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Full text of "Monmouth College Catalog"

MOUTH 



COLLEGE 
CATALOG 




SPECIAL EDITION 
1962-1963 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE BULLETIN • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 

This catalog is designed to provide information about 
Monmouth College and its curriculum. If further in- 
formation is needed, inquiries may be addressed to the 
appropriate office at Monmouth College, Monmouth, 
Illinois, as follows: 

Admissions Procedures, Financial Aid and 
Publications for Prospective 
Students Director of Admissions 

General Affairs of the College . . Office of the President 
Faculty Appointments, Academic Matters 

and Public Events Academic Dean 

Business Affairs Business Manager 

Transcripts of Records Registrar 

Prospective students and their parents are invited to 
visit the campus whenever they find it convenient. 

The following off-campus admissions representatives may 
also be contacted for additional information: 



CHICAGO ST. LOUIS 

Robert H. Riggle Donald Ingerson 

2036 South Fifth Avenue 58 Spring Avenue 

Maywood, Illinois Ferguson 35, Mo. 

Telephone: 333-7794 Telephone: J A 2-3767 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Series LXIX, No. 11, March, 1962. 
Published monthly except June and August by the Monmouth i 
College. Entered as Second Class matter at the postoffice in 
Monmouth, Illinois. 



Monmouth College Catalog 
7962-63 

SPECIAL EDITION 




With the academic year 1962-63, Monmouth College begins 
its new educational program structured around the three-term, 
three-course curriculum. This special edition contains infor- 
mation concerning the new curriculum. The regular catalog 
is published biennially in July. 



March, 1962 
Monmouth, Illinois 



Coffege Calendar 
1962-63 



1962 

Sept. 19 — Wednesday .... Faculty Conference 

Sept. 20 — Thursday Faculty Conference 

Sept. 22 — Saturday Dormitories open to new students. All new 

students must report by 5 p. m. 

Sept. 23 — Sunday Program for freshman and other new students. 

Sept. 26 — Wednesday .... Upperclass registration and payment of ac- 
counts. 

Sept. 27 — Thursday Freshman registration and payment of ac- 
counts. 

Sept. 28 — Friday First term classes begin (8 a. m.) 

Oct. 13 — Saturday Homecoming 

Nov. 3 — Saturday Parents' Day 

Nov. 21 — Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins (12 noon) 

Nov. 26 — Monday Thanksgiving recess ends (8 a. m.) 

Dec. 10 — Monday First term classes end (5 p. m.) 

Dec. 11 — Tuesday Reading period 

Dec. 12 — Wednesday First term examinations begin 

Dec. 15 — Saturday First term examinations end (5 p.m.) 



1963 

Jan. 2 — Wednesday .... Second term classes begin (8 a. m.) 

Mar. 11 — Monday Second term classes end (5 p. m.) 

Mar. 12 — Tuesday Reading period 

Mar. 13 — Wednesday .... Second term examinations begin 

Mar. 16 — Saturday Second term examinations end (5 p.m.) H 

Mar. 26 — Tuesday Third term classes begin (8 a.m.) 

June 3 — Monday Third term classes end (5 p. m.) 

June 4 — Tuesday Reading period 

June 5 — Wednesday .... Third term examinations begin 

June 7 — Friday Third term examinations end (5 p. m.) 

June 8 — Saturday Alumni Day 

June 9 — Sunday Baccalaureate 

June 10 — Monday Commencement 






2 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 3 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

General Statement 4 

Academic Program 5 

Graduation Requirements 5 

Distribution Requirements 6 

Field of Concentration 7 

Senior Comprehensive Examination 7 

Independent Reading 7 

Academic Regulations 9 

Admission 12 

Courses of Instruction 13 

Divisions of the Faculty 60 

Officers of Instruction 60 



Genera/ Statement 

Monmouth College is a fully-accredited, four-year liberal arts college. It 
was founded in 1853 by Presbyterians of Scottish descent and is affiliated 
with the United Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. Monmouth shows its heri- 
tage by using the kilted Scotsman as its school symbol. 

The 30-acre, wooded campus is in the eastern portion of Monmouth, 
Illinois, a city of 10,000. The college buildings, in the Georgian style of 
architecture, are within a few minutes' walking distance of any point on 
campus. The city is 200 miles southwest of Chicago, and easily accessible 
from all directions. 

Transportation is provided by the main line of the Burlington railroad, 
two bus lines and air travel to within 10 miles. U. S. Highways 34 and 67 
intersect in the heart of Monmouth. Private planes may use the Mon- 
mouth airfield. 

Monmouth is a member of the American Association of University 
Women, Associated Colleges of the Midwest, Associated Colleges of Illi- 
nois, Association of American Colleges, Association of American Univer- 
sities, Midwest Athletic Conference and the Midwest College Council. It 
is accredited by the North Central Association and the American Chemical 
Society. 

The fraternity system is active on the campus and there are eight na- 
tional organizations and one local fraternity which maintain chapters at 
Monmouth. The first sorority in the United States, Pi Beta Phi, was 
founded here in 1867. This sorority and Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority 
have their Alpha chapters at the college. 

All out-of-town students at Monmouth live in college residence halls, 
fraternity houses or approved private homes. There are five residence halls, 
three for women and two for men. Each hall is supervised by the college 
administration. 

College-sponsored activities include debate, dramatics, intercollegiate and 
intramural sports, journalism, music and religious groups and several de- 
partmental extra-curricular clubs. There are 15 honorary fraternities with 
chapters on the campus. The well-developed social program includes lec- 
tures, concerts, formal dances, informal open houses, receptions, teas and 
other events. 

The counseling program provides a faculty counselor for each student, 
to aid in the important tasks of selecting a curriculum and a career. After 
graduation, the college placement office assists students in finding employ- 
ment. 



The Academic Program 

The Monmouth College faculty has adopted a new curriculum for the 
college effective September, 1962. Under this new educational program, 
the nine-month academic year will be divided into three terms of approxi- 
mately 10 weeks each. 

Normally, students will register for three full term courses each term 
for a total of nine term courses during the academic year. Thirty-six 
term courses are required for graduation. Freshman and sophomores are 
required to take physical education each term without credit toward 
graduation. 

A full term course will normally meet four times weekly for 50-minute 
periods, exclusive of laboratory sessions. All courses are regarded as 
term courses with the exception of fractional courses in studio art, applied 
music and dramatics. 

Students may register for 10 courses during the regular academic year 
with the approval of their academic adviser. In this case students are 
permitted to register for a fourth (full) course during one term of the 
academic year if no fractional courses are taken. 

Students who achieve a 3.0 (B) or better grade average during the 
preceding two terms may register for more than 10 courses during an 
academic year with the permission of the academic dean and their aca- 
demic adviser. In no case is a student permitted to register for more 
than four courses during any term. 

For graduation a student must attain or surpass a grade-point average 
of 2.0 (C). 

To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Arts a candidate must meet 
certain specifications in quantity, quality, distribution, field of concentra- 
tion, independent reading, and in the senior comprehensive examination. 

The educational policy behind this shift in the academic program 
involves increased emphasis on learning, self -education, reducing the frag- 
mentation of student attention and more independent study. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

I. Credit in a total of 36 term courses. 
II. A grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or better in all courses. 

III. Distribution of 14 term courses in specified divisions and completion of 
six terms of satisfactory work in physical education. 

IV. A field of concentration consisting of either (1) a departmental major 
presenting a minimum of seven term courses from the major depart- 
ment and a minimum of five term courses in related fields chosen 
from those specified by the major department: or (2) a topical major 
of at least 12 term courses approved by the curriculum committee. 
All courses in the field of concentration require a grade-point average 
of 2.5 or better. 

V. A passing grade in the senior comprehensive examination. 
VI. Satisfactory completion of a program of independent reading includ- 
ing a general reading and comprehensive reading program. 
VII. The senior year must be spent in residence at Monmouth College. 
(No exceptions to these regulations will be made unless authorized by the 
faculty.) 



Distribution Requirements 

The distribution requirements are intended to help the student attain a 
broad and comprehensive acquaintance with the basic characteristics of 
the world in which we live. These requirements are intended to help the 
student attain familiarity with the tools of the intellect including (1) the 
experimental methods, (2) the method of empirical generalization, (3) 
language and (4) the method of formal analysis. Distribution require- 
ments should be fulfilled within the first two years, if possible. 

Students may satisfy any of these requirements by passing an examina- 
tion sufficiently comprehensive to test their knowledge of the work pre- 
sented in the required course or courses. 



DIVISION I 
HUMANITIES 

Art or Music: One term course 

English: Two term courses 

English (literature), History or Philosophy: Two term courses chosen from 

separate fields 
Foreign Language: Two term courses (beyond 101 and 102) 
Religion or Bible: One term course 
Speech: One term course 

DIVISION II 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Two term courses in separate fields chosen from the departments of eco- 
nomics, government, psychology or sociology. 

DIVISION III 
NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

Three term courses chosen from the departments of biology, chemistry, 
geology, physics, or mathematics, including a sequence of two term courses 
in a laboratory science. 

DIVISION IV 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Freshmen and sophomores are required to complete six terms of satis- 
factory work in physical education unless excused by the director of the 
college health service for medical reasons. A proficiency rating for each 
term course will be given. 



Field of Concentration 

A field of concentration shall consist of (1) a departmental major and 
related courses or (2) a topical major. All courses in the field of concen- 
tration shall be of grade-point 2.0 or better and the grade-point average 
must be 2.5 or better. 

DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 

A departmental major shall consist of at least seven term courses chosen 
from the major department and at least five term courses or related courses 
chosen from those specified by the major department. The work in the 
field of concentration during the junior and senior years shall include 
some form of individualized study. Each student must give positive evi- 
dence of his competence in his field of concentration by means of a com- 
prehensive examination. 

TOPICAL MAJOR 

A topical major shall consist of at least 12 term courses chosen from 
different departments as a group of studies linked together by a special 
theme or field of interest. The program for the topical major must be 
approved by the curriculum committee and shall be under the direction of 
an adviser appointed by that committee. The work in the field of con- 
centration during the junior and senior years shall include some form of 
individualized study. Each student must give positive evidence of compe- 
tence in his field of concentration by means of a comprehensive examination. 

SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A comprehensive examination in the field of concentration is required of 
each candidate for the degree. This examination will be in three parts: 

1. The Graduate Record examination, to be taken during the senior year. 

2. A written essay examination of four hours, consisting either of one 
four-hour paper or two two-hour papers on questions which require 
a comprehensive grasp of the problems of the field and a broad acquaint- 
ance with its literature. 

3. An oral examination (where not more than three candidates will be 
examined at one time) by a committee composed of one representative 
of the candidate's major field, one representative of his related field, 
and one to be nominated by the candidate from a department outside 
the field of concentration. 

The second and third parts of the examination must be taken during 
the last two terms of the candidate's residence as a regular student. The 
examination will be judged as a whole, and will be graded Honor, Pass or 
Fail. A grade of Pass is required for graduation; a grade of Honor is re- 
quired for honors at graduation. A candidate who fails the examination 
may apply for one re-examination, but a second failure will be final. 

INDEPENDENT READING 

All students are required to pursue a program of independent reading dur- 
ing their period of enrollment at Monmouth College. The reading program 



8 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

is divided into two parts; part one, entitled general reading, covers the 
freshman and sophomore years; part two, entitled comprehensive reading, 
covers the junior and senior years. 

General Reading Program 

The general reading program envisages a lively acquaintance with and 
understanding of broadly-selected writings which are of great worth and 
significance to the educated person and his world. 

The general reading program is administered by the general reading 
program committee of the faculty. This committee will ascertain from 
every faculty-member those books which are worthy of inclusion in the 
general reading list. The committee will then determine what writings 
shall be included in the program. Each year review and revision, if required, 
shall be made by the faculty committee. The student will be encouraged 
to begin his reading immediately upon acceptance as a student of the col- 
lege and to continue the reading throughout the freshman and sophomore 
years, giving particular attention to the reading during vacation periods. 

Students will be required to give evidence of an adequate acquaintance 
with a selected portion of the general reading list in the beginning of the 
first term of the sophomore year. Satisfactory performance is required for 
junior standing. 

Comprehensive Reading Program 

The comprehensive reading program administered by each department en- 
visages a lively acquaintance with and a good understanding of selected 
writings related to the student's field of concentration. A broad biblio- 
graphical acquaintance with outstanding works in the field plus a first- 
hand knowledge of selected works in concept and import will be required. 

The senior comprehensive examination will include the work of the 
comprehensive reading program. 

The comprehensive reading lists will be prepared by the several depart- 
ments. 



Academic Regulations 

ATTENDANCE 

At Monmouth College, responsibility for class attendance is placed upon 
the student except as this is limited by the regulations which follow: 

1. Courses of study at Monmouth College are planned and organized upon 
the assumption that the student will be in regular attendance. The stu- 
dent is responsible for all work covered in the course, including lectures, 
class discussions, assignments of any kind and all examinations. How- 
ever, students need not make application to have absences excused and 
need not make any explanation of class absences. 

2. Freshmen will be permitted no voluntary absences during the first term. 
During the second and third term, this will apply only to freshmen who 
failed to earn a grade-point average of at least 2.0. All unexcused ab- 
sences for freshmen who are not permitted to have voluntary absences 
must be explained to the personnel dean concerned no later than 24 
hours after the student returns to class. 

3. Attendance is required at the last meeting of a class before, and at the 
first meeting of a class after, a college vacation. Students who have 
urgent reasons for absences immediately before or after vacations may 
be excused by the registrar. 

4. A student whose record in a course is suffering because of frequent 
absences may be required by his instructor or the academic dean to give 
up the privileges of these regulations and, during the remainder of the 
semester, explain all absences. This action may be taken at any time 
during a semester. 

5. All students, unless excused by the faculty committee on absences, are 
required to attend chapel services and the monthly Vesper service held 
on the first Sunday afternoon of each month in the college auditorium. 
Students are expected to attend public worship in the church of their 
choice on Sundays. 

In addition to excused absences a student may have two absences from 
chapel and/or vespers during a term without penalty. Additional absences 
shall entail loss of credit. 

REGISTRATION 

In the spring of each year students will register in advance for all three 
terms of the next academic year. New students, in consultation with the 
personnel dean concerned, will choose their courses during the summer 
preceding their entrance to the college. 

All changes in registration require written permission of the instructor 
for the courses involved and the student's adviser. A fee of $5.00 is charged 
for each course change made after the first week of classes. A course may 
be added after it has been in session for one week only with the recom- 
mendation of the instructor and adviser and approval of the academic dean. 
Withdrawal from a course after the first week of classes carries the grade 
of F except for reasons of illness or circumstances beyond the control of 
the student. 

A student may not register in a new course after the second week of 
classes. 

9 



10 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

GRADES 

Academic work is graded at Monmouth College as follows: 
A 
B 

C + 

c 

D 

F Failure 

I Incomplete (Grade Deferred) 

W Withdrawal 
The mark I signifies work in the course is incomplete due to illness or 
circumstances beyond the control of the student, or where the instructor 
feels further evaluation is needed before the grade is determined. Unless 
the I is removed within the term following that in which it was given, the 
grade automatically becomes an F. The mark W signifies withdrawal and 
is given when a student withdraws from a course with the approval of the 
instructor involved, the student's adviser and the academic dean, provided 
the student is passing in the course at the time of withdrawal. The mark 
W will not be recorded after the end of the first week of classes except for 
reasons of illness or circumstances beyond the control of the student. 

GRADE-POINT AVERAGE 

All students in a class are ranked according to their work. Each teacher 
determines the rank of his own students in his own way. The following 
grades are used: 

A = 4 grade-points per term course 

B = 3 grade-points per term course 

C+ = 2.5 grade-points per term course 

C = 2 grade-points per term course 

D = 1 grade-point per term course 
The term "average" is determined by dividing the total grade-points 
earned during the term by the number of term courses taken. The cumu- 
lative average is the total of all grade-points earned, divided by the total 
number of term courses taken. 



ACADEMIC PROBATION 

A student who in any term fails to earn a grade-point average of at least 
1.5 is placed upon probation for the following term. At any time, a stu- 
dent doing very poor work (for freshman, this means a grade-point average 
of 1.0) may be warned and placed on probation with the understanding 
that unless his grade-point average is at least 1.5 at the end of the term, 
he may be dropped from college. A student on probation who fails to earn 
a grade-point average of at least 1.5 is required to withdraw from college 
for at least one term. 



CUMULATIVE GRADE-POINT AVERAGE 

A student with nine term courses but less than 18 term courses whose 
grade-point average is less than 1.6 is on probation. A student with at 
least 18 term courses, but less than 27 term courses, whose grade-point 
average is less than 1.8 is on probation. A student with more than 27 
term courses, whose grade-point average is less than 2.0, is on probation. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 11 

CLASSIFICATION 

The student who has nine term courses of college credit and a grade-point 
average of 1.6 is classified as a sophomore; 18 term courses and a grade- 
point average of 1.8, a junior; 27 term courses and a grade-point average 
of 2.0, a senior. 

DEGREES 

The degree regularly conferred is Bachelor of Arts. Candidates for a de- 
gree shall make formal application to the registrar one year in advance 
of their expected graduation date. The course may be completed at the 
close of any term but the formal graduation will occur at the commence- 
ment in June. The senior year must be spent in residence at Monmouth 
College. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Honors at graduation are either summa cum laude, magna cum laude or 
cum laude. The student is ranked upon his own merit, not upon compara- 
tive standing. To be eligible for honors at graduation a student must have 
been in residence at least six terms and have achieved a grade of Honor in 
the comprehensive examination. To be eligible for honors summa cum 
laude the grade-point average for the work taken in residence must be 
3.9 or higher. To be eligible for honors magna cum laude, the grade-point 
average for the work taken in residence must be 3.75 or higher. To be 
eligible for honors cum laude, the grade-point average for the work taken 
in residence must be 3.5 or higher. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Students may satisfy any division I, II or III requirement or secure ad- 
vanced placement by passing an examination administered by the depart- 
ment concerned and sufficiently comprehensive to prove their mastery of 
the required courses. Exemptions from distribution requirements may be 
recommended by the department concerned. If credit is desired, it may be 
recorded if it does not void necessary admission units and if the fees for 
such special examinations and additional hours are met. The fee for an 
examination to satisfy a divisional requirement or secure advanced place- 
ment with credit is $10.00. A fee of $45.00 per term course will be charged 
for recording credits on the transcript. No course except second-year for- 
eign language courses shall be used to satisfy both distribution and con- 
centration requirements. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Monmouth College students (except freshmen) are permitted to maintain 
and operate automobiles in accordance with regulations which are admin- 
istered by a committee composed of the personnel deans. A detailed fist 
of regulations governing use of automobiles is published in the Scots Guide. 

REGULATIONS 

Complete rules governing registration, attendance, conduct, probation, and 
use of automobiles will be published in the Scots Guide which is distributed 
at the beginning of the school year. 



12 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

ADMISSION 

Applicants must present a minimum of 15 secondary school units, 12 of 
which must be in the following fields: English, History, Social Science, 
Foreign Language, Mathematics, and Science (a unit is a subject carried 
for one school year). Four of the 12 units must be in English. One-half 
unit of the English requirement may be in speech or other communica- 
tion courses. 

All applicants are required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Advanced Placement 

A student may secure advanced placement at entrance by passing an 
examination administered by the department concerned. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Students may receive financial assistance through scholarships, Grants-in- 
Aid, part-time employment, and student loans. Recipients are selected on 
the basis of scholastic aptitude, scholastic achievement, and financial need. 
The National Defense Student Loan Fund is available at Monmouth 
for qualified students. 

FEES 

Expenses for the 1962-63 school year are as follows: 

Tuition and Fees $1225.00 

Room 300.00 

Board 500.00 

An estimated $300.00 to $400.00 will be required for books, supplies, 

clothing, recreation and other miscellaneous and personal items. 



Courses of Instruction 

ARRANGEMENT 

The departments of instruction in the following description of courses are 
arranged in alphabetical order. The listing of personnel at the beginning 
of each department's section of this catalog is historical, referring to the 
1961-62 year. The announcement of courses to be given is anticipatory, 
referring to the 1962-63 year. Departmental listings also contain general 
information concerning the program of the department and requirements 
for a major in that field. 

NUMBERING AND LEVEL 

The numbering of each course indicates the level of the course. Numbers 
100-199 are used for introductory courses open to freshman. Numbers 
200-299 are used for intermediate courses open to sophomores but not to 
freshmen. Numbers 300-399 are used for advanced courses open only to 
juniors and seniors or to sophomores with consent of the instructor. Num- 
bers 400-499 are used to designate departmental seminars and independent 
study. 

FRACTIONAL COURSES 

Art: All studio courses will be fractional courses. Studio classes will meet 
six hours per week, either three periods of two hours each or two periods 
of three hours each. Two terms must be completed to receive one course 
credit; an additional course credit will be given after the completion of 
the third term. 

Music: All applied music courses will be evaluated as one-sixth of a course 
per term. No credit will be given until the equivalent of a full course 
has been completed. 

Speech and Dramatics: Dramatics will be evaluated as one-sixth of a course 
per term. Directing and debate will be evaluated as one-third of a course 
per term. No credit will be given until the equivalent of a full course has 
been completed. 

ART 

Harlow B. Blum, Instructor, Acting Head 
Martha H. Hamilton, Assistant Professor 

Field of Concentration 

At least 10 term courses in art and five related term courses to include the 
following: four term courses in art history and design theory, four term 
courses in studio art and two term courses in independent study (Art 320 
and 420). 

101. Introduction to the History of Art. A study of art from prehistoric 
times to the Baroque period. 

Second term Mrs. Hamilton 

102. Introduction to the History of Art. A study of art from the Baroque 
period to the present time. 

Third term Mrs. Hamilton 

13 



14 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

103. Art Appreciation. A course for the general student, emphasizing 
increased perception of the formal elements of visual art — line, form, color 
and texture — with which one comes into contact every day. Included 
also are the theory and criticism of visual art. Open primarily to non- 
art majors. 
First term Mrs. Hamilton 

211. Design. A study of the fundamental elements and principles of 
design applied to fine and minor arts. 
Second term Mrs. Hamilton 

312. History of Interior Design, Furniture and Decoration. A study of 
interior design, furniture and decoration from prehistoric times through 
the seventeenth century. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Hamilton 

314. History of Interior Design, Furniture and Decoration. A study of 
interior design, furniture and decoration from the eighteenth century to 
the present. Prerequisite: Art 312 or consent of the instructor. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Hamilton 

316. House Planning and Decoration. A study of house planning and 
building, interior and exterior, and decoration and furnishing. Special 
emphasis on contemporary materials and methods. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) 

319. Mediterranean Culture of the 16th and 17th Centuries. See French 
319. 

320. Junior Independent Study. An individual research program ar- 
ranged in consultation with the instructor and designed to fit the interests 
of the student. 

Third term Staff 

321. Architecture. Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance architecture are 
used as a basis for appraising contemporary architecture. 

First term Mrs. Hamilton 

322. Contemporary Art. A study of twentieth century painting and sculp- 
ture with emphasis on the art in America. 

Third term Mrs. Hamilton 

331. European Renaissance. A study of the great figures in important 
centers in the Renaissance. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) 

420. Senior Independent Study. An individual research program as in 
320, but on a more advanced level. 
Third term Staff 

Studio Courses 

All studio courses are fractional courses. A one-term course requires the 
completion of two terms during which classes will meet six hours per week 
each term. Upon the completion of a third term "b" course an additional 
term course credit will be recorded. 

151 a, b. Fundamentals of Drawing. Introducing the beginning student 
to a variety of media: charcoal, conte, ink, pastel and watercolor. Theory 
and practice in the elements of drawing with the emphasis on creative 
expression. 

Mr. Blum 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 15 

201 a, b. Beginning Printmaking-Serigraphy. A studio course in silk- 
screen emphasizing the basic techniques of the medium in the development 
of the fine print. 

Mr. Blum 

251 a, b. Elementary Oil Painting. Introducing the student to composi- 
tion practice, analysis and painting techniques. Still-life, figure and land- 
scape. Prerequisite: Art 151 or consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Blum 

301 a, b. Advanced Printmaking. Prerequisite: Art 201. 

Mr. Blum 

351 a, b. Composition and Painting. Composition practice, analysis and 
painting techniques with emphasis on the creative formal elements. Pre- 
requisite: Art 251. 

Mr. Blum 

451 a, b. Advanced Composition. Individual creative work in the prac- 
tice of painting, sculpture or graphic arts; and seminar on professional 
problems. Prerequisite: Art 301 or 351. 

Mr. Blum 

BIBLE AND RELIGION 

Charles J. Speel, II, Professor, Head 

J. Stafford Weeks, Assistant Professor 

Harold J. Ralston, Professor 

Courses in the department have four main objectives: 

1. To develop in students a knowledge of the contents of the Bible, the 
use made of it in the past and present, the areas of study closely allied 
to it and the relationship of such knowledge to other fields of study. 

2. To help students discover the role of religion in contemporary life, both 
personal and social, and to assist them in their quest for moral and 
religious understanding and certainty. 

3. To develop in students a knowledge and understanding of the historical 
and doctrinal roles of Christianity and other religious forces. 

4. To prepare students for the varied tasks of lay leadership and to build 
a foundation for graduate study in the case of those preparing for the 
ministry, for religious education and for the teaching of Bible and 
Religion. 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven term courses. 

(b) At least five related term courses chosen in consultation with the de- 
partment. 

Bible 

101. Bible Survey. A survey of the Old and New Testaments and a 
study of Jesus and Paul. 
Each term Staff 

201. Old Testament Problems. Various aspects of Old Testament ma- 
terial including literature, religion and theology. 
First term (1963-64 and every third year) Mr. Speel 

212. New Testament Problems. Various aspects of New Testament ma- 



16 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

terial, including literature and religious thought. 

Second term (1964-65 and every third year) Mr. Speel 

301. Archaeology and the Bible. The bearing of archaeological and his- 
torical investigations on the life and literature of the Old and New Testa- 
ments along with a study of the relationship of neighboring cultures. 
First term (1962-63, 1964-65 and twice every three years) Mr. Speel 

Religion 

101. Basic Beliefs. A study of the fundamentals of the Christian faith 
and a consideration of the chief creeds of Christendom. 
First term. Mr. Weeks 

203. Ethics of the Professions and Business. A study of the history of 
Christian ethics and the ethics of the professions and businesses of the 
present day. Guest speakers, specialists in their fields, assist the instructor 
in the class. Discussion of historical and current situations. 
Third term (1963-64 and every third year) Mr. Weeks 

213. Philosophy of Religion. See Philosophy 213. 

301. Church History to 1450. A history of the Christian Church from 
the time of Christ to 1450 A.D., including a study of Christian doctrine, 
Church organization, significant ecclesiastical movements and outstanding 
Church leaders. 
First term Mr. Speel 

307. New Testament. See Classical Languages (Greek) 307. 

308. New Testament. See Classical Languages (Greek) 308. 

312. Church History 1450 to the Present. A history of the Christian 
Church from 1450 A.D. to the present, including a study of doctrine, 
organization, ecclesiastical movements and church leaders. 
Second term Mr. Speel 

322. World Religions. An introduction to the history of religion, em- 
phasizing the life and character of the founders, the philosophic develop- 
ment, the numerical and territorial expansion and the faith and practices 
of the religions of the world, both past and present. 
Second term Mr. Weeks 

324. Sacred Music. See Music 324. 

333. Christian Leadership. A study of the Christian ministry, the 
history, organization and administration of the Church. Includes an in- 
troduction to forms of worship, use of the Bible, and other materials and 
subjects related to Christianity and the furtherance of missions. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Weeks 

343. Program, Polity and Worship. A study of the program, polity and 
worship of the United Presbyterian Church. Arrangements may be made 
for students of other denominations to study their own church. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Weeks 

Seminars and Individual Study 

351. Field Work in Christian Education. A supervised program of prac- 
tical experience in connection with Christian education programs at local 
churches. Open only to juniors and seniors preparing for careers in Chris- 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 17 

tian education. Departmental consent required. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
Religion 323. Fractional credit. 

Mr. Speel 

401. Seminar. Open to juniors and seniors, subject to consent of the 
department. Topic for 1962-63: "The Middle East and Africa." 
First term Mr. Speel 

412. Reading Course. On problems of interest to the student. Open 
only to students who include Bible and Religion in their field of con- 
centration. 
Second term Mr. Speel 

423. Thesis Course. On a subject of the students' own choosing. Open 
onby to students who include Bible and Religion in their field of concen- 
tration. 
Third term Mr. Speel 



BIOLOGY 

John J. Ketterer, Associate Professor, Head 

ROBERT H. BuCHHOLZ, Associate Professor 

Milton L. Bowman, Assistant Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental major of at least seven term courses in addition to 
Biology 101 and 102 The seven term courses must include Biology 
201, 303, 305, 306, 401, and either 402 or 403. The remainder of the 
requirement may be satisfied by any other courses offered by the 
department. 

(b) Five term courses in the related fields of physics and chemistry of 
which the following are required: Organic Chemistry, one term; 
Quantitative Analysis, one term (unless excused by the adviser) and 
physics, two terms. A good background in mathematics is strongly 
urged. 

101. College Biology. An introduction to biology covering the organiza- 
tion of living organisms, their general physiology, morphology, embryology, 
genetics, evolution and ecology. Appropriate animal and plant forms are 
studied in both lecture and laboratory. Open to all students. 

First term Staff 

102. College Biology. Continuation of Biology 101. Prerequisites: Biol- 
ogy 101 or consent of the instructor. 

Second term Staff 

201. Introductory Physiology. An introduction to the physiology of 
mammalian organs and organ systems. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, 
and Chemistry 101 or consent of the instructor. 
First term Mr. Buchholz 

203. Genetics. An introduction to the principles of heredity in animals 
and plants. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the instructor. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

204. Botany. A review of the plant kingdom with emphasis on plant 
structure, physiology and classification. Open to all students. 

Third term Mr. Bowman 



18 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

206. Ecology. An introduction to ecology designed to give the student 
an understanding of the principles and concepts of environmental inter- 
relationships and interactions with living organisms. Prerequisites: Biology 
101, 102, and Biology 204 or consent of the instructor. 
Third term Mr. Bowman 

208. Organic Evolution. An introduction to the theories of evolution, 
the mechanics of evolution, the problems of the origin of life and evolution 
of plants and animals. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the 
instructor. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

301. Bacteriology. A general course consisting of a study of culture 
methods, morphology, identification and physiology of the bacteria. Some 
consideration is also given to the nature of disease and its control. Pre- 
requisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the instructor. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

302. Histology. An introduction to vertebrate animal tissues with con- 
sideration given to the relationship of form to function. Representative 
tissues are studied in the laboratory. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

303. Comparative Physiology. A comparison of animal physiological 
mechanisms in the muscle, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, digestive and 
excretory systems. The organisms will be studied in relation to ecology 
and the evolution of physiological function. Prerequisites: Biology 201 
and Chemistry 102. 

Second term Mr. Buchholz 

304. Advanced Physiology. A study of topics of current interest in 
basic and comparative physiology. Prerequisites: Biology 303 or consent 
of the instructor. 

Third term Mr. Buchholz 

305. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. A detailed study of the compara- 
tive anatomy of vertebrates. Shark, Necturus and cat are used as types 
in the laboratory. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the 
instructor. 

First term Mr. Ketterer 

306. Embryology. A study of the embryological development of verte- 
brates. Prerequisites: Biology 305 or consent of the instructor. 
Second term Mr. Bowman 

Seminars and Individual Study 

401. Seminar. Readings and discussions on selected topics designed 
to relate the knowledge from the several branches of biology to the whole 
of biological knowledge and to other learned disciplines from an historical 
and current problems point of view. Open to senior biology majors. 
First term Staff 

402. Experimental Biology. Advanced laboratory experimental work of 
the student's own choosing, not covered in other courses offered by the 
department. Detailed written reports are required. Open to senior biology 
majors. 

Second or third term Staff 

403. Research. Original research projects, chosen by the student in 
consultation with the staff, involving the search of primary literature 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 19 

sources, design and execution of experiments, and an oral and written 

report of the research results. Open to senior biology majors. 

Second or third term Staff 

405. Independent Study. Offered by special arrangement. 
Each term Staff 



CHEMISTRY 

Garrett W. Thiessen, Professor, Head 
Floyd F. Rawlings, Associate Professor 
Byron Hawbecker, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) Chemistry 101, 102, 103, 201, 301, 302, 403, 404; Physics 102 and 
Mathematics 152; and as many related courses as possible in biology, 
geology, math and physics. 

(b) American Chemical Society Accreditation: All of the above plus 
Chemistry 202, 203, 303 and 401 or 402; reading knowledge of German; 
Mathematics 254. 

101. Elementary Inorganic. Periodic Law, atomic structure, orbital 
picture of chemical bonds, phase rule, gas laws, and kinetic molecular 
theory, classical atomic and molecular weights, formulas, equations and 
stoichiometry, solutions, electrochemistry, oxidation-reduction. Four lec- 
tures, one lab (semimicro identification). Prerequisite: Two and one-half 
units of mathematics, slide rule. 

First term Mr. Thiessen 

102. Descriptive Elementary Organic. General survey of organic chem- 
istry including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, important functional 
groups (alcohols, carbonyls, amines, etc.), carbohydrates, amino acids and 
proteins, natural products. Four lectures, one lab (semimicro synthesis). 
Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent. 

Second term Mr. Hawbecker 

103. Electrolytic Equilibrium. Nuclear chemistry, kinetic equilibrium, 
ionic equilibrium, water ph, buffers, hydrolysis, solubility products, colloids, 
elementary thermodynamics, complexes. Three lectures, two laboratories 
(separation and identification). Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent; Physics — 
differential and integral calculus or equivalent. 

Third term Mr. Thiessen 

201. Elementary Analytical. Gravimetry, titrimetry and the physical 
chemical basis for analytical chemistry. Three lectures, two laboratories 
(gravimetry, titrimetry, physical chemical applications, colorimetry) . Pre- 
requisite: 102, 103. 

First term Mr. Rawlings 

202. Physical Chemistry. Thermodynamics (classical and statistical), 
solutions, kinetic theory, liquid states, molecular structures. Four lectures, 
one laboratory (physical properties of elements and compounds empha- 
sizing precision in measurement). Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and 
Mathematics 254. 

Second term Mr. Rawlings 

203. Physical Chemistry. Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium, 
electrochemistry, elementry chemical kinetics, Schroedinger equation, quan- 



20 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

turn chemistry, molecular bonding. Four lectures, one laboratory (miscel- 
laneous experiments in physical chemistry). 
Third term Mr. Rawlings 

301. Advanced Organic. Chemical bonding, resonance, sterochemistry, 
mechanisms of reactions for aliphatic and aromatic compounds, elimination 
and addition reactions, molecular rearrangements, emphasis on important 
synthetic procedures. Three lectures, two laboratories (advanced techniques 
in organic synthesis). Prerequisite: 102, 201. 

First term Mr. Hawbecker 

302. Advanced Analytical. Analytical complexes, redox theory, potentio- 
metry, multiple stage separations, conductometric titrations, polarography. 
Three lectures, two laboratories (advanced techniques including instru- 
mentation [electromagnetic waves and nuclear] ). Prerequisite: 201. 
Second term Mr. Rawlings 

303. Theoretical Inorganic. Acid-base chemistry, co-ordination chemistry, 
mechanisms of inorganic reactions, descriptive inorganic chemistry. Three 
lectures, two laboratories (emphasis on advanced techniques of inorganic 
synthesis). Prerequisite: 301, 203. 

Third term Mr. Hawbecker 

401. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Advanced chemical kinetics, statis- 
tical mechanics, spectroscopy, advanced topics in physical chemistry. Four 
lectures, one laboratory (nuclear chemistry, instrumental analysis). Pre- 
requisite: 302, 303. 

First term Mr. Rawlings 

402. Theoretical Organic. Advanced mechanistic theories, Hammett 
and Taft equations, heterocycles, applications of electromagnetic waves to 
organic chemistry. Three lectures, two laboratories (qualitative inorganic 
analysis, including applications of infra-red and ultra-violet spectra). 
Prerequisite: 301, 302. 

Second term Mr. Hawbecker, Mr. Thiessen 

403. Seminar. Survey of the chemical literature. Prerequisite: students 
must be chemistry majors in their senior year. 

Third term Mr. Hawbecker, Staff 

404. Independent Study. Consists of a senior thesis or a research 
project. Prerequisite: students must be chemistry majors in their senior 
year. 

Each term Mr. Hawbecker, Staff 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Harold J. Ralston, Professor, Head 
Bernice L. Fox, Associate Professor 

Latin 
Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven courses in addition to Latin 
101 and 102, and including 401. 

(b) Five or more related courses chosen with the approval of the adviser. 

101. Elementary Latin. A study of grammar and syntax. Designed 
for the student beginning the study of Latin. 
Second term Miss Fox 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 21 

102. Elementary Latin. A continuation of Latin 101, completing syntax 
and starting the reading of Latin authors. 
Third term Miss Fox 

204. Vergil's Aeneid. Prerequisite: two years of high school Latin or 
Latin 101-102. 

First term Miss Fox 

205. Cicero. Selections from the Orations and Essays. Prerequisite: 
two years of high school Latin or Latin 101, 102. 

Second term Miss Fox 

301. Livy's Histories. Emphasis on the early kings and the Carthagenian 
Wars. Prerequisite: three years of high school Latin or its equivalent. 
First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

302. Tacitus and Suetonius. The period of the Twelve Caesars, with 
special study of the periods of Augustus and Nero. Prerequisite: see 
Latin 301. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

303. Pliny's Letters. Special study of Roman private life at the time 
of pliny. Prerequisite: see Latin 301. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

310. Roman Drama. Studies in Plautus and Terence. Prerequisite: see 
Latin 301. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

311. Latin Lyric Poetry. Readings from Catullus, Ovid and Horace. 
Prerequisite: see Latin 301. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

312. Roman Satire. A study of the satires of Horace and Juvenal and 
the epigrams of Martial. Prerequisite: see Latin 301. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems in language or 
literature under guidance of the instructor. Advanced students only. 
By special arrangement Miss Fox 



Greek 

101. Elementary Greek. A study of Greek grammar and acquisition of 
vocabulary. 

Second term Mr. Ralston 

102. Elementary Greek. Continuation of the study of Greek grammar, 
with translation in Xenophon's Anabasis or other selected reading. 
Third term Mr. Ralston 

201. Greek Reading. Selections from Plato's Apology and Crito, or from 
the Greek historians, Septuagint, Apocrypha, or non-literary papyri. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

202. Greek Reading. Continuation of 201. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

307. New Testament. Forms, syntax and reading. Prerequisite: Greek 
101-102. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 



22 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

308. New Testament. Textual and word studies and more difficult read- 
ing. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

401. Independent Study. More advanced individual study of grammar 
or reading under direction of the instructor. 
By special arrangement Mr. Ralston 

Classical Civilization 

(Given in English. No foreign language prerequisite.) 

220. Roman Literature in Translation. A study of Roman literature 
in English translation. No prerequisites. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

221. Classical Mythology. A study of classical myths, especially as they 
relate to English literature. No prerequisites. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

223. Greek Civilization and Literature. Introduction to Greek life, artistic 
accomplishment and thought. Selections from Greek literature are read 
in English translation. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

224. Word Elements. Intended to aid in mastering general and technical 
derivatives from Greek and Latin stems. No previous study of these 
languages required. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

ECONOMICS 

James R. Herbsleb, Professor, Head 

Newell Beatty, Assistant Professor 

Robert Aduddell, Instructor 

Homer L. Shoemaker, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

The field of concentration may be either in Economics or Business Ad- 
ministration, or these areas may be combined: 

(a) Concentration in Economics requires the following courses: 305, 306, 
300, 301, 309, 311, 401 and Statistics. Additional electives available 
would be Economics 302, 303, 310 and a Survey of Accounting (inde- 
pendent study). 

Economics 200, 201 are required and may be used to satisfy s Division II 
requirements, but are not included in the field of concentration. 

(b) Concentration in Business Administration requires the following 
courses: 203, 204, 307, 308, 320, 321, or 322, 401 and Statistics. Addi- 
tional electives available would be Economics 100, 322, 323, 205, 
206, 324. 

Economics 200, 201 are required and may be used to satisfy Division II 
requirements, but are not included in the field of concentration. 

(c) Combined Economics and Business Administration curricula require 
the following courses: Survey of Accounting (independent study) or 
Economics 203, 204, 401, and other additional courses taken with the 
advice and consent of the adviser to complete the major. 
Economics 200, 201 are required and may be used to satisfy Division II 
requirements, but are not included in the field of concentration. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 23 

100. Introduction to Business Administration. A comprehensive picture 
of the business life of our day, giving insight into methods of organization 
and management of business such as factory management, marketing, fi- 
nance, personnel management, government aids and regulation, taxation of 
business. 
First or third term Mr. Beatty 

200. Principles of Economics. The two-term sequence (Economics 200- 
201) is designed to equip the student with a fundamental and rigorous un- 
derstanding of the methods and objectives of economic analysis. The course 
provides an intensive, orderly and objective set of basic relationships within 
which real world economic problems and policy questions may be analyzed. 
First term Mr. Aduddell 

201. Principles of Economics. A continuation of Economics 200. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 200. 

Second term Mr. Aduddell 

203. Principles of Accounting. This course does not presume any 
previous training in bookkeeping. It gives thorough acquaintance with 
the principles of accounting as applied to the corporate form of business 
enterprise. 

First term Mr. Shoemaker 

204. Principles of Accounting. A continuation of Economics 203 with 
emphasis on the interpretation of accounts as applied to both corporations 
and partnerships. Prerequisite: Economics 203. 

Second term Mr. Shoemaker 

205. Intermediate Accounting. Individualized study, usually seminar, in 
various fields of accounting such as budgeting, cost, taxation, etc. 
Second term Mr. Shoemaker 

206. Advanced Accounting. A continuation of 205. 

Third term Mr. Shoemaker 

211. Mathematics of Finance. See Mathematics 211. 

212. Elementary Statistics. See Mathematics 212. 

300. Intermediate Price Theory. An intensive view of modern price 
theory as it applies to individuals, firms and resource owners and their 
interaction in markets characterized by both perfect and imperfect compe- 
tition. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Second term Mr. Aduddell 

301. Intermediate Income Analysis. A comprehensive view of modern 
theories of the determination of income and employment. Includes dis- 
cussion of both Keynesian and post-Keynesian developments in income 
theory. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Third term Mr. Aduddell 

302. Business and Government. A study of basic industrial organiza- 
tion as it is altered by government regulation, particularly the regulation 
of monopoly and unfair business practices as spelled out in the Sherman 
Act and Clayton Act. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

First term Mr. Aduddell 

303. Government and Labor. A study of the changing position of labor 
before the courts and government regulation of labor unions. Prerequisite: 
Economics 201, 302. 

Second term Mr. Aduddell 

305. Money and Banking. A study of the history and theory of banking 



24 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

and the problems of monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: Economics 

201. 

First term Mr. Herbsleb 

306. International Economics. Analysis of our economic relations with 
other nations, relating to governmental policies in the area of trade and 
including economic development. Prerequisite: Economics 305. 
Second term Mr. Herbsleb 

307. Business Law. An introduction to the development of our legal 
system and the organization of our courts. Involves analysis of cases and 
application of principles with a view to the appreciation of the involvement 
and development of law in our society. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 
First term Mr. Herbsleb 

308. Business Law. A continuation of Economics 307, extending the 
analysis of the law into the realm of business organizations and property. 
Prerequisite: Economics 307. 

Second term Mr. Herbsleb 

309. Comparative Economic Systems. Analysis of the competing econo- 
mies of the world — Capitalism, Socialism, Fascism, Communism. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 201. 

Second term Mr. Herbsleb 

310. Public Finance. A study of the financing of government operations, 
including the problems of fiscal policy. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 
Third term Mr. Herbsleb 

311. History of Economic Thought. A study of the development of major 
economic thought and doctrines. Emphasis upon Mercantilists, Physiocrats, 
Classical School, Adam Smith, J. S. Mill, Alfred Marshall, J. B. Clark, 
Thorstein Veblen, J. A. Hobson, J. M. Keynes and others. Prerequisite: 
Economics 201. 

Third term Mr. Aduddell 

320. Investments and Finance. Analysis of the various types of invest- 
ment securities from the viewpoint of the investor, with attention to 
methods of corporation finance. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 204. 
First term Mr. Beatty 

321. Industrial Management. A study of the organization of industry 
and its management, including the physical plant, production, control and 
administration. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 203. 

Second term Mr. Beatty 

322. Marketing. Principles and problems in wholesaling, retailing, ad- 
vertising, chain stores and mail-order merchandising; study of buying 
motives and commodity markets; methods in buying, selling, ^transporta- 
tion, storage, pricing and credit extension. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 
First term Mr. Beatty 

323. Executive Management. An understanding of business reports, such 
as balance sheets, profit and loss statements, etc.; analyzing business prob- 
lems, arriving at decisions and presenting oral and written reports. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 201, 320, 321. 

Second term Mr. Beatty 

324. Personnel Management. A study of problems and methods of per- 
sonnel management; standards of living, wages, unemployment, trade 
union movement and methods of effecting adjustments between capital 
and labor. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Third term 

401. Independent Study — Seminar. A study of selected topics with 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 25 

emphasis on the student's responsibility in research, methods, presentation 

and defense of ideas. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 311. 

Third term Mr. Aduddell, Mr. Herbsleb 

EDUCATION 

Albert Nicholas, Professor, Head 

Charles E. Wingo, Professor 

Ben T. Shawver, Professor 

Thomas J. Erwin, Assistant Professor 

Katye L. Davenport, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

The education department prepares students for teaching in both the 
elementary and secondary schools. The courses offered meet the require- 
ments for the certificate in Illinois. While these courses also meet the 
requirements in a number of other states, students who plan to teach 
outside Illinois should consult with the department about requirements for 
a particular state. 

201. Introduction to American Public Education. Study of educational 
psychology, history and philosophy of education, and tests and measure- 
ments. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, Psychology 221 and 2.0 grade- 
point average. 

Second or third term Staff 

202. Introduction to American Public Education. A continuation of 201. 
Second term Staff 

220. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers. Required of all 
elementary teachers. See Physical Education 220. 

301. The Teaching of Arithmetic and Reading. Required of all elemen- 
tary teachers. Prerequisites: Education 201 and 202. Open to juniors and 
seniors. 

First term Mr. Wingo 

302. Secondary Techniques, Methods and Instructional Materials. Re- 
quired for secondary teachers. Prerequisites: Education 201 and 202. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

First term Mr. Nicholas 

303. Secondary Instructional Materials and the Teaching of Reading. 
Required for secondary teachers. Prerequisites: Education 201 and 202. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

Second term Mr. Nicholas, Mr. Wingo 

304. Science for Elementary Teachers. Study of methods, techniques 
and instructional materials in elementary school science courses. Prereq- 
uisites: Education 201 and 202. Open to juniors and seniors. 

First term Mr. Shawver 

307. School Administration. A study of the local school system, the 
duties of the superintendent and principal and the supervision of instruc- 
tion. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Wingo 

312. Teaching of Elementary School Music. See Music 312. 

325. Psychology of Learning. See Psychology 325. 

326. Teaching of Art and Children's Literature. Prerequisites: Education 
201 and 202. Open to juniors and seniors. 

331. Developmental Psychology. See Psychology 331. 



26 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

400. Independent Study. For seniors who wish to make a special study 
of some project in the field of education. 

First or second term Staff 

401. Student Teaching in the Elementary School. Required for the ele- 
mentary certificate. Open only to seniors who have met certain re- 
quirements. Application must be made by May 15 of the junior year. 
Application blanks and information regarding the requirements may be 
obtained at the education department office. 

First term Staff 

401 S. Secondary Student Teaching. Includes directed observation and 
full-time responsibility teaching in one or more of the grades seven through 
12 in a recognized school, participation in weekly conferences and guided 
study of relevant references. Each student will work closely with a critic 
teacher, a college supervisor from the Education Department and a rep- 
resentative from the student's major department. The latter will be partly 
responsible for instruction in methods in the student's major field. Re- 
quirements for admission are described in "Handbook About Teacher 
Preparation at Monmouth College." 
First term Staff 

402. Student Teaching in the Elementary School. Successful completion 
of 401 is a prerequisite for admission. Completion of 402S is required of 
all candidates for the Illinois State Elementary School Certificate. 
Second term Staff 

402S. Secondary Student Teaching. Successful completion of 401S is a 
prerequisite for admission. Completion of 402S is required of all candidates 
for the Illinois State Secondary School Certificate. 
Second term Staff 

ENGLISH 

Allen C. Morrill, Professor, Head 

Eva Hanna Cleland, Professor 

Adele Kennedy, Associate Professor 

Richard Leever, Associate Professor 

Ralph Wolfe, Assistant Professor 

Thomas Goss, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) At least seven courses in English beyond the freshman courses, 101-102. 
It is recommended that the following courses be taken: English 201-202, 
English 204, English 221 or English 311, English 361, and at least one 
seminar course in both the junior and senior year. 

NOTE: Upper college course prerequisites: Qualified students may apply 
for instructor's approval to waive usual prerequisites. 

101. Freshman English. Weekly themes are required. Attention is given 
to the improvement of the student's vocabulary and facility in self-expression 
and self-correction. The course also provides an introduction to various 
types of literature, including the essay, short story and biography. Required 
of all freshmen. 

First or second term Staff 

102. Freshman English. A continuation of 101 including drama, poetry 
and the novel. Prerequisite: 101. Required of all freshmen. 

Second or third term Staff 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 27 

1 02a. An honors course for freshman students whose performance in 
English 101 has been outstanding. More ambitious units of writing than 
those of English 102 and frequent conferences with the instructor. A 
course aimed at developing the students' initiative and achievement. Pre- 
requisite: English 101 and recommendation of the department. 
Second or third term Staff 

201. Survey of British Literature. British prose and poetry from their 
beginnings to 1800. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

First term Mr. Leever 

202. Survey of British Literature. Prose and poetry of Britain from 
1800 to the present. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 

Second or third term Mr. Leever 

204. Survey of American Literature. Growth of American literature, 
exclusive of drama, from its beginning to 1900. A study of the principal 
tendencies with emphasis on major figures. Prerequisite: sophomore stand- 
ing. This course may be followed by 305. 
First term Miss Kennedy 

221. Classical Mythology. See Classical Civilization 221. 

300. Report Writing. Primarily technical or report writing for pre- 
engineering and scientific students and students preparing for graduate 
work. Advanced training in the gathering, preparation, organization and 
presentation of information. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Goss 

301. Modern British Prose. Leading British writers and movements of 
the last 30 years. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

305. Modern American Literature. Growth of American literature from 
1900 to the present. A study of the leading writers and movements 
(sequel to English 204). 

Second term Aliss Kennedy 

306. Creative Writing. A workshop course of self-expression and evalu- 
ation in poetry, the essay and the short story. Consent of the instructor 
required for admission. 

Second term Miss Fox 

307. The English Novel. A study of the English novel from its beginnings 
to the present. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

308. The American Novel. A study of the American novel from its 
beginnings to the present. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Leever 

311. Great Books and Writers to 1800. A course in comparative litera- 
ture, both prose and poetry, including translated masterpieces from Egypt. 
Greece, Rome, Persia and India. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Goss 

312. Great Books and Writers from 1800. Extensive library readings 
and class discussions of the best literary productions of Europe and the 
Near East since 1800. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Goss 

313. The English Romantic Movement. A study of British poetry and 
prose in the romantic period. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Wolfe 



28 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

316. Tennyson and Browning. A study of British poetry in the second 
half of the nineteenth century with emphasis on Tennyson and Browning, 
their philosophy and their relation to their contemporary thought and 
progress. Individual studies are made of the lesser nineteenth century 
poets. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Cleland 

318. Victorian Prose. A study of the ideas of this era of change and 
progress as expressed in essay and fiction. Readings include such authors 
as Mill, Carlyle, Arnold, Ruskin, Dickens and Thackeray. 
First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Cleland 

320. European Short Story. French, Russian, German, Spanish, Italian 
and British short stories are studied. National characteristics and tech- 
niques are examined. 

Miss Cleland 

321. Seventeenth Century Literature. A study of seventeenth century 
British prose and poetry from the days of Donne and Jonson to the end 
of the Restoration. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

322. Eighteenth Century Literature. A study of eighteenth century 
British prose and poetry from Pope to Burns. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

324. Biography and Diaries. A study of subjective writing as well as 
objective biography which throws light upon manners, customs, political, 
religious and literary life and interesting personalities. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Cleland 

361. Shakespeare. A consideration of influences forming Shakespeare's 
background and the study of at least eight representative plays (see also 
English 462). 
First term Mr. Morrill 

363. The English Renaissance. A study of English writers in the six- 
teenth century with emphasis on Spenser, Sidney and Shakespeare's 
contemporaries. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Wolfe 

Seminars and Individual Study 

In order to encourage individual initiative and scholarly research, the 
English department requires English majors to elect, in the junior and 
senior years, at least one individual study or seminar course each year. 
The following courses meet this requirement: 

401. Chaucer. A study of Chaucer's England, his language and his 
writing, especially The Canterbury Tales. Permission of the instructor is 
required. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

403. Modern Poetry: British and American. A study of twentieth century 
British and American poetry. The course is conducted as a seminar with 
emphasis on literary movements and social significance. Prerequisites: 
senior standing and permission of the instructor. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

404. Studies in American Civilization. An integrated historical, social 
and cultural interpretation of life, thought and institutions in the United 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 29 

States from 1870 to 1950. Prerequisites: English 204, senior standing and 
permission of the instructor. See History 404 and Sociology 404. 
Second term Morrill, Davenport, Sanmann 

409. European Drama. A study of drama as a type of literature and a 
critical reading of Continental plays from Aeschylus to Ibsen. Emphasis 
on the literary qualities and social significance of the plays. Permission of 
the instructor required. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

410. Modern Drama. A continuation of English 409, but may be taken 
separately. Extensive library reading and class discussions of the best 
modern dramatic productions of Europe and America. Permission of the 
instructor required. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

412. English Seminar. Problems in English and American literature. 
First term Mr. Morrill 

413. Studies in Indo-European Philology. Emphasis is placed on the 
origin, growth and distribution of the Indo-European languages and on 
the history, structure and chief modifications of the English language. Per- 
mission of the instructor required. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Wolfe 

420. Independent Study. Independent study may be pursued on projects 
students wish to study thoroughly which are not offered in the usual courses. 
Given when requested. Staff 

426. Journalism. Credit for individual study in journalism may be given 
to a few selected students who are working on the Oracle, by permission 
of the instructor. 
Given when requested. Staff 

430. Teaching of Secondary School English. 

By special arrangement Mr. Leever 

452. Introduction to Criticism. A seminar course studying the rise of 
literary criticism among the Greeks and Romans and the evolution of 
modern critical standards, especially as they may be applied to British 
and American writers. Prerequisites: English 201, 202; six hours of litera- 
ture from 300 courses, and permission of the instructor. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Wolfe 

462. Shakespearean Studies. A seminar in which studies will be made 
of Shakespearean criticism and productions of Shakespeare's plays from 
1600 to the present. 
(1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Leever 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Donald L. Wills, Associate Professor, Head 

Field of Concentration 

(a) At least seven term courses in geology, excluding Geology 101-102. 

(b) At least five term courses in a related field. These may be taken in 
one or two departments approved by the adviser. 

(c) At least one term of independent study. 



30 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

(d) A grade of passing on the senior comprehensive examination. 
No major is offered in geography. 

101. Physical Geology. An introduction to the science of the earth. Ma- 
terials composing the earth and the work of agencies, both external and 
internal, modifying its surface. Field trips to areas of geologic interest. 
Open to all students. 

First term 

102. Historical Geology. A comprehensive review of what is known and 
inferred about the history of the earth from its beginning to the present 
time. Field trips to areas of geologic interest. Prerequisite: Geology 101. 
Second term 

201. Mineralogy. Crystallography; chemical, physical and descriptive 
mineralogy; geologic occurrences, associations and uses. Prerequisite: first 
year chemistry, mathematics through trigonometry. 

First term 

202. Mineralogy. Continuation of Geology 201. Prerequisite: Geology 
201. 

First term 

203. Petrology. Classification, occurrence, origin and hand-specimen 
recognition of common rocks. Prerequisite: Geology 202. 

Third term 

301. Structural Geology. Character, classification and origin of rock 
structures. Prerequisites: Geology 102; first year physics. 

First term 

302. Geomorphology. Origin, development and classification of land- 
forms. Prerequisite: Geology 102. 

Second term 

303. Field Geology. Instruction in field methods and introduction to 
problems of field geology. A period of two weeks will be spent in the field 
visiting areas of geologic interest. Prerequisite: Geology 301-302. 

Third term 

401. Optical Mineralogy. Optical mineralogy; the polarizing microscope; 
systematic study of rocks with respect to their mineralogy, texture and 
genesis. Prerequisite: Geology 203. 

First term 

402. General Paleontology. Fundamental treatment of the basic concepts 
•of paleontology. Systematic consideration of morphology, taxonomy and 
stratigraphic occurrences of invertebrate fossils. Prerequisite: first year 
biology; junior standing in geology. 

Second term 

403. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. Principles of sedimentation; ge- 
netic relations and correlation of rock and time rock units. Prerequisite: 
Geology 401-402. 

Third term 

404. Research and Seminar. Readings in geology; independent research; 
preparation and presentations of papers. Open only to seniors in geology. 
First term 

405. Research and Seminar. A continuation of 404. 
Second term 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 31 

406. Research and Seminar. A continuation of 405. 
Third term 

Geography 

101. Physical Geography. A systematic study of the physical and biotic 
environment. Open to all students. 
Third term 

GOVERNMENT 

Carl W. Gamer, Professor, Head 
Harry S. Manley, Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A minimum of eight courses, including Government 201 and 202, 341 
or 342 and 404. 

(b) A minimum of five courses in one or two related departments, chosen 
after consultation with the adviser. 

201. Introduction to American Government. A study of the federal gov- 
ernment and its constitutional development. Prerequisite: sophomore 
standing. 

First term 

202. State and Local Government and Politics. A study of the political 
institutions of the 50 states and their subdivisions (countries, townships, 
cities, etc.) ; also, the Constitution of Illinois, to meet one of the Illinois 
requirements for teachers. This course is a sequence to Government 201, 
although both can be taken independently. Prerequisite: sophomore stand- 
ing. 

Second term 

302. Business and Government. See Economics 302. 

303. Labor and Government. See Economics 303. 

310. Public Finance. See Economics 310. 

311. Party and Pressure Politics. A study of the problems and conduct 
of elections and primaries in the United States. Special studies are made 
of current political campaigns. Prerequisite: History 101 and 102 or Gov- 
ernment 201 and 202 or History 251 and 252, junior standing or consent 
of the instructor. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

320. Citizenship and the Christian Ethics. A study of areas, methods and 
functions of responsible citizenship in terms of the Judaeo-Christian value 
system as found in pronouncements of church bodies and official commen- 
taries on these. A study of case histories of various types of action and 
literature on the subject of responsible citizen-participation in the affairs 
of local, state, and national government and international affairs. Identifi- 
cation of existing unsolved problems. Opportunity to work on some super- 
vised project to apply knowledge gained. Prerequisite: Government 201 
or 202. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

330. Government and Politics in Metropolitan Areas. Organization, ad- 
ministration and functions of government in metropolitan areas: some 
special problems. Prerequisite: Government 201 or 202. Junior standing 
or consent of the instructor. 
Second term 



32 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

341. Foreign Governments, I. A study of government and political ac- 
tivity in England, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, the Scan- 
dinavian countries. Prerequisite: History 102 or Government 201 or 202. 
Junior standing or consent of the instructor. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

342. Foreign Governments, II. A study of government and political ac- 
tivity in the USSR and selected countries of Asia, Latin America and 
Africa. Prerequisite: History 102 or Government 201 or 202. Junior stand- 
ing or consent of the instructor. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

351. Political Theory to the Eighteenth Century. An historical survey 
and philosophical analysis of political theory from the time of the Greeks 
to the close of the seventeenth century. Required reading from the works 
of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke. Prerequisite: Gov- 
ernment 201 or 202. 

Second term 

352. Modern Political Theory. A continuation of Government 351 from 
the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present. Required reading 
from Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Mill, and Communist, Fascist and Socialist 
theorists. Prerequisite: Government 201 or 202. 

Third term 

360. Public Administration. A study of the nature, scope and develop- 
ment of the American administrative system, the theory of organization, 
staff and auxiliary agencies, chief executive, administrative departments, 
independent regulatory agencies, government corporations, administrative 
relationships and science in administration. Prerequisite: Government 201 
or 202. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

361. Legislatures and Legislation. A study of the legislative process, 
methods of getting information, public opinion and special interests, the 
struggle for power and the public interest. Prerequisite: Government 201 
or 202. Junior standing. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

380. World Politics. A study of states in relation to each other; as 
friends, rivals, contestants; the influence of nationalism, economic rivalry, 
power politics; causes of conflict, means of resolving conflict and avoiding 
war. Prerequisite: Government 201 or 202, or History 102. 
First term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

390. International Law. A study of the growth and nature of interna- 
tional law, substantive and procedural rules, using text and cases; current 
problems, new developments. Prerequisite: Government 201, Government, 
341, 342, or 380, or consent of the instructor. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

391. International Organization. A study of the nature, organization, and 
functions of international organization, serving political and economic ends. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

395. American Constitutional Law and Theory. A study of leading princi- 
ples of American Government as developed through judicial interpretation 
of the Constitution. Prerequisite: Government 201, 202 or consent of the 
instructor. Junior standing. 
First term 






MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 33 

396. American Constitutional Law and Theory. A continuation of 395. 
Second term 

Seminars and Individual Study 

401. Independent Study. Selected readings, written reports, conferences. 
Prerequisite : junior or senior standing. By arrangement with the instructor. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

402. Soviet Civilization Seminar. An interdepartmental (see Economics 
402, English 402 and History 402) or a departmental seminar to study the 
political and cultural life of the USSR. Prerequisite: Consent of the in- 
structor. 

By special arrangement 

404. Senior Seminar. Required of all majors in government. A schedule 
of reading, reports and discussion designed to give a broad knowledge of 
the literature in the discipline of Political Science. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) 



HISTORY 

F. Garvin Davenport, Professor, Head 

Mary Bartling Crow, Assistant Professor 

Douglas R. Spitz, Instructor 

Thomas Goss, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A minimum of seven courses including at least two courses from the 
101-103 sequence, either 251 or 252, and 400 and 408. (To qualify for 
graduate work, the student should have nine courses in history.) 

(b) Five courses in one or two related departments. 

(c) The senior comprehensive examination in history. 

101. Western Civilization. The main cultural and political features of 
Ancient and Medieval Civilization. 

First or Third term Staff 

102. Western Civilization. A continuation of 101, but may be taken sep- 
arately. Emphasis on the Renaissance, Reformation, Commercial Revolu- 
tion and rise of national states through the Napoleonic era. 

Second term Staff 

103. Western Civilization. A continuation of 102, but may be taken sep- 
arately. Emphasis on the main political, social and economic forces in 
Europe since 1815. 

Third term Staff 

251. American History, 1492-1865. A study of the main political, social 
and economic factors in the colonial, early national and Civil War periods. 
First term Mr. Davenport 

252. American History since 1865. A continuation of 251. but may be 
taken separately. Emphasis on Reconstruction, rise of big business, agrar- 
ian and labor movements and the United States as a world power. 
Second term Mr. Davenport 

290. Latin America. Emphasis on the independence movements and the 



34 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

political and social development of the modern republics. 

Third term Mrs. Crow 

301. Modern China. Covers the period from 1800 to the present, with 
emphasis on the impact of the West on China. 

Third term (not offered 1962-63) 

302. Modern Japan. Social, economic and political development of mod- 
ern Japan, with emphasis on the Japanese response to the problems posed 
by contacts with the Western world. 

Second term (not offered 1962-63) 

303. Modern India. A study of political, social and economic factors in 
modern India, with particular attention to British colonialism and the in- 
dependence movement. 

Third term (not offered 1962-63) 

311. History of Greece. From the Minoan civilization through the Hel- 
lenistic period. Emphasis on the social, cultural and political development 
significant in the context of Western civilization. Not open to freshmen. 
First term (not offered 1962-63) 

312. History of Rome. An interpretation and evaluation of Roman civ- 
ilization with special emphasis on the role of Rome in the founding of 
Europe. Not open to freshmen. 

Second term (not offered 1962-63) 

322. Medieval History. A study of medieval social and cultural life and 
its influence on later history. Prerequisite: History 101 or consent of in- 
structor. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

333. French Revolution and Napoleon. The ancient regime, the enlight- 
enment of the eighteenth century, the revolution and rise of Napoleon. 
Prerequisite: History 102 or consent of instructor. 

First term Mrs. Crow 

334. Nineteenth Century Europe. A study of the industrial revolution, 
the growth of democracy, nationalism and imperialism from 1815 to 1890. 
Second term Mrs. Crow 

335. Twentieth Century Europe. An investigation of European history 
from 1890 to the present with emphasis on imperial and Nazi Germany 
as the focal point of European politics. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Davenport 

341. History of Great Britain. English political and social development 
from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

342. History of Great Britain. A continuation of 341 but may be taken 
separately. Growth of the Empire, the development of the modern parlia- 
ment and political and social reform. England in the two world wars of 
the twentieth century. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

344. Modern Russia. A study of the political, social and economic 
developments in Russia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Em- 
phasis on the period since 1856 with special attention to Marxian ideology. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

351. History of American Culture. A study of American intellectual 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 35 

and cultural growth from the colonial period to about 1910. Prerequisite: 

History 251-252 or consent of the instructor. 

First term Mr. Davenport 

353. Twentieth Century America. A study of the social and intellectual 
life of the United States from about 1910 to the present. Prerequisite: 
History 351 or consent of the instructor. 
Second term Mr. Davenport 

384. History of the South. A study in regional history. Emphasis on 
the social and economic life of the South from 1800 to 1880. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Davenport 

Seminars and Individual Study 

400. Junior Seminar. Introduction to historical method and research. 
Individual projects. Required of all history majors in the junior year. 
First term Mr. Davenport 

402. Soviet Civilization. Individual projects in the political and cul- 
tural life of the USSR. Conducted on the seminar plan. Prerequisite: 
History 344. 
Third term Mr. Spitz 

404. Studies in American Civilization. (See also English 404 and 
Sociology 404). An integrated historical, social and cultural interpreta- 
tion of life, thought and institutions in the United States since 1870. 
Individual projects. Open only to English, history and sociology majors 
selected by the chairmen of the three departments. 
Third term Mr. Davenport, Mr. Morrill, Mrs. Sanmann 

408. Senior Seminar. Individualized study in American or European 
history. Required of all history majors in the senior year. 
Second term Mr. Davenport 



MATHEMATICS 

Paul Cramer, Associate Professor, Acting Head 

James McAllister, Associate Professor 

Fern Way Cramer, Instructor 

Lyle Finley, Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) At least seven term courses with at least three of them numbered 
300 or higher. 

(b) Five related courses from one or two other subjects approved by the 
department. Courses numbered 100, 111, and 112 will not count to- 
wards a major. 

100. Introduction to Mathematics. The number system, sets, axioms, 
classical and modern geometry, functions and graphs. 
Each term Staff 

111. College Algebra. Quadratic equations, simultaneous equations, pro- 
gressions, theory of equations, etc. 

First or second term Mrs. Cramer 

112. Trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, logarithms, identities and 



36 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

solution of triangles. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 or equivalent. 
Each term Mrs. Cramer 

151. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Fundamental ideas of functions, 
the straight line, the conies and an introduction to the concepts of 
calculus. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and 112 or equivalent. 

First or second term Mr. Cramer, Mr. Finley 

152. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. A continuation of 151. 

First or second term Mr. Cramer, Mr. Finley 

211. Mathematics of Finance. Interest, discount, annuities, amortization, 
sinking funds, bonds, depreciation, elements of actuarial science. Prereq- 
uisite: Mathematics 111 or equivalent. 

First term 

212. Elementary Statistics. A study of central tendency and variability; 
frequency, binominal, normal and chi-square distributions; correlation and 
regression; and analysis of variance and applications in related fields. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 111. 

Second term 

232. Essentials of Mathematics. Fundamental operations with natural 
numbers, inequalities, decimal numbers, percentage, measurement, irra- 
tional numbers. For Education majors. 
Third term 

251. Calculus. Further study of the techniques of differentiation and 
integration with applications to physics and engineering. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 152. 
First or third term Mr. McAllister, Mr. Cramer 

254. Differential Equations. An introduction to ordinary and partial dif- 
ferential equations and their applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 251. 
Second term Mr. McAllister 

301. Advanced Calculus. Series, partial differentiation, definite integrals, 
Fourier series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 254. 
Third term Mr. McAllister 

309. Vector Analysis. The algebra of vectors, vector fields, vector op- 
erators, introduction to geometry, mechanics and electricity. Prerequisite 
or corequisite: Mathematics 254. 
First term Mr. McAllister 

311. Introduction to Modern Algebra. Rings, integral domains, fields, 
groups, determinants and matrices. Prerequisite: Mathematics 152. 
First or second term Mr. Cramer 

312. Introduction to Modern Algebra. A continuation of 311. N 

First or second term Mr. Cramer 

315. Theory of Numbers. The properties of the whole numbers, divisi- 
bility, diophantine equations, prime numbers, congruences, residues, addi- 
tive number theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 152. 

First term 

316. College Geometry. Foundations of plane geometry, geometric con- 
structions, use of loci, fundamental theorems, the harmonic range, systems 
of circles, inversion. 

Third term 

340. Probability. Random variables, binomial, Poisson and normal dis- 
tributions, mathematical expectation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 212. 
By special arrangement Staff 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 37 

341. Functions of a Complex Variable. Series, conformal mapping, 
analytic functions, residues, complex integration. Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 301. 
Third term Staff 

403. Advanced Applied Mathematics. Ordinary differential equations, 
elementary set and matrix theory, hyperbolic functions, elliptic integrals, 
infinite series, Fourier series. Prerequisites: Mathematics 301 and 309. 
Second term Mr. McAllister 

404. Advanced Applied Mathematics. Gamma, Bessel and Legendre 
Functions, partial differential equations, vector analysis, probability and 
numerical methods, functions of a complex variable, operational calculus. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 301 and 309. 

Third term Mr. McAllister 

421. Independent Study and Seminar. Selected topics in advanced 
mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. 

First or second term Mr. McAllister 

422. Independent Study and Seminar. A continuation of 421. 

First or second term Mr. McAllister 

Astronomy 202. Introduction to Astronomy. A non-laboratory course 
dealing with basic facts and principles of astronomy. 
By special arrangement Staff 

Engineering 101. Engineering drawing and descriptive geometry. Use of 
instruments, orthographic projections, dimensioning, sectioning and pic- 
torial drawing. Representation of points, lines, planes and curved surfaces 
with applications. 
First or second term Mr. Cramer 

Engineering 102. A continuation of Engineering 101. 
First or second term Mr. Cramer 

Engineering 203. Surveying. Plane and topographical surveying with 
field work in the use of tape, level and transit. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
112 or equivalent. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

Engineering 207. Analytic Mechanics. A continuation of Physics 208. 
Third term Mr. Cramer 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Dorothy Donald, Professor of Spanish, Head 

Edwin Pleasants, Associate Professor of Spanish 

Erika BLAAS, Assistant Professor of German 

Momcdlo RosiC, Assistant Professor of Russian 

Arturo Serrano, Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Alexandra Kaminska, Instructor in French 

Laurence Romero, Jr., Instructor in French 

Christiane Zehl, Instructor in German 

Field of Concentration 

(a) Courses selected with the aid of a departmental counselor that cover 
the significant periods of the literature and other aspects of the 
spoken and written language. Evidence of ability to develop a given 
linguistic or literary subject involving research, organization and 



38 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

critical judgment will be provided by at least one independent study 
course. 

(b) For a departmental major in French, German, or Spanish, students 
must demonstrate by an oral and written examination a mastery of 
the language and comprehensive knowledge of the literature. 

(c) Students are encouraged to participate in the foreign study program 
which provides for a summer, a term, or a year in a foreign country. 
Contacts in the past have been made with Universite Laval, Quebec; 
Mexico City College; National University of Mexico; the Sorbonne; 
Heidelburg; and Freiburg i. Br. Candidates for foreign study must be 
approved by the department and programs must be planned well in 
advance. 

On the basis of placement examinations, recommendations for courses 
are made to students who wish to continue a language studied in high 
school. A proficiency examination provides a means of meeting the for- 
eign language requirement for graduation. 

French 

101. Elementary. Introduction to spoken and written French. Attention 
to pronunciation with practice in using the language. Laboratory facilities 
provide authentic speech patterns. This course builds a foundation for 
reading the language. 

First or second term Staff 

102. Elementary. Introduction to spoken and written French. Attention 
to pronunciation with practice in using the language. Laboratory facilities 
provide authentic speech patterns. This course builds a foundation for 
reading the language. 

Each term Staff 

201. Intermediate. Selected readings of modern literature, with con- 
versational approach. Continued emphasis on oral and written expression, 
aided by laboratory practice. Introduction to French contributions to the 
arts and sciences, illustrated by films, slides, tapes and discs. 

Each term Staff 

202. Intermediate. Selected readings of modern literature, with con- 
versational approach. Continued emphasis on oral and written expression 
aided by laboratory practice. Introduction to French contributions to the 
arts and sciences, illustrated by films, slides, tapes and discs. 

Second or third term Staff 

299. Conversation and composition. Practice in fluent speech and correct 
writing, with discussions and oral and written reports from selected authors 
and French-language periodicals. 
First term Mr. Romero 

301. The Novel. Background of the French novel, followed by the inter- 
pretation and analysis of outstanding modern authors such as Balzac, 
Flaubert, Proust and Gide. Use of literary recordings. Alternates with 305. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 

305. Short Story and Essay. Study of: a) the French short story as a 
literary genre, represented by Maupassant and Anatole France; b) the 
essay, introduced by Montaigne and cultivated by La Bruyere; and c) 
criticism by Sainte-Beuve. Alternates with 301. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 39 

306. French Theatre. A study of the genres of French classical tragedy 
and comedy. Study and analysis of the works of Corneille, Racine, Moliere 
and Voltaire. Alternates with 307. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 

307. French Theatre. Drama of the nineteenth and twentieth century 
playwrights including Hugo, Musset, Giraudoux, Camus and Sartre. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 

308. Moliere. Reading, analysis and discussions of selected plays with 
emphasis on the classical aspects of language and style. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Romero 

319. Mediterranean Culture, 1500-1650. Aesthetic aspects of the Medi- 
terranean world as reflected in literature, architecture, painting and sculp- 
ture. Correlation of historical background. Reading from French, Italian 
and Spanish literature in the original or in translation. Collaboration with 
the art and foreign language departments. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald, Mrs. Hamilton 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of the 
instructor, of certain aspects or periods of French literature, i.e., Medieval 
literature, the "Encyclopedists," French lyrics, memoirs and letters, con- 
temporary literature. 

Each term Staff 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance 
of the instructor. 
Each term Staff 

460. Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Languages. Discussion, obser- 
vation and practice in the field of foreign language teaching. Introduction 
to phonetics and linguistics. Attention given to teaching in elementary 
grades and practice with audio-visual aids. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. See Chemistry 404, Biology 401 
and Physics 401. In such courses the department acts as consultant for 
French-language material. 
By special arrangement Staff 

German 

101. Elementary. An introduction to the German language, with em- 
phasis on pronunciation and comprehension. Laboratory practice supple- 
ments classroom instruction. A foundation for reading and writing the 
language. 

First or Second term Miss Blaas, Miss Zehl 

102. Elementary. An introduction to the German language, with empha- 
sis on pronunciation and comprehension. Laboratory practice supplements 
classroom instruction. A foundation for reading and writing the language. 
Second or third term Miss Blaas, Miss Zehl 

201. Intermediate. Extensive reading of modern literature. Continued 
attention to written expression through diary, letter and essay writing; 
further practice in conversation through class and laboratory work. Ac- 
quaintance with essential aspects of German culture, through such media 
as monthly German news reels. 

First or third term Miss Blaas, Miss Zehl 

202. Intermediate. Extensive reading of modern literature. Continued 
attention to written expression through diary, letter and essay writing: 



40 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

further practice in conversation through class and laboratory work. Ac- 
quaintance with essential aspects of German culture, through such media 
as monthly German newsreels. 
First or second term Miss Blaas, Miss Zehl 

202S. Intermediate Scientific. Reading and discussion of scientific texts, 
biographies of scientists and a leading German newspaper. Use of German 
scientific films, tapes and discs (from Institut fur Film und Bild) . Primarily 
for science majors. 
First or second term (second term only 1962-63) Miss Blaas 

299. Conversation and Composition. Concentrated training in fluent 
speech and correct writing. Practice with such material as book reviews and 
written and oral reports in the field of art and music. 
Third term Miss Blaas 

301. Introduction to the Study of German Literature. A study of the 
major works and movements in German literature from the Early Period 
to the Age of Enlightenment. Extensive use of phonograph records of the 
"literatur-archiv." Prerequisites: 201-202 or the equivalent. 

First term Miss Blaas 

302. Introduction to the Study of German Literature. A continuation of 
301 concentrating on the Classical Period through the early twentieth 
century. 

Second term Miss Blaas 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of the 
instructor, of certain aspects of German literature. Prerequisite: a 300 
course or consent of the instructor. 
Each term Miss Blaas 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance of 
the instructor. Preparation for studies in Germany. 
Each term Miss Blaas 

460. Methods of Teaching German. See French 460, Biology 401. 
Third term upon request Miss Blaas 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. See Chemistry 404, Biology 401 
and Physics 401. In such courses the department of German acts as con- 
sultant for German-language material. 
By special arrangement Miss Blaas 

Spanish 

101. Elementary. An introduction to Spanish as a spoken and written 
language. Regular practice in the classroom and laboratory in hearing and 
imitating current, realistic speech. Four-fold aim of speaking, comprehend- 
ing, reading and writing the language. 

First or second term Staff 

102. Elementary. A continuation of 101. 

Each term Staff 

203. Intermediate. Continued emphasis on the spoken and written 
language, aimed toward adequate oral and written expression. Readings 
from modern literature, with analysis and interpretation. Acquaintance 
with cultural aspects of Spain and Spanish America. 

Each term Staff 

204. Intermediate. A continuation of 203. 

Each term Staff 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 41 

299. Conversation and Composition. Further development of fluency in 
handling the spoken and written language. Suhject matter for practice in- 
cludes literature, geography, current history and other phases of Hispanic 
civilization. Use of periodicals, records and tapes. Required of majors or 
substituted by proficiency test. 
First or third term Mr. Serrano 

305. Modern Spanish Literature. Brief studies of Spanish peninsular 
literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The first course deals 
with prose, emphasizing Perez Galdos, Generation of '98 and Ortega y 
Gasset. Alternates with 307 and 308. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

306. Modern Spanish Literature. A continuation of 305. The study of 
the Romantic movement in drama and poetry. Benavente, pre-civil war 
poets and contemporary poets and playwrights. Alternates with 307 and 
308. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

307. Spanish American Literature. A consideration of the search for 
identity of the rising Spanish American nations through their literature. 
The first course deals with prose, emphasizing such essayists as Rodo, 
Henriquez Urena, Vasconcelos and Alfonso Reyes. Alternates with 305 
and 306. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Pleasants 

308. Spanish American Literature. A continuation of 307 dealing with 
poetry and poetic prose, from Araucana epic to contemporary poets in- 
cluding Neruda, Borges and Torres Bodet. Alternate years with 305 and 
306. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Pleasants 

315. Drama of the Golden Age. A study of selected plays of Lope de 
Vega, Calderon Tirso de Molina and Alarcon with analysis of dramatic 
structure and ideological concepts of the age. Prerequisite: 300 course. 
Alternates with 316. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Pleasants 

316. Cervantes. A study of Cervantes' masterpiece Don Quijote, in addi- 
tion to the Nevelas ejemplares. Consideration of the life, character and 
milieu of the author. Prerequisite: 300 course. Alternates with 315. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

319. Mediterranean Culture, 1500-1650. See French 319. 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of the 
instructor, of certain aspects or periods of Spanish and Spanish American 
literature; i.e.;, literature before 1500, Romancero, Picaresque Novel, 
Chronicles of the Spanish Conquest, Short Story and Essay, Novels of 
the Mexican Revolution, Contemporary Hispanic Ideology. 

Each term Staff 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance 
of the instructor. 
Each term Staff 

460. Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Languages. See French 460. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. In such courses the department of 
Spanish acts as a consultant for Spanish-language material. 
By special arrangement Staff 



42 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Russian 

101. Elementary. Introduction to the spoken and written Russian 
language. Emphasizes distinctive characteristics of the structure of the 
language. The laboratory affords drills in pronunciation and practice in 
listening, comprehending and speaking and facilitates the acquisition of 
an active and passive vocabulary and use of grammatical principles. 
First term Miss Kaminska 

102. Elementary. A continuation of 101 including simplified Reading of 
Chekhov. 

Second term Miss Kaminska 

201. Intermediate. Continued emphasis on the oral and written language 
through laboratory practice. Readings from Russian authors, with audio- 
visual aids, affording a broader acquaintance with the Russian language 
and its people. 

Third term Mr. Rosic 

202. Intermediate. A continuation of 201. 

First term Mr. Rosic 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of 
the instructor, of certain aspects of literature and other fields of Russian 
culture. 
Second term Staff 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. See Chemistry 404, Biology 401 
and Physics 401. In such courses the department acts as consultant for 
Russian-language material. 
By special arrangement Miss Kaminska 



MUSIC 

Heimo A. Loya, Professor, Head 

James Dunn, Assistant Professor 

Elwood Ball, Assistant Professor 

PAUL Lyddon, Instructor 

Grace Gawthrope Peterson, Instructor 

It is the aim of the Music Department to provide: 

1. Opportunities in performance and classwork for any student to develop 
an understanding and appreciation of music. 

2. A four-year course for students whose interest leads them to concen- 
trate in music as an end in itself or as preparation for graduate study 
and a professional career. 

3. A four-year course which will comply with state requirements in both 
music and education for students who wish to become supervisors or 
teachers of music in elementary and secondary schools. 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least the following courses: Music 102, 103, 
201, 202, 321, 322, and two courses in Applied Music (private lessons). 

'b) At least five related courses chosen with the approval of the adviser. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 43 

NOTE: A general major should carry, in addition to the above, Music 
203, 303, 401 and 402. 

A student concentrating in performance should carry two additional 
courses in Applied Music: Music 203, 401 and 402. 

A student preparing for certification in Music Education should carry 
311, 312 and 313 or 303 and 314, and another course in Applied Music, 
as well as the necessary courses in the Education department. 

101. Introduction to Music. This course is designed to develop an under- 
standing of music through a study of musical materials, principles of or- 
ganization and historical styles. Open to all students: those with little or 
no musical experience should enroll in Section A: prospective majors and 
those with considerable musical training, Section B. 

Each term Staff 

102. Theory of Music I. An approach to the elements of music — 
melody, harmony, rhythm and form — as employed during the functional 
harmonic period (eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) through the de- 
velopment of skills in hearing, singing, keyboard, writing and analysis. 
Second term Mr. Lyddon 

103. Theory of Music II. A continuation of Music 102. 

Third term Mr. Lyddon 

201. Theory of Music III. Advanced Harmony. A continuation of 
Music 103. 

First term Mr. Lyddon 

202. Theory of Music IV. Counterpoint. The principles of modern coun- 
terpoint. Analysis and composition of two- and three-part inventions. 
Second term Mr. Lyddon 

203. Canon and Fuge. A continuation of Music 202. Advanced study 
in contrapuntal writing, based on the analysis of the fugues of Bach. The 
use of fugal devices in classic and modern composition. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ball 

301. Composition I. Creative work in small forms and for various 
mediums. Includes study and analysis of contemporary techniques. In- 
dividual study. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

302. Composition II. Continuation of Music 301. Individual study. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

303. Orchestration. Study of the characteristics and potential of or- 
chestral instruments, and of their combination in small groups and in the 
full orchestra. Arranging original compositions for musical groups on the 
campus. Individual study. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

311. Conducting. Principles and methods of conducting. Technique of 
the baton. Interpretive study of both choral and instrumental scores. Prac- 
tical experience in conducting musical groups on the campus. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Dunn 

312. Teaching Music in the Elementary Schools. Music fundamentals, 
teaching skills and actual teaching methods at different age levels. A 
comprehensive coverage of music requirements for prospective elementary 



44 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

teachers with special emphasis on singing and functional piano technique. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

313. Choral Techniques. Teaching and administration of vocal music in 
secondary schools. The general music program, the changing voice, in- 
structional problems and materials for vocal ensembles and operetta pro- 
duction. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Dunn 

314. Instrumental Techniques. Teaching and administration of instru- 
mental music in public schools. Techniques of group instruction, materials 
and equipment. Principles and methods of conducting school orchestras 
and bands, to include an intensive survey of the literature. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

321. History and Literature of Music I. Study of works, styles, and mu- 
sical activity from earliest times to the sixteenth century, including the 
study of the relationship of the art to contemporary, social, cultural and 
political circumstances. Emphasis on aural appreciation of style, evolution 
throughout history. Primarily for music majors. Others with the consent 
of the instructor. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Dunn 

322. History and Literature of Music II. Continuation of Music 321. 
From the sixteenth century to the present. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Dunn 

323. Twentieth Century Music. A study of the contemporary trends in 
music as manifested in the works of such composers as Stravinsky, Schoen- 
berg, ProkonefT, Hindemith, Bartok, Copeland and Barber and an evalua- 
tion of the Jazz idiom. Designed to give students a background for in- 
telligent appreciation and understanding of modern music. Prerequisite: 
101 or consent of the instructor. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Dunn 

324. Sacred Music. Music specifically related to the Protestant church. 
Major sacred works from all periods are heard and discussed. A portion of 
the semester's work is devoted to a critical appraisal of the standard 
church repertory of anthems, larger choral works, organ literature and 
hymns. Provision is made in this part of the course for the student to 
pursue detailed studies pertinent to his major interest. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ball 

Seminars and Individual Study 

401. Seminar. Primarily for junior and senior majors in music. Areas 
of study will include topics of special interest to the student, with ex- 
tensive independent reading and required weekly reports. 

First term Staff 

402. Independent Study. Research in an area of specialization. Open 
only to students completing a major in music. 

Second or third term Staff 

Applied Music 

Private Lessons. Instruction in solo performance is offered on a uniform 
basis of one 30-minute individual lesson and one class meeting weekly, 
with a minimum of one hour's practice daily, for one-sixth credit each 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



45 



term. Music majors may elect to combine two one-sixth units (on a basis 
of two half -hour lessons and a class period per week) with a minimum of 
two hours practice daily for one-third credit each term. No credit will be 
given until the equivalent of a full course has been completed. 

Odd numbers indicate a one-sixth credit per term; even numbers, one- 
third credit. 



Music 141 


or 


142 


Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 241 


or 


242 


Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 342 






Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 442 






Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 145 


or 


146 


Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon, 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 245 


or 


246 


Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon. 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 346 






Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon. 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 446 






Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon , 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 151 


or 


152 


Voice 






Mr. Dunn 


Music 251 


or 


252 


Voice 






Mr. Dunn 


Music 352 






Voice 






Mr. Dunn 


Music 452 






Voice 






Mr. Dunn 


Music 155 


or 


156 


Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 


Music 255 


or 


256 


Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 


Music 356 






Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 


Music 456 






Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 



Musical Organizations 



254. College Choir. Registration by permission of the instructor. At- 
tendance at choral society rehearsals required, (one-sixth credit each term) 

Mr. Dunn 

255. College Choir. A continuation of 254 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Dunn 

256. College Choir. A continuation of 255 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Dunn 

261. Orchestra. A laboratory course in the theory and practice of or- 
chestral and chamber music, (one-sixth credit each term) 

Mr. Loya 

262. Orchestra. A continuation of 261 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Loya 

263. Orchestra. A continuation of 262 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Loya 

264. Chorale. Limited to 16 voices. Registration by permission of the 
instructor, (one-sixth credit each term) 

Mr. Dunn 

265. Chorale. Continuation of 264 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Dunn 

266. Chorale. A continuation of 265 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Dunn 



46 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

267. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Registration by permission of the in- 
structor, (one-sixth credit each term) 

Mr. Loya 

268. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. A continuation of 267 (one-sixth credit 
each term). 

Mr. Loya 

269. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. A continuation of 268 (one-sixth credit 
each term) . 

Mr. Loya 

(No credit will be given until the equivalent of a full course has been 
completed.) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Samuel M. Thompson, Professor, Head 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven terms in philosophy including 
either 301, 302 or 303, 304 and two terms of independent study. 

(b) Five related courses chosen from one or two fields with the approval of 
the adviser. 

101. Introduction to Philosophy. An introduction to the general field and 
methods of philosophy, and the basic problems in the philosophy of science 
and the philosophy of man and human culture. 

Each term 

102. Introduction to Logic. A study of logical relations with special em- 
phasis upon the development of skill in the logical control and evaluation 
of thinking. 

Second or third term 

210. Advanced Logic. Techniques of symbolic logic and problems of 
logical theory. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101. 
First term 

213. Philosophy of Religion. A study of philosophical problems raised 
by basic religious beliefs and concepts. Open without prerequisite to all 
students except freshmen. This course is also listed under the Department 
of Bible and Religion, and may be used to satisfy Bible and Religion re- 
quirements. 
First term 

301. Greek and Medieval Philosophy. A study of the development of 
Greek and medieval philosophy, with emphasis on Plato, Aristotle, Au- 
gustine and Thomas Aquinas. Special attention will be given to the his- 
torical roots of contemporary problems. Open to juniors and seniors. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

302. Modern Philosophy. A continuation of 301, but may be taken by 
students who have not had 301. A study of the major philosophers from the 
Renaissance to the present century. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

303. Ethics. An analysis of basic moral concepts and a study of their 
application in personal choice and decision, and of the principal historical 
and contemporary ethical theories. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 47 

304. Political Philosophy. Theories concerning the nature of the state, 
the nature of law, the authority of the state and political obligation. A 
comparison of competing political philosophies. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Third term 

305. Contemporary Philosophy. Twentieth century philosophy, its roots 
in nineteenth century thought, and present issues in Anglo-American and 
European philosophy. Prerequisite: Philosophy 301 and 302, or consent 
of the instructor. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

306. Oriental Philosophy. A study of the chief schools of thought of 
China and India, and their influence throughout the Orient. Philosophy 
301 and 302 or consent of the instructor. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

315. Aesthetics. A study of values in literature, music, painting and 
other arts, with special attention to the relation of aesthetic experience 
and judgment to scientific and religious thought. Open to juniors and 
seniors. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

316. Philosophy of Science. The nature of scientific knowledge, and de- 
velopment of modern scientific concepts and the relation of science to other 
methods of inquiry and areas of knowledge. Prerequisite: Philosophy 102. 
Third term 

Seminars and Individual Study 

Each philosophy major is expected to take at least two individual study 
courses during each of the junior and senior years. Other juniors and 
seniors who have satisfied the prerequisites may be admitted to these 
courses by permission of the instructor. 

401. Philosophy Seminar. A study of philosophical methods as exem- 
plified in the work of selected philosophers. Prerequisite: four courses in 
philosophy. 
First term 

405. Philosophy of Education. Theories and basic concepts of education 
in relation to general philosophical issues. Seminar or independent study. 
Prerequisites: Philosophy 301, 302. 

By special arangement 

406. Philosophy of History. A study of theories concerning the nature 
of historical knowledge and an examination of their assumptions. Seminar 
or independent study. Prerequisite: Philosophy 301, 302. 

By special arrangement 

411. Junior Independent Study. Individual reading, reports and papers 
in areas of special interest to the student. Prerequisite: four courses in 
philosophy. 

Second term 

412. Junior Independent Study. A continuation of 411. 
Third term 

421. Senior Independent Study. Continuation of Philosophy 411 and 
412, culminating normally in the preparation of a senior thesis. Prereq- 
uisite: Philosophy 412. 
Second term 



-I J 



48 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

422. Senior Independent Study. A continuation of 421. 
Third term 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Robert Woll, Associate Professor, Head 

Charles Larson, Associate Professor, Director of Athletics 

Joe Pelisek, Assistant Professor 

Marcia Sebern, Instructor 

Marjorie Niblock, Instructor 

The Physical Education Department aims to provide opportunities for stu- 
dents to grow in an environment that is physically stimulating; socially, 
emotionally and morally beneficial. This is accomplished by providing 
activities for every interest and all ranges of ability to satisfy recreational 
needs both now and for the future under competent guidance. 

The curriculum in physical education for men and women is designed 
to prepare students for teaching physical education, health, safety, coach- 
ing athletics and intramural sports and directing recreational activities. 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental major of at least seven term courses chosen from the 
department, including the following courses: 202, 303, 305, 309, 455. 

(b) Courses totaling at least three terms in biology, consisting of Biology 
101, 102, and 201 or 305. Sufficient hours in education and psychology 
to satisfy state requirements for teachers of physical education. Con- 
sult the Education Department. 

(c) Related courses totaling at least five terms chosen from one or two 
subjects which the student is preparing to teach, after consultation 
with the adviser. 

(d) Majors in physical education are required to enroll in 12 terms of 
service classes numbered 100. 

(e) A minor in the field of physical education must complete five term 
courses including 305. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Intercollegiate competition is carried on in baseball, basketball, cross- 
country, golf, swimming, tennis, track and wrestling. 

College Requirement 

Freshmen and sophomores are required to complete six terms of satisfactory 
work in physical education (in courses numbered 100-190) unless excused. 
Individual exemptions from this requirement for a term at a time will be 
made by the director of the college health service for medical reasons. 
Passing a swimming test or receiving credit for a swimming course is a 
graduation requirement for all students. 

A maximum of six term courses in Physical Education (100-190) will 
be counted towards graduation. 

199. Principles and History of Physical Education. An introductory 
course in the fundamentals of physical education. Primarily for students 
intending to go into the field of physical education. Covers the problems 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 49 

of the field as well as the philosophy, aims and objectives of physical edu- 
cation. Includes historic development of physical education, including con- 
tributions of the various great cultures. 
Second term Mr. Pelisek 

202. Teaching of Rhythmic Activities. Designed to prepare men and 
women physical education majors to teach folk, square and social dance 
in the junior and senior high school. 
Third term Miss Sebern 

210. Anatomy and Physiology. A study of the structure and function of 
the human body with specific consideration to normal muscular activity. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mrs. Niblock 

220. Methods of Physical Education in the Elementary School. Methods 
of teaching physical education in elementary grades with specific emphasis 
on program content. 
First or second term Miss Sebern 

300. Men's — Methods of Coaching and Management of Interscholastic 
Sports. Lectures and demonstrations in the fundamentals of football, bas- 
ketball, track and wrestling. Management of athletics, team play in inter- 
scholastic sports and treatment of injuries is stressed. Intended to aid 
students who plan to coach in high schools. 

First term Staff 

301. Men's — Methods of Coaching and Management of Interscholastic 
Sports. A continuation of 300. 

Second term Staff 

302. Men's — Methods of Coaching and Management of Interscholastic 
Sports. A continuation of 301. 

Third term Staff 

303. Methods and Analysis of Teaching Physical Education Activities. 
Principles and techniques of teaching physical education activities with 
particular emphasis on the analysis of individual and team sports. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Staff 

304. Methods and Analysis of Teaching Physical Education Activities. 
A continuation of 303. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Staff 

305. Organization and Administration of Physical Education in the Sec- 
ondary Schools. The philosophy of physical education and organization of 
a high school physical education program. For teachers, supervisors and 
administrators of physical education and athletics in the public schools. 
First term Staff 

309. Correctives and Kinesiology. A study of the human body with re- 
spect to injuries most likely to occur in physical education classes and 
interscholastic athletics. Analysis of human motion, mechanically and 
anatomically, to include practical body mechanics, corrective exercising 
and postural training. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Niblock 

400. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance 
of the instructor. 
By special arrangement Staff 

455. Methods and Curriculum of Health Education. For those responsi- 



J I 



50 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



ble in any way for health instruction in the public school. Special con- 
sideration given to the selection of material and methods of instruction in 
establishing primary health habits. Emphasis will be given to drawing up 
a course of study which will be in line with the Illinois Health and Physical 
Education law. 
Third term Staff 

Physical Education Service Classes 

These classes are designed to meet the college requirement in Physical 
Education. Instruction is given in fundamental skills, techniques and par- 
ticipation in individual sports and team games. 



100. 


Freshman Football 


126. 


Advanced Bowling 


101. 


Varsity Football 


127. 


Freshman Tennis 


102. 


Freshman Basketball 


128. 


Varsity Tennis 


103. 


Varsity Basketball 


129. 


Volleyball 


104. 


Freshman Track 


130. 


Beginning Swimming 


105. 


Varsity Track 


131. 


Softball 


106. 


Basketball 


132. 


Intermediate Swimming 


107. 


Touch Football 


133. 


Freshman Golf 


108. 


Archery 


134. 


Varsity Golf 


109. 


Wrestling 


135. 


Advanced Swimming 


110. 


Handball 


136. 


Badminton 


111. 


Physical Fitness 


137. 


Trampoline 


112. 


Folk and Square Dance 


138. 


Social Dance 


113. 


Freshman Swimming 


139. 


Modern Dance 


114. 


Varsity Swimming 


140. 


Basic Movements 


115. 


Beginning Golf 


141. 


Tumbling 


116. 


Freshman Baseball 


142. 


Soccer 


117. 


Varsity Baseball 


143. 


Hockey 


118. 


Skating 


144. 


Advanced Physical Fitness 


119. 


Beginning Tennis 


160. 


Advanced Golf 


120. 


Advanced Tennis 


165. 


Life Saving 


121. 


Freshman Cross Country 


181. 


Basic Rifle 


122. 


Varsity Cross Country 


182. 


Advanced Rifle 


123. 


Freshman Wrestling 


190. 


Water Safety Instructors' 


124. 


Varsity Wrestling 




Course 


125. 


Beginning Bowling 







PHYSICS 

Lyle W. Finley, Professor, Head 

James H. McAllister, Associate Professor 

Paul Cramer, Associate Professor 



Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental major of at least seven term courses including three 
courses numbered above 300. 

(b) Five related courses chosen from one or two departments and ap- 
proved by the physics department. 

101. General Physics. Fundamentals of mechanics, heat and sound. 
Four class meetings and one laboratory period per week. Corequisite: 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 51 

Mathematics 151. 

First term Mr. Finley 

1 01 e. General Physics. Fundamentals of mechanics, heat and sound. 
Four class meetings and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: 
three years of high school mathematics or concurrent registration in college 
mathematics. 
First term 

102. General Physics. Fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. A 
continuation of Physics 101. Corequisite: Mathematics 152. 

Second term Mr. Finley 

102e. General Physics. Fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. A 
continuation of Physics lOle. 
Second term 

103. General Physics. Fundamentals of optics and atomic physics. A 
continuation of Physics 101, 102. Prerequisite: Physics 102, Mathematics 
152. (Students who have finished 102e may be admitted to Physics 103 
with the consent of the instructor provided they have adequate mathe- 
matical background. These students will be required to perform extra 
work.) 

Third term Mr. Finley 

207. Analytic Mechanics. Statics, coplanar forces in space, centroids, 
center of gravity, friction, moment of inertia, introduction to dynamics. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 152, Physics 103. 

First term Mr. Cramer 

208. Analytic Mechanics. Dynamics, rectilinear motion, curvilinear mo- 
tion and rotation, work, energy and power, dynamics of rotating bodies, 
plane motion, impulse, momentum and impact. Prerequisites: Physics 207, 
Mathematics 251. 

Second term 

209. Electronics. Electron dynamics, emission, space charge, vacuum 
tubes and circuit analysis, amplifiers, voltage multiplication, feedback, 
noise, oscillators. Four class meetings and one laboratory period each week. 
Prerequisite: Physics 102 or 102e; Physics 103 recommended. 

First term Mr. McAllister 

301. Light. Geometric and physical optics. Reflection, refraction, op- 
tical instruments, interference, diffraction, dispersion, polarization, laws 
of radiation, atomic and molecular spectra. Prerequisites: Physics 103. 
Mathematics 251. 
Third term Mr. Finley 

303. Electricity and Magnetism. An intermediate course in principles 
of electricity and magnetism and electrical measurements. Four class meet- 
ings and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Physics 103, 
Mathematics 254, 309. 

Second term Mr. McAllister 

304. Electricity and Magnetism. A continuation of the study of the 
principles of electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: Physics 303. 
Third term 

305. Thermodynamics. An introductory course in the principles of ther- 
modynamics. Prerequisites: Physics 102. Mathematics 251. 

First term Mr. Finley 



52 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

308. Atomic Physics. Properties of fundamental particles, atomic energy 
levels, excitation and emission phenomena, X-ray spectra, periodic ar- 
rangement of atoms, radioactivity, isotopes, nuclear structures, transmuta- 
tions. Prerequisites: Physics 103, Mathematics 251. 

Second term Mr. Finley 

309. Vector Analysis. See Mathematics 309. 

310. Electronics. An intermediate course in electronics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 209, Mathematics 254. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

311. Theoretical Physics. Various topics including the special theory 
of relativity and an introduction to quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 208, Mathematics 254. 

Third term 

401. Seminar. Special topics in physics. Prerequisite: six courses in 
physics. 
By special arrangement Staff 

403. Advanced Applied Mathematics. See Mathematics 403. 

404. Advanced Applied Mathematics. See Mathematics 404. 

410. Independent Study. Special topics in advanced theoretical or ex- 
perimental physics. Prerequisite: seven courses in physics. 
First term Staff 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Harold J. Ralston, Professor, Head 
Thomas J. Erwin, Assistant Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven term courses in psychology in- 
cluding 212, 221, 222 and either 311 or 401, together with necessary 
preliminary courses in biology and mathematics. Work in physics in- 
cluding sound and light is strongly recommended. 

(b) Five courses chosen from one or two related fields with the approval 
of the adviser. Suggested fields include biology, sociology, philosophy 
and mathematics. 

212. Elementary Statistics. (See Mathematics 212). 

221. General Psychology. Introductory study of the fundamental types 
of experience and behavior. Open to upperclassmen and third-term fresh- 
men. Prerequisite to all other courses in psychology. 

First or third term Staff 

222. Experimental Method. Introduction to methodology in psychology. 
Statistics, experimental design and theory construction are presented, dis- 
cussed and implemented in the laboratory. 

Second term Mr. Erwin 

223. Abnormal Psychology. Personality disorders and maladjustments, 
with discussion of the clinical approach to psychotherapy. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 53 

225. Developmental Psychology. Principles of development through 
childhood and adolescence stressing maturation, concept formation, learn- 
ing, the concept of readiness and developmental schedules. 
First term Mr. Erwin 

301. Perception. The psychology of sensation and perception. Com- 
parative and physiological data in sensation. Laboratory. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Staff 

302. Motivation. A survey of how motivation acts to produce behavior. 
Includes discussion of primary and secondary drive, hierarchy, and emo- 
tional theories of motivation. Laboratory. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Erwin 

303. Abilities. A study of human abilities and their measurement and 
the nature and factors involved in individual differences. Laboratory. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Staff 

304. Social Psychology. The relation of personality to society and cul- 
ture. Attention is given to the psychological aspects of human conflict and 
mass behavior. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

305. Learning. The process and principles of learning. Includes experi- 
mental findings, theories and applications in the educational field. Lab- 
oratory. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Erwin 

306. Cognition. A study of the more complex phenomena in behavior, 
such as concept formation, symbolic processes, thought and language, de- 
cision making and creative processes. Laboratory. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Erwin 

309. Problems in Personality. A study of the history and systems of 
psychology as they relate to the nature of human personality. 
By special arrangement Staff 

311. Seminar. Assigned readings, oral and written reports and group 

discussion on pertinent problems in psychology. Open to majors or those 
who have had five courses in the field. 

By special arrangement Staff 

401. Independent Study. Directed individual study on selected topics 
in psychology. Weekly written reports and conferences. Required of stu- 
dents majoring in psychology. 

By special arrangement Staff 

402. Independent Study. A continuation of 401. 

By special arrangement Staff 

403. Advanced Experimental Psychology. A detailed survey of the data, 
theories and methods of psychology. Basic areas of the curriculum are 
integrated to attempt to present a unified view of psychology. The lab- 
oratory is devoted to original research or repetition of previous experi- 
mentation of questionable validity. 

By special arrangement Staff 

404. Advanced Experimental Psychology. A continuation of 403. 

By special arrangement Staff 



54 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

SOCIOLOGY 

Madge Stewart Sanmann, Professor, Head 
Irene Kistler, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) One sociology course at the sophomore level, Sociology 301, and 401 
or 402. 

(b) Courses selected from those numbered 300 or above. 
Anthropology 201. Introduction to Anthropology. Brief review of pre- 
historic race, language and culture, economic and social institutions, re- 
ligion, art, attitudes and values of native peoples. 

First term 

Sociology 203. Societies Around the World. A comprehensive, systematic 
study of the chief types of societies, ranging from the primitive to the ad- 
vanced industrial, in the major habitats of the world. One society is com- 
pared with another as a whole and specifically in terms of the origin of 
the people, their physical environment, economic system, government, re- 
ligion, family life, social organization, structure, ideology and socio-cultural 
change. 
Second term 

206. The Family. A study of the family as a social institution: its forms, 
functions, development, organization, factors of disorganization and trends. 
First term 

301. Introduction to Sociology. Introductory analysis and description of 
the structure and dynamics of human society. Application of scientific 
methods to the observation and analysis of composition, social norms, group 
behavior, social stratification, social institutions and social change. 
First term 

302. Social Problems. Introductory survey of sociological aspects of im- 
portant modern social problems. Emphasis on social interrelationship and 
cultural differences involved in their genesis, significance and ameliora- 
tion or prevention. Library reading and special reports. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 301 or consent of instructor. 

Second term 

304. Home and Family Life. Analysis of psychological and sociological 
aspects of home and family life. Consideration of necessary early adjust- 
ments to significant interpersonal changes basic in the achievement of 
companionship and emotional interdependence. The development of eco- 
nomic insight, planning and management basic in the economic contribu- 
tion to family cohesion. Emphasis on individual fulfillment and family 
unity. Prerequisite: Sociology 206 or consent of instructor. 

Second term 

305. Population in Transition in the United States: Demography. A 

study of the composition, distribution, movements and cultural patterns of 
population and ethnic groups in the United States and its various regions. 
Attention given to scientific analysis of problems and trends. 
First term 

306. Social Stratification. System of social ranking with emphasis on 
class structure of the United States; power, prestige and privilege as re- 
lated to class differences; the culture and styles of life in different classes, 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 55 

status as determinant of personality, interaction and development; effect 
of social change and mobility. Prerequisite: Sociology 301. 
Second term 

308. Sociology of the Community. Nature, structure and functions of 
various types of communities; their characteristics, group relations and 
social institutions (home, school, church, government, health, wealth, lei- 
sure) ; modern trends molding rural and urban life. Attention is given 
to methods of modern redevelopment. Prerequisite: Sociology 301, 302, 
and/or 305. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

310. Crime and Delinquency. The nature, extent and explanations of 
crime and delinquency; historical development of criminological thoughts, 
modern approaches and methods; a review of the theories of treatment 
and evaluation of programs for prevention and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 301. 
Third term 

312. Racial Tensions and Cultural Conflicts. A survey of racial and 
cultural conflicts in contemporary civilization; theories of race and culture; 
relations between racial and cultural groups in specific situations in stra- 
tegic areas of the world; the status of racial, religious and ethnic minorities 
in the United States; organizations, programs and social movements de- 
signed to improve intergroup relationships. Prerequisite: Sociology 201 
and 302. 
Second term 

314. Introduction to Social Work. A survey of the field of social work. 
Historical development of social work concepts and philosophy; the present 
system and organization of social welfare and administration; the role of 
social work in contemporary society. Prerequisite: Sociology 206, 301, 302. 
Third term 

315. Mental and Physical Health in Family Living. The mental hygiene 
approach to tensions, conflicts and crises in the development of family 
living. Fundamental principles of human nutrition. Selection of diet to 
meet nutritional needs of children (infancy through adolescence), adults 
and elderly members of the family. Prerequisite: Sociology 206 or consent 
of instructor. 

Third term 

316. Social Change. The implications of science and technology for 
social change; effects of innovation upon social relationships; theories of 
social change, social effects of major inventions; a cross-cultural analysis 
of the processes of "industrialism." Prerequisite: Sociology 301 and 305. 
Third term 

401. Seminar. Reading and research designed to give a background in 
historical development, information concerning leaders, techniques and 
procedures, principles, projects and practices in original field research. 
Oral and written work required. Open to sociology majors or with the 
consent of the instructor. 

By special arrangement 

402. Independent Study. Introduction into an individual problem in a 
subject of interest to the student. Practice in library research, the use of 
specific research techniques and procedures and field research. Oral and 
written work is required. Open to Sociology majors or with the consent of 
the instructor. 

Second term 



56 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

404. Studies in American Civilization. (See also English 404 and History 
404). An integral historical, social and cultural interpretation of life, 
thought and institutions in the United States from 1870 to the present. 
Conducted on the seminar plan. Prerequisite: open to sociology majors; 
seniors, or with consent of the instructor and Sociology 401 or 402. English 
or history majors consult their advisers. 

Third term 

405. Contemporary Society: Russia. Description and analysis of social, 
economic and political life against a background of geography, population 
and development; values and ideology; family and education; communica- 
tion and public opinion; background place in modern world. Open only to 
seniors. 

(1962-63 and alternate years) 

406. Contemporary Society: Cultures of the Far East. The peoples, cul- 
tures, economy, religious life, government organization, family life, social 
organization, ideology and socio-cultural change and development. Open 
only to seniors. 

(1962-63 and alternate years) 

407. Contemporary Society: South America. A survey of the cultures of 
South America emphasizing the types and variety of societies, their char- 
acteristic features and changes that have taken place. Attention is given to 
contemporary social, economic and political problems. Open only to seniors. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) 

408. Contemporary Society: Africa. A survey of the cultures of Africa 
and patterns of behavior associated with them. Selected aspects of social 
and cultural change; consequences of commercialization of land and labor; 
consequences of Western education; emergent forms of stratification and 
race relations. Open only to seniors. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) 

409. Contemporary Society: The Near East. Survey of one or more ma- 
jor areas in terms of regional developments and historical and modern social 
problems. Open only to seniors. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) 



SPEECH 

Jean Liedman, Professor, Head 

Parker Zellers, Assistant Professor (on leave) 

Paul Gray, Instructor 

Brooks McNamara, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven courses in addition to Speech 
101, including 210, 221, 303, 316, 351 and 403. 

(b) At least five related courses. 

(c) Performance in dramatic production and/or intercollegiate forensics. 

101. Fundamentals of Oral Communication. Designed to help the stu- 
dent acquire knowledge and skill in selecting and evaluating speech ma- 
terials, organizing and phrasing ideas, developing effective control of voice 
and action and evaluating public speeches. 
Each term Staff 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 57 

102. Advanced Public Speaking. A continuation of Speech 101. Prin- 
ciples of persuasion, speaking for special occasions and parliamentary law. 
Third term Mr. Gray 

204. Radio Speech. The history and development of radio and television 
and their influence on society. Prerequisite: Speech 102 and sophomore 
standing or consent of the instructor. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Gray 

215. Debate Seminar. Open only to those who have won a place on the 
intercollegiate debate squad. Fractional credit. 
By special arrangement Mr. Gray 

221. Interpretative Reading. Theory and skill of reading prose and 
poetry aloud. 
First term Mr. Gray 

303. Discussion and Debate. The theory of argumentation and the appli- 
cation of it to various forms of discussion and debate. A study of evidence, 
reasoning, fallacies and briefing. Directed discussions, symposiums, panel 
discussions and team debating. Prerequisite: Speech 102, or consent of 
the instructor. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Gray 

315. Oration Seminar. Open only to those who have won a place on the 
intercollegiate debate squad. 
By special arrangement Mr. Gray 

322. Advanced interpretative Reading. Reading of advanced prose and 
poetry, dramatic poetry, classical literature and modern drama. Prereq- 
uisite: Speech 221. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Gray 

351. Scientific Bases of Speech. An introduction to voice science and 
phonetics. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Liedman 

352. Introduction to Speech Correction. A study of the process of normal 
speech development and the causes and treatment of various speech dis- 
orders. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Liedman 

401. Independent Study. An individual program of reading and research 
under the guidance of the instructor. 
By special arrangement Staff 

403. Senior Seminar. Reading and discussion designed to co-ordinate the 
fields of public address, theatre arts and speech science. 
By special arrangement Staff 

410. Independent Study. A continuation of 401. 
By special arrangement Staff 

Theatre Arts 

135. Freshman Workshop. A laboratory course in theatre practice, 
preparatory to membership in Crimson Masque (dramatic organization). 
Students learn the rudiments of theatre practice under the supervision of 
Crimson Masque personnel and the faculty director. Production will con- 
sist of two or three one-act plays, directed by the students. No fee is 
charged for this course and no credit is given, but if a student does satis- 



58 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

factory work he may become a member of Crimson Masque and register 

for a course in dramatics. 

First term Mr. McNamara 

136. Freshman Workshop. A continuation of 135. 

Second term Mr. McNamara 

137. Freshman Workshop. A continuation of 136. 

Third term Mr. McNamara 

210. Introduction to Theatre Arts. A reading course designed to introduce 
the beginning student to basic theatre theory and practice through investiga- 
tion of selected writings in dramatic theory and criticism, acting, directing 
and the technical fields of stagecraft and scenic design. 
Second term Mr. McNamara 

215. Stagecraft and Scenic Design. A textbook study of the technical 
and design elements of the dramatic production, combined with practical 
exercises in drafting, scenic design, stage lighting, costuming and makeup. 
A final project allows all students in the course to create a detailed and 
complete set of plans and designs for a stage production. The work of 
particularly gifted students may be incorporated into productions of the 
Monmouth College Theatre. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. McNamara 

235. Dramatics. Open to students who have satisfactorily passed the pro- 
bationary requirements of Freshman Workshop and others who may be ad- 
mitted by special permission of faculty director and Crimson Masque 
officers. Participation in the production of plays for public performance: 
acting, work on stage, property, lighting, publicity, makeup, costume and 
house committees. Fractional credit. 

First term Mr. McNamara 

236. Dramatics. A continuation of 235. 

Second term Mr. McNamara 

237. Dramatics. A continuation of 236. 

Third term Mr. McNamara 

311. Development of the Theatre. A survey of the growth and develop- 
ment of the theatre from prehistoric times to the present. Emphasis on the 
development of the physical theatre and history of acting and directing. 
Collateral reading and reporting on representative plays insures the in- 
tegration of all material with courses in dramatic literature offered by the 
department of English. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. McNamara 

316. Principles of Directing. A course designed to introduce the begin- 
ning student of directing to the practical and theoretical aspects of his art. 
Readings from the great directors and writers on stage direction are com- 
bined with exercises in play analysis, movement, blocking and other tools 
of the stage director in order to prepare the student for more advanced 
work in the field of directing. 
(1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. McNamara 

335. Dramatics. Continuation of Dramatics 237. Fractional credit. 
First term Mr. McNamara 

336. Dramatics. A continuation of 335. 

Second term Mr. McNamara 

337. Dramatics. A continuation of 336. 

Third term Mr. McNamara 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 59 

435. Dramatics. Continuation of Dramatics 337. Fractional credit. 
First term Mr. McNamara 

436. Dramatics. A continuation of 435. 

Second term Mr. McNamara 

437. Dramatics. A continuation of 436. 

Third term Mr. McNamara 

445. Directing. Production of a play as a laboratory performance or for 
the public. Prerequisite: 316. Fractional credit. 
By special arrangement Mr. McNamara 



_J 



Divisions of the Faculty 

For purposes of administration the departments of the faculty are 
grouped into three divisions, as follows: 

I. Humanities 
Art 

Bible and Religion 
The Classics 
English 
History 
Modern Languages 

French 

German 

Russian 

Spanish 
Music 
Philosophy 
Speech 

II. Social Sciences 
Economics 
Education 
Government 
Physical Education 
Psychology 
Sociology 

III. Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Geology 
Mathematics 
Physics 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Gibson, Robert W. 1952* 

President. A.B., Muskingum College, 1918; B.D., Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, 1921; D.D., Westminster College, 1934; LL.D., Sterling College, 
1951; Litt.D., Maryville College, 1957; Ped.D., Bradley University, 1959; 
Ohio State University, summer, 1918. 

Aduddell, Robert 1961 

Instructor in Economics and Business Administration. B.A., Drake Uni- 
versity, 1955; Northwestern University, 1958-1961. 

Ball, Elwood H. 1953 

Assistant Professor of Music and Dean of Men. B.Mus., University of 
Michigan, 1947; M.Mus., ibid., 1952; summer sessions, ibid., 1947-49; Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1950-1953; ibid., Teaching Fellow, 1951-1953. 

Beatty, Newell M. 1956 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administration. B.S., 
Tarkio College, 1921; M.B.A., Harvard University, 1925; Indiana Univer- 
sity, summer, 1960; University of Wisconsin, summer, 1961. 

*Joined Monmouth College faculty 

60 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 61 

Blaas, Erika 1956 

Assistant Professor of German. Ph.D., University of Innsbruck, Austria, 
1949; Fulbright Fellow, University of Wisconsin, 1950-1951; Karls Univer- 
sitat, Prague, 1943-1944; Universitat Graz, Austria, 1945-1947. 

Blum, Harlow B. 1959 

Instructor in Art. B.A., University of Illinois, 1956; M.A., Michigan 
State University, 1959. 

Bowman, Milton Lee 1959 

Assistant Professor of Biology. B.S., University of Louisville, 1951; 

M.A., University of Missouri, 1954; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1959. 

Bradford, Anne Mayor 1950 

Librarian and Associate Professor. A.B., Monmouth College, 1935; B.S. 
in L.S., University of Illinois, 1948; University of Iowa, summer, 1930. 

Buchholz, Robert H. 1950 

Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., Fort Hays State College, 1949; 
M.S., Kansas State College, 1950; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1957. 

Cleland, Eva H. 1923; 1951 

Professor of English. A.B., Washington State College, 1919; A.M., ibid., 
1925; University of California, summer, 1928; University of Michigan, sum- 
mer, 1932; University of Chicago, summer, 1933; Cambridge University, 
summer, 1936; Columbia University, summer, 1953, 1958; University of 
California, summer, 1959. 

Cramer, Fern Way 1946, 1957 

Instructor in Mathematics. B.S.E., University of Arkansas, 1931; Uni- 
versity of Illinois, summers, 1927-29. 

Cramer, Paul 1946 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Engineering. A.B., Illinois 
College, 1925; M.A., University of Illinois, 1926; University of Chicago, 
summers, 1932-33. 

Crow, Mary Bartling 1946 

Assistant Professor of History. A.B., Monmouth College, 1941; Ph.M., 
University of Wisconsin, 1945; ibid., summer, 1942. 

Davenport, Francis Garvin 1947 

Professor of History and Director, Summer Session. A.B., Syracuse 
University, 1927; A.M., ibid., 1928; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1936; 
Fellow, University of Illinois, 1928-1930; Fellow, Vanderbilt University, 
1936; Social Science Research Council Fellow, 1941-1942. 

Donald, Dorothy 1932 

Professor of Spanish. A.B., Indiana University, 1921; A.M., ibid., 1929; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1941; Middlebury College, summer, 1923; 
Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid, 1929-1930; Universidad Nacional 
de Mexico, summer, 1935; Universite Laval, Quebec, summers, 1952, 1958; 
Universidad Internacional Santander, summer, 1959. 

Dunn, James P. 1954 

Assistant Professor of Music. B.S., Bowling Green University. 1949; 
A.B., ibid., 1949; M.Mus., University of Michigan, 1952: ibid., summers. 
1952, 1953; University of Iowa, summers, 1957, 1958; State University of 
Iowa, 1959-60. 

Erwin, Thomas 1961 

Assistant Professor of Psychology. A.B., Missouri Valley College, 1950; 



62 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

M.A., University of Missouri, 1956; University of Kansas City, 1953, 1956; 
University of Missouri, 1959-1960. 

Finley, Lyle W. 1931 

Professor of Physics. A.B., Monmouth College, 1924; A.M., University 
of Illinois, 1925; University of Chicago, summer, 1927; University of Colo- 
rado, summer, 1929; University of Illinois, summer, 1935; Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1939-1940; ibid., summers, 1936-37; University of Minnesota, summer, 
1953; Georgetown University, summer, 1959. 

Fox, Bernice L. 1947 

Associate Professor of Classics. A.B., Kentucky Wesleyan College, 1932; 
University of Kentucky, 1933-1936; M.A., ibid., 1934; Research Fellowship, 
Ohio State University, 1936-1941. 

Gamer, Carl Wesley 1946 

Professor of Political Science. Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1922; S.T.B., 
Boston University, 1925; M.A., University of Illinois, 1937; Ph.D., ibid., 
1940; Pioneer University World Cruise, 1926-27; Institute of International 
Studies, Geneva, summer, 1927; Stutz Kirchenrechtliches Institut, Univer- 
sity of Berlin, 1938-39. 

Gray, Paul H. 1961 

Instructor in Speech. A.B., Marietta College, 1959; A.M., University 
of Illinois, 1960. 

Hamilton, Martha Metzger 1937 

Assistant Professor of Art. B.A., University of North Carolina, 1923; 
M.Ed., Harvard University, 1932; Harvard Graduate School for Education, 
1923-1925; University of Chicago, summers, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937; Cornell 
University, summer, 1959. 

Hawbecker, Byron L. 1961 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B.A., Manchester College, 1957; 
M.S., University of Illinois, 1958; National Science Foundation Fellow, 
Continental Oil Company Fellow, University of Arizona, 1959-1961. 

Herbsleb, James R. 1956 

Professor of Economics and Business Administration. B.A., College of 
the Pacific, 1947; M.A., Temple University, 1949; LL.B., School of Law, 
Temple University, 1949; Bryn Mawr College, 1956; Case Institute of 
Technology, summer, 1957; Indiana University, summer, 1959; University of 
Chicago, summer, 1960. 

Kaminska, Alexandra 1960 

Instructor in French. M.A., University of Lwow, Poland, 1938; Univer- 
sity of Cracow, Poland, 1939; Diplome de traductrice, University of Geneva, 
Switzerland, 1959; University of Chicago, summers, 1960, 1961. 

Kennedy, Adele 1946 

Associate Professor of English. B.A., University of Iowa, 1927; M.A., 
ibid., 1928; University of Iowa, summer, 1930; Columbia University, sum- 
mer, 1937; University of Iowa, summer, 1947; University of Colorado, sum- 
mer, 1960; University of Iowa, summer, 1961. 

Ketterer, John Joseph 1953 

Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., Dickinson College, 1943; Ph.D., 
New York University, 1953. 

Kistler, Irene 1953 

Instructor in Sociology. B.S., University of Illinois, 1928; University of 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 63 

Illinois, 1945; State University of Iowa and Iowa State University, sum- 
mer, 1960. 

Larson, Charles 1956 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Culver-Stockton College, 
1941; University of Illinois, 1944-1946; Bradley University, 1955-1956. 

Leever, Richard S. 1961 

Associate Professor of English. B.A., Illinois College, 1947; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1949; Ed.M., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., ibid., 1961. 

Liedman, Jean 1936 

Professor of Speech and Dean of Women. A.B., Monmouth College, 
1927; A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1935; Ph.D., ibid., 1949; University of 
Pittsburgh, summers, 1929-30; University of Colorado, summer, 1936; Uni- 
versity of Southern California, summer, 1947; Syracuse University, sum- 
mer, 1956; University of Denver, summer, 1960. 

Loya, Heimo 1936 

Professor of Music. B.Mus., Chicago Musical College, 1936; A.B., Mon- 
mouth College, 1938; M.A., University of Iowa, 1941; violin with Max 
Fischel; composition and orchestration with Louis Gruenberg; composition 
with Wesley La Violette; counterpoint with Gustav Dunkelberg; conducting 
with Rudolph Ganz and Christian Lyngby; Chicago Musical College, sum- 
mer, 1949; University of Iowa, summers, 1938, 1939, 1940. 1955, 1956; 
second semester, 1956-57; University of Colorado, summer, 1959. 

Lyddon, Paul W. 1960 

Instructor in Music. B.Mus., University of Rochester, 1954; M.Mus., 

University of Illinois, 1955; The Catholic University of America, summer, 

1959; Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester, summer, 1961. 

Manley, Harry S. 1961 

Academic Dean and Professor of Government. A.B., Westminster Col- 
lege, 1942; LL.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1945; Ph.D., Duke Univer- 
sity, 1955. 

McAllister, James H. 1957 

Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics. A.B., Peru State 
Teachers College, 1938; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1950; University of 
Iowa, summer, 1955; University of Kansas, summers, 1957, 1959, 1960: 
Michigan College of Mining and Technology, summer, 1961. 

McNamara, Brooks 1961 

Instructor in Speech. A.B., Knox College, 1959; M.A., State Univer- 
sity of Iowa, 1961. 

Morrill, Allen Conrad 1953 

Professor of English. A.B., Brown University, 1926; J. A., ibid., 1928; 
M.A., Harvard University, 1932; Ph.D., ibid., 1937. 

Niblock, Marjorie 1961 

Instructor in Physical Education. A.B., Monmouth College, 1958; Cer- 
tificate Course in Physical Therapy, Mayo Clinic, 1958-60. 

Nicholas, Albert 1948 

Professor of Education. A.B., Carthage College, 1922; A.M., University 
of Illinois, 1933; ibid., summers, 1931-33; University of Colorado, sum- 
mer, 1941. 

Pelisek, Joseph J. 1957 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. A.B., Cornell College, 1948; 



64 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

M.A., New Mexico Highlands University, 1951; Iowa University, 1956; 
ibid., summers, 1955, 1957, 1959. 

Pleasants, Edwin H. 1961 

Associate Professor of Spanish. B.A., University of Virginia, 1942; 
M.A., Louisiana State University, 1950; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 
1959; University of Puerto Rico, summer, 1946; University of San Carlos, 
Guatemala City, summer, 1949. 

Ralston, Harold Jameson 1946 

Professor of Classics. A.B., Tarkio College, 1922; A.M., ibid., 1923; 
Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1927; M.A., Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1928; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1930; University of Pittsburgh, 1926- 
1927; University of Chicago, summer, 1938; Northwestern University, sum- 
mer, 1957; University of Michigan, summers, 1959, 1961. 

Rawlings, Floyd 1957 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. BA., University of Redlands, 1941; 

M.S., Oregon State College, 1948; Ph.D., University of Washington, 1951; 
University of North Carolina, summer, 1957. 

Romero, Laurence, Jr. 1961 

Instructor in French. B.A., Louisiana State University, 1959; M.A., ibid., 
1961. 

Rosic, Momcilo 1959 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. A.B., Military Academy, 
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, 1937; A.M., ibid., 1937; Ph.D., University of Bonn, 
1950. 

Sanmann, Madge Stewart 1949 

Professor of Sociology. A.B., Monmouth College, 1921; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1923; A.M., Northwestern University, 1940; Ph.D., ibid., 
1948; ibid., summers, 1941, 1942, 1943. 

Sebern, Marcia 1961 

Instructor in Physical Education. B.S., Carthage College, 1960; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, summer, 1961. 

Serrano, Arturo 1961 

Assistant Professor of Spanish. B.A., Instituto Cardenal Cisneros, 
Madrid, 1930; Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, Universidad Central, 
Madrid, 1932-1936; Diploma of Official Translator in Spanish and English, 
Ministry of National Education, Colombia; Universidad Nacional de 
Colombia, 1959-1961; Universidad Nacional Pedogogica Feminina, Colom- 
bia, 1959-1961. 

Shawver, Benjamin T. 1946 

Professor of Chemistry and Education. B.S., Parsons College, 1932; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1950; Ed.D., ibid., 1952. 

Shoemaker, Homer L. 1961 

Instructor in Accounting. B.S., University of Denver, 1950. Certified 
Public Accountant, 1961. 

Speel, Charles J., II 1951 

Professor of Bible and Religion, John Young Chair of Bible. A.B., 
Brown University, 1939; S.T.B., Harvard University, 1949; S.T.M., ibid., 
1950; Ph.D., ibid., 1956. 

Spitz, Douglas R. 1957 

Instructor in History. A.B., Swarthmore College, 1949; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, 1955; ibid., 1955-57, 1960-61. 





1926 


A.B., 


Monmouth College, 1924; A.M., 


ibid., 


1931. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 65 

Thiessen, Garrett W. 1930 

Pressly Professor of Chemistry. A.B., Cornell College, 1924; M.S., 
University of Iowa, 1925; Ph.D., ibid., 1927; Associated Colleges of the 
Midwest program at Argonne National Laboratory, 1960-61. 

Thompson, Samuel M. 

Alumni Professor of Philosophy. 
Princeton University, 1925; Ph.D., 

Weeks, J. Stafford 1959 

Assistant Professor of Bible and Religion and College Chaplain. A.B., 
Juniata College, 1942; B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1945; Gettysburg 
Theological Seminary, 1945-1947; University of Chicago, 1948-1953. 

Wills., Donald Lee 1951 

Associate Professor of Geology. B.S., University of Illinois, 1949; 
M.S., ibid., 1951; University of Indiana, summer, 1959. 

Wingo, Charles E. 1958 

Professor of Education. A.B., Furman University, 1924; M.A., Cornell 
University, 1937; University of Chicago, summers, 1939-40; Purdue Uni- 
versity, summer, 1946; University of Colorado, summer, 1953. 

Wolfe, Ralph Haven 1961 

Assistant Professor of English. B.S., Bowling Green State University, 
1951; M.A., ibid., 1956; Ph.D., Indiana University, 1960. 

Woll, Robert G. 1935 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Monmouth College, 

1935; M.S., University of Illinois, 1941; University of Illinois, summers, 

1937, 1938, 1940; Western Illinois University, summer, 1961. 

Zehl, Christiane Maria 1961 

Instructor in German. Ph.D., "Lehramtspruefung," University of Vi- 
enna, 1961. 



1962 



1963 



1963 



SEPTEMBER 


JANUARY 


MAY 


S M T W T F 3 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

OCTOBER 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 


1 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

JULY 


NOVEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

APRIL 


28 29 30 31 


DECEMBER 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


30 31 







MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 

CATALOG 




1962-1963 



Monmouth college bulletin . monmouth, Illinois 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 

This catalog is designed to provide information about 
Monmouth College and its curriculum. If further in- 
formation is needed, inquiries may be addressed to the 
appropriate office at Monmouth College, Monmouth, 
Illinois, as follows: 

Admissions Procedures, Financial Aid and 
Publications for Prospective 
Students Director of Admissions 

General Affairs of the College . . Office of the President 
Faculty Appointments, Academic Matters 

and Public Events Academic Dean 

Business Affairs Business Manager 

Transcripts of Records Registrar 

Prospective students and their parents are invited to 
visit the campus whenever they find it convenient. 

The following off-campus admissions representatives may 
also be contacted for additional information: 

CHICAGO ST. LOUIS 

Robert H. Riggle Donald Ingerson 

2036 South Fifth Avenue 58 Spring Avenue 

Maywood, Illinois Ferguson 35, Mo. 

Telephone: 344-7794 Telephone: J A 2-3767 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Series LXX, No. 1, July, 1962 
Published monthly except June and August by the Monmouth 
College. Entered as Second Class matter at the postoffice in 
Monmouth, Illinois. 






Monmouth College Catalog 
1962-63 




With the academic year 1962-63, Monmouth College begins 
its new educational program structured around the three-term, 
three-course curriculum. The college catalog is published bi- 
ennially in July. 



July, 1962 
Monmouth, Illinois 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

College Calendar 3 

General Information 5 

Academic Program 8 

Graduation Requirements 8 

Distribution Requirements 9 

Field of Concentration 10 

Senior Comprehensive Examination 10 

Independent Study 10 

Special Study Programs 12 

Academic Regulations 14 

Admission 17 

Expenses 19 

Financial Aid 23 

Courses of Instruction 26 

Faculty 73 

Administration 80 

Scholarships, Prizes and Endowments 83 

Commencement Honors and Degrees 87 

Students, 1960-61 Academic Year 91 

Summary of Enrollment 107 

Geographical Enumeration 108 

Index 109 



College Calendar 
7962-63 



1962 

Sept. 19 — Wednesday .... Faculty Conference 

Sept. 20 — Thursday Faculty Conference 

Sept. 22 — Saturday Dormitories open to new students. All new 

students must report by 5 p. m. 

Sept. 23 — Sunday Program for freshman and other new students. 

Sept. 26 — Wednesday ....Freshman registration and payments of ac- 
counts, a. m.; upperclass registration and 
payment of accounts, p. m. 

Sept. 27 — Thursday Freshman registration and payment of ac- 
counts, a.m.; upperclass course changes, 
p. m. 

Sept. 28 — Friday First term classes begin (8 a. m.) 

Oct. 13 — Saturday Homecoming 

Nov. 3 — Saturday Parents' Day 

Nov. 21 — Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins (12 noon) 

Nov. 26 — Monday Thanksgiving recess ends (8 a.m.) 

Dec. 10 — Monday First term classes end (5 p.m.) 

Dec. 11 — Tuesday Reading period 

Dec. 12 — Wednesday First term examinations begin 

Dec. 15 — Saturday First term examinations end (5 p. m.) 

1963 

Jan. 2 — Wednesday ... Second term classes begin (8 a. m.) 

Mar. 11 — Monday Second term classes end (5 p.m.) 

Mar. 12 — Tuesday Reading period 

Mar. 13 — Wednesday .... Second term examinations begin 

Mar. 16 — Saturday Second term examinations end (5 p.m.) 

Mar. 26 — Tuesday Third term classes begin (8 a.m.) 

May 3-5 — Fri.-Sun Liberal Arts Festival: "The Orient in World 

Affairs" 

June 3 — Monday Third term classes end (5 p.m.) 

June 4 — Tuesday Reading period 

June 5 — Wednesday . . . .Third term examinations begin 

June 7 — Friday Third term examinations end (5 p. m.) 

June 8 — Saturday Alumni Day 

June 9 — Sunday Baccalaureate 

June 10 — Monday Commencement 

3 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



1962 


1963 


1963 


SEPTEMBER 


JANUARY 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 41 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11, 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

OCTOBER 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S | 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 


1 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 81 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

JULY 


NOVEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 


1 2 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 131 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 201 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27/1 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

APRIL 


28 29 30 31 


DECEMBER 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S | 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 2M 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


30 31 




I 



Genera/ Information 

Academic Aim 

Monmouth College proposes to provide young men and women with an 
understanding of the world in which they live, in all of its most general 
aspects; 

To provide them with an intelligent understanding and comprehension 
of the basic structure of the world of physical nature, the world of living 
organisms from the lowest to the highest forms, the world of human society 
and institutions, the world of ideas including the products of both imagina- 
tion and conceptual thinking, and the world of values; 

To provide them with a mature grasp of some one field of study, and to 
assure a moderate degree of skill in the use of the intellect. 

Monmouth affirms that such a course of study is the only sound founda- 
tion for an effective life in modern society, both as a necessary preparation 
for further training in any occupation or profession that involves the exer- 
cise of personal responsibility, and for any function in any phase of human 
life requiring judgement and understanding in addition to mere skill. 

History 

Monmouth College was founded in 1853 by Presbyterians of Scottish de- 
scent and is affiliated with the United Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. From 
1853 to 1856 the school was a preparatory school for ministers of the As- 
sociate Reformed Presbyterian Church, the church of the founders. The 
college received its charter from the general assembly of the State of Illi- 
nois in 1857. From the beginning, Monmouth has admitted women students 
on equal terms with men and thus is a pioneer in advanced education for 
women. 

During its first 100 years of existence, Monmouth College had five presi- 
dents: Dr. David A. Wallace, Dr. Jackson Burgess McMichael, Dr. S. R. 
Lyons, Dr. Thomas Hanna McMichael and Dr. James Harper Grier. Dr. 
Grier retired in 1952 and was succeeded by Monmouth's current president, 
Dr. Robert Wesson Gibson. 

Control 

Governing body of the college is the board of directors, composed of 40 
directors elected to office by the Illinois Synod of the United Presbyterian 
Church, U. S. A. and the Monmouth College Alumni Association. 

Accreditation 

Monmouth College is accredited by the North Central Association and the 
American Chemical Society. 

Membership 

Monmouth College is an institutional member of the American Alumni 
Council, American Association of Colleges in Teacher Education, American 
Association of University Women, Associated Colleges of the Midwest, 
American Council on Education, American College Public Relations Asso- 
ciation, Associated Colleges of Illinois, Association of American Colleges, 
Association of American Universities, Illinois Association for Teacher Edu- 
cation in Private Colleges, Midwest Athletic Conference, and Presbyterian 
College Union. 



6 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Associated Colleges of the Midwest 

Monmouth is a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest, an 
organization of 10 coeducational liberal arts colleges in Iowa, Illinois, Min- 
nesota and Wisconsin. These independent colleges, of similar size, organiza- 
tion and purpose, work together in various undertakings, curricular and 
extra-curricular, to increase educational effectiveness and operating effi- 
ciency. Continuing projects include the Argonne National Laboratory pro- 
gram, Language Instruction program and Insurance program. Member 
ACM colleges are Monmouth, Beloit, Carleton, Coe, Cornell, Grinnell, Knox, 
Lawrence, Ripon and St. Olaf. 

Midwest Athletic Conference 

Monmouth is a member of the Midwest Athletic Conference, which carries 
on intercollegiate competition at the varsity and freshman level. Member 
schools are the 10 Associated Colleges of the Midwest listed above. Com- 
petition is held in football, basketball, track, swimming, golf, tennis, base- 
ball, cross-country and wrestling. There are no intercollegiate athletics for 
women, except for occasional invitational tournaments and sports days. 
Extensive intramural competition is scheduled for both men and women 
in a program conducted by the Physical Educational department. 

Health, Counseling and Placement Services 

The Monmouth College student health service operates an infirmary, under 
the supervision of two registered nurses, which provides hospitalization for 
minor disabilities. The services of the two college physicians are available 
at the dispensary, which is open to all students for minor illnesses and 
emergency treatment. Coupled with this is a student insurance plan, the 
cost of which is borne completely by the college. This provides year-round 
coverage, both on and off the campus, for physician's services, hospital 
services and board and room, X-rays and laboratory tests, dental and 
medical care and surgery necessitated by injury or illness. Special cover- 
age includes treatment for Polio. A fully-accredited community hospital 
located two blocks from the campus is also available for hospitalization and 
out-patient care. 

Counseling services begin with comprehensive testing and interviewing 
during Orientation week. Following this, students choose a faculty adviser 
who assists in selecting a program of courses and advises the student on 
any other problems. In addition to the faculty adviser, the counsel of all 
staff members, including the deans and the college chaplain, is available 
to all students. 

Monmouth's office of student aid and placement assists both students 
and alumni in obtaining employment. The college placement bureau main- 
tains a career library and arranges interviews with company personnel 
representatives and Monmouth students. The office also administers part- 
time campus employment, upper-class scholarships, grants-in-aid and stu- 
dent loans. 

Campus Life 

In addition to the all-school social programs directed by the student coun- 
cil, other campus activities are sponsored by the 23 special interest clubs, 
15 honorary organizations, seven service groups and 11 social groups. The 
social groups include four national sororities, four national fraternities, one 
local fraternity and independent student associations. The first sorority in 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 7 

the nation, Pi Beta Phi, was founded on the Monmouth College campus in 
1867. This sorority and Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority have their national 
Alpha chapters at the college. 

Academic Buildings 

Wallace Hall, central classroom building, built in 1909; J. B. McMichael 
Science Hall, lecture rooms and laboratories, 1910; Auditorium; Administra- 
tion Building; Austin Hall, music classrooms and practice rooms; Art 
Center, classrooms, studios and art library; Student Center, dining hall, 
lounge, snack bar, post office, bookstore, conference rooms, student offices, 
music and recreation rooms; Woodbine, teacher preparation materials 
center, seminar rooms, faculty offices. 

Residence Halls 

T. H. McMichael Hall, women's residence hall, built in 1915; James Harper 
Grier Hall, women's residence hall, 1940; Alice B. Winbigler Hall, wom- 
en's residence hall, 1945; Honors House, residence for senior women; The 
Manor, home of the president; Fulton Hall, men's residence hall, 1950; 
Graham Hall, men's residence hall, 1960. 

Fraternity Houses 

Provide room and board for members: Alpha Tau Omega, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, Sigma Phi Epsilon, and Theta Chi fraternities. 

Sorority Chapter Rooms 

Housed in Marshall Hall for: Alpha Xi Delta, Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Pi Beta Phi sororities. 

Athletic Facilities 

Waid Gymnasium, constructed in 1925, houses basketball court, swimming 
pool, indoor track, rifle range, handball courts, locker-room and shower 
facilities, faculty offices. Adjacent to the gymnasium is the athletic field 
and stadium with facilities for baseball/ football, track, archery and tennis. 

Laboratories 

Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics. 

Carnegie Library 

Built in 1930, houses more than 80,000 volumes. Departmental libraries, 
slide record and photograph libraries, microcard and film readers, film 
strips, Martin Oriental Collection, cooperative work with Warren County 
Public Library. 

Location 

The 30-acre campus is located in the eastern section of Monmouth, Illinois, 
a city of 11,000 in Western Illinois. The city is 200 miles southwest of 
Chicago and is the county seat of Warren County. 

Transportation 

Monmouth is on the main line of the Chicago. Burlington and Quincy rail- 
road and is also served by two bus lines. Air travel facilities are 10 miles 
from the campus and U. S. Highways 34 and 67 intersect in the heart of 
the city. 



i Ot, 



The Academic Program 

The Monmouth College faculty adopted a new curriculum for the college 
effective September, 1962. Under this new educational program, the nine- 
month academic year will be divided into three terms of approximately 11 
weeks each. 

Normally, students will register for three full term courses each term 
for a total of nine term courses during the academic year. Thirty-six 
term courses are required for graduation. Freshman and sophomores are 
required to take physical education each term without credit toward 
graduation. 

A full term course will normally meet four times weekly for 50-minute 
periods, exclusive of laboratory sessions. All courses are regarded as 
term courses with the exception of fractional courses in studio art, applied 
music and dramatics. 

Students may register for 10 courses during the regular academic year 
with the approval of their academic adviser. In this case students are 
permitted to register for a fourth (full) course during one term of the 
academic year if no fractional courses are taken and if a 3.0 (B) or better 
grade average has been achieved in the two preceding terms. 

Students who achieve a 3.0 (B) or better grade average during the 
preceding two terms may register for more than 10 courses during an 
academic year with the permission of the academic dean and their aca- 
demic adviser. In no case is a student permitted to register for more 
than four courses during any term. 

For graduation a student must attain or surpass a grade-point average 
of 2.0 (C). 

To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Arts a candidate must meet 
certain specifications in quantity, quality, distribution, field of concentra- 
tion, independent reading, and in the senior comprehensive examination. 

The educational policy behind this shift in the academic program 
involves increased emphasis on learning, self-education, reducing the frag- 
mentation of student attention and more independent study. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

I. Credit in a total of 36 term courses. 
II. A grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or better in all courses. 

III. Distribution of 14 term courses in specified divisions and completion of 
six terms of satisfactory work in physical education. 

IV. A field of concentration consisting of either (1) a departmental major 
presenting a minimum of seven term courses from the major depart- 
ment and a minimum of five term courses in related fields chosen 
from those specified by the major department: or (2) a topical major 
of at least 12 term courses approved by the curriculum committee. 
All courses in the field of concentration require a grade-point average 
of 2.5 or better. 

V. A passing grade in the senior comprehensive examination. 
VI. Satisfactory completion of a program of independent reading includ- 
ing a general reading and comprehensive reading program. 
VII. The senior year must be spent in residence at Monmouth College. 
(No exceptions to these regulations will be made unless authorized by the 
faculty.) 

8 



Distribution Requirements 

The distribution requirements are intended to help the student attain a 
broad and comprehensive acquaintance with the basic characteristics of 
the world in which we live. These requirements are intended to help the 
student attain familiarity with the tools of the intellect including (1) the 
experimental methods, (2) the method of empirical generalization, (3) 
language and (4) the method of formal analysis. Distribution require- 
ments should be fulfilled within the first two years, if possible. 

Students may satisfy any of these requirements by passing an examina- 
tion sufficiently comprehensive to test their knowledge of the work pre- 
sented in the required course or courses. 

The same requirements for graduation will apply to transfer students 
except that some special arrangements may be made regarding the date at 
which the requirements of the first two years will be satisfied. These re- 
quirements should be completed within a year of the initial date of reg- 
istration. 

DIVISION I 
HUMANITIES 

Art or Music: One term course 

English: Two term courses 

English (literature), History or Philosophy: Two term courses chosen from 

separate fields 
Foreign, Language: Two term courses (beyond 101 and 102) 
Religion or Bible: One term course 
Speech: One term course 

DIVISION II 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Two term courses in separate fields chosen from the departments of eco- 
nomics, government, psychology or sociology. 

DIVISION III 
NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

Three term courses chosen from the departments of biology, chemistry, 
geology, physics, or mathematics, including a sequence of two term courses 
in a laboratory science. 

DIVISION IV 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Freshmen and sophomores are required to complete six terms of satis- 
factory work in physical education unless excused by the director of the 
college health service for medical reasons. A proficiency rating for each 
term course will be given. 

9 



Field of Concentration 

A field of concentration shall consist of (1) a departmental major and 
related courses or (2) a topical major. All courses in the field of concen- 
tration shall be of grade-point 2.0 or better and the grade-point average 
must be 2.5 or better. 

DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 

A departmental major shall consist of at least seven term courses chosen 
from the major department and at least five term courses or related courses 
chosen from those specified by the major department. The work in the 
field of concentration during the junior and senior years shall include 
some form of individualized study. Each student must give positive evi- 
dence of his competence in his field of concentration by means of a com- 
prehensive examination. 

TOPICAL MAJOR 

A topical major shall consist of at least 12 term courses chosen from 
different departments as a group of studies linked together by a special 
theme or field of interest. The program for the topical major must be 
approved by the curriculum committee and shall be under the direction of 
an adviser appointed by that committee. The work in the field of con- 
centration during the junior and senior years shall include some form of 
individualized study. Each student must give positive evidence of compe- 
tence in his field of concentration by means of a comprehensive examination. 

SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A comprehensive examination in the field of concentration is required of 
each candidate for the degree. This examination will be in three parts: 

1. The Graduate Record examination, to be taken during the senior year. 

2. A written essay examination of four hours, consisting either of one 
four-hour paper or two two-hour papers on questions which require 
a comprehensive grasp of the problems of the field and a broad acquaint- 
ance with its literature. 

3. An oral examination (where not more than three candidates will be 
examined at one time) by a committee composed of one representative 
of the candidate's major field, one representative of his related field, 
and one to be nominated by the candidate from a department outside 
the field of concentration. 

The second and third parts of the examination must be taken during 
the last two terms of the candidate's residence as a regular student. The 
examination will be judged as a whole, and will be graded Honor, Pass or 
Fail. A grade of Pass is required for graduation; a grade of Honor is re- 
quired for honors at graduation. A candidate who fails the examination 
may apply for one re-examination, but a second failure will be final. 

INDEPENDENT READING 

All students are required to pursue a program of independent reading dur- 
ing their period of enrollment at Monmouth College. The reading program 

10 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 11 

is divided into two parts; part one, entitled general reading, covers the 
freshman and sophomore years; part two, entitled comprehensive reading, 
covers the junior and senior years. 

General Reading Program 

The general reading program envisages a lively acquaintance with and 
understanding of broadly-selected writings which are of great worth and 
significance to the educated person and his world. 

The general reading program is administered by the general reading 
program committee of the faculty. This committee will ascertain from 
every faculty-member those books which are worthy of inclusion in the 
general reading list. The committee will then determine what writings 
shall be included in the program. Each year review and revision, if required, 
shall be made by the faculty committee. The student will be encouraged 
to begin his reading immediately upon acceptance as a student of the col- 
lege and to continue the reading throughout the freshman and sophomore 
years, giving particular attention to the reading during vacation periods. 

Students will be required to give evidence of an adequate acquaintance 
with a selected portion of the general reading list in the beginning of the 
first term of the sophomore year. Satisfactory performance is required for 
junior standing. 

Comprehensive Reading Program 

The comprehensive reading program administered by each department en- 
visages a lively acquaintance with and a good understanding of selected 
writings related to the student's field of concentration. A broad biblio- 
graphical acquaintance with outstanding works in the field plus a first- 
hand knowledge of selected works in concept and import will be required. 

The senior comprehensive examination will include the work of the 
comprehensive reading program. 

The comprehensive reading lists will be prepared by the several depart- 
ments. 



Special Study Programs 

ENGINEERING 

Students interested in engineering may take advantage of the binary pro- 
gram sponsored by Monmouth College in cooperation with Case Institute 
of Technology, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Briefly, this program calls for a three-year program of liberal arts study 
at Monmouth, followed by two years of engineering work at Case Institute. 
Upon completion of the five-year program the student will receive degrees 
from Monmouth and the engineering school. 

The binary program is designed to provide the engineering student with 
all the best features of two types of educational work — that of the liberal 
arts college and the technical engineering school. This combination is of 
great importance, for in an increasing degree men who have attained em- 
inence as engineers are required to have a broad background in liberal 
education to carry out their duties as executives in engineering work. 

Students may also attend Monmouth College three years and transfer 
to the Illinois Institute of Technology or University of Illinois. If they 
follow the program outlined below they may receive an A.B. from Mon- 
mouth at the time of graduation from the engineering school. 



I 
Math 151 
Physics 101 
English 101 
Art or Music 



Freshman 

ii 

Math 152 
Physics 102 
English 102 



Year 



in 

Math 251 
Physics 103 
Speech 101 



I 
Math 254 
Chemistry 101 
Foreign Language 



Sophomore Year 

ii 

Engineering 101 
Math 301 
Foreign Language 
Hist., Phil., or 
Eng. Literature 



III 

Engineering 102 
Chemistry 103 
Foreign Language 



I 
Math 309 
Physics 207 
Foreign Language 



Junior Year 

ii 

Economics 201 
Physics 303 
Government 201 



III 

Hist., Phil., or 
Eng. Literature 
Physics 305 
Bible or Religion 



WASHINGTON SEMESTER 

Students who have demonstrated exceptional academic ability are selected 
as candidates for this program. The study program at American University 
in Washington, D. C, is designed to bring superior students into contact 
with source materials and government institutions at the nation's capitol. 



12 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 13 

In addition to regular study and a research project, students are re- 
quired to participate in the Washington Seminar, a course consisting of a 
series of informal meetings with members of Congress and administration 
officials. Monmouth College offers full credit for work done under this plan. 



JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

Monmouth College participates in a variety of programs offering foreign 
study during the junior year. The Modern Foreign Languages department 
has an exchange agreement with Mexico City College where full tuition for 
one term is offered by Mexico City College to any Monmouth College stu- 
dent recommended by the Modern Foreign Languages department. Ex- 
change arrangements have also been made with Universite Laval, Quebec. 
Canada; National University of Mexico, Mexico City; and the University 
of Guadalajara. 

The most extensive "Junior Year Abroad" program is the one sponsored 
by the United Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. Under this program a student 
can study in France, Germany, Ghana, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Lebanon. 
Pakistan, Switzerland and the Philippines. 

Main requisites are a good academic record and a concern for inter- 
national relationships. In some countries special language preparation is 
necessary. 

Students can also do independent study under a program arranged by 
the Experiment in International Living. 

Application for any of the "Junior Year Abroad" programs should be 
made early in the sophomore year. Cost is $1,500 to $2,500 per year. 
While Monmouth College does not directly sponsor any of these programs, 
a faculty committee on study overseas maintains contacts with the spon- 
soring organizations and acts as a clearing-house for applications. This 
committee will also assist students who wish to apply directly to foreign 
schools and make independent arrangements. 



ARGONNE SEMESTER 

The Argonne Semester program, adapted to conform to the three-term, 
three-course curriculum, offers an opportunity for outstanding science stu- 
dents to study and do research at Argonne National Laboratory in suburban 
Chicago. Argonne, one of the nation's three major centers for nuclear 
research, is operated by the University of Chicago for the Atomic Energy 
Commission. 

The program provides for 15 weeks of full-credit study and research at 
Argonne. A group of 10 outstanding students in biology, chemistry, physics 
and applied mathematics is selected from the 10 Associated Colleges of the 
Midwest schools twice yearly. 

Students are assigned to Argonne scientists, with whom they work five 
mornings each week as part-time research assistants. They receive tech- 
nician-level pay for a 20-hour work week. Afternoons are spent in sem- 
inars and research conducted by faculty members from the ACM colleges 
in residence at Argonne. 



Academic Regulations 

ATTENDANCE 

At Monmouth College, responsibility for class attendance is placed upon 
the student except as this is limited by the regulations which follow: 

1. Courses of study at Monmouth College are planned and organized upon 
the assumption that the student will be in regular attendance. The stu- 
dent is responsible for all work covered in the course, including lectures, 
class discussions, assignments of any kind and all examinations. How- 
ever, students need not make application to have absences excused and 
need not make any explanation of class absences. 

2. Freshmen will be permitted no voluntary absences during the first term. 
During the second and third term, this will apply only to freshmen who 
failed to earn a grade-point average of at least 2.0. All unexcused ab- 
sences for freshmen who are not permitted to have voluntary absences 
must be explained to the personnel dean concerned no later than 24 
hours after the student returns to class. 

3. Attendance is required at the last meeting of a class before, and at the 
first meeting of a class after, a college vacation. Students who have 
urgent reasons for absences immediately before or after vacations may 
be excused by the registrar. Students with unexcused class absences on 
these days will be charged a $10 fee for each class missed. 

4. A student whose record in a course is suffering because of frequent 
absences may be required by his instructor or the academic dean to give 
up the privileges of these regulations and, during the remainder of the 
term, explain all absences. This action may be taken at any time dur- 
ing a term. 

5. All students, unless excused by the faculty committee on absences, are 
required to attend chapel services and the monthly Vesper service held 
on the first Sunday afternoon of each month in the college auditorium. 
Students are expected to attend public worship in the church of their 
choice on Sundays. 

In addition to excused absences a student may have two absences from 
chapel and/or vespers during a term without penalty. Additional absences 
shall entail loss of credit. Additional information on Attendance Regula- 
tions will be published in the Scots Guide which is distributed at the be- 
ginning of the school year. 

REGISTRATION 

In the spring of each year students will register in advance for all three 
terms of the next academic year. New students, in consultation with the 
personnel dean concerned, will choose their courses during the summer 
preceding their entrance to the college. 

All changes in registration require written permission of the instructor 
for the courses involved and the student's adviser. A fee of $5.00 is charged 
for each course change made after the first week of classes. A course may 
be added after it has been in session for one week only with the recom- 
mendation of the instructor and adviser and approval of the academic dean. 
Withdrawal from a course after the first week of classes carries the grade 
of F except for reasons of illness or circumstances beyond the control of 
the student. 

14 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 15 

A student may not register in a new course after the second week of 
classes. 

GRADES 

Academic work is graded at Monmouth College as follows: 
A 
B 

C + 

c 

D 

F Failure 

I Incomplete (Grade Deferred) 

W Withdrawal 
The mark I signifies work in the course is incomplete due to illness or 
circumstances beyond the control of the student, or where the instructor 
feels further evaluation is needed before the grade is determined. Unless 
the I is removed within the term following that in which it was given, the 
grade automatically becomes an F. The mark W signifies withdrawal and 
is given when a student withdraws from a course with the approval of the 
instructor involved, the student's adviser and the academic dean, provided 
the student is passing in the course at the time of withdrawal. The mark 
W will not be recorded after the end of the first week of classes except for 
reasons of illness or circumstances beyond the control of the student. 

GRADE-POBNT AVERAGE 

All students in a class are ranked according to their work. Each teacher 
determines the rank of his own students in his own way. The following 
grades are used: 

A = 4 grade-points per term course 

B = 3 grade-points per term course 

C+ = 2.5 grade-points per term course 

C = 2 grade-points per term course 

D = 1 grade-point per term course 
The term "average" is determined by dividing the total grade-points 
earned during the term by the number of term courses taken. The cumu- 
lative average is the total of all grade-points earned, divided by the total 
number of term courses taken. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

A student who in any term fails to earn a grade-point average of at least 
1.5 is placed upon probation for the following term. At any time, a stu- 
dent doing very poor work (for freshman, this means a grade-point average 
of 1.0) may be warned and placed on probation with the understanding 
that unless his grade-point average is at least 1.5 at the end of the term, 
he may be dropped from college. A student on probation who fails to earn 
a grade-point average of at least 1.5 is required to withdraw from college 
for at least one term. 

CUMULATIVE GRADE-POINT AVERAGE 

A student with nine term courses but less than 18 term courses whose 
grade-point average is less than 1.6 is on probation. A student with at 
least 18 term courses, but less than 27 term courses, whose grade-point 
average is less than 1.8 is on probation. A student with more than 27 
term courses, whose grade-point average is less than 2.0, is on probation. 



16 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

CLASSIFICATION 

The student who has nine term courses of college credit and a grade-point 
average of 1.6 is classified as a sophomore; 18 term courses and a grade- 
point average of 1.8, a junior; 27 term courses and a grade-point average 
of 2.0, a senior. 

DEGREES 

The degree regularly conferred is Bachelor of Arts. Candidates for a de- 
gree shall make formal application to the registrar one year in advance 
of their expected graduation date. The course may be completed at the 
close of any term but the formal graduation will occur at the commence- 
ment in June. The senior year must be spent in residence at Monmouth 
College. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Honors at graduation are either summa cum laude, magna cum laude or 
cum laude. The student is ranked upon his own merit, not upon compara- 
tive standing. To be eligible for honors at graduation a student must have 
been in residence at least six terms and have achieved a grade of Honor in 
the comprehensive examination. To be eligible for honors summa cum 
laude the grade-point average for the work taken in residence must be 
3.9 or higher. To be eligible for honors magna cum laude, the grade-point 
average for the work taken in residence must be 3.75 or higher. To be 
eligible for honors cum laude, the grade-point average for the work taken 
in residence must be 3.5 or higher. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Students may satisfy any division I, II or III requirement or secure ad- 
vanced placement by passing an examination administered by the depart- 
ment concerned and sufficiently comprehensive to prove their mastery of 
the required courses. Exemptions from distribution requirements may be 
recommended by the department concerned. If credit is desired, it may be 
recorded if it does not void necessary admission units and if the fees for 
such special examinations and additional hours are met. The fee for an 
examination to satisfy a divisional requirement or secure advanced place- 
ment with credit is $10.00. A fee of $45.00 per term course will be charged 
for recording credits on the transcript. No course except second-year for- 
eign language courses shall be used to satisfy both distribution and con- 
centration requirements. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Monmouth College students (except freshmen) are permitted to maintain 
and operate automobiles in accordance with regulations which are admin- 
istered by a committee composed of the personnel deans: A detailed list 
of regulations governing use of automobiles is published in the Scots Guide. 

REGULATIONS 

The college expects its students to conduct themselves as responsible mem- 
bers of a Christian community. Those who persistently refuse to conform 
to the spirit and regulations of the institution will not be permitted to re- 
main in college. 

Monmouth College opposes drinking, gambling, and hazing in all forms. 
The use or possession of alcoholic beverages on or off campus is not per- 
mitted by the college. 

Complete rules governing registration, attendance, conduct, probation, 
and use of automobiles will be published in the Scots Guide which is dis- 
tributed at the beginning of the school year. 



Admission 



In conformity with its purpose, Monmouth College admits as students 
young men and women of good moral character who are properly qualified 
by previous academic training to pursue the courses which the college 
offers. Preparatory training given by accredited four-year high schools or 
in grades 9 to 12 in junior high schools is the normal basis for admission 
to the freshman class, 

REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants must present a minimum of 15 secondary school units, 12 of 
which must be in the following fields: English, history, social science, for- 
eign language, mathematics and science (a unit is a subject carried for one 
school year). Four of the 12 units must be in English. One-half unit of 
the English requirement may be in speech or other communication courses. 
All applicants are required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by 
the College Entrance Examination Board and must present a satisfactory 
recommendation from their high school principal or counselor. Candi- 
dates who do not meet these requirements will be considered on their merits. 

PROCEDURE 

Application blanks and other information relating to admission may be 
obtained from the admissions office. A $10 fee must accompany applica- 
tions. This fee is non- refundable and is not applicable towards other college 
expenses. Application should be made early in the senior year of high 
school to the Director of Admissions, Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illi- 
nois. 

Arrangements for taking the College Entrance Examination Board scho- 
lastic aptitude test may be made by writing the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. 

ADMISSION COMMITTEE ACTION 

All applicants are notified of acceptance or rejection as soon as the ad- 
mission committee takes official action on their application. Monmouth 
College uses a "rolling" admissions policy, which means that applications 
are processed as received and applicants generally are notified of admission 
committee action within a month of application. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Students who wish to transfer to Monmouth from another school must 
present a letter of honorable dismissal and a transcript showing entrance 
credits accepted and credits earned while in attendance at that college. 
Transfer students must also furnish a statement indicating they are in 
good standing at the college from which the transfer is to be made. 

HONORS AT ENTRANCE 

In order to recognize and reward outstanding achievement of high school 
seniors applying for admission to Monmouth College, a program of Honors- 
at-Entrance has been established. A student may qualify for Honors-at- 
Entrance whether or not he has received financial aid. 

17 



18 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

High school seniors who rank in the upper 10 per cent of their grad- 
uating class will receive Honors-at-Entrance, including a certificate of 
merit signed by the president and issued by the college prior to the be- 
ginning of the academic year and listing as an Honors-at-Entrance student 
in appropriate college publications. 



HONOR SCHOLARS 

Students who receive Honors-at-Entrance may continue their status as 
Honor Scholars in succeeding years by exhibiting personal and social char- 
acter satisfactory to the Honor Scholars committee, by carrying extra- 
curricular responsibility and by maintaining the following grade-point 
averages: at end of freshman year, 2.75; at end of sophomore year, 3.0; 
at end of junior year, 3.5. Maintaining these standards will make the stu- 
dent eligible for Honors at Graduation. 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

College credit, advanced placement and reduction of the distribution re- 
quirements may be granted to entering students who have demonstrated 
sufficiently strong preparation. 

The advanced placement examinations of the College Entrance Exam- 
ination Board, tests given at Monmouth during Orientation week, and 
school records may be used by the department in making such a recom- 
mendation. 

Application for advanced placement should be made to the academic 
dean. Credit may be recorded if it does not void necessary admission 
units and if the fees for such special examinations are met. The granting 
of credit and a grade is authorized by the academic dean upon recom- 
mendation of the instructor who gives the course and the special examina- 
tion, the head of the department concerned and with the approval of the 
faculty adviser. 

Credit for one or more term courses is granted, and advanced placement 
at an appropriate level is offered, to any entering students who have 
demonstrated college level comprehension in one or more subjects. This 
credit satisfies any of the requirements for the degree to the same extent 
as if earned for courses taken at Monmouth. It may not be substituted 
for any course subsequently failed. 



Expenses 

TUITION AND FEES 

Tuition and fees, excluding fees itemized below, is $408.33 per term. This 
includes instruction and laboratory fees and the following privileges: stu- 
dent health service and insurance coverage; admission to all regular athletic 
games, concert-lecture series programs and plays in the college theatre; 
i Student Union dues; one-third payment towards purchase of the Ravelings, 
! college yearbook; a one-term subscription to the student newspaper, the 
Oracle; and support of forensics and the student council. Charges for 
laboratory breakage are billed at the close of each term. 

Special Students 

! Special students (working towards a degree but carrying less than three 
term courses), who desire participation in student activities and Student 
i Union privileges will be charged at the rate of $133.33 per term course. 

Special students who do not desire to participate in student activities or 
have Student Union privileges will be charged at the rate of $125 per term 
course. 

When, by special permission, a student carries an eleventh term course 
during an academic year, the additional charge will be $135 for this ad- 
ditional term course. 

Auditing Courses 

Students may audit courses, without credit, in addition to their regular 
i academic program subject to the permission of the instructor involved and 
i approval of the academic dean. Written permission of the instructor in- 
i volved is required before an audited course is listed on the student's per- 
manent record. 

Miscellaneous Fees 

Application Fee $10.00 

i Graduation Fee (including cap and gown rental) 15.00 

! Student Teaching Fee (Education 401, 401S, 402, 402S) 10.00 

| Late Registration Fee 3.00 

Change of Registration (after first week of classes in each term) . . 5.00 
| Special Fee, Geology 303 (Field Geology) 25.00 

I Practice-room fee for Piano, Voice and Instruments, per term: 

One hour daily 5.00 

two hours daily 8.00 



, 



Organ rental, per term: 

four hours per week 15.00 

six hours per week 25.00 

(For those students registered as full-time students, who include 
credit in applied music as a part of their program, there is no 
extra tuition charge. Private lessons on a non-credit basis are 
available at $25 per term for one half -hour lesson each week.) 

19 



20 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Special Examinations 

Students who have unexcused absences from a regular final examination 
or an announced hour test will be charged a fee for a special make-up 
examination. The fee is $10 for a final examination, $5 for an announced 
hour test. A statement from the business office showing that the fee has 
been paid must be presented before the examination will be given. 

Transcripts 

Each student is entitled to two transcripts, showing the record of his work 
at the college, without charge. A fee of $1 will be charged for each addi- 
tional transcript. No transcript will be issued until the student's college 
account has been paid. 

PAYMENTS 
Advance Tuition Deposit 

When notified of admission, new students are required to pay a $100 ad- 
vance tuition deposit to apply on college expenses for the first year. No 
refund of this $100 will be made unless the student suffers an illness or 
accident which prevents his entering college at the admission date for 
which he has applied; and then the refund will be made only if the college 
is notified prior to June 15 (one month prior to date of entry for new 
students entering at the second or third term). 

Returning students are also required to pay a $100 advance tuition de- 
posit not later than May 1, to apply on college expenses of the following 
year. Refund privileges for returning students are the same as those for 
new students. 

Deferred Payment 

Payments for tuition, fees, room and meals are due at the beginning of 
each term. A deferred payment charge of $5 will be assessed all students 
who defer any part of the term's bill. 

The deferred payment plan requires one-fourth of the total fees to be 
paid at registration and the balance to be paid in equal installments by 
the 15th day of each of the succeeding three months. 

A charge of five per cent interest will be made on all past-due balances. 
A student who does not maintain his deferred payments as scheduled will 
be dropped from classes. Students whose accounts are not paid in full 10 
days before the end of the term are not eligible to take final examinations. 

Other Payment Plans 

Plan One . . . Full Payment 

Under plan one, bills are paid in full at the beginning of the school 
year or at the beginning of each term. 

Plan Two . . . Deferred Payment 

Plan two provides for one-eighth of the total bill for the school year to 
be paid at registration and the balance to be paid in equal installments 
by the 15th day of each of the succeeding seven months. There is a 
$15 service charge for this plan. 

Plan Three . . . Monthly Payments 

Plan three spreads payments over an 11 -month period. There is no 
additional charge for this plan. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 21 

Monthly Payment Plan 

Parents who wish to pay tuition, board and room on the monthly pay- 
ment plan will be billed as follows: 

Advance Tuition Deposit* $ 100.00 

June 10 100.00 

July 10 100.00 

August 10 100.00 

September 10 400.00 

October 10 100.00 

November 10 100.00 

December 10 100.00 

January 10 400.00 

February 10 100.00 

March 10 325.00 

April 10 100.00 

$2,025.00 

Statements are sent out monthly by the Business Office on the first 
of each month and are payable by the tenth. Any grants or scholarships 
by Monmouth College are applied as follows: One-third against the Sep- 
tember charges, one-third against the January charges and one-third 
against the March charges. Any other fees or charges are shown on state- 
ments in the months in which charges are made. A room reservation de- 
posit of $15.00 is not credited to board, room and tuition charges. A $5.00 
bookkeeping charge will be added per term for deviations of more than 
30 days from the above schedule. 

In the event of withdrawal prior to the opening of school, full refund 
will be made of all monies paid, except the advance tuition deposit of 
$100 which is refundable only under special circumstances. If the student 
withdraws after school opens, refund will be made on the basis of terms 
stated in the catalog. 

Room and Meal Rates 

The charge for meals, per school year, is $500. During the official school 
year, 21 meals per week are served at the college dining hall. The first 
meal following a vacation period will be served the morning of the day 
classes are resumed. The dining room may be closed several days during 
the period between final examinations and registration for the new term. 

Room rent per year is $300, including linen service. 

Room reservations will be made only on payment of the $100 advance 
tuition deposit and a $15 room deposit. Rooms will be reserved in the 
order in which the deposits are received. 

Refunds 

If it becomes necessary for a student to withdraw from college, refunds 
of tuition will be made in accordance with the following schedule: 

Two weeks or less 80% 

During third or fourth week 60% 

During fifth or sixth week 40% 

During seventh or eighth week 20% 

Thereafter no refund 

"Payable at time of acceptance 



22 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Refund of board charges will be based on the unused portion of the 
term, less a penalty of two weeks. Room rent is not refundable under 
any circumstances. Students who are not able to abide by residence hall 
regulations, or who show marked unwillingness to cooperate with the house 
director, may be asked to move from their rooms without privilege of 
refund. 

Annual Expenses, 1962-63 

Tuition and Fees $1,225 

Room 300 

Board 500 

An estimated $300 to $400 will be required for books, supplies, clothing, 
recreation and other miscellaneous and personal items. 



Financial Aid 

PROCEDURE 

Students who meet the admission standards of the college may secure 
educational cost assistance in meeting their college expenses if a need is 
shown. Educational cost need is the difference between one year's educa- 
tional cost (tuition, books, board, room, etc.) and the student's resources 
for the same period (aid from parents, guardian, relatives, personal savings 
and vacation earnings, other scholarships and awards, etc.). 

To determine the need factor the student must complete, with his parents, 
a College Scholarship Service (CSS) form when he applies for financial 
aid. On this form he and his parents supply information about the fam- 
ily's income, assets, debts and other conditions affecting this factor in the 
student's resources. The completed form is sent by the applicant to 
College Scholarship Service, Box 175, Princeton, New Jersey. CSS forms 
may be secured from the college office of Student Aid and Placement. 

CSS computes an estimate of the family's financial means and furnishes 
this information to the college. The estimate states how much the family 
might reasonably be expected to pay toward the student's college expenses 
during the year. The CSS estimate and other information the college 
may have determines the amount and kinds of aid which may be given. 

TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID 

Monmouth College believes that the assumption of a reasonable amount 
of business- related responsibility during the student years develops maturity 
and post-college adjustment. For this reason every effort is made to com- 
bine the following kinds of educational cost assistance in meeting a student's 
need factor: 

SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS-IN-AID AND LOANS 

Monmouth's many awards of this type are described in detail elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

Scholarships 

Freshmen awards are made to students who rank in the upper one-fourth 
of their high school class and whose ability, character and promise of 
achievement are outstanding. Size of the scholarship depends upon need, 
rank in class and activity record. 

Upperciass students who have maintained a grade-point average of at 
least 3.0 in the preceding term, have a need, and whose ability, character 
and record indicate continued high achievement are eligible for scholarships. 

Grants-ln-Aid 

These awards are made to those students with financial need who do not 
qualify academically for scholarships. 

Freshmen, to qualify for a grant-in-aid, must rank in the upper half of 
their high school class, show promise of being able to pass college-level 
work and have a record showing good character, some leadership potential 
and participation in extra-curricular activities. 

Upperciass students must have a grade-point average of at least 2.0 and 
a previous college record indicating good character and conduct and con- 
tinued satisfactory achievement. 

23 



24 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Student Loans 

Student loan funds for assisting students in meeting college costs have been 
in existence for a number of years, but the passage of the National Defense 
Education Act in 1958 refocused attention and interest on this method of 
help in meeting college expenses. The usual student loan fund is a revolv- 
ing type wherein the repayment goes back into the fund for reloaning to 
other students with financial need. 

Interest rates are usually low (3 to 4 per cent) and repayment does not 
begin until the student ceases full-time attendance. Repayment periods 
vary with the different student loan funds. For example, the National De- 
fense Education Act Student Loan Program provides one year of grace 
after the student ceases being a full-time student. No interest accrues dur- 
ing this period and no repayments are due. 

Interest begins with the second year and then the student has 10 years 
to repay, with deferment of interest and repayment of principal for up to 
three years if the student attends graduate school or enters the armed 
services. The act requires that special consideration be given to students 
planning to teach or those who specialize in modern foreign languages or 
science. Other students become eligible for this type of loan after the 
special consideration cases have been completed. A student going into 
teaching may have 10 per cent of his loan cancelled each year for a maxi- 
mum of five years. 

In addition to the loan funds administered by Monmouth College, a list 
of other scholarship and loan funds administered independently are on 
file in the student financial aid office and information is available to those 
who wish to make their own arrangements for educational cost financing. 

Part-Time Employment 

Although there may be a slight variation in the number of jobs available 
to students on the campus and in the community from year to year, the 
number, generally, is slightly more than 200. Campus jobs include secre- 
tarial-type work, building and campus maintenance, switchboard operation, 
residence hall desk duty, library clerical work, residence hall counseling, 
food service duties and messenger services. The food services and residence 
hall positions pay from one-third to full board. Other jobs are at hourly 
rates ranging from 75 cents to $1.25 per hour. 

Student assistantships in the various departments provide a limited num- 
ber of jobs to upperclass students recommended by department heads. 

The college feels that part-time employment demands are reasonable in 
the number of hours per week required (this varies with jobs) , and expects 
the student to make whatever adjustments are required to accommodate 
his work, study and social program to the end that his academic program 
does not suffer. 

The college student aid office also lists community part-time jobs and 
notifies those students who have indicated an interest in part-time work. 
The college student aid office does not list jobs with excessive hourly de- 
mands, unreasonable night-time hours or environmental factors that are 
undesirable. 

GENERAL 

It is Monmouth's desire to provide educational cost assistance to every 
student having a financial need who possesses character, ability, promise 
and scholastic aptitude and is willing to make reasonable sacrifices to 
attain his goal of graduating from Monmouth College. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 25 

All financial aid is awarded with the understanding that the individual 
is a full-time student and will allow sufficient time to study consistently. 
Failure to maintain the required scholastic average will result in cancella- 
tion of the award. All awards (except for mid-year entrants) are made 
for a one-year period and one-third the award is deducted from the stu- 
dent's tuition account each term. All awards are acted upon by the schol- 
arship committee or by special committees, if required by the donors of 
special funds. 

Students holding awards must reapply before March 15 each year in 
order to obtain financial aid for the following academic year. 

Students receiving aid may not own or operate cars on the Monmouth 
campus. 

Students receiving financial aid from the college, except those whose 
homes are in Monmouth, are required to live in college housing. 

All recipients of the foregoing types of aid who transfer before gradua- 
tion to other degree- granting institutions are required to refund all such 
aid received to the time of transfer. 



PROCEDURE FOR APPLICATION 
Freshmen and Transfer Students 

New students applying for any of the above forms of financial aid must 
first apply for admission on the usual forms and be accepted. Next, the 
parents of the applicant must complete, sign and forward to Box 176. 
Princeton, New Jersey, the College Scholarship Service "Confidential State- 
ment" in support of request for aid. "Confidential Statement" forms may 
be obtained through your high school. 



Upperclass Students 



Upperclass students applying for financial aid must complete the CSS 
"Confidential Statement" which may be obtained at the college student aid 
office. Students receiving aid must reapply by March 15 each year in 
order to obtain financial aid for the following academic year. 



HONOR SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION 

Five scholarships with a value of up to $4,800 ($1,200 per year) are 
awarded each year to winners of the Monmouth College Honor Scholarship 
Competition. High school seniors ranking in the upper 20 per cent of 
their class and recommended by their principal or counselor are eligible to 
compete. Winners will be selected on the basis of test results and financial 
need. Those winners who do not have financial need will be given $100 
honorary awards. Candidates who do not win Honor Scholarships will be 
considered for other scholarships granted by Monmouth College through 
regular scholarship funds. Further information may be obtained by writing 
the director of admissions. 



Courses of Instruction 

ARRANGEMENT 

The departments of instruction in the following description of courses are 
arranged in alphabetical order. Departmental listings also contain general 
information concerning the program of the department and requirements 
for a major in that field. 

NUMBERING AND LEVEL 

The numbering of each course indicates the level of the course. Numbers 
100-199 are used for introductory courses open to freshman. Numbers 
200-299 are used for intermediate courses open to sophomores but not to 
freshmen. Numbers 300-399 are used for advanced courses open only to 
juniors and seniors or to sophomores with consent of the instructor. Num- 
bers 400-499 are used to designate departmental seminars and independent 
study. 

FRACTIONAL COURSES 

Art: All studio courses will be fractional courses. Studio classes will meet 
six hours per week, either three periods of two hours each or two periods 
of three hours each. Two terms must be completed to receive one course 
credit; an additional course credit will be given after the completion of 
the third term. 

Music: All applied music courses will be evaluated as one-sixth of a course 
per term. No credit will be given until the equivalent of a full course 
has been completed. 

Speech and Dramatics: Dramatics will be evaluated as one-sixth of a course 
per term. Directing and debate will be evaluated as one-third of a course 
per term. No credit will be given until the equivalent of a full course has 
been completed. 

ART 

Harlow B. Blum, Assistant Professor, Head 
Martha H. Hamilton, Assistant Professor 

As part of the liberal arts program, the art department offers courses de- 
signed to give students an aesthetic appreciation as well as an opportunity 
to develop creative processes. The art department aims to prepare inter- 
ested students for graduate work in the fine arts and a professional art 
career. For students interested in teaching art at the elementary or sec- 
ondary school level, the program is designed to comply with state require- 
ments for certification. 

Field of Concentration 

At least 10 term courses in art and five related term courses to include the 
following: four term courses in art history and design theory, four term 
courses in studio art and two term courses in independent study (Art 320 
and 420). 

101. Introduction to the History of Art. A study of art from prehistoric 
times to the Baroque period. 
Second term Mrs. Hamilton 

26 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 27 

102. Introduction to the History of Art. A study of art from the Baroque 
period to the present time. 

Third term Mrs. Hamilton 

103. Art Appreciation. A course for the general student, emphasizing 
increased perception of the formal elements of visual art — line, form, color 
and texture — with which one comes into contact every day. Included 
also are the theory and criticism of visual art. Open primarily to non- 
art majors. 

First term Mrs. Hamilton 

211. Design. A study of the fundamental elements and principles of 
design applied to fine and minor arts. 
Second term Mrs. Hamilton 

312. History of Interior Design, Furniture and Decoration. A study of 
interior design, furniture and decoration from prehistoric times through 
the seventeenth century. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Hamilton 

314. History of Interior Design, Furniture and Decoration. A study of 
interior design, furniture and decoration from the eighteenth century to 
the present. Prerequisite: Art 312 or consent of the instructor. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Hamilton 

316. House Planning and Decoration. A study of house planning and 
building, interior and exterior, and decoration and furnishing. Special 
emphasis on contemporary materials and methods. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) 

319. Mediterranean Culture of the 16th and 17th Centuries. See French 
319. 

320. Junior Independent Study. An individual research program ar- 
ranged in consultation with the instructor and designed to fit the interests 
of the student. 

Third term Staff 

321. Architecture. Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance architecture are 
used as a basis for appraising contemporary architecture. 

First term Mrs. Hamilton 

322. Contemporary Art. A study of twentieth century painting and sculp- 
ture with emphasis on the art in America. 

Third term Mrs. Hamilton 

331. European Renaissance. A study of the great figures in important 

centers in the Renaissance. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) 

420. Senior Independent Study. An individual research program as in 

320, but on a more advanced level. 

Third term Staff 

Studio Courses 

All studio courses are fractional courses. A one-term course requires the 
completion of two terms during which classes will meet six hours per week 
each term. Upon the completion of a third term "b" course an additional 
term course credit will be recorded. 

151 a, b. Fundamentals of Drawing. Introducing the beginning student 
to a variety of media: charcoal, conte, ink, pastel and watercolor. Theory 
and practice in the elements of drawing with the emphasis on creative 
expression. 

Mr. Blum 



28 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

201 a, b. Beginning Printmaking-Serigraphy. A studio course in silk- 
screen emphasizing the basic techniques of the medium in the development 
of the fine print. 

Mr. Blum 

251 a, b. Elementary Oil Painting. Introducing the student to composi- 
tion practice, analysis and painting techniques. Still-life, figure and land- 
scape. Prerequisite: Art 151 or consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Blum 

301 a, b. Advanced Printmaking. Prerequisite: Art 201. 

Mr. Blum 

351 a, b. Composition and Painting. Composition practice, analysis and 
painting techniques with emphasis on the creative formal elements. Pre- 
requisite: Art 251. 

Mr. Blum 

451 a, b. Advanced Composition. Individual creative work in the prac- 
tice of painting, sculpture or graphic arts; and seminar on professional 
problems. Prerequisite: Art 301 or 351. 

Mr. Blum 

BIBLE AND RELIGION 

Charles J. Speel, II, Professor, Head 

J. Stafford Weeks, Assistant Professor 

Harold J. Ralston, Professor 

Courses in the department have four main objectives: 

1. To develop in students a knowledge of the contents of the Bible, the 
use made of it in the past and present, the areas of study closely allied 
to it and the relationship of such knowledge to other fields of study. 

2. To help students discover the role of religion in contemporary life, both 
personal and social, and to assist them in their quest for moral and 
religious understanding and certainty. 

3. To develop in students a knowledge and understanding of the historical 
and doctrinal roles of Christianity and other religious forces. 

4. To prepare students for the varied tasks of lay leadership and to build 
a foundation for graduate study in the case of those preparing for the 
ministry, for religious education and for the teaching of Bible and 
Religion. 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven term courses. 

(b) At least five related term courses chosen in consultation with the de- 
partment. 

Bible 

101. Bible Survey. A survey of the Old and New Testaments and a 
study of Jesus and Paul. 
Each term Staff 

201. Old Testament Problems. Various aspects of Old Testament ma- 
terial including literature, religion and theology. 
First term (1963-64 and every third year) Mr. Speel 

212. New Testament Problems. Various aspects of New Testament ma- 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 29 

terial, including literature and religious thought. 

Second term (1964-65 and every third year) Mr. Speel 

301. Archaeology and the Bible. The bearing of archaeological and his- 
torical investigations on the life and literature of the Old and New Testa- 
ments along with a study of the relationship of neighboring cultures. 
First term (1962-63, 1964-65 and twice every three years) Mr. Speel 

Religion 

101. Basic Beliefs. A study of the fundamentals of the Christian faith 
and a consideration of the chief creeds of Christendom. 
First term. Mr. Weeks 

203. Ethics of the Professions and Business. A study of the history of 
Christian ethics and the ethics of the professions and businesses of the 
present day. Guest speakers, specialists in their fields, assist the instructor 
in the class. Discussion of historical and current situations. 
Third term (1963-64 and every third year) Mr. Weeks 

213. Philosophy of Religion. See Philosophy 213. 

301. Church History to 1450. A history of the Christian Church from 
the time of Christ to 1450 A.D., including a study of Christian doctrine. 
Church organization, significant ecclesiastical movements and outstanding 
Church leaders. 
First term Mr. Speel 

3C7. New Testament. See Classical Languages (Greek) 307. 

308. New Testament. See Classical Languages (Greek) 308. 

312. Church History 1450 to the Present. A history of the Christian 
Church from 1450 A.D. to the present, including a study of doctrine, 
organization, ecclesiastical movements and church leaders. 
Second term Mr. Speel 

322. World Religions. An introduction to the history of religion, em- 
phasizing the life and character of the founders, the philosophic develop- 
ment, the numerical and territorial expansion and the faith and practices 
of the religions of the world, both past and present. 
Second term Mr. Weeks 

324. Sacred Music. See Music 324. 

333. Christian Leadership. A study of the Christian ministry, the 
history, organization and administration of the Church. Includes an in- 
troduction to forms of worship, use of the Bible, and other materials and 
subjects related to Christianity and the furtherance of missions. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Weeks 

343. Program, Polity and Worship. A study of the program, polity and 
worship of the United Presbyterian Church. Arrangements may be made 
for students of other denominations to study their own church. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Weeks 



Seminars and Individual Study 

351. Field Work in Christian Education. A supervised program of prac- 
tical experience in connection with Christian education programs at local 
churches. Open only to juniors and seniors preparing for careers in Chris- 



30 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

tian education. Departmental consent required. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
Religion 323. Fractional credit. 

Mr. Speel 

401. Seminar. Open to juniors and seniors, subject to consent of the 
department. Topic for 1962-63: "The Middle East and Africa." 
First term Mr. Speel 

412. Reading Course. On problems of interest to the student. Open 
only to students who include Bible and Religion in their field of con- 
centration. 
Second term Mr. Speel 

423. Thesis Course. On a subject of the students' own choosing. Open 
only to students who include Bible and Religion in their field of concen- 
tration. 
Third term Mr. Speel 

BIOLOGY 

John J. Ketterer, Associate Professor, Head 

Robert H. Buchholz, Associate Professor (leave of absence, 1962-63) 

Milton L. Bowman, Assistant Professor 

David C. Allison, Assistant Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental major of at least seven term courses in addition to 
Biology 101 and 102 The seven term courses must include Biology 
201, 303, 305, 306, 401, and either 402 or 403. The remainder of the 
requirement may be satisfied by any other courses offered by the 
department. 

(b) Five term courses in the related fields of physics and chemistry of 
which the following are required: Organic Chemistry, one term; 
Quantitative Analysis, one term (unless excused by the adviser) and 
physics, two terms. A good background in mathematics is strongly 
urged. 

101. College Biology. An introduction to biology covering the organiza- 
tion of living organisms, their general physiology, morphology, embryology, 
genetics, evolution and ecology. Appropriate animal and plant forms are 
studied in both lecture and laboratory. Open to all students. 

First term Staff 

102. College Biology. Continuation of Biology 101. Prerequisites: Biol- 
ogy 101 or consent of the instructor. 

Second term Staff 

201. Introductory Physiology. An introduction to the physiology of 
mammalian organs and organ systems. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, 
and Chemistry 101 or consent of the instructor. 
First term Mr. Buchholz 

203. Genetics. An introduction to the principles of heredity in animals 
and plants. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the instructor. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

204. Botany. A review of the plant kingdom with emphasis on plant 
structure, physiology and classification. Open to all students. 

Third term Mr. Bowman 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 31 

205. Nutrition. Contributions of nutrition to the health and well-being 
of the individual, the family and society; essentials of an adequate diet 
based on food requirements; nutritive values of common foods; digestion 
and metabolism. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 or Biology 101. 
First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mrs. Kistler 

206. Ecology. An introduction to ecology designed to give the student 
an understanding of the principles and concepts of environmental inter- 
relationships and interactions with living organisms. Prerequisites: Biology 
101, 102, and Biology 204 or consent of the instructor. 
Third term Mr. Bowman 

208. Organic Evolution. An introduction to the theories of evolution, 
the mechanics of evolution, the problems of the origin of life and evolution 
of plants and animals. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the 
instructor. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

301. Bacteriology. A general course consisting of a study of culture 
methods, morphology, identification and physiology of the bacteria. Some 
consideration is also given to the nature of disease and its control. Pre- 
requisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the instructor. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

302. Histology. An introduction to vertebrate animal tissues with con- 
sideration given to the relationship of form to function. Representative 
tissues are studied in the laboratory. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ketterer 

303. Comparative Physiology. A comparison of animal physiological 
mechanisms in the muscle, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, digestive and 
excretory systems. The organisms will be studied in relation to ecology 
and the evolution of physiological function. Prerequisites: Biology 201 
and Chemistry 102. 

Second term Mr. Buchholz 

304. Advanced Physiology. A study of topics of current interest in 
basic and comparative physiology. Prerequisites: Biology 303 or consent 
of the instructor. 

Third term Mr. Buchholz 

305. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. A detailed study of the compara- 
tive anatomy of vertebrates. Shark, Necturus and cat are used as types 
in the laboratory. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, or consent of the 
instructor. 

First term Mr. Ketterer 

306. Embryology. A study of the embryological development of verte- 
brates. Prerequisites: Biology 305 or consent of the instructor. 
Second term Mr. Bowman 

Seminars and Individual Study 

401. Seminar. Readings and discussions on selected topics designed 
to relate the knowledge from the several branches of biology to the whole 
of biological knowledge and to other learned disciplines from an historical 
and current problems point of view. Open to senior biology majors. 
First term Staff 

402. Experimental Biology. Advanced laboratory experimental work of 
the student's own choosing, not covered in other courses offered by the 
department. Detailed written reports are required. Open to senior biology 
majors. 

Second or third term Staff 



32 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

403. Research. Original research projects, chosen by the student in 
consultation with the staff, involving the search of primary literature 
sources, design and execution of experiments, and an oral and written 
report of the research results. Open to senior biology majors. 
Second or third term Staff 

405. Independent Study. Offered by special arrangement. 
Each term Staff 

CHEMISTRY 

Garrett W. Thiessen, Professor, Head 

Floyd F. Rawlings, Associate Professor 

Robert Meyer, Assistant Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) Chemistry 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 203, 301, 302, 403; Physics 101, 102, 
103 and Mathematics 151, 152, 251, 254. Reading knowledge of Ger- 
man. Related courses in astronomy, biology, geology and physics, so 
far as is possible. 

(b) American Chemical Society Accreditation: All of the above plus Chem- 
istry 303 and 401 or 402; as many related courses as possible in mathe- 
matics, physics, biology and geology. 

101. Elementary Inorganic. Periodic Law, atomic structure, orbital 
picture of chemical bonds, phase rule, gas laws, and kinetic molecular 
theory, classical atomic and molecular weights, formulas, equations and 
stoichiometry, solutions, electrochemistry, oxidation- reduction. Four lec- 
tures, one lab (semimicro identification). Prerequisite: Two and one-half 
units of mathematics, slide rule. 

First term Mr. Thiessen 

102. Descriptive Elementary Organic. General survey of organic chem- 
istry including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, important functional 
groups (alcohols, carbonyls, amines, etc.), carbohydrates, amino acids and 
proteins, natural products. Four lectures, one lab (semimicro synthesis). 
Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent. 

Second term Mr. Meyer 

103. Electrolytic Equilibrium. Nuclear chemistry, kinetic equilibrium, 
ionic equilibrium, water ph, buffers, hydrolysis, solubility products, colloids, 
elementary thermodynamics, complexes. Three lectures, two laboratories 
(separation and identification). Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent; Physics — 
differential and integral calculus or equivalent. 

Third term Mr. Thiessen 

201. Elementary Analytical. Gravimetry, titrimetry and the physical 
chemical basis for analytical chemistry. Three lectures, two laboratories 
(gravimetry, titrimetry, physical chemical applications, colorimetry) . Pre- 
requisite: 102, 103. 

First term Mr. Rawlings 

202. Physical Chemistry. Thermodynamics (classical and statistical), 
solutions, kinetic theory, liquid states, molecular structures. Four lectures, 
one laboratory (physical properties of elements and compounds empha- 
sizing precision in measurement). Prerequisite: Chemistry 201 and 
Mathematics 254. 

Second term Mr. Rawlings 

203. Physical Chemistry. Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium, 
electrochemistry, elementry chemical kinetics, Schroedinger equation, quan- 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 33 

turn chemistry, molecular bonding. Four lectures, one laboratory (miscel- 
laneous experiments in physical chemistry). 
Third term Mr. Rawlings 

301. Advanced Organic. Chemical bonding, resonance, sterochemistry, 
mechanisms of reactions for aliphatic and aromatic compounds, elimination 
and addition reactions, molecular rearrangements, emphasis on important 
synthetic procedures. Three lectures, two laboratories (advanced techniques 
in organic synthesis). Prerequisite: 102, 201. 

First term Mr. Meyer 

302. Advanced Analytical. Analytical complexes, redox theory, potentio- 
metry, multiple stage separations, conductometric titrations, polarography. 
Three lectures, two laboratories (advanced techniques including instru- 
mentation [electromagnetic waves and nuclear] ). Prerequisite: 201. 
Second term Mr. Rawlings 

303. Theoretical Inorganic. Acid-base chemistry, co-ordination chemistry, 
mechanisms of inorganic reactions, descriptive inorganic chemistry. Three 
lectures, two laboratories (emphasis on advanced techniques of inorganic 
synthesis). Prerequisite: 301, 203. 

Third term Mr. Meyer 

401. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Advanced chemical kinetics, statis- 
tical mechanics, spectroscopy, advanced topics in physical chemistry. Four 
lectures, one laboratory (nuclear chemistry, instrumental analysis). Pre- 
requisite: 302, 303. 

First term Mr. Rawlings 

402. Theoretical Organic. Advanced mechanistic theories, Hammett 
and Taft equations, heterocycles, applications of electromagnetic waves to 
organic chemistry. Three lectures, two laboratories (qualitative inorganic 
analysis, including applications of infra-red and ultra-violet spectra). 
Prerequisite: 301, 302. 

Second term Mr. Meyer, Mr. Thiessen 

403. Seminar. Survey of the chemical literature, oral presentations of 
modern topics in chemistry and an original research project chosen in con- 
sultation with the staff. Prerequisite: students must be chemistry majors 
in their senior year. 

Third term Mr. Meyer, Staff 

404. Independent Study. Offered by special arrangement. 

Each term Mr. Meyer 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Harold J. Ralston, Professor, Head 
Bernice L. Fox, Associate Professor 

Latin 
Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven courses in addition to Latin 
101 and 102, and including 401. 

(b) Five or more related courses chosen with the approval of the adviser. 

101. Elementary Latin. A study of grammar and syntax. Designed 
for the student beginning the study of Latin. 
Second term Miss Fox 



I 



34 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

102. Elementary Latin. A continuation of Latin 101, completing syntax 
and starting the reading of Latin authors. 
Third term Miss Fox 

204. Vergil's Aeneid. Prerequisite: two years of high school Latin or 
Latin 101-102. 

First term Miss Fox 

205. Cicero. Selections from the Orations and Essays. Prerequisite: 
two years of high school Latin or Latin 101, 102. 

Second term Miss Fox 

301. Livy's Histories. Emphasis on the early kings and the Carthagenian 
Wars. Prerequisite: three years of high school Latin or its equivalent. 
First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

302. Tacitus and Suetonius. The period of the Twelve Caesars, with 
special study of the periods of Augustus and Nero. Prerequisite: see 
Latin 301. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

303. Pliny's Letters. Special study of Roman private life at the time 
of Pliny. Prerequisite: see Latin 301. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

310. Roman Drama. Studies in Plautus and Terence. Prerequisite: see 
Latin 301. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

311. Latin Lyric Poetry. Readings from Catullus, Ovid and Horace. 
Prerequisite: see Latin 301. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

312. Roman Satire. A study of the satires of Horace and Juvenal and 
the epigrams of Martial. Prerequisite: see Latin 301. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems in language or 
literature under guidance of the instructor. Advanced students only. 
By special arrangement Miss Fox 



Greek 

101. Elementary Greek. A study of Greek grammar and acquisition of 
vocabulary. 

Second term Mr. Ralston 

102. Elementary Greek. Continuation of the study of Greek grammar, 
with translation in Xenophon's Anabasis or other selected reading. 
Third term Mr. Ralston 

201. Greek Reading. Selections from Plato's Apology and Crito, or from 
the Greek historians, Septuagint, Apocrypha, or non-literary papyri. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

202. Greek Reading. Continuation of 201. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

307. New Testament. Forms, syntax and reading. Prerequisite: Greek 
101-102. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 35 

308. New Testament. Textual and word studies and more difficult read- 
ing. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

401. Independent Study. More advanced individual study of grammar 
or reading under direction of the instructor. 
By special arrangement Mr. Ralston 

Classical Civilization 

(Given in English. No foreign language prerequisite.) 

220. Roman Literature in Translation. A study of Roman literature 
in English translation. No prerequisites. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

221. Classical Mythology. A study of classical myths, especially as they 
relate to English literature. No prerequisites. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Fox 

223. Greek Civilization and Literature. Introduction to Greek life, artistic 
accomplishment and thought. Selections from Greek literature are read 
in English translation. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

224. Word Elements. Intended to aid in mastering general and technical 
derivatives from Greek and Latin stems. No previous study of these 
languages required. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

James R. Herbsleb, Professor, Head 

Robert Aduddell, Instructor 

Robert Cirese, Instructor 

Homer L. Shoemaker, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

The field of concentration may be either in Economics or Business Ad- 
ministration, or these areas may be combined: 

(a) Concentration in Economics requires the following courses: 305, 306. 
300, 301, 309, 311, 401 and Statistics. Additional electives available 
would be Economics 302, 303, 310 and a Survey of Accounting (inde- 
pendent study). 

Economics 200, 201 are required and may be used to satisfy Division II 
requirements, but are not included in the field of concentration. 

(b) Concentration in Business Administration requires the following 
courses: 203, 204, 307, 308, 320, 321, or 322, 401 and Statistics. Addi- 
tional electives available would be Economics 100, 322, 323, 205,. 
206, 324. 

Economics 200, 201 are required and may be used to satisfy Division II 
requirements, but are not included in the field of concentration. 

(c) Combined Economics and Business Administration curricula require 
the following courses: Survey of Accounting (independent study) or 
Economics 203, 204, 401, and other additional courses taken with the 
advice and consent of the adviser to complete the major. 
Economics 200, 201 are required and may be used to satisfy Division II 
requirements, but are not included in the field of concentration. 



J 



36 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

200. Principles of Economics. The two-term sequence (Economics 200- 
201) is designed to equip the student with a fundamental and rigorous un- 
derstanding of the methods and objectives of economic analysis. The course 
provides an intensive, orderly and objective set of basic relationships within 
which real world economic problems and policy questions may be analyzed. 
First term Mr. Aduddell, Mr. Cirese 

201. Principles of Economics. A continuation of Economics 200. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 200. 

Second term Mr. Aduddell, Mr. Cirese 

203. Principles of Accounting. This course does not presume any 
previous training in bookkeeping. It gives thorough acquaintance with 
the principles of accounting as applied to the corporate form of business 
enterprise. 

First term Mr. Shoemaker 

204. Principles of Accounting. A continuation of Economics 203 with 
emphasis on the interpretation of accounts as applied to both corporations 
and partnerships. Prerequisite: Economics 203. 

Second term Mr. Shoemaker 

205. Intermediate Accounting. Individualized study, usually seminar, in 
various fields of accounting such as budgeting, cost, taxation, etc. 
Second term Mr. Shoemaker 

206. Advanced Accounting. A continuation of 205. 

Third term Mr. Shoemaker 

211. Mathematics of Finance. See Mathematics 211. 

212. Elementary Statistics. See Mathematics 212. 

300. Intermediate Price Theory. An intensive view of modern price 
theory as it applies to individuals, firms and resource owners and their 
interaction in markets characterized by both perfect and imperfect compe- 
tition. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Second term Mr. Aduddell 

301. Intermediate Income Analysis. A comprehensive view of modern 
theories of the determination of income and employment. Includes dis- 
cussion of both Keynesian and post- Key nesian developments in income 
theory. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Third term Mr. Aduddell 

302. Business and Government. A study of basic industrial organiza- 
tion as it is altered by government regulation, particularly the regulation 
of monopoly and unfair business practices as spelled out in the Sherman 
Act and Clayton Act. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

First term Mr. Aduddell 

303. Government and Labor. A study of the changing position of labor 
before the courts and government regulation of labor unions. Prerequisite: 
Economics 201, 302. 

Second term Mr. Aduddell 

305. Money and Banking. A study of the history and theory of banking 
and the problems of monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: Economics 
201. 

First term Mr. Herbsleb 

306. International Economics. Analysis of our economic relations with 
other nations, relating to governmental policies in the area of trade and 
including economic development. Prerequisite: Economics 305. 
Second term Mr. Herbsleb 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 37 

307. Business Law. An introduction to the development of our legal 
system and the organization of our courts. Involves analysis of cases and 
application of principles with a view to the appreciation of the involvement 
and development of law in our society. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 
First term Mr. Herbsleb 

308. Business Law. A continuation of Economics 307, extending the 
analysis of the law into the realm of business organizations and property. 
Prerequisite: Economics 307. 

Second term Mr. Herbsleb 

309. Comparative Economic Systems. Analysis of the competing econo- 
mies of the world — Capitalism, Socialism, Fascism, Communism. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 201. 

Second term Mr. Herbsleb 

310. Public Finance. A study of the financing of government operations, 
including the problems of fiscal policy. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 
Third term Mr. Herbsleb 

311. History of Economic Thought. A study of the development of major 
economic thought and doctrines. Emphasis upon Mercantilists, Physiocrats, 
Classical School, Adam Smith, J. S. Mill, Alfred Marshall, J. B. Clark, 
Thorstein Veblen, J. A. Hobson, J. M. Keynes and others. Prerequisite: 
Economics 201. 

Third term Mr. Aduddell 

320. Investments and Finance. Analysis of the various types of invest- 
ment securities from the viewpoint of the investor, with attention to 
methods of corporation finance. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 204. 
First term Staff 

321. Industrial Management. A study of the organization of industry 
and its management, including the physical plant, production, control and 
administration. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 203. 

Second term Staff 

322. Marketing. Principles and problems in wholesaling, retailing, ad- 
vertising, chain stores and mail-order merchandising; study of buying 
motives and commodity markets; methods in buying, selling, transporta- 
tion, storage, pricing and credit extension. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 
First term Staff 

323. Executive Management. An understanding of business reports, such 
as balance sheets, profit and loss statements, etc.; analyzing business prob- 
lems, arriving at decisions and presenting oral and written reports. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 201, 320, 321. 

Second term Staff 

324. Personnel Management. A study of problems and methods of per- 
sonnel management; standards of living, wages, unemployment, trade 
union movement and methods of effecting adjustments between capital 
and labor. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Third term 

401. Independent Study — Seminar. A study of selected topics with 
emphasis on the student's responsibility in research, methods, presentation 
and defense of ideas. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 311. 
Third term Mr. Aduddell, Mr. Herbsleb 



38 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

EDUCATION 

Albert Nicholas, Professor, Head 

Charles E. Wingo, Professor 

Ben T. Shawver, Professor 

Katye L. Davenport, Instructor 

The education department does not offer a field of concentration. The 
department cooperates with the other departments of the college in the 
preparation of teachers. 

The education department offers courses to meet the requirements for 
certification in the elementary and secondary schools. The courses are 
planned primarily to meet the Illinois state requirements, but also meet 
the requirements in many other states. Students who plan to teach in a 
state other than Illinois should consult the education department in regard 
to the requirements in that state. 

201. Introduction to American Public Education. Study of educational 
psychology, history and philosophy of education, and tests and measure- 
ments. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and Psychology 221. 

Second term Mr. Nicholas, Mr. Wingo 

202. Introduction to American Public Education. A continuation of 201. 
Third term Mr. Nicholas, Mr. Wingo 

220. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers. Required of all ele- 
mentary teachers. See Physical Education 220. 

225. Developmental Psychology. See Psychology 225. 

301. The Teaching of Arithmetic and Reading. Required of all elemen- 
tary teachers. Prerequisites: Education 201 and 202. Open only to juniors 
and seniors. 

First term Mr. Wingo 

302. Secondary Techniques, Methods and Instructional Materials. Re- 
quired of all secondary teachers. Prerequisites: Education 201 and 202. 
Open only to juniors and seniors. 

First term Mr. Nicholas 

303. Secondary Instructional Materials and the Teaching of Reading. 

Required of all secondary teachers. Prerequisites: Education 201 and 202. 

Open only to juniors and seniors. 

Second term Mr. Nicholas, Mr. Wingo 

304. Science for Elementary Teachers. An interdisciplinary course en- 
compassing subject matter from the natural sciences and science education. 
Aim of the course is the preparation of students grounded adequately in 
content and methods for the elementary schools of today and tomorrow. 
Prerequisites: a sequence of two terms in a laboratory science. The third 
term requirement in Division III may be met by Education 304 if the 
student at the beginning of the senior year is continuing to prepare for 
elementary school teaching. Certification of this intention of the student 
will be required by the registrar from the student and the adviser. 
Third term Mr. Shawver 

305. Psychology of Learning. See Psychology 305. 

307. School Administration. A study of the local school system, the 
duties of the superintendent and principal and the supervision of instruc- 
tion. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Wingo 

312. Teaching of Elementary School Music. See Music 312. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 39 

326. Teaching of Art and Children's Literature. Prerequisites: Education 
201 and 202. Open only to juniors and seniors. 
Summer session Mrs. Davenport 

327S. Elementary School Art Workshop. A theory and laboratory course 
designed to give experience in exploring method, media and techniques 
useful in teaching art in elementary school. Design, mosaics, construction, 
paper sculpture, paper-mache and other techniques are taught. 
Summer session Mrs. Davenport 

400. Independent Study. For seniors who wish to make a special study 
of some project in the field of education. 

First, second and third terms Staff 

401. Student Teaching in the Elementary School. Required for the ele- 
mentary certificate. Open only to seniors. Application blanks and informa- 
tion regarding the requirements may be obtained at the education depart- 
ment office. Includes directed observation and full-time teaching experience 
in one of the elementary grades from kindergarten through the eighth 
grade. Each student will work closely with a critic teacher and a super- 
vising teacher from the education department. 

First term Staff 

401 S. Secondary Student Teaching. Includes directed observation and 
full-time responsibility teaching in one or more of the grades seven through 
12 in a recognized school, participation in weekly conferences and guided 
study of relevant references, Each student will work closely with a critic 
teacher, a college supervisor from the Education Department and a rep- 
resentative from the student's major department. The latter will be partly 
responsible for instruction in methods in the student's major field. 
First term Staff 

402. Student Teaching in the Elementary School. A continuation of 401. 
Successful completion of 401 is a prerequisite for admission. 

Second term Staff 

402S. Secondary Student Teaching. A continuation of 401S. Successful 

completion of 401 S is a prerequisite for admission. 

Second term Staff 

404. Phonics Workshop. Two weeks of intensive study with 45 hours of 

classroom instruction in addition to outside reading requirements. Studies 

will be based on use of the 44 basic speech sounds as perceptual skills in 

teaching reading. The language laboratory, which utilizes tape-recorded 

language drills, will be available for practice in producing and applying 

speech sounds in the teaching of reading. 

Summer session Mr. Wingo 

460. Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Languages. See French 460, 

German 460, Spanish 460. 

ENGLISH 

Allen C. Morrill, Professor, Head 

Eva Hanna Cleland, Professor 

Adele Kennedy, Associate Professor 

Richard Leever, Associate Professor 

Grace Boswell, Assistant Professor 

Carolyn Gray, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) At least seven courses in English beyond the freshman courses, 101-102. 
It is recommended that the following courses be taken: English 201-202, 



40 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

English 204, English 221 or English 311, English 361, and at least one 
seminar course in both the junior and senior year. 
NOTE: Upper college course prerequisites: Qualified students may apply 
for instructor's approval to waive usual prerequisites. 

101. Freshman English. Weekly themes are required. Attention is given 
to the improvement of the student's vocabulary and facility in self-expression 
and self-correction. The course also provides an introduction to various 
types of literature, including the essay, short story and biography. Required 
of all freshmen. 

First or second term Staff 

102. Freshman English. A continuation of 101 including drama, poetry 
and the novel. Prerequisite: 101. Required of all freshmen. 

Second or third term Staff 

1 02a. An honors course for freshman students whose performance in 
English 101 has been outstanding. More ambitious units of writing than 
those of English 102 and frequent conferences with the instructor. A 
course aimed at developing the students' initiative and achievement. Pre- 
requisite: English 101 and recommendation of the department. 
Second or third term Staff 

201. Survey of British Literature. British prose and poetry from their 
beginnings to 1800. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

First term Mr. Leever 

202. Survey of British Literature. Prose and poetry of Britain from 
1800 to the present. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 

Second or third term Mr. Leever 

204. Survey of American Literature. Growth of American literature, 
exclusive of drama, from its beginning to 1900. A study of the principal 
tendencies with emphasis on major figures. Prerequisite: sophomore stand- 
ing. This course may be followed by 305. 

First term Miss Kennedy 

221. Classical Mythology. See Classical Civilization 221. 

300. Report Writing. Primarily technical or report writing for pre- 
engineering and scientific students and students preparing for graduate 
work. Advanced training in the gathering, preparation, organization and 
presentation of information. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Staff 

301. Modern British Prose. Leading British writers and movements of 
the last 30 years. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

305. Modern American Literature. Growth of American literature from 
1900 to the present. A study of the leading writers and movements 
(sequel to English 204). 

Second term Miss Kennedy 

306. Creative Writing. A workshop course of self-expression and evalu- 
ation in poetry, the essay and the short story. Consent of the instructor 
required for admission. 

Second term Miss Fox 

307. The English Novel. A study of the English novel from its beginnings 
to the present. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

308. The American Novel. A study of the American novel from its 
beginnings to the present. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Leever 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 41 

311. Great Books and Writers to 1800. A course in comparative litera- 
ture, both prose and poetry, including translated masterpieces from Egypt, 
Greece, Rome, Persia and India. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mrs. Boswell 

312. Great Books and Writers from 1800. Extensive library readings 
and class discussions of the best literary productions of Europe and the 
Near East since 1800. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mrs. Boswell 

313. The English Romantic Movement. A study of British poetry and 
prose in the romantic period. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Boswell 

316. Tennyson and Browning. A study of British poetry in the second 
half of the nineteenth century with emphasis on Tennyson and Browning, 
their philosophy and their relation to their contemporary thought and 
progress. Individual studies are made of the lesser nineteenth century 
poets. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Cleland 

318. Victorian Prose. A study of the ideas of this era of change and 
progress as expressed in essay and fiction. Readings include such authors 
as Mill, Carlyle, Arnold, Ruskin, Dickens and Thackeray. 
First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mrs. Cleland 

320. European Short Story. French, Russian, German, Spanish, Italian 
and British short stories are studied. National characteristics and tech- 
niques are examined. 

Second term Mrs. Cleland 

321. Seventeenth Century Literature. A study of seventeenth century 
British prose and poetry from the days of Donne and Jonson to the end 
of the Restoration. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

322. Eighteenth Century Literature. A study of eighteenth century 
British prose and poetry from Pope to Burns. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

324. Biography and Diaries. A study of subjective writing as well as 

objective biography which throws light upon manners, customs, political, 

religious and literary life and interesting personalities. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mrs. Cleland 

361. Shakespeare. A consideration of influences forming Shakespeare's 

background and the study of at least eight representative plays (see also 

English 462). 

First term Mr. Morrill 

363. The English Renaissance. A study of English writers in the six- 
teenth century with emphasis on Spenser, Sidney and Shakespeare's 

contemporaries. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 



Seminars and Individual Study 

In order to encourage individual initiative and scholarly research, the 
English department requires English majors to elect, in the junior and 
senior years, at least one individual study or seminar course each year. 
The following courses meet this requirement: 

401. Chaucer. A study of Chaucer's England, his language and his 
writing, especially The Canterbury Tales. Permission of the instructor is 



42 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

required. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

403. Modern Poetry: British and American. A study of twentieth century 
British and American poetry. The course is conducted as a seminar with 
emphasis on literary movements and social significance. Prerequisites: 
senior standing and permission of the instructor. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

404. Studies in American Civilization. An integrated historical, social 
and cultural interpretation of life, thought and institutions in the United 
States from 1870 to 1950. Prerequisites: English 204, senior standing and 
permission of the instructor. See History 404 and Sociology 404. 
Second term Morrill, Davenport, Sanmann 

409. European Drama. A study of drama as a type of literature and a 
critical reading of Continental plays from Aeschylus to Ibsen. Emphasis 
on the literary qualities and social significance of the plays. Permission of 
the instructor required. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

410. Modern Drama. A continuation of English 409, but may be taken 
separately. Extensive library reading and class discussions of the best 
modern dramatic productions of Europe and America. Permission of the 
instructor required. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Kennedy 

412. English Seminar. Problems in English and American literature. 
First term Mr. Morrill 

413. Studies in Indo-European Philology. Emphasis is placed on the 
origin, growth and distribution of the Indo-European languages and on 
the history, structure and chief modifications of the English language. Per- 
mission of the instructor required. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

420. Independent Study. Independent study may be pursued on projects 
students wish to study thoroughly which are not offered in the usual courses. 
Given when requested. Staff 

426. Journalism. Credit for individual study in journalism may be given 
to a few selected students who are working on the Oracle, by permission 
of the instructor. 
Given when requested. Staff 

430. Teaching of Secondary School English. 
By special arrangement Mr. Leever 

452. Introduction to Criticism. A seminar course studying the rise of 
literary criticism among the Greeks and Romans and the evolution of 
modern critical standards, especially as they may be applied to British 
and American writers. Prerequisites: English 201, 202; six hours of litera- 
ture from 300 courses, and permission of the instructor. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

462. Shakespearean Studies. A seminar in which studies will be made 
of Shakespearean criticism and productions of Shakespeare's plays from 
1600 to the present. 
(1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Morrill 

GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Donald L. Wells, Associate Professor, Head 

(Sabbatical Leave, 1962-63; leave of absence, 1963-64) 

John C. Palmquist, Assistant Professor 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 43 

Field of Concentration 

(a) At least seven term courses in geology, excluding Geology 101-102. 

(b) At least five term courses in a related field. These may be taken in 
one or two departments approved by the adviser. 

(c) At least one term of independent study. 
No major is offered in geography. 

101. Physical Geology. An introduction to the science of the earth. Ma- 
terials composing the earth and the work of agencies, both external and 
internal, modifying its surface. Field trips to areas of geologic interest. 
Open to all students. 

First term 

102. Historical Geology. A comprehensive review of what is known and 
inferred about the history of the earth from its beginning to the present 
time. Field trips to areas of geologic interest. Prerequisite: Geology 101. 
Second term 

201. Mineralogy. Crystallography; chemical, physical and descriptive 
mineralogy; geologic occurrences, associations and uses. Prerequisite: first 
year chemistry, mathematics through trigonometry. 

First term 

202. Mineralogy. Continuation of Geology 201. Prerequisite: Geology 
201. 

First term 

203. Petrology. Classification, occurrence, origin and hand-specimen 
recognition of common rocks. Prerequisite: Geology 202. 

Third term 

301. Structural Geology. Character, classification and origin of rock 
structures. Prerequisites: Geology 102; first year physics. 

First term 

302. Geomorphology. Origin, development and classification of land- 
forms. Prerequisite: Geology 102. 

Second term 

303. Field Geology. Instruction in field methods and introduction to 
problems of field geology. A period of two weeks will be spent in the field 
visiting areas of geologic interest. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
Third term 

401. Optical Mineralogy. Optical mineralogy; the polarizing microscope: 
systematic study of rocks with respect to their mineralogy, texture and 
genesis. Prerequisite: Geology 203. 

First term 

402. General Paleontology. Fundamental treatment of the basic concepts 
of paleontology. Systematic consideration of morphology, taxonomy and 
stratigraphic occurrences of invertebrate fossils. Prerequisite: first year 
biology; junior standing in geology. 

Second term 

403. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. Principles of sedimentation; ge- 
netic relations and correlation of rock and time rock units. Prerequisite: 
junior standing in geology. 

Third term 

404. Research and Seminar. Readings in geology; independent research: 
preparation and presentations of papers. Open only to seniors in geology-. 
First term 



44 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

405. Research and Seminar. A continuation of 404. 
Second term 

406. Research and Seminar. A continuation of 405. 
Third term 

Geography 

101. Physical Geography. A systematic study of the physical and biotic 
environment. Open to all students. 
Third term 

GOVERNMENT 

Carl W. Gamer, Professor, Head 
Harry S. Manley, Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A minimum of eight courses, including Government 201 and 202, 341 
or 342 and 404. 

(b) A minimum of five courses in one or two related departments, chosen 
after consultation with the adviser. 

201. Introduction to American National Government. A study of the fed- 
eral government and its constitutional development. Prerequisite: sopho- 
more standing. 
First term 

202. State and Local Government and Politics. A study of the political 
institutions of the 50 states and their subdivisions (counties, townships, 
cities, etc.); also, the Constitution of Illinois, to meet one of the Illinois 
requirements for teachers. This course is a sequence to Government 201, 
although both can be taken independently. Prerequisite: sophomore stand- 
ing. 
Second term 

302. Business and Government. See Economics 302. 

303. Government and Labor. See Economics 303. 

310. Public Finance. See Economics 310. 

311. Party and Pressure Politics. A study of the problems and conduct 
of elections and primaries in the United States. Special studies are made 
of current political campaigns. Prerequisite: History 101 and 102 or Gov- 
ernment 201 and 202 or History 251 and 252, junior standing or consent 
of the instructor. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

320. Citizenship and the Christian Ethic. A study of areas, methods and 
functions of responsible citizenship in terms of the Judaeo-Christian value 
system as found in pronouncements of church bodies and official commen- 
taries on these. A study of case histories of various types of action and 
literature on the subject of responsible citizen-participation in the affairs 
of local, state, and national government and international affairs. Identifi- 
cation of existing unsolved problems. Opportunity to work on some super- 
vised project to apply knowledge gained. Prerequisite: Government 201 
or 202. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

330. Government and Politics in Metropolitan Areas. Organization, ad- 
ministration and functions of government in metropolitan areas; some 
special problems. Prerequisite: Government 201 or 202. Junior standing 
or consent of the instructor. 
Second term 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 45 

341. Foreign Governments, I. A study of government and political ac- 
tivity in England, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, the Scan- 
dinavian countries. Prerequisite: History 102 or Government 201 or 202. 
Junior standing or consent of the instructor. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

342. Foreign Governments, II. A study of government and political ac- 
tivity in the USSR and selected countries of Asia, Latin America and 
Africa. Prerequisite: History 102 or Government 201 or 202. Junior stand- 
ing or consent of the instructor. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

351. Political Theory to the Eighteenth Century. An historical survey 
and philosophical analysis of political theory from the time of the Greeks 
to the close of the seventeenth century. Required reading from the works 
of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke. Prerequisite: Gov- 
ernment 201 or 202. 

Second term 

352. Modern Political Theory. A continuation of Government 351 from 
the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present. Required reading 
from Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Mill, and Communist, Fascist and Socialist 
theorists. Prerequisite: Government 201 or 202. 

Third term 

360. Public Administration. A study of the nature, scope and develop- 
ment of the American administrative system, the theory of organization, 
staff and auxiliary agencies, chief executive, administrative departments, 
independent regulatory agencies, government corporations, administrative 
relationships and science in administration. Prerequisite: Government 201 
or 202. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

361. Legislatures and Legislation. A study of the legislative process, 
methods of getting information, public opinion and special interests, the 
struggle for power and the public interest. Prerequisite: Government 201 
or 202. Junior standing. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

380. World Politics. A study of states in relation to each other; as 
friends, rivals, contestants; the influence of nationalism, economic rivalry, 
power politics; causes of conflict, means of resolving conflict and avoiding 
war. Prerequisite: Government 201 or 202, or History 102. 
First term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

390. International Law. A study of the growth and nature of interna- 
tional law, substantive and procedural rules, using text and cases; current 
problems, new developments. Prerequisite: Government 201, 341, 342, or 
380, or consent of the instructor. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

391. International Organization. A study of the nature, organization, and 
functions of international organization, serving political and economic ends. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

395. American Constitutional Law and Theory. A study of leading princi- 
ples of American Government as developed through judicial interpretation 
of the Constitution. Prerequisite: Government 201, 202 or consent of the 
instructor. Junior standing. 
First Term 



46 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

396. American Constitutional Law and Theory. A continuation of 395. 
Second term 

Seminars and Individual Study 

401. Independent Study. Selected readings, written reports, conferences. 
Prerequisite : junior or senior standing. By arrangement with the instructor. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

402. Soviet Civilization Seminar. An interdepartmental (see Economics 
402, English 402 and History 402) or a departmental seminar to study the 
political and cultural life of the USSR. Prerequisite: consent of the in- 
structor. 

By special arrangement 

404. Senior Seminar. Required of all majors in government. A schedule 
of reading, reports and discussion designed to give a broad knowledge of 
the literature in the discipline of Political Science. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) 



HISTORY 

F. Garvin Davenport, Professor, Head 

Mary Bartling Crow, Assistant Professor 

Douglas R. Spitz, Assistant Professor 



Field of Concentration 

(a) A minimum of seven courses including at least two courses from the 
101-103 sequence, either 251 or 252, and 400 and 408. (To qualify for 
graduate work, the student should have nine courses in history.) 

(b) Five courses in one or two related departments. 

(c) The senior comprehensive examination in history. 

101. Western Civilization. The main cultural and political features of 
Ancient and Medieval Civilization. 

First or Third term Staff 

102. Western Civilization. A continuation of 101, but may be taken sep- 
arately. Emphasis on the Renaissance, Reformation, Commercial Revolu- 
tion and rise of national states through the Napoleonic era. 

Second term Staff 

103. Western Civilization. A continuation of 102, but may be taken sep- 
arately. Emphasis on the main political, social and economic forces in 
Europe since 1815. 

Third term Staff 

251. American History, 1492-1865. A study of the main political, social 
and economic factors in the colonial, early national and Civil War periods. 
First term Mr. Davenport 

252. American History since 1865. A continuation of 251, but may be 
taken separately. Emphasis on Reconstruction, rise of big business, agrar- 
ian and labor movements and the United States as a world power. 
Second term Mr. Davenport 

290. Latin America. Emphasis on the independence movements and the 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 47 

political and social development of the modern republics. 

Third term Mrs. Crow 

301. Modern China. Covers the period from 1800 to the present, with 
emphasis on the impact of the West on China. 

Third term (not offered 1962-63) 

302. Modern Japan. Social, economic and political development of mod- 
ern Japan, with emphasis on the Japanese response to the problems posed 
by contacts with the Western world. 

Second term (not offered 1962-63) 

303. Modern India. A study of political, social and economic factors in 
modern India, with particular attention to British colonialism and the in- 
dependence movement. 

Third term (not offered 1962-63) 

311, History of Greece. From the Minoan civilization through the Hel- 
lenistic period. Emphasis on the social, cultural and political development 
significant in the context of Western civilization. Not open to freshmen. 
First term (not offered 1962-63) 

312. History of Rome. An interpretation and evaluation of Roman civ- 
ilization with special emphasis on the role of Rome in the founding of 
Europe. Not open to freshmen. 

Second term (not offered 1962-63) 

322. Medieval History. A study of medieval social and cultural life and 
its influence on later history. Prerequisite: History 101 or consent of in- 
structor. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

333. French Revolution and Napoleon. The ancient regime, the enlight- 
enment of the eighteenth century, the revolution and rise of Napoleon. 
Prerequisite: History 102 or consent of instructor. 

First term. Mrs. Crow 

334. Nineteenth Century Europe. A study of the industrial revolution, 
the growth of democracy, nationalism and imperialism from 1815 to 1890. 
Second term Mrs. Crow 

335. Twentieth Century Europe. An investigation of European history 
from 1890 to the present with emphasis on imperial and Nazi Germany 
as the focal point of European politics. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Davenport 

341. History of Great Britain. English political and social development 
from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

342. History of Great Britain. A continuation of 341 but may be taken 
separately. Growth of the Empire, the development of the modern parlia- 
ment and political and social reform. England in the two world wars of 
the twentieth century. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

344. Modern Russia. A study of the political, social and economic 
developments in Russia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Em- 
phasis on the period since 1856 with special attention to Marxian ideology. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Spitz 

351. History of American Culture. A study of American intellectual 



48 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

and cultural growth from the colonial period to about 1910. Prerequisite: 

History 251-252 or consent of the instructor. 

First term Mr. Davenport 

353. Twentieth Century America. A study of the social and intellectual 
life of the United States from about 1910 to the present. Prerequisite: 
History 351 or consent of the instructor. 
Second term Mr. Davenport 

384. History of the South. A study in regional history. Emphasis on 
the social and economic life of the South from 1800 to 1880. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Davenport 

Seminars and Individual Study 

400. Junior Seminar. Introduction to historical method and research. 
Individual projects. Required of all history majors in the junior year. 
First term Mr. Davenport 

402. Soviet Civilization. Individual projects in the political and cul- 
tural life of the USSR. Conducted on the seminar plan. Prerequisite: 
History 344. 
Third term Mr. Spitz 

404. Studies in American Civilization. (See also English 404 and 
Sociology 404). An integrated historical, social and cultural interpreta- 
tion of life, thought and institutions in the United States since 1870. 
Individual projects. Open only to English, history and sociology majors 
selected by the chairmen of the three departments. 
Third term Mr. Davenport, Mr. Morrill, Mrs. Sanmann 

408. Senior Seminar. Individualized study in American or European 
history. Required of all history majors in the senior year. 
Second term Mr. Davenport 

MATHEMATICS 

Rupert D. Boswell, Jr., Professor, Head 

Lyle Finley, Professor 

Paul Cramer, Associate Professor 

James McAllister, Associate Professor (leave of absence, 1962-63) 

John D. Arrison, Assistant Professor 

Fern W. Cramer, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) At least seven term courses with at least three of them numbered 
300 or higher. 

(b) Five related courses from one or two other subjects approved by the 
department. Courses numbered 100, 111, and 112 will not count to- 
wards a major. 

100. Introduction to Mathematics. The number system, sets, axioms, 
classical and modern geometry, functions and graphs. 
Each term Staff 

111. College Algebra. Quadratic equations, simultaneous equations, pro- 
gressions, theory of equations, etc. 

First or second term Staff 

112. Trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, logarithms, identities and 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 49 

solution of triangles. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 or equivalent. 
Each term Staff 

151. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Fundamental ideas of functions, 
the straight line, the conies and an introduction to the concepts of 
calculus. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111 and 112 or equivalent. 

First or second term Staff 

152. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. A continuation of 151. 

First or second term Staff 

211. Mathematics of Finance. Interest, discount, annuities, amortization, 
sinking funds, bonds, depreciation, elements of actuarial science. Prereq- 
uisite: Mathematics 111 or equivalent. 

First term 

212. Elementary Statistics. A study of central tendency and variability; 
frequency, binominal, normal and chi-square distributions; correlation and 
regression; and analysis of variance and applications in related fields. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 111. 

Second term 

232. Essentials of Mathematics. Fundamental operations with natural 
numbers, inequalities, decimal numbers, percentage, measurement, irra- 
tional numbers. 
Third term 

251. Calculus. Further study of the techniques of differentiation and 
integration with applications to physics and engineering. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 152. 
First or third term Staff 

254. Differential Equations. An introduction to ordinary and partial dif- 
ferential equations and their applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 251. 
Second term Staff 

301. Advanced Calculus. Series, partial differentiation, definite integrals, 
Fourier series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 254. 
Third term Staff 

309. Vector Analysis. The algebra of vectors, vector fields, vector op- 
erators, introduction to geometry, mechanics and electricity. Prerequisite 
or corequisite: Mathematics 254. 
First term Staff 

311. Introduction to Modern Algebra. Rings, integral domains, fields, 
groups, determinants and matrices. Prerequisite: Mathematics 152. 
First or second term Staff 

312. Introduction to Modern Algebra. A continuation of 311. 

First or second term Staff 

315. Theory of Numbers. The properties of the whole numbers, divisi- 
bility, diophantine equations, prime numbers, congruences, residues, addi- 
tive number theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 152. 

First term Staff 

316. College Geometry. Foundations of plane geometry, geometric con- 
structions, use of loci, fundamental theorems, the harmonic range, systems 
of circles, inversion. 

Third term Staff 

340. Probability. Random variables, binomial, Poisson and normal dis- 
tributions, mathematical expectation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 212. 
By special arrangement Staff 



50 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

341. Functions of a Complex Variable. Series, conformal mapping, 
analytic functions, residues, complex integration. Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 301. 
Third term Staff 

403. Advanced Applied Mathematics. Ordinary differential equations, 
elementary set and matrix theory, hyperbolic functions, elliptic integrals, 
infinite series, Fourier series. Prerequisites: Mathematics 301 and 309. 
Second term Staff 

404. Advanced Applied Mathematics. Gamma, Bessel and Legendre 
Functions, partial differential equations, vector analysis, probability and 
numerical methods, functions of a complex variable, operational calculus. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 301 and 309. 

Third term Staff 

421. Independent Study and Seminar. Selected topics in advanced 
mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. 

First or second term Staff 

422. Independent Study and Seminar. A continuation of 421. 

First or second term Staff 

Astronomy 202. Introduction to Astronomy. A non-laboratory course 
dealing with basic facts and principles of astronomy. 
By special arrangement Staff 

Engineering 101. Engineering drawing and descriptive geometry. Use of 

instruments, orthographic projections, dimensioning, sectioning and pic- 
torial drawing. Representation of points, lines, planes and curved surfaces 
with applications. 
First or second term Mr. Cramer 

Engineering 102. A continuation of Engineering 101. 
First or second term Mr. Cramer 

Engineering 203. Surveying. Plane and topographical surveying with 
field work in the use of tape, level and transit. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
112 or equivalent. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

Engineering 207. Analytic Mechanics. A continuation of Physics 208. 
Third term Mr. Cramer 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Dorothy Donald, Professor of Spanish, Head 

Edwin Pleasants, Associate Professor of Spanish 

Erika Blaas, Associate Professor of German 

Momcilo Rosic, Assistant Professor of Russian 

Arturo Serrano, Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Johann Struth, Assistant Professor of German 

Alexandra Kaminska, Instructor in French 

Antoinette Lerond, Instructor in French 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven term courses, selected with the 
aid of a departmental counselor, that covers the significant periods of 
the literature and other aspects of the spoken and written language. 
Evidence of ability to develop a given linguistic or literary subject in- 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 51 

volving research, organization and critical judgment through at least 
one independent study course. 

(b) Five related courses chosen from one or two fields with the approval 
of the adviser. 

Students are encouraged to participate in the foreign study program 
which provides for a summer, a term, or a year in a foreign country. Con- 
tacts in the past have been made with Universite Laval, Quebec; Mexico 
City College; National University of Mexico; the Sorbonne; Heidelburg; 
and Freiburg i. Br. Candidates for foreign study must be approved by the 
department and programs must be planned well in advance. 

On the basis of placement examinations, recommendations for courses 
are made to students who wish to continue a language studied in high 
school. A proficiency examination provides a means of meeting the for- 
eign language requirement for graduation. 



French 

101. Elementary. Introduction to spoken and written French. Attention 
to pronunciation with practice in using the language. Laboratory facilities 
provide authentic speech patterns. This course builds a foundation for 
reading the language. 

First or second term Staff 

102. Elementary. A continuation of 101. 

Each term Staff 

201. Intermediate. Selected readings of modern literature, with con- 
versational approach. Continued emphasis on oral and written expression, 
aided by laboratory practice. Introduction to French contributions to the 
arts and sciences, illustrated by films, slides, tapes and discs. 

Each term Staff 

202. Intermediate. A continuation of 201. 

Second or third term Staff 

299. Conversation and composition. Practice in fluent speech and correct 
writing, with discussions and oral and written reports from selected authors 
and French-language periodicals. 
First term Mile. Lerond 

301. The Novel. Background of the French novel, followed by the inter- 
pretation and analysis of outstanding modern authors such as Balzac. 
Flaubert, Proust and Gide. Use of literary recordings. Alternates with 305. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 

305. Short Story and Essay. Study of: a) the French short story as a 
literary genre, represented by Maupassant and Anatole France; b) the 
essay, introduced by Montaigne and cultivated by La Bruyere; and c) 
criticism by Sainte-Beuve. Alternates with 301. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 

306. French Theatre. A study of the genres of French classical tragedy 
and comedy. Study and analysis of the works of Corneille, Racine. Moliere 
and Voltaire. Alternates with 307. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 



52 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

307. French Theatre. Drama of the nineteenth and twentieth century 
playwrights including Hugo, Musset, Giraudoux, Camus and Sartre. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Kaminska 

308. Moliere. Reading, analysis and discussions of selected plays with 
emphasis on the classical aspects of language and style. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mile. Lerond 

319. Mediterranean Culture, 1500-1650. Aesthetic aspects of the Medi- 
terranean world as reflected in literature, architecture, painting and sculp- 
ture. Correlation of historical background. Reading from French, Italian 
and Spanish literature in the original or in translation. Collaboration with 
the art and foreign language departments. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald, Mrs. Hamilton 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of the 
instructor, of certain aspects or periods of French literature, i.e., Medieval 
literature, the "Encyclopedists," French lyrics, memoirs and letters, con- 
temporary literature. 

Each term Staff 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance 
of the instructor. 
Each term Staff 

460. Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Languages. Discussion, obser- 
vation and practice in the field of foreign language teaching. Introduction 
to phonetics and linguistics. Attention given to teaching in elementary 
grades and practice with audio-visual aids. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. See Chemistry 404, Biology 401 
and Physics 401. In such courses the department acts as consultant for 
French-language material. 
By special arrangement Staff 

German 

101. Elementary. An introduction to the German language, with em- 
phasis on pronunciation and comprehension. Laboratory practice supple- 
ments classroom instruction. A foundation for reading and writing the 
language. 

First or second term Miss Blaas, Mr. Struth 

102. Elementary. A continuation of 101. 

Second or third term Miss Blaas,. Mr. Struth 

201. Intermediate. Extensive reading of modern literature. Continued 
attention to written expression through diary, letter and essay writing; 
further practice in conversation through class and laboratory work. Ac- 
quaintance with essential aspects of German culture, through such media 
as monthly German newsreels. 

First or third term Miss Blass, Mr. Struth 

202. Intermediate. A continuation of 201. 

First or second term Miss Blaas, Mr. Struth 

202S. Intermediate Scientific. Reading and discussion of scientific texts, 
biographies of scientists and a leading German newspaper. Use of German 
scientific films, tapes and discs (from Institut fur Film und Bild) . Primarily 
for science majors. 
First or second term Miss Blaas 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 53 

299. Conversation and Composition. Concentrated training in fluent 
speech and correct writing. Practice with such material as book reviews and 
written and oral reports in the field of art and music. 
Third term Miss Blaas 

301. Introduction to the Study of German Literature. A study of the 
major works and movements in German literature from the Early Period 
to the Age of Enlightenment. Extensive use of phonograph records of the 
"literatur-archiv." Prerequisites: 201-202 or the equivalent. 

First term Miss Blaas 

302. Introduction to the Study of German Literature. A continuation of 
301 concentrating on the Classical Period through the early twentieth 
century. 

Second term Miss Blaas 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of the 
instructor, of certain aspects of German literature. Prerequisite: a 300 
course or consent of the instructor. 
Each term Miss Blaas 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance of 
the instructor. Preparation for studies in Germany. 
Each term Miss Blaas 

460. Methods of Teaching German. See French 460. 
Third term upon request Miss Blaas 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. See Chemistry 404, Biology 401 
and Physics 401. In such courses the department of German acts as con- 
sultant for German-language material. 
By special arrangement Miss Blaas 

Spanish 

101. Elementary. An introduction to Spanish as a spoken and written 
language. Regular practice in the classroom and laboratory in hearing and 
imitating current, realistic speech. Four-fold aim of speaking, comprehend- 
ing, reading and writing the language. 

First or second term Staff 

102. Elementary. A continuation of 101. 

Each term Staff 

203. Intermediate. Continued emphasis on the spoken and written 
language, aimed toward adequate oral and written expression. Readings 
from modern literature, with analysis and interpretation. Acquaintance 
with cultural aspects of Spain and Spanish America. 

Each term Staff 

204. Intermediate. A continuation of 203. 

Each term Staff 

299. Conversation and Composition. Further development of fluency in 
handling the spoken and written language. Subject matter for practice in- 
cludes literature, geography, current history and other phases of Hispanic 
civilization. Use of periodicals, records and tapes. Required of majors or 
substituted by proficiency test. 
First or third term Mr. Serrano 



54 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

305. Modern Spanish Literature. Brief studies of Spanish peninsular 
literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The first course deals 
with prose, emphasizing Perez Galdos, Generation of '98 and Ortega y 
Gasset. Alternates with 307 and 308. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

306. Modern Spanish Literature. A continuation of 305. The study of 
the Romantic movement in drama and poetry; Benavcnte, pre-civil war 
poets and contemporary poets and playwrights. Alternates with 307 and 
308. 

Second term (1692-63 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

307. Spanish American Literature. A consideration of the search for 
identity of the rising Spanish American nations through their literature. 
The first course deals with prose, emphasizing such essayists as Rodo, 
Henriquez Urena, Vasconcelos and Alfonso Reyes. Alternates with 305 
and 306. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Pleasants 

308. Spanish American Literature. A continuation of 307 dealing with 
poetry and poetic prose, from Araucana epic to contemporary poets in- 
cluding Neruda, Borges and Torres Bodet. Alternate years with 305 and 
306. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Pleasants 

315. Drama of the Golden Age. A study of selected plays of Lope de 
Vega, Calderon Tirso de Molina and Alarcon with analysis of dramatic 
structure and ideological concepts of the age. Prerequisite: 300 course. 
Alternates with 316. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Pleasants 

316. Cervantes. A study of Cervantes' masterpiece Don Quijote, in addi- 
tion to the Novelas ejemplares. Consideration of the life, character and 
milieu of the author. Prerequisite: 300 course. Alternates with 315. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

319. Mediterranean Culture, 1500-1650. See French 319. 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of the 
instructor, of certain aspects or periods of Spanish and Spanish American 
literature; i.e.;, literature before 1500, Romancero, Picaresque Novel, 
Chronicles of the Spanish Conquest, Short Story and Essay, Novels of 
the Mexican Revolution, Contemporary Hispanic Ideology. 

Each term Staff 

401. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance 
of the instructor. 
Each term Staff 

460. Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Languages. See French 460. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Donald 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. The Department of Spanish acts 
as a consultant for Spanish-language material. 
By special arrangement Staff 

Russian 

101. Elementary. Introduction to the spoken and written Russian lan- 
guage, with emphasis on the distinctive characteristics of the structure of 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 55 

the language. The laboratory affords drills in pronunciation and practice 
in listening, comprehending and speaking. It also facilitates the acquisition 
of an active and passive vocabulary and use of grammatical principles. 
First term Miss Kaminska 

102. Elementary. A continuation of 101 including simplified reading of 
Chekhov. 
Second term Miss Kaminska 

201. Intermediate. Continued emphasis on the oral and written language 
through laboratory practice. Readings from Russian authors, with audio- 
visual aids, affording a broader acquaintance with the Russian language 
and its people. 

First term Mr. Rosic 

202. Intermediate. A continuation of 201. 

Second term Mr. Rosic 

320. Individual or Group Study. Specialized study, under guidance of 
the instructor, of certain aspects of literature and other fields of Russian 
culture. 
Third term Staff 

Reading in the Field of Concentration. See Chemistry 404, Biology 401 
and Physics 401. In such courses the department acts as consultant for 
Russian-language material. 
By special arrangement Miss Kaminska 



MUSIC 

Heimo A. Loya, Professor, Head 

Elwood Ball, Assistant Professor 

PAUL Lyddon, Instructor 

Douglas Peterson, Instructor 

Grace Gawthrop Peterson. Instructor 



It is the aim of the Music Department to provide: 

1. Opportunities in performance and classwork for any student to develop 
an understanding and appreciation of music. 

2. A four-year course for students whose interest leads them to concen- 
trate in music as an end in itself or as preparation for graduate study 
and a professional career. 

3. A four-year course which will comply with state requirements in both 
music and education for students who wish to become supervisors or 
teachers of music in elementary and secondary schools. 



Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least the following courses: Music 102, 103, 
201, 202, 321, 322, and two courses in Applied Music (private lessons). 

(b) At least five related courses chosen with the approval of the adviser. 



56 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NOTE: A general major should carry, in addition to the above, Music 
203, 303, 401 and 402. 

A student concentrating in performance should carry two additional 
courses in Applied Music: Music 203, 401 and 402. 

A student preparing for certification in Music Education should carry 
311, 312 and 313 or 303 and 314, and another course in Applied Music, 
as well as the necessary courses in the Education department. 

101. Introduction to Music. This course is designed to develop an under- 
standing of music through a study of musical materials, principles of or- 
ganization and historical styles. Open to all students: those with little or 
no musical experience should enroll in Section A: prospective majors and 
those with considerable musical training, Section B. 

Each term Staff 

102. Theory of Music I. An approach to the elements of music- — 
melody, harmony, rhythm and form — as employed during the functional 
harmonic period (eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) through the de- 
velopment of skills in hearing, singing, keyboard, writing and analysis. 
Second term Mr. Lyddon 

103. Theory of Music M. A continuation of Music 102. 

Third term Mr. Lyddon 

201. Theory of Music III. Advanced Harmony. A continuation of 
Music 103. 

First term Mr. Lyddon 

202. Theory of Music IV. Counterpoint. The principles of modern coun- 
terpoint. Analysis and composition of two- and three-part inventions. 
Second term Mr. Lyddon 

203. Canon and Fugue. A continuation of Music 202. Advanced study 
in contrapuntal writing, based on the analysis of the fugues of Bach. The 
use of fugal devices in classic and modern composition. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ball 

301. Composition I. Creative work in small forms and for various 
mediums. Includes study and analysis of contemporary techniques. In- 
dividual study. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

302. Composition II. Continuation of Music 301. Individual study. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

303. Orchestration. Study of the characteristics and potential of or- 
chestral instruments, and of their combination in small groups and in the 
full orchestra. Arranging original compositions for musical groups on the 
campus. Individual study. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

311. Conducting. Principles and methods of conducting. Technique of 
the baton. Interpretive study of both choral and instrumental scores. Prac- 
tical experience in conducting musical groups on the campus. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Peterson 

312. Teaching Music in the Elementary Schools. Music fundamentals, 
teaching skills and actual teaching methods at different age levels. A 
comprehensive coverage of music requirements for prospective elementary 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 57 

teachers with special emphasis on singing and functional piano technique. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

313. Choral Techniques. Teaching and administration of vocal music in 
secondary schools. The general music program, the changing voice, in- 
structional problems and materials for vocal ensembles and operetta pro- 
duction. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Peterson 

314. Instrumental Techniques. Teaching and administration of instru- 
mental music in public schools. Techniques of group instruction, materials 
and equipment. Principles and methods of conducting school orchestras 
and bands, to include an intensive survey of the literature. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Loya 

321. History and Literature of Music I. Study of works, styles, and mu- 
sical activity from earliest times to the sixteenth century, including the 
study of the relationship of the art to contemporary, social, cultural and 
political circumstances. Emphasis on aural appreciation of style, evolution 
throughout history. Primarily for music majors. Others with the consent 
of the instructor. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Peterson 

322. History and Literature of Music II. Continuation of Music 321. 
From the sixteenth century to the present. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Peterson 

323. Twentieth Century Music. A study of the contemporary trends in 
music as manifested in the works of such composers as Stravinsky, Schoen- 
berg, Prokofieff, Hindemith, Bartok, Copeland and Barber and an evalua- 
tion of the Jazz idiom. Designed to give students a background for in- 
telligent appreciation and understanding of modern music. Prerequisite: 
101 or consent of the instructor. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Peterson 

324. Sacred Music. Music specifically related to the Protestant church. 
Major sacred works from all periods are heard and discussed. A portion of 
the term's work is devoted to a critical appraisal of the standard church 
repertory of anthems, larger choral works, organ literature and hymns. 
Provision is made in this part of the course for the student to pursue de- 
tailed studies pertinent to his major interest. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ball 

Seminars and Individual Study 

401. Seminar. Primarily for junior and senior majors in music. Areas 
of study will include topics of special interest to the student, with ex- 
tensive independent reading and required weekly reports. 

First term Staff 

402. Independent Study. Research in an area of specialization. Open 
only to students completing a major in music. 

Second or third term Staff 

Applied Music 

Private Lessons. Instruction in solo performance is offered on a uniform 
basis of one 30-minute individual lesson and one class meeting weekly, 
with a minimum of one hour's practice daily, for one-sixth credit each 



58 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



term. Music majors may elect to combine two one-sixth units (on a basis 
of two half-hour lessons and a class period per week) with a minimum of 
two hours practice daily for one-third credit each term. No credit will be 
given until the equivalent of a full course has been completed. 
Odd numbers indicate a one-sixth credit per term; even numbers, one- 
third credit. 



Music 141 


or 


142 


Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 241 


or 


242 


Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 342 






Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 442 






Organ 






Mr. Ball 


Music 145 


or 


146 


Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon, 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 245 


or 


246 


Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon, 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 346 






Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon, 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 446 






Piano 


Mr. 


Lyddon, 


Mrs. Peterson 


Music 151 


or 


152 


Voice 






Mr. Peterson 


Music 251 


or 


252 


Voice 






Mr. Peterson 


Music 352 






Voice 






Mr. Peterson 


Music 452 






Voice 






Mr. Peterson 


Music 155 


or 


156 


Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 


Music 255 


or 


256 


Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 


Music 356 






Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 


Music 456 






Orchestral Instruments 




Mr. Loya 



Musical Organizations 



264. College Choir. Registration by permission of the instructor. At- 
tendance at choral society rehearsals required (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Peterson 

265. College Choir. A continuation of 264 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Peterson 

266. College Choir. A continuation of 265 (one-hixth credit each term). 

Mr. Peterson 

261. Orchestra. A laboratory course in the theory and practice of or- 
chestral and chamber music, (one-sixth credit each term) 

• Mr. Loya 

262. Orchestra. A continuation of 261 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Loya 

263. Orchestra. A continuation of 262 (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Loya 

264a. Chorale. Limited to 16 voices. Registration by permission of the 
instructor (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Peterson 

265a. Chorale. Continuation of 264a (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Peterson 

266a. Chorale. A continuation of 265a (one-sixth credit each term). 

Mr. Peterson 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 59 

267. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Registration by permission of the in- 
structor, (one-sixth credit each term) 

Mr. Loya 

268. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. A continuation of 267 (one-sixth credit 
each term). 

Mr. Loya 

269. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. A continuation of 268 (one-sixth credit 
each term). 

Mr. Loya 
(No credit will be given until the equivalent of a full course has been 
completed.) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Samuel M. Thompson, Professor, Head 
J. Prescott Johnson, Associate Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven terms in philosophy including 
either 301, 302 or 303, 304 and two terms of individual study. 

(b) Five related courses chosen from one or two fields with the approval of 
the adviser. 

101. Introduction to Philosophy. An introduction to the general field and 
methods of philosophy, and the basic problems in the philosophy of science 
and the philosophy of man and human culture. 

Each term Mr. Thompson 

102. Introduction to Logic. A study of logical relations with special em- 
phasis upon the development of skill in the logical control and evaluation 
of thinking. 

Second and third terms Mr. Johnson 

210. Advanced Logic. Techniques of symbolic logic and problems of 
logical theory. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101. 

First term Mr. Johnson 

213. Philosophy of Religion. A study of philosophical problems raised 
by basic religious beliefs and concepts. Open without prerequisite to all 
students except freshmen. This course is also listed under the Department 
of Bible and Religion, and may be used to satisfy Bible and Religion re- 
quirements. 
Third term Mr. Thompson 

301. Greek and Medieval Philosophy. A study of the development of 
Greek and medieval philosophy, with emphasis on Plato. Aristotle, Au- 
gustine and Thomas Aquinas. Special attention will be given to the histor- 
ical roots of contemporary problems. Prerequisite: 101, or junior or senior 
standing. 

First term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Thompson 

302. Modern Philosophy. A continuation of 301, but may be taken by 
students who have not had 301. A study of the major philosophers from the 
Renaissance to the present century. Prerequisite: 101, or junior or senior 
standing. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Johnson 

303. Ethics. An analysis of basic moral concepts and a study of their 
application in personal choice and decision, and of the principal historical 
and contemporary ethical theories. Prerequisite: 101, or junior or senior 
standing. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Johnson 



60 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

304. Political Philosophy. Theories concerning the nature of the state, 
the nature of law, the authority of the state and political obligation. A 
comparison of competing political philosophies. Prerequisite: 101, or jun- 
ior or senior standing. 

Second term Mr. Thompson 

305. Contemporary Philosophy. Twentieth century philosophy, its roots 
in nineteenth century thought, and present issues in Anglo-American and 
European philosophy. Prerequisite: 301 and 302, or consent of the in- 
structor. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Johnson 

306. Oriental Philosophy. A study of the chief schools of thought of 
China and India, and their influence throughout the Orient. Prerequisite: 
301 and 302 or consent of the instructor. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Johnson 

315. Aesthetics. A study of values in literature, music, painting and 
other arts, with special attention to the relation of aesthetic experience 
and judgment to scientific and religious thought. Prerequisite: 101, or jun- 
ior or senior standing. 

First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Thompson 

316. Philosophy of Science. The nature of scientific knowledge, and de- 
velopment of modern scientific concepts and the relation of science to other 
methods of inquiry and areas of knowledge. Prerequisite: 101, or junior 
or senior standing. 

Third term Mr. Johnson 



Seminars and Individual Study 

Each philosophy major is expected to take at least two individual study 
courses during each of the junior and senior years. Other juniors and 
seniors who have satisfied the prerequisites may be admitted to these 
courses by permission of the instructor. 

401. Philosophy Seminar. A study of philosophical methods as exem- 
plified in the work of selected philosophers. Prerequisite: four courses in 
philosophy. 
First term 

405. Philosophy of Education. Theories and basic concepts of education 
in relation to general philosophical issues. Seminar or independent study. 
Prerequisites: Philosophy 301, 302. 

By special arangement 

406. Philosophy of History. A study of theories concerning the nature 
of historical knowledge and an examination of their assumptions. Seminar 
or independent study. Prerequisite: Philosophy 301, 302. 

By special arrangement 

411. Junior Independent Study. Individual reading, reports and papers 
in areas of special interest to the student. Prerequisite: four courses in 
philosophy. 

Second term 

412. Junior Independent Study. A continuation of 411. 
Third term 

421. Senior Independent Study. Continuation of Philosophy 411 and 
412, culminating normally in the preparation of a senior thesis. Prereq- 
uisite: Philosophy 412. 
Second term 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 61 

422. Senior Independent Study. A continuation of 421. Prerequisite: 421. 
Third term 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Joseph Pelisek, Assistant Professor, Acting Head 

Robert Woll, Associate Professor, Director of Athletics 

Henry Andrew, Assistant Professor 

P. O. Smith, Assistant Professor 

Margaret Jones, Instructor 

Mary Fleming, Instructor 

The Physical Education Department aims to provide opportunities for stu- 
dents to grow in an environment that is physically stimulating; socially, 
emotionally and morally beneficial. This is accomplished by providing 
activities for every interest and all ranges of ability to satisfy recreational 
needs both now and for the future under competent guidance. 

The curriculum in physical education for men and women is designed 
to prepare students for teaching physical education, health, safety, coach- 
ing athletics and intramural sports and directing recreational activities. 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental major of at least seven term courses chosen from the 
department, including the following courses: 202, 303, 305, 309, 455. 

(b) Courses totaling at least three terms in biology, consisting of Biology 
101, 102, and 201 or 305. Sufficient hours in education and psychology 
to satisfy state requirements for teachers of physical education. Con- 
sult the Education Department. 

(c) Related courses totaling at least five terms chosen from one or two 
subjects which the student is preparing to teach, after consultation 
with the adviser. 

(d) Majors in physical education are required to enroll in 12 terms of 
service classes numbered 100. 

(e) A minor in the field of physical education must complete five term 
courses including 305. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Intercollegiate competition is carried on in baseball, basketball, cross- 
country, football, golf, swimming, tennis, track and wrestling. 

College Requirement 

Freshmen and sophomores are required to complete six terms of satisfactory 
work in physical education (in courses numbered 100-190) unless excused. 
Individual exemptions from this requirement for a term at a time will be 
made by the director of the college health service for medical reasons. 
Passing a svvdmming test or receiving credit for a swimming course is a 
graduation requirement for all students. 

A maximum of six term courses in Physical Education (100-190) will 
be counted towards graduation. 

199. Principles and History of Physical Education. An introductory 
course in the fundamentals of physical education. Primarily for students 
intending to go into the field of physical education. Covers the problems 
of the field as well as the philosophy, aims and objectives of physical edu- 
cation. Includes historic development of physical education, including con- 
tributions of the various great cultures. 
Second term Mr. Pelisek 



MrnviMmiTU 11 I imhiq 



62 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

202. Teaching of Rhythmic Activities. Designed to prepare men and 
women physical education majors to teach folk, square and social dance 
in the junior and senior high school. 
Third term Miss Jones 

210. Anatomy and Physiology. A study of the structure and function of 
the human body with specific consideration to normal muscular activity. 
Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mrs. Fleming 

220. Methods of Physical Education in the Elementary School. Methods 
of teaching physical education in elementary grades with specific emphasis 
on program content. 
First or second term Miss Jones 

300. Men's — Methods of Coaching and Management of Interscholastic 
Sports. Lectures and demonstrations in the fundamentals of football, bas- 
ketball, track and wrestling. Management of athletics, team play in inter- 
scholastic sports and treatment of injuries is stressed. Intended to aid 
students who plan to coach in high schools. 

First term Staff 

301. Men's — Methods of Coaching and Management of Interscholastic 
Sports. A continuation of 300. 

Second term Staff 

302. Men's — Methods of Coaching and Management of Interscholastic 
Sports. A continuation of 301. 

Third term Staff 

303. Methods and Analysis of Teaching Physical Education Activities. 
Principles and techniques of teaching physical education activities with 
particular emphasis on the analysis of individual and team sports. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Staff 

304. Methods and Analysis of Teaching Physical Education Activities. 
A continuation of 303. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Staff 

305. Organization and Administration of Physical Education in the Sec- 
ondary Schools. The philosophy of physical education and organization of 
a high school physical education program. For teachers, supervisors and 
administrators of physical education and athletics in the public schools. 
First term Staff 

307. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. For physical education 
majors who plan to enter the coaching profession. Cause, prevention and 
cure of injuries most common to competitive sports. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 
First term Staff 

309. Correctives and Kinesiology. A study of the human body with re- 
spect to injuries most likely to occur in physical education classes and 
interscholastic athletics. Analysis of human motion, mechanically and 
anatomically, to include practical body mechanics, corrective exercising 
and postural training. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mrs. Fleming 

315. Mental and Physical Health in Family Living. See Sociology 315. 

400. Independent Study. Individual research problems under guidance 
of the instructor. 
By special arrangement Staff 

455. Methods and Curriculum of Health Education. For those responsi- 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



63 



ble in any way for health instruction in the public school. Special con- 
sideration given to the selection of material and methods of instruction in 
establishing primary health habits. Emphasis will be given to drawing up 
a course of study which will be in line with the Illinois Health and Physical 
Education law. 
Third term Staff 

Physical Education Service Classes 

These classes are designed to meet the college requirement in Physical 
Education. Instruction is given in fundamental skills, techniques and par- 
ticipation in individual sports and team games. 



100. 


Freshman Football 


126. 


Advanced Bowling 


101. 


Varsity Football 


127. 


Freshman Tennis 


102. 


Freshman Basketball 


128. 


Varsity Tennis 


103. 


Varsity Basketball 


129. 


Volleyball 


104. 


Freshman Track 


130. 


Beginning Swimming 


105. 


Varsity Track 


131. 


Softball 


106. 


Basketball 


132. 


Intermediate Swimming 


107. 


Touch Football 


133. 


Freshman Golf 


108. 


Archery 


134. 


Varsity Golf 


109. 


Wrestling 


135. 


Advanced Swimming 


110. 


Handball 


136. 


Badminton 


111. 


Physical Fitness 


137. 


Trampoline 


112. 


Folk and Square Dance 


138. 


Social Dance 


113. 


Freshman Swimming 


139. 


Modern Dance 


114. 


Varsity Swimming 


140. 


Basic Movements 


115. 


Beginning Golf 


141. 


Tumbling 


116. 


Freshman Baseball 


142. 


Soccer 


117. 


Varsity Baseball 


143. 


Hockey 


118. 


Skating 


144. 


Advanced Physical Fitness 


119. 


Beginning Tennis 


160. 


Advanced Golf 


120, 


Advanced Tennis 


165. 


Life Saving 


121. 


Freshman Cross Country 


181. 


Basic Rifle 


122. 


Varsity Cross Country 


182. 


Advanced Rifle 


123. 


Freshman Wrestling 


190. 


Water Safety Instructors' 


124. 


Varsity Wrestling 




Course 


125. 


Beginning Bowling 








PHYSICS 





Lyle W. Finley, Professor, Head 

Paul Cramer, Associate Professor 

James H. McAllister, Associate Professor (leave of absence, 1962-63) 

Kenneth S. Robinson, Associate Professor 



Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental major of at least seven term courses numbered 103 or 
higher and including Physics 308 and at least two other courses num- 
bered above 300. 

(b) Five related courses chosen from one or two departments and ap- 
proved by the physics department. 

101. General Physics. Fundamentals of mechanics, heat and sound. 
Four class meetings and one laboratory period per week. Corequisite: 



64 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Mathematics 151. 

First term Mr. Finley 

1 01 e. General Physics. Fundamentals of mechanics, heat and sound. 
Four class meetings and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: 
three years of high school mathematics or concurrent registration in college 
mathematics. 
First term Mr. Robinson 

102. General Physics. Fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. A 
continuation of Physics 101. Corequisite: Mathematics 152. 

Second term Mr. Finley 

102e. General Physics. Fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. A 
continuation of Physics lOle. 
Second term Mr. Robinson 

103. General Physics. Fundamentals of optics and atomic physics. A 
continuation of Physics 101, 102. Prerequisite: Physics 102, Mathematics 
152. (Students who have finished 102e may be admitted to Physics 103 
with the consent of the instructor provided they have adequate mathe- 
matical background. These students will be required to perform extra 
work.) 

Third term Mr. Finley 

207. Analytic Mechanics. Statics, coplanar forces in space, centroids, 
center of gravity, friction, moment of inertia, introduction to dynamics. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 152, Physics 103. 

First term Mr. Cramer 

208. Analytic Mechanics. Dynamics, rectilinear motion, curvilinear mo- 
tion and rotation, work, energy and power, dynamics of rotating bodies, 
plane motion, impulse, momentum and impact. Prerequisites: Physics 207, 
Mathematics 251. 

Second term Mr. Robinson 

209. Electronics. Electron dynamics, emission, space charge, vacuum 
tubes and circuit analysis, amplifiers, voltage multiplication, feedback, 
noise, oscillators. Four class meetings and one laboratory period each week. 
Prerequisite: Physics 102 or 102e; Physics 103 recommended. 

First term Mr. Robinson 

301. Light. Geometric and physical optics. Reflection, refraction, op- 
tical instruments, interference, diffraction, dispersion, polarization, laws 
of radiation, atomic and molecular spectra. Prerequisites: Physics 103, 
Mathematics 251. 
Third term Mr. Finley 

303. Electricity and Magnetism. An intermediate course in principles 
of electricity and magnetism and electrical measurements. Four class meet- 
ings and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Physics 103, 
Mathematics 254, 309. 

Second term Mr. Robinson 

304. Electricity and Magnetism. A continuation of the study of the 
principles of electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: Physics 303. 
Third term Mr. Robinson 

305. Thermodynamics. An introductory course in the principles of ther- 
modynamics. Prerequisites: Physics 103, Mathematics 251. 

First term Mr. Finley 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 65 

308. Atomic Physics. Properties of fundamental particles, atomic energy 
levels, excitation and emission phenomena, X-ray spectra, periodic ar- 
rangement of atoms, radioactivity, isotopes, nuclear structures, transmuta- 
tions. Prerequisites: Physics 103, Mathematics 251. 

Second term Mr. Finley 

309. Vector Analysis. See Mathematics 309. 

310. Electronics. An intermediate course in electronics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 209, Mathematics 254. 

Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) 

311. Theoretical Physics. Various topics including the special theory 
of relativity and an introduction to quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 208, Mathematics 254. 

Third term Mr. Robinson 

401. Seminar. Special topics in physics. Prerequisite: six courses in 
physics. 
By special arrangement Staff 

403. Advanced Applied Mathematics. See Mathematics 403. 

404. Advanced Applied Mathematics. See Mathematics 404. 

410. Independent Study. Special topics in advanced theoretical or ex- 
perimental physics. Prerequisite: seven courses in physics. 
First term Staff 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Harold J. Ralston, Professor, Head 
Thomas J. Erwin, Assistant Professor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven term courses in psychology in- 
cluding 212, 221, 222 and either 311 or 401, together with necessary 
preliminary courses in biology and mathematics. Work in physics in- 
cluding sound and light is strongly recommended. 

(b) Five courses chosen from one or two related fields with the approval 
of the adviser. Suggested fields include biology, sociology, philosophy 
and mathematics. 

212. Elementary Statistics. (See Mathematics 212). 

221. General Psychology. Introductory study of the fundamental types 
of experience and behavior. Open to upperclassmen and third- term fresh- 
men. Prerequisite to all other courses in psychology. 

First or third term Staff 

222. Experimental Method. Introduction to methodology in psychology. 
Statistics, experimental design and theory construction are presented, dis- 
cussed and implemented in the laboratory. 

Second term Mr. Erwin 

223. Abnormal Psychology. Personality disorders and maladjustments, 
with discussion of the clinical approach to psychotherapy. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 



66 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

225. Developmental Psychology. Principles of development through 
childhood and adolescence stressing maturation, concept formation, learn- 
ing, the concept of readiness and developmental schedules. 
First term Mr. Erwin 

301. Perception. The psychology of sensation and perception. Com- 
parative and physiological data in sensation. Laboratory. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Staff 

302. Motivation. A survey of how motivation acts to produce behavior. 
Includes discussion of primary and secondary drive, hierarchy, and emo- 
tional theories of motivation. Laboratory. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Erwin 

303. Abilities. A study of human abilities and their measurement and 
the nature and factors involved in individual differences. Laboratory. 
Third term (1963-64 and alternate years) Staff 

304. Social Psychology. The relation of personality to society and cul- 
ture. Attention is given to the psychological aspects of human conflict and 
mass behavior. 

Second term (1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Ralston 

305. Learning. The process and principles of learning. Includes experi- 
mental findings, theories and applications in the educational field. Lab- 
oratory. 

Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Erwin 

306. Cognition. A study of the more complex phenomena in behavior, 
such as concept formation, symbolic processes, thought and language, de- 
cision making and creative processes. Laboratory. 

Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Erwin 

309. Problems in Personality. A study of the history and systems of 
psychology as they relate to the nature of human personality. 
By special arrangement Staff 

311. Seminar. Assigned readings, oral and written reports and group 
discussion on pertinent problems in psychology. Open to majors or those 
who have had five courses in the field. 
By special arrangement Staff 

401. Independent Study. Directed individual study on selected topics 
in psychology. Weekly written reports and conferences. Required of stu- 
dents majoring in psychology. 

By special arrangement Staff 

402. Independent Study. A continuation of 401. 

By special arrangement Staff 

403. Advanced Experimental Psychology. A detailed survey of the data, 
theories and methods of psychology. Basic areas of the curriculum are 
integrated to attempt to present a unified view of psychology. The lab- 
oratory is devoted to original research or repetition of previous experi- 
mentation of questionable validity. 

By special arrangement Staff 

404. Advanced Experimental Psychology. A continuation of 403. 

By special arrangement Staff 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 67 

SOCIOLOGY 

Madge Stewart Sanmann, Professor, Head 
Irene Kistler, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) One sociology course at the sophomore level, Sociology 301, and 401 
or 402. 

(b) Courses selected from those numbered 300 or above. 
Anthropology 201. Introduction to Anthropology. Brief review of pre- 
historic race, language and culture, economic and social institutions, re- 
ligion, art, attitudes and values of native peoples. 

First term 

Sociology 203. Societies Around the World. A comprehensive, systematic 
study of the chief types of societies, ranging from the primitive to the ad- 
vanced industrial, in the major habitats of the world. One society is com- 
pared with another as a whole and specifically in terms of the origin of 
the people, their physical environment, economic system, government, re- 
ligion, family life, social organization, structure, ideology and socio-cultural 
change. 
Second term 

206. The Family. A study of the family as a social institution: its forms, 
functions, development, organization, factors of disorganization and trends. 
First term 

301. Introduction to Sociology. Introductory analysis and description of 
the structure and dynamics of human society. Application of scientific 
methods to the observation and analysis of composition, social norms, group 
behavior, social stratification, social institutions and social change. 
First term 

302. Social Problems. Introductory survey of sociological aspects of im- 
portant modern social problems. Emphasis on social interrelationship and 
cultural differences involved in their genesis, significance and ameliora- 
tion or prevention. Library reading and special reports. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 301 or consent of instructor. 

Second term 

304. Home and Family Life. Analysis of psychological and sociological 
aspects of home and family life. Consideration of necessary early adjust- 
ments to significant interpersonal changes basic in the achievement of 
companionship and emotional interdependence. The development of eco- 
nomic insight, planning and management basic in the economic contribu- 
tion to family cohesion. Emphasis on individual fulfillment and family 
unity. Prerequisite: Sociology 206 or consent of instructor. 

Second term 

305. Population in Transition in the United States: Demography. A 

study of the composition, distribution, movements and cultural patterns of 
population and ethnic groups in the United States and its various regions. 
Attention given to scientific analysis of problems and trends. 
First term 

306. Social Stratification. System of social ranking with emphasis on 
class structure of the United States; power, prestige and privilege as re- 
lated to class differences; the culture and styles of life in different classes, 



I 



68 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

status as determinant of personality, interaction and development; effect 
of social change and mobility. Prerequisite: Sociology 301. 
Second term 

308. Sociology of the Community. Nature, structure and functions of 
various types of communities; their characteristics, group relations and 
social institutions (home, school, church, government, health, wealth, lei- 
sure); modern trends molding rural and urban life. Attention is given 
to methods of modern redevelopment. Prerequisite: Sociology 301, 302, 
and/or 305. 
Third term (1962-63 and alternate years) 

310. Crime and Delinquency. The nature, extent and explanations of 
crime and delinquency; historical development of criminological thoughts, 
modern approaches and methods; a review of the theories of treatment 
and evaluation of programs for prevention and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 301. 
Third term 

312. Racial Tensions and Cultural Conflicts. A survey of racial and 
cultural conflicts in contemporary civilization; theories of race and culture; 
relations between racial and cultural groups in specific situations in stra- 
tegic areas of the world; the status of racial, religious and ethnic minorities 
in the United States; organizations, programs and social movements de- 
signed to improve intergroup relationships. Prerequisite: Sociology 201 
and 302. 
Second term 

314. Introduction to Social Work. A survey of the field of social work. 
Historical development of social work concepts and philosophy; the present 
system and organization of social welfare and administration; the role of 
social work in contemporary society. Prerequisite: Sociology 206, 301, 302. 
Third term 

315. Mental and Physical Health in Family Living. The mental hygiene 
approach to tensions, conflicts and crises in the development of family 
living. Fundamental principles of human nutrition. Selection of diet to 
meet nutritional needs of children (infancy through adolescence), adults 
and elderly members of the family. Prerequisite: Sociology 206 or consent 
of instructor. 

Third term 

316. Social Change. The implications of science and technology for 
social change; effects of innovation upon social relationships; theories of 
social change, social effects of major inventions; a cross-cultural analysis 
of the processes of "industrialism." Prerequisite: Sociology 301 and 305. 
Third term 

401. Seminar. Reading and research designed to give a background in 
historical development, information concerning leaders, techniques and 
procedures, principles, projects and practices in original field research. 
Oral and written work required. Open to sociology majors or with the 
consent of the instructor. 

By special arrangement 

402. Independent Study. Introduction into an individual problem in a 
subject of interest to the student. Practice in library research, the use of 
specific research techniques and procedures and field research. Oral and 
written work is required. Open to sociology majors or with the consent of 
the instructor. 

Second term 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 69 

404. Studies in American Civilization. (See also English 404 and History 
404). An integral historical, social and cultural interpretation of life, 
thought and institutions in the United States from 1870 to the present. 
Conducted on the seminar plan. Prerequisite: open to sociology majors; 
seniors, or with consent of the instructor and Sociology 401 or 402. English 
or history majors consult their advisers. 

Third term 

405. Contemporary Society: Russia. Description and analysis of social, 
economic and political life against a background of geography, population 
and development; values and ideology; family and education; communica- 
tion and public opinion; background place in modern world. Open only to 
seniors. 

(1962-63 and alternate years) 

406. Contemporary Society: Cultures of the Far East. The peoples, cul- 
tures, economy, religious life, government organization, family life, social 
organization, ideology and socio-cultural change and development. Open 
only to seniors. 

(1962-63 and alternate years) 

407. Contemporary Society: South America. A survey of the cultures of 
South America emphasizing the types and variety of societies, their char- 
acteristic features and changes that have taken place. Attention is given to 
contemporary social, economic and political problems. Open only to seniors. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) 

408. Contemporary Society: Africa. A survey of the cultures of Africa 
and patterns of behavior associated with them. Selected aspects of social 
and cultural change; consequences of commercialization of land and labor; 
consequences of Western education; emergent forms of stratification and 
race relations. Open only to seniors. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) 

409. Contemporary Society: The Near East. Survey of one or more ma- 
jor areas in terms of regional developments and historical and modern social 
problems. Open only to seniors. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) 



SPEECH 

Jean Liedman, Professor, Head 

Parker Zellers, Assistant Professor (leave of absence, 1962-63) 

Paul Gray, Instructor 

Brooks McNamara, Instructor 

Field of Concentration 

(a) A departmental unit of at least seven courses in addition to Speech 
101, including 210, 221, 303, 316, 351 and 403. 

(b) At least five related courses. 

(c) Performance in dramatic production and/or intercollegiate forensics. 

101. Fundamentals of Oral Communication. Designed to help the stu- 
dent acquire knowledge and skill in selecting and evaluating speech ma- 
terials, organizing and phrasing ideas, developing effective control of voice 
and action and evaluating public speeches. 
Each term Staff 



70 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

102. Advanced Public Speaking. A continuation of Speech 101. Prin- 
ciples of persuasion, speaking for special occasions and parliamentary law. 
Third term Mr. Gray 

204. Radio Speech. The history and development of radio and television 
and their influence on society. Prerequisite: Speech 102 and sophomore 
standing or consent of the instructor. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. Gray 

215. Debate Seminar. Open only to those who have won a place on the 
intercollegiate debate squad. Fractional credit. 
By special arrangement Mr. Gray 

221. Interpretative Reading. Theory and skill of reading prose and 
poetry aloud. 
First term Mr. Gray 

303. Discussion and Debate. The theory of argumentation and the appli- 
cation of it to various forms of discussion and debate. A study of evidence, 
reasoning, fallacies and briefing. Directed discussions, symposiums, panel 
discussions and team debating. Prerequisite: Speech 102, or consent of 
the instructor. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Gray 

315. Oration Seminar. Open only to those who have won a place on the 
intercollegiate debate squad. 
By special arrangement Mr. Gray 

322. Advanced Interpretative Reading. Reading of advanced prose and 
poetry, dramatic poetry, classical literature and modern drama. Prereq- 
uisite: Speech 221. 
Second term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. Gray 

351. Scientific Bases of Speech. An introduction to voice science and 
phonetics. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Liedman 

352. Introduction to Speech Correction. A study of the process of normal 
speech development and the causes and treatment of various speech dis- 
orders. 

(1963-64 and alternate years) Miss Liedman 

401. Independent Study. An individual program of reading and research 
under the guidance of the instructor. 
By special arrangement Staff 

403. Senior Seminar. Reading and discussion designed to co-ordinate the 
fields of public address, theatre arts and speech science. 
By special arrangement Staff 

410. Independent Study. A continuation of 401. 
By special arrangement Staff 

Theatre Arts 

135. Freshman Workshop. A laboratory course in theatre practice, 
preparatory to membership in Crimson Masque (dramatic organization). 
Students learn the rudiments of theatre practice under the supervision of 
Crimson Masque personnel and the faculty director. Production will con- 
sist of two or three one-act plays, directed by the students. No fee is 
charged for this course and no credit is given, but if a student does satis- 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 71 

factory work he may become a member of Crimson Masque and register 

for a course in dramatics. 

First term Mr. McNamara 

136. Freshman Workshop. A continuation of 135. 

Second term Mr. McNamara 

137. Freshman Workshop. A continuation of 136. 

Third term Mr. McNamara 

210. Introduction to Theatre Arts. A reading course designed to introduce 
the beginning student to basic theatre theory and practice through investiga- 
tion of selected writings in dramatic theory and criticism, acting, directing 
and the technical fields of stagecraft and scenic design. 
Second term Mr. McNamara 

215. Stagecraft and Scenic Design. A textbook study of the technical 
and design elements of the dramatic production, combined with practical 
exercises in drafting, scenic design, stage lighting, costuming and makeup. 
A final project allows all students in the course to create a detailed and 
complete set of plans and designs for a stage production. The work of 
particularly gifted students may be incorporated into productions of the 
Monmouth College Theatre. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. McNamara 

235. Dramatics. Open to students who have satisfactorily passed the pro- 
bationary requirements of Freshman Workshop and others who may be ad- 
mitted by special permission of faculty director and Crimson Masque 
officers. Participation in the production of plays for public performance: 
acting, work on stage, property, lighting, publicity, makeup, costume and 
house committees. Fractional credit. 

First term Mr. McNamara 

236. Dramatics. A continuation of 235. 

Second term Mr. McNamara 

237. Dramatics. A continuation of 236. 

Third term Mr. McNamara 

311. Development of the Theatre. A survey of the growth and develop- 
ment of the theatre from prehistoric times to the present. Emphasis on the 
development of the physical theatre and history of acting and directing. 
Collateral reading and reporting on representative plays insures the in- 
tegration of all material with courses in dramatic literature offered by the 
department of English. 
(1963-64 and alternate years) Mr. McNamara 

316. Principles Of Directing. A course designed to introduce the begin- 
ning student of directing to the practical and theoretical aspects of his art. 
Readings from the great directors and writers on stage direction are com- 
bined with exercises in play analysis, movement, blocking and other tools 
of the stage director in order to prepare the student for more advanced 
work in the field of directing. 
First term (1962-63 and alternate years) Mr. McNaj7iara 

335. Dramatics. Continuation of Dramatics 237. Fractional credit. 
First term Mr. McNamara 

336. Dramatics. A continuation of 335. 

Second term Mr. McNamara 

337. Dramatics. A continuation of 336. 

Third term Mr. McNamara 



72 

435. Dramatics. 

First term 

436. Dramatics. 

Second term 

437. Dramatics. 

Third term 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 
Continuation of Dramatics 337. 



A continuation of 435. 



A continuation of 436. 



Fractional credit. 

Mr. McNamara 



Mr. McNamara 



Mr. McNamara 






445. Directing. Production of a play as a laboratory performance or for 
the public. Prerequisite: 316. Fractional credit. 
By special arrangement Mr. McNamara 



■ 



Divisions of the Faculty 

For purposes of administration the departments of the faculty are 
grouped into three divisions, as follows: 

I. Humanities 
Art 

Bible and Religion 
Classical Languages 
English 
History 
Modern Foreign Languages 

French 

German 

Russian 

Spanish 
Music 
Philosophy 
Speech 

II. Social Sciences 

Economics and Business Administration 

Education 

Government 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Sociology 

III. Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Geology 
Mathematics 
Physics 

THE FACULTY 

Gibson, Robert W. 1952* 

President. A.B., Muskingum College, 1918; B.D., Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, 1921; D.D., Westminster College, 1934; LL.D., Sterling College, 
1951; Litt.D., Maryville College, 1957; Ped.D., Bradley University, 1959; 
Ohio State University, summer, 1918. 

Professors Emeriti 

James Harper Grier, President Emeritus, Claremont, California. 

Emma Gibson, Professor of Latin, Emerita, Glendale, California. 

William S. Haldeman, Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, San Diego. 
California. 

Thomas Hoffman Hamilton, Professor of Appreciation of Art, Emeritus. 
Monmouth, Illinois. 

Mary Inez Hogue, Registrar Emerita, Claremont, California. 

Francis Mitchell McClenahan, Professor of Geology, Emeritus, Tucson. 
Arizona. 

* Joined Monmouth College Faculty 

73 



74 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Mary E. McCoy, Librarian Emerita, Monmouth, Illinois. 
Frank W. Phillips, Professor of Education, Emeritus, La Mesa, California. 
Edna Browning Riggs, Associate Professor of Music, Emerita, Monmouth, 
Illinois. 

Officers of Instruction 

Aduddell, Robert 1961 

Instructor in Economics and Business Administration. B.A., Drake Uni- 
versity, 1955; Northwestern University, 1958-1961. 
Allison, David C. 1962 

Assistant Professor of Biology. B.S., University of Illinois, 1956; 
M.S., ibid., 1957; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1960. 
Andrew, Henry W. 1962 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.A., State College of Iowa, 
1953; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1960. 
Arrison, John D. 1962 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. B.S., Michigan State University, 
1956; M.S., ibid., 1958. 
Ball, Elwood H. 1953 

Assistant Professor of Music and Dean of Men. B.Mus., University of 
Michigan, 1947; M.Mus., ibid., 1952; summer sessions, ibid., 1947-49; Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1950-1953; ibid., Teaching Fellow, 1951-1953. 
Blaas, Erika 1956 

Associate Professor of German. Ph.D., University of Innsbruck, Austria, 
1949; Fulbright Fellow, University of Wisconsin, 1950-1951; Karls Univer- 
sitat, Prague, 1943-1944; Universitat Graz, Austria, 1945-1947. 
Blum, Harlow B. 1959 

Assistant Professor of Art. B.F.A., University of Illinois, 1956; M.A., 
Michigan State University, 1959; Syracuse University, summer, 1962. 
Boswell, Grace H. 1962 

Assistant Professor of English. A.B., LaGrange College, 1949; M.A., 
University of Georgia, 1952; Alumni Foundation Fellow, ibid., 1954-55. 
Boswell, Rupert D., Jr. 1962 

Professor of Mathematics. B.A., Mississippi State University, 1950; 
M.S., ibid., 1951; Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1957. 
Bowman, Milton L 1959 

Assistant Professor of Biology. B.S., University of Louisville, 1951; 
M.A., University of Missouri, 1954; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1959. 
Bradford, Anne M. 1946 

Librarian and Associate Professor. A.B., Monmouth College, 1935; B.S. 
in L.S., University of Illinois, 1948; University of Iowa, summer, 1930. 
Buchholz, Robert H. 1950 

Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., Fort Hays State College, 1949; 
M.S., Kansas State College, 1950; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1957; 
Associated Colleges of the Midwest program at Argonne National Labora- 
tory, 1962-63. 
Robert C. Cirese 1962 

Instructor in Economics and Business Administration. B.A., De Paul 
University, 1960; M.A., University of Illinois, 1962. 
Cleland, Eva H. 1923; 1951 

Professor of English. A.B., Washington State College, 1919; A.M., ibid., 
1925; University of California, summer, 1928; University of Michigan, sum- 
mer, 1932; University of Chicago, summer, 1933; Cambridge University, 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 75 

summer, 1936; Columbia University, summer, 1953, 1958; University of 

California, summer, 1959. 

Cramer, Fern W. 1946, 1957 

Instructor in Mathematics. B.S.E., University of Arkansas, 1931; Uni- 
versity of Illinois, summers, 1927-29. (Part-time) 
Cramer, Paul 1946 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Engineering. A.B., Illinois 
College, 1925; M.A., University of Illinois, 1926; University of Chicago, 
summers, 1932-33. 
G r ow, Mary B. 1946 

assistant Professor of History. A.B., Monmouth College, 1941; Ph.M., 
University of Wisconsin, 1945; ibid., summer, 1942. 
Oavenport, Francis Garvin 1947 

Professor of History and Director, Summer Session. A.B., Syracuse 
University, 1927; A.M., ibid., 1928; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1936; 
Fellow, University of Illinois, 1928-1930; Fellow, Vanderbilt University, 
1936; Social Science Research Council Fellow, 1941-1942. 
Davenport, Katye L. 1949 

Instructor in Education. A.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 
1930; A.M., Peabody College, 1937; Mississippi Program for the Improve- 
ment of Instruction, 1933-1938. (Part-time) 
Donald, Dorothy 1932 

Professor of Spanish. A.B., Indiana University, 1921; A.M., ibid., 1929; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1941; Middlebury College, summer, 1923; 
Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid, 1929-1930; Universidad National 
de Mexico, summer, 1935; Universite Laval, Quebec, summers, 1952, 1958; 
Universidad Internacional Santander, summer, 1959. 
Erwin, Thomas J. 1961 

Assistant Professor of Psychology. A.B., Missouri Valley College, 1950; 
M.A., University of Missouri, 1956; University of Kansas City, 1953, 1956; 
University of Missouri, 1959-1960. 

Finley, Lyle W. 1931 

Professor of Physics. A.B., Monmouth College, 1924; A.M., University 
of Illinois, 1925; University of Chicago, summer, 1927; University of Colo- 
rado, summer, 1929; University of Illinois, summer, 1935; Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1939-1940; ibid., summers, 1936-37; University of Minnesota, summer, 
1953; Georgetown University, summer, 1959. 
Fleming, Mary H. 1962 

Instructor in Physical Education. B.S., MacMurray College, 1946. 
(Part-time) 
Fox, Bernice L. 1947 

Associate Professor of Classics. A.B., Kentucky Wesleyan College, 1932; 
Graduate Assistantship, University of Kentucky, 1933-1936; M.A.. ibid.. 
1934; Research Fellowship, Ohio State University, 1936-1941. 
Gamer, Car! W. 1946 

Professor of Political Science. Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1922; S.T.B., 
Boston University, 1925; M.A., University of Illinois, 1937; Ph.D., ibid., 
1940; Pioneer University World Cruise, 1926-27; Institute of International 
Studies, Geneva, summer, 1927; Stutz Kirchenrechtliches Institut, Univer- 
sity of Berlin, 1938-39. 
Gray, Carolyn L 1962 

Instructor in English. B.A., Marietta College, 1959; M.A., University of 
Illinois, 1960. 



76 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Gray, Paul H. 1961 

Instructor in Speech. A.B., Marietta College, 1959; A.M., University 
of Illinois, 1960. 

Hamilton, Martha M. 1937 

Assistant Professor of Art. B.A., University of North Carolina, 1923; 
M.Ed., Harvard University, 1932; Harvard Graduate School for Education, 
1923-1925; University of Chicago, summers, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937; Cornell 
University, summer, 1959. 

Herbsleb, James R. 1956 

Professor of Economics and Business Administration. B.A., College of 
the Pacific, 1947; M.A., Temple University, 1949; LL.B., School of Law, 
Temple University, 1949; Bryn Mawr College, 1956; Case Institute of 
Technology, summer, 1957; Indiana University, summer, 1959; University of 
Chicago, summer, 1960. 

Johnson, J. Prescott 1962 

Associate Professor of Philosophy. A.B., Kansas City College, 1943; 
A.B., Kansas State College, 1946; M.S., ibid., 1948; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University, 1959. 

Jones, Margaret 1962 

Instructor in Physical Education. B.A., Monmouth College, 1954. 

Kaminska, Alexandra 1960 

Instructor in French. M.A., University of Lwow, Poland, 1938; Univer- 
sity of Cracow, Poland, 1939; Diplome de traductrice, University of Geneva, 
Switzerland, 1959; University of Chicago, summers, 1960, 1961. 

Kennedy, Adele 1946 

Associate Professor of English. B.A., University of Iowa, 1927; M.A., 
ibid., 1928; University of Iowa, summer, 1930; Columbia University, sum- 
mer, 1937; University of Iowa, summer, 1947; University of Colorado, sum- 
mer, 1960; University of Iowa, summer, 1961. 

Ketterer, John J. 1953 

Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., Dickinson College, 1943; Ph.D., 
New York University, 1953. 

Kistler, Irene 1953 

Instructor in Sociology. B.S., University of Illinois, 1928; University of 
Illinois, 1945; State University of Iowa and Iowa State University, sum- 
mer, 1960. (Part-time) 

Lai, Che-Oi 1962 

Librarian and Instructor in Library Science. B.S., Chu Hai College, 
Hong Kong, 1957; M.A., Peabody College, 1962. 

Leever, Richard S. 1961 

Associate Professor of English. B.A., Illinois College, 1947; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1949; Ed.M., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., ibid., 1961. 

Lerond, Antoinette 1962 

Instructor in French. Baccalaureat, Universite de Nancy, 1946; Certifi- 
cat d' Aptitude Pedagogique, Universite de Nancy, 1962. 

Liedman, Jean 1936 

Professor of Speech and Dean of Women. A.B., Monmouth College, 
1927; A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1935; Ph.D., ibid., 1949; University of 
Pittsburgh, summers, 1929-30; University of Colorado, summer, 1936; Uni- 
versity of Southern California, summer, 1947; Syracuse University, sum- 
mer, 1956; University of Denver, summer, 1960. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 77 

Link, Florence I. 1961 

Reference-Documents Librarian and Instructor in Library Science. 
B.A., Jamestown College, 1927; B.L.S., University of Minnesota, 1949. 
Loya, Heimo 1936 

Professor of Music. B.Mus., Chicago Musical College, 1936; A.B., Mon- 
mouth College, 1938; M.A., University of Iowa, 1941; violin with Max 
Fischel; composition and orchestration with Louis Gruenberg; composition 
with Wesley La Violette; counterpoint with Gustav Dunkelberg; conducting 
with Rudolph Ganz and Christian Lyngby; Chicago Musical College, sum- 
mer, 1949; University of Iowa, summers, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1955, 1956; 
second semester, 1956-57; LTniversity of Colorado, summer, 1959. 
Lyddon, Paul W. 1960 

Instructor in Music. B.Mus., Eastman School of Music, University of 
Rochester, 1954; M.Mus., University of Illinois, 1955; Graduate School 
Fellowship, University of Illinois, 1954-55; The Catholic University of 
America, summer, 1959; Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester, 
summer, 1961. 

Manley, Harry S. 1961 

Academic Dean and Professor of Government. A.B., Westminster Col- 
lege, 1942; LL.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1945; Ph.D., Duke Univer- 
sity, 1955. 
McAllister, James H. 1957 

Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics. A.B., Peru State 
Teachers College, 1938; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1950; University of 
Iowa, summer, 1955; University of Kansas, summers, 1957, 1959, 1960: 
Michigan College of Mining and Technology, summer, 1961; Associated 
Colleges of the Midwest program at Argonne National Laboratory, 1962-63. 
McNamara, Brooks 1961 

Instructor in Speech. A.B., Knox College, 1959; M.A., State Univer- 
sity of Iowa, 1961. 
Meyer, Robert B. 1962 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A.B., Oberlin College, 1957; American 
Cyanamid Scholar, Oberlin College, 1956-1957; Ph.D., James B. Duke and 
American Cyanamid Fellow, Duke University, 1960. 
Morrill, Allen C. 1953 

Professor of English. A.B., Brown University, 1926; M.A., ibid., 1928: 
M.A., Harvard University, 1932; Ph.D., ibid., 1937. 

Nicholas, Albert 1948 

Professor of Education. A.B., Carthage College, 1922; A.M., University 
of Illinois, 1933; ibid., summers, 1931-33; University of Colorado, sum- 
mer, 1941. 
Palmquist, John C. 1962 

Assistant Professor of Geology. A.B., Augustana College, 1956: M.S., 
State University of Iowa, 1958; Ph.D., ibid., 1961. 
Pelisek, Joseph J. 1957 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. A.B., Cornell College, 1948: 
M.A., New Mexico Highlands University, 1951; Iowa State University. 
1956; ibid., summers, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1962. 
Peterson, Douglas R. 1962 

Instructor in Music. B.A., Grinnell College, 1950; B.M.E., Florida State 
University, 1951; M.A., University of Iowa, 1954; Workshop in Choral Art. 
San Diego State College, summers, 1955-58; Royal Conservatory of Music, 
Toronto, summer, 1959; University of Iowa, 1960-62. 



78 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Peterson, Grace Gawthrop 1922 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Monmouth College Department of 
Music, 1922 (Part-time). 

Pleasants, Edwin H. 1961 

Associate Professor of Spanish. B.A., University of Virginia, 1942; 
M.A., Louisiana State University, 1950; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 
1959; University of Puerto Rico, summer, 1946; University of San Carlos, 
Guatemala City, summer, 1949. 

Ralston, Harold J. 1946 

Professor of Classics. A.B., Tarkio College, 1922; A.M., ibid., 1923; 
Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1927; M.A., Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1928; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1930; University of Pittsburgh, 1926- 
1927; University of Chicago, summer, 1938; Northwestern University, sum- 
mer, 1957; University of Michigan, summers, 1959, 1961, 1962. 

Rawlings, Floyd 1957 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. B.A., University of Redlands, 1941; 
M.S., Oregon State College, 1948; Ph.D., University of Washington, 1951; 
University of North Carolina, summer, 1957; Oak Ridge Institute of 
Nuclear Studies, summer, 1962. 

Robinson, Kenneth S. 1962 

Associate Professor of Physics. B.A., Oakland City College, 1933; M.S., 
Indiana University, 1948. 

Rosic, Momcilo 1959 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. A.B., Military Academy, 
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, 1937; A.M., ibid., 1937; Ph.D., University of Bonn, 
1950. (Part-time) 

Sanmann, Madge S. 1949 

Professor of Sociology. A.B., Monmouth College, 1921; B.S., University 
of Illinois, 1923; A.M., Northwestern University, 1940; Ph.D., ibid., 1948; 
ibid., summers, 1941, 1942, 1943. 

Serrano, Arturo 1961 

Assistant Professor of Spanish. B.A., Instituto Cardenal Cisneros, 
Madrid, 1930; Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, Universidad Central, 
Madrid, 1932-1936; Diploma of Official Translator in Spanish and English, 
Ministry of National Education, Colombia; Universidad Nacional de 
Colombia, 1959-1961; Universidad Nacional Pedogogica Feminina, Colom- 
bia, 1959-1961. 

Shawver, Benjamin T. 1946 

Professor of Chemistry and Education. B.S., Parsons College, 1932; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1950; Ed.D., ibid., 1952. 

Shoemaker, Homer L. 1961 

Instructor in Accounting. B.S., University of Denver, 1950. Certified 
Public Accountant, 1961. (Part-time) 

Smith, P. 0. 1962 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Springfield College, 

1950; M.A., Columbia University Teachers College, 1951; Pennsylvania 
State University, summers, 1953, 1954, 1955. 

Speel, Charles J., II 1951 

Professor of Bible and Religion, John Young Chair of Bible. A.B., 
Brown University, 1939; S.T.B., Harvard University, 1949; S.T.M., ibid., 
1950; Ph.D., ibid., 1956. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 79 

Spitz, Douglas R. 1957 

Assistant Professor of History. A.B., Swarthmore College, 1949; M.A., 
University of Nebraska, 1955; ibid., 1955-57, 1960-61. 

Struth, Johann F. 1962 

Assistant Professor of German. Abitur degree, Realgymnasium, Mainz, 
Germany, 1947; A.B., Jacksonville State Teachers College, 1956; Gutenberg 
University, Mainz, 1948-52; University of Texas, 1959. 

Thiessen, Garrett W. 1930 

Pressly Professor of Chemistry. A.B., Cornell College, 1924; M.S., 
University of Iowa, 1925; Ph.D., ibid., 1927; Associated Colleges of the 
Midwest program at Argonne National Laboratory, 1960-61. 

Thompson, Samuel M. 1926 

Alumni Professor of Philosophy. A.B., Monmcuth College, 1924; A.M., 
Princeton University, 1925; Ph.D., ibid., 1931. 

Weeks, J. Stafford 1959 

Assistant Professor of Bible and Religion and College Chaplain. A.B.. 
Juniata College, 1942; B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1945; Ph.D.. 
University of Chicago, 1962; Gettysburg Theological Seminary, 1945-1947; 
University of Chicago, 1948-1953. 

Wills, Donald L 1951 

Associate Professor of Geology. B.S., University of Illinois, 1949; M.S., 
ibid., 1951; University of Indiana, summer. 1959; Sabbatical leave, 1962-63; 
leave of absence, 1963-64. 

Wingo, Charles E. 1958 

Professor of Education. A.B., Furman University, 1924; M.A., Cornell 
University, 1937; University of Chicago, summers, 1939-40; Purdue Uni- 
versity, summer, 1946; University of Colorado, summer, 1953. 

Woll, Robert G. 1935 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Monmouth College, 
1935; M.S., University of Illinois, 1941; University of Illinois, summers, 
1937, 1938, 1940; Western Illinois University, summer, 1961. 

Zellers, Parker R. 1956 

Assistant Professor of Speech. B.A., Emerson College, 1950; M.A., 
Indiana University, 1956. Leave of absence, 1961-63. 

Beste, Margaret C. 1949 

Registrar. A.B., Wheaton College, 1940. 



Officers of Administration 

Robert W. Gibson, A.B., B.D., D.D., LL.D., Litt.D., Ped.D President 

Harry S. Manley, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D Academic Dean 

Jean Esther Liedman, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Dean of Women 

Elwood H. Bail, B.Mus., M.Mus Dean of Men 

Mrs. H. A. Loya Secretary to the President 

W. E. Smith, A.B., M.S Business Manager 

Donald Kettering, A.B Assistant to the Business Manager 

David D. Fleming, A.B Director of Development and Public Relations 

L Victor Atchison, A.B Director of Alumni Relations 

L. Del Bowker, A.B., LL.B Director of Student Aid and Placement 

John S. Niblock, A.B Director of Publicity and Publications 

Glen D. Rankin, A.B Director of Admissions 

John R. Corporon, A.B Admissions Counselor 

Donald Ingerson, A.B., M.A Admissions Counselor 

Robert H. Riggle, A.B Admissions Counselor 

Ned Whitesell, A.B., M.A Admissions Counselor 

Miss Margaret Beste, A.B Registrar 

Miss Dorothy E. Whaling Assistant to the Registrar 

Mrs. John Bradford, A.B., B.S. in L.S Librarian 

Miss Che-Oi (Grace) Lai, B.A., M.A Library Assistant 

Miss Florence I. Link, A.B., B.L.S Reference-Documents Librarian 

James Ebersole, M.D Medical Director 

James Marshall, M.D Medical Director 

Mrs. John Holland, R.N College Nurse 

Miss Gertrude Lewis, R.N College Nurse 

Paul Bunn, A.B., M.A Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Maude Cook Director of Internal Maintenance 

ASumni Association Board of Directors 

William H. Woods, President Mrs. Harold Hubbard 

N. Barr Miller, Vice President Leonard Gibb 

Mrs. Paul Mcllvain, Secretary Roland Wherry, M.D. 

Dean L. Robb Neal A. Sands 

Mrs. James R. Speer Clarence P. Patterson 

Leroy Pierce James G. Manor, M.D. 

Mrs. Eva H. Cleland Mrs. Lowell Barr 

Frederick G. Ramback Miss Glendora Shaver 

Leonard Twomey Channing Pratt 

L. Victor Atchison, Executive Secretary 

80 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 81 

Monmouth College Board of Directors 

Robert W. Gibson, President, Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois 
Dr. Roger J. Fritz, Chairman of the Board; Secretary, John Deere Founda- 
tion, Moline, Illinois 

Chalmer Spiker, Treasurer of the College; President, National Bank of 
Monmouth, Monmouth, Illinois 

Mrs. Frederick H. Lauder, Secretary of the Board, Monmouth, Illinois 

Robert Acheson, District Commercial Manager, Illinois Bell Telephone 
Company, Western Springs, Illinois 

Ralph C. Allen, Chairman of the Board, R. C. Allen Business Machines, 
Inc., Grand Rapids, Michigan 

John Bailar, Jr., Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois 

Paul Barnes, Attorney; Foley, Sammond and Lardner, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Donald Beste, Attorney; Miller, Westervelt and Johnson, Peoria, Illinois 

Merton Bowden, President, Monmouth Trust and Savings Bank, Monmouth. 
Illinois 

Richard Braun, Pastor, Jennings United Presbyterian Church, Jennings, Mo. 

Robert Clendenin, Attorney; Clendenin and Burkhard, Monmouth, Illinois 

Ralph Douglass, Professor Emeritus of Art, University of New Mexico, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Dwight Eckerman, Executive Director, Economic Club of New York, New 
York, New York 

Frederick Foster, Chief Chemist, Polymer Chemicals Division, W. R. Grace 
and Company, Verona, New Jersey 

Robert Hendren, Executive Vice President, Chicago Bridge and Iron Com- 
pany, Oak Brook, Illinois 

Patricia Hofstetter, Attorney; Hofstetter and Hofstetter, Whittier, Calif. 

Richard Holmes, Purchasing Agent, Pressed Steel Tank Company, Wau- 
watosa, Wis. 

Gordon Jackson, Dean, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Russell M. Jensen, M.D., Physician and Surgeon, Monmouth, Illinois 

Robert Kempes, Youth Secretary, Board of Christian Education, U.P. 
Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 

John J. Kritzer, Attorney, Monmouth, Illinois 

James Lexvold, Industrialist, St. Charles, 111. 

Ralph Liddle, Geologist, Fort Worth, Texas 

Dan Gold Long, Pastor, Broadway Presbyterian Church, Rock Island, Illinois 

James Marshall, M.D., Physician, Monmouth, Illinois 

Robert Meneilly, Pastor, Village United Presbyterian Church, Prairie Vil- 
lage, Kansas 

James Munn, Cashier, People's State Bank, Westhope, North Dakota 

Cyrus Osborn, Executive Vice President, General Motors Corporation, 
Detroit, Michigan 

Kermit Petersen, Pastor, First United Presbyterian Church, Galesburg, 
Illinois 

Glen Pickens, Vice President, The Phoenix Insurance Co., West Hartford, 
Conn. 



82 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

Ivory Quinby, Partner, Quinby-McCoy Insurance Agency, Monmouth, Illinois 

John Service, Sales Manager, Spreader Works, Deere and Company, Moline, 
Illinois 

Kenneth G. Sturtevant, Chairman, Board of Directors, Borden Company, 
Rock Island, Illinois 

Donald G. Whiteman, Second Vice President, Northern Trust Company, 
LaGrange, Illinois 

H. Donald Winbigler, Dean of Students, Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif. 

W. McClean Work, First Vice President, Ketchum, Incorporated, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 



Monmouth College Board of Directors 
Committees for 1962-63 



Academic Affairs: 
John Bailar, Chairman 
Donald Beste 
Patricia Hofstetter 
Gordon Jackson 
Kermit Petersen 

Business Affairs: 
John Service, Chairman 
Russell Jensen 
John Kritzer 
Ivory Quinby 

Finance: 
Donald Whiteman, Chairman 
Ralph C. Allen 
Merton Bowden 
Robert Clendenin 
Robert Hendren 
James Munn 
Cyrus Osborn 
Chalmer Spiker 



Nominations and Degrees: 
Dwight Eckerman, Chairman 
Frederick Foster 
Dan Gold Long 
Glen Pickens 

Student Affairs: 
Robert Acheson, Chairman 
Ralph Douglass 
Richard Holmes 
Robert Kempes 
James Marshall 
Robert Meneilly 
Donald Winbigler 

Development: 
McClean Work, Chairman 
Paul Barnes 
Richard Braun 
James Lexvold 
Ralph Liddle 
Kenneth Sturtevant 



Executive Policy Committee 

Robert W. Gibson, Roger J. Fritz, Robert Acheson, John Bailar, 
Dwight Eckerman, John Service, Donald Whiteman, McClean Work. 



Scholarships, Prizes, 
and Endowments 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. The Addleman Scholarship 

2. The Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Barnes Scholarship 

3. The Sarah Holmes Bigger Scholarship 

4. The Biggsville Scholarship 

5. The Bohart Scholarship 

6. The N. H. and Isabelle Brown Scholarship 

7. The George H. Brush Scholarship 

8. The J. Boyd Campbell Scholarships 

9. Special Anniversary Scholarship, Mrs. Jennie Logue Campbell 

10. The Hattie Boyd Campbell Scholarship 

11. The Josephine Carnahan Scholarship 

12. The John Carothers Scholarships 

13. The Class of 1901 Scholarship 

14. The Crimson Masque Scholarship 

15. The C. G. Denison- William M. Story Scholarship 

16. The John S. and Mary Louise Diffenbaugh Scholarship 

17. The Lois Diffenbaugh Scholarship 

18. The Thomas McBride Bysart Scholarship 

19. The Elder Ministerial and Christian Work Scholarship 

20. The Bella B. Elliott Scholarship 

21. The Elmira Scholarship 

22. The John Q. Findley Scholarship 

23. The First Washington Scholarship 

24. The Founders Scholarship 

25. The Frew Scholarships 

26. The John Bunyan Galloway Scholarship 

27. The Garrity Scholarship 

28. The Gibson Scholarship 

29. Special Anniversary Scholarship, Professor Russell Graham 

30. The Ellen Denman Green and John Walker Green Scholarship 

31. The John Charles Hanna Scholarship 

32. The Hanover Scholarship 

33. The Harmony Memorial Scholarship 

34. The Nettie Firoved Herdman Scholarship 

35. The Janet Shaw Hayes Scholarship 

36. The Mabel Hinmann Scholarship 

37. The Hume Scholarship 

38. The Andrew Johnston Scholarship 

83 



84 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

39. The Johnston Scholarship 

40. The Elizabeth M. Keller Scholarship 

41. The Emma Brownlee Kilgore Scholarship 

42. The Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Kilpatrick Scholarship 

43. The Jane Kinkaid Scholarship 

44. The Mattie Kinkaid Scholarship 

45. The John Barnes Kritzer Scholarship 

46. The Lafferty Scholarships 

47. The Margaret Lord Music Scholarship 

48. The Olive J. Lowry Scholarship 

49. The M. M. Maynard Memorial Scholarship 

50. The Kathryn Arbella McCaughan Scholarship 

51. The Mary Cooke McConnell Memorial Scholarship 

52. The Homer McKay Scholarship 

53. Special Anniversary Scholarship, Mrs. Minnie McDill McMichael 

54. The Nash Scholarships 

55. The Mildred Steele Nearing Scholarships 

56. The Norwood Scholarship 

57. The La Verne Noyes Scholarship 

58. The Adam Oliver Scholarship 

59. The Robert Y. Park Scholarship 

60. The Luella Olive Parshall Scholarship 

61. The Margaret Pollack Scholarship 

62. The Margaret White Potter Memorial Scholarship 

63. The Prugh Scholarship 

64. The Luther Emerson Robinson Scholarship 

65. The Prudence Margaret Schenk Scholarship 

66. The Marion B. Sexton Scholarship 

67. The Shields Scholarships 

68. The Smith Hamill Scholarship 

69. The Somonauk Scholarship 

70. The Spring Hill Scholarship 

71. The St. Clair Scholarship 

72. The Stronghurst Scholarship 

73. The Nannie J. J. Taylor Scholarship 

74. The J. B. Taylor Scholarship 

75. The Esther M. Thompson Scholarship Fund 

76. The Martha Thompson Scholarships 

77. The Henry A. Todd Scholarship 

78. The J. L. Van Gundy Scholarship 

79. The Adaline Wilkin Waddell Scholarship 

80. The Martha Wallace Scholarship 

81. The J. F. Watson Scholarship 

82. The White Scholarship 

83. The Eli B. and Harriet B. Williams Fund 

84. The Woods Scholarships 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 85 

85. The Margaret N. Wordon Scholarship 

86. The Margaret N. Wordon Scholarship 

87. The John Wright Scholarship 

88. The Xenia Scholarship 

MONMOUTH COMMUNITY AWARDS 

Axline Drug Stores Award 

Exchange Club Award 

Ford Hopkins Award 

Formfit Award 

Jessie McMillan Whiteman Award 

Little York Award 

Lions Club Award 

Monmouth Savings and Loan Association Award 

Monmouth Trust and Savings Award 

National Bank of Monmouth Award 

Park 'N Eat Restaurant Award 

Turnbull Award 

Wirtz Book Company Award 

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Women's General Missionary Society of the United Presbyterian 

Church Scholarship 
The Synodical Scholarships 
The McCullough Scholarship 
The "M" Club Scholarship 
The Graduate "M" Club Scholarship 
The Peg Stonerook Brinker Scholarship 
The Moore Scholarship 
The Robert Ludwigsen Memorial Award 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 

Among the awards offered each year for excellence in various lines of 
activity are the following: 

The Waid Prizes. Six prizes are offered for biographical reading as 
a means of cultivating interest in biography among college students. Three 
prizes of $25.00, $15.00 and $10.00 are offered to freshmen. Three similar 
prizes are available to members of the three upper classes. These prizes 
were endowed by Dan Everett Waid '87. 

Forensic Emblem. This medal is presented by the College and the 
Forensic League to those who have represented the college in inter- 
collegiate debate or oratory. 

Mary Porter Phelps Prize. A prize of $50.00 is awarded each year to 
the student who, in the judgment of the faculty, has manifested superiority 
in three points: scholarship, thrift and economy, and the development of 
character. Only those who have completed at least two years' work in 
Monmouth College are eligible for this prize. 



86 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

The William B. McKinley Prizes in English. In 1925 Senator William 
B. McKinley of Illinois, endowed two prizes of $50.00 each to encourage 
individual study and research in advanced work in English. The prizes 
are awarded each year to students who offer the best theses upon specially 
designed subjects. 

Sigma Tau Delta Freshman Prizes. Rho Alpha Chapter of Sigma Tau 
Delta offers each year three prizes on Commencement Day to the fresh- 
men writing the best compositions in verse or prose. Entries must be 
prepared especially for this contest. 

Dan Everett and Eva Clark Waid Prize. This prize of $100.00 is 
endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Waid of New York, and is awarded by the 
faculty on the basis of all-around excellence and development. 

The Blair Award, provided by Dr. and Mrs. Charles P. Blair, for a 
student who is interested in the field of Latin. 

The Bernice L. Fox Latin Prize. This $200.00 annual award, given by 
an anonymous donor, is made to a Latin student "whose progress is 
worthy of recognition." Miss Fox, associate professor of classical languages, 
will select recipients of the award. 

LIBRARY ENDOWMENTS 

1. The John A. and Margaret J. Elliott Library of Religious Education. 

2. The John Lawrence Teare Memorial Library Fund 

3. The Kappa Kappa Gamma Memorial Fund. 

BUSINESS OFFICE ENDOWMENTS 

The Addleman Fund. 

ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIPS 

1. Pressly Professorship of Natural Science, endowed by W. P. Pressly of 
Illinois in 1886. 

2. Alumni Professorship of Philosophy, endowed by alumni of the college 
in 1881. 

3. John Young Chair of Bible, endowed by the United Presbyterian Board 
of Education. 

KILLOUGH LECTURE FUND 

Endowed by the Hon. W. W. Stetson of Auburn, Maine, to bring speakers 
to the college campus. 

MEMORIAL FUNDS 

Current memorial funds honoring former students and faculty-members 
include those for John Acheson, Dr. Hugh R. Beveridge, Harold Blair, 
Dean J. S. Cleland, Eleanor Gaddis Davidson, Donald Ralph Douglass, 
Mrs. E. A. Fetherstone, A. Y. Graham, Susan Harr, Paul Lohner, 
Robert Ludwigson, Clyde E. Matson, Marie Meloy, David Brainerd 
Moore, Dr. C. A. Owen, Richard V. Owen, M.D., Edna Browning Riggs, 
Henry Smith, Dr. Hugh B. Speer, T. Eleanor Wright. Others are the 
Ahlenius, Leonard, Matchett and Soule memorial funds. 



Commencement Honors 
and Degrees Conferred 

June 6, 1960 
HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Divinity 

The Rev. Dan Gold Long, A.B., B.D., Rock Island, Illinois 
The Rev. John M. Wilson, '27, A.B., B.D., Columbus, Ohio 

Doctor of Science 

W. Malcolm Reid, '32, M.S., Ph.D., Athens, Georgia 

Doctor of Pedagogy 

Eugene Youngert, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Melbourne Beach, Florida 

GRADUATING CLASS 

Bachelor of Arts — Honors Magna Cum Laude 

Karen Louise Hutchison 
Anita Louise Slebos 
Robert Emanuel Gamer 

Honors Cum Laude 

Momoko Doi 
Charles Leo Rassieur 
Carolyn Jean Davis 
Barbara Ann Divinsky 
Judith Ann Stafford 
David B. McConnell 
Judith Lind Reinsberg 
Jean Ellsworth Gantner 



Bachelor of Arts 

Nancy Eva Acheson Janet Jean Bourne 

Bruce Adrian Anderson David Allan Bowers 

Richard Lee Anderson John Samuel Brewer 

Lewis Beal Arnold Fred Leroy Brundage 

Roberta Christine Baer Susan Elizabeth Buck 

Janette Sommers Bain Dennis Charles Buda 

Patricia Ann Baird Mary Jane Bullard 

Rebecca Comstock Barr Sally Diane Charvat 

Charles Gilbert Bell Thomas Gordon Cheetham 

David Paul Bergstrom Nancy Georgetta Classon 

87 



88 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



Helen V. Connors 
Gretchen Marie Cook 
Robert Lee Cooper 
Glenna Jean Craig 
Zoltan Csavas 
Donn Homer Denniston 
George Dwight Dieckman 
Dale Jonathan Doan 
Arlene Mary Dresmal 
Mary Sue Ensminger 
Robert William Foens 
Frederick Harold Frantz 
Thomas Blair Frazier 
Jeanne Althea Gittings 
Jack James Glotfelty 
Dean Arthur Graves 
Ralph B. Griffith 
Ruth Melinda Hall 
Milford Scott Hansen 
Willard Linus Harlan 
Donald Raymond Hellison 
William Irving Herriott 
Charles Conrad Hild 
Marvin Eugene Hottel 
Lawrence Raymond Huber 
Won Moo Hurh 
Judith Louise Irelan 
George William Johnson 
Samuel Clark Jones 
Janet Cleghorn Kelley 
Carol Yvonne Kemmerer 
Lawrence Lee Kuhn 
Judith Virginia Lamb 
Audrey Diane Larson 
Nancy Carolyn Lee 
Richard Arthur Lefort 
Charles Edward Link 
Peter Raleigh Lipe 
Paul L. Lohner 
Janet Faith Long 
Carol Ann Macari 
John Peter Maclver 
Leon Stanbridge Martin, Jr. 
William Thornhill McBride 
William Warren McKelvey 
Jean Anne McRae 
Janet Kay Miller 
Raymond Lee Miller 
Carol Ann Bryden Moore 
Louise E. Mount 



Kenneth Dale Mueller 
Bruce Donald Nehmer 
Floyd Kenneth Nelson 
James Warren Nelson 
John Arthur Nunnikhoven 
Ronald James O'Brien 
Kathryn Frances Oliver 
Kenneth Wyverne Painter 
John Melvin Penney 
Marilyn Jean Painter Peters 
Alvin Thurston Peterson 
Walter Hermann Pfaeffle 
Robert George Reinsberg 
Galen Arthur Renwick 
William Duane Rhodenbaugh 
Ralph Lee Riggs 
Alice Margaret Robbins 
John Henry Sand 
Warren Allen Sanders 
Donald David Sands 
Richard Warren Sauerman 
Joan Barbara Schilthuis 
Henry John Schmidt 
Martha L. Mitchell Schmidt 
Barbara Sue Sears 
Adin Earl Slaughter 
George Russell Slaughter 
Maureen Clare Smiley 
Gail Urvie Nissen Smith 
Margaret Elizabeth Smith 
Mary Ann Smith 
Roger Enos Smith 
Floyd Porter Sours 
Allan Graham Sprout 
Jack Bogue Stankrauff 
Joseph Edward Suffield 
Karen Sundberg 
Susan Elizabeth Thompson 
Ann Therese Toal 
Janice Anne Tueckes 
Nancy Jeanne Van Natta 
John Henry Wagenknecht 
Raymond Willard Walters 
Edward Carl Wentland 
Richard Piatt Wherry 
Patricia Ann White 
Gary Dean Willhardt 
Gary L. Willman 
Donald Frederick Wirth 
Eldridge T. Yogi 



MEN WOMEN TOTAL 

Number of Bachelor's degrees conferred 78 53 131 

Bachelor's Degrees conferred to date 2673 2303 4976 



Candidates for Honors and Degrees 

June 5, 1961 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bonzelle Berenice Ahlenius 
Max Eugene Akerman 
Warren John Allen 
Amy Frances Amsbury 
Gerner Anderson 
Paul Hilding Arnstrom 
Scott Atherton 
Joseph A. Babinsky 
Carol Charlene Baldwin 
Robert Tryon Berendt 
Harry Ray Billups 
Richard Lowell Bivens 
Lila Ellen Keleher Blum 
Roger Allen Boekenhauer 
Thomas William Bollman 
Carl Anders Borine 
Margaret Claire Bozarth 
Donald Drake Brannan 
Glenn Arnold Brooks 
Mary Love Brown 
Paul Lewis Brown 
Janet Davidson Brownlee 
Neal Robert Bullington 
C. Marvin Burke 
James Reid Calhoun 
Thomas Martin Calhoun 
Alan Malcolm Campbell 
Terry Eugene Carrell 
Donald Wayne Chamberlin 
Barbara Sue Clark 
Egbert Edward Clark, Jr. 
Richard Hale Coe 
Barbara Jean Coleman 
Janet Elizabeth Connelly 
Joan Carole Conner 
David Robert Couch 
Kenneth Arthur Cox 
Richard William Crockett 
Barbara Jane Ditch 
Karen Louise Domer 
Richard Alden Dorn 
Rosalie Faye Easdale 
Darrell Willis Edson 
Robert Eugene Effland 
Paul Robert Ellefsen 
Donald Elliott 



Robert Hicks Feiertag 

Thomas Harold Feiertag 

Don Eugene Filbrun 

Robert L. Fleming 

Paul Stevenson Ford 

Elaine Laurie Gately 

James Lyle Gibson 

Robert Ross Gillogly 

Carl William Goff 

Lesley Glennis Griffin 

Pamela Jeanne Grimm 

David Allen Grummitt 

Ancil Robert Guilinger 

Claire Raymond Hagg 

Wilbert Eugene Hare, Jr. 

Anne Eckley Haynes 

Gloria Ann Heaton 

Jane Elizabeth Hill 

James Charles Hornaday 

Dennis Lee Hoy 

James Bruce Hughbanks 

Susan Dorothy Hunt 

Ronald S. Ihrig 

Gary Lane Johnson 

Robert Dennis Jornlin 

Jean Oesterle Kelly 

Ronald Lee Kenney 

Linda Lee Killey 

Gaylan Whitley King 

James Robert Klusendorf 

Robert Dean Kniss 

John Edson Kofoed 

Lance James Kohn 

Doris Eileen Kuehn 

Dennis John Lachel 

Charles Raymond Landstrom 

Gary Lee Larson 

Timothy G. Lee 

David Wesley Levine 

Oriville Dale Liesman 

Vira Lukasz 

Ronald Theodore Lundal 

Judith Ann MacLean 

Mary Jayne Rezner Manlove 

Mary Margaret Mason 

Shirley Katharine Matchett 



89 



90 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



Susan Ann Mathews 
Thomas Fisher Matthews 
Frederic Harry McDavitt 
Ellin McDougall 
Lynn Annette McGaan 
Lynn Orwig McKeown 
Clair Franklin McRoberts, Jr. 
Gilbert Kent Meloy 
William Ward Merry 
Ronald Ralph Milnes 
Richard Wesley Montgomery 
Paul Kenneth Moye 
Allen Stado Munneke 
Kendall Edward Munson 
Naomoto Nabeshima 
Beverly Jean Nelson 
Ronald Edwin Noton 
Lynwood Terry Oggel 
Lucille Schelling Owen 
Gerald Anthony Parsons 
Robert Floyd Patterson, Jr. 
Loretta Jane Pawley 
Linda Sue Perrine 
Elizabeth A. Petefish 
Homer Eugene Phillips 
John William Phillips 
Charles Glen Pogue 
Nelson Thomas Potter, Jr. 
Suzanne Prescott 
Louis Lester Pronga 
Kenneth Allen Rager 
John Wayne Reasner 



Karin Luise Richter 
Dennis O'Donnell Rineberg 
Sarah Margaret Roehm 
Henry Rogers, Jr. 
Norma Sheets Rosenbalm 
Carole Jean Rowland 
David Harry Russell 
Robert L. Singer 
Debra Dorothy Sippel 
Gladys Marie Slebos 
Dwight Elza Smith 
Linda Soliday 
Charles George Stewart 
Lynda Mae Stewart 
Joyce M. Biddle Switzer 
Sandor Laszlo Szatmari 
Gilbert Kurt Tauck 
Donald John Thompson 
George William Thoresen 
Richard Lee Tornquist 
James Dean Van Horn, Jr. 
Peter Dorian Vecchi 
Carolyn Hull Wallem 
Richard David Wallem 
Paul Lawrence White 
Stanley Allen Wilson 
Janet Lee Wissmiller 
Barbara Jean Woll 
Christine E. Work 
Larry Lealan Yeoman 
Gordon Kay Young 






Students for the Academic Year 

SENIORS 
1960-61 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Ahlenius, Bonzelle Berenice Bloomington, Illinois 

Akerman, Max Eugene Dixon, Illinois 

Amsbury, Amy Frances Bettendorf , Iowa 

Anderson, Gerner DeKalb, Illinois 

Babinsky, Joseph Anthony Kenmore, New York 

Baldwin, Carol Charlene Biggsville, Illinois 

Berendt, Robert Tryon Lombard, Illinois 

Bivens, Richard Lowell Carthage, Illinois 

Boekenhauer, Roger Allen Waterman, Illinois 

Borine, Carl Anders DeKalb, Illinois 

Bozarth, Margaret Claire Berwyn, Illinois 

Brown, Paul Lewis Paullins, Iowa 

Chamberlin, Donald Wayne Monmouth, Illinois 

Clark, Barbara Sue Des Plaines, Illinois 

Connelly, Janet Elizabeth Joliet, Illinois 

Conner, Joan Carole Galesburg, Illinois 

Couch, David Robert Redondo Beach, California 

Ditch, Barbara Jane Monmouth, Illinois 

Domer, Karen Louise LeClaire, Iowa 

Easdale, Rosalie Faye Coulterville, Illinois 

Edson, Darrell Willis Osco, Illinois 

Feiertag, Robert Hicks Marengo, Illinois 

Filbrun, Don Eugene Springfield, Illinois 

Fleming, Robert Lawrence Chicago, Illinois 

Ford, Paul Stevenson Monmouth, Illinois 

Gately, Elaine Laurie Chicago, Illinois 

Gibson, James Lyle Aledo, Illinois 

Gillogly, Robert Ross Savanna, Illinois 

Griffin, Lesley Glennis Port Washington, New York 

Guilinger, Ancil Robert Monmouth, Illinois 

Hare, Wilbert Eugene, Jr Mendota, Illinois 

Harr, Karen Allene Rochelle, Illinois 

Hill, Jane Elizabeth Newton, Iowa 

Hughbanks, James Bruce Prairie City, Illinois 

Hunt, Susan Dorothy DeKalb, Illinois 

Johnson, Gary Lane Aledo, Illinois 

Jornlin, Robert Dennis Earlville, Illinois 

Kelly, Jean Oesterle University City, Missouri 

Kenney, Ronald Lee Viola, Illinois 

Killey, Linda Lee Monmouth. Illinois 

Klusendorf , James Robert LaGrange. Illinois 

91 



92 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Kohn, Lance James Kenmore, New York 

Lachel, Dennis John Tenafly, New Jersey 

Landstrom, Charles Raymond Ottawa, Illinois 

Larson, Gary Lee Fulton, Illinois 

Levine, David Wesley Monmouth, Illinois 

Lundal, Ronald Theodore Glenview, Illinois 

Maclean, Judith Ann St. Louis, Missouri 

Manlove, Mary Jayne Rezner Davenport, Iowa 

Mason, Mary Margaret Chicago, Illinois 

Matchett, Shirley Katherine Denver, Colorado 

Mathews, Susan Ann St. Louis, Missouri 

McDougall, Ellin Goshen, Indiana 

McGaan, Lynn Annette Altona, Illinois 

McKeown, Lynn Orwig Monmouth, Illinois 

McRoberts, Clair Franklin, Jr. Milan, Illinois 

Meloy, Gilbert Kent .Earlville, Illinois 

Merry, William Ward Monmouth, Illinois 

Milnes, Donald Ralph Crete, Illinois 

Moye, Paul Kenneth Streator, Illinois 

Munson, Kendall Edward Monmouth, Illinois 

Nabeshima, Naomato Kanagawa-Ken, Japan 

Nelson, Beverly Jean Alexis, Illinois 

Owen, Lucille Schelling Monmouth, Illinois 

Parsons, Gerald Anthony Winnetka, Illinois 

Perrine, Linda Sue Bushnell, Illinois 

Petefish, Elizabeth Ann Virginia, Illinois 

Pogue, Charles Glen Media, Illinois 

Prescott, Suzanne Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Reasner, John Wayne Northfield, Illinois 

Richter, Karin Luise Park Ridge, Illinois 

Roehm, Sarah Margaret Eureka, Illinois 

Rogers, Henry, Jr Marietta, Illinois 

Rossen, Richard Bruce Chicago, Illinois 

Rowland, Carole Jean Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

Singer, Robert Louis St. Louis, Missouri 

Sippel, Debra Dorothy Chicago, Illinois 

Slebos, Gladys Marie Chicago, Illinois 

Soliday, Linda River Forest, Illinois 

Stewart, Charles George Pekin, Illinois 

Stohl, Gustive Samuel Monmouth, Illinois 

Switzer, Joyce Marie Biddle Seaton, Illinois 

Szatmari, Sandor Laszlo Mako, Hungary 

Thompson, Donald John Oak Park, Illinois 

Tornquist, Richard Lee North Henderson, Illinois 

Van Horn, James Dean, Jr Earlville, Illinois 

Wallem, Carolyn Jane Hull Hinsdale, Illinois 

Wallem, Richard David Ottawa, Illinois 

White, Paul Lawrence Galva, Illinois 

Wissmiller, Janet Lee Chicago, Illinois 

Woll, Barbara Jean Monmouth, Illinois 

Work, Christine Ellen Kirkwood, Illinois 

Young, Gordon Kay Ellisville, Illinois 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 93 

JUNIORS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Aberlin, Fred Anthony Grayslake, Illinois 

Adam, Frank III Clayton, Missouri 

Allaman, John Robert Monmouth, Illinois 

Allen, Warren John Morning Sun, Iowa 

Amann, Paul Clarence Kenmore, New York 

Anderson, Carol Ann Prairie Village, Kansas 

Anderson, Florence Ann Buffalo, New York 

Anderson, Neil Peter Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Ardell, Robert James Marengo, Illinois 

Armstrong, Marjorie Ann Elizabeth, Illinois 

Arnstrom, Paul Hilding Monmouth, Illinois 

Bain, Aubrey Edward, Jr Massapequa, New York 

Batek, Noreen Camille Park Ridge, Illinois 

Best, Robert Lee McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania 

Billups, Harry Ray Monmouth, Illinois 

Bjorling, Helen Altona, Illinois 

Blum, Lila Ellen Keleher Monmouth, Illinois 

Bollman, Thomas William Monmouth, Illinois 

Brannan, Donald Drake Monmouth, Illinois 

Briggerman, Julia Ann Peoria, Illinois 

Brooks, Glenn Arnold Monmouth, Illinois 

Brown, Mary Jocelyn Love Monmouth, Illinois 

Brown, Sonja Dawn Aledo, Illinois 

Brownlee, Janet Davidson Evans City, Pennsylvania 

Bruington, William Elmer Galesburg, Illinois 

Buffo, Gail Jeanette Des Plaines, Illinois 

Calhoun, James Reid Alexis, Illinois 

Calhoun, Thomas Martin Monmouth, Illinois 

Campbell, Alan Malcolm Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania 

Candor, Larry Thomas Cameron, Illinois 

Carlson, Raymond Arthur Media, Illinois 

Carroll, George Deeks, Jr Orland Park, Illinois 

Cave, Yolanda Ceballos Mexico City, Mexico 

Clark, Egbert Edward, Jr Galesburg, Illinois 

Coleman, Barbara Jean Elmhurst, Illinois 

Cook, Karl Emerson Monmouth, Illinois 

Cox, Kenneth Arthur Brookfleld, Illinois 

Craft, Betty Jean Harvey, Illinois 

Crockett, Richard William Monmouth, Illinois 

Davis, Carol Ann Chicago, Illinois 

Davis, Thomas Scott Palatine, Illinois 

DeForest, Richard Loren Mokena, Illinois 

DeGroot, William Lee Wyoming, Illinois 

Dorn, Richard Alden St. Louis, Missouri 

Downs, Sandra Scott Evanston, Illinois 

Effland, Robert Eugene Stronghurst, Illinois 

Ellefsen, Paul Robert Chicago, Illinois 

Elliott, Ardith Marie Woodhull, Illinois 

Elliott, Donald Lee Monmouth, Illinois 

Faust, Dennis Merritt Moline, Illinois 

Fink, Donna May Des Plaines, Illinois 

Fisher, Colleen Yvonne Monmouth, Illinois 



94 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Flanagan, Stephen Ray Berwick, Illinois 

Foreman, Sandra Kay Prairie Village, Kansas 

Frazier, Tamara Wilson Sturgis, Michigan 

Galloway, Elizabeth Bonnie Park Ridge, Illinois 

Glenn, Nancy Ann Elmwood, Illinois 

Goff, Carl William Little York, Illinois 

Gould, George Gary Elmhurst, Illinois 

Greer, Jerry Leroy Aledo, Illinois 

Greer, Larry Lee Aledo, Illinois 

Grimm, Pamela Jeanne Park Ridge, Illinois 

Guilinger, Nancy Christine Little York, Illinois 

Hagg, Claire Raymond Cambridge, Illinois 

Hallenbeck, Jean Jeanette Chicago, Illinois 

Harriss, Richard Allen San Mateo, California 

Heath, Jerome Bruce Crystal Lake, Illinois 

Heath, Robert Alan Lancaster, Ohio 

Heaton, Gloria Ann Toulon, Illinois 

Henry, Patricia Jeanne Hinsdale, Illinois 

Herhold, Frank Frederick Wilmette, Illinois 

Hornaday, James Charles Des Moines, Iowa 

Hostettler, John Davison Rochelle, Illinois 

Hubbard, Willis McCracken Monmouth, Illinois 

Hunt, Edwin Preston DeKalb, Illinois 

Ihrig, Ronald Smith Bay Village, Ohio 

Jahn, William Francis Grayslake, Illinois 

Jones, David Willard Normandy, Missouri 

Jones, Richard Evan, Jr Oak Park, Illinois 

Kempin, Paul Douglas Kewanee, Illinois 

Kinzer, Lloyd Wesley Oak Park, Illinois 

Kniss, Robert Dean Monmouth, Illinois 

Knox, Kenneth Howard Libertyville, Illinois 

Kofoed, John Edson Earlville, Illinois 

Kohn, Gerald Lee Kenmore, New York 

Kriegsman, John Martin Pekin, Illinois 

Kuehn, Doris Eileen Smithfield, Illinois 

Langley, Robert Lee Springfield, Illinois 

Larson, Roger LaVerne Berwick, Illinois 

Lee, Timothy Guy Taipei, Formosa 

Liesman, Orville Dale Lincoln, Illinois 

Lips, Judith Mary Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Loy, Phyllis Glendening Galesburg, Illinois 

Lukasz, Vira, A Portland, Oregon 

Manning, Larry Glen Galva, Illinois 

Markle, Glenn Richard, Jr Gary, Indiana 

Matthews, Thomas Fisher Aurora, Illinois 

McClinton, Patricia Lois Park Ridge, Illinois 

McDaniel, Harold Naylor Cincinnati, Ohio 

McDavitt, Frederic Harry Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

McMahon, Patricia Jo Leawood, Kansas 

McQueen, Rodney James Esmond, Illinois 

Mell, Jerold Ray Kaneville, Illinois 

Montgomery, Leslie David Palatine, Illinois 

Moore, Laurence John Ft. Morgan, Colorado 

Morris, James Olin Murray, Nebraska 

Morrison, William John, Jr Blue Island, Illinois 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 95 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Munneke, Allen Stado Monmouth, Illinois 

Muntzel, Philip Alan Prairie Village, Kansas 

Nelson, Richard Earl Aledo, Illinois 

Nickel. Susan Patricia Eureka, Illinois 

Oggel, Lynwood Terry Highland Park, Illinois 

Olsson, Shirley Christine Racine, Wisconsin 

Orednick, Joseph Paul Chicago, Illinois 

Pannabecker, Daniel Nelson Peoria, Illinois 

Parker, Wayne Franklin Monmouth, Illinois 

Patterson, Robert Floyd, Jr Camden, Illinois 

Pawley, Loretta Jane Berwyn, Illinois 

Pearson, Janet Carol Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Phillips, Homer Eugene Oak Lawn, Illinois 

Phillips, John William Cambridge, Illinois 

Pierce, Robert William, Jr Des Moines, Iowa 

Potter, Nelson Thomas Mt. Morris, Illinois 

Pronga, Louis Lester Ainsworth, Iowa 

Pultz, Harry Lee Markham, Illinois 

Rager, Kenneth Allen Peoria, Illinois 

Raih, Ronald William Monmouth, Illinois 

Reed, Sally Ann Monmouth, Illinois 

Richmond, Barbara Anne Blue Island, Illinois 

Rineberg, Dennis O'Donnell Quincy, Illinois 

Roark, Susan O'Sean Inglewood, California 

Robb, Jane Elizabeth Columbus, Ohio 

Rosenbalm, Norma Jean Monmouth, Illinois 

Rothaus, Joan Doris St. Louis, Missouri 

Russell, David Harry DeKalb, Illinois 

Schneider, Melinda Grace Hopkins, Minnesota 

Smith, Oliver David Monmouth, Illinois 

Smith, Dwight Elza Bushnell, Illinois 

Smith, Stephen Shaffer Riverside, Illinois 

Spears, David Lewis Marengo, Illinois 

Stavenhagen, Bruce Terry Monmouth, Illinois 

Stevenson, Donald Loren Burlington, Iowa 

Stewart, Lynda Mae Washington, Iowa 

Strube, William Curtis Jennings, Missouri 

Tauck, Gilbert Kurt Marengo, Illinois 

Tenhaeff, Audrey Jean Golden, Illinois 

Thoresen, George William Evanston, Illinois 

Thornburg, Linda Nell Monmouth, Illinois 

Thorstenson, Donald Carl Chicago, Illinois 

Trotter, Thomas Henderson Ainsworth, Iowa 

Vecchi, Peter Dorian Cicero, Illinois 

Vessel, Richard Louis Olympia Field, Illinois 

Wackerle, Fred William Chicago, Illinois 

Waltz, Catherine Maria Kewanee, Illinois 

Weeks, Charles Thomas Rochelle, Illinois 

Welch, Guy Franklin Aledo, Illinois 

Wendling, Kenneth Lee Evergreen Park, Illinois 

Werner, Warren Bennett Pekin, Illinois 

Whipple, John William Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Wilcoxen, Frank B Lewistown, Illinois 

Williams, Larry James Walnut, Illinois 



96 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Wilson, Stanley Allen Table Grove, Illinois 

Yeoman, Larry Lealan Carman, Illinois 

Young, Harry Arthur Park Ridge, Illinois 

Zury, Helene Morgan Gary, Indiana 

SOPHOMORES 

Abrell, Carol Etta LaGrange, Illinois 

Ahrens, Margaret Elmhurst, Illinois 

Anderson, Daniel Roy Des Moines, Iowa 

Ansell, Linda Vicky Glenview, Illinois 

Armstrong, Robert Bruce Rockford, Illinois 

Arnold, David Lynn Pontiac, Illinois 

Askew, Richard Raddon Summit, New Jersey 

Barr, Robert Bruce Monmouth, Illinois 

Barton, Robert Myron Rock Island, Illinois 

Bates, David Raymond Mount Morris, Illinois 

Bingaman, Robert John Peoria, Illinois 

Blair, Donnalee Fisher, Illinois 

Boehmer, George Ernest Sycamore, Illinois 

Boughan, Robert Lyle Canton, Illinois 

Bowdish, Kenneth Eugene Harvard, Illinois 

Bradley, Robert Donald Monmouth, Illinois 

Bradshaw, Edis Dwain Berwick, Illinois 

Brady, Margaret Ann Broadview, Illinois 

Bridgford, Bonnie Marie Aledo, Illinois 

Brooke, Richard Burley Marengo, Illinois 

Bruning, Harvey Robert Millburn, New Jersey 

Buchanan, Anne Shirley Clinton, Pennsylvania 

Bullard, Donna Mae Poplar Grove, Illinois 

Bullington, Anita Carol San Francisco, California 

Burroughs, Richard Henry Buffalo, New York 

Cable, Ruth Ann Eureka, Illinois 

Campbell, David Wallace Omaha, Nebraska 

Chism, Stanley Earl Newton, Iowa 

Christiansen, Larry Arthur Chicago, Illinois 

Christie, Alexander Moorhead Lake Forest, Illinois 

Christman, Carol Ann Alburtis, Pennsylvania 

Chrysler, Marjorie Lynne Oak Park, Illinois 

Claassen, Betty Ann Peoria, Illinois 

Clark, Carol Virginia Des Plaines, Illinois 

Claycomb, Robert Arnold Pekin, Illinois 

Cleff, Virginia Charlotte Oak Park, Illinois 

Cochrane, Margaret Rose Homewood, Illinois 

Constant, Marc Duncan Seaton, Illinois 

Crissey, Kaye Avon, Illinois 

Crockett, Marilyn Kay Hansen Elmwood Park, Illinois 

Dawson, Eugene Richard Berwyn, Illinois 

Demas, Carl James Oak Lawn, Illinois . 

Dettman, Carol Nancy Minneapolis, Minnesota 

DeVett, Robert Lewis New Berlin, Pennsylvania 

Dietz, Michael Ira Flushing, New York 

Dove, Timothy Herbert Collegeville, Pennsylvania 

Dunk, William Martin Mount Morris, Illinois 

Egan, Roberta Louise Galesburg, Illinois 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 97 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Engel, Donald Martin Wilmette, Illinois 

Falkenhain, James Russell Sparta, Illinois 

Flanagan, John Robert Berwick, Illinois 

Flanagan, William Gabriel Avon, Illinois 

Foulk, James Wesley Pennsville, New Jersey 

Frautschy, Linda Joy Sycamore, Illinois 

Frost, Anaclare Chicago, Illinois 

Fulford, Howard Allyn Peoria, Illinois 

Gealey, Thomas McDowell Butter, Pennsylvania 

Gee, James William Orland Park, Illinois 

Gibb, Larry Dean Rockford, Illinois 

Gibson, James Eugene Clarendon Hills, Illinois 

Gillespie, Daryl Ann St. Paul, Minnesota 

Goetz, A. Richard Peoria, Illinois 

Goetzinger, Gail Rae Goodfield, Illinois 

Goodale, Frederick Warren, Jr Lakewood, Colorado 

Graham, Keith Alan Chicago, Illinois 

Graue, Fred William, Jr St. Louis, Missouri 

Gren, Joseph John, Jr Monmouth, Illinois 

Grove, Jean Elizabeth Pasadena, California 

Hackett, James Kunkel Kenmore, New York 

Hadley, Judith Ann Maywood, Illinois 

Hahn, Walter Seymore, Jr Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 

Hall, Grace Ann Monmouth, Illinois 

Hamburger, Jane Halley St. Louis, Missouri 

Hamilton, Robert Claude Monmouth, Illinois 

Hanzlik, Mary Arthur Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

Happ, Michael Lee Quincy, Illinois 

Hartenberg, Elna Anne Wilmette, Illinois 

Hartley, Judith Annette Washington, Illinois 

Hattman, Charles Edward Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

Hemphill, William Loehr Clarinda, Iowa 

Herron, Sarah Frances Rocky River, Ohio 

Hodges, Norman Scott Oak Park, Illinois 

Holcomb, Robert Edward Sycamore, Illinois 

Holland, William Gordon Highland Park, Illinois 

Hood, Janice Irene Seaton, Illinois 

Home, Carolyn Nancy Shawnee Mission, Kansas 

Howard, Lucy Jane Monmouth, Illinois 

Huff, Nancy Lee Merriam, Kansas 

Huffman, Gary Evans Loves Park, Illinois 

Hunter, Mary Peat McMartin Galesburg, Illinois 

Hutton, Marilyn Gwen Rockford, Illinois 

Ikan, Ronald Emery Waukegan, Illinois 

Irey, Janet Kay Monmouth, Illinois 

Irvine, Sharon Louise Elmhurst, Illinois 

L-win, Lucille Elizabeth Richmond, Kentucky 

Jaeger, Wesley Allen Lindenwood, Illinois 

Johnson, Martha Ann Newton, Iowa 

Johnson, Patricia Theresa Oak Park, Illinois 

Jones, Mary Jane St. Louis. Missouri 

Juhl, Russell Albert San Pedro, California 

Killey, Phillip George Monmouth, Illinois 

Knepper, Rita Joyce St. Louis, Missouri 

Kolconay, Rolfe Louis Chicago. Illinois 



98 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Krell, Janet Kathleen Park Forest, Illinois 

Krueger, John Roger Alpha, Illinois 

Kutkat, James Henry Peoria, Illinois 

Lang, Gisela Marburg/Lahn, Germany 

Larocco, Allan Charles Chicago, Illinois 

Larson, Dennis Alfred Palos Park, Illinois 

Lauridsen, David John Walter Chicago, Illinois 

Law, Douglas Neil Pontiac, Illinois 

Lemon, John Rodney Aledo, Illinois 

Lindsey, Stuart Kent Woodhull, Illinois 

Link, Janet Catherine Chicago, Illinois 

Lohner, Virginia LaGrange, Illinois 

Lovett, Clyde Richard Avon, Illinois 

Lowry, Carol Ann Shawnee Mission, Kansas 

Loya, Karin Eileen Monmouth, Illinois 

Lunn, Olivia Francine Lombard, Illinois 

Lunsman, Janet Lillian Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Lyndrup, Lynette Carolyn Clifton, Illinois 

Mack, Ann Marie Des Moines, Iowa 

MacMaster, Daniel Miller Flossmoor, Illinois 

Mammen, Wayne Creston Peoria, Illinois 

Margetis, Peter Peoria, Illinois 

Marshall, Russell Frank Niota, Illinois 

Martel, Domicio Don Moline, Illinois 

Matthews, Anne Grace Aurora, Illinois 

McClure, Robert Harrison, Jr Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

McCormick, Susan Moline, Illinois 

McFarland, Patricia Ann Moline, Illinois 

McLain, Kathryn Ann Chicago, Illinois 

McLaughlin, Robert William Mendota, Illinois 

McLoskey, Mary Alice Monmouth, Illinois 

Mell, Priscilla Seymour Elburn, Illinois 

Meredith, Connie Joan Orland Park, Illinois 

Millen, John Clyde Dallas Center, Iowa 

Miller, Nancy Jane Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Mitchell, Jon Phillip Geneva, Illinois 

Moberg, Gary Philip Alexis, Illinois 

Moran, Donald William Monmouth, Illinois 

Morse, Patricia Ann Carlinville, Illinois 

Mrkvicka, Donna Lee Downers Grove, Illinois 

Mueller, Margaret Ann . . . .Chicago, Illinois 

Munson, Courtney John Little York, Illinois 

Nelson, Karen Lynn Chicago Heights, Illinois 

Nichols, Margaret Louise Burlington, Iowa 

Nolen, Mary Ann Stronghurst, Illinois 

Oakley, Frank Raymond Marengo, Illinois 

Ottsen, Karen Louise Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Park, Terry Ralph Danville, Illinois 

Patterson, Elizabeth Anne Park Forest, Illinois 

Patterson, Janet Kay Monmouth, Illinois 

Paulsen, Karli June Barrington, Illinois 

Peacock, Dale Martin Altona, Illinois 

Peacock, Paul Curtiss Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Pearre, James Alden ~ Pontiac, Illinois 

Peek, Judith Lynne Pontiac, Illinois 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 99 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Petersen, David Roy Chicago, Illinois 

Phelps, Grace Gage Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Phelps, Hugh McClure Denver, Colorado 

Pires, Jane Day Dixon, Illinois 

Polz, Laddie James Cicero, Illinois 

Poor, Linda Rae Chicago, Illinois 

Pratt, William Kimball Joliet, Illinois 

Probert, Sara Ann Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Pronga, Melvin George Ainsworth, Iowa 

Raistrick, Philip Craig Edelstein, Illinois 

Rasmusen, Jean Elizabeth DeKalb, Illinois 

Reed, Susan Olive Ramsey, New Jersey 

Reid, Mary Catherine Morning Sun, Iowa 

Reid, Sarah Ann Sparta, Illinois 

Reinsberg, William Richard Evanston, Illinois 

Riddle, Lisbeth Ann Eureka, Illinois 

Robinson, Barbara Sue Bushnell, Illinois 

Roegge, Donald Lynn Aledo, Illinois 

Russell, Joellen Princeton, Illinois 

Russin, Alexis, Jr Endecott, New York 

Schillinger, Jack Arthur Viola, Illinois 

Schmidt, Marilyn Francis Homewood, Illinois 

Schwieder, Charol Dee Davenport, Iowa 

Seago, James Leonard Spring Valley, Illinois 

Seatter, John Gordon Riverside, Illinois 

Service. Shirley Marie Moline, Illinois 

Sheese, Mary Alice Park Ridge, Illinois 

Shogren, Suzanne Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Sholes, John Morgan Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

Simpson, Hallie Philip Mundelein, Illinois 

Sindelar, James Alan Brookfield, Illinois 

Sluka, Judith Ann Chicago, Illinois 

Smith, Dee Ann , Stronghurst, Illinois 

Smith, Peter Kenny Riverside, Illinois 

Smith, Sharon Aquilla Monmouth, Illinois 

Speer, Carol Jean Hanover, Illinois 

Sprague, Barbara Ruth Newton, Iowa 

Steinke, Duane Carl Des Plaines, Illinois 

Sternaman, Dorothy Mae Chicago, Illinois 

Stevens, James John Chicago, Illinois 

Stewart, Ann Harriet Gladwyne, Pennsylvania 

Strickler, Donald Arthur Ingleside, Illinois 

Suffredini, Peter John Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Sweeney, Charles Edward, Jr Haddonfield, New Jersey 

Teal, Juanita Merle Sandwich, Illinois 

Temple, Jane Ruth Evanston, Illinois 

Torgerson, Richard Stone Evanston, Illinois 

Turner, Laura Oakey Corning, Iowa 

Turner, Robert Clayton Oaklawn, Illinois 

Veith, Carol Ann Waukegan, Illinois 

Walters, Suzanne Maryon Villa Park, Illinois 

Washburn, Steven Hoodless Flossmoor, Illinois 

Watson, Janice Mary Waukesha, Wisconsin 

Wilkinson, Terry Lee Roseville, Illinois 

Williams, Pearson Francis, Jr Palos Park, Illinois 



100 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Williams, Richard Sturges Lewistown, New York 

Wilson, Edna Rose Fox Lake, Illinois 

Winslade, William Joseph Carlinville, Illinois 

Wongstrom, David Virgeen Monmouth, Illinois 

Wood, Margaret Ellen St. Louis, Missouri 

FRESHMEN 

*Abercrombie, Frank Norman Champaign, Illinois 

Acheson, David Reed Western Springs, Illinois 

Acheson, Reed Drexel Cincinnati, Ohio 

Adams, Charles Frederick Grosse Pointe, Michigan 

Adams, Richard Winston Butler, Pennsylvania 

Addleman, James Dale Monmouth, Illinois 

Aikenhead, Richard Bruce Summit, New Jersey 

* Alexander, John Arthur Virden, Illinois 

* Allen, Gail Sue Harvey, Illinois 

Allen, Kenneth James Oregon, Illinois 

Allison, Gerald Marsden Stronghurst, Illinois 

Altman, Steven Alvin Norwalk, Connecticut 

Antoniadis, Spiros Denver, Colorado 

Appell, Jerry Lee Fairview, Illinois 

* Armstrong, Mary Ellen , Chandlerville, Illinois 

Atherton, Neil David Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Austin, Brain Michael Jerseyville, Illinois 

Bagwell, James Albert Skokie, Illinois 

* Bailey, Mary Jean Knoxville, Illinois 

Baker, Robert Alvin Knoxville, Illinois 

Ballou, John David Palos Park, Illinois 

Bamer, Frank Craig Park Forest, Illinois 

Barclay, Robert Lee Granite City, Illinois 

Barrile, Vittorio Pisa, Italy 

Barron, Charles Gilbert Monmouth, Illinois 

Barron, Mina Elaine Chicago, Illinois 

Batten, Nancy Lee Davenport, Iowa 

Bauer, Marian Elizabeth Haverton, Pennsylvania 

*Baurer, Ronald Lee Peoria, Illinois 

Beisser, Carl Louis Des Moines, Iowa 

Bellatti, Mardell Alvan Mt. Pulaski, Illinois 

Bennett, June Ellen Melvin, Illinois 

Berry, Charles Dwight Jackson Heights, New York 

Beveridge, Reid Kyle Williamsburg, Iowa 

Blaich, Judith Gail Manhasset, New York 

Blair, Charles Chabot Staunton, Virginia 

Bollin, Harry Carl Dallas City, Illinois 

Bollow, Robert Leroy Downers Grove, Illinois 

Bolon, Barbara Kay Monmouth, Illinois 

Boothe, Russell Herbert Evanston, Illinois 

Boswell, William Edward Dayton, Ohio 

*Boyd, Austin Maurice Woodburg, Connecticut 

Brermeman, Kenneth Dirk Riverside, Illinois 

Bronner, Robert Freeman Trenton, New Jersey 

Brooks, Jerrie Louise Urbana, Illinois 

*Brotheridge, James William, Jr ~. . . . .Rock Falls, Illinois 

"Honors-at-Entrance Students 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 101 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Brower, Jimmie Paul Monmouth, Illinois 

Brown, Harlow Douglas Princeton, Illinois 

Brown, Karen Ann Springfield, Illinois 

Buck, David Earle Glendale, Missouri 

Bull, Charles Eddy Nescopeck, Pennsylvania 

Burnham, John Hickey Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Buss, Kay Ellen Freeport, Illinois 

Butler, William LaBruce Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Campbell, Robert Halsey III Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Carius, Allan Paul Moline, Illinois 

Carr, Bernard Roger Avon, Illinois 

Carringer, Diana Silver Spring, Maryland 

Carroll, Elaine Nesbitt Wheaton, Illinois 

Cation, Ronald Gene Williamsfield, Illinois 

Caughron, James Willard Falls Church, Virginia 

Christenson, Carl William Lakewood, Colorado 

Cisco, Michel Kewanee, Illinois 

*Conard, Bruce Randolph Ferguson, Missouri 

Cotter, Philip William Binghamton, New York 

Courson, John Addison Denver, Colorado 

*Cowan, Jean Ann Monmouth, Illinois 

Coziahr, James Richard Lynn Center, Illinois 

Crabill, John William Monmouth, Illinois 

Crabtree, Mary Jane Downers Grove, Illinois 

Crum, Wayne Carl Rushville, Illinois 

Culver, Arthur Lynn Peoria, Illinois 

Cummings, Jan Garfield Monmouth, Illinois 

Curtis, Thomas Wayne Bushnell, Illinois 

Curtiss, Barbara Burkett Biggsville, Illinois 

*Danecke, Barbara Jean Ingleside, Illinois 

Danecke, Carol Anne Long Lake, Illinois 

Danner, David Lewis Astoria, Illinois 

Day, Allen Don Rock Island, Illinois 

Dear, Douglas Stewart, Jr Oceanport, New Jersey 

deLong, Oscar Anderson Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

Dermey, Donald Lee Gibson City, Illinois 

De Puy, George Nelson Blairstown, New Jersey 

Di Cerbo, Eugene Francis Schenectady, New York 

Dietrich, Nellie Diane Leechburg, Pennsylvania 

Dines, Charles Edward Kewanee, Illinois 

Divinsky, Louis Jean Chicago, Illinois 

Doyle, Thomas Barron Freeport, Illinois 

Dutton, David George Sycamore, Illinois 

Eckerle, Susan Jane Tenafly, New Jersey 

Eichin, Richard Paul Western Springs, Illinois 

Eisenhard, Eleanor Caroline Alburtis, Pennsylvania 

Eldridge, John Charles Ottawa, Illinois 

Ellerd, Christopher P Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

*Ellis, Stephen White Rochelle, Illinois 

Enloe, James Richard Galesburg, Illinois 

*Epperson, Sandra Sue Galesburg, Illinois 

Erion, Frank David Hinsdale. Illinois 

Estes, Howard William Prairie Village, Kansas 

Falcigno, Anthony Steven, Jr White Plains. New York 

=: Honors-at-Entrance Students 



102 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Fanning, Stuart John Melrose, Massachusetts 

Farwell, Edward Parris Northfield, Illinois 

Felder, David Arthur, Jr Washington, District of Columbia 

Finch, Robert Lyle Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

Fitton, Gail Ruth Peoria, Illinois 

Fowler, Karen Lynn Northbrook, Illinois 

Francis, Janalee Gibson City, Illinois 

Frantzen, Peter Chris Wilmette, Illinois 

Frehner, Katherine Louise Highland Park, Illinois 

French, Barbara Cottrell Old Saybrook, Connecticut 

Friberg, Faith Eljean Riverdale, Illinois 

Frink, Celia Catherine Englewood, Colorado 

Fritz, Marjorie Lee Chappaqua, New York 

Gardner, Charles Willard McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania 

Garretson, Nancy Lusk Park Forest, Illinois 

Garrett, Jack Henry Peoria, Illinois 

Gately, Harvey Allen Chicago, Illinois 

Gealey, Virginia Sarles Butter, Pennsylvania 

George, Raymond Louis, Jr Huntington, New York 

Geser, Michael Joel Ossining, New York 

Gibson, Glenn Huntington Oak Park, Illinois 

Gibson, James Gilbert Chicago, Illinois 

Gibson, Susan Kay Lombard, Illinois 

*Giffen, Elizabeth Ann Urbana, Ohio 

*Goehring, Linda Shaw Butler, Pennsylvania 

Goode, Susan Jane Kewanee, Illinois 

Gotaas, Richard M Evanston, Illinois 

Gould, Robert Frederick Elmhurst, Illinois 

Grams, William Clarence Fox Lake, Illinois 

Gray, Judith Celeste Garden City, New York 

*Greer, Joanne Evelyn Aledo, Illinois 

Gross, Terry Nielsen Jacksonville, Illinois 

Grove, Judson Theodore Mt. Carroll, Illinois 

Groves, Robert John Quincy, Illinois 

Gunning, Thomas Marion Carlinville, Illinois 

*Gustafson, Mary Ann Aledo, Illinois 

Haase, Ruth Ann Harvey, Illinois 

Halloran, Richard J. Ill Decatur, Illinois 

Hamilton, Valerie Ann La Jolla, California 

Hansen, Shardlow John Galesburg, Illinois 

Hanson, Clarence Russell Little York, Illinois 

Harner, Philip Lawrence Xenia, Ohio 

Harries, Larry Dean Watseka, Illinois 

Heimlich, Dale Rae Williamsville, New York 

Helmick, John Marion Peoria, Illinois 

Henderson, Margaret Rochester, Minnesota 

Hennessey, James Joseph Lynnfield Center, Massachusetts 

Henning, Janet Sue Athens, Illinois 

Hershberger, Alvin Earl Kenmore, New York 

Hey, Phillip Henry Dixon, Illinois 

Hinkle, Barbara Joan Virden, Illinois 

Hodgdon, Allan Cruikshank Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Hogan, Perry Michael Peoria, Illinois 

Howe, Charles Frederic Chicago, Illinois 

:: Honors-at-Entrance Students 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 103 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Howell, Johanna Blanche Ipava, Illinois 

Howes, Jane Osborn Monmouth, Illinois 

Hunter, Stephen Blake Leominster, Massachusetts 

Husser, Connie Lynn Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Hutchison, James Andrew Biggsville, Illinois 

Jablonski, Bruce Francis Riverside, Illinois 

Jasper, Jacqueline Virginia Joliet, Illinois 

Jensen, Donald William Oak Lawn, Illinois 

Johnsen, Judith Kay Niles, Illinois 

Johnson, Gary Lee Dahinda, Illinois 

Johnson, James Robert Orion, Illinois 

* Johnson, Joan Karen Painter Monmouth, Illinois 

Johnson, Kay Marie Monmouth, Illinois 

Johnson, Wendell Allen Monmouth, Illinois 

Johnson, William Mahlen West Falls, New York 

Kacer, Kevin George Crystal Lake, Illinois 

Kahler, Roger Erwin Morton, Illinois 

Kane, Barbara Maria Summit, New Jersey 

Keener, Lawrence A Kirkwood, Illinois 

* Keller, Suellen Nan Monmouth, Illinois 

Keller, William Walter III Brooklyn, New York 

Kelley, Howard Francis Monmouth, Illinois 

Kemmerer, Linda Joyce Waterloo, Iowa 

*Kernutt, Gillian Katherine Rochester, New Jersey 

*Kessinger, Marilyn Sue Amboy, Illinois 

Kilpatrick, John Pressly Hanover, Illinois 

Kimble, Jane Rae Peoria, Illinois 

Kirkpatrick, Mark Rocky River, Ohio 

Kissel, William George Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Krebs, Philip Lee Moline, Illinois 

Kriskowski, Martin Francis Sayreville, New Jersey 

*Larson, Gale William Berwick, Illinois 

Leader, Edwin Patterson, Jr Des Moines, Iowa 

Leffler, Mary Elizabeth Lake Bluff, Illinois 

Liddle, Sandra Fort Worth, Texas 

Long, James William Chicago, Illinois 

Love, John Charles Monmouth, Illinois 

Lowe, Richard Brooklyn, New York 

Luce, Jane Ann Dayton, Ohio 

Mack, Stephen Charles Chicago, Illinois 

MacMorran, Marsha Katinka La Grange, Illinois 

Magzanian, Louisa Victoria Little Falls, New Jersey 

*Mahnic, Jeane Carole La Salle, Illinois 

Makela, Laurie Allan Downers Grove, Illinois 

Marti, Alan Everett Park Ridge. Illinois 

McAllister, Robert Ward DeKalb, Illinois 

McClanahan, Neal Kempton Assiut, Egypt 

McCollum, Barbara Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

McDonald, Georgean Elizabeth Toledo, Ohio 

McGrane, Winifred Ann Far Rockaway, New York 

McKelvey, James Morgan, Jr Gurdaspur, Punjab. India 

McKelvie, Stanley Lewis Quincy, Illinois 

McKinley, James Frank Fox Lake, Illinois 

McMaster, Arthur John, Jr Chester, Pennsylvania 

"Honors-at-Entrance Students 



104 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

McTeague, William Thomas Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Mechling, Bruce Arthur Joliet, Illinois 

Menhall, Melissa Dalton Edgerton, Wisconsin 

Mervis, Ronald Francis New York, New York 

Mesenbrink, Joyce Carolyn Libertyville, Illinois 

Miguel, Marcella Joyce Lincolnwood, Illinois 

Mika, Lenore Patricia Long Lake, Illinois 

Milazzo, Kathleen Carroll Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Millar, James Dean Rock Island, Illinois 

Miller, Richard Philip Earlville, Illinois 

Miller, Wallace B Jamison, Pennsylvania 

Mitchell, Eugene William Chicago, Illinois 

Moore, Betty Ruth Chicago, Illinois 

Moore, Don William Streator, Illinois 

Morgan, William Gerry Xenia, Ohio 

Morhaus, Jeffrey Alan Malverne, New York 

Morin, Ronald Henry West Warwick, Rhode Island 

Morris, George Nelson Oquawka, Illinois 

Munch, Karen Ruth Davenport, Iowa 

Murphy, James Arthur Clarendon Hills, Illinois 

Murphy, John Blaise Danielson, Connecticut 

Murray, James Rigney Media, Pennsylvania 

Neahr, Mary Ann Sycamore, Illinois 

*Neall, Mary Elizabeth Wheaton, Illinois 

New, Frederic Emil North Caldwell, New Jersey 

Niblock, Jane Marguerite Homewood, Illinois 

Nicholas, Elyssa E Oak Park, Illinois 

Nichols, Robert B., Jr Kirkwood, Illinois 

Nickel, Joan Margaret , . Eureka, Illinois 

Norgart, Jerry Mitchell Monmouth, Illinois 

Norton, John Arthur Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Novak, Thomas Albert Villa Park, Illinois 

*Nungesser, Lois Marie Highland, Illinois 

Oakley, Dale Peoria, Illinois 

Olivant, James W Whitestone, New York 

Ortman, William Herbert Moline, Illinois 

Ostrom, June Margaret Mt. Prospect, Illinois 

Panucci, Robert Joseph Evanston, Illinois 

Parker, Russell Carleton Sea Cliff, New York 

* Parmenter, Sally Joan Milroy, Indiana 

Paskins, Sarah Louise Omaha, Nebraska 

Pate, James Leonard Monmouth, Illinois 

Patterson, James Michael Alpha, Illinois 

Patterson, Robert Finley Denver, Colorado 

Perry, Jack David Peoria Heights, Illinois 

* Peterson, Donna Jean Reynolds, Illinois 

Peterson, Marshall Herbert , Morrison, Illinois 

Petschke, James Paul Downers Grove, Illinois 

*Phillips, Jack Leroy Monmouth, Illinois 

Pooley, Lynn Elizabeth Chicago, Illinois 

Preucil, Kathryn Louise Evanston, Illinois 

*Prince, Edward Orin Havana, Illinois 

Pryzgoda, Alan Chester Shenorock, New York 

Pullen, Linda Lou Monmouth, Illinois 

*Honors-at-Entrance Students 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 105 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Rainford, James Donald Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

Rangel-Casas, Alberto Barranquilla, Colombia, S. A. 

Rathgeb, Harold Dean, Jr Alton, Illinois 

Reeder, Lawrence Ronald Riverdale, Illinois 

Remmert, Robert Fred Chicago, Illinois 

Reynolds, Meta Wilson Birmingham, Michigan 

Reynolds, Walter Robert Mt. Prospect, Illinois 

Rezner, Charles Thomas Mt. Prospect, Illinois 

*Rice, Darla Jean Kankakee, Illinois 

Rieckhoff, William Franklin Evanston, Illinois 

Robbins, Raymond Christopher Jacksonville, Illinois 

Romeo, Susan Lee Rock Island, Illinois 

Romine, William Crockett Monmouth, Illinois 

Ross, James A Monmouth, Illinois 

Rummey, Fred Henry III Oak Park, Illinois 

Rumohr, Sharon Anne Westmont, Illinois 

Rutishauser, Paul William Chicago, Illinois 

Rydberg, Nancy Ellen Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Schacht, Roland John, Jr Racine, Wisconsin 

Schaper, Fred Lamar Aledo, Illinois 

Schluter, Richard James Moline, Illinois 

*Schomas, Janet Sue Florence Homewood, Illinois 

Schrader, Jerry George Oregon, Illinois 

Schultz, Arthur George Evergreen Park, Illinois 

Sedwick, Dan DeWitt Monmouth, Illinois 

See, Gary Kent Monmouth, Illinois 

Siefken, Roger Allan Morrison, Illinois 

Simms, Dixie Lee Abingdon, Illinois 

Sked, Norman Philip Lake Forest, Illinois 

Skinner, Dixie Ann Verona, Pennsylvania 

Sloan, Mary Lee Galva, Illinois 

Smith, Dale Allan La Grange Park, Illinois 

Smith, Neal Leroy Muscatine, Iowa 

Smith, Richard Thomas Monmouth, Illinois 

Smithson, Charles Busby Bloomington, Illinois 

Snyder, Alan Kent River Forest, Illinois 

Sperry, Bruce C Bushnell, Illinois 

*Sproston, Michael Eugene Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

*Spurgeon, Harold Albert Avon, Illinois 

*Stankrauff, Julie Ann Mount Morris, Illinois 

Stanley, Gregg Stuart Cheshire, Connecticut 

Stanton, Frederick Lewis Larchmont, New York 

Steinbrecher, Richard Trimble Wilmette, Illinois 

Stetson, Gail Virginia Falls Church, Virginia 

Stewart, Barbara Jean Bloomington, Minnesota 

Stewart, Constance Wylie New York City, New York 

Stilwell, Louis Bruce Centerport, Long Island, New York 

Strand, Joan Evelyn Elmhurst, Illinois 

Stris, Peter K Brooklyn, New York 

Stuckey, Edward Lee St. Louis, Missouri 

Sutherland, Gary Edward Dayton. Ohio 

Sutherland, Richard Allen Dayton, Ohio 

Sutinis, Bernard Anthony Waukegan, Illinois 

Swanson, Eugene Carl River Forest, Illinois 

: Honors-at-Entrance Students 



106 MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

NAME HOME ADDRESS 

Swarthout, Sharon Lee Arlington Heights, Illinois 

Sweet, John Douglas Carlinville, Illinois 

Symanski, Paul Otto Fox Lake, Illinois 

*Taylor, Judith Ann Kirkwood, Illinois 

Taylor, William Robson Ottawa, Illinois 

Tench, Barbara Elaine West Hartford, Connecticut 

Thede, James Beckman Iowa City, Iowa 

Thomas, Linda Sue Heyworth, Illinois 

*Thornhill, Sara Eleanor Charleston, West Virginia 

Tomicek, Martha Lynn .... Chicago, Illinois 

*Tomlin, Robert Mac Galesburg, Illinois 

Traylor, Donald Ray Hammond, Indiana 

Trendler, Robert Wayne Skokie, Illinois 

Turner, Charlotte Ruth Normal, Illinois 

Ulmet, Thomas Lewis Highland, Illinois 

*Unsicker, Carl Lester Morton, Illinois 

Van Cura, Joseph Emil Riverside, Illinois 

Vipond, Mary Kay Lexington, Illinois 

Wagler, Sharon Kay Little York, Illinois 

Wahl, Lewis William Chicago, Illinois 

Walker, Dennis Elwood West Hartford, Connecticut 

Walker, John Charles Bloomington, Illinois 

Walker, Hulburt Thayer Portland, Maine 

Wark, David Jonathan Little Silver, New Jersey 

*Warnock, Linda Lee Alexis, Illinois 

Watkins, David Charles Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Watson, Luree Irene Rolling Meadows, Illinois 

Wellbrock, Kent William Peoria, Illinois 

Welsh, Deborah Elizabeth Evanston, Illinois 

Whalen, James Farrell Springfield, Illinois 

* Wherry, Stanley Ted Aledo, Illinois 

* Whiteman, Richard Wendell Monmouth, Illinois 

* Wiley, Julia Anne Fox Lake, Illinois 

Williams, Vicki Jo Des Moines, Iowa 

Wilson, Ronald La Verne Aliquippa, Pennsylvania 

Wilson, Stephen Douglas Galesburg, Illinois 

Wischhusen, Richard John Malverne, New York 

Wise, Glenda Gene Aledo, Illinois 

Wolma, Kenneth Meade Chicago, Illinois 

Wood, Walter Wesley Wilmette, Illinois 

Work, Bruce Van Syoc Kirkwood, Illinois 

Work, Lucina Mary Homewood, Illinois 

Worrell, John Peterson Rock Island, Illinois 

Wright, Gretchen Lelia Jacksonville, Illinois 

Wright, Sandra Jane Wilbraham, Massachusetts 

Yeranian, Ronald George New York, New York 

Yez, David John Millers Falls, Massachusetts 

Yujuico, John Ronald Huntington, New York 

:: Honors-at-Entrance Students 



Summary of Enrollment 

1960-1961 



WOMEN 


TOTAL 


40 


93 


51 


165 


107 


218 


122 


365 


30 


37 



MEN 

Seniors 53 

Juniors 114 

Sophomores Ill 

Freshmen . 243 

Specials 7 

Total 528 350 878 

Summer Session 1960 56 77 133 

Music Students 35 72 107 

Total 619 499 1118 

Duplicates 54 86 140 

Net Total 565 413 978 



107 



Geographical Enumeration 
of the College 



1959-1960 1960-1961 

1. California 7 7 

2. Colorado 6 10 

3. Connecticut 2 7 

4. Colombia, S. A 1 

5. District of Columbia 1 1 

6. Egypt 1 

7. Formosa 1 1 

8. Germany 1 1 

9. Hawaii 1 

10. Hungary 2 1 

11. Illinois 582 637 

12. India 1 

13. Indiana 6 5 

14. Iowa 40 37 

15. Italy 1 

16. Japan 2 1 

17. Kansas 9 9 

18. Kentucky 1 1 

19. Korea 1 

20. Maine 1 

21. Massachusetts 2 7 

22. Maryland 1 

23. Mexico 1 

24. Michigan 3 3 

25. Minnesota 6 6 

26. Missouri 21 18 

27. Nebraska 3 3 

28. New Jersey 3 . 16 

29. New York 9 39 

30. Ohio 8 14 

31. Oregon 2 1 

32. Pennsylvania 16 29 

33. Rhode Island 1 

34. Sweden 1 

35. Texas 1 

36. Virginia 2 

37. West Virginia 1 

38. Wisconsin 6 12 

Total ? 741 878 

108 



Index 



Absences 14 

Academic Aim 5 

Academic Buildings 7 

Academic Probation 15 

Academic Program 8 

Academic Regulations 14 

Accreditation 5 

Activities, Student 6 

Administration 

Officers of 80 

Directors 81 

Admission 

Advanced Placement 18 

Application 17 

Counselors 80 

Requirements 17 

Tests 17 

Transfers 17 

Advance Payments 20 

Advanced Placement Test .... 18 

Advanced Standing 17 

Adviser, Faculty 6 

Alumni Association 5, 80 

Applications 

Admission 17 

Financial Aid 25 

Application Fee 17 

Applied Music 57 

Argonne Semester 13 

Art 26 

Associated Colleges of the 

Midwest 6 

Athletic Facilities 7 

Attendance, Class 14 

Auditing Courses 19 

Automobile Regulations 16 

B 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Conferred 87 

Requirements for 8 

Bible and Religion 28 

Biology 30 

Board 

Fee 21 

Payment of Fee 20 

Refund of Fee 22 

Board of Directors 5, 81 

Business Administration, 

Economics and 35 



Campus Life 6 

Calendar 4 

Calendar, College 3 

Catalog Publication 1 

Chapel 14 

Chemistry 32 

Choir 58 

Class Attendance 14 

Classification of Students 16 

Classical Languages 33 

College Entrance Examination 

Board 17 

College Scholarship Service ... 23 

Commencement 87 

Committees of the Board 82 

Comprehensive Examinations . . 10 

Concentration, Field of 10 

Contents, Table of 2 

Control 5 

Correspondence Inside 

Front Cover 

Costs 19 

Counseling 6 

Counselors 

Admissions 80 

Faculty 6 

Courses of Instruction 

Art 26 

Bible and Religion 28 

Biology 30 

Chemistry 32 

Classical Languages 33 

Economics 35 

Education 38 

English 39 

Geology and Geography 42 

Government 44 

History 46 

Mathematics 48 

Modern Foreign Languages . . 50 

Music 55 

Philosophy 59 

Physical Education 61 

Physics 63 

Psychology 65 

Sociology 67 

Speech 69 

Credit by Examination 16 

Credits, High School 17 

Credits, Transcript of 20 



109 



110 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE • MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



Credits, Transfer of 17 

Curriculum, Organization of . . . 8 



Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts 16 

Candidates for 89 

Honorary 87 

Requirements 8 

Conferred 87 

Deposits, Advance 20, 21 

Directors 81 

Dismissal from College 16 

Divisions of the Faculty 73 

Dormitories 7 

Dramatics (See Theatre Arts) 



Economics and Business 

Administration 35 

Education 38 

Emeriti Professors 73 

Employment, Student 24 

Endowments 83 

Engineering Binary Program ... 12 

English 39 

Enrollment 

Geographical Distribution . . . 108 

Roll of Students 91 

Summary 107 

Entrance Requirements 17 

Examinations 

Advanced Placement 18 

Scholastic Aptitude 17 

Senior Comprehensive 10 

Expenses 22 



General Information 5 

Geographical Distribution 108 

Geology and Geography 42 

German 52 

Government 44 

Grade- Point Requirements .... 8 

Grading System 15 

Graduation Requirements 8 

Grants-in-Aid 23 

Greek 34 

Gymnasium 7 

H 

Health Service 

Facilities 6 

Hospitalization 6 

Insurance 6 

Staff 80 

High School Credits 17 

History 46 

History of the College 5 

Honor Scholars 18 

Honor Scholarship Competition 25 

Honorary Degrees 87 

Honors-at-Entrance 17 

Honors at Graduation 16 

Hospital Insurance 6 

Housing, Student 7 

I 

Independent Study 10 

Installment Payment Plans .... 20 

Instruction, Courses of 26 

Insurance, Health 6 

Intramural Sports 6 



Facilities 7 

Faculty 73 

Faculty Advisers 6 

Fees 

Advance Payments 20 

Board 21 

Late Payments 21 

Miscellaneous 19 

Payment of 20 

Refund of 21 

Room 21 

Transcript of Credits 20 

Tuition and 22 

Field of Concentration 10 

Financial Aid 23 

Fraternity Houses 7 

French 51 

Freshman Orientation 6 



Junior Year Abroad 13 



Laboratories 26 

Latin 33 

Library 7 

Library Staff 80 

Linen Service 21 

Loans, Student 24 

M 

Mathematics 48 

Membership, Institutional 5 

Men's Residences 7 

Midwest Athletic Conference . . 6 

Modern Foreign Languages ... 50 

Monthly Payment Plan 21 

Music . . . 55 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



111 



Music 

Applied 57 

Tuition and Fees 19 

Musical Organizations 58 

N 

Numbering of Courses 26 



Officers of Administration 80 

Officers of Instruction 74 

Organization of the Curriculum 8 
Orientation 6 



Payment Plans 20 

Philosophy 59 

Physical Education 61 

Physical Education Facilities . . 7 

Physical Plant 7 

Physics 63 

Placement, Advanced 18 

Placement, Vocational 6 

Political Science (See Government) 

Presidents of Monmouth College 5 

Prizes and Awards 85 

Probation, Academic 15 

Professors Emeriti 73 

Psychology 65 



Refunds 21 

Registration 14 

Regulations, Academic 14 

Regulations, Conduct 16 

Religion, Bible and 28 

Renewal of Financial Assistance 25 
Requirements for Graduation . . 8 

Reservations, Room 21 

Residence in Senior Year .... 8 

Residence Halls, Student 7 

Roll of Students 91 

Room 

Assignments 22 

Fee 21 



Payment of Fee 20 

Refund of Fee 21 

Reservations 21 

Student Residences 7 

Russian 54 



Scholarship Aid 23 

Scholarships 83 

Scholastic Aptitude Test 17 

Senior Comprehensive 

Examinations 10 

Senior Year in Residence 8 

Social Regulations 16 

Scots Guide 16 

Sociology 67 

Sorority Chapter Rooms 7 

Spanish 53 

Special Examinations 20 

Special Fees 19 

Special Students 19 

Speech 67 

Sports 7 

Student Handbook 16 

Student Residences 7 

Students, Roll of 91 

Summary of Enrollment 107 



Table of Contents 2 

Theatre Arts 70 

Transcript of Credits 17, 20 

Tuition 

Cost 19 

Payment of 20 

Refund of 21 



Vocational Counseling 6 

Vocational Placement 6 

W 

Washington Semester 12 

Where to Write Inside 

Front Cover