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Full text of "Mohawk (1968)"

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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT NORTH ADAMS 



. . . to strive, to seek, to find 
and not to yield. . ." 




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this 

book 

is dedicated 

to 

Andrew S. Flagg 





traditionalist 
revolutionary 
preserving the best 
rejecting the inferior 
compelling continuity 
commanding change 



moving, working, creating 

propelling us 

towards realization of 

our identity 

our failure 

our potential 

inspiring us 

in our search 

for meaning 




Call him 

a sensitive man. 
Aware 
but 
quiet. 

Not silent. 

Ever. 
Quiet. 

There is a wall. 
He roars 

in reaching 

sparks 

in 

searching 
radiates a wonder 

filled with know 
at you 

a prisoner 

outside 

the wall. 





And quiet 
And you 



prods 



maybe 

go 

with him 
to strike the sun 
or to clean the pasture spring. 

Or 
Prefer not to 

U 

You 

Want 

Dead 

or 

see 

only silence 

in 

quiet. 






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Be humble* Freshman! 




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encrusted with illusions, 

riddled with dead but lively teachings — 
iiood and bad, and as yet indistinguishable 
one from the other. 



bundled with the synthetic pelts 
of years being guided 
along a well-beaten path. 



•>■•* r til' *" ; '^ '• lif, - ^ 'I 



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10 




That path runs through open fields. 



by A. Bartini 



It branches 

not in arrows, 

hut in jagged edges. 





And where are you? 




What are you? 



13 




Searching 



Searching is what you are and what you 
And you need very badly. 





Look around; there are many other searchers here. 



16 




Look. If you can see over all that stuff. 

You will see 

open country ripe 

for searching. 

Unless you stir yourself 

to look 

you will be quite 

alone 

and lost 

to the unexamined life — being guided 

along the well-beaten path 

and passing into a stronger 

oblivion. 





■■^■■■^^■^■^■■■■■■■^■■■■^B 



St. Joseph High j7 



Look. And search. 

There are obstacles to be overcome. 




18 




Now, while you stand in confusion; 

Now, while you glimpse the scenery; 

Now, while you have humility hammered into you, 

You'd best begin to rummage through all that trash 

and treasure 

your 9 re lumbering under; 




19 



you'd best find that proverbial needle 
at the center 

to serve as a staff and a divining rod 
and something to hammer back with. 



ATTENDANCE — CLASS 

The policies stated below are the result of 
study and recommendations of students and fac- 
ulty. They will be effective during the 1967-68 
college year on a trial basis and will be evaluated 
in the spring of 1968. 

Purposes of these policies are: 

1. To encourage upperclass students to exercise 
mature personal judgment and to accept re- 
sponsibilities while enjoying greater freedom. 

2. To lessen the danger of academic failure by 
freshmen. 

To accomplish these purposes: 

1. Any sophomore, junior or senior student ex- 
cept those in Practice Teaching has no at- 
tendance requirements. 

2. Any freshman may not take more than three 
cuts. Beyond this number his course grade 
may be affected. 

Every freedom has related responsibilities. In 
order that this system is given an honest trial and 
fair evaluation the following responsibilities will 
have to be accepted. 

1. It is the responsibility of all students to fulfill 
the requirements of all courses in which they 
are enrolled. 

2. Students enrolled in Practice Teaching should 
accept their assignments with the same re- 






20 



1967-68 Student Guide 



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VWBMB 




It's w/ia* yow started with 

and the useful articles you picked up 

along the way 

if you can still find them. 

It's what moves beneath all that stuff. 




R. Nugai, C. Nash 



21 




P. Prevey, B.H. Benton, B. Melvin, V. King, D. Zappula, H. DeRusha, R. 
LaBelle, D. Lefebvre, L. Raymond, P. Reichart, L. Rodak. 



But brace yourself. 

Finding you in all your baggage can be a nightmare. 

But find you you must, 

for you may well be your only security here. 




22 



For here is changing. 




Frank 
Fuller Murdock 



Albert G. Smith Roy Leon Eldridge Grover C. Bowman Eugen L. Freel 



The mounting volcanic pressure of years of silent struggles 
has burst and spilled and showered glory on the nearest 
and the tallest 
and made him great. 




Andrew S. Flagg 




The ground has begun to shift; 
the pools have begun to flow with 
a shifting, unpredictable current, 
searching! 



23 










yind! you are one o/ tne several travelers, 

blessed or condemned, 

to be caught up in the heaving, 

the groping, 

the contortions, 

the freedom. 



CUTS SYSTEM FACES UNTIMELY DEATH? 




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MORE ON THE UHUH'UD CUTS SYSTEM APPEAR l>* f'*Ot I AND THE TOlTOfttAL PAGE 





• 



24 




you can't say ivhaVs past 
was not a nightmare 



The scenery around you changes so 











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and what's passing just a dream. 



25 



And after such a stretch of frustrated flatness, 





broken by many mirages 



and occasional oases, 




the very concept of change is refreshing, stimulating. 
And this change holds a promise. 



26 




Another mirage? 



27 



No. 




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A vision. 

And visions, unlike mirages, can become reality, 

as nightmares are blotted out and dreams sometimes come true. 



29 



You 




M. P. (Silva) Freiberg 



came 




here 




30 



because 



you thought it fashionable 




your father thought it fashionable 



you preferred it to Viet Nam 




you had nothing else to do; 




31 



because 



it's a ball 




it s inexpensive 





• • 
STATE C O L L E G E • NOHM.ADAMS. mass 01247 

• • 
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it's near home and Mother 




i/'s a place to find a husband 



32 



SEX 

AND THE SINGLE MAN 

Pcrhap* ibe moot perplexing 
question facing the modem col- 
lege male is, "How much should 
I let hif n| away with? And if I 
let her take me all the way. will 
she be able lo respect me any- 

■S Questions being dis- 
traternny houses and 

domuiiifirs all across (he United 

^l*W^. 

m> really love me or 
is she jusl out after 
she cod get 7 " The strict conven- 
tions of our morel cod* 1 ihmi 
"unwwl father", stigmatising him 
with humiliation of social exile. 

The unwed father becomes 

something dirty, unwunted, *orae- 

OM forgets about and 

something no one talk* about. 

The recent exploits of a coup 
of lust-crawd coeds on Beaeon 
Hill are graphic proof of the per- 
petual dangers facing even' col- 
lege male who want* to retain 
:.i- .. Ifti Met 

If he falls he must face the 
smug, kooning smiles and the 
cynical whispers. "He's easy " 

Before he even has a chance 
to regain perspective, girls are 
stopping him in the hallways and 
looking at him in a way that he 
doesn't want to be looked aL 



The "Cassanova Coed" is 
more subtle. She may proclaim 
her love for him or she may cas- 
ually introduce the subject of sex 
in order to gunge his moral fiber. 

Add to tins an infinite stream 
of books and pictures on sex »U 
beseeching the boy to surrender 
his virtue because it's smart and 
because it's modem. 

FVnpite these insidious pres- 
sures, it is possible for the boy 
to remain pure, and still get his 

A. boy can arrange for a double 
date if be fools the girl he in 
dating is too fast. 

To the girl who says. "Wed' 
be more comfortable in the beck 
seat. He can *ay. "We'd be safer 
in the front." 

On a date the horrors of the 
"marked" male increase. If be 
protects. "1 don't do that" or 
"I'm just not that way" the girl 
becomes violently angry because 
she hat been told different. 

The hoy is never sure of what 
a girl's motives are in dating bun. 
but there are signs. The "she 
girl" will waste little tune on 
techniques and •'imply try to force 
him to destroy his character. 

These, however, are merely 
techniques, the only certain boy. 
the only safe boy, the only res- 
pectable boy. is the boy that says. 



Student Voice February 17. 1965 



because 



you had no choice 



NORTH ADAMS 
EITHER 



you wanted to be a teacher 



you wanted to help people 




you wanted an 
education. 




33 




The old "high school on the hill" 

satisfied most of these reasons; 

it had the potential to satisfy the others. 



34 




You, now searching, see some of the potential 

becoming reality. 

In the meantime, you live the life of a 



student — 



bogged down in trivia, 




D. Diefendorf, A. Flagg 



frustrated by authority, 





but inspired by greatness; 




but toughened by experience. 



A. Roy 



35 



And you will vent your frustrations. 




36 




And you will triumph over tradition. 



37 




And you will learn how to 
preserve "the teacher image* 




read 

and 

comprehend, 



entertain guests at dinner, 




keep your room neat, 



cut a class gracefully, 





keep your money 



flowing, 



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teach, and how not to. 



39 



You will undergo, fight for, and welcome many changes. 






STUDENT VOICE 







40 












41 



MASSACHUSETTS STAT$^OU.EGE AT NORTH ADAMS 
Official Student Membership Card 

This is to »_L . .. _..- 

Certify that... SU?.AN..PULLEN... 

Has paid dues for the current semester indicated hereon 
2nd Semester, January. 1965 to Junfe, 1965 

Central Treasurer 




AuCflTIS 

Colleqe 



State College 

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION 
1966-1967 




STATE COLLEG 

N O * T M ADAMS. MASSACHUSETTS 01247 



l_ J 

MIDSEMESTER GRADE REPORT 

UNOFFICIAL 



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42 















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43 




Be humble, Freshman? 
Humble, student? 
Humble . . . how? 



44 



Before the senile voice of Tradition? 

the pompous voice of Domination 

the raucous voice of Ignorance? 

the giddy voice of Foolishness? 

No. Not seeing what spirit and freedom can accomplish. 




45 



Before the trembling voice of Knowledge. 






the sighing voice of Wisdom. 




the swelling voice of Education. 



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ffie exciting voice of Decision. 



46 





And these instill humility of themselves 
without hammering 
without hollering 
without humiliation. 




47 




This will help you in your 

search 

safely and securely 

through chaos and college 

wherever you go. 



48 



movement 




^ X 




"Be Friendly, Freshman!" 

a new motto for the new image, 

a new command for the changed times 



Orientation 
Weekend 1967 



picnics, dances, lectures — 
these were there before, 
but the spirit was different 




50 







^"^ 




a new breed was coming 
looking for the new 
for stimulation and excitement 
change would be faster this year 
it was thought 



51 



Halloween Dance 

the new class looked around, 

settled down, adjusted to the mold 

then tried itself 

a dance 

a chance for the high spirits 

of late fall to burst forth 

but where were they? 





there was change 
it was not the dance of 1964 
but nothing remains the same 
and change is not always progress 



52 




to convoke 

to gather together in a group 
an ancient collegiate tradition 
newly given life 



change 



c 

o 
n 
v 
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a 
t 

m 
1 

o 
n 




change of the most valuable kind 
change rejected by those 
who cry for it 



by those who want privileges 

the right to run the college 

but who cannot accept responsibilities 





MURDOCK HAL 

IN HONOR OF 
FRANK FULLER MURDOCH 
PRINCIPAL 1897 - 1921 



AfW 




53 



Far Eastern Arts Festival 




parochialism was shaken 

new horizons opened 

western tradition 

was pushed aside 

eastern tradition was honored 



54 



an art exhibit 



a Noh drama 



a lecture 



a dance recital 



beauty mysterious 



and profound 



new age-old ways 



of viewing the eternal questions 



refreshing exciting 



invigorating 




55 




many worked long hours 
to insure success 

Dr. Bressette and Dr. Cho 
deserve most credit 

many came to watch and listen 
some understood 

the festival was a sign for the future 

a promise that we will not always 

be sheltered within our hills 

isolated from the ways of others 

from knowledge of how they search 
for meaning 



% 




Soccer 



in the western tradition — 

not always pleasant 

playing soccer 

not when October feels 

like January 

and sleet covers Greylock Field 



but they played anyway 
in bad weather 

as well as good 
and regardless 
of the score 

tradition was maintained 
wars have been won 

on the playing fields of Eton 




57 



Sophomore Prom 1967 



the East made an impact 

on the sophomore class 

their prom was in the eastern mode 





Shangri-La 

on the slopes of a mountain 

higher than Everest 

we climb 

to see where we're going 




Crooked Lake? 



58 



Sophomore Prom 1965 





a glance backward 
two years 

our own sophomore prom 
we took as our theme 
not another culture 
but the epitome 
of our own — 

New York City 

we built a city 

in our own style 

as we seek to build 
our lives 

and our world 



59 




Cheerleaders 



fall into winter 

soccer into basketball 
before the games begin 
there must be cheerleaders 
try outs 
nervousness 



excitement 
uncertainty 

then the announcement 
at the pizza supper 
smiles 
happiness 

congratulations 

and a good time was had by all 



60 



W.R.A. 

open to all 

providing activities for all 

get-acquainted night for freshmen 
ski outings 

volleyball . . . basketball . . . bowling 
tennis . . . dance . . . swimming . . . 




61 




M. A. A 



the male equivalent 

of W.R.A. 

sponsoring organized athletics 



Judo Club 




seeking to train the body 
and the mind 
with self -discipline 
and physical exercise 
a new group 
somewhat different 
and welcome 




62 




Christmas 



tradition 

pleasant memories 

a drama with Harlequin and Scaramouche 
the glee club singing carols 



the secret Santa at the dorm 

art projects filling the buildings 
and 

at last . . . 




63 



w**!tP* : M ' "mw* 










Warn 



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exceptionally bitter this year 

remember the week the thermometer 
never read above zero? 
we looked for the warm 
and thought four degrees above was a heat wave 




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65 




The Dormitory 



winter brought more than cold 





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brought completion of the new dorm 

Hoosac Hall 

subject of speculation 

dreaming and moderate apprehension 




would it be like Taconic Hall? 




no, nothing is ever the same 
and this change was progress 



67 




The Student Government 



by midwinter 

those responsible 

for the student government 
were accustomed to their roles 



68 





The Senate 



the class of 1971 



the class of 1970 



69 




the class of 1969 . . . 



the class of 1968 . . . 

all seeking in their own way 

to mold the life of the college 



70 



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The Medical Technology Program 



many changes in the college 

in recent years 

find expression at Pittsfield General Hospital 




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71 




the med tech program 

an answer to the search for meaning 

for relevance 

of subject matter to human life 




72 





meaning is found in service 
dedication is the keynote 
hard work is the norm 




73 




exhaustion is customary 
but not resented 
because of the satisfaction 
of a job well done 



74 






Basketball 





75 






iiiiiii mimiimM" 



76 




the school sport 
a good season 

the Mohawks proved 
themselves again 
again 




is it possible 

that some other colleges 

think there is a Mohawk State College? 



77 



Winter Carnival 1968 




sophomore prom borrowed from another culture 
Winter Carnival went to the roots of our own 



Saturnalia 

ancient Roman festival 




78 




the contemporary version 
was worthy of the ancients 




79 






Winte 

• • I 

■ 





Winter Carnival 1967 



once again a glance behind 
Alpine Fantasy . . . 




80 








hectic in its activities 
resplendent in its Swiss Soiree 





81 



Student Teaching 



LESSON PLAN 



academic culmination 



proving how much 



or how little 



Names 
J rale; 



Dote: 
Subjects: 



you know 



for some 



the search ends here 



this is their life's work 



for others 

this is the death 

of any desire to teach 

and the beginning 

of a new search 



Lesson Type 3 , 

Developmental 
Presentation 
Problem 
Appreciation 

Drill 

Review 

Test 

Understandings are general concepts that result from organi- 
zing and interpreting the meanings of given situations . They 
are in the form of generalizations, theories, principles, snd 
comprehensive statements. (They are written in declarative 
sentences, ) 
Ex. Everyday life is abundant in necessities 

to use fractional, decimal, and percent thinking,, 

A. Facts and Knowledges ; 

Pact 3 are events, acts, circumstances, etc c which 
take place or have taken place. 

Knowledges are an accumulation, refinement or 
reorganization of facts. 

B, Skills and Abilities s 

Skills are facilities in specific mental or motor 
performances . 

EXc. in sounding letters 

in recognizing words 

in pronouncing words 

Abilities are generalized powers to perform an overall 
set of related skills. 
Ex. to read 
to write 
to evaluate 

Co Appreciations and Attitudes; 

Appreciations are likings for or tendencies to choose t 
They are satisfying emotional responses. 

Attitudes are likings for or tendencies to choose. They 
are satisfying emotional responses. 

Actioudes are relatively constant tendencies to act in 
certain directions and in accord with certain mental 
patterns. They may be intellectual, based on facts aad 
knowledges, or emotional, based on appreciations. 



82 



A^n 



Activities . . . 



belong during early spring 
to the various clubs 



AT 



83 




Christian Association 




Newman Club 



. . . to promote spiritual development; 

to increase understanding of beliefs and responsibilities 



84 



... to promote increased understanding of world events 
through discussions and lectures . . . 



... to stimulate intellectual discussion and fellowship . . 



International Relations Club 




Frank Fuller Murdock Honor Society 




85 



... to reflect student interests and attainments in writing; 
to stimulate creativity . . . 




Kaleidoscope 



. . . to provide campus news; to stimulate thought and 
debate . . . 



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NASCOT 



86 



[arlequin 
timulating 

inovating 

xperimenting 

lways searching for the best 

)oking among old and new 

i quest for the good, the true, 









































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the relevant 
challenging 
playing with reality 
with life 



'ith us 

ne-act plays 

dth bite and significance 

ihristmas productions of beauty 

pring plays of enchantment 




87 



Inauguration 



impressive ceremony 
with the air of a pageant 
seniors in caps and gowns 
for the first time 
the official installation 




88 




of our president 
long known and loved 



Baseball 



spring 

the all-American sport 

and the season 

for collegiate sports 

is almost over 





89 




Spring Play 



Ah, Wilderness! 



the clock turns back 
the early 1900's 



young men were searching 
for meaning in those days, too 




90 







there was a generation gap then 
boys had trouble with girls 



perhaps we can find meaning 
only in each other, 
only in being together 
"singing in the wilderness" 




91 




Off-Campus Life 





92 




the year ends 
good-by to apartments 
which have become homes 



nights of cramming for exams 
typing papers 



parties 

never to be forgotten 



all memories 
packed in boxes 
and sent home 
or to places unknown 









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Cap and Gown Day 



abolish it? 
the question 

long and fiercely debated 



the answer 





NO 



revised ceremony 
enjoyed by everyone 



tradition with change 



93 




Junior-Senior Prom 



94 



. . . the final fling 




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95 



Graduation 



the end 



or the beginning 



96 





college is ending 
but life still continues 



and search we must 




97 



The Mohawk 



our search here is over 
we must move on 





holly hinman — editor 



david lefebvre 
susan cote 
leo raymond 
judith galli 



98 



authority 





John J. Komorek 




Andrew S. Flagg 

President 

B.S.Ed., Massachusetts College of Art; M.Ed., 

North Adams State College; graduate courses 

at Harvard and Boston University. 



John J. Komorek 

Academic Dean 

A.B. Holy Cross College; M.A. Boston College; 

C.A.G.S., Boston University; Ed. D., Boston 

University. 



George Jarck 

Dean of Students 

B.S., North Adams State College; M.A., New 

York University. 



rosz 

Director of Admissions 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.A., Columbia 
University. 





John J. Grosz 




Robert V. Hamilton 



100 




George Jarck 



Richard A. Sleeman 

Director of Training and Placement 

B.S. Fordham University; M.A., New York 

University; Ed.D., New York University. 



Robert V. Hamilton 

Director of Graduate and Continuing Studies; 

Professor, Psychology. 

A.B., University of Oklahoma; M.S., University 

of Oklahoma; Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 




Richard A. Sleeman 



Ali M. Allmaker 

Assistant Professor, Departments of Philosophy 

and Physics 

R.S., Germany: M.S., State University of New 

5fork; M.Ed., North Adams State College. 



"I came to North Adams State Col- 
lege as an instructor the same year 
that the class of 1968 came as 
freshmen. I have stayed with the 
class for four years as advisor, and 
have a special fondness for it. I 
have found the class alert, respon- 
sive and enthusiastic; I have en- 
joyed teaching these people, as well 
as working with them on extra- 
curricular matters. I like to feel 
that we have grown together." 
ARNOLD G. BARTINI 



Clark H. Billings 




William S. Anderson, Jr. 

Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Union College: M.A., Yale University; 

Ph.D., Cornell. 








William S. Anderson, Jr. 



Robert Barden 

Assistant Professor, Department of Geography 
B.S., U.S. Naval Aademy at Annapolis; M.A., 
University of Colorado. 



1 If 





Robert Barden 



Arnold G. Bartini 

Assistant Professor, Department of English 

B.S., North Adams State College; M.A., Boston 

College. 




Arnold G. Bartini 



"I am very pleased to be a part of this warm, 

friendly and maturing institution." 

Clark H. Billings 

Instructor, Department of History 

B.A., University of New Hampshire; M.A., 

Florida State University. 




101 




Richard P. Blakemore 



George F. Gloster 




102 



Richard P. Blakemore 
Associate Professor, Department of Biology 
B.S., State University of New York at Albany; 
M.S., State University of New York at Albany. 



Frederick K. Bressette 

Chairman. Department of English; Director of 
the Theatre; Associate Professor of English 
and Speech. 

B.S., North Adams State College; M.A., Co- 
lumbia University; Professional Diploma in the 
Teaching of College English, Columbia Univer- 
sity; Ed.D. (Theatre Arts), Columbia Univer- 
sity. 




Lee Combs, Jr. 

;istant Professor, Department of Geography 
LA., Central Washington State College; M.A., 
University of Washington; M.Ed., University 
of Massachusetts. 




Frederick K. Bressette 




K. 0. Davis 

Assistant Professor, Department of Education 
B.A., Drake University; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 





H. Lee Combs, Jr. 



George F. Gloster 

Chairman, Department of Mathematics 
A.B., Boston College; M.Ed., North Adams 
State College; M.S.T., University of New- 
Hampshire. 






Rosalie B. Gwozdz 



John M. C. Hess 



Rosalie B. Gwozdz 

Instructor, Department of Modern Foreign 

Languages 

A.B., College of Our Lady of the Elms; M.A., 

Assumption College. 



John M. C. Hess 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Penn State University; M.S., University 

of Maine: Ph.D., University of Maine. 



Paul Mitchell Humora 
Instructor, Department of Biology 
B.A., Boston College; M.S., Northeastern Uni- 
versity. 



Suzanne M. Kemper 

Head Librarian 

B.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology: 

M.L.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 










Paul Mitchell Humora 



Jane Weiner LePage 




Suzanne M. Kemper 




Margaret M. Lanoue 

Associate Professor, Department of Education 
B.S.E., North Adams State Normal School: 
M.Ed., North Adams State College; B.S., Syra- 
cuse University. 



Jane Weiner LePage 

Instructor, Department of Music . 

B.Mus., Boston University; M.S., University of 

Massachusetts. 



1 • 





Margaret M. Lanoue 



103 





Edmund K. Luddy 



John T. McNulty 



Edmund K. Luddy 

Associate Professor, Department of History; 

Chairman, Humanities Division. 

A.B., Boston College; A.M., Boston University. 




John T. McNulty 

Associate Professor, Department of History 
A.B., Boston College: M.A. (History), Boston 
College; M.A. -(Philosophy), Boston College. 



William J. Mahoney 

Instructor, Department of Art 

B.S., Massachusetts College of Art; M.A.T., 

Assumption College. 



Virginia Davis Morris 

Assistant Professor, Department of Art 

B.S.. Skidmore College; M.Ed., North Adams 

State College. 



1 




Virginia Davis Morris 




Louise E. Mulligan 



104 




William J. Mahoney 



Louise E. Mulligan 
Instructor, Departments of English and Edu- 
cation 

B.S., Boston University; B.S., Bridgewater 
State College: M.Eng.Lit., Boston College. 



George W. Neel 

Associate Professor, Department of History 
B.S., Temple University; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania; Ed.D., Rutgers University. 



George W. Neel 





Helen M. Neel 

"I sometimes feel that NASC is un- 
dervalued and underrated by some 
of its student body ; they are afflict- 
ed with a sort of 'grass is greener 
on other campuses' psychology. I 
happen to disagree. This college has 
turned out many well educated, well 
trained and successful school teach- 
ers particularly and this up to the 
present is what we have been prin- 
cipally concerned to do. It can do 
the same for each of its students, 
depending of course on what each 
brings to it in the way of back- 
ground preparation, native intelli- 
gence, and, supremely, determina- 
tion and drive. "Buildings and fa- 
cilities play a part, a small part; 
teachers play a big part, but the 
student and his will to work is cru- 
cial. This has been known to over- 
come deficiencies in the first two, 
but not all the resources, human 
and/or material, of a Harvard or 
Yale have been known to overcome 
a deficiency in the letter." 

JOHN T. McNULTY 
James R. Schoen 





Helen M. Neel 

Associate Professor, Department of English 
A.B., Dickinson College; A.M., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 



Ames Samuel Pierce 

Associate Professor, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of History 

A.B., Harvard College; A.M., University of 
Michigan. 




Ames Samuel Pierce 



Patricia A. Prevey 
Instructor, Department of Physical Education 
B.S., Bridgewater State College; M.Ed., Spring- 
field College. 







Patricia A. Prevey 



Ellen F. Schiff 

Associate Professor, Department of Modern 
Foreign Languages 

A.B., Syracuse University: A.M., Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 




Ellen F. Schiff 



James R. Schoen 

Assistant Professsor, Department of Psychol 
B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.A., Ohio Stat. 
University; Ph.D., Catholic University. 



105 





William Seeley 



John H. Semon 



William Seeley 

Associate Professor. Department of Mathe- 
matics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
M.S., Williams College. 



John H. Semon 

Professor. Department of Physical Science 
B.S., University of Connecticut: M.S., Cornell 
University; Pfi.D.. Cornell University. 



Margaret Mary Toole 

Associate Professor, Department of English 

A.B., Rosary College; A.M., Loyola University. 



Robert R. Wheeler 

Assistant Professor, Department of English 

B.A., Dartmouth College; M.A., University of 

Massachusetts. 







Margaret Mary Toole 




William M. Young 



Robert R. Wheeler 



106 





William M. Young 

Assistant Professor, Department of Mathe- 
matics 

A.B., Syracuse University: M.A., Princeton 
University. 

Joseph Zavattaro 

Director, Department of Physical Education 
B.S.E., North Adams State College; M.Ed., 
North Adams State College. 




Joseph Zavattaro 



association 



Class of '71 




Donna M. 
Accetta 



r^ 




.1 




W *?f 



pi 



« ■ k 












Kim L. 
Anderson 



Katherine 
Angeli 



Frances A. 
Armstrong 



David A. 
Babcock 







■ 




^\ 



^1 ^ 



6^ 








' 










V-J 







Natalie L. 
Babine 




Lynn M. 


Jerome F. 


Lynn M. 


Judith A. 


Eugene P. 


Diane 


Baker 


Baran 


Barrett 


Bartlett 


Beaupre 


Bednarz 



rftl ^ 



Sandra L. 


Steven R. 


Clark 


Pamela J. 


Thomas P. 


Donna J. 


Blake 


Blake 


Boisvert 


Boudreau 


Boudreau 


Briggs 




Richard R. 


Margaret M. 


Diane C. 


Dennis R. 


Daniel 


Donna M 


Brodeur 


Brown 


Buletti 


Bullett 


Burr 


Bushika 




Stephen W. 


Joan M. 


Mary F. 


Therese M. 


Thomas A. 


Frances M 


Bushway 


Calcagni 


Candiloro 


Candiloro 


Cardinal 


Carlow 



108 




Dennis A. 

Carsno 



Donna L. 
Champagne 







Joann M. 
Codogni 



Joan F. 
Czaja 



■ 



m 



Janet 
Driver 




Anne M. 
Fitzgibbons 



Stephen W. 
Cody 



Dianne 

Dabrowski 



-sM — Mr* 



Barbara L. 
Duda 


v7 


■l J 




Linda M. 
Chartrand 




Carol A. 
Collins 




Margaret S. 
Deane 





/ 



Russell W. 
Durant 




Russell G. 
Furtado 



Paulette A. 
Gagne 






4 



Ronald P. 
Chiasson 




Donna L. 
Conant 







A 



Susan V. 
Demeo 




John J. 
Estes 




Michael C. 
Galeucia 




Cynthia C. 
Cichy 




Ann M. 
Connor 




Elaine B. 
Diamond 



Janice R. 
Faber 




J 




James R. 
Gallagher 




Christine E. 
Clairmont 







Susan E. 
Crandall 




Robert A. 
Divitto 




Daniel 
Fitzgerald 



r> 




Joann E. 
Gelaznik 



109 




110 




Kirt E. 
George 




Vincent J. 
Guerino 




Robert F. 
Hodecker 



£^L 




Frances E. 
Johnson 



James F. 
Kenny- 




Alfred A. 
Giovino 



Jane K. 
Holmes 



Sandra 
Joyce 



Paul G. 
Kenyon 




Linda M. 
Girard 




Anne M. 
Haddad 


Susan M. 
Hakes 




& 



Glenn H. 
Hurter 





Joan S. 
Kass 





Elizabeth J. 
Komorek 



Andrew J. 
Giza 




Arlton E. 
Handy 




Ernest R. 
Iacovelli 




Margaret A. 
Kazlauskas 



ft 



Carol A. 
Konvelski 




V^ 




Lawrence V. 
Gould 




Kathleen E. 
Harrington 




Mark A. 
Iacuessa 




Ellen T. 
Kelleher 







Donnis A. 
Kostek 




Scott E. 
Graham 



&s 



William 0. 
Herrick 




Ralph D. 
Jennings 




Nancy A. 
Kemp 




Geraldine 
Kurpaska 



111 




Carolyn J. 
Kuzia 




Carolyn 
Leadbetter 




J 



George A. 
Marshall 



Linda M. 
Mitchell 



f\ 



I w 1 





Paula M. 
Landry 



Kristin J. 
Lapine 



Susan M. 
Lariviere 




PI 




Richard E. 
LeBlanc 



Philip A. 
Lefevre 



Joseph J. 
Lipa 



r "<n» <r! 




^> 




VT 



Joseph J. 
Martin 



Elizabeth A. 

Meaney 



Thomas R. 
Melendy 




O" ^ 



Pm€ 



Julie A. 
Moran 



Virginia R. 
Morin 



Kathleen D. 
Mowry 



« ^ 







Lois Ann 
Novacek 



Donna L. 

Novakowski 



Maureen A. 
O'Connor 



Marsha L. 
O'Grady 





Bernard J. 
LaRoche 






Ronald C. 
Loring 




John E. 
Midura 



Allen E. 
Murdock 





Einar 0. 
Oleson 



Richard C. 
Leab 



i 






Donna M. 
Mandeville 




Moseph L. 
Misiaszek 




Linda M. 
Nelson 



AM 



David G. 
Owens 



112 




Robert E. 
Petrucci 




Bonnie L. 
Rayner 






Andre J. 
Robert 





Michael J. 
Schoen 




Susan A. 
Sormunen 




Leonard 
Pillarella 



;- ) 



Karen A. 
Reardon 



Ellen 0. 
Rogers 




Patricia S. 
Sharkey 





Diana M. 
Plant 



Susan M. 
Podienski 



^^ #*N M^ 

W w fi 



rf.fe 



Daniel J. 
Record 




Leonette M. 
Roy 




Edward M. 
Shartrande 




Patricia A. 
Spofford 



Michael S. 
Stephenson 



Marion A. 
Reed 




Lawrence J. 
Ryan 




Darleen A. 
Simon 




Nancy A. 
Swercewski 




Bonnie 
Price 




Ellen A. 
Renton 




Christine A. 
Saliba 





James J. 
Pyra 




Robert C. 
Rivard 




Francis E. 
Sauve 






d^M 



Margaret A. 
Skowron 




Barbara J. 
Smith 







Donna M. 
Symanski 



Janice M. 
Tenczar 



113 







Jane A. 
Tetlow 




Nancy M. 
Valotta 





Deborah L. 
Thompson 



Mary F. 
Tietgens 








Mariann L. 
Vecellio 



Bruce E. 
Vincelette 




Jane H. 
Trela 




Nancy E. 
Ward 




Joanne M. 
Trimarchi 




Judith E. 
Wood 




Beverly M. 
Vadnais 



114 




115 



Class of '70 



f* lfS 



i 

Christine A. 
Accetta 




Barbara A. 
Bailey 




Robert L. 
Betters 




Donna M. 
Bona 




Carleen C. 
Cairns 



1 



Dale R. 

Agar 






ffl 



Daniel W. 
Baker 




Valerie M. 
Bialecki 







i 



Ann K. 
Bongiolatti 




Bonnie L. 
Calnan 




Donald F. 
Alcombright 



4 k 



Gabriele A. 
Alt 




Allan F. 
Bates 



Julie A. 
Battaini 



Bonnie J. 
Bianchi 



Philip N. 
Bleau 




Anita M. 
Bonneville 



Margaret 
Borowick 




Michael 
Armata 




Elizabeth J. 
Begin 






Lorraine J. 
Bohl 




Bruce A. 
Boucher 




Jane K. 
Arvidson 









Barbara A. 
Bergeron 




Benjamin B. 
Bolt 






Nancy J. 
Bumette 



« « f> 



a j 




John J. 
Candiloro 



Constance E. 
Carson 



Thomas A. 
Cary 



Nancy A. 
Cetti 



116 






1 '"■ ."" 




T^r 




**s^ ^?T 



^ 





- 





Donna M. 
Dami 








** <~ 




Michael E. 
Davine 



Ronald R. 
Dill 



Maryanna E. 
Disanti 



Kathleen 
Disco 













ii 7. 



Stanley S. 
Dudziak 



Sandra 
Duprey 





William 
Fairs 


Q 


<4i^ 



Diane Ferrero 
Ernest 



Ernest 
Filiault 




/ » 






V 




Marilyn J. 


Patrick C. 


Jennifer A. 


Roy E. 


Joseph R. 


Gregory J. 


Chalmers 


Chaloux 


Chenard 


Chelsey 


Geary 


Coleman 




Mary P. 


Barbara J. 


Arthur J. 


Charlene C. 


Joan E. 


Stephen P, 


Connolly 


Coolong 


Costa 


Cowell 


Cwiertniewicz 


Dallmeyer 



I 



Stanley 
Dubek 



W 



Linda M. 
Garofano 



\~ -| 



i: 






Beverly A. 


Ardis E. 


John W. 


Dale 


Maryanne 


Donna M. 


Gebauer 


Gilbert 


Grande 


Granger 


Gwozdz 


Hartlage 



117 




118 




* 1 










z- C 



Suzanne 
Kirby 



V- 



Donald J. 
Klos 





John W. 
Kovolski 



Norma M. 
Lafleur 









k> 





Lucille H. 

Langer 



Elizabeth 
Lansing 



Laura G. 
Laversa 



Bryan F. 
LaBeau 





|Ptt:^ 





Gary A. 
Lamoureaux 



Alice B. 
Lefebvre 




Ate. A 




Hassett 


David 


Wilham F. 


Virginia M. 


David C. 


Geraldine L. 


Maureen M. 


Hearn 


Herman 


Hess 


Hine 


Hollister 




Frances K. 


William 


Diane G 


Maria A. 


Paul 


Linda M 


Jajko 


Jenkinson 


Johnson 


Jones 


Kasputis 


Kirby 




Dennis N. 
Lane 




Constance 
Lorion 




Floyd P. 


William J. 


Christine J. 


Gerald W. 


Barbara M. 


Carol E 


Lowry 


Luzis 


Mach 


Maddan 


Mann 


Marsh 



119 




Michael 
Martin 




Anne L. 
Nelson 



^W 



i 



~ > 



Gail A. 
Pasierbiak 




<u 



A 



Ronald E. 
Ruel 





Beverly L. 
Mickey 




. 



Susan L. 
Nelson 




Sharyn M. 
Pasternak 




Susan A. 
Saunders 



0% 



0H 




* 




Charlotte A. 
Miczek 



Lynn C. 
Mitchell 



"' ^y 



{ - 



i : T 




James L. 
Noel 



Janet M. 
Nowak 




* k 




Sandra M. 
Pleau 



Shirleyanne 
Prosack 




Frederick J. 
Scully 



Richard R. 
Sherman 





k ) 



.'. ~ i 



Elaine 
Morris 




Donna P. 
Oleszewski 




&fk**fi 



Elizabeth L. 
Randall 




Nancy H. 
Shippee 




Paul C. 
Morse 




Thomas F. 
Partenope 




Michael B. 
Ronan 




Thomas 
Sinopoli 




Barbara A. 


Donna M. 


Lauri 


David 


Marilyn 


Karen 


Skowronski 


Storz 


Tatro 


Thane 


Thomas 


Thorpe 



120 










Janet L. 


Elizabeth A. 


John W. 


Dora S. 


James E. 


Barbara A. 


Tracy 


Trimarchi 


Tytula 


Uliano 


West 


Wilson 



Theodore S. 
Zatorski 



121 



Class of '69 





Carolyn 
Adler 



Mary 
Armata 





John 
Barrett 



Raymond 
Bass 



^t5P y 



William 
Buzzell 



John 
Carey 





4 




Ronald 
Cimini 



Jean 
Ciuk 



J 



Wayne 
Collins 



Mm *?l 







Carol 
Contois 



^^T 



Dorothyann 
Atkinson 




Ruth 
Bedell 




Anne 
Cernak 




David 
Clark 




Robert 
Conway 




Frances 
Bachand 




Judoth 
Bragdon 




Allen 
Champney 



ft 



- : "i mm* 



^ȣ*M!*&k 



Jane 
Clark 




Patricia 
Cokke 




Susan 
lioni 



Richard 
Bryson 



Ronald 
Chapman 



Patricia 
Cogan 



Robert 
Cooper 




Neil 
Baker 





Ruth 
Burdick 




Francis 
Cichowski 







Robert 
Colby 




t 



\ . 

Thomas 
Davies 



122 




123 







Robert 
Davis 


Dennis 
Diefendorf 




Elizabeth 
DiLego 


Paul 
Dubois 


c\ 


ymr ,4 






A 


,\ * 


«ii 




Sm 1 A 



Patricia 
Duffy 





*ta 




W*** Vk5^ 




*0)\ 







i. M 








Janice 
Girard 



Marcia 
Goudreau 



John 
Graham 



Ellen 
Griggs 



Ellen 
Guiltinan 





. « 





■> » 







Nancy 
Dunn 




Charlene 


Bruce 


Richard 


Sharon 


Richard 


John 


Elder 


Elsensohn 


Falcon 


Farrell 


Field 


Flaherty 




David 


John 


Patricia 


Michael 


Richard 


Judith 


Fleming 


Flynn 


Fontano 


Furlong 


Gagnon 


Galli 




Carolyn 
Gwozdz 




Donna 


Ann 


Marceline 


Alice 


Robert 


Constant 


Hess 


Horton 


Hoye 


Iacuessa 


Ianitelli 


Jakoboski 



124 






Gary 
Janulewicz 




Katherine 
LaChance 




Mary 
Lepera 




Florence 
McFarland 



Brian 
Johnson 




William 
LaChance 




Joan 
Lubowicz 




Carol 

McKeon 




/ ^^^V 



{ 









Gretchen 
Johnson 



Pamela 
Jowett 



^ 



; i 




Ernest 
Lafontaine 



Marilyn 
Lamont 






Philip 
Mantoni 



Rosamond 
McCarthy 




Brian 
McLaren 



Mary 
Meany 




.f"*, 




James 
Kane 




Kenneth 
Law 




Sheila 
McCroary 




Barbara 
Michaels 





Virginia 
Kittler 




Barbara 
LeBeau 




Dennis 
McGeary 



^^ 



•'J 



Lisa 
Miller 




Joan 


William 


Bonnie 


Kathleen 


Patricia 


Linda 


Morawiec 


Morey 


Morin 


Murphy 


Murphy 


Neveu 



125 




ife" - 



JBWi-fK - » 






I 












>*V 










y 1 '^^l 




^^B 


h"!5 j 'InH 






fc^f 


' tiM^I 






k^C 









126 




Judith 
Nowell 







v >/ 



Joseph 
Rogge 




Dawn 
Straight 




<* 




It, I M ! 



John 
O'Connell 



Dane 
Olsted 



Katherine 
O'Neill 



Rose 
Pappas 






d!3> 



i. jt 






Cheryl 
Ruhman 



Paula 
Scarbeau 



Denise 
Sheahan 



Stephen 
Smachetti 






I- 










Brian 
Steady 



Eugene 
Sullivan 



Stanley 
Sylwanovicz 



Richard 
Syriac 





Mary 
Piretti 




Michaele 


Marsha 


Mary 


Christine 


John 


Edward 


Powers 


Price 


Raschdorf 


Richard 


Richards 


Roberts 



f% 



Joyce 
Smith 




\J 



Enver 


Bruce 


Donna 


Sherrie 


Lauri 


Paul 


Softie 


Sokolove 


Sommer 


Spooner 


Spobert 


Sprague 




William 
Taft 



127 










Zenia 


Mary Elizabeth 


Rita 


Michele 


Sharyn 


David 


Ta mow sky 


Taylor 


Trifone 


Tristany 


Vigna 


Vissoe 





Martin 
Yarmac 



Thomas 
Zabek 



128 




Familiar faces 



we will remember 





129 




130 





ourselves 




TERRY GAY ADAMOLI 

Lee 

English 

Glee Club 1,2; Lambda Iota Tau 3,4, 

secretary-treasurer 3. 



PETER 0. ANDREW 

Springfield 
History- 
Class President 1,3,4; Senator 2; Orien- 
tation Committee 2,3-4; Activities Com- 
mittee Chairman 2; Winter Carnival 
Chairman; Circle K Club; Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universities. 






BRENDA BAKER 

Clarksburg 
Elementary Education 



VINCENT BEAUDIN 

Adams 
Mathematics 



132 





KAREN A. BELL 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 

Class Secretary 2,3,4: Junior-Senior 

Prom ro-chairman. 



ROBERT ARTHUR BEEBE 

North Adams 
Biology 
Soccer: Varsity Baseball; Kappa Delta 
Phi. 




LINDA BIALAS 



Elementary Education 



FFM Honor Society. 




133 



DOLORES CHARRON BRULfi 

North Adams 
Elementary Education 
Queen's Court, Sophomore Prom. 



CHARLOTTE B. BOLT 

North Adams 
English 
Co-Editor Echo; Lambda Iota Tau. 







BRUCE BOISVERT 

North Adams 
History 




JUDITH A. BURNS 

Brookline 

History 




134 




H. JURGEN COMBS 
Bennington, Vermont 
History 
Orientation Committee 2; International 
Relations Club 2,3.4, president 3,4; 
Program Committee 3; Assembly Com- 
mittee 3.4; FFM Honor Soeiety; Photog- 
raphy Editor Mohawk '68. 




ALBERTA R. CILLI 

Williamstown 
Elementary Education 



SUSAN M. (CULLEN) COTE 
North Adams 
English 
Lambda Iota Tail, President 4: Harle- 
quin 3,4: The Grass Harp: Co-editor 
Mohawk '68. 



RONALD R. COTE 
North Adams 
Mathematics 





135 




ROBERT MARTIN CRAMER 

North Adams 
History 





THERESA A. CWIERTNIEWICZ 

North Adams 
Mathematics 
FFM Honor Society. 



BARBARA F. COUTURE 

Adams 
Mathematics 
FFM Honor Society. 




CYNTHIA FRANCES DAMIANO 

Adams 

Elementary Education 



136 




ANNE MARIE DeBI.OIS 
Adams 
Elementary Education 
Public Relations Officer 4. 



NOELLA MARY DeMEO 

North Adams 
Elementary Education 
FFM Honor Society. 




HENRY W. DeRUSHA, JR. 

Weston 
Elementary Education 
Circle K. 





DANIEL F. DeSANTIS 
Pittsfield 
History 
Baseball 1,2,3,4, captain 4; Soccer 2. 



137 





PATRICIA E. DUBIS 

Adams 
History 
Judicial Court 2. 



MARGARET E. DICKINSON 

North Adams 
Elementary Education 




ANNE L. DUPUIS 
North Adams 
Elementary Education 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4, pianist 2,3,4; Orienta- 
tion Committee 2,3,4 Co-Chairman 4; 
Winter Carnival Co-Chairman; Stunt 
Night Co-Chairman; Senator 3,4, Senate 
PR Officer 3,4; Class PR Officer 2; 
Student-Faculty Curriculum Committee; 
Inaugural Committee ; Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities. 



MICHAEL DZIOK 

Adams 

Mathematics 




138 




LEO E. ETHIER 

Upton 
History 
Orientation Committee 2,3,4; Circle K, 
President 4; Inaugural Committee. 



BERNARD B. FAVREAU 

Adams 

Mathematics 

Halloween Dance; Sophomore Prom; 

Science Club 2,3,4, Vice President 2, 

President 3,4. 






PRISCILLA L. FERREIRA 

North Dartmouth 
Elementary Education 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4, Mohawk Motets 4: 
Newman Club 1,2,3,4, Vice President 4: 
Harlequin 1,3,4; Delta Psi Omega 3,4, 
Sec-Treas. 4; Orientation Committee 2, 
3,4, Secretary 3, Co-Chairman 4; Woman 
of the Year. 



WILLIAM J. FIELDS 
Dalton 
English 
Berkshire Community College 



139 




RICHARD E. FROST 

Burlinton 

Mathematics 

Senator 2; Debating Society 2,3,4, 

Treasurer 2, Vice President 3, President 

4. 




KATHLEEN M. FLYNN 

Adams 
Elementary Education 
Montana State University 
Glee Club; FFM Honor Society. 



MARILYN (DONOVAN) GATTUSO 
North Adams 
Elementary Education 
Glee Club 1,2.3.4, President 4: FFM 
Honor Society 2,3.4, Treasurer 3, Secre- 
tary 4; Newman Club 1,2,3, Secretary 2; 
Orientation Committee 2; Winter Carni- 
val: Senator 1,2.3,4. 



KURT A. GABEL, JR. 
Pittsfield 
History 
Berkshire Community College 





140 



DAVID L. GIROUX 
Adams 
History 
Circle K: FFM Honor Society. 



DENNIS D. GIORDANO 
Pittsfield 
History 
FFM Honor Society. 






CAROLYN J. GIBE 

Westfield 
Elementary Education 
Cheerleader 1.2,3: Class Treasurer 2. 



RALPH E. HICKS 



International 
Treasurer 3,4 
President 2. 



Spencer 
History 
Relations 
Newman 



Club 
Club 



1,2,3,4, 

1.2.3.4, 




141 




HOLLY ANN HINMAN 

Lanesborough 

History 

FFM Honor Society; Editor Mohawk 

'68. 



TRACY B. JAHN, JR. 
Pittsfield 
Biology 
Berkshire Community College 




SYLVIA JAMROS 

Adams 

Biology 

Orientation Committee 2.3: Debating 

Society: Winter Carnival. 





JOYCE ELEANOR KELLAR 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 



142 




THOMAS J. KENNY 

Springfield 

Chemistry 

FFM Honor Society: Kappa Delta Phi. 





JUDITH E. KESS 

Brookline 
History 



MICHAEL J. KENDALL 

Dalton 

Mathematics 




SUSAN K. KIELTYKA 

Adams 

Elementary Education 



143 




JANE LOUISE KING 

North Adams 
English 
Harlequin 1,2,3,4, Vice President 4: 
Delta psi Omega; Lambda Iota Tau. 



ROSEMARY JEANNE LABELLE 
Marlboro 
Elementary Education 
Class Treasurer 1 ; Glee Club 1,2 ; 
Orientation Committee 2,3,4; Sophomore 
Prom Queen; Winter Carnival Court; 
Dorm Council 4. 



144 






EILEEN LEADBETTER 

New Bedford 
Elementary Education 
FFM Honor Society: Newman Club, 
President 4. 



DOUGLAS LeBLANC 

Spencer 

History 

Worcester Junior College; Assumption 

College. 





LEWIS EDWARD LUNDBERC, 
Northbridge 
History 
Kappa Delta Phi. 



DAVID E. LeFEBVRE 
Pittsfield 
Biology 
Harlequin 2,3,4, Secretary-Treasurer 4: 
Delta Psi Omega : Class Vine President 
3: Managing Editor Nascot 4: Co-Chair- 
man Winter Carnival: Co-Editor Mo- 
hawk '68. 




WILLIAM MAHER 

Norwood 
Elementary Education 
Class President 2; Senator 3; Senate 
Treasurer 4. 



BELINDA MELVIN 
Pittsfield 
Biology 
Dorm Council 3; President Hoosac Hall 
4: Inaugural Committee 4; Winter Car- 
nival Queen 4. 




145 



MADELINE F. NELSON 
Pittsfield 
Elementary Education 
Hofstra University 



CHERYL NASH 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 

International Relations Club; Glee 

Club; Co-Chairman Junior-Senior Prom. 




SANDRA J. MILLER 

Athol 
Elementary Education 
Christian Association. 




RONALD J. NUGAI 
Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 
Glee Club 3,4, Vice President 4; Inter- 
national Relations Club 3,4. 





146 




SHIRLEY A. PARADISE 

Williamstown 
Elementary Education 
Cheerleader 1,2; Orientation Committee 
2,3,4. 





JANE H. PACIOREK 

Adams 
English 
Orientation Committee 4. 



ANTHONY GEORGE PLANSKY 

North Adams 
History 



JOHN A. PIETREWICZ 

Webster 

Elementary Education 

Sacred Heart Scholasticate, Pomfret 

Center, Connecticut. 





147 



JUDITH POLAK 

Adams 

English 
FFM Honor Society: Glee Club; 
da Iota Tau; Judo Club. 



Lamb- 






DAVID W. POTTLE 

Everett 

History 
Kappa Delta Phi, Vice President 
Baseball 1. 



4; 



KAREN (KRUG) PLANSKY 

North Adams 
Elementary Education 




LEO FRANCIS RAYMOND 

Williamstown 

History 

Harlequin 1,2,3,4, PR Officer 4: Delta 

Psi Omega, President 4; Senator 3,4. 



148 




FRANCIS E. REARDON 
Pittsfield 
Mathematics 
Frederick College 
Baseball 2,3.4. Co-Captain 4. 



PRISCILLA R. REICHERT 

Danvers 
Elementary Education 
Christian Association, President 3,4. 




MICHAEL R. REILLY 

Pittsfield 

History 
Basketball 2; Baseball 1,2,3,4, Captain 
4. 





MARJORIE R. RICE 

Shelburne Falls 
Winter Carnival; Christian Association. 



149 





LYDIA ANN RODAK 

Springfield 
Elementary Education 



ROBERT F. RIVERS 
Dalton 
History 

Springfield College 
Baseball 2; Soccer 3. 




MACAIRE LOUISE ROSSI 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 



KAREN (KNIEPFER) ROUSSEAU 

Adams 
Elementary Education 
Westfield State College 




150 




ROBERT GEORGE ROY 

Williamstown 
Mathematics 



WENDY A. SANDERS 

North Adams 

English 

Class Secretary 1; FFM Honor Society; 

Lambda Iota Tau ; Newman Club, 

Treasurer: Echo, Editor 3. 






DONALD F. SENECAL 
Clarksburg 
Elementary Education 
Kappa Delta Phi. 



GERALDINE MARY SHANAHAN 

Groveland 

Elementary Education 



151 



LAURIE JEAN STASKO 

Westfield 
Medical Technology 





CAROL A. SICILIANO 

North Adams 
Elementary Education 
Class Treasurer 3,4. 



CHARLEEN M. STOWELL 
New Bedford 
History 
Class PR Officer 3; Harlequin 1,2,3,4, 
President 4; Delta Psi Omega; Interna- 
tional Relations Club, Secretary. 



RICHARD W. STEELE 

North Adams 
Mathematics 
Class Vice President 4. 




wmmmm^mmmKmmm 




152 



SARAH-ANNE TA1 LOR 
Pittsfield 
Elementary Education 
Berkshire Community College 



I W1HS ROBERT SWEET 
Hopedale 

Biology 






JOHN J. SULLIVAN, JR. 

Fall River 

Elementary Education 

Basketball 1.3: Orientation Committee 

2,3,4; Circle K; Senator 4. 



MARY ANN TRUDEAU 
Becket 
English 




153 




PETER C. TUSCINSKI 
Greenfield 
History 
Philosophy Club. 



CHARLES HENRY VIENS 

North Adams 
Elementary Education 
Berkshire Community College 




BARBARA IRENE WASSEL 
West Lynn 
Medical Technology 
Harlequin 1,2,3: Delta Psi Omega. 





JANICE M. WHEELER 

Clarksburg 

English 



154 



DAVID P. ZAPPULA 

North Adams 
Chemistry 






DENIS M. ZIEMINSKI 
Pittsfield 
History 



CLAIRE-LOUISE WOOD 

North Adams 
English 
Senator 2: Newman Club, Vice Presi- 
dent 3; FFM Honor Society, President 
4; Lambda Iota Tan. 




JONAS ZIEMINSKI 
Pittsfield 
Biology 



155 



LOUIS A. AXT 

North Adams 
Biology 

MARYLOU A. BENCIVENGA 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 

BEATRICE HOPE BENTON 

Tokyo, Japan 

Chemistry 

MARILYN T. (GALLESE) CARLSON 

North Adams 
English 

MARY LOU CHAFFEE 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 

ANITA CATHERINE CONSOLINI 

West Stockbridge 
Mathematics 

DAVID THOMAS ELWOOD 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 

THOMAS JOSEPH GRENHAM 
Quincy 
History 

LYNDA J. HOMICH 
Pittsfield 
English 

MEREDITH E. JOHNSTON 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 

LAWRENCE C. JOWETT 

Adams 
Elementary Education 

JAMES P. KEENAN 
Pittsfield 
Chemistry 



156 



JAMES B. KOLDIS 

Turners Falls 

History 

NANCY ANN KUNCE 
Pittsfield 
History 

ARNOLD JOHN LISCOMBE 

Quincy 

Elementary Education 

ANNE MARIE McDONALD 

Greenfield 

Elementary Education 

ROBERT HENRY MELLE 

Pittsfield 
History 

ALFRED JOSEPH NESTI 

Braintree 
History 

MICHAEL JOHN ONEIL 

North Adams 
Mathematics 

NANCY ELIZABETH RODDA 

Pittsfield 

Elementary Education 

PAMELA P. ROGERS 

New Lebanon, New York 
Elementary Education 

BRADFORD CHARLES SHIMMON 
Dalton 
History 

DAVID PAUL SIMON 

North Adams 
English 

FRANCES H. SMEGAL 

Pittsfield 

Mathematics 



157 



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m 





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■ I 



These paths, now trodden, 
grow over 



158 



too fast 
too slowly 
unnoticed. 



And we, who trod them. 
move on 




159 




to search . 



160