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Full text of "The Monticola"

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MOKITICOILA 



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Presented by 

WJESI \\][1I^C)IKV1IaV iP^NWlEIPvSIIY 

JVrittcn si directed by 



L. C. MAY 
Editor-in-Chief 

J. M. MOORE 
Business Manager 



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OREWORJD 



A S THE YEARS go by, and memory 
grows dim, the recollection of col- 
lege days becomes faint. This chronicle 
of college memories, permeated with the 
stirring spirit of West Virginia, will al- 
ways be a source of remembrance, — a re- 
membrance of the most hopeful and hap- 
py days of our lives. 

May you always value it as a treasure 
of undying college memories, and may 
you never lose the touch of that true 
Mountaineer spirit, engendered by a faith 
in the future of our State, and West Vir- 
ginia University. 




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IOedicavtion 



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fAVO NT I CO ILAr. 



"7'o pity distress is but human. 
To relieve it is godlike." 

— Horace Mann. 



""rmS volume of the Monticola is dedicated to a man who is one of 
the State's most distinguished citizens, Otto Schenk. Not only 
does his life demonstrate that honesty, unremitting toil, and a will to 
succeed are prerequisites of success, but through his wide-spread phil- 
anthropy and promotion of idealism he has established himself as one 
of the state's most valuable citizens. 

He is a native of West Virginia, educated in the university of 
hard work. His life is a record of inestimable service to the state. He 
is officer or director in five banks, chairman of many civic organiza- 
tions, and president of the Associated Charities. 

A successful business career is but an incident in his eventful life. 
His ambition has been to make this state a happier place to live in. By 
numerous charitable contributions, and by a sincere devotion to edu- 
cational institutions, he has become an inspiration to those who 
would benefit their fellowmen. 

He has assisted hundreds of young men in their efforts to secure 
an education, and when they have finished and taken up their life 
work, he feels fully repaid. 

He has taken an active interest in the Y. M. C. A., and in thj 
Y. W. C. A., and in all Christian organizations working for a worthy 
cause. 

In recognition of a great service to our state, educational institu- 
tions, and humanity in general, we dedicate this volume of the Mon- 
ticola to 

OTTO SCHENK. 

successful business man, philanthropist, idealist, 

promoter of education. 



Y 



^ 0»NTENT5 





CAMPUS 

ADMINISTRATION 
CLASSES 

ACTIVITIES 

ORGANIZATIONS 
MUDDY COLA 
and 
ADVERTISEMENTS 



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LlBnAKY 
WEST VIRGJNIA UNIVERSITY 




LIBRARY 
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



rAVONTICOLA., 



Administration 



fAVOINTI CO LAs 



Board of Governors 



Created by act of the Legislature on April 14, 1927. The board is appointed by the 
Governor and consists of seven members one from each congressional district of the state 
and one at large. This board has the entire control and management of all the educational 
affairs of the University, employs all teachers, officers and all employees of the University. 

MEMBERS 

Hon. E. G. Smith. Clarksburg, Presid.nt 
(Term expires June 30. 1930) 

D. A. Burt. Wheeling. Vice-President 
(Term expires June 30. 1930) 

Hon. Frank Babb. Keyser 
(Term expires June 30. 1932) 

Hon. Robert Ramsey, Wellsburg 
(Term expires June 30, 1929) 

Miss Gertrude Roberts, Huntington 
(Term expires June 30, 1929) 

Hon. Hugh I. Shott. Jr., Bluefield 
(Term expires June 30, 1929) 

Hon. Arthur B. Koontz, Charleston 
(Term expires June 30, 1930) 

Mr. C. T. Neff, Jr., Secretary 



B= 



rAVONTICOLA, 




fAVONTICOLA:^ 




DR. JOl IN ROSCOE 1 URNER 



■^ 



/'././. Tirii,t!i-i:,;,hl 



rAVONTICOLA. 



ANEW milestone of educational progress was firmly imbedded in 
state soil when Dr. John Roscoe Turner was formally inaug- 
urated the tenth president of West V^irginia University on November 
29, 1928 to succeed Dr. Frank Butler Trotter. 

The impressive ceremonies took place in the spacious new Men's 
Field House, before a brilliant concourse of several thousand persons, 
including representatives of more than fifty universities and colleges, 
state dignitaries, faculty members, leading citizens, alumnae, and 
students. 

The program which preceded the formal inauguration was so well 
arranged and conducted as to produce fervored approbation. The 
march of the undergrauates initiated the programmed events of the 
day. Then the colorful academic procession slowly wended its way 
from Martin Hall to the Field House with impressive step. 

The presiding chairman. Judge Edward G. Smith took charge of 
the assemblage in the Field House shortly after 2:30 o'clock. After 
invocation by Dr. Robert Armstrong, a delightful and inspiring mus- 
ical program offered entertainment to the vast audience. Judge Smith 
then formally inducted Dr. Turner into office, and the new president 
delivered his inaugural address. Dr. Turner embraced the desire for 
immediate progress for \^est Virginia University in setting forth his 
elaborate educational program. After congratulatory remarks by 
Governor Howard M. Gore and Edward S. Parsons, President of Mari- 
etta College, Dr. Armstrong pronounced benediction, and the exer- 
cises closed with a short musical program by the Cadet Band. 



-^ 



Page Twenty-Nine 



fAVOINTI CO LAs 



Administrative Officers of the Ufiiversity 



President of University 
Registrar of University 

Dean of Men 

Dean of Women 



Dean 



Dean 



Dear 



Director 



Dean 



ADMINISTRATION 



College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Law 

College of Engineering 

College of Agriculture 

School of Music 

School of Medicine 



School of Pharmacy 
Summer School 



Dr. John Roscoe Turner 

Prof. .A. J. Hare 

H. E. Stone 

Martha T. Fulton 



Prof. J. M. Callahan 
Prof. Thi.rmond .Arnold 

Prof. C. R. Jones 

F. D. Fromme 

Mr. Louis Black 
Dr. J. N. Simpson 

Mr. G. .A. Bergy 

Prol'. L. L. Friend 



Director 

College of Education 

Dean : D- J- N. Deahl 



J 



fAVONTICOLA.^ 




fAVONTICOLA., 



The Student Council 

of 
JVest Virginia University 



HARRISON CONAWAY President 

MARJORIE LINDERMAN Senior Representative (Woman) 

HERBERT RAINES Senior Representative (Man) 

MARGUERITE DILWORTH BOTTOME 

Junior Representative (Woman) 

BYRON RANDOLPH Junior Representative (Man) 

THOMAS ARNETT President of Senior Class 

ROBERT JACK President ot Junior Class 

FRANK MILLER President of Sophomore Class 

IRVIN JOHNSON President of Freshman Class 



J 



rAVONTICOLA., 




J 



7AVO INT ■ C O VAr i 



IVoma?i 'j StU(le?it Government 
Assoeiation 



EDITH JORDAN President 

ANNE SLIFKIN First Vice-President 

KATHLEEN CALLAHAN Second Vice-President 

CHRISTINE ARNOLD Secretary 

CATHRYN THOMPSON Treasurer 

HELEN CURTIS Senior Representative 

GENEVIEVE BROWN Junior Representative 

FREDA BRAL'N Sophomore Representative 

MARGARET FRENCH Freshman Representative 



rAVOINTICOLA.. 







-A 



Piiyr Thirty-Five 



fAVONTI CO UAs 




Page ThirtD-Si. 



rAVONTICOLA:^ 



Classes 



rAXONJTICOLA.^ 



Se?iior Class Officers 

THOMAS A. ARNETT President 

ADOLPH ABRAMSON Vice-President 

MARGARET AHERN Secretary 

VIRGINIA BYRER. T.rasurer 

CHARLES STEELE.. Historian 



I'agc Tliirly-Eiiihl 




Pa,ic Tliiil;l-yine 



L 



C. F. LITTl.EPAGE. LL . B. 
Charleston 

Sigma Chi; Fi Batar Cappar; Mountain; 
Sphinx: Torch and Serpent; Phi Delta 
Phi; Mountaineer Week Team, '29 



MARY SCOTT, A. B. 
Terra Alta 

Chi Omega 





KENNETH SHAFFER. A. B. 
Clarksburg 

Tau Kappa Epsilon: Sphinx; Epsilon P 



GENEVIEVE WILLIAMS, B. S. H. E 



Bridgeport 



Alpha Delta Pi 



FRANK G. KEYES, A.B 
Middlebourne 

\ ^t Tau Kappa Epsilon; 
^.^^1 Torch and Serpent; 

Chi Sigma Delta 




r.i.ir F'litii-Onc 



KENDALL H. KEENEY. LL.B.. A.B 
Ravenawood 

Kappa Alpha; Phi Delta Phi; Torch and Ser- 
pent; Fi Batar Cappar; Mountain; Pres. 
Inter-Frat. Council '27; Pres. Sphinx; Bus- 
iness Manager "Monticola" '26; We'it 
Virginia Law Quarterly; Mountaineer 
Week Team ■28, '29 



KATHRYN SNEDDON, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Beta Pi Theta; Westminster Girl's Club; 
Westminster Foundation Cabinet '28, '29 



JACK FRIEDLANDER, A.B. 

Clarksburg 





ALICE MONSER, A.B. 
Middlebourne 

eta Pi Theta; Newman Club; Kappa Delta 
Pi 



R. N. KIRCHNER, B.S.E.E. 

Welch 

Beta Theta Pi; Sphinx: 
Varsity Club:fi Batar 
Cappar; A. I. E. E. ; 
Track '27. '28, '29 




;•,/,„■ ynrhi-Ti 



r 



JAMES W. B. HEILMANN. LL.B. 
Mor^antown 

Delta Kappa Psi 



SARAH RIGGLE. A.B. 



Middlebourne 



Alpha Delta Pi 





l.AZELLE GONANO, B.S.C.E. 
Pageton 



LINN FORD. A.B. 
Dunbar 

Delta Gamma; Phi Beta Kappa: Y. W. C. A.; 
Cabinet; Press Club; Matrix: Rhododen- 
dron; English Club 



J. KENNETH GWINN. 
B.S.E.E. 
Hinton 



_ -r. KC Tau Beta Pi; Kappa 

-* ^^ .V Mu; Varsity Baseball 



•27. '28, '29 



Sf Nil 101^1^ 



C. p. CONNELL. B.S.E. 
Huntington 




Kappa Alpha 



ELIZABETH McNElL, B.S.H.E. 
Marl.ngtoii 




EVERETT WHITENER. A.B. 

Morgantown 



OCIE TUNE, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Chi Delta Phi; Mortar Board; Forum; Y. W. 
C. A.; Rhododendron; Matrix; Press Club 



HOBART H. BUSH. A.B. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

Torch and Serpent: Phi ^^ ^ ^p jH 

Lambda Upsilon; SiK- ^^ ^ 

ma Chi 




I 



ruiic Forly-Foiir 




Pfiflf Fuily-Fivc 




Page ForlySu: 





MARJORIE LINDERMAN. A.B. 

Morgantown 

Mononsahela Club; Kappa Phi; Senior Rep- 
resentative Student Council; Eta Si^ma 
Phi; English Club: Mortar Board; Phi 
Beta Kappa 



D. \V. MILLER, B.S.Asr. 
Gerardotown 

Alpha Gamma Rho ; W. Va. Agriculturist; 
Grange; Press Club; Athenaeum Staff; 
Judging Team 



MARGARET MARSHALL. A.B 
Fairmont 



Alpha Delta Pi; Y. W. C. A.; Woman's Stu 
dent Government Judiciary Board 



ADOLPH EDWARD COOPER 
Durbin 



N'arsily Club; Varsity 
Wrestling; \'arsity 

Baseball Squad; Phi 
Sigma Delta 




I'uijc Forty-Seven 




Page Forly-Eiiihl 





EARL SHOWALTER. B.S.E. 



Clarksburg 



Phi Kappa Ta 




GERTRUDE PRATT. A.B. 

Morsantown 







ROBERT E. ROACH. Ah 
New Cumberland 



I'hi Kappa Tau 






imM 



/•il./i /■■iirliy-.Vifi. 




PAUL MOORE, A.B. 
Fairmont 



Delta Tau Delta 



MARY BARNETT, A.B. 

Clarksburg 

Rhododendron; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Pi 
Theta; Y. W. C. A.; W. S. G. A.: Chem- 
istry Club 



WILIJ.AM T. MYERS, B.S.E.E. 
Morgantown 

Kappa Sigma; Sphinx; Scabbard and Blade 
A. I. E. E.; Varsity Track 



MARY BELLE OWENS, A.B. 



Clarksburg 



Alpha Xi Delta 




lOWARD R. ANDREWS. 
S. M. E. 

Cholyan 
111 Kappa Epsllon; A. 

S. M. E. 




Page Fifty 



CLARtNCE E. KEEPER. B.S.Med. 
Cameron 

Kappa Alpha: Fi Batar Cappar; Mountain; 
Torch and Serpent; Sphinx; Football Cap- 
tain -28; Varsity Track ■27. 26. ' I') . 
Varsity Club 



BER NEICE BALLARD. A.B. 
Princeton 





MAURICE COLEY. A.B. 
Bowling Green, Ky. 



CATHERINE STAHLMAN, A.B. 




iitRillCII^I^ 



i»(ij;c Fifty-One 




Phi Kappa Sip; 




GRACE KENNEY, A 
Morgantown 



T. S. HENRY, A. 
Morgantown 



Phi Kappa Tau 



EUNICE HELTZEL, A. 

Morgantown 




J. PAUL SWENTZEL. 

B. S. Ch. E. 

Clarksburg 

Gamma Epsilon 




P(i</f Fifty-Tiro 



L. D. PARRACK, LL.B. 

Terra Alia 




Fau Kappa Epsilon 




HARRIETT SHEPHERD. B.M. 
MorHanlown 



Chi Delta Ph.; Pan-Hellrnic Board 





C. P. ALDRIDGE. B.S.Agr. 
Hillsboro 

Dflta Epsilon: Block and Bridle; Grange; 
Wesley Foundation; Wesley Club 




HEl EN HUDSON AULD. A.B 



Morganlown 



K.ippa Phi; Matrix 




lOSEPH N. COOKE 
B.S.C.E. 



S:sma Delta Phi 




;'.i.;<- Fif(n-Tlncc 




CHARLES A. SWEARINGEN, A.B. 
Parkersburg 

Sigma Chi; Torch and Serpent; Fi Batar Cap- 
par; Sphinx; Head Cheerleader '28; Ch 
Sigma Delta 



MARY JACKSON, A.B 

Bluefield 



Pi Beta Phi; Kappa Ph: 



PAUL HOLLAND, LL.B 
Logan 

Delta Tau Delt 
Cappar; Mo 
Team; W. V; 
ma Rho; Chairm 
iters "28, 79 




Chi Omei. 




HELEN HITE, A.B. 
Fairmont 



F. H. GOFF. A.B 
Clarksbur 



Scabbard and Blade 
Blackguard Fusilier 



Vaiic Fifltj-Four 




L.AWRF.NCE A. WALLMAN, A.B. Gr..a. Stu. 
Fairmont 



Phi Kappa Sisma: Dramatic Club: Sco Beo- 
wulf Cedryht 



GRACE BISE. A.B. 
Morsanlown 

Kapna Phi; Beta Pi Thcta 





M. NX'. WILLIAMS, JR.. A.B. 
Morgantown 



Tnu kappa Epsilon 



OTIA C. PARKS. A.B 

Elizabeth 



Chi Delia Ph 




F. VANNOY, B.S.E.E 
Morgantown 




J. A. MORELAND, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Kappa Alpha; Basketball Mgr, '29; Sph 
Torch and Serpent; Scabbard and Blad 



WILMA McELROY BUVINGER, A.B 

Morgantown 



C'hi Delta Ph.; Phi Beta Kapp 



J. M. DePUE, B.S.Med 
Spencer 



Phi Sigma Kappa; Torch and Serpent; Ph 
Beta Pi; Alpha Zeta ; President S- 



FRANCES HAUGHT. A.B 



Mannington 



Chi Delta Phi 



11. I.. FL'EC. Ph.C 
Wheeling 






/'...,. /•■i7(,/-s. i-fM 




i:i.ic rain-r-iuht 




J. 1.. VAN METRE. A.B. 
Shepherd stown 



ANITA MAY NUTTER, A.B. 
Enterprise 

Phi Mu; Beta Pi Thet.i 





NEIL SWENT/EL, B.S.Ch.E. 
Clarksburg 

Phi Kappa Tau: Tau Beta Pi: Si^ma Gamma 
Epsilon: Phi Lambda Upsilon 



LUCILLE AHERN. A.B. 
Fairmont 

\ ice-President Mononguhela Club: Secretary 
Senior Class: Newman Club 



W ELDON BOONE. A.B 
Ronceverte 



L!a 




C. E. ZINK. Grad. Student 
Athens 




Ep.ilon Phi Siwma; Phi Brta Ka 



HILDA ROSENSHINE. A.B 
Clarksbur 



Beta Pi Theta 




H. L. PINNEY. A.B 
Charleaton 

I'hi Beta Kappa: Alph,. 
Camma Rho 




M. H. DEAHL. B.S.Asr. 
Morsanlown 



KATHl.EEN CALLAHAN. A.B. 
Mor^antown 

Chi Omega ; Woman's Student Covernmrnl 
Council 




Paye SUly Twit 




rn.n Siuly-Tliicc 



\. J. MOUROT. B.S.Med 

Mound 



HELEN CONNELLY, A.B. 

Wheeling 

Monongahela Club; Seo Beowulf Gedryht 
English Club; Westminster Girls Club; Y 
W. C. A. 



J. ROBERTS AGUAYO, B.S.Med 

Porto Rico 




MARTH.A W/\SHlNGTON, B.S.H.E 
Charleston 




W. G. GIFFORD, B.S.Agr. 
Clarksburg 

Tau Delta Theta : Alpha 
Zeta ; Grange; Fruit 
Judging Team '28 



Paije SiJ-ty-Foiir 



J. S. KLESECKER. B.S.Ed. 

Hedge.ville 



FRANCES BIBBEE, A.B 
Clarksburg 




MAX DeBERRY. A.B. 
Terra Alta 



la Delta Phi; Dramatic Club 



NELLIE STROUSS. A.B. 
Morgantown 

Westminster Girls' Club; Phi Beta Kappa 
Kappa Delta Pi; Beta Pi Theta^ Woman" 
Athletic Association; English Club; Var 
sity Hockey 





iMyi Sutyfi 



H. L. DEAN, A.B. 
Elk Garden 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



DOROTHEA ELIZABETH RIST. B.S.H.E. 
Wheeling 

Monongahela Club; Kappa Delta Pi; Phi Up- 
silon Omicron; Home Economics Club; 
Grange; Y. W. C. A. 




RALPH KING, B.S.M.E. 

Morgantown 



Scabbard and B'ade; Engineering Society 



ELEANOR KING, A.B 



CLARENCE WALSH, 

B.S.E.E. 

Youngstown, Ohio 

l^hi Kappa Tau; A. I. 
E E, 




Page Sixly-Si 




r.iyi Suty-Sccn 




Page Sixty-EiilM 




I'.l.rc fUslll-Xinc 





r- 



MICHAEL A. RAFFERTY. Ph.C 
Weston 



Kappa Ps 



FRAN H. BACKUS. B.S.E.E. 
Montgomery 

Tau Kappa Epsilon; Tau Beta Pi; A. 1. E. E 



O. B. ENGLEHART. B.S.Ch.E 

Morgantown 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; Delta Epsilon 



% 



^Ei\l€l^^ 




F. E. THORNTON, A.B 

Wellsburs 
Ph. Beta Kf 




LEONARD GOTTLIEB. Ph.C. 
WclcK 



Hhi Sigma Deltii 



W. E. KIMMINS. BS.Mcd. 
Di.ll>.. 

Sijjma Ph. Ep».!on: Phi Beta Pi 





/•«.;. scventy-Onc 




HARRY B. LAMBERT, AD 

Morgantown 



Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi; Delta Sigm 
Rho; Sigma Delta Phi; English Club; Pre 
Club: Debating Team '27, "28, "29; Rifl 
Team 1924 1925 



S. J. WEESE. B.S.Agr. 
Van Voorhis 

Alpha Gamma Rho: Anthony Dairy Club: 
Grange; Dairy Products Team; Dairy 
Cattle Team 




B. F. DEEVER, B.S.Agr 
Victor 




ROY WALRABENSTEIN, LL.B. 

Wheeling 



Phi Alpha Delta: Scabbard and Blade 



^BB^ 



SENIORS 



DANIEL D. MALONEY. A.B. 

Buckhannon 



Th.-ta Chi 




Page Srtcnixj-Tii 



r 



W. C. HUGHES. A.B. 
MorKanlown 

Kappa Alpha: Eta Sigma Phi 



GOLDIE ELLEN WILSON, B.S.H.E. 

Morgantown 

Secretary Westminster Girls' Club; Secre- 
tary Home Economics Club: Grange; 
Agriculture Club '26. '27: Barn Dance 
Committee '28 





L. C. GEISEL. A.B. 
Wheeling 



Ktippa Sigma: Toi 
Chi Sigma Delta 



:h and Serpent: Sphinx; 



ORPHA NALE. A.B. 
Morgantown 

Alpha Xi Delta; Dramatic Club 



W HAROLD WAYMAN 
B.S.Agr. 
Wheeling 
Alpha /eta. Agricul 
turist. .Anthony Dairy 
Club 





r.„jr Sr,;-iini-ri 




FRANCES JACOB. A.B. 
Wheeling 

Chi Omega; Mortar Board; W. A. A 
Sigma Phi; R. Jichancas 




CHAUNCEY M. PRICE. LL.B 
Morj;anlown 

Si«ma Chi; Phi Alpha Delta 



WILLIAM P. SCHAMBRA 
B.S.Ch.E. 
Wheeling 

H.1.1 Theta Pi: Tau 
Beta Pi; Phi Lambda 
L'psilon: Freshman 
Track 26 




CHRISTINE SCHLEL'SS. A.B 
Martinsburg 

.Alpha \i Delia; Pre*. Club 



PdV'' Sfrcnfy-Fiff 




Page Sct'cniy-Si- 




ELIZABETH HOOKER. A B 
Buckhannon 



Alpha X. Delta; Beta Pi Theta ; Sec. W 
Student Government '28 




\X ILEV GARRETT. A.B. 
Fairmont 

Dc'ta Tau Delta: Torch and Serpent; Varsity 
Club; Fi Batar Cappar; Football •26. 11. 
•28 



\I \URICE FREEMAN. A.B 

Parsons 



Kappa Epsilon 




ANGELA FALLON. A.B 
Clarksburg 



/Vj;;t ^'r lTii^j/-.St"i*fn 





ACNES NEELY MINNICH, A.B. 

Clarksburg 

Alpha Delta Pi; Kappa Phi; Retejos Jichan- 
icas; W. A, A.; Tennis Mgr. '27, '28; Asst. 
Instructor in Psychology; Basketball and 
Hockey 



EDWARD PRITCHARD. A.B. 
Cumberland 

Kappa Alpha; Chi Sigma Delta 



GRACE E. RUTHERFORD, B.S.H.E. 

Wallace 
Tau Delta; Kappa Phi; Phi Upsilon Omi- 




LEE MALONE, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Delta Kappa Psi ; RiHe 
Team '28, '29 




J 



Page Scvcnty-EigM 




Page Scventy-yine 




I'ayc Eiijlity 




J, K. ROLSTON. A.B. 
Wavcrly 



MARGARET McKONE. A.B 
Tunnclton 



Alpha Xi Delta 




II. L. HEGNER, JR.. B.S.Med 
Pittsburgh. Pa. 



Phi Beta Pi 



Wll.l lARD VILLETTA HARTMXN. 

B.S.H.E. 

Morgantown 

I'l Tau Delia; Home Economics Clul 
1 Grange; Kappa F-'hi 



JOSEPH CHARLES HALL 

B.S.Med. 

Youngatown. Ohio 

r.iu Kappa Epsilon 




H 



i'.l;/. f,;;;i(i/-Oll 




Page ElgMy-7'ico 




REGER. Crad. Sludcnl 
gantown 

Kappa Kappa Pbi : 



GENEVA BOBBITT, A.B.. Grad. Studmi 
Glen Jean 

Matrix: Press Club: Kappa Delta Pi 





JOHN H. MURPHY. B.S.Med. 
Wheeling 



K.ATHLEEN ROBERTSON. A.B. 
Clendennin 

^hi Mu; Seo Beowulf Gedryhl: English Club; 
Dramatic Club: Athenaeum Staff 




Page Eighty-Three 




E. T. ROWLAND, A.B 
Weirton 



Do!ta Kappa Ps 



ELIZABETH TABLER, A.B 
Mannington 



JOSEPH S. DYER. A.B 
Fort Seibert 



MILDRED SHRIVER. B.S.Ed 
Morgantown 





OSCAR SCHOFIELD. A.U 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ph. Alpha 



Page FAijIily-Four 




CURTIS M. CLARK. B.S.E.E 

Prince. 



Phi Alpha: A. I. E. E 



VIRGINIA LEE NUTTER. A.B 
Enterprise 



Phi Mu 




J. H. CONKLIN. B.S.Agr. 
Charles Town 

Anthony Dairy Club: 
Sigma Delta Phi 




HERMAN M. BOWERS. B.S.Agr 
Alaska 

Tau Kappa Epsilon: .Alpha Zeta : Grange 
Agriculturist Staff: Collegiate 4-H Club 
Epsilon Phi Sinma 



IRIS McCLURE. A.B. 
Morgantown 

K.,Dp,, Dolt.i Phi: Kapp., Phi: W. A. A.; Y 
W. C. A. 



r.. , ;■ .: .^,./'. 



I 




CHARLES W. HAWLEY, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Lambda Upsilon ; Track 
BaskelbalL Treas. Wesley Foundation 



ZELLA BISHOP, A.B, 

Sunr^mer Lee 
Sec Beowulf Gedryht; Chi Delta Phi 



R, C, GUTHRIE, B,S.Agr 

Pt. Pleasant 



^ 




BLANCHE PAULINE SHORTRIDGE. A.B. 
Morgantown 

Westminster Girls' Club: English Club; Rho 
dodendron; Matrix; Press Club; Athen 
aeum Staff, Y. W, C. A.. Freshman Com 
mission 



ROSCOE PENDLETON. 
A.B,, LL,B, 

Princeton 
Pi Kappa Alph.^. I'h 
Delta Phi; Law Quar 
terly Staff; Chair 
man of Senior Invi 
tation Committee 




Page Eighty-Six 




Pivjc Eighty-gcvcn 



LOUIS STURBOIS. A.B. 
Clarksburg 

Ph. Kappa Psi; Varsity Track "28. "29; Fi 
tar Cappar; Varsity Basketball "28, '29 



MARY JO MATTHEWS, A.B. 

Mannington 

Dramatic Club 



C. L. STEELE. A.B. 
McMechen 





Sigma Phi Epsilon; Varsity Club; Sphinx: 
Torch and Serpent; Mountain; Fi Batar 
Cappar; Baseball Manager "28 



MARY EVELYN WILSON, A.B. 
Clarksburg 



C. D. RY.AN, A.B. 

Mannington 

Phi Sigma Kappa; 
Mountain; Fi 3atar 
Cappar; Inter-Frat 

Council; Varsity 
Football '26, •27, '28 




Patic Eit/hlji-Eiii'it 




W ILLIAM H. ALLMAN, A.B 
Morganlown 



Theta Chi; Sphinx: Scabbard 
Blackguard Fusiliers 



BEATRICE SCORY. A.B 
Clarksburt; 



Alpha Xi D,-lta 




ROBERT BURCHINAL. A.B 
Morganlown 



.Mpha Delta 



T. D. STALES. Ph.C 
Hundred 



Kappa Psi 




I'l Kappa Alpha: Chi Sigma Delta; Monticolu 
Staff Zi. 26 



DOROTHY BAUER. A B 

Moundsville 



Pii.ii- F.>!iltly-\ine 



ROSS C. SHRIVER. B.S.Ch.E 
Morgantown 



MARY ELIZABETH POLING. A.B 
Elkins 





EDITH JORDAN, A.B. 

Pt. Pleasant 

Alpha Delta Pi; Mortar Board; Rhododen- 
dron; Dramatic Club; Matrix; Press Club; 
Kappa Phi 



WILLIAM S. MORGAN. JR.. A.B. 
Pt. Pleasant 

Sigma Nu; Mountain; Fi Batar Cappar; Var- 
sity Club; Inter-Fraternity Council: Track 
■26. '27. -Zi 



REBECCA GUIHER, A.B. 
Smithfield. Pa. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; 
Rhododendron; Mor- 
tar Board; Y. W. C. 
A.; Kappa Delta Pi; 
Beta Pi Theta; Mon 
licola Staff '28, '29 




WALTER S. BREWSTER. A.B 
Lewisburg 




Pi Kappa Alpha; Varsity Club: Torch anrl 
Serpent: Fi Batar Cappar: Varsity Football 

•27. '28 




KATHERINE HIRST. A.B. 
Kearneysville 

Phi Mu; Eta Sigma Phi: Scribblers Club 
University Choir 



W. R. BARNARD. B.S.Agr. 

IV-nnsboro 

.Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha Zeta : Grange 
Torch and Serpent; .Agriculture Council 
Junior Representative Student Council 
Senior Reprenenlative of Agriculture 
Council; Agriculturist Staff; .Anthony 
Dairy Club; President Agriculture Council 



•MARY FRANCES BROWN. LL.B.. A.B. 

Keyser 

Vlorlar Board: Delta Sigma Rho; Student 
Law Council 




KENNETH J. HAMRICK 
B.S.Med. 
Renick 





Parte Niucl!/-T ICO 




HARRISON CONAWAY. LL.B., 
Fairmont 
Delta Tau Delta; Phi Delta Phi: Mountain: 
Fi Batar Cappar: Sphinx: Torch and Ser- 
pent: President Student Body "28, '29; 
President Student Council -26. '27: Sum- 
mit Mountain: Member Law ColleRe Coun- 
cil; Mountaineer Vfeek Team; Art Editor 
Moonshine ■25; Chairman Athe 
Publications Board '28, '29; Monticol.. 
Publications •28, '29 



MARY LAFFERTY. B.S.H.E. 

Moundsv.Ue 



Chi Omega 





LUCY FRANCES FIELD. A.B. 
Charleston 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 



JOHN D. PHILLIPS. LL.B 

ClarkaburK 

Phi Kappa Psi: Sphinx; Fi Bata 
Mountain; Varsity Club: Torch 
pent: Mountaineer Week Team 



WILMA JONES. A.B 
Terra Alta 



Delta Gamma: Mort 
Board 




Page Xincty-Three 




Page Ninety-Four 




P(ii7f Xincty-Fiee 




BEATRICE SCOTT. B.S.H.E. 
Elkins 

Chi Delta Phi: Phi Upsilon Omicron; Agri- 
culture Staff; Pan-Hellenic Representative; 
Home Economics Club; Athenaeum Staff; 
Press Club; Collegiate 4-H Club 




L. BUSH SWISHER. B.S.Agr 
Weston 



ma Rlio; Alpha Zeta ; Agricul- 
turist; Press Club; Editor of West Virginia 
Agriculturist; Athenaeum Staff; Univer- 
sity Blue Band 



ELIZABETH L.AWRENCE. A.B. 



Alpha Delta Pi; Kappa Phi; Ph. Beta Kappa; 
English Club; Kappa Delta Pi; Beta Pi 
Theta; Wesley Foundation 



J. S. M.ANSKER. A.B. 

Brockton, Mass. 
H i 1 1 e 1 Foundation; 
Chemistry Club; Phi 
Beta Kappa: West 
Virginia University 
Academy of Science; 
University Orchestra; 
Pre-Medical Society 




rage Xincty-Si. 




['n.n- Xincly-Sei-i,i 




WILLIS THORN LINGER, B.S.Agr. 
Weston 




Anthony Dairy Club; Grange; Alpha Gamma 
Rho 



CAROLYN ALCOTT, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Chi Delta Phi; Westminster Girls' Club: W. 

A. A. 



OLGA NUTTER, A.B. 
Huntington 



Phi Mu 



ALBERT SPITZER. A.B. 
New York City 

Tau Epsilon Phi; Athenaeum Staff; Journnl- 
iers '28; Press Club; Varsity Vaudeville 
Act Chairman; Cadet Captain R. O. T. C. ; 
Pres. Hillel Foundation 




\ CLARA DWIGHT 

'- WHITTEN. LL.B. 

Puritan Mines 



Law Quarterly; Ordr 
of the Coif 




Page Sincty-Eighl 




Piiiic Sincty-Kine 




Page One Iliimlicd 




;■...,. i»„. ;; ...,i 



rAVO INT I CO L Aks 




i'.iy.- ((„, llui„li;<l '/■■' 




juniors 




Pniic One riiimlnd Three 



rAVONTI CO LAsi 



Junior Class Officers 

ROBERT L. JACK President 

PAULINE ENCLEHART ^ Vice-President 

HAZEL DUTY Secretary 

KATHERINE BIRCH Treasurer 



Vaije One Iliiiulrcil Fou; 



AVONTICOLAr, 



CHARLES B. HART 

Wheeling 



DOROTHY MATICS 

East Bank 



EVERETT 1.. DODGE 
Terra Alta 



MARY MONROE 
Parkersburg 



HARRY R. HESSE 
Wheeling 




CATHERINE PRESTON 
White Sulphur Springs 



DONALD McCILL 
Wheeling 



ELIZABETH HAUCHT 
West Liberty 



JOHN H. MARTIN 
Shinnaton 



MARY JACKSON 
Bluefield 



59B3 



iAVO 1ST ICO L As 



IRENE CARNEY 

Wheeling 



ALBERT S. DICKERSON 
Fairmont 



A. L. BICKEL 
Parkersburg 



KENNETH CAMERON 

Wheeling 



MARIE DOUGHERTY 




WALTER APPLEGATE 
Morgantown 



VIRGINIA BOWSER 
Paden City 



A. BATES BUTLER 

Wheeling 



THELMA DICK 

Charles Town 



FREDERICK H. DOBBS 

Wheeling 



mm^mmmm^mmammimfm^mm ^ 



■^^"W^ 



i;jj.: <!.. Ilu„.lr..l 



AVONTICOLA:, 



MARTHA BROMBERC 
Charleston 



CHARLES HADEN 
Morgantown 



JOSEPHINE HERD 
Morganlown 



S. N. HEADLEE 

New Martinsville 



MARY HUBBS 
Moundsville 




HAUL J. LANGAN 
Corning, N. Y. 



LUCILLE CHENOWETH 
Morgantown 



LYLE JONES 
Bridgeport 



FRANKIE LONG 
Harding 



JAMES FOLEY 

West Union 




7AVO NT I C O I. As 



1 



G. W. GRUBB 

Mannington 



PAULINE ENGLEHART 

Morg.intown 



HAROLD SLAVEN 
Morgantown 



SUE FREDLOCK 
Piedmont 



VIRGIL BROOKOVER 
Jacksonburg 




HARRIET FRENCH 

Bluefield 



LEONARD COHEN 

Morgantown 



EVA McCLUNG 

Reedv 



RUSSELL CURTIS 
Montrose 



ROSALIE BOUGHNER 

Morgnntown 



Parie One Hunarcd Eiijlit 



fAVONTICOLA.^ 






IRENE CAPLAN 

Clarksburg 



J. T. DRANSFIELD 
Cap MilU 



VIRGINIA GROSS 
Morgantown 



J. C. EAKLE 
Sutton 



LOUISE LANTZ 

Morgantown 





J \MES H. COLEMAN 
F.irmington 



k.r^ 


SALLY C. COHEN 


^^""^ 


Morgantown 


7 




/&: . 





L. M. ORR 
Wrll.burg 



K \THI EEN HOWa\RD 
Morgantown 



CREED MALONE 
Morgantown 



Page One Hundred -V- 



fAVONTICOLAs 



EDWARD J. FOX 
Wheeling 



RUTH BLODGETT 
Morgantown 



RUSSELL ELLYSON 
Cox's Mills 



GENEVIEVE BROWN 
Moundsville 



RICHARD C. BRAND 
Morgantown 




MRS. RUSSELL ELLYSON 
Cox's Mills 



J,\C BURDETT 
Point Pleasant 



VIRGINIA BARNETT 

Follansbee 



WM. T. BOOHER 
Wellsburg 



HELEN DAVISSON 

Jane Lew 



-1 



Vagc One H ■ -'ir, j i 



VVONTICOLA.^ 



FRANCES K. SOUTl 1 
Morgantown 



CHARLES D. THOMAS 
Weston 



VIRGINIA SAMPLES 
Grafton 



LAWRENCE ONEACRE 
New Martinsville 



MABEL WEST 
Lost Creek 




^-JKl 



MITCHELL W. UNGER 
Charleston 



JANE SPERRY 
Sislersville 



EARL WOLFE 
Parkersburg 



CATHERINE SMOOT 

Blurfield 



DONALD B. PARSONS 
Keyser 



Puyc Oitc lit. ; ■ ' 



rAVONTICOLAs 



BRUCE DAVIS 
Weston 



KATHRYN HUFFMAN 
Morgantown 



BEN L. HUMPHREYS 

Masontown 



BRENICE PRATHER 
Goffs 



W. D. PICKERING 
Huntington 




LAViNA McQuillan 

Follansbee 



JOHN MERRITT 

Glen White 



ELMA HICKS 
Webster Springs 



WARD STONE 

MorH«ntown 



MARGARET WELLS 



J 



rugc One IJunUnJ Tui.!vr 



7AVOINTI CO LA.^B=B 



VIRGINIA BINNIX 
Morgantown 



H. W. EPLING 
Welch 



RUTH BANE 
Unionto*vniown, Pa 



JACK C. SIEGEL 

Newark. N. J. 



MARY STURM 
Fairview 




CORDON BRILL 
Intermost 



MARIAN C. W'LLIAMS 
Moruantown 



H. L. OGDEN 
Fairmont 



SUSIE SMITH 
Pt Pleawnt 



\X k R CASTO 

Riplry 



fAVONTICOLA.^ 



FREDERICK D, PARSONS 
R.pley 



HAZEL RECTOR 
Shinnston 



ALEX DICKERSON 
Fairmont 



JOSEPHINE McBRlDE 
St. Marys 



DANIEL BOUCHNER 
Morgantown 




MARIAN WELLS 
St. Marys 



VIRGIL T. HANDLEY 
Grafton 



LOUISE HAMILTON 
Pennsboro 



EDWARD REED 
Parkersburg 



ALICE REYNOLDS 
Clarksburg 



Payc One Hundred Fourteen 



rAVOINTICOLA.^ 



J. H. FINNELL 
Kcyser 



SUE CRADDOCK 
Weston 



PAUL C. GATES 
Jane Lew 



VIRGINIA E. MEEKER 
Charleston 



H. J. PAUGH 
Berkeley Springs 




EVELYN COLE 
Bridgeport 



UALTEr< L SMITH 
Bluefield 



E\A H. PREISS 
Homestead, Pa. 



J W. MACHESNEY 
MorKanlown 



\ IRGINIA PARSONS 
Kej'ser 



rAVO NT I C O Ly^^ 



JUANITA COLF, 

Ravenswood 



GLENN WATSON 
Masontown 



MELBA WATERS 

Grafton 



WARNER GLOVER 
Fairmont 



RUTH TURNER 
Grafton 





J. H. BYRNSIDE 
Madison 



HELEN BOGGESS 
Moreantown 



THOMAS H. JOHNSON 

Wheelin.? 



MARY THOMAS 
Grafton 



CHARLES IHLENFELD 
Wheeling 






Page One Hundred Sixteen 



/AVONTI CO LA:. 



WILLIAM NOLAND 
Romney 



SALVADORA 

SANTOSREYE; 

Caguas, P. R. 



MAX HOLLAND 
Logan 



ZORAu LOWTHER 
Charleston 



JOHN TINIVELL 
Mor>;iinlown 




CATHERINE PATTON 
Bridgirpc't 



HOWARD M. BATSON 
Fairmont 



MILi:>RED PARRACK 
Terr« Alta 



J. T VAN \OORlllS 
Morganlown 



NELL RENNER 
Hundred 



rAXONTICOLAsBi 



BERTHA A. HALLER 
Elm Grove 



E. M. KREIGFR 
Elm Grove 



LADY LOU LaLANCE 
Huntingdon 



WILLIAM H. WINFIELD 
Clarksbur;' 



DOROTHY RINARD 

Mt. Savase 




CHRISTY WILDT 
Parkersburg 



VIRGINIA RIPLEY 
Clarl-.sburc; 



FREDERICK. W. FORD 
Dunbar 



MARY HITE 

Mannington 



J. A. MULLEN 

Pittsburgh 






rAVONT I CO LA:. 



F. D. McGINNIS 
Pcnnsboro 



ELVIRA MOUNTAIN 
Confluence, Pa. 



C. E. WALKER 
Garrett. Pa. 



JUANITA WILSON 

Mornanlown 



CLARENCE MOYFRS 
Bruceton MilU 




RACHEL SMITH 
Clark.burK 



H. C. PETER.SON 

Welton 



HILDA B. SUDER 
Meyertdale. Pa. 



R. E. L. JOHNSON. JR. 
Clarktburx 



N.XNCY LINGER 
Berkeley SpnnK* 



fAVONITI CO L>X^ 



GEORGE CUNNINGHAM 
Morgantown 



RUTH MILLER 
Tunnelton 



ELMONT ULLUM 
Glen reriis 



VIRGINIA MlHAI E 
Elkins 



\V. S. MILLER 
Fort Seihcrt 




C. S. BOGGESS 
Clarksburg 



JOSEPH KAYUHA 

Morgantown 



RUBY McQUIlLAN 

Follansl-e.- 



DELBERT NOEL 

Hinton 



EMILY McCAHAN 

ConnelUvllle, P... 



■^^wwaiiww 



i'.l.zf Onr lliin.li',! I „, i,lu 



AVOPSTICOLA., 



ROBERT RYLAND 
Ligonier. Pa. 



KATHLELN M<:CRAY 
Fairmont 



O. R. GATES 

Flen\inyton 



J. T. SCHAt'B 
Moundsville 



RENICK WILINSON 
Mor -antown 




1. J. CATAPANO 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 



WILLIAM LEWIS 
Pt. Plcawnt 



EMILIE FERIS 

Wlirrlin); 



DAVID HEXTER 
New York 



JAMES C. WILSON 
MorK.inlown 



fAVO NT ICO L As 



p. S. SCHEL. 

Morgantown 



JEANETTK GREEN 
Rowles)>ur;; 



W. J. McCULLOUCH 
Wheeling 



J. S. MOEHS 
New ^'ork City 



E. E. GIVEN 
Clendenin 




GEORGE I. BALLARD 

Glen Jean 



JENNINGS F. ROLLINS 
Cornwallis 



BERYLE PIPER 
Morganlown 



AUGUST W. PETROPLUS 

Wheeling 



S. S. MORRIS 
Cameron 



ruyt U"., Ilui.:h>,i Tu< nty-1: 



rAXOMTICOLA., 



S. S. BROWN 
Wheclin,! 



B. E. STEWART 
Morsanlown 




L^iii 



J. D. ROMINO 
Fiiirmont 



JAMES VERMIi HON 



H. F. JOHNSTON 
MorRnnlDwii 




LORA MILAM 
Robtnaon 



MARTIN EPSTEIN 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 



MAR1 JANE RIC.CS 
Mound.xillc 



TOM HAYMOND 
Shinniton 



J U. JOHMSON 
Key»er 



fAVONTICOLAs 



WILLIAM LARGENT 

Morgantown 



MARGARET MILLER 
Littleton 



OLIVER D. RINEHART 
Morgantown 



CHARLES 13. SEIBERT 

Martinsburg 



RUTH KLINE 
Morgdiilown 




J. B. DECK 
Stote.iljury 



D. PAMPIANO 
Morgantown 



ALMA MILLIKEN 

Tr:idolpK..i 



WARO 
Clay 



CYRIL RUBLE 
M >rgantown 



J 



P,inr Oil.' ;//' '•!:■■, I I I 



sAVONTI CO L A.^ 



LINDA POWELL 
Wheeling 



BERNARD LEVINE 
New York City 



HELEN BARRON 
Crecnsburg. Vu. 



MARK.HEIM LEE 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 



JAMES WEST 
Elkms 




WARD M SHARP 
Murl.nlon 



JEAN KYLE 
Cbrk.buig 



A. S. FISHER 
Chester 



CATHERINE DUNLAP 
\Xe.l Alrxnnder. Pa 



BELMAN SHORE 
Williamson 



7AVOISTICOLAS 



JOSEPHINE WATSON 
Morgantown 



L. H. MILLS 
Clarksburg 



FLORENCE STEALEY 
Clarksburg 



W. J. ROBERTSON 
Richwood 



RUSSELL G. SHEF'PARD 

Palestine 




BYRON RANDOLPH 
Clarksburg 



MARGUERITE 

DILWORTH BOTTOME 



Fleniington 



GLENN GIBSON 
McKeesport, Pa. 



JANE SEABRIGHT 
Roney's Point 



W. P. BURDETTE 
St. Albans 



I'lh/i one lluiitiiui iuinln-Hi 



rAVONTICOLA.^ 



FRANCES DOAK 

Morgantown 



PAUL GARRISON 
Morgantown 



DARLENE 



BRECKENRIDCE 
Wheeling 



J. K. SCOTT 
Terra Alta 



R. B. LlNDSAi 
Dingeis 




R M. RALSTON 

Welton 



CHRISTINE ARNOLD 
Weiton 



1R\ INC HOFFMAN 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 



DOROTHY MANASSE 
Chnrleiton 



EDWARD REED 

ParkeriburK 



!l_ 






fAVONTICOLAs 



EVELYN CARSKADON 
Charleston 



H. L. SUTTON 
Newark, N. J. 



ALICE BOYER 
Moryantown 



WILLIAM CLAY 

WARMAN 
Morgantown 



FRED LANDOLl' 

Newark, N. J. 




E. A .SMITH 
Morgantown 



VERA HENSELL 
Morgantown 



WILLIAM HARRICK 
Punxsutawney, Pa. 



GENEVIEVE 

PORTERFIELD 
Gerrardstown 



C. H. CRUDDEN 
Lancaster, Pa. 



I'njc Oi\c lluiidral Twcnty-EiijM 



fAVOISTICOLAs 



WM. A. THORNHILL 
Charleston 



MARY NETHKIN 
Newburg 



FREDERICK C. Vt ElMER ^ ^ 
Whcrlinn 



CHARLOTTE GRAYSON 
MorKantown 



OSCAR GOLDSTEIN 
Morurtnlown 




MARY CORRELL 
Morgantown 



R. CLARKE Bt'TLER 
Inwood 



MILDRED S. RUNNER 
Morgantown 



ELIZABETH MOORE 
Elkini 



\ IRGINI A SELLERS 
Morgantown 



rAVOINTICOLA.^ 



MARIAN GOODMAN 

Clarksburg 



C. J. McKAINE 

Monongah 



LEORA DUNN 

Reedsville 



J. M. MOORE 
West Alexander, Pa. 



J. R. WADDELL 
Philippi 




E. A. LATHAM 
Buckhannon 



CATHARINE BURCH 
Parkersbiirg 



L. C. MAY 
Sistersville 



SCHOLASTICA 



GAYDOSH 



Whe 



W. T. FAHEY 

WheelinK 



i'agf One [luiHlrcd rhirly 



rAVOISTICOLA-ii I > 




sfAVO NT I C O I- A^ 



Sophomore Class Officers 

FRANK MILLER President 

MARTIN CONTl Vice-President 

ELOISE KERR Secretary 

BERTHA HANDLAN . Treasurer 

CATHRYN THOMPSON Historian 



Oi.c Hundred Thiriy-Tito 



.^AVONJTICOLAs 




-i^AVO MT I CO L>^, 




m^mm 



r.ui, II,,' ll„i>,lrr,i Th,rlil-I'n,,.- 



yAVO INT I C O L A.^ 







C.i;.- Oiir Hundred Thirlii 



rvVVOrsJXI CO LA.-^ 



Freshma?! Class Officers 

ERVIN JOHNSTON President 

BRUNO WAMSLEY Vice-President 

MILDRED VARNER Secretary 

WILLIAM SMITH Treasurer 



J 



Vagr Cine IIidhJi-: .1 



7AVONTICOLAM 




Ah 



lL 



Pnijr One Hundred Thirtj/Srvcn 



fAXOINTI CO LAs 




A 



I 



^^^■~^~— ••- 



kAVO 1ST ICO L As 




MARY JO MATTHEWS 



Page One Tlundrcd Forty-Two 



rA\0 NT ICO LA.. 




MARGARET STRALEY 



Pastt One UuHdrid l\,rty-Thrcc 



fAVOIST I CO LA^ 




CATHRYN THOMPSON 



-A 



Pate one Uundrcd Forty-hvur 



/AVO ISJT I C O L At, 




LEORA DUNN 



1= 



IM,n- Om- Huudr.., 



rAXONITI CO L A:, 




ANNETTE WILEY 



^ 



Vaijc one JIundrcii torty-^i 



,rAVO INT ■ C O L A» 




GERALDINE BEVINCTON 



rA^^OMTICOLAr, 



Runners- Up Beauties 

l>i:\ri>Mci: Sronv 
\'iK(ii.\iA Rii'i,i:v 

CatiiicrinI': Staiii.man 
Cathichini: I'kios'iiin 

JIaRV WlI.I.IAlIS 

Sciioi.ASTiCA (Javdosii 
\'ii;(;ixi\ Caktim! 

.\Iii.i>Ki:i) \'ai!m:i{ 
I)I:kXi:i('i; 1!allaki) 
Ci-AiDiA JIazlictt 
TirioLMA I)ii\xi) 



Page One Uunirci Forty-Eight 



iSEBii&isrAVO NT I C C L A.^ 



Activities 



fAVO NT I C O L A.^ 



The Mountaineer 







ALBERT H. GLENN 

Selected by the Student Body of West Virginia University :is the 
Mountaineer, traditionally the man who has been the ideal representa- 
tive student during his four years enrollment in this institution. Albert 
(Big Sleepy) — during his enrollment participated in the following ath- 
letics: Foolb;,ll, •25, -lb. '27, •28. winning four letters; Basketball. •2o. 
"27. winning two letters; Track, "26. "27, "28, winning three letters. 
Me also was president of the Junior Class, and belonged to the follow- 
ing organizations: Sigma Phi Epsilon, Intra-r raternity Council '16-'27, 
Fi Bater Cappar, Mountain, Varsity Club, and Torch and Serpent. 
During the '29 Intramural Wrestling Tournumeril. he was also Univer- 
sity champion in the 165 pound class. 



■^■SH 



rAVOINTI CO LA.^ 



Most Xcafly Dressed Man 




JOHN D. PHILLIP 



^^^^BBBB^tmaa^a^ 






(•■ ■ ()■■ lluniirrd Fiftti-fhtr 



fAVO PST I C 1- As 



Most Active Girls 




DOROTHY DERING 

Chi Omega; Phi Beta Kappa; President 
Mortar Board; Pr-sident English Club; Seo 
Beowulf Gedryht: Beta Pi Th.^la ; Kappa 
Delta Pi; Rhododendion ; Press Cluij; Matrix; 
Pan-Hellrnic Board; Woman Representative 
on Socia Committee; R, O. 1, C. Company 
Sponsor '27-'23; Battalion Sponsor *28-'29: 
Cadet Hop and Military Ball Committee, 5 
years: Assisrant Art Editor Montcolo, '27; 
Assstant Editor, '28; Society Editor /'Vthen- 
aeum, '26-"27; Co-ed Prom Cimmitteo, '28; 
Vaisity Vai'deville. '27 and '.'8; Freshman 
Cabinet Y. W. C. A. 



MARY JO MATTHEWS 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club; 
Played leading roles in following University 
Piays: "Sun-Up," "The Family Upstairs," 
"H.- Who Gets Slapped'; E'ected the most 
beautiful girl in the Universi'v three consec- 
utive times Selected Queen Shenandoah 
VI of 1929 Apple Blossom Festival. Regi- 
mental R. O. T. C. Sponsor 1),?S1')29. 
Battalion Sponsor "28. 




Pagf Oiii- Ilunihxd Filty-rw 



,/VVONTICOLA., 



EDITH JORDAN 

Alpha Delta Pi: Mortar Board; President 
of W. S. G. A.. ■28-"29; President of Rhodo- 
dendron. ■27-"28: Financial drive ihi-irman 
for Y. W. C. A. ■27-"28; Dramatic Club; 
Matrix; Press Cluh; Kappa Phi; Secretary of 
W. S. G. A., ■27-'28; Sophomore Representa- 
tive of W. S. G. A. ■26-"27: University 
Plays. "The Goose Hangs High." Th: Peli- 
can ' ; Forum. 





RUTH BROWN 

Chi Delta Phi: Mortar Board; Rhododen- 
dron; Delta Sigma Rho; President Y. W. C. 
A. '29; Chairman of State Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A. Conference "29; Debate Team 
28; Co-ed Prom Committee. "28: Judiciary 
Board of Woman's Student Government As- 
sociation '2'); Member of Reli,Tlous Work 
Council "27; Westminster Girls Club: Sco 
Beowulf Gedryhl: Kappa Delta Pi: Eta Sigma 
Phi; Press Club; Forum Steering Committee; 
Hockey Class Team; "The Ideal West Vir- 
ginia Girl." 



7AVO INT I C O E. As 



%^ 



Mountaineer TVeek 



On March 27 began the third annual Mountaineer Week, in which 
seventeen of the leading high schools of the state were visited by nine 
student men. The aim of this visit was to create a better understanding 
of the University among high school students and to acquaint the peo- 
ple of the state with problems of the University and its future. 

Led by George Jackson, captain of the teams, the following men 
visited the folloviring schools in the order named: George Jackson, Clar- 
ence Keefer, and John Zevely went to Parkersburg, Williamson, V/il- 
liamstown, and Logan high schools; J. Brooks Lawson, E. Gaujot Bias, 
and Kendall Keeney visited Fairmont and East Side high schools, Wash- 
and Victory high schools at Clarks- 
high schools; Paul Holland, Charles 
ted Wheeling. Triadelphia, Warwood, 
Cumberland. William T. Fahey was 



ington-lrving, Wilson-Roo 
burg, and Belington and Elkin 
Littlepage, and John Phillips vi 
Wellsburg, Follansbee, and NeM 
publicity manager. 

The men selected to represent the University weie selected on the 
basis of scholarship and active participation in campus activities that 
bring them into close contact with all phases of University life. 

It may be interesting to note that the Mountaineer Week this year 
was sponsored entirely by the student body. This however, brought 
about a shortage in finances and as a result the number of days of vis- 
iting was cut down from five to two. The number of high schools 
visited this year was cut down from seventy to fifteen. 



Pnac n„r lliinilrf,! Flflv-Fnur 



^AVONTICOLA:^ 



Left to riuhl. First Row: Churlea Liltlep«K<-. Jock /evcly, J. Brooks 
Lawson, Kendall Keeney. Paul Holland. Second Row: John Ph.l- 
lips. Gcorjje Jiickson, Capt.. Clarence Keefer, E. Gaujol Bias, 
William T. Fahey. Pub. Mgr. 



fAVONTICOLAs 



JVho's IVho on the Campus 



President of the Student Body Harrison Conaway 

Senior Representatives on Student Council Marjorie Lindermann, 

Herbert Raines 
Junior Representatives on the Student Council Marguerite Dilvi-orth, 

Byron Randolph 

President of the Senior Class Thomas Arn'Jtt 

President ot the Junior Class Robert Jack 

President of the Sophomore Class Frank Miller 

President of the Freshman Class Irvm Johnston 

Summit of the Mountain Harrison Conaway 

L. H. C. P. of Fi Bater Cappar John Phillips 

President of Inter-Fraternity Council Fred Parriott 

President of the Sphinx Truehart Taylor 

President of Torch and Serpent William Winfield 

Captain of Football Clarence Keefer 

Manager of Football Charles Zoeckler 

Captain of Basketball James Black 

Manager of Basketball Joseph Moreland 

Captain of Wrestling James Cox 

Manager of Wiestling Andrew Marsh 

Captain of Track Leslie Montgomery 

Manager of Track Delbert Noel 

Captain of Baseball William Harrick 

Manager of Baseball Stuart Brown 

Captain of Rifle '.' Homer DeJournett 

Manager of Rifle William Largent 

Editor of Monticola Chester May 

Business Manager of Monticola John Moore 

Editor of Athenaeum William Fahey 

Business Manager of Athenaeum Solomon Bobes 

Editor of Agriculturist Bujh Swisht-r 

Editor of Student Directory William Thornhill 

Managing Editor of Athenaeum Otis Young 

Head Cheerleader Charles Swearingen 

Members of University Social Committee Dorothy Dering, 

Charles Swearlngen 



^mm^^rmm^mmmmm^mmmmmi^mmmm 



Page Om Iluiulred rifti/Si. 



rAVONTICOLAr, 



Members of University Athletic Committee Louis Meis.;l, 

Walter Brewster 

n of the University Dance Committee Bernard Rinehirt 

{ the Pan-Hellenic Dance Committee Eugene Hague 

n of the Junior Prom Committee Christy Wildt 

of Y. M. C. A _ James Vermillion 

of Y. W. C. A Ruth Brov.n 

Woman's Student Gov't Association Edith Jordan 

of Pan-Hellenic Association . Evelyn Carskadon 

of Phi Delta Phi Paul Ho'land 

of Phi Alpha Delta Milton Ferguson 

of Alpha Zeta Herman Bowers 

of Chi Sigma Delta Charles Swearingen 

of Tau Beta Pi Cecil Coulter 

of Theta Kappa Psi Scott Reger 

of Phi Upsilon Omicron Rulh Marlin 

of Kappa Phi Mary Jackson 

of Kappa Kappa Psi Scott Reger 

of Beta Pi Theta Leon Meillcur 

of Phi Lambda Upsilon Jack Rollins 

of Rhododendron Frances Doak 

of Mortar Board Dorothy Dering 

of Matrix Frances Delancy 

of Delta Sigma Rho Brooks Lawson 

of Litoon-awa .• Kathryn Hinkle 

of Law College Student Covernment Brooks Lawson 

of Freshman Medical Class Herbert Raines 

Mountaineer Freeman Bishop 

Manager of Mountaineer Richard Ralston 

of Journaliers Otis Young 

of Press Club Richard Ralston 

of Newman Club Marvin Hooker 

f Scabbard and Blade Floyd Brill 

ot Engineering Society Russell Squibb 

of Agricultural Council William Barnard 

of Grange Howard Peterson 

of Home Economics Council Elizabeth McNeill 

of Home Economics Club Ocelia Crane 

rman of Cadet Hop Committee E. G. Bias 



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r 



FAVONTICOtA^ 



Mont kola Calendar 
1928-29 



SEPTEMBER 

17, Monday Greetings I Scurry, hurry, getting little sisters and high school heroes reg- 
istered. 

19, Wednesday — Alarm clocks set for eight o'clock classes. We hope the tide of stu- 
dents" enthusiasm doesn't run low. 

20, Thursday 2,300 enrolled. Lazy students still searching in vain tor snap courses. 

"Adam and Eva" staged by Willard Ayers. 

21, Friday Our new president. Dr. John R. Turner, is introduced to the student body 

at first thuse. 

22, Saturday — Even though we lost to Davis and Elkins, 7-0, the sororities seem to have 
made time with the new co-eds. 

23, Sunday Freshman caps are seriously essential, but where, oh, where, are the girls 

arm bands? Get to work you sophomores! 

24, Monday Decrease of one hundred since last year in final enrollment. 

27, Thursday — Fi Bater Cappers elect John Phillips, "Bill" Fahey. ""Jim"" Cox, "Dick" 
Bias, Gordon Brill, as officers. 

28, Friday Athenaeum receives cheerful letter from "Ches" Latham, former football 

captain who wishes us best of luck in the Wesleyan game. ""Les" Montgomery elected 
Mountaineer track captain. 

29, Saturday — ""Chuck"" Swearingen elected head cheerleader, Lawrence Mills, ""Joe"" 
Lynch, and Jarvis Currence to assist. 

OCTOBER 
1, Monday Men's Field house almost completed. Plenty to be proud of boys! 

3, Wednesday — President Turner greets student body for first time at convocation. 

4, Thursday — Torch and Serpent pledges thirty men. 

6, Friday All sports fans and otherwise go to Wheeling to view the Haskell Indian 

game. (Their girls were busy with formal rushing.) 

9, Tuesday Dean Fulton and Dean Stone were much relieved when they read the 

comment of Chief-of-Police Smith in the Athenaeum, concerning the improvement 
of local collegiate behavior. 



Poijc One nundrcil Fifty-Eight 



i^AVOrSTI CO LA:, 



10, Wednesday — One hundred and five women pledged by sororities. Irvin Johnston 
elected freshman class president. 

13. Saturday — Fred Landolphi leads average for 1927-1928 with 95.833 percent. Stu- 
dent body averaged 78.8. William Penn Hotel removes furniture from lobby to pro- 
tect It from celebrating Mountaineers, as VARSITY DOWNS PITT. 9-6. 

15, Monday — EXTRA! EXTRA! Holiday given students for Panther defeat. Thuse. 
parade, and Mountaineer dance feature holiday. 

18. Thursday — Social calendar announced, but what a calendar — soon to be revised. 

20. Saturday — "Eddie" Stumpp, injured in Wash-Lee game, will be out for the season. 

23, Tuesday — "U" Band serenades Dr. Turner who comes out on the porch and greets 
the boys. 

27, Saturday — Dr. C. E. Bishop becomes Professor Emeritus after seventeen years of ser- 
vice. Social season finally opens with first Cadet Hop. 

30, Tuesday — "Chet" May and John Mark Moore announce 1929 Monticola staf? per- 
sonnel. Hoover and Smith clubs being formed on the campus. 

31, Wednesday — Woman students at West Virginia seem to be going out heavy for ath- 
letics. We wonder why all the "building" interest. 






NOVEMBER 

I, Thursday — First fire drill at Woman's hall. Causes excitement on "fraternity row." 
Y. W. C. A. membership increases under direction of new secretary. Miss Winifred 
Chaney. 

3, Friday — Poor football managers can hardly keep secret practice with the droves of 
co-ed hockey enthusiasts. 

4, Saturday — Fredlock pharmacy hot with political discussion. 

6. Tuesday — Campus club dinner given in honor of Dr. and Mrs. Turner. Election re- 
turns received. 

7. Wednesday — Virginia Ewing and Elmer Fiorentino represent West Virginia in semi- 
finals of National Radio Audition contest. 

8. hursday Campus is scene of big hub-bub. Three conventions open sessions here 

state journalism conference, junior farmers' week, and State Water conference. 

10, Saturday — "West Virginia Day" attracts large droves. First University dance does 
likewise. Tau Theta Rho formally installed as Phi Kappa Tau. 

14, Wednesday — L. C. Swing awarded Tau Beta Pi cup. 

1 5, Thursday Prof. A. J. Hare is critically ill in Johns-Hopkins hospital. 

16, Friday — West Virginia co-eds are superstitious. Rather than walk under the ladder 
across the doorway of Elizabeth Moore hall they cut classes. Now, were they super- 
stitious? 

1 7. Saturday — Athenaeum announces the 28th as University holiday to attend President 
Turner's inauguration. We are for more, and still more inaugurations. 



J 



llilnJ:\J Fifly-Xi 



sfAVO NT I C O L As 



20, Tuesday Student Directory issued today. Thanks to Bill Thornhill, editor. 

21. Wednesday — Seven seniors are elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Women students name 
vigilance group. Watch your step freshmen! 

23, Friday Oxford debaters arrives. "Oh deah meahl" 

23. Saturday — Women students recover childish habits and swarm to Play Day, Lots 
of fun and heaps of Eskimo pies. 

2 7. Tuesday — Dr. John R. Turner is formally innaugurated as thirteenth president of 

West Virginia. Big holiday — lots of soldiers music — speeches caps and gowns, 

and sponsors! 

29, Thursday — 'Turkey Day." Varsity defeats W. & J. Whooppeel 

DECEMBER 

I, Saturday — Martin club is installed as Phi .Alpha. Governor Gore elected to Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

4. Tuesday — University is proclaimed worth $2,500,000 to Morgantown a year. 

5. Rupert Powell champions the cause of Blue Band in several issues of the Athenaeum. 

6. Thursday It was a wise idea to bar the law freshies from swinging canes. Such ta'.l 

canes. 

7. Friday — Scholastica Gaydosh wins the Home Economics scholarship prize. 

9, Sunday — Hillel foundation organized. 

10, Monday— "Queen's Husband" scores big success. Good work Dramatic club and 
Miss Welch! 

12, Thursday Flu epidemic spreading, 300 are reported ill. 

I 5, Saturday Olficials seem to think a bit of knowledge more important than health — 

absolutely will not close school. Dozens ill and compelled to leave. Woman's hall 
a regular hospital. 

18, Tuesday School still in session, but no tests to be given. No tests, believe it or not. 

20, Thursday- — "Little Sleepy" 'Glenn made 1929 grid captain. Congratulations, 
"Sleepy!" 

21. Friday Finally allowed to go home. Everybody off for the holidays. 

JANUARY 

3, Thursday Howdy! 1 lowdy ! Everybody back. Welcoming kisses. "Vou had the 

flu" too? 

4, Friday Whooppeel Even Old Woodburn has her yellow streaks now! Watch out 

— wet paint! 

5, Saturday Congratulations to "Little Sleepy" and Helen. 

7. Monday — Exams approach. Cheaters brush up on newest strategy. 



Page One Iluudrcd Sixlu 



rAVOINTICOLA.^ 



10, Thursday — Charles Schuck, Wheeling. i» victim of iiiHurnza. 

14, Monday — Kessel advocates skull and bones for highvfay danger spots. We pity the 
poor co-eds who are v^ont to park along the way. 

28, Monday — Semester examinations all over. Everyone celebrates by gomg to the Mil- 
itary Ball. 

31, Thursday — By defeating D. and E 44 to 30, the Mountaineers win seventh straight 
game and the Varsity retains its title of "a point a minute team." 

FEBRUARY 

2, Saturday — Bigger and better Athenaeum, but the staff must be scotch with that little 
print. 

6, Wednesday — 111 flunk out for first term. 

12, Tuesday — West Virginia students at Ohio State organize Mountaineer club. 
I 3, Wednesday Registration lor second semester reaches 2.426. 

14, Thursday — Women students wish to thank William Fahey. the great linguist of the 
Athenaeum for giving them at least half a chance in his widely translated column. 

15, Friday — Students are surprised to leain that Lindy is going to be married to-Morrow. 

1 6, Saturday — Five fraternities plan to build new houses. 

20, Wednesday — Rushers are rushed to rush the rushecj. Thirty-eight women are 
pledged. 

22, Friday — University men get out their little sleds instead of their "tucks." Diminished 
stag line for Woman's Pan and Press club dance. 

23, Saturday — Congratulations to Captain Jimmy Cox who ends his wrestling career with 
an undefeated season. 

25, Monday Dr. Shortridgc succeeds Dean Callahan as dean of the .A.B. school. Director 

Friend succeeds A. J. Hare as registrar. 

26, Tuesday — Dr. Strausbaugh, if you succeed in gaining a state forestry for the Univer- 
sity, we heartily recommend a lover's lane, since Brooks and Co. won't furnish 
benches on the campus. 

28, Thursday — We realize now why the Chi Omegas have their Creek letter plaque 
almost on the roof, because the f'i Phis and Alpha Delta Pis have had theirs stolen. 

MARCH 

1, Friday — Mardi Gras side shows and jitney dance draw big crowd which spends many 
nickels on hot dogs and lemonade. 

2, Saturday — Open houses are revived. 

5, Tuesday 25 University women are aided by scholarships. 

7, Thursday System of registration to be revised. Let's hope it will do away with those 

infernally early tickets we have had to get. 



fAVONTICOLAr 



9, Saturday Harriett Lyon is the new name proposed for Woman's hall. 

I I, Monday — Varsity five rates fourth in the East. 

I 3, Wednesday University role shows students from 29 states. 

14, Thursday — The "C" budget is going down! down I down! 

1 5, Friday — University dean of clocks hasn't been on the job. 

16. Saturday — Plans made for Freshman Week are approved by faculty. 

1 7, Sunday — Student Religious Forum which was held during the week-end closes. 

19, Tuesday Varsity Vaudeville goes over big. Mary Jo Matthews is Miss W. V. U. 

21, Thursday — Athenaeum prints special edition in accordance with Mountaineer week. 

27, Wednesday — Mid-semesters over. Home for Easter. 

29 and 30, Friday and Saturday Captain "Jimmie " Cox goes to finals in National Inter- 
collegiate Wrestling championship finals at Ohio State university, Columbus, O., 
winni|j^ three matches to get there. Mountaineers are proud of you, "Jimmie. " 

APRIL 

4, Thursday — Big Easter Coeds back with more ambition and more clothes. 

6, Saturday — Phi Delta Theta fraternity holds large conclave with nine colleges repre- 
sented. 

9, Tuesday University broadcasts from Morgantown Post and Fairmont station. Sor- 
ority and fraternity songs also popular music being broadcast by students. 

1 I, Thursday — Mary Jo Matthews named queen of Apple Blossom Festival at Winchester, 
Va. 

12, Friday — Dig out your sailor suits, the "hill's" having a "boat ride." 

I 3, We're off to the press today. 



Page One Iluudred Sixly-Two 




Page On« Hundred S'xty-Tlxret 



rAVOINTI CO tA.^ 




A "kid" party was given for the residents of the Boughner House and Woman's Hall 
Annex by the students of Woman's Hall on Saturday evening. October 6, 1928, from 8 to 
10:30 o'clock. The guests came attired as little boys and girls. Children's games ivere 
played and for the more sedate "youngsters" tables of bridge were arranged. A prize 
was given for the best costumes. 

FIRST CADET HOP 

The first social season was opened by a Cadet Hop on October 2 7th. The .Armory 
was beautifully decorated with Rags, and red, white, and blue streamers. These plus 
the clever programs, Carson Howard's Orchestra, and the afternoon victory over Laf'iy- 
ette combined to make the first dance a decided success. 

UNIVERSITY DANCE 

The first University Dance of the year was held in the Armory on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 10. The fact that "old grads" and classmen joined in celebrating West Virginia's 
victory in (he afternoon's "Homecoming " football game, added to the gayety of the even- 
ing. The Armory was attractively decorated in the school colors, and the University 
guests danced from eight thirty until eleven thirty to the captivating music of Recce 
Henry's Orchestra. Light refreshments were served throughout the evening. 

PHI KAPPA TAU INSTALLATION DANCE 

The installation of Phi Kappa Tau here was celebrated by a dinner-dance at the 
Hotel Morgan, November 10, 1928. The dinner m the main dining room was followed 
with speeches by prominent officials of the fraternity. Afterwards the party adjourned 
to the upstairs ballroom where it was entertained by Carson Howard and his orchestra. 
The evening came to a successful close with the presentation of colored crystal pendants 
for each guest. 



I'liijc One lliiiiilivd Sixty-Four 



Ir- ~ AVONTICOLA:. 



PHI MU FORMAL 

The Phi Mu formal on November 2 3. 1928 wa. held nl the chapter house which 
was prettily decorated in rose and white. Confetti and gayly colored balloons added an 
fxtra touch of festivity. Carson Howard's Orchestra played the program of dances. 

WOMAN'S HALL FORMAL 

The women students living at the Woman's Hull .\nnex jnd Boui^hner House enter- 
tained five hundred quests at the formal dance Kiven m the ballrooms of the Hotel Mor- 
gan from eight until eleven thirty on Saturday. November 24. 1028. Dean Martha T. 
Fulton, Miss Isabella Hays, Mrs. E. B. Abbot and Mrs. While, composing the hostess line, 
received the guests. The music for the dancers was furnished by Reese Henry's Orches- 
tra, and throughout the evening light refreshments were served. 

TAU EPSILON PHI 

Tau Epsilon Phi entertained with .i coUegi.ite dinner-d.mce at the chapter houie on 
November 30, 1928. Banners and decorations in lavender and white gave the hou:,e a 
festive air. Carson f-loward played the program of dances. Treasure chests and w.it':h 
charms of silver, contributed to the success of the evening. 

FIRST PAN-HELLENIC 

Greeks met Creeks at the first Pan-Hellenic on December 7, 1928. The unusual 
lighting effect with the great mirror ball in the center of the room and Charlie Fulcher s 
Columbia Recording Orchestra made this one of the most delightful dances of the year. 

PI KAPPA ALPHA DANCE 

The pledges of Pi Kappa .Alpha fraternity entertained for the active members with n 
dance given in the chapter house Saturday. December 8. The hours were from eight o'clock 
to eleven-thirty and the musical program was furnished by Carson Howard's players. The 
rooms were attractively decorated in the fraternity colors and emblems, and light refresh- 
ments were served during the dancing. 

PHI KAPPA PSI PARTY 

One of the prettiest parties in the University circle was given by the young men of 
the Alpha chapter of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity in their home on Spruce Street on Saturday, 
December 8. 1928. The rooms of the chapter house were made brilliant by the addition 
of flowers and a design of striking black and white. The programs were also carried out 
in this color combination. Reese Henry's Orchestra p'ayed the proi;ram between the 
hours of eight and eleven thirty, and a bufTet supper was served during the intermission. 
Mrs. John Roscoe Turner and Mrs. Enoch Howard V'itkers presided at the urns, and the 
serving table was centered with a basket of pink roses and snapdrigons 

NEWMAN HALL 
An attractive dancing party of formal appointments was jiven Friday. December 
I 1. in the parlors of Newman Hall, by the membeis of the Newman Club. The spacious 
parlors were decorated to simulate a cabaret, and supper w.is served at small tables. 
During a musical program supplied by Reese Henry and his orchestra, a specialty num- 
ber was presented by professional dancers. 

DELTA TAU DELTA AND PHI SICMA KAPPA 

With the young men of Delta Tau De'ta .ind Phi Signi.i K.ippa as hosts, a formal 
dance of delightful arrangements was given Saturday. December 1 2. in the ballroom of 
the Hotel Morgan. The musical program between the hours of eight thirty and eleven 
thirty was supplied by Jack Schill's "West Virginians" of Martinsburg, W. Va. Insignit 
of the fraternities, electrically lighted, were placed about the walls of the ballroom. 

SIGMA CHI 

The young men of Mu chapter of Sigma Chi entertained with a Japanese dinner 
dance on Friday evening. January 4, in the chapter house. The fraternity rooms were 
very attractively decorated to represent an oriental garden, and the guests came in cos- 
tume. Ross Gorman and his Victor Recording Orchestra played a delightful program of 
dances between the hours of seven and eleven thirty. Chaperones for the evening in- 
cluded alumni of the chapter. 



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TAU DELTA THETA 

On January 5tK, Tau Delta Theta entertained with a formal dinner dance in the 
Ortolan banquet room. The place was decorated in blue and white with multi-colored 
lamps here and there. Leather booklets with the fraternity seal in bronze were given as 
favors. Reese Henry's orchestra played the program of dances. 

CO-ED PROM 

The members of the Mortar Board sponsored a Co-ed Prom given at the Masonic 
Temple on January 9, I 929. Some of the girls came dressed in tuxedos representing the 
absent gentlemen. A delightful program of dances was played by Reese Henry and his 
orchestra between the hours of 8:30 and 1 1 :30 o'clock. 

MILITARY BALL 

The best decorations of the year formed the background of i 
the dance on January 28. 1929. A mirror ball, hung from the c 
the only lighting. The Silvertown Chord Orchestra, and the Silvei 
broadcasting of the dance were some of the good and unusual fe 
dance stand out as one of the best. Diaries bound in blue leathe 

SOPHOMORE DANCE 

The annual Sophomore dance was given at the Armory on February 8, with Carson 
Howard's Orchestra playing for the evening. The hall was attractively decorated in blue 
and white. 

ALPHA GAMMA RHO 

The members of Alpha Gamma Rho entertained with their winter formal on Friday, 
February 15, 1929 at the Hotel Morgan. A dinner was served at 6:30 and the Colonial 
Club Orchestra played a delightful program of dances between the hours of 8:30 and 
1 I :30. The ballroom was decorated in the fraternity colors. 

DELTA KAPPA PS! 

On Saturday, February 16, the Delta Kappa Psi entertained at the Morgan Hotel 
with a formal dinner dance. Reese Henry and his orchestra furnished the music. Leather 
purses of different colors were given as favors. 

MOUNTAINEER DANCE 

On Saturday, February 16, the annual Mountaineer dance was given in the Armory 
which was appropriately decorated in the school colors. Old Cold and Blue. Carson 
Howard played the program of dances which was varied by a contest to choose from the 
best dancers. The proceeds of the dance financed the Mountaineer Week team. 

WOMEN'S PAN-HELLENIC 

Bob McGowan's Orchestra from Monongahela. Pa., played for the Women's Pan 
which was held in the Armory on February 21. The decorations were of an appropriate 
George Washington tone. Confetti and serpentine added much to the gayety of the even- 
ing. 

PRESS CLUB FORMAL 

The members of the University Press Club gave a very attractive formal dance in 
the Armory on Friday, February 22, 1929. The programs were unique, being in the 
shape of newspapers, and the ballroom decorations also carried out the literary nature 
of the club. I^eese Henry's orchestra played the program of dances from 8:30 to 11:30 



clock. 



PHI KAPPA SIGMA 



The Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity entertained at the Hotel Morgan with a mid-winter 
formal on Saturday, February 23. 1929. At 6:30 a delightful dinner was served and 
Hawkin's Colored Orchestra of Uniontown, Pa. furnished the music for the dances be- 
tween the hours of 8:30 and 1 1:30. Colored serpentine, balloons and confetti added to 
the e\'ening*8 gaiety. 



Papo One Uiwilrfd fUrtii-KI^ 



^AVOrslTICOLA:. 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

The Kappas entertained with a dehuhtful dinrx-r .it the Motel Morgan. Small tablet 
decorated with sweet peas made a pretty picture of the ballroom. At 8:30 the room wai 
cleared so the guests could enjoy the program of dances played by Jack Schills and his 
West Virginians. 

MARDl GRAS 

A new custom was started with the Mardi Cras sponsored by the Y. W. C. A. on 
March 1. The carnival was give.i in the Armory which was fittingly decorated with cop. 
fetti and balloons. Hot dog, candy and novelty booths added to the gay atmosphere. 
Reese Henry played the program of "jitney" dances. 

PHI SIGMA DELTA 

On Saturday, March 2. 1929, a delightful informal dance was given at the chapter 
house of Phi Sigma Delta. Fraternity colors, widely difTused. and balloons, served as 
decorations. Prizes were given, refreshments were served, and Carson Howard's orches- 
tra rendered a delightful dance program. 

PI LAMBDA PHI 

On Saturday. March 2, Pi Lambda Phi entertained at the chapter house with their 
spring formal. Music by Carson Howard and his orchestral. The house was decorated 
in red and purple, the fraternity colors. 

ALPHA DELTA PI 

On March 9, the Alpha Delta Pi's gave their spring formpi ai the Hotel Morgan. 
Reese Henry furnished the music. Delightful refreshments were served. The hall was 
decorated in the sorority colors. 

CHI OMEGA FORMAL 

The young ladies of the Chi Omega fraternity entertained with their mid-winter 
formal on Friday evening. March 8, 1929, in the Masonic Temple. Bob McCowan's or- 
chestra of Monongahela, Pa. played a charming program of dances between the hours of 
eight thirty and eleven thirty o'clock. Confetti and serpentine added to the delight of 
the evening. 

MONONGAHELA CLUB 

Carson Howard's orchestra played a program of dances for the Monongahela Club's 
formal dance given in the room of the Ortolan on March 9, 1929. The programs and 
decoratetions were carried out in the fraternity's colors, rose and silver. 

SIGMA NU 

The young men of Sigma Nu entertained with .> spring f.irmal dinner dance in the 
ballroom of the Hotel Morgan. Bob McCowan's orchestra of Monongahela, Pa. pUyed 
the program of dances. Balloons, confetti, serpentine, horns, and whistles, added to the 
evenings's jollity. The ballroom w.ts attractively decorated in the fraternity colors. 

PAN-HELLENIC 

The fraternity men's second panhellenic was held on March 22, I ''29 at the Univer- 
sity Armory. A delightful program of dances was played and the ballroom was decor'iled 
in attractive colors. Refreshments were served during the evening. 

ENGINEERS' BALI. 

The College of Engineering entertained with an informal dance .it the .Armory on 
March 23. Reese Henry furnished the music. 

"U" DANCE 

The second University dance was given in the Armory on .-\pril 5th, 1929. Dec- 
orations were used and the bright colors added to the dancer's gaiety. Delightful refresh- 
ments wxre served throughout the evening and Reese Henry's orchestra furnished the 
music. 



rAVONJTI CO LA., 



PHI DELTA THETA 

On Saturday, April 6, the local chapter of Phi Delta Theta gave a conclave dance 

at the Morgan. A delightful dinner was served at 6:30. Carson Howard played between 

courses and for the rest of the evening. Serpentine and confetti added to the spirit of 
revelry. 

KAPPA ALPHA-PI KAPPA ALPHA 

On Friday, April 12, the Kappa Alpha and Pi Kappa Alpha fraternities entertained 
Phi Sigma Kappa and Delta Tau Delta with a formal dance at the Morgan. The Oriental 
Cotton Pickers played the program of dances. 

HILL "SAILOR PARTY" 

Delta Tau Delta and Phi Sigma Kappa were hosts to the young men of Kappa Alpha 
and Pi Kappa Alpha at a "sailor dance" given in the Armory on April 13, 1929. The 
guests came in various sailor costumes and the programs also carried out the naval at- 
mosphere. Jack Schill's West Virginians furnished the music for the dancers and delight- 
ful refreshments were served throughout the evening. 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON 

^au Kappa Epsilon gave its spring formal at the Morgan on Friday. .April I 9. Carson 
Howard played a delightful program of dances. Excellent refreshments and confetti 
added to the pleasure of the evening. 

DELTA KAPPA PSI 

The chapter house of Delta Kappa Psi fraternity in Sunnyside w.is the scene of .T 
delightful formal dance on Saturday, April 20, 1929. The rooms were decorated in the 
fraternity colors and the fraternity emblems were also used. The guests danced .i pro 
gram of twelve dances to the entertaining music of Reese Henry and his orchestra. 

PHI MU 

The chapters of Phi Mu gave a charming spring formal ini their chapter house on 
Carson Street on .April 20, 1929. The rooms were decorated in red and white, and wild 
crabapples and white lilacs were used in profusion. Walter Glenn's orchestra played a 
program of twelve dances from eight thirty to eleven thirty o'clock. 

PI BETA PHI 

On Saturday, April 20, the Pi Beta Phi gave their spring formal at the Morgan. The 
hall was beautifully decorated with serpentine and balloons. Carson Howard furnished 
the music. 

WOMAN'S HALL 

On Saturday, April 27, the young ladies of Woman's Hall and the other dormitories 
entertained at the .Armory with their spring formal. The place was beautifully decorated 
by Turner. Al Mabey and his Old Gold and Blue orchestra furnished the music. 



HH 



PaffC n„r llinulrrd SMii-Kiuhl 



rAVONTlCOLA., 



Publications 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^fi'^mmm^mmmtm'* 



T__J 



fAVOISTI CO LAs 



Athenaeum Public at ioji Board 

For the purpose of advising the publishing of the Athenaeum. 

J. HARRISON CONAWAY President 

MARGUERITE DILWORTH BOTTOME Secretary 

D. p. I. REED Faculty Adviser 

CHARLES E. HODGES Ahmmi Representative 

MARJORIE LINDERMAN BYRON RANDOLPH 

OTIS S. YOUNG S. 5. BOBES 

W. r. FAHEY 



r.;.,. II,.,- lluiulicd .Si-irjih) 



f 



rAVONTICOLA., 




t 



fAVOINTI CO LA^ 



The Athenaeum 



Published Tuesday. Thursday, Saturday of each week by the 
students of West Virginia University under the supervision of the Athen- 
aeum Publication Board and the Department of Journalism. 

THE STAFF 

WILLIAM T. FAHEY Editor-in-Chief 

OTIS S. YOUNG Managing Editor 

RICHARD H, RALSTON Tuesday News Editor 

FRANCES DeLANCY Thursday News Editor 

DANIEL C. BOUGHNER Satu.-day News Editor 

SOLOMON S. BOBES Business Manager 

J. DONOVAN FAUST Assistant Business Manager 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

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ELEANOR STONE Thursday Society 

OUIDA STONESTREET Saturday Society 

J. W. HARRIS Sports 

GLENN F. COOK Assistant Sports 

FERD BROWNING, JR ...Assistant Sports 

B. PAULINE SHORTRIDGE Literary 

RACHEL SMITH Humor 

KATHLEEN ROBERTSON Poetry 

JAMES A. WEST Tuesday Exchange 

C. FRANCIS PETERS Thursday Exchange 

PATRICI.A SEAMAN Saturday Exchan-e 

COPY DESK EDITORS 
TERESA BRODERICK Copy Editor 

JOHN H. MARTIN ...Tuesday 

IRENE CAPLAN Thursday 

ALICE M. BOYER Saturday 

REPORTERS 

Irma Ayers. R. L. Bled.soe, Ferd Browning, Jr., Mary Katherine 
Colborn, Glenn F. Cook, Lucille Fo.v, Ira Gould, James Harris, Edward 
H- Higgs, John R. Jackson, Scott Lowe 11, Martha A. Moore, C. Francis 
Peters. Norman Raies, Patricia Seaman, Helen M. Sharp, Virginia B. 
Stanard, Eleanor Stone, Ouida Stonestreet, Ores.sa Teagarden, Jos-phine 
Watson. James A. West, Pearl Wilson. 

BUSINESS ASSISTANTS 

WILLIAM HANES CHARLES IHLENFELD CHARLES POLAN 



wmm^mmmn^mmmim. i. - i. >■ k-.gSfi^aK^ 



Page One Hundred Serenty-Ttco 



rAVONTICOLAs 




/•,,.;.■ Ihn //"ii.lr. .1 .■-■ I ■ "ly- 



fAVONTICOLAs 



The JVest Virginia Agriculturist 

FOUNDED 1915 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 1.. BUSH SWISHER 

Managing Editor W. HAROLD WAYMAN 

Assistant Editor BEATRICE SCOTT 

Home Economics Editor L.UCRETIA WHITE 

Alumni Editor -IRA GOUlD 

News Editor .-. CLARENCE A. MAY 

Exchange Editor. R. CLARKE BUTLER 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager DOUGLAS W. MILLER 

Advertising Manager HOWARD G. PETERSON 

Circulation Manager HERMAN M. BOWERS 



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The Monti cola 



EDITORIAL STAFF 
L. C. MAY Editor- n-Chlcf 

ALBERT J. BLAIR ( Assoc ate Editors 

JANE SPERRY \ /^ssoc.ate tlditors 

GEORGE BALIARD Senior Editor 

RACHEL SMITH Junior Editor 

PAUL LANGAN Athletic Edito.- 

IRMA AYERS Organizations Editor (Woman) 

JOHN HOWARD MARTIN Organizations Editor (Man) 

WALTER GLENN Art Editor 

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DOROTHY MANASSE | 

VIRGINIA TAYLOR ) Society Editors 

BECKY GUIHER J 

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MALCOLM LOWE 1 

JULIUS COHEN ; Assistant Editors 

FREDERICK FORD J 

BUSINESS STAFF 

JOHN MARK MOORE Business Manager 

Assistants to the Business Manager 

JOHN M. BERRY NORMAN RAIES GEORGE SMOOT 

JOHN R. KING RALPH E. GRIMMETT ALGUST PETROPLUS 

HARRY HESSE RALPH HARTMAN 

Assistants to the Staff 

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Advertising Staff 

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Motiticola Publication Board 

HARRISON CONAWAY _ Chairman 

HARVEY J. SIMMONS Secretary 

DR. P. I. REED ; IT K \j ■ 

DR. R. C. SPANGLERf '^""'»y •'^'Iv.sers 

J. M. MOORE E. C. BIAS L. C. MAY 



5^ 



Page One Hundred Seventy-Bight 




Page One Huiulrcd Eiyht'i 




I'nrn One lIutHliid Hiolity-Ono 



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"SW^ 



Page Onr Hundred Eighlt/-Tu>o 



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COACH 1 E RODGERS 



COACHING STAFF 

Head Coach I. E. RodK<rrs 

Line Coach W. H. Mahi.n 

Line Coach Ro«» McHenry 



J*r 





CAPTAIN KEEPER CAPTAINELECT M. GLENN 



irAVO MX I CO L A., 




MANAGING STAFF 

CharlesWiUiam Zoeckler Manager 

Tom Brafford Delbert Noel 

l.yle Jones Bill MacChesney 

Tom Johnson John Byrnside 




12 
28 

9 

22 
17 
18 
M 

14 



W. V. U Sept. 22 Davis & Elkins 

W. V. U Sept. 29 W. Va. Wesleyan 

W. V. U Oct. 6 Haskell Indians... 

W. V. U Oct. 13 Pitt 

W. \'. U Oct. 20 W. ^ L 

W. V. U Oct. 27 Lafayette 

W. V. U Nov. 6 Fordham 

W. V. U Nov. 10 Oklahoma 

W. V. U Nov. 17 Georgetown 

W. V. U Nov. 29 \V. ^ J 



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Davis- El kins 7 — IV est Virginia 

An unheralded and incidentally an almost unh<?ard of football team, came up from the 
mountains around Elkins and pulled the big surprise. West Virginia's set up game on 
the opening of the 1928 season was turned into a sad defeat. The "Hurricane** pointed 
for this game and as a result their season was termed a success as soon as the final 
whistle blew. 

West Virginia opened the offensive and an exchange of punts resulted in the open- 
ing plays. D. St E. passed within its own territory, and Warren, "Hurricane** left half- 
back, took the pass for a gain of 41 yards, to the Mountaineer 17 yard line. Another pass 
and the ball was on the 7 yard line, where Rcngle carried it over for the touchdown on 
the fourth play. Smith kicked the Eonl to make the score D. & E. 7. West Virginia 0. 

At the beginning of the second half West Viiginia showed some real offensive play- 
ing. Hagberg intercepted a pass in mid-held, and upon gaining possession of the ball 
West Virginia opened up its aerial attack. .A Slumpplhrown pass to Garrett put the 
Mountaineers on the D. <^ E. 17 yard line. 1 he "Hurricane's** forwards held and at at- 
tempted pass was intercepted on the 3 yard line halting West Virginia*s march to a touch- 
down. The last quarter found the Mountaineers in a desperate drive trying to tic the 
score. Keefer*s line plunging and mixed with a good passing game again took the ball 
into the D. & E. territory, but just as it seemed that West Virginia was about to score, 
Rengle, one of the D. <k E. backs intercepted a beautiful pass that looked like a sure 
touchdown. The game ended on the next play with the score still Davis Elkins 7. West 
Virginia 0. 




r 



.VVONTICOLAs 





T. NIXON 



MORGAN 




PLASTER 



WEBER 





TAYLOR 



A-,- ., >-. ,. 



Page One Uiimlred Eighty-SU 



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JVest Virginia JVesleyan — fi'^est Virginia 12 

Still smarting from the D. 6c E. drubbing of the week before, the Mountaineers came 
to their own to crush the Wesleyan -Bob Cats" 12-0. West Virginia took the field with 
the determination of winning and as a result outplayed the Methodists throughout the 

'^" " Ea^ly ^in the first period McClung fumbled A. Clenns punt and Carrico recovered 
the ball on the WVsleyan 12 yard line. Captain Keefer carried it over for a touchdov/n 
on his second attempt through the line. Stumpp failed to kick the goal, making; the 
score West Virginia 6, Wesleyan 0. The Mountaineers kept the ball in the visitors terri- 
tory consistently and threatened to score several times, but fumbles lost the ball for them 
at inopportune times. ,-, . ■ i 

In the last quarter Stumpp made a quick kick which put Uesleyan back to its own 
9 yard yard line. Failing to gain through the line they attempted to pass within their 
own territory in a last eftort to score. K.efer intercepted a pass from Rodriguez on the 
Wesleyan 24 yard line. .A pass from Stumpp to Vachercsse put the ball on the yird 
line, and on two plunges at the line Keefer again scored. Stumpp failed to kick the :;oal 
The game ended shortly after the next kick off with Wesleyan throwing passes high and 
wide in an attempt to score. 



Haskell Indians 7 — JVest Virginia 28 

West Virginia won Us second consecutive game in the public school stadium at 
Wheeling by defeating the Haskell Indians from Lawrence, Kansas. The Varsity line 
dominated the game, thus enabling Captain Keefer to score three touchdowns wi>h his 

On the first play of the game Keefer cracked the center of the line for 16 yards. 
A march from the West Virginia 38 yard line resulted in the first touchdown. M. Glenn 
missed the goal. .As the quarter ended the Indians were threatening, having the ball on 
the West Virginia 28 yard line. But A. Glenn broke through and threw Weller for a loss, 
and the Mountaineers took the ball on downs. , , ,, „, ,.. . . n 

During the exchange of punts Lang recovered a fumble giving West Virginia the ball 
on the Haskell 40 yard line. Two passes, and three line plunges by Keefer, gave the 
Mountaineers their second touchdown. The extra point was made, making the score 
West Virginia 13, Haskell 0. By virtue of passes the Indians carried the ball to the West 
Virginia 7 yard 1 nc, where the Mountaineer linemen held as the half ended. 

Stumpps quick kick put the ball back to the Haskell goal line during the third quar- 
ter Scott blocked the attempted punt and the ball rolled out of the end zone giving 
West Virginia a safety. West Virginia scored its third touchdown during this period 
making its gains principally through the line, with Keefer adding most of the yards, and 
n'so the touchdown. The final West Virginia touchdown came during the last period as 
a resu't of a long pass from Varney to Garrett who sprinted 3 5 yards for the touchdown. 
The game ended with the Indians scoring their touchdown by four long passes, alter 
Ryan had fumbled in mid-field. 



fAVONTI CO LAs 





LARUE 



LEWIS 



University of Pittsburgh 6 — finest Virgitiia 9 

Who said the 13th was unlucky? On October 13th the Mountaineers invaded the 
Pitt Stadium in the "Smoky City." The traditional fighting spirit of the West \'ir;?mian3 
brought them one of the most glorious vicories in the history ot this institution. Coach 
Jock Suherland's "practice" game resulted in the first defeat the Panthers have lasted 
in their stadium. Although an upset in the eyes of the Eastern football critics, every 
loyal West Virginia fan went up to Pittsburgh with the determination to "Beat Pitt," and 
we did, and how! 

The first quarter had the ball traveling from one end of the field to the other. Sev- 
eral times Pitt threatened, but only to be held for downs when it got within the West 
Virginia 20 yard line. 

Pitt, during the second quarter, got its only score after a long march down the field, 
in which Parkinson continually battered the West Virginia line. Then Uansa slipped off 
tackle for the Panther touchdown. But the infuriated Mountaineer linemen swarmed 
through on the try for a placement goal, and "i^ittle Sleepy" Glenn blocked the kick. 

The excellent physical condition of the West Virginia team began to show up as 
the second half began, and by the beginning of the last quarter the Pitt team was com- 
pletely demoralized. About the middle of the third qu.Trter. Bartrug leaped high into 
the air to intercept another Panther pass, and he carried the ball to the Pitt 4 yard line 
before being downed. Keefer hit the line for two yards in two tries, and then the Pitt 
defense drawn up for another line play, Stumpp tossed a pass to Lang over the goal line 
for the touchdown. "Little Sleepy" Glenn kicked the goal with Stumpp holding the ball, 
making the score West Virginia 7, Pitt 6. 

With their backs against their own goal line, the Panthers were trying desperately 
to kick out of danger, but the Moutaineer forwards were hitting the line so hard that the 
Pitt center made a bad pass to Rooney who ran out of the end zone to get the ball, reg- 
istering an automatic safety for West Virginia. Score West Virginia 9, Pitt 6. 



■-*«ii 





HACEBERC 



fAVONTICOLAs 





RYAN 




Jl Washington and Lee — fVest Virginia 22 



The Mountaineers traveled to Charleston for the annual battle with \V ashinston and 
Lee, and reduced their ranking from Generals to privaies. VC'est Virginia continued its 
brilliant defense givins; W. & L. only three first downs during the whole game. The 
Mountaineers' runninsj attack seemed to have improved with the interference function- 
ing in an effective manner on the end runs. 

West Virginia did not score during the first quarter but in the second period got 
down to business. After a march of 54 yards during which Keefer, BartruR and Stumpp 
all carried the ball for large gains, the first touchdown was made. The kick was unsuc- 
cessful. The second touchdown of the period wa.>. the result of a pass to Bartrug from 
Stumpp. M. Glenn kicked goal to make the score 13-0. 

In the third quarter Bartrug slipped around end for the third touchdown, M. Glenn 
again kicking goal. The end of this period found the Mountaineers again pushing for 
another touchdown, the ball being on the 20 yard line as the quarter ended. Several line 
plays brought the ball to the one yard line where the Generals took the ball on downs. 
Stumpp was serious'y hurt on the play. The Mountaineers automatically scored a safely 



in the 
Score 



sst pe 



lod 



,t end of 



vhen Thibodeau stepped out of bounds 
W. V. U. 22, W. & I.. 0. 



the end zone while punting. 




;.„.„ ,.,. /;,.H,I 



fAVOINTI CO L Ass 





SCOTT BREWSTER 

Lafayettelp — JVest Virginia 17 

For tluf second time within two weeks the Mountaineers upset the Eastern football 
dope, defeating the Lafayette Leopards at Easton, Fa. 1 7 to 0. Rated the under-doR. 
the fighting West Virginians went up against a team that had not tasted defeat, nor been 
scored upon in its first five games this season. The Mountaineers displayed more ag- 
gressiveness in this game than it had in any game so tar. 

Early in the second quarter West Virginia turned a fumble into a touchdown. Bart- 
rug had punted and on the second play Brewster recovered a Lafayette fumble. A pas3, 
Ryan to Vacheresse was good for 28 yards and a first down, putting the ball on the 
Maroon 4 yard line. Ryan hit tackle twice, carrying the ball over the goal on the second 
attempt for the first touchdown of the game. M. Glenn kicked the goal making the 
score W. Va. 7. Lafayette 0. 

On the first play after the kickofl at the beginning of the second half, Lafayette 
again fumbled and Joseph recovered for West Virginia on the Lafayette 19 yard line. 
Ryan and Keefer made 7 yards through the line in three trys. With Ryan holding the 
ball, M. Glenn kicked a field goal from placement from the Maroon 18 yard line, mak- 
ing the score W. Va. 10; Lafayette 0. 

West Virginia gained its second touchdown near the end of the last quarter. La- 
fayette was staging a last attempt to score by passing, when Bartrug intercepted one of 
Purcell's passes and raced down the field 60 yards for a touchdown. The lanky sopho- 
more back gave a beautiful exhibition of broken-field running, eluding seven Maroon 
tacklers. M. Glenn kicked the extra point, score. W. Va. 17; Lafayette 0. 




I 



— AVONTI CO L A.^ 




^l!^ 




jOSEPI I 



Ford ham — fVest Virginia 18 



erned with 



concerned with whether "Al" Smith was going to defeat Hoover or not, the 
traveled to the Yankee Stadium in New York City on Election Day, for 

v'_-. \,:__: — i^jj showed the "Fight- 



Vi 



from home. The W 

Finother fighting team in the ecu 

5 after the openin<j kickoff, Captain Keefer made a first 

on the next play to the Fordham goal line. A Fordhan 

keep it and Vacheresse knocked it over the goal line. 

wn for the Mountaineers. M. Glenn missed the Eoal 



down, 

. back 

where 

leav- 



Littl 
Mountain 
their fifth con 
ing Irish" that there was 

On the first two pla' 
but West Virginia kicked 
touched the ball but failed t 
Lewis fell on it for touchdow 
ing the score W. Va. 6; Fordham 0. 

As the first half was coming to a clo 
behind his own goal line when his kick form 
the pass on the Fordham 10 yard line. On 
extreme right side of the field and over the 
Score W. Va. 12; Fordham 0. 

Early in the third quarter Keefer intercepted another Fordham pass on the Ford- 
ham 40 yard line. Bartrug passed to "Little Sleepy" Glenn who carried the ball to the 
10 yard line before being downed. Ryan on another end run took the ball over the goal 
for the last touchdown of the game. M. Glenn missed the goal, making the final score 
W. Va. 18; Fordham 0. 



se. Dellaire of Fordham, tried to pass from 

ation had been broken up. Lang intercepted 

a reverse play. Ryan carried the ball to the 

goal for West Virginia's second touchdov/n. 



I 




J 



/•ayi- Ow iiii"(in.ii -V' 



VVONTICOLA^, 





GORDON 



BEHNKE 



Oklahoma 6 — U^est Virginia 32 

Despite the bad weather a fairly large crowd turned out for the "West Virginia 
Day" game and saw the Varsity smother the Oklahoma "Aggies " 32 to 6. The Moun- 
taineers continued their aggresiveness and completely outplayed the "Cowboys" through- 
out the game. 

West Virginia kicked off to Oklahoma, who soon punted back after three tries nt 
the line failed. Larue and Keefer gave the Mountaineers a hrst down. On the next play 
Keefer broke loose off left tackle and raced 70 yards for the first touchdown of the game. 
The kick for the extra point was missed. Score W. Va. 6; Oklahoma 0. 

Near the end of the first quarter, Larue and Bartrug carried the ball to the Okla- 
homa 9 yard line. Keefer again carried the ball over on his second attempt at center. 
M. Glenn kicked the goal, making the score at the end of the first quarter, W. Va. 13; 
Oklahoma 0. 

Early in the second quarter Larue returned one of the "Aggies" punts 50 yards. 
A pass and a long run by A. Glenn put the ball on the Oklahoma 16 yard line. Varney 
passed to Joseph for a touchdown, and M. Glenn missed the goal, score. W. Va. 19; 
Oklahoma 0. 

The second half started off with all the first team back in the hneup. Keefer made 
a first down, and then Barlrui; passed to Ryan for another touchdown. M. Glenn kicked 
the goal making the score W. Va. 26: Oklahoma 6. Oklahoma scored its lone touchdown 
in the second period against the second team. The touchdown came by virtue of a 
blocked punt. 

The Mountaineers continued a march started late in the third quarter. Keefer, 
A. Glenn and Bartrug carried the blunt of the attack. Captain Keefer finally carried 
the ball over for the last touchdown and final score of the game. W. Va. 32; Oklahoma 6. 









G.\RRETT 



BARTRLG 



J 



rAVONTl CO VAn^ 




^ 






VARNEY 



F. GLENN 



Georgetown 12 — fVest Virg'mia 



Georgetown University brought the Mountaineers' long 
es to a close at the Griffith Stadium in Washington. D. C. 



inning streak of seven 



games to a ciose ai mc .^h.-.l.. ^.^ --, , i ■ i l «>i 

The first minutes of the game saw an exchange of punts, which the Mountaineers 
took advantage of and gained the ball on the Georgetown 24 yard line. The billtoppcrs 
tiehtened and M. Glenn tried an unsuccessful field goal. , , , , , , ■ 

Another march brought the ball up to the 30 yard line but Larue fumbled and ended 
the threat As the half ended "Big Sleepy" G!enn received a pass for 20 yards and took 
it to the goal line where he was forced out of bounds. It was only a matter of inches 
between Glenn and a touchdown, and it seemed as though he thought he was over the 

^°^ Shortly after the opening kickoff of the second half Dulpin got loose for a forty 
yard run Two passes put the ball on the Mountaineers" 13 yard line, and from there 
Georgetown took the ball over on straight line plunges. The kick for goal was blocked, 
leaving the score Georgetown 6; West Virginia 0^ 

Bartrug received the kickoflf and raced 60 yai 
Attempts at the line again failed and a pass tailed « r , j .u 

Mountaineers continued to fight and Bartrug placed another punt out of bounds on the 
Georgetown 3 yard line. The H.lltoppers lined up to kick from behind their own goal 
line, but Bozek took the ball and raced to the West \ irgin.a 4 3 yard line A first down 
and a 15 yard penalty put the ball on the Mountaineer 18 yard line. Four line plays 
were all that was needed to give Georgetown its second touchdown. The goal failed. 
Score. Georgetown 12: West Virginia 0. 



ih it before he was downed, 
the ball to the "Irish." The 




Fn,if On. ;/ . 



fAVOINTI CO LAs 




'-'^1^^ 




JVashirigto?i and Jefferson — fVest Virginia 14 

West Virginia ended one of its most successful seasons on Thanksgiving Day with a 
I 4 to victory over its ancient rival Washington & Jefferson. After a somewhat disap- 
pointing season the Presidents came to Morgantown determined to upset the dope and 
beat the Mountaineers. But West Virginia was just as determined, and as a result turned 
the neighbors back without a score. It was a fitting climax to top olf the Mountaineer 
schedule. 

The Mountaineers drew blood four minutes after the opening whistle. W. ^ J. 
tried a pass on the first play after the kick-off, which Ryan intercepted at midfield and 
returned to the 40 yard line. Keefer made a first down on two plunges through the line. 
Keefer made another gain and then Bartrue carried the ball over on an end run. .M. 
Glenn's kick was good, making che score W. Va. / ; W. & J. 0. 

Late in the second period W. & J. was forced to punt fiom its own goal line, and 
Ryan returned the kick from the 40 yard line to the 30 yard line. A pass to Lang put 
the ball on the Wash. ^ Jeff. 13 yard line. .After two unsuccessful line plays Bartrug 
passed to Ryan for West Virginia's second and !a.n touchdown of the game. M. Glenn 
again kicked the goal, making the final score West Virginia !4; Washington 6t Jefferson 0. 




Page One Hundred Ninety-Four 



^-^,.^ .^■..■.„^^,-. ... . rh ^^^i-rtg^rSM A.r= 







Cheer Leaders 

LAWRENCE MILLS 

CHARLES SWEARINGEN (HchU) 

JOSEPH LYNCH 

JARVIS CURRENCE 



ea;ii: One Hundred Ninety-Five 



rAVOINTI CO VA^. 



! 




Paye One Uundral Sincty-Six 



-iAVO INT ■ C O L As 



I 



Summary of 1928 Freshman 
Football Season 

West Virginia University's 1928 Plebe gridiron squad was one of 
the most promising first year combinations ever to v^ear the colors of 
gold and blue. Several outstanding performers who should prove very 
valuable in Varsity ranks in future years were included in the rostir. In 
Marker, Haddock, Doyle. Martin. Waggoner, Bill Smith, Latham, and 
Lewis, Coach Homer Martin had an excellent nucleus around which ^o 
build a first class Mountaineer team. 



1928 Freshman Football Schedule 

October 13 Tech PL-bes at Pittsburgh 

October 20 Pitt Freshmen at Home 

October 27 Potomac Stale at Keyser 

November 3 W. & J. Freshmen at Home 

November 17 St. Vincent's at Beatty, Pa. 

November 24 Kiskiminetas at Morgantown 



J 



rAA^OMTI CO L A:, 




;',i.,'. o„, iiuitduii ^ ,.-t. 



kAVONTICOLA:. 



\ 



Basketball 




-? 



/',,,/• Oir. Ilu„,lr,:l V, 



rAVO NIT I CO L A.^ 




Varsity Basketball Squad 



FRANCIS H. STADSVOLD. 
JOSEPH MORELAND 



PERSONNEL OF SQUAD 

JAMES BLACK, Captain 

RL^nOLPH HAGE^ERG 
I AWRENCE PLASTER 
GEORGE RATCLIFFE 
EDWARD W. FOX 
MARSHALL GLENN 
EMORY LEPERA 
TRUEHEART TAYLOR 
LOULS STURBOIS 
GEORGE SHARP 
RALPH M. HARTMAN 



. ..Coach 
Manager 



rAVONTICOLA:, 




Coacl. 
STADSVOLD 



1929 Basketball Record 



West 


Virgi 


West 


Virsi 


West 


Virg, 


West 


Virsi 


Wes 


Virg. 


Wes 


Virgi 


Wes 


V.rgi 


Wes 


Virgi 


Wes 


Virgi 


Wes 


Virgi 


Wes 


Virqi 


Wes 


Virgi 


Wes 


Virgi 


Wes 


V.rgi 


Wes 


Virgi 


Wes 


Vi.g. 


Wes 


Virg. 


Wes 


Virg 


Wes 


t Virg 


Wes 


t Virg 


W..S 


t Virg 


Wes 


t V.rg 



37: 
47; 
44; 

40: 



26: Salem College .- 23 

54: Carneg.e Tech ' 

W. Vd Wes!eyan College 18 

Grove C.ty College 25 

Marshall College 21 

... University of Pittsburgh 35 

44: Davis-Elkins College 30 

24: Geneva College « 

50: West Virginia Wesleyan 26 

37: Washington \ Lee 42 

49: Virginia Poly 27 

45: University of Virginia 36 

39; Army \l 

29; Temple University ^U 

49; Georgetown University 44 

Allegheny College 29 

Carnegie Tech 31 

44: Grove City ., \\ 

33; Washington & Jefferson 21 

19: University of Pittsburgh 41 

43; Davis Elkins College 49 

23; Washington ft Jefferson 46 

714 



38; 
46: 



862 
West Virginia — Won 16; Lost 6. 



I 



^AVO NT I C O LAsBsss 




Basketball 1929 



On the night of Ja 



versity basketbal 
College Tigers, 
and 2,500 fans 
Mountaineer forv 
started the seasoi 
the score of 26 
sick list and did 



ry 3rd. 1929, the West Virginia Uni- 



team opened its 1929 season against the Salem 
This game inaugurated the New Field House 
A'itnessed the game. With Lepera, the flishy 
ard, featuring the game the West Virginia team 

with a victory, defeating the fast Salem five by 
o 23. Captain Black, and Taylor were on the 
not play in the opening game. 



The next game found the Mountaineers defeating CarneRie 
Tech, by the score of 54 to 19. Before a crowd of 3,000 the 
first "Big Four" opponent furnished little excitement. CoacK 
Stadsvold's crew showed some fine team work, and passed the 
ball in rings around the famous Plaid. Captain Black and Taylor 
were both back in the lineup, but neither started but saw action 
in both periods. "Little Sleepy" Glenn was high scorer for the 
evening with 15 points. "Swede" Hagberg contributed 10 points. 
"Eddie" Stumpp hurt his trick knee and had to be carried from 
the floor. 

Ross' West Virginia Wesleyan basketball team found the 
going rather rough in choosing the Mountaineers to open their 
1929 season. The Varsity traveled to Buckhannon and defeated 
the "Bobcats" 3 7-18. However the score at the end of the first 
half was 1 9 to 8, but in the last half the Mountaineers gradually 
drew away with a big lead. "Little Sleepy" Glenn was high point 
man for the evening with 14 points. 



Th( 
Gro 

, We 



himself, 
obstacle 
gave Co 



■ next game found the Mountai 
ve City, with comparative ease 
st Virginia was on the long end 
:d 16 points while "Little SI 



Plaster, the sophomore f 
to the Grove City offense, 
ach Stadsvold a chance to 



py 



eers disposing of an old 

When the final whistle 

if a 47 to 25 score. Tay- 

Glenn gathered I 2 for 



ard, proved to be a ( 
The large lead of the 
ie all his substitutes. 



stant 

irsity 



The Mountaineers had little trouble in disposing of the "Big 
Green" from Marshall. The score was 44 to 21. This was the 
fifth consecutive victory for the West Virginians, in spite of some- 
what ragged teamwork in the opening period. Again "Little 
Sleepy" Glenn led the team in scoring, getting 20 points from 9 
baskets and two fouls. 



On Friday evening, January 18. the Mountaineers traveled 
to Pittsburgh and defeated the Pitt Panther by the score of 40 to 
35. The game was anybody's from beginning to end for the score 
was lied no less than ten times throughout the contest. Coach 
Stadsvold's tossers, though rated as the underdog, as usual in 
Pittsburgh, played hard, clean basketball throughout the game 
and with a strong finish were able to |)ile up a five point lead as 
the game ended. The whole team deserves much credit for this 
victory, but as usual the scoring honors go to M. Glenn. He scor- 
ed 17 points, just one point less than the famous Hyatt of Pitt. 
However the West Virginia ace outscored his rival from the field, 
getting 8 field goals to Hyatt's 7. 




Pngc Two Hundred Two 



rAVONTICOLAs 



To bcKin the second semester right, the University basket- 
ball team defeated Cam Henderson's "Scarlet Hurricane" 44 to 
30. The same was fast throughout, but both teams had an "off" 
night at the basket. Glenn and Hagberg were the high scorers 
for the Mountaineers, getting 15 and 13 respectively. Plaster 
was again the big man in the defense, netting a basket for himself 
also. The Elkins team was built around this man and though 
he failed them in the first half, he came back and played the whole 
second half, getting 10 of his team's total points. 

Geneva College has the honor of being the first team to de- 
feat the Mountaineers in their new Field House. Geneva brought 
a big team to Morgantown and as the second half drew near to a 
close they piled up a big lead to make the final score 42 to 24. 
Incidentally both teams had a winning streak of seven games when 
they went on the floor. In spile of the absence of Hagbeig. the 
West Virginians carried on through the first half leading at the 
end of this period by the score of 1 8 to 16. But soon after the 
beginning of the second period the height of the visitors began to 
telj the storv. and they gradually pulled away from the Mountain- 
eers. The West Virginians sorely missed iheir big center and 
their play was ragged throughout the contest. Much credit is due 
the Geneva team however for they were "on " and carried the 
ball down the court at will. 

In the final home game before their long road trip, the 
Mountaineers triumphed over West Virginia Wesleyan 50 to 26. 
The game was rather listless throughout, and even though they 
won by a large score, the Mountaineers were still off form. Bart- 
rug, starting his second game in place of Hagberg who has been 
on the injured list, was high scorer for the evening and showed 
considerable form. He had 14 points, while Lepera contributed 
1 1 and Glenn 9. Plaster continued his good work at guard. 




HAGEBERG 




RADCLIFFE 



In the first game of their long road trip, the Mountaineers 
met with their second defeat of the season. The annual game 
with Washington and Lee was again played at the Vanity Fair 
hall in Huntington, and when the final whistle ended the game 
W. and L. was on the long end of the 42 to 37 score. The first 
half was anybody's game, the score at the end of this period being 
19 to 18 in favor of the Virginians. The second half found the 
"Generals" gradually gaining, ending the game with a five point 
lead over the Mountaineers. Taylor scored 1 1 points for West 
Virginia. 

The following Monday found the Mountaineers taking a one- 
sided game from V. P .1. at Bluefield. Getting back to the old 
form. West Virginia played real basketball throughout, and as a 
result of the big lead Coach Stadsvold was able to use his entire 
squad of 10 men, thus giving the regulars somewhat of a rest. 
Glenn, Hagberg and Taylor were all tied for high point honors, 
each contributing I 1 points. 

Tuesday found the Mountaineers in Charlottesville, Va. Here 
they met and defeated the University of Virginia 45 to 36. Vir- 
ginia had the lead throughout the first half and part of the sec- 
ond half. The West Virginians however staged a last minute 
rally to overcome the lead. Black had 10 points, while Lepera 
and Hagberg each scored 9. 

On the following night West Virginia defeated the Army at 
U'esI Point, in an extra period game, 39 to 34. This was the 
big game on the West Virginia schedule and the Mountaineers 
played brilliantly to win it. The score at half time was 17-17. 
•At the end of the regular playing period it was 31-31. Glenn 
was back to form and scored 17 points, while Taylor had 10. 



fAVONTI CO LA.^ 




West Virginia lost the second game of its trip to Temple at 
Philadelphia, 40 to 29. The game was played on a small court 
and was rough throughout. The score at the half was 1 8 to 16 
in favor of Temple, but the Mountaineers couldn't seem to func- 
tion properly in the second half. Taylor scored 9 points, while 
Glenn had 8. 

Georgetown was the next victim of the Mountaineers in the 
final game of the long road trip. Georgetown rallied in the last 
half to make the final score 49 to 44 after trailing by nine points 
at the half. Glenn and Taylor were both 'on" and scored 18 
and I 6 points respectively. 

Allegheny, who the night before had trimmed Geneva, fell 
before the Mountaineers in their first home game after the road 
trip. The game was fast throughout, and though the West Vir- 
ginians had the lead continually the final score only gave the 
Mountaineers a nine point advantage. 38 to 29. The Varsity 
seemed to function smoothly after their tiresome road trip. Glenn 
scored 15 points and Taylor contributed 10. Dennison scored 
16 points tor the losers. 

West Virginia traveled to Pittsburgh to play its return game 
with Carnegie Tech, defeating them by the score of 46 to 31. 
The Mountaineers only had a 6 point lead at the half, but the 
last period found them easily drawing away from the Plaid. 
Glenn had the best night he has had this season, scoring 10 field 
goals and 2 out of 2 fouls, for a total of 22 points. 

On the following night the Mountaineers defeated Grove 
, at Grove City, Penna., by the score of 44 to 35. West Vir- 
> put up a brilliant game against the Grovers and the outcome 

never in doubt. Taylor had 14 points and Glenn scored 12. 



^ Cit; 



The W. dk J. Presidents proved a strong foe at Washington, 
Pa. and West Virginia was extended to win from them, 3 3 to 21. 
A second half rally pulled the game out of doubt, after the Pres- 
idents held the Mountaineers to a one point lead at the half. 
Glenn contributed four field goals and a cuup'.e of fouls for a total 
of 10 points for the evening. 

A record breaking crowd saw Pitt beat the Mountaineers, 
41 to 1 9 in the big home game of the West Virginia schedule. 
This was a complete upset, especially by such a decisive score, 
for the Mountaineers had defeated Pitt in Pittsburgh earlier in the 
season. Both Hyatt and Glenn were off form, the former only 
securing 9 points, while the Mountaineer star contributed 4. 

West Virginia continued its slump at Elkins. losing to the 
"Scarlet Hurricane" 49 to 43. The game was rough throughout 
and as a result three D. & E. men and four Mountaineers were 
eliminated from the game on personal fouls. Peters, the big 
Indian center for D. & E. starred for the victors. Glenn had 
a good night contributing I 5 points to the West Virginia score. 

The last game of the season was lost to the W. & J. Presi- 
dents by the .score of 46 to 25. The Mountaineers seemed to be 
"off" more in this game than in any other throughout the se.ison. 
Though it was rather disappointing to the West Virginia fans to 
sec the Mountaineers lose to such a poor team, it undoubtedly 
showed the strains of the long season and hard road trip upon 
the physical condition of the West Virginia team. Glenn was 
again high scorer for the evening contributing I 3 points or over 
half of the Mountaineers total score. Robinson of W. & J. had 
nine field goals to hia credit and three out of three fouls for a 
total of 2 1 points. 




TAYLOR 



^immmmmm 



Vag Two JIuiuInd I'ou 



4 



rAVONTICOLA.^ 



Wrestlirig 







SL 



/■(.yc J-» ii i^'-- J 



r 



fAVOINTICOLAs 




STEVE HARRICK Coach 

JAMES COX Captain 

ANDREW T. MARSH Manager 



PERSONNEL OF SQUAD 

GORDON BRILL BILL HARRICK 

THEODORE NIXON GEORGE NIXON 

ADOLPH M. COOPER PAUL MEYERS 

WALTER BREWSTER GEORGE COLE 

CHARLES G. KREBS MILLARD LARRISON 

WILLIAM HIGGINS BERNARD LEVINE 



Poifc Two IJ., 



7AVONTI CO L A.^ 






I. 



fAVONTI CO L As 



i 



Wrestling 1929 



FOR the opening match of the 1929 wrestling season, the Mountaineer matmen had 
little trouble in defeating Waynesburg College. The Varsity registered five fails 
and two time decisions against one fall for the visitors, making the score 31 to 5. 
Cooper, Captain Cox, Brill, Higgins and Nixon scored falls over their opponents, whih 
Ruble and Meyers each won their match on large time advantages. Cole, returning to the 
mat after two years idleness, failed to show his old form and was thrown by Captain 
Ford of Waynesburg for the visitors' only points. 

The University of Michigan gave Harrick's men some little trouble in the second 
match of the season. The match was one of the closest ever seen here, the final bout 
deciding the match. Cooper gained a fall in the first bout, and Captain Cox after an 
extra period gained a decision over Hewett, a National Champion. Brill won his bout 
with a large time advantage, but Meyers, Higgins, Harrick and Brewster all lost on time 
advantages. Thus with Michigan in the lead 12 to II. Nixon went into the unlimited 
bout with the determination to win the deciding match. In the last three minutes of the 
bout Nixon got the body scissors on his opponent and won the contest with a time ad- 
vantage. This final victory for the Mountaineers make the final score I 4 to 12. 

The West Virginia wrestlers hung up their third consecutive victory at the expense 
of Ohio State. The Buckeye match proved to be another thriller similar to the Michigan 
match. Cooper and Cox both had close calls in the final minutes of their bouts, but each 
had gained time advantage before this. Brill also gained a time decision over his oppo- 
nent, to give the Mountaineers a 9 to lead for the first three bouts. Meyers lost his 
bout by a time advantage, but "Bill" Harrick pulled the surprise of the evening in gain- 
ing a quick fall over Hudak who was supposed to be the Buckeye's best bet. Higgi.is 
then lost on a time decision, but Brewster gained back these three points by a time ad- 
vantage over his opponent. Nixon lost his bout by a time decision, making the final count 
West Virginia 17; Ohio State 1 I. 

Between semesters the University wrestling team journeyed to Stillwater, Okla. to 
meet the Oklahoma Aggies, National Collegiate Champions. As the result of such oppo- 
sition Coach Harrick's matmen met their first defeat of the season. Captain Cox gained 
himself some national recognition in winning his bout by a fall, incidentally scoring all 
of the Mountaineers' points. Cooper, Brill, Meyers, Higgins and Harrick all lost on timn 
decisions, while the Nixon brothers were both thrown, making the final score Oklahoma 
25; West Virginia 5. 

West Virginia wrestlers took their second successive defeat at the hands of last 
year's Big Ten Champions, Illinois, by the score of 24 to 8. The first bout of the even- 
ing was a surprise in that Cooper lost on a time decision. Captain Cox however con- 
tinued to keep his slate clean, and won his bout with a large time advantage. Brill also 
lost by a fall. The Mountaineer veteran hurt himself during the tussle and was in a bad 
way after that. Johnson, Cole and Higgins all lost their bouts on time decisions, and 
Levine was thrown in the 175 pound class. Ted Nixon, however, ended the match with 
some excitement in winning the final bout by a fall. 

The West Virginia grapplers finished their season by losing to the Navy. The future 
admirals defeated the Mountaineers I 7 to 8 before the largest crowd to ever attend a 
wrestling match at the University. The first bout was a surprise to local tans in that 
Cooper lost by a fall to the Navy captain, Ashford. Captain Cox came right back in th • 
next bout to tie the score by throwing his opponent. Brill. Meyers, Harrick and T. 
Nixon all lost their matches on time decisions. G. Nixon gave West Virginia three more 
points by a time advantage over his man in the last bout of the evening. The West Vir- 
ginia team finished its season with three victories and three defeats. The feature of the 
evening was that Captain Cox completed his last year with a clean slate. 



J 



/'.lyi 1 ..u Jl..„J,,,l L. 



rAVONTlCOLAs 



1928 ff'rcstl/n<y Record 



Wr»t Virgil 

West VirRJi 

West Virgil 

West Virgil 

West Virgil 

West Virgil 



a 28: W.ynrsburg 

a 14; iVl chigan 

a 17; Ohio Stale 

5; Oklahoma A. *< M. 

8; Illinois 

8; N.,vy 



80 



5 

12 

II 

25 
24 
17 

74 



West Vi 



-\*'on 3; Lost 3. 



fAVO NT I C O L A.-^ 




Pane Two Hundred Trn 



rAVO INT I CO L Asi 



Track 






I 




fAVONTI CO l->^^ 




i'uuc- Two IhuHlirtI Tn 



/AVO NT I C O L An 




COACH SMITH 







MONTGOMERY 
Captain-Elect 



Capta 




-^ 



I'.iyc Tiro UunJnJ i' . ' 



rAVOPSITICOLA^, 



Record of Meets 



Dual Meets 

West Virginia gSVi; Geneva College 

West Virginia 59 i University of Pittsburgh 

West Virginia 110 ; Bethany College 



2671/2 



36% 

76 

25 

l37'/2 



"Big Four" Meet 

West Virginia University 941/i points, first; University of Pittsburgh — 90 

second; Washington and Jefferson, third; Carnegie Tech, fourth. 

Ohio Relays 



West Virginia team of Montgo 
Distance Medley Relay. 



Stender and Riley 



tr of the Open 



Meet Competition 

West Virginia— Won 3; Lost I. 



Intercollegiate Track Records 



h 

Dash 
Dash 
Dash 
Dash 
Dash 

Run 

Run. .. 



Track Events 

Holder of Record Record 

.Leatherwood 10 sec .Marietta-Wesl.-W. V.U. 

.D'Auito iO sec. Bethany Duel 

.D'Auito 10 sec Varsity-Freshmen 

D'Auito 22-2/5 sec Pitt Dual 

-Montgomery 50-2/5 sec Big Four 

Buvinger 2:00-2/5 Pitt Dual 

-Calloway 4:27-2/5 Pitt Dual ..... 

Calloway 9:58-4/5 Pitt Inter-Coll 



Event 

100 Yard De 

100 Yard 

100 Yard 
220 Yard 
440 Yard 
880 Yard 
One Mile 
Two Mile 

High Hurdles Morrison 15-3/5 Big Four 

Low Hurdles Morrison 22-1/5 Big Four 



Field Events 

Shot Put Davis 45' 8" Bethany Dual . 

Discus Throw KCirchner 138' 3" . Bethany Dual .. 

Hammer Throw Kcefer 149' 9" Pitt Dual 

Javelin Throw Dilcher 179' 6" Pitt Dual 

High Jump Hill 5' 1 n4" Classes Meet .... 

Pole Vault .McMillan 12' \W Wesleyan Dual 

Broad Jump raylor 22' 10%" Big Four 



1915 
1923 
1925 
1925 
1927 
1927 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1927 



1924 
1928 
1928 
1926 
1923 
1924 
1927 



Uutulr'-.l /■'< 



jtVVO ISIT 1 C O L AiB 



Review of 1928 Track Season 

"One of the most successful" has been the rating given the season of 1928 in West 
Virginia University track activities. The Varsity record of two victories in three dual 
meets, in which events it amassed a total of 267 'i points to the opposition's 13 7',{;, and 
the annexation of the "Big Four" title, as well as the winning of the medley distance relay 
at the Ohio Relays Carnival, were meritorious of the consideration accorded it. 

What is generally conceded to have been the best freshman team in the history was 
that of the same season, the plebes having won the "Little Four" title by winning their 
two meets, one from the University of Pittsburgh frosh und the other from the Carnegie 
Tech yearlings. In these two meets they amassed a total of 174 2/3 points to 77 1/3. 

Despite the loss of two of the best distance runners ever to wear the Gold and Blue, 
Captain John Stender and Ralph Buvinger, it was generally considered at the close of last 

season that the veteran nucleus would provide another strong team one possibly stronger 

than that of 1928. Injuries and ineligibilities, however, "jinxed" Coach Art Smith's 
squad and several of those persons counted as "pivot points" were missing when the 1929 
season got under way. 

The first serious blow was the loss of Albert ("Big Sleepy") Glenn, who became 
ineligible when he assumed the coaching dutie.s as tutor of freshmen in the 1929 basket- 
ball campaign, thus removing the only experienced high jumper, a first-class hurdler and 
^ good javelin thrower. Then came the loss of Marcus Brand, sophomore distance run- 
ner who was counted upon as the one person to fill the gap left by Captain Stender. Brand 
developed an attack of appendicitis during the indoor track season and was forced to un- 
dergo an operation, thus removing him from outdoor activities in the early part of the 
campaign. 

Most serious of all blows came in the opening dual meet when Vental Waggoner, 
sophomore sprinter and jumper, was injured and rendered unfit for the season. 

As a consequence of these important "removals" and other subsequent injuries, the 
Varsity ranks were depleted as the season got into full swing. 



rAVOMTICOUA^, 




Fafje Two llu>\ilr'',t sirtr. n 



r/VVONTI CO L A.^ 




Indoor Track Squad 



ART SMITH 

DELBERT NOEL 



DAVID JACOBS 
J, R. STANLEY 
HAYMOND MAXWELL 
H. W. EPLING 
WILLARD AYERS 
VENTAL WAGGONER 
HERBERT HARD^ 
MICKEY BRAND 
JAMES MONROE 



PERSONNEL OF SQUAD 
LESLIE MONTGOMERY 
C. E. LEIPHART 
JAMES MERRICK 
OSCAR GOLDSTEIN 
WILLIAM RUCK 
CI ARENCE E. LEWIS 
R. C. MILLIARD 
CLARENCE KEEPER 
DARRELL HILL 



.. CoacK 
Manager 



WILLIAM HUGHES 
I. T. VAN VOORHIS 
L. H. YOUNG 
CHARLES HOULT 
SIDNEY KWASS 
RALPH KIRCHNER 
FRED RILEY 
HOMER HOGUE 



West Virginia University 25 -j 

West Virginia University 56 



Record of Meets 

Oh.o Stale 70% 

Pittsburgh 40 



fAVONTI CO LAsi 




WEST VIRGINIA SPRINT RL.I A^ It: \M 



Review of Indoor Track Season 

The building of the Men's Field House for a place to hold indoor sports facilitated 
Indoor track, a sport never before sponsored by this University. Coach Art Smith found 
this spacious building an ideal place to groom his cinder artists during the winter months. 



The first indoor track meet ever to be held h 
as our opponents. The fully experienced Ohio 
coached proteges and they easily won by th 
team proved to be one of the strongest links 
petitors. 



? was on February 23 with Ohio State 

ids proved too much for the Smith- 

= score of 70 V2 to 2 5 '4. The sprint relay 

n the squad winning easily from their com- 



The second meet was held on March 2 with Pitt as an opponent. West Virginia's 
speed merchants showed rapid improvement over their previous form and surprised their 
supporters by trouncing Pitt 56 to 40. Bowen proved to be the outstanding performer 
of the meet, scoring with Utterback a great number of points for the opponents. 

The First Annual Indoor Games vfas then held. Several teams v^rere represented, 
including performers from some of the leading colleges in the Northeast. Many out- 
standing stars and intercollegiate champions competed. No team scores were kept, indi- 
vidual action being the criterion. West Virginia's sprint relay team walked away from 
all opposition again winning easily from the entire field. 



^^ 



Paae 'I'lio riiintlrcd Eightee:i 



^AVO NT I C O L A.^ 



Boxing 




fAVONTICOLA.^ 




Boxing Squad 



EDDIE VACHERESSE Coach 

LYLE JONES Manager 



PERSONNEL OF SQUAD 

HARRY F, STUNICARD CHARLES GREG KREBS ROBERT LATHAM 

ENOCH ARTHUR LATHAM ANDREW T. MARSH OWEN HAMILTON 



^•f"P«pw*P^»'"^^T 



S^SB 



^AVONTICOLA.^ 




COACH VACHERESSE 



Summary of Season 






For the first time in the history of West Virginia University. inter-Collegiate Boxing 
was introduced in the regular routine of Winter sports. Eddie Vacheresse. gridiron hero 
and diamond artist, was selected to coach the many aspirants and proved himself to be 
more than capable of filling the bill. Soon after practice began it was found that included 
in the roster were two very capable performers. Harry Stunkard and Krebs. Both were 
accomplished boxers and proved a nucleus around which Coach Vacheresse built his team. 

Due to the fact that no preliminary schedule had been made previous to the intro- 
duction of the sport only one bout was fought, and thai was with Penn State's veteran 
mit team. The bout was staged at State College. Pa. before one of the largest crowds 
ever to witness such an encounter in that city. Stunkard and KreLs both won their bouts 
in over-time periods, but the main feature of the bout was the fight that Bob Latham, 
W. V. U. 160 pounder, put up against Captain Allie Wolf. Penn State's intercollegiate 
champion. Latham won the first round, but a blow to the body in the second weakened 
him and the referee stopped the fight and awarded a technical knockout to Wolf. 

In the 115 pound class Parks of Penn State won over Marsh of West Virginia. In 
the 125 pound class Epstein of Penn State won over Hamilton, the bout being very close 
as was the previous one. In the 135 pound class Stunkard took the aggressive with the 
opening of the bell but at 'he end of three rounds of fighting the referee ruled it a draw 
and sent the two men into an extra round, Stunkard winning by a comfortable margin. 
In the 145 pound division Krebs was forced to go into the fourth round to win over his 
opponent although the spectators seemed to think hat the West Virginian had won as 
did the Penn State opponent, Davis, who rushed over at the end of the third round to 
congratulate him. 

In the I 7 5 pound class Mc.Andrews secured a decision over Nick Latham of W. V. U., 
it however, being a very close decision. Owing to the fact that West Virginia was not 
represented in the heavyweight class the bout was forfeited to Penn State making the finji 
score 5-2 in favor of their opponents. 



/■ii.;.- Tuo Huttilnd Tticnty-Onc 



r 



iSii^AVO NT I C O L AsB 




I'agc Two Uiiiiilrcd T\cciity-Tico 



7AVO NT I CO L A^^is 



Baseball 



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l\ii/c Iwo Uunihi-a 3'u,cii(i/-Four 



rAVOINTi CO L As 




9 • 



<JVIBC<,. 



•V 



CAPT. PHILLIPS STEEL 



if 



HARRICK 
CAPT. -ELECT 



i 




COACH RODGERS 



Wc, 


Virgini 


Wm 


Virgmi 


^ Wes 


Virgini 


Wcs 


Virgini 


We. 


Virginif 


We. 


Virgini, 


We. 


Virginif 


Wr, 


Virgini 


We. 


Virginii 


We. 


Virgin,. 


We. 


V.rgin, 


We. 


Virgini 


We. 


Virgini 


We. 


Virgini 


We. 


Virginij 



Rccon/ of VJ28 Baseball Season 



VARSITY BASEBALL 



9: 
10: 
7; 
4: 
6: 
6: 
12: 
3: 
2: 
8; 
4; 
21: 
2: 
3: 
5: 

102 



Mariettn College 

Marietta College 

Fairmont Normal 

Morris-Harvey College 
Fairmont Normal .- 



2 

9 

3 

1 

2 

CUrk.burg M-A League _... I I 



Fairmont M-A League 

Notre Dame 

Notre Dame 

Western State Teachers .... 

Michigan State Normal 

Michigan A. *< M. College 
Marshall College 

Marshall CoUege 

Green. burg W-P League . 



4 

4 
14 
4 

1 

8 

3 

66 



We.t Virginia — Won I I ; Lost 4. 



rAVO NT ■ C O I. As 



1928 Baseball Review 



Eleven victories and four defeats comprised the record established by the Varsity 
baseball team of 1928, a seasonal mark which surpasses the major portion of those of 
the past ten years. 

A strong nucleus of veterans with the addition of three first-cla:;s sophomores to the' 
Varsity ranks, in Russell ("Bus") LaRue, third baseman; Earl ("Cutie"! Wolfe, catcher; 
and Charles Bruns, pitcher; provided a well-rounded team as the 1928 season opened, 
and five straight games were annexed before Clarksburg of the Middle-Atlantic leagu,^ ad- 
ministered the first defeat. Then the Varsity took its trip through the mid-west, opening 
with a pair of defeats at the hands of Notre Dame sluggers, and closing with three decisive 
victories over a trio of strong teams representing Michigan State. Upon its return here 
a split of the Marshall College series of two games resulted, and then the closing victory 
over Creensburg of the Western Pennsylvania league. 

"Bill" Harrick, veteran left fielder, who led the team in slugging, was elected to lead 
the 1929 team, and he opened the latter campaign auspiciously by again hitting over .450 
per cent in the first half dozen games. 

The 1 928 season, however, proved in some respects, a distasteful one. for it marked 
the passing of two of the greatest fielders and hitters ever to don West Virginia uniforms, 
as well as two veteran hurlers of much value. George Hand, said to have been the best 
fielding outfielder ever produced here, and George ("Ducky") Phillips, captain and short- 
stop; John Harsanyi and Sammy Lopinsky, both pitchers were the outstanding men who 
were lost, along with Rinehart. a pitcher-outfielder who aided much in the successes of 
the latter part of the 1928 campaign. 

All of these posts proved difficult to fill as the current season opened, and ail were 
considered the weak spots of the team as the 1929 campaign was launched. 



FRESHMAN BASEBALL 

West Virginia 2; Kiski Prep 9 

West Virginia 20; Fairmont Collegians 10 

Weot Virginia 1 I ; .',aidley ^ Selby 2 

West Virginia 9; Kiski Prep 10 

We-.t Virginia 17; Granville 10 

59 41 

West Virginia— Won 3; Lost 2. 



Piiyc Two lluntlri.tl Ttccnli/.Si 



fAVONTICOLAs 



Intramurals 




Paije Ttco lluiidicd Twenty-Seven 



rAVOlNTICOLA.^ 




PROF. HARRY L. SAMUEL 



Intramural Athletics for Men 



As AN integral part of the new Department of Physical Education, headed by Dr. Carl 
P. Schott, there has come to the University this year a Department of Intramural 
sports under the directorship of Professor Harry L. Samuel, a graduaie of Michigan and 
Columbia. Professor Samuel comes to us from the University of Michigan where he has 
been a big factor in carrying on the most extensive and complete progr im of IntramuraU 
which exists anywhere in the country. West Virginia Alumni can point with pride to 
the fact that the University is the first school in the East to employ a lull time Director 
of Intramural Sports. 

What are intramural sports? What does this word "intramural" mean? It is de- 
rived from the two Latin words "intra" meaning "within," and "muralisv " meaning 
"wall." Literally speaking the term Intramural Athletics means athletics "within the 
walls" of a particular school or institution. Intramural Athletics, thus provide us with 
our avenue of approach to an ideal we have long heard talked about but never fully real- 
ized, namely, "athletics for all." 

Intramurals at West Virginia 

The first activity of the Fall program just completed was Speedball, a game new to 
West Virginians. This game was first introduced at the University of Michigan as a sub- 
stitute for football and soccer. The game retains all the features of soccer football and in 
addition has some of the best features of basketball and regulation football. The gam- 
was first introduced on the local campus thru the showing in Commencement Hall of a 



Pnyc rico IJundrcd Twcnty-Eii/ht 



rAVONTICOLA:. 



two-reel motion picture of an actual game and showed some of the fundamentals of the 
game in slow motion. A crowd of about four hundred witnessed the presentation of this 
film. Actual play got under way on October 8lh and the game was received with unex- 
pected enthusiasm, the boys taking to the game like ducks to water. A round robin tour- 
nament was conducted for the fraternities. Twenty-three out of twenty-five fraternities 
on the campus entered teams in this sport. They were divided into leagues, there being 
three five-team leagues and two four-team leagues. Each of these teams met every other 
team in its league and on the basis of games won and lost the following five teams came 
thru as winners of their respective leagues: Delta Tau Delta, lau Kappa Epsilon. Tau 
Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Sigma and Phi Sigma Delta. These league winners were then 
bracketed and met in an elimination tournament to decide the inter-fraternity champion- 
ship. Tau Kappa Epsilon and Phi Sigma Delta went into the finaU and the former emerg- 
ed as the inter-fraternity champion by virtue of its defeat of the latter on the old athletic 
field on Saturday afternoon, November 3rd. No one of these teams played less than three 
games and Tau Kappa Epsilon, the champion played in all seven games. There wrre 494 
different men who took part in the games. Four games were played each afternoon and 
in all there were forty-eight games played between the fraternities. 

Following the inter-fraternity speedball competition a tournament for non-frateriiity 
teams was conducted. There were three such teams, the Sharpes, the Unknowns and the 
Stiff-Joints. Here 34 additional men took part and the Stiff-Joints were returned the 
winners. Next followed a tournament for the inter-class championship. There were 
eleven teams in this competition, playing a round robin in leagues and the Freshman 
A. A.'s, the Freshman Laws and the Junior A. B.s won in their respective league cham- 
pionships. In the elmination series for the class championship the Junior A. B.'s cam'; 
•-hru victorious after a hard battle with the Freshman A. B.'s. who forced the Juniors to 
play thru two overtime periods before bowing to defeat. The cl.iss leagues brought out 
129 different participants. 

Alumni may wonder where these games were played. Two fields were uaed, one 
located south of Chemistry Hall on a plot that had been laid out by the University gar- 
dener as a lawn. The other was laid out on the old .-Athletic Field behind Commence- 
ment Hall. Part of the field ran over on to the practice field of the Varsity football team 
but the project had the endorsement of Coach Rodgers and Direcor Stansbury and no 
inconvenience was experienced by cither the Varsity or intramural players. 

The regulation speedball field is the rame size as a regulation football field. Both of 
these improvised fields were much too small to be adequate, the one near Chemistry Hall 
being 76 yards by 22 yards and the one on the old ,Athletic field being 80 yards by 40 
yards. 

At the same time that speedball was under way there was being conducted a Fall 
tennis tournament in both singles and doubles. In spite of the fact that not a single 
tennis court was available on the campus it was possible to complete play in the singles 
tournament by using five tennis courts in the city, the use of which were obtained thru 
personal appeal to the Morgantown Country Club, the Evansdale Tennis Club and a pri- 
vate family in Westover. Inclement weather forced the discontinuance of play m the 
doubles before they could be completed but the singles championship of the University 
was won by H. C. Levis "31, of Buffalo. N. Y.. who defeated N. Ragland '30 of Beckley. 
W. Va.. in a thrilling five set match. There were 68 men entered in the singles tourna- 
ment and 26 pairs in the doubles. 

In the mean time students had been training for the first Inter-fraternity and All- 
Campus Cross-Country races ever held at the University. Cross-Country running is a 
strenuous sport, especially when one h.Ts to climb the hills that extend upward in all direc- 
tions from the site of the University. In order to be eligible to compete in either of these 
races each contestant was requited to run over the course, which covered a distance of 
two and one-eighth miles, at least nine times before the day of the race and in addition 
in order to insure that he was in fit physical trim he was required to have his heart and 
lungs examined at the health service and present before noon on the day of the race a 
statement from Dr. Kessel that he was in fit shape to compete in this activity. Those 
men who had been playing speedball were permitted to substitute the playing of three 
games of speedball for three of the practice runs which meant that each man had run the 
course at the very least six times before taking part in the races. 



^AXOMTICOLA.^ 



Sixteen men representing seven fraternities faced the starter's gun on Thursday after- 
noon, November 22nd. Kappa Sigma fraternity by virtue of placing men in first, fifth 
and tenth positions won the race with the low point score of sixteen. In a Cross-Country 
race the lowest score wins, since each man to finish scores the same number of points for 
his team as the position in which he finished indicates. The scores of the first three men 
to finish for any one fraternity counted in the scoring. "Mickey" Brand '31, representing 
Kappa Sigma was the individual winner and his lime for the two and one-eighth mile jaunt 
was 12 minutes and 21 seconds. It should be noted that all sixteen men to start in this 
race finished and none showed any evidence of being worn out, thus showing the impor- 
tance of having men train for this kind of a contest. 

Six men faced the starter on the following Tuesday, November 27th, in the All- 
Campus race held over the same course. This race was open to both fraternity and non- 
fraternity men. Charles E. Leiphart '3 1, of Wheeling was the winner of this event. His 
time for the course was considerably better than that made in the inter-fraternity race, 
being 12 minutes and 5 seconds, which at present is the record for the course. All six 
starters finished the run. The first three to finish will be given jerseys with their class 
numerals thereon. 

Realizing that the Faculty needs recreative activity as well as the student body a 
faculty horseshoe pitching tournament was conducted this fall. Eighteen entered for the 
singles and sixteen were in the doubles. Inclement weather prevented either of these 
tournaments going thru to completion but all had an opportunity to get out at least once 
and enjoy the clear autumn air and the freedom from the routine of the classroom while 
indulging in a few rounds of "barnyard golf." 

Had an Alumnus happened in at Commencement Hall on the evening of December 
I I th or 12th between seven and ten o'clock he would have been treated to a sight most 
pleasant to behold. Gathered here in the old gymnasium were more students than this 
room has ever before accommodated at one time. The occasion for this demonstration 
was the running of the first inter-fraternity wrestling tournament in the school's history. 
This was to be followed later by an All-Campus Wrestling Tournament which will be held 
shortly after the Christmas holidays are over. 

With the basement of Commencement Hall jammed to the rafters with over 500 spec- 
tators and contestants the tournament got under way at 7 p. m. on Tuesday, Decembe.' 
Ilth. One hundred forty-nine men had "weighed in" ihe previous afternoon. Matches 
were conducted in all eight weights under National Intercollegiate rules. Steve Harrick, 
Varsity wrestling coach, assisted by members of the Varsity wrestling squad refereed the 
boats in commendable fashion. It was necessary to have two mats going at all times. 
All bouts were of five minutes duration unless terminated by a fall. During the first even- 
ing there were in all 104 bouts carried thru, fifty-two of them resulting in falls, thirty-five 
in time decisions while only seventeen bouts weie defaulted. In most cases these defaults 
were occasioned by the fact that one or the other of the competitors could not compete 
because of an attack of the "flu" which had just begun to make its appearance on the 
Campus. 

unh 
g at 7 F 
spiritedly 
sset to C 



On the first evening the 175 lb. class and the 
the semi-finals. On the second night beginning a 
jammed to its capacity. Fifty-four bouts were spir 
ing material was uncovered that should be 



squad. In the heavier w 
Varsity football men furni 
Glenn, Clint Carrico, Nel; 
fame were competing for 



the 



inner in the 165 lb. cla 



sights it is interesting to note 
shed some of the liveliest bout 
on Lang, "Bus" Larue and G 
aurels in the great Greek spor 



itcd class weie carried thru to 
m., the "old gym" was again 
ontested and some likely look- 
ich Harrick's Varsity wrestling 
that many of Coach Rodgers' 
of the evening. "Big Sleepy" 
Joseph, all of Varsity football 
"Big Sleepy " Glenn emerged 



Team honors went to Sigma Phi Epsilon who scored a total of 25'j points, rollin.j 
up first places in the 1 15, 165, 175 and unlimited classes. .Mpha Gamma Rho trailed in 
second place with I 1 points, followed by Tau Kappa Epsilon with 9 points. The ne.it 
teams in order were Beta Theta Pi and Kappa Alpha tied for fourth with 8 points each. 
Kappa Sigma and Phi Delta Theta tied for fifth with 7 points each. Phi Sigma Delta was 
in eighth position with 6 points, Pi Lambda Phi was in ninth position with I'i points and 
Pi Kappa Alpha was tenth with I .oint. In all there were I 29 different men who actually 
competed in the tournament and u total of 158 bouts were contested during the two even- 



inpn 



Pnqr Two Tliitidrnl Tl\ir'.-.i 



>VOINTICOLA3i 



ings. There should be even greater 
yet to come and it is possible that it 
days. 



taking part in the All-Campua tournament 
necessary to run the tournament over three 



The Winter Program 

The Winter Program was stajjed in the new mens Field House. Something wa» 
going on every evening betwe-n the hours of 7 .-ind 10 on Mnndavs thru to Thursday, 
excepting on evenings when some Varsity Basketball contest was being staged. 

There were 25 fraternity basketball teams, 10 class teams and 6 non-fraternity teams. 
Each of these teams played every other team in its league and then the league winnrri 
met in a series to decide the championship. Kappa Sigma won the fraternity basketball 
title by virtue of its victory over Kappa Mu in the final game. The Sophomores were 
returned the winners in the class leagues and the Scoreless Wandertrs won the non- 
fraternity championship. 

Two track meets were conducted in the Field House, one an all-fraternity affair and 
the other an all-campus event. Phi Sigma Kappa won the fraternity title, while each 
man to score 5 or more points in the all-campus meet was given a handsome gold medal. 



s conducted on one of the local commer- 
3nd in another year it is planned to con- 
n. Kappa Sigma was returned the victor 



The bowling tournament for fraternities 
cial alleys. It turned out to be a huge succe; 
duct this activity for class and non-fraternity 
in this competition. 

As a wind-up to the winter program of intramural sports there was held in the Field 
House on Saturday evening, March 16th the first annual athletic carnival in the history 
of Intramural Sports at West Virginia. The final game for the fraternity basketball title 
was played as well as the final bouts for the University Boxing Championships in si-x 
weights. A couple of novelty events kept the crowd in good humor. The Varsity sport 
captains staged a Kiddie Kar race and the spectators were treated to f. rare sight when 
"Little Sleepy" Glenn. "Les" Montgomery. "Jimmie" Cox. and Truehart Taylor mounted 
their trusty Kars to break all records for speed. Two picked male quartets of runners 
represented Chi Omega and Kappa Kappa Gamma and competed against each other for 
inter-sorority relay championship. These two teams reached the finals by virtue of hav- 
ing made the best times in the trials held during the week preceding the carnival. 



Pci'if Tiro 1 1. 1 



rAVOMXICOLA., 



Varsity Club 



Officers 

TRUEHEART TAYLOR President 

JACK ZEVELY Secretary 

HAYMOND MAXWELL, JR. . Treasurer 



M. 



embers 



James Black Thomas BrafTord James Cox 

Ado'ph Cooper Kennelh Cowden Edward Girden 

Edward Fox Wiley Garrett R'jdo'p'.i Hageberg 

Albert Glenn Marshall Glenn Mike Hardy 

Homer Hogue Geor^^e Hand Clarence Keefer 

Gordon Brill William Harrick Russell LaRue 

Gene Hag>ie Ralph Kirchner Louis 1>. Meisel 

Clarence Lewis Haymond Maxwell Jr. Fred Morgan 

Kenni-th Miller Leslie Montgomery Julian Scott 

George Nixon Clarence Ryan Paul Summers 

Willian Simmons Trueheart Taylor Jack Z^veiy 

Edw.x.d Vacheresse Walter Brewster 



J 



I'nrjp T\rn Hiindreil iinriii-lwi 



rAVONT ICO L A.^ 




wimmm^mi^m 



rAVONTI CO VJ^ 



IVcman^s Athletic Coufnil 

The purpose of this Council is to cooperate with the Lin versity authorities in regu- 
lating all matters pertaining to woman's athletics: to increase interest in ail athletics 
among the women students, and to further in every possible way the spirit of good sports- 
manship on the campus. 

Officers 

FRANCES JACOBS President 

VIRGINIA MILLER '. Vice-President 

LAURA CRAIG - #l Secretary 

MARGARET STRALEY ": Treasurer 

Sport Managers 

Martha Bayles Hockey 

Bertha Handlan Basketball 

Sarah Cree Baseball 

Martha Moore Track 

Jeanette Brooks -^ Hiking 

Carolyn Alcott Tennis 

Jane Seabright Archery 

Anna Mary Tropf Swimming 

Class Representatives 

Agnes Neely-Minnich Senior 

Irene Carney Junior 

Virginia Doak Sophomore 

Sue Proctor Freshman 

Grace Griffin Sponsor 

Beatrice Thomas Sponsor 

Beatrice Hurst Sponsor 

Beatrice Hildebrandt Sponsor 



FAVONTICOLA^^i 



1 




rAVONTI CO LA.^ 




i'.iyc lav llumlrr,! Tlnrtii-. 



'^'fTm— ^AVONTICOLA. 



Military 



AVONTICOLAs 




li^H^ 



/'.I.;. •;■",, IIhiuIi'.I rhifly-Eioli: 



ps 



fAVONTICOLAs 




Pcrsouricl of Headquarters 



Harv-y H. Fletcher 
Raymond R. Tourlillott 
Taylor W. Forman 
R M. McCutcheon 
S. E. Whitesides Jr 



Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



Major Infantry (DOl.) 



Captain Infantry (DOL) 
Executive Officer and Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Captain Infantry (DOL) 

Assistant P. M. S. ft T. 

Captain Corps of Engineers (DOL) 

Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

1st lieutenant Infantry (DC)L> 



Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

P. N. Strong lot Lieutenant Corps of Engineers (DOL^ 

Assistant P. M. S. \ T. 



Floyd M. Brill 

Albert Spitzer 

R. M. King 

W. L. Browning 

W. A. Wallrabenstein 



2nd Lieutenant Infantry Rssc 
2nd Lieutenant Infantry Rese 
2nd Lieutenant Marine Corps Rese 
2nd Lieutenant InfarfCry Kese 
2nd Lieutenant Infantry R^sf? 



rAVONTICOLA:. 




Reserve Officers 



W, C. Ayers 

W. T. Fahey 

\. T. Marsh 

J. T. Steel 

L. F. Malone 

W. C. Underwood 

T. R. C. King 

W. S. Sheppard 

M. P. Hooker 

L. H. Armentrout 

C. Smith 

M. W. Williams 
K. W. Cameron 
J. A. Moreland 

E. Reed 

B. A. Humphreys 

F, R. Lardin 
J. M. Morgan 
E. Croushore 
A. A. Maust 
E. Milam 

r. C. Williams 
J. H. Reeder 
H. W. Largent 
P. J. Johnson 
E. Fox 

W. J. Moore 
H. O. Parrack 



PERSONNEL 

J. R. Nolting 

I. W. Machesney 

B. F. King 

R. M. Cooper 

J. H. Ebeling 

G. R. Cunningham 

J. A. Wiles 

L. J. Shaffer 

W. D. Myers 

L. Gonano 

K. Hare 

F. A. Ingram 

T. F. Manion 

W. C.Walsh 

3. L. Williams 

F. D. McGinnis 

T. R. Cooper 

R. R. McCue 

T. E. Baker 

M. C. Cunnmgham 

O. S. Young 

W. Boone 

V. O. Whitman 

H. G. Martin 

R. C. Brand 

J. H. Brewster 

H. A. Burton 

E. E. Megailey 

E. Vacheresse 



R. C. Hilliard 
I. H. Kisner 
R. R. Stewart 
A. Meadows 
F. W. D. Parsons 
D. R. McCill 
R. A. Ruth 
W. H. Allman 
H. C. Hardesty 
K. W. Showalter 
H. H. Layman 
L. S. Hirsh 

A. W. Petroplus 
H. M. Markley 
M. Glenn 

F. Maynard 
I. H. Goodwin 
I. H. Campbell 
C. C. Coulter 
I. H. Conklin 
C. F. Brown 

B. F. Dever 
S. J. Hobday 

S. N. Merenndino 

F. F. Riley 

S. S. Brown 

F. W. Ford 

A. R. Wittenberg 

L. D. Meisel 

J. R. Nuzum 



rAVOlNTl CO LA.^ 




Sponsors of R. O. T. C. 

Mary Jo Matthews i\eciment;il 

Mary Williams 1st Battalion 

Dorothy Dering 2nd Bitlalion 

Dorothy Brand 3td Battalion 

Thelma Brand .. Company A 

Marguerite Dilworth Bottome Company B 

Martha Bromberg . Company C 

Barbara Dowd Company D 

Catherine Preston Company F 

Virginia Miller Company E 

Dorothy Manasse Company G 

Helen Deffenbaugh Glenn Comininy H 

Mary Hfce Company 1 

Marian Goodman Band 



rAVOlNTICOLAs 




^iDIKBni^HMIIIHIHHHB 






R. O. T. C. BAND 




Captain 




J. A. MORELAND 

W. A. MESTREZAT 

A. A. WHITENER 

F. H. BENNETT 


Leader 




Assistant Leader 




Drum Major 




Arnold, K. C. 


Harr :s, E. L. 


Neff. H. H. 


Beatty, T. F. 


Hart. I. W. 


Porterfield. K. F. 


Becker, H. 


Hartman, R. M. 


Post, C. 


Bennett. F. H. 


Harts. L. E. 


Rice. C. H. 


Blum, E. C 


Hou't, C. S. 


Skaff. P. 


Bruhn. C. W. 


Katz, J. 


Speiden. E. F. 


DeAn«elis, C. E. 


Kennedy, D. C. 


Spillm.-in, G. W. 


DeAmato, II. 


Kiester, J, H. 


Sterling. \V. H. 


Doll, W. E. 


Locker, H. V. 


Sutherland, E. H. 


Classman. D. 


McHale, E. W. 


Taylor. E. L. 


Goodman, E. 


Melnicoff, S. 


Whitener. A. A. 


Gressang. E. C. 


Merritt, J. 3. 


Woolcock. R. 


Gwynne. A. C 


Miller. William C 


Meyers. E. 


Hale. F. A 


Moran. D. E. 





rAVO NT I CO L As 







REGIMENTAL STAFF 

WILl.ARD C. AYERS 

WILLIAM T. FAIIEY , 

WALTER C. UNDERWOOD 

T. R. C. KING 

K. W. CAMERON 

FIRST BATTALION STAFF 

ANDREW T. MR ASH 

W. S. SHEPPARD 

CLAIR SMITH 

R. O. T. C. COMPANY "A" 

EDWARD REED 

E. MILAM 

FRED R. LARDIN 

J. M. MORGAN 

EARL CRCUSHORE 

Darnette. R. M. ' arham R. S. 

Brown. H. A. Lewis. L 

Bolcy, N. W. Mahanna. D. G. 

Cordray. E. B. Mankoff. L. 

Orinkard R. McStepn. A. J. 
Dallob. S. JK, Miller. J. W. 

DeAngeli-. A. Parshall. D. B. 

FuMcr. M. F. Shipman. I. K. 

Horan. J. S Smith. C. P. 

Hutchinson. B. M. .Stewart. L. J. 

Jolliffe. A. B. Thorn. R. B. 

Hcdrick. W. H Burgrss. L. W. 

Kramer, J. S. Clark. L. R. 

Kunst, L. L. Epstein, M. 





Colonel 


Lieute 


nant-Colonel 




Adjutant 


Plans and Training 


Se 


rgeant-Major 


Lieute 


nant-Colonel 




.Major 




.Adjutant 


C 


adct Captain 




. Lieutenant 




.... Sergeant 




..- Sergeant 




.. Sergeant 


H;ndo. .M. 




Healey. G. H. 




Heck. E. T. 




Harrick. G. 




Johnston. H. F. 




McGovern. E. II. 




Morgan. S C. 




Porter. J. W. 




Reynolds. C. F. 




Roles. F. 




Smith. W. H. 




Walker. C. I-:. 




Drinkard, R. 





rAVO INT ■ C O I- A.^ 




R. O. T. C. COMPANY "B" 

A. A. MAUST Captain 

L. G. WEIMER Sergeant 

GEORGE F. BARBERS Sergeant 

JACOB H. REEDER ._. Sergeant 

H. W. LARGENT Sergeant 

P.J.JOHNSON Sergeant 



Angel. H. R. 
Brown, J. D. 
Corwin, W. M. 
Crow. J. H. 
Dorsey, J. R. 
Downing. \V. R. 
Dworkin, S. 
Emerson, J. N. 
England, F. M. 
Foote, C. I. 
Grossman, C. B. 
Hare, C. E. 
Holt, J. F. 
Johnson. C. C. 
Leeson. L. R. 



Llewellyn. M. 
McDermott. B. 
Neff, E. .M. 
O'Neill, C G. 
Poland, J. R. 
Rogers, R. P. 
Stidger, H. C. 
Walker, O. J. 
Watkins, A. H. 
Winkler, W. E. 
Brown, R. L. 
Chipps, D. D. 
Clarke, E. F. 

Dc-Vol H. A. 



Dicker.son, M. E. 
Dorr, J. T. 
Dotson, B. 
Finnell, J. H. 
Habig, D. 
Holland. H. T. 
Hushes, W. T. 
Kiger, M. R. 
McColloch. W. J. 
Parrill, D. M. 
Pelter, J. J. 
Prichard, A. C. 
Stamler, N. F. 
Waggoner, V. F. 
Werner. S. 



/AVO NT I C O L A:^ 




^^n^ 



Srif w w 1% 



R. O. T. C. COMPANY "C" 

EDWARD FOX Captain 

W. J. MOORE Lieutenant 

H. O. PARRACK Lieutenant 

J. R. NOLTING Lieutenant 

J. W. MacCHESNEY Sergeant 

B. F. KING Sergeant 

R. M. COOPER Sergeant 

JOHN H. EBELING Sergeant 

G. R. CUNNINGHAM Sergeant 

J. A. WILES Sergeant 

L. J. SHAFFER Sergeant 

Adkinn. M. C. Romano. L. Buxo. R. R. 

Hingotti. S. A. Rosenthal. J. "^""fr' }' ^' 

.\»hworth. A. L. Samson. W. H. -ould. I 

3!air. A. J. .,au„der,. k. M. iT'T' I 

tJradley. E. A. Selby. E. K. ^all. J L 

breeden. P. O. Shipley. D. B. Ha.r.s. J W 

Brown. M. E. Spence. J. N. Jackson. At. 

Corn. J. B. bokn'jerTcr. T. M fvosanovic, F. 

Doyle, J. E. Storck. E. D. Martin. W. S. 

Eddy. D. J. Stewart. J. W. ^^"'i';'^»°"- ^: ^. 

Hamilton, W. P. Wa ker. R. E. McWhortcr. J. A. 

..uftm..n. J. F. Wallace. J. B. Morello. A J. 

l<,aplai. J Weisman. S. Neurnuin. W. 

H^nee H R. Wolfe. C. T Rob.nson. R. R. 

I oehr J F. Meyers. O. P. Schoficld. M. 5. 

Martn. P. H. Ashburn. H. V. Dimpson, J. N. 

Mcclntosh, C. L. Aauld. E. A. bnyder. M. H. 

.Moore. B. J. Axelrod. A. Staats. C. L. 

Pietro. G. H. Beall. J. L. Swmdier. H. T. 

Radivojevic, S. M. Brand. B. G. Tokar. L. 

Robinson. G. H. Brown. F. M. 



7 ,. ,, ;/...,,/.. .1 forly-f 1 



rAVONJTI CO L A^, 




SECOND BATTALION STAFF 



J. I. STEEL 

M. P. HOOKER 
R. S. BOONE .. 



Lieutenant -Cylon-l 

Major 

Adjutant 



R. O. T. C. COMPANY "D" 



W. D. MYERS 
LAZELLE GONANO 
RAYMOND HARE 

F. A. INGRAM 

T. F. MANION 

W. C. WALCH 

B. L. WILLIAMS 

B) 



— Captain 
Lieutenant 
. Seraieant 

, ,. Sergeant 
.. Sergeant 

.. Sergeant 

.. Sergeant 



D. L. 
Brcokover, H. 
Carpenter, E. B. 
Ditlmern, L. L. 
Douglass. J. B. 
Drum. C. M. 
Edmondson, R. E. 
Gaston. J. H. 
Gllkeson. R. M. 
Hardesty. .A. W. 
laquinta. S. 
Kiiyuha. F. 
Lilly. K. O. 
l.orant. J. A. 
1 ukr, H. D. 
.Montgomery, R. K. 
Neihaus. E. J. 
Rees, T. G. 
Risher, G R. 



Romano. P. 

Saville. J. E. 
Smith. T. 
Snyder. P. M. 
Sprigg. M L. 
Stewart. M. T. 
Sutton. B. J. 
Swentzel. B. F. 
Wacowski. J. J. 
Winger. L. H. 
Barton. C. L. 
Hall. A. I I. 
Haslam. W. A. 
Hayhurst, F. B. 
Henry G. K. 
Herbert, H. L. 
Kerr. V. W. 
Lockhirt S 
Markley. H. W. 



McCormick, C. J. 
Nickles. M. J. 
No;tinj;ham. J. R. 
Flanig.in, C. W. 
Null, E. J. 
Nuzun.. C. R. 
O'Lcary. C. J. 
Plovanich. J. P. 
Rodgers, E. 
Shepherd. J. B. 
Simpson. J. L. 
.Spongier. O. B. 
Swing. L. C. 
Talkington. P. D. 
Vannoy. P. M. 
Warder. R. C. 
Webb. H. O. 
Wick, E. W. 



^AVO INT ■ C O L Ass 








I 



R. O. T. C. COMPANY "E" 

P. D, McGINNlS Captain 

T. R. COOPER Lieutenant 

R. R. McCUE Lieu'cnant 

T. E. BAKER Sergean: 

M. C. CHAMBERLAIN 5er>;e.mt 

Dodge. D. A. Simonton. W. E. Kinca.d. H. H. 

Enul*-. E. L. Stauh. S. W. Lewis. H. A. 

Friend. A. W. Sylvester, W. C. I ynch. E. E. 

Goddin, A. H. Timblin, C L. McCa..Wey. A. E. 

HhII. L. W. Waiigoner. W. G. .McMillion. W. C. 

Ilervey, G. E. Witl.ers, C. B. Mi ler. E. F. 

Mickm;.n. H. B. Bai'ey. H. P. Morris. W. M. 

Hoban. M. J. Brown. P. N. PowcU, E. J. 

K.line. J. B. Darnall. W. H. Power. W. R. 

Kuhary. E. F. DeLancy. C. J. Ranne U. W. B. 

Lefevre. G. F. DeMoNs, K. H. Reed, R. P. 

I yens. C R. Merrebee. D. Rhodct. H. A. 

McCiie. W. P. Fitlro A. E. RiRSs. G. M. 

Monack, R. E. Gaal, C. j. Stewart. C. F. 

Mu.sgrove. W. D. Harris. E. D. Steenbersen, P. H. 

Parsons. N. W. lleatherman. J. Ta-eail. R. M. 

.Simmons. O. B. H:««ins. C. E. Walter. E. G. 

H.KK.ns. O. R. 



rAXONITICOL>X, 




R. O. T. C. COMPANY "F" 



OTIS S. YOUNG 

WELDON BOONE .. 
VERNE O. WHITMAN 

P. B. SHANKS 

H. G. MARTIN 

R. C. BRAND 

J. H. BREWSTER 

H. A. BURTON ... 

E. E. MEGAILEY 

E. VACHERESSE 

R. C. HILLARD 

Baum. H. E. 
Baldinger. F. S. 
Barker, T. A. 

B.. I, W, E. 

Brookover, B, M. 
Brown, C. B. 
Brown, J. M. 
Canh, J. W. 
Ch twood, H. C. 
Currence, R. F. 
Dar.ifls, M. R. 
£ sen. E. T. 
Ev.-na, B. B. 
Elliott. R, 
George, L. 
Goddin. R. L. 
Hale, R. R. 

Hill, C. W. 
Hornor. C. S. 
K.nK. J. R. 
Mahanna, D. L. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 
Lieutenant 
Lieutenant 
-- Sergeant 
.. Sergeant 
.. Ser2eant 
... Sergeant 
... Sergeant 
.. Sergeant 
.. Sergeant 



Malesky. J. S 
Michael, V. 
Perrine, P. 
Poe, B. L. 
Porter, H. R. 
Munchmeyer, 
Stout, R. B. 
.Summerfoeld. 1 
Ttljay, H. T. 
Woodruff, I. E. 
Woodworth, A. 
.\dkins, J. M. 
Betances. M. E, 
Brosjlia, J. A. 
Casto, C, F. 
Coort. R. L. 
Dienna. D. F. 
Eschwege. E. 
Emrick, G. W. 
Forman, L. M. 
Gal agher, J. F 



J. R. 



Gaston, G. A. 
Hanes. W. J. 
Howard, E. B. 
Huff, H. H. 
Jacob, S. S. 
Jeffreys, E. O. 
Joseph, E. 
Lieble, H J. 
May, C. A. 
.Means, M. C. 
Pearsall. J. S. 
Nutter. R. B. 
Free. P. F. 
Rubin, M. 
Sm th. S. j. 
Snyder, J.N. 
Thomas, C. C 
Toiiry, C. E. 
Wa ter. E. K. 
White. B. S. 
Wotring, R. M. 



rAXONTICOLA.^ 




THIRD BATTALION STAFF 

LEE F. MALONE Lieutenant-Colonel 

LOUIS H. ARMENTROUT Major 

M. W. WILLIAMS Adjutant 

R. O. T. C. COMPANY "G" 

JOHN H. KISNER Captain 

R. R. STEWART Lieutenant 

A MEADOWS Seri^cant 

F. W D. PARSONS Sergeant 

D R. McGlLL SergMnt 

R. A. RUTH Sergeant 

Bradford. Bt-rt Jr. Rea. H. B. Cordon. W. V. 

Brown. Bonn Rich. H. A. Herod. L. E. 

Callaway. R. D. Ru/iska. N. J. Haddad. A. 

Cameron. R. R. Stewart, R, G. Higgs. E. H. 

Carden. J. D. Sondcrman. W. R. Mutton. L. F. 

Cramer. R. H. Sutton. N. G. Imbro. H. A. 

Erb. P. E. Teagarden. J. L. Johnson. G. L. 

Ferrara. L. Tibbs, R. B. juliano. F. J. 

Foley J. F. Towler. J. L. I eFevre. O. B. 



Groves. A. O. 


Wilson. J. F. 


LaFoll-tte. J. A. 


Haddock. G. 7. 


Basman. Jack 


McCle'land. A. C. 


Moult. H. R. 


Brown. L. D. 


McNeer. C. O. 


Imlay. J. M. 


Buecker. J. A. 


Mulligan. H. J. 


ion^s. Ralph Jr. 


Catapano. P. F. 


Po'an. C. G. 


L,rb, L. S. 


Copossela. F. .A. 


Treloaan, H. C. 


.Mallamo, J. T. 


Craig. L. G. 


Waxman. M. S. 


McNamara. R. G, 


Crudden. C H. 


West wood. F. E. 


McCov. R. L. 


Donlan. J. M. 


W.lmoth. C. E. 


Netser. R. W. 


D'.Acostino. G. L. 


Wildstein. L. 


OFarrell. P. J. 


Fleshman, C. L. 











f. 



rAVONTI CO LAs 




R. O. T. C. COMPANY "H" 

WM. H. ALLMAN Captain 

H. C. HARDESTY Lieutenant 

K. W. SHOWALTER Lieutenant 

H. H. LAYMAN Lieutenant 

L. S. HIRSH Lieutenant 

A. W. PETROPLUS Sergeant 

H. M. MARKLEY Serjeant 

MARSHALL GLENN Sei-°eant 

FRANK MAYNARD Sergeant 

J. H. GODWIN .. Sergeant 

J. H. CAMPBELL Sergeant 

Arnold, M. R. Miedel, H. E. Conti, M. E. 

Booton, O. H. Mitchell, J. M Crago, F. H. 

Burton, G. P. Moore, C. J. Darr, C. E. 

Dean, W. H. Ocoma, E. C. Day, F. K. Jr. 

Collins, E. E. Peterson, A. B. Geddes, D. M. 

Cornwell, C. S. Ross, R. M. Goldfine. R. 

Coudoux, O. J. Sebulsky, J. Goldberg, G. D. 

Dawson, J. Jr. Slathers, G. D. Golden, M. H. 

Dorsey, L. E. Stephan, J. O. Jacobs, D. W. 

Echols. J. E. Strickman, H. Keever, K. W. 

Field. G. F. Vodop.vec. F. K liner, J. H. 

Foster. W. H. Wayt, E. R. Kornguth, M. 

Gerwig. W. H. We'ls, J. A. Loy, E. J. 

Gompers, H. W. White. C B. Jr. Myers, O. P. 

G'over. W. Wiseman, E. L. Mundoll, R. H. 

Hammer, S. F. Wotring. E. H. Pesachovsky, H. 

King, O. K. Tibbs. R. B. Robinson, M. 

Laughorn. H. W. Jr. Brown. M. E. Rumble. W. J. 

Leppert. W. C. Barrickman. D. S. Seidemann, I. 

Levenson, H. B. Barrickman. M. R. .Sergi. C. N. 

Levitt, L. Beardsley. E. E. Wcissenburger. J. T. 

Marker. H. J. Benko, J. Watkins. C. E. 

Mariiues, A. Blirkman. B. M. Welsh. E. E. 

McMillen, S. D. Brand, J. M. Whitlock, J. W. 

Michie, B. L. Bush. L. Zahniser. R. B. 
Cohen, T. R. 



Page Two Hiimlr 



r 



,AXONTICOLA. 




R. O. T. C. COMPANY T' 

C. C. COULTER Captain 

J H. CONKLIN Lieutenant 

C. F. BROWN Lieutenant 

B. F. DEVER Lieutenant 

S. J. HOBDAY Sergeant 

S N. MERENDINO Sergeant 

F. F. RILEY Sergeant 

S. S. BROWN Sergeant 

F. W. FORD Sergeant 

A. R. WITTENBERG Sergeant 

L. D. MEISEL Sergeant 

J. R. NUZUM Serjeant 

Chafin. W. J. Parsons. K. D. Browning. F. Jr. 

Clayton. F. Pielro. F. J. Caruso. P. 

Coombs. F. M. Proudfoot, T. Cohen. J. 

Cohn. L. I. Repair, R. C. Cook. O. N. 

Cuhbon, E. 11. Smoot. G. W. Cook. G. F. 

DeMarcQ. R F. Steenburgh, W. E. CouU. F. W. 

Donley, R. G. Cnydor, C. W. Jr. Divvens. H. N. 

Gessler. P. E. Viggiano. M. A. Fletcher. J. J. 

H ehle. F. R. Vivas. J. R. Hamilton. C. S. 

Hilrlr^th, E, D. Way. Durbin H. Hash. J. W. 

Munhes H E Welch. R. Kranaskas, J. 

llunnmgs, C. F. Wray, E. B. Leiphart, C. D. 

lohn-on. J. G. Wr.ght. B. W. Neuberger. L. H. 

Kalinauskas, A. A. Wickline D. Preece. D. H. 

Keeean J R Sm.th. S. G. Robertson, W. J. 

Lushbaugh. H. F. Barna.d. J. W. Riddel. C. F. 

Mayola, L. V. Benedum. S. W. Roth, E. R. 

Millesoii W T. Boiarsky. J. L. Schrader, H. S. 

Morris S 5 Bowlen, J. H. Snyder. W. F. 

Murphy, G. S. Brookover, V. C. Walter, R. D. 



fAVONTI CO LAs 





or •» *y 




Scabbard and Blade 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin, 1905 

Co. C— Second Regiment, W. V. U. 

Established, 1916 

Associate Members 

Major H. H. Fletcher Captain R, M. McCutcheon Prof. Waggener 

Captain R. R. Tourtillott Lieut. S. E. Whitesides, jr. Prof. Chidester 

Captain T. W. Forman Thurmond .Arnold 

Officers 

FLOYD M. BRILL Captain Co. C— Second Regiment 

WILLIAM T. FAHEY 1st Lieut. Co. C— Second Regiment 

ANDREW T. MARSH 2nd Lieut. Co. C— Second Regim.^nt 



Flovd M. Brill 
William T. Fahey 
Andrew T. Marsh 
Paul Shanks 
Joseph Morcland 
lohn Kisner 



Membe 

Edward Reed 
James M. Depue 
Lewis Armentrou 
Edward Fox 
Marvin Hooker 
William Allman 



Arthur Maust (pledge) 

Thomas F. Manion 

J. I. Steele (pledge) 

Clair Smith 

W. L. Browning 

F. D. McCinnis 



Vage 3' no Hundred Fijty-Twn 



m 



r/VVONTICOLA:, 



I 




Varsity Rifle Team 



CAPT. RAYMOND R. TOURTILLOTT (DOLi Co.ich 

li WILLIAM LARGENT Manager 

II \. DcJOURNETT Captain 



R. I. Uoone 

C R. Cunningham 

II. r. Swindler 

B. S. White 

J. Rumble 

F. Kosanovic 



L. F. Malone 
R. R. McCue 
1. A. Wiles 
M. Williams 
E. E. Megailey 
E. G. Walters 



R. D. F^ike 

F. G. Weiner 

B. F. Rinchart 

G. Emrick 

C. R. Hare 

W. D. Pickering 



FRESHMAN RIFLE TKAM 



CAPT. D. M. 


BEAIRD 







11. Chitwood. 


Capt. 


H. 


Counts 


R. Lyons 






c. 


1. Foote 


\-. Michael 






C. 


Cornwell 


W. McCue 






H. 


Stidger 


R. B. Tibbs 






M 
J. 


England 
M. Adkins 



Coach 



M. Manuel 
J. Woodruff 
C. Hunnings 
J. Lorant 
C. Wolf 



dtta 



^AVONTICOLAs 




Blackguard Fusiliers 

Founded at Camp Knox, Ky., 1927 

MOTTO— Mark 96-97-98-99-100 

COLORS Black and Blue 

FLOWERS Mops and Brooms 



Art Maust 
Chink Layman 
Bill Allman 
Lew Armentrout 



Clair Smith 
Sing Marsh 
Bill Fahey 
Karl Showalter 
Bill Moore 



Ed Reed 
Paul Shanks 
'oe Moreland 
Chubby Coff 



Honorary 

Capt. R. M. McCutcheon Lt. S. E. Whiteside 



CJeor^e Barbel 
Dick Brand 
Jim Brewster 
Earl Croushor 
John Ebeling 
S!ei-py Glenn 
Bob Milliard 



Pledges 

Byron King 
Bill Machesney 
Harry Markley 
Frank Maynard 
Don McGill 
Azel Meadows 
Louis Meisel 
Salvy Meredino 



endinc 



Vincent Me 
Jim Nuzum 
Dan Pickering 
Jake Reeder 
Eddie Vacheresse 
Bus Wittenberg 
Bob Cooper 



l''l,j,- Two lliiufin;! Fifty-Four 



fAVOISTICOLA.^ 




i'uye Tu-0 Ihimind Fiftr/Su 



rAVO NT I C O L A.^ 



I 



Index to Or^atiizatious 






E 



NATIONAL FRAFERNITIES 

lnler-1- fotcrnity Council 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Phi Signia Kappa 

SiRniu Chi 

Phi Kappa Sigma 

Kappa Alpha 

Beta Theta Pi 

Delta Ti,u Oc'.tp 
Sigma Phi Lpsllon 

Kapp.'i Sigma 

Si^ma Nu . .. 

Theta Chi 

Pi Lambda Phi 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Alpha Cainma Rho 

Pi Kappa Alphp 

Alpha Phi D.-lle .. 

Phi Delta Ihc-m 

Phi Kappa li-u 
Phi Sigma Delta 
Phi Alpha 

LOCAL FRATERNITIES 

Tau Delta Th€^lo 
Delta Xi.ppa Psi 

Delta Epsilon 

Kapp.i Mu 

NATIONAL SORORITIES 

Pan Hellenic Arsociation 

Alpha Xi Delta 

Chi Ome,j;H . 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Pi Beta Phi 

Delta Clamma 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Phi Mu 



260 

264 

26d 
270 
272 
271 
276 
278 
2bO 
282 
284 
2 CO 
23-^ 
2')0 

m 

2'M 

296 
<00 



532 
i04 
30(> 
i0» 



3n 
)l4 
3lo 
>I8 
»20 
^11 
'24 
32b 



rAVOrSTICOI-As 



LOCAL SORORITIES 

Chi Delta Phi 328 

Pi Tau Delia 330 

Monoiigahela Club 332 

HONORARIES 

Tau Beta Fi 336 

English Club 338 

Alpha ZetH 340 

Phi Epsilon Omicron 342 

Press Club 344 

Matrix 346 

Phi Beta Pi 348 

Kappa Psi 350 

Dramatic Club 352 

Delta Sigma Rho 354 

Kappa Kappa Psi 356 

Mountain , 358 

Sphinx 360 

Motar Bjard 362 

Torch and Serpent 364 

Rhododendron 366 

Fi Batar Cappar 368 

The University Choir 370 

Kappa Delta Pi 272 

Y. W. C. A 374 

Beta Fi Theta 376 

Seo Beowulf Gedryht 378 

A. 1. E. E 380 

Kappa Phi 382 

Westminster Girls Club _ 384 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 386 

Epsilon Phi S'gma >^ 388 

Chi Sigma Delta 390 

Eta Sijma Phi 392 

Collegiate Four-H Club , 394 

Anthony Dairy Club 396 

Jour nailers , 398 



iss^AVO INT I C O ■- As 



Fraternities 



Page Tico llutulrcj Fitly-Xi 



fAVONTICOI-A^- 



Inter-Fraternity Council 

OFFICERS 

President L. VAL HOOD 

Vice-President THOMAS DUVAL 

Secretary JACK ZEVELY 

Treasurer STANLEY SIMPSON 

Phi Kappa Psi Haymond Maxwell 

Beta Theta Pi L. Val Hood 

Sigma Nu Henry Snyder 

Sigma Chi Jack Zevely 

Phi Sigma Kappa Clarence Ryan 

Kappa Alpha Thomas Duval 

Delta Tau Delta Stanley Simpson 

Pi Kappa Alpha Robert Burchinal 

Tau Kappa Epsilon Bernard Rinehart 

Theta Chi Ashford Ayors 

Alpha Gamma Rho F. W. D. Parsons 

Phi Kappa Sigma Charles McKain 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Charles Steele 

Kappa Sigma ,^ Eugene Haguo 

Phi Delta Theta William M. Harrington 



L 



Vaijc Two Hundred Sixly 



iAVOrSTICOL^^ 




i 



-J 



fAVONJXI CO L A.^ 




Harlan Selby 
Robert Chrisman 
Joseph Buchanan 
Jack Moore 
Lewis Caldwell 
Walter Vickers 
Charles E. Hodges 
Steele Trotter 



A. \V. PorterPeld 
Nat Frame 
Forest Stemple 



1 larvey J. Simmons 
Fred Kopp 
James Phillips 
Harry W. Lively 



George W. Jacks 
Matt Warren 
Charles B. Hart 
William Winfield 



Malcolm J. Lowe 
David W. Jacobs 



Phi Kappa Psi 

Founded at Jefferson College, 1852 

COLORS Red and Green 

FLOWER Jacqueline Rose 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established 1890 



Fratres in Urbe 




Brad Laidley 


Mort Gregg 


D. H. Courtney, Jr. 


Robert T. Donley 


Joe Courtney 


Robert Wilbourn 


James Fitch 


Alex Robb 


Wm. E. Glasscock 


Robert Hennen 


Gilbert B. Miller 


David B. Reger 


Philip Cochran 


James Trotter 


Robert Brock 


Male J. Posten 


Fratres in Facultate 




Dr. Friend E. Clark 


Dr. L. L. Friend 


Dr. E, H. Vickers 


Dr. Madison Slathers 



Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 

I Inymond Maxwell Jr. 
Louis Sturbois 
Joseph McDermott 
William Simmons 

Juniors 

lohn D. Phillips 
Lyie Jones 
Warren Williams 
James Coleman 

Sophomores 

Jack Kilmer 



James Coston 
Trueheart Taylor 
J. M. Brown Jr. 
Scott C. Lowe III 



Frank Maynard 
Wilton Davis 
fames Brewster 



Gene Beardsley 



Johnn Wilson 
George Stathers 
Junior Jones 



Richard Currence 
Grover Smith 



John Clifford 
Robb Cramer 



A 



rAVONTICOLiV, 




i^AVONITICOLA., 























Ms^Hn^:- , ..^^ 


^ 




1 


HBiI 


^ 




1 


^^^^^^ 


% 






Phi Sigma Kappa 




Found 


ed at Massachusetts Agricultural 


College 1873 






COLORS— Silver and Mager 


ta 






FLOWER— Carnation 








DELTA CHAPTER 








Established Feb. 24, 1891 








Fratres in Urbe 






Frank L. Bowman 
Floyd G. Devaughn 
Wi.liam Hunt 
Frank B. Kunst 
1 ucien H. Lyall 
David C. Reay 
Terence D. Stewart 
Prescctt C. White 


Dr. Arthur L. Bowers 
Robert W. Fisher 
Dr. Brindley John 
John B. Latterner 
Thomas W. Nale 
.Adolph M. Snyder 
Dr. B.-njrtmin M. Stout 
Dennis Willis 

Fratres in Facultate 


Robert H. Boyers 
David C. Garrison 
Dr. Bsnjamin C. Johns 
Cassius M. Lemley 
Dr. Donald M. Post 
Edgar B. tewart 
W. M. Strawn 
Frank R. Yoke 




Prof. Joseph A. Ayers 
Prof. B, W. King 
Prof. b. .1. Morris 


Prof. John B. Grumbein 
Prof. Sidnev Maynard 
Dr. L. H. Taylor 

Fratres in Universitate 


Dean C. R. Jones 
Prof. R. L. Morris 
Prof. Bennett S. White 






Seniors 






Marion R. Blair 
H.rbert Wise 
Robert E. St-uley 
Thomas J. Mclntire 
John K. Burdett 


Haines Paine 
Stanley R. Fisher 
Harry K. McNinch 
J. M. Depue 
Edward Vacheresse 
Juniors 


Robert Lafollette 
Edward F. Weber 
Fred K. Parriott 
Clarence Ryan 
Alfred Neely 




Ben W. Bird 

Paul Garrison 

Wi liam j. Robertson 


.Mark B. Condry 
Wil iam Largent 
Robert B. Ryland 


Boyd Dotson 
Saniuel Pepper 
Charles W. Zoeckler 


' 




Sophomores 






Edwin BartruR 
James A. Lafollette 
Charles W. Furbee 


CI nton McNeer 
Robert Hamilton 

Freshmen 


Ned H. Ragl.ind 
Clyde Smith 


i 


Julan D. Stealey 


Edward T. Heck 

Pledges 


Dana P. Hartlett 




Lawrence Beall 
11. W. l.anghorn 
Dana Garden 


Fred . Thurmond 
L. L. Dust 


Horace F. Woodrum 
Lawrence Plaster 






.: . : — ■ _ 





futje Tiro nimi/mJ Sixty-luur 



rAXOINTICOLA., 




fAVOINTICOLA.^ 




I 



Sigma Chi 

Founded at Miami University, 1855 

COLORS— Sky Blue and Gold 
FLOWER— White Rose 

WEST VIRGINIA MU MU CHAPTER 
Established 1895 



Judge \. G. Lazelle 
Robert White 
Ear! Smith 
A. Gordon Tait 
Judge Frank Cox 
Donald G. Lazelle 



Cha 
Cha 



-y M. Price 
A. Swearingen 



Earl S. Wolfe 
John G. Zevely 
Gregory C. Krebbs 
James W. Merricks 
George L. Ballard 

Harold H. Neff 
Robert C. Vodrey 
Charles C. Gressang 
J. Gordon Johnson 

George 7.. Haddock 
William R. Sanderman 

Douglas Shields 
John M. Mitchell 



Fratres in Urbe 

Paul H. Price 

Glen Ney 

Joseph 11. McDermott 

Therman Stout 

Howard L. Swisher 



Fratres in Facultate 

L. Darby L. D. Arnett 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 
Charles F. Littlepage 
Charles H. Bonneson 

Juniors 
Fred G. McGinnis 
Clelus H. Jenkins 
Christy V. Wildt 
Ralph E. Grimmett 

Sophomores 
John N. Simpson 
Charles E. Casto 
Charles E, Wilmoth 

Freshmen 

Carl B. White 
Charles S. Horner 
Pledges 
Walter H. Gerwig 



W. p. McCue 
Stanley Cox 
John Tait 
Wayne Cox 
John Sanders 



Hobert H Bush 
Maurice W. Coley 

Edgar R. Minnich 
James A. McWhorter 
John H. Martin 
Frod W. Ford 



S. Sprigg Jacob 
Von Walter Gordon 
William P. McCue 



Harry S. Marker 
Ralph Thorn 



iwo JliiiHlrcd SiJcty-Si. 



rAVONTICOLA., 



i 







fAVOINTI CO LAs 




Phi Kappa Sigma 

Founded at University of Pennsylvania, 1850 

COLORS Black and Gold 

ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 
Established 1896 





Fratres in Urbe 




J. R. Blackburn 
]. L. Hatfield 
L. E. Cole 
Harry O. Cole 
W. E. Reed, Jr. 
E. K. Morice 


C. T. Neff 

Samuel G. Chadwick 

W. O. Orr 

L. G. Hunter 

J. R. Fredlock 

Eugene Gunning 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 


Albert Shuman 
Harry J. Zevely 
Edward G. Donley 
Phinncy P. Reiner 
James G. Jeter. Jr. 


E. G. Bias 
J. B. Lawson 


Lawrence Wallman 
Juniors 


C. H. Reynolds 


William Browning, Ir. 

B. J. Humphreys 
J. B. Lynch 

C. J. McKain 


Don B. Parsons 
H. J. Paugh 
P. ). Reed 
L. X. Schmidt 

Sophomores 


J. K. Scott 

F. P. Warder 

G. A. Wood 
J, A. Mullen 


Donald Habig 
Ralph Hartman 
Fred Lardin 


Austin Phillips 
Phil Saunders 

Freshmen 


P. H. Steenbergen 
Felix Westwood 


George Boyd 


Paul OTarrell 

Pledges 


W. S. Staub 


Robert Hilliard 


John Poling 


Jack Towler 



wf^imummmm 



rAVONTI CO L As 




1 



r ■ ;. . - o il,. 



VVONTICOLA.. 




Kappa Alpha 

SOUTHERN 
Founded at Washington and Lee University, 1865 

COLORS— Crimson and Cold 
FLOWERS— Red Rose and Magnolia 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA RHO CHAPTER 



Thomas R. Dille 
Hershie L. Echart 
Judge Charles G. Baker 



Established, 1897 

Fratres in Urbe 

William Scherr 
J. P. Vandervort 
D. D. Richards 



Roy O. Hall 
James Moreland 
James E. Dille 



Fratres in Facultate 
Dr. Robert A. Armstrong Richard C. Bishop 
Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 



K. H. Keeney 
C. E. Keefer 
I. R. Moreland 
C. P. Connell 



J. C. Wiles 
W. C. Ayers 
R. C. Brand 
P. J. Langan 



W. R. Power 



William Waggoner 

Abrnm Hale 

H. W. Merriman 

G, D, Wilson 

B. U. Hohanncss 



T. H. Duval 
C. F. Morrison 
M. J. Ferguson 
H. M. Fischback 

Juniors 

W. C. Hughes 

F. L. Smoot 

L. C. May 

R. A. Wittenberg 

Sophomores 

11. C. Hardy 

Freshmen 

C. W. Sydnor 
R. C. Edmondson 
George Smoot 
C. B. Disque 
William Smith 



A. 


S. Mead 


R. 


E. Hagberg 


E. 


L. Peters 


E. 


P. Pritchard 


E. 


M. George 


W 


m. K. Behnke 


L. 


D. Meisel 


R. 


C. McConnaughey 



A. J. Bla 



J. R. King 
R. D. Callaway 
E. D .Storck 
Carl McComas 
W. G. Young 



J 



riunjrcd Scvcnt:/ 



rAVONTICOLAs 







i>iij;i- Tito H /.<.i sciiiily-One 



sAVONTICOLAs 




Beta Theta Pi 

Founded at Miami University, 1839 

COLORS Pink and Rose 

FLOWER— Rose 

WEST VIRGINIA BETA PSI CHAPTER 

Established, 1900 



W. O. Barnard 
George Barnard 
Vernon Bardnard 
W. H. Hormell 
J. B. Lorent 
Roscoe Posten 
I. L. Riggs 

Prof. Leo Carlin 
Dr. A. M. Reese 



Ralph Kirr.hner 
James G. Kendrick 
Clarence Lewis 

Enoch A. Latham 
Stewart S. Brown 
Herbert C. Lewis 

John W. Barnard 
D. F. DIcnna 
Edwin Howard 
Paul Meyer* 

Robert R. Hale 
Hale Watkina 



D. M. Imlay 
J. R. Dorsey 



Fratres in Urbe 
F. D. Bishop 

F. C. Bishop 
N. C. Burdett 
Wm. Downs 
W. B. Madeira 

G. F. Randall 

Fratres in Facultate 

W. H. Kendrick 
Dr. C. B. Price 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 

William Schambra 
L. Val Hood 

Juniors 

Richard H. Ralston 
Charles D. Thomas 
W. Mitchell Unger 

Sophomores 
Ralph E. Talbott 
Charles Walkins 
Leland W. Burgess 

Freshmen 

Harry L. Jones 
Robert S. Latham 
Pledges 
W. E. Doll 
O. J. Cadoux 



Wavne Coombs 
R. E. Davis 
J. D. Downs 
W. H. King 
G. H. Perry 
Ralph Rice 



11. C. Hov 



Kenneth Talbott 
J. K. Chase 



W. Thurlow B 
Louis M. Orr 



John C. Southern 
Azel Meadows 
Banks Shepherd 



Beverly L. Michie 



R. M. Barnett 
R. S. Shoup 



J 



I'agc Tico Hundred Scveiity-Tico 



7AVOINT1 CO L Ass 




Page Two nunjrcd Siicnln-Thrce 



7AVONTI CO VAr. 




Delta Tail Delta 



W. S. John 
F. P. Corbin 
Paul McKcei 
Homer G. Garl 
James Reed 
C. A. Gibbons 



R. P. Holland 
Harrison Conaway 



Founded at Bethany College, 

COLORS— Purple, White and 

FLOWER— Pansy 

WEST VIRGINIA GAMiMA DELTA 

Established 1900 

Fratres in Urbe 

John R. Akens 
L. W. Burnsidc 
T. N. Stewart 
C. M. Bolton 
W. H. Holland 
j. R. Hare 

Fratres in Facultate 

Dr. C. M. Bray 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

J. R. Stealey 
W. S. Garrett 



1859 

Gold 



S. E. Taylor 
Raymond Kerr 
Lem John 
Neai Ramsey 
Leroy M. Miller 
G. K. Simmons 



G. P. Moore 
S. R. Simpson 



P. E. Bottomc- 
H. Boggess 
W. M. Cochran 
H. L. Ogden 

U. Higginbotham 
J. F. Beatty 
J. R. Nuzum 



H. K. HigRinbotham 
M. L. Holland 
S. V. Scott 

Sophomores 

W. J. Hanes 
C. H. Hoult 
A. E. Jackson 



G. L. Cole 
J. E. Wilson 
1.. D. Jarvis 



L. D. Brown 
G. L. Johnson 
H. N. Divvens 



E. L. Taylor 



F. S. Baldinger 
W. R. Downing 



Pledges 
C. P. Smith 



L. B. Brown 
R. M. Thalmer 



7AVO INT I C O L Am 




Page Tico Hundred Bevenly-Fivc 



ii^AVO NT 1 CO I. A^ 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Founded at Richmond College, 1901 

COLORS — Purple and Red 

FLOWERS Roses and Violets 

WEST VIRGINIA BETA CHAPTER 
Established 1903 
Fratres in Urbe 



Joseph Bierer 
C. A. Duncan 


Fred Bierer 
Gay H. Dent 


H. J. Easterday 
Charles Lemley 


Okey Glenn 
David C. Graham 
M. J. Kearns 
L. M. Stoops 
Stephen Harrick 


J. T. West 
E. F. Hushell 
W. M. Linn 
Fred H. Graham 
M. L. Cohen 


D. D. Hamilton 
Delmar G. Runner 
Howard H. Thompson 
Lunt Estep 



P. O. Summers 
A. Chilton Farmer 
Albert Glenn 
W. Nelson Dunn 
Clair Davis 



O. Bruce Davis 
Delbert Noel 
Geortie F. Nixo) 
Lawrence Mills 
Frederick Riley 



James Hershell Bowlen 
Junior Browning 
II. A. Lewis 



John B. Wallace 
Ernest Franklin Pauley 
Wesley Cash 



Fratres in Facultate 

G. W. Grow 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

William Harrick 
Harold R Ridenour 
William E. Kimmons 
Dennis D. Thomas 
Charles Steele 

Juniors 

Marshall Glenn 
Charles Haden 
T. D. Nixon 
William Schweitzer 
Darcey Wilson 

Sophomores 

Harold A. Lewis 
Charles Darr 
Glenn Cook 

Freshmen 

Forbes Heihli 
Oliver Teagarden 
Albert Grimm 



Thomas B. Brafford 
George Cans 
Frederick J. Meyer 
James B. Johnson 



Daniel Boughner 
Wilbur J. McCulloch 
William M. Applegate 
William Hoby 



Samuel Pearsall 
Joseph Whitley 



John E. Echala 
Arno Wamsley 
Ralph Ross 



-tAVO NT I C O L A., 




2»u.7e Tu:o n.,:idr:l t. 



•^ 



„r^\OrvJXICOLA.N 




Kappa Sigma 

Founded at University of Virginia, 1869 

COLORS— Scarlet. Green and White 
FLOWER — Lily of the Valley 



WEST VIRGINIA GAMMA PHI CHAPTER 
Established, 1883 

Re-established, 1918 

Fratres in Urbe 



David A. Christopher 
Harlan Cokely 
J. C. Smith 
R. H. Jarvis 
W. S. Price 



A. W. Miller 
C. D. Minor 
J. W. Shilling 
C. E. Watts 
J. M. Orth 



West Hardy 
Clarence Roby 
J. B. Cottle 
M. L. Wilson 
Robert Andrew 



1 


Fratres in Facultate 




.Andrew J. Dadisman 


Leslie Hayes 
O. R. Ford 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 


Dr. C, R. Kessel ! 


E. G. Hague 
L. C. Geise) 
W. C. Boggs 


Cullen Hall 
W. J. Myers 
J. MerinR 

Juniors 


EUinqwood Kav 
J. T. Strosnider 


T. R. Garvin 
Clinton Carrico 
William Emblem 


Russell La Rue 
Charles Ihlenfeld 
Edward Fox 

Sophomores 


Thomas Johnson 
Wilson Lang 


J. M. Brand 
Dennis Robinson 
Eu'^ene Joseph 
liushc-s Crago 


Evan Harris 
Charles Nuzum 
Geo. Cunningham 
J. W. Hash 

Sophomores 


W. T. Hughes 
Edward Stumpp 
Frank Miller 


D. C. Kennedy 
lla.ry Tebay 
Paul Martin 
Donald Mahanna 


B. B. Evans 
Morgan Sprigg 
Burchinal Baker 
Fred Coombs 


Robert Stork 
James Chambers 
Darrel Mahanna 

1 






\ 



li^AVO INT I C O L iX, 




fA\OMTICOL>V, 




umjia awa— q^MB 



Sigma Nil 



Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1869 



COLORS Black, White and Gold 

FLOWER— White Rose 

WEST VIRGINIA GAMMA PI CHAPTF.R 
Established, 1904 



Wm. S. Morgan 
Louis R. Bennett 
Cyrus H. Maxwell, Jr 



Charles H. Amble 
G. H. Colebank 



E. Bailey Wyckoff 
John E. Amos 
J.is. Monroe 



E. Burdett Allison 
B. Ernest English 
Williivm N. Lewis 



lames 
Frede 

Willi,-. 



L. Jar 
Rob.-rt 
Samue 
Harry 



A. Chafm 
ic A. McDonald 
1 E, Lively 



'is Currence 

E. Walker 
J. Smith 

F. Welch 



Robert Rodgers 



Fratres in Urbe 

Herbert McMillan 
Franklin M. Brand 
Hickory Hutchison 

Fratres in Facultate 

L. P. Hardman 
C. C. Spiker 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

Harvey L. McCreery 
Charles P. Lambert 
Renick C. Wilkinson 



John Byrnside 
Harold W. Epling 
Dennis Loudin 

Sophomores 

R. Birk Warner 
K..r.n.lh I,. Butt 
Thomas J. Adams 

Freshmen 

Jason Weisseberger 
Charles L. Wolte 
Jack E. Burdette 
John E. Doyle 

Pledges 

Philip M. Snyder 
Jack McCreery 



Geo. R. Maxwell 
Robert Hugart 



H. F. North 
R. H. Gist 



w. 


Kennon 


Cowden 


R. 


Ca 


md 


en 


Starcher 


Jar 


nes 


R. 


Bl 


ick 




lames 


K. 


Edmoi 


ison 


Jar 


les 


H. 


Hatch 


= r 



Reardon S. C. Cuppett 
R. Meredith McComas 
L, Verne Robertson 



Leland H. Winger 
Bert Bradford 
Robert U. Drinkard 
Harold L. McMillan 



Edward Sutherland 



I'agc Two lluml. 



AVONTICOLA., 




rAVONTI CO LAs 




Theta Chi 

Founaed at Norwich College, 1856 

COLORS— Red and White 
FLOWER Red Carnation 



WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA KAPPA CHAPTER 
Established, 1921 



B. G. Reedcr 
George R. Farmer 



Gordon B. Fox 
Daniel D. Maloney 



Flarl Croushore 
James B. Deck 
J. C. Eakle 
I. H. Finnell 
W. n. Allman 



W. A. Haslam 
K. W. Keever 
J. W. Porter 
W. B. Rnnn.lls 



F. Max England 
H. H. Lickliter 



Fratres in Urbe 

Paul L. Sommers 
Clifford R. Cotts 

Fratres in Facultate 

K. C. Westover 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

Andrew T. Marsh 
Leslie Montgomery 
Otis S. Young 

Juniors 

H. R. Hesse 
E. M. Krieger 
J. J. Logue Jr. 
D. G. Moler 
J. M. Moore 

Sophomores 

C. W. Seibert 
J. W. Whitlock 
W. O. Callahan 
V. F. Waggoner 

Fresh 



H. O. Rodeheaver 
Dr. William H. Cozad 



(Kenneth Taylor 
J K. RoUton 



M. .\. Ayers 
loseph Kayuha 
E. William Noland 
Lewis H. .'\rmentrout 



W. T. MilIe!,on 
H. J. Mulligan 
C. E. Staats 
Wi'liam Sterling 



estimen 



R. W. Neater 
D. B. Parshall 



llowe Stidc 



JL 



Ilini.Irr,! Ei,iht,i-T\i 



AVONTICOLA., 




rAVOINTI CO LAs 




Pi Lambda Phi 

Founded at Yale University, 1895 

COLORS Purple and Gold 

WEST VIRGINIA MU CHAPTER 
Established 1922 

Fratres in Urbe 

Milton S. Gessner 
Fratres in Facultate 

Dr. B. B. Kaplan 



Judas Apple 
Bernard Jubelirer 
Lee \\. Silberstein 



Fratres in Univertitate 

Seniors 

Maurice B. Ferderber 
Erwin J. Nelowet 
G. Gerard Weinslein 



Joseph B. 1 lerskovit^ 
Joseph A. Porter 



Oscar B. Goldstein 
Bernard Sclove 
David B. Hexter 



Sam R. Brownstein 
Lewis Mrdvin 



Henry E. Baum 
Bennie P. Cohen 



Leslie 1. Cohen 



Belman Shore 

1 I. Lawrence Sutton 

Sophomores 

Morris Funt 
Norman T. Ruzow 

Freshmen 

Marvin Manuel 



Sidney I. Kwas 
Richard Solof 



Harold B. Levi 



David Ginsburg 



Pledges 

Charles B. Grossman Irwin O. Shapiro 



mp*<"«9pp 



/ ■■ •i-rmi 



rAVONTICOLA.^ 




I'ai/C TtCO Unntli'.l EujhIy-FiVC 



fAVONTI CO LAs 



) 



i 




Leland F. Booth 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Founded at Illinois Wesleyan, 1899 

COLORS — Cherry and Red 
FLOWER Red Carnation 



WEST VIRGINIA RHO CHAPTER 
Established, 1923 



Fratres in Urbe 

Leland C. Shriver 

Fratres in Facultate 

John D. Barnhart 

Fratres in Universitate 



Charles A. Hartley 



Frank H. Backus 
Thomas R. Cooper 
Maurice M. Freeman 
Frank^Keys 
1 Ross C. Shriver 


Herman M. Bowers 
.Mart. M. Chambers 
French H. Hyre 
.Alston G. Lanham 
Marshall W. Williams Jr. 

Juniors 


Harry Cooke 
Lee Dean 
D. Reed Raines 
Kenneth A. Shaffer 


Howard 1. Andrews 
Owen Gates 
George Riggs 
Cyrif Ruble 


Howard M. Batson Jr. 
Clarence J. Koontz 
Bernard F. Rinehart 
Elmont W. Ullum 

Sophomores 


Howard F. Johnston 
W. Darrel Lowe 
Oliver D. Rmehart 
Ruskin J. Wiseman 


Elmer E. Lynch 
Okay Spangler 
Allison E. Fittro 


Eu^tene G. Null 
Chester C. Thomas 
Carter Withers 

Pledges 


Eugene J. Powell 
Elza C. Waters 


John Merritt Jr. 
Harold Keys 


Lcwi.s R. Clark Jr. 
Ralston I. McCoy 


Howard .X. Rhodes 
Robert Munchmeyer 



Page Tioo Uuinlixd L.jLl., 



rAVONTICOLA., 




;■ ■ ;!■. ;/ 



r 



VVO NT ■ C O I- As 




E. L. Core 

H. O. Henderson 

E. A. Livesay 

P. C. Bennett 



W. R. Barnard 
Homer H. Hogue 
H. S. Raines 
S. J. Weese 



J. T. Dransfield 
G. H. Hollis 

J. S. Moehs 

F. W D. Parsons 

Russell Sheppard 



Remus C. May 
Robert R. Robinson 
S. N. Giddings 
E. A. Auld 



Tom Solenberper 
Lloyd Dorsey 
C. H. Fleshman 



Alpha Gamma Rho 

Founded at Ohio State University, 1904 

COLORS — Dark Green and Gold 
FLOWER— Pink Rose 

ALPHA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established 1921 



Fratres in Facultat 

J. H. Longwell 
W. C. Schnopp 
R. L. Mason 

Fratres in Urbe 



Fratres in Univcrsitate 

Seniors 

C. H. Hunter 
W. G. Johnson 
W. T. Linger 

D. W. Miller 

Juniors 

H. G. Peterson 
C. O. Prunty 
Russell Ellyson 
Chas. B. Seibert 
R. Clarke Butler 



Sophomo 

W. F. Coull 
Ira Gould. Jr. 
A. Brooks Peters 



Freshmen 

Ralph NX <lch 

Pledges 

Harry Trelogan 
Kennrth Parsons 



M. B. 
A. A 



Hoffman 
Ackerman 



J. A. Sturr 



H. L. Pinney 

C. F. Solenberger 

L. Bush Swisher 



Virgil Brookover 
C. H. Hardesty 
P. S. Oshel 
W. M. Sharp 



W. E. Bell 

B. M. Brookove 

H. H. Huff 



C. L. Hawkins 
L. D. Hildreth 



Page Two Uuii<licd Eighly-Eight 



rAVOINTI CO L Azi= 




Page Iico lUiii.lrcd LigMn-Nine 



fAVO NT 1 C O I- A.^ 



kf^s^^'i?. 




M. J. Malamphy 



A. H. Foreman 



T. M. Arnelt 
W. K. Graham 
\V. S. Brewster 



Pi Kappa Alpha 

Founded at University of Virginia, 1868 

COLORS — Garnet and Gold 
FLOWER— Lily of the Valley 

ALPHA THETA CHAPTER 
Founded, 1904 

Re-established, 1925 

Fratres in Urbe 



Fratres in Facultate 

President John R. Turner 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 



H. B. Kinkaid 
F. G. Phelps 



J. V. Hopkins 



R. I. Burchinal 
R. H. Pendleton 



C. D. Flowers 
J. W. Machesney 



J. r. Dorr 

J. W. Stewart 



S. F. Hammer 
R. Caddock 



Earl Encle 
J. H. Offutt 



W. B. Johnston 
M. V. Martin 



Sophomores 



S. C. Morgan 
W. H. Smith 



Freshmen 



J. F. Holt 
J. S. Horan 



Pledges 



W. G. McFarlen 
Charles Rice 



J. H. Kisner 
G. H. Robinson 



T. E. Tonry 



V. St. C. Montieth Jr. 



)liuulr'd Suu-fi 



fAVO NT I CO L A«i 




rAVOISTI CO L As 




Alpha Phi Delta 

Founded at Syracuse University, 1912 

COLORS— Purple and White 
FLOWER— Pink Carnation 



PI CHAPTER 
Fralres in Urbe 

Frank Lepera 



Joseph D'Aiigosti 



Fratres in Univcisilate 
Seniors 

W. A. Farinatti J. A. Oliverio 



J. L. Bennett 
H. A. Imbro 
J. D. Romino 



Junior 

I. J. Catapano 
D. Piampiano 
j. Tinivell 



F. \. Caruso 
J. Profeta 
F. Landolphi 



F. A. Capossela 
W. B. Cuarini 



Sophomores 



M. Hando 

P. F. Catapano 

A. Morello 



M. E. Cor.ti 
C. N. Sergi 



S. laquinta 
A. Acquaviva 



J. Mallamo 

R. F. DeMarco 



P. Camelletti 



Pledge 

G. D'/Xgoslino 



/'./>. Tim lliimlrcd Xinitj/'Two 



rVVVONTICOLAa 




rAVOMTICOLA:, 




Phi Delta rhcta 

Founded at Miami University, 1848 

COLORS Argent and Azure 

FLOWER White Carnation 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established 1927 



Dr. Robert Cameron Colwell 
Merle Wright 



George Hatfield 
Michael Krosnoff 
Mike Harrington 

James Vermillion 
Fred Dobbs 



George Harris Healey 
Robert Ashworth 
William Morris 
John Gaynor 



EUi.ion Summerfield 
Bud Wray 
Carol O'Neil 

Archie Stiner 
Clarence Higgins 



Fratres in Facultate 

Fratres in Urbe 

Paul Topper 

Fratres in Universitale 
Seniors 
Raymond Tissue 
Ray Hannum 

Juniors 

Laurence Evans 
Owen Schaeffer 

Sophomores 
David G. Lilly 
Jack Fletcher 
Paul Meyers 
James Harris 

Freshmen 

Harry Slunkard 
John Kieater 



Harold Camfield Havinghurst 
Ted Coyer 



James Cox 
Jack Smith 



Hally Lick. 
Clayton Ro 



Pledges 
elle 



George Ratcliffe 



Joe Heatherman 
Dennis Preece 
Roland Clapperton 



Ed Seville 
Oswald Walker 



Clayton 1 lunnings 



i'u<;c ia-o Hundred y 



.AVONTICOLA.^ 




i-.i.n iu., li ....1 A..... 



rAXONIXICOLA., 




Phi Sigma Delta 

Founded at Columbia University, 1910 

COLORS Purple and While 

FLOWER Carnation 

WEST VIRGINIA UPSILON CHAPTER 
Established, 1927 



S. S. Bobe 
L. Gotlieb 



Fratres in Universifate 
Seniors 
A. E. Cooper 



J. Friedlandcr 



A. Fi»her 
J. G. Siegel 



A. Axelrod 
L. M. Forman 
J. Ba»man 
H. K. Polan 



H. R. Ansel 

L. Lieb 

J. Sebulaky 



Sophomores 



M. A. Kaplus 
M. S. Waxman 
A. Bt-rman 



Freshmen and Pledges 



L. Bush 

L. Mankoff 

M. H. Golden 



Harry Szanger 



J. Cohen 
C. G. Polan 
L. Wildst.ln 



B. R. Oppenheimor 
N. F. Stamler 



L 



Mr. Samson Finn. Morgantown 



Hon. Bennj. S. Rosenbloom 



r,i,„ - '/ ' ..-„ ihnuh;:i v/iir r i;- ^ - 



rAVONTICOLA.^ 











-* 09 







fAVONTI CO LAs 




Phi Kappa Tau 

Founded at Miami University 1906 

COLORS— Old Gold and Harvard Red 
FLOWER Red Carnation 



ALPHA XI CHAPTER 
Established, 1928 



W. S. Bosley 

C. A. Bowers Jr. 

G. I. Burner 

C. C. Coulter 

H. V. Dejournett 



Fratres in Universitate 

Graduate 

J. F. Heflin 

Seniors 

T. S. Henry 
D. D. Murphy 
R. H. Pell 
R. E. Roach 
W. A. Williams 



S. D. Snodgrass 
K. W. Showalter 
W. L. Smith 
N. L. Swentzel 
W. C. Walsh 



L. M. Board 
G. H. Cowell 
R. L. Curtis 
E. E. Given 



W. A. Glovrr 
R. D. Koch 
E. H. McGov( 



W. M. Corwin 
W. H. Jarnell 
J. B. Kline 



V. T. Handley 
C. C. Hess 
E. R. Knotts 
G. R. Koch 

Sophomores 

I. R. Nottingham 
T. O. Prentice 



Pledges 

C. A. McClelland 
R. E. Monack 



F. A. Ingram 
I. R. Michael 
W. S. Miller 
E. A. Smith 



J. N. Snider 
C. E. Walker 



1. O. Pongracz 
R. B. Tibbs 



AXOINTICOLA., 





J 



fAVOINTI CO LAs 




Phi Alpha 



Founded at George Washington University, 1914 
COLORS Crimson and Blue 






Adolph C. Abramson 



Theodore R. Cohen 
Bernard Levine 
Byron F. Sack 



Bernard Blickman 
Harold L. Berbert 



Harman B. Levenaon 



ALPHA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established December 1, 1928 

Fratres in Urbe 

Harry Stein 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 



Juniors 

Martin Dworkin 
Rdward C. I^utwin 
Rudolph Schiffman 



Sophomores 

Erwin Eisen 
Sigmund Weiner 



Pledges and Freshmen 



Oscar Schofield 



Martin Epstein 
Lee J. Mnrkheim 
Mortimer S. Schofield 



Robert Coldfine 
Israel Hark 



William E. Winkle 



Page Three Uuiulral 



rAVONTICOLA., 




Vane Three Hundred One 



fAVONTICOLAs 




Tau Delta Theta 

Founded at West Virginia University, 1919 

COLORS Blue and White 

FLOWER — Chrysanthemum 



E. E. Hamstead 
George Goodwin 
Paul Dobbins 



Fred H. Bennett 
Ben S. Moats 
Stanley Cavendish 



Alvah Hamstead 
Edward Reed 
Raymond Walker 



Carl B. Post 
Stanford Lockhart 
Charles Leiphart 
Earl M. Defibaugh 



W. Charles Sylvester 



E. L. Smith 
J. E. Craig 
Fred Simon 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 

lames L. Feeney 
William T. Fahey 
Max Cooper 

Juniors 

Harley Burton 
W. D. Pickering 



Sophomores 

Ambrose McCaskey 
Leonard Swing 
Hermin Devol 
Fred E. Houck 



Freshm 

Edward McHale 
Charles Timblin 



C. P. Dorr 

A. L. P. Srhmeichel 

Homer Smith 



Fletcher Mann 
Henry C. Gregory 
Belmont Robb 



Wayne Hough 
A. French Board 



William Wick 
James Simpson 
James C. Gaal 



Glendon Burton 



Page Three Hundred Tico 



isAVONT I CO LA., 



^Bsm 







Page Three Hundred Three 



fAVONTI CO LA.^ 




Delta Kappa Psi 



Founded at West Virginia University, 1923 



COLORS Maroon and White 

FLOWER— White Carnation 



Herschel Henry 



Kermit A. Locke 



William P. Burdette 
Everett L. Dodge 
Howard M. Kuehner 
Byron B. Randolph 
W. Clay Warman 
Harry M. Chenoweth 



Harold V. Locker 



Earle L. Elmore 



Fratres in Urbe 

Kermit A. Mason 
Charles O. Moody 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

Lee F. Malone 
J. Bert Heilman 

Juniors 

Willard K. Casto 
John H. Eberling 
Creed Malone, Jr. 
Ward D. Stone 
Edward J Williams 
W. Dewey Bourne 

Sophomores 

Harold W. Ward 
Norman G. Mathieson 



Freshmen 

Richard G. 
Pledges 



Edward T. Ro 



Robert M. Cooper 
S. Robert Johnson 
Carl J. Nutter 
William A. Thornhill 
William C. Gold 
Slidell B. Wolfe 



Forrest Roles 



McNa 



Dwight A. Dodge 
Edward J. Loy 
Allen Brown 



Lloyd L. Dittmer 
Irving C. Foote 



Richard Tibbs 
W. Louis Brown 



Page Three TJundrcd Four 



i^AVO INT I C O L A.^ 







L 



P O i,j J 



lage Three Hundred Five 



rAVO INT I C O I. A.^ 




Delta Epsilon 

Founded at West Virginia University, 1925 

COLORS— Green and White 
FLOWERS Red and White Rose 



H. G. Colebank 



G. P. Auldridge 
T. R. C. King 
O. F. Englehart 



L, E. Bradley 
M. H. Dickerson 
T. H. Haymond 
W. W. Murrill 
J. T. Van Voorhis 



E. H. Higgs 
E. G. Rodgcrs 



Fratres in Urbe 

Fratres in Facultate 

E. C. Jones 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

C. C. Leet 
J. E. Winter 

Juniors 

H. E. Brown 

D. W. Fizsimmons 
S. N. Headlee 

L. F. Oneacre 
D. D. Chipps 

Sophomores 



J. E. Snyder 



F. C. Stewart 



E. L. Fo 
»G. R. Le 



C. C. Hall 
H. H. Musgrave 
F. A. Turner 
J. C. Wilson 



J. b. Sutton 



J. M. Adkins, Jr. 



J. M. Emerson 
J. F. Foley 



Pledges 

O. S. Hamilton 



E. A. Bradley 



E. A. Smith 



Page lU -cf Hundred Sit, 



fAVO NT I CO 1. A.^ 




Page r/i/if llundixd SfVtn 



:V\01NTICOl.A.^ 



_ «9^ 



f f f 



i^Jij: lU 



■ IJ" 



Hi IT-®:* 




Kappa M/i 

Founded at West Virginia University, 1928 

COLORS— Orange and Black 
FLOWER— White Rose 

Fratres in Urbe 
John P. O'Farreil Patrick Gainer 



J. K. Gwinn 



Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 

William OTarrell 



Thomas F. Manion 
Maivin P. Hooker 



Juniors 

]. Vernon Sacher 
William J. Moore 



Alexander Diksa 



Louis H. Ncuberger 
James Donlan 



Sophomores 

Charles McCormick 
Charles J. O'Leary 



Don Moran 
John Gallagher 



Freshmen 

Howard W. Gompers Edward Niehaus 



Edgar R. Wayt 
Paul E. Erb 
Joseph J. Wacowski 



Pledges 

Paul Geosler 
Raymond J. Duffy 
Michael J Hoban 



Norbert Ru7iska 
John Broglio 
Walter Durkin 



I'aiji: Three Hundred Eigti: 



iiAVO NT ■ C O L Aa 




f:: ^ "^ 






Li. 



Pope Jlu\^ iiui.J.-tJ A. 



— AXONITI CO L A.^ 







i'.i..;, Thrrr Ihnnlr,.! 7 r 




Piini- Three Hundred Eleven 



^AVOMTICOLA., 



1 



Pafi-Hellenic Association 

EVELYN CARSKADON President 

LEONA BONNELL ., Secretary 

MARGUERITE SHUTTLEWORTH Treasur^-r 

Representatives 

Helen Smith '\lpha Xi Delta Irene Carney 

Dorothy Dering Chi Omega Ra< hel Smith 

Mary Evelyn Wilson Kappa Kappa Gamma Christine Arnold 

Genevieve Brov\;n Pi Beta Phi Velma Shreve 

Josephine Watson Delta Gamma .. Wilma Jones 

Elizabeth Woods Alpha Delta Pi Leona Bonnell 

Marguerite Shuttleworth Phi Mu Pauline Englehart 

Elizabeth Shrivjr Chi Delta Phi Beatrice Scott 

Mary Bond Pi Tau Delta Hazel Duly 

Lucille Ahjrn Monongahela Club Mary Williams 



-5 



AVONTICOLA., 




fAVOISTI CO LAs 




B. O. Havener 



Genevieve Swell 

Mabel Lucas 

Lillian Johnson 

Mary Lomse Richardson 

Elizabeth Morrison 



Eleanor Bigelow 
Bernice Brennan 
Lois Byrnside 
Virj^inia Carter 
Loretta Fiahback 
Elizabeth Hooker 

Catherine Burch 
Irene Carney 



Dorothy Mima 
M.ldred Arnett 



Alpha Xi Delta 

Founded at Lombard College, 1893 

COLORS — Double Blue and Gold 
FLOWER— Pink Rose 

IOTA CHAPTER 
Established, 1905 



Mr 



Patronesses 

Ed Smith 



Shanks 



Sorores in Urbe 

Leola Stout 
Lorna White 
Madeline Kramer 
Mrs. Hutchinson 
Jerry Rienner 

Seniors 

Julia Mason 
Maigaret McKone 
Orpha Nale 
Mary Belle Owens 
Ocea Price 



Jur 



Leora Dunn 
Emilie Faris 



Golda White 
Louise Bolton 
Margaret Barrick 
Mabel Cobun 
Mary Louise Hall 



Dorothy Robinson 
Christine Schleuss 
Beatrice Scory 
Helen Smith 
Leah Squires 



Louise Lantz 
Mary Monroe 



Sophomores 

Hinkle 



Freshr 



Mar 



King 



Thelma Dick 
Jannes Kirby 
Elizabeth Staats 
Eva Wharton 



Pledges 

Evelyn Meadows 
Elizabeth Hayy 
Katharine Patton 
Elizabeth Bennett 



Virginia Burdetle 
Lucille Shrum 
Mary Helen Thompson 
Clara Jane Hamill 



Three llumlred Fourteen 



AVONTICOLA., 




fAVOINTICOLAs 




Chi Omega 



Founded at University of Arkansas, 189 

COLORS Cardinal and Straw 

FLOWER— White Carnation 

WEST VIRGINIA THETA CHAPTER 
Established, 1905 









Patronesses 






Mr.-.. 


Luther S. Brock 


Mrs. 


Friend E. Clark 
Sorores in Urbe 


Mrs. 


Frank Cox 


Mrs 


Joe Bierer 


Mrs. 


Wm. E. Glasscock 


Mrs. 


Michael Malamphy 


Mrs 


James Morton Callahan 


Mrs. 


Stel'a Gist 


Miss 


Virginia Morgan 


Mrs. 


F. D. Cornell 


Mrs. 


lohn B. Grumbein 


Mrs. 


Elton Mourice 


Mrs 


John Harrington Cox 


Miss 


Helen Hunter 


Miss 


Mable Patterson 


Mrs 


Stanley Cox 


Mrs. 


Russel Huston 


Mrs. 


Harrv McCreery 


Mrs. 


Ray Fredlock 


.Mrs. 


Marcellus Jackson 


Mrs. 


Martha Shawver 


Mrs. 


Jay Garlow 


Mrs. 


Raymond Kerr 


Miss 


Mary Weaver 



Miss Lydia Hinkle 
Miss Minerva Lawson 



Sorores in Faculttate 

Miss Beatrice Hirst 
Miss Helen Pettigrew 



Sterrett 





Sorores in Universitate 






Seniors 






Virginia Taylor 


Kathleen Callahan 




Mary Lafferty 


Maiy Scott 


Helen Hite 




Lucille Chenow 


Dorothy Dering 


Virginia Bvrer 




Barbara Dowd 


Frances Jacob 


Juniors 






Helen Boggess 


Jane Sperry 




Mabel West 


Rachel Smith 


Margaret Davis 

Sophomores 






Geraldine Bevington 


Mary .Mice Davis 
Freshmen 




Margaret Hatfif 


Helen Emslcy 


.Mary Margaret Bernard 


Marv Williams 


Nellie Virginia Lynch 


Mary Bradford 




Fern Bickerton 


Helen Huston 


Helen Davisson 




Evelyn Dupuy 


Margaret Stralcy 


Mary Garnette Dear! 


an 


Sue Fredlock 


Martha Alexander 


Stella Keister 




Edna Meyers 


Dorothy Armstrong 


Ruth Murphy 







■w— ^"^iWPWW^IP 






iijn-if f^lrrrrtl 



rAVOlSITICOLA., 




i 



Pujie Three UuiiJred Seventeen 



fAVONTICOLAs 




Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Founded at Monmouth College, 1870 

COLORS Dark and Light Blue 

FLOWER— Fluer-de-Lis 

BETA UPSILON CHAPTER 
Established, 1906 



Mrs. 


J. S. Stewnrd 


Mrs. 


Nellie Slathers 


Mrs. 


,Ae:nes Chitwood 


Miss 


Catherine Alger 


Mrs. 


Maud Lough 


Miss 


Ada Reiner 


Mrs. 


Anne Cox 


Mrs 


Fanny Kay 


Mrs. 


Mildred Posten 



Dr. Byrd Turner 

Dr. Elizabeth Stalnaker 



Rebecca Guiher 
Margaret Mapel 
Marv Evelyn Wilsc 
Katherine Wilson 



Mary Hite 
Jane Seabright 

Elizabeth M. Hicks 



Da 


tv 


Ma 


e Miller 




(ill 


Sn 


lith 






Ma 


rga 


ret 


Brooks 




Ma 


rpa 


rel 


Carspeckc 


n 


He 


en 


Bottome 





Sorores in Urbe 

Mice Mathilda Albright 

Mrs. Estelle Brannon 

.Mrs. R. M. Mntthews 

Mrs. Sarah Bernard 

Miss Beulah Posten 

Mrs. .Alfreda Vieweg 

Mrs. Anagrace Robey 

Mrs. Pearl Hennen 

.Mrs. Leanna Brown 

Sorores in Facultate 

Dr. Margaret Buchanan 
Miss Flora Hayes 

Sorores in Universitate 

Seniors 

Mary Virginia Brown 
Harriet Louise French 
Lucy Higginbotham 
Anita Highland 



Chi 



Juniors 

stine .'\rnold 



Sophomores 

Jeannotte Brooks 

Freshmen 

Fredrica Mcore 
Katherine Wilson 
Katherine Lough 
Elizabeth Berry 



Mrs 
.Miss 
Mrs 
Miss 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mis> 
Mis> 
Mis. 



Ethel Moreland 
Theresa Dower 
T. W. Arnold 
Louise Keener 
Hope Donley 
Virginia Bishop 
Margaret Reay 
Helen Gilbert 
Mary Dower 



Miss Clara Lytle 
Mrs. Evelyn Hite 



Mary Jo Matthews 
Lucy Frances Fields 
Catherine Stahlman 
Cecilia McCue 



Catherine Presto 



Dorothy Bishop 



Luc 
.-\n) 
Mai 
El.-, 



c Dunlap 
Lou Bickel 
Cox 

,r Gilbert 



;/iiii,;r(ii Euihtci: 



fAVONTICOLA.^ 



^s^ss. 




fAVONTI CO LAsB 




Mrs. H. L. Carspecken 



Helen Carle Ambler 
La Verne B. Davis 
Margaret Ford Gray 
June Lilly John 
Florence Conant Hodge 



Elizabeth Frost Reed 



Pi Beta Phi 

Founded at Monmouth College, 1867 

COLORS Wine and Silver Blue 

FLOWER — Red Carnp.tion 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA 

Established, 1918 

Patronesses 

Mrs. H. E. Stone Mr..<. 

Sorores in Urbe 



1. G. La 



Mary Jackson 



Rogene Bayles 
Genevieve Brown 
Marguerite D. Bottome 
Lucile Fox 



Irma Ayers 
Bonila Blair 
Dorothy Br.ind 
Jean Crile 



Phyllis Buck 
Johnsic Cooke 

Darlene Breckcnridg 
Mary Alice McKee 
Catherine Smoot 



.Angie Friend Reeder 
Margaret W. Metzler 
Kathleen M. Miller 
Frances Sanders 
.Anne Traubert 

Sorores in Faculttate 

Sorores in Universitate 
Seniors 
Li\dy Lou La Lance 



Bertha Mailer 
Lucille Hall 
Elma Hicks 
Dorothy Manasse 

Sophomores 

Helen D. Glenn 
Bertha Handlan 
Virginia Miller 
Jean Rogers 

Freshmen 

.Xnnette Wiley 

Pledges 

Sara Sprigg 
Ruth Summers 
Mary Young 



Bessie Beatty Wade 
Rebecca Wade 
Delle T. Warman 
Mildred Friend Wilsc 



Winifred Che 



Velr 



Melba Waters 
Elizabeth Weidner 
Margaret Wells 
Eleanor Wilson 



Eleanor Stone 
Anna Mary Tr 
Jean Wade 



Mary Ellen Weightman 



Elizabeth Wade 
Virginia Wiley 



Page Three Iliiudred Twcntji 



7AVOISTI CO VAs 




Page Three Hundred Ticenty-One 



A^ONTICOLA:^ 




Mr 


s. 


Hu 


ber 


t Hill 




Mr 


^■ 


C. 


R. 


Jones 




Mr 




A. 


Rufener 




Mr 


s. 


Pa 


ul Price 




Ml 


ss 


Ma 


rie 


Austin 




Mi 


3S 


Rac 


he 


Coogle 




Mi 


SS 


Kathe 


fine Spei 


cher 



Delta Gamma 

Founded at Oxford Institute, 1872 

COLORS— Bronze, Pink, and Blue 
FLOWER— Ophelia Rose 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA XI CHAPTER 
Established, 1921 

Patronesses 

Mrs. H. E. Knowlton Mrs. R. H. Edmundson 

Mrs. Stanley Fiedler 

Sorores in Urbe 

Ml-ss Virginia Carter Miss Gladys Bennett 

Mrs. Leon Leonian Miss Amy Graham 

Mrs. James P. Hare Miss Hel,-.n Edmundson 

Miss Nonnie Shoup Miss Elinor .Allbright 
.Mrs. J. P. Lilly 

Sorores in Universitate 

Seniors 

Lynn Ford Helen Curtis Esther Kessell 

Wilma Jones Ocelia Crane Elizabeth Ueekly 

Edith Robey Mary E. Poling Berneice Ballard 



Josephine Watson Evelyn Carskadon .Mary Burton 

Maude Weimer Martha Bromberg 

Sophomores 

Elouise Kerr Josephine Brown Helen Bennett 

Jane Atkinson Thelma Brand Edith Wilson 

Carol Sc:inlon Virginia Guthrie 

Freshmen 

Louida Colebank Virginia Conn Vivian Keston 

Marparet French 

Pledges 

W.inita Cole Sue Proctor Sarah Jane Ice 

Mildred Verber .Anna Belle Preiss 



Iliuulral Twcntii-Tn 



rAVOINTlCOLAs 




l':l.l. Thr,. Ilun.lnd lu-nly-Thr 



fAVOISTI CO V.Ar. 




George W. Price 



Mrs. Edward Meeks 

Mrs. Charle,s Moore 

Mrs. V. M. Barnard 

Mrs. Russell Crawford 

Miss Margaret Berry 

Miss Alice Hartley 

Mrs. C. M. Bray 

Mrs. Paul Everly 



Dorothy Bauer 
Edith Jordan 
Agnes Neely Minnich 
F.li/abeth Woods 



Susie Smith 



Ruth Bryan 
Kathryn McElroy 



Marian Goodman 
Alecn Talbott 
Cleista Richard 



J/p/ja Delta Pi 

Founded at Wesleyan College, 1851 

COLORS— Blue and White 

FLOWER— V.olet 
Patronesses 
Mrs. Wm. J. Snee 

Sorores in Facullate 

Miss Constance Welch 

Sorores in Urbe 



A. Anderson 



Mrs, Kermit Mason 

Miss Mabel Sterling 

Miss Mildred Hutchinson 

Mrs. J. F. Moore 

Mrs. Robert McLain 

Miss Pauline Mattingly 

Mrs. Ronald Bishop 



Sorores in Universitate 

Seniors 

Leona Bonnell 
.Margaret Lahm 
Sara Riggle 
Helen Elliot 
Irene Collett 



E. Rodgers 



Juniors 

Mildred Cross 
Reba Keesee 

Sophomores 

Mary Dean 
Margaret Stalnaker 

Pledges 

Martha Woods 
Virginia McHale 



Mr 

Miss Marguerite Smith 

Miss Mary Jane White 

Miss Helen Phelps 

Miss Gertrude Connelly 

Mrs. Raymond Lester 

.Mrs, L. N. John 



Elizabeth Lawrence 
Genevieve Williams 
Hazel Daniels 
Margaret Marshall 



Frances Haney 
Ireta Havirley 



jean Emerson 
Rulh Johnson 



I'aijc Three Hundred Twenli/-Four 



fAVO NT I C O L A, 




■^ 



rAXONJTICOLA.^ 




Phi Mu 



Founded at Wesleyan Coileje, Macon, Georgia, 1852 

COLORS— Rose ana White 
FLOWER— Enchantress Rose 

Sorores in Urbe 
Mrs. Myron S. Collins 



Kathleen Robertson 
Anita May Nutter 



Sorores in Universitate 

Seniors 

Olga Nutter 

Margaret Shuttlesworth 

Vadn Swart 



Virginia Lee Nutter 
Catherine Hurst 



Mary Sturm 



Josephine Herd 



Sophomores 

F'ranci-s Courtney Markely Mary Elizabeth Gaynor 
Helen Sharp Virginia Stanavd 

I lenrietta Amo? Elizabeth Taylor 



Dora Long 
Cathryn Thompson 



Miriam Lockhart 



Freshmen 

Ruth McDuii 



Anne McMillan 

Marion Wells 

1 ranees Thornherry 



Pledges 

lulia Reass 
Alice Rusk 
Virginia Barkwill 
Alma Kincaid 



Mary McKain 
Mary Martin 
Claudia Hazletl 



^AVO NT I C O L A:, 




^AVONITICOLA., 




Mrs. T. L. Harris 
Mrs. Ralph Maxwell 



Letha Ire 

.Mary Reiner Johnson 



Carolyn .'\lcott 
Ruth Brown 
Olin Harks 
Zella Bishop 



Ruth Bane 

Mary E'len Burke 

Mary Gorrell 



Helen lohnson 
Ren,, Walter 



Chi Delta Phi 

nded at West Virginia University, 1923 
COLORS — Orchid and Purple 
FLOWER— Ophelia Rose 
Patronesses 



Mrs. J. Leslie French 
Miss Clara Livesay 

Sorores in Urbe 

Lillian Crane 

B'anche Blackburn Glenn 

Sorores in Universifate 

Seniors 

Harriet Shepherd 
Catherine Davison 
Frances Haught 
Dorothy Klein 

Juniors 

Josephine McBride 
Dorothy Shaffer 
Elizabeth Shriver 

Sophomores 



Mi: 



Ruth Wood 



Mable Slagle 
L.ouise Frazier 



Edith Barnes Slaver 



Laura Craig 

Ocie Tune 

Beatrice Scott 

Wilma McElroy Buvinger 



Bernice Prather 
Virginia Meeker 
Nancy Davidson Delli-Catti 



Faith Lawrence 



Elizabeth Hayes 



Alma Ayers 
Lucille King 
Frances Slahl 
Helen Williams 



Olma Umbel 
Helen Spangler 

Pledges 

Genevieve Johnson 
Elizabeth Moore 
Hazel Rector 



Florence King 
Nell Shepherd 
Thelma Wilcox 



lliiiulrnl TirnittiKi'iht 



pAVOINTICOLA., 




>VVONTI CO LAs 



Pi Tan Delta 

Founded at West Virginia University, 1926 

COLORS Yellow and White 

FLOWER— Yellow Rose 

Patrons and Patronesses 

Dr. and Mrs. Friend Dr. and Mrs. Cunningham Dr. and Mrs. Modder 

Dr. Bishop Mr. Ray Dille .Mr. Dave Christopher 

Alumni in Urbe 

Mabel Haller Mary Virginia Jones Vida McLaughlin 

Katherine Sturgiss Virginia Holland Grace Martin 

Gertrude Smith 

Sorores in Universitate 



Lorraine King Genevieve King Virginia Riddle 

Grace Rutheriord Sue Matthews 



Delia Duty Hazel Duty Alice Beyers 

Marie Preiss 

Sophomores 
Mary Bond Helen Sharpes 

Freshmen 

Lillian Yocke 



r I /' IhrcK' Hundred lltirly 



rAXOPSTI CO LA:, 




rAVONTI CO LAs 




Motjongahela Club 

Founded at West Virginia University, 1927 

COLORS— Rose and Silver 
FLOWER— Pink Rose 



Patronesses 

Mrs. A. Pelzer Wagener Mrs. E. B. Hall 



Miss Sylvia Soiipart 



Lucille Ahem 
Helen Connelly 
Marjorie l^inderman 



Sorores in Universitale 

Seniors 

Dorothea Rist 
Verba Snodgrass 
Sylvia Sutton 



Anna Cullcy 
Ruth Grove 



Virginia Barnett 
Kathleen Hoard 



Jur 



Virginia Gross 
Vera Hensell 



Marian W'illian 
Ruth Blodgett 



Mary Louise Sutton 



Sophomores 



Freda Braun 
Eunice Linderman 



Ruth Morr 



Mary Kay Bishop 



Pledges 

Sarah Caughey 



Lthel While 



Page Thrrc IlinulnJ Thnly-li 



VVONTICOLA.^ 




n^ 



Paye Three //u.n/rt.l Diirly-Diree 



p 



fAVONTICOLAs 






Pane Three Hundred Thirlii-rnu' 




r.ui.- Three II umind Thirty. Five 



fAVOINTICOLAs 



Tail Beta Pi 

Honorary Engineering Society 

Tau Beta Pi was founded at Lehigh University in 1855. It is the oldest and most 
representative of the Honorary Engineering Societ es and is llie only one at West Vir- 
ginia University. Its purpose is to mark in a fitting manner those who have conferred 
honor upon their Alma Mater by distinguished scholarship and exemplary character as 
undergraduates, or by their attainments as alumni. Distinguished scholarship is not con- 
sidered the sole criterion although it is the primary requisite for admission. 

Alpha chapter of West Virginia was formed from the local Theta Psi and wai in- 
stalled in 1922. 

Members in Faculty 

C. R. Hones G. P. Boomsliter R. M. McCutcheon 

R. P Davis W. A. Koehler L. L. Amidoa 

A. H. Forman C. H. Gathers W. W. Hodge 

M. C. Holmes 



Offi 



cers 



GECIL G. COULTER President 

HARRY GIDLEY Vice-President 

HOMER DeJOURNETT Corresponding Secretary 

HARRY NEALE Recording Secretary 

W. E. VELLINES : Treasurer 

WILLIAM SCHAMBRA Cataloguer 

Members 

Neal Swentzel G. K. Gwinn J. D. VanVoorhis 

P. E. Davis Charles Seibert G. C. Barnes 

Frank Backus A. F. Board G. H. Hollis 

Oscar Englehart Leonard Board S. N. Headlee 

W. C. Warman 



Three Huntlnil Tliirtti-Si 



7AVO INT ■ C O L Ass 




Piiije Thric Hundred Thirty-Seven 



rAVOINTI CO LAs 






English Club 



Honorary English Society 
Established at West Virginia University, 1900 

Head . DOROTHY DER'NC 

Clerk KATHLEEN ROBERTSON 

Watch IMA ROSE BARTLETT 

Head Seeker J. FRANK HEFLIN 

Sponsor 

Professor David Dale Johnson 

Honorary Members 
Dr. Mackey Constance Welch Professor Modder 

Members 

Elizabeth Cramer Irene Carney Lynn Ford 

Raymond Hughes Marjorie Linderman William Lovell 

Pauline Shortridge Nellie Strouss Margaret Wells 

Virginia Fiiylor Geneva Bobbilt Helen Connelly 

Ruth Klein Elizabeth Lawrence Dorothy Matics 



lluiuin,! TUirly-Kinhl 




fiiyi r/ii.t //u.idKd Tliirlji-Smc 



fAVONTICOLAs 



Alpha Zeta 

Founded at Ohio State University, 1897 
West Virgin-'a Chapter Established, 1922 



HERMAN McCLURE BOWERS 

W. RUSSELL BARNARD 

W. HAROLD WAYMAN 



.Chanr^lbr 

Censor 

Scrilae 



FRENCH M. HYRE 
L. BUSH SWISHER.. 



.--Tr3asiirer 
.Chronicler 



Members in Faculty 



R. J. Garber 
T. E. Odland 
G. Malcolm Troul 
N. J. Giddings 
L. M. Thurston 



W. R. Barnard 
L. Bush Swisher 
Clifford Carson 



Clarence Dorman 
Paul A. Eke 
K. C. Westover 
W. W. Armentroul 
Max M. Hoover 
L. M. Peairs 

Active Membei 

Seniors 

W. G. Gifford 

W. Harold Waym.'in 

Ira Gould 



L. H. Longwell 
Walter Schnopp 
Leland Booth 
Raymond Glasscock 
K. S. Morrow 



Herman M. Bowers 
French M. Hyre 



Russell Clark Butler 



Ira Gould Jr 



Gordon A. Br 
William N. Le 



Sophomores 

Harry Chester Trelogan 



Clarence Lee Fleshman 



Robert R Robinson 



Page Three Uundrcd Fori,/ 



-^AVO NT I C O L Aa 




Pat/e Three Bundred FortyUiu- 



-^ 



rAA^ONITICOLA.^ 



Phi Up s Hon Omicro?i 

Honorary Home Economics Society 
West Virginia Chapter Established, 1923 

COLCR5— Yellow and White 



Rachel Colwell 



Honorary Memhers 



Nell Neibit 



RUTH MARTIN 

VADA SWART 

ELEANOR BIGELOW 
MAYME MORRISON .. 
MARY CORRELL 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 



Laura Craig 
Helen Curtis 
Susan Hammer 
Fay Kryder 



Memh 

Beryl Piper 
Elizabeth Hagy 
Beatrice Scott 
Ruth Martin 



Vada Swart 
Eleanor Bigelow 
Mayme Morrison 
Mary Gorrell 



-i 



rAVOPSTICOLAji 




■^^ipg 



rAXOMTICOLA^, 



Press Club 



Officers 

RICHARD RALSTON President 

CHARLES IHLENFELD Vice-President 

FRANCES DOAK Secretary 

PAULINE SHORTRIDGE Treasurer 

DR. P. \. REED Faculty Advisor 

Honorary Member 

William A. Evans 
Dean H. E. Stone Dr. P. 1, Reed 



M 



embers 



Catherine Dunlap Josephine Wats/n Raymond Hughes 

Alice Boyer Irma Ayers Sinsel Morris 

Ira Gould Martha Moore Joseph Mochs 

R. H. Ralston Otis Young Phoebe Lemen 

V. V. Hensell Linn Ford Virginia Parsons 

Ocie Tune Josephine Herd George Faulkner 

Ch;istine Schleuss J. H. .Martin George Ratcliffe 

Pearl Wilson Geneva Bobbitt Loretta Fishback 

James Wilson Tom H. Hayinond Edith Robey 

Eleanor Stone ,^nna Mary Tropf C. S. Keefer 

W. T. Fahey James Harris Mary Belle Owfens 

D. M. Miller Teresa Broderick Isabelle Thomasson 
Frances DeLancy Charlotte Grayson William Winfield 
Edith Jordan Albert Spitzer Elise Scott 

E. H. Rig«s S. S. Bobes Ned Ragland 

L. Bush Swisher Edis Lemley Kathryn Sturgiss 

Daniel Boughner Kathleen Marshall Rosalie Boughner 

Blanche Shortridgc Helen Hudson Auld. Arthur Maust 

.Scott Lowe Dorothy Dering 



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fAVO N T I C O L As 



Matrix 

Sponsor 

Mrs. P. I. Reed 

PatronesseG 

Mrs. J. H. Patterson Mrs. Del Roy Richards ,V;iss Nellie Donley 

Alumnae in Town 
Alice Hartley Grace Martin 

Officers 

President FRANCES DELANCY 

Vice-President GENEVA BOBBITT 

Secretary .... ALICE M. BO'l ER 

Treasurer K.ATHLEEN M.ARSI l.XLL 

Honoi'aty Member 
Miss Rose Sweeney 

Me mbers (Active ) 

Josephine Herd Alice M. Boyer Isabelle Thomasson 

Frances Doak Helen Sharp Geneva Bobbitt 

Frances DeLancy Virs^inia Parsons Pauline Shortridge 

Teresa Broderick Irma Ayers Helen Hudson Auld 

Elma Hicks Ocie Tune Irene Caplan 

Pledges 

Rachel Smith Oressa Teas^arden Dorothy Baker 

Ruth Turner Martha Moore Virginia Stanard 

Eleanor Stone Mary K. Colburn 



rAVO NT I CO LA., 




^^^^•^^^m 



f-ij. il,,\. Ih.'i.lr- .( ;-...(i, 



fAVO NT I C O L A.^ 



Phi Beta Pi 

Honorary Medical 
Founded at the University of Pitts^jurgh, 18S1 

WEST VIRGINIA BETA A' PHA CHAPTER 
Established, 1922 

COLORS— Green and White 
FLOWER— White Chrysanthemum 

Fratres in Urbe 

Dr. Ira E. Hall Or. D. M. Po.st . Dr. E. F. He.skc 

Dr. B. M. Stout Dr. G. W. Phillips Dr. F. H. Sisler 



Fratres in Facultate 



Dean J. M. Simpson 
Dr. J. Frank Pearcy 



T. M. Arnett 
J. E. Hall 
W. E. Kimmin 
J. H. Mering 
J. H. Murphy 



L. H. Armentrout 
K. L. Butt 
Newt Dupuy 
E. L. Justice 
11. S. Raines 



W. S. Parker 
Wm. Riheldaffer 
Dr. C. R. Kessel 




Dr. E. J. XanLiere 
Cecil Draa 


Fratres in Univ 


Brsitate 




Seniors 






W. C. Boggs 
M. R. Hannum 
A. G. Lanham 
P. G. Modi 
C. G. Power 




J. M. DePue 
H. L. Hegner 
C. E. Lewis 
A. J. Mourot 
F. E. Prunty 


Juniors 






W. T. Booher 
C. .\. Dreyer 
R. M. Fisher 
T. H. Murphy 
R. E. Talbott 




W. H. Bruder 
R. J. Duffy 
R. C. Haislip 
L. M. Orr 
1. H. Walker 



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Piiiie Three Huiidn-il forly-.Viiie 



rAVONTICOLAs 






Kappa Psi 



HONORARY PHARMACEUTICAL 
Founded at the Medical College of Virginia, 1879 

WEST VIRGINIA BETA ETA CHAPTER 
Established 1925 

COLORS — Scarlet and Cadet Gray 
FLOWER— Red Carnation 

Fratres in Urbe 

Dr. H. H. Thompson Dr. R. R. Pierce Dr. F. M. Dent 

Chiirles H. Antram 

Officers 

Regent T. L. WILLIAMS 

Vice-Regent M. A. RAFFERTY 

Secretary-Treasurer B. E. DOWNS, JR. 

Fratres in Universitate 

II. C. McCulloh C. H. Traubert H. T. Moors 

J. M. Donlan B. E. Downs Jr. H. L. Fueg 

G. A. Gaston D. M. Parr.ll E. L. Peters 

W. A. Robey M. .\. Rafferty T. D. Stiles 

T. L. Williams J. A. Oliverio G. H. Pietro 

H. R. Reidnour G. E. Weber 

Pledges 

D. W. Chipps 



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Pntie Three Hundred Fifty-One 



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IVest Virginia University Dramatic Club 

Sponsor 

Piofessor Wilbur Jones Kay 

Faculty Members 

Miss Constance Welch Mrs. Ruth j. Simonson 

Officers 

BARBARA DOWD F'resident 

A. BATES BUTLER Vice-President 

HENRIETTA AMOS Secretary 

PROF. WILBUR JONES KAY Treasurer 

Members 

Henrietta Amos Walter Glenn lohn Musgrave 

Katherine Amos Charles Ihlenfeld "Orpha Nale 

Willard C. Ayers James Johnson Edwin Peters 

Leona Bonncll Edith Jordan William Power 

Stewart Brown Ellingwood Kay Kathleen Robertson 

A. Bates Butler William Lively Dorothy Rinard 

Max DeBerry ' Scott C. Lowe Jane Seabright 

Barbara Dowd Mary Jo Matthews Harold D. Slaven 

Leora Dunn Wilbur McCulloch Lawrence Wallman 

Ewert Given Julia Ward Mason Charles Zoeckler 
John Mark Moore 






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Delta Sigma Rho 

Honorary Forensic Fraternity 

Officers 

BROOKS LAWSON President 

HARRIET FRENCH Vice-President 

RUTH BROWN Secretary-Treastirer 

WILLIAM MOORE Manager Men's Debates 

LUCY HIGGINBOTHAM Manager Women's Debates 

Members 

Constance Welch Harriet French J. Brooks Lavvson 

Byron Randolph lohn G. Zevely Ben Humphreys 

Paul Holland Grove Moler Darlene Breckenridge 

Fletcher Mann August Petroplus Aileen Hatfield 

Mary Frances Brown William Largent Bernard Sclove 

Sponsored by Prof. Wilbur Jones Kay 



i.i^AVO NT I C O L As 




/'ii.;i' Three Bundred nfiv-Flve 



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Kappa Kappa Psi 

National Honorary Fratern:ty for Bandsmen 
Founded at Oklahoma State College, 1919 



WEST VIRGINIA OMICRON CHAPTER 

Established, 1926 

The constant purpose of Kappa Kappa Psi is to increase the ability, prestige, and 
membership of the University Band. 

Fratres in Urbe 

Carson E. Howard Merritt Chambers 

Honorary Members 

W. A. Mestrezat William H. Russell 

Fratres in Universitale 

Seniors 



Melville Peck 
Rupert W. Powel 
Fred H. Bennett 



Scott N. Reger 
Fred H. Kopp 
William Willian 



Dennis D. Thomas 
Don Parsons 



John Mark Moore 
Joseph Romino 



William R. Power 
Evan Harris 
Harold Neff 



Elmer Myers 
James A. West 
James Scott 

Sophomores 

Gordon Spillman 
Harold Locker 
Charles Gressane 



Sylvester N. Ciddings 
John R. Jackson 



Edgiar Speiden 
James F. Beatty. Jr. 
Carl Post 



Edward McHa 
William Millei 



John Merritt 



Edward Kennedy 
Carl Bruhn 
Edfjar Blum 



Pledges 



Carl Kanalz 
Charles Rice 



George Boyd 
lohn Keister 



Charles Timblin 



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l-n.j. Thr.r rhimlnd F.^l.w-S.- 



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The Mountain 



HONORARY 

Officers 

HARRISON CONAWAY Summit 

CLARENCE KEEPER Guide 

JOHN PHILLIPS Trail 

PAUL HOLLAND Cache 

CLARENCE RYAN . Pass 

JACK ZEVELY Trapper 



Members 



Willard Avers 
Walter Brewster 
Ned Ceori-e 
Paul Holland 
Kendall Keeney 
Clarence E. Lewi 
William Morgan 
GeorKO Phillips 
Julian Scott 
Truehart Taylor 
Charles Zoeckler 



= k Bi. 



Harrison Conaway 
Albert Glenr. 
George Jackson 
Nelson Lang 
Haymond Maxwell 
George Nixon 
John D. Phillips 
Harvey Simmons 
Edward X'acheresse 
Thomas Bradford 



William Fahey 
Marshall Glenn 
C'arence Keefer 
Charles Littlepag 
Louis Meisel 
Fred Parriott 
Clarence Ryan 
Charles Steele 
Jack Zevely 
Gordon Brill 




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The Sphinx 



TRUEHART TAYLOR 
HARVEY SIMMONS ... 



President 
Secretary 



Harrison Conaway 
W. B. Johnston 
William T. Mvers 
Don B. Parsons 
J. A. Moreland 
John D. Phillips 
Andrew T. Marsh 
William S. Morgan, Jr. 
W. N. Dunn 
R. N. Kirrhner 



Members 

Ray Hannum 
kenneth Shaffer 
W. C. Ayers 
L. C. Geisel 
Wm. H. Allman 
Trueheart Taylor 
L. V. Hood 
Herbert S. Raines 
C. F. Littlepage 
Charles A. Swearingen 



Charles F. Solenl: 
C. L. Steel 
C. J. McKaine 
Haymond Maxwell 
George Jackson 
Harvey Simmons 
William Simmons 
Stanley Simpson 
Clarence Koontz 



Ihuji- Thrci- Uun,\n;} Sirln 



rAVOIVTICOLA.^ 



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i'lipr r/irre Huiulrcd Slxty-One 



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Morta?' Board 

Woman's Senior Honotary Organization 

Founded at University of Syracuse, 1918 

Laurel Chapter Established at W. V. U., 1925 

The purpose of the Laurel Chapter of Wortar Board is to encourage and recoi;ni/.e 
leadership in student activities among women of the University. It the spring of each 
year such junior women as have become eligible by activity in student aifairs are chosen 
to membership. The organization strives to promote movements for the best interest of 
the State and for the student life at West Virgmia University. 

Officerii 

DOROTHY DERING President 

REBECCA GUIHER Vice-President 

MARJORIE LINDERMAN Sccretary-Treas.irer 

WILMA JONES .. Historian 

FRANCES JACOBS Keeper of the Scrap Book 



Dorothy Dering 
Marjorie Linderman 
Frances Jacobs 



Members 



Edith Jordan 
Rebecca Guihe 
Wilma Jones 



E'eanor Bige 
Ocie Tune 
Ruth Brown 



Ilundi'i'il Sisly-Tu,.i 



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fAVONTICOLAs 



Torch and Serpent 

Honorary Sophomore Organization 

FRANK MAYNARD '. President 

NED RAGLAND ., Secretary 

HAROLD NEFF Trsasurer 

Honorary Members 

Dave Christopher F. R. Yoke 

Active Members 

Hobart Bush Gordon Brill Leland Brown 

Julian Scott J. H. Kisner William Hanes 

Christy Wildt Wiley Garrett Delbert Noel 

B. F. Rinehart James Wilson Gred Shadd 
R. S. Cunningham K. H. Smith Bruce Davis 

C. J. Koontz J. W. McChesney Harold Locker 
A. R. ^^ittenberg Vane Robbins Frank Day 

R. C. Brand Chilton Farmer William Ruck 

W. C. Ayers Charles Lemley Eugene Powell 

Eddie Fox Chesney Young Howard Batson 

Cullen Hall Austin Phillips Cyril Ruble 

Andy Alexander Joseph Mullins John Whitlock 

John Strosnider Henry Schrader Frank Maynard 

Fred Parsons John Berry E. M. Krieger 

Joseph Moehs Warren Williams Andrew Marsh 

H. G. Peterson Ned Raghnd Howard Neff 

Jack Johnson Robert Hamilton Sprigg Jacobs 

Julian Hearne Clyde Smith Kenneth Keever 

Irish McKain Edward Ronry Luther Hutton 

W. H. Winfield John Dorr I. J. Logue 

Lyle Jones Cree Morgan Alan Auld 

Malcolm Lowe Upshur Higginbotham J. M. Moore 

C. W. Zoeckler John Porter 



IV>P"""«IIPP< 



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Pat/e Three Hun.lrnl ^iisiy-Fn-e 



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Rhododendron 

An Honorary Organization for Junior Girls 

Purpose: To promote democracy and scholarship on the campus of West Virginia 
University. 

Officers 

FRANCES DOAK Presi.le.it 

MARGARET WELLS Secret iry 

MARY GORRELL Treasurer 

CHRISTINE ARNOLD Marahall 

SCHOLASTICA CAYDOSH Keeper of the Cauldio;i 

Honorary Members 

Dr. and Mrs. T. L. Harris 

Active Members 

Ehna Hicks Evelyn Carskadon Dorothy Matties 

Genevieve Brovifn Jane Seabright 



Dorothy Dering Rebecca Guiher Edith Jordan 

Mary Barnett Pauline Shortridge Wilma Jones 

Ocie Tune Ruth Brown Eleanor Bigelow 

Linn Ford 



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fAVONTI CO L^^ 




Fi Batar Cappar 



Officers 

L. H. C. P , JOHN D. PHILLIPS 

Vice-L. H. C. P '. CHARLES STEELE 

Keeper of the Conklin ... WILLIAM FAHEY 

Keeper of the Hoard CHARLES LITTLEPAGE 

Band Master : DICK BIAS 

Cheer Leader JAMES COX 

Keepers of the Bull 

1. Keeper of the Fore Legs GORDON BRILL 

2. Keeper of the Hind Legs GEORGE RATCLIFF 



John Phillips 
James Black 
Thomas Brafford 
Walter Brev/ster 
George Cole 
Harrison Conaway 
Kent Gowden 
James Cox 
Thomas Duvall 
J. Ferguson 
Elmer Fiorentino 
Wiley Garrett 
Albert Glenn 
F^rancis Glenn 
Marshall Glenn 
R. Hasberg 
W. Harrick 
Paul Holland 
George Jackson 
Clarence Keefer 
Kendall Keeney 
Clarence Lewis 
Charles Littlepage 
Ross McHenry 
Louis Meisel 



The Roll 

Ted Nixon 
George Phillips 
Bill Winfield 
Lyle Jones 
Doc Epiing 
Tom Johnson 
Gene Josephs 
Red Gordon 
Greg Krebs 
Chuck Swearingen 
Lawrence Plaster 
Clarence Ryan 
Harvey Simmons 
Julian Scott 
Charles Steele 
Paul Summers 
Truehart Taylor 
Fred Wagner 
John Wiles 
Jack Zevely 
Louis Sturbois 
E. G. Bias 
John Amos 
Stuart Brown 



Bus Larue 
Eddie Fox 
Clint Carrico 
Gordon Brill 
Paul Bottome 
George Ratcliff 
Homer Hogue 
Jarvis Currence 
Bill Smith 
William Fahey 
Ned George 
Ralph Kirchner 
Bill Morgan 
George Jackson 
Charles Zoeckle 
Eddie Bartrug 
Dolly Beall 
Herb Hardy 
Emery Lepera 
Bill McChesney 
Nick Latham 
Chnrles Hart 
Bill Simmons 
Red Ayers 



Page Three Uundral Sidly-Eigh! 



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Pnflc Three Huiulnd Sixtj^Sine 



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The University Choir 



LOUIS BLACK Director 



Loisbelle Baker 
Mary Ellen Burke 
Helen Davisaon 
Nancy Davisson Delli-Gatti 
Madeline Fitzpatrick 
Alma Heltzel 
Katherine Lough 
Kathryn McElroy 



Sopranos 

Ruth Morris 
Brenice Prather 
Agnea Rush 
Margaret Shuttleworth 
\'ir£;inia Burdette 
V'irsinxa Belle Davies 
Mary Virginia DeBerry 
Lucy Betlzhoover-Dille 



Grace Hetrick 
Josephine McBrido 
Doris McLaughlin 
Etta Null 
Ocea Price 
Mildred Rymer 
Thelma Wilcox 
Freda Ziff 



Rogene Boyles 
Virginia Ewing 



Altos 

Linda Powell 
Eleanor Eichorn 
Edna Leyman-Morris 



Ruth Shurtz 

Marie Courtney-Smith 



George Boyd 
Herman DeVol 



William Callahan 
Paul Vannoy 



Elmer Fiorentino 
Evert Whitener 



James Brown 
Hugh McNeill 



Basses 

Arthur Whitener 

Carl Bruhn 

William Miller 

Volney W. Shepard, piano 
Grace Martin-Snee, organ 



Charles Wolfe 
Walter Wolfe 



fAVOINTI CO LA.^ 




1=^ 



rAVO NT I C O I- A.^ 



Kappa Delta Pi 

Honorary Education Fraternity 

ALPHA UPSILON CHAPTER 
Established at West Virginia University, 1927 

Honorary Members 

Dr. J. N. Deahl Dr. L. B. Hill Sylvia Soupart 

Dr. J. E. Bohan Dr. Carl P. Schott May Wilt 

Dr. R. L. Pollock Lucy Coplin 

Officers 

FRANCES DeLANCY President 

DOROTHEA RIST Vice-President 

GENEVA BOBBITT Secretary-Treasurer 

CHARLOTTE GRAYSON Recorder 

DR. J. E. BOHAN Counselor 

Members 

Ruth Brown Iris McClure Margaret Mapel 

Dorothy Dering Rebecca Guiher Virginia Taylor 

Zola Eddy Elizabeth Lawrence Virginia Carter 

C. G. Rollins Lucy Higginbotham 

Initiates 

Feaster Wolford Kathleen Robertson Leon Mayeur 

William Lovell Homer Stiles Alice Monser 

Reardon Cuppett Jasper Dyer Nellie Strouss 

Elma Hicks Frances Haught 



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J 



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:ifa 



y. ff\ c. A. 

RUTH BROWN President 

JULIA MASON Vice-President 

FRANCES DOAK Secretirv 

LENORA WELLS Treasurer 

Cabinet 

Christine Arnold Rebecca Cuiher Mary Hite 

Lucille Chenoweth Jane Seabright Lucille Hall 

Naomi Duchwan Matgaret Wells Ocie Tune 

Margaret Marshall 

Advisory Board 

Dean Martha T. Fu'ton Miss Grace Griffin Mrs. Albert Reese 

Miss Ruth Moer Mrs. R. A. Lowe Mrs. Harry Cole 

Mrs. J. L. French Miss Rebecca Pollock 



ppm 



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Beta Pi Thcta 

NATIONAL HONORARY FRENCH FRATERNITY 
Etablished at West Virginia University, 1927 

LEON MAYEUR President 

DOROTHY DERING Vice-President 

MARY BARNETT Recording Secretary 

NELLIE STROUSS Corresponding Secretary 

JOSEPH BOFFO . Treasurer 

DR. MADISON STATHERS Sponsor 

Members 

Mary Barnett Leon Mayeur R. R. Ashburn 

Dorothy Bauer Nellie Strouss Lenore Wells 

Grace Bise Joe Morelond Elizabeth Lawrence 

Joseph Boffo Dorothy Robinson Irene Rolland 

Dorothy Dering Helda Rosenshine Anita Nutter 

Rebecca Guiher Irene Collett Kathryn Sneddon 

Elizabeth Hooker Henry Snyder Robert McClelland 

Pledges 

Scott Lowe Alice Monser Beryl Piper 

Elizabeth Woods Catherine Preston Joseph James 

Margaret Davis Jean Kyle Genevieve Brown 

Lauretta Fishback Tmxelle Liller Virginia Carter 



rAVONTICOLvV, 




fAVONTI CO LAs 






Seo Beowulf Gedryht 

Seo Cwen Waes-Hael Folces MRS. JOHN HARRINGTON COX 

Se Micel Scop JOHN FRANKLIN HEfLIN 

Se For Sittend CARTER BISHOP 

Se Foran Sittend KATHLEEN ROBERTSON 

Se Hoard Weard IMA ROSE BARTLETT 

Se News Mann MILDRED LORAiNE KING 

Se Boce Weard ELIZABETH CRAMER 

Honorary Member 

Mr. Gardner Sytnous 

Members 

Dr. John Harrington Cox Elizabeth Cramer Virginia Taylor 

Mrs. John Harrington Cox Dorothy Dering Geneva Bobbitt 

Ima Rose Bartlett John Franklin Heflin Helen Louise Boggess 

Carter Bishop Mildred Lorraine King Freda Braun 

Zella Bishop Ida Nale Bernice Grennan 

Ruth Ann Brown Dorothy Virginia Matics Walter P. Glenn 

Irene Barnes Carney Emily McCahan Bertha Handlan 

Evelyn Carskadon Kathleen Robertson Eloise Kerr 

Helen Connelly Dr. Fred Manning Smith Mr.s. Ethel Michael 



Putft Ihicc Uundrcd HcvciUy-Jiif/hc 



fAVO INT I C O L A?s- 




fAVONTICOLA.^ 



American Institute of Elect?'ical Engineers 

Established, 1884 
West Virginia Branch Established, 1915 

The West Virginia Branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers is one 
of the sixty-eight student branches in the United States. It was organized in 1915 under 
the direction of Professor V. Karapetoff of Cornell University and Professor W. E. Dick- 
enson of West Virginia University. 

The objects of the institution are the advancement of the theories and practice of 
Electrical Engineering and of allied arts and sciences, the maintenance of a high profes- 
sional standing among its members and the development of the individual engineer. 

Officers 

C. C. COULTER President 

IVAN F. VANNOY Vice-President 

C. B. SEIBERT .. Secretary 

F. D. McGINNIS Treasurer 

PROF. A. H. FORMAN Counselor 

Faculty Members 
A. H. Forman A. A. Hall E. C. Jones 

Members 
Seniors 

W. S. Bosely P. C. Coulter H. V. Dejournett 

G. I. Burner I. F. Vannoy J. K. Gwinn 
M. C. Clark W. C. Walsh M. P. Hooker 
T. R. Cooper F. H. Backus R. N. Kirchner 
F. D .McGinnis W. S. McDaniel B. J. Paladino 

P. E. Davis 



O. R. Allen W. H. Rose i. S. Merritt 

George C. Barnes C. B. Seibert "C. E. Moyers 

Charles A. Bowers W. C. Warman Earl Milam 

S. N. Giddings F. E. Watson R. I. Boone 

E. M. Hansford V. O. Whitman I. I. Steele 

George H. Hollis Ale.-cander Diksa W. H. Sutton 

Joseph Kayuha .^. F. Fervier C. W. Thrall 

J. R. Nottingham G. S. Garrett S. W. Pride 

.S. F. Oneacre H. H. Kincaid B. I.. Williams 

R. 11. Pell Creed Malone J. E. Winter 
T. J. Manion 



f'lac Three lliindrril Elahty 



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7AVONTICOLA., 




Puj/c Three Hiui./kiI hU.ihiy.On 



fAVOISTI CO VA^ 



Kappa Phi 

NATIONAL METHODIST GIRLS' CLUB 
Founded at Kansas University, 1916 

PI CHAPTER 
Installed at West Virginia University, October 25, 1926 

COLORS Sky Blue, Pine Green, Pure White 

FLOWER— Pink Rose 

Aim: Every Methodist girl in the University world today n leader in the chiir h of 
tomorrow. 

Officers 

Sponsor MRS. MYRON S. COLLINS 

„ . , ) ELIZABETH LAWRENCE 

^^^^'aenl ( MARY JACKSON 

Vice-President GENEVIEVE BROWN 

Assistant Vice-President MILDRED ARNETT 

Secretary LUCY TRICKETT 

Corresponding Secretary 1 ELIZABETH LAWRENCE 

Treasurer KATHRYN HINKLE 

Historian .. RtJBY McQUII.LAN 

Chaplain : GERALDINE PROTZMAN 

o \ VERA HENSELL 

'^^P°''""' V / IRMA AVERS 

Candle Beam Editor ALICE BOY ER 

Committee Chairmen 

Program FAITH LAWRENCE 

Membership LAURA CRAIG 

Christian Service MARY HUBBS 

Social GLADYS GOOD/\LL 

Art EUNICE LINDERMAN 

Music FRANCES CHENOWETH 

Invitation .-. LAVINA McQUILLAN 

Active membership 1928-1929 includes 103 young members. 

Patronesses 

Mrs. R. A. .Armstrong Mrs. W. S. Bell Mrs. 1 .. S. Brock 

Mrs. L L. Friend Mrs. N. J. Giddinys Mrs. W. E. Lowther 

Mrs. T. L. Harris 

University Pastor 

Rev. Myron S. Collins 



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fAVONTICOLAs 



IVestminstcr Girls Club 

Founded — May 1927 

COLORS Orange and Silver 

FLOWER— White Rose 



Mrs. F. E. Clark Mrs. M. W. Wood Mrs. J, S. Stewart 

Mrs J. R. Moreland .Mrs. W. E. Brooks 

Sponsor 

Mrs. J. L. French 

Active Members 

Caroline Alcott Virginia Cross M?ry Jane Riggs 

Dorothy Allman Louise Hamilton Carol Scanlon 

Eleanor Biglow May Jones Harriet Shepherd 

Ora Bowser Marjorie King Pauline Shortridge 

Virginia Bowser Rulh Martin Katherine Sneddon 

Dorothy Brand Joe McBride Eleanor Stone 

Ruth Brown Pauline Nicholson Nellie Strou.°.s 

Jeanette Brooks Jane Nutter Marion Williams 

Helen Connelly Otia Parks Coldie Wilson 

Sarah Cree Cornelia Porterfield Mary E. Behner 

Frances Delancy Genevieve Porterfield Clare Livesay 
Catherine Dunlap 

Pledges 

Bertha Antram Margaret French Nell Shepard 

Martha .Alexander Mary Goodwin Virginia Schiffler 

Geraldine Bevington Joy Hazlett Verba Snodgrass 

Virginia Bickerton .Alberta Hunter Mabel Slagle 

Darline Breckcnridge Katherine Lough .Anna Mary Tropf 

Margaret Brooks Martha Lewis Juanita Wilson 

Helen Cathrell Maude Lovitt Katherine Wilson 

Louida Colebank Francis Madeira Eva Wharton 

Anna Culley Ann McMillan Leah Williams 

Mary Alice Davis Mary E. Polling Mary Williams 

Helen Emsley Evelyn Freest Betty Weidner 

Sue Fredlock Agnes Rush Lillian Yocke 



Page Three Hundred Eighty-Fui:r 



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Sigma Gamma Epsilo?i 
Hotwrary Geological Society 

Active Members 

Lee McLure Morris, "29, President 

Russell Dalzell Squibb, 'iO, President-Elect 

Chester Renn Parrish, '29, Secietary, Treasurer 

William L. Simmons, '29, Corr. Secty. — Editor 

Elwood Booth, '29 

Oscar Dale Englehart, '29 

Elvin Eweri Given, '29 

Homer Arthur Hoskins. M. S. Ch. E. (Research Fellow) 

Charles Cade Leet, '29 

Dennis Lee McElroy, B. S, E. M. (Research Fellow) 

Neal Swentzel, '29 

John Paul Swentzel, '29 

Associate Members 

Harry Manon Fri-iley. Ph. D. Delmar Gaston Runner, (W. Va. R. M. S.) 

Sydney Longman Galpin, Ph. D. William .Anderson Staab, E. M. 

Willaid Wellington Hodge, A. M. (Faculty Representative) 

Clyde Bernard Jenni. B. S. Ch. E. Ritz Courtney Tucker. 

John Littlefield Tilton, Ph. D. (Asst. State Geologist, W. Va.) 

Walter Alio., Koehler. Ph. D. Walter James Yeaton, M. S. 

Charles Elmer Lawall, M. S. 



/'ui/i 7Vine lliiiiilnil fiyAi 



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Epsilon Phi Sigma 

Honorary Graduate Educational Fraternity 

WILLIAM W. LOVELL Worthy Justice 

CHARLES E. ZINK Worthy Herald 

FEASTER WOOLFORD Worthy Scribe 

HOMER R. STILES Worthy Keeper 

FRITZ J. STEMPLE Worthy Guide 

Members 

W. W. Lovell Charles E. Zink Feaster Wolford 

Homer R. Stiles Fritz J. Stemple Kenneth W. Shaffer 

J. Frank Heflin William F. Staats Charles E Herringto.i 

Fred E. Ross Leonard J. Furbce Conn Costello 

Dawson Lemlcy Herman Bower Lee Dean 

French Hyre Joe Ashcraft Harry Cook 

R. A. Ruth John M. Priest Marvin H. Snyder 

E. F. Whitener Jennings F. Rollins Owen Gates 



Uiimlrcd EujMxi-Ein)'t 



rAVO INT I C O L>!iL, 




JM,;t 77ll.r // '■ 'Ir^.l I- 



rAXONJTICOLA., 



Chi Sigma Delta 

Honorary Economics Fraternity 
Founded at West Virginia University, 1927 

COLORS Red, White and Gold 

FLOWER— Red Rose 

Faculty Advisor 

William S. Glasheen 

Officers 

CHARLES SWEARINCEN President 

HARLAN KINCAID Vice-Pre-iident 

VAL HOOD Secretary-Trjasurer 

Members 

Edward Reed Andrew T. Marsh j. William Machesney 

Havmond Waxwell Frank Keys Maurice Coley 

Edward Pritchard Max W. Cooper Fred H. Bennett 

L. Val Hood Harlan Kincaid Theodore King 

W. M. Harrington Charles Swearingen Stewart Brown 

Harold Jenkins Herman DeVol Paul Shanks 
Robert Burchinal 



llv,t,li,;l Sill. In 



i^AVOrSTICOL. 




i^AVO^T T CO L A^, 



Eta Sigma Phi 

Honorary Latin Fraternity 
Founded at University of Chicago, 1924 

WEST VIRGINIA PHI CHAPTER 
Established October, 1927 

Honorary Members 

Dr. A. P. Wagener Dr. Lydia Lothrop W. R. Miller 

Dr. C. G. Brougas .Mr. Melvin Bengston 

Alumni 

Anna Virginia Rector Alice V. Cook W. C. Hughes 

Helen Elliott 

Officers 

MARJORIE LINDERMAN Prycani.^ 

FRANCES J.ACOBS . Epi-Prytanis 

ROBERT McQuillan Crammateus 

M.ARIAN WILLIAMS Crysophilus 

CHARLES BARRICKMAN Sergeant-at-Arms 

Members 

Walter Applegate Marjorie Linderman Frances Bradley 

Frances Jacobs Mary Jane Riggs Louise Lantz 

Katharine llinkel Marian Williams Robert McQuillan 

John Koller Charles Barrickman Eugene White 

Katherine Hirst 

Initiates 

Ruth Brown Jeanette Brooks Dora Long 

Edna McLain David Hey|<-r Louis Neuberger 



Ihiiidr,;! \inrlt/.Tur, 



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rAVONTICOLA., 




■tAVONT I CO LA.^ 



Collegiate 4-H Club 

Founded at West Virginia University in 1925 

COLORS Green and White 

Faculty 

Dr. Nat T. Frame Mr. C. H. Hartley Miss Pauline R. Spangler 

Mr. 1. B. Boggs Mr. Russell H. Gist Miss Gertrude Humphrey 

President ^.-. HERMAN McCLURE BOWERS 

Vice-President •. LEE H. DEAN 

Secretary-Treasurer BEATRICE .SCOTT 

Members 

J. T. Dransfield Georse Emeric'c Alma Milliken 

Robert Munchmeyer Buddy Sprigg Eleanor Bigelow 

Lee H. Dean Herman M. Bowers Elizabeth Moore 

Charles H. Horner Jr. Waller H. Wayr.an Sybil Ramsey 

French M. Hyre Marie Dransfield Margretta Bailey 

Harley Burton Pearl Ward Helen Johnson 

Clarence .May Maurine Ford Genevievo Porterfield 

Harry Cooke Ocie Tune Elizabeth McNeil 

Gerald Repair Dorothy Klein Lucretia J. White 

Fred Clayton Beatrice Scott 




Tm,;. Thr, Hini.lrr.l Y.... (//-F. 



i^ 



AXONTICOLA., 




p 



rA^O 1ST I C O I. As 



The Anthony Dairy Club 

Founded at West Virginia University, 1921 

Faculty Advisors 

H. O. Henderson L. M. Thvirston K. S. Morrow 

Officers 

W. HAROLD WAYMAN President 

W. RUSSELL BARNARD Secretary and Treasurer 

Graduate Students 

Harold Cecil Olson Richard A. Ackerman 

Seniors 

W. Harold Wayman Herbert C. Hunter John Marshall Pierpoint 

John David Spiggle W. Russell Barnard Thorn Linger 

Samuel J. Weese Charles H Carpenter W. G. lohnson 

lames H. Conklyn 

Juniors 

Russell Clarke Butler Richard E. Harbert John Tellius Dransfield 

C arence I.. Fleshman Stephen F. Hytracek Ivan McKeever 

John M. Duncan 

Sophomores 

Ira Gould Jr. Fred Coull Harry Chester Trnlopa i 

Rufus Reed 



Viui, Thrt, Ihimlird Ximly-Si. 



fAVONTICOLA.^ 







-d 



fAVONTI CO LAs 



Journaliers 



OTIS S. YOUNG President 

DANIEL BOUGHNER Vice-President 

RICHARD H. RALSTON Secretary 

NED RAGLAND Treasurer 

Honorary Members 

Harry L. Snyder H. S. Whetzel A. S. Poling 

Monroe Boyer Charles Hodges Dr. Allen Porterfield 

Active Members 

Daniel Boughner William A. Evans Wm. T. Fahey 

Ira Gould Tom H. Haymond John Hart 

Raymond Hughes Charles Ihlenfeld John Martin 

Arthur A Maust Francis Peters Ned Ragland 

Richard H. Ralston P. 1. Reed Dana Reynolds 

Alfred Spitzer James West James C. Wilson 
Otis S. Young 



Pledge 
James W. Harris 



,1 .Vi/lcly-i-ij/'it 



rAVOINTICOLA.^ 




1 



fAVONTICOLAs 




I'uffc Fuur JIuiuln.l 



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rAVOlNTICOLA.^ 



Four Thoughts 



The MONTICOLA has never been In the hab.t of apoligi/ing for anything and 
no where in its entire history can evidence of an apologetic attitude be found. But this 
year, we must tearfully admit, our MUDDYCOLA SECTION la a terrible failure,— a de- 
plorable printer's error, a catastrophe. So it is with the deepest concern that we offer 

our most sincere apologies to the school, the faculty, and the unfortunates harbored 
within the walls of this institution. (First thought: by J. M. Moore, Business Managei.) 

"The Jokes are ill-timed, ill-considered, ill-natured, and ill-bred." (Second thought 
by Art Smith, Trackless Coach) "and the profanity is unbearable!" (Same). 

"1 disclaim all responsibility for this non-literary appendage to what otherwise might 
have been a worth-while book. It seems to me that it is offspring of moronic minds 
that somehow found a place on the staff. So I advise you to skip over the humor and read 
only the ads that made this book possible. And I assure you that the culprits responsible 
for this mental relapse will be apprehended and punished by the joint action of the busi- 
ness manager and the Freshman Class." (Third thought by PRESIDENT TURNER.) 

"In happiest lives some gloom must fall, and we beg tolerance. Human frailty will 
always be with us, and as Napoleon said to Caesar on the Eve of aWterloo: "The proof 
of the pudding is in the eating!' (And he would have said more if Cleopatra had not 
interrupted.) (Fourth thought not claimed by anone, ANONYMOUS.) 



Patic Four Hundred Two 



rAVO NT 1 C O L A.^i 




CHILDREN OF OUR MOUNTAINS 

and 

POTENTIAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS 

whose West Virginia parents man the powerful plant of the 

HOPE NATURAL GAS COMPANY 

on the banks of the Elk River in the mountains of 
Kanawha County known as 

JOHN J. CORNWELL COMPRESSOR STATION 

where stands a model little community of modern and com- 
fortable homes with spacious and attractive grounds whose 
happy population is a portion of that large host of native 
West Virginians which comprise 9V' of the employees of 
the Llope Natural Gas Company. 



rAVONTICOLA^ 



Contents 



Frontispiece 
Four Thoughts 

Contents 

In Memoriam 

Administration 

For Deans 

1929 True Story Section 

Beauty Section 

MiHtary Department 

True Story Continued 

Campus Types? 

Lost and Found Bureau 

Athletics 

Bill Rodgers Says 

English Department 

Dr. Karr, Mystic 

Do You Know? 

Frat Minutes 

That's That 



Papr Four Hundred Foor 



rAVO rST I C O LiX^ 



Photo Crafters 

Official Photographers 
for the 

MONTICOLA 

1925 - 1926 - 1927 - 1928 
1929 - 1930 




40 12th Streeet 221 Pleasants Street 

Wheeling, \X'. Va. Morgantown, W. \'a. 



/•,,„.■ in„T llun.u.a Fi 



rAVOMTICOLA., 



3n iHemoriam 



In memory of those dear departed fellow-sufferers, who were 
unable to weather the storm of lectures and quizzes, let us bow 
our heads in solemn prayer. For brief though their sojourn was, 
they disported themselves gallantly and lit Murads, while a\\ 
around them their be'oved fellow students succumbed to pneu- 
monia from prolonged exposure to drafty lectures, or went color- 
blind by watching yellow paper. The s:n of their departure rests 
upon the malevolent souls hired by the state to prevent their 
pasrage through this great institution of yearning (to get out ). 

The more so let us pray for they suffered heartaches, sor- 
rows, and laborious application to nonenttiies. (and no more 
shall their smiling faces grace the portals of our institution), and 
though deprived of a degree by a wretched unreasonable faculty, 
they are waiting beyond the hills to join hands with us and share 
our happiness in escaping lurking danglers of college life. May 
we too, Oh Lord, some day escape the smirking professorial 
faces, and leave them far behind us. AMEN! 



Pofjr Four Ih^ 



-^AVO INT I C O L>X, 



MASON & HAMLIN 
PIANOS 




BALDWIN 
PIANOS 



"Morgantown's Oldest Music House" 

WHERE LOVERS OF THE BEST NOW MORE 

THAN EVER GO FOR THINGS MUSICALE 

(2 STORESj 

422 HIGH STREET 235 WALNUT STREET 



KNABE 

PIANOS 



CHICKERING 
PIANOS 



Remember- 



That we wish you, as seniors, a very prosperous and 
happy life — 



J 



OHNSON' 

"ALWAYS RELIABLK" 

MEN'S WEAR 



S 



DO NOT DO WITHOUT BREAKFAST! 
FOR YOUR HEALTH'S SAKE: 

On Your Way to School 

STOP AT THE 

WHITE FRONT RESTAURANT 



A good, healthy 
w.-«fni meal 
at all hours. 



WILLEY ST. 

INSTANT 
SERVICE 



Special 

Student 

Dishes 



A DEPENDABLE CLEANING SERVICE 
FOR EVERY OCCASION 



TELEPHONE 1-2-3-4 



OUR RED TRUCKS WILL CALL 

M.ASTER 



t'tgnKEZ fonneK 



CLE.ANER 



MAIN OFFICE. 473 HIGH STREET 



I', I II- rni.r lliinitrfA Rrvm 



rAVONITICOLA., 



Administratioti 



OUR IDEA OF PUNISHMENT IN AFTER LIFE FOR PROFESSORS AND DEANS IS: 

I si. To appear before an examining board of black hearted devils for admittance 
to Hell. 

2nd. To be put in charse of a satanir demon, who shall force them to carry 120 
hours of work each week, and to write 50,000 word term papers every week-end. on the 
composition, elements, principles, wherefores, and whys of iire and brimstone. 

3rd. To flunk out of Hell at least twice a year, and beg for re-admittance. Th-^n 
to be compelled to carry 5698 reams of yellow paper up and down an endless stairway 
for the rest of eternity. 

4th. If they survive, to be given the following exam: 

A. List all the oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, lagoons, creeks, babbling brooks, 
rivulets, springs, and damp places on the earth's surface. 

B. Write four thousand original jokes and tell why they are funny! 

C. Give in detail the elements that go to make perfect beer and support 
your assertions. 

D. Make a list of all the students that you have flunked. (No more th.in 
five sheets to be furnished on this question) and make humble apologies. 

E. Tell in detail just why the Athenaeum is a good-for-nothing, down- 
right, rotten publication, and don't be afraid to exaggerate. 

F. Explain why the Monticola is the best, finest, most perfect University 
publication, (and watch your step!) 

G. If a golf ball rebounds 8 feet when it hits a battleship, after a 90 pound 
drive by a man weighing 300 pounds, with a caddy weighing 89 pounds looking 
on, how far should it rebound when it hits a freshman's head when being driven 
by a stroke of lightning, emanating from a clear sky? (.Answer must be within 
.0098 percent correct.) 

H. Are the Monticola beauties really that v/ay or is It the photography. 
(If wrong answer is given on this quest on, there is no hope of passing the test.) 

THERE IS NO CHOICE OF QUESTIONS, and no extra time will be given. 
If the test is not passed the victims are to be pitched back in Hell, and' con- 
demned to everlasting lecturing on their respective subjects, WITH NO .AUDI- 
ENCES WHATSOEVER. 







^H" 



Piifie /••imr lliiiulnd Ki,ih' 



vvONTICOLA^a 



Morgantown's Most Up-to-Date 
Stationers 




Headquarters for University Student Supplies 



PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS REBUILT MACHINES 



LATEST BOOKS 



LENDING LIBRARY 



FORMAL STATIONERY FANCY WRITING PAPERS 



CACoceyfisseLav 

417 High Street Phone 1624 



fAVO INT ICO L As 



Compliments of 

Bank of Monongahela Valley 

Federal Savings and Trust Co. 

Second National Bank 

Bank of Morgantown 

Union Bank and Trust Co. 



Compliments of 
SCHERR'S BOOK STORE 



■^■ww 



Hini.h. ,1 I ■ 



rAVOINTICOLA., 



True Story Section 




COACH RODCERS 

My youth was spent in solemn study of the Hindu classics, but owinK to bad eye- 
sight I was forced to give up my Sanskrit research. My mother had not warned me of 
the lurking evils in football, so one day, while witnessing a Harvard-Yale match a devilish 
maiden captivated me. and soon I was a victim of her cleopatric wiles. The sight of her 
black raven hair waving in the breeze, her oriental t-yes. and her piquant smile aggra/aied 
my infatuation and made me her slave. 

But she would not have me. for she liked only football heroes. So secretly, without 
breathing a word to a soul. I studied football in the attic every evening until the wee small 
hours of the morning. Needless to say I made good in football, and at the moment of my 
triumph 1 looked into the bleachers, and what did I see. Oh merciful Socrates? She was 
in the arms of another! 

1 could not wait. 1 made the touchdown, and running up the bleachers I seized my 
stillelto and shot the wretch, shot him dead. 1 filed, and tired, and fired until the gun 
was empty. Then 1 said to her: "Oh diabolical woman, you have crushed my flowery 
hopes." 

I escaped to Chinatown, and for days lived on nothing but rice. Under the kind 
care of a Chinese cook, I gained a little weight and grew a moustache. Thus I esciped 
the sleuths. Then I settled down with my old feeble grandmother in a cozy cottage, and 
assumed the innocent pastimes of knitting and chewing tobacco. 

My advice to Freshmen, who aspire to be football heroes, is: If you are unprepared 
for the problems of life by an inadequate knowledge of the secrets of life, don't come out 
for football until you have a course in zoology. 



r>VV.ONTICOLA5 



COMUNTZIS 



.-^^ 



"*^; 



-WHERE YOU GET THE BEST OF EVERYTHING- 




THE STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR GOOD FOOD ! 

Try Our Famous 50c. Plate Lunch. 

Excellent Sandwiches and Light Lunches 

Delicious Refreshments 

Home Made Confections and Pastries 



The Four Corner Words are the Cornerstones of Our Reputation 

Established in West Virginia in 1900 
^A^ In Morgantown 1909' ^ 

<&, A Twenty-Eight Year Prestige is Your Quarantee c^ 



P<l:tr Fniir lliindrcl Twi-tvr 



rAVONTICOLA.^ 




1 \'^\-s'b<ldL V,dv a-^cL «=,Va- s\cW^ /- 



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One of THote 

Thefo Chi- an 


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MuDD/CoLft _ , 

e,eauf\/ Sect/on 




Jory Mo 



W/iQf Me- >//- 



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rAVO NT I CO L A.^ 




AUTOBIOGRAPHY 
James Morton Callahan. (Copyrighted, 1931) 

When I reached the age of 30, I was a burly, frisky boy, innocent of the real secrets 
of life. My ambition was to be a piano mover but alas in spite of nrxy buoyant spirits the 
task proved too much for me. My Aunt insisted that 1 go to college. 1 ran away and 
for a decade became very successful posing for Arrow Collar Ads. 

My family desicovered me, and 1 had to return home. I went to college but could 
not get along with the deans. After flunking out of each college successively, I entered 
the engineering school where 1 found an c^miable dean. 

My graduation was a solemn occasion. By a clerical error, I was given a Ph. D. 
instead of a B. S. C. E. but 1 did not say anything. I then enlisted in the state militia, 
and after a drunken brawl with the general 1 resigned. 

1 then had to be content with a professorial job. When coeds were admitted to the 
institution. 1 fell a victim to their wiles and was expelled from the college faculty. Mow 
I regret this incident, my mother had never told me. Soon I was hopelessly enme^hed 
in marital difficulties, for they all wanted to mairy me. An attempt to espouse the Mor- 
mon religion was frustrated by Abraham Lincoln, no 1 eloped to Siberia with my beloved. 

We raised chickens together in a pastoral cottage on the glaciers of Muskomoomo. 
My happiness was cut short by a telegram from W. V. U. asking me to accept the de^nship 
of the A. B. school. So I left my sweetie in Siberia for the call of duty. She promised to 
wait, and 1 know that even now she is thinking of me in the little Eskimo teepees. 

1 am going back some day. And as my parting advice to Freshmen, let me say that 
diligence coupled with assiduous application to industry is essential to success. 



I 



I'agc Four llundrt-d Fvurli:-:n 



rAVONTI CO LAs 



Quality Food Products 

GINGHAM GIRL FLOUR 

SWANSDOWN COFFEE 

COBB'S NEW YORK CANNED VEGETABLES 

H. G. PRINCE & CO. CALIFORNIA FRUITS 

Sold by Leading Retail Grocers 

LOUGH-SIMPSON GROCERY CO. 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 



The Ortolan Cafeteria 

Where Morgantown Comes to Dine on 

REAL HOME COOKING 

SPECIAL 50c SUNDAY EVENING SUPPER 

WITH SERVICE 

PARTIES BANQUETS 

DANCES BRIDGE 

239 SPRUCE ST. PHONE 1597 



Hotel Morgan 



NEW AND MORGANTOWN 

UP TO DATE W. VA. 



i;i,„- four llun<lr,;i Fifteen 



fAVONTI CO LAs 



Beauty Now-Pcrmancnce in Later Years 
Assured for Your Becktold Bound Book 

As the years pass, the contents of your annual will become more and 
more priceless. 

Bound as it is in a Becktold Cover, this edition with ordinary care will 
last more than a lifetime. 

The distinction and charm of genuine craftsmanship possessed by all 
Becktold Covers is well exemplified in this 1930 MONTICOLA. 

BECKTOLD COVERS 

BECKTOLD COMPANY 

200-212 PINE STREET ST. LOUIS 



R. L. BOKEY 

SHOE STORE 

FORMERLY THE PEACOCK SHOP 
407 HIGH STREET 

Novelty Footwear 



Virginia Laundry 

SAM BINNIX. Proprietor 
In Rear of Hotel Morgan 

FOR QUICK SERVICE CALL US. 

Your Laundry is Insured Against Fire and Tornadoes. 



l'(ii/c Four Hundred Sixletn 



fAVONTI CO LAsi 




Campus Types 



court 

iry steps, 

A wink, 

Parson's 



The Newlyweds 

You see them everywhere. Thej 
the classroom, they court on the lib 
they court in the registrar's office, 
a smile, a gesture — and off to th< 
home. High blond pressure has become the 
disease of the day. No man is safe: no woman 
immune. It is a campus epidemic. 

rhey rent a cozy cottage, buy a rose bush 
call up the milk man. and settle down to help 
each other get an education. 

They walk like king and queen, while sigh 
ing maidens and envious bachelors look on and 
lament their fate. In blissful isolation, they 
become gentilely unconscious of their former 
pals, who now become but atmosphere to them. 
It's "Good morning. Mrs." and "How do you 
do, Mr", where formerly it was "Hy, Maryl" 
and "Ho. Jake!" "Hows the wife today?" has 
replaced, "Gotcha lesson today?" 

Get married, cause if you don't, you'll be 
.sorry some day. .A young lady is like a prom- 
issory note. She becomes settled when she ar- 
rives at maturity. You can never find out the 



her a ring 



The Fisherman. 

Our latest type. He has the greatest line and can 
fling it with the most graceful accuracy, and he always 
pulls in a fish. He spends the morning reading Izzac 
Walton's "Fish and Why they Bite. " and the rest of the 
day. he talks of Juries and Einstein's latest theory. With 
a long studious face, he foils them all into thinking he 
is an intellectual marvel, and a social phenomenon. 
Everyone beems with admiration, when he opens the 
meeting thus: "We meet in congress assembled to per- 
petuate that infinite immutable doctrine of human falli- 
bility, proinulgated in the alleged compunctious epistles 
just vocalized." Then he gets a vote of confidence, and 
in solemn tones he calls. "God bless us. every one." 

Ruth treated Boaz very badly, he will tell you, for she 
pulled his ears and trod on his corn. .-Nnd he stoutly 
declaims that a deaf man cannot be legally convicted, 
because it is not legal to condemn a man without a hear- 
ing. .And where do you suppose he was going when 
he was in his nineteenth year? Into his twentieth. Like 
all lawyers, he is an uneasy sleeper. He lies on one 
side, then on the other, and remains wide awake all the 



FAVOINT■COLA.^i 



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Pofifc Four HuiiUnd Eighteen 



Always in the 
spotlight - - ' • 

METROPOLITAN 
THEATRE 



The Home oS 
Talking Pictures 



VITAPHONE 

— and — 

MOVIETONE 



Pa^e Four Hundred Nineteen 



rAVO MT I C O I- As 



ROGERS PHARMACY 

DRUGS — CANDIES — PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 

Heme of ^erfe-iinne Candles 
The Sterling of Sweets 



For Your Hardware Needs 

Monongahela Supply Co. 

University Avenue Morgantown, W. Va. 



R. A. WILBOURN CO. 

INCORPORATKIJ 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

Manufacturers of 

PURE ICE 

Corner Clay and Donley Sts. Morgantown, W. Va. 



OS G O O D ' C 
"In the Heart of MorgaiDown" K^ 



i\iiic Four Hundred Tictnlij 



rAVONTiCOLA.. 






WARMING THE PRO\ERBl.\L BENCH 



r.i.ic /'niir lliiiidntl 



rAXONTI CO L As 



STOCKS 


WHEN ORDERING 


BONDS 


GLASSWARE 


GRAINS 


Look for the 


W. S. lAMS & COMPANY 


MARK OF J5\ QUALITY 

A Smile in Every Glass 


Donlev Building 


220 Pleasant St. 


Over One Billion Pieces Sold 


MORGAN TOWN, W. VA. 


Annually 


Phone 2121 


HAZEY-ATLAS GLASS CO. 


Offices Also at 


WHEELING, W. VA. 


CLARKSBURG— FAIRMONT 






Ten Factories 


Correspondents of 




A. E. Masten & Company 


I M 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


GLASS nrl WARE 


DIRECT PRIVATE WIRE 


/MX 


ANNOUNCING 


OPPENHEIMER'S 


The 1929 Lineup of 

BRAEBURN 






UNIVERSITY 


MORGANTOWN'S 


CLOTHES 


Best Men's Shop 


SUNFAST FLANNEL 




FELT HATS and 


Quality Clothiers 


WILSON BROS 


and Furnishers 


HABERDASHERY 

HARRY GOLDSMITH 








OPPENHEIMER'S 


Met. Theatre Building 





rnoc Four Ihi.f.lrcd Tw<»lii-TiiO 



rAVONTICOLAa 



f=',rGshman T-heme : Cotrectec/ — 




Lost O / <^monc/ 



CtW Oiui-C-^-veyU^ ■jJUJ' ^^\JU wf7o? 



UdflOC 




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7AXOMTICOLA 



^ill Rogers Says: 

(Special from BILL ROGERS, to the MUDDYCOLA. Copyriiihted 1929) 

"Well, all I know is what I read in the Athenaeum and what I see in the Muddycola. 
Darn tjood book you're publishing there. Couldn't do better myself. 

I like the pictures of your campus, but would suggest a few improvements. The 
uncultured aspect can be remedied by placing a little statuary here and there. A Jtatue 
of Eunpedes chasing the doe would go nice in front of Woodburn Hall, and Aphrodite 
playing checkers with Mercury would be a knock-out for the front of the Field-house. 
And you seem to be lacking in organizations on your campus. I would suggest more 
societies, clubs, etc. 

I went to college, too. I never knew it until I sobered up and found a diploma in 
my hand. Confronted with the alternative of choosing between Phi Beta kappa and Fi 
Bater Capper, 1 chose the latter, because it was an older institution, founded by Socrates 
they say. That's being pretty old, even older than the liquor they drink. 

Yes, siree, I'm a college man, but 1 only boast about it to college students. My polit- 
ical career would be ruined if the politicians found out about it. That's why I use good 
grammar in my write-ups, to make them think I never went to college. 

We had beauty contests, too. You people ought be ashamed to call those things you 
hold, beauty contests. That photoprapher ought to be shot, or better still, sent to Con- 
gress to take hazy, esthetic portraits of our Senators, and send them to Hollywood Casting 
Bureaus. At any rate, his activities are a crime and high misdemeanor under the Act 
for the Punishment of False, and Misleading Misrepresentations, of 1908. 

I am sorry to see you don't have the honor system there. The school where I went 
had it for 50 years, then some darned sneak went and squealed and ruined everything. 

I like the pictures of your R. O. T. C. corps. They look like half-starved Armenians 
suffering under the yoke of the terrible Turks. I presume the service is compulsory in 
your school. To see the faces of those cadets standing in ranks is to see what the fac" 
of Nebuzube looked like after 98 years imprisonment. However, it's good stuff for the 
boys, keeps them out of mischief, and all that. 

I have restrained myself considerably in this letter. I hate lo criticize your school, 
after your sending me such a nice copy of the yearbook. I intend to visit over your way 
someday. 

Signed: BILL ROGERS. 

(Editor's Note: A bill has just been mailed to Mr Rogers for the .said Muddycol.i 
copy. His answer will be published in next year's Agriculturist.) 



W^ 



Page Fniir llmiilrcd Tianty-Four 



rAVONTICOLA., 



Serving Every Student Activity 

University life is neither all study nor all play. It is a happy combi- 
nation of both. 

It is our pleasure to render the public service necessary for both 
activities. When you watched winter sports it was beneath 
electric illumination. When you studied late into the night 
electric light assisted you. When you traveled out of town or 
in the city it may have been on Monongahela Transport buses. 
\X hen you needed heat during the winter, natural gas provided it. 

It has been our privilege to serve West Virginia University student-, 
for several years. May it continue to be our pleasure in the 
years to come. 

Furnishing Electric Light and Power, Electric 

Railway and Bus Transportation, and 

Gas in Northern West Virginia. 

MONONGAHELA WEST PENN PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 
MONONGAHELA TRANSPORT CO. 



The Post Office Is Opposite Us 

RICHARD RESTAURANT 

MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 



0. J. Morrison Department Stores Co. 

"A WEST VIRGINIA ORGANIZATION" 

Associated Stores 

Charleston, W. Va. Morgantown, W. Va. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. Huntington, W. Va. 

Ripley, W. Va. West Union, W. Va. 

Logan, W. Va. Spencer, W. Va. 

Fairmont, W. Va. Clendenin, W. Va. 



^ 



fAVONT I OOVA^ 



Dr. Karr 



DR. KARR, World Famous Mystic, answers student queriea through the Monticola: 
(The Monticola is glad to be ot service to the students, and can only regret that 
a few letters had to be omitted because of lack of space.) 

OOGIE MEISEL: 

Yes, the girl you wish to marry has a wooden leg. That explains the squeaking; you 
thought you heard when she sat down. However, a good lubricating oil will remedy 
the condition and I see no reason why she should not make a good wife. No, you are 
not fat! 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN: 

Lumbago can be due to various causes. Correct your diet and cut down on whiskey, 
Lucky Strikes, and wild parties. If ailment persists see a reliable osteopath. 

Dr. Karr. 
GEORGE JACKSON: 

A. B. after a name can stand for many things. It may mean A BOOB, or ANOTHER 
BUM, or AGRONOMICAL BIBLIOGRAPHER. More often, however, it means ALSO 
BROKE. Does that answer your question? 

Dr. Karr. 
JAMES COX: 

For your sprained ankle I would advise Sloana's Liniment taken INTERNALLY, or 
Boswell's Bruise Balm also EXTERNALLY. No, 1 don't think you would succeed in the 
movies I 

Dr. Karr. 

MARY JO MATTHEWS: 

Yes, you do resemble Clara Bow, but I think you have a stronger resemblance to 
Colleen Moore. A pea-green wire haired terrier would match your complexion fine. You 
left your wrist watch on the third table on the left in Comuntzis, Friday, May 15, 3:00 
A. M. 

Dr. Karr. 
SCOTT LOWE: 

Yes I think it is advisable to marry young. The person who told you that necking 
is detrimental to the health was apparently deceiving you. .Auihorities have found no 
evil consequences unless complications set in. Your indigestion was due to mixing lister- 
ine with Jumbo Peanuts. 

Dr. Karr. 
HARRISON CONAWAY: 

You are president of the student body. FOR TRYING TO DECEIVE ME. by telling 
me you were a shoe polish salesman, I refuse to answer your question. 

Dr. Karr. 
SLEEPY GLENN : 

Your question is of a personal nature. I advise you to send a stamped self-addressed 
envelope and repeat your question. 

Dr. Karr. 
DEAN STONE: 

You are not fat, it is called pleasingly plump. Yes, you are a Hollywood type, and 
would succeed admirably in western movies playing two gun parts. I do not advise you 
to part your hair in the middle. Clara Bow prefers it on the left side. 

Dr. Karr. 
FRANK BUTLER TROTTER: 

Ah. ha. you rascal. 1 know you are no longer president. Eskimo pies .ire not 
harmful unless eaten in excess. Yes, Wrigley's chewing gum is safe. 

Dr. Karr. 
HARRY ADAMS STANSBURY: 

Your financial worries will be settled in a few years, and a big donation is forth- 
coming from a tall dark man. No. the stadium is not too large, but the quality of cement 
is poor. You arc popular with the students, and don't let your enemies worry you. You 
will outlive them. 

Dr. Karr. 



-AXONTICOLA., 



HIGHWAY TAX COSTS 

By JOHN E. WALKER 
Former Special Assistant on Taxation to the Secretary of the Treasury 
KEY FACTS 
Railroads pay less than 2' 2 per cent of total highway income. 
Six-tenths of rail taxes for highways are for local feeder roads. 
Special motor vehicle taxes are more than equivalent to all highway mainte- 
nance costs, state and local. 
Special motor vehicle taxes pay for 35 per cent of the entire highway bill of 

$1,500,000,000. 
Less than twelve cents out of each state and local general tax dollar goes to 

highways. 
Motor trucks pay twice as much in special taxes per vehicle as private auto- 
mobiles. 
Common carrier buses pay twenty-four times as much in special taxes as the 

private automobile. 
State authorities expend 47 per cent of the total highway funds, counties ex- 
pend 53 per cent. 
Maintenance expenditures are increasing in proportion to construction costs 
due to growing mileage of improved roads. 

West Virginia Motor Transportation Ass'n. 

HEADQUARTERS. CHARLESTON. WEST VIRGINIA 



THE SELBY-GAPEN COMPANY 

444 Spruce St. Phone 41 

FRATERNITY DECORATING OUR SPECIALTY 
See Us First 

Quality Wallpapers — Distinctive in Design and Colors 

The Best in Paints, Varnishes, 

Lacquers and Enamels 

Pictures Framed in Latest Patterns. Let us Frame Your Group Piciture in 
a Permanent. Distinctive Frame. 



SECOND WARD PRODUCE MARKET 
Emil Ferrara, Prop. 

MEATS, GROCERIES. FRUIT AND NOTIONS 

Telephone 1614 Corner White and Wilson Ave. 

Morgantown, W. Va. 



rAVONTICOLAs 



Compliments of 

GODFREY L. CABBOT, Inc. 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 
PRODUCERS OF NATURAL GAS 



Morgantov^n Hardware Company 

" IF ITS HARDWARE, WE HAVE IT " 

Phone 239 High Street 



Its the Cut of Your Clothes that Counts 

Wolf's Clothes Shop 

405 High Street 

STYLE HEADQUARTERS 

Where Society Brand Clothes are Sold. 



'm^mmsm^-mmm^m^^^^mmmmmmmm 



I'lujc Four lliimlna Twciitv-BOiht 



m 



rAVONTICOL/V^ 



CAPTAIN TOURTILLOTT: 

It was Sherman who said ARMY LIFE IS HELL. Although there is some evidence 
that Shakespeare had a similar sympathy when he wrote King Lear, putting in the mouth 
of the Swiss Guards the famous words: 

"Anon, vassals, back to the kitchen for the navy is a place for knaves, and the armv 
IS a living HADE^." However, the idea can be traced to the Sanskrit legends, which 
have not yet been translated into English. 

Dr. Karr. 
MAX DE BERRY: 

Yes, you are a great actor. But the girl who said your profiU- was a John Barrymore 
must have been mistaken, or teasing you. or what is worse, outwardly deceivmg you. I 
advise you to specialize in post anti-Mid-Victorian Drama. 

Dr. Karr. 
OTIS YOUNG: 

Niagara Falls is a hackneyed place for a honeymoon. Try Star City. Divorce law- 
yers are cheapest in Portugal. Thanks for your nice long letter, I haven't finished it 
yet, but so far I think you"rc right. 

Dr. Karr. 
SWEDE HAGBERG: 

Phi Beta Kappa is an honorary scholastic fraternity. 

Dr. Karr. 
MAJOR FLETCHER: 

The next contingent of Freshmen will be more intelligent. 

Dr. Karr. 







ex 

OV 







^ffavt io ^ 






J 



fAVO NT I CO L A.^ 



Do You Know 



There will be a meeting of all students who have flunked couises in Brazilian History 
in front of the Armory, Sunday night. Refreshments will be served and every one is to 
bring his nut-cracker along. 

There will be a meeting of all students desirous of burning down Woodburn Hall, 
tomorrow morning at 6:00 A. M. The affair is to be kept a secret, and be sure to bring 
some matches along. 

Condition exams in Cafeteria 198 will be given this evening at 8:00. Be sure to 
attend. Clara Bow will be the guest of honor. 

The Z. V. Z. W. will meet immediately. All absent members will be blown out of 
their beds. 

This ain't such a bad school after all. 

R. O. T. C. training will be compulsory for all Freshmen and Sophomores next year, 
says Harvey Fletcher. 

The engineers will meet soon to make drastic changes in the mechanism of the school 
wheelbarrow according to Mary Jo Matthews. 

From now on acrobatic and esthetic toe dancing is forbidden at fraternity formals 
according to Dean Stone. 

Unless some one claims the empty ink bottle found in Commercement Hall, it will 
be filled and donated to the Freshman Class. 

TESTIMONIALS: 

Cunningham: I find complete solace and comfort in reading Greek philosophy on 
bills of fare. 

Kay: Public speaking teaches one how to speak in public. 

Reese: I advise all girls who intend to marry to take Arthropology. It is the study 
of insects. 

Darby: I advise all students who don't like French to take Spanish for their group 
requirement. 

Arnold: The study of law is the study o( human vacuity as exemplified by the law- 
yer class. 

(Editor's Note: Vacuity is not in the Dictionary. Ask Arnold.) 



Pffje ; cur UiiiulrrtI Thirtii 



VVONTICOLAssHi 



"The Home of Good Plumbing" 

CLYDE BRAND 

PLUMBING, GAS AND STEAM FITTING 

Office and Shop Cor. High and Foundry Sts. 

Bell Telephone 748 



The Q^MART 
^HOPPE 

llni,.| .\l,M-aii nuildinj,' 

Irrespective of the season — we show new models — and new models are 
always in season. 

FROCKS — WRAPS — HATS 



Phone 781 

iilorsantoton jFlori^t Conipanp 

MORGANTOWN'S LEADING FLORIST 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers always on hand 
also Canary Birds and Goldfish 

MEMBERS OF F. T. D. 

235 SPRUCE ST. MORGANTOWN. W. VA. 



Compliments of 

Purity Ice Cream Co< 



/',!./( ^•l•l<r ;;ciii</r.il rhirlj/-Onc 



fAVONTICOLA. 



SANITARY MILK 

and 

ICE CREAM 

Sanitary Milk and Ice Cream Co, 

"THE HOME PLANT." 



Electrical Equipment Company 

"Morgantown's Oldest Electrical Shop" 

White Building 493 High Street 

THOR WASHERS, G. E. REFRIGERATORS. PREMIER CLEANERS, 

THOR IRONERS, FIXTURES & WIRING, CONTRACTORS, 

RCA RADIOS 

"EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL." 



Printed and Bound 

by 

Morgantown Printing and Binding Co. 

Morgantown, West Virginia 



ALEX ZECK & SON CO. 

Heating and Plumbing Engineers 

Selecting your Plumbing is like selecting your wife — you have to live 
with both for a long time. Be careful you don't make a mistake. See Zeck 
first. In deciding either question — the price does not arise. 



I'niir Four llinulrcd Thirty-Two 



rAVONTlCOLA.^ 



1 drink ♦ . . yoii drink 
everybody's drinking > 

M Av 1 s; 

T 

JLhIS tjreat ready-to-serve chocolate drink is creating 
a sensation. It's creamy-smooth. It's chocolate flavor at 
its delicious best. 

Mavis is a food-drink, wholesome and hodv-huildinn, 
so excellent that it is served as a 
supplementary food to children in 
many school lunch-rooms. 

Mavis is absolutely pure — it's 
Pasteurized. Every bottle is thor- 
oughly clean — sterilized. 

Serve Mavis ice-cold. Or hot if 
you prefer. 



Oi pofiular-prieed. 

chocolate iJrink. 

rtadu lo serfe, 



MavU Bottling Company of Terra Alta 

220 WashinKton Street 

Terra Alia, West N'irsinia 



(V)Ac;is 



chocolate 
driak 

,Ai j-roccry stores and bottled drink stands 




>|JB0 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Central Automobile Co. 

MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 



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r,w /■''"'■ /'""''If' J'lirly-rhriC 



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«•# 



CeL/T FOiitfAL 



1 




A\P' 



;',i;/. y'uii)- Hundred Thirty-Four 



yAVOINTI CO LA.^ 




i 



Page Four HundrM Thirty-Pfv« 



rAVONTI CO VAs 



Minutes of Fraternity Meetings 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Sufficient sisters simply aostmble to afford an affirmative affair. Sister Stahlman 
rises (as does also the sun) to move a vote of thanks to Sister Matthews for being born, 
otherwise Kappa advertsing would not be so obvious. Sister Higi^mbotham moves that 
Sister Matthews' key to ihe city of Winchester and scepter of power be sent to the Smith- 
sonian Institute and that a Kapp^ room be reserved at that institution, each member of 
the Kappa chapter being expected to contribute a suitable souvenir. Sister Highland 
promises a photograph of "me and Sarah Bernhardt ". SutHcient souvenirs being jsoidu- 
ously assembled, the society discusses other matters. Sister Arnold inquires how far up 
the Hill, Kappa politics will go. Sister Preston suggests all (he way to the top. '"We 
won't have to walk home." Argument follows as to relative merits of roller skates, or 
scooters, and the meeting falls apart. 

PI BETA PHI 

The meeting is callad to order and comes once in a while. Sister Hicks rises to in- 
quire if brother-in-laws Glenn i.nd Bottome did right by our Nell. They assure the sor- 
ority vigorously that they did. Sister Manasse moves that such being the case, the cook 
should have her vacation und the married sisters display their culinary art, so that the 
health of the said brothers in law will be assured. Sister Ayers moves that the clause, 
"we do not extract promises' be added to By-law 12, Section 16. Sister Brown seconds 
the motion "because we can't have it said again." Sister Hall moves that a nev/ item be 
added to the budget — -five grJlons of peroxide of superior quality, for the benefit of Sister 
Douglas, for it is understood that gentlemen (not W. Va. Eds) prefer blondes. Sister La 
Lance moves that she be nominated for the beauty contest for she is in pretty good shape 
for it. 

ALPHA XI DELTA 

Sister Dunn calls the members together, according to an old Japanese custom. Under 
head of unfinished business, Si.'iter Hinkle moves that a new set of tires be bought for the 
members of the sorority. Sister Carney rises to add to the motion a new stop watch. 
Sister Scory requests that Sister Squires be urged to sing the "Lovalierre " from Woolworth, 
over the radio, and Sister Squiren feeling that Sister Scory handed too much of i mean 
crack, urges the sisters to request Sister Scory to get expression in her blue eyes be- 
sides "I believe you." Sisli r Squires loses a curl, and the meeting adjourns. 

PHI MU 

The meeting is calUd to order, as it were. Sister Taylor arrives late, forgets the 
password, and has to remain in outer darkness and on the sun porch. The session looks 
interesting, and she tears her hair. Sisters Shuttleworth and Hirst race to Sie who can 
second the motions and get their names in the Secretary's book. They sit near the door 
in case of fire, but there never is afire. Sister Kathleen Robertson, composer of that pop- 
ular campus favorite "How to make one drink take the place of two," announces that 
she has sold exclusively to Al Maybe's Orchestra, her latest effort: "Phi Beta Kappa, 1 
Love You. " 

ALPHA DELTA PI 

The meeting is called to order and immediately adjourns for discussion. Sister Mar- 
shall moves that Sister Goodwar get Major Fletcher to bring the army at night in order 
to protect the house. Sister Woods requests Sisttr Hawley to give the chapter a discus- 
sion on good posture. Soni< one falls over a little love that has been lost. The dates 
come, the girls go, and the niccting is no more. 

DELTA GAMMA 

The meeting opens v>ith the singing of "Why I .Am Not a Kappa," followed by a 
prayer of thanksgiving thai "I Am Not a Phi Mu. " The president leads with an elevat- 
ing discussion of "How I bec.Tme what I am not, by one who never has been a Chi 
Ome^a." Business is then taken up during which Sister Jones is nominated for the cap- 
taincy of the Delta Gamma ne.king team. She is opposed by Si!>trr Ballard. The latter 
is unanimously elected because her technique is more quiet. 



Pugr Fo-.ir Ilunjrrd Thirtt/SIr 



rAVO NT ICO L A.^ 



s 



CHI OMEGA 

Owing to the presence of the Alumnae who came to iee how their little charges 
were getting along, the chapter conducted a very serious rneetin^. Sister Dering nomi- 
nated Sister Rachel Smith lor Thi Beta Kappa. Sister Byrer gave .i report from -he Inter- 
fraternity council on the rulirs for Interf raternily Necking Fo'jrn.innMit which is to be held 
soon . Sister Callahan moved tKut the rules concerning th^ use of the strangle hold lie 
eliminated. One of the alumnae opened a discussion as to how many parking corners for 
parking should be permitted in one house and the meeting broke up in despair. 

DELTA TAU DELTA 

Brother Bottome calls the meeting to order to discuss funds for a new house. Broih.-r 
Simpson is fined for drinking;. Brother Bottome annonunces sufficient money now avail- 
able. Brother Conaway a?ks that when the new house is finished if exploration of the 
cgrridor will yield enough to make a quorum. Brother Holland tells a slightly soiled joke. 
It is overruled. 

PI KAPPA ALPHA 

Meeting fails to assemble for some time. Brothers .Arnelt. Brewster, and M.Trti;i 
finally arrive in time and a majority are present. Brother .Arnetl moves an in v:-stii;ition 
of the Delta Gamma's sine- Brother Hill has forsaken their precincts. Brother Martin 
reports but live quarts left in the jug. .A unanimous motion to adjourn to Brother M's 
room is carried out without dissenting vote. 

PHI DELTA THETA 

Brother Evans moves the gavel out to the lawn since he cannot get a majority inside. 
Brother Cox wrestles with the problem of the future of the fraternity when ho is gone. 
Brother Harrington suggests a room be set aside for the lug shoes of former Brother 
Thompson and Brother Cox. .An insignificant brother suggests that Brother Ratcliffe's 
hat b- added to the collection. 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA 

Meeting is arranged by private conference with members in their rooms. Brother 
Johnson attempts to make it a bull session, but the motion of Brother Bias is adopted: 
"Tonight — an all night p.irty al! over town." Broth -r Reynolds is sent to trace Brother 
Bias" footsteps from the Pan-Hellenic for a Monticola cover design. 

DELTA EPSILON 

Brother Fox takes th.^ burden of running the frat on his manly shoulders and in a 
tired voice sought to call i meeting. However Brother Bradley was at one of the sorority 
houses playing "eyes" and learning how to spell Phi Kappa Phi, and Brother Musgrave 
was writing a treatise on "How to be elected on the social committee. " Result, no meet- 
ing. 

A SPECIAL ALPHA GAMMA RHO 

The meeting opened in lh<- Ag. School with Bro. Robinson throwing the bull. Bro. 
Finney was appointed to r.iuilyze Bro. Maines mental reactions to the election. Bro. 
Finney declined the dirty job. The "bull" having been generously distributed, Bro. Sei- 
bert suggested a little "stud poker", thereby bringing the meeting to an abrupt end. 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON 

An informal stag parly wi.s thrown to get the frat lads togclher, whereupon to the 
dismay of Bro. Bowers, a inreting was called to order and he was prohibited from associ- 
ating with his wife. Bro. Keinhart proposed a toboggan slide run into the center of the 
campus. Bro. Cooper moved adjournment before examinations began. It was so ord< red. 

PHI KAPPA PSI 

A prep was sent to the Kappa house to fetch Bro. Warren. As soon as Bro. Prown 
arrived with the new pink "aiteis from Fredlock's. the meeting opened in the usual man- 
ner with Bro. Taylor absent. Pro. Phillips declared the organization could no; have made 
a better choice for presidepll..l c-.ndidate than himself. Bro. Jackson gained the floor for 
a few comments on the qualili's of Bro. F. for president, why he, Bro. J. was nevir elected 
president and the election of I'HM, when he was a Freshman, was conducted. Bro. J.ick- 
son still talking. 



;; ir,.i ;.'.... 



rAXONITICOLA., 



SIGMA NU 

A meeting was contrived by Bro. Cowden's superior brain and believed to be an un- 
precedented event. Bro. Amos wobbled in a little late. Bro. Landon moved to in.struct 
the preps on how to use the Sigma Nu brand. No further business being in order, Bro. 
Edmondson adjourned to che Kappa House to study law. 

THETA CHI 

Contrary to all custom, a meeting was held on time. Bro. Ayers wiped the political 
slime from his fingers, and gave a report from the Interf raternity Council. Bro. Hesse 
suggested that Bro. Moler spend a few nights in the house instead of wandi^ring all over 
town. Bro. Marsh gave this suggestion his moral support. Bro. Krieger moved that a 
new house be built. Moore seconds the motion and the meeting is adjourned, till Bro. 
Montgomery makes a track man out of his first baby boy. 

SIGMA PHI EPSILON 

Notice of all candidates for sport managers to be at the house succeeded in raising 
a quorum. Bro. Steele solicited votes for the beauty contest and moved to have preps 
instructed that Mary Jo was not the prettiest girl on the campus. Bro. Bratlord moved 
that Bro. M. Glenn in the art of married life is a success inasmuch as a Sig Ep should 
not be a failure no matter what he was managing. Meeting broke up abruptly. 

PHI ALPHA 

Bro. Abramson added up the cost of a dance and banquet. Bro. Abramson is still 
figuring on how to get bread for $.03 a loaf. Due to Bro. Abramson still figuring, no 
meeting was held. 

PHI SIGMA DELTA 

The meeting was opened by a silent prayer. Brother Katz makes a speech on the 
value of modesty, but neverthelest wishes that more attention be paid to the grades he is 
making in law school. Ution complaint of the governing body. Brother Bobes assures 
the brothers that he will us-; all the influence that he has to reduce the price of the Athen- 
aeum from $.03 to $.02. Brother Szanger breaks his Sphynx-like silence by announcing 
the fraternity standing in Intra-Mural Spors. Brother Cooper loses control of himself and 
breaks the table with his fist, although he could hardly reach it. Brother Basman moves 



the 


eliminati 


on of bea 


ns frorr. the daily menus. Brother 


Polan 


is m 


oved when 


djourn- 


ment is effec 


ted. 




















MEN-NON-FRAT-POLITICAL MEETING 










Clair Smith calls 


the meeting in the usual way: to 


wit: r 


lotice 


in the 


Athenaeum. 


George Luca 


s announces that he is present. Smith declares th 


at he 


will no 


t be 


ab!e to 


run 


for pres 


dent. F. 


L. Bates Butler dramatically assure 


s the 


audie 


nee that 


he 


s avail- 


able. Simm 


ons states 


that he has pocketed the non-frat 


ernity 


vote 


but tha 


t the 


report 


tha 


he has been pledg 


ed Phi K.ap is misleading. Lincoln 


IS thrown 


out on his ear when 


1 h« 


attempts 


to take a 


collertion Smith dismisses the m 


acting 


after 


calhng 


atte 


ition to 


1 '*>^ 


fact that 


there wil 


be c.n election. Everyone to go o 
SIGMA CHI 


ut to 


eek 


votes for 


him 


self. 




Meeting 


was calle 


d to Older amid the hub-bub of the 


camp 


lis po 


liticians 


on the front 


por 


ch. Bro. 


Zevely m 


oved ihat the Sigma Chi Fraternity 


vote f 


or hi 


m in the 


presidential 


Bro 


Wildt o 


bjected u 


ntil he paid the $.25 that he owed 


him 


since 


1925. 


Bro 


Hartly 


staggered to 


his feet and suggested that Bro. Wildt's graft 


from 


he d 


ance be 


used 


to pur- 


cha 


se votes 


or Bro. Z 


svely. Bro. Littlepage brought the 


meetir 


ig to 


a close 


with 




crack from v 


vhich ther 


e was no comeback. 


















PHI SIGMA KAPPA 














Session 


called to 


order ,n Stadium Hall. Bro. Ryan 


is ca 


rried 


in and 


laid 


upon a 


loui 


ige, by B 


ro. Brill w 


ho looked like a blacksmith with a 


pair o 


f hor 


,eshoes i 


n his 


hand). 


Bro 


Bird sta 


cs that th 


•re is no Payne about him this year. 


Mee 


ting 


s adjour 


ned 


n favor 


of a 


Whoope 


e Party a 


t the New Chaltonte, to which Bro. 


Ryan 


and 


his bottl 


e gu 


r«le as- 


sen 


ed. 

















Pagr Fiii(r rhiwlrr,! ThU-hi-Kinlil 



AVONTICOLAa 




i^AVOMTICOL^, 



KAPPA ALPHA 

The meeting set for Tue.s<lay finally opens on Wednesday when Bro. Ayers has fin- 
Jahed telling the press aboi-t his medals. Bro. Hardy requests that the girls should be 
allowed to attend the sessions in order that he may shine along with Bro. .Ayers. Bro. 
Meise! suggests adjournment in oider to mourn the passing of Bro. Wiles, who has these 
5 years associated to his great detriment with John Barleycorn. Bro. Hagberg moves 
his P. B. K. pin in approval. 

KAPPA SIGMA 

Bro. Hall started tosjinf; .t ball against the chinaware and soon there were fnough 
gladiators assembled to hold the usual bull fight. Bro. Hague arrived in course of time 
with a new story on his mind nnd the campus election in his pocket. Bro. Stumpp sought 
some publicity for his pull. bro. Lang thought his mole should also be given consider- 
ation by the Athenaeum. Bro. Larue ended the torture session by hinting at a marble 
contest at Pittsburgh and v.as crushed in the rush of the dear brothers to root for Ross. 

KAPPA MU 

An early morning meeting is called by Bro. Moore to discuss why Kappa Mu exists. 
Nobody is eager to tackle the problem and Brothers Erb and Neuberger move to excom- 
municate the subject. It is so ordered. 

SIGMA DELTA PHI 
The meeting opens as most meetings have a tendency of doing. Bro. Conklyn 
makes a speech. "No runs; no hits; no errors." Bro. Pike proposes publication of a 
pamphlet stating that there \j a fraternity on the campus called Sigma Delta Phi. Every- 
body speaks individually on the subject, everybody seems to favor the motion so the meet- 
ing ends, to enable the members to get to their 8 o'clock classes. 

PI LAMBDA PHI 

Meeting comes to order very quickly. Bro. Porter, the chaplain, utters a prayer 
hoping for better luck against the Phi Sigs. Bro. Herskovitz swells up at the thought of 
being kept out of the Int jt rVaternity Council. Bro. Sclove admonishes Bro. Goldsteins 
action in putting the shot Ht (he dinner table with Bro. Hexer"s cherry, as chjrri-is are 
few and high these days. 

DELTA KAPPA PSI 

Meeting opens amid the tut moil created by the recent visit of Dean Stone and several 
Phi Gams. Brothers recover their balances in Bro. Thornhill s room where things lyin^ 
loose are apt to congregate. Bro. Randolph declares for the last time that he will be in 
school next year and can run for an office. The fraternity is over-jubilant and adjourns 
to celebrate. 

TAU DELTA THETA 

A few more men are pledged by leadpipe methods and soon there is enough for a 
quorum. Bro. Fahey instructs the boys in the art of self-advertising and agrees to be a 
candidate at large on the campus. Bro. Reed ends the delight with a dirty crack and 
brothers rush madly about South Park in the initiation of Bro. Fahey. 

BETA THETA PI 

The resounding smack of the president's lips brought the meeting to order. Bro. 
Hood congratulated himseit on hi- good luck in becoming president of the In* ;rfr<iternily 
Council. Various brothers r^.us.sured him that it was luck. Brother Ralston me.-k!y .stated 
that he would like to become Editor of the Athenaeum. Bro. Lewis lamented the exis- 
tence of liquor at parties. The brothers being unable to concentrate on nothing but 
liquor, women, and Beta Theta Pi passed into oblivion amid the applause of the Hill fra- 
ternities. 

PHI KAPPA TAU 

Everybody was pres-nt, for Phi Kappa Tau was the new national fraternity here, and 
must be made the best. Brother Goard was urging the brothers to give him an office. 
Bro. Coulter prepared an i.ssaull upon the Inter-Fraternity Council. Bro. Kach diss! 
paled everywhere. Meeting (xliourned amid the great applause and congratulations on 
everybody's success in "no loTiger feeling like a local." 



Pai?f Fnur II,. 

LIBRARY 



WERT VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 




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