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Full text of "The Monticola"

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Hark, Ye Knockers ! Bring forth your hammers and 
proceed to knock. For several weeks, we have noticed a 
knocking expression on your benign countenances, and at 
last patience has its reward, for we do herewith present 
the much heralded 'Monticola. ' Knock and he exceeding 
glad: for great will be the vanity thereof. The 'Monticola' 
is here, but its compilers, where are they ? 

The editors have taken to the tall and 'uncut' to 
repent of their folly in undertaking the work; the busi- 
ness manager, to escape his creditors, vanished between 
two days, and no trace of him can be found; the members 
of the board have gone into hiding, where they will remain 
until the storm shall have spent its fury. 

Throughout the book will be found knocks and rubs 
in verse and picture. Gentles all, we have tried to be 
lenient with you and the gentle reminders of your peculi- 
arities are given with not a whit of ill-will or disrespect, 
but rather in a spirit of friendliness. Be like the Southern 
Colonel, who, on being given some cherries preserved in 
brandy, said, "I prize the gift not for the value of the 
fruit, but for the spirit in which it was given." 



This year closes another epoch in the history of the 
West Virginia University. In every department a marked .(rt Q ntiraI -> 
increase in fidelity and loyalty has been noticed. Our OS. 

athletics have been a source of pride. Last year's base-ball 
team was above the average college team and did a credi- 
table season's work. The track team was the best in our 
history and the showing we made at the meet in Pittsburg 
ranked us a leader in that department of athletics. 
Anthony McCue, it will be remembered, carried off the 
field championship. In foot-ball we were badly handicaped 
from the start through lack of material, but the record 
made by the team was one of which we need not be ashamed. 
and is a credit to the university. The basket-ball team kepi 
up the pace set by its predecessors, and, for the lirst time 
in the history of the institution, finished the season with 
cash ahead. The glee club stands without a parallel. The 
various literary societies have had more enthusiasm than 
ever; and the debating teams were exceptionally strong. 

The work of getting out an annual is arduous even 
when there is harmony and union among the students. 
But when this harmony is broken and strife is rampant, 



22814 



the work is more difficult. One thing only happened this 
year which marred our happiness; namely, the Fraternity 
fracus. since i his trouble affected the 'Monticola' more 
m j. I or less, we cannot refrain from saying a word or two. 
08. Certain Fraternities, because of grievances, real or imagi- 
nary, withdrew from participation in all university affairs 
and forbade their members to remain on the 'Monticola' 
Board. Furthermore, they refused to allow their pictures 
1o he inserted in this hook. We have carried on the work 
without them, and have not yielded to impulse and car- 
tooned them or ridii uled them in verse, which has been 
expected: but we have treated them as apart from the 



university, according to their desire. While lamenting the 
whole affair, we wish to condemn it in the strongest Lan- 
guage possible, regardless of where the blame may rest. 
We believe that the Fraternities are on the wrong track 
and are staining the fair name of their university. Why 
not forget our imagined grievances, and, as a unit, work 
to place the name of our Alma Mater where it should he. 
among the fairest of the fair.' 

The Board wishes to acknowledge its indebtedness and 
to express its gratitude to Messrs. Moore and Foreman, 
alumni of the school, for their work so cheerfully given. 

The Editors. 





fflonttcola 

'OS. 



LIBRARY 
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



3 



N DEDICATING this humble hook, wo have tried 



to choose ;i in;m truly representative of our 
Alma Mater and in glancing about among its 

alumni we decided ou one who h;is been noted for his 

manly qualities, and who has always held the lair name of 
his Alma Mater above reproach. This book is respectfully 
dedicated to West Virginia University's first graduate, 



•Indue Marmaduke Herbert Dent, Grafton, Wesl Virginia. 




iflonticola 

'08. 



MARMAIHKK IIKKBKRT DENT. 



Jflarmabufee Herbert Bent. 



ftlonttcola Marmaduke Herbert Dent was born at Granville, W. Xn., political party. He has also had the respect of other 

'08 

vc% April 18th. 184!). His entire school life was spent in our parties. In 1876 he received the nomination for prose- 
own University town and he graduated from the Univer- cuting attorney; in 18!»i2 he was elected Judge of the 
sity in 1870 at the head of his class, also at the foot. Supreme Court of Appeals in which office he served for 
Judge Dent's life has been one devoted to the inter- twelve years, when he was defeated for re-election; and 
ests of his state and fellownien and throughout his event- in 1906 he was honored with the nomination for congress 
fid career he has ever held most dear the qualities that by the democratic party. 

make a man. After graduation he taught school two years lie has now retired from politics and is devoting him- 

and then entered the Clerk's office of the Circuit and self to the practice of his chosen profession ill the higher 

County Courts where he remained three years, during courts of law. Although he has given his life to his state 

which time he was Commissioner of accounts and Com- he has found time to attend to things of higher impor- 

missioner in Chancery. In 1875 he opened law offices in lance and is an active worker in the Church of God. He 

Grafton ami ;i year later married Mary Jones Wade and is ;i member and an elder in the Presbyterian Church ot 

took up his residence in Grafton where he has resided Grafton and Superintendent of the Sabbath school and 

ever since. Two children were horn, Carrie Louise, wife is preparing himself when 'life's fever is over' 'to fold 

of Professor Roberl A. Armstrong of Wesl Virginia 1'ni- the drapery of his couch about him ami lie down to pl< as- 

versity and Herberl Warder who is associated with his anl dreams' not to say goodnight hut in some happier 

father in the practice of law. clime to hid those long lost to sie'ht, hut to memory dear. 

Judge Dent baa been held iii high esteem by his own a glad goodmorning. 



Unibersittp Calenbar. 



l907 - ™ 0& - iHonticola 

June ^4, Monday Summer School Begins January 3, Friday, 8 I'. M Winter- Convocation '08. 

August 2, Thursday Summer School Ends January 6, .Monday . . .First Recitations of Winter Quarter 

September 16, Monday Fall Quarter Begins February 22, Saturday, Washington's Birthday, a Holiday 

September 16, 17, 18, Monday Tuesday. Wednesday, March 17. Tuesday, Last Recitations of the Winter Quarter 

Entrance Examinations 

March 18, Wednesday, to March 20, Friday 

September 16, 17, 18. Monday, Tuesday Wednesday, Final Examinations of Winter Quarter 

Marticulation and Registration of Students 

September 18, Wednesday. 8:80 P. M Fall Convocation 

September 19, Thursday, Recitations of Fall Quarter Begin 

March -4, Tuesday. (Registration Day,) 

November 28 to December 1 Thanksgiving Recess Spring Quarter Begins 

December 13, Friday Last Recitations of Fall Quarter March 24, Tuesday, 8 I'. M Spring Convocation 

December 16, Monday to December 18, Wednesday. March 25, Wednesday, Recitations of Spring Quarter Begin 

inclusive. . . . Final Examinations of Fall Quarter 

May '.W. Saturday Memorial Day, a Holiday 

December 19, Thursday, to .January 2, 1908 

Quarterly Recess June 9. Tuesday Last Recitations of Spring Quarter 

January 3, Friday, (Registration Day June 10, Wednesday, to June 13, Saturday, inclusive, 

Winter Quarter Begins Final Examinations of Spring Quarter 

dune is, Thursday Commencement 



March 20, Friday Winter Quarter Ends 

March 21, Saturday, to March -A, Monday Quarterly Recess 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



Poarb of Regents. 

FOE THE TEEM BEGINNING MAY 10, 1903. 

J. R. Trotter Buckhannon 

F. P. McNeal Wheeling 

J. B. Pinley, Parkersburg 

C. M. Babb Falls 

FOR THE TEEM BEGINNING MAY 19, 1905. 

C. E. Haworth Huntington 

E. M. Grant Mprgantown 

L. J. Williams Lewisburg 

I). C. Gallaher Charleston 

T. P. Jacobs, New Martinsville 



10 



(0fftcer£ of gfomimsitratton anb 3n£tructton. 



Officers of tlje Hmuergitp. 

Daniel Boardman Purinton, Ph. D., LL. I) President 

Powell Benton Reynolds, D. D., Chaplain 

Waitinan Barbe, Litt. D Assistant to the Presi- 
dent and Field Agent 

Susan Maxwell Moore Dean of Women 

Alfred Jarrett Hare, A. M Registrar 

Alexander Reid Whitehill, Ph. D Treasurer 

Thomas Edward Hodges, A. M Assistant Treasurer 

William J. White Auditor 

Frederick L. Emory, .. Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



fflonticola 

'08. 



Wtt UntberSitp Council. 



Daniel Boardman Purinton, Charles Edward Hogg, 

.lames Madison Burns, Thomas Clark Atkeson, 

Alfred Jarretl Hare, Alexander Reid Whitehill, 

Waitman Barbe, Frederick Wilson Truseott, 
Powell Benton Reynolds, Will Hazen Boughton. 

Robert Allen Armstrong. 




Jttonticola 

'08. 



fflonttrola 

"08. 




DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, Ph. D., LL. D., President and Professor of Philosophy. 

A. I'».. West Virginia University., 1873; A.M., ibid., 1870; Ph. D., University of Nashville, 
1S1I2: LL. I).. Dennison University 1889. Instructor Preparatory Department of West Virginia 
University, 1873-9; Professor of Logic, ibid., 1879-81; Professor of Mathematics, ibid., 1881-5; Pro- 
fessor of Metaphysics ibid, 1885-9; Vice-President and Acting President, ibid., 1881-82. Instructor 
in Vocal Music, ibid., 187;i-S!i; President Dennison University, 1890-1891; presenl position since 
1901. Author "Christian Theism." 



^r 




I Mm-. K. HODGES. 




(WELL BENTON REYNOLDS. 

14 




ST. GEORGE Hi Ki:i! BROOKE 






ittonticola 

'08. 



ROBERT WILLIAM DOUTHAT. 



ALFRED JARRETT HARE. 



JAMES MADISON I'.l RNS. 






FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY. 



RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS. 

15 



ALEXANDER Kill) \\ Mil III II LI. 



GTJje Jfacultp. 



fflonticola 

'08. 



DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, Ph. D., LL. D., President and 
Professor of Philosophy. 

ST. GEORGE TUCKER BROOKE, A. M., LL. D., Professor of Com- 
mon and Statute Law. 



WILLIAM P. WILLEY, A. B., A. M., Professor of Equity, Juris- 
prudence, and Commercial Law. 

POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS, A. M., D. D., Chaplain, and Pro- 
fessor of Economics and Sociology. 

ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Chem- 
istry. 



THOMAS EDWARD HODGES, A. B., A. M., Professor of Physics. 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A. B., A. M., Professor of Latin Lan- 
guages and Literature, and Principal of the Preparatory 
School. 

CHARLES HENRY PATTERSON, A. B., A. M., Professor of 
Rhetoric. 

FREDERICK WILSON TRUSCOTT, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of 
Languages and Literature. 

JOHN BLACK JOHNSON, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 



THOMAS CLARK ATKESON, M. S., Ph. D., Dean of the College of 
Agriculture, and Professor of Agriculture. 



JAMES MADISON BURNS, Major U. S. Army, Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics, and Commandant of Cadets. 



FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY, M. M. E., M. E., Professor of 
Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, and Superinten- 
dent of Buildings and Grounds. 

JAMES SCOTT STEWART, B. S., M. S., Professor of Mathematics. 

SAMUEL B. BROWN, A. B., A. M., Professor of Geology and Min- 
eralogy. 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A. B., A. M., Professor of English 
Language and Literature, and Head of the Department 
of English. 



HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN, A. M., LL. D., Professor of the 
Greek Language and Literature. 

CLEMENT ROSS JONES, B. S. C. E., M. M. E., Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering. 

WILL HAZEN BOUGHTON, B. S. C. E., C. E., Professor of Civil 
Engineering. 

RUSSEL LOVE MORRIS, B. S. C. E., C. E., Professor of Civil 
Engineering. 



ROBERT WILLIAM DOUTHAT, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Latin 
Languages and Literature. 



JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Professor of 
Education. 



BERT HOLMES HITE, M. S., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, 
Vice Director and Chemist of the West Virginia Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 



JOHN LEWIS SHELDON, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Bacteriology, 
and Bacteriologist of the West Virginia Experiment 
Station. 



16 






fttonttcola 

'OS. 



HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN. 



CLEMENT ROSS JONES. 



WILL HAZEN BOUGHTON. 






JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN. 
\ 



JASPER NEWTON DEAHL 

17 



JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON. 



SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, Dean of Women and Instructor in 
Piano. 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of History 
and Political Science. 

iflonttCOla ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ, Director of Physical Training. 

'08. 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON, A. B., M. D., Professor of Anatomy 
and Physiology, and Head of the Medical Faculty. 

JOHN HARRINGTON COX, Ph. B., A. M., Professor of English 
Philology. 

WALTER LYNWOOD FLEMING, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of 
History. 

ROSS SPENCE, Director of the School of Music, and Instructor on 
Stringed Instruments. 

CHARLES EDGAR HOGG, Dean of the Law School, and Professor 
of Constitutional and International Law. 

WAITMAN BARBE, A. M., Litt. D., Assistant to the President, 
and Associate Professor of English Language and 
Literature. 

FREDERICK LAWRENCE KORTRIGHT, B. S., D. Sc, Associate 
Professor of Chemistry. 

C. EDMUND NEIL, A. B., Associate Professor of Elocution and 
Oratory. 

WILLIAM JACKSON LEONARD, Associate Professor, and Head of 
the Department of Fine Arts. 



JURTIN FRANK GRANT, Ph. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of 
Anatomy and Pathology. 

GEORGE PERRY GRIMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D., Special Lecturer in 
Economic Geology. 

DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS, A. B., LL. B., Principal of the Com- 
mercial School. 

ECA MAY HUBBARD, Instructor in Drawing and Painting. 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, B. M., Instructor on the Pipe Organ and 
Piano. 

CHARLES COLLIER HOLDEN, A. B., Head of Department of 
Romance Languages. 

WILLIAM ELMORE DICKINSON, A. B., M. E., Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Electrical Engineering. 

RUDOLPH WERTIME Instructor in Piano. 

ALEXANDER STEWART THOMPSON, Instructor in Vocal Music. 

WALTON KIRK BRAINARD, B. S., Instructor in Dairying. 

THOMAS CARSKADON JOHNSON, B. S. Agr., A. M., Instructor 
in Horticulture and Botany. 

SIMEON CONANT SMITH, A. B., A. M., Assistant Professor in 
Rhetoric, and Instructer in English in the Preparatory 
School. 

JAMES A. WAUGH, V. S., Instructor in Veterinary Science. 

WILLIAM MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER, A. B., Instructor in 
German. 



EDWIN FAYETTE CHURCH, JR., B. S., Associate Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering. 



WARD J. McNEAL, M. D., Ph. D., Instructor in Anatomy and 
Bacteriology. 






iflonttcola 

*08. 



Ii HIX HARRINGTON COX. 



DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS. 



"HOMAR ( LARK ATKESOX. 






ROSS SPENCE. 



WALTER LYNWOOD FLEMING. 

19 



CHARLES HENRY PATTERSON. 



MADISON STATHERS, A. B., Ph. D., Instructor in Romance Lan- 
guages. 

ALDHEUS WILSON SMITH, A. M. ( Ph. D., Instructor in Physics. 

JAMES EDGAR LAREW, B. S. C. E., Instructor in Physics. 

Assistant in English. 



ittonttcola 

>qq DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A. B., A. M., 



MABEL CONSTANCE FOSTER, Assistant in Harmony, Theory, 
Musical History, Sight Reading, Ear Reading and Piano. 

DRUSILLA VICTORIA JOHNSON, A. B., A. M., Assistant in Greek 
and Mathematics. 

LOUISE FERRIS CHEZ, Assistant Director of Physical Training, 
in Charge of the Woman's Gymnasium. 



RUFUS A. WEST, Assistant in Metal Working and Stationary 
Engineering. 

THOMAS HOWARD CATHER, Foreman of the Machine Shop. 

W. A. MESTREZAT, Assistant in Music (Wind Instruments.) 

JOHN B. GRUMBEIN, Foreman of the Woodshop. 

ALBERT JACKSON COLLETT, LL. B., Assistant in Shorthand 
and Typewriting, and Secretary of the President. 

PAULINE G. WIGGIN LEONARD, B. L. S., A. M., Librarian. 

JESSICA GARDNER CONE, Assistant Librarian and Cataloguer. 

MARGARET CLARK SMITH, A. B., Assistant Librarian. 




«o 



Slumnu 




Frank Cox. 



Frank Cox was born near Morgantown in Monongalia 
County, West Virginia, June 18, 1862. Ai an early age he 
entered the Wesl Virginia I 'Diversity and 1 graduated with 
the class of '83, receiving a LL. B. degree. On his twenty- 
first birthday he was admitted to practice law at the Mon- 
ongalia bar. In isss he became a member of the well 
known law firm of Cox & Baker. The same year he was 
elected Prosecuting Attorney of Monongalia County. Gov- 
ernor Atkinson, in 1899, appointed him Judge Advocate 
with the rank of Brigadier General, which position he 
held for two years. When the World's Fair was held at 
St. Louis he was made a member of the West Virginia 
Exposition Commission. On account of his legal talent 
and ability as a lawyer he was nominated by the Republican 
party as a candidate for Judge of the Supreme Court of 
Appeals and was elected in the fall of 1904. Shortly after 
becoming a member he was chosen by his colleagues as 
President of the Court. After having been on the bench 
for two years he resigned his position to resume his law 
practice in connection with Mr. Baker. Lasi year, in 
recognition of his services and attainments, lie was chosen 
President of the W. V. V. Alumni Association, which posi- 
tion he still holds. 



fttonticola 

'08. 



ittonttcola 

'08. 




Clark W. May, 



Clark W. May, born on ;i farm al Griffithsville, Lincoln 
County, West Virginia, July 14, 1869; educated in Un- 
common schools of Lincoln Couny; completed the law 
course at the University of West Virginia, -June 1894, and 
at once began the practice of law at Hamlin, in his native 
county. In 1896 he was elected Prosecuting Attorney of 
Lincoln County, in which capacity he served for Dour 
years. In l!Ki() he was elected a senator in the legislature 
of the State for the old seventh district, composed of the 
counties of Lincoln, Logan, Mingo, Raleigh, Wyoming, 
McDowell and Mercer. In the legislative session of 1901, 
although the youngesl member of the body, lie was made 
chairman of the judiciary committee of the senate and 
served throughout the entire session with satisfaction to 
that body, so much so that at I he 1903 session he was 
unanimously nominated by his parly associates for the 
office of President of the Senate, and was elected to that 
position. On his 35th birthday, at Wheeling, he was nomi- 
nated by the Republican State Convention for the office 
id' Attorney General, to which he was elected al the follow- 
ing November election. His term as Attorney General will 
expire March :5. 1909. 



•--j 




" aHitl) toisiom frougfjt." 

(Officers!. 

President John Thomas West 

Vice-President Carl Colgord 

Secretary j \ Gist 

Treasurer George C. Beneke 

Historian Howard M. Ernst 

23 



&&&&&tft&teXm 



Color*. 



Red and Blue 



Sis-s-s! — Boom! Cuckoo! Seniors I ! ! 



itlonticola 

'08. 



fflonticola 
'08. 




WILLIAM GARNETT BAYLISS, 

Dunloop. 
Kappa Alpha, 
W. V. A. A.: Mountain; Base-ball 
team ! 05, '06, '07; Captain Base-ball 
(earn '07; ( lass Pies. 1 : Sub. Foot- 
ball team '05, '06; Mbnticola Board. 
B. S. M. E. 




GEORGE C. BENEKE, 

Wheeling. 

Phi Kappa Sigma, 

Law Society; Vice-Pres. Jr. I.aw Class 
'06-'O7; Tteas. ('lass (4). LL. B. 



FRANK M. BOYLES, 

Piedjnonl . 
Phi Kappa Sigma, 

\V. V. A. A. B S. 




ARTHUR K. BRAKE, 

Buckhannon. 

Sigma Xii, 
W. V. A. A. j Base-ball team (2); 
Fool -ball team (2) (.".) (4) j Engineer- 
ing Society; Y. M. C. A.: Manager 
Basket-ball team (4). B. S. M. E. 




21 



LIBRARY 
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 









* fH 8 


- 


*(■ i^. 


' 


>1i 



FRANK M. BRAND, 

Morgantown. 
Sigma Nu, 
W. V. A, A.; Parthenon Literary 
Society; Debating Association; Law 
Society; Pres. Parthenon Society: 
Pies. Law Society; Treas. Debating 
Association; Inter-Society Debater 
'06; Winner Bryan Prize: Winner 
Elkins Prize in Greek; Winner Board 
of Regents Pri/.c; Gymnasium Lea- 
der: Class Basket-ball team '06; 
Business Manager Monticola '(Hi. 

PL. B. 




itlonticola 

'08. 



EVALYN SACK BURNS, 

Morgantown. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, 

W. V. A. A.; Monticola Board; 
Women's League; Y. W. C. A.: 
Cla>s Vice-Pies. Mi. A. P. 



IDWARD C. COLCORD, 

St. Albans 
Kappa Alpna, 
Ingineering Society: W. V. A. A. 
res. Engineering Society (2) 
reas. Cadet Officers' Club (3) 
adet Major (3); Ass't. Basket-bal 
lanager (3); Business Manager Mon 
cola '07. 




ERANCIS C. COLCORD 



St. Al 



Kappa Alpha. 
Engineering Society: W. Y. A. \.; 
Cadet Officers Club; Cadet Major '06; 
Pres. Engineering Soust^ (i) Presi- 
dent Class (3) : Ass't. Manager Foot- 
ball team (3) : Vice-Pres. (add Offi- 
cers' Club (3) : Distinguished Cadet. 
1st, '2nd. and 3rd section: Marks- 
man. B. S. 0. E. 




25 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




HOMER E. COOPER, 
A. B. 



Auburn. 




ARTHUR SPENCER DAYTON". 

Philippi. 
Delta T«n Delia, 
Columbian Literary Society: Debat- 
ing team against Wboster (4): Win- 
ner of First Prize in Wboster Debate 
'07; English Club. A. B. 



ROBERT McVEIGH UK \\K. 

Piedmont. 

Pi Kappa . l//<//". 

( 'olumbian l.ii era i \ Soeiel j ; W. V. 

A. A. : Law ( lull : Sec. Junior La « 

I lass. 1. 1.. B. 




MARY DOROTHY EDWARDS, 

Mart insburg. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, 

W. V. A. A. : V. W. C A.; Women's 
League. 




2(5 




HOWARD M. ERNST, 

Thompson, Ohio. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, 

Mountain; Foot-ball team (2). (3), 

(4); Manager Basket-ball team (3); 

( lass Historian (4). B. S. ( '. K. 




ittonttcola 

'08. 



CAMDEN PACK FORTNEY 

Lumberpori . 

Vetta Tun I), Ittt. 
Tngineering Society. B. S. C. E. 



ROBERT GATHERUM, 







Gatewood. 


Engineering 


Societ y : 


Concord Al- 


iniini 




ii. S. ('. E. 




ETHEL AVERIL GREEN, 

Morgantown. 

Alpha Xi Delta, 

English Club; W. V. A. A.; V. W. C. 

A.j Greek Prize (2); Monticola Board 

(3); Class Prophet (4). A. B. 




ittonttcola 

'08. 




LYDA J. HANIFAN, 

A. 11. 



Elkins. 




\V. 1). HEREFORD, 

St. Albans. 

Sigma Nu, 

A. B. Washington and Lee; Pres. 

Senior Law. LL. B. 



WARREN II. HODGES, 

Mbrgantown. 

Sigma Nu, 
Columbian Literarj Society; English 
Club; Debating Association; W. Y. 
A. A.; Intei ■■< ollegiate Rebate '04 
Mini "07; Representative ii. Central 
( iiat en ial I eague '04 : Presidenl Col- 
umbi in Literal \ Set ie< \ {?.) Sc: u 1 \ 
Debater (3) ; Member Athlel ic Board 
(2). A. B. 




.mux o. hi "i'< iiixsox. 



Sigma Nu, 



Beeklev 



,aw Society : Engl 
v ssocial ion ; Y. M 

lie 1(111 I it CI n \ 5 

iw Sociel y (.'!) 



ih ( lulu Debating 
C. A.; Pres. Par- 
ociety (3); Pres 
Athetotic Board 



3) ; inter-Society Debater (2) ; inter- 

Collegiate Debater '05; Glee Club '06- 

'07 ; Editor-in-Chief Athenaeum [5). 

A. B., LL. 1!. 




2H 




ALVA D. KENNAMOND, 

Wheeling. 
Sigma Nu, 
Parthnon Literary Society; W. V. A. 
A.; Athenaeum Board (4); Athletic 
Board: English Club; Montieola 
Board (3); Delegate Sigma Xu Grand 



Convention Chicago '07. 



A. B. 




iflonttcola 

'08. 



THOMAS LEAHY, 

Austinburg, I >hio. 

l'lii Sigma Kappa, 

Mountain; Foot-ball team (2), (3), 

(4) ; Captain Foot-ball team (4), '08. 

B. s. C. K. 



AURA F. LEWIS, 

Aberdeen. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
W. C. A.; Woman's League Buch- 
inori Club; Pies. V. \Y. C. A. (3); 
nglish Club. A. B. 




JOSEP 



MARSH, 



Harrisville 



Columbian Literary Society; Debater 
in [nter-Society Contest '06; Pres. 
Students' Publishing Ass't.; Pres. 
Mountan; Winner on team against 
W. CJ. P. '05; Editor-in-Chief Mon- 
ongalian; Assistant Editor Athe- 
naeum: English club, A. 1'.. 




iflonttcola 

'08. 




WILFRED A. MORRIS, 

Conhellsville, Pa. 
Phi Kappa I 'si. 
Assistant Manager Track team {•>). 
1!. S. ('. R. 




CLIFFORD MYERS, 

Mason. 

Assistant in Gymnasium (2), (3); 
Cadet Corps; Cadel Officers' Club; 
Class Historian (3); Sec. \V. V. A. \. 
(4); See. Tennis Club (4). A. I'.. 



WALTER M. PARKER, 



limit inari on. 



Sigma Nu, 



A. R. 




GERTRUDE SLOANE POLLOCK, 

Buckhannon. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, 

^ . \V. ('. A.: W. V. A. A.; Buckhan- 
iion Club. A. I!. 




30 




CLARENCE POST, 

Fairmont. 

V. W. ('. A.; Class Treas. (3); Mon- 
tieola Board (3). A. !i. 




ittonticola 

'08. 



HOWARD M. QUICK, 

Marietta, Ohio. 
Delta Tun Delta. 
LL. B, 



DNA RIGHTMIRE, 

Morgantown. 

olumbian Literary Society; Y. W. 
. A. j Class Poet (3); Woman's 
eague. A. 1!. 




WILBERT II. ROBINSON, 

Millsboro. 
Sigma Phi Epsilor., 
Engineering Soc. B. S. C. E. 




ittonttcola 

'08. 




CHARLES B. ROSS, 



B. Ami. 



Moreantown. 




MARSHALL W. RUST, 

Charles Town. 

Kappa Alpha, 
Engineering Societv; W. V. A. A. 

b. s. c. e. 



MARTIN I.. SAYRE, 

Evans. 

Engineering Society; Marshall Club; 
Tennis ( lub; Odd Fellows Club; Vice- 
Pres. Engineering Soc-ety; Vice-Pres. 

^ . M. < '. A.: Pre-. Engineering Sue. 
I".. s. ('. E. 




DA COSTA SMITH. 

Weston. 
I'hi Sigma Kappa. 
Montieola Hoard (3) : Pres. Athletic 
Ass't. (4). LL. B. 




:i2 




ROBERT P. STRICKLER, 

Parsons. 

Delta Tan Delta, 
W. V. A. A.; Montieola Board (3) ; 
Class Vice-Pres. (2) Base-ball team 
(1). (2). (3). A. B. 




iflonttcola 

'08. 



CHARLES E. WAYMAX. 

Fairmont . 
Phi Kappa J'si. 
Base-ball team (2), (3), (4). 

I:, s. \i. !•:. 



AELES E. WELLS, 



Wheelins 



adei Officers' Club; W. V. A. A.; 
VIonticola Board (3). 1!. S. ('. E. 




JOHN T. WEST, 

Cassville. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
W. \'. A. A.: Cadel Officers' Chib; 
Second Marksman Medal (It; Distin- 
guished Cadel (1). (2); Winner of M. 
('. Lillev Sword (2); Vice-Pres. Class 
(2); Monongalian; Montieola Board 
(3) ; Athenaeum (4) ; Class Pres. i4i ; 
Assistant in Zoology. B. S. 




33 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




AXTEE M. WHALEY, 



Finch. 



Columbian Literary Society; Law 
Club; Debating Ass't; Winner of 
Tax Commissioner's Prize '04. '05; 
Business Manager Monongalian; 
Capt. Debating team '05, '06, '07; 
Columbian Literary Society Debater 
'00 - '07 : Business Manager Athe- 
naeum (4); Montioc.ola Board (3). 

LL. I!. 




ORLA M. WILKERSON, 



Wolfrun. 



Parthenon Literary Society; W. V. A. 
A.; W. V. Debating Ass't.; on win- 
ning team in debate with VV. U. 1*. 

(4). A. I!. 



JAMES E. WILSON", 

Mannington. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
(.Ice ( lub (2), (3), Hi ; VV. V. A. A.: 
Kngineerng Society; Foot-ball team 
(2) ; Track team (3), l4l : Captain 
track team (4) : Class Basket -ball 
team (4). B. S. C. E. 




OTIS GUY WILSON, 



Harrisvil 



English Club; Columbian Literary 
Society; Y. M. ('. A.; \V. V. A. A.'; 
Pres. Seminary Club. 




31 




JOHN E. CORBIN, 

Good Hope. 

Delta Tau Delta; Phi Petit Pi. 
B. S. M. D. 




iflonttcola 

'08. 



GEORGE II. CAMPBELL, 

( Larson. 

Sigma Phi Epsikm; Phi < 'hi. 

B. s. M. I). 



SEPTIMUS J. KELL, 

Welch. 
Base-ball and foot-ball teams; 
Glee ( lub '04-'05. B. S. M. D. 




1>. J. MAIION'K. 



Glee ( lub '(l4-'() 



Morgantown. 

B. S. M. I). 




iHonttcola 

'08. 




C. L. PEARCY. 

Morgantown. 
Phi Sigma Kappa; Phi Chi, 
Basket-ball team '04; Manager 
basket-ball team '05; Basket-ball 
team at P. & S.. Baltimore, '00; 
Cade! Captain '05. B. S. M. 1). 




A. F. POST. 

Clarksburg. 
Delta Ton Delta; Phi Beta Pi 
Foot-ball team '04 - '05; Glee ( lub 
'05. B. S. M. I). 



I). S. TALKINGTON, 



B. S. M. I). 



M iddlebourno. 




HANK E. FLOWERS, 

Glover Gap 
Sigma Phi Epsihn; Phi <'lii. 

IS. S. .M. 1). 




:io 



ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ, Morgantown. 

W. V. U. Faculty: W. V. A. A.; Leader V. M. C. A. Gym- 
nasium Indianapolis; Graduate Chatauqua School of Physical 
Education; Graduate of Harvard School of Physical Training; 
Graduate Coach, Oberlin College '99; Physical Director and 
Coach, DePauw University '01 - '02; Physical Culture and 
Coach. University of Cincinnati, '<I2-'U4: Present Physical 
Director W. V. U. A. B. 



WILLIAM B. COFFORTH, 

B. S. C. E. 

ALBERT JACKSON COLLET, 

Delegate to National Convention Delta Chi at 
ada (3). 

JOSEPH A. GIST, 
LL. B. 

JUSTIN F. GPvANT, 
Graduate. 

HENRY S. HESS. 
B. S. C. E. 



Keyser. 

Beverly. 

Toronto. Can- 

A. 1'.. 

Wellsburg. 

Morgantown. 
Morgantown. 



JESSIE JENKINS. Montrose. 

Y. \V. C. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; Athenaeum Board 
(3); Monticola Board (.'!): Contestant in Inter-Society Decla- 
mation Contest. A. B. 



JAMES II. HUNKLE, 
B. S. M. K. 

PAIL H. MARTIN. 
1. 1.. B. 

NELLIE D. MORRIS, 

Columbian Literary Society; Y. W. C. A. 

1BA F. NESTOR, 

A. B. 



Morgantown. itlont i roln 

'08. 



Morganl ow n. 



MorgantoM n. 

A. B. 



Anvil. 



Fairmont . 



CHESNEY M. RAMAGE, 

Parthenon Literary Society; (dec Club (2) (3); \V. V. A. A.: 

Debating Ass't.; Editor-in-Chief Monticola (3); Athenaeum 

Board: Winner Inter-Society Contest '05; on winning debating 

team against VY. V. P. "0.-). B. S. 

ALVA C. ROBINSON, Morgantown. 
LL. B. 

BIRK S. STATHERS, Martinsburg. 
LL. B. 

ELLA M. TURNER, Shepardstown. 

English Club; V. \Y. ('. A.: Woman's League. Graduate. 

STEPHEN G. JACKSON. lane Lew. 
B. S. 



37 



iflonttcola 

'OS. 




—Historian. 



Mentor Jflebtc J|t£torp 



Having completed the work in the Medical Depart- 
ment of W. V. \'.. the Sophomore class of 1!").") cast their 
garments about them and journeyed into a distant land, 
even beyond the mountains and to the seaside where the 
tide regularly ebbs and Hows and the seagulls Ian the waves. 
Here we took up the work anew iii the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons as mighty Juniors. Some of our men, 
being mistaken lor Freshmen, were called upon to show 
their ability as swimmers in the Chemical Laboratory 
tank by the second year class, but it did not take many 



minutes for ns to demonstrate our superiority over the 
underclassmen. After this incident the days flew by with 
astonishing rapidity and we were all ''plugging" for the 
final Junior Exams. When the Springtime came and the 
flowers wrvt' blooming we were called to accounl for the 
seed thai had been sown amongst our cerebral convolutions. 
When the harvesting was over it, was found thai some of 
the seeds had fallen by the wayside, but the greater part 
of them had fallen on fertile "round and had yielded 
abundantly. It was found thai we as a body had reached 



38 



the first rank and that one of our number had so acquitted 
himself that he was second to none in all the class. So 
ended our first year's work in Baltimore. 

When the roll was called at the beginning of our 
Senior year, every man was in his place prepared to win 
laurels for himself and for W. V. l T . At the present time. 
we find no physical signs or clinical symptoms of disap- 
pointment on the faces of our men. On the contrary we 
note all the marks of success and even the diminutive tow- 
headed "Kid" Taylor, says he is going to give the gold 
medal to his baby Elizabeth, to assist her in cutting her 
teeth. 

We have fought a good fight; we have almost run our 
course, but before we say good bye to college life we desire 
to record the characteristics of some of the boys. 

Pearey believes fresh air is the greatest prophylactic 
known, and often goes to Lutherville and other suburban 
towns. 



e cnampeen duckpin 



Post and John Oorbin are th 
bowlers — High score 46. 

Kell and Mahone have made vague and effectual efforts 
to grow VanDyke beards. 

Campbell is walking in the trodden paths. 
Flowers has become a Benedict and is as happy as 
"a little boy with a red wagon." The Historian feels 
like saying to the others, "Go thou and do likewise." 

Talkington believes in studying medicine and attend- 
ing lectures when it is convenient to do so. 

As this year completes our study of medicine and we 
must leave our Alma Mater we bid a last farewell to all 
our friends who have been so true in our college life. It 
is with regret that we say good-bye to the "old gold and 
blue" and the two years which we spent within her walls 
shall be to ns always the most pleasant memory. 

Historian. 
Class '07. 



iHonttcoIa 

'08. 




39 



itlonttcola 

'08. 



"Viva A Bas Les Scabs" 

AMALAGA 
BRIDGELESS 

UNION ! 

Mouse Colcord High Muck-de-Muck 

Twin Colcord Dispenser of Engineering Phrases (cussing) 

Sport Morris Grand Mogul 

New River Green Labor inextraordinary 

Shorty Hess Assistant Mismanager 

Puddinhead Wilson Main Guy 

Dutch Ernst Head Knocker 

Smiling Cap. Leahy Exalted Growler 

Snakes Wells Hot air producer (tender of radiators) 

Mac Fortney Chief Gaza'o 

Rube Gatherum Draft Clerk (window opener) 

Pope Sayre Insulting Engineei 

Rusty Rust Guardian of Elue Prints 

"United it Stands; Divided it Falls." 

40 






Vv 



)&? 



S{P 




fflonticola 

'08. 



SENIOR CIVIL ENGINEERS. 



jttonticola 

'08. 




r.> 




Junior* 



"VLo tfjrm, 
3lt is tfje minb that makes tfjr bob? rich. 




Montitoia 

'08. 



(Officers;. 

President w ~ r 

W. (1. LoUGH 

Vice-President Pt .„,„„ „ ,„ 

■ • ^ LARENCE E. ! 'RACY 

Secretary ,,.- _ 

J Maude Fulcher 

Treasurer ... Tr 

Harbour Mitchell 

Historian u 1D ,, r „, 

Mabel Jane Weaver 

Poet .... m ^. 

Clark F. Hinm an 



Colors. 

Old Gold and White 

Boomalaeka, Boomalaeka Wha Who Ray' 
Razzle Dazzle! Hobble Gobble; Juniors Hoorai ' 
11 ' Vl l> Hi Yi : Rai Ral -Rah! ! 
•Juniors Juniors- Sis-Boom-Bah ! 
Juniors ! ! ! 



13 



iflonticola 

'08. 




C. M. BENNETT. 

Bennetl was the fashionable mem 
I,,.,, of the Junior Board, the one, 
who bad supper al a late hour. 
Along about seven o'clock, Wednes- 
day evenings, when Monticola busi- 
ness began to gel warm, Bennett, 
pulling oul his watch would an- 
nounce, "Well, I've gol i- go home 



t (1 Bupper, am 



he dii 



E. S. BOCK. 

Here is one <>t' the busiest students 
in the University. "Teddie" may be 
seen in the Library any time in the 
vicinity of Professor (ox's reserve 
shelf. He lias taken almost everj 
course that professor offers. On the 
side, Bock is Assistant Editor-in- 
chief of the Athenaeum, ami one of 
the Mbnticola editors. 





C. A. BOWERS. 

you see in Bowers ..,,e of the mosl 
daring men in the University. Dur- 
ing the winter examinations, lie was 
overheard explaining to a co-ed when 
an d how to use French conditional 
sentences. A- a reward he i- being 
prominently mentioned for the Hall 
Fame in the Carnegie Hero Associ- 
ation. 



n 



JAMES S. BROYLES. 

Broyles is a mechanical genius who 
will some day startle the world. He 
spends most of his time oxer in the 
Mechanical Hall, tinkering away at 
some intricate hit of machinery. His 
spare moments arc given to French, 
in which lie is particularly proficient. 





ERNEST A. BRUCE. 

Von have heard, no doubt, of 
"angels unawares." Such an angel ('.') 
is Bruce. No one had dreamed of 

connecting him with Robert Bruce of 
Scotland. until the Junior Class 
meeting last fall, when Pow in a 
hurst of mighty eloquence, informed 
us of that fact. Bruce, is the hus- 
tling business Manager of this An- 
nual. 



iflonttcola 

'OS. 



G. A. COLLIER. 

Here is a man noted for his quiet- 
ness. He was never known to make 
a noise, hut in his unassuming way 
is quite a -.tickler for the ladies. His 
smile would charm any lady, in fact 
he is a regular I [obson. 




45 



ittonticola 

'08. 




G. B. FOLK. 

.'■''. , '''' lk is ■' graduate of Shep- 
ardstown N'ormal. Such is his faith 

I; "'"« '"ftituti f learning, "ha? 

/'C:;'" ; " ^/xpected tenter 
V ,|', ( J " "'"V" "'" University. 
oti ^ hls expectations were 
realized, George, on the whole i, 
" P r f*ygood fellow, though we hive 
■"' t0 d '«cover ,1,,, he is related to 
Governor Folk „, Mi 880uri '' '" 



VIRGINIA FOULK. 

. Felicissima, pulcherrima, sapientis- 
sima Puella F ou l k! A ti„, ill; , . 
T" ";;" l -'"-l-'- " ersationaHst! 

;• c^rsa, rr: te r 

bane, subventitious Junior! \v',l„ ' 
ty recommendatory to her prepon 

^"^rj-rt things yet remain 

••,, ,"' r."' frequently flies off 
^\!;^Z.-^ has "-» "down 





THOS. B. FOULK. 



came t< 



When 
was a quid little boy bul 

m'lniicr and stvl 



IC IS 



W. V. U. he 
now, his 

-Hell (() c-l'lvi. 

M' *° sto P and stare and ask 

Is thai the President?" Tom v, ,' 

k """- «» the base . bal] ma|| ; fou 
year. Is thai the ,,„.,.■• 



40 



MAUD L. FULCHER. 

Behold in this young lady a scl 1- 

marm. who is not only prettv but 
amiable. .Miss Fulcher is one of our 
finest students, the pride of Dr Cal- 
lahan's heart. She does all the work 
he assigns— an event hitherto unpar- 
alleled in the history of the Univer- 
sity— and then, like Alexander, she 
sighs for more. 





W. R. FRANTZ. 

•Justice can not be .lone this noble 
vouth. 



iflonticola 

'08. 



1 1, 



THOS. J. GILL00LY. 
'/ man with the map of Ireland 



foot-ball man. when he is mad. VVhen 
you want to see Tom, go to Swisher's 

r »eatre and take a front seal he 
"'" '"' there, if the bill i s a musical 
comedy. 




#lonticola 

'08. 




BERTHA S. HAWLEY. 

This young lady better known as 
-Til,lv Ann" is the life of Woman s 
Hall ■ for she is very jolly. She is 
especially fond of rnidnighl lunches 
(hauled up I" the third story by a 
,,,,„., a nd of walking up street with 
: , tall mar. or. each side of her. Miss 
Sawley, who is Assistant Editor-in- 
chief, i> brilliant in Anglo-Saxon. 



CLARK F. HINMAN. 



Behold in this rogish-eyed lad. one 
f the versatile talents. Hinman once 
„„t up a vaudeville show: he was 
president of the Athletic Association 
last year; he plays on the foot-hall 
team, and last, bid not least, he re- 
ports for a Morgantown Daily. His 
leisure time is spent in working Eor 
a B. S. M. E. 





BROOKS S. HUTCHINSON. 

Brooks is a product of Fairmont 
.,,„, a cr edit to his native town. He 
will lie a man some day. '11ns noble 
youth has the honor of being the 
lightest man o,. the Varsity foot-ball 



team last season 



p. > President of 



the Athletic Association he i> pilot- 
ing the ship safely through the 
troubled seas. 




J. H. JENKINS. 



Jimmy's Ma told him to have noth- 
ing to do with the ladies when lie 
came to W. V. U. He obeyed her 
until Prof. Emory entertained the 
engineers, then it was that Jim be- 
came known among the Co-Eds. Did 
you see him at the Junior Prom? 





ETHEL B. JONES. 



This 



lung lady lias suddenly de- 
veloped a mysterious fondness for 
Harvard. She lias a Harvard pin, a 
Harvard pennant, greets you when 
you enter her door, and printed slips 
of Harvard examination questions 
Butter from the pages of her books. 
Can anyone explain, or — does it need 
explanation ? 



itlonticola 

'08. 



W. M. KENNEDY. 

And now we muM say something 
of 'Bill.' lie i> a charming youth, 
never deigning to look at anything 
so insignificant and frivilous a- a 

Co-Ed. He has a wonderful mind. 
Why! when Kill was a mere infant, 
lie could remember when it was time 

to (TV. 




49 



fflonticola 

'08. 




H. W. LAWSON. 

Lawson may nol presenl ii very 
Imposing figure in the class-room, bu1 
as i he fair co e I sai I. "When Lawson 
ildii- his shoulder straps, and buckles 
on hi~ Bword, and begins to "bossy," 
there i-. in slang phrase, "something 
doing." 



GAY LOUGH. 

This rosy-cheeked lad is the Presi- 
dent of the Junior Class. It is ru- 
mored that Gay Lough found in his 
Christmas stocking a 1 k on "Par- 
liamentary Law." Why? Everyone 
knows that Lough is well-versed in 
that subject. He didn't need such a 
gift. 





ARTHUR M. LUCAS. 

Lucas is a slender fellow, with a 
little hint of the reserve force really 
in him. He is so fond of having his 
picture taken, that he insisted that 
the Monticola Board have four pic- 
tures taken so as to lie sure to get 
a good one. We always have thought 
it was three for the Board and six 
for Lucai. 



J. P. McJILTON. 

McJilton, or '".Mac"' as he is more 
familiarly called is the star mechan- 
ical student of the Junior class. 
After the winter examination grades 
were sent out. '"Mac" was overheard 
exclaiming in tones of heart-felt, re- 
lief. "Well, 1 didn't make less than 
73 or more than 75, Hurrah!"' 





HARBOUR MITCHELL. 

Here is Mitch, the pride of all the 
men and the ladies' delight (?) How 
could it he other wise when he comes 
from Wheeling. He has athletic in- 
clinations, nuf ced. 



GEORGE POW. 

Behold our Editor-in-Chief. Like 
the suitor of -fail' Portia 1 who "boughi 
his doublet from ltal\ . his round hose 
in France, and hi- bonnet in <ler- 
manv," Pow is cosmopolitan, lie was 
born in Scotland, brought up in 
Massachusetts, educated in Kentucky 
and he will be graduated (if the fac- 
ulty he sufficiently lenient i from the 
West Virginia University. The pro- 
duet is - w,.|| perhaps the less 
said about that the better. 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




itlonticola 

'08. 




BOYD RANDALL. 

Eoyd Randall is .1 tall good-looking, 
blue-eyed chap, \\ 1 1< > mighi make a 
hit « ii h 1 1 e co eds, if he v\ ould only 
spare 1 he 1 ime from his si udics. 
Randall i- a dili«ent studeni of Em- 
c: son, 1 ho " h, En ei son w ould prob- 
ably 1 in n o' er in his gra\ e ai -uric 
of 1 he senl i;i enl - assigi ed to him bj 
Randall. 



CLARA REINHEIMER. 

Mis- Reinheimer's long suit is 
German. She has risen very nobly d> 
the occasion often and helped her less 
fortunate sisters by translating Ger- 
man foot-ball notes i" Beowulf. .Miss 
Reinheimer lives in Fairmont, though 
really she is nol to blame for that. 





LEE ALLEN SMITH. 



52 



CILDA SMITH. 

Tli is tall young lady .answers in 
Woman's Hall parlors to the name 
of "Judy." Her major is mathmatics. 

In this Held slip has covered her- 
self with glory and won the heart 
of "Foxy" Stewart. She bids fair 
now to be a politician, fur she takes 
much interest in Rights (licit/) of 
various matters. 





fflonttcola 

'08. 



LAWRENCE SAUNDERS. 

This hoy is never -ecu except goino 
to and from his studies which he 
attends regularly. lie spends his 
spare moments with the kodak. 



FLOYD B. SELBY. 

Selby is a camera fiend. On almost 
any clear day. he may lie seen in- 
dustriously snapping the University 
buildings, the professors and the stu- 
dents. The small Junior pictures are 
evidences of his artistic ( '.' ) skill. 
Selby expects to he a B. S. M. E. 
some da\ it' the t'acult \ Is sulli: i- 
entlv lenient. 




53 



ittonticola 

'08. 




JOHN F. THROCKMORTON. 

John I''. Throckmorton i> one of 
our legal lights, who is hound to 

succ I i, ;i long name has any 

n eight . John's educat ion is said I o 
be deficienl in one respect, lie slums 
Feminimity. We would respectfully 
suggest thai some of his friends in 
the Law < lass at bend to this defi- 
ciency 1 ill nine. 



C. E. TRACY. 

This meek looking youth hails from 
the wilils of Monroe County. Me 
was not heard of much around the 
Engineering school until he assumed 
the present role of running the 
Toaniv." 





MARGARET L. WADDELL. 



Miss Margarel 
showed what work s 
by voluntarilj enrol 
term for Rhetoric 1. 



Lynn Waddell 
le is capable of, 
ing in the fall 

'This alone was 



noteworthy, hut to cap the climax, 
she made 96 under "Pat!" Since 
then such is the reputation she gained 

that her work lias been mere play. 



MABEL JANE WEAVER. 

Behold in this young-lady one of 
the kindest-hearted girls in the Uni- 
versity. If you are blue, go to Miss 
Weaver for comfort. She will ad- 
minister it by the wholesale Miss 
Weaver is one of the Joke Editors 
of this Annual, which fact may ac- 
count for the general excellence of 
the jokes. 





ittonttcola 

'08. 



J. A. YONKER. 

Allow us t<> introduce to you Jacob 

11. Yonkcr. "Jake,"' as he !-, best 

known, is so V-i and reliiiiig 

that even his professors arc hanllj 
aware of his existence, were it not 
for his brilliant dxss-work. 



GEORGE F. WHITING. 

My motto is: 
"A little learning is a dangerous 

thing 
Drink deep, or taste not the Pcr- 

ian spring." 




55 



fHonticola 

'OS. 





ALLAN E. BURNER. 

In the Fall of 1903, one, Allan E. 
Burner, came to \V. V. 1'. from the 
wilds of Pocahontas County with 
t « n object s in \ iew . one i o secure 
a me lical educal ion and. I he ol her, 
i o secure a \\ ife. Since i hen he has 
ra pid si rides in bol h direei ions. 
His education is aboul secured and for 
a wife he has had lii> eye on a dozen, 
lnii . i he poor boj can no1 decide 
uii i he i iehf one, 



C. W. CONN. 

It would be a '"('(inn' game to write 
up this chap. 



R. W. DUNHAM. 

Bobby camp id W. V. U. in 1902 
with the one object in view of be- 
coming a minister of the Gospel. 
But after interviewing -lack Hare he 
decided to study medicine. Though 

Bobby is only a little fellow lie is 
there with the goods and always has 
a readj answer when cpii/. days come 
around. Bobby often refers to the 
many happy (?) hours spent in Prep 
Hall reciting Latin to Prof. Hare and 
always finishes with: — "Those days 
are the cause of my mighty stature." 




56 





JHonticola 

'08. 



J. H. STEINBERGER. 

On a beauteous summer mom, in 
the great valley of the Ohio, there 
was once born a bouncing baby boy. 
It was a bard matter for the parents 
to deeide on a name for the new 
arrival, since they were extremely 
anxious to give him one that was 
not common and one he could be 
proud of when be became a man. 
After much deliberation, he was 
named Johnnie, and Johnnie it re- 
mained until he came to W. V. I'. 
When the cute manner in which he 
mingled with the Co-eds. gave rise 
to the name he now bears. "Steeny 
the Heart-breaker." The first im- 
pression that John made at college 
was that of a flirt but now it has 
become more serious and we wonder 
what it can be that has caused such 
a change in the life and manner of 
our quiet little boy. 



G. D. JOHNSON. 

It was not 'till the year 1!HI4 that 
W. V. U. was honored by the pres- 
ence of young Delbert. His coming 
created quite a sensation, especially 
among the Co-eds. When asked what 
his object was in coming to school, 
he proudly expanded his chest and 
said. '"1*111 studying to be a Doctor." 
There are Doctors, and. there are 
Doctors, but. there is only one Del 
bert. There was a time when his 
modesty made him shy of all things 
female but that is of the past; now, 
his reputation with the girls is SO 
well established that he i- in a class 
by himself. But Delbert i-- a good 
fellow, and there may conic a time 
when thai longed for little \\l. I).* 
will be bis. 



57 



Class of 1908 



Allman, George K. A. H> Lorentz 

Bennett, C. M. B. S. C. E Morgantown 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; W. V. A. A.; Engineering Society; 
itlontlCOla Monticola Board. 

'AC 

vt7 * Bock, Edward S. A. B Morgantown 

Delta Tau Delia: W. V. A. A.; Athenaeum Board (3); Mon- 
tieola Hoard: English Club. 



Fulcher, Maud L. A, B Morgantown 

Chi Omega; Woman's League; Ass't in English. 



Bowers, Albert C. A. IS. 



Wheeling 
. . VVikel 



Broyles, James S. B. S. M. E 

Y. M. ('. A.; Engineering Society. 

Bruce. Ernest A. li. S. ('. E Bluefield 

Sigma Nu: W. V. A. A.: Assistant Manager Track Team (1); 
Class Pres. (2); Manager 'Track (cam (2); Business Man- 
ager Molll ieola. 

Burner, E. A. I'.. S. M. I) Cass 

\V. \a. Club, Baltimore: Pres. Y. M. C. A. CD. 



Collier, G. A. li. S. M. E. 



( 'credo 



Dunham, Robert W. I!. S. M. D Bclington 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Phi ( Id: \V. \'a. Club, Baltimore; Y. M. ('. A. 

Folk, George B. A. I! Martinsburg 

English ( lull. 

Foulk, M. Virginia. A. I! Huntington 

Chi Omega; Y. \Y. ('. A.: W. V. A. A.: Woman's League; 
Head of English (lull (3); Athenaeum Hoard CD: Monticola 

Boaxd 'H7 'IIS; Sec. I »a II - 1 lelleilic Ass't (3) J I'rcs. I 'a II - Del Icllic 

Ass'i i:d : Ass'1 iii English CD. 

Foulk, Thomas B. I'.. S. ( '. K Huntington 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Mountain; (dec Club; Chora] Society; 
Cadet Officers' Club; \Y. V. A. A.; Class Treas. (1); Assist- 
ant Manager Base-ball teajm (2); Manager Base-ball team 
(3); Monticola Hoard '07. 



Frantz, Winter R. B. S. ( '. E 

Hid Kappa Psi; W. V. A. A. 



. Cumberland. Md. 



Gillooly, Thomas J. HI- B Weston 

Hid Kappa Psi; W. Y. A. A.: Foot-hall team (4); T. X. E. 

Grose, Edward R. A. B Sago 

Green, Barbara M. I!. S. C. E Hinton 

W. V. A. A. 

Hawley. Bertha S. A. B Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Woman's League; Y. W. c. A.: W. 
V. A. A.; Class Sec. (2): Y. W. C. A. Sec (2); Treas. 
Women's League (3); Assistant Editor-in-Chief Monticola. 

Hinman, Clark F. H. S. M. K Somerville, Mass. 

Hid Sigma Kappa; W. Y. A. A.: Foot-ball (cam (1) (2) CD; 
Track team (1) (2) (3); Captain Track team (2); Pres. 
Athletic Ass't. CD: Monticola Hoard. 

Hutchinson. Brooks S. A. B Fairmont 

D.dta Tau Delta: Delta Chi: Mountain: W. Y. A. A.: Foot- 
ball team CD : Pres. Athletic Ass't. CD. 

Jackson, James H. A. H Jane Lew 

Johnson, G. D. I!. S. M. I) Kenova 

Phi Sigma Kappa: Hid Beta Hi: W. \'a. Club, Baltimore; 
Y. M. C. A.: Treas. Medic class (1) ; Medic ( lass Vice-Pres. (21. 

Jenkins, James H. B. S. C. E Petroleum 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; W. Y. A. A.: Buchannon Club; Manager 

Track team CD. 

Jones, Ethel B. A. .1! Knottsville 

Chi Omega; Y. W. C. A. : English Club; Monticola Hoard: 
Woman's League. 

Kennedy, William M. A. 15 Fairmont 

l'lii Kappa Psi. 



68 



Lawson, Herchel W. A. B Morgantown 

W. V. A. A.; Cadet Officers' Chili; Monticola Board. 

Lough, W. G. B. S Fairmont 

Delta Tan Delta; W. V. A. A.; Class Ties. (3). 

Lucas, Arthur M. B. S. C. E Morgantown 

Sigma Nu; Y. M. C. A.; Engineering Society; Monticola 
Board. 

Mcjilton, John P. 1!. S. M. E Sleepy Creek 

Y. M. C. A.; Engineering Society; .Masonic Club; Distin- 
guished Cadet; Monticola Board. 

Mitchell, Harbour. . . B. S. M. E Wheeling 

Phi Kappa Psi; Assistant Foot-ball Manager (2) ; Class Treas. 
(3). 

Pow, George. B. S. C. E Adams, Mass. 

Phi Sigma Kappa; W. Y. A. A.; Editor-in-Chief Monticola. 

Randall, Boyd. A. B Martinsburg 

Reinheimer, Clara May. A. B Fairmont 

Woman's League. 

Saunders, Lawrence. B. S. M. E Yan Yoorhis 

Engineering Society; Cadet Officers' Club; Cadet Major. 

Selby, Lloyd. B. S. M. E Morgantown 

Smith, Cilda L. A. B Fairmont 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. W. C. A.;W. V. A. A.; Woman's 
League; Class Historian (2'); Sec. Y. W. C. A. (3). 



Smith, L. A. A. B Morgantown 

Steenbergen, J. H. B. S. M. D Point Pleasant 

Phi Kappa Sigma: Phi Beta Pi; W. Ya. Club, Baltimore; Y. 
M. ('. A.; Class Historian (Medici (1); Pres. Medic Class (2). 

Swiger, Arlen G. A. B Clarksburg 

Beta Theta Pi. 

Tracy, Clarence E. B. S. C. E Mderson 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; W. V. A .A.; Engineering Society: Class 
Foot-ball team (1); Class Basket-ball team (2); Sec. En- 
gineering Society (2); Distinguished Cadet: Winner Third 
Medal, Drill and Discipline; Class Vice-Pres. (3). 

Throckmorton, John F. LL. B Hundred 

Waddell, Margaret L. A. B Brandonville 

Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League. 

Weaver, Mabel Jane. A. B Morgantown 

Alpha Xi Delta; Class Historian (3); Monticola Board: 
Woman's League. 

Whiting, George W. A. B Martinsburg 

English Club. 

Yanosky, Felix. B. S. M. D Longacre 

Yonker, J. A. B. S. M. E Mason 

Cadet Officers' Club; Gold Medal. Drill and Discipline ('05); 
Silver Medal Highest Target Score '0(1; Vice-Pres. Cadet 
Officers' Club. 



jHonttcola 

'08. 




m 



59 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




The coming of great events is often heralded before- 
hand by some mysterious splendbr, the advent of striking 
phenomena is fell long before the actual arrival. So in 
the fall of 1904 was the coming of the class of 1908 felt 
days before the opening of the school. The sky seemed 
brighter, the campus look on a livelier green, and the in- 
structors, the first time for years, appeared with smiles 
on their faces and hope in their hearts. There existed 
among them an assurance that the year would be a brill- 
iant and successful one for W. V. U. 

On the day of registration the old students were soon 
aware of powerful and superior spirits moving among 
them. Even the registrar did an unheard-of thing as a 
little hunch of '08ers fame up who had already found in 
each other kindred spirits. As they handed him their 
cards he loaned hack from his little table and slowly 
pushed back the white cap he wore. "Some more Freshmen, 
I see. .Most promising class I've seen yet." 

And at once this most remarkable class began to show 
"the stuff I 'was made of." In the inter-class "rush" with 
the Sophomores of that year the '08ers won easily. The 
Sophomores realized early thai they ww in danger of 
defeat, so after sending up prayers and supinations to 
the gods for aid in the terrible struggle to come, they 
gathered around them the bravest representatives of 



60 



Prepdom, (their closest allies), and met the class of 1908 
on the campus. But as often as the Sophs, with frantic 
and desperate efforts rushed forward, the '0.8ers swept 
them back until they were forced to leave the field, victims 
of ignominous defeat. 

Thus, when the wonderful class reached that stage of 
its collegiate development when it was called Sophomore, 
and when it met the class of 1909 in a similar bloodless 
combat, it came off the field bearing again the baniui- oi 
victory. 

In all forms of Athletics the members of the Junior 
class have won their share of laurels. In foot-ball, base- 
ball, and basket-ball they have distinguished themselves 
as well as on the track and elsewhere. 

Anions the members of the Junior class numbers those 
who in after years will be great statesmen, orators, 
engineers, and political and literary leaders of the country. 
As they have shown themselves in the past so will they 
show themselves in the future, ready and well prepared 
for any emergency that may arise. 

The illustrious career id' the Junior class with its 
noble achievements, its progress and development will serve 
as an inspiration for all succeeding classes. It is one of 
the cruelties of fate that not more than once in the history 
of a college does it boast of such a class as the class of ]'.)()$. 

Historian. 




iHonttcola 

'OS. 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




An Fbi-e-ntc 



Jkibe ttjat apes tjumanitp." 



(Officers! 

President H. 0. Hall 

Vice-President Lobina Fries 

s< crt tary Ada Moon 

Treasurer A. I). Hall 

Historian II. C. Barnes 

Cheer Leader J. P. Morarity 



Colors! 
Blue and White. 

Jflotoer 
Violet. 

Rip! Rap! Rip! Rap! Rip! Rap! Roars! 

Zing Bill'!!! Zing!— -Spat!!! 

Sophomores ! Sophomores ! ! Sophomores ! ! ! 




iWonttcola 

'08. 



63 



ifflonttcola 

'08. 



^>opf)omoreg 



H. C. Barnes. 

V. V. Baumgardner, A T A. 

A. 1). Bell, 2 e E. 

Leo. Carlin. B B II. 

W. E. Cather. 

Mary H. Cooper A S A. 

Lewis S. Core, A T 0. 

Crystal Courtney, A S A. 

C. E. Cummings, 2 N. 



G. II. 


( ummings, 


* 


K 


2 


.1. c. 


Ely. 2 N. 








C. V. 


Feller. 








T. \V 


. Fitzgerald. 








Lawn 


■nee Foreman. 






J. K. 


Findlovson. 


A 


T 


A. 


Lorena Freis, X U 








Rosa 


Folau. 








(). F. 


Gibbs. 








.1. \V. 


Hall. 








i:. o. 


Hall. 








1 [arry 


L. Griffin. 








L. i:'. 


Ilolloway. 








ll. C. 


1 [umphreys, 


y 


N 


' 


IS. s. 


Hutchinson, 


A 


T 


A 


W. L. 


Hutchinson 








B. W 

II. ('. 


, King, <I> 2 
Koelz, 'l> K 


K. 






W. E 


. Lloyd. 








\v. s, 

T. B. 


Lloyd. 
Lawler, 









T. J. McCarthy. 

Ada. Moon. 

•I. P. Moriarity, K A. 

Ada M. Xeal X V.. 

Virginia Xeal. X P.. 

Paul R. Morrow, 2 N. 

E. D. Mason, 2 X. 

Rebecca L. Pollock. 

1!. 1). Peebles, ATA. 

0. P. Rodgers, B 9 II. 

Donald Ross. 

.1. M. Russell. 

If. W. Saunders. 2 N. 

II. M. Scott, 2 X. 

C. C. Sheppard, $ 2 K. 

Jacob F. Shreve. 

II. R. Snyder. ATA. 

Eleanor B. Steele. K K 

Mabel Stout. 

Lola Blanche Shinn. 

Mae Sullivan. K K 1\ 

C. L. Swecker. 

Ida Sutherland, K K r. 

J. K. Settle. 2 X. 

Blanche Smith. 

W. \Y. Trent. 2 N. 

Cyrus Vim Bibber, K A. 

Mabel R. Watkins, A S 

A. C. Weaver. 

Lucy G. Wilson. K K V 



r. 



64 




ifflonttcola 

'08. 



If the class of 1909 were not so well known, a history 
of its work, and, perhaps, even its existence would be neces- 
sary. But as everyone, who is well informed, is aware of the 
merit and the talent of this class, this brief history is 
written for the enlightment of the few, who may not for 
some reason or other, have as yet, heard of the achieve- 
ments of this, the best class that ever entered the Uni- 
versity. 

In the fall of '05 we organized as a class and held our 
first class meeting and election amid the futile assaults 
of ever-present Sophomores. At this time, J. C. Gibson 
of Ohio County, was elected president. 

Last fall found a majority of the class back, and after 
the usual class election, and the "Sophomore - Freshman 
Kush," the class settled down to work for the year. I\. 0. 
Hall of Taylor County, was elected president, and under 



his leadership, the class has met with unbounded success. 
Early in the year strong marks of superiority began to 
manifest themselves. 

The value and importance of the class of '09 is every- 
where perceived and admitted, and 1 it may he said here, 
that no one places a higher estimate upon this class than 
its own members, each of whom works for the reputation 
and welfare of the school and the class. In fact, no one 
could be found who would willingly assume the responsi- 
bility of representinti' so brilliant a class. 

In most, or all of the college organizations we have 
members of whom we are justly proud. Many honors 
have indeed come our way. 

We have a basket ball team and a base ball team, 
both of which have never been beaten in any inter-class 
games. Besides this, we have representatives on the foot- 



65 



ball eleven and the base-ball nine. Nor can it be said that 
our class is Lacking in musical talent. Many of its mem- 
bers are found in both the Glee and Mandolin Clubs. 
There are only a few of the positions filled by Sopho- 
■ftlonticola mores > ;111< ^ ;l complete list would be almost impossible. 
'08. Our class is truly imbued with the college spirit. 11 

always stands ready to help and to enlist others in the 
greal work of education. 



We challenge any class of W. V. I*. to a comparison 
of the work done. In fact, we believe, that each member 
is a hard working student, who has high aims and ideas, 
and who is earnestly seeking to prepare himself for his 
chosen life work. 

We are indeed proud of the work done in the past 
and hope in the future to maintain the reputation already 
earned. 

Historian. 




ee 



SAY HELLO/ BABY! 

SCENE— The Hall of Science TIME -Registration Day, Fall Term 1 906 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Class of 1909 



SOLOMON 

PREXYNAE ^ ., , 

JACQUELIN D'sputmg Mothers 

SOLDERS Committee on Classification and Grades 

W. V. U.s Youngest 

SOLOMAN Holding up a squalling, wrig- 
ling infant To which of you two women does 
this babe belong? 

PREXYNA and JACQUELINE Tis mine' 'tis 
mine! 

SOLOMON Since belongs to both of you, 
each shall have half. Soldiers, bring your in- 
struments Motioning to the Committee on 
Classification and Grades. 

JACQUELINE Moaning and tearing her hair 
in frenzy Stop! stop! 'Twill ha ve a hard enough 
time if left whole. Give to her! Prex. is silent 

SOLOMON You, Jacq., the babe belongs to 

you, but I will Give to Prex. to console her for 

her Loss of her eldest last spring. I will be 

Godfather and train up in the way should 

go. Prexyna. I give you this poor, tortured, little infant for training, guidance and instruction has 
been kicked cuffed and abused by this woman Jacqueline until has lost all semblance of intelligence 
Now dear little ' ootsie, wootsie," remember that your Uncle Solomon has taken pity on you, and de- 
Uvered you from the clutches of this horriblT woman, because he thought that he discovered in your 
foolish cranium an mfinitesminal germ of intelligence which, possibly, by constant association with 
wisdom may grow and develop more fully. But as this is a long and tedious process, I will have to 
^v j ronc'^'ir^c ° rS T d " Pre P s " to overlook your childish prattle and habits due to VERDAN- 
CY and r-RhSHNESS. (Turning now to the students gathered around) You must not be aston- 
ished to see toddling around the campus in swadling clothes clutching a huge 



MILK BOTTLE 



in one hand and a teeth ii 
goric and soothing syrup 

ing ol the symbol of i 



. the puerile prattling . 
ice is also not respi 



1 the insistent odors of pare- 
iifole (or the inartistic scrawl- 



around in public places 1 will emlcai 

decorations which 



OnSTB-ZESK.O 



•sample, to tram . artistic sense so thai will be able to produce 



;",",;' t,,„ „■':, ;,,:;;,; ,'"' r;,, rv " im i,elra s k^ $***»* * <"<■ campus, i w,n a isoiurn, S h »™7»,nt 

tS^ , .™ i SP™??S5.5 < ?™e?iV n I ',. now "?* . Now. while I ove the little darling like a cat loves its mouse. sKould 



become unruly or vicious I shall nol l.ul In I,. 



rlmg like a cat loves us mouse, should 
■•I the warning ol inv old maxim. "Spare the rod and spoil the child." 



Otherwise Known as the class of 1909, will 
Pay all due Respect to their Superiors, the 
class of 



1910 



After having been rushed off the face of the earth by the wonderful Freshman class they 
still have the brass, nerve and gall to say that they are the only, only. WE, the class of 
1910, do not question their place in the University with regards to age, as they have been here 
for the past twenty years bearing the distinction of Preps. 

S0PHM0RES 

is one of the words in the reform spelling book which under the present spelling, means bigot, swelled head 
sissy, pusillanimous, foolish unsophisticate and would be 

Back to the farm and the coal mines with this bunch of monstrosities which would deceive the educated 
public with their claims to greatness and education Hot air is vented by them at every opportunity saying 
what they would do and are about to do to the greatest ever I'JlO These spontaneous explosions are the re- 
sult of pent up would-do. and cannot be checked until the gas is allowed to escape of its own accord 

To show thesissifiedness of this monstrosity which the University holds oul to rhe world as a class and 
labels it 1909 to identify and separate it from respectable people IT had to secure the services ol a girl in the 
writing of a socalled proc" which has recently been posted 

When a Soph more meets a Freshman he should not take off his hat as several have offered to do. but let 
him remember only the catastrophy of the rush night and betake himself to the tall ami uncut 

It is understood that the authorities have ordered several barrels of whitewash to eradicate a certain 

YELLOW STREAK 

which has appeared upon the spinal colum of this freak wearing the brass tag with 1909 marked upon it 



itlonticola 

'0$. 



TB2XK25&S2SS. 




^^^WV^^WvmW HIMWM^^WI 



1 



" S?oung people tljmfe olb people arr fools, 
l'«nt olb people Uiiom voting people are fools.' 



Officers; 

President L. \V. Ryan 

Vice-President John T. Morgan 

Secretary Claude Grimm 

Treasurer IT. L. -Ionics 

Historian B. M. Smite 



Colors 
( )range and Black 

fell 

Chee Hee! 

Chee Haw! 

Chee Haw! Haw!! Haw!!! 

Freshmen ! ! ! 




ifflonticola 

'08. 



Jfresrtjmen 



iflonticola 

'08. 



Allen. II. M., ^ X. 

Allender, .). <!. 

Atkeson, Mary M., A 2 A. 

Atkeson, Leda ('.. A 'S A. 

Hates. K. I.. 

Berry, C. S., * K *. 

Billingsley, -lav Edgar. 

Bond, M. ().. 2 X. 

Blown. <;. \Y., B e II. 

Billiard. A. II.. 2 X. 

Burns. C. S., 2 X. 

Burnsiile. Morris C. 

Burrell, H. K. 

Campbell, II. L., B G n. 

Compton, E. Pearl. 

Crewson, (>. <!. 

Cunningham, Otto. 

Dean. E. ('. 

DeVaney, W. B., i: B E. 

Dickinson, .Marie Louise, X <>. 

Dille. .1. E., K A. 

Donley, W. (i. 
Fck.nian. .1. R. 
Emsley, .1. S. 
Estill, D. II.. K A. 
Evans, .1. C. 
Fitzwater, John I!. 
Foreman, Nyna. 
Gotshall, J. II.. B II. 
Grayson, John L., B o II. 
Grimm, B. F. 
iiaii. w. f:. 

Harris. T. I... B 6 II. 
Hodges, E. Pearl. 
Hoskins, II. A. 
Howard, .1. K. 
Jones, II. I... B o II. 



.Jones. Anna. K K 1'. 
Kahn, D. II. 
Kisar. A. F. 
Knoke. F. L., * K 2. 
Koelz, F. It.. * K M'. 
Lang, F. R. 
Lashley, K. S. 
Lewellyn, Edna M. 
Loving, A. ('.. B H II. 
McCombs, F. P. 
McCutpheon, R. P. 
Mollison, J. L., ATA. 
Moon. Charles. 
Morgan, T. T., * 2 K. 
Morris. L. H.. * K *. 
Oldham. E. ('.. K A. 
Patterson. T. S„ ^ X. 
Peebles, Margaret L. 
Pracht, Myra A. 
Price. F. Pearl. 
Proctor. \V. A. 
Purinton, K. I!. 
Reiner, P. P. '1'. •]• K 2. 
Ryan, L. \\\. 2 N. 
Smith. ('. .). 
Smith. P.. M. II K A. 
Steele, F. \V. 
Stemple, F. W.. <I> K *. 
Torrance. A. A. 
Vance, Helen B., X n. 
Vance, Joseph ('. 
Vance, Finnic ('.. K K 
Wells. W. F. 
Wiley, \V. R. 
Wolfe. Noble A. 
Yarger, Bertha P>. 



70 




& 



Jfresfymen Htsitorp 




jfflonticola 

'08. 



In the fall of 1906 there came to the West Virginia 
University a class of mighty men. These men, when they 
looked upon themselves, said, "Woe unto those who are 
against us." When the Sophomores saw these Freshmen, 
they trembled and were filled with great terror. Well 
might they tremble, for at the hands of these men they 
were to suffer many and grievous defeats. Soon there 
appeared on the bulletin boards, notices concerning a 
Freshman class meeting on a certain evening at six-thirty. 
On that evening the earth shook with the weight of opposing 
armies. The Freshies came together on the campus, elected 
their leader, and prepared to meet the Sophs. Soon there 
were shouts from the direction of Commencement Hall, 
and the enemy appeared. Immediately the two sides lined 
np opposite each other and the bloody battle was on. 
Thrice did they meet in dreadful combat, and at the end 
the Freshies were announced the victors. Then with shouts 



they marched down to the theatre and witnessed scenes on 
the stage. 

Soon after this victory for the Freshmen, the annual 
class field meet took' place. Of course the Freshies were 
there. They entered their men in the several events, with 
the result that they carried off the honors of the day. The 
Sophs, were beaten again. With crestfallen looks they 
took their way homeward to tell how the Freshies had 
whipped them. They were sad. indeed, and wondered why 
such a glorious class as that of 1!H0 had ever entered 
school while they were Sophs. So others too have wondered, 
then shaken their heads and given up the problem, ('>r 
none can understand how a whole class can be so invincible 
as is the Freshman. 

Soon the next battle between the Freshies and Sophs 
was to occur, and both sides prepared for the conflict. At 
last the fateful day came, and the classes met on the grid- 



iron. The poor Sophs, foughl hard to win but it was impos- 
sible. They were lined' up against invincible*. When the 
Varsity coach witnessed the Freshmen's grand plays, he 
was filled with delight, and drew on the Freshmen resources 
-ftfonticola ''"' ^' ;l,-s it. v men. 'Twas the same old story. The Sophs. 
'08. were badly worsted, and. down-hearted, they left the held 
with "curses nol loud but deep. " 

Still another time were the Sophs, to meet their Water- 
loo at the hands of the Freshies. The foot-ball season 
being over, the Sophs, began to crow about how they would 
"'wipe up the earth" al bnsloet-ball. They thought they 

had a fine learn, ind 1. and their hearts were filled with 

dreams of revenge. They comforted themselves with the 
idea that now at lasl they would whip (lie Freshies. But 
alas! the besl rounded hopes may totter and fall, and so 
it was with the Sophomores. They met the Freshmen, and 
as usual were defeated. Then the air was filled with 



"weeping and wailing, and gnashing of teeth." The 
Sophs, then fully realized that t 'was impossible to overcome 
the Freshies at any point whatever. The Freshmen have 
proved victorious in all forms of athletics, and the present 
Sophomore class will finish its course with vain regrets 
that it was ever destined to contend with such a class as 
that of 1!H0. 

Not only are the Freshmen great on the athletic Held, 
hut also in the class room. They are recognized by the 
professors as being id' a higher order id' material than 
others. Thus there arc no "flunks" in the class, and no 
need to address petitions or prayers for mercy to any 
auster council or committee. 

In the time to come the Freshmen will keep up their 
record. There is surely a bright star which shall guide 
their future career. 

Historian. 




72 




jHonttcola 

'08. 



(Officers! 

President W. IX Hereford 

Vice-President C. A. Sutton 

Secretary D. C. Smith 

Treasurer George Somervilee 

Historian Thomas Ramage 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



H>tntor Hato 



Uderson, K. X. 
Vrmstrong. I'. <!. 
'abb, Haven ('. 
'aikcr. Selby A. 
'ntten. Henry ('. 
faushkee, I). \V. 
leneke, George ('. 
iiiLNiiiHin. II. M. 
Hair, II. ('. 
'land. V. M. 
ampbell, -I. K. 

air. LOUIS A. 

'ooper, V. F. 

lavis. VV. O. 

towns, II. A. 
•■imll.'x-. A. r. 
list, -I. A. 
Ilenn, -\. M. 
[all. 0. I,. 
[ami I ton, .1. C. 
tamriek, -I. -I. 
[ereford, VV. I). 
[olmes, II. II. 
Ititi.lt . II. A. 
hit cliinsmi. .1. Q. 



Kenna, J. E. 
Lewis, (). C. 
Martin. P. II. 
McDowell, J. (). 
Meader, B. B. 
Morrison, W. F. 
Musgrave, l>. ('. 
Pendleton. D. M. 
Price, (i. VV. 
Quick, It. M. 

Haniauc 'Hi as 

Robbins, A. ('. 
Rohr, Cecil R. 
Feay, Samuel 
Sheppard, -I. I!. 
Simmons, VV. II. 
Smith. DaCosta 
Somerville, (J. (■. 
Slathers. I!. S. 
Strosnider; Homei 
Sutton, ('. A. 
Thomas. -I. I). 
Ward, C. M. 
Whalev, I!. M. 



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jflontteola 

'08. 



75 



&X$s 



itlonttcola 

'08. 




VTfVy 




^ 



<U: 



( fentlemen of the Jury : 

We appeal to yon. the world, sitting as ;i jury, In 

decide whether we. the Senior Law class of the West Vir- 
ginia University, have done our duty as it was presented 
tn us. We are going nut into the world in do battles with 
mankind in the hope thai success will he ours. Some will 
attain wealth, fame and glory, others will Fall by the way- 
side unknown, unsung. If any one of our classmates Iocs 
not attain the height for winch he will struggle, lie can 
look hack to the days when he was a member of the greatest 
class ever turned out in the University, thai of 1907, and 
there find eomforl for his unsatisfied longings. 

It was within the luvast id' this, our class, that the 
Honor system was horn. Il was this, our class, that nursed 
if into ;i toddling infant and then carefully trained it 
into a strong rohust giant. Forever this will stand as a 
mark of distinction. Neither storms, the erosion of time 




nor warfare will destroy it. for it has been tilled to over- 
flowing with the elixir of life and bathed in the fountain 
of youth. Why do the other classes in the University 
disdain to pass tins same system .' The answer is simple, 
gentlemen, jealousy. 

We have been accused of rowdyism and creating dis- 
turbances maliciously hut the charges are unfounded. It 
is true we are noisy at times hut only in the animal side 
of that greal love which we bear to our University showing 
itself. It is that desire to conquer and do good breaking 
forth. This is the spirit which wins. Combine the desire 
to conquer with the good angel of love and they produce a 
fortification which is unassailable. 

No matter what we he, statesmen, lawmakers or lead- 
ers, let us not forget the varsity days of the greatest class 
that the University has produced, the Law class of 1907. 



ittonttcola 

'08. 







\=z> 



iflonticola 

'08. 




President S. G. Littlepage 

Vice-Presidt nt Charles E. Hogg, Jr. 

Historian Wm. Maxwell 

Cheer Leader W. 0. Davis 



Koll 



\ Mi -.ni, F. X. 
Brightwell, W. I). 
( hilton, s. .\r. 
Downs, IT. R. 
Dyler, L I.. 
Estep, ('. E. 
Edgar, A. I'. 
Gillboly, 'I'. .1. 
Roggess, W. F. 
Goldbarth, I. S. 
Ihill. Pearcj 
Kanna, ('. M. 
Ilaniisli, I). J|. 



(). 



[enson, J. 
fuey, II. B. 
lull'. Boyd 
[unter, Glenn 
lames. II. .1. 
lenkins, .1. ('. 
Fenkins, A. (i. 
-akin. I\ L. 
-a ni/.. I'. I?. 
.ewellvn. ( '. L. 
Marcum, I'. II. 
Marple, A. E. 
Maxwell, J. W. 



Mediums. ]!. K. 
Mclntyre, Mont 
Morris, .1. I!. \V. 
Xutall. John 
Nash. -I. II. 

Rupert, <:. W. 
Senter, II. G. 
Smith, .1. II. 
Snider. E. G. 

Sternberg, ('. II. 
Throckmorton, .1. I 1 ' 
Vandervort, II. S. 
Yost, E. \. 




fflonticola 

'08. 



79 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




& 



Junior Hato Jltsitorp 




since it has been the custom of preceeding classes to 
leave some slight traces of having passed through this vale 
of tears, it becomes my pleasant duty to state that we too 
have been, and are, diligenl "Disciples of Blackstone." At 
the very outset, the Class of 1907-08 held one of the closest 
elections known to \Y. V. l\, which resulted in the election 
of S. ('. Littlepage as President. He has faithfully per- 
formed his many duties and shown himself a promising 
star of the W. Va. Bar. It is through his leadership and 
the hearty co-operation of the whole class that it stands 
today without a peer. 

Though few in numbers we are well represented in 
every departmenl of Athletics. "Three cheers for Mac- 
Intire and Gillooley" was a common cry on the foot-ball 
field last Kail. Rupert's name has been in the mouths of 
the fans all Spring and his work on the basediall team has 
heen a credit (o the ('hiss. Nor can it he said lliat we are 



weak mentally. Already the features of our orators. Dayton, 
Jackson, and Huff, may be seen in the leading newspapers. 
Since we expect their names to become known to the world 
it is unnecessary to speak of their part in the [nter-Collegi- 
ate debate when their opponents were driven before them 
like mist before a sea-born gale. 

The sound morals and strong personality of our worthy 
I lean and his associates have deeply impressed each member 
of the Junior Law Class and never have they been known 
to make recitations in the Pre]), department hidious by 
unearthly yells as they pass that much-needed department. 

Each member <d' the class is a perfect gentleman and 
always meets his fellow class mates with a broad smile and 
at the same time reserves a much broader one for some 
heart-winning Co-Kd. Thus it may be justly said that in 
the hearts of a Junior Daw are found two of the most 
desirable qualities of manhood. Love and Sympathy. 

Historian. 



mi 




jflonttcola 

'08. 



iWonttcola 

'08. 



g>opf)omore Mth Cla&S 

(UNORGANIZED) 

C. A. Bowers Wheeling. 

J. G. Callison Huntington 

A. C. Knight, .Alt. Clare. 

II. G. Jordan Morgantown. 

G. M. Shough. Hundred. 

A. E. Smith. Morgantown. 

II. H. Smith Butler, Pa. 

A. C. Weaver Morgantown: 



Jf reaftmen jHeti Clas& 

(Officers; 

President IIknry Becker 

Vice-President W. B. Hunter 

Secretary K. II. Sisler 

Treasurer Walter Point 

Historian Claude Gautieb 

Yell Master Claude Grimm 

&oU 

T. II. Becker Bluefield. 

( ). s. Campbell Philippi. 

( '. \'. Gautier Huntington. 

C. E. Grimm St. Marys. 

W. I.. Hutchinson Flat woods. 

Glen I [arper Elkins. 

W. B, Hunter Citie. 

W. W. Point. Jr Huntington. 

( '. F. Sayre New Haven, 

K. II. Sisler Morgantown. 

I. \V. Taylor Morgantown. 

Giugessi Georgessi Morgantown. 



82 




Jfflonttcola 

'08. 



83 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




& 



Jfresfymm ffltb Jltetorp 




In writing a history of this class, it must be borne in 
mind thai space forbids us writing all that can be written 
on the subject. While not Large in numbers, the class 
makes up in quality what it lacks in quantity. Some point 
out the fact that we are for the 'eagle eyes' of Drs. Grant, 
MaeNeal, and Simpson, and should cause the rest of lis to 
feel proud of being among the number that today make 
up the Freshmen Medics. 

We arc especially proud of our noble class officers 
who have always done their duty and who were never 
absent when needed. Henry Becker, our President, has 
been our representative in the (dee Club and his record 
speaks for itself. Tall and handsome, Henry has special 
favors at Woman's Hall. Our Vice-President is a "Byrd" 
Hunter and he usually gets the birds, though 'tis said that 
he once had to go to Fairmont to find one. Although our 
Secretary is 'Sis.' he has a weakness for young ladies. 
Anyone passing through Sunny Side about 11:30 P. M. 
on certain nights in the week, will hear the noise of a 
score of alarm clocks reminding Sisler that it is time to 
leave. 'Pigey' Point has had a very heavy burden upon 
his shoulders, but everyone believes that 'Pigev's' shoulders 
are broad enough to cany all the cash of the Freshmen 
Meds. Grimm, our xi>vy competent Yell Master is not at 



all grim although he probably felt that way when he was 
put off the train on a certain occasion. 

In addition to the brilliant set of officers we have 
several men who distinguished themselves along the line 
of research work. Prominent among these is our handsome 
Glenn Harper who has spent many sleepless nights trying 
to find out how food went down the spinal chord. 'Pap' 
Taylor tried to demonstrate how to grow a mustache, and. 
he was kind enough to carry, in his vest pocket, a magni- 
fying glass so we could all see. Doc. Sayre proved to the 
entire satisfaction of Dr. Simpson, the difference between 
a. Malay and a Man. Every class has its digger and to 
C. \j. Hutchinson belongs the honor of being ours. Sylvester 
had a. bunch of 'Keys' but he lost it. His sadness for 
the past six months is thus explained. Campbell is our 
musician (he belongs to the band) and the sad wails 
of his music ( .' I can be heard as far as the 'Hick' house. 

We wish to express our gratitude to Drs. Simpson and 
Grant for their untiring efforts in our behalf. We are 
especially indebted to Dr. MaeNeal who has labored for 
us in the face of difficulties that weaker men dare not 
face. The Fresh men Meds. are here for business and we 
trust that W. V . F. may never be ashamed to own us in 
the days to come. 

Historian. 




jflonttcola 

'08. 



85 



iflonticola 

'08. 




iWonttcola 

'08. 



p)i Kappa $s'i 



Founded at Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, 18;V2. 



Colors 

Pink and Lavender. 



Jflotoer 

Sweet Pea. 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



W&txt Virginia gUpfca Chapter 



ESTABLISHED MAY 23, IS'.io. 



Rev. A. NT. Buchanan, 
(i. P. Grimsley 
A. F. Dickey 
6. B. Miller 



Fraters in Urbe. 



Rev. F. M. Compton 
('. .V. Ridgeway 
C I). Willey ' 
.1. K. Buchanan 



Fleming N. Alderson 
John K. Kenna 



Charles A. Bowers 
Winter R. Frantz 
Thomas J. Gillooly 



Curtis S. Berry 



Robert M. Gawthrop 
William G. Hamilton 
Charles O. Hood 



Fraters in Universitate. 
1907. 

1908. 



1909. 
Herman C. Koelz 
1910. 



Wilfred A. Morris 
Charles K. Wavman 



Q I/. Llewellyn 
Harbour Mitchell 
William M. Kennedy 



Leroy II. Morris 



Frederick H. Koel/. 
Forrest W. Stemple 



ss 




Jllonticola 

'08. 



Jfflonttcola 

'08. 



&oll of &cttbe Chapter* 



Washington-Jefferson College 

Bueknell University 

Dickinson College 

Lafayette College 

Swarthmore College 

Amherst College 

Cornell University 

( olumbia University 

Johns Hopkins University 

University of Virginia 

West. Virginia University 

Vanderbilt University 

Ohio Weslevan University 

Ohio State University 

University of Indiana 

University of Illinois 

Northwest eni I 'ni versit y 

University of Wisconsin 

University of Minnesota 

University of Kansas 

I. eland Standford, Jr., University 



Allegheny College 

Gettysburg College 

Franklin and Marshall College 

University of Pennsylvania 

Dartmouth College 

Brown University 

Syracuse University 

Colgate University 

Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 

Washington and Lee University 

I ni\ : lsit \ of Mississippi 

University of Texas 
Wittenburg University 
DoPauw University 
Purdue University 
University of Chicago 
University of Michigan 
Peloif College 
University of Iowa 
University of Nebraska 
University of California 



oo 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



33f)i ££>tgma &appa 



Fraternity Pounded, 1873. 



Colors 
Silver and Magenta. 



91 



H&tlta Cfcapter 

itlonttCOla ESTABLISHED FEBRURAY 24. 1891. 

'08. 

Fraters in Urbe. 

Walter H. South William Winfred Smith 

Arthur I. op Boyers Edgar Stewart 

Terrence David Stewart James Carroll Frazer 

Theophilus Sutton Boyd William .Mount Sivpy 

Clyde Alexander Prescott ('. White 

David Campbell Garrison Robert W. Fisher (Eta.) 
David Ohadwick Reay 



Fraters in Faculate. 



•lames Henry Stewart Clement Ross Jones 

Russell Love Mollis Dennis Martin Willis 

Frank liaison Kunst John B. Gmmbein 



Fraters in Universitate. 



1907. 
Howard M. Ernst Thomas Leahy 

A. 1. Findley DaCosta Smith 

Dennis M. Willis 

igo8. 

John 1!. Grurnbein George Row 

Benjamin F. McGinnis 

1909. 

Rex Milliken I!. Walter King 

C. ('. Sheppard John W. Welch 

1910. 

W. Glenn Harper John T. Morgan 

William B. Hunter Earl Rearey 

Grover 0. Lemley Fred E. Vandale 



Jfflonticola 

'08. 







iflonticola 

'08. 



&oll of &cttoe Chapter* 



Massachussetts Agri. College 
Cornell University 
Yale University 
University of Maryland 
Penn State College 

Washington University 



< leorge 
Lehigh University 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Qreen's College 
Dartmouth College 
Williams College 



Tech. 



Brown University 

Swart hmore ( College 

Union University 

West Virginia University 

College of the City of New York 

Stephens Institute of Technology 

( olombia I University 

St. Lawrence University 

Franklin and Marshall College 

St. John's College 

University of Virginia 



Cluli 



New York 
Boston cluh 
Albany Club 
Southern Club 



Alumni Clubs 



Morgantown Club 
Philadelphia Cluh 
Connecticut Club 
Pittsburg Club 



in 



jWonttcola 

'08. 



$()t llappa g>igma 



Fraternity Founded, 1850. 



Colors 
Old Gold and Blue. 



95 



ittonticola 

'08. 



iptji 2£appa ^>tama Jfratermtp 



David Hott 
Harry Zevely 
TIipo' J. Arthur 
Lewis Dunn Beall 



Fraters in Urbe. 



Chas. W. Held 

Edw. G. Donlev 

Sain'l. G. Chadwick, Jr. 



Fraters in Universitate. 



Samuel 1!. Seay 
Frank M. Boyles 
Chas. J. Hogg 



Thomas B. Foulk 
Finney L. Lakin 
Glenn Hunter 



I'liinney 1*. Reiner 
Frank L. Knoke 
George M. Shough 



1907. 



1908. 



1909. 



Howard M. Bingamon 
George G. Somerville 
George C. Beneke 



Edgar A. Thomas 
Robert H. Kincaid 



George II. Cummins 
Daniel Henry Barr 



flfl 




Jfflonticola 

'08. 



97 



ifflonttcola 

'08. 



&oU of gcttoe Chapters 



University of Pennsylvania Alpha 

Washington and Jefferson College Dellta 

Dickinson College Epsilon 

Franklin and Marshal] College Zeta 

University of Virginia Eta 

Columbia University Tota 

Tulane University Mu 

University of Illinois Rho 

Randolph Macon College Tan 

Northwestern University Upsilon 

Richmond College Phi 

Pennsylvania State College Psi 

Washington & Lee University Alpha Alpha 

University of West Virginia Alpha Gamma 

University of Maine Alpha Delta 

Armour Institute of Technology Alpha Epsilon 

University of Maryland Alpha Zct 

University of Wisconsin Alpha Theta 

Vanderbil't University Alpha Tota 

University of Wisconsin Alpha Kappa 

University of California Alpha Lambda 

Massachussctts Institute of Technology Alpha ^Iu 

Georgia School of Technology Alpha Nu 

Purdue University Alpha Chi 

University of Michigan Alpha Omicron 

University of Chicago Alpha Pi 



98 



Eappa &lpf)a 

(SOUTHERN) 

Fraternity Founded Washington and Lee, 1865. 



Color* 

Crimson and Gold. 



Jttonttcola 

'08. 



99 



jttonttcola gUpfja l^fjo Chapter 

'08. 

ESTABLISHED MARCH 10, 1897. 



Fraters in Urbe. 



Thus. Ray Dille Altlm Warman 

■ lames Rogers Moreland Lindsay Haymond Petticord 

Hell Roy Richards Win. Jefferson Snee 

K. B. Quick LeRoy Taylor 



Fraters in Faculate. 
Tims. K. Hodges Robt: Aldcn Armstrong 



Fraters in Universitate. 



1907. 

Win. Garnet! Bayliss Francis C. Coleord 

I-:<1\\ m i<1 ('. Coleord Marshal] W. Rus-1 

1908. 

.lames W'. Nash Stephen ( '. Littlepage 

1909. 

Frederic L. Boydston John I'. Moriarity 

Davis II. Estill' Cyrus R. VanBibher 

19 10. 

Henry W'. Davis Samuel V. Ilaworlh 

• lames Dille Edward ( '. Oldham 

.lames K. Ilaworlh Walter VV. Point, Jr. 



10(1 




Jflonticola 

'08. 



101 



ittonticola 

'08. 



IRoll of gcttbe Chapters! 



Washington and Lee 

University of Georgia 

Wofford College 

Emory College 

Elandolph .Macon College 

Richmond College 

Kentucky State College 

Mercer University 

University of Virginia 

Alabama Poly. Institute 

Southwestern University 

University of 'Texas 

University of Tennessee 

Davidson ( iollege 

University of North Carolina 

Soul hern I "ni\ ersit y 

Vanderbill I fniversity 

Tulane University 

Central University of Kentucky 

University of the South 

University of Alabama 

Win. Jewell College 

Win. & Mary College 

Kent ucky I 'ni versify 



University of Missouri 
John Hopkins University 
Millsape College 

George Washington University 
University of California 
University of Arkansas 
Lei and Standford, Jr. 
University of West Virginia 
Georgia School of Tect. 
Hampden Sidney College 
l m\ i rsit \ of Mississippi 
Trinity College 

Kentucky Wesleyan University 
X. C. A. & M. College 
Missouri School of Mines 
Bethany College 
College of Chariest on 
Georgetown College 
Delaware College 
University of Florida 
Louisiana State University 
s. w. Presbyterian University 
Westminister University 
Washington University 



102 



jftlonttcola 

'08. 



Belta Cau Belta 



Fraternity Founded, 1859. 



Colors 

Purple, White and Gold. 



Jflotoer 
The Pansv 



103 



#amma Belta Chapter 

itlOllttCOla ESTABLISHED MAY 24. 1900. 
'08. 

Fraters in Urbe. 

George ('. Sturgiss (Delta Prime) Frank P. Oorbin, "01 

Joseph Mooreland (Camilla) Willey Scott Jones, '02 

■ lames L. Callard (Kappa) Ross C. Shriver, '01 

Rev. -I. ('. Ely, D. I). (Gamma) lames D. Gronnfnger, *<>(> 

Willey Scott Jones, '02 



Fraters in Faculate. 
Simeon ( . Smith (Beta Mu) William M. Baumgartner, 'Oa 



Fraters in Universitate. 
1907. 

Gohen ('. Arnold II. .ward M. Quick 

Arthur s. Dayton Chesney M. Ramage 

Camden I'a^e Fortney Robert P. Strickler 

1908. 

Edward S. Bock Walter Gav Lough 



Jrooks S. Hutchinson 



1909. 



Vincent V. Baumgartner Everett (\ Smith 

John !•'. Findlayson lluliort E. Snyder 

Walter R. Reitz 

1 910. 
John L. Mollisou Robert D. Peebles 



104 




iflonttcola 

'08. 



105 



^™g CoIa *oll of Sctibe Chapter* 



Southern Division. 

Vanderbilt University University of Virginia 

Washington & Lee University George Washington University 

University of the South University of Texas 

Tulane University University of .Mississippi 
Emory College 

Western Division. 

University of [owa University of Wisconsin 

University of Minnesota University of Colorado 

Northwestern University Leland Standford, Jr. University 

University of California University of Illinois 

University of Nebraska University of Chicago 

Armour Institute of Technology Baker University 

Northern Division. 

Ohio University University of Michigan 

Albion College fvenyon College 

Indiana Universitj DeParrw University 

Adelberl College ' Hillsdale College 

Chib Wesleyan University University of Indianapolis 

Ohio State University West Virginia University 

Wabash College Purdue University 

Eastern Division. 

Allegheny College Rennselaer Institute 

Stevens Institute of Technology Lehigh University 

University of Pennsylvania Tufts College 

Massachusetts Institute of Tech- Brown Universitj 

nology Columbia Universitj 

Cornell University Wesleyan University 

Dartmouth College Washington & Jefferson College 



106 



H>tgma $f)t €ptftlon 

Fraternity Founded at Richmond College, 1901. 

Colors 

Purple and Red. 



Jflotoers 

Red! Rose and Violet. 



Jflonttcola 

'08. 



107 



iflonticola 

'08. 



<§amma pJeta Chapter 

ESTABLISHED FEBRUARY 22, 10(14. 



Fraters in Universitate. 

1907. 

( harles Alexander John T. West 

\V. Howard Robinson .lames K. Wilson 

1908. 

Clyde M. Bennett -lames ][. Jenkins 

George B. Folk Montford Mclntire 

Clarence E. Tracy 

1909. 

Alexander I). Bell Guy 1!. Hartley 

Thomas 1). Gorby Clayton C. Holland 

1 910. 
John B. W'vall 



108 




iHonticola 

'08. 



109 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



&oll of Settee Chapter* 

Richmond College University of Pennsylvania 

Roanoke College North Carolina A. & M. College 

University of Illinois West Virginia University 

Jefferson .Medical College Ohio Northern University 

W'cstein University of Pennsylvania Wittenberg College 

University of Colorado Syracuse University 

William and Mary College Washington & Jefferson 



gugma j£u 



Fraternity Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1869. 



Colors; 

Black. White and Gold. 



Jflotoer 
The White Rose. 



Jtlonttcola 

'08. 



in 



fHonticola (gamma $t Chapter 

'08. 

ESTABLISHED FEBRUARY 24, L904. 



Fraters in Urbe. 

William E. Albig Robert Rodman Green 

Fraters in Universitate. 
1907. 

Arthur Kenl Brake John Quinc.V Hutchinson 

Franklin Marion Brand Joseph Applegate Gisl 

Walter Donaldson Hereford Aha Dayne Kenamond 

Warren Hampton Hodges Waller Miller Parker 

1908. 

Ernes! Arden Bruce James Henry Smith 

Arthur Maple Lucas John Franklin Throckmorton 

1909. 

Carroll Elbridge Cummins Thomas Schaffer Patterson 

John Calvin Ely, Jr. Hal leek McGinnis Scot! 

Harry Christopher Humphreys Herbert Watts Saunders 

Paul Reed Morrow William Hoodson Trent 

1910. 

Marcus Oran Bond Archabald Hupp Bullard 

Thomas Henry Becker Lonnie Watterson Ryan 
Hugh Miller Allen 




iflonticola 

'08. 



113 



fflonttcola 

'08. &oll of gkttue Chapter* 



Lehigh University University of Illinois 

University of Pennsylvania University of Michigan 

University of Vermont University of Chicago 

Stevens Institute of Technology Lombard University 

LaFayette College University of Iowa 

Cornell University Iowa State College 

Syracuse University Kansas State University 

Vanderbilt University Missouri state University 

Kentucky State College William Jewell College 

University of Georgia Missouri School of Mines and 

University of Alabama Metallurgy 

1 Inward College Washington University 

North Georgia Agricultural College University of Minnesota 

Mercer University University of Arkansas 

Emory College University of Texas 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute Loui'sana state University 

Georgia School of Technology Tulane University 

Bethany College Colorado School of Mines 

DePauw University University of Colorado 

Ohio State University University of Washington 

Purdue University University of Oregon 

University of Indiana University of Montana 

West Virginia University Lei and Standford, Jr. University 

Case School of Applied Science University of California 

Mount Union College Washington and Lee University 

Rose Polytechnic Institute University of North Carolina 

Albion College North Carolina A. & M. College 

Northwestern University Univeristy of Virginia 

University of Wisconsin 



114 



$i &appa &lpfja 



Fraternity Founded at University of Virginia, in 1868. 



Colors 

Garnet and Old Gold. 



Jflotoer 

Lily of Valley. 



Jtlonttcola 

'08. 



115 



ittonttcola 

'OS. 3Upfja ftfieta Chapter 



ESTABLISHED l'.KM. 



Fraters in Faculate. 
Walter L. Fleming 



Fraters in Urbe. 

Alex Hardie Foreman Phillipp Henry Man-inn 

Michael Josepli Malampliy Joseph Henry Mills 



Fraters in Universitate. 



1907. 
Louis Arnold Can- Robert McVeigh Diane 

1908. 

Curtis Miller llainia Claude Harrison Layman 

Arthur < lyde Knighl Lawrence Cook Yeardley 

1909. 

Pierce Byron Lantz Boyd Milford Smitli 

1910. 

I; >s Downey Boyles Eugene Ramp English 

Ivan Stannard Davis Harvev Lake Na\ 



110 




iflonttcola 

'08. 



iflonttcola 



&oll of &ctibe Chapter* 

University of Virginia . .Alpa 

Davidson College Beta 

William and Mary College Gamma 

Southern University ..Delta 

University of Tennessee .Zeta 

08. Tulane University . Eta * 

Southwestern Presbyterian University . Theta 

Hampden- Sidney .Iota 

Kentucky University .Kappa 

Presbyterian College Mu 

Wbfford College y u 

Richmond College .Omieron 

Washington and Lee University . l'i 

Cumberland University .Rbo 

Vanderbilt University .Sigma 

University of North Carolina ..Tan 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute Upsilon 

Roanoke College l>l,i 

University of the South ..Chi 

Georgia Agricultural ( lollege Psi 

Ketnucky State College ..Omega 

Trinity College y pna Alpha 

Centenary College Alpha Beta 

Louisana State University Alpha Gamma 

Georgia School of Technology Alpha Delta 

North Carolina A. & M. College ...Alpha Epsikm 

University of Arkansas Upha Zeta 

University of Florida Alpha Eta 

West Virginia University Upha Theta 

Millsaps College \]p|,a Iota 

Missouri School of Mines Upha Kappa 

Georgetown College Alpha Lambda 

SUumnt Chapters 

Richmond, Va Uumnus Alpha 

Memphis, Tenn Alumnus Beta 

White Sulphur Springs W, Va Uumnus Gamma 

Charleston, s. c Uumnus Delta 

Norfolk, Va Uumnus Epsilon 

Dillon, s. C Uumnus Zeta 

New Orleans, La Uumnus Eta 

Dallas', Texas Uumnus Theta 

Knowillc. Tenn Uumnus lota 

Charlottesville, Va Uumnus Kappa 

Opelika, Ala Uumnus Lambda 



UK 




'&} 




-^ 



•m 



p 

*«r /. it 



;4 



^»^iiiiiirtiiiiriippi,i|iij 






Txmm 









I? 



rail 




u 












-ALL Tfje. L^| C}] f^E Turk's 
' 8/ WIRE..DIIMC | F'y "V\ 

tt wl e '( ln, i i iiiVE ' 1 v 




tffii //,. ■ I N\JL 



Mn 



UhlT 11 - L-^OLR^ 

5ecui^e.d, 

cHf\P£L Will Be., 1 
DlSCQpi- phlu^p l 

BfOy>i% Of jljt PRtllDE^ 




A?m jvggejtioa/, wnicn,iF FOLLOWED ovt, WOVLD HA/L j\ 

HARKED WFECT ON ATTENDANCE AT CHAPEL, rejpectfwiiy emitted to t «e faculty. 



Jflonticola 

'08. 



119 



itlonticola 

'08. 




glpfca #i Belta 



Sorority Founded at Lombard College, Galesburg, III 
April 17, 1893. 

Colors 

Light Blue, Dark Blue and Gold. 

Jflotoer 

Pink Rose Bud 



jWonticola 

'08. 



121 



*?**** 3ota Cftqttr 



ESTABLISHED MAY 8, L90S. 



Sorores in Facultate. 
Diusilla V. p. Johnson 

Sorores in Urbe. 
Mrs. Carl Harrison Smith 



Sorores in Universitate. 

1907. 

Etlii'l Averil Green 



1908. 

Mary Hannah Oooper Mabel Jane Weaver 

1909. 

M;n\ Meek Atkeson Mary Steward Fravel 

Crystal Courtney Lillian Ballard Smith 

Mabelle Rav Watkins 



» 



1910. 
Leda Cordelia Atkeson Blanche Elizabeth Watkins 



122 




ittonttcola 

'08. 



123 



fttonticola 

'08. 



&oll of &ctibe Chapters 



Alpha— Lombard ( College Galesburg, III. 

Beta— Iowa Wesleyan University Mt. Pleasant. la. 

Gamma .Mi. Union College Alliance. (). 

Delia Bethany College Bethany, \V. Va. 

Epsilon University of South Dakota Vermillion, S. Dak. 

Zeta Wittenberg College Springfield, <). 

Eta Syracuse University Syracuse, X. V. 

Theta University of Wisconsin Madison, Wis. 

Iota- West Virginia University Morgantown, W. Va. 

Kappa - -Universil y of Illinois Champaign, 111. 

Lambda Tufts' College Boston. Mass. 

Alumnae Chapters; 

Alliance Aliunnae Ulianee. ( ). 

Mt. Pleasant Alumnae Mt. Pleasant, la. 

Tufts' Alumnae Boston, Mass. 



124 



Ci)t #mega 

Founded University of Arkansas, April 5, 1895. 



Colors 

Cardinal and Straw. 



Jflotoer 

White Carnation. 



Jflonttcola 

'08. 



125 



fHonticola tZTfjeta Chapter 

'08. 



ESTABLISHED JUNE 2. 1905. 



Sorores in Urbe. 



Mrs. John Harrington Con Mrs. Waitm&n Barbe 

Mrs. C. Russell Huston Mrs. Fred \V. Truscott 

Miss Janette Hayes Miss Mary H. Turner 

Mi~- Maude Evans Dille 



Sorores in Facultate. 

Elizabeth Clayton 

Sorores in Universitate. 

1907. 

Jessie Jenkins Gussie Belle I. owe. Voice 

1908. 

Margarel Virginia Foulk Theo. W. Baldwin, Piano 

Maud Louise Fulcher Pansee Merle damage, Piano 

Ethel Belle -lone. 

1909. 

Ada May Xeal Lorena Lee Fries 

Virginia Bransford Xeal 

1910. 

Lucy Clare Clifford Helen Blanche Vance 

Marie Louise Dickinson 



1211 




iflonttcola 

'OS. 



127 



Jfflonticola 

'08. 



&oll of &cttoe Chapters 

University of Arkansas Psi 

Kentucky I 'Diversity Chi 

Southwestern Baptist University Upsilon 

University of Mississippi Tau 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College Sigma 

Tulane University-Newcombe College Rho 

University of Tennessee Pi 

University of Illinois Omicron 

Northwestern University Xi 

University of Wisconsin Nil 

Universit v of ( California Mu 

University of Kansas Lambda 

University of Nebraska Kappa 

University of Texas Iota 

George Washington University Phi Alpha 

West Virginia University Theta 

University of Michigan Eta 

University of Colorado Zeta 

< 'olumbia I 'niversit y-Barnard ( ollege Epsilon 

Colby College ' Beta 

Dickinson < ollege Delta 



128 



Jfflonttcola 

'08. 



Eappa &appa #amma 



Founded, 1870. 



Colors; 

Light Blue and Dark Blue. 
Jflotoer 

The Fleur-de-lis. 



129 



iflonticola 

'08. 



Peta ^Hpstlon Cfjapter 

ESTABLISHED DECEMBER 22, 1906. 



Sorores in Urbe. 



Mrs. .lames Moreland Mrs. I.eauna lirown 

Mrs. Adelaide Church Margaret Buchanan 



Sorores in Universitate. 
1907. 

Evalyn Sage Burns Mary Dorothy Edwards 

Laura Francis Lewis .lane Ktta Kinney 

Ceil rude Sloane I'olloek Harriet T. Stalnaker 

1908. 

Cilda Langfitl Smith Bertha Sterling Hawley 

1909. 

laiey Wilson Ida Katlierine Soul herla ml 

Lina Courtney Vance Nolle Steele 

Mae Sullivan 

1910. 
Anna Jones 



130 



Jfflonttcola 

'08. 




i::i 



itlontirola 

'08. 



&oll of Petite Chapter* 



Boston University 
Barnard College 
Adelphi College 
Cornell University 
Syracuse University 

I 111\ : I : it \ of 1 : mi:;.. 1\ 1111 1 

Swathmore ( ollege 
Allegheny College 
Buchtel College 
W'oostcr University 
Ohio State University 
I Ihiversity of Michigan 
Adrian College 
Hillsdale College 
Tulane University 
University of California 
\\ i-st \ irginia I iu\ ; rsit\ 



Indiana State University 
DePauw University 
Butler ( Sollege 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Illinois 
North western University 
Illinois Wesleyan 
University of Minnesota 
Iowa State University 
Missouri State University 
Nebraska state University 
Kansas State University 
Colorado State University 
Texas State University 
Leland Stanford University 
University of Washington 



13? 




iflonttcola 

'08. 



133 



Columbian Utterarp H>ocietp 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



Officers 

Fall Quarter. 

I'r< snh nt B. M. Whaley 

Vice-President 0. C. Lewis 

Treasurer H. A. Hundt 

Recording Secretary Mabel Watkins 

Corresponding Secretary II. C. Batten 

Critic II. M. Blair 

Marshall W. R. Timelier 

Chorister A. K. Brake 



Winter Quarter. 
C. A. Sutton 
E. R. Gross 
II. C. Batton 
Edna Kightjnire 
W. R. Thaeher 
B. M. Whaley 
B. M. Whaley 
Blanche Watkins 



Spring Quarter 
IT. M. Blair 
J. F. Shrive 
Boyd Huff 
Dessie Protzman 
Pearl Hodges 
O. <!. Wilson 
I). W. Bauschke 
C. A. Sutton 



iflemuers 



A. G. Allison 

A. K. Brake 

1). \V. Bauschke 
II. M. Blair 
Arthur Dayton 
II. A. llimclt 

B. W. King 
(). ('. Lewis 
Thomas Ramage 
.1. M. Russell 

• I. K. Shepherd 
('. A. Sutton 
W. 1(. Thaeher 
I',. .M. Whaley 
.1. ('. Evans 
II. M. Quick 
o. G. Wilson 
Warren Eodges 
Boyd Hull' 



K. It. Gross 
A. M. Lucas 
.lames (). McDowell 
G. W. Price 
Iloiuer Strosnider 
.1. F. Shrive 
W. C. Senter 
.1. F. Marsh 
(iuy Means 
George ('. Somerville 
Rebecca Core 
Crystal Courtney 
Pearl E. Hodges 
Ethel l.aKue ' 
Nellie Morris 
l)es-,ie I'rotzman 

Edna Rightmire 
Mabel Watkins 
Blanche Watkins 
Grace Yoke 



134 



Jfflonttcola 

'08. 




13.i 



Jkrtfjenon Utterarp ^>ocietp 



Officers; 

Pall Quarter. 

iflotlttcola President II. E. Cooper 

'08. Vice-President R. 0. Hall 

Secretary Blanche Smith 

Attorney I. P. Nestor 

Critic ., T. 1). Gorby 

Chorister II. A. Reynolds 

Marshall P. (J. Armstrong 



Winter Quarter. 
T. 1). Gorby 
G. B. Polk 
Florence Yarger 
G. A. Gist 
W. (). Trent 
II. A. Reynolds 
II. E. Cooper 



Spring Quarter 
Ira P. Nestor 
Blanche Smith 
(iny Allender 
II. E. Cooper 
P. M. Brand 
Geniveve Douthat 
T. 1). Gorby 



Jflcmtoers 



I', G. Armstrong 
Grace A. Asroett 

F. M. Brand 
II. E. Cooper 
<;. B. Callison 
W. E. Cather 
VV. <i. Dadysman 
Geniveve Douthat 
•l. c. Ely 

G. B. Foulk 
T. I). Gorby 

• l. A. Gist 
<). I.. Hall 
R. o. Hall 

.1. .1. Harariels 
Mabel Houston 
II. Humphries 

• I. (,>. Hutchinson 
.1. M. Hartley 

.1. (i. Allender 
I;. I.. Bates 
\. I). Kennamond 
E. R. Long 
Ollie Knotts 

\nlircv Hess 

Jessie Jenkins 
Ethel Jones 
Lettie Jenkins 



1). 


\Y 


McGill 


A. 
L, 

1. 


M 
C. 
F. 


Her 

Musgrave 
Nestor 


/c 


nki 


( hnori 


<;< 


Mi 


■ Parker 


Ella 


'ollock 


W 


t 1 


Parker 


Be 


lie 


Protzman 


15. 


Randall 


II. 


A 


Reynolds 


I>( 


arl 


Scott 


CI 


ira 


Selby 


Laura 


Strickler 


HI 


mc 


he Smilli 


1'.. 


W 


. Smith 


.1. 
.1 




Tucker 
Vanoe 


F. 


!•:. 


Vandale 


(' 


E. 


Luellen 


\\" 


. T 


rent 


(i. 


W 


. Whiting 


G. 


li. 


Wyatt 


o. 


w 


Wilkerson 


Yi 


ola 


Wolf 


Hi 


rth 


a Yarger 


Fl 


ore 


uc Yarger 


E. 


A 


Yost 



186 




jfllonttcola 

'08. 






(^Engineering ikocietp 



iHonticola 

'08. 



Officers; 

Fall Quarter. 

President M. L. Sayre 

Vice-Pres. and Treas ('. C. Sheppard 

Secretary \. I). Hell 

Critic Prof. W. E. Dickinson 

Librarian -1. X. Calvert 



Winter Quarter. 
P. C. Oolcord 
J. S. Broyles 
('has. Moon 
Prof. C. R. Jones 
C, V. Feller 



Spring Quarter 

Robert (Jathenun 

Chas. Moon 

C. V. Feller 

Prof. W. II. Boughton 

J. P. McJilton 






jfflembfrs 



A. I). Bell 

Prof. \V. II. Boughton 

.1. S. Broyles 

Prof. E. F. Church 

F. ('. Colcord 
E. ('. Oolcord 

Prof. W. E. Dickinson 
T. I). Deveney 
II. \V. Davis 
Prof. F. L. Emory 
('. \'. Feller 
Kiilicrt Gatherum 
J. I!. Grumbein 
(). F. (iil)hs 
• l. \ Banna 

G. H. Hartley 
Homer Hoskins 
W. E. Lloyd 
Arthur M. Lucas 
Prof. ('. 1!. Jones 
.1. E. Larew 



Orr Meredith 
.1. I'. McJilton 
.1. I>. Moriarty 
("lias. Moon 
Prof! P. I.. Morris 
W. A. .Mmiis 
■ I. I.. Morgan 
E. ('. Oldham 
• I. I'.. Rupert 
J. M. Russell 
M. \V. Rust 
Donald Ross 
L. I). Saunders 
M. L. Sayre 
ii. \r. Scott 
('. ('. Sheppard 
L. \V. Spragg 
C. E. Tracy 

Rufus West 
.1. E, Wilson 



V.W 



Jflonttcola 

'08. 




130 



Specimen ^Program* 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



engineering ^>ocietp 

REVIEWS. 

( assiers Homer Hoskins 

Engineering and Mining Journal .1. M. linssell 

Proceedings American Institution of Electrical 

Engineers ('. V. Feller 

Proceedings Beating and Ventilating Engineers I. E. Wilson 

Paper- Subject to lie announced I. B. Grumbein 

Columbian Hirerarp ^>ocietp 

Reading Miss Hodges 

Reading Miss Yoke 

Reading Mr. Evans 

Essay Mr. Marsh 

Essay Mr. llnssell 

( (ration Mr. Wilson 

Debate: Resolved, Thai Unmarried Men of Reasonable Sound 

Minds, and Over the Age of Thirty, Should lie Taxed. 
All'. Mr. Lewis NTeg. Mr. Dayton 

Mr. Hull' Mr Batton 

•Parthenon lUterarp ^>ocietp 

"Curious Tree.-." Essay Miss Houston 

"Purpose in Life," Essay Mis> Dague 

••A Fashinoble School Girl," Reading Miss Wolfe 

"An Oldtime Punishment," Reading Mis>, Protzman 

"Visions of the Future," Oration Mr. Whiting 

Int ermission. 
Debate: Resolved, I hat the Intermediate Sentence, as Punishment 

lor ( rime, is Better Than Commitment for an Arbitrary 

Definite Period. 
Alf. Mr. ( ooper Neg. Mr. Hall 

Mr. Trent Mr. Brand 



im 



g. ». c. a. 

(Officers! 

President Crystal Courtney 

Viee-I'resident Anna Sturgiss 

Bee. Secretary Bertha Hawijey 

Cor. Secretin 1 !/ ( Iilda Smith 

Treasurer Ethel Jones 

Chorister . Gussie Lowe 



Jfflonticola 

'08. 



fcoll 



Mary Atkeson 
Leda Atkeson 
Evalyn Burns 
Bertha Cavalier 
Pearl Compton 
Elizabeth Clayton 
Crystal Courtney 
Nancy Coplin 
Mary Cooper 
Ella Coraley 
Maud Dille' 
Carrie Dague 
Helen DeBerry 
Anna Elliot 
Virginia Foulk 
Lorena Fries 
Mary Fravel 
Nyna Foreman 
Ma vine Griffin 
Bertha Griffin 
Ethel Green 
Maria Cist 
Florence Cist 
Pearl Hodges 
Bertha Haw ley 
Oeie Hardesty 



June Houston 
Georgie Houston 
Mary Hogg 
Drusilla Johnson 
Ethel Jones 
Jessie Jenkins 
Blake Lemley 
Laura. Lewis 
Gussie Lowe 
Leila Loving 
Effie Mealy 
Ada Moon 
Mary Mestrezat 
Nellie Morris 
Ada Xeal 
Virginia Neal 
Gertrude Pollock 
Ella Pollock 
Dessie Protzman 
Myra Praeht 
Rose E. Peck 
Edna Rightmire 
Blanche Shinn 
Pearl Scott 
Ida Southerland 



Anna Sturgiss 
Caroline Schmidt 
Louise Stone 
Cilda Smith 
Lillian Smith 
Nell Steele 

Mae Sullivan 
( leorgie Staats 
Mabel Stout 
Zetta Stanard 
Helen Treat 
Ella Turner 
Edith Taylor 
Lina Vance 
Helen Vance 
Ratchel Whitman 
Nora Ward 
Lucy Wilson 
Mabel W'atkins 
Lyme Waddell 
Ethlyn Wolfe 
Evelyn Wolfe 
Viola Wolfe 
Nora Walters 
Blanche W'atkins 



Hi 



I?, in. c. a. 



Officers 

Pr< sident Ellis A. Yost 

itlonttCOla l " ' -P re sident II. \Y. Sanders 

'Qg^ Rec. Secretary Paul Naylor 

Cor. Secretary George W. Whiting 

Treasurer William W. Trent 

Organist Thomas W. Fitzgerald 

Chorister 0. F. (Jibrs 

&bhtSorp J^oarb 

Faculty. Alumni. Student. 

J. II. Cox T. Sutton Boyd Ceo. W. Grow 

Roberi A. Armstrong William E. Albig F. II. Patterson 

Thomas E. Hodges Frank Weaver J. F. Throckmorton 



fcoll 



Guy Allender 
II. V. Batten 
T. II. Becker 
A. 1). Bell 
A. K. Brake 
J. S. Broyles 
II. K. Burrell 
J. T. Carter 
G. I!, (lark 
II. E. Cooper 

(i. (i. ( ICWSOll 

Thomas Fitzgerald 
George B. Folk 
(>. s. Gibbs 
T. I). Corby 
.1. A. Banna 
Warren Sanna 
W. H. Hodges 
ll. II. Holmes 
II. ( '. I [umphrej a 
o. ('. Lewis 
.1. F. Marsh 



.1 


P. 


McJilton 


Ch 


ail. 


's Moon 


Clifford Myers 


Paul 


NTaylor 


Clifford Parker 


T. 


S. 


Patterson 


Ch 


irence Post 


Boyd 


Randall 


.1. 


T. 


Reaburn 


II. 


\\ 


. Saunders 


M. 


L. 


Sa vre 


H. 


M 


Scotl 


('. 


<'. 


Sheppard 


F. 


II. 


Sisler 


W 


0. 


Senter 


\v 


W. Trent 


J. 

F. 


F. 

T. 


Throckmorton 
Vandale 


B. 


M. 


Whalej 


G. 


W. 


Whiting 


.1. 


A. 


Ybnker 


El 


is 


A. Yost 



M2 



jftlonttcola 

'08. 




H3 



iflonttcola 

'08. 







114 




debating Ceams 

atfirmatibe tEeam 
W. V. U. vs. W. U. P., April 8, 1907. 



JHonttcola 

'08. 



S. J. Jackson, Captain 



Orla M. Wilkerson 



George G. Somerville 



Alternate. Boyd Hull' 
Decision fur the Afhrmativj 



A. S. Dayton 



Jlegatibe (Eeain 

W. V. U. vs. Wooster, April 8, 1907. 

B. M. Whaley, Captain 

Alternate, II. C. I Inmpln e\ s 
Decision lor the Negative. 



\V. II. Hodges 



SHfirmatitoe (team 
W. V. U. vs. College of the City of New York. 

W. IT. Hodges A. S. Dayton S. G. Jackson 

Alternates. ( ). M. Wilkerson. I',. M. Whaley, Captain 

Decision for the Negative. 



H. C HUMPHREYS 



B M WHALEY. 



W H HODGES 
A S DAYTON 



G G SOMERVILLE 
O M WILKERSON 



145 



ittonticola 

'08. 



tEfje Umbersittp JflaSonic Club 

€>fftcerS 

I'n sidi ill A. J. Findlev 

Si cri tary (>. L. Hall 

Treasun r II. E. Cooper 



^onorarp JWemucrs 



Tliomas E. Hodges 
Frederick W. Truscotl 
Clement Ross Jones 
John Nathan Simpson 
William Jackson Leonard 
Alexander S. Thompson 
Theo. Howard Gather 
Simeon ('. Smith 
I. II. Stewart 



Robert A. Armstrong 

• lames .Madison Burns 
Anthony Weneel Chez 
Justin Frank Grant 

Kufus A. West 

Russell Love Morris 
Charles li. Patterson 
Jasper X. Deahl 
Charles K. Hoge 



aicttut iHrmbcrs 



George G. Somerville 

J. I'. McJilton 

\". I-'. ( ooper 

II. K. Cooper 

O. I.. Mall 

II. M. Scott 



K. A. Th as 

1!. Walter Kill" 

Clyde M. Bennett 
Fred M. Hoffman 

John B. Crumbein 

A. J. Findlev 



jftlonticola 

'08. 




Hato H>ocietp 



iflonttcola 0lUtn * 

'08. Fall Quarter. Winter Quarter. 

Preside nt 0. C. Lewis Preside nt F. }.\. Brand 

Vice-Presidt nt ('has. A. Sutton Vice-Presidt nt 1*. G-. Armstrong 

S< en tary I>. W. Baushke Secretary R. B. Robertson 

Critic F. M. Brand Critic . .1. R. Sheppard 

Treasurer •). Q. Hutchinson Treasurer .J. M. Glenn 

Marshall B. M. We u>ey Marshall J. M. Pendleton 

Spring Quarter. 
President P. G Armstrong 

VlCt -I'll sit 1 1 til . \. .). FlNDLAtf 

Seen tary \V. C. Sunter 

Critic J. F. Throckmorton 

Marshall P. M. Brand 

Jfflembers 

Paul Griffith Armstrong Opha Olark Lewis 

Daniel William Banshke ( harles Lewis Llewellyn 

Herbert McClaskey Blair James Otey McDowell 

Franklin Marion Brand Lawrence Clifton Musgrave 

Louis Arnold Carr Daniel Micajah Pendleton 

Harry Rutherford Downs Thomas Ramage 

Rjoberl Mcveigh Drane Robert Bruce Robertson 

Allen Penick Edgar John Franklin Throckmorton 

A. Judson Findlay James Reed Sheppard 

Joseph M. Glenn Charles Alexander Sutton 

Walter Donaldson Hereford John David Thomas 

Lowry Burchinal Huey Baxter Monroe Whalev 

Boyd Huff Ellis Asby Foal 
■ l < > 1 1 1 1 Quincj Hutchinson 



ns 



Jflonttcola 

'08. 




H9 



iHonticola 

'08. 



&f)e Cnglis* Club 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Charles Benry Patterson, A. M. 
Jerome Hall Raymond, Ph. I). 
Josephine Raymond, A. M. 
Powell Benton Reynolds, I). I). 
Wail man Barbe, A. M.. Litt. I). 
William Jackson Leonard. 
James Russell Trotter, A. M. 
Frederick Wilson Truscott, Ph. 
John Harrington Cox, A. M. 
Pauline Wiggin Leonard, A. M. 
Elobert Allen Armstrong, A. M. 
.lame- Morton Callahan. I'll. I). I, 
C. Edmund Neil. 



ALUMNI IN CITY. 

Fred Oolburn Flenniken, LL. I!. 

Leila .lessic Kra/.er " 
Georgia Craig Truscott. A. B. 
Elizabeth Tapp Peck. A. B. 
Alberta Caroline Baumgartner, A. 



ALUMNI IN UNIVERSITY. 

Simeon Conant Smith. A. M. 
David Dale Johnson, A. M. 
Bertha Browning Purinton, A. IS 
Ella May Turner. A. B. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



M 


. Virg 


ini 


a Foulk, 


Head 


Ethel A 


. ( 


Ireen, Clerk 


W; 


in ren 


II. 


Hodges 




.1. 


Q. II 


lite 


hinson 




w 


alter 


M. 


Parker 




Lama 1 




Lewis 




Ed 


ward 


s. 


Bock 




W 


illiam 


M 


. Baumg 


art ner 



Ethel I!. Jones 
Otis Guy Wilson 
Herchel W. Lawson 
Aha I). Kennamond 
Mary M. Atkeson 
Ait Inn- s. Dayton 
Joseph I-". Marsh 
George B. Folk 
George W. Whiting 



I >eceasei 



W$t Jflountatn Club 



itlonttcola 

'08. 



Officers! 

Summit Joseph Franklin Marsh 

Guide Paul H. Martin 

Cache Arthur S. Dayton 

Echo Otha C. Lewis 

Pass John E. Kenna 

Trapper Birk S. Stathers 

( U nsor Wm. Harnett Bayliss 

Hanger Charles Henry Patterson 

Woodman Stephen G. Jackson 

Snake Hunter Herbert Blair 



.Joseph F. Marsh 
Paul IT. Martin 
Arthur S. Dayton 
Otha 0. Lewis' 
John B. Kenna 



jWembers 



Birk S. Stathers 
\\*ni. Oarnett Bayliss 
Charles H. Patterson 
Stephen G. Jackson 
Herbert Blair 



Howard M. Ernst 
Thomas Leahy 
Thomas B. Foulk 



jWembersi of tfje Jflarsif) 



Brooks S. Hutchinson 
Harry G. Shaffer 
Fred L. Boydson 



151 



'OS. 



1&\)t Puckijannon Club 



President 0. (i. Wilson 

Secretary .). II. Jenkins 



G. K. Alhnaii 
Gohen Arnold 
Victor Barbe 
II. M. Blair 
A. K. Brake 
II. K. Burrell 
Willard Clayton 
Jesse! Coeman 

.Minnie (nrc 

Ruth Core 
E. I!. < (rose 
Stella Hall 
Grace ETardesty 
Warren Hodges 
II. A. Koskins 
Boyd llulV 
James Jackson 
• I. II. Jenkins 
Civile Knight 



F. I.. Lakin 
Laura Lewis 
(). ('. Lewis 
Blanche Lazelle 
•I. !•'. Marsh 

W. I'. MeCue 

Gertrude Pollock 
Blanche Shinn 
Amos Smith 
• I. F. Shreve 
Prof. Madison Slathers 
Georgia staats 
Forrest Stem pie 
(has. A. Sutton 
Clophus Swecker 
.1. I''. Throckmorton 
Mrs. Frank Weaver 
<). <;. Wilson 
Mrs. Ellis Yost 



152 



&f>e Roman's league of WLtstt Virginia TOuerSttp 

Object: — To promote better acquaintance among the wives of the mem- 
bers of the Faculty and the young women students of the Uni- 
versity. 

(Officers 

President Jessie Fitch 

Vice-President Anna Sturgiss 

Secretary Ada Neal 

Treasurer Bertha S. Haw ley 



jflonticola 

'08. 



lrtt 



Cabet <0fficerg Club 

©rgani?eb 1903 
iflontiCOla *«P** 1905 



'08. 



Officers 

President Cadet Major Herbert W. Sanders 

First Vice-President Cadet Firsl Lieutenant J. II. Ybnber 

Second-Vice President .... Cadet First Lieutenant S. J. Jackson 

Secretary Cadet First Lieutenant C. C. Shcppard 

Treasun r Cadet Second Lieutenant II. M. Scott 

^onorarp Jfflember 

Major .lames M. Burns, ('. s. Army. 

gktiue jfflcmbcrs 

Cadet Major E. ( '. Colcord 

Cadet Major V. C. Colcord 

Cadet Major L. 1). Saunders 

Cadet Major II. \V. Sanders 

Cadet Captain C. K. Wella 

Cadet Captain II. E. Batten 

Cadet Captain C. C. Holland 

Cadet Captain \. C. Weaver 

Cadet Captain .1. A. Cist 

Cadet Captain \V. E. Lloyd 

Cadet Captain II. \\\ Lawson 

Cadel 1st. I.ieut c. W. Price 

Cadet 1st. i.ient s. G. Jackson 

Cadet 1st. I.ient C. 0. Shcppard 

Cadet 1st. I.ient II. A. Yonker 

Cadet 1st. I.ient C. S. Burns 

Cadet 1st. Lieut I.. W. Ryan 

Cadel 2nd. I.ieut Clifford Myers 

( a.let 2nd. I.ieut II. M. Scotl 

Cadet 2nd. I.ieut 'P. I'.. I'oulk 

Cadet 2nd. I.ieut \. V. Hess 



1M 



#reen -persimmon 







*f 



Know all of ye ! This sheet is published off 
and on, giving bits of judgment wherever needed. 
We think these morsels will aid you, — Try one. 



Sttorgantown. W. Va.. T*b. 26. 1907. tto. I = 



Tlpe (&xzzn Vtxsimmnn 



COMPILERS 

Editor-in-Chief Hiram Green Persimmon 

City Edilor Abe Drawn Mouth 

Student Editor Romulus Wry Face 

Society Editor Katarina Pucker 

Sporting Editor Lefty Shrivel 

*Keeper of the Files U.R. Acrid 

. . . . Tr (A. Simmon 

Assistant Keepers • | Q simmon 

f Hezekiah Pucker 
Dome Heads j Uf]y Ima rucker 

Distributors The Twelve Pucker Boys 



PRODUCING QUARTERS 

Simmon Holler, lying just due Sou-West from the State Ex- 
periment Farm on Hezekiah Pucker Estate, where the fruit 
grows luxuriantly. 

Editor's Office Loft of Pucker Hennery 



jfflonttcola 

'08. 



"price 5 Sickles 



All done for West Virginians for Five Shekels. 



*File Keepers not allowed to vote on editorials, also always restricted 
is free thinkers. 



iflonticola 

'08. 




156 




Jilonttcola 

'08. 



GTfje ^tftenaeum 

Editor-in-Chief John Quincy Hutchinson 

Ass't Editor-in-Chief Edward S. Bock 

gtooctate (EbitorS 

Athletic Thomas Corby 

Local B. Walter King 

Personal .M. Virginia Foitlk 

Exchange Alva D. Kennamond 

Organizations Robert M. Drane 

Business Manager B. M. Whaley 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



Isrl'T^fy* 2 ' "^ G dcacrdsT^Tqirig, j^ir>l&? 




<P 




jHonttcola 

'08. 



159 



fflonttcola Y/. 
'08. 




;VV 


|HBpH^9HHH 








" apfe*!!^ V '■ 






B 


fill 

MAW II 


II II 


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mil i ■ ■■ iB ■■ I 


f 1 


111 J 181 *1 


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R* - P» ^BBj 8> /^■k 


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iflonttcola 

'08. 



161 



iflonticola 

'08. 





Jflonttcola 

'08. 



163 



itlonticola 

'08. 



#lee anb Jflanboltn Club* 

(Officers 

Din dor Ross Spence 

I'n sidt ul W. E. Harlan 

Manager S. (i. -Jackson 

dtc (glee Out) 



First Tenor: 


First 


Bass: 


o. K. Gibbs 




('. ('. Yoiint 


\V. E. Harlan 




Thos. Becker 


II. ( '. Humphreys 




.1. ('. Klv 


If. \. Reynolds 




W. P. McCue 


Second Tenor: 


Second Bass: 


• 1. (,). Hutchinson 




T. 1?. Foulk 


A. M. Lucas 




.1. E. Wilson 


K. A. Thomas 




1). L. Carden 


II. R. Van Horn 




1). H. Hani i si i 


K. (I. Shaffer 







im 



fflonttcola 

'08. 



tElje Jflanfcoltn Club 



Win. Garnet! Bayliss 
Gorwin S. limns 
Davis II. Estill 
T. W. Fitzgerald 
James It. Haworth 
s. Vinton Haworth 



Lowry I!. Huey 
Newell Stanley Lloyd 
Pierce B. I. ant/. 
Audry I. Marple 
John Xuttall 
Boyd M. Smith 



wo 




jftlonttcola 

'08. 



JHonticola 

"08. 



Centi) Annual Cour 



Place. 
KinffM ood 



Date. 



Building. 



Local Management. 



i Limberland, Md. 

.Mini insburg 

Shepardstow 11 . . . . 
( ha ilea Tow n .... 
Clifton Forge, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 

Lew isburg 

\rontgomerj 

( liarleston 

I hint ingt mi 

Poinl Pleasant 

Pari ei sburg 

\ I 1 rgantown 



4 \rmovy High School 

5.. .School Auditorium Keyser Prep. School 



u. i CaiToll Lyceum Carroll Club 

n. 8 Opera House High School 

ii. 9 School Building State Normal School 

n. 10 Powhattan College High School 

n. II .Masonic Opera House The Massno 

n. 12 University Chapel W. & I.. 

ii. 14 Carnegie Hall Lewisburg Female Institute 

n. L5. . Prep. School Building Preparatory school 

n. IC Mercer Hall Charleston High School 

ii. 17 Carnegie Library Bids; Huntington II. School 

ii. is Hoof's Opera House pt. Pleasant It. School 

n. I'.) Camden Theatre First Presbyterian Church 

n. 31 .Swisher Theatre Glee and Mandolin Club 

ania trip scheduled for the hist of March. 



168 



Z\)t Cfjoral g>octetp 



Alexander S. Thompson, Director. 

(Officers 

President Geo. C. Sturgiss 

Vice-President Clara D. Thompson 

Secretary H. M. Fitch 

Treasurer M. T. Sisler 



iWonttcola 

'08. 



Soprano Section: 

Laura M. Boughton 
Eleanor Brock 
Emma Carmen 
Josephine Colbert 
Virginia Connell 
Crystal Courtney 
Mary E. Daniels 
Elizabeth Evans 
Jennie E. Fitch 
Marie Gist 
Ocie S. Hanlesty 
Laura D. Johnson 
Gussie B. Lowe 
Martha R. Martin 
Ruth Maxwell 
Birdie McCartney 
Mary Mestrezat 
Grace L. Morgan 
Barbara Xaret 
Blanche Protzman 
Dessie Protzman 
Mabel C. Reynolds 
Pansee Ha mage 
Maude Saunders 
Myra Shank 



Jfflembers 

Caroline Schmidt 
Marie Schmidt 
Jane C. Taughenbaugh 
Bessie Ward 
Nora Walters 
Bertha S. Watson 
Elizabeth H. Watson 
Lillian R. Wiles 
Elma V. Williams 
Willa Wilson 

Alto Section: 

Bliss Biersach 
Mary Cooper 
Mrs.' E. I', Grimsley 
M. Gertrude Haves 
Ollie C. Knotts ' 
Blake Lemley 
Blanche Lazelle 
Edna. May Ley man 
Marv C. Martin 
Ella' V. Martin 
Erne Mealy 
Ethel F. Moreland 
Winifred South 
Eva, Watts 



Tenor Section: 

(iwillvn Da vies 
Harry G. Day 
John M. Gregg 
H J. McGinnis 
W, T. Harlan 
Joseph A. Martin 
J. P. McJilton 
Charles H. Schmidt 
Andrew Torrence 
John A. Vount 



Bass Section: 

William B. Baumgartner 
Clyde M. Bennett' 
Walter K. Brainard 
Lawrence M. Cox 
Phillip .1. Davies 
Edward L. Ha vis 
A. .1. Findley 
David T. Jones 
Warren Murie 
Millard T. Sisler 
Thomas Williams 
Paul Vount 



IB9 



itlonticola 

'08. 



170 




Jtlonttcola 

'08. 



itlonttcola 

'08. 



gtfjlettc &s&octatton 



Presidt nt Clark F. 1 1 in may 

Vict -President Loins A. Cabr 

S< cri inr/i Clifford Myers 

Treasurer Thomas B. Hodges 

Si i«I< ill Representatives A. I). Kennamond, J. T. West 

Faculty Representative Wm. Baumgartner 

Alumni Representatives . . . .James Moreland, Dr. David EJott 



172 



_ — __ — -■ ••.'-..' : : 




illonttcola 

'OS. 



173 



ftlonticolii 

'08. 



1&a*t JiaU 

Manager Houston G. Young Captain .... Earl D. Mason 



Cniich 



\lch. 


31 


Vpri 


2 


Apri 


3 


Apri 


1 


\pri 


."> . 


Apri 


27 


May 


L2 


• llllle 


1 


Fune 


.) . 


lune 


7 


Fune 


8. . 


In: e 


'.i 



Catcher 

I -it fliers ... 

First Base . 
Second Base 
Third Base 
Short Stop 
Right Field 
Center Field 
l.ei't Field . 





April 




April 




Vpril 




May 




May 




May 




May 




May 




May 




May 




May 




May 




May 




June 




June 




June 




June 


.w 


. V. 1 


w. 


\ 1 


w. 


V. 1 


w. 


\ . 1 


,w. 


V. 1 


w. 


V. 1 


w. 


V. 1 


\v. 


V. 1 


w. 


\ . [ 


w. 


V 1 


\\ . 


V. 1 


w. 


V. FJ 



13. 

20. 



1(1. 
11 . 
18. 

2 ■_> 

24. 

id. 

2! I. 

30. 

30. 

22 

23. 

27 

28 



Htne up 



Substitutes -Austin. Ely. 



.McCarthy 

. Kenna. Sea v. Gorby 

. Mason 

.Bayliss 

Downs, Striekler 

< Ironninger 
. Kenna, Sea v 

Coir 
Wa \ man 



. . W. 

\v. 
. .w. 
.w. 

w. 

w. 
,w. 

w. 
.w. 
. w. 

w. 
w. 

w. 

w. 
.w. 

w. 
.w. 



u. 
u. 
r. 
u. 
r. 
u. 
r. 
u. 
r. 
r. 
u. 
u. 

V. 

u. 

u. 
u. 
u. 



Scores 

At Home 

■■•• 1 Wheeling 

1" Manhattan 



( 



.10. 

. 7 . 
. 8. 

.10. 
. 4. 
. 5. 
.12. 
. 7. 
2. 
12. 



. (I. 

. n. 
.11 . 
. :{. 



liege . 
Manhattan College 
.California Normal 

.Carlisle Indians .... 
< ai lisle Indians . . <; 

w. v. w. r ; 7 

. Uniontown ■> 

Waynesburg ( bllege :i 

. Waynesburg College 8 

. I tennison c> 

. Dennison ■> 

I tennison \ 

.0. w. r 

.0. w. u 

All ( olleeians 



All-Collegians 



4 
:i 

HI 



Abroad. 









.11 




. ."> 




2 . . 
I I 




1 




. '1 




.1! 

8 




Hi 

. :i 



I. 

anil 
ierrv 



V. \l 
\\a>li 
Wood 
Navy 

si. .1, 
W. V. 

Wa \ in 

0. W. u. 
Dennison 

< harlesl i>n 

( harlesl on 
( harleston 



Forresl 



in'- i ollege :? 

W. I . . .' i. 



1111'! 



Coll. 



.1:1. 
II. 

3. 



:i 
in 



at 
.at 

.at 
.at 
al 
.at 
at 
at 
al 
at 
at 
al 



Va. 
Va. 

1. 

M.l. 
Mil. 



Lexingt on 
Lexington 
Orange, \ 
Annapolis 
Annapolis, 
Buckhannon, \\ . 
Waj nesburg, Pa. 
Delaware. ( ). 
Dennison. II. 
Charleston, W 
Charleston, W 
('harleston. \V 



Carl Fork cm 



Va. 



Va. 
Va. 

\ a. 



171 




Jilonttcola 

'08. 



175 



Honticola W^b 

'os. jf oot Pall 






Manager Birk S. Si athers 

Oaptairi Thomas Leahy 

Coach Carl Forkum 

LINE-UP. SUBSTITUTES. 

Left End L. Hutchinson The "Pony" Back Field. 

Left Tackle Leahy Quarter Pearcy 

Left Guard Brake Left Half dan- 
Center White Right Half Iluev 

Righl Guard Hamilton Full Ryan 

Right Tackle Mclntyre Rust 

Righl End B. Hutchinson Gillooley 

Quarter Reynolds Bayliss 

Lefl Half Hinman Bullard 

Righl Half Kemia Sage 

Full Ernst Chilton 

Abroad. 

o.t. 20 W. V. TJ 2 Marietta 4 at Marietta, 0. 

S T ov. 10 W.V.V W. U. P 17 at Pittsburg, Pa. 

Nov. 23 W. V. (' Penn. Slate 11 at State College, Pa. 

Nov. 29 W. V. (i W. .V ■! 2!) at Washington, Pa. 

At Home. 
Sept. 29 W. V. U <> Ohio I'niv !> 

Oct. ii W. V. r. :?7 Connellsville, Pa 

Oct. 13 W. V. U 11 California Normal 

Oct. 27 \V. V. U 25 Grove City 

Nov. :i W. V. I" :>1 Carnegie Tech 

Nov. II w. v. r 54 YV. V. w. r 4 




jHonttcola 

'08. 



177 



jflonttcola 

'08. 



gasket Pall 



Feb. 1 l 

Feb. 15 

Feb. 16 

Feb. is 

Feb. 19. 

Feb. 2i 

Feb. 22 



Manager \. K. Brake 

( iaptain Ear] Mason 

Coach J. 1). Gronninger 



Pearcy 
Ely w a 
Ryan 

Strickler*"" v 



THE VARSI1Y. 



Scores 



Baumgarl ner 
Reiner*^ £j 



Abroad. 

. V. I' Ml W. I*. P 44 at Pittsburg, Pa. 

V. I". ...fr9 . . . Circleville 43 at Circlevttle, 0. 

Y. C. . . *Vr21 ...<>. W. U. if) at Delaware, 0. 

V. I". . . ; Smith's Skating Rink.. ..53 at Columbus, 0. 

V. [J. . 9 Ohio Univ. . . .' 20 at Athens, O. 

V. V. ...27 Marietta Y. M. ( '. A 40 at Marietta, 0. 

V. r. ..14 Parkersburg V. M. ('. A. 20 at Parkersburg, VV 

At Home. 

21 Westminister 46 ^ 

20 Bethany 16*— < 

60 Wilmerding 4 

2(i \V. V. P 20 



Jan. 


26 


\v. v. u 


Feb. 


■> 


,w. v. r 


Feb. 


9 


\v. v. r 


Mar. 


2.... 


. \v. v. u 


Mar. 


9 . . . . 


. ..W. V. 1" 



Va. 



U 27 McKeespod 



13 



17H 




jflonttcola 

"08. 



ittontitola ««* mi > ktic * 

'08. 

Manager Ernest A. Bruce 

Captain J. E. Wilson 



lamer \. \\". Chez 



.1 


\ 




THE TEAM. 






Wilson 




By.ars 




Hininan 




Reiner 




Mc( hie 




Settle 




Pearcy 




Brown 





^arSttp &ecorbg 



Event. Holder Record. 

100 Yard Dash lames Gibson '05 11 sec. 

440 Yard Run James Gibson '()."> 54 4-5 sec. 

120 Yard Hurdle Anthony McGue '06 16 sec. 

220 Yard Hurdle fames Gibsoo '05 27 4-5 sec. 

High Jump ( lark llinman '06 5 ft. 6 in. 

Pole Vault Etley Smith '07 9 ft. 

Hammer Throw lames Wilson '07 00 ft. 1 in. 

Snboor 

Event. Holder Record. 

Shot I'nt (lark llinman "07 .'54 ft. y s in. 

K. High dump (lark llinman '06 5 ft. (i in. 

S. High .lump Clark llinman '06 4 ft. 4'/> in. 

G. I), Griffin '07 

Pole Vaull Charles Smith '09 7 ft. 

S. Broad dump lames Wilson "07 ft. in. 

Kin- Vault Charles Smith '(I!) lo ft. :! in. 

Pull Up Franklin Brand '06 I'd times. 

Dip G. D. Griffin '07 14 times 

Fence Vaull Charles Smith '09 ."> ft. II in. 




Jllonttcola 

'08- 



181 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



Bual ^racfe fflttt 

WLt&t "Virginia anb Jflarietta 

iHorsantomn, W. ¥a., jfflap 12, 1906 

100 Yard Dash, (1) Bickley of Marietta; (2) Carrothers, Marietta; (3) 

Byars, W. V. I . Time 10.4 sec. 
•220 Yard Dash, (1) Byars, W. V. U.; (2) Carrothers, Marietta: (3) Bickley 

Marietta. Time 2(i.(i see. 
440 Yard Dash, (1) Bickley, Marietta; (2) Carrothers, Marietta; (3) 

Gates, Marietta. Time 50.2 see. 
880 Yard Dash. (1) Lenhard, Marietta; (2) McCloy, Marietta: (3) O'Brien. 

Marietta. Time 2 mill. 20 4-5 see. 
Mile Run, (1) McCloy Marietta; (2) O'Brien, Marietta; (3) Settle, W. V. 

U. Time 5 niiii. 22 2-.") sec. 
120 Yard Hurdles (1) MeCue. W. V. U.; (2) MacDonald, W. V. P.; (3) 

Lehnhard, Marietta. Time 16 sec. 
220 Yard Hurdle. (1) McOue, W. V. CI; (2) Pearcy, W. V. Q.; (3) McCloy, 

Marietta. Time 30 sec. 
Shot Put (I) llhimaii, W. V. 1'.; (2) Marshick, Marietta; (3) Wilson, \V. 

V. U. 34 ft. V K iii. 
Pole Vault, (1) McCloy. Marietta; (2) McCue, W. V. P.; (3) Pearcy, W. 

V. P. 9 ft. 6 in. 
Hammer Throw, (1) Wilson. W. V. P.; (2) Humphreys, Marietta; (3) 

lliiimaii. W. V. U. 107 ft. .") in. 
Running Broad Jump, (1) Lehnhard, Marietta; (2) Wilson, W. V. P.: 

(3) McCue. W. Y. P. 20 ft. in. 
Running High .Jump, 111 Hinman, W. Y. P.: (2) McCue. W. V. P.; 

CM Lehnhard. Marietta. 5 ft. ti in. 
Mile Relay. Won by Marietta. 

Firsts Seconds Thirds Total 

West Virginia fi 6 54 

Marietta 7 7 ti 62 



INTER-COLLEGIATE MEET AT PITTSBURG, PA., JUNE 3, 1906. 

Wes1 Virginia, with hut five men in the contest, won third place. 
receiving a total of 2*2 points, viz.: 

Met lie lirst in High Hurdles; second in High Jump, Pole Vault, and 

Low Hurdles. 
Hinman, firsl in High Jump. 
Wilson, second in I Iaiuiner Throw. 
field Champion of the Meet, Anthony McCue. W. V. P. 



BASE - BALL. 



FOOT - BALL. 



BASKET - BALL 



TRACK. 






£ 






$k 




. 


^^5S K^p* 




ijvy ■" ».* y^fcvfc 




3 




W. G. BAYL1SR. 



TIIOS. LEAHY. 



EARL PEARCY. 



J. E. WILSON. 



Varsity Captains. 



183 



jftlonttcola 

'08. 



■% 



iflonticola 

'08. 




^>opf)omore Jfefeet JPall GTeam 

LINE-UP. 

Manager Lawrence Foreman 

Captain c. II. Lav. nan 

A. C Weaver Donald Ross 

V. V. Baumgartner ||. w. Sanders 

W. L. (allicr 



|S| 




jfflonticola 

'08. 



$rep packet pall fteam 

LINE - UP. 

Manager J. J?. Wyatt 

< iaptain P. B. Naylor 

J. H. Riddle F. ML Bailey 

•I. M. Burns Quintero 

H. H. Baumgartner 



185 



ftlonttcola 

'08. 




§elte 



Rah! Kali! Ru! W. V. V . 
Sis boom bah! Tiger! ! ! 



Che he! Che ha! Che ha, ha, ha! 
West Virginia! Rah! Rah! Rah! 



CIipw terbacher! (hew terbacher! 

Chaw, (haw. Chaw ! 
Eat terbacher, cat terbacher! 

Rah, Rah, Hah! 
Drink a lager, Drink a lager, 

Drink a lager beer. 
West Virginia Varsity! 

We're all here! 



I SI, 



jftlonttcola 

'08. 




$rep Jf oot pall GTeam 



I?. Wyatt Manager 

C. Stanard Captain 

LINE - UP. 

Kerr L. E. 

Robinson L. T. 

Stanard L. G. 

Deveney ('. 

Means R. G. 

Combs R. T. 

('. Hums R. E. 

J. Burns Q 

Carden L. II. 

Buffano R. H. 

Grimm F. I!. 

Smith Sill.. 

SCORES. 

Preps 6 Freshmen .... 

Preps. ...11 Sophomores o 

Preps 5 M. H. S 



187 



iilonticola 

'08. 



S $arobp 



(Heard on the foot-ball trips.) 
Tune: "Waltz Me Around Again, Willie. 



Here's to Coach Forkie who's sure on the porky, 

.Sam Hill can't you that plainly see? 

A medal he's wearing, but not for his daring, 

For bravery at a pink tea. 

A tine bunch of ladies were drinking like Hades 

And sure would have croaked on the spot. 

Had not Coach with vigor jumped in in a jigger, 

And manfully kicked o'er the pot. 

CHORUS. 

Chase me around again, Forkie, 

Around, around, around. 

I'm in such line fettle I run like Prep Settle, 

And don't let my feet touch the ground. 

Like a Prohibish candidate running 'gainst booze 

I'll run till I run the soles clean off my shoes; 

Chase me around again, Forkie, 

Around, around, around. 



Who is it plays snappy and awfully scrappy, 

And slugs his man woefully hard? 

Who by his rough playing is all liis foes Slaying 

'Cept when from the game he's debarred? 

At Wup he went slugging, his man he got huggin 

And gave him a terrible jolt; 

His man had Abe under, but to bis great wonder 

Abe soon had an Abe Overholt. 

ciiours. 

Turn me around again. Abie. 

Around, around, around. 

You're such a hugger, a heck of a slugger, 

You soon put my back to the ground. 

But now on the side-lines we both soon will be, 

And then on the game you will gaze wistfully. 

Turn me around again. Abie. 

Around, around, around. 



There's a man they call Tubby, who plays awful scrubby, 

As a hero you'll find he's right there 

One day he went swimmin' and saved nineteen women 

Without even wetting his hair. 

When Leahy was gasping, the water was grasping, 

Brave Tubby who stood on the bank. 

Said: "Men, I will save him, before you can shave him." 

Stooped down and the water soon drank. 

CHORl'S. 

Save me from deatli again. Tubby. 

Again, again, again. 

He's built like a pretzel, the best in old Wetzel, 

Just give three loud cheers for him, men. 

No wonder he swims like a duck or a deer, 

New Martinsville's water most half of the year. 

Save me from death again. Tubby, 

Again, again, again. 



188 




Jfflonttcola 

'08. 



A PHYSICAL TRAINING CLASS. 



189 



iHonttcola 

'08. 



$roaram OTL V. ©♦ (gpmnasttc exhibition 

gntfjonp 3H. €\)t}, director 



i. Grand March. All Classes. 

MARCH: ••York Oity Post," by Cadet Hand. 

2. Cadet Class. 

ANTHONY W. CHEZ, Director. 

3. Children's Class. 

MRS. ANTHONY W. ( III:/. Director. 

4. Pyramid, Three High. 

MEMBERS OF GYMNASTIC TEAM. 
HIGH KICK: J. I.. Grayson. 

5. Swedish Gymnastics. 

Mil 'NO WOMEN'S AND MISSES' CLASSES. 
MRS. ANTHONY W. CHEZ, Directoi. 

6. Long Horse, Advance Work. 

GYMNASTIC TEAM. 

ANTHONY W. CHEZ, Director. G. W. GROW, Leader. 

7. Elementary Indian Club Drill. 

GIRLS' CLASS. 
MRS. ANTHONY W. CHEZ, Director. 



8. Games. Misses' Class. 

(a) "Poison." 
(1>) Relay Race. 

9. Parallel Bars. Advance Work. 

C. H. LAYMAN. Leader. 

ARCH ARMSTRONG, DUNBAR MEEK. 

WALTZ By Cadet Land 

10. Swedish Folk Dances, in National Costumes. 

(a) Yafva Vadmal, (Weaving Dance). 
(hi Klappdans. 
Id Ostogotapolska. 

11. Basket-ball and Bean Bag Race. 

GIRLS' CLASS. 

12. Tumbling, Pyramids. Advanced Work. 

MEMBERS OK GYMNASTIC TEAM, 
0. MYERS, Leader. 

GALOP Cadet Band. 

Cadet Band Concert. 

W. A. MESTREZAT, Director. 

7:4.") o'clock. 

1. OVERTURE Poet and Peasani Suppe 

2. SONG Wesl Virginia Patterson 

:?. MARCH Liberty Cap Chaplin 



190 




Jflonttcola 

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DIRECTOR CHEZ AND GYMNASIUM LEADERS. 

191 



iflonttcola 

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»arerg of tije "W. V." 

gear "06 -'07 



Reason of '06 

r P. J. McCarthy 0. ('. Cole 

S. B. Steay E. D. .Mason 

•I. I). Gronninger J. E. Kenna 

\V. G. Bavliss J. C. Ely, Jr. 

J. (!. Pritehard S. ('. Austin 

K. I". Strickler H. A. Downs 

('. E. Wav.man T. 1). Gorby 



Jfoot Pall 



H. M. Ernst • W. L. Hutchinson 

A. K. Brake » Karl Pearcy 
Thomas Leahy » L. W Ryan 

('. F. llinman - A. F. Reynolds 

B. S. Stathers J. E. Kenna ' 
I.. I'.. Iluev Mont Melnlvre 
M. W. Rust -I. ('. Hamilton 
1!. S. Hutchinson . Edwin While 



^asfeet Pall 



Earl Pearcy P. 1'. Reiner 

.1. ('. Ely, Jr. R. P. Strickler 

K. A. Can- A. K. Brake 
I.. W. Ryan 

^racfe 

Benson of '06 

('. I", llinman .1. E. Wilson 

.1. V. Gibson K. I'. Smith 

A. li. Francher E. A. Bruce 

A. F. McCue J. W. livers 



Jttonttcola 

'08. 



tennis Club 

(Officers; 

President O. G. Wilson 

Treasurer Thomas B. Hodges 

Secretary Clifford Myers 

JWembers 

W. E. Albig C. P. Hartley 
F. P. Pest Pearl Hodges 
H. G. Blair W. H. [lodges 
M. 0. Pond H. C. Humphreys 
F. M. Boyles J. Q. Hutchinson 
H. L. Campbell E. R. Lang- 
Leo Carlin H. W. Lawson 
L. A. (air J. E. Larew 
F. P. Carbin D. H. Kahn 
H. E. Cooper J. F. Marsh 
A. J. Findley T. S. Patterson 
H. P. Gallaher J. A. Purinton 
H. S. Green R. 15. Purinton 
R. R. Green W. W. Trent 
S. S. Green B. M. Smith 



193 



itlonttcola 

'OS. 





191 




Jtlonticola 

'08. 




195 



itlonticola 

'06. 



Jftelb g>tatt 

Commandant James M. Burns, Major I T . S. Army 

Cadet Major II. W. Sandkks 

Cadet Captain Charles E. Wells, Jr. 

Cadet ('(/plain L. D. Saunders 

Cadet Captain A. C. Weaver, Signal Officer 

Cadet First Lieutenant S. J. Jackson, Adj. 

Cadet First Lieutenant .... Gorwin S. Burns, Quarter Master 



urn 




iflonttcola 

'OS. 



Montitoia 

'08. 




J2on=Commt£#ioneb i£>tatf 

Cdth I St rgedni Major II. A. Reynolds 

Cadet Quarter Master Sergeant. . .. J. P. McJilton 

Cadet Ordinance St rgeant Thomas L. Harris 

Cadil Principal Musician TAMES II. Riddle 

Cadet Drum Major Donald Koss 



I'W 




ittonttcola 

'08. 



Dnim Major Donald Ross 



Thomas H. Becker 



A. P. Armstrong 
I). S. Cronin 
0. S. Campbell 
6. G. Crewson 
L. P. Hallowav 
J. H. Hefke 
C. H. Livqngood 
X. S. Llovd 



Corporals. 



Privates. 



A. I. Marple 



A. D. Hell 



F. 0. Marple 
F. B. Maver 
.1 G. Mealy 
C. K. Mellon 
Clifford Parker 
T. 0. Pitzer 
Harry Sperling 
B. A. Stephenson 



ftlonttcola 

"08. 




Company & 

Officers 

Captain II. W. Lawson 

First Lieutenant L. W. Ryan 

Second Lieutenant T. B, Foulk 

Firsi Sergeant W. It. Thacher 

Sere ml Sergeant W. G. mill 

Third Sergeant J. C. Evans 

Fourth Sergeani S. V. Haworth 

Fifth Sergeant B. W. King 

Corporals 
!•'. F, Nickel! II. J. Hawkins 

Alfred Carnes E. ('. Smith 

200 




Jflonttcola 
'08. 



Company ]& 

Officers 

Captain T. A. Gist 

First Lieutenant C. C. Sheppard 

Second Lieutenant H. M. Scott 

First Sergeant R. O. Hall 

Second Sergeant Ira F. Nestor 

Third Sergeant J. A. Hanna 

Fourth Sergeant G. W. Whiting 

Corporals 
C. H. Layman G. W. Grow- 

ls:. S. Lashlev 



201 



iflonttcola 

'08. 




Company C 

Officers 

< kptain W. E. Lloyd 

First Lieutenant J. A. Ybnker 

Second Lieutenant Clifford Mvcr* 

First Sergeant D. If. Ksti'll 

Second Sergeant (!. B. Folk 

Third Sergeant Boyd. Randall 

Fourth Sergeant R. C. Ward 

Fifth Sergeant IT. C. Barnes 

Corporals 

T, W. Fitzgerald W. F. Morrison 

J. I'. Molarity L. M. Smith 



Jfrtoatesi 





Companp & 




0. Austin 




M. E. Har'an 


R. P. Beckett 




D. R. Nickel 1 


Thomas Brown 




F. D. Palmer 


.1. M. Burns, Jr. 




W W. Point. Jr. 


A. J. Collins 




R. J. Rose 


Parker Oorbitt 




E. H. Shaffer 


J. C. Cross 




J. B. Smith 


T. M. Dorse v 




F. L. Sutten 


H. A. Downs 




C. R. Srlenstriek* 


E. A. English 




C. B. Van Bibber 


A. Gershain 




H. R. Vail Horn 


S. S. Green 




Stark Ward 


Pearey Hall 


Warren Hanna 

Companp M 


X. A. Wolfe 


V. Barba 




C. E. Sloane 


T. D. Divinnev 




E. Smith 


\V. G. Donley 




G. C. Smith 


J. B. Ha worth 




L. E. Sydenstricker 


J. E. Howard 




M. L. Taylor 


Z. MacDonald 




H. A. L. Walkup 


K. T. Manning 




L. C. Watson 


W. R. Reitz 


J. A. Rupert 

Companp C 


T. B. Zinn 


H, M. Allen 




G. (I. Means 


0. L. Armstrong 




M. Morris 


M. C. Burnside 




J. R. W. Monis 


R. L. Bnehannon 




L. C. Mu s<> rave 


0. R. Clark 




K. C. Oldham 


R. H. Cist 




B. L. Page 


R. J. Gould 




J. T. Raburn 


H. A. Hoskins 




J. H. Robinson 


W. H. Hoyt 




11. S. Sydenstricker 


L. L. Jamison 




B. Tenant 


E. R. Lang 




C. Tetrick 


C. R. Bong 




11. L. Crow 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



A. C. Loving 



203 



ittonttcola 

'08. 




'THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF THE FACULTY. 




Jfflonticola 

'08. 



205 



itlonttcola 

'08. 



IN MEMORIAM 



a 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY EXCAVATED 



9' 



BY 



WALTER DONALDSON HEREFORD. 



*"West Virginia University Excavated" is the title of the 
story Unit won first prize (Faculty judges) in the Monticola short 
story contest, It contained a few gentle roasts on various mem- 
bers of the faculty which were too pointed to suit the Censor 
and higher officials, and "West Virginia University Excavated" 
was laid awav to rest, — The Editors. 



2<W 



jfHargaref* $art in tfte Content: 



Benton, West Virginia, April 5, 1907. 
My Dear old Eleanor: 

I am almost ashamed to write to you after having 
waited so long, but I have been so very busy that I have 
not had the time to write sooner. You know I am expecting 
to graduate this year, and, of course, I have more than 
usual to do, as I have to write my graduating essay. There 
are eleven in the Senior class. There were only ten of us 
last year, but Xettie Marsh came into our class at the begin- 
ning of this term. Did I ever tell you about her? She has 
lived out in the country all her life, and I do not think she 
has been accustomed to very much. All of our class were 
surprised when Professor Burke said she could graduate 
this year. It seems, though, that she has had a good teacher 
at the country school, who prepared Xettie for college. 
That "marvelous Miss White" as Xettie calls her teacher. 
got married some time ago, and the result is that Xettie has 
come to Benton, and is in our class. All of us Seniors 
are cross to think that she will graduate with us. You see 
we have been together ever since our Freshman year, and 
now we do not like a stranger to come into the class at the 
eleventh hour. 

Xettie is certainly an odd-looking girl. She wears 
calico shirt-waists all out of style, a shabby brown skirt 
that sa^-s in the back, and a brown hat with two chicken 
feathers on it. She acts just as strangely as she dresses. 
Sometimes we girls talk to her, and she never answers any- 
thing except, "yes" or "no." During the recess period, 
she never takes a walk, — always sits at her desk and studies. 



Indeed, she hasn't any more life in her than a rag' doll has. 

Let me tell you what a silly thing she did one day: I had jftflonttCOla 

brought some fudge to school one day and was passing it '08. 

around to all of the girls and boys. After I had given all 

of the rest, I handed some to Nettie, who was sitting in a 

far corner of the room. When I passed the candy to her 

great tears came into her washy blue eyes. Now anyone 

who cries when a girl offers her some fudge is perfectly 

silly. Don't you think so? 

Dear me, here I have been so busy telling you about 
Nettie Marsh, that I had almost forgotten to say anything 
about the prize which Mr. Gray has offered, lie has offered 
ten dollars to the Senior who writes the best paper. After 
thinking a great deal harder than I generally think, I have 
decided to try for the prize. Ten dollars isn 't so much. 
and yet it would get me a great many things I want. Of 
course, Xettie Marsh is going to try, too. I certainly hope 
that she will not get it. If I am not the lucky one, I want 
one of the girls or boys, whom I know real well to get tin 1 
prize. I have decided to write about "A School Girl's 
Life." Do tell me something to say, some little suggestions, 
you know. I am all in a flurry over this prize. My mind 
seems to lie a blank; at first, I thought it wouldn't be hard 
to write a paper, but, don't you know, every thing I say 
sounds so tame ! 

Indeed, my dear old Eleanor, I must stop writing 
because I have a thousand and one things to do. I hope 
that you will not be too busy to write to me very soon. 
From your loving cousin, 

Margaret. 



207 



Benton, West Virginia, May 12, 1907. 
My Dearest Eleanor: 

This is the first opportunity I have had to answer your 

very interesting letter. I can testify that a girl is very 

busy when she is about to graduate and has to write a 

ffclonttCOla prize paper besides. It was perfectly lovely of you to make 

'08. those suggestions. I don't know what I should have done 

without- them. 

Now. my dear old cousin, I am going to tell you some- 
thing which I am certain you will be glad to hear. One 
day last week, I was reading my paper to Professor Burke, 
and he told me, very confidentially, of course, that my 
paper was the best of all that he had heard. You see, all 
of us have read our papers to the professor and he made 
smile suggestions and corrections. Now, don't you breath 
it, but he told me that he saw no reason why I should not 
win the prize. You may think strange for the teacher to 
tell me this, but you see, he is not one of the judges, so 
it doesn't matter much what he told me. Professor Burke 
also said Nettie Marsh had a very interesting paper. Do 
you suppose there is any possibility of her winning? I am 
not much afraid of such a thine' after whal Professor Burke 
has said about my paper, but just suppose thai the judges 
should like Nellie's paper better! But I am going to do 
my best to win. 

1 do not know whether I shall have time to write to 
you again before the coldest or not. However, 1 shall write 
as soon as it is over. 

Lovingly your cousin, 

Margaret. 

I*. S. I am having a beautiful white organdy made 
l'<>y the contest. It is trimmed with lace and is very pretty. 

M. 



Benton, West Virginia, May 25, 1907. 

My deal- Eleanor: 

No doubt you have been wondering whether I won the 
prize contest, which was held last night. I imagine you shut 
your eyes and tried to see me how I looked in my 
new dress as I read my paper. Honey-Bunch, 1 know 
you will be surprised when I tell you that I was not at the 
contest. I shall tell you how it all happened. About a 
week ago, I was sitting all alone in our recitation room at 
the noon hour. I did not know that anyone was near until 
I heard Nettie Marsh's voice. She was out in the hall, and 
as the dlOOr was open. 1 could hear every word that she said. 
She was talking to one of the Junior girls. 1 heard her say. 
"Yes, I should like to get the prize, but I suppose I can't. 
I should like to have the money to give to mother. She 
is working so hard to keep me in school. Father is dead, 
you know. " 

Eleanor. I cannot describe the feeling that went over 
me when [ heard these words. All in a Hash 1 saw how 
selfish I was and how unselfish Nettie was. Then it entered 
my head to let Nettie gel the prize. At first, I must con- 
fess, it was very hard for me to give up the idea of the 
honor, but every time I was tempted to be selfish, Nettie's 
words would ring through my head. I made all sorts of 
plans to keep from being in the contest. At last, 1 decided 
that 1 would have an attack of the grippe, so last Tuesday 
I suddenly became very ill! I told Mamma that I had a 
raging headache, and sharp pains between my shoulders. 
Of course, poor dear little mamma was very much alarmed, 
as it was just two days before the contest, and she wanted 
to send for the doctor. 1 assured her that I did not need 
a physician as I would soon be well. Mamma made me go 
to bed, so I was compelled to be in a scorching hot room a 1 ! 



208 



day Wednesday and yesterday. The blinds were down and 
not a breath of air could get into the room. The blinds 
were put down at my suggestion, as I told Mamma that 
the light hurt my eyes. To tell the truth, I didn't want. 
Mamma to see what a healthy-looking sick person I was. 

During these last two days, I have suffered like a 
martyr. I have drunk no less than two gallon dandelion 
tea, and! have had my back blistered with at least half a 
dozen mustard plasters as large as an apple pie. Every 
time mamma came into the room, I groaned as if 1 were 
in great misery. 

Yesterday, I shed a few large crocodile tears, when I 
told mamma it would be impossible for me to take a part 
in the contest, as I was not very much better. She wrote 
a note to Professor Burke, telling him of my illness. Whim 
evening came, I was much better-that is. well enough for 
mamma to go to the contest. All the time she was away, 
I was nervous and excited. I was so anxious to know who 



would win the prize that I could scarcely wait for her 
return. After hours and hours, it seemed to me, she earnc 
home. "Who won.'" 1 almost screamed. "Let me see," 
said mamma, "some girl by the name of Marsh, I believe." 

1 was so glad that I jumped out of bed and danced 
around the room with joy. "Margaret," said mamma, 
much alarmed. "You are sick! Go back to bed this min- 
ute." Then I confessed my sin to mamma, and 1 strange 
to say, she did scold me for my deceitfulness, but only said, 
"you poor child!" I am not certain whether she was 
thinking of my sacrifice or the dandelion tea and mustard 
plasters. 

Don't yon think I have written you a long letter for 
a sick person.' You must write a letter equally as long to 
your cousin, 

Margaret. 
*Second Prize. L. F. 



Jflonttcola 

'08. 



®f)e Jflts&ton of OToman. 



Since Adam quit tending- the Eden truck farm 

It's troubled both cynic and sneer 

To discover for woman a mission on earth 

Besides that of being a dear; 

The poet, the lover, the woman's rights crank 

All assign her a positive place. 

But it's taken the maker of posters and ads 

To make use of her form and her face. 

Her molars she's scouring with "Brown's Scrub Them Clean" 

As a peach she's an ad. for "Peach Soap." 

Be it autos or crackers or candies or gum 

Her mug's along side of the dope; 

With "Leblache's" or "Mennen's Borated" 

She powders herself just for us. 

With health foods and flours, cigarettes and pure beers 

She shows she's a terrible cuss. 



On magazine covers and calendars too 

She smiles on us day after day. 

The right to display our suspenders and socks 

She w-ill probably soon take away; 

For her face and her figure are used as an ad. 

From Greenland to Fiji's dark isles, 

Though she no longer works as a keeper of homes 

As an ad. she works hard with her smiles. 

You'll find her so pictured and posed everywhere 

That you cannot escape here below 

And when you are dead you are likely to find 

In the next world it still will be so; 

So don't be surprised if St. Pete passes out 

A harp ad. that's graced with her soul. 

And the devil will probably sell patent scoops 

With an ad. for her shoveling coal. 



209 



Wi)t Heart of ttje (©etstfja/ 



To walk into a Japanese tea-honse in Tokio, and see a 

ifclontttola Greek letter fraternity pin on the kimono of a dark-eyed 

08. geisha is such a surprise, that you may be pardoned if your 

curiosity should load you to ask how the pin got there. 
Picture, if you please, sunny April in Japan. It is the 
choicest month in the year. The air is fragrant with per- 
fume. There are cherry blossoms, pink and white every- 
where. You seem to have been transported into Floral- 
land, a, land where life is pleasure. 

In such a. land, one bright April morning, John How- 
ard, Yale "(14, found himself. lie was a young American 
civil engineer, who had been sent by Ins government on a 
special mission to Japan. Howard was tall and broad- 
shouldered, a typical college-bred fellow. T I is face in 
repose, was rather commonplace; when animated, it was 
rather striking. When he smiled, which he did often, he 
disclosed a sel <d' even white teeth. His eyes, dark and 
twinkling, were his most distinguishing feature. You 
thought thai they were dark brown; but. when you looked 
at them closely, you found that they were dark blue. Yon 
never quite go1 over the surprise. 

Howard's first week in Japan was a lonely one. lie 
was a man of strong affections, and he missed sorely. ao1 



only his family, but 



boys and Xe 



lie. 



Nelli( 



YOU 



must understand, was the girl he had left behind him in 
.Maryland, the girl, who even then was waiting for "-lack" 
to come hack-. Al the beginning of the second week. John, 
wanidtering by chance into a Japanese tea-house, was greeted 
by a bewildering vision feminimity. 

A dainty Japanese geisha was asking whal his excel- 



lency would have. She was barely five feet in height, but 
she was so exquisitely proportioned that she seemed taller. 
Her shining black hair was piled in coils on her head. 
Through the top coil two jewelled hairpins were stuck at a 
coquettish angle. Her expressive eyes wvw dark and so 
were her eyebrows. Her eye-lashes were lone 1 and curly. 
Her mouth was small and of curves best descibed by the 
word "Icissable. *' Her kimono of red crepe silk was just 
short enough to reveal a pair of red kid sandals. Altogether 
the vision was a charming one. 

She was the first woman that had spoken to John since 
he had been in Japan. He stared so long and so hard 
that blushingly she repeated the question. 

"What will your excellency have.'" 

"Oh!" said John hastily, "Bring me a cup of tea and 
si me wafers." 

When she returned with the tea. John ventured a 
remark. Her command of English was wry poor so that 
conversation languished. When John left, she said. "Come 
again." That, and the first sentence she had uttered, 
seemed to be the only ones, which, doubtless for material 
reasons, she knew best. 

John did "come again," at the end of the week. And 
then the time between his visits shortened until he gol 
into the habit of dropping in every day aboul five for his 
cup of tea. Onoto, (for by this time he had learned her 
name.) was always looking for him, and she was the little 
geisha who always served him. Their conversations ^rcw 
longer and longer. She gave him many an insighl into 
the life of Japanese geisha. John told her all about his 



210 



college and his work, teaching her many new words inci- 
dentally. His fraternity pin interested her most. She had 
told him once that the men of her land never wore jewelry. 
John, in a. general way, had tried to explain why he wore 
the scroll of Alpha Delta Chi. Yon can readily understand 
why he did not succeed very well. All that Onoto gathered 
was that he loved it very much. 

One day, John came into the tea-house rather hurridly. 
As Onoto served him, he said excitedly, 

"Onoto, I am going away tonight." 



She looked at hii 



u hianklv 



'Going away V 



"Yes, I am going hack to America, to the dearest land 
on earth," he said jubilantly. He did not notice how white 
she had grown. 

Yet, in his own way, he was fond of her. "Onoto, 



there is a girl back in America waiting for me. ^Vhen I 
tell her how good you have been to me, she will not begrudge 
\.o you the dearest thing I own — my fraternity pin." 

Silently she let him pin it on her red kimono. Then 
she lifted her face to his and her eyes were dark with 
unshed tears. Against the whiteness of her face, they shone Jilotlticola 
strangely. "I shall wear it for ever," she said, as though 08. 

registering a vow. Then in American fashion they shook 
hands and said, "Goodbye." 

That night, on board an American liner. John Howard 
thought uneasily. "Onoto seemed pretty much cut up. I 
believe she half-liked me." 

That night, on her bed of matting, a humble Japanese 
geisha prayed to her gods for strength for the future. 

* Third prize. M. V. P. 



git the $rom. 



Ouch! Oh! 

What! On your toe? 

Say that music's fine. 

Almost divine. 

Ouch! Oh! 

Again on your toe? 

Hope you will excuse me, 

Just learning you know. 

Do I like Poe? 

Yes, I think he's all right. 

That music's divine, 

Say you dance out of sight. 

I think this makes nine, 

Why, I could two-step all night. 



2BUSS anb JffliSerp. 

If perfect bliss 

Is to kiss 

The lips of a co-ed, 

I pray thee 

To tell me 

The greatest misery. 

My prayer is this 

About the kiss 

And perfect bliss 

"That when I taste 

The sand and paste 

May the good Lord 

Have me dead." 



311 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



0n S>ucf) a jWortL 



Jessiee and Lorenzo had worked hard from eight-thirty until twelve o'clock on one of those terrible winter term 
examinations. Somewhat discouraged, thev talked as follows as they strolled around the circle': 



Dor. . 

"On such a morn as this 
When the sweat flowed swiftly to the knees 
And they did quake together, on such a morn 
Sisyphus, methinks mounted the rugged hill 
And let slip the huge round stone 
That cost him many a sigh and many a groan." 

Jess 

"On such a morn 
Did many a Christian trip to the den 
And there tight and die with the beasts 
Or mangled, limp away." 



Lor. 



"On such a morn 
Was Prometheus hound to the cruel rock 

That vultures might be tilled with liver 

Am] jealous Coils he pleased at the sight of pain. 

.less 

"On such a morn 
Some imp Invented irregular verbs 
And did in this outdo old Satan." 



Lor. . 

"On such a morn 
Did Jessica steal answers from' her neighbor 
And with swift pen told all from Adam 
As far as Green Persimmon." 



Jess 

"On such a morn 
Did young Lorenzo wear well his spur 
Bleeding the sides of his gentle horse 
To him a true one." 

Dor. . 



"On such a morn 
Will Gabriel blow his mighty horn 
And call men unprepared to judgment. 
Then none may horse or pony ride 
St. Peter grades us right, you know 
If ninety, "above;" if sixty, "below." 



212 



jfflp jWatmg iWatct 



After an absence of two years I found myself at the 
Comraencement Ball of The West Virginia University. 

As soon as the hearty welcome of my old friends was past, 
I withdrew to my favorite nook from which place I could 
see the happy faces Hit before me. and listen to the merry 
feet and the sweet *" Hudson Waltz" of the same old 
orchestra to which music I had oft danced. Now and 
then there floated to my ears above the soft cadence of 
music, the suppressed merry outbursts of laughter. 

It was a case of heart that drew me back to these 
beloved scenes. Dreamily my thoughts turned from the 
moments of the present to a picture of the past ; a picture 
whose every incident was graven upon my heart for I 
had been both hero and martyr. Before me stood the trim 
figure of a girl with laughing, mischievous eyes of brown 
anil' vvd. smiling lips. She it was whom I loved and had 
loved these six years past with all the fiery passion of 
youth. How happy I bad been this night two years ago! 
Had I not just hope that she loved me with the same 
pure passion I held for her? But it was at the gate— at 
the gate — Alas! 

She had bid played with me, toyed with me, lied to 
me all the time. Yet I loved her. And because I loved 
her, I had returned to get one glimpse of her before I left 
to return I knew not when. In vain my eyes searched 
the ball room of the Armory: she was not here. My heart 
was too heavy for dlancing this night; I felt a defeated 
competitor after the award had been made. 

Wearily I got my hat and moved through the conser- 
vatory. I no longer heard the sweet music, the laughter, 



or merry trip of feet, for my mind had conjured up the 
treasured picture of a past day. the sole remaining com- 
panion of my jilted heart. As I turned the knob of the 
door which led out into the night, I heard my name spoken 
by a voice whose familiarity made my heart bound and 
rebound, every muscle quiver, and every nerve tingle. 
Pain intermingled with happiness swelled up into my heart 
like a tidal-wave upon the beach. Trembling, I turned 
leaving the door half open. 

"Mignon!" burst from my lips. 

It was the same sweet girl who had spoken those fate- 
ful words at the gate. With her large brown eyes spark- 
ling with pleasure and a smile diffusing her whole coun- 
tenance, she quickly came towards me. As I looked at 
her I knew why I loved her so dearly — this beautiful vixen. 

"Why, Dick Langmead, where on earth did you come 
from.'" she asked as she took my hand. 

"I got in this afternoon from Mexico." I replied, and 
my hand trembled in hers. 

"From Mexico.' What have you been doing in 
Mexico.' Come. Dick, sit dlown and tell me all that you 
have been doing since you graduated." 

I tell her of what I had been doing? 1 sit beside her. 
look into her eyes, hear the sound of her voice, feel my 
heart, yes, my xevy soul sick with melancholy.' \'o. this 
was more than I sought. A man has the courage to face 
all difficulties, save to be in the presence of her whom he 
loves, but who has refused him. 1 could not relate how 
empty life had been since that Commencement Ball; how 
utterly desolate and uncheerful home had been, how I had 



Jtlonttcola 

'08. 



21.! 



prone to the Mexican Rockies to be far from all familiar 
faces only to think — think — of the Mignon I loved 1 . I had 
lived with nature, conversed with her, and tried to forget. 
I could not. No, no. I could not tell her of this. I could 
nut stay. 
itlontitola "Mignon," I said, "do not think me ungallant, hut 

'08. it is necessary that I go, I have a very important engage- 
ment at ten-thirty, so important that I cannot neglect it. 
It is ten now. I know that you will excuse me for this 
evening, won't you?" 

"Why, Dick Langmead, what do you mean '. Of course 
you would lie ungallant. Do you think that I am going 
to let you go so soon ? Xo, indeed. Let the old engage- 
ment go. Let it go, db you hear? Come, Dickie, that's 
a good boy. " 

She laid her hand lightly on my arm, and looked up 
at me in the most wistful, beseeching manner with her 
Large brown eyes. As I looked into them, I felt myself 
drawn to her. He the result what it might I would stay. 
I walked with her to a cupid-seat, concealed as it was by 
beautiful palms and ferns. As we sealed ourselves the 
lovely notes of "Peter Piper" floated in, and my spirits 
nearly rose to the point of happiness. 

"Now. Dick, that I have broken that obstinate will of 
yours, I want you to tell me of what you have been doing." 

There was no escape. I must relate all. I took control 
of my voice lest she might hear the sadness of my heart. 

"Well. Mignon," I began with voice slightly quiver- 
ing, "after thai night — that night of the Ball I went home. 
For some reason I did not find the wanted happiness there; 
tin' familiar faces did nol interest me. I was tired id' balls, 
of society, of Salmi prattle; I longed to go out into the 
world, not among business men, but where I could be \'vt^' 
from all restraint, to live with nature." 



"Father had just purchased a large ranch north-west 
of Monterey, and I prevailed upon him to give me the 
superintendency. Arriving at LI Buenoviento, the ranch's 
name, I found things in a most deplorable condition. The 
OOW-punchers were a motely crowd of drunkards and thieves. 
I discharged them all and secured a force of Texans. 
Those whom I had discharged took illwill against me, and 
began to steal my cattle as well as shoot the Texans. We 
had 1 a big fight in October on the Yalo. which we won. 
But that seemed to arouse their hatred all the more. With 
a force increased by half, they attacked us one evening 
before mess with the intent of burning the buildings. We 
ran out of the cabins to give fight, and as 1 stepped through 
the door, I fell, shot, through the right lung." 

"Dick!" Mdgnon broke in on my narrative and 
tightly clutched my arm. 

"Yes, I was laid up several weeks. Well, my boys 
got behind the cabins and nearly annihilated the villanous 
gang. After that they never troubled me again." 

"Faithfully I worked upon the ranch, never shirking 
my slightest duty, but strive as I might I could not be 
happy. The boys were kind enough to me; they did all 
they could to make me happy, but to no avail. I love 
nature: I love to feel the cool, fresh air of the prarie. to 
see the beautiful sunrise and miles of green Lrrass. and 
hear the lowing of the cattle. But all of this could not 
draw the melancholy from my heart. Something was lack- 
ing in my life." 

"Dick, it was only the presence of a woman that was 
lacking. Are there not plenty of Spanish senoritas there.' 
1 have heard that they were beautiful, more SO than the 
American girl; they love strangers, besides they are usually 

well educated." 

1 looked at Mignon and found her searching my face 



with her eyes as if trying to read my every expression. 
She seemed to be eagerly waiting my answer. I could not 
understand her interest. 

"Yes, Mignon, the senoritas are all of that, but I bad 
no desire to marry any. I never made the acquaintance 
of one. In fact I did not care to meet any woman. My 
heart was too lonely and depressed to seek consolation. 
I felt as if I eould stand it no longer, and in dispair I 
decided to leave. I made an honest old cowboy captain 
and wired father of my departure." 

"And, Dick," broke in Mignon, "where are yon going 
now ? ' ' 

"I am going to leave America. I am going to live 
in fast society to see if I cannot drown this melancholy; 
to forget these cares and pains. No matter at what price 
happiness comes it shall be bought. Count de Barnois of 
Paris has invited me to live with him, and I leave tomorrow 
to accept his invitation. That is my story, Mignon. Now 
I must go." 

"No, Dick, you must not go to Paris. You must not 
try to find happiness in the bowl and among society women. 
Go back to Buenoviento and work for your father." 

"I can't go back there, I would go mad. To live so 
lonely, so isolated, is hell itself. I know that I ought to 
go, but I cannot stand it." 

"Take some one back with you. Dick, some girl. Is 
there not one girl that could make your life happy?" 

"No— No," I falteringly lied. I longed to tell her all: 
to tell her that I could live anywhere or under any condi- 
tions with her. Yet I feared to speak. 

"Study hard, Dick. Is there not just one girl who 
could make you happy far away from society, from 
humanity.'" 

Once more she searched the depths of my mind with 



her eyes. To look' into Uiem and lie was impossible. 

"Yes, Mignon," I replied in a low, tremulous voice, 
"there is one girl, but she— she — " 

"Refused you, Dick? But, Dick, remember the old 
saying that girls do not always mean what they say. Ask 
her again." 

"I cannot. It is not because I do not love her, for 
God knows that I love her to madness. I could not stand 
a second refusal. No, I am going to Paris. No more nature 
for me," I concluded recklessly. 

"No, you are not going to Paris. You are going back 
to Mexico. You are going to look after your father's in- 
terests as well as your own. Besides, Dick, you are going 
to be happy, for you are going to take back the girl you 
love. 

"Mignon! Mignon!" I cried, "for heaven's sake don't 
trifie with me." 

"Why, Dick, I am not trifling with you," and she 
looked smilingly up into my face. 

"You don't mean — don't mean," I arose quivering 
with emotion. 

"I mean, Dick Langmead, that I am going with you 
to Mexico. Why, Dick, I have proposed to you. Couldn't 
you see, you stupid, that I loved you that night two years 
ago? I have loved you all the time, and I was so afraid 
that you would never return. My yirlish vanity nearly 
ruined us both. But, Dickie, that is all past, and I love 
you a whole lot more now." 

Slowly as if in a dream I drew her to my heart, and 
as I kissed her upturned lips the sad plaintive tones of 
the "Waltz of Dreams" wafted to my ears, but it found 
no audience. The ears of my heart were closed to sadness 
for I had found my mating match. 

W. D. II. 



ifflonticola 

'08. 



215 



ftlonttcola 

'08. 




•216 




jfflonttcola 

'08. 



217 



Wt$t Virginia Unibersatp. 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



Organization. 
The University consists of the following colleges, 

schools, and departments: — 

1 The College of Loafers. 

2 The College of Working Mechanics (Union Men). 

3 The College of Farmacology. 

4 The College of Lawlessness. 

5 The College of Hick-kutters. 

6 The College of Hoss Doctors. 

7 The College of Hot Air. 

8 The College of Discords. 

9 The School of Foreshorting. 

10 The School of Sabbeth School Oratory. 

11 The Department of Plunkers. 

Location. 
The University is found on various parts of the campus, 
extending from the river to the other side of the campus. 
The location is the same as last year except that the Ath- 
letic field has been raised and an expensive sistem of til- 
ing ( !} laid to assist in making it water-proof. 

Funds. 

The University is supported by (1) Interest on its 
debts. (2) The Liberality ( .'.'.') of the Slate Legislature. 
(3) Extortions from the students. (4) Gym. Fees. 

Buildings. 

The buildings are as follows: — 
1 Woodburn Hall, brick, for the confinement of the 



Law School and the School of Music. Often used 
as a place to test Chinese fire crackers. 

2 Science Hall, brick, day loafing place for 
' ' Prexie. " 

3 Martin Hall, brick, kindergarten department. 

4 Commencement Hall, brick, square, formerly used 
as a brewery, now a place not to have Chapel. 

5 Experiment Station, red, for the analysis of fer- 
tilizers. 

6 The Armory, brick, basement, for Y. M. & Y. W. 
C. A. receptions, and dances. 

7 Library, stone, for loafing, spooning, manufaetur- 
of matches, etc. This building contains a number 
of choice alcoves, secluded spots and window seats 
for a. selected number of young people, (you are 
expected to furnish your own cushions and acces- 
sories). 

8 Prexie 's House, stone, for ornamental purposes. 
9' The Central Heating and Power Plant .' .' .' .' .' !. for 

use when the supply of coal and gas is exhausted. 

10 The Woman's Hall, wood, barn-like, for a bluff. 

11 Observatory, for class use in Sign Painting and 
Advertising. 

12 Athletic Field, for experimental purposes and 
Cadet drill. This field can be used for athletics 
between times. 

Entrance Requirem ents. 
The subject may be either a male or female. In either 



ease he or she is expected to bring a certificate from some 
school or institution saying that the bearer has had twice 
the amount of work for which credit is desired (ail desired 
credits will be discounted 50 per cent.) 

Registration. 

Under the new and expeditious system of registration 
a new student can register in a week, if he has an old one 
to pilot him through the red-tape district. Old students, 
by taking the short cuts, may get through in less time. 
Students should form in line around the circle before pass- 
ing before the "White Cap." 

Classification. 

Students will be classed according to their flunks, cuts, 
and ability to chew "Mail Pouch." 

No student shall lie admitted to the Freshmen class 
until he has provided himself with a milk bottle, a bib 
and a. paint brush. 

No student shall be classified as a Sophomore until he 
has been three years a Freshman in good and regular 
standing. (By diligent cutting and flunking a satisfactory 
examination, and with the consent of the committee on 
flunking and grading this condition may be removed). 

No student shall be classified as a Junior until he has 
been at least three times on the "Faculty Mule." 

No student shall be classified as a Senior until he can 
thoroughly masticate and expectorate four bags of "Mail 
Pouch" a day. 

Degrees. 

This institution offers the following degrees which will 
be conferred upon the worthy students at the end of four 



or more years at the discretion of the committee on Stu- 
dents' Exits. 

Bachelor of Athletics (A. B.) 

Bachelor of Loafing (LL. B.) 

Mule Driver (M. D.) 

Kitchen Mechanic (K. M.) 

Doctor of Phlunking (Ph. D.) 

Examinations. 
Examinations will be held at the close of each term 
to determine the official standing of the students. Post 
mortem examinations will be held at the beginning of the 
term for the benefit of those whose standing is still in 
doubt. A student is expected to make at least 60 per 
cent, (average) to still sojourn with us but if he shows the 
proper spirit of humiliation and promises to reform he 
will be given another opportunity (this process will be 
repeated ad infinitum.) 

General Information. 

Special inducements are ottered students taking Sab- 
beth School Oratory, no tuition will be charged and a re- 
duction will be obtained in board. 

Chapel will be given if enough students apply for the 
course to justify its being given. 

Rooms may be had at private houses. Students must, 
however, furnish their own tobacco, periodicals, and 
refreshments. 

When wishing to smoke on the campus one should 
place himself on the steps of some building where he may 
be seen and at the same time block the progress of other 
students. It is also good form to lean out of the windows 
for a short smoke, usually a cigarette. 

"Mail Pouch" is the only brand of chewing tobacco 
officially recognized by the Chewers' Union. 



iWonticola 

'08. 



219 



jflonttcola 

'08. 



Light boarding can be had at any of the fortresses of 
the city. 

Students wishing to make use of the Athletic Field 
must secure a suitable boat and have it inspected and reg- 
istered by the Superintendent of Marines. 

To secure uniformity of conditions for all kinds of 
Athletic contests, a rain has been ordered for each event 
scheduled. 



All students should set their watches with the chro- 
nometer on Martin Hall and keep them regulated with it 
(corrected annually by wireless telegraphy from the base- 
ment). 

Further information concerning any of the schools 
or departments may be had by writing to the Head of the 
same or the Secretary of the "Lemon Club." 




220 



Woman's i>all Hocate 



On the evening of the 27th of January, Rosa made 
a noise. Fifteen minutes and thirty-seven seconds later, 
Clara dropped a book. The Hall was thoroughly alarmed. 

Mae S — - excitedly, one Friday, "Girls! I do be- 
lieve I told 'em both to come tonight." 

One girl at the Hall gets up at six, and rides ten 
miles, with the thermometer at zero —and the preacher, to 
hear a good sermon. 

Jim-iny! Howe did Oussie get that music? 

We always have fresh cut F (-) ow (-)ers for Sunday 
dinners. Anna is generous. 

Emmy Harris is a lucky girl to have such a devoted 
"brother." 

Teddy daily watches for Miss Moore. 

Teddy can eat apples. 

Tedldy wants to go to Sunday School. 

Teddy reads the newspaper. 

Teddy takes physical culture. 

Up to Christmas Pansee was very nicely Settle-d. 

"Why are those fourteen girls hanging over the ban- 
isters?" "The telephone bell is ringing." 

Clare Clifford is back for the Spring term. She is 
carrying twelve courses and intends to study. 

"Girls what's all that commotion up stairs.'" "(), 
1 hat's Cilda Smith, putting things to Reitz. " 

Mrs. Howe, "Sh! It's Sunday." 



An extra postman has been put on the Woman's Hall 
route since January 3rd, because Blake Lemley alone, has 
received 98 letters, 7() post cards, (J packages, and 4 special 
deliveries. 

Emma Harris, at the telephone, "Please go 'way and 
keep quiet, it's a long distance message." 

''Tildy" is stopped in the hall, having been discovered 
as she crossed the bridge — "It doesn't look well, Bertha, 
for you to walk with two larij< gentlemen." "Tildy," 
meekly, "I'm sorry they're so big." 

In her zeal for knowledge Helen Vance arises at 
2-.'M) A. M., and disturbs the slumbers of her long-suffering 
roommate, with her frantic efforts at translating Horace. 

Miss Moore in the dining room, at the beginning of 
the term, "Young ladies, you will take your places as 
follows: Miss Stout will sit next to me — why she is'nt 
here!" One of the girls, "1 just met her hurrying to the 
depot." 

"Don't, be alarmed, it's only little Trixie sliding 
brooms down the stairs." 

Since Miss Gertrude Pollock's accent to the third 
floor, Miss Moore has to make frequent trips up there, to 
stop the nightly revelry. 

The damsel from Erie, holding a burning match in 
her hand— very excitedly- "(iirls, name it Quick!" 



jfflonttcola 

'08. 



poofe* IXebtetoeb. 



Jfflonttcola 

'08. 



"The Modern Cupid." A hook for co-eds especially, 
telling when and where to look for him, when you should 
find him, and how to know him when you do find him. 
A very exhaustive treatise on the subject and rhetorically 
correct, by Miss Evalyn Burns. 

"A Bachelor's Blunder." In this hook, Mr. (). C. 
Lewis sets forth the reasons why he has never married. 
The hook is somewhat of an autobiography of his own life. 
Mr. Lewis tells the young men to avoid following in his 



footsteps. It seems to be his bigness of heart that induced 
him to write such a book. The book is very interesting 
and instructive to young men. 

"The Higher and Better Life or Long Hair in Its 
Relation to Christianitv. " A great literary triumph; 
in its style and in the thought expressed it stands alone. 
By 1). W. Baushke, with Preface, Appendix and Index by 
Ichabod Crane. 



15oofe£ Eecettoeb. 



'Chatterbox" Miss Colbert. 

'Idle Thoughts of An Idle Fellow" Louis Chit. 

How to Conduct A Literary Society". ... B. M. Whaley. 

Innocence Abroad" W. V. V. Freshman. 

'Condensed Notes" — Aids to Memory in 

Examinations A Sophomore. 

'What I Know," (10,000 pages, small type).. 

Homer Strosnider. 

'Wit and Humor of the Age" Snakes Wells. 

Chips We Bass in the Night" Skin Draneand Louis Carr. 

'Kidnapped" (When a Freshman.) A. S. Dayton. 

'Back to the Tall Timbers" ( '. S. L. Bohr. 

The (Doming Race" Puddenhead Wilson. 

'My Experience as a Reporter" Miss Ada Neal. 

■ Reveries of ;i Bachelor" Professor Smith. 

' I low to ( Jet Rich " Professor Morris. 



"Sleep As a Fine Art" "Cockle" Bruce. 

"The Life of a Busy Bee" Maud Puleher. 

"The Strenuous Life" Jessie Jenkins. 

"Public Speaking as a Profession" Jack Kenna. 

"Military Commands in Words of One 

Syllable" Ma.j. II. W. Sanders. 

"Manual of 'Prospecting.' " B. Walter King. 

"Other People's Business and How to Hun 

It." (). M. Wilkerson. 

"Compendium of Knowledge" W. I). Hereford. 

"How to Bool< Like Engineers".. Colcord ami Colcord. 

"Why Don't You Smile:'" J. Edgar Larew. 

"Nursery Rhymes" J. Pierpoint Morgan. 

"Manuring, Theory and Practice" .. Prof. F. L. Emory. 

"Evolution of W. V. I T ." "Doc." Collet. 

" Fishin ' Worms" John Thomas West. 



-i-z-i 



J|ere anb tEfjere. 

The Athlete Carr 

Occuring in Fences Post 

The Wise .Man Sage 

A Safe Criterion Brand 

Better than a Little Moore 

Good to Eat Lamb 

How to Find 'em Hunt(d) 

A Good Trade Taylor 

A Great Angler Fisher 

Only a Youngster Kidd 

Ring Bell 

Coll-ett A little Coll 

What he likes to do Crow 

The matchless, peerless, bald-headed wonder Cooper 

Just how its done Wright 

Lseful in a way.. Mason, Miller, Smith, Shepherd, Cooke 
Safety appliance (Air) Brake 



jffilonttcola 

'08. 



is>ome of the Jgopg. 

George Washington Price. 
Benjamin Franklin McGinnis. 
Henry Clay Batton. 

Alexander Napoleon Bonaparte Dayton. 
Baxter Mnnroe Demothenese Whaley. 
Harris Aqnilla Protzman Reynolds. 
John Qnincy Adams Hutchinson. 
Albert. Andrew Jackson Collet. 
Rough and "Reddv" Wilkerson. 



prominent Actors! anb GChetr Paps. 

The Freshman — The Rising Generation. 

Prexy — The Sinecure. 

The Prep. School — Three Hundred Thieves. 

Miss Vance — A Boy Wanted. 

Ramage and Post — City Sports. 

Jack Hare — Tribulations of a BaldJaeaded Man. 

Miss Neal — A Social Highwayman. 

Foxv Stewart— Star Gazer. 



223 



iflonttcola 

'08. 










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Bo |?ou peltebe 



That Hutchinson is in love? 

That Prexy is President of the University? iHotlttCOla 

That Dayton ,is engaged ? '08. 

That the Chi Omegas had policemen and reporters to help 
them initiate .' 

That Louis Carr wears lavender socks when he has his pic- 
ture taken ? 

That Whaley knows parlimentary law :' 

That Miss Edwards is growing? 

That Miss Smith ever recognized an acquaintance on the 
street 1 

That Hereford and "Coke" ever indulges in H,0 ? 

That Prexie knows : — What Prats, are represented in W. 

V. U. ? 
How often the Athenaeum is issued ? 
How Mechanical Hall looks on the 

inside ? 
Anything about Sunday Schools .' 

That "Foxy" sells books at "cost and carriage?" 

That Truscott ever forgets his cane and silk handkerchief ? 

That the girls are high jinks in Ladies' Parlor? 

That Friend is a. picture trust and should be suppressed ? 

That Prof. Larew knoweth not how to chew'? 

That Lucas is a good politician ? 

That Lloyd ever kept awake in Physics? 

That Wilkerson will ever learn not to butt in ? 

That Pow ever studies? 

That Leahy has a girl ? 

That Prof. Emory ,is an authority on tile draining ? 

225 



% Jfeto Comparisons. 



©to |9ou Cfaer g>ee 



iflonttcola 

'08. 



Burns, 


Burner, 


Brown. 


Camp, 


Campbell. 




Carle, 


Harlin 




Cole, 


Coleman, 


Colebank 


Conn, 


Connell. 




Cork, 


Corker. 




Fish, 


Fisher, 


Bates. 


(iibbs, 


Gibbons, 


Gibson. 


Gist, 


Gist, 


Gist. 


Green, 


Greene, 


Greener. 


Pier 


Hogg. 




Hundt, 


Hunter. 




Mustard, 


Musgrave, 


Musk rat. 



Finny Lakin miss a show .' 

Fatty play basket-ball .' 

Susan's Teddy Bear.' 

Chez without a system .' 

Cap. Leahy smile ? 

"Prof." Larew try to smile.' 

Sammy Brown with Ada Neal .' 

"Major*' Sanders? 

Prof. Brainard in the library? 

Mr. Wilson without Mr. Marsh .' 

The Cadets drill .' 



(©uerries. 

If Dean Hogg were Czar of Russia whal would his 
title be? 

Why is Hutchinson so "Loving?" 

Which attracted the mos1 attention al the Glee Club 
concert, the Club or the rat? 



226 



0m Censor. 

Friends, students, West Virginians! lend me your ears. 

I come to laud our Censor and to praise him. 

The evil themes we write are scored by Simeon, 

The good are sometimes praised by dear old "Pat." jWottttCOla 

So was it with our Censor. Our Editor '08. 

Will tell you that our Censor was censorious, 

And grievously hath the Censor censured us. 

Here under leave of Prexie — AND the Censor, 

(For Prexie is a lienient, gentle censor. 

So are the Profs — all lenient, gentle censors), 

Come I to write for our Monticola. 

The Censor was our friend, our "firm, good friend," 

But Pow, our Editor, says he was censorious, 

And Pow, our Editor, surely ought to know. 

Our Censor "canned" a roaring, ripping story 

Of local color, ' ' West Virginia Excavated. ' ' 

Did this in our friend, the Censor, seem censorious 1 

And when Pow kicked, 'our Censor then relented. 

All Censors should be made of sterner stuff. 

But Pow still says the Censor was censorious 

And Pow, our Editor, surely ought to know. 

You all shoiild know, that the "Profs." who are in the 

story 
When separately seen, were most indifferent, 
Together, they stood pat. And so the Censor 
Canned the story. Was this censorious? 
Yet Pow still says, he was censorious 
And Pow, our Editor, surely ought to know. 
We editors read the story, not without laughter 
Why then should our Censor deny it to you? 

judgment ! ! ! Bear with us. 

The story never was "0. K-ed by Censor." 

227 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



Commanbmentsi of tijc Hato School. 

I. Thou shalt not steal. 

II. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife. 

III. Love thy wife as thyself, and let no other woman 
enticeth thee from her, lest thou takest a long troublesome 
journey. 

IV. Thou shalt not drink unto intoxication. 

V. Entereth not into a hotel at the hour of midnight 
in a hilarious and exuberant state of intoxication. 

VI. Thou shalt not break down the door of thy 
neighbor's house at 2 A. M., lest thy presence be required 
he fore .Justice Boughner. 

VII. Thou shalt not leave thy coat behind thee when 
thou tleest from an officer, lest thou art afterwards dis- 
covered. 

VIII. Thou shall not enter a theatre or other public 
place of amusement intoxicated unless thou hast a friend 
to lake thee home. 

IX. Thou shalt not linger in Bumbo Lane on show 
nights, lest an ill wind blow upon thee. 

X. Remember Chapel day to keep it holy, and throw 
nothing more than brickbats during the recitations. 



I. A co-ed is true to a student when no other seeks 
her love. 

II. A co-ed paints, adorns herself, and practices arts 
merely to please the student. 

III. A co-ed's smile cost three dollars; tickets to the 
next show. 

IV. A co-ed encourages proposal ami on refusal de- 
nies encouragement. 

V. A co-ed worries for speculation. 

VI. A co-ed will smile on him who wears a loud suit 
and loud socks. 

VII. A co-ed is happy when she can slander another 
and make herself perfect. 

VIII. A co-ed's complexion and hair are uncertain. 

IX. A co-ed is often jealous because another co-ed 
loves a student she cannot love. 

X. A co-ed's indifference is better than her love. 



Equation 1. 1 woman-j-1 man=l grass* 
Equation 2. 1 woman — 1 man =l widow 
Multiply 

(1) by (2). 1 sq. woman — 1 sq. man=l grass widow- . 
*"A11 Flesh is (irass." Bible. 



a-.'H 



jWonttcola 

'08. 



Jfor &ail (&n engineering H>tubent.) 



Owing to the fact that I expect to graduate and 
my papers in June, and at that time will need all 
mnnny I can git holt of. I have resolved to advertise 
offer for sail. 
1 book. Etiquette and Guide to Dancing $ 

(Used only in Junior Prom.) 

1 Thesis skeleton, (second hand) 

1 Complete note hook on Mechanics, without the 

backs 

(I dont need it, I have two others.) 
1 Tabulation of effective formulae for "pulls" on 

the various professors 

1 Psychological Bluffs (by a law student) 

1 Physics Lali. note book 

1 Scientific German text, (interlined translation).. 
1 Set Dif. Calculus exam, questions, (genuine).... 



get 1 Set. Integral Calculus exams, questions, (genuine) .!!> 

the (These questions have been used to re- 

and move conditions for 20 years.) 

1 Topographical map of the campus, west of Front 
.23 St., showing location of each shade tree 

and the best grass plots 25.00 

.30 1 Miscellaneous collection, (consisting of plumb 

bobs, library hooks, stationary, chemicals, 

2.00 instruments, etc., swiped from the various 

departments), quit claim only 1.49 

1 Shoe-box full of Mail Pouch coupons, ( I chew 

2.00 buckshoe now) 5.00 

.05 1 Bible, (dusty but good as new) 08 

1.98 Note: — An undergraduate purchaser will be given, free 

2.4°' of charge, complete wen-king plans for making 70 per cent. 

.19 under "Sport," "Sammy," and "Dickey." 



229 



itlonticola 

'08. 



8 tErageop (M ffli&& Jffloore learns; of tfje borrotomg). 

in Jfour gets. 



Act I. 

Time. Sunday, 6 I\ M. 

Scene. Woman's I hill Parlor. 

The telephone hell rings violently. Every <rirl jumps 
up with a look of expectation, then, quickly sits down again 
and endeavors to look indifferent. After much ( .') pur- 
suasion, Gilda is induced to answer the phone. The message 
proves to be for Miss Harris. 

Act II. 

Time. Five minutes later. 
Scene. Same. 

.Miss Harris re-appears in the parlor, "It's Mr. II— 
and he wants me to go to church. (Jussie. may I wear your 
black hai .'" 



Act III. 

Time. Ten minutes later. 
Scene. Miss Lowe's room. 

Emma trys on Gussie's hat. and finding it becoming 
to her, departs to dress. 

Act IV. 

Time. Seven-thirty. 

Scene. Presbyterian Church. 

Miss Harris and Mr. II— - walk into church. Sharp- 
signed woman: "I think I saw that tall Miss Lowe wearing 
that hat yesterday. I wonder whose it really is." 

( furtain. 

N. B. — These scenes may he repeated indefinitely, 
propei- substitutions of names, places and garments being 
made. 



230 



JBrain g>tormg. 

jWinor Squalls. 



STRIKE ONE. 
The strife 'round the umpire waxed and grew, 
Nor yet did the row diminish; 

And they beat him to pulp with a base-ball bat. 
And gave him a hard wood finish. 



"TOMMY'' HODGES. 
I like Professor Hodges' talks, 
His jokes I like a lot. 

But sometimes what he says, I think 
Is awful Tommy rot. 



Jflonttcola 

'08. 



PROF. EMORY. 
Some say the man is crazy — 
To me he so appeals — 
Now if lie's really crazy. 
He must have Emery wheels. 



THE ROAD TO HEALTH. 
The road to health 'tis hard to find, 
But that there's one there's no dispute; 
For many know the only way 
Is just to take the good Swamp Route. 



NOT ANGULAR. 
The maiden to her lover coos, 
As towards his arms she swerves; 
"You'd better hold on tight, Sweetheart, 
When you go 'round the curves." 



TOO MUCH FOR THE MAJOR. 
Major Burns is a soldier brave, 

And his duty he'll do almost; 
The Dominion and Chronicle he faithfully reads. 
But he falls asleep at his Post. 



PROFESSOR PATTERSON. 
In Rhetoric 2 when questions are dealt, 
There isn't a question but that. 
The hand that one gets must always be played 
You're fixed, so you have to stand "Pat." 



SIMEON SMITH. 
This teacher is a funny man. 
His every speech has wit and pith 
Why should he not cut monkey-shines' 7 
His name is Simeon Smith. 



I BET HE LAUGHED IF HE DID. 

When the Lord in creation was fixing with care 
Geological periods down, 

I wonder if he ever planned for the race, 
The limit in one Sammy Brown. 



231 



2te ©tfters g>ee tte 



fttonticola 

'08. 



Dr. Purinton, (taking off his eye-glasses and smiling 
benignly), "Now, if you'll pardon something personal— 

Dr. Reynolds, (chewing liis thumb), "Now that's so — 



isn't it .'" 

Dr. Deahl, (with a hand on each hip), "Well I don't 
know that I just catch the drift of your meaning. Please 
state your question again." 



Dr. Callahan, (ramming both hands viciously into his 
coat-pockets), "Now, I'll ask you this question. Now I'll 
ask you another question." 



Professor Cox, (in a stern voice), "This is abominable. 
Vague paraphrases are n<>l acceptable. Inexact knowledge 
is worth nothing." 



Dr. Whitehall, (coughing), "Well, it's in the book 
That's what we're here for - I can't study your lessons for 
you. " 

Professor Stewart . (in a consiliatory tone), " Now hoys, 
now. young gentlemen. " 



Dr. Truscott, (icily), "II would he Well to consult the 

dictionary occasionally, and no1 to rely wholly on one's 
own memory." 



Professor Emory, (with an authorative air), "When- 
ever in doubt, lake moments." 



Professor Armstrong, (with a twinkle in his eye). "The 
class hereafter will please sit alphabetically." 



Professor Morris, (in a determined tone of voice). "I 
want to learn you something before Ihe end of the term." 



Professor Hodges, (waving both arms violently). "Now 
you may think it strange for 220 pounds of beef and brawn 
like me to talk about spirit, bid I tell you foot-ball spirit- 



Professor Patterson, (in a weary tone). "Be natural 
Have one point, of view and stick to it." 



Dr. Brooke, (in his soft Southern voice). "This hap- 
pened, sail, at a time where of the memory of man runneth 
not to the contrary. " 



Professor Hare, (rubbing his luxuriant locks), "Now 
people there was once a time when long hair was fashion- 
able, hut people, I do not believe it would do for that fash- 
ion to return. " 



Professor Ilolden, (in a confidential tone id' voice). 
"That's Ihe way, young men. Women are all alike." 

Simeon Smith, (with a bored-to-death air). "Don't you 
know we teachers just pine for humor .' If you have any in 
you. please show it. in your themes." 



Dean Hogg: — "The author handles that subject very 



well. 



232 



jWonttcola 

'08. 



CULLED FROM A STUDENT'S NOTE BOOK. 

Homer is not supposed to have lived. He wrote the 
Iliad and Odyssey. 



Dr. Barbe and Professor Patterson in unison one morn- 
ing a.s they meet Dr. Truseott and five Woman's Hall 
girls, (Dr. Truseott is carrying - a bucket about two by 
twice), "Where's the picnic going to be?" 



Some one has estimated that the amount of hot air 
turned loose at the preliminary debating contest would raise 
the temperature of West Virginia to equal that of Cuba. 

Reddy Wilkerson, (preparing for the preliminary de- 
bating contest), "Say, McD I'll be d— - if I do not 

make some of them fellers work for their monev!" 



Prom The Woman's Hall Cook Book. 

To make apple turnovers: — Scrape out the inside of 
three apples, and place between two fiat wads of dough. 
Sew the edges together and place in a hot oven. Eat two 
before retiring. About two A. M. turnover. 



She Studies English. 

A sweet Freshman Co-Ed. entered the Acme Depart- 
ment Store, and approaching one of the male clerks said 
calmly, "Have you any of those elastic bands capable of 
being enlongated' and adjusted at pleasure, and used by 
the feminine portion of mankind for placing about the 
lower extremities of their locomotive members, to insure 
the proper position and the required attitude of the hab- 
iliments of their tibias.'" The clerk is slowly recovering. 



233 



Jfrom Partem* Source* 



a, .. . PICKED UP BY J. F. M. 

08. Miss So-and-so. — "I wish someone would tell tne what 

a drake is. ' ' 

Mr. "A drake! Why, a drake is a rooster-duck." 



Pedagocia] Student. — "Good. That's according to the 
development theory, always proceed from the known to 
the related unknown." 



First Student. — "ITow did you get along in the Chem- 
istry test?" 

Second Student. — "Much better than T did in the first 
one. I answered nearly half the questions this time." 



West.— "I understand thai -John I). Rockefeller, Jr., 
is a class leader. " 

Stemple. — "Yes. no doubt he is a leader in his class." 



Mr. L.— "Do you study Chemistry?" 

Mr. M.— " Yes, sir." 

Mi'. L. — "What do you gel when you put an arid and 
a base together?" 

Mr. M. "Unless I am very careful, I gel an evolution 
of -hoi air (from Professor W-- — ), and a black circular 
deposit." 



234 



First Latin Student :—" What 's the matter?" 
Second Latin Student: — "Too much 'Hare' lip." 



D. C. : — "The inheritance goes to the longest liver." 
Harry Downs: — "How do you know which has the 
longest liver?" jftlotUtCOla 

'08 

"Tony" Chez: — "I don't mind being called Tony at 
home but I don't want the students to find it out." 



Page Fortney has fallen out with Cicero because he 
wasn't an engineer. 



Prof. Whitehill : — ' ' Arsenic is used in a variety of 
dy(e)ing operations" — and he wondered why everyone 
laughed. 



Miss Lowe: — (drawing back to let Miss Moore pre- 
cede her down stairs), "Let Miss Moore go first," 

Miss Moore: — "Are you going to follow me in a hum- 
ble manner, Gussie ? 

Womna's Hall Girl: — "Miss Moore, she is going to 
follow you in a Lowe(ly) manner." 



"De tous les poisons 1 'Amour est le plus violent," 
Student translating: — "Of all poisons love is the most 
violent. ' ' 

Mr. Stathers: — "Yes sir, that is right." 



In Mechanics Class. 

Prof. Emory : — ' ' Where do you put that point ? ' ' 

Bruce : — ' ' Anywhere. ' ' 

Prof. E. : — "Yes and draw a line through some place 
which is equal to — Who chased who around the walls of 
where ? ' ' 

235 



Coach Forkum to Carr: — "You will have to take a 
brace, Louis, or you will be put on the bench for flunking." 
Carr: — "Oh no! I'm a law student, Coach." 



itlottttCOla Obeying Instructions. 

'08. 

Coach Forkum to foot-ball squad as they went on the 
field to play Univ. of Ohio: — "Now fellows, go in and play 
as though you never played before." Ohio won. 9 to 6. 



One of Emory's maxims — "Do your work so you can 
swear at it." 



Tom Foulk Has a Prescription Filled. 

Druggist: — "Who is this for, Tom?" 

Tom: — "Why for me! I'm sick and Dr. Davids cave 
it to me. " 

Druggist: — "Well, Tom, this prescription is for a 
confirmed drunkard in the last stages of the I). T's. " 



Dr. Callahan: — (In history class B) "Has anyone 
of you seen a. comet '! " 

"Doc" Onllelt:— "Oh yes. small ones." 

Dr. Callahan: — ".Most of us arc loo young to have 

seen one." 



'Teddy' Bock: — (on being asked why he had missed 
so many Monlicohi Board meetings), "Well, you see, Pow, 
for a Few week's I have heen peculiarly handicapped." 



836 



Prof.: — "What kind of a priest is an Auger?" 
Carr: — "Suppose he must be a holy priest." 



Dr. Johnson in Zoology. — "Mr. Dorsey, name some of 
the organs on the dorsal side of the body." 

Mr. Dorsey. — "The kidneys, intestines, and stomach." jiloiltirola 

Dr. Johnson. — "Mr. Dorsey, you know better than that. 'OS. 

Yon know your stomach is not on your dorsal side." 

A Kind Student. — "Dr. Johnson, you must remember 
lie boards at a fort. " 



Dr. Callahan. — "You should bear in mind that llenry 
VIII. married all these women to keep his status quo." 

Student to next neighbor. — "Which one of his wives 
was Status Quo"?" 



Dr. Callahan, (in History), "Mr. Welch, please tell 
us about the Fries Rebellion — Fries Riot." Welch thinks 
Dr. Callahan said "ITea.se rise," so he rises — to the oc- 
casion, metaphorically and literally. 

A little boy standing on the sidewalk the morning after 
the Military Ball exclaimed, "Say Bobbie, it must be some 
high-toned guy that's dead. Just look at the spread they're 
cuttin." 

Yes, He Knows the Bible. 
Prof. Morris, in Roads, Streets, and Pavements dis- 
cussing asphaltum, "The basket that Noah was found in, 
there in the bulrushes, was daubed with the stuff." 



''Tommy" Hodges in Physics 18: — "In everything 
you undertake to do with an alternating current, 'it always 
plays into your hand." 



237 



j-Honttcola 
'08. 



" Humor is the juxtaposition of incongruous concepts." 
— Cox. Isn't that enough to <juell humor? 



Mr. Littlepage: — (Speaking to Dean Hogg), "In West 
Va., what is the difference in punishment for voluntary 

and involuntary insanity?" 



Prof. Armstrong-: — "Who is the prince of Hell?" 
Mr. B. Hough:— (Very shyly and softly). "The 
D-e-v-i-1." 



Chilton: — "Good morning, Dr. Hare." 
Brof. Hare: — Hare, sir. without the "Doctor." 
Chilton: — "It seems to me. sir. more like "Doctor',' 
without the hair." 




emorsL 



Arnold, Golien. 

Let the world slide. 
Bayliss, W. G. 

It is .said that he is constant. 
Boyles, F. M. 

Man delights me not. 
Brake. A. K. 

A round, fat oily man of God. 
Brand. F. M. 

Can there be no second Cicero? 
Burns. Evalyn S. 

She moves a Goddess and looks a queen. 
Chez, Anthony. 

I had about said: "This is Hercules." 
Colcord. ]•'. C. 
Colcord. E. C, 

Two lovely berries molded mi cine stem. 
Cooper, Homer E. 

Dee]> versed in books and shallow in himself. 
Dayton, Arthur S. 

Fling away ambition: 

By that sin fell the angels. 
Diane. Robert M. 

I love life: then let me remember this: 
Time is the stuff life's made of. 
Edwards. Mary D. 

A bevy of fair women, she. 
Ernst, Howard M. 

A man he is to all the students dear. 
Gatherum. Robert. 

Shall 1 like a hermit dwell 

( )n a rock or in a cell '.' 
Gist, J. A. 

In him I see Parson Primrose. 
Grant. Justin A. 

The fumes of his thoughts envelope him. 
Hanifan. Lyda J. 

I awoke one morning and found myself famous. 



Hodges, Warren H. 

I'll not budge an inch. 
Hutchinson. J. Q. 

A politician — one that would circumvent God. 
Fortney, C. Page. 

Here*s my hand. 
Jenkins. Jessie. 

And mine, with my heart in it. 
Kennamond. A. 1). 

Gladly wolde he Ierne and gladly teche. 
Leahy. Thomas. 

A man of actions, not of words. 
Lewis, Laura. 

For I am nothing if not critical. 
Marsh, Joseph E. 

Does good by stealth, and blushes to find it fame. 
Morris, Nellie D. 

Her very frowns are fairer far 

Than smiles of other maidens are. 
Morris. Wilfred A. 

They call him "Sport." 
Murphy, J. S. 

Why am I not from Jupiter sprung? 
Myers, Clifford. 

Prodigal of time. 
Nestor, Ira F. 

This man hath an axe to grind. 
Parker. Walter M. 

Ex tua lingua melle dulcior Unit oratio. 
Pollock. Gertrude S. 

She is ever gentle. 
Post. Clarence. 

Never alone, for lie's always accompanied by good thoughts. 
Quick, Howard M. 

A grass fat man. 
Ramage, C. M 

He hath an excellent good name. 



Jfflonttcola 

'08. 



239 



Rightmire, Edna. 

To her the merest flower that grows can give 

Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears. 
Uoliliins. Aria C. 

He makes a solitude and calls it — peace. 
Ross, Clias. B. 
j-HoiltlCOla Rise, hones! Muse! And sing the Man of Ross. 

'08. Rust. .Marshall W. 

Foster-child of Silence and Slow Time. 
Say-re, Martin L. 

The fire in the flint shows not till it he struck. 
Smith. DaCosta. 

Not to know me argues yourself unknown. 
Strickler, Robert. 

What is the end of fame! "I'is hut to fill 

A certain portion of uncertain paper. 
Turner, Ella M. 

Fruitful Effort is thv name. 



Wayman, ("has. E. 

He. is the mildest mannered man 

That ever scuttled ship or cut a throat. 
Wells, (has. F. Jr. 

A man who can make so vile a pun 

A> he. would not stop to pick a pocket. 
West. .1. T. 

I dare do all that may become a man. 
Whaley, B. M. 

lie's tough, ma'am, he's tough; he's tough and devilish sly. 
Wilkerson, 0. M. 

Blow, Winds, and crack your checks! rage! blow! 
Willis. Dennis M. 

Truth hath a silent breast. 
Wilson. Otis Guy. 

Thou art near to the angels planned. 
Wilson. James E. 

For my part, getting up seems not so easy by half as lying. 



A Senior who had been in the mercantile business, mi 
receiving an invitation to spend a week end with his host 
girl, dashed off the following reply: 

"Morgantown, \V. Va.. March 6th, 1907. 
Deai- Miss: — 

Yours dl' the fourth inst. at hand and contents noted 
with care. Will say in reply thai it will he impossible for 
me to deliver the 150-lbs. of dry meat as per your order. 
Do not order from others until you hear I'roni me again. 
Thanking you for your past patronage and hoping lor the 
continuance of the same, I am. 

Yours truly. 

'1)7 & Co." 



2 in 



Juniors; 



Lough, W. (!. 

"No man is born without ambitious worldly desires. - ' 
Ilinman, C. F. 

"Silence is more eloquent than words." 
Lucas. A. M. 

"Beware the fury of a patient man." 
Hutchinson, B. S. 

"He was not merely a chip off the old 
Block, but the old Block itself." 
Ilawley. Bertha S. 

"I hold lie loves me best that calls me "Tihly.' 
(with apologies to Thomas Heywood.) 
Smith. L. A. 

"I have a heart with room for every joy." 
Fuleher, Maud L 

"Anything hut history, for history must he false." 
Frantz, W. It. 

"An honest man's word is as good as his bond." 
Folk. (i. B. 

"Your word is as good as the Bank, sir." 
Whiting, <i. W. 

"My favored temple is an humble heart." 
Bennett. ( '. M. 

"A little nonsense, now and then 
Is relished by the wisest men." 
Tracy. ( '. E. 

"He trudg'd along, unknowing what he sought, 
And whistled as he went for want of thought." 
McJilton, J. P. 

"The greatest fault I should say. is to be conscious of none." 
Yanosky. Felix. 

"Whistling to keep myself from getting afraid." 
Reinheimer, Clara M. 

"A true friend is forever a friend." 
Collier. G. A. 

"But there's a gude time coming." 



Waddell, M. W. 

"The mildest manners ami the gentlest heart." 
Pollock. Ella. 

"Whatever anyone does or says. I must be good!" 
Green, B. M. 

"And feel that I am happier than I know." 
Yonker. J. A. 

"A man of courage is also full of faith.' 
Grose, E. B. 

"Hold the fort I am coming." 
Selby. L. B. 

"Can one desire too much of a good thing?" 
Jackson, J. H. 

"He had a face like a benediction." 
• lones, Ethel. 

"A face, with gladness overspread ! 
Soft smiles, by human kindness bred!" 
Kennedy. W. M. 

"I awoke one morning and found myself famous." 
Saunders, L. D. 

"Short is my date, but deathless my renoun." 
Bowers. A. B. 

"All human things are subject to decay 
And when fate summons, monarchs must obey." 
Foulk, 'I'. B. 

"And his big manly voice 
Turning towards childish treble, pipes and whistles in his 
soul." 

Lawson, H. W. 

"To take a soldier without ambition is to pull oil' his spurs." 
Bruce, Ernest. 

"Bush on. keep moving." 
Jenkins, .1. II. 

"On with the dance! Let joy be unconfined; 
No sleep till morn, when youth and pleasure meet." 



ittonttcola 

'08. 



2Jt 



Gillooley, T. J. 

"0 beautiful and grand 
My own. my native land ! " 
Randall, Boyd. 

"I never with impatient air. 
In conversation overhear." 
itlOlttiCOla Weaver. Mabel .[ ano . 

'Qg "Like a lovely tree 

She grew to womanhood, and between whiles. 
Rejected several suitors, just to learn 
How to accept a better in his turn." 
Smith. Cilda. 

"And gaze around her from left to right 
With the prophetic eye of appetite." 



P.royles, J. S. 

"Gloomy as night he stands." 
Rock. E. S. 

"But love is blind, and cannot see 

The petty follies that themselves commit." 
Row. George. 

"Thanks he to the Cods! My hoy has ,h,ne his duty. 
Mitchell, Harbour. 

••])o well and light and let the world sink." 
Throckmorton. .1. F. 

"Awake, arise, or he forever fall'n." 
Foulk. Virginia. 

"Bosom up my counsel 
You'll find it wholesome." 



Prof. I). J). -J.: — " Ben Greet is coming to Morgantown 
soon to play 'Tlie Merchant of Venice' and it would be well 
for all the classes to read it. " 

Student, (a week or so later): — "Professor, 1 read 
'The Merchant id' Venice' through and couldn'1 find where 
it said anything about Hen Greet." 



242 



Calendar 



SEPTEMBER. 

17 Charleston "Sports" return. -Mark Hanna. etc. 

18 Numberless (?) Co-eds arrive. 

19 Convocation and frightful rainstorms. 

20 Strenuous rushing season begun, many new ideas introduced. 

21 Dog fight, Drs. Ely and Huchanon's. 

22 Chi Omegas have a rushing party. Hurray ! ! 
24 Alpha Xi Deltas have a party. 

2(i Freshmen- Sophomore Rush. Freshmen win and Sophs, give a 
theatre party. 

27 Phi Sigma Kappa Smoker. 

28 Kappa Delta party. 

29 First game of the season. Ohio Univ. 9; W. V. U. 6. 

30 All the new students attend church. 

OCTOBER. 

1 H. M. Quick meets Miss Quick. 

2' Circus day. Senior Laws give themselves a holiday. 

3 Xed Colcord learns to smoke, Carl ditto. 

4 Monticola election. 

5 Sophomore proclamation against Freshmen. 

6 W. V. U. 37; Oonnellsville 0. 

(Xot a Co-ed present.) 

7 A few new students cut church. 

8 Freshmen Proclamation. 

9 Don Hereford makes the announcement that he is going to 

rush Miss Burns this year. 

10 Walter Keitz meets .Miss Smith at prayer meeting. 

11 Joe Colbert distinguishes herself in French class — See Bock for 

particulars. 

12 Mass meeting — Co-eds give their pennies to support the team. 

13 W. V. U. 11; California 0. (Four Co-eds present.) 

14 Virginia Foulk talks of her eastern school. 

15 Digby: — "Doggonit, 1 have this thing right in my fist. I can 

invite whomever I want." 
10 Digby sends the Sigma Xus a suit -case. 
17 Law students take another holiday to see the team off. 



'08. 



18 Marietta 4; W. V. U. 2. 

19 Hurrah the clock is going ! 

20 Morgantown High School 0; Fairmont High School 0. 

21 Presbyterians hold forth. JflOttttCOla 

22 Best show of the season. Why were not the Co-eds there? 

Sigma Xus. as usual, attend in a body. 

23 Arnold confesses that he does not know the principle parts of 

■shall' in Anglo Saxon class. 

24 Harry Downs entertains the students by doing guard duty. 

25 .1 i in Nash meets Elizabeth on the bridge — South Park. 
20 "Speedy" Quick begins his Military Ball program. 

27 W. V. U. 25; Grove City 0. (Six Co-eds there.) 

28 Collett and Littlepage take dinner with Dr. Brown. 

29 Coach Forkum's dog has a fight. 

30 Dickson sends out invitations for his dance. 

31 Tacky party. 

NOVEMBER. 

1 Dickinson's father comes to town. 

2 Sigma Xu initiation. 

3 W. V. U. 51; Carengie Tech. 0. (At last there is a little rooting. 

Helen Vance leads the Co-eds). 

4 Prep Settle takes Pansee driving though it is Sunday. 

5 All classes are cut. election tomorrow. 
Election Day. Wonderful and strange signs appear in the halls 

and on the campus. 

7 .Mr. Myers gives a definition of a "jackal." "A bird of Europe." 

8 Law students return after election vacation. 

9 More strange signs. 

10 W. V. U. 0; W. U. P. 17. "Plum." 

11 Prep. Settle calls on all the girls in Woman's Hall. 

12 Prof. Cox defines "humor." 

13 Pipes says they have gooseberry trees in Maine. 

14 Woman's Hall lias a visitor and the girls have an extra large 

dinner. 

15 Sophomores turn down the Honor system. 

16 Sophomores receive great condemnation from the Senior Laws. 



243 



17 W. V. U. 54; Buchannon 4. Co-eds attend in a body, Beneke so 

shocked that he forgets to take their money. 

18 Prep. Settle chaperones ten girls from Woman's Hall. 

1(1 The snowy earth rose up to .meet Lee Hutchinson's smiling face. 

20 B. S. K. T. 

21 Mass meeting at the theatre. The Co-eds chew gum and Miss 
itlOnttCOla Moore reproves them. Nigger. Jim makes a speech. 

'@g 22 The team leaves Penn. State. All the students (26) send apol- 

ogies to Kenna. 

23 Team reaches l'enn. State. Hinnian refuses to go to bed and 

l-'orkic gets mad. 

24 Penn. State 10; W. Y. I". 0. 

25 Forknm takes the team to church. 

26 Lizzie Ramage starts the \Y. & J. exclusion. 

27 Hanna: — Skirt mn viedo et veliementer gaudeo. 

28 Mass meeting. Lizzie Ramage grows excited. Dean Hogg has 

the meeting thrust on him. 

29 W. & J. 2!); \V. Y. I". (>. WHEW !!!!!!! 

30 Dolliver does not arrive. Why? He owes money. 

DECEMBER. 

1 Xo thnse after the W. & J. experience. 

2 "Maw" Chez allows Lobby to call on Di.mpsie. 

3 Bruce begins to get sleepy. 

4 Woman's Hall raided at mid-night. Xo Co-eds stolen. Sorrow 

among the men. 

5 Monticola Board meet. 

Low renders a solo. -'Xo Wedding Bells for Me." 

7 Aila, Xeal skips a day in Latin. 

8 Virginia f'onlk lectures on "Eastern Institutions." 
!l renter Los1 has a girl. 

Ill John Mollison in one sentence of 250 words and in one breath 
gives the balcony scene from Lomeo ami Juliet, verbatim. 
I 1 finny I. akin goes t o a show. 

12 Coke Smith goes h c to see his mother (?). 

13 Chesney Ramage questions a friend on matters of love. 

14 15, 16. Everybody studies for exams. 

17 Low hee starts for Kentnckee to see slice. 

15 Cohen fails to show up for exams. Students leave for home. 

Morgantown again peaceful. 



8 
<) 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
l(i 
17 
18 
1!) 
21) 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
20 



28 
20 
30 
31 

1 



JANUARY. 
Registration Day. Glee (dub leaves. 

Virginia Foulk has not yet returned, having a new girl in tow. 
V. W. and V. M. C. A. Social. 
New resolutions. Everybody <zoe^ to church. 
The third Vontski appears. 

The <>irls discover his noble chin ('.'). Also that he has a voice. 
Bruce sleeps and Green talks New River. 
Bing arrives for his seventh consecutive year. 
Delta Tan Delta entertain some friends. 
Council discusses chapel. 
Rain. 
Bertha Kuntz Baker fails to arrive, second lizzie of the lecture 

course. 
More rain. 
And still it rained. 

The Law students play in the snow to amuse the Co-eds. 
Senior Civils appear in corduroys and leggings. 
Glee club returns. 
Coke goes home! Why? 

Great doings in regard to the coming A. A. election. 
Lizzie Ramage's County Fair meets for the first rehearsal. 
Paul Morrow goes home heart broken. 
Lizzie Ramage's County Fair breaks up. 
A. A. election. Skating at the pump station. 
Basket-ball, Westminister 40: W. V. U. 21. 

Some of the Greeks become disgruntled, take the.r doll 

rags and go home. 
Warren Hodges tills two country pulpits. Georgie Staats plays 

the organ, Abe Brake leads the singing and leads in prayer 

and Blanche Watkins is the audience. 
Visitors begin to arrive for the ball. 
Teddy Lock smiles because Vera has arrived. 

Clifford Myers purchases a second-hand atlas (price unknown. I 
Glee Club concert Van Home star (?). 

FEBRUARY. 

Military Hall. 

W. V. U. 20: Bethany 10. 

(As usual) The preachers denounce the evils of society ami 
the Militarv Ball. 



•ut 



4 Classes not very well attended. 

5 Coke looks homesick. 

6 Monticola meeting. Cilda Smith kept away by other Rites. 

7 "The Earl and the Girl" arrive. All the sports sit in the front 

row. 
- 8 Mark Hanna and others follow the show to Cniontown. Co-eds 
become jealous of the chorus girls. 
9 Collette, Littlepage, Cillooley, Jim. Xash, and Fats Hamilton 
join the chorus girl trailers. 

10 Once more Green talks of New River and Bruce sleeps on. 

11 Phi Kappa Sigma banquet. 

12 Mickie and Fatty play basket -hall. 

13 The girls get busy. 

14. Miss Moore ought to have received her "Teddy Bear." 

15 Oh! If the Co-eds were only chorus girls. 

16 Cronin renders a solo. 

17 Sunday. 

18 Teddy Bear actually arrives at Woman's Hall. 

19 The large bears arrive in town. Doc. gives them a penny. 

20 Bears perform for Prexie. 

21 Ben Greet. 

22 Bruce forgets it a holiday and cuts classes. 

23 The Freshmen trim the Seniors in basket-ball. 

24 Where is Coke? Gone home. 

25 Laura Lewis rushes frantically into Ladies' Parlor looking 

for a bible — at Prof. Cox's suggestion. 
2(1 Green Persimmon appears — should have been called "Sour 
Grapes." 

27 Ada Neal wants to know if Miss Moore's Teddy Bear is alive. 

28 Lawson buys a number eight hat. 

MARCH. 

1 Ernest Bruce goes to Fairmont. 

2 Basket-ball, W. V. C. 26; W. U. P. 20. 

3 Lloyd buys a number nine hat. 

4 Inauguration Bay ! ! ! ! ! (Xext year). 

5 Dimpsie visits in Terra Alta. 
Finny Lakin goes home. 

7 Monticola Board attempt to have picture made ! ! 



8 Green tells R. R. construction class about New River and 

Leahy snores. 

9 Prep. Garden (3 X pledge) and others of the anti-athletic 

faction attend the basket-ball game - - and the dance. 

10 Gussie renders a solo in Emmy's hat. 

11 Chez gets his "system" ready. 

12 Chez exhibits his "system" — pretty good. 

13 Monticola board attempts another picture ! ! ! ! ! 

14 "Tildy" has two big fellows. 

15 Leahy excells Bruce in sleeping. 

Hi Ocie Hardest y — "Oh, get me a man ! !" 

17 St. Patrick's Day. Dimpsie McDougal appears on the campus 

a wearing a green hat; Dennis J. Gilhooley a — trailing. 

18 Walter Reitz on being sued for breach of promise leaves town. 

19 Winter Term closes and Pan flunks in her library course — as 

she announces only six callers the entire term. 

20 Exams. 

21 — 25 Vacation. 

26 Registration Day. 

27 Prep. Yeardley returns and enters German class — strange ami 

wonderful translations were made. 

28 Coach Forkum resigns. 

29 No wonder Coke went home! 

Sam Seay learns that it requires more than a knowledge 
of base-ball to stay in college. 

30 Y. W. & Y. M. C. A. social — .much cackling done — Trent loses 

out. 

31 A burglar appears at Woman's Hall. .Mae Sullivan frantically 
seizes her ATA pin; Anna Jones her Easter roses. 

APRIL. 

1 !!!!!! 

April Fool. 

2 Snow storm — Gertrude Pollock wears her Spring bonnet. 

3 Sammy Brown says Deltas are valuable — Jessie Jenkins gets 

a ATA pin. 

4 Bruce and Friend have a rumpus. 

5 Bi Bi. 

6 Pansee and Becker receive lemons — a reward for their star per- 

formance. 

7 Coke brought his wife last night. 



Jtlonticoln 

'08. 



LMS 



8 W. V. U. wins in debate over \V. V. P. and Wooster. 

11 Helen Vance begins private study under .Air. Wilson. 

12 Rain — Fairmont Cancels. 

13 (hue Clifford receives an urgenl appeal for 11 E I. 1' . 

Rain — Fairmont cancels. 
15 "Volcano" organized. 
JClOntlCOlS 16 Cicat commotion in ladies' parlor — New girl arrives. 

'08. 17 Gay Lough astonishes Geology class by answering a question. 

l!t Rain — Buckhannon game cancelled. 
20 Rain — Buckhannon game cancelled. 
12 Cilda Smith dons a Delta Tau Delta pin. 

22 Nan Brook tells about the "Cast" Iron building. 

23 Wilkerson tries to buy headache medicine in a saloon in New 

York City. 

"What the - - do you think this is?" 

Fairmont goes back home. 

24 Wilkerson examines the subway cars and loses his train . 

25 Game Oil with Fairmont for tomorrow. 

20 Fairmont cancels. College of City of X. Y. defeat W. V. U. in 

debate. 
27 Fairmont at last. W. V. U. is winning and Fairmont quits. 



20 
30 



13 
14 



Pow cuts Bock out. 

Fairmont Times cartoons W. V. [J. and Clarksburg cancels. 

MAY. 
No more games with W<'st Penn. League. 
P. ( ). M. League sides with W. V. U. and throws over the Wesl 

Penn. League. 
Westminister 3; W. A'. U. 2. 

They play in the mud. \\". Y. (J. (i: Westminister 5. 
Some Wup men arrive. 

Rain — Wup game off. Tom Foulk named "Rain in the Face." 
Buckhannon game oft'. Pow goes to Parkersburg. 
W. Y. I". S; Buckhannon 2. 

Team starts on Eastern trip. W. V. C. 7: W. [I. P. S. 
W. V. U. (I: W. & -I. 1. 

The .Junior Prom. 
W. V. I*. 5; W. & d. ti. 

Dual Track Meet. W. U. F. 74: W. Y. U. 34. 
Penn State 5; W. Y. U. 0. 
BuchneH 13; W. Y. U. 3. 

(We refuse to give more scores.) 
Mbnticola goes to press. 



I< >t foot says : — 

(), Co-ed., in our hours of case, 
Mushv, bald, and easy to squeeze. 



Upon the lips he kissed her, 

A co-ed. young and meek. 

She must have been eating onions, 

For he lasted them a week. 



24K 




iflonttcola 

'08. 



247 




'.MS 



Announcement. 

<J itiiaS lb expend out adcetlise'is //it/ utale/ut 
appreciation el l/ieii WillinunedA lb <Jta/il t/j Z&ei-t 
mttc/i needed Auppoti". 

Q^incetetu, 

Q)tne^t CI. i^Otuce, 
tJjuM/iejj Jy/ia/iauet ^//to/ilico/a JyOci. 



ittecca $ool anb JStHtarb Eoom* 



BOWLING ALLEYS 



NEWEST, BRIGHTEST AND BEST IN TOWN. MOST UP-TO-DATE BOWLING 

ALLEYS AND EQUIPMENTS 

FOLLOW THE PROCESSION 



IXtcfjarbsicin probers; 

PROPRIETORS 

PEOPLES PHONE 659-R UNDER THE MADERA HOTEL 



CHEMICALLY PURE 

ACIDS 

AND 

AMMONIA 



THE GRASSELLI 
CHEMICAL CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



Branches: 

Chicago, New York, Si. Louis, 

St. Paul, New Orleans, Cincinnati, 

Milwaukee, and Elsewhere. 



BC N O PPENH EI MCK. 

Merchant Uailor 




Nc&rly4 years 

Of increasing 
demand for 

LlLLEY 

Uniforms 

Always superior, 
never inferior. 
That is the rea- 
son you find Lil. 
ley Un'forms in 
all leading Mili- 
y schools and Col- 
leges in America. 

Send for prices and 
eatalog. Address: 
THB 

M. CLilley&Co. 

Columbus, Ohio. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 




* 



High-Grade Tailoring 
at Modest Prices. 



yOVK- CLOTHES THESSEV F*REE OF CHA'RGE. 

175 Walnut Street. Opposite Court House. 



ESTABLISHED 1851 



Ctmer & Smenb 



204-211 THIRD AVE. NEW YORK 
COR. 18th STREET 



idkim^ 



?]>? 



IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents 

Chemicals, Physical and 

Scientific Apparatus, 

Assay Goods. 

WE HANDLE THE BEST OF EVERYTHING 
NEEDED IN LABORATORY 



Peoples 'Phone 377 J. 



Bell 'Phone 222 R. 



W. F. KNAPP 



DEALER IN 



MEATS AND GROCERIES 



236 Walnut Street. 



GO TO 



DAVIS' 

g>moue House 

Headquarters kok studknts. 





Spalding Athletic Goods 

Always Pass because they are Kept up to the Mark and Never Fall Below the 

Official Standard. 

"Recognized \ZnitJersally as "Best for _/Jthletes. 

SEND FOR THESE BOOKS NOW- TEN CENTS PER COPY. 

No. 238. ({roup XVI— Muscle Building. By Dr. L. H. Guliek. Director of PhysicaJ Training, X. Y. Public Schools. 
No. -7. Group XII — College Athletics. M. C. Murphy, the well-known Athletic Trainer, now with Univ. of Penn. 
No. 246'. Group XII — Athletic training for Schoolboys. By Geo. W. Orton of the Univ. of Penn. and a famous athlete 
himself. 

A copy of our complete catalogue of athletic goods will be mailed upon request. 



126 Nassau Street, 
NEW YORK. 



MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

709 Fourteenth Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 



149 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 



Electric Massage 

No Waits 



Hair Cutting 

Six Barbers 



AD. BOWER 

Barber Sltop 



Shaving — Hot and Cold Baths — Electric Shampooing. 
Court House Square, Corner Walnut and Main Streets. 



JOHN F. IHLI, 

TAILOK- 

CLEANING, PRESSING, ALTERING 
AND REPAIRING. 

SUITS PRESSED 50C. AND UP. 

Second Floor. 

Second National Bank Building. 





"Out-of-doors" with a STEVENS- 
best thing for man or boy. Learn- 
ing to shoot well and acquiring 
qualities of Self-control, Decision 
and Manliness, are all due to 
Stevens Firearm Education :: :: 



Beautiful Ten Color 
Hanger, fine decora- 
tion for your "den" 
or Club Room, mailed 
for 6 cents in stamps. 



J. Stevens 
Arms & Tool 
Company 

P. 0. Box 4097, 

Chicopee Falls, Mass., U. S. A. 



Ask your dealer for Stevens Rifles, 
Shotguns, Pistols. Insist on our time- 
honored make. If you cannot obtain, 
we ship direct, express prepaid, upon 
receipt of catalog price. 




Everything you want to know about 
the Stevens is found in 140 page illus- 
trated catalog, mailed for four cents 
in stamps to pay postage. 





The Ache Department Store 




fourteen complete departments 




IMORGANTOWN'S MODERN SHOPPING CENTER 

STUDENTS ALWAYS WELCOME. 


HIGH ART CLOTHING 


G. W. WEIBEL 

PRACTICAL CLEANER AND DYER 

OF LADIES AND GENTS GARMENTS. 

KID GLOVES CLEANED AND DYED. 

PRICES MODERATE. 

424 north Front St. morgantown, w. va. 




Stetson Shoes, 
Crossett Shoes, 
Stetson Hats, 
Cravenette Hats. 




CI 

307 MAIN STREE 


,YDE E. JACO 

T MORG 


BS 

ANTOWN, W. VA. 





E. H. COOMBS, President L. S. BROCK, Vice-President 

T. J. McGREW, Cashier 

BANK OF THE 
MONONGAHELA VALLEY 

CAPITAL $110,000.00 
SURPLUS $110,000.00 

We do a general bsnking business and pay interest on time deposits. 
WE SOLICIT YOUR BUSINESS 





te 



s?t> &£>///'://. 




The pen with 



the Clip - Cap 




IT'S A COMFORT TO USB 

"WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN. 

II eliminates tlie ink buttle from the desk 
r table, which is generally overcrowded 
nyway. 

II means that much additional room avid 
hat much less worry about spilling . 

It means freedom, ease „nd conveni- 
ence in writing, and the Clip-Cap is a 
safetj device that ,^rii>s the pocket and also 
keeps it from rolling off the desk. 

Can be used with any kind of ink, but 
mixing different kinds nl' anything is never 
good and a pen is always better off for a 
steady diet of one kind. 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen Ink is 
ilways the same. Filler's for desk or 

Traveler's use. 



L. E .Waterm an Co., 173 Broadway, n.y. 

! 209 STATER 5T..CHICAG0. 8 SCHOOL ST..B0ST0N. 961 BROADWAY, OAKLAND,CAL.| 
f 136 ST. JAMES ST., MONTREAL. 




C I^ O O K S 

J EWEI.RY 




H. S. HAYES 



fections, P^ri_iit«, Pro= 
visions, Qtieenww^are 
s r^i cl O 1 a s ss w^ ea it e 



MORGANTO W N , 



THOS, E. HODGES, 
President. 



M. L,. BROWN, 

Cashier. 



Hank of Morgantown 



CAPITAL ... $ 40,000.00 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 6,000.00 

DEPOSITS - - - . 225,000.00 



THIN HANK DOBS A (iKNKKAL BANKINIi HUSINKSS. 



BEGAN BUSINESS JUNK SO, limit. 



Fine Carnages for Wedding Parties and Funera's. 

Largest and Most Complete Livery in the City. 

Horses Constantly on Hand for Sale. 



GUY M. HAYES 

Livery, Sale and Feed Stable. 

CHESTNUT STREET 
Between Walnut and Fayet.'e Streets. 



Rigs of all Kinds on Short Notice. MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 

Carriages Meet all Trains and Boats on Order. 



A. H. FETTING 



Manufacturer of 



#recfe Hetter Jf ratermtp Jetoelrp 



213 IN. Liberty St. 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAIND. 



Memorandum packages sent to any fraternity 
member through our representatives. 
Mess. Geo. C. Hayes (&. Company. 



Special Designs and estimates 
furnished on class pins, 
medals, rings, etc. 



U. G. WELLS 

THE 
BARBER 

HAIR CUTTING AND MASSAGE A SPECIALTY 

335 MAIN STREET. 



SECOND NATIONAL BANK 



MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 



CAPITAL, $80,000. SURPLUS, $68,000 

STATE DEPOSITORY. 

4 percent, interest paid on time Deposits. 



A. J, GARLOW. President. 

W. C. McGREW, Vice-Pies. 

W. E. ARNETT. Cashier. 

W. H. ASHCRAFT, Asst. Cashier. 



37 Williams Street 
BOSTON, MASS. 



C L. BERGER & SONS 

Precise Engineering and Surveying Instruments *A 



They secure in their instruments: Accur- 
acy of division, Simplicity in manipulation: 
Lightness, combined with strength; Achro- 
matic telescope, with high power: Steadi- 
ness of adjustment under varying temper- 
atures ; stiffness to avoid any tremor, even 
in a strong wind, and thorough workman- 
ship in every part. 

These instruments are in general use by 
the IT. S. Government Engineers. Geologists 
and Surveyors, and the range of instru- 
ments, as made by them for River, Harbor. 
City. Bridge, Tunnel, Railroad and Mining 
Engineering, as well as those made for 
Triangular or Topographical Work and 
Land Surveying, etc., etc., is larsier than 
that of any other firm in the Country. 

Illustrated Manuel and Catalogue Sent on 
Application. 



Morgantown Hardware Co, 




Most Everything 
in 



sor 



asiSi 



Sp^SpQ 



Both Phones 



High Street 



Remember, O, Remember 1 1 & MeetmeatLucky's! Athletic 



r 



That MAX WATERS 
has the largest line of 
Shoes in the City and 
wants to sell you a pair 



i 




Supplies 



College and School 
Flags mx^ Outfitters 
forallkindsof sports 



/. Will Luckhardt 

3.26 Diamond Street 
Opp. Grand Opera House 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



•WINCHESTER 

REPEATING SHOTGUNS 

are strong shooters, strongly made and 
so inexpensive that you won't be afraid 
to use one in any kind of weather. 
They are made 10, 12 and 16 gauge. 

A FAVORITE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN 



Sold Everywhere. 




K Otto Greiner 




Merchant Tailor 



Second Floor. Four Doors North of Post Office, 
MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA. 



HIGHEST HONORS EVER CONFERRED ON ANY 

AMERICAN PIANO IN THE "WORLD'S 

GREAT EXPOSITIONS" 



"$a lb torn" 



Grand Prix Paris, 1900 



Grand Prize St. Louis, 1904 



Decoration of the Legion of Honor, conferred in 1 900 
by the French Government 

Fo^Saieby PHILLIPS & JONES 



FRED ERD. 

PROPRIETOR 



HIGH STREET 

OPP. WALLACE HOUSE 



MORGANTOWN 
MIRY 



BREAD, CAKES AND PIES 



THE FRESHEST AND BEST TO BE HAD 
IN THE CITY 



YOU ARE INVITED TO CALL AND INSPECT OUR LINE OF GOODS 



q 



This book is the product of The Elletson-Carver 
Company, Printers, Binders and Stationers, 
231 Court Square, Parkersburg, West Va. 



Fraternity Pins W. V. U. Pins 

Fraternity and College Stationery 



We Carry an Up-to-Date and Attractive Line of College 

and Fraternity Goods. Memorandum Packages 

of Fraternity Pins Cheerfully furnished 

to any Fraternity 



Geo. C. Nayes & Co., 

The Students Jewelers 
153 Walnut St. 



Our Stock of Diamonds, Watches, Clocks and Jewelry 

is large and varied. We invite your 

careful inspection of our line 



Fraternity and College Pennants 
Wall Placques Fraternity Novelties 



The Preparatory Branch 

of the 



C'liiiucisity 



Montgomery, West Va. 

Principal, JOSIAH KEELY. 



JENKINS BROS.' VALVES 
JENKINS' 1906 PACKING 




The Genuine Goods always bear 
Trade Hark as shown in cut 



JENKINS BROTHERS 

■ 33=35=37 N. 7th St., Philadelphia 



New York 



Boston 



Chicago 



London 











mt ». &mttf) 

^attstfactorp tailoring 
St ^attrfactorp prices;* 











Wist Virginia Umwirsity 

HORQANTOWN 



EQUIPMENT: Ten buildings, eight of them stone and brick, besides the buildings on the 
Experiment Farm; Library of 30,000 volumes; Laboratories; Shops, Etc. 

DEPARTMENTS : 1. The College of Arts and Sciences. 2. The College of Engineering and 
Mechanic Arts. 3. The College of Law. 4. The College of Agriculture. 5. The School 
of Music. 6. The Department of Fine Arts. 7. The Medical College. 8. The Military 
Department. 9. The School of Pharmacy. 10. The Commercial School. 11. The Pre- 
paratory School. 12. The Summer School, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, for 
the professional preparation of teachers, principals and superintendents of schools. 

FACULTY of about Seventy Members, trained in the best colleges and universities in the world. 

STATE CADETS to the number of 225 receive free books and uniforms in addition to free 
tuition. 

WOMAN'S HALL : The building formerly known as Episcopal Hall has been leased by the 
University. The sum of three thousand dollars will be spent this summer in repair and 
furnishings. This building, to be known in the future as Woman's Hall, will accommodate 
sixty young lady students. The Dean of Women will be in charge. 

ADy'vU \q\ &e\.av\.ea u^otmattoTv \.o "VDaVVnxaw, "Barbe, or \o iVve TresvdeuX., Ti. "ft. TuruAow, "PYv. ~D., CC T>. 



Meet me at the 




The College Shop" 

Where you can buy 
Cigarettes, Cigars, Stogies 
and all kinds of 
Smoking and Chewing Tobacco 



Mail Pouch Club Meeting 
2 and y:jo 




HUNT'S ICE CREAM FACTORY 



Scluunbe & Matj 

Charleston t HI. Ha. 



Modish Clothes 
Ready-to- Wear 
^f Fine Tailoring 

Ever New Furnishings 




T. PICKENPAUGH, 163 to 167 Walnut Street 

= MORGANTOWN, WE5T VIRGINIA ===== 



General Merchants, handlers of Clothing, both 
styles — ready=made and made=to=order — Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Shirts, 
Ties, etc. Goods for Ladies, consisting of Ging- 
hams, Batiste, Hadras, Organdies, Linens, 
Mulls, Silks and Satins for dress wear; Hose, 
Shoes, Fancy Parasols, Umbrellas, etc.; House 
Furnishings, Carpets, Rugs, Oil Cloth, Lin= 
oleum, Mattings, Blinds, Lace Curtains, etc. 
SEVEN DEPARTHENTS ALL FILLED. OUR 
PLEASURE IS TO PLEASE YOU 




&fje Cfja*. H. CUtott Company 



THE LARGEST COLLEGE ENGRAVING HOUSE 
IN THE WORLD 



WORKS : 17th Street and Lehigh Avenue, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commencement Invitations and Class Day Programs 



Dance Programs and Invitations Menus Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals 
Class and Fraternity Stationery Class Pins and Medals (Write for Catalogue) 

Calling Cards — Special Offer to Students 




H. A. D AVI DSON 



COR. CHESTNUT ST. & COURT ALLEY 



I'ln or i inking parlors 

Corner Beechurst Avenue and Front Street 



BOTH PHONES 





■ ■/ ■ I! 



COOK'S HOSPITAL AND TRAINING SCHOOL COMPANY 
FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 



You Can't Beat It Unless You Cheat 



Skinners Tavern 

Fairmont. W. Va. 



BENJ. G. WILLIAMS, 
Proprietor. 



AT THE DEPOT 



For Up-to-Date Plumbing, Steam and Hot 
Water Fitting, ?.ll kinds of Valves and Fittings, 
Gas Burners and Portable Lamps, call on 



Morgan town Plumbing Co. 



E. C. WIEDEBEUCH, 
Manager 



OPPOSITE PUBLIC 
SCHOOL BLDG. 



STEWART 



The Florist 



Carnations; a S>pectaltp 



Bell Phone 359 J 



Peoples Phone 485 




S. k B. Throttling Separating 
and Coal Calorimeter 

Prof. R. C. Carpenter's Patent. 

Xext to importance to Steam En- 
gine Indicators for getting a correct 
idea of the working of a power plant 
are our Throttling and Separating 
Calorimeters for determining the 
moisture in steam. 

No engineer should be without one. 
Write for descriptive catalogue. 

The Si fiaetter & Budenberg Mfg. Co. 

Works: — Foxboro, Mass. 

Office and Salesrooms: 

23 Dey St.. New York. 
15 W. Lake St. Chicago 



GO TO 

FRIT^IST ^) ™ E PLEASANTS STREET 

^^^^^^^ PHOTOGRAPHER 

CJWhen you want the best pictures and frames. Friends is the best equipped 
gallery in '.own. He has the most expensive lenses that are made, and uses 
nothing but the highest priced materials in making his pictures. And then his 
ability and skill are unquestioned. When you wish the best always go to 

FRIEND, The Photographer, 221 Pleasants St. 




HARRY FRIEDMAN, 
Attoraey-at-Law, 

Grafton, West Va. 


A. BLISS McCRUM, 

Attorney-at - La w, 

Box 2!)!). Kingwood, W. Va. 


W. W. SMITH, 
Lawyer. 
Brook, Reed & Wade Bldg. 


Marmaduke H. Dent. 1870. 
Herbert W. Dent, 1905. 

DENT & DENT, 

Lawyers. 
Grafton, West Virginia. 


RAMAGE & SMITH, 
Attorneys-at -Law. 
Offices, 27-28 Trust Bldgv, 

Fairmont. W. Va. 


JOHN ALDEN PURINTON, 
Lawyer. 

Morgantown, W. Va. 


ELIAS B. HARTLE, 
Class '97. 

Attorn ey-at'-Law, 
No. 11 Hamilton Row, 

Hagerstown, Md. 


Joseph Moreland. Jas. R. Moreland. 

MORELAND & MORELAND, 
Attorneys-at- Law, 

Morgantown. West Virginia. 
Office on Court Square. 


SHEPPARD, G00DYK00NTZ 
& SCHERR, 

Corporation, Commercial and Real Estate 
Law, 

Williamson, W. Va. 


J. W. ROBINSON, 
Lawyer. 
First National Lank Bldg., 

(i raft on, W. Va. 


WILLIAMS & DICE, 

Lawyers. 

Lewisburg, West Virginia. 


GUY R. C. ALLEN, 
Attorney-at-Law, 
No. 1425 Chapline St. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 


M. J. MALAMPHY, JR. 

Lawyer. 

Morgantown, . . . West Virginia. 


JAMES EDGAR BROWN, 

Attorney and Counsellor. 
108 LaSalle Street. 
Chicago. 
'Phone Main 4341. 



' ~~* ' LIBRARY 
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 




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