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Full text of "Mohawk Valley cook book"

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Compiled and Published 



THE LADIES' SOCIETY 



St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 



CAKAJOHARIE, N, Y. 
'I 



1889. 



FIRST EDITION. 




A copy of this Cook Book will be mailed to any address on 
y' Aj^eceipt of Fifty cents. Apply to 

\y^^\\ Mrs. Benjamin Smith, Secy. 



5^^irx- 



*Wi 



1889. 

PRESS OF I.. C. CHILDS Si SON, 
Utica, N. Y. 






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5 



Copyright, 1S89. 



PREFACE. 

^' She looketh well to the ways of her household^ 

The Mohawk Valley Cook Book has been prepared and careful- 
ly revised with special reference to the needs of young and inexperi- 
enced housekeepers ; great pains have been taken to write out 
each recipe clear]3\ so that if followed closely, success will be cer- 
tain : and all have heen thoroughly tested and proved to he valuahle. 
Much of the information which it contains will be found useful in 
every home, of which the '•house-mother" is herself the head; to 
these and all, the contents of this little book are commended by 

The Ladies of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 

(Janajoharie, N. Y. 



SOUPS. 



QENhJRA L DIRECriONS. 

In making soups of almost every kind, it is absolutely necessary 
to wash the meat thoroughly before putting it into the kettle, with 
plenty of cold water to cover it. For a general rule, allow one 
quart of water to one pound of meat ; set it on the range or stove 
where it will heat slowly, and as soon as the scum begins to rise, 
stand with skimmer in hand, and take it carefully off, until no 
more appears. Should the water boil too violently, throw in half 
a cup of cold water, and turn the meat over in the kettle, when 
the rest of the scum will be disengaged and float to the top. When 
this is done, set the kettle where it will simmer slowly for at least 
four hours, not adding any salt until nearly done. If the soup is 
wanted for use the same day, it should now be strained through a 
colander, the fat skimmed off, and allowed to settle for a few min- 
utes, when it can be returned to the kettle, to add whatever ingre- 
dients or seasoning may be desired. The juices of the meat will 
be best extracted, if it is cut in small pieces, and the larger bones 
crushed, before putting into water. It is better, if possible, to make 
the soup or stock the day before it is wanted, strain it, and set it aside 
in a bright tin pan, or large eartlien bowl ; when cold, the fat will lift 
off easily, before putting it on the stove, and it can be poured off care- 
fully, so as not to disturb tlie settlings. Should a perfectly clear 
broth be desired, it can be strained again, (after heating, if the soup 
has jellied) through a bag, which has first been wrung out of hot 
water. Cheese cloth, doubled, makes the softest and most suitable 
straining bag for this purpose. 

The meat of beef shank makes a standard soup, — veal or mutton 
added to this give additional flavor to it; or these can be used alone. 
The trimmings of large roasts, of chops, steak, etc., can all be used 
to make delicious broths, taken raw, or after having been upon the 



6 

table, and the bones and less choice portions of fowls, — turkej^ 
chicken or duck, can be saved for the same purpose. These cooked' 
meats should be thoroughly washed in scalding water, to remove 
all taste of gravy or dressing, then put into the kettle with plenty 
of cold water, skimming if necessary, and proceeding according to 
former directions. Should the soup boil down too much, hot water 
can be added at any time after skimming. 

A half-cup of rice is sufficient for from three to four quarts of 
soup. It should be well washed, and boiled in the broth for at 
least half an an hour; the same quantity of sago is needed, but 
will boil in half the time. If herbs are used for flavoring, they 
should be tied in small bunches if fresh, or in a small piece of soft 
cloth if dried. If not wanted for immediate use, the soup or stock 
will keep for several days, if set away in a very cool place. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

To three quarts of stock, add a large handful of cabbage cut very- 
fine, three large potatoes cut into dice, half a pint of tomatoes, one 
or more onions, as desired, also cut fine ; carrots in small pieces can 
be added, and all boiled for half an hour, or longer, until vegetables 
are thoroughly cooked. If you wish thickening, beat together one 
egg, one heaped teaspoon of flour, and two tablespoonfuls of milk, 
and add it to the soup a few minutes before serving. It is well to 
stir gradually into this mixture of milk, egg and flour, a little of the 
hot broth ; then return all to the kettle, stirring the soup, as it is 
poured in, to prevent curdling. 

ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

Take about seventy heads of asparagus, cut away the hard parts^ 
and boil the rest until tender. Throw half of it into cold water; 
press the rest through a sieve, or fine colander, and stir it into three 
pints of stock ; add salt, pepper, a teaspoon of sugar, and let all 
come to a boil ; cut the remaining asparagus into small pieces, put 
them into the soup, let it boil up, and then it is ready to serve. 

FROM "50 SOUPS." 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



MACARONI SOUP. 

Break one-third of a pound of macaroni into small (two inch) 
pieces; boil for half an hour, or until soft, in slightly salted water, 
then drain. Have about two quarts of stock, boiling hot; add the 
cooked macaroni; season with salt and white pepper; boil a mo- 
ment, and serve. 

VERMICELLI SOUP. 

Boil in stock — beef or mutton — two tablespoonfuls finely minced 
celery to one quart; when tender, and about five minutes before 
taking up, stir in two tablespoonfuls of vermicelli, broken into 

DICCGS 

BLACK BEAN SOUP. 

Soak one pint and a half of black beans in water over night ; put 
them over the next morning to cook, in plenty of cold water, add- 
ing more as it boils away ; in four hours, and perhaps sooner, they 
will be soft enough to mash through a colander ; stir them gradu- 
ally into two quarts of boiling stock, with half a pint of cooked 
tomatoes, which have previously been put through a colandei-; 
mix a tablespoon of flour, very smooth, with a little water, and 
stir into the soup just before taking up; slice about half a lemon 
into the tureen just before serving. MRS. emeline F. smith. 

WHITE BEAN SOUP. 

This can be made in the same way, omitting the tomatoes and 
the sliced lemon. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Three medium sized potatoes, 1 pint sweet milk, 1 teaspoon of 
chopped onion, 1 teaspoon each of chopped celery and parsley. 
(The laiter two may be omitted.) One tablespoon of butter, rub- 
bed with ^ tablespoon of flour, and cooked in ^ pint of boiling 
milk. Boil the potatoes in salted water, until quite soft, and boil 
the onion, celery and parsley in the pint of milk. When potatoes 
are cooked, drain and mash them, and pour over them the boiling 
milk, stirring fast. Put through a fine strainer, rubbing as much 
of the potato through as possible, — set on the stove to boil, adding 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



8 

salt, pepper and a little cayenne, and when boiling, stir in the 
flour and butter thickened in the cup of milk. Strain into the 
tureen immediately. This is sufficient for six. 

MRS. J c. m'clure. 

TOMATO ^OTJl\ WITHOUT MEAT. 

One quart of stewed tomatoes, either fresh or canned, one quart 
boiling water. When heated thoroughly, put through a sieve or 
fine strainer, so as to make perfectly smooth ; stir in a half teaspoon 
of soda, and one pint sweet milk; season with salt, pepper and a 
teaspoon of butter. Stir well, and serve immediately. 

BOUILLO}^. 

Is a very strong, clear beef broth. When done, it must be allowed 
to cool, when the whole of the fat should be removed. When 
wanted for use, it must be strained, seasoned with salt and pepper, 
and served very hot. If other flavoring is desired, of herbs, sum- 
mer savory, sweet basil, majoram, etc., they should be boiled for 
a short time in the broth, before straining. 

BREAD- DICE FOR SOUP. 

Cut rather dry bread into small squares, and fry in very hot 
butter until brown, not burned. Put into the tureen, and pour the 
boiling stock of beef, veal or chicken over it. 

CHICKEN SO UP. 

Cut up one chicken, and put it into the soup kettle with two 
quarts of cold water; skim and boil slowly for more than an hour. 
Add then, one teaspoon of salt and a very little pepper, and two 
desert spoonfuls of washed rice; boil half an hour longer, add a 
gill of cream, or a half pint of milk, and serve as soon as boiling, 
having taken out the chicken. A part of this, if desired, may be 
cut in small pieces, and returned to the soup. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



MOCK BISQUE SOUP. 
One quart can tomato, 3 pints milk, 1 large tablespoon flour, 
butter the size of an egg, pepper and salt to taste, 1 scant teaspoon 
of soda. Put the tomato over to stew, reserve a half cup of milk, 
with which mix the flour smoothly, and put the rest over in a 
double kettle to boil ; stir in the mixed flour and milk, and boil 
ten minutes longer. To the tomato add the soda, stirring well, 
and rub through a sieve, or a strainer that is .Hne enough to keep 
back the seeds ; add butter, salt and pepper to the milk, then the 
tomatoes, and serve immediately. If half the portion is made, stir 
the tomato in the can well before dividing. * * * 

MKS. M. L. SMITH. 

GREEN CORN SOUP. 

Six large ears of green corn, grate the corn from the cobs, and 
scrape them. Put the cobs in a kettle, and cover them with boil- 
ing water ; boil from fifteen to twenty minutes, remove the cobs, add 
the grated corn, and enough sweet milk to make a quart, or a little 
more. Add butter, salt and pepper, boil ten minutes and serve. 

MRS. S. A. READ. 

TOMATO CREAM SOUP, NO. 2. 

Cut up six ripe tomatoes, and put them over to stew ; boil one 
pint of milk in a double boiler, mix two large teaspoonfuls of flour, 
with a very little milk till smooth, then stir it into the boiling 
milk; cook ten minutes. To the tomato put one scant salt spoon 
of soda, stir well, rub through a strainer fine enough to keep 
back seeds ; add a desert spoonful of butter to the milk, stirring 
well, then the tomato, and serve immediately. •• ^ * 

MRS. M. L. S. 

CLEAR SOUR. 

Three lbs soup meat, or a soup bone weighing that ; gash the meat 
well, and put it on to cook with three quarts of cold water, three 
teaspoons of salt, half a one of pepper, — one small carrot, one turnip, 
one large onion, (each should weigh 3 oz. after peeling,) stick one 
•clove in the onion ; cut the vegetables, and add them to the meat, 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



10 

after it has boiled slowly two hours, then boil three hours more,, 
so slowly that just an occasional bubble comes to the surface. 
The soup must have been skimmed when it first came to the boil, 
according to the previous directions for soup ; it must be skimmed 
again after the vegetables are in. When done, strain, then set- 
away to cool ; take off the fat, and pour very carefully through a 
clean cloth, keeping the sediment, which can be used for gravy.. 
This should make two quarts and a pint of clear soup, if the boil- 
ing has been very slow, and the kettle kept covered. 

MRS. M. L. S. 

TOMATO SOUP NO. 3. 

Take one quart stewed tomatoes, either canned or fresh, heat and 
put through a fine colander, or a strainer which will retain the 
seeds ; then add to two quarts strong soup-stock, seasoning with salt 
and pepper to taste. Add a teaspoonful of butter, and a little 
celery salt. MRS. J. c. m'c 

NOODLES FOB SOUP. 

Break two eggs into flour, with three tablespoonfuls warm water,, 
and a pinch of salt. Mix to a very stiff paste, roll very thin ; rub 
flour over the surface, and cut in four inch strips; lay them in a 
pile, and with a sharp knife cut as fine as possible. When sou]) is 
done, drop in, and boil ten minutes. 

M CK T URTL E SO UP. 

Soak one pint of turtle soup-bean in cold water over night. In 
the morning put over to boil (in fresh water), one hour before pat- 
ting in the meat, about three lbs., for which veal is best ; add salt 
and pepper, three or four whole cloves, the same of allspice, and a 
little sweet marjoram, if you have it. Boil till beans are very soft 
and mash through a colander, all except the skins and spice. Put 
back into the kettle to keep hot ; cut a few nice pieces of the meat 
the size of a filbert, a half lemon sliced very fine, peel and all ; two 
hard boiled eggs sliced and put in the tureen. Pour the boiling 
soup over all, and serve. The meat may be left out. 

MRS. ]). s. R. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



MEATS, POULTRY, &C. 

OF nKEF. 

The middle ribs and sirloin are best for roasting. A piece 
of ten lbs. will require about tliree hours roasting; one of 
from four to six lbs. will cook easily in an hour and a half, unless 
it is desired to be thoroughly done ; but any amount of time beyond 
this specified, only serves to make the meat more dry. Mutton 
also is liked a little underdone by many ; but veal, lamb and pork 
must be well-cooked, and are better over, rather than underdone. 
Poultry also must be well cooked, vvheiher roasted or fricasseed. A 
large turkey (10 to 12 lbs.) will take from three to three and a half 
hours to roast ; fowls of medium size from one and a half to two hours. 
To boil meats or poultry, put tliem into hot water, moderately 
salted, remove scum as it rises, and let them boil slowly, until per- 
fectly tender, but no longer. The time required varies with the 
size and toughness of that which is cooked ; when a fork enters 
easily, it may be considered done. 

BEEF, A la 31 ODE. 

Take a round roast of beef, weighing seven or eight lbs. ; make a 
number of incisions in it, with a sharp knife, into M'hich press 
strips of salt pork, four inches long, and half an inch each way 
in thickness. Season well with salt, pepper, cloves, allspice, cinna- 
mon, a very little, and the same of nutmeg, all well mixed, and 
rubbed into the meat. Put into the pan with cue pint hot water^ 
and roast very slowly for at least two hours and a half, basting 
frequently, and adding to the water as it boils away. When nearly 
done, if desired, add ^ pint of sherry wine to the gravy, and con- 
tinue to baste. Take from the pan when done, and thicken the 
gravy remaining with a tablespoon of flour, mixed to a cream with 
cold water. Boil up for five minutes, and turn into grav}^ bowl. 

BEEF STEAK, 

That from the round is most generally fried, after having been 
well pounded. Take about a tablespoon each of butter and fresh 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRKSKRVATIVE. 



12 

'dripping; have it very hot in the pan, put in the steak, letting it 
"brown quickly on one side, then turn it, cover up closely, and fin- 
ish cooking. Take from pan on hot platter, turn a cupful of hot 
■water into the pan, and thicken the gravy with a full teaspoon of 
flour, mixed with a little water. Boil up, pour over steak and 
•serve. 

BREF STEAK AND ONIONS. 

Use for this round stf-ak. About half an hour before cooking 
it, peel from one to two dozen onions, according tD size, and put 
over to boil. When steak is done, drain the onions in a colander, 
•cut them up, and put them in the frving pan, season with salt and 
pepper, dredge in a little flour, and add a tablespoonful of butter ; 
stir well together, put in the pan over the fire, stirring often ; when 
they are soft and a little brown, return the steak to the pan, and 
heat all together. Put the meat on a dish, pour the onions and 
gravy over it, and serve very hot. 

STEAK FOR BROILING. 

Use sirloin or porterhouse steak ; broil over a brisk fire, on grid- 
iron or in strong toaster; turn frequently ; do not season until done. 
After being placed on the dish, place upon it small bits of butter, 
and stand in the oven for a minute. Or a gravy can be prepared 
with as much or as little butter as you wish to use, one gill hot 
water, a sprinkle of flour, salt and pepper; put into a pie-plate in a 
warm place, and when the steak is on the dish, pour over it. 

STEWED KIDNEYS 

Take a pair of beef kidneys, free from fat and gristle ; wash well, 
once in cold water, then in hot water. Cook for three or four 
hours, changing water each hour, doing this the day before, if 
wanted for breakfast next morning ; cut them up in inch pieces, put 
•over to stew in the water in which they were boiled ; add salt pep- 
per and butter to taste, thicken the gravy with a little flour, stirred 
up with cold water ; serve as hot as possible. 

. TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



13 

MOCK DUCK. 

Have a round steak cut half an inch thick ; remove the botic,. 
sewing up the holes. Make a dressing of about a cupful of bread 
crumbs, a leaspoonful of butter, a little chopped onion, pepper and 
salt, well mixed, spread on the meat ; roll up and sew together, put 
in H kettle on lop of range, cover 'very closely, and cook for three 
hours, turning often, and adding more water when needed. When 
done, remove the threads, place on a platter, thicken the gravy 
slightly, and pour over the meat. 

SMOKED BEEF WITH CREAM. 

Cut very thin, put into boiling water and cook a couple of min- 
utes, turn off the water, and replace with rich sweet cream, letting 
it come to a boil, and season with pepper. If you have no cream, 
use milk, a teaspoon of butter, and thicken with a very little fiour. 

SMOKED BEEF, WITH EGGS 

Cut thin, and let stand a few minutes in boiling water. Heat a 
lump of butter, the size of a hickory nut in the frying pan ; brown 
the beef in this, after turning off the water. Have ready some 
lightly beaten egi^s, in number as desired, from two to six, pour 
into the hot beef, stir briskly until the eggs are cooked, and serve 
immediately. 

IWAST VEAL. 

The best for this purpose is from the loin, from five to eight 
pounds in weight. It will need one-third longer cooking than 
beef. If you have some of the flanky, thin part with the roast, 
make a dressing of bread crumbs softened with milk, a large tea- 
spoon of butter, pepper, salt, and a little finely chopped onion, if 
desired ; lay on the meat, fold over, and sew together, or bind 
around tightly with a cord. Basle often, having rubbed salt upon 
the meat before it is put in the pan, and sprinkle it lightly with 
pepper. If possible, serve grated horseradish to eat with it. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. * 



14 
VEAL CUTLET. 

Can be dipped in egg, then in fine bread crumbs, put into the 
pan in which some butter or dripping has been made very hot. 
'C.»ver up tight, and cook slowly, turning when well browned. 

VEAL cm LET AND CHOPS. 

Can be broiled as beefsteak, and are improved by small bits of 
butter put over the pieces before serving. Tiiey are excellent to 
have a large cup full of stewed tomatoes, very hot, poured upon 
the dish on which they are served. 

YEAL LOAF. 

Three and one-half pounds veal, fat and lean, and one-half pound 
salt pork, all chopped very fine. (It is better lo have your butcher 
run it through the sausage-cutter.) Mix with six small crackers, 
rolled very fine, two eggs, butter the size of an egg (unless tiie 
meat is quite fat), one tablespoon salt, "one grated nutmeg, one 
teaspoon black pepper, and a very small quantity of cayenne pep- 
per. Mix thoroughly, and pack into a baking-pan ; bake slowly, 
and baste often with the fat which will collect at the sides of the 
pan, or a little butter melted in hot water. When cool, slice very 
thin: garnish the dish with celery or parsley leaves. 

MRS. C, G. PETTIT. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Six coflfee-cups of finely-chopped cooked veal. Put into a sauce- 
pan half a cup of butter, eight even tablespoons of flour; when 
they melt to a smooth paste, add three teacups of milk, a very 
small onion chopped fine, and two tablespoons of chopped parsley, 
and boil until thick. Turn into a bowl, and add three eggs, the 
chopped meat, and salt and pepper to taste; mix well, and set 
away to cool, when mold into oblong shape, dip in beaten egg, 
roll in bread or cracker crumbs, and boil a few minutes in hot 
lard. This makes 36 croquettes. They can be set away, and 
heated in the oven when wanted. contributed. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



15 
VA'AL POT-PIE. 

"Take three pounds of the loin, cut in pieces and wash. Put in 
kettle with six strips of sweet salt pork, as large as one's middle 
finger, season with salt and pepper, cover with hot water, and set 
it stewing. Make a dough of one quart sifted flour, four tea- 
spoons baking powder, rubbed together with butter the size of a 
small egg, and enough sweet milk stirred into it with a spoon to 
make it like biscuit dough. Let your veal stew half an hour or 
more, add boiling water till a little more than well covered, and 
set on top of stove where it will boil gently. Take a spoonful of 
dough at a time and lay over the top, cover with a tight cover so 
that no steam will escape. Listen to bubbling and keep it slowly 
boiling for 25 minutes, but do not uncover till done, when you 
ought to find a white fluffy mass. Dish the crust carefully, put- 
ting it around the edge of a large platter, the meat in the center. 
Over the whole pour the gravy. Should there not be enough broth 
left in the kettle, add a cup of hot water, butter the size of an egg, 
and flour to thicken. A cup of sweet cream is an addition. 

MRS. S. A. R. 

OR, VEAL POT- PIE NO. 2. 

Cook the veal until done, making the gravy as directed above. 
Have the biscuit dough baked as biscuit, split open, lay on platter 
and lay meat on top, pouring the gravy over all, using milk to 
make it if you have no cream. MRS. E. f. s. 

VEAL LIVER. 

Cut in slices about half an inch thick, wash well and dry on 
towel, roll in flour and fry till thoroughly done in a small quantity 
of dripping with a very little butter. When done, take up, turn a 
few tablespoons of hot water into the frying pan, shake it around 
and pour over the liver. That which remains of this or the un- 
cooked liver, can be cut in pieces about two inches long and stewed 
till tender in a little hot water. When cooked, turn oflf the water, 
put over it sufficient milk to cover and a large teaspoonful of but- 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



16 

ter, thicken with a spoonful of fiour, boil up a few minutes and 
serve. MRS. E. F. S. 

SWEET-BREADS. 

Wash in salted water, remove stringy parts, parboil fifteen min- 
utes, slice in two, dip in egg and roll in bread or cracker crumbs ; 
season and fry in hot lard. 

S WEET- B RE A I)S, FlilCA SSEED. 

The cooked sweet-breads can be used, cuttiog them into small 
pieces and stewing for ten minutes in a little soup-stock or water, 
season with pepper and salt, add a teaspoon of butter and thicken 
the gravy with a little flour. If they are fresh, cat in thin slices, 
wash and cook for half an hour in water or soup-stock ; then 
make gravy as before directed, adding, if desired, a half-cup cream 
and one well-beaten egg. 

ESGALLOrED MEAT. 
One pint minced meat, one teacupful dried bread crumbs, one 
tablespoon of butter, one egg, salt and pepper to taste.' Mix to- 
gether and add gravy, stock or milk to make the mass quite moist. 
Bake in an earthen dish olc hour in a slow oven. 

VEAL KIDNEYS, STEWED. 

Soak in cold salt water for several hours (if for breakfast, over 
night.) Boil fifteen minutes, pour ofl: first water and boil in an- 
other till tender. Cut the kidneys into small pieces, and with the 
broth make a iiravy, thickening slightly with flour, and adding, 
milk, salt and pepper. Spices and wine cnn be added if desired. 

MISS L. C. BAUM. 

BAKED VEAL OR CHICKEN POT PIE. 

Line the sides of a small dinner pot with pie crust. Take from- 
two to three pounds of veal or chicken, cut in small pieces and 
place in the pot with alternate layers of sliced potatoes until pot is 
full ; seasoning the layers as they are put in, with salt, pepper and 



THY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT. 



17 

small pieces of butter, filling in with liot water sufficient to cook 
the meat and leave enough for a gravy. Lay over the whole a 
cover of pie crust, in the center of which cut a small slit. Cover 
loosely, set on top of stove, and cook very slowly for two hours ; 
then uncover and put in the oven for half an hour. Take ofl the 
top crust, thicken the gravy, put it and the meat and side crust on 
the platter, laying the top crust over all. 

ROAST LAMB. 

Young lamb should be thoroughly roasted and brought to the 
table with a browned gravy made in the pan in which it has been 
cooked, and with mint sauce made thus : 

MINT SAUCE. 

Take fresh young mint, wash and dry on cloth, chop very fine ; 
take of it three heaped tablespoons and mix with two of sugar. 
After fifteen minutes pour over it about half a cup of good but 
not too strong vinegar. 

LAMB CHOPS, 

As well as mutton chops, must be broiled. Lamb cutlets can be 
either fried or broiled ; if fried, a brown gravy can be made by 
putting a little hot water in frying-pan after meat has been taken 
out, letting it boil up, and thickening with flour. 

RAGOUT OF LAMB. 

Take from the neck or breast of lamb about one pound and a 
half and cut in small pieces. In a frying pan put a tablespoon of 
butter and one of flour; set on the stove until melted and a pale 
brown, stirring slowly all the time. Pare and slice one onion and 
one carrot, and add to this brownish paste or roux • also one pint 
of peas if desired, and the meat, seasoning with salt and pepper, 
and also a teaspoon of vinegar. Stir well together and put on 
close cover, cook slowly and be careful that it does not burn. 
After cooking twenty minutes add two-thirds pint of hot water 
and a little parsley, cover again closely and set where it will just 
simmer and cook until meat is tender. "Catharine owen." 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 
B 



18 
BOILED MUTTON. 

Take a leg of mutton, wasb it well and put it into boiling salted 
water, and boil from two to three hours, according to size. Serve 
it with plain drawn butter or with caper sauce. Make these sauces 
as follows : Drawn Butter — Mix well together two teaspoons of 
flour and two ounces butter. (Butter the size of a small egg will 
be two ounces.) When well mixed, pour gradually into it one 
pint boiling water, stirring all the time, and then set on the stove, 
and continue to stir until it just comes to a boil, when it is done. 
This sauce can also be made with milk. For Caper Sauce — Add 
two large tablespoons of capers just before serving. 

MRS. E. F. SMITH. 

MUTTON CHOPS. 

Season with salt and pepper and broil slowly till thoroughly 
done. 

POEK. 

In cooking pork, it should be slowly done, and care should be 
taken that it is thoroughly cooked. 

TO BOIL A HAM. 

Wash and clean perfectly in two or three warm waters; put it 
into a large pot with cold water enough to cover; let it come to a 
boil, then set on the back part of the stove, and cook slowly till 
done throughout. A ham of twelve pounds will take about six 
hours to cook. Fill in as the water boils away, or else the ham 
will be too salt, and try with a fork towards the last, which will 
pierce easily when it is cooked enough. Take up, skin, and trim 
away dark spots; stick a clove here and there into the fat surface, 
•or put little spots of black pepper instead. 

HAM PATTIES. 

Chop fine some scraps of lean boiled ham, and mix with an 
equal amount of crumbed bread, seasoning with pepper. A table- 
spoon of butter, or the like quantity of the fat, chopped, can be 
udded. Moisten with milk to a soft paste. Fill muffin tins with 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



19 

the mixture, and break an egg on top of each, sprinkling over 
them salt, pepper, and a few cracker or bread crumbs. Put in the 
oven and bake ten minutes, or until the eggs are cooked. 

CONTRIBUTED. 

TO CORN BEEF. 

Make a brine that will bear up an egg, showing a spot as large 
as a "nickel." Heat and skim till clear, and pour hot over the 
beef, adding two ounces salt petre to a quarter of the beef. Ready 
to use in a week. MRS. D. S. K. 

PRESSED BEEF— SUPPER DISH. 

Two pounds round beef steak chopped fine, one cup sweet milk, 
two tablespoons salt, one tablespoon black pepper, two soda crack- 
ers rolled tine, and one egg. Mix all well together with the hands, 
press into a bread-tin, and bake one hour and a half. When cold, 
cut in thin slices. MRS. W. N. S. 

BROILED STEAK, WITH MUSHROOMS 

One porter house sterdc, seasoned, and broiled rare. Take one- 
half cup butter and half a teaspoonful flour; let it brown in the 
pan, and pour in nearly a cup of boiling water, into which turn one 
small cupful of mushrooms ; let them simmer ten minutes, then 
pour over the steak and serve. MRS. BINGHAM. 

MUTTON CHOPS WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

Take lean chops, salt, pe})per, and dip in beaten eggs, then roll 
in cracker-crumbs, and fry in hot drippings. According to the 
number of chops, have tomatoes, canned or fresh, put through a 
sieve to strain out the seeds, and stewed till like a very thick 
cream. Season with salt, pepper and butter, pour on a hot platter, 
and then lay on the nicely browned chops. MRS. D. S. R. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING, TO EAT WITH ROAST BEEF. 

In a large bowl put a half pint flour,, and half teaspoon of salt 
Stir in very gradually one pint of milk, and four eggs beaten light, 

USING PETTIT^S CIUER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



20 

beating constantly and thoroughly. Pour into a greased pan, and 
bake from one-half to three-quarters of an hour. Serve immedi- 
ately. MRS. c. T. V. s. 

ENGLISH POT FIE. 

Cut 1-| lbs. round steak into finger-lengths, and dust with flour. 
In an iron kettle, first heated, drop the fat, and then the lean meat^ 
and after it has browned, one carrot, a turnip and an onion cut 
into small pieces. Stir briskly, and pour in one pint boiling water,, 
seasoning to taste ; let it come to a boil, then set where it will just 
simmer, covering closely. Make a crust of one cup chopped suet, 
two scant cups flour and a level teaspoon of salt. Toss together 
in a bowl, make a hole in the centre, pour in half a cup of cold 
water, and mix quickly with a knife, adding a few drops of water 
to bind the crumbs, but do not knead. Eoll out a very little 
larger than the kettle, and an inch thick, and lay over the meat 
and vegetables, cover, and keep gently simmering for an hour. 
When ready to serve, cut the crust pie fashion, and lay on the 
platter around the meat. MRS. M. L. s. 

HAMBURG STEAK. 

Have a nice round steak (beef) chopped fine at the market. In 
a hot frying pan, put a tablespoon of butter; when melted, put in 
the meat, which has been seasoned with salt and pepper, and stir 
until the red look of the meat is changed, which will take about 
three minutes. MRS. hettie b. b. 

STUFFING FOR ROAST FOWLS. 

Take stale bread crumbs, rubbed fine, moisten slightly with 
milk ; for a turkey, about two large tablespoonf uls of butter should 
be used, and mixed in a melted state ; season with salt, pepper, a 
teaspoon of finely powdered summer savory, a little chopped celery, 
and an egg, if desired. Or small pieces of bread which have been 
dried in a cool oven, may be scalded with boiling water, thoroughly 
drained, and the butter and seasoning added. Plain mashed pota- 
toes are sometimes used, with the same seasoning. For ducks and 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



21 

geese, onion and sage should be used. For boiled fowl, oysters 
are often used ; a pint to each turkey. The hearts, livers, gizzards 
of roast fowls should be boiled in salted water until tender, chopped 
very line, and stirred with the water in which they have been 
■cooked, into the dripping pan, after the fowl has been removed. 
Thicken with flour, to make the gravy. The fowls should be 
roasted slowly, and often basted, with the juices which escape from 
them into the pan. 

CHICKENS. 

young chickens should be split open down the back, and broiled 
for 20 minutes over a clear lire, watching carefully that they do 
not burn. Put bits of butter over them, salt and pepper, and stand 
in the oven two minutes before serving. For fricassed chicken, 
■cut up and put in a stew-kettle, with plenty of hot water ; skim 
and salt, then cook slowly for one hour and a half or two hours, 
according to size and age, or until tender; then thicken the broth 
with a little flour, till about as thick as cream. It is more delicious 
to let the broth cook down pretty low, and add rich milk to make 
the gravy with. Another way of cooking chickens is to cut them 
open down the back as for broiling, steam for half an hour, and 
then finish them in a dripping-pan, in the oven, using the water 
over which they have been steamed, to put into the pan, for bast- 
ing and gravy. Another nice way is to cut up the chicken as for 
a fricassee, cook in water (put on hot) till nearly done, then put 
into a dripping-pan with enough hot butter to brown nicely, turning 
each piece over, that both sides may brown. When done, take up 
and set in the oven for a few minutes ; add to the butter remaining 
in pan, half a cup of hot water, then a pint of rich milk ; thicken 
a little with flour, and put the chicken back into the grav}^ for 
about three minutes, when serve. A little chopped parsley may 
be added to gravy. 

ESCALLOPED CHICKEN. 

Cook two large chickens till very tender, seasoning with salt and 
pepper. Then cut into quite small pieces, and put a layer of it 
into a baking dish, alternately with layers of cracker crumbs and 



USING PETTIT'S ClDl^^R AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



22 

bits of butter. Repeat till dish is full, adding the broth in whieb 
chicken was cooked, to each layer, just enough to cover. Sprinkle- 
crumbs over the top, put in oven and brown. 

MRS. E. M'KINSTRY. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Two cups chopped meat, one egg, one-half cup potatoes, mashed 
and seasoned well. Mix and make into rolls about three inches- 
long, and fry in hot fat. MRS. M. L. S. 

CHICKEN CR0QUET2ES, NO. 2. 

To each pint minced fowl, add one-half pint cream, and season 
with pepper, salt, and a little finely minced parsley. Heat together 
in a stew-pan, and when boiling, thicken with one tablespoon each 
of butter and flour, first mixed to a smooth paste ; cook a few min- 
utes, then stir in the beaten yolks of two eggs, and remove from 
the lire. When cool roll into form, dip in egg, then in cracker 
crumbs, and fry. 

In frying all croquettes, the fat (lard or dripping} must be very 
hot, and they are best done in a wire basket. The flavor may be 
varied by that of onion or lemon juice, and strong soup-stock may 
be used instead of cream, while finely powdered bread crumbs may 
take the place of flour. This recipe should make 18 croquettes. 

MRS. M. L. S. 

BROILED PART.RID OE, WITH JELL Y DRESSING. 

Split bird down the back, broil and season with salt and pepper. 
For dressing, take butter the size of an egg, one-half cup currant 
jelly, heating first the butter thoroughly, then put in jelly and lei 
simmer until the latter is entirely dissolved; pour over partridge 
and serve. mrs. bingham. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT. 



SHELL FISH, ETC. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

Drain the liquor from one quart oysters, and add to it one quart 
of milk and water, mixed in any desired proportion ; set on the 
stove and skim as it heats. When boiling, add salt and pepper to 
taste, and thicken with one tablespoon even full of flour, rubbed 
smooth with one large tablespoon of butter. Or, two tablespoons 
of verj' fine cracker crumbs may be used instead of flour. When 
ready to use, put'in the oysters, and let them cook until the edges 
begin to curl, no longer. Serve at once. "e." 

STEAMED OYSTERS 

Drain the liquor from the oysters, put it on the stove, let boil, 
skim, and season with butter, pepper and salt. Add the oysters, 
let them come to a boil, and serve at once. MRS. e. f. s. 

OYSTER STEW. 

Drain oysters, let liquor boil, and skim it; for one quart oysters, 
three-quarters pint of milk to the liquor; add salt, pepper and but- 
ter; when boiling, put in oysters, and cook just long enough to 
curl the edges. Have tureen hot, and serve. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Drain oysters thoroughly; roll all first in flour or very fine 
cracker dust; then take each in turn, dip in beaten egg, and again 
into the cracker dust. Let stand for half an hour, if possible, in a 
cool place, then fry quickly in very hot fat and serve immediately. 

"E."' 

OYSTER OMELETTE. 

Whisk six eggs to a stiff froth, and add, by degrees, one cup of 
cream, or milk^ and beat well together, seasoning with salt and 
.pepper to taste. Have ready one dozen fine oysters cut in half; 
pour the egg and milk into a pan in which is a large tablespoon of 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



24 

melted butter, hot; drop the oysters evenly over the surface, fry a 
light brown, but do not turn. Serve at once. MRS. E. m'k. 

OYSTER CAKES. 

Chop very fine one-quarter pound veal, one quarter pound suet, 
and one pint solid oysters. Mix, add pepper and salt and enough 
cracker crumbs to make into small cakes. Dip into beaten egg 
and fry in butter. M. R. 

DEVILED OYSTERS 

To one hundred oysters, chopped fine, add about half the quan- 
tity of bread crumbs, one-half cup butter, (melted.) one pint milk, 
salt, black and cayenne pepper ; thicken with one tablespoon flour. 
Scrub lai'ge, deep oyster shells, and fill them with the mixture, 
sprinkling the tops with cracker dust, and bake till brown in hot 
oven. Patty-pans can be usee! instead of the shells. 

MISS L. c. B. 

CREAMED OYSTERS 

Take one quart large oysters, strain off the liquor,, set it on the 
stove, boil and skim. In a kettle put one pint cream or milk, to 
which add one saltspoon salt, two tablespoons of rolled and sifted 
crackers, and one teaspoon of cornstarch, moistened with a little of 
the milk. Stir carefully until boiling, then add a teaspoon of but- 
ter, (if viilk was used,) and boil up again, adding the oyster liquor. 
Meantime the drained oysters should have been placed in a colan- 
der or steamer, over boiling water, from five to eight minutes, or 
until edges shrivel. Put them in a hot dish, and pour cream over 
them. MRS. J. c. m'c. 

OYSTER PIE. 

Line a dish with puff paste; dredge well with flour; drain one 
quart of oysters, put into the dish, season with salt, pepper and 
butter; add some of the liquor, sprinkle rolled crackers over, 
then put on the top crust, leaving a small opening in the top for 
the steam to escape. Bake in a quick oven, served hot as possible. 

MRS. FRASIER SPRAKER. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



'25 

LITTLE PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Season large oysters with pepper, roll them in rolled crackers ; 
■cut bacon in thin slices, wrap an oyster in each slice, and fasten 
with a toothpick. Cook just long enough in a frying pan to cook 
the bacon — about two minutes. Serve on small pieces of toast, if 
desired. Florence m. speaker. 

OYSTER PATTIES 

Make a puff paste of one pound flour, one pound butter, two eggs 
and a little water, one teaspoon baking powder. Roll out one-fourth 
of an inch thick, cut out a round piece for the bottom of patty, then 
cut in strips and wind around the edge until pyramid in shape; bake 
quickly. 

CREAM OYSTER FOR FILLING PATTIES 

One quart of oysters, cooked in their liquor, and drained ; in an- 
other kettle put one pint of milk, minced parsley, salt, one table- 
spoon flour rubbed smooth in milk ; mix all these together, then 
boil, stirring carefully ; add a generous lump of butter, (tablespoon- 
ful,) boil a while longer, put the oysters in a hot dish, pour the cream 
over them, and serve, or place carefully in the patty-shells. F. M. S. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

Scald oysters in salted water, which should be hot before putting 
them in. When they come to the top, skim them out, and lay 
them on a dry cloth. Strain the oyster liquor, boil and skim ; put 
the oysters in a jar, and pour the hot liquor over them. To a gal- 
lon of oysters, use one quart of vinegar, one finely sliced lemon, 
and two tablespoons whole pepper. Heat the vinegar also ; use 
count oysters. To keep in summer, put while hot in fruit jars and 
•close tight. MRS. s. moerell. 

CLAM SOUP. 

To 20 or 25 clams chopped fine^ add two quarts of boiling water, 
■and when they boil up stir in one large tablespoonful of butter 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



26 

and two of flour, previously well rubbed together ; let the whole 
simmer a few minutes, then stir in one pint milk and one egg, beaten 
together; take up immediately. mrs. m. f. scholl. 

STEWED CLAMS. 

Let them stew slowly, with a little pepper, in their own liquor, 
for 15 or 20 minutes. Put slices of buttered toast in a dish, and 
pour over. * 

CLAM CLIOWDER. 

Fry two slices salt pork in an iron pot ; take it out in a few 
minutes, leaving the fat in the pot; put in a few thin slices of 
onion first. Have ready six potatoes cut into dice, one quart of clams 
chopped fine, six crackers rolled and the pork cut up small; put 
first a layer of potatoes, then of the clams, plenty of pepper and a 
little salt, and more onion ; fill up the remainder in the same way, 
put in the liquor of the clams, and fill in with water enough to 
cover the chowder. Cook nearly half an hour, and just before 
taking-up, add one pint milk. This makes enough for eight people. 

MRS. D. H. F. 

LOBSTER BISQUE. 

To one can lobster, four cups milk, three-fourths cup rolled 
crackers, four cups boiling water, two tablespoons butter, salt to 
taste, juice of a lemon, and cayenne pepper at discretion. Cut lob- 
ster small with knife, and put into the boiling water, with the salt 
and pepper, and cook 80 minutes. Heat the milk to boiling, and 
stir into it the cracker crumbs ; when the lobster has cooked half 
an hour, stir in the butter, simmer five minutes, add the milk, stir 
well, and just before serving, put in lemon juice. Serve as a soup; 
and with it crackers and slices of lemon MRS. E. m'k. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Wash one head of lettuce, drain well, and shred in small pieces; 
cut or chop one lobster in small pieces, (canned lobster will do as 
well,) and mix lobster and lettuce together. Have ready the fol- 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



27 

lowing dressing, and pour over the whole. Dressing. — Beat to- 
gether the yolk of one hard boiled egg, (first rubbed smooth,) one 
raw egg, one teaspoon ground mustard, same of pepper, half-cup 
melted butter, half cup sugar, and the juice of one lemon, with 
one tablespoon of vinegar. MRS. M, l. s. 

TIlMBALE OF SALMON. 

Remove bones, skin and oil from one can salmon, and mash 
through a sieve. Add gradually, beating all the time, four table- 
spoons of cream, and unbeaten whites of two eggs, until the whole 
is a smooth paste, and white; add salt and cjiyenne to taste. 
Fill mixture in small cups, and stand in a baking pan, half-filled 
with hot water. Bake 2U minutes; when done, turn out of cups, 
and pour drawn butter over. 

CREAMED SALMON. 

Turn one can of salmon into a colander, and drain, pick into 
small flakes with a fork, and remove all bits of bone and skin. 
Heat in a double boiler one cup of cream, and one-half cup milk, 
with a pinch of soda : rub together two even teaspoons of cornstarch 
and one tablespoon butter, salt and pepper, and stir into the boil- 
ing milk, not ceasing to stir until it has thickened and is smooth. 
Put in the salmon, and stir with a fork till hot. Fill scallop shells 
or patty pans, sprinkling cracker crumbs over, and small bits of 
butter. Bake a light brown. MES. E. m'k. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Drain and pick over one can salmon ; mix with four soda crackers, 
rolled fine, the juice of one lemon, two well beaten CL'gs, butter the 
size of an ^gg,^ and season with salt and pepper. Make into balls, 
roll in cracker crumbs and the white of egg. Brown in hot lard. 

MRS. D. S. MORRELL. 

CODFISH RALLS 

Two cups fish, boiled and picked, four cups hot mashed potatoes, 
one and one-half tablespoons butter, three or four tablespoons of 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



28 

milk; mix and make into cakes, roll in crumbs, then in egg, then 
in crumbs again, and fry. MRS. C. t. V. S. 

FISH BALLS NO. 2. 

Equal parts of uncooked codfish, and potatoes fresh boiled and 
mashed, but not seasoned. Shred fish tine, wash twice in cold 
water, squeezing dry at last; add hot potatoes, and mix with spoon, 
till cool enough to use the hand. Season with pepper and a little 
salt, if necessary, add one egg, and butter the size of an ego-, beating 
well. Dip hand into cold water, form mixture into small cakes, 
roll in flour or egg, and rolled cracker. Have hot lard or drippings 
in flat pan, one-quarter inch deep, and drop them in ; when brown- 
ed on one side, turn. Ten minutes will cook them. MRS. D. S. R. 



FISR BALLS NO. 3. 

One cup salt codfish, one pint of peeled and cut up potatoes, one 
egg, well beaten, one teaspoon butter, one-fourth salt spoon pepper. 
Wash^the fish and pick into half inch pieces, and throw into cold 
water until ready. Put fish and potatoes in stew-pan, cover with 
boiling water and cook twenty-five minutes, or till potatoes are 
soft. Drain off water carefully, mash and beat the potatoes together 
until very light. Add butter and pepper, beat again till cool, and 
stir in beaten egg. Shape in a tablespoon, without smoothing, slip 
into a wire basket, and fry in boiling hot lard one minute. Drain 
on soft paper and send immediately to table. MRS. H. van e. 

CREAMED CODFISH. 

One quart codfish, shredded fine ; wash in two or three waters, and 
squeeze dry. Put large tablespoon of butter in frying pan ; when 
melted stir in fish, add large cup of milk or cream, let it boil up, 
set back from the fire, and stir in a well-beaten egg. Pour out on 
platter, and sprinkle over it two hard boiled eggs, chopped, and a 
little chopped parsley. MRS. C. T. VAN S. 

TRY PitESKliVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



29 

POTTED FISH. 

Take a fresh fish, herring, shad or other fish ; clean, dry and cut 
in convenient size for packing in a stone jar ; cover the bottom of 
the jar with slices of fish, sprinkle over salt, pepper, three or four 
allspice, the same of cloves, a bit of mace, and small bits of butter ; 
then more layers, with spices as above, till the jar is nearly filled ; 
cover with cider vinegar, but not too strong. Put tight cover on 
jar, and bake in slow oven for six hours. hettie b. b. 

HALIBUT 

May be cut in steaks, washed, and dried on cloth, rolled in flour, 
and fried in plenty of very hot lard or dripping. Or, a piece of 
from five to six pounds may be boiled for about an hour in water 
slightly salted, and in which is one tablespoon of vinegar. Serve 
with drawn butter, in which (for one-half pint) is stirred a hard- 
boiled egg, finely chopped. 

SHAD 

May be prepared for frying in same manner, taking care to have 
fat very hot; or it may be broiled and sent to table, seasoned 
lightly, and with bits of butter over it. 

BLUE FISH 

Is excellent fried or broiled, but is better to be baked, first being 
filled with this dressing : Bread crumbs, slightly moistened with 
milk, to which a tablespoon of butter has been added, season with 
salt, pepper, and a little chopped parsley or celery. When the fish 
is nearly done, having basted it several times with butter, turn a 
half cup of milk into the pan, which thicken at the last with flour 
and pour over the fish. E. F. s. 

DEVILED CLAMS. 

Take fifteen hard clams, have them opened raw, cut off the out- 
side rim or hard part of the clam, chop the balance quite fine. 
Save a portion of the liquor to mix the clams with the bread dust 

USING PETTIT'S CIDEH AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



30 

or crumbs, of which take about three tablespoon fuls, or more if 
they seem very moist. Add three tablespoons melted butter, red 
pepper, and a very little Worcestershire sauce and salt, and mix 
soft. Have the clam shells thoroughly clean, and fill them with 
the mixture ; sprinkle bread crumbs over them, and place them in 
oven until nicely browned. Serve hot, and garnish with parsley. 

MRS. WILLIAM ARKELL. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Take fifty small oysters, and cook m salted water until their 
eiiges begin to curl, then let them cool thoroughly. Cut about the 
same quantity, by measure, of celery in small pieces, put salt, pep- 
per, vinegar, and a few drops of lemon juice with it ; then add the 
oysters whole. Place on dish, and cover with mayonnaise dress- 
ing; garnish with sliced lemon, pickles, hard boiled eggs and pars- 
ley. MRS. WM. A. 

BOILED SARDINES ON TOAST. 

Take fine large sardines, lifting carefully from box, and wipe off 
oil, or let it be absorbed by soft paper. Broil in fine toaster, and 
lay on narrow strips of hutterei toast. Serve hot. 

MRS. C. T. VAN S. 



VEGETABLES. 

STEWED POTATOES 

Bake six potatoes, and when eold, take off skin and chop fine. 
Put one pint of milk in a spider, with a tablespoon of butter, salt 
and pepper. When the milk boils, put in potatoes, heat thorous^hly, 
turn in hot dish and serve. mrs. c. o. pettit. 

LYONAISE POTATOES. 

One quart cold boiled potatoes cut in dice, three tablespoons 
butter, one of chopped onion. Fry onion in butter till it begins 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



31 

to yellow: add potatoes, salt and pepper; stir with fork carefully. 
When well heated, add a little parsley, if desired, and cook two 
minutes longer. Serve on hot dish. contributed. 

POT A TOES ESC ALL OPED. 

Peel and slice six medium potatoes. Put in a baking dish a 
layer of potatoes, then one of bread crumbs, a little salt and small 
pieces of butter. Continue till all the potatoes are used, having 
bread crumbs on top. Cover with milk and bake forty-five min- 
utes, or till potatoes are tender. Or boil potatoes first, not too 
well done. MRS. bingham. 

POTATO PUFF. 

Two cups of mashed potatoes, two tablespoons melted butter, 
two well-beaten eggs,' one cup milk.. Mix well and bake lialf an 
hour in quick oven. M. a. k. 

POTATO BALLS OR CROQUETTES NO. 1. 

Four large mealy potatoes, cold, mashed with two tablespoons 
melted butter, salt, pepper, tablespoon cream and beaten yolk of 
one egg. Eub together till very smooth. Shape into balls or 
small rolls ; dip in beaten egg, then in sifted bread crumbs. Fry 
in boilmg lard. MRS. ALICE geortner. 



POTATO CROQUETTES AO. 2. 

One pint hot mashed potatoes, one tablespoon butter, half a salt- 
spoon white pepper, half teaspoon of salt, yolk of one egg. Beat 
until very light. When cool add yolk and mix thoroughly. Eub 
through a sieve. Shape in balls, roll in bread crumbs, then in 
beaten egg, again in crumbs. Fry in hot lard one minute. Drain 
and serve. MRS. annie taylor. 

POTATO SOUFFLE. 

Bake six potatoes. When done, cut off just the top. Scrape 
the inside out, being careful of shells. Mash and season with but- 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



32 

ter, salt and cream. Whites of two eggs, beaten stiff, mix in light- 
ly. Fill the shells with mixture, set on a tin, and bake ten or fif- 
teen minutes. MRS. ALICE WATSON. 

POTATO SALAD. 

One quart boiled potatoes, sliced ; one teacup cabbage, shredded ; 
one small onion, tablespoon and a half of butter, the same quantity 
of drippings. Fry onion in dripping, with one tablespoon of flour,, 
till it begins to yellow. Add a half cup vinegar. Stir in potatoes 
and cabbage, and pour over two tablespoons sweet cream. Season 
to taste with salt and pepper. MRS. M. l. s. 

SLICED CUCUMBERS 

Cut in thin slices, throw into salted water, and put in a cool 
place for an hour. When ready to serve, drain the water off, season 
with salt, pepper and a very little vinegar, stirring in at last (for a 
pint) one-half cup of thick sour cream. Eat with cayenne pepper. 

bai<:ed tomatoes. 

Peel them, and put in bottom of baking dish, cutting in half if 
they are large, and putting the cut side up. Sprinkle over with a 
thin layer of bread crumbs, salt, pepper and small bits of butter, 
and repeat until dish is full, having crumbs on top. Bake one 
hour in a brisk oven. " e." 

ESCALLOPED TOMATOES 

Take stewed tomatoes, canned or fresh, put in baking dish in 
alternate layers with bread crumbs, salt, pepper and bits of butter. 
Bake half an hour. "E.'^ 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS 

Put one pint white beans (pea beans are considered best) in cold 
water at night. In the morning drain off, put on hot water more 
than to cover, small piece of salt pork two and a half or three 
inches square. Season with salt — not too much, as the pork will 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



33 

add some — pepper, tablespoon molasses. Pour in earthen jar or 
bean pot, set pork in the top, cover and bake in slow oven all day. 
Look in occasionally, and if too dry add hot water. When done 
should be very moist but not watery. MRS. HETTIE B. bullock. 

CREAM TURNIPS. 

Peel, slice, and cut in inch-square pieces, and stew the turnips 
till tender. Make a sauce of a cup of milk. Put in a double 
boiler, and when hot stir in a tablespoon of butter that has been 
mixed with half a spoon corn starch or flour ; season with pepper 
and salt. Drain the turnips, turn into the boiler and let stand for 
ten minutes. Do not let it boil. mrs. e, m'k. 



PARSNIP CAKES 

Boil soft and mash smooth six medium-size parsnips. Season 
with salt, pepper and butter. Add one egg, beaten light. Drop 
from spoon into a pan in which is some butter, hot. Fry brown 
on both sides. MRS. MC. 

FRIED TOMATOES 

Select medium sized smooth tomatoes, not too ripe. Cut in slices 
one inch thick. Sprinkle a little salt and pepper over them, dip in 
beatenjegg, then in rolled crackers or bread crumbs. Fry in a little 
hot lard, carefully turning when brown on one side, and serve with 
following sauce : mix one tablespoon flour smoothly with one pint 
milk, using very little till perfectly smooth, add tablespoon butter 
creamed, beat all into the milk, with one well-beaten egg, a little 
salt and pepper, and a little mace, if liked. Place stew-pan on 
range and let simmer till it thickens. Put tomatoes on a hot dish, 
pour sauce around, and serve; or, after tomatoes have been taken 
from pan, put in a half cup boiling water, thicken with a little 
browned flour, boil up and pour over tomatoes. Green tomatoes 
prepare in the same way, omitting cream sauce. 

MRS. M. SMITH. 

USING PETTIT'S ClDEit AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 
C 



34 

TOMATOES WITH MAYONNAISE. 

Smooth medium tomatoes, carefully skinned, the stem end cut 
out and piled with a mayonnaise, makes a very pretty as well as 

good dish. CONTRIBUTED. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

Grate eight ears of sweet corn, or cutting down through the centre 
of^kernels, scrap out, add two eggs, two tablespoons flour, a little salt. 
Stir together and dip wnth large spoon into frying pan with hot 
lard, in cakes; turn when brown. MRS. m'c. 

CORN PUDDING. . 

Three well beaten eggs, one quart milk, one quart corn cut and 
scraped, from the ear, or canned corn chopped fine. Salt and pepper to 
taste, two teaspoons butter. Bake half an hour. If corn is fresh 
use two quarts of milk and bake an hour and a half. 

CONTRIBUTED. 

MACARONI 

Break and wash 12 sticks macaroni, put in two quarts boiling waetr 
with one tablespoon salt, boil 25 minutes, pour off water. Prepare 
one-half cup grated cheese, one-half cup of bread crumbs. Put a 
layer of macaroni in a baking dish, sprinkle over some cheese and 
bread crumbs, a little pepper, salt, and some bits of butter. Repeat 
till all is used ; poke a hole in the centre. Pour over all one-half 
pint cream sauce, sprinkle crumbs and cheese on top, set in oven to 
brown about one-half hour. 

CREAM SAUCE FOR MACARONI 

One pint cream or milk, one big tablespoon flour. Let half of 
cream come to boil; flour mixed smooth in the remainder; stir in 
the boiling cream and boil three minutes. Use half for the amount 
of macaroni mentioned. MRS. n. s. b. 

MACARONI PIAIN 

Wash and break in pieces, six sticks of macaroni, or eight of spa- 
ghetti ; put in salted water and boil until tender but not broken, about 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



35 

20 minutes. Drain and put a layer in a baking dish ; over this some 
grated cheese and pieces of butter. Then more macaroni, cheese 
and butter, a little salt. Put over all milk or cream, till you can 
see it, or bread crumbs can be added. Bake one-half hour, or till a 
nice brown. K. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 

SALAD DRESSING No. 1. 

Six eggs beaten light, half teacup melted butter, one coffee cup 
cream, one tablespoon mustard rubbed with tablespoon of sugar, 
one coffee cup good vinegar. Cook until of the consistency of 
custard, over hot water. For two chickens the above quantity is 
sufficient; take one-third chicken, two-thirds celery, pick the meat 
when hot ; chop celery ; pepper and salt to taste. 

MRS. S. A. R. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

Shred cabbage fine, salt and pepper, one cup of vinegar, one large 
tablespoon of melted butter, one tablespoon sugar. Put in sauce 
pan and boil, pour hot on cabbage and cover. Stir in lightly with 
a fork, two tablespoons sour cream just before serving. Prepared 
in the morning. MRS. S. A. R. 

CELERY SALAD. 

Cut the celery into pieces about a half an inch long; pour over 
salad dressing No. 1. MRS. s. A. R. 

MA YONNALSE DRESSING. 

One hour before using, place on ice a soup plate, silver fork, two 
eggs, and a bottle of table oil. Prepare in a cool room. Take the 
cold plate, break yolks of eggs on it and begin to stir, only one 
way — then oil, a drop at a time, constantly stirring till you have 
used one-fourth of a large sized bottle. Add half a teaspoon mixed 

USINa PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



36 

mustard, a very little red pepper and salt to taste, the juice of half 
a lemon, constantly stirrino^ till all the ingredients are in. Vinegar 
may be used inplace of lemon, and more added if too rich. Set on 
ice until wanted. mrs, c. t. van s. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

Two tablespoons of oil to one of vinegar ; pepper and salt to taste. 
For water cresses, garnish dish with cold boiled eggs, and pour 
over the dressing or serve in sauce tureen ; also use tor lettuce, and 
lettuce and tomatoes together. mrs. c. t. van s. 

PREPARED MUSTARD. 

Two eggs, two small teaspoons salt, three tablespoons mustard 
two small cups of vinegar, one tablespoon of sugar, a small pinch 
of cayenne pepper. Cook until it thickens. 

MA YONJVAISE DRESSING. 

Yolk of one egg, half teaspoon dry mustard ; mix well, then drop 
in oil, stirring constantly until it is very thick; thin with vinegar; 
if more dressing is required, add slowly more oil, -and then vinegar, 
then half teaspoon salt, the juice of half a lemon. Stir with silver 
fork. MRS. J. c. m'c. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



EGGS. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil the ef]jgs hard ; when cold remove the shells. Lay them 
carefully in a jar, pour over them scalded vinegar, well flavored 
with whole cloves, allspice to suit the taste ; also pepper and salt. 
When cold close the jar closely. MRS. F. s. 

DEVILED EGGS. 

Boil six eggs hard; when cold remove the shells and cut in two 
with a sharp knife. Cut the yolks in a bowl, rub smooth, add tea- 
spoon soft butter, a pinch of salt, a sprinkle of pepper, a little vine- 
gar. Fill the white portion of the eggs with this mixture ; put 
parslev or lettuce on a plate and arrange the eggs on it. 

ANNA m'c. PETTIT. 

POACHED EGGS. 

Have the water hot and salted. Break each egg separately in a 
saucer, slip carefully from saucer to the water; boil slowly ; when 
done remove with a skimmer; trim neatly. Put each egg on a 
square piece of buttered toast, or on a thin slice of broiled ham. 

MRS. F. SPRAKER. 

BAKED EGGS, Wo. 1. 

Butter a smooth tin, break the eggs in a saucer one by one, and 
slip into the pan ; do not crowd so as to break the yolks. Put a 
bit of butter and a sprinkle of salt on each egg. Set them into the 
oven, bake until the whites are set; if the oven is right it will take 
but a few minutes. contributed. 

BAKED EGGS, No. 2. 

Take as many eggs as needed — separate carefully so as not to 
break the yolks. Beat the whites to a stiii froth ; spread the whites 
on the tin, then carefully drop the yolks in the froth one by one; 
sprinkle with salt, set in a hot oven and bake five minutes. 

contributed. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



38 

OMELET. 

Four eggs, one cup of milk, one tablespoon of flour, a little salt.. 
Beat the whites of the eggs to a froth ; add last. Put a little but- 
ter in the spider, cover closely, cook in a few minutes. XXX. 

BOILED EGGS. 

Put into a kettle of boiling water with a spoon; be careful not to 
crack the shell ; if desired soft, let them boil two and a half or three 
minutes ; if hard, six minutes. 

BAKED EGGS, No. 3. 

Take one dozen hard boiled eggs, cut in halves, remove the yolks, 
whip them lightly with finely chopped boiled ham, well seasoned ; 
put this mixture back into the whites, make a sauce of drawn but- 
ter, put the eggs in a pudding dish, pour the sauce over them; 
sprinkle a few bread crumbs and a little chopped ham over this; 
bake until slightly brown. Serve hot. 

MRS. CLARA T. VAN STEEN BURGH. 

I^LAIN OMELET. 

Separate six eggs, beat the whites to a stiflE froth, the yolks 
very smooth ; to each yolk add a teaspoon of milk, beat well, lastly 
stir in the whites lightly. Have ready a hot frying pan with a 
lump of butter; pour in the mixture. Do not stir, but as soon as 
it begins to set, slip a knife under around the edge, letting the mix- 
ture through. While a little soft on top, set into a hot oven a few 
minutes ; place a hot dish bottom upwards on the top of the pan,, 
and upset or roll it on the dish. mrs. d. s. r. 

rO TELL GOOD EGGS. 

Put them in cold water; if they sink, or the large end turns up,, 
they are not fresh. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



BREAKFAST AND SUPPER CAKES AND 

DISHES. 

HOP YEAST. 

Take one large handful of hops, put in bag and place in pot with 
four quarts cold water ; let it boil hard tor 20 minutes. Then pour 
slowly over one quart unsifted flour, stirring fast while pouring. 
When milk warm, add tablespoon salt, one of ginger, two of 
molasses, and a cup of yeast or two yeast cakes. Let stand 24 
hours, stirring often, then put in a jug ; do not press the cork tight. 
Keep in cool place. mrs. w. n. scholl. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

Two quarts flour, piece of butter size of an egg, two eggs, salt 
spoon of salt. Rub butter and flour together, beat eggs well and 
add with salt three-fourths of a cup yeast, and milk enough to make 
a soft dough. (If in cold weather milk should be warm.) Knead and 
set to rise. When light, knead again lightly, roll out and cut in 
cakes one-fourth inch thick. Put in warm place to rise, and bake 
in quick oven. Can be mixed at night for breakfast, or in the 
morning for supper. MRS E. F. s. 

ROLLS OR TEA BISCUIT 

Scald one pint of milk, add one tablespoon sugar, little salt, 
butter half the size of an egg, one egg. When lukewarm, stir in 
three-fourths cup of yeast, or small yeast cake; flour to make a 
stiff batter; let rise and knead as often as it gels light. Roll and 
cut out one hour before baking. MRS. s. A. R. 

BROWN BREAD, No. 1. 

One pint of corn meal, two of rye flour, half cup molasses, small 
tablespoon soda. Mix with warm water, thin enough to pour into 
a greased pail. Or it may be mixed with buttermilk or sour milk, 
using a little more soda. Steam three or four hours until it begins 
to shrink from the pail. MRS. H. D. walker. 

USING PETTIT'S CIUER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



40 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

One quart of warm water, a little salt, a heaped quart of graham 
flour, three-fourths of a cup of yeast, one cup of molasses. Stir to- 
gether and set to rise over night. In the morning mix witii wheat 
flour, stifif enough to form into loaves ; let rise, then bake one hour 
and a quarter. 

BRO WN BREAD, No. 2. 

Two cups sweet milk, one of sour milk, two of corn meal, one of 
wheat flour, one-half cup molasses, teaspoon soda. Scald sweet 
milk, pour on corn meal, stirring ; when cold add other ingredients. 
Steam three hours, then put in hot oven to dry. MRS. N. S. B. 

CORN BREAD. 

Two and one-half cups flour, one large cup of meal, two teaspoons 
cream tartar, one of soda, three eggs, one cup of sugar, one pint of 
milk, two tablespoons melted butter. Mix well together and bake 
in hot oven. MRS. J. H. nellis. 

FOX'S CORN MUFFINS. 

One cup of flour, one-half cup meal, one-half teaspoon of salt, 
two and one-half baking powder, heaped tablespoon of butter. 
Beat well, and bake in a hot oven. 

CORN CAKE. 

One cup of flour, two-thirds of a cup of meal, one-third cup of 
sugar, one egg, one tablespoon melted butter, one cup of milk, 
three teaspoons baking powder, a little salt. Bake in quick oven 
30 minutes. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS 

One pint milk scalded, one tablespoon butter melted in milk, one 
of sugar, a teaspoon of salt, one-half cup of yeast, or one-fourth of a 
cake of compressed yeast dissolved in a half cup of warm water, six 
or seven cups of flour. When the milk is cool enough, add yeast, 
then the flour gradually, that it may not be too stiff. When light, 
stir down and let rise again. Koll, and cut out : put in pans, let rise 
till ready for the oven. MRS. H. D. w. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



41 

PARKER HO USE ROLLS No. 2. 

Into one pint boiling milk, put one-half cup butter. When cool, 
add one-fourth cup white sugar, one-half cup yeast, and a pinch of 
salt. Have two quarts sifted flour, make a hole in centre, and 
pour in mixture. Do this at night, next morning mix and knead 
well. Roll out in afternoon, cutting half inch thick; rub a little 
butter on top, and fold over. When light, wash top with sweet 
milk, and bake twenty minutes in quick oven. E. F. S. 

BREAKFAST ROLLS 

Take a piece of bread dough after it has been mixed and raised 
in the morning. Roll a half inch thick, cut with a knife, one inch 
wide and four inches long; have ready a kettle of hot lard, drop 
them in and fry like cruller. Serve hot. mes. m. f. s. 

SODA BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour, four teaspoons baking powder, piece of butter 
size of egg. Mix baking powder thoroughly in flour, then the but- 
ter. Use sweet milk enough to m.ake as soft as you can roll. Bake 
in quick oven. Will made 30 biscuit. c. t. van s. 

DROP BISCUIT. 

One pint ot flour, one dessertspoon butter rubbed in the flour 
until like sand ; one small spoon salt, two teaspoons sugar, one 
small teaspoon baking powder. Rub all thoroughly together. 
Take a scant half pint of milk, make a hole in middle of flour and 
pour in ; make a stiff batter, drop on pan and bake in hot oven. 

MRS. M. L. s. 

GRAHAM GEMS, No. \. 

One pint milk, one cup graham flour, one cup wheat flour, one 
egg, a pinch of salt. Bake in hot oven. 

GRAHAM GEMS, No. 2. 

One well beaten egg, pinch cf salt, one pt. of sour milk and 
cream, one teaspoon soda. Graham flour to make a stiff batter. 
Bake in quick oven. MRS. w. N. s. 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



42 

OATMEAL. 

For eight persons take one cup prepared oat meal, two cups lake 
warm water, ^ teaspoon salt. Boil fifteen minutes in double boiler. 

GEREALINE MUFFINS, 

Two cups cerealine, two cups wheat flour, into which has been 
sifted two teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon salt; then add 
two well beaten eggs, milk sufiicient to make a soft batter. Bake 
in gem pans in a quick oven. MRS. w. n. s. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

One quart of milk, one tablespoon butter melted in the milk, put 
aside till cool. Beat well five eggs, stir into milk with three pints of 
sifted flour, small teaspoon salt, one and a half tablespoons yeast. 
Should be light in three or four hours if kept near the fire. Bake 
on a griddle. 

WHEAT CAKES. 

One pt. thick sour milk, one pt. of flour, mixed together at night. 
In the morning add one well beaten egg, one teaspoon soda, pinch 
of salt. Bake on griddle. MRS. Mcc. 

SYRUP FOR CAKES 

Ten lbs. sugar and two qts. of water will make one gal. syrup. 
Put sugar and water in a pan or preserving kettle. Set on back of 
range; stir occasionally till dissolved, then let it heat till clear, but 
do not let it get boiling hot. r. 

POP OVERS, No. 1. 

One and a half cups flour, one and a half cups milk, three eggs^ 
pinch of salt, tablespoon sugar. Put in gem pan, start in slow 
oven, hot oven towards the last. MRS. c. t. van s. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



43 

POP OVERS, No. 2. 

Two cups flour, two eggs, one pt. milk, one heaped teaspoon 
baking powder, little salt. Beat twenty minutes, put in gem pans, 
or cups. Bake twenty minutes in hot oven. hettie b. b. 

RAISED WAFFLES. 

One qt. of flour, one pt. sweet milk, lukewarm, two eggs, two 
tablespoons melted butter, teaspoon salt, half teacup of yeast. 

MRS. D. SPEAKER. 

DEUTSCHE KUCHEN. 

Make a sponge of one pint of warm sweet milk, one half yeast 
cake at night; set to rise. In the morning add a cup of Jmilk, half 
a cup of butter, two tablespoons of sugar, a pinch of cinnamon, and 
salt; flour enough to knead soft. Let rise again ; when light, roll 
in sheets one half inch thick, let rise again, then spread melted but- 
ter over the top ; sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. Will make 
two cakes in round tins. Or take a pint of light bread sponge, and 
add milk, &c. MRS. b. c. fox. 

WHEA T M U FEINS 

One pint flour, one tablespoon butter rubbed in flour, one egg, 
three small teaspoons baking powder, sweet milk to make batter 
like wheat cakes. Bake in hot oven in muffin tins. 

MISS OLLIE WAGNER. 

BLUEBERRY CAKE. 

One-half cup sugar, one egg, one small cup milk, one and a half 
cups flour, large tablespoon butter, large teaspoon baking powder, 
cup berries, pinch of salt. Bake in quick oven fifteen minutes. 

MRS. H. WALKER. 

SALLY LUNJV. 

One scant pint flour, two eggs, one teacup milk, one-half teacup 
of butter, two heaped teaspoons baking powder. Beat eggs sepa- 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



44 

rately, adding whites last. Bake in pan or loaf about half an hour 

s. A. R. 

PUFFS. 

One cup buttermilk, one egg, half teaspoon soda, a little salt. 
Mix very soft, roll thin, cut in small strips or squares, and drop in 
hot lard. To be eaten with maple syrup. MRS. s. A. R. 

GEMS. 

One egg, one cup of milk, one of flonr, or enough to make a batter 
a little thicker than pancakes. Pinch of salt, two teaspoons baking 
powder. Heat gem pans hot, butter them, then pour in batter. 
Bake in quick oven twenty minutes. contributed. 

MUFFINS. 

Melt a piece of butter half the size of an egg, in one pint of milk. 
Stir in one egg, a half cup of yeast, or half a yeast cake, one lb. of 
flour. Set to rise over night. Bake on griddle in muffin rings, 
adding a half teaspoon soda dissolved in hot water. 

CONTRIBUTED. 

HOMINY FRITTERS. 

One cup cooked hominy, one pint milk, two eggs, a little salt, 
two teaspoons baking powder, flour to make a stiff batter. Drop 
in hot lard. MRS. s. A. R. 

CHEESE CANARIES 

Cut slices of bread half an inch thick, then with a large round 
-cutter, cut circles, these cut in half — they are not the true crescent 
shape that canopies should be, but will answer. Put a tablespoon 
of butter in a small sauce-pan (because to fry so little the butter 
required wouki be twice as much if you used a frying-pan,) and fry 
to a light brown. When done take them up and grate cheese over 
them, adding pepper and salt. Put them on a tin, to be set in the 
•oven, until the meat goes on to the table. MRS. M. l. s. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



45 
FRITTERS. 

One pound and a quarter of flour, four eggs, one pint and a half 
of milk. Beat yolks light, add to the milk and stir into the flour. 
Beat whites stiff, stir in, adding a pinch of salt, and a heaped tea- 
spoon baking powder. Drop by the tablespoonful into hot lard 
and fry like crullers. MRS. E. r. s. 

APPLE FRITTERS, 

Are made by taking apples pared and cored, without dividing. 
Cut them in thin round slices and put one in each spoonful of 
batter. MRS. e. f. s. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

One cup of rice boiled with water and salt, one-half cup of sugar, 
one quart of milk. Boil until thick, then stir in two eggs, roll in 
sifted bread crumbs. Sauce : one-half glass currant jelly, one 
small glass sherry wine, boil until a little thick. Pour it over the 
croquettes, and serve at once. CLARA T. VAN steenbergh. 

JELLY SAUCE FOR RICE CROQUETTES 

One half cup boiling water, half cup currant jelly, two teaspoons 
corn starch, one tablespoon soft butter ; wet the corn starch with a 
little water, then stir it in the boiling water; cook until it thickens, 
then add the butter; last, beat the jelly in and pour it over the 
croquettes. MRS. e. m'kinstry. 

CHEESE STRA WS 

Mix two tablespoons of butter, four tablespoons of flour, four 
tablespoons of grated cheese, one egg, half teaspoon salt, a pinch of 
cayenne pepper. When these ingredients are well mixed together, 
roll out as thin as possible. Cut in strips one-quarter inch wide 
and three inches long. Bake them a nice brown. mks. m. l. s. 

FRIED CREAM. 

One pint of milk, a full half teacup of sugar, butter the size of 
a hickory nut, yolks of three eggs, two tablespoons of corn starch^ 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



46 

one tablespoon flour, a generous half cup full, all together ; half 
teaspoon of vanilla, a stick of cinnanaon one inch long; put cinna- 
mon in the milk when it is about to boil, then stir in the sugar, corn 
starch and flour, two latter mixed together and rubbed smooth 
with two or three tablespoons of (extra) cold milk ; stir it over the 
fire for fully two minutes, to cook the starch and flour. After taking 
it from the fire stir in the well beaten yolks of the eggs, return to 
the fire to set them, then remove from the fire ; take out cinna- 
mon stick, stir in butter and vanilla; pour it out on a buttered tin 
two-thirds of an inch thick. When cold nnd stiff cut into parallel- 
ograms, about two inches long by two wide; roll theiu carefully, 
first in sifted cracker crumbs, then in slightly sweetened and beaten 
egg, then again in the cracker crumbs ; put in a wire basket, dip in 
hot lard until fried a light brown color; put in a hot oven four or 
five minutes, to better soften the pudding. Sprinkle over with pn.l- 
verized sugar and serve. mes. m. l. smith. 



PIES. 

PIE CRUST. 

The easiest receipt for pie crust is the following. Three large 
cups flour, one cup lard, three-fourths cup water, half a salt spoon 
salt. This will make two round pies. Always use the best lard, 
and have it cold ; put it into the flour and salt, and with a knife 
cut it into tiny pieces. Pour in the water gradually, stirring con- 
stantly with knife, and do not touch with the hands until you have 
got it all together, and handle as little as possible, in rolling out. 
In summer take ice water. It will need a little more water in win- 
ter than in summer. 

This crust may be varied by taking part butter instead of all lard, 
and can be made with more shortening, if desired. To flake it for 
the upper crust, roll out lightly in a long strip, upon which place 
very small bits of butter, and a little sprinkling of flour. Koll like 
rolled sponge cake, cut across, and turn on end to roll out, sprink- 
ling lightly with flour. Use always fresh dough for top crust. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



47 
PENNSYLVANIA APPLE PIE. 

Line a pie plate with crust, then fill the dish full of apples, 
peeled, halved and cored. Mix together and pour over them, one 
cup sugar, half-cup cold water and one tablespoon flour, adding a 
few very small bits of butter. Bake till apples are cooked; have 
ready the whites of two eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, with two 
tablespoons pulverized sugar. Pour over top of pie and smooth, 
and return to oven a few minutes to brown slightly. Eat warm. 

MRS. A. m'c. p. 

APPLE PIE. 

One-half pound of apples, boiled and well mashed, ^ pound of 
butter beaten to a cream, mixed with the apples before the}'- are 
cold, three eggs well beaten, -| pound sugar, one lemon juice and 
grated rind. Bake in a puff paste — no upper crust. 

MRS. J. c. m'c. 

A PPLE ME RING UE PIE. 

Stew some good pie apples'and sweeten. Beat smooth and season 
with nutmeg. Line your dish with a good crust, fill with apples 
and bake. Make a meringue with the whites of three eggs, using 
two tablespoons of powdered sugar to each egg. If desired, flavor 
with rose water or vanilla. Beat till it will stand alone, and spread 
over the pie. Set back in the oven till colored a delicate brown. 
Eat cold. Very fine made with peaches. mrs. s. a. r. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

To one coffee cup stewed pumpkin pressed through a sieve, take 
one or two eggs, one pint new milk, sugar to make quite sweet, one- 
quarter teaspoon ginger, one-half cinnamon, or use nutmeg instead. 
Bake one hour in good crust. Squash pie is made precisely like 
pumpkin, only a little less of the squash. To make the pumpkin a 
darker colored pie, add more spice and a tablespoon of molasses. 

MRS. D. s. R. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



48 

LEMON PIE. 

For one pie, two lemons; juice and grated rind, two cups of 
sugar, one cup of milk, two tablespoons of corn starch, the jolks of 
four eggs. Cook together the corn strach and milk, add the other 
ingredients, and bake in a puff paste. Beat the whites of the eggs 
with six tablespoons of powdered sugar and pour over the custard ; 
put pie in oven, and brown slightly. mrs. j. c. m'c. 



LEMON PIE, No. 2. 

Grate rind and strain juice of two lemons. Pare, core and chop 
fine one large tart apple. Pound one soft cracker fine. Melt two 
teaspoons butter and mix with cracker crumbs. Mix lemon rind 
and juice with apple, and stir in two cups sugar. Beat yolks of 
two eggs to thick froth, then whites to stiffness, then both together. 
Beat these with lemon, apple and sugar. Mix buttered crumbs 
with all, and bake till crust is done. 

LEMON TARTS. 

The grated rind and juice of one lemon ; add to this one cup of 
sugar, the yolk of one egg, and a large cup of cold water, into 
which has been stirred a dessert spoonful of cornstarch. Then 
cook until it is a clear straw colored jelly. Fill the paste shells, 
(which have been baked ) with the jelly. Make a meringue with 
the white of the egg and two dessert spoonsful of powdered sugar. 
Cover the jelly with the meringue and stand in oven until a deli- 
cate brown. This will fill one dozen tarts. MRS. w. N. scholl. 



LEMON PRESERVE FOR TARTS. 

One lb. sugar, one-quarter lb. butter, six eggs, leaving out the 
whites of two ; juice and grated rind of two lemons. Cook slowly 
until the consistency of honey, stirring all the time. 

MRS. J. c. m'c. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



49 

FILLING FOR LEMON PIE. 

Put one and one-half cups boiling water in a sauce pan on the 
stove, then stir thick with two tablespoons cornstarch, one cup 
sugar, (powdered) the yolks of three eggs, juice of two lemons or 
three if necessary, a little salt, a little butter. Pour into crust and 
bake. Beat whites of eggs, add one teaspoonful of sugar, put on 
pie when baked, and brown over. CLARA VAN steenberg. 

PEACH PIE. 

Peel and halve peaches ; line a pie plate with crust, lay in the 
fruit, sprinkle liberally over them sugar and a little water. Bake 
with an upper crust or with cross bars of paste over the top. 

MRS. FRASIER SPRAKER. 

PINE APPLE PIE. 

One pineapple chopped fine, one-half cup water, two eggs, two 
cups sugar, three tablespoonfuls floui'. To be made with two crusts 
and will be enough for two pies. Florence m. spraker. 

PINE APPLE PIE. 

One teacup grated pineapple, one-half teacup water, one-half tea- 
cup sugar, yolks of two eggs, two even tablespoons cornstarch. 
Put in a pie dish lined with crust and bake half an hour. 

ORANGE PIE. 

Grate the rind from two large oranges, squeeze out the juice, 
beat four eggs and stir into them a cup of powdered sugar, add one- 
half teacup melted butter, after which add the orange with half 
pint milk or cream. Bake in a puff paste like a custard. 

MRS. J. C. M'c. 

BANANA PIE. 

Line a pie plate with rich crust and bake. Slice three or four 
bananas fine, according to size, and fill the crust when cold ; sprinkle 
a little sugar over them. Whip a teacup of sweetened cream very 
light and spread over the pie. MRS. ALICE WATSON. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 
D 



50 

MINCE MEAT. 

Boil four or five lbs. beef (solid meat) till tender. Chop fine, and 
to each bowlful of chopped meat, take two of chopped apples ; add 
one lb. chopped suet, two lbs. seeded raisins, (chopped) one lb. cur- 
rants, half lb. figs, also chopped, two lbs. sugar, half pt. molasses, salt, 
a little pepper, cloves, cinnamon and mace ( ground) to taste. Moisten 
well with cider, adding boiled cider, if jou can procure it ; and after 
mixing, put in large pan and cook for half an hour, when more 
spices and cider can be added, if needed. This may be canned 
like fruit, and set away for months. MRS. A. m'c. p. 

GREAM PIE, No. 1. 

Make an under crust for the pie and bake ; when done, fill with 
the following : three cups of milk, three tablespoons cornstarch, three 
eggs(the yolks only,)one cup sugar,a little salt. Cook until it thickens. 
Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, with a little sugar, and 
brown. Florence m. spraker. 

GREAM PIE, No. 2. 

With the yolks of two eggs, mix one-half cup sugar, one large 
tablespoon flour, a little salt, one pint cold milk, let thicken on 
the range. Flavor to suit taste. Put in a baked crust and bake 
eight minutes. Frosting made with the whites of the eggs and 
.sugar ; a tablespoon of jelly added makes it very nice. 

MRS. M. L. SMITH. 1 

GHOGOLATE PIE. 

Two cups of milk, yolks of two eggs, two-thirds cup sugar, two 
tablespoons cornstarch, two tablespoons grated chocolate. Heat 
the milk, sugar and chocolate together, add the cornstarch mixed 
in a little cold milk, then add the beaten yolks. Let all come to a 
boil. Line a pie tin with good pie crust, bake, then pour in the 
chocolate cream. Make a meringue of the two whites of eggs. 

MRS. E. MCKINSTRY. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



51 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

Take one quart of flour, sift into it two teaspoons of baking 
powder, a little salt, three tablespoons of butter well rubbed 
through ; add sweet milk enough to make soft dough, divide into 
two parts, roll each flat the same size, ])at one on top of the other 
■and bake; when done they will separate. Spread on plenty of 
butter. Have the strawberries washed and drained, slightly 
crushed ; spread them on the crust, sprinkle well with sugar, put 
■on the upper crust also well spread with butter. 

MRS. FRASIER SPEAKER. 

SAUCE FOR STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

Take one-half cup butter, one and one-half cups sugar beaten to a 
cream, one pint strawberries mashed ; mix together, add whites 
■of two eggs beaten light. MRS. d. h. f. 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



PUDDINGS. 

VELVET PUDDING. 

Five eggs, beaten separately. One teacup of white sugar. Four 
tablespoons corn starch, dissolved in a little cold milk, added to 
yolks and sugar. Boil three pints sweet milk, and pour into it the 
yolks and sugar while boiling. Remove from fire when it becomcg. 
quite thick. Flavor with vanilla and pour into a baking dish. 
Beat the whites to a stiff froth with one-half cup white sugar, then, 
pour over the top of pudding, and return to oven until slightly 
brown. To be eaten with sauce. MRS. ALICE c. geortner. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, three eggs, two dessert-spoons corn-starch. 
Use yolks, corn-starch and milk, and make a boiled custard. Let 
it stand until cold. Peel and slice four oranges, with two cup& 
sugar. Pour custard over oranges and stir all together. Then 
beat whites and add a little sugar, and pour over. whole. Set in 
the oven to brown. Let it get very cold before serving. 

MRS. ALICE C. GEORTNER. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

One half pound prunes, stewed soft, and stones taken out. Let 
cool before using. Whites of five eggs, beaten stiff. Then beat 
the prunes in the eggs, a little at a time. Stir in three tablespoons 
of sugar. Bake in a buttered dish until a nice brown. Bake in 
moderate oven. Eaten with whipped cream. 

MRS. N. S. BRUMLEY. 

FLORENTINE PUDDING. 

Make a sponge cake of six eggs, and bake in four cakes, in jelly 
tins. Beat the yolks of four eggs with four tablespoons of sugar. 
Pour one quart boiling milk on beaten eggs, stirring rapidly all 
the time. Then return to fire. Make a paste with three table- 
spoons corn starch mixed with a little cold milk, which stir at 



TilY PllKSERVlNG YOUR FKLUT WITHOUT HEAT, 



58 

once into custurd on fire. Boil until thickened, stirring all the 
time. Flavor while hot with one teaspoon vanilla. Put one layer 
of this, when cold, between two of the cakes. Make chocolate 
icing of three tablespoons grated chocolate, six tablespoons sugar, 
two of cream, a small piece butter. Let it simmer a few minutes. 
While hot spread over top of pudding and sprinkle with sugar. 

MISS LIDIE BAUM. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 

One-quarter cup of sugar, one-quarter cup of butter, one-half 
•cup flour, five eggs, one pint boiled milk. Mix sugar and flour 
with a little cold milk and stir into boiling milk. Cook until it 
thickens and is smooth. Add butter, then well-beaten yolks of 
eggs. Lastly, whites beaten stiflt". Bake in shallow dish, placed 
in pan of hot water, in hot oven. To be eaten with "Sea Foam 
Sauce." MRS. h. van evra. 

GOCOANUT PUDDING. 

Yolks of two eggs, one pint milk, one half cup sugar, one table- 
spoon corn starch, one cocoanut grated. Bake one- half hour. Beat 
the whites with a little ])o\vdered sugar, then pour over pudding 
-and brown. mrs. d. s. morrell. 

LEMON CREAM PUDDING. 

Beat yolks of four eggs with four tablespoons of sugar. Add 
juice and grated rind of one lemon and two tablespoons hot water. 
Simmer until thickened. Remove from fire. Stir in whites ot 
four eggs beaten to a stiff froth with two tablespoons sugar. Stir 
in the whites by tablespoons, beating some time after all are added. 

MRS. H. D. walker. 

SAGO AND APPLE PUDDING. 

Pare apples and punch out the cores. Fill holes with cinnamon 
and sugar, using two teaspoons of cinnamon to a cup of sugar. 
Putin pan a heaping tablespoon of sago to each apple. Put in the 
apples, fill the pan (nearly^ with water and bake one and one-half 
hours. MRS. H. D. W. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



54 

SJVOW PUDDING, No. L 

Whites of five eggs beaten very stiii, one-half box of gelatine 
soaked in warm water, juice of one lemon, one cup powdered 
sugar. Add sugar to eggs, and having put gelatine and lemon 
juice through a strainer, beat gradually into eggs. Put in mould. 
Served with cream or custard. clara t. van steenbergh. 

SNOW PUDDING, No. 2. 

One pint of boiling water, three tablespoons corn starch dis-* 
solved in cold water, whites of three eggs thoroughly beaten, a lit- 
tle salt. Stir corn starch into water until clear. Add the whites 
with tA^o tablespoons of sugar. Remove from fire when thoroughly 
mixed. Flavor and pour in mould. Serve with custard No. 1. 

MRS. E. M'kINSTRY. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

A scant cup of butter, one-half cup of molasses, one cup sweet 
milk, one and one-half cup graham flour, one teaspoon soda, one 
egg, one cup seeded raisins, one teaspoon each of cloves, cinna- 
mon and nutmeg. Steam two and one-half hours. Serve with 
sauce No. 1. mrs. c. g. pettit. 

SUET PUDDING, No. 1. 

One cup of suet, one-half cup molasses, one cup sweet milk, one 
cup seeded raisins, one tablespoon ginger, one teaspoon cream 
tartar, one-half teaspoon soda, flour to make a stiff batter. Boil 
two hours. MRS. J. c. m'c. 

SUET PUDDING, No. 2. 

One cup of suet, one cup molasses, three cups of flour, one and 
one-half cups milk, one and one- half cups ©f seeded raisins, one 
cup currants, three tablespoons baking powder. Steam three 
hours in pudding tin. If wanted richer, add more fruit. Serve 
with wine sauce. clara t. van steenbergh. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



55 

TAPIOCA CREAM OR FRENCH CUSTARD. 

Four tablespoons tapioca soaked over night in water enough to 
cover. Beat yolks of three eggs and two-thirds of a cup of sugar. 
Mix with tapioca after draining. Heat one quart milk, put in 
eggs, sugar and tapioca. Let boil until thick as custard Salt 
and flavor. Use whites of eggs for meringue, allowing two table- 
spoons of sugar to one .egg. Serve cold. mrs. d. s. head. 

SI At RLE RICE PUDDING. 

One cup of rice boiled in water until nearly soft, drain, and add 
milk instead. When quite soft, add yolks of four eggs and four 
tablespoons sugar, then beat whites with same quantity of sugar 
and any flavor you wish. Pour on top of pudding, and set in 
oven long enough to brown slightly, MRS. E. F. S. 

QUEENS PUD DIN 0. 

One pint of bread crumbs, one quart milk, one cup sugar, grated 
rind of one lemon, one teaspoon lemon extract, small piece of 
butter, pinch of salt. Bake in good oven, then spread a layer of 
jam over the top and cover with a meringue made with whites of 
two eggs. To be eaten hot or cold. h. v. d. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk. While boiling, add one and one-half ounces 
of chocolate dissolved in milk. When nearly cold stir in beaten 
yolks of six eggs, with four tablespoons of sugar. Flavor with 
vanilla. Bake like custard. Beat the whites of the eggs with six 
tablespoons of sugar. Pour over pudding. Bake three minutes. 
To be eaten cold. mrs. m. l. smith. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

Slice a quart of peaches in a pudding dish, put in a small piece 
of butter. Take yolks of two eggs, one tablespoon of corn starch, 
one pint of sweet milk and one cup of sugar. Let it come to a 
boil, and pour over the peaches. Then bake. When done, beat 
the whites to a stiff froth, sweeten and pour over the top, return to 
the oven and brown. To be eaten cold or hot. mrs. m. l. s. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



56 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One cup of sugar, one cup sweet milk, one egg, three table- 
spoons melted butter, three teaspoons baking powder, one pint of 
flour. Bake and serve hot with wine sauce. martha a. eice. 

JELLY PUDDING. 

One cup pearl tapioca, soaked over night in one and one-half 
pints of water. Cook one hour, then add salt, half cup of sugar, 
one tumbler of jelly, stir till dissolved and set it on ice. Serve 
with " milk sauce." ' contributed. 

ECLAIR PUDDING. 

Four eggs, one cup sugar, one cup flour, one teaspoon of baking 
powder. Bake this. When baked, spread with the following 
icing: Icing — The white of one egg, one-half cup of sugar, two 
tablespoons grated chocolate. Boil until thick and smooth. Just 
before serving pudding, split and fill with the following custard: 
One pint milk, a little salt, yolks of three eggs, one-half cup sugar, 
two tablespoons corn starch. Flavor with vanilla. 

FLORENCE M. SPRAKER. 

DIXIE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, one pint bread crumbs, one pound sugar, six 
or four eggs, two small or one large lemon. Separate the whites 
from the yolks, and add to the yolks four tablespoons of sugar. 
Then add the bread crumbs and milk with the grated rind of the 
lemon and bake. Beat the whites, sugar and lemon juice together 
until light. When the pudding is nearly cold, cover with the 
icing and bake a light brown. contributed. 

RICE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, four tablespoons of rice, butter size of lialf 
an egg, one half cup sugar, a little salt. Bake slowly two hours. 

MRS. M. L. SMITH. 



THY PUKSKRVIXG YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT EI EAT. 



57 
BREAD PUDDING. 

Spread with butter two slices of bread, cut in dice. Prepare a 
-custard of one quart milk, four eggs, sugar to taste, nutnneg. Pour 
over bread, bake until custard is done. Serve with hard sauce, 
with or without wine. MRS. d. s read. 

TIPSY PARSON. 

Blanch one pound of almonds bj pouring on boiling water. 
When cold thej will slip out of skins. Stick them in a sponge 
cake. Pour over cake one cup sherry wine. Have ready a cus- 
tard and pour over the cake. Prepare just before serving. 

MRS. 1). S. READ. 

GERMAN TOAST. 

Take stale baker's bread sliced, one pint sweet milk. Beat one 
•egg in milk. Dip in the bread about one hour before using. Lay 
on moulding board to dry. When ready to be served bake on a 
pancake griddle. The sauce — one egg, three-quarters of a cup 
of sugar, one-half cup batter, wine glass sherry wme. Mix butter 
and sugar. Add yolk beaten. Add sherry and beaten whites of 
■eggs. Serve on bread hot. miss o. wagner. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Two tablespoons of Indian meal, one tablespoon wheat flour. 
Mix with a little cold milk, then stir into one quart of boiling 
milk. Add a little salt and boil twenty minutes. When cold, 
beat two eggs, a cup of sugar. Add spice, and bake three quar- 
ters of an hour. A. c. G. 

HAMILTON PUDDING. 

Two eggs, two tablespoons sugar, one half cup butter, one cup 
milk, one cup chopped raisins, two cups flour, three teaspoons 
baking powder. Melt butter and add sugar. Beat eggs thoroughly 
and add the milk. Flour the raisins. Put baking powder in flour 
Steam in large cups one houi-. Wine sauce. 

MRS, w. N. s. 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



58 

INDIAN BAKED PUDDING. 

One quart sweet milk, butter size of butternut, three eggs well 
beaten, one teacup Indian meal, one-half cup seeded raisins, two- 
thirds of a cup of sugar. Scald the milk and stir in the meal 
while boiling, then let it stand until warm. Stir all together and 
bake one and one-half hours. MRS. G. w. van vlack. 

FIG PUDDING. 

One-half lb. of beet suet chopped very fine, one and one-half 
pints bread crumbs rolled very fine, three-quarters lb. fresh figs 
chopped very fine, one whole grated nutmeg, two teaspoons cinna- 
mon, one wine glass good sherry wine, one-half teacup sugar, yolks 
of four egofs, one teacup sweet milk, one teacup sifted flour, one tea- 
spoon baking powder in the flour. Beat all well together and steam 
three hours. 

SA UCE FOR FIG PUDDING. 

Whites of four eggs, leave the yolks for pudding; one teacup 
powdered sugar, wine glass good sherry, beat well and have soft 
and pour over pudding before serving. 

MRS. G. W. VAN V. 

CBA CKER PUDDING. 

Seven Boston crackers rolled very fine, three pints of milk, three 
eggs well beaten, one and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, 
one-half cup seeded raisins, one-half teaspoon nutmeg, one-halt' tea- 
spoon cinnamon, pinch of salt' Mix the whole in the dish to be 
baked in. Bake the day before in a moderate oven, four to five 
hours. Serve cold with cream which is whipped, without sugar. 

MRS. G. W. VAN V. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

Two rounded tablespoons corn starch, wet to a smooth paste with 
water, add to this two-thirds pint boiling water, and cook in a 
double boiler until corn starch boils and thickens ; remove and mix 
with the whites of two eggs stiffly beaten. Turn in a mould to 
harden. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



59 
SA UCE FOR PUDDING. 

Beat the yolks of the eggs well, add a scant cup of sugar, one 
cup of milk, cook in a doable boiler till thick as cream, and add 
flavoring. MRS. W. N. S. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

Stew one lb. prunes, till soft, remove pits, and beat u]) fine with 
a fork. Beat the white of one egg stiff, and add to one ]>int cream, 
after it has been whipped to a froth, and a heaping tablespoon of 
sugar stirred in. Mix all with prunes, put in dish and bake twenty 
minutes. MRS. E. m'k. 

SAUCE No. 1. 

Beat togother one cup of sugar and one half cup of butter, until 
creamy; add one tablespoon flonr, and stir again. Just before 
serving set on stove and stir in three-quarters pint of boiling water, 
stirring until it thickens. MRS. C. G. P. 

3IILIC SAUCE, 

One cup of sugar, one egg, one pint of milk, one tablespoon flour, 
cook five minutes or until done. CON. 

SA UCE FOR VEL VET PUDDING. 

Yolks of two eggs, one cup white sugar, one tablespoon of butter. 
Beat eggs and all the other ingredients well and add one cup boil- 
ing milk, then place it over the fire and let it come to a boiling 
heat. Flavor with vanilla. A. C. G. 

CREAMY SAUCE. 

One half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, four tablespoons 
of cream or milk, four tablespoons of wine, or four additional 
spoons of milk. Beat butter to a cream, add sugar and milk grad- 
ually beating till very light. Place bowl in which sauce has been 
made in a basin of boiling water, stir a few minutes till smooth. 
The last to be done just before serving. MRS. D. S. R. 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRKSERVATIVE. 



60 
CREAM SAUCE, {COLD.) 

One pint cream, four tablespoons sugar, nutmeg or vanilla. Siir 
■until sugar is dissolved. MRS. D. S. k. 

F0A3I SA UCE. 

One cup of sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one tablespoon of flour. 
Add one spoonful of hot water, enough to enable you to beat light. 
When ready to serve, add three gills boiling water, beating ar the 
time. Do not coi)k. One half wine glass of brandy added at the 
last will make a good brandy sauce. MRS. i). s. R. 

HARD SAUCE. 

One half cup butter, one and one-half cup powdered sugar. Add 
sugar gradually and beat till very light. Add wine glass of sherry 
wine with a little nutmeg. mrs. d. s. r. 

SA UCE FOR D UM FLINGS. 

One cup molasses, one cup light brown sugar, one cup boiling 
water, butter size of an egg, nutmeg to taste.' Boil and thicken 
with a little flour. Miss o. wagner. 

PUFFING SA UCE FOR THREE PEOFLE. 

One egg well beaten, one-half cup of sugar, add three tablespoons 
hot milk, stir well. Make in a bowl and set in the top of teakettle, 
let it stand until ready to serve, without stirring, then add two tea- 
spoons wine or brandy. Make just before serving. 

MRS. W. N. s. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



ICES, ICE CREAMS, JELLIES, ETC. 

LEMON ICE. 

To one quart of water add one lb. sugar, the juice of four 
lemons and one orange. Let the sugar dissolve thoroughly, strain 
and freeze. MRS. d. s. mokrell. 

If desired, the well- beaten whites of two eggs can be added just 
before freezing. 

FRUJT ICES. 

These are made by taking one quart of any desired fruit, raw or 
canned, cut in very small slices or pieces; add one quart water, and 
about threefonrths lb. sugar, according to acidity of fruit. The 
beaten white of one egg added just before freezing, is an improve- 
ment. e. 

LEMON SHERBET. 

Soak one tablespoon of gelatine in one cup water till soft, add 
one cup boiling water to dissolve. When cool, strain, add one lb. 
sugar, one quart cold water, and the juice of four or five lemons. 
Freeze. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

To the juice uf ten large oranges take one quart water and one 
lb. sugar. Soak one large tablespoon of gelatine in a little water, 
adding when soft half a cup of boiling water; strain and cool, mix 
with the other ingredients, and freeze. 

FR UIT FRAPPEE. 

Line a mold with ice cieain. Put fresh sliced fruit or berries in 
the centre, fill up the mold with ice cream, cover very closely, and 
pack in ice and salt for about iialf an houi*. 



USING PKTTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



62 



ICE CREAM. 

For one gallon of ice cream, take two quarts of rich milk, one 
q\iart of cream, one pound and a quarter of sugar, (granulated or 
white coffee sugar,) and full one-third of a box of Cox's gelatine. 
Let the gelatine soak for iialf an hour, or until soft, in one quart of 
the milk, then put on the range, but not where very hot. Stir con- 
stantly until quite dissolved, then add the sugar, and do not cease 
stirring until that has also dissolved, when strain directly into the 
freezer, and add the other quart of milk. If in haste, the freezer 
can be set in a pail of cold water, and the milk kept stirred for a 
few minutes; otherwise stand in a cool place, first adding one large 
tablespoonful of extract of vanilla. When ready to freeze, stir in 
the cream. MRS. emeline f. smith. 

WRITE ICE CREAM. 

Take two quarts cream and one quart milk ; beat together one 
pound of sugar, and the whites of two eggs, mix with the cream, 
and whip with egg-beater until frothed; add milk, lemon flavor? 
and freeze. 

STRA W BERRY ICE CREAM. 

Put one pound of granulated sugar over one quart strawberries* 
and let stand for an hour. Then add one quart of sweet cream and 
freeze. Peaches sliced small can be used instead of strawberries, 
made in the same manner. miss venette Stafford. 

STRA W BERRY CREAM. 

One-half box of gelatine dissolved in one-half cup of water ; wlien 
soft, add one cup of boiling water, and put aside to cool. Mash 
together one quart strawberries and one cup powdered sugar, let 
stand one hour, strain berries and add to gelatine; place pail in 
pan of ice water and beat until it thickens; stir in one pint whipped 
cream. Turn into mould to cool. mrs. n. s. b. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



63 

BISCUIT GLAck 

Yolks of four eggs beaten, sweetened and flavored to taste. Two 
-quarts cream after it is beaten and sweetened. Put yolks in pan 
with cream on top ; set in ice and salt for two hours, when it will 
be sufficiently frozen. MRS. l. w. frost. 

CHA EL OTTE li USiiE. 

One quart ot cream whipped; sweeten and flavor with vanilla. 
First dissolve one-half box of gelatine in two-thirds pint of water, 
strain gelatine, and stir slowly into the cream while warm. Add a 
small pinch of salt. Let cream stand until it commences to thicken, 
then stir thoroughly and turn into tins lined with sponge cake. 
This will serve sixteen people. MRS. N. s. b. 

SPANISH GEE AM. 

One quart of cream, one cup powdered sugar, one tablespoon of 
gelatine soaked in three tablespoons of water, beat in whites of 
three eggs, then stir in beaten cream. Turn in mould and set away 

to cool. C. T. V. S. 

BA VAEIAN CREAM. 

One quart sweet cream, yolks of four eggs, one half box gelatine, 
one teacup sugar, vanilla or almond to taste. Soak gelatine in a 
little cold water one hour, stir in half the cream hot, beat yolks 
with sugar and add, heat till it begins to thicken. When cool stir 
in remainder of cream beaten to a froth, a spoonful at a time, beat- 
ing till like sponge cake mixture. Turn in mould and set on ice. 
May be made with half milk. MRS. D. S. R. 

SPANISH CREAM, No. 2. 

Dissolve one-half box Cox's gelatine in one pint cold milk, scald 
another pint of milk, and pour over when gelatine is dissolved. 
Beat yolks of two eggs with one cup sugar, and stir in milk, cook 
ten minutes, then add the whites of eggs beaten stiff, stir briskly a 
few minutes, and then pour in mould and stand away to harden. 
Eat with cream or lemon sauce. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



64 

LEMON SA IJCE. 

The juice of one lemon, one large cup water, one-half tea-cup 

sugar. Let this come to a boil. Beat the yolks of two eggs light^ 

into which pour the boiling liq\iid, stirring hard. Set back on stove, 

let it come to a boil again, stirring all the time. Pour in sauce dish 

and stand away to cool. Beat the whites of the eggs very stiff, 

with three tablespoons powdered sugar, and put on top of sauce. 

MRS. E. F. s. 
FLOATING ISLAND. 

The whites of four eggs, four tablespoons of currant jellv, four 
tablespoons powdered sugar. Beat all together until very light 
and stiff. Flavor with vanilla. Serve with cream. MRS. B. 

FOR A DESSERT. 

. Line a large dish with sponge cake, thickly spread with jelly or 
marmalade. Then fill the dish with the whips. 

WHIPS 

Sweeten one pint of cream, add a glass of wine.> Stand in a cool 
place while you beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, add 
these to the cream, stirring rapidly, and pour in the dish. 

MRS, J, C. M'C. 

WINE JELLY. 

One box of Cox's gelatine, pour over it one pint cold water, let 
it stand ten minutes, then add one quart boiling water, one and one- 
half pounds sugar, mix well, add a little stick of cinnamon, if 
desired. When neai-ly cold, add one pint wine, a wine-glass of 
brandv; strain through a fine cloth into moulds. MRS. J. C. m"c. 

LEMON JELL Y. 

Dissolve one-half box of gelatine in one cup cold water, grate 
two and one-half lemons, take off the thick skin, and grate the 
pulp. Put three cups of sugar and three cups water in a kettle, 
Jet it boil a few minute?, then add the pulp, the grated rind, and dis- 
solve gelatine, and one tablespoon of vinegar, and let boil a moment 
longer. Strain into mould. M. A. R. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



65 

PHI LA DELPHI A JELL Y. 

Over three-quarters of a box of gelatine, pour one-half pint cold 
water, and let it stand for ten minutes, then add a half pint of boil- 
ing water. Squeeze the juice of two lemons, and add with the 
sugar to the gelatine while hot. Strain and let it stand until it 
begins to thicken, then stir in two oranges and two bananas sliced, 
and turn into mould to harden. Eat with cream. Wine jelly can 
be used instead of lemon jelly. mrs. b. 

CIDER JELL Y. 

Two-thirds of a box of gelatine, two coffee cups granulated sugar, 
one-half pint cold water, one-half pint cider, one pint boiling water, 
juice of one lemon, pinch of cinnamon. Put gelatine to soalc in the 
cold water one hour, have ready the sugar, cinnamon and lemon 
juice, add gelatine, then the boiling water, and lastly the cider, add- 
ing two tablespoons brandy. CON. 

QUICK CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

One tea cup cream, one teaspoon gelatine dissolved in a very 
little warm water; beat cream thick and sweeten and flavor to 
taste; add gelatine and pour into dish lined with lady fingers, or 
slices of sponge cake. Let the gelatine cool, and turn into the 
cream while beating it. MRS. w. N. s. 

ORANGE CHARLOTTE. 

One third box of gelatine, one-third cup of cold water, one-third 
cup boifing water, one cup sugar, juice of one lemon, one cup of 
orange juice and pulp, whites of three eggs. Line mould with lady 
fingers. One pint of cream may be used in place of eggs. Other 
fruits can be used. MRS. W. N. S. 

APPLE COMPOTE. 

Pare and core eight apples, leaving whole. Make a syrup of 
three fourths pound of sugar, to one pound of fruit; when it boils 
put in the fruit and boil till clear; place fruit in a glass bowl. Dis- 
solve half a box of gelatine in one-half cup of hot water, and stir 
briskly into the syrup, having first taken it from the fire ; strain 
over apples, and set in a cool place. CON. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 
E 



66 



STRA W BERRY ORE AM. 

One half cup gelatine dissolved in half cup water, when soft add 
one-half cup boiling water, put aside to cool ; one quart straw- 
strawberries, one pint cream, one cup powdered sugar. Mash ber- 
ries and sugar together, let stand one hour. Whij) the cream, 
strain berries and geletine. Place pail in pan of ice water and 
beat till it thickens ; stir in whipped cream, and turn into molds to 

cool. MRS. N. S. BRUMLEY. 



CAKES. 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

In preparing the materials for cake-making, the flour and sugar 
should be carefully sifted before weighing or measuring. If the 
butter is slightly softened and beaten with a fork before putting it 
with the sugar, they will mix more easily. If eggs are to be beaten 
separately, no speck of the yolk should be allowed to mix with 
the whites. Baking powder should always be mixed with the 
floui-. If soda and cream tartar are used, sift the latter into the 
flour, and dissolve the soda in the milk. If fruit is used, seed 
raisins and chop a little, wash currants carefully and dry, slice 
citron very thin. A little of the flour should be saved to mix 
with the fruit, which should be added last of all. 

The following table will be of use where scales are not at hand : 
One quart of flour, sifted and well heaped, weighs one pound. 
Four teacups sifted flour, even full, weigh , 
'One pint soft butter, well packed, weighs . 
Two and three-quarters teacups powdered sugar weig:!: 
Two teacups granulated sugar weigh . 
Two teacups, heaped, best coffee sugar, weigh 
Two and a half teacups best brown sugar weigh 
Two tablespoons, well heaped, of flour, weigh 
Soft butter, size of an egg, weighs 
One wine glass, common size, equals four tablespoons or two fluid 

ounces. 
A common sized tumbler or teacup holds half a pint 



one ounce, 
two ounces. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



07 

ANGEUS FOOD. 

Use for measuring, a large cup or tumbler holding three-fourths 
■of a pint, and let the measure be only level full. Sift one cup of 
flour four times, then measure, (it will have increased in bulk,) 
add one teaspoonful cream tartar and sift again; one cup and a 
half granulated sugar, sift and measure again ; the whites of eleven 
eggs beaten to a very stiff froth before adding sugar, and one tea- 
spoon vanilla, then the flour lightly stirred in. Put in ungreased 
•and very clean pan, set in moderate oven, which should not be 
•opened for fifteen minutes. Bake for forty minutes. Try with 
broom splint, and let it remain a few minutes longer if not quite 
baked. Turn pan upside down to cool, standing edges on some- 
thing to prevent it from resting down on table. 

ANGEL'S FOOD, No. 2. 

Whites of eleven eggs beaten very light, one-half pound pulver- 
ized sitgar, one-fourth pound flour, one teaspoon lemon essence, 
•one teaspoon cream tartar. Sift flour and sugar several times 
before using. Bake in tunnel dish without paper or greasing. 

MISS O. M. WAGNER. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, two-thirds cup milk, two 
and one half cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, whites of 
eight eggs. Flavor to taste. MRS. l. w. frost. 

CORSSTARCH CAKES. 

Two cups pulverized sugar, one scant cup butter, one-half cup 
milk, six eggs beaten separately, one paper corn starch, two tea- 
spoons baking powder. Bake in patty pan tins. 

MRS. A. J. read. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of ten eggs, yolks of seven, one tumbler of flour, one 
and a half tumblers of granulated sugar, one teaspoon cream 
tartar, juice and grated rind of one lemon, one-half teaspoon of 
.ammonia, (aqua ammonia will answer.) Beat the yolks and one- 



USINU PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



68 

half tumbler of sugar very light. Beat the whites of the eggs to a 
stiff froth, stirring in lightly the remainder of the sugar. Add the 
beaten yolks and sugar, the lemon also, and stir in the flour 
lightly, adding the ammonia last. Sift the sugar once before meas- 
uring. Sift the flour three times and measure. Then add the cream 
tartar to it and sift again. Bake in an ungreased pan as in 
Angel's Food, and when baked turn the pan upside down until 
cake is cool. con. 

LADY'S CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, one and one-half cups sugar, two cups flour, 
one cup (scant) sweet milk, one teaspoon cream tartar, one-half tea. 
spoon soda, whites of four eggs well beaten. Flavor with peach 
or almond. MRS. H. D. walker. 

SILVER CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, two and one-half cups flour, one-half cup but- 
ter, three-fourths cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoonful soda dis- 
solved in milk, whites of eight eggs, one teaspoonful cream tartar.. 
Stir butter and sugar together, then add the whites beaten to a. 
stiff froth, then the milk. After stirring this well, add the cream 
tartar dry. Bake half an hour. MRS. c. H. burbeck. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, one and one half cups 
flour, one tablespoon ice water or lemon juice, one heaped teaspoon 
baking powder. Beat yolks and sugar till very light. Beat 
whites to stiff froth, adding last carefully. This makes a good- 
sized loaf. For smallef, use four eggs, one cup each of sugar and 
flour, same amount of water and baking powder. 

MRS. D. S. READ, 

SPONGE CAKE, No. 2. 

Yolks of three eggs beaten with one cup of sugar very thor- 
oughly. Add one-half cup of water, one good teaspoon of baking 
powder, one and one-half cups of flour. Beat the whites to a stiff' 
froth and add just before putting in the oven. MRS. H. D. w. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



69 

DELICATE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, one and 
•one half cups flour, whites of four eggs, one teaspoon baking pow- 
der. AIRS. N. S. BRUMLEY. 

CUP CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three cups flour, one cup milk 
four eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. Bake in loaf or layers 
or add spice and raisins for spice cake, with tablespoon of molasses, 

MRS. D. s. R. 

POUND CAKE, OLD RECEIPT. 

i Three-quarters pound of butter, beaten to a cream, one pound 
sugar, ten eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one wine glass 
brandy, flavor with nutmeg, one pound flour. Beat for half an 
hour, bake in slow oven for nearly an hour. Try with broom 
splint ; if it comes out clean the cake is done. MRS. e. f. s. 

CHEAP POUND CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, five tablespoons 
sweet milk, one cup flour, two teaspoons baking powder. 

MRS. D. S. R. 

CO CO A BUT CAKE. 

Three cups sugar, three quarters cup butter, one cup sweet milk, 
whites of six eggs, three and one half cups flour, one teaspoon 
soda, two of cream tartar, one of salt, and the grated meat of 
one cocoanut. mrs. e. f. s. 

NUT CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, half cup butter, half cup milk, two cups flour, 
whites of tive eggs, one teaspoon baking powder, one coffee cup 
nut pits; add the beaten whites last or after part of flour has been 

put in. • MRS. C. G. PETTIT. 

CLAY CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, half pound of butter, six eggs, three tea- 
spoons baking powder, half pint sweet milk, one pound of flour ; 
flavor. Bake in loaf or layers. MRS. E. F. s. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



70 

FIG FILLING, FOR CAKE. 

One cup seeded raisins, half pound figs, both chopped. Put in 
pan with one cup sugar and half cup hot water, boil till smooth 
and thick, stirring often. Set off to cool, then spread on cake ; it 
is enough for two layers. _h. b s. 

CLARK CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, three-quarters cup butter, one cup milk, whites 
of six eggs, three heaping teaspoons baking powder, three cups of 
four : flavor. mrs. j. n. snell. 

OLD GOLD CAKE. 

Six ounces sugar, six ounces flour, three ounces butter, yolks of 
six eggs, one and one-half teaspoons baking powder, one-third cup^ 
milk. Flavor with nutmeg and add three quarters cup of currants. 

EMELINE. 

SOFT JUMBLE CAKE. 

Two coffee cups sugar and four eggs beaten together twenty 
minutes ; add one cup butter beaten to a cream, three teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, one cup milk and three cups flour. 

MRS. E. F. S. 

PUFF CAKE. 

One cup butter, three cups sugar, four cups flour, one cup milk, 
five eggs, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream tartar. Dissolve 
soda in milk, and sift cream tartar with flour. It is very nice 
with grated rind and juice of lemon. Can be baked in lai-ge flat 
pan and cut in diamonds, or baked in layers. 

MRS. JACOB H. NELLIS. 

MINNEHAHA CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, half cup butter, one cup milk, three cups flour, 
three eggs, two teaspoons baking powdei-. For filling, one teacup 
sugar with a very little water boiled together until brittle when 
dropped in water. Eemove from stove and stir in quickly the 
white of a well beaten egg, two cups chopped raisins, or one cup 
of raisins and one cup of hickory nuts. MRS. w. bullock. 

TKY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



71 

FEATHER CAKE. 

One tablespoon butter, one cup sugar, one cup milk, two cups 
flour, three teaspoons baking powder, one egg. mks. d. s. r. 

SANDWICH CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, three-quarters cup of butter, one cup sweet 
milk, three eggs, two and a half cups flour, three teaspoons of 
baking powder. Take out four tablespoons of dough, add one- 
half cup of molasses, half cup of flour, one cup of chopped rai- 
sins, half teaspoon of nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves. Put together 
with jelly. MRS. G. w. Goodrich. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE, No. 1. 

One cup grated chocolate, one cup sugar, one cup milk, one egg^ 
butter size of hickory nut, one teaspoon vanilla, one cup flour, 
one teaspoon soda. Cook chocolate with yolk of egg and half 
cup of milk, then add remainder of milk, butter and flour. Bake 
in two layers and put together with frosting. 

MRS. G. H. WATSON. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE, No. 2. 

Three eggs, three-quarters cup butter, two cups sugar, two cups 
flour, (scant,) one cup milk, four squares chocolate, grated, one 
small teaspoon soda, two small teaspoons cream tartar. Beat sugar 
and butter together, add yolks of eggs. Sift soda and cream tar- 
tar with the flour. Stir chocolate into milk, add flour, chocolate 
and milk. Beat whites of eggs, add last. Bake three-quarters of 
an hour in a moderate oven. This must be made carefully. Can 
be baked in two loaves, or three layers and put an icing of confec- 
tioner's sugar between. miss manny. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE, No. 3. 

Four eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, three 
cups flour, three teaspoons baking powder. Filling, half cup 
grated chocolate, one and one-half cups pulverized sugar, half cup 
milk. Let boil till quite thick, stirring all the time. Just before 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT J'RESEH VATIVE. 



72 

removing from the fire, add one egg well beaten; when cold flavor 
with vanilla. MRS. A. J. r. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

Whites of eight eggs, one cup sweet milk, one cup butter, two 
cups sugar, two cups flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder mixed 
with the flour, one cup cornstarch. Beat butter and sugar to a 
cream, add milk, then flour and cornstarch, then whites of eggs 
beaten verj light. Bake in layers. Icing — Whites of four eggs 
beaten very light, four cups sugar. Pour half pint boiling water 
over the sugar and boil until clear and will string from the spoon. 
Pour the boiling syrup over the whites of eggs and beat until cold 
and creamy. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

MRS. W. N. SCHOLL. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, half cup butter, one cup milk, two heaping 
cups flour, whites of three eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. 
Cream — Yolks of two eggs, two-thirds cup milk, one tablespoon 
flour or cornstarch, a little salt and a little sugar. Flavor with 
lemon or vanilla. Miss M. A. rice. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

E^our eggs, two cups sugar, two-thirds cup butter, two thirds cup 
milk, two cups flour, one teaspoon baking powder. Jelly — One 
grated lemon, one cup sugar, one egg, two tablespoons hot water, 
butter size of walnut. Boil till thick. MRS. A. J. R. 

ORANGE CAICE. 

Two teacups sugar, two cups flour, half cup cold water, five 
eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, juice and a very little of the 
grated rind of an orange. Bake in layers, (three) put between 
them icing, upon which lay thin slices of orange ; also on top of 
cake. Icings — White of one egg, one tablespoon of water, stir in 
confectioner's sugar until thick enough not to run. MRS. E. F. s. 

FILLING FOR CHARLOTTE RUSSE CAKE. 

Dissolve one tablespoon gelatine in a very little hot water, and 
add to one cup sweet cream, sweetened and flavored with vanilla 



THY PRESEEVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



73 

and whipped to a stiff froth. Put between layers and on top of any 
layer cake. MRS. G. h. w. 

LEMON CAKE. 

Five eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one cup butter, 
•one and one-half cups sugar, four teaspoonfids milk, two small 
teaspoonful.s baking powder, two and one-half cups fiour. l^ake in 
layers. Lemon frosting — One cup sugar, two tablespoont'uls but- 
ter, two eggs, juice of two lemons. Boil all together until the con- 
sistency of jelly. MRS. J. c. m'c. 

ENGLISH WALNUT CAKE. 

Whites of five eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, one half cup 
butter, one cup milk, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking pow- 
der. Bake in three la^'ers, putting between icing made of confec- 
tioner's sugar, and English walnut meats broken line. Put icing 
on top with whole meats laid over thickly. MRS. e. m'k. 

FIG CAIIE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three cups flour, 
whites of six eggs, two and one-half teaspoons baking powder. 
For filling, one-half pound figs, one-half pound raisins, one cup 
sugar, one cup warm water. Chop figs and raisins very tine ; put 
in sugar and water, and boil till quite thick. MRS. J. N. s. 

HICKORY CAKE. 

One pound sugar, one pound flour, one half pound butter, four 
•eggs, one teacup sweet milk, three teaspoons baking powder; fla- 
voring of vanilla, one large cup stoned raisins, one cup hickory-nut 
meats. MRS. E. F. s. 

FRULT CAKE. 

Four pounds of currants, three pounds of raisins, one pound cit- 
ron, one pound flour, one })Ound butter, one and one-half pounds 
sugar, one gill brandy, one gill molasses, ten eggs. Bake in four 
quart pan four hours, in slow oven. MRS. T. w. bingham. 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



74 

TOLEDO BREAD CAKE. 

One pint bread dough, one cup butter, two cups brown sugar,. 
four eggs, one wineglass brand}', one teaspoon soda in brandy ; one 
nutmeg, one-half teaspoon cinnamon, two cups seeded raisins, one 

cup flour, MRS C. H, WHITAKER. 

MY CAKE. 

Two cups brown sugar, one cup sour milk, two cups flour, one- 
half cup butter, two eggs, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream 
tartar. Put both soda and cream tartar in the milk the last thing. 
Fruit and spices to taste. mrs. a. w. geortner. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

One coftee cup molasses, one of brown sugar, three-fourths of 
butter, one of cold coftee, two eggs, two even teaspoons soda, four 
of cream tartar, one large teaspoon each of cinnamon and cloves, 
one grated nutmeg, three and one-half coffee cups flour, one pound 
seeded raisins. mrs. e. f. s. 

EGOLESS CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup molasses, two tablespoons butter,, 
one cup sweet milk, one cup seeded and chopped raisins, two tea- 
spoons soda, cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg of each an even tea- 
spoonful, two and one-half cups of flour. mrs. o. g. p. 

CAKE WITHOUT EGGS 

One small cup butter, two of sugar, four of flour, two full tea- 
spoons baking powder, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon 
cloves. Rub all together until very fine. One and one-half cups 
milk, one cup chopped raisins. Be sure to stir well together. This 
makes two loaves. mrs. h. d. w. 

MOLASSES CAKE, No. 1. 

One cup molasses, one-half cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, 
one teaspoon soda dissolved in one cup of boiling water, one egg, 
two cups of flour. E. m'k. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



76 

BOSTON MOLASSES CAKE, NO. 2. 

Three cups flour, one cup each of sour milk, sugar and molasses, 
two-thirds butter, two eggs, one teaspoon soda. Spice to taste. This 
makes two loaves. mrs. g. w. gkoktnek. 

SOFT MOLASSES CAKE, No. 1. 

One cup molasses, one brown sugar, one sour milk, four tal.le- 
spoons lard, two teaspoons soda, one salt, ginger and cinnamon to 
taste ; mix soft, drop with spoon. ANNE BULLOCK. 

SOFT MOLASSES CAKE, No. 2. 

One cup of butter, one-half brown sugar, one molasses, two eggs, 
one teaspoon soda dissolveii in one-half cup sour milk, or sweet 
milk can be used. Add flour enough to make a batter not too stiff ; 
ginger or spice may be added, also truit. MRS. J. H. N. 

MOLASSES CAKE, No. 3. 

One cup molasses, one sour cream or mdk, two flour, one egg, 
one teaspoon soda, ginger and pinch of salt. Bake in two pie tins. 
To be eaten hot. MRS. w. b. 

MOLASSES COOKIES 

Two cups of molasses, eight tablespoons lard, one-half cup water, 
three teaspoons soda, one teaspoon alum. Take one-half of the 
water, and put in the soda, and the other one halt put the alum in. 
Add the alum in water last, mix soft ; add a little cinnamon, if you 

choose. MRS. HARRIET TAYLOR. 

VBOP CAKES 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, one molasses, twelve tablespoons 
melted butter, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon alum, three-fourths 
cup sour milk, cloves, cinnamon and ginger to taste, four cups 
flour. MRS, L. c. 

CRULLERS, No. ]. 

One coffee cup sugar, one egg, two tablespoons butter, three 
teaspoons baking powder, one quart of flour, mixed with sweet 

milk. MRS. FRASIER SPRAKER. 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



76 
CRULLERS, No. 2. 

One Clip sugar, one sweet milk, one eg^, two teaspoons baking 
powder, a little nutmeg ; mix as soft as you can roll out, fry in hot 
lard. s. A. R. 

CRULLERS, No. 3. 

One quart flour, three teaspoons baking powder, one and one- 
half tal)lespoons melted lard rubbed in flour, two cups light brown 
sugar, two eggs, a little nutmeg, enough milk to make soft enough 
to roll out, fry in hot lard. o. m. wagner. 

CRULLERS, No. 4. 

Two cups sugar, one sour milk, two tablespoons sour cream, or 
one and one-half of melted butter, five eggs, teaspoon soda, nutmeg. 

MRS. JOHN VOSBURG. 
FRIED CAKES. 

Three eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, four tablespoons melted 
lard, one cup of sweet milk, three heaping teaspoons baking pow- 
der, one even teaspoon of salt, mix very soft. E. m'k. 

JUMBLES, No. 1. 

Four eggs, three cups sugar, one cup butter, very little soda, 
flour sufficient not to stick to board. MRS. E. m'kinstry. 

JUMBLES, No. 2. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of butter, four eggs, one gill of 

■wine, one and one-fourth pounds of flour. Flour your hands very 

slightly, take a teaspoon of the mixture, roll, and lay in ring. 

When partly baked, sift powdered sugar over them. 

MRS. J. c. m'c. 
SUGAR COOKIES. 

Two cups sugar, three eggs, one cup butter, two cups sweet 
milk, two teaspoons of baking powder. Bake in a quick oven. 

MRS. A. HAGADORN. 
SOFT COOKIES. 

Three-fourths pound sugar, one-half pound butter, five eggs, one 
pound flour, juice and rind of one lemon. Drop spoonful on tins. 
As soon as warm enough to run, sift sugar over them. 

MRS. E. F. s. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



77 

BUTTER DROPS. 
Two cups butter, two cups sugar, three eggs. Mix stiff, roll 

thin. S. A. READ. 

SUGAR COOKIES, No. 2. 

One coffeecup butter, two teacups sugar, one teacup sweet milk, 

two teaspoons baking powder, two eggs, flavor to taste. Mix very 

soft, roll thin. o. m. w. 

JUMBLES, No. 3. 

Two cups sugar, one and one-half cups butter, five cups flour, 

three eggs, four tablespoons sweet milk, two teaspoons baking 

powder. mrs. lewis clark. 

CHOCOLATE JUMBLES. 

One and one-half teacups white sugar, one-half cup sweet cream 
one half cup butter, one cup grated chocolate, one half teaspoon soda 
dissolved in cream, one-half teaspoon cream tarter, one egg. Work 
very stiff with flour; mix chocolate and cream tartar in the flour, 
roll thin. MRS. B. F. SPEAKER. 

COCO AN UT FUFFS. 

One cup cocoanut, one cup powdered sugar, beaten whites of two 
eggs, two tablespoons of flour or corn starch ; drop on buttered 
tins, bake quickly. F. M. s. 

HICKORY NUT MACAROONS. 
One cup sugar, one large or two small eggs, five tablespoons of 
flour, one cup chopped nuts. Drop from a spoon in buttered tins 
and bake. Miss m. dunn. 

GINGER SNAPS, No. I. 

Two cups of molasses, one of lard, one tablespoon ginger, one 
teaspoon salt, two teaspoons soda. Put all together, let boil, stifl'en 
with flour, and roll very thin. MRS. a. hagadokn. 

GINGER SNAPS, No. 2. 

One quart of molasses, one pound of sugar, one pound of butter, 
two teaspoons soda, three tablespoons of ginger, two of cloves. Boil 
molasses, butter, sugar and spices together for ten minutes; when 
cold add soda, and flour to roll easily. Roll very thin. 

M. J. c. m'c. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



78 

GINGER SNAPS, No. 3. 

One cup molasses, one-half cup brown sugar, one cup butter, 
tablespoon ginger, one teaspoon soda. Boil molasses and su^ar to- 
gether, then add butter and gino;er. When cool add flour. 

MISS MARY WELLS. 
LEMON SNAPS. 
One large cup of sugar, little more than one-half cnp butter, two 
eggs, two tablespoons boiling water, one-half teaspoon soda, two tea- 
spuons lemon, flour to roll easily. MRS. G. W. GOODRICH. 

SNOW BALLS. 

One cup powdered sugar, one of thick sweet cream, whites five 
eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. Bake in gem tins — frost. 

MARTHA A. RICE. 
WAFERS. 

Two cups butter, two cups sugar, two eggs, two cups flour — scant. 
Do not mix stiff, flavor. Roll very thin. They require very little 
baking. > MRS. J. c. m'c. 

SAND TARTS. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, three-fourths pound butter, the 
white of one egg, and yolks of two. Cream butter, add sugar and beat 
well, then eggs, then flour, making a stiff dough. Roll very thin and 
cut into shape, moisten the tops with white of egg, sprinkle with 
line sugar, mixed with cinnamon, have ready half a pound almonds, 
blanched and split ; })ut one or two on each cake, and bake in quick 
oven. MISS m. m. nellis. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



FRUITS. 

PRESERVED. JELLIED, CANNED AND PICKLED. 

Ill putting up fruits, use granulated, or best white coffee sugar ; 
■cook only in porcelain kettle, or bright tin preserving-pan. Let a 
little hot water stand in glass cans for a short time betore putting 
fruit in. 

In the following recipes, where "bowls" are mentioned, use one 
that will hold one pint and a half. 

TO CAN PEACHES. 

For each can, allow one heaping bowl of peeled and halved 
peaches, one-half bowl of sugar and a coffee cup of water. Make 
a syrup of sugar and water, only boiling just enough to make clear, 
strain, cool, and pour over the peaches, which have already been 
put in cans. Have a wooden rack at bottom of large boiler, on 
which place cans, and fill nearly to the top of cans, with cool water, 
set on stove and cover. After water has come to a boil, let them 
remain from ten to twenty minutes, according to ripeness of fruit. 
Take out, let stand a couple of minutes to settle, fill up with re- 
served syrup, and put in cans, closing securely. Screw down covers 
again, when cool, and try by turning upside down before setting 
away. If the cans leak, the fruit must be heated again. 

CANNED PLUMS. 

Can them in same manner as laid down for peaches, using same 
proportions of fruit, sugar and water as above. 

FOR RED AND BLACK RASPBERRIES AND BLACKBERRIES. 

Take in following proportions : three bowls fruit to one of sugar, 
and half a bowl water. Put together, set on stove long enough to 
beat throughout, and boil for not more than five minutes, then can. 
This quantity fills two cans. 

CUERRIES. 

To six pounds stoned fruit, add three pounds sugar, and one and 
a half pints of warm water. Set on stove, let boil thoroughly for 
five minutes, and can. This should be enough for five cans. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



80 
STRA WBERRIES. 

To six lbs. fruit use three lbs. sugar; put in pan alternately, and 
let stand a few minutes to draw out juice. Heat slowly, taking off 
when the fruit has boiled not more than five minutes. 

CURRANTS AND GOOSEBERRIES. 

May be canned in the same manner, and are nice for pies. 

FEARS AND QUINCES. 

Are canned alike. Pare, halve, core and drop into cold water, 

until all are ready. To one lb. fruit, take half pound sugar. First 

cook fruit till tender in water, keeping closely covered, or the fruit 

will darken ; when tender, pour off water, leaving it an inch below 

surface of fruit; pour in sugar and boil for ten minutes. To pears 

add slices of lemon, or small pieces of ginger root just before putting 

into the cans. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

Press pulp of grapes out of the skins, and put it over to boil, until 
the seeds are loosened, then pass through a colander to separate 
them. Put pulp and skins together and weigh them ; to five lbs. 
grapes take two and one-half lbs. brown sugar, one pint vinegar, 
one heaped teaspoon each of salr, pepper, cloves, cinnamon and all- 
spice. Mix thoroughly, set on range, and boil until they are some- 
what thickened, beirjg careful they do not burn. To eat with meats. 

CRAB APPLE JELLY. 

Take the stems and flower-buds from the ap})les, cut out spots, and 
cut in half, if large. Put on range with water enough tocme just 
to top of fruit, cover closely, and cook until it is thoroughly soft. 
Mash well, and turn into jelly bag, and let ^Irain, from afternoon 
till next morning, when all that is good will have come through. 
Measure juice, and to each pint, allow one full pint of sugar ; boil 
the juice briskly for fifteen minutes, and skim, then add the sugar, 
let it come again to a boil, and skim while boiling, for ten mm- 
utes longer; or until, when the drops in falling from the spoon, will 
jelly on it, before all has dripped away. Turn into turriblers or 
bowls, cover with some thin fabric to keep flies away, unti] 
hardened, which will be in one or two days. Cover top of jelly 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT. 



81 

witli letter paper dipped \v. brandy; and tlie bowls, t^Iasses, etc., 
witli brown paper dipped in wliite of eggp, or dissolved gelatine. 

QUINCE JELLY. 
Cut up the quinces without peeling, using part only, of the seeds. 
The peelings of those which are to be canned, can also be used for 
jelly, and a few apples may be added, if desired. Proceed exactly 
as with the crab apples. 

GRAPE AND PLUM JELLY. 
These can be made in same manner, except that they take much 
less time to cook soft than the others. Any juice which may nut 
drip from the bng over night, will not be clear, or make a clear 
jelly. This is a much easier way to make jellies, than to squeeze 
juice through bag while it is hot. 

YELLOW TOMATO PRESERVES. 
Remove the skins, take half a pound of sugar to one of tomatoes; 
boil till syrup is thick; before they are quite done, add lemon 
sliced thin, allowing one to a quart. Put in cans. HETTIE b. b. 

PICKLED PLUMS, 

For seven pounds of plumbs, take three of sugar, one quart of 

vinegar, one ounce whole cloves, one ounce stick cinnamon. Poil 

together sugar, vinegar and spices, throw over the fruit. When 

cool, strain off the syrup ; boil and pour over fruit, repeating again 

the first day. Let stand three days, drain off, and boil again. 

MKS. m'c. 
PICKLED PEARS. 

Quantity of fruit, sugar, vinegar and spices, same as for plums. 
Steam pears till tender. Dissolve sugar in vinegar, with spices; 
let boil and ponr on fruit. MRS. OLLIE abell. 

RIPE CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Soak sliced cucumbers in weak vinegar twenty-four hours. Dry 
them, make a syrup of two pounds of sugar, one quart vinegar, one 
of cinnamon buds. Cook untd tender. MRS. o. A. 

TO STEW CRANBERRIES NICELY. 

One cup of sugar, half a cup of water, one and a half of cran- 
berries. Bring sugar and. water to boiling, stir in berries, keep 
stirririg till all are burst open. HETTIE B. B. 



USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 

F 



82 

APPLES STEWED WHOLE. 

P;ire, and with an apple corer or small knife, extract the core ot" 
good, jaicy apples ; put in a deep dish with jast enough water to 
cover them ; put in steamer and steam till tender and clear ; t^ike 
out apples carefully, pat in a dish and cover to keep hot. Put the 
juice in a sauce-pan with a cup of sugar to twelve apples, and boil 
till Hke syrup; put in a little mace or whole cloves, ten minutes 
before removing from the fire. Pour over apples, cover till cold. 
Eat with cream if desired. hettie B. b. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Put currants on the stove in a pan till warmed thoroughly, then 
squeeze; for each pint of juice, take one pound of sugar; let the 
juice come to a boil, pour it over the sugar, stir well, and when 
sugar is dissolved pour into glasses. MRS. m'c. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

To five pounds currants, three pounds sugar, half pint vinegar, 
one tablespoon each cloves, cinnamon and allspice, tied in a cloth. 
Buil about 35 minutes. mrs! ollie abell. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI. 

Put in a stone jar three pounds sugar, one pint brandy. Then 
for each pound of fruit put in, add one pound of sugar. This 
should be begun with strawberries, and add the various fresh 
fruits as they come in their season. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI, No. 2. 
Put in two-gallon jar one quart brandy and three pounds granu- 
lated sugar. Then, as various kinds of fruit are obtained, add one 
pound of sugar to each pound of fruit. Begin with strawberries, 
cherries stoned, banannas, pineapples cut in pieces, etc. Keep in 
a cool place, and stir every few days, till the last of the fruit has 
been added. The quantity of brandy and sugar mentioned at first 
will bear seven or eight pounds each of fruit and extra sugar. 
Cover with paper, or transfer to cans or small jars. Use only 
choice fruit. To serve with cream, freeze with it, or in lemon 
jelly or pudding sauce. mrs. n. s. brumley. 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



S8 

PRESERVED P1^'E APPLES. 

After paring, cut in pieces in a chopping bowl, leaving out the 
core or hard part. Chop pretty line. Then chop the core by 
itself,' strain through a sieve, put together and weigh, allowing 
three-quarters of a pound of sugar to one of fruit. Boil a few 
minutes and put in cans. mrs. s. a. k. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Put one quart cranberries to boil in one pint cold water. Have 
ready in a bowl one pint of sugar. When berries are perfectly 
soft, mash while hot into bowl containing sugar, and stir till dis- 
solved. Pour in mold and set on ice twenty-four hours. 

MRS. E. m'k. 



CONFECTIONS. 



BU'lTER SCOTCH. 



Two cups molasses, butter size of an Qgg^ one cup of brown 
sugar, one-third of a cup of vinegar. Boil until it hardens in cold 
water, and pour in buttered tins. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

Two cups brown sugar, one cup of milk, one cup of molasses, 
one-quarter of a pound of chocolate, butter size of an egg. Boil 
until it hardens in cold water, and pour in buttered tins. 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup of water. Boil until it strings, 
put aside to cool, then stir to a thick cream. Flavor with vanilla 
or lemon, and make into balls. Melt one-half a cake of chocolate, 
dip the balls in it, and place on buttered plates in a cool place. 

CREAM DATES. 

Make cream as directed for chocolate creams. Take one-half 
pound fresh dates, remove stones, and fill centers of dates with 
cream. 

USING PETTIT'S CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



PICKLES, ETC. 

FRENCH CHOW CHOW. 

One quart large green cucumbers cut in pieces, one quai't very 
small ones, one quart button onions, one quart green tomatoes 
sliced and cut in pieces, one large cauliflower cut small, four large 
peppers cut in coarse bits. Put all in a weak brine, (one cup of 
salt to a gallon of water,) for twenty-four hours. Scald in same 
brine and drain. Make a paste of six tablespoons ground mus- 
tard, one of tumeric, one cup of flour, one of sugar, two quarts 
cider vinegar. First moisten the dry materials with a little 
vinegar, then add the remainder, stirring continually till smooth 
and thick, then add the pickles. mks. w. n. s 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

Cut up and boil the tomatoes till soft, sift them, to one gallon, 

add one-half teaspoon cayenne pepper, two of black pepper, two of 

cinnamon, two of cloves, one coffee cup of sugar, one quart vinegar, 

and boil till thick. E. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Six quarts ripe tomatoes cut up and boiled until soft, then run 
through a colander to take out skins. Add nine peppers and 
three onions finel}' chopped, three tablespoons salt, six tablespoons 
sugar, three of ginger, four of cloves, five of cinnamon, two of all- 
spice, three pints vinegar. Boil till it thickens. Bottle. e. 

CBISP CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Cover pickles with a boiling hot brine made in the propoition 

of one cup of salt to four quarts of water. The next da}^, or when 

cold, turn off brine and boil again, turning on hot. Repeat eight 

or nine times, after which drain till dry. Take vinegar enough to 

cover. Spice to taste, or get mixed spices. Five cents' worth is 

enough for a two-gallon jar. Boil spice in vinegar and pour on 

hot. MRS. s. A. R. 

GREEN TOMATO SAUCE. 

One peck tomatoes, twelve onions chopped fine, half a cup of 
salt, one-half cup ground mustard, one ounce ground ginger, one- 
half cup white mustard seed, one-fourth pound black pepper. Put 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



85 

tomatoes, onions and spices in alternate layers in a kettle, cover 
with vinegar, add one pound brown sugar, and stew for two hours. 

MRS. M. F. S. 
MIXED PICKLES. 

One half peck small cucumbers, one pint nasturtiums, one quart 
string beans, one quart onions, four carrots cut in pieces, two cauli- 
flowers, two ounces white mustard seed, one ounce black, one-half 
pint salt, onefourtli pound mustard, mixed with one fourth bottle 
table oil, three cents worth celer}' seed. Mix all well together ; put 
in a stone jai- ; scald vineojar enough to cover them ; add a little 
sugar. MRS. M A. F. 

LILLY PICKLE. 

Slice green tomatoes and onions very thin ; put in stone jar a 
layer of tomatoes two inches thick, then a single layer of onions ; 
proceed in this way until jar is full, then for a two gallon jar, take 
one pint salt, and enough water to cover the tomatoes, which must 
stand over night. In the morning, drain off the brine carefully ; 
put in jar and mix with pickle, one-half cup white mustard seed, 
two tablespoons ppppercorns, two tablespoons dry mustard, first 
mixed with a little vinegar, and enough more vinegar to cover. 
Sinnd jar in pot of boiling water, for about an hour ; and when all 
has cooled, remove pickle to smaller jars, and tie up closely. 

MRS. E. F. s. 

SPICED VINEGAR FOR PICKLES. 

To five quarts vinegar, one and three-fourths pounds brown 
sugar, one fourth pound white mustai'd seed, one-fourth bottle table 
mustard, one-fourth pound white ginger, two ounces each, ground 
pepper and turmeric, one-half ounce each, nutmeg, ground all-spice, 
mace, cloves and celery seed. Pound these all well before putting 
into tlie vinegar; add one-fourth pound scraped horseradish, one 
large sliced lemon, one half dozen small onions scalded in brine, 
atid laid in salt for a day. Pickles should lie in plain vinegar for 
two weeks before putting them in this mixture. 



USING PETTIT'S ClDEIt AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



BEVERAGES. 

COFFEE. 

For six people, take a coffeecup of ground coffee, put in half an 
egg, stir well, add one pint cold water, and stir again. Set coffee 
pot on cool part of stove, and let it come slowly to a boil ; stir down 
and fill in desired quantity of boiling water, let stand to boil a few 
minutes, and put to one side, until ready to take to table. It should 
not stand long. Serve, it possible, with a large teaspoon of whip- 
ped cream on top of each cup. 

ICED TEA. 

The usual allowance is one teaspoon of tea leaves, and a little 

more than one cup water to each person. For iced tea, make in 

the morning a stronger tea than usual, sweeten and set in cold 

place, until wanted. Pour into goblets, half filled witii pieces 

of ice. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Soak two squares of Baker's chocolate, (without cutting fine,) in 
one-half cap water, with two even tablespoons sugar for two hours, 
on back of range, when it will be reduced to paste. Have one 
quart milk boiling in double boiler, pour in the chocolate, and cook 
ten minutes, stirring constantly. Serve with whipped cream. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB. 

For three quarts ripe berries, take one quart good vinegar, put 
together and let stand twenty-four hours, then strain, and add to 
each pint of juice one pound of white sugar. Boil the whole to- 
gether, half an hour, skim and bottle. 

GRAPE WINE. 

To every gallon of well bruised gr;ipes, add one gallon of water ; 
let stand one week, then add three pounds sugar to every gallon 
of wine; let it stand for three months, draw off and bottle. 

ELDER-FLOWER CORDIAL. 

Take three gallons water, nine pounds white sugar. Let this 
boil, add the white of one egg, well beaten, skim, and add one 

TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



87 

quart elder-flowers (good measure) to the boiling mixturi". Stir 
and remove from fire, and put in a large jar; when cool, add 
three tablesooons lemon juice, and one yeast cake, stirring well. 
After six days, add three pounds of seedless raisins, or others if 
these cannot be procured. Put in a large jug, corking loo.sely 
at first ; let stand for six months, then rack off and bottle. 



A FEW USEFUL HINTS. 

FOR JllLUUW OR FRVIT STAINS. 

One half pound chloride of lime, one-fourth pound sal soda ; 
put the lime in a jar with one pint water, and let it stand over 
night; next morning add the soda and three quarts water; stir 
well, let it settle and bottle it. Stains and mildew will soon dis- 
appear from clothes soaked in it, but should not be allowed to 
stand more then fifteen minutes. Then wash out thoi'oughly and 
rinse. 

TO WASH BLANKETS. 

Fold the blankets and lay in large tub or bathing tub. Pour 
plenty of strong warm borax water, with a little white soap dis- 
solved in it, over the blankets, enough to cover them. Turn the 
blankets occasionally, keeping them folded, however, and let them 
soak several hours. Then rinse in warm water and put through 
the wringer. This method saves shrinkage and keeps them soft- 

MRS. n. I). WALKKK. 

CHILBLAINS. A SUliL BELIEF. 
One pint of strong vinegar, a lump of alum as big as a butter- 
nut, one teaspoon saltpetre. Set on the stove until hot and dis- 
solved. Bathe the feet two or three times in this mixture, using 
it hot during the afternoon and evening. When retiring, use for 
fifteen minutes and rub the feet a long time with the hand. 

MRS. H. P. W. 



USING PETTITS CIDER AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



88 

TO REMOVE RUST FROM STEEL. 
Cover the steel with sweet oil, well rubbed on. Forty-eight 
hours after rub it well with unslacked lime, finely powdered, until 
all the rust disappears. 

TO REMOVE SUN BURN. 

One pint simple tincture of benzoine atid sixteen parts of distilled 
water. Bath the skin with this twice a day. 

TO DESTROY WATER BUGS. 

Clean the sink and dry it well at night. Sprinkle powdered 
borax about the water pipes. 

AN EXCELLENT DEODORIZER. 

To purify a sick room, put one tablespoonful of bromo chlora- 
lum to eight of soft water. Dip clothes in and hang up. This 
will also purify the breath which is offensive from decayed teeth, 
rinsing the mouth several times a day. 

FROST ON WINDOWS. 

"Windows may be kept free from frost by rubbing the glass with 
a cloth wet with alcohol. 

TO CLEAN FEATHERS. 

Cover the feathers with a paste made of pipe clay and water. 
Rub them one way only. When quite dr}^, shake off the powder 
and curl them with a knife. Grebe feathers may be washed with 
white soap and soft water. 

CAMPHOR ICE. 
One ounce of lard, one ounce of spermaceti, one ounce of cam- 
phor, one ounce of almond oil, one-half cake of white wax, melted 

together. 

TOOTH POWDER. 

Equal parts of gum of myrrh, prepared chalk, orris root and Pe- 
ruvian bark, pulverized together and well mixed. 

TO RESTORE COLOR. 

Colors destroyed by acids may be restored by applying ammo- 
nia ; after it chloroform. 



TRY PRESERVING YOUR FRUIT WITHOUT HEAT, 



89 
TO RAISE THE PILE OF VELVET. 

Hold over boiling hot steam, wrong side of velvet to the steam. 
Then pass the back of the velvet over a hot sad iron. 

TO KEEP FURS FRO 31 MOTH. 

Whip them well tie them in linen bags, put into the boxes, then 
wrap closely in newspapers, tie or seal securely. No aromatics are 
needed. 



WELSH RAREBIT. 

One fourth pound rich cream cheese, one-fourth cup cream or milk, 
one teaspoonful mustard, one-half teaspoonful salt, a few grains of 
cayenne, one egg, one teaspoonful butter, four slices toast. Break 
the cheese in small pieces, or, if hard, grate it. Put it, with the milk, 
in a double boiler. Toast the bread and keep it hot. Mix the 
mustard, salt and pepper, add the egg and beat well. When the 
cheese is melted stir in the egg and butter and cook two minutes, 
or until it thickens a little, but do not let it curdle. Pour it over 
the toast. Many use ale instead of cream, 

BOSTON COOK BOOK. 



USING PETTir'S ClDKIl AND FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



Preserve Your Fruit Without Heat ! 

: BY using: 

PETTIT'S 
PRESERVATIVE. 

This article has been upon the inarl<et for several years, giving in each and 
every case perfect satisfaction. It having been extensively used, a very large 
number of testimonials could be recorded liere, but we believe it unnecessary, 
preferring to allow it to be sold upon its merit. 

This article is harmless. It will keep cider, fruit, etc., pei'fectly. Give it 
a trial and enjoy the great relief of putting up fruit without heat. 

PRICE, 40 CENTS PER BOX. 

Ask your druggist or grocer for it. If you cannot find it in your place- 
we will send it to any address on receipt of price. Complete directions in 
each box. 

PETTIT IFa. CO., 

CANAJOHAKIE, N, Y. 



SrJUClAL SrlLJH 



.OF- 



§i/4IL i ABiKJiLiSIf i. 



COTTRELL & LEONARD. 

are making a Special Sale of -Seal Sacques, ^A/■raps, 
Jackets, &c., previous to inventory, and are offering First 
Quality Seal Goods at prices which cannot be made 
next season. Seal will be higher, and it ^?vl]l pay to buy 
a Garment, Cap or Gloves no^A'■, even for next year's use. 

J^^PLUSH SACKS AND WRAPS, 

472 and 474 Broadway, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

A BEAK STANDS BY THK BOOK. 



TxaiE 



ALBANY 



O O O O O OOOOQOOOOOO 

^u^^i^d Journal 



O O O O O OOOOOOOOOOO- 



-: WILL BE : 



-^DELIVERED TO YOUR HOUSED 

— : FOR :- 

18 CENTS P.ER WEEK. 



iililllllllillllllllllllUIIIIIII 



It jow cannot get it of your news deah'i\ 
address 

T^I JOFR]^AL CO., 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



STONE&SHANKS, 

56 JNIoptl7 Pearl St.j 

ALBANY, F. 7. 

. Will hold during January and February a 
special sale of 

pi9^l^a(;^^iirtai95. 

This sale nvill include their entire line of novelties in 

SASH CURTIMS, 

And prices 7uill be named to make the sale specially attractive. 



Fiftij-TWo "Goo\" Bool^?, 

Giving a correct and graphic description of local events as they occur, 

AT ONLY $1.50. 

The above refers to a year's subscription to 

Tm MWm torts iiUtolj 






CANAJOHARIE, N. Y., 

Which, is the Breeziest, Brightest aod 

Best Weekly Baper in the 

^vlohaw^k: Valley. 

Editor and Proprietor, WILLET E. COOK. 



C S T I C H T , 

DEALER IN 



Boots, glioes ar\d I^ubbers. 



HOUSE ESTABLISHED 1850. 



GANAJOHARIE, IV. Y. 



HATTERS'. 



The Oldest and Largest Clothing Emporium in Central New York. 

DEALERS IN 



HATS, CAPS AND GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 



:e'(Dti 



(^arpeits, ^ 



• /Aeits and ^ 

^ AAattings, 

GO TO 

A,B,VanGaasbeek&Co, 

69 North Pearl St., 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



IN MEDICINE, 



Pettit's Little Liver Pills. 

A CERTAIN CURE FOR 

Constipation, Head Ache, Liver Complaint, 

DYSPEPSIA AND BILIOUSNESS. 

Many persons, particularly ladies, dislike to take Pills; but there are numerous 
reasons why the pill form of administering medicine is preferable. With a view to 
meet this objection as far as possible, we have compounded PETTIT'S LI TTLE LIVER 
PILLS of the most highly concentrated medicinal roots, and they are therefore so 
small that they can be easily taken; and. being sugar coated, are rendered tasteless^ 
We feel sure a trial will convince you that they are far superior to any other in the 
market. If your druggist does not keep ihem, send us 25 cents and we will send you a 
box by mail. 



PETTIT MFg, (50„ 



CANAJOHARIE, N. Y. 



Custom's Injuries. 

Described by a Noted London 
Dentist. 



37 High Hoi.born, ) 
London W. O. j 
Gkntlemen : I consider the bris- 
tle tooth brush has to answer in no 
little measure for the receding 
gums around the necks of the 
teeth so constantly brought to 
our notice. After thoroughly 
testing the 




tp^js^^rroo'T^S^^J 



I TANT WEAD IT. TAN OO ? " 

I have no hesitation in saying that any 
one who uses it for one week will 
never go back to the old bristle brush 
ivith its attendant miseries of Loose 

Bristles and Constantly Wounded Gums. 

Faithfully yours. 

J. SHIPLEY SLIPPER, Dental Surgeon. 

ITS ECONOMY. 

Holder (imperishable"), 35 cents. Polishers only need be renewed; 18 (boxed), 25 
cents. At dealers, or mailed. 



THE HORSEY MFG. CO. 



UTICA, N. Y. 



mrnm m. mwmm 






39 and 41 North Pearl Street, 

yiLBANY, / Y. 

Dry Goods. 



J. C. BKACH, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

(^hampagne-i^ider, 

BOILED CIDER, 

—AND— 

PURE eiDER VINEGAR. 

Russet Cider in Bottles a Specialty. 

PALATINE BRIDGE, N. Y. 



ANDREW DUNN «fe SON, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

JEWELKRS, 



AND IMPORTERS OF 



Diamonds ^ Artistie fsf oydtics. 

The largest stock in the Mohawk Valley of Diamonds, Jewelry- 
Watches and Clocks, Bronzes, and Novelties and Objects 
D' Art. Badges, Society Pins, and Prizes of all kinds. 

For ingenuity of composition, delicacy of chasing, gracefulness and good 
taste of the details, our goods are unexcelled. 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 

ANDREW DUNN Sc SON, Fort Plain, N. Y. 



TO OBTAIN THE GREATEST SUCCESS 

with the valuable recipes contained in this book, you should use the 

AcMl Baking P owder 



WHICH IS ABSOLUTELY 



PURE and HEALTHFUL. 

If your Grocer does not keep it send orders to 

KIRBY & DIEFENDORF, 

CANAJOHARIE, N. Y., 

owners of this celebrated brand. 

It^" Mail orders promptly attended to. 
It^^ Discount to th» trade on application. 

KIRBY & DIEFENDORF, 
36 Church Street, CANAJOHARIE, N. Y. 



•Msk l^owr Ifruffgist for 

HANSON'S 

If he does not keep it, do not let him convince you that some imitation 
is just as good. Send by mail to 

"W. T. HJLisrso^sr & oo., 

SCHENECTADY, N. Y. 

Price, 15 and 25 Cents. 



Hanson's Magic Cokn Salve is recommended by 10,000 of the principal 
Druggists in the U. S. and Canada. 



Office of WAGNER PALACE CAR CO. 
Opposite Grand Central Depot, 
C. D. Fr.AGG, General Superintendent's Office, 

General Sup't. New York, June 29, 1887. 

W. T. Hanson & Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

hear Sirs .-—The " Magic Corn Salve" came duly to hand; I immediately pave it a 
trial, and it affords me much pleasure to say that the results were highly satisfactory. 
My feet have not for years been in as good condition as they are at present. The remedy 
is a good one and all who are tioubled with coi ns should use it. Yours truly, 

C. D. FL.-^GG, Gen'l Sup't. 




G^- 



Everybody Reads It! 

$4.00 Per Year. 

ADDRESS 

Pdblisl^er Jtjd(Je, 

NEW YORK. 



USE 

BELLIff&ER & DTGERT'S 

^trictlij pure Balding powder'. 

It is free from Alum, Lime, Ammonia, Terra Alba, or any adulteration 
whatever. Contains strictly pure Grape Cream Tartar and Natrona Bi-Car- 
bonate Soda, and is the most reliable and most economical Baking Powder 
on the market. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



BELIilNGElt & DYGERT, 

52 Church Street, - CANA JOHARIE, N Y. 



CHARLES W. SCHARFF, 



Sole Agent for the 



OELEBR..A.TED 



iarloR" d "Pease" Furnaces, 



CANAJOHARIE, N. Y. 



HARDWARE. 

DOCKASH AND MYSTiC RANGES, 

ALSO, 

IVEonitor and. Crown Oil Stoves, 
CANAJOHARIE, N. Y. 

DANIEL SPIliKER, Jr., 



General Fire and Life 




OFFICES AT 



CANAJOHARIE aiifl SPRAKERS, N. Y. 



Established 1868. Incorporated 18S2. 



-^t 



v^^"^' 



tsi 



>.\iO 



I*!" ' * * --' 





'"^^M, 






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f-vr 



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^A-f 



'%, 



'^, 








-■^ 



OXJI^TIOE BPtOTHEPtS OO . 

ROCHESTEI?, N. Y. 

Preservers .\xu Packers of extra quality Canned Fruits, Vegetables, Meats, 

and other Tauli. Demcacies. 

These goods are for sale by first-class grocers Keuerally. If your grocer does not 

keep them, send dii'ect for priced catalogue. 



If you want the 
in the market, buy 

CLARK & WOOD'S 

STAR BRAND. 

Ask your Grocer for them. Cured by 

CLARK & WOOD, 

FORT PLAIN, N. Y. 

P. J. McMANUS. P. W. O'REILLY. 

McMANUS& O'REILLY, 

Successors to JOHNSTON & REILLY, 

Dry Goodgj 

59 & 61 North Pearl St., 



FREAR'S™lBAZAAR, 

Employ mg over ^0 people and con- 
taining a stock of ^'^aflo, anil iJaac^ 
©n^ (S\ooilx^ aggregating in vakte over 
$500,000, co7nprising the latest choice 
style scoffers shoppers the very best facil- 
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THE LEADING 



Dry (joods House 



OF NORTHERN NEW YORK. 



Wm. H. Frear, ptcrchasiiig his goods 
direct from the manitfactitrers, and 
paying spot cash, can afford to, and 
does sell his goods at loiver prices tha^i 
any other retail merchant in the State. 
The best place to trade is at 



FREAR'S TlillT BAZAAR 



CAiVAJOHARIE, N. Y. 



— DEALER IN — 



gtOYes, hardware, Iron, gteel, Etc., 

— AXD IN — 

THE NEW BEAUTY OIL STOVE. 

LATEST AND BEST. FREE FROM ALL ODORS. 

1^^ Should always be used to obtain best results from recipes given in this book. ..^ 

FRANK SHUBERT, 

CANAJOHARIE, N. Y. 



— DEALER IN- 



Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 

I^^FINE GOODS or ALL KINDS A SPECIALTY. .^1 

JOHN A. ZOLLER. HENRY ZOLLER. 

JOHN A. ZOLLER & BRO., 



-DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF- 



Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Etc. 



-MANUFACTURERS OF- 



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Mouldings and Turned Work of all kinds. 

Window and Door Frames made to order. 
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ADJOlXiNQ SPiflNQ /IXb ylXLE WORKS, 
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Don't Fail to see the Unsurpassed 

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PIANO. 

From $225 Upwards. 

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AicHrte, ALBANY, N. V. 



ESTABLISHED 1837, ^'^ ^^^ ^ LEPPEET, 



BtKuKK YOU Hrv. [Send for Catalogue.] Canajoharie, N. Y. 



J. li. EARLL. F. H. LATIMORE. 

|^0ijsel70l(d f{rt I^ooms, 

173 GENESEE STREET, UP STAIRS. 

Expert TTpMsterers and Becoratois. 

MAKE FROM SPECIAL DESIGNS 

Draperies, Portieres, 

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Ornamental IVood, 

]VIetal and C)ilass ^Vork. 



Their collection of Wall Papers embraces the most effective produc- 
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they invite orders for the decoration of single rooms or entire houses. 



PATENT 



Esliance and Sanilar; EefrigoraiorSp 



-MANUFACTURED BY- 



The Sweet Refrigerator Company, 

CANAJOHARIE, N. V. 



They have been in use several years, and 
are therefore known to possess the follow- 
ing qualities : 

1st. Perfectly dry air. 

2d. Economy in the consumption of ice. 

3d. Preservation of contents longer and 
in better condition thaix any other refrig- 
erator in the marliet. 

Jf.th. Mo zinc or other metal lining to 
corrode. 

5th. Easy to keep clean. 

6th. Twenty-five per cent, more inside 
space than any other refrigerator with the 
same outside measurem^ents. 

7th. Do not require broken ice. 

8th. Made of the best inaterial. 

9th. All sizes and forms, for dwellings, 
hotels, stores, restaurants, markets. 

10th. Entire freedom from all moisture. 

Has been awarded medal for highest 
merits at the American Institute Fair. For 
prices a.nd further particulars write to 

THE SWEET REFRIGERATOR CO. 

CANAJOHARIE, N. Y. 






WILLIS E. DJEFENDORF, 



WHOLESALE AND F?ETAIL 



.►^is —AND— 



■^ ^tal(*o^ef. 



FORT PLAIN, N. Y. 

Orders by mail promptly attended to.