; star, n h pastern white with black 
markings. No. 197. 

GIPSEY QUEEN III. (Colonel Napier McGill), br m; star, oh 
pastern and scar 0/ heel. No. 303. 

GIRAFFE (Mr. T. J. Roarke), b m ; little faint white mark in front 
of ^7H coronet. No. 137. 

GLASS O' GROG (Mr. Stephenson Grigg), gr g; flea-bitten, light 
bay spots, n/h leg light coloured. No. 338. 

GLENTASK (Mr. R. M. Douglas), br g ; few grey hairs as star, n/h 
coronet (season only). No. 317. 

GOAT, THE (Mr. H. A. Gairdine), b m ; scar front o' fetlock, grey 
tick in coat. No. 504. 

GO BANG (Messrs. Miller), br m ; small grizzled patch for star. No. 
10. 

GOLLYWOG, THE (Miss Wilson), dun g ; star, snip, white mane 
and tail. No. 218. 

GOOD LUCK (Messrs. Slocock), b g; star, bh fetlocks, white. 
No. 138. 

GOUCHO (Messrs. Dennis), b g. No. 114. 

GRACE (Mr. W. Brackenridge), br m; star. No. 356. 

GRANITE (Captain Loftus), grg; 4 white pasterns, light face. 
No. 503. 

GREEN LAWN (Mr. J. Stafford), ch m; star, race, snip. No. 237 

GREGORY'S POWDER (Mr. Maurice F. Dennis), chg; race, four 
white legs, n/ quarter K. No. 115. 

GREY BIRD (Mr. W. E. Drury), gr g ; n' shoulder. No. 586. 

GREY WINGS (Mr. St. L. G. Stephen), gr m ; flea-bitten forehead, 
neck and flanks. No. 485. 

GRIZEL (Mr. N. F. Archdale), gr m; n'f and bh fetlocks. No. 
139- 



HANDY ANDY (Mr. A. Hastings), ch g; star, o'h J stocking. 
No. 383. 

HAPPY THOUGHT (Major G. M. Eccles), ch m; star, race, oh 
fetlock. (Season only.) No- 280. 

HARD LUCK (Messrs. Slocock), br m ; star, snip oh fetlock, n'h 
coronet and heel. No. 140. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 515 

HARLEQUIN (Mr. H. F. Hardy), b g; star, nf and oh heel. 
No. 116. 

HASSAN (Mr. W. Lindsay), ch g; star, small spot o' shin No. 

505. 
HAWTHORN (Dr. Kelly Patterson), b m. No. 305. 

HAZEL (Mr. G. Morris Midwood), ch m; linear star, oh pastern, 
5" fetlock. (Season only.) No. 98. 

HENRY (Mr. James Farmer), br g ; b h coronets. No. 60. 

HEYDAY (Mr. H. F. Hardy), blk g; star, race, n f coronet and 
inside o/h coronet. No. 117. 

HILL DUCK (G. W. S. Willins), b m ; faint spinal stripe. No 99. 

HOB NOB (Captain Egerton Green), ch g; blaze face, b f coronets 

and heels, b/h stockings. No. 371. 

IDA (Mr. Jasper Grant), b m ; star, snip n h fetlock and up back of 
leg. (Season only. ) No. 334. 

IN AND OUT (Major Paynter), b m; small star-fetlocks. No. 238. 

ISAAC (Mr. B. Wilson), red roan g. No. 372. 

JACK-AN-APES (Messrs. Miller), b g ; oh coronet and heel. No. 
II. 

JACKO (Mr. H. E. Lambe), gr g ; slight bay marks over eyes. No. 

559- 
JANE (Mr. E. Bellamy), bl br m ; n h coronet. No. 198. 

JASPER (Captain Loftus), br g ; star, race, snip to n/ side, n h pas- 
tern. No. 141. 

JEMIMA (Mr. W. H. Moreshead), br m ; (season only). No. 199. 

JEN HO (Mr. J. Farmer), br g; few grey hairs in forehead. No. 62. 

JESSIE (Mr. H. Barker), b m. No. 61. 

JIM'S PALL (Mr. James Farmer), elevated ridge bone o' forehead. 

No. 384. 

JOAN (Mr. B. Worthington), bl g; of coronet, n'h fetlock. No. 
239- 

JOEY (Mr. A. K. Huntington), br g ; star, spot as snip, pasterns, 
and back of fetlocks. No. 408. 

JOHN O'GAUNT (Mr. J. Drage), gr g. No. 12. 

JOHNNY (Mr. Stuart Duckett), b g; star, snip, white mark on n/ 
side. No. 506. 

JUDGE, THE (Miss Tyrrel), dk b g ; b h pasterns and up to i fet- 
lock joint. No. 108. 

JUDGE, THE (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), brg; snip, pasterns, and fet- 
locks. No. 89. 



5i6 APPENDIX. 

JULIA (Messrs. Slocock), b m ; b h coronet rings. No. 142. 

JUMBO (Mr. W. E. Drury), bay g; blaze, race, snip n f fetlock, b h 
fetlocks. No. 587. 

JUST IN TIME (Mr. W. Blunsome),chg; grizzled blaze, narrow 
race and snip. No. 64. 

JUST IN TIME (Mr. P. W. Connolly), br g; few warts in front of 
sheath. No. 286. 



KATE (Mr. T. Corrigan), b m. (Season only.) No. 143. ~ 

KATE (Mr. E. T. Pritchard), dk ch m ; blaze top of mane, grey 
inside n/h coronet, o/h fetlock, spot inside of 0/ knee. No. 534. 

KATHLEEN (Mr. N. Haig), b m ; n h fetlock, o h coronet. No. 
346. 

KEYSTONE (Mr. M. Moncrieffe), dig; small crescent on forehead, 
scar o/h shin. No. 43. 

KHEDIVE (Mr. O. Milling), b g; star. No. 240. 

KIMBERLEY (Mr. R. Blakiston Houston), chm; star, o/f pastern, 
n/h outside coronet, Oy''H fetlock, ches. mark o/h coronet. No. 327. 

KING ARTHUR (Mr. Noel Price), b g ; narrow race, n f pastern 
and back of fetlock, b/h fetlocks. No. 46. 

KING JOHN (Mr. A. Price), b g; blaze, race, broad snip b h fet- 
locks. No. 47. 

KISS IN THE RING (Mr. P. Bullivant), ch g; blaze face. No. 
409. 

KITTEN (Mr. L. J. Droffats), b m. No. 241. 

KLONDYKE (Mr. J. Farquhar), bl g ; blaze, race, snip underlip, 
b/f and n/h fetlocks, o/h ^ fetlock. No. 447. 

KOORT NONG (Mr. N. Haig), b m ; inside oh heel, branded 829, 
n/ side hock, enlarged 0/ knee. No. 347. 



LADY BETTY (Mr. C. C. Gouldsmith), ch m ; blaze, underlip, of 
and b/h legs, n/f leg, ches. and white. No. 385. 

LADY BIRD (Mr. H. Barker), br m. No. 65. 

LADY BIRD (Mr. H. Boden), dk br m ; few grey hairs forehead, 
and tail and coat. No. 560. 

LADY BIRD (Lady Kilmorey), b m ; star, race, snip underlip, o^'f 
coronet. No. 242. 

LADY BIRD (Mr. J. N. Hone), br m ; (Season only.) No. 296. 

LADY CLARE (W. K. Carew), b m ; o f heel, and spot on coronet, 
o/h spot on outer heel. No. 243, 

LADY DEWET (Mr. C. B. Houston), br m; few spots above f/ 
knees. No. 331. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 517 

LADY FLORENCE (Messrs. Slocock), b m ; few grey hairs on 
forehead, n/h pastern and ^ fetlock. No. 145. 

LADY GOLIGHTLY (Mr. F. Barton), ch roan mare. No. 100 , 

LADY GEORGE (Mr. O. Milling), ches. m; star, race, oh fetlock, 
n/ heel. No. 244. 

LADY GRACE (Mr. J. Farmer), grey coat ticked, bay m; wart on 
chest. No. 66. 

LADY GREY (Mr. M. Quinn), grey mare, mottled dark grey legs, 
mottling mixed brown hairs. No. 476. 

LADY JANE GREY (Mr. Fosyth Forrest), gr m; scar above 0/ 
knee. No. 386. 

LADY MASSA (Captain L. Bryan), br m. No. 144. 

Lx\DY NELL (Messrs. Slocock), b m; scar outside oh fetlock. 
No. 507, 

LADY PAT (Captain Jenner), b m ; small dot as star. No. 357. 

LADYSMITH (Mr. M. de Las Casas), gr m; of dark, n f light. 
No. 410. 

LADY TOM (Mr. H. B. Harrison), br m ; faint star and race n h 
pastern and heel. No. 68. 

LADY WHITE (Mr. R. Blakiston Houston), b m ; star, race, snip 
o/f coronet. No. 320. 

LADY WINK (Messrs. Slocock), bl m; few grey hairs on forehead. 
No. 146. 

LASSIE (Mr. R. Young), ch m ; star, race, snip to n side, n h 
coronet and back of heel, n/h fetlock. No. 428. 

LATCH KEY (Mr. G. A. Miller), ch g ; star, spot o shoulder. No. 
No. 575. 

LATCH KEY (Mr. W. Lax), ch g ; star and short race. No. 387. 

LEDBURY (Mr. Bell), b g ; two small white marks n' side. No. 
576. 

LEECH, THE (Mr. G. Barter), b m ; star, scar front n'h fetlock. 
No. 396, 

LETTY LIND (Mr. A. M. Caldecott-Smith), bm; star, n h coronet, 
and b/h heels. No. 508. 

LIMIT, THE ((Mr. W. McCreery), ch m (3 years) ; blaze, n f fet- 
lock, o/f pasterns and stocking, n/h pastern. (Season only.) No. 436. 

LINDSEY (Messrs. Slocock), b m; blaze, race, snip bh fetlocks. 

No. 147. 

LINKMAN (Messrs. Miller), br roan g; dot race, snip, bh stock- 
ings, patch under n/ side body, grey hairs in tail. No. 373. 

LIQUEUR (Mr. H. P. Wilson), br g. No. 307. 

LITTLE FELLOW (Mr. Harcourt Gold), b g; star, n'h ^ fetlock. 
No. 429. 



5i8 APPENDIX. 

LITTLE HERCULES (Mr. F. C. Nash), ch roan g. No. 388. 

LITTLE LADY (Mr. J. Farmer), gr m ; light coloured head, b'h 
stockings. No. 67. 

LOAN (Messrs. Slocock), bl or br m ; brushed o h fetlock. No. 
148. 

LOCKET (Captain E. D. Cameron), b m. No. 448. 

LOCKSLEY (Mr. W. B. Hayes), b g; small star, scar inside, of 
leg. No. 509, 

LOPEAR (Mr. W. E. Drury), b g. No. 589. 

LORD BOBBY (Mr. Casson), b g; star, n h i fetlock o'h fetlock. 
(Season only. ) No. 430. 

LORD BOBS (Mr. J. St. P. McArdle), ch g ; star only. No. 245. 

LOVELY CASH (Mr. J. Devaney), b m ; bl legs. (Season only.) 
No. 273. 

LUCIANA (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), ch m ; blaze face underhp, n h 
stocking. No. 69. 

LUCILLE (Captain Egerton Green), ch m ; star, faint race, and 
snip, small white spot outside 0/ knee. No. 374. 

LUCY GLITTERS (Mr. J. Wormald), b m ; white spot back n/ 
knee. No. 411. 

LULU (Mr. William Lax), ch m ; star race, n'f coronet, white mark 
on o/h coronet, back of tendon. No. 389. 

LURLINE (Mr. F. O. Ellison), b m ; star, small white mark front 
of 0/ shin. No. 431. 

MABEL (Mr. N. F. Archdale), br m; oh coronet ring. No. 
149. 

MACAROON (Mr. D. C. Master), dun g ; square star. No. 70. 

MADGE (Mr. T. J. Roark), b m; star, b h pasterns, of coronet. 
No. 150. 

MAD EYE (Mr. R. W. Hall-Dare), dk b g; star. No. 246. 

MAGIC (Mr. F. B. Phillips), br m; star, snip. No. 201. 

MAGIC (Mr. C. W. Meredith), ch m; n'h i stocking, black spot 
outside o/h coronet. No. 202. 

MAHOMET (Captian Paske), b g; grizzled patch on each side of 
spine, under saddle. No. 271. 

MAINSTAY (Mr. F. Ellison), b br m; n/h pastern. No. 412. 

MANDARIN (Mr. F. Newman), gr g; dark legs, coronet rings. 
No. 466. 

MANIFOLD (Mr. N. Haig), ch g; blaze n h i stocking, white mark 
above both eyes on cheek. No. 348. 

MANSFIELD (Mr. W. McCreery), bg ; star o' coronet and heel, 
b/h fetlocks. No. 375. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 519 

Mx\RANGO (Mr. W. McCreery), ch m ; short blaze, scar outside 
o/h fetlock. No. 376. 

MARIE THE RAKE (Mr. N. Haig), br m ; saddle marks, spot n 
side. No. 349. 

MARJORIE (Mr. F. Wise), b m : very small star, small spot nh 
heel. Xo. 413. 

MARMALADE (Mr. Digby Master), b or br g. No. 71. 

MARMOZETTI (Mr. G. A. Miller), ch m ; star race x h pastern 
front o/h coronet. No. 577. 

MARSH MARIGOLD (Captain Phipps G. Hornby), ch m ; star. 
o/h coronet. No. 561. 

MARY ANN (Mr. J. Drage), br m; star of and n h fetlocks. No. 
13- 

MASTER OWEN (Keynsham Stud Company), b g ; star, race b h ^ 
stockings. (Season only.) No. loi. 

MASTER WILLIE (Mr. J. G. Murphy), bg; star, slight snip inside 
OH heel. No. 151. 

MATINEE (Mr. F. Ellison), b m; nh heel oh heel and part of 
coronet. No. 414. 

MAUD (Mr. C. W. Moncrieffe), br m ; clot for star, slight snip x h 
pastern and back of fetlock, o 'h fetlock. No. 203. 

MAY DAY (Mr. W. Roylance Court), b m ; star snip. No. 578. 

MAXIM (Mr. J. T. Roark), ch g; star, snip, bh coronets. No. 
152. 

MAY FLOWER (Dr. Kelly Paterson), b m ; small white mark, x h 
heel. No. 304. 

MAY FLY (Mr. J. T. Roark), ch m ; grizzled race. No. 153. 

MAY MORN (M. Percy Walcot), ch m ; star, race, snip, to x side, 
few grey hairs centre N'/ quarter. No. 72. 

MEADSTONE (Mr. R. Blakiston Houston), br m ; star, race, snip 
N F coronet, o/f outside coronet festoons in white b/h fetlocks, blk mark- 
ings in coronet. (Season only.) No. 329. 

MEG MERRILIES (Mr. S. Anderson), b m ; star, x h pastern, o h 
coronet. (Season only. ) No. 510. 

MELBA (Mr. N. Haig), ch m ; star, race, snip. No. 350. 

MELODY (Mr. Dipby Master), iron gr m; bay hairs on face. No. 
73- 

MERCURY (Mr. F. Wise), b g ; few grey hairs in forehead, b h pas- 
terns and back of fetlocks. No. 415. 

MERCURY (Lord C. C. Bentinck), ch g; star, grizzled race, white 
spot 0/ side behind girth. No. 459. 

MERRY LASS (Captain O'Hara), b m ; many saddle marks. No. 

295- 
MERRY TOM (Mr. J. Drage), b g; star, mealy legs. No. 579. 



520 APPENDIX. 

MERRY THOUGHT (Mr. A. Dugdale), br m; spot n' side. No. 
535- 

MICROBE (Captain F. Egerton Green), b m ; few grey hairs on fore- 
head. No. 458. 

MIDGE (Captain B. Daly), br m ; saddle marks b; sides and on 
centre of back. No. 247. 

MIKE (Mr. Evan T. Pritchard), ch g ; grey hairs forehead, n/h 
coronet, ring, o/h pastern, No. 536. 

MI LADY (Mr. R. Blackiston Houston), b m ; little grizzled patch 
inside o/f pastern. No. 314. 

MINUET (Messrs. Miller), b m; both hind coronets, patchy grey 
marks largest in heels. No. 14. 

MIRIAM (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), ch m; few grey hairs forehead, n/f 
coronet and heel, No. 580. 

MIRIAN (Mr. C. W. Meredith), b m ; few grey hairs forehead. 
No. 204. 

MISS COLONIAL (Mr. J. Farmer), br m ; wart front of neck. 
No. 74. 

MISS GINGER (Mr. W. Lindsay), star, race, disconnected spot as 
snip, n/f fetlock, o/h stocking. No. 205. 

MISS MURPHY (Mr. M. Murphy), ch m; n f coronet, star, b h pas- 
terns and part of fetlock. (Season only.) No. 299. 

MISS OAKLEY (Mr. Digby Master), br m ; large star, race, slight 
mark n/f heel. No. 390. 

MISS POPPET (Mr. A. A. Suffert), bl m ; star, grizzled, race. No. 
572. 

MISS SANDLEY (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), b m; o'h pastern, n/h 
coronet ring. No. 567. 

MISS WAREN (Mr. N. Haig), br m; small white spot above front 
o/h fetlock. No. 351. 

MISTRESS, THE (Mr. M. Quinn), b m; star, race, snip, n'h sock. 
(Season only.) No. 478. 

MOLLY (Mr. W. Ashmore), dk gr m; star, n h pastern. (Season 
only.) No. 156. 

MOLLY B AWN (Mr. W. B. Hayes), liver coloured m; star, n/h 
pastern and ^ fetlock. No. 511. 

MONA (Mr. W. G. Dease), br m; star, of coronet, bh fetlocks. 
No. 118. 

MONA (Lord Harrington), b br m ; star, both h ' pasterns and back 
of fetlocks. No. 358. . 

MOONSTONE (Mr. Digby Master), ch m; star, race inside n/f 
coronet inside o/h coronet. No. 391. 

MOORHEN (Mr. R. W. Fearnley), ch m ; star, short connected 
race, grey hairs on top of wither. No. 102. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 521 

MORGLAY (Mr. A. Price), br m ; X-shaped star, n'h coronet. No. 
48. 

MOVEMENT (Mr. N. E. Price), b m ; blaze race, snip, spot over n/ 
nostril, b/'h | stockings. No. 49. 

MOYRA (Mr. F. Wise), bl m ; star, n h heel. No. 416. 

MUSCIC (Mr. Digby Master), gr m; light mottled. No. 75. 

MUSTAPHA (Mr. B. Worthington), b g; star, race, snip, n f white 
over knee, b/h stockings. No. 24S. 

MY FANCY (Mr. N. F. Whelan), br m; scar on inner and back 

part q/h tendon. No. 154. 

MY LADY (Messrs. Slocock), b m ; few grey hairs forehead, snip. 
No. 155. 

MY LADY (Mr. Stewart Murray), gr m; brown tick, especially 
about body. (Season only.) No. 310. 

NALBUND (Mr. P. H. Sandilands), ch g; star, race, snip to o'side. 
No. 392. 

NAN (Mr. R. R. Barker), br m; star. No. 76. 

Ni\NCY (Mr. E. M. Stewart), ch m; star and race, (to o' side), snip 
b/h stocking. No. 330. 

NANCY (Mr. W. B. C. Burden), b m; star, race snip, n h fetlock. 
No. 393. 

NATTY (Mr. B. H. Nicholson), ch m ; star, race, white spots b' sides 
of neck, o/h pastern. No. 417. 

NAUGHTY BOY (Mr. W. E. Drury), br g; few grey hairs forehead, 
small mark o/h. No. 590. 

NEELGANOST (Mr. B. Daly), ch g; star, race, warts on chest. 
No. 119. 

NELLY (Mr. R. Blackiston Houston), b m ; star, few spots n shin. 
No. 321. 

NELLY BLY (Messrs. Slocock), b m ; n 'h coronet and heel. No. 

157- 
NETTLE (Mr. J. Farmer), b m ; star, n h coronet. No. 394. 
NEVER SAY DIE (Mr. W. G. Edge), b or br m ; star. No. 158. 

NEWPORT (Mr. W. C. Eustis), b g; star, white spots over body 
and quarters. No. 418. 

NIGRETI (Mr. N. Learmonth), bl g; star, race, snip oh coronet. 
No. 562. 

NIMBLE (Mr. C. H. Richardson), b m ; star, race, snip, N f and b H 
fetlocks. No. 326. 

No. I (Messrs. Slocock), b or br g ; few grey hairs forehead, n h pas- 
tern, o/h ^ fetlock. No. 159. 

NO HUMBUG (Mr. Noel E. Price), ch m ; very small spot forehead, 
small grey marks front b/f fetlocks. No. 50. 



522 APPENDIX. 

ODDINGTON (Mr. J. R. Ormrod), steel gr m; white hairs 

behind girth oj side. No. JJ. 

CEDIPUS (Captain Steeds), dark ch g ; star, race, snip, oh pastern, 
fetlock and back leg, spotted all over. No. 15. 

ONYX (Captain Loftus), br m ; Httle semilinear mark forehead, few 
grey hairs, n/f coronet. No. 160. 

OPHIA (Captain E. D. Miller), ch g; star, race, bald snip, oh 
coronet inside. No. 419. 

ORCHID (Captain W. E. H. Steeds), gr m; b tick side of neck, 
small blk spot n/ side of neck. No. 512. 

ORPHAN, THE (Mr. T. D. Wallis), br g ; o h coronet, ring and 
back of heel. No. 479. 

ORPHAN, THE (Mr. S. Anderson), br m ; star, b h pasterns. No. 

513- 
OYEZ (Mr. A. Dugdale), b g ; oh heel and coronet. No. 537. 

PADDY (Mr. C. H. Reade), br g ; saddle marks centre of back, 
permanent scar o/h heel. No. 250. 

PALMYRA (Mr. Thomas Anderson), br m; wide race, snip, n/f 
coronet, b/h ^ stockings. No. 161. 

PALNITA (Mr. J. D. Wallis), br m; faint star. No. 249. 

PANIC (Messrs. Miller), blk br m ; angular mark o side under 
saddle. No. 16. 

PANSY (Mr. J. Farmer), liver ch m ; star, race, snip, n h coronet. 
No. 395. 

PANTALOON (Mr. Dawson), b g; large blaze all four stockings to 
above knees and hocks. No. 467. 

PAT (Messrs. Slocock), ch dun g; dark ch, lighter legs. No. 162. 

PATCH (Mr. F. W. O'Hara), b m ; spot o side top neck and o,' 
shoulder, various saddle marks. No. 288. 

PATIENCE (Mr. J. H. Welch), b m ; star, race, snip, n/f inside 
coronet, n/h fetlock, o/h leg grizzled. No. 324. 

PATIENCE (Mr. Ulric O. Thynne), b m ; small star n/ side. No. 
359. 

PAXTON (Mr. G. A. Miller), dk b g; 3 white marks n side, one on 
back. No. 581. 

PEARL (Captain Loftus), br m; blaze, snip, n h pastern, grey tick 
in coat. No. 514. 

PEDLAR (Mr. Evan T. Pritchard), br g ; 2 grey marks on back, 
scar 0/ knee. No. 538. 

PILOT (Mr. W. E. Drury), b g ; star n'f heel, n'h fetlock, o'h pas- 
tern, and patch outside o/f heel. No. 591. 

PLAY TOY (Mr. T. J. Roark), ch g; oh coronet. No. 164. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 523 

POLEMIC MARE (Mr. x\rthur Natus), ch m; large star, narrow 
continuous race. No. 103. 

POM-POM (Mr. W. E. Grogan), ch g : star, race, snip to n side, 
n/h stocking, spot front o/h coronet. (Season only.) No. 515. 

POM-POM (Captain Phipps Hornby), br g; small lineal scar inside 
front 0/ coronet. No. 563. 

POP (Mr. E. Bellamy), br g; star, saddle and girth spots. No. 251. 

PRETTY JANIE (Mr. A. Rodgers), br m; star oh pastern and up 
inside fetlock. (Season only.) No. 316. 

PRICELESS (Mr. R. Whurr), b m ; few grey hairs n side fore top, 
single spot n/ side. No. 486. 

PRIMROSE (Messrs. Miller), b m ; single spot near stifle, two linear 
marks front y^/K shin.. No. 17. 

PRIMROSE (Mr. T. J. Roark), ch m; blaze bh stockings. No. 
165. 

PRIMROSE DAME (Mr. W. Stourbridge), ch m; star, grizzled 
extension over left brow. (Season only. ) No. 104. 

PRINCE (Mr. Engledon) ; star, disconnected race and snip, few 
grey hairs in tail. No. 166. 

PRINCE (Mr. E. N. McCormick), b g; blaze, race, snip, with 
grizzled edge to race, b/h fetlocks. (Season only.) No. 252. 

PRINCE, THE (Mr. J. D. Wallis), ch g; star, race, snip, oh pas- 
tern. (Season only. ) No. 259. 

PRINCESS (Rev. C. Prodgers), br m; nf coronet and heel, bh 
coronets. No. 432. 

PRINCESS (Mr. E. Rotherham), dk b m; star, narrow race to snip, 
over nostril, underlip, N'/f coronet, O/'f coronet inside, N'/h ^ stockings. 
No. 301. 

PRODIGAL (Mr. J. W. Hornsby), grg; oh leg light. No. 468. 

PUNCH (Hon. O. Hastings), b horse; star, small hollow over o 
shoulder point. No. 78. 

PUNCH (R.A. Polo Club), gr g ; white mottled quarters. No. 449. 

QUALITY (Mr. E. Rotherham), br g; few grey hairs forehead, b h 
pasterns. No. 300. 

QUEEN (Major Beech), dk b m ; few grey hairs under saddle. No. 
18. 

QUEENIE (Mr. R. A. Warren), b m ; blaze, scar front of fetlock 
n/h fetlock. No. 516. 

QUEENIE (Mr. T. Leonard), br m ; light grizzled saddle mark. 
(Season only. ) No. 200. 

QUERY (Messrs. Miller), br m ; large saddle marks o side, small 
ones n/ side, o/h pastern, few grey hairs front o/f coronet. No. 19. 



524 APPENDIX. 

RABOATH (Mr. W. McCreery), dk b g ; race, snip. No. 433. 

RATTLE (Captain E. G. Hardy), ch m ; blaze, race, snip n'h 
coronet, o/h inside fetlock. No 564. 

REDBIRD (Mr. W. E. Drury), ch g ; star, faint grizzled race b/h 
fetlocks. No. 592. 

RED HEART (Mr. E. F. Dease), ch m ; star, with grizzled border, 
narrow race, snip. No. 312. 

RED PICKLES (Mr. J. S. Bakewell), ch roan g ; rudimentary corn 
inside o/ hock. No. 565. 

RED ROSE (Lieut.-Colonel Henriques), ch m ; few grey hairs n/ 
side centre of forehead, o/h pastern and heel, white, with permanent scar 
on inner and front side of same. (Season only.) No. 105. 

REQUISITION (Captain Fielden), gr g. No. 573. 

R.H.A. (Mr. A. L. Farrant), gr g ; blaze o'f fetlock b'h stockings. 
No. 450. 

RINGLET (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), ch m ; small star. No. 79. 

RISK (Mr. C. W. Meredith), b m ; star race, broad snip to n nostril, 
n/f, o/h pastern, ^7H fetlock. No. 206. 

ROCK (Mr. W. E. Drury), b g ; star, snip, b f and oh fetlocks 

white, white marks n/ side. No. 593. 

ROLLO (Mr. C. H. Sheather), b g ; star oh pastern, and tuft o/f 
fetlock. No. 434. 

ROMAN LASS (Messrs. Slocock), gr m ; e'f and oh legs. No. 
167. 

ROULETTE (Mr. J. Adamthwaite j, ch m ; blaze nh stocking. 
No. 80. 

ROYAL OAK (Mr. R. Good), br g ; blaze, race, small snip o'h ^ 
fetlock. (Season only. ) No. 253. 

RUBY (Captain Loftus), ch m; star, broad race nh fetlock. 
(Season only.) No. 168. 

RUBY (Mr. F. Ellison), ch m; blaze, underlip n f coronet, n/h 
stocking o/f fetlock, with band to hock. No. 420. 

RUFUS (Mr. A. Dugdale), ch g; star race, snip. No. 539. 

ST. BLAIZE (Captain Phipps Hornby), br g; blaze, n'f stocking, 
b/h stockings. No. 566. 

ST. KILDA (Mr. N. Haig), ch m; star, narrow race, white spot n/ 
flank. No. 355. 

ST. OSYTH (Captain Egerton Green), b m ; star, snip, n h pastern 
and ^ of fetlocks white. No. 2. 

ST. PAT (Mr. P. J. C. Linnott), ch g; star, race curving to o' side, 
broad snip, n/h fetlock, o/h coronet. (Season only. ) No. 216. 

ST. PATRICK (Keynsham Stud Co.), bl g ; few grey hairs on fore- 
head, snip, n/f pastern both hind fetlocks. No. 107. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 525 

ST. SIEVA (Mr. W. C. Pagan), b m. (Season only.) No. 309. 

SAMMY (Colonel Campbell), gr g ; lightly flea-bitten, white mark n'f 
shin, also below and in front of N'/ hock. No. 270. 

SANTA JE (Mr. Glover), b g ; faint star. No. 469. 

SANTOI (Mr. A. Rawlinson), br m ; star to n side, b h pasterns 
and back of fetlocks. No. 360. 

SANTOI (Mr. C. Dillon), ch m ; faint race, grey tick in coat over 
both hip joints. No. 207. 

SANTOY(Mr. J Adamthwaite), br m ; star oh heel and back of 
fetlock. No. 81. 

SAPHIRE (Captain Loftus), ch m ; star n h coronet. No. 169. 

SARAH (Mr. C. H. T. Reade), br m; few small spots os behind 
saddle flap, few grey hairs under flap n/ side. No. 254. 

SAUCY MARY (Mr. N. Haig), b mstar. No. 352. 

SAVOY, THE (Captain L. Bryan), b m ; star, race, n h pastern and 
inside fetlock, o/h fetlock. No. 480. 

SCHOEMAN (Captain Egerton Green), ch g ; star, race b n stock- 
ings. No. 353. 

SCHOLAR (Mr. W. E. Grogan), b g; spot forehead, oh coronet 
ring. No. 517. 

SCOTTY (Mr. M. F. Dennis), b g; blaze, snip b h legs. No. 120. 

SCOUT (Messrs. Miller), ch g ; star race to n side, large snip ascend- 
ing race from 0/ nostril, o/f and q/h coronet, N/H stocking. No. 20. 

SEABREEZE (Major Harley), b m; white mark near bottom end of 
mane. No. 470. 

SEASIDE (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch m ; large star, narrow race scar 
outside n/h shin. No. 92. 

SECRET (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), dk b m; star, short race n f coronet, 
n/h fetlock, o/h pastern, and ^ fetlock. No. 208. 

SENSIBLE (Mr. J. Farmer), b m ; small star b h heels. No. 82. 

SEQUEL (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch m; star, narrow race b'h coronets, 
irregular markings. No. 461. 

SHAIBOOB (Major J. Fowle), gr horse; permanent scar on be 
coronets. No. 209. 

SHAMROCK (Mr. J. Mitchell), br g; dot on forehead, n h coronet 
and heel. No. 435. 

SHAMROCK (Mr. A. Rawlinson), b g; ring for star grizzled race, 
broad snip underlip, N'/f coronet and inside o/f fetlock. No. 93. 

SHEILA (Mr. J. B. Charters), br m. No. 308. 

SHERIDAN (Mr. W. Lyon Clark), b g blaze, n f fetlock, n h stock- 
ing. No. 377. 

SHYLOCK (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), chg; star, race, underlip, b/h stock- 
ings. No. 210. 



526 APPENDIX. 

SILENCE (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), b m ; small star, b h pasterns, small 
black spots on coronets. No. 21 1. 

SILVER (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b m ; star oh pastern. No. 83. 

SILVER (Mr. H. A. Gairdine), chm star race, mealy tail. No. 518. 

SIRDAR (Mr. G. J. Reade), br g saddle marks o' side only. No. 

335- 

SKITTLES (Mr. R. H. H. Eden), br m; few grey hairs, spot 0/ 
knee, mark 0/ shin. No. 568. 

SLIDEAWAY (Mr. W. E. Drury), chroang. No distinctive marks, 
more ches than roan. No. 594. 

SLIGO (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), bl m; star, nh pastern oh coronet, 
grey patch 0/ shoulder. No. 212. 

SLIMBOY (Mr. N. Haig), brg; oh coronet, scar inside oh leg and 
n/h leg. No. '354. 

SLIPPERY SALE (Mr. T. B. Montgomery), b m ; knob front o'f 
pastern, prominent forehead. No. 519. 

SLYBOOTS (Mr. T. L. Moore), b m ; small vertical linear star. 
No. 213. 

SLYONE (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), b m; small star^ snip n/ nostril. No. 
214. 

SLY PAT (Mr. T. R. Roark), gr g; light grey. No. 170. 

SNOB (Mr. R. Blakiston Houston), gr m ; dark, mottled with light 
coloured head. No. 323. 

SNOWBALL (:\Ir. R. Blakiston Houston), gr m; light coloured 
head, four dark legs. No. 322. 

SON JOHN (Mr. J. Bigley), chgrg; n'f and b/h pasterns. (Season 
only.) No. 171. 

SONNY (Mr. J. N. Hare), gr g; star n h pastern, oh small coronet 
mark, bay tick in coat. No. 298. 

SOPHIA (Mr. W. G. Dease), b m ; small spot o side saddle. No. 
121. 

SPANIARD (Major Paynter), b g; n f coronet and heel. No. 122. 

SPARKLET (Mr. J. Pyke Nott), liver ches m ; star, n f coronet. 
No. 106. 

SPARROW (Mr. W. E. Drury), b g; star. No. 595. 

SPARROW (Mr. R. Sullivan), b g; star, few grey hairs as snip, grey 
ticks in coat. (Season only.) No. 255. 

SPIDGER (Mr. Stuart Duckett), b m; star, bh pasterns. No. 
520. 

SPRITE (Captain E. D. Miller), bl m ; grizzled star, white marks on 
b/f and n/h shins. No. 421. 

STARLIGHT (Mr. Jasper Grant), ch m ; star, race, snip, oh fetlock. 
No. 333. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 527 

STARS AND STRIPES (Mr. A. L. Farrant, R.H.A.), red roan g; 
blaze, four white legs over knees and hocks. No. 451. 

STEPHANOTIS (Major A. Stoke), br m ; spot, nh heel, o'h 
coronet and heel. No. 452. 

STOUT (Messrs. Slocock), b g; few grey hairs on forehead. (Sea- 
son only.) No. 172. 

STRANGER (Major Paynter), br g ; star, interrupted race and snip, 
N'/h pastern. No. 477. 

STRELMA (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), b m ; faint patch under n saddle 
pannel. No. 215. 

STRIPES (Mr. St. L. G. Stephen), br m; small star, o h ^ fetlock, 
narrow white ring round body. No. 487. 

SUGAR PLUM (Mr. A. Rawlinson), ch m ; long star, both hind 
stockings. No. 94. 

SUMMER LIGHTNING (Mr. G. A. Miller), b m; few grey hairs 
on forehead, scar inside 0/ forearm, outside o/h shin. No. 361. 

SUMMER SHOWER (Mr. G. A. Miller), br m; grizzled star. No. 
362. 

SUNDAY (Mr. A. Rawlinson), grm; right J face light, left face 
dark, scar both shoulders, n/h heel light. No. 95. 

SUNFLOWER (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), b m ; star, oh coronet, spot n/ 
loin. No. 217. 

SUNSHINE (Mr. J. J. Stafford), gr g ; of heel, light patch below 
n/h outside. No. 256. 

SURPRISE (Mr. E. B. Sheppard), chg; star, race, snip, b h fetlocks, 

n/f coronet. No. 378. 

SUSAN (Mr. H. Barker), ch m; blaze, n'f pastern and up back of 
leg o/h fetlock. No. 84. 

SWEETMEAT (Captain Hickman), b m ; faint grizzled star. No. 
284. 

SWEETS (Mr. J. T. Roark), b m ; star, short race. No. 522. 

SWEET WILLIAM (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), b g ; star. No. 85. 

SYLPH, THE (Captain H. D. O. W^ard), br m ; small linear mark, 
n/h shin. No. 453. 

SYLVIA (Mr. P. J. Sinnott), b m; star, race, snip, o nostril, n'f 
coronet, b/h fetlocks. No. 257. 

TARBOX (Messrs. Miller), br g ; few grey hairs for star. No. 21. 

TAMBORINE (Mr. J. N. Hare), b g; few grey hairs in forehead. 
No. 297. 

TANTRUM (Major G. M. Eccles), b m; small star, bs under sad- 
dle, grizzled patch. No. 277. 

THEODORE (Col. H. M. Ridley), big; snip, bh pasterns inside 
fetlocks and heel. No. 569. 



528 APPENDIX. 

THUNDERSTORM (Messrs. Miller), ches g; star, race, snip, spot 
o/ side neck. No. 22. 

TINMAN (Mr. N. Learmonth), dung; star, nh and bf fetlocks. 
No. 570. 

TIP (Mr. F. Freake), b m ; star. No. 363. 

TITANIA (Mr. Ulric O. Thynne), br m; small star, few grey hairs 
in tail. No. 364. 

TOKER, THE (Mr. Henry Terral), b g; star, o'f and n h coronet. 
No. 460. 

TOM (Mr. H. A. Gairdine), b g ; blaze, n h fetlock, o h pastern. 
No. 524. 

TOMMY (Mr. J. H. Anketell-Jones), big; saddlemarks, few white 
dots front of o/f fetlock. No. 260. 

TOMMY DOD (Mr. E. T. Pritchard), b or br g; bf and nh 
coronets and heels, blk marks. No. 540. 

TOM THUMB (Mr. W. E. Drury), ch g; blaze face, n f fetlock, 
jj/h high stockings. No. 596. 

TOPSEY (Captain Loftus), br g ; snip, n/ nostril, b'h stockings, N;H 
fetlocks. No. 177. 

TORDILLO (Mr. M. F. Dennis), gr g; white face, 4 white legs. 
No. 123. 

TORTOISE (Mr. T. J. Roark), br m; star, oh coronet ring. No. 
178. 

TOUCH AND GO (Captain Long), b m ; grizzled right ^ face, few 
grey hairs right cheek. No. 219. 

TOY SHOP (Mr. T. Lewis Moore), mottled gr g; No. 525. 

TRUMPS (Mr. H. A. Gairdine), b g; few grey hairs on forehead, 

slight linear snip, n/h pasterns, blk markings inside. No. 526. 

TUMBLER (Mr. W. E. Drury), b g; no white. No. 597. 

TURQUOISE (Captain Loftus), ch m ; few grey hairs forehead, n h 
fetlock, o/h coronet. No. 527. 

VESTA (Mr. H. A. Gairdine), b m; nh pastern, oh coronet, blk 
marks. No. 528. 

VIC (Mr. W. McCreery), ch m; star, race, snip, n h coronet. No. 

437- 
VICTOR (Mr. J. J. Stafford), b g; star, b h pasterns. No. 261. 

VICTORIA (Mr. John Barker), b m; star, n h coronet, o h fetlock. 
No. 109. 

VIXEN (Miss Webber), gr m ; bay tinge in coat. No. 163. 

WATCHMAN (Mr. F. W. Perry), brg; n'f pastern and ^ fetlock, 
n/h pastern. No. 220. 



POLO PONIES, 1901. 529 

WELL MOUNT (Mr. R. St. G. Robinson), br g; n/h heel, spot 
front of same coronet. No. 287. 

WEXFORD (Messrs. Slocock), br g. No. 179. 

WILLL\M (i2th Lancers Club), ch g; star, disconnected race and 
snip, B /h pasterns and ^ fetlock. No. 268. 

WINCANTON (Mr. R. H. H. Eden),'b m; inside n f coronet and 
heel. No. 571. 

WINNIE (Mr. J. Adamthwaite), dk ch m ; star. No. 91. 

WITCHCRAFT (Mr. A. Price), bm; oh inside coronet and heel, 
small while mark N'/ quarter. No. 51. 

WOLVERINE (Messrs. Miller), b m; star, linear saddle marks. 
No. 23. 

WONDER BIRD (Mr. J. Cheshire), ch m; star, race, few white 
grizzled marks over n/ hip joint. No. 262. 

WREN, THE (Hon. O. Hastings), br m ; star. No. 90. 

YELLOW GIRL (:\Ir. W. C. Eustis), dun m; small star, blk stripe 
down back, zebra markings b/f. No. 422. 

YORK (Mr. J. Drage), b m ; star and scar outside n shin. No. 
582. 

YOURS TRULY (Mr. H. A. Gairdine), gr m; nf and bh legs, 
spot n/ side neck at wither. No. 529. 

ZOO (Mr. F. C. Nash), ch m ; star, race, snip of pastern and back 
of fetlock, o/h inside coronet. No. 397. 



1901.— THE FOLLOWING PONIES WERE NOT PASSED. 

BEECHNUT (Mr. F. Hargreaves), ch g; star, n'h coronet. No. 
438- 

BOBS (Mr. F. W. O'Hara), br g ; few grey hairs for star, odd mark- 
ings at upper part n/ knee. No. 293. 

BONNIE STAR (Captain L. Bryan), br m; star oh pastern and J 

fetlock, N'/ii pastern. No. 180. 

CHANGE (Captain Leo Wynne), b m ; star, race, spot for snip, oh 
coronet and heel. No. 291. 

CLAREEN (Mr. C. W. Creede), br m; star, snip, nh inside 
coronet, o/ii whole coronet white. No. 223. 

CORNELIAN (Sir H. de Trafford), ch m ; star, race, disconnected 
and small snip. No. 4. 

34 



530 APPENDIX, 1901. 

CORNER BOY (S. Anderson), bl br g; star bh pasterns. No. 
495- 

DELIGHT (Messrs. Slocock), br; with white hairs m, star, race, 
silver topped tail, n/h fetlock. No. 499. (See also under D, in passed 
for season). 

DE WET (Messrs. Slocock), b g; star shghtly to n; side. No. 181. 

DRACHMA (Mr. A. L. Farrant), b m; star, race, snip o f and oh 

pasterns. No. 454. 

FETTERLESS (Earl of Harrington), blk ch m ; star, n h coronet, 
o/h pastern and half fetlock. No. 365. 

GAMBLER (Mr. Ashton Clegg), b g; bh pasterns and heels, 
grizzled inside ^7H leg, dent in muscle of n/ quarter just below tail, few 
grey spots n/ side body. No. 585. 

KATE (Mr. W. E. Drury), b m; small vertical star, oh fetlock, n'h 
coronet, permanent scar 0/ shoulder. No. 588. 

LADY BIRD (Colonel Napier McGill), ch m; blaze face, n,f out- 
side coronet, white marks front of hock. No. 294. 

MAGIC 11. (Mr. C. W. Meredith), ch m ; star, race, dot for snip, 

b/h, odd shaped coronet markings. No. 224. 

MAISIE (Mr. Osmond Hastings), b m ; star oh fetlock, numerous 
saddle marks, 2 spots on 0/ side. No. 398. 

NORAH CREINA (Mr. John Leonard), b m ; star, race, broad snip 
o/f coronet. No. 222. 

PAUL (Major Carew), ch g ; star, N f coronet, b h fetlocks, grizzled 
about both quarters. No. 423. 

SHEELAH (Mr. B. J. O. Flaherty), blk m; o'h pastern and back of 
fetlock. No. 182. 

SILVERSKIN (Messrs. Miller), ches g. No. 24. 

SUGAR CANDY (E. Kennedy), br m ; point of o ear missing. 
No. 521. 

TWINKLE (Miss Wilson), br m ; star only. No. 221. 

VICTORL\ (Captain Takenham), ches m ; rich red ches, star, snip. 
No. 292. 







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INDEX. 



Abdullah, 200. 
Accidents, 234. 
Action, 105. 
Adam, C. G., 293. 
Adams, Major, 289. 
After play, ponies, 164. 
Agassiz, Mr. R., 303. 
Ainsworth, Capt. , 292. 
, W. J., 292. 
Airlie, Lord, 290. 
Alderson, General, 281. 
Aldridge, 282, 
Algiers, 200. 
Allhusen, 285. 
America, U. S. of, 297. 
American game, 305. 

,, ponies, 204-208, 306-308. 
Anderson, Mr. J., 269. 
Ansell, G. K., 289. 
Appleton, Mr. R., 303. 
Arab, characteristics of the, 190. 
Arabs, 143, 167, 187-192, 226-228. 
Argentina, 308. 
Argentines, 202-204. 
Army, polo in the, 273-296. 
Ashburner, Capt., 292. 
, L. F., 292. 
Atherley, Mr., 4. 
Attack, 272. 
Australasians, 215,216. 
Australian ponies, 204, 227. 
Ava, Lord, 286, 294. 
Awfully Jolly, 182, 202, 265, 270. 

Babington, Col., 275, 281. . 

, J. M., 291. 
Back, 32 34, 35, 36, 41, 56-60. 
"Back," 114. 
Back-handers, 15. 
Bailey, Major, 289. 



Baird, J. G., 291. 
Baldock, E., 4. 
Balfour, Mr., 204. 

,, , Mr. F., 309. 
Ball, how to hit the, 10. 
Balthorpe, Capt., 3. 
Banbury, 293. 
Bandages, 148, 149. 
Barbs, 200-202. 
Barclay, Capt. C, 290. 
Baring, Major E., 290. 
Barnes, Capt., 288. 
Barrett, Mr., 4. 
Barry, Capt., 283, 284. 

,, , S. L., 290. 
Beach, Mr. F., 301. 
Beatson, Col., 293. 
Beatty, Charlie, 281. 
Beaumont, Mr.H., 313. 
Bedding, 161-162. 
Beit, Mr., 313. 
Bell, E. W., 292. 
Bell-Smyth, Major, 287. 
Bellew, 295. 

Bellville, F. and J., 293. 
Belmont, Mr. A., 298. 

,, , Mr. R., 301. 
Belosselsky, Prince, 312. 

, Prince Serge, 312, 313. 
Ben Morgan bit, 139. 
Bendigo, 169, 216. 
Bennett, Mr. J. G., 297, 298. 
Benson, Mr., 301. 
Bentinck, Lord C, 2S4, 285. 

,, M W., 290. 

Beresford, Capt., 290. 

,, , Lord M., 4. 
„ W., 3. 
Bird, Mr. O., 301, 303. 
Bismark, 203, 204. 



534 



INDEX. 



Bits, 131. 
Bitting, 232. 
Blacker, F. D,, 4. 
Blackwood, Lord F., 285. 
Blair, F. G., 291. 
Blocking, 305. 
Blows, 72. 
Blue blood, 190. 
Boards, ']']. 
Boden, A. D., 292. 
Bolton, Capt., 303. 
Bombay, 187. 
Boots, 148, 149. 
Boris, Grand Duke, 312. 
Boscawen, Hon. H., 4. 
Boston Herald, The, 297. 
Boussod, M., 310. 
Brady, 205. 
Braggioti, Mr., 301. 
Bran, 159. 
Brand, 282. 

,, , Major, 290. 
Brassey, H. E., 287. 

„ , P., 285. 
Breeding, polo pony, 258-272. 
Breeds of ponies, 166-218. 
Bridles, 131. 
Brinton, Capt., 287. 
Broadwood, Col., 282. 
Bronson, Mr. F., 297. 
Brooke, Major, 290. 
Brooksbank, Capt., 291. 
Bryce, Mr. C, 298. 
Buckmaster, Mr., 179, 216. 
Buffalo Bill, 210. 
Bulkeley, Capt., 3. 
Bulkeley -Johnson, Capt., 289. 
Burn, Col., 293. 
Burnett, Capt., 291. 
Bush, Capt., 287. 

California, 308. 
Californian ponies, 208. 
Calley, Col., 286. 
Campbell, Capt., 291. 
,, , David, 285. 
Canadians, 216. 



Cap, 205. 

,, , polo, 72. 
Captaining a side, 60-62. 
Cardel, R. S., 286. 
Carew, Major, 290. 
Castlereagh, Lord, 4. 
Carter, W. R., 303. 
Carey, Mr., 298. 
Cavendish, Capt., 287. 

,, , Charles, 295. 
Changing legs, 121. 
Chaplin, R., 290. 
Charlton, 94, 164, 171, 178. 
Cheeky Boy, 189. 
Cheever, Mr. J., 301. 
Chesham, Lord, 281. 
Chief, 205, 308. 
Chifney bit, 140. 
Chisholm, Col., 294. 
Church, J. F., 291. 
Churchill, Mr. Winston, 288. 
Clark, Mr. F., 301. 
Clay, Capt. Spender, 287. 
Clayton, Capt., 3. 
Clifton-Brown, Major, 290. 
Clowes, Capt., 286. 

,, , Col., 282. 
Collis, Capt., 288, 289. 
Colonies, The, 310. 
Colvin, Col., 285, 
Combination, 24. 
Comewell, 216. 
Compton, Lord Alwynne, 293. 

,, ,, Douglas, 285. 

Conceit, 94, 171, 179. 
Conditioning ponies, 154-157. 
Conformation, 92. 
Congreve, Capt., 293. 
Conolly, Tom, 289, 295. 
Cookson, Capt., 287. 
Cow-ponies, 210. 
Cowdin, Mr. J., 303. 
Crawley, Major, 280, 290. 
Creagh, Brazier, 293. 
Creed, P. R., 292. 
Cricket, 6. 
Crossing, 70. 



INDEX. 



535 



Cruelty to ponies, 72. 
Cunard, Sir B., 297. 
Cutch ponies, 213. 

Daly, Captain, 178. 
Dancing Girl, 366. 
Dangers of polo, 68. 
Daniell, Capt. , 289. 
Darbyshire, Capt., 288. 
Dartmoor ponies, 170. 
Davis, Mr. E., 298. 
Dawnay, Capt., 290. 
de Bathe, Mr. P., 313. 
de Crespigny, Captain, 287. 

, Major, 291. 
d'Errazu, Luis, 310, 312. 
d'Escandon, Brothers E. and P., 310, 

312. 
de Lisle, Col., 215, 225, 282, 292. 
de la Rouchefoucauld, Vicomte, 310, 
de Luynes, Due, 310. 
de Madre, Comte J., 312. 
de Poix, Prince, 310. 
de Rothschild, Baron E., 311. 
de Villaviega, Marquis, 310. 
Deccan ponies, 213. 
Dennis, 171, 177, 178. 
Directions, 38, 39, 61. 
Dodesworth, Mr., 301. 
Dorrien, Mr. Smith, 3. 
Douglas, Mr. W., 297. 
Drage, Vet. Capt., 287. 
Dress, 84. 
Drybrough, Mr. "Jack,'' 178. 

,, , Mr. T. B., 192, 201, 210. 
Duff, Col., 282. 
Dugdale, F. B., 289. 
Durham Light Infantry, 292. 
Duval, yi., 310. 

,, , Brothers Raoul, 310, 312. 
Dynamite, 94, 171, 180. 

Eastern ponies, 167, 168. 

Egyptians, 192-195. 

Elder, Mr. G., 297. 

Eley, Capt., 291. 

Elliot, General Locke, 235, 280. 



Elliott, Mr., 303. 
Ellison, 295. 

„ ,G., 285. 
Elwes, Capt., 292. 
English ponies, 166-182. 
Eustace, Major, 288. 
Eustis, Brothers, 306. 
Experiences of breeders, 265. 
Express, 205, 308. 
Exmoor ponies, 170. 

Fair play, 75. 
Fearing, Mr. G. , 297. 
Feeding ponies, 157-161. 
Fenwick, Col., 287. 
Fielden, Capt., 290. 
Fife, Mr. W. F., 3. 
Figure of Eight, 122. 
Fincastle, Lord, 291. 
Fisher, Col., 290. 
Fitzgerald, Capt., 287. 
Fitzwilliam, Hon. F. , 4. 
Fletcher, A. F., 286. 
Follow Me, 169, 208. 
Football, 6. 
Forbes, Mr. A., 503. 

,, , Mr. W., 303. 
Foster, Mr. C, 303. 
Foul riders, 68. 
Fouls, 76. 
France, 310. 
Francke, Mr. A., 301. 

,, , Mr. R., 301. 
French, General, 283. 

,, , Mr. A., 301. 
Fryer, Capt. 2S9. 
Furber, Mr. F. , 309. 

Gardner, Mr. A., 303. 
Gascoigne, Major, 293. 
Gaunt, Capt., 288. 
Gear, 130-149. 
General officer. A, 223. 
Goal keeper, 5. 
„ posts, 79. 
Gold, the Brothers, 293. 
Gorham, Mr. E.,'303. 



536 



INDEX. 



Gosling, G. B., 292. 
Gough, Major, 291. 
Grabovski, Mr., 313. 
Graham, Major, 289. 

„ , Mr. R., 313. 
Gray, Mr., 301. 
Grayson, Mr., 301. 
Green, Capt. E., 290. 

» , Mr. P., 3. 
Grey Dawn, 189. 
Grierson, Capt., 297. 
Grissell, Capt., 3 
Griswold, Mr. F., 297, 298. 
Groom, Mr. H., 303. 
^ S, , Mr. J., 303. 
Groimd, hard, 70, 
Grounds, 77. 1 

,, , Indian, 222. 
Gulf Arabs, 192,211. 

Hackneys, 170,268,272. 
Haig, Col., 283, 290. 

,, , Neil, 289. 
Hambro, Capt., 291. 
Hamlin, Mr., 298. 
Handicapping, 302. 
Hanwell, "Jack," 282,295. 
Hardinge, Hon. C, 313. 
Hardy, Mr. Gerald, 72. 
Harness, ponies in, 162, 163. 
Harrington, Lord, 182, 265, 270. 
Harris, C. E., 291. 
Harrison, Col., 293. 
Hartopp, Mr., 3, 4. 
Hasperg, Mr., 313. 
Hazard, Mr. W., 304. 
Height of ponies, 5, 88, 227, 234, 

235- 
Helmet, Indian, 72. 
Henderson, 282. 
Henry, Col., 292. 
Herbert, Mr. F., 3. 

„ , Mr. H., 297, 301, 302, 303. 

,, , Mr. L. 298. 
Herberts, The, 253. 
Heseltine, Godfrey, 288, 293. 
Higgin, C. H., 289. 



Hill, Mr., 171, 267. 
Hippisley, Col., 288. 
Hitchcock, Mr. C, 298. 
, Mr. T., 301. 
Hitting out, 66. 

,, wild, 71. 
Hoare, Major, 288. 
Hobson, Capt., 290. 
Holdsworth, Col., 290. 
Holford, Capt., 290. 
Holland, Capt., 289. 
Hone, Capt., 284. 

,, , Mr. T., 301. 
Hooking sticks, 305. 
Hornby, Phipps, 4. 
Howard, H. R., 291. 
Howland, Mr. S., 297. 
Hoy, Mr. J., 303. 
Hughes-Onslow, Major, 290'. 
Hunnewell, Mr. H., 297. 
Hunt, Capt., 4. 
"Hup," 114. 
Hurlingham, 252. 
Hustling other ponies, 124. 

Idgit, 214. 
Importing ponies, 218. 
India, polo in, 221-251. 

,, ,, , saddler}' for, 248. 

,, , training ponies in, 239. 
Indian country breds, 211. 

,, game. The, 223. 

,, polo ponies, 225. 

,, ,, pony clubs, 242-247. 

,, ,, rules, 233-238. 
Ingestre, Lord, 4. 
Instructions, 38, 39, 61. 
Ireland, 90, 170. 
Irish ponies, 170. 
Iselin, Mr. C, 301. 

,, , Mr. F., 298. 

Jackson Sadleir, 285. 
Jay, Col., 297. 
Jenkins, Major, 293. 
Jenkinson, Major, 293. 
Jenner, Col., 292. 



INDEX. 



537 



Jenner, Sir W., 285. 

Jess, 214. 

Jodhpur, Maharajah of, 143. 

Joe, 212. 

Johnnie, 187. ' 

Johnstone, Capt. , 290, 

Jones, Capt., 289. 

,, , L. H., 4. 

,, , Mr. W., 43. 

,, , Percy, 294. 

Kantacojene Prince, 312. 
Kathiawar ponies, 213. 
Kavanagh, Col., 290. 
Keene, Mr. Foxhall, 205, 298, 301, 

306. 
Kenna, INIajor, 283, 284. 
Kennedy, J. , 4. 

,, , Mr., 6. 
Kensington, Lord, 287, 291, 295. 
Kernochan, Mr. J., 301. 
Kerrobit, 133, 139. 
Khalifa, 194. 
Kilmarnock, Lord, 4. 
Kinchant, F., 309. 
King, Major, 289. 
Kinsky, Count, 313. 
Kirk, 287. 

La Montague, Mr. E., 301. 
Ladenburg, Mr. A., 297. 
Lady Golightly, 182. 
Lafone, Capt., 288. 
Lambton, Col., 292. 

,, , Mr. C, 301. 
Lancet, 193, 194. 
Langosta, 203, 204. 
, IL, 169. 
"Language," 24, 38. 
Larios, Brothers, 200. 
Lawley, Col., 275, 284, 290, 301. 
Lawrence, Col., 283, 284. 
Le Gallais, Col., 179, 282, 295. 
Le Jeune, Baron, 310. 
Leader, Major, 288. 
Legge, Capt., 295. 
Little, Col., 284. 



Little, Fairy, 94, 171, 180. 

,, , Major C, 289. 

,, , Mr. M., 301. 
Lloyd, Capt., 288. 

,, , Eyre, 295. 
Lockett, Capt., 287. 
Long rein driving, iii. 
Longford, Lord, 287. 
Loose reins, 123. 
Lorillard, Mr. P., 298. 
Lovat, Lord, 287. 
Luard, Capt., 292. 
Lucerne, 229. 

Luna, 84, 94, 171, 172, 177. 
Lyle, Mr., 301. 

Machell, Mr. J., 303. 
Mackenzie, C. G., 295. 
Mackey, Mr., 205, 306. 
Maclagen, Mr., 301. 
Mac Laren, Capt., 291. 
,, , Major, 284. 
Macnamara, Sergt., 294. 
Mademoiselle, 94, 171, 172, 177, 272. 
Magnet, 193. 
Mahon, Col., 282. 
Maize, 154. 
Makins, Capt., 288. 
Management, polo pony, 150. 
Mandeville, Lord, 297. 
Manita, 207. 
Mann-Thomson, 287. 
Manure, 78. 
Marguerite, 212. 
Marjoribanks, Hon. D., 287. 
Marsham, H., 294. 

,, , Sergt. -Major, 294. 
Martin, Mr. P., 303. 
Martingales, 142-146. 
Martyn, Col., 294. 
Mary Morrison, 216. 
Matchbox, 84, 94, 171, 172, 177. 
Mathew, Capt., 292. 
Mathew-Lannovve, Capt,, 288. 
Maxwell, Captain F. A., 294. 

, Col., 294. 
McClintock-Bunbury J., 4. 



538 



INDEX. 



McCreery, Messrs. L. andW., 306. 
McCrery, Mr. Lawrence, 178. 
McKean, Mr. H., 303. 
McKenzie, C. G., 282. 
McLachlan, A. C, 291, 
Meeting other ponies, 123. 
Meyrick, Col., 293. 
Mexicans, 209. 
Mickey, 171, 177, 178. 
Middleton, Capt., 4. 

,, , Col,, 288. 
Mildmay, Major, 293. 
Milne, G., 293. 
Milner, Capt., 286. 
Modena, 193, 194. 
Moloch, 204. 
Montague, Mr., 297. 
Montana ponies, 209. 
Montmorency, 283, 284, 295. 
Moore, Mr. R., 3. 
Moreton, Mr., 301. 
Morgan, Mr. E., 301. 
Morris, Hon. G. H., 292. 
Morrit, Lieut., 286. 
Mortimer, Mr. S., 301. 
Mott, Mr. J., 297. 
Mouranyi, Mr., 313. 
Moore, Capt. St. L., 4. 

Muller, Mr., 313. 
Murray, Capt., 291. 

Namouna, 212. 

Nancy, 181. 

Nettle, 212. 

New Forest ponies, 170. 

,, Guinea, 212. 
Nickalls, Capt., 292. 
,, , Major, 286. 
Nickolson, Major, 290. 
Nipcat, 171, 177, 272. 
No Name, 190. 
No. I, 31, 32, 38-50, 51. 
No. 2, 50-54. 
No. 3, 32, 36, 50, 54-56. 
Norton, Capt., 290. 
Nose-bands, 146. 



Oelrichs, Mr., 297, 298. 
Oft" side, 305. 
Okeden, Capt., 3. 
O'Neill, Hon. A., 287. 
Ophir, 216. 
Orde, Mr., 301. 
Orr-Ewing, 291. 
Orsino, 204, 

Paddy, 210. 
Palairet, Capt., 3. 
Pardoe, Mr., 301. 
Parker, Mr. J., 303. 
Paterson, E., 289. 
Paynter, Major, 289. 
Peabody, Mr. G., 303. 
Peat, A., 4. 
,, , Brothers, 295. 
,, , Mr. J., 4, 180. 
Pedder, Capt., 291. 
Peel, Capt., 287. 
Pelhams, 135, 139, 141. 
Persians, 192, 211. 
Persse, 287. 
Peter, 197. 
Peyton, Algernon, 4. 
Phillips, Capt., 287. 
Pilcher, Col., 292. 
Players, number of, 4, 5, 27. 
Pole-Carew, Sir R., 281. 
Pole Star, 212. 
Polo abroad, 297-313. 

, advantages of, 6, 273. 
appliances, 77 

, development of, i. 

, first steps at, i. 
player, how to become a, 5. 

, theory and practice of, 24. 
pony, definition of a, 106. 
,, Stud Book Society, 258-265. 
Ponies, faulty, 69. 
Pony, choosing a polo, 6, 7, 85-107. 
Poore, Major, 285, 290. 
Portal, Major, 286. 
Potter, Mr. E., 301, 303. 
Prescott, Sir G., 287. 
Prince of Wales, 4. 



INDEX. 



539 



Proctor, Mr. J., 303. 
Pullers, 132. 

Quarter horses, 307. 
Quin, Wyndham, 291. 

Racing and Chasing Ponies, 163, 

164. 
Rake, The, 194. 
Ranelagh, 252. 
Rasbotham, 287, 292. 
Ravenscroft, H., 309. 
Rawlinson, Mr., 75. 

,, , Sir Henry, 283. 
Reining back, 112, 118. 
Renton, Capt., 203. 
Retrospect, A, 252. 
Rex, 94, 169, 205, 208. 
Ricardo, 287. 
Richards, Mr., 301. 
Riding at polo, 5, 20. 

,, ofif in India, 234. 

,, , reckless, 70. 
Ridley, Col., 275, 280. 
Rimington, Col., 282, 283, 285, 289. 
Ripley, Mr. S., 301. 
Robbins, Mr. C, 297. 

,, , Mr. S., 302. 
, Mr. W., 297. 
Roberts, Lord, 277. 
Robinson, Mr. D., 303. 
Robson, H., 308, 309. 

,, , Mr. Scott, 203. 
Rogers, Mr. F., 297. 
Rondo, 207. 
Roosevelt, Mr. T., 303. 
Roper, Capt., 4. 
Rose, 295. 

,, , A., 287. 

,, , Ernest, 287. 
Rosewater, 265, 270. 
Ross, Major, 292. 
Roxburghe, Duke of, 287, 
Royal, 188, 189. 
Russel, Lieut., 286. 
Russia, 312. 
Rutherford, Capt., 294. 

, Mr. W., 301. 



Saddlery, 165. 
Saddles, 147. 
Sailor, 171, 179, 272. 
Sandeman, Major, 286. 
Sandiway, 270. 
Sandow, 204. 
Sands, Mr. S., 302. 
Sanford, Mr. W., 298. 
Santa Romona, 208. 
Saracen, 182. 
Savory, 288. 
Schofield, Major, 282. 
Scott, Lord G., 290. 
Seagull, 189. 
Segundo bit, 140. 
Sellar, Capt., 288. 
Sewell, Mr. A., 297. 
Shaw, Mr. R., 303. 
Sheridan, Brinsley, 286. 

,, , Lieut., 286. 
Sherry, 200, 202. 
Sherston, ]Major, 294. 
Shetland ponies, 170. 
Shuttleworth, Capt., 4. 
Sinbad, 196. 
Siren, 94, 171, 177. 
Slavin, 204. 
Smith, Mr. Graham, 4. 
, , , Capt. Hyde, 4. 
Smith-Dorrien, General, 280. 
Snipe, 181. 
Snow, 190. 

Somerset, Lord A. , 4. 
South African ponies, 214. 
Sprightly, 182. 
Spring, 193. 
Spruce, 182. 
Spurs, 147. 

St. Quintin, Col., 3, 293. 
Stable management in India, 228- 
232. 
,, routine, 157-161. 
Stables, 162. 
Stansted bridle, 13S. 
Starting, 119. 
Stephen, Capt., 291. 
Stevens, Mr. J-, 301. 



540 



INDEX. 



Stick and ball, breaking to, 125-130. 

Sticks, 81. 

Stokes, Mr. H., 297. 

Stopping, 119. 

Strokes, forward, 1 1. 

Subsidiary goals, 238. 

Sunshine, 94, 171, 178, 179. 

Sykes, 287. 

Symons, A., 291. 

,, , Gen. Penn, 294. 
Syrians, 192, 195-200. 

Tamplin, Mr., 312. 

Tangiers, 200. 

Taylor, Capt. , 291, 294. 

Teck, Duke of, 286. 

Temper, 102. 

Tessie, 266. 

Texina, 169, 205, 307. 

Thorn, Mr., 206, 209. 

,, , Mr. W., 297,301. 
Thynne, N. O., 293. 
Tilney, Capt., 212, 286. 
Tom, 205. 

Tongue, tying the, 141. 
Tottenham, Capt., 291. 
Tower, Mr. A., 301. 
Training the polo pony, 108-130. 
Trappist, 200. 
Traum, Mr., 313. 
Tuckerman, Mr. W., 303. 
Tullibardine, Lord, 287. 
Turning, 116, 120. 
Tuson, Capt., 291. 
Twitch, 109. 
Types of polo ponies, 94. 

Umpire, 189. 
Umpiring, 62-66. 
Underhill, Mr. F., 303. 

Valentia, Lord, 3, 293. 
Vandeleur, Col., 295. 
Vaughan, Major, 290. 
Vernon, Capt. H. E., 293. 
Veterinary surgeons, 107. 



Vivian, Lord, 286. 
Voice, The, 113. 

Ward, Hon. G., 287. 

,, , ,, R., 283, 284, 287. 

„ , Mr. W., 303. 
Waring, Mr. G., 303. 

„ ,W.,287. 
Warren, Mr. S., 303. 
Waterbury, Mr. W., 301. 
Watering, 157- 161. 
Watson, Mr. John, 284, 301. 

,, , Major J. K., 294. 

„ , W. E., 288. 
Welsh ponies, 170, 181, 268. 
Whip, 147. 
Whitla, Major, 287. 
"Whoa !" 113, 119. 
Wicklow, Lord, 287. 
Wig, 171, 178. 
Wigan, J. T., 291. 
Wilberforce, 287. 
Wilkinson, Capt., 292. 
Willoughby, Capt., 285. 
,, , Hon. E., 4. 
Wilson, Clarence, 293. 

,, , Clive, 293. 

,, , Herbert, 293. 
Winslow, Mr. A., 303. 
Wintering ponies, 150-154. 
Winthorp, Mr. E., 301, 302. 

,, , Mr. R., 301. 
Winwood, Capt., 288. 
Wise, F. H., 291. 
Wolseley, Sir C, 4. 
Wood, Capt., 291. 
Woods, Mr. J., 3. 
Wooden horse, 8. 
Worcester, Marquis of, 4. 
Wormald, Capt., 290. 

,, , Major, 290. 
Wrong Sort, The, 172. 

Young, Mr. W., 303. 
Younghusband, Col., 293. 

ZoEDONE, 313. 
Zobrowski, Mr. E., 298. 




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