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Full text of "The Monticola"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

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Alma Mater, while we're with thee oft oppressive thou dost seem; 
But we know that in the future we will sometime sit and dream 
Of the joyous golden spring days on thy campus, 'neath thy trees, 
Where the "campus class" with song or cheer would load each passing 
breeze. 

Here's thy health, old Alma Mater; may thy glory grow forever! 
May the world with its allurements win our hearts from thee ah 

never! 
May thy children and thy honors multiply until the day 
That the broad Monongahela turns and ilows the other wav. 



21040 



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Jllout icoln 



This Humble Volume Was to Have Been 

Dedicated 

to 

POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS,]). D. 

But 

On Second Thought The Board of Editors 

Deemed This Unwise, 

So 

It Was and is Hereby Respectfully 

Dedicated 

to 

DEAE OLD "-PETE" REYNOLDS 

Respected for his wisdom, revered for his goodness 

and loved by all in return for his love. 




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Powell Benton Reynolds. I). I)., was born in Patrick 
Comity, Virginia, on January 9, 1841. lie is the son 01 
James B. and Koxana Reynolds, both deceased. His early 
life was spent in the South and here in 1861 he enlisted in 
the Confederate army. At first he was in Company I), 
5th Kentucky Infantry but he was afterward in Company 
K, 50th Virginia Infantry. He served faithfully during 
those few years of terrible struggle the cause of his native 
state. At the close of the war he was a prisoner of war at 
Point Lookout and was paroled April 9, 1865. 

From 1865 to 1870 he was a student at Richmond 
College. From 1872 to 188-1 he was President of Shelton 
College; from 188-1 to 1885 he was President of Buckner 
College. In 1887 he received the degree of A. M. from 
West Virginia University, and in 1890 the degree of D. D. 
from Richmond College. 

Since 1885 Dr. Reynolds lias been intimately connected 



with the life of West Virginia University, having been 
Professor of English from 1885 until 188!), Professor of 
.Metaphysics from 1889 to 1893, Acting President from 1893 
until 1895, Professor of Metophysies and Political Science 
from 1897 to 1901 and Chaplain and Professor of Economics 
and Sociology since 1901. 

When Doctor George Burman Foster of the University 
of Chicago dedicated his new book on "The Finalty of 
Christianity" "to Powell Benton Reynolds, my first great 
teacher" he, from his position of eminence and authority ex- 
pressed a sentiment that is common anion"' those who hold 
West Virginia University as their Alma .Mater. The at- 
mosphere of Dr. Reynold's class-room is intellectual in the 
highest sense and truly inspiring to "such as hear the truth 
with pleasure" as Josephus says. 

On the compus, at the "fort." in the students' rooms 
everywhere Doctor Reynolds is spoken of with the sincerest 



Itlouticola 



love and reverence of which a warm-hearted young West 
Virginian is capable. 

The good he has done for the West Virginia University 

in his years of service here is great. The good he has done 

iT^c in shaping lives is incalculably greater; for matters pertain- 

jlloiiticol.i 

ing to benefits to a human soul are too vast for our mortal 
estimates. 

Our time as students in the University is short. We 



have more things to accomplish and our work is hurried. 
We will doubtless forget all the rules, formulas and dates 
that we now have on our tongues. We will forget many of 
our class-mates and Professors. But we who with sincere 
hearts have studied under Doctor Reynolds will never forget 
his wise precepts, his perfect example, his merciful grades, 
bis ready smile and his genuine, always evident brotherly 
love. 



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— 10 — 



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For the Term Beginning May 19, 1901. 

C. E. Haworth Huntington 

E. M. Grant Morgantown 

D. C. Gallaher Charleston 

L. J. Williams Lewisburg 

T. P. Jacobs New Martinsville 

For the Term Beginning May !), 1903. 

J. R. Trotter Buckhannon 

C. M. Babb Falls 

J. B. Finley Parkersburg 

P. P. McNeil Wheeling 



— 13 - 



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June 29, Friday Summer School Begins 

August 9, Thursday Summer School Ends 

September 17, Monday Fall Quarter Begins 

September 17, 18, 19, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednes- 
day Entrance Examinations 

September 17, 18, 19, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednes- 
day Matriculation and Registration of Students 

September 19, Wednesday, 8 P. M Fall Convocation 

September 20, Thursday, Recitations of Fall Quarter Begin 

November 29 to December 2 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 14, Friday. . . .Last Recitations of Fall Quarter 

December 17, Monday, to December 19, Wednesday, 

inclusive Final Examinations of Fall Quarter 

December 20, Thursday, to January 3, 1907, 

Quarterly Recess 



190? 

January 3, Thursday (Registration Day) 

Winter Quarter Begins S"h* 

t , r iTT- r< .l- Jtlonticola 

January 3, Thursday, 8 P. M Winter Convocation 

January 4, Friday. . . .First Recitations of Winter Quarter 

February 22, Friday. . . .Washington's Birthday, a Holiday 

March 19, Tuesday. ..Last Recitations of Winter Quarter 

March 20, Wednesday, to March 22, Friday 

Final Examinations of Winter Quarter 

March 22, Friday Winter Quarter Ends 

March 23, Saturday, to March 25, Monday 

Quarterly Recess 

March 26, Tuesday (Registration Day, 

Spring Quarter Begins 

March 26, Tuesday, 8 P. M Spring Convocation 

March 27, Wednesday 

Reeitatkns of Spring Quarter Begin 

May 30, Thursday Memorial Day, a Holiday 

June 11, Tuesday. .. .Last Recitations of Spring Quarter 

June 12, Wednesday, to June 15, Saturday, inclusive 

Final Examinations of Spring Quarter 

June 20, Thursday Commencement 



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Daniel Boardman Purinton, St. George Tucker Brooke. 
James Madison Burns, Thomas Clark Atkeson, 

Alfred Jarrett Hare, Alexander Reid AYliiteliill. 

Waitman Barbe, Frederick Wilson Truscott, 

Powell Henlon Reynolds. Will llazen Bdughton, 

Roberl Allen Armstrong. 




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DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, Ph. D., LL. D., President and 
Professor of Philosophy. President's Bouse. 

A. ]5.. West Virginia University, 1873; A. M., ibid., 1876; Ph. I).. 
University of Nashville, L892; LL. I).. Denison University, 1889. 
Instructor Preparatory Department of West Virginia University, 
1873-9; Professorof Logic, ibid., 1879-81; Professor of Mathematics, 
ibid., 1881-5; Professor of Metaphysics, ibid, 1885-9; Vice-President 
and Acting President, ibid, 1881-82. Instructor in Vocal Music, ibid., 
1873-8!); President Denison University, 1890-1901; present position 
since 1901. Author "Christian Theism." 1889. 



15 - 



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POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS, A. M., 
D. D., Chaplain and Professor of 
Economics and Sociology. 

S7 Grant Avenue. 

A.M., West Virginia University, 1887. 
]).!).. Richmond College, 1800. Student, 
Richmond College, 1866-70. President 
Shelton College, 1 872-84; President. 
Buckner College, l884-.">; Professor of 
English', West Virginia University, 
1855-9; Vice- President and Professor of 
Metaphysics, ibid., 1889-93; Acting 
President, ibid.. 1893-5; Professor of 
Metaphysics and Political Science, ibid., 
I so.v 7: Professor of Philosophy, 1807- 
1901; Acting President . 1901; present 
|iosii ion since 1901. 



ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL, 
A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Chem- 
istry. 107 High Street. 

A.B., Princeton University, 1874; A. M. 
ibid., 180:S-.->; Ph. 1)., Washington and 
Jefferson College, 1887: Graduate stu- 
dent, University of Leipzig and Freiberg 
School of Mines, Germany, 1874-.); Pro- 
fessor of Experimental Science, Univer- 
sity Mound College, 1876-81; Principal 
Linsly Institute, 1881-5; present position 
since 1885. 





ST. GEORGE TUCKER BROOKE, A. M., 
LL. D., Acting Dean of the Col- 
lege of Law and Professor of Com- 
mon and Statute Law. 

128 W'illey Street. 

A.M.. West Virginia University, 1889; 
LL. 1)., Wake Forest College, 1800. Stu- 
dent. University of Virginia Law School, 
1867-9; member bar, Charles Town. W. 
Va.. sine 1869; Professor'of Common and 
Statute Law since 1878; present position 
since 1903. 



16 



ROBERT WILLIAM DOUTHAT, A. M., 
Ph. D., Professor of the Latin 
Language and Literature. 

203 Fife Street. 

A. M., Emory and Henry College, 1874; 
Ph. D., Roanoke College, 1877; Professor 
of Languages, Missouri University 
School of Mines and Metallurgy. 1873-84; 
President Collegiate Institute (New Mex- 
ico), 1884-7; President Collegiate In- 
stitute (Arkansas), 1887-0; Professor of 
Language. Kentucky Military Institute, 
1889-90; President Barboursville College, 
1800-5; Professor of Ancient Languages. 
West Virginia University, 1805-7: pres- 
ent position since 1807. 





SAMUEL B. BROWN, A. B., A. M., 
Professor of Geology and Miner- 
alogy. 640 High Street. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1883; 
A.M.. ibid.. 1880; Graduate student, Na- 
tional Museum, 1884; Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1801; Teacher of Language and 
Mathematics, Martinsburg, W. Va.. 
1883-5; Principal Glenville State Normal 
School. 1885-90; Assistant in Geology, 
West Virginia University. 1890-2; pres- 
ent position since 1S112. 



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THOMAS EDWARD HODGES, A. B., 
A. M., Professor of Physics. 

466 High Street 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1881; 
A. M.. ibid., 1884; Principal Morgantown 
Public Schools. 1881-6; Principal and In- 
structor in Natural Science and Peda- 
gogy. .Marshall College State Normal 
School. 1880-00; Graduate student, Cor- 
nell University, Summer, 1807: present 
position since 1800. 









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17 



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FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY, M. M. 
E., M. E., Professor of Mechanics 
and Applied Mathematics and Su- 
perintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds. L56 Foundry Street. 

B. s.. Worcester, Mass., Polytechnic In- 
stitute, 1887; M. M. E., Corn. -II Univer- 
sity, 1896; M. K.. Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute, L899; Director Mechanical De- 
partment, Washington, D. ('.. High 

Scl I. 1887-90; Superintendent Trades 

School. Concord Juncl ion, .Ma—.. L890-] ; 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Mechanic Arts, West Virginia Univer- 
sity, IS!ll-.'!; Director, Indianapolis, hid.. 
industrial Training and Technical High 
School, L893 5; present position since 
1897. 



JAMES MADISON BURNS, Major U. S. 
Army, Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics and Command- 
ant of Cadets. 22 Willey Street. 

Graduate of Heaver Academy. Entered 
the Union Army in 1801. Served in the 
1st and 2nd West Virginia Volunteers 
until the close of the war. Appointed 
2nd Lient.. 17th U. S. Infantry, and 
served in thai regiment until promoted 
Major in May, 1899. Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics and Command- 
ant of Cadets. Ohio State University, 
1899-1900; present position since 1000. 





ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A. B., A. M. 
Professor of the Latin Language 
and Literature, and Principal of 
the Preparatory School. 

411 High Street. 

A. 1?.. West Virginia University. 1889; 
A. M„ ibid.. 1902. Assistant in Latin 
and Mathematics, Preparatory School. 
West Virginia University. 1889-96; 
Preparatory Professor of Ancient 
Languages and Mathematics, ibid.. 
1896-8; Professor of Latin. 1898-1001? 
Graduate Student. Harvard University, 
1901; present position since 1901. 



CLEMENT ROSS JONES, B. S. C. E., 
M. M. E., Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. 22!) Kirk Alloy. 

]>. S. ('. E., West Virginia University, 
1894; M. M. E., ibid.. 1897; M. M. E., 
Cornell, 1'900. Associate Principal, West 
Virginia College, 1894: Assistant in Me- 
chanical Engineering, West Virginia 
University, 1895-97; Instructor, ibid., 
1897-99; Assistant Professor of Me- 
chanical Engineering, 1899-1901; Special 
Student in shop work, Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute. Summer, 1803; Special 
Student in Experimental Engineering, 
Stevens Institute of Technology, Sum- 
mer, 1897; Member American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers; present position 
since 1901. 





HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN, A. B., 

LL. D.., Professor of the Greek 
Language and Literature. 

070 High Street. 

A. B. 3 Yale University. 1S79: LL. D., 
Bethany College. 1901. Teacher of Latin 
and Greek, llillman Academy. Wilkes- 
barre Pa.. 1879-1881; Principal, ibid., 
1 SS 1 -St; : Teacher in Preparatory School. 
Richmond, Ky.. 1889-1892; Acting Pro- 
lessor of Creek. Central University, 
Richmond, Ky.. 1892-3; Principal of Har- 
rodsburg Academy. Harrodsburg. Ky.. 
1893-96; Professor of the Greek 
Language and Literature. Bethany Col- 
lege, Bethany, W. Va., 189(1-1900; Asso- 
ciate Professor of the Greek Language 
and Literature. West Virginia Univer- 
sity. 1900-01; present position since 1901. 



WILL HAZEN BOUGHTON, B. S. C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

669 Spruce St reel . 

1!. S. (('. E.), University of Michigan; 

1893; ('. E.; ibid.. 1898; Assistant En- 
gineer of .Maintenance id' Way for the ('.. 
C, ('. & St. L. Ky. and Bridge and 
Structural Draughtsman for the Ameri- 
can Bridge Company, the Brown Hoist- 
ing Machinery Company, and others; In- 
structor in Mathematics and Civil En- 
gineering. Denison University. 1894-1902,; 
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, 
ibid.. 1902-03; present position since 
1903. 



*On leave of absence for one year: 
holder of the Smithsonian Institute seal 
at the Zoological Station. Pay of Naples. 




<Tlie 
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RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS, B. S. C. E., 
C. E., Professor of Civil and Min- 
ing Engineering. 

357 Front Street. 

B. s. ('. ]•;.. West Virginia University, 
1895; ('. E.. ibid., 1898. Consulting En- 
gineer, State Board of Agriculture; As- 
sistant in ( i\il and Mining Engineering, 
Wesl Virginia University, L895-7; As- 
sistanl Professor civil and Mining En- 
gineering, L897-1903; present position 
since 1903. 



JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN, A. M., 
Ph. D., Professor of History and 
Political Science. 

276 Walnut Street. 

]'.. S., Southern Indiana Normal College, 
1892; A. 1!.. University of Indiana. 1894; 
A. M., ibid., 1895; Ph. I).. Johns Hopkins 
University, 1 s<)7 : Teacher in Southern 
Indiana Normal School, 1890-92; Assist- 
ant and Fellow, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1895-97; Acting Professor of Amer- 
ican History and Constitutional Law. 
Hamilton College, 1897-98; Lecturer on 
Diplomatic History and International 
Relations, Johns Hopkins University, 
1898-1001; Director, Bureau Historical 
Research, Washington, D. C. 1900-1902; 
Associate Professor of European History. 
1902-0.3; present position since 1003. 





JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, A. B., 
A. M. Professor of Education. 

414 Park Street. 

A. B., University of Nashville, L889; A. 
1!.. Harvard University, 1893; Higher 
Diploma. Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, 1889; A. M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1899; Fellow in Education, 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
1899-1900; Principal Wesl Liberty State 
Normal School. 1893-98; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education, 1001-02; Associate 

Professor of Education, 1902-03; present 
position since 1903. 



20 



ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ, Director of 
Physical Training. 

79 Grant Avenue. 

Leader V. M. C. A. Gymnasium] Indi- 
anapolis, 1802; Student, Mt. Hermon 
School (.Mass.). 1892-96; Special student. 
Oberlin College, 1890-99; Graduate Chau- 
tauqua School of Physical Education, 
1902; Graduate Harvard School of 
Physical Training, 1903; Graduate Coach, 
Oberlin College, 1899; Director Gym- 
nasium and Athletic Coach, Wabash Col- 
lege, 1900-01; Professor of Physical 
Training and Athletic Coach, De Pauw 
University, 1901-02; Director Physical 
Curture and Athletic Coach, University 
of Cincinnati, 1902-04; present position 
since 1904. 





ANDRE BEZIAT DE BORDES, Ph. D., 

Professor of Romance Languages 
and Literatures. 

93 Logan Avenue. 

Honorary Fellow, University of Chicago, 
1898-99; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 
1899; University of Paris (Sorbonne, 
France, Ecole des Chartes. Ecole des 
Hautes Etudes), 1901-1902; Professor of 
the French Language and Literature, 
Peninsular College of Gracia, Barcelona, 
Spain. 1891-92; Assistant in Modern 
Languages, Wesleyan College, Macon, 
Ga., 1S95-96; Professor of Modern 
Languages, ibid.. 1896-99; Professor of 
Romance languages. Kalamazoo College. 
1899-1900; Lecturer in the Romance 
Languages and Literatures, Columbia 
University, 1900-01; Instructor in 
French, University of Michigan, 1902-03; 
present position since 1903. 



jUoiiticoln 



JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON, A. B., M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy and Physio- 
logy. 293 High Street. 

A. B., University of Nashville, 1893; M. 
1)., Johns Hopkins University, 1902. First 
Assistant in Marshall College, 1893-7; 
Principal Huntington High School, 1897- 
8. Instructor in Anatomy and Physio- 
logy, 1902-03; Associate Professor, 1903- 
04; present position since 1904. 




21 



itlonticoln 




JOHN HARRINGTON COX, Ph. B., A. 

M., Professor of English Philology. 
lss Spruce Street. 

Graduate, Illinois state Normal Uni- 
versity, 1891; I'll. I!.. Brown University, 
1897; A. M.. Harvard University, 1900. 
Educational Director, Twenty-Third 
Streei Branch, Y. M. C. A.. New York 
( ity. 1897-9; Graduate student, Harvard 
University, 1899-1901; Professor of the 
English Language and Literature, Uni- 
versity of North Dakota. 1901-02; in- 
structor in English Philology, 1902-03; 
Associate Professor of English Philology, 
1903-04; presenl position since 1904. 



ROSS SPENCE, Director of the School 
of Music and Instructor on 
Stringed Instruments. 

165 High Street. 

Graduate University School <>f Music 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1S!I7: pupil of 
Emanuel W'iitli. Berlin. 1897-1900; 
Member Boston Festival Orchestra, 
1901; Instructor on Stringed Instru- 
ments, 1901-1904; present position since 
10(14. 





WALTER LYNWOOD FLEMING, A. M., 
Ph. D., Professor of History. 

258 McLane Avenue. 

B. S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute (A. 
and M. College), 1896; M. S.. ibid., 1897; 
M. A.. Columbia University, 1901 ; Ph. I).. 
ibid., 1904. Assistant in History, Eng- 
lish and Mathematics, Alabama Poly- 
technic Institute. 1896-97; Librarian, 
ibid., 1897-98, 1899-1900; Instructor in 
History and English, ibid., 1899-1900; 
Fellow in American History, Columbia 
University. 1901-02; Lecturer in History, 

ibid., 1902-03; Associate Professor of 

History, L903-04; present position since 
1904. 



22 



FREDERICK LAWRENCE KORT- 
RIGHT, B. S., D. Sc, Associate 
Professor of Chemistry. 

234 Jackson Avenue. 

B. S.. Cornell University, 1890; D. Sc., 
ibid., 1895. Assistant in Chemistry, ibid., 
1890-1; Chemist, Solvy Process ( ompany, 
1891-2; Assistant in Chemistry, ( ornell 
University, 181)2-3: Instructor in Chem- 
istry, ibid., 1893-9; Graduate student. 
Polytechnicum, Switzerland. 1899-1900; 
and Technische Hochschule, Carlsruhe, 
Germany, 1900; Instructor in Chemistry, 
Cornell University, 1900; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, 1900-1902; present 
position since 1902. 





WAITMAN BARBE, A. M., Litt. D., As- 
sistant to the President and Asso- 
ciate Professor of the English 
Language and Literature. 

258 High Street. 

B. S., West Virginia University, 1884; 
.M. S.. ibid., 1887: A. M., 1897; Litt. 11. 
Denison University, 1004. Regent, West 
Virginia State Normal Schools. 1895- 
1001: Field Agent. West Virginia Uni- 
versity, 1895-8; Graduate student. Har- 
vard University, 1000: present position 
since IS! IS. 



EDWIN MAXEY, D. C. LL. D., Associate 
Professor of Law. 

59 .rones Avenue. 

I'll. I?.. Bucknell University, 189B; LL. 
I!.. Chicago Law School. 18117: LL. M.. 
ibid., 18117: I). ( '. L., Illinois College o 
Law. 1898; Ph. M.. the University of 
Chicago. 1899; LL. I).. Illinois College of 
Law. 1901; M. Dip., Columbian Univer- 
sity, 1903. President of Palatinate Col- 
lege, 1893-94; Lecturer on Constitution- 
al and International Law, Illinois College 
of Law. 1896-99; Dean of Aurora Law 
School, 1898-1900; Dean of Law Depart- 
ment of Southern Universit y. 1900-1901; 
Teaching Fellow in Jurisprudence and 
Constitutional Law. University of Wis- 
consin. 1901-02; Lecturer on Colonial 
Law and Government, Columbian Uni- 
versity, 1002-03; present position since 
1903. 




*>v 




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23 



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EDMUND NEIL, A. B., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Elocution and Oratory. 

373 Spruce Street. 

A. P... McKendree University, 1895; A. 
]!.. Ohio Wesleyan University, 1 s«.)7 ; pri- 
vate pupil of Leland T. Powers, 1895-98 
(Summers), Instructor in Elocution. 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 1895-G; As- 
sistant Professor of Oratory, Ohio Wes- 
leyan School of Oratory. 1896-7; Profes- 
sor of Elocution, Denison University, 
1897-8; Impersonator under the manage- 
ment of the Central Lyceum Bureau 
since L898; Professor of Oratory and 
Elocution, Denison University, 1901-03; 
Assistant Professor of Elocution, 1903- 
i! I : pi esent posil ion since 1 904. 



DENNIS MARTIN 
Principal of 
School. 



WILLIS, LL. B., 

the Commercial 

South Park. 



LL. B.. West Virginia University; In- 
structor Methodist Conference Seminary. 
Buckhannon, 1801-2: Instructor. West 
Virginia Business College, 1892-3; In- 
structor, Northwestern Academy. Clarks- 
burg. 1893-4; Instructor. Central Com- 
mercial College, Cumberland, Md., 1894-5; 
Principal, Western College of Commerce, 
1895; present position since 1895. 





JUSTIN FRANK GRANT, Ph. B., M. D., 
Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
669 Spruce Street. 

Ph. 1?.. Yale University. L898; M. D., 
Johns Hopkins University. 1903. Resident 

Physician and Surgeon, Hahnemann Hos- 
pital. Rochester, X. V.. 1900- 1901: In- 
structor in Anatomy. 19(13-04: present 
position since 1904. 



24 



RY 

UNIVERSITY 



GRACE MARTIN SNEE, B. M., Instruc- 
tor on the Piano and Pipe Organ. 

422 High Street. 

Graduate, Virginia College for Young 
Ladies, 1893; B. M., ibid., 1894. Instruct- 
or in Piano Department, ibid., 1893-4; 
graduate student, Peabody Institute, 
Baltimore 1895-6; Assistant on the 
Piano, West Virginia University, 1897- 
1901; present position since 1901. 





EVA EMMA HUBBARD, Instructor in 
Drawing and Painting. 

Spruce Street. 

Graduate, Morgantown Female Semin- 
ary, 1870. Student in Mrs. I. P. Wilk- 
inson's studio, Wheeling, 1881-2; Instruc- 
tor in Drawing and Painting. Wheeling 
Female College, 1883-4; Student in Carl 
Becker Art School, New York City, 
1884-5; Instructor in Fine Arts. Moun- 
tain Lake Park Summer Chautauqua, 
1885-8; private studio. Wheeling, 1881-2; 
Instructor in Drawing and Painting. 
Wheeling Female Hart's School for 
Young Ladies, 1894-7: present position 
since 1897. 



ALEXANDER STEWART THOMPSON, 
Instructor in Voice. South Park. 

Springfield, Mass., Conservatory of 
Music, 1875-79; Private Studio. Albany, 
X. Y.. 1879-84; Director of .Music, Sara- 
toga Springs, X. V.. Public Schools. 1884- 
87: Student of Voice, William Courtney, 
New York City. 1887; Private Studio. 
Qtica, X. V.. 1887-90; Student of Piano, 
Kelso and Sherwood, 1890; Director of 
Music. Kansas State Normal, 1890-91; 
Norfolk, Va„ Ladies College. 1891-92: 
Student, Guildhall School of Music (Sims 
Reeves), London. Eng., and Dr. W. E. 
Gladstone, Royal College of Music. Lon- 
don, Eng., 1892-93; Oneida Conservatory 
of Music and Utiea School of Music, 
Utica, X. Y., 1893-97; Director of Music. 
Lincoln, 111., College, 1897-1903; Director 
of Music, Lombard College, 1903-4; pres- 
ent position since 1904. 




jlloul icoln 



35 



311 o nl r c oln 





WALTER KIRK BRAINERD, B. S., In- 
structor in Dairying. 

307 University Driveway. 

I!. S.. Michigan Agricultural College. 
1899; Graduate student, ibid., 1899-1900, 
and Tnlane University-, 1902-03; Enstruc- 
tor in Breeds of Live stock and Dairying, 
Baron de Hirscri School, Woodbine, \. 

.1.. 1901-02; Instructor in Br Is of Live 

Stock. Stock Feeding and Stock Breed- 
ing, Leland University, New Oilcans. La., 
1902-03; |>rcM'iit position since L903. 



SIMEON CONANT SMITH, A. B., A. M., 
Instructor in Rhetoric and Assist- 
ant in English in the Preparatory 
School. 




THOMAS CARSKADON JOHNSON, B. 
S., Agr., A. M., Instructor in Bot- 
any and Assistant Horticulturist. 
37^ Spruce Street. 

15. S. Agr., West Virginia University, 
1896; A. M., ibid., 1900; Instructor in 
Science. Lee Military Academy. 1896-9; 
Fellow and Graduate Student. Wesl Vir- 
ginia University, 1899-1901; Acting Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture. University of 
Missouri, L901-2; Fellow in Horticulture. 
Cornell University, 1902-3; present posi- 
tion since 1 !>().'!. 



26 



DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A. B., A. M., 

Assistant in English. 

37o Spruce Street. 

A. 1!.. Marietta College, 1896; A. M., 
West Virginia University, 19G3; [Instruc- 
tor in Latin and Sciences. Parkersburg 
High School. 1896-7; Instructor in Ger- 
man and Latin. Marietta Academy. 
1SD7-S: Instructor in English, Parkers- 
burg Hic.li Scl 1. 1898-1902; present po- 
sition since 1902. 





ELIZABETH LEE WHITESCARVER, 
Assistant in Shorthand and Type- 
writing. 156 W'illey Street. 

Student in Commercial School. West Vir- 
ginia University, 1895-7; present position 
since 1897. 



MABEL CONSTANCE FOSTER, Assist- 
ant in Harmony, Theory, Musical 
History, Sight Reading, Ear Train- 
ing, and Piano. 

Peabody Hotel. 

Student in Conservatory of Music. Phila- 
delphia, 1891-2,; Pupil of von Western- 
hagen, Philadelphia, 1893; Pupil of Elisa 
Mazzucato Young in Harmony, 1S07- 

11)01; Student in Sherwood Scl 1 of 

Music, 1901 -02; Accompanist in Sydney 
Lloyd Wrightson's Studio. Chicago, 1901- 
02; present position since 1902. 




ill on I icola 



27 



ill o n I i c o In 




DRUSILLA VICTORIA JOHNSON, A. 
B., A. M., Assistant in Greek and 
Mathematics. 670 High Street. 

A. I!.. Bethany College, 1900; A. M., 
West Virginia University, 1902; Instruc- 
tor in Greek and Latin. Bethany College, 
1899-1900; Graduate student. West Vir- 
ginia University, 1900-1901; Teacher of 
Greek and Mathematics, Preparatory 
Branch of West Virginia University af 
Montgomery, 1901-03; present position 
since 1003. 




RUFUS A. WEST, Assistant in Metal 
Working and Stationary Engineer. 
181 First Street. 

Apprentice Fairchild, Lawhead & Co., 
Carriage Builders, 1887-90; Blacksmith, 
Tygart Mfg. Co., 1890-92; Special stu- 
dent. Springs Garden Institute, Summer, 
1897; Head Stationary Engineer, Na- 
tional Export Exposition at Philadelphia, 
Fall, 1899; present position since 1892. 




LOUISE FERRIS CHEZ, Assistant Di- 
rector of Physical Training, in 
charge of the Woman's Gym- 
nasium. 79 Grant Avenue. 

Graduate, Chautauqua School of Physi- 
cal Education, 1902; Post Graduate 
work in Massage and Swedish; Assistant 
to Jakob Bolin of New York City in 
Clinic of Corrective and Orthopedic 
Gymnastics. 1903. Director of Physi- 
cal Training for Women. DePauw Uni- 
versity, 1901-2; Director. Physical Cul- 
ture for Women, University of Cincin- 
nati, 1903-4; present position since 1904. 



28 



W. A. MESTREZAT, Assistant in Music; 
Wind Instruments. 

South Morgantown. 

Pupil of W. H. Stowe, G. Oeschsle and 
F. B. Heubej; Member 21st U. S. Infan- 
try Band; Band Master, 1st W. Va., Vol. 
Infantry in Spanish War, and 30th U. S. 
Vol. Infantry in Philippines. 





THOMAS HOWARD CATHER, Foreman 
of the Machine Shop. 

487 Spruce Street. 

Apprentice B. & 0. R. R. Machine Shop 
at Grafton, 1887-91; machinist, B. M. R. 
R. Co. and Union Pacific R. R., 1891-93; 

C. R. I. & P. R. R. Co., Horton. Kans., 
1893-95; Cotton Belt R. R., Pine Bluff, 
Ark., 1895-97; Navy Yard, Washington, 

D. ('., 1898; Foreman B. & 0. Erecting 
Shop. Grafton, W. Va.. 1899-1902; pres- 
ent position since 1902. 



JOHN B. GRUMBEIN, Foreman of the 
Wood Shop. 401 Front Street. 

Graduate, Lebanon High School, Leban- 
on, Pa., 1894; Apprentice, Orr, Painter 
& Co., Reading, Pa., 1895-8; Pattern 
Maker. Harrisburg Foundry & Machine 
Co., 1898-9; same, Robert Wetherel & 
Co., Chester, Pa., 1899; same, Ingersoll- 
Sergeant Drill Co., Easton, Pa., 1899- 
1900; Foreman of Pattern Shop, Blairs- 
dell Mach'y Co., Bradford, Pa., 1900-03; 
present position since 1903. 



jllout icola 




29 



illoiiticoln 




BERTHA CLELAND BROWNING, A. B., 
A. M., Assistant in the Prepara- 
tory School. us Beverly Avenue. 

A. I!.. West Virginia University, 1900; 
A. M.. ibid., 1902; present position since 
1901. 



WILLIAM MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER, 
A. B., Instructor in German. 

A. B. West Virginia University, 1903; 
Instructor in German and French W. V. 
Preparatory School Keyser, 1003-5; Stu- 
dent in Berlin Summer, 1905. 





THOMAS CLARK ATKES0N, M. S., 
Ph. D., Dean of the College of 
Agriculture and Professor of 
Agriculture. 

234 Prospect Street. 

LL. P... Kentucky University, 1 S74 -. 
Ph. I'... Central Normal College, 1891; 
Ph. 1).. ibid., 1893; M. S.. Barboursville 
College, 1900; student. Kentucky A. & 
M. College, 1S74-0; Member of the vVesI 
Virginia State Board of Agriculture 
and Fanners' Institute Lecturer, since 
1891; Professor of Agriculture, \V. Va. 
University, 1891-3; President Barbours- 
ville College, 1896-7; Regent, W. Ya. 
University, 1S97; present position since 
1897. 



30 




JOHN LEWIS SHELDON, A. M., Ph. D., 
Professor of Bacteriology and 
Bacteriologist of the West Vir- 
ginia Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. 413 Park Street. 

I!. 1M.. B. Sc, Ohio Normal University, 
1895; B. Sc. University of Nebraska., 
IS!)!); M. S.. University of Nebraska. 
190] : Ph. I)., ibid., 1903. Instructor in 
Mathematics, Mount Hermon (Mass.) 
School, 1892-94; Instructor in Botany, 
Preparatory School to the State Uni- 
versity (Nebraska), 1898-9; Acting Head 
of the Department of Biology, Nebraska 
State Normal School, 1898-1900; in- 
structor in Botany. University of Ne- 
braska, 1900-1903; Fellow in Botany, 
ibid., 1900-1903; present position since 
190.3. 




ill o II 1 ic ol.i 



W. E. DICKENSON, Instructor in Elec- 
trical Engineering. 



WILLIAM P. WILLEY, A. B., A. M., Professor of Equity, Jurispru- 
dence, and Commercial Law. 250 Pleasant Street. 

A. P... Dickinson College, 1S(I2. A. M., ibid., lsnr>; member bar. Mor- 
gantown, W. Va., and Baltimore, M<1.. 1866-78; present position since 
1883. 

BERT HOLMES HITE, M. S., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, 
Vice Director and Chemist of the West Virginia Agricultural 
Experiment Station. r>47 Front Street. 

M. S.. West Virginia University. 1S90. Graduate student, Johns 
Hopkins University. ISiil-."); Fellow in Chemistry, ibid.. 18!)3-5; 
Chemist of West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station since 
1895; Professor of Organic Chemistry, West Virginia University, 
1895-7; present position since 1897; Chief Chemist of the- Geological 
and Economic Survey of West Virginia. 



*J0HN BLACK JOHNSTON, Ph. B., Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

l(i Franklin Avenue. 

Ph. 15.. University of Michigan, 1893; Ph. D.. ibid.. 1899; Assistant in 
Zoology, ibid.. 181)3-7: Instructor in Zoology., ibid. 1897-9; Assistant 
Professor of Zoology, \Yest Virginia University, 1899-1900; present 
position since 1900. 

FREDERICK WILSON TRUSCOTT, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of 
Germanic Languages and Literatures. mi Beverly Avenue. 

A. B.. Indiana University, 1891; A. M., ibid.. 1892; A. M., Harvard 
University. 1S!)4; Ph. D.. ibid.. 1896; Instructor in German. Indiana 
University, 1891-3; Assistant and Fellow in German, Harvard 
University, 1893-4; Graduate student of University of Berlin, 1896-8; 
1900-1901; Assistant Professor of Germanic Languages and Litera- 
tures, West Virginia University, 1897-9; present position since 1899. 



31 



JAMES SCOTT STEWART, B. S., M. S. Professor of Mathematics. 

146 Willey Street. 

]?. S.. West Virginia University. 1877: M. S.. ibid., 1880; Assistant 
in Preparatory School, West Virginia University, 1877-91; Proffissor 
dt' Mathematics, ibid, 1891-3; Superintendent of Schools. Fairmont, 
W. Va., 1893-4; present position since 1804. 

<Thc ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A. B., A. M., Professor of English 

ill o n 1 i c ola Language and Literature and Head of the Department of 

English. 107 High Street. 

A. I!.. West Virginia University, 1886; A. M., ibid, 1889; A. M., 
Harvard University, 1903; Principal West Liberty State Normal 
School, 1886-93; Professor of .Mathematics. West Virginia University, 
1893-4; Graduate student, University of Chicago. Summer, 1808; 
Professor of English, West Virginia University, 1804-1001; Vice- 
President, ibid., 1897-9; Student, Columbian University, 1900; pres- 
ent position since 1001. 

CHARLES HENRY PATTERSON, A. B., A. M., Professor of Rhe- 
toric. Grand Avenue, South Park. 

A. I'.., Tufts College, 1SS7: A. M.. ibid.. 1893. Assistant Professor of 
Rhetoric ami Elocution, West Virginia University, 1898-9; Professor 
of Rhetoric ami Elocution, 1899; present position since 1903. 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, Dean of Women and Instructor on 
the Piano. 52 University Driveway. 

Student in Peaby Institute. Baltimore, Md.. 1878-7'.); Teacher in Mor- 
gantown, W. Va., 1879-85; Student in New England Conservatory, 
Boston, .Mass.. (Piano, Carl. Faelten. Organ, Geo. E. Whiting), 
188.1-87; Teacher of Piano, Mount Holyoke College, Mass.. 18S7-01 ; 
Student in Berlin (Piano Oscar Haiti. L891-92; Teacher of Piano, 
Conservatory of Music. Ottumwa, Iowa. 1892-93; Head of Piano 
Department of Shepardson College and Denison University, Granville, 
Ohio. 1893-1903; Summer Course under Carl Faelten, Boston, Mass., 
1808. ami in Faelten Piano School. Summer of 1901; present position 
since lOO.'S. 



WILLIAM JACKSON LEONARD, Associate Professor and Head of 
the Department of Fine Arts. 107 High Street. 

EDWIN FAYETTE CHURCH, Jr., B. S., Assistant Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering. 288 Grand Street. 

15. S.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1901. Draftsman and 
Assistant to Engineer. William Cramp & Sons.. Philadelphia. 1001- 
1903. Draftsman. I. P. Morris Co., Philadelphia. 1003. Instructor in 
Marine and Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture. Lehigh 
University, 1903-1904. Associate Member of American Society of 
Naval Engineers and of Society of Naval Architects and Marine 
Engineers. Present position since 1004. 



CHARLES COLLIER HOLDEN, A. B., 
Languages. 



Instructor in Romance 
468 High Street. 



Student of University of Virginia, 1877-81; travel and study in 
Europe, 1881-83; Instructor in Modern Languages, Maupin's Uni- 
versity School. Ellicott City. .Maryland. 1855-88; A. 15. (extra ordi- 
nem), Johns Hopkins University. 1888; Graduate student, ibid.. 
18008; Principal of Private School. Raleigh, X. C, 1880-04; Prin- 
cipal of Elkton, Maryland, Academy. 1890-90; Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Hoys" University School of Baltimore, 1899-1900; As- 
sistant in Romance Languages. 1001-3; present position since 1903. 



RUDOLF WERTIME, Instructor on the Piano. 



4:>7 High Street. 



Pupil in the Loyal High School of Music. Berlin, 1804-1808. where for 
four years Ids instructors were Professors Raif, Bargiel, Wolff and 
Vuii Herzogenberg; Teacher in the Clinton Liberal Institute. New 
York, 1898-1900; Post Graduate work with the Conrad Ansorge, 
Berlin, 1900-1901; present position since 1903. 



WILLIAM HENRY WHITHAM, B. S., A. M., Assistant in Physics 
and Geology. 92 Beverly Avenue. 

P.. S.. West Virginia University, 1899; A. M.. ibid.. L900; A. M.. 
Cornell University, 1901; Graduate student. Cornell University, 1903- 
04; Fellow in Physics West Virginia University, 1899-1900; present 
position since 1001. 



32 



JAMES A. WAUGH, V. S., Instructor in Veterinary Science. 



ARTHUR LEE POST, A. B., Assistant in Bacteriology in the 
University and the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

87 Grant Avenue. 

A. B., West Virginia University. 1898; Fellow in Chemistry, ibid., 
1898-99; Teacher of Science, West Virginia Wesleyan University, 1809- 
1901; Student in the Medical Department of Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 1901-03: Student in Bacteriology, University of Chicago. Sum- 
mer, 1004; Graduate student. West Virginia University, 1004; present 
position since 1004. 



PAULINE G. WIGGIN, B. L. S., A. M., Librarian. 

12.3 Foundry Streft. 

A. M., Radeliffe College, 1895; B. L. S., New York State Library 
School, 1002. Instructor in English, Vassar College, 1895-97; In- 
structor in English, Wellesley College, 1807-00; Assistant in charge 
of History Division, New York State Library, 1001-02; present po- 
sition since 1902. 



JESSICA GARDINER CONE, Assistant Librarian and Cataloguer. 

148 High Street. 

Vassar College, 1870-80; New York State Library School diploma. 
1807. Library organizer and cataloguer, 1807-1004; present position 
since 1004. 



MARGARET CLARK SMITH, A. B., Assistant Librarian. 

107 High Street. 

A. B., Wilson College. 1002; Graduate, Drexel Institute Library 
School, 1003; Instructor in English and Mathematics in Martin's 
Ferry, Ohio, High School. 1904; present position since 1904. 




311 a a 1 tenia 






33 




illou I icol.n 






itcetd-. 

President N. H. Duval 

Vice-President, E. L. Dudley 

Treasurer, C. A. Ellison 

Secretary Harriet Stalnaker 

Historian Prank Outright 

Poetess Mary Coplin 

Prophet H. H. Rose 

Orator H. K. McQuarril 

Cheer Leader R. M. Price 

Manager Athletics R. L. Cole 



35 



M0//0, 
Nulli Maiores. 

Cc/ot.i. 
Light Blue and Silver Gray. 

Geri, geri, gero, gorum ! 

We're the class that makes things hum! 
Hobble gobble ! Ze, zi, zix ! 
R-ah, Rah, Rah ! Nineteen-six ! 











%*Y3 


?The 




311 outi coin 


^m WL w*l 



ANNA 



AUSTIN, 



Lewisbun 



V. W. C. A. 




MARGARET BUCHANAN, 

Kappa Delta. 

Morgantown. 

English Club; Le Cercle Dramatique 
Francais; Y. \y. C. A.; \V. V. A. A.; 
Class Secretary (I) & (2); Montieola 
Board (3) ; Secretary Athletic Asso- 
ciation (3) & (4); Secretary of Ten- 
nis Club (3) & (4); Athenaeum 
Board (4) A. B. 



FRANKLIN MARION BRAND, 
Sigma Nu. 

Morgantown. 
Parthenon Literary Society, W. V. 
A. A.. Bryan Prize (2), Elkins Prize 
Greets (2), Business Manager .Mont- 
icola (3), A. B. 



r 












, $ 




"*\ ' 

















EUGENE 1111. DT BARNHART, 
Delta Tau Delta. 

Shepherdstown. 

Cadel Officers Glubj Sec. Lieut. Co. 
B., Distinguished Cadet (3) C. K. 





I HUGH SAMUEL BYER, 
Beta Theta J'i. 

L. L. B. 



Phillippi. 




ROBERT LEE COLE, Itloiiticola 

Wheeling. 

W. V. A. A.; Cadet Corps; Cade! 
Basket-ball team; Athletic manager 
of Senior Class; Captain Senior 
Basket-ball team; Leader in Gym- 
nasium. A. B. 



MARY COPLIN, 



Boothsville. 



Y. W. C. A.; English Club; Monti- 
cola Board (3); Monongalian 
Board (4) ; Head English Club. A. B. 




CHARLES SUMNER CROW, 

Sigma Nu 

Pt. Marion. 

Sergeant of Band; Columbian Liter- 
ary Society, W. V. A. A. 







37 



jllonlicol.i 




DANIEL DAWSON, 

Phi Kappa Psi, Delta Chi. 

Charleston. 

English CI ill > ; Le Cerele Dramatiqiie 
Francais; Manager Foot -ball Team 
(1). L. L. B. 




EDWARD LUTHER DUDLEY. 

Phi Sigma Kappa. 

( irafton. 

Cadet Officers Club; W. V. A. A.j 
Vice President Class; Second Vice 
President Cadet Officers' Club; Q. M. 
Cadet Corps (.'5); First Lieutenant 
Co. A. (4). 15. S. M. C. 



NELSON HAMMOND DEVOL, 

Kappa Alpha. 

Wellsburg. 

\V. V. A. A. Pres. (lass, (4) Vice 
President A. A. (3). 




WILLIAM S. DOWNS. 

Beta Thetq Pi. 

Martinsburg. 

Engineering Society; W. V. A. A.; 
Cadet Officers' Club:Cadet Adjutant. 





CHARLES ALEXANDER ELLISON, 
Hans Creek. 

Y. M. C. A.; Engineering Society; 
Cadet Officers' Club; \V. V. A. A.; 
Cadet Major (3); Regents' Medal 
Target Practice (1); Presented 
sword as Captain Color Company 
(2) ; Business .Manager Athenaeum 
(3); Treasurer and Manager of Glee 
and Mandolin Clubs (4); Treasurer 
Senior Class (4); Treasurer \V. M. 
C. A. and Manager of Lecture 
Course (4). B. S. M. E. 




ALEX. BARDIE FOREMAN, 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Morgaiitou ii. 

Engineering Society: \V. V. A. A.; 
Cadet Officers' Club: President En- 
gineering Society; Captain Signal 
Corps. Corps of Cadets. B. S. M. E. 



iriouticola 



HARRY FRIEDMAN, 
Sigma Nu. 



Grafton. 



Columbia Literary Society; English 
Club; W. Y. A. A.; Law Society; 
Captain of Artillery; Cadet (nips 
(3); Associate Editor the Athen- 
aeum (3); Assistant Editor-in-chief 
ibid (4); Winner Regent's Prize in 
Composition June, 1905. L. L. B. 




JAMES DAVIS GRONNIGER, 

Delta Tan Delta. 

Charleston. 

Base-ball Team. (1). (2), (3) & (4); 

Basket-ball (2). (3) & (4); Captain 

Base-ball Team (.'!); Captain Bask- 
et-ball (3). 




illaul icol.i 




CLAY ASHBEL GIBSON, 

Phi Signia Kappa 



Moigantown 



W. V. A. A. 




WILLIAM COLYER GIST, 

Sigma Nu 

Wellsburg. 

W. V. A. A.; First Lieutenant and 
Adjutant of Cadet Corps; Law So- 
ciety; Literary Editor Monticola 
(4); Y. M. C. A. A. B. 



DANIEL MYRON GREENE, 

East Greenwich, R. I. 
Tennis Club: Odd Fellows Club; 
New England clul>: Columbian Lit- 
erarj Society; Debating Association; 
Member of Tennis Team. li)04-."); 
University Debating Team. 1905; 
Junior Law Historian, 1905; Essay- 
ist, Columbian 1905; President odd 
Fellows Club. 1905-6; President, Co- 
lumbian Literary Society 1906; Sec- 
retary Debating Association 1906; 
Local Editor Athenneum 1906; Edit- 
or-in-chief Monongalian 1906; A. I>. 
W. V. U. Mm.-). L. L. J'.. 




SAMUEL FRANCIS HAMMER, 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

Connor. 
W. V. A. A. 




40 




ARTHUR HALL, 



Grafton. 



Y. M. C. A.; Engineering Society; 
W. V. A. A.; Second Lieutenant 
Company A, 1905; Distinguished 
Cadet, 1904; First Marksman's 
Medal. 1904; Dele-ate to Students 
Volunteer Convention at Nashville; 
Delegate to Inter-state Convention 
at Cumberland. 15. S. M. E. 




(LARK FRANK HIX.MAX. 

riti Sigma Kappa. 

Somerville, Mass. 

\V. V. A. Foot-ball Team (3) & (4) : 
President A. A. (4); Track Team 
Captain (4). 



<TItc 

ill on I i coin 



rOHN QTJINCY HUTCHINSON", 

Sigma Nu. 

Beckley. 

Parthenon Literary Society ; Eng- 
lish Club; W. V. A. A.: Choral So- 
ciety; Law Society; Debating As- 
sociation; Inter-Collegiate Debater 
(3); Inter-Society Debater (3); 
Student member of Athletic Board 
(4) ; Treasurer Debating Association 
(4) ; President Parthenon Li erary 
Society (4) ; President Law Club 
L. L. B. 




LAWRENCE BENJAMIN HILL. 

McKim. 

Y. M. C. A.; Parthenon Literary So- 
ciety: Choral Society; W. V. A. A.: 
Marshall College Club: Chaplain 
Parthenon Literary Society; The 
Mountain. A. B. 





u 



Jttoiltitoln 




FRANK BATSON KUNST. 
I'hi Sigma Kappa 



Pruntytown. 




BEOUSTON GGFF YOUNG, 

Delta Tan Delta 

Clarksburg. 

Student Member Board of Directors 
of \Y. V. A. A. (4) : Assistant Man- 
ager Base-ball Team (3); Manager 
Baseball Team (4); ( la^s Historian 
(:5); Class Treasurer (2); Monticola 
Eoard (3); Delegate to National- Con- 
vention (it Delta Tau Delta. 10(14; 
President of Pan-Hellenic Council 
1904-5. L. L. P. 



JAMES EDGAR LAREW, 

Sii/niii Xii 

Red Sulphur Springs 
Engineering Society. 




MARSHALL WOODROW McDON- 
ALD, Charles Town. 

Kappa Alpha 

English Society: Track Team; W. 
V. A. A. : Cadet Officers' club: En- 
gineering Society; Football Team 
(3) and (4); First Lieutenant Com- 
pany P.: P. S. (). F. 




42 




JSSELL MILLAN. 



Mairninsrton. 



Engineering Society; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Distinguished Cadet; Cadet 
Captain Company C; Secretary, 
Yioe President and President of En- 
gineering Spciety. B. S. M. E. 




tThc 
iUonticoln 



WAYNE McCOEMICK MILLER, 

J'lii Sigma Kappa. 

Morgajitown. 

Engineering Society, Glee Club. 



GLENN JOHNSON MOOMAN, 

Franklin. 

Y. M. C. A. 




DANA PAUL MILLER, 

Sigma Chi, Delta Chi. 

Fairmont. 

Mountain: W. V. A. A.; Adjutant. 
First Captain and Major Cadet 
Corps. A. B. 




43 






<Thc 

jllonli coin 




RICHARD MeSHERRY PRICE, 

Chi Phi, Delta Chi, Theta Nix 
EpsUon, 

Charlesl r>n. 

\V. V. A. A.; Monticola Board (3) ; 
Cheer Leader (3). L. L. B. 




JOHN JAY PRICHARD, 

Phi Kappa Psi, DettaChi, 
Tlidu Xu Epsilon. 

Riverville. 

Mountain; Columbian Literary So- 
ciety; VV. V. A. A.; University De- 
bating Team (3); President W. V. 
A. A. (3); Manager Foot-ball Team 

(4,i. I.. L. B. 



I \KI.K WALTON REILEY, 
Beta Theta Pi. 



llinton. 



Mountain; Mandolin Club; (dee 
( ]ul> (2), (3) & (4) ; Assistanl 
Editor-in-chief Muni ieola (3) ; Pres 
idenl Sophomore Class. B. S. C. E. 




JEDIDIAB WALDO ROBINSON, 

Siyma An. 

Grafton. 

English Club; Mountain; W. V. A. 
A.; Lbav Club; Associate Editor 
Athenaeum, 1902-4; Editor-in-chief 
idem 1904-5. A. B. 




44 




HERSHEL HAMPTON ROSE, 

Phi Kappa Pxi 

Mannington. 

Columbian Literary Society; I\fa - 
sonic Club; English Club: Law So- 
ciety: W. V. A. A.: Columbian Ora- 
tor (3); Captain Inter-Collegiate De- 
bating Team (3); President Colum- 
bian, Winter 1904-5; President De- 
lating Association (4); President 
Senior Class. L. L. B. 




5" he 

Jlloul icola 



HENRY M. SCBEEfAEDER, 
Sigma Nu 



Lubeck. 



Engineering Society; Cadet Band. 
B. S. C. E. 



HARRIET TALBOT STALNAKER, 

Kappa Delta 

Martinsburg. 

V. W. C. A.; English Club; W. V. A. 
A.; Treasurer of Class (1); Vice 
President of Class (2 1 ); Secretary of 
Class (3); Secretary of Class (4). 
A. B. 




BIRK SMITH STATHERS, 

Sigma Chi, Delta Chi, Theta Nil 
Kpsilon, 

Weston. 

Mountain; W. V. A. A.; Tennis 
Club; President W. V. A. A. (4); 
Athletic Editor, Athenaeum (4) ; 
Assistant Manager Foot-ball Team 
(3); Editor-in-Chief, Monticola (4); 
Member-elect Inter - Collegiate De- 
bating Team (4) ; Manager Foot-ball 
Team (4). A. B. 




45 



31! o i: 1 i r nln 




WILBUR JACKSON STRADER, 

Sigma Chi 

Beverly. 

W. Va. Wesleyn Club of W. V. U.; 
W. V. A. A. A. B. 





.1. HAY TUCKWILLER, 



Morgantown. 



SAMUEL SLATER TUCKWILLER, 
Lew isburg. 

Y. .\l. ( '. A.; Engineering Society; 
President Y. M. C. A.; Vice Presi- 
ili'iil Engineering Society. B. S. M. E. 




PRESCOTT C. WHITE, 

Phi Sigma Kappa, 

Morgantown. 

University Masonic Club; Parthenon 
Literary Society; Debating Club of 
the Law School. L. L. B. 




46 




MISS (i. A. WATKIXS. 



Y. \V. (_'. A. 



Grafton. 




ELLA MAY TURNER, 

Shepherdstown. 
V. W. C. A. 



<Tfie 

illout icoln 



JOHN EDGAR CAMPBELL, Moundsville. 

Beta Theta Pi, Delta Chi. 
Mandolin and Guitar Club (2), (3) & (4) VV. V. A. A.; Mon- 
ticola Hoard (3). L. L. B. 

ALBERT JACKSON COLLET, Beverly. 

Beta Theta Pi, Delta Chi, Theta Xu Epsilon. 
Delegate to National Convention Delta Chi at Toronto, Canada 
(3). A. B. 

FRANK OUTRIGHT, Sago. 

Y. M. C. A.; graduate of W. Va. Conference Seminary; Holder 
of Peabody Scholarship 1903-04; Graduate of the University 
of Nashville 1904; Class Historian (4). A. B. 



HECTOR KEN/IE McQTJARRIE, Middle River, Nova Scotia. 

Beta Theta Pi. 
Columbian Literary Society: President Junior Law '(03); 
Mountain. 

NORVAL RACERS DAUGHERTY, Morgantown. 

Phi Kappa Psi. 
English Club; Y. M. C. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; W. J. 
Bryan Prize (2); Joint Winner J. W. Wiles Prize (3); Presi- 
dent Y. M. O. A. (2): President Parthenon Literary Society 
(3) ; Member of Debating Team (3). 

DWIGHT E. McQUILRTN, Shepherdstown. 

Delta Tan Delta. 
Mountain; President Y. M. C. A. "04-0.3; Editor-in-chief Athc- 
neauni '04. A. B. 



311 o ut i coin 





SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 




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species and state in definite terms that this 
thing comes from such and such a class. Pol- 
Lowing the plan of scientists efforts have 
been made to find the primary form from 
which the class of 1!)()(> came; but all inves- 
tigations have proved fruitless and it is now conceded that 
no dictum can be stated concerning the origin of the senior 
• •lass. Some of its members have come up from that great 
mass of ignorance known as the "Prep" Department of 
die University. 

Other members are from the various preparatory 
schools of Wesl Virginia. A few. Venus-like have sprung 
from misty places into their present exalted state as seniors. 
Tile nativity of pail of the class may be compared to 
tin- hind from which King Arthur came: no one is able 
to say anything about it. The largesl division of the 
class is comprised of those who like Topsy— seem to have 

"•lest grow6d up". The life of each member of the 
class mighl be taken up and given in detail but such work 
would encroach upon the province of the future historian. 
Consequently I prefer to let the public read the biography 
of each member as it comes From one or another of the 
greal publishing houses. After all the origin of the class 

is a matter of secondary importance] The central truth 
(o be noted is that a. great combination of wit, knowledge, 



youth and beauty has been brought together — such as is 
seen but once in a century. 

The first query about any organization is "What can 
it do.'" So mighty are the achievements of the senior 
class that the people have changed their question and say 
"What is it that it cannot do.'" At the present date no 
one has been found able to answer this query. Further- 
more, it is confidently asserted by men of broad learning 
that no one will ever be able to answer it. Some things 
that the class have already done may be enumerated to show 
wherein this class excels others. 

The harmony in the class has been one of its notable 
features. Not that it lacked men who insisted thai they 
must have an office; but the spirit of these men was differ- 
ent from that of the ordinary office-seeked. While most 
men want office for honor, these men have shown the true 
spirit and have sought office with a view to serving their 
class! The class has shown the proper spirit toward 
these philanthropists by giving them an office when it could 
possibly do so. If, at one election there were not offices 
for all sacrificing men a record was kept of the nanus of 
those who had not been rewarded and at the next election 
they were given a chance to show their loyally to the class 
by serving it. 

When this class was a junior its piety was the ad- 
miration of all the city ministers and class leaders. It is 



said that even a few members of the faculty took note of 
its uprightness. When the question of giving a "Prom" 
to the class of 1905 arose the members of the class of 1906 
held their hands in pious honor and said "We will not 
dance". Since the disposal of the "Prom" question our 
moral serenity has been disturbed but once and that was 
caused, as might be expected, by the unregeneratie juniors. 
From their frivolous hearts they evolved the idea of a dance 
and sent a message to the seniors saying "Come and be 
merry with us. ' ' Upon hearing these words the hearts 
of the seniors grew heavy for they knew that the juniors 
had not followed in the way that had been marked out for 
them by those who are far wiser than they will ever be. 

Such wonderful reports are abroad concerning the 
learning, wisdom and uprightness of the Seniors that the 
Juniors went to the President and said "When shall we 
become as wise and famous as the Seniors?" 

"Alas," the president answered, "you will never be 
as great as the class of 1906. The Bible says that one 
star differs from another star in glory and you are stars of 
less magnitude than they." Sadly the Juniors departed 
realizing that the President had spoken the truth. 

About the future of this class not much need be said. 
Places < f honor and remuneration are already opening up 
to its members. There is no vocation in life which cannot 
be filled by some man or woman from the class of 1906. 
Xo difference whether it be churning, teaching school, or 
building a railroad, the Senior class can furnish some one 
well qualified to do the work. 

There ought to he no discussion as to what part of the 
next world this class will occupy. It is conceded that this 
class will journey to the Isles of the Blest when it leaves 
this world. But should any of its members be consigned 
temporarily to Hades as moral thinkers and left to make 



up their back work before being permitted to join their 
classmates, who knows but that they may also he required 
to improve some of their college grades? Would it be out 
of harmony to have classes in Anglo-Saxon and Calculus 
in Hades'? Assuredly not! Furthermore it is con- 
fidently expected that in the nether world there will be no 
lack of teachers to take charge of classes in these two sub- 
jects. But it is idle to speculate further about the future 
of this class. Our mantle will soon fall upon the shoulders 
of a class that will scarcely be able to bear it but we can 
only hope for the best. We go forth realizing that the past 
has its lessons, the present its duties, and the future its 
hopes. 

HISTORIAN. 




illoiilirol.i 



49 



<Tfic 
fflontiroln 




M/WJ 7»£ l*S£> 



50 




President Tames Henry Caeeison 

Vice-President John Thomas West 

Secretary Thomas Bond Foeek 

Treasurer Clarence Post 

Historian Clifford Myers 

Poetess Edna Rightmire 

C o/ota; 
Red and Blue. 

Sis-s-s! — Boom! Cuckoo! Juniors! ! ! 

51 



Jllontical.i 




J. C. BERRY. 
When other folks gel to boasting of 
their literary acquaintances we always 
point with pride to Jack Berry, '07's par- 
ticular literary li^ht. I en \ is not so 
very tall but when the gray matter un- 
der his auburn locks (no, they are nol 
red i begins to rustle around yon may 
lie sure a real piece of literature is the 
result. Under his leadership the Ath 
enaeum lias maintained its high stand- 
ard and the editorials this year in its 
columns have been great. We under- 
stand that when he graduates he is go- 
ing to found .•• great S'ational magazine. 
If he ilooh '117 will subscribe in a bodv. 



GOHEN ARNOLD. 
Arnold is. as Jonas Chuzzlewit would 
say, "a deep 'un." lie does not say 
much — whether he is thinking deeply or 
not thinking ;tt all is a matter 01 con- 
jecture. But with co-eds Arnold is cer- 
tainly at home. Rumor has it that in 
the course of time Arnold will set tip 
as a Lawyer. We hope that his riches 
and honors will increase as he deserves; 
nay more — or he misrhl starve to death. 





WILLIAM GARNETT BAYLISS. 
Gap Bayliss, as he is known in the 
wilds of Layette County was born in 
Richmond, Virginia; but the authorities 
of that state knew that by nature he 
was more adapted to West Virginia. So 
they exiled him to the wilds of Loup 
Creek. The residents of that section 
thought that he was not suited to dodge 
the bullets that Hew around every nav 
day. They sent him to various reform- 
atories throughout the state such as 
Athens Normal, and Marshall College, 
But he found that these places were too 
small and confined for his greal talents 
and so came to Moreantown. 



52 



ARTHUR K. BRAKE, 

Mr. Brake is a physical, intellectual 
and social giant. Physically, he is very 
strong, for, while in Wheeling on the 
foot-ball trip last November, he nearly 
brushed Senator Scott over in the door- 
way of the McClure House elevator. In- 
tellectually, he is a wonder, for he once 
graduated from the W. U. W. V., which 
he still regards as being a little ahead 
of our own University. Besides, he has 
had at least three "rows" with his pro- 
fessors in the last six weeks, because 
they did not understand their subjects as 
well as he did. Socially, he is "great"; 
he has been advertising for a girl in the 
columns of the W U. W. V. Pharos. 
However, as to his morals, the least said 
the better. 





FRANK MORRIS BOYLES, 
Frank Morris Boyles walked in upon 
us some years ago and took his place 
immediately among those accounted wise 
— by themselves He may be seen walk- 
ing about the compus almost any morn- 
ing, usually with one or .more co-eds. If 
Frank would just '"look interested," 
throw back his shoulders and "wake 
up," he would be a good-looking chap. 
He is going to be a chemist they say and 
his success is pretty well assured. 



EVALYN SAGE BURNS. 
The star of success shines upon her 
college course. She is popular. Hence 
she is a leader wherever she happens to 
be. Miss Burns does not study all of 
the time but when her work does not 
satisfy a professor, she just uses her 
smile a little more and — she passes. In 
the social part of university life she is 
supreme. Bearing her honors gracefully, 
being well posted on athletics of all 
kind and using her smile impartially this 
willy junior is one of the many of whom 
we speak with great pride'; One thing 
puzzles us all concerning her — whether 
or not she is or ever has been the prey 
of Cupid. Babb, Eomine, Price and 
Moore made us think so. each in turn. 
Nelse is trying also but — we don't know. 




illunl icoln 



53 



iflonticoln 




LA VEGA WASHINGTON BURNS. 

I,;i Vega Washington Burns has been 
in the University for many Spring 
Terms. The fact that we have seldom 
-'■en ) i i iii except in Springtime "when a 
young man's fancy lightly turns, etc," 
may lead us to err when We say that 
La Viga is a great ladies' man. lie 
can say more sweet things in a moment 
than an ordinary fellow can think of 
in an hour. Still the girls all take it 
rather good nat uredly. It is remarka- 
ble what respect there is in \V. V. TJ. 
for the aged, 



GEORGE W. COFFIELD. 

Allow us to introduce to you Mr. 
George CorKeld. George is a splendid 
specimen of an all round man. but his 
modesty keeps him from being publicly 
known. lie fears to take part in ath- 
letics, lest he may be accused of trying 
to win the admiration of co-eds. He 
hesitates to make high class standing, 
for fear of being called a grind. He 
attends church only occasionally, that he 
may not he said to make pretensions of 
seeming good. Vet if this modesty ever 
leaves George, there'll lie hard times 
keeping a good man down. 





JAMES M. CALLISON. 
This is the picture of Sunny dim. who 
is found at the fort table the greater 

part of his time. He hails fr the 

wilds of Nicholas County, and came into 
our midst in the early nineties. dim is 
exceedingly frivolous, especially about 
young ladies. Some years ago he talk- 
ed continuously of his fair haired angel 
of Fairmont. But all his talk ceased, 
when she came to the University a few 
months later. As in this, so in all other 
cases, we are sorry to say. dim has never 
made any very near approaches to the 
society of the fair sex. .\s the president 
of our class. James is loved by all. for 
he is intensely human, nothing divine. 



54 



OTIS COLE. 
Otis Cole is best known in his base-ball 
uniform. He is an athlete from start to 
finish, and is seldom seen about the 
University in any other capacity. In 
plain, everyday clothes he is a week-look- 
in" little fellow who looks like he was 
in danger of collapse from too much 
studying. Rut when he takes his stand 
in center-field there is a .murderous look 
in his eye which bodes no good for the 
batter who knocks a high-lly to out- 
field. When athletics are at a low ebb 
he works a little towards his degree of 
B. S. C. E 



ARTHUR SPENCER DAYTON. 

Arthur Spencer Dayton is one of the 
Antedeluvians. He has been here many 
years and is quite a valuable man from 
the fact that he is personally acquainted 
with much of the history of our Univer- 
sity. His pink cheeks and winning ways 
soon won for Artie a place in the hearts 
of the co-eds. and until the last year or 
so he retained this place. Lately, how- 
ever, he see.ms to have "lost out" some- 
what. A characteristic thing in Artie is 
his confidential way with his acquaint- 
ances. He will approach, beckon to you 
mysteriously, lead you to some secluded 
spot and then ask in a whisper if you 
have a match about you. 





WILLIAM BRUCE COFFROTH. 

We did not know much about William 
Bruce Coffroth when the time came to 
tell of him as one of the Great Class. 
We asked a friend of his about Coffroth. 
The friend said. "I'll tell you; Bill is the 
kind of a fellow who slouches about 
minding his own business and looking 
like he did not know much; but he fools 
you when you know him better. He's all 
there." So we have decided to put this 
friends statement in. You can take it 
for what it is worth. 



111 o ii I i c ciln 



55 



illonlicoln 



FRANCIS CARLTON COLCORD. 

(See "Edward Clark Colcord" write- 
up.) 





EDWARD CLARK COLCORD, JR. 

Now here is a man ! Diogenes would 
have considered his search at an end if 
he had met Ed Colcord. He eschews all 
evil and many, many good things includ- 
ing pipes and Co-eds. He speaks only 
after mature deliberation and his word 
has weight. When, in his capacity as a 
Cadet officer he yells, "Attention"! ye 
little Freshman "rat" trembles so that 
his old Springfield rattles like a junk- 
cart. He always has his lessons; hence 
he never flunks; he avoids the Co-ed, 
hence, he is always happy and never 
"dead -broke." 



50 



ROBERT M. DRANE. 
Robert Drane is not very different 
from any other tall, lazy man excepting 
his original swagger. He does not walk 
when he wishes to change localities; he 
just rolls and twists and falls through 
the atmopshere, the rest of his body 
dragging his unwilling feet along. 
You can always find him when you want 
him by the cloud of smoke about his 
head. It is rumored that he is studying 
law, but his friends have when asked 
indignantly denied the charge. 





MARY DOROTHY EDWARDS. 
This fair Galatea of Pygmalion fame 
has undergone her last "Fall" term. Dif- 
fering in the one respect from the beau- 
tiful Grecian Galatea, who stepping from 
her pedestal, into being, broke the 
heart of Pygmalion, this living 
resemblance stepping from her pedestal, 
the curbing near Science Hall, fell and 
broke the ligaments, her dainty ankle. 
Pygmalion did not have '"fairy-like creat- 
ures" (2) to soothe his wounded heart as 
did the wounded ankle which was soon 
coaxed back to strength. 



MARGARET VIRGINIA FOULK. 

One of our great Poets has said 
'"Here is to the Ladies. They need no 
eulogy: they speak for themselves; but 
this quiet little creature with demurely 
drooping eyelids will need one thousand 
voices to shout her praise. 

Miss Foulk strolled into Morgantown 
in the fall of 1904 and since that time 
has been quite active in all lines, even 
in athletics. Although coming from 
the East she soon developed a liking 
for the Sunny "South" and likewise 
a liking for poetry, which she generally 
dedicates to her many ,111011 friends. 





57 



HOWARD MARK ERNST. 
Unto us a child was born. And they 
called his name Howard Mark Ernst. And 
the child grew and waxed strong and was 
fair to look upon. And it came to pass 
that he journeyed afar into Kentucky to 
Berea College. And the Professors open- 
ed their mouths and taugh him all the 
occult sciences of that land. And he said 
unto himself. I will arise and go to West 
Virginia University for there abounds 
much Foot Ball and great wisdom. And 
when he had won renown on the gridiron 
and as manager of the Basket Ball Team 
Sport Morris opened his mouth and 
spake unto him saying, "A straight line 
is the shortest distance between two 
points." 



eric 

itlouticola 



jllottticola 



PAGE FORTNEY. 
Genial, poliite, well acquainted with 
the line where his business leaves off 
and yours begins and rigidly respectful 
to that line- this is Page Fortney. Page 
studies nineteen hours out of the day 
and smokes the greater part of the re- 
mainder. A-, a student he ranks high. 
Page knows a woman's heart and con- 
sequently avoids all womankind. With 
these qualifications we feel assured of 
his ultimate success in his life work— 
( i\ il -Engineering. 





THOMAS BOND FOULK. 
Thomas Bond Foulk is the very erect 
Cadet Sergeant. lie is nut large in 
stature lmt has a great deep bass voice, 
n heavy frown and a ponderous step. 
He is always in a great hurry. Tom 
had a serious love affair last year and 
he has never appeared as cheerful since 
its sad ending. Business and business 
alone is now his sole thought and he ex- 
pects to he a Civil Engineer. 



ROBERT GATHERUM. 
Robert Gatherum is another one of 
those retiring kind of personages. A 
classmate when questioned about him 
said. "Yes, Gatherum is a man with few- 
opinions of his own: hut when he does 
get an idea. Lord man. he is like a hen 
that has just laid an egg! lie wants 
every one to know all about it."' Gather- 
um takes his school-work entirely too 
seriously. lie show-, many signs of he- 
ing an old bachelor in the near future. 
however, this will give him more op- 
portunity of being one of tin 1 great 
Civil Engineers of the future. 




58 



1 




ETHEL GREENE. 
This soldier of the Tenth Legion lias 
for seven long years followed the Ro- 
man eagles from victory to victory with 
the steady, even step of a grenadier. 
Whether in the "awkward squad" put- 
ting to flight Greek verbs and parallelopi- 
pedons or in the imperial guard assault- 
ing the last escarpment of the fortress, 
the same splendid discipline has char- 
acterized the behavior in each phase of 
the whole campaign. No counter march- 
ing, no retreat. To each command, yes. 
Replying to each defeat with a smile 
born of infinite hope. Beloved equally 
by the highest official in the general staff 
and by every private in the ranks. 



STEPHEN GOODLOE JACKSON. 
Stephen Goodloe Jackson claims .lane 
Lew as his birthplace, and is proud of 
it. lie is patriotic and declares that 
his home town grows more like London 
every day. lie has a shy. bashful man- 
ner which relieves timid maidens of any 
fear at his approach. However, behind 
Ins smooth manner is hidden a reserve 
force which sometimes causes him to do 
unexpected things. He has held numer- 
ous offices, having once been president id' 
his class. 





JESSIE JENKINS. 
Montrose, Pa., claims this young sage. 
From childhood she has been a wonder. 

having translated the first 1 k id' Caesar 

at the age of three. She entered the 
West Virginia University in the fall of 
1!»II4. and it is said, that she was very 
much disappointed because the Univer- 
sity did not offer more courses. She 
immediately enrolled for all the work 
the euriculum offered, and sighed for 
more work to do. Her examinations 
are mere pastime and require only a 
moments notice. She once gave a toast 
at a banquet that had to he studied word 
by work and carefully translated, -o 
great was the learning therein. 



311 o u I i coin 



59 



■■■■ 



jUonlicoln 



JAMES KUNKLE. 
Kunkle is a peculiar kind of genius. 
Some one said the other day, "Kunkle is 
a man who whittled himself out with 
his own jack-knife and is very well 
pleased with the accomplishment." Owing 
to his extreme self -consciousness he does 
not appear much in public but attends 
strictly to the directions of the Profes- 
sors as to long hard hours of study. He 
has, we feel sure, hidden qualities which 
will sometime raise him high in his 
chosen profession. 





A. D. KENNAMOND. 
It is said that this embodiment of in- 
telligence read Sanscrit at the age of six. 
and spoke Greek and Latin from the he- 
ginning. In other winds, this peculiar 
speciment of humanity never had any 
youth. When he first came to the Uni- 
versity his friends thought that he would 
become a diligent student, hut he has 
turned a sport of the first water. He 
is particularly noted for his bluffing, and 
his professors especially fall a victim 
to this intrigue. Every body likes Ken- 
namond because he has such a pleasing 
look, and walks like his grandfather; so 
easy like. 



00 



LAURA LEWIS. 
The Great Class is proud of Miss Louis. 
She is tall, stately and very dignified. 
Her proclivities for studying are very 
marked. Hour after hour when most 
students are wasting their time in idle- 
ness, she is pouring over ponderous vol- 
umes in the library and fitting herself 
to be a Frances E. Willard or a Carrie 
Chapman Cott. It is to be hoped that 
the little fellow with the how and quiver 
of arrows will not direct his darts in 
her direction because the world needs 
the contributions to Literature which she 
is capable of giving. 





THOMAS LEAHY. 
Per Captain, — Vot? Dor man vot never 
smiles mit himself just once, but kicks 
der pig skin up der fryin-pan already. 
He was er .mighty man, aint it? Und 
he vill blay agin next year und vill Cap- 
tain der Foot-ball Team. Dod Gast It! 



PAUL H. MARTIN. 
"Petie" Martin with a girl does not 
make much of a stir; nor has "Petie" 
ever done very much in the French plays 
in which he tried to shine; but put him 
in foot-ball togs, give him the ball just 
as the "rooters" give a .mighty Rah, rah, 
in! and then something's doin' sure! 
Paul is a fine athlete; but a little bit of a 
S'irl can just make a monkey of him. If 
some one just tells him sometime that 
life is a game of foot -ball he certainly 
will make a touch down. 





J. FRANK MARSH. 

This speciment of human lore is of pre- 
historic interest. He has always exist- 
ed, so far as any body knows. As an 
early pioneer of education in Ritchie 
County his work has been "marvelous". 
He sojourned for many years at Buck- 
hannon. housed in the archives of great- 
est learning. He came forth from that 
institution with a diploma, and all the 
knowledge that could be gathered there- 
abouts. It is said to this day that there 
is a dearth of learning in that school on 
account of his monopolistic control of 
knowledge while there. He is particular- 
ly noted for his good looks, sporty ways. 



jllaut icola 



jlloiiticoln 



PERRY WADE McMILLEN. 
(luce upon a time a little boy named 
Perry got his face washed and trotted 
away to school. lie grew in wisdom to 
such an extent that before a great .many 
years he was able to enter West Vir- 
ginia University. There he won im- 
mediate renown as a cadet and from the 
fact that he belonged to the great '07 
Class. Perry is not remarkable for his 
comeliness but along all other lines he is 
considered A 1. 





JOHN WILLIAM MASON. 
Pill Mason is a chemist, kodak-fiend 
and punster. He is also an authority 
and connoisseur on jokes. Jokes? He 
revels in them and when he comes up 
and says. "Say! I've got a new one!" 
we always stop and listen eagerly be- 
cause Pill knows how to tell one. Late- 
ly he has been rather sober-looking and 
he often sighs pensively. We are in doubt 
as to whether it is Cupid or indigestion 
or both. When Bill grows up we ex- 
pect him to make his mark in the world. 



JOHN DANA McNUTT. 
John Dana McNutt looks so glum 
and reserved, as a usual thing, that 
strangers usually consider him a hard 
nut to eiack. And. indeed, although 
when you know him. apparent taciturn- 
ity gives place to real pleasantness, he 
is never cracked, so to speak. His 
sound common sense is written all over 
his face. He has nick-names galore, 
but they don't seem to bother him at all. 
Engineering is his aim in life. 




02 




EARL DILWORTH MASON. 
Earl Dilworth Mason was born in Al- 
leghany, Pa., in the early "eighties." 
The avidity and industry with which 
he applied himself to every thing he 
undertook, won for him the cognomen 
of "Energy" a title so eminently befit- 
ting the man that it still lingers with 
him. AIi-. Mason's early education was 
of a superficial nature, for he would al- 
ways employ the time allotted for study, 
to drawing pictures or playing ball with 
the neighbor hoys. — vocations of which 
he is still very fond. In 1903 this 
slumbering genius came to West Virginia 
University to play "Base-ball," "Backet- 
ball", and erstwhile taking one or two 
course of study in the Varsity for recre- 
ation. 



CLIFFORD MYRES. 
Not much is known of Clifford's early 
history. When first seen in Morgan- 
town he was crossing the campus toward 
science hall, walking as stealthily, as a 
cat. His hearing is much like that of 
a hunter, sly and cunning. Clifford 
lias much musical ability, and when he 
renders with consummate artistic skill 
the charming symphonies of the masters. 
the effect is much like that produced by 
Orpheus of old. As an athlete, he has 
won .much fame. On numerous occas- 
ions, he has charmed large audiences by 
a most dextrious rendition of difficult 
acrobatic "stunts." 





NELLIE MORRIS. 
You have a chance here to look at a 
picture of one of the quickest and bright- 
est girls in the Junior class. Miss Mor- 
ris will be remembered for years to come 
for her happy disposition. She never 
has the "blues". If you want to know 
about the musicals "ask Nell". She prides 
herself on her ability to sing. She can 
warble like a bird. Some day we hope 
to read of her as being one of the 
world's leading vocalists. 



Ittouticola 



<Thc 



CLARENCE POST. 
"Post no bills on this Post to ad- 
vert ise any matrimonial scheme what- 
soever." is the warning of this dignified, 
curly headed, dimpled chin Junior, to 
the Co-eds of \V. V. U. "It might have 
been," is his only retort to their smil- 
ing faces and winsome ways. As a 
licoln student, he is a grind, but as a sport, he 
is unexcelled. Versed in all the mathe- 
matical knowledge of the ancient Egypti- 
ans, he dashes through Calculus and 
other Prep, mathematics, like a trout 
through a mountain pool. After imbib- 
ing all the knowledge at Fairmont Nor- 
mal, he came t o the University and is 
now trying to get a corner on Physics 
under "Tommy". 








WILFRED ARMSTRONG MORRIS. 
"Wilfred Armstrong Morris" he was 
christened, but since his days of prepdom 
lie lias been known chiefly by the title. 
"Sport."' He is a Pennsylvanian. from 
the home of the Connellsville coke. 
After many weary terms of mathe- 
matics and geology he has managed to 
reach dignity in the shape of member- 
ship in the Junior Engineering Class. It 
has been whispered that he is fond of 
girls in general, and would go to Helen 
— in particular! He is long, lean 
and lanky. 



MARY LYON PURINTON. 
Mary Lyon Turin! on is a poetess of 
whom we are all proud. She has a soft 
low voice, a soulful glance and the abil- 
ity to see three yards of poetry in a 
broken grassblade. Strange to reV.ie. 
she is an ardent student of Biology and 
in the Zoology class she dissects Rana 
Herculeus (bull frog) with as much 
nerve as Doctor Johnson. Report has it 
that the little fellow with the bow and 
arrows has done great execution in her 
heart and if this be true belles-lettres 
and science has lost much. 





HOWARD QUICK. 

Howard Quick came to West Virginia 
University from Marietta College. He 
came with the avowed intention of study- 
ing law, hut no sooner had he arrived 
in Morgantown than be began making 
out his programe for the military ball. 
After the ball had passed by he began 
to show signs of genius along other 
lines also. As a pianist he has made 
his mark. Those who know him well 
have great hopes that he will become 
a great jurist eventually; but those who 
know him best say that he will "marry 
rich" and be somebodv's husband." 



CHESNEY MACAULAY RAMAGE. 

Once there lived, in the quiet town 
of West Milford, a man named Ramage. 
Unto him, some twenty years ago, a son 
was born. Father Ramage called in 
the wise men of the town and inquired 
of them diligently what name would be 
most appropriate for his son. "Chesney 
Maculay," answered they. Father Ram- 
age replied, "Yea, verily, be it so". 
Chesney was a very precocious child and, 
'tis said, he devoured eagerly the works 
of his illustrious namesake before he 
had passed his second summer. Chesney 
is dignified and reserved, attends church 
regularly, and takes an especial inter- 
est in "Co-eds." 






EDNA RIGHTMIRE. 
Edna Rightmire was born in Grafton 
West Virginia, an uncertain number of 
years ago. She is famous for her wit 
and good humor. Her college career 
has been a very checkered one at first 
she determined to devote her life to 
the study of science and make her ma- 
jor study Chemistry, but after much 
persuasion she was prevailed upon to 
enroll in the English department. It 
is to be deeply regretted by future gen- 
erations that her famous "Treatise on 
Flying Lizardo" has been lost. 



3- fie 

illout icoln 



65 



jltoitticola 



MARSHALL WORMLEY RUST. 
Marshall Wormley Rust is, using a 
metaphor which engineering students 
will understand, a slow motion eccentric. 
On looking at him one is reminded of the 
saying. "Laziness, have 1 ever offended 
thee'.' - ' the answer being emphatically 
negative in the case of Rust. Rust came 
here from Charles Town and was a 
"Special" for some years but finally got 
into the Engineering College and in due 
season became a Junior. When he leaves 
West Virginia University with C. E. 
after his name we expect him to make a 
living. 





WILBERT HOWARD ROBINSON. 

Wilbert Howard Robinson is a con- 
noisseur of Mail Pouch tobacco. He has 
gained great renown in this respect in 
the years that he has spent in West Vir- 
ginia University. He always appears 
happy and smiling and always walks as 
if he had some definite destination in 
mind. He is handsome, witty and ac- 
complished but sad to relate no co-ed 
has ever been favored with his smile. 
All of his time and attention are devoted 
to getting his B. S. ( '. E. degree and 
also to keep Block Brothers working 
overtime. 



m 



MARTIN LUTHER SAYRE. 
Sayre is one of our orators. He is 
a man whose talents lay sleeping until 
a great crisis called them forth. This 
crisis was the discussion as to whether 
the Junior Class should have dancing at 
a "prom" they were considering "Com- 
promise with Sin? No, sir!" said Sayre 
and his speech against it was strong, 
very strong. He is studing Civil En- 
gineering, really studying it, and does 
not have much time for the lighter 
things in 'Varsity life. 





De COSTO SMITH. 
No, De Costo Smith is not a Spaniard 
but is just a very plain, ordinary Smith. 
He looks like Bill Smith or Sam Smith 
if there is anything in a name. He is 
a rather ordinary-looking individual with 
a small, drowling voice which is very 
seldom heard. If appearances deceive 
we are sure that he will, in the near 
future, startle the legal world by his 
ideas of law. 



CHARLES ENCELLE WAYMAN. 
While he was young and innocent, he 
was named Charles, but now, a lad of 
numerous nicknames, he is usually called 
"Muff", or "Apollo." Once upon a time, 
lie received a prize for Sunday school 
attendance, but he stands no show now. 
His present religion consists in the faith- 
ful worship of four mistresses: Music, 
(as he is master of a unique technique, 
with a touch that is all his own) ; the 
National Game, (his position is left 
field) ; Fairmont, his birthplace, ("the 
greatest industrial center on earth", he 
asserts) ; and Engineering, his future 
profession. 





illon t icola 



ROBERT STRICKLER. 

Bob Strickler is a scholar. Calculus is 
A, B, C to him. He reads Sophocles 
and Horace for the same reason that the 
Prep reads Frank Merriwell stories. 
From this you would suppose that he 
is a hollow-chested, sunken eyed some- 
body, wearing "specs" but he is not. On 
the contrary he is a good allround 
athlete, especially at ping pong. The 
only thing Bob does not succeed in is 
with the ladies. We hope some fair 
co-ed will attend to this part of his edu- 
cation speedily. 



67 



r. . -j/-j/.i**~< 



^^M 



jUoutir ol.n 



JOHN THOMAS WEST. 
Tom West is a man of a retiring dis- 
position. He takes more interest in his 
studies than in anything else. Yes, 
we know this is no place to roast him 
1ml we must toll the truth. His chest 
expansion is very groat but he uses 
il only in long expeditions to Cheat 
Mountains. Very early in his college 
life ho showed signs of becoming an em- 
inent naturalist or biologist and if he 
duos make one of these branches of study 
his life work, bo assured many new 
books on bugs and frogs will soon be 
before the scientific public. 





We 



CHARLES WELLS, 
well! "Snakes" Wells came in to 



this part of the country with a whoop, 
hurrah and a funny grin. A zone of noise 
always follows him. lie tells a joke 
and laughs loudest of all when it is told. 
Some laugh with him and the rest laugh 
at him. When Dr. Beziat De Hordes got 
'•Snakes" to play the part of "Le Grand 
Turc" in a certain French play ho s;iid 
•Musi be natural, Mr. Wells. " "Snakes" 
was natural and as n result brought 
down (ho house in his role as a Turk. 



BAXTER MONROE WHALEY. 
The time and place of Baxter's birth 
are not definitely known. The most 
authentic manuscript places the time 
some where past the middle of the nine- 
teenth century. When very young he 
"hiked" off to Morgantown, where he has 
since busied himself trying to be popu- 
lar with the "Co-eds." and incidentally 
attending the University. Baxter has 
won considerable reputation as a debater 
and is a candidate for promotion in the 
legal profession: He is a short, plump, 
jolly chap who enjoys a social "stunt" 
much more than he does reading Black- 
stone. 




b« 




ORLA M. WILKERSON. 
We find it difficult in such limited 
space to give a complete description of 
this subject, known as "Jack Wilkes." 
Above all things that may be said, how- 
ever, he is a very knowing young man 
and wise in his own conceit. If some of 
our readers find that they do not know 
(heir own business we cheerfully recom- 
mend them to "Wilkes." If others are 
curious about the secrets of any organi- 
zation in the University, they may be 
satisfied by consulting him. Tf profes- 
sors even, feel uncertain about facts not 
generally known, they may safely seek 
information from him. 



HERBERT ADDISON WOOFTER. 

Once in the remote part a tiny mass 
of protaplasni floating in the earth- 
heated waters of the universal ocean, 
felt within it from some source (ask 
the biologists where?) the spark of life. 
It grew fat, waxed strong and developed 
organs through a hundred thousand 
years or so of growth. Then it left the 
water and lived a few hundred thousand 
years, it and its successors, a terrestrial 
life. Always adding to itself new charms 
and utilities we find it finally a good- 
looking ape. A few more years and 
lo! men greet the final finished product 
as Herbert Addison Woofter, gentlemen, 
scholar and B. S. M. E. 





JAMES ELMER WILSON. 

The strength of mind and the grim 
determination of this Junior may be 
seen in his photograph. The grim de- 
termination was proved to be one of his 
qualities when he won the hammer-throw 
against Marietta's strong man in the 
"meet" last year (05). His deep bass 
voice is an important thing in Glee Club 
(loins'. Somehow it seems he has never 
made good with ye fair Co-ed. but it 
may be that he is just practicing being 
a bachelor. 



<Tflc 

311 o 11 f i c oln 



69 



Arnold, Gohen Clark, L. L. B Buckhannon 

Delta Tan Delta, W. V. A. A. 

Bayliss, William Garnett, M. E Dunloop 

^ e Kappa Alpha; W. V. A. A.; Mountain; Base-ball team 

iilonticoln '05, '06; Class Pres. I; Sub. Foot-ball team 'It.'); Monticola 

Board. 

Berry, John Charles, A. B Wheeling 

Phi Kappa Psi; Editor Athenaeum (3); Monticola Board. 

Boyles, Frank Morris, 1!. S Piedmont 

Phi Kappa Sigma; \\ . V. A. A. 

Brake, Arthur K., C. E Buckhannon 

Sigma Xn; Base-ball Team (2); Foot-hall Team .(3). 

Burns, Evalyn Sage, A. 1? Morgantown 

Kappa Delta; W. V. A. A.; Monticola Hoard: Circle 
Dramatique Francais; Y. \Y. C. A.; Class Vice-Pres. I. 

Burns, La Vega Washington, A. B 

Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Callison, James Henry, A. B Leivasy 

Sigma Xu: English Club; Parthenon Literary Society; 

Regents' Prize Declamation '02. 

Coffield, George Webster Peabody 

Sigma Xu; Parthenon Literary Society. 

Coffroth, William B., B. S. C. E Keyser 

Beta Theta Pi. 

Colcord, Edward C, 1!. S. C. E St. Albans 

Kappa Alpha; \V. X. A. A.; Engineering Society; Cadet 
Officers' Club; Nice President Y. M. C. A. (1); Secretary 
Engineering Society (1); President Engineering Society 
(2); Treasurer Cadet Officers' Club (_> & 3); Assistant 

Manager Basket-ball (3); Captain Co. P>: Distinguished 

Cadet 1st section; Manager Monticola '07; Cadet Major, 

Spring '00. 

70 



Colcord, Francis Carlton, B. S. C. E St. Albans 

Kappa Alpha; W. V. A, A.; Cadet Officers' Club; Y. M. 
C. A.; Captain Co. O; Vice-President Cadet Officers' Club; 
Vice-President and Treasurer of Engineering Society; Class 
Treasurer '05-00; Distinguished Cadet 1st section; 
Marksman. 

Cole, Otis, C. E Morgantown 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Base-ball Team (1). (2), (3); Captain 
Base-ball (2); Basket-ball Team (2), (3). 

Dayton, Arthur Spencer, A. B Philippi 

Delta Tau Delta; Circle Dramatique Francais; Columbian 
Literary Society. 

Drane, Robert McVeigh, L. L. B Piedmont. 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Columbian Literary Society. Law- 
Club; W. V. A. A.; Secretary Junior Law Class. 

Edwards, Mary Dorothy, A. B Martinsburg 

Kappa Delta; W. V. A. A. 

Ernst, Howard Mark, C. E South Thompson 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Foot-ball Team (2). <:!): Manager 
Basket-ball Team (:!) ; Engineering Society. 

Foulk, Virginia Morgantown 

Chi Omega; English Club; Y. W. C. A. 

Fortney, Camden Page, C. E Lumberport 

Delta Tau Delta; Engineering Society. 

Foulk, Thomas Bond, 1?. S. C. E Morgantown 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Olee Club; Choral Society; \V. Y. A. A.: 
Cadet Sergt. Co. C. 

Gatherum, Robert, 0. E Gatewood 

Engineering Society; Concord Alumni. 

Green, Ethel Averil, A. B Morgantown 

Alpha X. Delta; Circle Dramatique Francais; Music 
Club; Y. M. C. A.; Creeds Prize 1004-5; Monticola Hoard. 

Hereford, Walter D St. Albans 

Sigma Nu, Delta Chi. 



Jackson, Stephen Goodloe, B. S Jane Lew 

Sigma Chi; Class President (2); Winner First Prize in 
Debate vs. Wooster (3). 

Jenkins, Jessie, A. B Montrose 

Chi Omega; Y. \V. C. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; 
Circle Dramatique Francais; Anthenaeum Board '05-'06; 
Monticola Board; Contestant in Declamation Inter- 
Society Contest '05. 

Kennamond, Alva Dayne, A. B Wheeling 

Parthenon Literary Society; \V. V. A. A.; Sigma Nu. 

Kunkle, James Morgantown 

Sigma Chi; W. V. A. A. 

Kunkle, Justin Morgantown 

Sigma Chi; \V. V. A. A. 

Lewis, Laura Frances, A. B Aberdeen 

Kappa Delta; Y. W. C. A. 

Leahy, Thomas Austinberg, Ohio 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Foot-ball Team (2). (3); Captain 
Foot-ball (4). 

Marsh, Joseph Franklin, A. B Harrisville 

Columbian Literary Society; Debater in Inter-Society 
Contest '00; Y. M. C. A.; President Students' Publishing 
Association; Mountain; On team winning debate with 
W. U. P. '05. 

Lucas, Arthur Mapel Morgantown 

Sigma Xu; Columbian Literary Society: Cadet Officers' 
Club. 

Mason, Earle Dilworth, C. E Allegheny 

Sigma Chi; Base-ball team '04, '05, '06; Captain team '06; 
Class Historian (2); Monticola Board (artist). 

Mason, John W., Jr., B. S Fairmont 

W. V. A. A.; Circle Dramatique Francais; Monticola 
Board. 

McMillan, Perry Wade, C. E Masontown 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Engineering Society; Cadet Officers' 
Club. 



McNutt, John Dana, C. E Flatwoods 

Sigma Chi. 

Morris, Wilfred Armstrong, C. E Connellsville, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi; Assistant Manager Track-team 1905. 

Morris, Nellie Delia, A. 1? Morgantown 

Columbian Literary Society; Y. W. C. A. 

Myers, Clifford, A. B Mason 

Y. M. C. A.; Assistant in Gymnasium (2). (3); Cadet ?Fl\c 

Corps; Corporal Co. B.; Class Historian (3); Secretary 3ttcmticola 

W. V. A. A. 

Post, Clarence, A. B Fairmont 

Y. M. C. A.; Monticola Hoard; Class Treasurer (3). 

Purinton, Mary Lyon, A. B Morgantown 

Kappa Delta; Circle Dramatique Francais. 

Quick, Howard, L. L. B Marietta. Ohio 

Delta Tan Delta. 

Rightmire, Edna, A. B Morgantown 

Columbian Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. A.; Class Poet (3). 

Ramage, Chesney Macaulay, B. S Fairmont 

Delta Tau Delta; Circle Dramatique Francais; Parthenon 
Literary Society; Glee Club (2). (3); W. Y. A. A.: De- 
bating Association; Editor-in-chief Monticola; Anthenaeum 
Board; Winner inter-society contest in oration '05; on win- 
ning debating team vs. W. U. P. 1905; Inter-Society rep- 
resentative in essay 1900. 

Robinson, Wilbert Howard, C. E Millsboro 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Engineering Society. 

Rust, Marshall W Charles Town 

Kappa Alpha; Engineering Society; W. V. A. A. 

Smith, D. C 

Delta Chi, Phi Sigma Kappa; Monticola Board '07. 

Sayre, Martin Luther, C. E Evans 

Y. M. C. A.; Engineering Society. 

Strickler, Robert Parvin Parsons 

Delta Tau Delta; \V. Y. A. A.; Monticola Board; Vice- 
President (2); Base-ball team (1), (2), (3). 



MMIM 



jllonlicoln 



Wayman, Charles E Fairmont 

Plii Kappa Psi; Base-'ball team (2). 

Wells, Charles E Wheeling 

Cadet Officers' Club; Circle Dramatique Francais; W. V. 
A. A.; Monticola Board; Capt. Artillery Cadet Corps. 

Wilkerson, Orla McCombs Wolfrun 

W. V. A. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; Debating Asso- 
ciation. 

West, John Thomas Cassville 

Sigma 1'lii Epsilon; W. V. A. A.; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Second Marksman's Medal (1); Distinguished Cadet (1), 
(2); Winner of M. C. Lilley Sword (2); Vice-President 
(lass (2); Monongalian (2); Monticola Board; Assistant 
in Zoology (3). 

Whaley, Baxter Monroe, A. B Finch 

Y. M. C. A.; Columbian Literary Society; Debating As- 
sociation; Law Society; Monticola Board; Manager Mon- 
ongalian (3) ; Winner of Tax Commission Prize (2) ; Cap- 
tain of Debating Team vs. Wooster (3). 

Wilson, James Elmer, C. E Mannington 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Glee Club; W. V. A. A.; Engineering 
Society; Foot -ball Team (1); Track Team (2). 

Woofter, Herbert Addison, M. E Parkersburg 

Plii Sigma Kappa; Engineering Society. 




ElusonatUniontown. 




*#**************>**%fc##*****^****«»#* #*****«* ^ 



JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 




Usually a college class must have its history written 
and published in the college annual to inform the public 
of its existence and perhaps, achievements ; but in the case 
of the Class of '07, now the Junior Class of the West Vir- 
ginia University, this is not necessary. Practically every 
one in this section of the country has heard of this class 
but for fear there is some one who is not well informed in 
current history, this sketch, however unworthy it is, was 
written to enlighten their dull intellects. 

From the time that this class entered upon its career in 
the fall of '03 its life has been marked by an unbroken 
series of successes. When that "conglomerate mass of 
youthful and knowledge-seeking humanity" appeared be- 
fore that powerful Judge — The Honorable Registrar, that 
Worthy noted the unusual superiority of those cpialified to 
join the ranks of the '07 (Naughty-seven). The Honorable 
Treasurer who is also a chemist who was never known to 
make a mistake in an analysis, speadily perceived that they 
were diamonds in the rough. These worthy judges were 
not mistaken in their opinions for shortly after the class 
had affected an organization, it showed itself to be of no 
ordinary kind. 

In the famous Class War of '03, under the leadership 
of Bayliss it gave the Sophomores a disastrous defeat which 
was unparalled in the history of the University; and 
when by foul means they abducted our Secretary and our 



Historian, we easily frustrated their evil purpose and their 
pygmean plans came to naught. 

The next year when we were Sophomores under the 
leadership of Jackson, the Freshmen made a feeble attempt 
to dispute our valor. However they are exonerated since 
they knew not our prowess. 

We are now in the third year of our existence and are 
still manifesting our activity. This book is a product of 
our labor and of its excellence we leave you, kind reader, 
to judge. 

However, the former history of the class of '07 is 
indeed short as we have just begun ; in fact we have not had 
oixr Commencement yet. Think of what an array of 
volumes it will take to describe the achievements and vic- 
tories of the members of this class in after life. Certain- 
ly there are latent geniuses in this class who shall bring a 
spirit of pride to this University, similar to that which 
thrills the student of Oxford or Edinburg when he thinks 
of the immortals that once sought wisdom in those classic 
walls. We look around to see if there is any one of us that 
promises future greatness. How utterly we fail to dis- 
cover that ascending star ! Yet that might be expected for 
there is not a member of the class that does not show some 
signs of future greatness. Certainly, there will be classics 
written in the next decade bearing on the covers the names 
of Callison, Berry, Mason, Green, and Whaley. 



jllouticoL-i 



illoiif icoln 



Our orators will grace the platform to disseminate 
knowledge to the world. WiUcerson with his gentle mel- 
lifluous voice, when he takes one of his famous flights 
of oratory is hardly to be excelled even by Russell Con- 
well. Who could behold the military services of the 
"Colcord twins" without thinking' how safe this great Com- 
monwealth will be as long as they bear arms in its defence' 
Yet these mighty captains are not invulnerable. They 
are doomed to defeat when Cupid with his primitive anus 
enters the arena. There is Dayton ; a veritable chip off the 
old block, who, from present indications will easily over- 
tower his father in political honors. 

But why go further into detail to mention each mem- 
ber of the Class when they need no mention? They will 
carve their names in letters of gold in the annals of his- 
tory. Therefore it is mere mockery to insert them in an 
humble writing like this. 

In athletics '07 has indeed gained her laurels. She 
has been ready at all times to contest for the honor and 
fame of the "Old Gold and Blue'. On the baseball field 
and the track our class name is synonymous with success. 
Who has not heard of the exploits of Martin, Leahy, 
Ernst, Brake and Bayliss on the gridiron? How many times 
have they brought victory and fame to our University 
and joy to the hearts of our Co-eds? 

And now let us say that this class has given such an 
impetus to the prosperity and fame of the University, that 
the whole state has felt its influence. In fact many know 
the University only through the present Junior Class. 

When this class leaves the University — but no! Let 
us not dwell on unpleasant things! Let us hope for the 
best. 





illonlicoln 



Itlcmtirola 





JtloiUicoln 



77 



ill on ti coin 




J'n si<l< at Ernest Arden Bruce 

Vice-President James Riffe 

St in tary Bertha Sterling IIawi.ky 

'I'n asuri r John Steenbergen 

Historian Cilda Langpitt Smith 

Yell Master Lawrence Cook Xeardley 



Old Gold and White 



u& 



Boomalacka, Boomalaeka — Wha Who Ray! 
Razzle Dazzle! Hobble Gobble; Sophomore Hooray! 
Hi Yip— Hi Yi; Rat Rat— Rah! ! 
Sophomore Sophomore — Sis-Boom-Bah ! 
Sophomores ! ! ! 



78 




<Thc 
Itlouticola 



79 



<Thc 
Hlonltcola 



cS 



cphcmole 



6& 



Mow 



Austin, Samuel Cecil, 2 X B. S. M. E Lewisburg. 

Arnold, Gohen Clark, A T A L. L. B Buckhannon. 

Beneke, George Clans, * K 2 L. L. B Wheeling. 

Bennett, Clyde Mortimer B. S. C. E Morgantown. 

Blair, Herbert McClaskey L. L. B Weston. 

Boyles, .lames Samuel B. S. C. E Wirkel. 

Bruce, Ernest Arden, 2 N B. S. C. E Bluefield. 

Colebank, George Henry A. B Grafton. 

('oilier, Glenn Albert B. S. M. E Ceredo. 

( !ole, Jermiah Wilson A. B Cameron. 

Darst. Helen Marjory, K A A. B Ravenswood. 

Francis, Thomas, <i> K 2 B. S. M. E Connelsville. Pa. 

Francis, diaries Blaine B. S. C. E Point Marion, Pi 

Frantz, Winiter Reginald •!> K *F A. B Cumberland, M<1 

Goldbarth, Irvin Strauss. 2 X L. L. B Charleston. 

Hawley, Bertha Sterling, K A A. B Fairmont. 

I Taught. Benjamin Franklin A. B Atwood. 

Ilinman, Clark Frank B. S. M. E Somerville, Mass 

Hutchinson, Brooks Swearengen, A T A B. S Fairmont. 

Jones, Kthelyn Belle, X <> A. B Knottsville. 

Lawson, Herschel Wayne A. B Morgantown. 



Lawler, Trueman Bartin L. L. B Fairmont. 

Lough, Walter Gay, A T A B. S. M. E. Fairmont. 

Lucas, Arthur Mapel B. S. ('. E Morgantown. 

Mc( arthv. Timothy James 15. S. Agr Fenton, Mich. 



MeJilton. John Perkins B. S. M. E Sleepy Creek. 

Mitchell, Harbour, * K * m. g Wheeling. 

Riffe, Jerome Alfred, B 9 II M. E Hinton. 

Eteinheimer, Clara May A. B Fairmont. 

Saunders, Lawrence Davis C. E Randall. 

Selby, Floyd Blaine M. E Morgantown. 

Settle. Edward, 2 X B. S. C. E Deepwater. 

Spragg, Leon White B. S. C. E Wheeling. 

Steenbergen, John, <I> K 2 A. B Beale, 

Schwiger, Arlen Coir A. B Dola. 

Smith, Cilda Langtitt. K A \. B Fairmont. 

Shirkcy. Sydney Staunton. B 9 II \. B Maiden. 

Weaver, Mabel Jane. A X A \. B Morgantown. 

Wert/. Mayme Eleanor A. B Huntington. 

Woofter, Herbert Addison, <I> 2 K M. E Parkersburg. 

Yiniker, Jacob Alfred M. E Mason. 

Ycanlley. Lawrence Cook, 11 K A M. E Parkersburg. 






r ?.T V *i ? *»* V V V -.■ %r V V V V * 



S***** 



V 7|t V V r,r V ' 




SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 








If the class of '08 were one of the ordinary mediocre 
kind, usually found in the University, it would be easy to 
write its history. But since this class has made such 
an extraordinary record, it would require the united ef- 
forts of the Professors of both English and Mathematics 
to record rightly the progressions of the infinite series of 
its brilliant achievements. 

The venerable University Professors early recognized 
the fact that the class of '08 contained the best talent of the 
Middle and Southern states. Only a few members of 
this class were trained in the "kitchen" department of this 
University. Most of them came directly from the best 
secondary schools of the country. Owing to this fact, 
when the class entered the school in the fall of '04, it was 
not of that extremely seedy appearnce that generally char- 
acterizes the Freshmen classes of the State University. The 
one oi- two of the members who had not carefully brushed 
all the seed off their backs soon learned the better ways of 
the world by the association with their more cidtured class- 
mates. Quite soon, it was recognized by the University 
authorities that there must be more of an atmosphere of 
enterprise and improvement about the college buildings, 
in order that things might better harmonize with tin 1 up- 
to-date class that had just entered the University. Imme- 
diately, a plan was set on foot for renovating and re- 



decorating the Ladies parlor. This year, there has fallowed 
a complete cleaning up of the entire Woodburn Hall. 
Everybody recognizes the fact that such a system of clean- 
ing should have taken place several years ago, but it had 
to await the inspiration of the class of '08. 

The Sophomore class has been an inspiration along 
many lines and has taught not only the University authori- 
ties, but the students of other classes many things that they 
should know. When school opened in September '05, the 
University Professors were delighted to find all the class 
back; they knew that the wheels of progress would still 
roll on properly. On Friday evening of the first week of 
the school term, the class met for reorganization,— -to ex- 
amine carefully and to strengthen, if necessary, any weak 
places that might be discovered in the foundation, so care- 
fully constructed last year. A very efficient set of officers 
was carefully chosen. But just as it came time for elect- 
ing the class Historian, there was a slight noise heard at 
the door, which was interpreted to be the usual "Fresh- 
men interruption". The class was so anxious to get out 
and teach those "Freshies" the proper respect to be shown 
toward a dignified Sophomore meeting, that the Historian 
was chosen without proper consideration. 

The members of the Freshmen class learning of the 
Sophomore's organization, thought that they must follow 



Ittouticola 



81 



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suit. By organizing too. On the first evening that they 
called the meeting, there was a complete failure, owing to 
the fact that none of their members seemed to know enough 
to direct an election. The President of the University 
having learned this, took pity upon them and called an open 
air meeting on the campus for the following night; he 
also called out a company of cadets to assist them in the 
organization. Still it would have been a failure, had not 
the Sophomore class in its usual manner come to the res- 
cue, and assisted them in the work. When the election 
was finished, the Freshmen were so well pleased, and felt 
so grateful towards their Helpers, that they fell upon their 
knees ( ?) and gave proper recognition to the "powers 



that be", for the timely assistance rendered them in need. 

The class of '08 has always gained much popularity 
in Athletics. Some of the best players of the Varsity 
foot-ball team belong to this class. For this reason the 
Sophomores could not organize a class foot-ball team, as 
the other classes did not like the idea of being knocked 
around by those big foot-ball men. It has also gained many 
victories in basket-ball and other Athletics. 

The Sophomore class has plans in mind for continuing 
the good work the next two years. Before it leaves the 
University in '08 it will no doubt be recognized as the class, 
"first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of its 
fellow-students." HISTORIAN. 




LOST-STRAYED 

STOLEN!! 



(WMMMMMMMMMMMMMM* 



■^****-— **^* -*"-" ,,, * fc ' i " i ¥r i n"'riT-V | -i- u -|.v L rL- 



t u **m?**0m * *0+****+m»*****mmm 



Whereas it has pleaped the A.'mighty to weed out from our midst these 
worthless social outcasts, smitten oy the dread malady diagnosed 

CHOLERA INFANTUM, 

And should any be so fortunate as to survive the tortures of HELL, and 
return, let him be instructed as follows: 



I (HESHMEN MUSI DISCXdO (HEIR SHORT rSQUSEBS. 

II FRESHMEN MUST NOT WEAR 10U0 BtKDED HATS, W 1 u CAPS 
SWEATERS, DRAM WEARINC APRAgEt WITH W 1 U MONOCRAHS OR COLORS. 

III IRESMMfN MUST BElfJNC 10 TKf HTHKTIC ASSOCIATION T MC 
A.. AI LEAS! CUE UTERAR! SOCIETY, AHO MUST SIHC IN IHE CHAPEL CHOIR! 

IV. FRESHMEH MUST HQ1 CONTRACT AHf DEBTS IN THISCJTY. 

1 FRESHMEN SHALL NOT CUE VENT TO THE FOUL VAPORINCS OF THEIR 



VOLATILE HEADS IH (HE PRESENCE 01 01 
QUOTE SHAKESPEARE, MKTON. DANTE OR Hi 
LOWED PRECINCTS 



THE SERPENT S Wl 

LDVElt. POISON AI 



,E ENJOY THE SOCIETY OF 



■■■M um ■%»*■■» * m -i**,* *. ' ■■*'» »Li| .ii » » > t + , ,«,,,,, , , ^ .i^^^^M.^uy^N^* . « — >.i ■ w ^^.. > i.yyvM W w* m w u m . 



WARNING! 



From the Junior Kindergarten, 

FRESHMEN 

Fresh from the glebe, uncultured, rude, pusillanimous and gross bipeds 
(bearing only the surface marks of humanity i that have strutted but a brief 
hour upon a mimic stage, alternately crawling and pedalling around upon the 
moccasins of their infancy, as yet unweaned and undivorced from the sustain- 
ing dug of mamma, crying, weeping and wailing for gum rings and rattles, 
and with, as Milton says, "thoughts lower than any beadle!" 

From the Late Silence of These 

'09ERS. 

These insects that folly has created for the annoyance of our atmosphere, 
dangerous alike in their torpidity and their animation, infesting where they 
fly, and poisoning where they repose, it has been decided that they are 

DEAD 



'Tis but a fool's nature to trespass upon the 
direction of his superiors; and alas f Fresh- 
men, ye must now take heed: for 
WE, THE CLASS OF 1908. have banded ourselves together and given a 
solemn oath to carry into immediate execution, for the slightest infraction of 
any clause of the above code, punishment so terrible that, with all the rich- 
ness of our lauguage, it is incapable of being expressed. 



PROVOCATION 



FAKES, FREAKS, 

FLUNKERS I! 

SOPHOMORES 

A pest worse than the dread "Yellow Jack" has recently fallen over our fair city. 
A hetrogenous mass of seething, reeking, writhing, squirming, human MONSTROS- 
ITIES, consisting of all the refuse of the secondary schools of the State, together 
with a conglomeration of second-hand petrified PREPS, has flooded this city with 
its obstreperous proximity. 



NAUGHT-EIGHT 




The 8 is the Exponent 
of Their Nothingness. 



i &0PH0M0R&6. Being v E 



.y UNSOPHISTICAT. 



These Abominable. Bullheaded, Contemptible, Degraded, Effervescent, Fallacious, Gluttonous, Harangueful, Idiotic, 
Jagged, Knocking, Lugubrious. Malevolent, Noxious. Odious, Pamsimonious, Quiescent, Rancid. Scurrilous. Tattling, la- 
bearable. Vacillating, Windy. Xanlhia, Yellow, Zymotic, &_ arrived on sleek, well-fed ponies, which receive the 
greater part of their attention. They are characterized by their complete aversion to all kinds of exertion-physical 
or mental. Their distaste for all manly or athletic sports, is doubtless due to their 

COLD FEET 



ODE TO '00 

O, Y« Cod* and little Fuhe* 

w., ever like b» mofUl k <n; 
No 1 oh. no 3 • thouwnd unci no 'f 

A ...I WE hope, for ALMA MATER. 



T K.i thei 



Athletic Record 

I. FOOTBALL— All Games Forfeited 

II. BajVtball ? ? ? 

III. Baseball??? 

IV. Track???" 



ill an I icoln 



RETALIATION 



3t1outico(n 




r %, f ,. 



President James C. Gibson 

Vice-President Greedy C. Sheppard 

Secretary, Lorenna II. Frees 

Treasurer Donald Ross 

Veil Master John P. Moriarty 

Historian Virginia B. Neal 



Blue and White. 



. //onVi. 

Violet. 



M 



One-a-zippi, two-a-zippi, three-a-zippi /.an! 
Freshmen! Freshmen! heat us if you can! 




w he 

ill on I i coin 



85 



Itlonticoln 



KJtedSmen k/loii 



Bauragartner, Vincent Y., ATA 

Barnes, Hugh C. 

Barnhart, Elmer C, B 9 II 

Bell, Alexander I).. ^ * B 

Billingsley, Jay E. 

Boydstori, Fred A., K. A. 

Bremer, Ella A. 

Carlin, Leo. 

CmI her. Wilbur Karl. 

Colebank, George H. 

Coplin, Nancy, ASA 

Cummins, G. II. 

Cummins, C. E. 

Diniiiiik, Artemas D. 

Ely. John C. Jr., 2 N 

Estill. Davis IL. K. A. 

Feller, Charles V. 

Finlaj son. John K. 

Folan, Rose A. 



Fries, Lorenna II. X 9. 
Fitzgerald, T. W. 
Gibbs, Oscar F. 
Gibson, .lames ('.. K. A. 
Hall. Roy 0. 
Hall. John W. 
Ileadly. Julius B. 

H 1. Edgar F. 

Hutchinson. W. S. 
Kidd. Albert H. 
Kin--. B. W.. <I> ^ K 
Knoke. Frank E. 
Koelz, Herman C. 
Layman, Claude IL, II K A 
McConihay, Clarenve \Y.. 2 X 
Menefee, Columbia (!.. A S A 
Milliken, Rex, * 2 K 
Moon. Ada. A S A 
Moriarity, John P. 



Morris. I.. II. 
Neal, Ada M.. X <> 
Neal, Virginia B., X <> 
Row. George !'.. $ 2 K 
Reiner, Rhinney P., <I> K 2 
Ross. Donald. 
Sage, Richard \V. 
( landers. Herhert W., 2 N 
Scott, I la Heck M.. 2 N 
Sheppard, Creedy C, <I> 2 K 
Smith, Lee A. 
Smith. Charles .L. -I> 2 K 
Snyder. Hubert E.. ATA 
Steele. Willard. 
Vance, Linnie, K A 
Wat kins. Maybelle R. 
Weaver. Archie C. 
Whiting, Ceo. W. 
Wilson, Lucy C, K A 



g^^st^a^^s^^^i 




************* ******* * * ^ * * *:* *;= *:* * * *:* * * * *:* * *:* * * * *:r *;* «f ^ *s *:* *:* «* * ^ ^f *^ s* ,:* *^ ^ t:* t^ *;* *;* f:* * ^ Tjf *^ *^ «* * tJt * t:* *:* * * * * * * *^ ^f * * * ^ * rif 

1 



m PATRICK'S PRIVATE OPINION 

*«***Hlr* ************** **^*******************^ 




;f^i^fMN the aivnin ov Oct. 10 Howly mither an' 

0# howlin saints! Begorra an' oi don't know 
|$| whither me hid's on me heels or me back. 
:^-^w Sooch a rooshin shpankin' toime oi niver had 
:"^'^"|Bi since oi lift me mither in owld Oireland. 

Now if oi can iver sittle down I'll jist 
wroite a few wurrds ov what's happened these thray wakes 
since oive been here at the big school. Ah, an' it's a foine 
rooshin' toime oive been havin'! The furst thing on the 
furst day an' a felly wid a shmart look in his eye shtruts 
up an' sez to me, sez he "Hello Pat, an' what class do you 
belong to? "Home rule for Oireland an' may she live 
forever!" sez oi. "0 ye fool, an' what are ye 're colors?" 
sez he. ' ' Grane, ' ' sez oi, pointin ' proudly to me shamrock 
waist-coat. "Oh I guess ye belong to the Frishies, or 
oiight to," sez he shtruttin' away agin just as proud loike 
as if he was a polaceman wid buttons. 

Will thin that avnin' oi towld the felly oi shlape wid, 
"Misther Bob," sez oi puffin' out an' lookin' proud, "Oi 
belong to the 'Grane Fellies, the Frishmen, Misther 
Shmarty said oi did. ' ' Thin he wint roight to callin ' me 
a "brick" an' sooch other hard names, an' towld me to 
take off me shamrock waist-coat an' come wid him. When 
we got to the corner there was thraw other fellies wid bockets 
an' brooshes an' whoite an' yelly paint. Oi was always 
a good climber on board the ship, an' Misther Bob an 



me took one bucket an' stahrted climbin'. Whin our 
faces were as rid as English Lobsters we come to a little 
round shanty called the ' ' inservatory ' ' — a place where they 
see stahrs in. We didn't see anny tho, ' but before ye 
could wink your oye we had a big 09 roight there on the 
stahr-house. Thin we stahrted runnin' down the hill 
loike the divils were afther us an' oi thripped an' saw all 
the stahrs oi didn't see a whoile ago. Thin we come back 
to the big house wid the little windys an' the roof wid four 
soides to it. Oi sid me prayers an' the fellys hoosted me 
up, an' whin oi got back to the grane thir was four 09 's 
shtarin' roight at hivin' an' me an' tillin' the birds an' peo- 
ple that the grane fellies of 09 were the class afther their 
own hearts, an' that Patrick O'Neal was that swilled up 
wid proide that he couldn't brathe. Will thin the other 
fellies come up wid their buckets an' nixt mornin' oi felt 
loike a hero. Oi put on me hoigh hat and shtipped around 
as proud an' condecendin' loike as if oi was a perfissor. 

Nixt marnin ' Misther Bob wakened me from me shlape 
an' sez to me, sez he, "Git up an' let's look aroun. " Faith 
an' if ivery tiligraph pole wasn't bearin' a pace ov paper 
sayin' loyin' things about the grane fellies. 

Sakes an we wint afther the divilish things fure long 
ivery one ov thim was down. 

An now oive aised me moind oi giss oi'll till what oi 
stahrted to till a whoile ago. Ivery mither 's son ov us 



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was there to the furrst matin' ov the Grane Fellies. Ivery 
\van*s hahrt was thai swilled up wid proide that we couldn't 
slit ay in a house.. Out on the grane grass an' under the 
stahrs ov hiven we mit an' made a Liittle short felly our 
prisident. Thin if the shmarties didn't shtick in an' try 
to run us off. Shure an' that roiled me Oirish an' begorra, 
we wint at t him. Oi thought oi was in the stahr-house for 
sure: but oi jist kipt roight on yillin' for Owld Oireland 
and the grane fellies. Oi don't know what happened but 
furrst thing oi knows an' they have us all a mahrehin' down 
the shtrate an' yillin' "Thraw chares for the Shmarties." 
It wasn't fair an' bedad an' oi'll lick ivery blissed one that 
sez it was. ( )i yilled "Thray chares" loike thray divils, 
an' thin oi sid for the Grane Fellies jist as soft loike as if 
oi was savin' me prayers. 

Oeh, ochone ! an Oi'm grane all over now but oi can shtill 
yill '" Hurrah fure the grane fellies an' owld Oireland." 

Nov. 11. 
Och, howly tnither, an' we got it in the nick this toime. 
Faith an' the Prips bate us bad in foot-ball. But the grane 
fellies will come out on top yit. 

Nov. 18. 
Faith an' begibbers, an' oi knew wed do it. The Davis 
an' Ilkins fellies are bateii, an' the Grane Fellies are 
on top jist as Oi sid they'd be. 

Nov. 24 
Aehora, an me bid's been in hiven all aivnin'. Our tame 
knocked lie' shtonfin' out ov the other tame in bahsket-ball 
an' we're shlill on lop an' will sthay on top. Long live the 
Grane Fellies forever. 



Nov. 28. 

Ah. an' we got it back at the shmarties this toime. 
Shure an' weive invinted a bit ov blarney that'll sittle the 
whole false an' decaivin' sit ov thhn. Misther Bob an' me 
shtuch thim up ivery where, an' ivery won saw thhn too; 
for the shleepy shmarties shlipt roight on an' niver said a 
wurrd. 

Feb. 17. 

Ow. we'll dance all night, till broad dayloight 

An' go home wid the gurrls in the niarnin'. 

Ow, it's kilt oi am entoirely wid fascination an plisure. 
Shure an' it's St. Pathrick's day an' we've had a pahrty — 
a pahrty wid aitins an' shpaikins. Thray or fure fellies 
an' gurrls did the shpaikin' an' then St. Felix, the pathron 
saint ov the class walked roight in an towld us how he 
happened to be our pathron. an' jist what we must do an' 
what we mustn't, an' thin towld us he'd be back nixt year 
an' walked out. Thin ivery body shtarted shakin' hands 
an' thin we had aitins, an' won ov the gurrls played on the 
pianny an' we all sung, an' thin ivery won got soh nan loike 
an' ivery toime anny won shpoke he sid "Misther President, 
oi move," an' furst thing oi knowed a little felly moved 
"that Patrick O'Neal be class historian." 

An now it's bothered oi am entoirely. Oi don't know 
what to wroite at all. at all. For it's a foine history oi 
must lie wroitin' ov the fellies that have got the shpunk, 
the fellies that have got the shpirit. the fellies that will be 
a proide, an honor to the Wist Virginia School. 




itloitticoln 



ficet.) . 

President Hershil Hampton Rose 

Vice-President John Claude Keister 

Secretary Hugh Barclay 

Treasurer, Vester Brisan Dunn 

Historian, Prescott Cushing White 



lUoulir til.n 



Q^c/u'ot cZt/U" Cfc/.)J kJCoCC. 



Arnold, Arthur. 
ByarSj John William. 
Bj rer, Eugh Samuel. 
Barclay, Hugh. 
Campbell, John Edgar. 
Coffield, Geprge Webster* 
( '(maw ay, ( iniu Bryte. 
Cowgill, Ira V. 
Collett, Albert Jackson. 
Dawson. Daniel. 
Dougherty, Nbrval Rogers. 
Dunn. Vester Brisan. 
Flanagan, Daniel William. 
Friedman, Harry. 
Gronniger, .lames Davis. 



Greene, Daniel Myron. 
Hamilton, R. 0. 
Hutchinson, John Quincey. 
Honecker, Benjamin Stewart. 
Keister, John Claude. 
Lively, Clarence W. 
l.nliiii, Albert Lafayette. 
Marquarrie, Hector Kenzie. 
Malamphy, Michael Joseph. 
MeCue, Anthony Fielding. 
McEldowhey, John Cochran. 
McMorrow, John. 
McNJell, Chauncey St. Claire. 
Pettit, Charles Sherman. 
Prichard, John Guy. 
Price, Richard McSherry. 



Ititz. John Eldon. 
Rose, Herschel Hampton. 
Robinson. Jed Waldo. 
Seay, Samuel Bourne. 
Staubley, Ralph Franklin. 
Shinn. Fred Lawrence. 
Southern. John Cornelius. 
Steed, R. D. 

Strader, Wilbur Jackson. 
Shull, Claude Lareux. 
Tennant, Odell Scott. 
Wilcox. Howard J. 
White, Prescott Cushing. 
Walton. Joseph Lee. 
Young, Houston (ioff. 



90 




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91 



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In conformity with an ancient custom established in 
all regular and well governed Law Classes it becomes 
necessary to deposit in the archives of the University a 
short memorial of the Senior Law Class. No common 
class is it, certainly and yet the task is not easy because 
the wealth of material is so great that it is hard to choose 
what facts to set forth in so brief a sketch — 

What was said of the greatest Virginian — the father 
of his country — with some slight modifications certainly, 
and with a considerable of truthfulness probably may 
be said of the Senior Law Class of the West Virginia Uni- 
versity. They may be described as being first in war, 
first in peace and first in the hearts of the Co-eds. 

The record of our .Junior year had been one of warfare. 
It began with a hot contest — a fierce fight for the chief- 
tianship and this spirit seemed to pervade the proceedings 
and doings of the whole year. It was a year however 
of conquest and victory. We overran the Kingdom of 
the Three Blackstones and reclaimed from the "high 
brush" a large and well organized section of contracts. 

These victories, however, were not accomplished with- 
out some losses. When chief MacQuarrie looked over the 
ranks of his faithful followers in the Pall of 1905 he 
found thai some of his men were missing. The hoi en- 
gagements of "Exams", and the lout;' marches of t nil 
time had somewhat thinned the ranks. Some were sleep- 



ing on their rights in the wilds of Willey's woods — lost in 
the "high brush." Others had "lost out" in the attempt 
to pass the brook St. George. This stream seemingly fair 
enough in term time, nevertheless at its close becomes 
swollen to a Hood. Some of our cavalrymen riding <raily 
into the current attempted to stem the tide on horse-back, 
but sank beneath the waves to rise no more. Some 
also were marked mounds on Maxeys meadows. 

These slight losses, however, were more than compen- 
sated for by the arrival of new recruits and the work of 
reorganization for another year was undertaken with 
courage and the highest hope; and proved a comparatively 
easy task. How Rose rose to the occasion, and in his 
rising seemed a pillar of state, is too well known to all to 
need to be recounted here at any length. With prompti- 
tude and vigor he seized the reins of government and a 
broad and capable policy of peace and power at once 
unfolded itself for the benefit of the Class in particular 
and the University in general. 

With a view that the finances of the class should be 
safely and wisely administered Dunn was elected first 
Lord of the Treasury, and a faithful "watch dog" he has 
proved himself to be. None of the funds have been taken 
or misapplied. Why.' Because there "air no funds". 
When Dunn duns for funds he solemnly announces to the 
class that he is not collecting money for his own benefit. 



But we do not seem to take this suggestion very seriously. 

Under the present administration we have attained a 
degree of prosperity in the arts of peace almost unparalleled 
in the annals of Senior Law Classes. In athletics and 
music and literary work we have attained distinction, and 
in the study of the law we have made marvelous progress. 

The conduct of the class is now of a very high order; 
and most of our faults have disappeared. Especially is 
this true of the mastication of mail pouch which at one 
time was such a serious fault, and over which many must 
have shed bitter tears, judging from the condition which 
the floor of the class room often presented after a recita- 
tion. But as to this fault there is now a marked change 
for the better certainly. Nothing but harmless Hot-ball 
or innocent "Scrap" is now taken by way of refreshment 
during the tedious and tasteless recitation hours. It is 
true that Dr. Brooke has recently recommended to the 
class the wearing of gum shoes in the recitation rooms as 
a necessary precaution to protect the feet from the damp- 
ness of certain shinning pools upon the floor. But surely 
he was thinking at the time of some other class. Perhaps 
he was thinking of the days of Judge Johnson and simply 
spoke thus through force of an old habit. Surely he was 
not thinking then of the present Senior Class. 0, dear 
no, he surely was not. 

So much space has been taken up in discussing the 
foregoing feathers of the class that but little room remains 
for the presentation of its social attainments. However 
but little space is really needed for the consideration of this 
branch of our subject. Not but what the social qualities 
and distinctions of the class are many and varied They 
certainly are: and these things speak for themselves. All 
the world knows (and how could it be otherwise?) that tin 
Co-eds are sure that the Senior Law Class is just right. Of 



course none of the class attend the dances and balls. They 
would never think of doing anything so unconstitutional. 
But at Y. W. C. A. socials and church suppers they shine 
with becoming merit. 

The Senior Law Class like most law classes is a jolly 
good-natured lot of fellows. Our associations have been 
most pleasant; and it is with true regret that we part 
from our Alma Mater and from each other. 

Historian. 



Jllonf icoln 




93 



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E 
N 
I 
O 

R 

L 

A 

w 







We can Boast of a"5EMBLANCE of BEAUTY'among us. too!!! I 



94 




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tmwp 




am 



«Thc 
Jllouliroln 



'tceta. 

I'll sidi nl Fleming M. Alderson 

Vice-President Geo. C. Beneke 

Tn asun r Harry A. Downs 

Secretary Robt. ]\IcV. Drane 

Poet Daniel W. Bansiikk 

Historian Roy W. Ruekee 



fait 



Aldersoh, V. M. 
Arnold, (i. ('. 
Armstrong, Paul. 
Beneke, G. C. 
Blair, H. M. 
Brand, V. M. 
Batten, H. C. 
Banshke, I). W. 
Cain, S. W. 
Carr, L. A. 
( looper, %. F. 
Dawson; Daniel. 
Davis, W. O. 
Drane, R. McV. 
Downs, IT. A. 
Gibson, J. 0. 
Gist, J. A. 



Henshaw, E. L. 

Holmes. II. II. 
Hamerick, J. J. 
Hamilton, R. 0. 



). 



Hereford, \Y 
Hill, W. I). 
Kenna, J. E. 
Lewis, (). C. 
.Mad in. P. IT. 
Meador, B. 
Morrison, W. F. 
Musgrave, S. C. 
MeCue, A. F. 
Price, (!. W. 
Pendleton, P. M 
Quick, H. M. 
Ramage, T. F. 



Robbins, A. C. 
Rueker, R. \V. 
Rose, A. IT. 

St at hers. 15. L. 
Simmons, \V. 1!. 
Strosnider, II. 
Somerville, (!. <! 
Seay, S. B. 
Smith. D. C. 
Sheppard, A. I?. 
Thomas, J. D. 
Williams. E. S. 
Whaley, D. W. 
Staublej, A. F. 
Sutton, C. A. 



96 




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07 



JUoiil icola 







JUNIOR LAW HISTORY 






-:- -:• -:• * •:■ -:• •:- -:• -:- -i- -:• -:- •:• ■:- -:- ■:■ * ■:■ ■;■ * •;■ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * -:• * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ■:■ ■•■ * * ■:■ ■•■ ••■ * * * * * * * ■•- * * * * 



KADOi 



The Junior Law Class of 1905- '06 has proven beyond 
a doubt that it has cast aside the time worn traditions 
handed down by its predecessors and risen above the 
standard set by past classes. This was demonstrated when 
the class, realizing the necessity for a change in the ques- 
tionable methods pursued during past examinations, on 
the 16th day of April 1006 installed a new scheme to be 
pursued during examinations, to be known as the Honor 
System. Under this new method each man pledges him- 
self on his honor neither to give or receive assistance during 
any examination and to report any student whom he may 
deteel in this act of cheating. The accused is to be tried 
by the class and if found guilty of cheating notified to 
leave the University. This is certainly a step in the 



right direction and too much cannot be said in its favor. The 
Junion Law class deserves a great deal of credit for in- 
augurated this policy and it is to be hoped that future 
classes may profit by the worthy example set by this year's 
class and strive to perpetuate and carry out this new scheme 
of things. The tone of the law class will be raised and a 
degree will mean so much more than it did when it was 
an open secret that a great many men went through col- 
lege on their ability to devise unfair methods of passing 
rather than on their ability as students. 

No further history is needed. The one act set forth 
in the preceding paragraph has earned for the Junior 
Law (lass of 1905- '06 a pillar in the Hall of Fame. 

Historian. 




W 



:is 




Ittouticola 



3Houtiroln 



' icelA 

President John II. Steenbergen 

Vice-President Geo. Delbert Johnson 

Secretary Samuel Cecil Austin 

Treasurer Geo. C. Mountz 

Historian, Allen E. Burnes 



M0//0 

1 Specie mcr Agendo." 



3Uf 

Austin. Samuel Cecil, Sigma Chi Lewisburg, W. Va. 

Burner, Allen Eugene Cass. W. Va. 

Conn, Clyde Wm Smithfield, Pa. 

Francis, Thomas R., 4> K 2 Connelsville, Pa . 

Johnson, Ceo. Delbert, $ 2 K Kenova. W. Va. 

Mc( utcheon, Merle, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Mounts, Ceo. Calvin, West Alexander, Pa. 

< (wens, Wm. Thomas II K A Clarksburg. W. Va. 

Riley, Richard Morgantown, W. Va. 

Smith, (lifl'ord A Meadville. Pa. 

Steenbergen, .John II.. <I> K 2 l't. Pleasant. W. Va. 

Yanoskv, Felix Longacre, W. Va. 



100 




Jllonlicoln 



101 



M 



llloiit iroln 



%& 



Samuel Cecil Austin, better known as "Swiseel." is 
always late and often is very sleepy when he does eome. 
"Swiseel" is a hard student and keeps very late hours. 

Allen E. Burner — "Come now boys, a little less noise 
please." 

Clyde William Conn, one of our Pennsylvania boys, 
noted for his brilliant class work. 

Dr. S. — "Mr. Conn describe the internal ear.'.! 

Mr. Conn — "Well it is something like this first we have 
a sack with two little stones in it." 

Thomas R. Francis — often thinks he is an automobile 
and makes known his presence with loud "Honk"- 
"Honks" that would give the average students nervous 
prostration but it does not faze a medic. 

George Delbert Johnson is different from the rest of 
us in that lie lives in three states at once. He is a good 
student and is continually referring the Prof, to such and 
such a page in "Path" to back up his own statements. 

Merle McCutcheon ^-oes by the name of "Mac" most 




of the time. He is the fellow that was never known to 
blush. 

George C. Mountz thinks he is very bright and of 
course we never dispute his word at all. But "Clyde" 
did excellent work one day for Mountz said "Now that is 
•lust Like Mine." 

William T. Owens is our society man and when he is 
not smashing hearts he is breaking beakers in the lab. 

Richard Riley at home called "Dick" but we boys 
prefer the name "Mother"; so "Mother" Riley it is. 

Clifford A. Smith — Sun. moon and stars may pass 
away, but "C. A." will never change. 

John II. Steenbergen. Our quiet "Steeny" is very 
studious and was never known to waste his time with the 
"Co-eds." 

Feliz Yanosky. "Eh! Felix how do you pro- 

nounce 'Salkowski' or what is this word ' Adamkiewicz' ' 
is often heard in chemical lab. 




<f? 



102 



I 




illouticoln 



Illoulicoln 



^iw4m. 



'imen 




President A. Clyde Knight 

Vice-President Albert 0. Bowers 

Si en tary Howard H. Sjiitii 

Treasiin r George M. Shough 

Historian J. George Callison 



3Lr 

Knight, A. Clyde Mt. Clare, W. Va. 

SundmaeKer, H. W Morgantown, W. Va. 

Smith, Aiikis E Morgantown, W. Va. 

Smith, Howard II Butler, Pa. 

Shoughj George M Hundred, W. Va. 

Bowers, Albert. C Wheeling, W. Va. 

Weaver, Archie C., Morgantown, W. Va. 

( iallison, .1. George Leivasy, W. Va. 

( leargesse, Gniseppe, Morgantown, W. Va. 

Becher, Thomas Henry, Bluefield, W. Va. 



104 




illoul icol.n 



105 



Hlonticola 



# t£ 7jt 7 Jf # # 7jt # *? ?> ?> tJt tJ? 7> tJt V tJ- -Jt ?;t "Jr ?£ 7*7 7> •£ fjr tJt "J? 7? -^ 7«f 7> t£ ij? ijt -jr 7*7 *£ 7,7 jj? ?Jf 7> 7> 7> 7,7 »> T> 7jt 7> j£ ^ <? ?£ 7> 7^ V tJ? 7,7 7^ 9 "•* 'I? # *T -r *£ # # # *£ 9 *£ * *»* ** *» T V # # 7^ * *£ 7> 7> V 7,7 7> 7$?J»7 7?7 ?»? 



• ►■_. 



« 






^!* 




FRESHMEN MED HISTORY 




Only the fittest can survive the test of the ages, and so 
the law of natural selection or the "survival of the fittest," 
lias been at work through long years selecting, moulding, 
and finishing the material that was intended to constitute 
a freshman medical class in the West Virginia University 
during 1905-6. Late in September of 1905 this body of 
young men, all faithful followers of the god Aesculapius, 
were collected into the hallowed precincts of this seat of 
learning. B&ing of an investigating turn of mind, they 
were not wont to take things for (Jrant-ed. as had the soft 
mure medical class, but were determined to become Post-ed 
for themselves. Immediately after assembling the soft 
more class told them that epidemieum flunkem oportum 
epizooticum was a contagious disease, and warned them to 
prepare for an attack of the malady. But after careful 
reading, analyzing, dissecting, and where accessary inves- 
tigating by original methods, at last they came to the 
conclusion lhat this was one of the erroneous myths of the 
past, handed down and accepted blindly without due in- 
vestigation. 

The arduous Labors of making these scientific investi- 
gations and the overweening modesty of these young men 
forbids them to make a complete history of the varied 
achievements of the class, but they have in course of prep- 
aration an unabridged edition of the class history for the 



especial benefit of the soft more class and also for the use 
of classes to follow in order that they may perceive the 
cause of the unbounded success of this favored class. While 
it is not the intention at the present time to make public the 
full class history, it seems only proper that the results of 
these scientific investigations should be made public, in or- 
der that these classes which have preceded them may avoid 
a recurrence of the dread epidemieum flunkem oportum 
epizooticum, and the classes to follow may guard against 
an outbreak of the disease. The treatment found to be 
effective is about as follows: Solid Extract of Gray, ad- 
ministered in maximum doses throughout the year by D,r. 
Post; Piersal's Soothing Syrup, administered by Dr. Grant 
for about three months; Dr. Whitehill's Compound, pre- 
pared and administered by himself, with some slight as- 
sistance from one Brodbury; Howell's Favorite Prescrip- 
tion, administered by Dr. Simpson; Sallmon's Sedative, 
also administered by Dr. Simpson; and a short course of 
treatment for the nervous system, recommended by Dr. 
J. B. Johnston. If this course of treatment is followed ac- 
cording to the directions of these able advisers we can al- 
most guarantee its efficiency as a preventive of epidemieum 
flunkem oportum epizooticum. 

When the unabridged edition of the class history is 
ready for distribution the present soft more class and other 



IOC 



classes will find it advisable to make a careful study of the 
same that they may see the great labors of this class and 
understand its unbounded success in the study and preven- 
tion of this malady. For in the hard unceasing toil of 
these scientific investigations and present success they may 
perceive a portent of the untiring labors of the members 
of this class through coming years, and catch a reflection, 
as it were, of the unbounded success that the god Aescula- 
pius has in store for this band of faithful followers. 

Class Historian. 





In the Armory 

TWO BIG GAMES 

The sacred, saintly, sanctimonious, sapient, sensible, 
scholarly, sagacious, sententious, saturnine, sedate, self- 
satisfied SENIORS 

CLASH 

with the savage, sandy, sinewy, sanguinary, sacreligious, 
sardonic, satanlc. satirical, sarcastic, scathing, scurrilous, 
slatternly. SOPHOMORES 

AND 

the jolly, jocose, jocular, joking, jesting jovial, joyous, 
jibing, jeering, jumping, justling JLNIORS 

MEET 

the famous, fast, furious, fearless, ferocious, fiery, frisky, flashy, flippant, 
foxy, flunking. FRESHMAN. 



Itlonticola 



^.XDlVEISSIOlSr 



IS CJEISTTS 



107 



1Tf\e 

illonticoK-i 




108 



Sttouticola 



6Z>f. G7T 6Z> . 

U fit U Lappa <J &i 



Founded at Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, 1852. 



Pink and Lavender. 



Sweet Pea, 



109 



(The 
itloillicola 



yVeat vluxinici LCvpfoa, K^Jiapte^ 



ERSTABLTSSTIKD MAY 23, 1890. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Rev. A. M. Buchanan. Rev. V. M. Compton. 

G. P. Grimsley. ('. N. Ridgeway. 

A. F. Dickey. C. D. Willey. 

G. I!. Miller. .1. K. Buchanan, 



Fratres in Facultate. 
W. P. Willey. F. W. Truscott. 



Fratres in Universitate. 
1906. 



Daniel Dawson; A. 15. '03. .lolni Guy Prichard. 

Oirin Bryte Conaway, A. I>. 'o.'i. Herschel 11a mpt cm Rose, 

Norval Rogers Dougherty, A. li. '1)4. 

1907. 

Fleming Newman Alderson. Joftn Edward Kenna. 

John Charles Berry. Wilfred Armstrong Morris. 

Joseph Vincent Gibson. Charles Encelle Wayman. 

1908. 
Charles Albert Bowers. Winter Reginald Frantz. 

Harbour Mitchell. 

1909. 
Curtis Sterritt Berry. Charles Guy Hood. 

William Michael Kennedy. 



110 




inouticula 



111 



<Thc 
lllaiiticoln 



Uloffl o£ CtcUVe C/iar>/et; 



Washington- Jefferson College. 

Bucknell University. 

Dickinson College. 

Lafayette College. 

Swarthmore College. 

Amherst College. 

Cornell University. 

Columbia University. 

Johns Hopkins University. 

University of Virginia. 

West Virginia University. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Ohio State University. 

University of Indiana. 

University of Illinois. 

Northwestern University. 

University of Wisconsin. 

University of Minnesota. 

University of Kansas. 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 



Allegheny College. 

Gettysburg College. 

Franklin and Marshall College. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Dartmouth College. 

Brown University. 

Syracuse University. 

Colgate University. 

Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. 

Washington and Lee University. 

University of Mississippi. 

University of Texas. 

Wittenburg University. 

DePauw University. 

Purdue University. 

University of Chicago. 

University of Michigan. 

Beloit College. 

University of Iowa. 

University of Nebraska. 

University of California. 



112 



<Thc 
illauticoln 



U Si Q^iatna Cflappa 



Fraternity Founded 1873. 
Silver and Magenta. 



113 



t_//5/ Q^iama Ulappa 



ESTABLISHED FEBRUARY 24. 1891. 



illonliroln 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Walter H. Scmtli. David Chadwiek Reay. 

Arthur Lee Hovers. William Winfred Smith. 

Bennett Sexton White. Edgar Stewart. 

Terrence David Stew ait. .lames Carroll Frazer. 

Theophilus Sutton Boyd. William Mount Sivey. 

Clyde Alexander. Frank Hoy Yoke. 
David Campbell Garrison. 



Fratres in Facultate. 



•lames Henry Stewart. 
Russell Love Morris. 
Frank I.atson Kunst. 



(lenient Hos> Jones; 
Dennis Martin Willis. 
John I!. Gruihbein. 



Dennis Martin Willis. 
Frank Batson Kunst. 
Wayne McCormick Miller. 
(lark Frank Hinman. 



1906. 



Rrescott Cushings White. 
Edward Luther Dudley. 
Frederick Lawrence Shinn. 
day Ashbel Gibson. 



Howard Mark Ernst. 

DeCosta Smith. 

LaViga Washington Burns. 

George Delberl Johnson. 
Hex Milliken. 

Charles Smith. 
Earl Pearcy. 



1907. 



1908. 



1909. 



Herbert Addison Woofter. 
Thom'as Leahy. 



John B. Grumbein. 



Benjamin Walter King. 



114 




jlloul i coin 



115 



Hlonticola 



Sftoff of (TcliCe (Siap&tA 



Massachusetts Agr'k College. 

Cornell University. 

Vale University. 

University of Maryland. 

Penn State College. 

George Washington University. 

Lehigh University. 

Massachusetts Institute of Tech. 

Queen's College. 

Dartmouth College. 



Brown University. 

Swarthmore College. 

Union University. 

West Virginia University. 

College of the City of New York. 

Stephens Institute of Technology. 

Colombia University. 

St. Lawrence University. 

Franklin and Marshall College. 

St. John's College. 



CtuimtU LsCuva 



New York Club. 
Boston Club. 
Albany Club. 
Southern Club. 



Morgantown Club. 
Philadelphia Club. 
Connecticut Club. 



116 



Fraternity Founded at Miami University, Ohio, 1855. 
Old Gold and Sky Blue. 



White Rose. 



1Tf\e 
IHonticoIa 



117 



ill on I icoln 



ESTABLISHED MAY 18, 1895. 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Howard Llewellyn Swisher. Lewis Armstrong Meager. 

William Ellsworth Glasscock. Michael Eugene Gorman. 

Joseph Henry McDermott. John Hoffman Schissler. 

Alexander Gordon Tait. Hoax Baxter Cox. 

•lean Valjean Cooke. John Alden Purinton. 
.lustin M. Kunkle. 



Fratres in Facultate. 
( '. Edmund Neal. Arthur Lee Post. 

Frederick Lawrence Kortright. William Henry Wliithain. 



Fratres in Universitate. 
1906. 



Wilbur Jackson Stradef: 
Paul llecrmans .Martin. 

Stephen Goodloe Jackson. 
John Dana McNutt. 
Herbert M. Blair. 

Samuel Cecil Austin. 
J. Edward Settle. 

Clarence William McConihay. 

Harry G. Shaffer. 
liobert F. Thaw. 



1907. 



1908. 



1909. 



Special. 



I!irk Smith Slathers. 
Dana Paul Miller. 

Earle Dilworth Mason. 
James Harvey Kunkle. 
Ophle C. Lewis. 

Irvin Strauss Goldbarth. 



Harris A. Reynolds. 



118 




illo ul i c oln 



119 



k/CoiC ol CCcliQe ^yfiapl&t& 



tThc 

itlonl icol.i 



Mialni University. 

University of Wooster. 

Oliio Wesleyan University. 

George Washington University. 

Washington and Lee University. 

University of Mississippi. 

Pennsylvania College. 

Bucknell University. 

Indiana University. 

Dennison University. 

DePauw University. 

Dickinson College. 

Butler College. 

Lafayette College. 

Hanover College. 

University of Virginia. 

Northwestern University. 

Hobart College. 

Ohio State University. 

University of California. 

University of Nebraska. 

Beloit College. 

State University of Iowa. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Illinois Wesleyan University. 

1 'niversity of Wisconsin. 

University of Texas. 

University of Kansas. 



Tulane University. 

Albion College. 

Lehigh University. 

University of Minnesota. 

University of South California. 

Cornell University. 

Pennsylvania State College. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 

Purdue University. 

Central University. 

University of Cincinnati. 

Dartmouth College. 

University of Michigan. 

University of Illinois. 

Kentucky State College. 

West Virginia University. 

University of the State of Missouri. 

Columbia University. 

University of Chicago. 

University of Maine. 

Washington University. 

University of Washington. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Syracuse University. 

University of Colorado. 

University of Arkansas. 



iltoiilicoln 



U hi uiappa Q^ia 



ma 



Fraternity Founded 1850. 
Old Gold and Blue. 



121 



311on1iroln 



Ctlp/ici uamtna Lshaptet 



Fratres in Urbe. 

David Hott. Chas. W. Held. 

Harry Zevely. Edw. G. Douley. 

Theo. •). Arthur. Samuel O. Chadwick, Ji 
Lewis Dunn Beall. 



Fratres in Universitate. 

1906. 
Samuel B. Seay. Howard M. Bingaman. 

Sam. F. Hammer. John ('. MeEhlowney. 

1907. 

Thomas ]?. Foulk. George G. Sbmerville. 

ottis (). Cole. George ('. Beneke. 

pj-ank M. Boyles. William R. Monis. 

1908. 
John Steenbergen. Edgar A. Thomas. 

Thomas 1!. Francis. 

1909. 
I'hinuy 1'. Keiner. William ( ). Orr. 

GeoBge L. Wagge'neri 



122 




HFhfc 

illoulicaln 



123 



Che 
Jtlonlicoln 



yjlocl cL CCc/fae \^sfianl'&ls 



University of Ppniisylvania, Alpha. 

Washington & Jefferson College, Delta. 

Dickinson College, Epsilon. 

Franklin & Marshall College, Zeta. 

University of Virginia, Eta. 

Columbia University, Tota. 

Tulane University, Mu. 

University of Illinoise, Rho. 

Randolph Macon College, Tan. 

Northwestern University, Upsilon. 

Richmond College, Phi. 

Pennsylvania State College Psi. 

Washington & Lee University, Alpha Alpha. 

University of West Virginia, Alpha Gamma. 

University of Maine, Alpha Delta. 

Armour Institute of Technology, Alpha Epsilon. 

University of Maryland, Alpha Zet. 

University of Wisconsin, Alpha Theta. 

Vanderbilt University, Alpha Tota. 

University of Alabama, Upha Kappa. 

University of California, Upha Lambda. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology,. .Alpha Mu. 

( teorgia School of Technology, Alpha Nil. 

Purdue University, Alpha Chi. 

University of Michigan, Upha < >mieron. 



124 



Ulappci titpha 



(Southern) 



Fraternity Founded Washington and Lee 1865. 



C o/ota 
Crimson and Gold. 



Itlonticola 



125 



illouticol.-i 



((/nA'a ^Ji/ic CK/n/et 



KSTAIHJSITED MA 1H1I 10, 189 



Fratres in Urbe. 
Tlios. Ray Dille. Altha IVarman. 

James Rogers Moreland. Lindsay Haymond Petticordc. 

Dell Roy Richards. Win. Jefferson Snee. 



Fratres in Facultate. 
Thos. E. Hodges. Robt. Alder Armstrong 



Fratres in Universitate. 
1906. 

Nelson Ham ml Duval. Marshall Woodraw Macdonald. 

Earle Vitch Townsend. 

1907. 
Francis Carl Colcord. Arthur Thisthwood Davenport. 

Edw. Clark Colcord, Jr. Win. Garaetl Bayliss. 

Marshall W. Rust. 

1909. 
Fred I.. Bqyston. .lames C. Gibson. 

Davis Estill. Edw. Levi Williams. 



126 







127 



JUontiroln 



kJloiC ol Ctclisle ^-naptetA 



Washington and Lee. 

University of Georgia. 

Wofford College. 

Emory College. 

Randolph Macon College. 

Richmond College. 

Kentucky State College. 

.Mercer University. 

University of Virginia. 

Alabama Poly. Institute. 

Southwestern University. 

University of Texas. 

University of Tennessee. 

Davidson College. 

University of North Carolina. 

Southern University. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Tulane University. 

Central University of Kentucky. 

University of the South. 

University of Alabama. 

Win. Jewell College. 

Win. & Mary College. 

Kentucky University. 



University of Missouri. 

John Hopkins University. 

Millsape College. 

George Washington University. 

University of California. 

University of Arkansas. 

Leland Stanford, Jr. 

University of West Virginia. 

Georgia School of Tect. 

Hampden Sidney College. 

University of Mississippi. 

Trinity College. 

Kentucky Wesleyan University. 

N. C. A. & M. College. 

Missouri School of Mines. 

Bethany. 

College of Charleston. 

Georgetown College. 

Delaware College. 

University of Florida. 

Louisiana State University. 

S. W. Presbyterian University. 

West minster University. 



128 



I 










f a 



Founded 1859. 

Purple, White and Gold. 

The Pansy. 



129 



^famma <UJe<Clci L,fiap/'et. 

ESTABLISHED MAY 24. 19C0. 



<Hl* Fratres in Urbe. 

Slloulicbfa 



George" C. Sturgiss (Delta Prime). Frank P. Corbin, '01. 

Joseph Mooreland (Ganfma). Walter F. Holland, "no. 

.lames 1.. Callard (Kappa). Koss ( '. Rhriver, '01. 
Rev. .1. ('. Ely, D. D.. (Camma). 



Fratres in Facilitate. 
Simeon ('. Smith (Beta Mu.) William M. Raumgartr.er. 'C 



Fratres in Universitate. 

1906. 

Eugene Hildt Barnhart. Houston Goff Young. 

James Davis Gronninger. Dwight Eggleston McQuilkm, "<i">. 

Anthony Fielding McCue. 

1907. 

Gohen Clarke Arnold. Chesney Macauley Ramage. 

Arthur Spencer Dayton. Robert Parvin Stiickler. 

Camden Page' Fortney. Shelby Ethbert Taylor. 

1908. 

Edward Sidney Bock. Brooks Hutchinson. 

Walter Gay Lough. 

1909. 

Vincent Victor Baumgartner. Hubert Earl Snyder. 

Everett (Hen: Smith. Howard Maurice Quick. 



130 




jllonlicoln 



131 



KJioit ol Ctctisle. LmWkt 



in** 

Jtloulicoln 



Southern Division. 
Vanderbilt University. University of Virginia. 

Washington & Lee University. George Washington University. 

University of the South. University of Texas. 

Tulane University. University of Mississippi. 

Emory College. 



University of Iowa. 
University of Minnesota. 
Northwestern University. 
University of California. 
University of Nebraska. 
Armour Institute of Technology 
University of Wisconsin. 



Western Division. 

University of Colorado. 
Leland Stanford Jr. University. 
University of Illinois. 
University of Chicago. 
Baker University. 
University of Missouri. 



Ohio University. 
Albion College. 
Indiana University. 
Adelbert College. 



Northern Division. 

University of Michigan. 
Kenyon College. 
DePauw University. 
Hillsdale College. 



Ohio Wesleyan University. 
Ohio State University. 
Wabash College. 



University of Indianapolis. 
West Virginia University. 



Allegheny College. 

Stevens Institute of Technology. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Cornell University. 

Dartmouth College. 

Itennselaer Institute. 



Eastern Division. 

Lehigh University. 
Tufts College. 
Brown University. 
Columbia University. 
Wesleyan University. 
Washington & Jefferson College. 



132 



3Thc 

illoii ticoln 



Founded 1839. 
Rose. 
Light Shades of Pink and Blue. 



133 



JTlcmlicoln 



<jjc/a <y.u' C/u//y/<?t 



ESTABLISHED SEPTEMBEE 15, 1000. 



Fratres in Urbe. 
Fred C. Flenniken. Harold Rogers. 

A. W. Lorentz. 



Fratres in Facilitate. 
Waitman T. Barbe. 



Fratres in Universitate. 
1906. 



John Edgar Campbell. Earle Walton Reiley. 

William Smith Downs. Hugh Samuel Byrer. 

Albert Jackson (oiled. Hector Kenzie MacQuarrie 

1907. 
William Bruce Coll'rotli. 

1908. 
Archie Car) Moses Hall. Jerome Alfred Rifle. 

Sydney Stanton Shirkey. Chester Prince Rogers. 

1909. 
George Whitaker Brown. Harry Alyn Downs. 

Robert Neville. 



m 




Itlonticola 



135 



i Jl c /( o/ Clc/h V C n c in /ct.-> 



311uut icola 



Brown. 

Boston. 

Maine. 

Amherst. 

Dartmouth. 

Wesleyan. 

Vale. 

Bowdoin. 

Rutgers. 

Cornell. 

Stevens. 

St. Lawrence. 

( lolgate. 

Union. 

( lolumbia. 

Syracuse. 

Washington and Jefferson. 

Dickinson. 

Johns Hopkins. 

Pennsylvania. 

Pennsylvania State College. 

Lehigh. 

Hampden- Sidney. 

Ninth Carolina. 

Virginia. 

Davidson. 

Central. 

VaN.lcrbilt. 

Texas. 

Miami. 

( lincinnal i. 

Western Reserve. 

Ohio. 

Ohio Wesleyan. 



Bethany. 

Wittenberg. 

Denison. 

Wooster. 

Kenyon. 

Ohio State. 

West Virginia. 

Case. 

DePanw. 

[ndiana. 

Washington State. 

Wabash. 

Hanover. 

Purdue. 

Michigan. 

Knox. 

Beloit. 

Iowa. 

Chicago. 

Iowa Wesleyan. 

Wisconsin. 

Northwestern. 

Minnesota. 

1 llinois. 

Westminster. 

Washington. 

Kansas. 

Denver. 

Nebraska. 

Missouri. 

Colorado. 

California. 

Stanford. 



136 



Q^iama U hi (S> potion 

Fraternity Founded at Richmond College, Va., 1901. 

Co/ots 
Purple and Red. 

Red Rose and Violet. 



3l1ouf icoln 



137 



Itlonticola 



Cfamtna ^AJ<z/a L^SanA 



T 



'et 



ESTABLISHSED FEBRUARY 22. 1004. 



Fratres in Urbe. 
Gaylo/d Hess Dent. 



Fratres in Universitate. 

1907. 
Perry Wade McMilleif Wilberl Howard Robinson. 

Thomas Etamage! James Elrrier Wilson. 

John Thomas West. 

1908. 
Clyde Mortimer Bennett. Clarence Eustace Tracy. 

1909. 

Alexander Deacon Bell. Guy Baxter Hartley. 

Thomas David (iorby. Clayton Clark Holland, 

.lames Jenkins. 

Special. 
William Lee ( lo'ogle. 



i:w 




Ittonticola 



139 



jllouf icoln 



kJioil ol tlclitie \^f3apt&t& 



Richmond College. 

Roanoke College. 

University of Illinois. 

Jefferson Medical College. 

Western University of Pennsylvania. 

University of Colorado. 

William & Mary College. 



University of Pennsylvania. 
North Carolina A. & M. College. 
West Virginia University. 
Ohio Northern University. 
Wittenberg College. 
Syracuse University. 
Washington & Jefferson. 



HO 



Q^iatna i_Jtu 



Fraternity Founded at Virginia Military Institute 186!) 



Co/oi 



CoiA 
Black, White and Gold. 



itlauticola 



HI 



(? 67). /Dp .. 

Oamma «_/ / L fiaptiit 



Jltonticola ESTABLISHED FEBRUARY 23, L904. 



Fratres in Urte. 
Robert Rodman Green (Epsilori). 



Fratres in Universitate. 
1906. 

George Webster Cdffield. Warren Hampton Hodges. 

Henry Maxwell Schrader. Charles Summer Crow. 

Franklin Marion Brand. •lames Edgar Larew. 

Jedidiah Waldo Robinson, A. 1'... '05. William Colver Cist. 

Harry Friedman. John Quincy Hutchinson. 

1907. 

Arthur Kent Brake. Arthur Mapel Lucas. 

Joseph Applegate Cist. Walter Donald Hereford (Lambda. 

Walter Miller Parker. Alva Dayne Kenamond. 



ami 



s Henry Callison. 



1908. 
Ernest Arden Bruce. George Henry Colebank. 

1909. 
James Henry Smith. Ilalleck MeGinnis Scott. 

.John Calvin Ely, Jr. Herbert Watts Sanders. 



112 




illonticoln 



113 



Ulott ol (Jbcitoe L^Sapfetd 



criu' 

illonf icoln 



Lehigh University. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

University of Vermont. 

Stevens Institute of Technology. 

LaFayette College. 

Cornell University. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Kentucky State College. 

University of Georgia. 

University of Alabama. 

Howard College. 

North Georgia Agricultural College. 

Mercer University. 

Emory College. 

Alabama Polytechnic Instittue. 

Georgia School of Technology. 

Bethany College. 

DePauw University. 

Ohio State University. 

Purdue University. 

University of Indiana. 

West Virginia University. 

Mount Union College. 

Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Albion College. 

Northwestern College. 

University of Wisconsin. 



-University of Illinois. 

University of Michigan. 

University of Chicago. 

Lombard University. 

University of Iowa. 

Iowa State College. 

Kansas State University. 

Missouri State University. 

William Jewell College. 

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. 

Washington University. 

University of Minnesota. 

University of Arkansas. 

University of Texas. 

Louisiana State University. 

Tulane University. 

Colorado School of Mines. 

University of Colorado. 

University of Washington. 

University of Oregon. 

University of Montana. 

Leland Stanford Jr. University. 

University of California. 

Washington and Lee University. 

University of North Carolina. 

North Carolina A. & M. College. 

University of Virginia. 



144 



Utonticola 



yj i y /lappa CI in ha 

Founded at University op Virginia in 1868. 

Lily of Valley. 



145 



Itlouticola 



Li in ha Uhela i^/utn/ct 



ESTABLISHED ]!><>4. 



Fratres in Facultate. 
Walter L. Fleming. 



Fratres in Universitate. 
1906. 
Arthur Arnold. Albert L. Lolim. 

M. J. Malamphy. John Byars. 

1907. 
Robert M. Drane. Ralph F. Staubly. 

Louis Arnold Carr. 

1908. 
William T. Owens. Roger Karle Watson. 

Lawrence ('. Yeardlev. 

1909. 
Paul I). Barret. William E. Paul. 

Claude Layman. 



no 




illoiilicoln 



U" 



IT lie 

311oulirola 



xJlc// o/ Llc/i\\' L-/u//->/L't.i 



University of Virginia Upa. 

Davidson College Beta. 

William and Mary College Gamma. 

Southern University Delta. 

University of Tennessee Zeta. 

Tulane University Eta. 

Southwestern Presbyterian University. . Theta. 

Hampden-Sidney Iota. 

Kentucky University Kappa. 

Presbyterian College Mu. 

Wbfford College Nu. 

Richmond ( College Omicron. 

Washington and Lee University Pi. 

Cumberland University Rho. 

Vanderbilt University Sigma. 

University of North Carolina Tan. 

Lit (mini 

Richmond, Va Uumnus Alpha. 

Memphis. Tenn \lumnus Beta. 

White Sulphur Springs, W. Va Alumnus Gamma. 

Charleston. S. C Alumnus Delta. 

Norfolk, Va Alumnus Epsilon. 

Dillon, S. C \lumnus Zeta. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute Upsilon. 

Roanoke College Phi. 

University of the South Chi. 

Georgia Agricultural College Tsi. 

Kentucky State College Omega. 

Trinity College Upha Alpha. 

Centenary College Upha Beta. 

Louisiana State University Alpha Gamma. 

Georgia School of Technology Alpha Delta. 

North Carolina A. & M. College Upha Epsilon. 

University of Arkansas Alpha Zeta. 

University of Florida Upha Eta. 

West Virginia University Upha Theta. 

Millsaps College Alpha Iota. 

Missouri School of Mines .Alpha Kappa. 



New Orleans, La Alumnus Eta. 

Dallas, Texas Uumnus Theta. 

Knoxville. Tenn Alumnus Iol a. 

Charlottesville, Va Alumnus Kappa. 

Opelika, Ala Alumnus Lambda. 



148 



SUtd (Sii 

Fraternity Founded at Cornell University, 1891. 

Dark Shades of Red and Yellow. 



ftlonticola 



149 



Itl a ii t i c o I n 



c\> / ) ita in ia C /v cy? /c' 4; 



ESTABLISHED 1903. 



Fratres in Urbe. 
linn. Frank Cox. Hon. George ('. Sturg 

Frank Bowman. Frank Roy Yoke. 

A. 15. Fancher. John Allien l'urinton. 



Fratres in Facultate. 
St. Geo. Tucker Bro"bke. Edwin Maxey, 

William P. Willey. 



Fratres in TJniversitate. 

John Guy Pritchard. Dana Paul Miller. 

Fleming N. Alderson. Daniel Dawson. 

Richard McSherry Price. John Edgar Campbell. 

Birk S. Stathcrs. John E. Kenna. 

B. S. lTonecker. Dairy A. Downs. 

W. D. Hereford. Paul Martin. 

Albeit Jackson Collett. Da Costa Smith. 



150 




illcintUol.i 



151 



ntouticola 



Uloit cl Llc/h}& \-,nap{etA 



Albany Law School. 
Buffalo University Law School. 
Chicago-Kent Law School. 
Chicago University Law School. 
Cornell University. 
Dickinson College. 
Georgetown University. 
University of Michigan. 
University of Minnesota. 
New York Law School. 



New York University. 
Ohio State University. 
( tsgood Hall of Toronto, Canada. 
University of Pennsylvania. 
Syracuse University. 
West Virginia University. 
The University of Virginia. 
Leland Stanford University. 
Northwestern University. 



1&2 



IT ft* 

ITlanticola 



Sliela Jstu (9p&i£jn 



Founded at Wesleyan University, 1876. 



Green and Black. 



153 



JUouticola 



<//w/i/ y/((i i^n.i/'/c/i 



Fratres in Urbe. 
.Instill M. Kunkel. Albeit Fold Dickey. 

Chauncey DeWiti Willey. Gilbert Benton Miller. 

Many John Zevely. 



Fratres in Facultate. 
( '. Edmund Neil. John X. Simpson. 

l!«iss Spenee. 



Fratres in Universitate. 
John Guy Pritchard. Fleming N". Alderson. 

Richard MeSherry Price. Birk S. Stathers. 

Dana Paul Miller. Harry A. Downs, 

•las. II. Smith. John E. Kenna. 

Albert Jackson Oollett. 



15-1 




iUout icola 



155 



Jtloiiliroln 



yjlcci ol Cic/h^e \~Yiapletd 



Wesleyan University. 

Union College. 

University of California. 

Colgate University. 

Hamilton College. 

Stephens Institute Technology. 

Amherst College. 

Pa. State College. 

University of New York. 

University of Michigan. 

University of Minnesota. 

Dartmouth College. 

Swart hrnore College. 

Dickinson College. 

Bowdoin College. 

Case School of Applied Sciences. 

University of Kansas. 

Brown University. 

University of Iowa. 

Washington and Lee University. 

Yale University. 

University of Vermont Medical School. 

Harvard University. 

College of the City of New York. 

University of Maine. 



University of Virginia. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Syracuse University. 

Cornell University. 

Ken yon College. 

Adelbert College. 

Williams College. 

Lafayette College. 

Allegheny College. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

University of Wooster. 

Bucknell University. 

Ohio State University. 

Lehigh University. 

University of North Carolina. 

Northwestern University. 

Washington and Jefferson College. 

West Virginia University. 

Mt. Union College. 

Susquehanna University. 

Madison University. 

Rutgers' College. 

University of Chicago. 

University of Vermont. 



156 







ill a ul icoln 



157 



fttonticola 



C/lanna Vetla 



Sorority Founded West Virginia University, 1899. 
Hliu' and Crimson. 



Red Carnation. 



158 




Itlouticola 



159 



Ulappa cJJeita 



inonticola Sorores in Urbe. 

Evelyn Prati Hit o. Edith Grant Zevely. 



Soror in Facultate. 
Bertha Cleveland Browning. 



Sorores in Universitate. 
1906. 
Harriet Talbot Stalnaker. Margaret Buekanan. 

1907. 
Evelyn Sage Burns. Flora Ray Hayes. 

Mary Lyon Purinton. Lama Frances Lewis. 

Mary Dorothy Edwards. 

1908. 
Bertha Sterling Ilawlcy. Helen Marjorie Darst. 

Cilda Langlitt Smith. 

1909. 
Lucy Wilson. Ida Katherine Sutherland. 

I. ina Courtney Vance. Nelle Steele. 



100 



i^/ii \ytncaa 



Founded University op Arkansas, 1895. 

Cardinal and Straw. 

White Carnation. 



HTfte 

iUouticolci 



161 



Ulonlicoln 



i J he /a (^/it/n /c t 



ESTABLISHED 1005. 



Sorores in Urbe. 
Mrs. .Tolm Harrington Cox. Mis. Wait man Willey Barbe. 

.Mis. ('. Russell Huston. Mrs. Fred W. Truscott. 

.Miss Janet Hayes. Miss Mary 1!. Turner. 

Miss Maud Evans Dille. 



Sorores in Facultate. 
Elizabeth Clayton. 



Sorores in Universitate. 
1907. 
Margarei Virginia Foulk. Jessie Jenkins. 

1908. 
Ethel Belle Jones. 
1909. 
Margaret Elinor Brown. Lorena Fries. 

Virginia Lunsford Xeal. Nellie .lane Herbert. 

Ada May Neal. 

Specials. 
In Music — 

Carolyn Bloom. 

Nellie Burr Bassell. Theo. Baldwin. 

In Elocution — 

Jane May Hudson. Martha L. Post. 



162 




jUoul irolci 



163 



illoiHicoIn 



kJIo/c ol Clc/i^e (^/H/n/ctJ 



University of Arkansas Psi. 

Kentucky University Chi. 

Southwestern Baptist University Upsilon. 

University of Mississippi Tau. 

Randolph-Macon Womans College Sigma. 

Tulane University-Newcombe College. . .Rho. 

University of Tennessee Pi. 

University of Illinois Omicron. 

Northwestern University Xi. 

University of Wisconsin Xn. 

University of California Mil. 

University of Kansas Lambda. 

University of Nebraska Kappa. 

University of Texas Iota. 

George Washington University Phi Alpha. 

West Virginia University Theta. 

University of Michigan Eta. 



161 



Clip na ^Ai LUcl/u 



Sorority 
Founded at Lombard College, Galesburg, III., April 17, 

1893. 



Light Blue, Dark Blue, and gold. 



Zf/oi?etj 



Pink Rose Bud. 



I on l tin/ 

Alpha Xi Delta. 



Itlouticola 



165 



monticola %Jc/a ^'tyitcl 



INSTALLED .MAY 8, 1905 



Sorores in Facultate. 
Bertha Jane Smith. Drusilla V. P. Johnson. 

Sorores in Universitate. 
Elizabeth Julia Sadler '05 Post-graduate in Music. 

1907. 
Ethel Averil Green. 

1908. 
Crystal Courtney. Mabel Jane Weaver. 

Lucile Johnson. Mary Meek Atkeson. 

Lillian Barrel Smith. 

1909. 
Helen Ballard Smith. Columbia Gertrude Menefee. 



Nancy Coplin. 



Hi8 




Sttouticola 



ter 



illonlicola 



i^Ao// o/ (lc/t'\\> C/it/n/ct.-> 



Alpha — Lombard College Galesburg, 111. 

Beta — Iowa Weslevan University Mt. Pleasant. la. 

Cainnia .Mt. I'nion College Alliance, Ohio. 

Delta— Bethany College , Bethany. W. \'a. 

Epsilon — University of South Dakota ... Vermillion, S. Dak. 

Zeta — Wittenberg College Springfield, Ohio. 

Eta — Syracuse University Syracuse, N. Y. 

Theta — University of Wisconsin Madison, Wis. 

Iota — University of West Virginia Morgantown, W. Va. 

Kappa — University of Illinois Champaign. 111. 

Alliance Alumnae Alliance. Ohio. 

Mt. Pleasant Alumnae Mt. Pleasant, la. 



H'.s 







^ 



n-5 .wi^f 




Societies 



ant> 











* 



Itlonticoln 



169 



y^CMtfnbicin JLMe&ubu &cc /<?/// 



t-ceiA 



311onl icol.n 



Fall Term. 

I'n sith nt D. M. Green. 

Vice-President B. S. Honecker. 

Recording Secretary Dessie Protzman. 

Corresponding St crt tary Fred Shinn. 

Treason r B. W. King. 

Critic H. H. Rose, 

Marshal A. K. Brake. 

Chorister Lueile W. Elliot. 



Batten, II. C. 
Batrshke, 1). W. 

Barclay. Hugh. 

Blair, H. ('. 

Burns, L. W. 

Brake, A. K. 

Crow, ('. S. 

Courtney, Miss C. 

( nrc. .Miss Rebecca. 

Cowgill, I. v. 

Dayton; Arthur. 

Dunn, V. I!. 

Elliott, -Miss Lueile W. 

Evans, .1. ('. 

friedman, H. 

Green, I). M. 

Golden, Bruce. 

Hill. 

Bonecker, B. S. 



Winter Term. 

C. S. Cross. 
IT. C. Batten. 
Rebecca Core. 
Peard Hodges. 
W. R. Thacher. 
J. F. Marsh. 

D. M. Green. 
Anna B. -Johnson. 



, //(crnbet.i 



Hudson, Miss .lane. 
Hodges. Miss Pearl. 
Hundt. If. 

Johnson, Miss. 
King, B. W. 
Lazell, Miss Blanche. 
John, A. P. 
Lewis, (). ('. 
Lucas, .). R. 
Montague, 1!. Cary. 
Marsh. .1. 1'. 
Mason. .1. \V.. Jr. 
McDowell, .1. (). 
Morris, Miss Nellie. 
McFarland, Miss Winnie. 
Mooman, Glen .1. 
Post, Miss Mattie. 
Protzman, Miss Dessie. 
McQuarrie, H. M. 



Spring Term. 
F. L. Shinn. 
Chas. Sutton. 
Anna Johnson. 
Arthur Dayton. 
II. IIuii.lt. 

B. M. Whaley. 

C. S. Crow. 
11. K. Brake. 



Quick, II. M. 

Lose. H. H. 
Rightmire. Miss | 
Russell, -I. M. 
Robinson. .1. W. 
Shinn. F. L. 
Shull. ('. L. 
Sundmacher, II. 
Sutton, (has. 
Simmons, W. R. 
Shepherd, .1. P. 
Southern. 
Tallman. 
Thacher, \V. R. 
W'atkins. Miss. 
Whaley. !>,. M. 
Walton, J. L. 
Yoke, Miss ( trace. 
Ramage, Thos. 



Edna 




<The 
ItlontUoIa 



171 



6Z> 



Jain*. 



enon 



-^Lii'etati/ cnccieii, 



"/ 



'"'K-c,,, 



^j-f, c Fall Term. 

3no.it.coln /v,. v,r/r n t F. M. Brand. 

Vice-PresicU ni W. P. Sammons. 

Seen tary Jessie Jenkins. 

Attorney Flick- Warner. 

Critic 0. I\r. Wilkerson. 

Chorisit r Caroline Schmidt. 

Marshal, H. A. Reynolds. 



Winter Term. 
J. L. Hutchinson. 
J. S. Lantz. 
Pearl Scott. 
I. F. Nestor. 
T. D. Gorby. 
Ennna Ward. 
F. M. Brand. 



Spring Term. 
P. C. White. 
P.G.Armstrong 

Alice Lazier. 
I. F. Xestor. 
J. J. Hamrick. 
Emma Ward. 
J.Q. Hutchinson 



Paul 6. Armstrong. 
Clinton Tippy Boggess. 
Franklin Marion Brand. 
Allen Eugene Punier. 
Wilbur Earle Cather. 
James Henry Callison. 
.lames George Callison. 
George Webster CofTicld. 
Xorval lingers Daugherty. 
.Tolm Calvin Ely. 
Oeorge Billmyer Folk. 
Joseph Applegate Cist. 
Tlinnias David Gorby. 
Ida Hall. 
Edna Hall. 

Stella Hall. 
Monua Hall. 
Roy Olney Hall. 



JJ/Ceni beid 

Oscar Lee Hall. 
John .1. Hamrick. 

Aubrey Hess. 
Lawrence Benjamin Hill. 
John Quincy Hutchinson. 
Jessie Jenkins. 
Ethel Jones, 
bet tie Jennings. 
Ollie Knotts. 
John Scott Lantz. 
Alice Lazier. 
Clarence Lively. 
Alexander Miller. 
Ira Francis Xestor. 
Zinki < >mori. 
Goldie Love barker. 
Walter Miller Parker. 
Chesney Macaulay Ramage. 
Boyd Randal. 



Harris Aquilla Reynolds. 

John Eldon Ritz. 

Richard Ward Sage. 

William Phillipa Sa.mmons. 

Caroline Schmidt. 

Pearl Scott. 

Robert Dennis Steed. 

Laura Strickler. 

Margaret Strickler. 

Rose Stevens. 

Rietz Courtney Tucker. 

Fred E. Vandale. 

Flick Warner. 

Emma Ward. 

Orla McCombs Wilkerson. 

Prescotl rushing White. 

George Wesley Whiting. 

Andrew Claudius Wilson. 



172 




173 



Jllonl i coin 






President J. Frank Marsh 

Vice-President M. L. Sayer 

Corresponding Secretary A. A. Peazee 

Recording Si creiary W. R. Thatcher 

Treasurer B. M. Whale? 

Organist Clifford Myers 

Chorister A. K. Brake 



LuA'not// < /)catJ 



A. M. Buchanan, D. D. L. B. Hill 

Professor C. Edmund Neil. 



171 




jllon Jicoln 



175 



llloiiticola 



f. w. c° a: 

Not by mighl not- by power bul by .My Spirit s;ii1h tin 
Lord of hosts." 



Presidi nl Beetha Jane Smith 

Vice-President Clara Ellison 

Treasun r Crystal Courtney 

Recording Sun tary Ethel Averil (Jrken 

Corresponding Secretary DruSilla Johnson 

Chorister Gussie B. Lowe 

Delegate In Summer Conference, Lakeside, Ohio. 
Crystal Courtney. 

D( 1 1 (/ah s la SI ii<l< nl Vol a ah i r Conv< nl in a , Nash villi . T< n» . 
Effie Mealy. Ethel Jones. 



IT6 




Manttcoln 



Me myhrhave 6ee» parfecM, hafi& 
//nd/one/ty as any j/ou f'ad 
Mo/- Jae tried fo rabe'Mafh' 
Onder- 'r~bjuj " and naf/i 
JJeve/oaed info aCA/AiD 



Vfie 

lllont icoln 



(£)tiqineetina Q^oci'e/h 



Fall. 

President R. G. Milan. 

Vice-Presidt nl S. S. Tuekwiller. 

St cr( tary J. V. Feller. 

Critic Prof. F. L. Emory. 

Librarian J. N. Calvert. 



( jf/'' 



™%ce*6 



Winter. 
H. M. Schrader. 
M, L. Sayre. 
J. J. MeJilton. 
Prof. Dickinson. 
J. X. Calvert, 



Spring. 
H. L. Foreman. 
F. C. Coleord. 
C. E. Tracy. 
Prof. Church. 
J. E. Larew. 



, S/LembetJ 



Boughton, Prof. W. H. 
Broyles, J. S. 
Calvert, J. X. 
Church, Prof. E. F. 
Coleord, E. C. 
Coleord, V. C. 
Dickinson, Prof. 
Divinnev, T. G. 
Ellison. ('. A. 
Emory, Prof. 
Feller. C. V. 
Fireman, A. 1L 
Gatherum, Robt. 



Giambi en. Prof. J. P>. 
Iianna. J. H. 
Hall, Arthur. 
1 Tail ley, 0. B. 
Larew. J. E. 
McDonald. Mi W. 
McJrlton, J. P. 
McMillen, P. W. 
Millan, K. G. 
Miller, W. M. 
Morris, Prof. R. L. 
Moon, 
Riley, E. 



Ross, A. B. 
Rupert. J. R. 
Russell, 
Rust, M. W. 
Sayre, M. L. 
Schrader, H. M. 
Sheppard, C. C. 
Seott. H. M. 
Tracy, C. E. 
Tuekwiller. S. S. 
West . Prof. R. 
Wilson, J. E. 
Woofter, IT. A. 



178 




HThc 

lUoulitola 



179 



Jlloiitieola 



i m* 



i" iii 

^^m1 HHHImI . 




ON EARTH, HE FLUNKED MAN) 



180 



yy. v. It. <=JJ&aat{ria LQxAOclaf'lofi 



f »'"icet* 



President, H. H. Rose 

Vice-President, C. S. Shull 

Secretary, D. M. Greene 

Treasurer, J. Q. Hutchinson 



181 



3I1onticoln 



itlouticola 









|f> 




1 1 





( (JJ iii>nt/i\\' . team 

W. V. I', vs. Wooster. 

< ). ( '. Lewis Captain 

Walter M. Parker. Stephen <i. Jackson. 

*Deeision for Affirmative. 



182 




inontiroln 



, /Leaati\\' . / cui 



W. V. U. vs. W. U. P. 

Baxter Monroe Whaley Captain 

Fred L. Shinn. Ira V. Cogle 

*Decision for Affirmative. 



183 



(The 
Hlonlicola 



Cine MrUoetoilu i^J/Lt 



adontc 



i^ttib 



V "UcetA 

President, Prescott C. White 

Secretary, Geo. G. Somerville 

Treasurer, Thos. R. Francis 



Thomas Edward Hodges. 
Frederick Wilson Truscbtt. 
(lenient Rose Jones. 
.John Nathan Simpson. 
William Jackson Leonard. 
Alexander Stewart Thompson. 



KJLonotatu ^J/temaetA 

Theo. Howard Gather. 
Simeon Conant Smith. 
J. H. Stewart, 
Robert Allen Armstrong, 
dames Madison Burns. 
Anthony YVencel Chez. 



Edwin Maxey. 
Justin Frank Grant. 
Rufus A. West, 
Russell Lore Morris. 
Charles Henry Patterson. 
Jasper N. Deahl. 



H. M. Scott. 
A. L. Lohm. 
Joe. Gibson. 
J. P. MeJilton. 
\V. M. Miller. 
Ceo. (I. Somerville. 
V. !•'. Cooper. 



ttc/t'^e J item at. 



emnetA 



Sainl. C. Austin. 
L. W. Burns. 
T. E. Williams. 
(). L. Hall. 
H. C. Rose. 
V. C. White. 
'I'hos. R. Francis. 



H. W. Sundemacher. 
S. W. Cain. 
P. H. Peeples. 
J. B. Grumbein. 
B. W. King. 
W. T. Gabbert. 
E. P. Carman. 



184 




illouticoln 



1<5 



lllonlicoln 



kJ/ic cI/i/s\'Im'/i/ U utnian i^/iin 



/ct'ij 



Presick ut Victor F. Cooper 

Secretary B. Walter King 



Pi 


of. 


Robert 


A. 


Armstrong 


p 


■of. 


James 


M. 


Callahan, 


p 


of. 


Thos, 


H. 


Cather. 


p 


■of. 


Edwin 


S\ 


axey. 


p 


of. 


Russell 


L. 


Morris. 


1' 


of. 


.lames 


H. 


Stewart. 


Ji 


spe 


r N. Ca 


lveit. 


Clyde 


C. Conn. 





George H. Colebank. 
1 ra F. Nester. 

Frank ( ). Smith. 
Michael .1. Sutton. 
Frederick If. Willian 
Herbert A. Woofter. 
William J. White. 



186 




itloiilicola 



187 



illaiiticoln 



CERCLE DRAMAT1QUE FRANCAIS 

» 
DE L'UNIVERSITE DE LA VIRGINIE OCCIDENTALE 



MEMBRES ACTIFS 



MEMBERS HONORAIRES 

M M. D.I!. Purinton. President de l'Universite de la Virginie Oeeidentale, Morgantowii 

James II. Hyde, Officer de I'lnst ruction Publique, officer de la Legion d'Honneur 

Chas. J. Faulkner, Ex-Senateur, Attorney at Law, Washington, D. C. 

Alston G. Dayton, Ju.de a la Cbur Federale des Etats-Unis 

W. M. ( ). Dawson, Gouverneur de la Virginie Oeeidentale 

J. \Y. Mason, Judge a la Circuit Court, Fairmont 

E. M. Grant. Capitaliste, Morgantown 

J. C. Frazer, Avocat. Morgantown. 



BUREAU 

President A. Beziat De Bordes 

Vice-President C C. Holden. 

Tresorier A. S. Dayton. 

Secretaire Mile. P. G. Wiggin. 

Directeur Mine. J. C. Frazer. 



COMITE DES FINANCES 



Mine. W. 11. Cooke 
• I. \\\ Mason 



MESDAMES 
Rosa Folau 
Ethel Green 
Jessie Jenkins 
M. C. Foster 
E. S. Burns 
M. L. Purinton 
W. H. Cooke 
M. E. Dille 

MESSIEURS 
A. Beziat 
C. C. Sheppard 
A. S. Dayton 
0. C. Holden 
.1. W. Marley 
P. H. Martin 
J. W. Mason. 



A. K. Phillips 

Jessie J. Fitch 
J. C. Frazer 
E. J. Pugh. 
M. Virginia Foulk 
J. B. Johnston 
E. T. Peck 
P. G. Wiggin 
M. Buchanan 



C. H. Patterson 
W. M. Baumgartner 
C. R. Ramage 
H. M. Scott 
M. Saunders 
J. P. Mc.lilton 



MEMBRES ASSOOIES 



A. S. Dayton 
P. H. Martin 



MESSIEURS 
J. S. Broyles 
S. E. W. Burnside 
M. L. Forbes 
.1. B. Headley 
F. B. Kunst 
W. G. Lough 
D. H. Estill 



R. P. Strickler 
C. E. Wells. Jr. 
J. W. Lyons 
H. Mitchell 
R. A. Neville 
C. P. Rogers 



I8H 



kJ fi e i£>na Cid A C/tt a 



Honorary Members. 



Charles Homy Patterson, A. 
Jerome Hall Raymond, Ph. D. 
Josephine Raymond, A. M. 
Powell Benton Reynolds, D. D. 
Waitman Barbe. A. M. Litt. 
William Jackson Leonard. 
James Russell Trotter, A. M. 



M. Frederick Wilson Truscott, Ph. D. 

John Harrington Cox, A. M. 

Pauline Gertrude Wiggin, A. M. 

Robert Allen Armstrong, A. M. 
D. James Morton Callahan, Ph. I). 

Daniel Boardman Purinton, Ph. D. LL. D. 



IT fie 
Ittouticola 



Fred Coburn Flenniken, LL. B. 
Mrs. Leila Jessie Frazer 



Alumni in City. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Tapp Peck, A. B. 
Alberta Caroline Baumgartner, A. B. 



Mrs. Georgia Craig Truscott, A. B. 



Alumni in University. 
Simeon Conant Smith, A. M. Jed Waldo Robinson, A. B. 

David Dale Johnson, A. M. Daniel Dawson. A. B. 

Bertha Cleland Browning, A. M . 



Mary Coplin, '06 (Head). 
Margaret Buchanan. "(Hi (Clerk). 
Herschel Hampton Rose, '00. 
John Quincy Hutchinson, '00. 
Hairy Friedman. '00. 
Grace Minette Watkins, "00. 



Active Members. 

Ella May Turner, '00. 
Harriet Talbott Stalnaker, '06. 
John Charles Berry. '07. 
dames Henry Callison, '07. 
Ethel Avery Green. '07. 
Margaret Virginia Foulk, '07. 



oLa\\* QOociel\ 



uj 



3l1oiiticol.-i 



Winter Quarter. 

President John Quincy Hutchinson 

Via -I'n sick nl John Cornelius Southern 

s, crt tary James Reed Sheppard 

Trt usiin /•. George Webster Coffeeld 

Critic Prescott Cushing White 

Marshal Thomas -Joseph Kamage 



ice ta 

Spring Quarter. 

President John Cornelis Southern 

Vice-President Harry Friedman 

Secretary Charles Alexander Sutton 

Treason r Samuel Warnick Cane 

( 1 ritic Opha Clark Lewis 

Marshal John QuiNCY HUTCHINSON 



M 



ioe 



cm he ta 



Paul Griffith Armstrong. 
M. J. Ash. 
Hugh Barclay. 

Daniel William Banshke'. 
Franklin Marion Brand. 
Herbert MeClaskej Blair. 
ha Voorhees Cowgill. 
Ge'orge Webster Collielil. 
Samuel Warniek Cane. 
Harry Friedman. 
Bruce Golden. 
Edgar Levi Henshaw. 
John Quincy Hutchinson. 
Opha Clark Lewis. 
J. O. McDowell. 



Hector Kenzie MacQuarrie. 
Jedidah Waldo Robinson. 
Thomas Joseph Ramage. 
John Eldow Hit/.. 
John Cornelius Southern. 
Charles Alexander Sutton. 
Robert Dennis Steed. 
James Reed Sheppard. 
Floyd Tallman. 
Clyde Andrew Wilson. 
Edward Levi Williams. 
Baxter Monroe Whaley. 
Prescott Cushing White. 
Houston Goff Young. 



100 




191 



Jlloul icoln 



C/Se ^y/Ccun/c 



canlaiti 



Summit John Guy Pritchard 

Cache Hector Kinzie McQuarrie 

Cliff Paul Heermans Martin 

Trail Lawrence Benjamin Hill 

Pass Stephen Goodloe Jackson 

Echo Wm. Garnett Bayliss 



■ //(c/nrx. 



ninetA 



Win. Garnett Baj'liss. 
Jack Berry. 
Olis Oscar Cole. 
Frame Marsh. 
Dana Paul Miller. 
Jed Waldo Robinson. 
Birk Smith Stathers. 



Lawrence Benj. Hill. 
Stephen Goodloe Jackson. 
Paul Heermans Martin. 
Hector Kenzie McQuarrie. 
John Guy Pritchard. 
Earle Walton Reiley. 



\_^'dd CjeMow^ ^stiib 



Uceta 

President Daniel Myron Greene 

Vice-Presid< id John Alden McMorrow 

Secretary John Cornelius Southern 

Treasurer William Lee Coogle 



3Uouticoln 



ty/iem t)L 



C'tJ 



Shelby Aaron Barker. 
La Vega Washington Burns. 
Daniel Myron Greene. 
Alfred Jarrett Hare. 
Edwin Maxey. 
Oliver Clinton Pratt. 
William Earl Rumsey. 
James Garfield Smith. 
William James White. 
Logan McDowell. 
Blake Taylor. 
Hugh Barclay. 
Homer Garfield Jordan. 
Samuel Norwich Cain. 
James Scott Murphy. 
Jay Albert Snail. 



Clinton Tippy Boggess. 
William Lee Coogle. 
John Behmy Grumbein. 
Thomas Edward Hodges. 
John Alden McMorrow. 
Richard Mitchell Riley. 
Martin Luther Sayre. 
Rufus Asa West. 
John Cornelius Southern. 
James William Robinson. 
James Guy Allender. 
Marion Jackson Ash. 
Hornier Strosnider. 
Walter Oeal Davis. 
Braden Russell Wilson. 



193 



llloulicola ,/ 



Advisor I) Officer Prop. A. Lee Post 

President II. M. Blair 

Vice-President (). B. Conoway 

Recording Secretary W. II. Robinson 

Corresponding Secretary J. P. Marsh 



^J/Lcm be 



ta 



Gohen Arnold. W. J. Strader. 

II. s. Byrer. C. A. Sutton. 

A. K. Brake. Amos Smith. 

IT. M. Blair. ('. A. Smith. 

( >. B. Conoway. H. Q. Young. 

Frank Outright. J. V. Gibson. 

J. H. Jenkins. 0. C. Lewis. 

\V. P. McCue. A. F. McCue. 
W. If. Robinson. 



191 



311 out icoln 



CJ/ie fl cman 6 J^eaaue 0/ me fVe^t Viluiniu llni^eldi/u 

Object : To promote better acquaintance among' the wives 
of the members of the Faculty and the young women stu- 
dents of the University. 



President Margaret Buchanan 

Vice-Presi(h til Drusilla V. Johnson 

Secretary Ida K. Sutherland 

Corresponding Secretary Blake Lemley 

Treasurer Gussie B. Lowe 



195 



Cac/c'/' Ly/Jt'ceij i^inn 



JtlonJicoln 



Organized 1903. 
Keorganized April 1905. 



l-icetA 

President Cadet Major Danna P. Miller 

1st Vice-President Cadet Capt. Francis C. Colcord 

2nd Vice President. .Cadet 1st Lieut. Edward L. Dudley 

Secretary Cadet 1st Lieut. William S. Downs 

Treasurer Cadet Major Edward C. Colcord 



KjLonolatii < //Cemoet 

Major James M. Burns, U. S. Army. 



lYc//tV ^//(i.'ttif)L 



Cadet Major, Charles A. Ellison. Cadet 

Cadet Major. Dana P. Miller. Cadet 

Cadet Major, Chauncey S. McNeill. Cadet 

Cadet Major. Edward C. Colcord, Jr. Cadet 

Cadet Captain, Francis C. Colcord. Cadet 

Cadet Captain, Charles E. Wells. Cadet 

Cadet Captain. Marshall W. McDonald. Cadet 

Cadet Captain, Alex II. Foreman. Cadet 

Cadet Captain. Edward L. Dudley. Cadet 

Cadet Captain, Clyde M. Bennett. Cadet 

Cadet Captain, John T. West. Cadet 
Cadet Captain, Harry Friedman. 



Captain, Russel 0. Millan. 

1st. Lieut. William S. Downs. 

1st Lieut. Fred. L. Shinn. 

1st. Lieut. Lawrence D. Saunders. 

1st. Lieut. John C. Keister. 

1st. Lieut. William C. Gist. 

1st. Lieut. Henry M. Shrader. 

2nd Lieut. Herbert W. Saunders. 

2nd Lieut. Eugene II. Barnhart. 

2nd Lieut. George W. Price. 

2nd Lieut, Arthur Hall. 



196 



W V1U Matich Factory 



_a 




Itloittiroln 



/lit Pieman 



197 



Jllonlicoln 







198 





3t1onticola 





198 



Illoutirola 







(l)//a/e/i/j ij iibiij/iina Ci.i^ocia/ion 



President Frank B. Marsh 

Secretary and Treasurer Charles A. Ellison 



< J tt b I tea tiond 

"Athenaeum" 
" Monongalian " 



lllouticoln 



201 



Jlloiilicoia 




yJ/ie Cl/hcnac 



um 



Editor-in-Chief J. C. Berry. "07 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief Harry Friedman, '06 

Associate Editors 

Athletic Birk S. Stathers, '06 

Local D. M. Greene, '06 

Personal Jessie Jenkins, '08 

Exchange Margabet Buchanan, '06 

Organizations . Ciiesnev Ramage, '07 

Business Manager J. II. Callison, '07 

Mailing Clerk Arthur Hall, '06 



202 




SThe 
Stlonticola 



^y/Ce/ic/iaa/ia/i <J/)oata 



D. M. Greene Ediior+in-Chief 



Associate Editors 



Mary Lyon Pirinton. 
II. II. Rose. 



Mary ('dim, in. 
A. S. Dayton. 



B. M. Wiialey Business Manager 



203 



(The 
Ittottticoln 



JOHN WEST 

B. M. wJJaLEY 
ETHEL GR Ken 



CHESNEY j^ RAMAGE 
CLARENCE pQsT 

JESSE JENKINS 
D. C. SMiJh 



W. G. BAY I SS 



E. C. COLKORD, JR. 
A. D. KENAM0ND 

C. E. WELJ^S JR. 

J. W. M_^_SON 



R. J^ STRICKLER 
H.W.wQoFTER 
E. D. M^SON 
J. C. BER J? Y 

W. S. J)oWNS 
EVELYN • BURNS 



2W 






Jllonticoln 





Hi t 






ft? a 



'A 







CD 



2C5 



i Jdc 1//1 on lice la 



Ciiesxey Macaulay Ramage Editor-in-Chief 

1Eh* Heebert Addison Woopter Assistant Editor-in-Chief. 

ftlonticola 

Edward Clark Colcord Jr Mcwagi r 

Literary. 
John Charles Berry. Baxter Monroe Whaley. 

Ethel Averill Creen. .Jessie Jenkins. 

Clarence Post. 

Artists 
Earle Duayorth .Mason. William Smith Downs. 

Athletics 
William Garnett Bayliss. Robert Parven Stkicki.hr. 

Jokes, Roasts, Grinds. 

John William Mason Jr. Evalyn Sage Burns. 

Charles Evan Wells Jr. 

Alumni 

John Thomas West. 

Organizations 

De Costa Smith. 



2(Hi 



History Repeats Itself. 




itlouticola 



A clay tablet recently discovered in the ruins, of Babylon, and supposed to date from the reign of Ajax I 4144 B. C. 

207 



JUonttcola 



In a painting old of Greek triremes. 

The oarsmen are toiling like giants, it seems; 

The waves roll up, the rocks are nigh. 

And all depends on the Pilot's eye. 

The oarsmen may struggle — in vain is their tight 

If the Pilot guide them not aright. 

Yes, we are oarsmen on a stormy sea, 

A toast ! To the Pilot ! Our old Faculty ! 



2(« 



llloiiticoL-) 



>WON\ENS H/\UU' 




L 



^p^M-v 



llloiiticola 




210 




■^V 



w 

«1 81 



'Za p£»s belle" 




''Die Volksmassigste" 



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U 



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-vi 



r Za Mejor bailorina" 



211 



3t1ontico!n 



Ct UeyCep/totve kJ taaaJu 

Dayton (3:05 calls Dr. Bush) "Hello! is Carrie Bloom 
there?" 

Dr. B— "No, she is not, sorry." 

Strickler (3:06 same) "Hello! is Miss Bloom at home?" 
Dr. B — "No, she is not, sorry." 

Kenna (3:07 same) "Hello! is Miss Caroline there?" 
Dr. B— "No! She Aint!" 

Neville (3:08 same) "Hello! is Miss Bloom at home?" 
Dr. B— "NO! SHE IS NOT ! ! ! " 

McKeel (3:09 same) "Hello, is Miss Caroline Bloom at 
her room?" 

Dr. B— ! ! XX ! ? ? ? X. 

McKeel, "Why he just hung the receiver up in my face." 




illouticola 



213 








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214 




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311 on ti co In 



215 



Jllouticola 



CJ be Q^/iadcrta o£ l/eaA^ 



"Sweet maid, thine eyes are summer skies, 

Oh, prithee, why so blue?" 
"Why, I, you see, look up," said she, 

" Tis a reflected hue. " 

"Woman, thine eyes are winter skies, 

Oh, prithee, why so gray?" 
"The work I found lay on the ground, 

And there the shadows lay. ' ' 



Mary Lyon Purinton. 



216 




itloiittcola 



217 



3I1oiil icol.i 



i.J/ie ty/CuAtc i^titn 



Bertha Jane Smith President 

Mrs. Lucy B. Johnson Vice-President 

Mary Meek Atkeson Secretary 

Emma Ward Treasurer 

Jessie J. Fitch Marshal 



^y/iefnoi 



eta 



Mary Meek Atkeson. 
Elizabeth Clayton. 
( Yystal Courtney. 
Clara Ellison. 
Jessie J. Fitch. 
Ethel Green. 
Flora Ray Hayes. 
Virginia Herd. 



Mrs. Lucy B. Johnson. 
Gussie B. Lowe. 
Goldie Love Parker. 
Caroline Schmidt. 
Bertha .lane Smith. 
Helen Treat. 
Emma Ward. 
Anna White. 



218 



xJ/Landotifi unci Ol&e y^€ua& 



tceta 



Director Ross Spence 

President Earl V. Townshend 

Manager Charles A. Ellison 



IHonMcola 



67) 
xj toatam 



opt 



American Dance Bendix 

Mandolin Club 

Song — A Day Dream Streleski 

Mr. Harlin 
Violin Obbligato, Mr. Spence 

Ching-a-ling Anon 

Mr. Townshend and Glee Club 
Whistling Obbligato, Mr. Boydson 

Easter Anthem Spence 

Messrs. Harlan, Townshend, McEldowney, 
Arnold and Glee Club 

Repasz Band March Sweeley 

Mandolin Club 

Southern Medley Pike 

Glee Club 



College Life Frantzen 

Glee and Mandolin Clubs 

Pride of the Prairie Bolfe 

Mandolin Club 

Nursery Rhyme Suite Custance 

Glee Club 

The Wisest Man Spence 

Mr. Gibbs 

A Summer Dream Flat It 

Mandolin Club 

Quartette — Po' Little Lamb Parks 

Messrs. Harlan, Gibbs, Townsend, Arnold 

For West Virginia . . .Words and Music by V. II. Patterson 

Mr. Harlan and Glee Club 

Negro Love Song Porks 

Glee Club 



219 



Jtloiiticoln 



& 



ec 



6l;t' 



First Tenor — 
Gibbs. 
Gray. 
Harlan. 
Reynold. 

Second Tenor- 
Boydston. 
Reiley. 
Shaffer. 

McEldowney. 



First Bass. 
McNeill. 
Miller. 
Spenee. 
Townshend. 

Second liass. 

Arnold. 

( 'onn. 
McCutcheon. 

Wilson. 



220 






3Iloiitico(n 



^y/iandcidn K^tiib 



Earle Walton Reiley. Boyd Milford Smith. 

John Edgar Campbell'e. Samuel Cecil Austin. 

Davis Hudson Estill. Kay Cornelius Crago. 

Nelson Hammond Duval. Oscar Franklin Gebles. 

Newell Stanley Llovd. Corley Burns. 



222 




Itlonticola 



223 



inonlicoln 



^.fiotcit Q^ocic/i/ 



President E. IT. Coombs 

Via -President Delia Frazier 

Secretary Martha Brock 

Treasurer M. E. Sisler 

Librarian E. T. HUNDLEY 

Director A. S. Thompson 

Pianist Mabel, Constance Foster 

Organist Grace Martin Snee 



22» 



Program of the Vaudeville 



Given by the 

Students of the West 
Virginia University 

For the benefit of the 



Athletic Association 

Under the management of 
CLARK HINMAN 



Walnut Street Theatre 
Wednesday Evening .'. November 1st, 1905 



3. 



6. 



PROGRAM. 

GLEE CLUB 
Under direction of Prof. Spenee. 

(a) The Goblins Parks 

(b) Negro Love Song Paris ^l ( 

Glee Club. Sftoulicola 

(c) Keturah Words by ('lurk Hinman 

Music by Ross Spenee. 
Chesney Ramage and Glee Club. 

(a) Sweet Adeline 

E. V. Townshend and Glee Club. 

(b) My Irish Molly -o Sell wart z 

Chesney Ramage and Glee Club. 

Curiosity Words by Clark Hinman 

Music by Pass Spenee. 
E. V. Townshend 

Black-face Specialties 

D. A. Cronin 

The Wonderful Hypnotist 

Richard Price assisted by Jack Kenna 

McEldowney in popular songs Singing for the first time 
the great local hit, 

I'm the "Wisest Man Words by S. C. Carney 

Music by Ross Spenee. 

"Lizzie" Ramage 

Tramp Comedien, In Stunts, 



225 



lllout icola 



8. "Whistling Solos 

Mrs. L. C. Hinmaii 

Gaily Chant the Summer Birds Torrcy 

Swiss Echo Song E chert 

9. The Great Russian War Drama. 

"Love is not All; or. Give me a Drink of Vodka." 

CAST. 

(Jen. Bottlemupsky Weber Fields Yeardley 

Prince Itchi-itchi-itchi Lillian Russell Seay 

During the porformance will be rendered the following 
songs : 
"Tammany" 
"Helen Gonne" 

Illustrated parody, "In Shade of the Old Apple Tree." 
Slides by Energy Mason 

NOTE: The scenery in this play is magnificent, the 
properties, worth a munificent sum, consisting of one red 
wig and two penny papers. 

10. Smithie & Co., 

In Acrobatic and Tumbling stunts 

11. Riley Wilson 

The West Virginia Sunbeam, in Monologue and Parodies. 



12. Stereoptiean Pictures 

Under direction of Prof. Eufus West 

Slides by Energy Mason 

Football pictures taken from negatives owned by Arch 
Hall. 

13. "Tackles Back" 

A West Virginia Football Play. 

CHARACTERS. 

Mr. Thomas Martin, A Morgantown Gentleman, 

John B. Grunibi in 

Bob Martin, his son, A West Virginia Football 

player Paid Martin 

Mr. Edward Biddle of Lexington, Martin's second 

cousin, Jack K< nna 

Dr. George Brown, of Morgantown, Mrs. .Martin's 

brother "Deacon" Young 

('apt. Michael Dolan. of the Morgantown police 

force Dick Price 

Mrs. Martin, Martin's Wife Miss Lin-nit Vana 

Nell Martin, his daughter \£iss Jane Hudson 

Norah, their servant Miss Virginia Neal 

Time, the present. 

NOTE : If any of the actors make a hit do not feel that 
you have to, and throw things. 




22U 




<Thc 
Itlonticola 



JUouticola 



tllfilefoc UuiAociatlcn 



zetA 

President Birk S. Stathers 

Vice-Preside til N. H. Duval 

Treasurer Prof. T. E. Hodges 

Secretin-!/ Margaret Buchanan 

Student Representative J. Q. Hutchinson 

Faculty Representative Prop. U,. M. Willis 

Alumni Kcpresentatires David Holt, Gilbert Miller 




Itlouticola 



229 



JnonJicoIn 



C/oo/oatc 



Center Yeardley W.V.U. 

L - (; Taylor Westminstei Col 15 

R- G Brake California o 12 

L. T Leahy ( )hio Univ 28 

R- T Williams Bethany Col o 46 

L. E McCne Kentucky State Univ 45 

R- E Hall California 17 o 

!>• H Mattin Bethany 24 

R- H Hinmari Penn. State (I 

!•'• B Ernest Marietta fi 17 

Q MacDonald 

Cibson. McCue; "Pearl" 

Young. Gronniger. 

Carr. Bayliss. 

Huey. 



230 




jllout icola 



231 



Jtlonii coin 




yJiej/imen yJco/ba/c kJ<2 



a i)i 



Manage* 
( laptain 



.Herbert W. Saunders 
. . Claude II. Layman 



Bell C. 

King R. G. 

Williams L. G. 

Ke'olty R. T. 

Jenkins ]{. K. 

Gibson, F. 

Hall. Kerr. 



Orr L. E. 

Layman Q. 

Scott R. ll. 

Downs L. 11. 

Knoke L. T. 



R. 0. Hal 



Freshmen — "Preps" 

Freshmen 6 — Sophomores 

Freshmen 18— Davis & Elkins College . 



.20 

. 
. 



832 




Sttottticoln 







\ 




233 



illonl icola 









^AJade ijjait 



®'1C -tine-tin 



Catcher McCarthy Second Base Bayliss 

l Seay .... • , n , i Strickler 

I J I hird Base J 

Pitchers J Hall f McCauley 

| Staubley Right Field Mason 

Shortstop), Gronniger Center Filed, Cole (Capt.) 

First Base, Hertzler Left Field, Wayman 

Substitute Brake 

QjcoleA 

Opp. \V.\".r. Opp. W.V.U. 

Woodberry Forest 2 1"- Wooster Univ 3 5 

Univ. of Va 7 1 Waynesburg Col 7 8 

Univ. of Va 2 4 Westminster Col 1 16 

Wash. & Lee 4 3 ( California 7 8 

Va. Poly. lust 9 (i Dennison Univ 2 1 

Roanoke Col 11 12 Ohio Wesleyan Univ. (12 in.) 1 2 

Roanoke ( '<>1 8 4 < »hio Wesleyan Univ 2 (i 

Va. Mil. Inst 4 8 Ohio Wesleyan Univ 8 7 

Wheeling Cen. League 1 2 Ohio State Univ 4 :i 

Wheeling Cen. League (5 7 Fairmont Profs. 4 5 

W. Va. Wesleyan Col 2 12 Fairmont Profs 7 8 

W. Va. Wesleyan Col (! Fairmont Profs 7 1 

Bethany Col o 9 Penn. State Col 3 4 

Bethany Col :i G Pittsburg Col •'! 5 

Waynesburg Col. (13 in.) 4 :i Pittsburg Col 8 (i 



Itlauticola 



^/Jadkcl ^JJait 



Howard Mi Ernst Manager. 

Shelby E. Taylor Captain 

. J tic . J cam 

Cole. Strickler. 

Pearcy. Mason, 

Taylor. ('air. 

Gronninger. Smith. 

Ely. Reiner. 



236 




illonlicola 



•237 



•The 
llloulirolo 




f It II 1 'at iJOc/JKe/ J/jClll Ue 



Clfll 



JLtne-un 

P. H. Martin Captain 

A. W. Mason Manager 

Thomas Leahy J. T. West 

A. K. Brake. H. M. Ernst. 



238 




allun ticoln 



Ctzc/^?/' l^A/j/'cV ^JJacl Ue 



ea/n 

Manager . Claude H. Layman 

Asst. Manager Roger E. Watson 

Captain Lawrence Yeardley 

Cole F. McDonald G. 

Layman F. Ryan, G. 

Yeardley C. 

Hinman. Neaver. Morris. 

Cadets 24 — Morgantown Independent 34 

Cadets 34 — Freshmen 22 

Cadets 44 — Turner Juniors 18 

Cadets 46— Turn Verein 19 

Cadets 44— Turn Verein .22 

Cadets 34— Fairmont Y. M. C. A 7 

Cadets 59— Turn Verein 8 



239 



lllatiticol.i 




cOon/ictnoie iJ)a3Ke£ iAJa.CC Ul 



earn 



ft 

r*Ltnc-up 
L. C. Yeardley Captain 

M. (xOLDBARTH MllliiKJ' f 

E. Settle. C. E. Tracy. 

W. E. Loyd. II. W. Law son 



210 




<_/ tea Amen <Joa&K&£ J/jci€C \j c 



am 



Morris, 

Weaver, 
Gorby 



XI 



■up 



Ryan, 
Layman, 

Smith, 



Baumgardner. 



lllouticoln 



211 



Jllonl iroln 



Va t6 i/u x A eco tch 



Event. Holder. Record. 

LOO Yard Dash James Gibson '05 11 sec. 

44(1 Yard Run lames ( libson '05 54 4-."> see. 

12(1 Yard Hurdles Arthur Faiioher '05 17 see. 

220 Yard Hurdles -lames Gibson '05 27 4-.") see. 

High Jump Clark Hinman '06 •"> ft 4 3-8 in. 

Pole Vault Etley Smith '07 9 ft. 

Hammer Throw James Wilson '07 . 90 ft 1 in. 

i Jnacct 

Event. Holder. Record. 

Shot Put lames "Wilson '07 32 ft. 2 1-2 in. 

1!. High -lump Clark Hinman '06 5 ft. 4 in. 

e ... . , ( Clark Hinman '00 4 ft. 4 1-2 in. 

S. I ugh .lump J 

1 ] G. D. Griffirn '07 

Pole Vault Charles Smith '09 7 ft. 

S. Broad Jump lames Wilson '07 9 ft 9 in. 

Ring Vault Charles Smith '09 10 ft. 3 in. 

Pull up Franklin Brand '00 19 times 

Dip (i. I). Griffin '07 14 times 

Fence Yault Charles Smith '09 5 ft. 11 in. 



242 




ill o ii I i co In 



243 






3«af 'Gte&tic ,9/l.W 

ryc&t Viiuiinia and yj/iaticita 

«H* Motaanlb^n, W. V*., SMuu 5, /905 

JlloilticoJn ^ ^ 

100 Yard Dash- Won by Gibson, W. V. U.; Medic of W. V. V. 2d; Tipten of 
Marietta 3d; time 11 sec. 

220 Yard Dash— Won by Tipten of Marietta; Gilman of Marietta 2d: Cor- 
bin of W. V. T. 3d; time 2:5 see. 

440 Yard Dash— Won by Gibson of W. V. U.; Gilman of Marietta 2d; 
Moses of Marietta 3d; time 55 4-5 sec. 

880 Yard Rim— Won by l.enhart of Marietta: McCloy of Marietta 2d; In- 
gram of W. V. U. 3d; time 2 min. sec. 

Mile Run— Won by McCloy of Marietta: O'Brian of Marietta 2d; Martin of 
W. V. U. 3d; time 4 .min. 55 sec. 

120 Yard Hurdles — Won by Faneher of West Virginia; Simon. of Marietta 
2d: McCloy of Marietta 3d; time 17 sec. 

220 Yard Hurdles Won by Gibson of W. Y. I*. : Faneher of W. V. U. 2d; 
Simon of Marietta 3d; time 27 4-5 sec 

High Jump— Won by Hinman of W. V. U.; Stewart of Marietta 2i!: l.en- 
hart of Marietta 3d"; height, 5 ft. 4 3-8 in. 

Broad Jump — Won by McCue of W. Y. I".; l.enharl of Marietta 2d; Brake of 
W. V. T. 3d; distance, 1!) feet 1 in. 

Shot Rut— Won by Stone of Marietta; Backman of W. V. U. 2d ; Wilson of 
W. Y. ['. 3d; distance 34 ft. 2 1-4 in. 

Hammer Throw -Won by Wilson of W. V. I".; Humphries of Marietta 2d; 
Backman of West Virginia 3d; distance 96 ft 1 in. 

Role Vault— Won by Smith of W. V. U.; McCue of W. V. I'. 2d; McCloy 
of Marietta 3d; heighl 9 ft. 

Mile Relay Won by Marietta. 

Firsts. Seconds. Thirds. Total. 

West Virginia 8 5 7 62 

Marie! ta 5 8 (i 55 

m 




iUonttcoln 



Earl Veitch Townshend President 

Margaret Buchanan Secretary 

Thomas E. Hodges Treasurer 

245 



^Iflatets of Me °JP. V. 



Illontitol.i 



Arthur K. Brake. 
Howard M. Ernst. 
Joseph Gibson. 
Archie C. Hall. 
( 'lark F. Iliinnaii. 
Anthony W. McCue. 
Marshal] W. MacDonald. 



^/ao/oa// 



Thomas Leahy. 

Paul H. .Martin. 

Jolin Guy Prichard, .Manager. 

Zachariah Taylor. 

Frederick Williams. 

Lawrence C. Yeardley. 



William G. Bayliss. 
Otis Cole. 

• lames I). Gronninger. 
Archie C. Hall. 
Jacob (). Bertzler. 
Earle I). Mason 



i A/,ti.' tJoa// 



Timothy J. McCarthy. 
Monte E. Morgan, Manager. 
Samuel B. Seay. 
Ralph F. Staubley. 
Robert P. Strickler. 
Charles ('. Wavman. 






<y)a.i/£c>/ , huff 



Otis Cole. 

John ('. Ely. 

Howard M. Ernst, Manager. 



Arthur I!. Fancher. 
• lames Gibson. 
Clark F. llinman. 
\ nt I y W. McCue. 



■lames T). Gronninger. 
Earle Pea icy. 
Shelby E. Taylor. 



kJ lack 



Etley P. Smith. 

Benjamin F. Stout. Manager. 

■ lames E. Wilson. 



216 




JUa&t l/e 



eafc & 



UU 



!P 



Scuti 



Yes! It was on March the 28th when the good team 
West Virginia, with Manager Morgan, not J. Pierpont, 
but a close relation, at. the helm, set sail for a mighty 
invasion of ye Southland. 

Now in the vast annals of the West Virginia University 
as far back as memory and report go, there never had 
been a team of ball tossers from our good state who had 
visited this sunny land, so it was with rightful anxiety that 
the team mounted ye true old fashioned tramroad, the B. 
& 0. at Morgantown, and slowly jogged along over night 
on their journey. 

Undaunted by surroundings our dear friend Doctor 
Jeckyl, surnamed Kell began to toss bed cloths and pil- 
lows at his fellows just as soon as his berth was prepared 
for the night. 

Not being satisfied with this line of rough house Herr 
Jeckyl began to sing to the best of his small ability an 
old Irish song which had doubtless been imported with Herr 
Jeckyl 's parents, some centuries ago. 

After a night of semi-rest or vain attempt to sleep 
thru Jeckyl 's performance it was with joy we all hailed the 
loud cry at the door "Washington! Washington"! 

After a hearty breakfast at "Ye Hotel de Prunes", 
each fellow set out to see a long waited for sight which he 
might have read or heard about. 

"Gap" Bayliss and "Energy" Mason immediately 
set sail to see the biggest thing in our national eapitol— 
The Washington Monument. 

Both soon became bewildered in the meshes and 
tangles of the immense village, so wandering aimlessly 
about they strolled into an immense yard which was sur- 
rounded by a high iron fence. 



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On walked the sightseers even up to the large dwelling 

house on the veranda of which stood two officers at attention. 

Gap mustered courage to inquire who the owner was, 
and being informed our worthy President dwelt within, the 
two travelers entered the executive mansion "Energy" 
inquiring as to the President's whereabouts. 

Being informed Mr. Roosevelt was out of town a look 
of rare disappointment overspread the visages of the ex- 
pectant West Virginians and they made haste to catch their 
train to Woodberry Forrest after first writing out calling 
cards which they left with the servant. 

Arrive at Woodberry Forrest. 

Are mi t at train by Professor who drives us out to the 
school which lies five miles from station. 

We cross the Rappanhanock drive thro woods wherein 
occurred the Battle of the Wilderness, where all is still 
and quiet at this writing. 

(iani( — Score Woodberry Forrest 2. 
West Virginia 11. 

Go next to Charlottesville. 

The following day, Saturday, our own brave warriors 
did battle with the pride of "The Old Dominion State," 
but to no effect- -Score 

Virginia 7. 
West Virginia 1. 

Sabbath. No practice. 

Dr. Jeckyl is seen resting contentedly on the hotel 
veranda, pipe in mouth, feet on the railing and hat down 
over tin- eves as is customary with deep thinkers. 

Monday at the 3rd hour a monstrous crowd sat in the 
grandstand, while hundreds upon hundreds took their seats 
upon the tracks of the C. & ()., most of the latter however 
were all black in the face. 



Game commences. 

Great excitement. 

Chez falls off the players bench. 

Score 5th inning Virginia 2 W. V. U. 2. 

Violent rooting. 

Wild excitement. 

Chez sits down on his own stiff hat. 

The game is over. 

Score Virginia 2 West Virginia 4. 

A story became prevalent anion," the stern Virginians 
after this game, that a score written in large black letters 
stood out among their list of immortal victories, saying 
West Virginia -4 — Virginia 2. 

The writing was done upon a steel girder which spans 
the main street of Charlottesville. 

Whatever truth lay in this tale the writer is unable to 
say but he faintly remembers seeing several of the mem- 
bers of his team who wore a thorough coating of black paint 
upon their hands for several days thereafter. 
Tuesday — at Lexington. 

Washington and Lee 4. 

West Virginia 3. 

Hurley and Doc Jeckyl distinguish themselves and 
make names for themselves ranking witli Sheridan, because 
of their 36 mile ride on the back of a mule. 

Blackburg. Wednesday. 

V. P. I. 9. West Virginia 7 

Roanoke. Thursday. 

Roanoke 11. Wist Virginia 12 

Roanoke. Friday. 

Roanoke 11. West Virginia 8 

V. M. I. at Lexington Saturday. 

V. M. I. 5 West Virginia 9 

Successful Trip. 



248 




E 




I'll* 

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249 



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250 




The 3 Port. 



POLITICIAN 



CAR -Conductor 



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hORRECr-SHAPE 

[is also included] 



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Director Chez and Gymnasium Leaders. 



253 



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254 



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255 



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Commandant Major J. M. Burns, U. S. Army 

Cadet Major D, P. Miller 

Cadet ( 'uphi in C. E. Wells 

Cadet Captain C. M. Bennett 

Cadet lsl Lieut. Adj W. C. Gist 

Cadet lsl Lieut Wm. S. Downs 

Cadet lsl Lieut A. IT. Foreman 

Cadet lsl Lieut J. C. Keister 



250 




IT lie 

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257 



Vf|e 

3Uoiilicol.i 







, /Lcn- C c/n //)/.■).■) ic/ict/ V^/ii/j 

Cadet Sergt. Major S. (!. Jackson 

Cadet Q. M. Sergt C. S. Burns 

Cadet Ord. St rgt W. S. Heltzen 

Cadet. I'm,. Mus J. ('. Ai-i> 

258 



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, , T - . H. M Schrader 

1st Lieut 

, , t - , R. ('. Crago 

2nd Lieut ° 

~ , r • Sergt. H. C. Batten 

Drum Major ° 

Sergeants. 

C. M. Conn. G S. Crow. 

D. M. Flannagan. 

Corporals. 
T. H. Becker. G. Hinman. 

H. M. Ernst. Tom Raraagi 

Privates. 

A. P. Armstrong. P- B- Lantz - 

A. D. Bell. J- G. Mealy. 

E. A. Bruce. E. Townsheml. 
H. F. Compton. K- ?■ Watson. 
D. A. Croniir. 



259 



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Captain C. S. McNeill 

First Lieutenant Ed Dudley 

Second Lieutenant IT. W. Sanders 

First Sergeant C. C. Holland 

Second Sergeant W. E. Lloyd 

Third Sergeant Tom Foulk 

Fourth Sergeant II. W. Law son 

Fifth Sergeant L. Ryan 



W. I'. Samnions 
.1. P. McJilton. 

(ioo. Linn. 



Corporals. 



Musicians. 



L. C. Yeardley 
I). II. Estill. 

J. II. Riddle. 



2U0 




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6 



V 
om pa tin 



3 



Captain E. C. Colcord 

First Lieutenant M. W. McDonald 

Second Lieutenant E. H. Barnhart 

First Sergeant G. W. Price 

Second Sergeant H. C. Batten 

Third Sergeant C. C. Slieppard 

Fourth Sergeant J. W. Yonker 

Fifth Sergeant G. L. Dent 



J. R. Tuckwiller. 
G Myers. 
S. A. Waller. 



B. F. McGinnis. 



Corporals. 



Musicians. 



F. L. Boydston. 
B. W. King. 



R. K, McNeill. 



261 



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(O (O 

K^c/nntini/ L 

Captain F. C. Colcord 

First Lieut enant F. L. Shinn 

Second Lieutenant L. D. Sanders 

First Sergeant R. L. Colo 

Second Sergeant \. ('. Weaver 

Third Sergeant II. M. Scott 

Corporals. 
R. 0. Hall. W. G. Hall. 

W. R. Thacther. Ira Nestor. 

Musician. 
I). Ross. 



0/J . A 
<_/ % i fated 



Bainbridge. 
H. C. Barns. 
<!. \Y. Bigler. 
A. Cains. 
S. Campbell. 
EL A. Downs. 
.1. ('. Evans. 
J. W. Evans. 
F. W. Fitzgerald. 
S. H. Green. 



K^ompanii Li 

W. F. Harlan. 

P. Hall. 

T. L. Harris. 

H. .1. Hawkins. 

Lohm. 

Lantz. 

McMorrow. 

T. T. Nickell. 

R. Ogden. 

V. Rigot. 



•0 



D. L. Garden. 

H. B. Colebaffk. 
('. B. Cox. 
T. D. Devenny. 
0. F. Gibbs. 
G. W. Grow. 
J. A. Hanna. 

E. L. Henshaw. 

F. L. Knoke. 
('. G. Lashley. 
C. H. Layman. 



B. G. Brown. 
O. E. Boggess. 
R. W. Cummins 
G. R. (lark. 
G. B. Faulk. 
M. Calvin. 
J. C. Gibson. 
G. D. Johnson. 
E. R. Lang. 



L^o/nna/n/ t_X> 

X. S. Floyd. 

S. D. McGrnni. 

F. McDonald. 

Morris. 

W. R. Reitz. 

(). A. Richmond. 

C. B. Boss. 

Rogers. 

Reynolds. 

0. W. Robinson. 

J. A. Rupert. 

C. R. Long. 
R. EL Linengood. 
J. I'. Moriarty. 
W. F. Morrison. 
C. W. McConihay. 
F. ( '. Musgrave. 
A. R. Boss. 
R. C. Ward. 
J. R. Wilson. 



263 



R. L. Rose. 
F. II. Shaffer. 
S. Shirkey. 
F. ('. Smith. 
F. .\r. Smith. 
H. E. Snyder. 
Blake Taylor. 
Yaonskv. 
Leavitt. 
A. L. Metcalf. 



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C. F. Shull. 
G. C. Smith. 
N. C. St anna rd. 

F. M. Stewart. 
C. E. Sloan. 

R. C. Teter, 

H. A. L. Walkup 

J. F. Walton. 

G. W. Whiting. 
E. L. Williams. 



•I. R. Robinson. 

J. C. Southern. 

s. coir 

15. Randall. 

P. H. Fallen. 

C. V. Feller. 

C. Tetrick. 






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264 




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a C/ p /9 / J1 " C7p C7^ " 

Una d~aau ct U he Uiae't 



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When Jim Armsby entered college, he was immediate- 
ly, after the fashion of college boys, nicknamed, and his 
nickname was "the Lady." Since Jim was scarcely aver- 
age height, with delicate features, sofe brown eyes, and a 
t-allier quiel manner, this name suited him admirably. Long 
after the man who had bestowed it upon him had left 
college. .Jim was answering to the name, "the Lady." The 
impression, however, must not be gotten that Jim was ef- 
feminate. Par from it. Although he had never "made 
the "varsity eleven," he had played football and played 
it well, too. He had endured without a groan the set- 
ling of a collar bone, a nasty break where some player 
had struck him, and he had once knocked down a fellow 
who had insulted a girl, not withstanding the fact that 
the fellow was many sizes larger than Jim. 

Jim's best friend. Joe Sidney, was also nicknamed. 
His pseudonym, strange to say, was "the Tiger." Six 
feet tall, with shoulders proportionally broad, a star at 
football, playing with tigerish intensity, Joe well merited 
his nickname. I am inclined to think that but few of 
the buys thought of Milton, "the Lady of Christ's," when 
recalling Jim's nickname, hut they never failed to think 
df Stockton's "The Lady or The Tiger?'.'?" when naming 
the two together. .Many were the puns, many the witty 
remarks, consequent upon the coincidence of friendship 
and nickname. The buys endured (hem all with equan- 
imity. 

So their friendship continued until tiny both, in their 
senior year, fell in hive with the same girl, and it was no 



college-boy's love, but the earnest, sincere love of a man. 
Elizabeth Harwich was a brilliant girl, prominent both in 
the college, and in the social life of the small town where- 
in the college was located. She was above all an at- 
tractive girl with a personality that made friends for her 
everywhere. Her dark brown eyes could sparkle at the 
labored wit of one college professor, or they could look 
with intent interest upon the technical terms of another. 
Elizabeth entered college in the boys' senior year. It 
was only a short time before Jim met her, and two days 
Later he took Joe around, introducing him thus: "I'm 'the 
Lady,' here's 'the Tiger.' Then began the rivalry, 

good natured at first, serious later, but hostile, never. 

Elizabeth was equally nice to both boys. If Jim took 
her to church, Joe took her to the theater; if Jim took her 
driving, Joe took her boating: if Jim took her to the big- 
gest football game of the season, Joe took her to the dance 
given that night in honor of the visiting team, although he, 
pool- half-back, was so bruised and tired that every step 
was torture. And so matters went on. All spring "the 
Lady" and "the Tiger" strove, neck and neck, for Eliza- 
beth's favor, and her love. All three were extremely 
reticent. Elizabeth was unlike most girls in that she con- 
fided in no one. Jim and Joe were in a predicament. 
Hitherto each one had confided in the other. Now that 
was out of the question. 

One morning Elizabeth received two letters. The 
handwriting on each was familiar; one was from "the 
Lady", one from "the Tiger." Instinctively she guessed 



their meaning. Hastening to her room, she read them. 
The first read thus : 
My Sweet Heart: 

For a long' time I have known that I love you, but I 
have kept silent, fearing to sever our friendship, which 
believe me, is very sweet. But now I ask for something 
far sweeter — your love. 

Yours devotedly, 

"The Lady." 
The second letter was as follows. 
My dearest : 

Don't you know that I love you dearly? I want you 
to love me and I want you for my very own. 
With all my heart, 

"The Tiger." 
On Elizabeth's desk that night lay two envelopes in- 
tended respectively for "the Lady" and "the Tiger." 
In each hand was a letter. The one in her right read : 

My dear J 

You have grieved me beyond words. No one loves 
you more, as a friend, than 

Your friend, 

Elizabeth Harwick. 
The one in her left hand was much shorter: 
My dear Boy: 
Come. 

With love, 

Elizabeth. 
Slowly with a tear for one, and a Kiss for the other, 
she put them in their envelopes. 

I told you before that Elizabeth confided in no one. 
She didn't confide in me, so I do not know which letter 
went into which envelope. Do you? 

Virginia Poulk, '08. 



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267 



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///ete/i/' <j/t£j 



l J 



(Composed by Barnhart, ami dedicated to himself.) 



Now people listen, one and fill 
A story I'll tell to you. 

About the different girls 1 have; 
For Of ladies I have a few. 



And now comes one that 1 tell you true. 

Makes my heart heat fast by her glances; 
A waltz with her seems heaven on earth. 

The girl I take to the dances. 



First, there is the one who talks so sweet. 

The brightest and wittiest of all 
I am sure one couldn't help liking her; 

The one on whom I call. 



Xow there is another, a dear little girl, 
I dream of her every night. 

Her sweet face haunts me all the day. 
The girl to whom I write. 



Then, there is the cne so full of life. 

So jolly and gay. you know. 
I really believe I'm in love with her, 

The one I take to the show. 



And when all these girls go back en me, 
And leave me right in the lurch, 

I always have one to love me still. 
The girl that I take to church. 



Xow people, all, both foolish and wise, 
I want your opinion true, 

When I have so many to chose from 
I reallv can't choose. Could von ? 



Uhe oLcacnu cJ i^Ac 



a/ I ievH 



It was in springtime ; the trees were covered with shin- 
ing green leaves; the woods were filled with the fragrance 
of wild flowers; birds wen' twittering in every bush and 
tree, and all nature was bright and beautiful. Two 
Indian lovers were strolling slowly through the woods from 
the village, down the steep hill-side to where a large rock 
jutted out over the Valley. They came to a sort of 
level place and passing across this, through the thick trees 
and underbrush, came abruptly out on that large rock 
known as Pisquaowa, or the look across the river. 

They seated themselves on the rock and gazed out over 
the scene before them. Par below, like a tiny rivulet, 
the Chatouka, or Cheat River, was flowing along and 
the sound of its waters, darting among the rocks came up 
to them like the sound of far off laughter. On each 
side of the Chatouka the mountains rose straight from the 
river, to the height of several hundred feet, and were 
covered with dense forests of green, broken at intervals by 
the white crest of an out-cropping cliff or the gay color's 
of some blossoming tree. The declining sun cast its 
yellow rays over the whole valley and gave to everything 
a sort of golden tint that added still more to the enchant- 
ment of the scene. 

"It seems as if the Great Spirit must have put all of 
his best work on this Valley," remarked the youth, 
solemnly. 

"Yes," answered the girl, "and then, just gave us this 
setting of the sun, to show that he could make it still more 
beautiful." 



The sun slowly sank and the gorgeous after-glow 
spread over the hills and lighted the dark river, till it 
glowed like a molten stream. Still the lovers sat and 
mused; still they spoke of the goodness of the Great Spirit 
in giving them this earthly paradise for their home. 

The beating of the war-drum in the village called them 
back to earth. 

"The war-drum is calling to me, Jasowala" said the 
young man. "It calls to me to say that on the morrow I 
must go away. Go to fight the great Ogoheewa, the great 
White Day. He has hunted in our forests, left the forests 
of his tribe and invaded the hunting grounds of the 
Chatouka 's. Come to catch our beavers and our deer. But 
we will make him sorry for it, make him curse the day lie 
crossed the path of old Manaquija, cur great chief. The 
war party sets out tomorrow and I must go, and leave you. 
We will not all come back; and I want your promise that, 
should I fall before the arrow cr the tomahawk cf one 
of White Day's braves, you will never wed another, but 
will join me in the " Happy Hunting Ground" where we 
shall dwell forever." 

"Oh, Nautika," said the maiden, "Do not say such 
words of terror. You shall not go and leave me here". 

"Yes, but I must. Give me your promise. Say you'll 
meet me in the land of the Manitou". 

"But you will come back to me; no one of Ogoheewa 's 
tribe shall kill you. It would leave me broken hearted; 
not to think of seeing you, not to dream of ever being near 



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you. You can have my promise, truly. I will never wed 
another." 

"Swear it by the river, yonder. Swear you'll ever he 
true to me", persisted the lover. 

So the maiden promised; and they went back to the 
village together; he full of hopes to do brave deeds in 
the coming war, she full of sorrow at the parting. 

Early next morning the war canoes set out: floated 
down the dark Chatouka, paddled up the broad Mononga- 
hela and then on up the clear waters of the White Day. 

The summer passed and the squaws and children of 
the tribe of the Chatouka's waited for some news of the 
war party. Autumn came and the winds and frosts had 
turned the bright green of the trees to a gorgeous profusion 
of brilliant n'<\ and gold and yellow. On one evening 
in October the canoes came up the river and the warriors 
had returned. They landed and came up the hillside to 
the village. But Xautika was not with them and Jasowala, 
sad and tearful, lisp aed with an aching heart while the 
old Manaquija told the story of the battle, told how tin 
Chatouka's had defeated the warriors of the White Day. 

"Listen now, my people", said the old man, as they sat 
around the camp-fire, "Listen and you shall hear of the 
death of Navtika, the bravest warrior of the tribe. Ogo- 
lie< wa. sly and crafty, had entrapped us in an ambush. All 
our braves wiTf panic stricken and were just about to run 
for their canoes, when Xavtika rushed into the middle of 
the fight. All alone he ran forward towards Ogoheewa's 
battle line, arrows fell in show* rs about him, but he charged 
into the middle id' the line. He swung his tomahawk 
about him and before he fell wounded, he had slain OgO- 
heewa's son. This seemed to give our braves fresh eour- 



age and they fought hard and put the tribe of the White 
Days to rout. When Ogoheewa had retreated we went up 
to find Xavtika : he was lying dead beside the chieftain he 
had killed". 

Jasowala could not bear to see the celebration of the 
victory, bought so dearly. She quietly slipped away and 
wandered down to the great rock, Pisquaowa. There she 
sat the whole night long, grieving for her lover, for the 
brave she would never see again. The sun pose and still 
she sat there, sat there all throughout the day: dreaming of 
the happy days that they had spent there, dreaming of the 
lost Xavtika. And the sight of the river brought back to 
her the rememberance of her promise, her vow to meet him 
in the great Hereafter. 

Evening came and the sun-set flooded the mountains 
with a wonderful crimson light. She seemed to hear Xavtika 
calling to her, calling to her everywhere. Kvi ry sound 
of earth was to the maiden the voice of her lover calling. 
The evening breeze in the forest spoke her name. 
"Jasowala". The river whispered "Jasowala, darling, 
come to me". Xavtika was calling to her, asking her to 
join him in the Spirit Land. 

She arose and walked to the edge of the rock: there 
two hundred feet below her were the jagged boulders which 
had fallen at the base of the cliff. She looked down: in 
the deepening shadows, there below she saw Xavtika. He 
beckoned to her, and a bird down in the forest called 
"Jasowala". She stretched out her arms. "Xavtika. 
Xavtika, 1 am coming". And she leaped to join her 
lover in the "Happy Hunting Grounds". 

J. W. M. 



2ro 



(Tn <9/a(L 



tan 



KJLcnutncc 



Several years ago, while traveling in Italy, I eame, 
just about sunset, to the little City of Villoma. Almost 
all Italian towns, of any size, have some tradition or 
building, which is of interest to the traveler. A short dis- 
tance from Villoma, so my guide-book informed me, then; 
was a very interesting old castle. 

The night was clear and the full moon shone as it 
shines nowhere but in Italy. After I had eaten a good 
supper in the little old-fashioned inn, I decided that I 
would like to visit the old castle and view the ruins by 
moonlight. I had a great deal of trouble finding a man 
who would act as guide : everybody seemed to have some 
dread of going to the castle at night. But, finally, a 
young man, tempted by the gold piece I offered, agreed to 
conduct me to it and relate the history of the ancient build- 
ing. 

The castle stood on a high promontory, a half mile, 
perhaps, from the village, overlooking the Mediterranean 
Sea. The roof had long since fallen away, and the white 
stone walls, glistening in the silver light of the moon, looked 
the mere spectre of the once solid masonry. At the 
ends of one of the walls, rose tall turrets, like twin giants 
standing guard over the ancient pride of the family which 
once dwelt within this noble edifice. Pointing to a window 
in one of these towers, my guide said: 

"Do you see that window yonder?" 

I nodded in assent. 

"The daughter of the noble, who lived in this castle, 
was imprisoned in that room and died there". 



I begged him to relate the story, and after we had 
seated ourselvi s on a fallen pillar, he told me the following- 
legend : 

"Many years ago, Selanino, the noble who owned this 
castle, was the ruler of the town of Villoma. lie had a 
daughter, Lucretia, who was noted, far and near as one of 
the most beautiful girls in all Italy; her complexion was 
of the richest olive, and her eyes and her hair as black as 
the darkest shadow, but her disposition as bright as yonder 
moon. 

"Now, Lucretia 's father had decided that she should 
marry the son of a neighboring noble, but the girl herself 
desired to wed a poor young villager. Lucretia 's tears 
and entreaties were all in vain, her father would not listen 
to her marrying any except the young man he had selected 
to be her husband. Her father raged and entreated, 
threatened and cajoled; finally thinking thus to break his 
daughter of her stubborn disobedience he imprisoned the 
girl in the upper room in the tower, which I have pointed 
out to you. 

'This method of bringing the girl into submission, how- 
ever, proved unsuccessful ; for if she was at most times 
bright and cheery, she could also display, on occasions, a 
will as strong as that of her father 's. So the girl held out 
against her parent for three long years, declaring again, 
and again, that she would die in this lonely tower, rather 
than marry any but the man of her choice. Her lover 
proved worthy of her, also, for, every night, he would 
come and stand beneath her window, and on moonlit nights, 



Illouticoln 



271 



jnoulicoKi 



such as this cue. for hours, he would sit here and sing 
love songs to the accompaniment of a tinkling mandolin. 
The family lived in another part of the castle, and so these 
nightly visits of Lucretia's lover were known only to her- 
self. 

"On one beautiful night, just about like this, while the 
young man was singing to his sweetheart, her father dis- 
covered him. Selanino was so angered, to think that her 
lover would dare to enter the castle gardens and attempt 
to see the girl, that he drew his sword, and, rushing for- 
ward, killed the young man by a single thrust. 

''The young lady, looking out of her prison window, 
saw her lover murdered and, uttering one wild shriek, she 
fell back on the floor of her cell — dead. 

"And now, Signor, on moonlight nights, so the story 
g es, the spirit of the lover conies back from the other world 
and, standing beneath yonder window, plays a soft ser- 
enade to his spirit-sweetheart, who can be seen looking out 
between the bars of her lonely prison". 

Perhaps it was the surroundings; perhaps it was the 
awed tone of the speaker's voice, but this strange story 
told in the beautiful Italian language took a wonderful 
hold on me. Informing' my guide that I could find my 



way back to the village, alone, and thanking him for the 
story, I dismissed him. I lighted a cigar and soon was lost 
in meditation of the story and the beautiful scene stretched 
out before me. 

The sense-stealing aroma of my cigar, the distance roar- 
ing of the breakers on the beach, far below me. and the 
subtle sweetness of the cool night air, all combined to act 
upon my senses like a powerful narcotic, and I fell asleep. 
It may have been a dream, or it may have been the tinkling 
of a bell on some distant hill, but 1 was awakened by the 
sound of a mandolin, played as nobody ever heard one play- 
ed before. Unearthly music beyond description! The 
player seemed to put into the soft chords all the feelings 
and emotions of an entire life-time. And as I sat, in that 
semi-conscious condition, half asleep, half awake, I looked 
up and could have sworn that I saw the beautiful Lucretia 
at the tower window and her faithful lover standing on 
the ground below. 

I threw off this drowsiness and struggled to my feet. 
My cigar had gone out, and as I threw away the stump and 
started back to the village, the clocks were striking the 
hour of twelve. 

BILL '07. 




2?i 



yy/ial Ufieu Cite *JJoina 



Mugsie's in her bedroom playing Solitaire; 
Brownie's always with her making her play fair. 
Helen's eating, eating, everything in sight, 
Delia's in the parlor entertaining her Sevite. 
Mary Dot is busy making lassos of her eyes. 
Miller's sleeping sleeping, snoring for a prize; 
Tildy's giggling Winnie's phoning — to the only one 
Reny's at a Freshman meeting hasn't missed a single one. 
Jndie's working — very busy — sin<jin<;- in the chapel choir, 
Nellie Jane defends her fellow with an eloquence of fire. 
(Jussie's warbling melodies — Oil, may they all be brief, 
And Blake is out awalking with the editor-in-chief. 



JUonticoln 



273 



illoiilicol.i 




THE 1JBRARY (jlRL [££&' 



274 



CI <_/ tophecu 



Wfuc£ A 3&einp ^u/filUJ 



Come near ye nations to hear: and hearken ye people: 
let the earth hear what shall come to pass in the year a 
thousand and nine times a hundred and six years thereafter. 

In that year many shall hear of the town which is be- 
ing called Morgan — which being interpreted means the 
place of the pony — and to that city there shall come from 
the Hills of Greenheith many ones like unto the hills of 
their fathers, for in that day the grasshopper shall be a 
burden to the multitude of those who dwell on the farms 
round about. The long locks of these shall come with 
them and their eyes shall be as the eyes of the owles in the 
cedars of (ireenbeith; for to these tenderlings, snatched 
from their mother's brests, the Place of the Pony shall be as 
a place of many headed wild beasts. The names of these 
shall be called Preps which meaneth those of tender feet. 
Over these shall be a rider of iron whom they shall fear as 
the would an eagle with a beak of a ship. His bald head 
shall be a sign to that unless they labor and are heavy laden 
their records shall be barren even as his mighty head is 
barren. Woe to those that cometh down from Greenheith 
to be oppressed by him whose name is the name of many 
mules. 

In that year many sons and daughters of the tribes 
of Presibites and Sopholites shall be in this same city of 
much learning. The Preshibites, which are "those with- 
out the salt of wisdom" shall wax strong in wars with the 
Sopholites or "those of the swelled skull". The walls of 
the city shall bear their inscriptions, yea, the doors of the 
temples shall show forth their blasphemous handiwork. 



Passersby shall read their threatenings by the way side 
and shall wag their heads and cry aloud, "Surely wisdom 
shall be without a dwelling place till the coming of those 
from Greenheith; for these spend their days and nights in 
foolish sayings. They harden their necks with stiff bind- 
ings and swell their heads tip having nothing wherewith 
to fill the vacancy thereof." 

Hearken, for in that year wisdom shall build her a 
house in that city. She shall cry from the highest places 
and forty and four from the tribe of Junite shall heat- 
her voice and shall enter in and dwell with her. Conten- 
tions shall not be in their councils save when those of the 
nimble feet shall arise and say, "Let us go out into the by- 
ways and hedges and compel the sons and daughters of 
Senorite to come in to make merry with us until the 
morning. " Then those of the grave faces shall cry out 
vehemently against this saying. The seven pillars shall 
be made to shake with contentions. Then Wisdom shall 
arise in their midst and shall entreat them saying, "Let 
the tribe of Senorite come in and make merry; for their 
bones wax old and their spirits droop as do the leaves of the 
bay tree when the storm cometh. Let the time to the 
eleventh hour be for those of the grave faces and let those 
of the nimble feet dance to the music of stringed instru- 
ments till the second crowing of the cock." And so it 
shall be decreed. 

In that year of strange happenings the tribe of Seno- 
rite shall tremble as an aspen leaf; for the places of their 
tents shall be made desolate bv the voung and mighty and 



ilium i coin 



275 



<The 

ilia ul i coin 



there shall be for them no safe dwelling place. In the sixth 
month of the year and the eighth and twentieth day of the 
month, they shall depart as an old man departeth from 
the multitude. Their book shall be sealed and their name 
shall be heard no more. 

Divers strange and wise ones shall be placed over these 
Tribes. Some shall have limbs like unto reeds by the 
rivers: and some shall have bodies like unto the whales of 



the sea. In that memorable year many of these wise men 
shall turn their beards into plow shares and their coat- 
tails into pruning hooks. 

In the same year a mighty one shall move down from 
the mountains of the South to rule over the tribes in the 
valley. In his hand shall be a staff with a head of gold 
and many shall marvel at the size of his sceptre for his 
ruling shall be as a shepherd. 







276 



Itlonlicolo 




teE fl '«g mSmmwi 



277 



Jnoulicoln 



(l/ic pc/i/c ccmedtc Jtancai&e. 

Personnages. 

M. lc Professeur B . (qui tient dans ses bras du pain 

qu'il vient d'acheter.) 

Monsieur II . La scene est sur le pout a ' ' South Park. 

Prof. B . "Je vous dis, Monsieur, que " (il laisse 

toniber son pain.) 
M. H. . (avee un tres grand saint) " Permettex ?moi 

d 'avoir le plaisir de vous rendre votre pain." 
Prof. B . "Merei, Monsieur. Come je vous aid dit " 

(il laissee toniber de nouveau son pain.) 
M. II . (avee un grand saint) " Permettcz-moi de vous 

rendre votre pain. " 
Prof. B . "Merci, Monsieur. Je pense — ' (encore 

une fois. il laisse tomber son pain.) 

M. II . (avee un saint) "Voici votre pain." 

Prof. B — . "Merci, Monsieur. Xe pensez-vous pas que 

( pour la quatrieme fois, il laisse tomber son pain.) 
M II — . (il releve le pain et il le jete par le cote du pout) 

"DAMN THAT BREAD." 



278 



Jtloiiticoln 




279 



September. 10. Sophomores again try to put up notices. '09 appears 
25 - New students begin to show themselves. Groninger on the observatory. Numerous fights to-day and 
J. , ' ., . registers. c i ass rus h to-night. 

_i). More i reps come in. Jim Gibson comes back to see 11. The clothing business picks up. 

the town.' 12. Junior election. 

-'■ Lasl { ' ;l11 for registration. Big rush al registrars 13. "Red" Stout in town. Ii lias been learned from 

office after arrival of 3:30 train. reliable sources that he is not contemplating re- 

28. Firsi day of school. Boys begin to "make ryes" entering school. 

at the new co-eds. 14. W. V. F. 28; Ohio University 0. First armory dance. 

29. I'at assigns in rhetoric I. "How it Happened that 15. Dr. Ccmpston preaches against dancing. 

I came to College." "Hi. Simean Smith reads his class a story. 

30. W. V. U. 0; Westminster 16. 17. 

October. is. Scrubs score on Varsity. Carman knocks. 

1. New students go to church: old ones to ('heal. 19. Carl Colcord is seen on the street without Ned. 

2. The Prats begin to do a rushing business. 20. Class officers' day. Class officers give little speeches 
:i. Groninger go€s. to class for first time. to their students. Quite a popular institution 
4. M. E. Conference in full blast. Many students because it gives a half holiday. 

attend I .' .' .') 21. W. V. F. 4<F Bethany o. Sweeney Fleming misses 
■'• his weekly visit to Morgantown. 

<i. Athletic mass meeting. Lots of enthusiasm. The 22. Dick Price goes to church. 

Athletic Association raises $400.(10. 23. Mandolin Club rehearsal. Duval takes a. chew. 

'■ W. V. F. 12; California 0. Nightshirt parade. 24. Law school holds a jubilee. Riley makes a speech. 

Everybody takes a free ( ??) street car ride. 25. Dayton yets in a hurry. 

8. Iv \. Buchanan says thai the W. V. F. is nothing but 26. * K - ination. 

a big daueing academy. Feardley can 't see why 27. Dance at Arthurdale. 

he has never learned to dance. 28. Armory dance. Small attendance probably due to 
!». Sophomores post notices and Freshmen tear them Father Kluscr's influence. 

down before daylight. Rumors of an attempt 29. 

to burn down the old Dick house. 30. Dr. Callahan's class "cuts." 

380 



3.1. Monticola board announced. Hallowe'en. Nuf cod. 
November. 

1. Clarke llininan 's vaudeville. "Lizzie" Ramage makes 

a big hit. 

2. Coach Forkum fires Yeai'dley from the field; he evi- 

dently dots not appreciate the importance of 
Prep's performance in the vaudeville stunts. 

3. Pritchard goes over to Huntington after Kentucky 

State. After their gate receipts and uniforms 
are attached, Kentucky decides to come over and 
play us. 

4. W. V. U. 4"); Kentucky State (I. Large score prob- 

ably due to fact that this is a dry town. 
5. 

6. Mechanical Hall steps washed and engineering pro- 

fessor's get new chairs. "Sport" says something 
is going to happen. 

7. Cadets wear their new uniforms to school, and get 

struck on all the girls. 

8. Skeletons found on State Farm. Bi«' murder mystery. 
!>. Dr. Kortright gives an examination in organic chem- 
istry. Average grade 53 per cent. 

10. Murder mystery cleared up through efforts of Detec- 

tive Simpson. The skeletons were only the re- 
mains of some bricks. 

11. California 17; W. V. U. 0. 
12. 

13. "Fortune Teller" plays here. Since "Red" is not 

in town the company is not given any dance this 
year. 

14. 1. a. m. 75 students, 1 horse and wagon, and 3 wheel- 

barrows, working in unison make a move towards 
clearr athletics. 



15. Jim Groninger comes out for quarter-back and gets 
a big rosete up. 

1(>. Al Cheney is seen to laugh. 

17. Dayton starts maping out his military ball program. 

liS. W. V. IT. 24; Bethany 0. Armory dance — super- 
fluity of chaperones due to the fact that there were 
none at the last armory dance. 

20. Library officially adopted as a general loafing and ^'i c 

trysting place. Sllouticolo 

21. Charley Peddieord is very busy. 

22. Dr. Maxey fails to get off a joke iir one of his classes 

to-day. Later: Dr. Maxey confesses that he is 
rrot feeling well. 

23. Team leaves for State College. 

24. W. V. U. 0; Perm. State 6. 

25. Team returns. A great big thuse held and all the 

members of the team make speeches. Yea rd ley 
says he had a good time. 

26. Xelse Duval acts as butler- at Woman's Hall. 

27. Marietta trip proposed. 

29. The foot-ball team go to working on the rail road but 

are replaced by Dagoes. 

30. W. V. C. 17: Marietta 6. A crowd of rooters go 

over to see the game. 
December. 

1. Nothin' doirr". Holiday. Those who went to Mari- 

etta are glad there is no school. 

2. Post just wakes up and inquires, "Have we passed 

Fairmont yet .'" 

3. Prof. Douthat explains one of Dr. Maxey 's puns to 

Dr. Cox. 

4. Boys begin to cram for exams. 

5. The Freshmen issue posters against the Sophomores. 



281 



Illoul icoln 



7. Cecil Austin engages in a pillow fight at the lVabody. 
S. V. M. ('. A. Convention on. Coeds entertain visit- 
ors but forget to introduce the boys. 

10. Y. M. C. A. Convention ends. Coeds "don't think 

much of those visiting girls any way." The 
fellows do. 

11. The boys all sleepy in class — got up too early to see 

the girls off on the six o'clock train. 

12. Simmons whitewashes his red sweater. 
1:5. -Joke editor receives a contribution! 

14. Stat hers elected football manager for 1906. 
1."). Last day of school for fall quarter. 

Hi. Wishing to get an early start. Prof. Hare holds Latin 

exams. 
17. Nobody at church. Too near examinations. 

15. "A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse." 
ID. "How are the mighty fallen." 

20. "It's all over now." "We're going home." 

21. All is quiet, nothing is to be heard anywhere around 

tin' university, except, from the registrars office 
comes the sound of a pen gliding over paper; 
"Jack" is making out our reports. 

Dec. 22 — Ian. 3 

Vacation Time. 

January. 

1. The hoys are still at home, most of them make New 

Year's calls and some feel very good and happy. 

2. A few come back to Morgantown. New Year's resolu- 

tions broken. 
:>. Registration day. Miss Neal — "Say Professor, what 
makes yon wear that little white cap?" 



10. 



11. 

12. 
1:5. 
lo. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
2:5. 
24. 

25. 

26. 



28. 



First recitations for the winter quarter. Dick Price 

does not go to see .lane to-night. Says he has to 

study this term. 
Dick decides it don't pay to work. 
Caroline gets a new man. 
Prof. Patterson thinks he will have to put out 

"Standing Room Only" sign if anybody else 

enters Rhetoric II. 
First snow of the season * * " s give a sledding party. 
There was some talk of a Freshman — Sophomore 

snow ball battle to-day. but it developes that 

"there air no Sophs" when it comes to fighting. 
Hugh Sam Byrer gives a dance in B H " Hall. 
Armory dance postponed. 

Dance postponed again. Soiree by French Club. 
French lecture by M. Tiersat. 
J. A. (Jist plays set-back. 
Major Burns gives another lecture. 
Initiation night, -^ T A, - *■ B e 11 initiate. 
Armory dance, large attendance. 
Sunday. No one preaches on dancing! 
Prep. Chemistry class tries to blow up laboratory. 
Mountain initiates. 
Big scandal. Lizzie Ramage is reported smoking a 

cigarette on campus. 
Monticola Board 1 ntertained at Miss Burns'. Energy 

Mason's German solos much enjoyed. 
Athletic election. ( Jreat excitement. Many proxies. 

Meeting slightly delayed by being prorogued by 

Prepy. Dean Spence gits mad. 
W. V. U. 42 : Wilmerding Y. M. C. A. 13, at Basketball 

Freshmen 12; Juniors !*. 
Sunday. Young goes to Fairmont. 
Dreadfully dull. 



2S2 



30. Girls raise rough house in library; hoys cannot study. 
February. 

1. Junior Class meeting. Prom discussed. In absence 

of Father Kluser, Brake talks on dancing. 

2. Kappa Delta's go to Fairmont. Big banquet and 

reception. 

Military ball programs started in earnest. 
Armory Dance & Downs plays hide-and-si ek in Armory 
Kappa Delta's return. 

"Have you got your military hall program filled?" 
Monticola joke box officially adopted by Campus Class 

as waste basket. 
Kenna and Simmons advertise for girls to take to 

the military ball. 
FRAN C E — Strange signs appear. 
Gymnasium exhibit; Chez happy: tells everyone how 

he does everything; President's reception. 
Dr. Seaver lectures on physical culture. 
Visitors begin to arrive for Military Ball. 
Clara Smith gives big dance. 
Advance sale for "Ben Greet;" "No the tall man 

selling tickets at the Acme was not Ben Greet." 
"Paulina" — Comic opera by Professor Thompson and 

others. 
Corn-meal dance. 
"Twelfth night" Ben Greet. 
"Macbeth." 

Prexy sends out invitations to stay away from Mili- 
tary Ball. 
MILITARY BALL. 
Law students give Professors a holiday. 
Guests go home. Everybody goes to bed. 
Large attendance at church. Disappointment; no 

one preaches on Military Ball. 



3. 
4. 
5. 

6. 



9. 
10. 

12. 
13. 
14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

19. 
20. 
21. 

22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 



26. Work once more. 

27. French Club bakes pancakes; celebrating Mardi Gras. 

28. Lent begins; McQuilken gives up cards and cigarettes. 
March. 

1. Dan Dawson goes to class. 

2. Professor Willey calls boys fools; great depression 

of spirits noticed. 
8. Cuspidors ordered for law school; Mail Pouch ad- 
vances two points. 

15. Big snow-ball fight; Porter Post and Dick Simmons 

the heroes. 

16. The clock strikes every hour correctly today. 

23. First practice base ball game; 'Varsity beats scrubs 

after a. hard game. 

24. Snow four inches deep. 

26. New Theatre opens; law students adopt honor sys- 

tem ; some one says something about honor among 
thieves. 

27. Exams begin. 

28. Last day of Exams: base ball team starts on southern 

trip. 
31. W. V. IT 5; V. M. I. 4. 
April. 

2. W. V. U. 7 ; W. & L. 1. 

3. Registration Day; W. V. U. 14; Woodberry Forrest 

7; Glee Club goes away; Ellison happy. 

4. W. V. IT. 5; Naval Academy 11. 

5. W. V. U. 2; St. John's 3; tough luck! 

6. Miss Chorpening breaks into Rose's heart. 

7. Sammy Brown leaves that old red overcoat at home: 

Lough buys a straw hat on the strength of this. 

8. Rose appears to be hard hit. 

9. Track team begins to limber up; Shull talks of enter- 

ing mile ; others look sick. 



IThe 

llloulicoln 



283 






triio 

JDouttcoIn 



10. Sun comes out and docs his best to overcome blunders 
of those who drained ( .') athletic field. 

13. Wheeling here to play base ball; big crowd; lots of 

excitement; fasl ball; score 'Varsity 1; Wheel- 
ing 0. 

14. Rain, pain, rain; no game; Wheeling goes home; 

Kappa Delta's receive at President's home in hon- 
or of Mrs. Griffith. 

15. Easter Sunday; new hats? Well, say! Cold as can be 

but lots of white dresses 
16. 







281 



(bc/iec/u/e a/ If c/na/i »' iJta& 

From half past nine till half past ten, ~. 

Woman's Hall has quiet been. ,„ , 

I hen Arthur, coolly cuts a class, 
Walks home with Nell, his bonnie lass; 
Twelve o'clock and sure as fate, 
In Cad and Smith perambulate. 
At one P. M. and on till four, 
Peace reigns in Woman's Hall once more. 
Then lookout for a merry din, 
As Delia and Levi Shuffle in. 
For half an hour they'd make you sick! 
Helen rushes in with Pick. 
Then Richard Price and Jennie Mae 
Toddle in and there they stay. 
Supper time — nothing greater, 
Exit gentlemen — "See you later." 
Kimono parade begins at six — 
Gee ! it is an awful mix — 
Sixty-forty-five, the calls begin, 
Waggener prompt comes rolling in. 
Shaffer wanders in at eight ; 
Waggener leaves — but not too late ; 
For Alderson meanders in 
And takes his place — Oh what a sin ! 
Nine, and Arthur's strictly in it 
To see his Nellie "just a minute." 
Ten thirty — the bell — exit men. 
"Good night, gentlemen, call again." 



285 



fttonticola 




FOB! MMMMT -M f 

M /rtO OTHFff ^MUP ft£4S0/v7 



■>HC, 



J/ atts o/ ci cZJic/ionati/ o/ fVe&t vitainia Yt/i/^ct.u'/t/ 



Annual Inspection — The time Major Burns gets scared. 

Armory — A dance-hall. 

Athletic Field — A duck-puddle. 

Cadet — From "cad" and the dimunitive "et. " A little, 
cad. One who thinks himself very important. 

Cheat — An elysium known only to the chosen few. A 
place to get lost. 

Co-education — One of the blessings accompanying higher 
education in West Virginia. 

Flunk — The name applied to the familiar process of giving 
a student below sixty per cent. See Foxy. 

Football — A rough, brutal game once indulged in but n w 
fast disappearing owing to Faculty supervision. 

Fort — A place where beans are stored away. 

Freshman — The lowest form of college man. 

Grind — One who lets studies interfere with his college edu- 
cation. 

Gymnasium — A skin game (one dollar gym. fee). 

Hie Jacet — A coat worn in the anatomical laboratory. 



Hie — A dead person ; used by medics for dissecting, 
throwing and other useful pastimes. 

Honor System — A method by which all the members of a 
class may cheat at once without fear of detection. See 
Junior Law Class. 

Janitor — A loafer; one who does not look after the com- 
fort or convenience of the occupants of the Univer- 
sity buildings. 

Laboratory — A loafing place. 

Law School — A body of unruly students who are studying 
the principals of law and order. 

Library — A match factory. 

Military Ball — An annual festival occurring about Feb- 
ruary 22, and celebrated by a general drinking bout. 

Pun — A murdered English sentence. See Moxey. 

Rat — A young cadet. 

Snap — See Cox, Foxy, and Jack. 

Special — One who has too much pride to be a "Prep" and 
too little learning to be a collegian. 



ftloiiticola 



A Freshman once tried to propose, 
But knelt on the young lady's toes 
He hurt her pet corn, 
Wished he'd never been born, 
For she landed scpiare on his nose. 



While Walking Down Street. 

V-r-g-n-a "Professor Baumgardner, when you are 
out of the class room you are just 
like a "Prep!" 



287 



Jllonticol.n 



ULvou <J tep Ueatdtei 



Abou Prep Yeardley, may his tribe decrease, 

Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace, 

And gazing- round the room with frenzied look, 

Saw Jack Hare writing in a tiny book. 

Exceeding nerve had made Prep Yeardley bold 

And out he spake with voice and manner cold : 

"What scribblest thou?" The vision raised its head. 

And with a look of awful grandeur said : 

"The names of those who always pass ace high, 

No Hunker can his name herein descry." 

"And is my name there -Jack now do you think?" 

"If so 'tis written with invis'ble ink." 

Prep Yeardley hung his head in deep remorse 

"Thin write me as a lover of the horse." 

The vision came again and Prep awoke 
And to the writing ghost he boldly spoke: 
"What writing yet? What is thy labor now? 
I never saw a man write more than thou." 
-lack Hare held up a book of ponderous weight 
"A list of Hunkers — average thirty-eight." 
The ghost read out the list at Prep's behest 
And lo, Prep Yeardley 's name led all the rest. 
Prep Yeardley said: "I'm glad of this night-mare 
Exams are on I'll use this horse, .Jack Hare." 






trhc 

lUoiiticoIa 



Jane if the draymen struck? 

Or Winnie if the telephone wires broke? 

Or Margaret if her schedule got mixed:' 

Or Bertha if even malted milk fails? 

Or Helen and Mary if there's nothing more to eat? 

Or Nellie Jane when Arthur want's to see her "just 
five minutes?" 

Or bear the strain of the upstairs railing when 
the bell ring's?-- 



llloiiticola 



Pj//ien ^Jie/it/et^ofi Ulccfa 



The noise of a barnyard, the elanjor of arms, 
The rattle of ten thousand early alarms. 
The shrieks of the winds in the wintery gales, 
The beat of the swift flying wheels on the rails. 
The roars of a foghorn as loudly it tools, 
Seem only like whispers 

When Henderson roots. 

II. 

The roars of Niagara, the brays of a mule, 

The wails that come forth from our own music school, 

A show-boat's calliope raising a. din, 

Castoria infants a-crying like sin. 

The booms of a cannon as loudly it shoots 

Seem only like silence 

When Henderson roots. 

III. 

A throat made of Bess'mer; a sea might rejoice 

To be the possessor of such a strong voice. 

Whenever it sounds all nature does shake 

The sea groweth restless, the mountains do quake; 

All other must stop whenever he hoots, 

They're only as dummies 

When Henderson roots. 






290 



Yitnt'ctj CI. <J6. C 

A is for Arnold, who works when he can, 



B is for Brake a very good man, «mtc 

_ T . _. ,,. ' . , , , ntonticolo 

C is Jim Calhson, our president true, 

D is for Dayton who dances a few, 

E is Miss Edwards, a society belle — 

F is for Foulk who works to beat h 

G is for Green, a studeous child 

H is for Hereford whose writing is wild. 

I that is IT — the Seniors you know 

J is the Junior, a class that's not slow 

K is Kennamond, a jovial lad, 

L is for Leahy, on a team he's not bad — 

M is for Morris the real Junior "Sport", 

N is the place we are a name short. 

O also is open, if I do not mistake, 

P is for Post, a wild reckless rake, 

Q is for Quick, who has social "ambish" 

R is Miss Rightmire, she's all one could wish, 

S is for Smith, to be definite, D. C. 

T is the Time that we flunk, don't you see? 

IT University life brings to mind, 

V is the visions of times that we grind. 
W for Wilkerson, a political boss, 

X is Xams that makes us all cross. 

Y is the "yes" that the boys like to hear 
And Z is for Zero which ever we fear. 



291 



/P 67) p 67) f 67) p p 67) 

Li <_/ aae o£ U link <_/ toieddicnat U utid 



(Bona Fide) 



«"l\c 



*'Thcy shall be pun — ished for their puns" — Anomonous. 

Prof. Patterson — (Criticising theme) "A college education 

cultivates one" — Now what does that word 'culti- 
co l a vate' mean? Does it not bring to your mind somo 

sort of a 'harrowing experience?' 

Prof. Cox — (To student who lias just scanned awkwardly 
the line "Drink, pretty creature drink")— "Doesn'1 

il strike you thai there is a long time betwet n 
'drinks .'' 
.Mr. Smith (criticising theme) "She was considered one of 
the props of the church." — "Yes hut that word 
'prop!' It makes one think of such a stick!" 

Prof. Emory — "I deny the allegation and defy the 'al- 
ienator ! ' " 

Dr. Maxey (Al Ben Greel Performance) — "Now, if these 
actors should strike would they he sta»'e-struck ?" 

Dr. Beziat de Bordes — (Student) "Had weather professor 
we are having is il not .'" 

( I). B. d. B.)— "Yes it is! But we have to stand it 'weather' 
we like it or not !" 

Prof. Neil. "Pronounce 'oi' roundly and distinctly as in 
oil. It just slips oil' your tongue as easily." 

Dr. Bezial de Bordes— "11 is impossible for students to 
do much in the spring term. They 'Cheat' too 
much. " 

Dr. Simpson "Why would not a Prep make a »' 1 rab- 
bit dog ?" 
(Jive it up." 

J)r. S.— Because he is afraid of a Hare." 



What would happen, 

If Duval should forget and unbend a little.' 

If one of Jack's pupils should translate et tu. Brute. 

"Eat, you Brute" ? 
If Charley Ellison should quit the boarding house 

business? 
If McQuarrie never got to be a lawyer? 
If Outright should laugh? 
If Caroline Bloom should walk down street and back 

alone .' 
If the '08ers should show class strength and individu- 
ality ? 
If there were two libraries, one for the Co-eds and one 

for the rest? 
If Drs. Purinton, Douthat and Reynolds (bless them!) 

should be as unmerciful as the other Professors? 
If Quick should cut out society ? 
If Brake should jj'o to a dance? 
If Chauncy McNeil should throw the Cadet Corps 

down .' 
If "Deak" Young should go to Fairmont and find 

"Dog" Snider had arrived just before him? 
If Stathers should quit politics? 
If Louis Carr should see DO on his exam paper? 
If Clark Ilinman should announce another vaudeville? 
If some mean person should tell Rucker he was not 

the handsomest man in the country? 

0, Dei Immortales! Bet leprosy, small pox, cyclones 
and earthquakes pour upon our devoted heads but 
spare us any of these real calamities! 



lllottticolo 

The wisest guy — Doe Collet. 

The greatest buttiniske — Wilkerson. 

The cheekiest man — McNeil. 

The loudest man — Ellison. 

The grouchiest man — Duval. 

The jolliest man — (Exam, time when this was written.) 

The biggest dude — Rueker. 

"Block Bros." best customer — Mitchell. 

The busiest man — Stathers. 

The funniest cuss — Yeardley. 

The most solemn man — Outright. 

The shortest man — Friedman. 

The longest man — Riffe. 

The most slender man — Reitz. 

The broadest man — Jim Smith (?) 

The handsomest man — (We dared not risk making 500 

angry.) 
Most awkward man — Williams (Levi) 
The sportiest man — Morris. 



293 



<s 



enictJ 



Austin. Anne H. 

"Oho fie upon this single life! Forego it." 
Barnhart, E. II. 

■"So gentle vet so brisk, so wonderous sweet 

W h ty 

Iflonticola S " H1 tn P rattl€ ;lt a hul - v ' s feet " 

Brand, F. M. 

" A man's a fool 

If not instructed in a woman's school." 
Buchanan, Margaret. 

"For what I will, I will and there's an end." 
Byrer, II. S. 

"My lord advances with majestic mein." 
Campbell, •). E. 

"To tell thy miseries will no comfort breed." 
Col... R. L. 

"lie dues allot for every exercise 

a several hour — 
Collett, A. .1. 

"I loathe that low vice curiosity." 
Coplin, .Mary. 

"She is a woman, therefore may be wooed." 
< !row, ( '. S. 

"See one crow is lucky 'tis true 

But sure misfortune attends on two 

And meeting with three is the Devil." 
Outright, Frank. 

"A man there came, whence none could tell." 
Dawson. Daniel. 

" I am a mad was." 



Dudley. E. L. 



; Nay g I sir, hi' not so violent! 



Duval, N. II. 

"The shoe pinched hard 

The suffering dandy sighed." 
Daugherty, N. R. 

"What do you think of marriage?" 
Ellison, C. A. 

"They always talk who never think." 
Foreman. A. II. 

"If he holds on as he begins he's like 

To come to something." 
Friedman, Harry. 

"Tis a little thing." 
Gibson, C. A. 

"Why should the spirit of mortal be proud .'" 
Gist, W. C. 

"I have a name, a little name." 
Greene, D. M. 

"A Daniel come to judgment." 
Hammer, S. F. 

"And I knew he thought he was cutting a 

dash." 
Hall, Arthur. 

"I wish my hair dyed." 
Hutchinson, J. Q. 

"A politician, Proteus like, must alter face 

and habit." 
Hill, L. B. 

"Thought is deeper than all speech." 
Ilinman, 0. F. 

Social life is Idled 

With doubts and vain aspirings." 



291 



Kunst, F. B. 

"It is not beauty I demand." 
Larew, J. E. 

"Fresh from the fountains of the wood." 
McQuarrie, H. K. 

' ' My true love hath my heart and I have hers ' ' 
McDonald, M. W. 

"Ho! pretty page with the dimpled chin.'' 
McQuilken, D. E. 

"Such as I am all true lovers are." 
Millan, R. 

"I must confess my face is bad enough. 
Miller, D. P. 

' ' Tis the soldiers life 

To have their balmy slumbers waked with 
strife." 
Miller, Wayne. 

"Lithe and long as the serpent train." 
Moomaw, G. J. 

"Go, till the ground." 
Price, R. M. 

"Jane kissed me when we met." 
Prichard, J. G. 

"Trust me — with women worth the 
being won 
Stathers, B. S. 

The softest lover ever best succeeds." 



Reilly Earle. 

' ' Too sweet to last. ' ' 
Robinson, J. W. 

"I would not have my pen pursue the beaten 

track." 
Rose, II. H. 

"Somebody's courting somebody." 
Schrader, IT. M. ^* 

"Little I ask, my wants are few." JRonticola 

Stalnaker, Harriet T. 

"Is she not more than painting can express?" 
Strader, W. J. 

"I loved thee once, I'll love no more." 
Tuckwi iler, J. R. 

"They say he has genius." 
Tuckweiler, S. S. 

"A simple child." 
Turner, Ella M. 

"I never gave a lock of hair away." 
Watkins, G. M. 

"Thou large-brained woman." 
White, P. C. 

"The thoughts are strange that crowd into 

My brain." 
Young, II. G. 

"There is a pleasure in being mad 

Which none but madmen know." 




295 



rf" 



it /i iota 

Edwards. Gist, J. A. 

"Love, love, mystery of love." "He full of bashfulness and truth." 

Bayliss. Kunkle, James. 

fgu^ "I have no skill in woman's changeful "It is a beautiful necessity of our nature to 

]Uoni icoi.-i moods" love something." 

Brake. Kunkle, Justin. 

"I know what study is." "Yes, I am a relic of long ago." 

Coleord. j Mitchell. 

-J "Am I my Brother's Keeper?" "Besides thou art a bean," 

Coleord. | "What's that my child?" 

Dayton. "A fop well dressed, extravagant and wild." 

"Give me some music; music, moody food Boyles. 

for us that trade in love." "That sovereign alchemist!" 

Poulk. Arnold. 

"To be busy is my aim in life." "He asks no angel's wings, no Seraphs fire; 

.Mason. But. things, admitted to that equal sky, 

"A most astounding man." His faithful dog shall bear him company." 

Green. McNutt. 

"What marvelous talent she does possess for "It there not one among you that will dance 

one of her tender years." this dance for me?" 

Drane. Burns, L. W. 

"If time was money I'd be a millionaire." "I can love 

Leahy. But am loath to say so lest 1 prove 

"The Athlete's arm loses its strength by too Too soon unhappy." 

much pest." Callison, -lames. 

Post. My love, i drew 

"Willi age comes reflection." me to this place to seek some remedy. 

Burns. For my sick soul. 

".More beauteous than the moon in an en- Cole. 

clouded night." "A genius! I say a genius!" 

■m; 



Martin. 
Fortney. 
Jenkins. 
Rust. 

Quick. 

Jackson. 

Wayman. 

Wilkerson. 

Sayre. 

Wells. 

Woofter. 

Strickler. 

Berry. 
Kennamond. 

Mason, J. W. 



"A mighty man of valor." 

"A woman? No! Give me rather my pipe!" 

' ' Knowledge is power. 

"A simple child piling pebbles on the sea- 
shore of Time." 

"No doubt hut that I am wise." 

"Why out upon it! I can talk!" 

"Beauty?" Tis a thing to be despised!" 

"A little learning is a dangerous thing." 

"Come let us join the festive throng 
And sing and dance the whole night long." 

"Wisdom is a curious elusive dome." 

"O hear me! For I would speak!" 

"Seclusion hath removed thee far from mad- 
dening womankind." 

"The mind of man — how wonderful!" 

"A foolish man, that built his house upon 
the sand. 

"Then farewell hopes laurel boughs 
To garland my poetic brows." 



Coffroth. 

Myers. 

Gatherum. 

West. 

Marsh 

Morris. 

Hereford. 
Rohinson. 
McMillan. 
Lucas. 

Ernst. 



"He lazied the rest of the pleasant afternoon 
away." 

"As sweet and musical 
As bright Apollo's Lute. 

"A better chum than my pipe, I can not ®ll c 

find." IHouticoln 

"Just a military man am I." 

" 'Tis folly to he wise." 

"This Gallant, laboring to avoid popularity, 
falls into a habit of affectation, ten thousand 
times hatefuler than the first." 

"My tongue is the pen of a ready writer." 

"Work, work, work, moving night and noon." 

"A tall lean cadaverous man." 

"As an engineer my fame shall be without 
end." 



"A man of business in good company." 
Virginia Foidk. 

"Good goods come in small packages." 
Wilson. 

"My face is my fortune." 
Whaley. 

"To be self satisfied is to be content." 



illonl icol.i 



Prof. Boughton: "Can any one tell me what causes the 
difference in the atmospheric pressure at dif- 
ferent altitudes .' ' ' 
"Snakes": "The Barometer." 

A Junior whose surname is Dayton, 
Went in for heavy debaton, 
The other side always won, 
Gainst the Judge's bright son; 
Said Dayton, "Now I'll try oraton!" 

Student — "May I be excused from Physic exam:'" 
Teacher — "No! Nothing but death will excuse you, and 
then we'll hold a post mortem examination!" 

########## 

Prof. Atkinson (Lecturing to Agricultural Class). 

"A cow produces 2,000,000,000 of fat globules in 
each quart of milk." 
Chas. Ross — (Just Awakening) "Professor, when does a 

cow produce them fat gobblers?" 

tt flfr at Hfr ^fc a at tt iifc nk 

A Senior whose name is Rose. 

Raised his hand and scratched his nose. 

Said he " I'm afraid, 

I shall ne'er find a maid 
Who will give me a chance to propose. 

Dr. Maxey — "And what position does Miss Burns have on 

the Board. 7 
Miss .1. — "She has been given "Roasts." 
Dr. M. — "Miss Burns given Roasts! How unthoughted of 

the Board!" 



Mr. McD. — "How does your promising to be a sister to me 

help me?" 
Miss II — y "Oh, it provides you with so many brothers." 

Mason : (J. W.) (At opening of New theatre) "That is fine 
staccato work on the wall". 

Agricultural Student — "Yes our professions are closely 

related. ' ' 
Student of Dentistry — "How do you make that out?" 
Agri. S. — "Oh we're both learning to be stump-pullers!" 

Ye Professor crackes ye woarne oute joake 

Ye Freshman sees no fun. 
When ye exam tyme comes arounde, 

Freshman gets 61. 

Ye Professor cracks ye same auld joake 
Ye Sophmore yells, "It's fine!" 

When ye exam tyme comes arounde 
Sophomore gets 99. 



**-s--Jv : S :: Ji ;:: rt : ?i :: 'i : "ii : 



In "Foxy's" Class. 

Prof. S. — "How many problems were assigned for 
today?" 

Student— "Five." 

Prof. S.— "Did you get them all?" 

Student — "Yes, all but four and part of another one." 



299 



Jflcmticoln 



S-f\c 



In Rhetoric 11. 
Professor Patterson — "Miss B. what is the meaning of be- 
have?" 
Nan — "I don't believe I know." 
Prof. P. — "Well, you should learn at once." 
One on Laura. 

Itlonticoln Dr. Callahan — "How many capitals has Rhode Island?" 

Miss L. — "I am not sure I know." 

Dr. C. — "I am not sure either; you see those of us who 
studied geography forty years ago have forgotten 
those little things." 

The Mystery About Proffessor IIoeden's 
Solemnity Solved. 
Professor Holden (Translating passage in French) " 'Hell 
hath no furies like a woman scorned'. Young men, 
if you don't know what that means you will find 
out some day." 

Professor Beziat de Bordes had been in West 
Virginia University but a few weeks, when one morning he 
rushed excitedly into the room of another Professor and 
exclaimed: 

"I will do eet! I'm going to do eet ! I'm going to do 
eet! 

"Why what is the matter Professor Beziat? I hope 
you are not going to do anything rash." 

"Ah, you need not try to stop me! I'm ii'oin^ to 
do eet! II a! yes I vill!" 

"What on earth do you mean?" 

"Oh, eet is mes students! They never will learn 
Fr-rrench ! I'm £'oin<r to do eet!" 
"Do you intend to flunk them?" 
"Ila! Zat is de word! I mean! I will flonk dem all!" 

300 



Thought it Applied. 
Mr. B. (Speaking of a politician) — "And so you say that 
is the fellow who is light in his upper story?" 
(Rucker happens to pass and overhears this. Looks 
angry.) 



Miss Br— ke (Speaking of the poet Burns)— "Mr. Mitchell, 

do you like Buhns ? ' ' 
Prep. Mitchell — "Yes indeed — if there's plenty of sugar 

on 'em. ' ' 



Itlonticola 




301 






Itlonticola 




/a <_y opt i tat Cl its 



Did you ever notice how some one song seems to 
whistles it all the time? 

The following preferences have been noticed in West 

Pritchard : 

"That is How I love you Mame." 
Dick Price : 

"Jane, Jane, Jane." 
Dayton : 

"I Love Every Girl in the Wide, Wide World." 
Stathers : 

"I Want it All." 
Winnie Macfarland : 

"Won't You Fondle Me?" 
Levi Williams : 

"Always in the Way." 
McCarthy : 

"My Irish Molly— O." 
Grace Biddle: 

"Sammy." 
Bertha Browning : 

"Johnny, I'll take you." 



take possession of a person and how the person sing or 
Virginia I'niversity: 

Mason (John William Jr.) 

"Josephine My Jo." 
McKeel. 

"My Old Kentucky Home." 

Dr. Brooke : 

"Stories Adam Told to Eve." 

Caroline Bloom : 

"I Want to be an Actor Lady." 

Seniors (and McQuilken) : 

"Honey, Will you Miss Me When I'm Gone?" 

Professor Steward's Students: 

"I Can't Do That Sum." 

Bruce : 

"I Am Trying to Find a Sweetdieart." 
Mary Purinton : 

"Everybody Works But Father." 



(The 

Itlont icoln 



303 



Jllonticol.n 




Prof. Thompson 
in G-bandOpera 



:s<u 



Ctndet U he LT^a \^ne&tnu{ U \ 



Within the law school now the jokes are cracking 

And chestnuts fall about us on all sides. 
Doc. Maxey is his fertile brain a-wracking, 

And laughter now her smiling face ne'er hides. 
There is no joke which is beyond his making, 

As merrily he plods his onward way, 
Doc. Maxey is a wit beyond mistaking, 

And if you'll look you'll find him every day. 

Chorus. 
In the shade of the old chestnut tree 

He is laying for you and for me. 
If you ask for a joke 
No sooner you're spoke 
Than a roarer's forth coming to thee. 
Just give him a chance and you'll see 

With the goods he will there quickly be. 
Just give him some chaff, and he'll soon raise a laugh 

By a shake of the old chestnut tree. 



tee 



To me mem Vies of old days oft recur 

When father 'd say, "My boy come here to me. 
Be brave, my lad, you have no cause for fear — 

Come recline on my paternal knee. 
Don't he ashamed to turn your face away, 

For this is no fit show for you to see." 
And when I'd settled in the proper way. 

He'd introduce me to a hick'ry tree. 

Chorus. 
In the shade of the old hick'ry tree. 

As I lay o'er my dear father's knee — 
The words that I heard 
Seemed to me quite absurd — 
"My son, this hurts me worse than thee." 
The hands of the old busy bee 

Were never as busy as me, 
As I yelled at each lick, of the old hick'ry stick, 

In the shade of the old hick'ry tree. 



<rhc 

Snonticoln 



Written to the tune of "The Shade of the Old Apple 
Tree" and composed by Clark Hinman and Sam B. Seay, and 
suno- by Seay at the monster vaudeville performance given 
by Hinman for the benefit of the Athletic Association. 



3(15 



Itlonticola 



Ute< l iQcit& 



The following revivals are looked forward to with much interest. All the 
stars are well known here and it is confidently expected that Swisher's theatre 
will be filled to its utmost capacity when they appeal there. 

'■The Rivals" Stathers and Pritchard. 

"Running for Office" Kay Neville. 

"Sultan of Sulu" "Snakes" Wells. 

"Simple Simon Simple" Porter Post. 

"School for Scandal" By Woman's Hall Company. 

"She Stoops to Conquer" lane Hudson. 

"Girl and the Bandit" Nellie Jane Herbert and Dayton 

"Tyranny of Tears" Grace Kiddle. 

"The Office Boy" Doc Collet. 

"The Darling of the Gods" Jessie Fitch. 

"Strongheart" "Petie" Martin. 

"Cod's Good Alan" Dwight McQuilken. 

"The Pearl and the Pumpkin'* Winnie and Levi. 

".lust out of College" By the Senior Class. 

"Princess Chic" Donna Marie Roach. 

"Business is Business" T. B. Foulk. 

"Busy l/.zy" Tack Berry. 

"The Ginger-bread Man" Harbour Mitchell. 

"Mr. Bluebeard" Bavsky. 

"The Tattler" Jo Colbert. 

"Camille" By herself. 



306 



~c<w/J yVants, yjot (t>aie ot \9xcoatuie 



WANTED— Another fellow. Levi is 
getting tiresome. Will exchange him 
for any man almost. 

DELLA. 

FOR SALE— I will offer for sale to the 
highest bidder all my formulas for 
compounding hash, my .secrets as to 
the methods of collecting unpaid board 
hills, and full explanation as to the 
manner in which I hypnotised students 
into believing they were being fed at 
the Beanery. My only reason for 
selling is that I have all the money I 
can conveniently use. 

ELLISON. 

LOST — A button oft' my overcoat. As 
the overcoat came over in the May- 
flower I value each part of it highly. 
Finder please return to 

SAMMY BROWN. 

WANTED— An engineer to drain the 
Varsity athletic field. 

W. V. UNIVERSITY. 

FOR RENT— Until after the meeting of 
the Board of Regents, we the under- 
signed will rent our pleasant smiles. 
FACULTY. 



WANTED — Any information regarding 
number of dances to be at Military 
hall. QUICK. 



WANTED— Advice as to what I shall 
do with Pick when Bob Hennen co.mes 
home. HELEN DARST. 

WANTED— A guardian. 

WILKERSON. 

FOR SALE — A second hand volume of 
Langtield's "How to be Charming." 

quick;. 



LOST STRAYED OR STOLEN— My 
former prestige in W. V. U. Liberal 
reward paid for return of same. 

PRITCHARD. 



WANTED— Some nerve. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 
WANTED— A clock that tells the time 

of day. W. V. UNIVERSITY. 

FOR RENT— My place at Woman's Hall. 

DAYTON. 
WANTED — Some one to listen to me 
while T talk. ROSE. 

FOR SALE — Choice collection of puns. 
MOXEY PUN CO. (Incorporated.) 

WANTED— A fellow whom I can keep 
Must be a good listener and must have 
soft, warm hands. WINNIE. 



FOR SALE— A cam-el— bad to kick. 

LUCY C. 

WANTED — More room since my late 
honors. CHAUNCEY. 

FOR SALE— My new book on "How to 
Escape a Mother-in-law" is now out. 
Those wanting copies please consult 
me. HARRY DOWNS. 



Jtlcnilicolo 



FOR SALE — Information as to how to 
continue a "prorogued session of I he 
Athletic Association. 

HUTCHINSON. 

WANTED— Instruction in the English 
language. McCue. 

WANTED- -A moment of peace and 
quiet. MISS MOORE. 

$500.00 ! ! ! 
The Charging Machine invented by 
Director Chez has mysteriously disap- 
peared from the athletic field and the 
above 

REWARD 
will be paid for its recovery. 

W. V. A. A. 

WANTED— Students for our dancing 
class. PRICE & DUVALL. 



307 



fttonticolo 



CO 

s 



0° 




308 






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of the pocket. 

^ Our pens furnished with every known degree 
of pen-nib and to suit all styles of writing : 
fully guaranteed, exchanges allowed. 

^ Sold by all reliable dealers. 

L. E. WATERMAN CO.. 173 Broadway. New York 



Chicago 



San Francisco 



Boston 



Montreal 



University Headquarters ! 



Hanan Shoes 



! ° to ™l CE \ University Shoes 



Outfitters for Men 
and Women in All 
Wearing Apparel 



HIRSCHMAN'S 

'THE BIG STORE" 

Stetson Hats Queen Quality Shoes 



E. H. COOMBS, President L. S. BROCK, Vice-President 

J. H. McGREW, Cashier 

Bank of the 
Monongahela 
Valley 



We do a general banking business 
and Pay Interest on Time Deposits. 



RATEJ ^2.50 A^P. f3.00. 



MANLEY HOTEL 

CHAJ. E. MANLEY, 



PROPRIETOR.. 



JEFFERJON STREET, 

OPP COURT MOUSE. 



FAIRMONT, W. VA. 



B. K. ELLIOTT COMPANY 



IMPORTER! AND MANUFACTURERS 



T)y&\bvw$ ^&&\ena\ awd Suv\)e^tf\$ 5ws\Tuxxveu\s 



JPECIAL INDUCEMENTS TO UNIVERSITY JTUDENTS. 
ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION. 



106 JIXTH STREET, PITTJBURO. 



v. J ~s 




H. S. H 



fections, F*jruii'ts, Pro= 

visions, Oueenwwtire 

aocl Glassware 






3FcoeraI Snuings 
auu Crust Coutpautj 

COR. HIGH AND WALNUT STREETS 



JENKINS BROS.' VALVES 
JENKINS' 1906 PACKING 



Capital, $2,000,000 



Open an Account With Us 



4 Per Cent, paid on Time Deposits 



E M GRANT. PRESIDENT ISAAC VAN VOORHIS, VICE-PRESIDENT 

E D TUMLIN, Treasurer ALEX H TAIT, Vice-President 

Wm, G. TAfT. Assistant Treasurer 



The Genuine Goods always bear 
trade mark as shown in cut 



ji\. JENKINS BROTHERS 

133-35-37 N. 7th St., Philadelphia 
New York Boston Chicago London 




STEWART, the Florist 



Bell Phone 359] 
Peoples Phone .485 



Carnations a Specialty 



Stop 



f 



At the MINGO CIGAR STORE when 'in 
Morgantown. 



Look! 



At the high grade Cigarettes, Cigars, 
Candy, and Pipes. 



Listen ! 



To hear if any one says 
there is a better cigar 
store in town. 



MINGO CIGAR STORE 




TOM B. FOULK, Mgr. 



Liberman & Liberman 

College Trousers a Specialty 

Hade to measure and fully guaranteed 

H. H. ERNST, University Agent 



Make the latest, best, and 
neatest thing in Corduroys 




COOK'S HOSPITAL AND TRAINING SCHOOL COMPANY 
FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 



Stine's Restaurant 



i* 



Is there with the goods 

when it comes to the 

question of things good 

to eat 



FOR UP-TO-DATE 

Plumbing, Steam and 
Hot Water Fitting 

All kinds of Valves and 

Fittings, Gas Burners and 

Portable Lamps 

CALL ON 

Morgantown 
Plumbing (o. 

E. C. Wiedebeuch, Mgr. 

Opposite Public School Bids. 




• 




'V 




' 



I. C. WHITE, Ph. D., President 
GEO. C. STURGISS, Secretary 



o:f"i^ioe^irsb 



DAVIS ELKINS, Vice-President 
II. R. WARFIELD, Gen'l Mgr. 




///'// 




&m/i€mu 



ty/crj's/ffji /off ft, jfve&/ ty. In'Mf'turr 






DIRECTOIv'S 



I. C. WHITE 
GEO. C. STURGISS 
JOE. II. MeDERMOTT 



FRANK COX 

W. E. GLASSCOCK 



S. W. LORENTZ 
II. R. WARFIELD 



I). II. COURTNEY 
DAVIS ELKINS 
E. M. GRANT 



What Men of Fashion Wear is Always Shown By Us ! 



Tailors 



SCHWABE & MAY 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

Furnishers 



Clothiers 



MORGANTOWN F r ^ EaD - 



BAKERY 



HICH ST , Opp. Wallace House 



Bread 



Cakes 
and Pies 



The Freshest and Best to be had 
in the City 

<][ You are Invited to Call and Inspect our Line of Coods 



VISIT 

HEYMAN BROTHERS 

No. 314 Main Street 

For your shoes and Furnishings 



MORGANTOWN 



You are sure to get 
a square deal 



National Dye Works 






DYEING IN 



Corner Pleasants and 
Chestnut Streets 



Bell Phone 139-L 
Peoples Phone 283 



$ ALL SHADES 



Steam and Dry Cleaning and Pressing of Men's, Women's and Children's G arments 



THE ONLY FIRE PROOF HOTEL IN THE CITY. 




&Yie *yi€t& ijStefef 



? /? A 



r ie 




Aa 



yvMrfV/f/ 



m**&*4S«* 7 , w.tyu. 



J. XJ. Kellar & Co. 



DRY GOODS 



FANCY NOTIONS, LADIES AND 
GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



rates: $2 so to $4 oo per day American plan only C'ORXKR 5IAIX AND WALNUT STREETS 



SMITH & FETTY 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



MEAT MARKET 



NO. 236 WALNUT STREET 



Corner High and Willey 



T. V. COLEMAN 

STAPLE and FANCY 

Groceries 

Morgantown, West Virginia 



A. Q. Spalding & Bros. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official Athletic Supplies 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Qolf, Tennis, 
Athletic Clothing, Gymnasium Supplies 

Plans and Blue Priats of Gymnasium 
Paraphernalia Furnished upon Application 

Spaldin^s' TV. id 3 Mirk Goods are the 
acme of perfection; accppt no goods that 
are not the SPALDING kind : there is 
no substitute for a Spalding article. 
Every athlete should send at once for 
a copy of Spalding's Catalogue — it's free 

At* CDAiniMP P DDDO New York. Chicago, Denver, 
. U. Or/ALU I Nil & DnUd. San Francisco, Philadelphia, 

New Orleans. 




MEET ME AT LUCKY'S" 




ATHLETIC 
SUPPLIES 

College and School Flags 

Outfitters for all kinds of 
sports 

J. Will Luckhardt 

326 DIAMOND ST. 
Opp. Grand Opera House 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



Si- l /2. wide < 



Electric 

Light 

Prints 



(Large Prints up to 4^x12 feet: 
Prices for - Black Prints on Paper 3c sq. ft. 
( Blue Prints on Paper 2c sq. ft. 

Send for Prices on DRAWING MATERIALS 

E. G. SOLTMANN, L^Sy.' 



C. L. BERGER & SONS 

Precise Engineering and Surveying Instruments 



BOSTON, MASS. 



NO. 37 WILLIAMS STREET, 
They secure in their instruments: Accur- 
acy of division, Simplicity in manipulation: 
IAyhtness, combined with strength; Achro- 
matic telescope, with, high power: Steadiness 
of Adjustment under varying temperatures; 
stiffness to avoid any tremor, even in a strong 
triad, ond thorouyh workmanship in every 
part. 

These Instruments are in general nse 
by the U. S. Government Engineers, 
Geologists, und Surveyors, and the range 
of instruments, as made by them for 
River, Harbor, City, Bridge, Tunnel 
Railroad and Mining Engineering, as 
well as those made for Triangular or 
Topographical Work and Land Survey- 
ing, etc., etc., is larger than that of any 
other firm in the country. Illustrated Manual and Catalogue sent on 




application 



A. H. FETHING ♦♦****♦< 

manufacturer of G reek Letter Fraternity Jetoelry 

Temporary Location, 213 N. Liberty Street, Baltimore, Md. 



Memorandum package sent to any 
fraternity member through the Sec- 
retary of the Chapter. Special designs 
and estimates furnished on Class Pins, 
Rings, Medals for Athletic Meets, Etc. 



G. W. WEIBEL 

PRACTICAL 

3LE AN ER «d DYER 

LADIES' and GENTS' GARMENTS 
KID GLOVED 

CLEANED and DYED 



Prices Moderate 



No. 424 N. Front St. 



Nef^ly4 years 

Of increasing 
demand for 

LlLLEY 

Uniforms 

Always superior, 
never inferior. 
That is the rea- 
son you find Lil. 
ley Un'forms in 
all leading Mili- 
tary schools and Col- 
leges in America. 

bend for ) rices and 
eatalog. Address: 
THB 

C. Lilley & Co. 

Columbus, Ohio. 




I 



II 



» 



(5. & m g. $rk*| 



HAVE ALL KINDS OF 



FURNITURE, RUGS, 
MATTING, LINOLEUM 



333 FRONT STREET, 
MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA. 

x£v>::*:>::*::*:>::*::*::^^ 



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YOUR'E NEXT 1 

* at * 

ft AT ^ 

ft ft- 

I U (5. TOeira Staving %rl0r 1 



V. G. WELLS, PROPRIETOR. 



;:; no long waits. prompt service. £ 

three good barbers. !| 

'£ CALL ONCE AND YOU WILL CALL AGAIN. ]£ 



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S SHOP IN BASEMENT OF WALLACE HOUSE. 



sJSff * -J: ;;-.;»• ;'-" .-.': :;,.■;:. ;'■ ,i:',:;-.ij- .-.": ;•• :-; ^.-;,iL .-'.: :;. .■>.-.-'•.■=:. .:;. in .-."; ■». if, .:'.. .:;•.;»•. : : i Jj; .^Jjt sj; 

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** GO TO * 



1 Davis's Smoke House 



FOR 



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Cigars, Soda, Etc. 



$ The oldest and best Cigar Store in the city. 



;*::*>:>::*:>: »::*»..* 



v 
3*: 
:*: 



A 



Ramsey & Shafer 

OUR MOTTO IS: 

Fair Treatment, Prompt Delivery and the 
Best Meat that Money can buy. Come 
and let us prove it to you. 



>: 



38 228 Pleasants Street. Both 'Phones. 

Morgantown, West Virginia. 



*>*/..*. .*..*. >>. 




L. E. FRIEND 

OFFICIAL. PHOTOOHAPHKR 

NINKTKfcN HUNDRED AND SEVEN MONTICOLA 






JAMES EDGAR BROWN, 
Attorney-at-Law. 
1334-1340 
Stock Exchange Building. Chicago. 


W . W . SMITH, 

Attorney-at-Law. 

Morgantown, W. Va. 


TH0S. N. PARKS, 

Attorney and Counselor. 

Fairmont, W. Va. 
Will Practice in all Courts. 
Railroad and Corporation Law a Specialty. 


HARRY SCHERR, 

Attorney-at-Law. 

Williamson, \V. Va. 


H. 0. HITESHEW, 
Attorney-at-Law. 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 


CLARENCE E. MARTIN, 

Attorney-at-Law. 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 


JAMES C. FRAZIER, 

Attorney-at-Law. 

Morgantown, W. Va. 


JAS. A. MEREDITH, 

Attorney-at-Law. 
Looms 10 and 11, 
Trust Building, Fairmont, W. Va. 


Lawyer, 
Referee in Bankruptcy, 
Notary Public. 

W. FRANK STOUT. 

Office: 
Lowndes Building, Third St. 

Rooms 30 and 31. Clarksburg, W. Va. 


IRA L. SMITH, '05 
Attorney-at-Law. 

Fairmont, W. Va. 


A BLISS McCRUM, 

Attorney-at-Law. 

Box 2!)9. Kingwood, W. Va. 


E. F. MORGAN, 

Attorney-at-Law. 

Fairmont. W. Va. 


Marmaduke H. Dent, 1870. Herbert W. Dent, 1005 

DENT & DENT, 

Lawyers. 

Grafton, West Virginia. 


ELIAS B. HARTLE, 

Class '97. 
Attorney-at-Law. 
No. 11 Hamilton Row, Hagerstown, Md. 


L. J. WILLIAMS, 
L a w y e r . 

L e w i s li u r g . W . V a . 


LEO L E B , 

Attorney-at-Law. 
Citizens National Bank Building, 

Charleston. W. Va. 


GUY R. C. ALLEN, 

Attorney-at-Law, 
No. 1425 Chapline St. Wheeling, W. Va. 


H. M. KEMP, M. D., 
Bloomington. Md. 


MELVILLE PECK, 
Attorney-at-Law, 

Philippi, West Va. 


WILLIAM G. BROWN, 

Attorney and Counselor at Law. 

Kingwood, W. Va. 


AMOS 0. STANLEY, 
A t t i- n e y - a t - L a w . 

Fair 111 out, W . V a . 


DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

City of Saint Paul. 

James ('. Michael Corporation Attorney. 


JOHN ALDEN PURINT0N, 

Attorney-at-Law. 

Morgantown. \V. Va. 


CLAUDE W. MAXWELL, 

Attorney at-Law. 
Elkins, W. Va. 



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