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Full text of "Montana appraisal manual"

%^^ 11^ Cole Layer- Trunb I e 
•JUov^^^c Company 

M26iBaffl Montana 

appraisal manual 



MONTANA APPRAISAL MANUAL 




Prepared by 



Cole-Layer-Trumble Company 



Dayton, Ohio, 45406 



FOREWORD 



FOREWORD 



The purpose of the Montana Appraisal Manual is to establish standards, 
procedures, and guidelines to be followed by county appraisers in the appraisal 
of real estate in the State of Montana. 

While this manual may not answer every question related to property valuation, 
it does provide a procedure that can insure a uniform statewide approach to 
value. The proper use of this manual is important in maintaining a quality 
valuation system. 

This manual is supplied to Montana Appraisers for the purpose of valuing 
locally assessed properties. 



MONTAI^A 55TATP HBRARy 
ur,M^ E- 6th AVE. 
HKIENA, MONTANA 59620 



08/01/89 F-1 



FOREWORD 



C 



c 



F-2 08/01/89 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR PART ONE 
APPRAISAL PLAN 



TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR PART TWO 
APPRAISAL THEORY 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

1. 

1.1. 
1.2. 
1.3. 

1.4. 

1.5. 

1.6. 

1.7. 

1.8. 

2. 

2.1. 

2.1.1. 

2.1.2. 

2.1.3. 

2.1.4. 

2.2. 

2.2.1. 
2.2.2. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

RIGHTS AND THE PRINCIPLES OF VALUE 

BUNDLE OF RIGHTS 

THE NATURE AND MEANING OF VALUE 

VALUE IN USE AS OPPOSED TO VALUE 

IN EXCHANGE 

THE PRINCIPLE OF SUPPLY AND 

DEMAND 

THE PRINCIPLE OF HIGHEST AND 

BEST USE 

THE PRINCIPLE OF CHANGE 

THE PRINCIPLE OF SUBSTITUTION 

TRADITIONAL APPROACHES TO VALUE 

PROPERTY VALUATION TECHNIQUES 

APPLYING THE COST APPROACH 

REPLACEMENT COST 

ESTIMATING REPLACEMENT COST 

DEPRECIATION 

ESTIMATING DEPRECIATION 

APPLYING THE MARKET DATA 

APPROACH 

SELECTING VALID COMPARABLES 

PROCESSING COMPARABLE SALES 



PAGE 


PARAGRAPH 


2- 


NO. 


111 


2.3. 


1 


2.3.1. 


2 


2.3.2. 




2.3.3. 


3 


2.3.4. 


3 


2.3.5. 




2.3.6. 


3 


2.3.7. 


4 


2.3.8. 


4 


2.3.9. 


4 


2.3.10. 


5 


2.3.11. 


5 


3. 


5 


3.1. 


6 


3.2. 


6 


3.3. 


7 


4. 




4.1. 


7 


4.2. 


7 


4.3. 


8 





PAGE 

PARAGRAPH TITLE 2- 

APPLYING THE INCOME APPROACH 8 

INTRODUCTION 8 

THE PRINCIPLES OF CAPITALIZATION 9 

EXPLORING THE RENTAL MARKET 9 
QUESTIONS RELATING TO INCOME 

DATA 9 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENSE DATA 10 

CAPITALIZATION METHODS 11 

CURRENT TECHNIQUES 12 

DIRECT CAPITALIZATION 12 

MORTGAGE EQUITY CAPITALIZATION 12 

RESIDUAL TECHNIQUES 13 

MORTGAGE EQUITY METHOD EXAMPLE 13 

LAND VALUATION TECHNIQUES 14 

COMPARABLE SALES METHOD 14 

THE L^ND RESIDUAL TECHNIQUE 15 

RATIO METHOD 16 

MASS APPRAISING 17 

OVERVIEW 17 

DATA INVENTORY 19 

PROCESSING THE DATA 22 



TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR PART THREE 
DATA COLLECTION 

SECTION 31. PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION DATA 



FIELD 

CODE DESCRIPTION 

901 MUNICIPALITY CODE 

902 ASSESSMENT LIST CODE 

903 LEVY DISTRICT CODE 

904 ASSESSOR'S CODE 

906 PROPERTY ASSESSMENT CHANGE 
CODE 

91 1 OWNER NAME 1 

912 OWNER NAME 2 



PAGE 
31- 

1 
2 
2 
2 



FIELD 
CODE 

913 
914 
915 
916 
918 
919 
920 
921 







PAGE 


DESCRIPTION 




31- 


DBA 




3 


MAILING ADDRESS 




3 


CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE 




3 


FOREIGN COUNTRY 




3 


IN-CARE-OF TAXPAYER NAME 1 


3 


IN-CARE-OF TAXPAYER NAME 2 


3 


IN-CARE-OF MAILING ADDRESS 


3 


IN-CARE-OF CITY, STATE, 


ZIP CODE 


3 



08/01/89 



TC-1 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 



c 



SECTION 31. PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION DATA (Cont'd) 



FIELD 

CODE DESCRIPTION 

922 IN-CARE-OF FOREIGN COUNTRY 

925 ADDITION / SUBDIVISION 

927 SECTION, TOWNSHIP, RANGE 

929 SHORT LEGAL DESCRIPTION 

934 DEED BOOK AND PAGE 

936 PREVIOUS ID NUMBER 

939 NEW CLASS CODE & ALLOCATED 

BASE VALUE 

956 SUBSIDIARY DEED BOOK AND PAGE 



PAGE 
31- 



FIELD 




PAGE 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


31- 


961 


SUBSIDIARY OWNER NAME 


5 


965 


SUBSIDIARY NOTES 


5 


982-984 


EXEMPTION APPLICATION DATA 


5 


985 


APPEAL APPRAISER ID 


6 


986-989 


AB-26 FILING INFORMATION 


6 


990-993 


COUNTY APPEAL INFORMATION 


7 


994-997 


STATE TAX APPEAL BOARD 






INFORMATION 


8 


998 


COURT APPEAL INFORMATION 


8 



APPENDIX A31 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 
A31- 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 
A31- 



A31.1. 



STATE POSTAL ABBREVIATIONS 



A31 .2. 



PROPERTY CLASSIFICATION CODES 



SECTION 32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



C 



FIELD 


DESCRIPTION 


'AGE 


CODE 


32- 


010 


GEOCODE OR PARCEL IDENTIFICATION 


1 


060 


MAP 


13 


070 


ROUTING NUMBER 


14 


101 


PROPERTY TYPE 


14 


102 


IMPROVEMENT CLASSIFICATION CODE 


15 


103 


LIVING UNITS 


15 


104 


ZONING 


16 


105 


NEIGHBORHOOD 


16 


110 


PROPERTY ADDRESS 


16 


115 


CAMA CHANGE CODES 


17 


170 


ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR 


17 


180 


PERCENTAGE OF OWNERSHIP 


17 


190 


PARCEL TIEBACK 


17 


191 


CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP 






PERCENTAGES 


18 


201-203 


SALES DATA 


18 


299 


DELETE: LAND 


19 


300 


NONE 


19 


301-303 


FRONT FOOT 


19 


305 


1982 STANDARD DEPTH 


20 


311-313 


SQUARE FOOT 


20 


321-329 


ACREAGE 


20 


301-329 


INFLUENCE FACTORS 


21 


330 


SITE 


22 



FIELD 




CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


301-330 


LAND CLASSIFICATION CODE 


331-336 


AGRICULTURAL UVND TOTALS 


340 


AGRICULTURAL IRRIGATION 


341 


TIMBER 


400 


TOPOGRAPHY 


410 


UTILITIES 


420 


ACCESS 


430 


FRONTING 


440 


LOCATION 


450 


PARKING 


461 -463 


APPRAISAL INSPECTION INFORMATION 


464 


PERSON CONTACTED 


468 


CONTINUED REVIEW NEEDED 


471-472 


BUILDING / ELECTRICAL PERMIT 




RECORD 


481-483 


NOTES 


885 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: LAND 


886 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: MAIN BUILDING 


887 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: ACCESSORY 




BUILDING 


888 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: FLAT VALUE 


891-897 


OVERRIDE CODE & VALUE 


960 


FINAL BASE VALUE 



PAGE 
32- 

22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
24 
24 
25 
25 
26 
26 
27 
27 

28 
28 
28 
29 

29 
29 
29 
29 



TC-2 



08/01/89 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 



APPENDIX A32 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

A32.1. 
A32.2. 

A32.3. 
A32.3.1. 
A32.4. 
A32.5. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 
A32- 



COUNTY NUMBERS 1 
STANDARD ABBREVIATIONS FOR 

STREET ADDRESSES 2 

PARCEL SIZING PROCEDURES 3 

PARCEL SIZING PRINCIPLES 3 
PARCEL SQUARE FOOTAGE FORMULAS 7 

LOT DEPTH VALUATION FACTORS 9 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

A32.5.1. 

A32.5.2. 

A32.6. 

A32.7. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

PARCEL DEPTH VALUATION 

CALCULATIONS 

DEPTH FACTOR TABLES 

DIVISION OF A SECTION OF LAND 

AGRICULTURAL LAND PRODUCTIVITY 

GRADE SCHEDULES 



PAGE 
A32- 



9 
9 

12 

13 



SECTION 33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



FIELD 
CODE 

499 

500 

505 

506 

507 

508 

515 

520 

521 

525 

528 

530 

535 

540 

545 

550 

551 

557-558 

560 

561 

562 



DESCRIPTION 



PAGE 
33- 



DELETE: RESIDENTIAL BUILDING 1 
RESIDENTIAL IMPROVEMENT INDICATOR 1 

STORY HEIGHT 3 

EXTERIOR WALLS 3 

STYLE 3 

ROOF 5 

FOUNDATION 6 

BASEMENT 6 

FINISHED BASEMENT 6 

HEATING & COOLING 7 

HEATED FLOOR AREA 8 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 8 

PLUMBING 8 

ATTIC 9 

GARAGE STALLS 9 

MASONRY FIREPLACE 9 

PREFAB FIREPLACE and STOVE 10 

MISCELLANEOUS OTHER FEATURES 10 

CONDOMINIUM LEVEL 10 

CONDOMINIUM UNIT TYPE 10 

CONDOMINIUM AMENITIES 10 



FIELD 




PAGE 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


33- 


566 


MOBILE HOME 


11 


567 


MOBILE HOME SERIAL / TITLE NUMBER 


11 


568 


MOBILE HOME DIMENSION 


11 


570 


AGE 


11 


571 


DEPRECIATION 


12 


572 


PHYSICAL CONDITION 


13 


573 


GRADE 


13 


574 


COST AND DESIGN FACTOR 


14 


575 


FLAT ADD COSTS 


14 


576 


CDU 


14 


577 


PERCENT COMPLETE 


15 


581 


FLOOR AREAS BY LEVEL 


15 


582 


UNFINISHED FLOOR AREAS BY LEVEL 


15 


599 


DELETE: ADDITIONS 


16 


601-608 


ADDITIONS 


16 


699 


DELETE: OBY 


18 


701-706 


OTHER BUILDING & YARD 






IMPROVEMENTS 


18 


711 


MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS 


21 


800 


TOTAL OTHER IMPROVEMENTS 


21 



APPENDIX A33 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

A33.1. 
A33.2. 
A33.3. 



PAGE 
PARAGRAPH TITLE ASS- 

STORY HEIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS 1 

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES 3 

ROOF TYPE ILLUSTRATIONS 17 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

A33.4. 
A33.5. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

BUILT-IN GARAGE EXAMPLES 
PERCENT COMPLETE TABLE 



PAGE 

ASS- 
IS 
20 



08/01/89 



TO -3 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 



SECTION 34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



FIELD 




PAGE 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


34- 


599 


DELETE: COMMERCIAL BUILDING 


1 


600 


GENERAL BUILDING DATA 


3 


601-608 


BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - 






ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS 


6 


611-618 


EXTERIOR DATA 


10 


621-628 


INTERIOR DATA 


15 


631-638 


APARTMENT DATA 


19 


639 


PARKING DATA 


19 


699 


DELETE: COMMERCIAL OBY 


19 


701-706 


OTHER BUILDING & YARD 






IMPROVEMENTS 


19 



FIELD 
CODE 

800 
812 
820 

825 
830 
835 
965 
868 
869 



PAGE 



DESCRIPTION 


34- 


TOTAL OTHER IMPROVEMENTS 


20 


PERCENT COMPLETE 


24 


MODEL ADJUSTMENTS 


24 


OCCUPANCY OVERRIDE 


24 


VALUATION METHOD 


24 


INCOME YEAR OVERRIDE 


25 


REVIEWER REASON CODE 


25 


GENERAL OWNERSHIP 


25 


LIMITED OWNERSHIP 


25 



APPENDIX A34 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

A34.1. 

A34.1.1. 

A34.1.2. 
A34.1.3. 
A34.1.4. 
A34.1.5. 
A34.1.5.1. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

UNIQUE COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 

DATA COLLECTION PROCEDURES 

MIXED USE STRUCTURES, INCLUDING 

OFFICE WAREHOUSES 

MEZZANINES 

PENTHOUSES 

OPEN AREAS 

OPEN PARKING DECKS 

PARKING DECKS AS A SEPARATE 

STRUCTURE 



PAGE 
A34- 



PARAGRAPH 


PAGE 


NO, 


PARAGRAPH TITLE A34- 


A34. 1.5,2. 


PARKING DECKS CONNECTED TO AND 




AS LEVELS OF AN OFFICE BUILDING 7 


A34.1.6. 


ELEVATORS 8 


A34.1.7. 


ESCALATORS 9 


A34.2. 


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CLASSES 10 


A34.2.1. 


WOOD FRAME / JOIST / BEAM 10 


A34.2.2. 


FIRE RESISTANT 1 1 


A34.2.3. 


FIRE PROOF 12 


A34.2.4. 


PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL 13 



SECTION 35. SKETCH VECTORING 



PARAGRAPH 






PARAGRAPH 








NO. OR 






NO. OR 








FIELD 


PARAGRAPH TITLE OR 


PAGE 


FIELD 


PARAGRAPH TITLE OR 




PAGE 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION OF FIELD 


35- 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION OF FIELD 




35- 


35.1 


CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 


1 


35.5.1. 


ANGLE COMMAND - V 




5 


649 


DELETE: SKETCH VECTORS 


1 


35.5.2. 


FINISH COMMAND - F 




6 


651-658 


SKETCH VECTORS 


1 


35.5.3. 


OFF-SET COMMAND - S 




7 


35.2. 


DEFINITIONS 


2 


35.5.4. 


POINT COMMAND - P 




8 


35.3. 


SKETCH VECTORING RULES 


3 


35.5.5. 


RECTANGLE COMMAND ■ 


X 


10 


35,4. 


PROCEDURE 


4 


35,6, 


COMMON ERRORS ENCOUNTERED 




35.5. 


COMMANDS 


5 




IN SKETCHING 




11 



TC-4 



08/01/89 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 



APPENDIX A35 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 
ASS- 



ASS. 



SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLES 



SECTION 36. INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



FIELD 




CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


101 


PROPERTY TYPE 


102 


IMPROVEMENT CLASS CODE 


104 


ZONE 


10S 


NEIGHBORHOOD 


201-203 


SALES DATA 


210 


EQUITY 


220 


POTENTIAL GROSS INCOME 


230 


BUILDING DATA 


231-238 


GENERAL RENT INFO 


251 


ROW / HALL / BOTH 


252 


TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS 


253 


TOTAL NUMBER OF ROOMS 


254 


TOTAL NUMBER OF BEDROOMS 


255 


AVERAGE SOFT / UNIT 


256 


MAJOR RENOVATION 


261-266 


APARTMENT UNIT BREAKDOWN 


268 


APARTMENT AMENITIES 



PAGE 


FIELD 




PAGE 


36- 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


36- 




269 


APARTMENT FEATURES 


3 




271 


PARKING 


3 




272 


VACANCY 


4 




273 


INSURANCE EXPENSE 


4 




274 


PROPERTY TAX EXPENSE 


4 




275 


MAINTENANCE EXPENSE 


4 


2 


276 


INTERIOR MAINTENANCE EXPENSE 


4 


2 


277 


EXTERIOR MAINTENANCE EXPENSE 


4 


2 


278 


ELEVATOR EXPENSE 


4 


2 


279 


UTILITY EXPENSE 


4 


2 


280 


RESERVE FOR REPLACEMENT 


4 


2 


281 


MANAGEMENT EXPENSE 


5 


3 


282 


GENERAL EXPENSE 


5 


3 


283 


MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 


5 


3 


291-292 


NOTES 


5 


3 
3 


600 


STRUCTURE TYPE 


5 



APPENDIX A36 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 
A36- 



A36. 



OPERATING STATEMENTS 



08/01/89 



TC-5 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR PART FOUR 
REPLACEMENT COST 



SECTION 41. ESTIMATING REPLACEMENT COST NEW 



PARAGRAPH 
NO 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE PARAGRAPH 

41- NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 
41- 



41.1. REPLACEMENT COST 1 41.1.4. 

41.1.1. REPLACEMENT COST DEFINITION 1 

41.1.2. PRICING SCHEDULES 1 41.1.5. 

41 .1 .3. SELECTING THE PROPER QUALITY 

GRADE 1 41.2. 



APPLYING THE PROPER GRADE 

FACTOR 2 

APPLYING THE PROPER COST AND 

DESIGN FACTOR 3 

PRICING SCHEDULES AND COST 

TABLES 3 





SECTION 42. 


DWELLINGS 


PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


PARAGRAPH 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


42- 


NO. 


42.1. 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 


1 


42.3.1. 


42.1.1. 


INTRODUCTION 


1 


42.3.2. 


42.1.2. 


QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 


2 


42.4. 


42.2. 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 




42.4,1. 




AND PHOTOGRAPHS 


2 


42.4.2. 


42.2.1. 


GRADE 1 - CHEAP QUALITY 




42.4.2.1. 




RESIDENCES 


2 




42.2.2 


GRADE 2 - POOR QUALITY 




42.4.2.2. 




RESIDENCES 


5 


42.4,3. 


42.2.3. 


GRADE 3 - LOW COST QUALITY 




42.4.3.1. 




RESIDENCES 


6 


42.4,3.2. 


42.2.4. 


GRADE 4 - FAIR QUALITY RESIDENCES 


9 


42.4.3.3. 


42.2.5. 


GRADE 5 - AVERAGE QUALITY 




42.4.3.4. 




RESIDENCES 


10 




42.2.6. 


GRADE 6 - GOOD QUALITY 




42.5. 




RESIDENCES 


13 


42.5.1. 


42.2.7 


GRADE 7 • VERY GOOD QUALITY 




42.5.2. 




RESIDENCES 


14 


42.5.3. 


42.2.8. 


GRADE 8 - EXCELLENT QUALITY 








RESIDENCES 


17 


42.5.4. 


42.3. 


MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 


18 


42.5.5. 



PAGE 

PARAGRAPH TITLE 42- 

GENERAL APPLICATION 18 

MANUAL PRICING PROCEDURE 18 

PRICING TABLES 20 

DWELLING BASE PRICING SCHEDULE 20 

BASE PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 22 
HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 

ADJUSTMENTS 22 

PLUMBING ADJUSTMENTS 22 

ADDITIONS 23 

PORCHES 23 

ATTACHED UTILITY STRUCTURE 23 

ATTACHED GARAGES 24 
CARPORT / CANOPY; ATTACHED 

GREENHOUSE; DECKS; STOOPS 25 

OTHER FEATURES 25 

BASEMENT GARAGES 25 

MASONRY FIREPLACES 25 
PREFABRICATED METAL FIREPLACES / 

STOVES 26 

MISCELUNEOUS OTHER FEATURES 26 

FINISHED BASEMENT AREA 26 



TC-6 



08/01/89 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 
SECTION 43. MOBILE HOMES 



PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


PARAGRAPH 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


43- 


NO. 


43.1, 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 


1 


43.2.4. 


43.1.1. 


INTRODUCTION 


1 




43.1.2. 


QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 


1 


43.3. 


43.2. 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 




43.3.1. 




AND PHOTOGRAPHS 


2 


43.3.2. 


43.2.1. 


GRADE L - LOW COST QUALITY 




43.4. 




MOBILE HOMES 


2 


43.5. 


43.2.2. 


GRADE A - AVERAGE QUALITY 




43.5.1. 




MOBILE HOMES 


5 


43.5.2. 


43.2.3. 


GRADE G - GOOD QUALITY MOBILE 








HOMES 


6 


43.5.3. 



PAGE 

PARAGRAPH TITLE 43- 

GRADE E - EXCELLENT QUALITY 

MOBILE HOMES 9 
MOBILE HOME CLASSIFICATION GUIDE 10 

MANUFACTURERS ORDER 10 

MODEL NAME ORDER 24 

MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 38 

PRICING TABLES 40 

MOBILE HOME RATES 40 
HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 

ADJUSTMENTS 41 

LIVING AREA ADDITIONS 42 



SECTION 44. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


PARAGRAPH 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


44- 


NO. 


44.1. 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 


1 


44.4.2. 


44.2. 


MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 


2 


44.4.3. 


44.3. 


RESIDENTIAL YARD ITEMS 


3 


44.4.4. 


44.3.1. 


DETACHED GARAGES 


3 


44.4.5. 


44.3.2. 


CARPORT / CANOPY 


3 


44.4.6. 


44.3.3. 


PAVING 


3 


44.4.7. 


44.3.4. 


DETACHED RESIDENTIAL 




44.4.8. 




GREENHOUSES 


4 


44.4.9. 


44.3.5. 


BOATHOUSES AND BOAT DOCKS 


4 


44.4.10. 


44.3.6. 


DECKS, PATIOS, STOOPS, GAZEBOS 


5 


44.4.11. 


44.3.7. 


BARBECUE 


5 


44.4.12. 


44.3.8. 


UTILITY BUILDINGS 


5 


44.4.13. 


44.3.9. 


FENCES 


6 


44.4.14. 


44.3.10. 


RESIDENTIAL SWIMMING POOLS 


6 


44.4.15. 


44.3.11. 


TENNIS COURTS 


6 


44.4.16. 


44.4. 


AGRICULTURAL OTHER BUILDINGS 




44.4.17. 




AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS 


7 


44.4.18. 


44.4.1. 


GENERAL PURPOSE BARNS 


7 





PAGE 
44- 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

LEAN-TOS 8 

MILK HOUSES AND MILKING PARLORS 1 1 

SWINE BARNS 12 

TANKS 13 

SILOS 14 

POLE FRAME BUILDINGS AND SHEDS 17 

GRANARIES 18 

IMPLEMENT SHEDS 18 

QUONSET BUILDINGS 18 

POULTRY HOUSES AND BARNS 21 

PRE-FABRICATED STEEL BUILDINGS 22 

STEEL GRAIN BINS 23 

STEEL HOPPER BINS 23 

POTATO STORAGE BUILDINGS 24 

SLURRY SYSTEMS 24 

FEED / FENCE BUNKS 24 

SCALES 24 



SECTION 45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


45- 


45.1. 


COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 






VALUATION OVERVIEW 


1 


45.1.1. 


COST VALUATION 


1 


45.1.1.1. 


SELECTING THE PROPER QUALITY 






GRADE 


1 


45.1.1.2. 


QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 


2 


45.1.2. 


INCOME VALUATION 


2 


45.2. 


COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL COST 






SCHEDULES 


3 


45.3. 


MAJOR STRUCTURAL TYPES AND 






GRADES 


3 


45.4. 


MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 


42 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

45.5. 

45.5.1. 

45.5.2. 

45.5.3. 

45.5.4. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 

CONSTRUCTION PRICING TABLES 

COMMERCIAL STRUCTURE PRICING 

TABLE 

COMMERCIAL EXTERIOR WALL 

PRICING TABLE 

COMMERCIAL INTERIOR FINISH 

PRICING TABLE 

COMMERCIAL HEATING, AIR 

CONDITIONING, AND PLUMBING 

PRICING TABLE 



PAGE 
45- 



44 
44 
45 
46 



47 



08/01/89 



TC-7 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 



SECTION 45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS (Cont'd) 



PAFIAGRAPH 
NO. 

45.5.5. 

45.5.6. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

COMMERCIAL BUILDING OTHER 
FEATURES PRICING TABLE 
COMMERCIAL OTHER BUILDING 
AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS PRICING 
TABLE 



PAGE 


PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


45- 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


45- 




45.5.7. 


COMMERCIAL ELEVATOR PRICING 




48 




TABLES 


50 




45.5.8. 


GRAIN ELEVATORS & ANNEXES 


51 




45.5.9. 


FLAT STORAGE 


51 


49 


45.5.10. 


TANKS 


51 




45.5.11. 


BOLTED INDUSTRIAL BINS 


51 



SECTION 46. UN!T-IN-PLACE COSTS 



PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


46- 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


46- 


46.1. 


INTRODUCTION 


1 


46.6.9. 


DOORS 


11 


46.2. 


PROJECT SIZE 


1 


46.6.10. 


COLD STORAGE INSULATION 


11 


46.3. 


QUALITY OF CONSTRUCTION 


2 


46.6.11. 


WINDOWS 


12 


46.4. 


QUALITY GRADE AND FACTORS 


2 


46.6.12. 


STAIRS 


12 


46.5. 


DESIGN 


3 


46.6.13. 


ROOF VENTILATION 


12 


46.6. 


SCHEDULES 


3 


46.6.14. 


BOILERS 


13 


46.6.1. 


EXCAVATION AND FOUNDATION 




46.6.15. 


STEAM GENERATORS 


14 




CONSTRUCTION 


3 


46.6.16. 


WATER STORAGE TANKS 


14 


46.6.2. 


CONCRETE 


4 


46.6.17. 


STACKS 


15 


46.6.3. 


STEEL 


5 


46.6.18. 


RAILROAD SIDING 


15 


46.6.4. 


TIMBER 


5 


46.6.19. 


RAILROAD TRACK SCALES 


15 


46.6.5. 


WALL CONSTRUCTION 


5 


46.6.20. 


PAVING 


15 


46.6.6. 


FLOOR CONSTRUCTION 


7 


46.6.21 . 


TRUCK SCALES 


15 


46.6.7. 


ROOF CONSTRUCTION 


8 


46.6.22. 


WOVEN WIRE FENCE 


16 


46.6.8. 


INTERIOR FINISH 


10 


46.6.23. 


UTILITY PIPING 


16 




SECTION 47. 


DEPRECIATION 




PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


PARAGRAPH 




PAGE 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


47- 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


47- 


47.1. 


COST LEVELS 


1 


47.4.3.1. 


OBY PERCENT GOOD GUIDELINES 


8 


47.2. 


ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR 


2 


47.4.3.2. 


OBY PERCENT GOOD CALCULATION 


8 


47.3. 


DEVELOPING DEPRECIATION 




47.4.3.3. 


ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 


9 




SCHEDULES 


2 


47.4.3.4. 


OBY PERCENT GOOD TABLES 


12 


47.3.1. 


SALES RATIO ANALYSIS 


2 


47.4.4. 


COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 


15 


47.3.2. 


MARKET DEPRECIATION 


3 


47.4.4.1. 


COMMON CAUSES OF 




47.4. 


DEPRECIATION PROCEDURES 


4 




OBSOLESCENCE 


15 


47.4.1. 


DWELUNG 


4 


47.4.4.2. 


ECONOMIC LIFE TABLES 


16 


47.4.1.1. 


CDU RATING SYSTEM 


4 


47.4.4.3. 


PHYSICAL CONDITION / FUNCTIONAL 




47.4.1.2. 


AGE AND CDU 


5 




UTILITY RATING 


19 


47.4.1.3. 


SELECTION OF A PERCENT GOOD 


6 


47.4.4.4. 


MAIN BUILDING PERCENT GOOD 




47 4.1.4. 


EXAMPLES USING CDU 


6 




CALCULATION 


21 


47.4.2. 


MOBILE HOMES 


7 


47.4.4.5. 


COMMERCIAL OBY PERCENT GOOD 




47.4.3 


RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL 






CALCULATION 


21 




OTHER BUILDINGS & YARD 




47.4.4.6. 


COMMERCIAL PERCENT GOOD 






IMPROVEMENTS 


8 




TABLES 


21 



TC-8 



08/01/89 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd) 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 

G1 . ABBREVIATIONS 

G1.1. SKETCH 

01. 2. LAND AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS 

G1.3. MEASUREMENTS AND SYMBOLS 

G1.4. ARCHITECTURAL TERMS 

G1.5, GENERAL 



GLOSSARY 






PAGE 
G- 


PARAGRAPH 
NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 
G- 


1 

1 
2 
2 
3 
4 


G2. 

G2.1. 

G2.2. 

G2.3. 

G2.4. 


DEFINITIONS 
ARCHITECTURAL TERMS 
DATA PROCESSING TERMS 
REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL TERMS 
STATISTICAL TERMS 


5 

5 

10 

14 
23 



08/01/89 TC-9 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



TC-10 08/01/89 



INTRODUCTION 



INTRODUCTION 



THE MONTANA APPRAISAL MANUAL 



This manual has been prepared for the use of 
the Montana Department of Revenue, Property 
Assessment Division appraisal staff. It is designed 
to be used in conjunction with the statewide 
reappraisal beginning in 1987. The data collection 
and appraisal procedures are specific for the 1987 
reappraisal C7cle, and do not apply to the 
maintenance of current 1982 base year values. 

The appraisal manual is an integral part of the 
computer-assisted mass appraisal process. It 
provides the procedures to be followed in 
accurately and consistently collecting information 
about properties. It also presents the basic 
methodologies to be applied in estimating the 
market value of property considering the three 
accepted approaches to value: cost, income, and 
sales comparison. 

The appraisal manual is organized into five 
parts: 

PART ONE - APPRAISAL PLAN 

This part outlines the plan for conducting the 
1987 reappraisal cycle and implementing the new 
values at the conclusion of the reappraisal. 

PART TWO - APPRAISAL THEORY 

This part describes fundamental appraisal theory 
and the basis for the three commonly accepted 
approaches to value. It further describes the mass 
appraisal process, distinguishing it from the 
appraisal of individual properties. 

PART THREE - DATA COLLECTION 

This part describes the information to be 
collected about each property. It is organized into 
six sections, each dealing with a specific type of 
information. 

As part of the mass appraisal process, 
information is collected on each property. A 
standard form, called the Data Collection Card, or 
Property Record Card, is used to record this 
information in the field. Two data collection forms 
have been designed for use in conjunction with this 



manual. The Residential/Agricultural data 
collection form (RAD) and the 
Commercial/Industrial data collection form (CID). 
Some of the information on these forms is 
common to all properties; the portion of the form 
used to list data for improvements is unique to 
each form. Section 32 deals with the common 
data. Section 33, the residential improvement data, 
and Section 34, the commercial improvement data. 

Appendixes for some of the sections contain 
illustrations, examples, and tables of reference data 
that will be useful in performing the tasks or 
operations that are described in the section. 

Section 31 - I'roperty Administration Data, 

includes ownership, legal descriptions, levy district 
codes, etc. It is normally supplied to the 
Assessor's office from other sources, e.g., deeds, 
subdivision maps, etc. 

Section 32 - Common CAMA Data, is 

information that is to be collected on every 
property. It includes parcel identification data, site 
address, land breakdown information, sales data, 
etc. 

Section 33 - Residential and Agricultural 
Improvements, deals with the dwelling, mobile 
home, and residential and agricultural outbuilding 
data to be collected on each property. Where 
necessary, you may need to refer to more detailed 
information provided in later sections of the 
manual on quality grades, outbuildings, and sketch 
vectoring. 

Section 34 - Commercial and Industrial 
Improvements, discusses the information to be 
gathered for commercial and industrial structures. 

Section 35 - Sketch Vectoring, details the 
procedures to be used in vectoring sketches for 
input to the computer. Vectors can be used to 
automatically calculate improvement areas and to 
generate sketches displayed on computer monitors 
or printed on computer-output reports. 



08/01/89 



1-1 



INTRODUCTION 



Section 36 - Income und Kxpense Datu, 

describes the collection of economic information 
on commercial properties using the operating 
statement; and the transfer of this information to 
the Income and Expense Transfer Sheet for input 
into the CAMA system. 

PART FOUR - REPLACEMENT COST 

This part of the manual provides the 
specifications for the quality grades and various 
structure types as described in PART THREE, it 
also describes the procedures for applying the cost 
approach to estimate the market value of property. 

Section 41 - Estiniatin)> Replacement Cost New, 

briefiy describes the general steps that the 
appraiser must follow in determining the 
replacement cost of an improvement. 

The next five sections describe the specific 
procedures for calculating replacement costs for 
different types of structures. Each section includes 
quality grade specifications, pictures to aid in the 
classification and grading of structures, manual 
pricing instructions, and pricing tables. 



Section 42 - Dwellinjjs 

Section 43 - Mobile Homes 

Section 44 - Residential und Agricultural 

Outbuildini>s 
Section 45 - Commercial Buildings 
Section 46 - Unit-in-IMace Costs 

Section 47 - Depreciation, describes the 
procedure for determining the market value using 
the replacement cost. It deals with the normal 
depreciation and economic condition factors which 
must be applied in adjusting the value. 
Depreciation tables are provided as guidelines for 
use with dwellings, mobile homes, residential and 
agricultural outbuildings, and commercial 
structures. 

GLOSSARY 

The last part of the manual contains the 
Glossary, which includes Abbreviations and 
Definitions of Terms that arc used in various places 
and for various purposes throughout the manual. 



r 



r 



1-2 



08/01/89 



r 



r 



APPRAISAL PLAN 



PART ONE 
APPRAISAL PLAN 

This Part is to be supplied later. 



w 



08/01/89 1-1 



PART 1: APPRAISAL PLAN 



1-2 08/01/89 



%' 



» 



( 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



^ 



PART TWO: APPRAISAL THEORY 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

1. 

1.1. 
1.2. 
1.3. 

1.4. 

1.5. 

1.6. 
1.7. 
1.8. 

2. 

2.1. 

2.1.1. 

2.1.2. 

2.1.3. 

2.1.4. 

2.2. 

2.2,1. 
2.2.2. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 

RIGHTS AND THE PRINCIPLES OF 

VALUE 

BUNDLE OF RIGHTS 

THE NATURE AND MEANING OF VALUE 

VALUE IN USE AS OPPOSED TO VALUE 

IN EXCHANGE 

THE PRINCIPLE OF SUPPLY AND 

DEMAND 

THE PRINCIPLE OF HIGHEST AND 

BEST USE 

THE PRINCIPLE OF CHANGE 

THE PRINCIPLE OF SUBSTITUTION 

TRADITIONAL APPROACHES TO VALUE 

PROPERTY VALUATION TECHNIQUES 

APPLYING THE COST APPROACH 

REPLACEMENT COST 

ESTIMATING REPLACEMENT COST 

DEPRECIATION 

ESTIMATING DEPRECIATION 

APPLYING THE MARKET DATA 

APPROACH 

SELECTING VALID COMPARABLES 

PROCESSING COMPARABLE SALES 





PARAGRAPH 






PAGE 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 




2.3. 


APPLYING THE INCOME APPROACH 


8 


1 


2.3.1. 


INTRODUCTION 


8 


1 


2.3.2. 


THE PRINCIPLES OF CAPITALIZATION 


9 


2 


2.3.3. 


EXPLORING THE RENTAL MARKET 


9 




2.3.4. 


QUESTIONS RELATING TO INCOME 




3 




DATA 


9 




2.3.5. 


ANALYSIS OF EXPENSE DATA 


10 


3 


2.3.6. 


CAPITALIZATION METHODS 


11 




2.3.7. 


CURRENT TECHNIQUES 


12 


3 


2.3.8. 


DIRECT CAPITALIZATION 


12 


4 


2.3.9. 


MORTGAGE EQUITY CAPITALIZATION 


12 


4 


2.3.10. 


RESIDUAL TECHNIQUES 


13 


4 


2.3.11. 


MORTGAGE EQUITY METHOD 




5 




EXAMPLE 


13 


5 


3. 


LAND VALUATION TECHNIQUES 


14 


5 


3.1. 


COMPARABLE SALES METHOD 


14 


6 


3.2. 


THE LAND RESIDUAL TECHNIQUE 


15 


6 


3.3. 


RATIO METHOD 


16 


7 


4. 


MASS APPRAISING 


17 




4.1. 


OVERVIEW 


17 


7 


4.2. 


DATA INVENTORY 


19 


7 
8 


4.3. 


PROCESSING THE DATA 


22 



1. RIGHTS AND THE PRINCIPLES OF VALUE 



An appraisal, in itself, is nothing more than an 
opinion of value. This does not imply, however, 
that one opinion is necessarily as good as another; 
there are valid and accurate appraisals, and there 
are invalid and inaccurate appraisals. The validity 
of an appraisal can be measured against the 
supporting evidence from which it was derived, and 
its accuracy against that very thing it is intended to 
predict -- the actual behavior of the market. Each 
is fully contingent upon the ability of the appraiser 
to record adequate data and to interpret that data 
into an indication of value. 



cannot overstate the necessity of having a workable 
understanding of them. 

1.1. BUNDLE OF RIGHTS 

Real estate and real property are often used 
interchangeably. Generally speaking, real estate 
pertains to the real or fixed improvcmcnis to the 
land such as structures and other appurtenances, 
whereas real property encompasses all ihe interests, 
benefits and rights enjoyed by the ownership ol the 
real estate. 



Appraising real property, like the solving of any 
problem, is an exercise in reasoning. It is a 
discipline, and like any discipline, it is founded on 
fundamental economic and social principles. From 
these principles evolve certain premises which, 
when applied to the valuation of properly, serve to 
explain the reaction of the market. This section 
concerns itself with those concepts and principles 
basic to the property valuation process. One 



Real property ownership involves the Bundle of 
Rights Theory which asserts that the owner has the 
right to enter it, use it, sell it, lease it, or give it 
away, as he so chooses. These rights arc 
guaranteed by law, but they are subject to certain 
governmental and private restrictions. 



08/01/89 



2-1 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



The Governmental restrictions are found in its 
power to: 

• tax property. 

• take property by condemnation for the benefit 
of the public, providing that just compensation 
is made to the owner (Eminent Domain). 

• police property by enforcing any regulations 
deemed necessary to promote the safety, health, 
morals and general welfare of the public. 

• provide for the reversion of ownership to the 
state in cases where a competent heir to the 
property cannot be ascertained (Escheat). 

Private restrictions imposed upon property are 
often in the form of agreements incorporated into 
the deed. The deed also spells out precisely which 
rights of the total bundle of rights the buyer is 
acquiring. Since value is related to each of these 
rights, the appraiser should know precisely which 
rights are involved in his appraisal. 

Appraisals for Ad Valorem tax purposes 
generally assume the property is owned in the "Fee 
Simple", meaning that the total bundle of rights is 
considered to be intact. 



with (money) and that of the commodity 
acquired in the exchange (property)." 

"Value depends upon the relation of an object 
to unsatisfied needs; that is, supply and 
demand." 

"Value is the present worth of future benefits 
arising out of ownership to typical users and 
investors." 

With these definitions, one can see that value is 
not an intrinsic characteristic of the commodity 
itself. On the contrary, value is determined by 
people - created by desire, modified by varying 
degrees of desire and reduced by lack of desire. 
Throughout the definitions a relationship between 
the purchase and the commodity (property) is 
implied; this relationship is "value". A purchaser 
desires a property because it is a useful commodiiy 
in that it has utiUty. Utility is a prerequisite to 
value, but utility standing alone does not 
sufficiently cause value. If a great supply of a 
useful commodity exists, as for example air, needs 
would be automatically satisfied, desire would not 
be aroused, and therefore value would not be 
created. Therefore, besides having utility, in order 
to effectively arouse desire, the commodiiy must 
also be scarce. 



1.2. THE NATURE AND MEANING OF VALUE 

An appraisal is an opinion or estimate of value. 
The concept of value is basic to the appraisal 
process and calls for a thorough understanding. 
The American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers' 
Appraisal Terminology Handbook, 1981 edition, 
offers the following definitions of value: 

"The measure of value is the amount (for 
example, of money) which the potential 
purchaser probably will pay for possession of 
the thing desired." 

"The ratio of exchange of one commodity for 
another, for example, one bushel of wheat in 
terms of a given number of bushels of corn; 
thus the value of one thing may be expressed in 
terms of another thing. Money is the common 
denominator by which value is measured." 

"It is the power of acquiring commodities in 
exchange, generally with a comparison of 
utilities - the utility of the commodity parted 



One additional factor is necessary to complete 
the value equation -- the ability to become a buyer. 
A translation must be made of desire into a unit at 
exchange; a buyer must have purchasing power. 
The relationship is now complete: The commodiiy 
has utility and is relatively scarce, it arouses desire, 
and the buyer is able to satisfy that desire by 
trading for it, and so value is created. The 
question is how much value, and determining this 
is the job of the appraiser. 

Numerous definitions of value have been 
offered, some simple and some complex. It would 
seem, though, that any valid definition ol value 
would necessarily embody the elements ol uiiliiy, 
desire, scarcity and purchasing power. 
Furthermore, the concept of value very rarely 
stands alone. Instead, it is generally prefi.xcd by a 
descriptive term which serves to relate it lo a 
specific appraisal purpose or activity such as "loan 
value". Since appraisals arc made for a variety of 
reasons, it is important for the appraiser to clarify 
the specific purpose of the appraisal and the type 
of value which he seeks to estimate. 



2-2 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



3 



For Ad Valorem Tax purposes, the value sought 
is generally market value. The descriptive term 
"market" indicates the activity of buyers and sellers. 
MARKET VALUE is the justifiable price, or that 
price which an informed and intelligent buyer, fully 
aware of the existence of competing properties, and 
not being compelled to act, would be justified in 
paying for a particular property. 

1.3. VALUE IN USE AS OPPOSED TO VALUE 

IN EXCHANGE 

We have stated that there are a number of 
qualifying distinctions made in reference to the 
meaning of value. One of the most common and 
probably the most important relative to the 
purpose of this manual is the distinction between 
value in use and value in exchange. We have 
defined market value as a justifiable price which 
buyers, in general, will pay in the market. The 
question arises then as to the value of property 
which, by nature of its special and highly unique 
design, is useful to the present owner, but relatively 
less useful to buyers in the market. One can 
readily see that such a property's utility value may 
differ greatly from its potential sales price. It is 
even possible that no market for such a property 
exists. Such a property is said to have value in use 
which refers to the actual value of a commodity to 
a specific person, as opposed to value in exchange 
which aligns itself with market value, referring to 
the dollar-value of a commodity to buyers in 
general. 

1.4. THE PRINCIPLE OF SUPPLY AND 

DEMAND 

Among the forces which constantly operate to 
influence supply and demand are population 
growth, new techniques in transportation, 
purchasing power, price levels, wage rates, taxation, 
governmental controls, and scarcity. A sudden 
population growth in an area would create an 
increase in demand for housing. If the demand 
increased at a higher rate than the supply, there 
could soon be a scarcity of housing. If the demand 
was backed up by purchasing power, rentals and 
sale prices would tend to increase and ultimately 
reach a level which would tend to stimulate more 
builders to compete for the potential profits and 
thus serve to increase the supply toward the level 
of demand. As the supply is increased demand 
would begin to taper off. This would cause rentals 
and sale prices to level off. When builders, due to 
increases in labor and materials rates, are no 



longer able to build cheaply enough to meet the 
new level of prices and rents, competition would 
tend to taper off and supply would level off. The 
cycle is then complete. 

Balance occurs when reasonable competition 
serves to coordinate supply with demand. When 
competition continues unchecked to produce a 
volume which exceeds the demand, the net returns 
to investors are no longer adequate to pay all the 
costs of ownership, resulting in loss rather than 
profit and consequently, a decline in values. 

A community may well support two shopping 
centers, but the addition of a third shopping center 
may increase the supply to an excess. If this 
occurs, one of two effects are caused; either the 
net dollar return to all the shopping centers will be 
reduced below that level necessary to support the 
investment, or one of the shopping centers will 
flourish at the others' expense. 

1.5. THE PRINCIPLE OF HIGHEST AND BEST 
USE 

The highest and best use for a property is that 
use which will produce the highest net return to 
the land for a given period of time within the 
limits of those uses which are economically 
feasible, probable and legally permissible. 

On a community-wide basis, the major 
determining factor in highest and best use is the 
maximum quantity of land which can be devoted to 
a specific use and still yield a satisfactory return. 
Once a suitable basic use has been chosen for a 
specific property, each increment of capital 
investment to the existing or planned improvement 
will increase the net return to the land only up to 
a certain point; after this point is reached, the not 
return to the land begins to diminish. This is the 
point at which the land is at its highest and best 
use. 

For example, in planning a high-rise office 
building, each additional upper floor represents an 
extra capital expenditure which must yield a certain 
return to the investor. This return will be 
dependent upon the levels of economic rent which 
the market will bear at the time. An optimum 
number of floors can be calculated above which ilic 
income yield requirements of additional 
expenditures will no longer be satisfactorily mci. 
This, notwithstanding the possibility of other more 



08/01/89 



2-3 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



particular considerations, should determine the 
number of stories of the building. 

Detailed analysis of this type is rarely thrust 
upon the property tax appraiser. Generally the tax 
appraiser will And the most prudent course of 
action is to consider the present use and follow 
development rather than anticipate it. 

1.6. THE PRINCIPLE OF CHANGE 

The impact of change on the value of real 
property manifests itself in the life cycle of a 
neighborhood. The cycle is characterized by three 
stages of evolution: the development and growth 
evidenced by improving values; the leveling off 
stage evidenced by static values; and finally, the 
stage of infiltration of decay evidenced by declining 
values. 

The highest and best use today is not 
necessarily the highest and best use tomorrow. 
The highest and best use of the land often lies in a 
succession of uses. A declining single-family 
residential neighborhood may be ripe for 
multi-family, commercial or industrial development. 
Whether it is or not depends upon the relationship 
of present or anticipated future demand with 
existing supply. 

In estimating value, the appraiser is obligated to 
reasonably anticipate the future benefits, as well as 
the present benefits derived from ownership and to 
evaluate the property in light of the quality, 
quantity, and duration of these benefits based on 
actual data as opposed to speculative or potential 
benefits which may or may not occur. 

1.7. THE PRINCIPLE OF SUBSTITUTION 

Value is created by people in the market place. 
It is the function of translating demand into a 
commodity of exchange. When the benefits and 
advantages derived from two properties are equal, 
the lowest priced properly receives the greatest 
demand, and rightfully so. The informed buyer is 
not justified in paying anything more for a property 
than it would cost to acquire an equally desirable 
property. That is to say that the value of a 
property is established as that amount for which 
equally desirable comparable properties are being 
bought and sold in the market. Herein lies an 
approach to value ... and the basis of the valuation 
process. 



1.8. TRADITIONAL APPROACHES TO VALUE 

In the preceding paragraphs, it has been stated 
that value is an elusive item that occurs in many 
different forms, and that the forces and influences 
which combine to create, sustain, or destroy value 
are numerous and varied. It is the appraiser's 
function to define the type of value sought, to 
compile and to analyze all related data, and giving 
due consideration to all the factors which may 
influence the value, to process and translate that 
data into a final opinion or estimate of value. 
This he must do for each property he is to 
appraise. 

The processing of this data into a conclusion of 
value generally takes the form of three recognized 
approaches to value: Cost Approach, Market Data 
Approach, and Income Approach. Underlying each 
of the approaches is the principle that the 
justifiable price of a property is no more than the 
cost of acquiring and/or reproducing an equally 
desirable substitute property. The use of one or 
all three approaches in the valuation of a property 
is determined by the quantity, quality, and accuracy 
of the data available to the appraiser. 

The COST APPROACH involves making an 
estimate of the depreciated cost of reproducing or 
replacing the building and site improvements. 
Reproduction Cost refers to the cost at a given 
point in time of reproducing a replica property, 
whereas Replacement Cost refers to the cost of 
producing improvements of equal utility. 
Depreciation is deducted from this cost new for 
loss in value caused by physical deterioration, and 
functional or economic obsolescence. To this 
depreciated cost is added the estimated value of 
the land, resulting in an indication of value derived 
by the Cost Approach. 

The significance of the Cost Approach lies in 
its extent of application ... it is the one approach 
that can be used on all types of construction. It is 
a starting point for appraisers, and therefore it is a 
very effective "yardstick" in any equalization 
program for Ad Valorem taxes. Its widest 
application is in the appraisal of properties where 
the lack of adequate market and income data 
preclude the reasonable application of the other 
traditional approaches. 



2-4 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



The MARKET DATA APPROACH involves 
the compiling of sales and offerings of properties 
which are comparable to the property being 
appraised. These sales and offerings are then 
adjusted for any dissimilarities, and a value range 
obtained by comparison of said properties. The 
approach is reliable to the extent that the 
properties are comparable, and the appraiser's 
judgment of proper adjustments is sound. The 
procedure for using this approach is essentially the 
same for all types of property with the only 
difference being the elements of comparison. 

The significance of this approach lies in its 
ability to produce estimates of value which directly 
reflect the attitude of the market. Its application 
is contingent upon the availability of comparable 
sales, and therefore finds its widest range in the 
appraisal of vacant land and residential properties. 

The INCOME APPROACH measures the 
present worth of the future benefits of a property 



by the capitalization of the net income stream over 
the remaining economic life of the properly. The 
approach involves making an estimate of the 
"effective gross income" of a property, derived by 
deducting the appropriate vacant and collection 
losses from its estimated economic rent, as 
evidenced by the yield of comparable properties. 
From this figure then is deducted applicable 
operating expenses, insurance, and reserve 
allowances for replacements resulting in an 
estimate of net income, which may then be 
capitalized into an indication of value. 

The approach obviously has its basic application 
in the appraisals of properties universally bought 
and sold on their ability to generate and maintain 
a stream of income for their owners. The 
effectiveness of the approach lies in the appraiser's 
ability to relate to the changing economic 
environment and to analyze income yields in terms 
of their relative quality and durability. 



2. PROPERTY VALUATION TECHNIQUES 



1 



2.1. APPLYING THE COST APPROACH 

If the highest and best use of a property is its 
present use, a valid indication of value may be 
derived by estimating the value of the land, and 
adding the land value to the depreciated value of 
the structures on the land; the resulting equation 
being... 

Estimated Land Value 
+ Estimated Replacement Cost New of 
Structures 

- Estimated Depreciation 

= Indication of Property Value 

Since estimating the land value is covered in a 
separate section, this section will address itself to 
the two remaining elements. Replacement Cost and 
Depreciation. 

2.1.1. Replacement Cost 

Replacement Cost is the current cost of 
producing an improvement of equal utility to the 
subject property; it may or may not be the cost of 
reproducing a replica properly. The distinction 
being drawn is one between Replacement Cost, 
which refers to a substitute properly of equal 



utility, as opposed to Reproduction Cost, which 
refers to a substitute replica property. In a 
particular situation the two concepts may be 
interchangeable, but they are not necessarily so. 
They both, however, have application in the Cost 
Approach to value, the difference being reconciled 
in the consideration of depreciation allowances. 

In actual practice, outside of a few historic lypc 
communities in this country, developers and 
builders, for obvious economic reasons, replace 
buildings, not reproduce them. It logically follows 
that if an appraiser's job is to measure the actions 
of knowledgeable persons in the market place, the 
use of proper replacement costs should provide an 
accurate point of beginning in the valuation of 
most improvements. 

The replacement cost includes the total cost of 
construction incurred by the builder whether 
preliminary to, during the course of, or after 
completion of the construction of a particular 
building. Among these are material, labor, all 
subcontracts, builders' overhead and prolit, 
architectural and engineering fees, consuliaiion 
fees, survey and permit fees, legal fees, taxes, 
insurance, and the cost of interim financing. 



08/01/89 



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PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



2.1.2. Estimating Replacement Cost 

There are various methods that may be 
employed to estimate replacement cost new. The 
methods widely used in the appraisal Held are the 
quantity-survey method, the unit-in-place or 
component part-in-place method, and the model 
method. 

The Quantity-Survey Method involves a detailed 
itemized estimate of the quantities of various 
materials used, labor and equipment requirements, 
architect and engineering fees, contractor's 
overhead and profit, and other related costs. This 
method is primarily employed by contractors and 
cost estimators for bidding and budgetary purposes 
and is much too laborious and costly to be 
effective in every day appraisal work, especially in 
the mass appraisal field. The method, however, 
does have its place in that it is used to develop 
certain unit-in-place costs which can be more 
readily applied to estimating for appraisal purposes. 

The Unit-in-Place Method is employed by 
establishing in-place cost estimates (including 
material, labor, overhead and profit) for various 
structural components. The prices established for 
the specified components are related to their most 
common units of measurement such as cost per 
yard of excavation, cost per lineal foot of footings, 
and cost per square foot of floor covering. 

The unit prices can then be multiplied by the 
respective quantities of each as they are found in 
the composition of the subject building to derive 
the whole dollar component cost, the sum of which 
is equal to the estimated cost of the entire 
building, providing of course, that due 
consideration is given to all other indirect costs, 
which may be applicable. This component 
part-in-place method of using basic units can also 
be extended to establish prices for larger 
components in-place such as complete structural 
floors (including the finish flooring, sub-floor, joists 
and framing) which are likely to occur repeatedly 
in a number of buildings. 

The Model Method is still a further extension, 
in that Unit-in-Place costs are used to develop base 
unit square foot or cubic foot costs for total 
specified representative structures in place, which 
may then serve as "models" to derive the base unit 
cost of comparable structures to be appraised. The 
base unit cost of the model most representative of 
the subject building is applied to the subject 



building and appropriate tables of additions and 
deductions are used to adjust the base cost of the 
subject building to account for any significant 
variations between it and the model. 

Developed and applied properly, these pricing 
techniques will assist the appraiser in arriving at 
valid and accurate estimates of replacement cost 
new as of a given time. That cost generally 
represents the upper limit of value of a structure. 
The difference between its replacement cost new 
and its present value is depreciation. The final 
step in completing the Cost Approach then is to 
estimate the amount of depreciation and deduct 
said amount from the replacement cost new. 

2.1.3. Depreciation 

Simply stated, depreciation can be defined as "a 
loss in value from all causes." As applied to real 
estate, it represents the loss in value between 
market value and the sum of the replacement cost 
new of the improvements plus the land value as of 
a given time. The causes for the loss in value may 
be divided into three broad classifications: Physical 
Deterioration, Functional Obsolescence, and 
Economic Obsolescence. 

Physical Deterioration pertains to the wearing 
out of the various building components, referring 
to both short-life and long-life terms, through the 
action of the elements, age, and use. The 
condition may be considered either "curable" or 
"incurable", depending upon whether it may or may 
not be practical and economically feasible to cure 
the deficiency by repair and replacement. 

Functional Obsolescence is a condition caused 
by either inadequacies or over-adequacies in design, 
style, composition, or arrangement inherent to the 
structure itself, which tends to lessen its usefulness. 
Like physical deterioration, the condition may be 
considered either curable or incurable. Some of 
the more common examples of functional 
obsolescence are excessive wall and ceiling heights, 
excessive structural construction, surplus capacity, 
ineffective layouts, and inadequate building services. 

Economic Obsolescence is a condition caused by 
factors extraneous to the property itself, such as 
changes in population characteristics and economic 
trends, encroachment of inharmonious land uses, 
excessive taxes, and governmental restrictions. The 
condition is generally incurable in that the causes 
lie outside the property owner's realm o( control. 



2-6 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



1 



2.1.4. Estimating Depreciation 

An estimate of depreciation represents an 
opinion of the appraiser as to the degree that the 
present and future appeal of a property has been 
diminished by deterioration and obsolescence. Of 
the three estimates necessary to the cost approach, 
it is the one most difficult to make. The accuracy 
of the estimate will be a product of the appraiser's 
experience in recognizing the symptoms of 
deterioration and obsolescence and the ability to 
exercise sound judgment in equating all 
observations to the proper monetary allowance to 
be deducted from the replacement cost new. There 
are several acceptable methods which may be 
employed: 

Physical deterioration and/or functional 
obsolescence can be measured by observing and 
comparing the physical condition and/or 
functional deficiencies of the subject property as 
of a given time with either an actual or 
hypothetical, comparable, new and properly 
planned structure. 

Curable physical deterioration and functional 
obsolescence can be measured by estimating the 
cost of restoring each item of depreciation to a 
physical condition as good as new, or estimating 
the cost of eliminating the functional deficiency. 

Functional and economic obsolescence can be 
measured by capitalizing the estimated loss in 
rental due to the structural deficiency or lack of 
market demand. 

Total accrued depreciation may be derived by 
first estimating the total useful life of a 
structure and then translating its present 
condition, desirability, and usefulness into an 
effective age (rather than an actual age) which 
would represent that portion of its total life 
(percentage) which has been used up. 

Total accrued depreciation may also be 
estimated by deriving the amount of 
depreciation recognized by purchasers as 
evidenced in the prices paid for the property in 
the market place; the loss of value being the 
difference between the cost of replacing the 
structure new and its actual selling price (total 
property selling price less the estimated value of 
the land). 



2.2. APPLYING THE MARKET DATA 
APPROACH 

An indication of the value of a property can be 
derived by analyzing the selling prices of 
comparable properties. The use of this technique, 
often referred to as the "comparison approach" or 
"comparable sales approach", involves the selection 
of a sufficient number of valid comparable sales 
and the adjustment of each sale to the subject 
property to account for variations in time, location, 
site and structural characteristics. 

2.2.1. Seiecting Vaiid Comparabies 

Since market value has been defined as the 
price which an informed and intelligent buyer, fully 
aware of the existence of competing properties and 
not being compelled to act is justified in paying for 
a particular property, it follows that if market value 
is to be derived from analyzing comparable sales, 
that the sales must represent valid "arms length" 
transactions. Due consideration must be given to 
the conditions and circumstances of each sale 
before selecting the sales for analysis. Some 
examples of sales which do not normally reflect 
valid market conditions are as follows: 

Sales in connection with foreclosures, 
bankruptcies, condemnations and other legal 
action. 

Sales to or by federal, state, county and local 
governmental agencies. 

Sales to or by religious, charitable or 
benevolent tax exempt agencies. 

Sales involving family transfers, or "love and 
affection." 

Sales involving intra-corporate affiliations. 

Sales involving the retention of life interests. 

Sales involving cemetery lots. 

Sales involving mineral or timber rights, and 
access or drainage rights. 

Sales involving the transfer of part interests. 



08/01/89 



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PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



In addition to selecting valid market 
transactions, it is equally important to select 
properties which are truly comparable to the 
property under appraisement. For instance, sales 
involving both real property and personal property 
or chattels may not be used unless the sale can be 
adjusted to reflect only the real property 
transaction, nor can sales of non-operating or 
deficient industrial plants be validly compared with 
operating plants. The comparables and subject 
properties must exhibit the same use, and the site 
and structural characteristics must exhibit an 
acceptable degree of comparability. 

2.2.2. Processing Comparable Sales 

All comparables must be adjusted to the subject 
property to account for variations in time and 
location. The other major elements of comparison 
will differ depending upon the type of properly 
being appraised. In selecting these elements, the 
appraiser must give prime consideration to the 
same factors which influence the prospective buyers 
of particular types of properties. 

The typical home buyer is interested in the 
property's capacity to provide the family with a 
place to live. A primary concern is with the living 
area, utility area, number of rooms, number of 
baths, age, structural quality and condition, the 
presence of a modern kitchen and recreational 
conveniences of the house. Equally important is 
the location and neighborhood, including the 
proximity to and the quality of schools, public 
transportation, and recreational and shopping 
facilities. 



generally find it difficult to locate a sufficient 
number of comparable sales, especially of 
properties which are truly comparable in their 
entirety. It will, therefore, generally be necessary 
to select smaller units of comparison such as price 
per square foot, per unit, per room, etc. In doing 
so, great care must be exercised in selecting a unit 
of comparison that represents a logical common 
denominator for the properties being compared. A 
unit of comparison which is commonly used and 
proven to be fairly effective is the Gross Rent 
Multiplier, generally referred to as G.R.M. which is 
derived by dividing the gross annual income into 
the sales price. Using such units of comparison 
enables the appraiser to compare two properties 
which are similar in use and structural features, but 
differ significantly in size and other characteristics. 

Having selected the major factors of 
comparison, it remains for the appraiser to adjust 
each of the factors to the subject properly. In 
comparing the site, adjustments for size, location, 
accessibility, and site improvements must be made. 
In comparing the structures, adjustments for size, 
quality, design, condition, and significant structural 
and mechanical components also must be made. 
The adjusted selling prices of the comparable 
properties will establish a range in value in which 
the value of the subject properly will fall. Further 
analysis of the factors should enable the apprai.scr 
to narrow the range down to the value level which 
is most applicable to the subject property. 

2.3. APPLYING THE INCOME APPROACH 

2.3.1. Introduction 



In addition to the residential amenities, the 
buyer of agricultural property is primarily 
interested in the productive capacity of the land, 
the accessibility to the market place, and the 
condition and functional utility of the farm 
buildings and structures on the land. 

The typical buyer of commercial property, 
including warehouses and certain light industrial 
plants, is primarily concerned with its capability lo 
produce revenue. Of special interest will be the 
age, design and structural quality and condition of 
the improvements, the parking facilities, and the 
location relative to transportation, labor markets 
and trade centers. 

In applying the market data approach to 
commercial/industrial property, the appraiser will 



The justified price paid for income producing 
property is no more than the amount of investment 
required lo produce a comparably desirable rciurn; 
and since the market can be analyzed in order to 
determine the net return actually aniicipaicd by 
investors, ii follows that the value of income 
producing property can be derived from the income 
which it is capable of producing. What is invoKcd 
is an estimate of income through the collection and 
analysis of available economic data, the 
development of a property capiialization raic, and 
the processing of the net income into an indication 
of value by employing one or more of the 
acceptable capitalization methods and techniques. 



2-8 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



2.3.2. The Principles of Capitalization 

Capitalization is the process for converting the 
net income produced by property into an indication 
of value. Through the years of appraisal history, a 
number of procedures have been recognized and 
employed by appraisal authorities in determining 
the value of real estate by the income approach. 
Although present-day practice recommends only 
certain methods, we will at least touch on the 
other approaches to value - even though they may 
not be accepted in today's appraisal scene because 
they do not accurately reflect the current market 
conditions. 

2.3.3. Exploring the Rental Market 

The starting point for the appraiser is an 
investigation of current economic rent in a specific 
area in order to establish a sound basis for 
estimating the gross income which should be 
returned from competitive properties. The 
appraiser must make a distinction between 
economic rent or the rent which property is 
normally expected to produce on the open market, 
as opposed to control rent or the rent which 
property is actually realizing at the time of the 
appraisal due to lease terms established some time 
in the past. 

The first step then is to obtain specific income 
and expense data on properties which best typify 
normal market activity. The data is necessary to 
develop local guidelines for establishing the 
economic rent and related expenses for various 
types of properties. 

The next step is to similarly collect income and 
expense data on individual properties, and to 
evaluate the data against the established guidelines. 

The collection of income and expense data (I & 
E) is an essential phase in the valuation of 
commercial properties. The appraiser is primarily 
concerned with the potential earning power of the 
property. The objective is to estimate its expected 
net income. Income and Expense Statements of 
past years are valuable only to the extent which 
they serve this end. The statements must not only 
be complete and accurate, but must also stand the 
test of market validity. Consideration of the 
following factors should assist the appraiser in 
evaluating the I & E data in order to arrive at an 
accurate and realistic estimate of net income. 



2.3.4. Questions Relating to Income Data 

• Was the reported income produced entirely by 
the subject property? Very often the rental will 
include an amount attributable to one or more 
additional parcels of real estate. In this case, it 
would be necessary to obtain the proper 
allocations of rent. 

• Was the income attributable to the subject 
property as it physically existed at the time of 
the appraisal, or did the appraisal include the 
value of leasehold improvements and 
remodeling for which the tenant paid in 
addition to rent? If so, it may be necessary to 
adjust the income to reflect economic rent. 

• Does the reported income represent a full year's 
return? It is often advisable to obtain both 
monthly and annual amounts as a cross-check. 

• Does the income reflect current economic rent? 
Is either part or all of the income predicated on 
old leases? If so, what are the provisions for 
renewal options and rates? 

• Does the reported income reflect 100% 
occupancy? What percentage of occupancy docs 
it reflect? Is this percentage typical of this type 
of property, or is it due to special non-recurring 
causes? 

• Does the income include rental for all 
marketable space? Does it include an 
allowance for space, if any, which is either 
owner or manager occupied? Is the allowance 
realistic? 

• Is the income attributable directly to the real 
estate and conventional amenities? Is some of 
the income derived from furnishings and 
appliances? If so, it will be necessary to adjust 
the income or make provisions for reserves to 
eventually replace them, whichever local custom 
dictates. 

• In many properties an actual rental does not 
exist because the real estate is owner occupied. 
In this event it is necessary to obtain other 
information to provide a basis to estimate 
economic rent. The information required 
pertains to the business operation using the 
property. Proper analysis of the annual 
operating statements of the business, including 
gross sales or receipts, can provide an accurate 



08/01/89 



2-9 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



estimate of economic rent. Information 
requirements for a few of the more common 
properly uses are as follows: 

Retail Stores: The annual net gross sales. 
(Gross sales less returned merchandise) 

Hotels and Motels: The annual operating 
statement of the business. If retail or office 
space is leased in these properties, obtain the 
actual rent paid. 

Theaters: The annual gross receipts (including 
admissions and concessions) and seating 
capacity. 

Automobile Parking: The annual gross receipts. 

2.3.5. Analysis of Expense Data 

The appraiser must consider only those 
expenses which are applicable to the cost of 
ownership; that is, those expenses which are 
normally owner incurred. Any portion of the 
expenses incurred directly or indirectly by the 
tenant should not be considered. Each expense 
item must stand the test of both legitimacy and 
accuracy. How do they compare with the 
established guidelines and norms? Are they 
consistent with the expenses incurred by 
comparable properties? 

Management refers to the cost of 
administration. These charges should realistically 
reflect what a real estate management company 
would actually charge to manage the property. If 
no management fee is shown on the statement, a 
proper allowance must be made by the appraiser. 
On the other hand, if excessive management 
charges are reported, as is often the case, the 
appraiser must disregard the reported charges and 
use an amount which he deems appropriate and 
consistent with comparable type properties. The 
cost of management bears a relationship with the 
risk of ownership and will generally range between 
4 to 10% of the gross income. 

General expenses may include such items as the 
cost of services and supplies not charged to a 
particular category. Unemployment and F.I.C.A. 
ta,xes, Workmen's Compensation, and other 
employee insurance plans are usually legitimate 
deductions when employees are a part of the 
building operation. 



Reimbursed expenses refer to the cost 
associated with the maintenance of public or 
common areas of the commercial property. This 
expense is passed on to the tenants and should, 
therefore, only be considered when the amount of 
reimbursement is included as income. 

Miscellaneous expenses is the "catch-all" 
category for incidentals. This item should reflect a 
very nominal percentage of the income. If 
expenses reported seem to be excessive, the 
appraiser must examine the figures carefully in 
order to determine if they are legitimate expenses, 
and if so, to allocate them to their proper category. 

Cleaning expenses are legitimate charges. They 
are for such items as general housekeeping and 
maid service, and include the total cost of labor 
and related supplies. All or a portion of the 
cleaning services may be provided by outside firms 
working on a "contract" basis. Cleaning expenses 
vary considerably and are particularly significant in 
operations such as offices and hotels. "Rule of 
thumb" norms for various operations are made 
available through national management 
associations. The appraiser should have little 
difficulty in establishing local guidelines. 

Utilities are generally legitimate expenses and if 
reported accurately, need very little reconstruction 
by the appraiser, other than to determine if the 
charges are consistent with comparable properties. 
Local utility companies can provide the appraiser 
with definition guidelines. 

Heat and Air Conditioning costs are ofien 
reported separately and in addition to utilities. 
The expenses would include the cost of fuel other 
than the above mentioned utilities, and may 
include, especially in large installations, the cost of 
related supplies, inspection fees, and maintenance 
charges. These are generally legitimate costs, and 
the same precautions prescribed for "utilities" are 
in order. 

Elevator expenses, including the cost of repairs 
and services, are legitimate deductions, and are 
generally handled through service contracts. These 
fees can generally be regarded as fairly stable 
annual recurring expenses. 

Decorating and minor alterations are necessan.' 
to maintain the income stream of many commercial 
properties. In this respect they are legitimate 
expenses. However, careful scrutiny of these 



t 



2-10 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



figures is required. Owners tend to include the 
cost of major alterations and remodeling which are, 
in fact, capital expenditures, and as such are not 
legitimate operating expenses. 

Repairs and Maintenance expenses reported for 
any given year may not necessarily be a true 
indication of the average or typical annual expense 
for these items. For example, a statement could 
reflect a substantial expenditure for a specific year 
(possibly because the roof was replaced and/or 
several items of deferred maintenance were 
corrected); yet the statement for the following year 
may indicate that repairs and maintenance charges 
were practically nil. It is necessary for the 
appraiser to either obtain complete economic 
history on each property in order to make a proper 
judgment as to the average annual expense for 
these items, or include a proper allowance based 
on norms for the type and age of the 
improvements to cover annual expenses. Since it is 
neither possible nor practical to obtain enough 
economic history on every property, the latter 
method is generally used and the amounts reported 
for repairs and maintenance are then estimated by 
the appraiser. 

Insurance. Caution must be used in accepting 
insurance expense figures. Cost shown may be for 
more than one year, or may be for blanket policies 
including more than one building. It is generally 
more effective for the appraiser to establish his 
own guidelines for insurance. He must also be 
careful to include only items applicable to the real 
estate. Fire extended coverage and owner's liability 
are the main insurance expense items. Separate 
coverages on special component parts of the 
buildings, such as elevators and plate glass, are also 
legitimate expenses. 

Real Estate Taxes. In making appraisals for tax 
purposes, the appraiser must exclude the actual 
amount reported for real estate taxes. Since future 
taxes will be based on his appraised value, the 
appraiser must express the taxes as a factor of the 
estimated value. This can be done by including an 
additional percentage in the capitalization rate to 
account for real estate taxes. 

Depreciation. The figure shown for 
depreciation on an operating statement is a 
"bookkeeping figure" which the owner uses for 
Internal Revenue purposes and should not be 
considered in the income approach. This reflects a 



tax advantage which is one of the benefits of 
ownership. 

Interest. Although interest is considered a 
legitimate expense, it is always included in the 
Capitalization Rate. Most property is appraised as 
if it were "free and clear"; however, the appraiser 
does consider the interest of a current mortgage in 
the Capitalization Rate build-up. 

Land Rent. When appraising for real estate tax 
purposes, only the sum of the leasehold and the 
leased fee is usually considered. Land rent is not 
deducted as an expense. Considered separately, 
rent from a ground lease would be an expense to 
the leasehold interest and an income to the leased 
fee. However, if land were rented from another 
property to supply additional parking for example, 
that land rent would be an allowable expense. 

It is obvious that there are some expense items 
encountered on operating statements that the 
appraiser should not consider as allowable. This is 
because he is interested in legitimate cash expenses 
only. Income statements are usually designed for 
income tax purposes where credit can be taken for 
borrowing costs and theoretical depreciation losses. 

It is virtually impossible and certainly not 
always practical to obtain a complete economic 
history on every commercial property being 
appraised. On many properties, however, detailed 
economic information can be obtained through the 
use of Income and Expense forms. One must 
realistically recognize the fact that the data 
obtainable on some properties is definitely limited. 

In most cases, the gross income and a list of 
the services and amenities furnished can be 
obtained during the data gathering operation. 
However, in order to insure a sound appraisal, it 
may be necessary to estimate the fixed and 
operating expenses. This is best accomplished by 
setting guidelines for expenses, based on a percent 
of Effective Gross Income or a cost per square 
foot of leasable area. These percentages or costs 
will vary depending on the services supplied and 
the type of property. 

2.3.6. Capitalization Methods 

The most prominent methods of capitalization 
are Direct, Straight Line, Sinking Fund, and 
Annuity. Each of these is a valid method for 
capitalizing income into an indication of value. 



08/01/89 



2-11 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



The basis for their validity lies in the action of the 
market, which indicates that the value of income 
producing property can be derived by equating the 
net income with the net return anticipated by 
informed investors. This can be expressed in terms 
of a simple equation: 



Value = 



Net Income 



Capitalization Rate 



The Straight Line and Sinking Fund methods 
are both actual forms of Straight Capitalization, 
with one using Straight Line recapture and the 
other using Sinking Fund recapture. Both methods 
follow the same basic principles as Direct 
Capitalization, differing only in that they provide 
for separate capitalization rates for land and 
building; the building rate differing from the land 
rate in that it includes an allowance for recapture. 

Straight Line Capitalization allows for 
"recapture" based on remaining economic life of 
the building - implying that at the end of that 
period of time, there would be a zero improvement 
value. There are three fallacies in this thinking. 
First, the potential buyer (investor) has no 
intention of holding the property that long. The 
average investment period might average ten years. 
Second, the investor anticipates that at the end of 
that period he will either get all his money back or 
will make a profit. And third, is the depreciation 
allowance possible in connection with federal 
income taxes. 

Depreciation allowances begin to "run out" 
between seven and ten years, so the advantages of 
owning the property are reduced considerably. A 
prudent owner may choose to sell the property at 
this point and re-invest in another property so that 
he may begin the depreciation cycle again and 
continue to take full advantage of the favorable lax 
laws. 

For these reasons, the Straight Line 
Capitalization Method does not usually follow what 
the market indicates. 

Straight Line recapture calls for the return of 
investment capital in equal increments or 
percentage allowances spread over the estimated 
remaining economic life of the building. 

Sinking Fund recapture calls for the return of 
invested capital in one lump sum at the 



termination of the estimated remaining economic 
life of the building. This is accomplished by 
providing for the annual return of a sufficient 
amount needed to invest and annually re-invest in 
"safe" interest-bearing accounts, such as government 
bonds or certificates of deposit, which will 
ultimately yield the entire capital investment during 
the course of the building's economic life. 

Annuity Capitalization lends itself to the 
valuation of long-term leases. In this method, the 
appraiser determines, by the use of annuity tables, 
the present value of the right to receive a certain 
specified income over a stipulated duration of the 
lease. In addition to the value of the income 
stream, the appraiser must also consider the value 
that the property will have once it reverts back to 
the owner at the termination of the lease. This 
reversion is valued by discounting its anticipated 
value against its present day worth. The total 
property value then is the sum of the capitalized 
income stream plus the present worth of the 
reversion value. 

2.3.7. Current Techniques 

There are two methods, however, that do lend 
themselves to an accurate measure of market value 
based on potential income. These arc Direct 
Capitalization, utilizing the Direct Comparison 
Method of Rate Selection, and Mortgage Equity 
Capitalization. 

2.3.8. Direct Capitalization 

In Direct Capitalization, the appraiser 
determines a single "overall" capitalization rate. 
This is done by analyzing actual market sales of 
similar types of properties. He develops the net 
income of each property, and divides the net 
income by the sales price to arrive at an overall 
rate to provide an indication of value. 

2.3.9. Mortgage Equity Capitalization 

Mortgage Equity Capitalization is a form of 
direct capitalization with the major dilTcrcncc in 
the two approaches being the development of the 
overall capitalization rate. 

In this method, equity yields and mortgage 
terms are considered infiuencing factors in 
construction of the interest rate. In addition, a 
plus or minus adjustment is required to 
compensate for anticipated appreciation or 



2-12 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



depreciation. This adjustment can be related to 
the recapture provisions used in other 
capitalization methods and techniques. 

2.3.10. Residual Techniques 

It can readily be seen that any one of the 
factors of the Capitalization Equation (Value = 
Net Income divided by Capitalization Rate) can be 
determined if the other two factors are known. 
Furthermore, since the value of property is the 
sum of the land value plus the building value, it 
holds that either of these can be determined if the 
other is known. The uses of these mathematical 
formulas in capitalizing income into an indication 
of value are referred to as the residual techniques, 
or more specifically, the property residual, the 
building residual, and the land residual techniques. 

The Property Residual Technique is an 
application of Direct Capitalization. In this 
technique, the total net income is divided by an 
overall capitalization rate (which provides for the 
return on the total investment) to arrive at an 
indicated value for the property. This technique 
has received more popular support in recent years 
because it closely reflects the market. With this 
technique, the capitalization rate may be developed 
by either "direct comparison" in the market or by 
the Mortgage Equity Method. 

The Building Residual Technique requires the 
value of the land to be a known factor. The 
amount of net income required to earn an 
appropriate rate of return on the land investment 
is deducted from the total net income. The 
remainder of the net income (residual) is divided 
by the building capitalization rate (which is 
composed of a percentage for the return on the 
investment, a percentage for the recapture of the 
investment and an effective tax rate) to arrive at an 
indicated value for the building. 

The Land Residual Technique requires the 
value of the building to be a known factor. The 
amount of net income required to provide both a 
proper return on and the recapture of the 
investment is deducted from the total net income. 
The remainder of the net income (residual) is then 
divided by the land capitalization rate (which is 
composed of a percentage for the return on the 
investment, plus an effective tax rate) to arrive at 
an indicated value for the land. 



2.3.11. IVIortgage Equity iVIethod Example 

For purposes of illustration, assume an 
investment financed with a 70% loan at 14.0% 
interest. The term of the mortgage is 20 years, 
paid off in level monthly payments. The total 
annual cost for principal and interest on such a 
loan can be determined by referring to the 
mortgage equity tables. Select the Constant 
Annual percent for an interest rate of 14.0% and a 
term of 20 years. Note that the constant is 14.92% 
of the amount borrowed, or .92% more than the 
interest rate alone. 

Assume that the equity investor will not be 
satisfied with less than an 18% yield. The income 
necessary to satisfy both Lender and Equity can 
now be shown. The product of the percent portion 
and the rate equals the weighted rate. The total of 
each weighted rate equals the weighted average. 



Mortgage loan 

(principal interest) 
Equity 

(down payment) 
Weighted Average 



Weighted 
Portion Rate Rate 

70% .1492 = .1044 

30% .18 = .0540 

100% .1584 



Note that the "constant annual percent" is used 
for the rate of the loan. 

Since there is a gain in equity's position 
through the years by the loan being paid off little 
by little, it is necessary to calculate the credit for 
"Equity Build-Up". Assume that the investor plans 
to hold the property for ten years. Since the 
mortgage is for 20 years, only a portion of the 
principal will be paid off and this amount must be 
discounted, as it won't be received for ten years. 
From the Table of Loan Balance and Debt 
Reduction, at the end of ten years for a 20 year 
mortgage at 14%, the figure is .199108. Consulting 
the sinking fund tables indicates that the discount 
factor for 18% and 10 years is .0425. 

The credit for Equity Build-Up can now be 
deducted from the basic rate, thus: (% of loan 
paid in 10 yrs.) x (loan rate) x (sinking fund 18'"v 
for 10 yrs.) 



1 



Weighted Average 
-.199108 X 70% X .0425 

Resulting Net Rate 



.1584 
= .()()59 

= .1525 



08/01/89 



2-13 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



3. LAND VALUATION TECHNIQUES 



In making appraisals for Ad Valorem Tax 
purposes, it is generally necessary to estimate 
separate values for the land and the improvements 
on the land. In actuality, the two are not 
separated and the final estimate of the property as 
a single unit must be given prime consideration. 
However, in arriving at that final estimate of value, 
aside from the requirements for property tax 
appraisals, there are certain other reasons for 
making a separate estimate of value for the land: 

• An estimate of land value is required in the 
application of the Cost Approach. 

• An estimate of land value is required to be 
deducted from the total property selling price in 
order to derive indications of depreciation 
through market-data analysis. (Depreciation 
being equal to the difference between the 
replacement cost new of a structure and the 
actual price paid in the market place for the 
structure.) 

• As land is not a depreciable item, a separate 
estimate of land value is required for 
bookkeeping and accounting purposes; likewise, 
the total capitalization rate applicable to land 
will differ from the rate applicable to the 
improvements on the land. 

• Since land may or may not be used to its 
highest potential, the value of land may be 
completely independent of the existing 
improvements on the land. 

• Real Estate is valued in terms of its highest and 
best use. The highest and best use of the land 
(or site), if vacant and available for use, may be 
different from the highest and best use of the 
improved property. This will be true when the 
improvement is not an appropriate use and yet 
makes a contribution to total property value in 
excess of the value of the site. Highest and Best 
Use (Highest and Most Profitable Use; 
Optimum Use) is that reasonable and probable 
use which will support the highest present value 
as of the date of the appraisal. Alternatively, it 
is the most profitable likely use to which a 
property can be put. It may be measured in 
terms of the present worth of the highest net 
return that the property can be expected to 



produce over a stipulated long run period of 
time.[l] 

• As appraiser's opinions are based on data 

derived from the market, it is necessary to study 
and adapt, if possible, procedures used by those 
closest to everyday transactions. 

3.1. COMPARABLE SALES METHOD 

The most frequently used method in estimating 
the value of land is the comparable sales method 
in which land values are derived from analyzing the 
selling prices of similar sites. This method is in 
essence the application of the market data 
approach to value and all the considerations 
pertaining thereto are equally applicable here. 

The appraiser must select comparable and valid 
market transactions, and must weigh and give due 
consideration to all the factors significant to value, 
adjusting each to the subject property. The 
comparable sites must be used in the same way as 
is the subject property, and subjected to the same 
zoning regulations and restrictions. It is also 
preferable, whenever possible, to select comparablcs 
from the same or a similar neighborhood. The 
major adjustments will be to account for variations 
in time, location, and physical characteristics to 
include size, shape, topography, landscaping, access, 
as well as other factors which may significantly 
influence the selling price, such as the productivity 
of farm land. 

Although it is always preferable to use sales of 
unimproved lots for comparables, it is not always 
possible to do so. Older neighborhoods are not 
likely to yield a sufficient number of representative 
sales of unimproved lots to permit a valid analysis. 
In such cases, in order to arrive at an estimate ol 
land values using the comparable sales approach, ii 
is necessary to consider improved property sales 
and to estimate the portion of the selling price 
applicable to the structure. The procedure would 
be to estimate the replacement cost of the 
buildings as of the date of sale, estimate the 
accrued depreciation and deduct that amount from 



[1] American Institute of Real Kstute Appraisers' 
Appraisal Terminology lIundl)<M)k, 19SI edition. 



2-14 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



the replacement cost. The resulting estimated 
selling price of the buildings can be deducted from 
the total selling price of the property to derive the 
portion of the selling price which can be allocated 
to the land. The equation is as follows: 



S - Ve = V, 



where: 
S = 



Selling Price of Property 
Estimated Depreciated Value of 

Buildings 
Indication of Land Value 



In some older neighborhoods, vacant lots will 
exist often as a result of fire or normal 
deterioration. Since the desirability as a new 
building site is restricted, value is generally 
determined by adjoining property owners who have 
a desire for additional land area. 

In order to apply the comparable sales method, 
it is first necessary to establish a common unit of 
comparison. The units generally used in the 
valuation of land are price per front foot, price per 
square foot, price per acre, price per apartment 
unit, and price per motel unit. The selection of 
any one particular unit depends upon the type of 
properly being appraised ... frontage being 
commonly used for platted, uniform type residential 
lots, and square footage and acreage for larger, 
unplatted tracts, as well as irregularly shaped lots 
lacking in uniformity. Use of square footage is 
especially desirable in Central Business Districts 
where the entire lot maintains the same level of 
value: depth factor adjustments have a tendency to 
distort this concept. Commercial arteries are also 
best valued on a square foot basis. 

The utility of a site will vary with the frontage, 
width, depth, and overall area. Similarly, the unit 
land values should be adjusted to account for 
differences in size and shape between the 
comparables and the subject property. Since such 
an adjustment is generally necessary for each lot, it 
is beneficial that the appraiser adopt and/or 
develop standardized procedures for adjusting the 
lot size and the unit values to account for the 
variations. It is not uncommon for all lots within 
a development to market at the same price. 
Should data indicate this, it is necessary to make 
alterations or adjustments to maintain this value 
level. In some cases, a "site value" concept has 
advantages. Some of the techniques commonly 
employed are: 



• Standard lot sizing techniques provide for the 
adjustment of the frontage, width, and depth of 
irregular shaped lots to make the units of 
measurement more comparable with uniform 
rectangular lots. 

• Standard Depth Tables provide for the 
adjustment of front foot unit values to account 
for variations in depth from a predetermined 
norm. 

• Frontage Tables provide for the adjustment of 
front footage unit values to account for 
variations in the relative utility value of 
excessive or insufficient frontage as compared to 
a predetermined norm. 

• Acreage or Square Footage Tables provide for 
the adjustment of unit values to account for 
variations in the relative utility value of 
excessive or insufficient land sizes as compared 
to a predetermined norm. 

During the process of adjusting the comparable 
sales to account for variations between them and 
the subject property, the appraiser must exercise 
great care to include all significant factors and to 
properly consider the impact of each of the factors 
upon the total value. If done properly, the 
adjusted selling prices of the comparable properties 
will establish a range in value in which the value 
of the subject property will fall. Further analysis 
of the factors should enable the appraiser to 
narrow the range down to the value level which is 
most applicable to the subject property. 

3.2. THE LAND RESIDUAL TECHNIQUE 

In the absence of sufficient market data, income 
producing land may be valued by determining the 
portion of the net income attributable to the land 
and capitalizing the net income into an indication 
of value. The procedure is: 

1. Determine the highest and best use of the 
land, which may be either its present use or 
hypothetical use. 

2. Estimate the net income which the property 
can be expected to yield. 

3. Estimate the replacement cost new of the 
improvements. 



08/01/89 



2-15 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



4. If the case involves the present use, estimate 
the proper allowance for depreciation, and 
deduct that amount from the replacement 
cost new of the improvements to arrive at an 
estimate of their depreciated value. 

5. Develop appropriate capitalization rates. 

6. Calculate the income requirements of the 
improvements, and deduct the amount from 
the total net income to derive that portion 
of the income which can be said to be 
attributable to the land. 

7. Capitalize the residual income attributable to 
the land to an indication of value. 

3.3. RATIO METHOD 

A technique useful for establishing broad 
indications of land values is a "typical" allocation 
or ratio method. In this technique, the ratio of 
the land value to the total value of improved 
properties is observed in situations where there is 
good market and/or cost evidence to support both 
the land values and total values. This market 
abstracted ratio is then applied to similar 
properties where the total values are known, but 
the allocation of values between land and 
improvements are not known. The ratio is usually 
expressed as a percentage which represents the 
portion of the total improved value that is land 
value, or as a formula: 

V, 

— X 100% = V, 



where: 



Vi = Total Land Value 

Vj = Total Property Value 

V3 = Percent Land is of Total Property Value 



This technique can be used on most types of 
improved properties, with important exceptions 
being farms and recreational facilities, provided 
that the necessary market and/or cost information 
is available. In actual practice, available market 
information limits this technique primarily to 
residential properties, and to a much lesser extent, 
commercial and industrial properties such as 
apartments, offices, shopping centers, and 
warehouses. 



The ratio technique cannot give exact 
indications of land values. It is nevertheless useful, 
especially when used in conjunction with other 
techniques of estimating land values because it 
provides an indication of the reasonableness of the 
final estimate of land value. 

The ratio should be extracted from available 
market information and applied to closely similar 
properties. It should be noted that any factor that 
affects values may also affect the ratio of values. 
Zoning is particularly important because it may 
require more or less improvements be made to the 
land, or may require a larger or smaller minimum 
size. This tends to have a bearing on the land 
values, and so it may also infiuence the ratio of 
values considerably from community to community. 

The following is an example of a residential 
land valuation situation. 

Market information derived from an active new 

subdivision: 

Typical Lot Sale Price 

(most lots equivalent) S 15,000 

Improved Lot Sales (range) S65,000 10 S75,000 

S15,000 15,000 
Indicated Ratio to x 100% = 



S75,000 65,000 



20% to 23% 



Similar subdivision, but 100% developed: 
Typical Lot Sale Price 

(most lots equivalent) unavailable 

Improved Lot Sales (range) S85,0(X) to S105,(XX) 

Broadest Indicated Range of Lot Values 
(20% X 585,000 to 23% x 5105,000) 

517,(X)0 to 524,150 

Narrowest Indicated Range of Lot Values 
(23% X 585,000 to 20% x 5105,000) 

519,550 to S21,(XK) 

If both lots and improvements vary considerably, 
the broadest range is most appropriate. If most 
lots vary little and arc judged equivalent but ihe 
improvements vary somewhat, the narrowest range 
is appropriate. Most subdivisions exhibii a 
combination of the two ranges, showing a narrow 
typical range, but a wider actual range of land 
values. 



2-16 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



4. MASS APPRAISING 



In preceding sections, we have outlined the 
fundamental concepts, principles, and valuation 
techniques underlying the Appraisal Process. We 
will now approach the problem at hand ... the 
revaluation of certain specified real property within 
a total taxing jurisdiction, be it an entire county or 
any subdivision thereof ... and to structure a 
systematic mass appraisal program to effect the 
appraisal of said properties in such a way as to 
yield valid, accurate, and equitable property 
valuations at a reasonable cost dictated by 
budgetary limitations, and within a time span 
totally compatible with assessing administration 
needs. 

The key elements of the program are validity, 
accuracy, equity, economy, and efficiency. To be 
effective, the program must: 

• incorporate the application of proven and 
professionally acceptable techniques and 
procedures; 

• provide for the compilation of complete and 
accurate data and the processing of that data 
into an indication of value approximating the 
prices actually being paid in the market place; 

• provide the necessary standardization measures 
and quality controls essential to promoting and 
maintaining uniformity throughout the 
jurisdiction; 

• provide the appropriate production controls 
necessary to execute each phase of the 
operation in accordance with a carefully planned 
budget and work schedule; and 

• provide techniques especially designed to 
streamline each phase of the operation, 
eliminating superfluous functions, and reducing 
the complexities inherent in the Appraisal 
Process to more simplified but equally effective 
procedures. 

In summary, the objective of an individual 
appraisal is to arrive at an opinion of value, the 
key elements being the validity of the approach and 
the accuracy of the estimate. The objective of a 
mass appraisal for tax purposes is essentially the 
same. However, in addition to being valid and 
accurate, the value of each property must be 



equitable with other property, and what's more, 
these valid, accurate, and equitable valuations must 
be generated as economically and efficiently as 
possible. 

4.1. OVERVIEW 

The prime objective of mass appraisals for tax 
purposes is to equalize property values. Not only 
must the value of one residential property be 
equalized with another, but it must also be 
equalized with each agricultural, commercial, and 
industrial property within the political unit. 

The common denominator or the basis for 
equalization is market value -- that price which an 
informed and intelligent person, fully aware of the 
existence of competing properties and not being 
compelled to act, is justified in paying for a 
particular property. 

The job of the appraiser is to arrive at a 
reasonable estimate of that justified price. To 
accomplish this, the coordination of approaches to 
the valuation of the various classes of property 
must be made so that they are related one to 
another in such a way as to reflect the motives of 
the prospective purchasers of each type of 
property. 

A prospective purchaser of a residential 
property is primarily interested in its capacity to 
render service to the family as a place to live. Its 
location, size, quality, design, age, condition, 
desirability and usefulness are the primary factors 
to be considered in making a selection. By relying 
heavily upon powers of observation and inherent 
intelligence, knowing what could be afforded and 
simply comparing what is available, one property 
will eventually stand out to be more appealing than 
another. So it is likewise the job of the appraisers 
to evaluate the relative degree of appeal of one 
property to another for tax purposes. 

The prospective purchaser of agricultural 
property will be motivated somewhat differently. 
The primary interest will be in the productive 
capabilities of the land. It is reasonable lo assume 
that the purchaser will be familiar, at least in a 
general way, with the productive capacity of the 
farm. It might be expected that the prudent 
investor will have compared one farm's capabilities 



08/01/89 



2-17 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



against another. Accordingly, the appraiser for 
local tax equalization purposes must rely heavily 
upon production information that results from 
accepted management practices. 

The prospective purchaser of commercial 
property is primarily interested in the potential net 
return and tax shelter the property will provide. 
That price which is justified to pay for the property 
is a measure of the prospects for a net return from 
the investment. Real estate, as an investment then, 
must not only compete with other real estate, but 
also with stocks, bonds, annuities, and other similar 
investment areas. The commercial appraiser must 
explore the rental market and compare the 
income-producing capabilities of one property to 
another. 

The prospective purchaser of industrial property 
is primarily interested in the overall utility value of 
the property. Of course, in evaluating the overall 
utility, individual consideration must be given to 
the land and each improvement thereon. Industrial 
buildings are generally of special purpose design, 
and as such, cannot readily be divorced from the 
operation for which they were built. As long as 
the operation remains effective, the building will 
hold its values; if the operation becomes obsolete, 
the building likewise becomes obsolete. The upper 
limit of its value is its replacement cost new, and 
its present day value is some measure of its present 
day usefulness in relation to the purpose for which 
it was originally designed. 

Any effective approach to valuations for tax 
purposes must be patterned in such a way as to 
reflect the "modus operandi" of buyers in the 
market place. As indicated above, the motives 
influencing prospective buyers tend to differ 
depending upon the type of property involved. It 
follows that the appraiser's approach to value must 
differ accordingly. 

The residential appraiser must rely heavily upon 
the market data approach to value ... analyzing the 
selling prices of comparable properties and 
considering the very same factors of location, size, 
quality, design, age, condition, desirability, and 
usefulness which were considered by the buyer. 

The farm appraiser must rely primarily upon an 
effective analysis of the farm's productive potential 
to make an accurate "farmstead" or "farm homesiie" 
valuation. 



Rural dwellings are similar to urban dwellings 
in that their primary purpose is to provide a family 
with a home; as such, the appraiser should value 
them in the same manner as the valuation of any 
other residence. The approach to farm buildings, 
however, must be somewhat different. Here, the 
primary objective is to arrive at that value which 
the building's presence adds to the productivity of 
the land ... their degree of utility or usefulness. In 
determining the productive capabilities of the land, 
it will be necessary to divide the land into various 
classes according to specific types and uses, such as 
tillable, pasture, timberland, and irrigated tillable 
land, to compute the acreage of each class, and to 
value each class individually. Due consideration 
must be given to soil types and their fertility, 
making every effort to utilize all soil and land 
maps available through agriculture extension 
services, and state universities. Similarly, equal 
consideration must be given to all other factors 
affecting the value of the property, such as its 
location relative to the market place, its relative 
accessibility, the topography of the land, the shape 
and size of the fields, the extent and condition of 
the fences, drainage, water supply, etc. 

The commercial appraiser will find that since 
commercial property is not bought and sold as 
frequently as is residential property, the sales 
market cannot be easily established. Consequently, 
relying heavily on the income approach to value 
will require that the net economic rent which the 
property is capable of yielding must be determined. 
The amount of investment required to effect that 
net return at a rate commensurate with that 
normally expected by investors must also be 
determined. This can only be achieved through a 
comprehensive study of the income-producing 
capabilities of comparable properties and an 
analysis of present-day investment practices. 

The industrial appraiser will seldom be able to 
rely on the market data approach because of the 
absence of comparable sales. Al.so, it is not 
possible to rely upon the income approach ... again 
because of the absence of comparable invcsinienis. 
and because of the inability to accurately determine 
the contribution of each unit of production to the 
overall income produced. Therefore, by relying 
heavily on the cost approach to value, a 
determination must be made of the upper limit or 
replacement cost new of each improvement and the 
subsequent loss of value resulting overall from 
physical, functional, and economic factors. 



2-18 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



The fact that there are different approaches to 
value, some of which are more applicable to one 
type of property than to another, does not, by any 
means, preclude equalization between types. 
Remember that the objective in each approach is 
to arrive at a price which an informed and 
intelligent person, fully aware of the existence of 
competing properties and not being compelled to 
act, is justified in paying for any one particular 
property. Underlying, and fundamental to each of 
the approaches is the comparison process. 
Regardless of whether the principal criteria are 
actual selling prices, income-producing capabilities, 
or functional usefulness, like properties must be 
treated alike. The primary objective is 
equalization. The various approaches to value, 
although valid in themselves, must nevertheless be 
coordinated one to the other in such a way as to 
produce values which are not only valid and 
accurate, but are also equitable. The same 
"yardstick" of value must be applied to all 
properties, and must be applied by systematic and 
uniform procedures. 

It is obvious that sales on all properties are not ' 
required to effectively apply the market data 
approach. The same is true regarding any other 
approach. What is needed is a comprehensive 
record of all the significant physical and economic 
characteristics of each property in order to 
compare the properties of "unknown" values with 
the properties of "known" values. All significant 
differences between properties must in some 
measure, either positively or negatively, be reflected 
in the final estimate of value. 

Each property must be given individual 
treatment, but the treatment must be uniform and 
standardized, and essentially no different than that 
given to any other property. All the factors 
affecting value must be analyzed and evaluated for 
each and every property within the entire political 
unit. It is only by doing this that equalization 
between properties and between types of properties 
can be ultimately effected. 

All this, at best, is an oversimplification of the 
equalization process underlying the entire Mass 
Appraisal Program. The program itself consists of 
various operational phases, and its success depends 
primarily upon the systematic coordination of 
collecting and recording data, analyzing the data, 
and processing the data to an indication of value. 



4.2. DATA INVENTORY 

Basic to the appraisal process is the collection 
and recording of pertinent data. The data will 
consist of general supporting data, referring to the 
data required to develop the elements essential to 
the valuation process; neighborhood data, referring 
to information regarding pre-delineaied 
neighborhood units; and specific property data, 
referring to the data compiled for each parcel of 
property to be processed into an indication of 
value by the cost, market and/or income approach. 

The data must be comprehensive enough to 
allow for the adequate consideration of all factors 
which significantly affect property values. In 
keeping with the economics of a mass appraisal 
program, it is costly and impractical to collect, 
maintain, and process data of no or marginal 
contribution to the desired objectives. The axiom 
"too much data is better than insufficient data" 
does not apply. What does apply is the proper 
amount of data, no more or no less, which is 
necessary to provide the data base required to 
generate the desired output. 

General Supporting Data. The appraisal staff 
will be primarily concerned with cost, sales and 
income data, but they will also find it necessary to 
research and compile general socio-economic 
information pertaining to the entire political unit 
under appraisement. The information will serve to 
assist the staff during the analytical phase of the 
operation and should include, but not necessarily 
be limited to, population trends, prevailing 
geographical factors, primary transportation 
facilities, primary income sources, unemployment 
and income levels, institutional influences, the 
annual volume of new construction and ownership 
transfers, availability of vacant land, construction 
labor and material costs, preponderance of 
residential rentals, and the amount of residential 
vacancies. 

• To apply the cost approach to value, cost data 
must be sufficient to develop or select and 
validate the pricing schedules and cost tables 
required to compute the replacement cost new 
of improvements. 

• All data pertaining to the cost of loiai buildings 
in place should include the parcel idcniification 
number, properly address, date of completion, 
construction cost, name of builder, source of 



08/01/89 



2-19 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



information, structural characteristics, and other 
information pertinent to analysis. 

• Cost information may be recorded on the same 
form used to record specific property data. 

• The principal sources for obtaining cost data 
are builders and developers, and it is generally 
advisable to collect cost data in conjunction 
with new construction pick-ups. 

• Sales data must be sufficient enough to provide 
a representative sampling of comparable sales 
needed to apply the market data approach, to 
derive unit land values and depreciation 
indicators needed to apply the cost approach, 
and to derive gross rent multipliers and 
elements of the capitalization rate needed to 
apply the income approach. 

• All sales data should include the parcel 
identification number, property classification 
code, month and year of sale, selling price, 
source of information, i.e., buyer, seller, agent, 
or fee, and a reliable judgment as to whether or 
not the sale is representative of a true arm's 
length transaction. 

• Sales data should be recorded on the same form 
(assigned property record card) used to record 
specific property data, and verified during the 
property listing phase. 

• The principal source for obtaining sales data is 
the Realty Transfer Certificate. Other sources 
may include multiple listing services, developers, 
realtors, lending institutions, and individual 
owners during the listing phase of the 
operation. 

• Income and expense data must be sufficient 
enough to derive capitalization rates and 
accurate estimates of net income needed to 
apply the income approach. 

• Income and expense data should include both 
general data regarding existing financial 
attitudes and practices, and specific data 
regarding the actual incomes and expenses 
realized by specific properties. 

• The general data should include such 
information as equity return expectations, gross 
rentals, vacancy and operating cost expectations 



and trends, prevailing property management 
costs, and prevailing mortgage costs. 

• Specific data should include the parcel 
identification number, property address (or 
building ID), source of information, the amount 
of equity, the mortgage and lease terms, and an 
itemized account of the annual gross income, 
vacancy loss, and operating expenses for the 
most recent two-year period. 

• The general data should be documented in 
conjunction with the development of 
capitalization procedural guidelines. The 
specific data, since it is often considered 
confidential and not subject to public access, 
should be recorded on special forms, designed 
in such a way as to accommodate the property 
owner or agent thereof in submitting the 
required information. TTie forms should also 
have space reserved for the appraiser's analysis 
and calculations. 

• The principal sources for obtaining the general 
financial data are investors, lending institutions, 
and property managers. The primary sources 
for obtaining specific data are the individual 
property owners and/or tenants during the 
listing phase of the operation. 

Neighborhood data. At the earliest feasible 
time during the data inventory phase of the 
operation, and after a thorough consideration of 
the living environment and economic characteristics 
of the overall county, or any political subdivision 
thereof, the appraisal staff should delineate the 
larger jurisdictions into smaller "neighborhood 
units," each exhibiting a high degree of 
homogeneity in residential amenities, land use, 
economic trends, and housing characteristics such 
as structural quality, age, and condition. The 
neighborhood delineations should be outlined on 
an index (or comparable) map and each assigned 
an arbitrary Neighborhood Identification Code, 
which when combined with the parcel identification 
numbering system, will serve to uniquely identify it 
from other neighborhoods. 

Neighborhood data must be comprehensive 
enough to permit the adequate consideration of 
value-influencing factors to determine the 
variations in selling prices and income yields 
attributable to benefits arising from the location of 
one specific property as compared to another. The 
data should include the taxing district, the .school 



2-20 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



district, the neighborhood identification code, 
special reasons for delineation (other than obvious 
physical and economic boundaries), and various 
neighborhood characteristics such as the type 
(urban, suburban, etc.), the predominant class 
(residential, commercial, etc.), the trend (whether it 
is declining, improving, or relatively stable), its 
accessibility to the central business district, 
shopping centers, interstate highways and primary 
transportation terminals, its housing characteristics, 
the estimated range of selling prices for 
residentially-improved properties, and a rating of 
its relative durability. 

All neighborhood data should be recorded on a 
specially designed form during the delineation 
phase. 

Specific property data must be comprehensive 
enough to provide the data base needed to process 
each parcel of property to an indication of value, 
to generate the tax roll and related tax roll 
requirements, to generate other specified output, 
and to provide the assessing officials with a 
permanent record to facilitate maintenance 
functions and to administer taxpayer assistance and 
grievance proceedings. 

The data should include the parcel identification 
number, ownership and mailing address, legal 
description, property address, property classification 
code, local zoning code, neighborhood 
identification code, site characteristics, and 
structural characteristics. 

All the data should be recorded on a single, 
specially designed data collection card customized 
to meet individual assessing needs. Each card 
should be designed and formatted in such a way as 
to accommodate the listing of information and to 
facilitate data processing. In addition to the 
property data items noted above, space must be 
provided for a building sketch, land and building 
computations, summarizations, and memoranda. In 
keeping with the economy and efficiency of a mass 
appraisal program, the card should be formatted to 
minimize writing by including a sufficient amount 
of site and structural descriptive data which can be 
checked and/or circled. The descriptive data 
should be comprehensive enough to be suitable for 
listing any type of land and improvement data 
regardless of class, with the possible exception of 
large industrial, institutional, and utility complexes 
which require lengthy descriptions. la these cases, 
it will generally be necessary to use a specially 



designed supplemental property record document, 
keyed and indexed to the corresponding data 
collection card. The data collection card should be 
made a permanent part of the assessing system, 
and used not only in conjunction with the 
revaluation, but also to update the property records 
for subsequent assessments. 

The specific property data should be compiled 
from existing office records and field inspections. 
The parcel identification number, ownership, 
mailing address, and legal description may be 
obtained from existing tax rolls. Property 
classification codes may also be obtained from 
existing tax rolls (whenever available) and verified 
in the field. Local zoning codes may be obtained 
from existing zoning maps. Neighborhood 
identification codes may be obtained from the 
neighborhood delineation maps. Lot sizes and 
acreage may be obtained from existing tax maps. 
The property address, and the site and structural 
characteristics may be obtained by making a 
physical inspection of each property. 

In transferring lot sizes from the tax maps to 
the property record cards, the personnel 
performing the tasks must be specially trained in 
the use of standardized lot sizing techniques and 
depth tables, which are necessary to adjust irregular 
shaped lots and abnormal depths to account for 
variations from predetermined norms. In regard to 
acreage, the total acreage may be transferred, but 
the acreage breakdowns required to effect the 
valuation of agricultural, commercial, and industrial 
properties must be obtained in the field from the 
property owner and verified by personal 
observation and aerial photographs, if available. 

Field inspections must be conducted by 
qualified appraisers. During this phase of the 
operation, the appraiser should visit each property 
and make personal contact with the occupant. In 
the course of the inspection, the following 
procedures must be adhered to: 

• identification of the property. 

• verification of the ownership. 

• recording the property address. 

• verification of the property classification and 
zoning codes. 



08/01/89 



2-21 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



• interviewing the occupant of the building and 
recording all pertinent economic data. 

• inspection of the interior of the building and 
recording of all pertinent physical data. 

. measuring and inspecting the exterior of the 
building, as well as all other improvements on 
the property, and recording the story height, 
and the dimensions and/or size of each. 

• recording a sketch of the principal building(s), 
consisting of a plan view showing the main 
portion of the structure along with any 
significant attached exterior features, such as 
porches, etc. All components must be 
identified and the exterior dimensions shown for 
each. 

• selection of and recording the proper quality 
grade, physical condition, and effective age of 
the improvement. 

• selection of and recording the proper 
replacement costs or replacement cost 
adjustments for all field priced items. 

• reviewing the data collection card for 
completeness and accuracy. 

After the field inspection is completed, the data 
collection cards must be reviewed for completeness 
and accuracy. 

Complete and accurate data is essential to the 
program. Definite standardized data collection and 
recording procedures must be followed if these 
objectives are to be met. 

4.3. PROCESSING THE DATA 

This phase of the operation involves the 
analysis of data compiled during the data inventory 
phase and the processing of that data to an 
indication of value through the use of the cost, 
market, and income approaches to value. 

During the analytical phase, it will be necessary 
to analyze cost, market, and income data in order 
U) provide a basis for validating the appropriate 
cost schedule and tables required to compute the 
replacement cost new of all buildings and 
structures; for establishing comparative unit land 
values for each type of property; for establishing 
ihc appropriate depreciation tables and guidelines 



for each type of property; and for developing gross 
rent multipliers, economic rent and operating 
expense norms, capitalization rate tables and other 
related standards and norms required to effect the 
mass appraisal of all the property within an entire 
political unit on an equitable basis. 

After establishing the appropriate standards and 
norms, the specific data compiled for each property 
must be analyzed. This is done by giving due 
consideration to the factors influencing the value of 
that particular property as compared to another, 
and then to process the data into an indication of 
value by employing the techniques described in the 
section of the manual dealing with the application 
of the traditional approaches to value. 

Any one, or all three of the approaches, if 
applied properly, should lead to an indication of 
market value; of primary concern is applying the 
approaches on an equitable basis. This may 
require the coordinated effort of a number of 
individual appraisers, each appraiser acting as a 
member of a team, with the team effort directed 
toward a valid, accurate and equitable appraisal of 
each property within the political unit. Each 
property must be reviewed, during which time the 
following procedures must be adhered to: 

• verification of the accuracy of each of the 
characteristics recorded on the data collection 
card. 

• certification that the proper schedules and cost 
tables were used in computing the replacement 
cost of each building and structure. 

• determination of the proper quality grade and 
design factor to be applied to each building to 
account for variations from the base 
specifications. 

• making a judgment of the overall condition, 
desirability, and usefulness of each improvcmcm 
in order to arrive at a sound allowance for 
depreciation. 

• capitalization of net income capabilities into an 
indication of value in order to delermine ihc 
loss of value attributable to functional and 
economic obsolescence. 

• addition of the depreciated value of all 
improvements to the land value, and reviewing 



2-22 



08/01/89 



APPRAISAL THEORY 



the total property value in relation to the value 
of comparable properties. 

• determination that the total property value 
established can be correlated to actual sales of 
comparable properties. 

Once the final values have been established for 
each property, the entire program should be 
evaluated in terms of its primary objectives: Do 
the values approximate a satisfactory level of 
market value, and more importantly, are the values 
equitable? Satisfactory answers to these questions 
can best be obtained through a statistical analysis 
of recent sales in an appraisal-to-sale ratio study, if 
sufficient sales are available. 

To perform the study, it is necessary to take a 
representative sampling of recent valid sales and 
compute the appraisal-to-sale ratio for each of the 
sales. If the sample is representative, the 
computed median appraisal-to-sale ratio will give 
an indication of how close the appraisals within 
each district approximate the market value. This is 
providing, of course, that the sales included 
represent true market transactions. It is then 
necessary to determine the deviation of each 



individual appraisal-to-sale ratio from the median 
ratio, and to compute either the average or the 
standard deviation, which will give an indication of 
the degree of equity within each individual district. 
What remains then is to compare the statistical 
measures across property types in order to 
determine those areas, if any, which need to be 
further investigated, revising the appraisal, if 
necessary, to attain a satisfactory level of value and 
equity throughout the entire jurisdiction. 

The techniques and procedures set forth herein, 
if applied skillfully, should yield highly accurate 
and equitable property valuations, and should 
provide a sound property tax base. It should be 
noted, however, that no program, regardless of how 
skillfully administered, can ever be expected to be 
error-free. The appraisal must be fine tuned and 
this can best be done by giving the taxpayer an 
opportunity to question the value placed upon his 
property and to produce evidence that the value is 
inaccurate or inequitable. During this time, the 
significant errors will be brought to light, and 
taking the proper corrective action will serve to 
further the objectives of the program. What's 
important in the final analysis is to use all these 
measures as well as any other resources available 
to obtain the highest degree of accuracy and equity 
possible. 



08/01/89 



2-23 



PART 2: APPRAISAL THEORY 



2-24 08/01/89 



^ 



w 



% 



m 



^ 



f 



f 



31. PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION DATA 



C) 



31 . PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION DATA 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FIELD 

CODE DESCRIPTION 

901 MUNICIPALnr CODE 

902 ASSESSMENT LIST CODE 

903 LEVY DISTRICT CODE 

904 ASSESSOR'S CODE 

906 PROPERTY ASSESSMENT CHANGE 
CODE 

911 OWNER NAME 1 

912 OWNER NAME 2 

91 3 DBA 

914 MAILING ADDRESS 

915 CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE 

916 FOREIGN COUNTRY 

918 IN-CARE-OF TAXPAYER NAME 1 

919 IN-CARE-OF TAXPAYER NAME 2 

920 IN-CARE-OF MAILING ADDRESS 

921 IN-CARE-OF CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE 

922 IN-CARE-OF FOREIGN COUNTRY 





FIELD 






PAGE 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


PAGE 


1 


925 


ADDITION / SUBDIVISION 


4 


2 


927 


SECTION, TOWNSHIP, RANGE 


4 


2 


929 


SHORT LEGAL DESCRIPTION 


4 


2 


934 


DEED BOOK AND PAGE 


4 




936 


PREVIOUS ID NUMBER 


5 


2 


939 


NEW CLASS CODE & ALLOCATED 




2 




BASE VALUE 


5 


2 


956 


SUBSIDIARY DEED BOOK AND PAGE 


5 


3 


961 


SUBSIDIARY OWNER NAME 


5 


3 


965 


SUBSIDIARY NOTES 


5 


3 


982-984 


EXEMPTION APPLICATION DATA 


5 


3 


985 


APPEAL APPRAISER ID 


6 


3 


986-989 


AB-26 FILING INFORMATION 


6 


3 


990-993 


COUNTY APPEAL INFORMATION 


7 


3 


994-997 


STATE TAX APPEAL BOARD 




3 




INFORMATION 


8 


4 


998 


COURT APPEAL INFORMATION 


8 



CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 



^ 



All of the Property Administration data is contained on four screens. The following list shows the fields in 
numerical order and describes the data requirements for them. It also shows the number of the screen that 
contains the field. 



D 



901 MUNICIPALITY CODE PA SI 

Required 
A three-character code identifying the city or town 
in which the subject property is located. 

The rules governing the determination of a 
municipality are: 

1. An incorporated city or town must be a 
municipality. 

2. An unincorporated village or settlement may 
be a municipality if it has one of the 
following. 

a. Post Office 

b. Special taxing district for public services; 
for example, a Special Improvements 
District (SID). 

Rules governing the coding of a municipality 

1. A parcel (Quarter Section Lot) cannot have 
two municipality codes. For example, one 



parcel cannot be both inside and outside of 
an incorporated town. 

a. The city/town limits of an incorporated 
city/town will divide a parcel (a Quarter 
Section Lot). That is, an ownership that 
is both in and outside of an incorporated 
city or town must be divided into two 
parcels; one inside the city and the other 
outside. 

b. An unincorporated village or settlement 
has no "city limits", therefore the parcel 
boundaries will be the "city limits". 

2. If a parcel is not in a municipality, enter 
"XXX". 

Codes for each municipality will be found on the 
County Municipality List. Corrections to the list 
must be made and mailed to the Helena office. 

The MUNICIPALITY CODE is edited against the 
Municipality File for validity. 



08/01/89 



31-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



902 ASSESSMENT LIST CODE PA SI 

Required 
Enter the code that describes the type of 
Assessment List that is to be produced. 

MH MOBILE HOME, personal property mobile 

home 
NP NET PROCEEDS and ROYALTIES 
PP PERSONAL PROPERTY 
PR PERSONAL and REAL PROPERTY 
RE REAL ESTATE only 



903 LEVY DISTRICT CODE PA SI 

Required 
Enter the four-character code used to identify the 
taxing district in which the property is located. 
The county Levy District number will be found in 
the assessment book entry for the parcel, and the 
corresponding state code can be looked up in the 
Municipality or Subdivision listing for the county. 

The LEVY DISTRICT CODE is edited against the 
Municipality File for validity. There are two 
additional sub-fields provided if the parcel is 
located in any sub-levy district(s). 

Always enter all four digits, adding leading zeros if 
necessary. 



904 ASSESSOR'S CODE PA SI 

Required 
Enter the ten-character identifier, unique within a 
county, used by the local County Assessor to 
identify property within that county. The 
ASSESSOR'S CODE is used to aggregate a group 
of PA record values for output to one Assessment 
List (Notice of Values). The ASSESSOR'S CODE 
is assigned by the County Assessor. 

Care must be used to consistently right justify the 
ASSESSOR'S CODE number within this field so 
that computer sorting routines will produce a 
consistent index comparable to the county roll. 

SEQUENCE NUMBER - If applicable for the 
County, enter the two-digit SEQUENCE 
NUMBER for the geocode parcel. If no 
SEQUENCE NUMBER has been assigned, leave 
this field blank. 



906 PROPERTY ASSESSMENT CHANGE 

CODE PA SI 

Required 
Enter the PROPERTY ASSESSMENT CHANGE 
CODE that best describes the reason that a change 
is being made to this record. Enter the Change 
Code being coded in the left-most available 
position. Six different changes per year may be 
entered. 



1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 



OWNERSHIP CHANGE 

PARCEL SPLIT 

LAND USE CHANGES 

ADDITION or SUBTRACTION of 

PERSONAL PROPERTY affixed to land 

CHANGE IN TAXABLE PERCENTAGE 

ADDRESS CHANGE 

ERROR CORRECTION - no change in 

assessment 

CONVERTED - no activity on this record 

since initial data conversion 



1 



PA SI 



911 OWNER NAME 

Required 
Enter the name of the parcel's owner (the 
Taxpayer), left-justified. If the name consists of 
more than one word, leave one blank space 
between words. Abbreviate with care when 
necessary. The format to enter the information is: 

Last Name (space) First Name (space) Middle 
Initial 

This is the name of the person to whom 
correspondence from the system will normally be 
sent. The name in this field is also displayed in an 
alternate index that is used if the parcel geocode 
number is unknown. 

For parcels having multiple owners with different 
last names, enter the first owner's name in this 
field and the second owner's name in the OWNER 
NAME 2 field. 

If the ownership of the parcel is unknown, enter 
"Unknown". 



912 OWNER NAME 2 PA SI 

Optional 
Enter the second owner's name or use this field as 
an additional mailing address line. If needed, four 
more lines are available on each subsidiary record, 
field %1, to enter additional owners' names. 



31-2 



08/01/89 



31. PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION DATA 



el 



i^ 



913 



PA SI 



DBA 

Optional 
Enter the "Doing Business As" name of the owner 
of the parcel. If none, leave this field blank. 



914 



PA SI 



MAILING ADDRESS 

Optional 
Enter the house or building number, street name, 
and apartment or unit number, if applicable, of the 
owner's mailing address. This is a free-format 
field, enter left-justified. 

When a company or individual wishes to receive 
their mail through a post office box and also show 
their street address; the dual address is the answer. 
When two addresses are used, street address and 
post office box number, the box number should 
always be immediately above the last line in the 
address. For example: 



OWNER NAME I 
OWNER NAME 2 
MAILING ADDRESS 
CITY/STATE/ZIP 



915 



ABC Company 
907 Power Block Bldg 
P.O. Box 1234 
Helena MT 59601 



CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE PA SI 

Required, if mailing address is within the 

United States. 
CITY - enter the name of the city or town of the 
Taxpayer's mailing address. 

STATE - enter the two-character abbreviation of 
the Slate of the Taxpayer's mailing address. Valid 
entries are listed in the Appendix. 

ZIP CODE - enter the Zip Code of the owner's 
mailing address. If the owner's mailing address is 
outside of the United States, enter "00000". This 
will aid the computer sorting routines used for 
sorting mail by Zip Code. 

ZIP -I- 4 CODE - enter the Zip -I- 4 code of the 
Taxpayer's mailing address. If unknown, leave this 
blank. 

916 FOREIGN COUNTRY PA SI 

Required if mailing address is outside the 
United States. 

Enter the foreign City, State, Province, etc., portion 

of Taxpayer's mailing address. The Foreign 

Country field is free-format. 



918 IN-CARE-OF TAXPAYER NAME 1 PA SI 

Optional 
Enter the Care-of Taxpayer's Name. The Care-of 
Taxpayer is the buyer's name in the case of a 
contract for deed (sale). This is the name of the 
person to whom correspondence from the system 
will normally be sent. The name in this field is 
displayed in an alternate index that is used if the 
parcel geocode number is unknown. 

The format to enter the information is: 

Last Name (space) First Name (space) Middle 
Initial 



919 IN-CARE-OF TAXPAYER NAME 2 PA SI 

Optional 
A thirty-character field in which to enter the 
second line of Care-Of Taxpayer Name or to be 
used as an additional mailing address line. 



920 IN-CARE-OF MAILING ADDRESS PA SI 

Optional 
Enter the house or building number, street name, 
and apartment or unit number, if applicable, of the 
Care-Of Taxpayer's mailing address. This is a free- 
format field. 



921 IN-CARE-OF CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE 

Optional PA SI 

CITY - enter the name of the city or town of the 
Care-Of Taxpayer's mailing address. 

STATE - enter the two-character abbreviation of 
the state of the Care-Of Taxpayer's mailing 
address. Valid entries are listed in the Appendix. 

ZIP CODE - enter the Zip Code of the Care-Of 
Taxpayer's mailing address. If the Care-Of 
Taxpayer's mailing address is outside of the United 
States, enter "00000". This will aid the computer 
sorting routines used for sorting mail by Zip Code. 

ZIP-t-4 CODE - enter the Zip-l-4 code of the 
Care-Of Taxpayer's mailing address. If unknown, 
leave this blank. 



t) 



08/01/89 



31-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



922 IN-CARE-OF FOREIGN COUNTRY PA SI 

Optional 
Enter the foreign City, State, Province, etc., portion 
of the Care-Of Taxpayer's mailing address. The 
Foreign Country field is free-format. 



925 



PA SI 



ADDITION / SUBDIVISION 

Required for all platted parcels. 
The Addition/Subdivision, Block, and Lot is 
displayed in an alternate index that is used if the 
parcel geocode number is unknown. 

The Addition or Subdivision name will be found in 
the assessment book or on the property record 
card, and the corresponding abbreviation can be 
looked up in the subdivision list for the county. 

ADDITION/SUBDIVISION CODE - enter the 
three -character code that identifies the Addition or 
Subdivision in which the parcel is located. The 
code is edited against the Addition/Subdivision file. 
Enter "XXX" for unplatted parcels. 

BLOCK - enter the Platted/Legally Described 
Addition or Subdivision Block number on which 
the parcel is located. Always enter all three 
characters. For unplatted parcels, or Additions in 
which all lots have been grouped together without 
division into blocks, enter "000". 

LOT - enter the Platted/Legally Described Lot 
Identifier of the lot within the Addition on which 
the parcel is located. When the parcel occupies 
more than one lot and/or portions of lots, enter 
the lowest numbered Lot in this field and describe 
all Lot numbers in the SHORT LEGAL 
DESCRIPTION field. Be sure to enter all three 
characters, adding leading zeros if necessary. 

For unplatted parcels, or parcels in an Addition 
where numbered blocks have not been split into 
numbered lots, enter "000". In the latter case, 
portions of those blocks may be sold by metes and 
bounds description. 

NOTE: Letters may be included in the Block 
or Lot number. In this case, enter the 
letters as part of the number. Example: 
Amended Lot 2A, Enter "02A". 



927 SECTION, TOWNSHIP, RANGE PA SI 

Required for all unplatted parcels. 
Section, Township and Range is displayed in an 
alternate index if the parcel geocode number is 
unknown. 

SECTION NUMBER - enter the two-digit code 
representing the Section of the Township in which 
the subject property is located, as identified in the 
legal description of the recorded deed to the 
subject property. Valid entries are 01 through 36. 

TOWNSHIP NUMBER - Township is made up of 
three parts - number (two digits), half number (0 if 
no half, 5 if half), and suffix (direction, N or S). 
Enter the township as identified in the legal 
description of the recorded deed of the subject 
property. 

RANGE NUMBER - Range is made up of three 
parts - number (two digits), half number (0 if no 
half, 5 if half), and suffix (direction, E or W). 
Enter the range as identified in the legal 
description of the recorded deed of the subject 
property. 



929 SHORT LEGAL DESCRII»TION PA SI 

Optional 
Enter the legal description of the parcel as found 
in the deed describing the parcel, especially if no 
Addition/Subdivision (925) or Section, Township, 
Range (927) is entered. If the parcel's legal 
description is lengthy, additional entries may be 
made in the subsidiary ADDITIONAL 
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION fields (965). 

If the parcel is a single lot and that lot has been 
described in the ADDITION/SUBDIVISION fields, 
these legal description fields may be left blank. 



934 



PA SI 



DEED BOOK AND PAGE 

Optional 
Two deed references and the date of recording may 
be entered. If needed, eight more deed entries 
may be entered on each subsidiary record (956). 

BOOK - enter the book in which the deed for this 
parcel is contained. 

PAGE - enter the page of the book for the deed 
of this parcel. 



31-4 



08/01/89 



31. PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION DATA 



0) 



i)) 



^ 



DATE - enter the date the deed was filed; 
formatted as two-digit month, two-digit day, and 
two-digit year. 



936 PREVIOUS ID NUMBER PA SI 

Optional 
Two fifteen-character fields in which to enter 
identifiers formerly used to describe the subject 
property. Possible entries may be previous 
Assessor's codes or previous geocodes (as in the 
case of splits or combinations). 



939 NEW CLASS CODE & ALLOCATED BASE 
VALUE PA 52 

Optional 
Enter the NEW CLASS CODE(s) and the 
corresponding BASE VALUE(s), if the Class 
Code(s) or CAMA Base Value(s) of the parcel as 
passed from the CAMA file must be adjusted. 
NEW CLASS CODES & VALUES may need to 
be adjusted because of the granting of exemptions 
and/or value reductions. 

Up to sixteen NEW CLASS CODE(s) and 
ALLOCATED BASE VALUE(s) may be entered 
for a PA record. 

// the user adjusts one value or class, all other classes 
and values must be manually entered. The override 
is for the entire PA record. 

The complete listing of PROPERTY CLASS 
CODES can be found in the Appendix of this 
Section of the Data Collection Manual. 



956 SUBSIDIARY DEED BOOK AND PAGE 

Optional PA SUB 

Additional Deed Book and Page references for this 
parcel may be entered in these fields. 



961 SUBSIDL\RY OWNER NAME PA SUB 

Optional 
Additional Owner Names may be entered in these 
fields. 



965 SUBSIDIARY NOTES PA SUB 

Optional 
Fourteen fields, of thirty characters each, are 
provided in which to enter free-formatted notes 
relevant to any part of this parcel. 



982-984 EXEMPTION APPLICATION DATA 

Optional PA SUB 

Additional exemption information may be entered 
on subsequent subsidiary records. This may be 
required as in the case of a property owner who 
reapplies for an exemption after being denied. 

APPLICATION DATE - enter the date of the 
exemption application; formatted as a two-digit 
month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 

TYPE - enter the code that best describes the type 
of exemption (such as charitable, federal, religious) 
claimed by the applicant. 

01 Religious 

02 Charitable 

03 United States Government owned 

04 State of Montana owned 

05 County owned 

06 City owned 

07 School District owned 

08 Irrigation District owned 

09 Public Library 

10 Education 

11 Horticultural/Agricultural Society 

12 Non-Profit Health Care Facility 

13 Cemetery 

14 Art Gallery 

15 Public Observatory 

16 Non-Profit Water Association 

17 Developmentally Disabled Organization 

18 Non-Profit International Athletic Facility 

19 Non-Fossil Energy Generation 

20 Veteran's Clubhouse 

21 Community Service Building 

22 Disabled Veteran's Residence 

23 Non-producing Manufacturing and Railroad 
Operating Property 

NUMBER - enter the seven-character assigned 
number of the application. 

REVIEW DATE - enter the date the properly was 
reviewed for eligibility for exemption; formatted as 
a two-digit month, two-digit day, and two-digit 
year. 

DECISION DATE - enter the date the exemption 
was granted or denied; formatted as a two-digit 
month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 



08/01/89 



31-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



DECISION CODE - enter the code that describes 
the decision on this exemption application. 

1 GRANTED 

2 DENIED 

3 PARTIALLY GRANTED 

4 PENDING 

EXEMPTION AMOUNT - Enter the amount of 
value that has been determined to be exempt from 
assessment. This amount should also be allocated 
in the parcel's value override section, on screen 
MAS RES S9 and MAS COM SIO. 

NOTE: The appraiser should ensure that the 
total appraised value is allocated between 
exempt class codes (2150 and 3150), and 
standard class codes. The allocation must 
add up to the total appraised value. 

DECISION APPEALED - enter "Y" if the 
exemption decision is appealed. Leave the field 
blank if not appealed. 



EXPIRATION DATE 
exemption is to expire 



■ enter the date the 
The exemption must be 
reviewed on this date. This field is formatted as a 
iwo-digit month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 



EXEMPTION REASON CODE - enter the code 
that best describes the reason the request for 
exemption was granted or denied. 

GRANTED: 

01 Property met requirements of exemption 

statute 
(codes 02-04 are reserved for future use) 

DENIED: 

05 Not used for religious worship 

06 Not occupied by member of clergy 

07 Not in qualifying use on January 1 

08 Not owner of record on January 1 

09 Required information not submitted by 
applicant 

10 Missed March 1 application deadline 

11 Profit making corporation 

12 Not charitable in nature 

13 Not exclusive use 

14 No license from the Health Department 

15 Not incorporated as non-profit organization 

16 Cemetery: No permanent care and 
improvement fund established 



17 Charges admission 

18 Not open at reasonable hours 

19 Furnishes non-potable water 

20 No international sports use 

21 Not non-fossil fuel 

22 Portion of parcel used for a bar 

23 Portion of parcel used for business 

24 Excessive land 

25 Not a national fraternal organization 

26 Has a Montana food or beverage license 

27 Does not provide required services to senior 
citizens 

28 Excessive charge for use 

29 Not occupied by veteran or spouse of 
veteran 

30 Not killed on active duty 

31 Death not service connected 

32 Not 100% disabled 

33 Exceeds income requirements 

34 Not the primary residence 

35 Spouse moved from original house 

36 Spouse remarried 

37 Began production less than 6 months ago 

38 No manufacturing or railroad use 

EXEMPTION REASON EXPLANATION - enter 
any additional detail regarding the granting or 
denial of this exemption application that is not 
sufficiently covered by a reason listed above. 



985 APPEAL APPRAISER ID PA APPL 

Required 
Enter the permanent identification number of the 
person responsible for the review of the appeal 
information of this parcel. 



986-989 AB-26 FILING INFORMATION 

Optional PA APPL 

DATE FILED - enter the date the AB-26 was filed 
by the Taxpayer; formatted as a two-digit month, 
two-digit day, and two-digit year. 

REASON OF TAXPAYER REQUEST - enter the 
code that best describes the reason that the 
Taxpayer has requested that this property be 
reviewed. 

01 Improvement value too high 

02 Land value too high 

03 Personal property value too high 

04 Recent purchase price for property 

05 Not enough depreciation for condition of 
property 



r 



f 



31-6 



08/01/89 



31. PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION DATA 



K^^ 



06 Property should be in Class 18 or 19 

07 Property is in agricultural use or is in a 
green belt status 

08 Agricultural/Timber Land Classification 

09 Total property value too high 

10 Grade of house too high 

11 Income Approach not considered 

12 Present Worth of Future Benefits Approach 

AB-26 APPLICATION NUMBER - enter the 
seven-character application number of this 
application. 

YEAR - enter the tax (lien) year of the properly 
appraisal being reviewed. 

VALUE OF PROPERTY - enter the value of the 
property being reviewed before the Taxpayer filed 
the AB-26. 

HEARING DATE - enter the date that the 
Taxpayer's Request for Review was heard; 
formatted as a two-digit month, two-digit day, and 
two-digit year. 

VALUE AFTER DECISION - enter the value of 
the property being reviewed after the hearing with 
the Taxpayer, and review of property has been 
made. 

STATUS - enter the code that describes the 
decision taken on this Taxpayer's Request for 
Review (AB-26). 

1 APPROVED 

2 DISAPPROVED 

3 ADJUSTED 

4 PENDING 

5 WITHDRAWN 

DECISION DATE - enter the date the decision 
was rendered on this AB-26; formatted as a two- 
digit month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 



990-993 COUNTY APPEAL INFORMATION 

Optional PA APPL 

DATE APPEALED - enter the date the Appeal 
was filed by the Taxpayer; formatted as a two-digit 
month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 

REASON OF TAXPAYER APPEAL - enter the 
code that best describes the reason that the 
Taxpayer has appealed the value of this property: 



01 Improvement value too high 

02 Land value too high 

03 Personal property value too high 

04 Recent purchase price for property 

05 Not enough depreciation for condition of 
property 

06 Property should be in Class 18 or 19 

07 Property is in agricultural use or is in a 
green belt status 

08 Agricultural/Timber land classification 

09 Total property value too high 

10 Grade of house too high 

11 Income approach not considered 

12 Present worth of future benefits approach 

13 Continuation of previous year's appeal 

14 Denial of tax exemption 

APPEAL NUMBER - enter the seven-character 
number assigned to this appeal. 

YEAR - enter the tax (lien) year of the property 
appraisal being appealed. 

VALUE OF PROPERTY - enter the value of the 
property being appealed before the Taxpayer filed 
the appeal. 

HEARING DATE - enter the date that the 
Taxpayer's Appeal was heard; formatted as a two- 
digit month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 

VALUE AFTER DECISION - enter the value of 
the properly being appealed after the Appeal 
hearing with the County Tax Appeal Board. 

STATUS - enter the code that describes the 
decision taken on this Appeal. 

1 APPROVED 

2 DISAPPROVED 

3 ADJUSTED 

4 PENDING 

5 WITHDRAWN 

DECISION DATE - enter the date the decision 
was rendered on this Appeal; formatted as a two- 
digit month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 



08/01/89 



31-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



994-997 STATE TAX APPEAL BOARD 

INFORMATION PA APPL 

Optional 
DATE APPEALED - enter the date an appeal was 
filed with the State Tax Appeal Board by either 
the Taxpayer or the Department. This field is 
formatted as a two-digit month, two-digit day, and 
two-digit year. 

APPEAL REASON - enter the code that best 
describes the reason that the Taxpayer or the 
Department has appealed the decision on this 
property: 

Reasons for Taxpayer Appeal 

01 Improvement value too high 

02 Land value too high 

03 Personal property value too high 

04 Recent purchase price for property 

05 Not enough depreciation for condition of 
property 

06 Property should be in Class 18 or 19 

07 Property is in agricultural use or is in a 
green belt status 

08 AgriculturaiyTimber land classification 

09 Total property value too high 

10 Grade of house too high 

11 Income approach not considered 

12 Present worth of future benefit's approach 

13 Continuation of previous year's appeal 

14 Denial of tax exemption 

Reasons for Departmental Appeal 



01 
02 

03 
04 
05 
06 
07 
08 



09 
10 
11 

12 



Violation of Base Year 

Doesn't meet requirements of AG/Green 

Belt 

Appeal not timely 

Contrary to current statute 

Decision jeopardizes equality in that area 

Non-decision by County Tax Appeal Board 

Continuation of previous year's appeal 

Previous decision of CTAB or STAB not 

appealed and condition of property has not 

changed 

Violation of Administrative Rule 

Failure to exhaust Administrative remedies 

County Tax Appeal Board granted tax 

exemption 

County Tax Appeal Board excessively 

reduced property values 



DOCKET NUMBER - enter the seven-character 
assigned number to this appeal. 

YEAR - enter the tax (lien) year of the property 
appraisal being appealed. 

VALUE OF PROPERTY - enter the value of the 
property being appealed before the Taxpayer filed 
the appeal. 

HEARING DATE - enter the date that the 
Taxpayer's Appeal was heard; formatted as a two- 
digit month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 

VALUE AFTER DECISION - enter the value of 
the property being appealed after the Appeal 
hearing with the State Tax Appeal Board. 

STATUS - enter the code that describes the 
decision taken on this Appeal. 

1 APPROVED 

2 DISAPPROVED 

3 ADJUSTED 

4 PENDING 

5 WITHDRAWN 

DECISION DATE - enter the date the decision 
was rendered on this Appeal; formatted as a two- 
digit month, two-digit day, and two-digit year. 



998 COURT APPEAL INFORMATION 

Optional PA APPL 

DISTRICT COURT APPEAL - has the decision of 
the State Tax Appeal Board been appealed to 
District Court? Y = yes and N = no. 

SUPREME COURT APPEAL - has the decision 
of the District Court been appealed to the 
Supreme Court ? Y = yes and N = no. 



r 



31-8 



08/01/89 



%) 



(r 



APPENDIX 31 



A31.1. STATE POSTAL ABBREVIATIONS 



AL 


Alabama 


MT 


Montana 


AK 


Alaska 


NE 


Nebraska 


AZ 


Arizona 


NV 


Nevada 


AR 


Arkansas 


NH 


New Hampshire 


CA 


California 


NJ 


New Jersey 


CZ 


Canal Zone 


NM 


New Mexico 


CO 


Colorado 


NY 


New York 


CT 


Connecticut 


NC 


North Carolina 


DE 


Delaware 


ND 


North Dakota 


DC 


District of Columbia 


CM 


Northern Mariana Islands 


FL 


Florida 


OH 


Ohio 


GA 


Georgia 


OK 


Oklahoma 


GU 


Guam 


OR 


Oregon 


HI 


Hawaii 


PA 


Pennsylvania 


ID 


Idaho 


PR 


Puerto Rico 


IL 


Illinois 


RI 


Rhode Island 


IN 


Indiana 


SC 


South Carolina 


lA 


Iowa 


SD 


South Dakota 


KS 


Kansas 


TN 


Tennessee 


KY 


Kentucky 


TX 


Texas 


LA 


Louisiana 


ri 


Trust Territory 


ME 


Maine 


UT 


Utah 


MD 


Maryland 


VT 


Vermont 


MA 


Massachusetts 


VA 


Virginia 


MI 


Michigan 


VI 


Virgin Island 


MN 


Minnesota 


WA 


Washington 


MS 


Mississippi 


WV 


West Virginia 


MO 


Missouri 


WI 


Wisconsin 






WY 


Wyoming 



08/01/89 



A31-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A31.2. PROPERTY CLASSIFICATION CODES 



CODE 



DESCRIPTION 



CLASS 



PERCENTAGE 



1101 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1801 
1901 

2001 
2101 
2107 
2109 
2118 
2119 

2120 



!121 



2122 



2123 



Tillable Irrigated Land 

Tillable Non-Irrigated Land - Fallow 

Tillable Non-Irrigated Land - Continuously Cropped 

Grazing Land 

Wild Hay Land 

Timberland 

1 Acre Farmstead 
Tract Land 

Commercial Tract Land 
Locally Assessed Co-op Land 
Eligible Mining Claim 
Nonproductive Land Under 20 Acres 

Land devoted to processing ag/iimber products and out 
ol' production tor 12 months or acquired via Ibreclosure 
or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) 25% reduction lirst year. 
Land devoted to processing ag/iimber products and out 
of production for 12 months or acquired via foreclosure 
or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) 50% reduction second year. 
Land devoted to processing ag/iimber products and out 
of production for 12 months or acquired via foreclosure 
or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) 75% reduction third year. 
Land devoted to processing ag/iimber products and out 
of production for 12 months or acquired via foreclosure 
or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) salvage value. 



3 


30.U 


3 


30.0 


3 


30.0 


3 


30.0 


3 


30.0 


13 


3.84 


14 


3.088 


4 


3.86 


4 


3.86 


5 


3.0 


18 


.30.0 


19 


2.0 



20 



20 



20 



20 



3.86 



3.86 



3.86 



3.86 



2140 
2150 
2151 
2152 

2201 
2207 
2209 

2311 
2611 
2615 
2651 
2652 



100% Disabled Veterans' Land 
Exempt Res./Sub. Land 
Exempt Agricultural Land 
Exempt Timberland 

Residential City/Town Lots 

Commercial City/Town Lots 

Locally Assessed Co-op City/Town Lots 

Golf Course Land 

Industrial Land 

Locally Assessed Co-op On Industrial Land 

New Industry Land 

Research and Development Land 



4 


0.0 


4 


0.0 


3 


0.0 


13 


0.0 


4 


3.86 


4 


3.86 


5 


3.0 


4 


1.93 


4 


.3.86 


5 


3.0 


5 


3.0 


5 


3.0 



A31-2 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 31 



CODE 



A31.2. PROPERTY CLASSIFICATION CODES (Cont'd.) 
DESCRIPTION CLASS 



2130 
2131 
2132 
2133 
2134 
2135 
2136 
2137 
2138 
2139 



Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 



0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
90% 



LOW INCOME PERSON'S LAND - 1 ACRE FARMSTEAD 



2210 
2211 
2212 
2213 
2214 
2215 
2216 
2217 
2218 
2219 



3111 
3112 



3113 



3114 



3115 



3116 



0% 
10% 



Income 
Income 
Income - 20% 
Income - 30% 
Income - 40% 
Income - 50% 
Income - 60% 
Income - 70% 
Income - 80% 
Income - 90% 



3110 Improvements on Ag/Timberland 



3145 
3150 



Improvements on Disparately Owned Agricultural/Timberland 
Improvements on Disparately Owned Agricultural/Timberland 
can't demonstrate Sl,50() worth of annual income 

Improvements devoted to processing ag/timber products 
and out of production for 12 months or acquired via 
foreclosure or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) 25% market 
value reduction first year. 

Improvements devoted to processing ag/timber products 
and out of production for 12 months or acquired via 
foreclosure or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) 50% market 
value reduction second year. 

Improvements devoted to processing ag/timber products 
and out of production for 12 months or acquired via 
foreclosure or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) 75% market 
value reduction third year. 

Improvements devoted to processing ag/timber products 
and out of production for 12 months or acquired via 
foreclosure or bankruptcy (see 15-6-150) salvage value, 
fourth year and beyond. 

100% Disabled Veterans' Improvements 
Exempt Improvements 



14 

14 
4 



20 



20 



20 



20 



PERCENTAGE 



LOW INCOME PERSON'S LAND SUBURBAN TRACTS OR CITY / TOWN LOTS 



4 


0.0 


4 


0.386 


4 


0.772 


4 


1.158 


4 


1.544 


4 


1.93 


4 


2.316 


4 


2.702 


4 


3.088 


4 


3.474 


14 


0.0 


14 


0.309 


14 


0.618 


14 


0.926 


14 


1.2.35 


14 


1.544 


14 


1.853 


14 


2.162 


14 


2.47 


14 


2.779 



3.088 

3.088 
3.86 



3.86 



3.86 



3.86 



3.86 



4 
4 



0.0 
0.0 



08/01/89 



A3 1-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A31.2. PROPERTY CLASSIFICATION CODES (Cont'd.) 
CODE DESCRIPTION CLASS 



PERCENTAGE 



3301 Improvements on Tract Land 

3307 Improvemcnu on Commercial Tract Land 

3309 Improvements on Locally Assessed Co-op Tract Land 

3501 Improvements on Residential City/Town Lots 

3507 Improvements on Commercial City/Town Lots 

3509 Improvements on Locally Assessed Co-op City/Town Lots 

3607 Commercial Improvements on Right-of-Way 

3608 Residential Improvements on Right-of-Way 

3609 Locally Assessed Co-op Improvements on Right-of-Way 

3610 Agricultural Imps on Right-of-Way 
3631 Hydraulic Power Works Improvements 
3671 Golf Course Improvements 

3807 First Year New Industry Improvements 

3808 Second Year New Industry Improvements 

3809 Third Year New Industry Improvements 

3810 Fourth Year New Industry Improvements 

3811 Fifth Year New Industry Improvements 

3812 Sixth Year New Industry Improvements 

3813 Seventh Year New Industry Improvements 

3814 Eighth Year New Industry Improvements 

3815 Ninth Year New Industry Improvements 

3817 Tenth Year New Industry Improvements 
& All Industrial Improvements 

3818 Research and Development Firm Improvements 



4 


3.86 


4 


3.86 


5 


3.0 


4 


3.86 


4 


3.86 


5 


3.0 


4 


3.86 


4 


3.86 


5 


3.0 


4 


3.86 


4 


3.86 


4 


1.93 


4 


1.93 


4 


1.93 


4 


1.93 


4 


1.93 


4 


1.93 


4 


2.316 


4 


2.702 


4 


3.088 


4 


3.474 


4 


3.86 



3.0 



3819 


Improvements on Locally Assessed Co-op Industrial Land 


5 


3.0 


3851 


Improvements on New Industry Land 


5 


3.0 


3900 


Remodeled Improvements - Year of Construction 


4 


0.0 


3901 


Remodeled Improvements 1st Year after Construction 


4 


0.772 


3902 


Remodeled Improvements 2nd Year after Construction 


4 


1.544 


3903 


Remodeled Improvements 3rd Year after Construction 


4 


2.316 


3904 


Remodeled Improvements 4th Year after Construction 


4 


3.088 


3905 


Remodeled Improvements 5th Year after Construction 


4 


3.86 


3906 


Remodeled Research and Development Improvements - 
Year of Construction 


5 


0.0 


3907 


Remodeled Research and Development Improvements - 
Following 1st Year of Construction 


5 


0.(K)6 


3908 


Remodeled Research and Development Improvements - 
Following 2nd Year of Construction 


5 


0.012 


3909 


Remodeled Research and Development Improvements - 
Following 3rd Year of Construction 


5 


O.DIS 


3910 


Remodeled Research and Development Improvements - 


5 


0.024 



Following 4th Year of Construction 



A3 1-4 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 31 



1 



CODE 



A31.2. PROPERTY CLASSIFICATION CODES (Cont'd.) 
DESCRIPTION CLASS 



PERCENTAGE 



LOW INCOME PERSON'S IMPROVEMENTS ON SUBURBAN TRACT OR CITY / TOWN LOTS 



3135 
3136 
3137 
3138 
3139 
3140 
3141 
3142 
3143 
3144 



Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 
Income 



0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
90% 



LOW INCOME PERSON'S IMPROVEMENTS ON 1 ACRE FARMSTEAD 

3209 Income - 0% 

3210 Income - 10% 

3211 Income - 20% 

3212 Income - 30% 

3213 Income - 40% 

3214 Income - 50% 

3215 Income - 60% 

3216 Income - 70% 

3217 Income - 80% 

3218 Income - 90% 

6201 Personal Property Mobile Homes 

LOW INCOME PERSON'S PERSONAL PROPERTY MOBILE HOMES 



6235 


Income - 


0% 


6236 


Income - 


10% 


6237 


Income - 


20% 


6238 


Income - 


30% 


6239 


Income - 


40% 


6240 


Income - 


50% 


6241 


Income - 


60% 


6242 


Income - 


70% 


6243 


Income - 


80% 


6244 


Income - 


90% 


6245 


Income - 


100% 



4 


0.0 


4 


0.386 


4 


0.772 


4 


1.158 


4 


1.544 


4 


1.93 


4 


2.316 


4 


2.702 


4 


3.088 


4 


3.474 


14 


0.0 


14 


0.309 


14 


0.618 


14 


0.926 


14 


1.235 


14 


1.544 


14 


1.853 


14 


2.162 


14 


2.47 


14 


2.779 



12 



3.86 



Disabled Veterans Mobile Home 



12 


0.0 


12 


0.386 


12 


0.772 


12 


1.158 


12 


1.544 


12 


1.93 


12 


2.316 


12 


2.702 


12 


3.088 


12 


3.474 


12 


0.0 



08/01/89 



A3 1-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



CODE 



A31.2. PROPERTY CLASSIFICATION CODES (Cont'd.) 
DESCRIPTION CLASS 



PERCENTAGE 



6601 First Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6602 Second Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6603 Third Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6604 Fourth Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6605 Fifth Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6606 Sixth Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6607 Seventh Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6608 Eighth Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6609 Ninth Year New and Expanding Industry - 
Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6811 Air and Water Pollution Control Facilities 

6815 All Gasohol Related Properly 

8311 Electric Company Mileage 

8312 Electric Company Situs 

8313 Natural Gas Company Mileage 

8314 Natural Gas Company Situs 

8315 Gas and Electric Company Mileage 

8316 Gas and Electric Company Situs 

8331 Rural Electric and Telephone Co-op Mileage 

8332 Rural Electric and Telephone Co-op Situs 

8513 Railroad Company Mileage 

8514 Railroad Company Situs 

8515 Airline Company Flight Property 

8516 Airline Company Situs 

8517 Pipeline Company Mileage 

8518 Pipeline Company Situs 

8519 Telecommunication Company Mileage 

8520 Telecommunication Company Situs 

8523 Independent Telephone Company Mileage 

8524 Independent Telephone Company Situs 



5 


1.5 


5 


1.5 


5 


1.5 


5 


1.5 


5 


1.5 


5 


1.8 


5 


2.1 


5 


2.4 


5 


2.7 


5 


3.0 


5 


3.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


5 


3.0 


5 


3.0 


15 


Determined Annuallv 


15 


Delermined Annuallv 


17 


12.0 


17 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


11 


12.0 


7 


8.0 


7 


8.0 



L 



A3 1-6 



08/01/89 



^) 



f 



c 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FIELD 






FIELD 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


PAG^ 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


PAGE 


010 


QEOCODE OR PARCEL JDEhmFICATION 


1 


301-330 


LAND CLASSIFICATION CODE 


22 


060 


MAP 


13 


331-336 


AGRICULTURAL LAND TOTALS 


22 


070 


ROUTINQ NUMBER 


14 


340 


AGRICULTURAL IRRIGATION 


22 


101 


PROPERTY TYPE 


14 


341 


TIMBER 


23 


102 


IMPROVEMENT CLASSIFICATION CODE 


15 


400 


TOPOGRAPHY 


23 


103 


LIVING UNrrs 


15 


410 


UTILITIES 


24 


104 


ZONING 


16 


420 


ACCESS 


24 


105 


NEIGHBORHOOD 


16 


430 


FRONTING 


25 


110 


PROPERTY ADDRESS 


16 


440 


LOCATION 


25 


115 


CAMA CHANGE CODES 


17 


450 


PARKING 


26 


170 


ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR 


17 


461-463 


APPRAISAL INSPECTION INFORMATION 


26 


180 


PERCENTAGE OF OWNERSHIP 


17 


464 


PERSON CONTACTED 


27 


190 


PARCEL TIEBACK 


17 


468 


CONTINUED REVIEW NEEDED 


27 


191 


CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP 




471-472 


BUILDING / ELECTRICAL PERMIT 






PERCENTAGES 


18 




RECORD 


28 


201-203 


SALES DATA 


18 


481-483 


NOTES 


28 


299 


DPI FTE: LAND 


19 


885 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: UVND 


28 


300 


NONE 


19 


886 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: MAIN BUILDING 


29 


301-303 


FRONT FOOT 


19 


887 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: ACCESSORY 




305 


1982 STANDARD DEPTH 


20 




BUILDING 


29 


311-313 


SQUARE FOOT 


20 


888 


APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: FLAT VALUE 


29 


321-329 


ACREAGE 


20 


891-897 


OVERRIDE CODE 4 VALUE 


29 


301-329 


INFLUENCE FACTORS 


21 


960 


FINAL BASE VALUE 


29 


330 


SITE 


22 









CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 

All of the data common to Residential, Agricultural, Commercial and Industrial parcels is contained in five 
screens. The following list shows the fields in numerical order and describes the data requirements for them. 
It also shows the number of the screen that contains the field. 



010 GEOCODE OR PARCEL IDENTIFICATION 

Required RES / COM RS 

COUNTY - For the purpose of the Mass Appraisal 
System, each county is identified by the number 
currently being used on the automobile license 
plates. Counties have been assigned numbers from 
01 to 56. (See Table in Appendix) That portion 
of Yellowstone National Park which is located in 
Montana, but is not within any county, has been 
arbitrarily assigned the number 57. 

For example, the county license plate number of 
Lewis and Clark County is 5. Each single digit 
number is always prefixed with a leading zero. 
Enter 05 in the COUNTY field for all properties 
within Lewis and Clark County. 



ASSIGNED TOWNSHIP NUMBER - Townships 
are a part of the federal rectangular survey system, 
which is a land identification system. Under this 
system, land is divided into townships 6 miles 
square, which are related to base lines established 
by the federal government. The ba.se line running 
north and south is known as the "Principal 
Meridian" while the east and west base line is 
simply called the "Base Line". The township 
numbers east or west of the "Principal Meridian" 
are designated as ranges whereas the numbers 
north and south of the "Base Line' are tiers. (See 
Figure 32-1.) 



08/01/89 



32-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



SAMPLE PROPERTY RECORD CARD 

(Front of both Residential and Commercial cards; Residential shown. Commercial is identical.) 

U 









31 



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1 I r 
1,1,1 



I I I 

I t I 

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II 



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f iJlllillJtinl 



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I I I I 



a X « « 



lihiuli 






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i I 



ill 
111 



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yllllllJi 



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32-2 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



Ranges West 


Ranqes East 








3N 


1 










2N 






3W 


2W 


IW 


IN 
IE 


2E 


3E 




Base 




IS 


Line 








Q 
U 

'w 


2S 










a. 


as 







t; 

o 

z 

1 

c 
.o 



(A 

a 

jE 

tf) 

c 

5 

.o 



Figure 32-1. Townships in Relation lo the 
Principal Meridian and Base Line. 



For example, the shaded township in Figure 32-1 
would be described as "Township 3 North, Range 2 
East," meaning that the township is situated three 
tiers north of the Base Line and two tiers east of 
the Principal Meridian. 

Just as unique numbers have been assigned to 
counties, it has also been necessary to assign a 
unique number to each township or portion of a 
township that lies within any county in the state. 
This has been done for two purposes. One is to 
shorten the number of characters required to 
identify the township and the second is to provide 
a basis for a computer audit of the legal 
description carried on each property. 



numbered "0001". The next easterly township (or 
part of one) on the same tier of townships was 
numbered "0002". The next easterly township was 
numbered "0003". This process was continued until 
each township or portion of a township in the 
most southerly tier was consecutively numbered 
from west lo cast. 

This process was continued on the next most 
southerly tier of townships and each next most 
southerly tier of townships until alt the townships 
or parts of townships in each county in the state 
were numbered. 

Townships Split by County Lines (See Figure 
32-2.) 

Lewis &Cldrk ' Cascade 
County County 



17 N 



16 N 



I5N 



2661 



2551 



2445 



I 

I 2663 
1^ 

2662 N 



V553 



2552 



2446 



2664 



2555 



2554 



2447 



4W 



3vy 



Tw 



Figure 32-2. County Line Cutting Across 
Townships. 



A list of each township designation in Montana, 
together with the assigned township number and 
the a.ssigncd number for the county in which the 
township is located, will be found in the Master 
List of Assigned Township Numbers. 

Numbering Townships 



When a county line bisects a township, as shown in 
Figure 32-2, each portion of the township is 
a.ssigncd a separate number. 



Enter the ASSIGNED TOWNSHIP NUMBER for 
the parcel, if necessary, use leading zeros. 



Townships have been arbitrarily numbered starting 
with the most westerly township or part of a 
township in the most southerly tier of townships. 
This most southwestern township in the state was 



SECTION - A township is six miles square or 36 
square miles. Each square mile is designated as a 
section which is equivalent to 640 acres. Sections 
within a township are numbered from the northeast 



08/01/89 



32-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



corner, following a back and forth course, until the 
last section in the southeast corner is reached. For 
purposes of land description, sections are 
commonly divided into half sections containing 320 
acres, quarter sections containing 160 acres, etc. 
Land acreage descriptions are then made by 
referring to a particular quarter of a particular 
section located within a particular township, county 
and state. (See Figure 32-3.) 

Figures 32-3 and 32-4 demonstrate the subdivision 
of townships into smaller units. The legal 
description of the shaded portion of Figure 32-3 is: 
Section 23 Township 4N, Range 4E of the 
Montana Principle Meridian, County of Gallatin, 
State of Montana. 



6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


17 


16 


15 


14 


13 


19 


20 


21 


22 


'53- 


24 


30 


29 


28 


27 


26 


25 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 



•6 miles- 



Figure 32-3. Subdivision of Township 4 North, 
Range 4 East into Sections of One Mile 
Each Side. 



sides of a township and are referred to as lots 
(Government Lots) and are approximately forty 
acres in size. 



320 ACRES 



/CRE 



\J.\0 

acres' 



4) 

E 



Jc 



on 



l<1320leV4-^V2mi. H 

ft. mi. 



Figure 32-4. Subdivision of Section 23 Showing 
320 Acre Half Section, 160 Acre Quarter 
Section, and (Shaded) a Quarter Section Block 
of 40 Acres. 



Enter the SECTION NUMBER for the parcel, if 
necessary, use leading zeros. 

QUARTER SECTION - The Quarter Section 
number assigned to a parcel is the Quarter Section 
in which the Quarter Section Block is located. 
Quarter Sections are numbered counterclockwise as 
follows: NE = 1, NW = 2, SW = 3, SE = 4. 
(See Figure 32-5.) 



r 



The legal description of the shaded portion of 
Figure 32-4 would be NE4 of the SW4 (which is 
read "the Northeast quarter of the Southwest 
quarter") of Section 23, Township 4N, Range 4E of 
the Montana Principle Meridian, County of 
Gallatin, State of Montana. 

Because of the curvature of the earth, the 
north/south lines of ranges converge as they extend 
toward the north pole. To keep the range lines as 
nearly six miles apart as possible, the lines are laid 
out for approximately 24 miles, and then jog so 
that they are again six miles apart to preserve, as 
nearly as may be possible, the square shape of the 
townships. The irregular shaped areas created in 
the correction are usually along the north and west 



NW = 2 


NE=1 


SW=3 


SE=4 



Figure 32-5. 
Sections. 



Numbering Pattern for Quarter 



The Quarter Section, Block, and Lot sequence is a 
filing number designed to facilitate administrative 
record keeping and aid in field appraisal work, 
particularly in densely populated areas with a large 



c 



32-4 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



number of parcels per section. These numbers are 
arbitrarily assigned and may or may not have any 
relationship to block or lot numbers used in a 
legal location within a section. 

Assignment of Quarter Section 

TIic Tollowing rules arc to be used to determine 
what Quarter Section a Quarter Section Block is 
numbered in after the block boundaries are 
delineated. 




the lowest numbered Quarter Section, as shown in 
Figure 32-7. 



Rule 3, a Quarter Section Block (hat occupies an 
entire section will be numbered in Quarter Section 
1, ns shown In I'lfjurc M-H. I li<; only exception («» 
the rule would be farmstcnds. If you have 
agricultural land with a rarmslcad, code the 
Quarter Section where the farmstead is located. 




FIgnre 32-6. A Quarter Section Block Lying in 
Several Quarter Sections. 



Flciirc 32-R. A Quarter Section Block Occupying 
un Entire Qusirtcr Section. 



Rule 1, a Quarter Section Block that is partly In 
two or more Quarter Sections will be numbered In 
the Quarter Section where the majority of the 
block lies, as shown in Figure 32-6. 



QUARTER SECIION BLOCK - A Quarter 
Section I3lock Is an area bounded on all sides by 
physical features or by boundaries which must be 
retained for taxing purposes. 

Quarter Section Block Boundaries 



Rule 2, a Quarter Section Block that is equally in 
two or more Quarter Sections will be numbered in 



The following features must be used as block 
boundaries. 



LUMP GULCH ROAD 




Flgtire 32-7. A Quarter Section Block Lying 
Equally in Two Quarter Sections. 



• Slate and county boundaries 

• Section lines 

• Streets 

• Railroad tracks 

NOTK: This docs not include spur lines that 
do not divide private ownership. In railroad 
yards, only (he outermost tracks should he 
used as block boundaries. 

The following features may be used to subdivide 
large, Irregularly shaped or complex blocks. The 
Area Manager should be consulted before using 
the following for block boundaries. 



08/01/89 



32-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Streams, rivers (as denoted on the USGS 
Quadrangle Map Series), and other bodies of 
water. (Including double-line drainage) 

Private roads that serve two or more residences. 

In some situations, "imaginary" extensions of 
streets (these are to be indicated on the maps 
as a series of small dashed lines) may be used. 
However, "imaginary" extensions may not be 
used when any one of the features listed above 
is available. (See Figure 32-9.) 

If an "imaginary" extension of a street is to be 
used, it is subject to the following conditions: 

• The extension cannot exceed 300 feet in 
length. 

• The exact location of the beginning point of 
the extension must be readily identifiable. 
For example, the extension must never have 
its beginning point somewhere along a curve 
of a street. The location of the extension 
must be clearly visible on the map. 

• Street extension can never be established 
where they would split a parcel. (Quarter 
Section Lot) For example, cul-de-sacs must 
never be extended, because parcels are 
frequently located at the end. 

• Street extensions must be "straight-line" 
extensions and must intersect the first visible 
map feature along the extension. 

In areas where extensive use of cul-de-sacs 
make street extensions impossible, the parcels 
on the cul-de-sac (or multiple cul-de-sacs) may 
be delineated as a Quarter Section Block. (See 
Figure 32-9.) 



The following do not in themselves create Quarter 
Section Block boundaries. 

• Quarter section lines 

• Incorporated city or town limits 

• School district boundaries 

• Addition or subdivision boundaries 



Incorrect 



C\d«t >»<>.■ 



:-02; ji 



(@)^ 



(^) 1 (^) 




iii i i ii n i l II 1 1 *1 1 iiin i iiii II 



r 



Correct 



No street extension 
here due to cul-de-sac 




Figure 32-9. Incorrect and Correct Usage of the 
"Imaginary" Street Extension. 



Numbering of Quarter Section Blocks 

Quarter Section Blocks are consecutively numbered 
from left to right and from south to north within a 



32-6 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



Quarter Section. (See Figure 32-10) See 
QUARTER SECTION to determine in which 
Quarter Section a Quarter Section Block should be 
numbered. 



rMQuarter 
Section 



Section 14 



tC Quarter Section 





T- 
















(&> 


1 
1 


@) 




® 




® 




® 


T««« 




Kmi.. 














@ 


1 
1 


@ 




® 




(jg) 




© 



SaetnA ■ htc 



@) I @) @ @> @ 



TVmA 



Knv. 



@ 




® 




(Q) 




@ 




@ 


foo*^ 




K-ge. 














<B> 




® 




® 




@ 




c3> 


^iUV 




Kxt.. 














® 




® 




& 




(® 




(M2) 



At*^ 



^ 



@ I p i @ I ^- 1 <S) I g | @ I «[®_ 
® 1 1 ® Ijl ® Ijl (is) JJF®" 




(3) (^^ (^ 



SE Quarter Section 



) 



Figure 32-10. Quarter Section Block Numbering 
Pattern. 



NOTE: The use of a section map or city/town 
map as a control map for Quarter Section 
Block numbering in urban areas is 
recommended. The block number can then 
be transcribed from the control map to the 
map on which the parcels will be delineated. 

Tliere are areas where the consecutive numbering 
of Quarter Section Blocks is not advisable. This is 
particularly true in developing areas or areas of 
rapid growth. In those areas and with the counsel 
of the Area Manager, it is permissible to leave 
spaces in the numbering sequence. 



If there are any Quarter Section Blocks within a 
Quarter Section, there must be a block number 
"01". A Quarter Section Block that occupies the 
entire section will be numbered block 01 of Quarter 
Section 1. (See Figure 32-11.) 



Quarter Section Blockl 



Quarter Section 



^ 


//^y 


/%; 


/T/ 



Figure 32-11. Quarter Section Block Numbering 
for a Single Parcel Occupying an Entire Section. 



Quarter Section Block numbering CANNOT exceed 
99 for one Quarter Section. If the block 
numbering does exceed 99, consult your Area 
Manager to help make the necessary corrections. 

When an addition block is in more than one 
section, a separate Quarter Section Block Number 
may be assigned to each "piece" of the addition 
block in each section. (See Figure 32-12) 
However, it is acceptable practice to "bend" the 
section line around the entire block or down an 
alley, depending on what makes sense for that 
particular case. 

REMEMIJER: This system is to aid field review. 

When two or more addition blocks are joined 
together by vacated streets, one Quarter Section 
Block number is assigned. 



08/01/89 



32-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 







Section 22 






Section 


23 








Broadway 






St. 


,<® 


• 
> 


2® 






^"^ 


'Addition Block 








Main 






St. 










7<® 




6® 


• 

> 
< 




. @ 


• 

> 


4@> 






c 


State 


ITJ 




St. 








8® 


<U 
M 
O 
OQ 


g© 


Ol 


t ° t 


<u 

■M 

•M 

CO 


„@> 




' •" 








V 




^ 


Section line creates two 
Quarter Section Blocks 
'from one Addition Block. 



r 



Figure 32-12. Quarter Section Blocks Created from Addition Blocks by the Section Line. 



If one person owns both blocks or contiguous land 
in both blocks, use the SHORT LEGAL 
DESCRIPTION field to further explain that the 
vacated streets are also included as well as 
describing a full legal description of block and lots 
involved in the parcel. 

Map Preparation 

Source Map Hierarchy - All features that are used 
as Quarter Section Block boundaries must be 
shown on all maps. The hierarchy of source maps 
for locating these features is: 

a. USGS Quadrangle Map Series 

b. general highway maps 

c. maps from the county appraiser or assessor's 
office. 

Labeling Features - All roads, rivers, railroads and 
other features on maps should be labeled with 
their commonly used name. It is important that 
the same name be consistently used for any one 
feature throughout a county. (See Figure 32-13.) 

QUARTER SECTION LOT - A Quarter Section 
Lot (also known as a parcel) is a contiguous area 
of land described in a single description in a deed 
or as one of a number of lots on a plat, separately 
owned, either publicly or privately; and capable of 
being separately conveyed. The only exceptions to 
this deflnition are "lots" formed by the bisection of 



a single ownership by a section line or a taxing 
jurisdiction such as an incorporated city, town or a 
school district. 



Smith Crpek Rd 




C 



Figure 32-13. Road, River, and Railroad Labeling. 



Quarter Section Lot Boundaries 

A Quarter Section Lot is a contiguous ownership. 
A lot may also be divided by the following 
features: 



Quarter Section Block boundaries 
Dedicated alleys 
Taxing jurisdictions 
Incorporated city or town limits 
School district boundaries 



e 



32-8 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



A Quarter Section Lot may also be created to 
uniquely code ownerships as need be listed on the 
assessment (tax) roll. The Area Manager must 
approve all such lots and care should be taken to 
properly document them. 

A section line (a Quarter Section Block boundary) 
DOES NOT break a platted lot or tract in a 
dedicated addition or subdivision. 

• The section line must be "bent" around the lot 
(or tract) so that the lot (or tract) is coded in 
the section where the majority of the lot (or 
tract) lies. (See Figure 32-14.) 



k^ 



'Bafif Saetion Lin* 
Rad dMhad line. 



1 


2 


3 


^ 


5 


6 


7 


I 
8 






16 


15 


14 


^13' 

i 


12 


11 


10 


9 

i 



Section 5 I Saetion 4 

Figure 32-14. A Section Line "Bent" Around 
Tracts. 



• The "bent" section line will be shown by a RED 
DASHED line. Both the actual section line 
and the "bent" section line are to be indicated 
on the map. 

• The "bending" of the section line should be 
done to minimize confusion in the field. It is 
an acceptable practice to "bend" the line around 
an entire platted block or down an alley, 
depending on what makes sense for that 
particular case. 

REMEMBER: This system is to aid field review. 



Numbering of Quarter Section Lots 

The numbering of Quarter Section Lots should 
only be done AFTER all land within the Quarter 
Section Block has been accounted for and each 
ownership delineated (in orange if needed). 

The Quarter Section Lot numbers are assigned 
independent of the addition lot numbers. Quarter 
Section Lots reflect ownerships within a block. 
The typical numbering sequence is counterclockwise 
around the block. (See Figure 32-15.) 



Y> 


< 


3^ 


^4 

04"^-\ 


X 



t 




SUrt 
here 



-»- E 



Ownerships are. 

delineated in orange 

if needed - 




Figure 32-15. 

Numbers. 



Assignment of Quarter Section Lot 



The Quarter Section Lot sequence is to AID the 
appraiser in field appraisal work. The lot 
numbering sequence should be thought of as the 
order in which one would drive from parcel to 



08/01/89 



32-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



parcel. While this might not be possible in all 
cases, it can be used as a rule of thumb. A few 
examples might help to illustrate this point. 



J L 



L 



MAIN ST 



KlO 


■Of 


.07 


>oa 


Nv xM 


Itl 






«12 






02 


« 

01 


«13 


■ 14 



1 



FIRST ST 



r 



Figure 32-16. Quarter Section Lot Numbering on 
a Cul-de-Sac. 



Parcels on a cul-de-sac - All parcels fronting on a 
cul-de-sac should be numbered in sequence, 
because typically the front of the house faces the 
cul-de-sac. If a parcel is bounded by both a cul-de- 
sac and a road, still number the parcel in sequence 
with the other parcels on the cul-de-sac. (See 
Figure 32-16.) 



J L 



L 



TOWER ST 




HALL ST 



1 [ 



1 r 



Parcels on an alley - If a parcel fronts on an alley, 
number that parcel after the parcel that is in front 
of it. Frequently, a parcel is the back half of 
several lots and is fronting on the cross street. 
Again, number that parcel in sequence with the 
parcel in front of it. (See Figure 32-17.) 

Parcels in an area of mixed property type - In areas 
of mixed property types (i.e. residential and 
agricultural) and/or varying sized parcels, number 
all Quarter Section Lot parcels as if driving from 
one "front door" to the next. Access to the 
improvements on the parcel for Held appraisal 
work should be of prime consideration. (See 
Figure 32-18.) 



r 



» 


r 




' tf 


a 


p"* 





Figure 32-18. Quarter Section Lot Numbering in 
an Area of Mixed Property Types. 



For every Quarter Section Block there MUST be a 
Quarter Section Lot 01. A parcel that occupies an 
entire section must be Lot 01. There can only be 
one Lot 01 per block. (See Figure 32-19.) 

Quarter Section Lot numbering CANNOT exceed 
99 for one Quarter Section Block. If the lot 
numbering does exceed 99, the Area Manager 
should be consulted to help make the necessary 
corrections. 



Figure 32-17. Quarter Section Lot Numbering in 
an Alley-Divided Block. 



<? 



32-10 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



^ 



While it is desirable to consecutively number lots, 
it may not be prudent to do so. 

Depending on the locale, the sale activity, etc., 
consecutively numbering lots may cause more work 
than is necessary. Individuals aware of the local 
situation (i.e. appraisers, mapping clerks) should be 
consulted before lot numbering. 



01 



Figure 32-19. Quarter Section Lot Numbering 
Where a Parcel Occupies the Entire Section. 



Rights" and can be compared to a bundle of sticks, 
wherein each stick represents a distinct and 
separate right or privilege of ownership. These 
rights are inherent in ownership of real property 
and guaranteed by law, but subject to certain 
limitations and restrictions. They are the right to 
use real property, to sell it, to lease it, to enter it, 
to give it away, and the right to rcfu.sc to exercise 
any of these rights. [1] 




XQ2 


^x03 


xG6 


X06 
x^ 


X08 



^ 



Unique Quarter Section Lots 

Quarter Section Lx)ts are an identifier of 
ownership. The following types of ownerships are 
uniquely coded and are therefore treated separately. 

Condominiums - Each condominium unit is treated 
as a lot. The entire condominium complex (as 
given on the unit declaration or master deed) is 
assigned one Quarter Section Block number. 
Individual ownerships within the condominium 
complex may also be identified by the Unit 
Number. 

Improvements on leased land - An improvement on 
leased land is considered to be a Quarter Section 
Lot separate and distinct from the lot identifying 
the land. The Quarter Section Lot for the land 
should be numbered first, then the lots describing 
the improvements should be numbered in a driving 
order sequence. (See Figure 32-20.) 



Figure 32-20. Quarter Section Lots 02 Thru 08 
Show Numbering of Improvements on Leased 
Land. 



These rights may be held by different individual 
owners. For example, one may own the rights to 
the improvements on a parcel, while another 
retains ownership of the surface and the remaining 
rights. This is called a physical partial interest. 

A different type of division of rights occurs when 
one right is owned by several individuals in some 
proportion. An example of this type of division 
would be if two individuals own a parcel. One 
person owns a 1/4 interest and the other owns 3/4 
interest. This is referred to as a legal partial 
interest. 

Another way to picture the difference between 
physical partial interest and legal partial interest is 



1 



UNIT NUMBER - The Unit Number identifies the 
property rights associated with each parcel. 

Ownership of real property carries with it certain 
privileges. As a means of illustration, these rights 
or privileges are referred to as a "Bundle of 



[1] Americnii Institute of Reul Ivstute Appraisers, 
The Appraisal of Real Estate, 7th ed. (Chicago: 
Author 1978) p. 15. 



08/01/89 



32-11 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



by comparison with a layer cake. Each layer 
represents a physical partial interest (air rights, 
surface, improvements on the surface, subsurface, 
etc.) Legal partial interest can then be thought of 
as a slice of the cake. There may be many slices 
(or ownerships) and some may or may not be 
larger than others. 

Because the division of rights either physically or 
legally affects value, it is important to identify what 
rights are associated with each parcel. The UNIT 
NUMBER provides a means to identify the 
"breakdown" of rights for a parcel. If all of the 
rights to a parcel are held by one individual, UNIT 
NUMBER is coded "0000". 

However, if there is either physical or legal partial 
interests (or both) in a parcel, the first ownership 
is coded "0001"; the second "0002"; the third 
ownership "0003"; and so forth until all ownerships 
are identified and numbered. The rights to each 
particular ownership are enumerated in detail in 
the SHORT LEGAL DESCRIPTION field. If a 
parcel has any type of partial interest, no 
ownership should be coded "0000". 

The UNIT NUMBER has a second purpose in the 
Parcel Identification System. In situations where 
the standard methods utilized for Parcel 
Identification are not suitable, the unit number can 
be utilized to uniquely identify a parcel. Since unit 
number is an alphanumeric field with four 
positions, the combinations of unique numbers that 
can be created within a Quarter Section Lot are 
basically infinite. Assuming that you have more 
than 99 lots within a Quarter Section Block, the 
unit number can be utilized to expand the limits of 
the Parcel Identification Number. 

An example is: 

COUNTY 07 

TOWNSHIP 3966 

SECTION 07 

QUARTER SECTION 3 

QUARTER SECTION BLOCK 28 

QUARTER SECTION LOT 01-99 

possible 

UNIT NUMBER 0000 

In order to establish "uniqueness", only 1 digit 
must change at any position in the Parcel 
Identification Number. The COUNTY through 
QUARTER SECTION LOT are constrained by 
fairly rigid usage rules. In contrast. Unit Number 
is basically free form. The example above has 99 



Quarter Section Lots possible under standard 
parcel identification data coding rules. By 
changing the unit number to any other number or 
alphabetic characters, the Quarter Section Lot can 
be expanded another 99 positions for each change 
of the unit number. 

Another example might be in the description of 
mobile home parks. By standardizing the Parcel 
Identification Number for a mobile home park by 
using a Quarter Section Block of 01 and a Quarter 
Section Lot of 01, the Unit Number can be varied 
to identify which space the mobile home occupies. 
Perhaps a Unit Number series from MOOl to M999 
might be applicable in situations where the number 
of mobile homes exceeds 100. In situations where 
less than 100 mobile homes exist, MHOl to MH99 
might be applicable. 

Caution should be utilized when using the unit 
number to uniquely identify parcels. Since the 
field is alphanumeric the results of key data sorts 
for worksheets, cost computation sheets, valuation 
rolls, etc., are unpredictable and you may split 
areas when printing out records. Please note that 
alphabetic characters coded in the unit number will 
be sorted before numeric characters. For example, 
AAAO will sort prior to 0000, MOBl prior to 
0000, etc. 

It is advisable that you reserve unit numbers from 
0000 to 0999 for the standard "division of rights". 
All other numbers are free for your use, and are 
unique within any given quarter section, quarter 
section lot or quarter section block. 

In situations where a subdivision is already mapped 
by quarter section block or lot in the original plat, 
and that description is not unique to the quarter 
section, the unit number can be utilized to make 
that coding unique. Simply assign a unique unit 
number for each subdivision within the quarter 
section and use the lot and block numbers as 
assigned in the original plat. 

Another unique numbering system (used 
successfully in some areas of the state) uses the 
Quarter Section Number Scheme and the Quarter 
Section Block and Lot or Unit Number to identify 
the location of farmsteads. 

Let's assume (for example purposes) we have a 
farmstead located in the SW4 (southwest quarter) 
of the SE4 (southeast quarter) of Section 26. 
Since we already identify the SE4 of Section 26 in 



32-12 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



1 



the QUARTER SECTION field as a 4 we can 
then break the SW4 of Quarter Section 4 into 4 
more parts. (See Figure 32-21.) 



up to 99 cards per parcel. A card number must be 
entered on every card. 



2 


1 


3 


4 



Figure 32-21. Quarter Section Broken into 
Quarters. 



Using the standard number scheme we then 
identify the SW4 of Quarter Section 4 with a 
The geocode could look like this: 



COUNTY 
TOWNSHIP 
SECTION 

QUARTER SECTION 
QUARTER SECTION 



QUARTER SECTION 
UNIT NUMBER 



:> 



00 

9999 

26 

4 

BLOCK 03 Indicates 
SW4of 
QUARTER 4 

LOT 00 

would be coded 
0003 for this 
parcel if you 
preferred to use 
Quarter Section 
Block 01 and 
Quarter Section 
Lot 01. 



This system can be utilized down to a parcel the 
size of 2.5 acres by using the Unit Number and the 
existing QUARTER SECTION. If QUARTER 
SECTION was coded 3 or SW4 and the Unit 
Number was coded 4223, then the parcel would be 
located in the SE4NW4NW4SW4 of the section 
the parcel was located in. (See Figure 32-22.) 

Should you plan to use the UNIT NUMBER to 
uniquely identify parcels in your County, you 
should contact your Area Manager to inquire about 
standards in your area. 

CARD NUMBER - Enter the sequential number 
assigned to each particular card of a parcel. For 
example for parcels requiring one card, enter 01 on 
the first card; for parcels requiring two cards, enter 
01 on the first card and 02 on the second card; etc. 



ffl 



Figure 32-22. The Location (Shaded) of Unit 
Number 4223, Southwest, Northwest, Northwest, 
of the Southwest Quarter of Section 26. 



060 



RES / COM SI 



MAP 

Optional 
Three character positions are provided to enter 
numeric characters denoting the division of 
properties defined on an individual map. The 
purpose of this field is for geographical sorting of 
output reports. 

The Map Code uniquely identifies each map as to 
township, section and area. The Map Code, in 
total, is a nine digit number consisting of three 
fields; ASSIGNED TOWNSHIP, SECTION, and 
MAP. Only the last three digits of the Map Code 
are to be coded in this field. 

The Map Code is adaptable to all maps in all 
counties. The Map Code will be placed in the 
lower left-hand comer of the map and on any 
folder containing parcels geocoded on that map. 

First Field - ASSIGNED TOWNSHIP 
NUMBER 

Field one is the four digit ASSIGNED 
TOWNSHIP NUMBER of the township in which 
the mapped area lies. Mapped areas of multiple 
townships will use the lowest numeric assigned 
township number. 



08/01/89 



32-13 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Second Field - SECTION NUMBER 

The two digit SECTION NUMBER is the second 
field. If the entire mapped area is in one section, 
use that section number. 

• For maps covering property in more than one 
section, but all in the same township, use the 
lowest section number. 

• For mapped areas in more than one township, 
use the lowest numbered section in the 
township with the lowest assigned township 
number. This may not always be the lowest 
section number on the map. 

Third Field - MAP or the Mapped Area 

The third field of three digits MAP designates the 
mapped area. Any of the following eight methods 
may be used to designate the third field for a map. 

• Township maps and/or computer generated 
maps: These maps are always coded "XXX". 

• Individual section maps: For a map of a 
complete section, this field is coded "XXX". 

• Multiple maps of a section: It is possible to 
have several maps of the unplatted area of one 
section. In this case, the third field should be 
"XXX". To differentiate these maps, the 
appraiser may choose one of the following: 

a. The last one or two spaces may be used for 
numeric digits refleaing a number assigned to 
the map. 

b. Each map may carry a notation (aside from 
the code) to indicate it is one of several maps, 
(i.e., 1 of 2, 2 of 2). This would not be part of 
the actual map code and would primarily serve 
in the filing of and accounting for the maps. 

• Individual Subdivision/Addition: A map of a 
complete subdivision/addition will have that 
subdivision's or addition's three digit addition 
code for the third field. 

• Certificate of Survey: A certificate of survey 
will be treated exactly like an individual 
subdivision map using its three digit addition 
code in this field. 



Multiple maps of a Subdivision/Addition: If a 
subdivision, due to its scale and/or size, is 
drawn on more than one map, use the notation 
method of 1 of 4, 2 of 4, etc. This notation 
will not be coded but will serve in the filing of 
and the accounting for the maps. 

Maps of Multiple Subdivisions/Additions: For 
maps covering more than one subdivision but 
not an entire municipality, the third field will 
be the alphabetically lowest addition code. 

Municipality Maps: If an entire municipality is 
contained on one map, use the three digit 
municipality code for this field. Do this even if 
there may be more than one subdivision in that 
municipality. 



070 ROUTING NUMBER RES / COM SI 

Optional 
Enter three numeric characters (ranging from 001 
to 999) to the left of the decimal point, and two 
numeric characters (ranging from 01 to 99) to the 
right of the decimal point. This ROUTING 
NUMBER denotes the sequential routing assigned 
to each parcel of property. The purpose of this 
field is for geographical sorting of output reports 
to aid field work. 

The character positions to the right of the decimal 
point are provided to facilitate the identification of 
property after an ownership split has occurred. 
For example a parcel with a ROUTING NUMBER 
of 022.00 is split into three parcels. The first split 
from the parcel is numbered 022.01, the second 
022.02, and the third 022.03. 

NOTE: For parcels requiring multiple cards to 
list the information, the ROUTING 
NUMBER must be entered on each card. 



101 PROPERTY TYPE RES / COM SI 

Required 
Enter the code that best describes the specific real 
property type of the subject parcel. The basis for 
this classification is the actual present day use. 
This field consists of two characters; the first 
character indicates the general category for 
appraisal purposes, and the second character is 
used for a more definitive breakdown of each 
property type. 



32-14 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



^ 



") 



AR AGRICULTURAL RURAL: 

Agricultural/Timber land located in 
unincorporated areas of the county. 

AU AGRICULTURAL URBAN: 

Agricultural/Timber land located within an 
incorporated area of the county. 

CA CENTRALLY ASSESSED: All property 
located in a county which is centrally 
assessed. 

CR COMMERCL\L RURAL: All commercial 
property located in unincorporated areas of 
the county. 

CU COMMERCL\L URBAN: All commercial 
property located within an incorporated 
municipality. 

EP EXEMPT PROPERTY: All parcels which 
have been granted an exemption. Included 
are Federal lands, State lands, City owned 
property, and properties which have been 
granted an exemption by the Department of 
Revenue for religious, charitable or 
educational uses. 

FR FARMSTEAD RURAL: Farmstead and 

associated land located in an unincorporated 
area of the county. 

FU FARMSTEAD URBAN: Farmstead and 

associated land located within a municipality. 

lU INDUSTRIAL URBAN: AU industrial 
property located within an incorporated 
municipality. 

IR INDUSTRL^L RURAL: All industrial 

property located in unincorporated areas of 
the county. 

KR CONDOMINIUM RURAL: All 

condominiums located in unincorporated 
areas of the county. 

KU CONDOMINIUM URBAN: All 
condominiums located within an 
incorporated municipality. 

LA LOCALLY ASSESSED UTILITY 
PROPERTY 



MC MINING CLAIMS: All minmg claims which 
are patented by the United States 
Government. This property type is reserved 
for class 18 properties only. 

NV NON- VALUED PROPERTY: This code is 
to only be used for Condominium Master 
Parcels. 

RR RESIDENTIAL RURAL: All dwellings and 
mobile homes located in unincorporated 
areas of the county. 

RU RESIDENTL\L URBAN: All dwellings and 
mobile homes located within an incorporated 
municipality. 

TP TRIBAL PROPERTY: Property located 
within Indian Reservation boundaries and 
owned by the tribe. 

VR VACANT LAND RURAL: All vacant land 
located in unincorporated areas of the 
county. 

VU VACANT LAND URBAN: All vacant land 
located within an incorporated municipality. 



102 IMPROVEMENT CLASSIFICATION CODE 

Required RES / COM SI 

Enter the four numeric characters denoting the 
Improvement Classification Code for the 
improvements described on this card. 

The CLASSIFICATION CODE is a coding system 
to identify the different types of taxable property 
that may be found within a parcel. This should 
not be confused with PROPERTY TYPE, which 
codes both land and improvements as one. The 
CLASSIFICATION CODE uniquely codes land 
and improvements as if each were a separate unit. 

The complete listing of PROPERTY 
CLASSIFICATION CODES can be found in the 
Appendix of the Property Administration Data 
Section. 



103 



RES / COM SI 



:> 



LIVING UNITS 
Optional 
Enter the number of living units present in the 
dwelling described on this card. A living unit is 
defined as any room or group of rooms designed as 
the living quarters of one family or household, 



08/01/89 



32-15 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



equipped with cooking and toilet facilities, and 
having an independent entrance from a public hall 
or from the outside. 

For example, a single family residence contains one 
living unit, and the correct entry would be "CWl". 
An apartment building with 6 apartments in it, 
would be coded "006". 



land usages remaining in well-balanced 
conformity. 

IMPROVING - the neighborhood is on the 
up-trend, with remodeling or razing of 
outmoded structures, land usages being 
upgraded, new construction, etc 



If the card describes a Commercial type structure, 
is vacant, or contains only auxiliary improvements, 
enter "000". 



104 ZONING RES / COM SI 

Optional 
Enter the local zoning of the parcel. Space is 
provided to enter up to five alpha and/or numeric 
characters. 

MULTI-USE - Enter an "X" to indicate there are 
multiple zoning regulations for this parcel. 

NON-CONFORMING USE - Enter a "Y" to 
indicate there is evidence the parcel does not 
conform to the current zoning. 



105 



RES / COM SI 



NEIGHBORHOOD 

Required 
A neighborhood may be defined as a geographical 
area exhibiting a high degree of homogeneity in 
amenities, land use, economic trends, and 
improvement characteristics (such as structural 
quality, age, and condition). 

NEIGHBORHOOD - Enter the three numeric 
characters (to the left of the hash mark) to denote 
the specific neighborhood identification number. 

NEIGHBORHOOD SUFFIX - If a neighborhood 
has been broken into sub-neighborhoods, enter the 
one charaaer sub-neighborhood code (to the right 
of the hash mark). If there is no sub- 
neighborhood, leave the position blank. 

NEIGHBORHOOD TREND - Enter the code that 
best describes the trend of the neighborhood. 

1 DECLINING - the neighborhood is on the 
downgrade, showing considerable evidence of 
deterioration in buildings, land usage, etc. 

2 STABLE - the neighborhood is stable, 
showing evidence of good maintenance, with 



110 PROPERTY ADDRESS RES / COM SI 

Required 
NUMBER - Enter the Street Number for the 
parcel. 

SUFFIX - Enter the Suffix of the Street Number. 
For example, apartments at the same street 
address, 1220 Main St., may be numbered; 1220 A 
Main St., 1220 B Main St., 1220 C Main St., etc. 
The A, B, and C are suffix addresses and should be 
entered in this field. 

DIRECTION - Enter the Direction of the Street; 
i.e. N, S, E, W, NE, NW, etc. An example of a 
Street Direction is: 1220 West Main Street, west is 
the direction and should be abbreviated "W" and 
entered in this field. 

STREET NAME - Enter the street name, left- 
justified. Leave one blank space between words, 
abbreviations and numbers. If the parcel has a 
fi'actional street number or letter designation, leave 
one blank space after the street name and 
designation and then enter that fractional street 
number or letter designation. Record any fraction 
by two digits separated by a slash CD- 
Blank spaces are to be used in lieu of periods 
and/or commas. Recommended abbreviations 
appear in the Appendix. 

MUNICIPALITY or ZIP CODE - If the parcel is 
within a municipality and therefore the 
MUNICIPALITY CODE is not "XXX", enter the 
MUNICIPALITY CODE in this field. 

Otherwise, if the parcel is not within a municipality 
and the MUNICIPALITY CODE is "XXX". enter 
the last three digits of the Zip Code for the area 
where the parcel is located. The first two digits 
are known to be "59" for the entire state. Be sure 
to only enter the last three digits. 



32-16 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



1 



115 CAMA CHANGE CODES RES / COM SI 

Optional 
Enter the code that best describes the reason that 
the CAMA record is being changed. 



") 



1 

2 
3 
4 
9 



170 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 

LAND USE CHANGE 

TO CORRECT PARCEL INFORMATION 

PARCEL SPLIT 

CONVERTED - no activity on this record 



1 



ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR 

Optional RES / COM S2 

ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR is defined as 
extraordinary economic obsolescence that impacts 
all property located in a specific neighborhood, 
community, or geographic area. The ECONOMIC 
CONDITION FACTOR attempts to correct for the 
difference between replacement cost less normal 
depreciation and market value as they may differ 
from locality to locality. Enter the ECONOMIC 
CONDITION FACTOR applicable to the parcel in 
whole percent, right-justified. If no economic 
condition factor is to be applied leave this field 
blank. 

When coding the ECONOMIC CONDITION 
FACTOR, please follow the following guidelines: 

• For adjustments which increase the 
improvement(s) value, code the percent of 
increase plus 100. For example: to increase the 
improvement(s) value by 25%, code 125. 

• For adjustments which decrease the 
improvement(s) value, code the percent of 
decrease subtracted from 100. For example: 
To decrease the improvement(s) value by 20%, 
code 080. 



180 PERCENTAGE OF OWNERSfflP 

Optional RES / COM S2 

Enter the percentage of ownership of the entire 
parcel, this includes both land and improvements. 
Enter the number as a percentage, not the numeric 
equivalent. The decimal point is implied and must 
not be coded. The full value of the parcel's 
components must be listed and not a prorated 
amount (e.g. SITE VALUE = S3,500 and owner 
has a specified one-half ownership; enter the entire 
S3,500 in SITE VALUE, not Sl,750). If there is 
no divided ownership, leave this field blank. 



190 PARCEL TIEBACK RES / COM S2 

Optional 
There are two major reasons that the PARCEL 
TIEBACK field is used. 

The first reason is for those properties, mainly 
agricultural, commercial, or industrial type 
properties, which involve a number of parcels for 
one major complex. For descriptive purposes only, 
and as an aid in the valuation of such multiple 
parcels per complex, enter the Parcel ID of the 
primary parcel on all associated parcels of a single 
economic complex. 

The second major reason for use of the PARCEL 
TIEBACK field is for valuation of condominium 
type property. Enter the Parcel ID of the Master 
Condominium record, usually a commercial card. 

CODE - Enter the code that indicates the type of 
PARCEL TIEBACK that has been entered. 

1 CONDO MASTER - to indicate that the 
tieback parcel is a Condo Master parcel 
which includes the land and improvement 
characteristics of which the unit is a part. 
The cost value of the unit is equal to the 
percentage of ownership of the FINAL 
VALUE of the Condo Master. 

The unit parcel is not processed by the 
Residential Cost Program. 

2 COMMERCL\L - to indicate that the 
tieback parcel is the primary commercial 
parcel. 

3 AGRICULTURAL - to indicate that the 
tieback parcel is the primary agricultural 
parcel for the property. 

4 CONDO MASTER - to indicate that the 
tieback parcel is a Condo Master parcel 
which includes the common element land 
and improvement characteristics for the 
condominium complex of which the unit is a 
part. The cost value of the unit is equal to 
the percentage of ownership of the FINAL 
VALUE of the Condo Master plus the cost 
value of the unit as calculated by the 
Residential Cost program. 

The unit parcel is processed by the 
Residential Cost Program. 



08/01/89 



32-17 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



191 CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP 

PERCENTAGES RES / COM S2 

Optional 
CONDO GENERAL ELEMENT 
PERCENTAGE - Enter the percentage of General 
Common Element Ownership in the condominium 
complex for the condominium unit described on 
this record. Enter the number as a percentage, not 
the decimal equivalent. The decimal point is 
implied and must not be coded. If there is no 
divided ownership, leave this field blank. 

CONDO LIMITED ELEMENT PERCENTAGE - 
Enter the percentage of Limited Common Element 
Ownership in the condominium complex for the 
condominium unit described on this record. Enter 
the number as a percentage, not the decimal 
equivalent. The decimal point is implied and must 
not be coded. If there is no divided ownership, 
leave this field blank. 



201-203 SALES DATA RES / COM SI 

Optional 
Space is provided to enter the data for three sales. 
The data is arranged in vertical columns. The data 
should be listed from top to bottom, allowing one 
line for each sale. 

DATE - Enter the number of the month, the day 
of the month, and the last two digits of the year of 
the sale. Each position must be filled in. Use 
leading zeros if necessary. 

TYPE - Enter the code that best describes the 
property that was included in the sale. Only one 
code may be entered per sale. 

1 LAND ONLY 

2 LAND & BUILDING 

3 BUILDING ONLY 

4 PERSONAL PROPERTY ATTACHED 

AMOUNT - Enter the sales price of the sale. 
Right justify the entry, it is not necessary to fill in 
each position. 



SOURCE - Enter the code that best describes the 
source of information used to verify the sale as 
being valid or invalid. 

1 BUYER 

2 SELLER 

3 AGENT 

4 MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE (MLS) 

5 OTHER 

SALES VALIDITY - Enter the code which is most 
representative of the type of validity of the sales 
transaction after verification. 

INVALID 

1 VALID 

2 VERIHED VALID 

3 VERIHED INVALID 

4 MULTI-PARCEL VERIFIED VALID 

CONDITION OF SALE - Enter the code that best 
describes the condition of the sale. If there are no 
conditions and this is considered "an arms length 
transaction" enter "0" (zero). 

None or Valid Sale 

1 Forced Sale 

2 Relative 

3 Correct Deed or Establish Joint Tenancy 

4 Other 

5 Agricultural Land Sale 

6 Decedent's Sale 

7 Sheriff Sale 

8 Government Purchaser 

9 Court Decree 
A Sale is a gift 

B Purchaser & Seller Same 

C Doesn't Transfer Realty 

D Business Merger 

E Multiple Parcel Sale 

Z A code entered during the conversion and 
creation of the data file. The sale is valid, 
but it must first be reviewed by the 
Appraisal staff to be sure the parcel 
characteristics match the sale price. If they 
do match, change the "Z" to a "0" (zero) so 
that the sale is extracted to the Sales Historv 
file. 



C 



NOTE; If a sale is valid, coded "0", the 
computer system will enter an "X" in this 
position after the sale has been extracted to 
the Sales Histoiy File. 



32-18 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



1 



1 



DELETE - Enter a "D" to delete a sale which has 
been extracted to the Sales History File. This may 
occur if a sale previously thought of as valid is 
determined at a later date to be invalid. Be sure 
to correct the VALIDITY and CONDITION OF 
SALE to indicate the reason the sale is invalid. 

NOTE: After the sale has been removed from 
the Sales History File, the computer system 
will enter an "N" in this position. 



LAND DATA 

There are five categories of land entries - NONE, 
FRONT FOOT, SQUARE FOOT, ACREAGE, 
and SITE. Each entry begins with a field code 
number or line number. Immediately following the 
field number is a space to enter the land type 
description code, area of the land, unit price, any 
influence factors that should be applied to the 
value and the Class Code of the land segment. 

Each land segment entry is valued independently, 
or separately. Each line is calculated "horizontally" 
and the land segment sub-totals are summed 
"vertically" for a total land value of the record. 

If the Computer Assisted Land Pricing (CALP) 
sub-system is to be used to value a land segment, a 
UNIT PRICE of zero (SO) should be entered. If 
any value other than zero is entered in the UNIT 
PRICE field, that value will be used in the 
calculation of the value for that land segment. 



299 DELETE: LAND RES / COM GPD 

Optional 
This is a computer file maintenance entry and 
normally will not be utilized on the field card. 
The purpose of the delete is to remove all data 
previously entered in the computer in fields 300 
through 330. This function is initiated by selecting 
option "06" from the On-Line Menu of either the 
Residential or Commercial sub-systems. 



300 NONE RES / COM S3 

Optional 
Used for cases where no land value is applicable 
for that card or record. Enter the code "0" when 
applicable. Cases that may require no land coded 
are: 



Multi-sequence cards - normally all land data is 
recorded on the first card of a multiple series. 
If this is the case, enter "0" in this field for 
cards 02 and greater. 

Building on leased land - if a card represents 
only a building value record, there is no land to 
be coded. 

Condominiums - in many cases the land for a 
condominium is owned in common and no 
attempt is made to segregate the land 
characteristics for the individual condominium. 
The land value is provided through the 
PARCEL TIEBACK process. 



301-303 FRONT FOOT RES / COM S3 

Optional 
Use for all front foot lot value computations. 
Space is provided for three entries. 

TYPE - Enter the FRONT FOOT TYPE code that 
best describes the land segment being entered. 

1 REGULAR LOT - either an interior lot 
(i.e. bordered on two sides by adjacent lots), 
or a corner lot located at the street 
intersection with frontage on two sides. 

2 BACK LOT - a lot without street or road 
frontage. Access is from an adjacent parcel. 
This entry must always be used in 
conjunction with a Regular Lot. The Back 
Lot entry must be immediately below the 
Regular Lot entry. The same Influence 
Factor must be used on the Back Lot as is 
used on the Regular Lot. 

3 IRREGULAR LOT - a lot which is highly 
irregular in shape, such as a parcel on a cul- 
de-sac. 

4 WATERFRONT - a lot that has frontage on 
a lake, stream, or other body of water. 

5 WATER VIEW - a lot that has a view of a 
lake, stream, or other body of water that is 
significant to the value of the land. 

6 TRIANGULAR FRONT APEX - a 
triangular shaped lot with the apex of the 
triangle pointed towards the street. 



^ 



08/01/89 



32-19 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TRIANGULAR BACK APEX - a triangular 
shaped lot with the apex of the triangle 
pointed away from the street. 

NON-BUILDABLE - a lot on which it is 
impraaical or impossible to build. For 
example; a lot through which runs a ravine 
or gully or a lot which has restrictions 
against building. 



OTHER - 
described. 



a lot which is not otherwise 



WIDTH - Enter the width of the land segment 
being described in this entry. 

DEPTH - Enter the average depth of the land 
segment being described in this entry. 

UNIT PRICE - Enter the price per front foot, in 
whole dollars, of the lot segment being described in 
this entry. If the Computer Assisted Land Pricing 
(CALP) sub-system is to be used to value this lot 
segment, enter a zero in the field. 



305 1982 STA>a)ARD DEPTH RES / COM S3 

Optional 
If the land for this parcel is valued on a front foot 
basis, enter the Standard Depth used for valuation 
during the 1982 reappraisal. 

This entry will only appear on the computer 
terminal screen and not on the Data Collection 
Card. 



RESIDUAL - all excess land not considered 
necessary for support of the improvements. 
For the Income Approach to value, the 
value of this Residual land segment is added 
to the income less expense value of this 
parcel. 

WATERFRONT - land that has frontage on 
a lake, stream, or other body of water. 

WATER VIEW - land that has a view of a 
lake, stream, or other body of water that is 
significant to the value of the land. 

UNDEVELOPED - land that has no major 
structure or other site improvements made 
to it. 

NON-BUILDABLE - land on which it is 
impractical or impossible to build. For 
example; a lot through which runs a ravine 
or gully or a lot which has restrictions 
against building. 



OTHER - 
described. 



land which is not otherwise 



SQUARE FEET - Enter the area in square feet, 
to the nearest whole foot, of the land segment 
being described in this entry. 

UNIT PRICE - Enter the price per square fool, to 
the nearest cent, of the land segment being 
described in this entry. If the Computer Assisted 
Land Pricing (CALP) sub-system is to be used to 
value this lot segment, enter a zero in the field. 



311-313 SQUARE FOOT RES / COM S3 

Optional 
Use for all square foot lot value computations. 
Space is provided for three entries. 

TYPE - Enter the SQUARE FOOT TYPE code 
that best describes the land segment being 
described. 

1 PRIMARY SITE - land capable of being 
improved with a major structure, such as a 
dwelling or a commercial building. Normally 
this is the typical or zoned base lot size for 
the neighborhood. 



SECONDARY SITE 
or lots. 



an extra buildable lot 



321-329 ACREAGE RES / COM 54 

Optional 
Use for all acreage value computations. Space is 
provided for nine entries. 

TYPE - Enter the ACREAGE TYPE code that 
best describes the land segment being entered. 

1 PRIMARY SITE - land capable of being 
improved with a dwelling or other major 
improvements. 

2 RESIDUAL - all excess land not considered 
necessary for support of the improvements. 
For the Income Approach to value, the 
value of this Residual land segment is added 



32-20 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



^ 



^ 



^ 



to the income less expense value of this 
parcel. 

3 FARMSTEAD - enter the area considered 
to be the farmstead of the parcel, usually the 
area around the farm dwelling. 

4 CONTINUOUSLY CROPPED - those lands 
where the accepted practice is cropping at 
least 3 out of 4 years. 

5 FALLOW - those lands where the accepted 
practice is to crop one year followed by a 
year of summer fallow. 

6 IRRIGATED - those lands which are 
irrigated the majority of the time. 

7 GRAZING - those lands, either native range 
or domestic range, which are used to 
support livestock. 

8 WILD HAY - those lands where either 
native grass or alfalfa is cut a majority of 
years for hay. 

9 TIMBER - forest land exceeding 15 
contiguous acres that is capable of producing 
timber that can be harvested in commercial 
quantity. 

NON-BUILDABLE - land on which it is 
impractical or impossible to build. For 
example, a lot through which runs a ravine 
or gully or a lot which has restrictions 
against building. 

A RIGHT OF WAY - descriptive information 
only - no land value will be produced for 
this land segment 

ACRES - Enter the area in acres, to the nearest 
thousandth acre (999.999), of the land segment 
being described in this entry. 

GRADE • If this land segment is to be valued on 
a productivity basis, enter the grade of the land 
segment. The table of productivity grades is in the 
Appendix of this Section. 

UNIT PRICE - Enter the price per acre, to the 
nearest cent, of the land segment being described 
in this entry. If the Computer Assisted Land 
Pricing (CALP) sub-system is to be used to value 



this land segment, for either market or agricultural 
productivity purposes, enter a zero in the field. 



301-329 INFLUENCE FACTORS 

Optional RES / COM S3&4 

Each land segment entry, with the exception of the 
"Site" entry, provides for entering up to two 
separate (any combination of two) one-digit 
INFLUENCE FACTOR CODES and a 
corresponding three-digit INFLUENCE 
PERCENTAGE. 

INFLUENCE CODE - Enter the code that best 
describes the reason that the land segment value is 
influenced, positively or negatively, from the base 
neighborhood land model. A maximum of two 
codes may be entered for each land segment. An 
agricultural parcel may only be coded for 
ACCRETED and RELICTED influences. 

1 UNIMPROVED - to indicate comparative 
value loss attributable to a lack of 
improvements. 

2 EXCESSIVE FRONTAGE - to indicate 
comparative value loss attributable to 
excessive frontage in relation to utility. 

3 TOPOGRAPHY - to indicate comparative 
value loss attributable to topographical 
features. 

4 SHAPE or SIZE - to indicate comparative 
value loss (over and above the adjustment 
considered in lot sizing procedures) 
attributable to the shape or size of the lot in 
relation to its utility. 

5 ECONOMIC - to indicate comparative value 
loss attributable to physical economic 
detriments influencing the site, i.e., a 
dwelling next to a landMII. 

6 RESTRICTIONS or NONCONFORMING 
USE - to indicate comparative value loss 
attributable to restrictions regulating its use. 

7 ISLAND PROPERTY - to indicate 
comparative value loss or enhancement 
attributable to the site being on an island. 

8 FLOOD PLAIN - to indicate comparative 
value loss attributable to frequent flooding. 



08/01/89 



32-21 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



CORNER/ALLEY - to indicate comparative 
value loss or enhancement attributable to 
corner and/or alley influence. 

VIEW - to indicate comparative value 
enhancement attributable to the capability of 
the site to provide an appealing and 
desirable view. 



6 MINUS VALUE - to make a gross value 

land deduction. This code can only be used 
with other land entries and providing that 
the total amount to be deducted does not 
exceed the sum of all the other land entries. 

AMOUNT - enter the value of the site or the 
amount of the desired deduction. 



B NO ACCESS • to indicate comparative value 
loss attributable to a lack of access to the 
site. 

C ACCRETED - to indicate that the river has 
moved and land area has been gained. This 
description is descriptive only, no 
INFLUENCE PERCENTAGE is to be 
entered. 

D RELICTED - to indicate that the river has 
moved and land area has been lost. This 
description is descriptive only, no 
INFLUENCE PERCENTAGE is to be 
entered. 

INFLUENCE PERCENTAGE - Enter the total 
influence ]}ercentage to be applied to the land 
segment If two types of influences have been 
coded the percentage must be for both. 

The INFLUENCE PERCENTAGE will be greater 
than 100% for positive adjustments, and less than 
100% for negative adjustments. If no influence is 
to be applied to the land segment entry, simply 
leave ail fields blank (indicating 100%). 



330 



RES / COM S4 



SITE 

Optional 
Use to (a) site-value irregular lots, residual land, 
waterfront, or any other such sites for which you 
cannot or do not wish to show computations, or 
(b) make a gross value deduction for utility right 
of ways, and other similar property obstructions. 

TYPE - enter the SITE TYPE code that best 
describes the reason for the land value or 
deduction. 

1 SITE VALUE 

2 IRREGULAR 

3 RESIDUAL 

4 WATERFRONT OR VIEW 

5 NON-BUILDABLE 



301-330 LAND CLASSIFICATION CODE 

Required RES / COM S3&4 

Enter the four numeric characters denoting the 
LAND CLASSIFICATION CODE for the properly 
described on the land segment entry. 

The CLASSIFICATION CODE is a coding system 
to identify the different types of taxable property 
that may be found within a parcel. This should 
not be confused with PROPERTY TYPE, which 
codes both land and improvements as one. The 
CLASSIFICATION CODE uniquely codes land 
and improvements as if each were a separate unit. 

The CLASSIFICATION CODES will be 
automatically generated for Agricultural type land 
and need not be entered by the user. 

The complete listing of PROPERTY 
CLASSIFICATION CODES can be found in the 
Appendix of the Property Administration Data 
Section. 



331-336 AGRICULTURAL LAND TOTALS 

Optional RES / COM 54 

These six fields are the acreage totals of the 
various agricultural land type ureas of (he parcel; 
Continuously Cropped, Fallow, Irrigated, Grazing, 
Wild Hay, and Timber. The acreage that is to be 
entered in each field is the total of the land type 
area of the entire parcel. 

These fields should only be entered on the first 
card of the parcel (CARD = 01). If the parcel 
has no agricultural land, leave these fields blank. 



340 AGRICULTURAL IRRIGATION 

Optional RES / COM 54 

For agricultural land valuation purposes only, all 
other uses leave these fields blank. 



32-22 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



LAND ROTATION - enter the code that 
describes the rate of crop rotation for the land. 

1 MAXIMUM 

2 MEDIUM 

3 MINIMUM 

WATER COST - enter the code that describes the 
cost per acre to irrigate the land. 



TOPOGRAPHY - (Timber T Code) - Enter the 
code that best describes the topography of the 
section in which the timber is located. 



1 


- 20% 


2 


21 - 40% 


3 


41 - 60% 


4 


61 - 70% 


5 


Unproductive 



Code 



Water Cost 



01 less than S 1.50 

02 S 1.50 to S 2.49 

03 S 2.50 to S 3.49 

04 S 3.50 to S 4.49 

05 S 4.50 to S 5.49 

06 S 5.50 to S 6.49 

07 S 6.50 to S 7.49 

08 S 7.50 and greater 



341 TIMBER RES / COM S4 

Optional 
For timber land valuation purposes only, all other 
uses leave these fields blank. 



DISTANCE TO MILL - (Timber D Code) - Enter 
the code that describes the distance to the nearest 
manufacturing point for the timber described in 
this entry. 

Code Distance (Milesl 



1 
2 
3 

4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



- 20 

21 - 40 

41 - 60 

61 - 80 

81 - 100 

101 - 120 

121 - 140 

141 - 160 

161 - 180 



DISTANCE TO USABLE ROAD - (Timber R 
Code) - Enter the code that describes the amount 
of road which must be built into that section, in 
order, to harvest timber. 



Code 


Distance 




rMiles) 


01 


Present 


02 


.1 -.5 


03 


.6- 1 


04 


LI - 2 


05 


2.1 - 3 


06 


3.1 - 4 


07 


4.1 - 5 


08 


5.1 - 6 


09 


6.1 - 7 


10 


7.1 - 8 


11 


8.1 - 9 


12 


9.1 - 10 


13 


10.1 - 11 


14 


11.1 - 12 


15 


12.1 - 13 



Code 


Distance 




rMiles) 


16 


13.1 


- 14 


17 


14.1 


- 15 


18 


15.1 


- 16 


19 


16.1 


- 17 


20 


17.1 


- 18 


21 


18.1 


- 19 


22 


19.1 


- 20 


23 


20.1 


- 21 


24 


2L1 


- 22 


25 


22.1 


-23 


26 


23.1 


- 24 


27 


24.1 


- 25 


28 


25.1 


- 26 


29 


26.1 


- 27 


30 


Unproductive 



400 TOPOGRAPHY RES / COM 52 

Required 
Refers to the topographical features of the subject 
property. At least one entry must be listed, 
however, any combination of two of the below 
codes may be entered. 

1 LEVEL - to indicate the subject property is 
level to the access street. 

2 ABOVE STREET - to indicate the subject 
property is above the access street. 

3 BELOW STREET - to indicate the subject 
property is below the access street. 

4 ROLLING - to indicate a gently undulating 
terrain. 

5 STEEP - to indicate the property has 
excessive grade. 

6 LOW - to indicate the property has a low 
terrain. 



SWAMPY - to indicate wet spongy land, 
marsh, or bog. 



08/01/89 



32-23 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



N 



AG / TIMBER LAND - to indicate that the 
site is used for agricultural or timber 
purposes. 

NORTH EXPOSURE - to indicate that the 
view from the site is towards the north. 



SEPTIC - to indicate that only private sewer 
(septic tank) is available to the property. 

GAS - to indicate that natural gas is 
available to the property. 



W 



410 



SOUTH EXPOSURE - to indicate that the 
view from the site is towards the south. 

EAST EXPOSURE - to indicate that the 
view from the site is towards the east. 

WEST EXPOSURE - to indicate that the 
view from the site is towards the west. 



RES / COM S2 



UTIUTIES 
Required 
Refers to the services that are available to the 
properly. These services can be either public or 
private. At least one entry must be listed, 
however, up to three codes may be entered. Enter 
the code(s) which are most representative of the 
subject property. 

NONE • to indicate that no utilities arc 
available to the property. 

1 ALL PUBLIC - to indicate that all public 
utilities; including water, sewer, gas, and 
electric, are available to the property. 

2 ALL UNDERGROUND - to indicate that 
all utilities available to the property are 
underground. 

3 PUBLIC WATER • to indicate that public 
water is available to the property. 

4 PUBLIC SEWER - to indicate that public 
sewer is available to the property. 

5 COMMUNITY WATER - to indicate that 
community water is available to the property. 

6 COMMUNITY SEWER - to indicate that 
community sewer is available to the 
property. 

7 WELL - to indicate that the only water 
available to the property is from a private 
well. 



420 ACCESS RES / COM S2 

Required 
Refers to the primary fronting street or the street 
providing the most immediate access to the subject 
property, and the features which exist at the 
property. 

At least one entry must be listed; however, any 
combination of two of the below codes may be 
entered. 

LANDLOCKED / NONE - to indicate a 
property without access to any type of street 
or road. 

1 PAVED ROAD - to indicate a concrete, 
blacktop, or a comparably surfaced street or 
road. 

2 SEMI-IMPROVED ROAD - lo indicate a 
road or street of better quality than gravel 
but not paved. 

3 DIRT ROAD - to indicate a gravel or 
comparably surfaced road or street. 

4 PROPOSED ROAD - to indicate an access 
to the property via a road that has been 
platted or proposed but not constructed. 

5 SEASONAL ACCESS - to indicate that the 
access to property is only seasonal, not year- 
round. 

6 SIDEWALK - to indicate the presence of a 
paved sidewalk available for public use. 

7 ALLEY - to indicate the presence of an 
alley available for public use. 

8 RAILROAD - to indicate rail access to the 
property. 

9 RIVER or WATERWAY - to indicate that 
there is river or other waterway access to the 
property. 



32-24 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



430 FRONTING RES / COM S2 

Required 
Refers to the type of primary fronting street and a 
descriptive feature of that street. Enter the code 
which is most representative of the subject 
property. 

NONE - there is no access street for this 
property. 

1 MAJOR STRIP or CENTRAL BUSINESS 
DISTRICT - to indicate a highly traveled 
major artery or a major artery located within 
the central business district. 

2 SECONDARY ARTERY - to indicate a 
moderately to heavily traveled secondary 
artery or collector which can accommodate 
residential development along retail and 
commercial establishments. 

3 SECONDARY STREET - to indicate a 
moderately traveled residential sub-collector 
which is designed to conduct traffic between 
residential streets or lanes and major arteries 
or collectors. 

4 RESIDENTIAL STREET - to indicate a 
lightly traveled street whose primary purpose 
is to channel traffic to dwelling units and 
other streets. 

5 RESIDENTIAL LANE - to indicate a lightly 
traveled short street or court designed to 
channel traffic to dwelling units. 

6 CUL-DE-SAC - to indicate that the fironting 
street is a cul-de-sac or a street open at one 
end only, and has an enlarged turn around 
area at the closed end. 



road constructed to service the subject 
property. 



440 LOCATION RES / COM 32 

Required 
Refers to the type of neighborhood in which the 
subject property is located. In many instances, 
these boundaries have already been established or 
defined by city planners or other agencies. Enter 
the code which is most representative of the 
subject property. 

RURAL LAND - to indicate that the 
subject property is in a rural part of the 
county. 

1 CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT - to 
indicate the core area in the center of the 
city in which is concentrated the major 
retail, financial, professional, and services 
activities of the city. 

2 PERIMETER CENTRAL BUSINESS 
DISTRICT - to indicate the outer 
boundaries of the central business district or 
the core area in which the concentration of 
major mercantile activity is significantly less 
pronounced. 

3 BUSINESS CLUSTER - to indicate a cluster 
or number of commercial properties grouped 
together due to some attracting force; such 
as a major intersection of interstate highways 
or a major shopping mall. 

4 COMMERCIAL AREA - to indicate 
commercial development. This may include 
an almost continuous row or strip of retail 
stores and allied service establishments. 



DEAD END - to indicate that the fronting 
street is open at one end only, and does not 
have an enlarged turn around area at the 
closed end. 

FRONTAGE ROAD - to indicate a local 
street paralleling a limited access highway 
and built to service abutting properties and 
to gather and control vehicles entering or 
leaving the limited access highway. 

PRIVATE ROAD - to indicate that the 
primary fronting street is a privately owned 



NEIGHBORHOOD or SPOT - to indicate: 

• dwellings located in primarily residential 
areas. 

• commercial properties or individual or 
scattered commercial establishments 
located in basically residential areas. 

COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL PARK - 
to indicate a controlled park-like 
development designed to accommodate 
specific light industries and mercantile 
properties and containing the required 
utilities, streets, and other appurtenances. 



08/01/89 



32-25 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



INDUSTRIAL SITE - to indicate land or 
land improvements (not located in an 
established industrial park) adaptable for 
industrial use. Normally, this is a 
combination of land, improvements, and 
machinery intended for the assembling, 
processing, and manufacturing of products 
from raw materials or fabricated parts or for 
the production of natural resources. 

APARTMENT / CONDOMINIUM 
COMPLEX - to indicate the property is an 
apartment or condominium complex site. 

GOLF COURSE - to indicate that the 
subject property borders or is near a golf 
course. The proximity to the golf course is 
sufficient to affect the value of the property. 



450 PARKING RES / COM S2 

Optional 
Refers to the type, quantity, and proximity of 
parking available to the subject property. 

TYPE - Enter the code that describes the type of 
parking available to the subject property 

NONE • to indicate that no parking is 
available. 



2 ADEQUATE - to indicate that the quantity 
of parking available is sufficient and 
adequate to support the property. 

3 ABUNDANT - to indicate that the quantity 
of parking available is more than sufficient 
to support the property. 

PROXIMITY - Enter the code that describes the 
proximity of parking available to the subject 
property. 

FAR - to indicate that no parking is 
available, or that the lack of proximity to 
available parking is a detriment to the 
income producing capabilities of the subject 
property. 

1 NEAR - to indicate that the proximity of 
available parking is good enough to cause no 
detriment to the income producing 
capabilities of the subject property. 

2 ADJACENT - to indicate that available 
parking is very close or bordering the subject 
property. 

3 ON-SITE - to indicate that available parking 
is located on the subject parcel. 



1 OFF STREET - to indicate that off street 
parking is available. 

2 ON STREET - to indicate that only on 
street parking is available. 

3 ON & OFF STREET - to indicate that both 
on and off street parking facilities are 
available. 

4 PARKING GARAGE - to indicate that the 
primary source of parking for the subject 
property is a parking garage or deck. 

QUANTITY - Enter the code that describes the 
quantity of parking available to the subject 
property. 

NONE - to indicate that no parking is 
available. 

1 MINIMUM - to indicate that the quantity of 
parking available is minimal and inadequate 
to support the property. 



461-463 APPRAISAL INSPECTION 

INFORMATION RES / COM SI 

Required 
Space is provided to enter information regarding 
the three previous calls, visits, or reviews of the 
subject property. The data is arranged in vertical 
columns. 

NOTE: The third entry is reserved for 
information regarding the Reappraisal. 

DATE - Enter the number of the month, the day 
of the month, and the last two digits of the year 
when an update to the information described on 
this card was finished. Each position must be 
filled in. Use leading zeros if necessary. 

TIME - Enter the time of day in hours and 
minutes that the inspection was made for this 
parcel. 

IDENTIFICATION NUMBER - The Management 
Services Bureau will assign a permanent 
identification number for each person in the 



32-26 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



Property Assessment Division. Each number will 
uniquely identify one person and will not be 
reissued if that person leaves the Department of 
Revenue. A new number will not be issued if the 
person transfers between bureaus or counties. 

CODE - Enter the code that describes the type of 
contact that was made and the current status of the 
parcel. 

VACANT or OBY ONLY - to indicate that 
the parcel is vacant or only contains 
auxiliary improvements, and no responsible 
occupants are available. 

1 INTERNAL REVIEW - to indicate that an 
internal inspection and interview on the 
parcel were accomplished. 

2 EXTERNAL REVIEW - to indicate that 
there was no interview, but an external 
review of the parcel was made. 

3 REFUSED ENTRY - to indicate that both 
an interview and measurements on the 
parcel were refused. 

4 INFORMATION ESTIMATED - to indicate 
that information collected was estimated 
because access to the property was 
prohibited for some reason. 

5 DOOR HANGER / PRE-MAILER LEFT - 
to indicate that a door hanger or pre-mailer 
was left at the property. 

6 DOOR HANGER / PRE-MAILER 
RETURNED - to indicate that a door 
hanger or pre-mailer was returned from the 
property owner or some other responsible 
party. 

7 DATA FROM PRC - to indicate that 
information for this property was collected 
from the previous Property Record Card. 

8 NEW CONSTRUCTION - to indicate that 
this parcel is new construction. 

9 REAPPRAISAL WORK COMPLETED - to 
indicate that all work required for the 
reappraisal has been completed. 

NOTE: Code 9 may only be entered in the 
last position of Geld 463. 



RES / COM SI 



464 PERSON CONTACTED 

Optional 
NAME - Enter the name of the responsible person 
contacted, either in person or by phone. 

CODE - Enter the code that describes the person 
contacted. 



1 OWNER 

2 TENANT 

3 AGENT 



468 



4 BUILDER 

5 MANAGER 

6 OTHER 



CONTINUED REVIEW NEEDED 

Optional RES / COM SI 

If the value placed on the land or any principal 
building on the parcel is one that is not 
reconcilable with the apparent data, or if there are 
conditions pertaining to improvements that need 
special consideration and review, select from the 
following list the code that most appropriately 
denotes the condition to be reviewed and enter it 
in the position provided. If no such condition 
exists, or no review is needed, leave all positions 
blank. 

DATE - This date is a date in the future on which 
a reminder is to be printed for the reason selected 
below. Enter the number of the month, day of the 
month, and the last two digits of the year. Each 
position must be filled in. Use leading zeros if 
necessary. 

CODE - Enter the code that best describes the 
reason that this parcel must be reviewed at a later 
date. 

Code Description 

No review needed. 

1 Construction of a new principal building is 
incomplete. 

2 Construction of new accessory improvements 
is incomplete. 

3 Major remodeling of a principal building is 
in process. 

4 Incremental valuation increase due to 
remodeling. 

5 Ten year tax incentive - energy generation. 

6 Property is tax exempt. 

7 Mobile Home - personal. 

8 Mobile Home - realty. 

9 The appraisal was based on estimated 
conditions. 



08/01/89 



32-27 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Code Description 



lU 

11 

12 
13 

14 



15 

16 
17 
IS 
19 

2U 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



This parcel is non-residential, but has a 

residential structure on it. 

Agricultural classification review. 

Elcctricnl/Building permit review. 

Periodic floodliig, pcrcointion problems, or 

other water problems exist. 

The name of the parcel owner is not known. 

It cannot be discovered from the tax roll, 

mining claim books, or property record card. 

Review for land improvetftents (landfill or 

excavation). 

Mining claim review. 

Natural disaster review. 

Timber classification review. 

Incomplete or invalid Realty Transfer 

Certificate information. 

Pending appeal board or court decision. 

AB-26 review. 

Other (see notes). 

To be assigned later. 

Orchard 

Tree Farm 



471-472 nun.DINU / EmCTUlCAL IMCUMIT 

RECORD RES / COM SI 

Optional 
Space is provided to enter the data for two entries 
of building and/or electrical permit information. 
Tlie data is arranged in vertical columns. The data 
should be listed from top to bottom, allowing one 
line for each permit 



PERMIT NUMBER - 
permit, right justified. 



Enter the number of the 



DATE • Enter the number of the month, duy of 
the month, and the last two digits of the year of 
the permit. Each position must be filled in. Use 
leading zeros if necessary. 

AMOUNT - Enter the value of the permit. Right 
justify the entry, it is not necessary to fill in each 
position. 

CODE - Enter the code denoting the status of the 
permit. 

O OPEN - to indicate that the permit Is still 
open and may need to be inspected for 
completion of the new construction. 



C CLOSED - to indicate that the improvement 
has been finalized and has been picked up 
for new construction. 

PURPOSE - Enter the reason or purpose that the 
permit was Issued. 



481-483 NOTICS RES / COM S2 

Optional 
Notc.5 should he short and to the point. Space Is 
provided to enter three different NOTES for each 
property. 

NOTE CODE - Enter the code that best describes 
the reason for this note. This code will permit 
computer extraction and sorting of the notes to aid 
in field work and review. 

Code Description 

AS Adjusted sales price. 
BD Dog denies access. 
CF Owner expects a call before entering 
property boundary. 

FA Pint add cost. 

FD Access by four-wheel drive only. 

LG Locked gale. 

MC Mining Claim 

OD Owner denies access to properly. 

OS Owner should be contacted at another site. 

SO There Is a second owner for this parcel. 
SP Seasonal passage, access may be limited. 
SR Sanitary restrictions not lifted. 
SS Structure style not listed in standard style 

codes. 
SU Seasonal use or vacant parcel. 



EXPLANA'I ION . Enter wh:il additional 
descriptive informal Ion Is necessary that will 
further clarify the reason for this note. 



8«S A1'1M':AL AI3JUSTMliN I: I.ANI) 

Optional RES S9 & COM SIO 

Non-.ngrlculturnl land appeals adjustment decisions 
are coded In this Held. A " + " or "-" must be 
coded in the left hand position to indicate whether 
the adjustment Is an Increase or a decrease to the 
land value. 



32-28 



08/01/89 



32. COMMON CAMA DATA 



«) 



The computer will automatically adjust the non- 
agricultural Base Land Value(s) in the Land & 
Improvements Value column based upon the entry 
in this field. If there is only one non-agricultural 
land entry, the APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: LAND 
will be added to or subtracted fi-om the calculated 
Base Land Value. If there are more than one non- 
agricultural land entries, the APPEAL 
ADJUSTMENT: LAND amount will be 
apportioned across the multiple entries on a 
prorata basis. 



886 APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: MAIN BUILDING 
Optional RES S9 & COM SIO 

Improvement appeals adjustment decisions are 
coded in this field. A "-t-" or "-" must be coded in 
the left hand position to indicate whether the 
adjustment is an increase or a decrease to the 
principal building value. 

The computer will automatically adjust the Base 
Improvement Value in the Land & Improvements 
Value column based upon the entry in this field. 
The APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: MAIN BUILDING 
and the APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: ACCESSORY 
BUILDING amounts will be added together and 
then the total will be added to or subtracted fl-om 
the calculated Base Improvement Value. 



887 APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: ACCESSORY 
BUILDING 

Optional RES S9 & COM SIO 

Accessory improvement appeals adjustment 
decisions are coded in this field. A "-I-" or "-" must 
be coded in the left hand position to indicate 
whether the adjustment is an increase or a decrease 
to the accessory improvement value. 

The computer will automatically adjust the Base 
Improvement Value in the Land & Improvements 
Value column based upon the entry in this field. 
The APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: MAIN BUILDING 
and the APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: ACCESSORY 
BUILDING amounts will be added together and 
then the total will be added to or subtracted from 
the calculated Base Improvement Value. 



888 APPEAL ADJUSTMENT: FLAT VALUE 

Optional RES S9 & COM SIO 

Properties which are assigned a flat property value 
by the County or State Tax Appeal Board are 
coded in this field. The Appeal Board has stated 



one value for the entire property and has not 
specified what the individual values are to be for 
the non-agricultural land, principal buildings or 
accessory structure components. 

The property flat value is an eight digit positive 
value. Leading zeros must be coded. Please note 
that there is no "+" or "-" sign coded for this item. 
The value is always considered to be positive ("+"). 
The computer will automatically adjust both the 
Base Land Value and the Base Improvement Value 
in the Land & Improvements Value column based 
upon the entry in this field. The APPEAL 
ADJUSTMENT: FLAT VALUE amount will be 
added to the calculated Base Improvement Value 
and Base Land Value(s) on a prorated basis. 



891-897 OVERRIDE CODE & VALUE 

Optional RES S9 & COM 510 

Enter the OVERRIDE CLASS CODES and the 
corresponding VALUES, if the Value(s) or Class 
Code(s) of the record, as generated by the 
computer, and displayed in the Land & 
Improvements Value column must be adjusted. 

Override adjustments may be due to the granting 
of exemptions and/or reductions. Overrides will 
typically be entered for records that qualify for 
changes due to an exemption or appeal decision. 

Up to seven OVERRIDE CLASS CODES and 
VALUES may be entered for each CAMA record. 
If the user adjusts one value or class code, all other 
class codes and values must be manually entered. 
The Total of the Override Values must equal the 
Total of the Land & Improvement values. 

The complete listing of PROPERTY CLASS 
CODES can be found in the Appendix of Property 
Administration Section of the Data Collection 
Manual. 



960 FINAL BASE VALUE RES S9 & COM SIO 

Required 
VALUE - The total FINAL BASE VALUE, both 
land and improvements, to be assigned to the 
parcel is to be entered in this field. The 
breakdown by Classification Code is displayed in 
the Land & Improvements Value column. The 
computer will automatically move either the 
calculated cost, market or income value to this 
field (see REASON for rules governing computer 
generating values). If the computer generated 



08/01/89 



32-29 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



value is lo be changed or overridden, enter the 
VALUE, REASON, DATE, and REVIEWER. 

REASON - Enter the code that describes the 
methodology that was used to produce the FINAL 
BASE VALUE of the record. If the VALUE is 
produced by the computer, the corresponding 
REASON code will be automatically entered by 
the computer. 

Code Description 

Computer produced cost value, this value 
will be overlaid with market value or income 
value, if produced. 

1 Residential: Computer produced 

market/comparable sales value. 
Commercial: Computer produced income 
value. 

2 Recalculate a computer produced 
market/comparable sales value. 

3 Computer produced cost value, this value 
will not be overlaid with either market or 
income values. 



DATE - Enter the dale; month, day, and year, of 
the day on which the FINAL BASE VALUE was 
entered. If the VALUE is produced by the 
computer, the DATE will be automatically entered 
by the computer. 

REVIEWER - Enter the IdcntHicatlon Number of 
the person that assigned the FINAL BASE 
VALUE to the record. If the VALUE Is produced 
by the computer, the corresponding REVIEWER 
code will be automatically entered by the computer. 



C 



4 
5 
6 
7 
8 



User denned 
User defined 
User defined 
User defmed 
User defined 



Prior cycle value entered from the 
conversion of CAAS to MAS. 



V 



32-30 



08/01/89 



"*) 



3' 



t^ 



APPENDIX 32 



A32.1. COUNTY NUMBERS 



T)) 



^ 



COUNTY 


NO 


Beaverhead 


18 


Big Horn 


22 


Blaine 


24 


Broadwater 


43 


Carbon 


10 


Carter 


42 


Cascade 


02 


Chouteau 


19 


Custer 


14 


Daniels 


37 


Dawson 


16 


Deer Lodge 


30 


Fallon 


39 


Fergus 


08 


Flathead 


07 


Gallatin 


06 


Garfield 


50 


Glacier 


38 


Golden Valley 


53 


Granite 


46 


Hill 


12 



COUNTY 


NO 


COUNTY 


NO 


Jefferson 


51 


Roosevelt 


17 


Judith Basin 


36 


Rosebud 


29 


Lake 


15 


Sanders 


35 


Lewis & Clark 


05 


Sheridan 


34 


Liberty 


48 


Silver Bow 


01 


Lincoln 


56 


Stillwater 


32 


Madison 


25 


Sweet Grass 


40 


McCone 


41 


Teton 


31 


Meagher 


47 


Toole 


21 


Mineral 


54 


Treasure 


33 


Missoula 


04 


Valley 


20 


Musselshell 


23 


Wheatland 


44 


Park 


49 


Wibaux 


52 


Petroleum 


55 


Yellowstone 


03 


Phillips 


11 


Yellowstone 
National 




Pondera 


26 


Park 


57 


Powder River 


09 






Powell 


28 






Prairie 


45 






Ravalli 


13 






Richland 


27 







08/01/89 



A32-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A32.2. STANDARD ABBREVIATIONS FOR STREET ADDRESSES 



Addition 


ADD 


Alley 


AL 


Arcade 


ARC 


Avenue or Avenida 


AV 


Boulevard 


BLVD 


Branch 


BR 


Bridge 


BRIG 


Bypass 


BYP 


Calle 


C 


Causeway 


CSWY 


Center 


CTR 


Church 


CHR 


Circle 


CIR 


Common 


COM 


Court 


CT 


Co^/c 


COVE 


Crescent 


CRES 


Crossing 


CRSG 


Drive 


DR 


East 


E 


Expressway 


EXWY 


Foot 


Fl 


Freeway 


FRWY 


Front Foot 


FF 


Gardens 


GDNS 


Highway 


HWY 


Improvement 


IMP 


Improvements 


IMPS 


Inches 


IN 


Lane 


LA 


Loop 


LOOP 


Mall 


MALL 


Manor 


MNR 


Mews 


MEWS 



Motorway 


MTWY 


Municipality 


MUN 


North 


N 


Oval 


OVAL 


Overpass 


OVPS 


Park 


PARK 


Parkway 


PKWY 


Pass 


PASS 


Path 


PATH 


Pike 


PKE 


Place 


PL 


Plaza 


PLZ 


Point 


PT 


Ramp 


RAMP 


Road 


RD 


Route 


RTF 


Row 


ROW 


Rue 


RUE 


Skyway 


SKWY 


South 


S 


Square 


SQ 


Square Foot 


SOU 


Street 


ST 


Subdivision 


SUB 


Suite 


STE 


Terrace 


TER 


Throughway 


THWY 


Traffic-way 


TFWY 


Trail 


TRL 


Tunnel 


TUN 


Turnpike 


TPICE 


Underpass 


UNP 


Walk 


WALK 


Wall 


WALL 


Way 


WY 


West 


W 



A32-2 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 32 



3) 



A32.3. PARCEL SIZING PROCEDURES 



The majority of parcels are shaped in a way 
which readily lends them to the application of 
standard front foot sizing procedures and 
techniques. This Appendix contains an explanation 
of those procedures. Standardized procedures are 
essential to maintaining uniformity in land 
valuations. The appraiser must at all times 
e.xercise sound judgment in determining whether or 
not the procedures are applicable, using them only 
if they calculate accurate, equitable land valuations. 



A32.3.1. PARCEL SIZING PRINCIPLES 

The most important rule of lot sizing is that the 
established frontage and depth must form right 
angles. 

The Depth lines must be parallel to each other 
and the Width (Frontage) line perpendicular to the 
Depth lines. 

Prior to establishing the size of a lot, the scale 
of the plat must be established. 




Note the placement of the lot to the street. In 
the majority of situations, the narrowest portion of 
the lot is the width. Only if this lot were a corner 
lot would the possibility exist for the frontage to 
be 100. The position of the house should be 
considered in a corner lot situation. 



50 



STREET 



STREET 



Figure 2. 



The Lot in Figure 2 is similar to the previous 
example. Note that the 60' back lot line is not 
perpendicular to the depth lines. However, the 50' 
front lot line is. The Depth lines form right angles 
with the frontage, but vary in length. To establish 
the depth, these must be averaged. 100 + 115 = 
215. 215 divided by 2 equals 107.5. (0.5 or more 
is rounded up). 

The Lot size would be shown as: 



Figure 1. 



lONT FOOT 


WIDTH 




TYPE 


(FRONTAGE) 


DEPTH 


1 


50 


108 



3 



Figure 1 shows a 100% lot: the vertical lines 
form right angles with the horizontal lines. There 
are not any lines in this lot that do not form a 90 
degree angle. 

The Lot size would be shown as: 



lONT FOOT 


WIDTH 




TYPE 


(FRONTAGE) 


DEPTH 


1 


50 


100 



The Lot in Figure 3 is another example of 
average depth lot. The frontage is the line which 
is perpendicular to the depth lines. In this 
example, the frontage is 70'. in many situations, 
additional lines will need to be drawn to establish 
an accurate depth. By using only the 100' line as 
the depth, you would be totally disregarding the 
rear portion of the lot. Therefore, an additional 
depth line must be drawn (the dotted line 
perpendicular to the frontage). Any lines drawn to 
establish depth must be perpendicular to the 
frontage line. Also, this line or lines must he ol 
equal increments within the parallel depth lines. 



08/01/89 



A32-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



The lines drawn lo establish depth will have to be 
measured to scale for computation. The total of 
all depth lines is averaged for the effective depth: 

100' + 140* + 100' = 340 divided by 3 = 113.33 
- 70 — 




STREET 



Figure 3. 



All previous examples have had at least three of 
the frontage and depth lines perpendicular and 
parallel. In the Figure 5 example, a right triangle, 
there are only two perpendicular lines. When any 
Lot or portion of a Lot forms a right triangle, 
enter the Lot type that represents the triangular 
lot, the width and the depth. (The width is the 
line that runs parallel to the street, whether or not 
it actually borders the street.) 




STREET 



The Lot size would be shown as: 

FRONT FOOT WIDTH 

TYPE (FRONTAGE) DEPTH 

3 70 1 13 

The example in Figure 4 is very similar lo the 
previous one. Again, additional depth lines must 
be drawn perpendicular to the frontage in equal 
increments and measured to scale. Once measured, 
they can be added and averaged as shown here: 

70' + 75' + 90' + 100' + 90' = 425 
425 divided by 5 = 85' average depth 



Figure 5. 



If the base of the triangle is on the street 
(Figure 5), use Front Foot type (7) triangle back 
apex. If the apex of the triangle is on the street 
(Figure 6), use From Foot type (6) triangle front 
apex. 

The depth is the line that is perpendicular lo 
the width and in this example equals 100. The Lot 
size in Figure 5 would be shown as follows: 




STREET 



Figure 4. 



The entries for Figure 4 would be: 

FRONT FOOT WIDTH 

TYPE (FRONTAGE) DEPTH 

3 80 85 



FRONT FOOT 


WIDTH 




TYPE 


(FRONTAGE) 


DEPTH 


7 


100 


100 




STREET 



Figure 6. 



A32-4 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 32 



^ 



The Lx)t size in Figure 6 would be: 

FRONT FOOT WIDTH 

TYPE (FRONTAGE) DEPTH 

6 50 110 

In example Figure 7, the width lines are 
parallel, but the lines used to determine the depth 
are neither parallel to one another, nor 
perpendicular to the frontage line. Depth lines 
must be drawn and measured to scale. After the 
depth lines (dotted lines) are drawn, you will 
notice that within this Lot there are three 
individual lots. There are two back apex triangles 
and one regular Lot. The frontage is calculated as 
to Hows: 





-* 100 >- 




\25l 25/ 


V °7 


\l 50 / 


STREET 



Figure 8. 



^ 



140 

60 
~80 



Gross Width - the widest portion of the 
lot which will form right angles with the 
drawn depth lines. 
Regular Lot Width 

The width of both back apex triangular 
lots would be 40' each (80 divided by 2). 




STREET 



Figure 7. 



This lot would require 3 Front Foot entries: 

FRONT FOOT WIDTH 

TYPE (FRONTAGE) DEPTH 

• 1 60 105 

7 40 105 

7 40 105 



The Front Foot entries for Figure 8 would be: 

FRONT FOOT WIDTH 

TYPE (FRONTAGE) DEPTH 

1 50 105 

6 25 105 

6 25 105 

The lot shown in Figure 9 is referred to as a 
double entry lot. The lines are all perpendicular 
and parallel. However, two distinct lots can be 
formed for this one lot (note dotted line). This lot 
will have two frontages and two depths. 



50 



20 



70 



STREET 



Figure 9. 



3 



The Figure 8 example is just the reverse of the 
previous example. It is calculated in the same 
method, but Front Foot type (6), triangle front 
apex, is used because the apex of the triangles are 
on the street. Note: Depth is measured to scale 
along perpendicular lines. 



The Land size for Figure 9 would be: 

FRONT FOOT WIDTH 

TYPE (FRONTAGE) DEPTH 

1 50 100 

1 20 140 



08/01/89 



A32-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Lot No. 2 in Figure 10 is also a double entry 
lot. However, it differs from the previous example 
because the 50 x 50 portion of the lot at the rear 
has no street frontage. This is called a back lot 
and must be coded as such. This back lot has 
considerably less utility value and compensation 
must be made. An adjustment must be applied to 
show a lesser value than a lot having direct street 
access. 



ALLEY 




Lots that are very irregular in shape, like the 
examples of Figures 11 and 12, would be better 
valued using the square foot lot entries. 

The lot in Figure 11 does not have any two 
lines perpendicular or parallel. 




STREET 



STREET 



Figure 11. 



The type of lot shown in Figure 12 is usually 
found on a cul-de-sac. 



Figure 10. 



NOTE: Back lots require careful consideration 
in order to predict the interaction of 
standard frontage and excess frontage 
calculations on the total lot value. 

The Lot size would be shown as follows: 



FRONT FOOT 


WIDTH 




TYPE 


(FRONTAGE) 


DEPTH 


1* 


100 


200 


2* 


50 


150 




Figure 12. 



* A back lot entry must be used with a regular 
lot entry. The back lot entry subtracts the value of 
ihai portion of the regular lot entry that is not 
actually part of that lot. Back lot eniries {ire always 
iiiiiiiis value's. 



^ 



A32-6 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 32 



S) 



1. Square 




A32.4. PARCEL SQUARE FOOTAGE FORMULAS 



AREA = BASE x HEIGHT 



Example: 

Area = 20' x 20' = 400 sq. fi. 



2. Rectangle 




AREA = BASE x HEIGHT 

Example: 

Area = 40' x 20' = 800 sq. ft. 



^ 



3. Trapezoid 




r 



20' 



40' 



HEIGHT X (SUM OF 2 BASES) 



AREA = 



Example: 

10' x (20' +40') 
Area = = 300 sq.ft. 



4. Triangle 





HEIGHT X BASE 



AREA 



E,\ample: 

20' X 30' 
Area = = 300 sq.ft. 



08/01/89 



A32-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



5. Regular Polygon 



AREA = CONSTANT x SIDE SQUARED 



V. 

5 sides 


_ 


1.7205 X Side Squared 


6 sides 


= 


2.5981 X Side Squared 


7 sides 


= 


3.6339 X Side Squared 


8 sides 


= 


4.8284 X Side Squared 


9 sides 


= 


6.1818 X Side Squared 


10 sides 


= 


7.6942 X Side Squared 


11 sides 


= 


9.3656 X Side Squared 


12 sides 


= 


11.1962 X Side Squared 



Example: 2.5981 x (8x8) = 166 sq.ll. 



6. Circle 



AREA = Pi x (RADIUS SQUARED) 




Example: 

Area = 3.1416 x (10x10) = 314 sq. fi. 



A32-8 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 32 



S) 



A32.5. LOT DEPTH VALUATION FACTORS 



A32.5.1. PARCEL DEPTH VALUATION 
CALCULATIONS 

These tables are to be used as guides for 
calculating values for lots that are either shorter or 
longer than the standard lot depth in the area. 

Standard lot depths are shown across the top of 
the tables above the solid line. The left-hand 
column shows various actual depths that may exist. 

Select the actual depth of the lot and follow 
across to the proper standard lot depth for the 
area being appraised. The figure encountered is 
the percentage factor to be applied to the front 
fool value of the lot. The modified front foot 
value is then multiplied by the width of the lot. 



This is essentially one large table giving depth 
factors for lots from 10 to 200 feet deep and 
standard depths ranging from 100 to 160 feet. The 
numbers are to be regarded as percentages. 

The front foot depth factor is equal to the 
square root of the ratio of the actual depth to the 
standard depth. 



Actual Depth 
Standard Depth 



For example: a 90 foot deep lot where the 
standard depth is 100 feet gives a depth factor: 



\/ 90/100 = V 0.90 = 95% 



5 



A32.5.2. DEPTH FACTOR TABLES 



LOT DEPTH VALUATION FACTORS 



3 



ACTUAL 










STANDARD 


DEPTH 












DEPTH 


100 


110 


115 


120 


125 


130 


135 


140 


145 


150 


155 


160 


10 


32 


30 


29 


29 


28 


28 


27 


27 


26 


26 


25 


25 


12 


35 


33 


32 


32 


31 


30 


30 


29 


29 


28 


28 


27 


14 


37 


36 


35 


34 


33 


33 


32 


32 


31 


31 


30 


30 


16 


40 


38 


37 


37 


36 


35 


34 


34 


33 


33 


32 


32 


18 


42 


40 


40 


39 


38 


37 


37 


36 


35 


35 


34 


34 


20 


45 


43 


42 


41 


40 


39 


38 


38 


37 


37 


36 


35 


22 


47 


45 


44 


43 


42 


41 


40 


40 


39 


38 


38 


37 


24 


49 


47 


46 


45 


44 


43 


42 


41 


41 


40 


39 


39 


26 


51 


49 


48 


47 


46 


45 


44 


43 


42 


42 


41 


40 


28 


53 


50 


49 


48 


47 


46 


46 


45 


44 


43 


43 


42 


30 


55 


52 


51 


50 


49 


48 


47 


46 


45 


45 


44 


43 


32 


57 


54 


53 


52 


51 


50 


49 


48 


47 


46 


45 


45 


34 


58 


56 


54 


53 


52 


51 


50 


49 


48 


48 


47 


46 


36 


60 


57 


56 


55 


54 


53 


52 


51 


50 


49 


48 


47 


38 


62 


59 


57 


56 


55 


54 


53 


52 


51 


50 


50 


49 


40 


63 


60 


59 


58 


57 


55 


54 


53 


53 


52 


51 


50 


42 


65 


62 


60 


59 


58 


57 


56 


55 


54 


53 


52 


51 


44 


66 


63 


62 


61 


59 


58 


57 


56 


55 


54 


53 


52 


46 


68 


65 


63 


62 


61 


59 


58 


57 


56 


55 


54 


54 


48 


69 


66 


65 


63 


62 


61 


60 


59 


58 


57 


56 


55 



08/01/89 



A32-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



LOT DEPTH VALUATION FACTORS (Cont'd) 



ACTUAL 










STANDARD 


DEPTH 












DEPTH 


100 


110 


115 


120 


125 


130 


135 


140 


145 


150 


155 


160 


50 


71 


67 


66 


65 


63 


62 


61 


60 


59 


58 


57 


56 


52 


72 


69 


67 


66 


64 


63 


62 


61 


60 


59 


58 


57 


54 


73 


70 


69 


67 


66 


64 


63 


62 


61 


60 


59 


58 


56 


75 


71 


70 


68 


67 


66 


64 


63 


62 


61 


60 


59 


58 


76 


73 


71 


70 


68 


67 


66 


64 


63 


62 


61 


60 


60 


77 


74 


72 


71 


69 


68 


67 


65 


64 


63 


62 


61 


62 


79 


75 


73 


72 


70 


69 


68 


67 


65 


64 


63 


62 


64 


80 


76 


75 


73 


72 


70 


69 


68 


66 


65 


64 


63 


66 


81 


77 


76 


74 


73 


71 


70 


69 


67 


66 


65 


64 


68 


82 


79 


77 


75 


74 


72 


71 


70 


68 


67 


66 


65 


70 


84 


80 


78 


76 


75 


73 


72 


71 


69 


68 


67 


66 


72 


85 


81 


79 


77 


76 


74 


73 


72 


70 


69 


68 


67 


74 


86 


82 


80 


79 


77 


75 


74 


73 


71 


70 


69 


68 


76 


87 


83 


81 


80 


78 


76 


75 


74 


72 


71 


70 


69 


78 


88 


84 


82 


81 


79 


77 


76 


75 


73 


72 


71 


70 


80 


89 


85 


83 


82 


80 


78 


77 


76 


74 


73 


72 


71 


82 


91 


86 


84 


83 


81 


79 


78 


77 


75 


74 


73 


72 


84 


92 


87 


85 


84 


82 


80 


79 


77 


76 


75 


74 


72 


86 


93 


88 


86 


85 


83 


81 


80 


78 


77 


76 


74 


73 


88 


94 


89 


87 


86 


84 


82 


81 


79 


78 


77 


75 


74 


90 


95 


90 


88 


87 


85 


83 


82 


80 


79 


77 


76 


75 


92 


96 


91 


89 


88 


86 


84 


83 


81 


80 


78 


77 


76 


94 


97 


92 


90 


89 


87 


85 


83 


82 


81 


79 


78 


77 


96 


98 


93 


91 


89 


88 


86 


84 


83 


81 


80 


79 


77 


98 


99 


94 


92 


90 


89 


87 


85 


84 


82 


81 


80 


78 


100 


100 


95 


93 


91 


89 


88 


86 


85 


83 


82 


80 


79 


102 


101 


96 


94 


92 


90 


89 


87 


85 


84 


82 


81 


80 


104 


102 


97 


95 


93 


91 


89 


88 


86 


85 


83 


82 


81 


106 


103 


98 


96 


94 


92 


90 


89 


87 


86 


84 


83 


81 


108 


104 


99 


97 


95 


93 


91 


89 


88 


86 


85 


83 


82 


110 


105 


100 


98 


96 


94 


92 


90 


89 


87 


86 


84 


83 


112 


106 


101 


99 


97 


95 


93 


91 


89 


88 


86 


85 


84 


114 


107 


102 


100 


97 


95 


94 


92 


90 


89 


87 


86 


84 


116 


108 


103 


100 


98 


96 


94 


93 


91 


89 


88 


87 


85 


118 


109 


104 


101 


99 


97 


95 


93 


92 


90 


89 


87 


86 


120 


110 


104 


102 


100 


98 


96 


94 


93 


91 


89 


88 


87 


122 


110 


105 


103 


101 


99 


97 


95 


93 


92 


90 


89 


87 


124 


111 


106 


104 


102 


100 


98 


96 


94 


92 


91 


89 


88 


126 


112 


107 


105 


102 


100 


98 


97 


95 


93 


92 


90 


89 


128 


113 


108 


106 


103 


101 


99 


97 


96 


94 


92 


91 


89 



A32-10 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 32 



T 



LOT DEPTH VALUATION FACTORS (Cont'd) 



3 



ACTUAL 










STANDARD 


DEPTH 










DEPTH 


100 


110 


115 


120 


125 


130 


135 


140 


145 


150 


155 


160 


130 


114 


109 


106 


104 


102 


100 


98 


96 


95 


93 


92 


90 


132 


115 


110 


107 


105 


103 


101 


99 


97 


95 


94 


92 


91 


134 


116 


110 


108 


106 


104 


102 


100 


98 


96 


95 


93 


92 


136 


117 


111 


109 


106 


104 


102 


100 


99 


97 


95 


94 


92 


138 


117 


112 


110 


107 


105 


103 


101 


99 


98 


96 


94 


93 


140 


118 


113 


110 


108 


106 


104 


102 


100 


98 


97 


95 


94 


142 


119 


114 


111 


109 


107 


105 


103 


101 


99 


97 


96 


94 


144 


120 


114 


112 


110 


107 


105 


103 


101 


100 


98 


96 


95 


146 


121 


115 


113 


110 


108 


106 


104 


102 


100 


99 


97 


96 


148 


122 


116 


113 


111 


109 


107 


105 


103 


101 


99 


98 


96 


150 


122 


117 


114 


112 


110 


107 


105 


104 


102 


100 


98 


97 


152 


123 


118 


115 


113 


110 


108 


106 


104 


102 


101 


99 


97 


154 


124 


118 


116 


113 


111 


109 


107 


105 


103 


101 


100 


98 


156 


125 


119 


116 


114 


112 


110 


107 


106 


104 


102 


100 


99 


158 


126 


120 


117 


115 


112 


110 


108 


106 


104 


103 


101 


99 


160 


126 


121 


118 


115 


113 


111 


109 


107 


105 


103 


102 


100 


162 


127 


121 


119 


116 


114 


112 


110 


108 


106 


104 


102 


101 


164 


128 


122 


119 


117 


115 


112 


110 


108 


106 


105 


103 


101 


166 


129 


123 


120 


118 


115 


113 


111 


109 


107 


105 


103 


102 


168 


130 


124 


121 


118 


116 


114 


112 


110 


108 


106 


104 


102 


170 


130 


124 


122 


119 


117 


114 


112 


110 


108 


106 


105 


103 


172 


131 


125 


122 


120 


117 


115 


113 


111 


109 


107 


105 


104 


174 


132 


126 


123 


120 


118 


116 


114 


111 


110 


108 


106 


104 


176 


133 


126 


124 


121 


119 


116 


114 


112 


110 


108 


107 


105 


178 


133 


127 


124 


122 


119 


117 


115 


113 


111 


109 


107 


105 


180 


134 


128 


125 


122 


120 


118 


115 


113 


111 


110 


108 


106 


182 


135 


129 


126 


123 


121 


118 


116 


114 


112 


110 


108 


107 


184 


136 


129 


126 


124 


121 


119 


117 


115 


113 


111 


109 


107 


186 


136 


130 


127 


124 


122 


120 


117 


115 


113 


111 


110 


108 


188 


137 


131 


128 


125 


123 


120 


118 


116 


114 


112 


110 


108 


190 


138 


131 


129 


126 


123 


121 


119 


116 


114 


113 


111 


109 


■ 192 


139 


132 


129 


126 


124 


122 


119 


117 


115 


113 


111 


110 


194 


139 


133 


130 


127 


125 


122 


120 


118 


116 


114 


112 


110 


196 


140 


133 


131 


128 


125 


123 


120 


118 


116 


114 


112 


111 


198 


141 


134 


131 


128 


126 


123 


121 


119 


117 


115 


113 


111 


200 


141 


135 


132 


129 


126 


124 


122 


120 


117 


115 


114 


112 



3 



08/01/89 



A32-1 1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A32.6. DIVISION OF A SECTION OF LAND 



1 SECTION 


= 


1 SO. MILE - 640 ACRES 


1 MILE 


= 


8 FURLONGS 


320 RDS. 


= 


5280 FT. 


1 LINK 


= 


7.92 Inches 


1 FOOT 


= 


12 inches 


1 YARD 


= 


36 inches 




= 


3 feet 


1 ROD or 


= 


16.5 feet 


POLE 


= 


5.5 yards 




= 


25 links 


1 CHAIN 


= 


66 feet 




= 


100 links 




= 


4 rods 


1 FURLONG 


= 


40 rods 




= 


660 feet 


1 MILE 


= 


5280 feet 




= 


320 rods 




= 


80 chains 




= 


8 furlongs 



1 SQUARE FOOT = 144 sq. inches 
1 SQUARE YARD = 9 sq. feet 



1 SQUARE ROD = 



1 ACRE 



272.25 sq. feet 
30.25 sq. yards 

43560 sq. feet 
160 sq. rods 
10 sq. chains 



1 ACRE is about 208.75 feet square or 8 rods wide by 20 
rods long or any two numbers of rods whose product is 160 
(25 X 125 ft.) = .0717 of an acre. 



1 SQUARE MILE or 
1 SECTION 

1 TOWNSHIP 
or 

1 TOWNSHIP 



640 acres 

36 sq. miles 
36 sections 

6 MILES SQ. 



4 furlonga 40 ch. 160 


rda. 




2 furlonga 


20 chaina 




2640 feet 












r Nwy* 


■ 
c 




N 


EVa 


V 


■C 160 ACRES 


o 




o 


80 ACRES 


80 ACRES 


o 


160 roda 






80 roda 


1320 feet 




■ 2 furlonga 


660 ft. 


40 roda 




20 chaina 


80 roda 




2 20 ACRES 


20 AC. 


20 AC. 










2 1320 feet 


W'A 


a 
C 

u 

o 




u 

o 


40 ACRES 

N.W.S.E. 

S 


40 ACRES 
N.E.S.E. 

EVa 


c 

u 

o 


20 chaina 

3. 20 ACRES 

80 roda § 


40 rda. 
5 ACRES 


20 
rda 

5A 


330 

ft. 

5A 


1 furlong 
lOA 


10 chaina 
lOA 




20 chaina 

S.W.S.E. 
40 ACRES 


1320 feet 

S.E.S.E. 

40 ACRES 




660 ft. 
5 ACRES 


lOA 


lOA 


lOA 


lOA 


1 fur. 


10 ch. 


40 rda. 


660 ft. 




1320 feet 


2 furlonga 





A32-12 



08/01,-89 



APPENDIX 32 



H 



A32.7. AGRICULTURAL LAND PRODUCTIVITY GRADE SCHEDULES 



^ 



GRADE 



NON-IRRIGATED FARM LAND 

(PROPERTY CUSS CODE 1401) 

BUSHELS OF WHEAT PER ACRE 
ON SUMMER FALLOW 



GRADE 



GRAZING LAND 

(PROPERTY CU\SS CODE 1601) 

ACRES PER 1000# 
STEER 10 MOS. 



1A2 




Under 3 


lAl 




3 - 5 


1A+ 




5.1 - 5.9 


lA 




6 - 10 


IB 




11 - 18 


2A 




19 - 21 


2B 




22 - 27 


3 




28 - 37 


4 




38 - 55 


5 




56 - 99 


6 




100 or over 




WILD 


HAY LAND 




(PROPERTY CU\SS CODE 1801) 






TONS OF HAY 


GRADE 




PER ACRE 


1 




3.0 &. over 


2 




2.5 - 2.9 


3 




2.0 - 2.4 


4 




1.5 - 1.9 


5 




1.0 - 1.4 


6 




.5 - .9 


7 




Less than .5 



NON-IRRIGATED CONTINUOUSLY CROPPED 
FARM LAND 

(PROPERTY CU\SS CODE 1501) 

BUSHELS OF WHEAT PER 



1A8 


40 &. Over 
38 - 39 


GRADE 

1A4 


ACRE EACH YEAR 


1A7 


44 & over 


1A6 


36 - 


■ 37 


1A3 


42 ■ 


43 


1A5 


34 - 


■ 35 


1A2 


40 - 


• 41 


1A4 


32 - 


. 33 


lAl 


38 - 


■ 39 


1A3 


30 ■ 


■ 31 


lA 


36 - 


■ 37 


1A2 


28 ■ 


■ 29 


1 


34 - 


■ 35 


lAl 


26 - 


• 27 


2 


32 - 


33 


lA 


24 ■ 


• 25 


3 


30 ■ 


■ 31 


IB 


22 • 


• 23 


4 


28 - 


• 29 


2A 


20 - 


• 21 


5 


26 ■ 


• 27 


2B 


18 - 


19 


6 


24 - 


• 25 


2C 


16 - 


• 17 


7 


22 - 


■ 23 


3A 


14 ■ 


• 15 


8 


20 ■ 


■ 21 


3B 


12- 


■ 13 


9 


18 - 


19 


4A 


10 ■ 


• 11 


10 


16 - 


■ 17 


4B 


8 - 


9 


11 


14 - 


■ 15 


5 


Under 8 


12 


12 - 


13 








13 


10 ■ 


11 








14 


Less than 10 



TILLABLE IRRIGATED LANDS 

(PROPERTY CLASS CODE 1101) 

The assessed value of Tillable Irrigated Land is 
adjusted by the number of crop rotations per year 
and the cost of water. 



GRADE 
lA 
IB 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 



TONS ALFALFA 
PER ACRE 

4.5 or greater 
4.0 - 4.4 



3.5 
3.0 
2.5 
2.0 
1.5 
1.0 



3.9 
3.4 
2.9 
2.4 
1.9 
1.4 



less than 1.0 



08/01 /89 



A32-13 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



r 



c 



A32-14 08/01/89 



^ 



J 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



f) 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FIELD 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


PAGE 


499 


DELbIb: RESIDENTIAL BUILDING 


1 


500 


RESIDENTIAL IMPROVEMENT INDICATOR 


1 


505 


STORY HEIGHT 


3 


506 


EXTERIOR WALLS 


3 


507 


STYLE 


3 


508 


ROOF 


5 


515 


FOUNDATION 


6 


520 


BASEMENT 


6 


521 


FINISHED BASEMENT 


6 


525 


HEATING & COOLING 


7 


528 


HEATED FLOOR AREA 


8 


530 


LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 


8 


535 


PLUMBING 


8 


540 


ATTIC 


9 


545 


GARAGE STALLS 


9 


550 


MASONRY FIREPLACE 


9 


551 


PREFAB FIREPU^CE AND STOVE 


10 


557-558 


MISCELU^NEOUS OTHER FEATURES 


10 


560 


CONDOMINIUM LEVEL 


10 


561 


CONDOMINIUM UNIT TYPE 


10 



FIELD 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


PAGE 


562 


CONDOMINIUM AMENITIES 


10 


566 


MOBILE HOME 


11 


567 


MOBILE HOME SERIAL / TITLE NUMBER 


11 


568 


MOBILE HOME DIMENSION 


11 


570 


AGE 


11 


571 


DEPRECIATION 


12 


572 


PHYSICAL CONDITION 


13 


573 


GRADE 


13 


574 


COST AND DESIGN FACTOR 


14 


575 


FLAT ADD COSTS 


14 


576 


CDU 


14 


577 


PERCENT COMPLETE 


15 


581 


FLOOR AREAS BY LEVEL 


15 


582 


UNFINISHED FLOOR AREAS BY LEVEL 


15 


599 


DELbIb: ADDITIONS 


16 


601-608 


ADDITIONS 


16 


699 


DELETE; OBY 


18 


701-706 


OTHER BUILDING & YARD IMPROVEMENTS 


18 


711 


MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS 


21 


800 


TOTAL OTHER IMPROVEMENTS 


21 



)') 



CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 



All of the data specifically for Residential and Agricultural improvements is contained in four screens. The 
following list shows the fields in numerical order and describes the data requirements for them. It also shows 
the number of the screen that contains the field. 



t 



499 DELETE: RESIDENTIAL BUILDING 

Optional RES GPD 

This is a computer file maintenance entry and 
normally will not be utilized on the field card. 
The purpose of the delete is to remove all data 
previously entered in the computer for fields 
500-658. This function is initiated by selecting 
option "06" from the On-Line Menu of the 
Residential sub-system. 



500 RESIDENTIAL IMPROVEMENT 

INDICATOR RES S5 

Required 
Four alternatives are provided. Only one of the 
below entries may be entered. 

V VACANT LOT - This category is to be 
entered if the parcel to be described is 
vacant (no improvements). No improvement 
information is to be entered. 



D DWELLING - This category is to be entered 
if the parcel to be described has a dwelling 
on it. Information MUST be entered in 
both the 500 and Sketch Vectoring fields 
and MAY be entered in the Addition and 
OBY fields. 

M MOBILE HOME - This category is to be 
entered if the structure to be described is a 
mobile home. Information MUST be 
entered in the 500 and Sketch Vectoring 
fields and MAY be entered in the Addition 
and OBY fields. 

O OTHER - This category is to be entered if 
the parcel to be described is not vacant but 
only contains buildings that will be listed 
under OB&Y and/or Gross Building 
Summary. No information may be entered in 
the 500 fields. 



08/01/89 



33-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



SAMPLE PROPERTY RECORD CARD 

(Back of Residential Card) 






s ! 






-I -; 



S « S •■ 

i 1 s 1 1 

5 5 S s J I 



521 J = 
Hi is 



iiili 



2 8 



3 5 I 



s 
s s 

S3 



- o 

■ z 

19* 



1 sS 



i ' 



' z 






I 



i : 



! I ' fi 

:| i I U\i 

— ul- 
« I i 



133 I t 



i ; 3 



8 - 
^ « ■ 

III 

« 5 = 



i : 3 1 : 

C « 3 I 



si: I 

: 3 s < 



i! 



! I 



I 



S S 



II 



I 

3 ■ 

• s • 

-!! 
t ~ " * 

i ; = ! 

5 a a w 
I o . 2 

5 • *• - 

I 

> ; 



i 



'1 

2; t 



I I 



33-2 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



)^ 



505 STORY HEIGHT RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings. 
Enter the actual story height of the dwelling. Use 
the height which is most representative of the 
dwelling's story height. Enter the number of full 
stories in the left-hand position before the decimal 
point. There must be at least one full story. 
Enter the number of half stories ("0" for none, "5" 
for a half story) in the right-hand position, after 
the decimal point. 

1.0 to indicate one story. 

1.5 to indicate one and one-half stories. 

2.0 to indicate two stories. 

2.5 to indicate two and one-half stories. 

3.0 to indicate three stories. 

3.5 to indicate three and one-half stories. 



1 STUCCO - to indicate Stucco over frame or 
Permastone or Formsione. 

2 SHINGLE - to indicate shingles or shakes. 

3 MASONITE - to indicate hardboard of any 
type. 

4 ASBESTOS - to indicate Asbestos Shingle 
or Plank. 

5 ALUMINUM / VINYL / STEEL - to 
indicate aluminum, vinyl, or steel siding or 
sandwich panels. 

6 WOOD SIDING or SHEATHING - to 
indicate solid board. 



V'' 



)) 



NOTE: Be careful about what constitutes a full 
story, a half story, and an attic. Refer to 
the story height illustrations found in the 
Appendix of this Section. 

USE STORY HEIGHT INDICATOR - enter a 'Y' 
in this field if the sketch vectoring and cost 
programs are to use a story height factor in the 
programs. 



506 EXTERIOR WALLS RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 

homes. 
WALL CONSTRUCTION - Determine the 
predominate type of wall construction, select its 
code from the table below, and enter the code in 
the first position of this field. Other types of wall 
construction can be made equivalent to one of the 
below (i.e., prefab metal to frame, stone to 
masonry). 

1 FRAME 

2 MASONRY and FRAME 

3 MASONRY 

4 LOG (not log over frame) 

EXTERIOR FINISH - Determine the predominate 
type of exterior finish, select its code from the 
table below, and enter the code in the second 
position of this field. 

OTHER - to indicate any other type of 
exterior finish markedly different in 
appearance and which cannot be equated to 
one of the below. 



STONE - to indicate cut stone veneer, or 
reinforced concrete. 

BRICK - to indicate solid masonry, brick on 
block, or veneer. 

BLOCK - to indicate concrete block, 
structural clay tile, stucco over concrete 
block. 



507 STYLE RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings. 
Enter the code which is most representative of the 
style of the dwelling. Examples of the various 
house styles can be found in the Appendix of this 
Section. 

01 BI-LEVEL - (SPLIT FOYER, SPLIT 

ENTRY, RAISED RANCH, HILLSIDE 
RANCH, PENTHOUSE) ... a contemporary 
one story house which provides (or has the 
potential to be finished to provide) two 
levels of living area. The lower level is 
either a raised ("true" or "English") basement 
which protrudes about four feet above grade 
or a "walkout" type basement which has one 
side exposed at grade level when the house 
is built into a hillside. The Split Foyer or 
Split Entry has the front door at ground 
level halfway between the raised basement 
and first floor. The Raised Ranch or 
Hillside Ranch typically incorporates a 
basement garage and/or a "walkout" 
recreation room on the lower level. The 
• Penthouse has the main entrance located on 
the basement level. 



08/01/89 



33-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



U2 SPLIT LEVEL (TRl-LEVEL, SIDE-TO- 
SIDE SPLIT, FRONT-TO-BACK SPLIT, 
BACK-TO-FRONT SPLIT) ... a 
contemporary house with three basic living 
levels (not counting a basement, if present). 
Typically, the room layout consists of a 
garage and/or recreation room on the lower 
level, with the living room about a half flight 
of stairs up on the middle level. The 
bedrooms are located on the upper level 
over the recreation room or garage. 

03 RANCH (RAMBLER, TRUE RANCH, 
CALIFORNIA RANCH) ... a contemporary 
one story house with all habitable rooms and 
automobile storage located on one level. If 
a basement is present, it is typically a utility 

or storage type. 07 

04 MODERN (ULTRA-MODERN, POST- 
MODERN) ... houses which are innovative 
or unique in design, use of construction 
methods or materials. These are typically 
architect designed and built homes which 

belong in a class by themselves. If it can be 08 

identified, the specific style should be 

recorded in the NOTES section. Early 20th 

century architectural movements in this 

category include the Prairie, International, 

Art Deco, Art Moderne, and Miesian 

schools. Contemporary examples in this 

class would also include products of recent 

movements such as Brutalism, High Tech, 

Post Modern, and International Revival. 09 

05 TRADITIONAL or VICTORIAN (GOTHIC 
REVIVAL, CARPENTER GOTHIC, 
ITALIANTE, OCTAGON, RENAISSANCE 
REVIVAL, STICK, SECOND EMPIRE, 
HIGH VICTORIAN GOTHIC, QUEEN 
ANNE, EASTLAKE, RICHARDSON 
ROMANESQUE, SHINGLE) ...a rich and 
expressive architectural period which began 
around 1840 and continued to 1900. This 
style of dwelling is typified by asymmetrical 
shapes and silhouettes, often with steep 
intersecting gable roofs, towers, dormers and 
bay windows. Vertical emphasis is provided 

by the use of tall chimneys and turrets. 10 

Complicated scrollwork (gingerbread) and 
elaborate turned trimmings are prevalent 
items of decor. 

06 EARLY AMERICAN (COLONIAL, 
GARRISON COLONIAL, SALTBOX, 



GEORGIAN, FEDERAL, DUTCH 
COLONIAL, SOUTHERN COLONIAL, 
JEFFERSONIAN, GREEK REVIVAL, 
GEORGIAN REVIVAL, COLONIAL 
REVIVAL) ... almost all pre-Civil War 
American architecture is generally classified 
as a type of Colonial. This catch-all 
grouping includes true period homes and 
contemporary replicas. Although elements 
of this style are a major component of 
today's contemporary-traditional vernacular, 
only historically accurate examples belong in 
this category. Thus, most newer homes 
which contain only traces or idiosyncrasies of 
colonial architecture would not fall in this 
category. 

EARTH SHELTERED 
(UNDERGROUND) ... a contemporary 
house built below ground level or into a 
hillside. The roof is covered with earth 
except for skylights, a clerestory window, or 
possibly an atrium. 

CONVENTIONAL (CONTEMPORARY, 
FUNCTIONAL MODERN) ... contemporary 
one to three story houses with conservative 
architecture in the 20th century vernacular 
mode. These houses may incorporate 
elements of Traditional, Spanish, Colonial, 
Elizabethan, or period designs, but they are 
not true replicas. 

BUNGALOW (CALIFORNIA 
BUNGALOW, AIRPLANE BUNGALOW, 
CRAFTSMAN BUNGALOW) ... a 
picturesque cottage-like house introduced 
around 1900 and very popular through the 
1930's. The informal plan, elevation, and 
detail featured low simple lines, a wide 
projective gable roof, large porches, a walk- 
way stoop, and rough natural construction 
materials. Typically a one story residence, 
however, one and one-half story versions 
may incorporate a low shed dormer. The 
Airplane Bungalow has a small two story 
addition in the rear. 

OLD STYLE (TRI-GABLE ELL. 
UTILITARIAN COTTAGE, AMERICAN 
FOURSQUARE, FARMHOUSE. 
PRINCESS ANNE. SHIRTWAIST) ... mid 
19th century and early 20th century pattern 
book vernacular style houses which are 
transitions from the Victorian era or 



e 



33-4 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



O 



11 



12 



13 



14 



508 



provincial examples of Georgian revivals or 
picturesque English style period homes. 

LOG ... this category has exterior walls built 
of logs, either in round or squared shape. 

CONDOMINIUM ... this category identifies 
a distinct type of ownership. The unit living 
area is owned exclusively (fee simple) by the 
unit owner. The other components; land, 
common hallways, stairways, roof, 
foundation, and exterior recreation features, 
such as pools, tennis courts, etc., are owned 
in common by all unit owners. They may be 
townhouse, hi-rise, or garden apartment in 
style. 

A-FRAME ... this category has a frame in 
the shape of one or more "A's". A-Frames 
have very steep gable roofs, front and rear 
walls usually have large glass areas. A- 
Frames have been popular since WWII. 

OTHER (SHANTY, BASEMENT 
FOUNDATION HOME, SOD, QUONSET 
HUT, GEODESIC DOME, 
PREFABRICATED DYMAXION, 
CONVERTED BARN, FANTASY, 
FREEFORM, SILO/YURT KIT HOMES, 
PREFABRICATED MODULAR) ...truly 
unique or rare architectural examples which 
do not fall into any previously mentioned 
category can be indicated as Other. If using 
this entry, enter a description of the STYLE 
in the NOTES field. 



ROOF RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 

ROOF TYPE - Enter the code that best describes 

the type of roof of the subject property. 

Illustrations of the different roof types are in the 

Appendix of this Section. 



J) 






OTHER 


1 


FLAT 


2 


HIP 


3 


GABLE 


4 


GAMBREL 


5 


SHED 


6 


MANSARD 


7 


ARCHED 


8 


A-FRAME 


9 


BROKEN GABLE 



ROOF MATERIAL - Enter the predominant type 
of roofing material, selecting the code from the 
table below. 

1 WOOD SHINGLE to indicate a roof 
material composed of small sheets of 
redwood, white or red cedar machined to a 
uniform thickness and size. (Do not be 
fooled by old warped wood shingles which 
look like shakes). 

2 SLATE to indicate a natural, durable, stone 
used as a shingle. It is a fireproof, but 
brittle surface, about 3/16" thick and milled 
into various shapes. Colors range from grey 
to various hues of red, green, or purple. 

3 TILE to indicate a usually half-round 
product made of either clay or concrete 
which has been kiln baked to a hardness 
which gives a wearing surface that needs no 
paint. It usually has various red shades. 

4 COPPER to indicate a roof made of copper. 

5 METAL to indicate a roof made of sheets of 
corrugated galvanized metal, flat, standing 
seam or batten seam plates. 

6 WOOD SHAKE to indicate a roof material 
very similar to wood shingle, except for 
various thicknesses and slightly irregular 
shapes due to splitting rather than cutting 
the wood. 

7 COMPOSITION ROLL to indicate a roofing 
material made of a compressed fiber or 
paper material saturated with asphalt and 
rolled out over wood sheathing. 

8 BUILT UP TAR AND GRAVEL (ROCK) 
to indicate roofing that is built up by laying 
roofing felt with overlapping scams, then 
sealed by mopping with hot tar or roofing 
compound. The final coat of tar can be 
covered with small gravel. This is the most 
common roof material for fiat roofs and 
underground homes. 

9 ASBESTOS to indicate a rigid, grey, non- 
flammable natural mineral fiber shingle 
formed into a diamond or hexagonal shape 
(a barrel shaped cap rises from the roof 
ridge). 



08/01/89 



33-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



10 ASPHALT SHINGLE to indicate a flexible 
composition or fiberglass shingle applied 
over roofing felt (most commonly used in 
new construction). 

11 OTHER to indicate a roof material not 
listed above, which includes enamel metal 
shingles, thin membrane terne, or built up 
concrete. 



TYPE - Enter the code that describes the 
basement area. The area of the unfinished 
basement will be automatically calculated for the 
dwelling if BASEMENT is coded 2 or 3, or if 
basement area is coded as an Addition (Addition 
Code = 50). 

NONE to indicate that the dwelling has no 
basement area. 



515 FOUNDATION RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 

Enter the predominant type of foundation, select 

its code from the table below. 

NONE to indicate a dwelling with no 
foundation (i.e. dirt or mud sills). 

1 WOODEN or MASONRY PIERS / POSTS 
to indicate that the dwelling has piers for a 
foundation. 

2 CONCRETE to indicate a continuous 
foundation wall of poured in place 
reinforced concrete. 

3 SLAB to indicate a monolithic poured slab 
with no additional foundation or footing. 



1 CRAWL to indicate that the area below the 
dwelling is unfinished, accessible but less 
than a full story height, or is only 25% or 
less of the first floor area. 

2 PART to indicate that the basement area is 
greater than 25% but less than 75% of the 
first story area. 

3 FULL to indicate that the basement area is 
75% or more of the first floor area. 

DAYLIGHT BASEMENT - Enter a "Y" if the 
building contains a daylight basement or an "N" if 
it does not. To qualify as a daylight basement, the 
major portion of at least one wall must be exposed 
and the outside entrance must be at ground level 
or above. In most instances, daylight basements 
will be located on hillsides and sloping or terraced 
parcels. 



WOOD to indicate that the foundation for 
the dwelling is constructed of decay resistant, 
impregnated wood. 

BLOCK to indicate a continuous foundation 
wall constructed of concrete, structural clay 
tile, or cinder shaped in the form of hollow 
blocks, layered or stacked. 

STONE to indicate a continuous masonry 
foundation wall constructed of rubble or cut 
stone laid in place. 

OTHER to indicate a type of foundation 
wall that does not fall into the above 
categories. 



520 BASEMENT RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 

Indicates the presence of basement area. 



521 FINISHED BASEMENT RES S5 

Optional 
Indicates the presence of an area of the basement 
which is finished with a quality of material and 
workmanship consistent with the main living area 
of the dwelling (such as the lower or grade level ot 
bi-level and split level dwellings). 

AREA - Enter either the appropriate dimensions 
or the square foot area of the finished basement 
living area. 

QUALITY GRADE - Enter the code that 
describes the quality of the finish in the basement. 



1 


MINIMAL 


2 


FAIR 


3 


TYPICAL 


4 


GOOD 



e 



33-6 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



^ 



While this field must be coded, it will only affect 
the value produced for the 1987 reappraisal cycle. 

GRADE VARIATION - This field is exclusively 
for the 1982 cycle - Primary concern is given to the 
quality of workmanship and material in the 
finished part of the basement in comparison to the 
rest of the building. If the quality grade of the 
finished basement is the same as the rest of the 
building, leave this field blank. 

If the quality of the finished basement is less than 
the quality of the main part of the building, enter 
a "-" in the left-hand position and your estimate of 
the quality percent difference in the right-hand 
positions. 

If the quality of the finished basement is more 
than the quality of the main part of the building, 
enter a "+" in the left-hand position and your 
estimate of the additional quality in terms of a 
percentage in the right-hand position. 



525 HEATING & COOLING RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 
Refers to the presence of and type of heating 
system. Four alternatives are provided. Enter the 
type which is most representative of the subject 
property. 

NONE to indicate that the subject dwelling 
does not have a heating system ... warranting 
a full deduction from the base price for "no 
heating," as indicated by the pricing 
schedule. 

1 NON-CENTRAL to indicate that the subject 
dwelling has a heating system that is 
considered non-central for the area being 
heated ... warranting a partial deduction 
from the base price for central heating. 
Examples of non-central systems include 
floor or wall furnaces, electric baseboard or 
radiant ceiling heat. 

NOTE: Floor furnaces in dwellings with under 
600 SFLA should be considered "central." 
Floor furnaces in dwellings with over 600 
SFLA should be considered "non-central," as 
they become inadequate and inefficient to 
heat the required area. 



2 CENTRAL to indicate that the subject 
dwelling has a central system commensurate 
with the quality grade specifications of the 
dwelling ... warranting no addition to or 
deduction from the base price. Such systems 
may include gravity furnaces, radiant hot 
water and forced warm air furnaces. 

3 CENTRAL / AIR CONDITIONING to 
indicate that in addition to a central heating 
system, the subject dwelling has (either 
separately or combined) a central cooling 
system commensurate with the quality grade 
specifications of the dwelling ... warranting 
an addition to the base price for "air 
conditioning," as indicated by the pricing 
schedule. If a cooling system as described 
exists in the dwelling, enter only this 
numeric code. This code implies that a 
central heating system exists. 

HEATING FUEL TYPE - Enter the code 
describing the predominate type of fuel used by the 
heating system. 

NONE - No heating system exists. The only 
heat is derived from a fireplace, a 
freestanding space heater or a cook stove. 

1 COAL 

2 OIL 

3 GAS (either natural gas or liquified 
petroleum gas) 

4 ELECTRICITY 

5 SOLAR to indicate either a passive or an 
active solar system. 

6 WOOD (not to be confused with 0-NONE 
above) 

7 GEOTHERMAL 

HEATING SYSTEM TYPE - Enter the code 
describing the type of heating system of the subject 
property. Disregard supplemental heating such as 
an electric baseboard unit in an isolated room or 
addition. 

1 FLOOR / WALL / SPACE to indicate the 
presence of a wall, floor, or ceiling hung 
unit. 

2 HOT WATER to indicate the system 
employs hot water to distribute the heat by 
baseboard or radiators. 



J) 



08/01/89 



33-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



STEAM to indicate the system employs 
steam to distribute the heat by baseboard or 
radiators. 

GRAVITY HOT AIR to indicate the system 
has ducts but no means other than gravity 
flow to distribute the heat (gravity hot air). 

FORCED AIR to indicate the presence of a 
warm air system. With this system, the 
furnace has a fan or blower that pushes the 
warmed air through relatively small ducts. 
These ducts may run horizontally or 
vertically. Filters can be installed in the 
system to clean the air and a humidifying 
system included to add needed moisture. 

HEAT PUMP to indicate a reverse cycle 
refrigeration unit which can be used for 
heating and cooling. 

ELECTRIC BASEBOARD / RADIANT to 
indicate the presence of an electric heating 
system. This system is characterized by 
electric resistance elements that convert 
electricity into heat. These elements are 
embedded in the floors, walls, ceilings, or 
baseboard to provide radiant heat. 

PACKAGE AIR CONDITIONING to 
indicate the system has package air 
conditioning. 

HOT / COOL AIR to indicate a system 
utilizing warm and cool air (gas fired forced 
hot air with gas or electric refrigerated 
cooling). 



530 LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 

Enter one or two numeric characters denoting the 

quantities of each of the items described below. If 

the item does not exist, enter zero. 

TOTAL ROOMS - Enter the total number of 
separate rooms [excluding bathroom(s) and 
hallway(s)] comprising the living area of the 
dwelling (i.e., kitchens, living rooms, dining rooms, 
family rooms, dens, studies, and bedrooms). 

BEDROOMS - Enter the total number of separate 
rooms designed to be used as bedrooms. Count 
each independent area that has a privacy door and 
a reach-in or walk-in closet for clothes storage and 
a window. If a room was designed to be a 
bedroom, but is being utilized for some other 
purpose (such as a den), it is still to be included in 
this count. 

In a one room cabin, the one room is considered 
to be a living room not a bedroom. 

FAMILY ROOMS - Enter the number of informal 
living rooms, quality of finish consistent with the 
general finish of the dwelling. Count all rooms 
classified as family rooms, dens and recreation 
rooms. These can be located on any floor or in 
the basement. 

Do not count bedrooms being used as any of the 
above. If a room meets the standards for a 
bedroom, i.e., privacy, closet, window, access lo a 
bath, and obviously was intended at construction to 
be a bedroom, then it is counted as a bedroom. 



r 



528 HEATED FLOOR AREA RES S5 

Optional 
The heated area will normally be the total finished 
area of the building (first floor, upper floors, 
finished basement). However, if some areas such 
as attics or half stories have been finished with no 
provision for heating, except portable electric units, 
fireplaces or robber ducts, exclude this area from 
the total heated area. Do not include unheated or 
inadequately heated finished areas in the total 
healed areas. 

Enter the total square footage of adequately heated 
areas, right-justified. If no heated area exists; if 
there is no heating system; or if the computer 
calculated area is correct, leave this field blank. 



535 PLUMBING RES S5 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 
Enter either one or two numeric characters 
denoting the quantity of each item described below. 
Each character position must be filled in. Use 
leading zeros if necessary. If the item does not 
exist, enter zero. 

FULL BATHS - Enter the number of three-fixture 
bathrooms which include a water closet, lavatory, 
and bathtub or shower stall (a bathtub with a 
shower outlet is considered one fixture). 



^ 



33-8 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



HALF BATHS - Enter the number of two-fixture 
toilet rooms which include a water closet and 
lavatory. 

ADDITIONAL FIXTURES - Enter the total 
number of individual plumbing fixtures that are not 
counted in full baths or half baths. Include water 
heaters, kitchen sinks, single toilets, single 
lavatories, single bathtubs and showers, wet bars 
and sinks in recreation areas. Also include laundry 
tubs or connections (water and drain) for 
automatic washer hookup, but not as two fixtures 
where both are present. Add one fixture for each 
roughed in bathroom. 

TOTAL FIXTURES - this computer generated field 
is the total number of plumbing fixtures in the 
dwelling. 



GRADE VARIATION - This field is exclusively 
for the 1982 cycle - Primary concern is given to the 
quality of workmanship and material in the 
finished part of the attic in comparison to the rest 
of the building. If the quality is the same, leave 
this field blank. 

If the quality of the attic is less than the quality of 
the main part of the building, enter a "-" in the 
left-hand column and your estimate of the quality 
percent difference in the right-hand column. 

If the quality of the attic is more than the quality 
of the main part of the building, enter "-(-"in the 
left-hand column and your estimate of the 
additional quality in terms of a percent in the 
right-hand column. 



540 ATTIC 

Required entry for dwellings. 



RES S5 



:)' 



J' 



NOTE: Be careful about what constitutes a full 
story, a half story, and an attic. Refer to 
the story height illustrations found in the 
Appendix of this Section. 

ATTIC TYPE - Enter the code that describes the 
attic area. 

NONE to indicate no attic. 

1 UNFINISHED to indicate an unfinished 
attic having only a subfloor and stairs. 

2 PARTLY FINISHED to indicate either an 
undivided (one room) full finished attic, or a 
divided (two rooms) attic with one-half (one 
room) finished and the balance unfinished. 

3 FULLY FINISHED to indicate a divided 
(two or more rooms) fully finished attic. 

4 FULL FINISHED with WALL HEIGHT to 
indicate a divided (two or more rooms) fully 
finished attic which includes the presence of 
one or more small dormers. This category 
should be used when the existing wall height 
is not enough to be considered a 1.5 or 2.5 
story dwelling. 

While this field must be coded, it will only affect 
the value produced for the 1987 reappraisal cycle. 



545 GARAGE STALLS RES S5 

Optional (Number of Cars) 
To indicate the number of garage stalls associated 
with the dwelling. A stall is approximately 200 
square feet. 

BUILT-IN GARAGE - Refers to a finished garage 
built into a portion of the dwelling that would 
normally be considered finished living area. For 
example, a two story house with a garage built into 
the main ground floor area (not an addition) with 
living area above it. For description only, enter 
the car capacity of the built-in garage. The area 
for Built-in Garages must be accounted for in the 
Additions fields. See examples in the Appendix of 
this section. 

BASEMENT GARAGE - Refers to finished garage 
built into a portion of the basement of the 
dwelling. Enter the car capacity of the basement 
garage. 



550 MASONRY FIREPLACE RES S5 

Optional 
Indicates the presence of woodburning fireplacc(s) 
constructed of masonry. If no such fireplace exists 
for the dwelling leave all fields blank. Masonry 
woodburning fireplaces which have been 
permanently closed off should not be listed. 

STACK - Enter the number of fireplace chimneys, 
regardless of the number of stories and openings 
they contain. 



08/01/89 



33-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



STORIES - For each chimney stack, count the 
number of stories (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, etc.) of the portion 
of the building to which it is attached. Add the 
story heights of all chimney stacks together. The 
sum will be in full-stories and a possible half story. 
Enter the number of full stories in the left-hand 
position before the decimal point. Enter a "0" if 
there is no additional half story, or a "5" if there is 
a half story, in the right-hand position after the 
decimal point. If you have a situation where the 
chimney extends into the basement, include the 
extended portion as part of the Total Chimney 
Height. 

OPENINGS - Count each opening (fireplace) in 
each chimney. In a single chimney there might be 
openings in the basement and on the second floor, 
in addition to one on the first floor. There may 
be a back-to-back fireplace on one floor with two 
separate fireboxes or outlets each serving a 
different room. There may also be a barbecue 
firebox built into the chimney. 



E2 Residential Elevator (2 stop) 

E3 Residential Elevator (3 stop) 

EF Exhaust Fan 

GD Garbage Disposal 

IC Inter-Com System 

MS Miscellaneous Built-in's 

SB Spa Bathtub 

SL Stair Lift 

SS Security System 

QUANTITY - Enter the number of Other 
Features. If the code "BI" is entered, total the 
value of all OTHER FEATURES from the Cost 
Pricing Schedule, divide that sum by 100, and enter 
the point value in this field. 



560 CONDOMINIUM LEVEL RES S5 

Required entry for condominiums. 
Enter the floor level on which the condominium is 
located. The field is numeric, and two character 
positions are provided to enter "00" through "99." 
Use leading zeros if necessary. 



f 



551 PREFAB FIREPLACE AND STOVE RES S5 

Optional 
A prefabricated fireplace is an open firebox unit of 
metal construction that is connected by pipes to a 
chimney. Enter the total number of such 
fireplaces. If there are no Prefab fireplaces, leave 
this field blank. 



557-558 MISCELLANEOUS OTHER FEATURES 

Optional RES S5 

Refers to the presence of MISCELLANEOUS 
OTHER FEATURES which are not typically 
found in dwellings, but are to be valued. Two 
character positions are provided to indicate a code 
describing the item, and two character positions are 
provided to indicate the number of items. Two 
distinct entries are allowed. 

MISCELLANEOUS OTHER FEATURE CODE - 
enter the code that describes the feature. A 
maximum of two codes are permitted. 

BD Built in Dishwasher 

BF Built in Refrigerator 

BI Built-in's from conversion 

BM Built in Microwave Oven 

BO Built in Oven 

BR Built in Range 

BT Built in Trash Compactor 

CV Central Vacuum System 



00 to indicate lower level (basement 
or garden level). 

01 to indicate first floor. 

02 through 99 to indicate second floor, etc. 



561 CONDOMINIUM UNIT TYPE RES S5 

Required entry for condominiums. 
Four alternatives are provided. Enter the code 
which is most representative of the type of the 
condominium. 

1 INTERIOR to indicate condominium is an 
interior unit. 

2 CORNER to indicate condominium is cither 
a corner or end unit. 

3 UPPER LEVEL to indicate condominium is 
on a floor other than ground level and is 
not a penthouse unit. 

4 PENTHOUSE to indicate condominium is a 
penthouse unit. 



562 CONDOMINIUM AMENITIES RES S5 

Required entry for condominiums. 
Enter the code that indicates the most significant 
amenity available to this unit. 



e 



t 



33-10 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



NONE to indicate that none of the 
amenities listed below apply to this 
condominium. 

WATERFRONT to indicate condominium is 
on the waterfront. 



NOTE: The WIDTH and LENGTH 

dimensions of the mobile home should not 
include additions, expandos, or tip-outs. 
These items should be included as 
ADDITIONS. 



WATERVIEW to indicate condominium has 
a view of a lake, river, etc. 

GOLF COURSE VIEW to indicate - 
condominium is either on a golf course or 
has a view of a golf course. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW to indicate 
condominium has a view of a mountain. 



566 MOBILE HOME RES S6 

Required entry for mobile homes. 
MAKE - Enter, left-justified, the make of the 
mobile home. If MAKE is not known, enter 

"UNKNOWN". 

MODEL - Enter, left-justified, the model of the 
mobile home. If MODEL is not known, enter 

"UNKNOWN". 

YEAR - Enter the last two digits of the year in 
which the mobile home was constructed. 



570 AGE RES S6 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 
Enter the year of construction, the year of 
remodeling, and the effective year, if it is not the 
same as the original year of construction. 

YEAR BUILT - Refers to the original date of 
construction. Do not consider remodeling or 
additions, only the original building. Enter the 
last three digits of the year of construction. If the 
exact date cannot be ascertained, make the best 
estimate possible based on known construction 
dates in the immediate area, and place an "X" in 
the YEAR BUILT ESTIMATED. 

YEAR REMODELED - Optional entry. Refers to 
the date of the last extensive remodeling, i.e., 
remodeling which significantly alters the "effective 
age" of the dwelling. Enter the last two digits of 
the year of remodeling. This field is descriptive 
only and will not effect depreciation calculations. 
If the dwelling has not been remodeled, leave this 
item blank. 



567 MOBILE HOME SERL\L / TITLE 

NUMBER RES S6 

Optional entry for mobile homes. 
Refers to the serial number given to the mobile 
home by the manufacturer and used for 
identification purposes, or the title number listed 
on the title for the mobile home. Enter the 
number left-justified. 



568 MOBILE HOME DIMENSION RES S6 

Required entry for mobile homes. 
WIDTH - The width of a mobile home is 
determined by outside measurement of one of the . 
two equal, shortest sections of the perimeter 
footage. 

LENGTH - The length of a mobile home is 
determined by outside measurement of one of the 
two equal, longest sections of the perimeter 
footage. Do not include the towing tongue of the 
mobile home, if attached. 



EFFECTIVE YEAR - Optional entry. This entry, 
if entered, will override the year of construction in 
determining the depreciation for the dwelling. 
Enter the last two digits of the effective year. 

If the condition of the building is better than 
average, the effective year will be more recent than 
the actual year built. If the condition is worse 
than average, the effective year will be greater than 
the actual year built. 

Major alterations, additions or rebuilding can 
extend the useful life of a building and add to its 
present value. In such cases, the chronological life 
is not a solid indication of the amount of 
depreciation that should be applied. The "effective 
age" should be the guide. 

The cost of alterations and additions cannot be 
added directly to the previous appraised value of 
the buildings. A method for indicating how 
alterations, additions, and remodeling can impact 
the "effective age" of a building, is stated below: 



08/01/89 



33-11 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Great care must be exercised when using this 
method. Minor errors in remodeling percentages 
and chronological building life quickly render this 
method unacceptable. There is no substitute for 
the appraiser's analysis and supportable opinion. 
On dwellings that have exceeded 60 years effective 
age, use extreme caution. The analysis required to 
determine correct depreciation levels should 
include the comparison of replacement cost values 
to market evidence. 



Example 1: 

A building built in 1937, was remodeled by 20% in 1979 
(presume the current year is 1988): 

1988-1937 = 51 X 80% = 4080 

1988-1979 = 9 X 20% = 180 

Total 4260 / 100 = 43 years 
effective age 

1988 - 43 = 1945 - therefore, enter "45' in 
EFFECTIVE YEAR. 

Example 2: 

A building built in 1948, was remodeled by 30% in 1987 
(presume the current year is 1988): 

1988-1948 = 40 X 70% = 2800 

1988-1987 = 1 X 30% = 30 

Total 2830 / 100 = 28 years 
effective age 

1 988 - 28 = 1 960 - therefore, enter "60" in 
EFFECTIVE YEAR. 



571 DEPRECIATION 

Optional . 

This field is exclusively for the 1982 cycle. 



RES S6 



Depreciation goes to work immediately upon 
completion of a building and continues until the 
building is no longer usable. It is used in the cost 
approach to value and is the difference, stated as a 
percentage, between the current replacement cost 
of the building and it's estimated market value. 

The three types of depreciation that can affect 
value are physical deterioration, functional 
obsolescence and economic obsolescence. These 
are further broken down into curable and 
incurable. 

If abnormal depreciation is applied to a building, 
be sure to explain the reasons in the NOTES 
section (fields 481-483). 



PHYSICAL DEPRECIATION - This field is 
exclusively for the 1982 cycle - Physical 
depreciation can be detected and recognized by 
personal inspection. It may consist of wear and 
tear of such items as gutters and downspouts, 
windows and screens or there may be a need for 
painting or redecorating. Loose siding, missing 
shingles, rusted flashing and valleys, cracked 
plaster, loose electrical switches and broken 
fixtures, leaking plumbing or a furnace or boiler in 
bad repair are among other indications of physical 
deterioration. These conditions are usually curable 
and should be a part of the normal maintenance 
given the structure. There is, however, other 
evidence of the deterioration of the bone structure 
of a building; such as a settling of foundations, 
cracked bearing walls, broken floor joists or 
sagging rafters that might indicate an incurable 
condition because it may not be economically 
sound to repair the defects. 

Enter the amount of physical depreciation in whole 
percent, right-justified. Physical depreciation must 
be greater than zero and no greater than 80%. 

FUNCTIONAL OBSOLESCENCE - This field is 
exclusively for the 1982 cycle - Functional 
obsolescence reflects the loss of value because of 
decreased utility or desirability in a structure 
caused by such things as outmoded plumbing or 
heating, insufficient electrical outlets or abnormally 
high ceilings, etc. These are usually curable. 
Other conditions, such as outmoded architecture, a 
poor floor plan or columns and bearing walls that 
interfere with the proper utilization of space may 
not be possible to cure or may not be curable from 
an economic standpoint. It is possible to build an 
undesirable feature and functional obsolescence 
into a new building. 

Enter the amount of functional obsolescence in 
whole percent, right-justified. The obsolescence 
must not be greater than 80%. 

ECONOMIC OBSOLESCENCE - This field is 
exclusively for the 1982 cycle - Economic 
obsolescence is caused by forces outside of the 
building itself, such as business encroachment into 
a residential district or an influx of inharmonious 
inhabitants into a neighborhood. It is very seldom, 
if ever, curable. 

Enter the amount of economic obsolescence in 
whole percent, right-justified. The obsolescence 
must not be greater than 80%. 



t 



33-12 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



572 PHYSICAL CONDITION RES S6 

Optional entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 
Refers to a composite judgment of the overall 
physical condition or state of repair of the interior 
and exterior features of the dwelling relative to its 
age; or the level of maintenance which you would 
normally expect to find in a dwelling of a given 
age. This field is descriptive only and will not 
effect depreciation calculations. 

Consideration should be given to foundation, 
porches, walls, exterior trim, roofing, chimneys, wall 
finish, interior trim, kitchen cabinets, heating 
system, and plumbing. Six alternatives are 
provided. Enter the code which is most 
representative of the subject property. Only one 
selection may be entered. 

1 UNSOUND to indicate that the dwelling is 
structurally unsound, not suitable for 
habitation, and subject to condemnation. It 
is unfortunately possible that some dwellings 
may be occupied, but still suitable for coding 
as unsound. 

2 POOR to indicate that the dwelling shows 
many signs of structural damage (such as a 
sagging roof, foundation cracks, uneven 
floors, etc.), possibly combined with a 
significant degree of deferred maintenance 
(such as roof shingles need replacement). 

3 FAIR to indicate that the dwelling is in 
structurally sound condition, but has greater 
than normal deterioration present relative to 
its age. Dwellings in "fair" physical 
condition may be characterized as having a 
significant degree of deferred maintenance. 

4 AVERAGE to indicate that the dwelling 
shows only minor signs of deterioration 
caused by normal "wear and tear." The 
dwelling exhibits an ordinary standard of 
maintenance and upkeep in relation to its 
age. 



maintenance and upkeep in relation to its 
age. 



573 GRADE RES S6 

Required entry for dwellings and mobile 
homes. 
The accuracy of a residential appraisal depends 
largely upon the selection of the correct grade. 
Grade represents quality. Quality applies to both 
workmanship and type of materials used. The 
combination of quality workmanship and materials 
reflects increased cost and value. The value of a 
dwelling constructed of high quality materials and 
with the best of workmanship throughout may be 
considerably more than that of one built from the 
same floor plan with inferior materials and 
workmanship. 

The grading of structures is used to distinguish 
between variations in value and to identify the full 
range of conventional single family residential 
construction. The specifications of type of facilities 
may not vary greatly between grades; however, the 
quality of materials, workmanship and design may 
be decidedly different. 

The majority of dwellings fall within the definite 
grade of construction incorporating average quality 
of workmanship and materials. Consequently, 
better quality of construction, or construction of 
cheaper quality, can be determined by comparison 
with the average. A thorough inspection of both 
the inside and outside of a structure will reveal 
evidence of degrees of quality. 

There are many chances for error in selecting the 
proper grade for a residence; such as grading the 
homemaker's housekeeping ability, giving too much 
credit to the landscaping, being influenced by a 
new paint job, or the lack of proper maintenance. 
Always look for quality or the lack of it, and if the 
house happens to be older, try to picture the 
quality it represented when new and grade it as if. 
it were new. Adjustments for condition will be 
made through application of depreciation. 



% 



GOOD to indicate that the dwelling 
definitely exhibits an above ordinary standard 
of maintenance and upkeep in relation to its 
age. 

EXCELLENT to indicate that the dwelling 
exhibits an outstanding standard of 



Grading would be a relatively simple process if all 
houses were built to conform to the base 
specifications. Since this ideal condition docs nt)t 
exist, it becomes necessary to further refine the 
grading system. It is not unusual for conventional 
houses to be built incorporating construction 
qualities that fall in between the specifications of 
these established grades. If the house that is being 



08/01/89 



33-13 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



appraised does not fall exactly in a specific grade, 
the grade designation should be adjusted as 
deemed necessary by the use of the GRADE 
VARIATION. 

GRADE - This manual has eight basic grades of 
residences. Enter the grade of the structure from 
"1" to "8", inclusive. 



1 


CHEAP 


2 


POOR 


3 


LOW COST 


4 


FAIR 


5 


AVERAGE 


6 


GOOD 


7 


VERY GOOD 


8 


EXCELLENT 



The basic grade, representing costs of construction 
with average quality of workmanship and materials 
involved, is designated as Grade 5. 

For mobile homes a separate grading system has 
been devised. The following grades and codes 
must be utilized for mobile homes. 



L 
A 
G 
E 



LOW COST 

AVERAGE 

GOOD 

EXCELLENT 



accumulated total value of the dwelling (after 
applying the grade factor) for the cost and/or 
design factors not previously considered. 

If no COST AND DESIGN FACTOR is to be 
applied to this dwelling, leave the fields blank. 

AC Additional costs not covered by grade 

assignment. 
AS Architectural style adjustment. 

ED Envelope dwelling construction 

adjustment. 
EW Exterior wall material inconsistent with 

overall grade. 
GD Geodesic dome construction adjustment. 

IF Interior finish inconsistent with overall 

grade. 
LD Log dwelling construction adjustment. 

MS Mechanical system inconsistent with 

overall grade. 
RM Roof material inconsistent with overall 

grade. 



575 FLAT ADD COSTS RES S6 

Optional 
Costs that are included in this field will be 
depreciated. The trending and Economic 
Condition Factor fields will affect this value for all 
structures. 



(i' 



r 



GRADE VARIATION - 

For the 1982 cycle - Enter the grade variation in 
whole percent, right-justified. Place the "+" or "-" 
sign in the left most position. It is not advisable 
to "plus" or "minus" a grade by more than 15%; 
however, it may be necessary to plus a grade 8 
residence by 20% or more to realistically reflect its 
quality, and to minus a grade 1 residence by more 
than 20% for the same reason. If no grade 
variation is to be applied, leave this field blank. 

For the 1987 cycle ■ Only a GRADE VARIATION 
of "+" or "-" will be utilized, no percent adjustment 
is permitted. 



574 



RES S6 



COST AND DESIGN FACTOR 

Optional 
Enter the code that best describes the COST AND 
DESIGN FACTOR. A position is provided to 
enter a plus "+" or minus "-" symbol, and two 
positions to enter two numeric characters denoting 
a percentage to be added to or deducted from the 



Enter the total cost of all extra features in the 
principal building that would not be automatically 
covered by the standard cost and grade schedules 
for features enumerated in Items 501 through 574. 
Costs considered must be the excess over and above 
the usual costs for the grade and subtractions from 
the usual costs for the grade. Make sure to enter 
the "+" or "-" symbol for any fiat add costs. 
Include in the NOTES (fields 481-483) a 
description of the FLAT ADD COST items. 

If there are no FLAT ADD COSTS, leave this 
field blank. 



576 CDU (Condition - Desirability - Usefulness) 

RES 56 

Required entry for dwelling and mobile 

homes. 
This field is used in the depreciation of the 
structure. Enter the code denoting the composite 
rating of the overall condition, desirability, and 
usefulness of the dwelling. 



(: 



33-14 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



1 



UN UNSOUND to indicate that the dwelling is 
definitely unsound and practically unfit for 
use. 

VP VERY POOR to indicate that the condition 
approaches unsoundness; extremely 
undesirable and barely usable. 

PR POOR to indicate definite deterioration is 
obvious; definitely undesirable and barely 
usable. 

FR FAIR to indicate marked deterioration, but 
quite usable; rather unattractive and 
undesirable. 

AV AVERAGE to indicate normal "wear and 
tear" is apparent; average attractiveness and 
desirability. 

GD GOOD to indicate minor deterioration is 

visible; slightly more attractive and desirable, 
but useful. 

VG VERY GOOD to indicate slight evidence of 
deterioration; attractive and quite desirable. 

EX EXCELLENT to indicate perfect condition; 
very attractive and highly desirable. 



577 PERCENT COMPLETE RES S6 

Optional 
Use only if a new dwelling is partially completed to 
indicate percentage of completion as of the 
General Assessment Day. Do not consider 
remodeling, additions or older improvements with 
unfinished areas. Enter the percent complete in 
whole percent, right-justified. 

Refer to the Percent Complete table in the 
Appendix of this Section, for estimating unfinished 
construction. 

If dwelling is complete, leave this field blank. 



581 FLOOR AREAS BY LEVEL RES S6 

Optional 
Required entry when no sketch vectors are used. 

For pricing of the structure, areas must be 
calculated by fioor level. If the dwelling areas are 
sketched, the areas for this field will be 
automatically calculated by computer programs in 



conjunction with the dwelling story height code, 
basement code, attic code and addition codes. 

Manually entered values may be overridden by the 
computer generated areas from the Sketch Vector 
program. The person entering the sketch information 
will be asked if the current areas are to be 
overridden. 

There may be instances, due to the complexity of 
the structure, where the dwelling may not be able 
to be sketched. In these cases, one must enter the 
appropriate areas by floor level in these fields. 

BASEMENT AREA - enter the total basement 
area, regardless of whether the area is finished or 
unfinished. 



FIRST FLOOR AREA 
area of the dwelling. 



enter the total first floor 



SECOND FLOOR AREA 
floor area of the dwelling. 



enter the total second 



ADDITIONAL FLOOR AREA - enter the total 
area of the upper floors of the dwelling. 

HALF STORY FLOOR AREA - enter the total 
area of the half story of the dwelling. Use the 
"foot print" area of the floor below the half story 
for the area to be entered. 

ATTIC AREA - enter the total area of the attic of 
the dwelling. Use the "foot print" area of the floor 
below the attic for the area to be entered. 



582 UNFINISHED FLOOR AREAS BY LEVEL 

Optional RES S6 

Required entry when there is unfinished area in 
the dwelling. 

SECOND FLOOR AREA - enter the unfinished 
second floor area of the dwelling. 

ADDITIONAL FLOOR AREA - enter the 
unfinished area of the upper floors of the dwelling. 

HALF STORY FLOOR AREA - enter the 
unfinished area of the half story of the dwelling. 

ATTIC AREA - enter the unfinished area of the 
attic of the dwelling. 



08/01/89 



33-15 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



599 DELETE: ADDITIONS RES GPD 

Optional 
This is a computer file maintenance entry and 
normally will not be utilized on the field card. 
The purpose of the delete is to remove all data 
previously entered in the computer for fields 601 - 
608. This function is initiated by selecting option 
"06" from the On-Line Menu of the Residential 
sub-system. 



601-608 ADDITIONS RES S7 

Optional 
Enter the Addition Code that describes the area of 
the dwelling. The same Addition Code may be 
entered any number of times. Space is provided 
for eight separate entries of additions. Enter the 
appropriate Addition code in the column that 
corresponds with its floor level; either LWR (lower 
level or basement), 1ST, 2ND, or 3RD (any floor 
above 2nd floor). Refer to the Table of Addition 
Codes. 

If no additions are present, leave the entries blank. 

Normally, leave the AREA column blank because 
the area of the Addition will be calculated and 
entered in the field by the Sketch Vector program. 
Consult the Sketch Vectoring instructions in 
Section 35 for specific guidelines on how to sketch 
Additions. 



If the dwelling cannot be sketch vectored and 
therefore no data is entered in SKETCH VECTOR 
fields (651 to 658), both the field FLOOR AREAS 
BY LEVEL (581) and the AREA column of each 
ADDITION line (601 to 608) used must be 
entered. 

In cases where there is a stacked addition with an 
identical floor area for each level (for example, a 2 
story, open frame porch), enter the Addition Code 
for open frame porch (11) in both the 1ST and 
2ND column for that addition. 

In the rare case where there are more than eight 
additions on a dwelling, one must enter a manually 
calculated point total of all the additions not 
previously entered. First, enter the Addition Code 
"99", Miscellaneous Value, in the LWR column of 
field 608. Then, enter the manually calculated 
total points of the remaining Additions not 
entered, in the AREA column of this line. No 
other information should be entered in the 
remaining areas of this line. Each value point is 
equal to $100. 



r 



(^ 



€ 



33-16 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



TABLE OF ADDITION CODES 

The following are the valid Addition Codes and the corresponding abbreviations. 



Addition Tvpe 




Finished 
Frame Masonry 


Unfinished 
Frame Masonry 


Living Area 




10 ISF 


20 ISM 




Utility Area 
Bay Window 
Overhang/Oriel Window 


15 UTF 

16 BAYF 
66 OVHF 


25 UTM 

26 BAYM 
76 OVHM 


65 UTFU 75 UTMU 


Half Story 
Attic 




17 HSF 

18 AF 


27 HSM 


68 AU 


Garage 
Carport 
Garage Extension 




19 GRF 

30 CPF 

31 GREF 


29 GRM 

40 CPM 

41 GREM 


69 GRFU 79 GRMU 
80 CPU 


Canopy 




32 CANF 




82 CANU 


Attached Greenhouse 


37 AGH 






Basement 








50 BU 


Mobile Home Addition 
Expandos and Tipouts 


91 MHA 

92 MET 







Addition Tvpe 


Frame 


Masonry 


Open Porch 


11 OPF 


21 OPM 


Screened Porch 


12 SPF 


22 SPM 


Enclosed Porch 


14 EPF 


24 EPM 


Decks/Patios/Terraces 






Wood 


33 D-WD 




Concrete 


34 D-CO 




Stone Tile 


35 D-ST 




Masonry Stoop 


36 D-MS 




Ornamental Brick Trim 


85 OBT 




Solar Collector Area 


97 SCA 





Miscellaneous Value 



99 MV 



08/01/89 



33-17 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Examples 3 and 4 show how Addition Codes are 
used and entered. 



Example 3: 

Subject dwelling has an attached, 180 square foot, open 
frame porch over an enclosed frame porch, and a 440 
square foot attached frame garage. 



ATT 



CD 



LWR 1 ST 



2ND 



3RD AREA 



601 -A 
602-B 



A1 
A2 



14 
19 



11 



**** 



NOTE: The areas will be calculated by the Sketch Vector 
program. 



Example 4: 

Subject dwelling has the following additions: 

• 120 square foot open frame porch 

• 60 square foot open frame porch 

• 40 square foot open frame porch over 
60 square foot enclosed frame porch 

NOTE: Two entries will be necessary because the 
areas are different for the two porches. 

240 square foot greenhouse 
350 square foot frame living area 
300 square foot frame garage 

80 square foot garage extension 

50 square foot canopy 

ATT CD LWR 1ST 2ND 3RD AREA 



**** 
**** 
**** 
**** 
**** 

12 



NOTE: Since the number of Addition entries exceeds 
eight, it was necessary to utilize the numeric code '99" 
- Miscellaneous Value - and to manually calculate the 
point total of the garage extension and the canopy. 
For the remaining entries, the areas will be calculated 
by the Sketch Vector program. 



This part provides guidelines for collecting and 
recording additional structures or site 
improvements not a part of the dwelling. 



601 -A 


A1 




11 


602-B 


A2 




11 


603-C 


A3 




14 


604-D 


A4 




11 


605-E 


A5 




37 


606-F 


A6 




10 


607-G 


A7 




19 


608-H 


A8 


99 





699 DELETE: OBY RES GPD 

Optional 
This is a computer file maintenance entry and 
normally will not be utilized on the field card. 
The purpose of the delete is to remove all data 
previously entered in the computer for fields 701- 
711. This function is initiated by selecting option 
"06" from the On-Line Menu of the Residential 
sub-system. 



701-706 OTHER BUILDING & YARD 

IMPROVEMENTS RES S8 

Optional 
OBY TYPE CODES - Enter the Type Code that 
describes the improvement to be entered. A table 
of valid OBY codes follows the discussion of the 
OBY entries. 

The OBY Type Code refers to a category of 
improvements such as pools, barns, etc., and 
therefore, stands for the overall improvement itself 
and is made up of three parts. 

• The first character stands for the overall 
property identifier describing the OBY 
Improvement. 

• The second character stands for the structural 
category of the OBY Improvement. 

• The third character is numeric, which 
distinguishes one type of OBY Improvement 
from another within the same category. 

Several examples are listed below. 



r 



c 



OBY 








Type 


1st Char. 


2nd Char. 


3rd Char. 


Code 


Meanini; 


Meanini; 


Meaninu 


RGl 


Residential 


Garage 


Frame or 
CB 


RG2 


Residential 


Garage 


Brick or 
Stone 


AMI 


Agricultural 


Milk House 


Concrete 
Block 


AM2 


Agricultural 


Milk House 


Glazed 
Tile 



^ 



33-18 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



QUANTITY - Enter the number or quantity of 
totally identical OBY Improvements being listed. 

YEAR - Enter the year the OBY Improvement 
was constructed. Enter only the last two digits. If 
built prior to 1900, enter "00." If the year built is 
unknown, make the best estimate possible. 

SIZE - Enter either the square foot area, the 
dimensions, or the volume of the item based on 
the appropriate cost schedules. 

To enter the square foot area, positions are 
provided for six numeric characters (up to 999,999 
square feet). The square footage or volume should 
be right-justified. If necessary, enter leading zeros. 

To enter the dimensions, positions are provided to 
enter six characters: two numeric characters 
denoting either the width or diameter, a 
multiplication symbol (X), and three numeric 
characters denoting the length or height of the 
item. The multiplication symbol must always be 
entered in the third character position from the 
left (within the two vertical hash marks). All 
character positions must be filled in. Use leading 
zeros if necessary. 

GRADE - Enter the code denoting the quality 
grade of the item. If a quality grade is not 
applicable to the item, leave the field blank. 



CONDITION - Enter the code that identifies the 
overall condition of the improvement. 



U 



Residential 




Structures 


Description 


1 


Cheap 


2 


Poor 


3 


Low Cost 


4 


Fair 


5 


Average 


6 


Good 


7 


Very Good 


8 


Excellent 


Agricultural 


• 


Structures 


Description 


C 


Cheap 


L 


Low Cost 


A 


Average 


G 


Good 


E 


Excellent 



UNSOUND to indicate that the dwelling is 
definitely unsound and practically unfit for 



use. 



P POOR to indicate definite deterioration is 
obvious; definitely undesirable and barely 
usable. 

F FAIR to indicate marked deterioration, but 
quite usable; rather unattractive and 
undesirable. 

A AVERAGE to indicate normal "wear and 
tear" is apparent; average attractiveness and 
desirability. 

G GOOD to indicate minor deterioration is 

visible; slightly more attractive and desirable, 
but useful. 

E EXCELLENT to indicate perfect condition; 
very attractive and highly desirable. 

RATE - This is a calculated field ... refers to the 
unit value which when multiplied with the size is 
the base value, replacement cost new. 

INDEX - This is a calculated field ... refers to the 
factor which when multiplied with the replacement 
cost new less depreciation value is the value of the 
improvement. 

PERCENT GOOD - Optional entry. 

Refers to the resultant value (percent good) after 
deduction of physical depreciation and functional 
and/or economic obsolescence - expressed as a 
percentage. 

This is not a required entry. OBY Improvements 
are computer-priced and computer-depreciated. If 
this entry is used, it will function as an override to 
the computer generated depreciation and therefore 
the value of the improvement. 



08/01/89 



33-19 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



MODIFICATION CODES - Optional entry. 

Refers to an addition or deduction made to alter 
the cost component of the improvement from the 
base specifications. Modification Codes are 
identified by a numeric character and should only 
be utilized for the specific structure(s) intended. 
Enter left -justified. Up to four modification codes 
are allowed per OBY improvement. The valid 
MODIFICATION CODES are listed for each OBY 
TYPE CODE in the Residential Other Building & 
Yard Improvements table. 

FLAT VALUE - Optional entry. 



specifications. Special modifications are identified 
by a three-character code (as are the OBY 
improvements). The difference in using SPECIAL 
MODIFICATION CODES as opposed to regular 
MODIFICATION CODES is that a SPECIAL 
MODIFICATION CODE requires a separate line 
entry immediately below the OBY Type Code 
being modified. Other items necessary to describe 
the special modification must also be entered to 
allow for proper processing of the modification to 
an indication of value. The valid SPECIAL 
MODIFICATION CODES are listed for each OBY 
TYPE CODE in the Residential Other Building & 
Yard Improvements table. 



r 



This is not a required entry. OBY Improvements 
are computer-priced and computer-depreciated. If 
this entry is used, it will function as an override to 
the computer generated value of the improvement. 

SPECIAL MODIFICATION CODES - Optional 

entry 

Refers to a special modification made to alter the 
cost component of the improvement from the base 



NOTE: Special Modification Codes should only 
be utilized for the specific OBY 
improvement intended. 

RCNLD - This is a calculated field. It refers to 
replacement cost new less depreciation. 

Examples 5, 6, and 7 illustrate the concept of 
OTHER BUILDING & YARD 
IMPROVEMENTS: 



c 



Example 5: OBY Improvements on a Residential parcel. 

• Detached brick finished garage, 22 ft x 24 ft 

• Metal utility shed, 12 ft X 20 ft 

• Reinforced concrete pool 16 ft x 32 ft with electric heating. 



OBY 
CODE 



QUAN 



YEAR 



SIZE 



COND 



RATE 



%GD 



MOO 
CODE 



701 RG2 

702 RS2 

703 RP3 



01 
01 
01 



65 


1 1528 


60 


1 1240 


73 


16|X|032 



A 
A 



Example 6: OBY Improvements on an Agricultural parcel. 

• Barn, 24 ft x 60 ft, with gambrel roof 

• One story, metal poultry house, 24 ft x 200 ft, with a single pitch roof. 



OBY 
CODE 



QUAN 



YEAR 



SIZE 



COND 



RATE 



%GD 



MOD 
CODE 



701 


AB1 


01 


30 


|1|440 


C 


P 


5 


702 


AH1 


01 


35 


24|X|200 


C 


P 


5 



^ 



33-20 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



Example 7: Use of a Special Modification Code. 

• A 100' Concrete Feed Bunk with a full length roof and manual mechanical feeder. 



OBY 
CODE 



QUAN 



YEAR 



SIZE 



COND 



RATE 



%GD 



MOD 
CODE 



701 AF1 01 

702 FF1 01 

703 FF3 01 



87 


1 1100 


88 


1 1100 


88 


_L|ioo 



711 MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS 

Optional RES S8 

Enter the OBY Type Code(s), a maximum of three 
codes may be entered, and the total value of all 
the MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS. The 
value entered should be the total depreciated value 



of all the coded improvements. This field is 
usually used for low cost improvements that are of 
minimal value. 

A maximum amount of S999,999 of depreciated 
value is allowed to be entered. 



Example 8: Four miscellaneous sheds sound valued at $50 each. 
71 1 MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS RSI 200 



800 TOTAL OTHER IMPROVEMENTS 

Optional RES S8 

This field is used to add or deduct a value from 
the Total Improvement Value of the parcel. The 
value entered should be fully depreciated. Only the 
PERCENTAGE OF OWNERSHIP and 
ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR is applied to 
the value entered. 



Enter a narrative description of the value item. 
One character position is provided for entering a 
sign (+ or -) to indicate the type of value 
adjustment. Nine positions are provided to enter 
up to $999,999,999 dollars of depreciated value to 
be added or deducted to the Total Improvement 
Value of the parcel. 



Example 9: Because of its uniqueness, a depreciated value of a golf course Is manually calculated at $650,000 and would be 
entered as follows: 



800 DESCRIPTION: Golf Course [+] TOTAL GROSS VALUE: 650,000 



08/01/89 



33-21 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TABLE OF CODES FOR RESIDENTIAL / AGRICULTURAL OTHER BUILDING & YARD IMPROVEMENTS 



A. RESIDENTIAL 








BOAT HOUSES and DOCKS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 


BBl 
BB2 


Frame or Concrete Block 
Masonry 

Allowable Grades: 


Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

G, A, L 


100 SF 
100 SF 


5,000 SF 
5,000 SF 


BDl 
BD2 
BD3 


Light wood deck, light posts 
Medium wood deck, wood girders 
Heavy wood deck, heavy pilings 


Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 


15 SF 
15 SF 
15 SF 


3,500 SF 
3,500 SF 
3,500 SF 



CARPORTS 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



RCl 


Carport 


RC2 


Canopy 




Allowable Grades: 




Modification Codes: 


DECKS, 


PATIOS, TERRACES 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


RTl 


Deck, wood 


RT2 


Deck, concrete 


RT3 


Deck, stone/tile 




with sand base 


RT4 


Deck, stone/tile 




with concrete base 


RT5 


Deck, brick 


RT6 


Masonry Stoop/Terrace 


RT7 


Patio Covered 


RZl 


Gazebo 


BQl 


Barbecue, outdoor. 




brick/stone 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

3 - 7 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - Electricity 



MEASUREMENT 



150 SF 
10 SF 



MINIMUM 



1,000 SF 
2,500 SF 



MAXIMUM 



Allowable Grades: 



Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


10 SF 


5.000 SF 


Quantity 






G, A, L 







33-22 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



FENCING 
CODE 



DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



RFl 


Chain Link 


RF2 


Picket 


RF3 


Stockade 


RF4 


Post & Rail 


RF5 


Basketweave 


RF6 


Brick or Masonry 


RF7 


Ornamental Iron 


RF8 


Barbed Wire - 4 strand 



Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,0()() SF 


Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,000 SF 


Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,000 SF 


Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,000 SF 


Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,000 SF 


Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,000 SF 


Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,000 SF 


Hgt X Ln.ft. 


10 SF 


20,000 SF 



NOTE: Gates are to be included in the linear foot measurement. 



GARAGES 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



RGl Garage, detached, frame, finished 

RG2 Garage, detached, masonry, finished 

RG3 Garage, detached, frame, unfinished 

RG4 Garage, detached, masonry, unfinished Dim or Sq.ft. 



Dim or Sq.ft. 


150 SF 


5,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


150 SF 


5,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


150 SF 


5,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


150 SF 


5,000 SF 



Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - No Electricity 

3 - Insulation 



1 



4 - Heating 

5 - Electric door opener 



GREENHOUSES 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



GHl Wood frame, plastic covered 

GH2 Wood frame, glass walls 

GH3 Pipe/Metal frame, glass walls 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Code: 
1 - Earth Floor 



Dim or Sq.ft. 


20 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


20 SF 


1,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


20 SF 


1,000 SF 



G, A, L 



PAVING 
CODE 



DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



PAl Asphalt (Blacktop) 

PA2 Concrete 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 



10 SF 
10 SF 



9,999 SF 
9,999 SF 



SHEDS and UTILITY BUILDINGS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



RSI 


Shed, frame 


RS2 


Shed, metal 


RS3 


Shed, masonry 




Allowable Grades: 




Modification Codes: 




1 - Earth floor 




2 - Concrete floor 




3 - Insulation 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

G, A, L 

4 - Heating 

5 - Electricity 



15 SF 
15 SF 
15 SF 



5.000 SF. 
5,000 SF 
5,000 SF 



08/01/89 



33-23 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



SWIMMING POOLS 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 


RPl 


Vinyl-lined 


Dim or Sq.ft. 100 SF 


5,000 SF 


RP2 


Fiberglass 


Dim or Sq.ft. 100 SF 


5,000 SF 


RP3 


Reinforced Concrete 


Dim or Sq.ft. 100 SF 


5,000 SF 


RP4 


Gunite (Sprayed Concrete) 
Modification Codes: 


Dim or Sq.ft. 100 SF 


5,000 SF 




1 - No Filter 


5 - Diving Board 






2 - Gas/Propane Heater 


6 - Chrome/Steel Ladder 






3 - Electric Heater 


7 - Underwater Lighting 






4 - Solar Heating 






HTl 


Hot Tub 


Dim or Sq.ft. 10 SF 


500 SF ' 




Allowable Grades: 


G, A,L 




TENNIS COURTS 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 



TCI Asphalt 

TC2 Concrete 

TC3 Clay 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 
1 - Lighting 

B. AGRICULTURAL 

BANK and STANDARD BARNS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



ABl Bank Barn 

AB2 Standard Barn 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - No lighting 

3 - Stalls & partitions 



r 



Quantity 
Quantity 
Quantity 

G, A, L 

2 - Fencing 



3 
3 
3 



C 



MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMU^ 


Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 


500 SF 
500 SF 


15,000 SF 
15,000 SF 


E, G, A, L, C 






4 - Wood loft floor 

5 - Gambrel/Arched roof 





^ 



33-24 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



CATTLE FEED BUNKS and FENCE BUNKS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



AFl 


Concrete feed bunk 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


5,000 LF 


AF2 


Post & plank bunk 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


5,000 LF 


AF3 


Concrete fence bunk 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


5,000 LF 


AF4 


Post & plank fence bunk 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


5,000 LF 



Allowable Grades: 



G, A, L 



Special Modification Codes 



FFl 


Roof, 10' wide 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


500 LF 


FF2 


Mech feeder, automatic 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


500 LF 


FF3 


Mech feeder, manual 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


500 LF 


FF4 


Concrete apron, 10' wide 


Linear feet 


5 LF 


500 LF 


FF5 


Stock waterer, cattle 


Quantity 






FF6 


Stock waterer, cattle & hog 


Quantity 






FUEL STORAGE TANKS 








CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 


AUl 


Fuel tanks, underground 


Gallons 


100 GL 


10,000 GL 


AU2 


Fuel tanks, aboveground 


Gallons 


100 GL 


15,000 GL 


AU3 


Horizontal pressure tank 
Allowable Grades: 


Gallons 
G, A, L 


100 GL 


10,000 GL 


GRANARIES 








CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 


ARl 


Granary 
Allowable Grades: 


Dim or Sq.ft. 
G, A, L 


100 SF 


5,000 SF 



Modification Codes: 

1 - Wood Storage bin 

2 - Metal wall 

3 - Metal roof 



4 - Wood ventilating duct 

5 - No lighting 

6 - Pier foundation 



HORSE BARN and STABLES 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



ADl Horse Barn or Stable 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - No lighting 

IMPLEMENT SHEDS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


15,000 SF 


E, G, A, L, C 






3 - Insulation 

4 - Heating 






MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMU^ 


Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 
200 SF 


20,000 SF 
20,000 SF 


G, A, L 






4 - Heating 

5 - Enameled steel 







All Shed, wood frame 

AI2 Shed, concrete block 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Concrete floor 

2 - No Electricity 

3 - Insulation 



08/01/89 



33-25 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



LEAN-TO 










CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 


ALl 


1-Story lean-to 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - Lighting 


Dim or Sq.ft. 

G, A, L 

3 - Insulation 


10 SF 


5,000 SF 


MILK HOUSES and MILKING PARLORS 








CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 


AMI 


Milk House, Attached, Concrete block 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


2,000 SF 


AM2 


Milk House, Attached, Glazed tile 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


2,000 SF 


AM3 


Milk House, Detached, Concrete block 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


2,000 SF 


AM4 


Milk House, Detached, Glazed tile 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


2,000 SF 


AM5 


Milking Parlor, Concrete block 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


2,000 SF 


AM6 


Milking Parlor, Glazed tile 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Metal roof 

2 - Wood shingles 


Dim or Sq.ft. 
E, G, A, L 

3 - Composition roof 

4 - No healing 


50 SF 


2,000 SF 


POLE FRAME BUILDINGS 








CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


MEASUREMENT 


MINIMUM 


MAXIMUM 


API 


Four sides closed, metal 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


AP2 


Four sides closed, wood 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


APS 


One side open, metal 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


AP4 


One side open, wood 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


APS 


Four sides open, metal 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


AP6 


Four sides open, wood 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 



Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Concrete floor 

2 - No electricity 

3 - Insulation 



G, A, L 

4 - Wood lining 

5 - Truss roof, span to 50' 

6 - Enameled steel 



POTATO STORAGE 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



AOl Storage, underground 

A02 Storage, aboveground 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Concrete floor 

2 - No lighting 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

G, A, L 

3 - Pole frame 



500 SF 
500 SF 



25,000 SF 
25,000 SF 



33-26 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



POULTRY HOUSES 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



AHl 1-Slory frame or metal 

AH2 2-Story frame or metal 

AH3 3-Story frame or metal 

AH4 1 -Story concrete block 

AH5 2-Story concrete block 

AH6 3-Story concrete block 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - No lighting 

3 - Wood floor 

4 - Heating 

PREFABRICATED STEEL BUILDINGS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


20,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


20,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


20,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


20,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


20,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


50 SF 


20,000 SF 



E, G, A, L 

5 - Single pitch roof 

6 - Insulation, 1st floor 

7 - Insulation, 2nd floor 

8 - Insulation, 3rd floor 



MEASUREMENT MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



AXl Prefab building with vertical walls 

AX2 Prefab building with slant walls 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - No lighting 

3 - Insulation 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

G, A, L 



200 SF 
200 SF 



4 - Heating 

5 - Grain package 

6 - Enameled Steel/Aluminum 



20,000 SF 
20,000 SF 



QUONSET BUILDINGS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



AQl Quonset building 

Allowable Grades: 
Modification Codes: 

1 - Earth floor 

2 - No lighting 

3 - Insulation 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
G, A L 

4 - Heating 

5 - Grain package 



800 SF 



20,000 SF 



SCALES 
CODE 



DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



CAl Scales, platform 

CA2 Scales, truck 

CA3 Scales, cattle 



Capacity 


10,000 LBS 


80,000 LBS 


Capacity 


10,000 LBS 


80,000 LBS 


Capacity 


10,000 LBS 


80,000 LBS 



08/01/89 



33-27 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



SILOS 
CODE 



AKl 



ATI 
AT2 



DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



ASl 


Cone stave, with roof 


Diam x Hgt 


AS2 


Cone stave, without roof 


Diam x Hgt 


AS3 


Butler LMS silo 
(low moisture silo) 


Diam x Hgt 


AS4 


Porcelain silo 


Diam x Hgt 


ASS 


Prefabricated steel silo 


Diam x Hgt 


AS6 


Prefabricated steel, high moisture 


Diam x Hgt 



1,500 BU 

1,500 BU 

1,500 BU 

3,000 BU 

1,500 BU 

1,500 BU 



Modification Codes: 

1 - 17' auto unloader 

2 - 20' auto unloader 

3 - 25' auto unloader 

Bunker silo 

Allowable Grades: 

Trench, cone or plank 
Trench, dirt 

Modification Codes: 

1 - 20 ft. wide 

2 - 40 ft. wide 

3 - 50 ft. wide 



SLURRY SYSTEMS 
CODE DESCRIPTION 



4 - 17' raised arm auger 

5 - 20' raised arm auger 

6 - 25' raised arm auger 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



AYl Circular system 

AY2 Rectangular system 

Allowable Grades: 

STEEL BINS 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



Gallons 
Gallons 



20,000 
20,000 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



AGl 
AG2 

AG3 



Grain bins, with out drying bin 
Grain bins, with drying bin 

Steel hopper bins 

Allowable Grades: 



MAXIMUM 



75,000 BU 

75,000 BU 

100,000 BU 

200,000 BU 
100,000 BU 
100,000 BU 



Hgt X LF 


10 SF 


3,000 SF 


G, A, L 






Depth X LF 
Depth X LF 


10 LF 
10 LF 


3,000 LF 
3,000 LF 


4 - 60 ft. wide 

5 - 80 ft. wide 







r 



MAXIMUM 



500,000 
500,000 



MAXIMUM 



Diam x Hgt 
Diam x Hgt 


500 BU 
500 BU 


275,000 BU 
275,000 BU 


Diam x Hgt 


400 BU 


275,000 BU 


G, A, L 







^ 



33-28 



08/01/89 



33. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL IMPROVEMENTS 



SWINE BARNS 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



MEASUREMENT 



MINIMUM 



MAXIMUM 



AWl Swine farrowing barn 

AW2 Swine finishing barn 

AW3 Swine confinement barn 





Allowable Grades: 




Modification Codes: 




1 - 25% cone pit area 


Special 


Modification Codes 


FWl 


Wood Pens 


FW2 


Steel Pens 


FW3 


Fans 


FW4 


Waterers 


FW5 


Feeders 


FW6 


Stalls 



Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


200 SF 


20,000 SF 


E, G, A, L, C 







2 - 100% cone pit area 



Linear feet 
Linear feet 
Quantity 
Quantity 
Linear feet 
Quantity 



08/01/89 



33-29 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



P 



C 



• ^ 



33-30 08/01/89 



o2 



i 



o 



( > 



c 



APPENDIX 33 



A33.1. STORY HEIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS 




1 Story: All rooms are on one floor and are 
below the square of house at the eave line. This 
design usually has a low pitch roof with a slope of 
about 1/6. 




1 Story and Finished Attic with Wall Height: 

Same basic design as one story and finished attic, 
except for the addition of two or three small 
dormers. The usable attic floor area is about 55 % 
of the first floor area. 




I Story and Attic: Same basic design as 1 Story, 
except the pitch of the roof is usually greater, with 
a slope of about 1/4 or 1/3. This design has a 
permanent stairway to a usable, floored attic area 
which is approximately 20% of the first floor area. 
There are usually windows at each end of the attic. 




1 Story and Finished Attic Same basic design as 1 
Story and Attic, except the attic interior is finished 
and is usually divided into rooms. The attic floor 
area is approximately 40% of the first floor area. 




1^2 Story: This design is similar to 1 Story and 
Finished Attic, except that the roof pitch is greater 
- with a slope of about 1/3 or 1/2 - and there is a 
large dormer on one side of the roof and possibly 
one or two small dormers on the opposite side of 
the roof. Area of the finished second floor is 
approximately 75% of the first floor area. 




IVi Story: This design has a high pitch roof with a 
slope of about 5/8 or 3/4, and small dormers on 
one or both sides of the roof. The area of the 
finished second floor is approximately 75% of the 
first floor area. 



08/01/89 



A33-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 




2 Story: This is a typical two story dwelling, with 
the second floor area equal to the Hrst floor area. 




2 Story: Similar to the other 2 Story example, 
except that the second floor side walls are less than 
full height. Consequently, part of the second floor 
ceiling follows the slope of the roof. 








IVi Story: This design has two full stories and a 
half story similar to any of the three 1'/: Story 
examples. 



A33-2 



08/01 89 



APPENDIX 33 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES 



BI-LEVEL 





BI-LEVEL - (SPLIT FOYER, SPLIT ENTRY, RAISED RANCH, HILLSIDE RANCH, PENTHOUSE) 

A contemporary one story house which provides (or has the potential to be finished to provide) two levels of 
living area. The lower level is either a raised ("true" or "English") basement which protrudes about four feet 
above grade or a "walkout" type basement which has one side exposed at grade level when the house is built 
into a hillside. The Split Foyer or Split Entry has the front door at ground level halfway between the raised 
basement and first floor. The Raised Ranch or Hillside Ranch typically incorporates a basement garage and/or 
a "walkout" recreation room on the lower level. The Penthouse has the main entrance located on the 
basement level. 



08/01/89 



A33-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



SPLIT LEVEL 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 




CI 




ft 



SPLIT LKVKI. (TUI-LKVKI^ SII)K T()-S1I)K SI'IJT, KRON l-TO-HACK SIM-IT, HACK-T()-KK()NT SI'III) 

A contemporary house with three basic living levels (not counting a basement, if present). Typically, the room 
layout consists of a garage and/or recreation room on the lower level, with the living room about a half llighl 
of stairs up on the middle level. The bedrooms are located on the upper level over the recreation room or 
garage. 



c 



A33-4 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



RANCH 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 





liANCII (liAMBLER, TRUIi RANCH, CALIFORNIA liANCII) A contemporary one story house with all 
habitable rooms and automobile storage located on one level. If a basement is present, it is typically a utility 
or storage type. 



08/01/89 



A33-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



MODERN 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 





o 



MODERN (ULTRA-M0I)P:RN, POST-MODERN) Houses which are innovative or unique in design, use of 
construction methods or materials. These are typically architect designed and built homes which belong in a 
class by themselves. If it can be identified, the specific style should be recorded in the NOTES section. Early 
20th century architectural movements in this category include the Prairie, International, An Deco, Art 
Moderne, and Miesian schools. Contemporary examples in this class would also include products of recent 
movements such as Brutalism, High Tech, Post Modern, and International Revival. 



e 



A33-6 



Oa/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 



TRADITIONAL or 
VICTORIAN 





TliADITIONAL or VICTORIAN (GOTHIC REVIVAL, CARPENTER GOTHIC, ITALLANTE, OCTAGON, 
RENAISSANCE REVIVAL, STICK, SECOND EMPIRE, HIGH VICTORL\N GOTHIC, QUEEN ANNE, 
EASTLAKE, RICIL\RDSON ROMANESQUE, SHINGLE) A rich and expressive architectural period which 
began around 1840 and continued to 1900. This style of dwelling is typified by asymmetrical shapes and 
silhouettes, often with steep intersecting gable roofs, towers, dormers and bay windows. Vertical emphasis is 
provided by the use of tall chimneys and turrets. Complicated scrollwork (gingerbread) and elaborate turned 
trimmings are prevalent items of decor. 



08/01/89 



A33-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



EARLY AMERICAN 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 








W^ _^«» 


wfm'^Kttm' 1 ^1 ^!RnH 


m ■!=* i^» ^m 


iiufiii 


. J"M 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^^^SiHs^ - .i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^SH^IHH^Hi^^tf^^^M^H 



<» 



EARLY AMERICAN (COLONIAL, GARRISON COLONIAL, SALTBOX, GEORGIAN, FEDERAI^ DUTCH 
COLONIAL, SOUTHERN COLONIAL, JEFFERSONUN, GREEK REVIVAL, GEORGL\N REVIVAL, 
COLONIAL REVIVAL) Almost all pre-Civil War American architecture is generally classified as a type of 
Colonial. This catch-all grouping includes true period homes and contemporary replicas. Although elements 
of this style are a major component of today's contemporary-traditional vernacular, only historically accurate 
examples belong in this category. Thus, most newer homes which contain only traces or idiosyncrasies of 
colonial architecture would not fall in this category. 



^ 



A33-8 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



EARTH SHELTERED 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 





EARTH SHELTERED (UNDERGROUND) A contemporary house built below ground level or into a hillside. 
The roof is covered with earth except for skylights, a clerestory window, or possibly an atrium. 



I 



08/01/89 



A33-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



CONVENTIONAL 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 



o 








Hnnm t-^ i~ii 


n 


^^^^^ urn ^^'^ m9BK 



CONVENTIONAL (CONTEMPORARY, FUNCTIONAL MODERN) Contemporary one to three story houses 
with conservative architecture in the 20lh century vernacular mode. These houses may incorporate elements of 
Traditional, Spanish, Colonial, Elizabethan, or period designs, but they are not true replicas. 



A33-10 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



BUNGALOW 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 





BUNGALOW (CALIFORNIA BUNGALOW, AIRPLANE BUNGALOW, CRAFTSMAN BUNGALOW) 

A picturesque cottage-like house introduced around 1900 and very popular through the 1930's. The informal 
plan, elevation, and detail featured low simple lines, a wide projective gable roof, large porches, a walk-way 
stoop, and rough natural construction materials. Typically a one story residence, however, one and one-half 
story versions may incorporate a low shed dormer. The Airplane Bungalow has a small two story addition in 
the rear. 



I 



08/01/89 



A33-11 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



OLD STfLE 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 




# 




OLD STYLE (TRI-GABLE ELL, UTILITARL\N COTTAGE, AMERICAN FOURSQUARE, FARMHOUSE, 
PRINCt:SS ANNE, SHIRTWAIST) Mid 19th century and early 20th century pattern book vernacular style 
houses which are transitions from the Victorian era or provincial examples of Georgian revivals or picturesque 
English style period homes. 



^ 



A33-12 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



LOG 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 



S»- 




< ". 




LOG This category has exterior walls built of logs, either in round or squared shape. 



I 



08/01/89 



A33-13 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



CONDOMINIUM 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 





CONDOMINIUM This category identifies a distinct type of ownership. The unit living area is owned 
exclusively (fee simple) by the unit owner. The other components; land, common hallways, stairways, roof, 
foundation, and exterior recreation features, such as pools, tennis courts, etc., are owned in common by all unit 
owners. They may be townhouse, hi-rise, or garden apartment in style. 



A33-14 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



A-FRAME 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 





A-FRAME This category has a frame in the shape of one or more "A's". A-Frames have very steep gable 
roofs, front and rear walls usually have large glass areas. A-Frames have been popular since WWII. 



I 



08/01/89 



A33-15 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



OTHER 



A33.2. RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL STYLES (Cont'd) 





tfifjiiini; 



4 








OTHER (SHANIT, BASEMENT FOUNDATION HOME, SOD, QUONSET HUT, GEODESIC DOME, 
PREFABRICATED DYMAXION, CONVERTED BARN, FANTASY, FREEFORM, SILO/YURT KIT HOMES, 
PREFABRICATED MODUI^R) Truly unique or rare architectural examples which do not fall into any 
previously mentioned categories can be indicated as Other. If using this entry, enter a description of the 
STYLE in the NOTES field. 



A33-16 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



1 



I 



A33.3. ROOF TYPE ILLUSTRATIONS 




FLAT 




HIP 




GABLE 




GAMBREL 





'^m^ 



MANSARD 



/5N 




ARCHED 




A - FRAME 




BROKEN GABLE 



08/01/89 



A33-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A33.4. BUILT-IN GARAGE EXAMPLES 

EXAMPLE NO. 1 9 

A one-car garage built into a Z-story frame house. The garage is built under the upper floor living area. 



#1 



15 



1SF 
GRF 



30 



(^2Sf") 24 



AOOITIONS 


AOO 


CD 


LWR 


1ST 


2N0 


3AD 


AREA 




601 A 


Al 





n 


IQ 










8021 


A2 











EXAMPLE NO. 2 

A two-car garage built into the ground floor area of a 2-story frame house and extending beyond the upper 
floor area. 



10 
GREF 


15 

1SF 
GRF 


30 
(2Sf) 



#2 #1 



ADDITIONS 


AOO 


CO 


LWR 


1ST 


2N0 


3R0 


AREA 




SOI A 


Al 





31 


iQ 










6028 


A2 























NOTE: The garage extension code is used for the portion of the garage which extends beyond the main 
dwelling to avoid doubling up on flxed costs associated with the garage structure. 



A33-18 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 33 



A33.4. BUILT-IN GARAGE EXAMPLES (Cont'd) 



EXAMPLE NO. 3 



A two-car garage built partially into a two-story masonry house. The garage is built under upper floor living 
area and has living area to the rear of it. 



I 



#1 





15 




40 

(2Sm) 


30 


18 


15 


ISM 
GRM 

20 *2 


GR 


EM 


25 









AOOITIONS 


AOO 


CO 


LWR 


1ST 


2N0 


3no 


AREA 




601 A 


Al 





yi 
1^ 


20 


— 







602B 


A2 























08/01/89 



A33-19 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A33.5. PERCENT COMPLETE TABLE 

The following percentages indicate approximate portions of the total cost of an average home. They are listed 
in order of usual construction. The percentages are expressed as a whole number. 







WITH 


WITHOUT 




DESCRIPTION 


BASEMENT 


BASEMENT 


1 


Excavation: footings, foundation basement, columns 


11 


8 


2 


Joist, subfloor, floor 


3 


3 


3 


Wall framing (thru top plates) 


7 


7 


4 


Wall sheathing 


4 


4 


5 


Roof framing, ceiling joists, sheathing felt 


8 


9 


6 


Roof cover 


3 


3 


7 


Exterior Felt, Siding, exterior trim, porches, etc. 


7 


7 


8 


Windows, exterior doors 


8 


9 


9 


Exterior prime and paint 


3 


3 


10 


Plumbing - roughed in 


4 


5 


11 


Electric - roughed in 


2 


•> 


12 


Heating - roughed in 


1 


I 


13 


Insulation, walls & ceiling 


1 


1 


14 


Dry wall or plaster 


7 


7 


15 


Interior carpentry 


5 


5 


16 


Interior finish: paint, trim, walkover 


4 


4 


17 


Floor covering 


4 


4 


18 


Cabinets & countertops 


4 


4 


19 


Plumbing - finish 


7 


7 


20 


Electric - finish 


1 


1 


21 


Mechanical/Heating - finish 


5 


5 


22 


Finish hardware 


1 


1 



TOTAL 100% 100% 



A33-20 08/0189 



%) 



I 



^ 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FIELD 

CODE DESCRIPTION 

599 DELETE: COMMERCIAL BUILDING 

600 GENERAL BUILDING DATA 
601-608 BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - 

ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS 

611-618 EXTERIOR DATA 

621-628 INTERIOR DATA 

631-638 APARTMENT DATA 

639 PARKING DATA 

699 DELETE: COMMERCIAL OBY 

701-706 OTHER BUILDING & YARD 

IMPROVEMENTS 





FIELD 






PAGE 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


PAGE 


1 


800 


TOTAL OTHER IMPROVEMENTS 


20 


3 


812 


PERCENT COMPLETE 


24 




820 


MODEL ADJUSTMENTS 


24 


6 


825 


OCCUPANCY OVERRIDE 


24 


10 


830 


VALUATION METHOD 


24 


15 


835 


INCOME YEAR OVERRIDE 


25 


19 


965 


REVIEWER REASON CODE 


25 


19 


868 


GENERAL OWNERSHIP 


25 


19 


869 


LIMITED OWNERSHIP 


25 



19 



CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 



All of the data specifically for Commercial and Industrial improvements is contained in six screens. The 
following list shows the fields in numerical order and describes the data requirements for them. It also shows 
the number of the screen that contains the field. 



There are five distinct divisions to be completed to 
properly enter the characteristics for a 
Commercial/Industrial parcel. 

• General Building Data 

• Building Other Features - Attached 
Improvements 

• Exterior/Interior Data 

• Yard Improvements and Secondary Buildings 

• Valuation Override Fields 

A Commercial/Industrial building is divided into 
sections. Building sections are separated due to 
differing story height or due to major differences in 
type and quality of construction. A section can 
share a common wall or part of a common wall 
with another section or several sections, but 
otherwise could stand alone as a separate building. 

Building sections are divided into Exterior/Interior 
lines. An Exterior/Interior line is defined as that 
portion of a building section having all identical 
characteristics (except From - To) found on an 
Exterior/Interior Data line. In other words, an 
Exterior/Interior line consists of those stories in a 
building section that have the following identical 
characteristics: 



Dimensions (width x length or square feet) 

Perimeter 

Use Type Code 

Wall Height 

Exterior Wall Material 

Construction Type 

Interior Finish Percent 

Partitions 

Heating System Type 

Air Conditioning Type 

Plumbing 

Physical Condition 

Functional Utility 



599 DELETE: COMMERCLVL BUILDING 

Optional COM GPD 

This is a computer file maintenance entry and 
normally will not be utilized on the field curd. 
The purpose of the delete is to remove all data 
previously entered in the computer for Commercial 
fields 600-628. This function is initiated by 
selecting option "06" from the On-Line Menu of 
the Commercial subsystem. 



08/01/89 



34-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



SAMPLE PROPERTY RECORD CARD 

(Back of Commercial Card) 



S|3|5|5|5lil=l5 



H 



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Ill:} 



il SNU 



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ii r^ 



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s 1? 



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i i s i 



3 3 3 S 



1? I . i. 



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^1 i^i I 



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hill 



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i 



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^•iJlii: 






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ijstriji;? 



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TrmTTTT 







34-2 



oe/oi/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



600 GENERAL BUILDING DATA COM S5 

Required entry for building. 
The information for the GENERAL BUILDING 
DATA fields must be completed for every major 
building structure type. Every sub-field is a 
required entry if a building is listed. 

BUILDING NUMBER - Enter a 2-digit number 
denoting the "building number" being described. 
BUILDING NUMBERS should begin with 01, and 
be sequentially assigned. The BUILDING 
NUMBER is a descriptive field to aid in the 
identification of individual buildings on a multi- 
building parcel. 

YEAR BUILT - Enter the year in which the 
building listed was built. If the owner or tenant 
does not know the actual year, enter your best 
estimate possible, based on known years of similar 
properties in the immediate locality. A year built 
MUST be entered for each structure. 

YEAR REMODELED - Enter the last two digits 
of the year remodeled. This information is 
descriptive only. Adjustments to depreciation are 
affected only through the use of the EFFECTIVE 
YEAR field. 

EFFECTIVE YEAR - Enter the effective year to 
be used as an override to the year built in 
determining the "percent good" depreciation factor 
for the building listed. 

NUMBER OF UNITS - Enter the number of 
measurable units applicable for the building 
structure coded. The following are examples of 
BUILDING STRUCTURE TYPES and the types 
of UNITS to be counted. 



Struc. 

Type Struc. 

Code Type 



Measurable 
Units 



Struc. 






Type 


Struc. 


Measurable 


Code 


Type 


Units 


211 


Apartment, Garden 


Number of Living 
Units 


212 


Apartment, High 


Number of Living 




Rise 


Units 


314 


Hotel/Motel, High 
Rise 


Number of Rooms 


315 


Hotel/Motel, Low 
Rise 


Number of Rooms 


316 


Nursing Home 


Number of Beds 


318 


Boarding/Rooming 
House 


Number of Rooms 


336 


Car Wash, Manual 


Number of Bays 



337 Car Wash, Automatic 

338 Parking Garage/Deck 
364 Motion Picture 

Theatre 

381 Bowling Alley 

385 Tennis Club, Indoor 

386 Racquet Club, Indoor 
396 Mini Warehouse 

640 Hospital 



Number of Bays 
Number of Cars 
Number of Seats 

Number of Lanes 
Number of Courts 
Number of Courts 
Number of 
Rentable Units 
Number of Beds 



NOTE: For apartments and motels, the 

number of units will be used in selecting and 
applying the appropriate building area cost 
computations. 

STRUCTURE TYPE CODE - Enter the code 
which describes the purpose of the building as a 
whole. See the following pages for a table of the 
three-digit numeric codes which should be used. 

NOTE: When a building section has been 
constructed for multiple purposes, use the 
STRUCTURE TYPE CODE that describes 
the predominate use of the building section. 

GRADE - Enter the appropriate GRADE of the 
Structure. A plus ( + ) or a minus (-) sign, 
denoting a deviation from the base GRADE but 
still considered within the overall range of the 
GRADE, may be entered following the GRADE. 



Grade 



Description 



L 


LOW COST 


F 


FAIR 


A 


AVERAGE 


G 


GOOD 


V 


VERY GOOD 


E 


EXCELLENT 



NUMBER OF IDENTICAL UNITS - Enter the 
total number of identical building units. The 
characteristics of each building, including 
Exterior/Interior lines and Building Other Features, 
must be exactly identical. 



08/01/89 



34-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TABLE OF STRUCTURE TYPE CODES 



RESIDENTIAL 



Living Oriented 

Residential. One Family 101 

Residential, Two Family 102 

Residential, Three Family 103 

Residential, Four Family 104 

Mixed Res/Comm (built as Residential) 105 

Condominium (common element) 106 

Condominium (fee simple) 107 

Condominium (time share) 108 



Apartments 

Apartment, Garden (3 story & less) 211 

Apartment, High Rise 212 

Townhouse/Rowhouse 213 



COMMERCIAL 



Accommodations 

Hotel/Motel, High Rise (5 stories 

and up) 314 

Hotel/Motel, Low Rise (1 to 4 stories) 315 

Nursing Home 316 

Boarding or Rooming House 318 

Mixed Res/Comm (built as Commercial) 319 

Food and Beverage 

Restaurant 321 

Fast Food 325 

Bar or Lounge 327 

Night Club/Dinner Theatre 328 

Automobile Oriented 

Auto Dealer, Full Service 331 

Auto/Equipment Service Garage 332 

Service Station (full service) 333 

Service Station (self service) 334 

Truck Stop 335 

Car Wash (manual) 336 

Car Wash (automatic) 337 

Parking Garage/Deck 338 



Retail 

Super Regional Shopping Mall 
Regional Shopping Mall 
Community Shopping Center 
Neighborhood Shopping Center 
Strip Shopping Center 
Discount Department Store 
Department Store 
Supermarket 
Convenience Food Market 

Office/Bank 

Medical Office Building 

Drive-up Bank 

Bank 

Savings Institution 

Office Building, Low Rise 

(1 to 4 stories) 
Office Building, High Rise 

(5 stories and up) 
Office Condominium 
Retail Condominium 

Miscellaneous 
Funeral Home 
Veterinary Clinic 
Legitimate Theatre 
Motion Picture Theatre 
Cinema/Theatre 
Social or Fraternal Hall 
Hangar 
Day Care Center 



340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 



349 
350 
351 
352 

353 

354 
355 
356 



361 

362 
363 
364 
365 
367 
368 
369 



34-4 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



TABLE OF STRUCTURE TYPE CODES (Cont'd) 
COMMERCIAL (Cont'd) 



Multi-Purpose 




Sport and Health 




Downtown Row Type 


371 


Bowling Alley 


381 


Retail - Single Occupancy 


373 


Skating Rink 


382 


Retail - Multi Occupancy 


374 


Health Spa 


383 


Retail - Drive-Up 


375 


Swimming Pool, Indoor 


384 






Tennis Club, Indoor 


385 


Storaqe 




Racquet Club, Indoor 


386 


Cold Storage Facility 


391 


Country Club 


387 


Lumber Storage 


392 


Club House 


388 


Truck Terminal 


395 


Country Club with Golf Course 


389 


Mini Warehouse 


396 






Office/Warehouse 


397 






Warehouse 


398 






Warehouse, Prefab 


399 







Manufacturing & Processing 



INDUSTRIAL 

401 Research & Development 



405 



INSTITUTIONAL and SPECIAL PURPOSE BUILDINGS 



Recreational & Health 



Library 

School 

College or University 

Dormitories 

Churches 

Auditorium 

Hospital 

Post Office 

Police or Fire Station 

Correctional Facilities 

Cultural Facility 

Rail/Bus/Air Terminal 



610 
611 
612 
613 
614 
620 
640 
650 
660 
670 
680 
690 



Communication 

Telephone Equip Building 710 

Telephone Service Garage 715 

Radio/TV Transmit Building 720 

Radio, TV or Motion Picture Studio 725 



08/01/89 



34-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



601-608 BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - 
ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS 

Optional COM 35 

There are numerous types of BUILDING 
OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED 
IMPROVEMENTS which may be encountered on 
commercial and industrial properties. The most 
common of these have been provided for. The 
inclusion of all possible items is considered 
impractical, however, the ability to collect data on 
uncoded items has been provided for. In this 
situation the data collector should enter the BOF 
code MSI (miscellaneous structure) and enter a 
Hat dollar amount in the measurement 1 column. 



the Exterior/Interior line. For the 
following BOFs the Exterior/Interior line 
number should always correspond with 
the first floor of the building section: 

All Elevators 
All Escalators 
All Store Fronts 

BOF CODES - Enter the code that best describes 
the type of BUILDING OTHER FEATURE 
being described. See the Table of Codes and 
Measurements for Building Other Features and 
Attached Improvements. 



G 



LINE NUMBER - Enter the number (1 to 8) 
denoting the 'ExteriorAnterior line number" where 
the BUILDING OTHER FEATURE being 
described is located. The Exterior/Interior line 
number equates to the following field code 
numbers. 



FLAT VALUE (+ or -) - Space is provided to 
enter a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to denote the 
addition or deduction of a fiat dollar amount 
which would then be entered in the Measurement 
1 column. If the fiat value field is not utilized, 
this entry must be left blank. 



1 = 611 

2 = 612 



3 = 613 

4 = 614 



5 = 615 

6 = 616 



7 = 617 

8 = 618 



NOTE: It is extremely important to enter the 
correct Exterior/Interior line number in 
which the BUILDING OTHER 
FEATURE is located because the BOF 
will be depreciated in the same manner as 



MEASUREMENT 1/MEASUREMENT 2 - Space 
is provided to enter the appropriate 
measurements of the structure code being 
described. Use the character positions to the 
right. 



NUMBER IDENTICAL UNITS 
number of identical BOFs. 



Enter the total 



G 



TABLE OF CODES AND MEASUREMENTS FOR 
BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS 



BOF Description 



Code 



Measure 1 Measure 2 



# Units 



Air Conditioning, central 
Air Conditioning, unit 



ACl 
AC2 



Sq.ft. 



Each 



Aerial Walkway 
Atrium, cover only 
Atrium, walls 



AWl 

ATI 

AT2 



Width 
Width 
Ln.ft. 



Length 
Length 
Height 



Balcony 



BAl 



Width 



Length 



Bank Drive-In, canopy 
Bank Drive-In, teller booth 
Bank Drive-In, window 
Bank Night Deposit Chute 
Bank Pneumatic Tubes 
Bank Service Window 



BCl 


Width 


BC2 


Width 


BC3 




BE6 




BEO 


Ln.ft. 


BE8 





Length 
Length 



Each 
Each 

Each 



G 



34-6 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



TABLE OF CODES AND MEASUREMENTS FOR 
BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS (Cont'd) 



BOF Description 



Code 


Measure 1 


Measure 2 


# Ur 


BEl 


Width 


Length 




BE2 


Width 


Length 




BE3 






Each 


BE4 






Each 


BE5 






Each 


BTl 


Width 


Length 




BIl[l] 


Value 


1 




CFl 


Sq.ft. 


1 




CF2 


Sq.ft. 


1 




CF3 


Sq.ft. 


1 




CP5 


Width 


Length 




CP6 


Width 


Length 




CP7 


Width 


Length 




CRl 


Width 


Length 




CR2 


Width 


Length 




CR3 


Width 


Length 




RCl 


Width 


Length 




CMl 


Width 


Length 




CWl 


Length 






DHl 


Width 


Length 




ELI 


Capacity[2] 


Stop/Speed [3] 


Each 


EL2 


Capacity 


Stop/Speed 


Each 


EL3 


Capacity 


Stop/Speed 


Each 


EL4 


Capacity 


Stop/Speed 


Each 


EL5 


Ft Rise [4] 


1 


Each 


EL6 


Ft Rise 


1 


Each 


EEl 


Width 


Length 




FU 






Each 


FI2 






Each 


FI3 






Each 



Bank Vault, money, no door 
Bank Vault, record storage, no door 
Bank Vault Door, money, circular shape 
Bank Vault Door, money, rectangular shape 
Bank Vault Door, record storage only 

Basement Top 

Built-in 

Cooler, chiller 
Cooler, freezer 
Cooler, sharp freeze 

Canopy Roof, low cost 
Canopy Roof, average 
Canopy Roof, good 

Computer Room Floor 

Computer Room Air Control 

Computer Room Fire Suppression Equipment 

Carport 

Covered Mall 

Craneways 

Dock Level Floor 

Elevator - Electric Freight 
Elevator - Electric Passenger 
Elevator - Hydraulic Freight 
Elevator - Hydraulic Passenger 

Escalator, stair width 32" 
Escalator, stair width 48" 

Enclosed Entry 

Fireplace with 1 opening 
Fireplace with 2 openings 
Fireplace with 3 openings 



[I] FLAT VALUE (+/-) must be entered. 

[2] Elevator Capacity - enter capacity in pounds. 

[3] Elevator Slop/Speed - enter the number of stops in the first 2 positions and the speed (ft/min) in the last 4 

positions of Measure #2. 
[4] Escalators - enter the distance, in feet, between floors in Measure #1. 



08/01/89 



34-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TABLE OF CODES AND MEASUREMENTS FOR 
BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS (Cont'd) 



BOF Description 


Code 


Measure 1 


Measure 2 


# Units 


Garage, attached, frame, fin 


RAl 


Width 


Length 




Garage, attached, masonry, fin 


RA2 


Width 


Length 




Garage, attached, frame, unfin 


RA3 


Width 


Length 




Garage, attached, masonry, unfin 


RA4 


Width 


Length 




Greenhouse, economy, wood frame. 


GHl 


Width 


Length 




plastic covering 










Greenhouse, average, wood frame. 


GH2 


Width 


Length 




glass walls 










Greenhouse, good, pipe/metal frame. 


GH3 


Width 


Length 




glass walls 










Hoists, single plunger 


HSl 






Each 


Hoists, double plunger 


HS2 






Each 


Loading Dock, steel/concrete 


LDl 


Width 


Length 




Loading Dock, wood 


LD2 


Width 


Length 




Loading Dock, interior 


LD3 


Width 


Length 




Truck and Train Wells 


I,D4 


Width 


Length 




Dock Lcvcicrs 


LD5 






Each 


Miscellaneous Structure 


MS1[5] 


Flat Value 






Open Areas, high rise apts & hotels 


OAl 


Width 


Length 




Open Areas, garden apts, motels, and dwellings 


OA2 


Width 


Length 




Open Areas, stores & restaurants 


OA3 


Width 


Length 




Open Areas, industrial & warehouses 


OA4 


Width 


Length 




Open Areas, bank & office buildings - low rise 


OA5 


Width 


Length 




Open Areas, theaters & auditoriums 


OA6 


Width 


Length 




Open Areas, light metal buildings 


OA7 


Width 


Length 




Open Areas, office (high rise) 


OA8 


Width 


Length 




Overhead Doors, wood/metal 


ODI 


Width 


Height 


Each 


Overhead Doors, rolling steel 


OD2 


Width 


Height 


Each 


Overhead Doors, wood/metal with motor 


OD3 


Width 


Height 


Each 



^ 



and operator 
Overhead Doors, roll steel with motor 
and operator 



OD4 



Width 



Height 



^ 



Each 



Patio, wood 

Patio, concrete 

Patio, stone or tile, sand base 

Patio, stone or tile, concrete base 

Patio, brick 

Patio, masonry stoop 



RTl 


Width 


Length 


RT2 


Width 


Length 


RT3 


Width 


Length 


RT4 


Width 


Length 


RT5 


Width 


Length 


RT6 


Width 


Length 



[5] FLAT VALUE (+/-) must be entered. 



^. 



34-8 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



TABLE OF CODES AND MEASUREMENTS FOR 
BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS (Cont'd) 



1 



BOF Description 



Porch, open 

Porch, screened 

Porch, enclosed 

Porch, open, upper declc 

Porch, screened, upper deck 

Porch, enclosed, upper deck 

Roof, monitor 
Roof, high bay 

Skating Rink, indoor, ice skating 

Sprinkler System, wet pipe 
Sprinkler System, dry pipe 

Store Front, wood frame 
Store Front, avg metal frame 
Store Front, elaborate 

Swimming Pool, indoor 

Tunnel 

Utility Building, frame 
Utility Building, metal 
Utility Building, brick/stone 



Code 


Measure 1 


Measure 2 


PPl 
PP2 
PP4 
PP5 
PP6 
PP8 


Width 
Width 
Width 
Width 
Width 
Width 


Length 
Length 
Length 
Length 
Length 
Length 


MR1[6] 
MR2 


Ln.ft. 
Ln.ft. 


Height 
Height 


SKI 


Width 


Length 


SSI 
SS2 


Sq.ft. 
Sq.ft. 


1 
1 


SFl 
SF2 
SF3 


Length 
Length 
Length 


1 
1 

1 


RP5 


Width 


Length 


TUl 


Width 


Length 


RSI 
RS2 
RS3 


Width 
Width 
Width 


Length 
Length 
Length 



# Units 



[6] Roof - LINE NUMBER must be for floor levels 01 to 01. 



08/01/89 



34-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



611-618 EXTERIOR DATA COM S6 

Required entry for building - at least 
one line, field codes 611 and 621, is 
required. 
In describing the various positions of a Building 
Section, a concept of Exterior/Interior lines is 
needed. Please review the introductory paragraphs 
of this Section for a discussion on Building 
Sections and Exterior/Interior Lines. 



NOTE 3: Mezzanine and enclosure entries 
should follow the listing of the floor they 
are on. That is, if there is a mezzanine 
located on the first floor of a building, the 
mezzanine should be coded on the next line 
following (underneath) the first floor. 

NOTE 4: Penthouses should follow the top 
floor. 



SECTION NUMBER - Enter a one-digit number 
denoting the section of the building being 
described. SECTION NUMBERS are only 
descriptive. They should begin with 1 and continue 
in sequential order. 

LEVEL (FROM) - Enter the code that describes 
the Tirst" level of the Exterior/Interior line. This 
field is used in conjunction with the next field, 
LEVEL (TO), to describe the levcl(s) or floor(s) 
of the Exterior/Interior line being coded. 

Al to indicate attic. 

BI to indicate first basement. 

B2 to indicate sub-basement (up to B9 

available). 
CI to indicate first crawl space. 
El to indicate enclosure (up to E9 available). 
Ml to indicate mezzanines (balcony) (up to M9 

available). 
PI to indicate penthouses (up to P3 available). 

01 to indicate first story. 

02 to indicate second story 

LEVEL (TO) - Enter the code that describes the 
"last" level of the Exterior/Interior line. This field 
is used in conjunction with the previous field, 
LEVEL (FROM), to describe the level(s) or 
lloor(s) of the Exterior/Interior line being coded. 

NOTE I: When making entries to the FROM 
and TO fields, do not mix codes. 

NOTE 2: The numeric characters used with 
crawl space, mezzanines, attics, penthouses, 
and enclosures are for identification, not to 
indicate the floor or level where each item is 
located. For instance, if two enclosures were 
to be described on the first floor, they would 
be designated El to El and E2 to E2. 
Renumbering should begin when going to 
another floor. 



NOTE 5: Attic level entries should follow the 
highest floor level, including Penthouses. 

NOTE 6: The first floor must always be 
entered as a separate line entry (01 to 01). 

The following are examples of acceptable entries: 

1 To describe floors 2 through 9 of a building: 

LEVEL FROM: 02 TO: 09 

2 To describe a ba.scmeni and an identical suh- 
basemcnt: 

LEVEL FROM: Bi TO: B2 

3 To describe the first floor of a building, the 
first floor of a building must always be a 
separate entry: 

LEVEL FROM: 01 TO: 01 

4 To describe a mezzanine: 

LEVEL FROM: Mi TO: Mi 

5 To describe a penthouse: 

LEVEL FROM: Pi TO: Pi 

The following are examples of unacceptable entries: 

These entries are not only confusing, but would 
not form unique Exterior/Interior lines. They arc 
not to be used. 

1 This entry creates the question, "Is there a 
sub-ba.sement?" 

LEVEL FROM: B2 TO: (H 

2 This entry creates the question, "Is there a 
second story, third story, etc.?" 

LEVEl'fROM: Ih' TO: IVU 

3 This entry creates the question, "How many 
floors are there in between?" 

LEVEL FROM: Bl TO: PI 



C 



34-10 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



4 This entry does not enter the first floor as a 
separate line entry (01 to 01). 
LEVEL FROM: 01 TO: 03 

DIMENSION - SIZE - Enter either the dimensions 
(width and length) or the square foot area of the 
level being described. 

To enter the dimensions, character positions are 
provided for eight characters: three numeric 
characters denoting the width, one multiplication 
(X) symbol, and four numeric characters denoting 
the length. The multiplication symbol must always 
be entered in the fourth character position from 
the left (within the two vertical hash marks). 

To enter the square foot area, character positions 
are provided to enter eight numeric characters (up 
to 99,999,999 square feet). 

NOTE I: Do not enter the total square 
footage area for all stories of the 
Exterior/Interior line. 

NOTE 2: Use 75% of the first floor area for 
1 1/2 story buildings. 

DIMENSION - PERIMETER - Enter the effective 
perimeter of the Exterior/Interior line of the 
building section being described. Enter the sum of 
all exterior wall measurements around the base of 
the Exterior/Interior line to the nearest foot. 



NOTE I: When a common wall separates two 
Building Sections, include the length of the 
common wall with that section which 
corresponds to the height of the wall. If 
both sections are the same height, include 
the common wall with either one of the two 
sections, but not both. 

NOTE 2: When a common wall separates a 
building from an adjacent parcel under a 
different ownership, include the length of the 
common wall times 60% for both parcels to 
calculate effective perimeter. 

NOTE 3: When an open area separates two 
Building Sections, do not use this open area 
in calculating the effective perimeter. 

USE TYPE - Enter the USE TYPE code 
describing the current use of the Exterior/Interior 
line. 

NOTE I: The USE TYPE may differ from the 
STRUCTURE TYPE. 

NOTE 2: The USE TYPE for crawl space will 
always be "000" - None. 



08/01/89 



34-11 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



USE TYPE CODES 



Oil Apartment 

012 Hotel 

013 Motel 

021 Dormitory 

024 Dwelling Conversion - Multiple 

025 Dwelling Conversion - Office 

026 Dwelling Conversion - Sales 

027 Dwelling 

030 Laundromat or Dry Cleaners 

031 Restaurant 

032 Department Store 

033 Discount Store/Market 

034 Retail Store 



035 


Tavern or Bar 


036 
037 


Lounge 
Cafeteria 


038 


Convenience Store 


039 
040 


Dairy Sales 

Barber or Beauty Shop 


041 


Mini Warehouse 


042 
043 
044 

045 


Hangar 

Manufacturing 
Light Manufacturing 
Warehouse 



046 Auto Showroom or Office 

047 Auto Parts & Service 

048 Tennis Club 

049 Racquetball Court 

050 Skating Rink (Ice or Roller) 

051 Bank & Savings Institution 

052 Medical Center 

053 Office Building 



054 Nursing Home 

055 School 

056 Hospital 

057 Library 

058 Funeral Home 

059 Post Office 

061 Auditorium or Theatre 

062 Cinema 

063 Religious Institution 

064 Social or Fraternal Hall 

070 Service Station with Bays 

071 Service Station - Conversion Retail 

072 Service Station - Conversion Storage 

073 Service Station without Bays 

074 Car Wash - Manual 

075 Car Wash - Automatic 

081 Multi-Use - Apartment 

082 Multi-Use - Office 

083 Multi-Use - Sales 

084 Multi-Use - Storage 

085 Enclosure 

086 Support Area 

088 Restroom/Locker Room Facility 

090 Parking Garage 

091 Unfinished Residential Bascmcni 

095 Covered Mall 

100 Franchise Restaurant (Fast Food) 
see following detail list 

990 Parking, Upper Deck 



r 



c 



^ 



34-12 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



FRANCHISE RESTAURANT CODES 



Franchise Restaurant Name 





(typical) 


Use Tvpe Code 


Grade 


101 


F 


102 


A 


104 


A 


106 


F 


107 


A 


110 


A 


112 


G + 


115 


A 


118 


A 


120 


F 


121 


A 


125 


A 


126 


G 


130 


A 


132 


A 


134 


G 


136 


A 


140 


A 


146 


A 


148 


A 


150 


A 


152 


A 


153 


G 


156 


A 


160 


A 


162 


A 


166 


G 


170 


G 


172 


A 


174 


A 


176 


A 


178 


A 


180 


A 


182 


A 


184 


A 


186 


A 


188 


F 


190 


G 


192 


A 


194 


G 



A&W - prior to '75 

A&W - '75 and after 

Arby's 

Artie Circle - prior to '72 

Artie Circle - '72 and after 

Bonanza Family Restaurant 
Burger King 
Corner Pocket 
Country Kitchen 

Dairy Queen - prior to '72 
Dairy Queen - '72 and after 
Four B's - prior to '74 
Four B's - '74 and after 
Frontier Pies 
Godfather's Pizza 

Hardee's 

J-B Big Boy 

Kentucky Fried Chicken 

Little Big Man Pizza 

Long Horn 

Long John Silver 

McDonald's - prior to '74 

McDonald's - '74 and after 

Mister Steak 

Pioneer Pies 

Pizza Hut 

Rax 

Seasons' 

Shakey's Pizza Parlor 

Sizzler 

Skipper's Seafood Shoppe 

Sunny's 

Taco Bell 
Taco John's 
Taco Time 
Taco Treat 
Tastee Freeze 

Village Inn Pancake House 

Village Inn Pizza 

Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburgers 



08/01/89 



34-13 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



WALL HEIGHT - Enter the height of the wall 
described on the Exterior/Interior line story to the 
nearest foot. This measurement should be made 
from floor to floor and not from floor to ceiling. 

NOTE 1: Parapets should not be included in 
this measurement. 

NOTE 2: Gable type roofs should be measured 
to the eaves. Other roof types, such as shed 
or sawtooth should be averaged to compute 
the wall height to the roof line. 

EXTERIOR WALL MATERIAL - Enter the code 
that best describes the type of EXTERIOR WALL 
MATERIAL of an Exterior/Interior line. 

(X) NONE to indicate the absence of an exterior 
wall material. 

01 BRICK or STONE to indicate a brick or 
stone veneer. 



09 CONCRETE LOAD BEARING to indicate 
a concrete wall which supports a part of the 
building, usually a floor or roof. 

10 CONCRETE NON-LOAD BEARING to 
indicate a concrete curtain wall which does 
not support the roof or floor. 

11 GLASS to indicate walls of non-supporting 
glass panels set in metal frame. 

12 GLASS & MASONRY to indicate wails on 
non-supporting glass set in Brick or 
Concrete backup. 

13 ENCLOSURE to indicate a wood stud or 
concrete block office or sales enclosure wall 
in the interior of a building. 

14 CONCRETE TILT-UP to indicate concrete 
wall sections that are cast horizontally and 
tilted or lifted into position. 



02 reAME to indicate an exterior wall of 
wood, aluminum siding, composition siding, 
or shingles on sheathing. 

03 CONCRETE BLOCK to indicate a masonry 
wall consisting of concrete compressed into 
the shape of a block and allowed to harden. 

04 BRICK & CONCRETE BLOCK to indicate 
that at least one-third of the exterior walls 
are of a brick or concrete block material, 
and the rest of the exterior walls arc of the 
other material. 

05 TILE to indicate a hard earthenware block 
which has been hard burned and molded, 
such as terra cotta. 

06 MASONRY & FRAME to indicate that at 
least one-third of the exterior walls arc of a 
frame or masonry (brick or stone) material 
and the rest of the exterior walls are of the 
other material. 

07 METAL, LIGHT to indicate walls 
constructed of metal panels on wood or steel 
frame. 

OS METAL, SANDWICH to indicate walls 

constructed of a core of insulation covered 
on both sides by metal panels. 



15 SOLAR GLASS to indicate a high quality 
tinted heat absorbent glass set in metal 
frame. 

16 ASBESTOS CORRUGATED RIGID to 
indicate a rigid corrugated asbestos sheet on 
wood or steel frame. 

17 NATIVE STONE to indicate a locally 
quarried stone used as a load bearing wall. 
The stone can be irregular-shaped rubble or 
cut blocks set in place with mortar. 

NOTE I: Exterior wall material for ba.semcnt, 
crawl space, and parking garages will always 
be entered as code "00" - None. 

NOTE 2: Exterior wall material for cncU)sures 
should always be entered as code "13" - 
Enclosure. 

NOTE 3: Exterior wall material for mezzanines 
must be entered either as code "(X)" - None 
or code "13" - Enclosure. 

CONSTRUCTION CLASS - Enter the code that 
describes the class of construction of the 
Exterior/Interior line. 

I WOOD FRAME / JOIST / BEAM to 

indicate construction which incorporates 
wood stud balloon or platform framing or 



(■ 



34-14 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



wood post and beam framing (mill 
construction). This category also includes 
masonry structures which incorporate wood 
joist or plank floor systems, or wood joist, 
truss, or rafter roof systems. 

2 FIRE RESISTANT (Reinforced Concrete 
Frame) to indicate buildings with exposed 
structural steel, or reinforced concrete 
columns and beams. Multi-story structures 
will have steel floor joists with concrete 
plank or a reinforced concrete floor system. 
Exterior walls will typically be masonry or 
metal and glass panels. 

3 FIREPROOF (Structural Steel Frame) to 
indicate typically high-rise buildings with 
fabricated, heavy, structural steel column and 
beam framing which has been enveloped in a 
fireproof material such as concrete or 
gypsum. This incombustible material is 
applied to protect structural components of 
the building so that it can withstand a 
complete burnout of Its contents wiiht)ut 
structural damage. Floors will be reinforced 
concrete or precast concrete plank on steel 
joists protected by a gypsum-vermiculite 
plaster on metal lath ceiling. Exterior walls 
will be masonry or metal and glass panels. 

4 PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL - to indicate 
buildings framed with prefabricated steel 
members. The structure will incorporate 
either metal beams, girders, columns and 
purlins, or light gauge steel joists 
manufactured from cold formed shapes of 
sheet or strip steel. Multi-story buildings 
may have floors of wood, steel, or concrete. 
Exterior walls will typically be prefinished 
metal siding or sandwich panels. 

NOTE 1: For crawl space always enter 
construction type 1 and make no further 
entries on that line. 

NOTE 2: Mezzanines and the upper level of 
parking garages entries require the 
CONSTRUCTION CLASS to be blank. 

PERCENTAGE NET RENTABLE TO GROSS 
AREA - Enter the percentage of net rentable area 
to gross area. The gross area will be used for Cost 
Approach valuation calculations and the net 
rentable area will be used for the Income 
Approach valuation calculations. If there is no 



difference between the net rentable area and the 
gross area, leave this field blank. 



621-628 INTERIOR DATA COM 56 

Required entry for building. Ai least 
one line, field codes 61 1 and 621, is 
required. 
In describing the various positions of a Building 
Section, a concept of Exterior/Interior lines is 
needed. Please review the introductory paragraphs 
of this Section for a discussion on Building 
Sections and Exterior/Interior Lines. 

INTERIOR FINISH % (PERCENT) - Enter the 
extent of interior finish expressed in a percent. 
Consideration should be given to the fioors, 
ceilings, and walls. 

NOTE I: Consideration should be given to the 
STRUCTURE TYPE CODE of the 
Exterior/Interior line. For example, you 
would not expect to find the same extent of 
interior finish in a warehouse that you would 
find in a professional building. 

NOTE 2: As described earlier, the building is 
listed by sections. Each section has been 
assigned a USE TYPE or has been described 
in terms of the section's original 
construction use intention. Since the cost 
figures to be used to cost out the section 
and specific use type are a cost that is 
applicable to the specific type of section or 
structure under appraisal, the interior should 
be judged from that standpoint. An example 
would be: 

An office building section is described as 
having a use type of "general office." When 
this use type is recorded for this section, the 
interior is assumed to be completely finished. 
For mass appraisal it is not necessary to 
detail the office section's specific types of 
finish. The costing tables for general office 
use type already have finished interior built 
into their pricing rates. The data collector 
is really trying to determine if the complete 
section described as general office is 100% 
finished. If he/she finds the area is not to 
be considered 100% finished, the property 
record card should denote what percent is 
finished. 



08/01/89 



34-15 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Another example would be a warehouse. 
The property record card has been 
appropriately marked to indicate that the 
section is for warehouse use. Since 
warehouse interior walls are normally 
unfmished, or just painted, the costing tables 
for this use type would automatically reflect 
minor interior finish. Therefore, for a use 
type describing a warehouse, the data 
collector would record the interior as being 
100% finished. 

NOTE 3: Costing tables are established to 
appropriately consider the normal state of 
interior finish for each USE TYPE. Data 
collectors should consider that each USE 
TYPE to have 100% finish, even in the case 
of a warehouse, unless it is discovered that 
the percent of finish is not 100%. 

PARTITIONS - Enter the code that describes the 
extent of interior partition walls within the 
Exterior/Interior line. 



on whether the amount of partitioning is 
normal or not normal for the particular 
section use type. In the event that 
partitioning for a particular use type is 
considered above or below normal, all the 
data collector need do is to record the 
difference by use of a code symbol indicating 
the above or below status. The pricing 
tables are set up to appropriately cost out 
"normal," "below normal," "above normal," or 
"none" for each use type. Normal partitions 
for a retail store would be one partition 
separating the sales area from the storage 
area and one small office. In the event that 
there were more partitions, the data 
collector would record "above normal." 

HEATING SYSTEM TYPE - Enter the code 
denoting the predominant heating system type 
utilized within the Exterior/Interior line. 

NONE to indicate that no heating system 
exists. 



NONE to indicate that there are no 
partitions at all. 



HOT AIR to indicate cither forced or 
gravity system. 



BELOW NORMAL to indicate that only a 
few partitions have been constructed and 
that most similar structures have a few more 
partitions than the subject structure. 

NORMAL to indicate that the subject 
structure has about the same extent of 
partitioning that is found in similar 
structures. 

ABOVE NORMAL to indicate that the 
subject structure has rather extensive 
partitioning when compared to similar 
structures used for the same purpose. 



HOT WATER or STEAM to indicate bi)ih 
single and dual circulation heating system 
types. 

UNIT HEATERS or SPACE HEATERS to 
indicate the use of non-central heating units. 

ELECTRIC to indicate the presence of an 
electric heating system. This system is 
characterized by electric resistance elements 
that convert electricity into heat. These 
elements are embedded in the lloors, wails, 
ceilings, or baseboard to provide radiant 
heat. 



NOTE 1: The extent of partitioning should 
always be compared to what could be 
considered normal for structures having the 
same use. The use type code should be 
considered. For example, a structure that 
was built as a hotel but is now used as an 
office building will probably have more 
extensive partitions (3 - ABOVE NORMAL) 
than a structure built as an office building 
and used as an office building. 



5 HEAT PUMP to indicate a reverse cycle 
refrigeration unit which can be u.sed for 
heating and cooling. 

6 SOLAR to indicate either a passive or an 
active solar system. 

AIR CONDITIONING TYPE - Enter the code 
denoting the type of air conditioning within the 
Exterior/Interior line. 



NOTE 2: Partitions should be recorded based 



NONE to indicate that there is no air 

conditioning. 



34-16 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



1 CENTRAL to indicate that there is (either 
separately or combined) a central cooling 
system commensurate with the quality grade 
specifications of the structure. 

2 UNIT (Real Property) to indicate that there 
is air conditioning to the structure provided 
by indivdual units that are valued as real 
property. 

NOTE: Window air conditioners are not 
considered real property and should be 
considered as - NONE. 

PLUMBINGAVATER - Enter the code describing 
the extent and adequacy of the plumbing and 
piping system within the Exterior/Interior line. 
Consideration must be given to the USE TYPE of 
the Exterior/Interior line. For example, motels 
naturally have more extensive plumbing systems 
than retail stores. 

U NONE to indicate that there is no plumbing. 

1 BELOW NORMAL to indicate that the 
plumbing is below normal for the USE 
TYPE of the Exterior/Interior line. 

2 NORMAL to indicate that the plumbing is 
normal for the USE TYPE of the 
Exterior/Interior line. 

3 ABOVE NORMAL to indicate that the 
plumbing is above normal for the USE 
TYPE of the Exterior/Interior line. 

PHYSICAL CONDITION - Enter the one-digii 
numeric code denoting the physical condition of 
the Exterior/Interior line in relation to its age. 
Consideration should include foundation, frame, 
exterior walls, roof, heating, air conditioning, 
lighting and electrical systems, plumbing, internal 
walls, and floor finish. 

1 POOR to indicate that the Exterior/Interior 
line is structurally unsound. Major 
structural elements require replacement. 
The interior is in a dilapidated condition 
and does not appear suitable for use. 

2 FAIR to indicate that the Exterior/Interior 
line shows marked wear and deterioration 
but the property is usable for commercial or 
industrial purposes. It could be 
characterized as "needing work". 



3 NORMAL to indicate that the 
ExteriorAnterior line shows only minor signs 
of physical deterioration due to "wear and 
tear". There are few indications of deferred 
maintenance and no significant repairs or 
replacements are necessary. 

4 GOOD to indicate that the Exterior/Interior 
line is in new or "like new" condition. 
There are no deficiencies in material or 
construction and no signs of deferred 
maintenance. 

5 EXCELLENT to indicate that a major 
renovation or rehabilitation of the 
Exterior/Interior line has taken place. The 
effective age of the Exterior/Interior line has 
been altered to that of a much newer 
building in good condition. The amount of 
work done to enhance the appearance and 
structural soundness of the Exterior/Interior 
line is far in excess of that required for 
normal maintenance. 

FUNCTIONAL UTILITY FACTOR - Enter the 
one-digit numeric code denoting the functional 
utility of the Exterior/Interior line. Functional 
utility may be defined as the ability of the 
Exterior/Interior line to perform the function for 
which it is intended. It is the combined effect on 
marketability of the condition, utility, and 
desirability of the property. Consideration should 
be given to architecture, design and layout, sizes 
and types of rooms, and performance standards. 

BASEMENT: 

NONE to indicate that the basement has 
very little possibility of being utilized to any 
great degree. May be low posted and/or dirt 
floor. May be wet. 

1 POOR to indicate that the basement is 
capable of being only partially utilized due 
to height, size, ingress and egress, etc. Has 
no elevator service. 

2 FAIR to indicate that the basement may be 
capable of being utilized for dead storage, 
etc., but lacks good elevator service, 
although it may have old cable controlled 
type. 

3 NORMAL to indicate that the basement is 
capable of being fully utilized with good 



08/01/89 



34-17 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



movement of materials to first floor level by 
elevator or other mechanical means. 

4 GOOD to indicate that an exceptional 
utilization of entire basement area is 
possible. May house all or part sales, 
secondary office space, lounge, function 
rooms, kitchen, etc. Must be served by 
modern elevator. 

FIRST FLOOR: 

NONE to indicate that no possible present 
or future usefulness exists. 

1 POOR to indicate that the first floor 
exhibits very little possible utility at present 
or in the future due to shape, layout, size, 
construction, etc. 

2 FAIR to indicate that there may be excessive 
wasted space due to shape and size. 
Headroom and/or bay size is less than 
adequate. Problems exist with ingress or 
egress. 

3 NORMAL to indicate that the first floor 
layout provides for nearly full utilization of 
space. There is sufficient headroom and bay 
size to fulfill the function for which it is 
intended. 

NOTE: Most first floor areas will fall into this 
classification. 

4 GOOD to indicate that the first floor has 
exceptional utilization due to layout, ingress 
and egress. There is little or no wasted 
floor area and a maximum of net leasable 
space exists. 

SLCOND FLOOR: 

NONE to indicate that the second floor has 
no present or future utilization. 

1 POOR to indicate that the second floor has 
a low percentage of net leasable to gross 
floor area. The plumbing and lighting are 
obsolete. It may have small bays or be low 
posted. The overall layout is poor and no 
elevator service exists. There is no off-street 
parking available in the immediate area. 



2 FAIR to indicate that the second floor has 
excessive hallways, stairwells, elevator shafts, 
etc., which result in a lower percentage of 
net leasable space. There may be an older 
type manually operated elevator or none at 
all. There is still proper ingress and egress 
but little off-street parking is available in the 
area. 

3 NORMAL to indicate that the second floor 
layout provides for nearly full utilization of 
space with normal hall and stairwell areas. 
A self-service elevator is available. There is 
adequate off-street parking available in the 
immediate area. 

4 GOOD to indicate that the second floor has 
exceptional utilization. There is little or no 
wasted floor area. A modern self-service 
elevator is available. There is more than 
adequate off-street parking available in the 
immediate area. 

ABOVE SECOND FLOOR: 

Use the same guidelines as SECOND FLOOR 
except to consider that on buildings with no 
elevator, the higher the floor level, the less 
desirable the space becomes. 

It would be highly unlikely, in any building to 
progress upward floor by floor and have the 
functional utility increase. For example, if the 
second floor is classified as FAIR, it would not be 
likely for the third floor to be NORMAL. 

NOTE: Economic obsolescence is addressed 
during valuation review. 



INCOME AND EXPENSE INFORMATION 

For convenience, space is provided on the 
Commercial CAMA subsystem for capturing 
information pertinent to apartments and/or parking 
information for any type structure. This 
information is in addition to the information that 
is entered on the Income and Expense subsystem. 



34-18 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



"* 



631-638 APARTMENT DATA COM S7 

Optional entry for apartments. 
Enter up to six different bedroom and bath 
combinations for apartment buildings. When 
utilized, all character positions must be filled in. 
Enter the number of units, number of bedrooms, 
and number of baths for each identical apartment 
combination. Use leading zeros if necessary. 

Enter 1.0 for a full bath with no half bath, 1.5 for 
one full bath and one half bath, 2.0 for two full 
baths and no half bath, etc. 



639 PARKING DATA COM S7 

Optional 
Enter the number of covered and uncovered 
parking spaces for the parcel. 



OTHER BUILDING AND YARD 
IMPROVEMENTS 

This part provides guidelines for collecting and 
recording additional structures or site 
improvements not part of the principle structure. 



699 DELETE: COMMERCIAL OBY COM GPD 

Optional 
This is a computer file maintenance entry and 
normally will not be utilized on the field card. 
The purpose of the delete is to remove all data 
previously entered in the computer for Commercial 
fields 701-706. This function is initiated by 
selecting option "06" from the On-Line Menu of 
the Commercial subsystem. 



701-706 OTHER BUILDING & YARD 

IMPROVEMENTS COM S8 

Optional 
Up to six OTHER BUILDING and YARD 
IMPROVEMENTS per record may be entered. 
There are numerous types of OBY's which may be 
encountered on commercial and industrial 
properties. The most common of these have been 
coded and included in the Table of Codes and 
Dimensions for Commercial Other Building and Yard 
Improvements following the OBY coding 
instructions. The inclusion of all possible items is 
considered impractical; however, the ability to 
collect data on uncoded items has been provided 
for, see chart entry MSI. 



OBY CODE - Enter the OBY Code denoting the 
type of OTHER BUILDING and YARD 
IMPROVEMENT being described. 

FLAT VALUE - Enter a plus (+) or minus (-) 
sign to denote the addition or deduction of a fiat 
dollar amount which would then be entered in the 
Dimensions column. If the FLAT VALUE field is 
not utilized, this entry must be left blank. 

DIMENSIONS - SIZE - Enter either the 
dimensions (width and length) or square foot area 
of the item being described. 

To enter the dimensions, character positions are 
provided to enter eight characters, three numeric 
characters denoting the width, one multiplication 
(X) symbol and four numeric characters denoting 
the length. The multiplication symbol must always 
be entered in the fourth character position from 
the left (within the two vertical hash marks). All 
character positions must be filled in. Use leading 
zeros if necessary. 

To enter the square foot area of the item, 
character positions are provided to enter eight 
numeric characters (up to 99,999,999 square feet). 
Utilize the character positions to the right. 
Leading zeros are not necessary. 

NUMBER IDENTICAL UNITS - Enter the total 
number of identical OTHER BUILDING AND 
YARD IMPROVEMENTS. Both character 
positions must be filled in. Use leading zeros if 
necessary. 

NOTE: When activating the FLAT VALUE 
{+!-) column for any entry, the amount 
entered in the DIMENSIONS area will be 
used as the RCNLD for that line entry 
(limes the NUMBER OF IDENTICAL 
UNITS). The YEAR BUILT, PHYSICAL 
CONDITION, and FUNCTIONAL 
UTILITY, must be entered, but are used as 
descriptive data only. 

PHYSICAL CONDITION - Enter the one-digit 
numeric code denoting the physical cx)ndition of 
the OTHER BUILDING and YARD 
IMPROVEMENT being described. 

1 POOR to indicate that the OBY is in a 

dilapidated condition. It could be 
characterized as "beyond repair". 



08/01/89 



34-19 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



FAIR to indicate that the OBY shows signs 
of deferred maintenance, but the 
improvement does contribute to the 
commercial or industrial operation. The 
improvement could be characterized as 
"needing work". 

NORMAL to indicate that the OBY shows 
only minor signs of physical deterioration 
due to "wear and tear". There are few 
indications of deferred maintenance. 

GOOD to indicate that the OBY shows no 
signs of deferred maintenance. It could be 
characterized as in new or "like new" 
condition. 

EXCELLENT to indicate that the OBY has 
undergone major renovation or 
rehabilitation. Despite the actual age of the 
improvement, the effective age has been 
altered to a much newer improvement in 
good condition. The amount of work done 
to enhance the appearance and/or structural 
soundness of the improvement is far in 
excess of that required for normal 
maintenance. 

NOTE: Deferred maintenance may be defined 
as desirable repairs and rehabilitation that 
will require immediate expenditures. It does 
not necessarily imply inadequate prior 
maintenance. 



2 FAIR to indicate that the OBY adds to the 
ability of the property to perform the 
function for which it is intended, but the 
effect is minimal. 

3 NORMAL to indicate that the OBY adds an 
adequate amount to the ability of the 
property to perform the function for which 

it is intended. 

4 GOOD to indicate that no functional 
deficiencies exist for the OBY and that the 
improvement is well suited to aid the ability 
of the property to perform the function for 
which it is intended. 

YEAR BUILT OR INSTALLED - Enter the date 
in which the OTHER BUILDING and YARD 
IMPROVEMENT was constructed or installed. 
For Example: 1976 ... enter 76. 

PERCENT GOOD - Optional entry. Enter the 
appraiser's judgment of remaining percent good for 
the OTHER BUILDING or YARD 
IMPROVEMENT being described. Percent good 
and depreciation are complements of each other. 
Therefore, an improvement which is estimated to 
have 35% depreciation as of a given lime is said H) 
be 65% good. In this way, the calculated Percent 
Good can be overridden by entering the appraiser's 
estimate of the percent good. However, the year 
built, physical condition, and functional utility 
factors must still be entered. 



FUNCTIONAL UTILITY - Enter the one-digit 
numeric code denoting the functional utility of the 
OTHER BUILDING and YARD 
IMPROVEMENT. Functional utility may be 
defined as the ability of the improvement to assist 
the property to perform the function lor which it Is 
intended. Consideration should be given to design, 
size, and performance standards. 

I) NONE to indicate that the OBY adds 

nothing to the ability of the property to 
perform the function for which it is 
intended. It can in no way be considered 
serviceable. 

1 POOR to indicate that the OBY adds little 

to the ability of the property to perform the 
function for which it is intended. Major 
renovation is necessary to allow the 
improvement to make an adequate 
contribution to service. 



NOTF2: The purpose of this entry is to be 
override to the computer calculated 
PERCENT GOOD. 



H(M> TOTAL OrilER IMPROVEMENTS 

Optional COM S8 

This entry may be utilized in numerous ways. 
Since it is not expected that every parcel should be 
appraised by computer-assisted techniques, it is 
necessary to allow for the value of manually 
appraised properties to be integrated into the 
system. This is done by use of the TOTAL 
OTHER IMPROVEMENTS category. This 
category may also be utilized to add t)r deduct a 
flat dollar amount from the overall improvement 
value of the parcel. 



34-20 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



^ 



DESCRIPTION - Enter the description of the 
manually appraised property or to explain the 
reason for an addition or deduction of a flat dollar 
amount. 



VALUE - Enter a dollar value amount up to 
S999,999,999. Use the character positions to the 
right. Omit leading zeros. 



(+/-) - Enter a plus (+) or minus (-) to denote 
the addition or deduction of value. 



TABLE OF CODES AND DIMENSIONS FOR 
COMMERCIAL OTHER BUILDING and YARD IMPROVEMENTS 



OBY Description 



Code Dimension 



# Units 



Air Conditioning, central 
Air Conditioning, unit 



ACl 
AC2 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
1 



Each 



Annex, wood crib 
Annex, concrete 

Bank Drive-In, canopy 
Bank Drive-In, teller booth 

Boat Dock, light wood deck, light post 

Boat Dock, medium wood deck, wood girders 

Boat Dock, heavy wood deck, heavy pilings 

Boat House, frame or concrete block 
Boat House, masonry 
Boat Slip, economy 
Boat Slip, average 
Boat Slip, good 



ANl Cap in bushels 
AN2 Cap in bushels 



BCl 
BC2 

BDl 
BD2 
BD3 

BBl 
BB2 
BSl 
BS2 
BS3 



Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

Dim or Sq.ft. 
Dim or Sq.ft. 

1 

1 

1 



Each 
Each 
Each 



Bulkhead 



BKl 



Lin.ft. 



Canopy Roof, low cost 
Canopy Roof, average 
Canopy Roof, good 

Carport 

Drive House, wood & metal, good quality 
Drive House, wood & metal, average quality 
Drive House, wood & metal, low cost quality 
Drive House, concrete, good quality 
Drive House, concrete, average quality 
Drive House, concrete, low cost quality 

Drive-In Theater Screen 

Elevators, wood crib 
Elevators, concrete 



CP5 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


CP6 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


CP7 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


RCl 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


DHl 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


DH2 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


DH3 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


DH4 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


DH5 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


DHO 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


DTI 


Dim or Sq.ft. 


ELI 


Cap in bushels 


EL2 


Cap in bushels 



08/01/89 



34-21 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TABLE OF CODES AND DIMENSIONS FOR 
COMMERCIAL OTHER BUILDING and YARD IMPROVEMENTS (Cont'd) 



OBY Description 



Code 


Dimension 


RFl 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RF2 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RF3 


Hgi 


X Lin.ft. 


RF4 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RF5 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RF6 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RF7 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RF8 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RF9 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


RFO 


Hgt 


X Lin.ft. 


FSl 


Cap 


in bushels 


tS2 


Cap 


in bushels 


AUl 


Gallons 


AU2 


Gallons 


AU3 


Gallons 


RGl 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


RG2 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


RG3 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


RG4 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


GHl 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


GH2 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


GH3 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


KFl 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


LTl 


1 




LT2 


1 




LT3 


1 




LT4 


1 




LT5 


1 




MSI 


Rat Value 


PAl 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


PAZ 


Dim 


or Sq.ft. 


PA3 


Dim 


or Sq.fi. 



# Units 



Fence, chain link 
Fence, picket 
Fence, stockade 
Fence, post & rail 
Fence, baskeiweave 
Fence, brick or masonry 
Fence, ornamental iron 
Fence, barbed wire - 4 strand 
Fence, stock yard corrals 
Fence, pipe & post 

Rat Storage, wood 
Flat Storage, metal 

Fuel Storage Tank, underground 
Fuel Storage Tank, aboveground 
Fuel Storage Tank, horizontal pressure 

Garage, detached, frame, finished 
Garage, detached, masonry, finished 
Garage, detached, frame, unfinished 
Garage, detached, masonry, unfinished 

Greenhouse, economy, wood frame, plastic covering 
Greenhouse, average, wood frame, glass walls 
Greenhouse, good, pipe/meial frame, glass walls 

Kioska (Folomat, etc.) 

Light, mercury vapor, wall mounted 
Light, incandescent, wall mounted 
Light, fluorescent, pole & bracket 
Light, incandescent, pole & bracket 
Light, mercury vapor, pole & bracket 

Miscellaneous Structure, (+ or - must be entered) 

Paving, asphalt 

Paving, concrete, 4", w/o wire mesh 

Paving, concrete, 5"-6", w wire mesh 

Plumbing Fixture 

Railroad Trackage (spurs) 



FBI 



RRl 



Rcstroom Structure, frame/concrete block TRl 

Rcstroom Structure, brick or stone TR2 

Service Station Attendant's booth, steel/glass on masonry GSl 

Service Station Attendant's booth, stucco/glass on frame GS2 



Lin.ft. 

Dim or Sq.ft. 

Dim or Sq.ft. 

Dim or Sq.ft. 

Dim or Sq.ft. 



Each 
Each 
Each 
Each 
Each 



Each 



34-22 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



3^ 



TABLE OF CODES AND DIMENSIONS FOR 
COMMERCIAL OTHER BUILDING and YARD IMPROVEMENTS 



(Cont'd) 



OBY Description 



Shed, machinery 

Shed, aluminum 

Shed, finished metal 

Shed, quonset 

Shed, lumber, frame, 2 sides open 

Shed, lumber, frame, 4 sides open 

Scales, platform 
Scales, truck 
Scales, cattle 

Skating Rink, outdoor, ice skating 

Sprinkler System, wet pipe 
Sprinkler System, dry pipe 

Swimming Pool, outdoor, commercial 

Tanks, wooden 

Tanks, corrugated steel 

Tanks, bolted steel hopper 

Tanks, welded steel 

Tanks, bolted steel 

Tanks, underground fiberglass 

Tennis Court, asphalt 
Tennis Court, concrete 
Tennis Court, clay 

Tunnel, grain elevators 

Utility Building, frame 
Utility Building, metal 
Utility Building, brick/stone 



Code 


Dimension 


# Ur 


SHI 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




SH2 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




SH3 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




SH4 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




SH5 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




SH6 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




CAl 


Cap in pounds 




CA2 


Cap in pounds 




CA3 


Cap in pounds 




SKI 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




SSI 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




SS2 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




RP5 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




TAl 


Cap in bushels 




TA2 


Cap in bushels 




TA3 


Cap in bushels 




TA4 


Cap in bushels 




TA6 


Cap in bushels 




TA7 


Cap in gallons 




TCI 


1 


Each 


TC2 


1 


Each 


TC3 


1 


Each 


TUl 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




RSI 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




RS2 


Dim or Sq.ft. 




RS3 


Dim or Sq.ft. 





08/01/89 



34-23 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



COMMERCIAL VALUATION OVERRIDE FIELDS 

812 PERCENT COMPLETE COM S9 

Optional 
Use only if a new structure is partially completed 
to indicate percentage of completion as of the 
General Assessment Day. Do not consider 
remodeling, additions or older improvements with 
unfinished areas. Enter the percent complete in 
whole percent, right-justified. 



820 MODEL ADJUSTMENTS COM S9 

Optional 
Income models are predicated on typical income 
and expenses for a neighborhood. Some properties 
may not be typical for the neighborhood and need 
to have the income model "adjusted" for the 
property. Income model adjustments allow you to 
fine-tune the model for the subject property. 

This field allows you to modify the yearly income 
rale, the annual expense rate, and the financing 
(capitalization) of the subject property. Any or all 
three of these model terms can be adjusted 
independently. It is possible that there has already 
been a model adjustment input for the parcel, and 
care should be taken to assure that the current 
adjustments are carried on. 

INCOME ADJUSTMENT - The income stream for 
the property as generated by the model may be 
adjusted by use of a percentage factor. 

Enter the percentage by which the base inci)me of 
the model is to be multiplied. Input of 10()% 
means that there will be no adjustment. However, 
if no adjustment is needed for this property, leave 
this field blank. 

An adjustment for one USE TYPE of a properly, 
will cause an adjustment for all USE TYPES of 
the property. 

For example, ihe model generates S5.()()/sq.ll. of 
gross leasable area, but for this properly S4.l)()/sq.ft. 
would yield a more realistic value. Use an 80% 
adjustment. 

EXPENSE ADJUSTMENT - An Expense 
Adjustment may be needed in cases of net leases 
or u.se of an effective age. If an effective age is 
u.sed, expenses must be recalculated based on the 
adjusted age factor. 



Enter the percentage by which the expense rate of 
the model is to be multiplied. Input of 100% 
means that there will be no adjustment. However, 
if no adjustment is needed for this property, leave 
this field blank. 

CAPITALIZATION RATE ADJUSTMENT - The 
capitalization rate as listed in the model may be 
overriden by entering an override cap rale. Since 
there are two possible approaches to capitalization, 
you must be careful to know what approach is 
being used by the model in order to properly 
adjust the rate. 

Enter the three decimal places indicating the 
desired override capitali/.ation rate. For example, 
enter .115 if the desired cap rale is 11.5. 



825 OCCUPANCY OVERRIDE COM S9 

Optional 
This entry is used to override the typical occupancy 
rale as set in the Income Model. The number to 
be entered is to be expressed as the percent of 
occupancy. For example, a building for which you 
determine there is a 15%- vacancy, use 85% as the 
OCCUPANCY OVERRIDE figure. 



830 VALUATION METHOD COM 59 

Optional 
This field will direct the system to always use 
either the cost value, the income value, or a field- 
generated override value for this parcel's final 
value. The allowable codes for this field are below. 

The reviewer may determine that neither the cost 
value nor the income value as generated by the 
system accurately rellects what the final value for 
the parcel should be. If, after further analysis, the 
reviewer feels that the adjustment of the either ihe 
PHYSICAL CONDITION or the FUNCTIONAL 
UTILITY fields and/or the use of the MODEL 
ADJUSTMENT (820) fields would not be justified. 
the parcel's value must be manually calculated and 
entered in the FINAL BASE VALUE (960) field. 
The entry for this field, the VALUATION 
METHOD, should be "3" to indicate that the 
system generated values have been overridden. 



34-24 



08/01/89 



34. COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS 



T 



Code 



Report 

Entry 



System Action 



Use Cost The calculated cost value 

will be the parcel's final 
value. 



Another field that is useful in describing the 
reason for a value override is the PARCEL 
TIEBACK (190) field. This field is particularly 
helpful if the value override is because of another 
parcel; a multi-parcel property, or a secondary 
location. 



) 



Use Income The income value will be 
the parcel's final value 
unless there is no income 
value generated for the 
parcel, in which case the 
cost value will be the 
parcel's final value. 

Use Override The reviewer's manually 
calculated and eniered 
value in the FINAL 
BASE VALUE (960) 
field will be the parcel's 
final value. If no value 
is entered in field (960), 
the previous final value 
will be used. 

Use Cost The calculated cost value 

Suppress will be the parcel's final 

Income value. No income value 

will be produced for this 

parcel. 



835 INCOME YEAR OVERRIDE COM S9 

Optional 
Enter the last two digits of the effective year built 
to override the age (year built of the properly) that 
is used in calculating building expenses. 

For example, if the expenses for a properly should 
noi be adjusted the same amount as similarly aged 
buildings because of rehabililalion, an elfcclivc age 
can be assigned the building that would make less 
of an age adjustment to the building expenses. 



965 



COM S9 



REVIEWTlR REASON CODE 

Optional 
This field should be used to further explain the 
reason that the system generated values were 
overridden by a manually derived value. A list of 
possible reasons is below. 



Code 


Explanation 


01 


Location 


02 


Secondary location 


03 


Excessive land 


04 


Unique property 


05 


Multiple parcel property 


06 


Subject not typical for model 


07 


Multi-use within the same building 


08 


Non-conforming use within the 




neighborhood 


09 


Economic mis-improvement 


10 


Unfinished construction 


11 


Undivided interest 


12 


Gutted building 


13 


Building partially out of taxing 




jurisdiction 


14 


No predicted value 



CONDOMINIUM VALUE SEGREGATION 

If the FINAL BASE VALUE of this condominium 
master record must be partitioned into General 
and Limited Ownership values, the following two 
fields must both be completed. 



868 GENEIUL OWNERSHIP COM S9 

Optional 
Enter the value of the land and improvements thai 
are held in General Ownership. 



869 LIMITED OWNERSHIP COM S9 

Optional 
Enter ihe value of ihe land and improvements ihai 
are held in Limited Ownership. 



%) 



08/01/89 



34-25 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



34-26 08/01/89 



v^ 



V 



r'' 



if- 



(^ 



APPENDIX 34 



f 



A34.1. UNIQUE COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL DATA COLLECTION PROCEDURES 



A34.1.1. MIXED USE STRUCTURES, 
INCLUDING OFFICE 
WAREHOUSES 

A special problem exists in describing structures 
that have been designed to accommodate tenants 
with varying requirements. They may be mixed - 
with finished office areas, open retail areas, or 
shop and storage areas. To properly handle them, 
they should be classed as follows: 

081 Multi Use - Apartments 

082 Multi Use - Office 

083 Multi Use - Sales 

084 Multi Use - Storage 

However, there arc no distinct separations into 
sections. Since they can be scattered and may 
change as time goes on, it is difficult to list them 
as Section 1, Section 2, Section 3, etc. 



The following procedure is used for this type of 
building. See Example A34-1. 

• The Structure Type is 374 - Retail, Multi 
Occupancy. Do not use 397 - Office / 
Warehouse, since this type of structure is not 
really the same as warehouse construction. 

• Indicate the sizes and classification of the 
various areas on the sketch. 

• Somewhere in the sketch area indicate the total 
area and the area for each Use Type. Also 
indicate the total perimeter. 

• For each Use Type, calculate the actual 
perimeter. 



EXAMPLE A34-1. SKETCH OF A MIXED-USE COMMERCIAL STRUCTURE 



» 



105 1 




' 45 


SHOP& 
*6 STORAGE 


IS CONCRETE BLOCK 

(fl4,625") ' FIN. 

^ ^ 1 OFFICE 

AREA 

60 , 45 


45 


SHOP& 
STORAGE 

110 


45 






FIN. 

OFFICE „ 
AREA ^ 


Total Area = 14,625 SF 




65 




Total Perimeter = 740 FT 




45 



OFFICE: 4,950 SF 134% of Total Area) 
Effective Perimeter = 265 FT 

SHOP/STORAGE: 9,675 SF (66% of Total Area) 
Effective Perimeter = 475 FT 



EXTERIOR OAr* 


INTERIOR DATA 




SEC 
NO 


LEV 
FROM 


ELS 

TO 


DIMENSIONS 
SIZE 


PERIMETER 


USE 
TYPE 


WALL 

HGHT 


EXT 
WALL 


CONST 
CLASS 


%NET 
GHOSS 




INTERIOR 
FINISH % 


PTNS 


HEAT 


»/c 


PLUMS 


PHYS 
CONO 


FUNC 
UTIL 


Gil 
til 


1. 


Qi 




._,?fel5 

i_i'ig_so 


_lw5 


o_S?. 


L^ 
1^ 


Q3 
©3 


i 





fill 




2- 

2. 


1 


1 

1 


2. 
2. 


3 
3 


3 
3 



08/01/89 



A34-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A34.1.2. 



MEZZANINES 



A mezzanine is defined as "A low story formed 
by placing a floor between what would ordinarily 
be the floor and ceiling of a high story." 

In its simplest form, a mezzanine must consist 
of a floor capable of supporting varying degrees of 
load, and some type of horizontal and vertical 
support or frame for that floor. Mezzanines may 
also be closed in for offlces, storage labs, toilet 
rooms, or even living areas. See Example A34-2. 

The proper procedure for handling mezzanines 
In to first describe the basic building as if the 
mezzanine was not there; that is, from the 
standpoint of dimensions, height, plumbing, finish, 
sprinkler, etc. Then proceed on the next line to 
describe the mezzanine using the same section 
number and "Ml-Ml." The number character 
identifies only the number of mezzanines that exist 
in that section. For example, if there were three 
separate mezzanines, they would be listed as "MI- 
MI", "M2-M2", and "M3-M3." The number does 
not refer to the floor on which the mezzanine is 
located. 



The height of the example building is sixteen 
feet. This measurement should be made with 
no regard for mezzanines, as if they did not 
exist. 

(A) is an office mezzanine that is open 
underneath. Since three of the mezzanine's 
sides are the walls of the main structure, there 
is only 60 feet of wall. Always use the "multi- 
use" codes to describe the Use Type and 
indicate the actual height of the mezzanine wall, 
even if it does not go all the way to the main 
structure roof. As with an enclosure, always 
use Exterior Wall Type code "13" for the 
mezzanine walls. Leave Construction Class 
blank. Notice that the office area has a 
different type of heating and air conditioning 
system than the manufacturing area. 

(B) is an open mezzanine used for storage. It 
has no walls, so perimeter is "0". The height to 
the roof from the mezzanine floor is "8" feet, 
even though there are no walls. Indicate 
Exterior Wall Type as "00", since there are no 
walls. Interior finish should be "0", since there 
are no partitions and any finish (i.e., paint) 
present on the main wall may already have been 
accounted for. 



EXAMPLE A34-2. SKETCH SHOWING TWO MEZZANINES 



OFFICE 
MEZZ. 

to: 



120 
IS CONCRETE BLOCK 

100 



(A) 



(A) 





CLOSEO-IN 


. 


OFFICE 




MEZZANINE 


I 


iMOOd join) 


MEZZANINE 






Arm Mow 


a 


iTwzzanint op«n 




to plant 




(B) 



OPEN 

MEZZANINE 
(concrtte dack/ 
itMt framt) 



Atm below 
maz»nin« optn 
to plant 



(B) 

STORAGE 

MEZZANINE 

(op«il 





cxnnioR oxTA 


laTCmOR MT* 




«c 


IIV 
fUM 


lit 

10 


OlMfNSJONS 
Ml 


nmnttm 




■All 
HCHt 


W»ll 


cotist 

CIAS 


%NET 
GIIOSS 




INTfNIOH 
MNISHX 


n«s 


HIAT 


Art 


rium 


fMVJ 

com 


fUHC 

uni 


III 


L 


Ql 


oi 


OfeO,>,Ql5^ 


Al& 


oi^ 


i^ 


9i 


X 




Ul 


19J> 


z 


i 


^ 


z. 


3 


3 


•11 


\_ 


fM 


1i 


Qio 1 Ji 1 oQfrP 


__bO 


O'tl 


Oft 


Li 


Q 




l» 


jiop 


L 


\ 


\ 


X 


3 


i 


•11 


l_ 


'\'h 


f\'L 


•^iO.X.OQSO 


__00 


OftS 


Q3 


0.9 








•n 


pop 


9 


Q 


o 


o 


3 


i 



A34-2 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 34 



t 



A34.1.3. PENTHOUSES entered. It is quite possible to have more than 

one penthouse on a roof. If this is so, describe 

A penthouse is defined as "A building them as Pl-Pl, P2-P2, etc., entering data in all 

constructed on the roof of another building, and positions, 

normally smaller in area than the roof." 

Do not list elevator penthouses or stairway 

First, describe the building as if the penthouse penthouses. The elevator penthouse is included in 

was not there. After all lower floors have been elevator pricing, and stairway penthouses are not 

listed, the penthouse is indicated on the next line significant, 

below the top floor. All positions must be 



08/01/89 A34-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A34.1.4. 



OPEN AREAS 



When upper floors extend beyond the first 
tloor, there exists an "open area" under that 
extension. Do not confuse this situation with 
buildings that have open parking decks on the 
lower levels. The open area exists when there is 
usable space (be it office, apartment, storage or 
whatever) over completely bare area, such as no 
floor or slab. 



Examples A34-3 and A34-4 illustrate the proper 
use of the Open Area codes. Note in E.\ample 
A34-4 that what might be referred to by the office 
building management as "Floor Number 1" becomes 
"Floor Number 2" because in describing the 
building, the parking deck is considered as first 
floor, even though it is partly below grade. 

If questions or problems arise in the listing of 
complex buildings, consult your supervisor for 
interpretation. 



EXAMPLE A34-3. SKETCH SHOWING OPEN AREAS 



IS 


3S MASONRY & GLASS 
OPEN AREA 


(^.250^ 




4S MASONRY & GLASS 


so 


150 




15 


3S MASONRY & GLASS 
OPEN AREA 


(^^250^ 



4th FLOOR 
3rd FLOOR 
2nd FLOOR 



1st FLOOR 
(GROUND LEVEL) 













■ UllDIIIC OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMrRDVEMEflTS 












u» 


•Of 
CODE 


(l«T 

l.M 


MASUNEMfNT 

t 


WASUREaElIT 

1 


lOEN 
UNITS 


RCN 








Ml 

m 

CO 


1 


C*fi 


- 


___L5_ 


— i_i — 


OI. 






























CXTIRIOR DATA 


IRTERIOR DATA 




•0 


fROM 


IIS 

to 


OIHEiniONS 


MHIHCIEII 


USE 
TYPE 


HCHI 


EXT 


COUSI 
ClASS 


N»EI 
CROSS 




1N1C«10« 
MNISH\ 


PTHS 


HEAT 


A/C 


nu»t 


fMYS 
COND 


<u« 
um 


111 
til 


1. 
1 


0?- 


Oi 

oM 


o5oix,gi5 


P 


-4 


90 
^9 


o5 


3 

i 


il 

iO 













H7 


i9X> 
i<>_o 


1. 

2. 


i 


i 


2. 


1 


i 



A34-4 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 34 



D 



A34.1.4. OPEN AREAS (Cont'd) 



EXAMPLE A34-4. SKETCH OF OPEN AND BELOW-GRADE AREAS 



30 


3S MASONRY & GLASS /^mt^ 
OPEN AREA Ci:^ 


50 


5S MASONRY & GLASS 
PARKING DECK 

170 


20 


2S MASONRY & GLASS ^^ ^„„"Nv 
PARKING DECK V^J.WOy 



5th FLOOR 



4th FLOOR 
3rd FLOOR 



Ground 



Level 



2nd FLOOR 



1st FLOOR 
paFkTng'peck' 

- Partly Below Ground 











BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS 












LMC 


BOF 
C00€ 


l.M 


IKASUREMENT 


MEASUREMENT 
2 


lOEN 
UNITS 


RCN 










G01 

HI 
Ml 
M4 


1 


OA^ 


— 


30 


__._inQ 


OJ 
































EXTERIOR DATA 




INTERIOR DATA 




SIC 
HO 


FROK 


EIS 

10 


OWEKSIONS 
SIZE 


PERIMETER 


USE 
TYPE 


WAIL 
HGHT 


EXT 

*»Ll 


CONST 
CLASS 


\NET 
GROSS 




INTERIOR 
flNISH% 


PTNS 


HEAT 


*/c 


pcum 


PMYS 
CONO 


FUNC 
UTIL 


Cll 
tl! 

tl] 


I 
L 


01 


qi 


07q , X , 917 
qiq,x,0i7 
OfiQ.X, o_vT 



P 

g 


_5 


«o 
99 


0^ 

05 




1 


i9 
i? 


op 


•2. 
■X 
2 









sn 
m 

511 


IPP 

v_op 
ipp 


•2. 


Q 
i 
i 


q 
i 


1 

1 


3 
3 
3 


1 
3 



08/01/89 



A34-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A34.1.5. 



OPEN PARKING DECKS 



A34.1.5.1. Parking Decks as a Separate 
Structure 

General Building Data 

1. Enter the total number of parking spaces in 
Number of Units. 

2. Enter Structure Type Code 338. See 
Example A34-5. 

3. Building Number, Year Built, and Number 
Of Identical Units should also be entered. 



Exterior I Interior Data 

1. Enter "00" in Exterior Walls for all levels, 
except basement - which should have "09" 
entered. 

2. For the lower open parking deck levels, 
enter a Use Type of "090" and complete all 
Exterior / Interior data positions (Fields 611- 
618). 

3. For the upper open parking deck level, enter 
"990" in Use Type. There must be an entry 
in each entry position from Section Number 
through and including Exterior Wall (Fields 
611-618). It is also necessary to make 
entries in Physical Condition and Functional 
Utility. 



EXAMPLE A34-5. SKETCH OF PARKING DECK 




4th LEVEL 
3rd LEVEL 
2nd LEVEL 
1« LEVEL 



10 
10 
10 



EXTERIOR DATA 


INTERIOR DATA 




SIC 


liV 
(■oil 


10 


OIHEIOlOlli 
SI2E 


piRimrEii 


use 

TYPI 


•in 
HCHT 


WALL 


CO«SI 
CLASS 


null 

Gloss 




INIINION 
FINISH « 


nn 


HEII 


kit 


HUM 


f«vs 
COMO 


fUHC 
Ulll 


III 


1 


Oi 


Q\_ 


ilOiX.Oll© 


jA<f£> 


Q3P 


\o 


Q0 


\ 


__ 


Ml 


iOP 


1 


p 








2 


3 


ill 


\_ 


oa 


03 


ilQiXiOiio 


J»<sQ 


090 


IP 


op 


3 


__ 


12! 


iPjD 


2. 


Q 


g 


Q 


i 


i 


• ■I 


\_ 


Q4 


0^ 


lio.i.oiap 


-hi© 


ISO 


OP 


QP 


- 





li] 





- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 



A34-6 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 34 



f) 



A34.1.5.2. Parking Decks Connected to and 
as Levels of an Office Building 

General Building Data 

1. The Structure Type Code is 354 - High Rise 
Office Building. See Example A34-6. 

2. Do not enter parking spaces in Number of 
Units. 

3. Enter remaining data as usual. 
Exterior I Interior Data 

1. Enter "090" in Use Type and enter "00" in 
Exterior Walls for each parking deck level, 
except basement levels. 

2. If a basement level exists, enter "09" in 
Exterior Walls. 



5. 



For upper levels excluding the upper open 
deck, enter as with other structures, except 
for entering "00" in Exterior Walls. 

For the upper open parking deck level (if 
not roofed), enter "990" in Use Type and 
proceed as described for parking decks as a 
separate structure. 

On the level where office structure begins, 
there would be two entries. 



Example: 






Levels 




Use Type 


02 to 02 


Parking Deck 


090 


02 to 02 


Office 


053 



EXAMPLE A34-6. SKETCH OF PARKING DECK WITH OFFICE BUILDING ABOVE 



3 LEVEL 
PARKING DECK 

60 


4S GLASS AND MASONRY 
PARKING DECK 
PARKING DECK 

Ql 1,250^ 
90 





OFFICE 




OFFICE 




OFFICE 


PARKING DECK 


OFFICE 


PARKING DECK 


PARKING DECK 



£XTEHIOB DATA 


INTERIOR DATA 




SEC 
NO 


moM 


EIS 

TO 


DIMENSIONS 
SliE 


PERIMETER 


USE 
TYPE 


WALL 
HGHT 


EXT 

WALL 


CONST 
Cl»SS 


»«EI 

oaoss 




INTEniON 
flNISH% 


»T«S 


HEAT 


A/C 


PLUH« 


mvs 

CONO 


UTIL 


in 


I 


Oi 


OL 


11.5i?iOi50 


_5_5p 


09^ 


vo 


Qr> 


3 




SII 


ICO 


^ 





P 





3 


•3 


SI! 


\_ 


Ql. 


o^ 


t^5,^,OiSp 


_55^ 


090 


10 


QO 


3 




iil 


\og 


1 











3 


3 


113 


1 


03 


o^ 


ia^.?..fi535 


AlQ 


05J 


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1 




til 


\gp 


2. 


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\ 


2. 


3 


3 


l>« 


i 


o3 


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il5,X,Qjfti^ 


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QQ 


OQ 


- 


— 


SI4 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


3 



08/01/89 



A34-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A34.1.6. 



ELEVATORS 



When describing elevators in Building Other 
Features - Attached Improvements, indicate the 
iollowing: 

• Enter the pound capacity in the Measurement 1 
column, justifying to the right. 

• Enter number of stops in the first two positions 
of the Measurement 2 column, justifying to the 



left. Use a leading zero if necessary (three 
stops would be entered as "03"). 

• Enter elevator speed in the last four positions 
of the Measurement 2 column. Use a leading 
zero when necessary (750 feet per minute would 
be entered as "0750"). 

Example A34-7 is for a 3,500 pound capacity, 
electric passenger elevator with eight stops and a 
speed of 500 feet per minute. There are two 
identical elevators. 



ELEVATOR SPEED GUIDELINES 



Freight 



Passenger 



1 to 3 Floors 

4 to 10 Floors 

11 to 20 Floors 

20 and over 

1 to 3 Floors 
4 to 7 Floors 
8 to 12 Floors 
13 to 16 Floors 
17 to 20 Floors 

21 to 25 Floors 
25 to 40 Floors 
41 to 49 Floors 
50 and over 



50' per minute 
100' per minute 
150' per minute 
200' per minute 

150' per minute 
200' per minute 
250' per minute 
3(X)' per minute 
350' per minute 
400' per minute 
500' per minute 
800' per minute 
1000-1400' per minute 



EXAMPLE A34-7. DESCRIBING ELEVATORS 





■UllDING OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMTROVEMENTS 






line 


•OF 

cone 


i./.i 


iEASUHCMENT 

1 


MCASURCMENT 

1 


lOEN 
UHITS 


NCN 




Ui 
tn 
m 


1 


fLl 


- 


__3iQ0 


C8.05PS 


o> 














___ 


_ 






__ 





A34-8 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 34 



t 



A34.1.7. 



ESCALATORS 



Use the following procedure for escalators: 

Always enter the correct line number (which 
corresponds with the first or main floor of the 
building). 

Enter structure code "ELS" for 32" wide 
escalators and "EL6" for 48" wide escalators. 
(Note: These are the only sizes accepted.) 

Leave the Flat Value column blank. 

Enter distance between floors in the 
Measurement 1 column, justifying to the right. 
This is the total distance from one floor to the 
next floor, not ceilings. 



• Enter the number "1" in the Measurement 2 
column. This number is also to be justified to 
the right. 

• Enter the number of identical units. (Note: To 
be identical, the width, the structure code [ELS 
or EL6], and the distance between floors must be 
identical. Additional lines must be used if the 
escalators are not identical. 

Example A34-8 is for a three-story building with 
one 32" wide moving stairway going up and one 
going down, and one 48" wide moving stairway 
going up and one going down, serving all three 
floors. The distance between the first and second 
floors is 18 feet. The distance between the second 
and third floors is 14 feet. 



EXAMPLE A34-8. DESCRIBING ESCALATORS 



BUILDING OTHER FEATURES - ATTACHED IMPROVEMENTS 




LINE 


lOF 
CODE 


HAT 


WASUriEIIEIIT 
I 


MEASUREMENT 


IO£N 
UNITS 


«c« 


60 1 
602 
b03 
6H 


L 

1 
1 


£14 
6U 


- 


\3 

A 

v\ 

H 


__u__i 


01. 
ox. 











08/01/89 



A34-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A34.2. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CLASSES 



A34.2.1. WOOD FRAME / JOIST / BEAM (Construction Class 1) 




Wood Joist and Deck 
Brick Load Bearing Wall 




Wood or Steel Truss, 
Concrete Block Load Bearing Wall 




Wood Joist and Rafters, Brick on Wood Frame Wall 



A34-10 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 34 



I) 



A34.2.2. FIRE RESISTANT (Construction Class 2) 




Reinforced Concrete 
with Imbedded Steel Rods 




Reinforced Concrete 
with Innbedded Steel Rods 



M-i, 




Masonry Curtain Wall 



08/01/89 



A34-11 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



A34.2.3. FIRE PROOF (Construction Class 3) 





Fire Proofed Steel Frame 



A34-12 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 34 



A34.2.4. PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL (Construction Class 4) 




Light Steel Skeleton Franrie 
with Prefabricated Steel Siding 



m 




Light Steel Framing 



Columns, beams and ties 




Wall cover, girts, and window 



08/01/89 



A34-13 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



I 



A34-14 



08/01/89 



e 



35. SKETCH VECTORING 



f 



35. SKETCH VECTORING 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 






PARAGRAPH 








NO. OR 






NO. OR 








FIELD 


PARAGRAPH TITLE OR 




FIELD 


PARAGRAPH TITLE OR 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION OF FIELD 


PAGE 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION OF FIELD 




PAGE 


35.1. 


CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 


1 


35.5.1. 


ANGLE COMMAND - V 




5 


649 


DELETE: SKETCH VECTORS 


1 


35.5.2. 


FINISH COMMAND - F 




6 


651-658 


SKETCH VECTORS 


1 


35.5.3. 


OFF-SET COMMAND - S 




7 


35.2. 


DEFINITIONS 


2 


35.5.4. 


POINT COMMAND - P 




8 


35.3. 


SKETCH VECTORING RULES 


3 


35.5.5. 


RECTANGLE COMMAND ■ 


•X 


10 


35.4. 


PROCEDURE 


4 


35.6. 


COMMON ERRORS ENCOUNTERED IN 




35.5. 


COMMANDS 


5 




SKETCHING 




11 



35.1. CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 



All of the Sketch Vectoring data is contained in one screen. The following list shows the fields in numerical 
order and describes the data requirements for them. It also shows the number of the screen that contains the 
field. 



f 



649 DELETE: SKETCH VECTORS 

Optional RES/COM GPD 

This is a computer file maintenance entry and 
normally will not be utilized on the field card. 
The purpose of the delete is to remove all data 
previously entered in the computer for the Sketch 
Vector fields 651-658. This function is initiated by 
selecting option "06" from the On-Line Menu of 
either the Residential or Commercial sub-systems. 

651-658 SKETCH VECTORS RES S7 or COM CS 

Required entry for residential dwellings. 

Optional entry for commercial structures. 
Sketch Vectoring can be performed for both 
residential and commercial structures. The purpose 
of Sketch Vectoring is to encode the perimeter of 
a building as a set of vector strings so that the 
computer can plot a sketch and compute the 
square foot area of the building. In addition for 
Commercial buildings, the computer will calculate 
the perimeter of the building. 

The following instructions can be used for 
sketching both Residential and Commercial 
buildings. Specific instructions for the different 
building types follow the general instructions. 

There is a slight difference in the terminology used 
for sketching Residential and Commercial 



buildings. The first Residential area that is 
sketched is the main part of the house. The main 
part is the dwelling described in the "500 fields". 
This area is defined as AO (zero). The remaining 
areas to be sketched, defined as Al through A8, 
are the Additions to the house, as described in 
fields 601-608. 

The first Commercial area that is sketched is the 
Building Section or Level described on the first 
Exterior/Interior line, field 611. This area is 
defined as AO. The remaining areas to be 
sketched, Al through A7, are the Building Sections 
or Levels described on the remaining 
Exterior/Interior lines, fields 612-618. 

There will be complex commercial or industrial 
buildings to which the simple one-to-one vectoring 
instructions will not apply. For complex buildings, 
enter the vectors from the drawn sketch or enter a 
vector string for each separate part of the sections 
that are described on the Exterior Data lines. 
Examples of Commercial Sketch Vectors are shown 
in the Appendix to this Section. 

For the Residential main building or the first 
Commercial Building Section (both identified as 
AO), the computer system will put the point of an 
imaginary pen down on an imaginary piece of 



08/01/89 



35-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



paper to begin drawing the sketch of the area. 
The "pen" will start at the lower left comer of the 
building sketch. Then, based on the vector 
information you enter, the system will move the 
"pen" to draw the perimeter of the area being 
entered. 

For each Residential addition or subsequent 
Commercial Building Section, the computer 
assumes that it will start from the original starting 
point, the lower-left comer of the main building, 
and move the "pen" to a new starting point where 
it will begin to sketch the new Addition or Section. 
For a Residential dwelling, the system can handle 
vector information for the basic building and eight 
additions. Eight Commercial Building Sections or 
levels can be coded. 



Residential Sketches. The areas that are calculated 
by the Residential Sketch Vector Program are 
moved to the appropriate dwelling area fields 
(fields 581 and 582) and will be used in the 
calculation of the cost and market approach values. 
Areas that are sketch-vectored will override any 
areas entered in fields 581 and 582. 

Commercial Sketches. The areas and perimeters 
that are calculated by the Commercial Sketch 
Vector Program are for descriptive purposes only. 
Unlike residential sketches, the computer will not 
move the calculated areas and perimeters to the 
Exterior/Interior Line fields. 



35.2. DEFINITIONS 



Sketch 




Identified 


Vector 




on 


Sketch 


Identifier 


Residential 


As 




AO 


Main Body of House 




* 


Al 


1st addition 




A 


A2 


2nd addition 




B 


A3 


3rd addition 




C 


A4 


4th addition 




D 


A5 


5th addition 




E 


A6 


6th addition 




F 


A7 


7th addition 




G 


A8 


8th addition 




H 



Commercial 



Identified 
on Sketch 
As 



1st Section 
2nd Section 
3rd Section 
4th Section 
5th Section 
6th Section 
7th Section 
8th Section 



A 
B 
C 
D 
E 
F 
G 
H 



Addition - Features of the building that are above, 
below, or beside the basic structure, such 
as basements, attached garages, porches, 
canopies, bays, upper stories, overhangs, 
or other features that were either built 
along with the basic structure or added to 
it at a later date. 

C Commence - instmction for "pen" down 

or start drawing. 

D Down - to instruct the "pen" to move 

down. 

F Finish Command - the command used to 

close a sketch. 

H Halt - instruction to signify the end of all 

sketching. 



L Left - to instruct the "pen" to move left. 

N No vector string will be entered for that 

particular addition or section. 

NV No vectors will be entered at all. 

P Point Command - to identify a point 

within a sketch vector string for later 
reference. 

POB Point Of Beginning - the point where the 
drawing of an area began with the 
Commence instruction. There is a main 
POB for the entire sketch. It is the POB 
for the residential main building or first 
commercial section. In addition, there is 
a POB for each residential addition or 
each additional commercial building 
section sketched. 



35-2 



08/01/89 



35. SKETCH VECTORING 



^ 



R Right - to instruct the "pen" to move 

right. 

S Offset Point Command - used when 

sketching different floors of a dwelling 

U Up - to instruct the "pen" to move up. 

V Angle Command - used to draw that part 

of a building that does not form a 90 
degree angle. 

Vector - A line that is described by both a 

direction and length, for example: up 37 
feet is coded U37, or right 23 feet is 
coded R23. 



Vector String - A set of vectors that describe an 
area, for example: 

U34R50D24L18D10L32 could describe a 
1520 square foot main floor area of a 
house. 

X Rectangle Command - to complete the 

description of a rectangular area by 
continuing clockwise to the Point of 
Beginning of the Main Building, Addition 
or Section. 



35.3. SKETCH VECTORING RULES 



For coding of sketch vectors on the Data 
Collection Form: 



A maximum of 30 characters (including spaces) 
may be entered on each line of sketch data. 



There are three-character positions available for 
each vector, each descriptor, (AO, A5, etc.), or 
each command (C, H, etc.). Only alpha 
characters are allowed in the first-character 
position. Only numeric characters (or blanks) 
are allowed in the last two character positions. 

For commercial vectors, when the distance is a 
3-digit number, enter the direction in the first 
position and the distance in the next 3-position 
field. 

All sketches will have one main Point Of 
Beginning; the lower left-hand corner of the 
residential Main Building or first commercial 
Section. All other vector strings for Additions 
or additional Sections, will begin from this 
point. 

All vector strings must return to the POB of 
the individual vector string. This means that 
each Main body. Addition, or Section vector 
string must "close". The Finish Command may 
be used to complete a vector string. 

Outside dimensions required to position an 
Addition or Section may not always be shown 
and may have to be calculated from other 
dimensions shown on the sketch, or will have to 
be determined by the data collector in the field. 



Each Addition or Section (Al, A2, A3, etc.) 
may be started on a new line. This will be an 
aid for easier future maintenance. However if 
needed because of lengthy vector strings, it is 
possible to begin the next vector string on the 
same line as another vector string, even in the 
middle of the sketch line. 

A maximum of eight Residential Additions is 
permitted. 

Residential - The maximum continuous 
dimension allowed for any length or width is 99 
feet. To enter any dimension in excess of 99 
feet, use two vector strings to describe the area. 
Commercial - The maximum continuous 
dimension is 999 feet. 

If no vectors are to be entered, enter the 
instruction "NV", No Vectors, in the first two 
positions on the first line of entry. 

If for some reason an Addition is not to be 
sketched, (for example: too complex, or its 
circular in shape), enter the Addition 
Identification (Al, A2, etc.) and the instruction 
"N", no addition vectors. The area of the 
addition will have to be manually calculated and 
entered in the appropriate field. 



08/01/89 



35-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



35.4. PROCEDURE 



Determine the POB or starting point of the 
main body of the building. This is always 
the lower left comer of the sketch of the 
main building, (the southwest corner). 

The identifier for the main body of the 
building (AO) and the instruction meaning 
"pen" down, Commence is pre-printed in its 
proper position on first line of the Sketch 
Vector block of the Residential Data 
Collection Form. This entry will have to be 
coded on the Commercial Data Collection 
Form. 

When you begin entering the vector data 
into the system, enter "AOC" as the first 
three characters on the first line. This 
instruction tells the computer to Commence 
drawing the main body of the building, "AO". 
The only exception is to enter "NV", no 
vector, if there are to be no vector entries. 

Enter the balance of the required vectors to 
completely enclose the main body of the 
improvement, and return to the POB. 
When the vector string is closed, the 
imaginary "pen" will automatically "rise". 

Vector all rectangular sections of the sketch 
by using the Rectangle Command, "X". See 
the Command Section of these instructions 
for use of the "X" command. Use of the "X" 
command not only simplifies closure of 
sections, but also saves time and reduces the 
size of vector strings. 

If more than 30 spaces are required to 
vector any portion of the sketch, complete 
the vector string on the following line. 

Enter the Addition Identification Number 
(Al, A2, etc.) and then the vector string 
required to place the "pen" at the POB of 
the Addition or Section. It is necessary to 
instruct the computer to go from the main 
POB to the POB of the Addition or Section. 

Another method to move the "pen" to the 
beginning of an Addition or Section is to 
use the Point Command. See the Command 
Section of these instructions for use of the 
"P" command. 



10. 



11. 



Remember: all vectoring starts from the 
lower left corner (the main POB) of the 
main improvement (for Commercial 
structures - the first Section entered). 

NOTE: Once you have become proficient in 
veaoring, it is often desirable to 
"shortcut" outside or through the main 
body of the improvement to reach the 
POB of an addition. By following this 
practice, the POB can be reached with a 
maximum of two vectors. This may often 
be simpler than following the perimeter 
of the dwelling to the POB of the 
addition, but extreme caution should be 
used since the distance of these vectors 
may not be readily identifiable from the 
sketch. 

When the POB of the Addition or Section is 
reached, enter the instruction Commence, 
and then enter the balance of vectors 
required to completely enclose the Addition 
and return to the POB of the addition. 

In the event that there is an angle in the 
addition, two options are available. First, if 
the addition is trapezoidal you may square 
the addition by using the average length of 
the parallel sides and vector the addition as 
a rectangle. Second, you may choose to use 
the Angle Command, "V". See the 
Command Section of these instructions for 
use of the "V" command. 

Enter the vectors required for the balance of 
the Additions or Sections in order (A2, A3, 
etc.). Each addition may be started on a 
separate line (Residential: 652, 653, 654, 
etc.). 

After all vectors for the main body and all 
additions (for Commercial structures - all 
ExteriorAnterior Lines) are entered, enter 
the instruaion Halt, to indicate all the 
vector strings are completed. The Halt 
instruction must be the last entry made in 
the sketch vector area. Only one "H" may 
be entered. 



35-4 



08/01/89 



35. SKETCH VECTORING 



35.5. COMMANDS 

The examples following each of the Command descriptions have the various commands underscored so you can 
find them more easily. 



35.5.1. ANGLE COMMAND - V 

The Angle Command, "V", is used to draw that 
part of a building that does not form a 90 degree 
angle. The Angle Command consists of "V" and a 
pair of vectors (direction and distance) entries. 
The angled distance is calculated as the diagonal of 
the rectangle described by the entries following the 
"V". 



The Angle Command can be effectively used for 
most angles. However, because of the limitations 
of computer terminals and printers, the display of 
the angle on the terminal and paper copy is not 
shown. Rather the ends of the angled line are 
marked with 'X's' and a number designating the 
length is displayed between them. The accuracy of 
the area calculations will not be affected by the 
limitations of the display equipment. 



Example - (See Figure 35-1) 

Main Building Vector String with the Angle Command 
A0CU40R20VU1 0R1 0R20VD1 0R1 OFH 



ADDN. UMR 1ST 2N0 3R0 AREA 



601 A 

602 8 

603 C 

604 

605 E 

606 E 

607 S 

608 H 



_ _ _ °°°° 
_ _ _ 0000 

_ _ _ 0000 

_ _ _ oo°o 

_ _ _ 0000 

_ _ _ 000° 
_ _ _ 0000 
_ _ _ _ 0000 
GFA MAIN AREA 02600 

651 AOCU40R20VU10R10R20VD10R10FH 

652 [^ 

653 

654 

655 

656 

657 

658 



40 



X 20 — X 

14 14 



+ 20 — X 



40 



-60- 



TO ALTER VIEW OF SKETCH: NW.NE.SW.SE. ALL; or A-H; op FIELD CODE NUMBER 
PRESS CMO KEY 3 TO EXIT PARCEL NEXT FIELD 701 



Figure 35-1 . Use of the Angle Command. 



08/01/89 



35-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



35.5.2. FINISH COMMAND - F 

The Finish Command allows you to complete a 
vector string without entering the last two vectors 
necessary to close the sketch. This command 
causes the system to calculate the last two 
direction/distance entries. The result is automatic 
closure of the vector string. The Finish Command 
can be very useful when vectoring irregular shapes 
with lengthy vector suings. 



The use of the Finish Command can save five 
keystrokes over the standard commands used to 
close a sketch. 



ExampI* - (See Figure 35-2.) 

Main Building Vector String with the Finish Command: 
A0CU20R5U20R1 0D1 0R1 OF 

Main Building Vector String without the Finish Command: 
A0CU20R5U20R1 GDI 0R1 0D30L25 



lOQN. LWR 


1ST 2N0 3R0 


area 








601 A 


10 


0244 








602 B 

603 C 

604 


— _ _ 


0000 
0000 
0000 




+.-10— + 


605 E 

606 F 

607 G 

608 H _ 


GFA MaTn area 


0000 
0000 
0000 
0000 
00800 




1 
20 

1 
1 
1 


10 
1 


651 A0CU20 


RSUZORICDIORIOF 




+-5+ 


* 


652 A1R25C 


J18R808R10FH 




1 






653 






_ t 
20 

I 1 

_ 1 

_ 1 
+. 






654 








655 








656 








657 








658 






—25- 



-10—+ 



30— 8-+ 
I 8 

18 [ 
1 +A-10— + 
I 10 

I I 
+ 18 + 



TO ALTER VIEW OF SKETCH: NW.NE.SW.SE, ALL; or A-H; or FIELD CODE NUMBER 
PRESS CMO KEY 3 TO EXIT PARCEL NEXT FIELD 701 



Figure 35-2. Use of the Finish Command. 



35-6 



08/01/89 



35. SKETCH VECTORING 



35.5.3. OFF-SET COMMAND - S 

The Off-Set Command is designed so that the 
lower and upper story areas of a building can be 
separated from the main floor to be better 
displayed on the screen or when printed. This is 
an advantage if those areas are complex or not the 
same shape as the main floor of the structure. 

The Off-Set Command is always followed by a 
vector, a direction and distance. The vector 
instructs the computer in what direction and how 
far from the off-set point to sketch the addition. 
The next instruction is Commence and then the 
vector string describing the addition. 

The sketch program will display an "S" where the 
off-set begins. The distance and direction of the 
off-set is up to your preference and experience. 



A sketch may have several Off-Set Commands, one 
for the upper floor and one for the lower level. 
However, you should be careful with too large of 
off-sets, because of the automatic scaling of the 
sketching program. The sketch may become too 
small to be of use to you. The size of the sketch 
will not affect the area calculations. 



Example • (See Figure 35-3) 

Addition Vector string (A1) with the Off-Set Command: 
A1 U5R1 5SU40 CU30R1 5D1 0R1 5D20L30H 

NOTE: In this example the second floor area is 

coded Ets an addition because the second floor area 
is significantly different than the first floor area. In 
cases like this, where the upper floor is coded as an 
addition, be sure to set the USE STORY HEIGHT 
INDICATOR to 'N' so that the calculated upper floor 
area ia not doubled. 



AOON. LWR 1ST 2ND 3R0 AREA 










601 A 10 0750 

602 B 0000 

603 C ' 0000 

604 D 0000 

605 E 0000 

606 F 0000 

607 G 0000 

608 H 0000 

GFA MAIN AREA 01425 




*— 1510 

I 1 
30 +A-1 

1 

t 

1 

+- 30— 


5-* 
20 

1 

1 


651 A0CU35R30D10R15025L45 


+ 30 — 10 




652 AlU5R15SU40aJ30R15D10R15D20L30 


1 


1 




653 H 


1 
35 

1 
1 
1 




+-15-+ 


654 


1 


655 


25 


656 


s 1 


657 


1 


658 




45 ♦ 



TO ALTER VIE« OF SKETCH: NW.NE,SW,SE. ALL; or A-H; or FIELD CODE NUMBER 
PRESS CMC KEY 3 TO EXIT PARCEL NEXT FIELD 701 



Figure 35-3. Use of the Off-Set Command. 



08/01/89 



35-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



35.5.4. POINT COMMAND - P 

The Point Command gives you the ability to code 
the location of various points of the main 
structure, Additions, or Sections that will be used 
for later reference. 

The format of this command is ?n. The number n 
can be any number from (zero) through 7. The 
n numbers must be assigned in order beginning 
with 0, and continuing in sequence with no 
skipping of numbers. 

The first time that a ?n command is used will 
assign that location of the sketch to that Pn 
number. The second and subsequent use of that 
Pn number, moves the "pen" to that previously 
assigned location of the sketch. The "pen" may be 
in either the "up" or "down" position depending on 
what you need to be done. 

While the n numbers must be assigned in order, 
they can be used in any order after they are 
assigned. 



The Point Command can be used to either "trace 
backward" or "trace forward" depending on the 
need. 



Pen "Up" Example - (See Figure 35-4.) 

When sketching a main building with three additions, the 
POB of each addition may be described as PO, P1 , and 
P2. Then when it is necessary to move the 'pen' from the 
main POB of the main building to the POB of the addition, 
all you need to enter is the Pn. 

Vectors: 

A0CU35P0R30P1D1 0R1 5P2D25L45 

A1P1CR8X10 

A2P2CR8X15 

A3P0CU4X25H 



ADON. LWR 1ST 2ND 3R0 AREA 

601 A _ 11 _ _ 0080 

602 B _ 37 _ _ 0120 

603 C _ 33 _ _ 0100 

604 D _ _ _ _ 0000 

605 E _ _ _ _ 0000 

606 F _ _ _ _ 0000 

607 S _ _ _ _ 0000 

608 H __ _ _ _ 0000 

GFA MAIN AREA 1425 

651 AQCU35POR30P1D10R15P2D25L45 

652 A1P1CR8X10 ^ 

653 A2P2CR8X15 

654 A3P0CU4X25H 

655 

656 

657 

658 



35 



25 4 

30 ♦— +— 8-+ 

10 10 
I A I 



♦ 15...+.^.-f 

I t 

15 8 15 

25 t 

I I 

♦—8-+ 

I 
I 



-45- 



TO ALTER VIEW OF SKETCH: NW.NE.SW.SE, ALL; or A-H; or FIELD CODE Nl*IBER 
PRESS CMO KEY 3 TO EXIT PARCEL NEXT FIELD 701 



Figure 35-4. Use of the Point Command in the "Pen Up" Mode. 



35-8 



08/01/89 



35. SKETCH VECTORING 



Pen "Down" Example - (See Figure 35-S.) 

A house that is built on a sloped lot with the rear lower 
level exposed, has a deck that wraps around two sides of 
it. The POB of the deck and a corner of the deck that 
join the house are both identified with a Point The Point 



describing the POB of the addition will be used twice. 
First to move the "p*n" 'fOTi the main POB to the addition 
POB. And secondly, to trace backward' that portion of 
deck that adjoins the house. 

Vectors: 

A0CU35P0FI30D1 0R1 5D25P1L45 
A1 P0CU1 2R40D1 4R1 3D33L8P1 POH 



AOON. LWH ISr 2N0 3R0 AREA 

601 A _ 33 _ _ 0884 

602 a _ _ _ _ 0000 

603 C _ _ _ _ 0000 

604 D _ _ _ _ 0000 

605 E _ _ _ _ 0000 

606 F _ _ _ _ 0000 

607 G _ _ _ _ 0000 

608 H _ _ _ _ 0000 

GFA MAIN AREA 01425 

651 A0CU35P0R30010R15D25P1L45 

652 A1POCU12R40014R13D33L8P1POH 

653 2 

654 

655 • 

656 ^ 

657 

658 



t- 40 + 

12 14 

I I 

+ 30^ ♦ I 

I +—13--+ 

10 t 

[ t 

A+.— 15— + 33 

t t 

25 I 

I I 

I I 

• 45 +--8+ 



35 



TO ALTER VIEW OF SKETCH: NW.NE.SW.SE, AIL; or A-H; or FIELD CODE NUMBER 
PRESS CMO KEY 3 TO EXIT PARCEL NEXT FIELD 701 



Figure 35-5. Use of the Point Command in the "Pen Down" Mode. 



08/01/89 



35-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



35.5.5. RECTANGLE COMMAND • X 

The Rectangle Command, "X", allows you to sketch 
a rectangular area, either main building. Addition, 
or Section by entering only two sides of the area. 
Use of the "X" command not only simplifies 
closure of these areas, but also saves time and 
reduces the size of vector strings. 

To use the "X" command, position the "pen" at the 
corner of the area to be sketched. Then enter 
Commence; a vector, a direction (U, D, L, or R) 
and distance; an "X"; and finally, the distance of 
the next clockwise side of the rectangle. 



Exampl* - (See Figure 35^.) 

A concrete block comer grocery store built in 1949 has 
two recent additions added to the building. The first is a 
10' X 35' glass front entry way and the second is a 15' x 
20' metal receiving area at the rear of the building. 

Vectors: 

A1D10R10CU 10X35 
A2U30R5CU15X20 





LEVEL 


PERIM 


AREA 




A 


01 TO 01 


0185 


002100 




B 


01 TO 01 


0090 


000350 




C 


01 TO 01 


0070 


000300 


+ — -20 — + 30 + 




E 


XX TO XX 


0000 


000000 


15 C 15 1 
1 1 1 


XX TO XX 


0000 


000000 


F 


XX TO XX 


0000 


000000 


+-.+— 2520 — ^ 1 


G 


XX TO XX 


0000 


000000 


1 1 


H 


XX TO XX 


0000 


000000 


1 A 45 
30 1 


651 


A0CU30R25U15R30D45L55 


1 1 


652 


A1D10R10CU10X35 




1 1 


653 A2U30R5CU15X20H 
654 




i 1 




1 1 


655 








+'—10 55 10 + 


656 








1 B i 


657 








+ 35 + 


558 












TO ALTER VIEW OF 


SKETCH: 


NW.NE.SM.SE, ALL; or A-H; or FIELD CODE NUMBER 


PRESS CMO KEY 3 


TO EXIT PARCEL 


NEXT FIELD 701 



Figure 35-6. Use of the Rectangle Command. 



35-10 



08/01/89 



35. SKETCH VECTORING 



35.6. COMMON ERRORS ENCOUNTERED IN SKETCHING 



1. Missing Halt. 

2. Total of Down dimensions not equal to total 
of Up dimensions. 

3. Total of Right dimensions not equal to total 
of Left dimensions. 

4. Missing Commence in vector string. 

5. More than one Commence in vector string. 

6. First character after Commence is not alpha. 

7. First character in vector string not Addition 
Identification. 

8. Second character in vector string not 
numeric (1-8). 



9. Second character in vector siring greater 
than 8. 

10. Two continuous vectors showing no change 
in direction. 

11. Addition Identification numbers not 
sequential - for example, A6 must follow A5. 

12. Residential Additions: 

a. Addition sketched, but with no 
corresponding description in fields 
601-608. 

b. Conversely, addition described, but with 
no corresponding vector strings in fields 
652-658. 



08/01/89 



35-11 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



^ 



k 



35-12 08/01/89 



APPENDIX 35 



A35. SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLES 



The following examples demonstrate how to properly code additions and vector sketches, making effective 
use of the different vector commands. Each example includes a sample sketch as it might be drawn and 
labeled on the property record card. The appropriate addition entries and a correct set of sketch vectors have 
been recorded. 



TYPICAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 1 




#1 CANF 



Canopy 



ADDITIONS 


AOO 


CO 


LWR 


1ST 


2ND 


3R0 


AREA 


AOO 


CD 


.WR 


1ST 


2N0 


3RD 


AREA 


AOOITION CODES 


B01-A 


A1 




n 








6a9-E 


AS 












10 tSF 21 ifM 

11 OPF 25 JTM 






















8021 


A2 


606'F 


A6 


13 COPF 26 B*YM 

14 EPF 30 CPF 

15 UTF 32 CANF 

16 BAYF 33 WO 
19 GRF 50 BU 


ns^ 


A3 












6076 


*' 












__ 


__ 


„ 


















20 tSM 91 MHA 

21 0PM 92 MET 
23 CDPM 99 MV 


604-0 


A4 


6MN 


AS 


SKETCH VECTORS 


SSI 
6S2 
693 
694 
699 
6S6 
697 
SSI 


A 


,oc 


u^io 


X,5^) 


1 


1 


_1_ 


1 




_i 


, 




4_ 


R,1Z 


c?, 


/?i5 


)Ci5 


H 


_t_ 




_| 


1 


NV 

II 
V • 


• ADDITION 
' COMMENCE 


, 


l_ 


1 


1 


_i_ 


1 






I 


DOWN 
FINISH 




1 




. 1.... 


J 








1 


1 





HALT 
LEFT 


L_ 


i_ 


1 


I_ 


1 


_i_ 


1 




_J 


1 


NO VECTOR 
POINT 


_l 

1_ 


_i 

i_ 


_l 

_l_ 


_l 

1 


_i 

1 


J 


_l 


_l 


_l 

_| 


_l 

_|_ 


RIGHT 

OFFSET 

UP 

ANGLE 

RECTANGLE 

SYMBOL 


_l 


i_ 


—I 




_i 




_1 


_i 


_1 


-I 







08/01/89 



A35-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TYPICAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 2 

This example demonstrates the use of the Finish command, using "F in place of the last two vectors "D28L35" 
within the AO vector string. 



#1 



8 


15 • 


50 


(W) 








30 


CPF 


20 


^^ ^ 


28 




15 


P08 


35 








(101 


^ ,;i°''^. 



#2 



AOOITtOM 


AOO 


CO 


INK 


irr 


no 


ino 


ADEA 


AOO 


CO 1 


Ml 


tST 


2M 


10 


AIEA 


AOomoN cooa 


••I.A 


Al 





30 
31 


— 


— 





«»E 


Al 












10 isr M EM 


■ 














m* 


u 


m-F 


M 


11 cof» a iAY« 

14 tPf « cw 




















HK 


A3 


•w* 


AT 


l« lAYF a 04KO 
« OIF H W 


MM 


A4 












MM 


Al 








a ISM fl UNA 

21 om n MIT 


SKETCH VECTORS 


HI 
(U 
HI 
«« 
Hi 
Mt 
H? 


A^OC 


Mo 




w,e 


f^5o 


fF 


1 


, 


1 


1 






to 


_i 




1 


1 


1 


_l 


IV 


Aoomoi 

. COMaCNCE 


S 


^."^ 


*/• 






J 


_L 





OOM 
FIIISN 


_i 








1 


, 






MALT 
LEFT 


u. 






_i_ 














•0 VECTOI 

raiar 


_l 

1_ 


_i 


—I— 






r 


1 


_•_., 


_J 


1 


OFFtET 


i_ 










_| 


1 


1 


AIQLE 
MECTAMOLE 


M 


_l 


_!___ 


_i — 


_i 


_i 


_u_ 


_l 


.!_. 










STHMl 



A35-2 



08/01 89 



APPENDIX 35 



TYPICAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 3 















#1 






4 


29 

16 


18 




UTM 
7 








8 


17 


CE 


14 

AF 
GRM 

22 




20 


4 


OPM 


4 


14 



#3 



Note: Additions should (not must) be numbered clockwise. 



i 



AOOITIONS 


AOO 


CO 


LWR 


1ST 


2N0 


3RD 


AREA 


AOO 


CD 


LWR 


1ST 


2N0 


3flO 


AREA 


ADDITION COOES 


Ml A 


A1 




H^ 








605.E 


AS 












10 1SF 24 EPM 

11 OFF li UTM 




XI 


/« 
















13 COPF 2« BAYM 

14 EPF 30 CPF 

15 UTF 32 CANF 


SOM 


A2 


6M-F 


AS 




21 


















WiC 


A3 


807'G 


a; 


16 OAYF 33 WO 
19 GRF SO BU 


tOM 


A4 












SOS-H 


AS 












20 ISM 91 MHA 

21 OPM 92 MET 
23 COPM « "V 


SKETCH VECTORS 


Sil 
8S2 
SS3 
6M 
«SS 

es8 

8s; 


A, 00 




7 


l^H 


M^ 


f{ie 


U^ 


p^-^l 


P7 


^- 


I 


q/e 






>\b 


/ 


1,10 


1 


_L_ 


1 


l_ 


1 


_l 


_i 




A 

c 



F 
H 
I 
NV 

F 
R 
S 
U 
V 
X 


AOOITION 
COMMENCE 


,1 


M3 


m 


C 


HI 


V 


l_ 






u 


OOWN 
FINISH 


^% 


K% 


^ 


/^w 





1 


1 




1 


_l 




HALT 
LEFT 


^,5 


f\^d 


c 


(^f 


\J(, 


/( 


_1_ 


J 


_l 




POINT 


_l 

1 






_i 


1 


_l_ 


J 


_l_ 


J 


_) 


1 





OFFSET 






1 


_1— 


1 


1 


t 


_1_ 


_L 


ANCLE 
RECTANGLE 




1 


_ 


-I 


_i 


_l 




-I 


i_ 


1 








SYMBOL 



08/01/89 



A35-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TYPICAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 4 




8 #1 BAYF 



Square off minor angle m addition i 1 
and cnier at rectangle -4x9 



ADDITIONS 


AOO 


CO 


IW» 


1ST 


2M0 


3R0 


AREA 


AOO 


CO 


UWR 


1ST 


2»0 


3R0 


AREA 


AOOITION CODES 


(SI -A 


At 





It 









SOS^E 


AS 












III tSF 24 EPM 
11 OFF J5 UTM 

13 COPF 2* RAYM 

14 EPF 30 CfF 

15 UTF 3J CANF 












««• 


A2 


BOS'F 


Al 






















aac 


A3 


so;g 


A7 


11 BAYF 33 04»0 
19 GRF SO BU 






















n ISM SI MHA 


S0t4) 


A4 


SO«H 


A( 


21 OFM 12 MET 
23 COFM 99 MV 






















SKETCH VECTORS 


ni 

lU 
HI 
IM 

m 

(M 

n; 

(M 


A,ac 


U,3tf 


X,^0 


1 


, 


1 


, 


, 


, 


; 




/I 


.' 


R,Vo 


V,I0 


C, 


l/,*? 


x^'i 


« 






_J 


_i 


>V 


AOOITIO* 
COMMENCE 


1 






1 


1 




I_ 


1 






- 


_u 


DOWN 
FINISH 


1 




_l 


1 


_J 




1 


1 






1 





MALT 
LEFT 


i_ 




1 


l_ 


1 




_| 


1 




1 




MO VECTOR 

POINT 

RIGHT 

OFFSET 

UP 




1 




_l_ 


1 


_l 


J _ 




1 




J 


J 


1_ 


_!_ 






i 


_J_ 


1 


1 




_1 


_1_ 


ANGLE 
RECTANGLE 


_i 




_p 


_r 


_( 


_1_ 




_l 





_1 


-1— 






SYMIOL 



A35-4 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 35 



TYPICAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 5 




OVHF 



POB 



100 SF 



AOOItlONS 



AOO 



CO 



LWR 



1ST 



»0 



AOO 



CO 



3RD 



AOOITION cooes 



UI'A 



3 



«l 



__ai_ 



«»r 






LOO 



laro 



COIN 



10 ISf 

11 OPF 
U COPf 

14 EPf 

15 UTF 
IS >AYF 

19 GRF 

20 ISM 

21 0PM 
23 COPH 



24 EPM 
25UTIi 

■a aAYH 

30 CPF 

32 CAHF 

33 OWO 
SO«U 

91 UHA 

92 MET 
99 "V 



SKtiCwytCTORS 



AjOC 



\!ldL 

0/a 



_Ai_ 

_a5_ 



^^al. 






i^LC-- 



m^ 



HR 

M 



ii.A 






[IM 



_C. 



-I 



^32{«J_^__K_/ojJ$/^,__ 



yil. 



.!_. 






.1 



10 



M 



_A1 



_j- 



I I 



.1 



AOOITION 

COUHENCC 

OOWH 

FINISH 

MALT . 

LEFT 

NO VECTOR 

POINT 

RIGHT 

OFFSET 

UP 

ANGLE 

RECTANGLE 

SYHtOL 



08/01/89 



A35-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



TYPICAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 6 

Improvement and addition with angles in the sketch. In this case, the diagonal line will be represented by X's 
at each end of an imaginary (diagonal) line. The length of the line will be positioned between the two X's. 




AOOITlOMS 


AOO 


CO 


IMN 


IS1 


MO 


]IIO 


AREA 


AOO 


CO 


IW* 


1ST 


2110 


JRO 


AREA 


AOOITION COOES 


HI A 


Al 





^'1 


L_ 








(WE 


At 


_ 













10 ISF 24 ifK 

11 OPF 7% UTH 












M}| 


AJ 





1( 


> 


— 





%»f 


M 


— 


— 











H Eff M erf 

ISUtF 32CAIlf 










I* (AYE 3] WO 


m-( 


A) 


:: 


> 


:: 


"" 


Mr« 


A) 


" 


:: 


:: 


:: 


_... 


11 CUE M(U 
2t ISM SI HHA 


(MC 


A4 


IMM 


Al 


21 on* J2 KET 

n com M "v 


SKITO 


rVtCTORS 


Ul 


»iO£ 


y^. 


^^- 


&^o 


m 


?__ 


_L 


_, 


_) 


1 






^,1 


Kl 


7* 


m 

m 




^lo 


f{1 


v; 


-I 


Irl 


_i 


« ' 


1 AOOITION 
COHHENCE 


LI 


!sl 


u,i> 


Kl^ 




) DOWN 
EINISN 


(M 


^L 


5fo 


_<__ 


m 


%lh 


'ft 


_i 


1 




-» 


_t 




• ' NAIT 
LEET 












IV NOVfCTOR 


m 


i_ 


1_ 


_i 


_i_ 


1 


_!__, 


i_ 


_' 


1 


- 


_^_ 




POINT 




















1 RIGHT 


IM 


_i__ 


_l 


_i 


_i 


_i 


_l 


_i 


-I — 


J 


_i 




OEfSIT 
1 UP 


ni 


_i 


_l 


_i 


■ 


_i 


_l 1 


-«i^ ^ 


-I - 


_i 


— 1^_ 


J, 


) ANCLE 

r RrrTAMCif 


tw 


_i 


1 


_i 


_<*... 


-1 


-!__ 


_j-_ 


-(— — 


_i 


_j — 


SYMtOL 



A35-6 



08/01/69 



APPENDIX 35 



SPECIAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE 

Improvemem and additions including circular design. In this case, a representative computer diagram and 
computer-generated area will not be developed. 




15 



SSL 15 



-2 



#1 OPF 

In such cases as this, the following rules apply: 

I. Do not enter any sketch vectors in fields 651 through 658. 



2. 



Enter the manually computed living areas of the improvement in field 581 - Total Floor Area. Enter 
right-justified with leading zeros. 

Example: 





UMT 


infioo* 


no FLOOD 


AOO FLOOR 


HALF 


ATTIC 


Ml 


1 Of 01 

TOTAL FIMR AM« 















3. 



Enter the following first line for vectors (651): "NV" which stands for No Vectors. This entry should 
be made directly over the pre-printed AOC, as shown in the example below: 



Example: 



»5) ^EJLl 



SKETCH VECTOM 



f 



4. Enter BOTH the Addition codes AND the manually computed areas of each addition that does not 
represent living area in the 'Additions' area of the sketch vector sheet. 

Example: 



AOOftlONS 


AOO 


CO 


IWH 


1ST 


wo 


3R0 


ARtA 




Ml* 


Al 


-- 


30 


— 









607 a 


A2 





NOTE: In the case where an improvement and its additions can be vectored with the exception of a minor 
addition, it is desirable to either make the minor addition "square" or to handle it as an 'N' addition rather 
than to "NO VECTOR" the improvement and all additions. See Example Number 5. 



08/01/89 



A35-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



COMMERCIAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 1 









130 






30 






4S BRICK/STONE 
40 


RESEARCH 
LABS 










CANOPY 




SO 




FIN. 

OFFICE 

AREA 


50 












45 






45 





A simple commercial building that includes office area and research laboratories. 



EXnRIOR OATA 




SEC 
NO 


l£V 
FNOH 


EIS 

TO 


OWENSIONS 
SIZt 


nKlltETEN 


USE 
TYPE 


•All 
HCHT 


EXT 
"All 


CONST 
ClASS 


XNCT 
GROSS 


III 
(II 
(13 
tl« 
tlS 
ilC 
(U 

(II 


L 
\_ 

I 


01 


o_L 


A^ 















- 





SKETCH VtCTORS 


(M 


it. 


U,5o 
U,5o 

_i 


_i 


_i 


_l 




Wo 


1 


1 


_i 




_i 


_t 


_i 


A •OOITION 
C COMMENCE 
SOWN 
t fiNltM 
N HALT 


(M 




— >_ _ 


_i 


-t — 


-I 


-1 


_i _^ 


_i 


_i 


_i 


I lEfT 

NV NO VECTOa 


(M 

(s; 


-' — 


_* 


_i 

_i 


1 


_JL_ 




kj — 
1 


_i 

_i 


_i 


_i 


f fOINT 


_l 






N mCHT 
( OEfUT 






_i 


U UP 

V ANSIE 
























SYMCOl 


(U 


_l — 


-' 


_i 


_l 


_l 


_l 


_i 


-I 


_i 


-I 





A35-8 



08/01,89 



APPENDIX 35 



t 



COMMERCIAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 2 



A complex commercial building that includes separated Office Areas and separated Shop and Storage Areas. 



105 I 


45 


IS CONCRETE BLOCK 




SHOP & 
^5 STORAGE 


(j7625) ' FIN. 45 

^^ 1 OFFICE 

AREA 

60 , 45 


SHOP& 
STORAGE 

110 


45 




FIN. 

OFFICE „ 
AREA ^ 


Total Area = 14,625 SF 


65 




Total Perimeter = 740 FT 


45 



OFFICE: 4,950 SF (34% of Total Area) 
Effective Perimeter = 265 FT 

SHOP/STORAGE: 9,675 SF (66% of Total Area) 
Effective Perimeter = 475 FT 



Options: 



Vector each separate section as a string. 



SKETCH VECTORS 



i\Q 



L^if^-^i' 



At 
fl3 



l^^C 



Wx, 



ID 



^t^R 










u,^^K 






'PO 



Vector the building, as a whole, from the drawing. 



SKETCH VECTORS 


651 


AO 


t_ 


_U._ 


Uo 


r 


L^l 


A__ 


hLQ. 


L^? 


i<ii' 


6S; 


i.__ 


M 


if__ 


M_ 


_1 


_; 


_i 


_i 


_i 





08/01/89 



A35-9 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



COMMERCIAL SKETCH VECTOR EXAMPLE NO. 3 



A commercial office building whose upper floors extend beyond the size of the first floor. The Off-Set 
command is used to direct the computer to the area in which to draw the upper stories. 



15 


3S MASONRY a, GLASS /^..TN 
OPEN AREA vJ'^°^ 


50 


4S MASONRY A GLASS 
150 


15 


3S MASONRY & GLASS ^ — '^~^ 
OPEN AREA V^2.2SO^ 



4th FLOOR 
3rd FLOOR 



2ncl FLOOR 



lit FLOOR 
(GROUND LEVEL) 



IXTtmON DATA 




SEC 

M 


FKOil 


CIS 

TO 


oi«Eiaio« 

S12E 


KmHETEK 


ME 


MALI 
HGNT 


EXT 

■All 


COWT 
CIAS 


%»ET 

anon 


til 

III 


I 


O 1 

02. 


0\ 




__ 


053 

9f3 















SKETCH VECTORS 









^^A^0jt_ 



_( I 






AOOITIOII 
COiniEaicI 
00W1I 
riHISH 

MAir 

•0 VECTOa 

nmi 
mCHT 

OFFSET 

Uf 

AaciE 

MCTAaaiE 
STMtOl 



A35-10 



08/01/89 



r 



36. INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



36. INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FIELD 




CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


101 


PROPERTY TYPE 


102 


IMPROVEMENT CLASS CODE 


104 


ZONE 


105 


NEIGHBORHOOD 


201-203 


SALES DATA 


210 


EQUITY 


220 


POTENTIAL GROSS INCOME 


230 


BUILDING DATA 


231-238 


GENERAL RENT INFO 


251 


ROW / HALL / BOTH 


252 


TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS 


253 


TOTAL NUMBER OF ROOMS 


254 


TOTAL NUMBER OF BEDROOMS 


255 


AVERAGE SOFT / UNIT 


256 


MAJOR RENOVATION 


261-266 


APARTMENT UNIT BREAKDOWN 


268 


APARTMENT AMENITIES 



PAGE 



FIELD 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


PAGE 


269 


APARTMENT FEATURES 


3 


271 


PARKING 


3 


272 


VACANCY 




273 


INSURANCE EXPENSE 




274 


PROPERTY TAX EXPENSE 




275 


MAINTENANCE EXPENSE 




276 


INTERIOR MAINTENANCE EXPENSE 




277 


EXTERIOR MAINTENANCE EXPENSE 




278 


ELEVATOR EXPENSE 




279 


UTILITY EXPENSE 




280 


RESERVE FOR REPLACEMENT 




281 


MANAGEMENT EXPENSE 


5 


282 


GENERAL EXPENSE 


5 


283 


MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 


5 


291-292 


NOTES 


5 


600 


STRUCTURE TYPE 


5 



CONTENT OF DATA FIELDS 

All of the Income and Expense data is contained in two screens. The following list shows the fields in 
numerical order and describes the data requirements for them. It also shows the number of the screen that 
contains the field. 



lOl PROPER'IT TY1»E I&E SI 

Required 
Please see Section 32 for instructions to code this 
field. 



201-203 SALES DATA I&E SI 

Optional 
Please see Section 32 for instructions to code this 
field. 



102 IMPROVEMENT CLASS CODE I&E SI 

Required 
Please see Section 32 for instructions to code this 
field. 



104 ZONE l&E SI 

Optional 
Please see Section 32 for instructions to code this 
field. 



105 NEIGHBORHOOD I&E SI 

Required 
Please see Section 32 for instructions to code this 
field. 



210 EQUITY I&E SI 

Optional 
EXPENSES - Enter in this field the normal 
stabilized expenses associated with the rental use of 
this property. In order for this information to be 
usable it should reflect the typical allocation of 
expenses for the type of structure. Adjustments 
should be made to actual expenses to reflect only 
those typically paid by the owner of this type of 
property. 

NET INCOME - Enter in this field the stabilized 
net income for this property, reflecting market 
rents, stabilized occupancies, and stabilized 
expenses. 



08/01/89 



36-1 



PART 3: INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



220 POTKNTIAL GROSS INCOME I&E SI 

Optional 
Enter the potential annual gross income of the 
property based upon the gross area of all major 
structures on the property or on all rental units on 
the property. 



230 



I&E SI 



BUILDING DATA 

Optional 
Several approaches may be taken in listing the 
rental areas within a parcel. If multiple structures 
are involved, multiple I&E records may be used. 
However, it is recommended to facilitate manual 
and computer assisted analysis, that the values 
entered in this field reflect the parcel as a whole. 

GROSS AREA - Enter the gross leasable area of 
rental space in all major structures on the parcel. 

NUMBER OF FLOORS - Enter the number of 
floors or stories in the major structure on the 
parcel. 

YEAR BUILT - Enter the last three digits of the 
year built for the predominate structure on the 
parcel. 



ACTUAL RENT - Enter either the annual or 
monthly actual per square foot rent. Be careful to 
consistently record rents for all properties in terms 
of GRA versus NRA and annual versus monthly. 

SIZE - Enter the total square feet of leased space. 

AREA CODE - Enter the code that best describes 
the recorded SIZE of the leased space. 

1 GROSS AREA 

2 NET RENTABLE AREA 

3 NET USABLE AREA 

MARKET RENT - Enter the current market rent 
of the leased space, if different from the actual 
rent. 



251 



I&E S2 



ROW / HALL / BOTH 
Optional 
Enter the code that best describes the type of 
apartment building. 

R ROW to indicate that the apartment 
building is constructed so that each 
apartment has an entrance directly to the 
outside. 



231-238 GENERAL RENT INFO I&E SI 

Optional 
This section is provided to record actual office, 
retail, and other rents on a per square foot basis. 
Rents can be on either a gross rentable area 
(GRA) or net rentable basis (NRA) basis. In 
addition, the rents recorded may either be on a 
monthly or yearly basis. However, the information 
collected must be consistent across all properties. 

FLOORS - Enter the FROM and TO lloors of the 
leased floors, for example 01 - 01, or Bl - Bl. See 
the instructions in the Commercial/Industrial 
CAMA Data Section for additional information on 
this entry. 



H HALL to indicate that the apartment 

building is constructed so the entrance to 
each apartment is from a hallway. 

B BOTH to indicate that the apartment 
building has a combination of both 
apartments with direct outside access and 
hallway entrances. 



252 TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS I&E S2 

Optional 
Enter the number of apartment units in the 
apartment building. Include all sizes and types of 
units in this count. 



USE TYPE - Enter the USE TYPE code for the 
leased area. See the instructions in the 
Commercial/Industrial CAMA Data Section for the 
appropriate codes. 

DATE - Enter the last two digits of the year in 
which the lease was originated. 

TERM - Enter the total number of years of the 
lease. 



253 TOTAL NUMBER OF ROOMS l&E 52 

Optional 
Enter the overall total of all rooms; bedrooms, 
living rooms, kitchens, etc., in the apartment 
building. Do not include bathrooms or utility 
rooms in this count. 



36-2 



08/01/89 



36. INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



254 TOTAL NUMBER OF BEDROOMS I&E S2 

Optional 
Enter the total number of separate bedrooms in 
the entire apartment building. Studio apartments 
do not count as a bedroom. 



255 



I&E S2 



AVERAGE SQFT / UNIT 
Optional 
Enter the average square feet per apartment. To 
calculate this figure divide the gross area of the 
apartment building by the total number of units in 
the building. 



256 



I&E S2 



MAJOR RENOVATION 

Optional 
Enter the last two digits of the year in which the 
apartment building under went a major renovation. 
Do not consider routine maintenance or repairs; 
such as a new roof or exterior painting, as 
renovation. Renovation is performed to modernize 
the building to maintain its marketability. 



261-266 APARTMENT UNIT BREAKDOWN 

Optional I&E S2 

This section is used to record the different 
configuration combinations of type, bedrooms, 
baths, and size. Each different configuration 
should be listed on a separate line. 

TYPE - Enter the type of apartment unit. 

1 GARDEN APARTMENT - Unit in a 
multistory apartment building that is located 
on a single floor. 

2 TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT - Single or 
multistory unit with ground-level entrance 
that has no units above or below. 

3 OTHER 

UNITS - Enter the number of apartments with the 
listed configuration. 

BEDROOMS - Enter the number of bedrooms in 
the configured apartment. A studio or efficiency 
apartment has no bedrooms. 

BATHS - Enter the number of baths in the 
configured apartment. For example; one full bath 
= 10, one and half baths = 15, two full baths = 
20. 



SIZE - Enter the average square foot size of the 
unit in the listed configuration. For consistency, 
use the external dimensions of the apartment. 

RENT - Enter the rent per month of the particular 
configuration. The rent recorded should be the 
average market rent of the units in that 
configuration, or if desired, can be entered for each 
distinct actual rent. 



268 



I&E S2 



APARTMENT AMENITIES 

Optional 
Enter a 1-yes or (zero)-no to indicate whether 
the Apartment Amenity exists. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



269 



SWIMMING POOL 

TENNIS COURT 

CLUBHOUSE 

EXERCISE ROOM 

SAUNA 

COVERED PARKING 

BALCONY PATIO 

AUXILIARY STORAGE 

ELEVATOR 



I&E S2 



APARTMENT FEATURES 

Optional 
Enter a 1-yes or (zero)-no to indicate whether 
the Apartment Feature exists. 



DISHWASHER 

DISPOSAL 

FIREPLACE 

WASHER / DRYER HOOKUPS 

APPLIANCES: STOVE and / or 

REFRIGERATOR 

FURNISHED 



271 



I&E S2 



PARKING 

Optional 
COVERED - Enter the number and average per 
unit monthly rental charge for covered parking 
spaces. If included in monthly apartment rent, 
leave blank. Covered spaces may be in a parking 
ramp or a carport. 

UNCOVERED - Enter the number and average 
per unit monthly rental charge for uncovered 
parking spaces. If included in monthly apartment 
rent, leave blank. Uncovered spaces may include 
those in a parking lot or on the top deck of a 
parking ramp. 



08/01/89 



36-3 



PART 3: INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



272 



l&E S2 



VACANCY 

Optional 
Enter the average annual vacancy rate of the 
building. 



EXPENSE ITEMIZATION I&E S2 

This section is for input of the expenses as broken 
down by category. Generally, expenses would be 
expected to exhibit similarity within a particular 
structure and/or use type. Further, expenses can be 
compared across properties by considering them as 
a percentage of potential gross income. 



273 INSURANCE EXPENSE I&E 52 

Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the insurance on the building and the 
amount paid for the insurance. The amount paid 
should be the expressed as an annual premium. 



274 



l&E 52 



PROPERTY TAX EXPENSE 

Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the property taxes and the amount 
paid for property taxes. If the taxes paid are to be 
treated as the effective lax rate part of the 
capitalization rate, leave this field blank. 



275 MAINTENANCE EXPENSE I&E 52 

Optional 
The information pertaining to the maintenance of 
the building can be entered as either an overall 
figure in this field or broken down between 
interior and exterior maintenance in the next two 
fields. 



277 EXTERIOR MAINTENANCE EXPENSE 

Optional l&E 52 

Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the Exterior Maintenance of the 
building and the amount paid for the maintenance. 
Exterior maintenance can include the wages and 
salaries of personnel needed to maintain the 
exterior of the building, trash removal, security, 
supplies, and decorating. 



278 ELEVATOR EXPENSE I&E 52 

Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the repairs and service of the 
elevators in the building and the amount paid for 
such service. 



279 



I&E 52 



UTILIIT EXPENSE 
Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the utilities of the building. 

Enter the type of utilities paid for: 

1 ALL to indicate that all utilities; gas, water, 
electricity, sewer, telephone, and trash 
removal are paid. 

2 EXCEPT ELECTRICITY to indicate that all 
utilities except for electricity arc paid. 

3 OTHER to indicate that some other 
combination of utilities is being paid. 

Enter the annual amount being paid for utilities. 



Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the Overall Maintenance of the 
building and the amount paid. 



276 INTERIOR NUINTENANCE EXPENSE 

Optional I&E 52 

Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the Interior Maintenance of the 
building and the amount paid for the maintenance. 
Interior maintenance can include the wages and 
salaries of personnel needed to maintain the 
interior of the building, janitorial services, security, 
supplies, and decorating. 



280 RESERVE FOR REPLACEMENT I&E 52 

Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the Reserve and the amount paid for 
the eventual replacement of short-lived items. 
These are items that must be replaced before the 
end of the economic life of the building, such as 
water heaters, roof, heating and/or air conditioning, 
and floor coverings. 



36-4 



08/01/69 



36. INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



281 MANAGEMENT EXPENSE I&E S2 

Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the management expense and the 
amount paid. Management expenses can include; 
accounting and legal expenses, manager's salary, 
office expenses, rent collections, and commissions. 
Also include in this category all salaries for 
employees not included in other categories such as 
maintenance. 



291-292 NOTES l&E S2 

Optional 
Notes should be short and to the point. Space is 
provided to enter two different NOTES for each 
record. 

NOTE CODE - Enter the code that best describes 
the reason for this note. This code will permit 
computer extraction and sorting of the notes to aid 
in field work and review. 



282 GENERAL EXPENSE I&E S2 

Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the General Expenses and the 
amount paid. This category includes payroll taxes, 
group insurance, advertising, and other expenses 
not specifically accounted for in other categories. 



283 MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES l&E S2 

Optional 
Enter either Owner or Tenant (O or T) to indicate 
who pays for the Miscellaneous Expenses and the 
amount paid for them. Such items will be 
individually small amounts that do not justify a 
separate listing and are a small percentage of the 
effective gross income. 



CODES will be developed at a later date. 

EXPLANATION - Enter what additional 
descriptive information is necessary that will 
further clarify the reason for this note. 



600 STRUCTURE TYPE I&E SI 

Required 
Please sec Section 34 for instructions to code this 
field. 



08/01/89 



36-5 



PART 3: INCOME AND EXPENSE DATA 



f 



1 



36-6 08/01/89 



APPENDIX 36 



A36. OPERATING STATEMENTS 



The Operating Statements (I«&E's) are designed 
to collect and analyze income and expense 
information on income producing properties. With 
this information, the appraiser is able to estimate 
value through capitalization of income. The 
Operating Statements are divided into four major 
categories: Market Data, Cost Data, Remodeling 
Data, and Income and Expense Data. The Income 
and Expense area of the statements is divided into 
five specialized areas: Apartments, Hotel/Motel, 
General Commercial (retail, warehousing, industry), 
Office Buildings, and Mobile Home Parks. The 
purpose of the specific income and expense areas is 
to allow the property owner/manager space to 
enter applicable income, expense, and amenity data. 

MARKET DATA 

Space is provided to enter any sales information 
for both vacant and improved parcels. In addition, 
space is provided to enter the value of any 
personal property, inventories, or licenses that may 
have been included in the purchase price. Also, 
space is provided to enter the percent of mortgage, 
mortgage term, and interest rate. 

COST DATA 

Space is provided to enter any construction cost 
information that is available concerning the subject 
property. When possible, sizes of additions, 
paving, etc., should be entered under the comments 
area. 

REMODELING DATA 



Project amenities and unit built-ins should be 
noted as to what is included/available in the 
apartment complex. The owner expense statement 
includes areas to enter what is paid by the owner 
and the costs associated for a two year period. 
The occupancy percentage should be entered in the 
space provided. Space is also provided to enter 
the number of parking spaces available and the 
monthly rental charge, if applicable. 

Hotel and Motel 

This area of the operating statement is designed 
to enter the income, expense, and amenities 
associated with the hotel and motel operations. 
Space is provided to list the number and type of 
rooms available together with services and 
amenities per room. Income should be listed by 
rental type and amount per unit. Restaurant and 
lounge incomes should also be listed. Actual 
expense amounts should be obtained if possible 
and entered in the appropriate spaces. 

General Retail, Warehousing, Industrial, Other 

This area is designed to enter income and 
expense amounts on general retail (retail sales), 
small industrial, and warehouse type facilities. 
Space is provided to enter the tenants, floor level, 
lease term, and floor area of the lease. Expenses 
are broken down into the general areas of 
insurance, taxes, maintenance, and utilities. Actual 
expense should be entered when available. 

Office Building 



Space is provided to enter the cost and a 
description of significant remodeling that has been 
associated with the building, the year of the 
remodeling, and whether the cost was attributable 
to the owner or a tenant. 

OPERATING STATEMENT 

Apartments 

Space is provided to enter a detailed current 
quoted rent per month by unit type. In instances 
where rents are computed on a square foot basis, 
space is provided to note the total apartment 
complex rentable area. 



This area of the operating statement is to enter 
the applicable income and expense information for 
office buildings. Space is provided to enter the 
building total gross area, net rentable area, and 
lease terms, i.e., on a total gross or net rentable 
area. The amount of retail area should be entered 
together with the current occupancy rate. The 
income statement is designed to quote rent per 
square foot, based on floor level and whether 
escalation of rental clause is included. The 
expense area is broken down into three major 
categories: insurance and taxes, building 
maintenance, and utilities. Actual expense should 
be entered by category if available. 



08/01/89 



A36-1 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



Mobile Home Parks Sample Forms 

This area of the operating statement is to enter The following are illustrations of forms to be 

the applicable income and expense information for used to collect income and expense information on 

mobile home parks. Space is provided to enter the Apartments, Hotels and Motels, General Retail, 

total sites available; the operating period; the rent Warehousing, Industrial, Office Buildings, and 

schedule on a monthly basis by number of sites; Mobile Home Parks, 
and operating statement information including 
gross revenue and expenses. 



A36-2 08/01/89 



APPENDIX 36 



r 



APARTMENTS and HOTELS & MOTELS 
OPERATING STATEMENT 

I PLEASE RETURN COMPLETED FORM TO: 



PROPERTY AODRESSL 



J 



Dear Property Ovwner : 

A revaluation of all property is now being conducted in your community to establish current and equitable values for assessment purposes. 

As an owner or manager of income producing property you are aware of the impact that economic factors have on property valuation. In order that we may 
estimate a fair and equitable value, we request that you complete this form with the appropriate economic information and return tt as soon as possible. You 
may be assured the information you supply will be treated in a confidential manner. It will be used by the appraiser to assist him in arriving at an opinion of 
value on your property by the income approach. 

Please complete the part of this form applicable to your property. 

If additional space is required, or if you wish to submit any supplemental information, please attach it to this form. 

Very truly yours. 



MARKET & COST DATA 



MARKET 
DATA 



PUHCHASED LAND ONLY FOR 

S .. IN 19 



PURCHASED LAND & BUILDINGS FOR 
$ . _ IN19_ 



"please indicate the amount if any of the purchase price paid for CONSIDERATIONS OTHER THAN REAL ESTATE 
ITEMS AMOUNTS 



PERCENT OF MORTGAGE 
MORTGAGE TERIi/l 



MORTGAGE INTEREST RATE 



COST 
DATA 



1 All cost Should include labor, materials, arch nee lurai tees, and builders overhead and prof ii 

2 Building costs thoutd include (he structure, and all mechanical features such as electric, plumbmq. heannci. 

3 Site improvements refer lo features such as sue preparation, uniity services, and larKlscaprnq 

4 II cost includes Items not considered real estate, pieaie indicate uruler comments the items and ttw costs 



r conditioning. spnnKier iind elevators 



SITE 
IMPROVEMENTS 



BUILDINGS 



r 



t 



COST 1 YEAH 



-+- 



ADDITIONS TO 
ORIGINAL SLDG 



OTHER 
YARD ITEMS 



TOTAL 



t 



u 



I 



REMODELING 
DATA 



PLEASE INDICATE THE SCOPE AND COST OF SIGNIFICANT REMODELING 



DESCRIPTION 



COST PAID BY 
OWNER I TENANT 



OTHER DATA 



PlasM state any additional information you f««l is pertinent to ansure a fair and acuitabla appraital of your property. 



SUBMITTED BY 



TELEPHONE 



DATE: 



08/01/89 



A36-3 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



OPERATING STATEMENT 



APARTMENTS 



INCOME STATEMENT 


UMITTVPC 


40F UNITS 


CURR QUOTED 
RENT/MONTH 


PROJECT AMENITIES 


LANDLORD EXPENSE STATEMENT 
\J- WHERE APPROPRIATE ACTUAL 19 ACTUAL 19 


EFFICIENCY (Al 

IBI 






( 1 SWIMMING POOL 
( 1 TENNIS COURTS 
I 1 CLUB HOUSE 
( 1 EXERCISE ROOM 
( 1 SAUNA 

( 1 COVERED PARKING 
( ) BALCONIES/PATIOS 
( ) AUXILIARY STORAGE 


( 1 INSURANCE 

( 1 REAL ESTATE TAXES 

( 1 GROUND LEASE 


















1 BEDROOM (Al 

(Bl 
(C) 














MAINTENANCE 










1 I ALL 

( 1 EXT a STRUCT. ONLY 

( 1 JANITORIAL 






3 BEDROOM (Al 

IBI 
(CI 
(01 






















APARTMENTS INCLUDE 


UTILITIES 










( 1 RANGE 

( 1 REFRIGERATOR 

( 1 DISHWASHER 

( 1 DISPOSAL 

( 1 CARPET 

( ) DRAPES 

( 1 FIREPLACE 

( 1 WASHER / DRYER 

( 1 CONNECTIONS ONLY IW/DI 


( lALL 

1 1 ALL EXCEPT ELECTRIC 
1 1 TRASH REMOVAL 
( 1 PAYROLL 
( 1 SECURITY 
( ) RESERVES FOR 
REPLACEMENT 
( 1 MANAGEMENT 

1 1 MISCELLANEOUS 






3 BEDROOM (Al 
IBI 
(CI 
(01 






































4 BEDROOM lAI 
(Bl 
ICI 


























ACTUAL 1986 RENTAL INCO 


MF . tORRDTHFR 


INCOME (LAUNDRY. CLUBHOUSE RENTAl 
INCOME (LAUNDRY. CLUBHOUSE RENTAl 


fTr \ 


ACTUAL 1987 RENTAL INCO 


UF iq«7nTHFn 


FTC 1 








PARKINC 


♦ COVERED 
tuNCOVEREI 




MONTHLY COVERED 
CHARGE 
FOR PARKING UNCOVERED 




CURRENT 1 


3 




OCCUPAN 


CY % 








OPERATING STATEMENT - HOTELS A MOTELS 


ROOM COUNT 


SERVICES 


AMENITIES 


TOTAL GROSS INCOME 


s W/SINGLE BEDS 

- W/DOUBLE/KING BEDS 

» W/2 DOUBLES 

SUITES 




1 1 COFFEE SHOP 

1 1 RESTAURANT 

( 1 BAR 

( 1 NIGHTCLUB 

( ) SHOPS 

( 1 GAME ROOM 


( 1 COLOR TV 

1 1 EXERCISE FACILITIES 

( 1 TENNIS 

1 1 SAUNA 

( 1 POOL 

1 1 OTHER 


19 S 






TOTAL OPERATION EXPENSES 




1Q « 

lo S 


TOTAL KEY ROOMS 




INCOME STATEMENT 


EXPENSE STATEMENT 


S'^C 


• US » 
BLES • 
ES 9 
RA PERSON • 
ERS • 
TY BUILT 


H 


EST 
AR/ 
ARK 
ECR 
THi 


AIIRANT 


MANAGEt 

MARKETI 

WAGES 

HOUSKEE 

SUPPLIES 

roNTRAr 


JIPNT 


. DECORATING 
. REPAIRS/MAINT 
_ INSURANCE 
_ R. E. TAXES 19 




nr« 


a 


1 niiNriF 


hir. 






P 


INR 


Piwr. 




FXT 


R 


EATIONAL 

R iMpnuF . 








_ P. P. TAXES 19 




YEAR FACILI 






T«!PRUirFS 


OTHER TAXES 




AVG. » ROOMS SOLD /YR. 19 








AVG. RATF / nrri iPien onnuio 






1 


ADDITIONAL COMMENTS 


APPRAISERS I 

STABILIZED INCOME 19 

STABILIZED EXPENSES 19 

NET INCOME BEFORE RECAPTURt 
INDICATED VALUE. INCOME APPR 


JSE 






niPM 



























A36-4 



08/01 /S9 



APPENDIX 36 



GENERAL RETAIL, WAREHOUSING, INDUSTRIAL, OTHER, OFFICE BUILDINGS 

OPERATING STATEMENT 

I I PLEASE RETURN COMPLETED FORM TO: 



L 

PROPERTY ADDRESS. 



J 



Dear Proper tv Owner : 

A revaluation of all property is now being conducted in your community to establish current and equitable values for assessment purposes. 

As an owner or manager of income producmg property you are aware of the impact that economic factors have on property valuation. In order that we may 
estimate a fair arxj equitable value, we request that you complete this form with the appropriate economic information and return it as soon as possible. Vou 
may be assured the information you supply will be treated in a confidential manner. It will be used by the appraiser to assist him in arriving at an opinion of 
value on your property by the income approach. 

Please complete the part of this form applicable to your property. 

If additional space is required, or if you wish to submit any supplemental information, please attach it to this form. 

Very truly yours. 



MARKET & COST DATA 



MARKET 
DATA 



PURCHASED LAND ONLY FOR 

$ _ . .. . IN 19 



PURCHASED LAND & BUILDINGS FOR 
$ IN 19 _ 



PLEASE INDICATE THE AMOUNT IF ANY OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID FOR CONSIDERATIONS OTHER THAN REAL ESTATE 
ITEMS . _^ AMOUNTS 



PERCENT OF MORTGAGE 
MORTGAGE TERM 



MORTGAGE INTEREST RATE 



COST 
DATA 



SITE 
IMPROVEMENTS 



BUILDINGS 



ADDITIONS TO 
ORIGINAL BLDG 



1 All coti should include \abO( maieriali. arcnxeciural fees, and builders owerhead and profit 

2 Building costs sfiould include the struclu'e. and all mechanical features such as electric, plumbing, heating, air conditioning. spr.nKier jnd elevators 

3 Site improvements refer to features such as site preparation, utility services, and landscaping 

4 If cost includes itetns not considered real estate, please indicate under comments the items and the costs 

COMMENTS 



OTHER 
YARD ITEMS 



TOTAL 



J- 



REMODELING 
DATA 


PLEASE INDICATE THE SCOPE AND COST OF SIGNIFICANT REMODELING 

DESCRIPTION 


COST 


COST PAID BY 
lOWNER i^TENANT 


YEAR 








1 







OTHER DATA 



PI«M« tiat* any additional information you faat it partlnant to ansura a fair and aquitabia aopraiiat of your proparty. 



SUBMITTED BY 



TELEPHONE 



DATE: 



08/01/89 



A36-5 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



OPERATING STATEMENT 
GENERAL RETAIL, WAREHOUSING, INDUSTRIAL, OTHER 



TOTAL CROSS BUILDING AREA 




- 


MULTI TENANT 




CURRENT OCCUPAMCY 19 


NO. OF FLOORS 




SINGLE TENANT 




« 


FLOOR 
LEVELS 


TYPE USE OR 
OCCUPANCY 


TENANT NAME 
<VAC. IF VACANT) 


LEASE SIGNED 


MONTHLY 
RENT 


SPACE 

LEASED S.F 


OWNER EST. 
MARKET RENT 


DATE 
19 — 


TERM 


TO 














































































































































LANDLORD EXPENSE STATEMENT 


V- WHERE APTROeRIATE 


ACTUAL 19 


ACTUAL 19 


UTILITIES 


ACTUAL 19 


ACTUAL 19 


( I INSURANCE 

1 1 REAL ESTATE TAXES 

< 1 GROUND LEASE 






( ) ALL 

( 1 ALL EXCEPT ELECTRIC 
( I OTHER 
( 1 TRASH REMOVAL 
1 1 PAYROLL 
1 1 SECURITY 
( (RESERVES FOR 
REPLACEMENT 
1 1 MANAGEMENT 
( 1 MISCELLANEOUS 






















MAINTENANCE 










1 1 ALL 

( lEXT. a STRUCT. ONLY 

( I OTHER 

( ) JANITORIAL 


















































OPERATING STATEMENT - OFFICE BUILDINGS 


TOTAL GROSS BUILDING AREA 




TOTAL RETAIL AREA 

LEASED ON GROSS 
AREA BASIS 




CURRENT OCCUPANCY 


NET RENTABLE AREA 






OFFICE RETAIL 








t- % 


INCOME STATEMENT 


LANDLORD EXPENSE STATEMENT 


FLOOR LEVELS 


saFoo 

OFFICE 19 


T RENTS 
RETAIL 19 


ESCALATION CLAUSES 
YES NO 


%/- WHERE APPROPRIATE 


ACTUAL 19 


ACTUAL 19 


M II 

o 

'l 1 1 










( 1 INSURANCE 

( I REAL ESTATE TAXES 

1 1 GROUND LEASE 






































MAINTENANCE 














1 1 ALL 

( 1 EXT. a STRUCT. ONLY 

1 1 JANITORIAL 


















OTHER INCOME/EXPENSES 
PLEASE EXPLAIN: 






UTILITIES 






( 1 ALL 

( I ALL EXCEPT ELECTRIC 

( I OTHER 

1 1 TRASH REMOVAL 

( ) PAYROLL 










































( ( SECURITY 









A36-6 



08/01/89 



APPENDIX 36 



r 



MOBILE HOME PARKS 
OPERATING STATEMENT 

I PLEASE RETURN COMPLETED FORM TO: 



L 

PROPERTY ADDRESS. 



J 



Dear Property Owner : 

A revaluation of all property is now being condtjcted in your community to establish current and equitable values for assessment purposes. 

As an owner or manager of IrKome producing property you are aware of the impact that economic factors have on property valuation. In order that we may 
estimate a fair and equitable value, we request that you complete this form with the appropriate economic information and return it as soon as possible. You 
may tie assured the information you supply will be treated in a confidential manner. It wilt be used by the appraiser to assist him in arriving at an opinion of 
value on your property by the income approach. 

Please complete the part of this form applicable to your property. 

If additional space is required, or if you wish to submit any supplemental information, please attach it to this form. 

Very truly yours. 



MARKET & COST DATA 



MARKET 
DATA 



PURCHASED LAND ONLY FOR 

S IN 19 



PURCHASED LAND » BUILDINGS f OR 
$ „ IN 19 _ 



PLEASE INDICATE THE AMOUNT IF ANY OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID FOR CONSIDERATIONS OTHER THAN REAL ESTATE 
ITEMS ... .._. AMOUNTS 



PERCENT OF MORTGAGE 
MORTGAGE TERM 



MORTGAGE INTEREST RATE 



COST 
DATA 



SITE 
IMPROVEMENTS 



1 All colt should include labor, materials, architectural fees, and builders overhead and prohi 

2 Suildinq costs should include the structure, and alt rrtechanical leatures such as electric, pluirtbing heating, air conditioning, sprinkler and elevate 

3 Site improvements refer to leatures such as sue preparation, utility services, and landscapir^ 

4 It cost includes items not considered real estate, ples» indicate under comments the items and the cpsts 



-+-- 



ADDITIONS TO 
ORIGINAL SLOG 



OTHER 
YARD ITEMS 



TOTAL 



YEAR I 



COMMENTS 



REMODELING 
DATA 


PLEASE INDICATE THE SCOPE AND COST OF SIGNIFICANT REMODELING 




YEAR 


DESCRIPTION COST | OWNER I TENANT | 















OTHER DATA 



Pl««M ttata any additional information you fmml it partlnant to antura a fair and aquitabla appraisal of your proparty. 



SUBMITTED BY 



TELEPHONE 



DATE: 



08/01/89 



A36-7 



PART 3: DATA COLLECTION 



OPERATING STATEMENT 



MOBILE HOME PARKS 



OTERATINQ PERIOD: YEAR ROUND SEASONAL 

TOTAL SITES AVAILABLE FOR RENT: MOBILE HOME 



TRAVEL TRAILER 



SITES » 


s 


SITFS (3 


i 


SITFS S> 


* 



RENT SCHEDULE - MONTHLY BASIS 
SITES 9 S 



SITES ® $ . 
SITES @ S 



SITES 19 $ , 
SITES <S> S . 
SITES ® S , 



INCOME: 



ANNUAL GROSS POTENTIAL RENTAL INCOME IF 100% 
OCCUPIED DURING OPERATING PERIOD. IF POSSIBLE 



OPERATING STATEMENT FOR 19_ 

RENTAL REVENUE S 

OTHER ILAUNOBV, VENDING, ETC.) 

TOTAL INCOME 



EXPENSES: MANAGEMENT AND PAYROLL S 

REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE COSTS 

SERVICES 

UTILITIES 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 

OTHER TAXES. FEES, ETC. 

INSURANCE 

RESERVE FOR REPLACEMENTS 

MISC ADMIN. ILEGAL, AUDIT, ETC.) 

•OTHER (EXPLAIN) 

TOTAL expsNses 

•DO NOT INCLUDE DEBT SERVICE, INTEREST OR DEPRECIATION AS EXPENSES 



SIGNATURE OWNER. MGT OR AGT 



DATE 



TELEPHONE 



A36-8 



08/01/89 



# 



#) 






c 



H^) 



# 



( 



^^' 



41. ESTIMATING REPLACEMENT COST NEW 



41. ESTIMATING REPLACEMENT COST NEW 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 

41.1. REPLACEMENT COST 

41.1.1. REPLACEMENT COST DEFINITION 

41.1.2. PRICING SCHEDULES 

41 .1 .3. SELECTING THE PROPER QUALITY 
GRADE 



PAGE 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 



1 


41.1.4.. 


APPLYING THE PROPER GRADE 




1 




FACTOR 


2 


1 


41.1.5. 


APPLYING THE PROPER COST AND 








DESIGN FACTOR 


3 


1 


41.2. 


PRICING SCHEDULES AND COST 








TABLES 


3 



41.1. REPLACEMENT COST 



# 



%) 



The informed buyer is not justified in paying 
anything more for a property than what it would 
cost him to acquire an equally desirable substitute 
property. Likewise, the upper limit of value of 
most improvements is the cost of reproducing an 
equally desirable substitute improvement. It 
follows, then, that a uniform starting point for an 
Equalization Program is to determine the 
Replacement Cost New of each and every 
improvement. 

41.1.1. REPLACEMENT COST DEFINITION 

Replacement Cost is the current cost of 
producing an improvement of equal utility to the 
subject property; it may or may not be the cost of 
reproducing a replica property. The distinction 
being drawn is one between Replacement Cost, 
which refers to a substitute property of equal 
utility, as opposed to Reproduction Cost, which 
refers to a substitute replica property. 

The Replacement Cost of an improvement 
includes the total cost of construction incurred by 
the builder, whether preliminary to, during the 
course of, or after completion of its construction. 
Among these are materials, labor, all sub-contracts, 
builder's overhead and profit, architectural and 
engineering fees, consultation fees, survey and 
permit fees, legal fees, taxes, insurance and the cost 
of interim financing. 

41.1.2. PRICING SCHEDULES 

Pricing schedules and related cost tables are 
included in this manual to assist the appraiser in 
arriving at accurate estimation of Replacement 



Cost New. They have been developed by applying 
unit-in-place costs to the construction of specified 
hypothetical or model buildings. Application of 
the schedules involves the selection of the model 
which most nearly resembles the subject building 
and adjusting its price to compensate for all 
significant variations. 

Pricing schedules are included for various types 
of Residential, Agricultural, Institutional, 
Commercial and Industrial structures. 

Cost adjustments for the variations which are 
most frequently encountered in a particular type 
building are included. Adjustments for other 
variations may be made by using either the Other 
Feature Cost Tables or other appropriate 
schedules. 

41.1.3. SELECTING THE PROPER QUALITY 
GRADE 

The quality of materials and workmanship is the 
one most significant variable to be considered in 
estimating the replacement cost of a structure. 
Two buildings may be built from the same general 
plan, each offering exactly the same facilities and 
with the same specific features, but with widely 
different costs due entirely to the quality of 
materials and workmanship used in their 
construction. For instance, the cost of a dwelling 
constructed of high quality materials and with the 
best of workmanship throughout can be more than 
twice that of one built from the same tloor plan, 
but with inferior materials and workmanship. 



08/01/89 



41-1 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



The schedules included in this manual have 
been developed lo provide the appraiser with a 
range of grades comprehensive enough to 
distinguish all significant variations in the quality 
of materials and workmanship which may be 
encountered; the basic specifications for each grade 
as to the type of facility furnished remain relatively 
consistent throughout, and the primary criterion for 
establishing the grade being the overall quality of 
materials and workmanship. 

Two grading systems are in use in this manual. 
One is used for residential and agricultural 
buildings and the other is used for commercial and 
industrial buildings. 

The majority of buildings erected as either 
residential or commercial/industrial fall within a 
definite class of construction, involving the use of 
average quality of materials with average quality of 
workmanship. This type of construction being the 
most common, it can readily be distinguished by 
the layman as well as the professional appraiser. 
Consequently, better or inferior quality of 
construction can be comparatively observed. The 
quality grading system and pricing schedule in this 
manual are keyed to this obvious condition; the 
basic grade being representative of that cost of 
construction using average quality of materials with 
average quality workmanship. 

As an example, for residential dwellings, by 
assigning the factor 1.00 to Average Grade 
construction, the actual factor either above or 
below Average Grade can be illustrated as follows: 



Cheap Grade 


.30 


Poor Grade 


.49 


Low Cost Grade 


.68 


Fair Grade 


.85 


Average Grade 


1.00 


Good Grade 


1.29 


Very Good Grade 


1.48 


Excellent Grade 


1.67 



In order to facilitate using this grading system, 
and again to promote and maintain uniformity in 
approach, the value relationship of grade to grade 
has been incorporated into the development of the 
base specifications relating to each schedule used 
in the manual. 

The appraiser must exercise extreme caution not 
to confuse the concepts "quality" and "condition" 
when selecting the proper grade. This is especially 



applicable to older buildings, wherein a 
deteriorated condition can have a noticeable effect 
on their physical appearance. A building will 
always retain its initial grade of construction, 
regardless of its existing deteriorated condition. 
The Quality Grade ultimately selected must refiect 
that original built-in quality, and the selection of 
that grade cannot be influenced in any way by the 
physical condition of the building. 

41.1.4. APPLYING THE PROPER GRADE 
FACTOR 

Grading would be a relatively simple process if 
all buildings were built to conform to the quality 
grade specifications outlined above. The fact is, 
however, that this ideal condition does not exist. 
It is not unusual for any conventional building to 
be built incorporating construction qualities that 
fall between the established grade levels. The 
grading system in this manual has been designed in 
such a way as to provide the appraiser with a 
method for accounting for such variations by 
establishing intermediate grades. 

If the subject building is judged to be of a 
belter or inferior quality than the actual grade 
levels, a grade factor of plus (+) or minus (-) 
should be applied, i.e.. Average + would be better 
than a straight Average Grade, Good - poorer than 
a straight Good Grade, etc. 

There is very rarely any clear cut designation of 
a specific grade factor. The appraiser will generally 
select a range, such as Average + to Good -, and 
then weigh the various quality factors exhibited in 
the construction in order to select the proper 
factor. 

The quality factor ultimately selected should 
represent a composite judgment of the overall 
Quality Grade. Generally, the quality of materials 
and workmanship is fairly consistent throughout 
the construction of a specific building; however, 
since this is not always the case, it is frequently 
necessary to weigh the quality of each major 
component in order to arrive at the proper 
"overall" Quality Grade. Equal consideration must 
also be given to any "Additions" which are 
constructed of materials and workmanship 
inconsistent with the quality of the main building. 



41-2 



08/01/89 



41. ESTIMATING REPLACEMENT COST NEW 



W 



41.1.5. APPLYING THE PROPER COST AND 
DESIGN FACTOR 

Architectural fees, material quantities, labor 
efficiency, and other factors influencing total 
construction costs may vary considerably from one 
building to another, depending upon its particular 
design. Two dwellings, for instance, showing no 
marked difference in size and quality may still show 
a measurable difference in cost, attributable 
primarily to a difference in design. 

In computing the replacement cost of any 
building, therefore, it is necessary to adjust the cost 
to account for any features varying significantly 
from the base specifications from which the pricing 
schedules were developed. 

The pricing schedules included in this manual, 
unless otherwise specified, have been developed to 
reflect perimeter-to-area wall ratios of rectangularly 
shaped buildings, uniform eave lines and roof 



slopes, overhangs, ceiling heights, and other 
architectural features most typical of conventional 
designs. 

The adjustment for variations in design must be 
made by applying a Cost and Design Factor 
denoting a percentage adjustment of the sub-total 
replacement cost, i.e., apply a +5% to indicate a 
5% increase in the replacement cost, apply a 
-(-10% to indicate a 10% increase, etc. 

The Cost and Design Factors applicable to 
dwellings will normally range from to 15%. 
However, the Cost and Design Factors applicable 
to special architectural designs may range 
considerably higher. The selection of the proper 
Cost and Design Factor is a product of the 
experience and sound judgment of the appraiser, 
who must have the ability to analyze various 
construction components and determine the 
influence of each upon the overall cost. 



41.2. PRICING SCHEDULES AND COST TABLES 



# 



The Pricing Schedules and Cost Tables in this 
manual are provided to assist the appraiser in 
arriving at accurate and uniform valuations. Used 
properly, they should prove to be an invaluable 
tool. Quality valuations, however, are not the 
product of schedules and tables themselves, but 
rather of the appraiser's ability to use them 
effectively. In order to bring this about, a 
thorough understanding of the make-up and the 
capabilities and limitations of each schedule is 
essential. The appraiser must know the 
specifications from which the base prices were 
derived, the composition of the prices, and the 
proper techniques and procedures for applying the 
prices. What's more important, the appraiser must 
be able to exercise good common sense and sound 
judgment in selecting and using them. 



It should also be noted that the schedules and 
tables in the manual have been developed primarily 
for mass appraisal and tax equalization purposes. 
They have, therefore, been designed to provide the 
appraiser with an uncomplicated, fast, and effective 
method of arriving at an accurate estimate of 
replacement costs. In order to maintain simplicity 
in the schedules, techniques, and procedures, it is 
often necessary to make certain compromises from 
a strictly technical and engineering point of view. 
Extensive effort has been made in developing the 
schedules to minimize these compromises and limit 
them to variables which have minimal influence on 
the final value of the building. The schedules have 
been designed to reflect actual building costs and 
practices. Field tests have proven them to be both 
accurate and reliable, and when applied properly, 
highly effective in arriving at realistic replacement 
costs. 



08/01/89 



41-3 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



k 



41-4 08/01/89 



m 



t 



(C 



42. DWELLINGS 



42. DWELLINGS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 






NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE PAGE 


42.1. 


QUALfTY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 


1 


42.1.1. 


INTRODUCTION 


1 


42.1.2. 


QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 


2 


42.2. 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 






AND PHOTOGRAPHS 


2 


42.2.1. 


GRADE 1 - CHEAP QUALITY 






RESIDENCES 


2 


42.2.2. 


GRADE 2 - POOR QUALITY 






RESIDENCES 


5 


42.2.3. 


GRADE 3 - LOW COST QUALmC 






RESIDENCES 


6 


42.2.4. 


GRADE 4 - FAIR QUALITY RESIDENCES 


9 


42.2.5. 


GRADE 5 - AVERAGE QUALITY 






RESIDENCES 


10 


42.2.6. 


GRADE 6 - GOOD QUALITY RESIDENCES 


13 


42.2.7. 


GRADE 7 - VERY GOOD QUALITY 






RESIDENCES 


14 


42.2.8. 


GRADE 8 - EXCELLENT QUALITY 






RESIDENCES 


17 


42.3. 


MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 


18 


42.3.1. 


GENERAL APPLICATION 


18 



PARAGRAPH 






NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


42.3.2. 


MANUAL PRICING PROCEDURE 


18 


42.4. 


PRICING TABLES 


20 


42.4.1. 


DWELLING BASE PRICING SCHEDULE 


20 


42.4.2. 


BASE PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 


22 


42.4.2.1. 


HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 






ADJUSTMENTS 


22 


42.4.2.2. 


PLUMBING ADJUSTMENTS 


22 


42.4.3. 


ADDITIONS 


23 


42.4.3.1. 


PORCHES 


23 


42.4.3.2. 


ATTACHED UTILITY STRUCTURE 


23 


42.4.3.3. 


ATTACHED GARAGES 


24 


42.4.3.4. 


CARPORT / CANOPY; ATTACHED 






GREENHOUSE; DECKS; STOOPS 


25 


42.5. 


OTHER FEATURES 


25 


42.5.1. 


BASEMENT GARAGES 


25 


42.5.2. 


MASONRY FIREPLACES 


25 


42.5.3. 


PREFABRICATED METAL FIREPLACES / 






STOVES 


26 


42.5.4. 


MISCELLANEOUS OTHER FEATURES 


26 


42.5.5. 


FINISHED BASEMENT AREA 


26 



f 



42.1. QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 



42.1.1. INTRODUCTION 

The base cost of a residence is determined by 
the quality of construction. Determining the 
quality of both materials and workmanship is 
fundamental when assigning an overall quality 
grade. Quality of materials and workmanship in 
individual building components will vary, but will 
tend to influence each other and an overall quality 
grade will tend to be consistent throughout the 
residence. 

It is the appraiser's responsibility to weigh the 
quality of all the building components and assign a 
quality grade that best represents the total residence. 

Consideration should not only be given to 
quality of materials and workmanship used, but to 
complexity of design and layout. Lower quality 
residences are usually simple in design and reflect 
lower cost, and would be typical of tract 



development. Higher quality residences are usually 
more complex in design, with more attention given 
to layout and detail, and are usually individually 
designed. Higher quality houses are generally 
larger in size than lower quality residences. 

The general descriptions given for each grade 
are guidelines that emphasize the most prominent 
characteristics of residences within that grade. 
They are not meant to be exact specifications. 
Residences that do not typically represent the basic 
grade, can more accurately be valued by using a 
plus or minus grade variation. 

Photographs of each grade of residence are also 
to be used as guidelines. An accurate quality grade 
cannot always be assigned based on exterior 
appearance. Interior layout and finish can greatly 
influence cost and must be considered when 
assigning a quality grade. 



08/01/89 



42-1 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.1.2. QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 

The residential system uses a numerical grading 
scale with 5 as the average quality of construction, 
with a range of grades from a low of 1 (cheap 
construction) to a high of 8 (excellent 
construction). A plus (+) and minus (-) 
adjustment is allowed within each category. The 
relative value ranges are indicated by the following 
table. 



Grade 



Fair 



Grade 



1 - Cheap 



Poor 



Low Cost 



Value 
Ranee 

- .24 

.30 

+ .36 



- .43 

.49 

+ .55 



- .62 
.68 

+ .74 



Value 
Ranee 

- .79 

.85 

+ .90 







- .95 


5 - 


Average 


1.00 
+ 1.10 






- 1.19 


6 - 


Good 


1.29 
+ 1.35 






- 1.42 


7 - 


Very Good 


1.48 
+ 1.54 



- 1.61 

Excellent 1.67 

+ 2.00 



42.2. QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS AND PHOTOGRAPHS 



42.2.1. GRADE 1 - CHEAP QUALITY 
RESIDENCES 

Residences are of very low cost construction 
built with low quality materials and substandard 
workmanship. These residential structures will not 
meet minimum building code requirements. 
Exterior and interior finishes are very plain. These 
structures are built for minimal habitation and are 
distinguished by the absence of a perimeter 
foundation, plumbing and heating system. 

FOUNDATION - Wood sills on masonry or stone 
piers (no perimeter foundation). 
KXTKUIOR - Wood frame, minimal siding. 
ROOF - Low pitch; wood frame, cheap sheathing, 
roll roofing or metal; minimal or no eaves. 
FLOORS - Wood structure, single, softwood floor 
over minimal joists (no sub-floor). 
INTERIOR - Frame; wallboard walls and ceiling. 
IIIXriNG - None. 



PLUMBING - None. 

ELECTRICAL - Few fixtures or outlets. 

INSULATION - None. 

BASEMENT - None. 

GARAGE 

Foundation - Stone or wood sills (no perimeter 
concrete). 

Exterior - Wood frame; light studs; minimal 
siding. 

Roof - Low pitch; wood frame; roll roofing, no 
eaves. 

Floor - Dirt floor. 

Interior - Unfinished - hinged door; no 
windows. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - None. 
ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling; roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceiled. roof. 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceiled; 
shed roof. 



c 



42-2 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



GRADE 1 ■ CHEAP QUALITY RESIDENCES 







% 



08/01/89 



42-3 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



GRADE 2 - POOR QUALITY RESIDENCES 







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42. DWELLINGS 



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42.2.2. GRADE 2 - POOR QUALITY 
RESIDENCES 

Residences are of substandard construction, 
built with low cost materials and below average 
workmanship. These residential structures will not 
meet most minimum building code requirements. 
Exterior and interior finishes are plain with little 
or no trim. These houses are built for function, 
with little attention to design. 

FOUNDATION - Concrete or concrete block 

perimeter foundation and interior piers. 

EXTERIOR - Wood frame; light studs or box 

frame; low cost plywood or hardboard siding, 

stucco, masonry veneer; common brick or concrete 

block masonry. 

ROOF - Low pitch; wood frame, 1" spaced 

sheathing, lightweight roll roofing or composition 

shingles, or metal; minimal eaves. 

FLOORS - Wood structure; single, softwood 

flooring over minimal joists (no sub-floor); low 

cost floor covering, carpet or linoleum. 

INTERIOR - Frame; low cost wallboard or 

inexpensive drywall, painted; minimal low cost 

cabinets. 

HEATING - Forced warm air systems with 

thermostat control. 

PLUMBING - 4 cheap fixtures: lavatory, toilet, 

kitchen sink and water heater. 

ELECTRICAL - Minimum quality fixtures, 

minimum number of outlets (wiring substandard by 

most codes). 

INSULATION - Minimal. 

BASEMENT 

Foundation - Concrete or concrete block 
perimeter foundation and interior piers. 

Exterior - Concrete or concrete block walls; 
water-proofed; minimal windows. 

Floor - Concrete on the ground. 

Interior - Unfinished; exposed columns and 
beams; softwood, open riser stairs. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Minimum wiring; minimum number 
of outlets. 



BASEMENT FINISH 

Rooms - Fully partitioned for recreation room, 
bedrooms, laundry room, bathroom, etc. 

Floor - Cheap carpet or uncovered and painted. 

Interior - Furring and framing; cheap gypsum 
board or composition paneling, few interior 
partitions. 

Ceiling - Fiberboard. 

Heating - None, if heat desired, the basement 
finish area must be included in total heated area. 

Plumbing - None. 

Electrical - Minimum lighting and outlets. 

GARAGE 

Foundation - Concrete; concrete block; stone or 
wood piers. 

Exterior - Wood frame; light studs; cheap 
siding. 

Roof - Low pitch; wood frame; cheap 
composition roof, minimal eaves. 

Floors - Dirt floor. 

Interior - Unfinished; no wallboard; cheap 
overhead or hinged door; possibly one window. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - None. 

BASEMENT GAIUGE 

Foundation - Concrete or concrete block; base 
cost included in basement specifications. 

Exterior - Concrete or block walls; base cost 
included in basement specifications. 

Floor - Concrete on ground; base cost included 
in basement specifications. 

Interior - Finished - Fireproofed wall and 
ceiling. 

Heating - None, included in base specifications. 

Electrical - Minimum. 

ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling; roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceiled, roof. 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceiled; 
shed roof. 



% 



08/01/89 



42-5 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.2.3. GRADE 3 - LOW COST QUAUTV 
RESIDENCES 

Grade lF-3 residences are of low cost 
construction built with low cost materials and 
average workmanship but will meet most minimum 
building code requirements. Exterior and interior 
finishes are plain, minimum fenestration with 
inexpensive sash and little or no trim. These 
homes are built for function, not appearance. 

FOUNDATION - Reinforced concrete perimeter 

foundation and interior piers. 

EXTERIOR - Wood frame; sheathing; low cost 

plywood or hardboard siding, stucco, masonry 

veneer; common brick or concrete block masonry. 

ROOF - Low to medium pitch (usually less than 4" 

in 12"); wood frame, sheathing, lightweight 

composition shingle or tar and gravel, or metal; 

minimal eaves. 

FLOORS - Wood structure, light framing, softwood 

or plywood sub-floor; inexpensive carpet, vinyl 

composition tile or linoleum. 

INTERIOR - Frame; drywall painted or low cost 

paneling; painted or vinyl veneer cabinets, low cost 

laminated plastic countertops; hollow core doors 

and low cost hardware; minimal closet space. 

HEATING - Radiant, steam, forced warm air 

system or equal, with thermostat and automatic 

fired furnace or boiler. 

PLUMBING - 5 low cost fixtures: lavatory, toilet, 

bathtub or shower or combination, kitchen sink 

and water heater. 

ELECTRICAL - Low cost fixtures and a minimum 

number of outlets. 

INSULATION - Minimal. 

BASEMENT 

Foundation - Concrete or concrete block 
perimeter foundation and interior piers. 

Exterior - Concrete or concrete block walls; 
water-proofed; minimal windows. 

Roor - Concrete on the ground. 

Interior - Unfinished; exposed columns and 
beams; softwood, open riser stairs. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Minimum wiring; minimum number 
of outlets. 



BASEMENT FINISH 

Rooms - Fully partitioned for recreation room, 
bedroom(s), laundry room, bathroom(s), etc. 

Floor - Low cost carpet or composition tile. 

Interior - Furring and framing; drywall, taped 
and painted, or low cost paneling. 

Ceiling - Fiberboard. 

Heating - None, if heat desired, the basement 
finish area must be included in total heated area. 

Plumbing - None. 

Electrical - Minimum lighting and outlets. 

GARAGE 

Foundation - Concrete or block foundation. 

Exterior - Wood frame; low cost brick or block; 
low cost stucco or siding. 

Roof - Rafters; gable roof; low to medium 
pitch, light weight composition or asphalt shingles, 
minimal eaves. 

Floors - Unreinforced concrete slab. 

Interior - Unfinished: No wallboard; low cost 
overhead or hinged door; minimal window area. 
Finished: Wallboard; low cost overhead or hinged 
door; minimal window area. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Electrical - Minimal lighting. 

BASEMENT GARAGE 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter; 
base cost included in basement specifications. 

Exterior - Concrete or block walls; water- 
proofed; base cost included in basement 
specifications. 

Floor - Concrete on ground; base cost included 
in basement specifications. 

Interior - Finished: Fire proofed wall and 
ceiling. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Minimum. 

ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling; roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceiled, roof. 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceiled; 
shed roof. 



( 



c 



c 



42-6 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



GRADE 3 - LOW COST QUALITY RESIDENCES 





• 







08/01/89 



42-7 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



GRADE 4 - FAIR QUALITY RESIDENCES 








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42-8 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



42.2.4. GRADE 4 - FAIR QUALITY 
RESIDENCES 

Residences are of fair quality construction built 
with average materials and workmanship. These 
houses will meet minimum building codes and 
construction requirements of lending institutions 
and mortgage insuring agencies. Exterior 
ornamentation is usually limited to the front 
elevation and with a minimum amount of 
inexpensive fenestration. Interior finishes are plain 
with few refinements. These homes are usually 
designed from stock plans for speculative 
residential developments. 

FOUNDATION - Reinforced concrete perimeter 

foundation and interior piers. 

EXTERIOR - Wood frame; wood sheathing; 

plywood or hardboard siding, stucco, masonry 

veneer; common brick or concrete block masonry. 

ROOF - Low to medium pitch (usually 4" in 12" or 

less); wood frame, sheathing, lightweight 

composition shingles or tar and gravel, or metal; 

moderate eaves. 

FLOORS - Wood structure, medium frame and 

sub-fioor on first and upper floors, fair carpet, 

hardwood, asphalt or vinyl composition tile. 

INTERIOR - Frame; plaster or drywall taped and 

painted (enameled walls and ceilings in kitchen and 

bath); fair stock cabinets typically painted or vinyl 

veneered; laminated plastic countertops, small 

splash; stock hollow core doors with inexpensive 

hardware; minimal closet space. 

HEATING - Radiant, steam, forced warm air 

system or equal, with thermostat and automatic 

fired furnace or boiler. 

PLUMBING - 5 standard fixtures: lavatory, toilet, 

bathtub or shower or combination, kitchen sink 

and water heater. 

ELECTRICAL - Standard quality fixtures with a 

minimum number of outlets. 

INSULATION - Minimal. 

BASEMENT 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and interior piers. 

Exterior - Concrete or concrete block walls; 
water-proofed; adequate number and size of 
windows. 

Roor - Concrete slab floor; floor drain. 

Interior - Unfinished; exposed columns (wood 
or steel pipe) and beams; softwood, open riser 
stairs. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Adequate number of outlets. 



BASEMENT FINISH 

Rooms - Fully partitioned for recreation room, 
bedroom(s), laundry room, bathroom(s), etc. 

Floor - Fair carpet or vinyl composition tile. 

Interior - Furring and framing; drywall, taped 
and painted or paneling. 

Ceiling - Fiberboard or fair ceiling tile. 

Heating - None, if heat desired, the basement 
finish area must be included in total heated area. 

Plumbing - None. 

Electrical - Individual room lighting and 
adequate number of outlets. 

GARAGE 

Foundation - Concrete foundation. 

Exterior - Frame; block or brick; average stucco 
or siding. 

Roof - Wood frame, sheathing; low to medium 
pitch; composition shingles or tar and gravel, 
moderate eaves. 

Floors - Reinforced slab. 

Interior - Unfinished: Fair quality overhead and 
pedestrian doors and windows. Finished: Drywall, 
taped and painted or wallboard; fair quality 
overhead and pedestrian doors and windows. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Lighting and minimal outlets. 

BASEMENT GARAGE 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter; 
base cost included in basement. 

Exterior - Concrete or block walls; water- 
proofed; base cost included in basement. 

Floor - Concrete on ground; floor drain; base 
cost included in basement. 

Interior - Finished - Fire proofed wall and 
ceiling. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Minimum. 

ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling; roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceiled, roof 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceiled; 
shed or gable roof. 



08/01/89 



42-9 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.2.5. GRADE 5 - AVERAGE QUALITY 
RESIDENCES 

Residences are of average construction built 
with average quality materials and acceptable 
workmanship. These houses will meet or exceed 
minimum building codes and the construction 
requirements of lending institutions and mortgage 
insuring agencies. Exterior ornamentation is 
frequently limited to the front elevation but with 
an adequate amount of standard quality aluminum 
or wood sash fenestration. Interior flnishes are 
simple with some inexpensive wallpaper or 
paneling, doors are medium grade, hollow core 
with stock hardware. These homes are frequently 
designed for mass production. 

FOUNDATION - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and interior foundation or piers. 
EXTERIOR - Wood frame; wood sheathing; 
average quality siding or shingle, stucco, masonry 
veneer; common brick or concrete block masonry. 
ROOF - Medium pitch (5" to 12" or less); 2" x 6" 
rafters or manufactured trusses, good quality 
sheathing, wood or medium weight composition 
shingles or tar and gravel, or metal; average eaves. 
FLOORS - Wood structure, medium frame and 
sub-floor on first and upper floors; average quality 
carpet, hardwood, vinyl composition tile or sheet 
vinyl. 

INTERIOR - Frame; plaster or drywall taped and 
painted (enameled walls and ceilings in kitchen and 
bath), some average wallpaper or paneling; 
prcfinished cabinets; laminated plastic or ceramic 
tile counter tops with average splash; medium 
grade hollow core doors with standard grade 
hardware; stock baseboards; adequate closet space. 
HEATING - Forced air, steam, vapor, hot water, or 
radiant system with thermostat and automatic fired 
furnace or boiler. Exhaust fan in kitchen. 
PLUMBING - 6 average quality fixtures: lavatory, 
toilet, bathtub or shower or combination, kitchen 
sink, water heater and laundry facilities. 
ELECTRICAL - Average quality fixtures and an 
adequate number of outlets. 
INSULATION - Adequate. 

BASEMENT 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and interior piers. 

Exterior - Concrete or concrete block walls; 
water-proofed; adequate number and size of 
windows. 

Floor - Concrete slab floor; floor drain. 



Interior - Unfinished: exposed columns (wood 
or steel pipe) and beams; softwood, open riser 
stairs. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Adequate number of outlets. 

BASEMENT FINISH 

Rooms - Fully partitioned for recreation room, 
bedroom(s), laundry room, bathroom(s), etc. Some 
attention given to design. 

Floor - Average carpet or vinyl composition 
tile. 

Interior - Furring and framing; drywall, taped 
and painted, average wallpaper or paneling. 

Ceiling - Drywall, taped and painted. 

Heating - None, if heat desired, the basement 
finish area must be included in total heated area. 

Plumbing - None. 

Electrical - Individual room lighting and 
adequate number of outlets. 

GARAGE 

Foundation - Concrete foundation. 

Exterior - Frame; common brick or average 
quality stucco or siding; sometimes brick trim. 

Roof - Medium pitch roof 2" x 6" rafters or 
manufactured trusses, good sheathing; wood or 
composition shingles. 

Floor - Reinforced slab. 

Interior - Unfinished: average quality overhead 
and pedestrian doors and windows. Finished: 
Drywall taped and painted or wall board; overhead 
and pedestrian doors; windows. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Lighting and adequate outlets. 

BASEMENT GARAGE 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter; 
base cost included in basement. 

Exterior - Concrete or block walls; water- 
proofed; base cost included in basement. 

Floor - Concrete on ground; floor drain; base 
cost included in basement. 

Interior - Finished: Fire proofed wall and 
ceiling. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Average lighting and outlets. 

ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling; roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceilcd, roof. 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceilcd; 
shed or gable roof. 



i 



42-10 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLrNGS 



GRADE 5 - AVERAGE QUALITY RESIDENCES 









08/01/89 



42-11 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



GRADE 6 - GOOD QUALITY RESIDENCES 









42-12 



Oe/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



42.2.6. GRADE 6 - GOOD QUALITY 
RESIDENCES 

Residences are of good quality construction 
built with good quality materials and workmanship 
and will have some custom craftsmanship. These 
houses will exceed minimum building codes and 
construction requirements for lending institutions 
and mortgage insuring agencies. Exterior 
ornamentation reflect some attention to detail with 
ample and good quality fenestration throughout. 
Interiors are well finished usually with good quality 
wallpaper or wood paneling; doors are good quality 
hollow core with attractive hardware. These homes 
are frequently custom built but may be mass 
produced in above average residential 
developments. 

FOUNDATION - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and foundation or piers under interior 
supports. 

EXTERIOR - Wood frame; wood sheathing; good 
quality siding or stucco; masonry veneer; common 
brick or concrete block masonry. 
ROOF - Medium pitch with hips and valleys; 2" x 
6" rafters or trusses, good quality solid sheathing, 
good quality, heavy weight composition shingles or 
good quality cedar shakes, good eaves. 
FLOORS - Wood structure medium frame and sub- 
floor on first and upper floors; good quality carpet, 
hardwood, sheet vinyl or vinyl tile. 
INTERIOR - Frame; plaster or drywall taped and 
painted with enameled walls and ceilings in kitchen 
and bath, some good quality wallpaper or wood 
paneling; ample amount of natural wood veneer 
finished cabinets; laminated plastic, ceramic tile, or 
simulated marble countertops and splash; good 
quality hollow core doors with attractive hardware; 
hardwood baseboards; ample closet and storage 
space. 

HEATING - Forced warm air, steam, vapor, hot 
water, or radiant or equal system with thermostat 
and automatic fired furnace or boiler. Exhaust fan 
in kitchen and bathroom. 

PLUMBING - 9 good quality fixtures: lavatories, 
toilets, bathtubs or shower combinations, kitchen 
sink, water heater and laundry facilities. 
ELECTRICAL - Good quality fixtures and an 
ample number of outlets. 
INSULATION - Good. 
BASEMENT 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and piers. 



Exterior - Concrete or concrete block walls; 
water-proofed; adequate number and size of 
windows, good fenestration. 

Floor - Moisture proof concrete slab floor; 
adequate floor drains. 

Interior - Unfinished; exposed columns (wood 
or steel pipe) and beams; softwood, open riser 
stairs. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - An adequate number of outlets. 
BASEMENT FINISH 

Rooms - Fully partitioned for recreation room, 
bedroom(s), laundry room, bathroom(s), etc. Well 
designed and partitioned. 

Floor - Good carpet or vinyl flooring. 

Interior - Furring and framing; vapor barrier; 
drywall taped and painted, good wallpaper or 
paneling. 

Ceiling - Drywall taped and painted. 

Heating - None, if heat desired, the basement 
finish area must be included in total heated area. 

Plumbing - None. 

Electrical - Individual room lighting and 
adequate number of outlets. 
GARAGE 

Foundation - Concrete foundation. 

Exterior - Frame; face brick; good siding or 
stucco; good fenestration; good eaves. 

Roof - Medium pitch, wood rafters and 
sheathing; shakes, or good composition shingles. 

Floor - Reinforced slab. 

Interior - Unfinished: exposed frame; good 
quality doors and windows. Finished: Drywall 
taped and painted or good wall board; good doors 
and windows. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Good lighting and adequate number 
of outlets. 
BASEMENT GARAGE 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter; 
base cost included in basement. 

Exterior - Concrete or block walls; water- 
proofed; base cost included in basement. 

Floor - Concrete on ground, floor drain; base 
cost included in basement. 

Interior - Finished: Fire proofed wall and 
ceiling. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Good lighting and adequate outlets. 
ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling, roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceiled, roof. 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceiled; 
gable roof. 



08/01/89 



42-13 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.2.7. GRADE 7 - VERY GOOD QUALITY 
RESIDENCES 

Residences are of high quality construction, 
built with high quality materials, workmanship and 
custom craftsmanship. Exterior ornamentation 
show refinements with good quality fenestration 
throughout. Interiors are well finished with good 
quality wall coverings or wood paneling and 
hardware. These homes are usually individually 
designed. 

FOUNDATION - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and interior support foundation. 
EXTERIOR - Wood frame; wood sheathing; high 
quality siding or stucco; masonry veneer; face brick 
or stone masonry; custom ornamentation and trim. 
ROOF - Medium to high pitch with hips and 
valleys; heavy rafters, good quality solid sheathing, 
or cathedral ceiling with laminated beams and 
T&G deck; heavy wood shakes, good eaves. 
FLOORS - Wood structure, heavy frame and sub- 
fioor on first and upper floors; very good quality 
carpet, hardwood, sheet vinyl or ceramic tile. 
INTERIOR - Frame; expertly finished plaster or 
drywall taped and painted with enameled walls and 
ceilings in kitchen and bath; high quality wallpaper 
or vinyl wall covering, hardwood paneling; ample 
amount of natural wood veneer finished cabinets; 
ceramic tile or highest quality laminated plastic 
countcrtops and splash; hardwood or enameled 
doors with high quality hardware; hardwood 
moldings; spacious walk-in closets and large storage 
closets. 

HINTING - Forced warm air, steam, vapor, hot 
water, or radiant or equal system with thermostat 
and automatic fired furnace or boiler. Exhaust fan 
in kitchen and bathroom. 

PLUMBING - 12 high quality fixtures: lavatories, 
toilets, bathtubs or showers or combinations, 
kitchen sink, water heater and laundry facilities. 
ELECTRICAL - High quality fixtures, with well 
positioned outlets and some special outlets. 
INSULATION - More than adequate. 
BASEMENT 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and interior support foundation. 

Exterior - Concrete; water-proofed; adequate 
number and size of windows, good fenestration. 

Floor - Moisture proof concrete slab floor; 
adequate floor drains. 

Interior - Unfinished: exposed columns and 
beams (wood or steel), stairwell. 

Heating - None. 



Electrical - Adequate number of fixtures and 
outlets. 
BASEMENT FINISH 

Rooms - Fully partitioned for recreation room, 
bedroom(s), laundry room, bathroom(s), etc. Well 
designed and partitioned. 

Floor - High quality carpet, vinyl flooring, or 
tile. 

Interior - Furring and framing; vapor barrier; 
drywall taped and painted; good quality wallpaper 
or vinyl wall covering or hardwood paneling. 

Ceiling - Drywall taped, textured and painted. 

Heating - None, if heat desired, the basement 
finish area must be included in total heated area. 

Plumbing - None. 

Electrical - Individual room lighting and 
adequate number of outlets. 
GARAGE 

Foundation - Concrete foundation. 

Exterior - Frame or brick; very good stucco or 
siding; stone or brick trim. 

Roof - Medium to high pitch, heavy roof 
structure; shakes, tile, or good shingles, good eaves. 

Floor - Reinforced slab. 

Interior - Unfinished: No wall covering, very 
good doors and windows, good fenestration. 
Finished: Drywall taped and painted or good wall 
board; very good doors and windows, good 
fenestration. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Good lighting and an ample number 
of outlets. 
BASEMENT GARAGE 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter; 
base cost included in basement specifications. 

Exterior - Concrete or block walls; water- 
proofed; base cost included in basement 
specifications. 

Floor - Concrete on ground, floor drain; base 
cost included in basement specifications. 

Interior - Finished: Fire proofed wall and 
ceiling. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Good lighting and an ample number 
of outlets. 

ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling; roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceiled, roof. 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceiled; 
gable roof. 



42-14 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



GRADE 7 ■ VERY GOOD QUALITY RESIDENCES 







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42-15 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



GRADE 8 - EXCELLENT QUALITY RESIDENCES 




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42-16 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



42.2.8. GRADE 8 - EXCELLENT QUALITY 
RESIDENCES 

Residences are of highest quality construction 
built with best quality materials and workmanship 
with custom craftsmanship throughout. Exterior 
ornamentation reflects considerable attention to 
detail with well designed high quality fenestration. 
Interiors are well finished with highest quality wall 
coverings or hardwood paneling. These homes are 
individually designed and are usually unique, 
however, the base specifications does not represent 
the highest costs in residential construction. 

FOUNDATION - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and interior support foundation. 
EXTERIOR - Wood frame: wood sheathing; 
highest quality siding; masonry veneer; select brick 
or cut stone masonry; all custom trim. 
ROOF - Medium to steep pitch with hips and 
valleys; heavy rafters, good quality solid sheathing 
or cathedral ceilings with laminated beams and 
T&G deck, clay tile or slate, very good eaves. 
FLOORS - Wood structure, heavy frame and sub- 
floor on first and upper floors; excellent quality 
carpet, hardwood, terrazzo, ceramic tile, sheet vinyl. 
INTERIOR - Frame; expertly finished plaster or 
drywall taped and painted with enameled walls and 
ceilings in kitchen and bath; excellent quality 
wallpaper or vinyl wall covering, hardwood 
paneling, ceramic tile; ample amounts of hardwood 
cabinets and specialty cabinetry items; ceramic tile 
or highest quality laminated plastic countertops and 
splash; hardwood or enameled doors with best 
quality hardware and hardwood moldings, spacious 
walk-in closets and large storage closets. 
HEATING - Forced warm air, steam, vapor, hot 
water, radiant or equal with thermostatic controls. 
Automatic fired furnace or boiler. Exhaust fans in 
kitchen and bathrooms. 
PLUMBING - 15 excellent quality fixtures: 
lavatories, toilets, bathtubs or shower or 
combinations, kitchen sink, water heater and 
laundry facilities. 

ELECTRICAL - Excellent quality fixtures, many 
well positioned outlets and special outlets. 
INSULATION - More than adequate. 
BASEMENT 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter 
foundation and interior support foundation. 

Exterior - Concrete; water-proofed; adequate 
number and size of windows, very good 
fenestration. 

Floor - Moisture proof concrete slab floor; 
adequate floor drains. 



Interior - Unfinished; exposed columns and 
beams (wood or steel), stairwell. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Adequate number of fixtures and 
outlets. 
BASEMENT FINISH 

Rooms - Fully partitioned for recreation room, 
bedroom(s), laundry room, bathroom(s), etc. Very 
well designed. 

Floor - Excellent carpet, sheet vinyl or ceramic 
tile. 

Interior - Furring and framing; expertly finished 
drywall, high quality wallpaper or vinyl wall 
covering or excellent paneling. 

Ceiling - Drywall, expertly taped, textured and 
painted. 

Heating - None, if heat desired, the basement 
finish area must be included in total heated area. 

Plumbing - None. 

Electrical - Individual room lighting and 
adequate number of outlets. 
GARAGE 

Foundation - Concrete foundation. 

Exterior - Frame or brick; best stucco or siding; 
stone or brick trim. 

Roof - Heavy rafters or steep roof; shakes, tile, 
slate, or excellent shingles, ornamental eaves. 

Floor - Heavy slab. 

Interior - Unfinished: No wall covering; 
excellent doors, windows, very good fenestration. 
Finished: Gypsum board, taped, painted; excellent 
doors and windows, very good fenestration. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Good lighting and an ample number 
of outlets. 
BASEMENT GARAGE 

Foundation - Reinforced concrete perimeter; 
base cost included in basement specifications. 

Exterior - Concrete or block walls; water- 
proofed; base cost included in basement 
specifications. 

Floor - Concrete on ground, adequate floor 
drains; base cost included in basement 
specifications. 

Interior - Finished: Fire proofed wall and 
ceiling. 

Heating - None. 

Electrical - Good lighting and an ample number 
of outlets. 

ENCLOSED PORCH - Raised floor; interior finish; 
ceiling; roof like residence. 
OPEN PORCH - Raised floor; unceiled, roof. 
CARPORT / PATIO - Slab on ground; unceiled; 
gable roof. 



08/01/89 



42-17 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.3. MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 



The Residential Cost Program is used for 
computing the replacement cost new of all single 
family dwellings, and certain multi-family dwellings. 
"Average" grade costs are provided for first story, 
second story and additional stories and half story 
areas of dwellings of frame and masonry exterior 
wall construction, along with tables of base price 
adjustments, additions and other features. 

42.3.1. GENERAL APPLICATION 

In brief, the steps in the application of the 
pricing schedule are to add the costs for the 
separate areas on various levels (basement, first, 
second, additional, and half) and then to add 
adjustments for specific other items which affect 
the value. Finally, overall multipliers are applied 
to account for grade factor, cost and design factor, 
depreciation, and local indexes. 

42.3.2. MANUAL PRICING PROCEDURE 

Please note that the pricing schedules are 
computer-generated utilizing mathematical formulas 
to generate costs. It is possible to note a slightly 
different replacement cost new when comparing the 
computer-generated costs to the dwelling pricing 
schedules appearing in this manual. This is caused 
by the rounding procedures of the computer and 
should not be considered an error in the printed 
schedules or the computer-generated value. 

Step 1. - Base Price Determine the areas for 
each of the following levels: basement, first floor, 
second and additional floors, half story, and attic. 

Bay windows, overhangs and living area 
additions should be included in the calculated area 
of the appropriate floor level. 

a. Computer pricing will be calculated to 
the nearest square foot. However, for ease of 
manual calculations, round each area to the nearest 
10 square feet. In rounding, round 1 to 4 square 
feet down; and 5 to 9 square feet up. 

b. From the table for the appropriate floor 
level, select the area closest to, but not greater 
than the area for that level. Because the tables 
show values at 100 square foot intervals, it will be 
necessary to interpolate for sizes falling between 
ihcsc intervals. To help in this interpolation, the 



pricing schedules also give the dollar increment 
between the priced intervals. The price for a 
specific area for a given floor level is the price for 
that area plus the incremental value times the 
fraction of the area above the table level. 

For example, the price of a 1564 square foot 
first story frame area is the sum of the price given 
for 1500 square feet plus 64% (64/100) of the 
incremental price between 1500 and 1600 square 
feet. 

49,970 -I- [(64/100) * 2,480] = 

49,970 -I- 1,587 = 51,557 or 51,560 rounded 

c. If the dwelling is of masonry and frame 
construction (EXTERIOR WALLS = 2), the floor 
level cost will be the average of the frame and 
masonry costs for that size area. 

d. The prices for all levels present are 
rounded to the nearest SIO and added together. 

Step 2. - Base Price Adjustments Make the 
necessary base price adjustments to account for 
variations from the base specifications. These are 
addressed in the following paragraphs. 

Unfinished Area: A deduction must be made for 
any area within the living area of the dwelling 
which lacks interior finish, such as ceiling, wall and 
floor finish. Deduction is based on square foot. 

Heating and Air Conditioning: The base price 
includes a central heating system. A deduction 
must be made for "no heating" and non-central 
systems, and an addition must be made for central 
air conditioning. 

Heating adjustments are made on the basis of 
the healed area or the total living area. The total 
living area is the sum of: finished basement living 
area, first, second, and additional finished floor 
areas, plus 75% of any half story area and a 
variable percentage of any attic area, depending on 
finish (20% of partially finished, 40% of full 
finished and 55% of full finished at wall height). 
Using the computed total living area, access the 
Heating and Air Conditioning adjustments table to 
determine the appropriate adjustment. Interpolate 
as needed. Round the result to the nearest SlO. 



42-18 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



If the Heated Floor Area is different from the 
calculated total living area, use the total living area 
to determine a No-Heat adjustment then add back 
to this the adjustment based on the heated floor 
area. 



Example: 

A 1 '/: Story dwelling has heating on the first floor, but no 
heat in the upper half-story. The ground floor area is 900. 
Half-story area is calculated 75% of total 900 which is 
equal to 675. Total living area is 900 + 675 or 1 575 sf. 

From the No Heat Column: 

Total living area 1575 = - 2800 

(interpolated and rounded) 

Heated Area 900 = - 1910 



Add back 1910 
to - 2800 



- 2800 + 1910= - 890 



If the heated area is also Air Conditioned, add 
the Air Conditioning adjustment based on the 
Heated Floor Area. 

Plumbing: The base price assumes a "normal" 
complement of plumbing fixtures for the dwelling 
determined on the basis of the dwelling grade. An 
addition or deduction is made for excesses above 
or deficiencies below these norms. Determine the 
adjustment from the Plumbing schedule. 



Grade 



Number of Fixtures 



1 - 


Cheap 





2 - 


Poor 


4 


3 - 


Low Cost 


5 


4 - 


Fair 


5 


5 - 


Average 


6 


6 - 


Good 


9 


7 - 


Very Good 


12 


8 - 


Excellent 


15 



Step 3. - Additions Add the price for all 
additions, i.e., areas attached to but not included in 
the dwelling areas. These include: porches, 
attached garages and carports, built-in garages, and 
mobile home additions. 



NOTE: Attached Garages are garages attached 
to, but not included in, the area designated 
as the "base ground floor area". 

Built-in Garages are finished garages built 
into a portion of the dwelling that would 
normally be considered finished living area 
and must be described as an Addition to be 
valued. 

Step 4. - Other Features Compute the price 
of the specified Other Features from the table. 
Items to be priced as Other Features are Basement 
Garages, Fireplaces, Finished Basements, 
Unfinished Areas and the applicable Miscellaneous 
Other Features. As for additions, the value of 
Other Features (including chimneys, fireplaces, and 
basement/built-in garages) is given in points 
(increments of SlOO). 

Step 5. - Flat Add Costs Determine if there 
are any "flat add" costs to be added or subtracted. 

Step 6. Subtotal the prices arrived at in Steps 
1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. 

Step 7. Grade Factor Apply the proper 
Grade Factor. Refer to the "Estimating 
Replacement Cost New" Section 41 of this manual 
for an explanation of the application of grade 
factor, cost and design factor, and county index. 
The Grade Factors are listed in Section 42.1.2. 

Step 8. Cost and Design Apply the proper 
Cost and Design Factor. The resulting 
replacement cost new (RCN) is rounded to the 
nearest SIO. 

Step 9. - Depreciation Apply the appropriate 
percent good to the RCN. Follow the instructions 
in Section 47 to calculate a percent good. 

Step 10. • Economic Condition Factor 

Multiply by the local cost modifier and any 
economic condition factor. Round the resulting 
replacement cost new less depreciation (RCNLD) 
to the nearest SIO. 



The area of the addition should be rounded, for 
manual pricing, to the nearest 10 square feet and 
the pricing interpolated from the pricing schedule. 
The values shown represent points (increments of 
SlOO). 



Step 11. - Percent Confiplete Multiply 
RCNLD by the percent complete. 

Step 12. - Ownership Multiply by percent of 
ownership to arrive at final appraised value. 
Round the final result to the nearest SIO. 



08/01/89 



42-19 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.4. PRICING TABLES 



42.4.1. DWELLING BASE PRICING SCHEDULE 







nunc 






MASONRY 






FIRST 


2ND li 


HALF 


FIRST 


2ND I 


HALF 


AREA 


STORY 


AOO'L 


STORY 


STORY 


ADD'L 


STORY 


300 


20160 


11690 


7020 


21370 


13100 


7790 




2490 


1450 


860 


2640 


1610 


960 


400 


22650 


13140 


7880 


24010 


14710 


8750 




2480 


1440 


870 


2630 


1620 


960 


500 


25130 


14580 


8750 


26640 


16330 


9710 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


600 


27610 


16020 


9610 


29270 


17940 


10670 




2490 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


700 


30100 


17460 


10470 


31900 


19550 


11630 




2480 


1440 


870 


2640 


1620 


960 


800 


32580 


18900 


11340 


34540 


21170 


12590 




2490 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


900 


35070 


20340 


12200 


37170 


22780 


13550 




2480 


1440 


870 


2630 


1610 


960 


1000 


37550 


21780 


13070 


39800 


24390 


14510 




2480 


1440 


860 


2640 


1620 


950 


1100 


40030 


23220 


13930 


42440 


26010 


15460 




2490 


1440 


870 


2630 


1610 


960 


1200 


42520 


24660 


14800 


45070 


27620 


16420 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


1300 


45000 


26100 


15660 


47700 


29230 


17380 




2490 


1440 


870 


2640 


1620 


960 


1400 


47490 


27540 


16530 


50340 


30850 


18340 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


1500 


49970 


28980 


17390 


52970 


32460 


19300 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


1600 


52450 


30420 


18250 


55600 


34070 


20260 




2490 


1440 


870 


2640 


1620 


960 


1700 


54940 


31860 


19120 


58240 


35690 


21220 




2480 


1450 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


1800 


57420 


33310 


19980 


60870 


37300 


22180 




2490 


1440 


870 


2630 


1620 


960 


1900 


59910 


34750 


20850 


63500 


38920 


23140 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


2000 


62390 


36190 


21710 


66130 


40530 


24100 




2480 


1440 


870 


2640 


1610 


960 


2100 


64870 


37630 


22580 


68770 


42140 


25060 




2490 


1440 


860 


2630 


1620 


960 


2200 


67360 


39070 


23440 


71400 


43760 


26020 




2480 


1440 


870 


2630 


1610 


960 







FRAME 






MASONRY 






FIRST 


2ND 1. 


HALF 


FIRST 


2ND t 


HALF 


AREA 


STORY 


AOD'L 


STORY 


STORY 


ADD'L 


STORY 


2300 


69840 


40510 


24310 


74030 


45370 


26980 




2490 


1440 


860 


2640 


1610 


960 


2400 


72330 


41950 


25170 


76670 


46980 


27940 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1620 


960 


2500 


74810 


43390 


26030 


79300 


48600 


28900 




2480 


1440 


870 


2630 


1610 


960 


2600 


77290 


44830 


26900 


81930 


50210 


29860 




2490 


1440 


860 


2640 


1610 


960 


2700 


79780 


46270 


27760 


84570 


51820 


30820 




2480 


1440 


870 


2630 


1620 


960 


2800 


82260 


47710 


28630 


87200 


53440 


31780 




2490 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


2900 


84750 


49150 


29490 


89830 


55050 


32740 




2480 


1440 


870 


2630 


1620 


960 


3000 


87230 


50590 


30360 


92460 


56670 


33700 




2480 


1440 


860 


2640 


1610 


950 


3100 


89710 


52030 


31220 


95100 


58280 


34650 




2490 


1450 


870 


2630 


1610 


960 


3200 


92200 


53480 


32090 


97730 


59890 


35610 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1620 


960 


3300 


94680 


54920 


32950 


100360 


61510 


36570 




2490 


1440 


860 


2640 


1610 


960 


3400 


97170 


56360 


33810 


103000 


63120 


37530 




2480 


1440 


870 


2630 


1610 


960 


3500 


99650 


57800 


34680 


105630 


64730 


38490 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1620 


960 


3600 


102130 


59240 


35540 


108260 


66350 


39450 




2490 


1440 


870 


2640 


1610 


960 


3700 


104620 


60680 


36410 


110900 


67960 


40410 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


3800 


107100 


62120 


37270 


113530 


69570 


41370 




2490 


1440 


870 


2630 


1620 


960 


3900 


109590 


63560 


38140 


116160 


71190 


42330 




2480 


1440 


860 


2630 


1610 


960 


4000 


112070 


65000 


39000 


118790 


72800 


43290 




24840 


14410 


8640 


26340 


16140 


9600 


5000 


136910 


79410 


47640 


145130 


88940 


52890 



UNFINISHED AREA 



Refers to an area within the living area of the dwelling which lacks interior finish such as Ceiling, Wall and 
Floor Finish. 



Deduct per SF of Unfinished Area: 



5.00 



42-20 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



42.4.1. DWELLING BASE PRICING SCHEDULE (Cont'd) 





BASEMENT 


NO 


FOUNDATION 


ATTIC 








(DEDUCTION) 






FULL OR 








NO 




AREA 


PARTIAL 


CRAWL 


SUB 


PIERS 


FOUND. 


FINISHED 


300 


3230 


1500 


90 


200 


290 


3990 


400 


3630 


1680 


120 


260 


380 


4480 


500 


4030 


1870 


150 


330 


480 


4980 


600 


4430 


2050 


180 


390 


570 


5470 


700 


4830 


2240 


210 


460 


670 


5960 


800 


5230 


2420 


240 


520 


760 


6450 


900 


5620 


2610 


270 


590 


860 


5940 


1000 


6020 


2790 


300 


650 


950 


7440 


1100 


6420 


2980 


330 


720 


1050 


7930 


1200 


6820 


3160 


360 


780 


1140 


8420 


1300 


7220 


3350 


390 


850 


1240 


8910 


1400 


7620 


3530 


420 


910 


1330 


9400 


1500 


8020 


3720 


450 


980 


1430 


9890 


1600 


8410 


3900 


480 


1040 


1520 


10390 


1700 


8810 


4090 


510 


1110 


1620 


10880 


1800 


9210 


4270 


540 


1170 


1710 


11370 


1900 


9610 


4460 


570 


1240 


1810 


11860 


2000 


10010 


4640 


600 


1300 


1900 


12350 


2100 


10410 


4830 


630 


1370 


2000 


12850 


2200 


10800 


5010 


660 


1430 


2090 


13340 


2300 


11200 


5200 


690 


1500 


2190 


13830 


2400 


11600 


5380 


720 


1560 


2280 


14320 


2500 


12000 


5570 


750 


1630 


2380 


14810 


2600 


12400 


5750 


780 


1690 


2470 


15300 


2700 


12800 


5940 


810 


1760 


2570 


15800 


2800 


13190 


6120 


840 


1820 


2660 


15290 


2900 


13590 


6310 


870 


1890 


2760 


16780 


3000 


13990 


6490 


900 


1950 


2850 


17270 


3100 


14390 


6670 


930 


2020 


2950 


17760 


3200 


14790 


6860 


960 


2080 


3040 


18260 


3300 


15190 


7040 


990 


2150 


3140 


18750 


3400 


15590 


7230 


1020 


2210 


3230 


19240 


3500 


15980 


7410 


1050 


2280 


3330 


19730 


3600 


16380 


7600 


1080 


2340 


3420 


20220 


3700 


16780 


7780 


1110 


2410 


3520 


20710 


3800 


17180 


7970 


1140 


2470 


3610 


21210 


3900 


17580 


8150 


1170 


2540 


3710 


21700 


4000 


17980 


8340 


1200 


2600 


3800 


22190 


5000 


21960 


10190 


1500 


3250 


4750 


27110 



08/01/89 



42-21 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.4.2. BASE PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 
42.4.2.1. HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING ADJUSTMENTS 



a 



TOTAL 








HEATED 








OR 








Livim 


NO HEAT 


NON-CENTRAL 


WITH AIR 


AREA 


(-) 


(-) 


CONDITIONING 


300 


1120 


600 


890 


400 


1250 


670 


1000 


500 


1390 


750 


1110 


600 


1520 


820 


1210 


700 


1650 


890 


1320 


800 


1780 


960 


1430 


900 


1910 


1040 


1540 


1000 


2040 


1110 


1650 


1100 


2170 


1180 


1760 


1200 


2300 


1260 


1870 


1300 


2430 


1330 


1980 


1400 


2560 


1400 


2090 


1500 


2700 


1480 


2200 


1600 


2830 


1550 


2300 


1700 


2960 


1620 


2410 


1800 


3090 


1690 


2520 


1900 


3220 


1770 


2630 


2000 


3350 


1840 


2740 


2100 


3480 


1910 


2850 


2200 


3610 


1990 


2960 


2300 


3740 


2060 


3070 


2400 


3870 


2130 


3180 


2500 


4010 


2210 


3290 


2600 


4140 


2280 


3390 


2700 


4270 


2350 


3500 


2800 


4400 


2420 


3610 


2900 


4530 


2500 


3720 


3000 


4660 


2570 


3830 


3100 


4790 


2640 


3940 


3200 


4920 


2720 


4050 



TOTAL 








HEATED 








OR 








LIVING 


NO HEAT 


NON-CENTRAL 


WITH AIR 


AREA 


(-) 


(-) 


CONDITIONING 


3300 


5050 


2790 


4160 


3400 


5180 


2860 


4270 


3500 


5320 


2940 


4380 


3600 


5450 


3010 


4480 


3700 


5580 


3080 


4590 


3800 


5710 


3150 


4700 


3900 


5840 


3230 


4810 


4000 


5970 


3300 


4920 


4100 


6100 


3370 


5030 


4200 


6230 


3450 


5140 


4300 


6360 


3520 


5250 


4400 


6490 


3590 


5360 


4500 


6630 


3670 


5470 


4600 


6760 


3740 


5570 


4700 


6890 


3810 


5680 


4800 


7020 


3880 


5790 


4900 


7150 


3960 


5900 


5000 


7280 


4030 


6010 


5500 


7940 


4400 


6560 


6000 


8590 


4760 


7100 


6500 


9250 


5130 


7650 


7000 


9900 


5490 


8190 


7500 


10560 


5860 


8740 


8000 


11210 


6220 


9280 


8500 


11870 


6590 


9830 


9000 


12520 


6950 


10370 


9500 


13180 


7320 


10920 


10000 


13830 


7680 


11460 



((' 



42.4.2.2. PLUMBING ADJUSTMENTS 

Base Price includes the normal number of fixtures for the grade times S400. 

Add: S400 for each fixture above the normal number for the grade. 
Deduct: S400 for each fixture less than the normal number for the grade. 



l^ 



42-22 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



42.4.3. ADDITIONS 

42.4.3.1. PORCHES 

(All Prices are in Points) 







FRAME 






BRICK OR STONE 






OPEN 


SCREENED 


ENCLOSED 


OPEN 


SCREENED 


ENCLOSED 


AREA 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


20 


2 1 


3 2 


3 2 


2 1 


3 2 


4 2 


40 


4 2 


6 4 


7 4 


4 3 


6 4 


7 5 


60 


6 4 


9 5 


10 6 


6 4 


10 6 


11 7 


80 


7 5 


11 7 


13 8 


8 6 


13 9 


15 9 


100 


9 6 


14 9 


17 10 


11 7 


16 11 


18 11 


120 


11 7 


17 11 


20 12 


13 8 


19 13 


22 14 


140 


13 8 


20 13 


24 14 


15 10 


23 15 


26 16 


160 


15 9 


23 14 


27 16 


17 11 


26 17 


29 18 


180 


17 11 


26 16 


30 18 


19 13 


29 19 


33 21 


200 


19 12 


29 18 


34 20 


21 14 


32 22 


37 23 


220 


21 13 


32 20 


37 22 


23 15 


36 24 


40 25 


240 


22 14 


34 22 


40 24 


25 17 


39 26 


44 27 


260 


24 15 


37 23 


44 26 


27 18 


42 28 


47 30 


280 


26 16 


40 25 


47 28 


30 20 


45 30 


51 32 


300 


28 18 


43 27 


50 30 


32 21 


49 32 


55 34 


320 


30 19 


46 29 


54 32 


34 22 


52 34 


58 37 


340 


32 20 


49 31 


57 34 


36 24 


55 37 


62 39 


360 


34 21 


52 32 


60 36 


38 25 


58 39 


66 41 



42.4.3.2. ATTACHED UTILITY STRUCTURE 

(All Prices are in Points) 





FRAME 


BRICK OR STONE 




FINISHED 


UNFINISHED 


FINISHED 


UNFINISHED 


AREA 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


FIRST UPPER 


20 


2 1 


2 1 


2 2 


2 1 


40 


4 3 


3 2 


5 4 


4 3 


60 


5 4 


5 4 


7 5 


5 4 


80 


7 6 


6 5 


9 8 


7 6 


100 


9 7 


8 6 


11 9 


9 7 


120 


11 9 


9 7 


14 11 


11 9 


140 


13 10 


11 8 


16 13 


13 10 


160 


15 12 


12 9 


18 15 


14 12 


180 


16 13 


14 11 


21 17 


16 13 


200 


18 15 


15 12 


23 19 


18 14 


220 


20 16 


17 13 


25 21 


20 16 


240 


22 18 


18 14 


27 23 


22 17 


260 


24 19 


20 15 


30 25 


23 19 


280 


26 21 


21 16 


32 26 


25 20 


300 


27 22 


23 18 


34 28 


27 22 


320 


29 24 


24 19 


36 30 


29 23 


340 


31 25 


26 20 


39 32 


31 24 


360 


33 27 


28 21 


41 34 


32 26 



08/01/89 



42-23 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.4.3. ADDITIONS (Cont'd) 

42.4.3.3. ATTACHED GARAGES 

(All Prices are in Points) 





FRAME 


MASONRY 


EXTENSIONS 


AREA 


FINISHED UNFINISHED 


FINISHED UNFINISHED 


FRAME MASONRY 


20 


10 8 


14 11 


2 2 


40 


12 9 


16 13 


3 4 


60 


14 11 


18 15 


5 6 


80 


16 12 


21 17 


7 9 


100 


18 13 


23 19 


8 11 


120 


19 15 


26 20 


10 13 


140 


21 16 


28 22 


11 15 


160 


23 18 


30 24 


13 17 


180 


25 19 


33 26 


15 19 


200 


27 20 


35 28 


16 21 


220 


29 22 


37 30 


18 24 


240 


30 23 


40 32 


20 26 


260 


32 25 


42 34 


21 28 


280 


34 26 


44 35 


23 30 


300 


36 27 


47 37 


25 32 


320 


38 29 


49 39 


26 34 


340 


40 30 


51 41 


28 36 


360 


42 31 


54 43 


29 39 


380 


43 33 


56 45 


31 41 


400 


45 34 


58 47 


33 43 


420 


47 36 


61 49 


34 45 


440 


49 37 


63 50 


36 47 


460 


51 38 


65 52 


38 49 


480 


53 40 


68 54 


39 51 


500 


54 41 


70 56 


41 54 


550 


59 45 


76 61 


45 59 


600 


64 48 


82 66 


49 64 



PRICE PER SF 



OBT - ORNAMENTAL BRICK TRIM 
SCA - SOUR COLLECTOR AREA 



6.50 
20.60 



42-24 



08/01/89 



42. DWELLINGS 



42.4.3. ADDITIONS (Cont'd) 

42.4.3.4. CARPORT / CANOPY; ATTACHED GREENHOUSE; DECKS; STOOPS 

(All Prices are in Points) 





CARPORT/CANOPY 


ATTACHED 




DECKS 




STOOPS 








GREENHOUSE 






STONE 






FRAME 


MASONRY 




WOOD 


CONCRETE 


TILE 


MASONRY 


AREA 


UNFINISHED FINISHED 














20 


1 2 


2 


7 


1 





1 


1 


40 


2 4 


5 


14 


1 


1 


2 


2 


60 


3 5 


7 


21 


2 


1 


3 


4 


80 


4 7 


10 


28 


3 


2 


3 


5 


100 


5 9 


12 


36 


4 


2 


4 


6 


120 


6 11 


14 


43 


4 


2 


5 


7 


140 


7 12 


17 


50 


5 


3 


6 


8 


160 


8 14 


19 


57 


6 


3 


7 


10 


180 


10 16 


22 


64 


6 


4 


8 


11 


200 


11 18 


24 


71 


7 


4 


9 


12 


220 


12 20 


26 


78 


8 


4 


9 


13 


240 


13 21 


29 


85 


9 


5 


10 


14 


260 


14 23 


31 


93 


9 


5 


11 


16 


280 


15 25 


34 


100 


10 


6 


12 


17 


300 


16 27 


36 


107 


11 


6 


13 


18 


320 


17 28 


38 


114 


12 


6 


14 


19 


340 


18 30 


41 


121 


12 


7 


15 


20 


360 


19 32 


43 


128 


13 


7 


15 


22 


380 


20 34 


46 


135 


14 


8 


16 


23 


400 


21 36 


48 


142 


14 


8 


17 


24 



42.5. OTHER FEATURES 



42.5.1. BASEMENT GARAGES 

Refers lo any garage located within thai area of a dwelling priced as a basement. Price includes doors, 
enclosure walls, interior finish and lighting. 



Add per item: 1 Car Garage 900 

2 Car Garage 1,200 

3 Car Garage 1,450 



4 Car Garage 1,700 

5 Car Garage 2,000 



42.5.2. MASONRY FIREPLACES 

Add per item: Stack and One Opening 2,200 Each Additional Opening Same Stack 1,100 



08/01/89 



42-25 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



42.5.3. PREFABRICATED METAL FIREPLACES / STOVES 
Add per stack: 1,500 





42.5.4. 


MISCELLANEOUS OTHER FEATURES 




Add per 


item: 










BD 


Built-in Dishwasher 


370 


E2 


Residential Elevator (2-Stop) 


6,675 


BF 


Built-in Refrigerator 


1,645 


E3 


Residential Elevator (3-Stop) 


7,655 


BI 


Built-In's from conversion 


100/point 


EF 


Exhaust Fan 


90 


BM 


Built-in Microwave Oven 


485 


GD 


Garbage Disposal 


135 


BO 


Built-in Oven 


510 


IC 


Intercom System 


405 


BR 


Built-in Range 


280 


MS 


Miscellaneous Built-in's 


100/point 


BT 


Built-in Trash Compactor 


375 


SB 


Spa Bathtub 


2,355 


CV 


Central Vacuum System 


945 


SL 


Stair Lift 


2,670 








SS 


Security System 


945 



42.5.5. FINISHED BASEMENT AREA 



Minimal Refers to a relatively open undivided area finished with a cheap quality of materials and 

workmanship inconsistent with the main living area of the dwelling. Price includes Interior Wall 
Finish, Flooring, Ceiling and Lighting. 



Add per SF of Finished Area: 



2.86 



Add per SF for Air Conditioning: 



.90 



Fair Refers to an area with minimal partitioning finished with low-quality materials and workmanship 

that is below the quality of the main living area of the dwelling. Price includes Interior Wall 
Finish, Flooring, Ceiling, Partitioning and Lighting. 



Add per SF of Finished Area: 



7.28 



Add per SF for Air Conditioning: 



.90 



Typical Refers to a divided area finished with a quality of materials and workmanship consistent with the 

main living area of the dwelling...such as in the lower or grade level of split-level and bi-level 
dwellings. Price includes Interior Wall Finish, Rooring, Ceiling, Partitioning and Lighting. 



Add per SF of Finished Area: 



11.69 



Add per SF for Air Conditioning: 



.90 



Good Refers to a divided basement area finished with a quality of materials and workmanship higher 

than that of the main living area of the dwelling. Price includes Interior Wall Finish, Flooring, 
Ceiling, Partitioning and Lighting. 



Add per SF of Finished Area: 



15.60 



Add per SF for Air Conditioning: 



.90 



c 



42-26 



08/01/89 



^ 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 






Na 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


43.1. 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 


1 


43.1.1. 


INTRODUCTION 


1 


43.1.2. 


QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 


1 


43.2. 


QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS AND 






PHOTOGRAPHS 


2 


43.2.1. 


GRADE L - LOW COST QUALITY 






MOBILE HOMES 


2 


43.2.2. 


GRADE A - AVERAGE QUALITY MOBILE 






HOMES 


5 


43.2.3. 


GRADE G - GOOD QUALITY MOBILE 






HOMES 


6 



PARAGRAPH 






NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


43.2.4. 


GRADE E - EXCELLENT QUALITY 






MOBILE HOMES 


9 


43.3. 


MOBILE HOME CLASSIFICATION GUIDE 


10 


43.3.1. 


MANUFACTURERS ORDER 


10 


43.3.2. 


MODEL NAME ORDER 


24 


43.4. 


MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 


38 


43.5. 


PRICING TABLES 


40 


43.5.1. 


MOBILE HOME RATES 


40 


43.5.2. 


HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 






ADJUSTMENTS 


41 


43.5.3. 


LIVING AREA ADDITIONS 


42 



43.1. QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 



43.1.1. INTRODUCTION 

The base cost of a mobile home is determined 
by the quality of construction. Determining the 
quality of both materials and workmanship is 
fundamental when assigning an overall quality 
grade. Quality of materials and workmanship in 
individual building components will vary, but will 
tend to influence each other and an overall quality 
grade will tend to be consistent throughout the 
residence. 

It is the appraiser's responsibility to weigh the 
quality of all the building components and assign a 
quality grade that best represents the total residence. 

Consideration should be given not only to 
quality of materials and workmanship used, but to 
complexity of design and layout. Lower quality 
mobile homes are usually simple in design and 
reflect lower cost. Higher quality usually includes 
more complexity in design, with more attention 
given to layout and detail. Higher quality mobile 
homes are generally larger in size than those of 
lower quality. 

The general descriptions given for each grade 
are guidelines that emphasize the most prominent 
characteristics of mobile homes within that grade. 
They are not meant to be exact specifications. 
Mobile homes that do not typically represent the 
basic grade can more accurately be valued by using 
a plus or minus grade variation. 



Photographs of each grade of mobile home are 
also to be used as guidelines. An accurate quality 
grade cannot always be assigned based on exterior 
appearance. Interior layout and finish can greatly 
influence cost and must be considered when 
assigning a quality grade. 

43.1.2. QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 

For mobile homes, the residential system uses 
an alphabetic grading scale with a range of grades 
from a low of L (low cost construction) to a high 
of E (excellent construction). Plus (+) and minus 
(-) adjustments are allowed within each category. 
The relative value ranges are indicated by the 
following table. 



Grade 



Value 
Range 



- .43 
Low Cost .49 

+ .55 







- 


.62 


A - 


Average 




.68 






+ 


.74 






- 


.79 


G - 


Good 




.85 






+ 


.90 



- .95 

E - Excellent 1.00 

+ 1.10 



08/01/89 



43-1 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



43.2. QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS AND PHOTOGRAPHS 



43.2.1. GRADE L - LOW COST QUALITY 
MOBILE HOMES 

Low cost quality mobile homes are generally 
built to minimum construction standards 
established by the industry and most states. 
Workmanship and materials are of below average 
quality, with little or no attention to design. 
Ceiling height is typically T - 7'6". 

FOUNDATION - Set up on steel or concrete piers. 

EXTERIOR - Wood frame, prepainted lightweight 

aluminum siding with exposed fasteners; low cost 

windows with minimal fenestration; no trim or 

ornamentation. 

ROOF - Flat or slightly arched roofs, trusses with 

metal roofing; no eaves or overhang. 

FLOORS - Wood floor joists, with plywood or 

particle board subflooring supported by a light 

steel undercarriage; low cost carpet or asphalt tile 

floor covering. 

INTERIOR - Low quality printed or hardboard 

paneling; low cost paint grade or vinyl covered 

particle board cabinets; low cost hollow core doors, 

minimal closets. 

HEATING - Forced warm air system or equal for 

moderate climate, with thermostat and automatic 

fired furnace. 

PLUMBING - Includes 5 low cost white fixtures: 

any combination of lavatory, toilet, bathtub, 

shower, kitchen sink and hot water heater; and a 

laundry hookup. Plumbing is usually located along 

one side of the trailer, with minimal runs. 

ELECTRICAL - Minimal low cost light fixtures and 

electrical outlets. 

INSULATION - Included in base cost. 



43-2 08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



GRADE L - LOW COST QUALITY MOBILE HOMES 








J'- 


,«i1 




t 

■'^;^^.;.-- ■■■- . ,-« 




aillll wi 






08/01/89 



43-3 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



GRADE A - AVERAGE QUALITY MOBILE HOMES 



f 




Lrtrt^^E 


"■ ■''^. . ^•"WT—ilMfT'l 









i 



43-4 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



43.2.2. GRADE A ■ AVERAGE QUALITY 
MOBILE HOMES 

Average quality mobile homes will usually meet 
or exceed mobile home code requirements. 
Materials and workmanship are of average quality. 
Ceiling height is typically 7'6" - 8'0". 

FOUNDATION - Set up on steel or concrete piers. 

EXTERIOR - Wood frame, aluminum siding, 

aluminum windows with adequate fenestration; 

front elevation will usually have some 

ornamentation. 

ROOF - Sloped or arched roofs, trusses with metal 

roofing. No eaves, front overhang. 

FLOORS - Wood floor joists, with plywood or 

particle board subflooring, supported by rigid steel 

beam undercarriage; average quality carpet or vinyl 

composition floor covering. 

INTERIOR - Medium quality paneling, vinyl 

covered or inexpensive wood veneer cabinets, 

laminated plastic countertops, standard hollow core 

doors, adequate closet space. 

IIIiATING - Forced warm air system or equal for 

moderate climate, with thermostat and automatic 

fired furnace. 

PLUMBING - 7 average quality white or colored 

fixtures; any combination of lavatory, toilet, 

bathtub, shower, kitchen sink, and hot water 

heater; and a laundry hookup. 

ELECTRICAL - Ample number of lighting fixtures 

and outlets. 

INSULATION - Included in the base cost schedule. 



08/01/89 43-5 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



43.2.3. 



GRADE G 
HOMES 



GOOD QUALITY MOBILE 



Good quality mobile homes will generally 
exceed minimum mobile home code requirements. 
With these mobile homes some detail and 
ornamentation is given to interior finishes and 
exterior design. These mobile homes typically have 
8'0" ceiling height. 

FOUNDATION - Set up on steel or concrete piers. 

EXTERIOR - Wood frame, hardboard siding, 

aluminum windows with good fenestration. 

ROOF - Low to medium pitch, trusses with 

sheathing, composition shingles or metal; minimal 

eaves. 

FLOORS - Wood floor joists, with plywood or 

particle board subflooring, supported by rigid steel 

beam under-carriage; good quality carpet or vinyl 

flooring. 

INTERIOR - Good quality paneling or vinyl wall 

covering, painted or vinyl veneer cabinets, 

laminated plastic countertops, veneered hollow core 

doors, ample closet space. 

HEATING - Forced warm air system or equal for 

moderate climate, with thermostat and automatic 

fired furnace. 

PLUMBING - 8 good quality white or colored 

fixtures, fixtures include any combination of 

lavatory, toilet, kitchen sink, bathtub, shower, 

kitchen sink, and hot water heater; and a laundry 

hookup. 

ELECTRICAL - Ample number of good quality 

lights and outlets. 

INSULATION - Included in base cost of mobile 

home. 



i 



^ 



< 



43-6 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



GRADE G - GOOD QUALITY MOBILE HOMES 





*««1i, ■lHii«t2l,M)* » 







08/01/89 



43-7 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



GRADE E - EXCELLENT QUALITY MOBILE HOMES 



r 







r 





e 



43-8 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



43.2.4. GRADE E - EXCELLENT QUALITY 
MOBILE HOMES 

Excellent quality mobile homes will exceed 
minimum requirements of mobile home codes. 
Exterior and interior finishes start to approach the 
quality of those found in site-built residences, with 
attention given to ornamentation and trim. Ceiling 
heights are typically 8'0". 

FOUNDATION - Set up on steel or concrete piers. 
EXTERIOR - Wood frame, hardboard or wood 
siding, good fenestration, with wood or good 
quality aluminum windows; some ornamental trim. 
ROOF - Low to medium pitch, trusses, with 
sheathing and composition shingles, and moderate 
eaves. 

FLOORS - Wood floor joists, with plywood or 
particle board subflooring, supported by rigid steel 
beam under-carriage, excellent quality carpel or 
vinyl floor covering. 

INTERIOR - Excellent hardwood paneling or vinyl- 
covered drywall, wood veneer cabinets with 
laminated plastic countertops, very good wood 
veneer doors, walk-in closets or large wardrobes; 
ceilings may be cathedral or sloped. 
HEATING - Forced warm air system or equal for 
severe climate, with thermostat and automatic fired 
furnace. 

PLUMBING - 8 excellent quality white or colored 
fixtures; any combination of lavatory, toilet, 
bathtub, shower, kitchen sink, and hot water 
heater; and a laundry hookup. 
ELECTRICAL - Numerous lighting fixtures and 
outlets. 
INSULATION - Included in the base cost schedule. 



08/01/89 



43-9 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



EXAMPLE: 



43.3. MOBILE HOME CLASSIFICATION GUIDE 
43.3.1. MANUFACTURERS ORDER 



14'-1983<, means a 14 ft. mobile home built in 1983 or before. 
24'-1979>, means a 24 ft. mobile home built in 1979 or after. 



HANUFAaURER 


HODEL NAHE 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 




QUALITY 


ALLEN 


BON PRIX 


12' 


-1984<, 


14' 


-1983<, 24' 


-1977< 


Low Cost 


ALLEN 


BON PRIX 


12' 


-1985>. 


14' 


-1984>. 24' 


-1978> 


Average 


ALLEN 


FOUR SEASONS 


12' 


&14'-1982<, 


24'-1980< 




Low Cost 


ALLEN 


FOUR SEASONS 


12' 


&14'-1983>, 


24'-1981> 




Average 


ALSEACO 


ALL SEASONS 


12' 


-1982<. 


14' 


-1981< 




Low Cost 


ALSEACO 


ALL SEASONS 


12' 


-1983>. 


14' 


-1982> 




Average 


AMERICAN WAY 


AMERICAN WAY 


12' 


&14'-1986< 






Low Cost 


AMERICAN WAY 


AMERICAN WAY 


12' 


&14'-1987> 






Average 


ANCHOR 


BELMONT 


12' 


-1986<, 


14' 


-1984<, 24' 


-1978< 


Low Cost 


ANCHOR 


BELMONT 


12' 


-1987>, 


14' 


-1985>. 24' 


-1979> 


Average 


APACHE 


APACHE 


12' 


-1981< 








Low Cost 


APACHE 


APACHE 


12" 


-1982> 








Average 


ARGUS 


ARGUS 


14' 


-1983< 








Low Cost 


ARGUS 


ARGUS 


14' 


-1984> 








Average 


ARTCRAFT 


ARTCRAFT 


12' 


-1981<, 


14' 


-1983<, 24' 


-1984< 


Low Cost 


ARTCRAFT 


ARTCRAFT 


12' 


-1982>, 


14' 


-1984>, 24' 


-1985> 


Average 


ARTCRAFT 


BRENTVILLA 


14' 


-1985< 








Low Cost 


ARTCRAFT 


BRENTVILLA 


14' 


-1986> 








Average 


ASTRO 


ASTRO 


14' 


-1976< 








Low Cost 


ASTRO 


ASTRO 


14' 


-1977> 








Average 


ASTRO 


ASTRO 


14' 


-1987> 








Good 


ATCO 


ARTIC MANOR 


14' 


-1979< 








Low Cost 


ATCO 


ARTIC MANOR 


14' 


-1980> 








Average 


ATCO 


ATCO 


14' 


-1976< 








Low Cost 


ATCO 


ATCO 


14' 


-1977-1984 






Average 


ATCO 


ATCO 


14' 


-1985> 








Good 


ATCO 


GENTRY 


12' 


-1982<, 


14' 


-1979<, 20' 


-1978< 


Low Cost 


ATCO 


GENTRY 


24' 


-1981< 








Low Cost 


ATCO 


GENTRY 


12' 


-1983>, 


14' 


-1980>, 20' 


-1979> 


Average 


ATCO 


GENTRY 


24' 


-1982> 








Average 


ATCO 


GENTRY-CUSTOM 


24' 


-1978< 








Low Cost 


ATCO 


GENTRY-CUSTOM 


24' 


-1979> 








Average 


ATCO 


RIDEAU 


12' 


-1984<, 


14' 


-1982<. 16' 


ALL 


Low Cost 


ATCO 


RIOEAU 


24' 


-1978< 








Low Cost 


ATCO 


RIDEAU 


12' 


-1985>. 


14' 


-1983>, 24' 


-1979> 


Average 


AZTEC 


AZTEC 


12' 


-1981<, 


14' 


-1979<, 24' 


-1978< 


Low Cost 


AZTEC 


AZTEC 


12' 


-1982>, 


14' 


-1980>. 24' 


-1979> 


Average 


BENDIX 


BENOIX 


12' 


-1986<. 


14' 


-1979<. 20' 


-1978< 


Low Cost 


BENOIX 


BENDIX 


24' 


-1981< 








Low Cost 


BENDIX 


BENOIX 


12' 


-1987>, 


14' 


-1980>, 20' 


-1979> 


Average 


BENDIX 


BENDIX 


24' 


-1982> 








Average 


BENDIX-BOISE 


BOISE-CASCAOE 


12' 


-1986<. 


14' 


-1979<. 24' 


-1983< 


Low Cost 


BENDIX-BOISE 


BOISE-CASCADE 


12' 


-1987>. 


14' 


-1980>. 24' 


-1984> 


Average 


BENDIX-BOISE 


BROOKWOOD 


12' 


&24'-1982<, 


14'-1978<,20'-1981< 


Low Cost 


BENDIX-BOISE 


BROOKWOOO 


12' 


&24'-1983>. 


14'-1979>,20'-1982> 


Average 


BENDIX-BOISE 


GENERAL 


12' 


&14'-1984<, 


24'-1977< 




Low Cost 


BENDIX-BOISE 


GENERAL 


12' 


&14 








Average 


BENDIX-BOISE 


STAR 


12' 


-1984<, 




-1986<. 24' 


-1981< 


Low Cost 


BENDIX-BOISE 


STAR 


12' 


-1985>. 




-1987>, 24' 


-1982> 


Average 


BENDIX-BOISE 


WESTBROOK 


12' 


-1986<. 




-1978< 




Low Cost 


BENDIX-BOISE 


WESTBROOK 


12' 


-1987>. 




-1979> 




Average 


BENDIX-BOISE 


WESTWOOO 


12' 


-1986<. 




-1983<, 




Low Cost 


BENDIX-BOISE 


WESTWOOD 


12' 


-1987>. 




-1984>. 




Average 


BIG SKY 


BIG SKY 


14' 


-1981<. 


16' 


-1978<, 28' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


BIG S<Y 


BIG SKY 


14' 


-1982>. 


16' 


-1979>, 28' 


-1976> 


Average 



43-10 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MANUFACTURER 



MODEL NAME 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



BRENTWOOD 

BRENTWOOD 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 



BRENTWOOD 

BRENTWOOD 

CAMELOT 

CAMELOT 

CAMELOT 

CAMELOT 

CAMELOT 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

COLUMBINE 

COLUMBINE 

COLUMBINE 

COLUMBINE 

GREAT NORTHERN 

GREAT NORTHERN 

GREAT NORTHERN 

GREAT NORTHERN 

MONTCLAIR 

MONTCLAIR 

MONTCLAIR 

MONTCLAIR 

MONTROSE 

MONTROSE 

MONTROSE 

MONTROSE 

ALPINE CENTURIAN 

ALPINE CENTURIAN 

ALPINE CENTURIAN 

ALPINE CENTURIAN 

ALPINE CENTURIAN 

ALPINE CENTURY 

ALPINE CENTURY 

ALPINE CENTURY 

ALPINE CENTURY 

ALPINE CENTURY 

ALPINE CENTURY 

ALPINE LEADER 

ALPINE LEADER 

ALPINE LEADER 

ALPINE MARK II 

ALPINE MARK II 

ALPINE MARK II 

ALPINE MARK II 

ALPINE PRESTIGE 

ALPINE PRESTIGE 

ALPINE PRESTIGE 

ALPINE PRESTIGE 

ALPINE PRESTIGE 

ALPINE PRESTIGE 

CARMEL 

CARMEL 

CARMEL 

CARMEL 

CARMEL 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 



12'-1982<. 
12'-1983>, 



12'-1982<, 
12'-1983>. 



12'-1985<, 14'-1986<, 24'-1981< 

12'-1986>, 14'-1987>, 24'-1982>, 

14'&16' -1984<. 24'i26'-1981<, 

28'-1977<, 

14'&16'-19B5>, 24'126'-1982>, 

28' -1978-1986 

28'-1987> 

14'-1978<, 16'-1977<, 24'-1974< 

14'-1979>, 16' -1978-1984, 

24'-1975> 

16'-1985>, 

12'-1978<, 14'-1981<, 16'-1982<, 

24'-1977<, 

12' -1979-1986, 14 '-1982>. 16 '-1983> 

24'-1977-1986, 28'-1984< 

12'i24'-1987>, 28'-1983-1986 

28'-1987> 

12'&14'&28'-1977<, 24'-1974< 

12'&14'&28'-1979-1986, 

24' -1975-1984 

12'&14'&28'-1987>, 24'-1985> 

14'&16'-1981<,24'-1979<.26'-1976< 

14'&16'-1982>. 24'-1980>, 

26'-1977-1986 

26'-1987> 

14'&28'-1977<,16'-1980< 
14'&28'-1978-1986, 

16'-1981>, 24'-1982<, 26'-1986< 

14'-1987>, 14'& 28'-1987> 

14'&28'-1977,16'-1980< 
14'&28'-1978-1986, 

16'-1981>, 24'-1982<, 26'-1986< 

14'-1987>, 14'& 28'-1987> 

14'&16'-1975< 

14'!il6'-1975-1982. 24'&26' -1981< 

14 '&16'- 1983-1985 

24'&26'-1982-1985 

ALL SIZES 1986> 

12'&16'-1976<, 14'-197a< 

12'&16'-1977-1983, 14' -1979-1985 

24'-1982< 

12'&16'-1984>, 14'-1986> 

24' -1983- 1985 

24'-1986> 

14'-1975< 

14' -1976-1982 

14'-1983> 

14'-1980<, 16'-1981<, 24 

14'-1981-1985, 

24' -1979-1984 

14'&16'-1986>, 24'-1985> 

16'-1973< 

14'-1980<, 16'-1974-1980 

24'&28'-1977< 

14'!il6'-1981-1984. 

24 '&28'- 1978- 1982 

14'&16'-1985>, 24'&28'-1983> 

12'-1981<, 14'&20'-1978< 

24'&28'-1975< 

12'-1982>, 14'&20'-1979-1985 

24'&28'-1976-1983 

14'&20'-1986>, 24'&28'-1984> 

12', 24'&28'-1973<, 14'-1978< 

16'-1976< 

12'. 24'i28'-1974-1982 



1978< 
16' -1982- 1985 



Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Average 

Good 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 



08/01/89 



43-11 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MANUFACTURER 



MODEL NAME 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHIEF INO 

CHIEF IND 

CHIEF IND 

CHIEF IND 

CHIEF IND 

CHIEF IND 

CHIEF INO 

CHIEF INO 

CHIEF IND 

CONMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COfMODORE 

COMMODORE 



CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CUSSIC 

CLASSIC 

CUSSIC 

ATLANTIC 

ATUNTIC 

CONCORD 

CONCORD 

DELUXE 

DELUXE 

HUNTINGTON 

HUNTINGTON 

HUNTINGTON 

HUNTINGTON 

MANATEE 

MANATEE 

SEQUOIA 

SEQUOIA 

SUNVIEW 

SUNVIEW 

TAMARACK 

TAMARACK 

TAMMARON 

TAMMARON 

TITAN 

TITAN 

TITAN 

HOODLAKE 

WOODUKE 

WOODLAKE 

BLAIRHOUSE 

BLAIRHOUSE 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CREST 

CREST 

CREST 

CREST 

INVADER 

INVADER 

MEDALLION 

MEDALLION 

METAMORA 

METAMORA 

SUPERIOR 

SUPERIOR 

BELUVISTA 

BELLAVISTA 

BELUVISTA 

BELUVISTA 

BONNAVILU 

BONNAVILU 

BONNAVILU 

BONNAVILU 

BONNAVILU 

BROOKWOOD 

BROOKWOOD 

BROOKWOOD 

CITATION 

CITATION 

CITATION 



H'-1979-1985, 16' 


-1977-1983 


12', 24'i28'-1983> 


, 14'-1986>. 


16'-1984> 




ALL SIZES 1982< 




ALL SIZES 1983> 




14'-1986> 




ALL SIZES 1981< 




ALL SIZES 1982> 




12"&24'-1981<, 14' 


-1984< 


12'&24'-1982>, 14' 


-1985> 


14'-1981< 




14'-1982> 




14'il6'-1981<, 24' 


-1975< 


28'-1979< 




14'&16'-1982>, 24' 


-1976> 



28'-1980> 
ALL SIZES 1984< 
ALL SIZES 1985> 
12'&14'-1983<, 24'i28'-1981< 
12'&14'-1984>, 24'&28'-1982> 
12'&24'-1981<, 14'-1984< 
12'&24'-1982>, 14'-1985> 
ALL SIZES 1984< 
ALL SIZES 1985> 
24'-1981< 
24'-1982> 

12'-1986<, 14'-1985<, 
24'-1983<. 28'-1979< 
14'-1985>, 24'-1984>. 28'-1980> 
12'&14'-1985<, 24'-1983< 
28'-1984< 
12'&14'-1986>. 24' 
ALL SIZES 1982> 
ALL SIZES 1981< 
12'&14'-1983<. 16' 
16' 



-1984>. 28'-1985> 



-1978<, 
-1979> 



24'-1976< 



1978<, 24'-1976< 
1979> 



12'&14'-1984>, 

24'-1977-1985 

24'-1986> 

12'il4'-1983<. 16'- 

12'&14'-1984>, 16'- 

24' -1977-1985 

24'-1986> 

12'-I985<, 14'-1984< 

12'-1986>. 14'-1985> 

ALL SIZES 1981< 

ALL SIZES 1982> 

ALL SIZES 1981< 

ALL SIZES 1982> 

12'-1983<, 14'-1985< 

12'-1984>. 14'-1986> 

12', 14'&24'-1982<, 16'-1979< 

12', 14'&24'-1983>, 16'-1980> 

28'-1985< 

24'&28'-1986> 

12', 14'&24'-1981<, 16'-1974< 

28'-1978< 

12'&24'-1982-1985, 14'-1982> 

16' -1975-1985. 28' -1979-1984 

12', 16'&24'-1986>, 28'-1985> 

20'-1980< 

20'-1981>, 24'-1984< 

24'-1985> 

12'-1980<, 

28'-19ei< 

12'-1981>, 



14'-1981<, 24'-1979< 
14'-1982>, 24'-1980> 



Average 

Good 

Good 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 



43-12 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



HANUFACTURER 



MODEL NAME 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCH EMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 



CITATION 

CLASSIC 

CUSSIC 

CUSSIC 

CLASSIC 

COMET 

COMET 

COffWNDER 

COMMANDER 

ELCAR 

ELCAR 

ELCAR 

FRONTIER 

FRONTIER 

GALAXY 

GALAXY 

GUARDIAN 

GUARDIAN 

GUARDIAN 

GUARDIAN 

K02Y 

KOZY 

MANOR 

MANOR 

MANOR 

MANOR 

NOVA 

NOVA 

NOVA 

NOVA 

PACIFICA 

PACIFICA 

PAN AMERICAN 

PAN AMERICAN 

PARAMOUNT 

PARAMOUNT 

PARAMOUNT 

PARAMOUNT 

SAFEWAY 

SAFEWAY 

SHELBY 

SHELBY 

WILDWOOD 

WILDWOOD 

WILDWOOD 

WILDWOOD 

WILDWOOD 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

GOVERNOR 

GOVERNOR 

NASHUA 

NASHUA 

NASHUA 

NASHUA 

PACESETTER 

PACESETTER 

WESTCHESTER 

WESTCHESTER 

CRAFTMADE 

CRAFTMAOE 

CRAFTMADE 



28'-1982> 

14'-1985<, 20'-1980<, 24'-1981< 

28'-1984< 

14'-1986>, 20'-1981>, 24'-1982> 

28'-1985> 

14'-1985<, 24'&28'-1981< 

14'-1986>, 24'&28'-1982> 

14'-1983<, 24'-1979<, 28'-1981< 

14'-1984>, 24'-1980>, 28'-1982> 

24'-1980<, 28'-1982< 

24' -1981-1985, 28'-1983> 

24'-1986> 

12'-1985<, 14'-1983<, 24'-1981< 

12'-1986>, 14'-1984>, 24'-1982> 

14'&28'-1983<, 24'-1981< 

14'&28'-1984>, 24'-1982> 

14'-1985<, 20'-I980<, 24'-1981< 

28'-1984< 

14'-1986>, 20'-1981>. 24'-1982> 

28'-1985> 

14'-1983<, 24'-1979<. 28'-1981< 

14'-1984>, 24'-1980>, 28'-1982> 

12'-1980<, 14'-1981<, 24'-1979< 

28'-1981< 

12'-1981>, 14'-1982>, 24'-1980> 

28'-1982> 

12'-1981<, 14'-1985<, 

20' , 24'&28'-1983< 

12'-1982>, 14'-1986> 

20', 24'&28'-1984> 

24'-1979<, 28'-1981< 

24'-1980>, 28'-1982> 

24'-1984< 

24'-1985> 

14'-1980< 

14'-1981> 

28'-1985< 

24'-1984>. 28'-1986> 

12'-1985<. 14'-1982<, 24'-1981< 

12'-1986>, 14'-1983>, 24'-1982> 

12'-1982<, 14'-1978<, 24'-1979< 

12'-1983>, 14'-1979>, 24'-1980> 

12'-1980<, 14'-1981<, 20'-1983< 

24'-1983< 

12'-1981>, 14'-1982>, 20'-1984> 

24' -1984- 1985, 28'-1984< 

24'-1986>. 28'-1985> 

12'-1985<, 14'-1981<, 24'-1978< 

28'-1976< 

12'-1986>, 14'-1982>. 24'-1979> 

28'-1977-1985 

28'-1986> 

12'-1983<, 14'-1978< 

12'-1984>, 14'-1979> 

12'-1981<, 14'-1982<, 24'-1979< 

12'-1982>. 14'-1983> 

24' -1978-1985 

24'-1986> 

12'-1984<, 14'-1985< 

12'-1985>, 14'-1986> 

12'&14'-1984<, 24'-1981< 

12'il4'-1985>, 24'-1982> 

14'-1974<, 16'-1975<, 28'-1974< 

14'-1975-1981, 16'-1976-1982 

28' -1975-1983 



21'-1981< 
20'-1982>, 24'-1983< 



Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 



08/01/89 



43-13 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



HANUFACTURER 


MODEL NAME 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 


QUALITY 


CONTINENTAL 


CRAFTMADE 


14' -1982-1985. 16'-1983> 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


CRAFTMAOE 


28'-1984> 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


CRAFTMADE 


H'-1986> 


Excellent 


CONTINENTAL 


CRAFTMARK 


14'-1975<. 16'. 24'428'-1975< 


Low Cost 


CONTINENTAL 


CRAFTMARK 


14'-1976-1983 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


CRAFTMARK 


16'. 24'&28 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


CRAFTMARK 


14'-1984>, 16. 24'&28'-1985> 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


HIGH COUNTRY 


14'&16'-1979< 


Low Cost 


CONTINENTAL 


HIGH COUNTRY 


14'&16'-1980-1985. 24'-1982< 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


HIGH COUNTRY 


28'-1981< 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


HIGH COUNTRY 


14'&16'-1986>. 24'-1983> 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


HIGH COUNTRY 


28'- 1982-1985 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


HIGH COUNTRY 


28'-1986> 


Excellent 


CONTINENTAL 


PARKMONT 


14'&16'-1979<. 


Low Cost 


CONTINENTAL 


PARKMONT 


14'&16'-1980-1985. 24'-1982< 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


PARKMONT 


26'-1981< 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


PARKMONT 


14'&16'-1986>, 24'-1983> 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


PARKMONT 


26' -1982-1985 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


PARKMONT 


26'-1986> 


Excellent 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTMONT 


14'-1979«:. 16'-1973< 


Low Cost 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTMONT 


14' -1980-1985. 16'-1974-1981 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTMONT 


24'-1982<. 24'&28'-1982< 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTMONT 


14'-1986>, 16'-1982>. 24'-1983> 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTMONT 


26'&28'-1982-1985 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTMONT 


26'&28'-1986> 


Excellent 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTPARK 


14'&16'-1979< 


Low Cost 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTPARK 


14 '81I6'- 1980- 1985. 24'-1982< 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTPARK 


28'-1981< 


Average 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTPARK 


14', 16'-1986>, 24'-1983> 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTPARK 


26' -1982-1985 


Good 


CONTINENTAL 


WESTPARK 


26'-1986> 


Excellent 


OEROSE 


ROSEWOOD 


16'-1985> 


Average 


DEROSE 


VICTOR 


12'&14'ALL YEARS. 16'-1982< 


Low Cost 


OEROSE 


VICTOR 


16'-1983> 


Average 


DMH 


DETROITER 


12'-1981<. 14'-1981<. 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


OHN 


DETROITER 


12'-1982>. 14'-1982>. 24'-1978> 


Average 


OMH 


REVERE 


12'-1981<. 14'-1981<. 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


DMH 


REVERE 


12'-1982>. 14'-1982>. 24'-1978> 


Average 


ELKHART 


ELKHART 


12'. 14'-1973< 


Low Cost 


ELKHART 


ELKHART 


12'. 14'-1974-1982 


Average 


ELKHART 


ELKHART 


12'. 14'-1983> 


Good 


FALCON COACH 


FALCON 


14'-1978<. 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


FALCON COACH 


FALCON 


14'-1979>. 24'-1978-85 


Average 


FALCON COACH 


FALCON 


24'-1986> 


Good 


FLEETWOOD 


ACCENT 


12'. 14'-1973<. 12'. 14'-1983< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


ACCENT 


12'. 14'-1984> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


BARRINGTON 


12'-1976<. 14'-1978<. 24'&28'1981< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


BARRINGTON 


12'-1977-1985, 14'-1979>. 26'-1985< 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


BARRINGTON 


24'&28'1982> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


BARRINGTON 


12'. 26'-1986> 


Good 


FLEETWOOD 


BROADMORE 


12'-1985<. 14'-1984<. 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


BROADMORE 


12'-1986>. 14'-1985>. 24'-1978>. 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


BROADMORE 


28' -1977-1985 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


BROADMORE 


28'-1986> 


Good 


FLEETWOOD 


BROOKFIELD 


24'-1983<. 28'-1984< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


BROOKFIELD 


24'-1983>. 28'-1984> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


BROOKWOOD 


24'-1983<. 28'-1984< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


BROOKWOOD 


24'-1983>. 28'-1984> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


CHADWICK 


24'&28'-1984< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


CHADWICK 


24'&28'-1985> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


CROWN POINTE 


12'-1976<. 14'-1978<. 24'i28'1981< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


CROWN POINTE 


12'-1977-1985, 14'-1979>. 26'-1985< 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


CROWN POINTE 


24'i28'1982> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


CROWNPOINTE 


12'. 26'-1986> 


Good 


FLEETWOOD 


FLEETWOOD 


12', 14'-ALL YEARS. 24'i28'-1978< 


Low Cost 



43-14 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MANUFACTURER 


MODEL NAME 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 




QUALITY 


FLEETWOOD 


FLEETWOOD 


24'&28'-1979> 




Average 


FLEETWOOD 


GLENBROOK 


12'-1985<, 14'-1984<, 24' 


-1981< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


GLEN8R00K 


28'-1979< 




Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


GLENBROOK 


12'-1986>. 14'-1985>. 24' 


-1982> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


GLENBROOK 


28'-1980> 




Average 


FLEETWOOD 


HIGHLAND PARK 


24'-1979<, 28'-1979< 




Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


HIGHLAND PARK 


24 '-1980-1985. 26'-1985<. 


28'-1982> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


HIGHLAND PARK 


24', 26'&28'-1986> 




Good 


FLEETWOOD 


MEDFORD 


12'-1985<, 14'-1984<. 24' 


-1981< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


MEDFORD 


28'-1979< 




Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


MEDFORD 


12'-1986>, 14'-1985>, 24' 


-1982> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


MEDFORD 


28'-1980> 




Average 


FLEETWOOD 


SANDPOINTE 


12', 14'-1973<, 12', 14'- 


1983< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


SANDPOINTE 


12'. 14'-1984> 




Average 


FLEETWOOD 


VOGUE 


12'-1979<. 14'-1980<, 24' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


VOGUE 


12' -1980-1985, 14'-1981>. 


24'-1976-1985 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


VOGUE 


12'-1986>, 24'-1986> 




Good 


FLEETWOOD 


WESTFIELD 


12'-1979<. 14'-1980<. 24' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


WESTFIELO 


12' -1980-1985. 14'-1981>, 


24'-1976-19e5 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


WESTFIELD 


12'-1986>, 24'-1986> 




Good 


FLEETWOOD 


WESTON 


12'&14'-1984<, 24'-1977< 




Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


WESTON 


12'&14'-1985>, 24'-1978> 




Average 


FUQUA 


BELAIRE 


12'&14'-1981<, 20'-1981<, 


24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


FUQUA 


BELAIRE 


12'&14'-1982-1985. 20'-1982> 


Average 


FUQUA 


BELAIRE 


24' -1978-1984 




Average 


FUQUA 


BELAIRE 


12'&14'-1986>, 24', 26'&28' -1985> 


Good 


FUQUA 


CAREFREE 


14'-1980<, 24'-1973< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


CAREFREE 


14'-1981>, 24'-1974-1985 




Average 


FUQUA 


CAREFREE 


26'&28'-1984< 




Average 


FUQUA 


CAREFREE 


26'&28'-1985>, 24'-1986> 




Good 


FUQUA 


CASCADE 


16'-1981<. 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


CASCADE 


16' -1982-85, 24'-1983<, 26'-1983< 


Average 


FUQUA 


CASCADE 


16'-1986>,24'-1984-85,26' 


-1984> 


Good 


FUQUA 


CASCADE 


24'-1986> 




Excellent 


FUQUA 


CEDARBROOK 


24'-1981<, 28'-1982< 




Average 


FUQUA 


CEDARBROOK 


24' -1982-85, 28' -1983-85 




Good 


FUQUA 


CEDARBROOK 


24 '& 28'-1986> 




Excellent 


FUQUA 


CHALLENGER 


12'i 14'-1977< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


CHALLENGER 


12'&14'-1978-84 




Average 


FUQUA 


CHALLENGER 


12'&14'-1985> 




Good 


FUQUA 


CHAPARREL 


12'&14'-1977< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


CHAPARREL 


12'&14'-1978-84 




Average 


FUQUA 


CHAPARREL 


12'&14'-1985> 




Good 


FUQUA 


FUQUA 


12'&14'-1979<, 24'-1977< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


FUQUA 


12'&14'-1980-85, 24'-1978 


-84 


Average 


FUQUA 


FUQUA 


12'&14'-1986>, 24'-1985> 




Good 


FUQUA 


GULFSTREAM 


14'-1981<, 24'-1978< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


GULFSTREAM 


14'-1982>, 24' -1979-85 




Average 


FUQUA 


GULFSTREAM 


24'-1986> 




Good 


FUQUA 


UNDMARK 


14'-1979< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


LANDMARK 


14 '-1980-86 




Average 


FUQUA 


LANDMARK 


14'-1987> 




Good 


FUQUA 


PARKWAY 


12', 14'&24'-1979<, 20'-1981< 


Low Cost 


FUQUA 


PARKWAY 


12 '&24'- 1980-84, 14' -1980 


-85, 


Average 


FUQUA 


PARKWAY 


20'-1982-85, 26'-1981< 




Average 


FUQUA 


PARKWAY 


12'&24'-1985>. 14'&20'-1986>, 26'-1982> 


Good 


FUQUA 


QUEENSTOUN 


14'-1979< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


QUEENSTOWN 


14 '-1980-86, 24'&26'-1984 


< 


Average 


FUQUA 


QUEENSTOWN 


14'-1987>, 24'-1985>, 26' 


-1984-86 


Good 


FUQUA 


QUEENSTOWN 


26' -1987 




Excel lent 


FUQUA 


WESTRIOGE 


24'-1980<. 28'-1983< 




Average 


FUQUA 


WESTRIDGE 


24'-1982-86, 28'-1984-86 




Good 


FUQUA 


WESTRIOGE 


24'& 28'-1987> 




Excellent 


GAUXY 


GALAXY 


ALL SIZES/YEARS 




Low Cost 


GALLATIN 


CHATEAU 


ALL SIZES 1979<, 




Low Cost 


GALLATIN 


CHATEAU 


ALL SIZES 1980> 




Average 



08/01/89 



43-15 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



HANUFACTURER 



MODEL NAME 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



GALUTIN 


CIMMARRON 


14'-1981<. 16'&28'-1979< 


Low Cost 


GALLATIN 


CI^f«RRON 


14'-1982>, 16'&18'-1980> 


Average 


GALLATIN 


GALLATIN 


14'-1979<, 16'-1981< 


Low Cost 


GALLATIN 


GALLATIN 


14'-1980>, 16'-1982> 


Average 


GALLATIN 


UKEWOOD 


ALL SIZES 1977< 


Low Cost 


GALLATIN 


LAKEWOOD 


ALL SIZES 1978-85 


Average 


GALLATIN 


LAKEWOOD 


ALL SIZES 1986> 


Good 


GEER 


GEER 


14'-1977< 


Low Cost 


GEER 


GEER 


14 '-1978-85 


Average 


GEER 


GEER 


14'-1985> 


Good 


GERRING 


HOLLYPARK 


14'-1978< 


Low Cost 


GERRING 


HOLLYPARK 


14'-1974-1983 


Average 


GERRING 


HOLLYPARK 


14'-1984> 


Good 


GLEN RIVER 


GLENWOOD 


14'-1985<. 26'-1981< 


Average 


GLEN RIVER 


GLENWOOD 


14'-1986>. 26'-1982> 


Good 


GOLDEN WEST 


CALYPSO 


12'-1982<, 24'-1976< 


Low Cost 


GOLDEN WEST 


CALYPSO 


12'-1982>. 24'-1977-1985 


Average 


GOLDEN WEST 


CALYPSO 


24'-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


AIRLINER 


12'-1977< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


AIRLINER 


12 '-1978-84 


Average 


GUERDON 


AIRLINER 


12'-1985> 


Good 


GUERDON 


ARMOR 


12'-1977< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


ARMOR 


12 '-1978-84 


Average 


GUERDON 


ARMOR 


12'-1985> 


Good 


GUERDON 


ASTRA 


10'-1981<, 12'-1982<, 14'-1984< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


ASTRA 


10'-1982>, 12'-1983>. 14'-1985> 


Average 


GUERDON 


ATLAS 


12'.24'&28'-1978<, 14'-1981< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


ATLAS 


12'.24'&28'-1978-85, 14'-1982> 


Average 


GUERDON 


ATLAS 


12',24'&28'-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


BAYCREST 


14'-1984< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


BAYCREST 


14'-1985> 


Average 


GUERDON 


CAMELOT 


12'-ALL YEARS. 24'-1978< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


CAMELOT 


24'-1979> 


Average 


GUERDON 


CRANBROOK 


14'&24'-1982< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


CRANBROOK 


14'&24'-1983> 


Average 


GUERDON 


EMBASSY 


12'-1984<, 14'-1977< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


EMBASSY 


12'-1985>, 14'-1978-85 


Average 


GUERDON 


EMBASSY 


14'-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


ESQUIRE 


14'-1984< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


ESQUIRE 


14'-1985> 


Average 


GUERDON 


FUTURAMA 


12'-1983<, 14'-1985< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


FUTURAMA 


12'-1984>. 14'-1986> 


Average 


GUERDON 


GREAT LAKES 


12'.14'&16'-1981<, 24'-1975< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


GREAT LAKES 


12',14'&16'-1982>, 24'-1976-1984 


Average 


GUERDON 


GREAT LAKES 


28'-1984< 


Average 


GUERDON 


GREAT LAKES 


24'&28'-1985> 


Good 


GUERDON 


GUERDON 


12'M4'-1983<. 20'-1978<. 28'-1977< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


GUERDON 


12'&14'-1984>, 20'-1979-85 


Average 


GUERDON 


GUERDON 


24'-1982<, 28' -1978-1984 


Average 


GUERDON 


GUERDON 


20'-1986>. 24'-1982-85. 28'-1985> 


Good 


GUERDON 


GUERDON 


24'-1986> 


Excel len 


GUERDON 


HACIENDA 


12'-1983<, 14'&24'-1978<, 28'-1974< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


HACIENDA 


12'-1984>, 14 '&24'- 1979-85 


Average 


GUERDON 


HACIENDA 


28' -1975-1984 


Average 


GUERDON 


HACIENDA 


14'i24'-1986>. 28'-1985> 


Good 


GUERDON 


MAGNOLIA 


12',14'&20'-1977< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


MAGNOLIA 


12 ', 14 '&20'- 1978-84, 24'-1981< 


Average 


GUERDON 


MAGNOLIA 


12',14'&20'-1985>, 24'-1982-1985 


Good 


GUERDON 


MAGNOLIA 


24'-1986> 


Excel len 


GUERDON 


MAYFLOWER 


14'-1978<, 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


MAYFLOWER 


14'-1979-85, 24'-1978-85 


Average 


GUERDON 


MAYFLOWER 


14'&24'-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


MEADOWBROOK 


14'-1984< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


MEADOWBROOK 


14'-1985> 


Average 


GUERDON 


NORMANDY 


14'-197e<. 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 



43-16 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MANUFACTURER 



MODEL NAME 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



GUERDON 


NORMANDY 


14' 


-1979-85. 24' -1978-85 


Average 


GUERDON 


NORMANDY 


14' 


&24'-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


OAKMANOR 


16' 


-1980< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


OAKMANOR 


16' 


-1981> 


Average 


GUERDON 


OAKMANOR 


14' 


-1980<. 24'-1973<, 28'-1981< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


OAKMANOR 


14' 


-1981>. 24'-1974-86, 28'-1982> 


Average 


GUERDON 


OAKMANOR 


24' 


-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


OAKVILLA 


14' 


-1980<. 24'-1973<, 28'-1981< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


OAKVILLA 


14' 


-1981>, 24'-1974-86, 28'-1982> 


Average 


GUERDON 


OAKVILLA 


24' 


-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


STATLER 


14' 


-1981<, 24'-1973< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


STATLER 


14' 


-1982>, 24' -1974-1984 


Average 


GUERDON 


STATLER 


24' 


-1985> 


Good 


GUERDON 


TWIN LAKES 


12' 


,24'&28'-1978<, 14'-1981< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


TWIN LAKES 


12' 


, 24 •&28' -1978-85. 14'-1982> 


Average 


GUERDON 


TWIN LAKES 


12' 


.24'&28'-1986> 


Good 


GUERDON 


VAGABOND 


ALL 


SIZES 1981< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


VAGABOND 


ALL 


SIZES 1982> 


Average 


GUERDON 


VAN DYKE 


12' 


.14'&24'-1978<. 20'-1981< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


VAN DYKE 


28' 


-1973< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


VAN DYKE 


12' 


. 14 '&24' -1979-85. 20'-1982> 


Average 


GUERDON 


VAN DYKE 


28' 


-1974-1984 


Average 


GUERDON 


VAN DYKE 


12' 


,14'&24'-1986>, 28'-1985> 


Good 


GUERDON 


WOOD HAVEN 


12' 


,14'&16'-1981<. 24'-1975< 


Low Cost 


GUERDON 


WOOD HAVEN 


12' 


.14'&16'-1982>, 24'-1976-1984 


Average 


GUERDON 


WOOD HAVEN 


28' 


-1984< 


Average 


GUERDON 


WOOD HAVEN 


24' 


&28'-1985> 


Good 


HARMONY 


GIBRALTOR 


12' 


&14'-1984< 


Low Cost 


HARMONY 


GIBRALTOR 


12' 


&14'-1985> 


Average 


HARMONY 


SHERIDAN 


12' 


&24'-1979':, 14'-1981< 


Low Cost 


HARMONY 


SHERIDAN 


12' 


&24'-1980>, 14'-1982> 


Average 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


CARRIAGE HOUSE 


14' 


-1974<, 24'-1973< 


Low Cost 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


CARRIAGE HOUSE 


14' 


-1975-81, 24'-1974-81. 28'-1981< 


Average 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


CARRIAGE HOUSE 


14' 


-1982>, 24'-1982-85. 28'-1982-84 


Good 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


CARRIAGE HOUSE 


24' 


-1986>, 28'-1985> 


Excellent 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


12' 


-1982< 


Low Cost 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


12' 


-1983> 


Average 


INTERNATIONAL 


NEWPORT 


14' 


-1984< 


Low Cost 


INTERNATIONAL 


NEWPORT 


14' 


-1985> 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


BAINBRIOGE 


12' 


&14'-1981<. 20'-1979<, 24'-1983< 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


BAIN6RIDGE 


12' 


&14'-1982>. 20'-1980>. 24'-1984> 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


BAYWOOD 


28' 


-1980<, 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


BAYWOOO 


24' 


-1986<. 28' -1981-87 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


BAYWOOO 


24' 


-1987>. 28'-1988> 


Good 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


BILTMORE 


12' 


,14'&28'-1981<. 24'-1979< 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN /BROAD 


BILTMORE 


12' 


,14'&28'-1982>. 24'-1980> 


Average 


KAUFMAN /BROAD 


CANYON CREST 


12' 


.14'&28'-1981<, 24'-1979< 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN /BROAD 


CANYON CREST 


12' 


.14'&28'-1982>, 24'-1980> 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


WAYSIDE 


12 


&14'-1981<, 20'-1979<, 24'-1983< 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


WAYSIDE 


12 


&14'-1982>. 20'-1980>. 24'-1984> 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


WOODLAND 


14 


-1982< 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN /BROAD 


WOODLAND 


14 


-1983> 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


1800 SERIES 


14 


-1982< 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


1800 SERIES 


14 


-1983> 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


700 SERIES 


24 


-1985< 


Average 


KAUFMAN /BROAD 


700 SERIES 


24 


-1986> 


Good 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


8800 SERIES 


24 


-1977<, 26'-1980< 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


8800 SERIES 


24 


-1978-87, 28'-1981> 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


8800 SERIES 


24 


-1988> 


Good 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


900 SERIES 


28 


-1980<, 


Low Cost 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


900 SERIES 


24 


-1986<, 28' -1981-87 


Average 


KAUFMAN/BROAD 


900 SERIES 


24 


-1987>, 28'-1988> 


Good 


KENTWOOD 


KENTWOOD 


12 


-1985<. 14'&24'-1979< 


Low Cost 


KENTHOOD 


KENTWOOD 


12 


-1986>. 14'-1980-87, 24'-1980> 


Average 



08/01/89 



43-17 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MANUFACTURER 


MODEL NAME 


KENTWOOD 


KENTWOOD 


KIT 


COUNTY SQUIRE 


KIT 


COUNTY SQUIRE 


KIT 


COUNTY SQUIRE 


KIT 


FAIRVIEU 


KIT 


FAIRVIEW 


KIT 


FAIRVIEW 


KIT 


GOLDEN STATE 


KIT 


GOLDEN STATE 


KIT 


GOLDEN STATE 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


OLYMPIA 


KIT 


OLYMPIA 


KIT 


OLYMPIA 


KIT 


OLYMPIA 


KIT 


OLYMPIA 


KIT 


REGAL 


KIT 


REGAL 


KIT 


REGAL 


KIT 


ROYAL OAKS 


KIT 


ROYAL OAKS 


KIT 


ROYAL OAKS 


KIT 


SIERRA 


KIT 


SIERRA 


KIT 


SIERRA 


KIT 


STONEHAVEN 


KIT 


STONEHAVEN 


KIT 


STONEHAVEN 


KIT 


VENTURA 


KIT 


VENTURA 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LIBERTY 


HAWTHORN 


LIBERTY 


HAWTHORN 


LIBERTY 


LIBERTY 


LIBERTY 


LIBERTY 


LIBERTY 


MINUTEMAN 


LIBERTY 


MINUTEMAN 


LIBERTY 


OAKBROOK 


LIBERTY 


OAKBROOK 


LIBERTY 


PEERLESS 


LIBERTY 


PEERLESS 


LIBERTY 


RIDGEWOOD 


LIBERTY 


RIDGEWOOD 


MAJESTIC 


JUBILEE 


MAJESTIC 


JUBILEE 


MAJESTIC 


JUBILEE 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


MANN 


TRENTON 


MANN 


TRENTON 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


MELODY HOMES 


CAREFREE 


MELODY HOMES 


CAREFREE 


MELODY HOMES 


MELODY 


MELODY HOMES 


MELODY 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



14'-1988> Good 

12'-1978<, 14'-1981< Low Cost 

12'-1979-85, 14'-1982> Average 

12'-1986> Good 

12'-1978<, 14'-1981< Low Cost 

12'-1979-85, 14'-1982> Average 

12'-1986> Good 

14'-1975<, 28'-1973< Low Cost 

14'-1976-85, 24'-1984<, 28'-1974-85 Average 

14'&28'-1986>, 24'-1985> Good 

12'-1981<, 14'-1980<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

28'-1974< Low Cost 

12'-1982>, 14'-1981>, 24'-1975-84 Average 

28' -1975-1985 Average 

24'-1985>. 28'-1986> Good 

12'-1981<, 14'-1980<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

28'-1974< Low Cost 

12'-1982>, 14'-1981>, 24'-1975-84 Average 

28' -1975-1985 Average 

24'-1985>, 28'-1986> Good 

14'-1975<, 28'-1973< Low Cost 

14'-1976-85, 24'-1984«:. 28'-1974-85 Average 

14'&28'-1986>, 24'-1985> Good 

14'i28'-1981<, 24'-1974< Low Cost 

14'&28'-1982>, 24'-1975-1985 Average 

24'-1986> Good 

14'-1981<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

14'-1982>. 24'-1978-84 Average 

24'-1985> Good 

14'-1975<, 28'-1973< Low Cost 

14'-1976-85, 24'-1984<, 28'-1974-85 Average 

14'&28'-1986>. 24'-1985> Good 

14'-1984<, Low Cost 

14'-1985> Average 

12'-1979<, 14'-1976<, 20'-1977< Low Cost 

24'-1981<, 28'-1973< Low Cost 

12'-1980>, 14'-1977-84, 20'-1978-85 Average 

24'-1982>, 28'-1974-1982 Average 

14'-1985>, 2G'-1986>, 28'-1983> Good 

12',14'&24'-I981< Low Cost 

12',14'&24'-1982> Average 

12'-1984<, 14'-1985<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'-1985>. 14'-1986>, 24'-1980> Average 

12'&14'-19a5<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'&14'-1986>, 24'-1980> Average 

12'&14'-1985<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'&14'-1986>, 24'-1980> Average 

12'&14'-1985<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'&14'-1986>. 24'-1980> Average 

12'&14'-1985<. 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'&14'-1986>. 24'-1980> Average 

14'-1978< Low Cost 

14' -1979-87 Average 

14'-1988> Good 

14'-1983<. 24'-1976< Low Cost 

14'-1984>, 24'-1977-1986 Average 

24'-1987> Good 

12'-1982<. 14'-1980< Low Cost 

12'-1983>, 14'-1981> Average 

14'&20'-1979< Low Cost 

12'-1986<, 14'&20'-1980>, 24'-1985< Average 

12'-1987>, 24'-1986> Good 

12'-1981<, 14'-1982< Low Cost 

12'-1982>, 14'-1983> Average 

12'&14'-1984<. 24'&28'-1982< Low Cost 

12'&14'-1985>, 24'i28'-1983> Average 



43-18 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MANUFACTURER 



MODEL NAME 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



MODULINE ARDMORE 14'-1982<, 28'-1981< Low Cost 

MODULINE ARDMORE 14'-1983>, 24'-1987<, 28'-1982> Average 

MODULINE ARDMORE 24'-1988> Good 

MODULINE BEDFORD 14'-1982<, 28'-1981< Low Cost 

MODULINE BEDFORD 14'-1983>, 24'-1987<, 28'-1982> Average 

MODULINE BEDFORD 24'-1988> Good 

MODULINE CANDLEWOOD 14'-1982<, 28'-1981< Low Cost 

MODULINE CANDLEWOOD 14'-1983>, 24'-1987<, 28'-1982> Average 

MODULINE CANDLEWOOD 24'-1988> Good 

MODULINE CANYON CREST 12'-1982<, 14'-1983<, 28'-1982< Low Cost 

MODULINE CANYON CREST 12'-1983>, 14'-1984>, 24'-1987< Average 

MODULINE CANYON CREST 28'-1983> Average 

MODULINE CANYON CREST 24'-1988> Good 

MODULINE CORINTHIAN 12'-1982<, 14'-1983<, 28'-1982< Low Cost 

MODULINE CORINTHIAN 12'-1983>, 14'-1984>, 24'-1987< Average 

MODULINE CORINTHIAN 28'-1983> Average 

MODULINE CORINTHIAN 24'-1988> Good 

MODULINE DARTMOUTH 14'-1982<, 28'-1981< Low Cost 

MODULINE DARTMOUTH 14'-1983>, 24'-1987<, 28'-1982> Average 

MODULINE DARTMOUTH 24'-1988> Good 

MODULINE GIBRALTER 12'-1980<, 14'-1982<, 28'-1982< Low Cost 

MODULINE GIBRALTER 12'-1981-87. 14'&28' -1983>, 24'-1987< Average 

MODULINE GIBRALTER 12'&24' -1988> Good 

MODULINE LAMPLIGHTER 12 '&24' -1982<, 14'-1980< Low Cost 

MODULINE LAMPLIGHTER 12 '&24' -1983>, 14'-1981> Average 

MODULINE OLYMPIAN 12 '&24' -1982<, 14'-1980< Low Cost 

MODULINE OLYMPIAN 12 ' &24 ' -1983>, 14'-1981> Average 

MODULINE WOODRIDGE 12'-1980<. 14'-1982<, 28'-1982< Low Cost 

MODULINE WOODRIDGE 12'-1981-87, 14'&28' -1983>, 24'-1987< Average 

MODULINE WOODRIDGE 12 '&24'-1988> Good 

MONARCH MONARCH 24'-1977< Low Cost 

MONARCH MONARCH 24' -1978-1987 Average 

MONARCH MONARCH 24'-1988> Good 

NATIONAL AQUARIUS 12 '&14'-1987< Low Cost 

NATIONAL AQUARIUS 12'&14' -1988> Average 

NATIONAL NATIONAL 12'-1985<, 14'-1983<, 24'-1982< Low Cost 

NATIONAL NATIONAL 12'-1986>, 14'-1984>, 24'-1983> Average 

NOBILITY KINGSWOOO 14'-1986<, 16'-1981<, 24'-1980< Low Cost 

NOBILITY KINGSWOOD 12 '&28' -1985< Low Cost 

NOBILITY KINGSWOOO 12 '&28' -1986>, 14'-1987>, Average 

NOBILITY KINGSWOOO 16'-1982>, 24'-1981> Average 

PARKWOOD PARKWOOD 12'-1981<, 14'-1983< Low Cost 

PARKWOOD PARKWOOD 12'-1982>, 14'-1984> Average 

REDMAN BRIGHTON 12'-1987<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1980<, Low Cost 

REDMAN BRIGHTON 28'-1983< Low Cost 

REDMAN BRIGHTON 12'-1988>. 14'-1985>, 24'-1981> Average 

REDMAN BRIGHTON 28'-1984> Average 

REDMAN EATON PARK 12'-1985<, 14'-1986<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

REDMAN EATON PARK 12'-1986>, 14'-1987>, 24'-1980> Average 

REDMAN FLAMINGO 12'-1985<, 14'-1986<. 24'-1979< Low Cost 

REDMAN FLAMINGO 12'-1986>. 14'-1987>, 24'-1980> Average 

REDMAN GRANVILLE 12'-1987<, 14'-1985< Low Cost 

REDMAN GRANVILLE 12'-1988>, 14'-1986> Average 

REDMAN HALLMARK 12'&14' -1987< Low Cost 

REDMAN HALLMARK 12'&14' -1988> Average 

REDMAN KIRKWOOD 12 '&28' -1987<, 14'-1985<. 24'-1982< Low Cost 

REDMAN KIRKWOOD 12'&28' -1988>, 14'-1986>, 24'-1983> Average 

REDMAN LYNN HAVEN 12'&28' -1987<, 14'-1985<. 24'-1982< Low Cost 

REDMAN LYNN HAVEN 12'&28' -1988>. 14'-1986>, 24'-1983> Average 

REDMAN NEW MOON 12'-1987<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1980<, Low Cost 

REDMAN NEW MOON 28'-1983< Low Cost 

REDMAN NEW MOON 12'-1988>, 14'-1985>, 24'-1981> Average 

REDMAN NEW MOON 28'-1984> Average 

REDMAN REDMAN 12'-1986<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1980< Low Cost 

REDMAN REDMAN 26'-1983< Low Cost 



08/01/89 



43-19 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



mWUFACTURER 



MODEL WAME 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



REDMAN REDMAN 12'-1987>, 14'-1985>, 24'-1981> Average 

REDMAN REDMAN 26'-1984> Average 

REDMAN SEVILL 12'-1986<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1980< Low Cost 

REDMAN SEVILL 26'-1983< Low Cost 

REDMAN SEVILL 12'-1987>. 14'-1985>, 24'-1981> Average 

REDMAN SEVILL 26'-19e4> Average 

REGAL REGAL 14'-1980< Low Cost 

REGAL REGAL 14'-1981>, 28'-1983< Average 

REGAL REGAL 28'-1984> Good 

ROLLOHOME ROLLOHOME 12'-1978<, 14'-1981<, 16'-1976< Low Cost 

ROLLOHOME ROLLOHOME 12'-1979-1986, 14'-1982>. 16'-1977-85 Average 

ROLLOHOME ROLLOHOME 14'-1987>, 16'-1986> Good 

ROYAL WESTERNER 12'-1983<, 14'-1982<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

ROYAL WESTERNER 12'-1984>. 14'-1983>, 24' -1979-1987 Average 

ROYAL WESTERNER 24'-19e8> Good 

RUSHMORE RUSHMORE HOME 14'-1979<, 16'-1977< Low Cost 

RUSHMORE RUSHMORE HOME 14' -1980-1987 , 16' -1978- 1985 Average 

RUSHMORE RUSHMORE HOME 14'-1988>. 16'-1986> Good 

SCHULT AMBASSADOR 12'-1986<, 14'-1987<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

SCHULT AMBASSADOR 14'-1987>, 16'-1988>, 24' -1980- 1987 Average 

SCHULT AMBASSADOR 24'-1988> Good 

SCHULT CHALLENGER 14'-1982< Low Cost 

SCHULT CHALLENGER 14'-1983> Average 

SCHULT CHATEAU 14'-1984<, 16'-1983< Low Cost 

SCHULT CHATEAU 14'-1985>, 16'-1984> Average 

SCHULT CITATION 14'-1979<, 16'-1985< Low Cost 

SCHULT CITATION 14' -1980-1986, 16'-1986> Average 

SCHULT CITATION 14'-1987> Good 

SCHULT CUSTOM 12'-1978<, 14'-1980<, 16'-1982< Low Cost 

SCHULT CUSTOM 12' -1979-1984. 14'-1981>. 16'-1983> Average 

SCHULT CUSTOM 12'-1985> Good 

SCHULT HOMESTEAD 14'-1980< Low Cost 

SCHULT HOMESTEAD 14' -1981-1985 Average 

SCHULT HOMESTEAD 14'-1986> Good 

SHAR LO HOMES ADRIAN 12'-1988> Average 

SHAR LO HOMES ADRIAN 12'-1987< Low Cost 

SHELTEREX BROOKDALE 12'&14'-1979<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

SHELTEREX BROOKDALE 12 '-1980-1987. 14'-1980>, 24' -1979-1987 Average 

SHELTEREX BROOKDALE 12'-1988>, 24'-1988> Good 

SHELTEREX PONDEROSA 12'&24' -1978<, 14'-1980< Low Cost 

SHELTEREX PONDEROSA 12 '&24' -1979-1987, 14'-1981> Average 

SHELTEREX PONDEROSA 12 'i24' -1988> Good 

SHELTEREX SECURITY 12'-1983<. 14'-1985<, 24'-1976< Low Cost 

SHELTEREX SECURITY 12'-1984>. 14'-1986>. 24' -1977-1987 Average 

SHELTEREX SECURITY 24'-1988> Good 

SHELTEREX SHELTEREX 12'-1983<, 14'-1985<. 24'-1976< Low Cost 

SHELTEREX SHELTEREX 12'-1984>, 14'-1986>, 24' -1977-1987 Average 

SHELTEREX SHELTEREX 24'-1988> Good 

SHELTEREX VANTAGE 12'-1978<. 14'-1979<. 24'-1977< Low Cost 

SHELTEREX VANTAGE 12' -1979-1987. 14'-1980>, 24'-1978-87 Average 

SHELTEREX VANTAGE 12'&24' -1988> Good 

SILVERCREST SILVERCREST 12'-1983<, 20'-1979<, 24'-1975< Low Cost 

SILVERCREST SILVERCREST 12'-1984>, 20'-1980>. 24'-1976-1987 Average 

SILVERCREST SILVERCREST 24'-1988> Good 

SKYLINE ACADEMY 12'&24'-1982<. 14'-1986<, 20'-1978< Low Cost 

SKYLINE ACADEMY 12'&24' -1983>. 14'-1987>, 20'-1979-1986 Average 

SKYLINE ACADEMY 20'-1987> Good 

SKYLINE BUDDY 12'-1983<, 14'-1982<, 20'&24'-1980 Low Cost 

SKYLINE BUDDY 28'-1979< Low Cost 

SKYLINE BUDDY 12'-1984>, 14'-1983>, 20'!i24'-1981> Average 

SKYLINE BUDDY 28'-1980> Average 

SKYLINE CAMERON 12'-1987<. 14'-1985<, 20'-1982< Low Cost 

SKYLINE CAMERON 24'-1979< Low Cost 

SKYLINE CAMERON 12'-1988>, 14'-1986>. 20'-1983> Average 

SKYLINE CAMERON 24'-1980> Average 



43-20 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MANUFACTURER 


MODEL NAME 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 


1 


QUALITY 


SKYLINE 


COMMANDER 


12' 


&14'-1983< 








Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


COMMANDER 


12' 


&14'-1984> 








Average 


SKYLINE 


CUSTOM 


14' 


-198K, 


24' 


-1979< 






Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


CUSTOM 


12' 


-1982>, 


24' 


-1980> 






Average 


SKYLINE 


DEERFIELD 


12' 


&14'-1983< 








Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


DEERFIELO 


12' 


&14'-1984> 








Average 


SKYLINE 


HILLCREST 


12' 


-1987<, 


14' 


-1984<. 


20' 


-1985 


Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


HILLCREST 


24' 


-1980<, 


28' 


-1979< 






Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


HILLCREST 


12' 


-1988>, 


14' 


-1985>, 


20' 


-1986> 


Average 


SKYLINE 


HILLCREST 


24' 


-1981>, 


28' 


-1980> 






Average 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


12' 


-1987<, 


14' 


-1985<, 


20' 


-1982< 


Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


24' 


-1980<, 


28' 


-1975< 






Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


12' 


-1988>. 


14' 


-1986>, 


20' 


-1983> 


Average 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


24' 


-1981>, 


28' 


-1976-1987 




Average 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


28' 


-1988> 










Good 


SKYLINE 


OAK COVE 


14' 


-1984<, 


16' 


-1985<, 


24' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


OAK COVE 


28' 


-1982< 










Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


OAK COVE 


14' 


-1985>, 


16' 


-1986>, 


24' 


-1976-1987 


Average 


SKYLINE 


OAK COVE 


28' 


-1983> 










Average 


SKYLINE 


OAK COVE 


24' 


-1988> 










Good 


SKYLINE 


OAK MANOR 


14' 


-1984<. 


16' 


-1985<. 


24' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


OAK MANOR 


28' 


-1982< 










Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


OAK MANOR 


14' 


-1985>, 


16' 


-1986>. 


24' 


-1976-1987 


Average 


SKYLINE 


OAK MANOR 


28' 


-1983> 










Average 


SKYLINE 


OAK MANOR 


24' 


-1988> 










Good 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


12' 


-1987<, 


14' 


-1985<. 


20' 


-1982< 


Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


24' 


-1980<, 


28' 


-1975< 






Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


12' 


-1988>, 


14' 


-1986>. 


20' 


-1983> 


Average 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


24' 


-1981>, 


28' 


-1976-1987 




Average 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


28' 


-1988> 










Good 


SKYLINE 


SPRINGBROOK 


14' 


&16'-1983< 








Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


SPRINGBROOK 


14' 


&16'-1984> 








Average 


SKYLINE 


SUNVALLEY 


12' 


-1983<, 


14' 


-1987<. 


24' 


-1977< 


Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


SUNVALLEY 


12' 


-1984>, 


14' 


-1988>. 


24' 


-1978-1987 


Average 


SKYLINE 


SUNVALLEY 


24' 


-19e8> 










Good 


SKYLINE 


SUNWOOD 


12' 


-1983<, 


14' 


-1987<. 


24' 


-1977< 


Low Cost 


SKYLINE 


SUNWOOD 


12' 


-1984>, 


14' 


-1988>, 


24' 


-1978-1987 


Average 


SKYLINE 


SUNWOOD 


24' 


-1988> 










Good 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


12' 


-1984<, 


24' 


-1986< 






Low Cost 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


12' 


-1985-1987, 


24'-1987> 




Average 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


12' 


-1988> 










Good 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


12' 


-1978<. 


14' 


-1977< 






Low Cost 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


12' 


-1979-1987. 


14' -1978-1985 


Average 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


12' 


-1988>. 


14' 


-1986> 






Good 


STIEGLER 


STIEGLER 


12' 


-1983<. 


14' 


-1982< 






Low Cost 


STIEGLER 


STIEGLER 


12' 


-1984>, 


14' 


-1983> 






Average 


SUNRIZON 


COLUMBIA 


24' 


-1983<. 


26' 


-1984<. 


28' 


-1985< 


Low Cost 


SUNRIZON 


COLUMBIA 


24' 


-1984>. 


26' 


-1985>. 


28' 


-1986> 


Average 


SUNRIZON 


REMINGTON 


14' 


-19e7<. 


16' 


-19e7<. 


18' 


-1988< 


Low Cost 


SUNRIZON 


REMINGTON 


14' 


-1988>, 


16' 


-1988> 






Average 


SUNRIZON 


SEVILLE 


24' 


-19e3<. 


26' 


-1984<, 


28' 


-1985< 


Low Cost 


SUNRIZON 


SEVILLE 


24' 


-1984>, 


26' 


-1985>. 


28' 


-1986> 


Average 


TAYLOR 


BUCKINGHAM 


14' 


-1982< 










Low Cost 


TAYLOR 


BUCKINGHAM 


14' 


-1983> 










Average 


TAYLOR 


WEDGEWOOD 


14' 


-1982< 










Low Cost 


TAYLOR 


WEDGEWOOD 


14' 


-1983> 










Average 


TOWN&COUNTRY 


TOWN & COUNTRY 


12' 


-1982<, 


14' 


-1977<. 


16' 


-1984< 


Low Cost 


TOWN&COUNTRY 


TOWN & COUNRTY 


12' 


-1983-1987. 


14' -1978-1985. 16'-1985> 


Average 


TOWN&COUNTRY 


TOWN & COUNTRY 


12' 


-1988>. 


14' 


-1986> 






Good 


TOWNEHOUSE 


TOWNHOUSE 


12' 


&14'&24 


'-1978< 






Low Cost 


TOWNEHOUSE 


TOWNHOUSE 


12' 


-1979-1986, 


14'-1979-1987, 


Average 


TOWNEHOUSE 


TOWNHOUSE 


24' 


-1979-1987 








Average 


TOWNEHOUSE 


TOWNHOUSE 


12' 


-1987>. 


14' 


&24'-1988> 




Good 


TRAVELO 


TRAVELO 


12' 


-1973<. 


14' 


-1976<, 


24' 


-1976< 


Low Cost 


TRAVELO 


TRAVELO 


12' 


-1974-1983. 


14'-1977-85, 24'-1977-87 


Average 


TRAVELO 


TRAVELO 


12' 


-1984>, 


14' 


-1986>, 


24' 


-1988> 


Good 



08/01/89 



43-21 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MANUFACTURER 


MODEL NAME 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTIOt 


1 


QUALITY 


UNITED 


UNITED 


12' 


-1986<, 


14' 


-1982<, 






Low Cost 


UNITED 


UNITED 


12' 


-1987>, 


14' 


-1983>, 


! 24' 


-1984< 


Average 


UNITED 


UNITED 


24' 


-1985> 










Good 


UTAH 


BRENTWOOD 


14' 


-1982<. 


24' 


-1978< 






Low Cost 


UTAH 


BRENTWOOD 


14' 


-1983>, 


24' 


-1979-1 


1987 




Average 


UTAH 


BRENTWOOD 


24' 


-1988> 










Good 


UTAH 


COLUMBIA 


14' 


-1978< 










Low Cost 


UTAH 


COLUMBIA 


14' 


-1979-1987, 


28'-1983< 




Average 


UTAH 


COLUMBIA 


14' 


-1988>. 


28' 


-1984-1 


1987 




Good 


UTAH 


COLUMBIA 


28' 


-1988> 










Excel lent 


UTAH 


LEISURE HOME 


14' 


-1983<. 


24' 


-1977< 






Low Cost 


UTAH 


LEISURE HOME 


14' 


-1984>. 


24' 


-1978-1 


1986 




Average 


UTAH 


LEISURE HOME 


24' 


-1987> 










Good 


UTAH 


UTAH 


12' 


-1979<, 


20' 


-1978<, 


, 24' 


-1978< 


Low Cost 


UTAH 


UTAH 


28' 


-1978< 










Low Cost 


UTAH 


UTAH 


12' 


-1980-1987, 


20'-1979-l 


1987, 


Average 


UTAH 


UTAH 


24' 


-1979-1987, 


28'-1979-l 


1987 


Average 


UTAH 


UTAH 


12' 


&14'i20 


'&24 


'&28 






Good 


VICTORIA 


VICTORIA 


12' 


-1979<, 


14' 


-1978< 






Low Cost 


VICTORIA 


VICTORIA 


12' 


-1980>, 


14' 


-1979-1 


L987 




Average 


VICTORIA 


VICTORIA 


14' 


-1988> 










Good 


VIKING-EOGEW- 


BRENTWOOD 


24' 


-1977< 










Low Cost 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


BRENTWOOD 


24' 


-1978-1987 








Average 


VIKING-EOGEW- 


BRENTWOOD 


24' 


-1988> 










Good 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


EDGEWOOD 


24' 


-1978< 










Average 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


EDGEWOOO 


24' 


-1979-1983 








Good 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


EDGEWOOD 


24' 


-1985> 










Excellent 


VKING-EDGEW- 


GOLD SEAL 


24' 


-1976< 










Average 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


GOLD SEAL 


24' 


-1977-1983 








Good 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


GOLD SEAL 


24' 


-1984> 










Excellent 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


IMPERIAL 


24' 


-1976< 










Average 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


IMPERIAL 


24' 


-1977-1983 








Good 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


IMPERIAL 


24' 


-1984> 










Excellent 


VOGUE 


VOGUE 


14' 


-1984<, 


24' 


-1982< 






Low Cost 


VOGUE 


VOGUE 


14' 


-1985>, 


24' 


-1983> 






Average 


WESTUAY 


WESTWAY 


24' 


-1982< 










Average 


WESTWAY 


WESTWAY 


24' 


-1983-1986 








Good 


WESTWAY 


WESTWAY 


24' 


-1987> 










Excellent 


WESTWAY 


WESTWOOD 


24' 


-1980<. 


28' 


-1982< 






Average 


WESTWAY 


WESTWOOD 


24' 


-1981-1985, 


28' -1983-1 


1986 


Good 


WESTWAY 


WESTWOOD 


24' 


-1986>, 


28' 


-1987> 






Excel lent 


WESTWOOD 


WESTWOOD 


14' 


-1988< 










Low Cost 


WICK BUILDING 


AQUARIUS 


14' 


-1984< 










Low Cost 


WICK BUILDING 


AQUARIUS 


14' 


-1985> 










Average 


WICK BUILDING 


ARTCRAFT 


14' 


-1984< 










Low Cost 


WICK BUILDING 


ARTCRAFT 


14' 


-1985> 










Average 


WICK BUILDING 


CORONADO 


28' 


-1985< 










Average 


WICK BUILDING 


CORONAOO 


28' 


-1986> 










Good 


WICK BUILDING 


GRANDVILLE 


14' 


-1984< 










Low Cost 


WICK BUILDING 


GRANDVILLE 


14' 


-1985> 










Average 


WICK BUILDING 


MARSHFIELD 


14' 


-1981< 










Low Cost 


WICK BUILDING 


MARSHFIELD 


14' 


-1982> 










Average 


WICK BUILDING 


PINEBROOK 


28' 


-1985< 










Average 


WICK BUILDING 


PINEBROOK 


28' 


-1986> 










Good 


WICK BUILDING 


WICKCRAFT 


14' 


-1984< 










Low Cost 


WICK BUILDING 


WICKCRAFT 


14' 


-1985> 










Average 


WICKES HOMES 


OEERFIELD 


14' 


-1982< 










Low Cost 


WICKES HOMES 


OEERFIELD 


14' 


-1983> 










Average 


WICKES HOMES 


FASHION MANOR 


12' 


-1985<, 




-1982<, 


, 24' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


WICKES HOMES 


FASHION MANOR 


12' 


-1986>, 




-1983>, 


,24'- 


•1976-1986 


Average 


WICKES HOMES 


FASHION MANOR 


24' 


-1987> 










Good 


WICKES HOMES 


RITZCRAFT 


12' 


-1985<, 




-1982<, 


, 24' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


WICKES HOMES 


RIT2CRAFT 


12' 


-1986>, 




-1983>, 


,24'. 


•1976-1986 


Average 


WICKES HOMES 


RITZCRAFT 


24' 


-1987> 










Good 


WICKES HOMES 


STYLECRAFT 


12' 


-1985<, 




-1983< 






Low Cost 


WICKES HOMES 


STYLECRAFT 


12' 


-1986>, 




-1984> 






Average 



43-22 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MANUFACTURER 


MODEL NAME 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 


QUALITY 


WICKES HOMES 


WICKES 


12'-1985<, 


14'-1983<, 24'-1979< 


Low Cost 


WICKES HOMES 


WICKES 


12'-1986>, 


14'-1984>, 24'-1980> 


Average 


WINDSOR 


WINDSOR 


14'-1977< 




Low Cost 


WINDSOR 


WINDSOR 


14' -1978-1985 


Average 


WINDSOR 


WINDSOR 


14'-1986> 




Good 


WINSTON 


BROUGHAM 


14 




Low Cost 


WINSTON 


BROUGHAM 


14'&24'-1978-1987, 28'-1981> 


Average 


WINSTON 


BROUGHAM 


14'&24'-1988> 


Good 


WINSTON 


COUNTRY ROAD 


14 




Low Cost 


WINSTON 


COUNTRY ROAD 


14'i24'-1978-1987. 28'-1981> 


Average 


WINSTON 


COUNTRY ROAD 


14'&24'-1988> 


Good 


WINSTON 


FOUR SEASONS 


14'-1981<, 


24'-1978<, 28'-1980< 


Low Cost 


WINSTON 


FOUR SEASONS 


14'-1982>. 


24'-1979-1987, 28'-1981> 


Average 


WINSTON 


FOUR SEASONS 


24'-1988> 




Good 


WINSTON 


SUNDANCER 


12'-1983<, 


14'-1982< 


Low Cost 


WINSTON 


SUNDANCER 


12'-1984>, 


14'-1983> 


Average 


WOODUND 


WOODUNO 


12'-1983<, 


14'-1984<, 20'-1985< 


Low Cost 


WOODUNO 


WOODLAND 


24'-1979< 




Low Cost 


WOODLAND 


WOODLAND 


12'-1984>, 


14'-1985>, 20'-1986> 


Average 


WOODLAND 


WOODUNO 


24'-1980> 




Average 


ZIMMER 


CASTLEWOOD 


28'-1981< 




Low Cost 


ZIMMER 


CASTLEWOOD 


28'-1982> 




Average 


ZIMMER 


NASHUA 


14'-1982<, 


24'-1980< 


Low Cost 


ZIMMER 


NASHUA 


14'-1983>, 


24'-1981> 


Average 


ZIMMER 


PRINCESS 


14'-1982<. 


24'-1980< 


Low Cost 


ZIMMER 


PRINCESS 


14'-1983>, 


24'-1981> 


Average 


ZIMMER 


WINDSOR 


14'-1975> 




Low Cost 


ZINWER 


WINDSOR 


14'-1976-1987 


Average 


ZIMMER 


ZIMMER 


12'-1985< 




Low Cost 


ZIWER 


ZIMMER 


12'-1986> 




Average 



08/01/89 



43-23 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



43.3.2. MODEL NAME ORDER 



MODEL NAME 


MANUFACTURER 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 




QUALITY 


ACADEMY 


SKYLINE 


12'&24'-1982<. 14'-1986<, 


20'-1978< 


Low Cost 


ACADEMY 


SKYLINE 


12'i24'-1983>, 14'-1987>, 


20' -1979-1986 


Average 


ACADEMY 


SKYLINE 


20'-1987> 




Good 


ACCENT 


FLEETWOOD 


12'. 14'-1973<, 12', 14'- 


19e3< 


Low Cost 


ACCENT 


FLEETWOOD 


12', 14'-1984> 




Average 


ADRIAN 


SHAR LO HOMES 


12'-1988> 




Average 


ADRIAN 


SHAR LO HOMES 


12'-1987< 




Low Cost 


AIRLINER 


GUERDON 


12'-1977< 




Low Cost 


AIRLINER 


GUERDON 


12'-1978-84 




Average 


AIRLINER 


GUERDON 


12'-1985> 




Good 


ALL SEASONS 


ALSEACO 


1Z'-1982<, 14'-1981< 




Low Cost 


ALL SEASONS 


ALSEACO 


12'-1983>, 14'-1982> 




Average 


ALPINE CENTURIAN 


CENTURY 


14'&16'-1975< 




Low Cost 


ALPINE CENTURIAN 


CENTURY 


14 '&16'- 1976- 1982. 24'&26 


'-198K 


Average 


ALPINE CENTURIAN 


CENTURY 


14 '&16' -1983-1985 




Good 


ALPINE CENTURIAN 


CENTURY 


24'&26'-1982-1985 




Good 


ALPINE CENTURIAN 


CENTURY 


ALL SIZES 1986> 




Excellent 


ALPINE CENTURY 


CENTURY 


12'il6'-1976<, 14'-1978< 




Low Cost 


ALPINE CENTURY 


CENTURY 


12'il6'-1977-1983, 14'-1979-1985 


Average 


ALPINE CENTURY 


CENTURY 


24'-1982< 




Average 


ALPINE CENTURY 


CENTURY 


12'&16'-1984>. 14'-1986> 




Good 


ALPINE CENTURY 


CENTURY 


24'-1983-1985 




Good 


ALPINE CENTURY 


CENTURY 


24'-1986> 




Excel lent 


ALPINE LEADER 


CENTURY 


14'-1975< 




Low Cost 


ALPINE LEADER 


CENTURY 


14' -1976-1982 




Average 


ALPINE LEADER 


CENTURY 


14'-1983> 




Good 


ALPINE MARK II 


CENTURY 


14'-1980<. 16'-1981<. 24' 


-1978< 


Average 


ALPINE MARK II 


CENTURY 


14'-1981-1985, 16'-1982-1985 


Good 


ALPINE MARK II 


CENTURY 


24' -1979-1984 




Good 


ALPINE MARK II 


CENTURY 


14'&16'-1986>, 24'-1985> 




Excellent 


ALPINE PRESTIGE 


CENTURY 


16'-1973< 




Low Cost 


ALPINE PRESTIGE 


CENTURY 


14'-1980<. 16'-1974-1980 




Average 


ALPINE PRESTIGE 


CENTURY 


24'&28'-1977< 




Average 


ALPINE PRESTIGE 


CENTURY 


14'&16'-1981-1984, 




Good 


ALPINE PRESTIGE 


CENTURY 


24 '&28'- 1978- 1982 




Good 


ALPINE PRESTIGE 


CENTURY 


14'&16'-1985>. 24'&28'-1983> 


Excellent 


AMBASSADOR 


SCHULT 


12'-1986<. 14'-1987<. 24' 


-1979< 


Low Cost 


AMBASSADOR 


SCHULT 


14'-1987>, 16'-1988>. 24' 


-1980-1987 


Average 


AMBASSADOR 


SCHULT 


24'-1988> 




Good 


AMERICAN WAY 


AMERICAN WAY 


12'&14'-1986< 




Low Cost 


AMERICAN WAY 


AMERICAN WAY 


12'&14'-1987> 




Average 


APACHE 


APACHE 


12'-1981< 




Low Cost 


APACHE 


APACHE 


12'-1982> 




Average 


AQUARIUS 


NATIONAL 


12'il4'-1987< 




Low Cost 


AQUARIUS 


NATIONAL 


12'&14'-1988> 




Average 


AQUARIUS 


WICK BUILDING 


14'-1984< 




Low Cost 


AQUARIUS 


WICK BUILDING 


14'-1985> 




Average 


ARDMORE 


MODULINE 


14'-1982<, 28'-1981< 




Low Cost 


AROMORE 


MODULINE 


14'-1983>, 24'-1987<, 28' 


-1982> 


Average 


ARDMORE 


MODULINE 


24'-1988> 




Good 


ARGUS 


ARGUS 


14'-1983< 




Low Cost 


ARGUS 


ARGUS 


14'-1984> 




Average 


ARMOR 


GUERDON 


12'-1977< 




Low Cost 


ARMOR 


GUERDON 


12 '-1978-84 




Average 


ARMOR 


GUERDON 


12'-1985> 




Good 


ARTCRAFT 


ARTCRAFT 


12'-1981<, 14'-1983<, 24' 


-1984< 


Low Cost 


ARTCRAFT 


ARTCRAFT 


12'-1982>, 14'-1984>, 24' 


-1985> 


Average 


ARTCRAFT 


WICK BUILDING 


14'-1984< 




Low Cost 


ARTCRAFT 


WICK BUILDING 


14'-1985> 




Average 



43-24 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



HODEL NAME 



MANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



ARTIC MANOR ATCO 14'-1979< Low Cost 

ARTIC MANOR ATCO 14'-1980> Average 

ASTRA GUERDON 10'-1981<, 1Z'-1982<, 14'-1984< Low Cost 

ASTRA GUERDON 10'-1982>, 12'-1983>, 14'-1985> Average 

ASTRO ASTRO 14'-1976< Low Cost 

ASTRO ASTRO 14'-1977> Average 

ASTRO ASTRO 14'-1987> Good 

ATCO ATCO 14'-1976< Low Cost 

ATCO ATCO 14' -1977-1984 Average 

ATCO ATCO 14'-1985> Good 

ATLANTIC CHAMPION ALL SIZES 1981< Low Cost 

ATLANTIC CHAMPION ALL SIZES 1982> Average 

ATLAS GUERDON 12' ,24'&28' -1978<, 14'-1981< Low Cost 

ATLAS GUERDON 12' .24'&28' -1978-85, 14'-1982> Average 

ATLAS GUERDON 12' ,24'&28'-1986> Good 

AZTEC AZTEC 12'-1981<, 14'-1979<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

AZTEC AZTEC 12'-1982>, 14'-1980>, 24'-1979> Average 

BAINBRIDGE KAUFMAN/BROAD 12'&14' -1981<, 20'-1979<, 24'-1983< Low Cost 

BAINBRIDGE KAUFMAN/BROAD 12 '&14'-1982>, 20'-1980>, 24'-1984> Average 

BARRINGTON FLEETWOOD 12'-1976<, 14'-1978<, 24'&28'1981< Low Cost 

BARRINGTON FLEETWOOD 12 '-1977-1985, 14'-1979>, 26'-1985< Average 

BARRINGTON FLEETWOOD 24'&28'1982> Average 

BARRINGTON FLEETWOOD 12'. 26'-1986> Good 

BAYCREST GUERDON 14'-1984< Low Cost 

BAYCREST GUERDON 14'-1985> Average 

BAYWOOD KAUFMAN/BROAD 28'-1980<, Low Cost 

BAYWOOD KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1986<, 28'-1981-87 Average 

BAYWOOD KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1987>, 28'-1988> Good 

BEDFORD MODULINE 14'-1982<, 28'-1981< Low Cost 

BEDFORD MODULINE 14'-1983>, 24'-1987<, 28'-1982> Average 

BEDFORD MODULINE 24'-1988> Good 

BELAIRE FUQUA 12 '&14' -1981<, 20'-1981<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

BELAIRE FUQUA 12 '8.14' -1982-1985, 20'-1982> Average 

BELAIRE FUQUA 24' -1978-1984 Average 

BELAIRE FUQUA 12'&14' -1986>, 24', 26'&28' -1985> Good 

BELLAVISTA CHIEF IND 12', 14'&24'-1982<, 16'-1979< Low Cost 

BELLAVISTA CHIEF INO 12', 14'!i24'-1983>, 16'-1980> Average 

BELLAVISTA CHIEF INO 28'-1985< Average 

BELUVISTA CHIEF INO 24'&28' -1986> Good 

BELMONT ANCHOR 12'-1986<, 14'-1984<. 24'-1978< Low Cost 

BELMONT ANCHOR 12'-1987>. 14'-1985>, 24'-1979> Average 

BENDIX . BENDIX 12'-1986<. 14'-1979<, 20'-1978< Low Cost 

BENDIX BENDIX 24'-1981< Low Cost 

BENDIX BENDIX 12'-1987>, 14'-1980>, 20'-1979> Average 

BENDIX BENDIX 24'-1982> Average 

BIG SKY BIG S<Y 14'-1981<. 16'-1978<, 28'-1975< Low Cost 

BIG SKY BIG SKY 14'-1982>, 16'-1979>, 28'-1976> Average 

BILTMORE KAUFMAN/BROAD 12 ' ,14'&28'-1981<, 24' -1979< Low Cost 

BILTMORE KAUFMAN/BROAD 12' ,14'&28'-1982>, 24'-1980> Average 

BLAIRHOUSE CHICKASHA ALL SIZES 1982> Average 

BLAIRHOUSE CHICKASHA ALL SIZES 1981< Low Cost 

BOISE-CASCADE BENDIX-BOISE 12'-1986<, 14'-1979<, 24'-1983< Low Cost 

BOISE-CASCADE BENDIX-BOISE 12'-1987>, 14'-1980>, 24'-1984> Average 

BON PRIX ALLEN 12'-1984<, 14'-1983<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

BON PRIX ALLEN 12'-1985>, 14'-1984>, 24'-1978> Average 

BONNAVILLA CHIEF IND 12', 14'&24' -1981<, 16'-1974< Low Cost 

BONNAVILLA CHIEF IND 28'-1978< Low Cost 

BONNAVILLA CHIEF IND 12 '&24'- 1982- 1985, 14'-1982> Average 

BONNAVILLA CHIEF IND 16'-1975-1985. 28'-1979-1984 Average 

BONNAVILLA CHIEF IND 12' , 16'&24' -1986>, 28' -1985> Good 

8RENTVILLA ARTCRAFT 14'-1985< Low Cost 

8RENTVILLA ARTCRAFT 14'-1986> Average 

BRENTWOOD BRENTWOOD 12'-1985<, 14'-1986<, 24'-1981< Low Cost 

BRENTWOOD BRENTWOOD 12'-1986>, 14'-1987>, 24'-1982>, Average 

BRENTWOOD UTAH 14'-1982<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 



08/01/89 



43-25 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MODEL NAME 



MANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



BRENTWOOD UTAH 14'-1983>, 24'-1979-1987 Average 

BRENTWOOD UTAH 24'-1988> Good 

BRENTWOOD VIKING-EDGEW- 24'-1977< Low Cost 

BRENTWOOD VIKING-EDGEW- 24' -1978-1987 Average 

BRENTWOOD VIKING-EOGEW- 24'-1988> Good 

BRIGHTON REDMAN 12'-1987<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1980<, Low Cost 

BRIGHTON REDMAN 28'-1983< Low Cost 

BRIGHTON REDMAN 12'-1988>, 14'-1985>, 24'-1981> Average 

BRIGHTON REDMAN 28'-1984> Average 

BROADMORE FLEETWOOD 12'-1985<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

BROADMORE FLEETWOOD 12'-1986>, 14'-1985>, 24'-1978>. Average 

BROADMORE FLEETWOOD 28'-1977-1985 Average 

BROADMORE FLEETWOOD 28'-1986> Good 

BROOKDALE SHELTEREX 12'&14' -1979<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

BROOKDALE SHELTEREX 12' -1980- 1987, 14'-1980>, 24' -1979-1987 Average 

BROOKDALE SHELTEREX 12'-1988>, 24'-1988> Good 

BROOKFIELD FLEETWOOD 24'-1983<, 28'-19e4< Low Cost 

BROOKFIELD FLEETWOOD 24'-1983>, 28'-1984> Average 

BROOKWOOD BENDIX-BOISE 12 '&24'-1982<,14'-1978<,20' -1981< Low Cost 

BROOKWOOD BENDIX-BOISE 12'&24'-1983>,14'-1979>,20' -1982> Average 

BROOKWOOD COMMODORE 20'-1980< Low Cost 

BROOKWOOD COMMODORE 20'-1981>, 24'-1984< Average 

BROOKWOOD COMMODORE 24'-1985> Good 

BROOKWOOD FLEETWOOD 24'-1983<, 28'-1984< Low Cost 

BROOKWOOD FLEETWOOD 24'-1983>, 28'-1984> Average 

BROUGHAM WINSTON 14 Low Cost 

BROUGHAM WINSTON 14 '&24'- 1978- 1987, 28'-1981> Average 

BROUGHAM WINSTON 14'&24' -1988> Good 

BUCKINGHAM TAYLOR 14'-1982< Low Cost 

BUCKINGHAM TAYLOR 14'-1983> Average 

BUDDY SKYLINE 12'-1983<. 14'-1982<, 20'&24'-1980 Low Cost 

BUDDY SKYLINE 28'-1979< Low Cost 

BUDDY SKYLINE 12'-1984>. 14'-1983>, 20'&24' -1981> Average 

BUDDY SKYLINE 28'-1980> Average 

CALYPSO GOLDEN WEST 12'-1982<, 24'-1976< Low Cost 

CALYPSO GOLDEN WEST 12'-1982>, 24'-1977-1985 Average 

CALYPSO GOLDEN WEST 24'-1986> Good 

CAMELOT CENTRAL 14'&16' -1984<, 24'&26' -1981<, Low Cost 

CAMELOT CENTRAL 28'-1977<, Low Cost 

CAMELOT CENTRAL 14'&16' -1985>, 24'i26'-19a2>. Average 

CAMELOT CENTRAL 28' -1978-1986 Average 

CAMELOT CENTRAL 28'-1987> Good 

CAMELOT GUERDON 12'-ALL YEARS, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

CAMELOT GUERDON 24'-1979> Average 

CAMERON SKYLINE 12'-1987<, 14'-19e5<, 20'-1982< Low Cost 

CAMERON SKYLINE 24'-1979< Low Cost 

CAMERON SKYLINE 12'-1988>, 14'-1986>, 20'-1983> Average 

CAMERON SKYLINE 24'-1980> Average 

CANDLEWOOD MODULINE 14'-1982<, 28'-1981< Low Cost 

CANDLEWOOD MODULINE 14'-1983>, 24'-19e7<, 28'-1982> Average 

CANDLEWOOD MODULINE 24'-1988> Good 

CANYON CREST KAUFMAN/BROAD 12 ' , 14'&28'-1981<, 24' -1979< Low Cost 

CANYON CREST KAUFMAN/BROAD 12' .14'&28' -1982>, 24' -1980> Average 

CANYON CREST MODULINE 12'-1982<, 14'-1983<, 28'-1982< Low Cost 

CANYON CREST MODULINE 12'-1983>, 14'-1984>, 24'-1987< Average 

CANYON CREST MODULINE 28'-1983> Average 

CANYON CREST MODULINE 24'-1988> Good 

CAREFREE FUQUA 14'-1980<, 24'-1973< Low Cost 

CAREFREE FUQUA 14'-1981>, 24' -1974-1985 Average 

CAREFREE FUQUA 26'&28'-1984< Average 

CAREFREE FUQUA 26'&28'-1985>. 24'-1986> Good 

CAREFREE MELODY HOMES 12'-1981<, 14'-1982< Low Cost 

CAREFREE MELODY HOMES 12'-1982>, 14'-1983> Average 

CARMEL CENTURY 12'-1981<, 14'&20' -1978< Low Cost 

CARMEL CENTURY 24'&28'-1975< Low Cost 



43-26 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



HODEL NAME 



HANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



CARHEL 

CARMEL 

CARMEL 

CARRIAGE HOUSE 

CARRIAGE HOUSE 

CARRIAGE HOUSE 

CARRIAGE HOUSE 

CASCADE 

CASCADE 

CASCADE 

CASCADE 

CASTLEWOOD 

CASTLEWOOD 

CEDARBROOK 

CEDARBROOK 

CEDARBROOK 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTENNIAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CHADWICK 

CHADWICK 

CHALLENGER 

CHALLENGER 

CHALLENGER 

CHALLENGER 

CHALLENGER 

CHAPARREL 

CHAPARREL 

CHAPARREL 

CHATEAU 

CHATEAU 

CHATEAU 

CHATEAU 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CIMMARRON 

CIMMARRON 

CITATION 

CITATION 

CITATION 

CITATION 

CITATION 

CITATION 

CITATION 

CLASSIC 

CLASSIC 

CUSSIC 

CLASSIC 

CLASSIC 

CLASSIC 



CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

HOUSE/HARMONY 

HOUSE/HARMONY 

HOUSE/HARMONY 

HOUSE/HARMONY 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

ZIMMER 

ZIMMER 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

FLEETWOOD 

FLEETWOOD 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

SCHULT 

SCHULT 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

GALLATIN 

GALLATIN 

SCHULT 

SCHULT 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

GALLATIN 

GALLATIN 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

SCHULT 

SCHULT 

SCHULT 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

CENTURY 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 



12'-1982>, 14 '&20'- 1979- 1985 

24'&28'-1976-1983 

14'&20'-1986>, 24'&28'-1984> 

14'-1974<, 24'-1973< 

14'-1975-81, 24'-1974-81, 28'-1981< 

14'-1982>, 24' -1982-85, 28' -1982-84 

24'-1986>, 28'-1985> 

16'-1981<, 

16'-1982-85. 24'-1983<, 26'-1983< 

16'-1986>, 24 '-1984-85, 26'-1984> 

24'-1986> 

28'-1981< 

28'-1982> 

24'-1981<, 28'-1982< 

24'-1982-85, 28'-1983-85 

24'&28'-1986> 

14'-1978<, 16'-1977<, 24'-1974< 

14'-1979>, 16'-1978-1984, 

24'-1975> 

16'-1985>, 

12'-1978<, 14'-1981<, 16'-1982<, 

24'-1977<, 

12'-1979-1986,14'-1982>,16'-1983> 

24'-1977-1986, 28'-1984< 

12'&24'-1987>, 28' -1983-1986 

28'-1987> 

12', 24'&28'-1973<, 14'-1978< 

16'-1976< 

12', 24'&28' -1974-1982 

14'-1979-1985, 16' -1977-1983 

12', 24'&28'-1983>, 14'-1986>, 

16'-1984> 

24'&28'-1984< 

24'&28'-1985> 

12'&14'-1977< 

12'&14'-1978-84 

12'&14'-1985> 

14'-1982< 

14'-1983> 

12'&14'-1977< 

12 '&14' -1978-84 

12'&14'-1985> 

ALL SIZES 1979<, 

ALL SIZES 1980> 

14'-1984<, 16'-1983< 

14'-1985>, 16'-1984> 

12'8.14'-1983<, 16'-1978<, 24'-1976< 

12'&14'-1984>, 16'-1979> 

24'-1977-1985 

24'-1986> 

16'i28'-1979< 
16'&18'-1980> 
14'-1981<, 24'-1979< 



14'-1982>, 24'-1980> 



14'-1981<, 

14'-1982>, 

12'-1980<, 

28'-1981< 

12'-1981>, 

28'-1982> 

14'-1979<, 16'-1985< 

14' -1980-1986, 16'-1986> 

14'-1987> 

1982< 

1983> 



ALL SIZES 
ALL SIZES 
14'-1986> 
14'-1985< 
28'-1984< 
14'-1986> 



20'-1980<, 24'-1981< 



20'-1981>, 24'-1982> 



Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 



08/01/89 



43-27 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



HODEL NAME 



MANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



CLASSIC 

COLUMBIA 

COLUMBIA 

COLUMBIA 

COLUMBIA 

COLUMBIA 

COLUMBIA 

COLUMBINE 

COLUMBINE 

COLUMBINE 

COLUMBINE 

COMET 

COMET 

COttlANDER 

COMMANDER 

COftlANDER 

CONWANDER 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCH EMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCORD 

CONCORD 

CORINTHIAN 

CORINTHIAN 

CORINTHIAN 

CORINTHIAN 

CORONAOO 

CORONADO 

COUNTRY ROAD 

COUNTRY ROAD 

COUNTRY ROAD 

COUNTY SQUIRE 

COUNTY SQUIRE 

COUNTY SQUIRE 

CRAFTMADE 

CRAFTMADE 

CRAFTMADE 

CRAFTMADE 

CRAFTMADE 

CRAFTMADE 

CRAFTMARK 

CRAFTMARK 

CRAFTMARK 

CRAFTMARK 

CRANBROOK 

CRANBROOK 

CREST 

CREST 

CREST 

CREST 

CROWN POINTE 

CROWN POINTE 

CROWNPOINTE 

CROWNPOINTE 

CUSTOM 

CUSTOM 

CUSTOM 

CUSTOM 

CUSTOM 

DARTMOUTH 

DARTMOUTH 

DARTMOUTH 

DEERFIELO 



COMMODORE 

SUNRIZON 

SUNRIZON 

UTAH 

UTAH 

UTAH 

UTAH 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

CENTRAL 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

SKYLINE 

SKYLINE 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CONCHEMCO 

CHAMPION 

CHAMPION 

MODULINE 

MODULINE 

MODULINE 

MODULINE 

WICK BUILDING 

WICK BUILDING 

WINSTON 

WINSTON 

WINSTON 

KIT 

KIT 

KIT 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

CHICKASHA 

FLEETWOOD 

FLEETWOOD 

FLEETWOOD 

FLEETWOOD 

SCHULT 

SCHULT 

SCHULT 

SKYLINE 

SKYLINE 

MODULINE 

MODULINE 

MODULINE 

SKYLINE 



28'-1985> 

24'-1983<, 26'-1984<, 28'-1985< 

24'-1984>, 26'-1985>. 28'-1986> 

14'-1978< 

14' -1979- 1987. 28'-1983< 

14'-1988>, 28' -1984-1987 

28'-1988> 

12'il4'i28'-1977<, 24'-1974< 

12'&14'&28'-1979-1986, 

24' -1975-1984 

12'&14'&28'-1987>, 24'-1985> 

14'-1985<, 24'&28'-1981< 

14'-1986>, 24'&28'-1982> 

14'-1983<. 24'-1979<, 28'-1981< 

14'-1984>, 24'-1980>, 28'-1982> 

12'&14'-1983< 

12'&14'-1984> 

12'-1985<, 14'-1981<, 24'-1978< 

28'-1976< 

12'-1986>, 14'-1982>. 24'-1979> 

28' -1977-1985 

28'-1986> 

12'&24'-1981<, 14'-1984< 

12'&24'-1982>, 14'-1985> 

12'-1982<, 14'-1983<, 28'-1982< 

12'-1983>, 14'-1984>. 24'-1987< 

28'-1983> 

24'-1988> 

28'-1985< 

28'-1986> 

14 

14'&24'-1978-1987. 28'-1981> 

14'&24'-1988> 

12'-1978<. 14'-1981< 

12'-1979-85, 14'-1982> 

12'-1986> 

14'-1974<, 16'-1975<, 28'-1974< 

14'-1975-1981, 16'-1976-1982 

28'-1975-1983 

14'-1982-1985. 16'-1983> 

28'-1984> 

14'-1986> 

14'-1975<, 16', 24'&28'-1975< 

14'-1976-1983 

16', 24'i28 

14'-1984>, 16, 24'&28'-1985> 

14'«i24'-1982< 

14'&24'-1983> 

12'&14'-1983<, 

12'&14'-1984>, 

24'-1977-1985 

24'-1986> 

12'-1975<, 14'- 

12'-1977-1985, 

24'&28'1982> 

12', 26'-1986> 

12'-1978<, 14'-1980<, 16'-1982< 

12' -1979- 1984, 14'-1981>, 16'-1983> 

12'-1985> 

14'-1981<, 24'-1979< 

12'-1982>, 24'-1980> 

14'-1982<, 28'-1981< 

14'-1983>, 24'-1987<, 28'-1982> 

24'-1988> 

12'il4'-1983< 



16'-1978<, 24'-1976< 
16'-1979> 



-1978<, 24'&28'1981< 
14'-1979>. 26'-1985< 



Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Good 

Excellent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 



43-28 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



HOOEL NAME 


MANUFACTURER 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 




QUALITY 


DEERFIELD 


SKYLINE 


12'&14'-1984> 






Average 


OEERFIELD 


WICKES HOMES 


14'-1982< 






Low Cost 


DEERFIELD 


WICKES HOMES 


14'-1983> 






Average 


DELUXE 


CHAMPION 


14'-1981< 






Low Cost 


DELUXE 


CHAMPION 


14'-1982> 






Average 


DETROITER 


DMH 


12'-1981<. 14' 


-198K, 24' 


-1977< 


Low Cost 


DETROITER 


DMH 


12'-1982>, 14' 


-1982>, 24' 


-1978> 


Average 


EATON PARK 


REDMAN 


12'-1985<. 14' 


-1986<, 24' 


-1979< 


Low Cost 


EATON PARK 


REDMAN 


12'-1986>, 14' 


-1987>. 24' 


-1980> 


Average 


EDGEWOOD 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


24'-1978< 






Average 


EDGEWOOD 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


24' -1979-1983 






Good 


EDGEWOOD 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


24'-1985> 






Excellent 


ELCAR 


COMMCOORE 


24'-1980<, 28' 


-1982< 




Average 


ELCAR 


COMMODORE 


24'-1981-1985, 


28'-1983> 




Good 


ELCAR 


COMMODORE 


24'-1986> 






Excellent 


ELKHART 


ELKHART 


12', 14'-1973« 






Low Cost 


ELKHART 


ELKHART 


12', 14'-1974- 


•1982 




Average 


ELKHART 


ELKHART 


12', 14'-1983= 






Good 


EMBASSY 


GUERDON 


12'-1984<, 14' 


-1977< 




Low Cost 


EMBASSY 


GUERDON 


12'-1985>, 14' 


-1978-85 




Average 


EMBASSY 


GUERDON 


14'-1986> 






Good 


ESQUIRE 


GUERDON 


14'-1984< 






Low Cost 


ESQUIRE 


GUERDON 


14'-1985> 






Average 


FAIRVIEW 


KIT 


12'-1978<, 14' 


-1981< 




Low Cost 


FAIRVIEW 


KIT 


12'-1979-85. 14'-1982> 




Average 


FAIRVIEW 


KIT 


12'-1986> 






Good 


FALCON 


FALCON COACH 


14'-1978<, 24' 


-1977< 




Low Cost 


FALCON 


FALCON COACH 


14'-1979>, 24' 


-1978-85 




Average 


FALCON 


FALCON COACH 


24'-1986> 






Good 


FASHION MANOR 


WICKES HOMES 


12'-1985<. 14' 


-1982<, 24' 


-1975-: 


Low Cost 


FASHION MANOR 


WICKES HOMES 


12'-1986>, 14' 


-1983>,24'- 


1976-1986 


Average 


FASHION MANOR 


WICKES HOMES 


24'-1987> 






Good 


FLAMINGO 


REDMAN 


12'-1985<. 14' 


-1986<, 24' 


-1979< 


Low Cost 


FLAMINGO 


REDMAN 


12'-1986>. 14' 


-1987>, 24' 


-1980> 


Average 


FLEETWOOD 


FLEETWOOD 


12', 14'-ALL YEARS, 24'i28' -1978< 


Low Cost 


FLEETWOOD 


FLEETWOOD 


24'&28'-1979> 






Average 


FOUR SEASONS 


ALLEN 


12'&14'-1982<, 


24'-1980< 




Low Cost 


FOUR SEASONS 


ALLEN 


12'&14'-1983>, 


24'-1981> 




Average 


FOUR SEASONS 


WINSTON 


14'-1981<, 24' 


-1978<, 28' 


-1980< 


Low Cost 


FOUR SEASONS 


WINSTON 


14'-1982>, 24' 


-1979-1987, 


28'-1981> 


Average 


FOUR SEASONS 


WINSTON 


24'-1988> 






Good 


FRONTIER 


COMMODORE 


12'-1985<, 14' 


-1983<, 24' 


-1981< 


Low Cost 


FRONTIER 


COMMODORE 


12'-1986>, 14' 


-1984>, 24' 


-1982> 


Average 


FUQUA 


FUQUA 


12'&14'-1979<, 


24'-1977< 




Low Cost 


FUQUA 


FUQUA 


12'M4'-1980-85, 24'-1978 


-84 


Average 


FUQUA 


FUQUA 


12'&14'-1986>. 


24'-1985> 




Good 


FUTURAMA 


GUERDON 


12'-1983<. 14' 


-1985< 




Low Cost 


FUTURAMA 


GUERDON 


12'-1984>, 14' 


-1986> 




Average 


GAUXY 


COMMODORE 


14'&28'-1983<, 


24'-1981< 




Low Cost 


GAUXY 


COMMODORE 


14'&28'-1984>, 


24'-1982> 




Average 


GALAXY 


GALAXY 


ALL SIZES/YEARS 




Low Cost 


GALLATIN 


GALLATIN 


14'-1979<, 16' 


-1981< 




Low Cost 


GALLATIN 


GALLATIN 


14'-1980>, 16' 


-1982> 




Average 


GEER 


GEER 


14'-1977«: 






Low Cost 


GEER 


GEER 


14 '-1978-85 






Average 


GEER 


GEER 


14'-1985> 






Good 


GENERAL 


BENDIX-BOISE 


12'&14'-1984<, 


24'-1977< 




Low Cost 


GENERAL 


BENDIX-BOISE 


12'&14 






Average 


GENTRY 


ATCO 


12'-1982<, 14' 


-1979<, 20' 


-1978< 


Low Cost 


GENTRY 


ATCO 


24'-1981< 






Low Cost 


GENTRY 


ATCO 


12'-1983>. 14' 


-1980>. 20' 


-1979> 


Average 


GENTRY 


ATCO 


24'-1982> 






Average 


GENTRY-CUSTOM 


ATCO 


24'-1978< 






Low Cost 


GENTRY-CUSTOM 


ATCO 


24'-1979> 






Average 


GIBRALTER 


MODULINE 


12'-1980<, 14' 


-1982<, 28' 


-1982< 


Low Cost 



08/01/89 



43-29 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MODEL NAME 



MANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



GIBRALTER MODULINE 12'-1981-87, 14'i28'-1983>, 24'-1987< Average 

GIBRALTER MODULINE 12'&24' -1988> Good 

GIBRALTOR HARMONY 12'il4'-1984< Low Cost 

GIBRALTOR HARMONY 12'&14'-1985> Average 

GLENBROOK FLEETWOOD 12'-1985<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1981< Low Cost 

GLENBROOK FLEETWOOD 28'-1979< Low Cost 

GLENBROOK FLEETWOOD 12'-1986>, 14'-1985>, 24'-1982> Average 

GLENBROOK FLEETWOOD 28'-1980> Average 

GLENWOOD GLEN RIVER 14'-1985<, 26'-1981< Average 

GLENWOOD GLEN RIVER 14'-1986>. 26'-1982> Good 

GOLD SEAL VIKING-EOGEW- 24'-1976< Average 

GOLD SEAL VIKING-EDGEW- 24' -1977-1983 Good 

GOLD SEAL VIKING-EOGEW- 24'-1984> Excellent 

GOLDEN STATE KIT 14'-1975<. 28'-1973< Low Cost 

GOLDEN STATE KIT 14'-1976-85, 24'-1984<. 28'-1974-85 Average 

GOLDEN STATE KIT 14'&28' -1986>, 24'-1985> Good 

GOVERNOR CONCHEMCO 12'-1983<. 14'-1978< Low Cost 

GOVERNOR CONCHEMCO 12'-1984>, 14'-1979> Average 

GRANDVILLE WICK BUILDING 14'-1984< Low Cost 

GRANDVILLE WICK BUILDING 14'-1985> Average 

GRANVILLE REDMAN 12'-1987<, 14'-1985< Low Cost 

GRANVILLE REDMAN 12'-1988>, 14'-1986> Average 

GREAT LAKES GUERDON 12' .14'&16'-1981<, 24'-1975< Low Cost 

GREAT LAKES GUERDON 12' .14'il6' -1982>, 24' -1976-1984 Average 

GREAT LAKES GUERDON 28'-1984< Average 

GREAT LAKES GUERDON 24'&28' -1985> Good 

GREAT NORTHERN CENTRAL 14 '&16' -1981<,24' -1979<,26' -1976< Low Cost 

GREAT NORTHERN CENTRAL 14'&16' -1982>. 24'-1980>. Average 

GREAT NORTHERN CENTRAL 26' -1977-1986 Average 

GREAT NORTHERN CENTRAL 26'-1987> Good 

GUARDIAN COMMODORE 14'-1985<. 20'-1980<, 24'-1981< Low Cost 

GUARDIAN COMMODORE 28'-1984< Low Cost 

GUARDIAN COMMODORE 14'-1986>, 20'-1981>, 24'-1982> Average 

GUARDIAN COMMODORE 28'-1985> Average 

GUERDON GUERDON 12'&14' -1983<, 20'-1978<, 28'-1977< Low Cost 

GUERDON GUERDON 12 '&14' -1984>, 20'-1979-85 Average 

GUERDON GUERDON 24'-1982<, 28' -1978-1984 Average 

GUERDON GUERDON 20'-1986>, 24' -1982-85, 28'-1985> Good 

GUERDON GUERDON 24'-1986> Excellent 

GULFSTREAM FUQUA 14'-1981<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

GULFSTREAM FUQUA 14'-1982>. 24'-1979-85 Average 

GULFSTREAM FUQUA 24'-1986> Good 

HACIENDA GUERDON 12'-1983<, 14'&24' -1978<, 28'-1974< Low Cost 

HACIENDA GUERDON 12'-1984>, 14'&24' -1979-85 Average 

HACIENDA GUERDON 28' -1975-1984 Average 

HACIENDA GUERDON 14'&24' -1986>, 28'-1985> Good 

HALLMARK REDMAN 12 '&14' -1987< Low Cost 

HALLMARK REDMAN 12'&14' -1988> Average 

HAWTHORN LIBERTY 12' .14'&24' -1981< Low Cost 

HAWTHORN LIBERTY 12' ,14'&24' -1982> Average 

HIGH COUNTRY CONTINENTAL 14'&16' -1979< Low Cost 

HIGH COUNTRY CONTINENTAL 14'&16' -1980-1985, 24'-1982< Average 

HIGH COUNTRY CONTINENTAL 28'-1981< Average 

HIGH COUNTRY CONTINENTAL 14'&16' -1986>, 24'-1983> Good 

HIGH COUNTRY CONTINENTAL 28'- 1982-1985 Good 

HIGH COUNTRY CONTINENTAL 28'-1986> Excellent 

HIGHLAND PARK FLEETWOOD 24'-1979<, 28'-1979< Low Cost 

HIGHUND PARK FLEETWOOD 24' -1980-1985, 26'-1985<, 28'-1982> Average 

HIGHUND PARK FLEETWOOD 24' , 26'&28' -1986> Good 

HILLCREST SKYLINE 12'-1987<, 14'-1984<. 20'-1985 Low Cost 

HILLCREST SKYLINE 24'-1980<. 28'-1979< Low Cost 

HILLCREST SKYLINE 12'-1988>, 14'-1985>, 20'-1986> Average 

HILLCREST SKYLINE 24'-1981>, 28'-1980> Average 

HOLLYPARK GERRING 14'-1978< Low Cost 

HOLLYPARK GERRING 14' -1974-1983 Average 



43-30 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



HODEL NAME 


MANUFACTURER 


HOLLYPARK 


GERRING 


HOMESTEAD 


SCHULT 


HOMESTEAD 


SCHULT 


HOMESTEAD 


SCHULT 


HOMETTE 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


SKYLINE 


HOMETTE 


SKYLINE 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


HOUSE/HARMONY 


HUNTINGTON 


CHAMPION 


HUNTINGTON 


CHAMPION 


HUNTINGTON 


CHAMPION 


HUNTINGTON 


CHAMPION 


IMPERIAL 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


IMPERIAL 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


IMPERIAL 


VIKING-EDGEW- 


INVADER 


CHICKASHA 


INVADER 


CHICKASHA 


JUBILEE 


MAJESTIC 


JUBILEE 


MAJESTIC 


JUBILEE 


MAJESTIC 


KENTWOOD 


KENTWOOD 


KENTWOOD 


KENTWOOD 


KENTWOOD 


KENTWOOD 


KINGSWOOD 


NOBILITY 


KINGSWOOD 


NOBILITY 


KINGSWOOD 


NOBILITY 


KINGSWOOD 


NOBILITY 


KIRKWOOD 


REDMAN 


KIRKWOOD 


REDMAN 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KIT 


KOZY 


COMMODORE 


KOZY 


COMMODORE 


LAKEWOOD 


GALLATIN 


LAKEWOOD 


GALLATIN 


LAKEWOOD 


GALUTIN 


LAMPLIGHTER 


MODULINE 


LAMPLIGHTER 


MODULINE 


LANCER 


UNCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANCER 


LANDMARK 


FUQUA 


LANDMARK 


FUQUA 


LANDMARK 


FUQUA 


LEISURE HOME 


UTAH 


LEISURE HOME 


UTAH 


LEISURE HOME 


UTAH 


LIBERTY 


LIBERTY 


LIBERTY 


LIBERTY 


LYNN HAVEN 


REDMAN 


LYNN HAVEN 


REDMAN 


MAGNOLIA 


GUERDON 


MAGNOLIA 


GUERDON 


MAGNOLIA 


GUERDON 


MAGNOLIA 


GUERDON 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



14'-1984> Good 

14'-1980< Low Cost 

14' -1981-1985 Average 

14'-1986> Good 

12'-1987<, 14'-1985<, 20'-1982< Low Cost 

24'-1980<, 28'-1975< Low Cost 

12'-1988>, 14'-1986>, 20'-1983> Average 

24'-1981>, 28'-1976-1987 Average 

28'-1988> Good 

12'-1982< Low Cost 

12'-1983> Average 

14'&16'-1981<. 24'-1975< Low Cost 

28'-1979< Low Cost 

14'&16'-1982>, 24'-1976> Average 

28'-1980> Average 

24'-1976< Average 

24' -1977-1983 Good 

24'-1984> Excellent 

12'-1985<, 14'-1984< Low Cost 

12'-1986>, 14'-1985> Average 

14'-1978< Low Cost 

14 '-1979-87 Average 

14'-1988> Good 

12'-1985<, 14'&24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'-1986>. 14'-1980-87. 24'-1980> Average 

14'-1988> Good 

14'-1986<, 16'-1981<, 24'-1980< Low Cost 

12'&28'-1985< Low Cost 

12'&28'-1986>. 14'-1987>, Average 

16'-1982>, 24'-1981> Average 

12'&28'-1987<, I4'-1985<, 24'-1982< Low Cost 

12'&28'-1988>. 14'-1986>, 24'-1983> Average 

12'-1981<, 14'-1980<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

28'-1974< Low Cost 

12'-1982>, 14'-1981>, 24'-1975-84 Average 

28' -1975-1985 Average 

24'-1985>, 28'-1986> Good 

14'-1983<, 24'-1979<, 28'-1981< Low Cost 

14'-1984>, 24'-1980>, 28'-1982> Average 

ALL SIZES 1977< Low Cost 

ALL SIZES 1978-85 Average 

ALL SIZES 1986> Good 

12'&24'-1982<, 14'-1980< Low Cost 

12'&24'-1983>. 14'-1981> Average 

12'-1979<. 14'-1976<, 20'-1977< Low Cost 

24'-1981<, 28'-1973< Low Cost 

12'-1980>, 14'-1977-84, 20'-1978-85 Average 

24'-1982>, 28' -1974-1982 Average 

14'-1985>, 20'-1986>, 28'-1983> Good 

14'-1979< Low Cost 

14 '-1980-86 Average 

14'-1987> Good 

14'-1983<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

14'-1984>, 24'-1978-1986 Average 

24'-1987> Good 

12'-1984«:, 14'-1985<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'-1985>, 14'-1986>, 24'-1980> Average 

12'&28'-1987<, 14'-1985<, 24'-1982< Low Cost 

12'&28'-1988>, 14'-1986>, 24'-1983> Average 

12',14'&20'-1977< Low Cost 

12',14'&20'-1978-84, 24'-1981< Average 

12',14'&20'-1985>, 24' -1982-1985 Good 

24'-1986> Excellent 

14'-1983<, 24'-1976< Low Cost 

14'-1984>, 24'-1977-1986 Average 



08/01/89 



43-31 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



HOOEL NAHE 


MANUFACTURER 


WIDTH - YEAR COMSTRUCTIOK 




QUALITY 


MAJESTIC 


MAJESTIC 


24'-1987> 






Good 


MANATEE 


CHAMPION 


ALL SIZES 1984< 






Low Cost 


MANATEE 


CHAMPION 


ALL SIZES 1985> 






Average 


MANOR 


COfWODORE 


12 


-1980<, 14'-1981<, 


24' 


-1979< 


Low Cost 


HANOR 


COttWOORE 


28 


-1981< 






Low Cost 


MANOR 


COftlOOORE 


12 


-1981>, 14'-1982>. 


24' 


-1980> 


Average 


MANOR 


COI««OORE 


28 


-1982> 






Average 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


14 


420'-1979< 






Low Cost 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


12 


-1986<. 14'»20'-1980>, 


24'-1985< 


Average 


MARLETTE 


MARLETTE 


12 


-1987>. 24'-1986> 






Good 


MARSHFIELD 


WICK BUILDING 


14 


-198K 






Low Cost 


MARSHFIELD 


WICK BUILDING 


14 


-1982> 






Average 


MAYFLOWER 


GUERDON 


14 


-1978<. 24'-1977< 






Low Cost 


MAYFLOWER 


GUERDON 


14 


-1979-85, 24' -1978-85 




Average 


MAYFLOWER 


GUERDON 


14 


&24'-1986> 






Good 


MEADOWBROOK 


GUERDON 


14 


-1984< 






Low Cost 


MEAOOWBROOK 


GUERDON 


14'-1985> 






Average 


MEDALLION 


CHICKASHA 


ALL SIZES 1981< 






Low Cost 


MEDALLION 


CHICKASHA 


ALL SIZES 1982> 






Average 


MEDFORD 


FLEETWOOD 


12'-1985<. 14'-1984<. 


24' 


-1981< 


Low Cost 


MEOFORD 


FLEETWOOD 


28'-1979< 






Low Cost 


MEDFORD 


FLEETWOOD 


12'-1986>. 14'-1985>. 


24' 


-1982> 


Average 


MEDFORD 


FLEETWOOD 


28'-1980> 






Average 


MELODY 


MELODY HOMES 


12'il4'-1984<, 24'i28 


'-1982< 


Low Cost 


MELODY 


MELODY HOMES 


12'&14'-1985>. 24'428 


■-1983> 


Average 


METAMORA 


CHICKASHA 


ALL SIZES 1981< 






Low Cost 


METAMORA 


CHICKASHA 


ALL SIZES 1982> 






Average 


MINUTEMAN 


LIBERTY 


12'M4'-1985<. 24'-1979< 




Low Cost 


MINUTEMAN 


LIBERTY 


12'M4'-1986>, 24'-1980> 




Average 


MONARCH 


MONARCH 


24'-1977< 






Low Cost 


MONARCH 


MONARCH 


24' -1978- 1987 






Average 


MONARCH 


MONARCH 


24'-1988> 






Good 


MONTCLAIR 


CENTRAL 


12'-1982<. 14'&28'-1977<. 


16'-1980< 


Low Cost 


MONTCLAIR 


CENTRAL 


12'-1983>. 14'&28'-1978-1986. 


Average 


MONTCLAIR 


CENTRAL 


16'-1981>. 24'-1982<, 


26' 


-1986< 


Average 


MONTCLAIR 


CENTRAL 


14'-1987>, 14'i 28'-1987> 




Good 


MONTROSE 


CENTRAL 


12'-1982<, 14'&28'-1977.16'-1980< 


Low Cost 


MONTROSE 


CENTRAL 


12'-1983>, 14 '&28'- 1978- 1986, 


Average 


MONTROSE 


CENTRAL 


16'-1981>. 24'-1982<. 


26' 


-1986< 


Average 


MONTROSE 


CENTRAL 


14'-1987>, 14 '& 28'-1987> 




Good 


NASHUA 


CONCH EMCO 


12'-1981<, 14'-1982<. 


24' 


-1979< 


Low Cost 


NASHUA 


CONCHEMCO 


12'-1982>, 14'-1983> 






Average 


NASHUA 


CONCHEMCO 


24 '-1978- 1985 






Average 


NASHUA 


CONCHEMCO 


24'-1986> 






Good 


NASHUA 


ZIMMER 


14'-1982<, 24'-1980< 






Low Cost 


NASHUA 


ZIWER 


14'-1983>, 24'-1981> 






Average 


NATIONAL 


NATIONAL 


12'-1985<. 14'-1983<. 


24' 


-1982< 


Low Cost 


NATIONAL 


NATIONAL 


12'-1986>. 14'-1984>. 


24' 


-1983> 


Average 


NEW MOON 


REDMAN 


12'-1987<, 14'-1984<. 


24' 


-1980<. 


Low Cost 


NEW MOON 


REDMAN 


28'-1983< 






Low Cost 


NEW MOON 


REDMAN 


12'-1988>, 14'-1985>, 


24' 


-1981> 


Average 


NEW MOON 


REDMAN 


28'-1984> 






Average 


NEWPORT 


INTERNATIONAL 


14'-1984< 






Low Cost 


NEWPORT 


INTERNATIONAL 


14'-1985> 






Average 


NORMANDY 


GUERDON 


14'-1978<, 24'-1977< 






Low Cost 


NORMANDY 


GUERDON 


14'-1979-85. 24'-1978-85 




Average 


NORMANDY 


GUERDON 


14'424'-1986> 






Good 


NOVA 


COMMODORE 


12'-1981<. 14'-1985<. 






Low Cost 


NOVA 


COMMODORE 


20", 24'i28'-1983< 






Low Cost 


NOVA 


COfWODORE 


12'-1982>. 14'-1966> 






Average 


NOVA 


COKMODORE 


20'. 24'i28'-1984> 






Average 


OAK COVE 


SKYLINE 


14'-1984<. 16'-1985<, 


24' 


-1975< 


Low Cost 


OAK COVE 


SKYLINE 


28'-1982< 






Low Cost 


OAK COVE 


SKYLINE 


14'-1985>, 16'-1986>, 


24' 


-1976-1987 


Average 


OAK COVE 


SKYLINE 


28 


-1983> 






Average 



43-32 



08/01/69 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MODEL NAHE 



MANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



OAK COVE 

OAK MANOR 

OAK MANOR 

OAK MANOR 

OAK MANOR 

OAK MANOR 

OAKBROOK 

OAKBROOK 

OAKMANOR 

OAKMANOR 

OAKMANOR 

OAKMANOR 

OAKMANOR 

OAKVILLA 

OAKVILLA 

OAKVILLA 

OLYMPIA 

OLYMPIA 

OLYMPIA 

OLYMPIA 

OLYMPIA 

OLYMPIAN 

OLYMPIAN 

PACESETTER 

PACESETTER 

PACIFICA 

PACIFICA 

PAN AMERICAN 

PAN AMERICAN 

PARAMOUNT 

PARAMOUNT 

PARAMOUNT 

PARAMOUNT 

PARKMONT 

PARKMONT 

PARKMONT 

PARKMONT 

PARKMONT 

PARKMONT 

PARKWAY 

PARKWAY 

PARKWAY 

PARKWAY 

PARKWOOD 

PARKWOOD 

PEERLESS 

PEERLESS 

PINEBROOK 

PINEBROOK 

PONDEROSA 

PONOEROSA 

PONDEROSA 

PRINCESS 

PRINCESS 

QUEENSTOWN 

QUEENSTOWN 

QUEENSTOWN 

QUEENSTOWN 

REDMAN 

REDMAN 

REDMAN 

REDMAN 

REGAL 

REGAL 

REGAL 



SKYLINE 

SKYLINE 

SKYLINE 

SKYLINE 

SKYLINE 

SKYLINE 

LIBERTY 

LIBERTY 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

GUERDON 

KIT 

KIT 

KIT 

KIT 

KIT 

MODULINE 

MODULINE 

CONCH EMCO 

CONCH EMCO 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORI 

COMMODORE 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

CONTINENTAL 

FUQUA 

FUQUA • 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

PARKWOOD 

PARKWOOD 

LIBERTY 

LIBERTY 

WICK BUILDING 

WICK BUILDING 

SHELTEREX 

SHELTEREX 

SHELTEREX 

ZIMMER 

ZIMMER 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

FUQUA 

REDMAN 

REDMAN 

REDMAN 

REDMAN 

KIT 

KIT 

KIT 



21'-198I< 
20'-1982>, 



24'-1983< 



24'-1988> 

14'-1984<, 16'-1985<, 24'-1975< 

28'-1982< 

14'-1985>, 16'-1986>, 24' -1976-1987 

28'-1983> 

24'-1988> 

12'&14'-1985<, 24'-1979< 

12'&14'-1986>, 24'-1980> 

16'-1980< 

16'-1981> 

14'-1980<, 24'-1973<. 28'-1981< 

14'-1981>, 24'-1974-86. 28'-1982> 

24'-1986> 

14'-1980<, 24'-1973<, 28'-1981< 

14'-1981>, 24'-1974-86, 28'-1982> 

24'-1986> 

12'-1981<, 14'-1980<, 24'-1977< 

28'-1974< 

12'-1982>, 14'-1981>, 24'-1975-84 

28' -1975-1985 

24'-1985>, 28'-1986> 

12'&24'-1982<, 14'-1980< 

12'&24'-1983>, 14'-1981> 

12'-1984<, 14'-1985< 

12'-1985>, 14'-1986> 

24'-1979<, 28'-1981< 

24'-1980>, 28'-1982> 

24'-1984< 

24'-1985> 

14'-1980< 

14'-1981> 

28'-1985< 

24'-1984>, 28'-1986> 

14'&16'-1979<. 

14'&16'-1980-1985, 24'-1982< 

26'-1981< 

14'&16'-1986>, 24'-1983> 

26'-1982-1985 

26'-19e6> 

12', 14'&24'-1979<, 20'-1981< 

12 '&24'- 1980-84, 14 '-1980-85, 

20'-1982-85, 26'-1981< 

12'&24'-1985>, 14'&20'-1986>, 26'-1982> 

12'-1981<, 14'-1983< 

12'-1982>, 14'-1984> 

12'&14'-1985<, 24'-1979< 

12'&14'-1986>, 24'-1980> 

28'-1985< 

28'-1986> 

12'&24'-1978<, 14'-1980< 

12 '&24' -1979-1987, 14'-1981> 

12'&24'-1988> 

14'-1982<, 24'-1980< 

14'-1983>, 24'-1981> 

14'-1979< 

14 '-1980-86, 24'&26'-1984< 

14'-1987>, 24'-1985>, 26'-1984-86 

26' -1987 

12'-1986<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1980< 

26'-1983< 

12'-1987>, 14'-1985>, 24'-1981> 

26'-1984> 

14'-1975<, 28'-1973< 

14'-1976-85, 24'-1984<, 28'-1974-85 

14'&28'-1986>, 24'-1985> 



Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Good 

Excel lent 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Low Cost 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 

Excel lent 

Low Cost 

Low Cost 

Average 

Average 

Low Cost 

Average 

Good 



08/01/89 



43-33 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MODEL NAME 


MANUFACTURER 


REGAL 


REGAL 


REGAL 


REGAL 


REGAL 


REGAL 


REMINGTON 


SUNRIZON 


REMINGTON 


SUNRIZON 


REVERE 


DMH 


REVERE 


DMH 


RIOEAU 


ATCO 


RIOEAU 


ATCO 


RIOEAU 


ATCO 


RIOGEWOOO 


LIBERTY 


RIOGEUOOO 


LIBERTY 


RITZCRAFT 


WICKES HOMES 


RITZCRAFT 


WICKES HOMES 


RITZCRAFT 


WICKES HOMES 


ROLLOHOME 


ROLLOHOME 


ROLLOHOME 


ROLLOHOME 


ROLLOHOME 


ROLLOHOME 


ROSEWOOD 


DEROSE 


ROYAL OAKS 


KIT 


ROYAL OAKS 


KIT 


ROYAL OAKS 


KIT 


RUSHMORE HOME 


RUSHMORE 


RUSHMORE HOME 


RUSHMORE 


RUSHMORE HOME 


RUSHMORE 


SAFEWAY 


C0f»1OD0RE 


SAFEWAY 


COMMODORE 


SANDPOINTE 


FLEETWOOD 


SANDPOINTE 


FLEETWOOD 


SECURITY 


SHELTEREX 


SECURITY 


SHELTEREX 


SECURITY 


SHELTEREX 


SEQUOIA 


CHAMPION 


SEQUOIA 


CHAMPION 


SEVILL 


REDMAN 


SEVILL 


REDMAN 


SEVILL 


REDMAN 


SEVILL 


REDMAN 


SEVILLE 


SUNRIZON 


SEVILLE 


SUNRIZON 


SHELBY 


COMMODORE 


SHELBY 


COftWDORE 


SHELTEREX 


SHELTEREX 


SHELTEREX 


SHELTEREX 


SHELTEREX 


SHELTEREX 


SHERIOAN 


HARMONY 


SHERIDAN 


HARMONY 


SIERRA 


KIT 


SIERRA 


KIT 


SIERRA 


KIT 


SILVERCREST 


SILVERCREST 


SILVERCREST 


SILVERCREST 


SILVERCREST 


SILVERCREST 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SKYLINE 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


SPACEMASTER 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


SPARTON 


SPRINGBROOK 


SKYLINE 


SPRINGBROOK 


SKYLINE 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



14'-1960< Low Cost 

14'-1981>, 28'-1983< Average 

28'-1984> Good 

14'-1987<, 16'-1987<, 18'-1988< Low Cost 

14'-1988>, 16'-1988> Average 

12'-1981<. 14'-1981<. 24'-1977< Low Cost 

12*-1982>, 14'-1982>. 24'-1978> Average 

12'-1984<. 14'-1982<, 16' ALL Low Cost 

24'-1978< Low Cost 

12'-1985>, 14'-1983>, 24'-1979> Average 

12'&14'-1985<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'&14'-1986>, 24'-1980> Average 

12'-1985<. 14'-1982<. 24'-l975< Low Cost 

12'-1986>, 14' -1983>, 24' -1976-1986 Average 

24'-1987> Good 

12'-1978<, 14'-1981<, 16'-1976< Low Cost 
12' -1979- 1986. 14'-1982>. 16'-1977-85 Average 

14'-1987>, 16'-1986> Good 

16'-1985> Average 

14'&28'-1981<, 24'-1974< Low Cost 

14'&28'-1982>, 24". 1975-1985 Average 

24 ■ - 1986> Good 

14'-1979<, 16'-1977< Low Cost 

14' -1980- 1987, 16' -1978- 1985 Average 

14'-1988>, 16'-1986> Good 

12'-1985<, 14'-19e2<, 24'-1981< Low Cost 

12'-1986>, 14'-1983>, 24'-1982> Average 

12', 14'-1973<, 12", 14'-1983< Low Cost 

12', 14'-1984> Average 

12'-1983<. 14'-1985<, 24'-1976«: Low Cost 

12'-1984>. 14'-1986>, 24' -1977-1987 Average 

24'-1988> Good 

12'&14'-1983<, 24'&28'-1981< Low Cost 

12'&14'-1984>, 24'&28'-1982> Average 

12'-1986<, 14'-1984<, 24'-1980< Low Cost 

26'-1983< Low Cost 

12'-1987>, 14'-19e5>, 24'-1981> Average 

26'-1984> Average 

24'-1983<, 26'-1984<, 28'-1985< Low Cost 

24'-1984>, 26'-1985>, 28'-1986> Average 

12'-1982<, 14'-1978<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

12'-1983>, 14'-1979>, 24'-1980> Average 

12'-1983<, 14'-1985<, 24'-1976< Low Cost 

12'-1984>, 14'-1986>, 24' -1977-1987 Average 

24'-1988> Good 

12'&24'-1979<, 14'-1981< Low Cost 

12'&24'-1980>, 14'-1982> Average 

14'-1981<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

14'-1982>, 24 '-1978-84 Average 

24'-1985> Good 

12'-1983<, 20'-1979<, 24'-1975< Low Cost 

12'-1984>, 20'-1980>, 24'-1976-1987 Average 

24'-1988> Good 

12'-1987<, 14'-1985<, 20'-1982< Low Cost 

24'-1980<, 28'-1975< Low Cost 

12'-1988>, 14'-1986>, 20'-1983> Average 

24'-1981>, 28'-1976-1987 Average 

28'-1988> Good 

12'-1984<, 24'-1986< Low Cost 

12' -1985-1987, 24'-1987> Average 

12'-1988> Good 

12'-1978<, 14'-1977< Low Cost 

12' -1979-1987, 14' -1978-1985 Average 

12'-1988>, 14'-1986> Good 

14'M6'-1983< Low Cost 

14'&16'-1984> Average 



(% 



c > 



43-34 



06/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MODEL NAME 


MANUFACTURER 


WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 


QUALITY 


STAR 


BENDIX-BOISE 


12' 


-1984<, 14'-1986<, 24'-1981< 


Low Cost 


STAR 


BENDIX-BOISE 


12' 


-1985>. 14'-1987>, 24'-1982> 


Average 


STATLER 


GUERDON 


14' 


-1981<. 24'-1973< 


Low Cost 


STATLER 


GUERDON 


14' 


-1982>, 24' -1974-1984 


Average 


STATLER 


GUERDON 


24' 


-1985> 


Good 


STIEGLER 


STIEGLER 


12' 


-1983<, 14'-1982< 


Low Cost 


STIEGLER 


STIEGLER 


12' 


-1984>, 14'-1983> 


Average 


STONEHAVEN 


KIT 


14' 


-1975<, 28'-1973< 


Low Cost 


STONEHAVEN 


KIT 


14' 


-1976-85, 24'-1984<. 28' -1974-85 


Average 


STONEHAVEN 


KIT 


14' 


&28'-1986>. 24'-1985> 


Good 


STYLECRAFT 


WICKES HOMES 


12' 


-1985<, 14'-1983< 


Low Cost 


STYLECRAFT 


WICKES HOMES 


12' 


-1986>, 14'-1984> 


Average 


SUNDANCER 


WINSTON 


12' 


-1983<, 14'-1982< 


Low Cost 


SUNDANCER 


WINSTON 


12' 


-1984>, 14'-1983> 


Average 


SUNVALLEY 


SKYLINE 


12' 


-1983<, 14'-1987<, 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


SUNVALLEY 


SKYLINE 


12' 


-1984>, 14'-1988>, 24' -1978-1987 


Average 


SUNVALLEY 


SKYLINE 


24' 


-1988> 


Good 


SUNVIEW 


CHAMPION 


12' 


&24'-1981<. 14'-1984< 


Low Cost 


SUNVIEW 


CHAMPION 


12' 


&24'-1982>. 14'-1985> 


Average 


SUNWOOD 


SKYLINE 


12' 


-1983<, 14'-1987<, 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


SUNUOOO 


SKYLINE 


12' 


-1984>, 14'-1988>, 24'-1978-1987 


Average 


SUNWOOD 


SKYLINE 


24' 


-1988> 


Good 


SUPERIOR 


CHICKASHA 


12' 


-1983<. 14'-1985< 


Low Cost 


SUPERIOR 


CHICKASHA 


12' 


-1984>. 14'-1986> 


Average 


TAMARACK 


CHAMPION 


ALL 


. SIZES 1984< 


Low Cost 


TAMARACK 


CHAMPION 


ALL 


. SIZES 1985> 


Average 


TAMMARON 


CHAMPION 


24' 


-1981< 


Low Cost 


TAMMARON 


CHAMPION 


24' 


-1982> 


Average 


TITAN 


CHAMPION 


12' 


-1986<, 14'-1985<, 


Low Cost 


TITAN 


CHAMPION 


24' 


-1983<, 28'-1979< 


Low Cost 


TITAN 


CHAMPION 


14' 


-1985>, 24'-1984>. 28'-1980> 


Average 


TOWN & COUNRTY 


TOWN&COUNTRY 


12' 


-1983-1987, 14'-1978-1985, 16'-1985> 


■ Average 


TOWN & COUNTRY 


TOWN&COUNTRY 


12' 


-1982<, 14'-1977<, 16'-1984< 


Low Cost 


TOWN & COUNTRY 


TOWN&COUNTRY 


12' 


-1988>, 14'-1986> 


Good 


TOWNHOUSE 


TOWNEHOUSE 


12' 


&14'&24'-1978< 


Low Cost 


TOWNHOUSE 


TOWNEHOUSE 


12' 


-1979-1986, 14' -1979-1987, 


Average 


TOWNHOUSE 


TOWNEHOUSE 


24' 


-1979-1987 


Average 


TOWNHOUSE 


TOWNEHOUSE 


12' 


-1987>. 14'&24'-1988> 


Good 


TRAVELO 


TRAVELO 


12' 


-1973<. 14'-1976<, 24'-1976< 


Low Cost 


TRAVELO 


TRAVELO 


12' 


-1974-1983, 14'-1977-85, 24'-1977-87 


Average 


TRAVELO 


TRAVELO 


12' 


-1984>, 14'-1986>. 24'-1988> 


Good 


TRENTON 


MANN 


12' 


-1982<, 14'-1980< 


Low Cost 


TRENTON 


MANN 


12' 


-1983>, 14'-1981> 


Average 


TWIN LAKES 


GUERDON 


12' 


,24'&28'-1978<, 14'-1981< 


Low Cost 


TWIN LAKES 


GUERDON 


12' 


,24'&28'-1978-85, 14'-1982> 


Average 


TWIN LAKES 


GUERDON 


12' 


,24'&28'-1986> 


Good 


UNITED 


UNITED 


12' 


-1986<, 14'-1982<, 


Low Cost 


UNITED 


UNITED 


12' 


-1987>, 14'-1983>. 24'-1984< 


Average 


UNITED 


UNITED 


24' 


-1985> 


Good 


UTAH 


UTAH 


12' 


-1979<, 20'-1978<, 24'-1978< 


Low Cost 


UTAH 


UTAH 


28' 


-1978< 


Low Cost 


UTAH 


UTAH 


12' 


-1980-1987, 20'-1979-1987. 


Average 


UTAH 


UTAH 


24' 


-1979-1987, 28'-1979-1987 


Average 


UTAH 


UTAH 


12' 


&14'&20'&24'&28 


Good 


VAGABOND 


GUERDON 


ALL 


. SIZES 1981< 


Low Cost 


VAGABOND 


GUERDON 


ALL 


SIZES 1982> 


Average 


VAN DYKE 


GUERDON 


12' 


,14'&24'-1978<, 20'-1981< 


Low Cost 


VAN DYKE 


GUERDON 


28' 


-1973< 


Low Cost 


VAN DYKE 


GUERDON 


12' 


,14'&24'-1979-85, 20'-1982> 


Average 


VAN DYKE 


GUERDON 


28' 


-1974-1984 


Average 


VAN DYKE 


GUERDON 


12' 


,14'&24'-1986>, 28'-1985> 


Good 


VANTAGE 


SHELTEREX 


12' 


-1978<, 14'-1979<, 24'-1977< 


Low Cost 


VANTAGE 


SHELTEREX 


12' 


-1979-1987, 14'-1980>, 24'-1978-87 


Average 


VANTAGE 


SHELTEREX 


12' 


&24'-1988> 


Good 


VENTURA 


KIT 


14' 


-1984<, 


Low Cost 


VENTURA 


KIT 


14' 


-1985> 


Average 



08/01/89 



43-35 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MODtL MAKE 



HANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



VICTOR DEROSE 12'&14'ALL YEARS, 16'-1982< Low Cost 

VICTOR DEROSE 16'-1983> Average 

VICTORIA VICTORIA 12'-1979<. 14'-1978< Low Cost 

VICTORIA VICTORIA 12'-1980>, 14'-1979-1987 Average 

VICTORIA VICTORIA 14'-19e8> Good 

VOGUE FLEETWOOD 12'-1979<, 14'-1980<, 24'-1975< Low Cost 

VOGUE FLEETWOOD 12' -1980- 1985, 14'-1981>, 24'-1976-1985 Average 

VOGUE FLEETWOOD 12'-1986>, 24'-1986> Good 

VOGUE VOGUE 14'-1984<, 24'-1982< Low Cost 

VOGUE VOGUE 14'-1985>, 24"-1983> Average 

WAYSIDE KAUFMAN/BROAD 12'414'-1981<, 20'-1979<, 24'-1983< Low Cost 

WAYSIDE KAUFMAN/BROAD 12'il4'-1982>, 20'-1980>, 24'-1984> Average 

WEDGEWOOD TAYLOR 14'-1982< Low Cost 

WEDGEWOOD TAYLOR 14'-1983> Average 

WESTBROOK BENDIX-BOISE 12'-1986<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

WESTBROOK BENDIX-BOISE 12'-1987>, 24'-1979> Average 

WESTCHESTER CONCHEMCO 12'il4'-1984<, 24'-1981< Low Cost 

WESTCHESTER CONCHEMCO 12'414'-1985>. 24'-1982> Average 

WESTERNER ROYAL 12'-1983<, 14'-1982<, 24'-1978< Low Cost 

WESTERNER ROYAL 12'-1984>, 14'-1983>, 24'-1979-1987 Average 

WESTERNER ROYAL 24'-1988> Good 

WESTFIELD FLEETWOOD 12'-1979<. 14'-1980<, 24'-1975< Low Cost 

WESTFIELD FLEETWOOD 12'-1980-1985, 14'-1981>, 24' -1976-1985 Average 

WESTFIELD FLEETWOOD 12'-1986>. 24'-1986> Good 

WESTMONT CONTINENTAL 14'-1979<, 16'-1973< Low Cost 

WESTMONT CONTINENTAL 14' -1980-1985, 16' -1974-1981 Average 

WESTMONT CONTINENTAL 24'-1982<, 24'&28' -1982< Average 

WESTMONT CONTINENTAL 14'-1986>, 16'-1982>, 24'-1983> Good 

WESTMONT CONTINENTAL 26 '&28' -1982-1985 Good 

WESTMONT CONTINENTAL 26'i28' -1986> Excellent 

WESTON FLEETWOOD 12'&14'-1984<, 24'-1977< Low Cost 

WESTON FLEETWOOD 12 '&14' -1985>, 24'-1978> Average 

WESTPARK CONTINENTAL 14'&16' -1979< Low Cost 

WESTPARK CONTINENTAL 14 '&16'- 1980- 1985, 24'-1982< Average 

WESTPARK CONTINENTAL 28'-1981< Average 

WESTPARK CONTINENTAL 14', 16'-1986>, 24'-1983> Good 

WESTPARK CONTINENTAL 26'-1982-1985 Good 

WESTPARK CONTINENTAL 26'-1986> Excellent 

WESTRIDGE FUQUA 24'-1980<, 28'-1983< Average 

WESTRIDGE FUQUA 24'-1982-86, 28'-1984-86 Good 

WESTRIDGE FUQUA 24'i28'-1987> Excellent 

WESTWAY WESTWAY 24'-1982< Average 

WESTWAY WESTWAY 24 '-1983- 1986 Good 

WESTWAY WESTWAY 24'-1987> Excellent 

WESTWOOD BENDIX-BOISE 12'-1986<, 14'-1983<, Low Cost 

WESTWOOD BENDIX-BOISE 12'-1987>, 14'-1984>, Average 

WESTWOOD WESTWAY 24'-1980<. 28'-1982< Average 

WESTWOOD WESTWAY 24' -1981-1985, 28' -1983-1986 Good 

WESTWOOD WESTWAY 24'-1986>, 28'-1987> Excellent 

WESTWOOD WESTWOOD 14'-1988< Low Cost 

WICKCRAFT WICK BUILDING 14'-1984< Low Cost 

WICKCRAFT WICK BUILDING 14'-1985> Average 

WICKES WICKES HOMES 12'-1985<, 14'-1983<, 24'-1979< Low Cost 

WICKES WICKES HOMES 12'-1986>, 14'-1984>. 24'-1980> Average 

WILDWOOD COMMODORE 12'-1980<, 14'-1981<, 20'-1983< Low Cost 

WILDWOOD COffWDORE 24'-1983< Low Cost 

WILDWOOD COMMODORE 12'-1981>, 14'-1982>, 20'-1984> Average 

WILDWOOD COMMODORE 24' -1984- 1985, 28'-1984< Average 

WILDWOOD COttWDORE 24'-1986>, 28'-1985> Good 

WINDSOR WINDSOR 14'-1977< Low Cost 

WINDSOR WINDSOR 14' -1978-1985 Average 

WINDSOR WINDSOR 14'-1986> Good 

WINDSOR 2IMMER 14'-1975> Low Cost 

WINDSOR ZIWER 14' -1976-1987 Average 



ct 



f» 



t' 



43-36 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



MODEL NAME 



MANUFACTURER 



WIDTH - YEAR CONSTRUCTION 



QUALITY 



WOOD HAVEN GUERDON 12 ' , 14'&16' -198K, 24'-1975< Low Cost 

WOOD HAVEN GUERDON 12 ', 14'&16' -1982>, 24' -1976-1984 Average 

WOOD HAVEN GUERDON 28'-1984< Average 

WOOD HAVEN GUERDON 24'&28'-19a5> Good 

WOODLAKE CHAMPION 12 '&14'-1985<, 24'-1983< Low Cost 

WOODUKE CHAMPION 28'-1984< Low Cost 

WOODUKE CHAMPION 12'&14'-1986>, 24'-1984>, 28'-1985> Average 

WOODLAND KAUFMAN/BROAD 14'-1982< Low Cost 

WOODLAND KAUFMAN/BROAD 14'-1983> Average 

WOODLAND WOODLAND 12'-1983<, 14'-1984<, 20'-1985< Low Cost 

WOODLAND WOODLAND 24'-1979< Low Cost 

WOODLAND WOODLAND 12'-1984>, 14'-1985>, 20'-1986> Average 

WOODLAND WOODLAND 24'-1980> Average 

WOOORIDGE MODULINE 12'-1980<, 14'-1982<, 28'-1982< Low Cost 

WOOORIDGE MODULINE 12'-1981-87, 14'&28' -1983>. 24'-1987< Average 

WOOORIDGE MODULINE 12 '&24'-1988> Good 

ZIMMER ZIMMER 12'-1985< Low Cost 

ZIMMER ZIMMER 12'-1986> Average 

0700 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1985< Average 

0700 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1986> Good 

0900 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 28'-1980<, Low Cost 

0900 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1986<, 28' -1981-87 Average 

0900 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1987>, 28'-1988> Good 

1800 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 14'-1982< Low Cost 

1800 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 14'-1983> Average 

8800 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1977<, 26'-1980< Low Cost 

8800 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 24 '-1978-87, 28'-1981> Average 

8800 SERIES KAUFMAN/BROAD 24'-1988> Good 



08/01/89 



43-37 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



43.4. MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 



Please note that the pricing schedules are 
computer-generated utilizing mathematical formulas 
to generate costs. It is possible to note a slightly 
different replacement cost new when comparing the 
usage of computer-generated costs to the pricing 
schedules ap[>earing in this manual. This is caused 
by the rounding procedures of the computer and 
should not be considered an error in the printed 
schedules or the computer-generated value. 

Mobile homes differ from dwellings in their 
pricing. The basic mobile home unit is purchased 
as a unit from the factory and moved to its 
location. The basic unit therefore has a standard 
price and reflects a standard complement of 
features including plumbing and heating and air 
conditioning. The purchaser may, once the mobile 
home is delivered, add to it by putting it on a 
permanent foundation, crawl space or basement, 
adding rooms, porches, garages, etc., and possibly 
other features such as fireplaces. 

Typically mobile homes have a shorter expected 
life than normal dwellings and the effective quality 
is less than that of a comparably-sized house. To 
facilitate the valuation of mobile homes and the 
additions, we will be using a special mobile home 
schedule to price the base and applying the 
residential pricing tables for the additions. The 
appropriate quality grade adjustments are 
incorporated through the overall grade factor 
derived from the residential tables. 





Comparable 






Dwelling Grade 




Mobile Home 


for Addition 


Associated 


Grade 


Pricine 
2 


Grade Factor 


L 


.49 


A 


3 


.68 


G 


4 


.85 


E 


5 


1.00 



From this grade table you will note that we are 
using the Excellent mobile homes as our base 
grade for pricing. We will effect adjustments for 
quality grade to both the mobile homes and 
additions in the final step of applying the grade 
factors. 



Step 1. - Base Price Determine the length 
and width of the mobile home. Computer pricing 
will be determined to the nearest foot. For ease of 
calculations, the manual tables have been printed 
in two foot increments of length. On the schedule, 
select the row corresponding to the length of the 
mobile home (round up to nearest even foot 
length). Then go across the table until you find 
the rate corresponding to the width of the mobile 
home. Apply this rate to the actual square footage 
of the mobile home to determine its base cost. 

Step 2. - Base Price Adjustments Make the 
necessary base price adjustments to account for 
variations from the base specifications. These are 
addressed in the following paragraphs. 

Unfinished Area: Make deductions for an area 
within the living area of the mobile home which 
lacks interior finish, such as ceiling, wall and floor 
finish. Deduction is per square foot. 

Heating and Air Conditioning: The base price 
includes a central healing system. A deduction 
must be made for "no heating" and non-central 
systems, and an addition must be made for central 
air conditioning. 

These adjustments must be manually computed 
and entered through the flat value add field. 

Plumbing: The base price assumes a "normal" 
complement of plumbing fixtures for the mobile 
home determined on the basis of the grade. An 
addition or deduction is made for excesses above 
or deficiencies below these norms. 



Grade 



Number Of Fixtures 



L 


5 


A 


7 


G 


8 


E 


8 



L 



43-38 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



Step 3. - Additions Add the price for all 
additions, i.e., areas attached to but not included in 
the dwelling areas. These include, for mobile 
homes, living area additions, as well as porches, 
attached garages and carports, and mobile home 
additions. Use the dwelling additions schedules in 
Section 42 for additions other than living area. 
Mobile Home Living Area additions rates are 
included in this section. 

The area of the addition should be rounded to 
the nearest 10 square feet and the pricing 
interpolated from the pricing schedule. The values 
shown represent points (increments of SlOO). 

Step 4. - Other Features Compute the price 
of the specified Other Features from that table, 
hems to be priced as Other Features are Basement 
Garages, Fireplaces, Finished Basements, 
Unfinished Areas and the applicable Miscellaneous 
Other Features. As for additions, the value of 
Other Features (including chimneys, fireplaces, and 
basement garages) is given in points (increments of 
SlOO). 

Step 5. - Flat Add Costs Determine if there 
are any "flat add" costs to be added. 

Step 6. Subtotal the prices arrived at in Steps 
1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. 



Step 7. - Grade Factor Apply the proper 
Grade Factor. Refer to the "Estimating 
Replacement Cost New" Section 41 of this manual 
for an explanation of the application of grade 
factor, cost and design factor, and county index. 
The actual Mobile Home Grade Factors are in 
Section 43.1.2. 

Step 8. - Cost and Design Apply the proper 
Cost and Design Factor. The resulting 
replacement cost new (RCN) is rounded to the 
nearest SlO. 

Step 9. - Depreciation Apply the appropriate 
percent good to the RCN. Follow the instructions 
in Section 47 to calculate a percent good. 

Step 10. - Economic Condition Factor 

Multiply by the local cost modifier and any 
economic condition factor. Round the resulting 
replacement cost new less depreciation (RCNLD) 
to the nearest SlO. 

Step 11. - Percent Complete Multiply 
RCNLD by the percent complete. 

Step 12. - Ownership Multiply by percent of 
ownership to arrive at final appraised value. 
Round the final result to the nearest SlO. 



08/01/89 



43-39 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



43.5. PRICING TABLES 
43.5.1. MOBILE HOME RATES 













W 


I D 


T 


H 
















SINGLE 










DOUBLE 






LENGTH 


8 


10 


12 


14 


16 


18 


20 


22 


24 


26 


28 


30 


20 


36.50 


31.85 


28.10 


25.35 


28.80 


27.95 


42.55 


41.10 


39.55 


38.40 


37.20 


35.70 


22 


35.55 


30.85 


27.15 


24.45 


27.55 


26.70 


40.60 


39.10 


37.50 


36.35 


35.20 


33.85 


24 


34.75 


30.00 


26.40 


23.75 


26.50 


25.65 


38.95 


37.45 


35.85 


34.70 


33.50 


32.25 


26 


34.05 


29.30 


25.75 


23.10 


25.65 


24.80 


37.60 


36.05 


34.45 


33.25 


32.05 


30.90 


28 


33.50 


28.70 


25.15 


22.60 


24.90 


24.05 


36.40 


34.85 


33.20 


32.05 


30.85 


29.75 


30 


33.00 


28.15 


24.70 


22.15 


24.25 


23.40 


35.35 


33.80 


32.15 


30.95 


29.75 


28.75 


32 


32.55 


27.70 


24.25 


21.75 


23.70 


22.85 


34.45 


32.85 


31.25 


30.05 


28.85 


27.90 


34 


32.20 


27.30 


23.90 


21.40 


23.20 


22.35 


33.65 


32.05 


30.40 


29.20 


28.00 


27.15 


36 


31.85 


26.95 


23.55 


21.05 


22.75 


21.90 


32.95 


31.35 


29.70 


28.50 


27.30 


26.45 


38 


31.55 


26.60 


23.25 


20.80 


22.35 


21.50 


32.35 


30.70 


29.05 


27.85 


26.60 


25.85 


40 


31.25 


26.30 


22.95 


20.55 


22.00 


21.15 


31.75 


30.10 


28.45 


27.25 


26.05 


25.30 


42 


31.05 


26.05 


22.75 


20.30 


21.65 


20.80 


31.25 


29.60 


27.95 


26.70 


25.50 


24.80 


44 


30.80 


25.80 


22.50 


20.10 


21.40 


20.50 


30.80 


29.10 


27.45 


26.25 


25.00 


24.35 


46 


30.60 


25.60 


22.30 


19.90 


21.10 


20.25 


30.35 


28.70 


27.00 


25.80 


24.60 


23.95 


48 


30.40 


25.40 


22.10 


19.75 


20.85 


20.00 


29.95 


28.30 


26.60 


25.40 


24.15 


23.55 


50 


30.25 


25.20 


21.95 


19.55 


20.65 


19.80 


29.60 


27.90 


26.25 


25.00 


23.80 


23.20 


52 


30.05 


25.05 


21.80 


19.40 


20.45 


19.55 


29.25 


27.60 


25.90 


24.65 


23.45 


22.90 


54 


29.90 


24.90 


21.65 


19.30 


20.25 


19.35 


28.95 


27.25 


25.60 


24.35 


23.15 


22.60 


56 


29.80 


24.75 


21.50 


19.15 


20.05 


19.20 


28.65 


27.00 


25.30 


24.05 


22.85 


22.30 


58 


29.65 


24.60 


21.40 


19.05 


19.90 


19.05 


28.40 


26.70 


25.05 


23.80 


22.55 


22.05 


60 


29.55 


24.45 


21.25 


18.95 


19.75 


18.85 


28.15 


26.45 


24.75 


23.50 


22.30 


21.80 


62 


29.45 


24.35 


21.15 


18.85 


19.60 


18.70 


27.90 


26.20 


24.55 


23.30 


22.05 


21.60 


64 


29.30 


24.25 


21.05 


18.75 


19.45 


18.60 


27.70 


26.00 


24.30 


23.05 


21.85 


21.40 


66 


29.20 


24.15 


20.95 


18.65 


19.30 


18.45 


27.50 


25.80 


24.10 


22.85 


21.65 


21.20 


68 


29.15 


24.05 


20.85 


18.55 


19.20 


18.35 


27.30 


25.60 


23.90 


22.65 


21.45 


21.00 


70 


29.05 


23.95 


20.75 


18.45 


19.10 


18.20 


27.15 


25.40 


23.70 


22.45 


21.25 


20.80 


72 


28.95 


23.85 


20.70 


18.40 


19.00 


18.10 


26.95 


25.25 


23.55 


22.30 


21.05 


20.65 


74 


28.90 


23.75 


20.60 


18.30 


18.90 


18.00 


26.80 


25.05 


23.40 


22.10 


20.90 


20.50 


76 


28.80 


23.70 


20.55 


18.25 


18.80 


17.90 


26.65 


24.90 


23.20 


21.95 


20.75 


20.35 


78 


28.75 


23.60 


20.45 


18.20 


18.70 


17.80 


26.50 


24.75 


23.05 


21.80 


20.60 


20.20 


80 


28.65 


23.55 


20.40 


18.15 


18.60 


17.75 


26.35 


24.60 


22.95 


21.65 


20.45 


20.10 


82 


28.60 


23.50 


20.35 


18.05 


18.50 


17.65 


26.20 


24.50 


22.80 


21.50 


20.30 


19.95 


84 


28.55 


23.40 


20.30 


18.00 


18.45 


17.60 


26.10 


24.35 


22.65 


21.40 


20.20 


19.85 


86 


28.50 


23.35 


20.25 


17.95 


18.35 


17.50 


26.00 


24.25 


22.55 


21.25 


20.05 


19.70 


88 


28.45 


23.30 


20.15 


17.90 


18.30 


17.45 


25.85 


24.10 


22.40 


21.15 


19.95 


19.60 


90 


28.40 


23.25 


20.10 


17.85 


18.25 


17.35 


25.75 


24.00 


22.30 


21.05 


19.85 


19.50 



HHA - MOBILE HOME ADDITION 
MET - EXPANDOS AND TIPOUTS 



PRICE PER SQFT 

27.00 
15.65 



^' 



43-40 



08/01/89 



43. MOBILE HOMES 



43.5.2. HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING ADJUSTMENTS 



TOTAL 








HEATED 








OR 








LIVING 


NO HEAT 


NON-CENTRAL 


WITH AIR 


AREA 


(-) 


(-) 


CONDITIONING 


300 


1120 


600 


890 


400 


1250 


670 


1000 


500 


1390 


750 


1110 


600 


1520 


820 


1210 


700 


1650 


890 


1320 


800 


1780 


960 


1430 


900 


1910 


1040 


1540 


1000 


2040 


1110 


1650 


1100 


2170 


1180 


1760 


1200 


2300 


1260 


1870 


1300 


2430 


1330 


1980 


1400 


2560 


1400 


2090 


1500 


2700 


1480 


2200 


1600 


2830 


1550 


2300 


1700 


2960 


1620 


2410 


1800 


3090 


1690 


2520 


1900 


3220 


1770 


2630 


2000 


3350 


1840 


2740 


2100 


3480 


1910 


2850 


2200 


3610 


1990 


2960 


2300 


3740 


2060 


3070 


2400 


3870 


2130 


3180 


2500 


4010 


2210 


3290 


2600 


4140 


2280 


3390 


2700 


4270 


2350 


3500 



08/01/89 



43-41 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



43.5.3. LIVING AREA ADDITIONS 





FR 


AMC OR 


CB 


BRICK OR 


STONE 


BSHT 


UNFIN 
ATTIC 


FIM 
ATTIC 


AIR 
CONO 


AREA 


FIRST 


FULL 


HALF 


FIRST FULL 


HALF 


AOON 


AODN 


ADDN 


ADON 


10 


3 


2 


1 


3 2 


1 














20 


5 


4 


2 


6 4 


3 


1 





1 





30 


8 


6 


4 


9 6 


4 


1 


1 


1 





40 


11 


8 


5 


11 9 


5 


2 


1 


2 





50 


13 


10 


6 


14 11 


6 


2 


1 


2 





60 


16 


12 


7 


17 13 


8 


2 


1 


3 


1 


70 


19 


14 


8 


20 15 


9 


3 


2 


3 


1 


80 


22 


16 


10 


23 17 


10 


3 


2 


4 


1 


90 


24 


18 


11 


26 19 


12 


4 


2 


4 


1 


100 


27 


20 


12 


29 21 


13 


4 


2 


5 


1 


110 


30 


22 


13 


31 23 


14 


5 


3 


5 


1 


120 


32 


24 


14 


34 26 


15 


5 


3 


6 


1 


130 


35 


26 


16 


37 28 


17 


5 


3 


6 


1 


140 


38 


28 


17 


40 30 


18 


6 


3 


7 


1 


150 


40 


30 


18 


43 32 


19 


6 


4 


7 


1 


160 


43 


32 


19 


46 34 


21 


7 


4 


8 


1 


170 


46 


33 


20 


49 36 


22 


7 


4 


8 


2 


180 


48 


35 


22 


51 38 


23 


7 


4 


9 


2 


190 


51 


37 


23 


54 40 


25 


8 


5 


9 


2 


200 


54 


39 


24 


57 43 


26 


8 


5 


10 


2 


210 


56 


41 


25 


60 45 


27 


9 


5 


10 


2 


220 


59 


43 


26 


63 47 


28 


9 


5 


11 


2 


230 


62 


45 


28 


66 49 


30 


9 


6 


11 


2 


240 


65 


47 


29 


69 51 


31 


10 


6 


12 


2 


250 


67 


49 


30 


72 53 


32 


10 


6 


12 


2 


260 


70 


51 


31 


74 55 


34 


11 


6 


13 


2 


270 


73 


53 


32 


77 58 


35 


11 


6 


13 


2 


280 


75 


55 


34 


80 60 


36 


11 


7 


14 


3 


290 


78 


57 


35 


83 62 


37 


12 


7 


14 


3 


300 


81 


59 


36 


86 64 


39 


12 


7 


15 


3 


310 


83 


61 


37 


89 66 


40 


13 


7 


15 


3 


320 


86 


63 


38 


92 68 


41 


13 


8 


16 


3 


330 


89 


65 


40 


94 70 


43 


14 


8 


16 


3 



^ 



43-42 



08/01/89 



1) 



t 



V 

fr 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 

44. RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 

NO. PARAGRAPH TITLE 

44.1. QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 

44.2. MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 

44.3. RESIDENTIAL YARD ITEMS 

44.3.1 . DETACHED GARAGES 

44.3.2. CARPORT / CANOPY 

44.3.3. PAVING 

44.3.4. DETACHED RESIDENTIAL 
GREENHOUSES 

44.3.5. BOATHOUSES AND BOAT DOCKS 

44.3.6. DECKS, PATIOS, STOOPS, GAZEBOS 

44.3.7. BARBECUE 

44.3.8. UTILITY BUILDINGS 

44.3.9. FENCES 

44.3.10. RESIDENTIAL SWIMMING POOLS 

44.3.11. TENNIS COURTS 

44.4. AGRICULTURAL OTHER BUILDINGS 
AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS 

44.4.1. GENERAL PURPOSE BARNS 





PARAGRAPH 






PAGE 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


1 


44.4.2. 


LEAN-TOS 


8 


2 


44.4.3. 


MILK HOUSES AND MILKING PARLORS 


11 


3 


44.4.4. 


SWINE BARNS 


12 


3 


44.4.5. 


TANKS 


13 


3 


44.4.6. 


SILOS 


14 


3 


44.4.7. 


POLE FRAME BUILDINGS AND SHEDS 


17 




44.4.8. 


GRANARIES 


18 


4 


44.4.9. 


IMPLEMENT SHEDS 


18 


4 


44.4.10. 


QUONSET BUILDINGS 


18 


5 


44.4.11. 


POULTRY HOUSES AND BARNS 


21 


5 


44.4.12. 


PRE-FABRICATED STEEL BUILDINGS 


22 


5 


44.4.13. 


STEEL GRAIN BINS 


23 


6 


44.4.14. 


STEEL HOPPER BINS 


23 


6 


44,4.15. 


POTATO STORAGE BUILDINGS 


24 


6 


44.4.16. 


SLURRY SYSTEMS 


24 




44.4,17. 


FEED / FENCE BUNKS 


24 


7 
7 


44.4.18. 


SCALES 


24 



44.1. QUALITY GRADE SPECIFICATIONS 



This section of the manual provides grade 
specifications, pictures, and costs for residential and 
agricultural other buildings and yard improvements. 

The pictures and grade specifications are 
incorporated where possible on the same or facing 
pages as the pricing tables so that you will be able 
to find all of the information regarding a particular 
structure in one place. 

Two grading systems are used. 

For residential (dwelling-related) structures the 
same numerical grade system (1-8) that is applied 
to dwellings is used. 

The grade factors that are applied will be the 
same as those used for dwellings. 

For other structures, including all agricultural 
buildings, an alphabetical grading scale with a 



range of grades from a low of C (cheap 
construction) to a high of E (excellent 
construction) is used. Not all structures permit the 
use of all grades. Be sure to review the allowable 
grades for the structure being coded. The relative 
value range of all grades is indicated by the 
following table. 







Value 




Grade 


Ranee 


C 

L 


- Cheap 

- Low Cost 


.50 
.78 


A 
G 


- Average 

- Good 


1.00 
1.26 


E 


- Excellent 


1.55 



If there is an exception to this rule, it will he 
noted on the page describing the structure type. 



08/01/89 



44-1 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.2. MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 



The pricing schedules for Other Buildings and 
Yard Improvements show costs for a selected set of 
sizes of the item, or rates of selected sizes. The 
tables cover the range of sizes which are expected. 
To arrive at a Replacement Cost New Less 
Depreciation, the value will have to be adjusted for 
any grade factor differential and depreciated 
according to the item's age, condition, and expected 
life, using the following procedure. 

1. Determine the unit of measurement to be 
used, whether it is per square foot, cubic 
foot, bushel, per unit, etc. 

2. Calculate the number of units of the item. 
For example, if the unit of measurement is 
square feet and the dimensions are given, 
multiply the dimensions to arrive at the area 
of square feel. 

3. a. If using tables which show total cost, find 
the entry in the table nearest to, but not 
exceeding, the number found in Step 2. Any 
remaining units may be interpolated by the 
fraction of its value to the next entry in the 
table. For example, if the area of the item 
is 348 square feet and the entries in the 
table are at 20-square-foot intervals, the cost 
value is equal to the value at 340 square feet 
plus 40% (i.e., 8/20) of the price difference 
between the 340-square-foot and 360-square- 
foot costs. 

b. If the table shows a unit value (such as 
square foot rate), use the rate nearest the 
size found in Step 2. 

4. If codes for modifications have been entered, 
use the rate shown for the modification and 
add it to the cost determined in Step 3. If 
the modification cost is applied on a per- 
unit of area or volume basis, multiply the 
rate by the number of units found in Step 2 
and add to the cost determined in Step 3. 



Apply the proper grade factor, if necessary. 
The grade factors used for the item arc 
indicated in the tables. The basic cost 
(100%) applies to average quality (Grade 3- 
Rcsidential or Grade A-Agricultural) iicm>. 
Multiply the cost found in Step 4 by the 
grade correction factor to arrive at 
Replacement Cost New (RCN). 

Find the percent good for the item. II a 
manually determined override percent good 
has been entered, proceed to Step 7. 
Otherwise, find the expected life for the 
item, shown in the Residential and 
Agricultural Depreciation Schedules section. 
In the depreciation table for this expected 
life, find the percent good for the item's age 
and condition. 

Multiply the RCN found in Step 5 by ihc 
percent good determined in Step 6. 

Multiply the result of Step 7 by the County 
cost index multiplier to arrive at the 
Replacement Cost New Less Depreciation 
(RCNLD). Round the resulting value to i he- 
nearest one hundred dollars (SlOO). 

NOTE: There may be some small 

differences in the cost generated using 
the manual procedure and those 
produced by the computer. This is UK- 
result of using formulas rather than 
tables and also some different rt)unding 
procedures in the computer. The 
difference should not be interprcicd as an 
error in either of the calculations. 



c 



c 



44-2 



08/01 89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



44.3. RESIDENTIAL YARD ITEMS 



44.3.1. DETACHED GARAGES 



44.3.2. CARPORT / CANOPY 





RGl 


RG2 


RG3 


RG4 




FRAME 


MASONRY 


FRAME 


MASONRY 


AREA 


FINISHED 


FINISHED 


UNFINISHED 


UNFINISHED 


160 


23.15 


37.95 


19.40 


34.20 


180 


21.55 


35.10 


18.00 


31.55 


200 


20.30 


32.85 


16.85 


29.40 


220 


19.30 


31.00 


15.95 


27.65 


240 


18.45 


29.45 


15.15 


26.20 


260 


17.70 


28.15 


14.50 


25.00 


280 


17.10 


27.05 


13.95 


23.95 


300 


16.55 


26.10 


13.50 


23.00 


320 


16.10 


25.25 


13.05 


22.20 


340 


15.65 


24.50 


12.70 


21.50 


360 


15.30 


23.80 


12.35 


20.90 


380 


14.95 


23.25 


12.05 


20.30 


400 


14.65 


22.70 


11.80 


19.80 


420 


14.40 


22.20 


11.55 


19.35 


440 


14.15 


21.75 


11.35 


18.95 


460 


13.95 


21.35 


11.15 


18.55 


480 


13.75 


21.00 


10.95 


18.20 


500 


13.55 


20.65 


10.80 


17.90 


550 


13.15 


19.90 


10.40 


17.20 


600 


12.80 


19.30 


10.10 


16.60 


650 


12.50 


18.80 


9.85 


16.15 


700 


12.25 


18.35 


9.65 


15.70 


800 


11.85 


17.60 


9.25 


15.00 


900 


11.55 


17.05 


9.00 


14.50 


1000 


11.30 


16.60 


8.75 


14.05 


1100 


11.10 


16.20 


8.60 


13.70 


1200 


10.90 


15.90 


8.40 


13.40 



Modification Codes: 

1 Earth Floor -1.50 

2 No Electricity - .60 

3 Insulation .50 

4 Healing 1.00 

5 Electric Door Opener 300.00 



SpcciUcations: 

See Sections 42.2.1. thru 42.2.8. Quality Grade Specifications 
for Dwelling Garage. 





RCl 


RC2 




OPEN 


OPEN 




FR/MTL 


FR/MTL 


PRICE PSF 


5.00 


5.00 


ModificatioD Codes: 






1 Earth Floor 


-1.50 




2 Electricity 


.60 




SpeciCcatioas: 







Permissible grades are 3-7. The specifications for 3. 5. :ind 
7 are provided as guidelines for the difference in base 
specifications. 



Frame: 

Roof: 

Other Features; 



Frame: 
Roof: 

Floor 

Other Features: 



Frame: 

Roof: 

Floor: 

Other Features: 



GRADE 3 
Low cost wood or metal post. (May be 
prefab.) 

Shed type, typically corrugated tiberghis.s. 
sheet metal or roll composition. 
Earth or gravel. 

GRADE 5 
Average quality wood or metal post. 
Asphalt shingles on wood joist and decking: 
ceiling. 

Asphalt or concrete on grade. 
Minimal electrical service. 

GRADE 7 
Good quality wood, metal or masonry poMs; 
may include wainscot or railing. 
Asphalt or wood shingles, clay tile or shilc 
on wood joist and decking; celling. 
Reinforced concrete. 
Adequate lighting. 



44.3.3. PAVING 





PAl 


PA2 


AREA 


ASPHALT 


CONCRETE 


500 


1.26 


2.35 


1000 


1.10 


2.10 


2000 


0.99 


1.93 


3000 


0.94 


1.85 


5000 


0.89 


1.77 


10000 


0.84 


1.69 


15000 


0.82 


1.56 


25000 


0.80 


1.63 



08/01/89 



44-3 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.3.4. DETACHED RESIDENTIAL GREENHOUSES 





GNl 


GH2 


GH3 


AREA 


RUSTIC 


WOOD FR 


METAL PIPE 


40 


28.50 


37.95 


57.05 


50 


25.95 


34.55 


51.90 


60 


24.05 


32.05 


48.15 


70 


22.65 


30.10 


45.25 


80 


21.45 


28.60 


42.95 


90 


20.50 


27.35 


41.05 


100 


19.70 


26.25 


39.45 


110 


19.05 


25.35 


38.10 


120 


18.45 


24.55 


36.90 


140 


17.45 


23.25 


34.90 


160 


16.65 


22.20 


33.35 


180 


16.00 


21.35 


32.05 


200 


15.45 


20.60 


30.95 


220 


15.00 


20.00 


30.00 


240 


14.60 


19.45 


29.15 


260 


14.25 


18.95 


28.45 


280 


13.90 


18.55 


27.80 


300 


13.60 


18.15 


27.25 


340 


13.10 


17.50 


26.25 


380 


12.70 


16.95 


25.40 


420 


12.35 


16.50 


24.70 


460 


12.05 


16.05 


24.10 


500 


11.80 


15.70 


23.60 


520 


11.65 


15.55 


23.35 


550 


11.50 


15.35 


23.00 


600 


11.25 


15.00 


22.50 


650 


11.00 


14.70 


22.05 


700 


10.85 


14.45 


21.65 


800 


10.50 


14.00 


20.95 


1000 


9.95 


13.30 


19.95 



SpcoTicatioas: 

GHl Wood Frame, plaslic covered 

Use the same specifications as GHZ except the wnlis .nv 

plastic. 
GH2 Wood Frame, glass walls 

Grade L: Low continuous wall luundatiun; slnndjiU 
glazed glass; low quality wood frame wiili 
door, earth floor, minimal ventilation and 
electrical service. 

Grade A: Continuous wall foundation: double pane or 
standard glazed glass; average quality wikhI 
frame with end wall doors; gravel or carlli 
floor, adequate ventilation, electrical and 
water service. 

Grade G: Continuous wall foundation; tempered or 
laminated double or triple pane gLi!..s: giMid 
quality wood frame with end wall d(K)r>.; 
concrete floor or walk.s; good ventilation, 
electrical and water .service. 
GH3 Pipe / Metal Frame 

Grade L: Low continuous wall foundation; Mand.iid 
glazed glas.s; low cost aluminum or pi|H; 
frame with door; earth tloor, minimal 
ventilation and electrical service. 

Grade A: Continuous wall foundation; standard. 

double or triple pane glass; average Mccl 
frame with end wall doors; gravel or carlli 
floor, adequate ventilation, electrical and 
water service. 

Grade G: Continuous wall foundation: icni|KTed or 
laminated double or triple pane glavs; 
anodized metal or tubular fnime with end 
wall doors; concrete flcwr or walk.%: giKKl 
ventilation, electrical and water service. 



Modilicatioa Code: 

1 fiarth Floor 



-1.50 



44.3.5. BOATHOUSES AND BOAT DOCKS 



BOATHOUSES 

BBl BB2 

FRAME MASONRY 



7.05 



Specifications: 



9.30 



BOAT DOCKS 

BOl BD2 BD3 

LIGHT MEDIUM HEAVY 



12.45 



18.70 31.15 



liBI Frame or Concrete Block 

Grade L: Continuous wall foundation: low quality 

siding on rough wood frame: sheet metal or 
roll rooHng on wood joist and decking; one 
side open. 

Grade /\: Continuous wall foundation; average quality 
wood siding on wood frame: asphalt shingles 
on wood joist and decking; minimal 
electrical service; garage type door to water 
level. 

Grade G: Continuous wall foundation: good quality 
siding on dimensioned wood frame: good 
quality asphalt or wood shingles on wixxl 
joist and decking: adequate electrical 
service; garage type d(x)r to water level. 



BB2 



Masonry 
Grade L: 



Grade A: 



Grade G: 



Continuous wall foundation: concrete IMock 
walls; unfinished interior, single pilch iihiI 
with sheet metal or roll rixifing: one mJc 
open. 

Continuous wall foundation: contrcle IMock 
walls: unfinished inlerlor: double piulieJ 
roof with asphalt shingles on wchkI joiM .ind 
decking; minimal elecirical service; garai:c 
type door to waler level. 
Continuous wall foundation: coiitioic bUvk 
with stucco exterior walls; painted inleiioi 
with ceiling; double pitched rixif wiih goinl 
quality asphalt or wixxi shingles on wikv.1 
joist and decking; adequate electrical 
service: garage iy|x; door to w.iiei Icscl 



BDI Light wihkJ deck, light |X<sts. 
UD2 Medium wihhI deck, wixhI girders. 
UD.< I leavy wihxI deck, heavy pilings 



44-4 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



44.3.6. DECKS, PATIOS, STOOPS, GAZEBOS 





RTl 


RT2 


RT3 


RT4 


RT5 


RT6 


RT7 


RZl 




WOOD 


CONC/HAS 


STONE/TILE 


STONE/TILE 


BRICK 


HAS STOOP 


PATIO 






DECK 


DECK/PATIO 


OECK/PATIO 


DECK/PATIO 


DECK/PATIO 


TERRACE 


COVERED 


GAZEBO 


AREA 






SAND BASE 


CONC BASE 










30 


11.35 


2.55 


6.80 


8.50 


3.95 


9.00 


7.50 


10.95 


50 


8.20 


2.30 


6.10 


7.60 


3.55 


8.20 


7.26 


10.95 


70 


6.80 


2.15 


5.70 


7.10 


3.30 


7.75 


7.12 


10.95 


100 


5.70 


2.00 


5.35 


6.65 


3.10 


7.40 


6.99 


10.95 


150 


4.80 


1.90 


5.00 


6.25 


2.90 


7.05 


6.86 


10.95 


200 


4.35 


1.80 


4.80 


6.00 


2.80 


6.80 


6.79 


10.95 


300 


3.85 


1.70 


4.60 


5.75 


2.65 


6.55 


6.70 


10.95 


500 


3.40 


1.65 


4.35 


5.45 


2.55 


6.30 


6.62 


10.95 



SpccUjcations: 

STRUCTURE 
CODE GRADE 



RTl 


A 


R17 


A 


RT3 


A 


RT4 


A 


RT5 


A 


RT6 


A 


RT7 


A 


RZl 


A 



* 



DESCRIPTION 

Average quality redwood or pressure treated softwood; includes handrails and steps. 

Non-reinforced concrete or pre-cast 2" thick concrete blocks. 

Tile, flagstone, or slate on sand base. 

Tile, flagstone, or slate on concrete base. 

Brick on sand bed, epoxy with stone, or concrete with stamped pattern finish. 

Raised concrete slab on continuous wall perimeter foundation with steps; no roof. 

Covered concrete or masonry patio. 

Average quality wood framing, wood deck, with rails and roof. 



44.3.7. BARBECUE (BQ1) 

400.00 Each 





RSI 


RS2 


RS3 


AREA 


FRAME 


METAL 


MASONRY 


25 


11.35 


11.35 


14.15 


50 


8.75 


8.75 


11.55 


75 


7.60 


7.60 


10.40 


100 


6.90 


6.90 


9.70 


150 


6.10 


6.10 


8.90 


200 


5.60 


5.60 


8.40 


300 


5.00 


5.00 


7.80 


500 


4.45 


4.45 


7.25 



McxliQcatioo Codes: 



1 


Eiirlh Floor 


-1.50 


-> 


Concrete Floor 


1.50 


3 


Insulation 


.50 


A 


Healing 


1.00 


5 


Electricity per S.F. 


.60 



44.3.8. UTILITY BUILDINGS 



SpcctGcations: 
GRADE 



DESCRIP-nON 



L Low quality construction; used materials; earth llooi. 

A Average quality construction; 0-8 loot wall licjghi; 

concrete or plank tloor; unfinished interior. 
G Good quality construction; concrete footings; lew 

windows; concrete floor; finished interior; elccinc 

lighting. 



08/01/89 



44-5 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.3.9. FENCES (PER LINEAL OR SQUARE FOOT) 







HEIGHT (FEET). IF 


APPLICABLE 


TYPE 




3 


4 




5 


6 


8 


RFl 


Chain Link 


3.95 


5.10 




6.25 


7.40 


9.70 


RF2 


Picket 


6.50 


8.00 




9.50 


11.00 


14.00 


RF3 


Stockade 


3.75 


5.00 




6.25 


7.50 


10.00 


RF4 


Post and Rail 


4.25 


5.00 




5.75 








RF5 


Basketweave 










9.75 


10.50 


12.00 


RF6 


Brick or Mason. 






5 


.00 per 


square 


foot 


RF7 


Orn. Iron 






5 


.00 per 


square 


foot 


RF8 


Barbed Wire 






1 


.90 per 


lineal 


foot 



44.3.10. RESIDENTIAL SWIMMING POOLS 

BASE PRICE: Includes basic pool structure, filter and pump equipment, all plumbing, drains, and a minimum 3' perimeter concrete 
walkway. 



!«•! VINYL LINER POOL - Vinyl liner, sand hopper 

bottom, galvanized steel walls or equal. 



RP4 



GUNrni POOL - Gunite sprayed steel wiills .iiiJ 
bottom. 



SIZE 


AREA 


RATE 


COST 


12 X 27 


324 


19.25 


6.240 


16 X 32 


512 


14.90 


7,630 


18 X 36 


648 


13.30 


8,620 


20 X 40 


800 


12.20 


9.760 



SIZE 


AREA 


RATE 


COST 


12 X 27 


324 


28.50 


9,230 


16 X 32 


512 


24.95 


12,770 


18 X 36 


648 


23.55 


15,260 


20 X 40 


800 


22.45 


17.960 



RP2 



iin 



FIBERGLASS POOL - 1/4" rigid tiberglass 
self-supporting pool. 



SIZE 


AREA 


RATE 


COST 


12 X 27 


324 


26.35 


8,540 


16 X 32 


512 


20.75 


10,620 


18 X 36 


648 


18.50 


11,990 


20 X 40 


800 


16.70 


13,360 



CONCRETE POOL - good quality poured concrete 
walls and bottom. 



Pool ModiUcalion Codes: 

1 No filler 

2 Gas healer 

3 Electric heating 

4 Solar heat (psf) 

5 Diving board 

6 Ladder 

7 Underwater Lights 



HTl HOT TUB 

2,500 Each 



-1.170. 
940. 

2,060. 

1.95 SqFl 
400. Eiich 
160. Eiich 
150. Each 



SIZE 


AREA 


RATE 


COST 


12 X 27 


324 


24.30 


7,870 


16 X 32 


512 


19.25 


9,860 


18 X 36 


648 


17.10 


11,080 


20 X 40 


800 


15.45 


12,360 



44.3.11. TENNIS COURTS 



TCI Asphalt 
TC2 Concrete 
TC3 Clay 



15.620 
18,780 
10.960 



Modincatioa Codes: 

1 Lighting 4,5(K) 

2 l-"cncing 3,5(K) 



44-6 



08/01 89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



^ 



44.4. AGRICULTURAL OTHER BUILDINGS AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS 



44.4.1. GENERAL PURPOSE BARNS 



I 





ABl 


AB2 


ADl 


AREA 


BANK BARN 


STANDARD BARN 


HORSE BARN 


800 


18.50 


8.80 


25.25 


1000 


17.05 


8.35 


23.75 


1200 


16.10 


8.05 


22.65 


1400 


15.45 


7.75 


21.80 


1600 


14.90 


7.55 


21.10 


1800 


14.55 


7.40 


20.55 


2000 


14.20 


7.25 


20.05 


2200 


13.95 


7.10 


19.65 


2400 


13.75 


7.00 


19.30 


2600 


13.55 


6.90 


18.95 


2800 


13.40 


6.80 


18.70 


3000 


13.25 


6.75 


18.40 


3200 


13.15 


6.70 


18.20 


3400 


13.05 


6.60 


18.00 


3600 


12.95 


6.55 


17.80 


3800 


12.85 


6.50 


17.60 


4000 


12.75 


6.45 


17.45 


4500 


12.60 


6.35 


17.10 


5000 


12.50 


6.25 


16.80 


5500 


12.40 


6.15 


16.50 


6000 


12.30 


6.10 


16.30 


6500 


12.20 


6.05 


16.10 


7000 


12.15 


6.00 


15.90 


7500 


12.10 


5.95 


15.75 


8000 


12.05 


5.90 


15.60 


8500 


12.00 


5.85 


15.45 


9000 


12.00 


5.80 


15.35 


9500 


11.95 


5.80 


15.20 


10000 


11.90 


5.75 


15.10 



BANK BARNS - identified as having a basement, witli entnincL-s 
provided at the basement and first floor level. Ttiese barns arc 
typically built into a hillside. 

STANDARD BARNS - identified as having an entrance on only 
one level, the ground tloor. 



Modification Codes: 






Bank / Standard Barns 




1 


Earth Floor 


■1.50 


2 


No Lighting 


-0.60 


3 


Stalls and Partitions 


0.30 


4 


Wood Loft Floor 


1.50 


5 


Gambrel / Arched Roof 
Horse Barn / Stable 


1.10 


1 


Earth Floor 


-1.50 


2 


No Lighting 


-0.60 


3 


Insulation 


0.30 


4 


Heating 


0.60 



I 



08/01/89 



44-7 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.4.1. GENERAL PURPOSE BARNS (Cont'd) 



SpcciHcatioiis: 



C GRADE 



G GRADE 



I'oundation: 
Exterior Walls: 

Inierior 
Floors; 

Oihcr Fealures: 



Foundation: 
Exierior Walls: 

Intenor 

Floors: 

Kool: 

iJllier Fealures: 



Foundation: 
tAicrior Walls: 



Interior 
|-U>ors: 

Other Features: 



Concrete walls and footings. 

Low cost wood or metal siding on light 

wood frame. 

Unnnished; few to no stalls. 

First, concrete; Upper, low cost wood on 

wood joist. 

Roll composition or light metal on low cost 

wood decking and light wood frame. 

None. 

L GRADE 

Concrete walls and footings. 

Low cost wood or metal siding on light 

wood or steel frame. 

Unfinished: few stalls. 

First, concrete; Upper, wood on wood joist. 

Roll composition or light metal on wood 

decking on wood or light steel framing. 

Minimal lighting. 

A GRADE 

Concrete walls and footings. 

Wood or metal siding on wood or steel 

frame; adequate windows, service doors, and 

equipment access doors. 

Unfmished; some stalls, feed rooms. 

First, concrete; Upper, wood on wood joist, 

timber or steel beams and columns. 

Adequate electrical and water service; wood 

feed bunk. 



Foundation: Concrete walls and footings. 

Exterior Walls: Concrete block; good quality wckkJ or mcMl 

siding; good quality wood or incl.il Iniiiic. 

normal windows, service doors, and 

equipment access doors. 
Interior Some wainscot, stalls: feed r(x>m. 

Roors: First, concrete; Upper, wood on wood joim. 

timber or steel beams and columns. 
Roof: Good quality asphalt or wood shingles on 

wood decking; heavy wcxxi or sled I'raini; 
Other Features: Good electrical service with normal Ilxiuics 

and outlets: water service: barn gutter 

cleaner, concrete feed bunk; mechanical 

feeder. 

E GRADE 

Foundation: Concrete walls and footings. 

Exterior Walls: Brick or brick on block: Ix.-M qu;ilily smk.J 

metal siding, or brick vcnccr on licavy «i..id 

frame. Numerous good quality windows. 

service doors and equipment acccs.s diH>i> 
Interior Painted; good quality stalls. Stable ceiliiii;. 

tongue and groove waiii.scot. Feed room. 
Floors: First, concrete; Upper, wcxxl on wckkI joim. 

Timber or steel beams and columns. 
Roof: Best quality asphalt, wood sliingles. or clav 

tile on wood decking. He;ivy wood or mccI 

frame. 
Other Features: Good electrical service with numerous 

fixtures and outlets; good water service: 

bam gutter cleaner concrete feed bunk. 

mechanical feeder, restroom. 



44.4.2. LEAN-TOS 



ALl 1-Story 



4.00 SqFt 



Modifjcation Codes: 

1 Earth Roor -1.50 

2 Lighting 0.60 

3 Insulation 0.30 



44-8 



08/01,89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



GENERAL PURPOSE BARNS 





GOOD BARN 



AVERAGE BARN 




SPECIAL PURPOSE DAIRY AND HORSE BARNS 





GOOD 



GOOD 



GENERAL PURPOSE BANK BARNS 




AVERAGE 




08/01/89 



44-9 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



MILK HOUSES AND MILKING PARLORS 
^ *-. *^ B 




I r^ 




SWINE FARROWING BARNS 




SWINE FINISHING / CONFINEMENT BARNS 




44-10 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



44.4.3. MILK HOUSES AND MILKING PARLORS 







HILK HOUSES 


HILKING 












PARLORS 




ATTACHED 


DETACHED 








AMI 


AH2 


AH3 


AH4 


AM5 


AM6 


AREA 


CB/FR. 


TILE 


CB/FR. 


TILE 


CB/FR. 


TILE 


200 


20.65 


25.20 


23.75 


28.40 


30.30 


31.45 


300 


16.65 


22.45 


19.00 


24.85 


25.15 


26.85 


400 


14.55 


21.00 


16.50 


23.00 


22.45 


24.25 


500 


13.25 


20.10 


14.90 


21.80 


20.75 


22.55 


600 


12.35 


19.50 


13.85 


21.00 


19.55 


21.30 


700 


11.70 


19.00 


13.05 


20.35 


18.70 


20.35 


800 


11.15 


18.65 


12.45 


19.90 


18.05 


19.65 


900 


10.75 


18.40 


11.95 


19.50 


17.50 


19.00 


1000 


10.45 


18.15 


11.55 


19.20 


17.05 


18.50 


1200 


9.90 


17.80 


10.90 


18.75 


16.40 


17.70 



ModiGcatioa Codes: 

1 Metal Roof .75 

2 Wood Shingle Roof ,65 

3 Composition Roof -.65 

4 No Heating -2.15 



Specifications: 



L GRADE 



G GRADE 



Foundation: 
Exterior Walls: 

Interior; 

Floors: 

Roof: 



Other Features: 



Foundation: 
Exterior Walls: 

Inlenor: 

Flours: 

Roof: 

Other Features: 



Concrete walls and footing. 

Concrete block; wood or light steel siding; 

light wood or steel frame. 

Minimal finish. 

Concrete. 

Double or single pitch with low cost asphalt 

shingles on wood decking; light wood or 

steel frame. 

Minimal electrical service and plumbing; 

wood stanchions, milk piping. 

A GRADE 

Concrete walls and footings. 

Concrete block; wood or steel siding; wood 

or steel frame; wood or steel sash windows. 

Plaster wainscot. 

Concrete; drains. 

Double pitch with asphalt shingles on wood 

decking; wood or steel frame. 

Adequate electrical service and plumbing; 

pipe stanchions, milk piping; exhaust fan; 

unit heater; water heater. 



Foundation: 
Exterior Walls: 



Interior: 

Floors: 

Roof: 



Other Features: 



Foundation: 
Exterior Walls: 



Interior: 

Floor 

Roof: 



Other Features: 



Concrete walls and footings. 

Glazed tile or concrete block; good quality 

wood or steel frame; insulated; good qiuiliiy 

wood or steel sash windows. 

Plaster and ceiling; tile wainscot. 

Tile on concrete; drains. 

Double pitch with good quality asphalt 

shingles on wood decking; wood or steel 

frame; insulated. 

Good electrical service with normal lixlures 

and outlets; good plumbing; pipe stanchions; 

milk piping; exhaust fans, unit healers; \v:iicr 

heaters. 

E GRADE 

Concrete walls and lootings. 

Brick, glazed tile, or stucco on block: best 

quality steel siding on steel frame: insul.iicd; 

numerous excellent quality wood or .^leL•l 

sash windows. 

Ceramic or epo.\y finish; plaster ceilings. 

Tile on concrete; drains. 

Double pitch; best quality asphalt shingles 

on wood decking; wood or steel frame: 

insulated. 

Good electrical service with numerous 

fixtures and outlets; good qu;ility phinibini:: 

cow wash; restroom and shower: pqx: 

stanchions: milk piping; exh:iust lans; unit 

heater; water healer. 



08/01/89 



44-11 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.4.4. SWINE BARNS 





AMI 


Ata 


AW3 


AREA 


SWINE FARROWING 


SWINE FINISHING 


SWINE CONFINEMENT 


200 


18.85 


19.75 


20.60 


300 


15.30 


14.75 


15.65 


400 


13.50 


12.25 


13.15 


500 


12.40 


10.75 


11.65 


600 


11.70 


9.75 


10.65 


700 


11.20 


9.05 


9.90 


800 


10.80 


8.50 


9.40 


1000 


10.25 


7.75 


8.65 


2000 


9.20 


6.25 


7.15 


3000 


8.80 


5.75 


6.65 


4000 


8.65 


S.SO 


6.40 


5000 


8.55 


5.35 


6.20 


6000 


8.45 


S.25 


6.10 


7000 


8.40 


5.20 


6.05 


8000 


8.35 


5.15 


6.00 


9000 


8.35 


5.10 


5.95 


10000 


8.30 


5.05 


5.90 



Modificatioa Codes: 






1 25% concrete 


pit 


area 


1.50 


2 100% concreie 


pit 


area 


3.25 


Special Modificatioa Codes: 




FWl Wood Pens 






9.72 LnFt 


FW2 Steel Pens 






22.14 LnFt 


FW3 Fans 






530.00 Each 


FW4 Waterers 






151.00 Each 


FW5 Feeders 






34.00 LnFt 


FW6 Stalls 






146.00 Each 



Specifications: 



C GRADE 



G GRADE 



Foundation: 

Fninic: 

Exterior Walls: 

Interior; 

I'loor: 

Other I'ealures: 



Fnundation: 

Ir.inic; 

EMcnor Walls: 

Interior: 

Floor: 

Other l"ealures; 



I'oundalion: 
rr:inie: 
|-..\lcrii>r Walls: 

liiicnor: 

1 liH>r 

Other lealurcs: 



None. 

Earth. 

Low quality wood or sheet metal. 

Unfinished. 

Din. 

None. 

L GRADE 

Piers. 

Low quality wood. 

Vertical boards or plywood, no insulation. 

Unfinished. 

Plank or plywood. 

Minimum lighting and water service. 

A GRADE 

Continuous wall. 

Concrete block or average quality wood. 

Concrete block, metal, stucco or wood 

siding, insulated, little ventilation. 

Insulated ceiling, plywood finish, some 

division o( space. 

Concreie. 

Adequate lighting and water service. 



Foundation: Continuous wall. 

Frame: Masonry, light steel, or ginxJ quality \\i»ij 

Exterior Walls: Block, structural tile, steel panels. i)r ginij 

quality wood siding. Fully Insulated. 

adequate ventilation. 
Interior Insulated ceiling, average she;illiing, 

adequate wood or steel stalls. 
Roof: Commercial weight sheet melal or .isphall 

shingles. 
FHoor: Reinforced concrete. 

Other Features: Good lighting and water .scivicc. 

E GRADE 

Foundation: Continuous wall. 

Frame: Masonry, steel or ginxl quality \n«)d. 

Exterior Walls: Brick, fully insulated steel panels, or \i.i\ 

go<xl quality wixxl siding, draft free 

ventilation. 
Interior Insulated ceiling, sheathing. giMid grade 

wochJ or steel stalls. 
Roof: Surface treated metal or :i.spliall .sliiiigks >m 

wood Joists and decking. 
Floor: Reinforced concreie. 

Other Features: Ckhh) lighting, automated feeding and 

walering systems. leni(x.Talure conlrnlled 

environment. 



44-12 



08,01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



44.4.5. TANKS 



CAPACITY 


AUl 


AU2 


AU3 


(GALLONS) 


UNDERGROUND FUEL TANKS 


ABOVE GROUND FUEL TANKS 


HORIZONTAL PRESSURE 


500 


1.76 


6.29 


2.03 


750 


1.38 


5.13 


1.86 


1,000 


1.19 


4.45 


1.78 


1.500 


1.00 


3.63 


1.70 


2.000 


0.90 


3.14 


1.66 


3,000 


0.81 


2.57 


1.62 


4,000 


0.76 


2.22 


1.60 


5.000 


0.73 


1.99 


1.58 


7.500 


0.69 


1.62 


1.57 


10,000 


0.67 


1.41 


1.56 


15.000 


0.65 


1.15 


1.55 


20.000 


0.64 


0.99 


1.55 


30.000 


0.63 


0.81 


1.54 


50.000 


0.63 


0.63 


1.54 



08/01/89 



44-13 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.4.6. SILOS 



CONCRETE STAVE SILOS 



PORCELAIN SILOS 







ASl 


AS2 






WITH 


WITHOUT 






ROOF 


ROOF 


DM 


HEIGHT 


COST 


COST 


10 


30 


3,940 


3,510 


10 


35 


4,460 


4,020 


10 


40 


4,970 


4,540 


12 


30 


4,750 


4,130 


12 


40 


5.980 


5,360 


12 


SO 


7,210 


6,590 


14 


40 


7.020 


6.180 


14 


50 


8.460 


7.610 


16 


30 


6.460 


5.360 


16 


40 


8.100 


7,000 


16 


50 


9.750 


8,640 


16 


60 


11.390 


10,280 


la 


50 


11.070 


9,670 


18 


60 


12.910 


11,510 


18 


70 


14,760 


13,360 


20 


40 


10,370 


8,640 


20 


50 


12,420 


10,690 


20 


60 


14,470 


12,740 


20 


70 


16,520 


14.800 


24 


40 


12,770 


10.280 


24 


50 


15,230 


12.740 


24 


60 


17,690 


15.210 


24 


70 


20,160 


17.670 



Cos! includes foundation and erection. 



BUTLER LMS* SILOS 



DIA 


HEIGHT 


AS3 

COST 


24 


59 


50,060 


24 


69 


56,470 


27 


59 


58,050 


30 


59 


66,420 


36 


59 


84,310 


36 


69 


93,920 









AS4 


DIA 


HEIGHT 


MODEL 


COST 


14 


40 


.... 


19,440 


17 


40 


SAO 3 


24,010 


17 


50 


SA03 


29,430 


20 


40 


SA03 


28,720 


20 


50 


SA03 


35.110 


20 


60 


SA06 


41,490 


20 


70 


SA06 


47.870 


20 


20 


SA14 


15,960 


20 


25 


SA14 


19,150 


20 


30 


SA14 


22,340 


20 


22 


SA15 


17,240 


20 


27 


SA15 


20,430 


25 


65 


SA09 


56,850 


25 


80 


SA09 


68.810 



Cost includes foundation and erection. 



PREFABRICATED STEEL SILOS 



Cost includes foundation and erection. 
* Low Moisture Silage 







ASS 


ASS 






PREFAB 


HIGH HOIST. 






STEEL 


STORAGE 


DIA 


HEIGHT 


COST 


COST 


11.5 


20 


3.880 


4,850 


11.5 


30 


5,370 


6,720 


11.5 


40 


6,870 


8,590 


13.42 


20 


4,500 


5,630 


13.42 


30 


6,250 


7,810 


13.42 


40 


7,990 


10.000 


15.33 


20 


5.140 


6,440 


15.33 


30 


7,140 


8,930 


15.33 


40 


9.130 


11,420 ■ 


17.25 


20 


5.810 


7.270 


17.25 


30 


8.050 


10.070 


17.25 


40 


10.300 


12.880 


20 


30 


9.400 


11,760 


20 


40 


12.000 


15.010 


20 


50 


14,600 


18.260 


24 


30 


11,420 


14.300 


24 


40 


14,550 


18.200 


24 


50 


17,670 


22.100 



Cost includes foundation and erection. 



Modification Codcs: 

1 17' Automatic Unloader y.200 

2 20' Automatic Unloader 9.310 

3 25' Automatic Unloader 13.050 

4 IT Raised /\rm Auger 3.270 

5 20' Raised /\rm Auger 3,520 

6 25' Raised Arm Auger 3.780 



44-14 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



SILOS 




:> 







I 



CONCRETE STAVE SILOS 



PORCELAIN SILOS 














^ 


^bm ' 




■ 


B^ 




■ 


■rr'^ 






■ 


Kr 






11 


















i 


»»^-3).« 


1 








BUTLER LMS SILOS 



PREFABRICATED STEEL SILOS 



08/01/89 



44-15 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



SILOS 





TRENCH SILOS 



BUNKER SILOS 



POLE FRAME BUILDINGS AND SHEDS 





-y*% 







44-16 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



TRENCH SILOS 



BUNKER SILOS 



BASE PRICES PER LINEAL FOOT - 30' WIDE 



BASE PRICES PER LINEAL FOOT - 30'WIDE 



TRENCH 


ATI 


AT2 


DEPTH 


CONC. OR PLANK 


DIRT 


10 


116.00 


36.00 


12 


135.00 


41.75 


16 


172.75 


53.50 


20 


210.50 


65.00 


25 


257.75 


79.75 


30 


305.00 


94.25 



ModiCcation Codes: 



1 20 ft. wide 


-29.00 


-13.00 


2 40 ft. wide 


25.00 


12.00 


3 50 ft. wide 


49.00 


25.00 


4 60 ft. wide 


69.00 


37.00 


5 80 ft. wide 


108.00 


61.00 


SpcciGcalioDs: 







Treated Plantc or Concrete Floor and Side Walls. Normally 
Below Ground Level. B Grade (ATI only) can be used to 
distinguish all concrete (walls and floor) from plywood walls and 
concrete floor construction. 



WALL 




HEIGHT 


AKl 


8 


101.50 


10 


113.50 


12 


125.25 


16 


149.00 


20 


172.75 


25 


202.50 



Modification Codes: 




1 20 ft. wide 


-17.00 


2 40 ft. wide 


11.00 


3 50 ft. wide 


22.00 


4 60 ft. wide 


31.00 


5 80 ft. wide 


47.00 


SpecificalioDs: 





Treated Plank Side Walls with Open Ends. Usually Above 
Ground level with a concrete Floor on Grade. 



44.4.7. POLE FRAME BUILDINGS AND SHEDS 



BASE PRICES - PER SQUARE FOOT - 36' SPAN 
FOUR SIDES CLOSED ONE SIDE OPEN FOUR SIDES OPEN 





API 


AP2 


AP3 


AP4 


AP5 


AP6 


AREA 


METAL 


WOOD 


METAL 


WOOD 


METAL 


WOOD 


600 


6.45 


7.05 


5.75 


6.15 


4.15 


4.75 


1000 


5.25 


5.65 


4.65 


4.95 


3.50 


3.95 


1400 


4.65 


5.00 


4.15 


4.40 


3.20 


3.50 


2000 


4.15 


4.45 


3.75 


4.00 


2.90 


3.15 


3000 


3.75 


4.00 


3.45 


3.60 


2.65 


2.80 


4000 


3.50 


3.75 


3.25 


3.40 


2.50 


2.55 



Modificatioo Codes: 



1 


Concrete Floor 


1.50 


-) 


No Electricity 


- 0.60 


3 


Insulation 


0.30 


4 


Wood Lining 


0.80 


5 


Truss Span to 50' 


0.25 


6 


Enameled Steel 


0.30 



SpcciOcations: 

L GRADE 

Low cost construction, light metal or low grade wood 
wood frame. No electrical or water service. 



iidins; 



A GRADE 
Average quality construction, metal or wood siding on \voi>d 
frame. Minimal electrical and water .service. 

G GRADE 
Good quality construction, surface treated commercial grade 
metal or good grade dimensioned wood siding on heavy wooil 
frame. Adequate electrical and water service. 



08/01/89 



44-17 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.4.8. GRANARIES 



44.4.10. QUONSET BUILDINGS 



AREA 


ARl 


400 


13.45 


soo 


12.30 


600 


11.50 


700 


10.85 


800 


10.40 


900 


10.00 


1000 


9.70 


1200 


9.20 


1400 


8.85 


1600 


8.55 


1800 


8.35 


2000 


8.15 



Modification Codes: 

1 Wood Storage Bins 2.20 

2 Metal Walk 030 

3 Metal Roof 0.15 

4 Wood Ventilation Ducts 1.10 

5 No Lighting -0.60 
() Pier Foundation -0.80 



AREA 


AQl 


800 


9.35 


900 


8.95 


1000 


8.60 


1200 


8.05 


1400 


7.60 


1600 


7.30 


1800 


7.00 


2000 


6.80 


2400 


6.45 


2800 


6.20 


3200 


5.95 


3600 


5.80 


4000 


5.65 


4500 


5.50 


5000 


5.40 


6000 


5.20 


7000 


5.05 


8000 


4.90 


10000 


4.75 



Spccil'icatioas: 

l-ounUation; 
Walls: 

I-lot>r. 
Roof: 
Oilier Features: 



Concrete walls and footings. 

Drop Siding. Interior 1" x 4" Wood Crib 

Siding. 

Concrete, Loft Pine on Wood Joist. 

Double Pitch, Shingle on Wood Decking. 

Electric Lighting. 



Modificatioa Ctxlcs: 




1 Earth Floor 


-1.50 


2 No Lighting 


-0.60 


3 Insulation 


0.30 


4 Heating 


0.60 


5 Grain Package 


•1.70 


Specifications: 





44.4.9. IMPLEMENT SHEDS 





All 


AI2 


AREA 


WOOD FRH 


CONC BLCK 


200 


10.70 


16.80 


300 


9.80 


15.35 


400 


9.25 


14.50 


SOO 


8.90 


13.90 


600 


8.60 


13.50 


700 


8.40 


13.15 


800 


8.20 


12.90 


900 


8.10 


12.65 


1000 


7.95 


12.50 


1200 


7.75 


12.20 


1500 


7.55 


11.85 


2000 


7.30 


11.45 


2500 


7.15 


11.20 


3000 


7.05 


11.00 


4000 


6.85 


10.75 


5000 


6.75 


10.55 



L GRADE 
Concrete footings, low cost metal siding on light wood frame. 

A GRADE 
Continuous wall foundation, average metal siding on wood 
frame, adequate equipment, pedestrian doors. 

G GRADE 
Continuous wall foundation, heavy steel (no frame), adequate 
equipment and pedestrian doors. 



Modificaliiio Codes: 

1 Concrete Floor 

2 Lighting 

3 Insulation 

4 Healing 

5 Enameled Steel 



1.50 
-0.60 
0.30 
0.1)0 
0.40 



44-18 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



GRANARIES 




QUONSET BUILDINGS 




IMPLEMENT SHEDS 




08/01/89 



44-19 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



POULTRY HOUSES AND BARNS 




PREFABRICATED STEEL BUILDINGS 





44-20 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



44.4.11. POULTRY HOUSES AND BARNS 





FRAME OR HETAL 


CONCRETE BLOCK 




AHl 


AH2 


AH3 


AH4 


AH5 


AH6 




ONE 


TWO 


THREE 


ONE 


TWO 


THREE 


AREA 


STORY 


STORY 


STORY 


STORY 


STORY 


STORY 


200 


11.00 


17.20 


23.50 


14.30 


22.40 


30.55 


400 


8.75 


13.65 


18.60 


11.05 


16.95 


22.85 


600 


7.75 


12.15 


16.55 


9.65 


14.75 


19.80 


800 


7.20 


11.25 


15.35 


8.80 


13.45 


18.15 


1000 


6.75 


10.65 


14.50 


8.20 


12.65 


17.05 


1200 


6.50 


10.20 


13.95 


7.80 


12.05 


16.25 


1400 


6.25 


9.85 


13.50 


7.45 


11.55 


15.65 


1600 


6.05 


9.60 


13.10 


7.20 


11.20 


15.20 


1800 


5.90 


9.35 


12.80 


6.95 


10.90 


14.80 


2000 


5.80 


9.15 


12.55 


6.80 


10.65 


14.50 


2400 


5.55 


8.85 


12.15 


6.50 


10.25 


14.00 


2800 


5.40 


8.60 


11.85 


6.25 


9.90 


13.60 


3200 


5.30 


8.45 


11.60 


6.05 


9.70 


13.30 


3600 


5.15 


8.30 


11.40 


5.90 


9.45 


13.05 


4000 


5.10 


8.15 


11.20 


5.75 


9.30 


12.85 


5000 


4.90 


7.90 


10.90 


5.50 


8.95 


12.45 


7500 


3.75 


6.30 


8.80 


3.90 


7.00 


10.10 


10000 


4.45 


7.25 


10.05 


4.85 


8.15 


11.45 



ModiGcalioa Codes: 

1 Earlh Floor -1.50 

2 No Lighting -0.60 

3 Wood Floor -1.00 

4 Heating 0.60 

5 Single Pitch Roof -0.30 

6 Insulation, First Floor 1.65 

7 Insulation, Second Floor 0.55 

8 Insulation, Third Floor 0.55 



Spccificatioos: 



Foundation: 
Exterior Walls: 



Interior: 
Ground Floor 
Upper Floor 

Roof: 



(ilher Features: 



L GRADE 

Masonry walls and footing. 

Concrete block; or low grade dimensioned 

sheathing, roll composition or metal on 

wood or light steel frame. Minimal 

windows. 

Unfinished. 

Concrete. 

Wood on wood joist or wood on steel 

frame. 

Double pitch, metal or asphalt shingles. 

Roofing on wood sheathing with wood or 

steel frame. 

Minimal electrical and water service; roof 

ventilators. 



A GRADE 

Foundation: Masonry walls and fooling. 

Exterior Walls: Concrete block; or wood or metal siding on 

wood or light steel framing. Adei|uaic 

number of wood or steel sash windows. 
Interior Unfinished. 

Ground Roor Concrete. 

Upper Floor. Wood on wood joists or wood on steel 

frame. 
Roof: Double pitch; metal or asphalt shingles. 

Roofing on wood sheathing with wood or 

steel frame. 
Other Features: Adequate electrical and water service; roof 

ventilators. 

G GRADE 

Foundation: Masonry walls and footing. 

Exterior Walls: Concrete block or good quality wood or 

metal siding on good grade dimensioned 

wood or light steel frame. Numerous gtKxl 

quality wood or steel sash windows. 
Interior Interior sheathing on walls with plywood 

ceilings; may be painted. 
Ground Floor Concrete with drains. 

Upper Floor Wood on wood joists or wood on steel 

frame. 
Roof: Double pitch; good quality; asphalt or \vtK)d 

shingles, roofing on wood sheathing with 

wood or light steel frame. 
Other Features: Good electrical and water service; roof 

ventilators. 

E GRADE 

Foundation: Masonry walls and footings. 

Exterior Walls: Brick or block; Brick veneer or stucco on 

high grade dimensioned wood frame: Sicel 

panels or best steel framing. Numerous 

excellent quality wood or steel .sash windows. 
Interior: Finished and painted interior walls and 

ceiling. 
Ground Floor Concrete with drains. 

Upper Roor: Wood on wood joists or wood on slccI 

frame. 
Roof: Double pilch; best quality asphalt or wikkJ 

shingle. Roofing on wood sheathing with 

wood or steel frame. 
Other Features; Wiring in conduit with numerous electrical 

fixtures and outlets; good water service; rcKif 

ventilators. 



08/01/89 



44-21 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.4.12. PRE-FABRICATED STEEL 
BUILDINGS 





«X1 


AX2 


AREA 


VERTICAL HALLS 


SLANT WALLS 




10- WALL HEICHT 


10' WALL HEIGHT 


1000 


7.80 


7.01 


1200 


7.24 


6.50 


1400 


6.82 


6.13 


1600 


6.45 


5.80 


1800 


6.17 


5.57 


2000 


5.94 


5.34 


2200 


5.76 


5.20 


2400 


5.57 


S.Ol 


2600 


5.43 


4.87 


2800 


5.29 


4.78 


3000 


5.15 


4.64 


3200 


5.06 


4.55 


3400 


4.97 


4.46 


3600 


4.87 


4.36 


3800 


4.78 


4.32 


4000 


4.69 


4.22 


4500 


4.55 


4.09 


5000 


4.41 


3.95 


5500 


4.27 


3.85 


6000 


4.18 


3.76 


6500 


4.09 


3.67 


7000 


3.99 


3.57 


7500 


3.90 


3.53 


8000 


3.85 


3.44 


9000 


3.71 


3.34 


10000 


3.62 


3.25 



Spodficatioos: 

L GRADE 

Frame: Light steel frame and rafters. 

Exterior Walls: Sheet metal. 

Interior Unfinished. 

Floor Concrete on grade or asphalt. 

Other Features: Minimal electrical service. 

A GRADE 

Frame: Steel frame and rafters. 

Exterior Walls: Steel siding. 

Interior. Unfinished. 

Floor Concrete on grade or asphalt. 

Other Features: Adequate lighting and outlets, equipmciil. 
and doors. 

G GRADE 

Frame: Steel frame and tru.ss. 

Exterior Walls: Surface treated steel or iiluniinuni .siding 

Interior Unfinished, shop area Including lot)l 

cabinets. 
Floor Concrete on grade. 

Other Features: Good lighting and outlets. Adcqunlc 

equipment and pedestrian doors. 



c 



M<xlincalioQ Codes: 



1 


Barlh Floor 


-1.50 


-■> 


No Lighting 


-0.60 


3 


Insulation 


0.30 


4 


Healing 


0.60 


5 


Grain Package 


2.00 



Enameled Steel/Aluminum 



0.35 



Special Modifkatioo Code: 

1-XI Additional Stoty Height. The average base height for 
Pre-Fabricated Steel Buildings is 10". If the structure 
being coded has a story height greater than 10', enter 
the number of feet over the base in the Quantity field 
and enter the area in the Size field. 



44-22 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



44.4.13. STEEL GRAIN BINS 









AGl 


AG2 








WITHOUT 


MHH 








DRYING BIN 


DRYING BIN 


OIA 


HGT 


CU. FT. 


COST 


COST 


15 


7.3 


1295 


2.100 


2,610 


15 


11.0 


1944 


2.330 


2,840 


15 


14.7 


2592 


2.560 


3,070 


15 


18.3 


3239 


2.790 


3,300 


18 


11.0 


2799 


2.640 


3,370 


18 


14.7 


3733 


2,970 


3,700 


18 


18.3 


4664 


3,300 


4,030 


18 


22.0 


5598 


3.630 


4,370 


18 


25.7 


6532 


3.970 


4,700 


18 


33.0 


8397 


4.630 


5,360 


18 


40.3 


10263 


5.300 


6,030 


18 


47.7 


12131 


5.960 


6,700 


21 


11.0 


3810 


3.000 


3,990 


21 


14.7 


5081 


3.450 


4,450 


21 


18.3 


6349 


3.900 


4,900 


21 


22.0 


7620 


4.360 


5.350 


21 


25.7 


8891 


4.810 


5.810 


21 


33.0 


11430 


5.710 


6,710 


21 


40.3 


13969 


6.620 


7,620 


21 


47.7 


16511 


7,520 


8,520 


24 


11.0 


4976 


3,410 


4,710 


24 


14.7 


6637 


4,000 


5,310 


24 


18.3 


8292 


4,590 


5,900 


24 


22.0 


9953 


5,190 


6,490 


24 


25.7 


11613 


5.780 


7,080 


24 


33.0 


14929 


6.960 


8,260 


24 


40.3 


18245 


8,140 


9,450 


24 


47.7 


21565 


9,330 


10,630 


27 


11.0 


6298 


3,880 


5,530 


27 


14.7 


8399 


4,630 


6,280 


27 


18.3 


10495 


5,380 


7,030 


27 


22.0 


12596 


6,130 


7,780 


27 


25.7 


14697 


6,880 


8,530 


27 


33.0 


18894 


8,370 


10.020 


27 


40.3 


23091 


9,870 


11.520 


27 


47.7 


27294 


11.370 


13.020 


30 


14.7 


10370 


5.340 


7.370 


30 


18.3 


12957 


6.260 


8,290 


30 


22.0 


15551 


7.180 


9,220 


30 


25.7 


18145 


8.110 


10,140 


30 


33.0 


23326 


9.950 


11,990 


30 


40.3 


28508 


11,800 


13,840 


30 


47.7 


33696 


13,650 


15.690 


36 


14.7 


14932 


6,960 


9.890 


36 


18.3 


18658 


8,290 


11.220 


36 


22.0 


22393 


9,620 


12,550 


36 


25.7 


26129 


10,950 


13,880 


36 


33.0 


33590 


13,610 


16,540 


36 


40.3 


41051 


16,270 


19,200 


36 


47.7 


48522 


18,940 


21,870 









AGl 


AG2 








WITHOUT 


WHH 








DRYING BIN 


DRYING BIN 


OIA 


HGT 


CU. FT. 


COST 


COST 


36 


58.7 


59719 


22,930 


25,860 


42 


14.7 


20324 


8,880 


12,870 


42 


18.3 


25395 


10,690 


14,680 


42 


22.0 


30480 


12,500 


16,490 


42 


25.7 


35564 


14,320 


18,310 


42 


33.0 


45720 


17,940 


21,930 


42 


40.3 


55875 


21,560 


25.550 


42 


47.7 


66044 


25,180 


29,170 


42 


58.7 


81284 


30,620 


34,610 


48 


14.7 


26546 


11,100 


16,310 


48 


18.3 


33169 


13,460 


18,670 


48 


22.0 


39810 


15,830 


21,040 


48 


25.7 


46451 


18,200 


23,410 


48 


33.0 


59715 


22,930 


28.140 


48 


40.3 


72979 


27,660 


32,870 


48 


47.7 


86262 


32,390 


37.600 


48 


58.7 


106167 


39,490 


44,700 


60 


18.3 


51827 


20,120 


28,250 


60 


25.7 


72580 


27,510 


35,650 


60 


40.3 


114030 


42,290 


50,430 


60 


47.7 


134784 


49,690 


57,830 



44.4.14. STEEL HOPPER BINS 









AG3 


DIA 


HGT 


CU. FT. 


COST 


6 


10.0 


283 


550 


6 


16.0 


452 


660 


6 


21.0 


594 


750 


6 


25.0 


707 


820 


6 


28.0 


792 


880 


9 


14.0 


891 


1,030 


9 


17.0 


1081 


1,150 


9 


20.0 


1272 


1,270 


9 


25.0 


1590 


1,470 


9 


28.0 


1781 


1,600 


9 


31.0 


1972 


1,720 


12 


20.0 


2262 


2,030 


12 


25.0 


2827 


2.390 


12 


31.0 


3506 


2,820 


12 


36.0 


4072 


3.180 


12 


42.0 


4750 


3.610 


15 


36.0 


6362 


4,800 


15 


42.0 


7422 


5,470 


18 


36.0 


9161 


6,780 



08/01/89 



44-23 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



44.4.15. POTATO STORAGE BUILDINGS 





AOl 


A02 




POTATO 


POTATO 




STORAGE 


STORAGE 


AREA 


UNDERGROUND 


ABOVE GROUND 


1000 


5.00 


15.85 


2000 


4.75 


12.75 


3000 


4.60 


11.40 


4000 


4.55 


10.60 


6000 


4.50 


9.65 


8000 


4.45 


9.05 


10000 


4.40 


8.65 


15000 


4.35 


8.05 



Modincalioo Codes: 




1 Concrete Floor 


+ 1.50 


2 No Lighting 


-0.60 


3 Pole Frame 


-2.30 



44.4.17. FEED / FENCE BUNKS 



BASE PRICES - PER LINEAL FOOT 



( 



FEED BUNK 
AFl AF2 



FENCE BUNK 
AF3 AF4 



CONCRETE 32.70 22.90 

POST t PUNK 17.10 14.30 



Spodal Modificatioa Codes: 

FFl 10' Roof 29.70 LnFt 

FF2 Mech. Feeder, Auto 74.30 LnFt 

FF3 Mech. Feeder, Manual 58.80 LnFt 

FF4 Concrete Apron 10.70 LnFt 

FF5 Cattle Waterer 340.00 Each 

FF6 Cattle/Hog Waterer 420.00 Each 



44.4.16. SLURRY SYSTEMS 









AYl 








CIRCULAR 


DIA 


HGT 


GALLONS 


COST 


25.0 


13.0 


853' 


11,010 


25.0 


18.0 


1.181 


14.230 


32.0 


10.0 


1.075 


13,190 


42.0 


9.0 


1.667 


19.000 


42.0 


13.5 


2,501 


27,170 


42.0 


18.0 


3,334 


35.350 


48.0 


10.0 


2,419 


26,380 


61.5 


9.0 


3,574 


37,710 









AY2 








RECTANGULAR* 


MID 


LNG 


GALLONS 


COST 


20 


20 


535 


6,710 


20 


40 


1.070 


11,090 


20 


60 


1.604 


15,480 


20 


80 


2.139 


19.860 


20 


100 


2.674 


24,250 



( 



Based on 10" height. 



44.4.18. SCALES 





CAl 


CA2 


CA3 




PUTFORH 


TRUCK 


CATTLE 


CAPACITY 


SCALE 


SCALE 


SCALE 


(POUNDS) 


COST 


COST 


COST 


10,000 


9,000 


12.000 


7.500 


20,000 


15,500 


14.000 


10.000 


40.000 


28.500 


18.000 


15,000 


60,000 




22.000 




80,000 




26.000 





( 



44-24 



08/01/89 



44. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS 



GRAIN BINS 





FEED BUNKS 




•f " 




-.^^ 



POTATO STORAGE BUILDINGS 



SLURRY SYSTEMS 






08/01/89 



44-25 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



('■ 



44-26 08/01/89 



^J 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 






NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


45.1. 


COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 






VALUATION OVERVIEW 


1 


45.1.1. 


COST VALUATION 


1 


45.1.1.1. 


SELECTING THE PROPER QUALITY 






GRADE 


1 


45.1.1.2. 


QUALITY GRADES AND FACTORS 


2 


45.1.2. 


INCOME VALUATION 


2 


45.2. 


COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL COST 






SCHEDULES 


3 


45.3. 


MAJOR STRUCTURAL TYPES AND 






GRADES 


3 


45.4. 


MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 


42 


45.5. 


COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 






CONSTRUCTION PRICING TABLES 


44 


45.5.1. 


COMMERCIAL STRUCTURE PRICING 






TABLE 


44 


45.5.2. 


COMMERCIAL EXTERIOR WALL 






PRICING TABLE 


45 



PARAGRAPH 






NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


45.5.3. 


COMMERCIAL INTERIOR FINISH 






PRICING TABLE 


46 


45.5.4. 


COMMERCIAL HEATING, AIR 
CONDITIONING, AND PLUMBING 






PRICING TABLE 


47 


45.5.5. 


COMMERCIAL BUILDING OTHER 






FEATURES PRICING TABLE 


48 


45.5.6. 


COMMERCIAL OTHER BUILDING 
AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS 






PRICING TABLE 


49 


45.5.7. 


COMMERCIAL ELEVATOR PRICING 






TABLES 


50 


45.5.8. 


GRAIN ELEVATORS & ANNEXES 


51 


45.5.9. 


FU\T STORAGE 


51 


45.5.10. 


TANKS 


51 


45.5.11. 


BOLTED INDUSTRIAL BINS 


51 



45.1. COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL VALUATION OVERVIEW 



The Commercial/Indusirial system provides for 
both the cost and income approaches to value. 
The cost approach is a model approach with 
adjustments to the component level. The income 
approach utilizes income models which do not 
require income and expense data on each 
individual property, but which permit income 
adjustment or override parameters on the 
exceptional properties. Limited applications of the 
market approach are available for multifamily type 
properties. 

45.1.1. COST VALUATION 

Pricing schedules and related cost tables are 
included in this section to assist the appraiser in 
arriving at accurate estimates of Replacement Cost 
New. They have been developed by applying 
segregated cost to all components. The application 
of the schedules involves the computer pricing of 
all components from the data collection form. 

Costs have been developed for all basic 
structure types, interior and mechanical costs, and 
exterior wall costs; and are computed to develop an 
overall Replacement Cost New. 



Since various construction types are necessary 
for different uses, several costs were developed for 
basic structures. High rise office buildings require 
different cost ranges than properties such as one- 
story warehouses, commercial buildings, and service 
stations. Interior finish, heating, plumbing, air 
conditioning and lighting requirements are varied 
for different uses, requiring cost ranges. Certain 
use types, such as Fast or Franchised Food 
Restaurants and Service Stations, begin with a 
specified cost, then are modified by grade. 
Building Other Features, attached improvements, 
and Other Building and Yard Improvements are set 
up on a more simplified cost system requiring in 
most cases only minor modifications. 

45.1.1.1. Selecting the Proper Quality Grade 

The quality grade of materials and workmanship 
is one of the most significant adjustments to be 
made in the cost approach. Many buildings with 
similar square feet areas and uses can vary 
significantly in cost. This is due to quality of 
materials and workmanship. A better quality 
building is expected to have a longer economic life 
and requires less maintenance. The appraiser must 



08/01/89 



45-1 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



analyze these characteristics in order to arrive at an 
estimate of quality grade. 

Most properties will be computer priced at an 
average or typical building grade and will require 
no quality grade percent modification. The 
generated value for replacement less normal 
condition/utility factor will be accurate. It becomes 
the appraiser's responsibility to analyze the 
generated values. 

45.1.1.2. Quality Grades and Factors 

The commercial system uses an alphabetic 
grading scale with "A" as average quality of 
construction, with a range of grades from a low of 
"L" (low cost) to a high of "E" (excellent 
construction). A plus (+) and minus (-) 
adjustment is allowed within each category. The 
relative value ranges are indicated by the following 
table. 



45.1.2. INCOME VALUATION 

The income model approach differs from 
traditional computer-assisted income valuation 
techniques in that it does not require income data 
on each property. Income models may be 
developed through manual analysis of income and 
expense data or by utilizing computerized modeling 
software, such as the MRA module in MAS, to 
analyze the data. Models are developed on the 
basic physical characteristics collected on the 
standard data collection form. Valuation results 
may be adjusted for exceptional properties by 
inputting income quality rating, expense adjustment 
factor, occupancy override, and capitalization rate 
overrides. Provisions are included for excess 
acreage valuation. 



c 



Grade 



L - Low Cost 



Value 
Ranee 

- .40 

.50 

+ .60 







- 


.70 


F - 


Fair 




.78 






+ 


.85 






- 


.92 


A - 


Average 




1.00 






+ 


1.08 






- 


1.17 


G - 


Good 




1.26 






+ 


1.35 






- 


1.45 


V - 


Very Good 




L55 






+ 


1.67 



c 



- 1.85 

Excellent 2.10 

+ 2.50 



c 



45-2 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



45.2. COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL COST SCHEDULES 



The Commercial/Industrial Costs were derived 
in the following manner. 

Numerous Structure Type Codes were created 
and combined into ten Basic Structure Types, 
which include the following: 

FRAMING COST - The Frame Cost Rate 
(dollars per square foot of floor area excluding 
basement area) as a function of Construction Class 
and Basic Structure Type. 

ROOFING COSTS - The cost rates for the roof 
framing and roofing materials (dollars per square 
foot of floor area covered) as a function of basic 
structure type. Insulation costs have been included 
in the roofing materials. 

FLOOR STRUCTURE COST - The Structural 
Floor Cost (dollars per square foot of the floor 
area) as a function of the basic structure type. 

EXTERIOR WALL MATERIAL COST - The 

Exterior Wall Material Cost (dollars per square 
fool of wall area) as a function of material type 
code and the basic structure type. All wall 
material costs include insulation, normal openings, 
and appropriate back-up materials when required. 

CEILING AND FLOOR FINISH COST - The 

Ceiling and Roor Finish Cost (dollars per square 
foot of floor area) as a function of the Basic 
Structure Type or multi-use use type code. 



BASEMENT COST - The Basement Wall Cost 
Rate (dollars per square foot of wall area) as a 
function of the Construction Class and Basic 
Structure Type. The cost of waterproofing has 
been added. 

Use Type Codes were developed which equate 
to the type of interior utilization of the structure 
being described. Costs were developed for the 
specific use types, which include the following: 

INTERIOR PARTITION COST - The Interior 
Partition Cost (dollars per square foot of floor 
area) as a function of use type code and quality or 
extent of occurrence code. 

HEATING COST - The Heating Cost (dollars 
per square foot of floor area) as a function of the 
heating system type and the use type code. 

AIR CONDITIONING COST - The Air 

Conditioning Cost (dollars per square foot of floor 
area) as a function of the air conditioning system 
type and the use type code. 

PLUMBING COST - The Plumbing cost (dollars 
per square foot of floor area) as a function of use 
type code and quality or extent of occurrence code. 

LIGHTING COST - The Lighting cost (dollars 
per square foot of floor area) as a function of use 
type code. Lighting costs are assumed to be 100% 
in all use type codes. 



45.3. MAJOR STRUCTURAL TYPES AND GRADES 



The following pages contain representative photos of major commercial building construction classes and 
grades. 



08/01/89 



45-3 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Garden Apartment 



Structure Type Code: 21 1 

Grade: A+ 

Use Type: 
Apartment 

Use Type Code: 01 1 
Construction Class: 1 




c 




structure Type: 

Garden Apartment 



Structure Type Code: 211 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Apartment 

Use Type Code: 01 1 

Construction Class: 1 



c 



Structure Type: 

Garden Apartment 



Structure Type Code: 21 1 
Grade: A 



Use Type: 
Apartment 



Use Type Code: 011 
Construction Cleiss: 1 




e 



45-4 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 

Garden Apartment 



Structure Type Code: 21 1 

Grade: A- 

Use Type: 
Apartment 

Use Type Code: Oil 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 

Garden Apartment 



Structure Type Code: 21 1 

Grade: F+ 

Use Type: 
Apartment 

Use Type Code: Oil 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

High Rise Apartment 



Structure Type Code: 212 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 
Apartment 

Use Type Code: Oil 

Construction Class: 2 




'^JV*, 



■Jl* 




08/01/89 



45-5 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Hotel/Motel, High Rise 

Structure Type Code: 314 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 
Hotel 

Use Type Code: 012 

Construction Class: 2 




Structure Type: 

Hotel/Motel, High Rise 



Structure Type Code: 314 

Grade: G- 

Use Type: 
Hotel 

Use Type Code: 012 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Hotel/Motel, High Rise 



Structure Type Code: 314 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Hotel 

Use Type Code: 012 

Construction Class: 1 







I 









'B"| I'll IF \^ 



45-6 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



structure Type: 

Hotel/Motel, Low Rise 



Structure Type Code: 315 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Motel 

Use Type Code: 013 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 

Hotel/Motel, Low Rise 



Structure Type Code: 315 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Motel 

Use Type Code: 013 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

Hotel/Motel, Low Rise 



Structure Type Code: 315 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Motel 

Use Type Code: 013 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-7 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 
Restaurant 



Structure Type Code: 321 

Grade: V 

Use Type: 
Restaurant 

Use Type Code: 031 

Construction Class: 1 




c 




structure Type; 
Restaurant 



Structure Type Code: 321 

Grade: G + 

Use Type: 
Restaurant 

Use Type Code: 031 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 
Restaurant 



Structure Type Code: 321 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Restaurant 

Use Type Code: 031 

Construction Class: 1 




45-8 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Bonanza Family Restaurant 

Use Type Code: 110 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: G + 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Burger King 

Use Type Code: 1 12 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Dairy Queen 

Use Type Code: 121 

Construction Class: 1 





08/01/89 



45-9 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A + 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Godfather's Pizza 

Use Type Code: 132 

Construction Class: 1 




Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Kentucky Fried Chicken 

Use Type Code: 140 

Construction Class: 1 



CTi.'i:' ■ i 



Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Long John Silvers Seafood 
Restaurant 

Use Type Code: 150 

Construction Class: 1 




45-10 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type; 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: G + 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
McDonald's 

Use Type Code: 153 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A + 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Pizza Hut 

Use Type Code: 162 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A+ 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
J-B Big Boy 

Use Type Code: 136 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-11 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Mr. Steak 

Use Type Code: 1 56 

Construction Class: 1 



ir 






Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Taco Bell 

Use Type Code: 180 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Village Inn Pancake House 

Use Type Code: 190 

Construction Class: 1 




^ 



45-12 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: G- 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Wendy's Old Fashioned 
Hamburgers 

Use Type Code: 1 94 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 
Fast Food 



Structure Type Code: 325 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Franchise Restaurant 
Arby's Roast Beef 

Use Type Code: 104 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 
Bar/Lounge 



Structure Type Code: 327 

Grade: A- 

Use Type: 

Tavern or Bar 

Use Type Code: 035 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-13 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 
Bar/Lounge 



Structure Type Code: 327 

Grade: A- 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Tavern or Bar (035) 
Mutti-Use Apartment (081) 

Construction Class: 1 




Structure Type: 

Auto Dealer, Full Service 



Structure Type Code: 331 

Grade: G 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Auto Showroom (046) 
Auto Parts & Service (047) 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 
Bar/Lounge 



Structure Type Code: 327 

Grade: A- 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Tavern or Bar (035) 
Multi-Use Apartment (081) 




45-14 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 

Auto Dealer, Full Service 



Structure Type Code: 331 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Auto Showroom (046) 
Auto Parts & Service (047) 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 

Auto Dealer, Full Service 



Structure Type Code: 331 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Auto Showroom (046) 
Auto Parts & Service (047) 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

Auto/Equipment Service 
Garage 

Structure Type Code: 332 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Auto Parts & Service (047) 

Construction Class: 4 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Multi-Use Sales (083) 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-15 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Auto/Equipment Service Garage 



Structure Type Code: 332 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Auto Parts & Service (047) 
Multi-Use Sales (083) 

Construction Class: 1 




Structure Type: 

Auto/Equipment Service Garage 




Structure Type Code: 332 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Auto Parts & Service (047) 
Multi-Use Sales (083) 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

Service Station (full service) 

Structure Type Code: 333 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Service Station with Bays 

Use Type Code: 070 

Construction Class: 1 

OBY Type: Canopy (good) 
OBY Code: CP7 




45-16 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 

Service Station (full service) 

Structure Type Code: 333 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Service Station Conversion Retail 

Use Type Code: 071 

Construction Class: 1 

OBY Type: Canopy (average) 
OBY Code: CP6 






Structure Type: 

Service Station (full service) 

Structure Type Code: 333 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Service Station with Bays 

Use Type Code: 070 

Construction Class: 1 

OBY Type: Canopy (average) 
OBY Code: CP8 



OBY Type: 

Service Station Attendant's Booth 

OBY Code: GS2 

OBY Type: Canopy (good) 

OBY Code: CP7 




08/01/89 



45-17 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



OBY Type: 

Service Station Attendant's Booth 

OBY Code: GS2 

OBY Use Type: Canopy (good) 

OBY Code: CP7 



I 





OBY Type: 

Service Station Attendant's Booth 



OBY Code: GS2 

OBY Type: Canopy (good) 

OBY Code: CP7 



e 



Structure Type: 

Car Wash (Manual) 



Structure Type Code: 336 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Car Wash (Manual) 

Use Type Code: 074 

Construction Class: 1 




45-18 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



structure Type: 

Car Wash (automatic) 



Structure Type Code: 337 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Car Wash (automatic) 

Use Type Code: 075 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 

Car Wash (automatic) 



Structure Type Code: 337 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Car Wash (automatic) 

Use Type Code: 075 

Construction Class: 1 



m) 



Structure Type: 
Parking Deck 



Structure Type Code: 338 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Multi-Use Sales (083) 
Parking Garage (090) 
Parking Upper Deck (990) 

Construction Class: 2 




08/01/89 



45-19 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Parking Garage/Deck 



Structure Type Code: 338 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Multi-Use Sales (083) 
Parking Garage (090) 
Parking Upper Deck (990) 

Construction Class: 2 





Structure Type: 

Parking Garage/Deck 



Structure Type Code: 338 

Grade; A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Parking Garage (090) 
Parking Upper Deck (990) 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Regional Shopping Mall 

Structure Type Code: 341 

Grade: G+ sectionalized as to use 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Department Store (032) 
Discount Store/Market (033) 
Retail Store (034) 
Covered Mall (095) 

Construction Class: 2 









ri 


"ZlT^^IWP 




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mkiP^mm^^fi^ 


J^li^Hfei 







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r 



45-20 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



structure Type: 

Community Shopping Center 



Structure Type Code: 342 

Grade; G- 

Use Type: 
Retail Store 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 2 




Structure Type: 

Neighborhood Shopping Center 



Use Type Code: 034 
Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Strip Shopping Center 



Structure Type Code: 344 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Retail Store 

(above normal partitions) 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-21 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Strip Shopping Center 



Structure Type Code: 344 

Grade: A+ sectionalized as to use 

Use Type: 
Retail Store 
(above normal partitions) 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 2 






Structure Type: 

Strip Shopping Center 



Structure Type Code: 344 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Retail Store 

(above normal partitions) 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

Strip Shopping Center 



Structure Type Code: 344 

Grade: A+ 

Use Type: 
Retail Store 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 1 




45-22 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



structure Type: 

Discount Department Store 



Structure Type Code: 345 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Discount Store/Market 

Use Type Code: 033 

Construction Class: 2 




Structure Type: 

Discount Department Store 



Use Type: 

Discount Store/l\^arl<et 

Use Type Code: 033 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Department Store 



Structure Type Code: 346 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Department Store 

Use Type Code: 032 

Construction Class: 2 




08/01/89 



45-23 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 
Supermarket 

Structure Type Code: 347 

Grade; A+ 

Use Type: 

Discount Store/Market 

Use Type Code: 033 

Construction Class: 2 





Structure Type; 
Supermarket 

Structure Type Code: 347 

Grade: F 

Use Type: 

Discount Store/Market 

Use Type Code: 033 

Construction Class: 1 

Use Type: 

Multi-Use Storage 

Use Type Code: 084 

Construction Class: 4 



€ 



Structure Type; 

Convenience Food Market 

Structure Type Code: 348 

Grade: A+ 

Use Type: 

Convenience Store 

Use Type Code: 038 

Construction Class: 1 




^ 



45-24 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 

Convenience Food Market 

Structure Type Code: 348 

Grade; A+ 

Use Type: 

Convenience Store 

Use Typo Code: 038 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 

Convenience Food Market 



Structure Type Code: 348 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Convenience Store 

Use Type Code: 038 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

Medical Office Building 



Structure Type Code: 349 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Medical Center 

Use Type Code: 052 

Construction Class: 2 




08/01/89 



45-25 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



structure Type: 
Bank 



Structure Type Code: 351 

Grade: A + 

Use Type: 

Bank &. Savings Institution 

Use Type Code: 051 

Construction Class: 2 




c 




Structure Type: 
Bank 



Structure Type Code: 351 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Bank & Savings Institution 

Use Type Code: 051 

Construction Class: 1 



e 



Structure Type: 

Savings Institution 



Structure Type Code: 352 

Grade: A- 

Use Type: 

Bank & Savings Institution 

Use Type Code: 051 

Construction Class: 2 




L 



45-26 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 




structure Type: 

Savings Institution 



Structure Type Code: 352 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Bank & Savings Institution 

Use Type Code: 051 

Construction Class: 2 



Kt 




^a^ ^ ..^^^ 

C^wiETfi 



structure Type: 

Office Building, Low Rise 



Structure Type Code: 353 

Grade: G- 

Use Type: 

Office Building 

Use Type Code: 053 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Savings Institution 



Structure Type Code: 352 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Bank & Savings Institution 

Use Type Code: 051 

Construction Class: 2 




II I 



mk 



fim 




08/01/89 



45-27 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Office Building, Low Rise 



Structure Type Code: 353 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Office Building 

Use Type Code: 053 

Construction Class: 2 




Structure Type: 

Office Building, Low Rise 




Structure Type Code: 353 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Office Building 

Use Type Code: 053 

Construction Class: 2 



^ 



Structure Type: 

Office Building, High Rise 



Structure Type Code: 354 

Grade: G 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Office Building (053) 
Parking Garage (090) 

Construction Class: 2 




(- 



45-28 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



structure Type: 

Office Building, High Rise 



Structure Type Code: 354 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 

Office Building 

Use Type Code: 053 

Construction Class: 2 





^^^^^^H|^K_ 


1 




0^ ■*■■■ UKmm ISH 




structure Type: 

Office Building, High Rise 



Structure Type Code: 354 

Grade: G 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Retail Store (034) 
Office Building (053) 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Motion Picture Theater 



Structure Type Code: 364 

Grade: G- 

Use Type: 

Auditorium or Theater 

Use Type Code: 061 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-29 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 
Cinema/Theater 



Structure Type Code: 365 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Cinema 

Use Type Code: 062 

Construction Class: 2 




1 




■■"^"''-■^ ;-^-^. 



z^«a,... ■««->». 





Structure Type: 
Hangar 



Structure Type Code: 368 

Grade: G 

Use Type: 
Hangar 

Use Type Code: 042 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Downtown Row Type 

Structure Type Code: 371 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Multi-Use Apartment (081) 
Multi-Use Office (082) 

Construction Class: 1 




45-30 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 

Downtown Row Type 

Structure Type Code: 371 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Retail Store (034) 
Multi-Use OHice (082) 

Construction Class: 1 




A 




-■ 




k I A 


. 


,1 


m\ 




\j^m 


^ 


mm^ 


^M i- 


^^^^^H^^L^^^jaHiM^^H^^B 


m 









Structure Type: 

Downtown Row Type 

Structure Type Code: 371 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Retail Store (034) 
Multi-Use Office (082) 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Retail Store 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-31 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Retail Store 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 4 




r 




structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Retail Store 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 1 



c 



structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Retail Store 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 1 




45-32 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Multi-Use Office 

Use Type Code: 082 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Multi-Use Sales 

Use Type Code: 083 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: F 

Use Type: 

Multi-Use Storage 

Use Type Code: 084 

Construction Class: 1 






08/01/89 



45-33 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 373 

Grade: L+ 

Use Type: 

MuKI-Use Sales 

Use Type Code: 083 

Construction Class: 1 




r 



structure Type: 

Retail - Single Occupancy 



Use Type: 

Multi-Use Sales 

Use Type Code: 083 

Construction Class: 1 



c 



Structure Type: 

Retail - Multi Occupancy 

Structure Type Code: 374 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Multi-Use Office (082) 
Multi-Use Sales (083) 
Multi-Use Storage (084) 

Construction Class: 1 




s c 



45-34 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



structure Type: 

Retail - Multi Occupancy 



Structure Type Code: 374 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Retail Store 

Use Type Code: 034 

Construction Class: 1 




I. 




Structure Type; 

Retail - Multi Occupancy 

Structure Type Code: 374 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Multi-Use Apartment (081) 
Multi-Use Office (082) 
Multi-Use Sales (083) 

Construction Class: 1 



Structure Type: 
Bowling Alley 



Structure Type Code: 381 

Grade: A- 

Use Type: 

Multi-Use Sales 

Use Type Code: 083 

Construction Class: 1 




08/01/89 



45-35 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Tennis Club • Indoor 



Structure Type Code: 385 

Grade: A- 

Use Type: 
Tennis Club 

Use Type Code: 048 

Construction Class: 4 








Structure Type: 

Racquet Club - Indoor 



Structure Type Code: 386 

Grade: A+ 

Use Type: 

Racquet Ball Court 

Use Type Code; 049 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Cold Storage Facility 



Structure Type Code: 391 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Cold Storage 

Use Type Code: 060 

Construction Class: 1 




45-36 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 
Truck Terminal 



Structure Type Code: 395 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Warehouse 
(above normal partitions) 

Use Type Code: 045 

Construction Class: 4 




Structure Type: 
Mini Warehouse 




Structure Type Code: 396 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Mini Warehouse 

(above normal partitions) 

Use Type Code: 041 

Construction Class: 1 



v:<a 



Structure Type: 
Warehouse 



Structure Type Code: 398 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Warehouse (045) 
Multi-Use Office (082) 

Construction Class: 1 




.<•»■._ -'■ ' 



08/01/89 



45-37 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type; 
Warehouse 



Structure Type Code: 398 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Warehouse 

Use Type Code 045: 

Construction Class: 1 





Structure Type: 
Warehouse 



Structure Type Code: 398 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Warehouse 

Use Type Code: 045 

Construction Class: 1 



c 



Structure Type: 

Prefab Warehouse 



Structure Type Code: 399 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Multi-Use Sales 

Use Type Code: 083 

Construction Class: 4 




45-38 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 

Prefab Warehouse 

Structure Type Code: 399 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Warehouse (045) 
Multi-Use Office ((082) 

Construction Class: 4 



d 




Structure Type: 

Prefab Warehouse 



Structure Type Code: 399 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Warehouse 

Use Type Code: 045 

Construction Class: 4 



Structure Type: 

Manufacturing / Processing 

Structure Type Code: 401 

Grade: G- 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Manufacturing (043) 
Multi-Use Office (082) 

Construction Class: 2 



F 




08/01/89 



45-39 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



Structure Type: 

Manufacturing / Processing 

Structure Type Code: 401 

Grade: A 

Use Type/(Use Type Code) 
Light Manufacturing (044) 
Multi-Use Office (082) 

Construction Class: 1 




Structure Type: 

Manufacturing / Processing 




.fiiiftiifiliW^ ',\\ 




Structure Type Code: 401 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 

Light Manufacturing 

Use Type Code: 044 

Construction Class: 2 



Structure Type: 

Manufacturing / Processing 



Structure Type Code: 401 

Grade: A 

Use Type: 
Warehouse 

Use Type Code: 045 

Construction Class: 1 




45-40 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



Structure Type: 

Manufacturing / Processing 



Structure Type Code: 401 

Grade: F 

Use Type: 

Light Manufacturing 

Use Type Code: 044 

Construction Class: 4 





Structure Type: 

Manufacturing / Processing 



Structure Type Code: 401 

Grade: F 

Use Type: 

Light Manufacturing 

Use Type Code: 044 

Construction Class: 4 



08/01/89 



45-41 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



45.4. MANUAL PRICING INSTRUCTIONS 



Although the Commercial/Industrial CAMA 
System has computer pricing capability, it is 
sometimes desirable to manually price 
improvements. The following is the correct 
procedure for manually pricing 
commercial/industrial improvements utilizing the 
computer-generated cost tables. 

As an aid to manually pricing C/I 
improvements, a manual pricing work sheet has 
been provided. An example copy is shown at the 
end of this section. 

Each exterior/interior line is individually priced 
according to the following procedure. 

1. Determine the Basic Structure Code by 
utilizing the Building Construction Type 
Cost Schedule and the Structure Type Code 
located in the General Building Data section 
of either the data collection form or the 
computer screen COM-S5. 



7. Add the Building Base Rate (Step 3) and 
the Adjusted Wall Rale (Step 6). 

8. Determine the Interior Base Rate by 
utilizing the Interior Cost Schedule - based 
on the Use Code. 

9. The Interior Base Rate must be adjusted 
because of any difference from the cost of 
interior finish as included in the rate for the 
Use Type in the Interior Cost Schedule. 
Calculate the percent of unfmished area and 
the Adjusted Finish Rate (equal to the 
product of the unfinished percentage and the 
finish rate). 



Example: 

Use Code 034 (Retail Store) has an Interior Rate 
= $14.25 

Interior Finish coded as 80% finished. 
$14.25 * 20% unfinished = - $2.85 



Example: 

Structure Type 321 (Restaurant) has a Basic 
Structure Code of 03. 



2. Determine the Construction Class (Framing) 
and Floor Level of the Exterior/Interior 
Line. 

3. Determine the Building Base Rate by using 
the Building Construction Type Cost 
Schedule - based on the Basic Structure 
Code, Construction Type, and Floor Level. 

4. Determine the Exterior Wall Rate by 
utilizing the Exterior Wall Material Cost 
Schedule - based on the Exterior Wall Type 
Code and the Basic Structure Code. 

5. Determine the Perimeter Area Ratio, PAR, 
(expressed to the nearest thousandth) by 
dividing the perimeter of the building by the 
area. 

6. Multiply the Exterior Wall Rate times the 
PAR times the Wall Height to determine 
the Adjusted Wall Rate. This rate will be 
used to adjust the Building Base Rate for 
the cost of the exterior walls. 



10. Determine any necessary adjustments to the 
Interior Base Rate because of deviations 
from normal partitioning. Use the rates in 
the Interior Costs and Adjustments Schedule 
appropriate for Use and Portion codes. 

n. Determine any necessary adjustments to the 
Interior Base Rate for Heating and Air 
Conditioning. Use the rates in the Interior 
Costs and Adjustments Schedule appropriate 
for Use, Heating and Air Conditioning 
codes. 

NOTE: Central air conditioning may or 
may not be included in the base rate 
based on Use Code. 

12. Determine any necessary Adjustments to the 
Interior Base Rate for deviations from 
normal Plumbing. Use the adjustment 
appropriate to the Use and Plumbing codes. 

13. Determine the Total Interior Rate of the 
building by adding the Interior Base Rate 
and any adjustments for Interior Finish, 
Partitions, Heating, Air Conditioning, and 
Plumbing. 



45-42 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



» 



I 



14. Add the Total Exterior Rate (Step 7) and 19. 
the Total Interior Rate (Step 13) to 

determine the Total Square Foot Rate. 

15. Multiply the Total Square Foot Rate by the 
area of the Exterior/Interior line to 

determine the Unadjusted Value of the 20. 

ExteriorAnterior line. 

16. Determine the Cost of Building Other 
Features/Attached Improvements (BOF) by 21. 
utilizing the Building Other 

Features/Attached Improvements Cost 

Schedule - based on the BOF Type Code, 

unit of measure, and rate per unit. Select 

the rate per unit based on the BOF code, 

and multiply the rate times the appropriate 

measurement to determine the value of the 22. 

BOF (rounded to the nearest $10). 

17. Add the BOF value(s) from Step 16 which 
belong with the Exterior/Interior line to the 
Unadjusted Value of the Exterior/Interior 23. 
line to determine the Unadjusted 

Replacement Cost New (RCN) (rounded to 
the nearest SIO). 

18. Calculate a Percent Good for the 
Exterior/Interior line. Follow the 24. 
instructions in Section 47 to calculate a 

Percent Good. 



Multiply the Unadjusted RCN of the 
Exterior/Interior line times the Percent Good 
to determine the Base Replacement Cost 
New Less Depreciation (RCNLD) (rounded 
to the nearest SIO). 

Add all the Base RCNLD Exterior/Interior 
line values to determine a Sub-total of Base 
RCNLD. 

Multiply the Sub-total Base RCNLD times 
the Percent Complete, Grade Factor, 
Economic Condition Factor, County Index, 
and the Percent of Ownership (rounded to 
the nearest SIO) to determine the Building 
RCNLD. 

Calculate any Other Building and Yard 
Improvements (OBY) RCNLD Value using 
the Commercial Other Buildings and Yard 
Improvements Pricing Table (45.5.6). 

Calculate the Adjusted Total Other 
Improvement Value by multiplying the Total 
Improvement Value by the Percent Complete 
and Percent of Ownership (rounded to the 
nearest SIO). 

Add the Building RCNLD, Total OBY 
Value, and Adjusted Total Other 
Improvement Value to calculate the TOTAL 
VALUE of the Commercial record. 



I 



08/01/89 



45-43 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



45.5. COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION PRICING TABLES 



45.5.1. COMMERCIAL STRUCTURE PRICING TABLE 







Basic 




BASE 


HENT 






FIRST FLOOR 




UPPER FLOOR 




STRUCTURE TYPE 


Str. 


Wood 


Fire 


Fire 


Pre-Fab 


Wood 


Fire 


Fire 


Pre-Fab 


Wood 


Fire 


Fire 


Pre-Fab 


Codt 


Description 


Cod* 


Joist 


Resist. 


Proof 


Steel 


Joist 


Resist. 


Proof 


Steel 


Joist 


Resist. 


Proof 


Steel 


101 


Residential, One Family 


10 


3.75 


5.95 


.... 


.... 


8.35 


13.15 


.... 


.... 


6.00 


6.95 


.... 


.... 


102 


Residential, Two Family 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








103 


Residential, Three Family 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








104 


Residential, Four Family 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








105 


Mixed Res/Com (built as Res) 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








106 


Condominium (common element) 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








107 


Condominium (fee simple) 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








108 


Condominium (time share) 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








211 


Apartment, Garden (1-3 story) 


02 


7.15 


11.70 


11.70 





8.35 


13.20 


16.70 





6.00 


6.90 


11.20 





212 


Apartment, High Rise 


01 


12.30 


14.20 


14.20 





9.65 


14.20 


17.85 





6.65 


8.95 


12.15 





213 


Townhouse/Rowhouse 


10 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








314 


Hotel/Motel, High Rise 


01 


12.30 


14.20 


14.20 





9.65 


14.20 


17.85 





6.65 


8.95 


12.15 





315 


Hotel/Motel, Low Rise 


02 


7.15 


11.70 


11.70 





8.35 


13.20 


16.70 





6.00 


6.90 


11.20 





316 


Nursing Home 


02 


7.15 


11.70 


11.70 





8.35 


13.20 


16.70 





6.00 


6.90 


11.20 





318 


Boarding or Rooming House 


18 


3.75 


5.95 








8.35 


13.15 








6.00 


6.95 








319 


Mixed Res/Com (built as Com) 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


321 


Restaurant 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


325 


Fast Food 


09 






































327 


Bar or Lounge 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


328 


Night Club/Oinner Theatre 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


331 


Auto Dealer, Full Service 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


332 


Auto/Equipment Service Garage 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


333 


Service Station (full service) 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


334 


Service Station (self service) 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


335 


Trucii Stop 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


336 


Car Wash (manual) 


07 


9.35 


11.55 


11.55 


9.35 


8.50 


10.75 


13.30 


8.75 


6.15 


6.80 


8.95 


6.20 


337 


Car Wash (automatic) 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


338 


Parking Garage/Deck 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


340 


Super Regional Shopping Mall 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


341 


Regional Shopping Mall 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


5.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


342 


Community Shopping Center 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


343 


Neighborhood Shopping Center 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


U.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


344 


Strip Shopping Center 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


345 


Discount Department Store 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


346 


Department Store 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


347 


Supermarket 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


348 


Convenience Food Market 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.50 


7.30 


349 


Medical Office Building 


08 


12.85 


15.35 


15.35 





11.80 


20.25 


24.20 





8.90 


13.15 


16.90 





350 


Drive-up Bank 


05 


9.45 


14.90 








20.06 


34.86 








13.99 


19.65 








351 


Bank 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


352 


Savings Institution 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


353 


Office Build, Low Rise 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


354 


Office Build, High Rise 


08 


12.85 


15.35 


15.35 





11.80 


20.25 


24.20 





8.90 


13.15 


16.90 





355 


Office Condominium 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


356 


Retail Condominium 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


361 


Funeral Home 


02 


7.15 


11.70 


11.70 





8.35 


13.20 


16.70 





6.00 


6.90 


11.20 





362 


Veterinary CI inic 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


363 


Legitimate Theatre 


06 


12.25 


15.70 


15.70 


12.25 


12.05 


19.80 


24.30 


12.45 


8.25 


12.50 


16.35 


8.15 


364 


Motion Picture Theatre 


06 


12.25 


15.70 


15.70 


12.25 


12.05 


19.80 


24.30 


12.45 


8.25 


12.50 


16.35 


8.15 


365 


Cinema/Theatre 


06 


12.25 


15.70 


15.70 


12.25 


12.05 


19.80 


24.30 


12.45 


8.25 


12.50 


16.35 


8.15 


367 


Social or Fraternal Hall 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


368 


Hangar 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


369 


Day Care Center 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


371 


Downtown Row Type 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


373 


Retail - Single Occupancy 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


374 


Retail - Multi Occupancy 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


375 


Retail - Orive-Up 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 



45-44 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 







Basic 




BASEMENT 






FIRST FLOOR 




UPPER FLOOR 




STRUCTURE TYPE 


Str. 


Wood 


Fire 


Fire 


Pre-Fab 


Wood 


Fire 


Fire 


Pre-Fab 


Wood 


Fire 


Fire 


Pre-Fab 


Code 


Description 


Code 


Joist 


Resist. 


Proof 


Steel 


Joist 


Resist. 


Proof 


Steel 


Joist 


Resist. 


Proof 


Steel 


381 


Bowl ing Alley 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


382 


Skating Rink 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


383 


Health Spa 


05 


9.45 


15.00 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


384 


Swimming Pool, Indoor 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


385 


Tennis Club, Indoor 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


386 


Racquet Club, Indoor 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


387 


Country Club 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


388 


Club House 


03 


12.40 


15.00 


15.00 


11.55 


9.95 


15.75 


18.85 


9.90 


6.90 


9.85 


12.55 


7.30 


389 


Country Club with Golf Course 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


391 




04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


392 


Lumber Storage 


07 


9.35 


11.55 


11.55 


9.35 


8.50 


10.75 


13.30 


8.75 


6.15 


6.80 


8.95 


6.20 


395 


Truck Terminal 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.45 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


396 


Mini Warehouse 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.45 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


397 


Office/Warehouse 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.45 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


398 


Warehouse 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.45 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


399 


Warehouse, Prefab 


07 


9.35 


11.55 


11.55 


9.35 


8.50 


10.75 


13.30 


8.75 


6.15 


6.80 


8.95 


6.20 


401 


Manufacturing & Processing 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.45 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


405 


Research & Development 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


610 


Library 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


611 


School 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


612 


College or University 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


513 


Dormitories 


01 


12.30 


14.20 


14.20 





9.65 


14.20 


17.85 





6.65 


8.95 


12.15 





614 


Churches 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


620 


Auditorium 


06 


12.25 


15.70 


15.70 


12.25 


12.05 


19.80 


24.30 


12.45 


8.25 


12.50 


16.35 


8.15 


640 


Hospital 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


650 


Post Office 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


660 


Pol ice or Fire Station 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


670 


Correctional Facilities 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


680 


Cultural Facility 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


690 


Rail/Bus/Air Terminal 


05 


9.45 


14.90 


14.90 


11.20 


11.40 


18.00 


21.20 


11.75 


7.95 


11.10 


14.10 


7.65 


710 


Telephone Equipment Building 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


715 


Telephone Service Garage 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


720 


Radio/TV Transmitter Build 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 


725 


Radio, TV, Motion Pic Studio 


04 


12.15 


15.00 


15.00 


12.25 


11.20 


16.10 


19.05 


9.90 


8.15 


10.10 


12.60 


7.25 



45.5.2. COMMERCIAL EXTERIOR WALL PRICING TABLE 



EXTERIOR WALL MATERIALS 
Code Description 



BASIC STRUCTURE COOES 
4 5 6 



10 



00 


None 










---- 


____ 








---_ 


"V.V." 


""" ""!^! 


01 


Brick 




10.25 


8.70 


10.45 


9.95 


11.65 


11.45 


8.40 


11.65 


8.70 


02 


Frame 




6.90 


5.40 


7.40 


6.90 


7.65 


7.50 


5.80 


7.65 


6.40 


03 


Concrete Block 




8.90 


7.95 


8.75 


8.15 


9.80 


9.35 


6.40 


9.80 


7.95 


04 


Brick and Concrete 


Block 


9.50 


8.35 


9.65 


9.10 


10.70 


10.35 


7.40 


10.70 


8.35 


05 


Tile 




12.75 


12.55 


12.80 


12.15 


12.55 


12.60 





12.55 


12.55 


06 


Masonry and Frame 




8.50 


7.50 


8.95 


8.40 


9.65 


9.45 


7.05 


9.65 


7.50 


07 


Metal, Light 










2.20 


2.20 


2.20 


2.20 


1.90 


2.20 





08 


Metal, Sandwich 










7.35 


6.90 


6.90 


6.90 


6.90 


6.90 





09 


Concrete, Load Bearing 


9.65 


8.95 


10.25 


9.90 


11.05 


10.75 


7.80 


11.05 


8.95 


10 


Concrete, Non-Load 


Bear 


9.20 





9.35 


9.15 


10.20 


9.30 


7.30 


10.20 





11 


Glass 




14.90 


14.05 


15.05 


13.75 


15.80 


15.50 


12.05 


15.80 


14.05 


12 


Glass and Masonry 




13.65 


12.75 


13.60 


12.50 


15.25 


16.15 





15.25 


12.75 


13 


Enclosure 













2.00 








2.10 








14 


Concrete, Tilt-Up 










8.10 


7.35 


8.40 


8.35 


5.55 


8.40 





15 


Solar Glass 




22.60 


22.40 


23.95 


22.15 


26.30 


25.85 





26.30 


22.40 


16 


Corrugated Asbestos 




6.15 


5.80 


6.80 


6.45 


7.10 


6.90 


4.65 


7.10 


5.80 


17 


Native Stone 




8.50 


7.50 


8.95 


8.40 


9.65 


9.45 


7.05 


9.65 


7.50 



08/01/89 



45-45 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



45.5.3. COMMERCIAL INTERIOR FINISH PRICING TABLE 







INTER 


NO 




PARTITIONS 




USE TYPES 


BASE 


INTER 




BELOW 


ABOVE 


Code 


Description 


RATE 


FINISH 


NONE 


NORH 


NORM 


Oil 


Apartment 


18.15 


-3.55 


-6.90 


-0.70 


0.75 


012 


Hotel 


25.50 


-3.25 


-10.30 


-1.20 


1.45 


013 


Motel 


23.00 


-3.05 


-9.55 


-1.20 


1.45 


021 


Oormi tory 


26.45 


-3.25 


-10.45 


-1.20 


1.40 


024 


Dwelling Conversion - Multiple 


17.70 


-3.05 


-6.65 


-1.15 


1.45 


025 


Dwelling Conversion - Office 


17.70 


-3.05 


-6.65 


-1.15 


1.45 


026 


Dwelling Conversion - Sales 


17.70 


-3.05 


-6.65 


-1.15 


1.45 


027 


Dwell ing 


17.70 


-3.05 


-6.65 


-1.15 


1.45 


030 


Laundromat or Dry Cleaners 


20.38 


-5.27 


-2.28 


- .78 


0.91 


031 


Restaurant 


38.80 


-6.50 


-8.85 


-3.10 


6.20 


032 


Department Store 


20.20 


-4.05 


-3.90 


-0.85 


1.15 


033 


Discount Store/Market 


14.05 


-4.05 


-1.35 


-0.15 


0.25 


034 


Retail Store 


14.25 


-4.05 


-1.75 


-0.60 


0.70 


035 


Tavern or Bar 


23.55 


-4.05 


-5.80 


-1.95 


3.15 


036 


Lounge 


23.55 


-4.05 


-5.80 


-1.95 


3.15 


037 


Cafeteria 


25.65 


-3.30 


-3.05 


-1.10 


1.65 


038 


Convenience Store 


14.25 


-4.05 


-1.75 


-0.60 


0.70 


039 


Dairy Sales 


15.70 


-4.45 


-1.75 


-0.60 


0.70 


040 


Barber or Beauty Shop 


15.66 


-3.56 


-1.55 


- .53 


-0.62 


041 


Mini Warehouse 


4.90 


-0.70 


-0.65 


-0.50 


0.65 


042 


Hangar 


5.10 


-0.70 


-0.50 


-0.15 


0.25 


043 


Manufacturing 


5.95 


-0.70 


-0.80 


-0.30 


0.65 


044 


Light Manufacturing 


5.95 


-0.70 


-0.80 


-0.30 


0.65 


045 


Warehouse 


4.90 


-0.70 


-0.65 


-0.50 


0.65 


046 


Auto Showroom or Office 


15.95 


-3.65 


-2.70 


-0.70 


1.05 


047 


Auto Parts & Service 


8.40 


-0.70 


-0.80 


-0.30 


0.50 


048 


Tennis Club 


12.95 


-0.70 


-2.70 


-0.30 


0.50 


049 


Racquetball Court 


24.75 


-1.50 


-13.60 


-1.35 


3.95 


050 


Skating Rink (Ice or Roller) 


11.70 


-1.85 


-1.70 


-0.60 


0.70 


051 


Bank & Savings Institution 


38.40 


-6.95 


-14.90 


-2.30 


2.65 


052 


Medical Center 


38.60 


-6.95 


-15.95 


-2.35 


2.70 


053 


Office Building 


30.20 


-6.95 


-11.65 


-2.55 


3.30 


054 


Nursing Home 


34.30 


-6.95 


-12.15 


-1.95 


2.35 


055 


School 


31.05 


-6.95 


-11.65 


-0.50 


1.95 


056 


Hospital 


53.15 


-6.95 


-22.15 


-2.00 


2.20 


057 


Library 


33.50 


-6.95 


-11.65 


-1.50 


1.75 


058 


Funeral Home 


24.70 


-3.65 


-9.65 


-2.35 


3.05 


059 


Post Office 


33.50 


-6.95 


-11.65 


-1.50 


1.75 


061 


Auditorium or Theatre 


25.95 


-3.45 


-9.45 


-1.75 


2.60 


062 


Cinema 


25.00 


-3.45 


-9.50 


-2.20 


2.80 


063 


Religious Institution 


25.55 


-3.45 


-9.95 


-2.30 


3.05 


064 


Social or Fraternal Hall 


23.85 


-3.45 


-8.60 


-1.65 


1.90 


070 


Service Station w/ Bays 


14.40 


-0.70 


-5.95 


-0.70 


0.80. 


071 


Service Sta, Retail Conversion 


15.20 


-0.70 


-5.95 


-0.70 


0.80 " 


072 


Service Sta, Storage Conversion 


14.40 


-0.70 


-5.95 


-0.70 


0.80 


073 


Service Station w/o Bays 


21.75 


-0.70 


-5.95 


-0.70 


0.80 


074 


Car Wash - Manual 


5.95 


-1.50 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


075 


Car Wash - Automatic 


5.95 


-1.50 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


081 


Multi-Use - Apartment 


17.85 


-2.80 


-7.10 


-0.70 


0.80 


082 


Multi-Use - Office 


24.70 


-3.65 


-9.65 


-2.35 


3.05 


083 


Multi-Use - Sales 


11.70 


-1.85 


-1.70 


-0.60 


0.70 


084 


Multi-Use - Storage 


5.95 


-1.50 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


085 


Enclosure 


18.35 


-3.60 


-6.65 


-1.15 


1.45 


086 


Support Area 


5.95 


-1.50 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


088 


Rest room/ Locker Room Facility 


5.95 


-1.50 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


090 


Parking Garage 


1.80 





-0.65 


-0.50 


0.65 


091 


Unfinished Residential Basement 


4.40 


-1.50 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.35 


095 


Covered Mall 


13.20 


-4.05 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


100 


Franchise Fast Food Restaurant 


58.85 














990 


Parking, Upper Deck 


0.10 















45-46 



08/01/89 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



45.5.4. COMMERCIAL HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING, AND PLUMBING PRICING TABLE 







HEATING 


AIR 


CONDITIONING 




PLUMBING 




USE TYPES 


HOT 


HOT 










BELOW 


ABOVE 


Code 


Description 


NONE AIR 


WATER UNIT 


NONE 


CENTRAL 


UNIT 


NONE 


NORM 


NORM 


Oil 


Apartment 


-1.45 


-1.00 


-2.20 




-0.85 


-2.55 


-0.60 


0.70 


012 


Hotel 


-1.65 


-1.15 


-2.45 




-1.00 


-4.35 


-1.10 


1.40 


013 


Motel 


-1.55 


-1.15 


-2.45 




-1.00 


-4.05 


-1.05 


1.40 


021 


Dormitory 


-1.65 


-1.15 


-2.30 




-4.20 


-4.20 


-1.10 


1.50 


024 


Dwelling Conversion - Multiple 


-1.55 


-1.15 


-2.30 




-1.00 


-2.55 


-0.75 


1.10 


025 


Dwelling Conversion - Office 


-1.55 


-1.15 


-2.30 




-1.00 


-2.55 


-0.75 


1.10 


026 


Dwelling Conversion - Sales 


-1.55 


-1.15 


-2.30 




-1.00 


-2.55 


-0.75 


1.10 


027 


Dwelling 


-1.55 


-1.15 


-2.30 




-1.00 


-2.55 


-0.75 


1.10 


030 


Laundromat or Dry Cleaners 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-2.97 


-1.29 


1.81 


031 


Restaurant 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-5.95 




-1.45 


-5.10 


-1.70 


2.50 


032 


Department Store 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-2.00 


-1.75 


0.65 


033 


Discount Store/Market 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-1.20 


-0.30 


1.20 


034 


Retail Store 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-1.15 


-0.50 


0.70 


035 


Tavern or Bar 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-5.10 


-1.70 


2.50 


036 


Lounge 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-5.10 


-1.70 


2.50 


037 


Cafeteria 


-1.20 


-0.80 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-3.30 


-1.15 


1.65 


038 


Convenience Store 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-1.15 


-0.45 


0.70 


039 


Dairy Sales 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-1.15 


-0.45 


0.70 


040 


Barber or Beauty Shop 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 


-2.51 


-1.09 


1.53 


041 


Mini Warehouse 


-1.65 


-0.85 




2.50 


1.15 


-0.75 


-0.55 


0.70 


042 


Hangar 


-1.65 


-0.85 




2.50 


1.15 


-0.75 


-0.65 


0.75 


043 


Manufacturing 


-1.65 


-0.85 




2.50 


1.15 


-0.85 


-0.30 


0.50 


044 


Light Manufacturing 


-1.65 


-0.85 




2.50 


1.15 


-0.85 


-0.30 


0.50 


045 


Warehouse 


-1.65 


-0.85 




2.50 


1.15 


-0.75 


-0.65 


0.70 


046 


Auto Showroom or Office 


-1.65 


-0.85 


-2.50 




-1.15 


-1.85 


-0.60 


0.70 


047 


Auto Parts & Service 


-1.65 


-0.85 


-2.50 




-1.15 


-1.05 


-0.50 


0.70 


048 


Tennis Club 


-1.65 


-0.85 


-2.50 




-1.15 


-1.85 


-0.50 


0.70 


049 


Racquetball Court 


-1.35 


-0.60 


-2.00 




-1.05 


-1.35 


-0.35 


1.35 


050 


Skating Rink (Ice or Roller) 


-1.55 


-0.85 


-2.65 




-1.40 


-1.15 


-0.50 


0.70 


051 


Bank & Savings Institution 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-3.15 


-1.15 


1.70 


052 


Medical Center 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-4.75 


-1.75 


2.45 


053 


Office Building 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-1.55 


-0.25 


1.95 


054 


Nursing Home 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-5.00 


-1.45 


1.95 


055 


School 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-3.25 


-1.10 


1.55 


056 


Hospital 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-7.95 


-1.90 


2.60 


057 


Library 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-2.60 


-1.00 


1.45 


058 


Funeral Home 


-2.30 


-1.65 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-2.20 


-0.85 


1.35 


059 


Post Office 


-2.35 


-1.70 


-3.05 




-1.40 


-3.25 


-1.10 


1.55 


061 


Auditorium or Theatre 


-2.65 


-1.95 


-3.05 




-1.20 


-3.25 


-0.75 


1.05 


062 


Cinema 


-2.65 


-1.95 


-3.05 




-1.20 


-2.35 


-0.60 


0.70 


063 


Religious Institution 


-2.65 


-1.95 


-3.05 




-1.20 


-2.50 


-0.85 


1.35 


064 


Social or Fraternal Hall 


-2.65 


-1.95 


-3.05 




-1.20 


-2.60 


-1.00 


1.45 


070 


Service Station w/ Bays 


-1.50 


-0.25 




2.50 


1.15 


-4.30 


-1.45 


0.80 


071 


Service Sta, Retail Conversion 


-1.50 


-0.25 




2.50 


1.15 


-4.30 


-1.45 


0.80 


072 


Service Sta, Storage Conversion 


-1.50 


-0.25 




2.50 


1.15 


-4.30 


-1.45 


0.80 


073 


Service Station w/o Bays 


-1.50 


-0.25 




2.50 


1.15 


-11.65 


-5.95 


2.20 


074 


Car Wash - Manual 


-1.55 


-0.85 




2.45 


1.10 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


075 


Car Wash - Automatic 


-1.55 


-0.85 




2.45 


1.10 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


081 


Multi-Use - Apartment 


-1.45 


-1.05 


-2.15 




-0.85 


-2.20 


-0.65 


0.70 


082 


Multi-Use - Office 


-2.30 


-1.65 


-3.00 




-1.40 


-2.20 


-0.85 


1.35 


083 


Multi-Use - Sales 


-1.55 


-0.85 


-2.65 




-1.40 


-1.15 


-0.50 


0.70 


084 


Multi-Use - Storage 


-1.55 


-0.85 




2.45 


1.10 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


085 


Enclosure 


-1.55 


-1.15 


-2.30 




-0.85 


-2.55 


-0.75 


1.10 


086 


Support Area 


-1.55 


-0.85 




2.45 


1.10 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


088 


Restroom/Locker Room Facility 


-1.55 


-0.85 




2.45 


1.10 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.30 


090 


Parking Garage 


























091 


Unfinished Residential Basement 


1.55 


1.55 0.75 




2.45 


1.15 


-0.70 


-0.25 


0.35 


095 


Covered Mall 


-1.70 


-1.00 


-2.70 




-1.45 











100 


Franchise Fast Food Restaurant 


























990 


Parking, Upper Deck 



























08/01/89 



45-47 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



45.5.5. COMMERCIAL BUILDING OTHER FEATURES PRICING TABLE 



BUILDING OTHER FDkTURES 




Unit of 




Description 


Code 


Measure 


Rate 


Air Conditioning, central 


ACl 


SqFt 


2.65 


Air Conditioning, unit 


AC2 


SqFt 


1.40 


Aerial Walkway 


AWl 


SqFt 


160.00 


Atrium, cover only 


ATI 


SqFt 


25.90 


Atrium, walls 


AT2 


SqFt 


9.35 


(square foot of wall area) 








Balcony 


BAl 


SqFt 


2.60 


Bank Orive-In, canopy 


BCl 


SqFt 


23.30 


Bank Orive-In, teller booth 


BC2 


SqFt 


59.95 


Bank Orive-In, window 


BC3 


Each 


6,250.00 


Bank Night Deposit Chute 


BE6 


Each 


5.350.00 


Bank Pneumatic Tubes 


BEO 


Each 


530.00 


Bank Service Window 


BE8 


Each 


5,770.00 


Bank Vault, money, no door 


BEl 


SqFt 


83.50 


Bank Vault, record storage. 


BE2 


SqFt 


25.20 


no door 








Bank Vault Door, money. 


BE3 


Each 


5,970.00 


circular shape 








Bank Vault Door, money. 


BE4 


Each 


25,900.00 


rectangular shape 








Bank Vault Door, 


BE5 


Each 


2,050.00 


record storage only 








Basement Top 


BTl 


SqFt 


5.95 


Built-in 


BIl 


Each 


100.00 


Cooler, chiller 


CFl 


SqFt 


5.80 


Cooler, freezer 


CF2 


SqFt 


7.30 


Cooler, sharp freeze 


CF3 


SqFt 


9.90 


Canopy Roof, low cost 


CP5 


SqFt 


5.05 


Canopy Roof, average 


CP6 


SqFt 


6.20 


Canopy Roof, good 


CP7 


SqFt 


5.05 


Computer Room Floor 


CRl 


SqFt 


9.10 


Computer Room Air Control 


CR2 


SqFt 


6.00 


Computer Room Fire Suppression 


CR3 


SqFt 


7.75 


Carport 


RCl 


SqFt 


6.20 


Covered Mall 


CMl 


SqFt 


19.40 


Craneways 


CWl 


LnFt 


28.45 


Dock Level Floor 


DHl 


SqFt 


0.85 


Elevator - Electric Freight 


ELI 


Each 


See 


Elevator - Electric Passenger 


EL2 


Each 


Elevator 


Elevator - Hydraulic Freight 


EL3 


Each 


Pricing 


Elevator - Hydraulic Passenger 


EL4 


Each 


Table 


Escalator, stair width 32" 


ELS 


Ft Rise 


5,200.00 


Escalator, stair width 48" 


EL6 


Ft Rise 


6,200.00 


Enclosed Entry 


EEl 


SqFt 


17.45 


Fireplace with 1 opening 


FIl 


Each 


2,350.00 


Fireplace with 2 openings 


FI2 


Each 


3.500.00 


Fireplace with 3 openings 


FI3 


Each 


4,650.00 


Garage, attached, frame. 


RAl 


SqFt 


11.00 


finished 








Garage, attached, masonry. 


RA2 


SqFt 


14.05 


finished 








Garage, attached, frame. 


RA3 


SqFt 


8.80 


unfinished 








Garage, attached, masonry, 


RA4 


SqFt 


11.24 


unfinished 








Greenhouse, economy 


GHl 


SqFt 


6.40 


Greenhouse, average 


GH2 


SqFt 


8.20 


Greenhouse, good 


GH3 


SqFt 


9.55 


Hoists, single plunger 


HSl 


Each 


2,950.00 


Hoists, double plunger 


HS2 


Each 


3,900.00 



BUILDING OTHER FEATURES 




Unit of 




Description 


Code Heasure 


Rate 


Loading Dock, steel /concrete 


LOl 


SqFt 


7.75 


Loading Dock, wood 


L02 


SqFt 


5.25 


Loading Dock, interior 


L03 


SqFt 


16.85 


Truck and Train Wells 


L04 


SqFt 


9.25 


Dock Level ers 


LD5 


SqFt 


3,800.00 


Miscellaneous Structure 


MSI 


Each 


0.90 


Open Areas, high rise 


OAl 


SqFt 


4.80 


apartments & hotels 








Open Areas, garden apartments, 


, 0A2 


SqFt 


4.40 


motels & dwel 1 ings 








Open Areas, stores & 


0A3 


SqFt 


5.15 


restaurants 








Open Areas, industrial & 


0A4 


SqFt 


5.15 


warehouses 








Open Areas, banks h office 


0A5 


SqFt 


6.30 


building low rise 








Open Areas, theaters & 


0A6 


SqFt 


6.80 


audi tori urns 








Open Areas, light metal 


0A7 


SqFt 


3.70 


buildings 








Open Areas, office buildings 


0A8 


SqFt 


6.45 


high rise 








Overhead Doors, wood/metal 


ODl 


SqFt 


8.95 


Overhead Doors, roll steel 


0D2 


SqFt 


14.20 


Overhead Doors, wood/metal 


0D3 


SqFt 


11.90 


with motor and operator 








Overhead Doors, roll steel 


0D4 


SqFt 


18.90 


with motor and operator 








Patio, wood 


RTl 


SqFt 


3.50 


Patio, concrete 


RT2 


SqFt 


1.20 


Patio, stone or tile. 


RT3 


SqFt 


1.40 


sand base 








Patio, stone or tile. 


RT4 


SqFt 


3.20 


concrete base 








Patio, brick 


RT5 


SqFt 


2.95 


Patio, masonry stoop 


RT6 


SqFt 


6.00 


Porch, open 


PPl 


SqFt 


14.50 


Porch, screened 


PP2 


SqFt 


19.90 


Porch, enclosed 


PP4 


SqFt 


22.65 


Porch, open, upper deck 


PP5 


SqFt 


9.05 


Porch, screened, upper deck 


PP6 


SqFt 


12.30 


Porch, enclosed, upper deck 


PPS 


SqFt 


13.60 


Roof, monitor 


MRl 


SqFt 


2.50 


Roof, high bay 


MR2 


SqFt 


2.50 


Skating Rink, indoor, 


SKI 


SqFt 


9.80 


Ice skating 








Sprinkler System, wet pipe 


SSI 


SqFt 


1.15 


Sprinkler System, dry pipe 


SS2 


SqFt 


1.30 


Store Front, wood frame 


SFl 


LnFt 


64.75 


Store Front, avg metal frame 


SF2 


LnFt 


130.00 


Store Front, elaborate 


SF3 


LnFt 


195.00 


Swimming Pool, indoor 


RP5 


SqFt 


32.40 


Tunnel, grain elevator 


TUl 


LnFt 


225.00 


Utility Building, frame 


RSI 


SqFt 


6.80 


Utility Building, metal 


RS2 


SqFt 


7.60 


Utility Building, brick/stone 


RS3 


SqFt 


8.25 



45-48 



08/01/69 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



45.5.6. COMMERCIAL OTHER BUILDING AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS PRICING TABLE 



OBY IMPROVEMENTS 




Unit of 




Description 


Code 


Meisure 


Rate 


Air Conditioning, central 


ACl 


SqFt 


2.65 


Air Conditioning, unit 


AC2 


SqFt 


1.40 


Annex, wood crib 


ANl 


Bu 


Table 


Annex, concrete 


AN2 


Bu 


Follows 


Bank Drive-In, canopy 


BCl 


SqFt 


23.30 


Bank Drive-In, teller booth 


BC2 


SqFt 


59.95 


Boat Dock, light wood deck. 


BDl 


SqFt 


12.45 


light post 








Boat Dock, medium wood deck. 


BD2 


SqFt 


18.70 


wood girders 








Boat Dock, heavy wood deck. 


803 


SqFt 


31.15 


heavy piling 








Boat House, frame or concrete 


BBl 


SqFt 


7.05 


Boat House, masonry 


BB2 


SqFt 


9.30 


Boat Slip, economy 


BSl 


Each 


3,650.00 


Boat Slip, average 


BS2 


Each 


4,550.00 


Boat Slip, good 


BS3 


Each 


5,450.00 


Bulkhead 


BKl 


LnFt 


100.00 


Canopy Roof, low cost 


CP5 


SqFt 


5.05 


Canopy Roof, average 


CP6 


SqFt 


8.40 


Canopy Roof, good 


CP7 


SqFt 


12.30 


Carport 


RCl 


SqFt 


5.05 


Drive House, wood & metal 


DHl 


SqFt 


42.50 


Good quality 








Drive House, wood & metal 


DH2 


SqFt 


30.25 


Average qual ity 








Drive House, wood & metal 


DH3 


SqFt 


18.00 


Low Cost qual ity 








Drive House, concrete 


DH4 


SqFt 


54.00 


Good qual ity 








Drive House, concrete 


DH5 


SqFt 


41.00 


Average quality 








Drive House, unique 


OHO 


SqFt 


20.00 


Low Cost qual ity 








Drive-In Theater Screen 


DTI 


SqFt 


12.15 


Elevators, wood crib 


ELI 


Bu 


Table 


Elevators, concrete 


EL2 


Bu 


Follows 


Fence, chain link 


RFl 


SqFt 


See 


Fence, picket 


RF2 


SqFt 


Res/Ag 


Fence, stockade 


RF3 


SqFt 


OBY 


Fence, post & rail 


RF4 


SqFt 


Pricing 


Fence, basketweave 


RF5 


SqFt 


Tables 


Fence, brick or masonry 


RF6 


SqFt 


5.00 


Fence, ornamental iron 


RF7 


SqFt 


5.00 


Fence, barbed wire - 4 strand 


RF8 


LnFt 


1.90 


Fence, stock yard corrals 


RF9 


LnFt 


6.20 


Fence, pipe & post 


RFC 


LnFt 


8.64 


Flat Storage, wood 


FSl 


Bu 


Table 


Flat Storage, metal 


FS2 


Bu 


Fol lows 


Fuel Storage Tank, underground 


AUl 


Ga1 


See 


Fuel Storage Tank, aboveground 


AU2 


Gal 


Res/Ag 



OBY IMPROVEMENTS 
Oesriptlon 



Unit of 
Code Measure Rate 



Fuel Storage Tank, AU3 Gal OBY 

horizontal pressure Pricing 

Garage, detached, frame, RGl SqFt Tables 

finished J 

Garage, detached, masonry, RG2 SqFt I 

finished i 

Garage, detached, frame, RG3 SqFt i 

unfinished I 

Garage, detached, masonry RG4 SqFt i 

unfinished I 



Greenhouse, economy 
Greenhouse, average 
Greenhouse, good 
Kioska (Fotomat, etc.) 
Light, mercury vapor, 

wall mounted 
Light, incandescent, 

wall mounted 
Light, fluorescent, 

pole & bracket 
Light, incandescent, 

pole & bracket 
Light, mercury vapor, 

pole & bracket 
Miscellaneous Structure 
Paving, asphalt 
Paving, concrete, 

4" without wire mesh 
Paving, concrete, 

5"-6" with wire mesh 
Plumbing Fixture 
Railroad Trackage (spurs) 
Restroom Structure, 

frame/concrete block 
Restroom Structure, 

brick or stone 
Service Station Attendant's 

booth steel or glass on 
Service Station Attendant's 

booth stucco or glass on 
Shed, machinery 
Shed, aluminium 
Shed, finished metal 
Shed, quonset 
Shed, lumber, frame, 

2 sides open 
Shed, lumber, frame, 

4 sides open 
Scales, platform 
Scales, truck 
Scales, cattle 



Skating Rink, outdoor, 

ice skating 
Sprinkler System, wet pipe 
Sprinkler System, dry pipe 
Swimming Pool, outdoor, 

commercial 
Tanks, wooden 
Tanks, corrugated steel 
Tanks, bolted steel hopper 
Tanks, welded steel 
Tanks, bolted steel 
Tanks, underground fiberglass 
Tennis Court, asphalt 
Tennis Court, concrete 
Tennis Court, clay 
Tunnel, grain elevators 
Utility Building, frame 
Utility Building, metal 
Utility Building, brick/stone 



GHl 
GH2 
GH3 
KFl 
LTl 

LT2 

LT3 

LT4 



MSI 
PAl 
PA2 



PBl 
RRl 
TRl 



SqFt 
SqFt 
SqFt 
SqFt 
Each 

Each 

Each 

Each 



LT5 Each 



Each 
SqFt 
SqFt 



PA3 SqFt 



Each 
LnFt 
SqFt 



TR2 SqFt 



GSl 
masonry 
GS2 
frame 
SHI 
SH2 
SH3 
SH4 
SH5 



SqFt 

SqFt 

SqFt 
SqFt 
SqFt 
SqFt 
SqFt 



SH6 SqFt 



1 

i 

I 
120.00 
210.00 

63.35 

570.00 

500.00 

645.00 

0.90 
1.15 
2.15 

2.35 

400.00 
54.40 
20.70 

24.60 

77.70 

52.15 

6.40 
7.85 
11.20 
9.15 
3.95 

3.55 



CAI 


Pounds 


See 


CA2 


Pounds 


Res/Ag 


CA3 


Pounds 


OBY 
Tables 


SKI 


SqFt 


9.80 


SSI 


SqFt 


1.15 


SS2 


SqFt 


1.30 


RP5 


SqFt 


36.75 


TAl 


Bu 


Table 


TA2 


Bu 


Follows 


TA3 


Bu 


i 


TA4 


Bu 


i 


TA6 


Bu 


I 


TA7 


Gal 


I 


TCI 


Each 


15,620.00 


TC2 


Each 


18,780.00 


TC3 


Each 


10,960.00 


TUl 


LnFt 


225.00 


RSI 


SqFt 


5.75 


RS2 


SqFt 


7.60 


RS3 


SqFt 


8.85 



08/01/89 



45-49 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



45.5.7. COMMERCIAL ELEVATOR PRICING TABLES 
ELECTRIC FREIGHT - ELI 



Capacity: 


2000 


4000 


6000 


8000 


10000 


12000 


14000 


16000 


18000 


20000 


Speed 






















100 


41000 


44400 


47800 


51150 


54550 


57950 


61350 


64750 


68150 


71500 


150 


44200 


48350 


52550 


56750 


60900 


65100 


69300 


73500 


77650 


81850 


200 


47350 


52350 


57300 


62300 


67300 


72250 


77250 


82200 


87200 


92200 


250 


50550 


56300 


62100 


67850 


73650 


79400 


85200 


90950 


96750 


102500 


300 


53700 


60300 


66850 


73400 


80000 


86550 


93150 


99700 


106250 


112850 


350 


56900 


64250 


71600 


79000 


86350 


93700 


101100 


108450 


115800 


123150 


400 


60050 


68250 


76400 


84550 


92700 


100850 


109000 


117200 


125350 


133500 



ELECTRIC PASSENGER - EL2 



Capacity: 


1500 


2000 


2500 


3000 


3500 


4000 


4500 


5000 


Speed 


















100 


35500 


40500 


45000 


50000 


54500 


59500 


64000 


69000 


150 


39500 


44500 


49500 


54000 


59000 


63500 


68500 


73000 


200 


44000 


48500 


53500 


58500 


63000 


68000 


72500 


77500 


260 


48000 


53000 


57500 


62500 


67500 


72000 


77000 


81500 


300 


52500 


57000 


62000 


67000 


71500 


76500 


81000 


86000 


400 


94000 


100000 


105000 


IIOOOO 


115000 


121000 


126000 


131000 


500 


109000 


115000 


122000 


128000 


135000 


141000 


147000 


154000 


600 


124000 


131000 


139000 


146000 


154000 


161000 


168000 


176000 


700 


139000 


147000 


156000 


164000 


173000 


181000 


190000 


198000 


800 


154000 


163000 


173000 


182000 


192000 


201000 


211000 


220000 


900 


168000 


179000 


190000 


200000 


211000 


221000 


232000 


243000 


1000 


183000 


195000 


207000 


218000 


230000 


242000 


253000 


265000 


1100 


198000 


211000 


224000 


236000 


249000 


262000 


274000 


287000 


1200 


213000 


227000 


241000 


254000 


268000 


282000 


296000 


309000 


1300 


228000 


243000 


257000 


272000 


287000 


302000 


317000 


332000 


1400 


243000 


259000 


274000 


290000 


306000 


322000 


338000 


354000 



HYDRAULIC FREIGHT - EL3 



Capacity: 


2000 


4000 


6000 


8000 


10000 


12000 


14000 


16000 


18000 


20000 


Speed 






















50 


13700 


18900 


24100 


29200 


34400 


39600 


44800 


50000 


75280 


79020 


100 


19000 


24700 


30400 


36100 


41900 


47600 


53300 


59000 


85810 


90440 


150 


24300 


30500 


36800 


43000 


49300 


55500 


61800 


68000 


96350 


101850 


200 


29600 


36300 


43100 


49900 


56700 


63500 


70300 


77000 


106890 


113270 



HYDRAULIC PASSENGER - EL4 



Capacity: 


1500 


2000 


2500 


3000 


3500 


4000 


4500 


5000 


Speed 


















50 


15000 


17500 


20000 


22500 


25000 


27500 


30100 


32600 


75 


17700 


20400 


23100 


25800 


28500 


31300 


34000 


36700 


100 


20400 


23300 


26200 


29100 


32100 


35000 


37900 


40800 


125 


23100 


26200 


29300 


32400 


35600 


38700 


41800 


44900 


150 


25800 


29100 


32400 


35800 


39100 


42400 


45700 


49000 


200 


31300 


35000 


38700 


42400 


46100 


49800 


53500 


57200 



45-50 



08/01/89 



45.5.8. GRAIN ELEVATORS & ANNEXES 



45. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 



45.5.9. FLAT STORAGE 





Wood/H 


Etal 


Concrete 


Capacity 


Elevator 


Annex 


Elevator 


Annex 


(Bushels) 


ELI 


ANl 


EL2 


AN2 


10.000 


7.69 








15,000 


6.43 








20,000 


5.68 








25.000 


5.17 








30.000 


4.79 


2.98 






40,000 


4.25 


2.61 






50,000 


3.89 


2.36 






60,000 


3.62 


2.17 


4.37 


2.56 


75,000 


3.33 


1.96 


4.06 


2.36 


100.000 


2.99 


1.73 


3.70 


2.13 


150,000 


2.59 


1.45 


3.27 


1.85 


200,000 


2.35 


1.28 


3.02 


1.69 


250,000 


2.19 


1.17 


2.85 


1.57 


300,000 


2.07 


1.08 


2.72 


1.49 


400,000 






2.54 


1.38 


500,000 






2.42 


1.30 


600,000 






2.33 


1.24 


750,000 






2.23 


1.17 


1,000.000 






2.H 


1.10 


1,500,000 






1.98 


1.01 


2,000,000 






1.90 


0.96 



Capacity 


Wood 


Steel 


(Bushels) 


FSl 


FS2 


50,000 


0.84 


0.78 


60,000 


0.71 


0.69 


75.000 


0.63 


0.64 


100,000 


0.57 


0.60 


150,000 


0.53 


0.57 


200,000 


0.48 


0.53 


250.000 


0.44 


0.51 


300.000 


0.41 


0.49 


400,000 


0.38 


0.47 


500,000 


0.34 


0.44 


600,000 


0.30 


0.41 


750.000 


0.27 


0.40 


1,000.000 


0.26 


0.39 


1,500,000 


0.24 


0.38 



45.5.10. TANKS 



45.5.11. BOLTED INDUSTRIAL BINS 
(HOPPERS) 





TAl 


TA2 


TA4 


TA6 


TA7 


Capacity 


Wood 


Ga1v 


Welded 


Bolted 


Undgrd 


(gallons) 


Tank 


Steel 


Steel 


Steel 


Fibgis 


500 


4.52 


1.45 




3.46 


3.71 


750 


3.74 


1.23 




2.84 


2.73 


1.000 


3.28 


1.10 




2.46 


2.24 


1,500 


2.73 


0.95 




2.02 


1.75 


2,000 


2.40 


0.85 




1.76 


1.50 


3,000 


2.01 


0.74 




1.44 


1.25 


4,000 


1.78 


0.68 




1.25 


1.13 


5,000 


1.62 


0.63 




1.13 


1.06 


7,500 


1.37 


0.56 




0.93 


0.96 


10,000 


1.22 


0.52 


1.40 


0.81 


0.91 


15,000 


1.05 


0.47 


1.17 


0.67 


0.86 


20,000 


0.95 


0.45 


1.03 


0.59 


0.84 


30,000 


0.82 


0.41 


0.87 


0.49 


0.81 


50,000 


0.70 


0.38 


0.70 


0.39 


0.79 


75,000 


0.62 




0.60 


0.33 




100.000 


0.57 




0.54 


0.29 




150,000 


0.52 




0.46 


0.24 




200,000 


0.49 




0.42 


0.22 




300,000 






0.37 


0.19 




400.000 






0.34 


0.17 




500,000 






0.31 


0.16 




750,000 






0.28 


0.14 




1.000.000 






0.26 


0.12 




2.000,000 






0.23 






3,000,000 






0.21 






5.000,000 






0.19 






7,500,000 






0.18 






10,000.000 






0.18 













TA3 






Diameter 


9 


12 


15 


18 


21 


Height 












(Feet) 












16 


4610 


6080 


7960 


10260 


12990 


24 


5210 


7150 


9640 


12680 


16270 


32 


5820 


8220 


11310 


15090 


19550 


40 


6420 


9290 


12990 


17500 


22830 


48 


7020 


10360 


14660 


19910 


26120 


56 


7630 


11440 


16340 


22320 


29400 



08/01/89 



45-51 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL MANUAL PRICING WORKSHEET 

lOrtANA MASS APPRAISAL SYSTEM 
CEMMERCIAI/ INDUSTRIAL MANUAL PRICING WDRKSHEET 



SIKJCr TYPE 


EXi'LRLOK/INi'ERiOR LINE 


BASIC STR CODE 


611 


612 


613 


614 


615 


616 


617 


618 


TFUET, 






















BUILDING BASE RATE 


















EXlllUOK WALL KAl'E 


















PAR 






















WALL HEIGHT 


















AOJUSTEU WALL RATE 


















TOTAL EXTERIOR RATE 


















USE TYPE 






















INIUUOR BASE RAl'E 


















ADJUSTMENTS: 
INlimOK FINISH % 


















ADTOST FINISH RATE 


















PARiTlONS 






















HEAT 






















AIR COtJDTYiatTmG. . 


















PLUMBING 






















'lUTAL INlliRiOK KAl't 


















TOTAL RATE 






















AREA 






















UNADJUSTED VALUE. . . 


















TOTAL BOF'S 


















UNADJUSTED RCN 


















PERCENT GOOD 


















BASE RCNLD 


















SUB^IUIAL BASE RCNLD 




BUILDING OTHER 


OIHER BUIIDING&YARD IMPROVEMENTS 








RCN 


% GOOD 


BQKD 


X PERCENT OCMPIZTE.. 






Tine 


RCN 




701 












601 










702 








V Pin^ 




602 










703 












603 










704 








X PERCENT OWNERSHIP 




604 








705 












605 








BUIUDING ROJLD 


706 










606 








TCrTAL OBY VAIUE 




SUB-TCr 


CAL 






607 










ADJ TCTTAL OTHER VALUE 




X ECF 






608 














X PERCENT OWNERSHIP 




























TOTAL OBY VALUE 





45-52 



08/01/89 



% 



r^ 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 






PARAGRAPH 






NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE 


PAGE 


46.1. 


INTRODUCTION 


1 


46.6.9. 


DOORS 


11 


46.2. 


PROJECT SIZE 


1 


46.6.10. 


COLD STORAGE INSULATION 


11 


46.3. 


QUALITY OF CONSTRUCTION 


2 


46.6.11. 


WINDOWS 


12 


46.4, 


QUALITY GRADE AND FACTORS 


2 


46.6.12. 


STAIRS 


12 


46.5. 


DESIGN 


3 


46.6.13. 


ROOF VENTILATION 


12 


46.6. 


SCHEDULES 


3 


46.6.14. 


BOILERS 


13 


46.6.1. 


EXCAVATION AND FOUNDATION 




46.6.15. 


STEAM GENERATORS 


14 




CONSTRUCTION 


3 


46.6.16. 


WATER STORAGE TANKS 


14 


46.6.2. 


CONCRETE 


4 


46.6.17. 


STACKS 


15 


46.6.3. 


STEEL 


5 


46.6.18. 


RAILROAD SIDING 


15 


46.6.4. 


TIMBER 


S 


46.6.19. 


RAILROAD TRACK SCALES 


IS 


46.6.5. 


WALL CONSTRUCTION 


5 


46.6.20. 


PAVING 


15 


46.6.6. 


FLOOR CONSTRUCTION 


7 


46.6.21 . 


TRUCK SCALES 


15 


46.6.7. 


ROOF CONSTRUCTION 


8 


46.6.22. 


WOVEN WIRE FENCE 


16 


46.6.8. 


INTERIOR FINISH 


10 


46.6.23. 


UTILITY PIPING 


16 



46.1. INTRODUCTION 



Unit-in-Place Cost Tables have been included in 
the Montana Appraisal Manual to be used as a 
guide by the appraiser in making unit-in-place 
adjustments to the existing Pricing Schedules. 

The Pricing Schedules in the Manual have been 
developed by applying unit-in-place costs in the 
construction of various hypothetical or model 
buildings. It is advisable to use these Pricing 
Schedules whenever feasible limiting the 
application of the Unit-in-Place Cost Tables to 
special purpose type buildings which are not readily 
adaptable to the existing Schedules. 

Making a complete valuation by using unit-in- 
place costs is a job that requires both a great deal 
of time, technical knowledge, and skill. An 
appraiser must have a thorough understanding ot 
all aspects of construction especially those factors 
which tend to influence overall costs, and an 
equally thorough understanding of the extent to 
which these factors are taken into account in the 
particular unit-in-place costs which are used. 
Among the most significant variables which the 
appraiser must consider are basic material prices. 



the quality of material, the cost of labor, labor- 
efficiency, the quality of workmanship, profit and 
overhead, and the extent of pre -job and on-the-job 
architect and engineering fees. 

The Unit-in-Place Cost Tables in the Manual 
have been developed to include (1) volume prices 
of average quality materials; (2) the cost of union 
labor with labor-efficient7 typical of average quality 
workmanship; (3) normal contractor overhead and 
profit; and (4) normal architect fees. The Cost 
Tables can be effectively applied to conventionally 
designed construction conforming with these, 
conditions. However, the effective application of 
the Cost Tables to types of construction which vary 
from these conditions is solely dependent upon the 
ability of the appraiser to determine the extent of 
the variations and to adjust the Replacement Cost 
accordingly. 

Among the factors which the appraiser must 
most frequently consider are the size of the project. 
the overall quality of construction, and the 
variations in design. 



46.2. PROJECT SIZE 



The material prices and labor-efficiency 
considered in the development of the Unit-in-Place 
Cost Tables are those typical of sizeable 



construction projects involving carload lots of 
materials, and labor-efficiency averaged over an 
extended construction period and under normal 



08/01/89 



46-1 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



conditions. When using the Unit-in-Place Cost 
Tables on smaller commercial type projects, it is 
necessary to account for the variations in the basic 



material prices and labor-efncienc7 by adding 10- 
30% to the Base Cost Tables. 



46.3. QUAUTY OF CONSTRUCTION 



The Unit-in-Place Cost Tables reflect average 
quality material and workmanship. Both of these 
factors may vary considerably, resulting in a grade 
of construction ranging from very poor to very high 
quality. The following Quality Grade Specifications 
are provided to assist the appraiser in selecting the 
proper Grade. 



Average Grade 



Very Good to 
Excellent Grade 



Good Grade 



Very high quality of material 
and excellent quality of 
workmanship throughout. 
Specially built construction 
requiring architect fees to cover 
both design and supervision, 
and engineering fees 
commensurate with the type of 
construction ranging from 
normal fees at the lower level 
of this Grade range to extensive 
fees at the Excellent level. 

Above average quality materials 
and a good quality 
workmanship throughout, 
requiring architect fees. 



Fair Grade 



Low Cost Grade 



Average quality materials and 
workmanship throughout, 
conforming with specifications 
of the Unit-in-Place Cost Tables 
as developed in the Manual. 

Below average quality materials 
and fair to poor quality 
workmanship throughout, not 
requiring architect fees. 

Very cheap grade of materials, 
usually "culls" and "seconds," 
and a very poor quality of 
workmanship resulting from 
unskilled, inexperienced, "do-it- 
yourseir type labor, not 
requiring architect fees. 



Generally, the quality of materials and 
workmanship is fairly consistent through the 
construction of a specific building. It is therefore 
usually more feasible to weigh each component and 
to make a composite judgement of the overall 
Quality Grade. 



46.4. QUALITY GRADE AND FACTORS 



The commercial system uses an alphabetical 
grading scale with "A" as average quality of 
construction, with a range of grades from a low of 
"L" (low cost) to a high of "E" (excellent 
construction). A plus (-I-) and minus (-) 
adjustment is allowed within each category. The 
relative value ranges are indicated by the following 
table. 



Value 
Grade Ranee 

- .40 
- Low Cost .50 

-I- .60 







- 


.70 


F - 


Fair 




.78 






+ 


.85 






- 


.92 


A - 


Average 




1.00 






+ 


1.08 






. 


1.17 


G - 


Good 




1.26 






+ 


1.35 






- 


1.45 


V - 


Very Good 




1.55 






+ 


1.67 



- 1.85 
Excellent 2.10 

+ 2.50 



^ 



46-2 



08/01/69 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



46.5. DESIGN 



Since unit-in-place costs are developed from 
basic construction components, they obviously 
cannot include an allowance for variations in 
design. Labor-efficiency in construction varies 
considerably from building to building depending 
upon its particular design. In elaborate or specially 
designed buildings, it is not uncommon for the cost 
of putting a specific unit in place to be two to 
three times as great as putting the same unit in 
place in a conventionally designed building, 
resulting in a proportionately higher cost. In 
computing the Replacement Cost, it is necessary to 



account for this variation in labor-efficiency and 
also to account for the higher architect and 
engineering fees caused by the special design. 

This adjustment, in addition to those for other 
variations, must be made by applying a Design 
Factor to the total Replacement Cost. The 
selection of the proper Design Factor is largely a 
product of the experience and sound judgment of 
the appraiser. The appraiser must have the ability 
to analyze variable construction components and to 
determine the influence of each upon the overall 
cost. 



46.6. SCHEDULES 



46.6.1. EXCAVATION AND FOUNDATION CONSTRUCTION 



BULK EXCAVATION 

Bulk Excavation-Left on Site Per Cu. Ft. 
Normal Haul-Small Quantities Per Cu. Ft. 
Normal Haul-Large Quantities Per Cu. Ft. 
Caisson Cost-Including Excavation Concrete, 
Casing Complete Per Cu. Ft. 

Rock Excavation Per Cu. Ft. 



TRENCH EXCAVATION 

Trench Excavation including Backfill, Normal 

Haul 

Trenches 3' deep Per C/Y 

Trenches 4' deep Per C/Y 

Trenches 5' deep Per CA' 

Trenches 6' deep Per C/Y 

Trenches 8' deep Per C/Y 

Trenches 10' deep Per C/Y 

2" WOOD SHEET PILING 

PER S/F 

Sheet Piling Trenches 5' to 8' deep 

Sheet Piling Trenches 10' to 15' deep 

Bsmls. or Founds. 8' to 12' deep 

Bsmts. or Founds. 14' to 20' deep 



STEEL SHEET PILING 

QUANTITY COST PER S/F 



0.23 






0.33 


Small Average 


Large 


0.26 


27.85 19.00 
If Pulled and Reused-Deduct 45% 


14.55 


16.85 






0.29 


WOOD PILES 
Size of Files 






12" Butts per L/F 


11.40 




14" Butts per L/F 


11.65 




16" Butts per L/F 


12.05 


4.93 


Treated Piles - Add 2.25 per L/F 




4.93 






4.93 






4.24 


PRE-STRESSED, PRE-CAST CONCRETE PILES 


4.24 






3.14 


12" per L/F 


12.35 




16" per L/F 


15.85 




20" per L/F 


21.55 




STEEL PIPE PILES - CONCRETE FILLED 


4.30 






6.05 


10" per L/F 


30.40 


4.95 


12" per L/F 


37.00 


6.85 


14" per L/F 


48.00 



08/01/89 



46-3 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



CONCRETE POURED IN PLACE 
STEP - TAPERED STEEL PILES (RAYMOND) 



12" 
16" 



per L/F 
per L/F 



STEEL "H" PILES 



8" X 8" - 


36# 


10" X 10" - 


42# 


- 


57# 


12" X 12" - 


53# 


- 


74# 


14" X 14" - 


73# 


- 


89# 


- 


102# 


. 


117# 



per L/F 
per UF 
per L/F 
per L/F 
per L/F 
per L/F 
per L/F 
per L/F 
per L/F 



13.40 
15.50 



14.95 
17.20 
21.90 
21.20 
27.80 
27.95 
32.95 
37.45 
41.25 



FOUNDATION CONCRETE 

Concrete for Foundations, Footings, Grade 
Beams & Walls that can be placed by Transit 



Mixer - PSl 4,000 lbs. 



av. Per C/F 



1.75 



S/F 


2.60 


S/F 


4.15 


S/F 


3.80 


S/F 


4.30 


S/F 


5.35 



FOUNDATION FORMS 

Footing Forms 

Column Pier Forms 

Wall Forms to 8' high 

Wall Forms to 14' high 

Wall Forms to 22' high 

Wall Forms for Radial Concrete Walls - 

ADD 45% to 90% 



NORMAL FOUNDATION WALL & FOOTING 

Cost of Foundation to Grade for normal buildings 
(without Basement) including excavation, backfill, 
forms and reinforcing steel, per L/F I'-O" high. 

8" Cone. Wall & Cone. Footing per L/F 5.35 

12" Cone. Wall & Cone. Footing per L/F 7.85 

16" Cone. Wall & Cone. Footing per L/F 8.60 

20" Cone. Wall & Cone. Footing per L/F 9.50 

8" Cone. Block Wall & Footing per L/F 6.95 

12" Cone. Block Wall & Footing per L/F 8.35 



WATERPROOFING BASEMENT WALLS 

Membrane 1 Ply Fabric per S/F 0.76 

Membrane 2 Ply Fabric per S/F 0.96 

Membrane 3 Ply Fabric per S/F 1. 10 
Integral Waterproofing in Concrete 

Mix per C/Y 2.28 



46.6.2. CONCRETE 



CONCRETE ONLY 

PER C/Y 

Price variations depend on quantities and whenever 
placed by transit mixer wheeled, or hoisted and 
wheeled. Add excavation, backfill, forms & 
reinforced steel. 

Mass - Mats & Heavy Slabs 16.30 

Walls - Heavy 13.95 

Walls - Light 13.05 

Structural - Heavy 21.85 

Structural - Light 18.70 

Foundation - Heavy 8.05 

Foundation - Light 7.15 



REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLS 

PER S/F SURFACE 

Including Forms & Reinforcing Steel. 

Wall Height to Top of Footing. 



Thick 


Plain Walls 


Pilastered Walls 


4" 


8.55 


11.65 


6" 


9.20 


12.00 


8" 


9.85 


12.65 


10" 


10.50 


13.60 


12" 


11.20 


14.55 


14" 


11.85 


15.50 


16" 


12.50 


16.45 


18" 


13.15 


17.40 


20" 


13.80 


18.35 


24" 


15.20 


20.15 



46-4 



08/01/89 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 











REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMNS 


















PER L/F 










Size 


Round 


Square 


Size 


Round Square 


Size 


Round Square 


Size 


Round 


Square 


12" 


25.90 


34.55 


18" 


48.40 


24" 


59.65 69.15 


30" 


87.40 


95.40 


14" 




39.15 


20" 


45.90 54.50 


26" 


78.45 


32" 




98.75 


16" 


34.20 


43.15 


22" 


61.70 


28" 


-— 84.15 


36" 


119.45 


115.95 



46.6.3. STEEL 



STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAMING 
PER LB 



ELECTRIC WELDED REINFORCING MESH 

PER S/F 



Light Weight-Small Quantity 
Light Weight-Large Quantity 
Heavy Weight-Small Quantity 
Heavy Weight-Large Quantity 
AJiglechord Steel Trusses-Light 
Pressed Steel Trusses-Heavy 
Open-Web Steel Joist-Light 
Open- Web Steel Joist-Heavy 



1.20 


Slabs, Floors & Walks - 10 ga. 


0.50 


0.82 


Slabs, Floors & Walks - 8 ga. 


0.70 


1.58 


Slabs, Hoors & Walks - 6 ga. 


0.90 


1.33 


Slabs, Floors & Walks - 4 ga. 


1.15 


0.62 


In Walls ADD 0.15 per S/F 




0.70 






0.69 






0.73 


REINFORCING STEEL 

PER LB 






Footings & Slabs-Light 


1.02 




Footings & Slabs-Heavy 


0.98 




Walls, Cols. & Beams-Light 


1.36 




Walls, Cols. & Beams-Heavy 


1.18 



46.6.4. TIMBER 



Timber Framing 4" x 12" 

Treated Timber Framing 

Timber Trusses 

Glued Laminated Timbers (Light) 5" x 12" 

Glued Laminated Timbers (Heavy) 6" x 30" 



Per Bd. Ft. 

Per Bd. Ft. 

Sq. Ft. Covered Area 

Per Ln. Ft. 

Per Ln. Ft. 



1.30 
1.45 
3.05 
9.15 
29.40 



46.6.5. WALL CONSTRUCTION 



EXTERIOR STUDS 

PER S/F SURFACE 



INSULATION-NON RIGID I"YFE 

PER S/F SURFACE 



Including Plates & Framing for Normal Openings 
2" x 4" 16" O.C, 8' high 0.70 

2" x 6" 16" O.C, 8" high 0.75 



Fiberglass-Kraft Faced One Side, 12" Thick 0.90 

Fiberglass-Kraft Faced One Side, 6" Thick 0.50 

Fiberglass-Kraft Faced One Side, 3'/:" Thick 0.35 

Urethane Foam-3'/4" Thick 2.05 



08/01/89 



46-5 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 





SHEATHING 




PER S/F SURFACE 






Wails 


r Wood-Horizontal 


0.95 


r Wood-Diagonal 


1.00 


3/8" Plywood 




0.70 


1/2" Plywood 




0.75 


5/8" Plywood 




0.90 


3/4" Plywood 




0.00 
SIDING 




PER S/F SURFACE 



Cedar Bevel Siding, 5/8" 

Cedar Rustic Siding, 3/8" 

Fir Rough Siding 

Redwood Sawn Plain, 3/8" 

Redwood Shiplap Siding, 5/8" 

Wood Shingle Siding-Fire Rated 

Asbestos Protected Metal 

Asbestos Shingles 

Asphalt Shingles 

Corr. Iron Siding (26 Ga.) Plain 

Corr. Iron Siding (26 Ga.) Colored 

Corr. Asbestos Siding 

Corr. Aluminum .024" Thick (Unpainted) 

Corr. Aluminum .024" Thick (Painted) 

Corr. Aluminum .032" Thick (Unpainted) 

Corr. Aluminum .032" Thick (Painted) 

Corr. Fiber Glass Panels-Fire Rated 

Stucco on Frame 

Stucco on Masonry 

Wood Vertical Sheet Siding 



GLASS BLOCK 

PER S/F SURFACE 

8" X 8" X 4" Thick Plain Face 
12" X 12" X 4" Thick Plain Face 
8" X 8" X 4" Colored Glass 
12" X 12" X 4" Colored Glass 



Roof 

0.95 
1.00 
0.00 
0.75 
0.90 
1.00 



1.25 
1.20 
1.15 
1.45 
1.60 
2.50 
2.65 
1.25 
0.90 
1.40 
1.65 
2.40 
1.60 
1.85 
1.85 
2.10 
3.00 
1.60 
1.90 
1.40 



9.65 
11.25 
10.65 

9.65 



INSULATED WALL PANELS 

PER S/F SURFACE 

VA" Insulation & Galvanized Steel Interior 

Galvanized Steel Exterior 7.10 

Aluminum Exterior 6.20 

Protected Metal Exterior 6.60 

Porcelain on Aluminum Exterior 13.95 

Stainless Steel Exterior-26 Ga. 8.25 

Colored Aluminum Exterior 6.45 



MASONRY 

PER S/F SURFACE 

4" Face Brick - Veneer - Normal 5.40 

4" Face Brick - Veneer - 1st Grade 5.70 

4" Common Brick - Veneer 4.80 

8" Common Brick Wall 9.50 

12" Common Brick Wall 11.15 

16" Common Brick Wall 14.45 

4" Concrete Block Wall 2.65 

6" Concrete Block Wall 2.90 

8" Concrete Block Wall 3.65 

12" Concrete Block Wall 4.95 

4" Concrete Block Backup 2.65 

6" Concrete Block Backup 2.90 

8" Concrete Block Backup 3.65 

4" Face Brick & 4" Common Brick 10.15 

4" Face Brick & 8" Common Brick 14.85 

4" Face Brick & 4" Concrete Block 7.95 

4" Face Brick & 6" Concrete Block 8.25 

4" Face Brick & 8" Concrete Block 9.00 

4" Face Brick & 4" Tile 12.95 

4" Face Brick & 8" Tile 16.10 

4" Local Stone Veneer 9.(K) 

Limestone Facing 11.40 

r Ariilicial Stone Wainscot 17.45 

1" Slate 16.10 

2" Slate 20.00 

2" Glazed Tile - 1 Side - Interior 6.60 

4" Glazed Tile - 1 Side - Interior 7.45 

8" Glazed Tile - 1 Side - Interior 10.75 

5 Coats-Plaster on Int. Masonry Wall 0.30 

1'/:" Marble - Domestic 19.65 

1" Marble - Foreign 24.55 



c 



46-6 



08/01/69 



46.- UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



PRECAST TILT-UP CONCRETE PANELS 




PRECAST TEES 














PER S/F 




PLANKS 


S/F 


WALL 


S/F 


SINGLE 




DOUBLE 




6" Hollow Core 


3.95 


Flat Panel 


11.25 


10' X 24" Deep 


5.45 


6" X 12" Deep 


4.80 


8" Hollow Core 


4.15 


Shaped Panel 


15.35 


10' X 36" Deep 


6.70 


6" X 18" Deep 


5.35 


12" Hollow Core 


4.95 


Window Panel 


18.65 


10' X 48" Deep 
6' X 12" Deep 


7.60 
6.45 


6' X 24" Deep 


5.85 


BEAMS 


LN.Kl. 


COLUMNS 


LN.Fl'. 


6' X 24" Deep 


7.75 






12" X 12" 


38.80 


12" X 12" 


28.25 










12" X 18" 


47.50 


18" X 18" 


46.25 










12" X 24" 


62.70 


24" X 24" 


58.30 











46.6.6. FLOOR CONSTRUCTION 



CONCRETE GROUND SLABS 

PER S/F 



PRESTRESSED CONCRETE JOIST 

PER L/F 



4" Concrete Including Base 

4" Concrete-Mesh Rein.-Incl. Base 

6" Concrete-Mesh Rein.-lncl. Base 

8" Concrete-Mesh Rein.-lncl. Base 

10" Concrete-Mesh Rein.-lncl. Base 



CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SLABS 

PER S/F 



1.55 


6" X 12" 8" X 12" 10" X 12" 12" x 12" 


1.95 


5.20 5.55 6.60 7.95 


2.55 




4.40 




5.55 


HOLLOW CORE SLABS (FLEXICORE) 




PER S/F 




4" 6" 8" 10" 




3.80 4.15 4.60 5.35 



FLOOR 




FLAT 


THICKNESS 




SLAB 


5" 




6.85 


6" 




7.35 


7" 




7.80 


8" 




8.35 


9" 




8.85 


10" 




9.55 


FLOOR TOPPING 


CONC. TOPPING 


THICKNESS 


ON 3" 


RIB MET. DECK 


2 1/2" 




5.70 


3" 




5.85 


3 1/2" 




5.95 


4 




6.05 



For Beam & Girder job Deduct 5% from Flat 
Slab. 



LONG SPAN STEEL DECKING 

PER S/F 

Cellular decking with cells used for 

Ventilation or Electrical Distribution 

1 1/2" Depth 4.15 

3" Depth 4.55 

4 1/2" Depth 5.55 

6" Depth 5.95 

7 1/2" Depth 6.45 



WOOD AND TIMBER CONSTRUCTION 

PER S/F 

1" Wood Subnoor-Horizontal 0.95 

r Wood Subfloor-Diagonal 1.00 

1/2" Plywood 0.70 

5/8" Plywood 0.80 

5/8" Particle Board 0.70 

5/8" Wood Fiber Board 0.75 



Wood and Timber Construction Cont'd Next Page 



08/01/89 



46-7 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



WOOD AND TIMBER CONST. (Cont'd) 



2" X 8" Wood Joist 
2" X 10" Wood Joist 
2" X 12" Wood Joist 
4" X 12" Timber Framing 
Treated Timber Framing 



Per Bd. Ft. 
0.90 
0.94 
0.95 
1.33 
1.46 



Per Bd. Ft. 
2" X 4" Wood Sleepers on Concrete, Treated 1.55 
2" X 6' Wood Sleepers on Concrete, Treated 1.25 



FINISHED FLOORS 

PER S/F 

1 1/2" Cement Topping 1.25 
Each Additional 1/2" ADD 0.90 
Monolithic Finish 2.35 

Fir nooring 1" x 4" T&G 2.10 

Oak Flooring 2 1/4" T&G 2.60 

Sanding and Finish-ADD 0.95 

2" Wood Block Flooring-Creosoted 2.40 

2 1/2" Wood Block Flooring-Creosoted 3.00 
3" Wood Block Flooring-Creosoted 3.50 



FINISHED FLOORS (Cont'd) 

3/16" Asphalt Tile-Dark Marbleized 0.95 

3/16" Asphalt Tile-Med. Lt. Marbleized 1.10 

3/16" Asphalt Tile-Light Col. Marbleized 1.15 

1/8" Greaseproof Asphalt Tile 0.95 

1/8" Vinyl Asbestos Tile 1.25 

1/8" Solid Vinyl Tile-Travertine 2.15 

1/8" Rubber Tile 1.85 

3/32" Linoleum-Light 1.30 

1/8" Linoleum-Heavy 1.65 

Neoprene Tile Floor 5.20 

Ceramic Tile Floor-On Mortar 3.65 

Ceramic Tile Walls on Mastic 3.50 

Ceramic Tile Walls on Mortar 4.30 

2 3/4" Quarry Tile-Epoxy Grout 5.85 

2 3/4" Quarry Tile-Acid Resistant 7.10 

r Slate Flooring 16.10 

2" Terrazzo Bonded on Concrete 4.80 

3" Terrazzo Not Bonded to Concrete 6.05 

1 1/2" Marble-Domestic 19.65 

r Marble-Foreign 24.55 

2" Slate-Flooring 20.00 



46.6.7. ROOF CONSTRUCTION 



ROOFING 

PER S/F 



Roll Roofing-55# Smooth Surface 

Roll Roonng-90# Mineral Surface 

Compo, Roofing 3 Ply 

Compo, Roofing 4 Ply 

Compo, Roofing 4 Ply & Gravel 

Compo, Roofing 5 Ply & Gravel 

Fiberglass Shingles 220# 
Fiberglass Shingles 240# 
Fiberglass Shingles 260# 
Asphalt Shingles 235# 
Asphalt Shingles 30()# 
Asphalt Shingles 350# 
Concrete Tile-Standard 



0.35 Slate Shingles 3.65 

0.50 Spanish Tiles- Wired 3.45 

0.75 Wood Shingles #1 Cedar 1.60 

0.95 Wood Shingles-Fire Treated 2.25 

1.10 Porcelain Enamel Tiles- 18 Ga. 4.10 

1.20 Corr. Aluminum .024" Thick-Unpainicd 1.45 

Corr. Aluminum .024" Thick-Painted 1.70 

0.50 Corr. Aluminum .032" Thick-Unpaintcd 1.85 

0.60 Corr. Aluminum .032" Thick-Painted 2.10 

0.65 Corr. Iron 24 ga.-l" insulated-Unpaintcd 2.35 

0.90 Corr. Iron 24 ga.-l" insulated-Painted 2.65 

0.95 Corr. Asbestos 2.40 

1.20 Corr. Fiberglass panels-Fire Rated 3.00 
1.65 



( 



46-8 



08/01/89 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



^ 



WOOD DECKING 








POURED GYPSUM DECKING 




PER S/F 








PER S/F 




r Wood Fiber Decking 






1.00 


Cement Fiber Plank, T & G 2" Thick 
Cement Fiber Plank, T & G 2 1/2" Thick 


1.55 
1.70 


Marine-Plywood Decking, 1/2" 






2.55 


Cement Fiber Plank, T & G 3" Thick 


1.85 


Marine-Plywood Decking, 5/8" 






2.65 






Marine-Plywood Decking, 3/4" 






2.80 


Sub-Purlins 6' Span 
Sub-Purlins 8' Span 


0.45 
0.60 


2" Laminated Wood Decking 






1.75 






3" Laminated Wood Decking 






2.90 


ADD for Form Boards Below: 




4" Laminated Wood Decking 






3.80 


Acoustical 1" Thick 
Acoustical 2" Thick 


1.20 
1.85 


WOOD RAFTERS & PURLINS 






Asbestos Cement Board 1/4" Thick 


0.80 


PER BD. Fl'. 








Gypsum Board 1/2" Thick 
Mineral Fiber 1" Thick 


0.70 
0.75 


2" X 6" to 2" X 12" Flat Roof 






1.00 


Mineral Fiber 2" Thick 


1.00 


2" X 6" to 2" X 12" Gable Roof 






1.25 


Wood Fiber 1" Thick 


0.80 


2" X 6" to 2" X 12" Steep or Cut-Up 


Roof 




1.55 


ADD to Form Boards Above: 




INSULATION-RIGID TY1>E 






Poured Gypsum 2" Thick 


0.65 


PER S/F 








Poured Gypsum 2 1/2" Thick 
Poured Gypsum 3" Thick 


0.75 
0.90 


r Wood Fiber Board 






0.45 






2" Wood Fiber Board 






0.80 






Polyurethane Core-l" Thick 






0.75 


PRECAST CONCRETE SLAB 




Polyurethane Core-2" Thick 






1.15 


PER S/F 




Polyurethane Core-3" Thick 






1.55 


2" 2 1/2" 
7.75 8.05 


3" 

8.35 


STEEL DECKING 








Pre-cast, Pre-stressed Concrete Channel. 




PER S/F 














Composite 


LONG SPAN STEEL DECKING 




Inter. Wide 




2" 




PER S/F 




Rib Rib 


Lok-Floor 














Web Depth 20 Ga. 18 Ga. 16 (i 


a. 


18 Ga. Painted 1.30 1.65 




1.45 








18 Ga. Galv 1.45 1.75 




1.60 




4 l,/2" Depth 4.60 4.95 5.20 




20 Ga. Painted 1.15 1.40 




1.25 




6" Depth 4.80 5.10 5.45 




20 Ga. Galv 1.25 1.55 




1.40 




7 1/2" Depth 5.45 5.85 6.20 




22 Ga. Painted 1.00 1.25 




1.10 








22 Ga. Galv 1.15 1.40 




1.20 









08/01/89 



46-9 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



46.6.8. INTERIOR FINISH 



WOOD FURRING 

I" X 2" on Masonry Wall Per Ln. Ft. 

I" X 2" on Concrete Wall Per Ln. Ft. 

r X 2" on Wood Wall Per Ln. Ft. 

5 Coats Plaster on Masonry Walls-Per S/F 



WALL BOARDS 

PER S/F 

1/4" Sheetrock-Taped & Tex. 

1/2" Sheetrock-Taped & Tex. 

5/8" Sheetrock-Taped & Tex. Fire-rated 

5/8" Sheetrock-Moisture Resistant 



0.50 
0.75 
0.45 
0.30 



0.35 
0.60 
0.70 
0.75 



PARTITIONS 

PER S/F 

2" X 4" Stud Partitions, Finished 2 Sides, 
Including Normal Openings 

1/2" Sheetrock (Dry Wall)-Fire Rated 
Gypsum Lath & Plaster 
Metal Lath & Plaster 

Metal Partitions 

Masonry Partitions-Use Masonry 
Wall Price and ADD for Finish 2 sides 



3.80 
4.95 
5.70 

9.25 



r 



1/4" Tempered Hardboard 
3/8" Tempered Hardboard 

Formica 



PREFINISIIED PANELING 

PER S/F 



Birch 
Cherry 
Oak 
Walnut 



STRUCTURAL GLAZED TILE 

PER S/F 

2" Wall-Single Face 
4" Wall-Single Face 
6" Wall-Single Face 
4" Wall-Double Face 

ADD For Finish on Unglazed Side 



0.60 
0.65 

7.80 



1.30 
1.55 
1.65 
1.95 



6.60 

7.45 
8.55 
9.50 

0.20 



CEILING INSULATION - NON-RIGID ITPES 

PER S/F 

Fiberglass-Blankets or Batts-12" Thick 0.90 

Fiberglass- With Foil one side- 10" Thick 0.70 

Fiberglass- With Foil one side-6" Thick 0.50 

Ultra Therm-Acoustical-6" Thick 0.50 

Perlite-2" Thick ■ 0.60 

Vermiculite-Poured-2" Thick 0.75 

Vermiculite-Poured-3" Thick 0.95 



ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS 

PER S/F 

Fiberglass-Suspended 2.05 

Mineral Fiber-Glued 2.55 

Mineral Fiber-Suspended 2.SJ0 

Steel Metal Pan-Suspended 3.45 

Alum. Metal Pan-Suspended 3.95 

Stainless Steel Pan-Suspended 4.95 

Luminous Ceiling-Panels 2.80 



LATH & PLASTER 

PER S/F 

3/8" Gypsum Lath & Plaster Wall 3.65 

1/2" Gypsum Lath & Plaster Wall 3.80 

.Metal Lath & Plaster Wall 2.25 

Metal Lath & Acoustical Plaster 4.30 
For Ceiling Work ADD to above 0.10% 



c 



46-10 



08/01/89 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



1 



Interior Plaster 2 Coat Brush 
Interior Plaster 2 Coat Roller 
Exterior Wood 2 Coat Brush 
Exterior Wood 2 Coat Roller 
Stucco Exterior 2 Coat Roller 



PAINTING 

PER S/F 

0.43 Stucco Exterior 2 Coat Spray 

0.39 Masonry Walls 2 Coat Brush 

0.41 Masonry Walls 2 Coat Roller 

0.42 Masonry Walls 2 Coat Spray 

0.35 Hand Sanding, Puttying, Prep 



0.34 
0.86 
0.89 
0.79 
0.14 



46.6.9. DOORS 



OVERHEAD WOOD OR METAL DOORS 

S/F OF SURF. AREA 



WOOD COLD STORAGE DOORS 

EACH 





Wood 


MetuI 




Chiller/ 




Sharp 


Size 


Per S/F 


Per S/F 


Size 


Cooler 


Freezer 


Freeze 


To 100 S/F 


7.60 


7.90 


2'-0" X 3'-0" 


350.00 


380.00 


420.00 


To 200 S/F 


6.35 


7.60 


2'-6" X 6'-6" 


880.00 


960.00 


1,080.00 


Over 200 S/F 


5.70 


6.95 


3'-0" X 6'-6" 


1,040.00 


1,150.00 


1,290.00 








4'-0" X 6'-6" 


1,270.00 


1,420.00 


1,590.00 


Mechanical 


Operation: 


ADD S360 


5'-0" X 6'-6'' 


1,590.00 


1,770.00 


2,000.00 


Electric Op 


eration: 


ADD S905 


6*-0" X 6'-6" 


1,900.00 


2,130.00 


2,410.00 








8'-0" X 6'-6" 


2,180.00 


2,510.00 


2,880.00 



Cooler & Freezer Doors are usually inset doors. 
Sharp Freeze Doors are usually overlap doors. 
For Metal Doors ADD 23% to above cost. 
For Stainless Steel Doors double above cost. 



46.6.10. COLD STORAGE INSULATION 

PER S/F OF SURFACE AREA 
(WALLS, FLOORS, CEILINGS) 









Insuiution Thickness 






Type 


1" 


2" 


4" 


6" 


8" 


Cork Board 


1.70 


2.90 


5.00 


6.85 


8.60 


Styrofoam 


1.60 


2.40 


3.75 


4.70 


5.55 


Fiberglass 


1.45 


2.15 


3.30 


4.05 


4.80 


Foamglass 


1.65 


2.80 


4.80 


6.60 


8.20 


Mineral Wool 


1.00 


1.65 


2.80 


3.65 


4.55 


Polyurethane: 












-Spray 


1.70 


2.90 


5.10 


7.00 


— 


-Board 


1.60 


2.65 


4.55 


6.15 






Cost is for Installation, Vapor Barrier, Hot Asphalt, Skewers, Furring, Sealing. 



08/01/89 



46-11 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



46.6.11. WINDOWS 

PER S/F 



Wood Sash Windows 
D.H. Wood Sash 
Aluminum Frame Windows 
Steel Sash Windows 
Continuous Steel Sash 



7.70 
11.50 
10.15 

5.35 
4.70 



46.6.12. STAIRS 

PER FLIGHT 



Average Fir or Y.P. Stairs 

Average Hardwood Stairs 

Pan Type Steel Stairs-Cone. Treads 

Reinforced Concrete Stairs 

Fire Escape-First Flight 

Fire Escape-Each Additional Flight 



850.00 
1,110.00 
2,090.00 
2,220.00 
1,260.00 
1.110.00 



46.6.13. ROOF VENTILATION 



GRAVriT ROOF / WALL VENTILATORS / EXILVUSTERS 



Size In 
CFM 



Ventilators 
Each, Installed 
Motorized 



Exhausters 

Each, Installed 

Motorized 



145 

250 

325 

630 

875 

1200 

2500 

3000 

5000 

6800 



190.00 

230.00 

310.00 

410.00 

520.00 

730.00 

1,590.00 

1,780.(X) 

2,020.00 

2,150.00 



0.00 

0.00 

610.00 

720.00 

830.00 

1,020.00 

1,390.00 

1,490.00 

1,590.00 

1,780.00 



46-12 



08/01/89 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



% 



46.6.14. BOILERS 



HORIZONTAL RETURN FIRE TUBE BOILERS 

LOW PRESSURE (15 LB.) FIREBOX TYPE 

Installed Complete, including Pumps, Piping, 
Controls & Foundation. 



SCOTCH MARINE BOILERS 

HIGH PRESSURE (125 LB) 

Installed Complete, including Pumps, Piping, 
Controls & Foundation. 



Rated 


Cost Per 


Cost 


Rated 


Cost Per 


Cost 


II.P. 


H.P. 


Installed 


H.P. 


H.P. 


Installed 


20 HP 


580.00 


11,600.00 


20 HP 


730.00 


14,600.00 


30 HP 


500.00 


15,000.00 


30 HP 


610.00 


18,300.00 


50 HP 


390.00 


19,500.00 


50 HP 


480.00 


24,000.00 


75 HP 


330.00 


24,750.00 


75 HP 


410.00 


30,750.00 


100 HP 


290.00 


29,000.00 


100 HP 


350.00 


35,000.00 


150 HP 


240.00 


36,000.00 


150 HP 


310.00 


46,500.00 


200 HP 


220.00 


44,000.00 


200 HP 


260.00 


52,000.00 


300 HP 


190.00 


57,000.00 


300 HP 


230.00 


69,000.00 


400 HP 


160.00 


64,000.00 


400 HP 


200.00 


80,000.00 



ADD for Fuel Oil Tanks & Stack 



ADD for Fuel Oil Tanks & Stack 



HORIZONTAL RETURN FIRE TUBE BOILERS 

HIGH PRESSURE (125 LB.) FIREBOX TYPE 

Installed Complete, including Pumps, Piping, 
Controls & Foundation. 



Rated 


Cost Per 


Cost 


II.P. 


H.P. 


Installed 


20 HP 


760.00 


15,200.00 


30 HP 


640.00 


19,200.00 


50 HP 


420.00 


21,000.00 


75 HP 


350.00 


26,250.00 


100 HP 


320.00 


32,000.00 


150 HP 


260.00 


39,000.00 


200 HP 


230.00 


46,000.00 


300 HP 


190.00 


57,000.00 


400 HP 


180.00 


72,000.00 



FUEL OIL TANKS 

Underground Fuel Oil Storage Tanks, Including 
Excavation, Backfill & Normal Piping. 



ADD for Fuel Oil Tanks & Stack 



Capacity, 
Gallons 

550 
675 

840 

1,000 

1,550 

2,000 

3,000 

4,000 

6,000 

8,000 
10,000 
15,000 
20,000 



Cost 
Installed 

1,150.00 
1,210.00 
1,290.00 
1,400.00 
1,850.00 
2,330.00 
3,130.00 
3,860.00 
5,220.00 
6,140.00 
7,510.00 
10,900.00 
14,300.00 



Increase Cost 35% For Fiber Steel Tanks. 



08/01/89 



46-13 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



46.6.15. STEAM GENERATORS 
Automatic Steam Generators, Oil or Gas Fired. Installed Complete -- 

PRICE PER HORSEPOWER ^ 

H.P. Rating Lb. of Steam Per Hour 15 Lb. Steam Pressure 125 Lb. Steam Pressure 

15 518 630.00 730.00 

30 1,035 370.00 430.00 

60 2,070 280.00 330.00 

100 3.450 250.00 280.00 

150 5,175 220.00 270.00 

200 6.900 190.00 230.00 

46.6.16. WATER STORAGE TANKS 
ELEVATED STEEL TANKS 



Capacity 




If To* 


ver Is: 




Of Tanli 


50' High 


75' High 


100' High 


150' High 


25,000 Gal. 


122.300.00 


137,500.00 


155,600.00 


197.900.00 


50,000 Gal. 


136.800.00 


153,400.00 


172.200.00 


216.700.00 


75,000 Gal. 


150,700.00 


168,000.00 


187,500.00 


233.400.00 


100,000 Gal. 


163.800.00 


183,4(X).00 


204.100.00 


262.300.00 


150,000 Gal. 


201.400.00 


220,800.00 


241,600.00 


290.200.00 


200,000 Gal. 


227.800.00 


248,600.00 


272.100.00 


325.000.00 


300,000 Gal. 


294.500.00 


324,300.00 


356.900.00 


432.600.00 


400,000 Gal. 


358,300.00 


384,600.00 


416.600.00 


493.000.00 


500,000 Gal. 


430.500.00 


461,100.00 


493.000.00 


564.500.00 


750,000 Gal. 


576.400.00 


611,100.00 


650.000.00 


732,000.00 


1,000.000 Gal. 


750.000.00 


798,600.00 


849.9(X).0() 


965,500.00 



t 



For Hurricane or Earthqualce Areas 

ADD 18% to cost with 50' tower 
ADD 19% to cost with 75' tower 
ADD 20% to cost with 100' tower 
ADD 22%' to cost with 125' tower 

Prices include Steel Tank, Foundation. Riser Pipe. Frost Case, Ladder and Walkway. Tower, completely 
installed. 

3" REDWOOD TANKS 

Capacity Mounted Add Per I7F 

Of On BIdg. or Tower 

Tank Roof On R(M)r 

20,000 Gal. 19,700.00 410.00 

30,000 Gal. 25,700.00 450.00 

40.000 Gal. 31.100.00 510.00 

50,000 Gal. 36.200.00 630.00 
Use same price for 3" Fir Tanks. 

If Redwtx)d Tank is on Steel Tower in yard, use 60% of Steel Tank price. 



46-14 08/01/89 



^ 



46. UNIT-IN-PLACE COSTS 



46.6.17. STACKS 

COST PER FOOT OF HEIGHT 



Base 






10 Ga. 


Dia. 


Brick 


Concrete 


Steel 


Outside 


Stack 


Stack 


Stack 


T 






130.00 


y 






170.00 


4- 






200.00 


5' 






230.00 


6' 


490.00 


420.00 


270.00 


7* 


560.00 


480.00 




8* 


630.00 


540.00 




9* 


690.00 


600.00 




10' 


760.00 


660.00 





Base 






10 Ga 


Dia. 


Brick 


Concrete 


Steel 


Outside 


Stack 


Stack 


Stuck 


12' 


890.00 


780.00 




14* 


1,030.00 


890.00 




16' 


1,150.00 


1,010.00 




18' 


1,270.00 


1,120.00 




20* 


1,390.00 


1,240.00 




22" 


1,510.00 


1,350.00 




24' 


1,630.00 


1,460.00 




28' 


1,860.00 


1,670.00 




32' 


2,090.00 


1,880.00 





Above costs include normal Foundation, Ladder, Lightning Rods, and Painting. For Square/Rectangular 
Chimneys, use 1/3 the perimeter in place of the diameter. 

46.6.18. RAILROAD SIDING 

Cost Per L/F including Rails, Ties, and Ballast. Add Sl,900 for each Siding Bumper. Add S66.85 per L/F for 
9' Concrete Railroad Bed. 



'eij>ht of Rail 


Cost 


(Lb. per Yd.) 


Installed 


40 


37.00 


60 


46.50 


80 


54.50 


100 


61.50 


115 


66.50 


130 


71.00 



Size of Rail 
(B X H) 

3 1/2 X 3/1/2 

4 1/4x4 1/4 

5x5 

5 3/8x6 

5 1/2x6 5/8 
6x6 3/4 



46.6.19. RAILROAD TRACK SCALES 
Capacity Cost 

125 Ton 72,500.00 

Prices Include Concrete Pit, scale and installation. 

46.6.20. PAVING 



Blacktop on Reinf. 

4" Base Concrete 

2" Topping 0.70 4" 1.60 

3" Topping 0.95 6" 1.75 

4" Topping 1.00 8" 1.90 

+. .15 per inch of base. 



Crushed 
Stone 

4" 0.30 
6" 0.35 
8" 0.45 



Add for Switch 
And Turnout 

9,200.00 
11,300.00 
12,900.00 
14,500.00 
15,500.00 
16,400.00 



46.6.21. TRUCK SCALES 

MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL 
Capacity (Tons) Cost 

10 11,500.00 

15 14,600.00 

50 34,800.00 

60 36,400.00 

80 37,500.00 

100 41,2(X).00 

125 46,300.00 

ADD 19,600.00 for Computer Outlet. 
ADD 2,600.00 for Remote Read System. 
ADD 10,400.00 for Weight Printer (Printomatic). 
Prices include Platform Pit, scale and installation. 



08/01/89 



46-15 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



46.6.22. WOVEN WIRE FENCE 
Based on 10' Sections with 3 strands of barbed wire/1 side, Galv. (L/F includes space for Gates). 



#6 Wire per UF 
#9 Wire per L/F 



9.20 
8.05 



ADD for Gates 6.95 per S/F of Gates 
ADD for Top Rail 1.10 per UF 
ADD for small quantity - 10% 



HEIGHT 
» 

12.55 
10.95 



17.10 
14.90 



DEDUCT for no barbed wire 1.30 per L/F 
DEDUCT for large quantity - 10% 



46.6.23. UTILITY PIPING 

PRICE PER L/F 



CORRUGATED STEEL 



BLACK PIPE 



8" 


8.35 


10" 


9.75 


12" 


11.25 


16" 


15.35 


20" 


19.35 


24" 


24.35 


36" 


40.80 


48" 


60.70 


60" 


82.35 



REINFORCED CONCRETE PIPE 



8" 


7.90 


12" 


10.75 


16" 


14.55 


24" 


23.10 


30" 


31.30 


36" 


39.60 


48" 


59.80 


60" 


82.85 


72" 


109.85 


84" 


137.75 


96" 


169.80 


VALVES 


4" 


430.00 


6" 


750.00 


8" 


1.150.00 


10" 


1,590.00 


12" 


2,180.00 



4" 
6" 
8" 
10" 



9.15 
15.95 
24.35 
33.20 



VITRIFIED CLAY PIPE 



4" 


6.60 


6" 


7.35 


8" 


8.50 


10" 


10.65 


12" 


12.95 


18" 


26.25 


24" 


33.30 


30" 


48.00 



P.V.C. WATER 200# 



4" 
6" 
8" 


4.95 

7.35 

10.50 




HYDRANTS 


2-Way 
3-Way 


790.00 
920.(X) 



46-16 



08/01/89 



(^ 



L 



'(c 



47. DEPRECIATION 



47. DEPRECIATION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PARAGRAPH 






NO. 


PARAGRAPH TITLE ' 


PAGE 


47.1. 


COST LEVELS 


1 


47.2, 


ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR 


2 


47.3. 


DEVELOPING DEPRECIATION 






SCHEDULES 


2 


47.3.1. 


SALES RATIO ANALYSIS 


2 


47.3.2. 


MARKET DEPRECIATION 


3 


47.4. 


DEPRECIATION PROCEDURES 


4 


47.4.1. 


DWELLING 


4 


47.4.1.1. 


CDU RATING SYSTEM 


4 


47.4.1.2. 


AGE AND CDU 


5 


47.4.1.3. 


SELECTION OF A PERCENT GOOD 


6 


47.4.1.4. 


EXAMPLES USING CDU 


6 


47.4.2. 


MOBILE HOMES 


7 


47.4.3. 


RESIDENTIAL / AGRICULTURAL OTHER 






BUILDINGS & YARD IMPROVEMENTS 


8 



PARAGRAPH 
NO. 

47.4.3.1. 

47.4.3.2. 

47.4.3.3. 

47.4.3.4. 

47.4.4. 

47.4.4.1. 

47.4.4.2. 

47.4.4.3. 

47.4.4.4. 

47.4.4.5. 

47.4.4.6. 



PARAGRAPH TITLE 



PAGE 



OBY PERCENT GOOD GUIDELINES 8 

OBY PERCENT GOOD CALCUUTION 8 

ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 9 

OBY PERCENT GOOD TABLES 12 

COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 15 

COMMON CAUSES OF OBSOLESCENCE 15 

ECONOMIC LIFE TABLES 16 
PHYSICAL CONDITION / FUNCTIONAL 

UTILITY RATING 19 
MAIN BUILDING PERCENT GOOD 

CALCULATION 21 
COMMERCIAL OBY PERCENT GOOD 

CALCULATION 21 

COMMERCIAL PERCENT GOOD TABLES 21 



The Montana Appraisal Manual provides 
benchmark depreciation tables which you may use 
as a guide in establishing your own depreciation 
tables. A guide is useful in helping to establish 
consistency in the rating of properties as to 
physical condition, functional utility, desirability, 
etc. as it relates to the property's estimated value. 
It provides a means to use sales information to 
establish benchmark ratings for properties in a 
neighborhood. 

The desirability of property can change over 
time. Sometimes this happens on a global basis, 



i.e. the value levels of all property move up or 
down on a fairly consistent basis; or it can occur 
with respect to certain groups of property. When 
this happens, adjustments may be needed in the 
depreciation schedules or formulas. (We will 
explain more about how the schedules are 
generated from the underlying formulas later in 
this section.) 

There are, however, several issues that need to 
be addressed in conjunction with using or setting 
the depreciation tables. 



47.1. COST LEVELS 



The Montana Appraisal Manual has been 
produced with one set of cost tables. It is 
recognized that these cost figures represent average 
value, levels in the state as of 1987. These figures 
will need to be adjusted to reflect local 
construction costs for locales throughout the state. 
This is done through the application of the county 
index. The county index can vary substantially 
across the state due to a number of reasons 
including: economic climate, availability of skilled 
labor pool, prevalent use of union or non-union 
labor, cost of shipping construction materials, etc. 



Cost levels may be established through analysis 
of local new construction costs in your county or 
region. This can include both a comparison of 
manual values against actual new construction 
figures, or where insufficient figures arc available, a 
comparison of labor and materials costs for your 
area with areas in which this data and a well- 
established index are available. 

The cost index should be established before you 
start to make adjustments to depreciation tables. 



08/01/89 



47-1 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



47.2. ECONOMIC CONDITION FACTOR 



The economic condition factor is a component 
ut depreciation or market adjustment that is 
usually applied after normal depreciation. It is 
normally 1.00 (100%) for the majority of properties 
where the cost index has been properly established 
and the depreciation schedules have been 
adequately calibrated. 

It has a role in representing the effects of the 
economic climate on unique properties in a boom 
or bust economy. It can affect individual 
properties, or it can affect a whole class of 
properties. In a boom economy, market demand 
can force market prices above actual construction 
costs, with both new houses and used houses 
selling well in excess of stabilized construction 
costs. 



In a bust economy that affects certain 
industries, the market demand for a commercial or 
industrial facility can turn sour and values can fail 
substantially, especially if it is a prolonged fall in 
prices or demands for the services/products the 
business provides. If that industry is the major 
source of income for the residents of the area, 
many people will be forced to seek employment 
elsewhere causing a glut of properties to go up for 
sale or in some instances foreclosures. It is not 
uncommon for values to drop 30-50% in some 
instances over a several year period of time. There 
is little or no new construction when this happens. 
The economic condition factor applied on a 
regional basis becomes one means of dealing with 
this situation without changing the normal 
depreciation which has been applied against the 
properties, or temporarily lowering the cost index 
below realistic construction cost minimums. 



47.3. DEVELOPING DEPRECIATION SCHEDULES 



The Montana Appraisal Manual contains a 
benchmark depreciation table which you may use 
as a guide in establishing your own depreciation 
tables. When you begin the process of establishing 
your depreciation tables, you should have already 
established your baseline cost index and the grade 
level and design features for your basic dwelling 
structure, to arrive at a proper RCN (Replacement 
Cost New). 

Depreciation reflects a composite of physical 
depreciation due to age and condition, as well as 
functional and economic obsolescence which can be 
related to age, location, and economic conditions. 
For Residential property, these are reflected in 
CDU (condition - desirability - utility) rating. 

If you use a standard benchmark CDU table as 
a guideline in establishing your local benchmark 
CDU's early in the appraisal process, and then use 
the local benchmark CDU's on a consistent basis 
(uniform within a neighborhood), you can apply 
the Cost Approach reasonably with only minor 
adjustments to the depreciation tables to reflect 
changes in market condition that occur during the 
reappraisal project. 



Several analysis capabilities are available in the 
Montana MAS to assist in the process of adjusting 
the CDU tables and the depreciation tables. These 
include Sales Ratio Analysis and Market Modeling 
for Depreciation. They will be discussed briefly 
later in this Section, and in depth in the Valuation 
Manual. 

Adjustment of the CDU table cannot correct 
problems due to underlying inconsistency in CDU's 
on individual properties. 

47.3.1. SALES RATIO ANALYSIS 

The Sales Ratio report provides summary 
statistics on the ratio of appraised values to sales 
prices. Sales may be aggregated by price range or 
age within the residential improved class. Statistics 
include the number of sales, aggregate ratio, mean 
ratio, standard deviation, median ratio, and 
coefficient of dispersion (COD). 

The Sales Ratio report provides inlbrmaiion lo 
assist in establishing a county index. By taking 
recent sales and considering the sales ratios lor 
new homes (0-3 years old), a county index may be 



f 



47-2 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



computed which, if applied, will bring the ratio on 
new homes to 100%. 

The county index factor derived in this way 
should be tested against other indicators. In 
particular, RCNLD's for new houses should be 
compared against available new construction costs. 
Ratios should be tabulated and summary statistics 
should be calculated for comparison against other 
indicators. 

Sample Residential Sales Ratio Report 



Aggr. Std. Median 

Ratio Mean Dev. Ratio COD 



Age 


No. 


Ranee 


Sales 


Impr. 




(Yrs) 




0-3 


40 


4-6 


15 


7-10 


20 


11-15 


25 


16-20 


20 


21-30 


30 


31-40 


20 


41-50 


15 


51-60 


10 


61-h 


25 


Total 




Impr. 


220 


Vacant 


30 


Total 




Resid. 


250 



10.9 106.9 8.2 



106.3 107.1 
109.2 
109.2 
108.3 
110.4 
112.7 
113.2 
109.2 
104. 
101.0 



109.2 108.5 12.9 108.6 9.8 



NOTES: Using median as the overall ratio and 
assuming that land represents 20% of the 
total value, the appropriate index would be 
calculated as: 



B 



Using the total residential improved statistics 
and a somewhat higher land percentage of 
22%, we have: 



B 



.78 



= .90 



R - L 



1.086 - .22 



The Sales Ratio Analysis report can also be 
used for validating depreciation tables. For 
example, in the above case after applying a county 
index of .90 to improvement values, the ratios 
would still indicate the need for some downward 
adjustment to the percent goods in the middle age 
ranges of the depreciation table and an increase in 
percent goods in the bottom age ranges of the 
table. 



Age 






Ranee 


Existing Table 


Adjusted 


0-3 


97% 


98% 


4-6 


93% 


94% 


7-10 


90% 


90% 


11-15 


85% 


85% 


16-20 


80% 


78% 


21-30 


75% 


72% 


31-40 


70% 


67% 


41-50 


65% 


64% 


51-60 


60% 


62%. 


61-f- 


55% 


60% 



R - L 



The above adjustments rellect some smoothing 
to new factors derived from the sales ratio data to 
ensure that values will not jump erratically with a 
small change in age. 

The above analysis assumes thai all dwellings 
had been recorded as having CDU of average. 

47.3.2. MARKET DEPRECIATION 



where R is the overall ratio and B and L are 
the portions of total appraised value 
associated with Land and Building. In this 



case: 



= .92 



R - L 1.069 - .2 



Another alternative to developing market-based 
depreciation is the use of the Market Modeling 
subsystem in Montana MAS to develop 
depreciation models. Templates have been set up 
under OLPM for use with the Alternate Market 
Valuation menu to extract sales information, to 
develop a market-derived percent good for the 
dwelling residual, and to model this "percent good" 
as a function of age and CDU rating. 



08/01/89 



47-3 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



47.4. DEPRECIATION PROCEDURES 



It is often advisable to develop schedules and 
tables to be used as a guide for the appraiser to 
determine value. The use of such tables is 
especially applicable in mass appraisals for tax 
equalization purposes where it is essential to 
establish and maintain uniformity. However, 
Percent Good tables, based on actual age alone are 
impractical. Remodeling, for instance, has the 
effect of prolonging the remaining life of a 
building, thus making its effective age considerably 
different than its actual age. Consideration must 
be given to all the factors operating to influence 
the overall condition, desirability, and degree of 
usefulness of each structure. 

47.4.1. DWELLING 

47.4.1.1. CDU Rating System 

As houses grow older, they wear out; they 
become less desirable, less useful. This universal 
decline in value is called depreciation, and 
appraisers are required to determine the degree of 
this loss in each property they examine. If all 
houses deteriorated at the same rate, this decline 
in value would be a simple function of the age of 
the structure - a certain percentage per year. 
However, houses depreciate at varying rates 
depending on a number of variables. 

Every building is acted upon by two value 
reducing forces. One tends to shorten its physical 
life, the other shortens its economic life. Both 
forces act concurrently, overlap, and affect each 
other. Its expectancy of life - both physical and 
economic - is longest on the day the key is handed 
over by the builder. The building is then most 
desirable and most useful. The future benefits 
which the occupant may expect to enjoy are at the 
maximum. From that day forward, however, decay 
and wear and tear act to lessen the value of the 
structure by curtailing its remaining capacity for 
use. 

At the same time the hoilse is "wearing out", it 
is also "going out of style". It is becoming less 
desirable. It is progressively becoming less useful, 
both from the effect of forces within the property 
(obsolescence), and outside of it as well 
(encroachment of undesirable influences such as 
less desirable property uses). 



Neither physical decline nor functional loss arc 
constant in their action. Deterioration is a 
relatively steady process offset periodically by 
maintenance. Worn-out elements of the building 
are repaired or replaced at intervals, depending 
upon the policy of the owner. Cheaper houses 
generally deteriorate faster than better ones. 
Obsolescence and encroachment may come slowly, 
or happen almost overnight. The forces which 
cause both deterioration and functional/economic 
depreciation may act and often do act 
simultaneously, but they are not necessarily related. 
A house may decline in physical condition, and yet 
throughout its entire life remain relatively 
functional. 

Obviously, the age of a house remains an 
important factor in estimating accrued depreciation. 
Many houses receive "normal" maintenance and 
experience "average" economic loss due to 
obsolescence and functional depreciation. These 
buildings depreciate at an average rate as they 
grow older. 

Other houses lose value at lesser or more rapid 
rates. CDU Ratings provide a means by which 
normal depreciation may be modified according to 
the appraiser's best determination of the relative 
loss of value in a structure, as compared with the 
average loss that might be expected. The age of a 
dwelling by itself is an unreliable indicator of the 
degree of depreciation from its cost new. For 
houses also depreciate because they wear out and 
become less desirable and less useful from a variety 
of causes. 

To assist the appraiser in establishing the CDU 
rating of a building, a classification or rating 
scheme that follows the normal observations of an 
appraiser as a building is examined has been 
developed. The following table lists the CDU 
ratings and their accompanying definitions of the 
observed physical condition of the building and ihc 
degree of desirability and usefulness for the 
building age and type. 



47-4 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



^1 



CDU Rating 
Of Dwelling 

UNSOUND 



VERY POOR 



POOR 



FAIR 



AVERAGE 



GOOD 



VERY GOOD 



EXCELLENT 



CDU RATING GUIDE 



Definition 

Dwelling is definitely unsound 
and practically unfit for use. 

Condition approaches 
unsoundness; extremely 
undesirable and barely usable. 

Definite deterioration is 
obvious; definitely undesirable 
and barely usable. 

Marked deterioration, but quite 
usable; rather unattractive and 
undesirable. 

Normal "wear and tear" is 
apparent; average attractiveness 
and desirability. 

Minor deterioration is visible; 
slightly more attractive, 
desirable and useful. 

Slight evidence of deterioration; 
attractive and quite desirable. 

Dwelling is in perfect condition; 
very attractive and highly 
desirable. 



47.4.1.2. Age and CDU 

Age is reflected as an index of the normal 
deterioration and obsolescence in a structure which 
may be expected over the years. Condiiion 
represents a variable measure of the effects of 
maintenance and remodeling on a building. 
Desirability is a measure of the degree of appeal a 
particular building may have to prospective 
purchasers. Usefulness is a measure of the utility 
value of the structure for the purpose for which it 
may be used. 

The degree of deterioration and obsolescence, 
or loss of value from all causes, both within and 
without the property, is automatically taken into 
account. This is accomplished by means of a 
simple CDU rating of the capabilities and qualities 
of the structure, in the same manner as would a 
prospective purchaser. Sound valuation theory 
presupposes the existence of a prospective buyer 
with intelligence enough to compare the advantages 
and disadvantages of competing properties, and to 
rate the property he is examining according to its 
relative degree of desirability and usefulness. 

Percent good is defined as the resultant 
estimate of the diminishing value of an 
improvement, after subtracting the amount of 
estimated depreciation from the Replacement Cost 
New. For example, a structure which is estimated 
to be 45 percent depreciated as of a given time has 
a percent good of 55. Therefore, depreciation and 
percent good are complements of each other. 

Once the CDU rating of a building has been 
established through a consideration of its condiiion. 
desirability, and usefulness for its age and its type, 
reference to the Dwelling Percent Good Table will 
indicate the appropriate value percent remaining 
for a structure possessing these qualities, in the 
degree observed and noted by the appraiser. 



08/01/89 



47-5 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



47.4.1.3. Selection of a Percent Good 

There are only two steps to determine the 
Percent Good of a dwelling. 

1 Rate the dwelling in terms of its overall 

condition, desirability, and usefulness, CDU. 



From the following table, select the 
corresponding Percent Good based on the 
dwelling's observed age, either actual age or 
a calculated effective age, and the established 
CDU. 



PERCENT GOOD TABLE FOR DWELLINGS 



OBSERVED 




Very 










Very 




AGE 


Excellent 


Good 


Good 


Average 


Fair 


Poor 


Poor 


Unsound 


- 3 


100 


97 


95 


90 


85 


80 


75 


60 


4 - 8 


97 


95 


90 


85 


80 


75 


70 


55 


9 - 13 


95 


90 


85 


80 


75 


70 


65 


50 


14 - 18 


90 


85 


80 


75 


70 


65 


60 


45 


19 - 23 


85 


80 


75 


70 


65 


60 


50 


35 


24 - 28 


80 


75 


70 


65 


60 


50 


40 


25 


29 - 38 


75 


70 


65 


60 


50 


40 


35 


20 


39 - 49 


70 


65 


60 


55 


45 


35 


30 


20 


50 & over 


65 


60 


55 


50 


40 


30 


25 


20 



47.4.1.4. Examples Using CDU 

To use the CDU System, the appraiser rates 
each house according to his composite impression 
of its relative condition, desirability, and usefulness 
- for its age and type. The following four cases 
illustrate this convenient and practical method of 
determining percent good in houses. 

Case One: A fifteen-year-old single family 
residence situated in an attractive residential 
suburb of a typical American community. Grade 
"6" with two baths. Minor deterioration is visible; 
slightly less attractive and desirable than new, but 
useful. A qualified observer would rate this house 
above average on the CDU Rating System. 
Accordingly, our appraiser has assigned it a CDU 
Rating of "Good". Referring to the Percent Good 
Table for Dwellings, we find 80% Good would be 
appropriate. 

Case Two: A one story frame house seven years 
old. Grade "5" or average quality construction; 
ihrce bedrooms, one and one-half baths. Structure 
shows normal wear and tear and has average 
attractiveness and desirability. The appraiser's 
impression is, "for a seven-year-old Grade "5" 
hou.se. this would be rated as Average." From the 
table we find 85% Good is indicated. 



Case Three: This century-old Colonial style frame 
house is located in a New England seaport 
community; erected 1858. Grade "6" or good 
quality construction. Building has been extremely 
well maintained and completely modernized with 
central heating, electric lighting, and plumbing 
added. The structure is in good physical condition 
in spite of its age. Building is architecturally 
attractive and quite desirable. The appraiser's 
impression is, "for a very old house of Grade "6" 
quality, this is an Excellent one." From the table 
65% Good is indicated. 

Case Four: A twenty-four-year-old single family 
residence of Grade "5" quality; one story and 
basement, frame construction; three bedrooms with 
bath. Structure has had normal maintenance and 
is average in physical condition. Within the past 
two years, an elevated six-lane expressway passing 
over the adjoining lot has been erected. This 
encroachment has seriously detracted from ihc 
attractiveness and desirability of the property. 
Accordingly, the appraiser has a.ssigned a CDU 
Rating of "Very Poor". From the table 40% Good 
is indicated. 



47-6 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



47.4.2. MOBILE HOMES 

The depreciation procedures to be followed for 
mobile homes is the same as for dwellings with 
one exception, there is a separate Percent Good 
Table For Mobile Homes. 

There are only two steps to determine the 
Percent Good of a mobile home. 



Rate the mobile home in terms of its overall 
condition, desirability, and usefulness, CDU. 

From the following table, select the 
corresponding Percent Good based on the 
mobile home's observed age, either actual 
age or a calculated effective age, and the 
established CDU. 



^ 



PERCENT GOOD TABLE FOR MOBILE HOMES 



OBSERVED 




Very 










Very 




AGE 




Excellent 


Good 


Good 


Average 


Fair 


Poor 


Poor 


Unsound 


- 


1 


99 


99 


98 


98 


97 


97 


97 


93 


2 




96 


95 


94 


92 


90 


89 


88 


66 


3 




94 


93 


91 


89 


85 


84 


82 


50 


4 




92 


91 


88 


85 


80 


78 


76 


37 


5 




90 


89 


85 


82 


75 


73 


70 


29 


6 




88 


87 


83 


79 


70 


68 


64 


22 


7 




87 


85 


80 


76 


66 


63 


58 


18 


8 




85 


83 


78 


73 


62 


58 


53 


18 


9 




84 


82 


76 


70 


58 


54 


49 


18 


10 




82 


80 


74 


68 


55 


50 


44 


18 


11 - 


12 


80 


78 


71 


64 


50 


45 


39 


18 


13 - 


14 


78 


75 


67 


59 


44 


39 


33 


18 


15 - 


16 


76 


72 


63 


55 


39 


34 


28 


18 


17 - 


19 


73 


69 


60 


51 


34 


28 


23 


18 


20 - 


23 


70 


65 


55 


45 


28 


23 


18 


18 


24 - 


27 


66 


61 


50 


39 


23 


18 


18 


18 


28 - 


31 


63 


58 


45 


35 


19 


18 


18 


18 


32 - 


35 


61 


54 


42 


31 


18 


18 


18 


18 


36 - 


39 


59 


52 


39 


28 


18 


18 


18 


18 


40 & over 


57 


50 


37 


26 


18 


18 


18 


18 



08/01/89 



47-7 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



47.4.3. RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
OTHER BUILDINGS & YARD 
IMPROVEMENTS 

47.4.3.1. OBY Percent Good Guidelines 

The appraisal of Other Buildings and Yard 
Improvements for both residential and agricultural 
properties is a difficult task. Other Buildings and 
yard Improvements are rarely purchased or sold 
separately from the balance of the property. The 
cost of construction of a swimming pool, which is 
built for the convenience and comfort of a properly 
owner, will rarely add an equivalent amount to the 
market value of the property. The cost of 
construction of a farm outbuilding that can be 
justified by its contribution to the farming 
operation will again seldom add an equivalent 
amount to the market value of the property. 

In effect. Other Buildings and Yard 
Improvements have value in direct proportion to 
their degree of utility or usefulness. This is an 
extension of the principle of contribution, which 
affirms that the value of any factor in production is 
dependent upon the amount which it contributes to 
the overall net return, irrespective of the cost of its 
construction. Any effective approach to the 
valuation of Other Buildings and Yard 
Improvements must reflect the action of investors. 
Informed farm owners and operators would not 
invest in buildings which could not pay for 
themselves by either maintaining or adding to the 
required level of productivity. Homeowners would 
not invest in swimming pools, detached garages, 
etc., which would not supply the degree of 
conformity and/or convenience they desire. 

The physical condition of an Other Building or 
Yard Improvement bears a direct relationship on 
the desirability and usefulness of that improvement. 
It is, therefore, possible to apply the CDU Rating 
System explained in Section 47.4.1 to generate a 
percent good estimate for different types of 
improvements of varying ages, based on condition, 
desirability, and usefulness. 

The CDU Rating System has been modified to 
assist the appraiser in developing applicable 
depreciation guidelines based upon the condition, 
desirability and usefulness of various Other 
Buildings and Yard Improvements. 

For the appraisal of Other Building and Yard 
Improvements, the term CDU Rating is modified 



to become Condition Rating. The term Condition 
Rating will still give the same consideration to all 
factors which influence the overall condition, 
desirability, and degree of usefulness of each 
structure. The eight CDU Ratings have been 
simplified to six Condition Ratings. These ratings 
are again intended to fit the normal impressions ul 
an appraiser as the improvement is examined. 
Condition Ratings, with their accompanying 
definitions are as follows: 

OBY CONDITION RATING GUIDE 



Condition 
Rating 

UNSOUND 



POOR 



FAIR 



AVERAGE 



GOOD 



EXCELLENT 



Definition 

Improvement is definitely 
unsound and practically unfit 
for use. 

Definite deterioration is 
obvious; definitely undesirable 
and barely usable. 

Marked deterioration, but quite 
usable; rather unattractive and 
undesirable. 

Normal "wear and tear" is 
apparent; average attractiveness 
and desirability. 

Minor deterioration is visible; 
slightly more attractive, 
desirable and useful. 

Improvement is in perfect "like 
new" condition; very useful and 
highly desirable. 



47.4.3.2. OBY Percent Good Calculation 

The Percent Good (PG) calculation uses the 
Economic Life of the improvement; the Year Builu 
the Appraisal Year, the computer system Apprais;il 
Year of valuation; and the Boitom-out Percent 
Good, in the following calculation. 

The Economic Life of the impri)vement and its 
Bottom-out Percent Good is found in the 
Residential/Agricultural OBY Cost Tables lor ihc 
specific improvement. 



c 



47-8 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



DF 



PG 



1 + X (1-X) + A X2 
where DF = Desirability Factor for structure 

100*DF 



where A 



where X 



1 



Bottom-out Percent Good 
Appraisal Year - Year Built 
Economic Life 



NOTE: If (Appraisal Year - Year Built) is less 
than the Economic Life use X, otherwise use 
L 



For example: 

A residential detached frame garage in Good condition 
was built in 1977. The Percent Good calculation for this 
OBY improvement is: 

From the Residential/Agricultural OBY Cost Table: 
Economic Life for a Frame Garage = 50 Years Bottom-out 
Percent Good for a Frame Garage in Good Condition = 

.45 



Therefore: 
A 


1.00 




= 1.22 




.45 




X 


1989 - 1977 




12 
50 


= .24 


50 


ar^ 




1 







1 + .24 (1 - .24) + (1 .22) (.24)^ 
1 1 



To facilitate manual computations, computer- 
generated depreciation tables are provided. 

This depreciation formula provides for 
continuous depreciation from a starting Percent 
Good of (100 * DF) for the structure when it's 
new to the Bottom-out Percent Good at the end of 
it's expected life. It starts depreciation at a 
straight-line rate from it's beginning Percent Good 
to at the end of it's expected life. This 
depreciation is gradually adjusted, being decelerated 
for structures in good condition and of high 
desirability toward a higher Bottom-out Percent 
Good. 

The desirability factor indicates that the market 
value for many auxiliary structures do not reflect 
their cost in the market place, even when new. As 
an example, detached garages are usually more 
expensive to build than attached garages, but 
market demands puts a higher value on an 
attached garage of the same size. 

47.4.3.3. Economic Life Table 

The following table details the expected normal 
economic life of Residential/Agricultural Other 
Building and Yard Improvements. This 
information can also be found in the Residential 
Cost Tables. 

The economic life of an improvement is part of 
the calculation to derive the Percent Good i)f the 
improvement. 



PG 



1 -I- .182 -I- .07 



= .80 or 80% 



1.25 



08/01/89 



47-9 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



NORMAL ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE FOR RESIDENTIAL / AGRICULTURAL 
OTHER BUILDING AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS 



OBY 


ECONOMIC 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


LIFE 


ABl 


Bank Barn 


50 


AB2 


Standard Barn 


50 


AOl 


Horse Barn or Stable 


50 


AFl 


Concrete Feed Bunk 


30 


AF2 


Post & Plank Bunk 


30 


AF3 


Concrete Fence Bunk 


30 


AF4 


Post & Plank Fence Bunk 


30 


AGl 


Grain bins, w/o drying bin 


25 


AG2 


Grain bins, with drying bin 


25 


AG3 


Steel Hopper Bins 


25 


AHl 


1-Story Frame or Metal 






Poul try House 


50 


AH2 


2-Story Frame or Metal 






Poultry House 


50 


AH3 


3-Story Frame or Metal 






Poultry House 


50 


AH4 


1-Story Concrete Block 






Poultry House 


50 


AH5 


2-Story Concrete Block 






Poultry House 


50 


AH6 


3-Story Concrete Block 






Poultry House 


50 


All 


Shed, Wood Frame 


25 


AI2 


Shed, Concrete Block 


30 


AKl 


Bunker Silo 


25 


ALl 


1-Story Lean-To 


30 


AMI 


Milk House, Attached, Concrete 






Block 


50 


AM2 


Milk House, Attached, Glazed 






Tile 


50 


AM3 


Milk House, Detached, Concrete 






Block 


50 


AM4 


Milk House, Detached, Glazed 






Tile 


50 


AM5 


Milking Parlor, Concrete 






Block 


50 


AM6 


Milking Parlor, Glazed Tile 


50 


AOl 


Potato Storage, Undergound 


50 


A02 


Potato Storage, Aboveground 


50 


API 


Pole Frame Building, 4-Sides 






Closed, Metal 


30 


AP2 


Pole Frame Building, 4-Sides 






Closed, Wood 


30 


AP3 


Pole Frame Building 1-Side 






Open, Metal 


30 


AP4 


Pole Frame Building, 1-Side 






Open, Wood 


30 


APS 


Pole Frame Building, 4-Sides 






Open, Metal 


30 



OBY 




ECONOMIC 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


LIFE 


AP6 


Pole Frame Building, 4-Sides 






Open, Wood 


30 


AQl 


Quonset Building 


30 


ARl 


Granary 


50 


ASl 


Silo, Cone Stave, with roof 


SO 


AS2 


Silo, Cone Stave, w/o roof 


50 


AS3 


Butler LMS Silo 


50 


AS4 


Porcelain Silo 


50 


ASS 


Prefabricated Steel Silo 


50 


AS6 


Prefabricated Steel Silo, 






High Moisture 


50 


ATI 


Trench, Cone or Plank 


25 


AT2 


Trench, Dirt 


25 


AUl 


Fuel Tanks, Underground 


25 


AU2 


Fuel Tanks, Aboveground 


30 


AU3 


Horizontal Pressure Tank 


30 


AWl 


Swine Farrowing Barn 


30 


AW2 


Swine Finishing Barn 


30 


AW 3 


Swine Confinement Barn 


30 


AXl 


Prefab Building with 






vertical walls 


30 


AX2 


Prefab Building with 






Slant Walls 


30 


AYl 


Circular Slurry System 


50 


AY2 


Rectangular Slurry System 


50 


BBl 


Boat House, Frame or 






Concrete Block 


30 


BB2 


Boat House, Masonry 


30 


BDl 


Boat Dock, Light Wood, 






Light Posts 


15 


BD2 


Boat Dock, Medium Wood, 






Wood Girders 


15 


BD3 


Boat Dock, Heavy Wood, 






Heavy Pilings 


25 


BQl 


Barbecue 


25 


CAl 


Scales, Platform 


25 


CA2 


Scales, Truck 


25 


CA3 


Scales, Cattle 


25 


GHl 


Greenhouse, Wood Frame, 






Plastic Covered 


25 


GH2 


Greenhouse, Wood Frame, 






Glass Walls 


25 


GH3 


Greenhouse, Pipe/Metal Frame, 


1 




Glass Walls 


25 


HTl 


Hot Tub 


15 


PAl 


Paving, Asphalt (Blacktop) 


15 


PA2 


Paving, Concrete 


15 


RCl 


Carport 


30 


RC2 


Canopy 


30 



c 



47-10 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



NORMAL ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE FOR RESIDENTIAL / AGRICULTURAL 
OTHER BUILDING AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS (Cont'd) 



OBY 




ECONOMIC 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


LIFE 


RFl 


Fencing, Chain Link 


20 


RF2 


Fencing, Picket 


20 


RF3 


Fencing, Stockade 


20 


RF4 


Fencing, Post & Rail 


20 


RF5 


Fencing, Basketware 


20 


RF6 


Fencing, Brick or Masonry 


30 


RF7 


Fencing, Ornamental Iron 


30 


RF8 


Fencing, Barbed Wire - 






4 Strand 


20 


RGl 


Garage, Detached, Frame, 






Finished 


40 


RG2 


Garage, Detached, Masonry, 






Finished 


40 


RG3 


Garage, Detached, Frame, 






Unfinished 


40 


RG4 


Garage, Detached, Masonry, 






Unfinished 


40 


RPl 


Swimming Pool, Vinyl -lined 


15 


RP2 


Swimming Pool. Fiberglass 


15 


RP3 


Swimming Pool, Reinforced 






Concrete 


15 



OBY 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



ECONOMIC 
LIFE 



RP4 Swimming Pool, Gunite 
(Sprayed Concrete) 

RSI Shed, Frame 

RS2 Shed, Metal 

RS3 Shed, Masonry 

RTl Deck, Wood 

RT2 Deck, Concrete 

RT3 Deck, Stone/Tile 
with Sand Base 

RT4 Deck, Stone/Tile 

with Concrete Base 

RT5 Deck, Brick 

RT6 Masonry Stoop/Terrace 

RT7 Patio Covered 

RZl Gazebo 

TCI Tennis Court, Asphalt 

TC2 Tennis Court, Concrete 

TC3 Tennis Court, Clay 



15 
30 
30 
30 
20 
30 

30 

30 
30 
30 
20 
15 
15 
15 
15 



08/01/89 



47-11 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



47.4.3.4. OBY Percent Good Tables 



25 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 



Six examples of OBY Percent Good tables have 
been provided to demonstrate the effect that 
various years of economic life and bottom out 
percentages have on the calculated Percent Good. 

15 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 





OBY 
EXCEL- 


IMPROV 
GOOD 


EMENT 
AVER- 


CONDIT 
FAIR 


ION RA 
POOR 


TING 
UN- 




LENT 




AGE 






SOUND 


BOTTOM 














OUT V: 


30 


25 


20 


15 


10 


5 


ACTUAL 














AGE 














1 


93 


93 


93 


92 


91 


87 


2 


86 


86 


84 


82 


78 


69 


3 


80 


78 


76 


72 


66 


52 


4 


73 


71 


68 


63 


54 


39 


5 


68 


64 


60 


54 


45 


30 


6 


62 


58 


53 


47 


37 


23 


7 


57 


53 


47 


40 


31 


19 


8 


52 


48 


42 


35 


26 


15 


9 


48 


43 


37 


30 


22 


12 


10 


44 


39 


33 


27 


19 


10 


11 


41 


36 


30 


24 


17 


9 


12 


38 


32 


27 


21 


14 


8 


13 


35 


30 


24 


19 


13 


6 


14 


32 


27 


22 


17 


11 


6 


15 


30 


25 


20 


15 


10 


5 





OBY 


IMPROV 


EMENT 


CONDIT 


ION RA 


TING 




EXCEL- 


GOOD 


AVER- 


FAIR 


POOR 


UN- 




LENT 




AGE 






SOUND 


BOTTOM 














OUT V: 


30 


25 


20 


15 


10 


5 


ACTUAL 














AGE 














1 


96 


96 


96 


95 


95 


94 


2 


92 


92 


91 


90 


88 


84 


3 


88 


87 


86 


84 


81 


73 


4 


84 


83 


81 


78 


73 


62 


5 


80 


78 


76 


72 


66 


52 


6 


76 


74 


71 


66 


59 


44 


7 


72 


70 


66 


61 


52 


37 


8 


69 


66 


61 


56 


47 


32 


9 


65 


62 


57 


51 


42 


27 


10 


62 


58 


53 


47 


37 


23 


11 


59 


55 


49 


43 


33 


20 


12 


56 


52 


46 


39 


30 


18 


13 


53 


49 


43 


36 


27 


16 


14 


51 


46 


40 


33 


25 


14 


15 


48 


43 


37 


30 


22 


12 


16 


46 


41 


35 


28 


20 


11 


17 


44 


38 


33 


26 


19 


10 


18 


41 


36 


31 


24 


17 


9 


19 


40 


34 


29 


22 


16 


8 


20 


38 


32 


27 


21 


14 


8 


21 


36 


31 


25 


19 


13 


7 


22 


34 


29 


24 


18 


12 


6 


23 


33 


28 


22 


17 


12 


6 


24 


31 


26 


21 


16 


11 


5 


25 


30 


25 


20 


15 


10 


5 



r 



47-12 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



30 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 



50 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 





OBY 


IMPROVEMENT 


CONDITION RA 


TING 




EXCEL- 


GOOD 


AVER- 


FAIR 


POOR 


UN- 




LENT 




AGE 






SOUND 


BOTTOM 














OUT V: 


30 


25 


20 


15 


10 


5 


ACTUAL 














AGE 














1 


97 


97 


96 


96 


96 


95 


2 


93 


93 


93 


92 


91 


87 


3 


90 


89 


88 


87 


85 


78 


4 


86 


86 


84 


82 


78 


69 


5 


83 


82 


80 


77 


72 


60 


5 


80 


78 


76 


72 


66 


52 


7 


77 


75 


72 


67 


60 


45 


8 


73 


71 


68 


63 


54 


39 


9 


70 


68 


64 


58 


50 


34 


10 


68 


64 


60 


54 


45 


30 


11 


65 


61 


56 


50 


41 


26 


12 


62 


58 


53 


47 


37 


23 


13 


59 


55 


50 


43 


34 


21 


14 


57 


53 


47 


40 


31 


19 


15 


55 


50 


44 


38 


29 


17 


16 


52 


48 


42 


35 


26 


15 


17 


50 


45 


40 


33 


24 


14 


18 


48 


43 


37 


30 


22 


12 


19 


46 


41 


35 


29 


21 


11 


20 


44 


39 


33 


27 


19 


10 


21 


42 


37 


32 


25 


18 


10 


22 


41 


36 


30 


24 


17 


9 


23 


39 


34 


28 


22 


15 


8 


24 


38 


32 


27 


21 


14 


8 


25 


36 


31 


26 


20 


14 


7 


26 


35 


30 


24 


19 


13 


6 


27 


34 


28 


23 


18 


12 


6 


28 


32 


27 


22 


17 


11 


6 


29 


31 


26 


21 


16 


11 


• 5 ■ 


30 


30 


25 


20 


15 


10 


5 





OBY 
EXCEL- 


IMPROV 
GOOD 


EMENT 
AVER- 


CONDIT 
FAIR 


ION RA 
POOR 


TING 
UN- 




LENT 




AGE 






SOUND 


BOTTOM 














OUT V: 


40 


30 


25 


20 


15 


5 


ACTUAL 














AGE 














1 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


97 


2 


96 


96 


96 


96 


95 


94 


3 


94 


94 


94 


93 


93 


89 


4 


92 


92 


92 


91 


90 


84 


5 


90 


90 


89 


88 


87 


78 


6 


89 


88 


87 


86 


84 


73 


7 


87 


86 


85 


83 


81 


67 


8 


85 


84 


83 


81 


78 


62 


9 


84 


82 


80 


78 


75 


57 


10 


82 


80 


78 


76 


72 


52 


11 


80 


78 


76 


73 


69 


48 


12 


79 


76 


74 


71 


66 


44 


13 


77 


74 


72 


68 


63 


40 


14 


76 


72 


70 


66 


61 


37 


15 


74 


70 


68 


64 


58 


34 


16 


73 


69 


66 


61 


55 


32 


17 


72 


67 


64 


59 


53 


29 


18 


70 


65 


62 


57 


51 


27 


19 


69 


64 


60 


55 


49 


25 


20 


68 


62 


58 


53 


47 


23 


22 


65 


59 


55 


49 


43 


20 


24 


63 


56 


52 


46 


39 


18 


26 


60 


53 


49 


43 


36 


16 


28 


58 


51 


46 


40 


33 


14 


30 


56 


48 


43 


37 


30 


12 


32 


54 


46 


41 


35 


28 


11 


34 


52 


44 


38 


33 


26 


10 


36 


51 


41 


36 


31 


24 


9 


38 


49 


40 


34 


29 


22 


8 


40 


47 


38 


32 


27 


21 


8 


42 


46 


36 


31 


25 


19 


7 


44 . 


44 


34 


29 


24 


18 


6 


46 


43 


33 


28 


22 


17 


6 


48 


41 


31 


26 


21 


16 


5 


50 


40 


30 


25 


20 


15 


5 



08/01/89 



47-13 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



50 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 



50 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 





OBY 


IMPROVEMENT 


CONOIT 


ION RA 


TING 




EXCEL- 


GOOD 


AVER- 


FAIR 


POOR 


UN- 




LENT 




AGE 






SOUND 


BOTTOM 














OUT V: 


45 


35 


30 


25 


15 


5 


ACTUAL 














AGE 














1 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


97 


2 


96 


96 


96 


96 


95 


94 


3 


94 


94 


94 


94 


93 


89 


4 


92 


92 


92 


92 


90 


84 


5 


91 


90 


90 


89 


87 


78 


6 


89 


88 


88 


87 


84 


73 


7 


87 


86 


86 


85 


81 


67 


8 


86 


85 


84 


83 


78 


62 


9 


84 


83 


82 


80 


75 


57 


10 


83 


81 


80 


78 


72 


52 


11 


81 


79 


78 


76 


69 


48 


12 


80 


78 


76 


74 


66 


44 


13 


78 


76 


74 


72 


63 


40 


14 


77 


74 


72 


70 


61 


37 


15 


76 


73 


70 


68 


58 


34 


16 


74 


71 


69 


66 


56 


32 


17 


73 


69 


67 


64 


53 


29 


18 


72 


68 


65 


62 


51 


27 


19 


71 


66 


64 


60 


49 


25 


20 


70 


65 


62 


58 


47 


23 


22 


67 


62 


59 


55 


43 


20 


24 


65 


60 


56 


52 


39 


18 


26 


63 


57 


53 


49 


36 


16 


28 


61 


55 


51 


46 


33 


14 


30 


60 


52 


48 


43 


30 


12 


32 


58 


50 


46 


41 


28 


11 


34 


56 


48 


44 


38 


26 


10 


36 


54 


46 


41 


36 


24 


9 


38 


53 


44 


40 


34 


22 


8 


40 


51 


43 


38 


32 


21 


8 


42 


50 


41 


36 


31 


19 


7 


44 


49 


39 


34 


29 


18 


6 


46 


47 


38 


33 


28 


17 


6 


48 


46 


36 


31 


26 


16 


5 


50 


45 


35 


30 


25 


15 


5 





OBY 
EXCEL- 


IMPROV 
GOOD 


EMENT 
AVER- 


CONDIT 
FAIR 


ION RA 
POOR 


TING 
UN- 




LENT 




AGE 






SOUND 


BOTTOM 














OUT V: 


55 


45 


40 


30 


20 


5 


ACTUAL 














AGE 














1 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


97 


2 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


94 


3 


94 


94 


94 


94 


93 


89 


4 


93 


92 


92 


92 


91 


84 


5 


91 


91 


90 


90 


88 


78 


6 


89 


89 


89 


88 


86 


73 


7 


88 


87 


87 


86 


83 


67 


8 


87 


86 


85 


84 


81 


62 


9 


85 


84 


84 


82 


78 


57 


10 


84 


83 


82 


80 


76 


52 


11 


83 


81 


80 


78 


73 


48 


12 


81 


80 


79 


76 


71 


44 


13 


80 


78 


77 


74 


68 


40 


14 


79 


77 


76 


72 


66 


37 


15 


78 


76 


74 


70 


64 


34 


16 


77 


74 


73 


69 


61 


32 


17 


76 


73 


72 


67 


59 


29 


18 


75 


72 


70 


65 


57 


27 


19 


74 


71 


69 


64 


55 


25 


20 


73 


70 


68 


62 


53 


23 


22 


71 


67 


65 


59 


49 


20 


24 


70 


65 


63 


56 


46 


18 


26 


68 


63 


60 


53 


43 


16 


28 


67 


61 


58 


51 


40 


14 


30 


65 


60 


56 


48 


37 


12 


32 


64 


58 


54 


46 


35 


11 


34 


63 


56 


52 


44 


33 


10 


36 


62 


54 


51 


41 


31 


9 


38 


60 


53 


•49 


40 


29 


8' 


40 


59 


51 


47 


38 


27 


8 


42 


58 


50 


46 


36 


25 


7 


44 


57 


49 


44 


34 


24 


6 


46 


57 


47 


43 


33 


22 


6 


48 


56 


46 


41 


31 


21 


5 


50 


55 


45 


40 


30 


20 


5 



L 



47-14 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



47.4.4. COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 

Depreciation for Commercial and Industrial 
properties is applied on a line-by-line basis rather 
than one rate for the overall structure. The 
Replacement Cost New (RCN) of the Main 
Building as described on the Exterior/Interior line 
is calculated, then added to that figure is the RCN 
of the Building Other Features attached to the 
line. The resulting sum is multiplied by the 
Percent Good as indicated by the Physical 
Condition and Functional Utility of the individual 
E.xterior/Interior line to derive a Replacement Cost 
New Less Depreciation (RCNLD). The RCNLD's 
of each line are then summed to obtain the Total 
RCNLD of the structure. The tables in this 
Section have been provided as guidelines to assist 
the appraiser in arriving at the resultant estimate 
of the diminishing value of improvements after 
subtracting all forms of depreciation. 

47.4.4.1. Common Causes of Obsolescence 

In the final analysis, an estimate of depreciation 
or value loss represents an opinion of the appraiser 
as to the degree that the present and future appeal 
of a property has been diminished by deterioration 
and obsolescence. The accuracy of the estimate 
will be a product of the appraiser's experience in 
recognizing the symptoms of deterioration and 
obsolescence and the appraiser's ability to exercise 
sound judgment in equating the observations to the 
proper monetary allowance to be deducted from 
the Replacement Cost New. The following is a 
listing of some of the most common sources of 
functional and economic obsolescence which should 
further assist the appraiser in arriving at a 
reasonable estimate of obsolescence. 

Common Causes of 
Functional Obsolescence 

• Poor ratio of land area to building area. 

• Inadequate parking, and/or truck and railroad 
loading and unloading facilities. 

• An appearance unattractive and inconsistent 
with present use and surrounding properties. 

• Poor proportion of office, rental, or 
manufacturing, and warehouse space. 

• Inadequate or unsuited utility space. 



• Limited use and excessive material and product 
handling costs caused by irregular and 
inefficient floor plans, varying floor elevations, 
inadequate clearance, and cut up interiors with 
small bays and an excessive number of walls, 
posts, and columns. 

• High maintenance costs resulting from mixed 
building constructions, and/or' the use of 
obsolete building materials. 

• Multi-story design when single story would be 
more efficient and economical. 

• Excessive or deficient floor load capacity. 

• Insufficient and inadequate elevator service. 

• Effects of corrosion created by manufacturing, 
processing, or storing of chemicals, etc. 

• Foundation and structural failures due to poor 
soil conditions, poor design, excessive loading, 
poor maintenance, excessive vibration of 
building and process equipment. 

• Inadequate power distribution, heating, 
ventilation, air conditioning, or lighting systems. 

Common Causes of 
Economic Obsolescence 

• Zoning laws and other governmental regulations 
which affect the usage and operation of the 
property. 

• Building code requirements which set current 
acceptable construction standards. 

• Market acceptability of the product or services 
for which the property was constructed or is 
currently used. 

• Profitability of the operation of the property 
and the justifiable investment which the 
business would support. 

• Termination of the need for the properly due lo 
actual or probable changes in economic or 
social conditions. 



08/01/89 



47-15 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



47.4.4.2. Economic Life Tables 

The following two tables detail the expected 
normal economic life of Commercial/Industrial 
structures and Commercial Other Building and 
Yard Improvements. This information can also be 
found in the Commercial and Industrial Cost 
Tables. 



The economic life of an improvement is pan of 
the calculation to derive the Percent Good of the 
improvement. 



f 



NORMAL ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE FOR COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURES 



CONSTRUCTION CLASS 



STRUCTURE 

TYPE 

CODE 



DESCRIPTION 



101 Residential, One Family 

102 Residential, Two Family 

103 Residential, Three Family 

104 Residential, Four Family 

105 Mixed Residential /Commercial 

(built as Residential) 

106 Condominium (common element) 

107 Condominium (fee simple) 

108 Condominium (time share) 

211 Apartment, Garden (3 story & less) 

212 Apartment, High Rise 

213 Townhouse/Rowhouse 



Hotel/Motel, High Rise (5 stories and up) 

Hotel/Motel, Low Rise (1 to 4 stories) 

Nursing Home 

Boarding or Rooming House 

Mixed Residential /Commercial 

(built as Commercial) 
Restaurant 
Fast Food 
Bar or Lounge 
Night Club/Dinner Theatre 
Auto Dealer, Full Service 

332 Auto/Equipment Service Garage 

333 Service Station (full service) 
Service Station (self service) 
Truck Stop 
Car Wash (manual) 
Car Wash (automatic) 
Parking Garage/Deck 
Super Regional Shopping Mall 
Regional Shopping Mall 
Community Shopping Center 
Neighborhood Shopping Center 
Strip Shopping Center 



314 
315 
316 
318 
319 

321 
325 
327 
328 
331 



334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 



Wood Frame / 


Fire 


Joist / Beam or 


Resistant 


Pre-Engi peered 


or 


Steel 


Fireproof 


40 


w*^ 


40 


— - 


40 


-.- 


40 





40 


«•« 


40 


— 


40 


--- 


40 





40 


50 


— 


50 


40 


— 





50 


30 


40 


50 


50 


40 


50 


40 


50 


40 


40 


20 


20 


30 


40 


30 


40 


30 


40 


30 


40 


20 


20 


20 


20 


30. 


40 


20 


20 


30 


40 





40 


40 


50 


40 


50 


40 


50 


30 


40 


30 


40 



f. 



k 



47-16 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



NORMAL ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE FOR COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURES (Cont'd) 



CONSTRUCTION CLASS 



^ 







Wood 


Frame / 


Fire 


STRUCTURE 




Joist 


; / Beam or 


Resistant 


TYPE 




Pre-E 


[ngineered 


or 


CODE DESCRIPTION 




Steel 




Fireproof 


345 Discount Department Store 






40 


50 


346 Department Store 






40 


50 


347 Supermarket 






30 


40 


348 Convenience Food Market 






30 


40 


349 Medical Office Building 






40 


50 


350 Drive-up Bank 






40 


50 


351 Bank 






40 


60 


352 Savings Institution 






40 


50 


353 Office Building, Low Rise (1 to 


4 stories) 




40 


50 


354 Office Building, High Rise (5 s 


tories and 


up) 


— 


60 


355 Office Condominium 






40 


50 


356 Retail Condominium 






40 


50 


361 Funeral Home 






40 


50 


362 Veterinary Clinic 






30 


40 


363 Legitimate Theatre 






— 


60 


364 Motion Picture Theatre 






40 


50 


365 Cinema/Theatre 






30 


40 


367 Social or Fraternal Hall 






30 


40 


368 Hangar 






30 


40 


369 Day Care Center 






30 


40 


371 Downtown Row Type 






40 


50 


373 Retail - Single Occupancy 






30 


40 


374 Retail - Multi Occupancy 






30 


40 


375 Retail - Drive-Up 






30 


40 


391 Cold Storage Facility 






30 


40 


392 Lumber Storage 






20 


30 


395 Truck Terminal 






30 


40 


396 Mini Warehouse 






30 


40 


397 Office/Warehouse 






40 


50 


398 Warehouse 






30 


40 


399 Warehouse, Prefab 






30 





381 Bowling Alley 






30 


40 


382 Skating Rink 






30 


40 


383 Health Spa 






30 


40 


384 Swimming Pool, Indoor 






20 


30 


385 Tennis Club, Indoor 






30 


40 


386 Racquet Club, Indoor 






30 


40 


387 Country Club 






40 


50 


388 Club House 






30 


40 


389 Country Club with Golf Course 






40 


50 


401 Manufacturing & Processing 






40 


50 


405 Research & Development 






40 


50 


610 Library 






50 


60 


611 School 






50 


60 


612 College or University 






50 


60 


613 Dormitories 






50 


60 



08/01/89 



47-17 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



NORMAL ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE FOR COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURES (Cont'd) 



CONSTRUCTION CUSS 



STRUCTURE 

TYPE 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



614 Churches 

620 Auditorium 

640 Hospital 

650 Post Office 

660 Police or Fire Station 

670 Correctional Facilities 

680 Cultural Facility 

690 Rail/Bus/Air Terminal 

710 Telephone Equipment Building 

715 Telephone Service Garage 

720 Radio/TV Transmitter Building 

725 Radio, TV or Motion Picture Studio 



Wood Frame / 


Fire 


Joist / Beam or 


Resistant 


Pre-Engineered 


or 


Steel 


Fireproof 


50 


60 


50 


60 


50 


60 


50 


60 


50 


60 


50 


60 


50 


60 


50 


60 


50 


60 


30 


40 


30 


40 


40 


50 



NORMAL ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE FOR COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 
OTHER BUILDING AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS 



OBY 


1 


ECONOMIC 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


LIFE 


ACl 


Air Conditioning, central 


15 


AC2 


Air Conditioning, unit 


15 


ANl 


Annex, wood crib 


30 


AN2 


Annex, concrete 


50 


BCl 


Bank Drive-In, canopy 


40 


BC2 


Bank Drive-In, teller booth 


15 


BDl 


Boat Dock, light wood deck. 






light post 


15 


BD2 


Boat Dock, medium wood deck. 






wood girders 


20 


BD3 


Boat Dock, heavy wood deck. 






heavy pilings 


30 


BBl 


Boat House, frame or concrete 






block 


20 


BB2 


Boat House, masonry 


30 


BSl 


Boat Slip, economy 


20 


BS2 


Boat Slip, average 


20 


BS3 


Boat Slip, good 


20 


BKl 


Bulkhead 


20 


CP5 


Canopy Roof, low cost 


20 


CP6 


Canopy Roof, average 


20 


CP7 


Canopy Roof, good 


20 


RCl 


Carport 


20 



OBY 

CODE DESCRIPTION 



ECONOMIC 
LIFE 



DHl Drive House, wd & mtl , good 35 

DH2 Drive House, wd & mtl, avg 35 

DH3 Drive House, wd & mtl, low 35 

DH4 Drive House, cone, good 50 

DH5 Drive House, cone, avg 50 

DHO Drive House, cone, low cost 50 

DTI Drive-In Theater Screen 20 

ELI Elevators, wood crib 40 

EL2 Elevators, concrete 50 

RFl Fence, chain link 20 

RF2 Fence, picket 20 

RF3 Fence, stockade 20 

RF4 Fence, post & rail 20 

RF5 Fence, basketweave 20 

RF6 Fence, brick or masonry 30 

RF7 ■ Fence, ornamental iron 30 

RF8 Fence, 4 strand barbed wire 20 

RF9 Fence, stock yard corrals 20 

RFO Fence, pipe & post 20 

FSl Flat Storage, wood 30 

FS2 Flat Storage, metal 30 

AUl Fuel Storage Tank, undergrd 20 

ALI2 Fuel Storage Tank, abovegrd 30 

AU3 Fuel Storage Tank, 25 
horizontal pressure 



c 



47-18 



08/01 /89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



NORMAL ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE FOR COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL 
OTHER BUILDING AND YARD IMPROVEMENTS (Cont'd) 



% 



OBY 




ECONOMIC 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


LIFE 


RGl 


Garage, detach, frame, fin 


40 


RG2 


Garage, detach, mas, fin 


40 


RG3 


Garage, detach, frame, unfin 


40 


RG4 


Garage, detached, mas, unfin 


40 


GHl 


Greenhouse, economy 


20 


6H2 


Greenhouse, average 


20 


GH3 


Greenhouse, good 


20 


KFl 


Kioska (Fotomat, etc.) 


20 


LTl 


Light, mercury vapor. 






wa11 mounted 


20 


LT2 


Light, incandescent. 






wall mounted 


20 


LT3 


Light, fluorescent. 






pole & bracket 


20 


LT4 


Light, incandescent. 






pole & bracket 


20 


LT5 


Light, mercury vapor. 






pole & bracket 


20 


MSI 


Misc Structure Value 


— 


PAl 


Paving, asphalt 


15 


PA2 


Paving, concrete, 4" 


15 


PAS 


Paving, concrete, 5"-6" 


15 


PBl 


Plumbing Fixture 


20 


RRl 


Railroad Trackage (spurs) 


20 


TRl 


Restroom Structure, 






frame/concrete block 


30 


TR2 


Restroom Structure, 






brick or stone 


40 


6S1 


Service Station Attendant's 
booth, steel or glass 






on masonry 


20 


GS2 


Service Station Attendant's 
booth, stucco or glass 






on frame 


20 



OBY 




ECONOMIC 


CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


LIFE 


SHI 


Shed, machinery 


30 


SH2 


Shed, aluminum 


SO 


SH3 


Shed, finished metal 


SO 


SH4 


Shed, quonset 


SO 


SH5 


Shed, lumber, frame, 






2 sides open 


20 


SH6 


Shed, lumber, frame. 






4 sides open 


20 


CAl 


Scales, platform 


SO 


CA2 


Scales, truck 


SO 


CAS 


Scales, cattle 


SO 


SKI 


Skating Rink, outdoor. 






ice skating 


20 


SSI 


Sprinkler System, wet pipe 


20 


SS2 


Sprinkler System, dry pipe 


20 


RP5 


Swimming Pool, outdoor. 






commercial 


20 


TAl 


Tanks, wooden 


20 


TA2 


Tanks, corrugated steel 


20 


TAS 


Tanks, corrug steel hopper 


20 


TA4 


Tanks, welded steel 


30 


TAS 


Tanks, welded steel hopper 


30 


TA6 


Tanks, bolted steel 


30 


TA7 


Tanks, fiberglass 


35 


TAO 


Tanks, other 


25 


TCI 


Tennis Court, asphalt 


15 


TC2 


Tennis Court, concrete 


15 


TC3 


Tennis Court, clay 


15 


TUl 


Tunnel, grain elevators 


20 


RSI 


Utility Building, frame 


20 


RS2 


Utility Building, metal 


20 


RS3 


Utility Build, brick/stone 


20 



47.4.4.3. Physical Condition / Functional Utility 
Rating 

The Percent Good of an improvemenl is a 
lunction of three items. The first component is 
the observed age of the structure. The observed 
age is calculated by subtracting cither the Year 
Built or, if entered, the Effective Year Built from 
the Appraisal Year. The Appraisal Year is a 



computer system dale that is user set generally to 
the date of appraisal for the jurisdiction. 

The second component to calculate a Pcrccni 
Good is the physical condition of the improvemenl. 
And the final third component, is the 
improvement's functional utility. 



08/01/89 



47-19 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



The Physical Condition and Functional Utility 
ratings are combined in the following table to 
determine the Physical Condition/Functional Utility 
Rating. This rate is then used to establish the 
Bottom-out Percentage Good of the 
Exterior/Interior Line at the end of the structure's 
economic life. 

A Physical Condition/Functional Utility Rating 
is determined for each Exterior/Interior Line of a 
Commercial structure. 



PHYSICAL CONDITION / FUNCTIONAL UTILITY 
RATING TABLE 



PHYSICAL 


FUNCTIONAL 


UTILITY RAT 


ING 


CONDITION 


Good 


Normal 


Fair 


Poor 


None 


Excellent 


1 


2 


3 


5 


6 


Good 


1 


2 


4 


6 


7 


Normal 


2 


3 


5 


6 


8 


Fair 


4 


5 


6 


8 


10 


Poor 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 



The Bottom-out Percentage Good is determined 
by use of both the Physical Condition/Functional 
Utility Rating found above and Depreciation Tabic 
Number found in the Main Building Structure 
Type Code Table of the Commercial and Industrial 
Cost program. 

The Depreciation Table Number indicates the 
"row" and the Physical Condition/Functional Utility 
Rating indicates the "column" to determine the 
Bottom-out Percentage Good of the improvement. 

For example: The first floor of a Bank 
(Structure Code = 351) has been inspected and it 
is determined that the Physical Condition should 
be rated Good (code =4) and the Functional Utility 
is rated Normal (code=3). Using the above table 
the Physical Condition/Functional Utility Rating is 
2. The Depreciation Table Number from the Main 
Building Structure Type Code Table for a Bank is 
OL Using the Main Building Depreciation Table 
in the Commercial Cost program the Percent Good 
is .60. 



r 



EXAMPLE OF MAIN BUILDING DEPRECIATION TABLE 







MAIN 


BUILDING 


STRUCTURE TYPE 


CODE DEPRECIATION 


TABLE 






RECORD 




PERCENT GOOD 


AT END 


OF EXPECTED LIFE 


BASED OK 


1 CDU LEVEL 




NUM 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


001 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


002 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


003 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


004 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


005 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


•0.10 


0.05 


006 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


007 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


008 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


009 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 


010 


0.70 


0.60 


0.50 


0.45 


0.40 


0.35 


0.30 


0.20 


0.10 


0.05 



( 



47-20 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



47.4.4.4. Main Building Percent Good 
Caiculation 

The Percent Good (PG) calculation uses the 
Economic Life of the structure; the Year Built, 
either the actual Year Built or the calculated 
Effective Year Built; the Appraisal Year, the 
computer system Appraisal Year of valuation; and 
the Bottom-out Percent Good, in the following 
calculation. 



The modified OBY Percent Good calculation 
formula is: 



1 



PG 



where A 



where X 



1 + [X (1-X)] + A X^ 

1 
Bottom-out Percent Good 
Appraisal Year - Year Built 
Economic Life 



NOTE: If (Appraisal Year - Year Built) is less 
than the Economic Life use X, otherwise use 
L 



47.4.4.5. Commercial OBY Percent Good 
Calculation 

The Percent Good calculation for Commercial 
Other Building and Yard Improvements is the 
same as for the Main Building with the addition of 
a Desirability Factor. 

The Bottom-out Percent Good is calculated in 
the same fashion as outlined in Paragraph 
47.4.4.3 - Physical Condition/Functional Utility 
Rating. 



1 



PG 



where A 



where X 



1 + [X (1-X)] -t- A X^ 

1 

Bottom-out Percent Good / 
Desirability Factor 

Appraisal Year - Year Built 

Economic Life 



- 1 



NOTE: If (Appraisal Year - Year Built) is less 
than the Economic Life use X, otherwise use 
L 



47.4.4.6. Commercial Percent Good Tables 

Seven examples of Commercial Percent Good 
tables have been provided to demonstrate the effect 
that various years of economic life and bottom out 
percentages have on the calculated Percent Good. 

15 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 



AGE 




PHYSICAL 


CONDITION AND / 


OR 




IN 






FUNCTIONAL UTILITY RATING 




YEARS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 


94 


94 


94 


94 


94 


93 


93 


93 


91 


87 


2 


89 


89 


88 


88 


88 


87 


86 


84 


78 


69 


3 


85 


84 


83 


83 


82 


81 


80 


76 


66 


52 


4 


82 


80 


79 


78 


77 


75 


73 


68 


54 


39 


5 


79 


77 


75 


74 


72 


70 


68 


60 


45 


30 


6 


76 


74 


71 


70 


68 


65 


62 


53 


37 


23 


7 


75 


72 


68 


66 


63 


60 


57 


47 


31 


19 


8 


73 


70 


65 


63 


60 


56 


52 


42 


26 


15 


9 


72 


68 


63 


60 


56 


52 


48 


37 


22 


12 


10 


71 


66 


60 


57 


53 


49 


44 


33 


19 


10 


11 


70 


64 


58 


54 


50 


46 


41 


30' 


17 


9 


12 


70 


63 


56 


51 


47 


43 


38 


27 


14 


8 


13 


70 


62 


54 


49 


45 


40 


35 


24 


13 


6 


14 


70 


61 


52 


47 


42 


37 


32 


22 


11 


6 


15 


70 


60 


50 


45 


40 


35 


30 


20 


10 


5 



08/01/89 



47-21 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 



20 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 



30 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 



AGE 




PHYSICAL CONDITION AND / 


OR 




IN 






FUNCTIONAL UTILITY RATING 




YEARS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


93 


91 


2 


91 


91 


91 


91 


90 


90 


90 


88 


85 


78 


3 


88 


88 


87 


87 


86 


86 


85 


82 


75 


64 


4 


85 


84 


83 


83 


82 


81 


80 


76 


66 


52 


5 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


77 


75 


70 


57 


42 


6 


80 


79 


77 


76 


74 


73 


70 


64 


50 


34 


7 


78 


76 


74 


73 


71 


69 


66 


58 


43 


28 


8 


76 


74 


71 


70 


68 


65 


62 


53 


37 


23 


9 


75 


72 


69 


67 


64 


62 


58 


49 


33 


20 


10 


74 


71 


67 


64 


62 


58 


55 


44 


29 


17 


11 


73 


69 


65 


62 


59 


55 


51 


41 


25 


14 


12 


72 


68 


63 


60 


56 


52 


48 


37 


22 


12 


13 


71 


66 


61 


57 


54 


50 


45 


34 


20 


11 


14 


70 


65 


59 


55 


51 


47 


42 


32 


18 


10 


15 


70 


64 


57 


53 


49 


45 


40 


29 


16 


8 


16 


70 


63 


56 


51 


47 


43 


38 


27 


14 


8 


17 


70 


62 


54 


50 


45 


40 


36 


25 


13 


7 


18 


70 


61 


53 


48 


43 


39 


34 


23 


12 


6 


19 


70 


61 


51 


46 


42 


37 


32 


21 


11 


5 


20 


70 


60 


50 


45 


40 


35 


30 


20 


10 


5 



AGE 




PHYSICAL 


CONDITION AND / 


OR 




IN 






FUNCTIONAL UTILITY RATING 




YEARS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


96 


96 


95 


2 


94 


94 


94 


94 


94 


93 


93 


93 


91 


87 


3 


91 


91 


91 


91 


90 


90 


90 


88 


85 


78 


4 


89 


89 


88 


88 


88 


87 


86 


84 


78 


69 


5 


87 


86 


86 


85 


85 


84 


83 


80 


72 


60 


6 


85 


84 


83 


83 


82 


81 


80 


76 


66 


52 


7 


83 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


77 


72 


60 


45 


8 


82 


80 


79 


78 


77 


75 


73 


68 


54 


39 


9 


80 


79 


77 


76 


74 


73 


70 


64 


50 


34 


10 


79 


77 


75 


74 


72 


70 


68 


60 


45 


30 


11 


78 


76 


73 


72 


70 


67 


65 


56 


41 


26 


12 


76 


74 


71 


70 


68 


65 


62 


53 


37 


23 


13 


75 


73 


70 


68 


65 


63 


59 


50 


34 


21 


14 


75 


72 


68 


66 


63 


60 


57 


47 


31 


19 


15 


74 


71 


67 


64 


62 


58 


55 


44 


29 


17 


16 


73 


70 


65 


63 


60 


56 


52 


42 


26 


15 


17 


72 


69 


64 


61 


58 


54 


50 


40 


24 


14 


18 


72 


68 


63 


60 


56 


52 


48 


37 


22 


12 


19 


71 


67 


61 


58 


55 


51 


46 


35 


21 


11 


20 


71 


66 


60 


57 


53 


49 


44 


33 


19 


10 


21 


70 


65 


59 


55 


51 


47 


42 


32 


18 


10 


22 


70 


64 


58 


54 


50 


46 


41 


30 


17 


9 


23 


70 


64 


57 


53 


49 


44 


39 


28 


15 


8 


24 


70 


63 


56 


51 


47 


43 


38 


27 


14 


8 


25 


70 


62 


55 


50 


46 


41 


36 


26 


14 


7 


26 


70 


62 


54 


49 


45 


40 


35 


24 


13 


6 


27 


70 


61 


53 


48 


43 


39 


34 


23 


12 


6 


28 


70 


61 


52 


47 


42 


37 


32 


22 


11 


6 


29 


70 


60 


51 


46 


41 


36 


31 


21 


11 


5 


30 


70 


60 


50 


45 


40 


35 


30 


20 


10 


5 



r 



47-22 



08/01/89 



47. DEPRECIATION 



40 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 



AGE 




PHYSICAL CONDITION AND / 


OR 




IN 






FUNCTIONAL UTILITY RATING 




YEARS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


97 


97 


97 


97 


2 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


93 


91 


3 


93 


93 


93 


93 


93 


93 


92 


92 


89 


85 


4 


91 


91 


91 


91 


90 


90 


90 


88 


85 


78 


5 


90 


89 


89 


89 


88 


88 


87 


85 


80 


71 


6 


88 


88 


87 


87 


86 


86 


85 


82 


75 


64 


7 


86 


86 


85 


85 


84 


83 


82 


79 


70 


58 


8 


85 


84 


83 


83 


82 


81 


80 


76 


66 


52 


9 


84 


83 


82 


81 


80 


79 


77 


73 


61 


47 


10 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


77 


75 


70 


57 


42 


11 


81 


80 


78 


77 


76 


75 


73 


67 


53 


38 


12 


80 


79 


77 


76 


74 


73 


70 


64 


50 


34 


13 


79 


78 


75 


74 


73 


71 


68 


61 


46 


31 


14 


78 


76 


74 


73 


71 


69 


66 


58 


43 


28 


15 


77 


75 


73 


71 


69 


67 


64 


56 


40 


26 


16 


76 


74 


71 


70 


68 


65 


62 


53 


37 


23 


17 


76 


73 


70 


68 


66 


63 


60 


51 


35 


21 


18 


75 


72 


69 


67 


64 


62 


58 


49 


33 


20 


19 


74 


71 


68 


66 


63 


60 


56 


46 


30 


18 


20 


74 


71 


67 


64 


62 


58 


55 


44 


29 


17 


21 


73 


70 


66 


63 


60 


57 


53 


43 


27 


15 


22 


73 


69 


65 


62 


59 


55 


51 


41 


25 


14 


23 


72 


68 


63 


61 


57 


54 


50 


39 


24 


13 


24 


72 


68 


63 


60 


56 


52 


48 


37 


22 


12 


25 


71 


67 


62 


58 


55 


51 


47 


36 


21 


12 


26 


71 


66 


61 


57 


54 


50 


45 


34 


20 


11 


27 


71 


66 


60 


56 


53 


48 


44 


33 


19 


10 


28 


70 


65 


59 


55 


51 


47 


42 


32 


18 


10 


29 


70 


65 


58 


54 


50 


46 


41 


30 


17 


9 


30 


70 


64 


57 


53 


49 


45 


40 


29 


16 


8 


31 


70 


64 


56 


52 


48 


44 


39 


28 


15 


8 


32 


70 


63 


56 


51 


47 


43 


38 


27 


14 


8 


33 


70 


63 


55 


51 


46 


42 


37 


26 


14 


7 


34 


70 


62 


54 


50 


45 


40 


36 


25 


13 


7 


35 


70 


62 


53 


49 


44 


40 


35 


24 


13 


6 


36 


70 


61 


53 


48 


43 


39 


34 


23 


12 


6 


37 


70 


61 


52 


47 


43 


38 


33 


22 


11 


6 


38 


70 


61 


51 


46 


42 


37 


32 


21 


11 


5 


39 


70 


60 


51 


46 


41 


36 


31 


21 


10 


5 


40 


70 


60 


50 


45 


40 


35 


30 


20 


10 


5 





50 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 




AGE 




PHYSICAL 


CONDITION AND / 


OR 




IN 






FUNCTIONAL UTILITY RATING 




YEARS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


97 


2 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


95 


94 


3 


95 


94 


94 


94 


94 


94 


94 


93 


92 


89 


4 


93 


93 


93 


92 


92 


92 


92 


91 


88 


84 


5 


91 


91 


91 


91 


90 


90 


90 


88 


85 


78 


6 


90 


90 


89 


89 


89 


88 


88 


86 


81 


73 


7 


89 


88 


88 


87 


87 


86 


86 


83 


77 


67 


8 


87 


87 


86 


86 


85 


85 


84 


81 


73 


62 


9 


86 


86 


85 


84 


84 


83 


82 


78 


69 


57 


10 


85 


84 


83 


83 


82 


81 


80 


76 


66 


52 


11 


84 


83 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


73 


62 


48 


12 


83 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


76 


71 


59 


44 


13 


82 


81 


79 


78 


77 


76 


74 


68 


56 


40 


14 


81 


80 


78 


77 


76 


74 


72 


66 


52 


37 


15 


80 


79 


77 


76 


74 


73 


70 


64 


50 


34 


16 


79 


78 


76 


74 


73 


71 


69 


61 


47 


32 


17 


78 


77 


75 


73 


72 


69 


67 


59 


44 


29 


18 


78 


76 


74 


72 


70 


68 


65 


57 


42 


27 


19 


77 


75 


72 


71 


69 


66 


64 


55 


39 


25 


20 


76 


74 


71 


70 


68 


65 


62 


53 


37 


23 


21 


76 


73 


70 


69 


66 


64 


60 


51 


35 


22 


22 


75 


73 


69 


67 


65 


62 


59 


49 


33 


20 


23 


75 


72 


68 


66 


64 


61 


57 


48 


32 


19 


24 


74 


71 


68 


65 


63 


60 


56 


46 


30 


18 


25 


74 


71 


67 


64 


62 


58 


55 


44 


29 


17 


26 


73 


70 


66 


63 


60 


57 


53 


43 


27 


16 


27 


73 


69 


65 


62 


59 


56 


52 


41 


26 


15 


28 


72 


69 


64 


61 


58 


55 


51 


40 


25 


14 


29 


72 


68 


63 


60 


57 


54 


49 


39 


23 


13 


30 


72 


68 


63 


60 


56 


52 


48 


37 


22 


12 


31 


71 


67 


62 


59 


55 


51 


47 


36 


21 


12 


32 


71 


67 


61 


58 


54 


50 


46 


35 


20 


11 


33 


71 


66 


60 


57 


53 


49 


45 


34 


19 


11 


34 


71 


66 


60 


56 


52 


48 


44 


33 


19 


10 


35 


70 


65 


59 


55 


51 


47 


42 


32 


18 


10 


36 


70 


65 


58 


54 


51 


46 


41 


31 


17 


9 


37 


70 


64 


57 


54 


50 


45 


40 


30 


16 


9 


38 


70 


64 


57 


53 


49 


44 


40 


29 


16 


8 


39 


70 


63 


56 


52 


48 


43 


39 


28 


15 


8 


40 


70 


63 


56 


51 


47 


43 


38 


27 


14 


8 


41 


70 


63 


55 


51 


46 


42 


37 


26 


14 


7 


42 


70 


62 


54 


50 


46 


41 


36 


25 


13 


7 


43 


70 


62 


54 


49 


45 


40 


35 


25 


13 


7 


44 


70 


62 


53 


49 


44 


39 


34 


24 


12 


6 


45 


70 


61 


53 


48 


43 


39 


34 


23 


12 


6 


46 


70 


61 


52 


47 


43 


38 


33 


22 


12 


6 


47 


70 


61 


52 


47 


42 


37 


32 


22 


11 


6 


48 


70 


61 


51 


46 


41 


36 


31 


21 


11 


5 


49 


70 


60 


51 


46 


41 


36 


31 


21 


10 


5 


50 


70 


60 


50 


45 


40 


35 


30 


20 


10 


5 



08/01/89 



47-23 



PART 4: REPLACEMENT COST 





60 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 




AGE 




PHYSICAL CONDITION AND / 


OR 




IN 






FUNCTIONAL UTILITY RATING 




YEARS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


98 


2 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


96 


96 


95 


3 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


93 


91 


4 


94 


94 


94 


94 


94 


93 


93 


93 


91 


87 


5 


93 


93 


92 


92 


92 


92 


92 


91 


88 


83 


6 


91 


91 


91 


91 


90 


90 


90 


88 


85 


78 


7 


90 


90 


90 


89 


89 


89 


88 


86 


82 


73 


8 


89 


89 


88 


88 


88 


87 


86 


84 


78 


69 


9 


88 


88 


87 


87 


86 


86 


85 


82 


75 


64 


10 


87 


86 


86 


85 


85 


84 


83 


80 


72 


60 


11 


86 


85 


85 


84 


83 


82 


81 


78 


69 


56 


12 


85 


84 


83 


83 


82 


81 


80 


76 


66 


52 


13 


84 


83 


82 


81 


81 


80 


78 


74 


63 


49 


14 


83 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


77 


72 


60 


45 


15 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


77 


75 


70 


57 


42 


16 


82 


80 


79 


78 


77 


75 


73 


68 


54 


39 


17 


81 


80 


78 


77 


76 


74 


72 


66 


52 


37 


18 


80 


79 


77 


76 


74 


73 


70 


64 


50 


34 


19 


79 


78 


76 


75 


73 


71 


69 


62 


47 


32 


20 


79 


77 


75 


74 


72 


70 


68 


60 


45 


30 


21 


78 


76 


74 


73 


71 


69 


66 


58 


43 


28 


22 


78 


76 


73 


72 


70 


67 


65 


56 


41 


26 


23 


77 


75 


72 


71 


69 


66 


63 


55 


39 


25 


24 


76 


74 


71 


70 


68 


65 


62 


53 


37 


23 


25 


76 


74 


71 


69 


67 


64 


61 


52 


36 


22 


26 


75 


73 


70 


68 


65 


63 


59 


50 


34 


21 


27 


75 


72 


69 


67 


64 


62 


58 


49 


33 


20 


28 


75 


72 


68 


66 


63 


60 


57 


47 


31 


19 


29 


74 


71 


67 


65 


62 


59 


56 


46 


30 


18 


30 


74 


71 


67 


64 


62 


58 


55 


44 


29 


17 


31 


73 


70 


66 


63 


61 


57 


53 


43 


27 


16 


32 


73 


70 


65 


63 


60 


56 


52 


42 


26 


15 


33 


73 


69 


65 


62 


59 


55 


51 


41 


25 


14 


34 


72 


69 


64 


61 


58 


54 


50 


40 


24 


14 


35 


72 


68 


63 


60 


57 


53 


49 


38 


23 


13 


36 


72 


68 


63 


60 


56 


52 


48 


37 


22 


12 


37 


71 


67 


62 


59 


55 


51 


47 


36 


21 


12 


38 


71 


67 


61 


58 


55 


51 


46 


35 


21 


11 


39 


71 


66 


61 


57 


54 


50 


45 


34 


20 


11 


40 


71 


66 


60 


57 


53 


49 


44 


33 


19 


10 


42 


70 


65 


59 


55 


51 


47 


42 


32 


18 


10 


44 


70 


64 


58 


54 


50 


46 


.41 


30 


17 


9 


46 


70 


64 


57 


53 


49 


44 


39 


28 


15 


8 


48 


70 


63 


56 


51 


47 


43 


38 


27 


14 


8 


50 


70 


62 


55 


50 


46 


41 


36 


26 


14 


7 


52 


70 


62 


54 


49 


45 


40 


35 


24 


13 


6 


54 


70 


61 


53 


48 


43 


39 


34 


23 


12 


6 


56 


70 


61 


52 


47 


42 


37 


32 


22 


11 


6 


58 


70 


60 


51 


46 


41 


36 


31 


21 


11 


5 


60 


70 


60 


50 


45 


40 


35 


30 


20 


10 


5 





70 YEAR ECONOMIC LIFE TABLE 




AGE 




PHYSICAL 


CONDITION AND / 


OR 




IN 






FUNCTIONAL UTILITY RATING 




YEARS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 


99 


99 


99 


99 


99 


99 


99 


99 


98 


98 


2 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


97 


96 


3 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


96 


95 


95 


93 


4 


95 


95 


95 


95 


94 


94 


94 


94 


92 


90 


5 


94 


93 


93 


93 


93 


93 


93 


92 


90 


86 


6 


92 


92 


92 


92 


92 


92 


91 


90 


87 


82 


7 


91 


91 


91 


91 


90 


90 


90 


88 


85 


78 


8 


90 


90 


90 


90 


89 


89 


88 


87 


82 


74 


9 


89 


89 


89 


88 


88 


88 


87 


85 


79 


70 


10 


88 


88 


88 


87 


87 


86 


85 


83 


77 


66 


11 


87 


87 


86 


86 


86 


85 


84 


81 


74 


62 


12 


87 


86 


85 


85 


84 


84 


83 


79 


71 


59 


13 


86 


85 


84 


84 


83 


82 


81 


78 


68 


55 


14 


85 


84 


83 


83 


82 


81 


80 


76 


66 


52 


15 


84 


83 


82 


82 


81 


80 


78 


74 


63 


49 


16 


83 


83 


81 


81 


80 


79 


77 


72 


61 


46 


17 


83 


82 


80 


80 


79 


77 


76 


70 


58 


43 


18 


82 


81 


80 


79 


78 


76 


74 


69 


56 


41 


19 


81 


80 


79 


78 


76 


75 


73 


67 


54 


38 


20 


81 


79 


78 


77 


75 


74 


72 


65 


52 


36 


21 


80 


79 


77 


76 


74 


73 


70 


64 


50 


34 


22 


80 


78 


76 


75 


73 


71 


69 


62 


48 


32 


23 


79 


77 


75 


74 


72 


70 


68 


61 


46 


31 


24 


78 


77 


74 


73 


71 


69 


67 


59 


44 


29 


25 


78 


76 


74 


72 


70 


68 


65 


57 


42 


27 


26 


77 


75 


73 


71 


69 


67 


64 


56 


40 


26 


27 


77 


75 


72 


70 


68 


66 


63 


55 


39 


25 


28 


76 


74 


71 


70 


68 


65 


62 


53 


37 


23 


29 


76 


74 


71 


69 


67 


64 


61 


52 


36 


22 


30 


76 


73 


70 


68 


66 


63 


60 


51 


35 


21 


32 


75 


72 


69 


67 


64 


61 


58 


48 


32 


19 


34 


74 


71 


67 


65 


62 


59 


56 


46 


30 


17 


36 


73 


70 


66 


64 


61 


57 


54 


43 


28 


16 


38 


73 


69 


65 


62 


59 


56 


52 


41 


26 


15 


40 


72 


68 


64 


61 


58 


54 


50 


39 


24 


13 


42 


72 


68 


63 


60 


56 


52 


48 


37 


22 


12 


44 


71 


67 


61 


58 


55 


51 


46 


36 


21 


11 


46 


71 


66 


60 


57 


53 


49 


45 


34 


20 


11 


48 


71 


65 


59 


56 


52 


48 


43 


32 


18 


10 


50 


70 


65 


58 


55 


51 


46 


42 


31 


17 


9 


52 


70 


64 


57 


54 


50 


45 


40 


29 


16 


9 


54 


70 


64 


56 


53 


48 


44 


39 


28 


15 


8 


56 


70 


63 


56 


51 


47 


43 


38 


27 


14 


8 


58 


70 


63 


55 


50 


46 


41 


36 


26 


14 


7 


60 


70 


62 


54 


49 


45 


40 


35 


25 


13 


7 


62 


70 


62 


53 


49 


44 


39 


34 


24 


12 


6 


64 


70 


61 


52 


48 


43 


38 


33 


23 


12 


6 


66 


70 


61 


51 


47 


42 


37 


32 


22 


11 


6 


68 


70 


60 


51 


46 


41 


36 


31 


21 


11 


5 


70 


70 


60 


50 


45 


40 


35 


30 


20 


10 


5 



47-24 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



GLOSSARY 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



G1. 


ABBREVIATIONS 


1 


G2. 


G1.1. 


SKETCH 


1 


G2.1. 


G1.2. 


LAND AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS 


2 


G2.2. 


G1.3. 


MEASUREMENTS AND SYMBOLS 


2 


G2.3. 


G1.4. 


ARCHITECTURAL TERMS 


3 


G2.4. 


G1.5. 


GENERAL 


4 





DEFINITIONS 5 

ARCHITECTURAL TERMS 5 

DATA PROCESSING TERMS 10 

REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL TERMS 14 

STATISTICAL TERMS 23 



G1. ABBREVIATIONS 



G1.1. 



Is LG 


- One 


Story Log 


Is MAS 


- One 


Story Masonite 


Is ASB 


- One 


Story Asbestos 


ISF 


- One 


Story Frame 


Is CMP 


- One 


Story Composition 


ISM 


- One 


Story Brick 


Is AL 


- One 


Story Aluminum 


Is Stn 


- One 


Story Stone 


Is VN 


- One 


Story Vinyl 


Is CB 


- One 


Story Concrete Block 


Is ST 


- One 


Story Steel 


Is Stu 


- One 


Story Stucco 


1 l/2s Fr 


- One 


and One Half Story Frame 


2SF 


- Two 


Story Frame 


2SM 


- Two 


Story Masonry 


2 1/2 SM 


- Two 


and One Half Story Brick 


OPF 


- Open Porch Frame 


OPM 


- Opei 


ti Porch Masonry 


EPF 


- Enclosed Porch Frame 


EPM 


- Enclosed Porch Masonry 


OPF 


- Open Porch Frame 


B 


With 


1 a Basement 


EPF 


- Enclosed Porch Frame 


ISM 


Over a One Story Brick 


B 


With a Basement 


A 


- Attic Over a One Story 


ISF 
B 


Frame With a Basement 


MHA 


- Mobile Home Addition 


MET 


- Mobile Home Expando or Tip ( 



SKETCH 




CPF 


- Carport Frame 


GRM 


- Garage Masonry 


GRF 


- Garage Frame 


ISF 


- One Story Frame Over 


GRM 


a Masonry Garage 


OVHF 


- Overhang - Frame 


OVHM 


- Overhang - Masonry 


BAYF 


- Bay Window - Frame 


BAYM 


- Bay Window - Masonry 


BOWF 


- Bow Window - Frame 


SPF 


- Screened Porch Frame 


SPM 


- Screened Porch Masonry 


UTF 


- Utility - Frame 


UTM 


- Utility - Masonry 


HSF 


- Half Story - Frame 


HSM 


- Half Story - Masonry 


GREF 


- Garage Extension - Frame 


GREM 


- Garage Extension - Masonry 


CANF 


- Canopy 


B 


- Basement 


BU 


- Unfinished Basement 


OBT 


- Ornamental Brick Trim 


D-WD 


- Deck Wood 


D-CO 


- Deck Concrete 


D-ST 


- Deck Stone Tile 


D-MS 


- Deck Masonry Stoop 


AGH 


- Attached Greenhouse 



08/01/89 



G'1 



GLOSSARY 



G1.2. LAND AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS 



AC 


- Acre 


L & B 


- Land and Buildings 


Acg 


- Acreage 


Mp 


- Map 


Act Frt 


- Actual Frontage 


Par 


- Parcel 


175' Av 


- 175 Foot Average 


Pg 


- Page 


Bk 


- Book 


Prop 


- Property 


CC 


- Continuously Cropped 


R 75' 


- Rear Frontage of 75 Feet 


CI 


- Corner Influence 


Rd 


- Road 


Calc Acg 


- Calculated Acreage 


R.O.W. 


- Right-of-way 


Disl 


- District 


Rtg No 


- Routing Number 


Eff Frt 


- Effective Frontage 


St 


- Street 


Eff D 


- Effective Depth 


Swr 


- Sewer 


EMF 


- Economical Misimprovement Factor 


TBR 


- Timberland 


Esmt 


- Easement 


Till 


- Tillable 


F 


- Fallow 


Topo 


- Topography 


F33* 


- Figured Frontage of 33 Feet 


Twn 


- Town 


FR 56' 


- Figured Rear Frontage of 56 Feet 


Twp 


- Township 


FRM 


- Farmstead 


UD 


- Undeveloped 


Frt 


- Frontage 


UI 


- Unimproved 


G 


- Grazing 


Utl 


- Utility 


HS 


- Home Site 


Vil 


- Village 


IF 


- Influence Factor 


WH 


- Wild Hay 


Imp 


- Improvement 


Wtr 


- Water 


I 


- Irrigated 


XF 


- Excessive Frontage 


Irr 


- Irregular 


XD 


- Excessive Depth 


LI 


- Land Improvement 


Zng 


- Zoning 



C( 



G- 



01. 3. MEASUREMENTS AND SYMBOLS 



AC 


- Acre 


Acg 


- Acreage 


Bd Ft 


- Board Feet 


BPD 


- Barrels-Per-Day 


BrI 


- Barrel 


BTU 


- British Thermal Unit 


Bu 


- Bushel 


Cap 


- Capacity 


C/For 


- Cubic Feet 


Cu/Ft 




Dbl 


- Double 


Dia 


- Diameter 


Ea 


- Each 


Ft 


- Feet 


Ga 


- Gauge 


Gal 


- Gallon 


GPD 


- Gallons-Per-Day 


Ht 


- Height 


Lb 


- Pound 


L/For 


- Lineal Feet 


Lin ft 




No 


- Number 


OC 


- On Center 



S/F 


or 


- Square Feet 


Sq 


Ft 




31(6) 


- 31 feet, 6 inches 


Yd 




- Yard 







- Square Feet 







- Cubic Feet 


S 




- Story 


#0 


a) 


- Number 


(XX) 


# 


- Pounds 







- Degree 


» 




- Feet (or minutes) 


H 




- Inches (or seconds) 


-t- 




- Plus 


• 




- Minus 


+ 




- Plus or Minus 


X 




- Times or By 


= 




- Equals 


> 




- Is Greater Than 


< 




- Is Lesser Than 


V 




- Pi (3.1416) 


« 




- Infinity 


@ 

II 




- "AT," eg. 10 lbs.@1.00/lb 

- Parallel 



G 



G-2 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



< 


- Angle 


<s 


- Angles 


U 


- Channel 



u. 



Channels 

Per, eg. Price/Lb. 



G1.4. ARCHITECTURAL TERMS 



Apt 


- Apartment 


Art 


- Artificial 


Asb 


- Asbestos 


Att 


- Attached 


Bldg 


- Building 


Bsmt 


- Basement 


ASPH 


- Asphalt Paving 


CB 


- Concrete Block 


cig 


- Ceiling 


Cmt 


- Cement 


Col 


- Column 


Com 


- Common 


Comp 


- Composition 


Cone 


- Concrete 


Const 


- Construction 


Dbl 


- Double 


DH 


- Double Hung 


Dk 


- Deck 


Dkg 


- Decking 


Drs 


- Doors 


DP 


- Double Pilch 


D & M 


- Dressed and Matched 


Dwl 


- Dwelling 


Elec 


- Electric 


Elev 


- Elevators 


Equip 


- Equipment 


Excav 


- Excavation 


Excl 


- Excluding 


Ext 


- Exterior 


Fibr Gls 


- Fiberglass 


Fin 


- Finish 


Fixt 


- Fixtures 


Fir 


- Floor 


Flrg 


- Flooring 


Ftg 


- Footing 


Fdtn 


- Foundation 


Fr 


- Frame 


Fgt 


- Freight 


Galv 


- Galvanized 


GI 


- Galvanized Iron 


Gar 


- Garage 


GLS 


- Glass 


H Col 


- H Column 


Hd Wd 


- Hardwood 


Htr 


- Heater 


Htg 


- Heating 


HC 


- Hollow Core 


Horiz 


- Horizontal 



HP 


- Horse Power 


Hse 


- House 


I Bm 


- I Beam 


Incl 


- Including 


I.D. 


- Inside Diameter or Identification 


Int 


- Interior 


Int Fin 


- Interior Finish 


I-Com 


- Intercom System 


Jst 


- Joist 


Lam 


- Laminated 


Lndg 


- Landing 


L & P 


- Lath and Plaster 


Lav 


- Lavatory 


L & O 


- Lead and Oil 


Lt 


- Light 


Ltg 


- Lighting 


Lts 


- Lights 


Linol 


- Linoleum 


Mach 


- Machine 


Mas 


- Masonry 


Mech 


- Mechanical 


MF 


- Mechanical Features 


Met 


- Metal 


Mezz 


- Mezzanine 


Misc 


- Miscellaneous 


Mono 


- Monolithic 


Obsol 


- Obsolete, Obsolescence 


OFF 


- Office 


OC 


- On Center 


1 E 


- One End 


1 Sd 


- One side 


OF 


- Other Feature 


O.D. 


- Outside Diameter 


OH 


- Overhead or Overhang 


Pnt 


- Paint 


Par 


- Parapet 


Pt 


- Part 


Ptn 


- Partition 


PW 


- Party Wall 


Pass 


- Passenger 


Pav 


- Paving 


Pil 


- Pilaster 


Plk 


- Plank 


Plstr 


- Plaster 


Plstrd 


- Plastered 


Plbg 


- Plumbing 


Pch 


- Porch 


Purl 


- Purlin 



08/01/89 



G-3 



GLOSSARY 



Rec Room 


- Recreation Room 


Rftr 


- Rafter 


RR 


- Railroad 


Refrig 


- Refrigerated 


Rein 


- Reinforced 


Rein Cone 


- Reinforced Concrete 


Ret WL 


- Retaining Wall 


Rf 


- Roof 


Rfg 


- Roofing 


Rm 


- Room 


Shtg 


- Sheathing 


Sdg 


- Siding 


SP 


- Single Pitch 


SS 


- Slop Sinks 


Sprink 


- Sprinkler 


Sq 


- Square 


Strs 


- Stairs 


Std 


- Standard 


Stdg 


- Standing 


Stm 


- Steam 


StI 


- Steel 


Stl PI 


- Steel Plate 


Stge 


- Storage 



Sup 


- Supports 


Sys 


- System 


T & G 


- Tar and Gravel or Tongue and Groove 


Terr 


- Terrace 


Tbr 


- Timber 


Toil 


- Toilet 


IR 


- Toilet Room 


Unfin 


- Unfinished 


Urin 


- Urinal 


Ven 


- Veneer 


Vent 


- Ventilator 


Vit 


- Vitrified 


VT 


- Vitrified Tile 


Wsct 


- Wainscot 


Whse 


- Warehouse 


WC 


- Water Closet 


WP 


- White Pine 


WF 


- Wide Flange 


Wind 


- Window 


Wir 


- Wiring 


Wd 


- Wood 


Wb Fp 


- Woodburning Fireplace 


Yd 


- Yard 


YP 


- Yellow Pine 



c 



r 



G1.5. GENERAL 



(C 



Ag 


- Agriculture 


N/C 


- New Construction 


Asmt 


- Assessment 


NF 


- Nothing Furnished 


Av 


- Average 


NV 


- No Value or No Vector 


CDU 


- Condition, Desirability, Usefulness 


Obsol 


- Obsolete or Obsolescence 


C & D 


- Cost and Design Property 


PIF 


- Priced In Field 


CID 


- Commercial/Industrial Data 


PP 


- Personal Property 


Comm 


- Commercial 


PRC 


- Property Record Card 


DCC 


- Data Collection Card 


PU 


- Public Utility 


Depr 


- Depreciation 


RAD 


- Residential/Agricultural Data 


EDP 


- Electronic Data Processing 


RCN 


- Replacement Cost New 


Est 


- Estimate(d) 


RCNLD 


- Replacement Cost New Less 


Ex 


- Exempt or Excellent 




Depreciation 


Excl 


- Excluding 


Res 


- Residential 


F.V. 


- Flal Value 


RV 


- Replacement Value 


Gr 


- Grade Value 


Sched 


- Schedule 


I & E 


- Income and Expense 


SV 


- Sound Value or Site Value 


Ind 


- Including 


T or Tot 


- Total 


Ind 


- Industrial 


UF 


- Utilities Furnished or Unfurnished 


LDS 


- Live Data System 


Utl Val 


- Utility Value 


N/A 


- Not Applicable 


Val 


- Value 



c 



G-4 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



G2. DEFINITIONS 



G2.1. ARCHITECTURAL TERMS 



apartment hotel 

A building designed for non-transient residential 
use, divided into dwelling units similar to an 
apartment house, but having such hotel 
accommodations as room furnishings, lounges, 
public dining room, maid service, etc. 

apartment house 

A multi-family residence containing five or more 
non-transient residential living units and generally 
providing them with a number of common 
facilities and services. 

attic 

An unfinished or finished portion of a building 
lying between the highest finished story and the 
roof, and wholly within the roof framing. 

basement 

A building story which is wholly or partly below 
the grade level. 



bay 



(1) A horizontal area division of a building 
usually defined as the space between columns or 
division walls. (2) An internal recess formed by 
causing a wall to project beyond its general line. 



building, fireproof 

A building in which all parts carrying loads or 
resisting stresses and all exterior and interior 
walls, floors, and staircases are made of 
incombustible materials, and in which all metallic 
structural members are encased in materials which 
remain rigid at the highest probable temperature 
in case its contents are burned, or which provide 
ample insulation from such a temperature. 

building, loft 

A building having three or more stories with few 
or no interior bearing walls and designed for 
storage, wholesaling, or light industrial purposes. 

building, single-purpose 

A building designed for a specific purpose which 
cannot be used for another purpose without 
substantial alterations; e.g., a theater or church. 

column 

A structurally isolated vertical member which is at 
least 8 to 10 times as long as its least lateral 
dimension and which is designed to carry loads. 
Compare "pier." 

conduit 

A tube, pipe, or small artificial tunnel used to 
enclose wires or pipes or to convey water or 
other fluids. 



bay window 

A window, or group of continuous windows, 
projecting from the main wall of a building and 
supported by a foundation. 



construction, brick 

A type of construction in which the exterior walls 
are bearing walls made of solid brick or brick and 
tile masonry. 



beam 

A long structural load-bearing member which is 
placed horizontally or nearly so and which is 
supported at both ends or, infrequently, at 
intervals along its length. 

beam, spandrel 

A wall beam supporting the wall above, as well 
as the floor. 

building 

Any structure partially or wholly above ground 
which is designed to afford shelter to persons, 
animals, or goods. See also "construction." 



construction, brick veneer 

A type of construction in which the exterior walls 
are one-layer brick curtain walls backed by a 
wood frame or masonry block. 

construction, fireproof 

See "building, fireproof." 

construction, mill 

A type of construction in which the exterior walls 
are substantial masonry bearing walls, with 
structural framing of heavy timber posts and 
beams, and which is further characterized by an 
open design and by other safeguards against fire 



08/01/89 



G-5 



GLOSSARY 



hazards. Sometimes called "Slow-Burning 
Construction." 

construction, reinforced concrete 

A type of construction in which the principal 
structural members, such as the floors, columns, 
beams, etc., are made of concrete poured around 
isolated steel bars or steel meshwork in such a 
manner that the two materials act together in 
resisting forces. 

construction, steel frame 

A type of construction in which there is a 
framework of steel structural members for the 
support of all loads and the resistance of all 
stresses. 

construction, wood frame 

A type of construction in which there is a 
framework of wooden structural members for the 
support of all loads and the resistance of all 
stresses. Loosely called "Frame Construction." 

coping 

A special capping at the top of a wall, serving 
principally as a watershed. 

cornice 

A projecting element at the top of a wall, serving 
principally as a decoration or as' part of the 
coping. 



dwelling, attached 

A multi-family dwelling in which the dwelling 
units are separated vertically by means of 
common or party walls. See "terrace." 

dwelling, duplex 

A two-family dwelling in which the two dwelling 
units are separated vertically, by means of a 
common or party wall, with a private street 
entrance for each, i.e., a two-family flat. 

dwelling, multi-family 

A building designed as a place of residence for 
two or more families or households. 

dwelling, row 

Any one of a series of similar single-family, 
two-family, or multi-family dwellings having one 
or more contiguous common, or party walls. 
Compare "Terrace"; "Dwelling, Duplex." 

dwelling unit 

Any room or group of rooms designed as the 
living quarters of one family or household, 
equipped with cooking and toilet facilities, and 
having an independent entrance from a public hall 
or from the outside. 

eaves 

The portion of a sloping roof which projects 
beyond the outside walls of a building. 



I X. 



,rnv 



course 

A uniform horizontal layer of brick, stone, terra 
cotta, shingles, or some other structural material, 
extending continuously around a building or 
along a wall. 

court 

An open space bordered on two or more sides by 
the walls of a single building, or of two or more 
buildings, and by a lot line or a yard on any side 
not so bordered. 

dormer 

(1) A relatively small structure projecting from a 
sloping roof. (2) A window set upright in the 
face of such a structure. 

dwelling 

Any building or portion thereof designed or 
occupied in whole or in part as a place of 
residence. 



elevation 

A drawing representing a projection of any one of 
the vertical sides or vertical cross-sections of a 
building or of any other object. Compare "plan." 

facade 

The face of a building. 

firewall 

A wall of fire-resisting material erected between 
buildings, or two parts of a building, to prevent 
the spread of fire from one part to the other. 

Hushing 

Small metal strips used to prevent leaking of 
roofs around chimneys, dormers, hips and valleys. 



flat 



(1) Any one floor of a building two or more 
stories high each floor of which constitutes a 
single dwelling unit and has a private street 
entrance. (2) The building containing two or 
more such floors. Compare "Dwelling, Duplex." 



c 



G-6 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



footing 

A spreading base to a wall, column, or other 
supporting member, which serves to widen the 
ground area to which structural loads are 
transmitted. 

foundation 

The structural members below grade level, or 
below the first tier of beams above grade level, 
which transmit the load of a superstructure to the 
ground. 

gable 

(1) The triangular portion of a wall between the 
slopes of a double-sloping (i.e., gable) roof. (2) 
The whole of the wall containing such a 
triangular portion. (3) A portion of a building 
extending from the remainder of the building and 
covered with a gable roof. 

girder 

A large or principal beam used to support 
concentrated loads at isolated points along its 
length. (Girders usually support the beams and 
structure above). 

header 

(1) A structural member which is laid 
perpendicularly to a parallel series of similar 
members and against which the latter members 
abut. (2) A brick or other piece of masonry 
which is laid in a wall in such a manner that its 
longest dimension extends along the thickness of 
the wall. Contrast "Stretcher." 

hip 

(1) A sloping line along which two roof surfaces 
meet to form an external angle of more than 180 
degrees. (2) A hip rafter. Compare "Ridge"; 
"Valley." 

hotel 

A building designed for transient or 
semi-transient residential use, divided into 
furnished single rooms and suites, and having 
such accommodations as lounges, public dining 
rooms and maid service, etc. 

hotel, apartment 

See "Apartment Hotel." 



and usually supported in turn by larger beams and 
girders. 



lintel 



joist 



One of a series of small parallel beams laid on 
edge and used to support floor and ceiling loads, 



A beam over a wall opening, such as a door or 
window, designed to carry the load of the wall 
over such opening. 

loft 

An unpartitioned or relatively unpartitioned upper 
story of a building, designed for storage, 
wholesaling, or light manufacturing. See also 
"Building Loft." Also, an attic-like open space 
below the roof of a house or barn. 

louver (or louvre) 

A ventilator containing slats which are placed 
lengthwise across the ventilator opening, each slat 
being slanted in such a manner as to overlap the 
next lower slat and to permit ventilation but 
exclude rain. 

marquee 

A flat roof-like structure which shelters a 
doorway, which has no floor beneath it, and 
which is usually supported wholly from the walls 
or the building. 

mezzanine 

A low story formed by placing a floor between 
what would ordinarily be the floor and ceiling of 
a high story. Note the mezzanine floor frequently 
has a smaller area than other floors and, if 
present at all, is usually between the first and 
second stories. 

millwork 

All of the wooden portions of a building, whether 
frame construction or otherwise, which are 
customarily purchased in finished form from a 
planing mill, such as doors, windows, trim, 
balusters, etc. 

overhang 

A finished portion of a building having full story 
height which extends beyond the foundation wall 
line on part of the ground story, or beyond the 
exterior walls of the ground story if part of any 
higher story. 

overhead structure 

Similar to overhang above ground story, as O.H. 
bridge or passage, O.H. walk, O.H. Addition. 



08/01/89 



G-7 



GLOSSARY 



partition 

See "Wall. Partition." 

pier 

(1) A thick, solid mass of masonry which is fully 
or partially isolated from a structural standpoint 
and which is designed to transmit vertical loads 
to the earth. (2) A structure projecting from 
land into water for use in loading and unloading 
vessels. Compare "Column." 

pilaster 

A flat-faced pillar projecting somewhat from, but 
engaged in, the wall of a building and used for 
decorative purposes or to help support truss and 
girder loads or both. 



pile 



A heavy timber, metallic, or masonry pillar driven 
into the earth to form a foundation member. 



pitch 



The slope of any structural member, such as a 
roof or rafter, usually expressed as a simple 
fraction representing the rise per lateral foot. 

plan 

A drawing representing a projection of any one 
of the floors or horizontal cross-sections of a 
building or of the horizontal plane of any other 
object or area. Compare "Elevation." 

purlin 

A beam running along the underside of a sloping 
roof surface and at right angles to the rafters, 
used to support the common rafters, and usually 
supported in turn by larger structural members, 
such as trusses or girders (usually run along the 
length of building). 

rafter 

A structural member placed, as a rule, in a 
sloping position and used as the supporting 
element for the structural material forming the 
plane of the roof. See also "Purlin." 

rafter, hip 

A rafter placed in an inclined position to support 
the edges of two sloping roof surfaces which meet 
to form an external angle of more than 180 
degrees. 

rafter, valley 

A rafter placed in an inclined position to support 
the edges of two sloping roof surfaces which meet 



to form an external angle of less than 180 
degrees. 

ramp 

An inclined walk or passage connecting two 
different floor levels and used in lieu of steps. 

residence 

See "Dwelling." 

ridge 

A horizontal line along which the upper edges of 
two roof surfaces meet to form an external angle 
of more than 180 degrees. Compare "Hip"; 
"Valley." 

rise 

(1) In general, any vertical distance. (2) 
Specifically, the rise of a roof, being the distance 
between the top of an exterior wall and the peak 
of the roof; the rise of a stair, being the distance 
from tread to tread. 

roof 

The top portion of a structure. Types of roofs 
include double-pitch, flat, gable, gambrel, hip, 
lean-to, single-pilch. 

roof, curb (or curbed) 

A roof with two slopes on each side. 

roof, flat 

A roof which is flat or sloped only enough to 
provide proper drainage. 

roof, gable 

A ridge roof ending in a gable. 

roof, gambrel 

A ridge roof with two slopes on each side, the 
lower having a steeper pitch. 

roof, hip (or hipped) 

(1) In general, any roof having one or more hips. 

(2) Usually, a roof with four sloping sides 
meeting along four hips or along four hips and a 
ridge. Compare "Roof, Pyramid." 

roof, lean-to 

(1) A roof having a single sloping side which is 
supported at the upper edge by the wall of an 
attached building or of a larger and higher 
portion of the same building (preferred). (2) Any 
roof with a single slope. Compare "Roof, Flat." 



r 



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G-8 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



roof, mansard 

A special type of curb roof in which the upper 
part of each of the four equally sloping sides is 
nearly horizontal, and the lower part is nearly 
vertical. 

roof, monitor 

A type of gable roof, commonly found on 
industrial buildings, having a small raised portion 
along the ridge with openings for the admission 
of light and air. 

roof, pyramid 

A hip roof having four sloping triangular sides, 
usually of equal pitch, meeting together at the 
peak. 

roof, ridged 

A roof having one or more ridges. 

roof, saw tooth 

A roof with a series of parallel sloping surfaces 
interspersed between a series of vertical surfaces 
which rise from the lower edges of such sloping 
surfaces and which contain windows for the 
admission of light and air. 

roof, single pitch 

Any roof with a single slope other than a lean-to 
roof. 



sash 



The wooden or metal framework in which the 
glass of a door or window is set. 



sheathing 

The covering, usually of rough lumber, 
immediately over studding or rafters. 

sill 



placed 



(1) The lower horizontal part of a door-case (the 
threshold) or of a window. (2) The lowest 
horizontal structural member of a frame building, 
upon which the superstructure is supported. 

sleeper 

A structural member laid horizontally on the 
ground or upon a masonry base as a support to a 
floor or other superstructures. 

specincations 

A detailed description of the dimensions, 
materials, quantities, structural procedures, etc., 
applicable to a projected or completed piece of 
construction. 



story 

That portion of a building enclosed by a floor, a 
ceiling, and the exterior walls. 

story, ground 

The first story lying wholly above the ground 
level. Synonymous with "First Story." 

story, half (or one-half) 

(1) For buildings with a mansard or gambrel roof, 
a finished portion of a building which lies above 
the wall plate or cornice and which has a usable 
floor area substantially less than that of the next 
lower story. (2) For all other buildings, a 
finished portion of a building which is above one 
or more full stories, which is wholly or partly 
within the roof frame and which has one or more 
exterior walls substantially lower than the full 
height of the story. 

story, one 

A building having no finished story above the 
ground story. 

stretcher 

A brick or other piece of masonry which is laid 
lengthwise in a wall. Contrast "Header." 

strut 

Any structural member which holds apart two or 
more other members by counteracting a pressure 
which tends to bring them together. Contrast 
"Tie." 

stud 

One of a series of small slender structural 
members placed vertically and used as the 
supporting element of exterior or interior walls. 
(Plural - "Studs" or "Studding.") 

subfloor 

The flooring laid directly on top of the floor 
joists but beneath the finish floor. 

tenement 

A building, usually of obsolete nature, designed 
primarily for non-transient residential use and 
divided into three or more dwelling units having 
common stairs, halls, and street entrances, and 
sometimes common bath and toilet rooms. 
Compare "Apartment House"; "Flat"; "Terrace." 

terrace 

(1) An unroofed level area covered with grass or 
masonry or both, raised above the surrounding 



08/01/89 



G-9 



GLOSSARY 



ground level, and having a vertical or sloping 
front. (2) A multi-family dwelling in which the 
dwelling units are separated vertically by means 
of common or party walls. Compare "Dwelling, 
Row"; "Dwelling, Duplex." 

terra cotta 

A hard-baked ceramic clay molded into decorative 
tiles, bricks, etc., and used particularly for facing 
and trim on buildings. 



tie 



Any structural member which binds together two 
or more members by counteracting a stress which 
tends to draw them apart. Contrast "Strut." 



wall, bearing 

A wall designed primarily to withstand vertical 
pressure in addition to its own weight. 

wall, common 

A single wall jointly used by two buildings or two 
sections of a single building. 

wail, curtain 

A non-bearing wall which is supported by 
columns, beams, or other structural members, and 
whose primary function is to enclose space. 

wall, fire 

See "Firewall." 



trim 



(1) The finishing wood and plaster work of the 
interior of a building, such as the doors, windows, 
wainscoting, and molding. (2) The contrasting 
elements on the exterior of a building which 
serve no structural purpose, but are intended to 
enhance its appearance, e.g., the cornice. (3) 
Occasionally, the hardware of a house, such as 
locks, hinges, doorknobs, etc. 



truss 



A combination of structural pieces fastened 
together into a rigid open member which is 
supported at both ends and upon which loads are 
superimposed. Compare "Girder." 



wall, partition 

An interior bearing or non-bearing wall which 
separates portions of a story. Synonymous with 
"Partition." 

wall, party 

A wall jointly used by two parties under easement 
agreement and erected at or upon a line 
separating two parcels of land held under 
different ownership. 

wall, retaining 

A wall designed primarily to withstand lateral 
pressures of earth or other filling or backing 
deposited behind it after construction. 



C 



valley 

A sloping line along which two roof surfaces 
meet to form an external angle of less than 180 
degrees. Compare "Hip"; "Ridge." 

veneer 

An ornamental or protective layer of material 
covering a base of another substance which is 
typically of inferior quality. 

wainscot (or wainscoting) 

(1) A wooden facing on the lower portion of a 
contrasting interior wall. (2) By extension, a 
facing of marble tile, or the like, on the lower 
portion of interior wails. 



window, bay 

See "Bay Window." 

window, dormer 

See "Dormer." 

wing 

A subordinate part of a building extending from 
the main part, or any one of two or more 
substantially co-ordinate parts of a building which 
extend out from one or more common junctions. 



G2.2. DATA PROCESSING TERMS 



wall 



A vertical structure serving to enclose, support, 
divide; as one of the vertical enclosing sides of a 
building or room. 



Batch 



Refers to, in data processing, a quantity of wijrk 
or programs, that are performed at one time. 



L 



G-10 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



BAUD 

The rate in bits per second at which data is 
transmitted over a communications link. Since 
each character of data is usually comprised of 
eight bits, 150 characters, per second equals 
approximately 1200 baud. 

binary 

A characteristic or property involving a selection, 
choice, or condition in which there are two 
possibilities, such as the number representation 
with a radix of two. 



bit 



The smallest unit of information in the binary 
number system. An abbreviation of binary digits. 
Normally, a bit refers to one "on", while a no bit 
means zero "off. 



block 



A group of machine words considered or 
transported as a unit. In flowcharts, each block 
represents a logical unit of programming. 



BPS 



Bits per second. The number of bits transmitted 
in one second. The baud rate is normally 
expressed in bps, i.e. 1200, 2400, 9600, etc. 

byte 

A sequence of adjacent binary digits operated 
upon as a unit; a unit of computer storage 
capacity equal to eight binary bits which may 
represent one alphabetic character, one numeric 
digit (unpacked), or a special character. 

calculator 

A keyboard machine for the automatic 
performance of arithmetic operations. 

CAMA or CAMAS 

Computer-Assisted Mass Appraisal System - 
Utilizing data processing to compare parcels, 
calculate values, and maintain property 
characteristics to increase efficiency and accuracy 
in the appraisal process. 

columns binary 

Pertaining to the binary representation of data on 
punched cards in which adjacent positions in a 
column correspond to adjacent bits of data; each 
column in a I2-row card may be used to 
represent 12 consecutive bits of 36-bit word. 



computer 

A computational device distinguished by its high 
speed, programmable operation, and large 
memory. 

computer program 

A series of instructions, in a form acceptable to 
the computer, prepared so as to achieve a certain 
result. 

CPU 

Central Processing Unit - The heart of the 
computing system, which contains the arithmetic, 
logical, and control circuits necessary for the 
interpretation and execution of a program and 
controls the functioning of the entire system. 

CRT 

Cathode Ray Tube - See video display terminal. 

data base 

A minimally redundant stored collection of data. 
A collection of data maintained by a computer. 

data base management 

A combination of hardware and software that 
controls and processes all requests for data in 
data bases. 

data element 

The smallest unit of data stored on some medium 
to which a reference or none may be assigned. 

data entry 

The process of placing information into 
machine-readable form. 

data path 

The input-processing-output flow followed by data 
(often repeatedly) during normal computer 
operations. 

data processing 

Performing operations on machine-readable data, 
either with or without the use of a computer. 

data structure 

The particular form in which data are to be 
treated by the computer program: whether as 
whole numbers, decimal fractions, or alphabetic 
characters, and whether as single pieces of 
information or as related sets or arrays of data. 



08/01/89 



G-11 



GLOSSARY 



data verification 

Checking the accuracy of data that has been 
placed into a data processing system. 

direct access 

An addressing scheme or random access storage 
medium that permits direct addressing of data 
locations. 



access file, by which problems or portions of 
problems may be solved. 

master file 

A file of records containing a cumulative history 
or the results of accumulation; updated in each 
file processing cycle, and carried forward to the 
next cycle. 



Q 



disk nie 

A means for storing data on a magnetic disk or 
platter. 

encode 

To apply a set of rules specifying the manner in 
which data may be represented such that a 
subsequent decoding is possible. 

feedback 

The process of returning portions of the output 
of a machine, process, or system for use as input 
in a further operation. 

Ilowchart 

A graphical representation of the definition, 
analysis, or solution of a problem using symbols 
to represent operations, data flow, and 
equipment. 

hard copy 

Output that appears on paper. 

hardware 

The physical equipment in a data processing 
system. 

indexed sequential 

A file in which records are organized sequentially 
with indexes that permit quick access to 
individual records as well as rapid sequential 
processing. 

kilobytes 

(kilo = 1000, bytes = characters) byte: A form 
of saying a character - numerical, letter, or 
symbol, in machine-readable form. Data 
processing personnel measure the size of records 
by bytes, instead of number of characters. 
Exactly, a kilobyte (KB or K) has 1,024 
"characters". 

library 

A collection of standard proven computer 
routines, usually kept on a library tape or random 



megabyte 

(< 1 million bytes) This unit is quite large and 
is usually used to measure the volume of a file, a 
disc, etc. 

memory 

The part of the computer that stores the program, 
holds intermediate results, and various constant 
data. Same as storage. 

modem 

A contraction of "Modulator Demodulator." Its 
function is to interface with data processing 
devices and convert data to a form compatible for 
sending and receiving on normal voice or sound 
transmission facilities. 

MliA 

Multivariate Regression Analysis - Also called the 
least square method, is a mathematical method 
for producing a model for a dependent variable as 
a linear function of independent factors. As an 
example - the predicted sales price (dependent 
variable) is a function of independent factors such 
as Square Feet, Style, Neighborhood, etc. 

multiplexor 

A computer hardware device used as a screening 
agent to the main computer. It polls all the 
messages from all terminals and transmits one by 
one to the main computer. It also dispatches 
"messages" to receiving ends ... it can be 
compared to the secretary of a big boss! 

multiprocessing 

System software that enables several CPU's to be 
connected together to provide faster, more 
reliable computing. 

multiprogramming 

Systems software that enables the computer to 
run several programs simultaneously. 



c 



L 



G-12 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



network 

A group of computers linked by printed-circuit 
cards, cables and network software, that share 
resources, such as disk drives and printers. 

object code 

A compiled program that is ready to be loaded 
into the computer. Contrast with source code. 

on-line 

Peripheral equipment or devices in direct 
communication with the central processing unit, 
and from which information reflecting current 
activity is introduced into the data processing 
system as soon as it occurs. 

operating system 

The systems software that manages all other . 
software in the computer (also known as an 
executive or monitor). 

operator's instructions 

These are sets of operation instructions which tell 
the operator what to do to get the jobs done on 
the computer. The instructions are designed for 
two types of operators: (1) Computer operators 
- run the computer, execute a job, mount a tape, 
etc. (2) Use operators - run different 
applications such as payroll, CAMA. The 
instructions tell them how to add a new record, 
delete a word, etc., either on a terminal or using 
cards. 

output 

Information that has been processed by the 
computer. 

peripheral equipment 

Units that work in conjunction with the 
computer, but are not part of the computer itself, 
such as tape reader, card reader, magnetic tape 
feed, high-speed printer, typewriter, etc. 

printer 

Hardware for outputting on paper. 

program 

The instructions that enable a computer to 
process data. 

programming language 

A system for coding instructions for computer 
processing. 



random access 

For device or media, the accessing of data by 
address rather than by sequence. 

record 

A collection of related items of data treated as a 
unit. 

sequence 

An arrangement of items of data according to a 
specified set of rules. 

sequential processing 

The procedure of processing data records in the 
same order that they occur. 

sequential storage 

Storing of data in sequential order. 

software 

The programs and routines used to extend the 
capabilities of computers, such as compilers, 
assemblers, routines, and subroutines. Also, all 
documents associated with a computer, e.g., 
manuals, circuit diagrams. 

source 

That which provides information to be entered 
into the computer. 

source code 

A set of instructions that are written in a 
programming language and that must be 
translated to machine language before the 
program can be run. 

source document 

A form containing raw data for entry into the 
computer. 

source file 

A computer program in high-level language code. 

standard deviation 

A statistical measure of the variation of a 
characteristic about its average value. Standard 
deviation is the square root of the variance of a 
characteristic about its average observed value. 
Variance is the sum of the squared deviations of 
each observed value from the average, divided by 
one less than the number of observations. For 
normally distributed observations, approximately 
70% of the observations will fall within one 
standard deviation of the mean or average value. 



08/01/89 



G-13 



GLOSSARY 



storage 

The retention of information in the computer 
system. 

summary report 

Output that displays only the end product of 
processing in a concise format. 

system software 

Qjmputer software that provides overall 
housekeeping functions for the computer. 

systems design 

The development of a computer system (hardware 
and software) to suit a particular application, by 
using the program development cycle. 

terminal 

A device in a system or communication network 
at which point data can cither enter or leave the 
system. 

transaction Tile 

A file containing transient data to be processed 
in combination with a master file. 

turn-around document 

A document or form prepared as output at one 
stage of the data processing cycle, and sent to a 
customer or other user with the intention of 
having it returned and used as input at a later 
stage. 

unit record 

A record in which all data concerning each item 
in a transaction is punched into one card. 

variable 

A quantity that, when identified by a symbolic 
name, can assume any of a given set of values. 

verify 

To determine whether a transcription of data or 
other operation has been accomplished accurately. 
To check the results of key punching. 

video display terminal 

Hardware for output on a television-style picture 
tube (cathode-ray tube or CRT). 



word 



A set of characters that occupies one storage 
location and is treated by the computer circuits 
as a unit and transported as such. 



work station 

A device that lets people transmit information to 
or receive information from a computer; for 
example, a display station or printer. 



G2.3. REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL TERMS 

abstract of values 

A computer-printed report of appraised and/or 
assessed values for each parcel of real property in 
a given taxing district; generally sequenced 
geographically. 

accrued depreciation 

See depreciation. 

actual age 

The number of years elapsed since the original 
construction, as of the effective valuation date. 
Compare with effective age. 

ad valorem tax 

In reference to property, a tax based upon the 
value of the property. 

aesthetic value 

A value, intangible in nature, which is attributable 
to the pleasing appearance of a property. 

agricultural property 

Land and improvements devoted to or best 
adaptable for the production of crops, fruits and 
timber and the raising of livestock. 

air rights 

The right to the use of a certain specific space 
within the boundaries of a parcel of land and 
above a specified elevation. 

alley influence 

The enhancement to the value of a properly 
rising out of the presence of an abutting alley; 
most generally applicable to commercial 
properties. 

amenities 

In reference to property, the intangible benefits 
arising out of ownership, amenity value refers to 
the enhancement of value attributable to such 
amenities. 

appraisal 

An estimate, usually in written form, of the value 
of a specifically described property as of a 



( 



e 



G-14 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



% 



specified date; may be used synonymously with 
valuation or appraised value. 

appraisal schedules 

Any standardized schedules and tables used in 
conjunction with a revaluation program such as 
replacement cost pricing schedules, depreciation 
tables, land depth tables, etc. 

appraised value 

See appraisal. 

appraiser 

One who estimates value. More specifically, one 
who possesses the expertise to execute or direct 
the execution of an appraisal. 

assessed value 

The value of taxable property to which the tax 
rate is to be applied in order to compute the 
amount of taxes; may be used synonymously with 
assessed value, taxable value, and tax base. 

assessing 

The act of valuing a property for the purpose of 
establishing a tax base. 

assessment district 

An assessor's jurisdiction; it may or may not be 
an entire tax district. 

assessment list 

Document sent to taxpayer showing ownership, 
legal description and values assigned to the 
property. 

assessment period 

The period of time during which the assessment 
of all properties within a given assessment district 
must be completed; the period between tax lien 
dates. 

assessment ratio 

The ratio of assessed value to a particular 
standard of value, generally the appraised value. 
A percentage to be applied to the appraised 
value in order to derive the assessed value. Also, 
referred to as a taxable percentage. 



assessor 

The administrator charged with the assessment of 
property for ad valorem taxes; his precise duties 
differ from state to state depending upon state 
statutes. 

assessor's code 

A unique identifier assigned by the assessor to 
identify property owned by one owner. Not the 
same as parcel number. 

average deviation 

In a distribution of values, the average amount of 
deviation of all the values from the mean value, 
equal to the total amount of deviation from the 
mean divided by the number of deviations. As 
applied to an assessment-to-sale ratio distribution, 
the average amount which all the ratios within 
the distribution deviate from the mean ratio. 

base price 

A value or unit rate established for a certain 
specified model, and subject to adjustments to 
account for variations between that particular 
model and the subject properly under 
appraisement. 

base value 

The total current appraised value, including new 
construction and appeal adjustments. This value 
is generated from the cost base year for the 
reappraisal cycle, and does not include sales ratio 
adjustments. 

blighted area 

A declining area characterized by marked 
structural deterioration and/or environmental 
deficiencies. 

Board of Equalization 

A non-jurisdictional board charged with the 
responsibility of reviewing assessments across 
properties and taxing districts and to assure that 
said properties and districts are assessed at a 
uniform level either raising or lowering 
assessments accordingly; also referred to as 
County Tax Appeal Board or State Tax Appeal 
Board. 



assessment roll 

The official listing of all properties within a given 
taxing jurisdiction by ownership, description, and 
location showing the corresponding assessed 
values for each; also referred to as tax list, tax 
book, tax duplicate and tax roll. 



building residual technique 

A building valuation technique which requires the 
value of the land to be a known factor; the value 
of the buildings can then be indicated by 
capitalizing the residual net income remaining 



08/01/89 



G-15 



GLOSSARY 



after deducting the portion attributable to the 
land. 

capitalization 

A mathematical procedure for converting the net 
income which a property is capable of producing 
into an indication of its current value. See 
income approach. 

CDU rating 

A composite rating of the overall condition, 
desirability, and usefulness of a structure as 
developed by the Cole-Layer-Trumble Company 
and used nationally as a simple, direct, and 
uniform method of estimating accrued 
depreciation. 

central business district 

The center of the city in which the primary 
commercial, governmental and recreational 
activities are concentrated. 

certiHed assessment evaluator 

A professional designation (C.A.E.) conferred by 
the International Association of Assessing 
Officers (LAAO) upon qualifying assessors. 

classified property tax 

An ad valorem property tax under which the 
assessment ratio varies for different property 
classes. 

component part-in-place method 

The application of the unit-in-place method to 
unit groupings or construction components. See 
unil-in-place method. 

corner influence 

The enhancement to the value of a property 
rising out of its corner location; most generally 
applicable to commercial properties. 

cost approach 

One of the three traditional approaches to value 
by which an indication of the value of a property 
is arrived at by estimating the value of the land, 
the replacement or reproduction cost new of the 
improvement, and the amount of accrued 
depreciation to the improvement; the estimated 
land value is then added to the estimated 
depreciated value of the improvements to arrive 
at the estimated property value. Also referred to 
as the cost-to-markel approach to indicate that 
the value estimates are derived from market data 
abstraction and analysis. 



cost factor 

A factor or multiplier applied to a replacement or 
reproduction cost to account for variations in 
location and time, as well as for other elements 
of construction costs not otherwise considered. 

CTAB 

County Tax Appeal Board, see Board of 
Equalization. 

cubic content 

The cubic volume of a building within the outer 
surface of the exterior walls and roof and the 
upper surface of the lowest floor. 

data collection card 

A specially designed card or form used by field 
personnel to record specific property 
characteristics in a uniform manner, which is 
subsequently used as a source document for data 
processing in a mass appraisal environment. 

data collector 

See lister. 

deed 

A written instrument which conveys an interest in 
real property. A quitclaim deed conveys the 
interest described therein without warranty of 
title. A trust deed conveys interest described 
therein to a trustee. A warranty deed conveys the 
interest described therein with the provisions that 
the freehold is guaranteed by the grantor, his 
heirs, or successors. 

depreciation 

Loss in value from all causes; may be further 
classified as physical, referring to the loss of value 
caused by physical deterioration; functional, 
referring to the loss of value caused by 
obsolescence inherent in the property itself; and 
economic, referring to the loss of value caused by 
factors extraneous to the property. Accrued 
depreciation refers to the actual depreciation 
existing in a particular property as of a specified 
date. 

Normal depreciation refers to that amount of 
accrued depreciation one would normally expect 
to find in buildings of certain construction, design, 
quality and age. 

depreciation allowance 

A loss of value expressed in terms of a percentage 
of replacement or reproduction cost new. 



I 



G-16 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



% 



depth factor 

A factor or multiplier applied to a unit land 
value to adjust the value in order to account for 
variations in depth from an adopted standard 
depth. 

depth table 

A table of depth factors. 

design factor 

A factor or multiplier applied to a computed 
replacement cost as an adjustment to account for 
cost variations attributable to the particular 
design of the subject property which were not 
accounted for in the particular pricing schedule 
used. 

deterioration 

Impairment of structural condition evidenced by 
the wear and tear caused by physical use and the 
action of the elements, also referred to as 
physical depreciation. 

economic depreciation 

See economic obsolescence. 

economic life 

The life expectancy of a property during which it 
can be expected to be profitably utilized. 

economic obsolescence 

Obsolescence caused by factors extraneous to the 
property. Also referred to as economic 
depreciation. 

economic rent 

The rent which a property can be expected to 
bring in the open market as opposed to contract 
rent or the rent the property is actually realizing 
at a given time. 

effective age 

An age assigned to a structure based upon its 
condition as of the effective valuation date; it 
may be greater or less than the structure's actual 
age. Compare with actual age. 

effective depth 

In reference to property valuation, that depth, 
expressed in feet, upon which the selection of the 
depth factor is based. 

effective frontage 

In reference to property valuation, that total 
frontage, expressed in lineal feet, to which the 



unit land value is applied. It may or may not be 
the same as the actual frontage. 

effective gross income 

The estimated gross income of a property less an 
appropriate allowance for vacancies and credit 
losses. 

effective valuation date 

In reference to a revaluation program, the date as 
of which the value estimate is applicable. 

encroachment 

(1) To gradually intrude on the rights or 
possessions of another. (2) The displacement of 
an existing use by another use, such as locating 
commercial or industrial improvements in a 
residential district. 

environmental deficiency 

A neighborhood condition such as adverse land 
uses, congestion, poorly designed streets, etc., 
operating to cause economical obsolescence and, 
when coupled with excessive structural 
deterioration, blight. 

equalization program 

A mass appraisal (or reappraisal) of all properly 
within a given taxing jurisdiction with the goal of 
equalizing values in order to assure that each 
taxpayer is bearing only his fair share of the tax 
load; may be used synonymously with a 
revaluation program or reappraisal cycle. 

equity 

In reference to property taxes, a condition in 
which the tax load is distributed fairly or 
equitably; opposite of inequity which refers to a 
condition characterized by an unfair or 
unequitable distribution of the tax burden. 
Inequity is a natural product of changing 
economic conditions which can only be effectively 
cured by periodical equalization programs. 

In reference to value, it is that value of the 
property remaining after deducting all liens and 
charges against it. 

excessive frontage 

Frontage which because of the particular utility of 
the lot does not serve to add value to the lot. 

exempt property 

See tax exemption. 



08/01/89 



G-17 



GLOSSARY 



Tee appraisal 

Generally referred to mean a rather extensive 
detailed appraisal for a single property or 
singularly used properties for a specific purpose. 

field crew 

The total professional staff assigned to a specific 
appraisal project, including listers, reviewers, staff 
appraisers, and clerical and administrative 
supporting personnel. 

functional depreciation 

See depreciation. 

functional obsolescence 

Obsolescence caused by factors inherent in the 
property itself. Also referred to as functional 
depreciation. 

functional utility 

The composite effect of a property's usefulness 
and desirability upon its marketability. 

geocode 

See parcel number. 

grade 

The classification of an improvement based upon 
certain construction specifications and quality uf 
materials and workmanship. 

grade factor or variation 

A factor or multiplier applied to a base grade 
level for the purpose of interpolating between 
grades or establishing an intermediate grade. 

grantee 

A person to whom property is transferred and 
property rights are granted by deed, trust 
instrument, or other similar documents. 
Compare with grantor. 

grantor 

A person who transfers property or grants 
property rights by deed, trust instrument, or other 
similar documents. Compare with grantee. 

gross area 

The total floor area of a building measured from 
the exterior of the walls. 

gross income 

The scheduled annual income produced by the 
operation of a business or by the property itself. 



gross income multipfier 

A multiplier representing the relationship between 
the gross income of a property and its estimated 
value. 

gross leasable area 

The total area of leasable space of an income 
producing property. Includes the common areas 
of the property (hallways, restrooms, etc.), as well 
as the floor area occupied by the tenant. 
Compare net leasable area. 

gross sales 

The total amount of invoiced sales before making 
any deductions for returns, allowances, etc. 

ground lease 

A document entitling the lessee certain specified 
rights relating to the use of the land. 

ground rent 

Net rent from a ground lease; that portion of the 
total rent which is attributable to the land only. 

improved land 

Land developed for use by the erection of 
buildings and other improvements. 

improvement 

Anything done to raw land with the intention of 
increasing its value, such as constructing a 
building or installation of sewer and water lines. 
The statutory definition of an improvement can 
be found in 15-1-101 M.C.A. 

income approach 

One of the three traditional approaches to value 
which measures the present worth of the future 
benefits of a property by the capitalization of its 
net income stream over its remaining economic 
life. The approach involves making an estimate 
of the potential net income the properly may be 
expected to yield, and capitalizing that income 
into an indication of value. 

income property 

A property primarily used to produce a monetary 
income. 

industrial park 

A subdivision designed and developed to 
accommodate specific types of industry. 



r 



G-18 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



industrial property 

Land, improvements, and/or machinery used or 
adaptable for use in the production of goods 
either for materials, or by changing other 
materials and products, i.e., assembling, 
processing and manufacturing ... as well as the 
supporting auxiliary facilities thereof. 

inequity 

See equity. 

influence factor 

A factor serving to either devalue or enhance the 
value of a particular parcel of land, or portions 
thereof, relative to the norm for which the base 
unit values were established; generally expressed 
in terms of a percentage adjustment. 

institutional property 

Land and improvements used in conjunction with 
providing public services and generally owned and 
operated by the government or other nonprofit 
organizations ... hospitals, schools, prisons, etc. 
Such property is generally held exempt from 
paying property taxes. 

interest rate 

A rate of return on capital. Frequently implies a 
contract rate; for example, a mortgage interest 
rate. 

land classification 

The classification of land based upon its 
capabilities for use and/or production. 

land contract 

A purchase contract wherein the grantee takes 
possession of the property with the grantor 
retaining the deed to the property until the terms 
of the contract are met as specified. 

land residual technique 

A land valuation technique which requires the 
value of the building(s) to be known; the value of 
the land can then be indicated by capitalizing the 
residual net income remaining after deducting the 
portion attributable to the building(s). 

landscaping 

Natural features such as lawns, shrubs and trees 
added to a plot of ground or modified in such a 
way as to make it more attractive. 



land use restrictions 

Legal restrictions regulating the use to which land 
may be put. 

land value maps 

A map used in conjunction with mass appraising, 
generally drawn to a small scale, and showing 
comparative unit land values, on a block to block 
basis. 

lease, lessee, lessor 

A written contract by which one party (lessor) 
gives to another party (lessee) the possession and 
use of a specified property, for a specified time, 
and under specified terms and conditions. 

leasehold 

A property held under the terms of a lease. 

leasehold improvements 

Additions, renovations, and similar improvements 
made to a leased property by the lessee. The 
statutory definition of leasehold improvements can 
be found in 15-1-101 M.C.A 

leasehold value 

The value of a leasehold; the difference between 
the contractural rent and the currently established 
economic or market rent. 

legal description 

A description of a parcel of land which serves to 
identify the parcel in a manner sanctioned by law. 

lister 

A field inspector or data collector whose principle 
duty is to collect and record property data. (Not 
an appraiser.) 

M.A.L 

A professional designation (Member of the 
Appraisal Institute) conferred by The American 
Institute of Real Estate Appraisers on qualifying 
real estate appraisers. 

market data approach 

One of the three traditional approaches to value 
by which an indication of the value of a property 
is arrived at by compiling data on recently sold 
properties which are comparable to the subject 
property and adjusting their selling prices to 
account for variations in time, location, and 
property characteristics between the comparables 
and the subject property. 



08/01/89 



G-19 



GLOSSARY 



inurket value 

The price an informed and intelligent buyer, fully 
aware of the existence of competing properties, 
and not compelled to act, would be justified in 
paying for a particular property. 

mass appraisal 

Appraisal of property on a mass scale, such as an 
entire community, generally for ad valorem tax 
purposes, using standardized appraisal techniques 
and procedures to affect uniform equitable 
valuations within a minimum of detail, within a 
limited time period and at a limited cost ... as 
opposed to a fee appraisal which is generally used 
to refer to a rather extensive detailed appraisal of 
a single property or singularly used properties for 
a specified purpose. 

mineral rights 

The right to extract subterranean deposits such as 
oil, gas, coal, and minerals, as specified in the 
grant. 

minimum rental 

That portion of the rent in a percentage lease 
which is fixed. 

model method 

A method of computing the replacement or the 
reproduction cost of an improvement by applying 
the cost of a specified model and adjusting the 
cost to account for specified variations between 
the subject improvement and the model. 

modernization 

The corrective action taken to update a property 
so that it may conform with current standards. 

mortgage, mortgagee, mortgator 

A legal document by which the owner of a 
property (mortgagor) pledges the property to a 
creditor (mortgagee) as security for the payment 
of a debt. 

neighborhood 

A geographical area exhibiting a high degree of 
homogeneity in residential amenities, land use, 
economic and social trends, and housing 
characteristics. 

neighborhood trend 

Three stages in the life cycle of a neighborhood 
... the improving stage characterized by 
development and growth; the static stage 
characterized by a leveling off of values; and the 



declining stage characterized by infiltration and 
decay. 

net income 

The income remaining from the effective gross 
income after deducting all operating expenses 
related to the cost of ownership. 

net leasable area 

The area of leasable space of an income 
producing property that includes only the floor 
area occupied by the tenant. Compare gross 
leasable area. 

net lease 

A lease wherein the lessee assumes to pay all 
applicable operating expenses related to the cost 
of ownership; also referred to as net net, or net 
net net lease. 

net sales 

Gross sales less returns and allowances. 

net sales area 

The actual floor area used for merchandising, 
excluding storage rooms, utility and equipment 
rooms, etc. 

non-conforming use 

A use which, because of modified or new zoning 
ordinances, no longer conforms to current use 
regulations, but which is nevertheless upheld to 
be legal so long as certain conditions are adhered 
to. 

notice of value 

A written notification to a property owner of the 
assessed value of certain properties described 
therein; often mandated by law to be given to 
each property owner following a revaluation of his 
property. 

observed depreciation 

That loss in value which is discernable through 
physical observation by comparing the subject 
property with a comparable property either new 
or capable of rendering maximum utility. 

obsolescence 

A diminishing of a property's desirability and 
usefulness brought about by either functional 
inadequacies and overadequacies inherent in the 
property itself, or adverse economic factors 
external to the property. Refer to functional 
depreciation and economic depreciation. 



'c 



G-20 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



operating expenses 

The fixed expenses, operating costs, and reserves 
for replacements which are required to produce 
net income before depreciation, and which are to 
be deducted from effective gross income in order 
to arrive at net income. 



property class 

A division of like properties generally defined by 
statutes and generally based upon their present 
use. The basis for establishing assessment ratios 
in a classified property assessment system. See 
classified property tax. 



overage income 

Rental received in addition to the minimum 
contract rental based upon a specified percentage 
of a tenant's business receipts. 

overall rate 

A capitalization rate representing the relationship 
of the net income (before recapture) of a 
property to its value as a single rate; it 
necessarily contains, in their proper proportions, 
the elements of both the land and the building 
capitalization rates. 

overassessed 

A condition wherein a property is assessed 
proportionately higher than comparable 
properties. 

parcel 

Piece of land held in one ownership. 

parcel number 

An identification number, which is assigned to a 
parcel of land to uniquely identify that parcel 
from any other parcel within a given taxing 
jurisdiction. 

percentage lease 

A type of lease in which the rental is stipulated 
to be a percentage of the tenant's gross or net 
sales, whichever specified. 

|)ersonai property 

Property which is not permanently affixed to and 
a part of the real estate, as specified by state 
statutes. 

physical depreciation 

See depreciation. 

preferential assessment 

An assessing system which provides preferential 
treatment in the form of reduced rates to a 
particular class of property, such as a system 
providing for farm properties to be assessed in 
accordance to their value in use as opposed to 
their value in the open market. 



property inspection 

A physical inspection of a property for the 
purpose of collecting and/or reviewing property 
data. 

property record card 

A document specially designated to report or 
process specified property data; may serve as a 
source document, a processing form; and/or a 
permanent property record. 

public utility property 

Properties devoted to the production of 
commodities or services for public consumption 
under the control of governmental agencies such 
as the Public Utility Commission. 

quantity survey method 

A method of computing the replacement or the 
reproduction cost of an improvement by applying 
unit costs to the actual or estimated material and 
labor quantities and adding an allowance for 
overhead, profit, and all other indirect 
construction costs. 

real estate 

The physical land and appurtenances affixed 
thereto; often used synonymously with real 
property. 

real property 

All the interests, benefits, and rights enjoyed by 
the ownership of the real estate. 

reappraisal 

The revaluation of all properties within a given 
jurisdiction for the purpose of establishing a new 
tax base. 

reappraisal cycle 

See equalization program. 

rent 

The amount paid for the use of a capital good. 
See economic rent. 



08/01/89 



G-21 



GLOSSARY 



replacement cost 

The current cost of reproducing an improvement 
of equal utility to the subject property; it may or 
may not be the cost of reproducing a replica 
property. Compare with reproduction cost. 

reproduction cost 

The current cost of reproducing a replica 
property. Compare with replacement cost. 

reserve for replacements 

A reserve established to cover renewal and 
replacements of fixed assets. 

residential property 

Vacant or improved land devoted to or available 
for use primarily as a place to live. 



standard depth 

That lot depth selected as the norm against which 
other lots are to be compared; generally the most 
typical depth. 

sublease 

See lease; the lessee in a prior lease simply 
becomes a lessor in a sublease. 

tax bill 

An itemized statement showing the amount of 
taxes owed for certain property described therein 
and forwardable to the party(s) legally liable for 
payment thereof. 

tax book 

See assessment roll. 



revaluation program 

See equalization program. 

sales ratio study 

A statistical analysis of the distribution of 
assessment or appraisal-to-sale ratios of a sample 
of recent sales made for the purpose of drawing 
inferences regarding the entire population of 
parcels from which the sample was abstracted. 

salvage value 

The price one would be justified in paying for an 
item of property to be removed from the 
premises and used elsewhere. 

site development costs 

All costs incurred in the preparation of a site for 
use. 

soil productivity 

The capacity of a soil to produce crops. 

sound value 

The depreciated value of an improvement. 

sound value estimate 

An estimate of the depreciated value of an 
improvement made directly by comparing it to 
improvements of comparable condition, 
desirability, and usefulness without first estimating 
its replacement cost new. 

STAB 

State Tax Appeal Board, see Board of 
Equalization. 



tax district 

A political subdivision over which a governmental 
unit has authority to levy a tax. 

tax duplicate 

See assessment roll. 

tax exemption 

Either total or partial freedom from tax; total 
exemption such as that granted to governmental, 
educational, charitable, religious, and similar 
nonprofit organizations, and partial exemption 
such as that granted on homesteads, etc. 

tax levy 

In reference to property taxes, the total revenue 
which is to be realized by the tax. 

tax list 

See assessment roll. 

tax mapping 

The creation of accurate representations of 
property boundary lines at appropriate scales to 
provide a graphic inventory of parcels for use in 
accounting, appraising and assessing; such maps 
show dimensions and the relative size and 
location of each tract with respect to other tracts. 

tax rate 

The rate generally expressed in dollars per 
hundred or dollars per thousand (mills) which is 
to be applied against the tax base (assessed value) 
to compute the amount of taxes. The tax rate is 
derived by dividing the total amount of the tax 
levy by the total assessed value of the taxing 
district. 



G-22 



08/01/89 



GLOSSARY 



tax roll 

See assessment roll. 

taxable percentage 

See assessment ratio. 

taxable value 

See assessed value. 

tillable land 

Land suitable for growing annual crops. 

topography 

The physical features of land. 

underassessed 

A condition wherein a property is assessed 
proportionately lower than comparable properties. 

uniformity 

As applied to assessing, a condition wherein all 
properties are assessed at the same ratio to 
market value, or other standard of value 
depending upon the particular practices followed. 

unimproved land 

Vacant land; a parcel for which there is no 
improvement value. 

unit cost or price 

The price or cost of one item of a quantity of 
similar items. 

unit-in-place method 

A method of computing the replacement or 
reproduction cost of an improvement by applying 
established unit-in-place rates, developed to 
include the cost of materials, equipment, labor, 
overhead and profit, to the various construction 
units. 

use density 

The number of buildings in a particular use per 
unit of area, such as a density of so many 
apartment units per acre. 

use value 

A procedure used to value agricultural land for 
ad valorem tax purposes which is based on the 
agricultural income or productivity attributable to 
the inherent capabilities of the land. 

vacancy 

An unrented unit of rental property. 



vacant land 

Unimproved land; a parcel for which there is no 
improvement value. 

valuation 

See appraisal. 

view 

The scene as viewed from a property. 

waterfrontage " 

Land abutting on a body of water. 

woodland 

Land which is fairly densely covered with trees. 

zoning regulations ' < ' 

Governmental restrictions relating