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Full text of "Montana, its story and biography; a history of aboriginal and territorial Montana and three decades of statehood, under the editorial supervision of Tom Stout ..."

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MONTANA 

Its Story and Biography 



A HISTORY OF ABORIGINAL AND TERRITORIAL MONTANA 
AND THREE DECADES OF STATEHOOD 



UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION 
OF 

TOM STOUT 



VOLUME II 




LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
DAVIS 



Copyright, 1921 

BY 
AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



GEN. CHARLES S. WARREN is one 'of the few sur- 
vivors of the group of pioneers who>.made the heroic 
and constructive period of Montana's early history. 
For over half a century he has lired on terms of 
injimacy with miner and prospector, mine operator, 
capitalist, statesman, has had his share in big con- 
structive movements, and perhaps ino one in Mon- 
tana today is better informed and could describe 
from his own experience and knowledge the real 
forces that have shaped and foimed the political 
and industrial fabric of the state. 

Charles S. Warren was born in sight of the his- 
toric Starved Rock near Utica, LaSalle County, 
Illinois, November 20, 1846, and is of colonial 
American stock. His mother, Hannah Brown, was 
born at Germantown, near Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, and she was a member of the Keyser fam- 
ily of Philadelphia of nearly a hundred years ago, 
and at that time her ancestor, Charles Keyser, was 
the president of Girard College. Her ancestors 
came over with Williatn Penn among the early set- 
tlers of Philadelphia. She was member of a prom- 
inent Quaker family of Pennsylvania. 

General Warren's father was Sylvanus B. War- 
ren, who was born in Philipstown, a suburb of 
Peekskill, New York, November 27, 1813. The War- 
rens were well known throughout New England and 
New York before the Revolution, and took a prom- 
inent part in that struggle for independence. Gen- 
eral Warren's ancestors built the first house in the 
vicinity of Cold Springs, opposite West Point, New 
York, prior to the Revolution. 

The Warrens were early settlers in central Illi- 
nois, in the Illinois Valley, and Charles S. Warren 
was reared in practically a pioneer home, but one 
of substantial New England and Quaker ideals. He 
was a farmer boy when the Civil war broke out, 
and served through the war for the Union and had 
two honorable discharges from the United States 
army. In 1866 he drove a bull team across the 
plains to Virginia City, Montana, where he grad- 
uated as a bull whacker on August 20, 1866. Dur- 
ing the winter of 1867-66 he taught school in Deer 
Lodge Valley at Hartley's Ranch near the mouth of 
Dry Cottonwood, about fifteen miles south of Deer 
Lodge. During the summer he followed placer min- 
ing, and for seven years operated in the placer 
diggings of Alder Gulch, Last Chance, French 
Gulch, German Gulch, Silver Bow, Butte and else- 
where in Montana. In fact for over half a century 
he has been more or less closely identified with the 
mining industry as well as with every other industry 
that has helped develop the resources and build up 
the territory and state. General Warren reached 
Butte November 24, 1866, and spent the following 
winter at Silver Bow, then the largest town in this 
part of Montana. In a business way his name has 
become associated with a number of groups compris- 
ing men of power and leadership in the develop- 
ment of the resources of the Northwest. He was 
one of the incorporators of the Inter Mountain 



Publishing Company, of the Comanche Mining 
Company, the Charles S. Warren Realty and Min- 
ing Company and numerous other corporations. 

General Warren has been a republican since he 
cast his first vote, and while he has never made 
politics a profession, few politicians have been more 
frequently honored with the responsibilities and 
duties of public office. He served as deputy sheriff, 
under sheriff and sheriff of Deer Lodge County 
from 1869 to 1875. That county then comprised 
everything from the Big Hole River on the south 
to the British possessions on the north, there being 
only two counties in Montana west of the Rocky 
Mountains, Deer Lodge and Missoula. He was the 
first police magistrate of Butte when the city was 
organized in 1880, and twenty-six years later was 
again elected police judge of the city. In terri- 
torial days he served for five years as clerk of the 
United States District Court of Silver Bow County, 
under Hon. William J. Galbraith, presiding judge. 
General Warren was elected a member of the State 
Constitutional Convention which met at Helena 
July 4, 1889, and framed the constitution of the 
state. Upon roll call he voted aye for woman suf- 
frage, and has never failed to give his support and 
influence to the political emancipation of women. 
He was a member of the National Republican Com- 
mittee four years when Mathew S. Quay was chair- 
man, resulting in the election of Benjamin Harri- 
son to the presidency in 1888. He served as a mem- 
ber of most of the territorial and state conventions 
for forty-five years, and as presidential elector was 
appointed to the duty of carrying the Montana vote 
to Washington and casting it for William H. Taft 
in 1908. 

With rank from major to brigadier general, he 
served on the staffs of J. Schuyler Crosby, Samuel 
T. Hauser, Preston H. Leslie and B. F. White as 
territorial governors. He was adjutant of the Mon- 
tana Battalion during the Nez Perce Indian war of 
1877, and raised a company and tendered its services 
to Governor Potts early in July, 1876, upon receiv- 
ing news of the Custer massacre, this service be- 
ing declined by the governor. He was also instru- 
mental in organizing the militia of the Territory 
of Montana. 

General Warren helped organize and is past com- 
mander of Lincoln Post No. 2, Grand Army of the 
Republic. The first department commander of the 
Grand Army of the Republic in Montana was Capt. 
Thomas P. Fuller, who was succeeded in that 
office in 1886 by General Warren. The death of 
Captain Fuller leaves General Warren as the rank- 
ing department commander of the Grand Army of 
the Republic of Montana. He is also a member of 
the board of managers of the State Soldiers Home 
at Columbia Falls. 

General Warren served as president of the Society 
of Montana Pioneers in 1907-08. He helped or- 
ganize the Silver Bow Club as a charter member 
and was president of the club in 1888, being sue- 



HISTORY OF MOXTAI 



ceeded in that office by F. E. Sargent. Some years 
ago General Warren was made a life member of 
the club. 

He is a past master of Butte Lodge, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, a Knight Templar Mason, 
belongs to the thirty-second degree of the Scottish 
Rite and Bagdad Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is a charter member of Butte Lodge of Masons, 
and served as its secretary for the first six years. 
He was a charter member and first secretary of 
Fidelity Lodge No. 8, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, a charter member of Damon Lodge No. 2, 
Knights of Pythias, a charter member of Silverbow 
Lodge No. 240, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, but has since severed his active connection 
with the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Elks. 

November 15, 1871, General Warren married 
Mittie Avery. They were married at what was 
then known as Silver Valley Station, now known as 
the "Hump," about six miles below Silver Bow and 
on the road betweii Butte and Gregson Springs. 
Mrs. Warren was born at Saco, Maine, September I, 
1854. Their two living children are: Wesley W. 
Warren, a resident of Sacramento, California; and 
Mary Warren Murphey, wife of John Milton Mur- 
phey, living at 221 North Excelsior Avenue, m 
Butte. 

JOSEPH MOORE DIXON. The present Governor of 
Montana was elected at the 1920 election to serve 
for the term beginning January 3, 1921, and ending 
January I, 1925. 

While his home and interests as a lawyer have 
been at Missoula for more than a quarter of a 
century, Joseph Moore Dixon is a really national 
figure not only on account of his service in the 
United States House of Representatives and Senate, 
but more particularly because he was called, on ac- 
count of his demonstrated .qualifications, by Theo- 
dore Roosevelt to lead the progressive party in the 
national campaign of 1912. 

Governor Dixon was born at Snow Camp, Ala- 
mance County, North Carolina, July 31, 1867, a son 
of Hugh W. and Flora (Murchison) Dixon. His 
people were Friends or Quakers. After attending 
common schools he was sent to the leading Quaker 
institution of higher learning in the Middle West, 
Earlham College at Richmond, Indiana. Later he 
was schooled in Guilford College, North Carolina, 
where he graduated in 1889, with his A. B. degree. 

Mr. Dixon came to Missoula in 1891. During the 
following year he studied in the law office of Woody 
& Webster, and was admitted to the bar in 1892. He 
practiced in partnership with I. G. Denny until 1894, 
when he was elected county attorney, having pre- 
viously served as assistant prosecuting attorney. He 
filled that office from 1895 to 1897. In 1900 he was 
elected to represent Missoula County in the Legisla- 
ture and his abilities as a lawyer and legislator and 
his influence with a great mass of the republican 
voters soon brought him to leadership in cementing 
the factions of the republican party in Montana. In 
1902 he received a substantial majority in the elec- 
tion for congressman-at-large to the Fifty-eighth 
Congress, taking his seat in 1903. In 1904 he was re- 
elected by a still larger majority. His leadership at 
home and his work in the Congress those four years 
made him the logical candidate to succeed W. A. 
Clark in the United States Senate. Mr. Dixon's 
term as United States senator was from 1907 to 1913. 
In 1912 the late Colonel Roosevelt selected him as 
chairman of the Progressive National Committee, 
and he was largely instrumental in organizing and 
rolling up the immense popular vote credited to the 
progressive candidates of that year. 

In 1900 Mr. Dixon acquired and reorganized the 



Daily Missoulian, one of the oldest and influential 
republican daiJy newspapers of the state. On his 
retirement from the Senate, in 1913, he assumed 
editorial control of the newspaper in person and 
continued as such until he disposed of the same 
in 1917. 

Governor Dixon has always been a stalwart re- 
publican with progressive tendencies. He was dele- 
gate-at-large to the national conventions of 1904 
and 1916. 

March 12, 1896, Mr. Dixon married Carrie M. 
Worden of Missoula, daughter of Frank L. Worden, 
one of the founders of Missoula. They have an 
interesting family of six daughters. 

McCoRMicK OF MONTANA. This is a variation 
from the ordinary title at the head of individual 
articles in this publication, and of itself it is signifi- 
cant, and its significance is one readily recognized 
all over the state. Business men, farmers and grain 
growers in particular, know McCormick of Montana 
as a business man whose success has been a valuable 
asset to the state, and as proprietor of McCormick 
of Montana Seed House, the largest concern of the 
kind in the state. There are many McCormicks in 
and around Billings, but the postoffice department 
and citizens generally do not need the initial letters 
W. H. to identify McCormick of Montana. 

Personally he has been identified with business 
affairs in Montana for over a quarter of a century. 
He is a nephew of "the grand old man of Montana" 
Paul McCormick, distinguished as a Montana settler 
of 1866, a pioneer farmer, freighter, Indian fighter, 
rancher and one of the notable business builders of 
Billings. 

McCormick of Montana was born at Hancock, 
Wisconsin, August 2, 1871. The McCormicks have 
been noted for a high degree of commercial enter- 
prise and likewise for prominence in all walks of life. 
His grandfather, James McCormick, was born in 
Cork, Ireland, in 1791, and on coming to America 
settled in Steuben County, New York. Though a 
farmer he became very influential in civic affairs 
and acquired a large amount of property. He died 
at Rexville in Steuben County in 1886. 

Hugh McCormick, father of McCormick of Mon- 
tana, was born at Greenwood in Steuben County, 
New York, in 1826. In 1858 he moved to Wisconsin, 
developed a large farm in that state, and lived there 
until his death at Hancock on June 16, 1871. He 
had the reputation of being progressive and ener- 
getic, and was one of the wealthiest men of his 
locality. He was successful in business and equally 
useful in the promotion of many worthy enterprises 
in his community. He was a republican in politics 
and a member of the Catholic Church. Hugh Mc- 
Cormick married Mary Ray, who was born in New 
York in 1834 and died at Hancock, Wisconsin, in 
1889. W. H. McCormick was the sixth and youngest 
child of his parents and was born after his father's 
death. The other members of the family were: 
Charles, who died at Rexville in Steuben County, 
New York, at the age of twelve years ; Fred, who 
has for many years been a resident of Montana, was 
formerly a miner, and is now a farmer and stock 
man at Finch in Rosebud County ; Louise, unmarried, 
is a property owner at Tacoma, Washington ; 
Theresa, wife of John Milne, a farmer and stock- 
man at Rothamay in Fergus County, Montana ; Cora, 
unmarried, owner of considerable property at Bil- 
lings and principal of the McKinley School in that 
city. 

As a boy McCormick of Montana was sent to New 
York State, and was educated in the Canisteo Acad- 
emy at Canisteo. and the Christian Brothers' St. 
'Joseph College at Buffalo. Leaving school at the 




M^CORMICK OF MONTANA 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



age of sixteen, he taught one year at Jasper in 
Steuben County, and in 1890 came to Billings, Mon- 
tana. For twelve years he was manager of the gro- 
cery and hardware firm of Donovan and Spear. In 
1902 he organized the McCormick Mercantile Com- 
pany at Billings, his principal associate being his 
uncle, Paul McCormick. This partnership was con- 
tinued for three years and was then superseded by 
the Donovan-McCormick Company, operating a de- 
partment store. 

The McCormick of Montana Seed House was 
established in 1907. This business might well be 
entitled to a lengthy description. The headquarters 
are at 2500 Minnesota Avenue. It is a business that 
has been developed to most extensive proportions 
by Mr. McCormick, and has undisputed claim to the 
position of being the largest seed house in Montana. 
The firm handles hay, grain and seeds in carload 
lots, also poultry supplies, and specializes 'as bean 
dealers, jobbers and shippers. In the handling, pick- 
ing and grading of beans, a separate department by 
itself, seventy-five people are employed. Fifteen per- 
sons work in the seed house and office, and twenty- 
five make up the staff of the hay baling department. 
The handling of hay is a big business in itself. Im- 
mense quantities are pressed and shipped by this firm 
to eastern markets. This is the house that has given 
Montana grown alfalfa seed a justified fame 
throughout the United States. 

As something of an auxiliary to the seed house is 
operated a 3,000 acre stock farm in Rosebud County. 
Part of this farm is devoted to the culture of pure 
seeds as well as pure bred livestock. The trial 
grounds for the seed house are on this ranch, and 
all the seeds marketed are submitted to tests to prove 
their high germination qualities as well as their 
adaptability to varying conditions of soil and climate. 

McCormick of Montana also built and owns the 
McCormick Hotel at 2500 Montana Avenue, and his 
own home is the noted old McCormick Log Cabin 
property, the early residence of his uncle, Paul Mc- 
Cormick, and one of the interesting landmarks of 
Billings. 

His initiative and enterprise are sufficiently dis- 
played in the above brief record. His friends and 
associates appreciate even more his integrity, and the 
great persistence that marked his early struggles 
with fortune. Some of his intimate friends know 
that when he finished school and took up life as a 
business man he was $700 in debt. Out of his early 
earnings he paid off every dollar of his obligations 
and then undoubtedly thereby established a credit 
which has remained steadily with him to the present 
time. 

A bit of military history also belongs in the record 
of McCormick of Montana. He was a member of 
Troop A of Billings of the Montana National Guard, 
which volunteered during the Spanish-American war 
as Troop M of the Third United States Volunteer 
Cavalry of Rough Riders. This troop was in service 
seven months and was mustered out in September, 
1898, at the close of the war. 

Mr. McCormick is a member of the Billings Mid- 
land Club, is a republican, is affiliated with the 
Catholic Church, is a third degree Knight of Colum- 
bus, having membership in Billings Council, and 
is a member of the Billings Lodge of Elks. He also 
belongs to the Country Club, is treasurer and a di- 
rector of the Midland Empire Fair Association, and 
a director and former president of the Rosebud 
Lake Association. 

In 1905, at Missoula, he married Miss Frances J. 
Murphy. She died at Billings in 1915, the mother 
of one daughter, Eloise, born March 9, 1913. 



WILFORD J. JOHNSON. It is not usual to call a 
man a veteran while still in his early forties, but 
if any banker in Montana has claim to a veteran 
experience it is Wilford J. Johnson of Lewistown, 
president of the First National Bank. This is due 
to the fact that he began banking experience when 
most boys are in school, and has pursued the busi- 
ness uninterruptedly and wijh steadily advancing 
influence and responsibility for nearly thirty years. 

He was born at Sutton, Nebraska, November 10, 
1876, a son of Joseph W. and Mary A. (Bagley)f 
Johnson. His parents are both natives of Iowa 
and are still Hying. Joseph W. Johnson, who has 
lived retired since 1909, was for many years in 
the newspaper business in Nebraska, and also be- 
came prominent in politics and for eight or ten 
years held the position of state railway commis- 
sioner. He is a republican and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Wilford J. Johnson was the oldest of five sons. 
He attended public schools only to the age of four- 
teen, and since then has acquired a broad educa- 
tion without resort to the formal training of the 
schoolroom. In 1890, at the age of fourteen, he 
went to work for the State Bank of Curtis, Ne- 
braska, as a clerk. Such were his abilities and 
value that he was promoted to the post of cashier 
when only seventeen years of age. Doubtless he 
was the youngest cashier in the country at that 
time. Mr. Johnson came to Montana in 1897, when 
only twenty-one years of age, and was associated 
with the First National Bank of Butte as teller 
until 1907. In that year he removed to Lewistown, 
and served the First National Bank as cashier and 
since 1916 as president. He is vice president of the 
Montana State Bankers Association. Mr. Johnson 
is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner. September 21, 1905, he married Elizabeth 
G. Gaylord. She is a native of Connecticut. 

CHARLES O'DONNELL. During an active and en- 
ergetic career extending over a period of a quar- 
ter of a century Charles O'Donnell, of Billings, has 
forged steadily to the forefront among successful 
stockmen and ranchers, among whom he now holds 
pre-eminent position. His career has been one ex- 
emplifying self-made manhood, for he started his 
independent life with a self-gained education and 
without financial assistant or influential friends, and 
each step upward has been achieved only after the 
exercise of his own energy and resource. In addi- 
tion to being president of the Montana Live Stock 
and Loan Company, and connected with various 
other prominent enterprises he is a large landholder. 

Mr. O'Donnell was born at Saginaw, Michigan, 
April 6, 1874, a son of Daniel O'Donnell, who died 
at Midland, Michigan. His opportunities for at- 
tending school were not numerous in his youth, 
but he made the most of his opportunities, and 
through self-teaching, keen observation and much 
reading has become a well-educated man. He be- 
gan to be self-supporting when he was eighteen 
years of age. He came to Billings in 1890, and 
was employed by the Montana-Minnesota Land and 
Improvement Company for one year in building 
the irrigation ditch for that concern. Following 
this he rented a ranch, which started him upon 
his successful career, for he soon became a ranch 
owner and stockman and yearly has increased his 
holdings and extended the scope of his operations. 
His home ranch is situated fourteen miles east 
of Billings, and is a tract of 1,250 acres of irri- 
gated land. In addition to this he owns 10,000 acres 
in Yellowstone County and a half interest in a 
ranch of 1,700 acres in Custer County. As one of 
Montana's leading stockmen, in August, 1915, he 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



became the leading factor in the organization of 
the Montana Live Stock and Loan Company, a 
concern which buys and sells livestock and loans 
mdhey thereon in addition to shipping all over the 
United States. The offices of this company are situ- 
is also president of the Cold Springs Livestock 
ated at 2719 First Avenue, and the officials are: 
Charles O'Donnell, president; Wallace Huidokoper, 
vice president; Frank O'Donnell, secretary and 
treasurer; and F. B. Bair, manager. Mr. O'Donnell 
Corporation at Forsyth, Rosebud County, Montana, 
a ranch and livestock corporation capitalized at 
$150,000, in which Mr. O'Donnell owns one-quarter 
of the stock. This corporation feeds 8,000 sheep 
every winter, as well as horses and cattle, and has a 
3,i8o-acre ranch, of which 2,000 acres are irrigated. 

Mr. O'Donnell's pleasant modern residence is sit- 
uated at 24 Yellowstone Avenue, Billings. In his 
political views he is a democrat, .with independent 
inclinations. With his family he belongs to the 
Roman Catholic Church, and is a third degree knight 
and member of Billings Council No. 1259, Knights 
of Columbus. He is a life member of Billings 
Lodge No. 394, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and holds membership also in the Billings Club 
and the Billings Coif and Country Club. 

In November, 1897, Mr. O'Donnell was married 
at Billings to Miss Katherine Riordon, who was 
born at Boston, Massachusetts, and was brought 
as a babe to Billings, where she received a high 
school education. Mr. and Mrs. O'Donnell are the 
parents of two children : Charles Everett, born 
August 10, 1903, who is a senior in the Billings 
High School ; and Lawrence Donald, born Decem- 
ber 10, 1909, attending the parochial school. 

LEO G. ZEIDLER. The career of Leo G. Zeidler in 
Plentywood began with the start of the permanent 
builders and has continued prominent in its business 
life throughout its annals. 

Mr. Zeidler arrived in the community of Plenty- 
wood in 1909, and in August of that year became a 
clerk for the Johnson-Riba Hardware Company, but 
a few months later embarked in business for him- 
self as a hardware merchant and erected the first 
business house of the new town. The Zeidler store 
was for a short time a lonesome one, being the only 
one along the main business street, but in a short 
time it was joined by all of the old town, the parties 
moving over in the spring of 1910, including the 
Johnspn-Riba Hardware Company, the Riba Bank, 
the Riba Lumber Yard, Ring & Sommers Restaurant, 
the J. A. Ford mercantile business, Fishbeck & Jar- 
vis, the State Bank of Plentywood, the Chad. Robin- 
son Livery, the Peter Diedrick feed mill, the Anson 
Kranzer blacksmith, the C. S. Nelson Herald office, 
Albert Chapman, land commissioner, Severt Olson 
Hotel and George E. Bolster, postmaster and hotel 
proprietor. And by this time several other business 
enterprises had sprung up, including the Rogers 
Lumber Company, St. Anthony Lumber Company, 
Kullass Lumber Company, the Tanna & Best Mer- 
cantile Company, and with the coming of the railroad 
the Farmers Elevator and the Montana-Dakota Ele- 
vators were built. 

Mr. Zeidler in all these years has continued his 
hardware business, it having first opened its doors 
to the public in February, 1910, and he has come 
to be known as one of the old and reliable business 
men of the town. He has also taken an active inter- 
est in the agricultural development of the locality. 
In 1907 he filed on a homestead in McClain County, 
North Dakota, proved it up with the usual tempo- 
rary improvements and farmed the^ land while he 
was acquiring title. In 1913 he became identified 
with the farming interests of Sheridan County, lo- 



cating his claim near the county seat, and has become 
well known as a grain raiser. During the seven 
years he has planted crops here he has harvested 
something each year, although in 1919, his poorest 
year, his yield after cutting and threshing did not 
quite equal the seed wheat he sowed. He has now 
under cultivation and improvement 500 acres of the 
almost i,ooo-acre tract which he owns, and the im- 
provements which he has placed on the land include 
fencing and the granaries. 

Mr. Zeidler was born in Jefferson County, Wis- 
consin, November 3, 1882, and he spent his early 
life there. His father, John Zeidler, of Lake Mills, 
Wisconsin, is a shoemaker still at his bench at the 
advanced age of seventy-two years. He was also 
born in Jefferson County, and has spent his life 
there. His father, also named John, a German, was 
sent into Wisconsin as a pioneer and helped build 
the first wagon road from the Hill Church to Rock 
River. He was actively engaged in clearing away 
the timber and in time developed a farm in the 
woods, and he now lies buried in the soil of that 
locality. Four of his children reached years of 
maturity, namely : John ; Charles, who died in 1919, 
at Mallard, Iowa; Christian, of Rockwell, Iowa; 
and Mary, who became the wife of George Troeger 
and died at Jefferson in 1919. John Zeidler, the 
son, married Christina Troeger, whose father came 
from his native land of Germany to the United 
States and was first a farmer and afterward a tan- 
ner at Jefferson, Wisconsin. Mrs. Zeidler was born 
in the City of Jefferson in 1851, and was married 
February 24, 1870, the. following children being born 
of the union : Edward, who is a resident of Rock- 
ford, Illinois ; Erney and George, both living at Fort 
Atkinson, Wisconsin ; Leo G., the Plentywood mer- 
chant; and Elsa, the wife of Jesse Calvert, of Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. 

Leo G. Zeidler was nineteen years of age when 
he left home to begin life on his own account. Going 
to Rockwell, Iowa, he was employed by an uncle in 
a hardware store for seven years, there gaining his 
early knowledge of the business. From Iowa he re- 
moved to North Dakota, where he secured his claim, 
as above noted, and from there came to Montana 
and cast his lot with the embryo Town of Plenty- 
wood. His public service in an official capacity has 
been as clerk of the Plentywood School District, but 
his service to the community as a citizen has been 
of far greater importance. During the country's 
participation in the World war he served as a mem- 
ber of the Home Guards, took an active part in the 
drives made for funds for Red Cross and other 
auxiliary work, and has always been active in the 
public welfare. His political support has been given 
to the republican party, and he cast his first presi- 
dential vote for Colonel Roosevelt in Iowa in 1904. 

At Rockwell, Iowa, June 21, 1909, Mr. Zeidler 
married Miss Jennie A. Gibson, who was born in 
that city in October, 1885, a daughter of Robert and 
Susie (McDowell) Gibson, both of whom were born 
in Pennsylvania. The father is a Civil war vet- 
eran. He served with the Army of the Potomac 
as a member of the Sixty-second Pennsylvania In- 
fantry, and took part in the heavy fighting of the 
war in Virginia and other parts of the South. After 
the war he migrated westward, stopping for a time 
in Illinois, and finally locating in Rockwell, Iowa, 
where he was engaged in the poultry, produce and 
meat business until he retired from a business life. 
He has been active in Grand Army circles, is a re- 
publican in politics and is a member of the Methodist 
Church. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson have five daughters 
and one son, and Mrs. Zeidler is the only repre- 
sentative of the family in Montana. After grad- 
uating from the high school at Rockwell, Iowa, she 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



became a high school teacher there. She is now a 
member of the School Board of Plentywood, this 
being one of the first instances where women have 
acted in a like official capacity. She has served in 
the position two years, and one other woman and 
three men are her colleagues on the board. She 
exercises her right of franchise with the republican 
party, and her first presidential ballot was cast in 
1916. Three sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Zeidler, Gibson, Robert and Barr. 

LEWIS O. EVANS, of Butte, has for over twenty 
years been recognized as one of the ablest corpo- 
ration lawyers in Montana, and his ability, gained 
through a wide and varied experience in legal prac- 
tice, and particularly in connection with questions 
of corporation and mining law, is well recognized. 

Born at Utica, New York, on August 31, 1871, 
he came to Montana with his parents, Owen and 
Emily J. (Church) Evans, in 1883, and has since 
resided in this state. On coming to Montana his 
father, Owen Evans, engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits, and was prominently identified with the civic 
and business life of Helena for a number of years. 
His parents subsequently removed to Anaconda. 

He began his education in the public schools of 
his native city, and graduated from the Helena 
High School when fifteen years of age. For a short 
period he attended the Cazenovia Seminary in New 
York, and later, after his return to Helena, studied 
law with the firms of Word and Smith and Word, 
Smith and Word. He was admitted to the bar 
while employed in their office in 1894, and has re- 
cently rounded out a quarter of a century of active 
practice. 

In December, 1895, Mr. Evans removed to Butte 
and entered the office of John F. Forbis, one of 
the most eminent practitioners that Montana has pro- 
duced. A year later the partnership of Forbis 
and Evans was formed, and was engaged in gen- 
eral practice until the retirement of Mr. Forbis 
January i, 1910. This firm was constantly employed 
in handling important litigation and was prominent 
in what is known as the "Heinze- Amalgamated" 
litigation from early in the year 1897 until its set- 
tlement in 1906. This was probably the most ex- 
tensive and bitterly fought litigation recorded in 
legal history. Most of Mr. Evans' practice has 
been devoted to the business of many of the large 
corporations which have their headquarters at Butte, 
and which in 1910 were merged into the Anaconda 
Copper Mining Company. In 1912 he became, and 
has since been, chief counsel for that company. He 
is also chief counsel for the Montana Power Com- 
pany and its subsidiary companies, and other cor- 
porations of less magnitude. 

Mr. Evans has taken an important part in the 
trials of many causes celebre in Montana, among 
them the "Michael Devitt," "Pennsylvania/' "Drum 
Lummon," "Larkin" and "Minnie Healy" mining 
cases. Mr. C. F. Kelley and Mr. Evans handled 
with entire success for the mining companies the 
celebrated "Smoke Case" between the farmers of 
the Deer Lodge Valley and the Anaconda Copper 
Mining Company and Washoe Copper Company. 

Mr. Evans is a member of the Montana State 
Bar Association and of the Silver Bow Bar Asso- 
ciation, and has served as president of the latter 
organization. 

In politics Mr. Evans is and at all times has been 
an ardent republican. He is a member of Silver 
Bow Lodge No. 48, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and Bagdad Temple of the Mystic Shrine, 
and other Masonic organizations, the Butte Lodge 



of Elks, Rocky Mountain Club of New York, the 
Montana Club, and the Silver Bow lub of Butte, 
and served three terms as president of the Silver 
Bow Club. He has at all times taken an active part 
in civic and other matters of community interest. 
In November, 1903, he married at Butte Miss 
Martha Nichols, daughter of Judge Erastus A. and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Warren) Nichols. Her father was 
for many years identified with the business life of 
Butte and later removed to Missoula. Mr. and Mrs. 
Evans have three children: Lewis Nichols, born 
October 12, 1904, Richard Orvis, born August 22, 
1907, and Elizabeth Warren, born May 2, 1913. 

JAMES EUGENE LANE is a man of exceptional busi- 
ness capacity, possessing a great deal of driving 
power in business and in everything he undertakes, 
and for a number of years has held vital and sig- 
nificant relations with the community of Lewistown. 
He is head of the Montana Lumber Company, which 
has nineteen places of business in the state. Mr. 
Lane held the rank of major in the American Red 
Cross overseas service during the late war. 

He was born at Whitehall, Illinois, September 8, 
1871, a son of James S. and Nancy J. (Baker) Lane. 
His father was a native of Wisconsin and his mother 
of Kentucky. His mother is still living at the age 
of eighty-one. James S. Lane received his early 
education in Wisconsin, and as a young man en- 
listed at the beginning of the Civil war and served 
in many battles and campaigns until the close. After 
the war he located at Whitehall, Illinois, and engaged 
in farming and stock raising until his death in 1872. 
He was a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public and a republican in politics. 

James E. Lane was educated in Illinois and Ne- 
braska, and in early life learned the business of car- 
penter and millwright. He came to Montana in the 
spring of 1893. His first location was at Billings. 
Later he was engaged in building the Jaw Bone 
Railway as superintendent of building and construc- 
tion under Richard Harlow from 1897 to 1900. They 
built the road from Summit to Harlowton. Sub- 
sequently Mr. Lane resumed the building and con- 
tracting business at Martinsdale, Two Dot and Har- 
lowton. He organized and operated the Midlen Coal 
and Lumber Company until 1903, when he sold out 
and then established his home at Lewistown. Here 
he organized the Montana Lumber Company, and 
remained as its general manager until 1909, since 
which date he has been president. This is one of 
the largest retail lumber concerns in the State of 
Montana. He is also director of the Bank of Fergus 
County, president of the Montana Home Building 
Company, and vice president of the Lewistown Brick 
and Tile Company. In February, 1919, a deal was 
consummated whereby the Montana Hardware Com- 
pany was consolidated with the Montana Lumber 
Company, and Mr. Lane is now the directing head 
of the newly merged concern. He was elected a 
member of the State Senate in 1914, and served one 
term of four years. 

In May, 1917, Mr. Lane assumed some heavy re- 
sponsibilities in the local and state organization of 
the American Red Cross. He took the post of or- 
ganizer and chairman of the Fergus County Chapter 
and as a member of the state executive board. Not 
content with what he could do for the organization 
in this country, he enlisted for the overseas work 
in May, 1918, and in June of the same year was 
sent to France. His headquarters were at Paris, 
where he was chief of hospital supplies with the 
rank of major. On different occasions he visited ' 
the front, and saw the great battlegrounds of the 
Argonne Forest and St. Mihiel and other points 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



under actual war conditions. He .was on leave of 
absence at Paris when the armistice was signed 
and soon afterward he returned home. All this 
service was given without a cent of remuneration. 

Mr. Lane is a charter member of the Judith Club 
and is affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 34, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Lewistown 
Chapter No. 15, Royal Arch Masons, Lewistown 
Commandery No. 14, Knights Templar, with the 
Scottish Rite Consistory and with Algeria Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine at Helena. He is a democrat 
in politics. 

May 17, 1900, Mr. Lane married Rose Wiley. 
She was born near Peoria, Illinois. They have two 
daughters: Edith, wife of D. W. Auenbaugh, liv- 
ing in California; and Newell, wife of Capt. F. M. 
Ha.wks, stationed at San Antonio, Texas. 

HUNTKR L. RICHMOND, a resident of Montana since 
1893, is vice president of the First Mortgage Loan 
Company of Great Falls. 

He ca'me to Montana when a child, having heen 
born on his father's farm in Macon County, Mis- 
souri. June 30, 1888. His father, the late Samuel 
T. Richmond, was born in Missouri, where he fol- 
lowed farming and stock raising, and in 1893 
brought his family to Montana, settling in Cascade 
County. Here he engaged in ranching on a large 
scale, owning about 700 acres of land. He special- 
ized in the better grades of livestock, running from 
50 to 150 head of cattle and breeding Shire and 
Percheron horses. In 1911 he retired, and his death 
occurred in March, 1914, at the age of fifty-two. 
He was several times honored with township offices 
and was a democrat, a Presbyterian and a member 
of the Woodmen of the World. Samuel T. Rich- 
mond married Mollie M. Gorham, also a native of 
Missouri, and who had come to Montana at the 
age of fourteen with her father, R. T. Gorham, who 
was a pioneer miner in this state. Mrs. Samuel 
Richmond is still living at the age of fifty-nine. 
She was the mother of seven children, Hunter L. 
being the third, and three daughters and two sons 
still survive. 

Hunter L. Richmond acquired his early education 
in the schools of Great Falls and at Bird Creek in 
Cascade County, and lived on his father's farm until 
he was seventeen. He then clerked for a time in 
a clothing store at Great Falls,, following which he 
proved up a homestead in Teton County. In 1914 
he became associated with the First Mortgage Loan 
Company of Great Falls, and since 1918 has held 
the post of vice president in that business. In the 
fall of 1919 he helped organize the Northern Na- 
tional Bank of Great Falls. Mr. Richmond is a 
democrat and is affiliated with the Knights of Co- 
lumbus. 

February 15, 1912, he married Mary Ellen Ryan. 
They have three children, Hunter E., Virginia Ann 
and Helen Marie. 

FRANCIS K. ARMSTRONG, for. many years an emi- 
nent figure in the Montana territorial and state bar, 
former judge of the Ninth Judicial Circuit, has been 
a resident of Bozeman forty years, and since retiring 
from the bench has given up law practice and con- 
cerns himself only with some incidental public duties 
and the handling of his extensive ranch properties. 

Judge Armstrong was born at Rockford in Surry 
County, North Carolina, March 6, 1849. His father, 
Francis K. Armstrong, Sr., was born in the same 
county March 28, 1802, and was prominent as a 
planter, hotel man and merchant until some financial 
disasters overtook him. A short time before the out- 
break of the Civil war he left North Carolina and 
removed his family to St. Joseph, Missouri, and 



also bought land at Iowa Point in Northeastern Kan- 
sas. His home was in Doniphan County, Kansas, but 
he died while on a business trip in Missouri in the, 
fall of 1861. In North Carolina he served as clerk 
in the District Court, and several terms represented 
Surry County in the Legislature. In the early days 
he was a whig. He was also a member of the 
Masonic fraternity and was a colonel of the militia 
in North Carolina. In Iredell County he married 
Miss Jerusha Belt, who was born in Iredell County, 
near Statesville, North Carolina, in 1807, and died 
in Doniphan County, Kansas, in 1891. They were 
the parents of seven children : Thomas J., who 
was a farmer and spent his last years employed in 
a bank at Highland, Kansas, where he died at the 
age of seventy-two ; Elizabeth, who died near St. 
Joseph, Missouri, at the age of thirty-five; Eliza, 
who died at the age of fourteen; Mary, who died at 
Butte, Montana, aged sixty-nine; Sarah, wife of 
James E. Martin, president cf the National Bank 
of Gallatin Valley at Bozeman; Rebecca, living at 
Atchison, Kansas, widow of Junius E. Moore, who 
was a merchant ; and Judge Francis K. 

Judge Armstrong received his early training in the 
rural schools of his native county in North Carolina, 
also attended school in Doniphan County, Kansas. 
He was a student in Highland University at High- 
land, Kansas, until taken ill during his senior year. 
Some years later, when he received his law degree, 
Highland University conferred upon him the Master 
of Arts degree as an appropriate recognition of the 
work he had all but completed. He began the study 
of law at Atchison, Kansas, under Gen. W. W. 
Guthrie and attended the law school of the Uni- 
versity of Missouri at Columbia, where he graduated 
LL. B. in 1875. Judge Armstrong is a Phi Beta 
Kappa, an honorary college fraternity to which only 
men and women of exceptional scholarship records 
are eligible. Judge Armstrong was admitted to the 
bar at St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1875, remained there 
six months, and then practiced in Doniphan County, 
Kansas, at Troy, with Judge Webb until 1879. He 
first entered politics in 1876 as democratic candidate 
for the office of county attorney. That was the year 
of the famous Hayes-Tilden national campaign. 
Doniphan County, Kansas, was strongly republican, 
gave Hayes a majority of 800 over Tilden, but 
on account of his popularity, recognized ability and 
vigorous election campaign, Judge Armstrong was 
chosen bv a substantial majority. 

The following extract from the Troy Bulletin 
of Doniphan County, is an expression of the esteem 
in which Judge Armstrong was held on leaving 
there : "F. K. Armstrong, Esq., has closed his of- 
ficial course with the people of Doniphan County 
and steps down and out. It is but due him as a 
man and citizen to say that he has shown by his 
conduct for the past two years as a public official 
that he has been worthy the confidence and trust 
given him by the pepple. Doniphan County never 
had a more capable or efficient county attorney and 
the court records will stand proof of the assertion. 
He is a young man yet, but he is a thoroughly posted 
lawyer was while reading and is yet a close stu- 
dent. Having read with one of the ablest lawyers 
in the state and graduated at law school with high 
honors, he has thoroughly prepared himself for the 
practice of his profession. Added to this he is a 
young man of strict honesty, excellent moral char- 
acter, and such genial social qualities that all who 
know him at once become his friends. Life to him 
certainly should be encouraging, and now that we 
are to lose him as a citizen from our midst we 
have no doubt but the pepple of the whole county 
will unite with the Bulletin in tendering him their 



warmest regards for his future success and wel- 
fare, and we trust that the mountain home he seeks 
in Montana will be fully up to his expectations and 
that he may soon take that position in his profes- 
sion and society there that he has so deservedly 
won here. He expects to leave for Montana the 
coming week." 

Soon after the close of his term as county attorney 
he came to Bozeman in 1879 and practiced with 
Col. Ira Pierce until the death of Colonel Pierce, 
then with Judge L. A. Luce and later with Charles 
S. Hartman. Montana was a territory when Judge 
Armstrong located at Bozeman. In the fall of 
1880 he was elected district attorney for the First 
District, which embraced all of Southern Montana 
from Dillon to Glendive. There were only three 
districts in the state at this time. In the fall of 
1884 he was elected a member of the Territorial 
Council, representing Gallatin County, and was 
chosen president of the council. Two years later 
he was elected a member of the Lower House and 
was speaker of the House. In 1891 upon the crea- 
tion of the Ninth Judicial Circuit, Governor Joseph 
K. Toole appointed Judge Armstrong as the first 
incumbent of the office of judge, and he was regu- 
larly elected to that office in 1904 and again in 
1908. 

Upon retiring from the bench in 1913 Judge Arm- 
strong made no effort to resume his law practice. 
He was formerly a member of the County and 
State and American Bar associations. In 1904 he 
was one of the organizers of the National Bank 
of Gallatin Valley, and is still a director and stock- 
holder. He owns a number of ranches in Gallatin 
County, aggregating about 5,ooo acres. He also 
has six dwelling houses in the city and his own 
home is at 302 South Central Avenue. 

Soon after leaving the bench Governor Norris 
appointed Judge Armstrong a member of the com- 
mission for the purchase of the Warm Springs 
property in Deer Lodge County, Montana. He was 
chairman of the commission and handled the ne- 
gotiations by which that property was transferred 
to the state. On this ground are now located the 
buildings of the state insane asylum. The trans- 
action was one involving over $600,000. 

Judge Armstrong has always been a stanch demo- 
crat in politics. He is a citizen of irreproachable 
character and is still regarded as one of the strong 
men upon whom the state can rely when it needs 
the services of counsellors. He is affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity and is a member of Boze- 
man Lodge No. 463 of the Elks. 

December 27, 1881, at Bozeman, Judge Arm- 
strong married Miss Lora Lamme, a native of St. 
Joseph, Missouri, and a daughter of Dr. A. and 
Elizabeth J> (Oliver) Lamme. Her father came 
to Montana about the close of the Civil war, was 
an able physician, but having little to do in a pro- 
fessional capacity he took up merchandising and 
at the time of his death was one of the chief mer- 
chants of Montana. Judge and Mrs. Armstrong 
have had three daughters. Mabel died at the age 
of six years. Lena is a graduate of the LaSelle 
Seminary near Boston, Massachusetts, and is the 
wife of R. E. Brown, member of the Brown Broth- 
ers Lumber Company at Helena, their home being 
at Bozeman. Edith, who is a graduate of the Na- 
tional Park Seminary at Washington, D. C, is the 
wife of R. B. Oliver, of Bozeman. Mr. Oliver 'is 
associated with Judge Armstrong in managing the 
latter's ranch properties and was formerly .a travel- 
ing salesman for the Deer-Weber Company. 



BURTON KENDALL WHEELER, who became United 
States attorney for the District of Montana on 
October 30, 1913, began the practice of law in 1906. 
Throughout the period of the World war he was 
the official representative of the Federal Depart- 
ment of Justice in Montana. 

Mr. Wheeler was born at Hudson, Massachu- 
setts, February 27, 1882, a son of Asa L. and Mary 
Elizabeth (Tyler) Wheeler. His people have been 
in Massachusetts for several generations. The 
Wheelers were Quakers and established their home 
at Sudbury, Massachusetts, before the Revolution- 
ary war. The Tylers were English people, also early 
settlers in Massachusetts. The mother of Mary 
Elizabeth Tyler was a Kendall. 

Burton Kendall Wheeler attended the public 
schools of his native town, graduating from the 
Hudson High School in 1900, and for some time 
was employed in office work at Boston. He re- 
ceived his law degree from the University of Mich- 
igan with the class of 1905, and soon afterward came 
to Montana and began practice at Butte on January 
15, 1906. His abilities soon procured for him a fa- 
vorable position in the local bar and he also became 
interested in politics, being elected and serving as 
a member of the Twelfth Legislature. He was 
democratic candidate for attorney general in the 
convention at Great Falls, and on the seventh bal- 
lot was defeated by Daniel M. Kelley by the narrow 
margin of ij4 votes. His nomination for United 
States attorney for Montana was among the first 
sent to the Senate by President Wilson. 

Mr. Wheeler is the owner of the Wheeler Block 
in Butte. He is a director in the Deaconess Hos- 
pital, is a member of the Masonic Order and Mystic 
Shrine, the Silver Bow Club, is a Methodist, and 
a member of the Montana Bar Association. 

At Albany, Illinois, September 7, 1907, he mar- 
ried Miss Lulu M. White, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth White. Mrs. Wheeler grew up on a farm 
in Illinois, graduated from the Fulton Normal 
School of that state, and studied music in Oberlin 
College Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio. For sev- 
eral years before her marriage she was a teacher 
of music in the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wheeler have five children : John Leonard, Eliza- 
beth Hale, Edward Kendall, Francis L. and Richard. 

JAMES M. WELDON. Now living retired at Lewis- 
town, James M. Weldon is one of the few sur- 
vivors among those who saw and knew Montana 
in the early and romantic days of the '6os. His 
name belongs with that notable list, greatly abbre- 
viated by time and circumstance, of the pioneers 
of 1862. The following is only a brief sketch of 
his career, but it suggests many vital points at which 
his own life has come in touch with Montana. 

He was born at Addison, Steuben County, New 
York, September 4, 1832. At the age of twenty- 
one, in 1853 he made the first stage of his migra- 
tions which eventually brought him nearly across 
the continent. For about nine years he lived at 
Mazomanie in Dane County, Wisconsin, some 
twenty-five miles from the capital of the state at 
Madison. The date of his eventful first journey 
to Montana was May 4, 1862, when he joined a 
party comprising eleven teams for the purpose of 
crossing the plains to Florence, Idaho. They drove 
horses, making rapid progress, traveling from 
twenty to thirty miles, and occasionally forty miles 
a day. The Missouri River was crossed at Coun- 
cil Bluffs and Omaha, and thence the route fol- 
lowed the North Platte to Fort Laramie, thence 
to Sweetwater and South Pass, by Fort Bridger and 
Soda Springs, crossing Snake River at old Fort 



8 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Hall. From there they went on to Salmon City, 
Idaho. At Birch Creek some 200 wagons were 
encamped, further progress being barred by the 
report that wagons could not get through. Many 
of the people in this camp were from Pike's Peak 
and many states. John Jacobs volunteered to lead 
the party through to the Mullan Trail and to Walla 
Walla, and the Weldon party went on with Jacobs, 
striking the Mullan Trail at Deer Lodge. At that 
time there was no one at Deer Lodge but John 
Grant, John Powell, for whom the county and 
mountain have since been named, and some half 
breeds. John Grant had quite a herd of cattle and 
horses. He told the party if they wanted fresh 
meat to kill a beef "in welcome," but as there was 
plenty of fish and game the invitation -was not ac- 
cepted. 

August i, 1862, the day after their arrival at Deer 
Lodge, the party went down to Gold Creek, eighteen 
miles below, reaching there at noon. A trading 
store was kept there by James and Granville Stuart, 
historic characters in Montana. On August 2d they 
prospected in Pioneer Gulch, sinking a hole some 
three feet in depth ; the water came in and they 
only got some "colors" which a couple of forty- 
niners from California said was "no good," and 
advised them to go on to something better. August 
3rd the journey was resumed, passing through Hell 
Gate Canyon. About half the party went by way 
of the Lolo Trail to Elk City, Idaho, while Mr. 
Weldon and the rest followed the Mullan Trail to 
Walla Walla, where they arrived August 25, 1862. 

Mr. Weldon spent about two months in the Blue 
Mountains, most of the time making shingles at 
$10 a 1,000. He could easily make 1,000 or more 
per day, and he made the shingles used for the 
roof of the Wells Fargo & Company Express 
office. In October, with six or seven others, he 
started back with saddle and pack horses for Boise. 
At Auburn, having lost the saddle and pack horses, 
they purchased two yoke of broncho steers and a 
wagon. A man soon joined them with a yoke of 
"broke" steers, which were put on as leaders, and 
thus equipped they went on to the Payette River 
and Boise Basin. The road being very rough they 
dropped the front wheels and made a cart with 
heavy tongue. Meeting some packers, they asked 
about the road ahead and were told that "if you 
are pilgrims you can go clear in, if not, only within 
ten miles." They "went in" to Boise Basin and to 
Idaho City. At the latter place Mr. Weldon met 
the late Clarence M. Goodell and his father. The 
latter was splitting shingles and the son was pil- 
ing them. This was about December 16, 1862. Mr. 
Weldon spent three years around Idaho City, 
Placerville, Centerville, Pioneer and Hoggem. This 
latter place received its name from the fact that 
some of the early miners tried to "hog" all the best 
claims. 

Mr. Weldon did more or less placer mining for 
three years, coming back to Deer Lodge in 1865. 
On the trip over he met W. A. Clark. Both men 
were horseback. Mr. Clark asked the price of to- 
bacco and was told it was one dollar per pound. 
It is a matter of history that Mr. Clark bought 
all the tobacco he could get at a dollar a pound 
and more after the price was raised on him. He 
freighted it over into Montana and sold it for six 
or seven dollars per pound. 

Then followed a succession of pioneer experiences 
for Mr. Weldon. The ranch he took up in Deer 
Lodge Valley he sold, and in 1866 moved to Galla- 
tin Valley, and after being there a while was eaten 
out by grasshoppers. In 1867 he went to Lemhi, 
Idaho; in 1868 to Sweetwater, Wyoming; and in 



1869 to Green River, being there when the Union 
Pacific Railroad was built. After some eight or 
nine years of eventful experience he returned to 
Wisconsin and Northern Michigan, and for eleven 
years was identified with the great lumber industry. 
Mr. Weldon has been a permanent resident of 
Montana since 1882. His first location was at Fort 
Maginnis, and he took up a ranch on the East Fork 
of Spring Creek, about twelve miles from Lewis- 
town, and was busily engaged in ranching until he 
sold his place in 1912 and made his home in Lewis- 
town. 

In 1871 Mr. Weldon married for his first wife 
Susan Dyke. On October 15, 1878, ne married 
Mrs. Rosetta (Elsworth) Downing. By the lat- 
ter marriage he has one daughter, Marian E., who 
is the wife of Ray S. Conger, of Lewistown. Mr. 
Conger is a son of Judge Everton J. Conger, an 
early member of the bench and bar of Montana 
and now a resident of Honolulu. 

Mr. Weldon recalls a number of experiences 
connected with his pioneer journey to the great 
Northwest. A few of these incidents are repeated. 
The ferry across Snake River used by the Wel- 
don party had been in operation only a few days. 
Some 200 wagons had congregated awaiting an 
opportunity to cross. An effort had been made 
without success to stretch a hemp cable across the 
river. One party, under the leadership of Judge 
M. H. Lott, had contained a man of considerable 
experience in that line. Judge Lott informed the 
proprietor of the ferry that he had a man who 
could fix the cable for them. They seemed re- 
luctant to avail themselves of his services. After 
repeated failures they hunted up the judge and 
his man and after some negotiations the latter 
was asked how much he would charge. That mat- 
ter, it was decided, should be determined by Mr. 
Lott. Judge Lott said when the cable was placed 
right his party was to be taken over first and free 
of charge. This proposition was accepted, the 
cable was adjusted and the Lott party inaugurated 
the successful operation of the ferry. 

After passing through Hell Gate, Mr. Weldon 
recalls the party went on to French Town, com* 
posed of Canadian French and half breeds. The 
firm of Higgins & Worden kept a trading post 
at Hell Gate, and at Fort Owen, now Stevens- 
ville, the principal trader was Maj. John Owen. 
At French Town one of the wagons broke down, 
and a delay was occasioned until a new axle tree 
could be made 6f green fir. The rest of the party 
went on, passing several good camping places ; 
finally night coming on they found themselves in 
heavy timber, and then arose a discussion whether 
they should advance or turn back. Two going 
ahead a short distance found a trail turning off 
to a fine park with grass and water, making an 
excellent camping place. Next day most of the 
party went on, but Mr. Weldon and companion 
stayed to wait the coming of the delayed wagon 
and also rest their horses and air their blankets. 
Soon a mounted Indian appeared, who watched 
them a few moments and disappeared. This 
alarmed the two men and they decided at once to 
break camp and follow the advance party. While they 
were hitching to the wagon the Indian reappeared 
and tendered them a mess of ripe wild plums. The 
plums were accepted and in return they gave the 
visitor some bread, but still they thought it best 
to move on lest they fall into some trap. After 
traveling all day they did not catch up with the 
advance party, so they camped alone. The follow- 
ing day they caught up with those ahead and the 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



party with the repaired wagon also reunited with 
them. 

The journey brought them near the Coeur d'Alene 
Mission, the principal building there having been 
erected without a nail, nothing but wooden pegs 
to hold the timbers together. The Indians seemed 
friendly and wanted the whites to join in friendly 
sports. First they had a wrestling match. One 
of the whites, John Bainbridge, finally consented 
to wrestle with a husky Indian and was thrown 
by the latter. There was only the one fall. The 
Indian was ready for other challengers but none 
cared to enter the list. Then a horse race was 
arranged. A horse for which Mr. Weldon had 
"traded" at French Town, and ridden by Mr. Wei- 
don's partner, won the race. The partner, John 
Argell, was quite full of fun, a good singer, and 
having won the horse race was considered quite a 
hero. Later he won a foot race. He was now a 
great favorite with the Indians, who wanted him 
to stay with them, offering him a lot of furs and 
his choice of two comely squaws offers that were 
not accepted. While at the Mission about 5,000 
bushels of grain were cut with knives and threshed 
with flails. 

Mr. Weldon recalls several instances of the 
friendly attitude of the northwestern Indians. 
When their party reached the Spokane River he 
and a companion thought they would fish along 
the stream. The trail seemed to follow down the 
river, and they went along thinking they would 
come to a ferry. They soon came to where the 
whites had left the road and taken to the river. 
The water was quite wide and rather swift. Mr. 
Weldon cut a stout stick of good length and size 
he could handle and successfully crossed. His 
companion, though able to swim, followed him 
only with great reluctance. Soon as they pro- 
ceeded towards the camp they met an Indian on 
horseback. Riding up to Mr. Weldon he turned 
his horse around and invited him to ride behind. 
He had probably seen the two men at the ford 
and singled out Mr. Weldon as the more aggres- 
sive of the two. Mr. Wfldon accepted the in- 
vitation, riding into camp, while his companion 
walked. There they found that the men with the 
wagons had met this Indian at the ford and for a 
present of tobacco he had piloted them over the 
river, thus saving quite a bill for ferrying a few 
miles below,. 

FRANK B. CONNELLY, one of the oldest and solid- 
est business men of Billings, has been a resident of 
that city over thirty years, coming here after an 
experience in the wholesale hardware business in 
Chicago. He has used his early training and his 
ability to promote and build up one of the largest 
wholesale establishments in the Northwest, con- 
ducted under the title of F. B. Connelly Company, of 
which he is sole owner. 

Mr. Connelly, who is also a member of the Mon- 
tana State Senate, was born at Middletown, k>wa, 
September 5, 1862. His great-grandfather Connelly 
came from the north of Ireland to Pennsylvania in 
colonial times. His father, Samuel J. Connelly, 
who was born at Mingo, near Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1831, was reared and married at Mingo, 
was a graduate of Washington College in South- 
western Pennsylvania, and soon after marriage 
moved to Middletown, Iowa, and in 1866 settled 
at Galva, Illinois. He spent two years as a farmer 
there and then moved to Toulon, Illinois, where he 
was in the livestock and butchering business. He 
died at Galva in 1904. During the Civil war he 
served as a member of the State Guards, was a 



republican always and an active member of the 
Presbyterian Church. Fraternally he was affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Samuel J. Connelly married Mary Johnson, who 
was born near Pittsburg in 1833 and died at Mid- 
dletown, Iowa, in 1865. She was the mother of five 
children, Frank B. being the youngest. The oldest, 
Alice Anna, lives at Galesburg, Illinois, widow of 
George P. Flint, who was a farmer and stock 
shipper. Thomas J. died in September, 1915, at his 
farm twelve miles west of Billings. F. L. Connelly 
was in the insurance business and died at Lewis, 
Iowa, in 1913. William, the other child, died in 
infancy. Samuel J. Connelly married for his second 
wife Eliza J. Kennedy, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania and died near Pittsburg. She was the mother 
of two children, one of whom died in infancy. Her 
surviving daughter is Mrs. Nannie M. Flannigan, 
wife of a carpenter and building contractor at San 
Diego, California. 

Frank B. Connelly acquired his education at 
Toulon, Illinois, leaving high school at the age of 
eighteen. In the meantime he had learned the trade 
of cheese maker. When nineteen years old he went 
v to Chicago and for four years was connected with 
one of the large wholesale hardware firms of that 
city and acquired a thorough knowledge of the busi- 
ness in every detail. 

On coming to Montana in 188- Mr. Connelly be- 
came connected with the hardware and implement 
house of Babcock & Miles at Billings. In 1894 the 
business was changed to the A. L. Babcock Hard- 
ware Company and Mr. Connelly was one of the 
active officials of the concern until August I, 1904. 
He served as secretary and manager. During 1904 
he was cashier of the Yellowstone National Bank, 
but in August of that year started his independent 
enterprise as a wholesale implement dealer. The 
business has since been known as the F. B. Connelly 
Company. This company is the distributing agency 
for some of the best known automobile and ma- 
chinery houses in America. They handle the Holt 
Caterpillar engines and Combined Harvester for 
Montana and Wyoming, the Austin and Western 
lines of contractors and road building machinery 
the Marion Steam Shovel Company wares, the Gar- 
ford motor trucks and Troy trailers, the Ford cars 
and trucks for Billings and vicinity, and the Ford- 
son tractor. The plant and offices of the F. B. Con- 
nelly Company are at 423 North Broadway. 

It is a familiar truth that the business man is 
often the most useful citizen of any community. 
Mr. Connelly was twice elected an alderman in 
Billings. He was elected to serve as a member of 
the House of Representatives during the eleventh 
session in 1909, and during that session was a mem- 
ber of the ways and means, banks and banking, 
towns and counties committees, and he introduced a 
bill requiring the railroads to maintain a bulletin at 
the depots for the reporting of the arrivals and 
departures of trains. He was also instrumental in 
amending the drainage law of that session. Mr. 
Connelly was elected a member of the State Senate 
in November, 1918, and during the 1919 session was 
chairman of the compensation committee in the 
Senate, chairman of the joint compensation commit- 
tee, and a member of the finance and claims, insur- 
ance and highways committees. The bill providing 
for the location of a State Normal School at Bil- 
lings was one that received his active and special 
support. Mr. Connelly, at his own expense, circu- 
lated the petition among the members of the House 
and the Senate to the governor to call an extra 
session to devise ways and means to use Montana 
stone instead of Indiana limestone in public building 



10 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



construction in Montana. The session was called 
and Mr. Connelly was successful in carrying the 
measure through. He was a member of the Re- 
publican National Convention that nominated Wil- 
liam H. Taft for president. 

Mr. Connelly is a republican in politics. He is 
affiliated with Ashlar Lodge of Masons, Billings 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, Billings Commandery, 
Knights Templar, Billings Consistory of the Scottish 
Rite, and Bagdad Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Butte. He is a charter member of Billings Lodge 
of Elks and was the third exalted ruler of the lodge. 
'He has been prominent in the Billings Midland 
Club, which incorporates the Chamber of Commerce, 
serving as president of the latter body in 1918, and 
as president of the Midland Club in 1919. In every 
way possible Mr. Connelly has exerted his influence 
in behalf of war auxiliary movements, and is presi- 
dent of the War Chest Fund of Billings. One of 
his sons was in the war as an officer. 

Mr. Connelly married at Burke, Wisconsin, De- 
cember i, 1885, Miss Flora E. Hart, a daughter of 
Rev. J. C. and Faithful (Holmes) Hart, both now 
deceased. Her father was a Baptist minister. The 
living children of Mr. and Mrs. Connelly are noted 
briefly as follows : Frank G., who received a high 
school education at Billings and is associated with 
his father in business; Lieutenant Kenneth A., who 
attended high school and was a student in Beaver 
Dam Academy at Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, when 
the war came on, and went with the National Army 
to France, serving with the rank of lieutenant until 
mustered out in February, 1919, and is now con- 
nected with his father's business ; Lenpra D., a 
graduate of the Polytechnic Institute at Billings and 
wife of Homer L. Guiler, connected with the F. B. 
Connelly Company ; Glenn Hart, a student in the 
Billings High School ; and Dean, a grammar school 
pupil. 

GEORGE W. EASTMAN. It is not from hearsay 
evidence but from actual experience that George 
W. Eastman, now living retired at Lewistown, can 
speak of the life and affairs of Montana over forty 
years ago. He was a freighter, stockman, buffalo 
hunter, miner, and prospector and public official in 
the early days of the state, and was almost in daily 
contact with men good and bad, conditions favor- 
able and adverse. 

Mr. Eastman has lived much of his life on the 
western frontier. He was born at Calais, Maine, 
April 19, 1855, a son of John and Mary A. (Han- 
son) Eastman. His father was a native of East- 
port, Maine, and his mother of St. Andrews, New 
Brunswick. About the close of the Civil war the 
Eastman family came west to Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota. John Eastman was a lumberman, an indus- 
try to which he was trained in Maine. He was 
employed as a timber cruiser and a contractor in 
getting out logs, and followed that industry both 
in Minnesota and Wisconsin. He died in Min- 
neapolis at the age of sixty-four, and his wife 
passed away at the same age. George W. East- 
man was the sixth of twelve children, eight of 
whom are still living. His father was a whig and 
republican and a member of the Methodist Church. 

George W. Eastman received his early educa- 
tion in Maine, later attended school in Minnesota, 
and acquired a practical knowledge of the lumber 
business in the great woods of the Northwest, at 
first under his father and then as an employe of 
the saw milling firm of Eastman, Bovee & DeLait. 
For several years he was employed as an edger 
in a sawmill. 

He and his brother formed a partnership and 
on April 18, 1877, left Minneapolis by rail for Bis- 



marck, Dakota, and thence by the steamer Batche- 
lor came up the Missouri River to Fort Benton and 
thence proceeded up the Yellowstone twenty miles. 
There they took a contract cutting cordwood for 
the Government. August 2, 1877, they reached Miles 
City, Montana, where they contracted with Smith 
& O'Toole in getting out timber to build the Post 
Sutler Building for the Government. The trees 
were cut and hewed from eight to sixteen miles 
above Miles City and then floated down the river 
to that point. Some 8,000 or 9,000 logs were han- 
dled by the Eastman brothers. In the fall of 1877 
Mr. Eastman began freighting between Bismarck 
and Miles City. The summer of the following 
year he helped put up hay for the Government and 
in the fall of that year began hunting buffalo. 
These buffalo hunts were conducted chiefly for the 
hides. During the fall he also prospected as a 
miner and in the winter of 1879 engaged in the 
stampede to the Panther Mountains. During the 
seasons he continued hunting buffalo until Novem- 
ber 9, 1882, when he returned to Miles City and 
the following spring came overland to that por- 
tion of Meagher County that is now Fergus Coun- 
ty. He was thus one of the pioneers of Fergus 
County, He contracted with the Collar Mining 
Company at Maiden to get out 600 cords of wood, 
and also did teaming for that company. During 
the summer of 1885 Mr. Eastman was placer min- 
ing in the Little Rockies for Davis & Hamilton. 
Along about that time he pre-empted land on Warm 
Spring Creek and took up a homestead and desert 
claim, and that brought him to the business which 
he followed successfully for over twenty years, 
stock raising and farming. Mr. Eastman sold his 
ranch in 1912 and then located near Lewistown, 
where he was in the grocery business until 1916, at 
which time he formally retired from business re- 
sponsibilities. 

Mr. Eastman was brought into contact with the 
public affairs of this city by his appointment as 
deputy sheriff of Miles City in 1882. He served 
a short time and then resigned. He and his brother 
had much experience *vith the criminal element of 
lost over $18,000 in stock, buffalo hides and other 
material, taken from them by the Indians and 
white outlaws. One time he made a trip to the 
head of Powder River and over it into the Black 
Hills, returning by way of Fort Custer and at 
Sheridan had a brush with the Indians, but failed 
to regain any of his lost stock. It is the testi- 
mony of Mr. Eastman that the bad white men 
were much more dangerous than the Indians, and 
most of the trouble was caused by white outlaws, 
who frequently incited the Indians to mischief, 
knowing that the blame could be easily shifted to 
the Red Men. Mr. Eastman has been through much 
hard and dangerous experience, but has retained 
his kindness of heart through all, and enjoys a 
host of friends in many parts of the state. In 
politics he has affiliated with the republican party. 

Ott April iq, 1902, Mr. Eastman married Minnie 
A. Maciles. She died November 4, 1902. On March 
24, 1008, he married Mary A. Dye. 

WILLIAM BERKIN. Recently a Montana paper 
published an interesting sketch of one of the oldest 
living pioneers of the state, William Berkin, who 
is now in the shadow of his ninetieth year and 
has spent nearly sixty years in Montana territory 
and State. A great deal of Montana history is 
briefly sketched in the newspaper article and por- 
tions of it are properly quoted. 

William Berkin was the pioneer transportation 
magnate of Montana. He came up the Missouri 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



11 



River nearly sixty years ago, and from a modest 
start of pack horses built up the Diamond R trans- 
portation organization which took first rank in the 
territory and served a wide stretch of country. He 
figured in many adventures, fought Indians, part- 
nered with Senator W. A. Clark, employed Col. 
Charles A. Broadwater and Sam Pepin as bull- 
whackers, shipped the first ore out of Butte by 
bull team to Corinne, Utah, by rail to San Fran- 
cisco and then to Swansea, Wales, made and lost 
fortunes, passed up opportunities to make millions, 
and now in the ninetieth-odd year old winter of 
his life is peacefully passing his declining years 
on a stock ranch in Meagher County. 

The broad highways that now traverse the state 
and make automobile riding comfortable were buf- 
falo trails when Berkin came to Montana. He 
brought with him a stock of goods and herd of 
pack animals, shipping his outfit from St. Louis 
to Fort Benton by steamboat. He built his own 
roads from Fort Benton to Bannack and Virginia 
City and other mining camps, blazing his way across 
the trackless prairie land and through mountain 
fastnesses, and founded the little Town of Boulder, 
capital of Jefferson County, just because the grass 
of the Boulder Valley was succulent and sweet, the 
place afforded sustenance and shelter for his live 
stock and it was on the road from Fort Benton 
to the placer mines. 

But he did not keep his pack train long. Gold 
on the bed rock of many Montana streams was 
bringing thousands of argonauts into . Montana, and 
he could not pack goods into the camps fast enough, 
so he effected the transportation organization which 
afterward became the famous Diamond R freight- 
ing outfit. This concern grew with the country, 
and in a short time Berkin found himself at the 
head of sixty bull teams. Each team consisted 
of twelve yoke, or twenty-four head, of oxen, 
with three wagons to the team. 

Charles A. Broadwater, who afterward became 
a famous empire builder and famed all over the 
West, found his first employment as one of Berkin's 
bull-whackers, and Sam Pepin, who was later to 
be associated with Broadwater in enterprises of 
magnitude in Northern Montana, was employed 
by Berkin in a similar capacity. Each of these 
men had charge of one of Berkin's bull teams. 
In all he had about 2,000 head of work cattle, and 
employed about 100 men, bull-whackers and station 
tenders. 

He and his men had many battles with the Indians, 
the country in the 400 miles that his teams traversed 
from Fort Benton to the gold camps being infested 
with hostile red skins. Every time a man started 
from Fort Benton in charge of one of Berkin's 
bull teams he took his life in his hands, but such 
was the spirit of the men of those days that he 
could always find plenty of men willing to go with 
him on the venture. 

The business grew and prospered with the de- 
velopment of the country, the population of which 
was increasing by leaps and bounds. Berkin, in 
an effort to maintain his supremacy in transpor- 
tation, decided to establish what became known 
latej as the "Diamond R Fast Freight," operating 
between the gold camps and Salt Lake City. This 
consisted of units of ten mule teams, each team 
hauling three wagons. He organized his equip- 
ments so that one of these teams left Salt Lake 
City on one end of the line and Helena on the other, 
every day, with stations for relays and change of 
animals all along the several hundred miles that 
stretch between the two points. The undertaking 
was very successful from the start. It necessi- 



tated the maintenance of an immense equipment 
of horses, mules, and a small army of drivers but 
it speeded up the delivery of freight in a manner 
that was very satisfactory to the mercantile estab- 
lishments in the mining camps, which depended 
on the Diamond R to keep their stocks replenished 
freight rates were high, but everyone was making 
money, ^and there was no haggling as to prices. The 
man who was taking out $ipo in gold dust every 
day was not inclined to be stingy, and bought luxu- 
ries at fabulous prices. 

Berkin continued in the freighting business until 
the 70s. In the meantime he had brought his fam- 
ily to Boulder, where he made his home, and had 
become interested in mining. He had acquired 
some placer property near Boulder, and in 1868 
put in a ditch, at considerable cost, to bring wa- 
ter to these placers. The venture proved fairly 
successful. About the same time he became inter- 
ested in the quartz possibilities of Butte. With W. 
A. Clark and Captain M. Wall, president of the 
Diamond R, he owned the Mountain Chief Mine 
on the Butte Hill. Ore from this property he 
hauled by bull team to Corinne and shipped it to 
San Francisco by rail, and from San Francisco by 
boat around the Horn to Swansea, Wales, for treat- 
ment. Even with the enormous cost of shipping 
the ore it proved profitable, but he considered it 
too slow, and sold his interest in the property for 
$3,700. It is now worth $25,000,000 or more. If 
he had held on to his Butte realty it would have 
made him fabulously wealthy. He bought the lot 
at the corner of Park and Main Street, on which 
the Rialto Theater stands, now worth perhaps $2,500 
a front foot, for twenty dollars. 

He was very much interested in the Vigilante 
movement, which rid the territory of Henry Plum- 
mer and his band of cutthroats. He had had 
enough experience with these men on the road and 
in the lonesome places to appreciate the good that 
would come to the territory by their elimination, 
and made a special trip to' Virginia City to be ini- 
tiated into the Vigilantes. Once in he became one 
of the right hand men of X. Beidler and Neil 
Howie, executives of the Vigilantes. His courage 
and fighting prowess were such that when Mon- 
tana was admitted to statehood he was named as 
the first United States marshal of the district, an 
office that it took a brave man to fill. 

William Berkin was born in England in 1830 
and learned the machinist's trade there. In 1856 
he married Sarah Jane Hall, also a native of Eng- 
land. Their first three children were born in the 
old country, one of whom died. Fannie and John 
came with them to America. William Berkin came 
to this country in 1860, and followed his trade 
at various cities and while at St. Louis was an 
employe of the American Fur Company. In 1862 
he came up the Missouri River to Montana, land- 
ing at Fort Benton. He brought his wife and chil- 
dren from England, and they arrived in the ter- 
ritory of Montana in June, 1865. Five other chil- 
dren were born to them in Montana : William A., 
who died at the age of twenty-eight; Thomas A.; 
Sarah ; Elizabeth, deceased ; and Hattie. 

THOMAS A. BERKIN, a son of the veteran Mon- 
tana pioneer and Indian fighter William Berkin, 
is one of the oldest native sons of this state, and 
for his part has played a busy career as a stock 
man and farmer and is also one of the well known 
public officials of Fergus County. 

Mr. Berkin was born at Boulder in Jefferson 
County, Montana, March 25, 1869, son of William 
and Sarah Jane (Hall) Berkin. The career of 



12 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



his father is sketched on other pages. Mr. Berkin at- 
tended the public schools of Boulder and his first em- 
ployment was on a cattle ranch and later, in 1882, he 
located at Lewistown and learned the carpenter's 
trade. In 1885 he returned to Boulder and became 
a contractor and builder. For fourteen years he was 
also engaged in the mining business. His ranch 
location was on Smith River up to 1907. He had 
a large tract of land devoted to horses, cattle and 
sheep. In 1907 he became proprietor of the Day 
Hotel at Lewistown, and operated that well known 
hostelry for two years. He then resumed his asso- 
ciation with ranching and since 1910 has been en- 
gaged in ranching and farming in the eastern part 
of Fergus County, near Flat Willow, which is his 
postoffice. He owns one of the most complete farms 
in the county, having 480 acres thoroughly devel- 
oped. He cuts three crops of alfalfa every sea- 
son and also large crops of corn and other grain. 
He also runs about 100 head of livestock. 

Mr. Berkin has for several years been deputy 
sheriff of Fergus County, and he is also a game 
warden of the state. His official home is at Lewis- 
town, though he spends much of his time at his 
farm. 

Mr. Berkin is affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 
456, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Po- 
litically he is a democrat. May 8, 1894, he mar- 
ried Mabel L. Coburn, a native of Iowa. 

WALTER MANSUR BICKFORD came to Montana in 
1884, a young lawyer, after several years of practice 
in the East. He at once became prominent in ter- 
ritorial politics, served as a member of the last 
Territorial Council, was a member of the State 
Constitutional Convention and of the State Capitol 
Commission. At the first state election he was an 
unsuccessful candidate for justice of the Supreme 
Court of Montana. 

Mr. Bickford, whose home is at Missoula and 
for many years practiced with offices at Butte, was 
born at Newburg, Maine, February 25, 1852. He 
was educated in the Maine Central Institute at Pitts- 
field and in 1878 was admitted to the Pennsylvania 
bar. Judge Bickford enjoys high rank as a cor- 
poration lawyer and is vice president of the Mis- 
soula Light and Water Company, the Missoula Street 
Railway Company and the Western Lumber Com- 
pany. He represented Montana as executive com- 
missioner at the World's Columbian Exposition in 
Chicago in 1893. He is a democrat in politics. 

October 16, 1878, he married Emma W. Woodford, 
of Jamestown, New York. She died June 17, 1915, 
leaving one daughter, Edith M., now the wife of 
W. L. Murphy, who is associated with Judge Bick- 
ford in practice. On September 25. 1916, Judge 
Bickford married Zelma M. Nash, of Missoula, who 
died July i, 1917. 

CARL C. NISSLER, city engineer of Lewistown, and 
a man of wide and varied experience in engineer- 
ing and other business affairs, was absent from his 
official position in Lewistown the greater part of 
1918 serving in the Engineer Corps of the National 
army, with the rank of first lieutenant. 

Mr. Nissler represents a pioneer family of Mon- 
tana and was born at Silver Bow, Silver Bow 
County, August 6, 1884. His father, Christian Niss- 
ler, was born in Sindlefingen, Wuertemberg, Ger- 
many, in 1836 and spent the first sixteen years of 
his life in his native country. Coming to America, 
he soon went to Philadelphia and learned the trade 
of baker and confectioner. In 1856 he went to 
San Francisco around the Isthmus, worked at his 
trade in Sacramento County, and prospected for 



gold in California, Oregon and Idaho, and finally 
located in the silver mining district of Virginia > 
City, Nevada, where he learned the brewing trade. 
In 1865 he left Nevada bound for Montana. He 
traveled by trail to Salt Lake City and thence by 
pack horse, being twenty days on the road and 
tramping at night with no protection except his 
blanket. He has some varied experiences in the 
mining camps of Montana, his most successful claim 
being in Bear Gulch. He invested the profits of 
this claim in a brewery at German Gulch and in 
1871 moved to Silver Bow. He brought the logs 
from a building at Butte City to Silver Bow and 
set it up as his brewery and some years later erected 
a complete plant. He spent the rest of his life 
in Silver Bow, where he died in November, 1901. 
He was a democrat in politics and became a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in 
California in 1860. In 1878 he married Miss Chris- 
tiana Konzelman, also a native of Wuertemberg, 
Germany. She died in 1892. They were the parents 
of ten children, eight of whom are still living. 

Carl C. Nissler was the first son and fifth child 
in his father's family and received his education 
in the public schools of Silver Bow, in All Hallows 
College at Salt Lake, in Notre Dame University at 
South Bend, Indiana, and in the Bishop Scott Mili- 
tary Academy at Portland. Oregon. He took his 
engineering work in the University of Michigan, 
graduating in 1908. On returning to Montana he 
was in the city engineer's office of Butte, Montana, 
for two years and then engaged in professional 
practice for himself at Great Falls and Lewistown. 
In 1912 Mr. Nissler organized the Lewistown Com- 
mission Company, wholesale fruits and produce, 
but sold his interest in 1916. He then took charge 
of the Domestic Steam Laundry, and in 1917 began 
his duties as assistant city engineer of Lewistown 
and was appointed city engineer in January, 1918. 

Mr. Nissler had been in office only a few months 
when on May 7, 1918, he was commissioned first 
lieutenant in the Engineers Reserve Corps. He was 
called to active duty on the I2th of May, being 
sent to Camp Lee for training. June I3th he was 
assigned to the 6o5th Engineers at Camp Forrest, 
Georgia, and was made camp exchange officer. He 
organized the engineers sub. depot and was com- 
manding officer of the 474th Engineers Depot De- 
tachment. He was also assigned as officer of camp 
morale. After nearly nine months of active service 
for his country he received an honorable discharge 
February 10, 1919, and at once returned to Lewis- 
town and resumed his responsibilities as city engi- 
neer. He is a man of thorough qualifications in his 
profession, and is a member of the Society of Mu- 
nicipal Engineers. He is also a member of the 
Rotary Club at Lewistown and is a past master 
of Lewistown Lodge Np. 37, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and in politics is a republican. 
Mr. Nissler married Miss Lillian Vivian, daughter 
of Joseph and Clara Bell (Labram) Vivian. Her 
parents were both born in Michigan and are now 
living at Butte, Montana. Mrs. Nissler, who is the 
oldest of four children, has one son, Carl Chris- 
tian, Jr. 

W. P. SMITH, M. D., located at Columbus, Mon- 
tana, in 1910, and took up the work of his profes- 
sion as a physician and surgeon with well trained 
abilities and is regarded as one of the most capable 
medical men in Stillwater County. He has acquired, 
has developed and owns some extensive ranch prop- 
erties near Columbus. 

Doctor Smith was born at St. Louis, Missouri* 
June 6, 1881. His father, Andrew P. Smith, was 



f 




Hi 






HISTORY OF MONTANA 



13 



born in Scotland in 1849, and came to the United 
States about 1869. For many years he was a mer- 
chant at St. Louis, Missouri. He was married at 
London, Ontario, Canada, to Meurissa Baker, who 
was born in London, Ontario, in 1857. She died 
at Chicago, Illinois, in 1904 while Andrew P. Smith 
died while visiting in Billings, Montana, in 1916. 
He was a republican and a very devout Presby- 
terian. The children were: John E., who resides 
at Los Angeles and is Pacific Coast representative 
of Marshall Field & Company at Chicago; Dr. W. 
P and M. A. Smith, who is also a representative 
of ' Marshall Field & Company and lives at Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Dr. W. P. Smith attended public school at Chi- 
cago, graduating from a high school in that city 
in 1902. He then spent two years in the preparatory 
department of the University of Illinois, and in 
1909 graduated with the M. D. degree from the 
Medical Department of that University. He is a 
member of the Phi Rho Sigma medical fraternity 
and the Alpha Omega Alpha honorary medical fra- 
ternity. From 1908 to 1910 Doctor Smith served 
as assistant to one of Chicago's most eminent physi- 
cians and surgeons, Dr. Alexander Hugh Ferguson. 
Since 1910 he has been engaged in a general medical 
and surgical practice at Columbus, his offices being 
in the Columbus State Bank Building. At least 
twice a year he keeps in touch with advanced ideas 
and practices of his profession, attending clinics 
and lectures in Chicago and Rochester, Minnesota. 
He specializes as a surgeon. He is a member of. 
the Stillwater County and State Medical Societies 
and the American Medical Association, and has 
served as County Health Officer. 

Doctor Smith owns 1,500 acres ten miles south 
of Columbus, a large part of it irrigated land and 
devoted to crops and livestock. He also has a 
modern home in Columbus. Doctor Smith is a 
republican, a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
is affiliated with Chicago Lodge of Masons, Bill- 
ings Chapter No. 5, Royal Arch Masons, Aldemar 
Commandery No. 9, Knights Templar, at Billings, 
Algeria Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Helena, 
Columbus Lodge of Odd Fellows, and Billings Lodge 
No. 394,' Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

He married Miss Grace Peterson, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Peterson, of Helena, at Colum- 
bus in May, 1913. They have one son, W. P., Jr., 
born June 18, 1915. 

REV. FRANK BRADLEY LEWIS, A. M. The subject 
of this review enjoys distinctive prestige among 
the citizens of Bozeman, where he now lives in 
honorable retirement after a life of ceaseless in- 
dustry in the cause of Christ and humanity, and 
which was crowned with success. As a neighbor 
and citizen he is highly esteemed by all who know 
him, for in every relation of life, religious, political 
or civic, his voice and his influence have been on 
the side of right as he has seen and understood the 
right. 

The Lewis family from which the subject of 
this sketch is descended is of rugged old Welsh 
stock, the family home having been on the border 
of Wales, whence came Benjamin Lewis to the 
shores of America in 1635. He first settled in 
Massachusetts, but soon afterwards located perma- 
nently in Connecticut, where the family has been 
established for many generations. The subjects 
grandfather, Cyrus Lewis, was born in 1783 in Hunt- 
ington, Connecticut, where he spent his entire life, 
his death occurring there in 1864. He was a farmer 
and because of his extended military service was 
called captain. He married Alice Hawley, also a 



native of Huntington. Among their children was 
the subject's father, George Thomas Lewis, who 
was born at Huntington, Connecticut, in 1814. He 
was a carriagemaker by trade, spent his entire life 
in his native state, and died at Stratford on August 
18, 1897. He was a democrat in politics and a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He was a member and active supporter of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. 

George Thomas Lewis was twice married, first to 
Eleanor Banks, a native of Connecticut, and who 
died at Fairfield, that state. To them was born 
one child, Eleanor, who died at Trumbull, Connec- 
ticut, in 1918, and who had been the wife of David 
B. Curtis, a farmer and who also is deceased. After 
the death of his first wife, George T. Lewis mar- 
ried Mary Bradley, who was born in 1820 in Fair- 
field, Connecticut, and who died at Stratford, Con- 
necticut, in February, 1903. To them were born 
three children, namely: Frank B., the immediate 
subject of this review; Alice, who died at New 
Haven, Connecticut, and George Fred, who gradu- 
ated from Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut, 
and from the medical department of Yale College, 
and is now a leading physician and surgeon in Strat- 
ford, Connecticut. 

Frank Bradley Lewis was born at Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, on July 25, 1844. He received his elemen- 
tary education in the public schools of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, and then attended Fairfield Academy, 
in Herkimer County, New York, where he prepared 
for college. He then entered Yale College, where 
he was graduated with the class of 1868, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1871 he received 
from his alma mater the degree of Master of Arts. 
During the following two years he was a senior 
tutor in St. Mark's School at Southboro, Massa- 
chusetts. He then entered the Berkeley Divinity 
School, at Middletown, Connecticut, from which 
he was graduated in 1871 and was ordained as a 
minister of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was 
assistant to the rector of St. Andrew's Church, Meri- 
den, Connecticut, for one year, and then for about 
the same length of time he served as rector of St. 
Paul's Church at Brookfield^ Connecticut, relin- 
quishing this church to become principal of Oxford 
Academy at Oxford, Chenango County, New York, 
where he remained for seven years. In 1879 Mr. 
Lewis came to Bozeman as rector of St. James 
Church, and thus began a period of service which 
lasted for more than three decades, the relation of 
rector to the church being maintained for thirty- 
two years actively and since 1911 as rector emeri- 
tus. He is now practically retired from active labor, 
though he still maintains general oversight of two 
missions, at Belgrade and Manhattan. During the 
period of his active labors here, Mr. Lewis proved 
a tower of strength for the forces of righteousness 
and ever stood ready to support and encourage 
every movement looking to the advancement of 
the best interests of the city and community. An 
effective speaker and able sermonizer, his pulpit 
service was characterized by earnestness and power, 
and during all the years of his identification with 
the church life of Bozeman he stood among the 
spiritual leaders of the people. 

Politically Mr. Lewis supports the democratic 
party. Fraternally he is a member of Bozeman 
Lodge No. 18, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Zona Chapter No. 12, Royal Arch Masons; St. 
John Commandery No. 12, Knights Templar, of 
which three bodies he is secretary; Butte Con- 
sistory of the Scottish Rite (thirty-second degree), 
and of Bagdad Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In 1919 he served as 



14 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Grand Captain General of the Grand Commandery 
of Knights Templar of Montana. 

On June 6, 1871, at Nichols, Connecticut, Frank 
B. Lewis was married to Georgia Frances Ambler, 
the daughter of Charles and Mary (Curtiss) Am- 
bler, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. Ambler 
was a maker of saddle trees and prior to the Civil 
war enjoyed a large business. To the subject and 
his wife have been born the following children : 
Arthur Franklin was graduated from the Hopkins 
Grammar School in New Haven, Connecticut where 
he took preparatory work for college. He was grad- 
uated from the college department of Yale Uni- 
versity in 1804, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. In 1898 he was graduated from the General 
Theological Seminary, New York City, and was 
ordained a minister of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. He is now rector of the Episcopal Church 
at North Haven, Connecticut. Alice Elizabeth be- 
came the wife of Iremaeus Kneeland Wisner, who 
died on his farm near Bozeman in 1911, since which 
time she has lived at home with her parents. She 
was graduated from the Bozeman High School, and 
then attended the State Normal School, at New 
Haven, Connecticut, after which she taught school 
in Bozeman for several years. Mary Curtiss gradu- 
ated from the Bozeman High School, attended the 
State Normal School at Dillon, Montana, and is 
now a teacher in the Bozeman schools. 

ANDREW P. STEPHENSON. The men of this coun- 
try are developing vision and initiative and learning 
to look forward in the establishment and expansion 
of their business concerns. Those of them who are 
succeeding upon a broad scale are the ones who 
recognize that conditions are in a transition period 
that requires careful planning not only to meet 
present day demands, but to provide for future 
possible shortages in raw materials and man power. 
This is an era of extraordinary conditions far out- 
classing any other in the history of the world, and 
to meet them and compete with others in the same 
line requires sagacity and practical knowledge of 
no mean order. One of the men who is proving in 
his everyday conduct of his large business that he 
is the right man in the right place is Andrew P. 
Stephenson, proprietor of -the Stephenson Lumber 
Company of Butte, Montana. 

Andrew P. Stephenson was born at Dallas, Texas, 
on February 26, 1875, and belongs to a very old 
American family, which was founded here during 
the seventeenth century by his ancestors that came 
here from England. For some generations the 
family was well represented in that part of the 
country now included in West Virginia, and 
Charles B. Stephenson, father of Andrew P. Stephen- 
son, was born at Harper's Ferry, West Virginia, 
in 1829, and he was there reared and educated and 
imbued with a love of the South which made him 
espouse its cause in the conflict between that section 
and the north, and he served as a brave soldier in 
the Confederate army. With the end of the war he 
found conditions in his native region so discourag- 
ing that he decided to migrate to the west, and came 
to Montana in 1866. For a time he was one of the 
pioneer merchants of Helena, and was also interested 
in mining and freighting, the same qualities which 
made him a good soldier aiding him in business 
life. He was interested in the "Only Chance" Mine 
at Highland City, Montana, one of the first gold 
mines to be developed in the state. In 1872 his at- 
tention was attracted by the successful experiments 
in cotton production in Texas, and he removed to 
Dallas, Texas, where he spent the remainder of his 



life, although his death occurred at Chicago, 
Illinois, where he had gone on a visit in 1905. A 
strong democrat, he never wavered in his support 
of the principles and candidates of that party. For 
many years he was a consistent member of the 
Episcopal Church. His fraternal connections were 
those he maintained with the Knights of Pythias. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Virginia 
Mitchell, was born at Richmond, Virginia, in 1840, 
and there they were married. Her death occurred 
at Dallas, Texas, in 1890. Of their six children, 
two were born at Helena, Montana, and the other 
four at Dallas, Texas. These children were as 
follows : Ella, who married P. P. Tucker, an in- 
surance broker of Dallas, Texas; Caroline, who 
married S. W. Wolfe, a clothing merchant of New 
York City, New York, died in that city, as did her 
husband; Charles, who is deceased, was in the ex- 
press business at Dallas, Texas ; Elizabeth, who is 
the widow of Dr. C. C. Fite, a physician and surgeon, 
is a resident of New York City, New York ; Roberta 
Lee, who is the widow of Dr. W. T. Blythe, a 
physician and surgeon of Dallas, Texas,%here Mrs. 
Blythe is now residing; and Andrew Hf who was 
the youngest. 

After attending the public schools of Dallas, 
Texas, Andrew P. Stephenson was a student in the 
Agricultural and Mechanical College at Bryan, 
Texas, for two years. Leaving college he went to 
Chicago, Illinois, and was employed in a wholesale 
shoe house for a number of years. He then went 
to northern Michigan and worked in the iron mines 
of that region for quite a long period, and then, 
still maintaining his connection with the iron in- 
terests, he returned to Chicago, Illinois. In 1899 
he went to British Columbia and formed connections 
with a large saw-mill outfit, which developed into 
a lumber business that he operated in Canada until 
1908, and in July of that year he came' to Butte. In 
order to gain a practical working knowledge of the 
lumber situation in Silver Bow County and its 
neighborhood he entered the employ of the Largey 
Lumber Company, and remained with it until the 
summer of 1915, when he resigned his position as 
manager, for he had risen to be in charge of its 
affairs, and founded the Stephenson Lumber Com- 
pany, with plant and offices at Nos. 90 to 100 East 
Front Street, Butte. This company is incorporated, 
the officers being as follows : Eleanor Stephenson, 
president, and Andrew P. Stephenson, secretary and 
treasurer. The company owns the plant and offices 
and the ground on which they stand. This is one 
of the largest lumber concerns in Butte, and handles 
lumber, building material and fuel, and does an im- 
mense business. In addition to his other interests 
Mr. Stephenson owns his modern residence at No. 
1923 Argyle Street. In politics he is a republican, 
but has not cared to enter public life, his business 
absorbing his time and attention. In the teachings 
of Christian Science Mr. Stephenson finds expres- 
sion for his religious convictions. 

Andrew P. Stephenson was married at McLeod, 
Alberta, Canada, to Miss Eleanor Patterson, a 
daughter of J. L. and Eleanor Patterson. Mr. Pat- 
terson was a successful pioneer rancher of the 
Bozeman district in Montana, and is now living in 
retirement at Bozeman, his wife having died some 
years ago. Mrs. Stephenson was graduated from 
the Milwaukee Normal College at Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson have two chil- 
dren, namely: Eleanor, who was born August 20. 
1904, and Ann, who was born November 9, 1905. 
Mr. Stephenson has not only attained to a material 
success, but he has won and holds the confidence 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



15 



of his fellow citizens. As a sound, dependable busi- 
ness man, he has few equals, and his knowledge of 
the lumber business is intimate and was acquired 
from personal experience at the source of supply. 
As a citizen he measures up to high standards, and 
while he has not desired political preferment, he 
has always shown an intelligent interest in the de- 
velopment of the community and a proper pride 
in civic matters. 

CLEMENT J. BALDWIN. One of the most distin- 
guished men of his part of the state is Hon. Clement 
J. Baldwin of Bridger, representative from Carbon 
County in the State Assembly, and a man whose 
progressive spirit has animated his associates and 
section for some years. He is a man who reaches 
the heart of things, and, understanding the needs 
of his people, seeks the most effective manner of 
relieving them and building up new defences against 
the inside foes every state has to fight. During his 
long and arduous service as a legislator he has 
fathered and supported a number of very construc- 
tive measures, and the people of Montana owe him 
a heavy debt for what he has accomplished and for 
the campaign of education he has started to bring 
about other changes and reforms. 

Clement J. Baldwin comes of one of the old fami- 
lies of this country, representatives of the Baldwin 
family having emigrated from Scotland to the 
American Colonies long prior to the Revolution. He 
was born at Willmar, Minnesota, May 2, 1878, a son 
of Corydon Josiah Baldwin, born in Farmington, 
New York, in 1849, who is a resident of Seattle, 
Washington. After attaining to manhood's estate 
in his native place C. J. Baldwin became a pioneer 
of Willmar, Minnesota, and for many years was 
a railroad engineer on the Great Northern Railroad, 
but is now retired. The Episcopal Church holds his 
membership. He is a republican, but not very active 
in his party. Mr. Baldwin belongs to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and Woodmen of the 
World. C. J. Baldwin was married to Anna John- 
son, born in Christiania, Norway, in 1853, and she 
died at Willmar in 1899, having been reared and 
educated in Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Baldwin 
had the following children : Albert N., who is a 
railroad engineer for the Great Northern Railroad, 
lives at Minneapolis, Minnesota; Edward, who is 
also a railroad engineer for the Great Northern Rail- 
road, lives at Watertown, South Dakota ; Clement 
J., who is the third in order of birth; Clara 
Josephine, who married Elmer C. Culp, a farmer re- 
siding in the vicinity of Billings, Montana; Anna 
Evelyn, who married Charles Arthur Gibson, a civil 
engineer by trade, resides at Seattle, Washington. 

Clement J. Baldwin attended the public schools of 
Willmar, Minnesota, and then took a business course- 
in the Willmar Seminary, which he completed at the 
age of eighteen years, going to work for the whole- 
sale cigar firm of Winecke & Doerr of Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, with which he remained for seven years 
and then, in May, 1902, located at Bridger and estab- 
lished the Baldwin Lumber Company, Incorporated, 
of which he is president. The main yards are at 
Bridger, on Main Street, and the company has 
branches at Fromberg and Belfry, Montana. In 
addition to his large interests in his lumber company 
Mr. Baldwin owns his residence at Bridger, the yards 
and offices occupied by the lumber company, and 665 
acres of irrigated land on Dry Creek, Carbon 
County, Montana. 

_ Mr. Baldwin has been very active in politics, work- 
ing always as a republican. Elected to the Bridger 
City Council, his record in that body made him the 
vol. n2 



logical candidate of his party for mayor, and he was 
elected to that office by a very gratifying majority, 
and he was returned for a second term. There 
were so many measures before the public that needed 
a strong man to push them that Mr. Baldwin was 
selected for assemblyman, and has been re-elected 
twice, having served continuously as the representa- 
tive from Carbon County from 1914. During his 
service in the Legislature he has been chairman of 
the committee on banks and banking, and a member 
of the committees of ways and means, railroads and 
transportation and trades and commerce, and was 
vice chairman of the ways and means committee. 
He introduced and had passed the bill which divided 
the high school funds equally among all the high 
schools in the county according to the number of 
students, which previously had all been given to 
the county high school ; the bill which exempted real 
estate and chattel mortgages from taxation by the 
state, and these bills are now on the statute books. 
Mr. Baldwin has always served the best interests 
of his constituents, and that they appreciate his abili- 
ties and willingness to devote himself to the good of 
his district is practically demonstrated by his reten- 
tion in office. 

In 1900 Mr. Baldwin was united in marriage at 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Miss Mary Bertha 
Moore, born at Janesville, Minnesota, who was 
graduated from the Manning School of Oratory 
and Dramatic Art at Minneapolis. There are no 
children. Mr. Baldwin is a Christian Scientist. He 
belongs to Golden Fleece Lodge No. 66, Ancient Free ' 
and Accepted Masons; Algeria Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of 
Helena, Montana; the Helena Consistory, in which 
he has been raised to the thirty-second degree ; Red 
Lodge Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Red Lodge, 
Montana; Red Lodge Lodge, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks ; and Montana Council, United 
Commercial Travelers. He is a director of the 
American National Bank of Bridger, and is in- 
terested in a public-spirited way in the growth of all 
of the business concerns of Carbon County, for he is 
thoroughly imbued with the spirit of the West and 
believes in encouraging legitimate expansion and the 
development of natural resources. Such a man as 
Mr. Baldwin has a great future before him, and the 
people he represents are certain of receiving scrupu- 
lous and efficient service and a whole-souled appre- 
ciation of them in every action. 

CHARLES WIPER. Just as there are no rules for 
building character, so are there no fixed rules for 
achieving success. The individual who can arise 
from mediocrity to a position of recognized emi- 
nence is he who can recognize and utilize the op- 
portunities that appear before him. The es- 
sential conditions of human existence are ever the 
same; the surroundings of individuals differ but 
slightly, and when on the highway leading to the 
goal of prosperity one man passes others who per- 
haps started out before him, it is because he pos- 
sesses the power to use advantageously the oppor- 
tunities which are given to all. Of the men of 
Lewistown who in their careers have made the 
most of the chances which have been given them, 
Charles Wiper, cashier of the Empire Bank and 
Trust Company, is an excellent example. 

Mr. Wiper was born at Forman, the county seat 
of Sargent County, North Dakota, October 31, 
1885, a son of Robert and Mary (Coleman) Wiper. 
His father, who was born in Scotland and came 
to the United States in young manhood, was origi- 
nally a coal miner, but eventually developed into 



16 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



a prosperous, wheat raiser and stockman of North 
Dakota, where both he and his wife, who was a 
native of Pennsylvania, passed away. Mr. Wiper 
was a republican and a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Of the twelve children 
in the family eleven are living, and Charles was 
the eleventh in order of birth. 

Charles Wiper received good educational advan- 
tages in his youth, first attending the little public 
school at Forman and then being sent to the North 
Dakota Agricultural College at Fargo. His first 
position was with the Ransom County State Bank 
at Sheldon, North Dakota, where he acted as book- 
keeper and subsequently held a like position at Bow- 
bells, that state, with the First National Bank. 
From the latter position he went to the . Citizens 
State Bank of Ryder, of which institution he was 
for seven years cashier, and then removed to Win- 
nett, Montana, where he became one of the organ- 
izers of the Winnett State Bank. Mr. Wiper re- 
mained as cashier of the latter bank until January, 
1918, when he was called to his present position as 
cashier of the Empire Bank and Trust Company 
at Lewistown. Mr. Wiper has impressed his abil- 
ity not only upon his associates, but on the public 
in general, and his personal popularity has con- 
tributed toward the success of the institution which 
he represents and which has a high standing among 
the finanical concerns of Fergus County. Mr. 
Wiper is a member of Jerusalem Lodge No. 115, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Winnett, 
having been first past master of this lodge; Hiram 
Chapter No. 15, Royal Arch Masons; Lewistown 
Commandery No. 14, Knights Templar ; Algeria 
Temple. Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine; and Lewistown Lodge No. 456, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. In politics he is 
a republican. 

Mr. Wiper was married June 19, 1915, to Miss 
Elsa Baldwin, and they are the parents of one son, 
Thomas. 

RAY A. LATHOM is a native son of Montana. He 
was born in .Livingston January 30, 1891. He is 
one of the progressive young leaders in politics in 
Stillwater County and he is now in his second term 
of service as county clerk. 

His father, George D. Lathom, is an old timer 
of Montana, and has lived in the state nearly forty 
years. He was born at Gallatin, Missouri, in 1860, 
son of John D. Lathom, a Missouri pioneer and a 
farmer, who spent his last years in that state. 
George D. Lathom came to Montana in 1882 and for 
a dozen years rode the cattle range as a cowboy. 
Most of his work was done in Yellowstone Valley 
near Livingston. In 1894 he homesteaded 160 acres 
in what is now Stillwater County, and that quarter 
section is part of the present ranch and farm of 
230 acres. This farm is in the irrigated section 
and is highly productive both as a grain and stock 
ranch. George D. Lathom is a democrat in politics. 
His home is on Stillwater River, six miles south- 
west of Columbus. He married Mary L. Denny, 
who was born in 1869. Ray is the oldest of their 
children. Myrtle is the wife of Stanley Milan, 
a farmer, machinist and automobile expert living, 
at Great Falls. Mattie is a teacher in Stillwater 
County. Earl is on the home farm, whife Lemuel 
and Lyle live with their brother Ray and attend 
school at Columbus. 

Ray Lathom was educated in the rural schools of 
Stillwater County, in the high school at Columbus, 
and was in the Abbott Business College at Billings 
until 1908. The next four years his time was em- 
ployed chiefly in surveying in what is now Still- 



water County and at Lander, Wyoming. During 
1912 and until March 24, 1913, he was a driver of 
automobiles. Upon the organization of the county 
government of Stillwater County he became deputy 
county clerk, and in 1916 was elected chief of that 
office and re-elected in 1918. 

Mr. Lathom has had six years of experience in 
the National Guard. He enlisted in Company K 
of the Montana National Guard in 1907 and served 
a full period of three years. In 1911 he enlisted in 
Company B of the Wyoming National Guards at 
Lander and again served three years. He went in ' 
as first rank and duty sergeant, and was promoted 
to top sergeant and later to acting second lieutenant. 

Mr. Lathom is a republican, is, affiliated with 
Stillwater Lodge No. 62, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, at Columbus, Billings Lodge No. 
394 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, Columbus Camp No. 842, Woodmen of the 
World, and is an active member of the Stillwater 
Commercial Club. 

Mr. Lathom has a modern home at the corner 
of A Street and Third Avenue, North, in Columbus. 
He married Miss Birdie F. Hunter, of Missoula, 
July 6, 1915. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. 
Hunter, reside at Missoula, where her father is 
foreman in the stockyards of the Northern Pacific 
Railway. 

HAROLD FREDERICK FORSYTH, chief draughtsman of 
the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, has been 
advanced to positions of added responsibility and 
dignity because of his ability and fitness for the 
discharge of their duties. He was born at Ham- 
mond, New Brunswick. Canada, September 25, 1882, 
a son of R. W. Forsyth, also born at Hammond, in 
1845. He died at Port Townsend, Washington, in 
1912, to which he went in 1889, and was there en- 
gaged in contracting and building. At Hammond he 
had owned and operated a sawmill, and been suc- 
cessful with it. After coming to the United States 
and securing his citizen's papers he espoused the 
principles of the republican party. A member of 
the Episcopal Church, he actively supported it. A 
brother of his. David Forsyth, is an archdeacon 
of the church in New Brunswick, Canada. R. W. 
Forsyth was a Mason, and well known in his order. 
The maiden name of his wife was Annie M. Drum- 
mond, and she was born in Upham, New Brunswick, 
Canada, in 1855. She survives him and makes her 
home at Anaconda. Harold F. ForsytH is the only 
living child of his parents. 

But a child when his father moved to Port 
Townsend, Washington. Harold F. Forsyth was 
reared there and attended its public schools, and 
was graduated from its high school in 1899. For 
the subsequent two years he worked on the daily 
paper there, and then for three years was in the 
employ of the government in the construction 
work of coast defense fortifications, in the engineer- 
ing department, as draughtsman and instrument 
man. Realizing the need of technical training, Mr. 
Forsvth then entered the State University at Seattle. 
Washington, and completed the junior year in the 
engineering course, after which he returned to the 
government service and remained in it for three 
and one-half years, being employed on the con- 
struction of the Gray's Harbor Jetty at Aberdeen, 
Washington. Mr. Forsyth then went with the 
Washington State Highway Department and for two 
years was occupied with the construction of high- 
way bridges, and for one vear was construction 
engineer for Charles C. Moore & Company of 
San Francisco. California, during that period being 
occupied on the construction of a power plant at 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



17 



Vancouver, British Columbia. In 1912 he was with 
the American Smelting & Refining Company as de- 
signer at their smelter at Tacoma, Washington. 
His work in these connections brought him to the 
notice of the Seattle Port Commission and his serv- 
ices were secured as district engineer for the con- 
struction of large docks and water terminals on 
the water front of Seattle. In 1916 Mr. Forsyth 
came to the American Smelting & Refining Com- 
pany again, as a designer at their smelter at Salt 
Lake City, Utah. During February, 1917, Mr. 
Forsyth formed his connections with the Ana- 
conda Copper Mining Company, first being a de- 
signer in the general offices, but was soon advanced 
to be construction superintendent, and then chief 
draughtsman, which position is commensurate with 
his ability and varied experience. He has under 
his supervision twenty-four draughtsmen, with 
offices in the general office building of the Washoe 
Reduction Works, two miles east of Anaconda. Mr. 
Forsyth is an independent republican. He belongs 
to the Episcopal Church and is a Mason, a member 
of Acacia Lodge No. 33, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons of Anaconda. The Anaconda Club, the 
Anaconda Country Club, and the Greek letter col- 
lege fraternity, Phi Gamma Delta, hold his member- 
ship and interest. Mr. Forsyth resides at No. 602 
Maple Street, Anaconda. He is unmarried. 

HERMAN CARL PAGENKOPF, manager of the Stone, 
Ordean, Wells Company, is one of the enterprising 
men of Butte who has risen to his present position 
through business merit and personal aptitude. He 
was born near Belgard, Pommerania, Germany, on 
April 7, 1877, a son of Albert H. Pagenkopf, born 
in 1851 in Pommerania, Germany, where he was 
reared, educated and married. By trade he was a 
flour miller, and came to the United States in 1887, 
locating at Hastings, Nebraska, where he still re- 
sides, being now retired, although after coming to 
this country he was engaged as a general workman. 
He is a democrat and a member of the Lutheran 
Church. With all young men in Germany, Albert 
H. Pagenkopf received a training in the German 
army during his obligatory military service. His 
wife bore the maiden name of Augusta Boehlke, 
and she was born in Germany on October i. 1854. 
They became the parents of the following children : 
Herman Carl, whose name heads this review; Paul 
E., who is a rancher and lives at Hamilton, Mon- 
tana, is specializing in the production of White Leg- 
horn chickens, and was for fourteen years an em- 
ploye of the Butte Street Railway Company as con- 
ductor ; Emma, who married J. Albert Van Schoik, 
Jr., a dairyman, proprietor of the White Clover 
Dairy Farm of Red Bank, New Jersey; Alma, who 
married Roy Schuffeberger, of Moorfield, Nebraska, 
a rancher, died at Hastings, Nebraska, on May 10, 
1919; Emil who is city salesman for the Capitol 
Commission Company of Helena. Butte and Great 
Falls, Alontana. is a resident of Butte; Minnie, who 
married Roy C. Roote, a teamster of Springfield, 
Massachusetts; Otto, who is a veteran. of the World 
war, resides at Davenport, Iowa, where he is an 
electrician ; William O., who is also a veteran of the 
World war, was in the Officers Training Camp at 
Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky, and is now 
associated with his brother-in-law. J. A. Van Schoik, 
Jr., in the dairy business at Red Bank, New Jersey; 
Fred C., who 'is now on his homestead near Man- 
ville. Wyoming, has recently been mustered out of 
the United States army after eighteen months over- 
seas during the World war ; and Anna, who is living 
with her parents. 

Herman Carl Pagenkopf was educated in the pub- 



lic schools of Hastings, Nebraska, and was graduated 
from its high school in 1895, and until 1901 was a 
clerk in a grocery at Hastings, Nebraska, leaving 
that city for Butte, which he reached on May 3, 1901. 
For the following four years he clerked for Lutey 
Brothers, and then became a salesman for the 
National Biscuit Company, covering Butte and 
western Montana, and leaving that corporation to 
occupy the same position for the Bozeman Milling 
Company, with headquarters at Butte, although his 
territory included western Montana and southern 
Idaho, with which he remained until July I, 1914. 
He then became manager for the Butte branch of 
the Stone, Ordean, Wells Company, with offices at 
the corner of Wyoming and Iron Streets, Butte. 
Mr. Pagenkopf's territory covers both Helena and 
Butte and extends from Wolf Creek on the north to 
the Idaho line on the south, and from Logan, Mon- 
tana, on the east, to Deer Lodge, Montana, on the 
west. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Pagenkopf is an 
independent voter, but his business responsibilities 
have been too onerous for his assumption of a pub- 
lic character. Both by inheritance and conviction he 
is a member of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Pagen- 
kopf belongs to Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 24, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Deer Lodge 
Chapter No. 3, Royal Arch Masons ; Zabud Council 
No. 2, Royal and Select Masters ; and Butte Council 
No. 106, United Commercial Travelers. He owns a 
modern residence at No. 1820 South Gaylord Ave- 
nue, Butte, and real estate in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

On September 26, 1906, Mr. Pagenkopf was united 
in marriage at Butte to Miss Mabel Genevieve Davis, 
a daughter of Charles E. and Eliza Jane (McTucker) 
Davis. A sound, reliable and dependable business 
man, Mr. Pagenkopf has proved his value to his 
company and his community and is held in the high- 
est esteem by all who know him. During the period 
he was on the road he learned the needs of patrons, 
and so is able to order the affairs of his present 
concern much more intelligently than if he had not 
acquired his knowledge by practical experience and 
first hand contact with those with whom the com- 
pany is carrying on business. Having made Butte 
his headquarters for so many years, Mr. Pagenkopf 
is naturally very much interested in its present and 
future, and willing and anxious to do everything 
that lies within his power to bring about a normal 
and healthy expansion of business. Such _men as 
he are valuable additions to any community, and 
deserve the consideration they generally command. 

W. L. A. CALDER, attorney-at-law, is engaged in 
a civil practice at Laurel. He was born at Ottawa 
City, Province of Ontario, Canada, April 12, 1875, a 
son of W. G. Calder, now a resident of Inkster, 
North Dakota. The Calder family originated in the 
Highlands of Scotland, but members of it came in 
an early day to Canada, and W. G. Calder was born 
in County Glengarry in 1839, but was married in 
County Stormont, Canada, and thereafter until 1891 
lived in the City of Ottawa, Canada, or the near 
vicinity, where he carried on a business as a car- 
penter and contractor. In 1891 he came to the 
United States and spent some years at Forest River, 
North Dakota, leaving them in 1899 for Inkster, that 
state, where he is still working actively at his trade. 
In 1918 he came to Laurel to erect an apartment 
house and a number of private residences for his 
son, W. L. A. Calder, and when the contract was 
completed, returned to Inkster. He is a republican, 
but while living in Canada was one of the original 
Orange Men. The Methodist Episcopal Church 
holds his membership. Fraternally he is an Odd 



18 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Fellow. W. G. Calder was married to Dorothy 
Logan, born in County Stormont, Canada. Her 
father, who was born at sea, became a surgeon and 
served with the British forces in India and Australia, 
and on board an ocean steamer plying up the St. 
Lawrence River to Quebec before he settled in the 
Province of Ontario, Canada, becoming one of the 
pioneer physicians and surgeons of that region, and 
oftentimes riding for a radius of 100 miles to see 
his patients. The children born to W. G. Calder 
and his wife were as follows: Margaret, who mar- 
ried W. T. Saunders, a ranchman, and resides at 
Laurel, Montana; Lucy, who married W. E. Cham- 
berlin, a merchant and extensively interested in farm 
lands in Yellowstone County, Montana, and North 
Dakota, resides at Laurel; W. L. A., whose name 
heads this review ; Mary, who married Harry Parker, 
resides at Livingston, Montana ; Dorothy, who mar- 
ried L. G. Gemmill, a ranchman, resides near Laurel ; 
and Lilly, who married a Mr. P. E. Sorensen, a 
banker, resides at Wheaton, Minnesota. 

W. L. A. Calder attended the public schools of 
Eastern Ontario, Canada, and the University of 
North Dakota, being graduated from the normal de- 
partment in 1899 and from the law department in 
1905. In the latter year he began the practice of 
his profession at Grand Forks, North Dakota, leav- 
ing there in 1909 for Laurel, where he has since re- 
mained. His offices are located in the Spencer- 
McCauley Block. Mr. Calder is an able lawyer and 
his practice is a large and valuable one. He has 
demonstrated his faith in the future of Laurel and 
Yellowstone County by investing quite heavily in 
its realty, owning a modern residence at the corner 
of Frfth Street and Fifth Avenue, an apartment 
house and four bungalows at Laurel and a ranch of 
160 acres outside the city. Both by inheritance and 
conviction he is a republican. Fraternally he belongs 
to Grand Forks Lodge No. 255, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, of Grand Forks, North 
Dakota; Grand Forks Camp, Modern Woodmen of 
America; Manvel Lodge, Brotherhood of American 
Yeomen; and the Grand Forks- Lodge of United 
Order of Foresters. He maintains membership pro- 
fessionally with the Yellowstone County Bar Asso- 
ciation and the Montana State Bar Association. 

In 1900 Mr. Calder was married at Grand Forks, 
North Dakota, to Miss Louise McDonald, a daughter 
of James and Catherine (Wickam) McDonald. Mr. 
McDonald, who is now deceased, was at one time 
a ranchman of Grand Forks County, North Da- 
kota. Mr. and Mrs. Calder have two children, Cath- 
erine, who was born December 24, 1907, and W. L. 
A., who was born February 7, 1911. 

DAVID HILGER. A life of larger and broader serv- 
ice to his home state of Montana it would be 
difficult to conceive than that of David Hilger of 
Lewistown. Mr. Hilger has lived in Montana over 
fifty years, his father was a distinguished charac- 
ter at Helena, and the son has been even more 
prominent in the making of history at Lewistown. 
His has been fundamental activities. They have 
been concerned with the improvement and devel- 
opment of land, the opening of new resources, the 
establishment of important industries and institu- 
tions, and the working out of an enlightened pro- 
gram of improvement affecting not only Lewis- 
town but the state at large. 

Some reference should be made at the beginning 
to his father, the late Nicholas Hilger. Nicholas 
Hilger was born in the Duchy of Luxemburg, Octo- 
ber 28. 1831, a son of Daniel and Susanna (Evert) 
Hilger. In 1847 the entire family came to America, 
first locating at Buffalo, New York. In 1854 Nicho- 



las Hilger went to St. Paul, Minnesota, and soon 
afterwards settled at Henderson in that territory. 
He became prominent in the early affairs of Min- 
nesota Territory, serving as justice of the peace, 
holding a position in the United States Land Office, 
helped take the census of Minnesota preparatory 
to statehood and was elected county auditor, an 
office he held ,from 1857 to 1864. He also held a 
commission as captain of a regiment in the state 
militia. 

He first came to Montana in 1864 as a member 
of the Sully Expedition, which arrived at Helena 
September 27, 1864. While in Montana he was 
appointed the first deputy recorder for Edgerton 
County. On June i, 1865, he started east to get 
his family, but was delayed in Minnesota, for some 
time by his business interests and did not return 
until 1867. He developed a large farm and ranch 
on the Missouri River and was active in public 
affairs as justice of the peace and probate judge. 
Nicholas Hilger married in 1857 Susanna Moerseh, 
of Minnesota. 

David Hilger was born in Minnesota, January i, 
1858, the oldest of the ten children of his parents. 
He was old enough to enjoy and appreciate the 
excitement and the constantly unfolding wonders 
of the three months' journey overland to Montana. 
The Hilger family was part of a large colony of 
sixty families and 300 single men, one of the larg- 
est and most important additions to the citizen- 
ship of the territory. David Hilger grew up at 
Helena, finished his education there, and became a 
cattle and sheep raiser in Lewis and Clarke County. 
His interests increasing and demanding a larger 
scope of range, he moved in 1881 to Dog Creek 
in the northern part of Fergus County, a date that 
identifies him with the very early pioneer settle- 
ment of that part of the state. He began with a 
small flock of sheep and meager equipment, but 
in the course of twelve years had become one of 
the dominant men in the sheep industry of Mon- 
tana. 

Mr. Hilger is properly credited with being one 
of the men most influential in the upbuilding and 
promotion of Lewistown as a commercial city. 
Gradually as his ranch holdings were sold off he 
concentrated his interests at Lewistown. He and 
George W. Cook became associated in the real 
estate business, and in course of time out of this 
grew the Hilger Loan & Realty Company, one of 
the largest concerns of its kind in the state, with 
Mr. Hilger as president. He and other business 
men organized the Judith Hardware Company in 
1890, a business that has drawn to itself some 
of the most capable men in that section of the 
state. Mr. Hilger was long president of the com- 
pany. For seventeen years he served as vice presi- 
dent and as president of the First National Bank 
of Lewistown, resigning the latter office on Janu- 
ary 9, 1917. He has since been chairman of the 
board of directors of the bank. In April, 1910, he 
organized the Flat Willow Ranch Company, own- 
ing 3,500 acres of land, and is president of the 
company. On December 27, 1910, he organized the 
Fergus County Land and Irrigation Company, of 
which he is president. These are important proj- 
ects for the irrigation and reclamation of large 
bodies of land in Fergus County. 

There is hardly a man of more versatile abili- 
ties and accomplishments than David Hilger in the 
State of Montana. For years his has been a dis- 
tinguished name in the democratic party, but his 
prominence in politics is due primarily to the dis- 
interested work he has accomplished in behalf of 
the public welfare. Politics with him is incidental 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



19 



to a genuine and sincere public spirit and public 
service. In the spring of 1894 he was appointed 
register of the United States Land Office at Lewis- 
town, and at that time made his home in the city. 
He served four years. He was selected to pre- 
side over the first County Democratic Convention 
held in Fergus County, and was chairman of the 
first County Central Committee, and also chairman 
of the first Democratic Municipal Convention in 
Lewistown. At considerable sacrifice of his pri- 
vate interests he served as a member of the Eighth 
Legislature in 1903-04, participating in the two ex- 
tra sessions of that assembly, one to appropriate 
money for a Montana exhibit at St. Louis in the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, and the other to 
consider the Fair Trial Bill which was made a law. 
This recalls a more recent service when by ap- 
pointment of Governor Stewart he was made chair- 
man of the Montana Commission of the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition at San Francisco in 1915. This 
commission had in charge the expenditure of a sum 
of $78,000, $50,000 having been appropriated by the 
Legislature and $28,000 subscribed by the citizens. 
The record of Montana in the Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position is a notable one and is described in detail 
in the general history of that exposition. 

May 14, 1917, Governor Stewart appointed Mr. 
Hilger a member of the State Tax and License 
Commission for a term of two years. On April 
21, 1916, he was elected a delegate to the National 
Democratic Convention in St. Louis. Of the four- 
teen candidates he received the largest number of 
votes. 

Mr. Hilger was one of the Lewistown citizens 
who brought about the establishment of a county 
high school and served as chairman of the board 
of trustees while the high school building was 
under construction. He was also a member of the 
board of trustees of the Carnegie Library when it 
was built and for a number of years afterward. 
By appointment of Governor Norris he was a 
member of the Commission on the Conservation of 
Our Natural Resources and the drafting of the pres- 
ent laws governing the state lands of Montana. 

Mr. Hilger is one of Montana's prominent mem- 
bers of the Order of Elks, his local affiliation being 
with Lewistown Lodge No. 456, of which he is a 
past exalted ruler. He was district deputy in 1906 
and has been a delegate to the Grand Lodge of 
Denver in 1905, Los Angeles in 1915, Baltimore 
in 1916, Boston in 1917 and Atlantic City in 1918. 

October 20, 1884, Mr. Hilger married Miss Chris- 
tina H. Fergus, daughter of William Fergus and a 
niece of James Fergus, the distinguished pioneer 
for whom Fergus County was named. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hilger had five children, two daughters dy- 
ing in infancy. The oldest daughter. Maude H., 
is the wife of George H. Osborne, a rancher in 
Fergus County, and they have a daughter, Chris- 
tine. David J., the only son of Mr. Hilger, is as- 
sistant cashier of the Montana State Bank at Geral- 
dine and married Mary Dowd. The youngest 
daughter, Christina L., is a student in the Fergus 
County High School. 

WILLIAM L. LAWSON. Possessing undoubted ex- 
ecutive and business ability and judgment, William- 
L. Lawson, who is prominently associated with the 
industrial affairs of Billings as assistant to the 
president of the Great Western Sugar Company, 
and as general manager of the concern, has been 
an important factor in advancing the growth and 
expansion of the company's interests in Montana, 
and very influential in furthering the success of the 
vast enterprise. 



The Great Western Sugar Company, founded in 
1902, was organized in the State of New Jersey, 
and is now capitalized at $30,000,000. Beginning 
on a rather modest scale, with its first factory at 
Loveland, Colorado, its business increased with sur- 
prising rapidity, and it now has ten factories in 
Colorado, three in Nebraska, two in Montana and 
one in Wyoming. The factory at Billings, situated 
about six miles south of the city limits, was built 
in 1905, the plant consisting of five individual brick 
structures, including the main building, the office 
building, the warehouse, the lime kiln, and the 
power house. The officers of the Billings plant are 
as follows : W. L. Lawson, assistant to the presi- 
dent, and general manager; Joseph Maudru, general 
superintendent ; F. H. Ballou, assistant chief en- 
gineer ; C. F. Ridley, cashier ; C. S. Milhiser, agri- 
cultural superintendent ; and H. S. Barringer, factory 
superintendent. This plant has a capacity of 2,000 
tons per day. The company's other Montana plant, 
located at Missoula, has a capacity of 1,000 tons 
a day. Its four officers are F. A. Wilson, local 
manager ; E. E. Durmin, factory superintendent ; R. 
M. Barr, agricultural superintendent of that district; 
and H. Towner, cashier, assistant to W. L. Law- 
son, who has general supervision over the Missoula 
territory. 

A native of Canada, W. L. Lawson was born at 
Hamilton, Ontario, September 28, 1870, of Scotch 
parentage. His father, the late William Lawson, 
was born in 1830, in Fifeshire, Scotland, and was 
there reared and married. Brought up to seafaring 
pursuits, he was engaged in the merchant marine 
service during his earlier life. Emigrating to Amer- 
ica, he settled permanently in Canada, living first 
in Hamilton, but spending his later years in Toronto, 
where his death occurred in 1912. He married 
Jessie Kerr, who was born in Edinboro, Scotland, 
in 1838, and died in Toronto, Canada, in 1917, 
having survived him five years. Jessie Kerr Law- 
son became a well known writer of Scottish stories 
and verses. 

Scholarly in his ambitions and attainments, W. L. 
Lawson was graduated from the University of Tor- 
onto in 1893, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
and Science, and for four years thereafter remained 
in that institution as assistant professor of chem- 
istry. Accepting a position then as chemist for 
the Alvarado Sugar Company, at Alvarado, Cali- 
fornia, he held it for four years, after which he 
was technical man for the Idaho-Utah Sugar Com- 
pany for a year. Becoming associated with the 
Great Western Sugar Company in 1005, Mr. Lawson 
was superintendent of the factory at Eaton, Colo- 
rado, for a year, and was then transferred to 
Sterling, Colorado, as manager of the plant there. 
Making good in that capacity, he was eventually 
given charge of two other Colorado factories, one 
at Brush and the other at Fort Morgan. In May, 
1915, he was promoted to his present position of 
assistant to the president of the company, and gen- 
eral manager of the Montana division of the Great 
Western Sugar Company, an office of great respon- 
sibility which he is filling with credit to himself 
and to the satisfaction of the firm. 

Politically Mr. Lawson is a republican, but takes 
no active part in the management of public affairs. 
He is a member of the Society of Chemical In- 
dustry, an international organization in which he 
takes much interest. Socially he belongs to both 
the Billings Club and the Billings Midland and 
Empire Club. Prominently identified with the Ma- 
sons, Mr. Lawson is a member of Eaton Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, of 
Eaton, Colorado ; of Denver Chapter, Royal Arch 



20 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Masons; of Denver Commandery, Knights Templar; 
of Denver Consistory, being a thirty-second degree 
Mason; and of El Jebel Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Denver. 
Mr. Lawson is a brother of A. C. Lawson, pro- 
fessor of geology in the University of California, 
and of A. A. Lawson, professor of botany in the 
University of Sidney, Australia. He is also a brother 
of James Kerr Lawson, the artist of London, Eng- 
land, who has been commissioned by the Canadian 
Government to paint some of the European battle- 
fields where the Canadian armies fought. 

JAMES K. MURPHY, assistant superintendent of 
the Washpe Reduction Works of the Anaconda 
Copper Mining Company, is one of the alert and 
energetic young men connected with this corpora- 
tion who are proving their worth as practical engi- 
neers and citizens. He was born at Butte, Montana, 
July 6, 1889, a son of James W. Murphy, and grand- 
son of Jeremiah J. Murphy, who was born in Ire- 
land in 1815, and died at Butte, Montana, in 1890. 
Coming to the United States in young manhood, 
he remained for a time in New Jersey, and then 
came as far west as Iowa, about the time of the 
war between the states, there being a pioneer farmer. 
In 1880 he extended his travels to Salt Lake City, 
Utah, and in 1885 reached Butte, Montana, where 
he lived in retirement until his death. His wife 
was a Miss Kane, born in Ireland, but brought to 
the United States in girlhood. Her father at one 
time owned a hunting . lodge in Ireland that was 
patronized by the royalty of England. Mrs. Jere- 
miah J. Murphy died at Butte, Montana. 

James W. Murphy was born in New Jersey in 
1859, and was reared in that state and Iowa, and 
came to Butte, Montana, in 1884, being then unmar- 
ried. Interested in real estate transactions, he 
formed a partnership with a Mr. Cannon under the 
firm style of Murphy & Cannon, and it was the 
pioneer one of its kind at Butte. James W. Mur- 
phy played an important part in the early develop- 
ment of Butte, both as a realty- dealer and citizen, 
but left that city for Portland, Oregon, in 1912, 
and has since then been living retired. He is a 
democrat. Born and reared in the Roman Catho- 
lic Church, he is a devout member of that faith. 
His wife was Miss Jessie Callahan before her mar- 
riage, and she was born at Norwood, Ontario, Can- 
ada in 1863, and died at Butte, Montana, in 1898. 
Their children were as follows : Rosalba, who mar- 
ried Frederick Laist, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work ; James K., whose name heads 
this review ; and Clinton, who died at Seattle, 
Washington, in 1918, when twenty-eight years of 
age. 

James K. Murphy was graduated from the Butte 
High School in 1907, following which he entered 
the School of Mines of Butte, from which he was 
also graduated in 1911, with the degree of Engineer 
of- Mines. In June, 1911, he came to Anaconda 
to engage with the Anaconda Copper Mining Com- 
pany as assistant testing engineer, and was pro- 
moted to be one of the chemists in the laboratory, 
and then chief chemist. Still later he was made 
superintendent of the roasting plants, and subse- 
quently the supervision of the Cottrell treaters was 
accorded him. Finally he became assistant su- 
perintendent of the Washoe Reduction Works of 
the company, with offices in the Chemical Build- 
ing, two miles east of Anaconda. Like his father, 
he is a democrat and Catholic. He belongs to Ana- 
conda Council No. 882, Knights of Columbus, in 
which he is a Fourth Degree Knight, to the 
Anaconda Club and to the Anaconda Country Club. 



He holds membership in the American Institute 
of Mining Engineers. 

In 1910 Mr. Murphy was married to Miss Emma 
Reeves, a daughter of Mrs. Roy Alley Reeves of 
Spokane, Washington, but formerly a resident of 
Butte, Montana. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy have the 
following children : Marion, who was born February 
17, 1912, and his twm sister, Frances. The family 
reside at the Montana Hotel. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Murphy are very prominent socially, and are held 
in the highest esteem by their wide circle of friends. 

HENNING RUSSELL BODEN. Success in life comes 
to the deserving. It is an axiom demonstrated by all 
human experience that a man gets out of life what 
he puts into it, plus a reasonable interest on the in- 
vestment. The individual who inherits a large estate 
and adds nothing to his fortune cannot be called a 
successful man. He who falls heir to a large fortune 
and increases its value is successful in proportion to 
the amount he adds to his possession. But the man 
who starts in the world unaided and by sheer force 
of will, controlled by correct principles, forges ahead 
and at length reaches a position of honor among his 
fellow citizens achieves success such as represen- 
tatives of the two former classes can neither under- 
stand nor appreciate. To a considerable extent, 
Henning R. Boden, chief clerk to the Superintendent 
of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, at Mis- 
soula, is a creditable representative of the class last 
named, a class which has furnished much of the 
bone and sinew of the country and added to the 
stability of our government and its institutions. 

Henning Russell Boden was born at Lake City, 
Minnesota, on the 2nd day of August, 1883. His 
father, Anders Boden, was a native of the Scandi- 
navian Peninsula, where he was born in 1835, and 
his death occurred at St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1911. 
In 1882 he came to the United States, settling in 
Lake City, Minnesota, of which locality he was a 
pioneer. In 1887 he moved to St. Paul, where he 
lived until his death. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Sophia Saline, and who now resides at North 
St. Paul, was also born on the Scandinavian Penin- 
sula. To Mr. and Mrs. Boden were born eight 
children, two daughters and six sons. 

Henning R. Boden, the seventh child and the fifth 
son, was educated in the public schools of St. Paul, 
Minnesota. In 1897, he entered the employ of a 
furniture factory at North St. Paul, and literally 
learned every detail of the mechanical end of its 
business. He began in the lumber yard, from whence 
he went into the the wood-working machine de- 
partment; thence to the finishing machine shop; 
thence to the cabinet-making department; thence 
to the paint shop and packing or shipping room. Mr. 
Boden next entered the employ of an organ and 
piano factory at North St. Paul, where he fired a 
battery of stationary boilers ; worked in the machine 
shop and in the "action" making department. Leav- 
ing here, he next entered the employ of a street 
railway as a laborer and then as a carpenter. He 
then fired a traction boiler in a threshing outfit 
operating near the Twin Cities, and also had some 
experience as a locomotive fireman on one of the 
railroads leading out of St. Paul. Later he was 
employed by a table company at North St. Paul as 
a cabinet maker. These incidents of his various 
employments covered the period from 1897 to 1902. 
During this period he, through persistent night 
study, completed a high school course, also a course 
in shorthand and bookkeeping at one of the leading 
business colleges in the Twin Cities. He then 
entered the service of one of the great rail systems 
operating between St. Paul and Chicago, and later 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



21 



on was , connected with one of the transcontinental 
systems radiating from St. Paul. He was next em- 
ployed by a road making machine concern as a 
bookkeeper and stenographer. After recovering 
from a severe illness Mr. Boden entered the service 
of the Northern Pacific Railway Company's engi- 
neering department, and at the same time took up the 
study of civil engineering, in which he finished a 
regular course, including mathematics, geometry, 
trigonometry, surveying, topography, electricity, 
dynamo and motor work. Then, finding many 
knotty legal problems constantly arising in the rail- 
road work, he finished a law course, at the end of 
which, in June, 1916, he was admitted to the bar of 
Montana. 

Mr. Boden has now served nearly twelve years as 
the head of the Superintendent's offices at Glendive 
and Missoula, and has, by his accuracy, expediency 
and thoroughness, made himself practically indis- 
pensable. He possesses a practical and original turn 
of mind. 

Mr. Boden first came to Glendive as head of the 
Superintendent's office there in June, 1908, and in 
April, 1915, came to Missoula in the same position 
and has continued in that capacity since. 

Politically Mr. Boden gives his support to the 
Republican Party, though not in any sense an as- 
pirant for public office. 

On January 29, 1907, at Stillwater, Minnesota, Mr. 
Boden was married to Margaret Anderson, the 
daughter of Hector and Margaret (Whalen) Ander- 
son, and to them have been born two children, Robert 
Hector, born November 14, 1910, at Glendive, and 
Jane Margaret, born May 20, 1915, at Missoula. 
Hector Anderson was born in 1844 in Inverness, 
Scotland, where he was reared and educated. He 
came to the United States in young manhood and 
located at Stillwater, Minnesota, where he engaged 
in lumbering. At Stillwater he was married to 
Margaret Whalen, born in New Brunswick, Canada, 
coming to Minnesota at the age of five years. She 
now resides at St. Paul, Minnesota. They became 
the parents of eight children, of whom Margaret was 
the youngest. 

JOHN O. HICHAM. For many years it has been 
claimed by sailors and pleasure travelers that once 
a person became embued with the spirit of the Orient 
it was impossible for him to live elsewhere, and this 
statement appears to be equally true of the West. 
Time and again have those who traveled toward 
the setting sun in this great country, purposing to 
make their stay a temporary one, sought to resume 
their former life in communities further to the east, 
but in vain, and they were drawn back to the "land 
of opportunity," the "places of broad vision" and 
eventually they have become a part of the won- 
derful commonwealths which are going ahead by 
leaps and bounds. John O. Higham, banker and 
ranchman of Belfry, Montana, is one of these 
cases in question, and his present prosperity proves 
that the West has been a good foster mother, while 
what he has accomplished shows that he is a valuable 
addition to the family. 

John O. Higham was born at Lanesboro, Minne- 
sota, February 22, 1872. His father, Andrew 
Higham, having also been possessed with the pioneer 
spirit, which sought adventure and led him to leave 
his native land of Norway, where he was born 
in 1828, and come to the United States in 1854, and 
after a short stay at Rushford, Minnesota, home- 
stead at Lanesboro, Minnesota, where he was one of 
the first settlers. He resided on this homestead 
until 1909, when he sold it and retired, dying at 
Lanesboro in October, 1918. In politics he was a 



republican. The Lutheran Church of Lanesboro held 
his membership and he was very active in church 
work. His wife, Ingeberth Sherdall, was born in 
Norway in 1827, but she was reared in Minnesota. 
Her death occurred at Lanesboro in January, 1919. 
She and her husband had the following children: 
Caroline, who married Ed Brekke, a farmer of 
Lanesboro, Minnesota; and John O., whose name 
heads this review. 

John O. Higham attended the public schools of 
Lanesboro and the high school of Grand Forks, 
North Dakota, and until he was seventeen years old 
made himself useful on his father's farm. At that 
age he went to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and a 
year later, in 1890, came to Montana, where for two 
years he was employed in construction work on 
the Great Northern Railroad at Fort Assiniboine 
at the time this road was entering Montana. In 
1892 Mr. Higham went to Sacramento, California, 
and for two years was there engaged in farming. 
Returning to Montana, for two years he was em- 
ployed as a cow boy and rode the range on the 
present site of Castle. Going back to his birthplace, 
for two years he was engaged as a clerk in one 
of its mercantile establishments, but the call of the 
West brought him back, and in 1900 he reached 
Absarokee, Montana, where for three years he was 
a member of the sales force of one of the general 
stores of that place, and at the same time he was 
gaining a practical knowledge of the needs of the 
people. Seeing the possibilities of sheep farming, he 
was engaged in that line for eighteen months near 
Joliet, in Carbon County, and then purchased a store 
at Joliet and for two years was engaged in a mer- 
cantile business. Selling it at a profit, he spent a 
year in California, and then, in 1906, he established 
himself at Belfry, Montana, and organized the Bank 
of Belfry in conjunction with W. F. Meyer, of Red 
Lodge, and John W. Chapman, also of Red Lodge. 
From the first Mr. Higham has been cashier, his 
fellow officials being John W. Chapman, president, 
and F. H. Alden, vice president, both of these gentle- 
men being prominent men of Red Lodge, Montana, 
so that the active management of the bank devolves 
on Mr. Higham. The capital of the bank is 
$20,000 and the surplus is $5,000. This stable in- 
stitution is located on Broadway. This bank is a 
vender of state-wide credit, and through alliance 
with great financial institutions of other communities 
its officials are able to provide customers with exact 
and confidential information essential to their ex- 
pansion and the carrying on of ordinary business 
affairs, while at the same time it transacts the usual 
functions of a banking house, the men connected 
with it being a guarantee of its reliability and con- 
servative policies. 

Mr. Higham is also a director of the First National 
Bank of Bridger, a director and vice president of 
the Gibson Culver Company of Fromberg, Montana. 
He owns a ranch one-half mile south of Belfry, con- 
taining 160 acres of irrigated land, where he main- 
tains his residence, and he also owns 1,200 acres 
in the Pryor Agency, Big Horn County, Montana. 
Politically he is a republican. He affiliates with the 
Presbyterian Church. Very prominent in Masonic 
circles, he belongs to the Star in the West Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of Red Lodge; 
Billings Chapter No. 6, Royal Arch Masons ; Aide- 
mar Commandery No. 5, Knights Templar; Algeria 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Helena, Montana ; and to Helena Con- 
sistory, in which the thirty-second degree has been 
conferred upon him. Mr. Higham is also a member 
of Bear Tooth Lodge, Benevolent and Protective 



22 



Order of Elks, of Red Lodge; and Joliet Camp, 
Modern Woodmen of America. 

In 1905 Mr. Higham was married at Billings, 
Montana, to Miss Jennie M. Wight, a daughter of 
James and Mary (Ettien) Wight, both of whom are 
now deceased. Mr. Wight was a rancher and stock- 
man in the Judith Basin of Montana, arriving there 
in 1884 and later became a pioneer of Joliet, Mon- 
tana. Mrs. Higham is a graduate of the State 
Agricultural College at Bozeman, Montana, and a 
cultivated lady of considerable attainments. Mr. and 
Mrs. Higham have four children, namely: Jack W., 
who was born December 14, 1907 ; Weldon O., who 
was born August 20, 1909; Robert X., who was born 
August 30, 1914; and Elizabeth U., who was born 
April 30, 1917. Mr. Higham's prosperity has come 
to him not by the royal road, but through the 
medium of hard work and intelligent foresight. He 
has known how to make good investments and his 
excellent judgment in this respect makes him an 
ideal banker, his customers feeling that one who had 
been able to multiply his own belongings so ad- 
vantageously could add to their material prosperity 
equally well. Although his various duties have not 
permitted his entering public life, he takes an in- 
telligent and effective interest in civic matters, and 
has the welfare of Belfry at heart. 

HENRY H. WILSON, M. D. A boy soldier in the 
Union army during the Civil war, Doctor Wilson 
took up the study of medicine when he returned to 
civil life and has been actively engaged as a physi- 
cian and surgeon for over half a century. Doctor 
Wilson practiced many years in Missouri and for 
the past twenty years his home has been at Lewis- 
town, where he still looks after an extensive busi- 
ness in his profession. 

Doctor Wilson was born at Langdon in Sulli- 
van County, New Hampshire, June 3, 1846, a son 
of Willard and Mary Ann (Hardy) Wilson, both 
natives of New York State. .His father, who was 
born in 1812, was a California forty-niner, going 
to the Pacific Coast around the Horn and return- 
ing by way of the Isthmus of Panama. On reach- 
ing the Atlantic side of the Isthmus he took pas- 
sage on a Government warship commanded by 
Captain, afterward Admiral, Porter. This vessel 
before reaching the United States put into port at 
Havana, Cuba. For several years Willard Wilson 
continued farming in New Hampshire, and in 1856 
left the bleak New England hills and moved to 
Illinois, locating at Astoria in Fulton County. Some 
years later, during the Civil war, he returned to 
New Hampshire, and died in that state in 1863. He 
was a whig in politics. 

Doctor Wilson was the second of three children, 
two of whom are still living. He was only six- 
teen years old when on September 2, 1862, he vol- 
unteered in Company H of the Eighty-Fifth Illinois 
Infantry. He saw much arduous service with his 
command, and was in the war until mustered out 
at Camp Butler, Illinois, June 19, 1865. He began 
the study of medicine with Drs. W. T. and B. C. 
Toler, and finished his course in the medical de- 
partment of the University of Iowa at Keokuk, 
g-raduating in 1867. Doctor Wilson first practiced 
at Lindley in Grundy County, Missouri, and in 1886 
moved to Humphreys in the same state, and shortly 
afterward to Trenton, where he was in practice 
until May, 1899. Since that date his home has been 
at Lewistown, and his offices as physician and sur- 
geon are in the First National Bank Building. 

Doctor Wilson has devoted the best years of his 
life to the practice of his profession and has won 



an enviable esteem in every community he has 
served. He is an independent in politics. 

In April, 1868, he married Miss Esther Green. 
Five children were born to their marriage : Min- 
nie N., Emma, H. K., Lionel and Ernest. Ernest 
died at the age of four years. Emma is an accom- 
plished business woman and is at the head of one 
of the important departments of the Chicago de- 
partment store of Carson, Pine & Company. The 
son, H. K., is a graduate of the Northwestern Uni- 
versity Medical Department of Chicago with the. 
class of 1904, and is one of the leading physicians 
and surgeons of Lewistown. The son Lionel, was 
a railway engineer with the Chicago, Rock Island 
road at Canton, Missouri, and died at the age of 
twenty-eight. 

GEORGE J. KOBELIN, a prosperous rancher and busi- 
ness man of Pompey's Pillar, represents the third 
generation of the family that has played a useful 
part in American citizenship and industry. The 
residence of the family for many years has bee'n 
in the Central West, in Illinois and Indiana. 

Mr. George J. Kobelin was born in Kankakee 
County, Illinois, September 15, 1867. His grand- 
father, George Kobelin, was born in Germany in 
1783, and came to the United States with his family 
when past middle age. He lived for many years 
at LaPorte, Indiana, where he died in 1881, when 
ninety-eight years of age. William Kobelin, father 
of the Montana rancher, was born in Germany in 
1836, and was six years old when he came to the 
United States with his parents in 1842. The 
family settled at LaPorte, where he grew up 
and married. He spent all his life as a farmer, 
and after his marriage moved to Kankakee County, 
Illinois, and in 1873 returned to Indiana and settled 
in Lake County, where he lived until his death in 
January, 1915, in Lowell. He was prominent in 
public affairs in Lake County, serving as township 
trustee four years and county commissioner six 
years. He was a republican and Mason. William 
Kobelin, who was of German ancestors, married a 
French girl, Margaret Paquin, who was born in 
Paris in 1844. She died at Lowell, Indiana, in Sep- 
tember, 1908. They had a large family of children, 
nine in number, mentioned briefly as follows : 
Amelia, who is the wife of Frank Stark, a farmer 
at St. Johns, Indiana ; Helen, wife of Albert Maack, 
a banker at Crown Point, Indiana ; George J. ; 
Laura, who married James Robinson, and resides at 
Hebron, Indiana ; Minnie, wife of Arthur Pattee, 
an attorney-at-law at Denver,' Colorado; William, 
connected with the Standard Oil Company at Crown 
Point, Indiana ; Frank, who has no settled place 
of residence ; John, of Everett, Washington ; and 
Carrie, unmarried. 

George J. Kobelin grew up and received his edu- 
cation in Indiana, living on his father's farm until 
he was twenty-two years of age. He had to start 
life without special advantages or capital and was 
a farm hand in Lake County, Indiana, for a number 
of years. Seeing the opportunities of the far West 
he came to Billings in 1903, spending one year with 
Yegen Brothers, following which he engaged in 
the stock and merchandise business. In 1915 Mr. 
Kobelin turned all his resources to ranching, and 
has been an active factor in Pompey's Pillar. He 
owns eighty acres of valuable irrigated land, be- 
sides 640 acres of dry farm and grazing land, and 
does an extensive business in raising stock. He is 
also vice president of the First National Bank of 
Pompey's Pillar. 

Mr. Kobelin is a republican and a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. On December 2, 1889, at Crown 



Point, Indiana, he married Martha L. Smith, a 
daughter of Levi and Lydia (Hayden) Smith. Her 
father died in Lake County, Indiana, in 1876. He 
was a farmer. Her mother is now living at Hunt- 
ley, Montana. Mrs. Kobelin, who died February 
13, 1919, was the mother -of seven children.' Their 
names in order of birth are Murray William, Guy, 
Eileen, Ruby, Jules, Elliott and Alberta. They are 
still with their father. Ruby and Jules are high 
school students, while Elliott and Alberta are still 
in grammar school. Murray is engaged in ranch- 
ing, and Guy, upon his return from the service, 
entered the employ of a Billings bank as teller. 

CHARLES I. EMERSON, cashier for the Anaconda 
Copper Mining Company, and one of the solid, re- 
liable men of this great corporation, was born at 
St. Paul, Minnesota, July 27, 1871. He is a son of 
Horace E. Emerson, and grandson of Horace 
Emory Emerson, a native of Maine, where he 
spent his entire life, and where for many years 
he was engaged in work as a millwright. The 
Emerson family came from England in the days 
prior to the American Revolution and became sub- 
stantial citizens of Maine. On his mother's side 
Charles I. Emerson comes of Irish stock. 

Horace E. Emerson was born at Bangor, Maine, 
in 1839, and died at St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1913. 
During his boyhood and youth he lived at Bangor, 
but soon after reaching his majority went to Port- 
age, Wisconsin, and from there enlisted to serve in 
the Union Army during the war between the states 
in 1861, as a member of the Second Wisconsin 
Volunteer Infantry, and among other engagements 
was at the battle of Antietam. After the close of 
the war he returned to Portage, Wisconsin, and was 
engaged in railroading, first with the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul Railroad, and later with the 
Great Northern Railroad, making St. Paul his head- 
quarters. In all of his railroad work he was a 
locomotive engineer. Always a strong republican, 
he gave his party his vigorous support. He was 
a Mason and a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. Horace E. Emerson was married to 
Emma C. Kittredge, born at Detroit, Michigan, in 
1848. She survives him and makes her home at 
St. Paul, Minnesota. Their children were as fol- 
lows: Horace E., Jr., who is a grain buyer for the. 
Thompson Elevator Company of Duluth, Minne- 
sota; George H., who went to Siberia as colonel 
of 300 railroad men to take charge of the Siberian 
Railroad during the great war, is a resident of St. 
Paul, Minnesota ; and Charles L, whose name heads 
this review. 

Charles I. Emerson attended the schools of St. 
Paul, until he was fourteen years old, when he left 
school and began learning the stereotyper's trade, 
and followed it for four years and then for four 
years was with Fairbanks & Morse, scale manu- 
facturers. In 1896 Mr. Emerson came to Anaconda 
to engage with the Anaconda, Butte & Pacific Rail- 
road 'as wiper, being soon promoted to master me- 
chanic's -clerk, then timekeeper, and finally cashier, 
with offices in the general office building of the 
Washoe Reduction Works, two miles east of Ana- 
conda. Like his father, Mr. Emerson is stanch in his 
support of the republican party, and has been elected 
to two terms in the City Council of Anaconda. He 
is a member of the Anaconda Lodge No. 239, 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and of the 
Anaconda Country Club. The modern residence at 
105 Pine Street occupied by the Emersons is owned 
by them. 

In 1897 Mr. Emerson was married at Anaconda to 
Miss Alice B. Penniman, a daughter of Mr. and 



Mrs. E. P. Penniman of St. Paul, Minnesota, he 
being foreman in the jobbing department of the 
Staats Zeitung newspaper. Mr. and Mrs. Emerson 
became the parents of the following children: 
Georgia Lucille married C. O. Prest, who lives at 
Venice, California, and is an aviator, and she is a 
graduate of the Anaconda High School ; Edna Vir- 
ginia, who is in the training school for nurses 
connected with the Murray Hospital at Butte, Mon- 
tana ; Emily, who is attending the Anaconda High 
School, lives at home ; and Alice Amelia, who is 
also attending the same high school as her sister. 
These daughters are all very intelligent and the 
younger ones give promise of attaining to the schol- 
arship of their elders. During his association with 
his present company Mr. Emerson has exhibited 
such sterling characteristics that those in authority 
have had no hesitancy in advancing him and will 
doubtless put additional responsibilities upon him in 
asking him to assume still higher positions, for he 
is worthy of their confidence and they appreciate 
his work. In his civic life Mr. Emerson has proven 
himself a good citizen, and his work in the council 
gives him a record as a public official of which he 
has every reason to be proud. He and his family 
are very popular socially, and their pleasant home 
is the scene of many gatherings, their friends en- 
joying the gracious and hearty hospitality there 
dispensed. 

FRED C. STODDARD, whose name is numbered among^ 
the pioneer citizens of Missoula, was born in Jack- 
son County, Michigan, August 18, 1857. His Stod- 
dard ancestors were English and Colonial settlers 
in Massachusetts. His father, Dr. Samson Stoddard, 
was born in Vienna, Oneida County, New York, 
February 6, 1806, was reared there, and when a 
young man moved to Jackson, Michigan. He was a 
pioneer physician and surgeon in Jackson County, 
and one of the first members of his profession in 
southern Michigan. He returned to Oneida County 
for his bride in 1831, returning to Jackson, practic- 
ing his profession for some years, and later moved 
to a farm twelve miles west of Jackson City in 
Concord Township, developing property of 640 
acres. This farm he afterward divided among fiis 
children, and in 1875 retired to Albion, Michigan, 
where he died August 26, 1876. He was one of 
the original republicans in Michigan, in which state 
the republican party was first organized. He held 
several township offices. Doctor Stoddard was 
twice married. His second wife was Mrs. Emily 
(Thayer) Lathrop, a native of the State of New 
York, who died at Stevensville, Montana. Fred C. 
Stoddard is the older of her two children. Mary L. 
is the wife of William Baggs, connected with a mer- 
cantile establishment at Stevensville, Montana. 

Fred C. Stoddard attended public schools at 
Albion, Michigan, graduating from high school in 
1875. Soon afterward he became assistant book- 
keeper and cashier with the J. K. Armsby Company 
of Chicago. He came to Montana in 1880. The first 
two years he was a rancher in the Bitter Root Valley 
on Skalkaho Creek. Mr. Stoddard has been a resi- 
dent of Missoula since the fall of 1881. Here for 
five years he resumed his vocation as bookkeeper 
for the pioneer establishment of Worden and Hig- 
gins, and for five years was bookkeeper and assistant 
cashier in the Missoula National Bank, now the 
First National Bank of Missoula, the oldest National 
Bank in Montana. In 1890, he engaged in the real 
estate and insurance business, dealing principally in 
Missoula city property, and built up a business that 
covered all of Western, Montana. In 1911 he sold 
his insurance business, continuing the real estate line 



24 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



and later adding the insurance business, with offices 
in the Higgins Block. 

Mr. Stoddard married Miss Minnie A. Freeman, 
April 16, 1884, daughter of Avery and Amanda Free- 
man of Fort Wayne, Indiana, and they have four 
children : Bessie Louise at home ; F. Thayer, whose 
career is sketched in later paragraphs ; Helen Friend, 
who is a student and employed in the registrar's 
offices of the State University at Missoula; and Ida 
Freeman, also a student in the State University. 
The home is at 336 South Fifth Street. 

Mr. Stoddard served one term in the City Coun- 
cil of Missoula. He is a member of the Episcopal 
Church and is a charter member of the Laurel Lodge 
No. II of the Knights of Pythias and of Hell Gate 
Lodge No. 383 of the Elks. 

Mr. Stoddard during his long residence at Mis- 
soula, has had an active part in forwarding every 
interest of the State University. He was a member 
of the local building commission that had charge of 
the construction of the three original buildings on 
the university campus, and also the laying out of the 
grounds, and was later a member of the commission 
which put up the fourth building. These buildings 
are the University Hall, Science Hall, Gymnasium 
and Ladies' Dormitory, and all of them are still used 
for their original purpose. 

F. Thayer Stoddard, present county surveyor of 
Missoula County, is a highly trained engineer. He 
was born at Missoula January 28, 1888, was educated 
in the local public schools, graduating from high 
school in 1906, and is a graduate of the State Uni- 
versity with the class of 1910, with the degree 
Bachelor of Science in Mineralogy and Geology. In 
university he was a member of the Sigma Chi and 
Theta Nu Epsilon fraternities, and is now a stock- 
holder in the Sigma Chi Alumni Building Associa- 
tion. After graduating until the spring of 1911 he 
was on the engineering staff of the Chicago, Milwau- 
kee and St. Paul Railway. Following that he was 
assistant to Robert Sibley, a well known Missoula 
engineer. In 1912, and for two years afterward he 
was with C. W. Swearinger, a municipal and civil 
engineer in Western Montana. Mr. Stoddard was 
elected county surveyor in 1914, and is now in his 
third consecutive term. He is a member of Laurel 
Lodge No. 11, Knights of Pythias, a member of the 
Grand Lodge of that order, and of Hell Gate Lodge 
No. 383, of the Elks, and Harmony Lodge No. 49 
of the Masons. He also belongs to the Rotary Club, 
is a member of the American Legion and of the 
Missoula Chamber of Commerce, is a republican and 
a member of the Church of the Holy Spirit, Episco- 
pal. Mr. Stoddard is unmarried. He owns a mod- 
ern home at 336 South Fifth Street, East. 

JOHN M. HOWLAND is president of the How- 
land & Maser Security Company at Lewistown. 
This is one of the leading firms of investment 
agents in the state, and recently they negotiated 
with eastern capital for the largest loan on record 
in Montana, involving about $150,000 made on the 
noted Dengle brothers ranch properties near Grass 
Range, the securities being in the form of a bond 
issue. This is only one of many successful trans- 
actions carried out by Mr. Howland, who is an 
unusually keen financier and during a comparatively 
brief residence in Montana achieved the striking 
success which earlier experiences in North Dakota 
and Minnesota seemed to assure for him. 

Mr. Howland has come to success after a long 
road through a youth of poverty and struggle, has 
educated himself and has made himself what he 
is. He was born on a farm near Kilkenny, Le- 
Sueur County, Minnesota, -September 9, 1874, son 



of Edwin and Mary (Fitzgerald) Howland. His 
father was a native Irishman, while his mother 
was a granddaughter of the last Lord Edward 
Fitzgerald, representing one of the most power- 
ful families of Ireland but originally of Norman 
stock fhat settled in England about the time of 
the Conquest. John M. Howland was twelve years 
old when his father died. His widowed mother 
had four small children and struggled along with 
adverse circumstances several years until her death. 
The children managed the farm as best they could, 
and John M. Howland during that period of his 
life had no advantages beyond a few terms in com- 
mon school, sufficient to give him a knowledge of 
reading and writing only. 

At the age of sixteen he was requested by a local 
school board to take the place of his sister, ill with 
typhoid fever, and do what he could to keep her 
school running. So satisfactorily did he discharge 
his duties as an impromptu teacher that he finished 
out the term for four months, and then received a 
teacher's certificate. The following winter he 
taught a five months' term of school in LeSueur 
County, and for several years taught school in the 
winter and helped run the farm in the summer. 
The next important incident of his early life came 
at the age of twenty, when, after turning over his 
interest in the homestead to the other children, 
he opened a store at Mulford Station with another 
man as partner. The partnership continued about 
a year. They were doing a fair business, largely 
on the exchange plan, selling dry goods and gro- 
ceries and accepting butter, eggs and cordwood in 
payment. They also bought grain for the James 
Quirk Milling Company. When the partnership 
was dissolved the arrangement was that the partner 
should collect all the bills due and pay all the 
debts. Meanwhile Mr. Howland was teaching 
school at Porter in Lincoln County, Minnesota. 
While there he was notified that the accounts of 
the firm had been collected but no debts paid. Here 
was a crisis, which Mr. Howland converted into 
an opportunity. The measures he took then has 
been significant and typical of all his subsequent 
business career. He paid all the accounts he could 
with funds at hand amounting to about $1,500, and 
gave his notes to his largest creditors, a grocery 
house at St. Paul, and at the end of several years 
had every obligation discharged. 

In the meantime he was getting a better educa- 
tion for himself, attending the Winona High School 
one year, followed by one term of teaching at Red- 
wood Falls, and then two years as student in the 
Mankato State Normal. He paid his way through 
the Normal by driving a delivery wagon in the 
summer and in school months worked in a lawyer's 
office. All the heavy work he carried in and out 
of school did not prevent him from making a rec- 
ord for himself as a football player and debater. 
While he was at Mankato Normal the Spanish- 
American war broke out and he enlisted in Com- 
pany M of the Fifiteenth Minnesota Volunteers, 
serving as corporal until the regiment was mus- 
tered out a year later, in the spring of 1899. He 
contributed a number of articles on army life to 
newspapers. 

After the war he clerked in a large department 
store at Minneapolis and for the Northwestern 
Telephone Company and then settled at Kenmare, 
North Dakota. His first work there was teaching 
the town school. In August, 1901, he engaged in 
the land business, and in a few years was at the 
head of a complete organization handling real estate 
and farm loans. Mr. Howland also had some time 
for politics while in North Dakota. He served as 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



25 



deputy sheriff of Ward County, and police magis- 
trate and city justice in Kenmare and clerk of the 
local school board. 

In 1914 Mr. Howland transferred his home and 
business interests to Montana, locating at Great 
Falls, where he assisted in organizing the First 
Mortgage L.oan Company of Montana. This com- 
pany issued $500,000 worth of stock, and Mr. How- 
land personally sold $200,000 of that stock, most of 
it in Western Montana. No purchaser ever had rea- 
son lo regret buying the stock, since it has paid not 
less than seven per cent dividends. In June, 1915, 
Mr. Howland came to Lewistown, and opened an 
offio: in the Imislund Block. Associated with Al- ' 
fred Blaisdell, former secretary of the State of 
North Dakota, he formed the Blaisdell-Howland 
Agency, acting as investment agents of the North- 
western Trust Company of. St. Paul. This is the 
largest trust company west of Chicago. On May 
5, 1917, Mr. Blaisdell entered the Officers Training 
camp at Calexico, California, and on being rejected 
for a place in the Regular Army joined the Intelli- 
gence department. During his absence Mr: How- 
land had full charge of the business. 

Mr. Howland is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and 
Independent Order of Foresters. Besides handling 
large sums of money for other individuals and 
corporations he individually owns much real estate 
and farm and ranch property in a number of north- 
western states. 

January 15, 1902, he married Miss Anna R. Wil- 
son, of Kilkenny, Minnesota, his own native town. 
They are the parents of five children, John Wilson, 
James Martin, Anna Ruth, Vivian Margaret and 
Evelyn Agnes. 

THE PARISH OF LEWISTOWN. In the fall of 1875 
during a visit among the halfbreed Cree, Chippewa 
and Assiniboine Indians in the Milk River country, 
Rev. Father Lestan from St. Boniface, Winnipeg, 
made arrangements for the building of a log church 
so that religious instruction could be given and 
the Mass celebrated for the rather large settlement 
of these halfbreeds. The following winter Rev. 
Father J. B. Gene came from Canada and the half- 
breeds built a log church 20 by 40, at a point five 
miles below Fort Belknap. A short time later the 
halfbreeds were induced to send a delegation to 
the Spring Creek country. 

In the spring of 1879 a French Canadian by 
the name of Janeaux visited this country and find- 
ing good land and game in abundance took up a 
homestead. In August of that year, old man Ouel- 
lette, another halfbreed, came with his family to 
this country as a government scout, and about the 
same time another half breed by the name of Isaie 
Berger took up a homestead at the fork of the 
road leading to Grass Range and Gilt Edge, about 
five miles east of Lewistown. In the fall of the 
same year Father Damiani visited this part of the 
country from St. Peter's Mission to administer the 
last sacraments to a dying halfbreed, who was 
camped at the foot of the Judith Mountains, and 
found about twenty-eight Catholic families living 
in that immediate vicinity. All these people had 
originally come from St. Joseph and Walla Halla, 
North Dakota, and had drifted west and north 
to the Missouri River hunting the buffalo. For 
several years thereafter Father Damiani and Father 
Schuler visited these halfbreeds, spending several 
weeks with them at the time, and when the present 
Lewistown began to grow said Mass occasionally 
in the house of F. A. Janeaux, at the northwest 
corner of Main and High Streets. On several 



other occasions Mass was also celebrated in the 
school building which was at that time located 
on the south side of Main Street, between Fifth 
and Sixth avenues. 

On Sunday, October 10, 1886, a meeting of the 
Catholic citizens of Lewistown and vicinity was 
held at the schoolhouse to take steps toward raising 
money to erect a church. Mr. Brereton called 
the meeting to order. Mr. H. P. Brooks was 
elected chairman and Doctor Lapalme, secretary. 
Mr. D. Brereton was elected treasurer. On mo- 
tion of D. M. Crowley a committee of five, con- 
sisting of the following named persons, was ap- 
pointed to collect subscriptions : L. Belanger, C. 
J. McNamara, Michael Brass, D. M. Crowley and 
H. P. Brooks. Thomas Morgan and Michael Gur- 
nett were appointed as solicitors. Fi A. Janeaux, 
D. M. Crowley, and Oliver Pichette were elected 
directors by acclamation. It was resolved that in 
soliciting subscriptions cash or notes at ten per 
cent interest be accepted. 

A whole city block known as Block No. 2 of 
Janeaux Addition No. I was donated by Mr. Jane- 
aux, and in 1887 a frame church, 24 by 60, was 
erected and blessed by Bishop Brondel on Sep- 
tember 23, 1888. Lewistown being then the prin- 
cipal center of the county became the seat of the 
new county called Fergus in- 1885. At that time 
the nearest priest was living at St. Peter's Mission, 
a distance of more than 140 miles. At intervals 
the priest stationed at Fort Benton would visit 
the place and later also the priest stationed at 
Great Falls. The first record to be found in the 
archives of the church is signed by the Rev. J.' 
van den Heuvel recording the baptism on July 
10, 1893, of George Ouellette, who was born on 
January 14 of the same year. In September of 
the same year Father Dols, stationed at Great 
Falls, visited this place for several days. Father 
van den Heuvel remained in Lewistown as resident 
pastor until some time in October, 1895, and during 
his pastorate the records of the church show that 
124 people were baptized, three buried and twelve 
couples married. In April, 1895, lot 3 block 3, 
Janeaux Addition No. I, on which a little house 
was standing, was secured as a residence for the 
priest. From that time up to March, 1896, the place 
was attended by Rev. C. G. Follett, then stationed 
at Fort Benton, and some time in March, 1896, 
Rev. Father E. Demanez was appointed as second 
resident pastor of St. Leo's Church, and continued 
in that capacity until he was killed in a railroad 
wreck between Great Falls and Fort Benton in De- 
cember, 1898. From November, 1895, to December 9, 
1898, a few days before Father Demanez' death, 
160 baptisms are recorded, twelve funerals and fifteen 
marriages. In the month of August, 1897, Rev. Father 
H. Schuler, S. J., visited the halfbreeds living around 
Fort Maginnis, a military post located about twenty- 
miles from Lewistown. In January, 1899, Rev. Jo- 
seph C. Pudenz, assistant to Rev. Father Dols, of 
Great Falls, paid Lewistown a short visit. On 
March 22, 1899, about two acres of land were do- 
nated by the scout Ouellette to be used as a Cath- 
olic cemetery, together with a sixty-foot roadway 
leading to it from the city limits. 

In June, 1899, the parish was again placed in charge 
of a resident priest by the name of Father J. Ver- 
maat. Another priest, however, had been appointed 
to the place, but died on his way to Lewistown. His 
name was Rev. Father Werner. By this time Lewis- 
town had grown to such an extent that an addition 
had to be erected to increase the seating capacity of 
the church, thereby making room for about 200 
people. From January 19, 1899, until October 28, 



26 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



1904, 246 baptisms are on record, 16 funerals and 
38 marriages. 

In the fall of 1904 Rev. Father Vermaat was 
transferred to Red Lodge, and in December, 1904, 
Rev. Father Van Clarenbeek succeeded him, and in 
February, 1906, was given an assistant in the person 
of Rev. J. J. O'Carroll, an evidence of the growth 
of the church in this part of the state. In Novem- 
ber, 1906, Father Van Clarenbeek left for Oregon 
and was succeeded by Rev. Father V. J. van den 
Broeck. During Father Van Clarenbeek's adminis- 
tration 117 baptisms are recorded, 33 funerals and 
15 marriages. Besides the Rev. J. J. O'Carroll at 
different periods Rev. Fathers Rocque, Leahy, Moly- 
neux and Mueller acted as assistants in St. Leo's 
Church. 

With the coming of the new transcontinental line 
of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in the year 
1907 remarkable developments took place in Fergus 
County arid new towns were springing up in all 
directions along its lines, as also along the new line 
of the Burlington, which made its appearance shortly 
afterward. In accordance with this wide develop- 
ment of territory a number of parcels of property 
were secured by Rev. Father van den Broeck, includ- 
ing lots at Moore, Roundup, Philbrook, now known 
as Hobson, Hilger, Winifred, Brooks, Stanford, 
Grass Range, Danvers and Kolin. 

April 3, 1913, approximately nine lots were se- 
cured in Lewistown between Broadway and Wash- 
ington streets on Second Avenue, right in the heart 
of the city, with a large frontage on Washington 
Street, and other frontage on Second Avenue and 
Broadway. On this location building operations 
were started in the last week of July, 1915, and 
the building completed by the ist of October, 1916, 
at a total cost of about $50,000. The first services 
were held on October I5th, and the church dedi- 
cated by the Rt. Rev. M. C. Lenihan on Sunday, 
November i2th. A five class room school was estab- 
lished in the large basement, with an average at- 
tendance of 140 pupils under the able direction of 
the Daughters of Jesus. These sisters, who are 
French exiles, arrived in Lewistown on August 27, 
1903, and shortly after their arrival opened a school 
located on lot 2, block 3, Janeaux Addition No. I, 
next door to the priest's residence, where they con- 
tinued to teach until moving to the new location. 
For about four years they also conducted a small 
hospital at the corner of Miller and Watson streets, 
and in 1907 they erected what was eventually des- 
tined to be the best and largest hospital in Central 
Montana. In the summer of 1907 Father van den 
Broeck, having secured some property in Moore, 
erected thereon a church at a cost of $2,500, which 
by the 2nd of February, 1908, was ready for public 
worship and the first Mass was said by Rev. A. 
Mueller. The church was dedicated on October 27th 
by the Rt. Rev. M. C. Lenihan, of Great Falls. In 
1914 a church was built at Hobson at a cost of about 
$3,000, and one at Stanford at the same cost. In 
1916 one was built in Danvers and in 1917 one was 
built in Hilger at a cost of $5,000. 

In August, 1908 the Catholic population had grown 
sufficiently large to justify Bishop Lenihan in mak- 
ing a division and appointing a resident pastor at 
Roundup, with charge over all the territory on the 
Milwaukee line east of Meagher County and west 
of Rosebud and as far north as the Snowy Moun- 
tains. In September, 1916, another division was 
made with a resident priest at Moore, having 
charge of all the places on the Milwaukee south 
of Glengarry, and all the places on the main line 
of the Burlington in Fergus County. Before the 
completion of the church in Danvers, in the fall 



of 1916, a third division of the parish was made, 
and a priest appointed to Denton with charge over 
all the places along the Milwaukee line between 
Ware and Great Falls. Other parishes which must 
eventually be established include Hilger, to serve a 
large Catholic population in the territory north and 
northeast of Lewistown, and another at Grass Range 
in the center of a good farming district. With these 
various divisions and extensions St. Leo's Church at 
Lewistown may truly be called the mother church 
of Fergus County, being entirely surrounded with 
churches which have been built during the past 
twelve years. 

REV. VICTOR J. VAN DEN BROECK, who has zeal- 
ously labored in the interest of the Catholic Church 
in Montana for more than thirty-two years, has 
since 1906 been pastor, of St. Leo's at Lewistown. 
As told in the history of that parish on other 
pages, his administration has been a thoroughly con- 
structive and progressive one, and has made St. 
Leo's the mother church of Fergus County. 

He was born in Belgium, October 16, 1863, son 
of John and Adeline (Crame) van den Broeck. His 
father died in Belgium, April 21, 1902, at the age 
of seventy-two, and his mother on September 7, 
1912, at the age of seventy-six. Of their eight 
children five are still living, four daughters and one 
son. 

Father van den Broeck attended the common 
schools to the age of thirteen, then the College of 
Mechlin in Belgium, and was a student of philosophy 
under the famous Cardinal Mercrer. He graduated 
in 1887 from the University of Louvain and was 
ordained a priest, June 24, 1887. On the 27th of 
August of that year he sailed for New York City 
and on the I5th of September arrived in Helena, 
Montana, where he remained until September, 1888, 
as assistant priest at the Cathedral. He was then 
assistant priest of St. Patrick's in Butte until Sep- 
tember, 1891, when he was appoined pastor at Miles 
City in charge of the Sacred Heart Church. In 
September, 1898, he was transferred to St. Rose de 
Lima Church at Dillon. He was engaged in the 
heavy labors incident to these charges for five 
consecutive years. In September, 1003, on account 
of ill health, he removed to St. Peter's Mission, 
and on December 31, 1905, left for Europe, visit- 
ing Rome. He returned to Great Falls in March, 
1906, but after about one month secured a leave 
of absence and returned to Europe, where he re- 
mained until October, 1906. Soon afer his return 
to Montana he was appointed resident pastor of St. 
Leo's Church at Lewistown and began his duties 
there November 2, 1906. From the date of the 
beginning of his pastorate until 1918 the records 
of the parish show 1,067 persons baptized, 273 
persons buried, 290 couples married, and 308 per- 
sons confirmed. 

RALPH E. BODLEY, supervisor of the Gallatin 
Forest at Bozeman, has made a splendid record in 
the forestry service of the government. He pre- 
pared himself for this great work and profession 
while in university, and was advanced more rap- 
idly from the first grade of the work to the post 
of supervisor than any other man in the history 
of the service. 

Mr. Bodley was born in Wahoo, Nebraska, No- 
vember '26, 1887. His father, Eli Bodley, is now 
living at Los Angeles. Eli Bodley was born in Bed- 
fordshire, England, in 1854, was reared and married 
in England, and is a graduate of Oxford University 
and a man of very cultured mind and came of a 
family of good social standing in England. He had 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



27 



some training in military duty while in his native 
country. In 1884 he brought his family to the 
United States and became a farmer and stock 
rancher at Wahoo, Nebraska. He acquired a large 
amount of land and was a successful business man in 
that vicinity for many years. In 1911 he left his 
ranch and moved to Wahoo and since 1917 has been 
a resident of Los Angeles. Most of his ranch 
holdings have been sold, but he still retains a place 
of 200 acres a mile north of Wahoo. Mr. Eli 
Bodley is independent in politics, a very active mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church and one of the leaders 
in that denomination at Wahoo. His wife was Mary 
Hobbs, who was born in Bedfordshire, England, 
in 1857, and died at Wahoo, Nebraska, in 1896. 
She was the mother of five children, Ralph E. being 
the youngest. Annie M., the oldest, is the wife of 
O. M. Templeton, a farmer at Malmo, Nebraska; 
Herbert J. is a farmer at Colon, Nebraska ; while 
Rupert H. and George B. are both on the old home- 
stead at Wahoo. 

Ralph E. Bodley attended the rural schools of 
Saunders County, Nebraska, and graduated from 
the high school at Wahoo in 1908, following which 
he spent four months traveling in Europe, and dur- 
ing this time he visited England, Scotland, Switzer- 
land, France and Germany. In the fall of 1908 he 
entered the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and 
received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1912. 
He is a Phi Beta Kappa honor graduate of the 
University of Nebraska. The following year he 
spent in post graduate work, giving all his time 
to forestry, and received his Master's degree in that 
subject in 1913. He is also a member of the Alpha 
Zeta agricultural honorary fraternity. 

On July i, 1913, he reported for duty as forest 
assistant at Sheridan, Montana. For nine months 
he was on the Madison Forest in Madison County, 
Montana, and three months as deputy forest super- 
visor at Missoula. July 16, 1914, a year and two 
weeks after he entered the forestry service, he was 
made supervisor of the Gallatin Forest and began 
his work at Bozeman on that date, with offices in 
the Federal Building. 

Mr. Bodley is an independent in politics and a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Lin- 
coln, Nebraska. His home is a modern residence 
at 601 South Sixth Avenue. At Kearny, Nebraska, 
December 27, 1915, he married Miss Bernice A. 
Birch. Her mother, Mrs. Clara Birch, lives at Lin- 
coln. Mrs. Bodley is a graduate of the Lincoln 
High School and spent two years in the University 
of Nebraska. They have two sons, Russell Ralph, 
born November 15, 1916, and Donald Claire, born 
August 17, 1919. 

TOM HIRST has had a veteran's experience and 
service with the Montana State Penitentiary at Deer 
Lodge. He is deputy warden, a position he has filled 
for the past ten years. 

Mr. Hirst was born at Sheffield, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, February 7, 1866, and has been a resident of 
Montana for over thirty years. His father, George 
Henry Hirst, was born in 1837 and died in 1899, 
spending all his life in Yorkshire, being a mechanic 
and machinist in some of the famous factories, of 
Sheffield. He was liberal in politics and a member 
of the Established Church in England. George H. 
Hirst married Mary Lodge, who was born in York- 
shire in 1837 and died at Sheffield in 1900. Tom is 
the oldest of their three children. His sister Harriet 
is unmarried and living at Sheffield, being a seam- 
stress by occupation; Mabel, the other sister, is the 
wife of William Hollus, proprietor of a millinery 
store at Sheffield. 



Tom Hirst attended public school in Sheffield up 
to the age of thirteen. He then served a five years' 
apprenticeship at the machinists' trade. He left 
England and came to America when he was about 
nineteen years of age. At that time a well known 
firm of ranchers just east of Deer Lodge was Lodge 
& Beaumont, the senior partner, Joseph Lodge, be- 
ing an uncle of Tom Hirst. The latter came to 
Montana to join his uncle, reaching Deer Lodge on 
May 12, 1885, and was a ranch hand for the firm 
of Lodge & Beaumont until September, 1893. That 
was the date of his first service at the State Peni- 
tentiary. Then and for some years later Conley '& 
McTague were the contract wardens who had charge 
of the penitentiary. Mr. Hirst began as a guard, 
and in 1909, while away from Montana visiting in 
New York City, he was appointed deputy warden, 
the office he fills today. He is a member of the In- 
ternational Society for Identification, and is the of- 
ficial in charge of the finger prints and Bertillon 
measurements of the State Penitentiary. 

Mr. Hirst served two terms representing the First 
Ward in the City Council of Deer Lodge. He is a 
republican, has served as vestryman in the Episco- 
pal Church, and is very prominent in the Knights 
of Pythias, being past chancellor commander of 
Valley Lodge No. 6, for the past twenty-one years 
has been keeper of records and seals, and has the 
Veteran's Jewel for a continuous membership of 
twenty-five years in good standing. He is also a 
member of the Grand Lodge of the Knights of 
Pythias in Montana. 

Mr. Hirst, who with his family resides at 706 
Fourth Street, married at Deer Lodge in 1896 Miss 
Emma Larsen. They have two sons : Edward 
Lodge, born June 12, 1897, is in the junior class of 
the Montana State University at Missoula, and dur- 
ing the summer of 1919 was with a surveying party 
under the government on the Blackfeet National 
Forest Reserve ; George Niel, the younger son, was 
born October 29, 1900, was in the Powell County 
High School into his senior year, and in 1918 joined 
the Students' Army Training Corps at Missoula. 
He is now employed by the O'Neill Garage at Deer 
Lodge. 

Mr. Hirst's paternal grandfather was a native of 
Holland, moving from that country to Yorkshire, 
England. For a number of years he was employed 
in woolen mills and was also an English soldier in 
the Crimean war. 

Mrs. Hirst is a daughter of Niel Larsen, a native 
of Denmark, one of the earliest settlers in Montana, 
coming to the territory in the early sixties. He was 
a pioneer at Deer Lodge, buying a farm a mile and 
a half east of that town. He died soon after set- 
tling there. The old homestead is now owned by 
his heirs, and his daughter Miss Mary lives on the 
farm and manages it. Mrs. Hirst is a member of 
the Sons and Daughters of Pioneers of Montana. 
Her two sisters, Mary and Annie, both came to 
Montana prior to 1866 and are therefore members 
of the Pioneers of Montana Society. Mrs. Hirst 
was born at Council Bluffs, Iowa, while her parents 
were visiting in the east, and only for that incident 
does not possess the same qualifications as a pioneer 
as her sisters. Her sister Annie lives at Deer Lodge, 
widow of M. J. Padden, who was a conductor for 
the Milwaukee Railroad. 

JAMES CRAIG, M. D. Doctor Craig had practiced 
medicine and surgery nearly forty years before he re- 
tired from active service in 1911. He was the third 
physician to locate at Columbus, came to Montana 
nearly thirty years ago, and has been one of the 



28 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



men who has conferred dignity upon the medical 
profession in Montana. 

He comes of an old family of the State of Maine 
and was born at Dixmont in Penobscot County April 
28, 1850. His great-grandfather emigrated from Scot- 
land and was a colonial settler on the Kennebee 
River in Maine. His father, James S. Craig, was 
born in Maine in 1806, spent his life there as a 
farmer, and died at Dixmont in 1854. His wife was 
Margaret L. Tasker, who was born in Maine in 
1811 and died at Dixmont in the spring of 1861. 
Doctor Craig was therefore a small boy when his 
parents died. He was the youngest of their chil- 
Albert, who served the last year of the Civil war 
and then reenlisted in the regular army and died in 
1867 at Brownsville, Texas ; Margaret, who died at 
dren, those older than himself being: Sanford, a 
farmer, who died at Dixmont; Mary, who died at 
Dixmont; Benjamin, who spent his life as a farmer 
at Dixmont; Wilford, who was also a lifelong 
Dixmont in 1916, the wife of Nathan White, a 
farmer still living at Dixmont. 
. Doctor Craig attended public school at Dixmont, 
also the Dummer Preparatory School in the parish 
of Byfield, Massachusetts, and in 1872 entered the 
Maine Medical School at Brunswick, the medical de- 
partment of Bowdoin College. He received his de- 
gree Doctor of Medicine in 1876, and during the next 
fifteen years was busily engaged in a general prac- 
tice at Unity in Waldo County in his native state. 

Doctor Craig came to Montana in April, 1891. 
The following eight years he lived at White Sul- 
phur Springs, and in December, 1898, located at 
Columbus as the third physician in the town. He 
has served as health officer of Stillwater County and 
the City of Columbus, and while at White Sulphur 
Springs was county physician of Meagher County. 
He has been mayor of Columbus one term, during 
1910-1911, and though retired from his profession 
he employed his professional services as a patriotic 
duty during the World war, serving as examining 
physician of the local exemption board. 

Doctor Craig owns a modern home in Columbus, 
a ranch of 280 acres, operated by a tenant, located 
a mile north of Columbus, and is secretary of the 
Columbus Irrigation District. He is an independent 
republican in politics. He is past master of Still- 
water Lodge No. 62, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, a member of Billings Chapter No. 6, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Aldemar Commandery No. 5, 
Knight Templars, at Billings, and of Algeria Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine at Helena. He is also past 
grand of Castle Mountain Lodge No. 16, of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, at White Sulphur 
Springs and a present member of Yellowstone Lodge 
No. 85, at Columbus, and a former member of the 
encampment. 

To the enviable position he enjoys Mrs. Craig has 
contributed through her various activities and benev- 
olent character. Doctor Craig married at China, 
Maine, in 1885, Lizzie S. Gould. Her father was 
related to the same Gould family that produced 
the great financier Jay Gould. She is also directly 
descended from one of three Chase brothers who 
came from England and were colonial settlers in the 
State of Maine. Her father, John Gould, was born 
at Sandwich, New Hampshire, in 1815 and spent 
many years of his active career as a farmer at 
China, Maine, where he died in 1889. He was a 
republican and was a very influential member of the 
Friends Church. He married Mary T. Jones, who 
was born at Unity, Maine, in r829, and spent her 
last years in Montana, passing away at Columbus 
in 1912. Mrs. Craig was the third of three children. 
Her brother, Charles E., died at China, Maine, at 



the age of twenty-two months, and her sister, Ella 
M., died at China at the age of twenty-one. Mrs. 
Craig was educated in the public schools of China, 
Maine, attended an academy there, and a boarding 
school at Vassalboro, Maine, also the Preparatory 
School of Colby College at Waterville, Maine. Be- 
fore her marriage she taught eleven years in her 
home state, and four years after her marriage was 
identified with the schools of White Sulphur Springs, 
Montana. She is an active member of the Friends 
Church. She is also past matron of Martha Chapter 
No. ii of the Eastern Star at White Sulphur 
Springs, and a member of Treasure State Lodge 
No. 85 of the Rebekahs. 

EDGAR W. METTLER. In a conspicuous place on 
the roll of Fergus County's successful members 
of the legal profession is found the name of Edgar 
W. Mettler, an excellent type of the alert, pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizen whose record 
is an indication that success is ambition's answer. 
During the period of his prominent connection with 
cases of important legal jurisprudence he has be- 
come more or less a familiar figure in the courts 
of the county, and especially in his home commu- 
nity of Lewistown, and no lawyer of the city has a 
better record for high and straightforward pro- 
fessional conduct or for success earned with honor 
and without animosity. 

Mr. Mettler was born on his father's farm in 
Ogle County, Illinois, April 15, 1876, a son of Wil- 
liam J. and Selina H. (Roberts) Mettler. His 
father, born in New York State, died when seventy- 
nine years of age; and his mother, a native of Con- 
necticut, reached the age of seventy-seven years. 
They were the parents of two children: Minnie 
B., the wife of O. N. Phelps, and Edgar W. The 
Mettler family were pioneers of Illinois, and Wil- 
liam J. Mettler was a mere child when he accom- 
panied his parents from New York State to Winne- 
bago County, in that community the family settling 
on United States Government land near what is 
now the thriving City of Rockford. There William 
J. Mettler grew to manhood, working on the home- 
stead and securing his education in the public 
schools and subsequently moved to Ogle County, 
Illinois, where he passed the remainder of his life 
as a farmer and stockraiser. He took a prominent 
part in democratic politics during his day, and for 
several terms was a member of the board of com- 
missioners of Ogle County. 

Edgar W. Mettler attended the public schools of 
Ogle County and in his youth assisted his father 
in the work of the home farm. It was not his in- 
tention, however, to lead an agricultural life, for 
he had become imbued with a desire for a career 
in the law, and, as he had not the means where- 
with to pursue his studies, at the age of eighteen 
years he left the parental roof and secured em- 
ployment in the Chicago general offices of the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railway. Later he was 
employed by the First National Bank of Engle- 
wood at Chicago, and with the money earned in 
these positions paid his way through a course in 
Power & Orr's Business College and the Valparaiso 
(Indiana) University. Continuing to work at what- 
ever employment of an honorable character pre- 
sented itself, he managed to put himself through 
the law department of the University of Michigan, 
from which he was graduated with his cherished 
degree in 1903. At this time Mr. Mettler's funds 
were exhausted completely. Nearly every young 
lawyer must go through a probationary period 
while he is awaiting the business that will give his 
start in professional life, but Mr. Mettler was com- 



y 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



29 



pelled to do something to pay for his living. Mak- 
ing his way to Chicago, after much anxious search- 
ing he came to an agreement with a firm to look 
after some of its legal business at Houston, Texas, 
to which city the young lawyer accordingly made 
his way. He had been admitted to the Michigan 
bar in March, 1903 and in the same year received 
permission to practice in Texas, where he remained 
for about two years. His business there satis- 
factorily concluded, January 3, 1905, he came to 
Helena, Montana, where he passed the examina- 
tion for entrance to practice and was accepted. 
Subsequently he came to Lewistown, where he soon 
became associated in practice with H. Leonard 
DeKalb, under the firm name of DeKalb & Mettler, 
an association which continued until August, 1911. 
Mr. Mettler then practiced alone until 1915, when 
he formed a partnership with Jack Briscoe, as 
Mettler & Briscoe, but this was terminated in No- 
vember, 1918, and Mr. Mettler has since practiced 
alone. He maintains offices in the Empire Bank 
Building, and his practice is large and important 
and constantly growing. He is a member of the 
county and state associations of his profession, in 
the ranks of which he is regarded as a skilled and 
thoroughly informed lawyer, and one who respects 
the ethics of the calling. He has served as police 
judge of Lewistown for a number of years, an 
office in which he has ever administered justice 
in an impartial manner according to the legal status 
of each case. Fraternally he is affiliated with Lewis- 
town Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks, and Lewistown Lodge No. 3, Knights 
of Pythias. He exercises his right of franchise 
as a democrat. 

Judge Mettler was married December 31, 1905, 
to Miss Faith Oldes, the sixth child in a family 
o>f six daughters and two sons born to B. C. and 
Editha (Hoagland) Oldes, the latter of whom died 
when she was forty years of age. B. C. Oldes, who 
was a naiive of Iowa, and died in September, 1917, 
at the age of seventy-four years, fought as a sol- 
dier during the Civil war. He was a member of the 
Sixteenth Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and 
was under the command of General Sherman when 
captured by the enemy and confined in the notori- 
ous Andersonville Prison, where he was held for 
nine months. Later, his military career finished, 
he took up farming in Missouri and then returned 
to Iowa, but finally settled in Montana as a pioneer 
farmer of Meagher (now Fergus) County, where 
he' spent the final days of his life. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mettler are the parents of two children, namely: 
Frank and Ruth R., both attending school. 

EMIL HEIKKILA has had a varied experience along 
the northern boundary line of the United States 
since leaving school at Duluth, has been identified 
with several mercantile corporations in Montana 
and is now general manager of the Roberts Ele- 
vator Company at Roberts. 

His people were pioneers in the great mining dis- 
trict of Northern Michigan and Northern Minne- 
sota, and he was born at Calumet in the former 
state November 16, 1881. His father, Andrew Heik- 
kila, was born in Finland in 1834. He became a 
miner at Calumet, Michigan, and was later one of 
the pioneers who opened the great iron range in 
Northern Minnesota. While opening up that range 
he had his home chiefly at Tower, Minnesota. In 
1899 he. moved to Cromwell, Minnesota, where 
for the past twenty years he has been identified 
with farming and is now retired with a comfort- 
able competence. He is a republican, a member 
of the Lutheran Church and a stanch American 



citizen. He married Lizzie Mattonan, who was 
born in Finland in 1836, in which country they 
were married. Their children are four in num- 
ber, Emil being the youngest. The oldest, Matt, 
is a farmer at Cromwell, Minnesota; Hannah, living 
at Spokane, Washington, is the widow of Gust 
Sundman, who was a diamond driller in the mines ; 
Andrew, whose present residence is in Alaska. 

Emil Heikkila attended public school at Tower 
and Duluth, Minnesota, graduating from the school 
in the latter city in 1896. The following two years 
he spent as an employe of the Northern Pacific 
and the Duluth & Iron Range Railways. The next 
ten years he engaged in merchandising in Black 
Hills, South Dakota. Mr. Heikkila located at Red 
Lodge, Montana, in 1912, and the following six 
years he was manager of the Kaleva Cooperative 
Mercantile Association. In January, 1918, he bought 
an interest in the Roberts Elevator Company at 
Roberts, and has since been its general manager 
and a director of the company. In the meantime 
he has also acquired some extensive and valuable 
ranching interests, owning a property of 160 acres 
in Butte County, South Dakota, and a ranch of 
420 acres in Carleton County, Minnesota. His home 
in Roberts is a modern and complete residence. 

Mr. Heikkila is a republican, is affiliated with 
Star in the West Lodge No. 40, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Carbon Chapter No. 20, Royal 
Arch Masons, Bear Tooth Lodge No. 534 of the 
Elks, all at Red Lodge, and Gold Run Camp No. 
1217 of the Modern Woodmen of America at Lead, 
South Dakota. 

He married at Lead, South Dakota, in 1905, Miss 
Ellen Silfven, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Sep- 
panen) Silfven. Her parents live at Sturgis, South 
Dakota, her father being a retired farmer and was 
one of the pioneers of that state. Mr. and Mrs. 
Heikkila have two children, Alfred, born February 
27, 1906, and Ercel Dean, born January 7, 1911. 

LAVERNE K. PENCE when a young man familiarized 
himself with all details of the automobile, both 
from the business and the technical and mechanical 
standpoint. Some years ago he located at Bozeman, 
and in a comparatively short time has built up the 
leading garage and one of the chief automobile 
sales agencies in Southern Montana. The business 
is known as L. K. Pence & Co. 

Mr. Pence was born at Fairfield, Washington, 
September 14, 1892. His father, Charleg F. Pence, 
was born in Illinois in 1869, was reared in his native 
state, and when a young man joined an emigrant 
train going overland to California. From California 
he moved to Washington, where he married, and 
he spent some time as a prospector in the Coeur 
D'Alene country. He also lived at Fairfield, and is 
now a resident of Spokane, where for several years 
he was an attorney and a real estate broker, but 
is now retired. He is a democrat in politics. 
Charles F. Pence married Mary Beatrice Koontz, 
who was born in Missouri in 1872. Laverne K. 
is the oldest of their children. Grace is the wife 
of Leslie Francis, a wholesale produce merchant 
at Spokane; Irlene Winifred is a student in the 
University of Washington at Seattle. Roy is in the 
Spokane High School and Carl is a pupil in the 
grade schools of Spokane. 

Laverne K. Pence received his early education at 
Spokane, attended high school there, and at the 
age of eighteen left his studies to become a mechanic 
for F. A. Williams, the Ford agent at Spokane. 
For several years he had no other enthusiasm than 
the automobile, and he was soon pronounced an 
expert in the business. In August, 1916, he was 



30 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



appointed traveling representative for the Ford 
Motor Company, and until October of the same 
year traveled over the States of Montana, Idaho and 
Washington. In October, 1917, he established his 
present business at Bozeman, his partner being 
his former employer, F. A. Williams, of Spokane, 
until 1920. The firm of L. K. Pence & Company is 
now owned entirely by Mr. Pence. The garage and 
offices are at the corner of Babcock Street and Black 
Avenue. Mr. Pence handles automobile accessories, 
and is local agent at Bozeman and Gallatin County 
for the Ford cars, tractors and farm implements. 
He does business all over Gallatin County and as 
far as Willow Creek, Harrison and Pony. 

Mr. Pence is still interested in mining in Alaska, 
Montana and Idaho. He is independent in politics 
and a member of Bozeman Lodge No. 463 of the 
Elks. His home is in the Clark Apartments at 616 
South Third Avenue. Mr. Pence married in Spo- 
kane September 8, 1916, Miss Florence Jones, a 
daughter of W. C. and Rosa (Marvin) Jones, resi- 
dents of Spokane. Her father is a practicing attor- 
ney. Mrs. Pence is a graduate of the South Central 
High School of Spokane. They have one daughter, 
Jane Marvin, born September 24, 1918. . 

DAN M. KELLY, ex-attorney general and counsel 
for the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, is one 
of the distinguished men and eminent attorneys of 
Montana, now a resident of Butte. He was born 
at Waterloo, Iowa, on August 19, 1880, a son of P. 
D. Kelly, now a resident of Waterloo, Iowa. P. D. 
Kelly was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1837, 
and in 1847 his mother brought the family to the 
United States and settlement was made in Wiscon- 
sin. A boy of ten at the time of the family immi- 
gration, P. D. Kelly was reared and educated at 
New Diggings, Wisconsin, and there he was mar- 
ried. During his active years he devoted himself 
to farming, and still owns two valuable farm prop- 
erties and is now living retired, being in comfort- 
able circumstances. He is a democrat politically, 
and a Roman Catholic in his religious belief. The 
maiden name of his wife was Catherine Barry, and 
she was born at London, England, in 1850. Their 
children were as follows : Mary, who is unmarried, 
teaches in the public schools of Boulder, Montana; 
T. F., who died at the age of forty years at White- 
hall, Montana, having been killed in a railroad ac- 
cident at that point, and at that time was a Short- 
horn cattle .breeder at Seneca, South Dakota ; Tom, 
who is a rancher of Seneca, South Dakota ; John, 
who lives at Elkton, South Dakota, has farming in- 
terests there ; J. E., who lives at Boulder, Montana, 
is now serving as county attorney of Jefferson 
County ; Dan M., who was the sixth in order of 
birth ; Kathryn, who married Doctor Martin Hagen, 
a physician and surgeon of Wichita, Kansas ; Nell, 
who married William Cavanaugh, a farmer of Hud- 
son, Iowa ; William F., who was killed at the age 
of twenty-six years in the same railroad accident 
in which his brother, T. F. lost his life; Raymond, 
who is on the home farm near Waterloo, Iowa; 
Leo, who is on his ranch near Whitehall, Montana ; 
and Clem, who is on a farm near Waterloo, Iowa, 
of nineteen years he immigrated to the United States, 

Dan'M. Kelly was reared and educated in Black 
Hawk County, Iowa, and was graduated from the 
Tilford Academy at Vinton, Iowa, in 1900, follow- 
ing which he entered the University of Iowa and 
was graduated from its law department in 1905, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Law. He is a 
member of the Hammond Law Senate, a literary 
society of his university. In the meanwhile, during 



1902, Mr. Kelly came to Montana and taught school 
in Madison County, Montana, for two years. After 
obtaining his degree in 1905 he came to Whitehall, 
Montana, and was engaged there in an active prac- 
tice until January i, 1907, when he was inducted 
into the office of county attorney of Jefferson County 
at Boulder, Montana, and held it for four years, 
and this is the office which is now held by his 
brother J. E. Kelly. After the expiration of his 
term of office Mr. Kelly was engaged in practice 
at Boulder for two years, and then in the fall of 
1912 he was elected attorney general of the state 
of Montana and moved to Helena. After being in 
office for two years and five months Mr. Kelly re- 
signed to become counsel for the Anaconda Copper 
Mining Company, and still holds this responsible 
position. He is a democrat, and in the fall of 1918 
was elected to the State Assembly on his party ticket, 
serving during the session of 1919. During this 
important epoch in the history of Montana Mr. 
Kelly was on the judiciary committee, the commit- 
tee on ways and means, and other important ones, 
and did his full part in transacting the business 
which came before the assembly for the securing of 
proper legislation for the reconstruction period after 
the great war. 

A Catholic by inheritance and conviction, Mr. 
Kelly is very active in church circles, and belongs 
to Butte Council No. 668, Knights of Columbus, in 
which he has been made a fourth degree knight; 
to Helena Lodge No. 193, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; to the Silver Bow Club; the Butte 
Country Club, both of Butte ; the Montana Club 
of Helena, Montana ; and the Rocky Mountain Club 
of New York City, New York. Professionally he 
maintains membership in the county, state and na- 
tional bar associations. He owns a modern resi- 
dence at 1260 West Platinum Avenue, Butte. 

In June, 1908, Mr. Kelly was married to Miss 
Lillian Wade, of Boulder, Montana, who died on 
July 26, 1917, at Butte, without issue. On Decem- 
ber 21, 1919, Mr. Kelly was married at St. Paul, 
Minnesota, to Miss Helen Meagher, a daughter of 
Dan J. and Elizabeth (Ryan) Meagher, who live 
at Helena, Montana, Mr. Meagher being engaged 
in the jewelry business in that city, and he was a 
pioneer of Montana. 

Mr. Kelly is one of the sound and highly trained 
corporation lawyers of the state, whose knowledge 
of corporate and state laws is profound. His prom- 
inence throughout Montana is unquestioned, and his 
acquaintanceship reaches to all classes and condi- 
tions of men. Both as an official and in private 
life he has commanded confidence and respect, and 
the people of Butte are proud to number a man of 
his caliber among their fellow citizens. 

JAMES E. KELLY, who is a brother of Dan M. 
Kelly, former attorney general of Montana and now 
a prominent lawyer at Butte, one of the counsel of 
the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, was for 
several years associated with his brother in busi- 
ness at Boulder, where he still resides. James E. 
Kelly has served eight years as county attorney of 
Jefferson County. 

He was born in Black Hawk County, Iowa, near 
Waterloo, November 6, 1878. He was educated in 
the rural schools of that county, graduated in 1902 
from Tilford Collegiate Academy at Vinton, Ohio, 
and took his law course in the University of Iowa 
at Iowa City. He received his LL. B. degree in 
1906, and in the fall of that year came to Montana 
and opened his law office at Whitehall. After one 
year he removed to Boulder and became associated 



7/c?/^ 



11 r-J'Mrt' 
f L/\ 




HISTORY OF MONTANA 



31 



with his brother Dan. They were law partners un- 
til Dan Kelly was elected attorney general in 1912. 
Mr. James E. Kelly has enjoyed a large general 
civil and criminal practice at Boulder in addition 
to his duties as county attorney. He was appointed 
to this office January i, 1912, to succeed Judge Show- 
ers, and has been regularly elected every two years, 
beginning in the fall of 1912. Mr. Kelly is also a 
member of the partnership of Kelly Brothers, own- 
ers of a large ranch near Whitehall. 

He is a democrat in politics, a member of the 
Catholic Church, is a third degree Knight of Colum- 
bus, being affiliated with Marquette Council No. 
842, is a member of Butte Lodge No. 240 of the 
Elks, and Basin Aerie of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles at Basin, Montana. 

Mr. Kelly owns a modern home in Boulder. He 
married there June 7, 1916, Miss Corinne De Celles, 
daughter of Edward and Caroline (Baril) De Celles. 
Her parents live at Boulder, and her father was a 
pioneer meat merchant there, but is now retired from 
business. Mrs. Kelly is a graduate of the Jefferson 
County High School. They have two children: 
James Leo, born July 30, 1917; and Mary Ruth, 
born December 4, 1918. 

JAMES PATRICK LAVELLE, present postmaster of 
Columbus, grew up in that town, son of the pioneer 
Montanan, the late Patrick Lavelle, and has been 
active in business and political affairs for a numbei 
of years. 

He was born at Titusville, Pennsylvania, -April 12, 
1881. His paternal ancestors came from Ireland and 
settled in New York in colonial times. The father, 
Patrick Lavelle, was born in Seneca Falls, New 
York, in 1839, grew up there, and served two years, 
from 1861 to 1863, with the One Hundred and 
Twenty-first New York Infantry in the Civil war. 
Among the battles in which he participated were 
those of Shiloh, Hanover Courthouse and Gettys- 
burg. He was once taken prisoner by the Con- 
federates. After being mustered out he went to 
Titusville, Pennsylvania, then the center of the great 
oil industry of America. He was employed for 
several years as a well shooter in the oil district 
of Western Pennsylvania, and he also married while 
in Titusville. Later he was a farmer in Pennsyl- 
vania until 1886, and then came to Montana, living 
at Billings and for two years being an employee of 
the Northern Pacific Railway. He located at 
Columbus in 1888, being one of the pioneers in what 
is now the county seat of Stillwater County. He 
bought land that was platted and sold as the Lavelle 
Addition to the townsite of Columbus. He also 
built the Lavelle Hotel, the first institution of its 
kind in Columbus, and was its genial proprietor for 
fifteen years. After that he retired and died at 
Columbus in March, 1912. He was prominent in 
local affairs, serving two terms as a county com- 
missioner of Yellowstone County and was once can- 
didate for the State Senate. He was a democrat in 
politics and a member of the Catholic Church. 
Patrick Lavelle married Margaret O'Brien, who was 
born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1848. She is still 
living in Columbus at the age of seventy-one. Her 
Dakota ; Grand Forks Camp, Modern Woodmen of 
children are seven in number. Mary is the wife 
of H. J. Calhoun, manager of the American Garage 
at Columbus; Maggie is the wife of W. P. Adams, 
who is in the livery and implement business at 
Columbus; Ambrose, a traveling salesman living at 
Omaha, Nebraska; James Patrick; Celia, wife of 
H. I. Grant, a hardware and grocery merchant at 
Columbus ; Nellie, assistant postmaster at Columbus ; 

Vol. II 3 



and Agnes, wife of N. W. Holt, owner of a ranch 
in the Lake Basin and residing at Columbus. 

James Patrick Lavelle was seven years old when 
his father located at Columbus, and he acquired 
his education in the local public schools. During 
1899-1900 he attended a business college at Val- 
paraiso, Indiana. For seven years he was engaged 
in the livestock business at Columbus, and then 
served two terms, four years, as under sheriff of 
Yellowstone County. For two years he was a mem- 
ber of the police force at Billings, and in May, 
1913, received appointment as postmaster at Colum- 
bus and has had active charge of that office for 
six years. He was reappointed for a second term 
in May, 1918. 

Mr. Lavelle is a member of the Columbus Com- 
mercial Club, is owner of some local city property, 
is active in the ranks of the democratic party, is a 
member of the Catholic Church, and is a third degree 
Knight of Columbus, being affiliated with Council 
No. 1259 of that order, and also a member of 
Billings Lodge No. 394 of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. Mr. Lavelle is unmarried. 

ELBERT F. ALLEN has spent practically all his life 
in Montana, though he was born in Fayette, Mis- 
souri, August 31, 1880. For the past fifteen years 
he has been busily engaged in handling a growing 
and influential law practice at Livingston. He" is 
the present city attorney of Livingston. 

Mr. Allen represents an old American family 
settled in North Carolina in colonial times. His 
grandfather, George J. Allen, was a native of 
North Carolina, and was an early settler in Mis- 
souri, where he followed farming. He died in 
Henry County of that state in 1852. George J. 
Allen married Esther Mitchell, a native of Wash- 
ington County, Tennessee, and a granddaughter 
of Samuel Doak, founder of Washington College, 
the first institution of higher learning west of the 
Allegheny Mountains. 

George J. Allen, Jr., father of the Livingston 
lawyer, was born in Henry County, Missouri, in 
1844, was reared there and made his first visit to 
Montana in 1863, being attracted to the then cen- 
ter of activities in this part of the Northwest, Vir- 
ginia City. In 1864 he took up a claim at Virginia 
City, but left the country in 1866 and returned to 
Missouri. He was married in Howard County of 
that state, lived as a farmer in Henry County and in 
June, 1880, again came to Montana for the pur- 
pose of making that state his permanent home. 
His family followed him a short time later and 
settled on his homestead of 160 acres near Living- 
ston. He occupied that homestead until 1914, and 
sold it only in 1919. He was a democrat and a 
member of the Congregational Church, He mar- 
ried Elizabeth J. Fisher, who was born in Howard 
County, Missouri, in 1852. Elbert F. is the only 
son of two living children. The daughter, Carrie E., 
is the wife of J. L. Anderson, a truck gardener at 
Livingston. Mr. Allen died May 26, 1919. 

Elbert F. Allen was educated in the public schools 
of Livingston, attended high school in that city, 
received his Bachelor of Science degrees from the 
Montana State College at Bozeman in 1903, and 
spent one year in the University of Missouri, in the 
law department, at Columbia. He also studied law 
privately and was admitted to the bar in Decem- 
ber, 1905. Since that date he has had both civil and 
criminal practice and his offices are in the Thomp- 
son Block at Livingston. He served one term of 
four years as city attorney, from 1913 to 1917, 
and in 1919 was again appointed to the same office. 
Mr. Allen is a republican, was master of Living- 



32 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



ston Lodge No. 32, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, during 1919, a member of Livingston Lodge 
No. 7, Royal Arch Masons, St. Bernard Com- 
mandery No. 6, Knights Templar, and Algeria 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Helena. He is also 
affiliated with Zephyr Camp No. 151, Woodmen 
of the World, Silver Tip Camp, Modern Wood- 
men of America, Tourist Homestead, Brotherhood 
of American Yeomen, and is a member of the State 
and American Bar associations and the Livingston 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Allen and family reside at 5*3 West Geyser 
Street. He married at Bozeman, January I, 1907, 
Miss Faith L. Jackson, a daughter of Thomas and 
Emma (Gordon) Jackson. Her parents are now 
deceased. Her father was a pioneer in the Madi- 
son Valley in Montana, going there in 1866. He 
developed a ranch and was also a teacher. Mrs. 
Allen is a graduate of the preparatory department 
of the Montana State College at Bozeman and also 
took a course there in domestic science and busi- 
ness. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have two children, George, 
born October 6, 1908, and Ernest, born July 26, 
1912. 

GEORGE W. PIERSON is distinguished among the 
lawyers of Montana as a former judge of the 
Thirteenth Judicial District, has been a member 
of the bar of the state for a quarter of a century, 
and since the beginning of his term as a judge has 
lived at Billings. 

He was born in Genesee County, Michigan, May 
21, 1869, son of Joseph and Hannah (Davenport) 
Pierson. The Pierson family came from England 
to New York in colonial times. The grandfather, 
John K. Pierson, was born in New York in 1817, 
after his marriage spent a short time in Canada, 
and then pioneered on a farm in Michigan, and 
lived in Genesee County until his death in 1890. 

Judge Pier son's maternal grandfather, Robert 
Davenport, was born in Pennsylvania in 1819 and 
was also a Michigan pioneer, being a blacksmith 
and farmer. He died at Hadley in that state in 
1889. His wife, Miss Margaret Earl, a native of 
Pennsylvania, also died in Michigan. The Daven- 
ports came originally from Holland, Pennsylvania, 
and Hannah Davenport's great uncle, Robert Da- 
venport, was one of the three men who escaped 
from the Wyoming and Cherry Valley massacre 
during the Revolutionary war. 

Joseph Pierson was born in Ontario, Canada, in 
1835, but grew up in Genesee County, Michigan, 
and spent many years there as a farmer. Later 
he moved to LaPeer County and farmed until his 
death at Hadley in 1895. He was an independent 
republican, served a term as councilman at Had- 
ley, and was affiliated with the Baptist Church. His 
wife was born at Hadley, Michigan, in 1840 and 
died there in 1895. Their children were: Robert 
J., a farmer at Hadley, Michigan; Nettie, wife of 
Frank Nowlin, in the jewelry business at Gaylord, 
Michigan; Roby, wife of A. B. Hubbard, a farmer 
at Clarkston, Michigan ; George W. ; Lewis, a me- 
chanic living at Flint, Michigan; and Dewey C, a 
farmer and stock man at Hadley. 

Judge Pierson attended the rural schools of La- 
Peer County, Michigan, graduating from the Had- 
ley High School in 1887 and for two years was 
a teacher in LaPeer County. In 1889 he entered 
the law school of the University of Michigan, tak- 
ing his LL. B. degree in 1891 and his LL. M. de- 
gree in 1892. The following two years he had a 
law office in Chicago and in the spring of 1894 
came to Montana and practiced at Red Lodge un- 
til 1911. He served as city attorney of Red Lodge 



in 1894-95 and again in 1904-06, and was county 
attorney of Carbon County from 1895 to 1897. He 
was. appointed district judge of the Thirteenth Dis- 
trict in 191 1, and then removed to Billings, filling 
with enviable distinction the office of judge until 
1917. Since retiring from the bench he has handled 
a general civil and criminal practice, his offices be- 
ing in the Electric Building. 

Judge Pierson is a democrat, is affiliated with 
Star in the West Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, at Red Lodge, Carbon Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons, Aldemar Commandery No. 5 of the Knights 
Templar at Billings, and Billings Lodge No. 394 of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He 
is a member of the Billings Midland Club. 

October 27, 1892, at Hadley, Michigan, he mar- 
ried Loretta Mann, daughter of Ernest and Clara 
(Shippey) Mann. Her father was a farmer in La- 
Peer and Oakland counties, Michigan. Judge and 
Mrs. Pierson have one daughter, Helen, a senior in 
the Billings High School. 

FLETCHER WEBSTER APPLETON, register of the 
United States Land Office at Bozeman, is a civil 
engineer by profession, and has had a widely diver- 
sified experience as an engineer, operator of min- 
ing properties and in general business affairs. 

Mr. Appleton is member of a prominent American 
family and one of peculiarly American and Yankee 
traditions. On both sides of his house is pure 
English descent. The Appletons came from Eng- 
land and settled in Massachusetts in early colonial 
days. His grandfather was named Samuel Apple- 
ton Appleton, and spent all his life in New England. 
He was identified with cotton manufacture at Low- 
ell, Massachusetts, and died at Boston. Samuel 
Appleton Appleton married the only daughter of 
Daniel Webster. Fletcher Webster Appleton is 
therefore a great-grandson of the great American 
statesman and orator, and his given name was be- 
stowed in honor of Daniel Webster's only son, Col. 
Fletcher Webster, who was a colonel in the Union 
army during the Civil war. A daughter of Samuel 
A. Appleton, Carrie Appleton, became the wife of 
Jerome Bonaparte, a brother of Charles Bonaparte, 
who was a member of President Roosevelt's cabinet. 
Samuel Appleton, father of Fletcher W. Appleton, 
has had a distinguished career. He was born in 
Massachusetts in 1841, was graduated from Yale 
College with his law degree in 1861, and the same 
year joined the Twelfth Massachusetts Infantry 
and was all through the war. He practiced law in 
Massachusetts several years and was a member of 
the Legislature of that state one term. In the early 
'703 he moved to Chicago and was a lawyer in that 
city, but since 1887 his home has been at St. Paul, 
Minnesota. He practiced law in the twin cities, but 
eventually his services were availed by the West 
Publishing Company, the largest law publishing con- 
cern in the world. He has been 'with this company 
for over thirty years and is editor in chief of its 
publication. Samuel Appleton is a republican. He 
married Miss Anna Jones, who was born in Massa- 
chusetts in 1843 and died at St. Paul in 1888. 
Fletcher W. is the oldest of their children. Esther 
is the wife of Col. Wilson G. Heaton, with home at 
Fort Douglas, Arizona. Colonel Heaton served in 
the Spanish-American war, holds the rank of colonel 
in the regular army, and was with Pershing both on 
the Mexican border and in the World war. Anna S. 
Appleton is the wife of John E. Seabury, head of 
Seabury & Company, an important wholesale gro- 
cery house in St. Paul. Robert E., the youngest of 
the family, lives on the Island of Hayti, was former 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



33 



United States Consul but is now secretary to the 
Consul there. 

Fletcher Webster Appleton was born in Chicago 
October 8, 1873, but received most of his educa- 
tion in Minnesota. He attended the public schools 
of St. Paul, graduated in 1892 from the Shattuck 
Military Academy at Faribault, and for a year and 
a half pursued the civil engineering course in the 
University of Minnesota. For two years he was 
connected with the West Publishing Company at 
St. Paul, and then followed his profession as civil 
engineer at Colorado Springs and Cripple Creek 
until 1897, and at Cincinnati until 1898. On July 
25, 1898, during the Spanish-American war, he 
enlisted in the Fourteenth Minnesota Regiment. 
He was in training at Chickamauga Park, was a 
first sergeant with his command, and spent two 
months at Leech Lake, Minnesota, during the Indian 
outbreak. In that service he was under the com- 
mand of General Bacon. He received his discharge 
November 18, 1898. 

Soon afterward Mr. Appleton came to Montana, 
locating first at Livingston, and soon afterward 
became superintendent of the McGinnis Gold Min- 
ing Company at Cook City. He was the executive 
of that company until 1905. He then resumed his 
engineering practice at Livingston and became 
owner of a half interest in the Livingston Land & 
Abstract Company. Since 1911 Mr. Appleton has 
been receiver for .the Yellowstone Portland Cement 
Company. His home has been at Bozeman since 
April 13, 1913. As register of the United States 
Land Office he has his headquarters in the Federal 
Building and is responsible for all the records in 
connection with government lands in the Bozeman 
district. 

Mr. Appleton is a democrat in politics. While at 
Livingston he was city clerk. He is a vestryman 
of the Episcopal Church at Bozeman, is affiliated 
with Bozeman Lodge No. 18, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, Livingston Lodge No. 246, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, and is a member 
of the Bozeman Chamber of Commerce. He has 
some mining interests in Montana and owns a 
dwelling house on Eighth Street in Livingston. 

In June, 1904, at Livingston, he married Miss 
Alberta Graves, a native of Kentucky. They have 
one daughter, Grace Fletcher, born November 28, 
1905. 

HARRY EDSON ARNOLD is a veteran railroad man, 
has been a locomotive fireman or engineer for twenty 
years, and is one of the best known men of his 
craft in the state, due to the fact that he is gen- 
eral chairman of the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen and Engine Men on the Puget Sound Lines 
of the Milwaukee System. 

Mr. Arnold was born at New Albany, Floyd 
County, Indiana, June 14, 1882, a son of William 
and Laura J. (Forsyth) Arnold. His father was 
born in 1844, and for many years has been a resi- 
dent of New Albany, where his mother died in No- 
vember, 1882. They had three children, John David, 
Florence and Harry Edson. John is also a railroad 
man, being a switchman at New Albany. 

Harry E. Arnold attended the public schools at 
Seymour, Indiana, graduating from high school in 
1899. Almost immediately thereafter he entered the 
service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway Company, 
beginning as a fireman, and has been a railroad fire- 
man in nearly every state of the Union. He came to 
Montana in 1908, and was a fireman with the North- 
ern Pacific Railway with headquarters at Missoula, 
and in 1909 joined the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 



Paul Railway, with headquarters at Deer Lodge. 
In 1912 he was promoted to engineer and now holds 
seniority rights as engineer on his division. He was 
chosen general chairman of the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Firemen and Engine Men for the Mil- 
waukee System on the Puget Sound Lines in IQII, 
and has been delegated with those responsibilities 
now for over nine years. Mr. Arnold casts his vote 
in politics independently. He is affiliated with Deer 
Lodge No. 14, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Valley Chapter No. 4, Royal Arch Masons, Zabud 
Council No. 2, Royal and Scottish Masons, Ivanhoe 
Commandery No. 16 of the Knights Templar, East- 
ern Montana Consistory No. I, and Algeria Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine. 

At Benton, Illinois, December 28, 1910, Mr. Arnold 
married Miss Ruth Steves, daughter of Henry L. 
and Amelia (Reeder) Steves, the latter a resident of 
Boston, Massachusetts. Her father was a Metho- 
dist minister and died at Benton, Illinois. Mr. and 
Mrs. Arnold have two daughters, Mary, born Sep- 
tember 2, 1913, and Ruth Jane, born October 16, 
1916. 

WILLIAM WITT came to Montana in 1911, was a 
homesteader and rancher for several years, has been 
very active in civic affairs in Stillwater County since 
it was organized, and is cashier of the First National 
Bank of Columbus. 

He was born in Scott County, Iowa, February 
5, 1 88 1. His father, Chris Witt, was born in Ger- 
many in 1855 and came to the United States at the 
age of nineteen, settling in Scott County, Iowa. He 
was married there, and has followed farming as an 
occupation. He and his wife now reside at Holstein 
in Ida County, Iowa, and he is retired with a good 
competence for his remaining years. Politically he 
is a democrat. His wife was Anna Steffen, who was 
born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, in 1857. Of 
their children, Herman, the oldest, is a farmer at 
Kingsley, Iowa; the second is William; Henry, the 
third, is a farmer at Columbus, Montana, as is 
also the next, Adolph; Alma is the wife of Frank 
E. Ewoldt, a contractor at Holstein, Iowa; while 
Ella, the youngest, is still at home with her parents. 

William Witt attended public school at Holstein 
and completed the sophomore year in the high school 
there. He was in the Dennison Normal and Busi- 
ness School at Dennison, Iowa, during 1900-01, and 
on leaving there worked in a store at Holstein a 
year, for two years was in the Leader Department 
Store at Appleton, Minnesota, continued his mer- 
cantile experience at Graceville, Minnesota, and 
while there became bookkeeper in the First National 
Bank of Graceville, and before coming to Montana 
was promoted to assistant cashier. 

Mr. Witt came to Columbus in 1911 and home- 
steaded 160 acres. He has been identified with the 
First National Bank of Columbus as cashier since 
1913. The bank was established under a national 
charter in 1909. Its financial position is a most 
substantial one. The capital is $25,000 and the sur- 
plus $25,000. The officers of the bank are J. L. 
Fraser, president; Grant S. Irwin, vice president; 
and William Witt, cashier and a director. 

Mr. Witt has been public administrator for Still- 
water County since the county was organized in 1913, 
serving his third term. He was the first secretary 
of the Stillwater Club, is a democrat, and is affiliated 
with Stillwater Lodge No. 62, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. Mr. Witt owns ranch lands to the 
extent of 1,700 acres in Stillwater County. He is 
also a director in the Old Faithful Oil and Gas 
Company. 

In 1915, at Columbus, he married Miss Emma Lou 



34 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Briggs, daughter of D. F. and Katie (Wopdson) 
Briggs. Her mother lives at New London, Missouri, 
and her father, now deceased, was a Missouri 
farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Witt have one son, William 
Briggs, known as "Billy," born October 18, 1917. 
Mrs. Witt finished her education in a seminary in 
Missouri. 

H. J. REESE, county clerk of Park County, has 
been, a resident of this northwest country for nearly 
twenty years, having come here soon after he left 
the army as a volunteer soldier in the Spanish- 
American war. 

Mr. Reese was born at Maryville, Missouri, No- 
vember 17, 1879. His remote ancestry was Ger- 
man. His great-grandfather was a native of Hesse, 
Germany. Mr. Reese's paternal grandmother was a 
member of the Evans family and was a Daugh- 
ter of the American Revolution. Joseph Reese, 
father of the county clerk, was born at Port Ma- 
tilda, Pennsylvania, in 1855, was reared and mar- 
ried there, and in 1878 moved to Maryville, Mis- 
souri, where he is still living, now practically re- 
tired. Until 1918 he held the office of county sur- 
veyor for six years.' He is a republican and a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity. Joseph Reese mar- 
ried Nancy E. Woodring, who was born at Port 
Matilda, Pennsylvania, in 1857 and died at Mary- 
ville, Missouri, in 1899. H. J. Reese is the oldest 
of their children. Allen, the second in age, is sta- 
tion agent for the Ogden Short Line Railway at 
Meridian, Idaho. Nancy is the wife of Dr. G. A. 
Windsor, proprietor of the Park Hospital at Liv- 
ingston, Montana. 

H. J. Reese was educated in the public schools 
of his native town, graduating from high school 
in 1897. In April of the following year he en- 
listed in Company E of the Fourth Missouri Volun- 
teers for the Spanish-American war. With his 
command he spent his time in Camp Alger, Camp 
Mead and finally Camp Weatherill, at Greenville, 
South Carolina. He was mustered out February 
10, 1899. Early in the following year he arrived 
at Phillipsburg, Montana, and spent two years with 
the Granite Bi-Metallic Consolidated Mining Com- 
pany. In 1902 he came to Livingston, and was in 
the service of the Northern Pacific Railway Com- 
pany until 1915 as clerk in the freight department. 
In the latter year he was appointed city clerk of 
Livingston, filling that office until January I, 1919. 
With; a growing popularity as a citizen and with 
exceptional qualifications for the office, he was 
chosen county clerk in November, 1918, and began 
his duties for a term of two years January i. I9IQ. 

Mr. Reese is a republican and is affiliated with 
Livingston Lodge No. 32, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, Livingston Camp of the United 
Spanish War Veterans, Livingston Chamber of 
Commerce and is a member of the Gateway City 
Band, his instrument being the clarionet. He re- 
sides at 219 South Seventh Street. 

Mr. Reese married Miss Delia McCreary at Phil- 
lipsburg, Montana, in 1901. Her mother, Mrs. Wil- 
bert McCreary, lives at Salt Lake City, Utah. Mr. 
and Mrs. Reese have three children : Edith, born 
May 16, 1903, a freshman in the Park County High 
School; Mildred, born December 26, 1907, and Jo- 
seph, born August 22, 1910, both in the public schools 
of Livingston. 

THOMAS C. INGHAM is well known in several 
communities both in Montana and Minnesota as a 
grain dealer, and is manager of the Occidental Ele- 
vator Company at Roberts, where he has lived sev- 
eral years. 



He was born at Bradford in Yorkshire, England, 
April 16, 1891. His father is Arthur Ingham, who 
was born at Knersborough, Yorkshire, in 1863. 
There is a record of members of the Ingham family 
running back 400 years showing that every genera- 
tion has contributed members to the business of 
contracting and building. Thomas Clayton Ingham's 
grandfather, Thomas Ingham, was a contractor 
and railroad builder. He was born at Tickhill, 
Lancashire, England, and died at Bradford. Arthur 
Ingham grew up and married in England, learned 
the trade of contractor and builder, and on com- 
ing to the United States in 1883 located at Minne- 
apolis. He has been back to England several times, 
though calling Minneapolis his home. He is a re- 
publican and a member of the Episcopal Church, 
belongs to the Sons of St. George, and for eight 
years was an English soldier. 

The mother of Thomas C. Ingham was Ann 
Clayton, who was born in Yorkshire in 1866 and 
died there in 1891, soon after the birth of her only 
son and child, Thomas Clayton. Arthur Ingham 
afterward married Louisa Surr, who was born in 
Yorkshire. Their children are: Marjorie, wife of 
Herbert Welcome, of Minneapolis, who served as 
an electrician in the American army with the ex- 
peditionary forces in France; Irene, who is mar- 
ried and lives at St. Paul, Minnesota, where her 
husband is a Government employe ; Lois and Emily 
both with their parents. 

Thomas C. Ingham remained in England after 
his mother's death, attended the public schools of 
Bradford and a technical college through a four 
years' course. He graduated in 1908, and in that 
year came to Minneapolis, where he followed the 
building trade until 1911. He then engaged in the 
grain business at Leeds, North Dakota. He started 
in at the very bottom, learning the industry by ex- 
perience. His first employers were the Cullen Ele- 
vator Company. Later he was appointed their 
manager at Cooley, North Dakota, was then sent 
to Norwich, North Dakota, as manager for the 
Norwich Farmers Elevator Company two years, 
subsequently transferred his headquarters to Wil- 
ton, North Dakota, and had charge of three ele- 
vators for a period of two years. In the fall of 
1917 he came to Roberts as manager of the Occi- 
dental Elevator Company. 

Mr. Ingham is a republican, a member of the 
Episcopal Church, is affiliated with the Sons of St. 
George and is a member of Star in the West Lodge 
No. 40, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

In 1915, at Minneapolis, he married Miss Gretchen 
Vogl. They have one son, Robert James, born 
March 5, 1918. Mrs. Ingham was born at Farm- 
ington, Minnesota, was educated in the public schools 
there, is a graduate of the Minneapolis High School 
and attended the University of Minnesota. Before 
her marriage she was a teacher of music. She is 
one of the active workers in the Episcopal Church 
at Roberts. 

Mrs. Ingham's father is Otto Vogl, who was 
born in New York State in 1855, a son of Franz 
Vogl, who was a native of Bavaria, Germany, and 
after coming to the United States established his 
permanent home in Wisconsin, where he was in 
business and died at Columbus in that state in 1896. 
Otto Vogl was reared in Wisconsin, came to Min- 
nesota when a young man, and conducted a cloth- 
ing store at Faribault, where he married, and at other 
places in Minnesota. Since 1893 he has made his 
home at Minneapolis. At present he is a sales- 
man with the Finch, Van Slyke, McConville whole- 
sale dry. goods house of St. Paul. He is a republi- 
can and an Odd Fellow. Otto Vogl married Laura 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



35 



McKune, who was born at Morristown, Minnesota 
a daughter of Lewis McKune. The McKunes came 
to Massachusetts about 1630 from England. Mrs. 
Ingham is descended through her mother's ances- 
tors from a Revolutionary soldier named Lewis 
Her maternal grandfather, Lewis McKune, was 
captain of Company G of the First Minnesota In- 
fantry, enlisting in 1861, and was killed at the 
Second Battle of Bull Run. He was a native of 
Pennsylvania and a pioneer farmer and merchant 
at Morristown, Minnesota. He was also one of 
the first members of the State Senate of Minne- 
sota. Captain McKune married Laura Corse, a 
native of Pennsylvania, who died at Morristown, 
Minnesota. The children of Otto Vogl and wife' 
are three in number: Frances, wife of M. J. Cul- 
lem, a resident of Leeds, North Dakota, and a 
grain buyer; Harry, a traveling salesman living at 
Minneapolis, who married Marguerite Close; and 
Mrs. Ingham. 

C. C. JAMESON is a Montana merchant, well known 
both at Livingston and Bozcman, and has been a 
factor in the management and development of the 
noted Golden Rule Syndicate of stores, represented 
in eleven stores in Montana towns and cities. Mr. 
Jameson is now a partner in the McCracken & 
Jameson Company, Incorporated, owning the Mc- 
Cracken-Jameson store at Bozeman. 

He was born at Marshfield, Webster County, 
Missouri, April 25, 1882. His ancestors came 
from Scotland, and were colonial settlers in Georgia. 
His grandfather, Milton Jameson, was born in 1819, 
served as a Confederate soldier, and spent his active 
life in Southern Missouri. He died in Webster 
County, that state, in 1895. B. C. Jameson, father 
of the Bozeman merchant, was born in Georgia in 
1862, and when he was five years of age his parents 
moved to Webster County, Missouri, where he 
spent the rest of his active life as a merchant. 
Since 1917 he has lived retired at Springfield, Mis- 
souri. B. C. Jameson is a republican and a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. He married Mary E. 
Britton, who was born in Missouri in 1861. W. R. 
Jameson, their oldest child, is connected with the 
Springfield Creamery Company at Springfield, Mis- 
souri, being general road man for this corporation, 
a $200,000 company. J. E. Jameson is connected with 
the Upham-Gordpn wholesale shoe house in Spring- 
field. The next is C. C. Jameson. Mary is the wife 
of Charles W. Dyer, a farmer of Springfield, Mis- 
souri, while Mabel and Bessie, the youngest of the 
family, are still at home, the former being employed 
in a wholesale silk and millinery house and the 
latter a stenographer. 

C. C. Jameson attended rural schools in Webster 
County, Missouri, and spent two years in the high 
school at Marshfield. Since leaving school his ex- 
perience has been entirely in commercial lines. For 
three years he worked in a dry goods store, and in 
1902 completed a business course in the Draughan 
Business College at Springfield. The next two 
years he covered an extensive territory in Kansas, 
Oklahoma and Texas, representing the Martin 
Manufacturing Company, makers of work clothing. 
He then took charge of the clothing store of W. W. 
Moore at Bolivar, Missouri, for a year and a half, 
and on severing his Missouri connections he joined 
the Golden Rule Syndicate at Livingston. For 
three months he was assistant manager of one of 
the stores at Bozeman, and then for two years was 
manager of A. Braton's women's ready to wear 
store. After that he was general manager and 
buyer for the Golden Rule department store at 
Livingston until June i, 1919. He returned to Boze- 



man as manager and one-third owner of the Boze- 
man department store. 

Mr. Jameson is a republican, a member of the 
Baptist Church, and still retains his fraternal 
affiliations with Bolivar Lodge No. 56, Knights 
of Pythias, in Missouri. 

January 3, 1917, at Billings, Mr. Jameson mar- 
ried Miss Lois Skinker, daughter of Judge C. H. 
and Minnie (Gravely) Skinker of Bolivar, Missouri. 
Her father is a distinguished Missouri jurist who 
for the past fifteen years has served as judge of 
the Eighteenth Judicial District, being first appointed 
by Governor Hadley of Missouri. Two of the most 
noted criminal trials in the Middle West in recent 
years came before him. One was the Stanley 
Ketchel murder case and the other the Keet baby 
kidnapping case. Mrs. Jameson attended the Mis- 
souri State University at Columbia two years and 
another year at Drury College, Springfield, Missouri. 

J. RALPH SCOVIL. The name of Scovil is one of 
the best known ones in industrial circles not only at 
Butte, but throughout Western Montana, this promi- 
nence having been given it by the united activities 
of J. Ralph Scovil and his father, John Scovil, both 
of whom are excellent and very successful business 
men. J. Ralph Scovil is proprietor of the Unique 
Cleaning and Tailoring Company, and his father is 
connected with a number of large concerns at Butte 
and other cities, and is recognized as the leading 
laundryman of Montana. 

J. Ralph Scovil was born at Anaconda, Montana, 
on November 15, 1892, a son of John Scovil, and 
grandson of L. N. Scovil, the latter a native of Mid- 
dletown, Connecticut, where he was born in 1809. 
He died at Springville, Utah, in 1890. The Scovil 
family was founded in the American colonies prior 
to the Revolution, corning here from England, and 
becoming prominent in the New England settle- 
ments. 

^L. N. Scovil went first to Ohio and later to Provo, 
Utah, and during the war between the states he 
returned to the land of his forefathers, and for a 
time was connected with the London "Times." He 
became a republican, and until his death voted the 
ticket of that party. In the creed of the Mormons 
he found expression for his religious faith, and was 
one of the leading members of the Mormon colony 
at Springville, where he made his home in later 
years. The grandmother of J. Ralph Scovil bore 
the maiden name of Hannah Marsden, and she was 
born near Liverpool, England, in 1839, and died at 
Springville, Utah, in July, 1907. Her father was 
William Marsden, also a native of England, and he 
died at Parawan, Utah, in 1887, to which place he 
came from Burlington, Iowa, and he was both a 
farmer and merchant and a very successful man. 
The following children were born to L. N. Scovil 
and his wife, Hannah (Marsden) Scovil : John, who 
became the father of J. Ralph Scovil; S. S., of Salt 
Lake City, Utah; Sylvia, who is the widow of John 
Roylance, lives at Springville, Utah; Mina, who is. 
Mrs. E. J. Wignal, of Salt Lake City, Utah; Clara, 
who is Mrs. Eugene W. Raymond, of Salt Lake City, 
Utah ; and Jennie, who is Mrs. Walter R. Dusen- 
berry, of Salt Lake City, Utah. 

John Scovil, father of J. Ralph Scovil, was born 
at Provo, Utah, on January 30, 1863, and until he 
was thirteen years old attended the public schools of 
Springville, Utah, but then began to be self-support- 
ing, working first as a teamster. In 1884 he came 
to Anaconda, Montana, and for a time was con- 
nected with the Upper Works as watchman and 
later timekeeper, and still later became manager 



36 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



of the milk ranch in the vicinity of Anaconda. All 
this time he was looking for work suited to his 
capabilities, and entered upon what was to be a re- 
markably successful business career when he be- 
came a driver for the Anaconda Laundry Company. 
After gaining some knowledge of the laundry busi- 
ness through this connection he established a laun- 
dry of his own under the name of the Montana 
Laundry at Anaconda, and conducted it so success- 
fully that in 1899 he sold it at a good profit and 
came to Butte. From the time he became a resi- 
dent of Butte to the present day Mr. Scovil's opera- 
tions have been so remarkably successful as to chal- 
lenge admiration and stimulate emulation. Begin- 
ning with the purchase of the pioneer Union Laun- 
dry, Mr. Scovil forged ahead, acquiring possession 
in part or as sole owner of the C. O. D. Laundry, 
the Troy Laundry, the Palace Laundry and the 
Taylor Laundry, in time so consolidating them that 
he is now operating them under the names of the 
C. O. D. Laundry, capitalized at $200,000, and giv- 
ing employment to 100 persons, and the Taylor 
Laundry, capitalized at $150,000, and giving employ- 
ment to seventy-five persons, the former being the 
largest laundry in Montana. In addition to his im- 
mense laundry interests John Scovil is president of 
the Unique Cleaning and Tailoring Company of 
Butte; president of the Scovil Realty Company, In- 
corporated, of Butte; and president of the Ward- 
robe Cleaning and Tailoring Company of Great 
Falls, Montana. He owns his own residence at 
Butte, an apartment house, the Lennox Hotel, two 
brick blocks, the building occupied by the Unique 
Cleaning and Tailoring Company, the site of the 
Speedway Stables, twelve dwellings and a farm, all 
at Butte; the building occupied by the Wardrobe 
Cleaning and Tailoring Company at Great Falls, 
Montana; an apartment house of fourteen apart- 
ments, a business block and a modern brick dwelling 
at Salt Lake City, Utah, and a dwelling at Spring- 
ville, Utah. John Scovil is a republican. He be- 
longs to the Butte Chamber of Commerce, the 
Rotary Club, the Silver Bow Club and the Country 
Club, and is a Knight of Pythias. 

In 1891 Mr. Scovil was married at Anaconda, 
Montana, to Miss Mary J. Keith, a daughter of Mrs. 
Jane Keith, who died at Anaconda in 1901. Mrs. 
Scovil was born at Corinne, Utah, in 1873, and died 
at Anaconda on May 30, 1900, leaving one son, J. 
Ralph, whose name heads this review. On June 12, 
1901, Mr. Scovil was married to Miss Lalia G. 
Walton, a daughter of John and Henrietta (Smith) 
Walton, of Butte. Mr. Scovil has no children by 
his second marriage. 

After completing the eighth grade of the Butte 
Public Schools, J. Ralph Scovil entered Shattuck 
Military Academy at Faribault, Minnesota, where 
he completed the junior year, and he completed his 
collegiate work at the Princeton Preparatory School 
in 1912. Following this he entered the University 
of Pennsylvania, and left it in 1913. Mr. Scovil 
then took a business course at the Wharton School 
of Finance and Commerce, and was graduated there- 
from in 1914. He belongs to the Greek Letter Fra- 
ternity Phi Sigma Kappa. 

In 1914 Mr. Scovil returned to Butte and took 
charge of the Unique Cleaning and Tailoring Com- 
pany, Incorporated, the leading business of its kind 
in Butte, with premises at No. 128 West Granite 
Street. This company was incorporated in 1908, and 
Mr. Scovil's father is its president. 

J. Ralph Scovil is a republican like his father 
and grandfather before him. He affiliates with the 
Episcopal Church. The American Legion, the Rotary 



Club, the Good Roads Association, the Rocky Moun- 
tain Rifle Club, the Butte Country Club, the Silver 
Bow Club and the Areo Club of America all have 
his membership. At present Mr. Scovil lives in the 
Werner Apartments on South Clark Street, although 
he did own a modern residence at No. 637 Colorado 
Street, but sold it when he enlisted for service dur- 
ing the great war. 

On October 15, 1917, J. Ralph Scovil enlisted and 
was sent to Berkeley, California, to the government 
school of aviation, from whence he went to the 
North Island Flying Field at San Diego, California, 
and was mustered out as a flying sergeant of the 
first class and was in line for a commission at the 
time of the signing of the Armistice, when he would 
have been transferred to Riverside, California. The 
date of his discharge papers is March I, 1919. 

On April 7, 1916, Mr. Scovil was married at Butte 
to Miss Frances McDonald, a daughter of Doctor 
H. J. and Caroline (Le Mere) McDonald, residents 
of Butte, where Doctor McDonald is engaged in a 
successful practice. Mrs. Scovil attended the Haver- 
gal School for Girls at Toronto, Canada, for two 
years. 

WILLIAM P. ADAMS, an implement dealer at 
Columbus, is a Montana pioneer, and thirty years 
ago was riding the range for various stock outfits 
in the Yellowstone Valley. He is one of the old 
timers at Columbus, and has had much to do with 
that town's progress and upbuilding. 

Mr. Adams was born in Meigs County, Ohio, 
October 3, 1865. He belongs to the old Massachu- 
setts Adams family. His grandfather, John Adams, 
was born in Pennsylvania in 1782, and was an early 
settler in Meigs County, Ohio, where he followed 
the milling business. He died in Meigs County in 
i875- John Quincy Adams, father of the Quincy 
merchant, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1829, and was 
a young boy when his parents moved to Meigs 
County, Ohio. He spent all his life in that county, 
from his father learned the trade of milling and 
engaged in that industry for many years. He died 
in Meigs County in 1899. He served as a member 
of an Ohio Regiment of Infantry during the Civil 
war, and in politics was a democrat. John Q. 
Adams married Emeline Peoples, who was born in 
Ohio in 1833 and died in Meigs County. Their chil- 
dren were : Mark A., ^vho operates the old home 
flouring mill at Ken'o, in Meigs County ; Joseph, 
who was a blacksmith, came to Montana in 1899 
and died at Terry in 1914; Addison, who was a 
structural iron worker and died at Portland, Oregon, 
in 1914; William P., who is fourth in age; Emeline, 
wife of Mr. Brown, of Meigs County, Ohio ; and 
Sybil, who is the wife of a Meigs County farmer. 

William P. Adams grew up in the rural districts 
of Meigs County, attending country schools, and 
at the age of sixteen left home and went to Kansas, 
where he spent four years on a stock farm in Coffey 
County. From there in 1888 he came to Montana, 
and in that 'year became acquainted with the little 
hamlet of Stillwater, now the City of Columbus. 
As a cowboy he rode the range all over this dis- 
trict for twelve years. He then established the 
first livery and feed stable of any consequence at 
Columbus, and was active in that business until 
April, 1918. He still owns the stables, but now gives 
all his time to the implement business. He has a 
well equipped store on Pike Avenue, owns the 
building in which his business is conducted, and 
has many other property interests, including a 
modern home, two dwelling houses, and an interest 
in a ranch of 480 acres seven miles north of 
Columbus. 



37 



Mr. Adams is well known in public affairs, having 
served as sheriff of Yellowstone County during 1906- 
07. He is a republican, and is affiliated with Billings 
Lodge No. 394 of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

At Columbus in 1896 he married Miss Maggie 
Lavelle, daughter of that splendid old pioneer of 
Columbus, Patrick Lavelle, concerning whom special 
mention is made on other pages of this publication. 
Mr. and Mrs. Adams have four children : Willie, 
born July 11, 1899, a graduate of the Columbus 
High School, and an employee of H. I. Grant's 
merchandise business at Columbus; Patrick, born 
November 11, 1900, now engaged on the County 
Survey; Dorothy, who has completed the first year 
of the high school ; and Harold, a grammar school 
student. 

O. T. RAGLAND during the past five years has 
become known as one of the most useful, ener- 
getic and public spirited citizens of Livingston, 
where he is serving as police magistrate and has 
built up a large and prosperous insurance agency. 
Mr. Ragland came to Montana following the ex- 
ample of other members of his family, who re- 
sorted here as a matter of health and climate. 

His business career for many years centered in 
Southern Illinois and he is a native of Kentucky, 
born in Ballard County, April 19, 1855. 

The paternal branch of his family goes back to 
England, and included the noted Lord Ragland. 
The Raglands were colonial settlers in Virginia. 
Mr. Ragland's grandfather, Robert Ragland, was 
born in Virginia in 1790 and was a Kentucky pio- 
neer, first living on a farm in Henry County and 
later in Ballard County, where he died in 1863. 
Edmond Ragland, father of Judge Ragland, was 
born in Henry County, Kentucky, in 1814. From 
Henry County after his marriage he moved to Bal- 
lard County and began farming there soon after 
President Jackson had bought the land from the 
Indians. He was an able business man and con- 
ducted his farm with a high degree of success. 
He died in Ballard County in 1902. As a demo- 
crat he served as deputy county clerk of Ballard 
County and was also postmaster of Woodville. He 
was an active supporter and deacon in the Baptist 
Church, and as a Mason the first Masonic Lodge 
in Ballard County was organized in his home. Ed- 
mond Ragland married Mary Gains, who was born 
in Boyle County, Kentucky, in 1816 and died in 
Ballard County in 1882. The fifth in a family of 
six children, Oscar T. Ragland is the only one to 
come to Montana and the only one to find a per- 
manent home and occupation outside of Ballard 
County. The others have all been Ballard Counfy 
farmers. The two oldest, Sam B. and James W., 
were farmers and the former died at the age of 
sixty-seven and the latter at thirty-three. George 
L., the third in age, is a farmer and tobacco buyer 
of Ballard County. Bettie is the wife of George 
F. Reesor, a Ballard County farmer, and Edmond 
T., the youngest, is also in Ballard County. 

Oscar T. Ragland acquired his early education in 
the rural schools of his home county, walking a 
distance of three miles between his father's home 
and the schoolhouse. He lived at home to the age 
of twenty-five and then went to Southern Illinois 
and spent two years working in a flour mill at 
New Columbia in Massac County. For five years 
he was engaged in the flour milling business at 
Metropolis, Illinois. Then came his first public 
honor when elected constable. After serving one 
year he moved to his farm in Illinois and energeti- 
cally prosecuted his business as an agriculturist until 



1896. That year he engaged in the life insurance 
business, and for three years his headquarters and 
home were at Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois. 
He returned to Metropolis in 1900 and continued 
successfully in the insurance business until 1915. In 
the meantime his daughter Goldie May, now deputy 
county clerk at Livingston, had come to Montana 
in 1912. In 1914 she induced her mother to seek 
the benefits of the wonderful climate of Montana, 
and Mrs. Ragland with her younger son came to 
the Northwest in that year. In 1915 Mr. Ragland, 
having disposed of his Illinois business, joined 
the family in Livingston and has since been engaged 
in the insurance business. In 1916 he was elected 
justice of the peace and was re-elected in 1918. He 
was chosen police magistrate in April, 1919. His 
business offices are at 108 East Callender street. 
He also owns a complete modern home at 314 South 
Second Street. 

Judge Ragland is a republican, a member and 
deacon of the Baptist Church, is past grand of 
Park .Lodge No. 17, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and represented his lodge in the Grand 
Lodge at Helena in 1917. He is secretary of his 
home lodge and is a member of Egyptian Encamp- 
ment of the Odd Fellows. He also belongs to the 
Livingston Chamber of Commerce. 

In 1879, at New Columbia, Illinois, Mr. Rag- 
land married Miss Alice Nutty, daughter of Gale 
and Sallie Nutty. Her father was a soldier in both 
Mexican and Civil wars, was a farmer and is now 
deceased. Her mother lives at Samoth, Illinois. 
The oldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Ragland is Ophia, 
wife of E. W. Brady, head bookkeeper for the A. 
W. Miles Company of Livingston. Richard Frank, 
the second in age, has made a notable record as 
a soldier and his present home is at Washington, 
District of Columbia, where he still holds the rank 
of captain. He was commissioned second lieu- 
tenant in June, 1917, and spent fourteen months in 
France with the American Expeditionary Forces. 
He was prompted to first lieutenant of the Twelfth 
Railroad Engineers Corps. In September, 1918, he 
was returned to this country, and stationed at Camp 
Humphreys, Virginia, for the purpose of organizing 
and training new recruits, for the Engineer Corps. 
After the armistice he was ordered to Washington 
and was assigned the interesting task of rewriting 
the book on Railroad Engineers previously compiled 
in 1912, and he is now bringing the record to date 
with particular reference to the services of this 
famous organization in France. Alfred F. Ragland, 
the third child, enlisted in June, 1917, was first 
trained at Camp Lewis, Washington, and afterward 
transferred to Camp Kearney, California, and most 
of his time was spent as sergeant in the Base 
Hospital. The- fourth of the family, Goldie May, 
has already been mentioned. Paul L., the youngest, 
is in the freshman class of the Park County High 
School. 

HOWARD P. MCPHERSON is postmaster and pub- 
lisher and the source of a variety of wholesome 
influence and enterprise for the new town of Rapelje 
in Stillwater County. 

Mr. McPherson, who has been a printer and news- 
paper man throughout his active life, was born at 
Clarinda, Iowa, July 23, 1884. As his name indi- 
cates, he is of Scotch ancestry. His grandfather, 
Angus McPherson, was born in Scotland in 1822, 
and was a ship carpenter for many years. He im- 
migrated to Nova Scotia and in the latter period 
of his life moved far inland to Marshalltown, Iowa, 
where he ceased working at his trade and took up 
farming. He finally settled near Alexandria, South 



38 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Dakota, where he died in 1889. He married Cather- 
ine Vaughn, who was a native of Scotland, where 
they were married. She also died near Alexandria. 

James W. McPherson, father oi the Rapelje post- 
master, was born in Nova Scotia in 1846, and was 
reared and educated in that Canadian province. 
He was a young man when he went to Marshall- 
town, Iowa, and followed the trade of carpenter 
and builder for a number of years. In 1880 he 
moved to Clarinda, Iowa, and in 1884 became a 
pioneer in Dakota Territory, locating at what is 
now Alexandria, South Dakota. He homesteaded a 
claim on the prairie, developed it into a farm, and 
occupied it until his death. While visiting he died 
at Lincoln, Nebraska, in September, 1911. He was 
a democrat and a member of the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen. At Marshalltown, Iowa, he 
married Catherine Pershing, who was born in Ohio 
in 1852 and is a cousin of General Pershing. Since 
1914 she has made her home at Irene, South Da- 
kota. She is the mother of seven children : Harry, 
a general merchant at Irene; Roy, a printer living 
at Lincoln, Nebraska; Ethel, wife of S. W. Jenkins, 
who is connected with the Duplex printing press 
factory of Battle Creek, Michigan; Howard P.; 
Harold, who d ed at the age of seventeen; Wil- 
lard, a baker living at Detroit, Michigan ;. and Mary, 
a teacher at Irene, South Dakota. 

Howard P. McPherson was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Alexandria, South Dakota, gradu- 
ating from high school in 1902. While a school 
boy he learned to set type and the other intrica- 
cies of a printing office, and after leaving high school 
he went to Battle Creek, Michigan, and was in the 
job printing business for about ten years. He 
then returned to Irene, South Dakota, and bought 
the Tri-County News, which he edited until 1917. 

Soon after the founding of the new Town of 
Rapelje Mr. McPherson arrived on the scene in 
September, 1917, and established The Advocate. 
The first issue of this paper was printed January 
I, 1918, and it was the first local journal in the new 
town. It serves as the chief medium of news for 
that locality and its circulation is over Stillwater 
and Yellowstone counties. Mr. McPherson erected 
a new building and installed a modern plant, fully 
equipped for all the needs of his paper and for 
general printing. He owns his place of business and 
also his residence on Main Street. Mr. McPher- 
son and his paper are independent in politics 

"Mr. McPherson was appointed postmaster in April, 
1919. He is also stockholder in the Farmers Ele- 
vator at Rapelje, is secretary of the Rapleje Com- 
mercial Club and a member of the Methodist Church. 

He married at Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1907, 
Miss Ethel Durkee, daughter of Frank and Mary 
(Wakeman) Durkee. Her parents are residents of 
Alexandria, South Dakota, her father being a re- 
tired real estate dealer. Mr. and Mrs. McPherson 
have five children: Glenneda, born in 1911; Donald, 
born in 1912; Robert, born in 1915; Ethel Mary, 
born in 1916; and Wilma, born in 1918. 

FRANKLIN LEONARD STONE, cashier of the Sales- 
ville State Bank, is one of the younger men in the 
financial affairs of his native state and has devoted 
his time and talents steadily to banking since he 
left college five years ago. 

He bears the name of his grandfather, who was 
a prominent pioneer in the Gallatin Vallev of Mon- 
tana. The grandfather of Franklin Leonard Stone 
was born in New England in 1812, lived for many 
years in Illinois, and in 1865 came, to the Gallatin 
Valley of Montana, where he was a farmer and 



cattleman. He died near Old Gallatin in 1884. His 
wife was Sarah Barber, a native of Illinois. 

D. P. Stone, father of the Salesville banker, was 
born at Onarga, Illinois, in 1862, and was three 
years old when the family made the journey up the 
Missouri River to Fort Benton in 1865. He grew 
up in Gallatin County and for many years has 
lived on his ranch at Central Park. He owns 480 
acres of fine land in that community. He is a demo- 
crat, and is a very active member and has served 
as elder in the Presbyterian Church. He married 
Susie Smith, who was born in Tyrone County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1873. Franklin Leonard is the 
oldest of their children and was born at Central 
Park in Gallatin County, March 20, 1894. Parker, 
the second in age, is living on the ranch with his 
father, attended the Montana State College and in 
April, 1918, enlisted in the United States navy, was 
a bugler and was mustered out in January, 1919. 
Louise is a student in the Montana State College 
at Bozeman, Lillian is in the Gallatin County High 
School, and Lula, the youngest, is in grammar 
school at Bozeman. 

Franklin Leonard Stone received his early educa- 
tion at Central Park and completed his junior year 
in the Montana State College. On leaving college 
in 1914 he accepted the post of collection clerk in 
the First National Bank at Bozeman. He looked 
upon this as an opportunity to learn banking rather 
than merely as a .means of earning money, and 
was from time to time promoted to larger responsi- 
bilities. He was made bookkeeper, later receiving 
teller, and in December, 1918, he came to Sales- 
ville as cashier of the state bank of that town. The 
Salesville State Bank was established in October, 
1911, under a state charter. Charles L. Anceney is 
president, C. W. Overstreet is vice president, and 
Mr. Jones, cashier. The bank is capitalized at 
$25,000, and has surplus and profits of $75,000. 

Mr. Stone is an independent voter and a member 
of the Presbyterian Church. He is affiliated with 
Salesville Lodge No. 69 of the Odd Fellows and 
with Bozeman Lodge No. 463 of the Elks. 

BERT S. HIND. One of the largest hydro-electric 
plants developed in Montana during the last decade 
is at Thompson Falls, at the western edge of the 
state. This plant is pperated by the Thompson Falls 
Power 'Company, the superintendent of which is a 
prominent young electrical engineer, Bert S. Hind. 
He has been in charge as superintendent of the plant 
since November, 1916. This plant, which utilizes 
the power resources of Clark's Fork of the Colum- 
bia River, developes an enormous amount of horse 
power, which is distributed to the Coeur d'Alene 
Mines in Idaho, furnishes the electric current for 
the operation of the Milwaukee Railway over the 
Rocky Mountain Division, and also current for do- 
mestic purposes in Thompson Falls, Plains and other 
adjoining towns. 

. Bert S. Hind was born at Austin, Texas, April 
30, 1882, but has lived the greater part of his life 
in Montana. His parents were T. D. and Maggie 
(Reed) Hind. His father was born in England in 
1853 and his mother in Scotland in 1857- They were 
married in England, and the first of their three chil- 
dren was born in that country. T. D. Hind brought 
his family to the United States in 1881, and for a 
short time was a merchant at Austin, Texas. In 
1885 he moved to Kansas, and for several years 
conducted a store at Larned in that state. In 1889 
he came to Butte, Montana, and was manager of 
the Wilson Brothers store at Centerville, a suburb 
of Butte. In 1892 he established a business of his 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



own at Whitehall, and on selling this in 1908 moved 
to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he lived on 
a ranch until his death in January, 1918. He was 
a member of the Episcopal Church and affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias and Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, the Maccabees and the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. His wife died in the same year, 
1918, at Chicago. The oldest of their children was 
Ethel, now living on her ranch near Norris, Mon- 
tana, widow of Peter Carmichael. Bert was the 
second in age, and the youngest, Clarence, is a 
farmer at Constantine, Michigan. 

Bert S. Hind received his early education in the 
public schools of Lamed, Kansas. He came to 
Montana in 1894, and completed the studies of the 
eighth grade at Whitehall. He worked there at 
different occupations for a year or so, and gained 
his first experience in the electrical industry in 
1900, when he went to work for the Montana Power 
Company at Norris. He was with that concern un- 
til 1904. In the meantime he took two corre- 
spondence courses in electrical engineering, and has 
diplomas from the International Correspondence 
School at Scranton and the American School of 
Correspondence at Chicago. Subsequently he at- 
tended the Montana State College at Bozeman, and 
graduated with the Bachelor of Science degree in 
1909. After leaving college Mr. Hind resumed 
his connection with the Montana Power Company 
at Norris as foreman until November, 1916, when 
he came to Thompson Falls. His home is at the 
plant of that company. 

Mr. Hind took an active and patriotic part in all 
war measures in his community. He assisted in 
getting all campaigns for subscriptions to Liberty 
Loans and other objects fulfilled, and for the past 
three years has been chairman of the local Red 
Cross Chapter. He is also scout master at Thomp- 
son Falls, and is a man of wholesome and sincere 
interests in the welfare of his community. Politi- 
cally he votes independent. 

In April, 1910, at Norris, Montana, he married 
Miss Gertrude Mitchell, daughter of Charles and 
Nora (Robins) Mitchell, the latter still a resident 
of Norris. Her father, deceased, was one of the 
first hoisting engineers at Butte. Mrs. Hind at- 
tended the Academy of the Sacred Heart at Mis- 
soula. They had two children: Bert S., who died 
at the age of seven days; and Charles Herbert, 
born January 3, 1916. 

ALFRED- L. THOMAS. This is a name that signifies 
to old timers in Montana the sheep industry v at its 
highest and on its most magnificent scale. Mr. 
Thomas is no longer an active factor in the sheep 
business, but he made his fortune through the in- 
dustry, and at one time his flocks grazed over liter- 
ally "a thousand hills." In any list of men who 
through their individual and co-operative efforts 
have done most to develop the natural resources 
of Montana the name of Alfred L. Thomas would 
properly appear. 

He comes of a sturdy race of farmers and sea- 
faring people and was born at Bear River, Nova 
Scotia, May 18, 1863. His great-grandfather was 
an English sea captain and helped colonize Nova 
Scotia. Joseph Thomas, grandfather of Alfred L., 
spent all his life in Nova Scotia and was a farmer. 
He married a Miss Marr, of Scotch descent. They 
both died at Bloomfield, Nova Scotia. J. V. Thomas, 
father of Alfred, was born at Bear River, Nova 
Scotia, in 1835 and died there in 1910. The efforts 
of his active lifetime were spent partly in farming 
and partly in the lumber industry. For many years 



he was president of the Agricultural Society of 
his county. He was also a great temperance worker 
and was a liberal in Canadian politics. His wife 
was a Miss Trevoi, who was born in 1837 and died 
in . 1873, spending her life at Bear River. Their 
children were: Sarah Emret, who died in 1907, 
the wife of Rupert Harris, who is a farmer and 
lumber man at Bear River, Nova Scotia; Anna 
Delle Maretta, who died at Bear River at the age 
of twelve years; Welcome Curtiss, who occupies 
the old homestead in Nova Scotia; Alfred L.; Mrs. 
Arthur P. Dunn, whose husband is a shoe manu- 
facturer at Boston, Massachusetts; and Aletha Cor- 
lina, wife of Fred Hoyt, who is in the automobile 
business at Seattle, Washington. A. L. Thomas has 
a brother at Egar, Montana, in the mercantile busi- 
ness. 

Alfred L. Thomas spent his boyhood in his native 
town, and at the age of seventeen left school and 
began to satisfy his tastes and ambitions for a prac- 
tical business career. After five years in partner- 
ship with Balcom Brothers in Nova Scotia he came 
out to the western states. He visited in Seattle dur- 
ing the winter of 1886 and in the following spring 
arrived in Montana. From Big Timber he soon 
removed to Martinsdale and spent two years on a 
sheep ranch. That was his introduction to the 
sheep business, and he then started a sheep ranch 
of his own, and gradually increasing his operations 
he had at different times some of the largest flocks 
and some of the largest holdings devoted to the 
business in Montana. He owned 73,000 acres of 
land in one block in the Lake Basin country. Fre- 
quently his flocks reached the imposing total of 
50,000 head. Altogether Mr. Thomas was a sheep- 
man for thirty years, and in spite of many vicissi- 
tudes he shared with other sheep men he made a 
fortune. 

Mr. Thomas removed to Columbus in 1912, im- 
proving some property he had previously acquired. 
In 1917 Mr. Thomas traded some of his Montana 
lands for an apartment house in Chicago, covering 
a whole block on Forty-second Street and Grand 
Boulevard. This is one of the modern high-class 
apartment houses of that city and the investment 
represents a fortune in itself. Mr. Thomas, however, 
still has extensive interests at Columbus, including 
the State Bank Building, a large garage, the court- 
house, a laundry, three dwellings, a modern office 
building on Pike Avenue, but has disposed of all 
his ranch lands. He is president of the Old Faithful 
Oil Company of Wyoming, and for years was presi- 
dent of the Stillwater Irrigation Company and was 
the man responsible for the maintenance of the 
large ditch that supplies Columbus and surrounding 
country with irrigation. He was also president and 
owner for ten years of the Columbus State Bank 
and he is now interested in a large sugar plantation- 
of 2,700 acres in Cuba. His interests and his busi- 
ness associations are truly those of a cosmopolitan 
variety and such as only a man of wealth and great 
enterprise could handle. 

Mr. Thomas is a republican, is identified with the 
Commercial Club at Columbus, and is a thoroughly 
loyal and pubfic spirited citizen of his adopted 
state. 

In 1918, at Livingston, Montana, he married Miss 
Marian Otto, daughter of F. W. and Minerva (Der- 
mont) Otto. Her father is engaged in the real 
estate business at Columbus. Her mother was acci- 
dentally killed in an automobile accident at Billings 
in 1918. Mrs. Thomas had two years of special 
training as a nurse. She and Mr. Thomas have one 
child, Bernard Alfred, born November I, 1918. 



40 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



WILLIAM STRYKER, D. O. Doctor Stryker is one 
of the leading representatives of osteopathy in 
Montana, has practiced within the borders of the 
state since 1910, and has a splendid clientage in his 
present home City of Livingston. 

He was born at Washington, Iowa, June 5, 1888. 
The Stryker family is Scotch-Irish in ancestry and 
were early settlers in Pennsylvania. His grand- 
father, W. A. Stryker, was born in Indiana in 
1824 and was a physician and surgeon and also a 
Methodist minister. He settled in Muscatine 
County, Iowa, in 1855, and died at Victor in that 
state in 1900. W. R. Stryker, father of Doctor 
Stryker, was born in Sullivan County, Indiana, in 
1851 and was reared in Iowa and for many years 
preached as a member of the Iowa Conference in 
the southeastern corner of the state. Since 1904 
he has been superannuated and is now living retired 
at Washington, Iowa. He is a republican and a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. At Pella, Iowa, 
he married Metta Shaw, who was born at Alleghany, 
New York, in 1858. Veda, the oldest of their chil- 
dren, is a teacher at Washington, Iowa, Doctor 
William is second. Charles N., whose home is 
at Iowa City, is an osteopathic graduate but is not 
practicing. He is general sales manager for the 
Freezeout Fire Extinguishing Company of Chicago 
and travels over the territory between Chicago and 
Des Moines. Paul J., who is traveling representative 
for the Freezeout Company, enlisted in November, 
1917, at Billings, Montana, with the regular army, 
was sent overseas in January, 1918, in the Big Gun 
Corps, and spent seven months with the American 
artillery forces around Verdun. He was severely 
gassed in August, 1918, and was mustered out in 
March, 1919. 

William Stryker received his early education in 
the public schools of Iowa, including the high school 
at Washington, and until 1905 attended the Wash- 
ington Academy. In 1907 he entered the American 
School of Osteopathy at Kirksville, Missouri, and 
was graduated D. O., in 1910. The same year he 
began practice at Missoula, remained there two 
years, and then practiced at other points in the 
state until he removed to Livingston in April, 1917. 
He has many of the leading families of Livingston 
among his patients. His offices are in the Veit 
Building. 

Doctor Stryker has also identified himself with 
community affairs, is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce, is secretary of the Rotary Club, and 
a director in the Livingston Club. He has served 
as city health officer. He is independent in politics. 
He is a member of the Methodist Church and is 
affiliated with Livingston Lodge No. 599, Loyal 
Order of Moose. 

May 20, 1917, at Butte, he married Miss Mabd 
Garnngton, daughter of J. J. and Ellen Garrington. 
Her mother resides with Doctor and Mrs. Stryker. 
Her father, deceased, was a railroad contractor^ 
did some early work in that line in Oregon, and 
settled at Missoula in 1899. Mrs. Stryker is a 
graduate of the high school at Missoula and of the 
Montana State University. They have a son, born 
September 12, 1918, named William G. 

,. G. BRADBROOK. Later generations will always 
have a pardonable interest in the founders and 
makers and builders of new communities and towns. 
A town of Montana whose history is comprised 
within the last two years is Rapelje, and the main 
actors in its upbuilding are still on the scene. One 
of them is L. G. Bradbrook, who is a partner in 
the chief hardware and lumber business there and 
is connected with other business enterprises. 



Mr. Bradbrook is a young man and most of his 
mature years have been spent in the lumber and 
hardware business. He was born at Red Cloud, 
Nebraska, July 28, 1887. His grandfather was an 
Englishman who immigrated to America and be- 
came a farmer near Sandusky, Ohio, where he died. 
Fred Bradbrook, father of L. G. Bradbrook, was 
born in Ohio in 1853, and when a young man went 
out to the western frontier of Nebraska, settling 
at Red Cloud. He was a photographer and opened 
the first regular studio to furnish photographs to 
the people of the Red Cloud community. He after- 
ward lived retired and died at Red Cloud in 1905. 
He was a republican and was affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of 
Pythias. Fred Bradbrook married Theressa Ak- 
hofer, who is still living at Red Cloud. She was 
born in Germany in 1856, but was reared in Neb- 
raska. L. G. Bradbrook is the older of two sons. 
His brother, G. L. Bradbrook, is also a partner 
in the lumber business, being located at the 1 Hysham 
plant of the Bradbrook-Saunders Lumber and Hard- 
ware Company. 

L. G. Bradbrook acquired his education at Red 
Cloud, graduating from the high school in 1905. 
Soon after leaving school he entered the lumber 
business at Bruning, Nebraska, where the Brad- 
brook-Saunders Lumber and Hardware Company 
first started. The present headquarters of this 
flourishing business are at Hysham, Montana, and 
branches are in Rapelje, Wheat Basin and Myers. 
The largest individual plant is at Rapelje. A fine 
new brick building was erected in 1918 to house 
the hardware store, and in the rear is the lumber 
yard, both departments being equipped with every 
staple commodity needed for a new and growing 
town and vicinity. The officers of this business 
are: D. E. Saunders, of Billings, president; W. B. 
Saunders, of Billings, vice president; and L. G. 
Bradbrook, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Bradbrook is president of the Rapelje Com- 
mercial Club, a director of the First National Bank, 
is president of the Rapelje Telephone Company, 
and owns some extensive ranch lands at Hysham. 
Mr. Bradbrook is unmarried, is independent in poli- 
tics and is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

J. A. SHADOAN. Deeds are thoughts crystallized, 
and according to their brilliancy do we judge the 
worth of a man to the country which produced 
him, and in his works we expect to find the true 
index to his character. The .study of the life of the 
representative American never fails to offer much 
of pleasing interest and valuable instruction, de- 
veloping a mastering of expedients which has 
brought about most wonderful results. The subject 
of this review is a worthy representative of that 
type of American character and of that progressive 
spirit which promotes public good in advancing 
individual prosperity and conserving popular inter- 
ests. 

J. A. Shadoan, president and general manager 
of the Salesville Mercantile Company, one of the 
most important enterprises in the Gallatin Valley, 
was born in Somerset, Pulaski County, Kentucky, 
on November 25, 1881. He is the son of J. T. and 
Bethada (Bales) Shadoan, who are still living in 
their old Kentucky home. J. T. Shadoan was born 
in Somerset, Kentucky, in 1859, and his entire life 
has been devoted to agricultural pursuits. He is 
a republican in politics, and his religious affiliation 
is with the Christian Church. His wife, Bethada. 
was also born in Pulaski County, Kentucky, in 
1859, and she bore her husband the following chil- 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



41 



dren : John, who is a railroad conductor, residing 
at Mart, Texas; Joseph, who died in Pulaski Coun- 
ty, Kentucky, at the age of twenty-five years ; the 
subject of this sketch is the next in order of birth; 
Stella, who is the wife of William Cover, a ranch- 
man at Manhattan, Montana ; Clarence lives in 
Manhattan, Montana, where he is employed in a 
garage ; L. D., who also lives in Manhattan, oper- 
ates a ranch near there; Frank is his father's as- 
sistant on the home farm in Kentucky; Hobart 
is a rancher at Manhattan ; May is the wife of a 
Mr. Burns, an electrician by trade and foreman 
in the railroad shops at Somerset, Kentucky. 

J. A. Shadoan received his educational training 
in the rural schools of his native community, where 
he lived until seventeen years of age. In 1898, 
ambitions for a larger field of labor and oppor- 
tunities for advancement, Mr. Shadoan came to 
Manhattan, Montana, and entered the employ of 
Thomas Gibson as a farm hand, with whom he 
remained for two years. He then rented a ranch, 
which he operated on his own account for three 
years. In 1909 he bought 240 acres of fine irri- 
gated land situated two miles west of Salesville, 
and to the improvement and cultivation of that 
place he devoted himself for a year. He still owns 
this place, though now residing in Salesville. In 
1910 Mr. Shadoan bought the controlling interest 
in the Salesville Mercantile Company, of Salesville, 
which he incorporated and to which he has since 
indefatigably devoted himself. The company has 
been incorporated and the present official personnel 
of the corporation is as follows : President and 
general manager, J. A. Shadoan ; secretary, F. C. 
Roberts ; treasurer, W. H. Bradley. The company 
operates a fully organized department store, the 
departments including farm implements, hardware, 
groceries, dry goods and other lines demanded by 
the local trade. The policy of the company has 
always been to so select their stock as to meet the 
needs of their patrons, and this fact, coupled with 
courteous treatment and prompt service, has gained 
for them a well deserved popularity throughout the 
Gallatin Valley. Mr. Shadoan devotes himself un- 
remittingly to the management of the business, and 
to his good business judgment is due the splendid 
success which the company enjoys. 

Politically Mr. Shadoan is a stanch republican, 
though not an aspirant for public office. He is a 
member of the Christian Church and also belongs 
to Salesville Lodge No. 69, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

In 1904, at Bozeman, Montana, Mr. Shadoan was 
married to Alma Wright, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. E. Wright. Her father, who is deceased, 
was county judge of Wayne County, Kentucky; 
his widow now resides in Los Angeles, California. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Shadoan have been born two 
children, namely: Raymond, born August 12, 1905, 
and Lawrence, born April 18, 1908. In every phase 
of life's activities Mr. Shadoan has been true to 
his duties and his opportunities and has so ordered 
his actions as to merit the high regard in which he 
is today held by those who know him. 

EDWIN LEONARD JOHNSON came to Plains, Mon- 
tana, in 1906, and has been continuously associated 
with the First National Bank of Plains, and as its 
cashier has helped promote its prosperity and its 
strength as one of the leading banking institutions 
of Sanders County. 

Mr. Johnson was born at Center City, Minnesota, 
January 24, 1885. His people were pioneers in Min- 
nesota, where his grandfather, Jonas Johnson, 
homesteaded a farm more than half a century ago. 



Jonas Johnson was born at Smoland, Sweden, in 
1827, and after his marriage brought his family to 
this country and settled in Center City, Minnesota. 
He was an industrious and successful farmer in 
that locality until his death in 1917. C. J. Johnson, 
father of the Plains banker, was born at Center 
City, Minnesota, in 1862, and is still living there. 
He has spent his active career as a dairy farmer. 
He is a republican and a member of the Lutheran 
Church. C. J. Johnson married Mary Moline, who 
was also born at Center City, in 1863. They have 
a large family of children, and several of the sons 
were soldiers and officers in the World War. Henry 
A., the oldest, is cashier of the Scandia State Bank 
at Scandia, Minnesota. Edwin L. is the second in 
age. William, the third, died at the age of four 
years. J. Arthur, at home with his parents, en- 
tered the first officers' training camp, was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant at Fort Snelling, and after- 
ward promoted to first lieutenant, and was in serv- 
ice at Houston, Texas, and in New Mexico until 
mustered out in the spring of 1919. Oscar R., an 
electrician living at Minneapolis, also enlisted at 
the outbreak of the war, was in an officers' train- 
ing camp and commissioned a second lieutenant, 
and served until discharged in May, 1919. Theodore, 
at home, attended a training school at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and was mustered out in January, 
1919. Paul, the seventh child, helps on his father's 
farm. Esther T. is the wife of a farmer at Marine 
on the St. Croix River in Minnesota. The two 
younger children are Oliver and Elmer, twins, both 
at home. 

Edwin Leonard Johnson was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Center City, including the high school, 
and for two years was a student in the famous 
Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, Minnesota. 
Leaving college in 1905, he spent the following year 
before coming to Montana in the employ of Wy- 
man, Partridge & Company, wholesale dry goods 
of Minneapolis. He entered the First National 
Bank of Plains in 1906 as bookkeeper and stenog- 
rapher, was promoted to assistant cashier in 1908, 
and since 1910 has been cashier. 

The First National Bank of Plains was estab- 
lished in 1904 under a national charter. It operates 
on a capital of $25,000, surplus and profits of $12,- 
ooo, and enjoys aggregate deposits of $300,000. J. 
M. Keith, of Missoula, is president of the bank, 
C. H. Rittenour, of Plains, is vice president, with 
Mr. Johnson, cashier. 

Mr. Johnson has identified himself with Plains 
as a citizen and home owner and has a modern 
residence here. He has served as mayor, is a re- 
publican voter, a member of the Community Church 
and is a past master of Ponemah Lodge No. 63, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He is also a 
member of the Montana and the American Bankers 
Association. 

In 1910, at Plains, he married Miss Louise Jack- 
son, a daughter of P. B. and Mamie (Glenn) Jack- 
son, residents of Gate, Washington. Her father 
is now a retired minister of the Congregational 
Church. He first came to Montana in 1892, and 
for five years was pastor of the Congregational 
Church at Billings, later had pastorates at Sprague, 
Washington, Little Rock, Arkansas, North Yakima, 
Washington, and from 1901 to 1909 was pastor 
at Plains. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have two chil- 
dren: Charles Glenn, born November 17, 191 1; and 
Robert Brooks, born March 8, 1913. 

JOHN ROWLEY. A number of Montana and western 
pioneers have their home at Lewistown, including 
John Rowley, whose experiences in the West cover 



42 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



more than forty years, though practically all his 
life has been spent in a western environment. 

He was born at Salt Lake City, February 18, 1858. 
His parents, John and Isabel (Slater) Rowley, were 
only temporarily residents at Salt Lake. They were 
natives of England, and came to this country with 
. six of their children in 1849. They were eight 
weeks in crossing the ocean on a sailing vessel and 
from New York City went out to the then extreme 
frontier, Nebraska City, Nebraska. From that point 
John Rowley, Sr., engaged in freighting over the 
plains with ox teams. His family made several trips 
with him, and for one winter, 1858, the family home 
was at Salt Lake City. John Rowley, Sr., continued 
in the freighting business until his death. He was 
the father of nine children, five sons and four 
daughters, and four are still living, including John 
Rowley, the youngest child. 

The latter spent most of his boyhood at Nebraska 
City and attended the public schools. At the age 
of thirteen he became a cowboy with Crawford, 
Thompson & Company, and not long afterward 
reached Deer Lodge, Montana, where he was con- 
nected with a prominent cattle outfit. Later he 

was with the Horse Shoe Outfit, and for 

about twenty-five years was associated with N. J. 
Dovenspeck. He then engaged in the sheep and 
cattle business for himself, and at the present time 
owns a fine ranch fifty miles east of Lewiston. 
He is a republican, but has never had any aspira- 
tions to hold office. 

His life has been one long and eventful experience 
in the western country. He made seven successful 
trips between Montana and Cheyenne, Wyoming, 
the latter being the shipping, point for many years. 
The first trip was made with a bunch of cattle in 
1876. In crossing Green River one of the young 
men of the party was drowned. His companions re- 
covered the body, rolled it in a blanket and gave him 
as decent a burial as possible. At another time 
Mr. Rowley and his companions were crossing Wind 
Riyer where Lander, Wyoming, now stands. Indians 
appeared, stole their horses, but the cowboys gave 
chase and overhauled the Indians about seventy miles 
distant. There ensued a skirmish in which the stolen 
stock was recovered. One man was left to guard 
the stock while the others, bent upon vengeance, fol- 
lowed the Indians. Going about fifteen miles they 
came up and had a skirmish. One of the men, 
named John McCullum, was wounded in the fight, 
and the white men decided they had sufficient Indian 
encounter for the time. They started back, but on 
reaching the spot where the horses had been left 
discovered they had again been driven away by the 
Indians, and they then made their way back as best 
they could, carrying the wounded man to Lander. 

Mr. Rowley recalls an amusing incident in 1879 
that happened at Pine Bluff, Wyoming, showing how 
the West was looked upon by a certain class of 
eastern people. There were seventeen different herds 
waiting shipment at the point with the full com- 
plement of cowboy attendants. About 100 yards 
from the station was a saloon crowded with cowboys 
when the westbound train pulled in for a stop of 
about ten minutes. It was a cold winter day and 
blowing hard ; and a passenger dressed in eastern 
style and holding on to a derby hat jumped off the 
train and ran over to the saloon. He pushed his 
head in the door and said, "I don't want to buy 
anything but just want to see the interior of a 
Western saloon." One of the cowboys for a joke 
pulled out his gun and shouted "Kill the son of a 
gun." Immediately they all pulled their guns and 
began shooting through the roof. The passenger 
yelled with terror and made a wild break for the 



train, breaking all speed limits and records in getting 
there, and no doubt since has told the tale many 
times of how he escaped death from a crowd of 
bloodthirsty ruffians chasing him over the country. 
Such incidents were common in the old days, and 
the old timers have had many hearty laughs since 
that time about them. 

At Lewistown October 6, 1889, Mr. Rowley mar- 
ried Miss Martha Josephine Skaggs. She is a daugh- 
ter of Cyrus and Anna Caroline (Moser) Skaggs. 
Her father was born in Missouri and died at th 
age of seventy-eight and her mother was a native 
of North Carolina and died at the age of fifty- 
eight. Mrs. Rowley was the oldest of seven chil- 
dren, four sons and three daughters, six of whom 
are living. Mr. and Mrs. Rowley have three chil- 
dren : John Harvey, the oldest, enlisted December 
7, 1917, in the Aviation Corps and was in service 
at Kelley Field, later at Camp McArthur, Texas, sub- 
sequently at Newport News, and received a commis- 
sion. Lancelot Charles, the second son, is a civil 
engineer with home at Philadelphia. Hyacinth, the 
only daughter, is completing her education in the 
University of Wisconsin at Madison. 

FRANK BENDER came to Montana more than thirty- 
eight years ago, has had a varied experience as a 
rancher, printer, merchant and public official, and 
is now at the head of one of the leading real estate 
businesses in Southern Montana, at Livingston. 

Mr. Bender was born in New York City March 
9, 1860. His father, John Adam Bender, was born 
in 1824 and died in 1869, spending all his life 
in New York City, a shoe merchant, manufacturer 
and leather dealer. After the formation of that 
party he became an ardent republican. He was a 
member of the Lutheran Church. His wife, Rosie 
Bender, was born in 1826 and died in 1866. Of 
their children the oldest, Charles, enlisted in the 
One Hundred and Forty-Ninth New York Infantry, 
was wounded in battle and died from the effects 
of the wounds after the close of the war. Philip, 
the second son, was a farmer and died at Sparta, 
Wisconsin. Emil E., died in Dakota Territory. 
Frank is the fourth in age, while John A., the young- 
est, is a miner now at Anchorage, Alaska. 

Frank Bender graduated from high school in 
New York City in 1876. For two years he worked 
with the Hatch Lithograph Company in his native 
city and spent one year in the Jon.es Foundry Com- 
pany at Brooklyn. On leaving the East he went 
to a farm near Sparta, Wisconsin, and afterward 
spent two and a half years with the job printing 
firm of Johnson, Smith & Harrison at Minneapolis. 

Mr. Bender came to Montana in 1881, first locat- 
ing at Glendive, soon afterward going to Miles 
City, and for about six months was employed as 
purchasing agent for the contractors who were 
working down the Cheyenne Bluffs along the river 
between Miles City and Rosebud. Mr. Bender then 
had some business relations speculating in ranch 
properties around Bozeman and in March, 1883, 
came to Livingston and was associated with his 
brother John A., as a farmer and stockman. In 
1884, leaving their stock on the range, they moved 
to Cook City and during the winter of 1885-86 
Mr. Bender was at Fridley, now known as Emigrant. 
March I, 1886, he started on a visit to California, 
but returned in May and resumed his activities 
as a stock raiser. In 1898 he sold out his ranching 
interests and returning to Livingston spent two 
years as a merchant. Then followed a long period 
of official service, including four years as constable 
of Livingston Township, and since then continu- 
ously as a justice of the peace. He also served 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



43 



a term as alderman, and twelve years as police 
judge. Since 1909 Mr. Bender has been in the real 
estate business, and has developed a complete 
organization with a service covering city and ranch 
properties all over Southern Montana. His offices 
are in the Thompson Block. 

Mr. Bender is one of the prominent Odd Fellows 
of Montana. He is affiliated with all branches of 
Odd Fellowship, being a past grand of Park Lodge 
No. 17, past chief patriarch of Columbian Encamp- 
ment 204, past captain of Garfield Canton, and was 
major of the Second Battalion of the Patriarchs 
Militant for a number of years and has been a 
delegate to the Grand Lodge, representing all the 
branches on a number of occasions. He is also 
past venerable consul of Silver Tip Camp No. 5675, 
Modern Woodmen of America and past exalted 
ruler of Livingston Lodge No. 246 of the Elks and 
was a representative to the Grand Lodge in 1906 
at Denver Colorado. For a number of years Mr. 
Bender has served as secretary of the Livingston 
Fire Department which was organized in 1886 and 
of which he is one of the oldest living members. 
He is also secretary of the Park County Pioneers, 
an association which was organized in 1918. He 
is a democrat in politics. 

His home is at 320 South Third Street. He mar- 
ried at Livingston in 1892 Miss Ollie V. Cole, 
daughter of Alfred and Mary Ann (Freeman) Cole. 
Her parents are deceased, her father having been a 
pioneer Montana farmer at Glendive. 

WILL J. SODERLIND, who was prominently identi- 
fied with the establishment of the pioneer banking 
institution of Rapelje, is a banker by profession, 
since he has been connected with banks during the 
greater part of his active lifetime and all his ex- 
perience has been in commercial lines. Mr. Soder- 
lind has a wide acquaintance with the northwestern 
country, not only Montana but several adjoining 
states and in Canada. 

He was born at Ludington, Michigan, May 23, 
1885. His father, Alfred Soderlind, was born in 
Sweden in 1857, was reared in that country to the 
age of eighteen, and on coming to the United States 
located at Ludington, Michigan. In 1886 he moved 
to Lake Benton, Minnesota, where he bought a 
farm. From farming he formed connections with 
the financial community and established the Farm- 
ers State Bank of Lake Benton and since 1906 has 
been its cashier. He is still living at Lake Ben- 
ton. He also served as register of deeds of Lin- 
coln County, Minnesota. He is an independent 
democrat and is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. Alfred Soderlind married Emily Johnson. 
She was born in Sweden in 1861 and was reared 
from childhood in Michigan; Will J. is the oldest 
of their children. Charles is assistant cashier in 
the Farmers State Bank at Lake Benton, Minne- 
sota ; Alma is the wife of Hans Lyngaard, a farmer 
in Lincoln County, Minnesota; Alice is still at 
home; Grace is the wife of Roy Martie, who has 
a lieutenant's commission in the National army; 
and Walter, the youngest, is with the home circle. 

Will J. Soderlind acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Lake Benton, to which com- 
munity he was taken when about a year old. He 
finished his sophomore year in the high school, and 
in 1903 attended the Minneapolis School of Busi- 
ness. His banking experience began as bookkeeper 
with the National Citizens Bank of Lake Benton. 
He was \y 2 years in that work, then spent two 
years as assistant cashier, and two years as cashier, 
of the Securities State Bank of Seaforth, Minne- 



sota. On leaving that position he acquired a some- 
what different experience in banking. As an em- 
ploye of the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Com- 
pany he was in their Minneapolis office for i l /2 
years and then for one year represented the com- 
pany at Winnipeg, Canada, and in 1911 the same 
company sent him to their Billings headquarters, 
where he remained as bookkeeper and cashier for 
two years, and then for two years was assistant 
collector and another two years were spent as gen- 
eral collector covering Montana and Wyoming. 

Mr. Soderlind left the Case Company in 1917 to 
identify himself with the new Town of Rapelje 
at the time the First National Bank was established. 
This bank has a capital of $25,000, and its surplus 
is $2,500. The officers are: Roy J. Covert, of Bill- 
ings, president; Albert E. Platz, of Billings, vice 
president; Will J. Soderlind, cashier; and J. Herbert 
Jones, assistant cashier. 

Mr. Soderlind is also secretary and treasurer of 
the Rapelje Telephone Company and is agent for 
the Rapelje Townsite Company. He owns his home 
in the town and a farm north of Rapelje. Mr. 
Soderlind is an independent in politics, a member 
of the Episcopal Church, belongs to the Commer- 
cial Club of Rapelje and is affiliated with Rapelje 
Lodge No. 122, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

In 1910, at Seaforth, Minnesota, he married Miss 
Florence Longbottom, daughter of John and Eliza- 
beth (Johnston) Longbottom, resident of Seaforth, 
her father being a retired merchant, farmer and 
banker. Mr. and Mrs. Soderlind have two children : 
Jay, born August 24, 1912, and Shirley, born July 7, 
1916. 

PROF. J. H. HOLST since 1913 has been principal 
of secondary education and director of the sum- 
mer season of the Montana State College at Boze- 
man. A notable achievement as a teacher and school 
leader preceded his coming to Bozeman, where 
during the past half dozen years he has been able 
to influence for the better the large number of young 
men and women preparing for work in the educa- 
tional profession. 

Professor Hoist was born at Gravois Mills, Mis- 
souri, March 2, 1873. His father was N. J. Hoist 
and his grandfather was Nicholas Hoist, and both 
were natives of the Province of Schleswig Hoi- 
stein, when that province was part of the King- 
dom of Denmark. The family are of Danish an- 
cestry. Nicholas Hoist was born in 1815, had 
served his time in the Danish army and in 1859 
brought his family to America and settled in Mor- 
gan County, Missouri. He was one of the early 
farmers in that section and lived there the rest of 
his life. He died at Gravois Mills in 1898, at the 
advanced age of eighty-three. N. J. Hoist, his son, 
is still living at Eldpn, Missouri. He was born in 
Schleswig Holstein in 1849, and was ten years of 
age when brought to the United States. He grew 
up in Morgan County, Missouri, and has spent his 
active life as a farmer. Since 1911 he has lived 
retired at Eldon, but still owns a small farm, his 
original place being owned by his sons. He is a 
democrat; an active worker in the Christian Church 
and is affiliated with the Masonic Order. His wife, 
Rachel Jane James, was born at Gravois Mills, 
Missouri, in 1850. Professor Hoist is the oldest 
of their six children. Letreciam, the second in age, 
is the wife of C. F. Rastorfer, a farmer at Bar- 
netts, Missouri ; Thomas R. lives on a farm at Mar- 
vin, Missouri ; J. D. is a farmer at Eldon ; Hiram 
operates a grain elevator in Colorado ; and Ola, the 
youngest, is unmarried and living with her parents. 

Receiving his first advantages in the rural schools 



44 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



of Morgan County, J. H. Hoist afterwards at- 
tended an academy at Versailles in his native state, 
and in 1898 graduated from the Hooper Institute 
at Clarksburg, Missouri. In the meantime for two 
years he had practical experience as a newspaper 
man, one year of which was with the St. Louis 
Chronicle. For two years he was associate presi- 
dent, but as a matter of fact was the actual head 
of the Hooper Institute. Professor Hoist began 
his career as a Montana educator in 1900, when he 
located at Dillon and worked a year with the Dillon 
Tribune. He then became principal of schools at 
Gibbonsville, Idaho, held that post three years and 
for three years was also interested in mining opera- 
tions in Idaho. 

In 1908 Professor Hoist returned to Montana and 
organized at Victor the first consolidated school 
in the state. He was its superintendent six years. 
What he did there is best reviewed in the words 
of the leading editorial contained in the Journal of 
Education of Boston in the issue of October 25, 1917. 
"Professor J. H. Hoist," says the editorial, "now 
of the State College 'of Agriculture at Bozeman, 
\fontana, is one of the best demonstrations we know 
of a man's giving himself more than state-wide 
recognition by intensified service in a small com- 
munity. Victor is a little place in the Bitter Root 
Valley of Montana. It has never had more than 
a hundred fifty population. Mr. Hoist went there 
nine years ago this September. The school en- 
rollment was one hundred thirty-seven, or nearly 
equal to the entire population of the village. Of 
course the district lines were much larger than 
the village boundaries." The editorial then enume- 
rates a long list of progressive achievements under- 
taken through and as a result of Mr. Hoist, in- 
cluding the increase in number of teachers, better 
salary schedule for their services, the teaching of 
agriculture on scientific principles, the organization 
of a Parents-Teachers Association and a District 
Teachers Association, the establishment of a school 
savings bank, the first in the state, the organization 
of the first County Interscholastic League, and the 
making of the periodic events of debating and liter- 
ary contests, athletic meets, the principal gala oc- 
casions for the entire community. In 1912 Mr. 
Hoist, after having added a high school course 
and greatly increased the facilities of the Victor 
school and the building of a splendid schoolhouse 
for the district, secured the consolidation of five 
school districts, thus bringing about the first con- 
solidated school in Montana. 

The editorial in the Journal of Education closes 
with the following sentences : "When the Agricul- 
tural College elected him to a position in the faculty 
in 1913 the school district voted to make his salary 
equal to any that the state would pay. The banquet 
to Mr. and Mrs. Hoist with the gifts of a gold watch 
for him and of a silver service for Mrs. Hoist was 
an event never to be forgotten in the Bitter Root 
country. More than four hundred were seated 
at the tables. Professor J. H. Hoist not only made 
Victor famous for Victor, but famous for more 
first things in progressive education than any other 
city in the state." 

While Professor Hoist has been able to broaden 
the effectiveness of his influence and educational 
ideals through his present work at Montana State 
College, he doubtless regards his experience at 
Victor as one of the most stimulating and happy 
of his entire career. In 1918 the degree of Master 
of Arts was conferred upon him by Montana Uni- 
versity. Professor Hoist owns a farm in the Bitter 
Root country in Ravalli County. a"nd therefore has 
a direct personal interest in Montana agriculture. 



He and his family reside at the Barracks. He is 
independent in politics, is a vestryman in the Epis- 
copal Church, served two years as master of his 
Masonic lodge at Victor and is a member of Boze- 
man Lodge No. 18, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and is affiliated with the Lily of the Valley 
Chapter No. 6 of the Eastern Star. He is a member 
of the National Education Association. 

In 1910, at Poison, Montana, he married Miss 
Laura C. Maynard. Her father, Judge A. D. May- 
nard, is a large property owner at Poison, where 
he resides, and is also engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness at Pablo in Flathead County. Mrs. Hoist is a 
graduate of Montana State Normal College at Dillon 
and before her marriage was a teacher in the schools 
at Victor for three years. Mr. and Mrs. Hoist 
have two children, Rachel Edith, born January 31, 
1912; and Jane Maynard, born February n, 1914. . 

C. C. MILLS is a lawyer by profession, but since 
coming to Montana has given his chief time and 
abilities to newspaper work. He is now manager 
and editor of the Sanders County Ledger at Thomp- 
son Falls. 

Mr. Mills was born at Redfield, Iowa, September 
28, 1872. His paternal ancestors came from Eng- 
land, and the family lived for many years in the 
southern states. Grandfather Milton Mills was 
born in Tennessee in 1816. He became one of the 
pioneer farmers in the vicinity of Redfield, Iowa. 
La*ter he took up merchandising, and he 'died at 
Redfield in 1890. His wife was Matilda Locke, 
also a native of Tennessee. She died at Redfield, 
Iowa. John H. Mills, father of the Montana 
editor, was born in Indiana in 1846, and was a 
small child when his parents moved to the State 
of Iowa. He was reared and married near Red- 
field, and for many years was a farmer and later 
engaged in the newspaper business. He is still 
living at Redfield and is now connected with the 
oil inspection department of the state government. 
He is a veteran Union soldier, having enlisted in 
1863, when only seventeen years of age. He was 
a private in Company H of the Thirty-ninth Iowa 
Infantry, and served until the close of the war. 
He participated in the march to the sea under 
Sherman. He has long been an active member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic and in 1918 was 
department commander of the Iowa State Grand 
Army of the Republic. He is a republican and is 
affiliated with the Masons and Knights of Pythias. 
John H. Mills married Sarah A. Duck, who was 
born in Indiana in 1846. They had four children: 
R. R., a farmer at Redfield, Iowa; C. C. Mills; 
Milton L., of Lowerville, Iowa; and R. C., a veter- 
inarian at Redfield. 

C. C. Mills secured his early advantages in the 
rural schools of Dallas County, Iowa, graduated 
from the high school at Redfield in 1893, and in 
1896 received his Bachelor of Science degree from 
Iowa State College at Ames. He taught a number 
of terms to defray the expenses of his college 
education. Mr. Mills prepared for the legal pro- 
fession in the law school of the University of Wis- 
consin, where he graduated LL. B. in 1904. For 
one year he practiced at Westfield, Wisconsin, and 
for eight or nine years had a law office and pub- 
lished a newspaper at Scranton, North Dakota. 
From 1913 to the spring of 1919 Mr. Mills published 
the Montana Idea at Dodson. After some weeks 
of travel he located at Thompson Falls, where he 
is editor and manager of the Sanders County Ledger. 
The Ledger is one of the oldest papers in western 
Montana, having been established in 1884. It en- 
joys a substantial circulation and influence through- 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



out Sanders and surrounding counties, and is re- 
publican in politics. 

Mr. Mills is himself a republican voter. He is 
affiliated with Liberty Lodge No. 99, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, at Dodson, being past senior 
warden. He is also a member of Helena Con- 
sistory of the Scottish Rite. In 1896, at Redfield, 
Iowa, he married Miss Sabra Welker, daughter of 
A. J. and Anna B. (Park) Welker, now residents 
of Great Falls, Montana, where her father is. a 
retired farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Mills have three 
children: Clarence L., born October 20, 1897; Don- 
ovan, born December 7, 1901 ; and Sabra Helen, 
born June 27, 1910. The son Clarence enlisted De- 
cember 7, 1917, and was sent overseas March 27, 
1918. Eleven months of overseas service is credited 
to the young soldier. He participated in several 
of the chief offensives in which the American forces 
had a part, including the St. Mihiel, Argonne and 
Verdun. He was mustered out in March, 1919. 

FREDERICK F. ATTIX, M. D., who is one of the 
two Fellows of the American College of Surgeons 
represented in Lewistown, came to this state as 
surgeon for a mining company, and for the past 
eighteen years has been busily engaged in the work 
of his profession at Lewistown, where he founded 
and has developed one of the finest private hospitals 
in the Northwest. 

Doctor Attix was born at Buffalo Prairie, near De- 
troit, Minnesota, August 8, 1878, a son of Henry 
S. and Mary H. (Knowles) Attix. His father was 
born in Illinois in 1854 and his mother in Michigan 
in 1858. Doctor Attix is the oldest of six children, 
four sons and two daughters, all still living. His fa- 
ther was a farmer until 1890, when he removed to 
Colorado and engaged in gold and silver mining. He 
was appointed postmaster at Mentor, Minnesota, 
in 1886, and in politics has been a sturdy democrat 
for many years. Both the father and mother are 
now residents of Oakland, California. 

Doctor Attix acquired his early high school educa- 
tion at Glenwood Springs, Colorado, attended St. 
John's College at Denver in 1891 and 1892, and took 
his medical work in the University of Pennsylvania 
at Philadelphia. He finished his four years' course in 
1900. Returning to Denver, he was employed for 
eight months as company surgeon for the Colorado 
Southern Railway. In January, 1901, he came by 
stage coach into the Judith Basin of Montana, and 
for about eight months served the Gilt Edge Mining 
Company as its surgeon. In August, 1901, he opened 
his offices at Lewistown, and has kept his work 
pretty exclusively confined to general surgery. Dur- 
ing 1916-17 he built what is known as the Attix 
Clinic Building, which is in every way representa- 
tive of the most advanced ideas in hospiial con- 
struction. He has fitted it with every appliance for 
diagnostic clinical work. There is a large operating 
room, X-Ray apparatus, electric sterilizing outfit 
of his own design, and every other facility that can 
be found in modern hospitals. Doctor Attix is a 
member of the Fergus County Medical Society, the 
Silver Bow County Medical Society, the Montana 
State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. He was elected a member of the 
American College of Surgeons in 1914, and has 
since been chosen to a Fellowship in that body. 
Politically he is a republican. 

Doctor Attix married, March 24, 1903, Ruth Cre- 
sap. She was born near Kansas City, Missouri. Mrs. 
Attix is a member of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. They have two daughters, Zelda and 
Julia. 



CLARK W. ALLEN. With no important interrup- 
tions Clark W. Allen has been engaged in the lumber 
or grain business ever since he arrived at years 
of discretion and manhood. His interests and home 
have been at Big Timber for a number of years, 
where he is manager of the Thompson Yards, In- 
corporated. 

He was born at Aylmer in the Province of 
Ontario, Canada, June 21, 1882, His paternal 
ancestors originally came from Holland and were 
colonial settlers in New York. Mr. Allen's great- 
great-grandfather was probably what is described 
as a United Empire Loyalist, since he removed 
his family to Canada at the time of the Revolu- 
tionary war. The grandfather of Mr. Allen was 
Clark Allen, a native of New York State, but spent 
most of his life on a farm at Aylmer, Ontario, 
where he died in 1888. Robert Allen, father of 
Clark W., was born at Aylmer in 1850, was reared 
and married and followed farming there for several 
years, and in 1883 went as a pioneer to Watertown, 
South Dakota, where he homesteaded a 160 acres 
and also took a timber claim. He proved and 
operated his farm until 1903, at which date he retired 
to Minneapolis, where he died in 1917. He was 
a republican after coming to the United States, was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
affiliated with the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. His wife was Sarah E. Warnock, who was 
born at Aylmer, Canada, in 1854, and died at Min- 
neapolis, in 1917. Clark W., is the third of their 
four children. Ethel L., the oldest, is a teacher 
in the public schools of Minneapolis. Jessie I., is the 
wife of George E. Davis, secretary of a grain com- 
pany at Warren, Minnesota, while Jennie is the 
wife of John A. Shaw, engineer for a construction 
company at Fargo, North Dakota. 

Clark W. Allen was graduated from the high 
school at Watertown, South Dakota, in 1900. He 
has no memories of his birthplace in Ontario, since 
the family left there when he was about a year 
old. All his life has been spent in the northwestern 
country. He had his first experience in the lum- 
ber business at Watertown as bookkeeper with the 
S. H. Bowman Lumber Company, later in 1903, was 
promoted to manager of the yard of the same com- 
pany at Revillo, South Dakota, and was there two 
years. The following year he interrupted his busi- 
ness career to improve his educational advantages, 
attending the University of Minnesota at Minnea- 
polis. When he resumed his business it was in 
the general office of the Imperial Elevator Company 
at Minneapolis for about a year. He then super- 
vised the establishment of a lumber yard at Plaza, 
North Dakota, for the Bovey Shute Lumber Com- 
pany and remained as its manager until 1910. 

Mr. Allen on coming to Big Timber in 1910 be- 
came the manager for the H. M. Allen & Company. 
Eight years later the local business and other yards 
were purchased by the Thompson Yards, Inc., and 
Mr. Allen has continued as manager at the old 
stand. 

He regards himself as a fixture in the citizenship 
of Big Timber and owns a modern home on Seventh 
Avenue. He served as city councilman four years 
and was president of the council throughout that 
term. He is a republican, a trustee of the Con- 
gregational Church, and is affiliated with Big Tim- 
ber Lodge No. 25, Knights of Pythias, Big Timber 
Camp, Modern Woodmen of America, and Livings- 
ton Camp, Woodmen of the World. 

On October 25, 1910, at Plaza, North Dakota, he 
married Miss Stella Hagen. Her mother is de- 
ceased. Her father, S. H. Hagen, is a merchant at 
Plaza. Mrs. Allen is a graduate of the Northwood 



46 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



High School in North Dakota, and for two years 
was a student in the University of North Dakota. 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen have three children: Ethelynn, 
born December 31, 1911; Clark Warnock, born 
December 30, 1912; and Jerome, born June 5, 1914. 

AXEL M. PETERSON, the manager of the Farmers 
Co-operative Elevator Company at Joliet, is a citi- 
zen and business man whose career deserves spe- 
cial consideration. He had many handicaps to over- 
come, acquired a thorough education though a poor 
boy, and has realized every successive advancement 
through the medium of hard work and sound ability. 

He was born in Southern Sweden, November 2, 
1873. His father was Peter Nelson, who spent all 
his life in Sweden, served in the Swedish army 
several years and was a shoemaker by trade. The 
mother was Ingred Johanson, who was born in 
Southern Sweden in 1842. About 1800, after the 
death of her husband, she came to the United States 
and located at Osage, Iowa, where she lived until 
her death in 1907. Her two children were Ingred 
and Axel. Ingred lives at Osage, Iowa, widow of 
Alfred Swanson, who was a blacksmith in that 
town. 

Axel M. Peterson attended the Lutheran paro- 
chial schools in Sweden until he was confirmed at 
the age of thirteen. Then, in 1887, he accompanied 
his sister to the United States and for several win- 
ters attended school at Osage, Iowa. Every sum- 
mer he worked in the fields for neighboring farmers, 
and his ambition to secure a good education led him 
to. deny himself many normal pleasures and he 
worked to the limit of his strength. He attended 
the Cedar Valley Seminary and finished his junior 
year, and his subsequent education has been well 
rounded out by reading and observation. As a young 
man he worked in a nursery at Osage, also clerked 
in a clothing store, and in 1902 came out to Mon- 
tana and took up a homestead of 160 acres at Ab- 
sarokee in Stillwater County. He commuted his 
homestead rights by the payment of a $1.25 an 
acre and lived there two years. He was then back 
in Iowa for two years working in a clothing store, 
and then resumed his place on his homestead in 
Absarokee for two years. Having sold his farm 
he rented a ranch on Red Lodge Creek in Carbon 
County for two years, and in the spring of 1913 
moved to the Joilet community and bought a lob- 
acre ranch. To that property he gave five years of 
close and. uninterrupted management, selling out in 
1918, and in that year moving into the town of Joilet, 
where he became the well qualified manager of the 
Farmers' Cooperative Elevator Company. He is also 
secretary and treasurer and a director of this cor- 
poration. 

Mr. Peterson is a republican, member and deacon 
of the Christian Church, is affiliated with Carbon 
Lodge No. 65, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, being worshipful master of the lodge, and 
has taken the degrees in the Billings Consistory of 
the Scottish Rite. 

He married at Carpenter, Iowa, in 1901, Miss Ella 
Eddy, daughter of Thomas and Louise (Allanson) 
Eddy. Her father was a farmer in Iowa and in 
1900 came to Carbon County, Montana. Both her 
parents are deceased. Mrs. Peterson is president of 
the Board of Education at Joliet. They have two 
young sons, Arnold K., born August 10, 1902, and 
Stanley H., born July 25, 1904. 

EDWARD O'BRIEN. The life. of a successful man is 
always an interesting study, and all the more so 
when results have been won by personal effort in 
the face of difficulties. Attention may thus be 



called to Edward O'Brien, who is superintendent of 
the smelter department at Anaconda for the great 
A. C. M. Company, a position of vast responsibility 
only properly comprehended by those who under- 
stand the potent forces in constant operation in 
the mighty furnaces connected with this modern 
industry. 

Edward O'Brien was born in County Limerick, 
Ireland, May 7, 1867, and is a son of Daniel and 
Ellen (Redfern) O'Brien, both of whom were born 
in County Limerick, the father in 1824 and the 
mother in 1839. Daniel O'Brien came with his fam- 
ily to the United States in 1865 and was one of 
the pioneer settlers in Walworth County, Wisconsin. 
He acquired and improved a farm there, and lived 
usefully and peacefully until his death, which oc- 
cured at Geneva Lake, in Walworth County, in 
1884. He was married to Ellen Redfern in Ireland, 
and their three children were born there, namely : 
William, who died in the City of Chicago in 1917, 
was a foreman in railroad shops at Cleveland, Ohio, 
for many years ; Thomas, who is a cement con- 
tractor at Anaconda, Montana; and Edward, who 
is one of Anaconda's prominent and substantial 
citizens aside from his connection with the A. C. 
M. Company. Both parents were faithful members 
of the Roman Catholic Church. 

Edward O'Brien attended the country schools 
, near his father's farm in Walworth County as op- 
portunity offered, but in early youth found farm 
tasks somewhat distasteful and determined to event- 
ually seek employment for his energies, in a direc- 
tion that was more congenial. Starting out for 
himself practically without capital, he went to Chi- 
cago, Illinois, easily made friends there and secured 
employment that occupied him for two years. In 
1884, on his way westward, he reached Pueblo, 
Colorado, and spent one year working there. In 
1885 he came to Anaconda, and was immediately 
given employment as furnaceman's helper with the 
A. C. M. Company, and has been identified with this 
great business enterprise ever since. It has been 
a characteristic of Mr. O'Brien that he has never 
stood still, and the humble helper soon became shift 
boss, then was promoted to be foreman, and sub- 
sequently was made superintendent of the entire 
smelter department. The offices where he transacts 
business are in the Smelter Building, at the Washoe 
Reduction Works, two miles east of Anaconda. 

Not only in business life has Mr. O'Brien been 
successful because of fidelity and dependability, 
but his sterling character has been so universally 
recognized at Anaconda that his fellow citizens have 
twice elected him mayor of the city and have profited 
under his firm, judicious administration. 

At Helena, Montana, in 1904, Mr. O'Brien was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary O'Neil, whose 
parents, John and Mary O'Neil, are deceased. John 
O'Neil came to Butte, Montana, in 1881 and worked, 
in a smelter there, but later moved to Anaconda 
and operated a boarding house. Mrs. O'Brien was 
educated in a college in Canada. Mr. and Mrs. 
O'Brien are members of the Roman Catholic Church. 
He belongs to Anaconda Council No. 882, and is a 
third degree Knight of Columbus, is a member of 
the Catholic Order of Foresters, and belongs also TO 
the Anaconda Club. Like his father before him, 
Mr. O'Brien has always been a strong supporter 
of the principles of the democratic party. He 
owns a valuable piece of real estate here, his hand- 
some, modern residence that stands on Maple Street, 
Anaconda. 

GRIFFITH ALEXANDER WILLIAMS was busily en- 
gaged as a teacher and school superintendent for 



47 



several years before coming to Montana, but left 
the teaching profession to engage in journalism. He 
is now publisher of two newspapers in Sanders 
County, and is one of the most widely known resi- 
dents of Plains. 

Mr. Williams was born at Kirkland in Cumber- 
land County, England, May 22, 1882. His branch 
of the Williams family has lived in Wales for many 
generations, and through his mother is of old Eng- 
lish stock. Grandfather Griffith Williams was born 
in 1817 and died in 1910, having spent all his life as 
a farmer in Carnarvonshire, Wales. Hugh Wil- 
liams, father of the Montana newspaper man, was 
born in Carnarvonshire, Wales, May 28, 1849, and is 
still living at the age of seventy-one, a resident of 
Cleator Moor in Cumberland County, England. At 
the age of twenty-one he left his native district in 
Wales and moved to Kirkland, England, where he 
was married and where he worked in the iron ore 
mines. In 1891 he transferred his residence to 
Cleator Moor, where he was engaged in the in- 
surance business and mining until he retired. For 
many years he was a lay preacher of the Methodist 
Church. He is a Liberal in politics. His wife was 
Sarah Twiname, who was born in Cumberland 
County, England, in 1862. Griffith A. is the oldest 
of their children. Margaret Jane is the wife of 
Arthur Hunt, who for four years was a British sol- 
dier in the World war, and is now a warden in the 
Wormwood Scrubbs Prison at London, England. 
Gaunor is the wife of Richard Hughes, also a 
warden in the Wormwood Scrubbs Prison. Agnes 
Mary is the wife of H. S. Armitage, a rancher at 
Briston, Montana. Sarah Elizabeth, unmarried, lives 
at Lancashire, England, and took an active part in 
war work. Elsie May is married and lives at Lan- 
cashire, while the youngest children, still at home, 
are Winifred, Arthur, Arnold and Robert. 

Griffith Alexander Williams was educated in the 
public schools of Cleator Moor, graduating from 
high school in 1900. He then served as an ap- 
prentice school teacher in Cumberland County and 
later as assistant principal in Derbyshire until 1905. 
Mr. Williams came to Butte, Montana, in October, 
1905, and for a short time was a teacher in the 
high school department of the Butte Business Col- 
lege, for one year was principal of schools at Ennis 
and one year superintendent of schools at Wisdom, 
Montana. He first entered the newspaper business 
associated with John N. Armstrong, proprietor of 
the Big Hole Breezes. He bought out the paper 
after Mr. Armstrong's death and continued to edit 
it until 1915. He next became publisher and editor 
of the Dixon Herald in Sanders County, and still 
directs the policy and management of the Herald, 
which was established in 1911. It is inde- 
pendent in politics. In February, 1918, Mr. Wil- 
liams bought the Plainsman at Plains from Guy 
Stratton. This is one of the older newspapers 
in what is now Sanders County, having been estab- 
lished in 1899. The Plainsman is also conducted 
independently as to political affiliation, and is the 
official paper of Sanders County at the time this is 
written. The plant and offices are opposite the 
Northern Pacific Depot, and there is a modern 
equipment operated by electric power for handling 
all the work of a standard newspaper. Mr. Wil- 
liams' papers circulate and have a large influence 
over Sanders and surrounding counties. 

Personally Mr. Williams is a republican and was 
chairman of the Republican County Central Commit- 
tee of Sanders County in 1916. He served as a 
member of the school board at Dixon and is affili- 
ated with Wisdom Lodge No. 61, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and is a past grand of Golden 

Vol. II-4 



Link Lodge No. 27, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, also at Wisdom. 

In 1913, at Wisdom, he married Charlotte A. 
Wold, daughter of P. M. and Marion Wold, resi- 
dents of Minneapolis. Her father is a retired mer- 
chant tailor. Mrs. Williams is a graduate of the 
Minneapolis High School and is a thoroughly well 
qualified musician, especially instrumental. She was 
a teacher of music at both Wisdom and Dixon, Mon- 
tana. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have three children: 
Marion Elizabeth, born October 19, 1914; Agnes 
Adelma, born June 20, 1916; and Griffith Hugh, born 
December i, 1918. 

HARRY L. WILSON, who came to Billings in 1901, 
is a prominent lawyer, member of the firm Nichols 
& Wilson, and is also widely known all over the 
State of Montana, having been the republican can- 
didate for governor in 1912. 

His father, Frank J. Wilson, was a resident of 
Miles City, Montana, for a number of years. He 
was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in 1853, son 
of E. C. Wilson, also a native of Pennsylvania. E. 
C. Wilson spent his life in Pennsylvania but died 
in Nebraska in 1909. Frank J. Wilson when a young 
man moved to Lanark, Illinois, and married there 
Miss Cordelia Miller. She was born in Illinois in 
1857 and died at Covina, California, January 18, 
1917. Frank J. Wilson for a time was in the paint 
and oil business at Lanark, Illinois, was also a 
teacher, spent five years as a farmer in Tama 
County, Iowa, another five years as a farmer in 
Jewell County, Kansas, and in 1893 moved to Miles 
City, Montana, where he was a painting contractor. 
From 1901 he was engaged in the ice business. His 
death, which occurred October 27, 1903, was the 
result of an accident when his team ran away. He 
was a democrat, a member of the City Council, and 
for many years was affiliated with the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He was favorably re- 
garded at Miles City, and among other tributes the 
Yellowstone Journal published an article, one para- 
graph of which deserves repetition : "Miles City 
has lost from its citizenship in its brief existence 
men who have, from one cause or another, been 
better or more widely known, but never one of 
greater intrinsic worth as a citizen and a man. He 
came to us years ago quietly and unostentatiously, 
and thus he grew into our life until something over 
three years ago the people of his ward chose him 
unanimously as their representative in the City 
Council, and after two years' service he was again 
unanimously chosen to succeed himself, and had he 
lived his term of service would only have been 
ended by his peremptory refusal to accept re- 
election. In his private business his affairs steadily 
grew better from the start of some ten years ago, 
and the full measure of his prosperity was enjoyed 
by his family, whose sustaining prop is now so 
rudely plucked away." 

The children of Frank J. Wilson and wife were : 
Harry L. ; Guy, who died in infancy; Rena May, 
wife of Randolph Deivel, a wealthy stockman and 
formerly a member of the Legislature in Custer 
County, living at Miles City ; Lula, wife of J. E. 
Campbell, who succeeded her father in the ice 
business at Miles City; Floyd B., a merchant tailor 
at Covina, California ; and Richard W., who grad- 
uated in June, 1918, from the law department of the 
University of California, and is now practicing law at 
Covina. 

Harry L. Wilson was born at Lanark, Carroll 
County, Illinois, June 19, 1879, and acquired his 
education in the public schools of Iowa and Kansas. 
He graduated from the Miles City High School 



48 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



June 4, 1897, and on June i, 1899, received his law 
degree from the Northern Indiana Normal School 
and University at Valparaiso. For eighteen months 
he was stenographer and law student with Hon. C. 
R. Middleton of Leavenworth, Kansas. Mr. Mid- 
dleton formerly was prominent as a lawyer in 
Montana. On account of ill health Mr. Wilson 
returned to Montana, was employed in several law 
offices as a stenographer, an art he had learned in 
college, and on January 15, 1901, he came to Billings, 
where he went to work for Col. O. F. Goddard 
and later for Fred H. Hathhorn, attorneys, spending 
three years with those lawyers. He began private 
practice in 1904 and in the fall of the same year 
was elected county attorney of Yellowstone County, 
an office he filled with exceptional ability for three 
terms, being reelected in 1906 and 1908. In June, 
1910, he formed his partnership with Judge Edmund 
Nichols, under the name Nichols & Wilson. This 
firm, with offices in the Electric Building, handles 
a large general practice, and is regarded as one of 
the best law firms in Eastern Montana. 

Mr. Wilson was temporary chairman of the State 
Republican Convention in 1912, and without solicita- 
tion on his part or any expectation of the honor he 
was placed on the state ticket as candidate for 
governor, being brought in as the "dark horse" by 
his party. Mr. Wilson is a stockholder and director 
of the Rowe Furniture Company and the Highland 
Homes Company of Billings. He is prominent 
fraternally, being affiliated with Ashlar Lodge, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons, Billings Chapter 
No. 6, Royal Arch Masons, Aldemar Commandery 
No. 5, Knights Templar, and Algeria Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine at Helena. He is past exalted 
ruler of Billings Lodge No. 394 of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, has represented the 
lodge in seven national conventions, and is past 
district deputy for the State Lodge of Elks. 

September 30, 1903, at Dexter, Illinois, Mr. Wilson 
married Miss Virginia Baker, daughter of A. W. 
and Olive M. (Rippeteau) Baker, who are still 
living at Dexter, her father being a retired merchant 
and the former postmaster. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson 
have two daughters: Winnifred W., born October 
31, 1904, and Gladys, born July 26, 1907. 

EDMUND NICHOLS, senior member of the law firm 
of Nichols and Wilson at Billings, was born in St. 
Lawrence County, New York, June 4, 1860, son 
of Orson K. and Amanda L. (Jones) Nichols. His 
first American ancestor, John Nichols, came to 
America from England and settled in Massachusetts 
in the seventeenth century. Orson K. Nichols was 
a member of an artillery regiment during the Civil 
war and died while a prisoner of war in 1864. 

Edmund Nichols, only child of his parents, at- 
tended school in New York and graduated from the 
law department of the University of Iowa in 1883. 
He practiced at Adel, Iowa, until 1888, then at 
Perry, Iowa, until 1902, and served a term as 
prosecuting attorney. He was elected judge of the 
Fifth Judicial District of Iowa in 1902, and filled 
that office with distinguished ability for two terms. 

Judge Nichols came to Billings in January, 1911, 
and has since been associated in practice with Harry 
L. Wilson. He is prominent in Masonic orders, is 
a republican, and is First Reader in the Christian 
Science Church of Billings. 

June 17, 1885, Judge Nichols married Miss Doro- 
thy I. Stephens, a native of Illinois. They have five 
children: Lillian, a graduate of St. Mary's Hall 
at Faribault, Minnesota; Dorothy, connected with 
the Christian Science Publishing House at Boston 



and a graduate of the Billings High School ; Joseph- 
ine, wife of Robert Perkins, a farmer; Edmund, a 
student at the Montclair Academy, Montclair, New 
Jersey; and Elizabeth, attending the public schools. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL, though now one of the 
recognized leading business men and merchants 
of Big Timber, had a hard struggle to acquire a 
foothold on the ladder of success, but has always 
been a willing and cheerful worker and a man ready 
to accept opportunity and recognize it when he 
saw it. 

He is a native son of Big Timber, born in that 
pioneer town as it was thirty-five years ago, Jan- 
uary 31, 1884. His paternal ancestors came original- 
ly from England. His father, O. F. Churchill, was 
born in Oregon in 1858, was married in Oregon 
and settled on a homestead of a 160 acres near 
Big Timber in 1882. He was a republican and a 
Methodist. William- Churchill's mother was Alma 
Sherrill, who was born in Iowa in 1863, and is 
now living with her son William at Big Timber. 
William Churchill has one sister, Reno, and she 
also lives with her mother. Her mother married 
for her second husband Dana W. Cross in 1889. 
He was born in Vermont in 1855, came to Montana 
about 1883, was a homesteader on Sweetgrass Creek 
near Melville, later proved up a farm and home- 
stead on Otto Creek, and lived there until 1895. 
He died at Lewistown in 1917. To that union were 
born four children. Harry, the oldest, is a tailor 
at Big Timber. Sarah died at Big Timber in 1912, 
the wife of John Watt, a merchant at Columbus, 
Montana, and her only child, Alice Watt, is now be- 
ing cared for by her grandmother. Carl F. Cross en- 
listed from Butte, Montana, in September, 1917, and 
went overseas in 1918, with the Three Hundred and 
Sixty-Second Ambulance Company, and was a par- 
ticipant in the St. Mihiel drive and in the battle of 
the Argonne Forest from September 26th' to October 
4th, and from October 3Oth to November nth was 
in the Lys-Scheldt offensive. He was mustered 
out May 8, 1919, and has since returned to Big 
Timber. Fred Cross was accidentally shot and 
killed at the age of eleven years. 

William Churchill acquired his education in the 
public schols of Big Timber. At the age of fourteen 
he began working in a printing office, and for two 
and a half years he also helped his mother run a 
rooming house. He then resumed work as a printer 
with the Big Timber Express for three years, 
worked on the Yellowstone Leader for W. J. 
Hannah two years, and until the fall of 1906 was 
with the Big Timber Pioneer. In 1906, as a member 
of the National Guard, he went to the coast and 
later attended the State Rifle Tournament of New 
Jersey. In the fall of 1906 he was back in Montana 
at Moore in Fergus County, where he was with the 
Inland Empire for two and a half years. In the 
meantime he had homesteaded a lop acres and 
proved up his claim, which he sold in 1917. He 
also bought another place of 160 acres near 
Stamford, and sold this property in 1918. In 1909, 
after leaving the Inland Empire, Mr. Churchill be- 
came a journeyman printer at Miles City on the 
Yellowstone Journal, a daily paper. In 1910 he 
returned to Big Timber to look after his cattle, 
and after rounding them up he sold out and from 
1912 to the spring of 1915 he was a printer with 
the Pioneer at Big Timber. He then abandoned 
the printing trade and in association with William 
K. Amery bought a stock of general merchandise, 
and their partnership has successfully prosecuted 
the enterprise until it is one of the leading stores 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



in the vicinity. They have discontinued all other 
lines of merchandise but groceries. Mr. Churchill 
is the senior partner. 

He owns a home in Big Timber. He is unmarried, 
he is an alderman of Big Timber, elected in April, 
1919. He is a past chancellor commander of Big 
Timber Lodge No. 25, Knights of Pythias, a mem- 
ber of Sweetgrass Camp No. 10610, Modern Wood- 
men of America, is a republican, belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce, the Sweetgrass County 
Good Roads Association, the Big Timber Build- 
ing and Loan Association, and as a matter of fact 
is identified with every progressive and public 
spirited movement in his community. 

ERNEST L. MARVIN is cashier of the Jofiet State 
Bank, and since identifying himself with that town 
has been a leader in its community activities and 
has always shown a willingness to do his part as a 
public spirited citizen. *.,.,.. c 

Mr. Marvin was born at Bradford, Illinois, Sep- 
tember 12, 1888, and apparently has the years of his 
greatest usefulness and service still ahead of him. 
His father, E. L. Marvin, was of English ancestry 
originally settled in Connecticut and was born in 
1851, near Ogdensburg, New York, on the Canadian 
side of the river. He grew up in New York State, 
and then removed to Illinois and spent his active 
career at Bradford, where he died in 1904. He was 
railroad station agent at Bradford for a number of 
years, and the last two years of his life were spent 
as a real estate and insurance broker. He is a 
republican, was closely identified with the Methodist 
Church of his home town, and was a prominent Odd 
Fellow. He married in Illinois Cora A. Thomson, 
who was born in that state in 1860 and is still living 
at Lafayette, Illinois. She was the mother of four 
children: Guy E., who is court reporter at Boze- 
man, Montana ; Ernest L., Pauline, wife of G. E. 
Snyder, a farmer at Lafayette, Illinois, and R. W., 
cashier of the Nichols Shepard Company at Billings, 
Montana. 

Ernest L. Marvin attended public school at Brad- 
ford and Lafayette in his native state graduating 
from high school in the latter town in 1906. Then 
after employment in a local store for a few months 
he came to Montana in 1906, and the next seven years 
was an employe of W. R. Westbrook, a banker at 
Laurel. He came to Joliet in 1913, and for the past 
six years has been cashier of the Joliet State Bank. 

Mr. Marvin is active both in politics and fraternal 
affairs. He is town clerk of Joliet, clerk of the 
school board and republican precinct committeeman. 
He is secretary of Carbon Lodge No. 65, A , ncien ^ 
Free and Accepted Masons; is past grand and 
present secretary of Joliet Lodge No. 77 of the 
Odd Fellows, and for two years was patron of 
Aloha Chapter No. 41 of the Eastern Star. He is a 
member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Marvin owns 
bis own home in Joliet and some real estate at 
Laurel, Montana, his former town. 

He married at Belfry, Montana, June 19,1912, 
Miss Janet McLauchlin, a daughter of Donald and 
Emma (Harris) McLauchlin. Her parents are farm- 
ers at Belfry. They have two children: Alice May, 
born April 28, 1913, and Janet, born April 20, 1915- 

FRANK F. TUCKER. There is a real message of 
economy in every show window of Tucker Brothers 
clothing establishment, and the brand of service 
rendered by this reliable firm is one which is u 
versally appreciated. Frank F. Tucker, the senior 
member of the firm, is one of the big factors in the 
business life of the city and he is a man who knows 
how to get for his customers what they want, and 



how to meet their requirements in every particular. 
He was born at Napanee, Ontario, Canada, June 19, 
1879, a son of John R. Tucker. The father was 
born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and died at 
Anaconda, Montana, in 1917. He was reared at 
Napanee, Ontario, Canada, and there learned the 
brickmaking trade. In 1883 he came to Anaconda and 
was for some years engaged in building operations, 
being one of the pioneer contractors and builders 
of the city. Politically he was a republican. He 
married Miss Emma Conger, born in Ontario, 
Canada, who died at Anaconda. Their children 
were as follows : Annie, who died at Anaconda, 
was married ; Frank F., who was the second in 
order of birth ; Earl, who is a member of the firm 
of Tucker Brothers, lives at Anaconda; Elmo, who 
lives at Anaconda, enlisted for service during the 
great war in 1917, was sent overseas and was 
mustered out of the service in May, 1919. 

Frank F. Tucker attended the public schools of 
Anaconda until he was twelve years of age, and 
then became a clerk in a clothing store of Anaconda 
and continued to learn this line of business as a 
member of the selling force of several establish- 
ments until he founded one of his own in 1918. 
Although as yet a new undertaking, this clothing 
store of Tucker Brothers is one of the leading ones 
of its kind in this section of Montana, and is con- 
veniently located at No. 207 Main Street. The 
members of the firm are Frank F. and his brother 
Earl J. Tucker. They handle a high class of cloth- 
ing of the latest design and of infinite variety, and 
careful dressers have learned that not only can they 
secure fashionable and good-fitting garments of 
excellent quality here, but also that the prices are 
extremely reasonable considering the value of the 
goods. 

Frank F. Tucker is a republican, but has not 
sought to come before the public for office. He 
belongs to Anaconda Lodge No. 239, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and to the Anaconda 
Club and the Anaconda Country Club. His resi- 
dence is in the Alpine Apartments. In 1911 Frank 
F. Tucker was united in marriage with Miss Gladys 
Martin, a daughter of Martin Martin, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and 
Mrs. Tucker have no children. 

Earl J. Tucker, junior member of the firm of 
Tucker Brothers, was born at Napanee, Ontario, 
Canada, November 14, 1889. The Tucker family 
migrated from England to America during the 
colonial epoch. The maternal grandfather of the 
Tucker Brothers was Belayat Conger, and he was 
born in Ontario, Canada, and there died in 1888, 
having spent his entire life in that province. By 
trade he was a plasterer and stone mason, and later 
became a contractor. Earl J. Tucker was reared at 
Anaconda, and was graduated from its high school 
in 1907, following which he went to Butte, Montana, 
as timekeeper for the Anaconda Copper Mining 
Company, remaining in the employ of this company 
for three years. Upon leaving it he was engaged 
in an insurance business for seven years, being 
state agent for the Massachusetts Bonding and In- 
surance Company, and retained his office at Butte 
until September, 1919, when he closed it. In 1918 
he assisted his brother to establish the clothing 
house of Tucker Brothers, which has turned out to 
be such a successful enterprise. Like his brother 
he is a republican, and he also belongs to the 
Anaconda Lodge No. 239, Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, and to the Anaconda Club. He 
lives at 1002 West Fourth Street. 

In 1908 Earl J. Tucker was united in marriage 



50 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



with Miss Florence Jennings, a daughter of W. H. 
and Minnie (Coddington) Jennings, residents of 
Anaconda. Mr. Jennings is superintendent of the 
iron warehouse of the foundry department of the 
Anaconda Copper Mining Company. Mr. and Mrs. 
Earl J. Tucker have two children, namely : Jack, 
who was born January i, 1909; and Earl J., Jr., 
who was born June 13, 1913. 

ARTHUR J. DAVENPORT. While for a number of 
years he has enjoyed a national reputation as a 
musician, a leader of bands and orchestra, Mr. Dav- 
enport is a stanch lover of the advantages of Mon- 
tana and spent several years on a homestead in this 
state. He has developed a widely known conserva- 
tory and school of music at Hamilton, where he 
resides. This conservatory is attended as a 'musical 
finishing school by pupils from all over the western 
part of the state. 

Mr. Davenport was born in Pawnee City, Ne- 
braska, January 4, 1874. His Davenport ancestor 
came from England, his grandfather being the first 
of the name in this country. His father, J. S. 
Davenport, was born in New York State in 1834, 
was reared there, and was married in Nebraska. He 
lived for a number of years at Pawnee City, where 
he conducted an apiary, being in the bee and honey 
business on a commercial scale. In 1878 he moved 
to Red Bluff, California, where he engaged in mer- 
chandising and where he died in 1910. He was a 
veteran of the Civil war, having served all through 
the struggle. He was taken prisoner and spent nine 
months in Andersonville prison. He was a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Masonic 
fraternity and a republican in politics. J. S. Dav- 
enport married Minnie Taylor, who was born in 
1843 and is still living at Spokane, Washington. 
Her children were three in number: Louis M., man- 
ager of the Davenport Hotel at Spokane ; Arthur J. ; 
and Jessie, wife of Doctor Robbins, a physician and 
surgeon at Los Angeles, California. 

Arthur J. Davenport received his early education 
in the public schools of Red Bluff, California, where 
he lived from the age of four years. He graduated 
in 1893 from the Cans Crofford College at Red 
Bluff, and spent two years in the further study of 
music at San Francisco. He enlisted as a musician 
in the regular army, and served five years. After 
that for several years, with headquarters at Chicago, 
he traveled all over the country as a band and 
orchestra leader, covering all the larger cities in the 
United States and Canada. For two years he also 
taught brass instruments in the Illinois School of 
Music and in the Chicago Seminary, alternating be- 
tween those institutions. He spent one year in 
Chautauqua Lyceum work. 

Coming to Montana, Mr. Davenport farmed on 
the Flathead reservation five years. He then re- 
moved to the Bitter Root Valley and has since 
been teaching, with scholars from Darby, Hamilton 
and Corvallis, and has made his home at Hamilton 
since 1917. The Davenport Conservatory of Music 
is a well appointed and equipped institution, furnish- 
ing the best of instruction in all branches of music. 
Mr. Davenport personally has charge of the in- 
struction in brass and string instruments, while his 
wife, who is a graduate of the Columbia School at 
Chicago, is teacher of piano and vocal. Their peri- 
odical pupil recitals are great events in local mu- 
sical circles. The Conservatory is at 214 Main 
Street. 

Mr. Davenport is a republican, is affiliated with 
Ravalli Lodge No. 36, Knights of Pythias ; Ionia 
Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 



Hamilton Chaper No. 18, Royal Arch Masons ; and 
Corvallis Lodge of Odd Fellows. He married at 
Chicago in 1910 Miss Lula Runkel, a native of 
Oconto, Wisconsin. 

W. B. NUTTING, who came to Montana in 1881, 
is an old time cowboy and rancher, has been a 
resident of Red Lodge since 1895, and was a charter 
member of the Red Lodge State Bank, one of the 
most flourishing and prosperous financial institu- 
tions in the state. 

This bank was organized in 1902, opening for 
business on April 2d. Mr. Nutting was its first 
president, and held that position until 1910. Mr. 
D. G. O'Shea was president of the bank from 1910 
to 1917, when Mr. Nutting resumed the executive 
direction. E. M. Clark is vice president and A. E. 
Logan is cashier. The Red Lodge State Bank has 
a capital of $85,000 and surplus of $21,000, and its 
deposits in 1919 aggregated more than $1,000,000. 
During the past fifteen years the bank has been 
managed by the same board of directors, and none 
of its stock has changed hands except a small 
amount distributed to the employes. 

Mr. Nutting was born at Highland in Northeast- 
ern Kansas September 3, 1861, son of Lucius Nutting 
and descended from John Nutting, whose name ap- 
pears as a member of the Massachusetts colony 
under date of August 28, 1650, when he married 
Sarah, a daughter of Stephen Eggleson (Eggleston). 
John Nutting and wife lived at Woburn, Chelms- 
ford, now Westford, Massachusetts, and in 1661 
removed to Groton, where two years later he was 
chosen selectman, and in 1668 constable. He owned 
a large amount of land and was prominent in civic 
and religious affairs and was killed during an 
Indian attack in 1676. 

Lucius Nutting, father of W. B. Nutting, was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1820, a son of 
Bryant Nutting. As a young man he went west 
to Illinois, and became a physician and surgeon. 
He was attracted to California and went over the 
plains in 1849, but soon returned to Illinois and 
resumed practice. Later he built and conducted a 
saw mill at Crescent City, Iowa, and in 1857 located 
in Doniphan County, Kansas, where he pursued 
farming and saw milling until 1878. The following 
year he removed to Arizona, but afterward returned 
to Doniphan County and in 1880 came to Montana 
and in the following year homesteaded at Laurel. 
He removed to Bozeman in 1895, and lived there 
until his death in 1903. He was active as a republi- 
can and served as, a commissioner of Yellowstone 
County six years, and held all the lay offices in the 
Presbyterian Church. He married Elizabeth Allison, 
who was born in Pennsylvania in 1819 and died at 
Bozeman in 1001. Their children were : * Julia, 
wife of Bryant Cowan, one of the leading authorities 
in the Shorthorn cattle industry in America ; Wilder, 
a Methodist minister at Three Forks, Montana; 
Lucius A., a Shorthorn breeder at Laurel, Montana ; 
William B. ; Lillie E., unmarried ; and Roy H., of 
Eureka, California. 

William B. Nutting attended the public schools of 
Kansas until he was sixteen years of age and since 
then has depended upon his own exertions for his 
advancement and success. For a number of years 
he was a cowboy both in the Middle West and in 
Montana, and he also worked in the mines of 
Colorado for a time. He went out to Colorado in 
1877. The first of his cowboy experiences was 
acquired on the Arkansas River near Fort Las 
Animas. That was when the Santa Fe Railroad was 
building its through line to the coast. From there 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



51 



he removed to Georgetown, Colorado, and subse- 
quently was among the first to join in the rush to 
the Leadville mining district. 

On comjng to Montana in 1881 he engaged in 
ranching at Laurel. He rode the ranger over the 
greater part of Southern Montana and made his 
home near Laurel until 1890, when he moved across 
the line into Fremont County, Wyoming, and con- 
tinued business there as a rancher and stockman. 
In 1895 he transferred his home to Red Lodge. He 
owns one of the best homes in that city. 

Mr. Nutting served as chairman of the County 
Commissioners of Carbon County as a republican, 
and is affiliated with Red Lodge Camp, Modern 
Woodmen of America, and Bear Tooth Lodge No. 
534, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Also 
Mr. and Mrs. Nutting are pioneers of Eastern 
Montana. 

April 18, 1887, near Park City, Montana, he mar- 
ried Miss Eva Cellers, daughter of Samuel Cellers. 
Her father was a pioneer Montanan, coming in 1881, 
and was a farmer and stockman until his death. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nutting have one son, Roy A., who 
is assistant cashier of the Red Lodge State Bank. 
He married Miss May B. Grills, of Flint, Michigan, 
and they have a daughter, Elizabeth G., only grand- 
child of Mr. and Mrs. Nutting. 

CHARLES THOMAS BUSHA has rounded out his 
full forty years of residence in Montana, and most 
of those years have been spent at Big Timber, 
where he was a pioneer business man and still main- 
tains a vigorous hold of business as a commission 
merchant, rancher and dairyman. Three of Mr. 
Busha's sons were with the colors in the World 
war. 

He was born at Detroit, Michigan, December 
3, 1858, and is of French and English ancestry. His 
father, Charles Thomas Busha, Sr., was born in 
France in 1836, left that country when a young man 
and went to Canada, was married at Detroit, Mich- 
igan, and spent all his life as a trader. During 
the '6os he returned to Canada and died in the 
Province of Ontario in 1879. He was a Catholic. 
Before he left France he served the regular time 
in the army. He married Helen Clark, who was 
born at Detroit in 1839. They had two children, 
Hattie and Charles Thomas. The former died in 
Detroit as the wife of Lewis Barrett. The mother 
married for her second husband Joseph Lemere, 
a native of Canada, who died at Westboro, Wis- 
consin. Mrs. Lemere died at Detroit, Michigan, in 
1912. By her second marriage she had four chil- 
dren. The two sons are Alexander, a county official 
at Detroit, Michigan, and George, in the garage 
business at Chicago. 

Charles Thomas Busha acquired his education in 
the public schools of Detroit, including high school, 
but left his books and studies at the age of sixteen 
and began doing for himself. For several years 
he was a hotel clerk, and was on duty at hotels 
in Stevens Point, Milwaukee and Arcadia, Wiscon- 
sin, and at Winona, Minnesota. 

On coming to Montana in 1879 Mr. Busha spent 
a brief time at Martinsdale on the Musselshell, from 
there went to Helena and was employed in the 
lumber yard of Sanford & Evans for one year, after 
which he went back to the Musselshell River and 
engaged in the stock business until 1885. That was 
the year of his location at Big Timber, where he 
became one of the early merchants, and continued 
active in mercantile circles until 1913. Since then he 
has specialized in the commission business, buying 
wool and other farm products. His irrigated ranch 
of 500 acres half a mile east of Big Timber on the 



Boulder River is widely known for its dairy cattle, 
and Mr. Busha has his home there, a modern resi- 
dence, surrounded with a complete equipment of 
high class barns and other buildings. His business 
offices are on McLeod Street in Big Timber. Mr. 
Busha is a republican in politics and is affiliated 
with Big Timber Lodge of Masons and Livingston 
Lodge No. 246, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

Mr. Busha has good reason to be proud of his 
family, and besides the three sons who were soldiers 
all his children have fitted themselves for positions 
of usefulness and honor. He married at Little 
Elk in Meagher County, Montana, in 1885 Miss 
Ida L. Pound. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Pound, pioneers in Western Wisconsin in 1854, 
are now deceased, the father having been a pioneer 
business man of Missoula, a real estate broker. 
Mrs. Busha taught in the school at Chippewa Falls, 
Wisconsin, and was the first teacher in the school 
at Martinsdale on the Musselshell River. The 
oldest of their family of ten children is Beulah, 
who finished her education in a girls' seminary at 
Petersburg, Virginia, and is the wife of Ernest R. 
Paterson, a prominent merchant at Big Timber. 
Thad C. Busha, second of the family, was a student 
of the Big Timber High School and is receiving 
teller in the First National Bank at Mason City, 
Iowa. Lenore, a graduate of the Sweetgrass County 
High School and a student of the State Universi^- 
at Missoula, lives at home with her parents. Charles 
Thomas, Jr., is the oldest of the three sons who 
were in the army. He had completed his junior 
year in the law department of the State University 
at Missoula when in 1917 he entered the Officers' 
Training Camp at the Presidio, California, was com- 
missioned a first lieutenant, and went overseas with 
Company C of the Three Hundred and Sixty-Fourth 
Infantry. Later he was promoted to captain of 
Company D of the same regiment and was with 
the Expeditionary Forces until he returned to this 
country on April 6, 1919. Mabel Busha is a graduate 
of the College of Montana at Deer Lodge, and is 
the wife of Alfred Johnson, a stock raiser at Hall, 
Montana. Helen is a graduate of the County High 
School and is stenographer for the Master Mechanic 
of the Northern Pacific Railway at Livingston. 
Beatrice, a graduate of the County High School, is 
assistant cashier in the Commercial Bank and Trust 
Company at Big Timber. Willard M., also a high 
school graduate, is clerking in a store at Big Tim- 
ber. Homer saw his 1 first military service on the 
Mexican border, re-enlisted at the beginning of the 
war with Germany, and went overseas where he 
won his commission as second lieutenant. He was 
with the Three Hundred and Fourth Heavy Tank 
Service and was a machine gun instructor. He 
returned to the United States March 17, 1919. 
Theodore C., the youngest of this interesting family, 
is a graduate of the County High School. He 
enlisted in ^ February, 1918, was in training for the 
aerial service at Waco, Texas, and was mustered 
out in April, 1919, and is now on his father's 
ranch. 

HARRY J. WATERS was on the ground soon after 
the founding of the now thriving town of Rapelje, 
entered the general merchandise business, and out 
of a wealth of long experience in that line has 
promoted and built up one of the most thriving 
concerns of its kind in that part of the state. 

Mr. Waters was born at Oskaloosa, Iowa, July 20, 
1868. His remote ancestors came from Germany, 
but for several generations lived in Pennsylvania. 
His father, Matthew Waters, was born in Penhsyl- 



52 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



vania in 1833, and as a young man went back to 
Oskaloosa, Iowa, from Ohio, where he was reared. 
He was one of the early operators in the lumber 
business at Oskaloosa and continued a resident of 
that city until his death in 1886. During the Civil 
war he was a member of an Iowa home guard and 
was called out for service in Northern Missouri 
during Price's raid. He was a republican and an 
Odd Fellow. Matthew Waters married Lucy Shef- 
ton, who was born in Kentucky in 1831 and died at 
Oskaloosa in 1879. A brief record of their family of 
children is as follows : Henry B., a harness maker 
who died at Hastings, Nebraska, in 1910; Medly A., 
a rancher and traveling salesman of Billings, Mon- 
tana ; William Irving, a harness maker by trade, 
who came to Montana in 1883, followed his business 
at Miles City, Helena, Great Falls and Missoula, 
became the pioneer in his line at Great Falls and 
Missoula, and subsequently moved to Florida, where 
he owns and occupies a ranch; Charles, the fourth 
in the family, died in infancy; Cora, who died at 
Grand Forks, North Dakota, in 1897, was the wife 
of W. P. Welch, now a real estate and insurance 
broker at Miles City, Montana, and also a justice of 
the peace there; Harry J. ; and Fred, who died in 
infancy. 

Harry J. Waters acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Oskaloosa, but his school days 
were ended at the age of fourteen, and at that period 
of his youth he entered a printing office. Mr. Waters 
might qualify as an old time printer. He worked 
two years at Oskaloosa, spent three years in a print- 
ing office at Washington, Kansas, and for another 
three years was assistant postmaster in that town. 
In 1892 he went to Belleville, Kansas, and clerked 
in a general store there four years. That was his 
initial experience in merchandising. The five fol- 
lowing years he spent in a general store at Wash^ 
ington and for four years he traveled over North- 
west Kansas selling groceries. For three years he 
was connected with the dry goods business at Lex- 
ington, Missouri, and in these places he acquired a 
thorough knowledge of general merchandising. 

Mr. Waters came to Montana in 1908, first locating 
in Billings, where he spent four years with the 
Kelley Mercantile Company, then for two years man- 
aged the store of the McDaniel Sheep Company, 
was for seven months with Hart-Albin Company, 
next clerked in Carl Friedman's store and with its 
successor, the Cole-Williams Company, for two years. 
He came to Rapelje on August i, 1917, and estab- 
lished and built one of its two leading general stores 
which marked the pioneer business section of the 
new town. He was first associated with W. C. 
Spalding, but Mr. W. C. Cole, of Edgar, Montana, 
bought out Mr. Spalding's interest on March I, 
1919, and the firm is now the Waters-Cole Com- 
pany. They have a fine store on Main Street. 

Mr. Waters also quickly identified himself with the 
public affairs of his town, and is chairman of the 
school board. He is a republican, a member of 
Billings Council of the United Commercial Trav- 
elers, and was first president of the Commercial 
Club of Rapelje, serving in 1917-18. 

He married Miss Grace Cropper, of Washington, 
Kansas, in 1893. Her parents, W. H. and Helen 
Cropper, reside at Nora, Illinois, her father being a 
retired miller and stockman. Mr. and Mrs. Waters 
have two children : Lucy E. a graduate of the Bill- 
ings High School and now a teacher in Stillwater 
County, Montana ; and Robert M., who is connected 
with the Lake Basin State Bank at Rapelje. 

HARRY M. JOHNSON, manager of the Public Utili- 
ties and Townsite departments of the Anaconda 



Copper Mining Company, is a man well qualified 
for his position and capable of handling the various 
and important problems which are constantly being 
presented to him. He was born at Oswego, New 
York, June 25, 1883, a son of John J. Johnson, also 
born at Oswego, who lived there all his life and 
died there in 1884. He married Catherine Brady, 
who was born and died at Oswego, passing away in 
1890. Harry M. Johnson was the only child of his 
parents. At his mother's death the lad was taken 
by his aunt, Mrs. Anna J. Hartnett, and reared in 
her home. 

After attending the public schools of Oswego, 
Harry M. Johnson, at the age of sixteen years, left 
high school and obtained a position as messenger 
boy with the New York Central Railroad. From 
the first he exhibited such ability and willingness 
to work and learn that he was promoted through 
the various positions to be chief clerk in the account- 
ant department, with headquarters at Oswego, New 
York, remaining there until 1906, when, in Sep- 
tember of that year, he came to Anaconda, Montana, 
to engage with the Butte, Anaconda & Pacific Rail- 
road, holding a clerical position for two years. Mr. 
Johnson then went with the Anaconda Copper Min- 
ing Company and until 1911 handled traffic matters 
in the Washoe Reduction Works, but in that year 
was transferred to Salt Lake City, where he was 
associated with the ore purchasing interests of the 
International Refining & Smelting Company for the 
Anaconda Copper Mining Company, but in June, 
1913, was brought back to Anaconda to take charge 
of his present departments, which cover the electric 
lighting of Anaconda, the conduct of the water- 
works and the street railway. Mr. Johnson has 
seventy-five men under his supervision, and has 
offices at No. 101 Main Street. He is a Roman 
Catholic, and belongs to Oswego Council No. 227, 
Knights of Columbus, being a Third Degree Knight. 
Mr. Johnson also belongs to the Rotary Club, Ana- 
conda Lodge No. 239, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Anaconda Club and the Anaconda 
Country Club. He resides at the Alpine Apart- 
ments. 

During the great war Mr. Johnson enlisted for 
service, and was commissioned captain in the ord- 
nance department, being mustered into the service 
on October 22, 1917, and was sent overseas on 
February 7, 1918, where he was detailed to assist 
in the orgainzation of ammunition depots and the 
transportation of ammunition on the lines of com- 
munication, with his headquarters at Tours, France. 
In the discharge of his duties Mr. Johnson traveled 
all over France, and was on the firing line in March, 
1918. For thirty days he was with the British 
command on observation work, rendering during 
the period he was in the army a very efficient 
service. He was returned to the United States on 
December 29, 1918, and was mustered out of the 
service on January 4, 1919. Mr. Johnson was cited 
by General Pershing for exceptionally meritorious 
and conspicuous service while a member of the 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

In 1912 Mr. Johnson was married at Butte, Mon- 
tana, to Miss Kathryn Evans, a daughter of Owen 
C. and Emily (Church) Evans, both of whom are 
now deceased. Mr. Evans was one of the pioneer 
merchants of Helena. Montana. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson have no children. During his period of 
activity Mr. Johnson has risen steadily, and entirely 
through his own efforts, and his present standing 
with his company and community is all the more 
creditable on this account. 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



53 



FRANCIS MCHENRY GRAFTON began his career in 
Montana in 1896 in the office of the Anaconda Cop- 
per Mining Company at Anaconda. For a number 
of years he was in the service of that great cor- 
poration, with increasing responsibilities and at dif- 
ferent posts. He is now manager of the Interstate 
Lumber Company at Hamilton. 

Mr. Grafton was born at Cambridge, Iowa, March 
5, 1877. He is of an old English family early settled 
in Virginia. His great-great-grandfather as an Eng- 
lish boy was apprenticed to an employer in Virginia. 
Later he became an extensive land holder, planter 
and slave owner in Virginia. His slaves were set 
free by the grandfather of Francis McHenry Graf- 
ton. The latter's father was Dr. William Hill 
Grafton, for many years a prominent physician and 
a gentleman of cultivated mind and character. Doc- 
tor Grafton was born at Baltimore, Maryland, in 
1826, was reared and married in that city, and in 
1847 was the honor graduate from the medical de- 
partment of the University of Maryland. He prac- 
ticed at Baltimore a number of years, with an in- 
terval at Denver, Colorado, and finally moved to 
Cambridge, Iowa, where all his children were born 
and reared. After many years of professional labors 
he retired and in 1904 moved to Los Angeles, where 
he died in 1908. He was a democrat, held various 
local offices, and was a particular friend of schools 
and education. He was a very ardent Methodist and 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. He served ?s 
a surgeon with the Union army during the Civil war. 
He was on the battlefields of Bull Run, Antietam 
and Gettysburg, and remained with the medical 
department of the army after the war, assisting in 
closing up the last five hospitals maintained by the 
army, the final work of this nature being done at 
Washington. Doctor Grafton married Sarah Liv- 
ingston, who was born in Ohio in 1849, ar >d is st 'U 
living at Los Angeles. They had the following 
children : William D., in the fuel and produce busi- 
ness at Anaheim, California; Francis McHenry; 
Edward L., a publisher of magazines and books and 
manager of the Grafton Publishing Company at 
Los Angeles ; Albert Kurtz in the real estate and 
insurance business at Los Angeles ; Eugene Hill, a 
printer at Los Angeles ; and Mary, wife of R. B. 
Newcomb, an orchard owner and orange grower and 
also a produce dealer at Santa Ana, California. 

Francis McHenry Grafton received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Cambridge, Iowa, 
graduating from high school in 1892. He chose a 
commercial career and had his early experience in 
several stores in Iowa, including a year at Perry. 
He graduated in 1894 in the shorthand and typewrit- 
ing course from the Capital City Commercial Col- 
lege at Des Moines, following which for a year and 
a half he was employed in a law office at Harlan, 
Iowa. 

In 1896, coming to Montana, he became clerk and 
stenographer for the Anaconda Copper Mining Com- 
pany. Four years later he was assigned similar du- 
ties with this corporation at Belt, Montana, where 
he remained a year and a half. For ten years he 
was general bookkeeper for the Big Blackfoot Mill- 
ing Company at Bonner, though in the meantime, in 
1907, he spent about a year at Los Angeles. In 1911 
Mr. Grafton came to Hamilton, and for five years 
was with the local plant of the Anaconda Copper 
Mining Company. In 1916 he accepted his present 
interests as manager of the Interstate Lumber Com- 
pany, one of the leading corporations of the kind 
in western Montana. He is also a stockholder and 
director in the Grafton Publishing Corporation of 
Los Angeles. 



Mr. Grafton is a republican, and at Missoula is 
affiliated with Ionic Lodge, No. 38, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, with Hamilton Chapter No. 
18, Royal Arch Masons, and is past commander of 
St. Omar Commandery No. 9, Knight Templars at 
Missoula. He is affiliated with Algeria Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine at Helena. 

In 1905, at Hamilton, Mr. Grafton married Miss 
Mabel M. Markle, daughter of John M. and Celia 
(Parish) Markle. Her mother is now deceased. 
Her father, living with Mr. and Mrs. Grafton, is a 
former superintendent of the Hamilton plant of the 
Anaconda Copper Mining Company. Mrs. Grafton 
finished her education in a girls' seminary at Spo- 
kane, Washington. To their marriage were born 
two children : Jean Frances, born in 1908, and Car- 
roll B., born in October, 1911. 

ERI M. FARR, M. D. One of the skilled and 
reliable physicians and surgeons of Billings is Dr. 
Eri M. Farr, whose reputation is not merely a local 
one, but extends over a wide territory, and he is 
oftentimes called into consultation by his brother 
practitioners. He was born at Muncy, Pennsylvania, 
January 6, 1884, a son of Smith B. Farr. The birth 
of Smith B. Farr took place at Moreland, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1838, and his death at Muncy, that state, 
in 1902, he having never left it. He devoted his life 
to farming. A 'stanch republican, he always sup- 
ported the principles of that party. The Baptist 
Church held his membership. The maiden name of 
his wife was Anna M. Warn, who was also born at 
Moreland, Pennsylvania, in 1847, and survives him, 
making her home at Muncy, Pennsylvania. Their 
children were as follows : Doctor Farr, who was 
the eldest; Mary, who married Morris D. Worthing- 
ton, resides at Curwensville, Pennsylvania, where he 
is a stenographer; and Roy, who is an attorney of 
Los Angeles, California. Smith B. Farr was a son 
of Richard Barcley Farr, and his father, the great- 
grandfather of Doctor Farr, was a Revolutionary 
soldier named William Farr, who served in the 
Colonial army from Pennsylvania. The Farr family 
of this country is of English origin, but has been 
in the New World since an early day in the history 
of the American Colonies. Richard B. Farr was 
born in Pennsylvania, and died at Moreland, that 
state, shortly before the birth of Doctor Farr. He 
was a lumberman, and never left his native state. 

Eri M. Farr attended the grammar and high 
schools of Muncy, Pennsylvania, being graduated 
from the latter in 1901, For the subsequent three 
years he was a student of Bucknell University, and 
then attended the Medico-Chirurgical College at 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which he was 
graduated in 1908, with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. For the following eighteen months he 
was an interne at the Robert Packer Hospital at 
Sayre, Pennsylvania, specializing in surgery, and 
then engaged in a general practice in that city, 
remaining there until 1913. In that year he camt 
west to Billings, and has remained here, building 
up connections which are creditable and profitable as 
a physician and surgeon. His offices are at 205-207 
Electric Building. Doctor Farr built a comfortable 
modern residence at Billings in 1913, and here he 
makes his home. Professionally he belongs to the 
Yellowstone County Medical Society, the Montana 
State Medical Society, the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. Well known as a Thirty-second Degree 
Mason and Shriner, he belongs to Irem Temple of 
Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania. He is a member of 
Billings Star Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; the Canton Encampment of the Odd Fellows ; 
to Billings Lodge, Woodmen of the World; and Bil- 



54 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



lings Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He also maintains 
very pleasant social relations as a member of the 
Country Club. Doctor Farr is assistant surgeon for 
the Northern Pacific Railroad, and is examiner for 
several life insurance companies, having a very large 
clientele in this line. He was also a member of the 
Medical Advisory Board during the war for the 
Fifth District, comprising five counties. 

On January 29, 1912, Doctor Farr was married at 
Sayre, Pennsylvania, to Mrs. Laura (Reed) Fish, 
a native of Iowa, and they have one son, Malcolm, 
who was born January 2, 1913. Mrs. Farr was 
educated in the public schools of Billings, having 
come to that city from her birthplace, Manino, 
Iowa. She is an Episcopalian, and a strong sup- 
porter of her church. Her father, William W. Reed, 
died at Manino, Iowa, when she was still a child, 
where he was engaged in merchandising and was 
postmaster. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Sarah Lyons, and she, too, was born in Iowa. The 
children in the Reed family were three in number, as 
follows: Lydia, who is married; Mrs. Farr; and 
William. In 1896 Mrs. Farr was first married to 
John W. Fish, clerk and treasurer of Yellowstone 
County, and a prominent man, who died in 1910, 
leaving her with two children, namely: Dorothy 
Fish, who was born June 2, 1908; and George Fish, 
who was born March 27, 1910. Doctor and Mrs. 
Farr are very prominent socially and are admirable 
entertainers, enjoying gathering their many friends 
about them at their hospitable home. In his pro- 
fession Doctor Farr stands deservedly high, being 
recognized as one of the able and experienced prac- 
titioners of Yellowstone County. Possessing as he 
does the characteristics which make for good citizen- 
ship, he has always been considered as one of the 
best types of American manhood, and can be relied 
upon to take a creditable part in all movements 
inaugurated to improve civic conditions and bring 
about moral reforms. Still in the very prime of 
vigorous young manhood, he retains the enthusiasms 
of youth, while his experience and knowledge give 
weight to his judgments, and the influence he wields 
is not inconsiderable. 

CHRISTIAN T. SWENSON has been a banker at 
Scobey since April, 1914, is a man of wide experi- 
ence in financial affairs, and since the age of seven- 
teen has been an employe or working official in bank- 
ing institutions. 

Mr. Swenson is an American by nearly thirty 
years of residence, but was born May 19, 1886, at 
Frederickshald, one of the larger cities of Norway. 
For a time his parents, Thorer and Carolina (Han- 
son) Swenson, lived at Christiania, the capital city, 
but in 1893 the family sailed for America, landing 
at New York, their destination being Crary, North 
Dakota. On reaching there the father engaged in 
his trade as a painter, and has continued to follow 
that occupation ever since. He also proved up a 
homestead, has been identified with farming and 
land holding, and is now a man of financial inde- 
pendence. He early acquired American citizenship 
and has voted as a republican. He and his wife 
were reared Lutherans but are now members of the 
Congregational Church. They reared three sons: 
Christian T. ; Stanley P., a banker at Michigan, 
North Dakota; and Lawrence, assistant cashier of 
the First National Bank of Crary, North Dakota. 
Thus all the sons have chosen banking careers. 

Christian T. Swenson was reared at Crary from 
the age of seven, and acquired a public school educa- 
tion, supplemented later by a commercial college 
course at Fargo. His first important business train- 
ing was in the capacity of deputy postmaster at 



Crary. Then, at the age of seventeen, he went to 
work and became a student of banking in the First 
National Bank of Crary. He also homesteaded 
near Stanley, and lost enough time from his posi- 
tion to prove up and secure a title. From the bank 
at Crary he went to Williston, North Dakota, and 
for a year had charge of the local business of the 
well known farm loan corporation of E. J. Lander 
& Company. 

The First National Bank of Scobey was chartered 
in April, 1916, succeeding the State Bank of Scobey, 
which opened its doors at old Scobey in October, 
191 3 being the second banking house in the town. 
The state institution was capitalized at $25,000, with 
G. A. Fadness president, and from April, 1914, Mr. 
Swenson as vice president, while early cashiers were 
J. C. Jackson and O. J. Helland. When Mr. Swen- 
son became vice president the institution had moved 
to the new town and the banking house was located 
in the street, while its permanent home was being 
erected, this being occupied in the fall of 1914. 
When the bank took out a national charter the 
officers remained the same until L. V. Hanson be- 
came cashier and N. L. Nelson, of Plentywood, be- 
came president. The financial statement at the 
close of business in 1919 shows capital stock of 
$30,000, surplus and undivided profits of $17,321.70 
and deposits of $462,415.04. 

Mr. Swenson gave his effective personal aid to 
the work oi raising funds during the war, though 
the cashier of the First National Bank was the offi- 
cial spirit of the drive. Mr. Swenson is president 
of the Sheridan and Roosevelt County Bankers As- 
sociation. Fraternally he is a Mason. 

At Casselton, North Dakota, February 4, 1914, 
he married Miss Ingleiv Jesten, who was born near 
Christiansand, Norway, in March, 1886, and was 
three years of age when her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew Jesten, came to America. The family lived 
for a time near "Moorhead, Minnesota, and finally 
settled at Casselton, North Dakota, where Mrs. 
Swenson grew up and was educated. She is a 
graduate of the State University of North Dakota 
and was a teacher before her marriage. Mrs. Swen- 
son is the youngest of three children, the others 
being Mrs. A. S. Needles, of Scobey, and Torfin Jes- 
ten, a railroad engineer at Breckenridge, Minnesota. 
Mr. and Mrs. Swenson have three young children, 
Lois, born in 1915, .Stanley, born in 1916, and Robert, 
born in 1917. The Swenson home is a modern six- 
room residence on Main Street, and one of the 
centers of hospitality of the town. 

CHARLES JAMES BUZZETTI. The senior member of 
the leading mercantile firm of Carbon County, 
Charles James Buzzetti, is one of the experienced 
business men of Fromberg, and since its establish- 
ment in 1008 the house of Buzzetti & Emmett has 
grown until it occupies its present prosperous as- 
pect. Mr. Buzzetti is a native of Genoa, Vernon 
County, Wisconsin, where he was born December 23, 
1872, a son of John and Delphine (Jambois) Buz- 
zetti, and grandson of a Mr. Jambois, who was born 
in France, but came to the United States at an early 
day, and after stopping for a time in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, came up north to Genoa, Wisconsin, 
where he died, having been a farmer all his life. 

John Buzzetti was born near Genoa, Italy, in 1837, 
and he died at Genoa, Wisconsin, in 1882. In young 
manhood he left Italy, where he had been reared, and 
upon coming to the United States located at Genoa, 
Wisconsin. With the outbreak of the Civil war 
he espoused the cause of the North, and in 1862 
gave practical expression to his preference by en- 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



55 



listing in the Seventy-First Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry, and served until the close of the war, when 
he returned to Genoa, Wisconsin, and spent the re- 
mainder of his life in agricultural pursuits. His 
political sentiments made him a republican. From 
birth he was a Roman Catholic. John Buzzetti was 
married at Genoa, Wisconsin, his wife having been 
born at New Orleans, Louisiana, April 21, 1843. 
She survives him and lives at Fromberg, Montana. 
Their children were as follows : Peter, who died at 
the age of forty years in a boat wreck off the coast 
of Seattle, Washington, was a barber; John, who 
was drowned on the Mississippi River when three 
years old; Jennie, who married Ed Shomers, an 
architect, lives at La Crosse, Wisconsin ; Charles 
James, who is fourth in order of birth ; Tony, who 
is proprietor of a cafe at Fromberg; Mayme, who 
married Fred Rahrer, a breeder of thoroughbred 
horses, resides at Fromberg; Frank J., who is a busi- 
ness man of Fromberg, and Emma, who married 
M. F. Emmett, the junior member of the firm of 
Buzzetti & Emmett, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this work. 

Charles James Buzzetti attended the public schools 
of Genoa, Wisconsin, until he was fifteen years old, 
and then left school and for the succeeding three 
years was engaged in farming. At the age of 
eighteen years he began railroading on the Minne- 
sota & International Railroad, holding the position 
of division operator in Minnesota for eight years, 
when, in 1897, he came to Montana and was oper- 
ator at Townsend, this state, for the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, later being sent to Logan, and still 
later to Silesia, remaining with that road for five 
years. He was then made agent and operator at 
Bridger, and so continued for two years. Mr. Buz- 
zetti then came to Fromberg, and in 1905 organized 
the Fromberg Co-operative Association for the pur- 
pose of conducting a general store, of which he was 
secretary and treasurer for two years, severing 
these connections in 1908 to found his present busi- 
ness, which had its initial opening as a small men's 
furnishing store. The two young men soon found 
that they were in their right element, and kept on 
adding to the lines they carried until now they are 
general merchants and their house is the leading 
one in this section of the state. Mr. Buzzetti owns 
the modern store building on Main Street, occupied 
by his firm, which he bought in 1917, as well as his 
comfortable modern residence at Fromberg, and a 
120-acre ranch of irrigated land at Silesia, Montana. 
The firm enjoys a very large and expanding trade 
from a radius of twelve miles outside of Fromberg. 

On February 9, 1897, Mr. Buzzetti was married at 
Brainard, Minnesota, to Miss Elizabeth Collins, a 
daughter of Dennis Collins, a pioneer blacksmith of 
Brainard, Minnesota, who, with his wife, is now de- 
ceased. Mr. and Mrs. Buzzetti have one child, Dona, 
who was born June 30, 1903, is now attending 
the Fromberg High School, of which she is a bright 
pupil, popular alike with her teachers and associates. 
Mr. Buzzetti is one of the enterprising men of 
Fromberg, and he and his partner are so abreast of 
the times that they realize the importance of sup- 
porting any legitimate measure that will advance 
their city and locality and bring into it outside capi- 
tal for investment. 

MACKZY F. EMMETT, junior member of the mer- 
cantile firm of Buzzetti & Emmett, of Fromberg, 
Montana, is one of the responsible men and excellent 
citizens of his locality, and one whose business pros- 
perity is due to his own sagacity and ability. He 
was born at 'Hanging Rock, West Virginia, May 24, 
1878, a son of Jacob H. Emmett, and grandson of 



Andrew Emmett. The Emmett family was founded 
in the -New World during colonial days, when four 
brothers of that name came to what was afterward 
to be the United States of America, one locating at 
Emmettsburg, Maryland; one in Kentucky; one at 
Hanging Rock, West Virginia, and one in North 
Carolina, and from them have descended all of the 
Emmetts of this country. 

Andrew Emmett, grandfather of Mackzy F. Em- 
mett, was born at Hanging Rock, West Virginia, 
and died there, his farm in that vicinity being handed 
down to his son, Jacob Emmett. The maiden name 
of his wife was Elizabeth Pepper, and she, too, was 
born, reared and died at Hanging Rock. 

Jacob H. Emmett was born at Hanging Rock, 
West Virginia, in 1840, and he passed away there 
in 1912, having spent his life in West Virginia, and 
directed his efforts along agricultural lines. While 
he was a life-long democrat, he never aspired to 
political honors. A member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, he was very active in its work, 
and contributed generously toward its support. With 
the outbreak of the Civil war he cast his lot with 
the Confederate States, and fought during the whole 
conflict under General Lee, and among other impor- 
tant engagements was in the battles of South Moun- 
tain and Gettysburg. He married Virginia Heare, 
who, surviving him, resides on the old homestead at 
Hanging Rock, West Virginia. She was born in 
that vicinity in 1848. The children born to her and 
her husband were as follows : Delia Lee, who died 
at a Texan city in 1915; Wade Gordon, who is a 
banker of Eastern Shore, Virginia; Evan G., who is 
a merchant of Hanging Rock ; Mackzy F., who is the 
fourth in order of birth; Jacob D., who is express 
and freight clerk at Graybull, Wyoming; James S., 
who is cashier of the Bridger Coal Company, of 
Bridger, Montana; Walker W., who is operating the 
Emmett homestead at Hanging Rock; Lucille Vir- 
ginia, who married H. L. Barlow, a retired lumber- 
man of Fromberg, died at Fromberg in 1909; Clin- 
ton Earley, who served in the United States army 
as a member of the American Expeditionary Forces 
at Toul, France; Franklin I., who is serving in the 
marine aviation service at Hampton Roads, Vir- 
ginia ; Blanche, who is unmarried, lives with her 
mother, and Hill, who is an automobile salesman, 
resides at Augusta, West Virginia. 

Mackzy F. Emmett attended the public schools of 
Hanging Rock, being graduated from its high school, 
and from Shenandoah College at Shenandoah, Vir- 
ginia, in 1902, with the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
In 1902 he came to Fromberg, Montana, and for two 
years was engaged in teaching school, leaving Car- 
bon County at the expiration of that period to spend 
two years in gold mining in Idaho. Returning to 
Fromberg, he formed a partnership with C. J. Buz- 
zetti and they established their present mercantile 
business, controlling a very desirable trade and 
doing a fine business. Mr. Emmett owns his own 
residence at Fromberg. 

In 1908 Mr. Emmett was married at Laurel, Mon- 
tana, to Miss Emma Buzzetti, a sister of C. J. Buz- 
zetti. Mr. and Mrs. Emmett have the following chil- 
dren: Virginia, who was born June 6, 1909; Robert, 
who was born December 7, 1911, and Mary, who was 
born November 15, 1915. Mr. Emmett is one of the 
alert business men of Fromberg who is thoroughly 
alive to the opportunities offered the young man in 
Western cities of recent establishment. He and his 
p?irtner are typical of the region, and spare no 
efforts to give to their trade the benefits of their 
connections, which enable them to secure timely mer- 
chandise and offer it at prices as low as is con- 
sistent with market quotations on goods of their 



56 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



class. Their service is excellent, and their customers 
remain with them, for they appreciate the fact that 
this firm is reliable and trustworthy in every respect, 
as well as thoroughly up-to-date in stock and equip- 
ment. 

ALBERT C. ROECHER. The gentleman whose name 
heads this paragraph is widely known as one of the 
enterprising merchants of Bozeman, where he has 
lived for a number of years and has been prom- 
inently identified with the commercial interests of 
that locality. His well-directed efforts in the prac- 
tical affairs of life, his capable management of his 
business interests and his sound judgment have 
brought him large rewards for the labor he has 
expended, so that today he is numbered among the 
representative men of his city. 

Albert C. Roecher was born in Pomeroy, Meigs 
County, Ohio, on September 3, 1869, and is a son 
of J. F. and Magdalena (Rasp) Roecher. J. F. 
Roecher was born in 1840 in Allegheny City, now 
a part of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where his parents 
had settled on their immigration to this country 
from Germany. He was reared and educated in 
Allegheny, but in young manhood moved to Pome- 
roy, Ohio, where he married and where he fol- 
lowed his trade, that of a harness-maker. In 1877 
he removed to Chester, Ohio, where he continued 
his trade and where his death occurred in Novem- 
ber, 1918. He was a republican in politics, and 
served as township clerk at Chester for the long 
period of thirty-five years. He was active in all 
the civic and political affairs of his community and 
was as popular as he was well known throughout 
that section of the state. He was a member of 
the Lutheran Church and of the Knights of Pythias. 

J. F. Roecher married Magdalena Rasp, who was 
born in 1841 at Pomeroy, Ohio, and who died at 
Chester in 1899. To this worthy couple were born 
the following children, eight in number: Minnie 
is the wife of Dr. A. E. Ayler, of Greencastle, 
Indiana; Emma, who remained unmarried, died at 
the age of thirty years; Albert C. is the next in 
order of birth; Lucy, now deceased, was the wife 
of H. Bert Fox, also deceased; Anna is the wife 
of J. B. Heaton, a farmer at Mutual, Ohio; J. E. 
is cashier of the Commercial Bank and Trust Com- 
pany at Big Timber, Montana; Clarence is an auto- 
mobile dealer at Chester, Ohio; Elsie is a book- 
keeper in the Commercial Trust and Savings Bank 
at Big Timber, Montana. 

Albert C. Roecher received his elementary edu- 
cation in the public schools of Chester, Ohio, after 
which he was a student in the academy there. Leav- 
ing school at the age of twenty-one years, he took 
a course in the Mountain State Business College at 
Parkersburg, West Virginia, graduating in 1894. 
In the meanwhile he had been clerking in a general 
store at Chester, and it is probably owing to the 
fact that this store carried a line of drugs that 
Mr. Roecher's future vocation was determined. In 
1897 he came to Bozeman, Montana, and formed 
a partnership with William Alward. They bought 
the leading drug store here, giving it the name of 
the new firm, Roecher & Alward, and under their 
direction it proved to be a good business move. 
Mr. Roecher continued his studies in pharmacy 
and chemistry, and then went to Minneapolis and 
took a full course in the Minnesota Institute of 
Pharmacy, receiving, after examination, a license 
as a pharmacist in 1903. In 1908 Mr. Alward died, 
and Mr. Roecher took over his interest, having been 
sole owner since that time. He carries a large and 
well selected line of drugs, stationery, cut glass, 
hand-painted china, photographic supplies, etc., and 



his store is considered the leading drug store of 
Gallatin County. He also owns the brick building 
in which the store is located, and which also 
houses three other stores, and owns a ranch of 
160 acres of land, six miles south of Logan, Mon- 
tana. 

Politically, Mr. Roecher is a stanch supporter of 
the republican party, and at one time served as 
trustee of school district No. 7, Bozeman. Frat- 
ernally he belongs to Bozeman Lodge No. 463, Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; Pythagoras 
Lodge No. 2, Knights of Pythias; Bridger Camp 
No. 62, Woodmen of the World; Gallatin Castle 
No. 82, Royal Highlanders ; and to the Retail Drug- 
gists Association of Montana. 

In 1891, in Meigs County, Ohio, Mr. Roecher was 
married to Nora Story, the daughter of Elias and 
Lucy (Carper) Story, both of whom are deceased. 
The father was a pioneer farmer in Meigs County, 
Ohio, came as a pioneer to Virginia City, Montana, 
in 1863, and in 1876 returned to Meigs County, 
where his death occurred. To them were born the 
following children : Rausie, who is a graduate of 
the Gallatin County High School, of the Montana 
State College, and attended the Milwaukee Downer 
School for Girls, is the wife of Selmer H. Solberg, 
owner of a gentlemen's furnishing store at Big 
Timber, Montana ; Chester, who is his father's as- 
sistant and who is now taking a course in pharmacy, 
graduated from the Gallatin County High School 
and was a student in the Montana State University 
at Missoula. 

A western man in the broad sense of the term, 
although a native of the east, Mr. Roecher realized 
the wants of the people and, with unerring judgment 
and keen discrimination, supplied the demand. 
Affable and popular with all classes, he has long 
been numbered among the leaders of his community 
and is eminently entitled to representation in a work 
of the character of this one. 

WILLIAM E. HARRIS. A native of Montana, Wil- 
liam E. Harris began his business career imme- 
diately on completing his high school course, and 
his experience has been almost entirely in automo- 
bile mechanics and the garage business. 

Mr. Harris, who is proprietor of one of the lead- 
ing garages in southwestern Montana, at Hamilton, 
was born at Butte February 28, 1885. His father, 
also William E. Harris, was of Welsh ancestry and 
was born in Pennsylvania in 1853. He spent his 
early life in his native state, and in 1881 located 
at Butte, where he followed mining. He owned a 
half interest in the St. Lawrence Tunnel at Butte. 
He died in that city in 1889, when thirty-six years 
of age. He was a republican in politics. At Butte 
he married Mary Ann Shearer, who was born in 
Ohio in 1855, and is now living at Hamilton. She 
was the mother of two sons, William E. and Claud. 
Claud enlisted in 1917, trained at Camp Lewis, and 
in 1918 went overseas. In the late summer of 1919 
he was still in service in France with the grade of 
corporal. 

William E. Harris attended the public schools of 
Butte until 1901, when his mother removed to Ham- 
ilton, where he graduated from high school in 1904. 
The following year he worked as a foreman on the 
Bitter Root Stock Farm, but in 1905 took up the 
automobile and garage business, which he learned 
thoroughly. He has a special inclination for me- 
chanics, and is a master of automobile mechanism. 
In 1916 he bought the large garage at 352 Main 
street and has floor space 130x40 feet. His business 
has grown and prospered until his quarters are far 
too small. He maintains a general garage, a repair 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



57 



shop, and handles all automobile accessories and 
operates a service station. 

Mr. Harris is a republican voter, and is a member 
of the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. He owns 
a modern home on Fourth Street. In 1907, at Mis- 
soula, he married Miss Margaret Loretta Morrissey, 
daughter of Dan and Mary Morrissey. Her mother 
is now deceased. Her father is a retired resident at 
Santa Monica, California. Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
have three children: Anna, born in November, 1909; 
William, born in 1912; and Doloris, born in 1914. 

PETER JOHN VAN LAKEN. Many of the most pros- 
perous and esteemed citizens of our country have 
come from beyond the seas, and into this land of 
promise and plenty have brought those habits of in- 
dustry and thrift that have won for them places of 
prominence in the various walks of life, making 
them veritable leaders in the industrial and business 
world. Conspicuous among this number now living 
in Montana is Peter John Van Laken, of Billings, 
president and sole proprietor of the Van Laken 
Construction Company. A native of Europe, he 
was born December 14, 1881, in Antwerp, Belgium, 
where his father, Francis Van Laken, was a life- 
long resident. He is descended from an old and 
honored Dutch family, the Van Lakens having for- 
merly lived in Holland, from whence they emigrated 
to Belgium many generations ago. 

John Francis Van Laken, grandfather of Peter, 
was born in Antwerp in 1820, and as a mason and 
builder there spent his years, dying in 1907. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Melania Van Damme, 
was born, reared and educated in Antwerp, and 
there lived until her death. 

Francis Van Laken's birth occurred in 1855. Learn- 
ing the mason's trade when young, he worked at it 
faithfully, becoming skilled in the art, and during 
his years of activity was a general contractor as well 
as a mason. His wife, whose name before marriage 
was Clemence Jacobs, was born in Antwerp, Bel- 
gium, in 1856, and is still a resident of that city. 
Five children were born of their union, as follows : 
Arthur, a machinist and now owner of a general 
machine shop, resides in Antwerp, his birthplace; 
Melania, who married Joseph Seeldrayers, an Ant- 
werp broker, died of the influenza in 1919; Louis 
lived but fourteen years; Peter, the special subject 
of this brief personal sketch ; and Adaline, wife of 
Emil T. Felt, of Antwerp, an officer in the Belgian 
Army, who participated in five of the larger battles 
of the World war, and has recently been mustered 
out. 

The boyhood days of Peter John Van Laken were 
passed in laying the foundation of his future educa- 
tion in the public schools of Antwerp. Possessing 
artistic talent, and having a natural aptitude for 
mechanics, he subsequently completed a course of 
study at the Government Technical School, becom- 
ing expert in draughting and architectural work. 
Later, under the instruction of his father, he learned 
the mason's trade, which he followed for a time, 
being quite successful. In 1903, seized with the wan- 
derlust, Mr. Van Laken determined to try life for 
himself in America, and immigrating to the United 
States located in Chicago, Illinois, where he fol- 
lowed his trade four years. Going from there still 
farther westward in 1907, he spent a year in Spo- 
kane, Washington, but not entirely pleased with his 
prospects in that locality he made another move, 
settling at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, where he carried 
on a substantial business as contractor and builder 
for nine years. In June, 1917, Mr. Van Laken, de- 
sirous of broadening his scope of action, came to 
Billings, Montana, and in the selection of a favor- 



able location has found that he made no mistake. 
Immediately establishing the Van Laken Construc- 
tion Company, of which he is president and entire 
owner, he has since been constantly employed in the 
upbuilding of the city. Some of the most beautiful 
commercial buildings have been erected under his 
supervision. Among some of his notable achieve- 
ments as a contractor and builder is the Hart-Albin 
Building, a three-story structure with basement, the 
largest in Billings, and one of the largest office 
buildings in Montana. He erected the Carlin Build- 
ing on Broadway, and others of equal importance, 
the work of his hands and brain being very fre- 
quently in, evidence. He has a pleasant home at 
North Thirty-Second Street. 

Mr. Van Laken is an adherent of the republican 
party, and is a member of the Coeur d'Alene Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons; of 
the Coeur d'Alene Camp, Modern Woodmen of 
America; and of the Billings Midland Club. 

In 1901, in Antwerp, Belgium, Mr. Van Laken 
married Miss Marie De Buyser, a daughter of 
Charles and Frances (Van Eyke) De Buyser. Her 
father, a mason and contractor, still resides in Ant- 
werp, where the death of her mother occurred a 
few years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Van Laken have four 
children, namely : Gabriella, born June 19, 1903, now 
a senior in the Billings High School, is a gifted 
musician, having a very sweet voice, and has sung 
with the Glee Club; Julia, born January 5, 1905, is a 
freshman in the Billings High School; Arthur 
Francis who died at the age of ten weeks, in Chi- 
cago; and Arthur, born on Friday, June 13, 1913. 

WILLIAM C. RYAN, principal of the Sweetgrass 
High School at Big Timber, is a veteran educator, 
and has been in the work more or less continu- 
ously for thirty years. 

Mr. Ryan, whose ancestors came from Ireland, 
was born at Springfield, Ohio, February 12, 1869. 
His father, Henry Ryan, was born in Southern 
Ohio in 1844 and spent his active life on a farm 
near Springfield, where he died in 1916. In politics 
he was a democrat, and was affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows from the time 
he reached his majority until his death. He married 
Elizabeth Ryman, who was born in Clark County, 
Ohio, in 1844 and died at Springfield in 1915. Wil- 
liam C., is the oldest of their children. The second, 
Mary, is the wife of Wilbur Trout, a farmer, flour 
moulder and successful business man of Springfield, 
Ohio. Oscar, is superintendent of the annealing 
department of the Springfield Malleable Iron Works, 
while Charles, the youngest, is also an educator, 
being superintendent of schools of several townships 
of Clark County, Ohio, and a resident of Spring- 
field. 

As a boy William C. Ryan attended country 
schools near his father's farm, and in 1888 grad- 
uated from the Clark County High School. Mr. 
Ryan is a man of scholarly tastes and there has 
hardly been a year since he left high school when 
he has not attended some institution as a student 
and accepted every opportunity to advance his abili- 
ties and technical training for educational work. 
For three years he taught school in Clark County 
and two years in Franklin County, Ohio, utilizing 
the summer vacations in attending college. He then 
entered the Northern Indiana Normal School, now 
Valparaiso University, where he spent four quarters 
each three years. He graduated with the A. B. 
degree in 1896 and he also has the degree Master 
of Science and degree Civil Engineer from Val- 
paraiso. While there he became affiliated with 
Sigma Pi College fraternity. He has attended 



58 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



summer schools nearly every year of his teaching 
career. In 1896 he went to Trenton, Missouri, for 
one year was head of the Mathematics Department 
in Avalon College, and for two years was principal 
of the Trenton High School and then another year 
remained as principal of the Normal Department 
of Avalon College. During 1809-1900 he was a 
student in the University of Chicago, where he 
made chemistry his major study. He then returned 
to .Trenton and was superintendent of city schools 
three years. 

Coming to Montana in the fall of 1903, Mr. Kyan 
served as principal of the County High School 
at Big Timber for seven consecutive years. In 
1910 he retired from the teaching profession and 
bought a fruit ranch at Spokane, Washington. A 
year later he sold that and returned to Montana 
and became district manager of the Central Life 
Insurance Company of Des Moines, and for six 
years represented that company with offices at 
Billings, and developed a large business and proved 
himself a thoroughly resourceful insurance man. 
In 1919 he resumed active connection with educa- 
tional affairs when he took a three years contract 
as principal of the Sweetgrass County High School 
at Big Timber. He has a staff of seven teachers 
and an enrollment of 125 scholars in the high 
school. 

Contrary to the usual run of educators Mr. Kyan 
has been successful in business affairs. H owns 
a ranch of 280 acres seventeen miles northeast of 
Columbus, Montana, and has it under lease. He 
also has a modern home at Big Timber and a 
dwelling house at Billings. Mr. Ryan is an inde- 
pendent republican, and is active in the Christian 
Church as a member of the State Board of the 
Church. Early in life he became affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has 
membership in the Lodge, Encampment and Canton 
at Bozeman and is a retired captain of the Uni- 
formed Rank. He is also a past chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias. 

In May, 1905, at Livingston, he married Miss 
Melvetta Jolly. Her mother is Mrs. Mary Jolly, 
of Trenton, Missouri. Mrs. Ryan is a graduate 
of the Trenton High School and attended Avalon 
College through her junior year. She then taught 
in the Trenton schools and attended the Missouri 
State University several summer sessions. They 
have three children: Henry Wallace, born January 
8, 1906; Mary, born November 2, 1907; and Helen, 
born June 15, 1910. 

EDWARD BIGELOW. Continuously devoting his time 
and energies to the varied requirements of his busi- 
ness, and possessing an ability equal to its demands, 
Edward Bigelow, of Billings, proprietor of Bigelpw's 
Mercantile Agency, has won an honored position 
among the successful business men of the city. He 
was born in Columbus, Ohio, October 24, 1875, a 
son of Charles E. Bigelow, and comes of good old 
Scotch-Irish stock, his immigrant ancestors on the 
paternal side having settled in Massachusetts in colo- 
nial days. 

A native of Massachusetts, Charles E. Bigelow 
was born in 1851, in Spencer, but his youthful days 
were spent in Boston, where he acquired his early 
education. As a young man he went to Ohio, stop- 
ping first in Loveland, but after his marriage remov- 
ing to Columbus, and for a time thereafter serving 
as a conductor on the Pennsylvania Railroad. In 
1882, on the opening of the New York, Chicago and 
St. Louis Railroad, he accepted the position of 
baggage master at Bellevue, Ohio, where he remained 
three years. Going to Buffalo, New York, in 1885, 



he was yard master for the same road for two years. 
Retiring from the railway service, he has since been 
associated with the "Buffalo Express," one of the 
leading newspapers of that city. He is a republican 
in politics, and an ex-member of the Royal Arca- 
num. His wife, whose maiden name was Christian 
Tigar, was born in Loveland, Ohio, in 1853, and died 
in Buffalo, New York, in 1894. Three children were 
born to them, as follows: Frederick T., of Buffalo, 
New York, is an accountant for the Lehigh Valley 
Railroad Company ; Edward, of whom we write, and 
Burt, of New York City, in the office of the "New 
York Times." 

As a boy Edward Bigelow attended the public 
schools of Cincinnati and Bellevue, Ohio, and of 
Buffalo, New York. Then, beginning life as a wage- 
earner, he worked for five years in a Buffalo lumber 
yard, and subsequently was employed in the Buffalo 
-Post Office from 1895 until 1906. Accepting then 
a position with the United States Smelting Com- 
pany, he held it for eighteen months, being located 
at Midvale, Utah, near Salt Lake City. Joining an 
engineering corps, he afterward worked for a short 
time on the construction of the Consolidated Min- 
ing Company's plant at McGill, Nevada. 

Desirous of further advancing his education, Mr. 
Bigelow entered Mount Hermon Academy, widely 
known as Moody's School, near Northfield, Massa- 
chusetts. Leaving that institution in 1909, he came 
to Montana with an engineering corps, and for six 
months assisted in the construction of that branch 
of the Northern Pacific Railway that extends from 
Livingston to Wilsall. Going then to Salt Lake 
City, he remained there as statistician for the Utah 
Copper Company until 1911, when he went to the 
Pacific Coast, visiting California and Oregon. Com- 
ing to Billings, Montana, in September, 1911, Mr. 
Bigelow was bookkeeper and cashier for a time, 
first for W. H. Donovan and later for W. H. Mc- 
Cormick. Resuming his duties as a statistician, he 
was in Butte with the Butte and Superior Copper 
Company for a time, and then at Great Falls, Mon- 
tana, with the Anaconda Copper Mining Company. 
In April, 1914, Mr. Bigelow returned to Billings, 
where he has since resided, his home being at 807 
North Thirtieth Street. He is carrying on a substan- 
tial business as manager of the Bigelow Mercantile 
Agency, and is likewise employed as an accountant. 
He is a republican in politics, a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, and belongs to Erie Lodge 
No. 161, Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Ma- 
sons. 

On November 24, 1910, Mr. Bigelow married, in 
Billings, Miss Mabel Johnson, a daughter of Orange 
Chapin Johnson. She was born at Rochester, Min- 
nesota, and received her education in Iowa, being 
graduated from the Lake Mills High School, and 
later completing a business course at the Capital 
City Commercial College in Des Moines. A member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, she takes an 
active interest in church work, and was general sec- 
retary of the Young Women's Christian Association, 
a position that she also filled while a resident of 
Salt Lake City. At the present time she is vice 
president of the Billings Young Women's Christian 
Association. Mrs. Bigelow is of English descent. 
Her immigrant ancestor, Lawrence Johnson, who 
was born in England in 1758, came to America in 
1776 with a company of British soldiers, and sub- 
sequently surrendered to Washington at Philadel- 
phia, and afterwards fought with him for the inde- 
pendence of the Colonies. William Meslar Johnson, 
Mrs. Bigelow's grandfather, was born in Ithaca, 
New York, in 1815, and died January 15, 1871, from 
pneumonia. Orange Chapin Johnson was born in 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



59 



Whitesville, New York, in 1850. Going to Minne- 
sota in early life, he was engaged in the lumber 
business at Rochester a number of years, and since 
coming to Billings in 1907 has been here similarly 
employed, being with the Thompson Yards, Incorpo- 
rated. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and is a member of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Order of Masons and of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Louise McDaniel, was born and reared in 
Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Bigelow have one 
child, Donald Edward, born February 16, 1912. 

HENRY FRANCIS SEARS learned the printing trade 
when a boy, worked as a printer when he first 
came to Bozeman more than thirty years ago, but 
finally gave up his trade and profession to become 
a farmer, and while he is very busy as proprietor 
and manager of the Republican Courier at Bozeman, 
he is still interested in the practical side of agri- 
culture and has a first class farm in Gallatin County. 
Mr. Sears was born in Kent County, England, 
October 16, 1866. His father, Thomas H. Sears, 
was born in the same county in 1845, was reared 
and married there, and was a country gentleman 
and owner of a valuable estate. He sold his life 
interest in that estate in 1870 and crossed the ocean 
and settled at Brantford in the Province of Ontario. 
After that he lived retired and died in Ontario 
in 1909. He was educated in the famous Eton 
Preparatory School of England. Thomas H. Sears 
married Blanche Knowles, who was born in Kent 
County, England, and died at Brantford, Ontario, 
in 191 1. They had a large family of children. 
Thomas H., the oldest, is representative for a type 
foundry at Toronto, Canada; Blanche Marian is 
deceased ; Charles J. is a real estate broker at Boze- 
man, and Henry Francis is the next in age. Isabella, 
Florence and Edith are all deceased. Margaret is 
the wife of Frank Alderson, a farmer and linotype 
operator at Bozeman. Mrs. Alice Thomas still lives 
at Brantford, Ontario, and Edwin, the youngest of 
the family, is a cigar maker at Elmira, New York. 

Henry Francis Sears secured his early education 
in the public schools of Brantford, Ontario. When 
thirteen years of age he began working in a print- 
ing shop at Brantford, and at fifteen went to Buffalo, 
New York, and completed his apprenticeship as a 
printer and followed his trade there as a journeyman 
one year. He was at Detroit two years, and in 1885 
arrived at Bozeman and was soon working in the 
office of the Bozeman Chronicle and also with the 
Courier. For six years he was a printer in these 
establishments, and then left the printing shop al- 
together for nearly ten years and devoted that time 
to farming in Gallatin County. In 1900 Mr. Sears 
and J. H. Dawes established the Gallatin County 
Republican. They conducted this paper until 1905, 
when they consolidated with the Avant Courier, thus 
establishing the present Republican Courier. In 
1905 the Republican Courier Company was incor- 
porated, and in succeeding years Mr. Sears bought 
all the other stock and is sole owner of the publica- 
tion. 

While the Republican Courier is a comparatively 
new paper the Avant Courier was established fifty 
years ago, in 1869. It was first published as the 
Pick and Plow. In 1871 Major Anderson obtained 
control and gave it the name Avant Courier, and 
continued its publication until its consolidation in 
1905. This is therefore one of the very oldest papers 
in Montana. Mr. Sears is publishing a column of 
items each week from the files of thirty-five years 
ago, and probably no other paper in the state can 
do this. He has a well equipped plant and offices 



at 241 West Main Street, and the mechanical facil- 
ities are adequate not only for the printing of the 
paper but for a large commercial and job printing 
business. 

Mr. Sears is a republican, a member of the 
Episcopal Church, is affiliated with Bozeman Lodge 
No. 463, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
Bridger Camp No. 62 Woodmen of the World at 
Bozeman, Eureka Homestead No. 415, Brotherhood 
of American Yeomen, at Bozeman, is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce, and the Bozeman 
Typographical Union. 

Mr. Sears owns a farm of 175 acres seven miles 
east of Bozeman and has other real estate both 
in the city and county, including a modern home 
at 415 Third Avenue, South. Mr. Sears married at 
Bozeman in 1889 Emma Bradley, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth Bradley, both now deceased. Her 
father was a Pennsylvania miner and farmer. Five 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Sears : Clyde 
R., a graduate of the Gallatin County High School, 
now in the confectionery business at Whitehall, 
Montana ; Frank, also a graduate of the County 
High School, a linotype operator in his father's 
office; Edith, a graduate of the County High School, 
who attended the Montana State College one year, 
and is the wife of G. C. Davenport, an automobile 
salesman at Bozeman ; Thomas H. who is a graduate 
of high school and a student in the Montana State 
College; and Harry, who died April 29, 1919, at the 
age of twelve years. 

CHARLES E. HARTLEY when he came to Montana 
was a young man with a college education but no 
special business training beyond his experience as a 
teacher. He learned the laundry business in this 
state, and starting with modest capital and small 
equipment has developed at Hamilton the only steam 
laundry plant in Ravalli county, and with a wide 
scope of service beyond the limits of that county. 
It is the Bitter Root Steam Laundry of which he 
is proprietor and owner. 

Mr. Hartley was born on a farm in Webster 
County, Missouri, February 25, 1878. He is of Eng- 
lish ancestry and his people were colonial settlers 
in some of the southern states. His grandfather, 
Jesse Hartley, was born in Tennessee in 1803. In 
1840 he took his family to southern Missouri and 
was one of the first settlers in Webster County, 
where he homesteaded. In the course of years he 
developed a fine farm of four hundred acres. Jesse 
Hartley was remarkable for the substance of his 
achievements and also for the length of his life. 
He died January 28, 1908, in Webster County, Mis- 
souri, at the age of a hundred and five. 

Robert Hartley, his son, father of the Hamilton 
business man, was born in Tennessee in 1838, and 
was two years of age when his parents moved to 
Webster County, Missouri. The old homestead in 
Webster County is still his home. He has spent 
his active life as a farmer, and during the Civil 
war was a soldier on the Union side. He saw 
much of the border warfare, participating in the 
campaigns against Price and Quantrill, and was also 
in the great battle of Wilson Creek. He was a 
republican and an active member of the Baptist 
Church. Robert Hartley married Jane Murrell, who 
was born in North Carolina in 1848. A brief record 
of their children is as follows : I. A., a farmer and 
orchard owner at Escandido, California; Minnie M., 
wife of N. M. Lowder, a banker at Elkland, Mis- 
souri; Jesse George, who runs the old home farm 
of his parents; Charles E. ; Floyd O., a hardware 
merchant at Ozark, Missouri; Hester, wife of Joseph 
Jackson, a farmer of Webster County, Missouri; 



60 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Mabel, wife of Olaf Peterson, a paint, oil and 
general merchant, and a painter by trade, at Ham- 
ilton, Montana ; and Ezra, a clerk in a store at 
Marshfield in Webster County, Missouri. 

Charles E. Hartley secured his education in the 
rural schools of his native county in Missouri. 
For four years he attended the Southwest Baptist 
College at Bolivar, Missouri, graduating with the 
class of 1900. He was a member of the Athenian 
Society in college. Before graduating he had taught 
one year in Webster County, and after getting his 
diploma he went back to the same school as its 
principal. 

Mr. Hartley came to Montana in 1901 and ac- 
quired his practical knowledge of the laundry busi- 
ness at Missoula. In the spring of 1905 he removed 
to Dillon, where he managed a laundry for two 
years. Then with his experience and modest capi- 
tal he came to Hamilton and bought a small hand 
laundry. Since then he has extensively remodeled 
and re-equipped the plant, has introduced steam and 
other mechanical appliances and now has a large and 
modern plant. He owns the building in which the 
business is conducted at the corner of Main and 
First streets. 

Out of his prosperity he has acquired a modern 
home at the corner of Fifth and State streets, also 
another dwelling adjoining his residence, and two 
other city lots. Mr. Hartley is an independent re- 
publican, is treasurer of the Baptist Church, a mem- 
ber of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce and 
affiliated with Ionic Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Hamilton Chapter No. 18. Royal 
Arch Masons, Crusade Commandery No. 17. Knights 
Templar, Algeria Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Helena, Ravalli Lodge No. 36, Knights of Pythias, 
and Pine Cone Camp No. 754, Woodmen of the 
World. 

January 14, 1904, at Missoula, Mr. Hartley mar- 
ried Miss Anna Svoboda, daughter of John and 
Frances (Dplinski) Svoboda. Her parents are resi- 
dents of Missoula and her father is a retired laun- 
dryman. Mr. and Mrs. Hartley have two children: 
Zelma, born February 25, 1905, and June, born June 
8, 1911. 

JOHN WILLIAM CHAPMAN, president of the Meyer 
and Chapman State Bank of Red Lodge, is one of 
the oldest residents of the northwest, and its fertile 
valleys and rugged mountain sides constitute almost 
the breath of life to him. As an old time cowboy 
and cattle man he was associated with some of the 
newest country opened to settlement in Wyoming 
and Montana, and recalls many of the noted names 
of pioneer characters of that time. 

Mr. Chapman, who still retains extended ranching 
and farming interests, was born at Springfield. Illi- 
nois, May 15, 1850, the only son and child of William 
and Artie Anasa (Riddle) Chapman. The Chapmans 
are an English family but have been in America since 
colonial times. William Chapman was born in 1827 
and was one of the early farmers of Central Illi- 
nois. He died at Springfield, that state, in 1851. 
His wife was born in the territory of Iowa in 1833, 
and soon after his death she removed to Oregon 
in 1851, settling in Douglas County. She became the 
wife of William Merriman, who died in Jackson 
County, Oregon. She died at Medford, Oregon, in 
1917. 

From the facts just related it will be seen that 
John W. Chapman had his first conscious recollec- 
'tion of his mother's home in Oregon. He grew up 
there in the country, attended the rural schools of 
Douglas County to the age of sixteen, and then hired 
out as a cowboy. He was employed by some of 



the first cattle outfits ranging stock in the vicinity 
of Virginia City, Nevada. He made his first ac- 
quaintance with Montana in 1878, when he was run- 
ning cattle on the Tongue River near Miles City. 
In 1879 he settled on a ranch on Tongue River but 
a year later went to the vicinity of Cody, Wyoming, 
and had his ranch headquarters there for twenty-two 
years. In that time he acquired extensive interests 
as a cattle man, and had under lease or individual 
ownership great tracts of land. Mr. Chapman has 
been a resident of Red Lodge since 1904. He still 
owns about 2,000 acres of grain and stock land situ- 
ated in Wyoming and in Carbon County and the 
Big Horn country of Montana. 

Mr. Chapman was associated with the late W. F. 
Meyer and Paul Britsche in founding the Meyer 
& Chapman Bank, and became its president upon its 
reorganization as the Meyer & Chapman State Bank 
on December i, 1912. Frank Lyle is vice president 
and the cashier is Fred Alden. This is one of tbe 
largest banks of Carbon County, with a capital of 
$50,000, surplus and profits of $28,000 and deposits 
averaging $500,000. The bank owns and occupies 
part of the most conspicuous business building in 
Red Lodge, a substantial two-story banking and 
office structure at Broadway and Eleventh streets. 
Mr. Chapman is also president of the Hardin State 
Bank at Hardin and president of the Bank of Belfry. 
His home is the most commodious and attractive 
residence in Red Lodge, surrounded with well kept 
grounds. Politically he acts independently and has 
never sought any public office. Mr. Chapman mar- 
ried Miss Alpha Chapman at Canyonville in Douglas 
County, Oregon, in 1882. She was a native of that 
county. 

J. S. SOLBERG made a definite choice of Big 
Timber as his home thirty years ago. He was 
the pioneer shoemaker and harness dealer in that 
town, followed his regular trade for many years, 
but is now proprietor of the leading men's furnish- 
ing goods store in Sweetgrass County. 

Mr. Solberg was born at Bergen, Norway, De- 
cember 29, 1863. His father, S. " Solberg, spent 
all his life as a carpenter and builder. He was born 
in 1832 and died in 1885. He had served his 
regular term in the Norwegian army and was an 
active member of the Lutheran Church. His widow, 
Martha Solberg, still living at Bergen, was born 
in 1833. The oldest child, OH, came to the United 
States and did farm work at Black Earth, Wiscon- 
sin, and died while making a voyage back home 
to his native country. J. S. Solberg is the second 
of the family, and his other brother, Martin, is 
a farmer at Huntsville, Alabama. The two younger 
children, Annie and Sophia, are both unmarried 
and live in Norway. 

J. S. Solberg received his education and also 
served his apprenticeship at the shoemaker's trade 
in his native city. He was twenty years of age 
when he came to the United States in 1884 and he 
not only followed his trade but also did farming 
at Black Earth in Dane County, Wisconsin. In 
July, 1887, he arrived at Big Timber, Montana, and 
was soon busily working at his trade as a shoe- 
maker. At the end of three years, his services 
having come into demand in repairing harness, he 
established the first harness shop. He has the 
distinction of having made the first pair of shoes 
in Big Timber. He continued his shoe and harness 
business until 1907, when he broadened out his 
business enterprise by establishing a men's furnish- 
ing store. He owns both this store and its large 
and well selected stock on McLeod Street, and he 
also has a modern home on the corner of Anderson 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



61 



and Fifth Avenue. Mr. Solberg is a member of 
the Sons of Norway, is a Lutheran and a republican. 
At Melville, Montana, in 1891 he married Miss 
Hannah Bekken, a native of Wisconsin. Their 
oldest child is Selmer H., a graduate of the Mon- 
tana State College at Bozeman, who is now silent 
partner and active assistant to his father in the 
business. The second child, Oscar, has a place 
on the roll of honor of Montana's volunteers in 
the late war. He went overseas in July, 1918, and 
was killed in France September 29th. The three 
younger children are Stella, Louis and Helen. Stella 
graduated from the State College at Bozeman and 
is now teaching in the high school at Virginia 
City; Louis attends the County High School in the 
sophomore class, while Helen is in the eighth grade 
of the grammar schools. 

REUBEN J. LORD. Since coming to Montana, more 
than twenty years ago, Reuben J. Lord has been 
actively identified with the industrial interests of 
Billings, and as a successful contractor and builder 
has been an important factor in aiding the develop- 
ment and promoting the growth of this now pros- 
perous city. A son of the late Luther Lord, he was 
born July 5, 1859, in Surry, Hancock County, Maine. 
On the paternal side he comes of good old Scotch- 
Irish stock, being a lineal descendant of one of two 
brothers, John Lord and James Lord, who migrated 
from Londonderry, Ireland, to Maine in 1621, land- 
ing in Kittery, not far, probably, from the present 
site of the Portsmouth Navy Yard. His great 
grandfather settled permanently in Surry, Hancock 
County, Maine, and there Isaac Lord, the next in 
line of descent, spent his entire life, his birth oc- 
curring in 1741 and his death in 1820, during his 
years of activity having been engaged in farming 
and lumbering. 

Born on the home farm in Surry, Maine, in 1816, 
Luther Lord received excellent educational advan- 
tages as a youth, and for upwards of forty years 
taught school in Hancock County. He was like- 
wise engaged to some extent in literary work, hav- 
ing been a book agent, and becoming widely known 
in his native county as editor of a newspaper. A 
whig in politics as a young man, he joined the 
republican party soon after its formation, and from 
that time until his death in 1883 was one of its 
stanchest adherents. Active and influential in public 
affairs, he served as county treasurer of Hancock 
County for nine consecutive terms, and for many 
years was town clerk and selectman of Surry, and 
also filled the office of justice of the peace for a 
long, long time. Uniting with the Baptist Church 
at the age of twenty-one years, he became very 
prominent in its affairs, and served many years as 
deacon. 

Luther Lord married Priscilla Jellison, who was 
born in Mariaville, Hancock County, Maine, in 1834, 
and died in Surry, Maine, in 1883. Seven children 
were born to their union, namely : Edgar, a civil 
engineer, resides at Bar Harbor, Maine ; Reuben J. ; 
Isaac, deceased; Abbie, wife of Stephen H. Leland, 
of Lamoine, Maine, a retired custodian of the naval 
station of that place ; Martin Luther, who was a con- 
tractor and builder at Berkeley, California, and died 
in April, 1919; Clara, living at Southwest Harbor, 
Maine, is the widow of Augustus Mayo, who was 
for many years prosperously engaged in mackerel 
fishing, and Maurice S., a contractor and builder at 
Columbus, Montana. 

Educated in the public schools of his native town, 
Reuben J. Lord at the age of nineteen years began 
his career as a teacher at Ellsworth, Maine, and 
served as principal of the schools one term. Going 



then to Bar Harbor, he Worked as an apprentice at 
the carpenter's trade two years, after which he 
started there in business on his own account, con- 
tinuing for a period of sixteen years. In the spring 
of 1899, realizing the great demand for skilled labor 
in the newer states of the far West, Mr. Lord fol- 
lowed the trail of the ever wide-awake emigrant to 
Montana, locating in Billings. Embarking in busi- 
ness as a general contractor, he has been busily 
employed ever since, his work being appreciated. 
Among the buildings which he has erected in Bill- 
ings is the substantial structure in wh'ich the Billings 
Industrial School is located and the attractive resi- 
dences of Frank O'Donnell, Frank Raedemher, 
Dr. W. A. Allen and others of equal prominence and 
beauty, including his own residence at 407 South 
Thirty-first Street. 

At Mount Desert, Maine, October 14, 1882, Mr. 
Ldrd married Miss Julia M. Mayo, a daughter of 
the late Thomas Mayo. Her mother, whose maiden 
name was Lydia Smith, was born in Mount Desert, 
Maine, in 1834, an d is now living in Billings, making 
her home with Mr. and Mrs. Lord. Mr. Mayo was 
for many years engaged in sea-faring work as cap- 
tain of a vessel traversing the ocean. Three children 
have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Lord, as 
follows : Charles R., who died at the age of twenty 
years ; Alice, who died in childhood, and Lida 
Grace, wife of LeRoy E. Torrence, assistant cashier 
of the Yegen Bank at Billings. 

JAMES E. ELLIOTT, M. D. Former county health 
officer of Gallatin County, Dr. James E. Elliott is a 
Bozeman physician and surgeon, and a man of wide 
and varied experience and of splendid talents in 
his profession. His father was a doctor, and several 
other members of the family have earned a worthy 
place in the same profession. 

His paternal ancestors came from England and 
were colonial settlers in Virginia. However, the 
family for several generations have lived in Indiana. 
James E. Elliott was born in Clay County, that 
state, July 20, 1883. His grandfather was Harrison 
B. Elliott, a native of Indiana, a pioneer' farmer, 
and a leader in local politics. At one time he 
served as county commissioner. He died at Green- 
castle in Putnam County, Indiana, many years ago. 
The father of Doctor Elliott was T. A. Elliott, who 
was born in Indiana in 1851, was a graduate of the 
Medical College of Nashville, Tennessee, and for 
twenty-five years practiced his profession in Clay 
County, where he died in 1907. He was a democrat 
and a member of the Presbyterian Church. Dr. T. 
A. Elliott married Anna B. Collier, who was born 
in Indiana in 1859, and is still living at Kansas 
City, Missouri. The oldest of her children is Harry 
Elliott, a graduate of the Indiana Medical College 
at Indianapolis, a physician and surgeon at Brazil, 
the county seat of Clay County, Indiana, for over 
a year a captain in the Medical Reserve Corps and 
up to the spring of 1919 still on duty with the 
American Expeditionary Forces at Verdun, France. 
Dr. James E. Elliott is the second of the family. 
Mrs. Jennie Shaw is the wife of a Kansas City 
publisher. Frank is a resident of Dallas, Texas, 
joined the Officers Training Camp in 1908, was com- 
missioned captain and served until mustered out in 
1919 and has since become an oil operator in Texas. 
John, the youngest of the family, is a dentist by 
profession at Kansas City, and was connected with 
the Dental Corps of the army during the war. 

Dr. James E. Elliott attended rural schools in 
Clay County, Indiana, graduated from the high 
school at Poland in 1809 and soon afterward entered 
the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, where 



62 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



he graduated M. D. in 1904. He spent one year 
as an interne in St. Anthony's Hospital at Terre 
Haute, and has since come in contact with the most 
advanced ideas and methods of medicine and 
surgery by post-graduate work and attending clinics 
in Chicago and with the Mayo Brothers at Roches- 
ter, Minnesota. Doctor Elliott practiced medicine 
at Terre Haute, Indiana, for eleven years. He 
came to Montana in 1915, and has been permanently 
located at Bozeman since December, 1917, and has 
already built up a large and satisfactory general 
practice as a physician and surgeon. His offices are 
in the Story Block. His home is in the Evergreen 
Apartments. He served as county health officer in 
1918. He is a member of the County, State and 
American Medical Associations. Doctor Elliott owns 
a ranch of 157 acres of irrigated land four miles 
north of Belgrade. He is a democrat in politics, a 
member of the Presbyterian Church and affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias at Terre Haute. . 

In 1906, at Brazil, Indiana, he married Miss 
Kathryne Dietz, daughter of Emil and Anna Dietz, 
who now reside at Anaconda, Montana. Her father 
is a traveling salesman. Mrs. Elliott is a graduate 
of the high school at Noblesville, Indiana. They 
have one daughter, Kathryne, born December 8, 
1909. 

WILLIS C. WELLS grew up in Wisconsin, in the 
heart of the great dairy district of that state, was 
a practical dairyman when only a youth and sub- 
sequently became a recognized expert as a butter 
maker and creamery man. For a number of years 
he was in that business in Wisconsin. He has also 
been manager of a number of creameries in the 
northwest, and has put several such establishments 
on their feet in Montana. Mr. Wells is now pro- 
prietor of the Hamilton Creamery, and has done 
much to make that institution a stimulus to the 
dairy industry of Ravalli County. 

Mr. Wells was born in Dodge County, Wisconsin, 
November II, 1868. His people were Wisconsin 
pioneers. His grandfather, Newton Wells, was born 
in 1815 and was an early settler in Wisconsin, where 
he developed a farm. He died at Neosha in that 
state in 1865. Mathias N. Wells, father of the Ham- 
ilton citizen, was born in Vermont in 1844, and 
began his career as a farmer in Dodge County, 
Wisconsin. Since 1879 his home has been at Neills- 
ville in that state. He continued farming until he 
retired. For three years he was a Union soldier, 
serving with the Seventh Wisconsin Battery. Most 
of his service was around Memphis, Tennessee, and 
on the western border. He is a republican in politics. 
Mathias Wells married Alberta Pettingill, who was 
born in Vermont in 1846. They were married in 
Dodge County, Wisconsin. Willis is the oldest of 
their children. Burton H. is connected with an un- 
dertaking establishment at Neillsville. Hattie May 
is the wife of Ed Lloyd, a farmer near Columbia, 
Wisconsin. 

Willis C. Wells acquired his early education in the 
rural schools of Clark County, Wisconsin. He lived 
on his father's farm until 1891, and while there ac- 
quired a practical knowledge of farming, dairying 
and the creamery business. In 1895 he took the but- 
ter-making course at the University of Wisconsin 
at Madison. He then took charge of the creamery, 
known as the Farmers Co-operative Creamery at 
Strum, Wisconsin. In the fall of 1896 he was called 
back to Madison to serve as instructor in butter- 
making, and gave his services to the University for 
one term. The following two years he had charge 
of the Farmers .Co-operative Creamery at Edmund, 
Wisconsin, for three years was creamery manager 



at Arcadia, Wisconsin, and then left his native state 
to take charge of the Farmers Co-operative Cream- 
ery at Corona, South Dakota. After nine months, 
on account of rheumatism, he was compelled to 
give up his work and on December 26, 1900, he 
reached Kalispell, Montana. He bought a farm in 
the Flathead district, and operated it for six years. 
On leaving the farm he spent a year as manager of 
the creamery at Yakima, Washington, and then for 
two years followed various lines of employment at 
Columbia Falls, Montana. He returned to Kalispell 
to take charge of the Farmers Co-operative Cream- 
ery, and after nine months bought the plant and 
operated it with increasing success and profit for five 
and a half years. At the end of that time he re- 
turned the plant to the farmers and patrons. 

Mr. Wells came to Hamilton in March, 1917, leas- 
ing the Farmers Co-operative Creamery. At the end 
of two years he bought it and is now sole proprie- 
tor. The plant is located at Sixth and North streets, 
and it handles a large bulk of the cream produced 
over a territory fifty miles around. 

Mr. Wells is a republican and a member of the 
Methodist Church, and is affiliated with the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He resides on Fifth 
Street, North. He married near Strum, Wisconsin, 
in 1896, Miss Theoline H. Soland, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. T. H. Soland. Her father, now deceased, 
was a Wisconsin farmer, and her mother lives at 
Blair in that state. Mr. and Mrs. Wells have two 
children : Mabel, who received a high school edu- 
cation and is at home and Lawrence, who lives at 
Portland, Oregon. 

ELBERT HYMER was the pioneer real estate man 
and has the leading real estate business at Red 
Lodge. He has been a resident of Red Lodge for 
a number of years, and has had a very active 
career, his range of experience including everything 
from farm work to engineer in coal mines. 

Mr. Hymer was born near Holdrege, Nebraska, 
on a homestead. The postoffice at that time was 
called Sacramento. His grandfather, John B. 
Hymer, was a native -of Ohio, and was of Scotch- 
Irish ancestry, his wufe being Irish. He spent a 
number of years at Holdrege, Nebraska, where he 
died in 1896. His trade was that of stationary en- 
gineer. W. E. Hymer, father of Elbert Hymer, 
is a well known resident of Red Lodge. He was 
born in Illinois in 1854 a d after his marriage moved 
to Sacramento, near Holdrege, Nebraska, and took 
up a homestead. He moved into Holdrege in 1884 
and was engaged in the implement business and 
later as president of the Holdrege National Bank. 
In 1891 he came to Red Lodge, Montana, and was 
an important factor in developing the coal mines 
in that part of the state and also owned one of the 
important portions of Red Lodge, known as the 
Hymer Addition, most of which has since been sold. 
He is now living practically retired. He is a re- 
publican, a member of the Methodist Church, and is 
affiliated with Lincoln Lodge of Elks at Lincoln, 
Nebraska. W. E. Hymer married Mary E. Dunlavy, 
who was born in Illinois in 1853. They had six 
children: Otis, a newspaper man at Bakersfield, 
California; Katherine, who is the wife of George E. 
Blanchard, a physician practicing at Pomona, Cali- 
fornia; Clarence E., who was killed by a sheave 
wheel in the mines at Red Lodge at the age of 
twenty-five ; J. A., who is in the automobile business 
at Los Angeles; Elbert; and Evangeline, at home 
with her parents. 

Elbert Hymer attended public school at Holdrege, 
Nebraska, to the age of twelve. The following year 
he left home and went to work, doing farm labor, 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



63 



accepting other employment and on going to Lin- 
coln, Nebraska, drove a delivery wagon. Later he 
took the preparatory course in the Nebraska Wes- 
leyan Univ'ersity, and that finished his education. 
Mr. Hymer first came to Montana in 1895, spending 
one summer at Red Lodge. For a number of years 
he followed the business of stationary fireman and 
hoisting engineer in mines, and he worked in the 
Red Lodge mines for two years beginning in 1905. 
From 1907 for five years he was a hoisting engineer 
in the mines at Butte, and when the mines were shut 
down he found work with the Northern Pacific 
Railway as a locomotive fireman. 

Mr. Hymer returned to Red Lodge in 1912 and en- 
gaged in the real estate and farm Joan business. 
His offices are in the Meyer-Chapman Bank Build- 
ing. He is individually owner of some fine ranch 
lands to the extent of 661 acres in Carbon and 
Yellowstone counties. He also has a modern home 
at 324 North Platte Street. 

Mr. Hymer is a republican, is affiliated with Bear 
Tooth Lodge No. 534 of the Elks, and a member of 
Red Lodge Chamber of Commerce. At Helena, 
Montana, December 10, 1898, he married Miss Mabel 
E. Terry. Her mother is Mrs. Sarah E. Terry, of 
Butte. They have one child, Elmer Clare, born 
March 22, 1913. 

HENRY ELLINGSON, president of the Ellingson 
Mercantile Company at Big Timber, has been a 
Montanan for many years and has made his time 
and energies count for successful achievement as 
a farmer, rancher and business man, and has en- 
joyed high standing among his fellow citizens, who 
have twice elected him to the Legislature. 

Mr. Ellingson was born near the famous cathedral 
city of Trondjen, Norway, September 9, 1846. His 
father, Elling Gaustad,- was born in 1809 and died 
in 1887. having spent all his life on a farm near 
Trondjen. He was a Lutheran in religion. He 
married Gertrude Langorgen, who was born near 
Trondjen and died there in 1873. They had two 
sons, Ole the older dying on a farm near Trondjen 
in 1910. 

Henry Ellingson was educated in Norwegian 
schools, and lived on his father's farm until 1866, 
when, at the age of twenty years, he came to Amer- 
ica, spending a short time in Chicago and then 
going out to the northwestern frontier and settling 
in Fillmore County, Minnesota. Both in Chicago 
and the first year he spent in Minnesota he attended 
American schools for the purpose of learning the 
English language. In the spring of 1867 he moved 
to Stevens Point, Portage County, Wisconsin, and 
worked in the pineries four years. He then re- 
turned to Fillmore County, Minnesota, was a farmer 
there eleven years, and then established his pioneer 
home in Montana, at what is now Melville in Sweet- 
. grass County. He located on railroad land and 
followed farming there for twenty-five years. His 
next location was in Bear Creek in Carbon County, 
where he was a pioneer merchant. He sold out 
his business in the fall of 1913, and then took a 
rest from business cares, spending about fifteen 
months on the California coast. On returning from 
California Mr. Ellingson joined his son Edwin H., 
at Big Timber, where they established the Motor 
Inn Garage, one of the first two enterprises of that 
kind in Big Timber. The business is conducted 
by the Ellingson Mercantile Company, of which 
Mr. Ellingson is president. He owns the garage 
building on McLeod Street and Second Avenue, 
where they have floor space 60x140 feet. Recently 
they purchased the building on Second and Ander- 
son streets, including four lots, the building being 



50x140 feet. They not only do general garage 
service but repair and handle automobile accessories 
and sell the Overland car, the Oil-Pull Rumely 
tractors, the Monarch Never-Slip tractors and 
handle a general line of threshing machinery and 
trucks. Mr. Ellingson also owns his home at the 
corner of Fourth Avenue and Bamble Street. 

He was elected on the republican ticket to the 
House of Representatives from Carbon County in 
1912, serving during the session of 1913. In 1916 he 
was chosen by Sweetgrass County to the State 
benate for a term of four years. In the Senate 
he has served on the county and towns, public 
lands, public buildings, public morals, irrigation 
and water rights and other committees. Mr. Elling- 
son is a member of the Lutheran Church and is a 
member of the Big Timber Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias. 

In n l870 ' in Wau P aca County, Wisconsin, he mar- 
ried Miss Gma Becken. She was born in Norway 
a daughter of Hans Becken, who brought his 
family to the United States in 1857, and was a 
pioneer homesteader in Portage County, Wisconsin 
where he died in 1872. Mrs. Ellingson was educated 
in Portage County. Her mother, Siegred Becken 
was born in Norway in 1827 and died at Big Tim- 
ber, Montana, in 1911. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellingson have had seven children: 
the oldest is Edwin H., his father's active business 
partner. Edwin was born in Fillmore County, Min- 
nesota, in 1872, was educated in the common schools 
there and at Big Timber. Susanna, the second 
child, is the wife of George Rostad, a rancher at 
Big Timber. George, the third in age, died in 
1889, at the age of thirteen. Emma is the wife of 
a farmer near Tacoma, Washington, Marks Smaby. 
Oscar is one of the firm and has charge of the 
office of the Ellingson Mercantile Company at Big 
Timber. John G., is in the insurance business at 
Big Timber, .while Hilma, the youngest, is the wife 
of Oliver O. Bekken, a mechanic at Big Timber. 

CHARLES F. KINMONTH. A man of energy and 
enterprise, possessing good business ability and 
judgment, Charles F. Kinmonth, of Billings, has 
for several years been actively identified with the 
agricultural interests of Yellowstone County, and 
holds a position of note among 'the extensive land 
holders of this section of the state. A native of 
Iowa, he was born in Lucas County October 22, 
1868, a son of the late O. F. Kinmonth. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, Alexander Kinmonth, was born 
in Scotland in 1809, and there married a Miss Foote. 
Soon after that happy event he emigrated with his 
wife to the United States, settling in Hobart, Dela- 
ware County, New York, where both spent their 
remaining years, his death occurring in 1889. He 
was a carpenter and cabinet maker by trade, and 
also became owner of quite a tract of land, on which 
he carried on general farming to some extent. 

O. F. Kinmonth was born in Delaware County, 
New York, in 1834, and grew to manhood on the 
home farm. As a young man he migrated to Illi- 
nois, and soon after the breaking out of the Civil 
war enlisted in the Fourteenth Illinois Infantry, and 
with his comrades saw hard service on the field of 
battle. Subsequently engaging in agricultural pur- 
suits, he spent a year in Stark County, Illinois, and 
then removed with his wife to Lucas County, Iowa, 
where he improved a good farm and became promi- 
nent as an agriculturist. He lived to a ripe old age, 
dying in Russell, Iowa, in 1904. 

The maiden name of the wife of O. F. Kinmonth 
was Esther Ann Atherton. She was born in Stark 
County, Illinois, in 1849, and is now residing in 



64 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Russell, Iowa. Seven children were born of their 
union, as follows: Roderick, a farmer by occupa- 
tion, died in Russell, Iowa, aged thirtv-six years; 
Charles F., the subject of this brief sketch; Maude, 
wife of C. A. Currier, who is engaged in farming 
at Chariton, Iowa; Alexander, a farmer in Ballan- 
tine, Montana; Orin, living on the home farm in 
Russell, Iowa; Mabel, wife of Arthur Pyle, a mail 
clerk on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road, residing in Russell, Iowa, and Belle, wife of 
Neil Lonychan, who is engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits in Russell, Iowa. 

Having laid a substantial foundation for his future 
education in the rural schools of Lucas County, 
Iowa, Charles F. Kinmonth completed a course of 
study at Elliott's Business College in Burlington, 
Iowa. Having as a youth become thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the various branches of agriculture, 
he chose the independent calling to which he was 
reared, and was engaged in farming in his native 
county until 1904. Migrating then to Western Ne- 
braska, Mr. Kinmonth operated a threshing outfit, 
and did a good business as an auctioneer for four 
years. Coming from there to Ballantine, Montana, 
on April 16, 1908, he took up in Yellowstone County 
a homestead claim of eighty acres of land, and to 
this original tract he has since added other valuable 
tracts, having title now to 1,280 acres of fine Mon- 
tana land. Leaving his homestead in November, 
1916, Mr. Kinmonth assumed possession of his beau- 
tiful residence at 114 Avenue B, Billings, and has 
since devoted his time and attention to auctioneer- 
ing, a business in which he is an expert. 

Mr. Kinmonth married in 1897 at Kearney, Ne- 
braska, Miss Dessa Larimer. Her father, J. R. Lari- 
mer, was born in Ohio in 1834, and died in Kearney, 
Nebraska, April 2, 1918. During his earlier life 
Mr. Larimer was for many years engaged in the 
grain and elevator business at Bloomington, Illinois. 
In 1884 he removed with his family. to Kearney, 
Nebraska, where he continued as a farmer and 
commission broker until his death. He was a stanch 
republican in politics and an active and prominent 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he served for three years in the 
Fifty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, doing his 
duty faithfully as a soldier. Fraternally he was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Margaret E. 
Jones, was born at Arrowsmith, Illinois, in 1851, 
and is now a resident of Billings. Montana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kinmonth are the parents of four 
children, namely : Maurine, a graduate of the Bill- 
ings High School, is the wife of Preston Trask, of 
Ballantine, Montana, a well-known and successful 
ranchman; Clarice, now, in 1919, a junior in the 
Billings High School; Mildred, an eighth-grade pupil 
in the public schools, and Eleanor, who is attending 
school in the first grade. In his political affiliations 
Mr. Kinmonth is independent, voting for the best 
men and measures without regard to party preju- 
dice, and fraternally he is a member of Kearney 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Kear- 
ney, Nebraska. 

JOHN A. HARADER began his career as a teacher. 
He was connected with schools in four or five 
different states in the West and Northwest, which 
was followed by a period of newspaper and con- 
vention reporting. But he found the true field for 
his energies and abilities as an executive in com- 
mercial affairs. He is the present manager of the 
Bozeman Chamber of Commerce, and has made that 
one of the livest and most influential commercial 
bodies in Montana. 



Mr. Harader was born at Mount Aetna, Iowa, 
January 12, 1878. His is an uncommon family name, 
and probably all the Haraders in the United States 
trace their ancestry back to his great-grandfather, 
who was one of two brothers coming from Switzer- 
land on the French border and settling in Virginia 
in 1812. One of the brothers never married. The 
great-grandfather established his family in Virginia. 
His son Jacob, grandfather of John A., lived in 
Virginia for a number of years and after his mar- 
riage took his family to Indiana, then to Iowa. He 
was a farmer and flour miller. He was a stanch 
Union man, and during the Civil war joined the 
Union army and was killed in an engagement in 
Texas. A. Harader, father of John A., was born 
in Virginia in 1843, and when a boy accompanied 
his parents to Indiana and then to Iowa. At the age 
of eighteen, in 1861, he enlisted in the Fourth Iowa 
Infantry, and served as a gallant and faithful 
soldier all through the war. He was at Shiloh, 
Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain, and with Sherman 
in many of his campaigns. He received a gun shot 
wound through the chest at Chattanooga. Follow- 
ing the war he returned to Mount Aetna, Iowa, 
married, and settled down as a merchant in that 
.locality. In 1883 he established the pioneer store at 
Mount Vernon, South Dakota, then a territory. 
Later he farmed in South Dakota and about 1898 
moved to Cottonwood, Kansas, where he continued 
.farming until he retired. He is now living at 
Cassoday, Kansas, past seventy-five years of age. 
He has been prominent in politics in different locali- 
ties as a republican. At Mount Vernon, South 
Dakota, he was police judge. He is one of the lead- 
ing members of the Dunkard Church. A. Harader 
married Jane Magness, who was born in Ohio in 
1851. They had ten children: Ada, wife of M. G. 
McKenzie, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and a member of the Missouri Conference; 
Jacob, who died in infancy; Jennie, wife of W. A. 
Bell, a hardware merchant at North Yakima, Wash- 
ington ; Maggie, who died in Texas at the age of 
thirty-five ; William, a merchant at Burns, Kansas ; 
John A., who is the sixth in age among the children ; 
Ward, a teacher in the public schools at Enumclaw, 
Washington; Mabel, a resident of Seattle, Washing- 
ton, wife of Wid Vinson, who was with the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces and the Army of Occupa- 
tion in Germany; Blanche, wife of Samuel Vinson, 
a farmer living at Clements, Kansas; and Benjamin, 
who received military training at Camp Lewis and 
was recently mustered out and returned home. 

John A. Harader received a public school educa- 
.tion. He graduated from the high school at Mount 
Vernon, South Dakota, in 1897 and spent the fol- 
lowing year teaching in Davidson County, that state. 
He went to Cottonwood, Kansas, with his parents 
and for a year was principal of the schools at Home- 
-stead, Kansas. He is a graduate of the Commercial 
Department of the Kansas Wesleyan University at 
Salina, and also attended for one year the State 
Normal School at Emporia. For four years, be- 
ginning in 1902, Mr. Harader was connected with 
a business college at Superior, Wisconsin. Coming 
west to Payette, Idaho, he engaged in the real estate 
business, then traveled through Colorado and on 
returning to Payette joined the Chamber of Com- 
merce as manager. In 1914 he was called to Yakima, 
Washington, as manager of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, remaining there two years, when his services 
were requisitioned by the business men of Bozeman. 
He has been manager of the Bozeman Chamber of 
Commerce since 1916, and his business offices are 
in the Story Block. The organization comprises 
300 members, and its membership and effectiveness 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



65 



are in the main a tribute to the organizing and 
executive abilities of Mr. Harader. Mr. Harader is 
president of the Montana Association of Commercial 
Secretaries for the years 1918-19. 

For over a year he had all his time and energies 
enlisted in war work, being chairman of the War 
Chest at Bozeman, serving as County Food Admin- 
istrator, working in every Liberty Loan and other 
campaign, and was also secretary of the Council of 
Defense. He has been prominent in all move- 
ments to develop the state. 

Mr. Harader is an independent in politics. He 
has become affiliated with several fraternal organi- 
zations in different towns where he has had his 
home, including Yakima Lodge of Masons, Boze- 
man Lodge No. 463, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and Payette Lodge of Knights of 
Pythias. 

Mr. Harader and family reside at 401 South 
Eighth Avenue. He married at Payette, Idaho, in 
1909, Miss Edith M. .Wood, a daughter of A. E. and 
Elizabeth (Gerould) Wood. Her parents reside at 
Payette, where her father is a real estate broker. 
Mrs. Harader is a graduate of the Payette High 
School. To their marriage were born three chil- 
dren, all members of the home circle, as follows : 
Gerould, born in August, 1910; Marcus, born in 
November, 1912; and Frank, born March 17, 1915. 

THEODORE REINBOLD. As a boy in his native city 
of Newark, Ohio, Theodore Reinbold became inter- 
ested in automobile mechanics. He tinkered with 
some of the first practical makes of cars. For a 
number of years he has been recognized as a past 
master of everything propelled by a gasoline engine. 
At Hamilton, Montana, he has developed the largest 
automobile and garage business in Ravalli County. 

Mr. Reinbold is stiTl very young, having been born 
August 30, 1891. His parents were Christian and 
Mary Reinbold, both natives of Germany. His 
father was born in 1859, and as a young man settled 
in Ohio, where he married, and since his marriage 
has lived in Newark. He is a stationary engineer 
and Theodore inherits his mechanical ability. The 
father is a democrat and a member of the Lutheran 
Church and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. His wife 
was killed in 'a railroad accident at Newark in 1907. 
They were the parents of five children : Fred, man- 
ager of .the C. L. Adams lumber yard at Stevens- 
ville, Montana; Elizabeth, wife of John Freednour, 
a glass blower at Newark ; Carl August, owner of 
the Reinbold plumbing and heating establishment at 
Newark; Theodore; and Otto Christian, an auto- 
mobile mechanic whose present home is at Spokane, 
Washington. 

Theodore Reinbold acquired a public school edu- 
cation at Newark. He left school at the age of 
fourteen and went to work in the Ford Garage of 
that city. He operated cars and did general re- 
pair and mechanical work there until 1911. In that 
year he came to Stevensville, Montana, and for two 
years had full charge of the cars and trucks owned 
and operated by the Sunset Orchard Corporation. 
Another year he spent at the Spokane headquarters 
of the Holt Manufacturing Company, makers of the 
celebrated Caterpillar tractor. Mr. Reinbold estab- 
lished a garage and Ford agency at Stevensville, 
Montana, in 1914. The firm was Stratton Rein- 
bold, which was continued until May, 1918. At the 
latter date Mr. Stratton sold out to H. O. Bell of 
Missoula. The firm is now Bell & Reinbold, and 
there is a third partner, Harold Holt. Mr. Bell has 
charge of the H. O. Bell Company, a Ford agency 
at Missoula, while Mr. Reinbold is in complete 
charge of the Ford agency and garage at Hamilton. 



His garage occupies three city blocks, at the corner 
of Main and Third streets. He handles Ford cars 
and Fordson tractors and all accessories. 

Mr. Reinbold is an independent in politics. He 
is affiliated with the Lutheran Church and is a mem- 
ber of Ionic Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, Hamilton Chapter No. 18, Royal 
Arch Masons, Crusade Commandery No. 17, Knights 
Templars, Bagdad Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Butte, and is a member of the Hamilton Chamber 
of Commerce. He owns a modern home on South 
Fourth Street. 

August 12, 1916, at Missoula, he married Miss 
Vivian Marguerite Stratton, daughter of R. A. and 
Theressa (Stiern) Stratton, residents of Stevens- 
ville. Her father is president of the Montana Farm 
and Livestock Company. Mrs. Reinbold was edu- 
cated in the Stevensville High School and in a 
girls' seminary at Spokane. Mr. and Mrs. Rein- 
bold have one son, Theodore ^Robert, born Febru- 
ary 13, 1918. 

THOMAS G. ARMSTRONG came to Montana more 
than thirty years ago. His services have proved 
valuable to several mercantile organizations and 
for a number of years past he has been president 
and director of the Big Timber Supply House and 
has also acquired and owns some important ranch- 
ing interests. 

Mr. Armstrong was born at Ausable Forks in 
Clinton County, New York, November 2, 1862, and 
represents the third generation of the Armstrong 
family in this country. His grandfather, Thomas 
Armstrong, was a native of Durham, England, and 
on coming to America became a farmer in Vermont. 
He died at Brandon in that state in 1878. George 
W. Armstrong was born in Vermont in 1842, but 
spent the greater part of his life in New York 
State. While at Ausable Forks he managed a large 
mercantile establishment and was also a superin- 
tendent in the J. & J. Rogers Iron Company. In 
1899 he removed to Plattsburg, New York, and 
was bookkeeper for the Davis Provision Company. 
He died at Plattsburg in 1915. In politics he was 
a democrat and served a term as clerk of Clinton 
County. Outside of business and family his chief 
interest was his church membership as a Methodist. 
He married Sarah Hodgson, who was born on 
the Isle of Motte in Lake Champlain in 1837, and 
is still living at Plattsburg at the advanced age 
of eighty-two. Thomas G., is the oldest of her six 
children. Norman, the second in age, is a farmer 
at Anoka, Minnesota, while Harry, the youngest, 
is an electrician at Duluth, Minnesota. The other 
three reside at Plattsburg, New York. Mrs. Nellie 
Cason is the wife of a bookkeeper, Mrs. Annie 
Agnew's husband is an attorney, while Ethel is un- 
married and lives with her mother. 

Thomas G. Armstrong attended rural schools in 
Clinton County, New York, but at the age of 
thirteen left his books and studies and began doing 
for himself. He lived on a farm in Clinton County 
four years and then went to the mining district 
of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan at Houghton 
and for three years was an employe of the Calumet 
Hecla Mining Company. The next stage of his 
progress brought him to the Red River Valley 
of North Dakota, where he was clerk in a store 
at Hunter two years. Mr. Armstrong arrived on 
the scene of his permanent career at Big Timber, 
Montana, in November, 1888. For the next eight 
years he was employed by the pioneer mercantile 
firm of Hatch Brothers & Company, then spent 
two years in the sheep business and ranching, and 
for eight years was with the H. Bliss Hardware 



66 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Store. He was a primary factor in establishing 
the Big Timber Supply House in 190?- This com- 
pany does an extensive retail and wholesale trade 
in groceries, hardware, farm implements and other 
Mipplies. The offices, plant and warehouses are 
located on Anderson Street. The business is in- 
corporated with Mr. Armstrong as president, W. S. 
\Vutdicomb, vice president, and J. W. Kirkwood, 
secretary and treasurer. Mr. Armstrong also owns 
a 320 acre grain ranch in the Gibson district of 
Sweetgrass County. He has a modern home in 
Big Timber. 

Politically he is identified with the democratic 
party and is affiliated with Hunter Lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Big Timber 
Camp No. 10610, Modern Woodmen of America. 

He married at Livingston, Montana, in 1894, 
Marie Anderson, a native of Ontario, Canada. 
They have two children, Nina and Dick. The 
daughter is a graduate of the Montana State College 
at Bozeman and the wife of A. D. Burkett, chemist 
for a cement plant at Trident, Montana. Dick 
enlisted in June, 1918, and the following August, 
after completing his training in camp, went overseas 
with the Expeditionary Forces to France. 

CHARLES H. DRAPER, publisher of the Picket- 
Journal of Red Lodge, is a native Montanan, has 
made his paper the medium of news and history 
in Carbon County for a number of years, and through 
a knowledge of the experience of his honored 
father, Frank W. Draper, probably knows as much 
of the real history of men and events in Carbon 
County as any other individual. 

Frank W. Draper, his father, was born in Ticon- 
deroga County New York, February 4, 1854, and a 
few years later his parents, Hiram and Mehitable 
(Le Crane) Draper, moved west to Illinois and 
settled at Belvidere. Hiram Draper, also a native 
of New York State, entered the Union army and 
lost his life in a battle in 1863. Frank W. Draper 
grew up in Belvidere, graduated from the high 
school and at the age of seventeen went with other 
members of the family to Edgar, Nebraska. He 
taught there for a year or so and in 1874 went to 
Sioux City, Iowa, and shortly afterward started for 
California. From that time forward he had a life 
of hardship and adventure, and was vitally identi- 
fied with many of the fundamental activities of the 
Northwest. About three years after he started for 
California he was on the way by prairie schooner 
from Denver to the Black Hills of Dakota, where 
he became a pioneer furniture merchant in partner- 
ship with a Mr. Pepper. Not long afterward he 
sold his interest and engaged in the drug business 
for eighteen months. His next experience was as 
wagon boss for a large freighting company doing 
business between Bismarck and the Black Hills. 

Frank W. Draper drove to Miles City, Montana, 
in 1880, and took charge of the Diamond R wagon 
train, which performed a large part of the trans- 
portation service out of Miles City in those days. 
The following winter was one remembered by the 
oldest inhabitant for the severity of the cold and 
the excessive snow, when livestock by the thousands 
perished on the ranges. Traffic and transportation 
had to be maintained in spite .of such conditions and 
Mr. Draper and his men suffered untold hardships 
in keeping up the service. Later in that year Mr. 
Draper moved to Junction City and opened a retail 
liquor store and a few months later went to Ben- 
son's Landing, four miles from where Livingston 
now stands. Centers of business and industry in 
those days were seldom permanent,. and in order to 
keep up with rapid changes and fluctuations Mr. 



Draper built a house in sections, which enabled him 
to move without loss and inconvenience. When 
Clark, now Livingston, was started, he was almost 
immediately on the ground with his section house, 
and that house is recorded in history as the first 
building erected there. He continued in business at 
Clark or Livingston until the fire of 1885 destroyed 
his property. His next move was to Cooke City, 
then a lively place, but on November 6, 1886, the 
smelter shut down and the business and population 
of the camp dwindled away. The Drapers remained 
at Cooke City until August, 1887, when he trans- 
ferred his residence to Nye. This camp had to move 
when its site was found to be included within the 
Indian Reservation. The next move proved to be the 
last one for Mr. Draper. He located at Red Lodge 
and in partnership with Doctor Macomber opened 
the first drug store of the town. He sold out his 
interest in that a year or so later and spent one 
summer on the ranch, and eventually took up farm- 
ing and ranching as his regular work. He was liv- 
ing on the ranch when death came to him on July 10, 
1901, and removed one of the best loved and most 
honored citizens of Carbon County. 

He was a charter member of the Knights of 
Pythias and Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Livingston and the Woodmen of the World at Red 
Lodge, was a stanch republican and a factor in local 
politics, and is remembered as the first school trustee 
at Red Lodge, hiring the first school teacher in 1888. 

September 13, 1882, he married Miss Matilda 
Martin. In the absence of ministers in the Mon- 
tana of that day the ceremony was performed by 
Judge Braden. Mrs. Draper was born in Germany, 
where her father died, and she came to this country 
with her. mother, two sisters and two brothers in 
1874, locating at Sioux City, Iowa, and later going 
to Miles City, Montana, with friends. She is now 
living at the home ranch four miles northwest of 
Red Lodge. She is the mother of six children : 
Irwin Albert, also on the home ranch ; Alvin, his twin 
brother, who died in infancy; Edwin W., a rancher 
at the home place ; and Charles H. ; and twin sisters 
who died at birth. 

Charles H. Draper was born at Nye City, Montana, 
March 25, 1888. He acquired a limited education in 
the rural schools of Carbon County, the public 
schools of Red Lodge, and took the preparatory and 
the regular collegiate course at the State College at 
Bozeman, where he graduated in 1912. He is a 
member of the Sigma Chi College Fraternity. 

Since leaving college Mr. Draper has been con- 
tinuously in journalism. He bought an interest in 
the Carbon County Journal in 1912, becoming its 
editor and manager and in 1913 acquired all the 
property. The Carbon County Journal was estab- 
lished June 26, 1909, at Joliet, and was moved to 
Red Lodge January i, 1912. It is a democratic paper 
and the official organ of Carbon County, going to 
most of the homes of that county and also having 
a large circulation in surrounding counties. The 
offices of the plant are at 211 Broadway. In October, 
1918, Mr. Draper also acquired the Red Lodge Picket, 
consolidating the two under the present name of 
Picket-Journal. The Picket was established in 1888, 
one of the early papers of Montana. Mr. Draper 
now has the best equipped and most conveniently 
arranged printing and publishing plant in the Mon- 
tana weekly newspaper field. 

He is a democrat, though never an aspirant for 
public office, and served four years as chairman of 
the Democratic County Central Committee. He is a 
vestryman of the Episcopal Church and is affiliated 
with Star in the West Lodge No. 40, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Bear Tooth Lodge No. 534 of 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



67 



the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a 
member of the exclusive local social club known 
as the Inquiry Club, and is on the governing board 
of the Red Lodge Chamber of Commerce. Mr. 
Draper owns his modern home at 511 North Hauser 
Avenue. 

May 14, 1914, at Kalispell, he married Miss Meryl 
A. Fitch, daughter of John H. C. and Lena J. 
(Babcock) Fitch. Her parents still live at Kalis- 
pell. Her father is a pioneer druggist of that town. 
Mrs. Draper is a graduate of the Flathead County 
High School and finished her education in the State 
College at Bozeman. To their marriage have been 
born two children : Richard John, born September 
2, 1916, and Gayle Adele, born April 15, 1919. 

DANIEL MARTIN CROWLEY. The type of business 
ability and citizenship represented by the late Dan- 
iel Martin Crowley is -a distinctive contribution to 
any community. The city of Lewistown was the 
place honored by his residence for many years, he 
was one of the earliest settlers there and had the 
honor of erecting the second frame building on the 
site. 

Mr. Crowley, who died January 19, 1906, was very 
successful in business and joined his success with 
traits of kindness and generosity that made him 
popular wherever known. It is said that one of the 
largest concourses of people ever witnessed in that 
community followed his body to its last resting 
place. Mr. Crowley was born at Brasher Falls, New 
York, January 17, 1856, being the third of nine chil- 
dren of John and Mary (Hurley) Crowley. His 
parents were natives of Ireland and came to America 
on their wedding tour, where John Crowley spent 
the rest of his life as a farmer. 

On his father's farm Daniel Martin Crowley lived 
to the age of nineteen. He had a common school 
education. In 1875 he started for the Northwest, 
and for several years worked in lumber camps and 
in other occupations in Minnesota. He came to Mon- 
tana in 1879, and with his brother John was associated 
in ranching near Townsend. He came to Lewistown 
about 1881. As one of the original settlers he took 
up a homestead, and rapidly acquired interests that 
made him one of the big men financially and other- 
wise in this section of the state. He was perhaps 
most widely known because of his success in devel- 
oping strains of horses for the track. Some of the 
fastest and best horses ever produced in Montana 
were bred or trained in his stables. He also owned 
several ranches, was a stockholder in the Electric 
Light and Telephone Company at Lewistown, and 
his investments covered almost the entire state. He 
served as deputy sheriff of Fergus County, but 
otherwise took no prominent part in politics except 
to aid the republican party and his friends. 

Since his death his extensive business interests 
have been capably managed by Mrs. Crowley, who 
still resides in Lewistown. She shared with her 
late husband in generous plans and helpfulness 
toward her community and was very prominent in 
the various war auxiliary movements in recent years. 
The Crowleys as a family are active in the Catholic 
Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crowley were married at Lewistown 
August 23, 1898. Her maiden name was Annie E. 
Clancy. Her father, John Clancy, came to Montana 
in 1886 and was a successful rancher in the Judith 
Basin. Mrs. Crowley has two sons, Charles J. and 
Glancy D. 

CLYDE H. LORANCE, president of the Lorance Vul- ' 
canizing and Tire Company at Billings, is one of 
the progressive and enterprising young business citi- 



zens of this flourishing center of commercial activity, 
who has recognized the trend of the times, taken 
cognizance of his opportunities and established him- 
self in a line of effort in which his inherent abilities 
have been given full play in the working o.ut of 
success and the development of a prosperous enter- 
prise. He was born at Beatrice, Nebraska, Novem- 
ber 7, 1890, a son of O. P. and May B. (Bradley) 
Lorance. 

William H. Lorance, the grandfather of Clyde H., 
was born in 1828, in Tennessee, and was there edu- 
cated and reared to young manhood, when he went 
to Missouri and was there married. For a time he 
was engaged in agricultural pursuits in that state, 
but subsequently pushed on to the frontier of Ne- 
braska, in 1865, and was a pioneer in the vicinity 
of Brownville, adjoining which town he owned a 
farm. In addition to developing a productive farm- 
ing property he carried on extensive operations as 
a contractor, and was also successful in his activities 
as a quarryman, being a man of industrious habits 
and natural abilities. In 1893 he retired from active 
labor and took up his residence at Auburn, Ne- 
braska, where he served as justice of the peace and 
rounded out an honorable career, his death occur- 
ring in 1912. At that time he was the last surviving 
Mexican war veteran of Nemaha County, Nebraska. 
Mr. Lorance was .an active and general supporter 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was a 
.stanch democrat in his political allegiance. He mar- 
ried Mary Owen, a native of Missouri, who died at 
Brownville, Nebraska, and they became the parents 
of the following children: John H., who is con- 
nected with a packing company at Kansas City, 
Missouri, as a machinist; Doctor B. F., a successful 
practicing physician at Auburn, Nebraska ; Thomas 
Arthur, of Houston, in charge of the buying for 
the silk department of the largest department store 
of that city or vicinity, and he lost his wife in the 
great Galveston flood while a resident of that city ; 
O. P. ; Ed, a boilermaker of Omaha, Nebraska ; 
William I., a large ranchman of Alliance, Nebraska ; 
Belle, the wife of Rev. Clyde Metcalf, a Methodist 
Episcopal minister with a charge at Visalia, 'Cali- 
fornia ; Ethel, the wife of Tom Reeves, owner of a 
vast sheep ranch, with 20,000 head of sheep, at Flag- 
staff, Arizona ; and Hope, who married a tonsorialist 
of Los Angeles, California. 

O. P. Lorance was born in Gentry County, Mis- 
souri, July 2, 1863, and was reared and married in 
Nebraska. He was brought up as a farmer's son, 
but soon made his way to the big cities, and for 
eighteen years was identified with the 'big packing 
firm of Swift & Company at South St. Paul, Minne- 
sota. In the spring of 1914 he came to Montana and 
settled on a farm in Yellowstone County, purchas- 
ing one-half section of land. On this he carried on 
operations until the year 1917, when he took up his 
residence at Billings, where he is now secretary 
and treasurer of the Lorance Vulcanizing and Tire 
Company. Mr. Lorance belongs to Billings Camp, 
Modern Woodmen of America, and the Billings 
Midland Club, is independent in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He married 
Mary B.* Bradley, who was born at Grass Lake, 
Michigan, in 1871, and of their children, Clyde H. 
is the only survivor. 

Clyde H. Lorance attended the public schools of 
the Twin Cities, St. Paul and Minneapolis, in Min- 
nesota, as well as a private high school, but at 
the age of eighteen years put aside his studies to 
embark in business affairs. For a time he followed 
the vocation of surveying and was subsequently 
employed in the Stock Yards at South St. Paul for 
one year, following which he spent four years in the 



68 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



employ of the Wells Fargo Express Company at St. 
Paul. In 1914 he accompanied his parents to Mon- 
tana and settled with his father on the farm in 
Yellowstone County, where he remained until 1917, 
the year of the organization of the Lorance Vul- 
canizing and Tire Company. Under his capable 
and energetic management this business has grown 
to large and important proportions, and the business 
house, at No. 3012 First Avenue, North, has been 
the scene of enlargement and additions, both as to 
building and stock. In addition to doing a large 
business in the line of vulcanizing tires, the firm 
sells new automobile tires, solid rubber tires, auto- 
mobile accessories and gasoline, and its business has 
shown a consistent, healthy and gratifying increase 
since its inception. Mr. Lorance has shown himself 
a business man of marked attainments, and has 
already established himself in a substantial place 
among the leaders of the younger generations en- 
gaged in commercial pursuits at Billings. Mr. 
Lorance is independent in his political views, and 
his only public office has been that of constable, 
which he filled while a resident of Acton, Montana, 
he then being engaged in farming with his father. 
Mr. Lorance has made the most of his opportunities 
for investment, and is the owner of three handsome 
and valuable ranches, an irrigated tract of forty 
acres at Warden, Montana; a dry farming tract of 
160 acres at Custer, Montana ; and an irrigated 
farm of 100 acres at Fishtail, Montana. Mr. Lor- 
ance belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
is a member of the Billings Midland Club. 

In 1911, at St. Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Lorance was 
married to Miss Perlie Marie Kimball, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Kimball, the latter of whom 
resides at Billings. Mr. Kimball, who is deceased, 
was for a number of years clerk of the Modern 
Woodmen of America at St. Paul, and later en- 
gaged in ranching in Yellowstone County, Montana. 
Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lorance: June, born June 28, 1915; and Jean, born 
in 1917. 

DON C. TAYLOR, superintendent of schools at 
Hamilton, is an educator whose work has brought 
him favorable attention not only in Montana, but 
in other states of the northwest and southwest. He 
began teaching in his home state of Michgan, and 
has made education his life work. 

Mr. Taylor was born in Allegan County, Michi- 
gan, December I, 1876. In the paternal line he is 
of Scotch-Irish ancestry, while his mother's family 
were English colonial settlers in Massachusetts. The 
Taylors first settled in New York. The grandfather 
of the Hamilton educator was John Taylor, who 
was born near Ogdensburg, New York, lived many 
years there and afterward became a pioneer in 
northern Wisconsin. He was a stone mason and 
farmer, and died at Augusta, Wisconsin, at the age 
of forty-five. 

Joel W. Taylor was born in New York in 1843, 
and at the age of sixteen moved to Allegan County, 
Michigan. That district of southern Michigan was 
then heavily covered with the finest quality of pine 
timber, and for a number of years he was* actively 
engaged in lumbering, until the center of the mill- 
ing Industry was transferred to other fields. After 
that he remained as a farmer in Allegan County 
and died there on July 4, 1895. 'For ten years he 
held the office of township supervisor, was a re- 
publican in politics, an active supporter of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and affiliated with the 
Knights of Maccabees. Joel W. Taylor married 
Emma Crawford, who was born in Barry County, 
Michigan, in 1845, and died in Allegan County in 



1910. Don C. is the oldest of their children. Joel 
Clare is a train dispatcher with the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railway at Holland, Michigan. Burke W. is 
an employe of the Dodge Brothers Motor Com- 
pany at Detroit. Florence is the wife of John Prak- 
ken, office manager for the Bush & Lane Piano 
Company at Seattle, Washington. 

Don C. Taylor grew up on his father's farm in 
the rural schools of Allegan County. He spent 
three years in the preparatory department of Hope 
College in Holland, Michigan, and afterward took 
the regular four years' course in Hope College, 
graduating with his Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1905. In the meantime he had taught four years 
in the rural schools of his native county. In Sep- 
tember, 1005, Mr. Taylor went to Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, where he was principal of the Second Ward 
School for six years. From the southwest he went 
to the northwest, and for a year followed commer- 
cial occupations in Spokane. In 1912 he became 
superintendent of schools at Murray, Idaho, re- 
maining there two years, and for five years was 
superintendent at Mullan in Idaho. Mr. Taylor ac- 
cepted his present responsibilities as superintendent 
of schools at Hamilton in July, 1919. The local 
school system under his supervision comprises three 
schools, a staff of twenty-five teachers and an en- 
rollment of six hundred scholars. 

Mr. Taylor has been a member of the National 
Education Association since 1908 and also belongs 
to Montana State Teachers' Association. He is a 
republican, a member of the Presbyterian Church 
and is junior warden of Mullan Lodge No. 50, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons. His home is on 
South 'Third Street in Hamilton. 

In 1900, in Allegan County, Michigan, he married 
Miss Lucinda Beery, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Pritchard) Beery. Her father was an Allegan 
County farmer and is now deceased. Her mother, 
member of one of the most prominent families of 
Allegan County, resides with Mr. and Mrs. Taylor. 
Mrs. Taylor is a graduate of the Allegan High 
School. To Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have been born 
five children: Marjorie, born May 31, 1901, now in 
her first year in the State University of Montana ; 
Don Milan, who died at the age of ten and a half 
years ; Joel Wilson, born August 26, 1004. a fresh- 
man in the Hamilton High School; Emerson B., born 
November 4, 1909, a student in the grammar school ; 
and Don C., Jr., born February 21, 1915. 

FRED L. GIBSON. In no profession is there a 
career more open to talent than is that of the law, 
and in no field of endeavor is there demanded a 
more careful preparation, a more thorough appre- 
ciation of the absolute ethics of life or of the 
underlying principles which form the basis of all 
human rights and privileges. Possessing all the 
requisite qualities of the successful lawyer, Fred 
L. Gibson, of Livingston, stands today among the 
eminent practitioners of his section of the state. 

Fred L. Gibson was born at Dundee, Michigan, 
on September 20, 1874, the son of Matthew and 
Ellen (Carney) Gibson, the former of whom died 
in Madison County, Montana, in 1894, and the latter 
is now making her home with her son, the imme- 
diate subject of this sketch. Matthew Gibson was 
born in 1828 in Cattaraugus County, New York, 
but in his early youth the family moved to Southern 
Michigan, where he was reared. His permanent 
residence was in Monroe County, that state, where 
he followed the trade of a plasterer and where 
also he operated a farm. In 1888 he removed to 
Clermont County, Ohio, and he followed agricultural 
pursuits there until April, 1894, when he came to 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



69 



Madison County, Montana, where his death oc- 
curred shortly afterwards. He was a democrat 
in his political faith and was a highly esteemed 
citizen. While living in Michigan Mr. Gibson mar- 
ried Ellen B. Carney, who was born in 1843 in 
Monroe County, that state, arid to them were born 
two children, Fred L., and Guy, the latter of whom 
is now a farmer in Madison County, Montana. 

Fred L. Gibson received his elementary educa- 
tion in the rural schools of Monroe County, Mich- 
igan, and in 1891 graduated from the high school at 
Owe'nsville, Ohio. In 1894 he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Madison County, Mon- 
tana, and during the following two years was en- 
gaged in teaching school. Then for the same 
length of time he operated a ranch, but these voca- 
tions did not satisfy his ambitious spirit, and he 
entered the law department of the University of 
Nebraska. At the end of a year he became the 
publisher of the Alder Gulch Times at Virginia 
City, which engaged his attention for about a year. 
In June, 1899, Mr. Gibson was admitted to the bar 
and entered upon the practice of his profession. 
In the spring of 1901 he removed to Forsyth, Mon- 
tana, and helped to organize Rosebud County, of 
which he was appointed county attorney, a position 
which he filled for two and a half years. Resigning 
that position in 1903, he removed to Livingston, 
where he has since resided and where he has re- 
ceived emphatic recognition as a lawyer of unusual 
ability and as a citizen of progressive and yet sound- 
ly conservative ideas. He has since coming to 
Livingston commanded a large share of the legal 
practice in the local courts and has been success- 
ful in both criminal and civil practice. On January 
i, 1917, Mr. Gibson formed a law partnership with 
Yard Smith, under the firm name of Gibson & 
Smith, with offices in the National Park Bank 
building. 

Politically Mr. Gibson is a republican, and ever 
since reaching his majority has taken a live interest 
in public affairs. His abilities and public spirit 
were quickly recognized after he came to his state, 
and in 1899 he was elected to represent Madison 
County in the Sixth Legislature. In 1909 he rep- 
resented Park County in the^ Eleventh Legislature, 
in which he rendered effective service as a member 
of the judiciary and other committees. In 1918 the 
citizens of Park County again chose him to rep- 
resent them in the Legislature, where he again 
was assigned to some of the most important com- 
mittees of the House, including those on judiciary 
of which he was chairman, and revenues and taxa- 
tion. During 1907 and 1908 Mr. Gibson served as 
city attorney of Livingston and in 1911-12 was 
county attorney of Park County, his services in 
both positions being eminently satisfactory. He 
is deeply interested in educational matters and is 
now serving as a member of the county High 
School Board. He is a director of the National 
Park Bank. He is a member of the Park County 
Bar Association, the Montana State Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association. 

In 1899, at Meadow Creek, Montana, Mr. Gibson 
married Winifred Fletcher, the daughter of Wil- 
liam A. and Ellen (Gordon) Fletcher, the latter 
of whom is now residing at Meadow Creek. The 
father, who is deceased, was a pioneer ranch owner 
in Madison County. To Mr. and Mrs. Gibson have 
been born the following children: Kathleen is a 
senior in the Park County High School at Living- 
ston, Alice is a freshman in the same school, and 
Fred L., who was born on April 18, 1917- 

Years of conscientious work have brought to 
Mr. Gibson not only increase of practice and repu- 
tation, but also that growth of legal knowledge 



and that wide and accurate judgment the possession 
oi which constitutes marked excellence in the 
profession. In discussions of the principles of law 
he is noted for clearness of statement and candor ; 
he seeks faithfully for firm ground and having 
once found it nothing can drive him from his 
position. His zeal for a client never leads him to 
urge an argument which in his judgment is not 
in harmony with the law, and in all the important 
litigation with which he has been connected no 
one has ever charged him with anything calculated 
to cast a reflection upon him or his profession. 

HUBERT ALFRED SIMMONS. The history of Hubert 
Alfred Simmons reads like a story thrown on the 
screen of life, for it shows how an industrious lad 
climbed from a- lowly position to one of responsi- 
bility, and then, having discharged his duty to his 
mother and younger brothers and sisters, earned the 
money to educate himself for a learned profession 
in which he gained so distinguished a reputation that 
he was selected more than once to represent the 
people in high public office, at present being county 
attorney of Carbon County. He was born at Spadra, 
Arkansas, November 13, 1881, a son of Ferdinand 
Simmons, who was born in Germany in 1851 and 
died at Spadra, Arkansas, in 1888. He was reared 
in Germany, and, according to the custom, gave his 
country the usual military service, but so convinced 
did he become of the hardships this entailed that 
after his marriage he came to the United States so 
that his children would not be compelled to enter 
the army, and in 1879 became mine foreman at 
Oweta, Arkansas, and later held the same position 
at Spadra in the same state. Prior to this he had 
bought a farm at Spadra, and there died, firm in the 
faith of the Roman Catholic Church. Politically he 
was a republican. He was married to Anna Eliza- 
beth Graff, born in Germany in 1861, who survives 
him and makes her home at Red Lodge. Their 
children were as follows : Hugo, who died in in- 
fancy; Hubert Alfred, whose name heads this re- 
view ; Frank, who is a coal miner of Klein, Montana ; 
William, who is the only policeman and constable 
of Bear Creek, Montana, and also serves as deputy 
sheriff; Otto J., who owns the only abstract business 
of Red Lodge. The mother of this family was 
married second to William Youngholter, now of Red 
Lodge, who came to the United States from Ger- 
many when about twenty years of age. Until 1917 
he was a member of the police force of Red Lodge, 
but is now engaged in mining. Mr. and Mrs. Young- 
holter became the parents of the following children : 
John, who died in infancy; Katherine, who married 
C. R. Northrop, who lives at Red Lodge and is em- 
ployed by the Chapman State Bank; Anna, who died 
at the age of eight years ; and Mayme, who married 
Dave Henderson, a mine mechanic of Red Lodge. 

Hubert Alfred Simmons attended the public 
schools of Spadra and Jenny Lind, leaving school 
to engage in mining and farming, living on the 
homestead during the time he was so engaged. In 
1898 the family came to Belt, Montana, and he was 
given employment during the summer and fall of 
that year on a section of the railroad, and in the 
winter entered the mine. In the spring of 1899 there 
was a strike at the mine, and ,he returned to section 
work for a short time, improving his position by 
going with an extra gang of workmen to repair 
bridges at Belt on the Great Northern Railroad, a 
difficult and dangerous undertaking. Until Septem- 
ber, 1899, he remained with this railroad, when he 
accompanied his mother and her family to Red 
Lodge, at which time he engaged with a grading 
outfit bu'lding the switches at the mines, but left 



70 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



in December of that year to resume mining. In 
1901 Mr. Simmons began clerking in a general store, 
and at the same time took a commercial course in 
the International Correspondence School. Always 
ambitious, he resolved to fit himself for the legal 
profession. He took a business course at Red Lodge, 
and then began to read law at nights while working 
in the day, thriftily saving every penny he could 
spare from the bare necessities. Having prepared 
himself as far as lay in his power and saved up 
$1,000, Mr. Simmons entered the Indiana law school 
of the University of Indianapolis, from which he 
was graduated May 23, 1906, with the degree of 
LL. B. Additional expenses aside from those he had 
figured upon necessitated the earning of more money 
than the initial $1,000, and Mr. Simmons for eighteen 
months eked out his scanty resources by waiting on 
the table in a hotel as have so many others before 
him who regarded, as he, no sacrifice too great in 
order to secure the proper training. 

Following his graduation Mr. Simmons returned 
to Red Lodge and for a short time was in the office 
of Judge George W. Pierson, and in the fall of 1906 
was elected clerk of the court to fill an unexpired 
term of two years, and re-elected in 1908 and 1912. 
In 1916 he was placed upon the regular republican 
ticket for county attorney, to which office he was 
elected by a gratifying majority, and was re- 
elected to the same office in 1918. His offices are in 
the United States National Bank Building. A con- 
sistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
he is active in its good work. Mr. Simmons belongs 
to Bear Tooth Lodge No. 534, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks ; Star in the West Lodge No. 
40, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of which he 
was master for two terms ; and Carbon Chapter No. 
20, Royal Arch Masons, of Red Lodge. He is a mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce and the .Carbon 
County Bar Association, of which he is vice presi- 
dent. He has been a member of the Republican 
State Central Committee for Carbon County since 
1914. A man of affairs, he is vice president of 
the Eagle Coal Company of Red Lodge, and secre- 
tary of the W. B. Innes & Company, of Billings, 
Montana. His modern residence at No. 518 North 
Platt Street, is owned by him. 

On June I, 1907, Mr. Simmons was married to Miss 
Ellen Freeman, a daughter of William and Mary 
(Robinson) Freeman, of Red Lodge, where Mr. 
Freeman is engaged in mining. Mr. and Mrs. Sim- 
mons have the following children: Hubert Alfred, 
Jr., who was born February 10, 1910, and Helen 
Annie, who was born April 20, 1918, and her twin 
sister, Margaret Ida. 

JOHN W. CLARK. A man of brains and intellect, 
keen-witted and enterprising, John W. Clark, a 
well known resident of Billings, has won a brilliant 
record as a commercial traveler, and as a repre- 
sentative of the Oliver Chilled Plow Company has 
achieved distinguished success, winning a command- 
ing position in the ranks of his fellow-salesmen. 
A son of the late George H. Clark, he was born 
at Stamford, McLean County, Illinois, July 31, 1876. 
His paternal grandfather, Milton Clark, a tailor 
by trade, spent his entire life of ninety-seven years 
in Lancashire, England. 

Born in 1853 in Lancashire, England, George H. 
Clark there spent the days of his boyhood and youth. 
In 1871, long before attaining his majority, he im- 
migrated to this country, locating at Stamford, 
Illinois, where he was engaged in general farming 
for many seasons. Removing to Gibson City, Illi- 
nois, he continued his agricultural labors in that 
vicmjty from 1889 until 1900, when he purchased a 



farm at Indianola, Iowa. To the improvements al- 
ready inaugurated he added others of much value, 
making it one of the most desirable pieces of prop- 
erty in the neighborhood. Retiring from active 
work in 1914, he made his home in the village of 
Indianola until his death April 18, 1915. A republi- 
can of the old school, he was prominent in local 
affairs, and while in Stamford, Illinois, serving as 
deputy sheriff and constable. He was a Presbyterian 
in religion, and a generous contributor toward the 
support of the church. He married Sarah Bos- 
singham, who was born in Stamford, Illinois, in 
1855, and now resides in Indianola, Iowa. The fol- 
lowing children were born to them : John W., the 
special subject of this sketch; Clarence, a rancher 
at Pompey's Pillar, Montana, died of the influenza 
in December, 1918; Clara, twin sister of Clarence, 
married Percy Last, a farmer at Indianola, Iowa ; 
Ada, wife of Bruce Nunemaker, who is engaged 
in farming at Indianola; Fred, also a farmer, re- 
sides in Indianola; Ernest, of Indianola, is a tiller 
of the soil; Fern, wife of James Blackford, a suc- 
cessful agriculturist of Indianola, and Albert, living 
with his mother on the home farm. 

Leaving the public schools of Stamford, Illinois, 
at the early age of thirteen years, John W. Clark 
accompanied the family to Gibson City, and the fol- 
lowing year assisted his father on the farm. Having 
a natural aptitude for mechanics, he secured a posi- 
tion in Peoria, Illinois, and for seven years was 
there employed in a threshing machine shop, be- 
coming an expert workman. Continuing then with 
the same firm, the Colean Manufacturing Company, 
he was transferred to Fargo, North Dakota, and for 
two years was traveling expert and salesman. Re- 
maining in Fargo, Mr. Clark entered the employ of 
the Huber Manufacturing Company, which made a 
specialty of threshing machines, and was with that 
concern nine months. For two years thereafter he 
held a similar position in the same city with Reeves 
& Company. His next venture was with the Minne- 
apolis Threshing Machine Company as traveling 
salesman, his headquarters being at Fargo. 

In 1911 Mr. Clark made his advent into Montana, 
coming to Billings with the Moline Plow Company 
as traveling salesman, his territory including all of 
Montana. In 1912 he took up a homestead of 280 
acres lying seven miles south of Billings, and he 
still owns the ranch on which he lived for four 
years, making extensive improvements upon it dur- 
ing that time. Returning to Billings, he was en- 
gaged in the real estate business a year, and then 
went back on the road, traveling for the Sandusky 
Tractor Company for fifteen months. Accepting 
then his present position as expert traveling sales- 
man for the Oliver Chilled Plow Company, he 
covers a territory embracing the south half of the 
state, and in his work is meeting with characteristic 
success, his sales being large and eminently satis- 
factory to all concerned. He has accumulated val- 
uable property, and in addition to having title to 
his ranch owns his pleasant residence at 615 South 
Thirty-fourth Street. He is a stockholder in the 
Farmers Elevator at Billings and served as its , 
first president, resigning the position on account of 
being away from home so much of the time. 

Mr. Clark is a steadfast republican in politics, 
and is prominent in fraternal circles, being a mem- 
ber of Jamestown Lodge No. 6, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, at Jamestown, North Dakota; of 
Hiawatha Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; of Hiawatha 
Commandery, Knights Templar, at Jamestown, North 
Dakota; of Billings Camp, Woodmen of the World; 
of Jamestown Lodge, Beneveloent and Protective 
Order of Elks; of Illinois Council, United Com- 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



71 



mercial Travelers of America, and of Billings Lodge, 
Brotherhood of American Yeomen. 

Mr. Clark married, July 16, 1916, at Big Timber, 
Montana, Mrs. Sigred Marie (Malmberg) Gray, a 
daughter of C. F. Malmberg. Mr. Malmberg was 
born in 1847, in Sweden, where he grew to man's 
estate. Coming to the United States in the spring 
of 1884, he settled in Omaha, Nebraska, where he 
followed his trade of carpenter and cabinet maker 
until his death October 28, 1916. He was a republi- 
can in politics, a member of the Swedish Mission 
Church and of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. His first wife, whose maiden name was Sophia 
Palm, was born in Sweden in 1852, and died in 
Omaha, Nebraska, in 1898, leaving five children, as 
follows : Joe, engaged in the milling business at 
Minneapolis, Minnesota; Ada, wife of Frank Dudley, 
who has been connected with the street railway 
service of Omaha, Nebraska, for the past twenty 
years, being now an auditor ; Sigred Marie, who 
became Mrs. Clark; Albin Robert, associated with 
a wholesale shoe firm at Omaha, and Carl Henry, 
also living in Omaha, Nebraska, occupies a position 
in one of the banks of that city. After the death of 
his first wife Mr. Malmberg married a second time, 
Huldah Carlson becoming his wife, and to them 
one child was born, Harry, who lives with his 
brother, Carl Henry, in Omaha, and is attending 
the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have no 
children. 

WILLIAM YOUNG PEMBERTON. Judge Pemberton 
is probably the only living member of the Montana 
bar whose memory and experience might be quoted 
as authoritative on subjects connected with the his- 
tory of the early territorial bar. He came to Mon- 
tana, fresh. from his law studies, in 1863, an d as a 
lawyer and subsequently as Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court he has participated in the develop- 
ment of Montana law, courts and precedence from 
the very beginning of organized civil conditions in 
the territory and state. 

Judge Pemberton, who is one of the advisory 
editors of this publication, was born at Nashville, 
Tennessee, June I, 1841, a son of William and 
Martha (Brooks) Pemberton. He is of English 
and Scotch ancestry and the Pembertons were early 
settlers in Old Virginia. Judge Pemberton grew up 
in Missouri, attended public schools, the Masonic 
College at Lexington, Missouri, and graduated 
LL. B. from the Cumberland University Law School 
at Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1861. For about a year 
he practiced law in Missouri, and in 1863 arrived 
at Virginia City, Montana. He was one of the 
few college trained and regularly qualified lawyers 
in that pioneer mining camp. In the work of bring- 
ing about law and order and a system of civil gov- 
ernment under the auspices of the Territory of 
Montana, Judge Pemberton played a notable part. 
In 1865 he moved to Helena, then only a mining 
town, and practiced law there for several years. 
In 1868 he went back to Missouri, and he also prac- 
ticed as a lawyer in the State of Texas. Judge 
Pemberton located at Butte in 1880 and since 1909 
has again resided at Helena. 

He was elected district attorney of the West Side 
District in 1882, and prosecuted cases arising from 
most of the counties of Western Montana. He was 
re-elected in 1884. In 1891 he was appointed District 
Judge of the Second Judicial District, and -about a 
year later was elected and qualified for the highest 
position in the State Judiciary, Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court. He began his duties January I, 
1893, and served until 1899. 

After retiring from the Bench Judge Pemberton 



looked after the interests of a large clientage, in- 
cluding some prominent corporations. Since June, 
1909, however, he has given his entire time and at- 
tention to his duties as librarian of the State His- 
torical and Miscellaneous Library at Helena. Judge 
Pemberton has been one of the prominent democrats 
of Montana from territorial times to the present. 
He is a Mason and is a former president of the 
Society of Montana Pioneers. 

Judge Pemberton was an infant when his parents 
died in Tennessee, and he knows little of his an- 
cestry. His grandmother on his mother's side was 
a Powell, whose father was at Yorktown under 
Washington at the close of the Revolution. On 
October 26, 1865, at Helena, Judge Pemberton mar- 
ried Clara May Hutchison, daughter of Major John 
C. Hutchison. He has four children: Warren. T., 
who married Ollie Minor ; Alice M., wife of W. H. 
Allen ; Early P., who is married and lives in Mis- 
souri; and Lulu, wife of Harry A. Rheem. 

DANIEL H. BILLMEYER, M. D. Doctor Billmeyer 
came to Montana about thirty-five years ago, and for 
a long time was a company physician and surgeon 
with the Northern Pacific Railway. Since 1905 he Has 
been engaged in a general practice at -Plains, and is 
proprietor of a well equipped hospital, one of the 
best institutions of its kind in Northwestern Mon- 
tana. 

The Billmeyer family came originally from Alsace- 
Lorraine and were colonial settlers in Pennsylvania. 
The grandfather of Dr. Billmeyer was Martin Bill- 
meyer, who spent all his life in Pennsylvania and 
was a farmer. Peter Billmeyer, father of the doc- 
tor, was born at Chilaquisa, Pennsylvania, in 1813, 
and also lived all his life in that state. For many 
years he was in the iron business, and was the first 
sheriff of Columbia County. He was a Democrat 
and a member of the Lutheran church. He died at 
Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1904. His wife was 
Mahila Roat, who was born at Chilaquisa in 1824 
and died at Bloomsburg in 1913. They had four 
children : Frank, an attorney at New York City ; 
Emma, who died at Philadelphia in 1917 the wife of 
A. J. WiUiams; Daniel Harrison; and Blanche, wife 
of Howard Brayton, a business man of New York 
City. 

Daniel Harrison Billmeyer was born at Blooms- 
burg, Columbia County, Pennsylvania, January 28, 
1864, was educated in the local schools, including 
high school, and took special studies in the State 
Normal College at Bloomsburg. From there he en- 
tered the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, 
from which he received his M. D. degree in 1884. 
Dr. Billmeyer began practice in Montana at Thomp- 
son Falls, being there a short time. For three years 
he was assistant surgeon in the Northern Pacific 
Hospital at Missoula. and was then transferred to 
Rosslyn, Washington, as chief surgeon for the 
Northern Pacific Coal Company. He was there dur- 
ing the strike troubles of ^888. Following that for 
five years he was again "assistant surgeon of the 
Railway Hospital at Missoula, after which he left 
Montana and practiced medicine at Waupan, Wis- ( 
consin, until 1905. On returning to this state he lo- 
cated at Plains, where he has been in general prac- 
tice. He established his private hospital in 1914. His 
hospital clientage is drawn from all over Western 
Montana. He has facilities for accommodating 
twelve patients. Dr. Billmeyer has served several 
times as coroner of Sanders County, and is a mem- 
ber of the County, State, and American Medical as- 
sociations. He is a stockholder in the Helena Build- 
ing and Loan Association. Politically he is a demo- 
crat and is affiliated with the Lutheran church and 



72 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



is a member of Waupun Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and Waupun Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons, and also of the Knights of Pythias Lodge at 
Waupun, Wisconsin. 

In 1892, at Missoula, he married Miss Georgia 
Holmes, daughter of George and Eliza (Hadden) 
Holmes. Her mother resides at Fond du Lac, Wis- 
consin, where her father, a traveling salesman, died. 
Doctor and Mrs. Billmeyer have two children : Harri- 
son, who graduated from the high school at Plains 
and was a clerk for the Northern Pacific Railway, 
died in 1918 at the early age of twenty-four; 
Blanche, born September I, 1897, is a graduate of the 
Plains High School and is still at home. 

ROBERT D. SHORTHILL has lived in Montana since 
he -was three years of age, and from boyhood has 
been identified with the commercial affairs of Liv- 
ingston either as clerk or since 1912 as an inde- 
pendent merchant. He has one of the leading gro- 
cery stores in Southern Montana. 

Mr. Shorthill was born in Trinidad, Colorado, 
October 20, 1882. Some of his family have parti- 
cipated in the pioneer development of Montana. 
His grandfather, David R. Shorthill, is well re- 
membered by some of the old timers in the Yellow- 
stone Valley. He was born in Pennsylvania in 
1825, was with a Pennsylvania regiment in the Civil 
war, and in 1869 made his first trip to the North- 
west, spending about two years prospecting in Emi- 
grant Gulch, Montana. He then went back to 
Pennsylvania and in 1879 finally settled in Park 
County, Montana, homesteading 160 acres on the 
Yellowstone River. He lived there until his death 
in 1900. He was a republican, a Methodist, and a 
member of th*e Masonic fraternity. 

John R. Shorthill, father of the Livingston mer- 
chant, was born in Pennsylvania in 1847, lived in 
his native state until after his marriage, and spent 
many years as a railroad man, beginning in Penn- 
sylvania and afterward serving various railroads in 
Mexico, Arizona and Texas. In 1885 he came to 
Bozeman, Montana, and on the i7th of March of 
that year homesteaded 160 acres on Yellowstone 
River, sixteen miles south of Livingston. . He was 
a prosperous pioneer, developed a fine farm and 
ranch of 320 acres and lived in that environment 
until his death in 1914. He was a republican and 
a Methodist. John R. Shorthill married Alice 
Divelbliss, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1851 
and died on the Montana farm in 1910. May, the 
oldest of the children, became the wife of Thomas 
E. Allen and both are now deceased. Charles A. 
lives on a ranch on the Yellowstone River in Park 
County, Dave occupies the old homestead. Lizzie 
is the wife of a railroad engineer and lives in Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Robert D. Shorthill, youngest of the family, at- 
tended country schools in Park County, and at 
the age of fourteen left his father's ranch and 
began his commercial experience at Livingston. He 
worked for several firms of grocers, being a clerk 
steadily for sixteen years. In 1912 he entered the 
grocery business with George D. Allen under the 
name Allen & Shorthill, establishing their store at 
102 North Main Street. Mr. Shorthill is now sole 
proprietor of this business, one of the largest stocked 
grocery stores in Livingston and emphasizing the 
quality of its service. 

Mr. Shorthill is a republican, a Methodist, and 
is affiliated with Park Lodge No. 117, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, at Livingston, Livingston 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, Livingston Lodge of 
the Loyal Order of Moose and Zephyr Camp No. 
151, Woodmen of the World. He is also active in 



the Chamber of Commerce and Commercial Club 
and a stockholder and member of the Railway 
Club of Livingston. His residence is at 223 South 
Sixth Street. 

October 22, 1913, at Livingston, he married Miss 
Carrie Boyd, a native of New York State. She is 
a graduate of a shorthand school in Vermont. 

CHARLES WILSON, one of the best known citizens 
of Carbon County, a retired merchant, well known 
in fraternal and __ civic circles, has been a resident 
of Montana for 'over thirty years and has had an 
exceedingly busy life since boyhood. 

He was born at Gordon in Berwickshire, Scotland, 
August 5, 1846. His ancestors were Scotch farmers 
for generations. His grandfather was Charles Wil- 
son, who spent all his life in Scotland, and his 
maternal grandfather was Andrew Dobie, who owned 
a small farm in Scotland. Francis Wilson, father 
of Charles, was born in Scotland in 1820, followed 
farming there, for four years was a policeman in 
Greenlaw, Scotland, and in 1855 brought his family 
to the United States. He was an Iowa pioneer, 
settling on a farm at Delhi. He was also a brick 
and tile maker. He died at Delhi April 2, 1864, at 
the comparatively early age of forty-four. He was 
a member of the Established Church of Scotland, the 
Presbyterian, and was an Odd Fellow. Francis Wil- 
son married Elizabeth Dobie. She was born in 
Berwickshire, Scotland, July 13, 1820, and at her 
old home in Delhi, Iowa, she recently celebrated her 
ninety-ninth birthday. Charles Wilson is the oldest 
of her children. A. D., the second in age, was last 
heard of while employed as a foreman for a mining 
company at Cripple Creek, Colorado, in 1904, and on 
leaving there went to Arizona. Frank is a farmer 
at Delhi, Iowa. Christina lives at Manchester, Iowa, 
widow of J. B. Smith, a farmer. J. D. lives on a 
farm between Alberta and Chokio, Minnesota. Agnes 
is the wife of J. T. Brown, a farmer at Milltown, 
Wisconsin. 

Charles Wilson had some education in the schools 
of Scotland, attended school in Delhi, Iowa, from 
the age of nine, but in 1863 left school and owing 
to his father's death the following year, being the 
oldest son, he had to assume the responsibility of 
caring for his mother and remained with her until 
he was twenty-one. Some of his early experiences 
were working in stone quarries, as a railroad man, 
and one summer operating an engine in a distillery 
at Guttenberg, Iowa. After that he farmed in 
Delaware County, Iowa, until 1877, and for the fol- 
lowing ten years was employed by the Fort Dodge 
Coal Company near Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

Mr. Wilson came out to Montana in 1887. He was 
one of the early residents of Red Lodge and for 
one summer followed the trade of carpenter. After 
that he was a stationary engineer until 1896, in 
which year he established a confectionery store and 
bottling works. He built that up to prosperous pro- 
portions and sold out the plant in 1910 to the firm 
of Brooks & Powell. He fully intended to retire 
and did so at that time, but in 1916 he and Neil 
D. Argo bought back the bottling works. The man- 
agement devolved on Mr. Argo and in October, 
1918, Mr. Wilson sold his interest to Mr. Argo. 

Mr. Wilson has always affiliated with the demo- 
cratic party in politics. He served as police judge 
of Red Lodge for two years. He is one of the 
oldest Odd Fellows in the State of Montana and 
the oldest past grand at Red Lodge. He joined that 
order January 25, 1873, and has a forty year jewel 
for continuous membership. He was through all the 
chairs of his local lodge as long ago as 1875. He 
is now a past grand of Garfield Lodge No. 36, 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



73 



Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On January 2, 
1886, he became a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, served as chancellor of his lodge in Iowa 
and at present is affiliated with Park Lodge No. 22. 
In Masonry his lodge affiliation is with Star in the 
West Lodge No. 40, 'of which he was master in 
1892-93 and again in 1909-10. He is also affiliated 
with Carbon Chapter No. 20, Royal Arch Masons, 
Aldemar Commandery No. 5, Knights Templar, Al- 
geria Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Helena, and is 
past patron of Venus Chapter No. 32 of the Eastern 
Star. 

Mr. Wilson owns two business buildings in Red 
Lodge and a modern home at 605 North Houser 
Avenue. At Delhi, Iowa, March 15, 1874, he married 
Miss Jennie A. MacRunnels. . She died at Coleville, 
Iowa, October 31, 1885. On August 25, 1888, at St. 
Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Wilson married Miss Olive A. 
Roberts. She died at Red Lodge April 16, 1910. 
Mr. Wilson married Mrs. Jennie (Roberts) Argo 
at Sibley, Iowa, April 20, 1911. Mr. Wilson has no 
children. His wife's father was J. D., Roberts of 
New York State, who was an early settler at Bur- 
lington, Iowa, and afterward homesteaded in Min- 
nesota, six miles over the line from Little Rock, 
Iowa. Mrs. Wilson by her first husband has three 
children : Mamie, wife of Lavette Polley, a dentist 
at Sibley, Iowa; Winnie, wife of Frank Dunn, a 
farmer at Beaver Creek, Minnesota; and Neil D. 
Argo. 

NEIL D. ARGO, one of the prominent younger busi- 
ness men of Red Lodge, was born at Little Rock, 
Iowa, February 4, 1891. His father, Jerry A. Argo, 
was born in 1851, and died at Little Rock in 1895. 
He spent all his business life there, and owned two 
ranches and also a hotel. He held several local 
offices as a democrat and was affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. During the 
Civil war he was for two years a private in an Iowa 
regiment. Jerry A. Argo married Liza Roberts, who 
was born at Clinton, Iowa, in 1863 and is now Mrs. 
Charles Wilson of Red Lodge. Mr. and Mrs. Argo 
had three children : Mamie, a resident of Sibley, 
Iowa, and wife of Doctor Polley, a dentist, who 
served with the rank of second lieutenant and as a 
dentist with the American Expeditionary Forces ; 
Winifred, wife of Frank Dunn, a rancher in Minne- 
sota ; and Neil D. 

Neil D. Argo attended public school at Little 
Rock, -Iowa, also the high school there, and in 1910 
finished his education in Palmer's Business College 
at Cedar Rapids. He was first employed at Red 
Lodge as timekeeper with the Northwestern Im- 
provement Company, was promoted to bill clerk and 
collector, then to billing clerk, and spent six years 
with that corporation. In 1916 he and his step- 
father, Mr. Wilson, bought the Red Lodge Bottling 
Works and confectionery business. The confec- 
tionery department was closed out in October, 1918, 
and at that time Mr. Argo became sole proprietor 
of the Red Lodge Bottling Works. This is an im- 
portant local industry, and it supplies soft drink 
retailers throughout Eastern Montana and Northern 
Wyoming. 

Mr, Argo is independent in politics, is a member 
of the Red Lodge Chamber of Commerce, and a 
thoroughly public spirited local citizen. On June 16, 
1915, he married Miss Kate Torreyson. Her mother 
is Mrs. Fannie Torreyson, of Red Lodge. Her 
father, jack Torreyson, was a prominent pioneer 
character of Red Lodge, owning the first ranch that 
was developed adjoining that town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Argo have one child, Neil, Jr., born June 13, 1917. 



NORRIS F. BURGER. A prominent and popular 
young business man of Billings, Norris F. Burger, is 
amply qualified for the responsible position he holds 
as manager of the Purity Bread Company, Incorpo- 
rated, which supplies a large area of the surround- 
ing country with bakery products. A son of S. F. 
Burger, he was born at Buffalo, New York, Decem- 
ber 31, 1887, of pure Dutch stock, the ancestors from 
which he traces his descent having emigrated from 
Holland to Pennsylvania in colonial times. His 
grandfather, George S. Burger, a life-long resident 
of Pennsylvania, was born in 1818, and died at his 
home in Erie in 1890. He was a contractor and 
builder, and followed his trade in the vicinity of 
Pittsburg for many years. He married Sarah Franz, 
who was born in Pennsylvania in 1820, and died 
in Erie in 1892. 

Born in 1860, near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, S. F. 
Burger was reared and educated in Erie, and early 
in life entered the employ of the New York Central 
Railroad Company, being located at Buffalo, New 
York, until 1891, and the following eight years serv- 
ing as conductor on a passeneer train, with his home 
at Erie, Pennsylvania. Becoming associated with 
the Northern Pacific Railway service, he removed 
to Tacoma, Washington, in 1899, an d is there still 
employed as conductor of a passenger train. He is 
a republican in his political affiliations, a member 
of the Baptist Church, and belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He married Annie 
M. Weeks, who was born in Oswego, New York, in 
1869, and to them three children have been born, as 
follows : Flora, wife of C. F. Elder, an accountant 
at Tacoma, Washington; Norris F., the subject of 
this brief personal history, and Edith, living with 
her parents. 

Having acquired the rudiments of his education in 
the public schools of Erie, Pennsylvania, Norris F. 
Burger continued his studies in Washington, being 
graduated from the Tacoma High School with the 
class of 1904, and later attending the University of 
Washington at Seattle for two years. Then, after 
spending one year at the drug business in Tacoma, 
he was for four years deputy county engineer of 
Pierce County, Washington. In 1911 Mr. Burger 
became associated with the baking business at Ta- 
coma, and continued thus employed for six years, 
in the meantime becoming familiar with every detail 
of the trade. In March, 1917, he came to Billings, 
where he has since resided, his home being at 815 
North Broadway. Holding a position of importance 
with the Purity Bread Company, Incorporated, he 
has proved himself extremely capable and efficient 
in the management of its business and financial af- 
fairs, through his efforts its operations being ex- 
tensive and constantly increasing' in volume and ex- 
tent. This company, with plant and office at 824 
North Twenty-seventh Street, has the following 
named officers : L. F. Miller, president ; Louis Dous- 
man, vice president; E. B. LeClair, secretary, and 
N. F. Burger, treasurer and general manager. Carry- 
ing on a general baking business, it supplies a large 
territory, including Northern Wyoming and Montana 
west to Big Timber, east to Beach, North Dakota, 
and north to Buffalo, Montana. Mr. Burger has 
management of the entire tract, in his work having 
supervision of a corps of thirty-two employes. 

Mr. Burger married, December 15, 1915, at Seattle, 
Washington, Miss Jessica Cleveland, a daughter of 
George and Nora (Wilson) Cleveland, neither of 
whom are now living. Mr. Burger is a republican 
in politics, and belong to the Rotary Club and to 
the Billings Midland Empire Club. 



74 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



FRANK W. MACHEMER. Few can draw. rules for 
their own guidance from the pages of Plutarch; but 
all are benefited by the delineation of those traits 
of character which find scope and exercise in the 
common walks of life. The unostentatious routine 
of private life, although in the aggregate more 
important to the welfare of the community than 
any meteoric public career, cannot, from its very 
nature, figure in the public annals. However, each 
locality's history should contain the names of those 
individuals who contribute to the success of the 
material affairs of a community and to its public 
stability; men who lead wholesome and exemplary 
lives which might be profitably studied by the on- 
coming generation. In such a class must consistently 
appear the name of Frank W. Machemer, one of 
the leading business men and public-spirited citizens 
of Bozeman. 

Frank W. Machemer is descended from sterling 
old Holland stock, the family having been trans- 
planted to America in the days of the colonies, 
settling in Pennsylvania. In that state the subject's 
grandfather, William Machemer, was born in 1813. 
In 1856 he moved to Constantine, Michigan, being 
numbered among the pioneers of that locality, and 
there he engaged in farming and in merchandising 
until his death, which occurred in 1889. He married 
Catherine Seaman, a native of Pennsylvania, and 
also of old colonial stock. Among their children 
was Levi Machemer, who became the father of the 
subject of this sketch. He was born in Williams- 
port, Pennsylvania, in 1841, and was reared there 
until fifteen years of age, when he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Mottville, St. Joseph 
County, Michigan. He was married in Constantine, 
Michigan, and has made that place his home during 
the remainder of his ilfe, being now retired from 
active labor. He was a woodworker by vocation and 
led a very active life. He is a republican of the con- 
servative type and is a member of the Dutch Re- 
formed Church. He married Eliza Teasdale, who 
was born in 1848 in Constantine, Michigan, and it 
is noteworthy that they celebrated their golden 
wedding anniversary in September, 1917, in the 
very house where she was born, reared and married 
in Constantine. To this worthy couple were born 
the following children : Mary L. ; Frank W., the 
immediate subject of this review; and L. J., who 
is the partner of his brother Frank at Bozeman. 

Frank W. Machemer received his education in 
the public schools of Constantine, Michigan, com- 
pleting his studies in the high school. At the age 
of sixteen years he left school and, entering a 
furniture factory, applied himself to learn the trade 
of a cabinetmaker, which engaged his attention for 
four years. He then removed to Sturgis, Michigan, 
where he worked at his trade, also being employed 
at different times in Elkhart and Cambridge City, 
Indiana. In May, 1903, Mr. Machemer came to 
Bozeman and entered the employ of the Bozeman 
Manufacturing Company, with whom he remained 
for eight years. In 1911 he went to work for 
Eschenbacher & Company, who then operated the 
plant which he now owns. In January, 1917, he 
bought the plant in partnership with his brother 
L. J., and they have since operated the business 
under the firm name of the Machemer Brothers. 
The plant, located on South Church Avenue, was 
erected by John Koch in 1882 and is one of the 
pioneer industries of Gallatin County. It has be- 
come one of the most important enterprises of the 
kind in Southern Montana. The firm manufacture 
window frames, sash, inside woodwork, automobile 
bodies in brief, practically everything that is made 
of wood and for which there is any local demand. 



This plant was destroyed by fire in August, 1919, 
but will be rebuilt as soon as a suitable new location 
is secured. 

Politically Mr. Machemer is a stanch republican. 
His fraternal relations are with Western Star Lodge 
No. 4, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Boze- 
man, and Constantine Lodge, Knights of the Macca- 
bees, at Constantine, Michigan. 

In Constantine, Michigan, Mr. Machemer was 
married to Jessie E. Roberts, the daughter of Will- 
iam E. and Amanda (Malam) Roberts. The father, 
who was a farmer, is now deceased, and his widow 
now resides in Battle Creek, Michigan. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Machemer have been born the following chil- 
dren : Harold R., born May 5, 1896, is on a ranch 
near Bozeman; Levi M., born April 25, 1899, is a 
student in the Montana State College, at Bozeman. 
Mr. Machemer has consistently given his support to 
every measure looking to the advancement of the 
best interests of the community and enjoys to a 
marked degree the confidence of all who know him. 

REV. -M. J. DONOHUE has given all his time since 
his ordination as a priest to various churches in 
Montana. He is now pastor of St. James Church 
at Plains, and has a parish including all the area 
of Sanders County. Besides the church at Plains 
there are churches at Thompson Falls, at Paradise 
and at Hot Springs, while missions under the direc- 
tion of Father Donohue are at Camas Prairie, Lone- 
pine, Perma, Eddy, White Pine, Alger, Trout Creek. 
Heron and Noxon. 

Father Donohue was born at Florence, New York, 
November 25, 1876. son of Michael and Anna (Mee- 
han) Donohue. His parents were of Irish ancestry. 
His father was born at Utica, New York, in 1845. 
and for many years was a merchant and farmer at 
Florence. He died at Camden, New York, in 1917. 
He held various town offices and was an influential 
citizen in local affairs. He was a democrat and a 
Catholic, and during the Civil war enlisted at Utica, 
New York, and served in a Union regiment. His 
wife was born at Florence, New York, in 1849 and is 
still living at Camden. 

Father Donohue attended the public schools at 
Florence and spent six years with his classical stud- 
ies at Niagara University at Niagara Falls. He took 
his theological course in St. Viator's Seminary and 
College at Bourbonnais, Illinois, spending five years 
in that institution. He was ordained in 1911 at Buf- 
falo, New York, by Bishop Colton of Buffalo. His 
first active work was as assistant pastor of St. Jo- 
seph's parish at Butte, where he remained a year. 
For a year and a half he was assistant pastor of St. 
Peter's Church at Anaconda, and for a short time 
was assistant pastor of St. Helena Cathedral at 
Helena. He came to Plains July 24, 1914, and for 
five years has given a diligent and faithful adminis- 
tration of his many duties in maintaining and build- 
ing up the Catholic church in Sanders County. The 
new St. James Church at Plains was dedicated De- 
cember 14, 1919. There are about two hundred fam- 
ilies in the parish. Father Donohue is a member of 
Anaconda Council, Knights of Columbus, and is a 
third degree knight. 

O. R. DUNCAN was elected public administrator 
of Sweetgrass County in April, 1919. He has be- 
come well known in that county through his busi- 
ness activities, formerly as a creamery manager 
and now as proprietor of a complete and well pat- 
ronized garage. 

Mr. Duncan was born at Clinton Falls, Minne- 
sota, June 12, 1822. His grandfather established 
the family in New York State, coming from Scot- 



HISTORY OF MONTANA, 



75 



land. His father, Henry Duncan, was born near 
Syracuse, New York, in 1847, was reared and mar- 
ried there and had a farm. On this farm was 
an extensive grove of hard maples, and the manu- 
facture of maple sugar was an important industy 
with him. During the '7 s ne moved to Minnesota 
and was a pioneer homesteader at Clinton Falls. 
Later he sold his farm there and in 1892 moved 
to Medford, Minnesota, where he was proprietor 
of a hotel until his death in 1912. He was an ac- 
tive prohibitionist in politics and a very devout Bap- 
tist. Henry Duncan married Sarah Brown, who 
was born in 1850 and died at Medford, Minnesota, 
in 1913. Ella, the oldest of their children, is the 
wife of Richard Cheesman, a miller living at Whist- 
ley, Alabama ; Eslie is a traveling salesman whose 
home is at Redford, South Dakota; Marion is the 
wife of Henry Cheesman, a mechanic in the rail- 
road shops at Edmonton, Canada; while O. R. Dun- 
can is the fourth and youngest of the family. 

He acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Clinton Falls and Medford, Minnesota, 
and was a student in the Owatonna Business Col- 
lege at Owatonna, Minnesota, until 1900. By prac- 
tical work he learned the creamery trade in Min- 
nesota, and followed it a year at Ranchester, Wyo- 
ming. In 1909 he came to Big Timber, Montana, 
and for three years managed the local creamery. 
The following three years he spent at Butte, where 
he worked for the Henningson Produce Company. 
Since returning to Big Timber he has been en- 
gaged in the automobile business. He built his new 
garage in September, 1917. He has floor space 
36 by 60 feet, and furnishes not only a garage serv- 
ice but handles accessories and has a shop for re- 
pairs. His garage is at the corner of McLeod Street 
and Third Avenue. 

Mr. Duncan is a republican in politics and was 
elected on that ticket to his office as public ad- 
ministrator. He is affiliated with Sweetgrass Camp 
No. 10610, Modern Woodmen of America, is a 
member of the Big Timber Chamber of Commerce 
and Sweetgrass County Good Roads Association. 

In 1902, at Medford, Minnesota, he married Miss 
Nora May Reinhard, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
C. S. Reinhard, farming 'people who live at Med- 
ford. Mr. and Mrs. Duncan have two children, 
. Leona, born in 1904, and Lavern, born in 1905. 

CHARLES L. BRYAN. One of the best diversified 
farms and ranches in Sweetgrass County is at 
McLeod, owned by Charles L. Bryan. Mr. Bryan 
is a veteran Montana farmer and rancher. He 
came to the territory over thirty-five years ago 
and rode the range as a cowboy for a number of 
years before homesteading ,and settling down to 
the serious business of life. 

He was born in Marion County, Missouri, July 
13, 1863. His ancestors came originally from Ire- 
land and were pioneers in Kentucky. His father, 
William Bryan, was born in Missouri in 1829, was 
a carpenter by trade but spent most of his time 
at farming. He lived for many .years in Marion 
County, Missouri, and died at the home of his son, 
Carter Bryan, in Great Falls, Montana, where 
both he and his wife are buried. He was a demo- 
crat and a very interested Presbyterian and a man 
of the highest morals. It is said that he never 
drank liquor or used tobacco throughout his life. 
He married Elizabeth Fender, who was born in 
Marion County, Missouri, in 1833, and died at 
Great Falls, Montana, in 1912. Florence the old- 
est of their children, lives at Livingston, Montana, 
wife of D. W. McLeo'd, who in 1883 homesteaded 
the island on the Yellowstone River at the foot 



of Main Street in Livingston. Fannie, the sec- 
ond of the family, is the wife of Charles Hans- 
brough, who came to Great Falls and lived on a 
farm near there from 1896 to 1901, then moved to 
California, and is still living in Idaho. Charles 
L. Bryan is the third in the family. His brother, 
Carter, above mentioned, is a farmer, came to Liv- 
ingston during the 'gos and afterward lived at Great 
Falls and is now a resident of Boise City, Idaho. 
Emma, the fifth of the children, lives in California, 
while of Benjamin, the youngest, the family has 
had no word since he was last heard from on a 
ranch in Oregon. 

Charles L. Bryan attended rural schools in Mar- 
ion County, Missouri, also the Palmyra Seminary 
at Palmyra, Missouri, and spent the first twenty 
years of his life on his father's farm. Soon after 
reaching Livingston in April, 1883, he engaged as 
a cowboy with a cattle outfit and for ten years 
rode the range. In the meantime he had married 
and he and his wife settled on his homestead twenty- 
five miles south of Big Timber, on the Boulder 
River. He still owns 160 acres in that homestead, 
but it is only part of his ranch of 1,080 acres. This 
ranch and farm have a set of modern buildings 
and farm equipment that betokens the progres- 
sive enterprise of Mr. Bryan. Much of his land 
produces grain and he specializes in the Poll An- 
gus cattle. Mr. Bryan is a democrat and is affili- 
ated with Livingston Homestead of the Brotherhood 
of American Yeomen. 

He married at Livingston in 1888 Miss Maggie 
McLeod, a daughter of William F. and Martha 
(Sowel) McLeod, both now deceased. William 
F. McLeod, who died at Big Timber in 1914, was 
a California forty-niner, afterward lived in Ore- 
gon, and in 1881 settled on the Crow Indian Reser- 
vation in Montana. He was a pioneer stock raiser 
and a man of much prominence in Southern Mon- 
tana. The main street of Big Timber is named 
in his honor, as is also the Town of McLeod in 
Sweetgrass County, the postoffice of Mr. Bryan. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bryan had seven children: Charles 
L., Jr., a musician and piano tuner at Big Tim- 
ber ; Edna, wife of Harry Cross, a tailor at Big 
Timber ; William F. and Roy, both on the home 
ranch with their parents ; Pat who is employed in 
the implements and hardware department of the 
A. W. Miles Company at Livingston; Edith, wife 
of Charles Campbell, a rancher at Big Timber; 
and Bessie, a junior in the County .High School at 
Big Timber. 

CHARLES WOODWORTH. In the distribution of her 
personal gifts Nature, however generous, rarely con- 
fers upon a single individual superior excellence in 
more than a single line. The qualities that go to 
make for success in one field of endeavor are not 
as a rule the same which would bring prosperity 
in another. Yet there are some men who seem to 
have been gifted in a way that forms the exception 
proving the foregoing rule, and in this class may be 
mentioned Charles Woodworth, one of the pro- 
prietors of the Lewistown Automobile and Truck 
Company, who during a comparatively short career 
has invaded numerous fields of activity, in each of 
which he has come forth a conqueror. 

Mr. Woodworth was born at Townsend, Broad- 
water County, Montana, September I, 1885, a son of 
John J. and Mary C. (Shirlock) Woodworth. John 
J. Woodworth was born in 1852, in California, and 
was there married, his wife being a native of New 
Zealand. They became the parents of nine children, 
all living, of whom Charles is the fourth in order of 



76 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



birth. The father received his education in the 
public schools of California, and as a young man en- 
gaged in the sheep business in his native state, 
a vocation which he followed for about four years. 
In 1882 he came to Broadwater County, Montana, 
and ran bands of sheep in the vicinity of Townsend 
until 1886, in that year moving to Fergus County. 
Here he continued in the sheep business for five 
more years, and then sold his business and retired to 
Lewistown, where his death occurred in 1906, when 
he was fifty-four years of age. Mr. Woodworth 
took an interest in the affairs of his community 
and served efficiently in the capacity of road super- 
visor for many years. He was a democrat in his 
political adherence, and was fraternally affiliated 
with the Woodmen of the World. Mrs. Woodworth, 
who survives him, makes her home at Lewistown. 

After attending the public schools of Lewistown, 
Charles Woodworth, at the age of eighteen years, 
embarked upon his independent career as the pro- 
prietor of a small draying business. Subsequently 
he became the proprietor of a retail liquor estab- 
lishment, which he conducted until 1919, but in the 
meantime had entered other lines of industry. In 
1911 he had embarked in the real estate business, and 
since the same year has been raising stock, at this 
time operating some 4,000 acres of land, in addition 
to which he has an interest in other ranches. His 
live stock at this time numbers approximately from 
500 to 600 head of cattle. In March, 1919, after dis- 
posing of his saloon business, Mr. Woodworth em- 
barked in a new line of endeavor when, with L. S. 
Butler and W. A. Cooper, he founded the Lewis- 
town Automobile and Truck Company. This busi- 
ness has been another in which he has been success- 
ful, a further indication of his possession of fine 
business abilities. Mr. Woodworth is a member of 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and in politics is a 
democrat. He has formed many acquaintances and 
won many friendships at Lewistown, and in busi- 
ness circles his reputation is that of a man of 
integrity and high business principles. 

Mr. Woodworth was married February 5, 1910, to 
Miss Helen M. Crevier, who was born at Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, and they are the parents of one 
daughter, Mary Elizabeth. 

ERNEST A. BOSCHERT. While not one of the old 
timers of Montana, the career of Ernest A. Boschert 
is of interest because of the phenomenal enterprise 
he has directed to the upbuilding of the leading 
hardware business at Ballantine, beginning there 
with a stock of goods valued at only a few hundred 
dollars and making his own business expand even 
more rapidly than the town itself. 

Mr. Boschert was born at Burlington, Wisconsin 
January 11, 1883. His grandfather, a native of Ger- 
many, came to America, and at a time when Wis- 
consin 'was virtually an unbroken wilderness and 
years before it became a state he located on land 
at Burlington and spent the rest of his years making 
a farm. Charles Boschert, father of Ernest A., was 
born on that farm in 1843 and is still living there, 
having spent more than three-quarters of a century 
in one locality. He is a democrat and a Catholic. 
Charles Boschert married Josephine Prasch, who 
was born at Burlington in 1855. Ernest A. is the 
second of their family of children, seven in num- 
ber. The others are A. A., salesman for the F. B. 
Connelly Company, of Helena, Montana; Otelia, wife 
of Clarence Brown, manager of the Detroit, Mich- 
igan, branch of the Cudahy Packing Company; Ed- 
ward, a farmer at Burlington, Wisconsin; Elnora, 
wife of Charles McCarthy, also of Burlington; Al- 



bert, on the home farm at Burlington; Marie, wife 
of Joseph Bazel, a butter maker at Burlington. 

Ernest A. Boschert attended the rural schools of 
Racine, Wisconsin, and lived at home with his 
father until he was twenty-two. He then went to 
Chicago, and during 1904-05 was a student in Bryant 
& Stratton's Business College. He had some metro- 
politan training and experience in mercantile busi- 
ness in Chicago, being for six months an assistant 
bookkeeper in a wholesale dry goods house and for 
five months working in the neckwear department of 
the wholesale men's furnishing store of Wilson 
Brothers. For seven months he was bookkeeper and 
clerk in a hardware store in Evanston, a Chicago 
suburb, and with this experience and equipment came 
to Billings in April, 1907. After eight months with 
the Sande Hardware Company he bought a small 
stock of groceries at Ballantine. and when he took 
charge he was also invested with the duties and 
responsibilities of postmaster. He held the postoffice 
and continued his store for ten years. In the mean- 
time his little stock of groceries had expanded into 
a large general or department store, and in 1911 he 
closed out everything except hardware and is now 
proprietor of the leading establishment of that kind 
in his part of Yellowstone County. He owns the 
store building, and keeps everything needed on the 
farms and ranches in the way of hardware. 

Mr. Boschert also owns a modern home on Beech 
and Third streets in Ballantine. He is a republican 
and Catholic, and is affiliated with Billings Council 
No. 1259, Knights of Columbus, the Royal High- 
landers, and the Billings Midland Empire Club. On 
August 6, 1913, at David City, Nebraska, he married 
Miss Edena Fenlon, daughter of P. F. and Fannie 
(Flynn) Fenlon. Her mother lives at Ballantine, 
while her father, now deceased, was a traveling 
salesman. Mr. and Mrs. Boschert have one daugh- 
ter, Margaret Lewine, born July 7, 1918. 

WILLIAM J. BEALL. The history of the City of 
Bozeman would be far from complete without a 
sketch of William J. Beall, who was one of the 
founders of the little city that is the county seat of 
Gallatin County. Mr. Beall was born in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, May 19, 1834, was educated in the 
public schools of his native city and studied for his 
profession as an architect and builder in the office 
of his father, Benjamin Beall, who then stood high 
in his profession in Pennsylvania. 

William J. Beall moved to Kansas in 1856, from 
there to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, and in 1862 to 
, Denver and in March, 1863, arrived in Montana. 
, For a few months he engaged in mining at Vir- 
ginia City, but January, 1864. found him in the 
.Gallatin Valley, where he located a mine, but sold 
his interest to his partner a few months later and 
in company with D. E. Rouse came to the present 
site of Bozeman, where they located adjoining farms 
in the month of July and built the first two houses. 

The division line between the farms was where 
the old Laclede Hotel building stands on Main 
Street and Bozeman Avenue, Rouse's quarter section 
lying east and Beall's west of that line. The 
government survey afterwards threw Mr. Beall's 
line farther east, making what is now Rouse Street 
his east line, with Main Street his south line. Mr. 
Beall built his house on Bozeman Street, near Main, 
just back of the site of the Masonic Temple. Mr. 
Rouse built on the south side of Main Street, east 
of Bozeman Avenue. After a few years Mr. Beall 
was in partnership with W. H. Tracy, who took up 
a claim adjoining Mr. Beall's on the west, and part 
of these claims were platted into town lots. 

In the winter of 1865-66 Mr. Beall did the car- 



77 



penter work on the large story and a half log resi- 
dence erected on the Alderson ranch a mile south 
of Bozeman. While holding his claim and as his 
time and means would permit he followed his trade 
as carpenter and builder in Bozeman and in other 
towns in Montana. In 1868 he built a residence on 
Bozeman Avenue, four blocks from Main Street. 
This has long been recognized as one of the pic- 
turesque and attractive homes of the city. Here 
Mr. Beall died September 3, 1903. His wife, still 
living, has enjoyed the comforts of that home since 
November, 1868. 

Many business blocks and residences in Bozeman 
are monuments to Mr. Beall's architectural skill. 
The old Sacred Heart Cathedral Building, built in 
1874-75, and the Herald Building, erected in 1875 
at Helena, are among the buildings still standing 
in other parts of the state. Mrs. Beall still cherishes 
among her records a testimonial from the building 
committee of the Cathedral in the handwriting of 
Robert C. Walker, consisting of an extract from the 
minutes of the building committee of the Roman 
Catholic Church, Helena, Montana Territory, Octo- 
ber 5, 1874, as follows : 

"Whereas, it has been deemed necessary on ac- 
count of the lateness of the season and on account 
of disappointment in the delivery of the required 
cut stone, to temporarily suspend work upon the 
church, and 

"Whereas, W. J. Beall, the architect and superin- 
tendent of the building, has given the committee 
great satisfaction by his definite and artistic plans 
and specifications drawn according to designs origi- 
nating with himself, 

"Therefore, resolved, that the Building Committee 
of the Roman Catholic Church tender to Mr. Beall 
their thanks and this expression of their approbation 
for his energy and skill displayed in behalf of the 
building and for the faithful performance of the 
duties reposed in him. 

"L. F. LaCroix, chairman, 
"Robert C. Walker, secretary." 

In the spring of 1875, as the records show, Mr. 
Beall was sent for by the building committee to 
superintend the completion of the structure, which 
he did to the utmost satisfaction of all concerned. 
The building after completion was called the 
"Sacred Heart Cathedral" and it was only a few 
years ago that a larger cathedral was erected. A 
prominent architect from the east while' visiting in 
Helena a few years ago noticed this Sacred Heart 
Cathedral and said it was one of the finest speci- 
mens of architectural skill he had seen in the West. 

Mr. Beall was a quiet and unobtrusive citizen, 
ever attentive to whatever business he had in hand. 
He was universally recognized as one of the most 
honorable and upright business men of the com- 
munity, a gentleman in every sense of the word. 
He was made a Mason in Gallatin Lodge No. 6 in 
1866, and was interested in all the subsequent growth 
and advancement of the lodge. He was a charter 
member of the Pioneers Society of Gallatin County 
and also a member of the Society of Montana Pio- 
neers. He is survived by his wife, formerly Rosa 
V. Barker, whom he married in November, 1868. 

MRS. W. J. BEALL, whose maiden name was Rosa 
V. Barker, enjoys the distinction of having been 
the first white woman to locate at Bozeman, coming 
here August i, 1864. Bozeman has been her home 
ever since, though she has traveled east and west 
since she could travel by railroad. For more than 
half a century her home has been a comfortable 
residence on Bozeman Avenue, North, erected by 
her husband in 1868. Plans are now under way to 



secure the block of ground on which the Beall resi- 
dence stands, originally a part of the Beall home- 
stead, for a recreation park as a memorial to the 
young men of this community who served in the 
World war. 

Mrs. Beall's father was James Barker, an early 
pioneer of Montana. She was born in Lewis 
County, New York, and spent there the early years 
of her life. She graduated from Fairfield Seminary 
in New York, making a specialty of music and art, 
in both of which she was very proficient. She 
taught music in the seminary for one year and is 
still identified with the alumni society of the school. 

She moved with her parents to Wisconsin and 
went through many trying experiences in the South 
during the Civil war, and in crossing the plains 
with her husband and two little girls in 1864 she 
had many narrow escapes from being killed by 
Indians. They had other trying experiences and in 
crossing the Big Horn River she and the children 
came near being drowned. 

Mrs. Beall has taken an active part in the social 
and religious life of Bozeman, and is highly es- 
teemed by citizens of the community. Her children 
were a comfort to her in her pioneer days, and the 
loss of these little ones brought her much grief. 
When the first Sunday school was organized in 1866 
by W. W. Alderson in Bozeman, under the auspices 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, she was one 
of the most active members and was a worker in 
that pioneer church. 

Mrs. Beall helped in establishing St. James Epis- 
copal Church in Bozeman and has been the most 
faithful communicant ever since, much of the time 
being a worker in the Sunday School and the Guild. 
She was a charter member and the first conductress 
in Lily of the Valley Chapter of the Order of 
Eastern Star, with which she is still identified. In 
the Pioneers Society of Gallatin County she served 
as historian for several years, and is now serving 
her second term as president of this organization. 
She is also a member of the Society of Montana 
Pioneers and is identified with the Sons and Daugh- 
ters of Pioneers of the County and State. For 
many years she was active in the Women's Christian 
Temperance Union of Bozeman. 

Her husband's career as a Montanan has been 
sketched on preceding pages. During his lifetime 
Mrs. Beall assisted him in his business affairs and 
since his death in 1903 she has looked after her own 
business with remarkable accuracy. Though past 
the allotted three score and ten, she is remarkably 
well and active in body and mind. 

Mrs. Beall has lived the life of an earnest Chris- 
tian, and her strong faith in God through her trials 
and tribulations has kept her above the sorrows that 
might have crushed to earth a woman of ordinary 
character. In the fifty-five years she has lived in 
Bozeman she has seen the city grow from two log 
cabins to one with hundreds of beautiful homes 
and a population of 8,000 people having the best 
religious and educational advantages possible. 

ARAD H. FRANKLIN is an old timer in Montana 
and the Nprthwest, has been a miner, contractor and 
in other lines of business, and is at present repre- 
sentative in the Legislature from Mineral County, 
with home at Superior. 

Mr. Franklin was born in Harrison County, Iowa, 
July i, 1868. This branch of the Franklin family 
came originally from England and settled in Massa- 
chusetts in colonial times. His father, Jerome B. 
Franklin, was born in New York State in 1832, was 
reared and married there, and afterwards became 
a farmer in Harrison County, Iowa, and was a 



78 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



hotel proprietor at Dunlap in that state. He also 
did considerable business as a bridge builder. In 
1887 he came to Helena, Montana, and was employed 
as a carpenter by the Montana Central Railway 
Company. In the fall of 1887 he located at Butte, 
where he continued business as as carpenter and 
builder until 1894. The last years of his life were 
spent on a ranch at Stevensville, Montana, where 
he died in 1915. He was a republican in politics, 
a member of the Presbyterian Church and affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His 
wife was Mariette Baskin who was born in New 
York State in 1828 and died at Stevensville, Mon- 
tana, in 1912. They had a family of seven children : 
Helen who married Steven Corley, a contractor 
and carpenter and both died at Stevensville, Mon- 
tana; Mary is the wife of J. J. Moorhead, a farmer 
and cattle buyer at Dunlap, Iowa; F. S. Franklin is 
a carpenter in the shipyards at Spanway, near 
Tacoma, Washington; Kate is the wife of George 
A. Smith, and they own the old Franklin ranch 
at Stevensville; Sarah, the fifth child, died in in- 
fancy, and the sixth in order of birth is Arad H. ; 
John, the youngest, is an electrician at Seattle, Wash- 
ington. 

Arad H. Franklin received his early education 
in the public schools of Dunlap, Iowa. He was about 
eighteen years of age when he came to Montana in 
1886. His first experience was at Rosebud, where 
during the summer he rode the range as a cow- 
boy. In the spring of 1887 he was at Great Falls 
and shortly afterward at Helena, where he spent a 
year with Porter Brothers, a well known firm of 
railroad contractors. For four years he was with 
the Electric Light Company at Butte. He then 
formed a partnership with his brother F. S. Franklin, 
and for two years they did teaming contracting. 
They also owned mining property near Shoupe, 
Idaho, and they operated their mine in that locality 
from 1894 to 1897. From the latter year until 
1900 Mr. Franklin engaged in prospecting in both 
Idaho and Montana. From 1900 to 1905 he con- 
ducted his father's ranch, and he and his brother 
then spent about a year filling a contract for the 
construction of a water ditch in Ravalli County. 
Mr. Franklin in 1907 moved to Spokane, where 
he spent the winter as a barber and from May 
to August, 1908, had a barber shop at Grand Forks, 
Idaho. Since 1908 he has conducted a high class 
barber establishment at Superior. He is also presi- 
dent of the Mask Iron Company, and owns a mod- 
ern home and other real estate at Superior. 

Mr. Franklin has long been interested in politics 
in various communities, being affiliated with the 
democratic party. He served as a justice of the 
peace at Superior and also in Missoula County. 
He was elected to represent Mineral County in the 
Sixteenth Session of the Legislature in 1918. He 
was a member of the fish and game, railroad trans- 
portation, mines and mining, journal and other 
committees. Mr. Franklin is a Catholic, and is 
affiliated .with Missoula Council No. 1021, Knights 
of Columbus, Missoula Camp No. 5329, Modern 
Woodmen of America, and Jocko Tribe No. 10. 
Independent Order of Red Men. 

In 1005, at Missoula, he married Mrs. Agnes 
( Welch) Clark, daughter of Martin and Mary 
Welch, both deceased. Her father was a Wisconsin 
farmer and afterwards owned a timber claim at 
DeBorgia, Montana. Mr. Franklin has no children 
f his own, but has two step-children, Laura, wife 
of A. C. Bennett, a carpenter at Butte; and O. J. 
Pike, who conducts a pool hall at Superior. 

T. B. SEI.TF.RS is a lawyer, and soon after gradu- 
ating from law school and his admission to the bar 



of Illinois came to Montana and is now in. his tenth 
year of his successful general practice at Big Tim- 
ber. 

Mr. Sellers represents a family that has been 
substantially identified with the agricultural and 
business and professional interests of Illinois for 
nearly seventy years. He was born at Topeka, Illi- 
nois, May 22, 1884, and is a son of Henry Selters, 
who was born in Germany in 1826 and came to 
the United States in 1847, when twenty-one years 
of age. He was a pioneer in the locality where 
the Town of Havana, Illinois, now is and developed 
a homestead and lived as a farmer the rest of his 
life. He died at Havana in 1905. He became a 
republican when that party was founded and was 
a member of the Evangelical Church. His brother, 
George Selters, was a Union soldier with an Illi- 
nois regiment and while a prisoner at Anderson- 
ville died May 24, 1864. The State of Illinois is 
now erecting a monument at Andersonville in honor 
of the sons of the Prairie state who lost their lives 
while prisoners of war in that notorious stockade. 
Of the eight children of Henry Selters and wife, 
Barbara Shundlemeyer, who was born in Germany 
in 1840 and died at Havana, Illinois, in 1914, J. B. 
is the youngest and the only one to adopt the State 
of Montana as his home. Mary, the oldest, mar- 
ried a Mr. Deiss and she is a widow and lives at 
Monte Vista, Colorado ; Enoch is a banker and 
livestock man at Clayton, Illinois; Chris owns a 
large ranch at Monte Vista, Colorado ; Anna is un- 
married and lives on the home farm at Havana, 
Illinois ; Henry is also a ranch owner at Monte 
Vista, Colorado, as is also Joseph, the seventh child; 
Kathryn, sixth in age, is a graduate nurse, lives 
at Peoria, Illinois, for several years had charge 
of the Peoria County Hospital, and is at this writ- 
ing engaged in special work in her profession in 
Chicago. 

J. B. Selters attended rural schools in Mason 
County, Illinois, spent three years in the literary 
department of Illinois Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington, and after a three years' course in 
the law department graduated with the LL. B. de- 
gree in 1910, and was admitted to the Illinois bar 
the same year. A few weeks later he arrived at 
Big Timber, Montana, and after a brief novitiate 
was accorded a living business as a lawyer and 
has handled some of the very important civil and 
criminal carses of the local courts. His offices are 
in the Lovyry Building on McLeod Street. He 
served as city attorney from 1915 until he resigned 
in 1918, and during 1917-18 was county attorney. 
During the World war he was a member of the 
Legal Advisory Board and was the Government 
appeal agent for Sweetgrass County. He is also 
a member of the Eastern Montana Bar Association. 
Mr. Selters is a republican, member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, and he and his wife are 
well known in social circles of Big Timber. Re- 
cently he sold his modern home on Fourth Avenue 
and has now purchased a home on Sixth Avenue. 
East. Mr. Selters married at Billing in 1912 Miss 
Estelle Clark, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. 
("lark, residents of Hobart, Oklahoma. Mrs. Sel- 
ters is a skilled vocalist and instrumental musi- 
cian, and completed her musical education in the 
American Conservatory of Music at Chicago. They 
have one son, J. B., Jr., born September 14, 1914. 



v CHEESMAN, who first came to Montana in 
pioneer times, over thirty-five years ago, was for 
ten years prominently identified with the ranching 
and farming interests of this state and is now living 
in comfortable retirement at Lewistown. 

Mr. Cheesman was born in Racine Countv, Wis- 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



consin, August 16, 1857, a member of a pioneer 
family of the Badger State. His parents, Edward 
and Eliza (Johnson) Cheesman, were both natives 
of England. Henry Cheesman was the third son 
and fifth child. Two of the daughters and one son 
were born in England. They came to America in 
1844 by sailing vessel, being six weeks on the ocean. 
From New York City they traveled by boat to Al- 
bany, thence by canal to Buffalo and around by the 
lake by sailing ship to Kenosha, Wisconsin. Edward 
Cheesman reached Wisconsin with only $2.50 in 
money. He located a tract of Government land in 
Racine County and virtually hewed a home out of 
the wilderness. His first house was built of logs. 
He lived there many years and prospered, owning 
200 acres of good farming land, devoted to general 
crops and sheep and cattle. He retired in 1886, 
and spent his last days in Milwaukee, where he died 
in 1903, at the age of eighty-nine years. His wife 
died at the age of sixty-five in 1882. They had six 
sons and three daughters, six of whom are still 
living. Edward Cheesman held various township 
offices and was a whig and republican in politics, 
and during the Civil war was a strong supporter 
of the Union. 

Henry Cheesman acquired his education in the 
public schools of Racine County and attended the 
Rochester Academy in that state for 2*4 years. 
After his first marriage he engaged in the hotel 
business at Rochester, and then took up farming in 
Rock County. After selling his interests in Wiscon- 
sin he came to Montana in June, 1883, with a herd 
of sheep. His destination was Dillon, where he 
sold his flock to some sheep men. He spent several 
months in the state and then went back to Wis- 
consin. He afterward returned to Fergus County, 
Montana, and in 1908 engaged in farming on a large 
scale, operating about 4,500 acres and acting as 
superintendent for the Judith Basin Land Company, 
as stock buyer. Since June, 1918, he has lived re- 
tired. In 1915 Mr. Cheesman raised 26,000 bushels 
of wheat on 600 acres of land. He is affiliated with 
Judith Lodge No. 30, . Knights of Pythias, and in 
politics is a republican. 

Mr. Cheesman is an enthusiastic Montanan and 
shows his pride and confidence in his adopted state 
not alone by words but by deeds. No measure or 
project tending to the betterment of either local 
or state conditions has ever come up that failed 
to receive his hearty support, both in time and 
money. He has always worked to the end of a gen- 
eral improvement in all phases of both public and 
private progress, and has given substantial evidence 
of his beliefs. Never desiring political preferment, 
his judgment and opinions have nevertheless had 
much to do in shaping public matters for their 
betterment. 

In 1880 he married for his first wife Emma A. 
Gipson. She was born in Racine County, Wisconsin, 
and died in 1884. In 1886 Mr. Cheesman married 
Anna B. Emery, who was born in Industry, Maine. 
They have two children, Wallace Henry, who lives 
at Clinton, Wisconsin, and married Edna Conley; 
and Harriet L., who is the wife of Frank J. Hughes, 
of Lewistown, and the mother of one daughter, 
Ellen. 

r 

CHARLES O. STOUT. For all the magnificence of 
its variegated sources, Montana is an agricultural 
state, and its prosperity will rest more securely 
every year upon its farms and ranches. One of the 
men who have achieved a practical success in the 
raising of crops and the operation of land in Yel- 
lowstone County is Charles O. Stout, of Ballantine. 

Mr. Stout, who has been a resident of Montana 
vei. n e 



for twelve years, was born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 
January 12, 1881. His grandfather, Michael Stout, 
was born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, spent 
his life as a farmer and died in Cumberland County 
of that state before his grandson was born. John A. 
Stout, father of the Montana rancher, was born in 
Cumberland County in 1852, also spent his life in 
Pennsylvania as a farmer, and died at Shippensburg, 
Pennsylvania, in October, 1907. He was a republi- 
can and a very active member of the Baptist Church. 
His wife was Emma Saltzgiver, who was born in 
Adams County, Pennsylvania, in 1846, and is now 
living at Newville, in Cumberland County, Penn- 
sylvania. She was the mother of three children, 
Alba S., wife of W. S. Meals, owner of a coal mine 
and farm near Johnstown, Pennsylvania; Charles O., 
and Mary R., wife of C. R. Killian, ticket agent in 
the Pennsylvania Depot at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Charles O. Stout attended public school in Cum- 
berland County, for two years was a student in the 
Blue Ridge College at New Windsor, Maryland, and 
in 1904 completed a course in the Philadelphia Busi- 
ness College. For a time he worked in a business 
office in Philadelphia and after taking a civil service 
examination was appointed to a position in the chief 
postoffice inspector's office at Washington. He broke 
away from the routine duties and the life of the 
East and came out to Billings in June, 1907. The 
first seven months he was in the state he was em- 
ployed by the Billings Sugar Company, and then 
moved to Ballantine, where for over ten years he 
has been busily engaged in ranching. Mr. Stout 
owns forty-seven acres of the highly valuable irri- 
gated land between Worden and Ballantine. He has 
everything in complete order and with facilities in 
the way of barns and other buildings that make 
efficient farming possible. He also has a modern 
home. During 1918, when patriotism demanded the 
utmost of the farmers, Mr. Stout operated 400 acres. 
He also has other interests, being vice president of 
the Ballantine State Bank and is director of the 
Ballantine Telephone Company. 

Mr. Stout is cne of the leading republicans of 
Yellowstone County. He was a candidate for the 
Legislature in 1912 and for six years was justice of 
the peace for his precinct. He is a member of the 
Baptist Church. 

In January, 1911, he married Miss Re Bryson, 
daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Asher) Bryson, 
at Ballantine. Her parents live at Ballantine, her 
father being a retired farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Stout 
have five children : Robert John, born October 12, 
1912; Mary Elizabeth, born February 13, 1914; Will- 
iam Charles, born September 22, 1915 ; Edna Aileen, 
born June 4, 1916, and Ruth, born February 18, 1918. 

WILLIAM DUANE TALLMAN. One of the distinc- 
tive incidental functions of this publication is to take 
recognition of those citizens of the great common- 
wealth of Montana who stand distinctively repre- 
sentative in their chosen spheres of endeavor, and 
in this connection there is eminent propriety in 
according consideration to Professor William Duane 
Tallman, one of the able and popular educators of 
the state, who holds a professorship in the mathe- 
matical department of the State College at Bozeman. 

William D. Tallman was born at Sterling, Ar- 
kansas, on February 12, 1875, and is a son of Duane 
Dano and Jennie (Whittemore) Tallman. The 
father was born in 1851 at Reedsburg, Wisconsin, 
was reared and educated there, and in young man- 
hood went to Arkansas, where he went into the 
general mercantile business. He died at Lake Vil- 
lage, Arkansas, in October, 1874. He was a 
republican in politics and a member of the Masonic 



80 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



fraternity. He married Jennie Whittemore, who 
was born in Iowa in 1854 and who died at Lake 
Village, Arkansas, on April ip, 1875. The subject of 
this sketch was their only child. 

William D. Tallman received his elementary edu- 
cation in the public schools of Sparta, Wisconsin, 
graduating from the high school there in 1892. He 
then entered the University of Wisconsin at Madi- 
son, where he was graduated in 1806, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, in mathematics. He 
is a member of the honorary Greek Letter society 
Phi Beta Kappa. During 1896-7 he taught mathe- 
matics in the Madison (Wisconsin) High School, 
and during the following school year was a fellow 
in mathematics at the University of Wisconsin. 
During the next year he taught mathematics in the 
Eau Claire (Wisconsin) High School, and then, 
from 1899 to January I, 1901, he was instructor in 
mathematics and a graduate student at the University 
of Wisconsin. On the date last mentioned Pro- 
fessor Tallman came to Bozeman and accepted the 
chair of mathematics in the Montana State College. 
He is still the incumbent of that position, and has 
for many years been one of the most popular and 
respected members of the faculty of this splendid 
institution. 

Professor Tallman gives his support to the re- 
publican party and has taken an active interest in 
local public affairs, having served four years as _a 
member of the City Council of Bozeman. He is 
also a member of the Presbyterian Church, while his 
fraternal relations are as follows: Gallatin Camp 
No. 5245, Modern Woodmen of America; Bridger 
Camp No. 62, Woodmen of the World; Eureka 
Homestead No. 415, Brotherhood of American Yeo- 
men, and Bozeman Lodge No. 463, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He is also a member 
of the American Mathematical Society and the 
Society for the Promotion of Engineering Educa- 
tion. 

Professor Tallman has been twice married, first, 
on June 27, 1900, at Lake Bluff, Illinois, to Anna 
DeMuth, daughter of Mrs. Susanna DeMuth, of 
Peru, Indiana. Mrs. Tallman was a graduate of 
the Chicago Deaconess Training School. Her death 
occurred on February 4, 1908, at Rochester, Minne- 
sota. The children born to this union are as fol- 
lows: Mildred, born May 2, 1903; Hazel, born 
November 10, 1904, and Duane, born December 17, 
1907. On September 8, 1909, at Bozeman, Professor 
Tallman was married to Maude DeMuth, a sister of 
his former wife and they have one child, William 
D., born December 12, 1910. Mrs. Tallman is a 
graduate of the Montana State College. 

Professor Tallman realized early in life that there 
is a purpose in life and that there is no honor not 
founded on worth and no respect not founded on 
accomplishment. His life and labors have been 
eminently worthy because they have contributed to 
a proper understanding of life and its problems. 

CHARLES C. WILLIS. In that section of Montana 
known as Sanders County probably no citizen's 
personal recollections and experiences go back fur- 
ther and give him more of the authority of a 
spectator and historian than Charles C. Willis, a well 
known rancher and real estate dealer at Plains. 

Mr. Willis, who has lived in Montana thirty-five 
years, was born at Columbia, Missouri, August 7, 
1854. His paternal ancestors were Englishmen who 
settled in New Jersey in colonial times, and several 
of the family were revolutionary soldiers. Mr. 
Willis' grandfather, John Willis, was born in New 
Jersey in 1800. For many years he devoted himself 
to the cause of the Baptist ministry in Missouri. 



He was a circuit rider and founded and built many 
churches of his denomination. Besides his eloquence 
as a preacher he was a skillful carpenter and me- 
chanic, and in building some of the early churches 
he used his individual skill in constructing the build- 
ings and in making the pews and other articles of 
furniture. He lived a long and active life and died 
near Columbia, Missouri, in 1886. 

John E. Willis, father of Charles C. Willis, was 
born in Mississippi in 1828, but was reared and 
married near Columbia, Missouri, where he followed 
the business of stock raising. He was a man in 
advance of his time in that section of Missouri, 
and was one of the first to establish a herd of pure 
bred Shorthorn cattle. When the Civil war came 
on, as a Southerner, he joined the Confederate side, 
and while serving in the regimental commissary 
department in Price's army was killed near .Spring- 
field, Missouri, in 1863. He was a democrat and a 
member of the Christian Church. His wife was 
Sallie A. Cromwell, a direct descendant of the 
Oliver Cromwell family of England. She was born 
near Columbia, Missouri, in 1829, and died at Cen- 
tralia in that state in 1880. Charles C. was the 
oldest of her children. Elizabeth died at the age 
of three months. John is in the life insurance 
business at Glasgow, Montana, while J. R. Willis, a 
farmer at Plains, was killed in a runaway accident at 
Plains February. 26, 1920. 

Charles C. Willis while a boy attended rural 
schools in Boone County, Missouri. He was only 
nine years of age when his father died. For two 
years, in 1872-73, he attended the Missouri State 
University at Columbia. After leaving college he 
became a farmer, at first in Boone County, and 
after 1878 in Audrain County, Missouri. 

Mr. Willis arrived at Thompson Falls, Montana, 
January 18, 1885. He conducted a ranch near that 
town and was also the pioneer drayman. For eight- 
een months he had the contract for hauling water 
for the town. In 1886 he moved to Plains, and 
developed one of the first farms and ranches in this 
vicinity. Mr. Willis is now. owner of about 1,300- 
acres of land. For a number of years he did much 
contracting for the Northern Pacific Railway, and 
for several years was interested in the lumbering 
industry. Since 1909 he has handled a large amount 
of the local real estate transactions and has bought 
and sold property for others as well as for himself. 
He still lives on his home ranch of 200 acres a half 
mile west of the depot. Part of this farm is in the 
corporation limits of Plains. 

Mr. Willis has been a member of the State Board 
of Horticulture since it was created more than 
twenty years ago. He was also a justice of the 
peace in the early days, at a time when the present 
Sanders, Flathead, Ravalli and Lincoln counties 
were part of the larger Missoula County, comprising 
nearly all of Western Montana. Politically he is 
a democrat. 

In 1875, near Columbia, Missouri, Mr. Willis 
married Miss Mary Shock, daughter of James H. 
and Susan (Keith) Shock, both deceased. Her 
father was a pioneer settler in Missouri. Mrs. 
Willis died at Plains in 1895. She was the mother 
of seven children : Clarence H., living on the home 
ranch ; Maude, who died at the age of three months ; 
Alvin K., a shipyards worker living at Oakland, 
California; Mary, died at the age of twenty-four 
years; John K., a farmer near Avondale in Valley 
County, Montana; Charles M., whose home is at 
Hot Springs in Sanders County and who operates 
a dray line between Hot Springs and Plains and 
Perma; and Willard P., the present postmaster of 
Plains. 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



81 



In 1898, at Plains, Mr. Willis married for his 
present wife Miss Sadie Cave, daughter of James 
and Celia (Woody) Cave. Her father was for 
many years a farmer at Ozark, Missouri. He died 
in the fall of 1917 at the advanced age of eighty- 
five, while her mother died in 1919, aged eighty- 
seven. 

LORIN F. DOUTHETT. Of the forty odd years 
since he left college Lorin F. Douthett has spent 
nearly thirty in Montana and his name is asso- 
ciated actively with several of the important busi- 
ness institutions of Big Timber. He is regarded 
as one of the men who have had most to do with 
the upbuilding of that city. 

Mr. Douthett was born in Bloomington, Illinois, 
June 12, 1854, and is of Scotch ancestry. _ His pa- 
ternal ancestors settled at an early date in Penn- 
sylvania. His father, Robert Douthett, was born 
in Pennsylvania in 1825, grew up there, moved 
to Illinois when a young man, and after his mar- 
riage moved to Bloomington, where he followed 
the business of carpenter and builder a number of 
years. He was also an Illinois farmer. In 1886 
he moved to the new agricultural district around 
Wessington, South Dakota, and finally went to 
the Pacific Coast and then to Tacoma and Seattle 
and was retired at San Francisco when he died 
in 1911. He was a republican and a member of 
the Methodist Church. His wife was Eliza Mont- 
gomery, who was born in Boone County, Iowa, in 
1832, and died at Tacoma, Washington, in Septem- 
ber, 1916. Lorin F. was the second of their family 
of six children. Eugene, the oldest, is a farmer at 
Covington, Nebraska; Don Clarence, whose home 
is in Sioux City, Iowa, is connected with the Gov- 
ernment river improvement work on the Mississippi ; 
Veleria is the wife of John M. Reynolds, a manu- 
facturer of hardwood floors, parquetry and other 
products at Mill Valley, California; Alma, whose 
home is at Tacoma, Washington, is the widow of 
her second cousin, Heber Douthett, who was a 
farmer ; Minnie Belle is the wife of W. U. White, a 
farmer at Hope, North Dakota. 

Lorin F. Douthett attended public school at 
Bloomington, Illinois, spent three years in the State 
Normal University at Normal, and completed his 
sophomore year in the Illinois Wesleyan Univer- 
sity at Bloomington. After leaving college in 1876 
he farmed for several years in McLain County, 
Illinois, and was also in the grocery business at 
Bloomington. He moved out to Dakota Territory 
in 1884 locating in Wessington, South Dakota, and 
was a farmer there until he came to Big Timber in 
1891. His first work here was at teaming, and he 
then established what is now the pioneer wood and 
coal business at the town. He added a lumber 
yard in 1911 and since 1914 has been a dealer in 
automobiles. His offices and yards are on First 
Avenue near McLeod Street. He leases an auto- 
mobile garage on First Avenue and handles Ford 
cars and accessories. He also owns the ice house 
at the foot of McLeod Street. Mr. Douthett is the 
president of the Big Timber Building & Loan As- 
sociation and is secretary and treasurer of the 
Montana Cold Storage and Fuel Company. His 
modern home is on Third Avenue. 

Mr. Douthett is a democrat in politics. He served 
one term as alderman of Big Timber and is affili- 
ated with the Congregational Church. 

In 1907, at Chicago, Illinois, he married Miss 
Margaret May Duggan, daughter of William and 
Isabelle Duggan. Her parents now reside at Min- 
neapolis. Her father is a machinist. Mr. and Mrs. 
Douthett had eight children: Edward B., born in 



December, 1908; Doris Evelyn, born in 1909; Mary 
Audrey, born in 1911; Jane Thais, born in 1912; 
Carol, born in 1913; Lorin Frank, born in 1915; 
Lawrence O'Neil, born in 1916; and Alice Mar- 
guerite, born in 1918. Carol died March 24, 1914,' 
Lawrence O'Neil died September 2, 1916; and Alice 
Marguerite died March 28, 1919. Mrs. Douthett 
died March 23, 1919. 

WYLLYS A. HEDGES, a former receiver of the 
United States Land Office at Lewistown, where he 
still resides, has had a career that honorably supple- 
ments that of his distinguished father, the late Judge 
Cornelius Hedges, one of the greatest of Montana's 
pioneers. 

Cornelius Hedges, whose story has probably been 
told in every published work on Montana and which 
should be set down here in brief as a matter of ap- 
propriate record, was born in Westfield, Massachu- 
setts, October 28, 1831, and died in 1909. He had an 
ancestor in the Revolutionary war, and his people 
for many generations were prominent in New Eng- 
land. His parents were Dennis and Alvina (Noble) 
Hedges. Cornelius Hedges was liberally educated, 
graduating from Yale College in 1853 an d from the 
law department of Harvard College in 1856. He 
became a pioneer lawyer at Independence, Buchanan 
County, Iowa, and practiced there until 1864, part 
of the time also editing the Buchanan County Bulle- 
tin, the first paper in Independence, Buchanan 
County. 

In April of 1864 he started across the plains by 
team to Virginia City, Montana. There he worked 
as a practical miner, and on January 15, 1865, arrived 
at Helena. He was one of the first members of the 
bar of the territory. In 1867 he brought his family 
to Montana, coming by steamboat up the Missouri 
River. He was appointed United States attorney for 
Montana by President Grant, and in 1872 was ap- 
pointed superintendent of public instruction of the 
territory. His service in that office for six years 
did much to formulate the early educational policy 
of Montana. He served as probate judge five years 
and in 1882 was reappointed superintendent of public 
instruction. He was a member of the State Con- 
stitutional Convention and elected a member of the 
first State Senate in 1889. 

One of the publications of the Montana Historical 
Society's collections is the journal of Cornelius 
Hedges, recounting the trip headed by General Wash- 
burn, of which he was a member, in the explora- 
tion of the Upper Yellowstone and the Yellowstone 
National Park. Cornelius Hedges is said to be re- 
sponsible for the original suggestion that this be 
made a national preserve. 

For many years he was called "the father of 
Masonry in Montana." He took his first degrees 
in that order in Iowa in 1859. He became a charter 
member of Helena Lodge No. I in 1865, and was its 
first master. He held all the offices in the York Rite 
and the Scottish Rite. He was also one of the 
founders of the City Library of Helena, and in the 
early days was a member of the Vigilante organiza- 
tion. In politics he was a stanch republican. _ For 
many years Judge Hedges was one of the prominent 
sheep men of Montana, running thousands of head 
on the range along the Mussel Shell River. 

In 1856 Judge Hedges married Miss Edna L. 
Smith, who was born at Southington, Connecticut, 
in 1836. She died in 1912. Of their eight children, 
five are living: Wyllys A.; Dennis, who died in 
childhood; Henry H. ; Edna L., wife of H. B. 
Palmer; Emma, wife of John Woodbridge; Lang- 
ford ; Ellen, who died in childhood ; and Corne- 
lius, Jr. 



82 



HISTORY OF MONT AN" A 



Wyllys A. Hedges was born at Independence, 
Buchanan County, Iowa, July 3, i857, and was not 
yet ten years of age when brought to the Territory 
"of Montana. He was a student in some of the early 
schools of Helena, and in 1869, at the age of thir- 
teen, was appointed librarian of the Helena Public 
Library. After finishing high school he entered Yale 
University, and returned from the East to become 
the original settler on the townsite of Great Falls in 
1878. He lived there until 1880, and then went to 
California and bought a flock of sheep which he 
drove overland to Bercail on Careless Creek in 
Meagher County. He reached his destination No- 
vember 6, 1881, and, associated with his father, con- 
tinued in the sheep and cattle business until 1906. 
He was largely responsible for the development of 
the sheep industry in the Mussel Shell Valley, and 
a town in that vicinity is still known as Hedges. 
In 1906 Mr. Hedges was appointed by the late Col- 
onel Roosevelt receiver of the United States Land 
Office at Lewistown, and held those responsibili- 
ties until October 2, 1913. Since then he has been 
engaged in the real estate business. As a republican 
he was elected a member of the Lower House of 
the State Legislature in the Fourth, Sixth, Seventh 
and Ninth assemblies, and during his last term was 
speaker of the house. Like his father, he is active 
in Masonry, being affiliated with Lewistown Lodge 
No. 37, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Hiram 
Chapter No. 15, Royal Arch Masons, and he and his 
wife are members of Marie Chapter No. 36 of the 
Eastern Star. 

September 3, 1884, he married Miss Ida S. Beach. 
She was born in Southington, Connecticut, where 
Mr. Hedges' mother spent her girlhood. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hedges' four children are all deceased. 

WILLARD HICKOX, of Billings, is probably the pre- 
mier authority in Montana on all subjects connected 
with bee culture and honey production. Like most 
men who have been successful in that industry 
he seems to have a natural genius for work, though 
of course experience and training count largely for 
his success. He is secretary, treasurer and manager 
of the Rocky Mountain Bee Company and is secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Montana Honey Producers' 
Association, Incorporated. 

Mr. Hickox was born at Fowler, in Trumbull 
County, Ohio, November 12, 1857. The name Hickox 
is of English origin and was one of the first names 
transplanted to the soil of New England. His grand- 
father, Jesse Hickox, was born in Connecticut in 
1782 and in 1818 took his family to the western 
wilderness and settled in the Ohio Western Reserve 
in Trumbull County. He had previously served as a 
soldier of the War of 1812. He died at Fowler in 
1867. His wife was a Miss Janes. 

Daniel B. Hickox, father of Willard, was born in 
Connecticut in 1814 and was four years old when 
his parents moved to Ohio. He spent the rest of his 
life there as a farmer and died in 1876. He was 
an old school republican and was active in the 
Methodist Church. His wife, Laura Tanner, was 
born in Fowler and died there November 15, 1857. 

Willard Hickox, only child of his parents, grew 
up on his father's farm to the age of nineteen, at- 
tended school at Fowler and K r <luated from the 
Cleveland High School in 1877. He also took special 
courses in the Spencerian Business College at Cleve- 
land. For fifteen years Mr. Hickox was employed 
as a bookkeeper and stenographer in Cleveland, and 
while working in that city and with his home nearby 
he acquired his first practical knowledge and expe- 
rience in bee keeping. In IQOO he moved to Shawnee, 
Oklahoma, and after one summer there went to Fort 



Collins, Colorado, and organized the Rocky Moun- 
tain Bee Company. Besides his work in handling 
bees at Cleveland he also spent a year in Michigan 
in the same line of work. Mr. Hickox has been 
manager of the Rocky Mountain Bee Company since 
it was established. In 1911 he moved his headquar- 
ters to Rosebud, Montana, and during that year 
made his home in Cartersville. In 1912 he moved 
to Forsyth, Montana, and since 1916 has had his 
home in Billings, his residence being at 508 St. Johns 
Avenue. 

The Rocky Mountain Bee Company in 1919 owned 
2,000 stands of bees. These are moved about from 
point to point to secure the best results of honey 
productions, the principal location being near Rose- 
bud, Cartersville, Oronoco, Sanders, Myers, Hysham 
and Laurel. The company has produced and shipped 
as high as 150,000 pounds or fifty-five tons of honey 
in a single year, and this honey is distributed all over 
the United States. All the Montana business is 
handled through the offices at Montana Avenue and 
West Fifth Street in Billings. The company is in- 
corporated in Colorado with headquarters at Ber- 
thoud. 

While he was a resident of Cleveland Mr. Hickox 
made his home at Rockport, a suburb of that city. 
He was postmaster of Rockport at one time, also 
mayor, and a member of the Christadelphian Church 
of Cleveland. He is a republican, a Mason, Elk 
and Woodman of the World. 

Mr. Hickox married at Rockport, Ohio, in 1879, 
Miss Dora McBride, daughter of Samuel and Delilah 
(Holton) McBride. Her father was a farmer in the 
states of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Nebraska and Okla- 
homa, keeping well out to the frontier. He is now 
deceased and her mother is living at Chattanooga, 
Oklahoma. 

ROBERT SCHAEFER. Among the citizens and busi- 
ness men of Southern Montana who believe in fol- 
lowing twentieth-century methods is Robert 
Schaefer, the pioneer cheese manufacturer of Mon- 
tana and proprietor of three successful factories in 
this state. He comes of a splendid Swiss family, 
one that has always been strong for right living 
and industrious habits, for education and morality, 
and for all that contributes to the welfare of the 
commonwealth. Such people are welcomed in any 
community, for they are empire builders and as 
such have pushed the frontier of civilization ever 
westward and onward, leaving the green wide- 
reaching wilderness and the far-stretching plains 
populous with contented people and beautiful with 
green fields ; they have constituted that sterling 
horde which caused the great Bishop Whipple to 
write the memorable line, "Westward the course of 
empire takes its way." 

Robert Schaefer was born in Canton Berne, 
Switzerland, on February 8, 1878, and is the son 
of Peter and Margaret (Willener) Schaefer. Peter 
Schaefer was born in 1842, in Canton Berne, Swit- 
zerland, and his death occurred there in 1911. In 
many respects he was a most remarkable man. He 
received a good, practical education, as do all the 
children of Switzerland, and after taking up work 
on his own account showed himself to be the pos- 
sessor of more than ordinary mental capacity. He 
held practically all the state offices of his native 
country and at the early age of twenty years he 
became a supreme judge "in Canton Berne, an office 
he held for a number of years. He was well known 
throughout his country and was held in the highest 
cm. He was by trade a carver. He became 
t.ic inventor of the art of wood carving as prac- 
tised by thi' Swiss, and traveled all over the world 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



83 



in that vocation. He was a soldier in the Swiss 
army, serving along the border in 1870-71, holding 
the rank of first sergeant. In 1876 he came to the 
United States, locating at Philadelphia, where he 
became a noted wood carver and was in the employ 
of the leading furniture factory there. He became 
a citizen of the United States, but returned to his 
native land in 1879. He was a member of the 
Evangelical Reformed Church and was very active 
and earnest in his religious life. He married 
Margaret Willener, who was born in 1853 in Canton 
Berne, Switzerland, and who now resides in Meirm- 
gen, that country. To them were born the following 
children : Edward, who has been a soldier of the 
United States Army since 1898, was a soldier in the 
Spanish-American war, and more recently in the 
World war, being at the present time in France 
with the Fifty-Third Division, holding the rank of 
supply sergeant; Robert, the subject of this sketch, 
is the next in order of birth; Peter is a laborer 
and resides in Cleveland, Ohio; Saloma is the wile 
of Fritz Boesch, who resides at St. Gallen, Switzer- 
land, and is a soldier in the Swiss national army; 
Werner is a wood carver at Meiringen, Switzerland ; 
Lena, who died at Meiringen, Switzerland, in 1911, 
at the age of twenty-three years; Katherine is a 
school teacher at St. Gallen, Switzerland. 

Robert Schaefer received a good education in the 
public and high schools of Berne and then learned 
the trade of cheese making, a vocation in which the 
Swiss excell all other nationalities. He then went 
to Germany and for a short time was engaged in 
the cheese business there. In July, 1902, Mr. 
Schaefer came to the United States, landing at New 
York, where he remained for about three weeks. 
He then went to Canal Dover, Ohio, where he was 
engaged in general work until 1911, when he went 
to Arlington, Wisconsin, and established a cheese 
factory for Jacob Marty. April I, 1915, he came 
to Salesville, Montana, and erected a cheese factory, 
the first one to be established in the State of Mon- 
tana. He has equipped his factory with every 
modern facility for the making of all kinds of 
cheese, and so successful has he been in his opera- 
tions that he has established two other similar fac- 
tories in this state, one at Belgrade and one at 
Central Park, both of which have proven very 
successful. The products of these factories have 
already earned a high reputation for their excellent 
quality and they are sold all over Montana and 
other neighboring states. Mr. Schaefer has $30,000 
invested in the business, and he is reaping the fruits 
of his faith and his works. 

Politically Mr. Schaefer is an ardent supporter 
of the republican party, while his fraternal relations 
are with Salesville Lodge No. 69, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows; Pythagoras Lodge No. 2, Knights 
of Pythias, at Bozeman; and the local lodge of the 
Daughters of Rebekah. 

In 1902, at Nobitz, Saxony, Robert Schaefer was 
married to Anna Eliza Ruchti," a native of Canton 
Berne, Switzerland, and to them have been born 
three children, namely: John Godfrey Peter, who 
died at the age of six months; Alma Louise, born 
February 21, 1904, and John William Franklin, born 
September 11, 1905. 

Although a quiet and unassuming man, with no 
ambition for public position or leadership, Mr. 
Schaefer has contributed to the material, civil and 
moral advancement of his community, while his 
admirable qualities of head and heart and the 
straightforward, upright course of his daily life has . 
won for him the esteem and confidence of the people 
with whom he has been associated. 



WILLIAM CASTLES has been in Montana fourteen 1 
years, and since he came to Superior his business 
as a merchant has rapidly increased until his firm 
is now one of the largest individual taxpayers 
in Mineral County. 

Mr. Castles was born at the City of Liverpool, 
England, February 12, 1878. His father, Wesley 
Castles, was born at Drumlin, County Armagh, 
Ireland, in 1855, was reared and married there, 
and became a farmer and butcher. After his mar- 
riage he moved to Liverpool, where he owned a 
chain of meat markets. He prospered in his 
business affairs and subsequently retired to Belfast, 
Ireland, where he died in 1912. He was a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, the Apprenticed Boys of 
Derry, was a Methodist and a conservative in 
politics. His wife was Mary Theressa Bland, who 
was born at Lancaster, England, in 1854, and died 
at Belfast in 1915. They had a family of ten chil- 
dren, including: Wesley, who became a miner, went 
to Australia, and died in that country at the age 
of forty; Lavinia Augusta, wife of George Ruddell, 
owner of a meat market at Lurgan, Ireland; Bertha 
Louise, wife of Robert J. Mulligan, a musketry 
instructor in the British army living at Belfast; 
William ; Garfield and Eleanor Gertrude, both of 
whom came from the old country and have lived 
at Superior, Montana, since December, 1919. 

William Castles acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Liverpool and at Lurgan, 
Ireland, finishing his work in school at the age of 
sixteen. He learned the butcher business under 
his father. Mr. Castles is a veteran English soldier, 
having spent eighteen months in the Boer war dur- 
ing 1901-02. He was a sergeant of the Sixtieth 
Company of Imperial Yeomanry. From South 
Africa he returned to Lurgan, Ireland, and engaged 
in the butcher business for himself for several 
years. 

Mr. Castles came to the United States in 1906, 
and going to Missoula, Montana, was employed by 
the John R. Daily Company and Koopman & Wiss- 
brod, owners of two extensive wholesale and retail 
meat businesses in that city. In November, 1915, 
Mr. Castles came to Superior, and in partnership 
with Koopman & Wissbrod bought the butcher 
shop of Tom Merkle, who was a pioneer miner and 
butcher at Superior. Mr. Castles dissolved his 
partnership with Koopman & Wissbrod in 1916, and 
acquired the entire business. Soon afterward he 
formed his present partnership with Paul Westfall, 
each partner sharing equally. Mr. Castles is a 
practical meat market man, and Castles and West- 
fall own and operate a large ranch at Ashmore. 
On this ranch are raised the cattle, sheep and hogs 
which constitute practically the entire source of 
supply for the meat sold at the market in Superior. 
They specialize in fresh and choice beef, mutton 
and pork, and as the animals are killed and dressed 
at the ranch and sold at the market the middle- 
man's profits are eliminated and the business is 
conducted on the lowest possible scale of prices 
consistent with high quality and good service. 

In November, 1917, Castles & Westfall also bought 
the general merchandise store of Jesse Daly at 
Superior. Mr. Castles also is manager of this busi- 
ness, located on Main Street. It carries one of the 
best selected stocks of general merchandise in West- 
ern Montana, and the firm enjoys a trade derived 
from all over Mineral County and the western 
portion of Missoula County. 

Mr. -Castles is an independent voter, is a member 
and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and superintendent of its Sunday school, and is 
a member of Montana lodge of Superior, Ancient 



84 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Free and Accepted Masons, having been transferred 
from Acacia Lodge No. 24, Lurgan, Ireland. 

In 1912, at Missoula, he married Miss Catherine 
Louisa Irwin, daughter of William and Elizabeth 
(Brown) Irwin. Her father is a retired butcher 
at Lurgan, Ireland, and her mother died there. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Castles are five in 
number: Mary, born March 22, 1913; William 
Irwin, born June 12, 1914; James Bland, born Sep- 
tember 22, 1915; John Ross, born January 17, 1917, 
and Wesley, born September 26, 1918. 

CHARLES C. WALLIN, M. D., vice president of the 
Montana Medical Society, has been a resident of 
this state since 1905 and has achieved special promi- 
nence as a physician and surgeon. His home is 
at Lewistown and he is a former president of the 
Fergus County Medical Society. 

Doctor Wallin was born at Saugatuck, Michigan, 
January 3, 1876, a son of Franklin B. and Hannah 
(Chadbourne) Wallin. His parents were both na- 
tives of New York State. His grandfather Wal- 
lin was a tanner and was in that business nearly 
seventy years. He built up a large industry in 
Michigan, conducted for many years as C. C. Wal- 
lin & Sons. Franklin B. Wallin learned the trade 
from his father and after 1874 continued the busi- 
ness as the Wallin Leather Company, with offices 
both at Chicago and Grand Rapids, Michigan. He 
was president of this company until his death, 
which occurred in August, 1908. He was then sev- 
enty-seven years of age and had lived in Michigan 
from early childhood. He was a member of the 
Michigan Legislature during the Civil war and 
gave ardent support to all war measures. He was 
active in the Congregational Church and was widely 
known at Grand Rapids and vicinity not only be- 
cause of his business prominence but for his many 
philanthropies. His wife, Hannah Chadbourne, was 
born in Otsegq County, New York, and died at 
Grand Rapids in 1910. She was descended from 
a Revolutionary soldier and through her Doctor 
Wallin has membership in the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. 

Doctor Wallin is the oldest of a family of three 
children. He grew up from the age of five in 
Grand Rapids, attended the public schools there 
and finished his literary education at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, graduating in 1898. In the spring 
of that year he enlisted in the Thirty-Second Michi- 
gan Volunteers for service in the Spanish-American 
war, and was afterward transferred to the hos- 
pital corps of the Third Division of the Fourth 
Army Corps. While at Tampa, Florida, he was 
stricken with typhoid and was invalided home. 

Doctor Wallin graduated from the medical school 
of the University of Michigan in 1902, and began 
practice at Grand Rapids, where he was associated 
with an eminent Michigan surgeon, Dr. S. C. Graves. 
While at Grand Rapids, Doctor Wallin was on the 
staff of three of the city hospitals. He came to 
Montana in 1905, first locating at White Sulphur 
Springs and in 1908 moving to Lewistown. His 
work as a surgeon has been especially noteworthy, 
and he ranks among the state's best qualified men 
in that field. He has held a captain's commission 
in the medical department of the National Guard 
of Montana. He is a member of the American 
Medical Association, and is affiliated with all 
branches of Masonry, including DeWitt Clinton 
Consistory of the Scottish Rite at Grand Rapids 
and Saladin Temple of the Mystic Shrine in the 
same city. Doctor Wallin has served as health 
officer of Lewistown for half a dozen years. He 
has done post-graduate work in Chicago and in 



1911 went abroad and spent much time in the 
Vienna Hospital. He is a member of the Judith 
Club, is a Delta Upsilon college fraternity man and 
in politics a republican. 

September 10, 1902, Doctor Wallin married Miss 
Florence A. Munro, daughter of Malcolm Munro. 
Mrs. Wallin was born at Wardville, Ontario, Can- 
ada. She and her husband are members of the 
Episcopal Church. Doctor and Mrs. Wallin have 
two children, Chadbourne and Frances Marcella.- 

ISAAC MORRIS HOBENSACK was among the founders 
and for many years president of one of the greatest 
hardware businesses in Montana, the Judith Hard- 
ware Company of Lewistown. In recent years he 
has become noted as a Bonanza wheat grower in the 
Northwest, and his acreage produced a tremendous 
volume of cereal during the war years. He is still 
prominent in that industry. 

Mr. Hobensack was born on his father's farm in 
Bucks County, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1858, and 
has been a resident of Montana for over thirty 
years. His parents, Isaac Cornell and Mrs. (Hog- 
land) Hobensack, were both natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, where they spent their lives, his father as a 
Pennsylvania farmer. The father died in 1904, at 
the age of seventy-six and the mother at the same 
age in 1908. Isaac C. Hobensack was a whig and 
republican in politics. He and his wife had nine 
children, five of whom are still living, Isaac Morris 
being the second in age. 

The latter lived in Pennsylvania until he was 
twenty-seven years old. In that time he received 
his education in the common schools and worked 
at home on the farm. His health became increas- 
ingly impaired, and he finally 'sought recuperation 
and improvement in the northwest country. He ar- 
rived at Lewiston, Montana, August 4, 1885, having 
made the journey by railway and stage. Mr. Hoben- 
sack since boyhood has been possessed of much me- 
chanical talent, and while he came to Montana with 
little or no capital, he found a ready outlet for 
his energies and one that has brought him rapid 
advancement along the road of prosperity. His 
first work in this state was sawing wood. Later he 
bought a wood sawing outfit. In July, 1889, he had 
the distinction of opening the first hardware store 
at Lewistown, his partner being Oliver Jutras. The 
business was conducted as Jutras & Hobensack until 
1892, at which date. Mr. Theodo're Sloan purchased 
Mr. Jutras' interests. The firm continued as Hoben- 
sack & Sloan until the spring of 1898 when Mr. 
Arthur Stoddard purchased Mr. Sloan's interest. 
Mr. Hobensack organized the Judith Hardware Com- 
pany in 1900, and was its president and manager 
until 1904. After that he was satisfied with the 
duties of president, which gave him more time to 
look after his other interests. He remained presi- 
dent of this prominent hardware house until 1917. 

In 1915 Mr. Hobensack first appeared upon the list 
of prominent Montana wheat growers. In that year 
from 500 acres of land he harvested 25,000 bushels 
of wheat. Partly through his interest in the busi- 
ness and under the stimulation of patriotism he ac- 
complished almost a miracle in Montana in 1918, 
when he harvested twenty-four bushels of spring 
wheat to the acre on 500 acres. While that much 
grain has been frequently raised by individuals in 
Montana in other years, it will be remembered that 
the year 1918 was marked by an almost total failure 
of wheat in Montana. Mr. Hobensack has used a 
unique implement for the northwestern wheat fields, 
known as the Holt Self Propelled Combination 
Harvester, a machine which accomplishes a remark- 
able saving in extensive wheat fields. 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



85 



Mr. Hobensack was one of the organizers of the 
Winnett Irrigation Company, owning many thousands 
of acres of land. Mr. Hobensack has turned his 
interests amounting to a ninth of all the land over 
to his wife and five children. The company is rapidly 
developing this tract as one great wheatfield. Mr. 
Hobensack is interested in local affairs, particularly 
in educational matters, and served as a member of 
the Lewistown School Board many years. He is a 
republican in politics. 

For several years past he and his family have 
spent the winters in California. May 10, 1878, he 
married Miss Sarah Saurman, a native of Mont- 
gomery County, Pennsylvania. Anna, the oldest of 
their five children, is the wife of Paul- Taber and 
has a son and daughter; Elsie is the wife of Harry 
Eldridge and the mother of two children; the son 
Horace enlisted June 14, I9 J 8, in the Machine Truck 
Corps at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky, and re- 
ceived his honorable discharge in December of the 
same year. Ella is the wife of Frank J. Hagan and 
has a son. Bernice, the youngest child, is still at 
home with her parents. 

PHILIP WESCH, a resident of Billings since 1899, 
a mason contractor, has done a notable service in 
the. upbuilding of the city, and there are many mon- 
uments in the shape of important public and busi- 
ness structures that testify to his personal abilities 
and the efficiency of the organization of which he is 
the head. 

Mr. Wesch was born at Mannheim, Baden, Ger- 
many, June 21, 1859. His father, John Valentine 
Wesch, was born in 1814 and died in 1862. He 
spent all his life in Germany, and was also a con- 
tractor. In religion he was a Lutheran. His wife 
was Atelheit Diemer, who was born in 1819 and 
died in 1870. Of their children Philip alone came 
to the United States. Henry, Hiop and Julius all 
died in the old country. Tobias is still living in 
Baden, a policeman. Rosina is the wife of Henry 
Steck, a shoemaker. Atelheit is deceased. Valen- 
tine is a cabinet maker and city clerk. 

Philip, the youngest of eight children, attended 
the common schools to the age of fourteen and then 
served a thorough apprenticeship at the mason's 
trade. He came to the United States in 1883, spend- 
ing one year in Wisconsin, followed his trade at 
Mitchell, South Dakota, until 1889, was in the Black 
Hills region at Hot Springs for ten years, and in 1899 
moved to Billings, where he has since been at the 
head of an organization for mason contracting. Mr. 
Wesch did the mason work on the City Hall, the 
Northern Hotel, the Public Library, the Northern 
Pacific Freight Depot and many other important 
buildings. Out of his business effort he has achieved 
property, having a modern home at 522 North Thir- 
tieth Street, an apartment house at 2905 North 
Twenty-ninth Street and a ranch of 320 acres a. 
mile west of Acton. Until he sold his interest in 
1918 he was president of the Billings Artificial Stone 
Company. . 

Mr. Wesch votes as a republican, is affiliated with 
the Congregational Church, and is a member of Bill- 
ings Star Lodge of Odd Fellows, Hot Springs 
Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen, the 
Mystic Toilers, Billings Lodge, Brotherhood of 
American Yeomen, and the Billings Club. 

In 1885, at Mitchell, South Dakota, Mr. Wesch 
married Miss Bertha George, daughter of Julius and 
Amelia (Witsel) George. Mrs. George lives at the 
home of Mr. Wesch. Julius George was a sailor by 
life occupation, and his family lived at Hamburg, 
Germany, while he sailed to all parts of the world. 
After retiring from the sea he came to the United 



States. Mrs. Wesch died at Hot Springs, South 
Dakota, in 1890, the mother of one daughter, Rosa 
Anna, wife of John W. Barnes, a dentist at Billings. 
In 1891, at Hot Springs, Mr. Wesch married Her- 
mina George, a sister of his first wife. They have 
four children: Walter Philip, who lives at Billings 
and was recently mustered out of the United States 
service as a lieutenant of the ordnance department; 
Leo, who is a sergeant with the Army of Occupa- 
tion in Germany; Florence, a student in Bozeman 
College at Bozeman, and Elizabeth, in the Billings 
public schools. 

NELSON STORY, JR., started life with the tre- 
mendous responsibility of being worthy of the name 
he bears, one of the oldest and most honored in 
Montana's commercial history. In the course of 
twenty years he has fully justified his possession of 
the name of his honored father. He is a thorough 
business man, a capable executive, and by his judg- 
ment in picking new tenants has been able to carry 
on and direct many of the large and important en- 
terprises of his section of the state. 

While the Story family has been prominent in 
Montana for over half a century, from this state 
its wealth and enterprise have radiated into other 
sections, particularly to Southern California, and 
much of the individual wealth and enterprise of Los 
Angeles is associated with the family. 

Nelson Story, Sr., still credits Bozeman as his 
home town. He is past eighty years of age and was 
born at Bungtown in Meig* County, Ohio, April I, 
1838. His paternal ancestry goes back in New Eng- 
land history to about 1640. He lived on his father's 
farm in Ohio until fourteen years of age. The death 
of his father threw him upon his own resources, 
and from that time forward he had to carve his 
.own destiny. He had a partial college education. 
He was a participant in the early freighting between 
the Missouri River and the Rocky Mountains, and 
as a miner, freighter, cattle and horse dealer and 
man of varied interests his career belongs to the 
history of California, Montana and a number of ter- 
ritories. Going to Kansas in territorial times he 
worked at splitting rails, breaking the tough prairie 
sod, and at other forms of arduous labor. He first 
came to Montana in 1863, starting from Fort Leaven- 
worth and crossing to Denver. From Denver he 
started for Bannock, Montana, with an outfit of 
two wagons, two yoke of cattle and sixteen packs 
of jacks. He made his first stop at Alder Gulch 
and then established a store with the goods he had 
brought overland at Summit City. Much of the 
merchandise he sold was brought in by pack train 
from Nevada. He also bought a mining claim and 
took out $40,000 worth of gold. Nelson Story, Sr., 
arrived at the little community of Bozeman in 1865, 
and no one figure has been longer and more com- 
pletely identified with that Montana City than Nel- 
son Story. During the Civil war period he drove 
a wagon team for the government in the vicinity of 
Fort Laramie. In 1866 he went to Texas, bought a 
large number of cattle and drove them over the 
northern trails to Montana. He was very successful 
in the stock business and for many years continued 
merchandising. At one time he was one of the 
leading cattle men and horse men of Montana, and 
ran his cattle on the Crow Indian Reservation. He 
disposed of his horses in 1888 and gradually sold 
out his cattle between 1890 and 1893. He was also 
in the milling and banking business, establishing the 
Gallatin Valley National Bank, of which he was 
president. .He is still a large stockholder in the 
Commercial National Bank. Most of the money 
derived from his cattle interests he invested in Los 



86 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Angeles city property. He established the Nelson 
Story & Company flour mill, afterwards the Boze- 
man Milling Company, which was owned by his 
son Nelson and Thomas B. Story. In 1919 they 
transferred their holdings in this company to the 
Montana Flour Mills Company for stock in that 
corporation. Though retired from the heavy re- 
sponsibilities of business, Nelson Story, Sr., is still 
a very active man for his years. He is a republican 
in politics. 

Nelson Story, Sr., married Ellen Trent, who was 
born in Neosho County, Kansas, in 1845. The two 
oldest of their children died in infancy. Rose is 
the wife of Dr. G. L. Hogan, a physician and sur- 
geon at Los Angeles. The next in age is Nelson, 
Jr. Thomas Byron is president of the Bozeman 
Milling Company, an extensive sheep rancher, stock- 
holder in the Commercial National Bank and owner 
of a large amount of city property in Bozeman. 
The sixth child, Alice, died in infancy. Walter P. 
Story is a prominent figure in the City of Los 
Angeles, and is distinguished as the builder of the 
first skyscraper office structure in that city, the 
Story Building, which was completed in 1910. 

Nelson Story, Jr., was born at Bozeman May 12, 
1874, and had every opportunity for a thorough 
business training and liberal education. He attended 
public school at Bozeman, including high school, 
spent three years in the Shattuck Military Academy 
at Faribault, Minnesota, two years in the Ogden 
Military Academy at Ogden, Utah, where he gradu- 
ated in 1893, and during 1893-94 was a student in the 
Bryant & Stratton Business College. On returning 
to Bozeman he went to work in his father's flour 
mill and managed it for several years. He then 
established a machine shop and foundry, building 
it up to a successful local enterprise and then sell- 
ing. Since then his interests have been of a broad 
and varied nature. He still owns a large amount of 
real estate, several business buildings and residences ; 
is vice president of the Bozeman Milling Company; 
owner of the Story Supply Company, automobile 
accessories, on West Main Street and Grand Street, 
of which James R. Cochran is manager ; and owner 
of the Story Rock Company, operating a rock crush- 
ing plant at Logan, Montana, with a capacity of 500 
tons of rock a day during the summer season. This 
business is managed by Q. A. Harris. Mr. Story 
does a great amount of contracting. At present he 
has a force of men and equipment, with Ben Hager 
as foreman, digging ten miles of dyke and drainage 
for the Madison Dyke & Drain Company. This is a 
project to keep the ice in the Madison River from 
overflowing the farms in Gallatin County. For the 
prosecution of his many varied business affairs Mr. 
Story maintains a suite of offices in the Story 
Building on the corner of West Main Street and 
Black Avenue. This office building, one of the best 
in Bozeman, is owned by his sister Mrs. G. L. Hogan. 
Mr. Story has been sensitive to his obligations to 
the public welfare. He was elected in 1902 and 
again in 1910 a member of the Legislature, serving 
in the eighth and tenth sessions. For one term he 
was mayor of Bozeman, for four years a member 
of the City Council, and for two years a county 
commissioner of Gallatin County. He is a republi- 
can in politics, is past master of Bozeman Lodge 
No. 18, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, a mem-, 
ber of Zona Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, is past 
commander of the Knights Templar, and is affiliated 
with Algeria Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Helena. 
He also belongs to Bozeman Lodge No. 463, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, and is a mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Story and family live in a modern home at 



722 South Central Avenue. He married at St. 
Louis, Missouri, June 10, 1895, Miss Etha L. Mayo, 
daughter of William . Henry and Ella (Curley) 
Mayo. Her father, now deceased, was a thirty-third 
degree Mason, at one time recorder of the Masonic 
bodies of the Missouri jurisdiction, filling that 
office for thirty years before his death. Mrs. Mayo 
lives with Mr. and Mrs. Story. The latter have two 
children. Nelson Story III, born January 13, 1000, 
was educated in the local public schools and in Cul- 
ver Military Academy in Indiana two years and 
graduated in 1919 from the Gallatin County High 
School. Mayo, a daughter, was born October 13, 
1902, and is attending one of the best finishing 
schools for- girls in the Middle West, Monticello 
Seminary at Godfrey, Illinois. 

J. C. CON KEY for the past fifteen years has been 
editor of the Ravalli Republican at Hamilton. That 
accounts for only about half of his experience 
as a printer and newspaper man. For a number 
of years before coming to Montana he was a director 
of one of the leading pa'pers of California. 

Mr. Conkey was born at West Union, Iowa, 
November 7, 1870. He is of Scotch ancestry. In 
Scotland the name was spelled McConkey. Three 
of the McConkey brothers came to New York in 
colonial times. The family to which J. C. Conkey 
belongs subsequently dropped the "Me." His gramf- 
'father, Jacob Conkey, was born in New York State 
in 1800, and was an early settler in Iowa. He ac- 
quired a large amount of farm land, in the vicinity 
of West Union, and left a large farm to each of 
his three sons and much valuable city property 
to his daughter. He died in 1864. A. B. Conkey, 
father of the Hamilton editor, was born at Defiance, 
Ohio, in 1845, and during his youth removed to 
West Union, Iowa, where he married and where he 
was successfully engaged in farming until 1881. He 
then followed the business of contracting and build- 
ing in West Union, but in 1899 retired from busi- 
ness and has since been a resident of Fresno, Cal- 
ifornia. He is an independent republican in politics. 
A. B. Conkey married Edith Daniells, who was born 
in New York State in 1843. J. C. Conkey is the 
eldest of their children. Maud is married and lives 
at Fresno, while Laura is the wife of Clyde Wolf, 
an orchard owner at Lindsay, California. 

J. C. Conkey attended the public schools of West 
Union, Iowa. Already he had acquired some prac- 
tical knowledge of printing and newspaper work, 
having begun an apprenticeship with the West Union 
Gazette in 1886. In 1887 on leaving high school, 
he went to Alameda, California, and there for 
thirteen years was connected with the semi-weekly 
Argus. He was one of the incorporators of the 
publishing company which issued that paper as a 
daily, and remained a director in the establishment 
until 1900. By too close application to his work 
he found that he needed a change and vacation, 
and during that interval he visited a friend in 
Anaconda. While in Anaconda he worked with the 
Standard and then with the Jefferson County Zephyr 
at Whitehall. That was a busy time for newspaper 
men and editors. W. A. Clark was making a cam- 
paign for the United States Senate, and journalism 
was a much cultivated profession. 

While visiting the Bitter Root Valley in 1904 
Mr. Conkey leased the Ravalli Republican for one 
year with the privilege of purchasing the plant. 
About 1909 he bought the paper, having in the mean- 
time edited it. The Ravalli Republican was estab- 
lished in 1887 and is the leading paper in Ravalli 
County and enjoys a large circulation and influence 
throughout Western Montana. The plant and offices 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



87 



at 301 Main Street have the best of equipment in 
the way of a printing plant. The paper is republican 
in politics. 

Mr. Conkey is a republican voter. He is affiliated 
with Ionic Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Hamilton Chapter No. 18, Royal Arch 
Masons, Crusade Commandery No. 17, Knights 
Templar, Algeria Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Helena, and is a member of the Hamilton Chamber 
of Commerce. In 1915, at Watsonville, California, 
he married Miss Isabel Gilray, daughter, of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Gilray. Her parents reside at Sault 
Ste. Marie, Michigan, where her father is a Gov- 
ernment employe. Mrs.. Conkey finished her edu- 
cation in a college in Michigan. They have one 
daughter. Catherine, born October 21, 1917. 

GEORGE D. AUNE. In the present day when com- 
petition is keen in all lines of endeavor, the ac- 
complishment of success demands a definite and 
decided superiority. This is true at the village 
four-corners, but it is applicable in a much greater 
degree in those lines of high specialized work where 
the best brains are devoted to intricate detail, striv- 
ing to produce absolute efficiency and to secure 
the advantage from each new trend of circum- 
stance. Whether in the professions, in productive 
lines, in work of a prombtive character, or in the 
markets of the world, a man finds equally keen 
strife ahead of him ; and when the fight is made 
with discernment, vigor and aggressiveness, and 
success is acquired, half the compensation, other 
than financial independence, is derived from the 
satisfaction of having come a conqueror over those 
worthy of his steel. One of the highly-specialized 
industries of today is that which deals with the 
sale of insurance. In this field George D. Aune 
of the firm of Osborne & Aune, at Lewistown is 
practically a newcomer, but what he has accom- 
plished thus far in his career would make it indi- 
cate that he will be able to hold his own in the face 
of stern competition. 

Mr. Aune was born at Delavan, Faribault Coun* 
ty, Minnesota, July 19, 1884, a son of Peter and 
Bargild (Iverson) Aune, natives of Norway, where 
the former was born in 1860 and the latter in 1861. 
The Aune family was first founded in the United 
States by the grandfather of Mr. Aune, who came 
here during the excitement raised over the dis- 
covery of gold in California, in 1849. After spend- 
ing some time in California he returned to Nor- 
way, but this country had made such an impres- 
sion upon him that he decided to make it his home, 
and in 1866 again came here, this time with his 
family. Locating in Faribault County, Minnesota, 
he passed the remainder of his career in farming. 
Peter Aune was but six years of age when he ac- 
companied his parents to the United States, and 
his education was secured in the district schools 
of Faribault County, where he passed his boyhood 
in assisting his father with the work of the home- 
stead. He inherited this property at his father's 
death and made numerous improvements there, de- 
veloping it into one of the most valuable proper- 
ties in the locality. He continued to be engaged 
in farming and raising stock for some years in 
Faribault County, but finally disposed of the home- 
stead at an attractive figure and moved to Cot- 
tonwod County, where he bought land and engaged 
in farming and stockraising until 1913- Since that 
time his attention has- been given largely to busi- 
ness ventures, for Mr. Aune has been a most suc- 
cessful and energetic man and has branched out in 
his activities in a number of directions. He is now 
the owner of undertaking establishments at Heron 



Lake, Jeffers, Lamberton, Windom, Cotton and 
Highwater, in addition to which he superintends the 
operation of his farm and has large landed inter- 
ests in the states of South Dakota and Oregon. 
Mr. Aune is a member of the Lutheran Church 
and in politics a republican. He was married in 
Nicollet County, Minnesota, to Bargild Iverson, and 
they are the parents of three sons and three daugh- 
ters, all of whom are living. 

The eldest of his parents' children, George D. 
Aune received his education in the public schools 
of Faribault County, Minnesota, and Saint Olaf 
College. His boyhood was passed on his father's 
farm, and his first money was earned during the 
threshing season, but he had no desire for an agri- 
cultural life, and when the opportunity presented 
itself accepted the chance to enter the First State 
Bank of Walnut Grove, of which he was assistant 
cashier for two years. In 1907 he came to Mon- 
tana, and, at Moore, became identified with the 
Judith Commercial Company, in which general store 
he worked for six months. In the meantime he 
had entered Government land and eventually proved 
up on 160 acres. Subsequently he entered the State 
Bank of Moore, of which he was assistant cashier 
until 1913, and then removed to Denton, Montana, 
where he became one of the organizers of the Den- 
ton State Bank. Of this institution he remained 
cashier and manager until May, 1918. That month 
marked his advent at Lewistown, where he became 
associated with J. N. Osborne, under the style of 
Osborne & Aune, general agents for the Montana 
Life Insurance Company. The firm is doing an 
excellent business, and Mr. Aune has already es- 
tablished himself in public confidence and that of 
his business acquaintances as a man of marked abil- 
ity and energy and of strict integrity and probity. 
Mr. Aune is a member of the Western Star Lodge 
No. 104, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and 
Lewistown Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. He is a Lutheran in his re- 
ligious belief, but at Lewistown supports the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church in . its benevolent and char- 
itable work. As a voter he favors republican candi- 
dates and principles. 

On June 15, 1910, Mr. Aune married Miss Chaun- 
cie A. Albright, who was born at New Haven, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of David J. and Martha 
K. (Ash) Aune, who were the .parents of three 
sons and three daughters. Mrs. Aune was the third 
child in order of birth and four are now living. 
Mr. and Mrs. Albright are farming people of near 
Stafford, Kansas, and are held in high esteem. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Aune: Arlene M., Judith O. and Margaret L. 

FRANK C. CLINE. President of the Billings Laun- 
dry and owner of one of the valuable ranches of 
this section, Frank C. Cline has earned the right 
to be numbered among the leading business men of 
Billings. He was born at Bay City, Michigan, 
March 6, 1876, a son of M. C. Cline. The Cline 
family was established in the United States by the 
grandfather of Frank C. Cline, and he died at Simco, 
Ontario, Canada, before his grandson came into the 
world. M. C. Cline now resides at Saginaw, Michi- 
gan, but he was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1847, 
and was there reared. After attaining his majority 
he came to the United States and located at Bay 
City, Michigan, where he became superintendent of 
the Industrial Iron Works, this concern being en- 
gaged in building large cranes, so that his position 
was a responsible one. Here he remained until 1901, 
when he moved to his present location to become 
foreman of the Jackson-Church Company, but he is 



88 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



now retired. Politically he is a democrat. His re- 
ligion is that of the Roman Catholic Church. While 
living in Canada he served in the Dominion Army. 
M. C. Cline was united in marriage with Margaret 
Leonard, born at Jersey City, New Jersey, and died 
at Bay City, Michigan, in 1895- Their children were 
as follows: Frank C., whose name heads this re- 
view; Arthur M., who owns a laundry at Stockton, 
California ; and Mabel, who died at the age of thirty- 
five years. After the death of his first wife M. C. 
Cline was married to Kate Moriaraty, born at Mon- 
treal, Canada, and their children are as follows: 
Leo, who is attending the Ann Arbor Training 
School for the United States Service, and Martin, 
Jr., a student, who is at home. 

Frank C. Cline attended the public schools of Bay 
City through the eleventh grade, and the Bay City 
Business College, from which he was graduated in 
1896. Too close application to his books brought 
on a period of ill health, and he decided to enter 
the business world, his first position being with the 
Bay City Telephone Company. Mr. Cline then 
learned the laundry business and established the Val- 
ley Laundry at Bay City, selling it in 1897. For the 
subsequent twelve months he was at Grand Forks, 
North Dakota, being there connected with railroad 
work, but then re-entered the laundry business at 
Delano, Minnesota, selling his establishment seven 
months later. In 1900 he came to Montana and for 
two years had charge of the National Laundry at 
Great Falls, leaving that city for Idaho Falls, Idaho, 
where he owned and operated a laundry for two 
years, and then soW it. For a short period there- 
after he had charge of the New Laundry at Butte, 
Montana, and then, in June, 1907, came to Billings 
and bought the Billings Laundry, having as part- 
ners in his venture George H. Casey, T. J. Casey 
and Frank T. Ryan. This laundry, which was estab- 
lished in 1894, is the largest establishment of its 
kind in Southeastern Montana, and gives employ- 
ment to over loo persons. Work is sent to it from 
points as far distant as 200 miles in Montana, North 
Dakota and Wyoming. The building, located oppo- 
site the post office, is of brick and is supplied with 
every modern appliance known to the laundry trade. 
Mr. Cline today is the majority stockholder and is 
its president and Mrs. Cline is the treasurer. Mr. 
Cline is independent in his political views. He be- 
longs to the Roman Catholic Church of Billings, 
and to Billings Council No. 1259, Knights of Colum- 
bus, and Billings Lodge No. 394, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. Since coming to Billings 
he has been connected with the Midland Club and 
the Billings Golf Club. His residence is regarded as 
one of the finest in the city, and it is located at 
729 North Twenty-ninth Street. In addition to his 
other holdings he owns 640 acres of valuable ranch 
land nine miles east of Billings, which he devotes 
to the growing of grain. 

In 1907 Mr. Cline was united in marriage with 
Miss Louise Hayes, a daughter of John and Louise 
Hayes, the former of whom was a merchant, but is 
now deceased. The latter, who survives, lives at 
Escanaba, Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Cline are the 
parents of the following children : Dorothy, who 
was born April 23, 1908; Arthur, who was born in 
June, 1911; Francis, who was born February 10, 
1915, and John Martin, born March 31, 1919: A 
sound, reliable and upright business man, Mr. Cline 
has forged ahead and has firmly established himself 
in the confidence of the people of Billings. His 
name stands for good work and honorable methods, 
and his business shows a healthy and gratifying in- 
crease annually. 



ERNEST C. BUSCH. A man who can speak with 
authority on the life and times of Montana going 
back over forty years is Ernest C. Busch, a retired 
rancher living at Lewistown. In his early days 
in the state Mr. Busch worked as a sheep herder, 
and he has covered a large part of the state in his 
experiences with sheep, cattle and horses. 

Mr. Busch was born in Germany, October 28, 1849, 
a son of John C. and Elizabeth (Wilah) Busch. His 
parents spent all their lives in Germany, where his 
father was a produce dealer. His father died at 
the age of seventy and his mother at seventy-four, 
Ernest being the oldest of their eight children, two 
of whom are now living. 

Mr. Busch finding the conditions of Germany op- 
pressive and restrictive of business opportunity came 
to this country in 18/6. His first destination was 
Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he arrived in the month 
of March. After working out as a farm hand for 
about two years he came up the Missouri River to 
old Fort Benton, Montana, thence to Sun River, 
working as a cowboy, and later in the vicinity of 
Fort Maginnis took employment as a sheep herder. 
In 1883 he located his homestead in section 27, town- 
ship 14, range 19, and made a start with a small 
flock of sheep. In 1890 he disposed of his flocks and 
began raising cattle and horses, and from that time 
on was connected with general farming until Novem- 
ber I, 1918, when he leased his farm and with ample 
means retired to enjoy life at Lewistown, where in 
addition to his own home he owns considerable real 
estate. Mr. Busch is a republican but has never 
cared for office, and has done his part as a Montana 
pioneer by studious attention to his own business 
and respecting always the rights and privileges of 
others. January i, 1898, he married Miss Dena Al- 
bers. 

LESTER PARK WORK is vice president and manager 
of the Story-Work Sheep Company, which with re- 
lated interests comprise one of the most extensive 
sheep outfits in Montana. Mr. Work is a young 
business man, well fitted by experience and training 
for the great responsibilities he bears, a native Mon- 
tanan and son of a noted pioneer of this country, 
John F. Work. 

John F. Work, who is still living at Bozeman, 
was born June 30, 1835, n t far from the battlefield 
of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania. He was a son of 
James and Marie (Black) Work, his father also 
a native of Pennsylvania. James Work during the 
early '405 moved to Illinois and later to Missouri, 
was a broom manufacturer and meat packer in 
those states, and in 1849 started overland for Cali- 
fornia with a bull team. In 1853 he returned to 
Missouri and resumed pork packing, but during 
1862-63 was again in California engaged in mining 
and farming, spent another year in Idaho, and after 
that lived on a farm in Missouri until his death 
in 1869. 

John F. Work was too young to accompany his 
father to California. He spent his early life on a 
Missouri farm and in 1857 took up the business of 
driving cattle from Missouri to the twin cities of 
Minnesota. In 1859 he went to the Pike's Peak 
gold mines. He was a member of the party with 
his father which started with an outfit of mules and 
horses to California in 1862. At South Pas's he left 
the party to join an expedition going to the gold 
mines at Salmon River, and had many varied ex- 
periences and adventures in Idaho and Washington. 
In the latter part of 1865 he arrived at Virginia 
City, Montana, soon afterward went to Helena, 
and in succeeding years was identified with several 
pioneer communities in the Northwest, including 




MRS. ERNEST C. BUSCH 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



89 



Deer Lodge. He was at Bozeman in 1867 an d m 
1872 he located on a ranch on the Upper Yellow- 
stone River in Park County. He was a rancher 
and. miner for several years and in 1876 accom- 
panied an expedition to the Black Hills. He was 
superintendent for several large cattle firms in 
Montana, also continued his business as a freighter, 
and about 1880 became interested in the sheep busi- 
ness, which he handled on a growing scale in con- 
nection with many other activities in transporta- 
tion, contracting, and other lines of business. He 
made his permanent home at Bozeman in 1892. He 
was personally associated with many of the fore- 
most men of Montana in pioneer and later times, 
and probably no one now living has a better mem- 
ory of the history of Montana over a period of 
fifty years than John F. Work. 

January 10, 1884, he married Mary Evelyn Stone, 
who was born in Missouri. Her father, Jeremiah 
Stone, came to Montana in 1883 and was a rancher 
near Bozeman for many years. John F. Work and 
wife had three children : Ward, who died in child- 
hood; Vida M., who is the wife of Ray C. Hollo- 
way, a Bozeman merchant; and Lester P. 

Lester Park Works was born thirteen miles east 
of Livingston February 25, 1889. He was educated 
in the common schools of Bozeman, completed his 
junior year in the Gallatin County High School and 
spent two years in the Montana State College. 
On leaving school in 1909 he entered the sheep 
business in the Yellowstone River Valley, and for 
a time was associated with Peter Koch, a Montana 
pioneer who died at Pasadena, and with John Har- 
vat, the well known business man of Livingston. 
These men handled sheep on a thousand hills and in 
many valleys of Montana. They bought out the 
Briggs Ellis outfit, one of the largest in the state. 
In 1914 Mr. Work withdrew from this combination 
and became associated with T. B. Story of Boze- 
man, organizing the Story-Work Sheep Company 
and the Clear Range Sheep Company. In the in- 
corporation of the Story-Work Sheep Company T. 
B. Story is president, Mr. Work, vice president and 
manager, and W. P. Harmon, secretary and treas- 
urer. In 1918 this firm sheared 65,000 old sheep and 
raised thousands of lambs. They own 100,000 acres 
of deeded land in Park, Sweetgrass, Gallatin, Broad- 
water and Meagher counties. The offices of the 
corporation are .in the Story Block at Bozeman. 

Mr. Work is also interested in real estate at 
Bozeman and has a modern home there at 415 South 
Central Avenue. He is a republican in politics and 
is affiliated with Bozeman Lodge No. 463 of the 
Elks. At White Sulphur Springs, Montana, in 
November, 1917, he married Miss Olga Black, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Powell Black, both now de- 
ceased. Her father was a pioneer lawyer at White 
Sulphur Springs. Mrs. Work is a graduate of the 
College for Girls -at Lexington, Kentucky. 

JEFFREY P. WHYTE has lived in the Bitter Root 
country of Western Montana for the past twenty 
years, and has developed one of the leading mer- 
cantile concerns at the town of Darby in Ravalh 
County. 

His ancestors were English. His grandfather 
was born in England in 1799, and was an early 
settler in the province of Quebec, Canada, where 
he followed farming. He died at Carillon, Quebec, 
in 1889. Capt. John Whyte, his son, and father 
of the Montana merchant, was born at Carillon, 
Canada, in 1847. He was reared and married m 
his native province, and became a boat captain on 
the St. Lawrence River. He lived for many years 
at Grenville, but since 1884 has had his home at 



North Bay in Ontario and is now retired from his 
profession. He is a liberal in political thought 
and a Catholic and Knight of Columbus. He mar- 
ried Bridget Carlon, who was born in Ireland in 
1845 and died at North Bay in 1908. A brief record 
of their children follows : Thomas, a farmer at 
Wisawasa, Ontario, Canada; Jeffrey P.; Robert, a 
demonstrator for the Ross Rifle Factory living in the 
City of Quebec; Rose "Ellen, wife of William Tray- 
nor, chief mail clerk on the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way, living at North Bay, Ontario. 

Jeffrey P. Whyte was born at Grenville, Quebec, 
Canada, August 19, 1876, and received most of his 
education in the public schools of Wisawasa. He 
left school at the age of eighteen, and worked in 
the lumber woods of Michigan until he came to 
Montana in 1900. Then for eight years he was 
connected with the lumber industry of the Bitter 
Root Valley until 1908 when he opened a cafe at 
Darby. He conducted that business seven years, 
and in 1915 opened a toggery store and in 1918 built 
the substantial structure on Main Street which 
houses his present mercantile concern, with a full 
stocked department of groceries and a store for 
men's and boys' clothing. He also owns a modern 
home on Main Street. 

Mr. Whyte is a member of the Catholic church, 
is affiliated with Hell Gate Lodge No. 383, of the 
Elks, and is a democratic voter. In April, 1908, 
at Hamilton, Montana, he married Miss Josephine 
Solleder, a daughter of August and Mary (Lyman) 
Solleder, who reside at Darby, Montana. Her 
father is a carpenter and builder. Mr. arid Mrs. 
Whyte have two children : Gordon, born in June, 
1909, and Maxine, born in September, 1910. 

OSCAR p. MUELLER. From the practice of law 
to a position of trust in the Government of his 
community is but a step for an individual to make, 
one that has been frequently taken to the better- 
ment of the aspirant and his constituency. In his 
professional practice an attorney must necessarily 
show his hand, expose his ability, the strength of 
his personality and the stand he takes on the fun- 
damental principles governing society. Should he, ' 
at some future time, desire to enter political life 
he must rely upon the record of his practice to 
gain him support. He may be accredited with the 
requisite knowledge and experience, but unless the 
footprints he has left behind him are clear and 
clean and in unshaken places he cannot inspire nor 
hold public confidence. If, on the other hand, he 
leaves behind him a succession of imprints all 
leading unerringly in the proper direction, the pub- 
lic recognizes him as being trustworthy, and the 
step from legal practice to a repressentative posi- 
tion in the Government is successfully accomplished. 
Of the members of the Fergus County legal pro- 
fession who have impressed themselves upon their 
communities as worthy of trust and have thereby 
been honored by election to public office, Oscar O. 
Mueller, city attorney of Lewistpwn, is an example. 

Mr. Mueller was born on his father's farm in 
Madison County, Iowa, March 29, 1877, a son of 
George and Katherine (Schutt) Mueller, the for- 
mer born at Waldeck-on-the-Rhine, Germany, in 
1846, and the latter was born in Germany in 1851. 
George Mueller was but thirteen years of age when 
he emigrated to the United States on a sailing 
vessel which made port at New York after a voy- 
age of three weeks on the Atlantic. After spend- 
ing some time in New York City he went to War- 
saw, Illinois, where he remained for three years, 
and during that time was married. He and his 
wife became the parents of seven children, all of 



90 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



whom are living, of whom Oscar O. was the fifth in 
order of birth. From Warsaw Mr. Mueller re- 
moved to Madison County, Iowa, and there worked 
as a farm hand. He was industrious and frugal, 
and eventually managed to accumulate sufficient 
means to purchase a farm of 160 acres, on which 
he engaged in farming and stock raising operations. 
As the years passed he continued to add to his 
holdings until he and his youngest son were the 
owners of a full section of fine farming land, which 
is still in their possession. They are also exten- 
sive breeders of graded stock and are well known 
among the agriculturists and stockmen of their 
part of the State of Iowa. Mr. Mueller is one of 
the prominent men of his locality and has various 
interests, one of which is the Farmers Insurance 
Company, of which he was one of the organizers 
and of which he has served as president for about 
ten years. He takes an active and interested part 
in the promotion of the best interests of his lo- 
cality, and in his political adherence is a stanch 
republican. 

After attending the public schools of Madison 
County, Iowa, Oscar O. Mueller took a four-year 
course in the Iowa State Normal College, being grad- 
uated therefrom in the class of 1903. At that time he 
entered upon a short career as a school teacher, 
being for two years principal of schools at Stacy- 
ville, Iowa, but this was not his chosen vocation, 
and in 1905 he entered the law department of the 
University of Iowa, being graduated therefrom with 
his degree of Bachelor of Law with the class of 
1908. He was admitted to the Iowa bar, and Sep- 
tember ii, 1008, came to Lewistown, Montana, 
being admitted to practice in this state in the month 
following, when he at once settled down to the 
duties of a professional business, the growth of 
which has since been as rapid as it has been satis- 
fying in its importance. He maintains offices in 
the Empire Bank Building and is accounted one of 
the leaders of the Fergus County bar. His knowl- 
edge of the fundamental principles of his calling 
and his skill in presenting his arguments put him 
in a position where he was recognized as being 
'of official qualifications, and for two years he 
served as assistant county attorney. On June i, 
1916, to fill a vacancy, he was appointed city at- 
torney of Lewistown, and May i, 1917, received the 
reappointment to that office, which' he has since 
filled with ability and fidelity. He is a republican 
in politics and his fraternal connections include 
membership in Lewistown Lodge No. 37, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is past 
master, and Hiram Chapter No. 15, Royal Arch 
Masons, of which he is at present high priest. 

On June 9, 1915. Mr. Mueller was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Josephine Cook, who was born at 
White Sulphur Springs, Montana, the elder of the 
two children of Charles W. and Abbie (Kenne- 
cott) Cook, pioneers of Montana, where they are 
now living, the former a native of Unity, Maine, 
and the latter of New York State. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mueller are the parents of one son, Glenn H. 

H. LEONARD DF.KALB. A former judge of the Dis- 
trict Court, H. Leonard DeKalb began -the practice 
of law at Lewistown in 1902, and has been identi- 
fied with many important professional and public 
interests since that date. 

Judge DeKalb was born at Alexandria, Nebraska, 
May 10, 1879, a son of Thomas J. and Margaret 
(Raugh) DeKalb, both natives of Pennsylvania. His 
father was born in Philadelphia April 2, 1845. His 
mother was born in Luzerne County June 15, 1847. 
Thomas J. DeKalb was educated in Philadelphia 



and in 1861, at the age of sixteen, enlisted in the 
Second Pennsylvania Cavalry and served with the 
Army of the Potomac until the close of hostilities. 
He was in the battle of Gettysburg and all the other 
campaigns of his regiment. At the close of the war 
he returned home, taught school for several years, 
and then set out for the western frontier, locating 
in Jefferson County, Nebraska, where he took up a 
homestead and where he still lives, owning between 
700 and 800 acres of land. He gave his active super- 
vision to general farming and stock raising until 
1904, since which year he has lived retired. He has 
served several terms as county commissioner of Jef- 
ferson County, is a democrat and a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. He and his wife had 
six children, three sons and three daughters, all 
living. 

H. Leonard DeKalb attended the public schools in 
Nebraska and finished his law course in the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska with the class of 1902. He was 
admitted to the Nebraska Bar in June of that year 
and on the 24th of December arrived at Lewistown, 
Montana, where he was soon admitted to the state 
bar. Since then he has been busied with a general 
practice. He was elected city attorney of Lewistown 
in 1904, and filled that office six years. On March 
31, 1917, he was appointed district judge, but re- 
signed from the duties of that office May 18, 1918. 

Judge DeKalb served as a member of the County 
Council of Defense. He is a democrat and a mem- 
ber of the State Bar Association. He is junior 
partner of the well known law firm of Belden & 
DeKalb, of Lewistown. Fraternally his affiliations 
are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

May 30, 1905, Judge DeKalb married Vera B. Mc- 
Clean. She is a native of Muscatine, Iowa. They 
have one daughter, Nellie Mohrine. 

EDWIN L. FENTOX. There are no obstacles so great 
that they cannot be overcome provided a man brings 
to bear upon them a sufficient amount of mental 
effort and persistence. One of the advantages of 
this country is that opportunities are offered to all 
alike, and that the poor boy can give rein to his 
ambition with just as much hope of attaining to the 
goal he sets for himself as the one who is the son of 
wealthy parents, and sometimes with more, because 
in the first instance the economic necessities of the 
lad without means are sufficiently urgent to compel 
him to exert himself to the utmost and to develop 
every faculty. Edwin L. Fenton, one of the alert 
business men of Laurel, Montana, presents in his re- 
markable career a case which comes under the above 
classification. Le.ft an orphan, and reared in an 
orphan school, he has never ceased to press forward, 
and each time he has entered a field he has regis- 
tered the sharp, resonant impressions of the vibrat- 
ing needle of experiences gained in a former one. 
His every act has been sharp, clear and illuminating, 
and yet at the same time he has kept an open mind 
and heart and quick understanding for the needs of 
humanity. The result has been that he has not only 
achieved material prosperity, but he has been elected 
and re-elected to various offices by his appreciative 
fellow citizens and stands today as one of the repre- 
sentatives of the highest type of western manhood 
and American citizenship. 

Edwin L. Fenton was born at Wellsboro, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 8, 1839, a son of Henry Fenton and 
grandson of Luman Fenton, who was an early 
farmer of Pennsylvania, and died on his farm near 
Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, in 1886. He married Emily 
Austin, and she also died on the old homestead near 
Wellsboro. Henry Fenton was born near Wellsboro, 
Pennsylvania, and was a farmer in his native state. 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



91 



With the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in 
Company G, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, in 1861, and was killed during the first battle 
of the Wilderness. With the organization of the 
republican party he espoused its principles. His wife 
bore the maiden name 'of Maria Hard, and she was 
boTn in Pennsylvania and died at Wellsboro, Penn- 
sylvania, having borne her husband two children, 
Ida L., who died in Ohio, and Edwin L., whose name 
heads this review* 

Losing his father at such a tender age, Edwin L. 
Fenton was reared and educated in the Soldiers' 
Orphan School at Mansfield, Pennsylvania, and re- 
mained in this institution until he was sixteen years 
old, leaving at that age to begin working in the 
outside world. Until 1883 he remained in Pennsyl- 
vania, working at whatever tasks of an honest nature 
could be secured, for one year of that period teach- 
ing school, but his ardent young spirit could not be 
content with the narrow confines of the East, and 
in the spring of that year he struck out for the 
West, and like our "greatest American," gained ex- 
perience and health on a ranch, spending one sum- 
mer near Grand Forks, North Dakota. Marrying 
in that fall, he went back to Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, 
and for a year worked in a lumber yard and saw- 
mill. He then moved to Pen Yan, New York, and 
for four years was engaged in farming, but having 
once experienced the freer life of the West, he came 
back to it, arriving in Park City, Montana, in 1889, 
and after some changes homesteaded, his ranch being 
located between Park City and Laurel. After prov- 
ing this property he sold it in 1899, and that same 
year came to Laurel, was made its postmaster and 
held that office for fourteen successive years. In 
1913 he embarked in his present realty business, and 
also sells insurance and negotiates loans, doing the 
largest business of its kind in the county. His office 
is conveniently Ipcated on First Avenue, and he owns 
the building in which it is located, as well as a 
modern residence on Third Avenue. 

A republican of the stalwart type, Mr. Fenton has 
been a potent force in his party ever since coming 
to Laurel, being its first mayor, and he is deputy 
assessor for Yellowstone County and clerk of the 
school board of Laurel. In addition to his other 
interests he is justice of the peace and a notary 
public, and discharges the duties of police judge. 
He is secretary and treasurer of the Laurel Realty 
Company, the Old Mill Ditch Company, and of the 
Farmers Mutual Telephone Company, to all of these 
concerns bringing a ripened experience and sound 
judgment which are of great benefit in the trans- 
action of business and the securing of public con- 
fidence. 

In fraternal matters Mr. Fenton is deservedly 
popular and is past grand of Laurel Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows; helped to organize 
Camp Laurel, Modern Woodmen of America, and 
he is also an aggressive member of the Laurel 
Commercial Club, exerting himself to add new names 
to the membership list of all of these organiza- 
tions. The Laurel Congregational Church has in 
him one of its most helpful members, and he is one 
of its deacons. 

On December 3, 1883, Mr. Fenton was united in 
marriage with Miss Anna L. Crans at Grand Forks, 
North Dakota. She was born at Wellsboro, Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of O. V. Crans, who also offered 
up his life on the altar of his country during 
the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Fento.n became the 
parents of the following children : Nina, who mar- 
ried B. H. Clark, lives at Billings. Montana, where 
Mr. Clark is an inspector for the Northern Pacific 
Railroad Company, and they have three children, 



Anna, Edwin and Frank; George W., who is un- 
married, resides at Laurel, and assists his father 
in business ; Helen, who married Frank Jacobs, is 
a resident of Perma, Sanders County, Montana, 
where Mr. Jacobs is a stockman and stock in- 
spector ; Frances, who resides at home, is one of 
the teachers of the First Ward School of Laurel; 
and Harriet, who was graduated from the Laurel 
High School in the class of 1918, is stenographer 
for Attorney W. L. A. Calder, of Laurel. The 
children have all been, well educated and are a credit 
to their parents and the training they have received. 
Mr. Fenton is admittedly a man who early learned 
the value of time, the pleasure of working, the in- 
fluence of example and the virtue of patience, and 
is now reaping the benefits of this knowledge, and 
his community is the richer for his presence in it. 

WILLIAM MERRIAM COBLEIGH is the scientific 
authority to whose department are referred many 
problems involving the pure water supply, sani- 
tation, and matters involving the science of chem- 
istry in relation to industry. Mr. Cobleigh is a 
chemist, and has been teaching and practicing his 
profession in Montana for over a quarter of a cen- 
tury. He is state chemist and head of the chem- 
istry department of the Montana State College at 
Bozeman, where he has his home and headquarters. 

He was born at Haverstraw, New York, Sep- 
tember 7, 1872, of New England ancestry. His 
grandfather, John Cobleigh, was a native of New 
Hampshire, descended from a family that settled 
there in colonial times from England. John Cob- 
leigh spent his active life as a farmer and died 
in Northumberland, New Hampshire, about 1874. 
Professor Cobleigh through his mother is a mem- 
ber of the Merriam family, which was also estab- 
lished in New Hampshire in colonial days, when 
four brothers came over from England. 

William Cobleigh, father of William Merriam, 
was born in Northumberland, New Hampshire, in 
1838. He was a student in Dartmouth College 
when the war broke out and in 1861 joined the 
Sixteenth New Hampshire Infantry and was all 
through the war. He was in the Shenandoah Valley 
campaign under General Sheridan and at the 
famous Battle of Winchester. He was mustered 
out with the rank of captain. After the war he 
married and engaged in the mercantile business at 
Stratford, New Hampshire, and about 1869 moved 
to Haverstraw, New York, where he remained a 
few years. In the meantime he finished his studies 
and entered the ministry of the Presbyterian 
Church. He is well remembered in a number of 
communities of the Northwest for his missionary 
labors. He preached at Park River and Grafton, 
North Dakota, and in the spring of 1887 came to 
Corvallis, Montana. He was one of the first min- 
isters there and also at Grantsdale. Later he had 
pastorates in Idaho and Washington, but finally 
retired to Corvallis in Ravalli County. He was 
a republican in politics and a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. Rev. William Cobleigh married 
Julia A. Merriam, who was born in Northumber- 
land, New Hampshire, in 1840 and is now living at 
San Diego, California. 

William Merriam Cobleigh was the only child 
of his parents. He was fifteen years old when they 
came to Montana. He had attended school in 
Grafton, North Dakota, including the high school 
there, and after September, 1887, continued his 
preparatory work in the College of Montana at 
Deer Lodge and was graduated from that insti- 
tution with the degree of E. M. in June, 1894. 
In the meantime he had spent several vacations as 



92 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



assistant chemist for the Anaconda Mining Com- 
pany at Anaconda. A quarter of a century ago 
Mr. Cobleigh came to Bozeman as assistant in 
chemistry at the State College. He is now the 
oldest professor in continuous service among the 
state colleges of Montana. As head of the depart- 
ment of chemistry his offices are in the New Chem- 
istry Building. Mr. Cobleigh has been a close 
student of his profession, and has taken post-gradu- 
ate courses in Columbia University, Harvard Uni- 
versity, the University of Chicago. He received 
his master's degree in chemistry at Columbia Uni~ 
versity in 1899. 

Besides his work as state chemist of Montana 
he is chemist for the State Board of Health. He 
is a member of the American Public Health Asso- 
ciation, Fellow of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, is a member of the 
American Waterworks Association and the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society. Mr. Cobleigh is a trustee 
of the Presbyterian Church at Bozeman, is a re- 
publican, and is affiliated with Bozeman Lodge No. 
18, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

He resides in a modern home at 909 South Third 
Avenue. He married at Sunderland, Massachusetts, 
in 1901, Miss Esther Rose Cooley, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. George L. Cooley, the latter now 
deceased. Her father is a retired farmer at 'Sun- 
derland. Mrs. Cobleigh is a graduate of the Moody 
Seminary at Northfield, Massachusetts. To their 
marriage were born three children, Winifred M., 
born December 16, 1903, now in the Gallatin County 
High School; Lois E., born December 21, 1910, 
a pupil in the grammar schools of Bozeman ; and 
Norman B., born June 12, 1919. 

H. L. SUMMERS. Soon after his return from 
France, where he served with the Twentieth Engi- 
neers, H. L. Summers, a native son of Montana, 
engaged in business at Darby, being president and 
founder of the Darby Mercantile Company. 

Mr. Summers was born near Hamilton, Montana, 
June 9, 1892, and his people were among the pioneers 
of the territory and state. In the paternal line 
he is of Welsh ancestry. His father, John A. 
Summers, was born near Springfield, Missouri, in 
1849, grew up there and at the age of nineteen 
came to Montana in 1868. He was a pioneer black- 
smith at Deer Lodge, Blackfoot City, Missoula, and 
Corvallis, and was married in the latter town. After 
his marriage he moved to the vicinity of Hamilton, 
where he engaged in cattle raising. He was suc- 
cessful as a rancher much above the ordinary and 
at one time owned 800 acres of land and ran be- 
tween 1,000 and 1,500 head of cattle. He sold his 
cattle interests in 1899. Not long afterward he 
bought a ranch of 380 acres near Corvallis, improved 
it as a diversified farm, and in 1907 harvested the 
largest crop of oats ever produced by an individual 
farm in the Bitter Root Valley. His yield that 
year was 22,000 bushels. Not long afterward he 
sold his farm and in the spring of 1908 moved to 
Missoula, where he lived retired, and in 1911 went 
to Los Angeles, California, where he died January 
J 5> I9!5- He was a republican in politics, and for 
many years served as master of Ionic Lodge No. 
38, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

John A Summers married Juda Chaffin. She was 
born in Kansas in 1860, and when a small girl came 
to the Bitter Root Valley of Montana, where she 
grew up. She is now living at Santa Monica, 
California. Her father, Elijah Chaffin, was a Mon- 
tana pioneer and a successful farmer and stock- 
man in the western part of the state. He died at 
Corvallis many years ago. John A. Summers and 



wife had the following children: Inez, wife of 
John Ashby, a farmer at Corvallis; Margaret, who 
lives with her mother; Jeanette, wife of Harry W. 
Johnson, a rancher at Corvallis ; Fred, a contractor 
of street paving at Los Angeles; H. L. Summers; 
Leland, a stockholder in the Keyes & Company 
produce business at Corvallis ; and Louise, who 
lives with her mother in California. 

H. L. Summers was educated in the public schools 
of Hamilton, attended the high school at Corvallis 
through his junior year, spent eight months in the 
Garden City Commercial College and for one term 
was a student in the Los Angeles Business College. 
Leaving school in 1912, Mr. Summers spent three 
years as cashier with the Missoula Electric Supply 
Company, for two years was bookkeeper with the 
Western Montana Bank at Missoula, and in 1916 
he made an extensive travel tour by automobile, 
leaving Missoula, going to San Francisco, to Ti- 
juana in Lower California, and returned to Mis- 
soula in the spring of 1917. Following that he 
was teller in the Missoula Trust & Savings Bank 
until March 25, 1918, the date of his enlistment 
for war service. He was sent to Washington, 
District of Columbia, with the Forty-Third Engi- 
neers, and soon afterwards was transferred to the 
Twentieth Engineers, with which he went over- 
seas May 22nd, reaching France on the 3Oth of 
May, 1918. He was overseas more than a year, 
and on his retyrn landed at Newport News, Vir- 
ginia, June 23, 1919, and was mustered out at Fort 
A. D. Russell July 2, 1919. 

After spending three months recuperating Mr. 
Summers organized the Darby Mercantile Company, 
and opened the general department store on Novem- 
ber i, 1919. This company now has the leading 
general mercantile business in Ravalli County out- 
side of Hamilton. Besides Mr. Summers as presi- 
dent of the company Valentine Troop is vice presi- 
dent and E. L. Sargent is secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Summers is also secretary and treasurer of 
the Majestic Bottling Works at Missoula. He is 
a republican, and is affiliated with Harmony Lodge 
No. 49, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at 
Missoula, and Hell Gate Lodge No. 383, of the 
Elks at Missoula. He is unmarried. 

WALTER H. PECK. A pioneer of Montana of the 
year of 1881, Walter H. Peck furnishes in his ca- 
reer an illustration of self-made manhood typi- 
cal of the lives of many of the men who had the 
privilege of opening up this state and who, in ad- 
vancing the general progress of the community, 
found the opportunity of prospering personally, 
both in fortune and position. Mr. Peck, who is 
now practically retired from active affairs, makes 
his home at Lewistown, but is still a large land- 
holder and is vitally interested in all that pertains 
to the welfare of the state in which he was given 
his chance to prove himself. 

Walter H. Peck was born in Illinois, August 28, '. 
1853, a son of Rev. John and Sarah (Bremmer) 
Peck. His father, who was a graduate of the New 
York State University, was a Presbyterian minis- 
ter who came west in young manhood and had 
his first charge in Indiana. He was born at Green- 
wich, Connecticut (then known as Horse Neck), 
and for a number of years filled pulpits in Indi- 
ana and Illinois, theVi returning to New York, where 
he preached in churches in the western part of 
that state. Subsequently he again came west, lo- 
cating at Saint Peter, Minnesota, where he was 
engaged in his ministerial labors at the time of 
the Indian uprising at Mankato, Minnesota, near 
Saint Peter, during the '6os, when thirty-six of the 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



93 



belligerents were hanged by the United States Gov- 
ernment. Later Reverend Peck went to Paterson, 
New Jersey, where he passed his last days, and there 
his death occurred in 1868, when he was fifty-six 
years of age, his wife, a native of New York City, 
surviving until 1876 and dying at the age of fifty- 
four years. Reverend Peck was first a whig and 
later a republican in his political views. He and 
his wife were the parents of two sons and one 
daughter, and Walter H. was the second in order 
of birth. 

Walter H. Peck was educated in the public schools 
of Paterson, New Jersey, and was but fourteen 
years of age when he began work in the general 
offices of the Erie Railway Company. Assigned 
to the 'auditor's office, during the next, eleven years 
he applied himself to clerical work and gave his 
employers the best of satisfaction. The call of the 
West, however, which he had heard for some years, 
eventually proved too strong and in the spring of 
1881 Mr. Peck settled his affairs in the East and 
journeyed by train to Bismarck, North Dakota. He 
arrived in time to catch the first steamboat of the 
year, the famous old Far West, with Captain 
Good in command. The boat was crowded to its 
capacity with early spring arrivals, and fourteen 
days were consumed in making the trip to Fort 
Benton, Montana, where Mr. Peck continued his 
journey by securing passage on a stage. This car- 
ried him to what was known as Little Mack's Ranch, 
the sheep ranch of a Mr. McDonald, for whom 
Mr. Peck worked for about 2j4 months, at $35 per 
month, this being the first money he had earned in 
Montana. Returning to Fort Benton, he joined an 
ox team outfit which he accompanied to another 
sheep ranch. It was not long thereafter that Mr. 
Peck purchased his first band of sheep, buying 
them from Paris Gibson, one of the pioneer sheep- 
men of the state. Mr. Peck herded this band dur- 
ing the winters of 1881 and 1882, and then located 
on Government land on Box Elder Creek. There 
he established the first postoffice in Meagher (now 
Fergus) County, on his ranch, this being known 
as Roy postoffice, of which he was the first post- 
master. It was a year later before he secured serv- 
ice by the United States mail, the stage coaches 
running between Fort Meginnis and Rocky Point, 
stopping tri-weekly at his office. 

Mr. Peck continued in the sheep business until 
1899, in which year he sold out his bands and lo- 
cated at Garneill, opening a general merchandise 
store. In the meantime he did not give up his 
ranching operations, in fact increased them and 
ran large herds of cattle, and continued in both 
lines of endeavor until 1916, when he practically 
retired from active labor. He has since resided 
at Lewistown, where he has been in the enjoyment 
of the rewards which are his by reason of his years 
of faithful and industrious labor. He is still the 
'owner of between 1,300 and 1,400 acres of valu- 
able ranch land, which he rents to tenants, Jn ad- 
dition to 320 acres which he himself superintends 
merely "to keep his hand in." Mr. Peck has always 
been satisfied with the activity to be found in his 
ranch and business interests, and has had no de- 
sire for the political forum. While public life has 
not appealed to him, he has been of value to his 
community in his interpretation of the meaning of 
citizenship and all good movements have had his 
unquestioned and unwavering support and co- 
operation. As a voter he is a republican, and he 
has several fraternal affiliations. 

Mr. Peck was married September 22, 1885, to 
Miss Zelinda Stuart, who was born in Randolph 
County, North Carolina, a daughter of Henry and 



Abigail (Lossiter) Stuart, natives of the Old North 
state, the latter of whom still survive. Mr. Stuart, 
who was born July 15, 1828, died December 17, 
1906, having been the father of seven children, all 
of whom are still living, and Mrs. Peck is the eld- 
est. Mr. Stuart left North Carolina and went with 
his family to Adams County, Illinois, where he 
was engaged in farming and stock raising for 
some years, but later sold his property and pur- 
chased a farm in Hancock County of the same 
state, where- he spent the last years of his life. 
He was a republican politically, and in religious 
faith was reared as a Quaker, but later embraced 
the faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Peck there have been born a daugh- 
ter and two sons : Helen B. who resides with her 
parents; Henry Stuart, an electrical engineer, ap- 
plied for an office in the United States Engineer- 
ing Department at Vancouver, British Columbia, 
in September, 1917, and October i, 1918, received 
his commission as first lieutenant of United States 
Engineers, United States army, sailed from New 
York City, and is now in service in .France. In 
April, 1919 he received his commission as captain. 
John Walters, a farmer and ranchman of Fergus 
County, married Margaret Schuster and has three 
children, John Addison, Walter Hyer and Virginia 
Stuart. 

FRED R. WARREN came to Montana in 1883. As 
a freighter, rancher, banker and business man of 
large affairs his interests have been identified with 
the Judith Basin for a third of a century, and his 
name is well known all over the region around 
Lewistown. 

Mr. Warren was -born in Wyoming County, New 
York, January i, 1857, a son of Otto and Mary 
(Jones) Warred. His parents were also natives 
of New York State. His father spent his active 
career as a farmer and building mover, and also 
made a creditable record as a Union soldier. He 
died at the age of sixty-three. He was a Metho- 
dist, a republican, and a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. His wife died at the age 
of fifty-five. Fred is the fourth in a family of two 
sons and five daughters, all living. 

He acquired his education in Livingston County, 
New York, attending the grammar and high schools 
there. In 1879, at the age of twenty-two, he came 
West, his first destination being Fort Collins, Colo- 
rado. He spent two years on a sheep ranch, and 
learned many of the details of that industry. He 
then engaged in teaming, hauling the output of a 
brick yard while Fort Collins was in process of 
construction. On March 12. 1883. he left Fort Col- 
lins with a four-horse team bound for Billings, 
Montana. He reached Billings May 4th, and that 
may be considered the date of his permanent es- 
tablishmerfl in Montana. At Billings he made the 
acquaintance of P. W. McDow, and soon took 
a load of freight and came on to the Judith Basin, 
stopping where Utica is now located. For about 
two years he worked for John D. Waite in the 
sheep business, and then began handling a flock 
of his own. He increased his interests and at one 
time he had 14,000 sheep grazing on his own and 
leased lands. In 1914 he sold his ranch and sheep 
and in that year located at Lewistown, where he 
built the comfortable home in which he still resides. 

In 1910, with his son-in-law, Mr. Woodward, 
he organized the Warren Banking Company at 
Hobson. Later they established the First National 
Bank at Hobson, Mr. Warren having served as 
president from the beginning. He is also presi- 
dent of the Stone Born Ranch Company, president 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



of the Sapphire Oil Company of Kansas and vice 
president of the Lewistown Oil Company of Mon- 
tana. 

In politics Mr. Warren is a republican. While 
living at Utica he served as chairman of the school 
board and while on the board a fine public school 
building was erected. He is affiliated with Lewis- 
town Lodge No. 37, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Hiram Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and 
Lewistown Commandery, Knights Templar. He also 
belongs to Lewistown Lodge No. 456, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and is one of the 
lodge trustees. He is also a trustee of the Judith 
Club. 

March 27, 1887, Mr. Warren married Margaret 
Tabler, a native of New Albany, Indiana. They 
have one daughter, Ethel G., wife of Herbert F. 
Woodward. Mr. Woodward is manager of the 
First National Bank at Hobson, Montana. The 
five grandchildren are Margaret, Warren, Ruth, 
Ethel Louise and Claria Woodward. 

J. A. NORTH. During the past fifteen years one 
of the leading operators .in realty at Billings has been 
J. A. North, a progressive, energetic and well- 
informed business man who has steadily worked his 
way to a place of importance. His interests are ex- 
tensive and varied, centering principally in city 
properties, farms and loans, and in each line of en- 
deavor he has brought to bear an inherent and 
developed ability that has carried his activities 
through to a successful conclusion. 

Mr. North was born at Adel, the county seat of 
Dallas ' County, Iowa, January 20, 1872, a son of 
T. R. and Naomi E. (Stewart) North, and a member 
of a family which originated in England and settled 
in Ohio at an early day in the history of that 
state. T. R. North was born in Ohio in 1835, and 
was reared in Ohio and Indiana, being first married 
in the latter. A lawyer by profession, he first prac- 
ticed his calling in Indiana, subsequently went to 
Adel, Iowa, where he had am office for some years 
and where he was married a second time, and finally 
returned to Warsaw, Indiana, in 1909, and retired 
from active pursuits. He now makes his home there 
and is in the enjoyment of the rewards that have 
come to him through the unceasing labors of his 
active years. Mr. North was a railroad attorney and 
became well and favorably known in his profession, 
as he was also as a leader of the democratic party 
in the various communities in which he resided. On 
numerous occasions he was a delegate to state, con- 
gressional and national conventions, and, while he 
never sought nor cared for public office, was elected 
mayor of Adel, Iowa, and gave that city an excellent 
administration. He was formerly a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In 1864 Mr. 
North enlisted in the Fifty-second Regiment, Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, and, among other engagements, 
fought at Stony Creek. His only brother, Jack 
North, was captain of a company of Indiana volun- 
teers, and fought under General Sherman in his 
notable march from Atlanta to the sea. By his first 
marriage T. R. North had one daughter, Lillie, who 
married J. H. Whitman, who is now deceased. She 
was again married, being united with A. Andrus, 
a mine owner and timberman of Astoria, Oregon. 
The second union of T. R. North was with Naomi 
E. Stewart, who was born in Illinois in 1839 and 
died at Medford, Oregon, in 1888, and they became 
the parents of six children : Etta, who is unmarried 
and a resident of Racine, Wisconsin ; Austin, presi- 
dent of the North Real Estate and Investment Com- 
pany, of Billings ; J. A., of this review ; Alice, who 
is the widow of Mr. Milliken, who died shortly 



after their marriage, and a resident of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania ; Joseph R., president of North 
Brothers, Incorporated, a real estate firm of Billings ; 
and Otto, secretary and treasurer of the same con- 
cern. After the death of his second wife T. R. 
North was again married, being united with Laura 
Abbott, of Des Moines, Iowa. They became the 
parents of one child, Ava, who is married and re- 
sides at Warsaw, Indiana. 

J. A. North obtained his education in the public 
schools of Adel, Iowa, and after his graduation from 
the high school there in 1889 went to Omaha, Ne- 
braska, where he secured a position with the Mer- 
chants Dispatch and Transportation Company. One 
year later he went to Oregon and for eight years 
was engaged in horticultural work, and in 1898 lo- 
cated at Garfield, Washington, where he was em- 
ployed in the same capacity, and in buying, packing 
and shipping fruit for four years. His next location 
was at Spokane, Washington, where for two years 
he was identified with the Great Northern Railway, 
and from that city he came to Billings in 1904 to 
engage in the real estate business, with offices at 
No. 13 First National Bank Building. He is the 
sole proprietor of the business, and is prominent 
among the handlers of farms, city properties, loans 
and insurance. Mr. North is an excellent judge of 
property values, and his wide and varied experience 
in different localities has served to develop his abili- 
ties and equip him particularly for the line which 
he now follows. His standing in business circles 
is an excellent one, for his entire career has been 
characterized by integrity and honorable dealing. 
His pleasant, modern home is situated in the suburbs, 
southeast of Billings. Mr. North is independent in 
his political views, and has not sought the doubtful 
honors of public life, but has demonstrated his good 
citizenship by public-spirited actions and through his 
support of movements calculated to benefit the gen- 
eral weal. He has various connections of a civic, 
business and social nature, and is a man who natur- 
ally makes friendships and retains them indefinitely. 

In 1892, at Jacksonville, Oregon, Mr. North was 
united in marriage with Miss Minnie Johnson, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Johnson, both of 
whom are deceased. Mr. Johnson was a real estate 
operator, first at Medford, Oregon, and later at Gar- 
field, Washington, in both of which communities he 
was held in high esteem by his business associates. 
To Mr. and Mrs. North there have been born three 
children: Bessie, the wife of Ralph L. Morris, of 
Billings, proprietor of the Billings Times: J. La- 
Verne, who is engaged in ranching west of Billings ; 
and Stewart Wells, who resides with his parents. 

ROY ORVIS WILSON is registrar of Montana State 
College and is also head of the department of sec- 
retarial studies. Mr. Wilson has spent most of 
his time since leaving college in some phase of 
educational administration, and much of the time 
also as a teacher of commercial arts. 

He was born at Dell Rapids, South Dakota, No- 
vember 26, 1884. His paternal ancestors came from 
Scotland and were colonial settlers in Massachusetts. 
The family was one of the first to settle in the 
Territory of Iowa, going there nearly a century 
ago. Grandfather Wilson was born near Decorah, 
Ibwa, in 1825. He spent his life as a farmer, and 
after retiring moved to Arlington, South Dakota, 
where he died in 1909. The name of his wife 
was Mary Wilson. B. L. Wilson, father of Roy 
Orvis, was born at Decorah, Iowa, in 1856, was 
reared and married there, moved to Dell Rapids, 
South Dakota, a little before his son Roy was born, 
and in 1887 located on a farm at Brookings, South 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



95 



Dakota, where he now lives. He has spent all 
his active life as a farmer and is now retired. He 
is a republican and is affiliated with the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. B. L. Wilson mar- 
ried Mary Holm. She was born in Decorah, Iowa, 
in May, 1863, a daughter of John Holm. John 
Holm is a native of Copenhagen, Denmark. He 
was a merchant in that city and also a prominent 
factor in world trade, owning twelve merchant 
vessels which operated on the Baltic Sea. He 
achieved much wealth by his varied commerce. He 
came to the United States and lived on a farm in 
Decorah, Iowa, for several years, but a short time 
before the outbreak of the World war returned to 
Copenhagen and resumed his business there, and 
is still living in that city. B. L. Wilson and wife 
had three children: Frank Martin, dentist, at Port- 
land, Oregon; Roy Orvis; and Ada, wife of Guy 
Miner, a merchant at Des Moines, New Mexico. 

Roy Orvis Wilson spent his early life on a South 
Dakota farm, attended school at Brookings, and 
graduated from high school in 1901. He did two 
years of commercial work in the South Dakota 
State College at Brookings, receiving his certifi- 
cate in June, 1903. From 1903 to 1905 he was 
private secretary to the president of the South 
Dakota State College and assistant registrar. 

For one year he was instructor in the commer- 
cial department of the South Dakota State Col- 
lege. From 1907 to 1911 he attended the South 
Dakota State College, and after graduating from 
the four year course, he came to Montana on 
July 5, 1911, and in the fall of that year entered 
upon his duties in the Montana State College at 
Bozeman as registrar. Since March, 1918, he has 
also been professor of secretarial studies. 

Mr. Wilson is an active member and has served 
as an elder of the Christian Church. He is a re- 
publican in politics. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with Bozeman Lodge No. 18, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, Western Star Lodge No. 4, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Bozeman Lodge 
No. 463, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and is a member of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. He and his wife reside in the Ever- 
green Apartments. He married at Bozeman in 
November, 1911, Miss Maude Moore Parker, daugh- 
ter of Rev. J. E. and Nellie A. (Moore) Parker. 
Her parents reside at Missoula, Montana. Her 
father is a minister of the Christian Church and 
is also interested in Montana property, owning a 
ranch near Missoula. 

F. M. LEWELLEN is a prominent merchant and 
business man in Northwestern Montana, being secre- 
tary and treasurer of the McCowan Commercial 
Company, 'operating the largest department store in 
Sanders County. 

Mr. Lewellen is a native of Missouri, and re- 
ceived his early commercial training in that state. 
He was born in the town of Paris November 22, 
1880. His paternal ancestors were Welsh and came 
to the United States in colonial times. His father, 
Thomas Lewellen, was born at Florida, Missouri, 
in 1827, and spent his life as a farmer at Florida 
and Paris. He died in the latter locality in 1901. 
For a number of years he devoted his farm largely 
to the typical Missouri industry of raising mules. 
During the Civil war he was on the Confederate 
side, and was all through the struggle. He was 
severely wounded near Richmond and at one time 
was made a prisoner, being kept at Alton, Illinois, 
until exchanged. Politically he was a democrat. 
Thomas Lewellen married Rebecca Woodson, who 
was born at Stoutsville, Missouri, in 1839 and died 
vol. n T 



at Paris in that state, in 1903. She was the mother 
of five children : Lena, wife of C. H. Bondurant, 
a farmer in Madison, Missouri; J. W., in the 
insurance business at Paris, Missouri; C. T. and O. 
I., both merchants at Welch, Missouri; and F. M. 
Lewellen. 

The latter attended the rural schools of Monroe 
County, Missouri, and in 1901 graduated from the 
Gem City Business College at Quincy, Illinois. For 
some time he was employed in a wholesale dry 
goods house at St. Louis, and came to Montana 
in 1904. For a short time he was with the Bozeman 
Milling Company, and spent two seasons with the 
Wylie Transportation Company in the Yellowstone 
National Park and one winter in the offices of the 
Northern Pacific Railway at Livingston. 

Mr. Lewellen joined the McGowan Commercial 
Company at Plains in 1907, beginning as clerk. He 
has promoted himself by his individual ability and 
industry to an important share of the executive 
responsibilities, now holding the offices of secretary 
and treasurer. The McGowan Commercial Company, 
whose large department store is on Railroad Street 
in Plains, was established in 1882 by the late J. A. 
McGowan. The business was incorporated in 1901, 
and the officers are C. H. Rittenour, president, R. 
A. Ruenauver, vice president, and F. M. Lewellen, 
secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Lewellen is a member of the City Council 
at Plains. He is a democrat, and is past master of 
Ponemah Lodge No. 63, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. He has a modern home at Plains. 

November 11, 1908, he married Miss Ida Flagler, 
daughter of J. Z. and Vinnie (Farmer) Flagler, 
both residents of Plains, her father being a retired 
farmer. Mrs. Lewellen is a graduate of the Missoula 
County High School and is a graduate in music 
from the Sacred Heart Academy of Missoula. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewellen have two children : John, born 
January 7, 1912; and Marion born November 13, 
1914. 

JULIAN A. SUITER. The contribution of Julian 
A. Sutter to the business prestige and development 
of the thriving City of Lewistown is a jewelry 
establishment that is at once a credit to the city 
and to its founder and proprietor. Conducted as 
Sutter Brothers, during the fifteen years of its 
existence it has followed a policy of honorable and 
straightforward business principles and policy that 
have served to establish it firmly in the confidence 
of the people and to place Mr. Sutter among the 
leading business citizens of the community. 

Mr. Sutter was born July 2, 1875, at Le Locle, 
Canton of Neuchatel, Switzerland, a son of Joseph 
and Bertha (Montandon) Sutter. His parents were 
natives of Switzerland, where they were married, 
and his father is now a resident of Plattsburg, 
Missouri, where his mother passed away in 1893. 
Of the two sons and five daughters in the family, 
Julian A. is the only one to have been born in 
Switzerland. Joseph Sutter was born in 1853 and 
was brought up in a family which for many years 
had followed the trade of watchmaking, one of 
the principal industries of that country. He, ac- 
cording to family custom, mastered the business, 
which he followed in Switzerland until 1877, when 
he immigrated to the United States with his wife 
and son. The first location of the family in this 
country was at Wooster, Ohio, where Mr. Sutter 
followed his trade until 1879, but found this too 
unremunerative in the face of the opportunities 
that were presenting themselves, and in the year 
mentioned went to Kansas, where he engaged in 
farming. In this, however, he did not prove sue- 



96 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



cessful, and in 1881 he went to Plattsburg, Mis- 
souri, and engaged in the jewelry business, which 
is another enterprise for which the Swiss nation 
is famous and for which its people seem to have 
a natural penchant. Mr. Sutter has continued in 
this line ever since and is now one of the promi- 
nent business men of Plattsburg. 

Julian A. Sutter was only two years of age when 
he was brought to this country, and was still a 
small lad when the family located at Plattsburg, 
where his early education was acquired in the pub- 
lic schools. He subsequently started to learn the 
trade of jeweler from his father. He mastered 
this business, as well as watchmaking, and after 
leaving Plattsburg went to Lincoln, where he worked 
at his trade for about nine years. In 1905 he 
established himself in business at Lewistown, and 
this city has since been the home of Sutter Broth- 
ers, the business being thus named after Mr. Sut- 
ter and his younger brother, Edouard Sutter, his 
partner. Their establishment, located at No. 417 
West Main Street, is the leading jewelry and watch- 
making business in the city, and can boast of as 
complete a stock, in proportion, as any of the great 
establishments of Chicago or the other large cities 
of the country. 

Mr. Sutter is a master of his difficult trade and 
a business man of excellent abilities, as well as a 
gentleman who adds to his other qualifications cour- 
tesy and geniality. His name on commercial pa- 
per is highly honored, evidencing his standing in 
business circles, and it has been his fortune to have 
formed lasting friendships with many of the lead- 
ing citizens of the city of his adoption. He is fra- 
ternally affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 37, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Hiram Chap- 
ter No. 15, Royal Arch Masons; Lewistown Com- 
mandery No. 14, Knights Templar; Algeria Tem- 
ple Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, at Helena; and Lewistown Lodge No. 456, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His 
political association is with the republican party, 
although he is not a politician and has never sought 
office as a candidate. With other leading business 
and professional men of Lewistown he is an actively 
interested member of the Rotary Club. 

Mr. Sutter was married February 21, 1900, to 
Miss Alta Wilson, who was born at Atchison, Kan- 
sas, and they are the parents of one son, Claude E. 

JAMES I. WERNHAM, M. D. The profession of 
medicine embraces a vast field of knowledge, and 
the successful physician must of necessity be a 
man of varied learning. Never at any time has 
the healing art demanded more of its practitioners 
than at the present day and never has the profes- 
sion given so fair an account of itself. Find the 
leading physician in a community and this acquain- 
tance will indicate with few exceptions the man 
of the greatest intellectual attainment, the keenest 
mind, the most progressive spirit and, in many 
cases, the greatest public benefactions. In the list 
of leading physicians of Billings the name of Dr. 
James I. Wernham occupies a prominent place be- 
cause of his professional accomplishments, his per- 
sonal worth and his value to his community. 

James I. Wernham was born at Marengo, Illi- 
nois, November 25, 1874, a son of Dr. S. C. and 
Emma (Titus) Wernham. The family is of Eng- 
lish origin, and was founded in America by the 
great-grandfather of Doctor Wernham, who im- 
migrated to New York City, in which metropolis 
was born in 1804 James Wernham, the grandfather 
of James I. He was a sailmaker by trade and fol- 
lowed that vocation for many years in New York, 



but late in life retired from active pursuits and 
removed to Marengo, Illinois, where he died in 1876, 
the owner of a valuable property. He married 
Margaret McKenzie, a native of New Jersey, and 
among their children was S. C. Wernham, who was 
born in New York City in 1844. S. C. Wernham 
was reared in his native community, where he 
received his preliminary educational training, and, 
having decided upon entering the medical profes- 
sion and made some preparations therefor, went 
to Chicago, Illinois, to complete his training, grad- 
uating from the noted Rush Medical College with 
the class of 1872 and the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. He at once located at Marengo, where he 
has been engaged in practice ever since, for al- 
though his years now number more than three- 
quarters of a century he still retains the confidence, 
reverence and affection of the poeple who have 
had his ministrations for so many years and who 
will allow themselves to be served by no other 
practitioner. Not alone in his profession has he 
been prominent, for civic affairs have claimed a 
large share of his attention, and the pioneer physi- 
cian has borne a goodly part of the responsibilities 
of office. He served as alderman and mayor of 
Marengo and as coroner of McHenry County, Illi- 
nois, in addition to which for many years he dis- 
played his friendship for education as an active 
and helpful member of the school board. He is 
a faithful member of the Baptist Church, which 
he joined many years ago, and is a leading Mason 
of his locality. Doctor Wernham married Emma 
Titus, who was born at Pennington, New Jersey, 
in 1849, and they became the parents of four chil- 
dren : Dr. James I.; Spencer, who is a decorator 
residing at Elgin, Illinois ; George, a dry goods 
merchant of Chippewa Falls, Minnesota ; and Emma, 
the wife of Frank McCarty, a leading attorney 
of Elgin, Illinois, and at present a member of the 
Illinois State Legislature. 

James I. Wernham attended the public schools 
of Marengo, Illinois, and early in his career evi- 
denced a predilection for his father's profession. 
He graduated from the high school at Marengo 
in 1893 and after one year entered the University 
of Illinois, where he pursued a four-year course 
and graduated in the class of 1899, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science. This was followed by a 
course of three years in Rush Medical College, Chi- 
cago, Illinois, where he had a brilliant career, and 
was a member of the Nu Sigma Nu Greek letter 
medical fraternity and graduated in 1902 with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. He was a member 
of the Kappa Sigma Greek letter college fraternity 
at the University of Illinois. During the year 

1902 the young physician served as interne at the 
Post-Graduate Medical College, Chicago, and in 

1903 commenced practice at Marengo with his 
father. In March, 1904, to further his medical 
education, he went to Europe, where he remained 
until April, 1905, taking post-graduate work at 
Vienna and Berlin, particularly specializing in gen- 
eral and surgical diagnosis, a field in which he 
has since attained something more than a local 
reputation and in which he is accounted an author- 
ity. On his return to Marengo he rapidly assumed 
a place of leadership among the younger physi- 
cians, and was the recipient of a number of honors, 
being elected president of the McHenry County 
Medical Society and vice president of the Illinois 
State Medical Society. 

Doctor Wernham continued to practice at Marengo 
until 1913, in which year he came to Billings, where 
he has since carried on a professional business 
as a general medical and surgical practitioner, and 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



97 



the reputation which he brought with him from 
Illinois as a learned, skilled and thoroughly cap- 
able devotee of his art has been strengthened and 
fortified by his work since his advent at Billings. 
He maintains well appoined offices in the Hart- 
Albin Building, second floor, and continues to be a 
close and careful student during his leisure hours, 
as he is also an interested member of the Yellow- 
stone County Medical Society, the Montana State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. He is a popular member of the Billings 
and Billings Midland clubs and of Billings Camp, 
Modern Woodmen of America, is a republican in 
his political views, and holds membership in the 
Presbyterian Church. In addition to his modern 
residence at No. 945 North Thirty-first Street, he 
is the owner of a 640-acre ranch at Acton, Mon- 
tana, where he is engaged in raising grain and 
stock. The Wernham family has a good military 
record, including the services of John Wernham, 
an uncle of the doctor, who lost his life while fight- 
ing as a soldier 'of the Union in Kentucky during 
the Civil war. On September 24, 1918, Doctor 
Wernham enlisted as a member of the Medical 
Officers Training Corps, and after one month's train- 
ing at Fort Riley, Kansas, where he was advanced 
to the rank of captain, was sent to Debarkation Hos- 
pital No. 51, National Soldiers Home. After five 
months in the service as a surgeon he received his 
honorable discharge February 24, 1919. 

Doctor Wernham was married at Chicago, Illi- 
nois, in 1908, to Miss Grace Middleton, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Middleton, the lat- 
ter of whom is deceased. Mr. Middleton, formerly 
a well known and successful Chicago merchant, is 
now retired from active pursuits and a resident 
of Lake Wales, Florida. Three children have 
blessed the union of Doctor and Mrs. Wernham : 
Helen, born in January, 1910; Martha, born August 
2, 1911, and Elizabeth, born May 28, 1919. Mrs. 
Wernham is a descendant of Hon. Arthur Middle- 
ton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. 

JOSEPH POPE. It is doubtful if there are any people 
of Montana who have not heard of Joseph Pope 
of Billings, this state, for his name is a household 
word in this part of the west, and will always be 
associated with the monumental work he has accom- 
plished in the cause of prohibition, to which he has 
devoted the best years of his life, leaving the 
ministry so as to give to this very important moral 
reform all of his energies. At present he is super- 
intendent of the Montana Anti- Saloon League, with 
offices at No. 213 Stapleton Building, Billings. 

Joseph Pope was born in Cornwall, England, May 
14, 1866, a son of Jeremiah Pope, also born in Corn- 
wall, in 1843. He there rounded out his useful life 
as a farmer, dying in 1913. A man of strong re- 
ligious convictions, he was a consistent and earnest 
member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, which 
he served as a lay preacher, and he gave generously 
of his means and time toward its support. A con- 
servative, he was very active in politics and held 
a number of local offices, being one of the most 
prominent men of his community. The maiden name 
of his wife was Phillippa Andrewartha, and she 
was born in Cornwall, England, in 1846, where she 
still resides, having survived her husband. The chil- 
dren born to them were as follows : Joseph, whose 
name heads this biography ; Elizabeth, who married 
James Hammill, a farmer of Cornwall, England ; 
Grenfell, who is a farmer of Cornwall ; Eugenie, 
who married Charles Bryant, a contractor and 
builder of Cornwall; Bampfyld, who is also a farmer 



of Cornwall ; Charles, who died in 1916, was 
originally a farmer, but at the time of his demise 
was engaged in gold mining; Mabel, who is married, 
now resides in England, but resided for a period 
in South Africa ; and Ethel and Annie, both of whom 
reside in England. The sons were gold miners in 
young manhood in America and South Africa. 

Joseph Pope was carefully educated for the min- 
istry, first in the public schools of his native place 
and later in the Congregational Theological College 
at Bristol, England, from which he was graduated 
in 1890. Immediately thereafter Rev. Mr. Pope came 
to the United States and for one year supplied the 
pulpit of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Red 
Lodge, Montana, leaving there for Big Timber, 
where until 1894 he served as pastor of its Con- 
gregational Church. From there he went to Colum- 
bus, Montana, to take charge of its Congregational 
Church, but in 1900 returned to Big Timber, and re- 
mained for three years. His next charge was the 
Congregational Church at Laurel. Montana, where 
he remained for two years. After this he spent 
three years on a ranch he had bought at Park City, 
Montana, and during this period was engaged in the 
cattle and sheep business. He also invested in a farm 
near Howard, Montana, but has now disposed of 
these interests. In 1908 Mr. Pope's services were 
enlisted as assistant state superintendent of the Con- 
gregational churches of Montana, and he held that 
position until July I, 1915, when he was elected 
state superintendent of the Montana Anti-Saloon 
League, and is still serving as such. It is almost 
impossible to give full credit to Mr. Pope for his 
work along this line, for he has accomplished so 
much. It was he who is responsible for the prepara- 
tion and introduction of the resolution providing 
for the submission of prohibition to the electors 
of this state. After the question was submitted Mr. 
Pope conducted a resolute and aggressive campaign 
and carried the state by a majority of 30,000 votes. 
He has not given up the work of educating the 
masses, but is one of the national lecturers of the 
Anti-Saloon League. 

Ever since he came to Montana Mr. Pope has been 
a prominent figure in public affairs. During the 
thirteenth session of the State Assembly he was the 
republican representative from Yellowstone County, 
and much of the constructive legislation of 1913 is 
directly or indirectly due to his efforts and influence. 
A friend of education, he served on the school board- 
at Big Timber and Laurel, and at Big Timber he 
was also a member of the county high school board. 
Believing in purifying politics, Mr. Pope has never 
spared himself in endeavoring to raise the standards 
of the communities in which he has resided, and has 
always been a very strong influence for moral up- 
lift outside of his ministerial duties, for he is a man 
who has always practiced what he preached in the 
broadest conception of the words. He has held that 
all reform is not effected by the churches, but 
that a powerful force is exerted by the concerted 
action of business and social organizations, and while 
at Park City and Laurel he was one of the militant 
members of the Chamber of Commerce, during the 
period that the Great Western Sugar Company was 
induced to locate its plant at Billings. Mr. Pope also 
helped to organize the Sugar Beet Growers Asso- 
ciation. A man of broad vision, he saw the neces- 
sity of irrigation, and took a leading part in the 
organization of the North Sanders Irrigation Dis- 
trict, he now serving as its secretary. In the selling 
of the $100,000 worth of bonds for the construction 
of an irrigation canal to cover 5,000 acres of very 
fine valley lands Mr. Pope waged an energetic cam- 
paign, and was eminently successful in disposing of 



98 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



them. He owns 950 acres of irrigated land at 
Hysham, Montana, which is now devoted to the 
raising of grain and alfalfa, and it is in the North 
Sanders District. 

In 1890 Mr. Pope was married at Cornwall, Eng- 
land, to Miss Susannah Coad, a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. John Coad, both of whom are now de- 
ceased. Mr. Coad was a farmer and auctioneer, and 
very active in the political and social life of his 
community, serving as a member of the County 
Council and as chairman of the County Board of 
Guardians for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pope have three children, namely: Lila Mae, who 
was born January 28, 1895, is a graduate of the 
State University at Missoula, Montana, and married 
Donovan Worden, a farmer of Missoula, Montana; 
Ethel Mildred, who was born November 27, 1896, at- 
tended the Billings High School, from which she 
was graduated, and the State University for one 
year, and is now in the office of J. I. Case Threshing 
Machine Company at Billings, Montana ; and Dorothy 
Coad, who was born in August, 1906. 

There was a time when Mr. Pope was called a 
visionary when he promulgated his prohibition gos- 
pel, although his motives were never questioned, 
and few who listened to him then imagined that 
before many years had passed his fondest hopes 
would be realized. Had he and others who worked 
with him just as earnestly and faithfully per- 
mitted themselves to be discouraged and given up 
their fight against the saloon element the glorious 
results of the unceasing campaign would never have 
come about. If he had accomplished nothing more 
Mr. Pope can feel that he has achieved a revolution 
in moral conditions which will be everlasting in its 
effects for good. He has fought long and hard, 
straining every energy, and has evinced such ability 
to influence his contemporaries that much of the 
work has been left to his acute mind and alert 
vigilance. Each move has been strikingly charac- 
teristic of the man, and any reverses have only 
served to augment his resources. Attacks from the 
saloon element have not deterred him from pur- 
suing what he deemed was the right course, and 
day by day converts have been added to his cohorts 
until now he has all of the better class with him to 
the end. It is such men as Mr. Pope who under- 
stand how to put to practical uses the careful train- 
ing they receive in preparing for their profession, 
and teach their fellow citizens that the minister of 
the gospel knows how to live Christianity as well 
as how to enunciate its doctrines from his church. 
While Mr. Pope was a forceful preacher, and a 
power for good in the ministry, he has those charac- 
teristics which make him still more useful as a 
worker with the masses in securing those reforms 
which cannot be brought about unless they are taken 
up by the men who have made them their life 
study. 

ANTRIM E. BARNES. The West is more prompt 
to acknowledge merit, and many of the more am- 
bitious men of the country are locating in the 
flourishing towns in the more newly developed 
states, knowing that there they will find opportuni- 
ties to advance so that they may secure the posi- 
tions in their communities to which their abilities 
entitle them. Antrim E. Barnes, vice president of 
the First National Bank of Three Forks, and loco- 
motive engineer for the Chicago, Milwaukee and 
St. Paul Railroad, is one of the men who has 
achieved an enviable success in a state far removed 
from his native one of Indiana. He was born at 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, August 22, 1874, a son of An- 



trim E. Barnes, born in Ohio in 1841, who died at 
Fort Wayne in 1876. 

Antrim E. Barnes, Sr., was reared in Ohio, but 
after his marriage located at Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, being 
engaged in the lumber business. During the Civil 
war he gave his country his support as a soldier, 
and probably his early death was the result of the 
hardships endured during his military experience. 
The republican party had in him a hearty supporter. 
Both as a Mason and a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church he lived up to the highest ideals 
of manhood, and, dying, left behind him an influence 
for good on his community. His marriage to Jus- 
tina Holloman occurred in Michigan, but she was 
born near Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1846, and she 
survives him and lives at Coesse, Indiana. Her an- 
cestors served in the American Revolution, as did 
those of her husband, as the Barnes family came to 
North Carolina from Ireland during the Colonial 
period in this country's history. Mr. and Mrs. An- 
trim E. Barnes, Sr., had but one child, who bears 
his father's name. 

After the death of her husband Mrs. Antrim E. 
Barnes moved to Coesse, Indiana, and there Antrim 
E. Barnes, Jr., was reared, and was graduated from 
its high school in 1891. Soon thereafter he came 
West to McCook, Nebraska, where for 3% years 
he was an apprentice to the machinist trade, and then 
went to Sheridan, Wyoming, to become fireman on 
the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, and 
was later promoted to be locomotive engineer, leav- 
ing that road in 1908 to go with the Wabash Rail- 
road as engineer at Peru, Indiana, where he re- 
mained until 1900. Mr. Barnes then returned to 
the Burlington Road at Sheridan, Wyoming, for 
two years. Feeling the need of further instruction, 
in 1902 he matriculated at Perdu University at La 
Fayette, Indiana, and took a three years' course. 
In 1905 he came to Livingston, Montana, as engi- 
neer for the Northern Pacific Railroad, leaving it 
in 1907 for the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul 
Railroad. He left Lewistown for Three Forks in 
1911, and since then has become vice president of 
the First National Bank. He owns his residence 
at 622 Second Avenue, East, and one ranch 
of 328 acres of land 3 l /2 miles south of Roundup, 
Montana, with water rights, and another one of 640 
acres of irrigated land sixteen miles northwest of 
Three Forks. He is a republican and has served 
on the school board. Not only is he a conscien- 
tious member of the Presbyterian Church, but he 
serves it as an elder. Well known as a Mason, he 
belongs to Livingston Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; Livingston Consistory, which has 
conferred on him the thirty-second degree; and Al- 
geria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, of Helena, Montana. He also be- 
longs to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
and is chief of Painted Rock Division No. 744, and 
was a member of its general committee for a num- 
ber of years. 

In 1907 Mr. Barnes was married at Billings, Mon- 
tana, to Miss Lucy Marshall, a daughter of George 
W. and Sarah Marshall. Mr. Marshall died at 
Belgrade, Montana, in 1918, but his widow survives 
him and continues to reside at Belgrade. One of 
the pioneers of the Upper Madison River, Mr. Mar- 
shall gained the name of "Elk" Marshall because 
of the fact that he raised elk as well as stock upon 
an extensive scale. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes became 
the parents of two children, Lucy M. and Antrim E. 
By a former marriage with Miss Zella Mossman at 
Coesse, Indiana, in 1898, Mr. Barnes has a son, 
Charles, who is a medical student. Mrs. Barnes is 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



99 



a lady well known in the county, and she and Mr. 
Barnes have gathered about them a pleasant cir- 
cle of friends to whom they dispense the delightful 
western hospitality at their home upon many oc- 
casions. 

JOHN A. McMiLLAN is an old time Montanan, 
in early life was associated with his father in the 
building of mills and smelters, but for thirty years 
has been railroading, and is now joint agent at 
Butte for the Northern Pacific and the Oregon 
Short Line and the Great Northern Railways. Mr. 
McMillan was born at Lancaster, Ontario, Canada, 
April, 5, 1868, of pure Scotch ancestry. His grand- 
father, Allan McMillan, was born in Scotland in 
1790, and in early life crossed the ocean to Canada 
and became a pioneer farmer in Glengarry County, 
Ontario. He lived there until his death in 1880. 
He married a Miss Campbell, also of Scotland. 
Their son Hugh A. McMillan, long prominent in 
the mining industry of the Northwest, was born 
in Glengarry County, Ontario, 1838, and died at 
Butte in 1910. He was reared and married in 
Glengarry County, and took up the business of con- 
tractor and builder. In 1876 he located at Mount 
Pleasant, Michigan, continuing the same business, 
and in 1882 arrived at Butte, where he had an inter- 
esting part in the pioneer development of that city. 
He was the builder of the original Anaconda smelter. 
He also remodeled the Alice Mine Mill, built the 
Bluebird Mill, and as an expert in this class of 
construction he was subsequently employed and as- 
sociated with the Fraser & Chalmers Company of 
Chicago and built many mills and smelters in South 
Africa and Old Mexico. After coming to the United 
States he voted as a republican, was a member of 
the Presbyterian Church and the Masonic fraternity, 
and in early life served with the Canadian Militia, 
and was called to active duty during the Fenian 
rebellion.. Hugh A. McMillan married Mary Mc- 
Leod, who was born in Glengary County, Ontario, 
in 1844, and is now living at Butte with her son 
John. John is the oldest of five children. Maude 
is the widow of W. D. Shamburger and makes her 
home on the large Shamburger ranch at Payette, 
Idaho. Donald Andrew is a millwright and con- 
tractor living at Johannesburg in South Africa. 
Margaret is the wife of Robert Raff, secretary of 
the Big Black Foot Milling Company at Missoula. 
Harriet is the wife of C. F. Head, chief of police 
at Loveland, Colorado. 

John A. McMillan received his early education 
in the public schools of Glengarrv County. Ontario, 
and Mount Pleasant, Michigan. From the Michigan 
home he returned to Glengarry County, and was 
graduated from high school there in 1885. He 
arrived at Butte, Montana, in August, 1886, and for 
a short time was timekeeper at the Bluebird mill. 
Then for two years he was with his father in build- 
ing a mill for the Philadelphia and Idaho Smelting 
Company at Ketchum, Idaho, and left there to go 
to California. 

Since the spring of 1889 Mr. McMillan has been 
a permanent resident of Butte. He worked in 
the mines until November of that year and then 
entered the service of the Montana Union Railway 
as a clerk. This line of railway was absorbed by 
the Northern Pacific in 1896, at which date Mr. Mc- 
Millan was made chief clerk to the auditor and 
general freight and passenger agent of the larger 
corporation. His next promotion was to cashier 
of the Northern Pacific, and in January, 1901, he 
was made joint agent for the Northern Pacific and 
the Oregon Short Line roads. He has handled the 
duties of that position for these roads nearly twen- 



ty years, and subsequently was also made agent for 
the Great Northern. In- that capacity he has super- 
vision over four hundred employes of these differ- 
ent lines. His offices are on South Arizona street. 

Mr. McMillan is an independent voter, is affiliated 
with Butte Camp No. 153, Woodmen of the World, 
and is a member of the Independent Order of For- 
esters at Toronto. He also belongs to the Butte 
Country Clu6 and the Butte Curling Club. His 
home is at 1041 Colorado Street. 

In 1894, at Butte, he married Miss Elizabeth M. 
McGregor, daughter of John and Margaret (Camp- 
bell) McGregor, now deceased. Her father is a 
farmer in Glengarry County, Ontario. The only 
child of Mr. and Mrs. McMillan is Gregor M., born 
November 9, 1896, now a student in the Montana 
State Agricultural College at Bozeman. 

LEWIS S. BUTLER. During the last quarter of a 
century Lewis S. Butler has supplied a large amount 
of the business enterprise that has been made ef- 
fective in advancing the commercial, industrial and 
civic interests of Lewistown and Fergus County. 
Mr. Butler is an active figure in a number of un- 
dertakings, probably most conspicuously as senior 
partner of the firm of Butler ,& Woodworth, a 
firm owning and directing one of the largest ranch 
and livestock properties in this part of Montana. 
Something of the extent and operations of the firm 
is told in connection with a sketch of his partner, 
Mr. Woodworth. 

Mr. Butler was born in Warren County, Illinois, 
on his father's farm, January 24, 1867, a son of 
Joseph R. and Rebecca Jane (Stockton) Butler. 
His father was a native of Ohio and his mother 
of Illinois. His father when a boy went with 
his parents to Warren County, Illinois, was edu- 
cated in Ohio and Illinois and in 1871 moved to 
DeKalb County, Missouri, where he bought land 
and engaged in farming and stock raising on an 
extensive scale. He was one of the pioneer rais- 
ers of Percheron horses and also of Shorthorn 
cattle in Northwestern Missouri. He was a demo- 
crat in politics. Joseph R. Butler died in 1878, at 
the age of forty-nine. His wife passed away in 
1871, at the age of thirty-five. Lewis is the young- 
est and only survivor of six children. 

He was eleven years of age when his father died, 
and a few years later started to make his own 
way in the world, working out at wages of fifty 
cents a day. He attended school more or less regu- 
larly until seventeen years of age, when he began 
farming the tract of land inherited from his father. 
His associations with Montana began in April, 
1885, when he arrived at Bozeman and was em- 
ployed by William Fly, a cattle man, as a cowboy 
riding the range through to Judith Basin in Meagher 
County. Later he worked for Charles Lehman at 
Cottonwood in Lehman's general store and hotel 
for about a year. His .next experience was driving 
a band of horses to Dakota. 

February 11, 1888, at King City, Missouri, Mr. 
Butler married Miss Ida M. Easterly. For their 
wedding journey they started at once to Fergus 
County, Montana, and on reaching here Mr. But- 
ler entered a tract of Government land on Spring 
Creek, seven miles below Lewistown. He was on 
the homestead three years and then sold his prop- 
erty and engaged in business with J. M. Powers 
on a horse ranch. He was there about two years, 
then returned to Lewistown and was a butcher 
for a year and a half and in the live-y business 
for some length of time. The next five or six 
years > were spent in traveling in Northern Montana 
and in Canada, and about that time he became 
associated with Mr. Woodworth. Mr. Butler was 



100 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



ness at Lewistown until 1916. Since then his chief 
in the wholesale and retaH liquor and cigar busi- 
interests have been cattle ranching with the firm 
of Butler and Woodworth. This firm owns about 
6.000 acres of land, located nine miles south of 
Grass Lake, and it is stocked with 600 or 700 head 
ol cattle. They also are extensive breeders of Per- 
cheron horses. In January, 1919, Mr. Butler also 
engaged in business with Charles Woodworth and 
W. A. Cooper under the title of the Lewistown 
Automobile and Truck Company, handling the 
agency for the Studebaker cars and Diamond T 
trucks and operating a general garage and acces- 
sory establishment at Lewistown. 

Mr. Butler is a democrat, but has never cared for 
official position. However, through the personal 
influence of Tom Stout he consented to serve as 
sergeant-at-arms in the State Legislature in 1917. 

Mrs. Butler was born in Tennessee, a daughter 
of Philip L. and Alpha (Pinington) Easterly, her 
parents being also natives of Tennessee. Mrs. But- 
ler is the first in a family of three daughters and 
three sons. Her father died in 1899 and her mother 
is still living. Her father was a successful farmer 
and stockman of Gentry County, Missouri, and in 
politics a democrat. Mr. and Mrs. Butler have six 
children, and are also very proud of their nine 
grandchildren. Alpha E., their oldest child, is the 
wife of John McQuirk and the mother of three 
sons ; Elsa I. married Charles Thrasher and has 
two sons and one daughter ; Octa is the wife of 
Joseph Franchoise and has two daughters ; Ida 
married William A. Cooper and has one son. The 
two youngest children, both at home and in school, 
are Dorothy and Lewis Stockton. 

CHARLES F. RIDLEY. An active participation in 
business matters and civic affairs during a period 
covering fourteen years has made Charles F. Rid- 
ley well and favorably known to the citizens of 
Billings, where he is cashier of the Great Western 
Sugar Company. Mr. Ridley entered the employ 
of this concern in 1906 and has worked his way 
steadily upward to his present position through 
hard and conscientious application to his duties, and 
though his private interests have been exacting and 
heavy, he has still found time to devote to the wel- 
ware of the institutions of his adopted community. 

Mr. Ridley was born at London, Ontario, Canada, 
April 23, 1876, a son of William and Mary Ann 
(Heath) Ridley. His father was born in 1842, in 
the City of Birmingham, England, where he was 
reared, educated and married, and in that city 
learned the trade of machinist, particularly as ap- 
plied to the building of locomotives. In this con- 
nection he also mastered the principles of the dis- 
tribution of gas and the manufacture thereof, as 
well as commercial steam heating and its relation 
to distribution. Mr. Ridley came to the United 
States in 1873, and after a- short stay at Portland, 
Maine, went to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, where 
for two years he was connected with the Great 
Western Railway Company. Subsequently he went 
to London, Ontario, where he had charge of the 
gas works until 1880, and later went to Denver, 
Colorado, where he built the Denver City Steam 
Heating Works and remained until 1913. In that 
year he retired from active affairs and removed 
to San Diego, California, where his death occurred 
in 1915. In Denver Mr. Ridley had the distinc- 
tion of having charge of the first electric railway 
ever built anywhere, this being constructed after 
the patents of Professor Short of Chicago, as 
an underground electric, i. e., the current being 
underground. One of the leading and foremost 



members of his profession, he was a life member 
of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, from 
which he drew a pension. In politics Mr. Ridley 
was a republican. He was an Episcopalian and a 
strong churchman, and was a thirty-second degree 
Scottish Rite Mason and a member of the Albion 
and Cambrian Societies of England. Mr. Ridley 
married Mary Anne Heath, who was born in Bir- 
mingham, England, in 1844, and who survives him 
as a resident of Denver, Colorado. Six children 
were born to them, as follows : Arnold William, 
manager of the steam heating department of the 
Denver Gas and Electric Company of Denver, Colo- 
rado ; Frances W., the wife of Victor Ryfa, for- 
merly a bank clerk and now in the service of the 
United States Government at New York City, where 
his banking experience in handling French ex- 
change has made him valuable as a French inter- 
preter ; Charles Frederick, of this notice ; Edwin, 
an engineering valuator of municipal plants for 
the State of Washington, residing at Seattle, that 
state ; Reuben Thomas, an optician of Denver ; and 
Mary Ann, the wife of Charles H. Hines, an auto- 
mobile mechanic of Denver. 

Charles F. Ridley was educated in the public 
schools of Denver, Colorado, and at the age of 
fourteen years gave up his studies to accept a posi- 
tion in the office of the auditor of a railroad com- 
pany at Denver. In 1906 he became general book- 
keeper for the Great Western Sugar Company, 
with which concern his advancement has been steady 
and consistent, until today he occupies the re- 
sponsible post of cashier of the Billings' branch of 
this important concern. The offices are located one 
mile south of the city. Mr. Ridley since his ar- 
rival at Billings has become widely and favorably 
known among the business men of this community, 
and is accounted a shrewd and astute man of affairs, 
competent, reliable and substantial. He lives in a 
pleasant home at No. 314 South Thirty-fifth Street, 
and has established himself permanently as a citi- 
zen of Billings, performed the duties of citizenship 
well and being at present a member of the board 
of school trustees. He is a republican in his po- 
litical adherence, and is a member of the Billings 
Midland Club and a thirty-second degree Mason, 
belonging to Ashlar Lodge No. 29 Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, and to Billings Consistory. 
In 1904 Mr. Ridley was married at Toronto, Can- 
ada, to Miss Maude V. Westlake, who died in 
Denver in 1909, leaving two children : Lola Jean, 
born October 12, 1905, and Mildred Westlake, born 
December 31, 1907. The present Mrs. Ridley prior 
to her marriage, January 29, 1913, at Denver, was 
Miss Edith Parker, who was born at Lowestoft, 
England. 

W. E. HARMON. One of the men who has 
stamped the impress of his strong individuality 
upon the minds of the people of Montana in a 
manner as to render him one of the conspicuous 
characters of the state is W. E. Harmon, who had 
a successful career as an educator for a number 
of years, but who is now equally successful as a 
farmer and ranchman. Faithfulness to duty and a 
strict adherence to a fixed purpose, which always 
do more to advance a man's interests than wealth 
or advantageous circumstances, have been domi- 
nating factors in his life, which has been replete 
with honor and success worthily attained. 

W. E. Harmon was born in Fulton County, Ohio, 
on February 7, 1856, and is a son of Arva and 
Harriet (Benedict) Harmon. The father was born 
in New York State in 1832, and was there reared 
and married*. In 1854 he removed to Fulton Coun- 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



101 



ty, Ohio, where he became a pioneer farmer, and 
lived there until 1876, when he moved to Michi- 
gan. Ten years later, in 1886, he came to Liv- 
ingston, Montana, of which locality he was a pio- 
neer, arid there he engaged in contracting for a 
few years. In 1890 he came to Bozeman and lived 
with his son, W. E. Harmon, until 1905, when he 
retired from active life and went to Puyallup, 
Washington, where his death occurred on June II, 
1918. He was a democrat in his political views 
and a strong and earnest member of the Baptist 
Church. He married Harriet Benedict, who was 
born in 1836 in Connecticut, and who now lives at 
Puyallup, Washington. To this worthy couple were 
born the following children: W. E., the subject of 
this review ; Carrie E. is the wife of Wilbur Dodge, 
a shipyard carpenter at Puyallup, Washington; Her- 
bert is a farmer at Sycamore, Illinois; and Mary 
is unmarried and resides at Zion, Illinois. 

W. E. Harmon received his elementary educa- 
tion in the public .schools of Fulton County, Ohio, 
and Morenci, Michigan. He then took a five year 
course in Valparaiso University, at Valparaiso, In- 
diana, where he was graduated in 1884 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. The following year 
he was principal of the Clayton, Michigan, schools, 
and in 1885 he became principal of the schools of 
Livingston, Montana, being retained here two years. 
Then for 17^ years he was superintendent of the 
schools of Bozeman, and it is stated that to him is 
largely due the perfection of the educational sys- 
tem of the schools of that city. Mr. Harmon's 
abilities and success as an educator had attracted 
favorable notice and he was elected state superin- 
tendent of public instruction, entering upon the 
duties of that office in 1905. He was elected to 
succeed himself in that position, thus serving eight 
years. The splendid service rendered by him to 
the state is a matter of record, but it is specially 
noteworthy that his incumbency was marked by 
a tremendous forward stride in the educational 
methods and standards of this state. Mr. Harmon 
standardized the teaching certificates of the state ; he 
served on the State Text-book Commission, wrote 
three courses of study for the state, and succeeded 
in putting the state course in all schools. In addi- 
tion to his long and creditable career in one of the 
most useful and exacting of professions he also 
proved an honorable member of the body politic, 
rising in the confidence and esteem of the public, 
and in every relation of life he has never fallen 
below the dignity of true manhood nor in any way 
resorted to unworthy methods. 

Upon leaving the office of state superintendent 
of public instruction Mr. Harmon relinquished his 
pedagogical career and took over the management 
of his fine farm of 240 acres of irrigated land lo- 
cated about a mile west of Bozeman. The place 
is well improved and completely equipped in every 
"way and is considered one of the finest ranches 
in the Gallatin Valley. Mr. Harmon also owns a 
modern residence on North Seventh Avenue, Boze- 
man, and a residence and six lots on Eighth Avenue. 
Since retiring from the office of state superintend- 
ent he has served three times as state representative. 

Politically Mr. Harmon gives his support to the 
republican party, and his religious connection is 
with the Presbyterian Church, of whch he is an 
lder. Fraternally he is a member of Eureka Home- 
stead No. 415, Brotherhood of American Yeomen; 
Bridger Camp No. 62, Woodmen of the World. 
He takes a deep interest in every movement or en- 
terprise' looking to the advancement of the best 
interests of the community. He is a director of the 
National Bank of Gallatin County. 



In 1887, in St. Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Harmon 
was married to Etta Kendall, a native of Minne- 
sota, and whose death occurred in 1892. To them 
were born the following children. Florence, who 
died at Lewistown, Montana, May 13, 1919, was 
the wife of David Bolton, assistant cashier of the 
Fergus County Bank at Lewistown. She was a 
graduate of the Helena High School, the State 
Normal School at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and taught 
school at Appleton, Wisconsin, one year, and at 
Lewistown, Montana. Ella May, who is a graduate 
of the Montana State College, is a home science 
demonstrator for Ravalli County for the State Col- 
lege. Cora Alice, who died on April I, 1919, was 
a graduate of Leland Stanford University, Cali- 
fornia, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
had been a teacher of English in the schools of 
Terry, Montana. In 1893 Mr. Harmon was 'married 
to Mary Stegmier, a native of Minnesota. 

HARRY E. PERKINS, of Billings, is a veteran lumber 
merchant, and has been in that business for thirty 
years. He started as a yardman, and is now presi- 
dent of the Perkins Savage Lumber Company. 

Mr. Perkins was born at Flora, Illinois, May 2, 
1864, and. represents old New England ancestors, his 
people being among the early pioneers of Vermont. 
His father, Henry P. Perkins, was born in Chilli- 
cothe, Ohio, in 1825, grew up there, was married in 
his native state, and shortly afterward moved to 
Flora, Illinois, where he was a teacher. In 1866, 
at the close of the Civil war, he established a home 
well out on the frontier of Kansas, near Emporia, 
and was a farmer in that section until 1883. He then 
moved to Carlisle, Arkansas, where he continued 
farming and where he died in 1889. He was a 
staunch republican and a very active member of the 
Methodist Church. Henry P. Perkins married 
Martha A. Brainard who was born at Chillicothe, 
Ohio, in 1835 and is still living in her eighty-fifth 
year at Carlisle, Arkansas. She was the mother of 
a large family of thirteen children, the first, a son, 
dying in infancy, and the second, Mattie, dying at 
the age of three years. George I., who died at Bil- 
lings, Montana, at the age of fifty-seven, resided at 
Springdale, Montana, where he was manager of a 
lumber yard. David B. is a lumberman, banker 
and farmer at Carlisle, Arkansas. Harry E. is fifth 
in age. Maggie is the wife of Henrv J. Lewis, a 
farmer at Daphne, Alabama. John died in infancy. 
Annie is the wife of C. A. Rosenbaum, a railroad 
agent at Little Rock, Arkansas. Clara married 
Alexander McRae, superintendent of an oil mill at 
Argenta, Arkansas. Robert A. is a .farmer at Car- 
lisle, Arkansas. Rosie is the wife of William 
Branch, a produce commission merchant at Little 
Rock, Arkansas. Daisy is the wife of Mr. Crips, 
a farmer in Missouri. Charles C., the youngest, is a 
farmer and dairyman at Carlisle, Arkansas. 

Harry E. Perkins was two years old when the 
family moved to Lyon County, Kansas, he grew up 
on his father's farm there, attended rural schools, 
a commercial college at Little Rock, Arkansas, 
and at the age of twenty-five left home to make his. 
independent start in the world. He spent one year 
on a ranch in South Dakota. Mr. Perkins had a 
brief military experience on the northwestern fron- 
tier during the Sitting Bull outbreak of 1890-91. 
He was in the service of the organized militia for 
eighteen months during the period of Indian hos- 
tilities. Ever since that time he has been connected 
with some phase of the lumber business. He went to 
work for C. H. Chase at Willow Lake, South 
Dakota, as a yard man, and eventually was made 
manager of the local yards and a co-partner of Mr. 



102 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Chase. The business was subsequently incorporated 
as the C. H. Chase Lumber Company, with Mr. 
Perkins as secretary and manager. In 1916 the 
business was sold, and at that time Mr. Perkins and 
Michael Savage joined forces and in February, 1918, 
incorporated the Perkins-Savage Lumber Company, 
with Mr. Perkins as president and Mr. Savage as 
secretary and manager. This is a Montana corpora- 
tion, the home offices being in the Babcock Building 
at Billings. They handle retail lumber and hard- 
ware and have a trade in and around Billings, also 
have a yard at Lovell, Wyoming, and are interested 
in lumber yards at Acton, Molt, Gray Cliff, Spring- 
dale and Belfry, Montana. 

Mr. Perkins is also a ranch-owner, having one 
farm of 160 acres north of Billings, and another of 
640 acres at Pompeys Pillar. He owns a modern 
home at 1240 North Thirtieth Street in Billings. Mr. 
Perkins is a trustee of the Congregational Church, 
and is affiliated with the Ashlar Lodge No. 29, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Billings Con- 
sistory of the Scottish Rites, Parker Lodge of 
Knights of Pythias of South Dakota, Billings Camp, 
Modern Woodmen of America, Billings Chapter of 
the Eastern Star, and the Royal Neighbors of 
Parker, South Dakota. 

September 19, 1893, at Willow Lake, South Dakota, 
he married Miss Addie McMullin, daughter of 
William and Mary (Pettit) McMullin. Her mother 
lives at Clarkston, Washington, where her father, a 
veteran of the Civil war and a retired farmer, died 
March 27, 1919. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins have three 
children : Hazel, who died at Huntley, Montana, 
aged fourteen years ; Bernice F., born April 29, 
1896, a graduate of Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio,* 
and a kindergarten teacher at Billings ; and Muriel 
J., born August 9, 1900, who attended Oberlin Col- 
lege and is preparing to finish her education in the 
University of Minnesota. 

JOSEPH CHAUVIN, one of the reliable and pros- 
perous brokers of Butte, is recognized as one of the 
political leaders of this region and a republican of 
note in the Northwest. He is a son of Leander 
Joseph Chauvin, born in the Province of Quebec, 
Canada, in 1826, and died at Shelburn, Vermont, 
in 1915. In 1837 he came to the United States and 
located at Shelburn, Vermont. Here he later en- 
gaged in farming. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Harriet Pepin, and she was also born in the Province 
of Quebec, Canada, in 1829. Her death occurred 
at Shelburn, Vermont, where all of their children 
were born, they being as follows : Joseph, whose 
name heads tfris review; an unnamed infant son; 
Leander, who lives at Springfield, Massachusetts, is 
a carpenter by trade ; Louis N., who is engaged in 
farm work in the vicinity of Hamilton, Montana; 
Otheleo, who is deceased ; Harriet, who married 
Moses Charbonneau, a shoemaker of Barre, Ver- 
mont; Emma, who married Harry Crawford, a con- 
tractor and builder of Oak Park, Illinois ; Napoleon, 
who is a carpenter and builder of Massachusetts; 
Felix, who is doing farm work in the vicinity of 
Shelburn, Vermont ; Alma, who married Napoleon 
Prunier, who has been coachman and later chauffeur 
for a prominent family of Burlington, Vermont, 
for many years ; and six others who died young. 

Joseph Chauvin, the oldest son, came to Mon- 
tana on June i, 1881, and has been engaged in 
active business in this state ever since. For the 
first twenty-five years he was occupied very profit- 
ably in handling furniture, but then sold in 1906 
and engaged in his present undertaking, being a 
broker in stocks, mines and real estate, with offices 



at 112 West Granite Street, where he has been 
located for the past fifteen years. His residence 
is at 1 10 West Granite Street. He also owns a 
number of patented mines at Butte, which he esti- 
mates to be worth $60,000. 

Upon coming to Butte Mr. Chauvin was favor- 
ably impressed with the possibilities of the place and 
from then on has been one of the most active boost- 
ers of the city, and through his efforts much outside 
capital is brought here, the investment of which has 
aided in the development of the industrial and com- 
mercial interests. A natural political leader, he 
has been the delegate of his party to numerous 
county and state conventions, but he has not per- 
mitted the use of his name on the ticket for any 
office, as he prefers to use his influence as a private 
individual. Enthusiastic in his support of the party, 
he possesses the power to sway others, and his 
advocacy of a candidate is accepted as practical 
proof of his making a fine official, and as a usual 
thing his election follows. 

In his business operations Mr. Chauvin is a shrewd 
aggressive man, whose reliability is unquestioned. 
Having spent so many years at Butte he knows all 
about realty and stocks, and his advice with refer- 
ence to such matters is accepted as authoritative. 
Mr. Chauvin is one of the oldest living members 
of Butte Lodge, No. 240, Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, joining that order the year the 
lodge was established at Butte. The Roman Catho- 
lic Church has in him a devout member. Recog- 
nizing the good work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, he has long been one of its members 
and whenever a drive is on to secure funds for it, 
Mr. Chauvin is always one of those making large 
contributions and soliciting the same from others. 
He also belongs to the Butte Business Men's Asso- 
ciation, in which he is a forceful character, as he 
is in another commercial organization known as the 
Aero Club. 

The children of Mr. Chauvin are as follows : 
Charles Frederick, who is a resident of New York 
City, New York, is secretary of the Hale Desk 
Company, and he was graduated from the Hopkins 
Institute of Burlington, Vermont; and Anna, an 
adopted daughter. She married W. M. Jermain and 
they live at Deer Lodge, Montana. Mr. Jermain 
is a concrete contractor. They have one child, 
Beulah, who married James Donnelly, a printer by 
trade, and they live at Butte. Mr. and Mrs. Don- 
nelly have a daughter, Dorothy, and on December 
25, 1919, Mr. Chauvin had a little family gather- 
ing at his home in Butte at which were present Mrs. 
W. M. Jermain, her daughter, Mrs. James Donnelly 
and her granddaughter, Dorothy Donnelly, and 
grandson, Joseph G. Chauvin, four generations 
thus being represented. 

The Canadian element, not only the Scotch and 
English, but the French, is strongly represented in 
Montana and Mr. Chauvin at different times has 
exercised his art and literary expression in the 
characteristic dialect of old Quebec. The editor 
takes the privilege of reproducing two examples of 
his literary product, one entitled "The Wreck of 
the Jule La Plant" and the other one of a series of 
"Woodville Letters" which Mr. Chauvin contrib- 
uted to a local publication and which entertained 
a large group of readers. 

'Twas one dark night on Lac Champlain, 

De wind she blow, blow, blow, 
When de crew of de skow Jule La Plant 

Get scare and run below. 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



103 



For de wind she's blow like hurricane, 

Bimeby she blow some more, 
When de skow buss up on Lac Champlain 

One half-mile from de shore. 

De captain she's walk on de front deck, 
She's walk on de hind deck, too ; 

She's call de crew from up de hole, 
She call de cook also. 

De cook, his name was Rosa, 

He's come from Montreal, 
Was chamber-maid on a lumber barge 

On dat big Lachine canal. 

De wind she blow from nor, eass, wess, 

De sou' wind she blow, too, 
When Rosa say, 'Oh ! captain, 

Whatever shall I do?' 

De captain she's throw de hank, 

But still dat skow she drift, 
For de crew he can't pass on dat shore 

Because he lose dat skiff. 

De night was dark like one black cat, 

De waves run high and fass, 
When de captain take poor Rosa 

And lash her to de mass. 

When the captain put on the life preserve 

And he jump into de lac, 
And say, 'Good-bye, my Rosa dear, 

I go drown for your sack.' 

Next morning very hearly, 
About half-past two, three, four, 

De captain, cook and wood skow 
Lay corpses on dat shore. 

For de wind she's blow like hurricane, 
Pretty soon she blow some more, 

For dat skow buss upon Lac Champlain, 
One-half mile from de shore. 

MORAL : 

Now all good wood-skow sailor mans, 

Take warning by dat storm, 
And go and marry one nice French girl, 

And live on one good farm. 

Den de wind may blow like hurricane, 
And 'spose she's blow some more, 

You shan't get drowned on Lac Champlain 
So long you stay on shore. 

The "W.oodville Letter" is as follows: 

Woodville. Mont., on top de Montague Rocheus, 

On de Hind Part of dis month : 
My dear Chauvin : 

I receive your hinvite to hattend ze grand cele- 
bration to narade St. Jean Baptist de 24th June 
on top of Butte. But am feel so shame wid my 
wife Julie for what she has been done, dat ham 
hoblige to hask you to hexcuse me, and when am 
tole you what she has been done, you will have 
some compassion wid me. 

Well, my dear Chauvin, my heart ees fill wid 
sad tonite an eet give me much pain to wrote you 
dis lettair, ef t'ing keep hon like dis, I'll be compel 
to get divorce from my wife Julie. 

My dear Chauvin, what you spose Julie been 
done? You can't nevaire tink an eet make me 



feel shame for him, to tole you de why she has 
been bring disgrace on top my head. 

The odder day I'll go on Pete Fontaines saloon 
to see the boys. What you tink I'll fine dare? 
Hexcuse me while I'll drop some tear. My wife 
Julie was stan' up by de bar wid segar on his mout, 
an schooner of beer on his hand, when Julie was 
see me come een, he say to me, Pete, come have 
someting on me, what you took, old hoss? 

Well, my dear Chauvin, when I'll seen that I'll 
feel so much shame I'll try to crowl trough de knot 
hole on top de floor, I can't move, an I can't say 
someting, den Julie he say, what de troub' Pete, 
dis de firs' time I been seen you refuse to took some- 
ting, tint hevry day your wife hax you to drink 
wid him, come took someting, Pete, am going to 
put some red paint on de town tonite, by gosh. 

Whoop, I can lick hany son of a gun een Wood- 
ville, wid one han' tie on my back. Am the stuff 
you bet. Have nudder on me boys, am got de long 
green to pay for eet. All de bum on Woodville 
was een de saloon and dey was all drink wid Julie. 

Den what you suppose Julie done. His ax Jock- 
pot Charlie for chew and heel bite off piece plug 
tobac, and den he'll get down by card table and com-, 
mence to shuffle de cards, an ax Joe Shomway to 
play game stud poker wid him. 

Am feel so shame for Julie dat I haint know what 
to do, but I can't help hadmire de way he'll handle 
dem cards, sometimes he'll hole four haces, some- 
times five, by gosh, Joe was got skin hivry time. 

Den Julie was walk up to de bar an call for 
de drinks, she'll took cocktail an' lite fresh segar, 
den he'll put his arm around ole John Tebo's neck, 
and commence talk politic, an' discuss de League of 
Nashun. Bemby' I'll go up to Julie an' I'll ax him 
to come home wid me, an' what you spose he say? 
Course I will Pete. Am got kine lonesome for 
you, sometam, so I tought I'll go to de saloon 
an got quaint wid you. 

When we got home de baby was black on his 
face wid cry, an' de dinner dish haint wash. Den 
when am sure nobody see me I'll say Julie, dis ees 
disgrace, you bought to be shame on yourself. 
What for youil do all dat. Am motion to broke 
you back, an fore nudder day ees down on top 
dis home I'll get divorce. When women ees got 
so low down like dat, she haint got no respec for 
himself ''tees time to disolve partnership an quit 
beesness. 

Am draw myself up an look just like mad, an 
terreble as I can, but Julie haint got one bit scare. 
He say, Pete, taint no worser for women to go 
on top saloon an smoke an drink an play cards dan 
for men to done dat, an am like to tole you right 
here dat hevry time I'll see you go on Pete Fon- 
taine's saloon, I'll go dare too. 

When Julie hanswers me like dat, I cant say some- 
ting. He look like he mean beesness, am like to 
know where Julie been got such crazy notion on 
top hees head, but Julie haint be on de saloon since, 
an am been afraid to go dare myself. 

Sometime when am tink about eet, am tink Julie 
struck de whale on top de hed. What you tink 
about eet? 

Your Frein, 
Jo. TEBO. 

BRUCE ANSON GUMMING. In the field of farm 
loans and real estate, a line of business which de- 
mands great ability and a comprehensive knowledge 
of values, Bruce Anson Gumming has made a de- 
cided success of his operations at Lewistown. He 
has achieved an enviable positon in business circles, 
not alone because of the brilliant success which he 



104 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



has achieved, but also on account of the honorable, 
straightforward business policy he has ever fol- 
lowed. He possesses untiring energy, is quick of 
perception, forms his plans readily and is deter- 
mined in their execution, and his close application 
to business and his excellent management have 
brought to him the high degree of prosperity which 
is today his. He has demonstrated in his career 
the truth of the saying that success is not the re- 
sult of genius, but the outcome of clear judgment 
and experience. 

Mr. Gumming was born on his father's farm in 
Blue Earth County, Minnesota, September 24, 1879, 
a son of William and Isabella A (Treanor) Gum- 
ming, natives of Canada. William Gumming was 
born in 1834, and on first coming to the United 
States as a young married man settled at Fond 
du Lac, Wisconsin, but subsequently moved to 
Minnesota, where he became a pioneer of Blue 
Earth County. There he. took up wild land, estab- 
lished his home, and in time developed a substan- 
tial and productive farm, upon which he died in 
1909, at the age of seventy-five years, after having 
completed a useful and honorable career. He was 
first a whig and later a republican in politics, but 
did not desire public office. Mrs. Gumming, who 
was born in 1840, survives her husband and resides 
on the old Minnesota homestead. Of the family 
of four sons and three daughters, six children are 
living. The parents were God-fearing people and 
church members, and the children were reared to 
lives of honesty and industry. 

The fifth in order of birth of his parents' chil- 
dren, Bruce Anson Gumming attended the public 
schools of Blue Earth County, Minnesota, the Dixon 
Business College and the Illinois Normal School, 
and in 1901 secured his first employment, as assist- 
ant cashier of the First National Bank of Minne- 
sota Lake, Minnesota. After about three and one- 
half years in that capactiy he removed to Hope, 
North Dakota, where he was bookkeeper for the 
First National Bank of Hope, a position in which 
he also had charge of the bank's general insur- 
ance business. After about three years he went 
to Blabon, North Dakota, and became cashier of 
the Blabon State Bank. This position he also held 
for about three years, but in the spring of 1911 
came to Lewistown, where he established himself 
in the farm loans and real estate business, in which 
he has since continued with much success. His 
office is situated at No. 305 Montana Building. 
Mr. Gumming is essentially a product of the grow- 
ing, progressive Northwest, aggressive, enterpris- 
ing and energetic, alive to the fast-appearing op- 
portunities and strict in his conception of business 
ethics and principles. He is a republican in his po- 
litical adherence, and while residing at Blabon 
served as school treasurer and township clerk. He 
first became a member of Occidental Lodge No. 
27, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Hope, 
North Dakota, but after centering his activities at 
Lewistown demitted and became a member of Lew- 
istown Lodge No. 37. He belongs also to Lewis- 
town Lodge No. 456 of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

On February 17, 1915, Mr. Gumming married Miss 
Edna M. Woodrum, and to this union there have 
been born two sons and one daughter : Mark Clin- 
ton, Donald William and the infant daughter. 

WARNER L. HALGREN. To be classed with the 
dependable business men of a large city is no slight 
honor, and such classification belongs to Warren 
L. Halgren, manager for the Gamble Robinson 
Company branch house at Billings, with which firm 



he has been continuously identified for twenty-six 
years. Beginning at the bottom of the ladder when 
twelve years old, his successive promotions prove 
the possession of those qualities which arouse re- 
spect, esteem and confidence in employers. Mr. 
Halgren came to Billings in 1913, but has been a 
resident of Montana since 1909. 

Warner L. Halgren was born at Watertown, 
Minnesota, January 3, 1881, and is a son of Frank 
L. and Carrie Belle (McKee) Halgren, the latter 
of whom was born in 1863, at Watertown, Minne- 
sota, and now resides at Los Angeles, California. 
The father, Frank L. Halgren, was born in 1858, 
on the Atlantic Ocean while his parents were com- 
ing to America from Stockholm, Sweden. They 
settled at Watertown, Minnesota, where he was 
reared and educated, and where until 1891 he was a 
schoolteacher. In that year he removed to Mont- 
rose, Minnesota, where he was connected with the 
postal service on the Great Northern Railway, and 
died there. He was a republican in politics, 
and for many years was a faithful member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He belonged to the 
Masonic fraternity. His three children all survive, 
namely: Warner L.; Forest G., who resides at Be- 
midji, Minnesota, is manager for the Gamble-Rob- 
inson Company at that point; and Josie, who re- 
sides with her mother. 

Warnef L. Halgren attended the public schools 
at Montrose and Minneapolis, and later took a 
business course in the Metropolitan Commercial 
College at Minneapolis. As early as 1893 he en- 
tered the employ of the Gamble Robinson Com- 
pany, working during vacations while attending 
school at Minneapolis, starting with the laudable 
ambition to be successful and has kept that end 
in view during the succeeding years. Recognition 
was given -of his ability in 1901 when he was made 
a traveling representative for this house, and for 
eight years his territory was the State of Michigan. 
In 1909 he was stationed at Miles City. Montana, 
as manager of the Miles City branch of the busi- 
ness, and continued there until 1913, wheti he came 
to Billings to assume his present duties in a wider 
field. The company has commodious offices at No. 
2707 Minnesota Avenue. The territory under Mr. 
Halgren's jurisdiction covers Northern Wyoming 
and Eastern Montana, and he has fourteen em- 
ployes under his supervision. The company handles 
fruits and vegetables wholesale, and the Billings 
branch, under Mr. Halgren, is in a very prosperous 
condition. 

In 1906, at Manistique, Michigan, Mr. Halgren 
was married to Miss Elsie G. Brown, a daughter 
of the late E. C. and Ida Brown, the former of 
whom was a well known lumberman at Manistique. 
Mrs. Halgren is a graduate of the Manistique High 
School and the Ypsilanti Normal School. Mr. and 
Mrs. Halgren have one son, Warner Brown, who 
was born December 12, 1912. The family resides 
at No. 335 Clark Avenue, Ballings. In his political 
affiliations Mr. Halgren has always been a republi- 
can. He has been active in Masonry for many 
years, and belongs to Ashlar Lodge No. 29, Ancient 
Free and Accepted. Masons ; Billings Chapter No. 
6, Royal Arch Masons ; and Aldemar Commandery 
No. 5, Knights Templar. 

W. J. McMuLLEN was reared and educated at Deer 
Lodge, and since early manhood has been connected 
with local commercial affairs. He is now one of 
the active partners in probably the leading drug 
business at Deer Lodge. 

He was born at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, Octo- 
ber 23, 1887. The father M. McMullen was born 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



105 



in the same Wisconsin community in 1858, lived 
there until after his marriage, was a farmer and in 
1890 came to Deer Lodge and engaged in the hard- 
ware business. However, his most successful efforts 
were in mining operations. He died at Deer Lodge 
in 1902. M. McMullen married Mary Bowen, who 
was born in England in 1860 and died at Deer Lodge 
June I, 1918. 

W. J. McMullen, only child of his parents, fin- 
ished the junior year of the Powell County High 
School and at the age of sixteen began doing for 
himself. He gained a valuable business experience 
and training as clerk in the Cash grocery store until 
1907. For a year he was with the City Mercantile 
& Drug Company's store, and in 1908 opened a busi- 
ness for himself as a druggist, the firm name being 
Randall & McMullen. K. H. Wood bought the Ran- 
dall interests in 1917 and the firm is now McMullen 
& Wood. It is a growing business and they have 
a high class clientele and a splendid stock of goods 
and equipment in their store at 423 Main Street. 

Mr. McMullen, who is unmarried is an independ- 
ent republican in politics, is a member of Lodge 
No. 14 Ancient Free and Accepted Masons at Deer 
Lodge, Valley Chapter No. 4 Royal Arch Masons, 
Ivanhoe Commandery No. 16 Knight Templars, 
Bagdad Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Butte, and 
Anaconda Lodge No. 239 Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. Mr. McMullen owns a modern 
home on Fifth Street in Deer Lodge. 

WALTER O. DOWNING, at the head of a prominent 
real estate and insurance business at Lewistbwn, is 
a man of interesting Montana experience, having 
lived in the territory and state over thirty-five years. 

He was born in Elizabethtown, Minnesota, March 
14, 1875,. a son of Christopher and Roseta (Els- 
worth) Downing. His father, who was born at 
Monroe, Michigan, in 1839, was a farmer, but left 
his plow at the call of his country and enlisted in 
Company A of the Fourth Michigan Infantry on 
June 5, 1861. He went to the .war for a three-year 
term, but experienced such hardships that he was 
granted an honorable discharge November 19, 1863, 
at the General Hospital at Washington, District of 
Columbia. He returned home with health broken, 
but lived until 1876, his death being the direct re- 
sult of his army service. He was a stanch republican 
in politics. His wife was born May 17, .1853, at 
St. Clair, Michigan, and came to Montana with her 
second husband, J. M. Weldon. By her marriage to 
Christopher Downing she was the mother of two 
children, Laura and Walter. The former is the wife 
of Edward M. Nave, of Fergus County. 

W T alter O. Downing was seven years old when he 
was brought to Montana by his mother and stepr 
father in 1882. They made the journey from 
Harrispnville, Michigan, by railroad as far as Junc- 
tion City, and thence overland by team and wagon 
to Fort Maginnis, Montana. They located twelve 
miles southeast of the present City of Lewistown, 
then in Meagher County, now Fergus County. In 
this frontier district Mr. Downing spent his boy- 
hood and youth. His first schooling was at the hands 
of a school teacher employed in the home of Mr, 
Weldon. Later, with four other children, he was 
taught in the home of a neighbor, and then attended 
a log schoolhouse, the teacher being Miss Anna 
M. Weidert, now the wife of George J. Wiedeman of 
Lewistown. When thirteen years old Mr. Downing 
went to work for a firm of carpenters and con- 
tractors to learn the carpenter's trade, He also 
cooked for the outfit to pay his board. During 
winters he managed to get in a term or two of 
school. He also rode the range during the spring 



and fall roundups, and while attending school he also 
spent three months working for his board for the 
late J. I. Corbley, county commissioner. He also 
had some experience with the pioneer freighting 
organization carrying goods between Billings, Fort 
Benton, Great Falls and Lewistown. . 

It is evident that Mr. Downing even as a boy had 
an object and an ambition. Though his earnings 
were meager, he managed to save enough to pay for 
a three-months term at the Agricultural College at 
Bozeman. He remained in that college for two 
years, working for his board at the college during 
the last eighteen months. On leaving college with 
an equipment of general and scientific training he re- 
turned to the homestead and worked on the home 
ranch as a farmer and stock man until 1912. In 
that year he located in Lewistown and engaged in 
the real estate, loan and insurance business, and 
has since made the name Walter O. Downing Com- 
pany one of especial prominence in its line. 

Mr. Downing is a member of Lewistown Lodge 
No. 456, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and Judith Lodge No. 30, Knights of Pythias, and 
in politics is a republican. 

September 19, 1904, he married Katherine D. Wood, 
of Auburn, Illinois. She died January 12, 1912, the 
mother of one daughter and two sons, named 
Dorothy, Dell O. and Walter K. On November 
22, 1916, Mr. Downing married Antoinette R. Vogt. 

MARION E. BUCK, general superintendent of the 
Montana Power Company, was born at Danvers, 
Illinois, on November 4, 1877, a son of Benjamin A. 
Buck. The birth of Benjamin A. Buck took place 
near Baltimore, Maryland, on November 12, 1844, 
and he comes of a long line of upright ancestors, 
all of whom were worthy descendants from the 
founder of* the family in the American colonies, 
who came to this country from Holland in the 
seventeenth century. 

At the time the original Buck reached Maryland 
he with other pioneers had his choice of land, and 
he took a pride in keeping it in the family, making 
arrangements to have the title to it pass from 
father to son without interruption until the gen- 
eration to which Benjamin A. Buck belonged, when 
changes in conditions made it expedient to dispose 
of the homestead. When the family was first 
founded in this country its members were Episco- 
palians, but about the time of John Wesley's visit 
to the colonies they embraced Methodism. 

Students of biography are struck by the fact 
that in nearly all old-established families appears 
the tradition that when immigration was made here 
from some of the countries of the old world three 
brothers made the trip together, although often- 
times they separated after their arrival. The Buck 
family is no exception to this almost universal rule, 
for in the old family Bible, which bears the date 
of 1726, and on whose pages, brown with time and 
soiled by the handlings of many generations, is 
furnished proof of this tradition. One' of these 
brothers, was John Buck, born in 1693. John Buck 
was noted in his day as an extensive landed pro- 
prietor, and he lived to the age of seventy-seven 
years. His son was Benjamin Buck, born in Mary- 
land, and his son, John Buck, was the grandfather 
of Benjamin A. Buck. The birth of John Buck 
took place in Maryland in 1767, and he died in 1849, 
having been very prosperous and accumulating a 
large amount of land, which was divided among 
three sons, each one receiving sufficient to make 
him independent, as did the one daughter of the 
family. 

Benjamin M. Buck, father of Benjamin A. Buck, 



106 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



was born in 1794 and died in 1877, both events tak- 
ing place on the old homestead. All of his life 
was spent upon this property until the outbreak of 
the war between the states, when he left it for a 
brief period. During that conflict he lost some of 
his holdings, which were never recovered, and the 
family fortunes, like those of so many others in 
the South, were impoverished. In 1826 he was 
married to Miss Sarah H. Hobby and thejy became 
the parents of six children, namely: Catherine, 
John S., W. H., Arabella, Benjamin A. and Sarah. 
In political opinions he was a whig until the be- 
ginning of the war, after which he affiliated with 
the democratic party. A devout Methodist, he lived 
up to the highest conceptions of his faith. 

Benjamin A. Buck remained on the farm with 
his father, who had been disabled by an accident, 
until he was twenty-five years of age, first attend- 
ing the common schools and later one of the high 
schools of Baltimore, Maryland. In 1870 he came 
to the West with his brother-in-law, H. M. Kennedy, 
who owned a large tract of land in McLean Coun- 
ty, Illinois, and remained with him for four years. 
For a time subsequent to his leaving his brother- 
in-law Mr. Buck clerked in a general store at 
Danvers, and then for two years conducted a simi- 
lar business of his own, also at Danvers. 

In 1876 Benjamin A. Buck was married to Libby 
A. Estes, a daughter of William and Amanda 
(Goodrich) Estes, and soon thereafter moved to 
Dwight, Illinois, in 1882, embarking in a hardware 
business in that city and conducted it until he re- 
tired in 1905, after a very successful and reputable 
business career. Not only did he carry on his busi- 
ness in an energetic and satisfactory manner, but 
he gave an intelligent and effective support to civic 
affairs, and was one of the valued members of the 
Congregational Church. When he died at Dwight 
in 1908 the whole community mourned his passing, 
and Livingston County felt that it had lost one of 
its most representative men. The children of Ben- 
jamin A. Buck and his wife were as follows: 
Marion E., who was the elder, and Agnes B., who 
married H. B. Johnson, assistant electrical super- 
intendent of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company 
at Great Falls, Montana. Mrs. Benjamin A. Buck 
survives her husband and makes her home with 
her son. 

After passing through the common schools at 
Dwight, Illinois, Marion E. Buck became a student 
of its high school and was graduated therefrom in 
1892. He then entered the University of Illinois at 
Urbana, Illinois, and completed the junior year in 
1895. In that year he came to Colorado, and en- 
tered as an apprentice the employ of the Telluride 
Power Company at Telluride. For the first eighteen 
months he and Ralph D. Mershon worked on a 
special high tension investigation, the latter repre- 
senting the Westinghouse Electrical Manufactur- 
ing Company. The results of these months of in- 
vestigation established the fundamental principles 
for high tension transmission and methods of con- 
struction in vogue today. 

In the fall of 1897, after the completion of this 
experimental work, Mr.. Buck was called to Provo, 
Utah, and constructed the first 40,000 volt trans- 
mission line in the United States, for the Telluride 
Power Company. Two years later Mr. Buck came 
to Montana for L. L. Numm then general mana- 
ger of the Telluride Power Company, who had asso- 
ciated himself with John F. Cowan in Butte in a 
water power development on the Madison River. 
Still later a company was incorporated under the 
name of The Power Company, and Mr. Buck was 
a member of its executive construction staff. The 



first development work on the Madison River was 
done in 1900, and during the building of it Mr. 
Buck took an active part, and the company was 
enabled to commence serving power to Butte in- 
dustries through a connection with the Butte Elec- 
tric & Power Company. Mr. Buck was operating 
engineer for The Power Company until 1905, when 
the property was purchased by the Butte Electric 
& Power Company, and he was retained by the pur- 
chasers as operating engineer and superintendent 
of construction. 

From 1905 until 1908 Mr. Buck carried out the 
reconstruction of the dam on the Madison River 
and built the No. 2 development. In 1910 he came 
to Butte to take charge of the operations of the 
then enlarging system of the Montana Power Com- 
pany, under M. Hebgen, general manager, and F. 
M. Kerr, general superintendent. During the lat- 
ter part of 1914 Mr. Buck began the construction 
of the electrification of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railroad, and was engaged in this work 
continuously until May I, 1917, during which period 
he completed and put into operation this 440 mile 
section from Harlpwtown, Montana, to Avery, 
Idaho. The appreciation of Mr. Buck's services 
by his company was genuine, as was shown by his 
appointment in October, 1915, as general superin- 
tendent of the Montana Power Company, together 
with subsidiary companies, which very responsible 
position he still holds, discharging its onerous re- 
sponsibilities with dignified capability. The offices 
are located in the Montana Power Building, at No. 
40 East Broadway. 

Like his ancestors before him Mr. Buck is a 
democrat, and stanch in his support of his party, but 
has never cared to go before the public for sup- 
port for an office. He belongs to Virginia City 
Lodge No. 390, Benevolent and Protective Order 
Elks, which he joined in 1902; the Silver Bow 
Club ; and the Montana Society of Engineers. He 
maintains his residence at No. 1156 West Platinum 
Street. 

In 1899 Mr. Buck was married at McAllister, 
Montana, to Miss Gertrude L. Bronner, a daughter 
of S. M. and Catherine Bronner, the latter of whom 
is deceased. The former is still living and makes 
his home at Pokagon, Michigan, being now a retired 
farmer. Mrs. Buck attended the Montana State 
College at Bozeman, specializing in the domestic 
science branch, and is a skilled housekeeper and 
efficient homemaker, as well as a cultured lady. 
Mr. and Mrs. Buck became the parents of the 
following children : Dorothy Alice, who was born 
June 10, 1900, was graduated from the Butte High 
School in 1918, and is now attending Reed Col- 
lege at Portland, Oregon ; and Edwin R., who was 
born August 18, 1903, is attending the Butte High 
School. 

RUTH SHERIDAN. The Sheridan family have 
been influential people at Big Timber for twenty 
years. The late John E. Sheridan was a widely 
known Montana newspaper man, who came to the 
Northwest while in the service of the regular army 
of the United States. Two of his sons served with 
honor and credit in the World war. Several other 
of the children have made for themselves posi- 
tions of usefulness in their respective communi- 
ties. His daughter Ruth is now county clerk and 
recorder of Sweetgrass County and has shown ex- 
ceptional ability in handling the affairs of that office. 

John E. Sheridan was born at Portland, Maine, 
in 1861, of ancestors who came from Ireland and 
settled in Maine in colonial times. He grew up 
in Portland, learned the printer's trade, and in 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



107 



the regular service of the United States army came 
to Montana in 1888 and was stationed at Fort 
Assiniboine. He also lived for a time at Barker 
in Cascade County, and going to Belt he founded 
the Belt Valley Times, which he edited until 1899. 
In that year he founded the Big Timber Pioneer 
and made of that one of the most influential papers 
in Southern Montana. It is republican in politics 
and enjoys a large circulation in Sweetgrass and 
surrounding counties. John E. Sheridan died at 
Big Timber in 1906. He was a republican in poli- 
tics and a member of the Catholic Church. At 
Helena, Montana, he married Miss Augusta Roth, 
who was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, and is now 
living at Big Timber. 

Miss Ruth Sheridan, the third of their children, 
was born at Belt, Montana, and was educated in 
the public schools of Big Timber. She completed 
her junior year in high school and has become 
widely known in the town and surrounding coun- 
try. For a time she was employed in the Big Tim- 
ber postomce and in 1918 was appointed deputy 
county clerk. In the fall of that year her name 
appeared as candidate on the republican ticket for 
county clerk and recorder and January 6, 1919, she 
began a term of two years in that office. Miss 
Sheridan is a Catholic and active in the republican 
party. , 

Her oldest brother, Albert, enlisted in April, 1918, 
and was sent overseas in June and was with the 
Expeditionary Forces in France. Her younger broth- 
er, Philip, fifth in age among the children, enlisted 
in October, 1917, and was with the American forces 
sent to Siberia, going overseas in July, 1918. The 
second of the family is Mary Sheridan, who is a 
graduate of the Big Timber High School, attended 
summer normal school at Dillion several terms, 
and is a teacher at Lehigh. The next younger than 
Ruth Sheridan is Rachel, who is a graduate of the 
Big Timber High School, attended the Rassuss- 
man Business College at St. Paul, Minnesota, and 
is employed as a stenographer at Big Timber. 
Esther, sixth in the family, is a junior in the Big 
Timber High School, while Leah is in the sopho- 
more year and Naomi, the youngest, is in gram- 
mar school. 

NOBLE M. WALKER is president and general man- 
ager of the Judith Hardware Company at Lewis- 
town, a business whose service he entered as a 
clerk less than twenty years ago. He is a native 
Montanan, and is a member of a family around 
which revolve many of the most interesting and 
important associations of the pioneer as well as 
the modern history of the state. 

Pioneering has been a characteristic of the Walker 
family for several generations. The Walkers are 
of Scotch-Irish origin, one ancestor coming to this 
country from Ireland and his wife from Scotland. 
Their home was in Virginia, and they followed 
Daniel Boone into the bloody ground of Kentucky. 
David Walker, grandfather of the Lewistown mer- 
chant, was born in Adair County, Kentucky, July 
10, 1802. He grew up and married there, and in 
1827 settled in Sangamon County, Illinois, where 
he was one of the first farmers to break the soil 
of the corn belt. In 1835 he joined the tide of 
emigration to the Territory of Iowa, locating near 
West Point in Lee County, long before there was 
a town of that name. At West Point he spent the 
rest of his years, a successful farmer, a citizen of 
much public spirit, and was responsible for much 
of the early religious influences of his commu- 
nity. He was a charter member of the first Pres- 
byterian Church organized in the Territory of 



Iowa, and was a member of it until his death, which 
occurred at West Point, September i, 1876. He was 
a ruling elder in his church for twenty-five years. 
David Walker was the father of several well known 
citizens of Montana, including the late J. C. Walker, 
A. M. Walker, H. L. Walker, and also two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. William Hardenbrook and Mrs. John E. 
Pyle. 

Joseph C. Walker, father of Noble M. Walker, 
was born at Springfield, Illinois, March 30, 1830, 
and died at Lewistown, June 8, 1908, in his seventy- 
ninth year. When he was five years old his par- 
ents moved to West Point, Iowa, where he grew 
up. He served with the Union army during the 
winter of 1862-63, being at Corinth, Mississippi. 
He then returned to Iowa, and at West Point in 
April, 1863, married Miss Ruby A. Mason. She 
was born in Ohio and was taken as a child to 
Iowa by her parents. Two hours after their mar- 
riage Joseph C. Walker started overland, accom- 
panied by his bother, Alexander M. Walker, and 
Dr. Allen Hardenbrook, bound for California. 
They had wagons drawn by ox teams. At Denver 
the news reached them of gold discoveries in Mon- 
tana, and Joseph C. Walker and three companions 
sold their outfit and mule teams and traveled to 
Montana, reaching Alder Gulch, June 9, 1863. The 
Walker brothers had some experience in mining 
in Alder Gulch, not without profit, but soon bought 
a sawmill and became pioneer lumber manufac- 
turers. In December, 1864, they sold their mill 
and all returned by stage coach, to Atchison, Kan- 
sas, which was then the nearest railway point, the 
trip requiring thirty days. From Atchison, Joseph 
C. Walker took his gold to the United States mint 
at Philadelphia and received a statement dated 
January 21, 1865, apprising him that the bullion 
value of his shipment was $8,903.89. Joseph C. 
Walker and his brother acquired an outfit of 
wagons and teams and in the spring o'f 1865 re- 
turned to the West, after four months of travel 
reaching the present site of Deer Lodge. Mrs. 
Walker accompanied him on this return trip. Soon 
afterward they settled at Helena, which was then 
only a placer mining camp, and there again engaged 
in the sawmill business. Besides lumbering they 
also operated freighting outfits between Montana 
points and Nevada. In 1874 Joseph C. Walker 
was elected a member of the Territorial Legisla- 
ture from Lewis and Clark county, and served 
as sheriff of that county, for three years. In August, 
1883, he moved with his family to Fergus County 
and engaged in ranching and stock growing. Sev- 
eral years before his death he sold his ranch and 
moved to the City of Lewistown. At the time of 
his death he was vice president of the Montana 
Pioneers Society. He and his wife had three chil- 
dren, Maggie Montana, Noble M. and Joseph A. 

Among the many tributes paid to this noble Mon- 
tana pioneer the following editorial is exception- 
ally worthy of quotation: "The man who lives an 
upright and noble life, who has made trails into 
a new country in order that others, may come, and 
who lays out his course in such a way that friends 
may follow in his footsteps with assurances that 
they are traveling the right road, who commands 
the respect of every acquaintance he is a man 
whose name takes a prominent place in history. 
Such a man was J. C. Walker of Lewistown, a 
brother of A. M. Walker of Anaconda. A pioneer 
of Alder Gulch, a member of the Territorial Legis- 
lature, sheriff of Lewis and Clark county, in the 
'70s, a prominent ranch and cattle owner, J. C. 
Walker made for himself a name of which any 
man should be proud. Montana's band of sturdy 



108 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



trail blazers is being decimated, and within a few 
years more all of their names will be enrolled upon 
the history of the state as the argonauts who have 
done a glorious service to humanity and have passed 
to the other shore." 

Noble M. Walker was born August 20, 1872, 
while his parents were living at Helena, Montana. 
When he was a few months old, in 1873, his mother 
took him on a long stage journey of 600 miles 
from Helena to Corinne, Utah. During the summer 
of 1880 he and his mother left Helena by stage 
for Fort Benton, going down the river by boat and 
making a river journey to Bismarck. When Mr. 
Walker was eight years old his parents moved to 
Wisconsin, and the education begun at Helena was 
continued in the public schools of Eau Claire. After 
two years his parents returned to Butte, where he 
attended public schools. In 1883, when eleven years 
old, he earned his first money as a messenger boy 
for the United States Telegraph Company at Fort 
Benton. In the fall of 1883 he removed to Judith 
Basin with his parents, and became actively associ- 
ated with his father on the ranch as a cowboy. 
He rode the range for his father and for other 
outfits altogether for twelve years. After his father 
closed out the cattle business he continued a sheep 
raiser for about three years, and in 1903 he re- 
moved to Lewistown and went to work as a clerk 
for the Montana Hardware Company. After three 
years with that firm he then became a life insur- 
ance salesman and in 1905 entered the service of 
the Judith Hardware Company, rapidly going 
through successive promotions from clerk until he 
was elected general manager in 1912, and president 
and general manager in 1916. The Judith Hard- 
ware Company is one of the largest firms of its 
kind in the Judith Basin, and much of its growth 
and prosperity in recent years can be directly credited 
to Mr. Walker's genius as a merchant. 

He has also been active in local affairs, serving 
as alderman from the third ward by election in 
1917, and in 1918 was elected president of the Lewis- 
town Chamber of Commerce. He served as a 
member of the War Industry Board and secre- 
tary of the Community Labor Board and is a mem- 
ber of the School Board of District No. i. Mr. 
Walker is a republican in politics, is affiliated with 
Lewistown Lodge No. 456 of the Elks, Judith Lodge 
No. 3 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and Big Spring Camp No. 108 of the Woodmen 
of the World. He and his wife are very fond 
of music and share many other interests in com- 
mon. 

August 26, 1898, Mr. Walker married Miss Jen- 
nie M. Harwood. She was born at Morton, Min- 
nesota, a daughter of John and Evelyn (Dodge) 
Harwood, and was the seventh of their ten chil- 
dren. Her father later became a prominent rancher 
in Fergus County. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have 
three children. Joseph Albert, born September 2, 
1899, graduated from the Fergus County High 
School in 1918, and on October 9th of the same 
year was enrolled as a member of the Student 
Army Training Corps at the University of Mon- 
tana. He received his honorable discharge De- 
cember 18, 1918. Judith Adelaide, the second child, 
was born April 20, 1901, and was a graduate of 
the Fergus County High School. The youngest 
child is Marjorie Evelyn, born February 4, 1908. 

ROBERT H. WATSON is a man of wide experience 
and varied business interests and is connected with 
several enterprises of Hall, including the operation 
of a large real estate service. He was born at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, April 20, 1879, a son of Joseph 



W. Watson. The Watson family was established 
in the United States by the grandfather of Robert 
H. Watson, who came to this country from Scot- 
land. Joseph W. Watson was born in Kentucky 
in 1828, and died at Wichita Falls, Texas, in 1907. 
Reared in Kentucky, Joseph W. Watson left his 
native state after reaching maturity and went to the 
vicinity of Booneville, where he was engaged in 
farming until after the close of the war between 
the North and South, during which conflict he 
espoused the side of the latter section and served 
in the Confederate army under General Price, being 
wounded in the right hand. Upon his return home 
from the war, he went into Indian Territory and 
was engaged in ranching near Ryan until 1907, when 
he retired to Wichita Falls. His political beliefs 
made him a democrat, and he was strong in his sup- 
port of the principles of that party. In the Baptist 
Church he found the expression of his religious 
faith and he gave that denomination a hearty and 
loyal support. Mr. Watson is survived by his widow 
who lives at Enid, Oklahoma. She bore the maiden 
name of Sarah E. Patterson, and was born near 
Booneville, Missouri. Their children were as fol- 
lows : John, who is in the harness business at Rush 
Springs, Oklahoma ; Sarah, who married Robert 
Green, resides at San Marcus, Texas, where Mr. 
Green is engaged in ranching; Mary, who died at 
the age of six years ; J. H., who is in a real estate 
business at Dallas, Texas ; Elizabeth, who married 
Oliver Greathouse, now serving as sheriff of a 
Texan County; Mary, who married Jefferson 
Thomas, a railroad man, lives in Missouri ; George 
W., who is a mechanic of Amarillo, Texas ; James, 
who lives near Ryan, Oklahoma; Robert H., whose 
name heads this review ; Lucy, who died in 1900 ; 
Fannie, who married Tom Johnson a rancher in the 
neighborhood of Enid, Oklahoma ; and Alice who 
died in Oklahoma when thirty-five years old. 

Robert H. Watson attended the public schools of 
Indian Territory and Kansas, and lived at home 
until he was seventeen years old. He then went to 
Medicine Lodge, Kansas, where he worked as a 
cowboy, and was employed as such at Kiowa and 
Coldwater, Kansas. With the outbreak of the 
Spanish-American war, he served his country as a 
soldier, and then in January, 1899, enlisted for serv- 
ice in the Philippines to which he was sent, and 
where he remained for three years and eight months, 
during that period taking part in fifteen expeditions. 
He was acting quartermaster sergeant in the 
mounted constabulary scouts. Returning to this 
country in 1902, he was mustered out of the service 
at San Francisco, California, from whence he re- 
turned to Kansas and for the subsequent two years 
was in a restaurant business at Wichita, and Ray- 
mond, Washington, remaining in the latter city until 
he came to Hall, Montana. Since locating here he 
has invested quite heavily in local enterprises and 
is owner of a barber shop, ice cream and confec- 
tionery parlor, pool hall and telephone exchange, 
and conducts the leading real estate business of this 
section. Mr. Watson is one of the live business men 
of Granite County, and whatever he undertakes he 
carries through to a successful completion. The 
republican party has in him one of its most force- 
ful' exponents. Fraternally Mr. Watson belongs to 
Raymond Lodge, Loyal Order of Moose of Ray- 
mond, Washington; Raymond Aerie No. rt>3i, 
Fraternal Order of Eagles of Raymond, Washing- 
ton, and still retains his interests in these organ- 
izations. In addition to his interests at Hall, Mr. 
Watson is a stockholder of the Drummond Light & 
Power Company. 

In 1911 Mr. Watson was united in marriage with 




ADOLPHUS D. MYERS 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



109 



Miss Alma Hanley at Raymond, Washington. She 
is a daughter of W. J. and Mary (Campbell) Han- 
ley. Mr. Hanley and his family reside at Hall 
where he is conducting a garage. Mr. and Mrs. 
Watson became the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Lucy Belle born in 1912; Henry Jackson, 
who was born in 1913; James Robert, who was born 
in 1915; Bessie, who was born in 1917; and Jane, 
who was born in 1919. 

OTTO K. MYERS, who was brought to Montana 
when a child by his parents, grew up on a ranch, 
but for many years has been a successful business 
man at Lewistown. 

He was born at Midland, Ontario, December i, 
1881, a son of Adolphus D. and Delia May (Davis) 
Myers. His father was born in Buffalo, New York, 
in 1834, while his mother, who is still living, is a 
native of Canada. Adolphus Myers was a car- 
penter by trade, was in the merchandise business 
in Canada for several years, and in 1889 brought his 
family to Montana. He entered a homestead ten 
miles south of Great Falls and engaged in general 
farming. The old homestead among other features 
had a very fine spring of water. He later sold the 
ranch and was employed at his trade for five or six 
years with the B. M. Smelting Company at Great 
Falls. Then for two or three years he was solicitor 
for the Great Falls Tribune and in 1905 came to 
Lewistown and took up the manufacture of soda 
water and soft drinks. Later he built a fine plant, 
and operated it very successfully until his death, 
which occurred September 10, 1918. He was candi- 
date for mayor of Lewistown in May, 1913, against 
W. D. Symmes. In politics he was a socialist and 
was a member of Lewistown Lodge No. 37, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and a Woodmen of the 
World. 

Otto K. Myers, only child of his parents, was eight 
years old when brought to Montana, and he acquired 
his education in the public schools of Great Falls. 
He also worked on the ranch of his father and at 
one time had a thrilling experience when he and a 
boy companion got in the way of a stampede of 
about 1,000 head of cattle. They ran for about 
three miles before they met his father and other 
men, who by shooting into the on-coming herd 
turned their course and saved the lives of the 
boys. Mr. Myers on leaving the ranch went to work 
for a soda water company at Great Falls, learning 
the business, and in 1905 he used his experience 
jointly with his father's capital in the soft drink in- 
dustry, and since his father's death has been owner 
and proprietor of what is one of the flourishing 
business enterprises of Lewistown. 

Mr. Myers is independent in politics, voting for 
the best man, and is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. On June 9, 1913, he married 
Florence Connolly. She was born in Traverse City, 
Michigan. They have one daughter, Arelene. 

CHARLES H. LANE. In a city of the importance of 
Butte almost every line of endeavor is well repre- 
sented, this region offering an unsurpassed field for 
the abilities of some of the most enterprising busi- 
ness men of the country. One of them who is 
attaining to a gratifying prosperity here is 'Charles 
H. Lane, manufacturers agent. He was born at 
Natick, Massachusetts, on May 13, 1854, a son of 
John Edward Lane, an Englishman, born in 1801, 
who died at Natick, Massachusetts, in 1861. He 
founded the family in the United States, becoming 
a sea captain and sailing out of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, across the ocean and carrying on trading 
in almost every port of the world. After the 



organization of the republican party, he voted its 
ticket. His marriage occurred at Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, when he was united with Mary Jane 
La Coste, born in New Hampshire in 1804. She 
died at Natick, Massachusetts, in 1884, having 
borne her husband the following children : Anna, 
Mary, Victoria, Louise, Josephine, John Edwin, 
William and Isabelle all of whom are deceased ; 
Susan, who resides at Brooklyn, New York, is the 
widow of H. O. Daniels, who was a shoe manu- 
facturer, and she now conducts a large custom shoe 
repairing shop of New York City and gives em- 
ployment to eleven persons ; and Charles H., who is 
the youngest of the family. 

Charles H. Lane was educated in the public 
schools of Natick, Massachusetts, and was gradu- 
ated from its high school course in 1870. He be- 
gan his business career as a clerk for a Natick 
drug store and remained with it for eleven years. 
In 1880 Mr. Lane came to the West, and for six 
years was engaged in the sheep industry in Wyom- 
ing. He then engaged with Beckwith, Quinn & 
Company, general merchants of Carbon, Wyoming, 
and remained with them until 1889. In that year 
he came to Butte, Montana, to become secretary of 
the W. R. Kenyon Hardware Company, now the 
Montana Hardware Company, and held that office 
for three years, when he became cashier of the 
Miller, Chapman & Castle Hardware Company. A 
year later he became cashier for the Tuttle Manu- 
facturing Company, leaving it in 1897 to assist in 
organizing the Harrison-Lane Company, dealers in 
coal and mining supplies at wholesale. At the ex- 
piration of a year Mr. Lane sold his interests in 
this concern and established himself as sales agent, 
and for twenty-one years has represented the Ameri- 
can Steel & Wire Company and other corporations 
as a manufacturers agent, and he also is a whole- 
sale dealer in coal, his offices being at No. 101 
Lewisohm Block, Butte. He covers the whole state 
of Montana, visiting jobbers only. 

A very prominent man and a leader in the local 
democratic party, Mr. Lane served as mayor of 
Butte from 1915 to 1917, and gave the city a sound 
and businesslike administration, and he has also 
been a member of the school board for eight years. 
Both as a member and trustee of the Presbyterian 
Church, Mr. Lane is valued by his associates in 
religious endeavor. He belongs to Summit Valley 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Parker 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons and Natick Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar, the first of Butte and 
the last two of Natick, Massachusetts ; of Butte 
Council No. 106, United Commercial Travelers of 
America; the Rotary Club of Butte; and joined the 
Silver Bow Club in 1890. Recognizing the value to 
the community of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, Mr. Lane is a member of the Butte branch 
and is serving it as a director. 

In 1887 Mr. Lane was married at Belvidere, 
Illinois, to Miss Eliza Tompkins, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Newell C. Tompkins, the former of 
whom was a retired prospector who died at Butte, 
Montana, in 1911, having been associated with the 
Strang Company of Omaha, Nebraska, and Walker 
Brothers of Salt Lake City, Utah, together with the 
latter gentlemen opening a bank in that city dur- 
ing its pioneer days, which was housed in a tent. 
Mrs. Tompkins is also deceased. Mrs. Lane was 
educated in the girls seminary at Knoxville, Illinois. 
The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Lane have been 
as follows : Roger O., who was born on November 
23, 1888, is cashier in the pay office of the Anaconda 
Copper Mining Company, and a graduate of Lake 
Forest University of Illinois, with the degree of 



110 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Bachelor of Arts ; Anna Isabella, who was born May 
2, 1897, is at home; and Helen Elizabeth, who was 
born September 23, 1899, is also at home. The latter 
attended Ferry Hall Academy, Lake Forest, Illinois. 
The family residence at No. 2744 Edward Street is 
owned by Mr. Lane and he also o'wns a double 
dwelling on North Christopher Street. A man of 
capabilities and broad vision, he has been able to 
look into the future and see possibilities not visible 
to the ordinary man, and has possessed the courage 
to take advantage of opportunities as they came to 
his hand. His success is his own creation, and it 
is not confined to business circles, for he has at- 
tained to prominence both politically and socially. 

ALBERT LERov PHILLIPS came to Montana with 
a thorough practical knowledge of the pharmacy 
and drug business, and since 1912 has been the 
leading business man of that class in Big Timber. 

He was born on a farm in Sullivan County, Mis- 
souri, March 15, 1880. His paternal ancestry came 
originally from Wales and settled in Massachusetts. 

However, his grandfather, Brice Phillips, was 
born in Pennsylvania on December 16, 1821, and 
about 1866 left his farm near Waynesburg in that 
state and moved to Eastern Illinois, and a few 
years later went to Sullivan County, Missouri, 
where he died in 1896. Elias Phillips, father of 
Albert L., was born in Pennsylvania in 1850, and 
was sixteen years old when his parents moved to 
Eastern Illinois, near Laharpe, and was still a youth 
when he went with them to Sullivan County, Mis- 
souri. He became a farmer in Sullivan County 
and vigorously prosecuted his interests as a grain 
and livestock raiser and is still a factor in that 
promising agricultural district of Missouri. He is 
a democrat in politics and is an active supporter 
of the Church of God. He married Mary Isabel 
Rowland, who was born in Elbridge, Illinois, in 
1853. Chloey E.. the oldest of their children, is the 
wife of James Scott, a farmer near Yukon, Okla- 
homa; Albert L. is the second in age; Ira R. is a 
farmer in Sullivan County; Kenney is also a farmer 
in that county; and Eva May is the wife of Albert 
Shaver, a farmer in Sullivan County. 

Albert L. Phillips lived on the farm and ac- 
quired a rural school education, and in 1808 grad- 
uated from the Green City High School. He early 
determined that his career should not be that of a 
farmer. In 1902 he graduated from the State Nor- 
mal School at Kirksville, Missouri, and for two 
years taught in his native county. At Green City 
he acquired his first experience in the drug and 
jewelry business, where he remained two years, 
then worked in similar lines at Gait, Missouri, one 
year, and three years at Fairfax, Missouri. With 
this education and equipment he came to Montana 
in 1910, and became proprietor of the Melville 
Drug and Jewelry Company at Melville. His part- 
ner there was H. P. Nelson. In 1912 he formed a 
partnership with W. D. Richards under the name 
Richards & Company, and established his present 
business at Big Timber. In 1915 he became sole 
proprietor, and has given Big Timber a model es- 
tablishment as a drug store, one of the best stocked 
and managed stores of the kind in Sweetgrass 
County. Mr. Phillips lives over his store. 

He is a republican in politics, and is affiliated 
with Doric Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, at Big Timber, Big Timber Lodge No. 25, 
Knights of Pythias, is a member of Green City 
Camp No. 2656, Modern Woodmen of America, 
and is a member of Big Timber Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Sweetgrass County Good Roads Asso- 
ciation. 



EMIL O. KINDSCHY. The deft manipulation of the 
chisel has at all times commanded a liberal share 
of wonder and admiration ; it has preserved to the 
human race the beauty of antiquity, has marked 
the final resting-place of our dearest and most be- 
loved friends, and has made the home of their 
mortal remains a garden of art and loveliness ; it 
has also contributed largely to the beautifying of 
our cities, the adornment of our public parks, and 
to the perpetuating of the memory of the great and 
good. Among the men of Montana who are identi- 
fied with this line of work as proprietors of monu- 
ment establishments, one who has been particularly 
successful is Emil O. Kindschy, of Lewistpwn, who 
has likewise been prominent in civic affairs. 

Mr. Kindschy was born on a farm in Montana 
Township, Buffalo County, Wisconsin, June i, 
1881, a son of Christ and Margaret (von Wald) 
Kindschy, natives of Switzerland. Christ Kindschy 
was born in 1836 and was nine years of age when 
he accompanied his parents to the United States, 
the family settling in 1845 in Sauk County, Wis- 
consin. After coming to this country he was able 
to secure only three months of schooling, but as 
a man of natural intelligence and quick perception 
acquired a practical knowledge of matters of im- 
portance and moment which made up for his lack 
of a technical education. When a young man he 
went to Buffalo County, Wisconsin, where he se- 
cured a homestead in the wilderness and hewed 
himself a home out of the virgin forests, and in 
his latter years was engaged largely in diary farm- 
ing, with a prosperous business. He was one of 
the prominent and influential men of his commu- 
nity and served in various township offices, in- 
cluding those of chairman and treasurer, in addi- 
tion to being active in assisting in the advancement 
and progress of his county and state. His death 
occurred in 1912, when he had reached the age 
of seventy-six years, while Mrs. Kindschy, to whom 
he was married at Fountain City, Wisconsin, passed 
away in 1888, at the age of forty-four years. Of 
their seven children Emil O. was the sixth in order 
of birth, and five still survive. 

Emil O. Kindschy divided his boyhood between 
working on the home farm during the summer 
months and attending the district schools in the 
winter terms in Buffalo County, and when he en- 
tered upon his career it was in the role of school- 
teacher. He was but sixteen years of age when 
he took his first class in his home community in 
Buffalo County, Wisconsin, but the youthful in- 
structor proved proficient and capable of securing 
results, and for four years he was retained in the 
same capacity. In 1901 he came to Montana, ar- 
riving at Lewistown in February, and shortly there- 
after secured a position teaching in the public 
schools of Fergus County. After four years thus 
passed he turned his attention to other pursuits 
and until 1910 was occupied in connection with 
employment in the ranch business, cattle raising 
and farming. He then spent a year in visiting his 
father and other relatives in Wisconsin, but in 1911 
returned to Lewistown, where he entered the em- 
ploy of Abel Brothers, with whom he continued 
something under three years. In 1913 he embarked 
in the monument business, and now has a modern 
establishment at No. 123 East Maine Street, where 
he has the most up-to-date equipment to be se- 
cured. He uses only the best of materials, and, as 
a natural artist, his love for the picturesque and 
beautiful asserts itself in every detail of his busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Kindschy was married April 25, 1005, to Miss 
Ursula Camastral, who was born in Switzerland 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



and was eleven years of age when brought to the 
United States by her parents. Three children have 
been born to this union : Lillian, Ruby and Doris. 
In his political views Mr. Kindschy is a republi- 
can. He has been active in local affairs, and in the 
capacity of alderman of the first ward, to which 
position he was elected in the spring of 1916, worked 
effectively and constructively in behalf of the in- 
terests of his city and his constituency. Fraternally 
he is affiliated with Judith Lodge No> 30, Knights 
of Pythias, and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and he and Mrs. Kindschy belong to Anchor 
Rebekah Lodge No. 55. 

FRANK M. MORSE. Within the past couple of 
years real Americans 'have found that they possess 
a priceless heritage in a line of honorable ancestry 
dating back to the colonial days of this country, 
and they realize that some record of their family 
ought to be put in shape for preservation for their 
children. Money cannot buy this distinction ; it out- 
weighs wealth and high social position, and with it 
comes as a natural result, an earnest striving on 
the part of this and future generations, to live up 
to the standards of those who helped to make this 
country what it is today, the greatest on earth. One 
of these one hundred per cent Americans who are 
living in Montana, is Frank M. Morse, postmaster 
of Hall, who is one of the prosperous business men 
of Granite County. 

Frank M. Morse was born at Drummond, Mon- 
tana, October 8, 1886, a son of F. D. Morse, and 
grandson of Maj. John W. Morse. Major Morse 
was borne in Maine, where his ancestors settled 
prior to the American Revolution, coming to this 
country from England. The date of his birth was 
1834, and of his death, 1908, he passing away at 
Philipsburg, Montana. He came to Philipsburg at 
a very early day, and for years conducted a feed 
store here. At the time he selected this city for 
his permanent home, it was a pioneer settlement, 
and Major Morse did much to insure its future, 
both as an official and private citizen. A man of 
more than average ability and education, he was 
called upon to functionate as incumbent of practic- 
ally all of the local offices, and as a non-official ad- 
visor on matters of civic importance. 

F. D. Morse, father of Frank M. Morse, was born 
at Bangor, Maine, in 1854, and now lives at Drum- 
mond, Montana. Coming to Montana in the early 
'705, he was engaged for a time in mining at Bear 
Gulch, but later "homesteaded 160 acres of land in 
the vicinity of Drummond, to which he has since 
added until he now owns 1,600 acres of land and 
devotes it to hay, grain and cattle raising, his prop- 
erty being a very valuable one. His operations are 
carried on upon an extensive scale, and he has been 
very successful in his calling. A republican of the 
old school he has always supported the principles 
of his party, and served as deputy sheriff of Granite 
County for eight years and as sheriff for two years. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Julia Gas- 
per, was born at Surry, Maine, in 1861. Their chil- 
dren are as follows : Verdine B., and Frank M. 
Verdine B. was born August 23, 1884, and after 
attending the Drummond schools, was graduated 
from the Garden City Business College of Missoula, 
Montana. He then was engaged in farming until 
1916, when he entered into partnership in a mer- 
cantile venture with his brother at Hall, Montana. 
Like his father he is a republican. Verdine B. Morse 
was married to Wanda E. Burt, a daughter of 
Charles E. and Rosa (Healy) Burt, the former of 
whom is now deceased, having been a pioneer livery- 
man of Drummond, Montana, but the latter sur- 

Vol. II 8 



vives and lives at Drummond. Mr. and Mrs. Ver- 
dine B. Morse have the following children : Fran- 
ces, Edwin, Muriel and Reuel. 

Frank M. Morse was reared on his father's farm 
Until he was sixteen years of age, and during that 
period attended the public schools of Drummond. 
For the first five years following the completion of 
his sixteenth year, Frank M. Morse was in the 
employ of J. B. Featherman, a merchant of Drum- 
mond, and then for two years he was with Duncan 
Dingwall, another merchant of Drummond. In the 
meanwhile, desiring to learn something of the theory 
of business methods as well as their practical ap- 
plication, the ambitious youth took a correspondence 
course in this branch of learning, and then, feeling 
qualified for independent action, formed a partner- 
ship with his cousin, A. P. Morse, a son of Col. 
G. W. Morse, a pioneer of Montana, and the two 
young men carried on a mercantile business together 
for eighteen months at Drummond, and then, in 
1913 moved to Hall, Montana, and bought the small 
store, 20 by 25 feet, owned by Albert Tinklepaugh. 
From the time Mr. Morse took over this business, 
the trade improved and some time ago it was neces- 
sary for him to seek larger quarters, and now he 
and his brother occupy a modern store, 90 by 20 
feet, with full basement, and have three warehouses 
for the storing of their stock. The store is located 
near the depot, and the brothers keep at least 
$14,000 worth of stock on hand. Although Mr. 
Morse is a republican, his fitness for the office of 
postmaster was so universally recognized, that he 
was appointed by President Wilson on March 9, 
1915, to this office, and has held it ever since. In 
addition to his other interests, Mr. Morse owns a 
dwelling at Drummond. 

On June 10, 1908, Mr. Morse was married to Miss 
Anabelle McDonald, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jonas D. McDonald, both of whom were killed in 
the wreck of the Coeur d' Alene in 1909. Mr. 
McDonald was pumpman for the Missouri Pacific 
Railroad at Drummond for ten years prior to his 
tragic death. Mr. and Mrs. Morse became the 
parents of the following children: Donald, who 
was born December 25, 1909; Nevin, who was born 
March 17, 1911; Julia Irene, who was born in 1912; 
Fern, who was born in 1915; Carrol, who was born 
in 1917; and Edith, who was born in 1918. 

Mr. Morse is a splendid business man and under- 
stands his trade and how to meet its demands. Dur- 
ing the difficult days of the war and the reconstruc- 
tion period he has lived up to government require- 
ments, and made many sacrifices in order to meet 
them and at the same time protect his customers 
from excessive prices and unnatural shortage of 
commodities, and is certain to reap a well-merited 
reward in the future by a continued patronage from 
those whose interests he has kept in mind at a time 
when some of his calling have not hesitated to 
profit through the necessities of their customers. 

CHARLES L. WENTWORTH. The .career of Charles 
L. Wentworth, of Lewistown, illustrates most 
forcibly the possibilities that are open to a young 
man who possesses sterling business qualifications. 
It proves that neither wealth nor social position, nor 
the assistance of influential friends at the outset 
of his career, are at all necessary to place a young 
man upon the road to success. It also proves that 
ambitious perseverance, steadfastness of purpose and 
indefatigable industry, combined with sound business 
principles, will be rewarded, and that true success 
follows individual efforts only. 

Mr. Wentworth was born in Waldo County, 
Maine, March 26, 1871, a son of Franklin L. and 



112 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



Margaret E. (Bennett) Wentworth, natives of the 
same county, the father born August 24, 1838, and 
the mother July 17, 1846. The parents were mar- 
ried at Searsmont, Maine, and had two children : 
Charles L. ; and Nettie, the wife of Harry Haskell, 
of Portland, Maine. Franklin L. Wentworth passed 
his boyhood days on his father's farm, where he 
resided until his enlistment, June 26, 1862, in Com- 
pany D, Nineteenth Regiment, Maine Volunteer In- 
fantry. He served bravely and faithfully through- 
out practically the remainder of the Civil war and 
received his honorable discharge May 31, 1865. At 
the close of his military career he returned to the 
homestead, where he resumed farming, and was so 
engaged until the time of his retirement in 1918. 
A lover of fine horses, during his active years he was 
greatly interested in the breeding of such animals, as 
he was also of Durham cattle. Mr. Wentworth was 
originally a whig in his political views, but from 
1856 was a republican. He was prominent and in- 
fluential in civic affairs, and in addition to being 
road supervisor for fifteen years was one of his 
county's selectmen during a long neriod. He was 
active in the movements of the Presbyterian Church, 
and for many years held the post of deacon. Mr. 
Wentworth died May 2, 1919, and Mrs. Wentworth 
on May 16, 1919. 

Charles L. W'entworth received his education in 
the public schools of Waldo County, Maine, walking 
two miles from his father's farm to the little red 
schoolhouse on the hill. He was an industrious 
lad, and when only fourteen years of age earned 
his first money shingling the home, barn and shed 
of Isaac Burns, for which his daily wage was fifty 
cents. On October 19, 1891, Mr. Wentworth left the 
parental roof, and one week later arrived at Big 
Timber, Montana, where he engaged in teaming 
for the C. E. Severance Sheep Company. He sub- 
sequently took charge of all the team work and 
farming, and after about two years became super- 
intendent of the cow outfit of the same company, 
a position which he held for i l / 2 years. During 1894 
and 1895 Mr. Wentworth attended J. C. Duncan's 
Business College at Davenport, Iowa. During this 
time he had been employed as a cowboy in the outfit 
of Oscar Stephens, and for four years rode the 
range. His experiences as a rider of the range 
ceased at the time of his marriage, November 26, 
1896, to Miss Iva Ann Corbly, who was born near 
Sedan, Kansas, January 8, 1875, a daughter of 
Jacob Ingram and Jane (Bolton) Corbly. 

Jacob I. Corbly was born in Pennsylvania and 
died in 1904 in Montana, when sixty-two years of 
age. Mrs. Corbly, who was a native of Iowa, died 
in Kansas when her daughter, Mrs. Wentworth, was 
but three months old, she being the youngest of 
three daughters. In the fall of 1881 Mr. Corbly 
came to Dillon, Montana, by rail, and then traveled 
overland to near Bozeman, Gallatin County. In 
1890 he removed to Fergus County, and bought land 
four miles northeast of Lewistown, and also took 
up Government land under his soldier's claim, to 
which he added until he had nearly 1,000 acres at 
one time. He was a large cattle operator, and was 
not only well known in business circles, but was 
prominent also in civic affairs, was chosen by his 
fellow-citizens to represent them in the capacity 
of county commissioner for two terms, and served 
as a member of the school board for several years. 
He was a democrat in politics, a member of the 
Christian Church, and affiliated with Lewistown 
Lodge No. 37, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

Following his marriage, Charles L. Wentworth 
located on the land owned by his wife, an entry of 
160 acres, and later he himself homesteaded 160 acres 



in Fergus County. During the time of proving up 
on this property he worked in the Gilt Edge mining 
district, and subsequently bought the Nickel Plate 
stage line, between Lewistown and Gilt Edge, at 
the same time taking over the mail contract between 
Lewistown and Kendall. In all, he continued in 
the stage business for six years, and at the same 
time continued his farming operations. At this time 
Mr. Wentworth is one of the big wheat growers of 
the county and also is actively engaged in breeding 
standard-bred cattle and horses. His business con- 
nections are numerous, including a directorship in 
the Empire Bank and Trust Company, in which he is 
a stockholder, the Montana and Eastern Banking 
Corporation, and the Farmers Elevator Company, 
of which he was one of the organizers in 1008. The 
same year he engaged with the Montana State Fair 
Association as county representative in collecting 
all the produce exhibited from Fergus County, and 
in 1910 was made a member of the Advisory Board 
of that body. In 1913 he was elected vice president 
of the Montana Seed Growers Association, and in 
1918 was honored by election to the post of president 
of the Fergus County Fair Association. Mr. Went- 
worth is one of the prominent and influential re- 
publicans of his community, and in 1916 was elected 
alderman of the Third Ward of Lewistown, an 
office to which he was re-elected in 1918. His terms 
nave been characterized by much constructive work. 
Mr. Wentworth is fraternally affiliated with Judith 
Lodge No. 30, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is past noble grand of the Encampment of that 
order ; with Judith Lodge No. 30, Knights of 
Pythias ; the Dramatic Order Knights of Korassan ; 
Lewiston Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks ; and the Woodmen of the World. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wentworth are the parents of two 
children : Miss Leone Montana, who resides with 
her parents, and Lloyd Ingram. Lloyd I. Wentworth 
was married May 27, 1918, to Helen Waspbey, and 
July 6, 1918, enlisted in the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment of the United States Army at Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. He was subsequently transferred to the 
Motor Transport Corps, and was sent to Camp 
Johnson, Jacksonville, Florida. He was promoted 
to first lieutenant and at the close of the great war 
was identified with the Instruction Department. He 
is now held in the Officers Reserve, subject to call 
for five years from date of enlistment. 

THOMAS J. B. SHANLEY, M. D. There is no 
vocation that commands greater respect and few 
that offer better opportunities for the display of 
character and ability than does that of the medical 
profession. Dealing with the careers of men who 
have contributed to the upbuilding and prominence 
of the profession in the great commonwealth of 
Montana is a task every writer enjoys, for it leads 
through many and diversified avenues of useful- 
ness, and gives truth and expression to the fact 
that those, who have done most for their fellow- 
men and the advancement of the profession, are the 
ones who have lived honest and unselfish lives them- 
selves. In preparing a review of the lives of the 
men whose names stand out prominently among 
the medical men of this state, who by character and 
achievement have gained notable prominence, the 
record of Dr. Thomas J. B. Shanley of Butte is 
found to be one that compels more than passing 
mention. 

Doctor Shanley was born at Burlington, Vermont, 
on November n, 1880, a son of M. W. Shanley, and 
grandson of Thomas Shanley, born in Vermont in 
1805, and died at Burlington, that state, in 1885, 
having spent his entire life in Vermont, where he 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



113 



followed farming. He married a Miss Barrett, 
also a native of Vermont. His father, great-grand- 
father of Doctor Shanley, served in the American 
Revolution as one of the "Green Mountain Boys." 
The Shanleys came to the American colonies from 
Ireland, first living at Boston, Massachusetts, but 
later locating permanently in Vermont. 

M. W. Shanley was born at Burlington, Vermont, 
in 1850, and still makes that city his home, and 
in it he was reared, educated and married. For a 
time he was engaged in farming in its vicinity and 
then turned his attention to building. For about 
five years he lived in the western portion of North 
Dakota and was interested in the Stevens, Shanley 
& Scofield Ranch, where horses and cattle were 
grown upon an extensive scale, but returned to 
Vermont. The democratic party gives expression 
to his political views. In religious faith he is 
Roman Catholic. The maiden name of his wife 
was Elizabeth J. Flynn, born at Cambridge, Ver- 
mont, in 1850. Their children were as follows : 
Frank, who is a resident of Detroit, Michigan, is 
a large landowner of Towner County, North Da- 
kota, and spends a considerable portion of his time 
there ; Doctor Shanley, of whom we write ; Helen, 
who is studying medicine at Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York City, New York ; Joseph Wil- 
liam, who is an oil operator, resides at Casper, Wy- 
oming; and Bernadette, who for two years was a 
student of the School of Mines at Butte, but is now 
attending Columbia University. 

Doctor Shanley attended the public schools of 
Burlington, Vermont, and his environment was a 
valuable one during the formative period of his 
life. When he had completed the sophomore year 
in the Burlington High School, he did the work 
of the last two years of high school at the Uni- 
versity of North Dakota, and then entered George- 
town University at Washington, District of Colum- 
bia, and was two years in attendance on collegiate 
course. For the subsequent two years Doctor Shan- 
ley was at Atlanta, Georgia, looking after the min- 
ing and plantation interests of his brother Frank, 
and at the close of the second one he became a 
student in the medical department of Columbia 
University at New York City, New York,, and was 
graduated therefrom in 1909, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, and as a member of the Greek 
Letter fraternity, Chi Zeta Chi. 

Doctor Shanley was house surgeon at the French 
Hospital of New York .City for two years and 
seven months, thus gaining an invaluable practical 
experience, leaving that institution to become resi- 
dent physician of the Manhattan Maternity and Dis- 
pensary Hospital of New York City, where he re- 
mained for thirteen months. In December, 1912, 
Doctor Shanley located permanently at Butte, and 
entered upon the practice of his profession, spe- 
cializing in surgery, although he also has a general 
medical practice, and has built up a very large and 
valuable connection. His work has ever been dis- 
charged with a keen sense of conscientious obliga- 
tion, and his skill is evidenced through the results 
which follow his labors. 

Doctor Shanley is an independent democrat and 
a Roman Catholic, following in both his politics 
and religion the teachings of his father. He be- 
longs to Butte Council No. 668, Knights of Colum- 
bus, in which he has been made a third degree 
knight ; the Silver Bow Club ; and the county, state 
and national medical organizations ; and during 1919 
served the Silver Bow Medical Society as president. 
He was also president of the University Club of 
Butte from July, 1916, to September, 1918. His 



residence and offices are situated at No. 201 West 
Granite Street. 

In June, 1915, Doctor Shanley was married at 
Butte to Miss Anne Sennett, a daughter of Mrs. 
M. Sennett of Butte. Mrs. Shanley was born at 
Leadville, Colorado. Doctor and Mrs. Shanley have 
the following children : Thomas J. B., Jr., who 
was born on December 20, 1917; and Elizabeth 
Anne, who was born on December 10, 1918. 

Always interested in athletics, Doctor Shanley 
stroked the "varsity crew" during his freshman 
year at the Georgetown University at the inter- 
collegiate boat race on the Hudson River at Pough- 
keepsie, New York, in 1901, and came in second, 
Cornell being first. He has participated in many 
other boat races, one being against the crew of the 
United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Mary- 
land. Doctor Shanley maintains membership with 
the Virginia Boat Club of Richmond, Virginia, and 
the Atlanta Athletic Club, and is also a member of 
The Society of New York Alumni of Georgetown 
University and of the Menden Alumni Society of 
Columbia University, New York City. He has al- 
ways stood for the things which are right and 
proper both in his profession and outside of 
it, and no one has been more strict in the main- 
tenance of professional ethics than he. 

ERNEST R. PATTERSON, proprietor of one of the 
chief mercantile establishments of Big Timber, was 
about two years old when he made his first ac- 
quaintance with Montana. That was in 1888, in 
which year his father brought the family from 
the State of Maine and settled on the Musselshell 
River. His father, Eugene L. Patterson, was born 
near Belfast, Maine, in 1863. He had been em- 
ployed in the logging camps of Maine, also operated 
a milk route, and on coming to Montana was fore- 
man for a large ranch on the Mussellshell River 
and later conducted ranches in the Lake Basin 
country and at White Beaver. In 1896 he bought 
a ranch of his own on Sweetgrass Creek, twelve 
miles from Big Timber, and lived on this property 
until he sold out in 1908. He then bought the 
hardware stock of the Montana Trading Company 
at Big Timber and was financially interested in that 
business until his death. This is the hardware store 
of which his only son, Ernest, is now proprietor. 
Eugene Patterson was a republican and was affili- 
ated with Big Timber Lodge No. 25, Knights of 
Pythias. He died at Big Timber in 1914. His 
wife was Alice Shorey, who was born in Belfast, 
Maine, in 1869 ar >d is still living at Big Timber. 
Ernest R., who was born at Belfast, Maine, May 
6, 1886, is the older of two children, his sister Edith 
being the wife of John Cameron, a rancher near 
Reed Point, Montana. 

Ernest R. Patterson attended rural schools in 
Sweetgrass County, and later secured a liberal edu- 
cation. For three years he was a student in the 
State Normal School at St. Cloud, Minnesota, grad- 
uated in 1906 from the county high school at Big 
Timber, and then spent a year in the state university 
at Missoula. On leaving college he went to work 
in his father's business and since February I, 1919, 
has been sole proprietor. His store at the cor- 
ner of McLeod Street and First Avenue is a com- 
plete establishment, handling hardware and furni- 
ture, and there is also an undertaking department 
Mr. Patterson's partner in this being Casper Graff. 

Mr. Patterson is owner of a modern home on 
Fourth Avenue, and another dwelling on Fifth 
Avenue. He has served as city councilman of 
Big Timber, is a republican, is a past chancellor of 
Big Timber Lodge No. 25, Knights of Pythias, a 



114 



member of the Dramatic Order of the Knights of 
Khorassan and is affiliated with Big Timber Camp 
No. 10610, Modern Woodmen of America. 

He married at Big Timber in 1908 Miss Beulah 
Busha. On another page is an account of the 
numerous activities of her father, Charles T. Busha, 
one of the leading citizens of Big Timber. Mrs. 
Patterson is a graduate of the Sweetgrass County 
High School and finished her education in the 
Southern Female College of Virginia. To their 
marriage were born five children, Riley, the oldest, 
and Edith Lenora, both dying in infancy. The 
other three are Alice Helen, born May 3, 1911, Ida 
Elizabeth born May 13, 1914, and Beulah Gene, 
born May 21, 1919. 

ARTHUR A. STAPLETON. Since his arrival at Lew- 
istown in 1905 Arthur A. Stapleton has contributed 
materially to the upbuilding of the city, and on 
every side can be seen evidences of his ability as 
a constructor of substantial structures. His career 
has been indicative of the value of a useful trade 
when properly mastered and of the awards to be 
attained through following 'it through to its high- 
est possibilities, for m this way has Mr. Staple- 
ton become one of the leading factors in the busi- 
ness life of Lewistown and placed himself beyond 
the possibility for future financial needs. 

Arthur A. Stapleton was born at St. Mary's, Can- 
ada, October 25, 1874, a son of Arthur and Sarah 
(Long) Stapleton. His father, who was born in 
England in 1822, was brought to America on a 
sailing vessel by his parents when he was a mere 
child, the family being pioneers of the part of 
Canada in which they settled. There Arthur Staple- 
ton grew up in a somewhat wild part of the coun- 
try, learning the various lessons connected with 
the business of farming, which, with sawmilling, 
constituted his occupations throughout life. He 
was a man of industry and integrity, was honored 
in his community, and death in 1876 was mourned 
by a wide circle of acquaintances. Mrs. Staple- 
ton, who survived .her husband for a long period 
and died in 1913, at the advanced age of eighty 
years, was a native of Canada. There were nine 
children in the family, of whom six are still liv- 
ing, and Arthur A. was the eighth in order of birth. 
Arthur A. Stapleton was only about two years of 
age at the time of his father's death, and some two 
years later his widowed mother took him to Michigan, 
where, in the town of Lexington, he passed his boy- 
hood and secured his education in the public school. 
He was an industrious lad and even when still a mere 
boy did much to assist his mother in her struggles 
for a livelihood, remaining at her side until he was 
sixteen years of age. At that time he began to be 
self-supporting, and went to Grand Rapids, Mich- 
igan, to learn the trade of plumber. After completing 
his apprenticeship and mastering his trade he traveled 
as a journeyman for some years, and his first per- 
manent residence as a business man with an es- 
tablishment of his own was at Flint, Michigan, where 
he remained until 1905. During the time he had been 
located there he had done a good business and had 
become encouraged therein, but eventually decided 
that a wider field was awaiting him in the west, and 
accordingly, in the year mentioned, came to Lewis- 
town, Montana, where he has since centered his ac- 
tivities. Mr. Stapleton is now at the head of a 
large and prosperous business, which has grown and 
developed into the proportions of a necessary com- 
mercial asset. He has not alone confined himself to 
placing plumbing systems in some of the largest 
buildings in the city; on the contrary, his activities 
have extended into various fields of business en- 



deavor, he having been particularly active and prom- 
inent in the construction of residences and other 
structures. In addition to ten or twelve handsome 
and substantial residences which he contributed to 
the city's upbuilding, in 1916 he built the handsome 
Stapleton Block on Broadway, and is the principal 
owner of the Broadway Apartment Building on the 
same thoroughfare. His business transactions have 
always been characterized by strict fidelity to prin- 
ciple, contract and engagement, and his reputation is 
that of a ma'n whose word is as good as though it 
were backed by his name on a bond. Mr. Stapleton 
has found little time for politics, but is a stanch re- 
publican as a voter. Good movements, and particu- 
larly those affecting the welfare of his community, 
always have his earnest support and cooperation. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 
37, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; and Lewis- 
town Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

On June 28, 1894, Mr. Stapleton was united in 
marriage with Miss Nettie Tyler, who was born in 
Michigan, and to this union there have been born 
three children: Maynard H., Bernice and Tyler, all 
of whom are attending the Lewistown public schools 
and reside with their parents. 

H. A. FEATHERMAN, who is one of the progressive 
business men of Philipsburg, is successfully engaged 
in handling real estate and loans and writing insur- 
ance, and has been active in developing this sec- 
tion of the state. He was born at Stroudsburg, 
Pennsylvania, October 5, 1867, a son of Jacob A. 
Featherman, and a member of a family of English 
and French descent. Jacob A. Featherman was born 
near Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, where his ances- 
tors had located in pre-Revolutionary days, in 1827, 
and died there in 1906, having spent his entire life 
in that vicinity, and during his mature years being 
engaged in milling. He was a democrat in his po- 
litical belief, and a Reformed Lutheran in his relig- 
ious creed. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Ellen Stotz, and she came of Moravian descent. 
Mrs. Featherman survives her husband and lives at 
Allentown, Pennsylvania. She was born at Bethle- 
'hem, Pennsylvania, February 24, 1834. Their chil- 
dren were as follows: Mary, who married George 
Johnson, a publisher of Easton, Pennsylvania ; J. B., 
who came to Drummond, Montana, in 1878, became 
a merchant of the place, and there died in 1918; 
Lillie, who married M. J. Downs, now deceased, was 
formerly engaged in a real estate business at Easton, 
where his wife died in 1917; Annie, who married 
Reuben Albert, a surveyor, lives at Trenton, New 
Jersey; Jacob H., who died at Stroudsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, was a farmer during his mature years; 
Amanda, who died when about thirty, at New Chi- 
cago, Montana; Bertha, who is unmarried, lives at 
Drummond, Montana; H. A., whose name heads 
this review; Oliver F., who came to Philipsburg 
in 1885, was a bookkeeper, and died at Philipsburg 
in 1909 ; Fannie, who is a trained nurse, lives at 
Allentown, Pennsylvania; and Daisy, who married 
Anthony Graham, lives at Allentown, Mr. Graham 
having had charge of the Allentown Rapid Transit 
Company for many years. 

H. A. Featherman attended the rural schools of 
Monroe County, Pennsylvania, and then in 1885 
came to New Chicago, Montana, and for ten years 
was in the store of his uncle, John A. Featherman, 
and in the meanwhile attended the Helena Business 
College. Going from New Chicago to Drummond, 
Mr. Featherman clerked in the store of the same 
uncle until 1906, and in that year was elected treas- 
urer of Granite County, and re-elected to the same 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



115 



office in 1908, serving for four years, his second 
term expiring in March, 1911. He then became 
cashier for E. A. Hannah & Company, bankers, 
leaving that concern in April, 1918, to open up his 
present business of real estate, loans and insurance 
at Philipsburg, which he has developed into the 
leading one of its kind in Granite County. His 
offices are located in the Featherman Block on 
Broadway, which he owns, and he also owns a busi- 
ness building and lot on Broadway, adjacent to the 
post office, and his residence on the corner of Pine 
and Alfa streets, as well as' several other dwellings 
in the city. 

Mr. Featherman is a republican. The Methodist 
Episcopal Church is his religious home, and he is 
a trustee of it. Well known as a Mason Mr. Feath- 
erman belongs to Flint Creek Lodge, No. n, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, of which he has held every 
office including that of master ; Hope Chapter No. 
10, Royal Arch Masons, of which he has filled every 
office including that of high priest; Omar Com- 
mandery No. 9, of Missoula, Montana; Algeria 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Noble Mystic Shrine 
of Helena, Montana; and Pearl Chapter No. 14, 
Order Eastern Star, of which he served for two 
years as patron. He is a member of the Chamber 
of Commerce of Philipsburg, and is now one of 
its directors, and has been active in it and in the 
community generally, doing more than his part in 
interesting outside capital, and encouraging civic 
improvements and reforms. 

JOHN H. MclNTosH. Not only is John Mclntosh 
one of the leading men of Montana, and very active 
in the life of Butte as general manager of the 
Associated Industries of Montana, but he is also 
distinguished as belonging to one of the famous 
American families, founded here in the very early 
days of the colonies, by representatives of the family 
who came from Scotland and located in a portion 
of the present state of Georgia, which has a county 
named Mclntosh in their honor. Gen. Lachlan 
Mclntosh was one of the eminent command.ers of 
the Colonial troops during the American Revolu- 
tion, and an aide de camp of General Washington. 
He waged a successful warfare against the savage 
Seminole Indians and was one of the founders, to- 
gether with General Washington and Alexander 
Hamilton, of the famous Society of the Cincinnati. 

The grandfather of John H. Mclntosh was John 
Houston Mclntosh, and he was born at Trenton, 
New Jersey, and died at Saint Mary's, Florida, prior 
to the birth of his grandson. He married Eliza 
Higbee, who passed away at Trenton, New Jersey, 
John Houston Mclntosh maintaining homes both 
at Trenton and on his plantation on the Saint Mary 
River in Florida, which were occupied by the family 
according to the season. 

John H.. Mclntosh of this review was born in 
Early County, Georgia, on February i, 1879, a son 
of Dr. B. L. Mclntosh, born at Saint Mary's, Flor- 
ida, in 1837, and died at Marietta, Georgia, in July, 
1902. He was reared at Trenton, New Jersey, and 
was graduated from the American Institute of Med- 
icine and Surgery at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. When a 
young man he went to Savannah, Georgia, and be- 
gan the practice of his profession, but his plans 
were disturbed by the outbreak of the war be- 
tween the states and he, espousing the side of the 
South, enlisted in the Confederate army and served 
all through the war under General Lee, and par- 
ticipated in the various campaigns of that com- 
maVider in Virginia. He was severely wounded in 
the last battle of the war, at Sailors Creek in Vir- 



ginia, in which battle Doctor Mclntosh's brother, 
John H. Mclntosh, for whom the subject of this 
sketch was named, met his death. After his re- 
covery, Dr. Mclntosh located in Early County, 
Georgia, where he practiced his profession until 
1888, and was also interested on an extensive scale 
in the production of rice and cotton. In 1888 he 
removed to Marietta, Georgia, and continued in 
practice there until his death. A prominent demo- 
crat, he served for one term as commissioner of 
agriculture for the State of Georgia. He was an 
Episcopalian, and both as a member of that body 
and as a supporter of the public schools exerted 
an influence for good in his community. Doctor 
Mclntosh was married first to a Miss Nesbitt, a 
native of Georgia, who died about a year after mar- 
riage, in 1866, leaving one daughter, Lucy, who mar- 
ried Hugh N. Starnes, and died at Birmingham, 
Alabama, in 1918, her husband surviving her and 
engaging in the manufacture of iron in that same 
city. The second wife of Doctor Mclntosh bore 
the maiden name of Mary C. Hill, and she is now 
living with her son. She was born in Early Coun- 
ty, Georgia, in 1854. By his second marriage Doc- 
tor Mclntosh had the following family: Charlotte, 
who died in infancy; May, who married D. C. Cole, 
a capitalist of Marietta, Georgia; John H., who was 
the third in order of birth; Bayard, who is super- 
intendent of the woolen mills of Marietta, Georgia ; 
Joseph Higbee, who died in infancy ; and Richard 
H., who is a public accountant of Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

After being trained under private tutors in Early 
County, when he was ten years old, John H. Mc- 
lntosh was placed in the Mari'etta Academy, a boys' 
school. Later he took the high school course at 
Marietta, and was graduated therefrom in 1895. 
Mr. Mclntosh then studied law for a year in the 
office of United States Senator A. S. Clay at Mari- 
etta, Georgia, following which he entered the Uni- 
versity of Georgia at Athens, Georgia, in 1897, and 
was graduated therefrom in 1899 with the degree 
of Doctor of Law and as a member of the Greek 
Letter College Fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
During his collegiate course he was active in all 
branches of athletics and held the Southern record 
for pole vault for years. He was captain of the 
track team, played right field on the baseball team, 
was a member of the "varsity" football team for 
three years, and during his senior year was awarded 
the position of all Southern full back. 

On January I, 1900, Mr. Mclntosh came west 
to New Mexico, and as he was without the suffi- 
cient funds to open a law office he worked for eight 
months in the copper mine at Silver City. He 
then took a position as athletic director at the 
School of Mines at Golden, Colorado, and held 
it for a year. Going from there to Leadville, Colo- 
rado, he became a reporter on the Herald Demo- 
crat, of which he was later made city editor, and 
remained with that newspaper for a year, when 
he was made coach for the famous football team 
containing five former All American players, rep- 
resenting the Leadville Athletic Club, and traveled 
all over the West, playing the best teams. This was 
conceded to be the best club team in the West. In 
1902 Mr. Mclntosh worked as assistant city editor on 
the Denver News for three months, and then 
in March of that year came to Butte and became 
"sports" editor of the Intermountain, now the 
Daily Post, and continuing as such for a year. 
During this period he became interested in profes- 
sional athletics and won the middle weight wrestling 
championship of Montana when he defeated Adams 
at Dillon, Montana, for the title. During 1903 he 



116 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



went with the Helena Record at Helena, Mon- 
tana, for nine months, leaving that paper to take 
a position as "sports" editor on the old Butte Eve- 
ning News, which had just been established by 
F. A. Heinze, the copper king, and remained with 
it until in September, 1904, when he accepted the 
position of athletic director and professor of Eng- 
lish at the Colorado Agricultural College at Fort 
Collins, Colorado. While he was with that institu- 
tion he had signal success in his work, and among 
other honors won by him, his baseball team was 
twice champion of the state, or during 1905 and 
1906. In the fall of 1906 he returned to Butte and 
became associate editor of the Evening News, 
and while in that position promoted nearly all of 
the large athletic contests held in Butte, from 1906 
to 1908. In September, 1908, Mr. Mclntosh accepted 
the position of athletic director and instructor in 
English at the Montana State College at Bozeman, 
and remained there as such until the spring of 1911, 
when he became editor of the Republican Courier, 
a daily newspaper of Bozeman, but left it in 1912 
and came back to Butte and became a partner in 
the Cadillac State Agency. He sold part interest 
in this in 1913 and became mining and financial edi- 
tor of the Butte Daily Miner, holding that posi- 
tion until the spring of 1916, when he resigned and 
became secretary of the Silver Bow Employers As- 
sociation, and was so successful in handling indus- 
trial problems that a number of other communi- 
ties organized similar organizations for handling 
these problems following the methods of Mr. Mc- 
lntosh. In 1917 there was a coalition of all of 
these units into the Associated Industries of Mon- 
tana, of which Mr. Mclntosh was unanimously 
chosen for general manager, and still retains that 
important position. It is part of his duty to repre- 
sent Montana twice annually at the National In- 
dustrial Conference held at New York City. It 
is the chief aim of Mr. Mclntosh to establish and 
maintain industrial harmony by bringing employ- 
ers and employes into a better understanding of each 
other's problems. Mr. Mclntosh maintains offices 
at Nos. 305-6 and 7 Lewisohn Block. 

In his political faith Mr. Mclntosh is a repub- 
lican. He belongs to the Episcopal Church. The 
Silver Bow Club and the Butte Chamber of Com- 
merce also hold his membership. He is still con- 
nected with the Montana Cadillac Company as its 
vice president, and he owns a modern residence at 
No. 1119 West Park Street. 

On October 22, 1902, Mr. Mclntosh was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary Fleming at Colum- 
bus, Georgia. She is a daughter of Dr. Malcom 
and Anna (Meigs) Fleming, the former of whom 
was a physician and surgeon who died in Virginia. 
Mrs. Fleming survives and lives at Columbus, 
Georgia. Mrs. Mclntosh was graduated from the 
San Antonio, Texas, High School. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Mclntosh are as follows: 
Mary, who was born in August, 1908; John H., who 
was born in June, 1910; Bayard, who was born in 
January, 1912; and Anna, who was born in June, 
1918. 

Few men are better suited for their work than 
Mr. Mclntosh. Well educated and carefully trained, 
belonging to the aristocratic class by birth and early 
association, he can fully appreciate the stand of 
those whose capital has placed them above the ruck 
and stress of industrial striving; while his own 
struggles early in his career and his subsequent close 
association with young men in the making have 
given him a practical working knowledge of the 
problems of the employes and the dire need for 
their advancement. His training in law enables 



him to act in accordance with established ordi- 
nances and to plead with both sides so convincingly 
and authoritatively as to 'bring about an understand- 
ing when no one else could do so. A student of 
men and their impulses, Mr. Mclntosh early learned 
how to govern both and bring out of those with 
whom he came in contact the best in them, and to 
develop latent talents in a most remarkable man- 
ner. All of his former work has developed his own 
resources and made of him a leader of men in 
the greatest of games life in which, because of 
his fairness, his insight 'into human nature and his 
sympathy, he has been chosen to act as both direc- 
tor and arbitrator, and through his services not 
only are better understanding relations established 
between the two classes, capital and labor, but the 
public is a participant in the results. 

JOHN O. HKLSING was connected with the building 
of some of the pioneer railroads through Montana 
and the Northwest, and has led an exceedingly 
active life, much of it on the open range as a stock 
man. A few years ago he retired from his ranch 
and is now enjoying the comforts of a good home 
in Lewistown. 

Mr. Helsing was born in Sweden December 31, 
1862. He was the youngest in a family of four 
daughters and two sons, and was a small child when 
his father died. At the age of nine years he came 
to the United States with his mother and a sister. 
They landed at Quebec, thence went to Chicago, 
and two months later he accompanied his sister to' 
Lake City, Minnesota. For some five or six years 
he lived in the family of Fred Winters, a farmer 
in Minnesota, working for his board and clothing 
and attending school as opportunity offered. His 
next experience was as a farm hand at Wheatland, 
Dakota, spending about two years there. He then 
returned to Minnesota and went to work in the 
railway shops of the Northern Pacific at Brainerd. 
That was his first experience in railroading. After 
about two years in the railway shops at Brainerd 
he came to Montana, then the terminus of the rail- 
way, and did railway construction work. In the 
fall of the same year he moved to Reed's Point, 
about forty miles west of where Billings now stands, 
and subsequently was at Gardiner, or the present 
site of that town, which had then been laid out 
along the proposed route of the railroad. He helped 
construct some log houses on the site. Then with 
Mr. Plummer, a railway contractor, he came on to 
White Sulphur Springs, where he went to .work 
for Charles Cook. He spent the summer of 1882 
putting up hay, and he also operated the first self- 
binder brought into the Deep Creek Valley. In the 
fall of. 1882 he came into the Judith Basin with 
Barr Smith, a well known horse man, and worked 
on the range with Mr. Smith for about three years. 
He was then employed by the prominent Judith 
Basin pioneer, William Berkin, one summer, and 
about that time he took up a "homestead of 160 acres. 
He rode the range for about three years, and subse- 
quently, with E. S. Smith, bought 160 acres and 
engaged in stock ranching. They were associated 
two and a half years, and upon the dissolution of 
their partnership Mr. Helsing took over the land 
and continued cattle and horse ranching until 1000, 
when he sold his ranch property and moved to 
Lewistown. 

Prior to and preparatory to his settling down to 
the permanent life of the farm and ranch, Mr. 
Helsing married Miss Olive Lyons, a native of Iowa. 
Mr. Helsing is affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 
37 of the Masonic Order and in politics is inde- 
pendent. 




(7- 



117 



EDMUND WRIGHT, a resident of Montana over thirty 
years, is one of the best known men in Fergus County, 
where his name has figured prominently as a public 
official, business man and rancher and in connection 
with many civic and social affairs at Lewistown. 

Mr. Wright was born at Penn Yan in Yates County, 
New York, December 14, 1869, a son of Edmund and 
Sarah (Walton) Wright. His father was born in 
England in 1827 and .died December 26, 1913. His 
mother was born December 6, 1833, and died April 
30, 1914. Edmund, Sr., was eight years -old when 
brought to America by his parents, who located 
in New York state. He received his education in 
the public schools and learned the cabinet maker's 
trade. Four of his brothers enlisted and served all 
through the Civil' war in the Union army, and he 
himself tried to get into the service but was rejected 
on account of physical disability. However, he was 
able to serve his community in the capacity of deputy 
sheriff during the war. For many years he served as 
superintendent of the Birdsell Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and after 1887 lived retired. He was a repub- 
lican in politics. 

Edmund Wright, Jr., was fifth in a family of eight 
children, five of whom are still living. He acquired 
his early education in the public schools of Yates 
County and attended a business school at Elmira, 
New York. He was only eighteen years old when 
he came to Montana in 1887, and has witnessed 
every phase of the development of Lewistown from 
a pioneer village to the present time. For three 
years he was employed as bookkeeper in the Bank 
of Fergus County, and after that for many years 
was in one of the offices of the courthouse, at first 
as deputy county clerk and recorder two years, then 
deputy clerk of the District Court four years, and 
in 1896 was elected clerk of the District Court 
His admirable administration of the office called 
for a second term in 1900, and when he retired in 
1904 he had put in nearly fifteen years as an official 
servant. Since then Mr. Wright has been engaged 
in the real estate, loan and general insurance busi- 
ness, and in 1910 he organized the Wright Land 
& Investment Company, of which he is president. 
This is one of the large corporations of Fergus 
County and owns and operates 1,200 acres of im- 
proved land five miles from Lewistown, using the 
land as the basis of a general farming and stock 
raising proposition. 

Mr. Wright was a charter member of Lewistown 
Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, which he has served as exalted ruler; is 
also a charter member and past chancellor of 
Judith Lodge No. 30, Knights of Pythias, and was 
one of the organizers of the Judith Club at Lew- 
istown. Politically he is a republican and has been 
a stanch factor in the party for many years. 

In May, 1890, Mr. Wright married Lizzie M. Gud- 
gell. She was born at Chillicothe, Missouri. They 
have two sons, Frank A. and Robert G. Frank 
is a graduate of the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan and served one term as county 
attorney of Fergus County. He married Catherine 
Breitinger and they are the parents of two daugh- 
ters. Robert is in charge of the insurance depart- 
ment and the city department of the Wright Land 
& Investment Company. He is also treasurer of 
the company. 

HARRY H. AUSTIN is a member of the Big Tim- 
ber bar, and came to Montana after fifteen years 
of successful practice in his native State of Minne- 
sota. 

He was born in Blue Earth County, Minnesota, 
December 27, 1881. His paternal ancestors were 



from Scotland. His grandfather, Reuben Austin, 
was born in New York State in 1809, and when 
about middle age he moved west and became a 
pioneer farmer in Rock County, Wisconsin. Dur- 
ing the '703 he went out to Minnesota, and again 
did pioneering as a farmer in Blue Earth County, 
where he died in 1900. Orville H. Austin, father 
of the Big Timber lawyer, was born in Oneida 
County, New -York, in 1837. He spent his early 
life in Rock County, Wisconsin, where he mar- 
ried and where he followed the business of car- 
penter and builder. In 1876 he moved to Blue 
Earth County, Minnesota, followed his trade there, 
but since 1900 has lived retired at Minneapolis. He 
is a very staunch democrat in his political affilia- 
tions and a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
Orville H. Austin married Loretta Earl, who was 
born in Rock County, Wisconsin, in 1846. Charles, 
the oldest of their children, was a telegraph opera- 
tor and died in Blue Earth County, Minnesota, in 
1893. Viola, whose home is in Minneapolis, is the 
wife of Dr. E. C. Anderson, who is well known 
to the medical profession in Montana, having prac- 
ticed at Billings, Anaconda and Missoula, and from 
the latter city joined the medical corps of the army, 
rose to the rank of major, and his last professional 
services with the army were rendered at New York 
City. Frank L. Austin is cashier of the Thomp- 
son State Bank at Thompson Falls, Sanders Coun- 
ty, Montana. Delia is the wife of John Costin, a 
mine operator in the Iron Range of Minnesota at 
Virginia. Joseph Earl is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota Law Department and is practic- 
ing law at Chisholm, Minnesota. Winnie, the sixth 
of the family, died in infancy, and the youngest is 
Harry H. 

Harry H. Austin acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Good Thunder and Mankato, 
Minnesota, graduating from the Minneapolis High 
School in 1902 and then entered the law depart- 
ment of the University of Minnesota. He received 
his LL. B. degree in 1905. He is a member of the 
legal fraternity Delta Chi. Mr. Austin began his 
practice at Chisholm, Minnesota, in 1905, and de- 
veloped a fine business as a lawyer there. He 
served as city attorney, also as a member of the 
school board, and still has property in Minnesota. 
He came to Big Timber in December, 1918, and 
is already busy with a general civil and criminal 
practice, his offices being in the Masonic Building. 
He helped organize the Sweetgrass County Good 
roads- Association and is its secretary and treas- 
urer. He is also a member of the Big Timber 
Chamber of Commerce and on the board of direc- 
tors. He is a republican in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the State Bar Association of Minnesota, and 
is affiliated with Chisholm Lodge No. 1334, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. 

In 1909, at St. Paul, he married Miss Clyde Pen- 
nington, a daughter of Wellington and Bertha 
(Reed) Pennington. Her father, who was in the 
livery business, died at St. Paul in 1910. Her 
mother now lives in New York City. Mrs. Austin 
is a graduate of the St. Paul High School and the 
State Normal at Winona, Minnesota. To their mar- 
riage were born three children: Don, born August 
23, 1910; Barbara, born April 5, 1913; and Joseph, 
born June 24, 1918. 

REV. D. P. MEADE, pastor of St. Philip's Catholic 
Church of Philipsburg, is one of the earnest and 
scholarly men of his church, and one who is greatly 
beloved. He was born in County Limerick, Ireland, 
February 17, 1888. His preliminary education was 
received in the national school at Ballintubber, County 
Limerick, Ireland, following the completion of which 



118 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



he became a student of St. Andrew's Academy at 
Kilfinane, County Limerick, Ireland, and for two 
and one-half years took a classical course. The fol- 
lowing seven years were spent by him at St. Pat- 
rick's Seminary, at Thurles, County Tipperary, Ire- 
land, in acquiring a philosophical and theological 
course, and he was ordained to the priesthood on 
June 14, 1914. 

Soon after his ordination, Father Meade came 
to the United States and to Montana, and spent 
his first few weeks in the state at Walkerville, when 
on November 5th of that same year he arrived at 
Philipsburg to assume charge of the parish of St. 
Philip, and here he has since continued. This parish 
was organized in 1889, and is the first to be estab- 
lished in Granite County. The present church edi- 
fice at Philipsburg, was erected in 1892, but the first 
services were held at Granite. The parish now 
includes Southern Cross, Deerlodge County, and 
Father Meade ministers to the needs of 400 Cath- 
olics. The parsonage adjoins the church, which 
is on the corner of Carney and Franklin streets. 

Father Meade belongs to Deer Lodge Council No. 
1810, Knights of Columbus, of which he is a fourth 
degree knight; Division No. I, Ancient Order of 
Hibernians at Butte, Montana, and is state chaplin 
of this order, elected at the State Convention in 
August, 1919. Practical in his application of moral- 
ity to civic needs, he is a valued member of the 
Commercial Club. 

The father of Rev. D. P. Meade is Michael Meade, 
who was born at Ballintubber, County Limerick, 
Ireland, in 1858, and there he still resides, having 
been a farmer all of his mature years. He is a firm 
believer in the creed of the Roman Catholic Church 
of which he is a life-long member. His wife bore 
the maiden name of Ellen Hennessy, and she was 
born at Knocklong, County Limerick, Ireland, in 
1859. Their children were as follows : D. P., whose 
name heads this review; Mary, who died at the age 
of twenty-one years, was a Sister of Mercy in Gran- 
ard, County Longford, Ireland; John, who lives 
with his parents at Ballintubber, Ireland, is a 
farmer; and Julia, who is also living with her 
parents. 

JAMES M. SELF was brought to Montana when 
about seven years of age, grew, up in this territory 
and state, and for nearly thirty years has been a 
practicing lawyer and has had much to do with the 
business, industrial and public affairs of the west- 
ern counties. 

Mr. Self, who for the past twenty years has lived 
at Plains, was born in Nebraska City, Nebraska, 
October 25, 1865. Three days later, on the 28th 
of October, his father, James M. Self, died. The 
grandfather, Philip Jenkins Self, was born in Ken- 
tucky about 1800 and at an early day settled on a 
farm in Missouri. The Selfs are of English an- 
cestry and the family was first established in Vir- 
ginia. Philip J. Self died near Saline, Missouri, 
in 1871. His wife was a Miss Black. James M. 
Self, Sr., was born in Missouri in 1830 and by oc- 
cupation was a wheelwright. After his marriage 
he removed to Nebraska City, where he followed 
his trade and carriage making until his death. He 
was a democrat and a member of the Baptist 
Church. His wife was Melinda Batterton, who 
was born in Missouri in 1832 and died at Deer Lodge, 
Montana, in 1905. In 1872 she had come to Mon- 
tana with her brother, J. H. Batterton, and both 
were early residents of Deer Lodge. James M. 
Self, the lawyer, was the fifth and youngest of his 
father's family. Mary E., the oldest, died at Butte, 
wife of John P. Reins, who is owner of ranching 



and mining interests and lives near Sheridan, Mon- 
tana; Mattie is the wife of C. E. Aspling, publisher 
of the Powell County Post at Deer Lodge ; Eliza- 
beth married C. E. Freyschlag, formerly a merchant 
and banker at Philipsburg, Montana, now a resident 
of Colorado Springs, Colorado; and Nannie, who 
died young. 

James M. Self acquired his early education in the 
public schools of Deer Lodge and graduated A. B. 
from the College of Montana of that city in 1889. 
He went east to take his law course in the law 
department of Yale University, graduating LL. B. 
in 1891. The following four years he practiced 
law at Butte and after that lived at Anaconda, Deer 
Lodge County, until 1900. He was deputy county 
attorney of Deer Lodge County before Deer Lodge 
and Powell counties were separated. Mr. Self 
moved to Plains, Montana, in 1900. In 1902 he was 
elected to represent that county in the eighth ses- 
sion of the Legislature, and was a member of the 
judiciary, state institutions, and public buildings 
committees. After his legislative term he prac- 
ticed at Missoula two years, and since the creation 
of Sanders County has been one of the leading 
lawyers of that section of the state, handling a 
large civil and criminal practice. However, for 
two years he lived at Thompson Falls and served 
as attorney for Ed Donlan in acquiring various 
rights for what is now the Thompson Falls Power 
Company. For one year Mr. Self was cashier of 
the Farmers and Merchants State Bank of Plains, 
but has since sold his interests in the bank. His 
law offices are in the First National Bank block and 
he owns a modern home and a ranch adjoining the 
town on the northwest. He is a member and clerk 
of the Congregational Church, and is a member of 
Ponemah Lodge No. 63, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and past master of Thompson Falls Lodge, 
and a member of the State Bar Association. 

In 1898, at Plains, he married Miss Rowena Pierce, 
daughter of M. H. and Unity (Sapp) Pierce, now 
deceased. Her father was an early day rancher, 
carpenter and builder at Plains. Mrs. Self is also 
a graduate with the A. B. degree from the College 
of Montana at Deer Lodge. 

WILLIAM HANNA has been identified with the 
business life of Montana for nearly thirty years, 
and since 1900 has been a merchant and citizen of 
Lewistown. 

He was born at Fergus, Ontario, Canada, August 
15, 1866, son of William and Mary Jane Hanna. 
His parents were both natives of Ireland but of 
Scotch ancestry. His father came to Quebec when 
a young man by sailing vessel, and later moved 
into the wilderness of Ontario, locating near Fergus. 
He was a man of great industry and good business 
judgment, and acquired a tract of land which by 
slow and laborious effort was cleared and developed 
until it represented one of the best farms in that 
province. He cleared up 650 acres and had his 
farm well stocked with graded cattle and horses. 
He was active in the Presbyterian Church. William 
Hanna died April 15, 1909, at the age of seventy- 
four years, two months and three days, while his 
wife passed away December 15, 1914, in her seventy- 
seventh year. They were the parents of five sons, 
four still living, William being the third in age. 

William Hanna spent his early life on his father's 
Canadian farm, attending school in winter and work- 
ing on the farm in summer. After finishing his 
high school course he came west to Montana, reach- 
ing Helena in the spring of 1800. Later he went 
to Great Falls and was employed in the shops of 
the Street Railway Company until the spring of 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



119 



1893. He then followed his trade as a carpenter 
and helped build the Gilt Edge Cyanide Mill at Gilt 
Edge. Following that he was in the restaurant and 
meat market business until 1900, in which year he 
removed to Lewistown, and has since been sole 
owner of the Lewistown Feed and Seed Store, being 
the largest wholesale and retail dealer in hay, grain 
and poultry and feed in Montana. 

Mr. Hanna is affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 
37, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Lewistown 
Lodge No. 30, Knights of Pythias, of which he is 
a past chancellor commander, and is a member of 
the Chamber of Commerce, Judith Club and in 
politics is a democrat. 

J. H. TROWER. is proprietor of the only cream- 
ery industry in Sweetgrass County, at Big Timber, 
is an expert dairyman and buttermaker, and has 
had a long and active experience in that business, 
though in point of years he is still a young man. 

Mr. Trower was born on a farm in Lincoln 
County, Missouri, March 7, 1886. The Trower 
family has been in America since colonial times, 
coming originally from England. The grandfather, 
Henry Trower, was a native of Kentucky, and was 
an early settler in Lincoln County, Missouri, where 
he spent his last years. Henry A. Trower, father 
of the Big Timber business man, was born in 
Lincoln County, Missouri, in 1851 and spent all his 
life there as a farmer. He is now living at Ol- 
ney in that county. Politically he is a democrat 
and is a member of the Presbyterian Church. His 
wife, Margaret Downing, was. born in the same 
Missouri county in 1853 and died at Olney in 1899. 
They had a family of nine children. Anna is the 
wife of Joseph King, a farmer in Lincoln County; 
Mary is unmarried and lives at home with her 
father. Lula is the wife of Charles Kalb, an oste- 
opathic physician at Springfield, Illinois. The 
fourth child and oldest son is J. H. Trower. Isaac, 
the next of age, was in the army from October, 
1917, until March, 1919. He was in the aviation 
department and was trained and in service at 
Wright Field, San Antonio, Texas, in the Carnegie 
Institute at Pittsburgh, at St. Paul and finally at 
Door's Field in Florida. Since leaving the army 
he has been helping his brother at Big Timber in 
the creamery. The sixth is Frank Trower, who 
runs the homestead farm at Olney, Missouri. J. E. 
Trower enlisted the day following the declaration 
of war with Germany and at this writing is still 
in the navy, being chief water tender. William 
Trower is a farmer at Corso, Missouri. Roy A., 
the youngest, was a participant in some of the 
hardest fighting of the war. He was with the 
Eighty-ninth Division, and was in the front line 
trenches in France from August 2, 1918, until the 
signing of the armistice. He was in the St. Mihiel 
drive beginning September I2th, and on the I2th 
of October was transferred to the Argonne sector 
and was in that forest until the close of the war. 
He was a corporal. 

J. H. Trower while living on his father's farm 
attended the rural schools of Missouri and for five 
years he carried studies in the Kirksville State 
Normal. He left Kirksville in 1909 and then came 
to the Northwest, and in the University of Idaho 
at Moscow pursued a special dairying and butter 
making course, graduating in 1910. For two years 
he was assistant dairyman at the University of 
Idaho. Then for one year he had charge of the 
butter manufacturing department of the Schallen- 
ger Produce Company at Spokane, Washington. 
After this experience and training Mr. Trower came 
to Big Timber in 1914 and bought out an old cream- 



ery, but re-established and reorganized the business 
with a complete new equipment in 1918. The cream- 
ery plant is located on First Avenue. Mr. Trower 
through his business has done a great deal to stimu- 
late dairy production in Sweetgrass County, and 
furnishes a market for the surplus milk and cream 
to all the farmers in the county. He manufactures 
large quantities of butter and ice cream, and the 
surplus finds a ready market at Butte, Anaconda, 
Livingston and other towns. 

In other ways Mr. Trower is an aggressive and 
progressive factor in his locality. He is vice presi- 
dent of the Sweetgrass County Good Roads Asso- 
ciation. He owns a modern home at Fourth 
Avenue, West, and Stock Street. He is independent 
in politics, a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and is affiliated with Big Timber Lodge No. 25, 
Knights of Pythias. 

In January, 1913, at Spokane, Washington, he 
married Miss Ruby Rickel, a daughter of W. H. 
and Rose (Roberts) Rickel, who now reside at Big 
Timber. Mr. Rickel is employed in the Big Tim- 
ber Creamery. Mrs. Trower is a graduate of the 
Blair Business College of Spokane. To their mar- 
riage were born two daughters, Elizabeth Rose, 
born December 17, 1915, and Yevonne Elaine, born 
December 17, 1918. 

JAMES A. WEAVER, deputy game warden at Lewis- 
town, is a citizen who has played in his time many 
parts farmer, cowboy, range rider, deputy sheriff, 
merchant, and the scope of his experiences in Mon- 
tana covers a period of thirty years or more. 

He was born in Douglas County, Oregon, Feb- 
ruary 24, 1868, a son of James B. and Sarah Ann 
(Wright) Weaver. His father, a native of Ten- 
nessee, was reared and educated in that state and 
when a young man moved into Missouri. He was 
one of the early Californians, making the trip 
overland by ox team in 1850. After some expe- 
rience in the gold diggings he went north to Ore- 
gon, locating in Douglas County. He was a pioneer 
hotel man and merchant in that locality, later be- 
came a farmer, and finally retired from active busi- 
ness and spent eight or nine years in Montana with 
his children. He was a democrat and an Odd Fel- 
low. He died in 1906, at the age of seventy-two. 
His wife was born in Missouri and died in 1882. 
They were married in Oregon and had eight chil- 
dren, four of whom are still living, James A. being 
the fourth in age. 

The latter was reared in Douglas County, Ore- 
gon, attending the public schools there and spent 
much of his early life with his uncle, John W. 
Weaver. When only eight years old he rode one 
horse and led the other, dragging a harrow over 
the plowed fields. This farm experience contin- 
ued for about six years. He then went to Eastern 
Oregon, became a cowboy in 1887, and rode the 
range in Wyoming, and in July, 1888, arrived in 
Fergus County, Montana. He was employed in 
breaking horses and punching cows and in 1891 
received his first initiation into public service when 
appointed deputy sheriff of Fergus County. Later 
he was in the saloon and livery business, and was 
the first city marshal of Lewistown under Mayor 
J. P. Barnes. For a number of years Mr. Weaver 
has had ranch interests in the Stanford and Den- 
ton country. He was appointed deputy game war- 
den in 1915. 

Mr. Weaver is affiliated with Judith Lodge No. 
30, Knights of Pythias, and has been a member of 
Lewistown Lodge No. 456 of the Elks since its 
organization. Politically he is identified with the 
democratic party. 



120 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



On February 24, 1902, his birthday, he married 
Bertha K. Hosch. She was born in Iowa. Two 
children were born to their marriage : James Philip, 
who died at the age of five years, and John Hosch. 

MARTIN F. HAYES, a resident of Montana since 

1901 is former deputy county clerk and recorder of 
Powell County, and now has charge of the books 
of the firm Branscombe & O'Neill at Deer Lodge. 

He was born at Waterville, Minnesota, Septem- 
ber 26, 1886, of Irish ancestry. The Hayes family 
came to New York State early in the last century. 
His father Dennis P. Hayes was born at Troy, New 
York, in October, 1848, was reared there, and spent 
many years as a railroad man. He was in the em- 
ploy of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha 
as road foreman at Le Seuer, Minnesota, where he 
married and lived until 1889 when he located at 
Mankato and was in the stone quarry business under 
the partnership Jordan & Hayes until 1898. He 
then sold his interests in Minnesota and moved to 
Great Falls, Montana, where he was road foreman 
for the Great Northern Railway, and from 1902 
to 1905 filled a similar position at Winston and 
since 1905 has been road foreman at Silver Bow 
for the Butte, Anaconda & Pacific Railway. While 
he lived at Mankato, Minnesota, he served as city 
recorder. He is a democrat, a Catholic, a fourth 
degree Knight of Columbus, being affiliated with 
Anaconda Council No. 882, a member of the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians and Mankato Camp Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. He married Ellen Gorman, who 
was born at LeSeuer, Minnesota, in 1852, member 
of one of the early territorial families of Minne- 
sota. She died at Mankato in 1888. Her children 
were : William T., a railway conductor for the 
Northwestern railway, living in Worthington, Min- 
nesota; James P. in the livery business at Mankato; 
Philip E., chef at the St. Regis Hotel, Spokane, 
Washington ; and Martin F. and John H., twins, 
the latter a roadmaster for the Northern Pacific 
Railway at Moscow, Idaho ; Charles E., powder 
mixer for the Dupont Powder Company at Ramsey, 
Montana. 

Martin F. Hayes was educated in the public 
schools of Mankato, graduating from high school 
in 1898. The next two years he was assistant book- 
keeper for the Hubbard Milling Company. In 1901 
on coming to Montana he became foreman in the 
freight department of the Northern Pacific Railway 
at Helena, was promoted to car distributor and in 

1902 sent to Garrison, Montana. In 1907 he was 
made cashier, and in 1912 came to Deer Lodge as 
station agent holding that office until September, 
1915, when he had rounded out nearly fifteen years 
in the service of railway corporation. He then took 
up his duties as deputy county clerk and recorder 
but in February, 1918, resigned and took charge of 
the books of the well known Deer Lodge automobile 
concern of Branscombe & O'Neill at 306 Main 
Street. 

Mr. Hayes takes an active part in local politics, 
being secretary of the County Central Committee, 
an office he has held for the past three years. He 
is a Catholic, is grand knight of Deer Lodge Coun- 
cil No. 1810 Knights of Columbus. Mr. Hayes and 
family live in a modern home at 907 Fourth Street. 
He married at Deer Lodge in 1907 Miss Clara M. 
Smith, daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann (Booth) 
Smith, residents of Garrison, Montana. Her father 
is round*house foreman for the Northern Pacific 
Railway Company. Mrs. Hayes is a graduate of the 
Powell County High School at Deer Lodge. They 



have two children : Francis, born January 2, 1908, 
and Dorothy, born March 16, 1913. 

THEODORE HARDING THOMAS has a veteran's ex- 
perience and record as a miner in the western sec- 
tion of the state. He has been mining in what is 
now Mineral County for thirty years or more, and 
while he has met vicissitudes and has had the usual 
ups and downs of the mining game, his work and 
profits on the whole have been more than moder- 
ately successful. 

Mr. Thomas, who enjoys a high place of esteem 
in Mineral County and is the present county asses- 
sor, was born at Canning, in Nova Scotia, Canada, 
December 6, 1852. His grandfather, Henry Thomas, 
was born in Wales, in 1779, and in 1829 crossed tlie 
ocean and settled at New Canaan, Nova Scotia, 
where he spent the rest of his life as a practical 
farmer. He died in 1866. His son, David R. Thomas, 
was born in Wales in 1826, and was three years 
of age when the family came to this country. He 
became a farmer at Canning and in 1861 moved 
to Wolfville, Nova Scotia, and from there in 1890, 
having retired, moved to Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
where he died in 1910. He was a conservative in 
Canadian politics and a member of the Baptist 
Church. His wife was Mary Isabelle Fitch, who 
was born at New Canaan, Nova Scotia, in 1827 and 
died at Wolfville in 1869. Jessie, the oldest of their 
children, died at Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in 1919, 
being then the widow of Isaac Murray, a merchant 
in Nova Scotia. Maggie, who died in New York 
City in 1912, was the wife of Arthur Cunningham, 
who spent all his active career as a clerk in the 
postoffice department at Halifax, Nova Scotia, being 
finally pensioned for several years before his death. 

Theodore Harding Thomas, now the only one 
of the children living, was educated in the public 
schools of Wolfville, including the high school, and 
in 1873 received his A. B. degree from Acadia Col- 
lege at Wolfville. At that time his ambition was 
to become a physician, and he studied medicine at 
Wolfville and at Port Hawkesbury, Cape Breton. 
While reading medicine he taught school. Even- 
tually he abandoned his ideas as to a medical career, 
but continued teaching in Nova Scotia until the 
spring of 1880. 

He was first attracted to the mining district of 
the West during the Leadville stampede in Colo- 
rado. He also spent a time in Denver and at Colo- 
rado Springs for two years was a bookkeeper and 
a log sealer for the Colorado Pinery Trust Com- 
pany. In 1883 he went to southwestern Colorado 
in the San Juan district, where he prospected in 
mines for two years. 

Mr. Thomas came to Superior, Montana, in 1885, 
and his experience covers most of the history of 
that noted mining section. He was a prospector 
and placer miner and also did quartz mining for 
gold, silver and lead. He now owns stock in sev- 
eral successful mines. He is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Golden Sunset Mining Company, Lhe 
officers of which corporation are in Iron Mountain 
opposite the Northern Pacific depot. The company 
operates gold and silver mines on Cedar Creek. 

Mr. Thomas was honored by his fellow citizens 
with the office of county assessor in November, 
1918, and began his official term of two years in 
the following January. He is a democrat in poli- 
tics and is a former member of the Improved Order 
of Red Men. In 1892, at Missoula, he married Miss 
Maggie Briggs, a native of New York state. 

HERMAN OTTEN. Holding distinction as one of 
the earliest cattle men of Montana and as one of 









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121 



the first wheat-growers of Fergus County, Herman 
Otten, a retired citizen of Lewistown, has led a 
career that has included experience of an interesting 
character, and in his business activities has invaded 
a number of fields of endeavor, in all of which he 
has been successful. 

Mr. Otten was born at Radereisted Amt der Sted, 
Germany, February 2,2., 1838, and received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native place. 
Feeling that the United States offered better oppor- 
tunities for the gaining of success, at the age of 
eighteen years he left home and journeyed to New 
York on a sailing vessel. In New York City he was 
variously employed for three years, after which, in 
1859, he traveled to San Francisco by steamer, 
around Cape Horn, and for three years was employed 
on a farm near that city. Later he embarked in 
the saloon business at San Francisco, but disposed 
of his interests therein to go to Virginia, Nevada, 
where he worked for a time in the silver mines. 
Subsequently, in search of more remunerative em- 
ployment, he came overland to German Gulch, Mon- 
tana, by ox-team, but after a short stay joined 
George Fitchin and John Saylor in a trip to Texas, 
where the trio bought 300 head of cattle and drove 
them overland to Big Hole, Montana. Mr. Otten 
applied himself uninterruptedly to the cattle business 
until 1876, when he made a trip to the old country 
to visit his parents, but in 1877 returned to the 
United States, and June 17 of that year, at New 
York City, was united in marriage with Elise 
Ranges, who had been born in Brenkum, Germany, 
June 3, 1854, and had recently come to the United 
States. Shortly following their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Otten came to Big Hole, Montana, where for 
some years they resided on the range, but later 
went to Silver Bow. In 1887 Mr. Otten purchased 
a ranch at Cottonwood Creek, and in that year first 
came to Lewistown. Two years later he sold his 
cattle and became one of the organizers of the 
Judith Basin Bank at Lewistown, of which he be- 
came president. He continued to hold that position 
when the reorganization was effected that changed 
this institution to the First National Bank of Lewis- 
town, and he remained in the chief executive ca- 
pacity until his resignation, when he was succeeded 
by David Hilger, although he still retains a large 
share of stock in the institution. Mr. Otten has 
been practically retired from business affairs since 
1909, although he has large holdings and important 
interests. While at Cottonwood he was the pro- 
prietor of a successful general store, and in what- 
ever community he has resided he has had several 
irons in the fire in order to engage his energies and 
abilities to the utmost. That his foresight is great 
is noted in the fact that he was one of the first to 
realize the suitability of Montana as a cattle country 
and that he also was one of the first to recognize 
the possibilities in wheat-growing in Fergus County. 
His business reputation is of the highest, and in civic 
and social circles he has a number of important 
connections. 

Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Otten. 
namely: Anna O., the wife of W. M. Blackford, a 
prominent attorney of Lewistown, with five children ; 
Herman C, of Glengarry, Montana, who married 
Florence McMillen, and has two sons; Elise, who 
died December 9, 1918, as the wife of George W. 
Tubb, leaving three children ; Henry J., who mar- 
ried Jennie Anderson ; and Ella M., who resides with 
her parents. 

CHARLES HALTER, present superintendent of the 
county farm of Carbon County, was the pioneer 
restaurant man of Red Lodge, and became widely 



known through his connection with that business. 

He was born at Manistee, Michigan, January 14, 
1870. His father, Anthony Halter, was born in 
Germany in 1834 and when a small boy his parents 
came to the United States and settled in Wisconsin, 
where the grandfather died. The home in which, 
he was reared was six miles from Milwaukee. 
After his marriage he moved to Manistee, Michi- 
gan, when that was a lumber camp in the midst 
of the primeval woods. He followed his trade as 
a millwright for many years and died at Manistee 
in 1899. He was a democrat and a Catholic. 
Anthony Halter married Mary Stemper, who was 
born in Wisconsin in 1839 and died at Manistee in 
1876. Their children were : Christine, wife of Alex- 
ander Smith, a marine engineer on the Great Lakes 
living at Manistee; John who was an engineer 
with the Manistee and Northeastern Railroad and 
died at Manistee in 1915; Annie, living in Manis- 
tee. widow of William Douglas, who owns half of 
the Manistee & Northeastern Railroad; George, a 
retired engineer of the Manistee & Northeastern, 
living at Manistee; Louis who is a messenger for 
the United States Express Company and lives in 
Texas; Charles; Michael, who was a blacksmith 
and died at Manistee at the age of twenty-seven; 
and Frank, who is a farmer in Idaho. 

Charles Halter left school work at Manistee at 
the age of fifteen and from that time forward has 
made his own way in the world. He came to Mon- 
tana in 1897, and soon afterward engaged in the 
restaurant business at Red Lodge. He was about 
the first to furnish that service to the community 
and continued active therein until 1915, when he 
sold put. The next two years he managed a pool 
hall in the Pollard Hotel at Red Lodge, and in 
1917 was appointed to his present responsibilities, 
as superintendent of the county farm. The county 
farm is located a mile south of Red Lodge and is 
a well equipped place, including a fine brick house 
for the inmates, barns and other outbuildings. 
There are twenty-one acres of land. Carbon County 
has only a limited need for this institution, since 
there are few who have to avail themselves of its 
facilities. About the highest number who have 
been inmates of the home is ten, and at the present 
writing there, are only seven. 

Mr. Halter is independent in politics, is a Catholic 
and is a third degree knight of Manistee Council 
of Knights of Columbus. He owns a dwelling on 
North Platte Avenue. 

He married at Sheridan, Wyoming, in 1905, Miss 
Mary Johnson, a daughter of Peter and Mary John- 
son, both now deceased. Her father was a moulder 
by trade and worked at Manistee, Michigan, for 
thirty-five years. 

GEORGE ROBERT LYONS. The old New England 
State of Massachusetts has contributed its share of 
families which have left their comfortable homes 
in the East to assist in the civilization and settlement 
of the newer West, and among those now living in 
Montana who claim the Bay State as the place of 
their birth is George Robert Lyons, an extensive 
sheep ranchman of the Twodot community in 
Meagher County. However, although an easterner 
by birth, Mr. Lyons is essentially and distinctively a 
man of the West, for his education and training have 
been secured in Montana, and here he has spent his 
career and won his success. 

Mr. Lyons was born at South Lee, Berkshire 
County, Massachusetts, June 12, 1885, a son of 
George and Mary (Orr) Lyons. His father, a 
native of Ireland, came to the United States as a 
young man, and subsequently made his way over- 



122 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



land across the prairies to Montana, where he sought 
his fortune in the mines at Diamond City. Later he 
was one of the pioneers of the freighting industry 
from Salt Lake City to Helena, and then located 
in the Musselshell Valley, where he was an early 
and prominent cattle man. His closing days were 
passed on his ranch in that locality, and there his 
death occurred in 1912, when he was seventy-two 
years of age. He was a republican in his political 
views, but never cared for nor sought public office. 
Mrs. Lyons, who was born at South Lee, Massa- 
chusetts, survives her husband and resides at Two- 
dot. They were the parents of two children : George 
Robert; and Helen May, the widow of Edward 
Reaussen, who died in December, 1917, leaving a 
son, Edward. Mrs. Reaussen resides at Twodot with 
her mother. 

George Robert Lyons was educated in the public 
schools of Montana, and for additional training was 
sent to the military academy at Faribault, Minnesota, 
known as the Chaddock Military Academy. His boy- 
hood days were passed amid the surroundings of the 
ranch, and he came to immediately know and appre- 
ciate horses and cattle, so that it was not surprising 
that he adopted ranching for his choice of vocations 
when called upon to determine his career. When he 
took over the business he conducted it along the 
same progressive lines as had his father, and subse- 
quently added a band of sheep to the stock on the 
place. He gradually built up the business to its 
present proportions through good management and a 
knowledge of the needs of such an enterprise, and at 
times has had as many as from 600 to 1,500 head of 
cattle and from 5,000 to 6,000 head of sheep. This 
property, the C. L. Ranch, is widely known, as is its 
proprietor, who bears an excellent reputation as 
cattleman, rancher and substantial business man of 
integrity. Mr. Lyons is a member of Castle Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, at Twodot, and is popular with 
its members. He is a republican in his political 
affiliation, and while he has not sought the honors of 
public life has been prominent in seeking to support 
the movements which have promised the progress 
and advancement of the community in which he has 
made his home for so many years. 

Mr. Lyons was married October 16, 1912, to Miss 
Minnie May Fresser, who was born- at Helena, 
Montana, daughter of John H. Freeser, one of the 
pioneer miners and stoclcmen of Montana, now mak- 
ing his home at Twodot. Five children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Lyons, of whom four are 
living: George Robert, Jr., Nancy Louise, Doris 
Marie and John Henry. 

JOHN C. DOCTER, M. D. It is scarcely possible, in 
these modern days, for a man to be a successful 
physician without also being a man of learning and 
of solid, scientific acquirements. Often the youth 
who feels the inspiration that ultimately leads him 
into the medical profession, finds his progress one 
of difficulty from lack of encouragement, opportun- 
ity or capital, and when all these drawbacks are 
overcome, through personal effort, battles have been 
won that make firm the foundations of character. 
It -fs therefore easy to comprehend why the physician 
is usually a dominating figure in his community. 
Having conquered so many obstacles in his own 
career, he is able to overcome those which come 
up in civic affairs, and his fellow citizens naturally 
turn to him for advice and support aside from their 
need of his skill as a professional man. One of 
these forces for civic betterment and increased 
healthful conditions at Philipsburg is Dr. John C. 
Docter, who has but recently returned from his 
military service during the great war. 



John C. Docter was born at Mayville, Wisconsin, 
April 6, 1891, a son of C. W. Docter, and grandson 
of John Christian Docter. The great-grandfather 
of Dr. John C. Docter, a native of Germany, 
founded the Docter family in the United States. 
John Christian Docter was born in 1830, and died 
at Kenpsha, Wisconsin, in 1878. After serving in 
the Union army during the war between the North 
and South, he located at Kenosha, Wisconsin, where 
he worked at his trade of a carpenter and served 
on the city police force. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Elizabeth Stantz, and she survives him and 
lives at Kenosha. 

C. W. Docter was born at Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
in 1869, where he lived until after his marriage, 
when he located at Mayville that state. Early in 
life he was a photographer, but later went into the 
mercantile field, and is now one of the leading mer- 
chants and publishers of Mayville, owning a large 
novelty store and serving as president of the May- 
ville News Company. He also owns one of the 
popular moving picture theaters of the place and 
is interested in other business enterprises. Mr. 
Docter is an independent democrat, and has served 
as treasurer of Mayville and is now a director of 
its school board. He married Miss Anna Moeller, 
born at Kenosha, Wisconsin, in 1871, and their chil- 
dren are as follows : John C., whose name heads 
this review; Addie, who is unmarried, resides with 
her parents; Rudolph, who is a practicing dental 
surgeon of Mayville, was graduated from the Mar- 
quette University at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with the 
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery; Helen, who 
is a graduate of the Mayville High School, is living 
at home and Viola, who is also a graduate of the 
Mayville High School, is at home. 

John C. Docter attended the public schools of 
Mayville, and was graduated from its high school 
in 1909, following which for a year he was in his 
father's store. He then entered the Marquette Uni- 
versity at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from which he was 
graduated in 1914 with the degree of Doctor of Med- 
icine. At the same time he took a course in a night 
school and secured the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. He is a member of the Greek Letter fra- 
ternity Phi Beta Pi. 

In 1914 he became intern at the Northern Pacific 
Hospital, at Missoula, Montana, where he remained 
until the close of 1915, and then went to Drum- 
mond, Montana, and was engaged there in an active 
practice until January, 1918, when he came to 
Philipsburg. During 1917 he took a special course 
in surgery at the Northern Pacific Hospital. On 
October 19, 1918, he received a commission of first 
lieutenant in the Medical Corps, and was sent to 
Fort Riley, Kansas, and had not the signing of the 
Armistice occurred when it did, he would withoui 
doubt have been sent overseas. He was mustered ou 
of the service at Fort Riley, in December, 1918 
Returning to Philipsburg, he resumed his genera' 
medical and surgical practice which his military 
service had interrupted, and maintains offices in the 
Courtney Block. He is now health officer of Granite 
County, and one of the most progressive young men 
in his profession in this section. Independent in 
politics he gives his support to those measures he 
deems best for the people, irrespective of party 
lines. He is a member of Ruby Lodge No. 36, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons of Drummond, 
Montana; Hope Chapter No. 10, Royal Arch Masons 
of Philipsburg; Missoula Lodge, Benevolent Protec- 
tive Order of Elks ; and to the Philipsburg Chamber 
of Commerce. 

On March 17, 1916, John C. Docter was married 
to Miss Evaro Avery, at Missoula, Montana. She 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



123 



is a daughter of Amos and Caroline (Brunnell) 
Avery, the former of whom is deceased, but during 
life was the pioneer telegrapher of Missoula, and 
his widow, who survives him, is acting as chief 
telegrapher at Missoula and is the oldest in point of 
service in the employ of the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road. Mrs. Docter attended the Montana University 
at Missoula and Bruno Hall at Spokane, Washing- 
ton. Doctor and Mrs. Docter have two sons, John 
Christian, who was born March 13, 1917, and Charles 
William, born January 16, 1920. 

P. H. MCCARTHY, M. D. The affection in which 
the physician is held by those to whom he has 
ministered is of a character that excites admira- 
tion and inspires respect. The medical man occu- 
pies a position that is unique for in his hands lie 
the lives of those entrusted to his care and upon 
his knowledge, skill and poise in times of danger 
depends the future of the communfty. To the 
credit of the profession be it said that very few 
of the men who devote their lives to the healing 
art fail to live up to the highest standards of fine 
manhood and citizenship. They put self second, and 
give lavishly of their time and professional serv- 
ices often without thought as to recompense. They 
not only care for the ailing, but through their fore- 
sight and ability to provide for contingencies, pre- 
serve the public health and enforce sanitary regula- 
tions which oftentimes revolutionize the general 
soundness of the people, and establish a salubrity 
in their communities not dreamed of until they 
came into the locality with their scientific knowl- 
edge. One of the men who belongs to this dis- 
tinguished class is Dr. P. H. McCarthy, physician 
and surgeon of Butte. 

Doctor McCarthy was born at Hancock, Houghton 
County, Michigan, on October 15, 1875, a son of 
James McCarthy, born in Ireland about 1835. The 
paternal grandfather came to the United States from 
Ireland when his son James was but a lad, and 
located in New York City, where James McCarthy 
received his educational training. 

When he was still a young man, James McCarthy 
came as far west as Hancock, Michigan, where he 
was married, and he became manager of the Quincy 
Mine. It was while discharging the duties of this 
position that he lost his life in 1880, when there was 
an accident at the mine. He was a veteran of the 
war between the states. The Roman Catholic Church 
had in him a devout member. His wife bore the 
maiden name of Mary Driscoll, and she survives 
him, making, her home at Billings, Montana, her 
second husband being a ranchman of that locality. 
James McCarthy and his wife had the following 
children : Mary, who married John Leary, now 
deceased, a pioneer of Butte, which city he served 
as a fireman, lives at Los Angeles, California; Gene, 
who was a mining engineer, died in Colorado ; Dr. 
P. H., whose name heads this review ; and James, 
who was graduated from the Creighton Medical Col- 
lege of Omaha, Nebraska, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine, resides at Goldfield, Nevada. After 
the death of Mr. McCarthy, Mrs. McCarthy was 
married to Timothy Hanley, and their children are 
as follows : Jerry, who is a ranchman, lives at Bill- 
ings, Montana ; William, who is a ranchman of Ne- 
braska ; Abbie, who lives with her parents ; Robert, 
who is a physician and surgeon of Billings, Mon- 
tana, was graduated from the Creighton Medical 
College of Omaha, Nebraska, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine ; and Jennie, who is a teacher 
in the public schools of Butte, Montana. 

Doctor McCarthy attended the public schools of 
O'Neil, Nebraska, and was graduated from its high 



school course. For a time he followed mining in 
Colorado, coming to Butte from that state in 1892, 
and was employed by the Anaconda Copper Mining 
Company until 1898, when he matriculated in the 
Creighton Medical College and after completing the 
regulation four years' course was graduated in 1902 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Meanwhile, 
during the summer terms, he attended the Fre- 
mont Normal School of Fremont, Nebraska, and 
for two seasons was professor of chemistry and 
physiology in that institution. During 1903 Doctor 
McCarthy was interne in the Presbyterian Hospital 
at Omaha, Nebraska, and then came direct to Butte 
and has since been engaged in a general practice, 
specializing to a certain extent in surgery. In the 
years following his graduation Doctor McCarthy 
has taken many post graduate courses, for he is ;\ 
close student and keeps himself abreast of modern 
thought in his profession. Not only has he studied 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Chi- 
cago, but also in medical institutions of London and 
Paris, Europe, and of Baltimore, Maryland, New 
York City, New York, Cincinnati, Ohio, St. Louis, 
Missouri, and Rochester, Minnesota, specializing on 
surgery. He has not missed taking a course each 
year since securing his degree, and his efforts are 
rewarded by the reputation he has been able to 
establish as a surgeon, which extends not only over 
Montana but adjoining states. For some time he 
has been connected as surgeon with Saint James 
Hospital of Butte^ He is a member of the Silver 
Bow Medical Society, the Montana State Medical 
Society, the American Medical Association, the 
Butte Country Club, Butte Council No. 668, Knights 
of Columbus, of which he is a fourth degree knight, 
Butte Lodge No. 240, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and Butte Aerie No. n, Fraternal 
Order Eagles. His offices are at Nos. 5, 6, 7 and 8 
Owsley Block, and his residence is at No. 823 West 
Park Street. Doctor McCarthy is a very heavy 
holder of real estate in different parts of Montana, 
all of his interests being centered in this state. 
Politically a democrat, he was elected from Silver 
Bow County as a delegate to the national conven- 
tion of his party held at St. Louis, Missouri, in 
1916. Like his father he is a Roman Catholic. 

In addition to his extensive practice Doctor Mc- 
Carthy is also a director in a number of business 
enterprises of Butte, and is in every way a promi- 
nent citizen who has the welfare of this region 
at heart, and is exceedingly generous in his support 
of its interests. 

Doctor McCarthy was married at Omaha, Ne- 
braska, in 1905 to Miss Julia Stafford, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Stafford. Michael Staf- 
ford was a pioneer of the Missouri Valley and 
served as superintendent of construction of the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad through that part 
of the West. He is now deceased, but his widow 
survives him and resides at Omaha, Nebraska. Mrs. 
McCarthy was graduated from a collegiate course 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Doctor and 
Mrs. McCarthy have a daughter, Mary, who was 
born on November 7, 1910. 

When this country entered the great war, Doctor 
McCarthy tried to enlist, but was turned down on 
account of his physical condition. After a second 
examination he received his commission as captain 
on May 15, 1918, and was sent to Fort Benjamin 
Harrison in Indiana as captain of the development 
battalion, and was later made president of the board 
of demobilization. On December 18, 1918, he was 
mustered out of the service and, returning to Butte, 
resumed his practice. 

Doctor McCarthy is a man who is always show- 



124 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



ing kindness both to individuals and institutions, 
and is interested in all that pertains to modern 
progress in the highest sense of the word. He is 
inspired by high ideals and gifted beyond the or- 
dinary in his professional attainments, and it is 
probable that his health has been impaired by the 
absorbing strain of his duties. 

ERICK A. ERICKSON is a formally ordained minis- 
ter of .the Lutheran Church and first came to Mon- 
tana in his capacity as a minister. He organized 
the church of his denomination at Big Timber, but 
about ten years ago accepted a call from his minis- 
terial duties to resume his former profession as a 
teacher, and has since been superintendent of the 
city schools. He is a skillful teacher, an educator 
of broad mind and long experience, and has made 
the Big Timber school system one of the best in 
the state. 

Mr. Erickson, though born in Norway, May 28, 
1873, is an American by training and has lived in 
this country since early infancy. His father, Arne 
Erickson, was born in 1834 in Norway, and mar- 
ried in that country Johanna Larson. She was 
born in 1835. They were farmers in Norway and 
the father served in the regular Norwegian army. 
In 1875, when Erick was two years old, the family 
came to the United States and settled at Mona in 
Northern Iowa, where Arne Erickson was a pioneer 
farmer. In 1879 he pioneered to Dakota Territory, 
locating on a farm in what is now Cass County, 
North Dakota. From there he moved to Grand 
Forks and homesteaded 160 acres and a timber 
claim of 160 acres at Reynolds. He still lives on his 
'homestead there, though now retired from the re- 
sponsibilities of the farm of 320 acres which he 
owns. He has been a republican voter many years 
and is a loyal member of the Lutheran Church. 
His wife died at Reynolds, November 6, 1918. 
Most of their family of children are farmers or 
farmers' wives. Ele is the wife of B. Ellison, a 
farmer at Reynolds. Martin is one of the promi- 
nent business men of Reynolds, a farmer, banker, 
former member of the Legislature and former 
county commissioner. Lena is the wife of E. K. 
Grove, and they live on the old homestead at Reyn- 
olds. Annie lives at Reynolds, widow of S. O. 
Myhre, and she owns the farm on which she lives. 
Amund was a farmer at Reynolds and died in 1917. 
Erick A. is the sixth in age. Ole was also a farmer 
and died at Reynolds in 1911. Jennie is the wife 
of E. G. Brant, a rancher at Conrad, Montana, and 
Charles, the youngest of the family, is also on a 
ranch at Conrad. 

Erick A. Erickson acquired his early education 
in the public schools at Grand Forks, graduating 
from high school in 1888. He received a Normal 
diploma in 1890 from the University of North Da- 
kota at Grand Forks, and for several years taught 
in Grand Forks County. In 1896 he entered Augs- 
burg Seminary and College at Minneapolis, where 
he completed the regular college course and re- 
ceived the A. B. degree in 1898, and then continued 
in the theological school and was graduated Bache- 
lor of Theology in 1901. 

As a minister of the Lutheran Church Mr. Erick- 
son spent four years at Bellingham, Washington, 
after which he was professor of pedagogy and psy- 
chology in the Normal School at Madison, Minne- 
sota. In 1905 he came to Billings as a pastor of 
the Lutheran Church and a few months later was 
called upon to organize a Lutheran Church at Big 
Timber. When the church was constituted he re- 
mained as pastor and in that capacity was identi- 
fied with the life of this community until 1909. 



Mr. Erickson became superintendent of city 
schools in the fall of 1909. In the spring of 1919, 
just ten years later, his contract was renewed for 
another three year period. He has the supervi- 
sion of a staff of nine teachers, and the enrollment 
in the Big Timber schools is 285 students. In 1909 
he was also appointed a member of the County 
Educational Examining Board, and has filled that 
office continuously. He is a member of the Mon- 
tana State Teachers' Association, and is widely 
known over the state through his work as an in- 
structor in the Teachers' State Training School 
at Bozeman during the summers. He is a gifted 
penman, and penmanship is usually one of the 
subjects assigned him in the summer normals. 

Mr. Erickson lives in a modern home which he 
owns on McLepd Street. He is a republican, is 
affiliated with Big Timber Lodge No. 25 Knights of 
Pythias and is a member of the Sons of Norway. 

In 1902, at Bellingham, Washington, he married 
Miss Mary Mahlun, daughter of S. J. and Ingaborg 
(Austing) Mahlun. Her parents live at Reynolds, 
North Dakota, where her father is a retired farm- 
er. Mr. and Mrs. Erickson have had five children : 
Alvin, born March 14, 1905; Hilma Johanna, born 
January u, 1907; Leonard Melius, born December 
24, 1908; Elmer Martin, born November 26, 1910; 
and Arnold, born May 24, 1916. 

JOHN H. STEPHENS, the present sheriff of Fergus 
County, is a native of old Fort Logan, represents 
pioneer Montana stock, and his own career has 
been one of varied eventfulness, experience and 
service. 

He was born May 9, 1878, a son of Albert J. and 
Fannie E. (Hillis) Stephens. His father, who was 
born in Pennsylvania, left home at the age of four- 
teen and spent all the rest of his life in the Far 
West. His first experience was in the mining dis- 
trict of Colorado around Pike's Peak. Later he 
went to California and arrived in Montana in the 
historic year 1863, first locating at Bannock City as 
a gold prospector. From there he went to Diamond 
City, was a miner for some time, and then engaged 
in the butcher business and located a ranch in the 
Smith River Valley, two miles from Fort Logan in 
Meagher County. In 1874, at Diamond City, he 
married Fannie E. Hillis, who was born in Indiana. 
They moved to a ranch in that year and Albert 
Stephens was engaged in the cattle business for 
many years, until 1903. He then sold his ranch and 
cattle and moved to Cannon Ranch near White 
Sulphur Springs, where he died in February, 1917, 
at the age of seventy-nine. His widow is still living 
on the old ranch at White Sulphur Springs, and is 
now seventy-one years of age. Albert Stephens 
during the 'Sos^ served as county commissioner 
of Meagher County. He was one of the first 
members of the Masonic Lodge at Diamond City 
and in politics was a democrat. 

John H. Stephens was the second of eight chil- 
dren, six of whom are still living, four sons and 
two daughters. He acquired his early education in 
the grade schools of Lewistown, and attended busi- 
ness colleges at Davenport, Iowa, Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, and Helena, Montana. In 1892 he located 
in Fergus County and was a stockman until 1000. 
He then farmed for two years and in 1902 entered 
the Osteopathic College at Kirksville, Missouri, 
taking the full course and practicing for two years 
at Dillon and White Sulphur Springs. In 1906 he 
returned to Fergus County and located a home- 
stead, where he engaged in farming and stock raising 
near Roy until 1913. He then remained in Roy 
engaged in the livery and grain business, and in 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



125 



November, 1916, the votes of a majority of the 
people of Fergus County called him to the office 
of sheriff. He was re-elected in 1918, and has given 
a thoroughly efficient administration of that im- 
portant post. Mr. Stephens is a member of Lewis- 
town Lodge No. 37, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
Judith Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. Politically he is a republican. 

On March 20, 1900, he married Lillian E. Cook. 
She was born in Vermont, a daughter of George W. 
and Emily H. (Orvis) Cook, a well known family 
of Lewistown. Mr. and Mrs. Stephens have eight 
children, named Edith L., George H., Joseph C, 
Ruth, John H., Jr., Robert L., Mary C. and Lucile. 

REUBEN E. COY, manager of the Mountain State 
Telephone and Telegraph Company, with headquar- 
ters at Laurel, is one of the experienced young 
business men of Yellowstone County, and his abili- 
ties are held in high esteem not only by the offi- 
cials of his company, but also by his fellow citi- 
zens. He was born at Independence, Wisconsin, 
March 23, 1884, a son of E. S. Coy and grandson 
of Abraham Coy, a pioneer farmer of Wisconsin 
who homesteaded there, and died at Independence, 
that state, in 1907. 

E. S. Coy was born in Minnesota in 1856, but 
was reared in and about Independence, Wisconsin. 
For a number of years he was engaged in a mer- 
cantile business at Independence, and also engaged 
in farming, but he is now a rural free delivery 
carrier out of Independence. Politically he is a 
republican. For fifteen years he served Independ- 
ence as constable, and was city marshal for about 
fifteen years, always taking a very prominent part 
in civic affairs. The Methodist Episcopal Church 
holds his membership and has his loyal support. 
He was married at Independence, Wisconsin, to 
Barbara Cook, born in Wisconsin in 1864, and their 
children are as follows : George A., who resides 
at Laurel, Montana, is night train desk man at 
the yard offices of the Northern Pacific Railroad 
Company; and Reuben E., whose name heads this 
review. 

Reuben E. Coy attended the public schools of 
Independence, Wisconsin, until he was fifteen years 
old, when he was graduated in the high school 
work. In 1900 he entered the employ of the tele- 
phone and telegraph company at Independence, but 
at the expiration of two years left to become tele- 
graph lineman for the Northern Pacific Railroad 
Company, working over the entire system until 
1909, being during that period one of the two men 
thus employed. His first trip to Montana was 
made in 1902, and during the time he was work- 
ing as lineman he was frequently sent into the 
state, and was so pleased with conditions here that 
he located at Laurel in April, 1909, establishing 
himself in a clothing business, but closed it out 
in the fall of 1910 to enter the employ of the 
Mountain State Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany as exchange manager of the Laurel Exchange, 
comprising Laurel, Bridger, Joliet, Fromberg and 
Columbus, Montana. Mr. Coy has eighteen em- 
ployes under his supervision, and the exchange at 
Laurel is located on Main Street. Politically Mr. 
Coy is a republican and served on the school board 
for five years. He affiliates with the Congrega- 
tional Church. Fraternally he belongs to Corin- 
thian Lodge No. 72, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Laurel; and Arcadia Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Arcadia, Wisconsin. A booster 
for Laurel, he is an active member of the Com- 
mercial Club. Mr. Coy owns a comfortable mod- 



ern residence on Fifth Avenue, corner of Third 
Street. 

In September; 1909, Mr. Coy was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sarah Schaffner at Independence, 
Wisconsin. She is a daugther of J. J. Schaffner, 
a retired farmer. Mrs. Coy is a graduate of the 
Independence High School and attended the State 
Normal School at Stevens Point, Wisconsin. There 
are no children. Mr. Coy is a splendid type of 
alert young western business man, aggressive, com- 
petent and effective, interested in his community 
and anxious to give it the best of service. It is 
such men as Mr. Coy that build up the newer por- 
tions of the country and set an example in civic 
usefulness the older localities would do well to 
follow. 

MRS. MARY COLLIER JOHNSON. The Anaconda 
Business College is one of the most reliable institu- 
tions of its kind in this part of the West, and its 
courses are designed to give the students a practical 
knowledge of the fundamentals of commercial life 
so as to prepare them to step from the schoolroom 
into good paying positions. The institution is the 
outgrowth of the ideas and efforts of its owner, Mrs. 
Mary Collier Johnson, an educator of wide and 
varied experience and a woman of unusual business 
capacity. 

Mrs. Johnson was born at Houghton, Michigan, 
and is a daughter of Daniel Sullivan, and grand- 
daughter of Timothy S. Sullivan, born in County 
Cork, Ireland, who came to the United States and 
after spending some time at Boston, Massachusetts, 
became a pioneer of the mining regions of northern 
Michigan, being one of the first to operate the Isle 
Royal mine of the Northern Peninsula of Michigan. 
His death occurred at Houghton, Michigan. 

Daniel Sullivaji was born at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1831, and he died at Tombstone, Ari- 
zona, in 1915. After his marriage which took place 
at Houghton, Michigan, where he had been reared, 
Daniel Sullivan was one of the pioneer prospectors 
of Pioche, Nevada, and then in the early '70s went 
to Tintic, Utah, and on into the Black Hills of the 
Dakotas in 1876. Still later he prospected at George- 
town and Leadville, Colorado, and was one of the 
very first to reach Tombstone, Arizona, which was 
established in 1879, an <3 there he spent the rest of 
his life. Mr. Sullivan prospected for gold, silver 
and copper and made a fortune, but like so many 
of the prospectors re-invested in other mining prop- 
ositions. Politically he was a republican. His wife 
Mary was born at Swansea, Wales, in 1849, and 
died at Tintic, Utah, in 1874. Their children were 
as follows: Katherine, who married P. F. Clifford, 
a merchant of Butte, Montana; Mary, who married 
R. R. Johnson, lives at No. 23 Main Street, Ana- 
conda, he being clerk for the Anaconda Copper 
Mining Company; Margaret, who married W. E. 
Carpenter, superintendent of a mine in Humboldt, 
Arizona, and D. S. who lives at Tonopah, Nevada, 
where he also has mining interests. 

Mrs. Johnson attended the public schools of Mich- 
igan and Arizona, and then became a student of the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, taking a three 
years' course. Following that she attended the De- 
troit Business College of Detroit, Michigan. For 
the subsequent eighteen years she was engaged as 
a teacher in the public schools, for sixteen years of 
that time being connected with the Lake Linden, 
Michigan, High School as assistant principal. In 
1901 her attention was turned to the West, and she 
came to Montana, spending her first two years in 
the state as an instructor of the public schools of 
Butte. A woman of broad vision with great faith 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



in Anaconda, she decided to give practical expres- 
sion to it by establishing a business college, and 
in 1904 founded the Anaconda Business College at 
No. 23 Main Street, where the entire second floor 
is occupied. Pupils come to this college from the 
city and surrounding district, and her methods and 
thoroughness are commended by all who employ 
her graduates. She is very active as a member of 
the Anaconda Woman's Club, and was elected the 
first Republican County Central Committee woman 
of Deer Lodge County, which office she now holds. 
R. R. Johnson came to Montana in 1888, and after 
a year spent at Butte, became associated with the 
Anaconda Copper Mining Company and has been 
a resident of Anaconda ever since. A democrat of 
influence he was elected on his party ticket as a 
representative to the Thirteenth General Assembly 
of Montana from Deerlodge County. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson have no children. 

JOHN B. COPPO. Strength of purpose, intelli- 
gently directed, generally brings about a gratifying 
-material advancement. The man who, discovering 
the calling for which he is best fitted, forges ahead, 
undeterred by obstacles, undismayed by the chances 
and changes of life, is the one who reaches his ulti- 
mate goal. Such a man through his very prosperity 
proves his worth, for it is impossible for anyone 
to reach any height of good fortune if he shirks 
duty, or seeks to lay upon other shoulders the re- 
sponsibilities his own should bear. Great centers 
of industry develop men big of heart and brain, 
for competition acts as a stimulus and brings out 
the best in a man. John B. Coppo, member of the 
co-partnership operated under the name of the Butte 
Plumbing Company, is a man who honors Butte 
by his residence in the city, and is honored by 
. it in the success to which he has attained. 

John B. Coppo was born at Calumet, Houghton 
County, Michigan, on September 23, 1879, a son of 
John A. Coppo. The birth of John A. Coppo took 
place in 184$, at Ponte Canavesse, Piamont, Torino, 
Italy, and his death occurred at Butte, Montana, on 
April 20, 1919. Reared in his native place, he early 
developed. a desire to see new places, and even as 
a boy he traveled through Switzerland, France and 
Germany, working as an apprentice to the tinsmith- 
ing trade, and later becoming a journeyman tinsmith. 
This gave him a variety of experiences, for, accord- 
ing to the custom of the times and country, he and 
his employers walked from place to place, crossing 
the Alps on foot by way of Mount Saint Bernard. 

Having tasted of the pleasures of adventure, it 
was but natural that he should take a further 
chance, and in 1872, John A. Coppo came to the 
United States and located at Calumet, Michigan, and 
there followed mining for two years. Leaving 
Michigan, he went into the Black Hills during the 
rush to them after the discovery of gold, and was 
there from 1878 to 1879, but then returned to Calu- 
met, and for the next ten years was engaged in its 
mines. He then came to Montana and continued to 
work as a miner, being in the employ of the Butte 
& Boston Company, under Captain Hoatson as 
superintendent and Charles Palmer as general man- 
ager, and it was when he was so employed that his 
death occurred. Upon locating in this country Mr. 
.Coppo declared his intention of becoming a citizen, 
and after due process of law received his papers, 
and thereafter lived according to the rules and regu- 
lations of his adopted country and gave an intelli- 
gent support to the candidates of the republican 
party. The Roman Catholic Church had in him an 
earnest and faithful member. 

In 1874 he was married at Calumet to Madaline 



Rigano, who was born in 1852, and she survives 
him and makes her home at Butte. Their children 
were as follows : Lena, who is the wife of John 
Lamuth, lives on their ranch in Brown's Gulch, 
Silver Bow County, Montana, and John B., whose 
name heads this review. 

John B. Coppo attended the public schools of 
Calumet and Butte, remaining in high school through 
the sophomore year. He then entered the Butte 
Business College and after taking the regular course 
was graduated therefrom in 1897. When only fifteen 
years old he began working as office boy for J. R. 
Reed, and then was with the World Messenger Com- 
pany, but it was not until December 15, 1895, that 
he entered upon his real career, when on that date 
he began his apprenticeship to the plumbing trade 
with the Eschle Plumbing & Heating Company, with 
which he remained for nine years, becoming a jour- 
neyman plumber after six years of apprenticeship. 
Desiring to see- a little of the country, Mr. Coppo 
worked at Boise City, Idaho, and Caldwell, Idaho, 
and then, in 1904, embarked in business in that 
city, but sold it in 1906 and returned to Butte, 
where until May, 1911, he was engaged in working 
at his trade. He then formed a co-partnership with 
William De Workin, under the name of the Butte 
Plumbing Company, and this association is still 
maintained. The establishment is located at No. 205 
South Main Street, and the firm carry on a general 
heating arid plumbing contracting business. Among 
many other important contracts they have carried 
out may be mentioned those of the Emmerson and 
Washington schools, and the Knights of Columbus 
and Young Men's Chirstian Association buildings, 
in which the plumbing and (heating installation 
stand as monuments to their skill and fidelity in 
living up to the spirit as well as letter of their 
obligations. 

The political convictions of Mr. Coppo make him 
a democrat. In his younger days and up to the 
year of 1900 he devoted his time and efforts to for- 
warding the great American sport, "base ball," being 
manager of Butte's best team in 1898, but in 1899 
and 1900 worked as umpire in the Butte City League. 
As a lover of sport and feeling that his base ball 
days have gone, he now devotes his time in fishing 
in summer and plays the good old Scotch game of 
curling during the winter months. Born and reared 
in the Roman Catholic Church, he continues a mem- 
ber of it through sincere conviction. He belongs 
to Butte Council No. 668, Knights of Columbus, in 
which he has been made a third degree knight, and 
also a Butte Lodge No. 240, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, of which he is exalted ruler. 
Mr. Coppo owns his modern residence at No. 401 
South Excelsior Avenue, and he and his partner own 
the building in which their business is located. 

On June 19, 1905, Mr. Coppo was married at 
Pocatello, Idaho, to Miss Elizabeth Ray, a daughter 
of " Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Ray. Mr. Ray was one 
of the pioneer miners of Virginia City, Nevada, 
from whence he later came to Butte, and there he 
died, but Mrs. Ray survives him and is living at 
Butte. Mrs. Coppo died on December 5, 1913, with- 
out issue. On August 24, 1915, Mr. Coppo was 
married to Mrs. Blanche (Bagley) Sullivan, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bagley of Butte, 
where Mr. Bagley is engaged in mining. Mr. and 
Mrs. Coppo have a daughter, Mary Montana, who 
was born on April 5, 1917. By her former marriage 
Mrs. Coppo had three children, namely : Gertrude 
Ann, who was born in 1004, is attending the Butte 
Business College, and Glenn Joseph, who was born 
in 1906, and Blanche, who was born in 1908, are 
both attending the McKinley High School. Mr. 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



127 



Coppo enjoys the complete and absolute confidence 
of his business associates. Integrity has been the 
watchword of his whole career and is the funda- 
mental attribute of his character. He is honest 
with himself and with all men, and sincere in word 
and deed. 

JOHN B. RITCH. The career of John B. Ritch 
in Fergus County has extended over a period of 
thirty-five years, during which time he has been a 
prospector, miner, range-rider, cattleman, public offi- 
cial and repository of big business interests. At 
present he is one of the prominent and influential 
business men of Lewistown, with extensive connec- 
tions in commercial and financial circles. 

' Mr. Ritch was born December 31, 1868, in North 
Carolina. He was but fifteen years of age when 
he left the parental roof and made his way to the 
State of Texas, where he secured employment on a 
cattle ranch and subsequently rode the open range 
in the Lone Star State. His advent in Montana oc- 
curred in 1885, in which year he entered the Judith 
Basin of Fergus (then Meagher) County in the 
role of a- range rider, later engaging in mining 
and the newspaper business. He was elected clerk 
of the Tenth District Court, a position in which 
he served for eight consecutive years. Since then 
he has been variously connected with big business 
interests, making his headquarters at 409 West 
Main Street, Lewistown. His home here is at 
310 South Fifth Avenue. Mr. Ritch is a demo- 
crat has wielded some influence in the ranks of 
his party in Fergus County. 

In 1902 Mr. Ritch was united in marriage with 
Miss Minnie Rehder, and to this union there have 
been born two children : Myrtle Judith and John B., 
Jr. 

EDWARD FABIAN was a man whose good, honest 
work and citizenship contributed many things of 
value to Fergus County, and his name is one to be 
held in long and respectful memory in that com- 
munity. His family still live near Lewistown, and 
one of the sons made a brilliant record in the 
famous Rainbow Division during the World war. 

Edward Fabian was born in Alsace Lorraine, 
France, October 12, 1850, a son of Blaise and 
Frances (Schnebelen) Fabian. He was the second 
in a family of seven children. He acquired his 
education in France, and at the age of twenty 
entered the army and served during the Franco- 
Prussian war of 1870-71, battling against Prussian 
aggression in that war as did his son nearly fifty 
years later. He lost a finger in one battle. 

After the war he worked in his father's vineyard 
until 1880, when he came to the United States on 
a steamship to New York City and thence went by 
rail to Bismarck, Dakota, and by steamer reached 
Montana at Fort Benton. From there he crossed 
overland by ox team to Marysville, where his brother 
Alexander was mining. He spent about a year in 
that locality and then moved to Helena, working 
in the grocery store of Charles Lehman. On July 
22, 1882, Mr. Fabian married Anna Mary Laibacher. 
She was born in Switzerland February 20, 1854. 
After their marriage, which was celebrated in 
Helena, they worked for M. Beach on a farm until 
October, when Mr. Fabian went back to the mines 
at Helena. 

In July, 1883, they took their belated wedding 
trip, making a visit to France, where he remained 
until 1884, and then returned to Montana, his wife 
joining him about a year later. He was on the 
sheep and cattle ranch of Mr. John Brooks on Salt 
Creek until his wife returned in 1885, and then for 

Vol. II 



a time he was in the employ of Mr. Frank Day. In 
1886 Mr. Fabian bought a home on the Kendall 
Road near Lewistown, and turned his talents to the 
art of gardening, a business in which he excelled. 
He raised large quantities of fresh produce and 
fruit for the Lewistown markets and was actively 
engaged in that business and acquired a competence 
until his death on June 12, 1915. He first had a 
log house on his little farm, but in 1914 constructed 
a modern home, which he was permitted to enjoy 
only a short time but which his widow and family 
still occupy. He was a member of St. Leo's Catholic 
Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fabian had five children : Helen 
Elizabeth, who died in infancy, Charles Edward, the 
soldier son, Joseph Alexander, Henry, and Freda. 
Charles Edward enlisted October 5, 1917, and was 
made a part of the Fourth Division in December, 
1917, serving with the Thirty-Ninth Infantry. He 
left for France in April, 1918, and was placed with 
the Second Army Corps and saw much of the hard 
fighting along the Marne. In September, 1918, he 
was placed in the Motor Dispatch Division, and 
after the signing of the armistice went with his 
command to the Rhine in Germany and is still with 
the Army of Occupation. 

JAMES H. JORDAN. Those Americans who can 
trace back to colonial ancestry have every reason 
to be proud of their lineage, and of the fact that 
members of their family have been associated with 
the' constructive work of their country in all of 
its periods. This wonderful nation did not spring 
into being over night, but is the outgrowth of a 
series of epochs and of the character of the people 
of each. Without the heroism, sagacity, broad vi- 
sion and shrewd judgment of the country's foun- 
ders and developers there would not today be any 
mighty United States of America, but a couple of 
straggling colonies over which warring European 
nations would be wrangling. Therefore each one 
who does have the right to claim one or other of 
these forebears does so with gratitude, and as he 
matures and gains nroper appreciation of his privi- 
lege, tries to so shape his life and policies that in 
the epochs to come his descendants may in turn 
point back with pride to him. 

Long before the American colonies threw off the 
yoke of the mother country and 'aid the founda- 
tion of the present government, representatives of 
two families, the Jordans and the Chases, came 
to the shores of the New World from Ireland, and 
from the dates of their several landings took an 
aggressive and effective part in the history of theiu 
adopted country. Their descendants are worthy of 
them and what they accomplished, and one of the 
present day who has the blood of both in his veins 
is James H. Jordan, at Laurel, Montana, whose 
mother was born a Chase. 

James H. Jordan was born in Vernon County, 
Wisconsin, April 20, 1866, a son of R. W. Jordan 
and Sarah M. (Chase) Jordan. R. W. Jordan was 
born in Connecticut, where the family had lived 
for several generations, in 1830, and he died in 
Butler County, Iowa, in 1877. Growing up in his 
native state, R. W. Jordan learned there to be a 
farmer and followed that calling all of his life. 
In 1855 he sought better opportunities for his 
growing ambition in Vernon County, Wisconsin, 
of which he was a pioneer, but as that section de- 
veloped his inclination led him further west, and 
in 1872 he went to Butler County, Iowa, where 
he rounded out his useful life. From the organi- 
zation of the republican party Mr. Jordan found 
in its principles a reflection of his own, and gave 



128 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



it his hearty support. Early joining the Congre- 
gational Church, throughout his after life he lived 
up to its creed and contributed generously of his 
means and time to further its influence. As a 
Mason he was equally well known, and in every 
respect measured up to the highest standards of 
American manhood. His wife was born in Orleans 
County, New York, in 1835, and survives him, now 
making her home in Vernon County, Wisconsin. 
Their children were as follows : Warren A., who 
was a farmer, died at Lenox, Taylor County, Iowa, 
aged thirty-six years; Rosa, who married G. C. 
Bishop, a retired farmer of Vernon County, Wis- 
consin ; John S., who is manager of a lumber yard, 
lives in North Dakota; and James H., whose name 
heads this review. 

When he was only twelve years old James H. 
Jordan left the parental roof to become a clerk 
in a grocery store at Dubuque, Iowa, where he 
remained until 1886, then returning to Vernon 
County, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in farm- 
ing for eighteen years, and he was then in North- 
ern Wisconsin for eighteen months. For the sub- 
sequent four years he was engaged in conduct- 
ing a mercantile business at Retreat, Vernon Coun- 
ty, Wisconsin, and then, in 1910, came to Laurel, 
Montana. It was his connection with the Govern- 
ment, for which he did general surveying, that 
brought him to Laurel, and this growing commu- 
nity so appealed to him that when, three years 
later, he severed his relations with the surveying 
department he. arranged to go with the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company so as to remain in this 
part of the country, continuing with the latter for 
four years. For the next year he was a member 
of the sales force of a mercantile establishment, 
and then was called upon to assume the duties 
of the office of city clerk, to which he was elected 
in 1917 and re-elected in 1918, with offices in the 
city hall. Mr. Jordan has had experience in pub- 
lic office, as he was township clerk at Sterling, 
Vernon County, Wisconsin, for three years, in all 
of his campaigns being the candidate of the re- 
publican party, for, like his father, he has always 
espoused its teachings. Both by inheritance and 
conviction he is a member of the Congregational 
Church. Not only is he a member of Laurel Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, but is now past 
grand of it, and he also belongs to Laurel Camp, 
Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Jordan has 
demonstrated his faith in the future of Laurel and 
Yellowstone County by investing in a comfortable 
modern residence at the corner of Fifth Street and 
Wyoming Avenue, and a 32o-acre ranch nine miles 
southeast of Laurel. 

In 1887 Mr. Jordan was united in marriage with 
Miss Marcia Wightman, a daughter of Andrew 
B. and Melinda (Austin) Wightman, farming peo- 
ple who became pioneers of Wisconsin. Mr. Wight- 
man is now deceased, but his widow survives' and 
makes her home in Clark County, Wisconsin. Mr. 
and Mrs. Jordan became the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Hazel, who married C. E. Gil- 
breath, lives on Mr. Jordan's ranch; Ruby, who 
married H. T. Winters, a ranchman, and they 
live near Laurel; and Lin, who is attending the 
Laurel High School. 

The advancement of Mr. Jordan is somewhat 
remarkable for he is essentially a self-made man, 
and his educational opportunities were exceedingly 
limited. Possessing, however, natural ability and 
quickness of perception, from childhood he has 
been able to make his own way, and make that 
way a good one, and those who have come into 
contact with his methods recognize that they are 



practical and effective. His record as city clerk 
is clean and satisfactory in every way, and he is 
able to take care of a large amount of the busi- 
ness of the municipality, applying to the affairs ot 
his office the same alertness that has characterized 
him all his life. Both he and his wife are popular 
socially and have gathered about them a congenial 
circle of friends. As has been mentioned above 
in this article, it is such men as Mr. Jordan who 
can claim to be real Americans, and of him it can 
also be said that like his ancestors he is worthy of 
the land which gave him birth. 

ARTHUR C. KNIGHT, M. D. Holding prestige in 
the ranks of his profession by reason of superior 
natural ability, aided by a thorough training, wide 
experience, an acute comprehension of human nature 
and broad sympathy, Dr. Arthur C. Knight, is firmly 
established in the confidence of the people of Phil- 
ipsburg. Although engaged in practice here only 
since the beginning of 1919, Doctor Knight has 
shown himself such a thorough master of his call- 
ing as to win an appointment as surgeon for the 
Bimetalic Mining Company, the Philipsburg Mining 
Company, and the Gem Mining Company. During 
the great war he was one of the medical men who 
left an excellent practice, to serve his country, and 
returned to private life with an honorable record 
as a soldier and patriot. 

Doctor Knight was born in Harrison County, 
West Virginia, August 24, 1881, a son of John C. 
Knight, grandson of Valentine Knight, and great- 
grandson of Gustavious Knight. The Knights orig- 
inated in England, from whence representatives 
came to the American Colonies and settled in Vir- 
ginia. Gustavious Knight was born in Virginia and 
became a pioneer of what is now Harrison County, 
West Virginia. During the War of 1812 he served 
his country as a soldier. His son, Valentine Knight 
was born in Virginia in 1826, in what is now Har- 
rison County, West Virginia, and died there in 
1909, having been a farmer all of his life. 

John C. Knight, father of Doctor Knight, was 
born at Byron, Virginia, in 1853, and now lives near 
Clarksburg, West Virginia. He was reared on a 
farm at Byron, but after his marriage settled on 
a farm in Harrison County, where he has been 
occupied with agricultural pursuits all of his life. 
He is a democrat, but not active in politics. The 
Baptist Church has held his membership for many 
years. John C. Knight was married to Aldena 
Queen, who was born in Lewis County, Virginia, 
in 1858, died near Clarksburg, West Virginia, in 
1888. Their . children were as follows : Doctor 
Knight, who was the eldest born; and Ernest E., 
who is assistant state superintendent of schools 
lives at Charleston, West Virginia. 

Doctor Knight attended the public schools of his 
native county, the State Normal School at Glen- 
yille, West Virginia, from which he was graduated 
in 1902, and then, after he had taught school for 
two years, became a student of the West Virginia 
University at Morgantown for two years. He then 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
Baltimore, Maryland, from which he was graduated 
in 1909 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, and 
a member of the Greek Letter Fraternity Phi Beta 
Pi, and he is also a member of Pi Kappa Alpha. 

In 1909 Doctor Knight entered the Montana State 
Hospital at Warm Springs as assistant physician, 
and six months later was made assistant superin- 
tendent, and held that position until 1913, when he 
was appointed by Governor Stewart as state super- 
intendent of the hospital, and continued as such for 
a year. Doctor Knight then entered upon a general 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



129 



practice in which he was very successful, but as 
before stated left it to serve his country, and was 
commissioned a first lieutenant on September 17, 

1917, was called to active duty, January 16, 1918, 
spending six weeks in the medical officers training 
camp at Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia. 
From there he was sent to Camp Wadsworth, with 
the Third Pioneer Infantry at Spartansburg, South 
Carolina, but was detached from it on June 15, 1918, 
to serve on the camp examining board. On Sep- 
tember 19, 1918, he received his promotion to a 
captaincy, and was ordered overseas as a casual 
officer, arriving at Brest, France, on November 22, 

1918, after the signing of the Armistice. Doctor 
Knight was immediately assigned to base hospital No. 
214, and there assisted in putting the wounded sol- 
diers in such shape as to enable them to return to the 
United States. He returned to his own country with 
a detachment of sick and wounded, landing in New 
Vork City on February 9, 1919, and was mustered out 
of the service on February n, following which he 
came back to Montana, and accepting the appointment 
of surgeon to the three companies above referred to, 
located at Philipsburg, where he is also engaged 
in a general practice, with offices on Broadway. 
Doctor Knight is a republican. Brought up in a 
religious home atmosphere, he early joined the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Well known in Ma- 
sonry, Doctor Knight belongs to Mount Mariah 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Butte, 
Montana; Butte Consistory in which he has taken 
the thirty-second degree; and Bagdad Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of 
Butte. He is also a member of Butte Aerie No. 
n, Fraternal Order of Eagles, and the Maccabees, 
also of Butte. A believer in professional co-opera- 
tion, Doctor Knight belongs to Silver Bow County 
Medical Society, the Montana State Medical So- 
ciety, and the American Medical Association. 

On April 9, 1911, Doctor Knight was married at 
Butte, Montana, to Miss Mathilde Le Roy, a daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Le Roy, residents of 
Brooklyn, New York, where Mr. Le Roy is an 
accountant. Mrs. Knight died March 2, 1917, leav- 
ing a daughter, Dorothy C, who was born June 
25, IQIS. 

Doctor Knight's success is not the result of any 
happy chance; luck has played no part in his ad- 
vancement. At the beginning of his career he was 
compelled to meet and overcome the same obstacles 
which arise in the path of every young practitioner. 
These, however, succumbed to his constant study, 
his indomitable perseverance and the force of his 
ability, well applied, and he may today take a par- 
donable pride in the fact that he owes his present 
position and prosperity solely to his own industry 
and effort. 

JOHN CHARLES MAGUIRE. The visitor to Butte is 
liable to be impressed by the miles of well paved 
streets, but he may not know that the credit for 
this high class of work is due to John Charles Mn- 
guire, general paving contractor, who has done prac- 
tically all of the paving at Butte, Missoula and Lew- 
istown since 1913. He is essentially a product of 
the West, having been born at Ogden, Utah, on 
September 14, 1882, a son of John Maguire. The 
birth of John Maguire occurred in County Done- 
gal, Ireland, in 1843, and his death at Ogden, Utah, 
in 1902. His father, grandfather of John Charles 
Maguire, came to the United States from County 
Donegal, Ireland, about 1857, and settled first in 
Vermont, from whence he moved to Iowa, where 
he owned and operated a farm on the Grand River. 
In 1867 he came West to Utah, and was engaged 



in a mercantile business at Ogden, where his death 
occurred. He was a democrat. A life long mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic Church, he was active 
in religious affairs in each community in which 
he resided. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Conwell, and she, too, died at Ogden, Utah. 

John Maguire was a veteran of the war between 
the states, in which he enlisted in 1865, and follow- 
ing his honorable discharge he returned to his fa- 
ther's farm on Grand River, Iowa. When his. par- 
ents went to Ogden, Utah, John Maguire accom- 
panied them, and, like his father, engaged in mer- 
chandising, but later engaged in mining and handling 
real estate, developing into one of the successful 
pioneers of that city. Also like his father, he was 
a democrat, and served as a member of the City 
Council of Ogden. By inheritance and conviction 
he was a Roman Catholic. For some years he be- 
longed to the Ancient Order of Hibernians, and 
was at one time president of the local lodge at 
Ogden, and he also belonged to the Catholic Knights 
of America. John Maguire was united in marriage 
with Mary McGuire and she survives him and lives 
in Butte, Montana. Mrs. Maguire was born in 
County Roscommon, Ireland, in 1845. She and her 
husband had children as follows : Philip, who was 
an accountant, died at San Francisco, California, 
when he was thirty-five years old; Sarah, who mar- 
ried Con Smith, a rancher, lives at Boulder, Mon- 
tana; Agnes, who married Fred W. Burns, a mine 
operator, lives at San Diego, California; Mary, who 
married Dr. R. C. Monahan, a physician and sur- 
geon of Butte, Montana; Alice, who is unmarried, 
lives at Butte with her mother; John Charles, whose 
name heads this review ; Nellie, who lives with her 
mother, conducts an X-Ray laboratory; Grace, who 
is also with her mother, is engaged in teaching in 
the Butte public schools ; and Charles, who lives at 
Butte, is a salesman for the L. S. Cohn Cigar 
Company. 

John Charles Maguire attended the public schools 
of Ogden, and completed the sophomore year of 
the Ogden High School, and then for the subse- 
quent year was a student of the Intermountain Busi- 
ness College, from which he was graduated in 1899. 
Mr. Maguire then went to work with his uncle, 
Don Maguire, a mine owner in northern Utah, 
and remained with him for two years, leaving him 
to go into the office of the general foreman of the 
Union Pacific Railroad Company at Ogden. A y.ear 
later, so satisfactory was his record, he was pro- 
moted to be passenger yard foreman at the Union 
Station, Ogden, and held that position for two years. 
For the subsequent eighteen months Mr. Maguire 
was at Goldfield, Nevada, mining both over and un- 
derground, and in this way learning the business, 
and then, in the winter of 1906, he came to Butte, 
and worked in the old Parrot Mine, and also in the 
office of the Great Northern Railroad. Once more 
he returned to Ogden, and during 1907 was in the 
Sierra Madre district as a contract miner engaged 
in driving a tunnel. In 1908 he formed a partner- 
ship with V. P. Strange, and from then until 1913' 
was engaged in a general contracting business, 
which was incorporated in 1909 as the Strange- 
Maguire Paving Company, and gained a well-merited 
celebrity in paving work. In 1910 Mr. Maguire had 
charge of the paving contract at Klamath Falls, 
Oregon, and during 1911 and 1912 had charge of a 
similar contract at Missoula, Montana. In the spring 
of 1913 he severed his connections with the Strange- 
Maguire Paving Company and located at Butte, 
since which time he has been an independent con- 
tractor of paving work. In addition to his con- 
tracts at Butte, Missoula and Lewistown, Mr. Ma- 



130 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



guire has operated at Pocatello, Blackfoot, Idaho 
Falls, Rexburg and Saint Anthony, Idaho. His offices 
are conveniently located at No. 615 Daly Bank 
Building, and his residence is at No. 1260 West Gold 
Street, Butte. He is an independent democrat. Like 
all of the members of his family he is a Roman 
Catholic, and he belongs to Ogden Council No. 777, 
Knights of Columbus, of which he is a third degree 
knight; Ogden Lodge No. 719, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Silver Bow and Country 
clubs of Butte, and the Judith Club of Lewistown, 
Montana. Mr. Maguire is a member of the Pacific 
Highway Association and is vice president of the 
Silver Bow National Bank, and is otherwise inter- 
ested in this region. 

On January 7, 1911, Mr. Maguire was married to 
Miss Constance Smurthwaite, a daughter of C. A. 
and Margaret (Hope) Smurthwaite, residents of 
Salt Lake City, Utah, where Mr. Smurthwaite is 
a wholesale dealer in grain. Mrs. Maguire was 
graduated from the Ogden High School. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Maguire are as follows: 
Constance Patricia, who was .born on August 29, 
1913, and Frances Donna, who was born on Decem- 
ber 27, 1917. Mr. Maguire is one of the influential 
men of Silver Bow County, and well known through- 
out a wide region as a sound and dependable citizen, 
and one worthy of the highest consideration. His 
various contracts stand as a monument to his skill 
and reliability, and his connection with any project 
insures it proper completion, for he will not tolerate 
anything but the best of workmanship and a living 
up to the spirit as well as the letter of a contract. 

FREDERICK A. BELL, assistant cashier of the Em- 
pire Bank & Trust Company of Lewistown, has 
had a thorough training as a banker and was for- 
merly identified with large northwestern banks at 
St. Paul, Minnesota. 

He was born in St. Paul, May 15, 1883, a son of 
Frederick and Maria (Huxtable) Bell. His father, 
who was born in Durham, England, in 1858, came 
to this country when nine years of age with his 
mother and was reared and educated in St. Paul. 
He was for some years connected with the Nayes 
Brothers & Cutler, wholesale druggists house of 
St. Paul, and later with the Ryan Drug Company 
of that city. Later he became a paint dealer and 
several years ago retired and is now living, at the 
age of sixty-one, at Tacoma, Washington. His 
wife was born in New York State and died in 
1885, at the age of twenty-five. Her two children 
were Frederick A. and Edward, the latter dying 
in infancy. Frederick Bell, Sr., is a democrat and 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Frederick A. Bell received his education in the 
public schools of St. Paul, including the high 
school, and at the age of seventeen went to work 
for the American Exchange Bank of St. Paul. 
Subsequently he was with the Second National 
Bank of St. Paul and then returned to the American 
National Bank, the successor of the American Ex- 
change Bank. On the score of ability and hard 
work he was advanced to the position of paying 
teller, and continued his duties until 1910, when he 
was made a deputy in the office of the county 
treasurer of Ramsay County. Mr. Bell came to 
Lewistown and on January 2, 1911, became teller 
with the Empire Bank and Trust Company, and 
since October 14, 1917, has been assistant cashier. 

He is a democrat in politics and is affiliated with 
Lewistown Lodge No. 37, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Mason, and Hiram Chapter No. 15, Royal 
Arch Mason. He is also an active member of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 

On June 27, 1911, Mr. Bell married Miss Louise 



Marie Martinson. She was born at St. Peter Min- 
nesota, daughter of John and Ellen Martinson 
^>he has one brother, Edward Martinson. Mr and 
Mrs. Bell have two children, Vinette Ellen and 
John Frederick. 

PAUL BEHRENDT, proprietor of the Auto Machine 
Shop of Billings, is one of the substantial men of 
the city. He was born near Berlin, Germany Sep- 
tember 26, 1870, a son of Joachim Behrendt, also 
born near Berlin in 1833, and he died in Germany 
m 1894, having always lived in his native land 
Early in life he was a farmer, but later became a 
veterinarian for the German Government on a 
government breeding farm. Like other Germans 

c his period, he gave the required military service 
the regular German army. The Lutheran Church 
Had in him a devout member. Joachim Behrendt 
was married to Dorothy Ronnebeck, born, reared 
and died near Berlin. Their children were as fol- 
lows : Agnes, who is deceased ; Rudolph, who lives 
Berlin ; Herman, who is a teacher in Germany 
Paul, whose name heads this review; Theodore' 
who conducts a sporting goods store at Billings 
Montana, came to the United States in 1895 ; Louise' 
who lives in Germany; and Martha, who is also 
living in Germany. 

Paul Behrendt attended the public schools of his 
native land and there learned the machinist trade 
In October, 1894, he came to the United States and 
for the first four years lived at San Francisco, 
California, where he worked at his trade, leaving 
that city for Livingston, Montana, where for two 
years he worked for the United States Government 
in the Yellowstone National Park during the summer 
months, and during the winter ones he was with 
the Northern Pacific Railroad. In 1900 Mr. Behrendt 
came to Billings and established a repair shop, 
which has expanded into* an automobile machine 
shop and supply house, located at Nos. 2413-241=; 
First Avenue, North, of which he is the sole pro- 
prietor. He gives employment to six hands, and 
turns out excellent work. His modern residence 
located at No. 211 North Twenty-Sixth Street, is 
owned by him. Mr. Behrendt is a republican. He 
belongs to the Lutheran Church. 

In 1903 Mr. Behrendt was married at Billings to 
Miss Freida Brey, a daughter of Henry Brey, both 
of whom were born at Hamburg, Germany, where 
Mr. Brey still resides. Mr. and Mrs. Behrendt have 
the following children: Paul, who was born in 
1905; Eleanor, who was born in 1007; Helen, who 
was born in 1909 ; Marguerite, who was born in 
1912; Louise, who was born in 1915; and Richard, 
who was born in 1918. A carefully trained work- 
man, Mr. Behrendt is able to render an efficient 
service, and to extract from his employes the best 
of their work. His success is entirely due to his 
industry and sound business sense, and is' well 
merited. 

ALBERT A. LA BAR. Dating back to colonial days 
is the La Bar family, which was then founded in 
this country by a representative who left France, 
then in a disturbed condition, and sought freedom 
beyond the seas. Since then members of this hon- 
ored family have been associated with the develop- 
ment of different sections, some of them leaving 
the initial place of settlement, Pennsylvania, for 
Iowa, North Dakota, California, Montana and other 
states, all of them occupying places of trust and 
responsibility and holding the respect of their fel- 
low citizens. Laurel, Montana, is the home of one 
of the younger members of this family, Albert A. 
La Bar, who is capably managing the lumber yards 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



131 



of the Thompson Lumber Company, Incorporated, 
of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Albert A. La Bar was born in Palo Alta County, 
Iowa, June 18, 1880, a son of E. G. La Bar, now 
living on his fruit ranch at Portersville, California. 
E. G. La Bar was born at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1841, and was reared in that city, later 
going to Iowa and engaging in farming in Palo 
Alta County until 1885, when he removed to Trail 
County, North Dakota, being one of the pioneer 
farmers of that section. In 1913 he went to Porters- 
ville, California, where he owns and conducts a 
valuable orchard ranch .of considerable proportions. 
In politics he is an independent. E. G. La Bar was 
married to Matilda Ingbretson, born in Norway in 
1846, and their children are as follows: Carrie, 
who married Olaus Lee, a hardware merchant of 
Roth, North Dakota; Albert A., who was the sec- 
ond in order of birth ; Cora, who is married, lives 
with her husband, a locomotive engineer, at Glen- 
dive, Montana, where he owns a homestead ranch ; 
Samuel, who has a homestead near Custer, Mon- 
tana ; and Eva, who is at home with her parents. 

Albert A. La Bar has been very carefully edu- 
cated, first in the rural schools of Trail County, 
North Dakota, and the 'high school of Hillsboro, 
North Dakota, after which he was a student of 
Grand Forks College at Grand Forks, North Da- 
kota, for two years, completing his educational 
training at the. state agricultural college at Fargo, 
North Dakota, where he was for two seasons. 
Leaving college, Mr. La Bar put to practical use 
the instruction he had there obtained by engaging 
in farming in Trail County until he ' was twenty- 
three years old. His inclinations, however, were 
for a business career, and he formed connections 
with the Valley Lumber Company at Taft, North 
Dakota, which continued for two years, during 
which time he was manager of the company. He 
then held for four years the same position with 
the Tolna, North Dakota, branch of the same 
company, leaving it in 1910 to engage with the 
O'Neil Lumber Company at Kalispell, Montana. On 
January 28, 1917, Mr. La Bar located at Laurel, 
Montana, coming here to become general manager 
for the Laurel yards of the Thompson Lumber 
Company, Incorporated, of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, which position he still retains. The offices 
and yards are on Main Street. 

In 1904 Mr. La Bar was married to Miss Mar- 
tina Lee, at Hillsboro, North Dakota. She is a 
daughter of O. C. Lee, now deceased, although his 
widow survives him and lives at Kalispell, Mon- 
tana. Mr. and Mrs. La Bar have the following 
children : Almeda, who was born January 14, 1907 ; 
Elaine, who was born February 12, 1910; and Alem, 
who was born June 4, 1914. Mr. La Bar is a re- 
publican. He belongs to Tolna Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Tolna, North Dakota. 
One of the best lumbermen in this part of the state, 
Mr. La Bar is conducting the affairs of his com- 
pany with efficient alertness, and the annual volume 
of business is showing a gratifying increase. He 
is essentially a western product, and is typical 
of the aggressive, progressive spirit of his part 
of the country, which is producing so many worth- 
while men and women. Still in the heyday of his 
youth and enthusiasm, he has already achieved 
business distinction, and the future spreads prom- 
isingly before him. Although a newcomer to Laurel, 
he has the best interests of the city at heart, and is 
justly numbered among its most representative men 
and public-spirited citizens. 



HENRY J. FAUST. The people of a commonwealth 
cannot be too careful in their selection of men to 
represent them in the assemblies of their state for 
in the hands of these legislators rests the welfare 
of the interests of all classes. The power is vested 
in them to enact laws which will work for weal 
or woe, according to their characters, and to even 
amend the constitution. Fortunately for Montana 
the greater number of its representatives in both 
houses have been men of the highest character and 
standing, whose pride in their state and its develop- 
ment has made them put aside all personal consid- 
eration and work together to further improve con- 
ditions and provide for new questions which are 
bound to arise in any section. One of the men who 
measures up to the highest standards both as a 
state representative and private citizen, and who 
has in his office been of inestimable value to his 
district and state, is Henry J. Faust, a merchant 
of Drummond. 

Henry J. Faust was born in Chisago County, 
Minnesota, March 25, 1867, a son of Elias P. Faust, 
born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, near the 
border, in 1828, who died in Chisago County, Min- 
nesota, in 1885. He remained in his native land 
until he was twenty-six years of age, during which 
time he gave his country the obligatory military 
service, and then in 1854 left it for the United 
States. After landing in this country, he came 
direct to Chisago County, Minnesota, and there took 
up a homestead of 160 acres of land and became 
a successful farmer. In time he added to his orig- 
inal farm until he owned 330 acres of valuable land 
and died on his property. From the time he secured 
his papers of citizenship he was a republican, and 
was elected on his party ticket assessor of Chisago 
Township, Chisago County, for fifteen successive 
terms, his sterling integrity being universally ad- 
mitted. He was also elected road supervisor, and 
was otherwise prominent. In addition to all these 
activities he was popular as an auctioneer, and his 
services as such were claimed whenever any sales 
of importance were held for miles around. The 
Lutheran Church had in 'him a faithful member. 
Like so many of his fellow countrymen, Elias P. 
Faust was not backward in giving his adopted coun- 
try the benefit of his former military training and 
was a soldier in the Union army from 1863 until 
the close of the war between the North and the 
South. He married Christina Johnson, who was 
born in Sweden in 1830, and she died in Chisago 
County, Minnesota, in 1902. Their children were 
as follows : Lou, who died unmarried at Ovando, 
Montana ; Mabel C., who married Charles A. Jak- 
ways, a retired rancher of Missoula, Montana ; and 
Henry J., whose name heads this review, who at- 
' tained to maturity, and nine who died in infancy. 

Henry J. Faust attended the rural schools of his 
native county, and the high school at Marine Mills 
on the St. Croix, Minnesota. Following this for 
two years he was a student of Gustavus Adolphus 
College at St. Peter, Minnesota, and completed his 
studies with a business course at the Anoka Business 
College of Anoka, Minnesota, from which he was 
graduated in 1885. Although he passed the exam- 
ination for teachers and received a certificate 
entitling him to teach school, he never made use 
of it, preferring a business career. 

The first connection Mr. Faust had with mer- 
cantile life was as a clerk in a store at Lindstrom, 
Minnesota, where he also served as assistant post- 
master, and he continued this association for three 
years. In 1890 he came to Montana and for the 
first six months was a clerk for Weinstein & Com- 



132 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



pany, merchants of Philipsburg. At the expiration 
of that period he was sent to Drummond, then 
barely beginning its existence, as check clerk and 
relief agent for the Northern Pacific Railroad and 
held that position for two years. In the meanwhile 
he e was forming connections and building up an 
acquaintance, and when he formed a partnership 
with C. A. Jakways, his brother-in-law, and estab- 
lished the firm of Jakways & Faust, general mer- 
chants of Ovando, Montana, he found these of con- 
siderable value. The firm, founded in 1892, con- 
tinued as a partnership until 1904 when the business 
was incorporated as the Blackfoot Commercial Com- 
pany, with Messrs. Faust and Jakways and E. C. 
Johnson as stockholders and officials. The company 
branched out so as to include the handling of real 
estate and this became so important that the com- 
pany sold the mercantile interests, but still operate 
extensively in realty. Mr. Faust still holds his 
interest in this concern. 

In the meanwhile Mr. Faust was appointed post- 
master of Ovando, and served for ten consecutive 
years as such, and for twelve years was United 
States commissioner, rendering the Federal Govern- 
ment a faithful and efficient service in both offices. 

In August, 1915, Mr. Faust came to Drummond 
and purchased the interests of the Featherman Mer- 
cantile Company, associating with him in his new 
venture Charles M. Bassett, renaming the concern 
the Faust-Bassett Company, which caption it still 
retains. This is the leading department store of 
Drummond and Granite County, and is conveniently 
located on the corner of Main and Broad streets. 

A stalwart republican, Mr. Faust has long been 
a leader in his party, and was elected on its ticket 
as a representative to the lower house of the State 
Assembly from Powell County in 1902, and again 
in 1918, from Granite. In the last session he served 
on the Highways, Education, State Institutions, 
Public Health, Libraries, Trades and Commerce, 
Horticultural and Equal Suffrage committees, and 
introduced and had passed the bill allowing extracts 
for culinary purposes to be sold in Montana. In 
every way possible he served his constituents and 
made a record that will be a valuable campaign 
document if he cares to continue in public life. 

Mr. Faust belongs to Ruby Lodge No. 36, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is senior 
warden; Hope Chapter, No. 10, Royal Arch 
Masons of Philipsburg; Ivanhoe Commandery, 
Knights Templar of Deer Lodge; Hellgate Lodge 
No. 383, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of 
Missoula; and George Thomas Camp, Sons of 
Veterans, of Deer Lodge. He is president of the 
Drummond Commercial Club and has been very 
active in its work and is a booster for Greater 
Drummond. In addition to his other interests he 
is president of the Drummond Light & Power Com- 
pany, a director in the Drummond State Bank, owns 
a modern residence in Drummond, his store build- 
ing which is the largest structure in the city, and 
520 acres of valuable ranch' land in the Blackfoot 
Valley. 

Mr. Faust's son, Marvin Dwight, who was born 
in 1902 at Ovando, Montana, was graduated from 
the Mount Vernon High School at Mount Vernon, 
Washington in the spring of 1919, at that time being 
honored by being made salutatorian of his class. 
This young man who is exhibiting considerable bril- 
liancy, is now a student in the University of Mich- 
igan at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

FRANK H. LE SAGE. As the largest city of Mon- 
tana Butte offers exceptional opportunities to aggres- 
sive business men in almost everv line of endeavor, 



and one of them who is taking advantage of these 
openings is Frank H. Le Sage, president and manager 
of the National Supply Company. He was born 
at Eagle Harbor, Michigan, on June 9, 1882, a son 
of Joseph Le Sage, now residing at No.' 1010 Nevada 
Avenue, Butte. 

Joseph Le Sage was born at Eagle River, Mich- 
igan, on June 8, 1863, and was there reared, edu- 
cated and married. His parents were pioneers of 
this region, having come from the East. The fam- 
ily is of French-Ge.man descent, representatives of 
it coming to the Michigan settlement. After work- 
ing in the saw-mill of Eagle River for a time Joseph 
Le Sage moved to Eagle Harbor, Michigan, con- 
tinuing his connection with the saw-mill industry. 
In 1885 he came to Montana, and was one of the 
pioneer miners of this region, and is still engaged 
in this occupation, being now mining engineer for 
the Anaconda Copper Mining Company. In politics 
he is a democrat, but he has never cared to enter 
public life. The Roman Catholic Church hold? 
his membership. 

The maiden name of the wife of Joseph Le Sage 
was Barbara Otis, and she was born in Germany 
on March 12, 1863, and was brought to the United 
States in 1864 by her parents, Frank and Gertrude 
Otis. Frank Otis was born in Germany in 1834, and 
died at Butte, Montana, in 1904, his widow surviv- 
ing him and making her home at Butte. In 1864 
Frank Otis located at Eagle Harbor, Michigan, 
where his daughter Mrs. Le Sage was reared and 
married, and there he conducted a brewery. In 
1883 Mr. Otis came to Butte, Montana, and con- . 
tinued to work as a miner until his death. Joseph 
Le Sage and his wife have the following children : 
Frank H., who is the oldest; May, who married 
William Turner, pumpman for the Anaconda 
Copper Mining Company, resides at No. 1210 East 
Galena Street, Butte; William, who is a miner for 
the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, resides with 
his parents ; Hattie, who married Walter Dedrick, 
lives at San Diego, California ; Charles, who is a 
carpenter for the Anaconda Copper Mining Com- 
pany, lives with his parents ; and Frances, who is a 
telephone operator, resides with her parents. The 
sixth child, Joseph, died at Butte when eighteen 
years old. 

Frank H. Le Sage attended the public schools 
of Butte and the Butte Business College, from 
which he was graduated in 1912. In the meanwhile, 
when only fifteen years old, he began working for 
the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, but two 
years later left it for the Butte Electric Company, 
now the Montana Power Company. Starting in as 
an oiler, through steady application and hard work 
he rose to be engineer and still later to be chief 
electrician at the station. After ten years with 
that company he connected himself with the Butte 
Electric Supply Company as foreman, remaining 
with it from 1909 to 1914. In the latter year Mr. Le 
Sage organized the National Electric Company and 
incorporated it, and handles everything in electrical 
goods. The offices and store are at No. 204 West 
Park Street. From somewhat small beginnings Mr. 
Le Sage has built up one of the largest concerns of 
its kind in Western Montana. The officials of the 
company are as follows : Frank H. Le Sage, pres- . 
ident and manager; and Mrs. Frank H. Le Sage, 
secretary and treasurer. 

In his political views Mr. Le Sage finds the 
principles of the democratic party "in accordance with 
his ideas in national matters, but when it comes to 
local affairs he usually votes independently. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to Butte Lodge No. 240, Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He owns 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



133 



his modern residence at No. 938 California Avenue 
and other real estate at Butte. 

In 1907 Mr. Le Sage was married at Butte to 
Miss Edna Haney, born at Creston, Iowa, a daugh- 
ter of Charles D. Haney, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1846, and died at Butte in 1904. After 
being reared and educated in Pennsylvania, and 
shortly after attaining his majority, Mr. Haney went 
to Creston, Iowa, where he was married, and where 
he became foreman at the freight house of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. In 1904 
he came West to Butte, where his death occurred. 
He was a democrat and a member of the Congre- 
gational Church, and was a very religious man and 
active supporter of the church. His fraternal rela- 
tions were those connected with his membership 
with the Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America 
and Woodmen of the World. He married Martha 
Rusk, who was born in New York State in 1864, 
and she survives him and lives at Los Angeles, 
California. The children born to Charles D. Haney 
and wife were as follows : Frank D., who is with 
the Northern Pacific Railroad, lives at Billings, Mon- 
tana; Mrs. Le Sage; Erla, who married James P. 
Hennessy, lives at Los Angeles, California; and 
Robert D., who died at the' age of twelve years. 
Mrs. Le Sage was educated at the public schools 
of Creston, Iowa, and went through the sophomore 
year of the high school course, when she entered the 
Creston Conservatory of Music, from which she 
was graduated in 1904, and is a skilled instrumental 
musician. Coming to Butte, Montana, in 1904 with 
her parents, she taught music to private pupils 
until her marriage. She is now very often called 
upt n to use her talents at public concerts and special 
entertainments. An active member of the Methodist 
E'.piscopal Church, she oftentimes officiates at the 
organ and donates her services in musical affairs 
connected with the church. Mr. and Mrs. Le Sage 
have one son, Frank D., who was born on Septem- 
ber 28, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Le Sage are the center 
of a very congenial social circle, and Mrs. Le Sage 
occupies a high position among the musical people 
of Butte. As a business man Mr. Le Sage's ca- 
pabilities are unquestioned and his prosperity is the 
result of his own efforts and farsightedness. 

HENRY B. GIBSON. During the past twenty years 
the court proceedings of the Tenth Judicial District 
of Montana have been recorded by Henry B. Gib- 
son, official court reporter. In this long period he 
has witnessed and placed on record hundreds of 
trials, many of which have been history-making in 
their character. Few men are better known among 
the members of the legal profession and the judi- 
ciary, and his accurate, painstaking and expeditious 
labors have been commented upon frequently in_ a 
complimentary way by men high up in the councils 
of the state. 

Mr. Gibson was born at Creston, Ogle County, 
Illinois. December 8, 1870, a son of Emery Menzo 
and Henrietta (Buss) Gibson, being the second 
of three sons born to his parents. His father 
was born in New York State, January 25, 1846, and 
as a mere lad went to Creston, Illinois, where he 
met and married Miss Buss, who had been born 
in England, May 5, 1850. When he was a lad 
of but sixteen years Emery M. Gibson had run 
away from home and his widowed mother and 
enlisted in the Union army, fighting with the One 
Hundred and Fifth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, under Generals Thomas and Sherman, in 
all the skirmishes and battles of his command. 
At the close of the war he was given his honor- 
able discharge and returned to Ogle County, where 



he was variously employed until elected county 
treasurer, a position which he retained for several 
terms. In 1896 he went overland to California 
and located in San Diego County, where he engaged 
in the apiary business, and continued therein for 
twenty years. Eventually he went to Utah, where 
he is at this time engaged in coal mining. He is 
a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and 
in politics is a stanch republican. The death of Mrs. 
Gibson occurred in 1896. 

Henry B. Gibson attended the public schools of 
Ogle County, Illinois, and after learning stenog- 
raphy, at the age of fifteen years, secured employ- 
ment with H. H. Cardell, a lawyer at Perry, Iowa. 
Later he went to Des Moines, Iowa, where he 
worked for the Green Bay Lumber Company, and 
subsequently was employed by the same concern 
in their office at Rhinelander, Wisconsin. In 1890 
Mr. Gibson came to Helena, Montana, where he 
entered the offices of the Northern Pacific Railway 
as stenographer in the transportation department, 
but was subsequently transferred to the telegraphers 
and general ticket agent's office. Upon leaving the 
employ of the Northern Pacific he was employed 
for about one year in the office of Atty. Gen. 
Henry J. Haskell, following which for about six 
months he was employed by the First National 
Bank of Helena. When he left the employ of that 
institution he returned to the Northern Pacific 
as telegraph operator and assistant ticket agent, and 
remained in those capacities until 1899. In Sep- 
tember of that year Mr. Gibson was appointed 
court reporter for the Tenth Judicial District, lo- 
cated at that time at Fort Benton. In December, 
1900, when the court was changed to Lewistown, 
Mr. Gibson took up his residence here and has 
continued in the same capacity to the present time. 
He is a member of Lewistown Lodge No. 37, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and Lewistown 
Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. He is a republican in his political senti- 
ments. 

On December 14, 1898, Mr. Gibson was married 
to Miss Fredericka Nord, who was born in Canada, 
and to this union there have been born five children, 
of whom four are living : Dudley B., who while 
attending high school volunteered in the Students' 
Army Training Camp in October, 1918, and was 
honorably discharged in December, 1918; Evelyn 
and Edward Nord. twins, attending high school; 
and Emery Menzo, also a high school student. 

SAMUEL C. WEAVER. Lewistown experienced the 
loss of one of its best and most aggressive citizens 
in an automobile accident that instantly killed Samuel 
C. Weaver, head of the Judith Automobile Company 
and a popular and prominent business man. 

Mr. Weaver, whose death occurred while driving 
his car between Judith Gap and Harlowton on 
February 7, 1919, had been a resident of Montana 
for over a quarter of a century. He was born at 
Myrtle Creek in Douglas County, Oregon, February 
ii, 1873, son of James B. and Sarah Ann (Wright) 
Weaver, the former a native of Tennessee and the 
latter of Missouri. His father was an early settler 
in Missouri, went overland to California in 1850, 
and from there moved to Douglas County, Oregon, 
where he married and where he spent most of his 
remaining years as a hotel man, merchant and 
farmer. He died in 1906, at the age of seventy-two, 
and his wife died in 1882. 

Samuel C. Weaver acquired his education in the 
public schools of Oregon and was eighteen years 
of age when in 1891 he came to Montana and began 
riding the range. He was a cowboy four or five 



134 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



years, and then engaged in the liquor business at 
Lewistown and from that took up real estate and 
latterly engaged in the automobile business under 
the title Judith Automobile Company, with a garage 
in Lewistown. He was also interested in a number 
of other local business affairs. 

Mr. Weaver was popular, not only in social but 
in business circles. His reputation as a man of 
his word was universally recognized and he con- 
ducted his affairs on a broad gauge plan which com- 
manded the respect and admiration of all with 
whom he came in contact. Small or petty ways in 
business fte could not tolerate, and he was a strong 
believer in the maxim of "live and let live." He 
held his business and personal honor on a high 
plane with the natural resulting consequence that 
his associates always felt that they could bank on 
him at any time. 

In the words of one of the local newspapers : 
"Sam Weaver was one of the best known and best 
liked men in Fergus County. He was a keen sports- 
man and for many years had been prominent in the 
state trap shooting tournaments." He was affiliated 
with Lewistown Lodge No. 456, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and in politics was inde- 
pendent. Two of his brothers live at Lewistown, 
James A. Weaver, deputy game warden, and Edward 
Weaver. Another brother, William, lives at 
Geraldine and George lives at Chinook. 

March u, 1896, Mr. Weaver married Myrta E. 
Duncan. She was born in Caldwell County, Mis- 
souri, a daughter of William and Refugio (Slone) 
Duncan, both natives of Missouri. Mrs. Weaver 
was the younger of two children. 

O. G. KASSNER. It has been truly said that there 
is no royal road to fortune, but that each man must 
advance step by step along the highway of life. 
Some retard their advancement by resting too long 
by the way; others seek to discover treasure in 
bypaths,' but the one who keeps straight ahead, 
never shirking work or avoiding responsibilities, is 
the one who reaches the goal and has the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that his success is his own and 
that he does not owe it to any assistance rendered 
him. The City of Laurel has as one of its lead- 
ing merchants a man who has become one of the 
leaders in his special line not only for this but 
other cities in the state, and has won a deserved 
place among the substantial citizens of his county. 
This man is Otto G. Kassner, grocer and hard- 
ware merchant, member of the Laurel Commercial 
Club and one of the most alert boosters for the 
city. Like so many of the successes in business 
life in our western cities, Mr. Kassner is a young 
man, being in the very prime of life, but he is 
experienced and sagacious in handling the problems 
of his trade and those of the municipality. 

Otto C. Kassner was born in Blue Earth, Fari- 
bault County, Minnesota, April n, 1880, a son of 
Edward Kassner, born in Germany in 1839, and 
died at Blue Earth, Minnesota, in 1886. He was 
reared, educated and married in Germany, his wife, 
also a native of Germany, bearing the maiden name 
of Pauline Shimmel. Entering the German army, 
he gave his country the compulsory military serv- 
ice, and upon his return from the army resumed 
his farming which it had interrupted. In 1875 he 
brought his family to the United States, and com- 
ing to Minnesota secured land at Blue Earth and 
wrested a farm from nature amid pioneer condi- 
tions and privations. A lover of liberty and free- 
dom, the republican party's platforms offered him 
a materialization of his ideals, and from the time 
he was naturalized until his death he voted its ticket. 



His wife was born in 1844 and survives him, and 
makes her home at Sauk Rapids, Benton County, 
Minnesota. Their children were as follows: Emma, 
who married Albert Matthews, a general workman, 
resides at Minneapolis, Minnesota; Pauline, who 
married Gus Matthews, now deceased, is the owner 
of a large farm, but lives at Blue Earth, Minne- 
sota; Matilda, who married Albert Buegler, an ex- 
tensive farm owner, resides on their farm at Sauk 
Rapids, Minnesota; Otto G., who name heads this 
review ; Helen, who married Henry Levnau, died 
at Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in 1912, but he sur- 
vives and is now baggagemaster on the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad at Minneapolis, 
Minnesota ; and Lilly, who married Arthur Kelem, 
a barber, resides at Grand Forks, North Dakota. 

Otto G. Kassner attended the grammar and high 
schools of Blue Earth, Minnesota, and then became 
a student of the St. Cloud, Minnesota, Business 
College, completing his course in that institution 
in 1897. Following that he entered a clothing store 
at Blue Earth as a clerk, where for five years he 
was thoroughly grounded in practical salesmanship, 
using his experience to secure him a better posi- 
tion in a similiar establishment at Appleton, Min- 
nesota. He then went to Macoun, Saskatchewan, 
Canada, and spent three years there in a general 
store. 

Returning to the United States, Mr. Kassner in 
1912 bought an interest in the general store known 
as the Funk-Wold Company of Laurel, the name 
being then changed to the Wold-Kassner Company, 
but he severed his connection with it January 13, 
1916, and established himself in a hardware and 
grocery business on Main Street. Between then and 
April, 1919, his business expanded to such an ex- 
tent that he was obliged to buy a large building 
to house it, his new establishment being also on 
Main Street. This building is 30 by 130 feet, and 
he also owns a large warehouse in the vicinity of 
his store and a residence which he occupies. His 
knowledge of selling methods, and his desirable 
connections, which enable him to buy to advan- 
tage, have resulted in his building up a fine trade 
and establishing him as one of the most influential 
merchants in this part of Montana. 

In 1904 Mr. Kassner was married at Mankato, 
Minnesota, to Miss Tinna Sonnek, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Sonnek, the latter of whom 
died in the spring of 1919, although the former 
survives and lives at Minnesota Lake, Minnesota, 
being now a retired farmer, but formerly very 
active as a pioneer agriculturalist of Minnesota. Mr. 
and Mrs. Kassner have three children, namely : 
Kermit, who was born May 7, 1906 ; Donald, who 
was born in 1908; and Willard, who was born in 
1912. 

Mr. Kassner belongs to the Roman Catholic 
Church, and to Billings Council No. 1259, Knights 
of Columbus, of which he is a third degree knight. 
From the time it was organized he has been very 
active in the Commercial Club of Laurel, and he 
also belongs to the Billings Midland Empire Club. 
Having found his opportunity at Laurel, Mr. Kass- 
ner has great faith in Montana, and is anxious to 
educate others in the possibilities of this state, and 
especially of Laurel and its vicinity. He believes 
that the West is the place for the young man, and 
that each year will bring more of those who de- 
velop into worthwhile citizens to Laurel and other 
Montana cities, and through them and their efforts 
will additional capital be brought for investment 
in local enterprises. 

A stanch republican, Mr. Kassner has always 
supported the principles for which its best element 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



135 



has always stood, and he is a great admirer of the 
late Colonel Roosevelt. 

GEORGE W. YOUNG, D. D. S. Among the lessons 
which war conditions are emphasizing is the im- 
portance of sound teeth. This is not a lesson which 
ought to be new in our country, unless the proverb 
as to the honor of prophets in their own country 
applies; for American dentists have occupied the 
front rank throughout the world for many years. 
But the significance of teeth and diseases incident 
to them has only comparatively recently been real- 
ized by science. It is, however, realized now, and 
no competent diagnostician overlooks this fertile 
source of disordered health. A practical rule for 
all to follow is to have the teeth examined period- 
ically and make sure that no obscure focus of in- 
fection exists. In wartime the drastic standards of 
health demanded by military efficiency required the 
most careful supervision of the teeth, and the scien- 
tific dentist has become a recognized adjunct of mil- 
itary organization. This should carry weight with 
the civil population, for health in peace is worth 
considering. War must not have all our efficiency. 
Good teeth are an essential of gopd health. In 
man's constant warfare against disease the dentist 
fights in the front trenches. One of the skilled men 
of this learned calling who is engaged in the general 
practice of his profession in Granite County, is Dr. 
George W. Young, of Philipsburg. 

Doctor Young was born in County Middlesex, 
Ontario, Canada, September 23, 1860, a son of 
George Young, who was born in County Limerick, 
Ireland, in 1822, and died on his farm in County 
Middlesex, Ontario, Canada, in 1897. He left Ire- 
land with his parents in 1823, his father Charles 
Young having been commissioned to survey the 
La Chene Canal, but died of pneumonia contracted 
while making this survey, in 1827, and George 
Young was taken by his namesake uncle and reared, 
they living in the vicinity of Ottawa, Canada, until 
the lad was sixteen years old. He then began work- 
ing at the trade of a carpenter, and followed it at 
London, Hamilton, Kingston and Woodstock, Can- 
ada, and built the market at London, Canada. After 
his marriage, he located on a farm he had bought 
in County Middlesex, Canada, and there he rounded 
out 'his useful life. He was a conservative in poli- 
tics, and firm in his support of its policies. The 
Church of England held his membership. The 
maiden name of his wife was Catherine Bateman, 
and she was born in Caradoc Township, Middlesex 
County, Ontario, Canada, in 1827, and died in 
Middlesex in 1894. Their children were as follows : 
Mary E., who died in Middlesex, in 1898; Charles 
H., who is a horse dealer of Glencoe, Ontario, Can- 
ada; Doctor Young, whose name heads this review; 
Harriet Hester, who married S. E. Bowler, a farmer 
of Salmon, Idaho; Thomas H., who is manager of 
the Scales Work of Toledo, Ohio; J. L., who is 
a dentist of New York City; John B., who came to 
Montana in 1891, died on his ranch at Belt, Mon- 
tana ; and Catherine E., who married K. E. Parson, 
a hardware merchant of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. 

After being graduated from the rural schools of 
his native county, and the Strathroy High School 
of the same county, completing his courses in the 
latter in 1880, George W. Young taught the school 
which he first attended, for a year. In 1883 he came 
to the United States, and after spending a short 
time at Chicago, Illinois, traveled through twenty- 
seven states being engaged at carpenter work. He 
then returned to County Middlesex, but in 1889 
came back to the United States, and after a short 
stay at Great Falls, Montana, was in Helena for 



two years, where he studied dentistry and worked 
at his trade. Doctor Young then engaged in a prac- 
tice with his brother, J. L. Young at Granite, Mon- 
tana, for a year, when he moved to Philipsburg, 
and since December 15, 1891, has been engaged in 
practice here, being the pioneer of his profession 
at the county seat, now living today. His dental 
parlors are in the Sayrs Block. Doctor Young is 
a democrat and served as a member of the city 
council. He belongs to Granite Camp No. 323, 
Woodmen of the World at Philipsburg; Court Al- 
gonquin No. 3369, Independent Order of Foresters 
of Philipsburg; and to the Philipsburg Commercial 
Club. He owns a modern residence on the corner 
of Sutter and California streets. 

On May 26, 1892, Doctor Young was married 
to Miss Martha Paradise, at Granite, Montana. 
She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Moses Para- 
dise, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. Paradise 
was a wagonmaker at Elizabethtown, New York. 
Mrs. Young died in 1911, leaving two children, 
namely: Catherine, who is at home; and Glenn, who 
served during the great war as a marine, and was 
in the service for seventeen months. In 1915 Doctor 
Young was married to Miss Lucy Paradise, his 
sister-in-law, the ceremony being performed at 
Butte, Montana. They have no children. 

ROBERT H. RAINS. As the largest mining center 
of the world, Butte naturally attracts to it men of 
the highest caliber, whose inclinations and abilities 
have led them to take a constructive interest in 
those activities founded upon mental production or 
business lines which are the outgrowth of such 
production. One of the alert, dependable and enter- 
prising young men of this city is Robert H. Rains, 
president of the Rains Metallic Packing Company, 
who has not only gained an enviable position in his 
specr'al line, but has a bright future before him and 
is laying extensive plans for a much larger expan- 
sion than he has hitherto effected. 

Robert H. Rains was born at Silver Cliff, Colorado, 
on March 12, 1885, a son of W. H. Rains, who was 
born in July, 1857, at Queensland, Ohio. The Rains 
family was founded in this country during its colonial 
epoch, representatives of it coming from Scotland 
and England to Massachusetts at a very early day. 
Henry E. Rains, grandfather of Robert H. Rains, 
was born in New Jersey in 1809, and he moved to 
Ohio in young manhood and became active as the 
owner of large saw-mill and flour-mill interests. 
His death occurred in Ohio in 1893. On his moth- 
er's side of the house Robert H. Rains traces back 
to the same family tree as former president of the 
United States John Quincy Adams. 

Until he was eighteen years of age W. H. Rains 
lived in Ohio and attended its public schools, but 
at that time he came West to Leadville, Colorado, 
and became manager of a mine. In 1878 he moved 
to Silver Cliff, that same state, still operating as a 
mine manager. His efforts proved very successful 
and at one time he was worth $500,000, but the de- 
cline in the value of silver stock reduced his fortune 
so as to practically wipe out all his profits. Always 
a supporter of the republican party, he was elected 
on its ticket as a member of the City Council of 
West Cliff, Colorado, which is located one mile from 
Silver Cliff, but he is now living in the latter, city. 
W. H. Rains was married to Cynthia Jennie Adams, 
born at Sedan, Kansas, in 1862, and they became 
the parents of the following children : Robert H., 
whose name heads this review ; Henry E., who was 
a stationary engineer at Cripple Creek, Colorado, 
died of the influenza in 1919 ; Celia Ann, who mar- 
ried Morey E. Jones of Aurora, Illinois ; Leaf a, 



136 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



who died on July 12, 1899, aged four years; Leta, 
who was graduated from the Cripple Creek High 
School, lives with her parents; and Sidney H., who 
is in the moving picture show business at Cripple 
Creek, Colorado. 

Robert H. Rains was educated in the public 
schools of West Cliff, Colorado, and the Canyon 
City High School, until he was sixteen years old, 
when he left school to begin work as a stationary 
engineer at Cripple Creek, Colorado, where he re- 
mained until 1007, when he came to Butte. He is 
the inventor of a metallic piston ring packing for 
machinery, specially designed for use in pumps, 
hoists, compressors and all steam machinery. This 
invention has a nine-year record of successful opera- 
tion in Cripple Creek, where it was used in mining 
machinery. In order to manufacture it Mr. Rains 
incorporated his company at Butte in October, 1919, 
and it is backed by Montana capital. The officers 
of the company are as follows : Robert H. Rains, 
president ; Judge Sydney Sanner, vice president ; 
Elmer O. Binder, secretary; and Daniel Rafferty, 
treasurer. This company was formed for the pur- 
pose of putting Mr. Rains' invention on the world's 
market, and Judge Sanner is the legal adviser and 
business director, and is assisted in this work by 
his partner J. L. Templeton. Mechanical experts 
say that this is the best appliance ever devised for 
the purposes for which it is used. With the excep- 
tion of one concern, Mr. Rains' invention is now 
used by all of the large mining companies of Mon- 
tana. Judge Sanner's offices are at No. 402 Miner 
Building, Butte, and Mr. Rains' office and residence 
are at No. 317 South Dakota Street, Butte. Mr. 
Rains is a republican. He belongs to the Woodmen 
of the World. 

In addition to his Butte company, Mr. Rains is 
promoting a mining company at Corbin, Montana, 
to develop five claims he owns just east of the old 
Alta Works. 

On December 30, 1918, Mr. Rains was united in 
marriage with Miss Annie E. Lohrer at Helena, 
Montana. She is a daughter of Albert and Holda 
(Birkley) Lohrer, of Corbin, Montana, pioneers 
of the state. Mrs. Rains was graduated from the 
Jefferson County High School at Boulder, Montana. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rains have one daughter, Cecelia, who 
was born on December 16, 1919. 

DANIEL RAFFERTY, treasurer of the Rains Metallic 
Packing Company of Butte, is one of the men of 
Montana who is proving that success is the fruition 
of intelligent effort and indomitable persistence in 
the pursuit of ideals. Of course before there can 
be accomplishment there must be vision, and after 
that, long, hard work. He comes from the land 
of high ideals, enthusiasm and willingness to work, 
for he was born in County Armagh, Ireland, on 
March 9, 1881. 

The father of Daniel Rafferty .was also Daniel, 
and his birth occurred in the same place as that of 
his son, during the year 1836, and he died there 
in 1896, having been a farmer all his life. He was 
a consistent member of the Roman Catholic Church. 
His widow, who survives him and lives in County 
Armagh, was born there in 1844, and bore the 
maiden name of Mary Brawley. Their children 
were as follows : Katherine, who is the widow of 
James Robinson, an officer of the Irish Constabulary 
stationed at Belfast, Ireland, lives at Dublin, Ire- 
land ; John, who lives at Monaghan, Ireland, is an 
insurance agent; Sarah, who is a graduate nurse, 
served as such for the British Government during 
the great war in France, was seriously wounded and 
now lives at Edinburgh, Scotland; William, who 



was employed in the tube manufacturing works 
at Coatbridge, Scotland, died there in 1908; Daniel, 
whose name heads this review ; James, who lives 
at Darby, Pennsylvania, has been in the employ of 
the Baldwin Locomotive Works for the past fifteen 
years ; Minnie, who is unmarried* is a dressmaker 
of Clonas, North of Ireland ; Bridget, who is un- 
married, lives with her mother ; and two who died 
young. The paternal grandfather was John Rafferty, 
and he was born, reared, married and spent his 
entire life in County Armagh, where he was engaged 
in farming. The maternal grandfather was John 
Brawley, and he was born in County Armagh in 
1813, and died there in 1893, having been a farmer 
of that region all of his life. On both sides of the 
house Daniel Rafferty's ancestors were County 
Armagh people for many generations. 

Daniel Rafferty attended the parochial schools of 
his native county until he was seventeen years old, 
at which time he left Ireland for Liverpool, England, 
and spent eight months in a cabinet-making estab- 
lishment of that city. From there he traveled on 
into Scotland and worked at Glasgow and Lenox- 
shire for about six years, during which period he 
was connected with the iron and steel industry. 
Mr. Rafferty then went to Greenock, Scotland, and 
spent three months in a large shipbuilding plant, 
when he became motorman for the electric street 
car company and held that position for eighteen 
months. Returning to Ireland, he paid his old 
home a visit, and then went to Liverpool, England, 
and embarked from there for the United States, 
landing in New York City. 

For the first year after his arrival in this country 
Mr. Rafferty was employed in the Baldwin Locomo- 
tive Works of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and then 
for four months he was in the employ of the 
Philadelphia Traction Company. His next employ- 
ers were Gimbles Brothers, and he remained with 
them for six months. Mr. Rafferty then came to 
Montana and arrived at Butte on July 3, 1909, and 
from then on has operated in and about Butte, 
leasing a number of mines, generally in partnership 
with J. L. Templeton, and has become very success- 
ful. Since April 19, 1919, he has been piston expert 
for the Rains Metallic Packing Company, and he 
also holds the offices of treasurer and director 
of this corporation. In politics Mr. Rafferty is a 
republican. He belongs to the Roman Catholic 
Church. Unmarried, he makes his home at No. 507 
North Main Street. A man of courage and initiative, 
Mr. Rafferty has steadily advanced until he is today 
one of the leading men in his special line, and is 
also recognized as a mine operator of considerable 
importance. 

HARRY L. FITTON. Haying served his fourth 
term as city clerk of Lewistown, Harry L. Fitton 
is now a partner in the Lewistown Marble & Granite 
Works. He is an expert accountant, a man of 
thorough training and experience, having formerly 
been an educator, and is a citizen whose public 
spirit leads him to make ready response to whole- 
hearted co-operation with every movement affecting 
the welfare of his home city. 

Mr. Fitton was born on his father's farm in 
Dane County, Wisconsin, April 15, 1887, a son of 
James H. and Elizabeth G. (Broderick) Fitton. 
His parents were both natives of Dane County, 
Wisconsin, the county seat of which is the City of 
Madison. His father was born October 16, 1855, 
and his mother August 21, 1858. They were mar- 
ried November 7, 1884, and of their three children 
Harry is the oldest. His sister Valeria E., died 
October 26, 1918, wife of Herbert Gorman, and the 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



137 



younger sister is Velma V. James H. Fitton has 
long been a prominent farmer, stock raiser and 
dairyman in Southern Wisconsin, making. a specialty 
of Shorthorn cattle. He has served as chairman 
of his township board, is a democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Congregational Church. 

Harry L. Fitton acquired a good education in 
local and high schools and took special courses 
in the University of Wisconsin. He taught his 
first term of school at the age of seventeen and at 
nineteen was made principal of the schools of 
Mount Horeb, Wisconsin. He filled that office 
creditably for four years and in the spring of 1910 
left Wisconsin and came to Lewistown, Montana. 
Here he took charge of the books for the Depart- 
ment Store of Charles Lehman & Company at 
Lewistown, serving until August 3, 1912. On the 
5th of August of that year he was appointed city 
clerk under John L. Marshall, mayor, and has served 
continuously by reappointments in May, 1913, 1915 
and 1917. During the war Mr. Fitton was untiring 
in doing what he could in behalf of the soldiers 
and war auxiliary movements, especially the Red 
Cross. He filled out many papers for soldiers free 
of charge. His wife has been prominent in Red 
Cross work, being now county superintendent of 
a department of that great organization, and holds 
a badge of honor for over 800 hours of work. 
Mr. Fitton is a democrat in politics, and is exalted 
ruler of Lewistown Lodge No. 456, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. In Masonry he is 
affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 37, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and is now serving his 
third term as secretary of the Lodge. He is a 
member of Hiram Chapter No. 15, Royal Arch 
Masons ; Lewistown Commandery No. 14, Knights 
Templar; Algeria Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Helena; and he and his wife are both members 
of Marie Chapter No. 36, of the Eastern Star. 

Mr. Fitton married Miss Adella F. Schantz. She 
was born at Villisca, Iowa, daughter of Carl J. 
and Christine (Holmes) Schantz. Her parents are 
natives of Sweden and both are still living, her 
father being a farmer in Page County, Iowa. He 
is a republican and a member of the Swedish 
Lutheran Church. Mrs. Fitton is the fourth in a 
family of nine children, all of whom are still living. 

RUFUS B. THOMPSON. When in the high tide of 
his activities Rufus B. Thompson was one of the 
monarchs of the sheep industry of Montana. His 
flocks numbered thousands and thousands of head, 
and grazed over uncounted hills and valleys. He 
was also well known as a banker of Lewistown, 
where he lived for a number of years and where 
his death occurred December 6, 1914- 

He was of old New England ancestry and was 
born at Colchester, Vermont, June 16, 1857, a son 
of Samuel and Marion (Buell) Thompson. His 
parents were both natives of Vermont. He was 
the second of three sons. His father was a Ver- 
mont farmer, voted as a whig and republican and 
was a devout member of the Methodist Church. 

Rufus B. Thompson spent his early life on his 
father's rugged New England farm, and alternated 
with the work of home by attending school in winter 
sessions until he was about twenty-one years of age. 
He then came West, .the first stage of his journey 
taking him to St. Paul, Minnesota. From there he 
proceeded by stage to Bismarck, Dakota Territory, 
and thence by steamer up the Missouri River to 
Fort Benton. He first saw Montana about forty 
years ago, when nearly all the territory .was still 
in a pioneer condition. From Fort Benton after 
some time he went overland by ox and horse team 



to the Judith Basin, and was one of the first settlers 
on Willow Creek south of the Snow Mountains, 
where he took up Government land and began the 
sheep industry. He saw his flocks expand and in- 
crease and his business grow until he frequently 
had from 15,000 to 20,000 head on range at one 
time. In 1896 he established a feeding station for 
sheep at Seward, Nebraska, and also owned a home 
at York in that state. In 1906 he bought _ a fine 
home in Lewistown, and spent the rest of his days 
in that city. He sold his last interests as a sheep 
man in November, 1914, only a few weeks before 
his death. 

Mr. Thompson was a man of sturdy integrity and 
could not be moved from the strict path of hon- 
orable personal dealings by any inducement. In 
fact this was one of his dominant characteristics. 
He believed that all men should live up to their 
contracts to the fullest, no matter how the financial 
outcome resulted. In the conduct of his extensive 
business interests he took a broad view, and his 
dealings were always characterized by a strict sense 
of justice to all parties concerned. He never would 
enter into a business arrangement with any one 
unless convinced that both sides to the deal would 
participate in the financial returns, and was always 
inclined to lean towards the side of generosity in 
all of his business arrangements. 

He was also a man of leadership in public affairs 
and twice represented his district in the State Legis- 
lature. He was also a member of the School Board 
several terms. Mr. Thompson was one of the 
organizers of the Empire Bank & Trust Company 
of Lewistown, and when the organization was com- 
pleted on March 30, 1907, he was elected first 
president and filled that office until January 16, 
1909. He was affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 
37, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Hiram 
Chapter No. 14, Royal Arch Masons, Lewistown 
Commandery No. 15, Knights Templar, and Algeria 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Helena. Politically 
he was a republican. 

Mr. Thompson married Miss Imogene Jacobs, a 
native of Dane County, Wisconsin, and a daughter 
of George and Katherine Almira (Warren) Jacobs. 
Her mother was a native of Vermont. Her father, 
who was born in Germany, came to this country 
when seventeen years of age by sailing ship to New 
York, and thence came west to Iowa, whence he 
became a farmer and where he spent his last years. 
He was a whig in early life and later a republican. 
Mrs. Thompson was the fourth in a large family 
of thirteen children, eight of whom are still living. 
Her own children number three, the first, Jesse Fay, 
dying in infancy. Marion A. is the wife of Frank 
Ottman, living on the old Thompson homestead, 
and they have two daughters. Rufus B., Jr., married 
Susie Martin and has one daughter. 

LAWRENCE S. STEVENS, M. D. The medical pro- 
fession made a record during the late war that 
will not soon be forgotten. Countless numbers of 
the profession left well established connections to 
enlist in the service of their Government when they 
had every excuse that could be tendered for re- 
maining at home. Their work was of the utmost 
importance, not only at the front, but in the train- 
ing camps, where through their skill and experienced 
knowledge the embryo soldier was prepared for the 
titanic struggle before him by making him fit physi- 
cally as well as strategically. The members of this 
learned profession who made the sacrifice of their 
material welfare to serve their country will not 
be forgotten by their fellow citizens, but in the 
years to come will be pointed out as men who placed 



138 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



their patriotism above the dollar mark, and to whom 
the fine physical condition of the country's soldiers 
is largely due. One of these loyal physicians and 
soldiers worthy of special mention in a work of 
this high class is Dr. Lawrence S. Stevens of Laurel, 
Montana. 

Doctor Stevens was born in Cedar County, Mis- 
souri, October 29, 1881, a son of Dr. B. F. Stevens 
and grandson of Lawrence Stevens, the latter born 
in Indiana in 1812, and belonging to an old and 
honored family in this country, the original emi- 
grant coming from England to Virginia prior to 
the American Revolution. Lawrence Stevens be- 
came a pioneer farmer of Appanoose County, Iowa, 
where he died in 1888. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Fletcher, and she, too, was born in Indiana. 

Dr. B. F. Stevens was born in Indiana in 1837, 
and he died in Cedar County, Missouri, May :, 
1882. He was reared in Iowa, but moved to Mis- 
souri in young manhood, after having been gradu- 
ated from the Medical College of Keokuk, Iowa, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. During 
the Civil war he enlisted in the service, during 
1864, and was sent against the Indians in Nebraska. 
Politically he was a democrat. For many years 
he was well known as a Mason. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Emma Akin, was born 
in Kentucky in 1853, and she died in Polk County, 
Missouri, in 1888. Their children were as follows : 
Frank, who is a rural mail carrier, resides at 
Quincy, Missouri ; Locie, who married W. E. 
Vaughn, a ranchman, resides near Judith Gap, Mon- 
tana; and Dr. Lawrence S. 

After attending the rural schools of Missouri and 
the academy of Lowery City, Missouri, Lawrence 
S. Stevens in 1900 went to Western Canada and 
for the subsequent six years was engaged in deal- 
ing in real estate, but in that year matriculated in 
the medical department of the Universiy of Kan- 
sas City, Missouri, from which he was graduated 
in 1910 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, 
and that same year located at Fort Stockton, Texas, 
where for four years he was engaged in a general 
practice. In 1914 he came to Montana and until 
September, 1916, was in practice at Bridger, that 
state, leaving it for Laurel. In July, 1918. Doctor 
Stevens entered the United States service and was 
sent to the Medical Officers Training Camp at Fort 
Riley, Kansas, in the meanwhile being commis- 
sioned first lieutenant in June, 1918. He was as- 
signed to the Sixteenth Sanitary Train of the Six- 
teenth Division at Camp Kearny, California, com- 
manding Ambulance Company Two Hundred and 
Sixty-three. He was mustered out March 26, 1919, 
and returned to Laurel to resume his practice. His 
offices are in the McCauley Spencer Building on 
Main Street. Doctor Stevens is local surgeon for 
the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. During 
1918 Doctor Stevens was president of the Montana 
State Health Officers Association, and he belongs 
to the Yellowstone County Medical Society, the 
Montana State Medical Society, the American Medi- 
cal Association and is active in all of these organi- 
zations. Fraternally he belongs to Bridger Lodge, 
Ancient Free & Accepted Masons, and Bridger 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is 
very active in the Laurel Commercial Club. Politi- 
cally he is an independent democrat. 

In 1909 Doctor Stevens was united in marriage at 
Fall City, Nebraska, to Miss Matilda H. Hill, born 
in Iowa, who attended the Clinton High School of 
Clinton, Iowa, and who is a graduate registered 
nurse. Doctor and Mrs. Stevens have the following 
children : Iva Constance, who was born December 
29, 1910 ; Donna Mae, who was born January 3, 



1912; and Virginia, who was born September 9, 
1916. An experienced medical man, Doctor Stevens 
enjoys a wide-spread popularity, and is recognized 
as one of the most efficient men in his profession. 
Personally he has a large following, winning and 
holding friends through those characteristics which 
make for the highest standard of American citizen- 
ship. 

WILBER I. POWER, M. D., physician and surgeon 
and vice president of the First State Bank of 
Philipsburg, is one of the best known men of Gran- 
ite County. He was born at Farmington, Oakland 
County, Michigan, September I?, 1860, a son of 
Thomas H. Power, and grandson of Jared Power, 
who was born in Chautauqua County, New York, 
in 1806, and died in Oakland County, Michigan. 
The Powers trace their ancestry back to William 
the Conqueror, and came from England to the 
American Colonies long before the Revolution. 

Thomas H. Power was born near Farmington, 
Michigan, in 1830, and he died at Pontiac, Michigan, 
in 1902. He spent his whole life in Oakland County, 
and his mature years as a farmer. A republican 
of the old school, he was elected on his party ticket 
to several of the township offices, and was very 
prominent in his community. He married Lydia 
B. Stockwell, who was born in Redford Township, 
Oakland County, Michigan, died at Pontiac, Mich- 
igan, in 1884. Their children were as follows : 
Charles S., who is an oil operator, lives near Ossa- 
watomie, Kansas ; Walter J., who is a retired 
farmer, lives at Pontiac, Michigan ; Doctor Power, 
whose name heads this review ; Harry, who died 
at the age of fourteen years ; Frank, who died at 
the age of eighteen years; and Louis, who is an 
overseer for Henry W. Ford, lives at Detroit, Mich- 
igan. After the death of his first wife, Thomas 
H. Power was married to Flora Perkins, who was 
born at Birmingham, Michigan, died at Owosso, 
Michigan, in 1919. They had one son, Frank, who 
lives at Pontiac, Michigan, where he is working as 
an automobile mechanic. 

Wilber I. Power attended the rural schools of 
Oakland County, and the Pontiac, Michigan, High 
School, and then became a student of the State 
Agricultural College at Lansing, Michigan, from 
which he was graduated in 1885. In the meanwhile 
he earned sufficient money for his courses by teach- 
ing school in Oakland County and at Grand Rapids, 
Michigan, and was graduated from the Detroit Col- 
lege of Medicine in 1889, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. While at the Agricultural College 
he was a member of the Greek Letter Fraternity 
Delta Tau Delta. For the subsequent year Doctor 
Power was at St. Mary's Hospital at Detroit, Mich- 
igan, and then in 1890 he came West to Granite, 
Montana, where he was engaged in a general prac- 
tice for two years. He then located permanently 
at Philipsburg, building up here a fine medical and 
surgical practice and has the distinction of being the 
pioneer in his profession in this city. He took a 
post graduate course in the New York City Post 
Graduate School in 1899, specializing on general 
medicine. Doctor Power has his offices in the Doe- 
McLeod Building on Broadway. Like his father, 
a republican, Doctor Power has served as coroner 
of Granite County for two terms and is now county 
physician, and city health commissioner for Philips- 
burg. For one term he was mayor of Philipsburg. 
and was the candidate of his party for state senator, 
but on account of the overwhelming democratic 
majority in this district, was defeated, although be- 
cause of his personal popularity he ran way ahead 
of his ticket, in one election losing by only two 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



139 



votes, and the second time he ran, by five. He be- 
longs to Flint Creek Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, of which he is past master, hav- 
ing served his lodge as master two terms ; Hope 
Chapter No. 10, Royal Arch Masons, which he 
served as high priest for three terms; Pearl Chap- 
ter No. 14, Order of Eastern Star, of which he 
is past patron; Granite Camp, Woodmen of the 
World; Lincoln Homestead No. 559, Brotherhood 
of American Yeomen. Both as a private citizen 
and as chairman of the Granite County Chapter 
of the Red Cross, Doctor Power took a very active 
part in the war work, and in the Red Cross drives 
put Granite County over the top. Although not a 
member, he is serving the Philipsburg Presbyterian 
Church as a trustee. He is vice president and a 
director of the First State Bank of Philipsburg, and 
has been interested in the mining industry for many 
\-ears, and has been very successful in his ventures 
in this line. Doctor Power owns a modern res- 
idence at Philipsburg, where he maintains his home. 
In 1892 Doctor Power was married at Granite, 
Montana, to Miss Mary Williams, a step-daughter 
of Thomas Trevaille once postmaster of Granite, 
Montana, but now deceased. Mrs. Power died at 
Philipsburg in 1897 without issue. In 1898 Doctor 
Power was married second to Mrs. Marietta (Stock- 
well) Sewell, a daughter of Alva and Phoebe 
(Smead) Stockwell. Alva Stockwell was a com- 
mission merchant, who died at Paola, Kansas, but 
Mrs. Stockwell survives and lives at Paola. Doctor 
and Mrs. Power have no children, but Mrs. Power 
has a son by her first marriage, namely: H. F. 
Sewell, who is an attorney of Conrad, Montana. 
Doctor Power is one of the most representative men 
of this part of Montana, and is ranked among the 
eminent* practitioners of his profession. 

CHARLES E. O'NEILL. The law is known as a 
stern mistress, demanding of her devotees constant 
and unremitting attention and leading her followers 
through many mazes and intricacies before she 
grants them success at her hands. This incessant de- 
votion frequently precludes the idea of the success- 
ful lawyer indulging in activities outside of the 
straight path of his profession, especially if his voca- 
tional duties are of large and important nature. 
Then again, some men have been led into the prac- 
tice of the law through their connection with some 
other interests which necessitated a knowledge of 
the law along certain lines, and when this knowledge 
was gained, a desire was awakened to study still fur- 
ther and make the profession a life work. 'This lat- 
ter was the case of Charles E. O'Neill, one of the 
successful attorneys of Butte, who became a lawyer 
through his initial studies with reference to bank- 
ing law. 

Charles E. O'Neill was born at Marshall, Missouri, 
on February 22, 1889, a son of William P. O'Neill. 
The latter was born in Canada in 1860, and is now 
residing at Miles City, Montana. While still a child 
he was brought to Missouri by his parents, and 
there he was reared, educated and married, and 
became a farmer of Marshall, Missouri. In 1907 
he came to Montana and has since been a resident 
of Miles City, having extensive farming interests in 
its vicinity. He is a republican in politics and a 
Roman Catholc in religious faith. William P. 
O'NeiJl married Julia Devaney, born in Missouri in 
1865, a daughter of John Devaney, born in Ireland 
in 1814. His wife was also born in Ireland and they 
were married in Missouri, where both died, he in 
1000 and she in 1901. They were farming people. 
The children born to William P. O'Neill and his wife 
were as follows: Stella, who married Dr. F P 



Mahon of St. Louis, Missouri, a dental surgeon- 
Charles E., who was second in order of birth; Ray 
Francis, who is a railroad employe of St. Louis 
Missouri; and Florence, who married George Ach- 
maker, formerly an importer of New York City 
but now a resident of St. Louis, Missouri. 

Charles E. O'Neill was reared at St. Louis and 
attended its schools, and in 1906 came to Miles City, 
Montana, and spent a year on a ranch in its vicinity.' 
He then took a commercial course at the Butte 
Business College, specializing in stenography and 
bookkeeping, and in August, 1907, entered the Butte 
Commercial Bank, with which he learned the bank- 
ing business, remaining with that concern until 
January i, 1909, when he entered the First National 
Bank of Butte and continued with it until January 
I, 1919, a period of ten years. During this time he 
became thoroughly posted with reference to bank- 
ing of all kinds and banking law, and was admitted 
to the bar on June 11, 1919. He at once entered 
upon a general practice, and his offices are at Nos 
71-72 Owsley Building. Mr. O'Neill is independent 
m his political views. He belongs to the Roman 
Catholic Church. Fraternally he is connected with 
B "tte Council No. 668, Knights of Columbus, in 
which he has been made a third degree knight, and 
the Knights and Ladies of Security. At one time 
he belonged to the Butte Country Club. 

In 1911 Mr. O'Neill was married at Butte to Miss 
Kathryn C. Sullivan, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs 
John J. Sullivan, both of whom are deceased, he 
having been a miner of Butte and a member of the 
police force, and came to the city during its pioneer 
epoch. Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill have three children, 
namely : Edalene Frances, who was born on Novem- 
ber 6, 1913 ; Helen, who was born January 22, 1915 
and Jack Charles, who was born on November 8 
1916. Although one of the recent additions to his 
profession, Mr. O'Neill has already proved his abil- 
ity and is looked upon as one who will rise high 
in it, for he possesses the characteristics necessary 
for such advancement, being bold, independent and 
fearless, scorning petty tricks, fighting in the open 
for what he believes to be right. A man of sound 
judgment who weighs carefully both sides, he is 
certain of rendering impartial justice. 

HAROLD C. TILZEY, serving his fourth term as 
county surveyor of Fergus County, has been a 
resident of Montana nearly seventeen years and is 
a civil engineer of long and thorough practical 
experience and training. 

He was born on his father's homestead in Osborne 
County, Kansas, June 10, 1881, the oldest of the 
five children of Samuel and Minnie M. (Pitt) 
Tilzey. His father was born in England December 
31, 1854, and came when a child with his parents 
to America, making the journey by sailing ship and 
landing m New Y*ork. From there the family 
went West to Iowa, where they were pioneers, 
and subsequently were identified with the pioneer 
settlement of Kansas. Samuel Tilzey grew to man- 
hood in Kansas, engaged in farming in Osborne 
County for a number of years, and later became 
a buyer and shipper of cattle and hogs to the Omaha 
market. He was a republican in politics. His 
wife was born in Iowa September 28, 1861, and they 
were married in Kansas. 

Harold C. Tilzey grew up in Northern Kansas 
and Southern Nebraska, and attended grammar and 
high schools at Geneva in the latter state. He 
has a military record, having enlisted when eighteen 
years old, September 20, 1809, in Company F of the 
Thirty-Ninth Regiment of United States Volunteers. 
He enlisted for a period of two years and was 



140 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



sent to the Philippines under command of Col. 
Robert L. Bullard. He was made corppral of Com- 
pany F and served a little more than a year, being 
given his honorable discharge October 13, 1900. 
After his return Mr. Tilzey went to work in a 
hardware store at Geneva, and in 1902 came to 
Lewistown, Montana, and joined the Civil Engineer- 
ing Department of the Montana Railway Company. 
In the fall of 1904 he went to California and was 
in the Civil Engineering Department of the Western 
Pacific Railway Company for one year. On return- 
ing to Montana he was employed on the survey of 
the transcontinental line of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul, and his duties on that great trunk 
line required his time until the spring of 1908. He 
then took up the private practice of civil engineer- 
ing at Moore in Fergus County, and in November 
of the same year was elected for his first term 
of county surveyor of Fergus County. He was 
re-elected in 1910 and then followed an interval 
in which he was again engaged in private practice. 
He was again elected county surveyor in 1916, and 
by re-election in 1918 is serving his fourth term. 
He is now serving as secretary and treasurer of 
the Montana Society of County Surveyors. He 
is affiliated with Lewistown Lodge No. 456, Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks, is a member 
of the Judith Club and Chamber of Commerce 
at Lewistown and in politics is a republican. 

June 8, 1907, he married Anna M. Toomey, a 
native of Nebraska. Their five children are Kath- 
erine, Harold C, Jr., Dorothea M., Anna Beatrice 
and Effa M. 

GRANT ROBINSON, postmaster at Lewistown, is a 
thorough Westerner, a native of California, and 
has been a miner and rancher, public official, and 
actively identified with the various affairs of Mon- 
tana nearly thirty years. 

He was born in Humboldt County, California, 
September 14, 1865, a son of William S. and Electa 
Lavina (Albee) Robinson. His father was born in 
Virginia in 1827 and died in 1905, was reared and 
educated in his native state, and in 1850. went to 
the California gold fields. After some experience 
as a miner he turned his attention to farming and 
stock raising and lived in California the rest of 
his life: During the war he was a Union democrat. 
He was affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. His wife was born in Michigan and 
died in 1918, at the age of seventy-two. They had 
eleven children, four sons and seven daughters, 
nine still living, and Grant Robinson was the second 
in age. 

Grant Robinson acquired his education in the pub- 
lic schools of California and worked as a ranch 
hand during his early manhood. Coming to Mon- 
tana in 1891 he located in Fergus County, and on 
May 12, 1897, was united in marriage to Ethel 
Culver, a native of Iowa. Her parents, George and 
Caroline Culver, came to Montana in 1891, settling 
on East Fork, near Lewistown. Mr. and Mrs. 
Robinson have one son, William Culver Robinson, 
who was born in 1906. 

In 1901 Mr. Robinson bought a ranch on East 
Fork and operated it until 1908, in which year he 
was elected county treasurer and by reelection served 
four years. Mr. Robinson received his appointment 
as postmaster of Lewistown on May 20, 1913, and 
b> reappointment in 1917 is in charge of the office 
for a second term. He is a member of Lewistown 
Lodge No. 37, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Lewistown Commandery No. 14, Knights Templar, 
and Algeria Temple of Helena, Montana. He is also 



a member of Lewistown Lodge No. 456, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. , 

BENJAMIN LINCOLN PRICE. One of the convinc- 
ing young attorneys of Yellowstone County, Montana, 
who possesses a distinct impulse toward the hu- 
manities among the leaders of thought, and has 
always been an inspiration for activities of the best 
sort, is engaged in the general practice of his pro- 
fession at Laurel. He is a man not readily deceived 
in men or misled in measures, and is therefore an 
ideal person for public preferment, which fact his 
fellow citizens have recognized, for they placed him 
in the executive chair of their city government. Mr. 
Price was born in Wabash County, Illinois, July 12, 
1882, and for a man of his years has achieved much. 
His paternal grandfather, William Price, born in 
Delaware in 1825, sought better opportunities for 
expansion by turning his face westward, as did his 
grandson some years later, and located at an early 
day in its history in Wabash County, Illinois, where 
he spent the remainder of his life, dying there in 
1897, having in the interval passed through some 
trying experiences as a pioneer of that region. 
After coming to Illinois he was married, the first 
name of his excellent wife being Melissa. 

One of the sons of William and Melissa Price 
was Benjamin F. Price, born in Wabash County, 
Illinois, in 1852, and he became the father of Ben- 
jamin Lincoln Price, whose name heads this review. 
Benjamin F. Price was engaged in farming in 
Wabash County, Illinois, for many years, but is now 
living retired at Mount Carmel, Illinois. In politics 
he is a republican, and during 1900 was one of the 
census enumerators for his community. The Chris- 
tian Church holds his membership and is a bene- 
ficiary of his generosity. Mr. Price is well known 
as a Mason. He was married to Olive Angeline 
Duty, born in Wabash County, Illinois, in 1858, and 
they became the parents of the following children: 
Flora B., who died at the age of two years ; Harmon 
E., who is a physician and surgeon of Stockton, 
California, is a graduate of the Eclectic Medical 
Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio; Benjamin Lincoln, 
who was third in order of birth; Emma, who mar- 
ried Clyde Lester, an oil operator, resides at Allen- 
dale, Illinois ; Alfred M., who is a resident of Laurel, 
Montana, is now serving in the Army of Occupation 
at Luxemburg; Pearl, who married E. H. Dicks6n, 
a farmer, resides at Laurel, Montana ; William F., 
who is a farmer, resides at Laurel, Montana ; John 
D., who is in the radio branch of service in the 
United States Navy ; Olive, who is in the surgeon 
general's office at Washington, District of Colum- 
bia; and Virgil, who is in the United States Navy. 

Benjamin Lincoln Price after attending the rural 
schools of Wabash County, Illinois, attended the 
university at Valparaiso, Indiana, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Law. 
Appreciating the opening offered the alert young 
man in the West, Mr. Price came to Montana, and 
in the fall of 1908 established himself at Laurel, 
where he has since remained. Having been brought 
up in a home dominated by republican sentiments, 
he naturally affiliated himself with that party, and 
by his associates was placed on its ticket for mayor 
of Laurel in 1917, and elected by a gratifying ma- 
jority. He served as chief executive of the city 
during 1917 and 1918 and gave his municipality . 
a clean and businesslike administration. As a mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club of Laurel he takes 
part in the movements to better and advance the 
city, while professionally he belongs to the county 
and state bar associations. Laurel Lodge, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, has in him one of its 






HISTORY OF MONTANA 



141 



most enthusiastic members. Mr. Price owns con- 
siderable property at Laurel and in Yellowstone 
County, including a comfortable modern residence 
on Sixth Avenue, and the building in which his 
office and a newspaper and bindery plant are lo- 
cated at Laurel, and a ranch of 600 acres of valuable 
land outside the city. 

On January 6, 1909, Mr. Price was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Ibbie J. Fearheiley, at Mount Car- 
mel, Illinois. Mrs. Price is a daughter of Jacob 
and Anna (Aborn) Fearheiley, residents of Mount 
Carmel, Illinois, Mr. Fearheiley .being a farmer. 
Mr. and Mrs. Price have three children, as follows : 
Lois E., who was born April 26, 1912; Byron L., 
who was born July 10, 1915; and Harold, who was 
born December 20, 1918. Mr. Price is a man who 
possesses those qualities which are conspicuous in 
the characters of the best citizens, and in his pro- 
fession is admittedly one of the leading attorneys 
of Yellowstone County. 

LAWRENCE HAUCK. There are two lines of indus- 
try in any community of sufficient size to command 
outside attention, which exert an influence not easy 
to over-estimate, banking and the issuance of a 
newspaper. Through the medium of the first the 
stability and continuance of all business is assured, 
and the latter gives expression to the prevailing 
sentiment with reference to affairs both foreign 
and domestic, and bears an important part in shap- 
ing public opinion upon vital matters. When both 
these lines of such paramount importance are rep- 
resented by one man, his value to his fellow citizens 
is a recognized asset, and his stand on" any question 
is taken as authoritative. Lawrence Hauck, pres- 
ident of the First State Bank of Philipsburg,' and 
editor and proprietor of the Mail, the oldest journal 
of this region, fully measures up to the standards 
above set forth, and is one of the most representa- 
tive citizens of his part of the state. 

Lawrence Hauck was born at Schweinfurt, Ger- 
many, December 22, 1867, a son of John and Lena 
(Koetzner) Hauck, also natives of the same place, 
the family having been located in that part of Ger- 
many for many generations. John Hauck was em- 
ployed by the Imperial Government as roadmaster. 
Of his four children, Lawrence Hauck was the sec- 
ond in order of birth. 

Until he was fifteen years old Lawrence Hauck 
remained at home and attended the schools of his 
native city. On August i, 1883, he took passage 
for the United States, and upon his arrival in this 
country made his way direct to Montana. Although 
but a lad in years, he had been taught habits of in- 
dustry and had no difficulty in securing employment 
in a ranch in Deerlodge County, on which he re- 
mained for three years. During that period he 
saved his money, instead of wasting it as did the 
majority of his associates, and when he had a suffi- 
cient amount used it for a course in Deerlodge Col- 
lege, earning what he needed in excess of his sav- 
ings by hard labor during vacations and between 
terms. Having thus acquired, entirely through his 
own, unaided efforts, a thorough training in the 
language and other essentials of his adopted coun- 
try, which extended over three years, Mr. Hauck 
worked for a year as a clerk and salesman for the 
leading green grocer of Philipsburg, L. W. Shodair. 
His experience with this concern enabled him to as- 
sume the duties of bookkeeper for Elling & Buford, 
general merchants of Virginia City, Montana, which 
he continued to discharge for three years. Mr. 
Hauck then returned to Philipsburg as head book- 
keeper for the Freyschlag, Huffman and Company, 
proprietors of a large general merchandising con- 



cern, of which he also became a stockholder. Until 
this company discontinued business in 1894, Mr. 
Hauck remained in his responsible position, and at 
that time went with the First National Bank of 
Philipsburg, and was one of its efficient employes. 
This bank then liquidated, and Mr. Hauck purchased 
an interest in The Mail, his associates at that time 
being the Bryan brothers, but subsequently Mr. 
Hauck became the sole proprietor. Always a strong 
republican, Mr. Hauck took so aggressive a part in 
local affairs that he was the logical candidate for 
city treasurer and was elected to that office in Au- 
gust, 1899, by a gratifying majority, and held it for 
one term. During that same year he was appointed 
postmaster of Philipsburg and was reappointed, 
holding the office for eighteen years and giving to 
the people of Philipsburg an efficient and -satisfactory 
administration. For about twelve years he served 
as chairman of the county central committee of his 
party and led it to many a notable victory. His fra- 
ternal connections are with the Masonic order, he 
being a member of Flint Creek Lodge No. n, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons and Hope Chapter 
No. 10, Royal Arch Masons. 

Another achievement of Mr. Hauck which de- 
serves special mention was his promotion of the 
First State Bank of Philipsburg, and his develop- 
ment of this into one of the sound financial institu- 
tions of the county. The bank was organized in 
1912 with Mr. Hauck as its executive head, and Dr. 
W. I. Power as vice president and in 1918 E. E. 
Springer was appointed cashier. According to the 
last statement of this bank, its capital stock is $25,000 ; 
surplus and undivided profits, $70,000; individual 
deposits subject to checks, $330,000, with total de- 
posits of $560,000. The total resources of the bank 
are over $600,000. The bank is located on the cor- 
ner of Broadway and Sansom Street. 

On August 28, 1893, Mr. Hauck was united in 
marriage with Miss Dora Kroger, a daughter of 
Charles and Anna Kroger of Philipsburg. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hauck have five children, Herman, who was 
born November 18, 1894. He is now associated 
with his father in the publication of The Mail; 
Catherine, attending the University at Missoula; 
Elsie and Dora, attending high school, and John at- 
tending public school. 

As an editor Mr. Hauck has always displayed a 
fearless strength in handling public matters, and 
his reliability and clear, forceful manner of pre- 
senting facts have made his journal the exponent of 
his party and community. Unimpeachable and honor- 
able as he is known to be, his stand upon any ques- 
tion is recognized as the correct one by the better 
class of citizens and few movements of any kind 
are inaugurated before he is consulted. A section 
which has a man of such strength of character in 
it as Mr. Hauck is sure to progress, and much of the 
present civic development of Philipsburg and Gran- 
ite County is due to Mr. Hauck's energy and public 
spirit. 

CHARLES E. BLANKENHORN, M. D. Genius may 
be the motive power of success, but many who take 
the trouble to study the lives and leading character- 
istics of the men of the country who have accom- 
plished something are led 'to believe that experience 
and sound judgment must be combined with natural 
inclination to produce the best results. In the 
majority of cases where a man has risen above 
his fellows it will be found that his rise has come 
gradually through persistent fighting in spite of 
all opposition. There are many qualities which help 
to form the character, such as self-reliance, con- 
scientiousness, energy and honesty, and they all work 



142 



HISTORY OF MONTANA 



together to produce the highest standing and most 
satisfactory rewards. The above is certainly true 
of the career of Dr. Charles E. Blankenhorn, spe- 
cialist at the Murray Hospital of Butte. 

In no other profession is the true character of a 
man brought out so prominently as that of medicine, 
and as he really is, so is he held by his professional 
associates and colleagues. All who have the honor 
of Doctor Blankenhorn's acquaintance admit that he 
is respected, honored and beloved not only by his 
associates, but by those to whom he has long been 
a ministering friend. Although Doctor Blanken- 
horn is still in the very prime of young manhood, 
he has so kept pace with the march of improvement 
and by personal experiment and investigations, as 
well as study and exhaustive reading, that he is 
classed with the most efficient and dependable of 
his profession. He is one of the physicians and sur- 
geons of Montana who went into the service of 
their country when it had need of them, and his 
record as an officer is equal to that he is making 
in times of peace. 

Doctor Blankenhorn was born at L'Anse, Mich- 
igan, on April 3, 1889, a son of Charles Peter 
Blankenhorn, born in 1847. A butcher by trade, 
Charles P. Blankenhorn lived at L'Anse, Michigan, 
and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, dying in the latter city 
in 1909. During the war between the states he 
served in the Union army, and Doctor Blanken- 
horn's action in enlisting during the late war was 
in accordance to his father's teachings and example. 
From the time he cast his first vote Charles P. 
Blankenhorn supported the candidates of the re- 
publican party. For many years the Methodist 
Episcopal Church had in him a faithful and liberal 
member. A Mason, Mr. Blankenhorn rose in his 
fraternity until he was a Knight Templar. He 
married Sarah Sageman, born in 1848, who survives 
him and lives at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Their 
children were as follows : Alice, who married L. 
B. Armstrong, a traveling sales manager, lives at 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; Harry, who died at the age 
of fourteen years; Rose, who lives with her mother; 
Louise, who died in Milwaukee February 2, 1920; 
and Dr. Charles E. 

Doctor Blankenhorn was graduated from the 
grammar and high schools of L'Anse, Michigan, 
completing his courses in the latter in 1907. A year 
later he matriculated at the University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was in that institution 
for two years. After tfye death of his father he 
entered the University of Marquette at Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, and was graduated therefrom in 1913, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, and as a 1 
member of the Greek Letter college fraternity Phi 
Rho Sigma. 

From June 30, 1913, until June 13, 1914, Doctor 
Blankenhorn gained valuable experience as an interne 
in the Murray Hospital of Butte, and then entered 
upon a general practice with Dr. George W. Clay 
at Malta, Montana, this association being maintained 
until Doctor Blankenhorn enlisted in July, 1917, for 
service during the great war. He was commissioned 
a first lieutenant and was sent overseas with the 
Sixteenth Ambulance Corps, Second Division, arriv- 
ing in France in February, 1918. In July, 1918, he 
was invalided 'home, and 'was mustered out of the 
service on December 10, 1918. Returning to Mon- 
tana, he became a physician of the Murray Hospital, 
specializing in a genito-urinary practice. He has 
taken post-graduate work at Rochester, New York. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Chicago, Illinois, per- 
fecting himself in the specialty he has selected for 
his practice. 

The residence of Doctor Blankenhorn is at No. 701 



West Granite Street. In political matters he is 
an independent, not being willing to tie himself down 
by party connections. The Methodist Episcopal 
Church affords him a medium for the expression 
of his religious views. He belongs to Malta Lodge 
No. 57, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Malta, Montana ; Helena Consistory of Helena, 
Montana, in which he was made a thirty-second 
degree Mason ; and Algeria Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Helena. His 
professional affiliations are those he maintains with 
the Silver Bow Medical Society. 

In 1914 Doctor Blankenhorn was married a,t 
Helena, Montana, to Miss Grace Jones, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Jones. Mr. Jones is a rancher 
and stockman of Malta, Montana, but Mrs. Jones 
is deceased. Mrs. Blankenhorn was educated at 
the Montana State University at Missoula, Montana, 
and the State University of the State of Washington. 
Doctor and Mrs. Blankenhorn have two children, 
namely : June, who was born on June 4, 1916 : and 
Charles Edward, who was born on February 14, 
1918. 

Doctor Blankenhorn's strongly marked personal 
characteristics and decided ability have made him 
popular in medical circles, and wherever he is known 
he is held in high esteem. His professional service 
has ever been discharged with a keen sense of con- 
scientious obligation, and his work is bringing him 
ample and very gratifying recompense. 

JEFFERSON H. AKINS. In any developing com- 
munity, whether it be emerging from the wilder- 
ness or being transferred from village, into city 
the changing conditions offer splendid returns for 
foresight and business sagacity. The merchant who 
has the faculty to foresee the strategic commercial 
situation may claim a conquest just as he who 
shrewdly secured advantage in martial strife. It 
was largely through his ability to recognize where 
trade would develop that placed Jefferson H. Akins 
upon the high road to business success and pro- 
minent position, and for the past eighteen years his 
Golden Rule Store has been one of the leading 
establishments of its kind at Lewistown. 

Mr. Akins is a product of the agricultural com- 
munity of Cedar County, Missouri, where he was 
born on his father's farm September 16, 1867, a 
son of John and Mary Jane (Halbert) Akins. His 
father was born in Tennessee in 1835, and died 
at Humansville, Missouri, in 1910, at the age of 
seventy-five years, and his mother, a native of 
Missouri, passed away there in 1914, being seventy- 
six years of age at the time of her demise. They 
were the parents of ten children, of whom nine 
are living, and Jefferson H. was the seventh in 
order of birth. John Akins was still a lad when 
his family decided to remove from Tennessee to 
Missouri, and his boyhood was passed in the latter 
state, where his young manhood experienced the 
scenes and incidents occurring during the troubulous 
days leading up to the final outburst which culmi- 
nated in the great Civil war. As a farmer and 
breeder of stock he passed his industrious and 
useful career, and when he passed away his com- 
munity lost a good citizen. He was first a whip 
in his political views and later a republican, and 
throughout his life was a faithful and liberal mem- 
ber