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TX7"E HAVE here extended a 
" ' sincere effort to present a 
volume of the Monticola which is 
in keeping with the forward tide 
of West Virginia. 

We have endeavored to depict 
a true likeness of our school and 
by so doing, give pleasure to you. 

Pleasant thoughts of true fel- 
lowship with college friends and 
faculty, now vivid and seemingly 
indelible, may gradually fade and 
pass. To preserve these mem- 
ories for future moments of en- 
joyment is the object of the 1931 
Monticola. 




iy 



II 



e«li cation 



In appreciation of his devotion to 

tlie University we dedicate 

The 1931 Monticola 

to 

Frank Witcher McCullough 

Law Class 1910 

A loyal Mountaineer —a true 

West Virginian. 




3n illemoriam 



WILLIAM MILLER 
THEODORE SMITH 




ontentis 



DEDICATION 

CAMPUS 

ADMINISTRATION 

SENIORS 

JUNIORS 

SOPHOMORES 

FRESHMEN 

ACTIVITIES 

ATHLETICS 

MILITARY 

ORGANIZATIONS 

MUDDY COLA 




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Board of Governors 

OFFICERS 

EDWARD GRANDISON SMITH 
President 

DAVID ALLEN BURT 
Vice President 

CHARLES THOMPSON NEFF, JR. 
Secretary 

MEMBERS 

EDWARD GRANDISON SMITH 

DAVID ALLAN BURT 

FRANK- HENNEN BABB 

HUGH IKE SHOTT, JR. 

GERTRUDE ROBERTS 

ARTHUR BURKE KOONTZ 

CLEVELAND McSHERRY SEIBERT 



Page Twenty-Two 




Page Twenty-Three 




DR. JOHN ROSCOE TURNER 



DR. JOHN ROSCOE TURNER 
President of West Virginia University 



Dr. Turner, in the short period he has 
been at West Virginia University, has proved 
himself a brilliant scholar, an able leader and 
an extraordinary executive. He is a real friend 
of all the students and the University is proud 
to have such a man at its head. 



Administrative Officers of the University 

President of the University John Roscoe Turner 

Registrar of University Prof. Lloyd L. Friend 

Dean of Men Harry E. Stone 

Dean of Women Ruth Noer 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Dean Dr. W. P. Shortridge 

College of Law 

Dean Prof. Thurmond Arnold 

College of Engineering 
Dean - Prof. C. R. Jones 

College of Agriculture 

Dean Prof. F. D. Fromme 

School of Medicine 

Dean Dr. John N. Simpson 

College of Education 

Dean Dr. J. N. Deahl 

School of Pharmacy 
Dean Dr. G. A. Bergy 

School of Music 
Director Mr. Louis Black 

Summer School 
Director Prof. L. L. Friend 



Page Twenty-Bli 




Page Twenty-Sevt'D 



Student Council 

of 
IVest Virginia University 



JOHN D. PHILLIPS President of Student Body 

FRED LANDOLPHI Senior Representative (Man) 

KATHLEEN McCRAY Senior Representative (Woman) 

ARTHUR PRICHARD Junior Representative (Man) 

CATHRYN THOMPSON junior Representative (Woman) 

HERBERT RAINES President of Senior Class 

SIGMUND WEINER President of Junior Class 

PAUL ERB President of Sophomore Class 

CLARENCE LOVITCH President of Freshman Class 



Page Twenty-Eight 



JVomati 'j Student Government 
Association 



President - JANE SEABRIGHT 

First Vice-President EVELYN CARSKADON 

Second Vice-President HELEN BOGGESS 

Secretary MARY DEAN 

Treasurer MINA DUTY 

Senior Representative 1RF:NE CARNEY 

Junior Representative BERTHA HANDLAN 

Junior Representative MIRIAM LOCKHART 

Freshman Representative FRANCES LOVING 




Page Thirty-One 



Senior Class Officers 

President - HERBERT RAINES 

Vice-President HOWARD BATSON 

Secretary MILDRED ROSE 

Treasurer JOHN KISNER 

Historian GEORGE W. JACKSON 



Pagre Thirty-Four 




HERBERT S. RAINES 

Morgantown, W. Va. 
Degree— A. B. '29, B, S.Med. '30 

Alpha Gamma Rho : Phi Beta Pi Honorary 
Medical: Sphinx; Interfraternity Council; 
Senior Representative: President of Sen- 
ior Class: President of Freshman Medi- 
cal Class; President of Senior Medical 
Class: President of Phi Beta Pi National 
Honorary Med.; Delegate to N. S. F. A. 
1930; Athenaeum Board. 



MARTHA BROMBERG, A.B. 

Charleston 



TRUEHEART TAYLOR. A.B. 
Huntington 

Phi Kappa Psi: Mountam: F. Bater; Sphinx; 
Torch and Serpent; Basketball '2b, 'll. 
Captain '28, "29; Track '27, •28, '29. 



LEONARD M. BOARD, B.S.C.E. 
CIarksbur:z 



Phi Kappa Tau: Tau Beta Pi; Cha 
of Senior Week. 



BAILEY WYCOFF, LL.B. 
Grafton 



Sigma Nu; Phi Delta Phi 



KATHRYN SMOOT, A.B. 
Bluefleld 



Pi Beta Phi 



BERNARD SCLOVE 

Pi Lambda Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Sig- 
ma Rho; Winner of Debate State Liter- 
ary Contest '25; Varsity Debating '26, 
'27; Member Debate Team meeting team 
representing Universities of Great Britain 
'2 7; Student Director — B'nai B'rith Hillel 
Foundation. 



BRENICE PRATHER, B.M. 

Alpha Phi: W. S. G. A. '29, '30; Y. W. 
C. A. '20, '30; W. A. A. "29, '30; Uni- 
versity Choir "27, '28, '29, '30. 



RAY W. BAILEY, B.S.Med. 
Charleston 



FRED PHELPS, A.B. 

Morgantown 



Pi Kappa Alpha. 



W. DARRELL LOWE 
Tau Kappa Epsilon, Epsilon Phi Sigma. 



NELL RENNER, A.l 

Hundred 





B. J. PALADINO, B.S. 
Clarksburg 



MARY NETHKIN, A.B. 

NewburR 



ELMONT ULLMAN, B.S.Ch.E. 
Glenn Ferris 



Fau Kappa Epsilon. 



IRVING HOFFMAN, A.B. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ARTHUR W. CECH, B.S.Ch.E. 

Wheeling 



ROGENE BOYLES, Music 
Sistersville 



Page Thirty-Eight 



EARL S. WOLFE, A.B. 
Parkersburg 

Sigma Chi; Mountain; Fi Bater Cappai ; 
Football '26. '11: Baseball '27, '28, 'i'l. 
"30, Capt. "30; Varsity Club President 'lO. 



SCHOLASTICA GAYDOSH. B.S.H.E. 
Wheeling 



JOHN T. SCHAUB. A.B. \ 

Glendale ' 



Beta Theta Pi. 



DAVID B. HEXTER, A.B. 

New York City, N. Y. 

Pi Lambda Phi; Phi Beta Kappa: Eta Sigma 
Phi; Dramatic Club. 



ELVJN E. GIVEN, A.B. 
Clendennin 



RUTH BANE. A.B. 
Uniontown, Pa. 



Alpha Phi; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 





LYLE JONES. A.B. 
Bridgeport 

Phi Kappa Psi; Mountain; Fi Bater; Torch 
and Serpent; Phi Delta Phi; Boxing Man- 
ager. 



MARY TAIT. A.B. 
Morgantown 



J Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



BYRON RANDOLPH. LL.B. 

A B.. W. V. U. 1927; Delta Kappa Psi; Delta 
Sigma Rho: Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta 
Ph ; Debating; Debate Manager; Junior 
Representative; Student Council; Athen- 
aeum Publications Board; Member Stu- 
dent Board of Editors, West Virginia 
Law Quarterly. 6. 7; President, Law Col- 
lege Student Government. 



DONALD B. PARSONS, B.S.C.E. 

Keyser 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Kappa Kappa Psi; Sphinx; 
University Dance Com. '30. 



MARVIN HOOKER, B.S.E.E. 
Wheeling 



Kappa Mu. 



DARLENE B. BRADLEY, A.B. 
Elm Grove 

Pi Beta Phi; De'ta Sigma Rho; Mgr. Woman's 
Debating Team; Publicity Chairmin, 
Mardi Gras '29; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: 
Westminster Club. 



WILLIAM KENNETH BEHNKE, A.B. 

Follansbee 

Kappa Alpha; Fi Bater Cappar; Varsit% 
Club; Football '26. •27, '28, '9; Basebai 

'27, •28. '29, •30. 



HARRIET LOUISE FRENCH, A.B., LL.B. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Mortar Board; Delta 
Sigma Rho; President Y. W. C. A. •27- 
'28, First Vice-president W. S. G. A. "26- 
"27; Secretary-treasurer Delta Sigma Rho 
•27-'28, Vice-president •28-,^29, President 
•29-^30; Debating Team •26-^27-^28-'29 ; 
Law Quarterly Board •28-'29, Chairman 
•29-'30; President Kappa Kappa Gammi 
•29-'30. 



CHARLES BORUM SEIBERT, B.S.E.E. 
Martinsburg 

A'pha Gamma Rho; President of Tau Beta 
Pi; Interfraternity Council; Assistant in 
Engineering; A. 1. E. E. ; Intramural Man- 
ager •29, ^30. 



WARD D. STONE, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Delta Kappa Psi; Phi Delta Phi. 



JAMES WILSON. A.B. 
Clarksburg 

Delta Tau Delta; Torch and Serpent; Phi 
Lambda Upsilon. 



JOSEPHINE WATSON, A.\ 

Morgantown 
Delta Gamma. 





PAUL BOTTOME, LL.B. 

Moundsville 



Delta Tau Delta. 



MARQUERITE BOTTOME, A.B. 
Flemington 

Pi Beta Phi; Li-toon-awa; Basketball '27, 'ZS, 
■29; Baseball '27, •28, '29; Hockey •2b, 
•27, ^28; Sophomore Representative W. A. 
A.; Junior Representative and Secretary 
Student Council: Athenaeum Publication 
Board: Sponsor Co. B., •28. 



VINCENT MERENDINO. A.B. 
Clarksburg 



ENOCH ARTHUR LATHaNM, B.S.Agr. 
Buckhannon 

eta Theta Pi; Mountain; Fi Batar Cappar; 
Block and Bridle; Student Council 'ae; 
Assistant Football Manager '28; Varsity 
Boxing "29; Live Stock Judging Team ^29. 



FLOYD INGRAM, B.S.M.E. 
Cameron 



Phi Kappa Tau. 



RUTH TURNER, A.B. 
Grafton 

Pi Beta Phi; Kappa Phi; Press Club; Matri.t. 



Page Forty-Twi> 



WILLIAM THORNHILL. B.S.M.E. 

Charleston 
Delta Kappa Psi. 



SUELLA THOMPSON. B.S.H.E. 
Clarksburg 

Delta Gamma. 



CHARLES F. SOLENBERGER, B.S.Ch.i 

Martinsburg 
Alpha Gamma Rho; Sphinx. 



KENT TEBAY. A.B. 

Parkersburg 



GEORGE B.ANCROFT, A.B. 
Morgantown 



ALVIRA MOUNTAIN, A.B. 
Confluence, Pa. 





JOHN S. WILSON, B.S.M.E. 

Hickory, Pa. 



EVELYN BROWN. Music 

S^vandale 



Alpha Xi Delta. 



W1LL.ARD CASTO, A.B. 
Ripley 



Delta Kappa Psi, 



CARL J. NUTTER, LL.B. 

Spencer 



AUGUSTUS W. PETROPLUS, A.B. 

Wheeling 

Delta Sigma Rho ; Phi Beta Kappa: Monti 
cola; Phi Delta Phi. 



M.ARY ELEANOR REAM 
Morgantown 

Dramatic Club; Press Club; Athenaeum "27- 

•28. 



Page Forty-Four 



OSCAR W. JEPSEN. B.S.Med. 
Columbus. Ohio 



EVA McCLUNG, A.B. 
Reedy 



RALPH E. TALBOTT, B.S.Med. 
Philippi 

Beta Theta Pi; Phi Beta Pi. 



DANIEL McLaughlin, Grad. 

Elkins 



JENNINGS F. ROLLINS 

Sigma Chi; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Student 
Assistant in Chemistry; Caravan. 



HENRIETTA A. MARTIN, A.B. 

Flemington 

Alpha Xi Delta; Broaddus '27, "28; Dennison 
University '29. 




Page Forty-Five 




HERBERT OGDEN. LL.B. 
Fairmont 



CATHERINE PRESTON 
White Sulphur Springs 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Press Club; R. O. T. 
C. Sponsor '27-'28; Cadet Hop Commit- 
tee •27-'28-'29. 



RALPH M. FISHER, B.S.Med. 

Weston 



Sigma Phi Epsilon; Phi Beta Pi: Vice-Pr 
dent Senior Medical Class. 



RUSSELL G. ELLYSON, B.S.Agr. 
Glenville 

Alpha Gamma Rho ; Alpha Zeta ; Block and 
Bridle; Livestock Judging Team; Meat 
Judging Team; President Agricultural 
Council; Circulation Manager Agricul- 
turist; Anthony Dairy Club. 



CLARK R. MORGAN, JR. 
Charleston 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Band; Ohio Wesleyan 
"25, '26, University of Pennsylvania "26, 
■27. 



ELIZABETH THOMASSON, A.B. 
Hinton 



DENNIS D. THOMAS, A.B. 
Clendennin 

Sigma Phi Epsilon ; Torch and Serpent. 



GRACE HETRICK. B.S.H.E. 
Morgantown 



HOWARD M. K.UEHNER, LL.B. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Delta Kappa Psi. 



OTIS H. MILAM, M.A. 
Kappa Delta Pi. 



ERNEST C. VAN METRE, A.B. 
Shepherdstown 



MARGARET E. WELLS, A.B. 
Weston 

Pi Beta Phi; Mortar Board; Phi Beta Kappa; 
English Club; Rhododendron; Li-toon- 
awa; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: Co-ed Prom 
Committee. 





JOHN R. ALLEY, B.S.Med. 
Chillicothe, Ohio 



MARGARET MILL ER, A.B. 
Littleton 



WILLIAM THURLOW BOOHER, B.S.MecI. 
Moundsville 



eta Theta Pi; Phi Beta Pi, 



ROBERT McKINNEY COOPER, A.B. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Delta Kappa Psi ; Scabbard and Blade; Chi 
Sigma Delta; Order of the Cross; Black- 
guard Fusiliers. 



JOHN DALE THOMPSON, B.S.M.E. 

Morgantown 

Scabbard and Blade; President Student 
Branch A. S. M. E. 



MARY EDITH MONROE, B.S.H.E. 

Parkersburg 
Alpha Xi Delta, Ohio University '27, '28. 



JOHN STROSNIDER, Ph.C. 

Williamson 



HELEN BARRON, A.B. 
Greensburg, Pa. 



JAY MORRIS ARENA, B.S.Med. 

Clarksburg 



OSCAR B. GOLDSTEIN 

Pi Lambda Phi; Varsity Track 'ZS, '29, MO; 
Football '27; Varsity Club. 



JAMES B. JOHNSON, JR. 

Keyser 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Dramatic Club. 



HULDA B. SUDER, A.B. 
Meyersdale, Pa. 



Kappa Delta Pi. 





OPIE R. ALLAN, B.S.E.E. 
Forest Hill 

Tau Beta Pi; A. I. E. E. 



IVA C. HALL, B.S.Med. 
Charleston 



FREDERICK W. D. PARSONS, B.S.Agr. 
Ripley 

.Alpha Gamma Rho ; Sphinx; Torch and Ser- 
pent; Block and Bridle; Agriculture Coun- 
cil '26; Interfraternity Council; Grange. 



G. O. ROMIG, B.S.Ch.E. 
Keyser 



ANDREW ALBERT BROWN, B.S.C.E. 

London 



Tau Beta Pi; A. S. C. E. 



RUTH GROVE, A.B. 
Altoona, Pa. 



Gamma Phi Beta. 



HARVEY J. SIMMONS, A.B. 

Phi Kappa Psi; Mountain: Fi Batar Kappar; 
Sphinx; Torch and Serpent: Sigma Gamma 
Epsilon: Editor-in-Chief Monticola 1928; 
Non-Athletic Reward 1928. 



ANITA HIGHLAND, A.B. 
Clarksburg 

Kappa Kappa Gamma: W. S. G. A. 



CLARENCE E. W.ALKER, A.B. 
Garett 



PANSY MILLARD. B.S.H.E. 
Morgantown 



EDWARD REED, .^.B. 
Parkersburg 

Tau Delta Theta; Scabbard and Blade; 
Blackguard Fusiliers: Chi Sigma Delta; 
Cadet Captain R. O. T. C. 



HAZEL DUTY 
Wheeling 





WILLIAM H. WINFIELD, A.B. 
Clarksburg 

Phi Kappa Psir Fi Bater Cappar; President of 
Torch and Serpent; Press Club; Jour- 
naiiers; English Club; Junior Class His- 
torian: Athenaeum Staff; Assistant Bas- 
ketball Mgr. 



MARY PRITCHARD HITE. A.B. 

Mannington 



Kappa Kappa Gamma; Senior Editor Monti- 
cola. 



ANDREW V. WILEY. .■\.B. 
Clarksburg 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



MARY GARNET GORRELL, B.S.H.E. 

Charleston 

Alpha Phi; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Kappa 
Phi; Kappa Delta Pi; Rhododendron; 
Home Economics Club; Grange; Religious 
Work Council; Wesley Foundation Coun- 



CHESTER B. HIETT, B.S.Agr. 

Martinsburg 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha Zeta; Block and 
Bridle. 



MARGARET REED SHRIVER. A.B. 

Morgantown 
Pi Beta Phi. 



CLARENCE J. KOONTZ 

Parkersburg 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Torch and Serpent. 



ELIZABETH H AUGHT, A. 
West Liberty 



S. N. MERINDINO, A.B. 

Clarksburg 



SALVADOR SANTOS Y REYES 

Caguas, Porto Rico 

Li-toon-awa: La Tertulia, President '28-'29; 
Orchesis; Cosmopolitan Club: Dramatic 
Club. 



S. R. JOHNSON, Grad. 
Lexington, Ky. 



Delta Kappa Ps 



VERA VIRGINIA HENSELL, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Gamma Phi Beta; Kappa Phi Cabinet •.?8 
'29; Press Club; President "Wesley Pay- 
ers." 





WOOD HARLAN BRUDER, B.S.Med. 

Football '23. •24; Baseball '23, •24, 'lb; 
Varsity Club; Mountain; Phi Gamma 
Delta; Phi Beta Pi; Fi Batar Cappar. 



FRANKIE H. LONG 
Elkins 



KapFVT Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



HOLMES BLAIR, B.S.Med. 
Sandyville 



BLANCHE H. BOWMAN. B.S.H.E. 
Morgantown 



HARRY E. BALDOCK, B.S.Med. 
Charleston 



MILDRED CROSS, A.B. 

Letart 



Alpha Delta Pi. 



RICHARD J. SOLOF, LL.B. 
Charleston 



Pi Lambda Phi. 



IRENE CAPLAN 
Clarksburg 



VERN O. WHITMAN, B.S.E.E. 
Logan 

Mountaineer Club; A. I. E. E. ; Wesley House 
Cabinet; Wesley Players; Captain in R. 
O. T. C. 



RUBY McQuillan, a.b. 

FoUansbee 

Beta Pi Theta; Kappa Phi; Presid-nt 
Woman's Hall. 



WILLIAM H. ALLMAN, M S.Med. 

Morgantown 
Theta Chi. 



MILDRED C. ROSE, A.B. 
Morgantown 




Page Fifty-Five 




LEMUEL D. JARVIS, A.B. 
Clarksburg 



Delta Tau Delta 



DOROTHY MATICS, A.B. 
East Bank 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Rhododendron; 
President English Club; R. J. 



ARTHUR WHITENER, Music 
Morgantown 



MERLE STEMPLE. A.B. 
Bretz 



LEE J. MARKHEIM, A.B. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Phi Alpha; Varsity Track "28, '29. 



MARY JANE RIGGS. A.B. 

Moundsville 



JOHN M. DUNCAN, B.S.Agr. 

Moundsville 



LORA PEARL MILAM, B.S.H.E. 

Robinwood 

Pi Tau Delta: Phi Upsilon Omicron: Kappa 
Delta Pi; Kappa Phi; Y. W C. A.; Home 
Economics Club; 4-H Club; Wesley Play- 
ers. 



KARL H. KANALZ. B.S.E. 
Parkersburg 



Kappa Kappa Psi ; A. S. M. E. ; Mountaine 
Club. 



REBA KEESEL, A.B. 

Bluefield 



GEORGE H. HOLLIS, B.S.E.E. 
Martinsburg 

Alpha Gamma Rho ; Tau Beta Pi; A. I. E. E. 



JEAN ELIZABETH KYLE 

Clarksburg 
Beta Pi Theta. 





JOHN R. KOLLER. A.B. 
Triadelphia 



MARGARET VIOLET BAILEY, B.S.H.E. 

Morgantown 
Home Economics Club; Collegiate 4-H Club. 



ELMER E. MYERS, A.B., B.S. 
Philippi 

Theta Kappa Psi ; Kappa Kappa Psi ; Band 
•28, •29, •30. 



FRANCES KAPLAN, A.B. 
Harpers Ferry 



HOMER V. DeJOURNETT, B.S.E.E. 
Stollings 

Phi Kappa Tau; Tau Beta Pi: A. 1. E. E. ; 
Varsity Rifle Team, Capt. '29. 



VIRGINIA HAMPTON .SELLERS, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Kappa Phi. 



"X 



HOMER HAYHURST HOGUE, B.S.Agr. 
Pennsboro 

Alpha Gamma Rho ; Torch and Serpent; Fi 
Batar Cappar; Grange: Football '25, '26, 
•27, '28; Track '25, '26, '27, '28. 



JOSEPHINE HERD, A.B. 

Morgantown 

Phi Mu. 



HAROLD OLSON, Grad. Agr. 
Brookings, South Dakota 

Alpha Gamma Rho. 



ALMA MILLIKEN 

Kappa Phi; 4-H Club; Y. W. C. A.; Wesley 
Foundation Cabinet; Forum Steering Com- 
mitee. 



CLARENCE E. MOYERS, B.S.E.E. 

Bruceton Mills 

Student Assistant Electrical Engineering; 
Member of Tau Beta Pi; President of A. 
1. E. E. '29. '30. 



RUBY KOON, A. 
Monongah 




Page Fifty-Nine 




JOSEPH S. MOEHS. A.B. 
New York City 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Torch and Serpent; Sen- 
ior Invitation Committee; Senior Intra- 
mural Manager '30. 



ALICE REYNOLDS, A.B. 

Clarksburg 



GEORGE C. BARNES, B.S.E.E. 

Mount Hope 

Tau Beta Pi; A. I. E. E. ; Engineering 
sciety; Ass stant Cheerleader '27, "26 



HAZEL PIPER, B.S.H.E. 



Morgantown 



ARTHUR A. MAUST, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Journaliers; Scabbard and Blade; Black- 
a;uard Fusiliers; Press Club; Mountaineer 
Club; .Athenaeum Staff. 



LINDA IRVIN POWELL, B.M 

Wheeling 



University Choi 



IRA S. YOUNG. B.S.Ch.E. 
Morgantown 

Varsity Club; Varsity Track •28, "29, "30; 
Cross Country '29. 



MABEL FERN HESS. B.S.H.E. 
Morgantown 

Home Economics Club; Phil Hellenic Club 
•27. 



JOHN TULLUS DRANSFIELD. B.S..^gr. 
Gap Mills 

Alpha Gamma Rho-. Anthony Dairy Club; 
Collegiate 4-H Club. 



MARGARET BROWN 
Newell 



Kappa Phi. 



WILBUR McCOLLOCH, A.B. 
West Liberty 



Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



FLORENCE L. STEALEY. A.B. 
Clarksburg 





LUKE A. OLEANO, Ph.C. 
Kappa Pai; Track. 



MARY WITTEN, A.B. 
Princeton 



THURMAN STOUT, B.S.C.E. 
Clarksburg 
Sigma Chi. 



MARY L. THOMAS. A.B. 
Grafton 



JAMES E. WINTER, B.S.E.E. 
Morgantown 

Pi Kappa Phi; A. I. E. E. : Blue Band. 



MARGARET EDITH WILT, B.S.H.E. 
Aurora 

Home Economics Club. 



Page Sixty-Two 



MARTIN EPSTEIN, A.B. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

md; Drum Major '30; Phi Alpha; Phi Ep 
silon Phi; Kappa Kappa Psi; Fi Batar 
Cappar. 



SARA ROSEN. A.B. 
Clarksburg 



GLENN W. GRUBB, B.S.C.E. 
Mannington 



KATHRYN HUFFMAN, A.B. 
Morgantown 



JAMES C. WILSON. A.B. 
Morgantown 



HELEN S. SMITH, A.B. ' 
Point Pleasant 

Alpha Delta Pi; Pan-Hellenic Association. 











LOUIS MAHAN 


ORR 




Follanabee 






Be 


ta Theta Pi; Phi Beta Pi. 








SUSAN P. CRADDOCK, 


A.B. 




Weston 






Pi 


Beta Phi; Kappa Phi; Y. 


w. 


C. A. 




EDWARD M. HANSFORD, 


B.S.E.E. 




Pratt 






Ta 


u Beta Pi; Treasurer A. 


. E. 


E. 




FAY KRIDER, B.S.H.E. | 




Parsons 








PETER D. CRYNOCK 


B.S.Med. 1 




Pursglove 








JANE SPERRY. 


A.B 






Sistersville 






Ch 


i Omega. 










■1 


Page Sixty-Four 



HOWARD G. PETERSON. B.S.Agr. 
Weston 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Grange; Torch uid 
Serpent; Block and Bridle; Agricu turist 
Staff; Judging Team. 



MILDRED RUNNER. A.B. 
Morgantown 



JOHN J. KONRAD B.S.C.E. 
Charleston 



RUBY E. RISHER, A.B. 
Morgantown 



H. CLAY R. HARDESTY. A.! 
Clarksburg 



Alpha Ga 



ELMA HICKS 

Webster Springs 

President Pi Beta Phi; Matrix; Rhododen- 
dron; English Club; Kappa Delta Pi; Sec- 
retary W, A. A. Council '27; Press Club; 
Y. W. C. A. 




Page Sixty-Five 




NEWTON DuPUY, B.S.Med. 
Beckley 

Phi Kappa Psi; Torch and Serpent; Scabbard 
and Blade; Caravan; Phi Sigma Nu ; Phi 
Beta Pi; Baseball '26. 



B.AlRBARA dowd, a.b. 

Weston 
Chi Omega. 



ANTHONY YURKO, B.S.Med. 
HoUidays Cove 



MARY ELLEN BURKE, B.Mus. 
Morgantown 

Alpha Phi; University Choir; Public School 
Music; Glee Club. 



WARD M. SHARP, A.B. 
Marlinton 

.Mpha Gamam Rho ; Phi Epsilon Phi; Cara- 
van. 



ELEANOR J, McBRIDE, Music 

St. Marys 



.Alpha Phi. 



JAMES VERMILLION, B.S Med. 

Welch 



Phi Delta Theta. 



SUE WELLS FREDLOCK. A.B. \ 

Piedmont 

Chi Omega; W. A. A. Council: Westminster 
Girls' Club. 



WILLIAM CL.AY WARMAN, B.S.E.E. 

Weston 

Delta Kappa Psi; Tau Beta Pi; Scabbard and 
Blade; A. I. E. E. ; Cadet Captain Co. E. ; 
President Methodist Student Council; 
President General Engineering Society; 
Student Assistant in Electrical Enginere- 
ing. 



ELIZABETH L. MOORE, A.t. 
Elkins 



SAMUEL N. HEADLEE, B.S.Ch.E. 

New Martinsville 

Pi Kappa Phi: Tau Beta Pi; Sigma Gamr 
Epsilon; Phi Lambda Upsilon. 



VIRGINIA BAER, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Gamma Phi Beta. 





RUDOLPH SCHIFFMAN, A.B. 
New York, N. Y. 



Ph. Alpha 



VIRGINIA SAMPLES. A.B. 



WALTER M. APPLEGATE. LL.B. 
Morgantown 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



MRS. EMBREE L. .ARMENTROUT, A.B. 
Morgantown 



CLARENCE L. FLESHMAN, B.S.Agr. 
Orchard 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha Zeta ; Agricul- 
turist StafF; Anthony Diify Club; Press 
Club; Dairy Judging TeamS; Grange. 



FRANCES BRADLEY. A.B. 
Clarksburg 

Eta Sigma Phi. 



BYRON F. SACH. A.B. 

Morgantown 



VIRGINIA PARSONS, A. 

FCeyser 
Phi Mu; Matrix; Press Club. 



HAROLD D. SLAVEN, l.L.B. 

Morgantown 



W. S. McDANIEL. B S.E.E. 

Grafton 



HAROLD P. ARMBRECHT, A.: 

Wheeling 



EVA M. PREISS. A.B. 

Homestead, Pa. 




Pag-e Sixty-Nine 




PAUL S. OSHEL, B.S.Agr. 
Point Pleasant 



Alpha Gamma Rho. 



DOROTHY VIOLET SHAFFER. A.B. 
Masontown 

Alpha Phi; Debating Team. 



WILLIS H. ROSS. B.S.E.E. 
Morgantown 

Tau Delta Theta ; Scabbard and Blade; Red 
Dragon Casteliers; R. O. T. C. Lt. 



FORREST CLARK. B.S.Ed. 
Hemlock 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Broaddus College '11, 
'28: Michigan State College "29. 



ROBERT H. PELL. A.B. 
Morgantown 



VIRGINIA BARNETT 

Follansbee 



Gamma Phi Beta; W. S. G. A.; Y. W. C. A. 



FRANKLIN M. CHAMBERS. B.S.M.E. 

Ravenswood 



FRANCES NEWMAN. A.B. 



Moundsville 



Alpha Phi 



J. T. VAN VOORHIS. B.S.Eng. 
Morgantown 

Pi Kappa Phil Tau Beta Pi: Varsity Track 
•3O; Vice-President Student A. S. M. E. 



ALEX FISHER, B.S.Med. 






Chester 








EDWARD WILLIAM NOL.^ND 


A.B. 




Romney 








MARY STURM, 


A.B. 






Fairview 








Phi Mu; Press Club; Kappa 


Phi;Y. 


W. C. 


,A 


Cabinet '29, '30. 










Page Saventy-One 




CHRISTY WILDT, A.B. 
Parkers'jurg 

Sigma Chi; Mountain; Fi Batar Cappar; 
Torch and Serpent; Cheer Leader 1929. 



JANE O, SEAB?<1GHT, A.B. 

Roneys Point 

kappa Kappa Gamma; Phi Beta Kappa 
Mortar Board: President W. S. G. A. 



M. B. FERDEBER, B S.Med. 

Morgantown 
Pi Lambda Phi. 



FRANCIS CRINER. LL.B. 

Morgantown 



FREDERIC A. MacDONALD. LL.B. 



Sigma Nu; Phi Alpha Delta; President Sen- 
ior Law Class. 



REBECCA FRANCES DOAK, B.S.Ed. 
Morgantown 

Mortar Board; Rhododendron; Li-toon-awa; 
News Editor, Athenaeum; Kappa Delta 
Pi; Forum; Press Club; Y. W. C. A. Cab, 
inet; W. S. G. A., Sophomore Represen- 



JAMES SCOTT. B.S.Med. 

Terra .Alta 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Phi Beta Pi. 



CATHERINE JOHNSON P.ATTON, A.B. 

Bridgeport 
Alpha Xi Delta; Press Club; English Club. 



CORDON ALFRED BRILL. A.B. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Mountain; Fi Batar Cap- 
par; Torch and Serpent; .Alpha Zeta; 
Wrestling '28, '29; Captain. '30. 



GLENN S. WATSON, B.S.Ch.E. 

Masontown 



OWEN R. GATES, A.B. 
Flemington 



LENORE WELLS, A.B. 
Youngstown, Ohio 





FRED KOPP, LL.B. 
Huntington 

Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Alpha Delta. 



MARGARET FAHEY NEWMAN 

Moundsville 



Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



S. CLEMMER WARMAN, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Delta Kappa Psi; Press Club; Journaliers 
Managing Editor of Athenaeum. 



JOHN HOWARD MUSGRAVE 
Mount Clare 

Delta Epsilon; Dramatic Club; Social Cor 
mittee. 



J. VERNON SACHER, B.S.Ch.E. 
Wheeling 

Kappa Mu; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Lambda Up- 
silon; Sigma Gamma Epsilon: Newman 
Club. 



MARIAN C. WILLIAMS, A.B. 

Meadville, Pa. 

Gamma Phi Beta; Phi Beta Kappa; Eta Sig- 
ma Phi; Pan Hellenic Board .•29. '30; W. 
S. G. A. 



JACKSON JOHNSON, LL.! 

West Union 



Phi Kappa Sigma 



JUANITA COLE. A.B. 

Ravenswood 



Delta Gamma. 



H. J. PAUGH. B.S.C.E. 
Berkeley Springs 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Sphinx; President A. S. 

C. E. 



CHARLES R. ADAMS, A.B. 
Inwood 



WALTER C. CZERWINSKI, B.S.M.E. 
Jersey City, N. J. 

A. S. M. E.; Beta Sigma; Captain R. O. T. C. 



LOUISE HAMILTON. A.B. 

Pennsboro 





EDWARD JO:^DON FOX B.S.Ch.E. 

Wheeling 

Kappa Sigma; Phi Lambda Upsilon ; Sigma 
Gamma Epsi'on ; Fi Bater Cappar; Scab- 
bard and Blade; Torch and Serpent; Var- 
sity Club; Inter-Fraternity Council; Bas- 
ketball -28, '29. -30. 



RUTH MILLER, A.B. 

Tunnelton 
Gamma Phi Beta; Kappa Phi; Eta Sigma Phi. 



EDWARD LUTWIN. .A.B. 

New York, N. Y. 



Phi Alpha 



GORDON M. WOODDELL. B.S.E.E. 
Webster Springs 

Phi Sigma Kappa. 



HOWARD M. BATSON, JR., A.B. 

Fairmont 

Tau Kappa Epsilon; .Sphinx; Torch and Se 
pent; Vice-President .Senior Class. 



JEANETTE McGUFFlE, A.B. 
Tunnelton 



WILLIAM ROBERTSON, A.B. 

Richwood 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 



LEORA DUNN, A.B. 

Reedsville 

Alpha Xi Delta: Dramatic Chib; En!^ii.^h 
Club; La Tertulia; "Monticola" Staff; R. 
O. T. C. Sponsor; Senior Ball Commil- 
tee; "Outward Bound"; University Choir; 
University Glee Club; "Miss West Vi.- 



W. L. BROWNING. JR.. LL.B. 

Uniontov/n, Pa. 
Phi Kappa Sigma. 



WILLIAM p. BliRDETTE, .-X.B. 

St. .Albans 



Delta Kappa Ps 



E. L. PETERS, Ph.C. 

Union 

Kappa Alpha; Kappa Psi ; Dra. 
Sphinx. 



DELLA V. DUTY, .-X.E 

Wheeling 




Page Seventy-Seven 




WILLIAM H. COCHRANE, A.B. 
Fairmont 



Delta Tau Delta. 



EMILY S. PARIS. A.B. 
Elm Grove 



Alpha Xi Delta. 



LAWRENCE M. EVANS, LL.B. 
Moundsville 



Phi Delta Theta. 



WILLIAM W. LEWIS, B.S.Agr. 
Point Pleasant 



Sigma Nu. 



J. WALTER MASON. A.B. 
Marlinton 



RUTH BLODGETT, A.B. 
Gamma Phi Beta; Kappa Phi; La Tertulia. 



Paere Seventy-Eight 



HENRY P. SNYDER. A.B. 
Bruceton Mills 

Sigma Nu; Fi Batar Cappar. 



MARY ALICE CURRENCE 
Clarksburg 



Kappa Kappa Gamr 



H, W. EPLINC, A.B. 

Welch 



Sigma Nu; Track ■28. '29, '30; Varsity Club; | 
Fi Batar Cappar. 



RICHARD CLYDE BRAND, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Kappa Alpha; Torch and Serpent; Caravan: 
Blackguard Fusiliers; Cadet Officer, R. O. 
T. C. 



HAROLD R. RIDENOL'R, Ph.C. 
Princeton 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



SARAH L. LANTZ, A.B. 
Morgantown 




Page Seventy-Nine 




DANIEL BOUGHNER, A.B. 

Morgantown 

Sigma Phi Epsi'on; Phi Beta Kappa; Manag- 
ing Editor Athenarum 30; News Editor 
Athenaeum '29; Athenaeum Pub'ication 
Board; Press Club; JournaHers: English 
Club; Grey friars; Local Scribe, National 
Student Federation of America; Winner of 
Teaching Fellowship at Tufts College. 



CHARLOTTE G. CRAWFORD. B.S.Ed. 

Morgantown 

Pi Tau Delta; Kappa Delta Pi; Kappa Ph. 
Pre.'s Club; Y. W. C. A.: W. A. A. 



PAUL JOSEPH LANGAN, A.B. 
Corning, N. Y. 

Kappa Alpha; Fi Batar Cappar; Var.sity 
Club; Baseba'l '27, -28. 29, 30; Athletic 
Editor Monticola. 



JACK SIEGAL, A. 

Newark, N. J. 



Phi Sigma Delta; Ass't Bus. Mgr. Athe 
aeum; Wrestling '27, '28. 



JOHN H. MARTIN, A.B. 
Shinnston 
Sigma Chi. 



LUCILLE JANE KING 

Mount Nebo 

.Alpha Phi; Kappa Phi; Sponsor R. O. T. C. 
'30; Varsity Vaudeville '30; W. S. G. A.; 
Y. W. C. A.; Kappa Phi Cabinet; Wesley 
Foundation Cabinet. 



JOHN D, PHILLIPS, A.B., LL.B. 

Clarksburg 

Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Delta Phi; Mountain; 
Sphinx; Fi Batar Cappar; President of 
Student Body; President of Athenaeum 
Publication Board. Chairman of Monti- 
cola Publication Board; Law Quarterly 
Board '29 '30; Mountaineer Team '28. 
■29, -30; Interfraternity Council; Track 

•26. '27, '28. 



IRENE BARNES CARNEY, A.B. 

Wheeling 

Alpha Xi De'ta; Kappa Delta Pi; English 
Club: Seo Beowulf Gedryhf; Kappa Phi; 
Hockey Manager '2 7; Mickey "26; Junior 
and Senior Representative, W. S. G. A.; 
Treasurer W. S. G. A.; Junior and Senior 
Representative W. A. A.; Panhellenic 
Treasurer; Wesley Foundation. 



JOHN HARVEY EBELING, A.B. 

Wheeling 

Delta Kappa Psi; Scabbard and Blade; Ordei 
of the Cross; Blackguard Fusiliers; Phil 
hellenic Cub. 



H.^RRY R. HESSE, A.B. 
Wheeling 

Theta Chi; Boxing '30. 



CHARLES H. H.ADEN, A.B. 
Morgantown 

Sipma Phi Epsilon: Fi Batar Cappar; Var->:ty 
Club; Interfraternity Council. 



CHRISTINE .ARNOLD, A.B. 

Weston 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Mortar Board; Ph 
Beta Kappa; President Y. W. C. A. 





RICHARD RALSTON, A.B. 

Weston 

=ta Theta Pi; Mountain; Sphinx; Editor of 
Athenaeum; Editor Student Directory; 
Journaliers; President of Press Club. 



VIRGINIA E. WILEY. A.B. 
Charleston 



Pi Beta Phi, 



HARRISON GUS MUNTZING, A.B., LL.B. 

Maysville 
Phi .Alpha Delta; Law Quarterly. 



CHARLES p. THOMAS, A.B. 

Weston 
Beta Theta Pi. 



ALBERT IZZO. B.S.E.E. 
Dunbar, Pa. 



GENEVIEVE BROWN. A.B. 
Moundsville 

Pi Beta Phi; Mortar Board, President; Kappa 
Phi; Rhododendron; Beta Pi Theta; Kappa 
Delta Pi; Panhellenic Representative; Co- 
Ed Prom Committee; Junior Representa- 
tive, W. S. G. A. 



CULLEN HALL, A.B. 
William«on 



Kappa Sigma. 



SUSAN HAMMER. B.S.H.E. 

Flatwoods 



ENNIS E. MECAILEY, A.B. 

Chester 



BERNARD LEVINE. A.B. 
Bronx, N. Y. 



Phi Alpha. 



CLARENCE E. ROTH, Graa. 

Benwood 



MARTHA BAYLES. B.E.Ed. 
Morgantown 

Newman Club; W. A. A. Council; Track 
Manager '29; Y. W. C. A.; Press Club. 





HAROLD PROUDFOOT, A 

Grantsville 



Cappa Alpha. 



ALICE M. BOYER, A.B. 

Morgantowr. 



ALBERT MENEDIS, A.B. 

Newark, N. J. 



THOMA.S REED GARVIN 
Moundsville 

appa Sigma; Varsity Basketball Mana 
30; Varsity Cluh. 



RENICK WILKINSON, A.B. 
Morgantown 



Sigma Nu. 



MONN.A S. BLAND, Music 

Morgantown 



CHARLES GREGORY KREBS 

Charleston 

Sigma Chi; Scabbard and B'ade: Fi Batar 
Cappar; Mountain; Varsitv Club; Cadet 
Major '11. '28: Varsity Wrestling '27, 2?; 
Varsity Boxing 'l'). "30; Boxing Captain 
•30. 



NANCY D. DELLI-GATTI, Mt 

Morgantown 



Alpha Phi 



WINCHESTER T. LATHAM 

Buckhannon 

Beta Theta Pi; Varsity Club; Football '? t. 
•25, "26, '27; Captain Football ^27; Stu 
dent Council '27; Mountaineer Week 
Team '30. 



STEPHEN F. HYTROCEK. B.S.Agr. 
Fairchance, Pa. 



THOMAS H. JOHNSON 
Wheeling 

Kappa Sigma; Mountain; Fi Balar Cappa 
Varsity Club: Football Manager •29. 



CARRIE M. ADDISON, B.S.Ed. 

Morgantown 




P;is:e Eighty-Five 




JOHN MARK MOORE, A.B. 

West Alexander, Pa. 



Theta Chi; Bus. Mgr. MonHcola '29. 



TERESA BRODERICK. .A.B. 

Morgantown 



.Athenaeum Staff. 



EDWARD L. JUSTICE. B.S.Med. 

Wheeling 



ALBERT C. 3CANLON, .A.B. 
Morgantown 



FREDERICK H. DOBBS. A.B. 
Wheeling 



LOUISE McNAM.ARA. B.S.Ed. 

Williamson 



Page Eighty-Six 



FRED LANDOLPHI, A.B. 
Newark. N. J. 

Alpha Phi Delta; Student Council. 



K.'XTHLF.EN McCRAY. A.B. 
Fairmont 

Student Council; Secretary Athenaeum Pub- 
lication Board; Mountaineer Club Coun- 
cil; Y. W. C. A.; Newman Club; Dramatic 
Club; Representative N. S. F. A. Congress 
'30; Convocation Commitee. 



L. CHESTER MAY, A.B. 

Sistersville 
Kappa Alpha; Editor Monticola "30; Sphinx. 



CHARLES Mc. BARRICKMAN, LL.B. 
Morgantown 



JULIAN SCOTT, A.B. 
Fairmont 

Sigma Chi: Football '26. '28, '29. 



MERIAM F. CHENOWETH. Music 
Philipp. 







STEWART S. BROWN. 


A.B. 




Wheeling 




Be 


ta Theta Pi; Manager Basebal 
tain: Fi Batar Cappar; Sphinx 


•2<); Mo 




MARGARET L. DAVIS, 


A.B. 




Huntington 




Chi Omega. 






EDWARD KRIEGER. A.B. 




Wheeling 




T^ 


eta Chi. 






BENJAMIN MELNICOFF. 


A.B. 




Morgantown 






H. C. GREGORY, LL.B. 




Corley 






MELBA JEAN WATERS, 


B.S.Ed. 




Morgantown 




Pi 


Beta Phi. 





LOUIS H. ARMENTROUT, A. 
Morgantown 



SARAH H. CREE, A.B. 
Carmichaels, Pa. 



R. CLARKE BUTLER, B.S.Agr. 
Inwooa 

Alpha Gamma Rho ; Alpha Zpta; Exchange 
Editor of W. Va. Agriculturist; Grange; 
Wesley Foundation Cabinet: Religious 
Work Council; Wesley Players; Anthony 
Dairy Club; Business Manager W, Va. 
Agriculturist; Dairy Products Judging 
Team. 



GUY H. ROTHFUSS, B.S.Med. 

Herndon 



HERBERT H. KINKAID, B.S.E.E. 

Deepwater 

Tau Beta Pi; A. 1. E. E.: Vice-President of 
General Engineering Society. 



LLOYD S. H.AYES, B.S.Med. 

Morgantown 




Page Eighty-Nine 




H. L. SUTTON, A.B. 

Newark, N. j. 



ETHEL KEEFE. A.B. 

Morgantown 



Delta Gamma. 



CECIL C. COULTER, B.S.E.E. 
Logan 

Phi Kappa Tau: Tau Beta Pi; A. \. E. E. 



J. IR.A STEELE, B.S.E.E. 

Morgantown 
Second Lt. Engineers Reserve Corps; Assi 
tant to Prof, of Military Science and Ta 
tics; A. I. E. E. 



GAIL A. CASTON, Ph.C. 
Oxford 



EVELYN CARSKADON, A.B. 

Charleston 



Delta Gamma; Pan-Hellenic Associati 



JAMES H. COLEMAN, JR.. A.B. 
Farmington 

Phi Kappa Psii La Tertulia. 



ANNA LOU BICKLE. A.B. 

ParkersUurg 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Monticola Staff. 



GEORGE W. JACKSON, LL.B. 

Jane Lew 
Phi Kappa Psi. 



KATHERINE AMOS. A.B. 
Charleston 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



FLETCHER WILLS MANN. A.B.. LL.B. 

Ballard 

Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Sigma Rho ; Ph 
Delta Phi; Caravan; Tau Delta Theta 
Debating Team; Law Quarterly; Rifls 
Team. 



AUGUST W. PEROPLUS, A.B. 
Wheeling 




}'age Ninety-One 



Junior Class Officers 

President SIGMUND WEINF.R 

Vice-President HAROLD LOCKER 

Secretary VIRGINIA MILLER 

Treasurer LOU FORMAN 

Historian ELOISE KERR 








#1 % 



f4*f 



CHARLES B. HART 

Wheeling 



ELOISE PIERSON 

St. Albans 



PAUL. KIDD 
Glenville 



GAYNELLE STRAIGHT 
Rivesville 



PETER STEENBERGEN 

Point Pleasant 




MARY BRADFORD 

Pennsboro 



HAROLD NEFF 

Charleston 



ALICE BROWN 
Morgantown 



LOUIS MEDVIN 

Morgantown 



LEAH MAE WILLIAMS 

Fairmont 



WILLIAM HASLAM 
Moanville 



ROBERT LOWE 
Fairmont 



JAMES P. ENGLE 

Charles Town 



DOROTHY OWENS 
Hastings 



J. C. GOAL 
Morgantown 




CARRIE BROWN 
Morgantown 



MARY WILLIAMS 

Warwcod 



NELLIE JAMISON 

Morgantown 



CHARLES M. DERR 

Harpers Ferry 



ELMER MAY 

Keyser 



Vage Ninety-Five 



PAUL C. GATES 
Jane Lew 



LOISBELLE BAKER 
Morgantown 



GEORGE D'AGOSTLNO 
Morgantown 



VIRGINIA SAMSELL 
Morgantown 



CHARLES G. POLAN 
Charleston 




FRANCES STAHL 

Stotesbury 



PETER CATAPANO 
Brooklyn 



MILDRED BAYLES 

Morgantown 



NEAL WILSON 

Huntington 



MORTON WAXMAN 

New York 



ROY KOCH 
Grafton 



MARY MARTIN 
St. Marys 



DELBERT NOEL 
Hinton 



FAITH LAWRENCE 

Morgantown 



CARTER WITHERS 

Parkersburg 




LAURA LYON 

Rowleaburg 



HUGHES CRAGO 

Wheeling 



MILDRED ARNETT 
Morgantown 



I ROBERT TIGGLEBACK 
Wheeling 



JOHN N. SNYDER 
Eledi, Pa. 



Page Ninety-Seven 



EUGENE D. HARRIS 
Mannington 



DORA LONG 
Clarksburg 



WILLIAM H. STERLING 

Masontown 



VIRGINIA A. MILLER 

Wheeling 



WILLIAM T. MILLI30N 

Springfield 




BONITA BLAIR 
Morgantown 



LOUIS LEVITT 
New York 



MARGARET HATFIELD 

Morgantown 



WILLIAM H. DARNALL 
Mount Hope 



SYLVIA MILLIKEN 
Waynesburg, Pa. 



WILLIAM J. HANNA 

Wheeling 



VIRGINIA DAVIES 
Morgantown 



STARK A. WILMOTH ? * 
Montrose 



KATHRYN HINKLE 
Weston 



WILLIAM HAINES 
Wheeling 




DAISY MAE MILLER 

Charleston 



K. R. SMITH 

Weston 



ELEANOR STONE 

Morcantown 



CHARLES KRAMER 
Fairmont 



ELOISE SCHERR 

Keyser 



EDWARD S. LOY 

Hoy 



RUTH TIBBS 
Morgantown 



J. D. LYON 



FRANCES KUMP 
Elkins 



S. S. JACOBS 

Wheeling 




JEANETTE BROOKS 
Morgantown 



C. O, PRUNTY 

Oxford 



STELLA RECTOR 
Anawalt 



HUGH McNEIL 

Morgantown 



GLADYS SCHULTZ 

Parkc-rsburg 



Page One Hundred 



JAMES S. LOVE 
Elm Grove 



FREDA BRAUN 

Davis 



EDWARD RODGERS 
Clarksburg 



SUE FARRIS 

Cumberland 



WILLIAM RANNEL3 

Three Churches 




MABLE SLAGLE 
Mycrsdale, Pa. 



ROBERT R. ROBINSON 

Smithfield, Pa. 



ALMA CARRICO 

Rowlesburg 



FRANK SMOOT 
Bluefield 



EVELYN L. CROSSON 

Wheeling 



WILLIAM F. COULL 

Parkersburg 



SARAH THORNILEY 
Morgantown 



RUFUS REED 
Morgantown 



ALMA AYERS 
Crantsville 



CARROLL REYNOLDS 

Morgantown 




MARIE McDonald 

Bridgeport 



WILLIAM T. SHAULL 

Martinsburg 



MARTHA WOODS 
Wheeling 



ARTHUR PRITCHARD 
Mannington 



MILDRED BAYLES 

Morgantown 



JAMES BREWSTER 
Weston 



ETTA MAE NULL 

Hundred 



H. O. WEBB 

Ansted 



MARY SERVAIS 

Wheeling 



N. HOWARD ROGERS 
Kevser 




ELIZABETH MORGAN 
Farmington 



OTHO B. LeFEVRE 

Bunker Hill 



MABLE MAYNE 

Hundred 



EMANUEL SILK 



VIRGINIA ROBERTS 

Glenville 



NED RAGLAND 

Beckley 



FRANCES THORNBERRY 

Man 



WILLIAM CALLAHAN 
Wheeling 



MARJORIE KING 
Morgantown 



LOUIS FOREMAN 
Kimball 




MARGARET DURST 
Keyser 



RAYMOND NUTTER 
Enterprise 



VIRGINIA McHALE 

Elkins 



LEONARD SWING 
Rainelle 



ELOISE KERR 

Grafton 




Page One Hundred-Four 



MARCUS BRAND 
Morgantown 



VIRGINIA STOVER 
Grafton 



JAMES McWHCRTER 

Charleston 



JEAN CRILE 

Clarksburg 



CHARLES IHLENFELD 

Wheeling 




GENEVIEVE POE 
Alum Ridge 



MALCOLM J. LOWE 
Parkersburg 



lARGARET M. 

STALNAKER 



IRETA HAWLEY 

Morgantown 



DOROTHY ALLMAN 
Morgantown 






JAMES L. HALL 
Fairmont 



ELIZABETH WARD 

Morgantown 



LLOYD DEFFENBAUGH 
Masontown 



HALLiE McDonald 

Bridgeport 



ALVA PETERSON 

Buckhannon 




LILLIAN BLY 

Clarksburg 



HAROLD LOCKER 

Parkersburg 



ELEANOR EICHORN 

Cumberland, Md. 



CHESLEIGH RIPLEY 
Alma 



GEORGE KOCH 

Grafton 



ROBERT C. MILLIARD 

Morgantown 



ARTHUR McSTEEN 

Grecnsburg. Pa. 



CHARLES WATKINS 
Grafton 



VIRGINIA GUTHRIE 
Eceles 



HENRY SCHRADER 

Wheeling 




ELIZABETH STAATS 

Charleston 



JOHN SIMPSON 

Morgantown 



VIRGINIA BARKWELL 

St. Marys 



EVAN L. HARRIS 

Charleston 



JOHN31E COOKE 

Charleston 



Page One Hundred-Seven 



HERMAN DeVOL 

Parkersburg 



PHILLIP SAUNDERS 
Dunbar 



G. L. JOHNSON 
Wheeling 



LOUISE McNeill 

Marlinton 



CUS HALL 

Charleston 




DORTHEA FIELDS 
Kingwood 



HUGH DeAMATO 

Jeanette, Pa. 



MARJORIE SWISHER 

Buckhannon 



GEORGE LOUCAS 
Weirton 



DORIS PETTY 
Mount Morris 



Pag-e One Hundred-Eight 



HARRY TREELOCAN f 

Rivesville 



DOROTHY JO WHITE 
Shepherdstown 



EDWIN HOWARD 

Triadelphia 



MARIE ZURICK 

Fredericktown 



JOHN SPERANDEO 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




OLA ZIRKLE 
Philippi 



EUGENE BEARDSLEY 



'^ RUTH CUMMINGS 

1 St. Albans 



WILLIAM LARGENT 
Morgantown 



C. F. STEWART 

Morgantown 



ROBERT D. RIFFI 
Sunlight 



DOROTHY BAKER 
Grafton 



ELZA G. WATERS 

Clarksburg 



BARBARA GATHER 
Grafton 



SAM BROWNSTEIN 

Huntington 




JEAN WADE 

Morgantown 



H. G. MARTIN 

MoriLiantown 



RUTH WITHERS 

Grafton 



CREE MORGAN 
Greensburg, Pa. 



MORRIS FUNT 

Fairmont 



GEORGE H. HEALEY 
Wellsville, N. Y. 



DON MORAN 

Wheeling 



MARY BOND 
Clarksburg 



WILLIAM E. HALY 

Morganlovvn 



RALPH M. HARTMAN 

Tunnelton 




CATHRYN THOMPSON 

Clarksburg 



W. WARE MURRILL 
Huntington 



BOYD DOTSON 
Hinton 



CAROL SCANLON 
Morgantown 



LUCILLE FOX 
Sutton 



JACK KILMER 
Martinsburg 



EDITH 1.. WILSON 
Davis 



H. K. POLAN 
Charleston 



ELIZABETH V. HAGY 



J. BANKS SHEPHERD 
Charleston 




BERTHA HANDLAN 
Wheeling 



GEORGE CUNNINGHAM 
Morgantown 



CHARLES ZOECKLER 
Wheeling 



IRA GOULD 
Morgantown 



RUTH MORRIS 
Fairmont 



AZEL MEADOWS 
Huntington 



HOWARD FURBEE 

Manninuton 



DOROTHY BRAND 

Morgantown 



SIGMUND WEINER 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



EDWARD HIGGS 
Parsons 




IRMA AYERS 
Grantsville 



JOSEPH ROMINO 
Fairmont 



WILLIAM HUGHES 
Morgantown 



I NANCY F, MILLER 

Point Marion 



HELEN SHARP 

Wheeling 



JAMES K. EDMONDSON 

Beckley 



PAUL MYERS 
Clarksburg 



DON McGILL 

Wheeling 



JAMES HARRIS 

Wheeling 



DAVE JACOBS 

Morgantown 




FRANCES EBELING 

Wheeling 



CHARLES WILMOTH 

Grafton 



ELIZABETH R. TAYLOR 



ANNA MARY TROPH 

Morgantown 



JEAN ROGERS 

Monongah 



FERD BROWNING 

Morgantown 



RUSSELL SHEPHERD 



CLARENCE MAY 

Morgantown 



FRANK MILLER 

Moundsville 



NORMAN MATHIESON 

Munhall 




MARY DEAN 

Martinsburg 



CHARLES BOWERS 
Wheeling 



DAUFORTH PICKERING 

Ronceverte 



EDGAR SPEIDEN 

BlueHeld 



MARY LOUISE SUTTON 

Gassaway 



1' - 4 



ALBERT BLAIR 
Waynesburg, Pa. 



WALTER GORDON 

Parkersburg 



EDWARD F. CLARK 

Connellsville. Pa. 



JOHN HART 
Grove City, Pa. 



ALLAN AULD 

Morgantown 




MARY ALICE D.AVIS 
Morgantown 



MORGAN YOHO 
New Martinsville 



LOUIS NEL'BERGER 

Weston 



W. DAY FITZSIMMONS 

Wheeling 



RENA WALTER 

Wheeling 



fc '. ^t 



ALLISON FITTRO 
Clarksburg 



JOHN BYRNSIDES 

Madison 



JOHN L. KRANASKAS 



PHIL HARNESS 

Romney 



JOHN GALLAGHER ^ 

Parkersburg 




MARTHA MOORE 

Wheeling 



W. J. RUMBLE 

Point Marion, Pa. 



ALFRED MARELLO 

New York 



J. L. TOWLER 
Springton 



LOUISE FLETCHER 
Charleston 



ROSS LUDWIG 
Morgantown 



CHARLES CASTO 

Parkersburg 



DON HABIG 

Wheeling 



FRANK DIENNA 
Clarksburg 



JUNIOR BEATTY 

Mannington 




ELIZABETH WEIDNER 

Lumberport 



VERNE ROBERTSON 

Beckley 



FRANCIS GLENN 
Smithfield, Pa. 



AUSTIN PHILLIPS 

Wheeling 



VIRGINIA DOAK 

Morgantown 



SOPHOMORES 



Sophomore Class Officers 

President PAUL E. ERB 

Vice-President ROBERT MUNCHMEYER 

Secretary MINA DUTY 



FRESHMEN 



Freshman Class Officers 

President CLARENCE LOV1TCH 

Vice-Presideni ERNEST BIGLEY 

Secretary VIRGINIA BURT 

Historian CONNELL CONDRY 



Pagre One Hundred Twenty-Six 




Page One Hundred Twenty-Seven 



Freshman Class History 



We were introduced, seven hundred strong, to College Life by the first 
annual Freshman Week. During this period we were advised and instructed 
about different things that would arise during our stay at the University and 
how to meet them. 

After Registration we donned the Freshman Caps, black ties and black 
socks. Quite a letdown from the high and lofty positions we held as Seniors 
m our respective high schools, but we were not long in acclimating ourselves 
to the conditions. Of course, the strong arm of the Vigilance Committee 
may be helped to subdue us some. 

There were Student and Freshman Mixes. Here we met many people 
and made many friends. We were rushed around for a week or so by the 
various organizations and made to think that we were great stuff. 

Football games in the Fall were great. The Gold and Blue bunting 
floating over Mountaineer Field and the Band parading to the rythmic strains 
of Hail West Virginia. It was all a great thrill for us. Then the Winter 
sports and many dances. Then along came examinations to put a damper on 
our activities for a while. They also tended to deplete our ranks to some ex- 
tent. A great majority survived however for the Springtime in Morgantown. 

As I write the Spring Elections are getting under way. Rival factions are 
soliciting our votes with many promises of fine things. It looks as though it 
will be a great affair. 

HISTORIAN. 




Piige One Hundred-Thirty 





M O U N T A 1 N E E k 
Marshall Glenn 

Sigma Phi Epsilcn, Momi- 
tain, Fi Bater Cappar, 
Varsity Club; Varsi.y 
Football '11, ■28, •29; 
Varsity Basketball '2 7, 
'28, '29, '30; Varsity 
Track '23, 29; Captai.i 
of Varsity Football' 29; 
Captain of Varsity 
Basketball '29, '30; 
Member of West Vir- 
ginia Athletic Board. 




Mountaineer Week 



In keeping with a well established custom, on April the fourteenth began 
the fourth annual Mountaineer Week. This year about ninety of the high 
schools over the state of West Virginia were visited by nine of the leading 
students of the University. 

In the past it had been a custom to send the men out in teams of three 
but; this year there were individual speakers at each school. 

George Jackson was the manager of the entire group and made out itin- 
eraries for the following men: John D. Phillips, Richard Ralston, Winchester 
Latham, Christy Wildt, Nelson Lang, Cyrus Kump, Paul Bottome, Byron Ran- 
dolph and George Jackson. 

It was not the object of these speakers to interest students in West Vir- 
ginia University alone; but in all forms of higher education. As a starter for 
the week, a radio program was given over Station WiVlMN, in which songs of 
the State were sung and speeches made by prominent educators. 

It was, all in all, a very successful affair and West Virginia University is 
quite proud that she is able to sponsor such a program. 



Page One Hundred Thirty-Two 



Mountaineer Week Team 




George Jackson, John Phillips. Winchester Latham, Nelson Lang 
Paul Bottome, Byron Randolph, Richard Ralston, Christy Wildt 



Best Dressed Man 




CHARLES B. HART 




LEORA DUNN 





MARGARET STRALEY 




Page One Hundred Tliirtv-Seven 




CATHRYN THOMPSON 




Page One Hundred Thirty-Eight 




GERALDINE BEVINGTON 





SCHOLASTICA GAYDOSH 





ROSE CLIFFORD 



Most Active Girls 




JANE O. SEABRIGHT 

Roneys Point 



Kappa Kappa Ga 
Phi Beta Kappa 
Mortar Board 
President of W. S 
Li-Toon-awa 
Y. W. C. A. 
Dramatic Club 
Pan-Hellenic Ass. 
Rhododendron 



LEORA DUNN 

Reedsville 

Alpha Xi Delta 

Dramatic Club 

English Club 

La Tertulia 

Monticola Staff 

R. O. T. C. Sponsor 

Senior Ball Committee 

University Choir 

University Glee Club 

-Miss West Virginia 'BO" 




EVELYN CARSKADON 

Charleston 

Delta Gamma 

Mortar Board 

President of Pan-Heller.irr Associati 

Vice-President of W. S. G. A, 

Sea Beowulf Gedryht 

Convocation Committee 

Student Forum 

Rhododendron 





MARGARET E. WELLS 

Weston 



Pi Beta Phi 

P.lortar Board 

Phi Beta Kappa 

English Club 

Rhododendron 

Li-toon-awa 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

Co-ed Prom Committe 




Page One Hundred Forty-Three 



JVho 's Who On the Campus 



President of the Student Body John D. PhilHps 

Senior Man Representative on Student Council Fred Landolphi 

Senior Woman Representative on Student Council Kathleen McCray 

Junior Man Representative on Student Council Arthur Pritchard 

Junior Woman Representative on Student Council Cathryn Thompson 

President of Senior Class Herbert Raines 

President of Junior Class Sigmund Weiner 

President of Sophomore Class Paul E. Erb 

President of Freshman Class Clarence Lovitch 

President of Interfraternity Council Ashford Ayers 

Summit of Mountain John D. Phillips 

L. H. C. P. of Fi Batar Cappar Jack Zevely 

President of Torch and Serpent Frank Maynard.. 

Captain of Football Marshall Glenn 

Manager of Football Tom Johnson 

Captain of Basketball Marshall Glenn 

Manager of Basketball Reed Garvin 

Captain of Wrestling Gordon Brill 

Manager of Wresding Ferd Brownin^j 

Captain of Baseball Earl Wolfe 

Manager of Baseball Charles Haden 

Captain of Track Fred Riley 

Manager of Track Verne Robertson 

Senior Intramural Managers Charles Seibert and Joseph Moehs 

Captain of Rifle Team George Cunningham 

Manager of Rifle Team H. W. Largent 

President of Phi Beta Pi Herbert Raines 

President of Kappa Kappa Psi Rupert Powell 

President of Phi Lambda Upsilon Edward J. Fox 

President of Rhododendron Bertha Handlan 

President of Mortar Board Genevieve Brown 

President of Matrix Frances Doak 



President of Delta Sigma Rho Harriet French 

President of Li-toon-a-wa Wanda Mitchell 

President of Law College Student Government Byron Randolph 

President of Journaliers Arthur Maust 

President of Press Club John Howard Martin 

President of Newman Club William T. Fahey 

Captain of Scabbard and Blade Fred GofT 

President of Agriculture Council Russell EUyson 

President of Home Economics Club Fay Crider 

Chairman of Cadet Hop Committee Frank Maynard 

President of Dramatic Club Bates Butler 

Drum Major Martin Epstein 

Manager of Debating Team H. W. Largent 

Colonel of Blackguard Fusiliers Fred Goff 

Editor of Monticola Malcolm J. Lowe 

Business Manager of Monticola Ralph M. Hartman 

Editor of Athenaeum Richard Ralston 

Managing Editor of Athenaeum Daniel Boughner 

Business Manager of Athenaeum William Haines 

Editor of Agriculturist Ira Gould 

Editor of Student Directory Richard Ralston 

Business Manager of Student Directory William Doll 

Head Cheerleader Christy Wildt 

Members of University Athletic Board Russell LaRue, Marshall Glenn 

Chairman of University Dance Committee Bates Butler 

Student Assistant to Athletic Director Mitchell Unger 

President of Y. M. C. A Richard Tibbs 

President of Y. W. C. A Christine Arnold 

President of Woman's Student Government Association Jane Seabright 

President of Pan Hellenic Association Dortha Rinard 

President of Phi Delta Phi Julian Hearne 

President of Alpha Zeta Ira Gould 

President of Tau Beta Pi Charles Seibert 

President of Theta Kappa Psi Rupert Powell 

President of Phi Upsilon Omicron Beryl Piper 



Page One Hundred Forty-Five 



Monticola Calendar 
1929-30 



SEPTEMBER 

I 1, Wednesday — First "Freshman Week" proves big success. 

1 6, Monday — Upperclassmen ail ready for fall rushing since they had the 
privilege of advanced registration — but, oh, these poor freshmen! 

19, Thursday — Alarm clocks all set for eight o'clock classes. 

20, Friday — Registration totals 2,419. 

21, Saturday — Football season starts again. Too bad Wesleyan! Better 
luck next time. Sorority women doing a rushing business these days. 
Fraternity men saying, "We don't need him anyv^ray." 

26, Thursday — Fi Baters pledge 18 today. Dr. Reese displays live rattle- 
snakes from southern West Virginia. 

2 7, Friday — George "Red" Healey introduces his new song "Fight Moun- 
taineers. " 

28, Saturday — 5,000 people see opening of new airport at Suncrest. The 
sororities seemed to have scored with the new fre.shman co-eds even if 
we did lose to D. and E. 

30, Monday — We are glad the nev/ freshman caps are brighter and a better 
fit since they are so seriously essential. 



OCTOBER 

Tuesday — "Mike " puts in first appearance at practice house. Lucky 
"Mike." Sorority fights over at last. 

Wednesday — Athenaeum staff most carefully selected. We all hope 
they put more in it than news of professors and meetings of "such and 
guch " clubs, 



56 One Hundretl Forty-Six 



3, Thursday — Students pay $200 a day for smokes. Five hundred stubs 
found on Hbrary steps daily. 

5, Saturday — Benches moved to more secluded spot on lav/n in front of 
Moore hall. Why not do it up right? 

8, Tuesday — G. L. Johnson leads second semester average with 96. 1 4. 
Landolphi second. College womens apparel becomes more feminine 
Paris predicts curves. 

9, Wednesday — Landolphi has highest average for third consecutive year. Pi 
Lambda Phi's and Kappa's lead Greek letter groups for last year. 

12, Saturday Corousella says "Beat Pitt!" Go on Carousella — keep sayin' 
it. 

17, Thursday — Tumbling classes started by Prof. McGrew — for girls only! 

19, Saturday — W. and L. game at Charleston. We beat 'em 26-6. 

22, Tuesday — Students consume 150 ice cream cones each day. Seven to 

ten pints of buttermilk being sold to members of football team instead 
of—? 

23, Wednesday — Open houses approved by social committee. Happy 
nights are here again! 

24, Thursday — Ted Shawn and Ruth St. Dennis dance at the Field house. 

26, Saturday — Social season finally opens with general University dance — 
TOO general in fact. 

28, Monday — Torch and Serpent pledges 36 young boys. 

31, Thursday — Delinquent slips to be received by students slipping in their 
courses. 

NOVEMBER 

7, Thursday — Journalism conference and Junior Farmer's Week — for the 
again and againth time — swamp "collitch." 

8, Friday — Co-ed prom. "Could 1 wear your tux tonight, please? " 

I 1, Monday — 1 I students in Public Speaking i 1 class rise at 1 1 o'clock to 
pay tribute to Armistice day. 

12, Tuesday — Dormitories to be open until eleven o'clock. No more pacing 
the streets. 



F'ag-e "One Hundred Forty-Seven 



1 3, Wednesday — D. and E. and W. Va. U. sever athletic connections. 

25, Monday — Dover Road opens dramatic season at University. 

26, Tuesday — Annual Homecoming begins. 

2 7, Wednesday — Carnival at Field House. "Undergrads" and "Old Grads" 

come home broke but they enjoy side shows and jitney dancing. 

28, Thursday — W. and J. Turkey Day Game with Captain "Little Sleepy" 

Glenn, Nixon, Lang, Larue, Behnke, Carrico, Scott and "Tarzan" Glenn 
ending football careers. 

30, Saturday — Mountaineers proudly claim and welcome the third Glenn. 
Walter Marshall is born to Mr. and Mrs. "Little Sleepy" Glenn. 

DECEMBER 

2, Monday — Kappa Beta Phi grants charter here. Big competition for the 
Fi Batars! 

3, Tuesday — Board of Governors approves reorganization plans for college 
of Arts and Sciences. To have Saturday classes next year. Lucky sen- 
iors! Twelve seniors elected to Phi Beta Kappa. 

4, Wednesday — Elizabeth Moore Hall finally gets hair dryers Swimming 
courses here may be termed healthful now. 

9, Monday — "Red" Gordon selected 1930 grid captain. Marcus Brand 
heads Cross Country team. Congratulations! 

1 0, Tuesday — John Phillips selected as Rhodes Scholar from large field of 
candidates. West Virginia is proud of you, John. 

I 1 , Wednesday — Torch and Serpent initiation and freak day. Sorority ward- 
robes suffer great loss! 

21, Christmas holidays! But what holidays — every one snorting, even pro- 
fessors, because we have to return so soon. 

JANUARY 

2, Thursday — Greetings! We didn't want to come back — but here we are! 

4, Saturday — Yo-yo craze hits campus and Morgantowrj kindergartens, 
Woolworth in a rush. 



Page One Hundred Forty-Eight 



7, Tuesday — Exam schedules announced. Cheaters brush up on newest 
strategy. 

1 8, Saturday — Exams being held — Drug stores and the movie about to s^o 

into bankruptcy. Such hibernation. 

2 7, Monday — Exams over! Everyone celebrates by going to the Military 

Ball. 

FEBRUARY 

2, Ground Hog sees shadow. Get out your fur coats and galoshes every- 
body. 

3, Monday — Norman Thomas, noted socialist speaks here. Farm and 
Home Week program opens. 

8, Saturday — Registration totals 2,2 71 for second semester. 

12, Wednesday — First student convocation program. Good break for the 
freshmen. 

1 3, Thursday — Bill Haines elected business manager of Athenaeum for sec- 
ond semester. Congratulations Bill I 

I 6, Sunday — Hillel Foundation brings Louis Untermeyer here. 

I 9, Wednesday — President Turner puts out fire in his home before firemen 
arrive. 

21, Friday — Thornton Wilder speaks here. We'll soon become appreciative 
of good literature. 

25, Tuesday — Ping-pong is latest campus sport. It will be tiddle-winks next. 

26, Wednesday — Campus voting machines may be brought here to eliminate 
the stuffing of ballot boxes. Is that good citizenship? Now, we ask you? 

28, Friday — Many make merry plus at Mardi Gras. Many empty pockets 
also ! 

MARCH 

1, Saturday — Monongahela Club is granted charter from Gamma Phi Beta 

4, Tuesday — Pi Beta Phi buys lots in accordance with Pres. Turner's plan 
[or fraternity and sorority circle. 



Pag-e One Hundred Forty-Nine 



6, Thursday — De Angelis leads undergraduates in grades with average of 
96.2 for first semester. Thelma Lovett, graduate student, leads entire 
student body with average of 96.4. 

7, Friday — President Turner outlines plans for traffic tunnel. Safety first. 

8, Saturday — Whoopee! Big Winter Homecoming program and athletic 
carnival. Boxers beat Army! Cagers beat Pitt! Glenn, Fox, Ratcliffe 
and Lepera end basketball careers. 

Wednesday — Press Club Vaudeville. Leora Dunn and Margaret Straley 
tie for Miss West Virginia University. She is thus a pair and not a peach, 
according to Carousella. 

Tuesday — Marshall "Little Sleepy" Glenn named Mountaineer. Con- 
gratulations Sleepy! 

Thursday — Woman's Pan-hellenic constitution revised. To have elec- 
tion of officers instead of rotation. 



12, 

18, 
20, 
21, 

26, 
2 7, 

29, 
31. 



-Wor 



Pan-hellenic dance. Men to return the favor next Fri- 



Friday- 
day. 

Wednesday — Henry Chitwood awarded chemical scholarship for study 
at Johns Hopkins. Delta Epsilon granted a charter by Pi Kappa Phi. 

Thursday — Pi Beta Phi with an average of 84.09 leads all Campus 
groups in scholarship for first semester. Pi Lambda Phi's continue to 
lead fraternities with an average of 80.56. 

Saturday — Second matinee dance sponsored by Mountain. We do lov? 
our tea dances. 

Monday — Were off to press today! 



SOCIETY 



Page One Hundred Fifty-One 



FIRST UNIVERSITY DANCE— OCTOBER 26, 1929 

The social season was ushered in very successfully by the first University 
Dance. The Armory was decorated for the occssion with blue and gold 
streamers hung from a crystal ball in the center of the room. Carson How- 
ard's "West Virginians" furnished the music. 

CO-ED PROM— NOVEMBER 8, 1929 

The one dance of the year at which males are taboo was held in the 
Armory under the name of the Co-Ed Prom. All house mothers on the cam- 
pus were invited to attend as honor guests . Several specialty dances were 
presented and prizes were given to the best looking couple. Carson Howard's 
orchestra provided the music. 

FIRST CADET HOP 

The first Cadet Hop of the year was held Saturday, November 9. The 
Armory was beautifully decorated with American flags, and red, white, and 
blue festooning which made for a military atmosphere. Carson Hovsrard's 
orchestra played the program of dances. The members of the Detroit foot- 
ball team were special guests. 

WOMAN'S HALL FORMAL 

The annual semester formal of the three resident hall. Woman's hall, the 
annex, and the Boughner house was given in the ballroom of the Hotel Mor- 
gan, November 23. Carson Howard and his orchestra played the program of 
dances, and light refreshments were served during intermission. 

MOUNTAINEER CARNIVAL 

A new wrinkle was formed in the Social Calendar of the University 
when a Mountaineer Carnival was held in the new Field House. This event, 
long an idea in the mind of George Jackson, was made possible by the hearty 
support which he received from all organizations on the Campus. Each club 
having a booth in the Field House. There were Shooting Galleries, Chance 
Wheels and Side Shows. There was continued dancing Wednesday evening 
and Thanksgiving night. Kappa Sigma was awarded the trophy for having 
the most attractive booth at the Carnival. On Thursday morning there was 
a Home coming Parade in which the various campus organizations took part. 



Page One Hundred Fifty-Two 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 

The members of Sigma Phi Epsilon entertained with their semester formal 
December 6 in the ballroom of the Hotel Morgan. Music for the program of 
dances was furnished by Carson Howard and his orchestra, and light defresh- 
ments were served throughout the evening. 



LITTLE PAN-HELLENIC 

Delta Epsilon, Tau Delta Theta, Sigma Delta Phi, and Kappa Mu enter- 
tained jointly with a formal dance in the Armory December 7. The decora- 
tions were furnished by Turner and the Peerless Syncopators of Uniontown, 
Pa. played the program. 



FIRST PAN-HELLENIC 

The first Pan-Hellenic was held in the Armory, which was beautifully 
decorated in blue and white. A splendid program of dances was played by 
Ray Miller and his Brunswick Recording Orchestra of Chicago. The decora- 
tions were by Turner and the catering by Comuntzis. The committee in 
charge was composed of Alison Fittro, Christy Wildt and Malcolm Lowe. 



BARN DANCE 

The students of the College of Agriculture held their annual Barn Dance 
at the State Dairy Barn. Dancers appeared as farmers and farmerettes. Don- 
ald Edwards and his orchestra furnished the music for a delightful program of 
dances. 



CHI OMEGA 

Chi Omega entertained with a formal dance in the ballroom of the Hotel 
Morgan January 10. Carson Howard and his orchestra played the program 
of dances from 8 :30 to 1 1 :30 p. m. 




TORCH AND SERPENT 

The members of Torch and Serpent entertained with their tenth annua! 
dance December 1 3 from 9 to 7 o'clock in the ballroom of the Hotel Morgan. 
The music for the program of dances was furnished by Marion Hardy and his 
Alabamans of New York. The letter men of the University athletic squads 
were the guests of the organization. 



PI BETA PHI 

Pi Beta Phi gave their semester formal January 1 1 in the ballroom of the 
Hotel Morgan from 8:30 to 1 1 :30, The music for the program of dances was 
furnished by Edgar Barrett's orchestra of Fairmont. Decorations consisted 
of balloons arranged in carnival fashion. 

ALPHA XI DELTA— JANUARY II, 1930 

Pledges of Alpha Xi Delta entertained the active chapter with a formal 
dance in the dining room of the Hotel Morgan. The room was decorated 
with artistic panels depicting underseas scenes, sea shells and a ceiling canopy 
simulating green sea weed. The music was furnished by Carson Howard's 
"West Virginians." 

MILITARY BALL— JANUARY 2 7, 1930 

The annual Military Ball, given by the R. O. T. C. in the Armory, was 
one of the most successful events staged here in recent years. The center of 
the Armory was marked by an illuminatd American shield from which the 
stars and stripes were draped in circular fashion. Joe Nesbit's Pennsylvanians 
played the program of dances from 9:00 until 2:00. 

KAPPA SIGMA 

Members of the Kappa Sigma fraternity utilized the Armory for their 
semester formal. Copple's orchestra, of Wheeling, furnished the program 
of dances. 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA 

The Annual Skull Dance of Phi Kappa Sigma was held in the ballroom of 
the Hotel Morgan. A five course dinner for the members of the Fraternity 
and their guests preceded the dance. Novel lighting effects featured the dec- 
orations. The music was furnished by Emery Howard's orchestra. 

VALENTINE DANCE 

The second University dance was held Saturday, February 1 5 with Paul 
Graham and his Crackers, broadcasting orchestra from Miami Beach, Fla., 
playing the program of dances. Decorations in red and white carried out the 
valentine scheme, and serpentine and confetti added to the enjoyment ol 
more than two hundred couples present. 



GAMMA PHI BETA 

Gamma Phi Beta entertained with a formal dance at the Ortolan Febru- 
ary 22. Bill Hughes and his orchestra furnished the music. A modernistic 
design in black and white was carried out in the programs and decorations. 



PHI MU 

Gamma Beta chapter of Phi Mu entertained with their winter formal at 
the Hotel Morgan February 22. The ballroom was decorated in gold and 
black, and Carson Howard's orchestra played the program of twelve dances. 



MARDl GRAS 

The annual Mardi Gras which is sponsored by the Y. W. C. A. was held 
February the twenty-eighth at the Armory. Pirate costumes seemed to be the 
vogue, and prizes were given for the most unique one. Barkers vied to win 
the crowd to the various booths ranged along the west end of the Armory. 
A program of park plan dances was playecl by Carson Howard's West Vir- 
ginians. 

CADET HOP 

The second Cadet Hop of the year was held in the Armory on March 7. 
Festooning in blue and white and American flags featured the decorations by 
Turner. Carl McElfresh and his orchestra from Fairmont played the pro- 
gram. Scabbard and Blade, military organization, was in charge of the ar- 
rangements. 

PHI BETA PI 

The annual winter formal of Phi Beta Pi, national medical fraternity, was 
held at the Hotel Morgan Friday, March 7. Carson Howard's orchestra fur- 
nished the music. 



WOMAN'S PAN-HELLENIC 

The annual woman's Pan-Hellenic was held Friday, March 21 in the 
Armory. Paul Graham and his Crackers played the music. The decorations 
were in keeping with the St. Patrick season, being in green and white. 



PRESS CLUB FORMAL 

Press Club held its yearly formal dance in the Armory on Saturday, 
March 22. Paul Graham and his Crackers played the program of dances. 
Local newspaper officials were the guests of the club. 



PAN-HELLENIC— MARCH 28, 1930 

The popularity of Pan-Hellenic dances was evidenced by the great num- 
ber of dancers that filled the Armory to capacity to enjoy the Pan-Hellenic 
dance. The room was decorated in a novel way and the music of Johnny 
Johnson's orchestra was enthusiastically acclaimed by the dancers. 

CADET HOP 

The University Armory was gay with patriotic emblems and decorations 
symbolic of military activity. This was the final Cadet Hop of the year and 
the men of the corps and the officers appeared in uniform. Music was fur- 
nished by Carson Howard's West Virginians. 

ALPHA DELTA PI 

The spring formal dance of Alpha Delta Pi was held Saturday, April 3 
in the dining room of the Hotel Morgan. The program of dances played by 
Carson Howard and his orchestra lasted from 8:30 until I 1 :30 p. m. 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Members of Kappa Kappa Gamma entertained with a dinnei dance in 
the ballroom of the Hotel Morgan Saturday, April the fifth. The tables were 
beautifully decorated with Spring flowers and gardenias were given as favors 
to the men. The Stonewall Jackson orchestra of Clarksburg played a delight- 
ful program of dances. 



UNIVERSITY DANCE 

The third and last University dance for the year was held in the Armory 
Saturday, April 12. The decorations were in gold and blue, and Al Mabey 
and his Gold and Blue Boys furnished the music. 



KAPPA SIGMA-THETA CHI FORMAL 

The members of Kappa Sigma and Theta Chi entertained with a formal 
dance in the ballroom of the Hotel Morgan Friday, April the twenty-fifth. 
Attractive favors, bearing the seals of the fraternities were given to the guests. 
Music was furnished by the Washington and Jefferson Ten of Washington, 
Pa. 



DELTA GAMMA 

A dance of formal appointments was given by the members of DeUa 
Gamma in the ballrocm of ihe Hotel Morgan. The Stonewall Jackson orcher- 
tra of Clarksburg furnished the music for a delightful program of dances. 



HILL PARTIES 

The members of Kcppa Alphu: Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Tau DeUa and 
Pi Kappa Alpha entertained on Friday night, may the tenth with a formal 
dance in the Armory. The decorations were in Sprinf colors by Turner. 

On Saturday night the same fraternities were hosts at an informal party. 
Prizes were given to the dances wearing the most original costumes. 

ALPHA XI DELTA ROSE DANCE 

The members of Alpha Xi Delta gave their annual Rose Dance May 
the seventeenth at the Ortolan. Dancing was preceded by a five course din- 
ner. The ballroom was artistically decorated with pink roses on white trel- 
lises. The music was furnished by Carson Howards West Virginians. 



SENIOR BALL 

The annual Senior Ball was held May the thirteth in the ballroom of the 
Hotel Morgan. A recording orchestra under the management of the Music 
Corporation of America played a program of dances. 



PUBLICATIONS 



rage One Hundred Fifty-Nine 




Athenaeum Publication Board 

For the purpose of advising the publication of the Athenaeum. 

JOHN D. PHILLIPS President 

KATHLEEN McCRAY Secretary 

DR. p. I. REED Facu'ty Aviscr 

CHARLES E. HODGES Alumni Representative 



RICHARD RALSTON 
WILLLAM HAINES 
DANIEL BOUGHNER 
FRED LANDOLPHl 
ARTHUR PRITCHARD 



The Athenaeum 



Published Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday of each week by the students of West 
Virginia University under the supervision of the Athenaeum Board and the Department 
of Journalism. 

THE STAFF 

RICHARD H. RALSTON - Editor in Chief 

DANIEL C, BOUGHNER Managing Editor 

ORESSA TEAGARDEN Tuesday News Editor 

VIRGINIA STANARD Thursday News Editor 

FRANCIS PETERS Saturday News Editor 

WILLIAM J. HAINES Business Manager 

CHARLES POLAN Assistant Business Manager 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

JAMES WEST Sports Editor 

FERD BROWNING - Assistant Sports 

ELISA BETH SCOTT Poetry Editor 

OUIDA STONESTREET Humor Editor 

J. N. SPENCE Do You Know Editor 

ALICE BOYER _ - Feature Editor 

J. R. JACKSON - Tuesday Exchange 

PATRICIA SEAMAN Thursday Exchange 

MARTHA MOORE Saturday Exchange 

S. CLEMMER WARMAN Tuesday Telegraph 

MARY K. COLBURN Thursday Telegraph 

EDWARD HIGGS : Saturday Telegraph 




Paae Oiu- Ilunarta Sixty-Three 



Press Club 



OFFXERS 

JOHN H. MARTIN President 

JAMES W. HARRIS ..Vice President 

IRMA AYERS Secretary 

IRENE CAPLAN - Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



ELMA HICKS 
WILLIAM FAHEY 
RICHARD RALSTON 
RACHEL SMITH 
ANNE McCONNELL 
ARTHUR MAUST 
IRENE CAPLAN 
JOHN MARTIN 
DANIEL BOUGHNER 
ALICE BOYER 
TERESA BRODERICK 
VIRGINIA PARSONS 
FRANCES DOAK 
JOSEPHINE HERD 
GEORGE RATCLIFFE 
ISABELLE THOMASSON 
WILLIAM WINFIELD 
JOSEPHINE WATSON 
HELEN SHARP 
VIRGINI.A STANARD 
PATRICIA SEAMAN 
OUIDA STONESTREET 
JAMES HARRIS 



CHARLES W ATKINS 
FERD BROWNING, JR. 
LUCILLE FOX 
CATHERINE PATTON 
MARY COLBURN 
ORESSA TE.AGARDEN 
IRA GOULD, JR. 
EDWARD HIGGS 
ANNA MARY TROPF 
ELEANOR STONE 
HARRIET HAVENER 
MINA DUTY 
CL.ARENCE MAY 
CHARLES CONAWAY 
RUSSELL CURTIS 
JOHN L. TOWLER 
WILLIAM M. CORWIN 
JOHN PIRHALLA, JR. 
RICH.ARD TIBBS 
BOYD DOTSON 
WILLIAM DOLL 
A. N. BURGESS 
IRMA AYERS 



Page One Hundred Sixty-Four 




Page One Hundred Sixty-Five 



Monticola 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

IVALCOLM J, LOWE.. Editor in Chief 

MARY HITE Senior Editor 

JOHN TYLER Junior Editor 

JAMES HARRIS Athletic Editor 

MARY ALICE DAVIS Organizations Editor (women) 

ALBERT BLAIR Organizations Editor (men) 

WILLIAM RICKETTS Art Editor 

ANNA LOU BICK E... .Features Editor 

LEORA DUNNl <, . ^ ^ ,. 

RACHEL SMITH \ P , ,^^ pj >„r, 

ELEANOR STONE \ -(-alendar t-ditors 

THOMAS HITE ^ 
SANFORD H. BRCWNLEY | 

TOM STONE \ . --..- - - Assistant Editors 

MARTHA MOORE 

JO WATSON j 

BUSINESS STAFF 

RALPH M. HARTMAN . . Business Manager 

HOWE STIDCER 1 

JOHN W HCFFA | 

BILL DOLL J- : Assistants to Business Manager 

PA,VL HOOD I 

CORCTHY BAKER | 

ADVERTISING STAFF 

CHARLES B. GROSMAN Advertising Manager 

JOHN M. DAVIS... Assistant Advertising Manager 




Page One Hundred Sixty-Siven 




Monticola Publication Board 

JOHN D. PHILLIPS Chairman 

JOHN MARK MOORE ~ Secretary 

DR. p. I. REED / P^^^l Advisers 

DR. R. C. SPANGLER r ^aculty 

MALCOLM J. LOWE L C. MAY RALPH HARTMAN 






. .. ..-m;.^..-.. .M»^>m' II ■'■ ' fi' -ilWA 






Page One Hundred Seventy 



W. H. MAHAN, 

Line Coach 




I. E. RODGER5, 

Head Coach 




SCHEDULE AND RESULTS 



Wesleyan 

Davis Elkins 13 

Duquesne 7 

Pittsburgh 27 

W. & L. .. 6 

Okla. A. & M 6 

Fordham 

Detroit 36 

Georgetown 

W. & J 



West 


V,rg,n,a,, 


16 


West 


Virginia 


6 


West 


Virginia., 


/ 


West 


V.rg.n.a 


7 


West 


Virginia. 


26 


West 


Virginia 


9 


West 


Virginia. . 





West 


Virginia... 





West 


Virginia... 





West 


Virginia... 


6 



TOM JOHNSON 

Manager 




< 

a 



One Hundred Seventy-Two 



West Virginia 16 




W. Va. Wesleyan.. 



BROWN 



M. GLENN 
Captain 




GORDON 
Captain Elect 



WEST VIRGINIA 16; WESLEYAN 0. 



The Mountaineers, garbed in their new gold and blue ensemble, stopped a powerful 
West Virginia Wesleyan backfield and ripped the Methodist mediocre line to shreds to 
win their first game of the season by whipping the Bobcats, 10-6. 

Although their attack was none too smooth, the Mountaineers used straight football 
and very few passes to run up a margin of twenty-one first downs to eight. 

After dominating the play in the first quarter, but failing to score, the Varsity made 
a steady march down the field in the second quarter, aided by a pass from LaRue to Lang, 
and finally scored. Another sustained drive in the third period resulted in a second 
touchdown, and the other points were added by the accuracy of Capt. "Little Sleepy" 
Glenn's placement kicks. His final three points were picked up by a perfect placement 
from the 22-yard line just a few minutes before the game ended. 



West Virginia 6 






Davis Elkins 13 




HAMILTON 






LEWIS 




CARRICO 



DAVIS & ELKINS i 3 ; WEST VIRGINIA 6. 

A band of so-called Senators with a distinctly cosmopolitan aspect, including the war 
paints and Indian regalia, topped the Mountaineers for the second season in a row by win- 
ning the Sept. 28, game at Kiountaineer field, 13-6. West Virginia had a more powerful 
attack, but lacked sufficient scoring punch, despite the margin of thirteen first downs to 
eight. 

The Scarlet Hurricane scored five minutes after the game got underway. .'\fter an 
exchange of punts. D. & E. took possession of the ball in midfield and aided by a fumble- 
gain of twelve yards when yardage was pressing, finally pushed over a touchdown on a 
34-yard pass from Rengle to Mitchell. The Indian Smith kicked the extra point. 

West Virginia was twice halted at the 20-yard line in the first half after long marches, 
but the Mountaineers managed to tally just about four minutes before the first half ended 
when Stumpp heaved a 15-yard pass to Bartrug and the latter got away for a touchdown 
for a toatl advance of 50 yards. Capt. .M. Glenn missed the try for point and Davis-EIkins 
had a 7-6 advantage. 

The Mountaineers dominated the play until the last few minutes of the game, but 
they still lacked the scoring punch. Warren, fleet Scarlet Hurricane halfback, thwarted 
further effort to turn the tide to a Mountaineer victory when he intercepted a West Vir- 
ginia pass and got away for a 40-yard advance to the State 1 7-yard strip. Davis-Elkins 
lacked the drive to add to her total, however, and West Virginia was soon in, possession 
of the ball again. Finally, in a last desperate attempt to win the game, the Mountaineers 
resorted to passing from deep in their own territory. LaRue stood on his 10-yard marker 
and atempted to pass, but it was blocked by two big Senator ends, fell into Kepner's hand, 
and he went over for D. & E.'s other touchdown unmolested, thus submerging the Moun- 
taineers, 13-6. 



West Virginia 7 




Duquesne 7 



STUMPP 



PLASTER 




WEST VIRGINIA 7; DUQUESNE 7. 

When the Mountaineers were pitted against Duquesne University for the first time 
on Mounta-neer Field, Oct. 5. it developed that out-of-doors basketball was the style of 
athletic endeavor in vogue. Both West Virginia and Duquesne scored their touchdowns 
on long-range pass'ng attacks, the Mountaineers in the last three minutes of the first half 
and the Dukes in the last three minutes of the game. 

The Varsity was spending its t me on straight football, piling up first downs on bucks 
and exchanges of punts, but lacking a scoring drive under such conditions. Duquesne 
could do nothing with the Moi/.itaineer line, especially with Julian Scott, tackle, playing 
a remarkable game. Sensing an cpTortunity to use the West Virginia passing attack to 
advantage. Coach Ira Rodgers sent Eddie Stumpp into the game wth but three minutes 
of the first half to go. "Stumppie" picked out Capt. M. Glenn on three different occa- 
sions and ths duo completed three consecutive passes for 60 yards and a touchdown. 
G'enn added the goal from placement. 

As the second half progressed, Duquesne still failed to make any impression in the 
Mountaineer defense and West Virgnia contented itself with conservative football. Fin- 
ally the Dukes haltsd a Mountaineer drive on then own 10-yard line. The Pittsburghers 
then started an aerial drve which was not stopped by West Virginia, finally culminating 
in a 43-yard pass from Benedict to Pratt f c r a touchdown. Capt. •'Bifl ' Donnelli, the 
Dukes' star kicker, added the extra point from p'acement and the score was deadlocked 
at 7-7. The game ended soon after the kickoff without any other damage done. 



Page One Hundred Seventy-Five 



West Virginia 7 




Pittsburgh 2 7 



VARNEY 



FERRARA 




MARTIN 



PITT 27; WEST VIRGINIA 7. 

Superior power and more speed figured in the victory of the University of Pittsburgh 
over West Virginia by a 27-7 count at Pittsburgh, Oct. 12. 

Pitt, wtith "Pug" Parkinson, "Toby" Uansa and "Josh" Williams slashing and tear- 
ing behind a wall of interference, put .the Mountaineers under with two touchdowns in 
the first half and two more in the third quarter. 

Williams scored the first touchdown for the Panthers on a 22-yard run around ..-nd 
midway of the first quarter to end a 6 I -yard march. The Pitt outfit came right back and 
added another 7 7-yard advance, but were halted on the three-yard line by the Mountain- 
eers, but still packing too much power to be stopped they staged a 5 1 -yard parade and 
scored their second touchdown on a 10-yard pass from Williams to Uansa. 

The Panthers received the second-half kickoff and went unmolested through the 
Mountaineers for 73-yards and their counter. West Virgmia received the subsequent 
kickofi and got back to the Mountaineer 40-yard line. On the first play Stumpp threw a 
well-pitched pass to Bill Behnke and the latter galloped down the sidelines with good in- 
terference for the only West Virginia touchdown. Pitt's final touchdown was scored by 
Uansa in the third quarter after he had intercepted a pass thrown by Stumpp and raced 
60 yards. 

There was little excitement in the final chapter, and neither team scored. 



Page One Hundred Seventy-Six 



Wets Virginia 26 




W. & L. 



-ARLE 



BARTRUC 




LEESON 



WEST VIRGINIA 26; WASHINGTON AND LEE 6 



In spile of a sweltering heat which was more typical of a day on the beach than a 
session on the gridiron, the Mountaineers trimmed the Washington and Lee Generals at 
Charleston, 26-6, Oct. 19. 

With LaRue, Francis Glenn, and Jake Sebulsky leading the offensive. West Virginia 
ripped through the Genera's' line for a quartet of touchdowns. 

Washington and Lee threatened early in the game by a recovery of a West Virginia 
fumble on the Mountaineer 34-yard strip. The Generals marched to the State 2-yard line, 
but there the Southerners were halted and relinqu'shed the ball on downs. After kicking 
out of danger and gaining on another exchange of punts, the Mountaineers got a break 
which started them on the scoring spree. 

Midway of the first auarter Capt. M Glenn pounced on a loose ball on the Generals' 
20-yard line and three olays later LaRue plunged over from the 6-yard line. After re- 
ceiving the kickoff which foMowed, the Mountaineers marched cons-stently down the field 
for 65-yards and another score as Varney plunged over from the 2-yard line. 

Wash-Lee scored in the second half as West Virginia fumbled and a General recover- 
ed on the Mountaineer 30-yard strip. Two passes, both to Williams, giant end. gave the 
Virginians their only tally of the game. 

The Mountaineers -came right back wi:th .mother sustained march and worked the 
ball to the Wash-Jeff 25-yard mark wrom which point F. Glenn broke through the Gen- 
eral's' forward wall, filtered through their secondary and was off for a touchdowkn. 

Washington and Lee started a passing attack as the game neared a close, and finally 
had one intercepted on her 26-yard mark, from which point the Mountaineers plunged 
it through, with Capt. M. Glenn finally tallying from the 3-yard line. 



West Virginia 9 




Oklahoma A. & M. 6 



MARKER 




WEST VIRGINIA 9; OKLAHOMA A. & M. 6. 

It took all of Capt. "Little Sleepy" Glenn's resourcefulness to bring the Mountaineers 
through to a 9-6 victory over the Oklahoma "Aggies" in far-off Stillwater, Okla., Oct. 
25, but his accurate placement kick just seconds before the half-time ■whistle blew and a 
great catch of a pass and the subsequent run through the "Aggie" team later in the game, 
turned the tide. 

The Oklahomans were much tougher than had been expected and kept harassing 
the Mountaineers throughout the first half, but it was chiefly West Virginia fumblmg th.nt 
caused the trouble. Finally, just a few minutes before the half ended, the Mountaineers 
started a drive with the aid of a couple of long passes from LaRue to Lang, but they only 
got to the 23-yard line as the gun was about to boom. Glenn called time out and they 
decided on a p'acement try from the 23-yard mark. The wind was sweeping by in a bad 
direction, but Glenn's marksmanship was good and the Mountaineers took the rest period 
in the lead, 3-0. 

After threatening once during the first part of the third quarter, the Mountaineers 
got the braak which enabled them to score. An "Aggie" punt was blocked and recovered 
by Carrico on the Oklahomans' 36-yard line. A penalty set the Mountaineers back on 
the next play, but LaRue got off an 18-yard pass to Capt. M. Glenn and he picked his 
way the remaining 20 yards to score and put the Mountaineers ahead, 9-0. 

About midway of the fourth quarter LaRue was hurt and Doyle replaced him. The 
latter caught an "Aggie" punt on his four-yard line and was downed without return. 
Sebulsky kicked out, but Oklahoma worked the ball down to thi 15-yard line where Doyle 
intercepted a pass. A penalty put the Mountaineers back to their very goal line and then 
Sebulsky had his punt blocked and two husky "Aggie" linemen fell on the ball for a touch- 
dov^rn. The try for placement was missed. 

The Oklahomans started a desperate passing attack in the last six minutes of the 
game and had the Mountaineers on a frantic defense, but they were equal to the occasion 
and they were in possession of the ball on their own 30-yard line as the game ended. 



West Virginia 




Fordham 



MORGAN 



BEHNKE 




DOYLE 



WEST VIRGINIA 0; FORDHAM 0. 

The undefeated Fordham Rams were the Mountaineers' foes at the Polo Grounds, 
New York City, Nov. 5, and in a loosely played but exciting game the West Virginians 
held the New Yorkers at bay on their very goal line as the game ended, after having stop- 
ped the Cavanaugh team eight times previous'y inside of the 20-yard mark. 

West Virginia had a good attack as the game opened, but developed an attack of 
"fumbles" and just about handed the game to the Rams on a golden platter. The Moun- 
taineer line played remarkable ball, however, and every Fordham attempt to score after 
gift chances was smothered. 

Fordham's only sustained ma^rch of the game came just five minutes before it closed 
when the Rams started on their own 28-yard line and chiefly through passing and a de- 
ceptive delayed buck, marched consistently down the field to the West Virginia 4-yard 
line, but here the Mountaineers held three times and the gun boomed to end the game 
before the last chance of the series of downs was afforded the New Yorkers. 

"Tarzan" G enn's great line plunging and Capt. "Little Sleepy" Glenn's great defen- 
sive play behind a stalwart line saved the day. Capt. Siano of !^he Fordhamites was an 
outstanding star on the defense, and but for him the Mountaineers would have been away 
for long runs time after time. 



Pagre One Hundred Seventy-Nine 



West Virginia 




WAGGONER 




DETROIT 36; WEST VIRGINIA 0. 



West Virginia suffered her worst home defeat in years when the Titans of the Univer- 
sity of Detroit, led by the great Lloyd Brazil, halfback and captain, steamrolled the Moun- 
taineers under a 36-0 score on Mountaineer field in the annual "West Virginia Day" game, 
Nov. 9. 

The first quarter of the game was scoreless, but was marked by the Mountaineers' 
only scoring chance. They reached the Titan 16-yard line early in the game, but De- 
troit took the play from them there on and was never headed thereafter. 

Detroit had possession of the ball on the West Virginia 30-yard line as the first 
period ended, but passes and Brazil's 10-yard scoot around end brought the first score. 
Late in the first half the Mountaineers wtlre backed to their own goal line, but Bartrug 
got off a good kick to midlield. The shifty little "Sniz"' Ross took it back 25-yards, how- 
ever, and on the first play thereafter, Brazil heaved a long pass to Navin, end, who went 
over without being touched. Both tries for extra points were missed. 

The third Detroit touchdown was scored midway of the third quarier on an SO-yard 
march, climaxed by a 43-yard pass from Brazill to l^oss. Just before the third period 
ended, Behnke, Mountaineer end, fumbled after receiving a pass and Detroit recovered 
on its own 40-yard strip. Another uninterrupted march resulted and was terminated only 
when Ross wiggled his way through the Mountaineers to score from the 14-yard line. 

On the first play of the fourth quarter, Brazil intercepted one of LaRue's passes and 
was dropped on the West Virginia 40-yard line. Ross took the ball around end on the 
next play and raced 60 yards to tally. 

Brazil practically accounted for the fourth touchdown himself near the close of the 
game when he got loose from the Detroit 42yard line to the West Virginia 10-yard line 
and thep went over after three plunges, making the final score 36-0 when every try for 
the extra points failed. 



West Virginia 




Georgetown .. 



JOSEPH 



3EBULSKY 




F. GLENN 



WEST VIRGINIA 0; GEORGETOWN 0. 



pulled 


the 


unex 


pec 


ed 


gh Georg 


stown 


ou 


tfit 


oteKes 


to 


a 0-0 


de 


id- 



Exerting their famous Mountaineer spirit, the Varsity gridde 
the week after the Detroit debacle when they encountered the 
at Griffith Stadium, Washington, Nov. 16, and held Lou Little's 

lock. 1 I ar L 

The Mountaineers played alert ball throughout the game but warded off the strongest 
threat when Georgetown reached the West Virginia 2-yard line wih a first down late in 
the fourth quarter after a 50-yard march which was featured by a long pass. 

After having been repulsed at every turn in their offensive efforts, the Mountaineers 
settled into a conservative defensive game which taxed the strength of the Hoyas to the 
limit An off-side p'ay gave the Hilltoppers their big chance at the two-yard mark as the 
fourth quarter drew near to a close. The Mountaineers held the Hoyas without gain on 
the first two plays of the series and on the third play Georgetown fumbled and Gene 
Joseph, a substitute end injected to help ward off the drive, pounced on the ball to stop 
the rush. Eddie Bartrug, who had hooked up with Capt. Mooney of Georgetown in a 
great punting dual, got the West Virginians out of danger with a Icng punt. 

West Virginia played remarkably alert ball throughout, but the Hoyas contmued to 
molest through the air even after thwarted, and it was the great defense offered by Eddie 
Stumpp and "Litt'e Sleepy" Glenn in the closing minutes which kept these passes from 
being converted into winning touchdowns. 

There were no particular stars for West Virginia, for at no time durmg the season 
did they play so well as a team, unless it was in the closing encounter with Washington 
and Jefferson. 



Page One Hundred Eighty-One 



West Virginia 6 f ' 




W. & J 



BEALL 



ST'ONKARD 




WHITE 



WEST VIRGINIA 6; WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON 0. 



Living up to traditions, the Mountaineers would concede nothing to the Washington 
and Jefferson Presidents in their annual Thanksgiving day battle on Mountaineer field, 
and after a smart brand of football on a water and snow logged gridiron and in a driving 
snowstorm, topped the ancient rivals unexpectedly by a 6-0 count. 

With the gridiron a literal sea of mud after the first few minutes of play, clean hand- 
ling of the ball was rendered almost impossible, and it was on a piece of bad judgment 
that the Mountaineers got their scoring opportunity and capitalized on it to win the game. 

About midway of the first quarter, Maury Rush, W. & J.*s fleet safety man, fumbled 
a punt which he should have played safe and Nelson Lang, Mountaineer terminal, pounced 
upon it on the Presidents' 1 1 -yard line. An offside penalty aided the Mountaineers at 
this point and after five plays they finally sent "Tarzan" Glenn off tackle from the one- 
yard line for the winning score. 

Neither team could gain appreciably, but the alert play of the Mountaineers gave 
them three other chances to strike at the Presidents "in close" after they had scored. W. 
& J. only once got as far as the We»t Virginia 28-yard line. 

Eddie Bartrug's great punting of a muddy ball was the outstanding feature of the 
game. 



Yell Leaders 




VANNOY WiLDT FLOWERS 

HEAD 




< 

a 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL. 



One of the finest freshmen football teams in years at the 
University completed a successful season by defeating Potomac 
State, Kiski. Broaddus, Glenville and Carnegie Tech frosh, tie- 
ing Washington and Jefferson's plebes and losing to Pitt's year- 
lings by one touchdown. 

Several outstanding members of the Little Mountaineer 
team are expected to fill in gaps on the Varsity on the 1930 
outfit, and some are even considered superior to several Varsity 
holdovers. 

Capt. Leo Dotson, Bill Parriott, Harold McClure, Andrew 
Brawley, Tommy Canich, Morris Drobeek and a few other backs 
are both hefty and speedy. 

On the line, Wilbur Sortet, Jack Laskin and Carlan Hogue, 
ends; Frank Lough, Loyal Mackey and Pred Schweitzer, tackles: 
Jimmy Copeman, Homer Fizer, and Charlie Zirbis, guards; and 
Floyd Schw^artzwalder and Dick Mentzer, centers, are all out- 
standing in promise. 




STADSVOLD 

Coach 



BASKETBALL (Varsity) 



Wes 


V.rg.n 


Wes 


Virgin, 


West 


Virginu 


West 


Virginic 


West 


Virgini, 


West 


Virginie 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virgin! 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 


West 


Virginia 



10 University of Nebraska 45 

39 Carnege Tech 29 

34 Georgetown University 27 

33 W. Va. Wes'eyan College 27 

39 Penn State College 40 

17 W. Va. Wesleyan College 24 

51 Salem College 24 

50 Washington & Lee University 34 

3 1 Georgetown University 34 

29 Temple University . 35 

36 U. S. Military Academy 41 

21 Rider College 53 

28 New York University 30 

26 Duquesne University 28 

50 Geneva College 28 

3 1 Waynesburg College 28 

19 University of Pittsburgh 21 

48 Marshall College 35 

47 Washington & Jefferson 26 

46 Washington & Jefferson .. 30 

33 University of Pittsburgh 25 



727 

(Won I 1— Lost 10) 



674 



Page One Hundred Eighty-Eight 




VARSITY BASKET BALL SQUAD 

Standing (left to right) Coach Francis Stadsvold, Scott, Plaster, Bartrug, Cubbons, M.ui- 

ager Garvin. 
Seated (left to right) Doyle, Fox, Capt. Marshall Glenn, Michie, Ratcliffe. 



Afte 




NEBRASKA 45: WEST VIRGINIA 19 

shaky start in the Mid-West on their openinij 
barnstorming trip, the Nebraska "Cornhuskers" came to 
Mountaineer Field house and soundly defeated West Vir- 
ginia, 45-19 in the Varsity's inaugural game of the season. 
The "Cornhuskers" were big, rangy fellows, but it was a 
comparatively close affair in the first half. In the second 
period, Grace, Nebraska's All-Missouri Valley Conference 
forward, set the pace and the Mountameers fell sadly be- 
hmd. Bartrug and Cubbon, both new men, alternated at 
center, and the combination did not "click." Capt. "Little 
Sleepy" Glenn led the West Virginia atatck with five field 
goals. 



WEST VIRGINIA 39; CARNEGIE TECH 29 

The Mountaineers still looked somewhat ragged as they 
defeated Carnegie Tech. 39-29 in the second game of the 
season. Capt. Glenn and Bartrug were "off" in their per- 
formances and both were ejected on personal fouls late in 
the game. Eddie Cubbon. sophomore forward, started his 
first game and went well, but Truehart Taylor, replaced 
him near the close of the game and gave one of his old- 
time rallying performances by looping five goals in about 
four minutes. Capt. Nease led the Tartan.s' attack with 
twelve points. Cubbon had eleven and Taylor ten. 



Virginia's point 
the most, thirte 
halftime. 



WEST VIRGINIA 34; GEORGETOWN 27 

With Truehart Taylor again supplying the winning punch 
with four goals late in the game, the Mountaineers won a 
rough game from Georgetown in the Field House on Jan- 
uary 10. There were twenty-six fouls called in the game, 
seventeen on West Virginia and nine on Georgetown, but 
the Mountaineers outscored the Hoyas from the court inJ 

__^______ had better averages at the foul line to win, 34-27. Dutton, 

■ ' graceful Georgetown center, scored seventeen of his team's 

points, four fie'd goals and nine in thirteen foul tries. West 

e well distributed, but Capt. Glenn had 

The Mountaineers had a 17-13 lead at 



WEST VIRGINIA 33; W. VA. WESLEYAN 27 

Wesleyan's Bobcats provided unexpected opposition for 
the Mountaineers in the Field House, January 14, but a 
superior defense and a slightly better offense kept West 
Virginia out in front throughout and at the end the Moun- 
taineers had a 33-27 edge. Wesleyan could not get 
through the West Virginia defense, so the Bobcats fired 
away at long range. Battles, big Wesleyan forward, scored 
six from deep court and kept the Bobcats in the running. 
Meanwhile, the West Virginia offense was somewhat out 
of kilter and only a small portion of the Mountaineer shots 
"broke." Battles was high scorer for the game, with Glenn 
fo'lowing closely with five goals. 



PENN STATE 40; WEST VIRGINIA 39 

As the season turned out, there was only one game on 
the Mountaineer card that surpassed the battle with Penn 
State in the Field House, January 18. and that was the 
c'osing encounter with Pitt. The West Virginia and Nit- 
tany Lion teams battled neck-and-neck throughout, the 
Mountaineers showing smooth passing and. a thick defense, 
while the Penn Staters were going well with their long 
range gunning. The West Virginia forwards were in form, 
but the work of the "back line" of the offense was weak. 




RATCLIFFE 



Page One Hundred Ninety 



On the contrary, Penn State's entire team worked into the 
scoring, mostly from deep court, however, and it was a 
long shot near the close of the game that gave the Lions 
their 40-39 decision. Taylor, playing his last game foi 
the Mountaineers, worked bril -antly with Capt. Glenn, bul 
Penn State's "double-barreled" attack from deep courl 
could not be stopped. 



W. V.^. WESLEYAN 24; WEST VIRGINIA 17 

On the night of January 25 at Buckhannon, the Moun- 
taineers went from the sublime as it had been depicted 

in the Penn State game to the ridiculous. The West Vir- 

g'n a team was ragged, passed poorly and played roughly, 
and despite the fact that they outscored the Bobcats eight 
to ssven from the court, the too numerous fouls they com- 
mitted were chiefly responsible for the Mountaineers' 24-17 
downfall. Eddie Cubbon was the lead ng scorer, but he 
was handicapped by an injured foot. Capt. Glenn was en- 
tirely off form. 

WEST VIRGINIA 5 I ; SALEM 24 

Although Salem Co lege's Ten-Milers stopped Capt. 
Glenn, they forgot to keep tab on the other Mountaineers, 
princpally Eddie Cubbon, and West Virginia smothered 
the little state school team, 51-24. Cubbon had nine goals 
and a foul to top a'l scorers, and Ratcliffe and Plaster, 
guards, got into the scoring conspicuously for the first time 
of the year to gather seven goals between them. The 
Mountaineers were ahead 32-13 at halftime. Dodds, Salem 
center, scored thirteen points for his team. 




WEST VIRGINIA 50; WASHINGTON & LEE 34 

The Mountaineers started their long and difficu't Eastern 
tr-p by winning unexpectedly from the much-talked-about ^^^^^^^^= 
Washington and Lee General at Huntington, February 1, = 

50-34. Eddie Cubbon was left behind with an infected 

foot, but Johnny Doyle, the other soph' 
ed Mountaineer fans by stepping 



PLASTER 




re forward, sur- 
the breech and 

^ ng nineteen points to lead the West Virginia attack. 

The Generals were "down" from the start and at half-time 
were behind. 28-15. Leigh Williams, .All-Southern Confer- 
ence center, was the only Wash-Lee p'.ayer to appreciably 
dent the Mountaineer defense. 



GEORGETOWN 34; WEST VIRGINIA 3 1 
In a game much similar to that which the Mountaineers 
won from Georgetown at Morgantown earlier in the season, 
the Hoyas stopped the West Virginians at Washington, D. 
C, February 4 with a closing rally, 34-31. Georgetown 
was again in form from deep court, but the Mountaineers 
lound^the floor too slick for their fast passing offensive 
and failed to get their usual quota of "in" shots. Capt. 
Olenn played throughout the game and those on the re- 
mainder of the trip, with a fractured finger, received in the 
Lattle with the Wash-Lee Generals at Huntington. 



FOX 



TEMPLE 35; WEST VIRGINIA 29 

West Virginia found Temple univers'ty's team too big 
' r the small playing floor and failed to keep up with the 
Philadelphians at the start of the game which was played 
at Philadelphia, February 5. Despite the fact that they 
outscored Temple, 17-15 in the second half, the Mountain- 
eers could not overcome the 20-12 lead the Philadelphians 
had at the rest period and finished 35-29 in the arrears. 



ARMY 41; WEST VIRGINIA 36 




tan 

close 

aftern 

30-24 

shots. 

tainee 



-. ..._ js of Eddie Cubbon, the M 

ieers went on to West Point 



Still witho 



the 



«cai 1 i^mt and dropped their third 
game in a row to the Army Cadets, 41-36 on the 
' The Cadets pulled c 
iking" 



fr 



ell 



if February 6. 
the first half by "br 
the second half the game was toned down and 
fronts were evident, but again the Moun- 
' . /"I ^r_ i___T-_ 



• def 
fell 



'ith the 
ed do 



vith six goal 



ihort. 41-36. Capt. Gle 



as the leading 



RIDER COLLEGE 5 3 

Mountaineers took th« 



Th 

by losing to Rider 
ton, N. J., Feb. 7 
ward popped seve 
team to a 53-2 1 v 



WEST VIRGINIA 21 

ir worst defeat of the season 
another small court at Tren- 
er. Rider's six-foot-eight for 
ough the basket to lead his 



NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 30; WEST VIRGINIA 28 

After holding a 14-8 edge at halftime, the Mountaineers 
tired in their last game of the trip and New York Univer- 
sity squeezed through with a 30-28 victory in New York 
City, February 8. The new Yorkers won the game by 
looping eleven fouls in seventeen tries, while West Virginia 
got but two in five. West Virginia outscored the Violet 
from the court, thirteen to eleven. Capt. Glenn again led 
the attack with six field goals. 



Us 



stall- 



went o 
scored 
tory in 
for the 
first tir 
"break 
the Du 



-for 



ut and played the 
the Dukes, 20-14 in that period, just missing a vic- 
the closing minutes of the game which ended, 28-26 
Pittsburghers. Capt. Glenn went goalless for ::he 
ne during the season, and only Cubbon was able to 
his shots. "Midget" Stephens- was the star for 



DUQUESNE 28; WEST VIRGINIA 26 

the so-called professional style of attack and 
ing outside of the Mountaineer zone defense, the Duquesne 
"Dukes" managed to top the West Virginians, 28-26 at the 
Field house, Feb. I 2, in West Virginia's first home game 
after the disastrous Eastern trip. At halftime, the Moun- 
taineers were behind, 14-6, but the second period, th'jy 
man defense and out- 



WEST VIRGINIA 50; GENEVA 28 
West Virginia settled an old score in the Field house 
on the night of Feb. I 5 by trimming the Geneva Covenant- 
ers, 50-28. In 1929 the Covenanters snapped a Mountain- 
eer winning streak of seven games by winning by a large 
score, but this past campaign, the West Virginians brought 
an eight-man attack into play on the Geneva outfit and 
after getting away to a mediocre start and leading only 
19- 16 at halftime, broke through the Covenanters' defense 
in the second period vv^hen .Montgomery, Geneva guard, 
was forced out on personals, and outscored the Pennsyl- 
vanians, 31-12 in the second frame. 



WEST VIRGINIA 3 1 ■ WAYNESBURG 28 
Some more unexpected trouble was encountered in the 
Field house, Feb. 19. but Capt. "Little Sleepy" Glenn start- 
ed spurting and managed to give the Mountaineers a 30-28 
verdict over Waynesburg. The Yellow Jackets, employing 
the slow offense and the "stall" in a varied form, had West 
Virginia down 14-13 at halftime and Glenn had failed to 




DOYI E 



Jlundred Ninety-Tv 



bag a field goal. In the second period, however, the Moun- 
taineer captain crashed through with five and led the West 
Virginians in a rally which enabled them to win a three- 
point margin. 



PITT 21 ; WEST VIRGINIA 19 

Pitt's creat Panther cage outfit put a big price on the 
victory they gained over the Mountaineers at Pittsburgh, 
February 22 and used heir famous "stall" game to top .he 
West Virginians, 21-19. After the Mount.Tineers had ex- 
hibited a zone defense which thev cou'd not penetrate save 
by long gunning, and when the first half ended in a 17-17 
tie, the Panthers went out and got a two-point lead and 
stalled practically the entire second half and managed to 
hang on with a two-point v'ctory when a 'ast-minute spurt 
of the Mountaineers just missed the goal which would have 
tied the rame. G'enn, Bartrug and Doy'e each goaled 
thrice for West Virg^nin while Pitt had only eight all told. 
Capt. Hyatt of the Panthers goaled but once. Pitt's margin 
of victory was gained at the foul line. 



WEST VIRGINIA 48; M.ARSHALL 3 5 

Marshall college sent its best court five in years to the 
Fie'd house Feb. 26, Vut Capt. Glenn gave the Big Green 
a lesson in "southoawing" and led the Mountaineers to a 
24-14 lead at ha'ftime by baggmg seventeen points him- 
self. MarshaM concentrated on Glenn in the second period 
and then Cufcbon and Lepera carried on to offset a flurry 
of long-range shots by the C-ibell countians. Glenn finisji- 
ed with nineteen points for the evening's si 



hone 




WEST VIRGINIA 47; WASHINGTON & JEFFERSON 26 

The Washington and Jefferson Presidents got a peep at 
Glenn at his best in the Field house, March 1, and they 
also found that the Mountaineers possessed a scoring punch 
in the-r guards when Ratcliffe joined with Glenn and this 

an up t 



ty-nine points to aid materially in 
the 47-26 victory for West Virginia. Glenn had eight goals 
and a foul while Ratclifle tallied five goals and a pair of 
free throws. 




WEST VIRGINIA 46; W.ASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON 30 

The entire West Virginia team staged a scoring spurt at 
Washington, Pa., March 5 and a^ain the Washington and 
Jefferson Presidents were defeated, this time, 46-30. De- 
sn te the small Poor on which the game was played, the 
Mountaineer offensive worked smoothlv and the defense 
kept the Presidents' "in" shots scattered. Bartrug was the 
l-ad-ng s'-or-r with th'rt'en ponts, closely followed by 
Cu'jbon and Hami'ton of W. & J., and Ratcliffe. 



Pitt'; 



LEPERA 



WEST VIRGINIA 33; PITT 25 

srhtv Pantherns were not afforded the opportu- 
n-tv to use their famous "sta'I" olay in the colsing game 
rf the s-ason in the Field house, March 8 before a throng 
of 4, con persons and as a result the Mountaineers, with 
Capt. Glenn and Ratcl-fTe, each playing his last game, in 
great form, defeated Pitt 33-25. Ratcliffe kept the great 
Hyatt in check, but the Pantherns couldn't stop Glenn ind 
the Mountaineer ace led West Virginia's onslaught with 
seven goals and three fou's for seventeen points. 

West Virginia had a 1 7-9 lead at halftime. and played 
the Panthers on even terms at 16-16 in ihe second period. 

Hyatt scored nine points for Pitt and Glenn easily gained 
the edge on him for the year. 



BASKETBALL RECORD (Freshmen) 



Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
Freshmen 
F'shmen 
Freshmen 



28 Johnson's Independents 20 

57 Seneca A. C 19 

36 West Penn Collegians 19 

38 Fairmont Y. M. C. A 40 

32 Fairmont Collegians 34 

43 Uniontown (Pitt) Junior College 32 

33 Terra Alta National Guards 39 

49 Potomac State School 39 

53 Franz-Burka Collegians 47 

44 West Penn CollegianG 36 

47 Franz-Burka Collegians 43 

37 Terra Alta National Guards 27 

50 Potomac State School 62 

43 Duquesne University Freshmen 38 

17 University of Pitt Freshmen 40 

43 Uniontown (Pitt) Junior College 41 

59 Conner's A. C ... 30 

28 W. & J. Freshmen 19 

28 W. *: 1. Freshmen ... 26 

12 University of Pitt Freshmen . 32 



777 
(Won M— Lost 6) 



683 



BOXING 



Page One Hundred Ninety-Five 




VACHERESSE 
Coach 




RECORD 



West Virginia , I 

West Virginia 4 

West Virginia 3 

West Virginia 5 

West Virginia 1 

West Virginia . 4 

18 



Penn State College 6 

Georgetown University 3 

Bucknell University 4 

Western Maryland Col'ege 2 

New York University 6 

U. S. Military Academy 3 

24 



(Wen 3 Lost 3) 



One Hundred Ninety-Six 






uli-c',1 Niiietv 




BOXING SQUAD 

Rear Row (left to right) : Capt. Krebs, Robert Hamilton. Hesse, Hawkins, Coach 

Vacheresse. 
Front Row (left to right): Dienna, Stunkard, Owen Hamilton. 



BOXING 1930 

Boxing, the baby sport at West Virginia University, got a pood start with a team 
composed of six sophomores and one senior, Capt. Gregg Krebs. 

The meet (vith Penn State college at State College, Pa., inaugurated the sport on an 
intercollegiate basis. Although three of the bouts were e;:tremely close, the Mountameers 
won only one, the heavy^i/eight scrap which was annexed by Leonard Hawkins. 

After opening in a more auspicious manner than had been anticipated, the Varsity 
came back to Morgantown and put on the first intercollegiate bout ever staged on the 
campus, defeating Georgetown, 4-3 in the Field house. Hesse, 135 pounds; Stunkard, 
145-pounds; Capt. Krebs, 160 pounds, and Hawkins, heavyweight, won the bouts which 
gave the Mountaineers their victory. Stunkard defeated the intercollegiate welterweight 
champion, Capt. Fish, in an extra round bout. 

The third match, that with Bucknell, at Lewisburg, Pa., went to the Fennsylvanians, 
4-3. West Virginia won in the 135, 160, and heavyweight classes. 

• Western Maryland college was given a battle at Westminster, Md., in the fourth 

match, but the Mountaineers went under, 5-2, Stunkard m the 145-pound class and Haw- 
kins in the heavyweight class having been the only Varsity men to win. Tv/o other bouLs 
were extremely close. 

The Mountaineers took their worst beating of the season in New York City in com- 
petition with New York University, losing the match 6-1. Stunkard scored West Vir- 
ginia's only point, and Hawkins's four-match winning streak went by the boards when he 
fell before Serutis. 

Eddie Vacheresse's boys pulled a surprise in the big March 8 program at the Field 
house bef.ore some 4,000 fans when they defeated the Army, 4-3. Owen Hamilton, 125- 
pounder; Stunkard, boxing at 135 pounds; Krebs, in the 145 pounds; and Hawkins, 
heavyweight. 



Papre One Hundred Ninety-Nine 




r';is'e Two Hundred 




WRESTLING SQUAD 



Standing (left to right) : Coach Steve Harrick. Martin, Lewis, Levine, Higgins, Manager 

Browning. 
Seated (left to right): Meyers, Capt. Brill, Henry. Higginbotham, Wotring, Johnson, 

Beatty. 



Page Two Hundred-Tv 




HARRICK 

Coach 





Page Two Hundred-Three 



VARSITY RECORD 



We 



Virginia 24 



West Virginia . 6 

West Virginia __ 24 

West Virginia ... 24 

West Virginia 18 

West Virginia 28 

West Virginia 

West Virginia - 3 

127 



Waynesburg College 10 

Ohio State University 22 

Marshall College .. 6 

Western Reserve "U" 6 

Ohio University .. I 1 

Waynesburg College . 10 

U. S. Naval Academy 28 

Oklahoma A. & M. .. 3 1 

124 



(West Virginia won 5; Lost 3) 



WRESTLING 1930 

With only Capt. Gordon Brill, 145-pounder; Paul T. Meyers, 155-pounder; and Clar- 
ence Higgins, 165-pounder, as the only lettermen left as the 1930 wrestling season open- 
ed. Coach Steve Harrick experimented successfully and the Mountaineers finished their 
season with a record of five victories and only three defeats. 

Waynesburg co lege was the opening meet victim in the Field house, 24-10. West 
Virginia lost in the 1 1 5 and lightweight classes. 

In the second match of the season with Ohio State at Columbus, the Mountaineers 
dropped a 22-6 decision. Eddie Girden, 125-pounder, wrestling in h's last intercollegiate 
bout before graduating at mid-year, and Paul Meyers, 155-pounder, were the only West 
Virginians to win, both on substantial time advantages. 

On the succeeding week-end, Marshall college brcught its team to the Field house, 
but the Varsity trimmed the "Big Green," 24-6, losing only in the 115-pound and 135- 
pound bouts. 

The University opened athletic r = 'ationship with Western Reserve university of 
Cleveland when the Ohioans came to Morgantown for a meet with Coach Harrick's much- 
improved team. By winning all bouts excepting the 115-pound and 165-pound affairs, 
the Mountaineers gained their third victory in four starts, 24-6. 

In the closest match of the season, Ohio University was defeated at Athens, O., 18-11 
on the succeeding week-end. Capt. Brill, 145-pounds; Meyers, 155-pounds; Lewis, 175- 
pounds; Martin, heavywe^ight ; and Beatty, 1 15-pounds, won their bouts. 

Waynesburg college was encountered in a return match at Waynesburg in the sixth 
meet of the season, and this time the Varsity won. 28-10. The Yellow Jackets won the 
first two bouts, but were shut out hereafter. Paul Meyers, again wrestling at 155 pounds, 
won his sixth consecutive victory. 

The undefeated Navy Middies kept their record for the season intact when they shut 
out the Varsity at Annapolis the week-end following the second Waynesburg meeting, 
28-0. Meyers lost his first bout of the season to Gray of the Middies. 

Oklahoma A. & M. college, national collegiate championship team, defeated the 
Mountaineers, 31-3 in the concluding match of tke season in the Field house, March 7. 
It was the fifty-sixth consecutive dual meet victory for an "Aggie" team, extending over 
a period of eight years. Higginbotham, wrestling at 125 pounds, was the only West Vir- 
ginian to win his bout, although a couple of others were close, particularly the 1 55-pound 
struggle between Meyers of the Varsity and McGuirk of the "Aggies." 



One of the best freshman tear 
feated season. The Little Mountaii 



:ars at the University, 
Dn four matches and s 



ent through an unde- 
red 116 points to 28. 



FRESHMAN WRESTLING TEAM 

115-Pound Class Ben Sharpe 

125-Pound Class Lutrell Machlin 

135-Pound Class Charles Herd 

145-Pound Class George Smith 

155-Pound Class Captain Floyd Schwartzwalder 

165-Pound Class . . Joe Johnston 

175-Pound Class Loyal Macksy 

Unlimited Class Fred Schweitzer 



FRESHMEN RECORD 



West Virginia 31 

West Virginia 26 

West Virginia . 36 

West Virginia 23 

116 

(West Virginia 



Fairmont Y. M. C. A 3 

East Liberty Y. M. C. A 10 

Waynesburg Reserves 

Erie Boys' Club 15 



Dn 4; Lost 0.) 



TRACK 



Page Two Hundred-Seven 





INDOOR TRACK SQUAD 



s. Dave Jacobs, Ruble 



Rear row standing (left to r;ght): Van Voorhis, Clash, G« 
Callaway. 

Middle row (left to right: Coach Art Smith, Capt. Riley, Brand, H.ll, Deems, Hart, Way- 
goner, Coldstein, Manager Robertson. 

Front row (left to right): Hughes, Coombs, Bradford, Young, Geddes, Sprigg Jacob, 
William Waggoner, Chambers, Hoult. 




RlLt.V 
Captain 1930 




-:z:^ JS^ 



INDOOR RECORD 



West Virginia 



651/2 University of Pittsburgh 
(Won 1— Lost 0) 



34'^ 



P;iKe Two niiii.lTo.l-Xin.' 




Page Two Hundreil-Teii 



OUTDOOR TRACK 



Page Two Hundred-Eleven 




r'aso 'l'wi> lIundrea-TweU 



SPRING CAMPAIGN RECORDS 

(Dual Meets) 



West Virginia 86 

West Virginia 60y2 

West Virginia 116% 

263 



Geneva College 49 

University of Pittsburgh 74'/^ 

West Virginia Wesleyan 18% 

132 



West Virginia — Won 2 ; Lost 1 . 



BIG FOUR MEET 

First West Virginia, 99% 

Second University of Pittsburgh, 9 1 Vs 

Third — Carnegie Tech, 25 

Fourth — Washington & Jefferson, 6 

Although the personnel of the teams were practically the same, the list of events for 
indoor and outdoor track compeittion differ in a maior degree, thus accountine: for West 
Virginia's victory over the University of P)ttsburgh during the winter in the Field house, 
and the loss to the Panthers in dual competition out of doors at Pittsburgh during the 
spring. Likewise, the team personnels were the same for "Big Four" comoetition, but 
the mpnner of scoring and the list of events again played into the hands of Coach Art 
Smith's Fetter balanced team and the Mountaineers squeezed through to their second 
straight "Big Four" championship. 

The indoors comoetition proved to be valuable in stimulating interest in track and 
likewise as an aid to the Mountaineers during the spring campaign out of doors. 

On the whole, the 1929 track season -was a big success for West Virginia, and 'vas 
by far thf* most pretentious ever arranged, including the indoors program of the Ohio 
State dual meet which brought into competition two national champions in Dick Rock- 
awav. Buckeye hurdler, and he "fastest human," George Simpson, Ohio's greatest 
sprinter. 

Onlv two records of all-time performances of University men were eauaUed and none 
shattered last year in track, and both were marked bv Russell ("Runt") Calloway, fresh- 
man hurdler. Calloway equalled the 120-vard high hurdle mark of 15 3/5 sec, estab- 
lished by Okey Morrison and H. Maxwell in 1927, on the two occasions he ran in them 
in competition against the Pitt Frosh and Kiski. and in the Kiski dual, equalled the 220- 
vard record set bv Morrison at 25 1/5 sec, in 1927. The plebes, incidentally, defeated 
bpth the Pitt Frosh and Kiski in their only two duals. 



Page Two Hundrc-d-Thirteen 













1 930 BASEBALL SQUAD 



Rear row (left to ri^Kt) : Manager H^den, George Harrick, Peters. Staub. Schoffield, 
Koch, Watson, Coach Steve Harrick. 

Middle row (left to richt): Huf?man. Behnke, Wi'liam Harrick, Bruns, Erb, Stumpp, 
Larue, Wilkinson, Foster. 

Front row (left to right : Hash, Lew;, Jackson. Croushore, Weiner, Langan, Teagarden, 
Capt. Wolf, Jack. 







cS^^^G/j^. 



;. V 






r 



BILL HARRICK 

Captain 



Page Two Hundred-Seventeeii 



RECORD OF 1929 BASEBALL SEASON 



»West 

West 

*West 

*West 

*West 

*West 

*West 

West 

West 

West 

West 

West 

West 

*West 

'West 

»West 

»West 



Virg 

Virg. 

Virg 

Virg 

Virg 

Virg 

Virg 

Virg 

Virg, 

Virg: 

Virg 

Virg 

V: 

Virg 

V 

Virg: 
Virg: 



21 Fairmont Normal 5 

1 Fairmont Normal 4 

4 Ohio University 3 

5 Ohio University 7 

19 Bethany College -- 10 

10 Bethany College ^ 4 

11 Marshall College 14 

6 Georgetown University 8 

5 Washington College (Del.) 6 

4 Quantico Marines 5 

4 Quantico Marines 12 

7 Charleston Senators 5 

3 Marshall College 6 

13 Morris-Harvey College 7 

13 Morris-Harvey College II 

6 Davis-Elkins College 2 

3 Alumni 13 

135 



120 



West Virginia Won 8; Lost 9 

*Games played at home on the Old Athletic field. 



Page Two Hundred-Eighteen 



1929 BASEBALL SUMMARY 

With mediocre pitching and poor fielding to blame, West Virginia's 1929 base'ojil 
season was equally as mediccre. There was a bright spot, however, and that was the 
terrific s.ugging done by the Mountaineers. Eddie Vacheresse, veteran second baseman, 
gave a remarkable hitting exhibition throughout the season and finished with an average 
of .508 percent by hitting safely in the last fourteen contests. Earl Wolfe hit .486, while 
Bob Jackson, outfielder. Earl Croushore, shortstop and third baseman, "Bus" LaRue, third 
baseman, Capt. "Bi 1" Harrick, and Johnny Hash, outfielders, and Sigmund Weiner, gen- 
eral utility man, all hit over .300 per cent. The team batting average ^vas .3 1 7 per cent, 
but unfortunately the fieiding must have been just about as bad as the slugging was good. 

A distastrous road trip through the District of Columbia, Delaware and Virginia left 
a bad impression on the Mountaineers' record and depleted the Varsity ranks of two reg- 
ular stars LaRue, third sacker, and Wolfe, catcher. LaRue fractured an arm and 

Wolfe suffered a fractured leg in the second of two games with the Quantico Marines at 
their base in Quantico, Va,, and thus were lost for the last seven games of the season. 




HARRY L. SAMUEL. 
Director 



INTRAMURAL STAFF 

Director, HARRY L. SAMUEL 
ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

CARL P. SCHOTT, Director of Physcal Education 

LLOYD M. JONES, Director of Men's Service Program 

HARRY A. STANSBURY, Director of Intercollegiate Athletic 

HARRY L. SAMUEL, Director of Intramural Athletics 

Senior Managers 

Ex-officio Members the Varsity Coaches 



SENIOR MANAGERS 



CHARLES B. SEIBERT 



JOSEPH S. MOEHS 



BERNARD BLICKMAN 



JUNIOR MANAGERS 
D. FRANK DIENNA 



EVAN HARRIS 



INTRODUCTION 

With the establishment of a Division of Physical Education for men at West Virginia 
in the fa.l of 1928 there was also estabUshed, as a branch of this division, a Department of 
Intramural Athletics. Under the guidance of Professor Harry L. Samuel as Director ov 
Intramural Athletics the Department completed its first years of ex:stence in 1929. 

Previous to this new departure competition in basketball, track, baseba.l and horse 
shoes had been conducted on a straight elimination basis by the interf raternity council. 
This competition was closed to all fraternities or individuals outside the council and con- 
sequently this program reached only a very small proportion of the stadent body. 

Starting out in October 1926 Speedball, a game new to West Virginians, was intro- 
duced. The game was received with unexpected enthus asm on the pcirt of the student 
body and from this time on the reception accorded the Intramural program was most 
gratifying. 

During the first year twelve different sports have been conducted in the program. 
These have been Speedball, Tennis, Cross-Country Running, Wrestling, Basketball, Foul 
Throwing, Indoor Track, Bowling, Boxing, Playground Ba.l, Horseshoe Pitch ng and Out- 
door Track. In this present year it is planned to add such sports as Handball, Vo ley Ball 
and Indoor Relays. 

A total of 1073 different students participated in the twelve types of sports offered 
the first year and there was a total of 2642 entries in these sports. 

The program will be altered from year to year and those sports which prove unde- 
sirable for Intramural competition will be dropped and others will be added as popularity 
and facilities permit. 

Intramural athletics not only develops the individual, physically, but they train his 
mental, moral, and social natures as well. Thru this form of activity he learns the mean- 
ing of sportsmanship, fairplay, and the sacrificing of self for the best interests of the 
group. The social contacts the individual makes are invaluable while the returns which 
come from his exercise cannot help but contribute to a more complete living. 

Intramural athletics offers the individual, who played on his high school teams, but 
who is not sufficiently expert to make the varsity, the opportunity to satisfy his longing 
to participate in competitive athletics. The activities included in an intramural program 
are so varied that there is opportunity for every individual no matter what his level of 
ability. They enable the individual to perfect himself in those skills which he will want 
to pursue after college days are over. It makes for a deeper appreciation of varsity ath- 
letics, in fact. Intramural athletics has so many worth while qualities that 1 cannot rec- 
ommend too strongly, that every student make it a point to participate. 

MANAGERIAL SYSTEM 

A volunteer corps of student managers assist in carrying out much of the detail 
necessary to the functioning of the program. There are four classifications of managers; 



Page Two Hundred Twenty-Three 



viz., Senior Intramural Managers, Junior Sports Managers, Sophomore Try-outs, and Unit 
Managers. 

The Senior Intramural Managers shall be senior students appointed from the Junior 
Sports Managers of the preceding year by the Administrative Board. They shall directly 
supervise the work of the Junior Sports Managers and the Sophomore Try-outs. Upon 
the recommendation of the Administrative Board to the Athletic Board of Control, Senior 
Managers will be awarded sweaters with the minor sports managerial award thereon. Up 
to three Senior Intramural Managers may be appointed in one year. 

There may be up to six Junior Sports Managers appointed from the Sophomore Try- 
outs by the Administrative Board and who serve in their Junior year. They shall work 
under the supervision of the Senior Intramural Managers. Each shall be awarded a 
sweater, maroon in color with an old English W. V. in white thereon. 

The Try-outs shall be sophomore students. In exceptional cases second .-semestir 
freshmen may try out provided they have a high scholastic average for their first semester. 
The Try-outs shall be assigned to the Junior Sports Managers as needed and shall work 
under their direction attending particularly to such details as notifying contestants by 
phone or letter, caring for equipment, copying schedules and results, acting as scorers 
and time-keepers in games, etc. Each Try-out recommended by the Administrative Board 
shall be awarded a jersey with his class numerals in the colors of the Sophomore class. 

The Unit Managers shall be appointed by the organization which they represent. 
They shall be notified of the time and place for each contest and shall then be responsible 
for the prompt appearance of their team and its conduct during the game. 

Article V — Ail-Year Point System 



Section 1. For the fraternities there is conducted an all-year championship which 
is determined on a point basis. Each fraternity is given a certain number of point.s de- 
pendent on the showing made in the different sports. The fraternity having accumulated 
the highest point total at the conclusion of the spring program is awarded the trophy sym- 
bolic of the all-year championship. This trophy is donated by the A. G. Spalding Com- 
pany, Pittsburgh branch, and is known as "The A. C. Spalding Trophy for Intramural 
Sports." 

The fraternity winning the runner-up position is also given a trophy. This trophy is 
awarded by Mr. C. P. '"Mike" Leatherwood, a graduate of the University and a former 
varsity athlete. Mr. Leatherwood is proprietor of The Sport Shop at Clarksburg, W. Va., 
and the award is known as the "Sport Shop Trophy." 

^ apportioned as follows; 



Points for the AU-Year Competiti^ 



TOURNAMENTS 

Major Sports 

Baseball, Basketbaf 



Sp. 



Entranc 
edball .- 50 



Intermediate Sports 

Wrestling, Volley Ball 35 



POINTS 




Additional 


Winn 


100 


150 



65 



100 



Minor Sports 

Handball. Horseshoes 25 

MEETS 
Major Sports Entranc 

Outaoor Track, Indoor Track 40 

Intermediate Sports 

Foul Throwins, Indoor Relay 20 

Minor Sports 

Cross Country, Bowling, Tenn's 30 



50 



75 



POINTS 

Additional Winne 

60 100 




Pag-e Two Hundred Twenty-Five 



77!^ Varsity Club 



OFFICERS 

President , EARL WOLFE 

Vice-President WINCHESTER LATHAM 

Secretary STEWART BROWN 

Treasurer LELAND BROWN 



Louis Meisel 
Marshall Glenn 
George Nixon 
William Behnke 
Julian Scott 
Leland Brown 
George Cole 
Winchester Latham 
Stewart Brown 
Paul Langan 
Herbert Hardv 
Isaac Lewis 
William Harrick 
Earl Wolfe 
V. W. Gorden 
lack Zevely 
C. G. Krebbs 
Junior Beatty 
Henry HiggenbotKam 
Christy Wildt 
Frederick Riley 
George Harrick 
Delbert Noel 
Russell Calloway 



Homer Hogue 


Richard Wotring 


Leonard Hawkins 


Owen Hamilton 


Clarence Higgins 


Russell Larue 


Ralph Kirchner 


Louis Varney 


Frank Dienno 


Edward Vacheresse 


Robert Jackson 


Nelson Lang 


Robert lack 


H. W. Epling 


Sigmund Weiner 


Dally Beall 


Charles Bruhns 


Gene Joseph 


Oscar Goldstein 


Francis Glenn 


Si Ruble 


Lawrence Plaster 


Vental Waggoner 


Clinton Carrico 


Le?j'ie Montgomery 


Edward Stumpp 


Harry Hesse 


John Dovle 


Charles Hill 


Paul Myers 


Mickey Brand 


Edwin Bartrug 


Charles Leiphart 


Gordon Brill 


David Jacob, 


George Ratcliffe 


Edward Girden 


William Ruck 


Ira Young 


Harry Stunkard 


George Jackson 


Robert Hamilton 


Lyle Jones 


Edward Fox 


Edward Cubbon 


Thomas Johnson 


Emory Lepera 


Paul Martin 



Page Two Hundred Twenty-Sis: 



JVoman^s Athletic Council 



Or 



inized at West Vi 



University 1922 



The purpose of this council is to cooperate with the Un 
authorities in regulating all matters pertaining to woman's athle 
increase interest in all athletics among women students and to fu 
every possible way the spirit of good sportsmanship on the campu 



tics, 
rther 



COUNCIL 



Eloise Kerr 
Margaret Straley 
Virginia Guthrie 
B.-rtha Handlan 
Sue Fredlock 
Sara Helen Cree 
Louida Colebank 



Martha Bayies 
Henrietta Amos 
Jeanette Brooks 
Irene Carney 
Virginia Doak 
Florence King 
Mildred Varner 



Page Two Hundred Twenty Eight 




T~" IT 



^rnkm^i^- 



\z:iu~-i- 





Personal of Headqtiartefs 

OFFICERS AND STAFF 

Major H. H. Fletcher Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Captain K. F. Haunst Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Captain R. M. McCutcheon Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant S. E. Whitesides Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant P. N. Strong - Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant E. F. Adams Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant W. L. Browning Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant L. F. Malone Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant W. T. Fahey Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant F. H. GofT Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant J. L Steele t. Assistant P. M. S. ^ T. 

Lieutenant W. C. Ayers Assistant P. M. S. & T. 

Lieutenant L. H. Armentroul Assistant P. M. S & T. 

H. T. Schultz, Sgt (DEML) 

D. M. Beard. Sgt (DEML) 

H. L. Dearborn, Sgt (DEML) 




Advanced Cadets 



H. N. Lang 

M. Glenn 

r F. Barbers 

J. H. Reeder 

F. G. Weimer 

J. F. Maynard 

K. W. Cameron 

J. W. Machesney 

F. F. Ruley 

I. H. Brewster 

F. E. Houck 

J. D. Thompson 

B. F. King 

A. R. Wittenberg 
H. H. Mark'ey 

B. L. Humphreys 
R. Lardin 
W. Ford 
M. Blickman 

E. Megailey 
T. Eisen 
C. Morgan 

F. Stewart 
R. M. Taggart 
W. D. Pickering 
S. S. Brown 

I R. Nu^um 
P. C. Gates 
K. C. Berrv 
O. B. LeFevre 
W. C. McMillion 
H. L. Herbert 

D. R. McGill 



A. W^ Petropplus 

P. J. Johnson 

G H. Cunningham 

J, W. Porter 

W. H. Counts 

A. Rubin 

C. J. McCormick 

W. B. Rannelle 

H. O. Webb 

H. G. Martin 

W. H. Ross 

T. Baker 

J. B. Godwin 

H. P. Bailey 

A, H. Hall 

C. D. Leiphart 

J. H. Adkins 

E. M. Bartrug 

W. B. Martin 

E. G. Walters 

W. C. Warman 

G. W. Pride 

H. W. Unger 

W. D. Mr.Cul'a 

C. E. Higgins 

S. Lockhart 

A. E. McCaskey 

P. M. Vannoy 

O. R. Higgins 

W. H. Sterling 

\X/. C. C/erwinski 

R. C. Brand 



I. D. Lyon 

B, F. Rinehart 
L. C. Swing 

C. S.' Hoult" 
U, F. D:enna 
G. H. Hea'y 
J. Kranaskaa 
J. H, Ebeling 

E. Croushore 
I. A. Wiles 
H. A. Burton 

F. M. Brown 
B. S. Wh;te 
L. D. Brown 
R. M, Cooper 

F. W. D. Parsoi 
L. D. Meisel 

H. W. Largent 
R. C. Hillard 
H. T. Swindler 
B. G, Brand 
H. S. Schrader 
L. E. Merod 
V. Merindino 
S. L. Bobday 

G. E. Loucas 
J. M. Morgan 
G. W Emrick 
J. J. Fletcher 

D. M. Geddes 

E. H. Higgs 
W. H. Ruck 




Page Two Hundred Tliirty-Tlire 




Military Sponsors 

Regimental Annette Wiley 

1st Battalion - Irma Ayers 

2ncl Battalion Mary Tait 

3rd Battalion Mary Hite 

Company A - - Geraldine Beviiigton 

Company B Helen Bottome 

Company C - Cathryn Thompson 

Company D Margaret Straley 

Company E Lucille King 

Company F - ,..-. Dorothy Jo White 

Company G - Mary Williams 

Company M « - - Leora Dunn 

Company 1 Mary Alice Davis 



P:ig-e Two Humlred Thirty-Four 



Regimental and Batallion Staffs 

Cadet Colonel H. N. Lang 

Cadet Lt. Colonel Executive Officer M. Glenn 

Cadet Captain — Regimental Adjutant G. F. Barbers 

Cadet Captain — Regimental Supply Officer J. H. Reader 

Cadet Captain — Regimental Plans and Training F. G. Weimer 

Cadet Captain — Surplus J. F. Maynard 

FIRST BATTALION 

Cadet Lieutenant-Colonel _ K W. Cameron 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant Adjutant J. W. Machesney 

Cadet Major F. F. Riley 

SECOND BATTALION 

Cadet Lieutenant-Colonel _ _ J. H. Brester 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant — Adjutant ,.. F. E. Houck 

Cadet Major . J. D. Thompson 

THIRD BATTALION 

Cadet Lieutenant-Colonel B. F. King 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant A. R. Wittenberg 

Cadet Major H. H. Marklev 




Band 



Captain 



jpo 



.. B. L. HUMPHREYS 
MARIAN GOODMAN 



Anderson, Clair 
Arnold, Kilbourne 
Azar, Louis 
Barnette, R. M. 
Bigley, Ernest 
Blum, Edgar 
Bogue, Merwin 
Borgman, Wilfred 
Borinsky, Abe 
Boyd, George 
Bronson, Wade 
Camp, Charles 
Casey, .Addis 
Coudouy., Oscar 
DeAmato. Hugh 
DeAngelis, C. E. 
Dent Charles 
Doll. William 
Dorsey, James 
Emler, Charles 
Epstein, Martin 



Exley, Ben 
Gessler. Paul 
Classman, D. 
Goodman, Edward 
Gordon, J. 
Gvvynne. .Albert 
Habig, lohn 
Hale, Frank 
Harris, E. L. 
Hite, Thomas 
fackson, Colby 
kanalz, Karl 
Katz. J. 

Kennedy, Duncan 
Kiester, John 
Knepper, Norman 
Lewis Albert 
Linger. Paul 
Locker, H. V. 
Longanecker. Cha 
Margolin, Abe 



Moran. Don 
Martin, R.chard 
McHale, E. W. 
McLaughlin, Dan 
Melnicoff, S. 
Merritt. John 
Morgan, C. R. 
Myers, Elmer 
Parrish, John M. 
Pell, R. H. 
Pipes, Byron 
Robinson. D. H. 
Skaff. Philip 
Speiden, E. L. 
Taylor, E. L. 
Tiggleback, R. H. 
Timblin, C. L. 
West, J. A. 
Whitener, A. A. 
Witcherman, Paul 




Company A 

Captain E. R. LARDIN 

ist Lieutenant F. W. FORD 

2ncl Lieutenant E. E. MEGAILEY 

f B. M. BLICKMAN 

■ E. T. EISEN 

S. C. MORGAN 

C. F. 5TEWART 

1^ R. M. TACGART 

Ballantine. R. B. Miller, F. R. Bradford, B. Jr. 

Chapman. H. M. Piampiano, J. J. Cubbon, E. H. 

Comuntzis, P. G. Phillips, V. F. Elliott, R. 

Cooper, M. L. Robinson, L. T. Johnson, C. C. 

D lion, D. R. Rov, D. M. Lewis, 1. 

Evans, T. J. Sleeth, C. R. Llewellyn, M. 

Glasscock, P. C. Stuart. D. S. Jr. Nekoranec, P. L. 

lones, D. B. Taylor, I. E. Peters. G. B. 

Judy, J. D. Taylor, L. 1. Sydnor, C. W. Jr. 

Karr, W. M. Westerman, C. F. Thorn, B. 

Kerns, T. E. White, D. Wolfe, C. T. 

1 ough, D. H. Sellaro, J. A. Sellers, R. E. 

Leinwand, \. Baum, H. E. Hare, C. E. 
Lovitch, C. 



■xmmmmg'gfgjlggjfim^^ 











Company B 

Captain . W. D. PICKERING 

ist Lieutenant .. S. S. BROWN 

2nd Lieutenant J. R. NUZUM 

2nd Lieutenant P. C. GATES 

''K. C. BERRY 
c , J O. B. LeFEVRE 

sergeants < ^ ^ McMlLLlON 

I H. L. HERBERT 

Bary, A. Moore. T. S. Edwards. H. F. 

Collins, \V. J. Nuzum, D. G. Foran. J. A. 

Chrisler, H. L. Polen. F. E. Frame. R. N. 

Evans. E. R. Rose. C. R. Ginsburg, C. D. 

Everly, J. D. Sanders, W. A. Grossman. C. B. 

Hall, J. F. Smith, C. P. Hedrick. W. J. 

Jennings, E. Sneddon. J. C. Jolliffe. A. B. 

lones, O. L. Swick. L. B. McDermott. B. J. 

kemena, E. F. Jr. Thomson. H. H. Sebulsky, J. 

Koontz. T. D. Topper, J. A. Smoot, G. W. 

Kopp, R. A. Walker, A. E. Summerfield, E. S. C. 

Levin. J. Witry, H. J. Woodrum. L. R. 

McClellan. G, O. Clark. B. H. Harrick. G. 

Mason, P. W. Conn, J. B. 




Company C 

Captain D. R. McGILL 

1st Lieutenant . A. W. PETROPPLUS 

2na Lieutenant - P. J- JOHNSON 

2nd Lieutenant G. H. CUNNINGHAM 

f J. W. PORTER 

W. H. COUNTS 
. A. RUBIN 

Sergeants --) q j McCORMICK 

W. B. RANNELLE 
H. O. BEBB 

Ammor. F. K. Sharpe, B. R. Hill, C. W. 

Bandi, R. T. Smith, G. E. Jones, R. Jr. 

Bitanti, J. L. Sperandeo, J. J. Lieb, L. S. 

Bock, E. S. Jr. Strain, B. W. Mallamo, J. T. 

Brick, J. P. Sutton. B. V. D. VIooro, B. J. 

Burdett, J. F. Thornburv, J. H. Parshall, D. B. 

Davis, J. B. Ware, C. M Perrine, P. 

Fizer, H. M. Williams. R. E. Peterson, A. B. 

Ford. V. H. Woodhull. R .B. Raese, R. 

Fordyce, H. J. Canich. J. W. Romino, D. J. 

Goff, W. H. Arnold. M. R. Spence. J. N. 

Herd, C. T. Ashworth, A. L. Steenburgh, W. E. 

Hill. K. H. Bolev, N. W. Shipley. D. B. 

Laskin, J. Brown, R. L. Wallace, J. B. 

Mahanna. D. G. Chafin, R. Weisman. S. 

Miller, C. Collins, E. E. White, H. J. 

Muir, T. F. Cordray. E. B. White, J. W. 

Parsons, H. E. Eddy, D. J. Langhorn H. W. Jr. 

Richardson, H. W. Clash, F. Coombs, F. M. 

Ricketts W. B. Glover. W. Poland, J. R. 
Sawyers, F. W. 



Page Two Hundred Thirty-Nine 




Company D 



Captain H. G. MARTIN 

1st Lieutenant W. H. ROSS 

2nd Lieutenant - T. BAKER 

2nd Lieutenant J. B. GODWIN 

fH. P. BAILEY 
I A. H. HALL 
C. D. LEIPHART 

Sergeants - i J- H. ADKINS 

E. M. BARTRUG 
I W. B. MARTIN 
LE. G. WALTERS 

Brown. L. Pyle, G. R. Jr. Kuhary, E. F. 

Coffman, R. T. Reed. J. W. Lorant. J. A. 

Fisher P. F. Sandy, W. C. MaiesUy. J. S. 

Gardner, W. C. Shearer, J. P. Monack. R. E. 

Haines R. L. Shumate, M. R. Niehaus. E. J. 

Harrison, P. W. Thompson, B. J. Rea, H. B. 

Haught, A. P. Watson, K. S. Sinith, T. 

Headlee, D. R. Webb, R. M. Sprigg, M. L. Jr. 

Ho'land, L. B. Wotring, H. W. Staub. S. W. 

Kime. E. B. Gather, A. B. Sutton, B, J. 

Lee, W. T. Altizer, J. Sy'vester, W. C. 

Martin, F, H. Carpenter, E. B. Timblin, C. L. 

Mclnroy, S. W. Jr. Dodge, D. A. Waggoner, W. G. 

Mentzer, R. L. F.dmondson, R. E. Way, D. H. 

Nesbitt, W. J. Grow, W. C. Wilson, J. F. 

Pierson, J. R. Knee, H. R. Wiseman, E. L. 



Page Two Hundred Fort 



•_!-rA_i ' LJL 

]||Bieiiiiiil»«- 




Compatiy E 



Captain W. C. WARMAN 

1st Lieuten.mt". C. W. PR!DE 

2nd Lieutenant H. W. UNGER 

2nd Lieutenant D. W. McCULLA 

{C. E. HIGGINS 
3. I OCKHART 
I A. E. McCASKEY 

beargeants -j p |<^,] yANNOY 

; O. R. HIGGINS 
I, W. H. STERLING 

Bailey, J. S. Shuman. C. A. laquinta. S. 

Baumgarner. R. E. Sidell. B. W Jones. C. R. 

Carspecken, H. L. ]r. Strickler, W. G. Kayuha, F. 

Colborn, R. H. Tsorvas, G. Kirwin, L. P. 

Conner, B. G Wal'ace, J. E. Lefevre, G. F. 

Dawson, A. A. Wickman, D. W. Lilly, K. O. 

Forsyth, F. A. Jr. Brookover, H. Lyons, O. R. 

Henderson, !. G. Brown. D. L. Jr. McCann, J. C. 

Henkel. C. H. Can.mer, P. A. .McCue, W. P. 

Humphrie.s, K. E. Dittmer, L. L. VIcDowell, M. H. 

Houze. A. Jr. Douglass, J. B. Musgrove, W. D. 

Macln, L. J. Engle, E. L. Parsons, N. W. 

McKinley, G. W. Friend, A. W. Plaster, L. .\. 

Mellott, M. Gi'ke.son, R. M. Stewart, M. T. 

Messniore, L. E Goddin, A. H. Snyder, P. M. 

Morris, I. H. Ha'l, L. Withers, C. B. 

Post, C. L. Hervey, G. E. Rmehart O. N. 

Quencn, C. A. Hickman, H. B. 




Company F 

Captain W. C. CZERWINSKI 

Ist Lieutenant R. C. BRAND 

2nd Lieutenant J. D. LYON 

fB. F. RINEHART 
I L. C. SWING 
- " ■ J C. S. HOULT 

^'^'■S""'' ( D. F. DIENNA 

G. H. HEALEY 
I J. KR AN ASK AS 

Adelson, B. G. Morrison. C. R. Brown J. D. 

Baker. E. M. Murray, W. J. Brown. J. M. 

Berman, M. M. Penn, S. E. Brown. L. B. 

Blayney, H. K. Phillins. G. G. Brownstein. S. 

Boggess, T. E. Polan. M. CnrroU. G. W. 

Carter. H. T. Pritchard, W. D. Chitwood. H. C. 

Chenn. A. S. Reuter, V. G. Costanzo. V. A. 

Cobun, D. B. Richey. R. M. Dole. W. E. 

Cork, R. H. Schaeffer, G. D. Drinkard, R. U. 

Davis, C. F. Schwartzwalder. F. B. Goddin. R. L. 

Eraser. J. G. Seader. R. E. Huffman. J. F. 

Feingold, M. M. Seihert, C, E. Levitt, L. 

Givens, T. F. Smith, J. F. McMillen, S. D. 

Heddleston, R. H. Sprouse, E. M. McSteen, A. J. 

Hess. G. H. Stevenson. C. F. Power. R. S. 

Houck. M. R. Thomas. B. Saville. J. E 

Manuel, M. 1, Wise. C. C. Jr. Viggiano. M. A. 

Johnston, J. F. Young, C. M. Welch. R. 

Jones, E. E. Jr. Zimmerman. J. H. Wickline. P. D. 

Kennedy. F. P. Zalzneck. J. H. Wotring, E. H. 

Lyons. V. D. Adkins. C. M. Wright, B, W. 

Masonheimer, W. L. Bell, W. E. Leeson, L. R. 

McClaughertv. J. Brown. C. B. Shore, P. W. 
Monday, R. D. 



Page Two Iliindrpd Forty-Tv 




Company G 

Captain J. H. EBELING 

1st Lieutenant E. CROUSHORE 

2nd Lieutenant - I. A. WILES 

2nci Lieutenant H. A. BURTON 

fp. M. BROWN 

Sergeants \ B. S. WHITE 

[l. d. brown 

Ashworth, G. Parker, F. F. Echols, J. E. 

Brawley, A. V B. Pr.ce, C. M. Faster, M. F. 

Brewer. T. L. Prichard, C. Gaston, J. H. 

Chaplin, E. G. Riddle, H. G. Gerwig, W. H. 

Courtney, W. H. Rose, I. Gompers, H. W. 

DeVauIt, B. L. Sleeth, C. R. Haddock, G. Z. 

DeVoI, M. Slutsky, M. Hale, R. R. 

Dillon, K. C. Sperow, F. T. Mankoff, L. 

Dotson, L. Strother, P. Mayola, L. V. 

Ellyson, H. Thomas, E. 1. Milleson, W. T. 

Fisher, E. L. Tierney, K. Proudfoot, T. 

Fox, I. F. Watkins, H. V. Repair, R. G. 

Fox, N. H. Ever, G. L. jr. Rosenthal, J. 

Gandee, R. E Whiteley, J. M. Seidemann, I. 

Hall, G. H. Wilmoth, S. A. Selby, E. K. 

-lampton. R. L. Zirbs. C. J. Shipman. J. K. 

rienry, D. L. Geringer, B. J. Solenberger. T. M. 

Hesen, W. J. Angel, H. R. Stewart, R. G. 

Hogue, C. A. Cameron, R. R. Stidger, H. C 

Hutson, A. Garden. J. D. Vodopivec. F. 

Fvlayfield, O. W. DeMarco, R. F. Walker, R. E. 

McWhorter, I. P. Donley, R. G. Watkins, A. H. 
O'Srien, R. 



Piige Two Hundred Forty-Three 




Company H 

COMPANY H 

Captain R. M. COOPER 

1st Lieutenant F. W. D. PARSONS 

2nd Lieutenant - L. D. MEISEl , 

2nA Lieutenant .. - H. W. I ARGENT 

2nd Lieutenant R. C. MILLIARD 

fH. T. SWINDLER 
„ I B. G. BRAND 

Sergeants < [_, 5 SCHRACER 

I L. E. MEROD 

Barrett, S. J. Kennedy, J. H. Field, G. F. 

Burke. C. L. Lichliler, H. H. Foote, C. I. 

Cope, D. F. Mansour, V. Groves, A. O. 

Copeman, J. L. Mathias, J. Hamilton, W, P. 

Davisson. C. H. Means, R. C. Hiehle, F. R. 

Dever, G B Morley, W. V. Holt. J. F. 

Dobhs, L. F. Odell, C. B Hornor. C. S. 

Drobeck, M. J. Parriott, W. W. Kalinauskas, A. A. 

Emerson, R. W. Schmeichel, E. D. Mahanna, D L. 

Fesenmeier, G. A. Sortet. W. J. Marques. A. 

Fortnry, I B. -Spiro, J. Michie, B L. 

Fromer. J. I. Tilton. V. V. Morris, S. S. 

Galperin, S. W.Trd, L. Pettrey, L. G. 

Hall, W. L. Welch, G. B. Robinson, C. H. 

Hardy. H. C. White, H. B. Ross, R. M. 

Havener. J. G. Williams, F. J. Schiff, H. ! . 

HoRue, H. B, Blair, A. J. Stathers, G. D. 

Howard, Z. M. Booton, O. H. Stephen. J. O, 

Johnson, E. R. Corwin, W. M. Tibbs, Richard B. 

Jones, C. K, Currence. R. F. Walker, O. j. 

Kahn. E. Erb. P. E. Wray. E. B. 




Company I 

r y ■ V. MERINDINO 

L :^::: ::::::;:::::::::::::::: - g. e. loucas 

2^I:eu.enant ■ I ^- MORGAN 

fG. W. EMRICK 
I J. J. FLETCHER 
c , --,0. M GEDDES 

^^■■^^ ■ I E. H. HIGCS 

I W. H. RUCK 

Ashworth. C. V. Reed, L. M. Marker, H. J 

Bailey. M. A. R-hr^er, F. B. Mart.n P H. 

Baker, E. C. Roberts, E. E^ M.chael. V. 

Bonar, A. M. Rob.nsor,. B C^ Munchmeyer (. R. 

Brewer, T. L. Schwe.t^er F. T. Murphy, G. S. 

Brown. C. W. Scott D. F. Neff, E. M. 

Carroll F C Schaffer, R. T. Radivojev.c. S. M. 

rmlH^r's A I Sheppard, W. C, Rich, H. A. 

C pp: t,; W.^H. Slut'iv. M. San,,on, W. H 

Godbey. J. R. Sw.„dler, C. J. f-^^'A R 

Griffith, S. D. Varner, J. Stork. A. K 

I_|^^^i,t £ L Waddell, R. L. Teagarden. J. L. 

HoTa I W ' >^ifbs, C. J. Tebay, H. T. 

lames 'l Brad'ey. E. A. Tibbs, Robert B. 

KykerldaT', J. Chafin, W. J. Tyler, J. W. 

La.„e W DeAnelis. A. V.vas. J. R. 

Ma-rtt;. M. A. Doyle, J E. White, C. B. Jr. 

McClure, H. Ferrara, L. Rob.nson W. W. 

VcHale, M. A. Flemir^g, H. C. kn.ght.M.E 

Merryman. W. H. Hammer, S. F. ^J'^T} I I: 

Movers P "^ Hildrelh, E. D. Shurtleff, R. E. 

Nichols P R Hunnings. C. F. Sondeman, W. R. 

Pealzgrkf, R. A. Landron. D. Tennant. L. C. 



Scabbard and Blade 



FREDERICK H. GOFF Captain 

JESSE I. STEELE Ut Lieutsnam 

HARRISON M. MARKLEY 2nd Lieutenant 

ROBERT M. COOPER Ut Ser-eant 



Thos. Manion 

W. Harold Ross 

W. Danforth Pickerin, 

Frederick E. Hourk 

lohn D. Thompson 

John H. Ebelins 

Byron F. King 

John W. Machesney 

J. Frank Maynard, Jr. 

Earl Milam 

Marshall Gl.--nn 

Lee F. Malone 

Frederick W. Ford 

John Wisner 

Robert C. Hilliard 



James H. Brewster, Jr. 
William L. Browning. Jr 
Isaiah A. Wiles 
James R. Nuzum 
J. Don Lyon 
H. Nelson Lang 
H. William Largent 
Paul J. Johnson 
Howard G. Martin 
William C. Warman 
William T. Fahey 
WiUiard C. Ayers 
John M. Adkins 
William H. Counts 
George H. Healey 



Clarence E. Higgins 
Charles S. Hoult 
Charles D. Leiphart 
Ambrose E. McCaskey. 
Charles J. McCormick 
Samuel C. Morgan 
Bernard F. Rinehart 
William H. Ruck 
Henry S. Schrader 
Leonard C. Swing 
Roy M. Taggart 
Paul M. Vannoy 
Oscar H. Webb 
Harold Unger 
Jack Fletcher 




Page Two Hundred Forty-Six 




Blackguard Fusiliers 

Founded at Camp Knox, Ky. 1927 

Motto — Mark 96-97-08-100 

Colors— Black and Blue 

Flowers— Mop!, and Brooms 

Honorary Members 

Capt. R. M. McCutcheon Lt. S, E. White^ides 

Officers 

BYRON KING . Kernul 

FRED GOFF Majur 

JAMES NUZUM Pledge Master. 

Active Members 

Harrison Markley George Healev l.eland Brown 

John Ebeling S.C.Morgan' William Largent 

Bvron King John Porter George Cunningham 

Ben Humphries L. M. Reed B. G. Brand 

Jacob Reeder William Ruck D. F. Dienna 

James Nuzum Geors^e Barbers J. J. Fletcher 

Robert Hilliard Dauforth Pickering David Geddes 

Robert Cooper Frank Maynard Marshall Glenn 

George Barnes William Machesney Henry Schrader 

James Brewster Vincent Merindino D. R. Lyons 

Fred Goff Louis .Armentrout 




Red Dragon •, ,, Casteliers 

Founded at West Virginia University 1930 

Colors— Red and White 

Flowers— The Hop B'ossom 

President— (T. N. T. ) . W. DAUFORTH PICKERING 

Vice-President— (Gin Pole) FREDERICK E. HO'JCiC 

Secretary — (Lithographer) ... . J 1. STEELE 

Treasurer— (Keeper of the Sum) . W. H. ROSS 

Sergeant at Arms — (Chief Detonator) PAUL J. JOHNSON 

Corresponding Secretary (Rider of the Bicycle) G. W. PRIDE 

Honorary Members 

iV3J. Fletcher Capt. Hanst Nelson Lang 

Capt. .McCutcheon Lt Whitesides H. H. Markley 

Lt. Strong 

Actives 

W. D. Pickering H. G. Martin W. H. Unger 

J. D. Thompson W. C. Warman G. W. Pride 

I. I . Steele G. S. Garrett O. R. Higgins 

F. B. Houck L. W. Hall W. S. Martin 

I. M. Adkins S. C. Lockhart W. B. Rannells 

C. E. Higgins C. J. McCormick W. H. Sterling 

A. C. McCaskey I. C. Simpson J. P. Taggart 

E. G. Rodgers P. J. Johnson P. Vannoy 

W. H. Ross Earle Milan J. Walters 



Page Two Hundred Forty-Nine 




Page Two Hundred Fiftv 



ijnywjlippiwupiiiw —nji. i jj j»iwim»i i»^ 






Page Two Hundred Fifty-Two 



Index to Organizations 

HATJONAL FRATERNITIES 

Interfraternity Council 256 

Phi Kappa Psi 253 

Phi Sigma Kappa . 260 

Sigma Chi - ... 2o2 

Phi Kappa Sigma . 264 

Kappa Alpha 266 



Beta Theta Pi . . 

Delta Tau Delta 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Ill 

Sigma Nu ... . 274 

Kappa Sigma 

Theta Chi 



268 
270 



276 

278 



Pi Lambda Phi . 280 



Tau Kappa Epsiion 
Alpha Gamma Rho 



282 
284 



Pi Kappa Alpha . .. 286 

Alpha Phi Delta .-- - -. 238 

Phi Delta Theta . . -. 290 

Phi Sigma Delta -- 292 

Phi Kappa Tau .. 294 

Phi Alpha -... 296 

LOCAL FRATERNITIES 

Tau Delta Theta 298 

Delta Kappa Psi 300 

Delta Epsilon 302 

Kappa Mu 304 

NATIONAL SORORITIES 

Pan Hellenic Association - 308 

Alpha Xi Delta - - 310 

Chi Omega 312 

Kappa Kappa Gamma - 314 

Pi Beta Phi - 3 16 

Delta Gamma - 3 !3 

Alpha Delta Pi 320 

Phi Mu . - - - 322 

Alpha Phi 324 

Gamma Phi Beta - 326 



Page Two Hundred Fifty-Three 



HONORARIES 

Tau Beta Pi 330 

English Club 532 

Alpha Zeta . '■ 3J4 

Phi Upsilon Omricron - - 336 

Matrix ■■ ■ 338 

Phi Beta Pi 340 . 

La Tertulia 342 

Kappa Psi 344 

Dramatic Club - 346 

Delta Sigma Rho - 348 

Kappa Kappa Psi 350 

Mountain 352 

Sphinx - 354 

Motar Board - - 356 

Torch and Serpent - - 358 

Rhododendron 360 

Fi Batar Cappar 362 

University Choir - 364 

Girls Glee Club : 366 

Kappa Delta Pi . . - 363 

Y. W. C. A - - 370 

Beta Pi Theta 372 

A. 1. E. E 374 

Kappa Phi . - 376 

Westminster Girls Club : - 378 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon - 380 

Chi Sigma Delta - 382 

Eta Sigma Phi 384 

Anthony Dairy Club - 386 

Journaliers - 388 



Interfraternity Council 



President ASHFORD AYERS 

Vice-President . MORGAN MARTIN 

Secretary - CHARLES SEIBERT 

Treasurer .. .. CHRISTY WILDT 

Members 

Phi Kappa Psi Malcolm J. Lowe 

Phi Sigma Kappa Evans Stealey 

Sigma Chi Christy Wildt 

Phi Kappa Sigma Cyrus Kump 

Kappa Alpha WiUard Ayers 

Beta Theta Pi Stewart Brown 

Delta Tau Delta - Howard Boggess 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Charles Haden 

Kappa Sigma - Edward ^"ox 

Sigma Nu - Henry Snyder 

Theta Chi . Ashford Ayers 

Tau Kappa Epsilon Allison Fittro 

Alpha Gamma Rho Charles Seibert 

Pi Kappa Alpha Morgan Martin 

Phi Delta Theta George H. Healey 

Phi Kappa Tau . Floyd Ingram 




Pngo Two lIiHiilr.Ml Fitty-Soven 




Phi Kappa Psi 

Founded at Jefferson College 1852 

Colors— Red and Green 
Flower Jacqminot Rose 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established 1890 



Ha. 


Ian 


s 


elby 


Bra 


dfc 


rd 


Laidley 


Lev, 


,is 


Ca 


Idwell 


Cha 


rle 


s Hodges 


Wil 


ian 


1 E. Glassco 


Wa 


ter 


V 


ckers 


Steele 


Tr 


otter 


Joseph 


Bi 


chanan 


Dr. 


E. 


H 


Vickers 


Dr. 


Ma 


di 


on Stath 


Dr. 


Allen 


W. Port 



George W. Jacks 
John D. Phillips 



Charles B. Hart 
Eugene Beardsley 
Henry S. Schrade 
James H. Brewste 
Howard R. Furbe 

Richard Cuiranc-; 
Junior Jones 
Robb Cramer 

William Parriott 
Kadin Tierney 
Carroll Henkle 



Fratres in Urbe 

Jack Moore 
Robert Chrisman 
David H. Courtney Jr. 
Joseph Courtney 
James Fitch 
Gilbert Miller 
Philip Cochran 
Robert Brock 

Fratres in Facultate 
Dr. Friend E. Clark 
Dr. Lloyd L. Friend 

Fratres in Universi'tate 
Seniors 

William H. Winfield 
Harvey J. Simmons 
Fredrick P. Kopp 
Juniors 
J. Frank Maynard 
David W. Jacobs 
Robert W. Lowe 
A. H. Davidson 

Sophomores 

John F. Wilson 
George Stathers 
John Clifford 

Freshmen 
Thomas Hite 
Herbert Crisler 



Robert T. Donley 
Hale J. Posten 
Morton Gregg 
.Alex Robb 
Robert Wilbourn 
Robert Hennen 
James Trotter 
David Reger 

Dr. Kenneth Wood 
Dr. Forest Stemple 
Dr. Nat Frame 



Willis Lyle Jones 
James H. Colema 



John W. Tyler 
Malcolm J. Lowe 
G. L. Pettrey 
John H. Kilmer 
Wilton H. Davis 

Grover Smith 
William Foster 
Robert Kopp 

J. McKee Winfield 
John M. Parri.sh 
Lutrell Maclin 



Page Two Hundred Fifty-Eight 




Phi Sigma Kappa 

Founded a- MaGcacIiusetts Agiicu'tural Colleso 1873 



Frank L. Bowman 
Floyd G. Devaughn 
William Hunt 
Frank B. Kunst 
Lucien Lyall 
David C. Reay 
Terence D. Stewart 
Prescott C. White 

Prof. B. W. King 
Prof, S. J. IVIorris 
Dr. L. H. Taylor 



Frank R. Jameson 
.Alfred A. Nee y 



John K. Burdette 
Gordon M. Wooddell 
Gordon A. Brill 

Boyd DotEon 
Clyde .A. Smith 

Pvlaurice W. Wooddell 
Dana Corden 



I.ester R. Woodrun 
Leo Dotson 
Paul Nichols 
Connell Condry 
John B. Douglas 
Le» F. Dobbs 



Colors — Si 
F.ower 



;r and Mat 
-Carnation 



DELTA CHAPTER 
Established February 24, IS31 

Fratres in Urbe 
Dr. .Arthur L . Bowers 
Robert W. Fisher 
Dr Brindley lohn 
John B. Latt.-M,er 
Thomas W. iMale 
Adolph M. Snyder 
Dr. Benjam n M. Stout 
Dennis Willis 

Fratres in Facultate 
Dean C. R. Jones 
Prof. R. L. Morris 

Fratres in Univers'tate 
Graduate Students 

Edward Vacheresse 
Robert B. LaFol!ette 
Robert Stealy 

Seniors 
William J. Robertson 
Stanley Fisher 
William Larger.t 

Juniors 
Edwin M. Bartrug 
Lawrence Paster 

Sophomores 
Edward Heck 

Pledges 

John Morris 
Henry Carspecken 
Marshall Mathews 
Claude Davisson 
Earl Jennings 
Richard Mentzer 



Robert H. Boyers 
David C. Garrison 
Dr. Benjamin C. Johns 
Cassius M. Lemley 
Dr. Donald M. Post 
Edgar B. S-rv,'..n 
W. .M. Strawn 
Frank R. Yoke 

Prof. lohn B. Grumbeii 
Prof. Sidney Maynard 
Prof. Bennett S. White 



Ben W. Bird 
Sidney E. Good 



Paul Garrison 
Ned H. Ra gland 
Philip R. Simms 



Dana 
Robe 


P. Bartlett 
rt Ry'and 


Robe 
Char 


rt C. Hamiltor 
es W. Furies 


Dorrel Mahanna 


Eugene Prager . 
Earl Neff 
Jack Evans 
Clyde Burke 
Frederick Sawyers 
John South 



r.ige Two Hundred Sixtj 




Sigma Chi 

Founded at Miami University 1855 

Colors— Sky Blue and Gold 
Flower— Wh.te Rose 

MU MU CHAPTER 

Established 1893 



L. D. Arnett 
D. L. Brown 
Stanley Cox 
Frank Cox 
John A. Dille 
A. J. Tait 
Dorsey Brannen 


Fratres in Urfce 

Wayne Cox 
James L. Hanford 
1. Grant Lazzell 
William P. McCue 
Isaac VanVoorhis 
James P. Baker 
Donald O. Lazzell 

Fratres in Facultate 


Glenn M. Ney 
Paul Price 
Karl W. Smith 
Clifford Snider 
John Tait 
Robert White 
Howard L. Swisher 


L. D. Arnett 


A. L. Darby 

Fratres in Univers'tate 
Seniors 


Clifford Snider 


Maurice Coley 
George L. Ballard 
Charfes H. Bonneson 
Charles G. Krebs 


Christy V. Wildt 
C. Harold Jenkins 
Donald R. McGill 
John H. Martin 
James W. Merricks 
Juniors 


Earl S. Wolf 
Frederick W. Ford 
Julian C. Scott 
I. F. Rollins 


James A. McWhorter 
Harold H. Neft 
Merwyn A. Bogue 
John N. Simpson 


Charles E. Wilmoth 
Samuel S. Jacob 
Ch.-rles F. Casto 
Robert E. Vodrey 

Sophomores 


\'. Walter Gordon 
^ay Swan 

Vlarion P. Meredith 
lacob S. Hyer 


William P. McCue 
George Z Haddock 
Carl B. White 


H. J. Marker 

William R. Sonderman 

Freshmen 


Charles S. Horner 
Samuel B. Armbrust 
Walter H. Gerwig 


Ralph B. Thorn 
Oscar D. Ballard 
Charles T. Herd 


Roy W. Emerson 
Byron T. Pipes 

Pledges 


Norman E. Kneppe 
Raymond E. Archer 
Richard R. Martin 


Albert Sanders 




Georfje Weaver 




Page Two HundrPd SixtyTliree 




Phi Kappa Sigma 

Founded at University of Pennsylvania 1350 

Colors— Black and Gold 

ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established 1896 



J. R. Blackburn 
J. L. Hatfield 
L. E. Cole 
W. E. Reed, Jr. 
E. K. Morice 
Harry O. Cole 



B, L. Humphreys 



T. F. Clarke 
A. A. Phillips 
J. W. Hart 
Donald Habig 



Hall O'Farrell 
Shaffer Staub 
John Towler 



Gail Phillips 
Dennv Srott 
John Hoffa 



T. K. Ha 



Fratres in Urbe 

C. T. Neff 

Samuel G. Chadwick 

W. O. Orr 

L. G. Hunter 

J. R. Fredlock 



Fratres in Untvers^tale 

Seniors 

John Paugh 
J. K. Scott 

Juniors 

Ralph Hartman 
Robert H.lliard 
Fred Lardin 



Sophomores 

Felix Westwood 
George Boyd 

Freshmen 

James Copeman 
Lloyd Brown 

Pledges 



Eugene Gunning 
Albert Shuman 
Harry J. Zeverly 
Edward G. Donley 
Phinney P. Reiner 
James G. Jeter Jr. 



Donald Parsons 



Phillip Saunders 
Peter Steenberger 

P. M. Yoho 
P. F. Warder 



David Brown 
Cyrus Kump 
Spates Brady 



Sanford Brownlee 
Augustus Gather 
lohn Howard Habii 



Chester Schur 




Page Two Hundred Sixty-Five 




Kappa Alpha 

SOUTHERN 
Founded at Washington and Lee University 1865 

Colors Crimson and Gold 

Flowers — Red Rose and Magnolia 

ALPHA RHO CHAPTER 

Established March 10, 1897 



Thomas R. Dille 
Hershie L. Eckhart 
Judga Charles G. Baker 

Dr. Robert A. Armstrong 



George Wiles 
Louis Meisel 
Wil'.ard Ayers 
William Behnke 

Herbert Hardy 
Albert Blair 
George Wilson 

Wi'liam Waggoner 
Richard Edmondsor 
Edward Storck 



Wilbur Sortet 
Watson Pritchard 
Henry Weisner 

Frederick Schweit2 
Henry Marrynian 
Jack Lohr 



Fratres in Urbe 

William Scherr 
J. P. Vandervort 
D. D. Richards 

Fratres in Facultate 

Fratres in Univers;tale 
Seniors 

Richard Brand 
Chester May 
Paul Langan 



Juni. 



John Morr.s 
William Carroll 

Sophomores 

William Sydnor 
George Smoot 
Abram Hale 
Russell Callaway 

Freshmen 
Donald Lough 
Merideth Martin 

Pledges 

Floyd Long 
Harold Thomson 



Roy O. Hall 

Jam.es Moreland 
James E. Dille 

Richard C. Bishop 



Frank Smoot 
Howard Fischback 
Edwin Peters 
Harold Proudfoot 

Luther Reed 
David Frew 
Roy Williams 

Douglas Shipley 
Thurl Proudfoot 
Homer White 



Stanley Power 

Ewen Taylor 

Floyd Schwartzwalder 

Robert Ritchie 
Gordon Strain 
George Feisenmeir 



Page Two Hundred Sixty-Si.v 




Beta Theta Pi 





Founded at Miami University 


1839 




Color,s— Pink and Rose 






BETA PSI CHAPTER 






Established 1900 






Fratres in Urbe 




W. O. Barnard 
George Barnard 
Vernon Barnard 
W, H. Hormell 
J. B. Lorent 
Roscoe Posten 


F. D. Bishop 
1. L. Riggs 
". C. Bishop 

vl. C. Burdette 
iVilliam Downs 
^. B. Madeira 

G. F. Randall 

Fratres in Facultate 


Wayne Coombs 
R. E. Davis 
J. D. Downs 
W. H. King 
G. H. Perry 
Ralph Rice 


Prof. Leo Carlin 
Dr. A. M. Reese 


W. H. Kendrick 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 


Dr. C. B. Price 
H. C. Howard 


J. K. Chase 
Winchester T. Latham 
Ralph Kirchner 
John T. Schaub 


Richard H. Ralston 
W. Mitchell linger 
Stewart S. Brown 
Charles D Thomas 

Juniors 
Azel Meadows 
Edwin B. Howard 
Leiand W. Burgess 


W. Thurlow Booker 
Herbert C. Levis 
Louis M. Orr 
Ralph E. Talbott 


John W. Bernard 
John C. Southern 
Charles E. Watkins 


J. Bank Shepherd 
O. Paul Meyers 
John R. Waddell 




Sophomores 




John M. Davis 
R. Robert Hale 
Robert S. Latham 
A. Hale Watkins 
Beverly L. Michie 


William E. Doll 
R. Maxwell Barnette 
Richard Waddell 
James Dorsey 

Freshmen 


O. J. Caudoux 
Neal B. Wilson 
Thomas Stone 
David C. Smallridge 
Harry Fleming 


William Grow 




Stephen Griffith 


Edward Johnson 
V. Howard Ford 
John Davis 


Pledges 

Paul Harrison 
Homer Hunter 
Alvm Bailey 


Kenneth Hill 
Clayton Means 
Gordon Frazier 



mmM 





Delta Tan Delta 

Founded at Bethany College 1859 

Colors— Purple, White and Gold 
Flower — Pansy 

GAMMA DELTA CHAPTER 
Established 1900 



Willirm S. John 
W. F. Holland 
F. P. Corbin 
Paul McKee! 
Raymond Kerr 
Lem John 
Dr. Charles Bray 
James Reed 
Neal Rumsey 



Samuel J. Wil 



P. E. Boftome 
W. H. Cochrar 
M. L. Holland 

Junior Beatty 
Howard Bogies 
Leland Brown 
George Cole 

L. Bonn Brown 



Ernest L. Bigley 
David V. Sutton 



John Clarke 
Robert Cork 



Fratres in Urbe 

John A. Akins 
Leroy B. Miller 
Lester Burnside 
C. Allen Gibbons 
T. Nelson Stewart 
Albert Scott 
James R. Hare 
C. M. Bo'ton 
G. K. Simmons 

Fratres in Facultate 

Fratres in Univers;tate 

Seniors 

L. D. Jarvis 
S. Vern Scott 
James E. Wilson 

Juniors 
Nathan Divvens 
James Fahey 
Ceorste -Johnson 
William Hanes 

Sophomores 
E. L. Taylor 
R. M. Thalmer 

Freshmen 
Thom=,s S. Moore 
William H. Geppert 

Pledges 
Earle F. Boggess 
George Welch 



F. F. Corbin, Jr. 
Stanley Simpson 
K. B. Arbogast 
E. B. Stewart 
Carl Crawford 
Rev. M. S. Collins 
Ralph Harris 
W. H. Howell 
Roswell Reid 



Ch.irles S. Hoult 
Le'and H. Ogden 
Harold P. .Armbrecht 



James Nuzum 
Earle Jackson 
Henry Hieginbotham 
David MarVhall 



lames Holland 



I. Gibson Hendei 
"William Ricketts 



Charles Smith 
Edward F. Bock 



Page Two Hundred Seventy 




Page Two Hundred Seventy-One 




Sigma Phi Epstlon 

Founded at Richmond College 1901 

Colors— Purple and Red 

Flowers— Rose and Violet 

BETA CHAPTER 

Established 1903 





Fratres in Urbe 




Joseph B.erer 


Fred Bierer 


H. J. Easterday 


C. A. Duncan 


Gay H. Dent 


Charles Lemley 


Okey Glenn 


1. T. West 


D. D. Hamilton 


David Graham 


E. F. Hushell 


Delmar G. Runn 


M. J. Kearns 


W. M. Linn 


Howard H. Thon^ 


L. M. Stoops 


Fred H. Graham 


Lunt Estep 


Stephen Harrick 


M. L. Cohen 

Fratres in Facultate 
G. W. Grow 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 




Walter Applegate 


Charles Hadden 


Delbert Noel 


Daniel Boughner 


William Harrick 


Harold Ridenour 


Bruce Davis 


William Holy 


Frederick Riley 


Ralph Fisher 


James Johnson 


Dennis Thomas 


Marshall Glenn 


Wilbur McCulloch 
T. D. Nixon 

Juniors 


Samuel Best 


Hershell Bowlen 


Dyke Raese 


Charles Lemlev 


Ferdinand Browning 


James Gwilliams 


B. J. McDermott 


William Johnson 


Samuel Pearsell 
Harold Lewis 

Sophomores 


Dave Geddes 


Wesley Cash 


Ralph Ross 


Harold Counts 


John Echols 


Oliver Teas^rden 


Samuel Jacobs 


Albert Gwynne 


John Wallace 


Robert Biumgari 


Forbes Heihli 


Arno Wamsley 


Charles Camp 


Isaac Lewis 


Joseph Whitely 


C B. Simmons 


Franklin Pauley 


Charles Kramer 
Joseph Fletcher 

Freshmen 


William Chafin 


Edward Baker 


Ernest Roberts 


Charles Zirbs 


Roy Gandee 


Carroll Seibert 


M. DeVol 


William Hessen 


W. M. White 


Howard Hardy 


John Kennedy 




James Bassett 



Page Two Hundred Seventy-Tv 




Page Two Hundred Seventy-Three 




Sigma Nu 



Founded at Virginia Mjiitary Institute 1869 

Colors— Black. White and Gold 
Flower— While Rose 

GAMMA PI CHAPTER 
Established 1904 



William S. Morgan 
Louis R. Bennett 
Cyrus H. Maxwell, . 

Charles H. Ambler 
G. H. Colebank 



E. B. Wyckoff 
H. p. Snyder 

F. W. Glenn 



W. E. Lively 



J. J. T. Wei! 
R. E. Walker 
R. U. Drinka 



R. E. Shurtleff 
H. J. Ulrich 
H. M. Brawley 
Joe Burdette 



G. C. Deems 



Fratres in Urbe 

Herbert McMillan 
Franklin M. Brand 



Fratres in Facultate 

L. P. Hardman 
C. C. Spiker 

Fratres in Univers'tate 
Seniors 
R. C. Wilkinson 
John Byrnside 
I. K. Edmunson 
H. W. Epling 

Juniors 

F. A. McDonald 
T. J. Adams 

Sophomores 
C. T. Wolfe 
Bert Bradford 
S. J. Smith 
Jack Burdette 

Freshmen 
M. R. Chafin 
I. R. Godbey 
E. E. Jones 
T. D. Koontz 
W. B. McCulla 

Pledges 
W. W. Robinson 

G. Anderson 



Hickory Hutchiso 
George R. Maxw; 
Robert Hugart 

H. F. North 

R. H. Gist 



J. H. Hatcher 
W. N. Lewis 
R. B. Warner 



L. V. Robertson 



H. F. Welch 

J. E. Doyle 

H. L. McMillan 



Jack McClaagherty 
C. R. Morrison 
P. M. Snyder 
I, White 



A. V. 



Page Two IlunJred Seventy-Five 




Pag-e Two Hundred Seventy-Four 




Kappa Sigma 

Founded at Univers'ty of Virginia 1869 

Colors Scarlet, Green, and White 

Flower— Lily of the Valley 

GAMMA PHI CHAPTER 

Established 1883 

Re-established 1918 



David A. Christophe 
Harlan Cokelv 
J. C. Smith 
R. H. Jarvis 
W. S Price 



Andr 



J. Dadi 



T. C. Carrico 
W. T. Emblem 

E. J. Fox 

J. M. Brand 

F. H. Crago 

G. R. Cunr.int;ha 



J. B. Baker 
J. R. Chamber 
F. M. Coombs 
H. B. Crow 



1. F. Fo.v. 

N. H. Fox 

D. B. Jones 

W. Bronson 
M. J. Drobeck 



Fratres in Urbe 

A. W. Miller 
C. D. Minor 
J W. Shilling 
C. E. Watts 
J. M. Orth 

Fratres in Facultate 
Leslie Hays 
O. R. Ford 

Fratres in Univers:tate 
Seniors 
T. R. Garv4n 
T. H. Johnson 

Juniors 

J. W. Hash 

E. L. Harris 
W. T. Hughes 
G. B. Joseph 

Sophomores 

F. Clash 

G. H. Hall 

C, L. Ihlenfeld 

D. C. Kennedy 

D. L. Mahanna 

Freshmen 

E. F, Kemena 
L. B. Mackey 
P. W. Mason 

Pledges 
H. F. Edwards 
J. Harrell 

F. M. Lough 



West Hardy 
C'arence Robay 
I. B. Cottle 
M. L. Wilson 
Robert Andrews 

Dr. C. R. Kessel 



H. N. Lang 
R. G. Larue 
J. C. Strosnider 

E. F. Miller 

D. H. Robmson 

E. C. Stumpp 



R. p. Reed 

M. L. Sprigg 
A. R. Storck 
H. T. Tebay 



H. D. McClure 
J. C. Owens 
H. B. White 

J. B. Rinehart 
K. M. Rinehart 




Page Two Hundred Sevcnty-Se\ 




Theta Chi 

Founded at Norwich College 1856 

Colors— Red aTid White 
Flower Red Carnation 

ALPHA KAPPA CHAPTER 
Established 1921 



B. G. Reeder 
George R. Fa 



Ashford Avers 
John Fn,nell 
Harry Flesse 



Willi.iin Callahan 
Camden Eakle 
William Haslam 
Robert Jack 
Keneth Keever 



Edv/in Carpents 
Gerard Gross 
Frank Kayuha 



Harold Bla5'ney 
Ben Exley, Jr. 



Fratres in Urbe 

Paul L. Sonimers 
ClIlTord R. Cotts 

Fratres in Facultate 

K. C. Westover 

Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

Edward Krieger 
James Logue 
John Mark Moore 

Juniors 

William Milleson 
Grove Moler 
Howard Mulligan 
Dorsey Nester 
John Porter 

Sophomores 

Paul Kidd 
Heil Lichliter 



Freshmen 

William Lee 
Ellison Messmore 



H. O. Rodeheaver 
Dr. William H. Cozad 



William Noland 
Robert Tigglebeck 



William Rannell 
William Waggo 
John Whitlock 
Lloyd Young 



David Parshall 
Howe Stidtrer 



Edw.a.-d Schmeichel 




Pi Lambda Phi 

Founded at Yale University 1895 

Colors— Purple and Gold 

WEST V!RG!N!A MU CHAPTER 

Established 1922 



Judas Apple 
Maurice Ferderber 
David B. He:;ter 



Sidney J. Kwass 
Sim R. Brownstei; 



Henry E Baum 
Marvin I. Manuel 



Ben Ceringer 
Julius Smith 



Fratres in Urbe 

Milton S. Gessner 

Fratres in Facultate 

Dr. B. B. Caplan 

Fratres in Universjtate 

Seniors 

Bernard Sclove 
Oscar B. Goldstein 

Juniors 

Lewis Medvin 
Mori3 Funt 

Sophomores 

David Ginsbure 
Charles B. Grossman 

Freshmen 

Irvin Lienward 

Pledges 

Marcus Burman 



Riclvird Solof 
Erwin E. Baker 



Sidney J. Schatz 
Joe B. Herskovitz 



Bernard Adelson 

Eddie Baker 
Milton Zaizneck 




r^i.ijf Twu Hundrod Eighty-One 




Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Founded at Illinois Wesleyan 1899 

Colors — Cherry and Red 

Flower — Red Carnation 

RHO CHAPTER 

Established 1923 





Fratres in Urbe 




Leland F. Booth 


Leland C. Shriver 

Fratres iis Facultate 

John D. Barnhart 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 


Charles A. Hartley 


F. M. Chambers 
O. R Gates 
Howard Johnson 


\V. D. Lowe 
Cyril Ruble 
E. W. L'llum 

Juniors 


H. M. Batson 
C. J. Koontz 


A. E. Fittro 
E. J. Null 
Vernon Offut 
E. J. Powell 


J. S. Merrit 
Howard Rhodes 
B. F. Rhinehart 
Ckey Spangler 

Sophomores 


C. B. Withers 
E. G. Walters 
J. L. Kranaskas , 


Robert Munchmeyer 


Freshmen 

Marquard R. Shumate 


C. R. Jones 


J. Preston Engle 
Homer F. Fizer 
Joseph L. Johnson 
Carrol Miller 


Pledges 

T. L. Brewer 
!. O. Stephans 
Russell A. PhalsgrafF 
Claude Pritchard 


Earl Sprouse . 
R. G. Repair 
Thomas Kerns 
C. Dreppard 



Two Hundred Eighty-Two 




E. L. Core 

H. O. Hsnderson 

M. B. Hoffman 



R. C. Butler 
F. G. Clark, 
J. T. Dransfield 
Russel EUyson 
C L. Flesbman 



Buell Clark 
W. F. Coull 
Ira Gould, Jr. 



W. E. Bell 
Carson Brown 
C. L. Mawk.ns 



Joe Varner 

G. W. Emoric 
Forrest Forsy 

R. L. Godain 
E. L. Means 



Alpha Gamma Rho 

Founded at Ohio State University, 1904 

Colors — Dark Green and Gold 

Flower — Pink Rose 

ALPHA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established 1921 



Fratres in Facultate 
E. A. Livesay 
]. H. Longwell 
R. L. Mason 



Fratres 



Fratres in Un 
Seniors 
H. C. Hardesty 
C. B. Hiett 
G. H. Mollis 
J. S. Moehs 
P. .S. 03hel 

Seniors 

A. B. Peterson 
R. R. Robinson 
R. G. Sheppar.'l 

Sophomores 

E. D. Hildretb 
H. H. Huff 
H. D. Lowe 

Freshmen 

Pledges 

H. Hogue 
J. Hogue 
C. Hogue 



Urbe 
IversUale 



W. C. Schnopp 
P. D. Strausbaugh 



J. A. Stur 



F. W. D. Parsons 
H. G. P.^terson 
C. B. Sfibert 
C. F. Solenberger 



H. C. Trcloyan 
Claude Prunty 



[. R. M-redith 
Ralph W. Welch 



Bruce Robinson 

H. V. Watkins 
Robert Webb 
Earnest Wotrlng 



Graduates 

H, C. Olson 




Pi Kappa Alpha 

Founded at University of Virginia 1868 
Colors — Garnet and Cold 
Flower— Lilly of the Valley 

ALPHA THETA CHAPTER 

Founded 1904 

Re-established 1925 



M. J Malamphy 
A. H. Forn.an 



J. H. Kisner 
G. H. Robinson 

J. T. Do-r 

M. V. Martin 
Victor Monteith 



R. Caddock 
E. L. Engle 
J. F. Holt 



W. Courtney 
K.. Dillon 

J. i(. Hanna 
O. Lighthizer 



Fratres in Urbe 

W. E. Pad 

Fratres in Facullate 

President John R. Turner J. V. Hopkins 

Fratres in Univers'late 

Seniors 

F. G. Phelps 

Juniors 

Francis Parrick 
C. O. Flowers 
W. B. Johnson 

Sophomores 

H. Samson 
n. Edwards 
E. H. Cubbon 



Freshmen 



A. Casey 



W. U 



Pledq 



J. W. MacChesney 



C. E. Tonry 
S. C. Morgan 



5. F. Hamme 
(. H. Offutt 
P. V. Grahai 



J. H. H.U 
C. Swinler 




Page Two Hundred Eighty-Sevt 




Alpha Phi Delta 

Founded at Syracuse University 1912 

Colors— Purple and White 

Flower Pink Carnation 

PI CHAPTER 



W. G. Bufano 



Fratres in Urbe 
Frank Lepera 



Josf'pK D'Augostinio 



J. M. Arena 
Amleto Acqua 
Albert Izi-o 



Fratres in Univers:tate 

Seniors 

I. J. Catapano 
P. Camilletti 
J. J. Ch.avetti 



Fred Landophi 
1?'. Pianipiano 



P. F. Catapano 
M. E. Conti 



R F. HeMarco 



A. Bary 

G. L. D'Agosti 



Michael Hande 
Martin Farinetti 

Sophomores 

S. J. laquinta 

Pledges 

J. J. Piainpiano 
Dominick J. Romino 



A. H Imbro 
Joseph D. Romino 



J. T. Mallamo 
John Sperandei 



Page Two Hundred Eighty-Eight 




Page Two Hundred Kiglity-Nine 




-*>' 



Merle Wright 

Dr. Robert Camer 



Georec Hatfield 
James Vermillion 
iMarrs Wiseman 
Owen Schaeffer 

George Harrjs Heale 
Paul Meyers 
Ice Heatherman 
lohn Gpynor 

Ellison Summerfield 
Eveiett Wray 
Harry Stunkard 
Clayton Hunnings 

Ralph Colburn 
J. Donald Everly 

Allen Bonar 
Joseoh Balthis 
Howard Rogers 



Phi Delta Theta 

Founded at Miami University 1848 

Colors Argent and Azure 

Flower— White Carnation 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established 1927 
Fratres in Urbe 
Paul Fopper 

Fratres in Facultate 



Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 

George Ratcliffe 
Bernard McClaugherty 
Lawrence Evans 

Juniors 

James Love 
Jack Fletcher 
lames Harris 

R0S3 Ludwig 

Sophomores 

John Keister 
Ed Seville 
Oswald Walker 

Freshnien 

Orrcn Jones 
Clarence Quenon 

Pledges 

Charles Rose 
George Smith 



Frffd Coyer 

Harold Camfield Havinghurst 



David Lilly 
Robert A.shworth 
Fred Hill 



Elmer May 
Dudley Brown 
Paul Shore 



Charles Ashw^ 
Mart Brown 
Owen Groves 



Charles Stevenson 
Virgil Tilton 



Robert Bandi 
Arthur Walker 




Page Two HundrecT Ninety On 




Phi Sigma Delta 

Founded at Columbia University 1910 

Colors— Purple and White 

Flower— Carnation 

UPSiLON CHAPTER 

Established 3 927 



Alex S. Fisher 
Jeronie Gaskel 
Mar A. Kaplus 



Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

Harry Szanger 
Jerome Katz 



Abe S. Margolin 
Jack C. Seigel 



Jack Basman 
l.ouis R. Bush 
lul.us Cohen 
Louis M. Form 



Lester L. Lieb 
Hirry R. Angel 



Abe Borinsky 
Samuel Galperin 
Joseph Levin 



Louis Schoolnic 



Malcolm H. Golden 
Charles G. Polan 
l-lerman K. Polan 

Sophomores 

Louis Manknrf 

Freshmen 

Claren.:^ Lov.tch 
Samuel Penn 



Pledges 



Jack Laskin 



Nelson Stamler 
Louis C, Wildste 
Morton S. Waxm 



Jack Sebulsky 



Meyer Polan 
Robert K. Seade 



Samuel Galpern 




Page Two Hundred Xinrty-Three 




Phi Kappa Tan 

Founded at Miami University 1906 

Colors— Old Gold and Harvard Red 
Flower — Red Carnation 





M. 


Board 


c 


A. 


Bowers, 


c. 


C. 


Coulter 


R. 


L. 


Curtis 


H 


\i 


Dejour 


G. 


H. 


Cowell 


P. 


C. 


Gates 


W 


A 


. Glover 


G 


Kc 


ch 


R. 


Ka 


ch 


J'> 


hn 


Altizer 


W 


L 


Cottle 


H. 


L. 


CU.rnell 


B. 


L. 


DeVault 


E. 


F. 


Kuhary 





ALPHA XI CHAPTER 




Established 1928 




Fratres in Facultate 




Graduate 




J. F. Heflin 




Seniors 


E. 
C. 

E. 
K. 


E. Given 

C. Hess 
R. Knotts 

W. Showalter 




Juniors 


O. 
J. 

C. 

\^' 
J. 


B. LeFevre 
D. Lyon 

A. McC'elland 

S Miller 
R. Nottingham 




Sophomores 


w 

G. 


H. Dirnell 
E. Hervey 




Freshmen 


M. 


A. McHale 



E. 


A 


Smith 


W 


. L 


Smith 


C. 


E. 


Walker 


F. 


A. 


Ingram 


J. 


J. 


Pelter 


!. 


N. 


Snyder 


R. 


C. 


Warder 


R. 


O 


R.rfe 


S. 


A. 


W.lmoth 


R. 


E. 


Monack 


W 


M 


. Corwin 


L 


T 


Taylor 


J. 


C. 


Sneddon, J 




Page Two Hundred Nin ety-Fiv* 




Phi Alpha 



Founded at George Washington University 1914 

Colors — Crimson and Blue 

ALPHA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established December 1, 1928 



Martin Epstein 
Martin Dworkm 
Israel Hirk 



Fralres in Urbe 

Harry Stein 

Fratres in Univers'tate 

Juniors 

Berna-.d Levine 
Edward C. Lutwin 
Lee j. Markheim 



Rudolph Schiffman 
Byron F. Sack 
Mortiraer S. Schofield 



Gus Goldberg 
Bernard Blickman 



Merman B. Levenson 



Jerome Spiro 
Myer Feingold 



Sigmund E. Weiner 
Harold L. Herbert 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Irving Rose 

Pledges 

William Perilman 
Mose Slutsky 



Erv/in r. Eisen 



Joseph Rosenthal 



Emmanuel Kahn 



Paj?r- Two Flundred Ninety-Si 




Page Two Hundred Ninety-Seven 




Tan Delta Theta 

Founded at W-st Viiginia University 1919 

Colors Blue and White 

Flower Chrysanthemum 





Fratres in Urbe 




E. E. Hamstead 
George Goodwin 
Paul Dobbins 


E. L. Sp,ith 

J. E. CraiK 
Fred Simon 

Fratres in Univers:tate 
Seniors 


C. P. Dorr 
A. L. P. Schn 
Homer Smith 


W. R. Walker 
W. T. Fahey 
H. A. Burton 
A. F. Board 


A. Hamslead 
F. W. Mann 
H. C Gregory 

Juniors 


D. A. Faenow 
W. N. Ross 

E. D. Reed 


W. D. Pickeving 
L. C. Swing 
H. A. Devol 
A. E. McCaskey 


S. C. Lockhart 
C. Timblin 
C. D. Leiphart 
J. C. Gaal 


C. B. Post 

D. Musgrave 
H. Unger 

F. E. flouck 


E. McHnle 

W. C. Sylvester 

J. Simpson 


Sophomores 

p. A. CamiMO, 
Wayne :Martm 

Freshmen 

W. Sandy 


H. D. Reed 
Price 


H. Marti.i 


Pledges 

O. R. Higrma 


W. Gaal 



Two Hundred Ninety-Eight 



J 




="166 Two Hundred Ninety-XiUL 




Delta Kappa Psi 

Founded at West Virginia University 1923 

Colors Maroon and White 

Flower — White Carnation 



Fratres in Urbe 



Herschel Hi.-ary 



William P. Burdett- 
Willard K. R. Caste 
Robert M. Cooper 
John H. Ebeling 



Harold V. Locker 
Edward J. Loy 
Creed Malone, Jr. 
Harry M. Chenoweth 



L!oyd T. Dittmer 
Dwight L. Dodge 
Earle L. Elmore 
C. Irving Foote 



Fratres 



Ur 



Seniors 

Robert 3. iohnson 
Bvron B. Randolph 
Ward D. Stone 
W. ClayWarman 

Juniors 

Marman G. Mathiesoi 
Edwa-d J. Williams 
Devve/ bourne 
£dward T. Rowland 

Sophomores 

Lee F. Malono 
Vaughn Michael 
Normaji G. Parsons 



Howard M. Kuehne 
Carl J. Nl.tter 
Sl.dell B. Wolfe 



William A. Thornhill 
Cler.imer 3. Warman 
Milton C. Means 
For.eot Roles 



Myrwood G. 3utton 
Richard B. Tibbs 
William Gold 







Pledges 


Robert H. Heddleston 


James 


Thornbury 


Geori,'e Tsorvas 


Viotor 


Reuther 


William Nesbit 







Paul Glasscock 
David Wickhai.v 



Page Three Hundr'? 




Page Three Hundred-One 




H G. Coletank 



L. E. Bradley 
H. E. Brown 
D. D. Chipps 
C. C. Hall 



E. H. Higgs 
C. W. Hill 



E, A. Bradley 
John Adkins 



P. F. Fisher 
D. R. Headle 



Charles YouriE 



Delta Epsilon 

Founded at West Virginia University 1925 

Colors— Green and White 
Flowers Red and White Rose 



Fratres in Urbe 

Fratres in Facultate 
E. C. Jones 

Fratres in Universitate 
Seniors 

S. N. Headlee 
Charles Keet 
J. H. Musnrav.; 
L. F. Oneacre 

Juniors 

W. W. Murrill 
E. G. Rodgers 

Sophomores 

August Marques 
Jack Shipman 

Freshmen 



Pledges 



Shea Moye 



J. E. Snyder 



E. R. Smith 
I. T. N'nnVoorhi' 
j. C. Wilson 
J. E. Winter 



C. F. Stjwart 

W. D. Fitzsimmons 



W. L. Masonhe 



Edward Cordroy 



Graduate 

Leo Shinn 



Tatfr Three- IIiintJred-Two 




Kappa Mil 



Founded at West Vi.ginia University 1928 

Colors — Orange and Black 

Flower White Rose 



Patrick ]. Gainer 



Raymond J. Duffy 
J. Vernon Sacher 



Alex M. Dixsa 
lames M IJonlanc 
Don E. Moran 



Howard W. Gomperi 
Paul E. Erb 



Fratres in Urbe 



Fratres in Universitate 

Seniors 

William J. Moore 
Marvin P. Hooker 

Juniors 

Charles I. OLeary 
John A. Broc4l.o 

Sophomores 

Norbert I. Ruziska 
Frank L. Vodo-jivec 
Paul E. Gessler 

Freshmen 

Henry J. W.try 



J. C) Farrell 



Walter A. Durkin 
Thomas F. M-.pion 



John Gaila£,'her 
Charles J. McCormick 
Louis H. N,-uberger 



Edward J. Niei.aus 
Lawrence P. Kirwi 



Joseph C. McCanr 




rage Three Hundi-ed Five 




Page Three Hundred Six 



Pan- Hellenic Association 



IRENE CARNEY 
RACHEL SMITH 
MARY HITE 
GENEVIEVE BROWN 
JOSEPHINE WATSON 
DOROTHY RINARD 
JOSEPHINE HERD 
LOUISE FRAZIER 
VIRGINIA BARNETT 



Alpha Xi Delta 



Chi Omega 



Kappa Kappa Ga:i 



Pi Beta Phi 



Delta Gamma 



Alpha Delta Pi 



Phi Mu 



Alpha Phi 



Gamma Phi Beta 



MARJORIE KING 



GERALDINE BEVINGTON 



JEANETTE BROOKS 



BERTHA HANDLON 



ELOISE KERR 



IRETA HAWLEY 



MARY McKAIN 



ELIZABETH SHRIVER 



FREDA BRAUN 



Page Three Hundred Eight 




Page Three Hundred Nine 




V. O. Havener 



Genevieve Smell 

Mabel Lucas 

Lillian JoKnson 

Mary Louise Richardson 

Leola Stout 



Irene Carney 
Leora Dunn 
Emilia Paris 



Marjorie A King 
Doi-othy AUman 
Mildred Arnett 
ElizahetK Hagy 



Mi 



Duty 



Helen Sweraringer 
Mary Louise Carney 



Doris Thomas 
Marguerite Elliott 



Alpha Xi Delta 

Founded at Lombard College 1893 

Colors— Danube Blue and Cold 

Flower Pink Rose 

Iota Chapter Established 1905 

Patronesses 

Mrs. Edwaid Smith Mr 

Mrs, Caroline Shanks 

Sorores in Urbe 

Golda White 
Louise Lyall 
Marsjaret Barrick 
Mabel Coljun 



Sorores in Universifate 
Seniors 

Louise Lantz 
Mary Monroe 
Evelyn Brova 

Juniors 
Irma Fishbach 
Ann McCoi-nel 
Dorothy jo White 

Sophomores 

Virginia Burdette 
Harriett Havener 

Freshmen 

Ethel Marsh 
Katherine Steinbicker 

Pledges 
Beulah Grace Lawler 
Mabel Shannon 
Roxie Downs 



Samuel J. Morris 



Helen Nixon 
jerry Kane Runner 
Mary Davis Hogan 
Ocea Price 
Orpha Nale 



Henrietta Martin 
Catherine Paton 
Mary Louise Hal! 

<athrya Hinkle 
Barbara Gather 
-ranees Ebelin^ 
Vlargaret Sperry 

Evelyn Meadows 



Virginia G^ltner 
Helen Burri, 

Elizabeth Beagle 
Mary Elizabeth Collins 




Chi Omega 

l-'ounded at University of Arkansas 1895 

Colors Cardinal and Straw 

Flower— White Carnation 

WEST VIRGINIA THETA CHAPTER 
Established 1905 



Mr 









Patronesses 


Mrs 


Luther S. Brock 


Mrs 


Friend E. Clark 
Sorores in Urbe 


Mrs 


James Morton Callahan 


Mrs 


Joe B.erer 


Mrs. 


John Harrington Cox 


Mrs 


W. E. Glasscock 


Mrs 


Stanley Cox 


Mrs 


Stella Gist 


Mrs 


Ray Fredlock 


Mrs 


John B. Gruhbein 


Mrs 


Gay Garlow 


Mrs 


Russel Huston 


Mrs 


F. D. Cornell 


Mrs 


Marcellus Jackson 



Lvdia Hinkle 



Sorores in FacuUate 

Miss Beatrice Hurst 
Mrs. Helen Pettigrew 

Sorores in Universitate 

Seniors 



Miss Helen Hunter 
Miss Mabel Patterson 
Mrs. Raymond Kerr 
Mrs. Harry McCreey 
Mrs. Martha Shawver 
Mrs. E. M. Showalter. Jr 

Miss Helen Ste-rett 



Barbara Dowd 
Helen Boscess 
Virginia Dryer 


Lucille Chenoweth 
Jane Sperry 

Juniors 


Virginia Whetzel 
Margaret Davis 
Rachel Smith 


.Margaret Hatfield 
Geraldine B^vington 


Mary Williams 
Mary .Mice Davis 

Sophomores 


Mary Bradford 
Eloise Scherr 


Helen Emsley 
Marizaret Straley 
Nellie Virgin-a I'.ynch 
Helen Huston 


Dorothy Armstrong 
Mary Garnette Dearian 
Ruth Murphy 
Stella Keister 
Fern Bickerton 

Freshmen 


Mary Elizabeth Steg 
Mozelle Johnson 
Mary Franc-s Miller 
Ruth DuPuy 


Eleanor Coleman 
Jean Drinkard 


Florence Casto 

Pledges 


Katherine Dearian 
Kathleen Hennen 


Ann Fortney 
Helen Lake 
Betty Wheathall 


Sylvia Milliken Ruth Boundy 
Betty Brooks Harr Virginia Highland 
Mary Elizabeth Bartholomew Jean Mcintosh 




Page Three Hundred Thirteen 




Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Founded at Monmouth College 1870 



Color 



-De 



rk and Light Blue 
— Fluer-de-Lis 



BETA UPSILON CHAPTER 
Established 1906 









Sorores in Urbe 






Mrs. 


J. S. Steward 


Miss 


Ada Reiner 


Mrs. 


Ethel Moreland 


Mrs. 


Nellie Slathers 


Miss 


Mathilda Albright 


Mr.s. 


T. W. Arnold 


Mrs. 


Agnes Chitwood 


Mrs. 


Estelle Brannon 


.Mrs. 


Hope Donlev 


Mrs. 


Maud Lough 


Mrs. 


R. M. Matthews 


.Mrs. 


Virgniia Bishop 


Miss 


Louise Keener 


Mrs. 


Sarah Barnard 


Miss 


.Margaret Reay 


Mrs. 


Anne Cox 


Mrs. 


Alfreds Vieweg 


Miss 


Helene Gilbert 


Mrs. 


Fanny Kay 


Mrs. 


Anagrace Robey 


Miss 


Georgia Wade 


Mrs. 


Mildred Posten 


Mrs. 
Mrs. 


Pearl Hennen 
Leanna Brown 


Miss 


Margaret Carspe 



Dr. Byrd Turner 

Dr. Elizabeth Stalnaker 



Christine Arnold 
Anna Lou Bickel 
Lucille Dunlap 



Jeanette Brooks 
Elizabeth Hicks 



Helen Bottome 
Margaret Brooks 

Mary Elizabeth Ballangee 
Rose Clifford 
Nancy Hogg 
Evelyn Bird 



Sorores in Facultate 
Dr. Margaiet Cole 
Miss Flora Hayes 



Miss Clara Lytle 
Miss Evelyn Hite 



Sorores in Universitate 




Seniors 




Harriott French 
Mary Tait 
Anita Highland 
Mary Hite 


Dorothy Matics 
Catherine Preston 
Jane Seabright 


Juniors 




Daisy Mae Miller 


Mary Alice Currer 
Jill Smith 


Sophomores 

Marie Cox 
Katherine Lough 


ivatherine Wilson 
Frederica Moore 


Pledges 

Ruth Morris 
Eleanor Kemper 
Virginia Holliday 


Dorothy Newman 
Antoinette Wilson 
lean Miller 
Dorothy Shonk 



Page Three Hundred Fourteen 




page Three Hundred Fifteen 




Pi Beta Phi 

Founded at IMonmoutn College 18^7 
Colors— Wine and Silver Blue 

Flower Red Carnation 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established 1918 







Patronesses 






Mrs 


Harry E. Stone 




Mrs. I. G. Laz^elle 






SororcG in Urbo 






Mr, 


C. H. Ambler 


Mrs. Charles Hodges 


Mrs. R. Elton 


Warm. 


Mrs 


Robert Ashworth 


Mrs. B. Clifford John 


.Mr.. Minter L. 


Wilso 


Miss 


Madelyn Collins 


Miss Nellie Phillips 


Mrs. Harry 1. Miller 


Mrs 


Richard Earl Davis 


Mrs. B. L. Reeder 


Miss Ruth McL 


ain 


Mrs 


T. D. Gray 


Miss Frances Sanders 


Miss Marie Stu 


rgiss 


Mrs 


Marshall Glenn 


Mi.ss .^nne Trauoert 


Mrs. Volney SI 


epard 


Mrs 


J. M. Gregg, Jr. 


Mrs. C. A. Wade 


Mrs. Nelson S^^ 


ink 


Mrs 


Carson Howard 


Miss Rebecca Wade 


Mrs. Robert Wilbourr 






Sorores in Facultate 






Mrs. 


P. 1. Reed 


Miss Helen Kallenburg 
Miss Winifred Cheney 

Sorores in Univo- sitate 
Seniors 


.Mrs. C. Q. Wil 


iams 


Marguerite D. Bottome 


Susan Craddock 


Meiba Waters 




Rogene Bovles 


Lucille Hall 


Margaret Wells 




Darl 


ene B. Bradley 


Elm,T Hicks 


Dorothy Manas 


ee 


Genevieve Brown 


Margaret R. Shr.ver 


Virginia Wiley 








Kathryn Smoot 










Juniors 






Irma 


Aycrs 


Virginia Miller 


Johnsie Cook 




Boni 


ta Blair 


Jean Rogers 


Jean Wade 




Dorc 


thy Brand 


Ele.incr Stone 


Elizabeth We;dr 


lor 


Jean 


Crile 


Anna Mary Tropf 


Eleanor Wilsrn 




Bertha Handlan 




Lucille Fox 








Sophomores 






Annette Wiley 


Phylis Buck 


Mary Ellen We 


ghtmn 






Elizabeth Wade 










Pledges 






V.rg 


nia Bi.rt 


Virginia Keiley 


Ruth Turner 




Eliza 


beth Edwards 


Elizabeth Huey 


Madelyn Shrum 






Page Throe Hundred Seventett 




Delta Gamma 

Founded at University of Mississippi 1 872 

Colors Bronze, Pink and Blue 

Flower — Cream Colored Rose 

WE3T ViRGiNIA ALPHA X] CHAPTER 
Established 19Z1 



Mrs. Hubert Hill 



Mrs. A. Rufener 
Mr.s. Paul Price 
Miss Rachel Google 
Miss Virginia Carte: 





Patronesses 


K]-.s. 


R. C. Jones 


Mrs. 


H. E. Knowlton 




Sorores in Urb 


Mrs. 


Leon Leonian 


Miss 


Nonnie Shoupe 


Miss 


Esther Kissell 


Mrs. 


J. P.. Lilly 



K. H. Edmondson 



Miss 


Gladys Bennett 


Miss 


Amy Graham 


Miss 


Helen Edmondson 


Miss 


Maxine Crane 



Evelyn Carskadon 
Martha Bromberg 



Sorores in Universitate 

Seniors 

Maude Weimer 
Josephine Watson 
Elise Scott 



Mary Burton 
Juanita Cole 



Eloise Kerr 
Josephine Brown 



Louida Colebank 
Margaret French 



Eva Claire Hawley 
Kathryn Cramer 
Alicia Brownfield 
Mary Conwell 
Jane Jester 



Carol Scanlon 



Sophomores 

Cr^nn 



Pledges 

Katherine Scott 

Helen Smith 

Louise Smith 

Ruth Whistler 

Sue Proctor 

Martha Glenn Fleshe 



Hel,en Bennett 
Edith Wilson 



Viven Kester 
Mildred Varner 



Francis Kump 
Virginia Stover 
Carolyn Brown 
Marjorie Skidmore 
Dorothy Ward 




Page Three Iluntlred Nineteen 




Alpha Delta Pi 

Founded at Wesleyan College 1851 

Colors Blue and White 

Flower— Violet 



George W. Price 



Mrs. 


Edv/ard Meeks 


Mrs. 


Charles Moore 


Mrs. 


V. M. Barnard 


Mrs. 


Russell Crawford 


Miss 


Margaret Berry 


Mrs. 


C. M. Bray 


Mrs. 


Kermit Mason 



Miss Mabel Sterlmg 



M Idred Cross 
Marion Goodr 



Mary Dean 
Ireta Hawley 
Margaret Stalnaker 



Jean Emerson 
Barbara Atwood 



Myrle Baker 



Mabel McDonald 
Phvliss Traynor 
Gladys Wagner 



Patronesses 




Mrs. William J. Snee 


Mrs. George Anderson 


Sorores in Urbe 




Miss Mildred Hutchinson 
Mrs. I. F. Moore 
Mrs. W. H. Pierre 
Mrs. W. W. .Armentrout 
Mrs. Robert McLain 
Miss Pauline Mattinglv 
Mrs. Ronald Bishop 
Mrs. 1. C. Bishop 


Mrs. Ira E. Rodgers 
Miss Marguerite Smith 
Mrs Lemuel John 
Mrs. Raymond Lester 
Miss Elizabeth Lawren 
.Mrs. Lloyd Gaston 
Vir-inia Berry 
Mrs. C. 1. Weik 


Sorores in Universitate 




Seniors 




Reba Keesee 
Dorothy Rinard 
Susie Smith 


Irene Collett 
.■\lice Hartley 


Juniors 




Beth Ward 
Elizabeth Morgan 


Virginia Roberts 
Martha Woods 




Frances Haney 


Sophomores 




Evelyn Priest 
Clesta Richards 


Helen Cattrell 
Mr.s. Carl Schott 


Freshmen 




Ruth Simpson 


Virginia Ross ' 


Pledges 




Burline Wageoner 
Mary Willis 


Carol .^shby 
Fern Crockett 



Garnet Lemley 



Three Hundred Twenty 




Page- Three Hundred Twenty-One 




Phi Mu 



Founded Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. 1852 



Colors— Rose and White 


Flower— P.r 


k Rose 


GAMMA BETA 


CHAPTER 


Esiablished 


1927 


Patronesses 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Herd Mr 
Mrs. L. V. Carpenter 



S. Fuller Gbs 



Pauline Englehart 



Catherine Shaaf 
Mary Sturn 



Marian Lockhart 
Mary Ruth McDa 
Dora Long 
Mary E. Gaynor 



.Agnes Rush 



Marian Wilson 
Ruth Walls 
Margaret Robinson 



Sorores in Urbe 
Frances Courtney Marlev 
.Amy Follette Curtis 

Sorores in Universitate 
Seniors 

Cathryn Thompson 



Juniors 

Elizabeth R. Taylor 
Helen Sharp 
Francis Thornburv 
Mary Jane McKain 

Sophomore 



Pledges 

Julia Reace 
Ann McMillian 



Rev. and Mrs. M. 
Prof. E. C. Dicki] 



S. Collins 
ison 



Myron Collms 



Virginia Parsons 
Josephine Herd 



Mary Martin 
Martha Elma Kinc 
Virgir,ia Barkwill 
Henrietta Amos 



sn Gr 



Marie Gans 
Mary Robertson 
Ola Zirkle 



Page Three Hundred Twenty-Two 




Alpha Phi 

Founded at Syracuse University 1872 

Colors Silver and Bordeaux 

.^ers — Forget-me-not and Lily of the Va 

BETA IOTA CHAPTER 

Established 1930 



Mrs. T. L. Harris 
Mrs, Ralph Maxwell 

Letha Ice 
Lillian Crane 
Blan<:he Blackburn C 



Patron 

slie Fr€ 



sses 
ch 



Sofores in IJrbe 

Edith Barnes Slavens 
Carolyn Alcott 
Laura Craig 

Sorores in Universils 

Seniors 



Ruth Bane 


Josephine McBr.de 


Mary Ellen Burke 


Dorothy Shaffer 


Mary Gorrell 


Elizabeth Shiver 




Brenice Prother 




Juniors 


Rcna Walters 


Frances Stahl 


Louise Frazier 


Faith Lawrence 




Alma Ayers 




Sophomores 


Elizabeth Hayes 


Helen Tucker 


Oma Umbel 


Thelma Wilcox 




Helen Spangler 




Pledges 


Ruth Wolverton 


Hahala Hogue 


Phyllis Wolvterton 


Isabell Smith 


Edna Cowie 


Ruby Bishop 



Claire Lives: 
Ruth Wood 



Harriett Shepherd 

Ruth Brown 

Wilma McElroy Buvinger 



Nancy Davis 
Lucille King 
Elizabeth Moore 



n Delli-Gatti 



Johnson 



Eunice Perine 
Nelle Shepherd 



Gavnelle Straight 
Avice Findlev 
Stella Rector 



Hundred Twenty-Four 




I'iiso Three HundreJ Twenty-Fivi 




Gamma Phi Beta 

Founded at Syracuse University 1874 

Colors — Fawn and Seal Brown 
Flower Carnation 

WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA PI CHAPTER 
Established 1930 



Mrs. E. Benlon Ha 



an Michael 



Virainia Barnett 
Ruth Grove 
Marian WilHams 
M -rle Stemple 



Patronesses 

Viss Sylvia Soupart 
Mrs. Sheridan W. Bell 

Sorores in Urbe 

Marjorie Linderman 

Sorores in Universitate 

Seniors 

Kathleen Hoard 
Ruth Miller 
Ruby Keen 



Mrs. John Harrington Cox 



Medora Mason 



Vera Virginia Hensell 
Ruth Blodgett 
Virginia Gross 
Virginia Baer 



Braun 



Edwina Hartr 



Virginia Reed 



Marv L. Sutton 
Ruth Morris 

Sophomores 

Helen Pyles 

Freshmen 



Marjorie Wallace 



■Marv Kav Bishc 



Margaret Nutter 




Page Three Hundred Twenty-Seven 




iRe ThrcM- llnn.h-<'a Twonty-Eight 



Tail Beta Pi 



WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Honorary Engineei-hig Fraternity 

Tau Beta Pi was founded at Lehigh University ;n 1885. It is the oldest and most 
representative of the honorary engineering societies and is the only one at West Virginia 
University. Its purpose is to mark in a fitting manner those who have conferred honor 
upon their Alma Mater by distinguished schoiarship and exemp ary character as under- 
graduates, or by their attainments as alumni. Distinguished scholarship is not considered 
the sole criterion although it is the primary requisite for admission. 

Alpha chapter of West Virginia was formed from the local Theta Psi and was in- 
stalled in 1922. 

Colors— White and Seai-skin Brown 
Members in Faculty 

C. R. Jones G. P. Boomsliter R. M. McCutcheon 

R. P. Davis W. A. Koehler L. L. .Amidon 

A. H. Forman C. H. Gather W. W. Hodge 

Officers 

GHAS. B. SEIBERT President 

S. N. HEADLEE . : Vice-President 

JOSEPH T. VAN VOORHIS Corresponding Secretary 

A. F. BOARD : Recording Secretary 

GECIL C. GOULTER - Treasurer 

Active Members 

C. E. Moyers Opie R. Allen J. T. Van Voorhis 

Cecil C. Coulter Andrew A. Brown J. Vernon Sacher 

Wm. C. Warman James E. Newcomer S. N. Headlee 

Chas. B. Seibert Geo. H. HoUis Leonard M. Board 

E. .M. Hansford Geo. C. Barnes Homer Dejournett 

Herbert H. Kincaid Leonard C. Swing 




Page Three Hundred Thirty-One 



English Club 

Honorary English Society 
Established at West Virginia University 1900 



Georgia Wade 
Dorothy Matics 
Irene Carney 
Raymond Hushes 
Margaret Wells 
Daniel Boughner 



Members 

Hazel Reed 
Eloise Kerr 
Elizabeth Haught 
Faith Lawrence 
Elma Hicks 
Byrd Pickens 



Bertha Handlan 
Sarah Willis 
Frances Ball 
Leora Dunn 
Kathryn Hinkle 
Kathryn Patton 




Thirty-Two 




Page Three Hundred Thirtj'-Tliree 



Alpha Zt'ta 

Founded at Ohio University 1897 
West Virginia Chapter Established 1922 

OBicers 

IRA GOULD. Jr. .. ChcnceHor 

R. CLARKE BUTLER Censo. 

CLARENCE L. FLESHMAN ^ Scribe 

WILLIAM N. LEWIS Treasurer 

HARRY C. TRELOGAN Chronicler 

Members in Faculty 

L. M. Peairs Walter C. Schnopp K. C. Westover 

J. H. Longwell Harold C. Olson C. R. Orton 

R. J. Garber K. S. Morrow C. Q. Williams 

R. S. Glasscock L. M. Thurston M. M. Hoover 

W. W. .Armentrout W. H. Pierre F. J. Schneiderham 

Leland Booth E. N. McCubbin W. S. Ligon 

Active Members 

Seniors 

R. Clarke Butler Clarence L. Fleshman Chester B. Hiett 

William N. Lewis Russell G. Ellyson 

Juniors 

Harry C. Trelogan Ira Gould, Jr. Robert R. Robinson 

William T. Milleson W. Jason Rumble George W. Emrick 

Sophomores 

Starkey Shafer 



Page Three Hundred Thirty-Four 



Phi Epsilon Omicron 

Honorary Home Economics Society 

DEAN RUTH D. NCER Faculty Adviser 

BERYL PIPER President 

SUSAN HAMMER ... Vice-President 

ELIZABETH HAGY Secretary 

FAY KRYDER . Treasurer 

MARY GORRELL Chaplain and Candle Editor 

Mary Gorrell Fay Kryder Beryl Piper 

Susan Hammer Lora Milam Evelyn Croson 

Elizabeth Hagy Sarah Thornley Scholastica Gaydosh 

Irma Ayers Jesse E. Shaffer Nell Shepherd 




Page Three Hundred Thirty-Seven 



Matrix 
Honorary Journalistic 

Petitionini Theta Sigma Phi 
Sponsors 

Mrs. P. 1. Reed Mrs. Ce! Roy Richards Mrs. J. H. Patterson 

Honorary Member 

Miss Rose Sweeney 

Officers 

FRANCES DOAK President 

ELMA HICKS .... Vice-President 

TERESA BRODERICK Secretary 

HELEN SHARP Treasurer 

Alumni 

Alice Hartley Ed s L. Gaston Grace M. Frame 

Seniors 

Rachel Smith Teresa Broderick Frances Doak 

Irene Caplan E'ma Hicks Alice Boyer 

Isa':elle Tomas.son Virtjinia Parsons 

Juniors 

Irma Ayers Josephine Herd Dorothy Baker 

Martha Moore Virginia Stanard Helen Sharp 

Mary Colburn Eleanor Stone Ruth Turner 

Pledges 

Harriet Havener Ruth McDaniels 




Page Three Hundred Thirty-Nine 



Phi Beta Pi 



Honorary Med'ca! Fraternity 
Founded at University of Pittsburgh 1891 

H. S. RAINES President 

R. E. TALBOTT . Vice-President 

W. T. BOOHER . Secretary 

L. M. ORR . - Treasurer 

C. A. DREYER Honored Guard 

R. M. FISHER Historian 

W. H. BRUDER Chaplain 

E. N. DEPUY Editor 

T. H. MURPHY Counsellor 

L H Armentrout L. M. Orr E. L. Rowland 

W. T. Booher H S. Raines J. Scott 

W H. Bruder R- E. Talbott D. H. Robinson 

C A. Dreyer A. R. Yurko J. Ackermann 

P. J. Duffey J. S. .Wilson J. Gallagher 

E. N. Depuy J. M. Arena M. Myers 

R. M. Fisher G. G. Adamo H. Black 

R. C. Haislit W. Allman A. Aqua-V.va 

E L lustice F. W. Glenn K. B. Rothey 

T. H. "Murphy W. Gasper M. E. Conf 

Pledges 

D. L. Farnsworth F. Dobbs A. J. Neihaus 



r.as'o Throe TTundrptl Forty 




Paifc Three Hundred Forty-One 



La Tertulia 



Honorary Spanish Society 

Motto Amor a lo espanol 

Colors Red and Gold 

Flower — Pansy 

RENA WALTER 

President 

AUGUST MARQUES 
Vice-President - 

HUGH Mc.NElLL 

Secretary 

ELEANOR STONE 
. , . SHERMAN W. BROWN 

Faculty Adviser 

Members 

■ r 1 D 1 Helen Boceess Neal Wilson 

Helen Pvles neieii u*ji,gca= 

neien r yi Pa,,Hnp Enelehart Freda Goldinger 

Charles Conaway Kaulme Lngienari m,„k» Wmds 

t"r,S',... X:'X''str.„„ l;::rf"j.. 

A^l^rBrown Sylvia MiU.ken Hazel Duty 

r °hhach R.chard Currence Del'a Duty 

hma F.schbach 1^' " Salvadora Santos-Reyes 

^?;S^ GX.e Eir^erh^'^^ade Rena Walter 

"-^ ^^^-" S;'watii:s ^no"ren'::'s:L'.ey 

Margaret Kruger naie waiitins 



Three Hundred Forty-Two 




Page Three Hundred Forty-Three 



Kappa Pst\ 
Natiojial Honorary Pharmaceutical 

BETA CHAPTER, W. V. U. 1925 
Founded at Un'versity of Virginia 1879 

R. D. MONDAY President 

G. H. P1ET:^0 Vice-President 

VONDAL D. LYONS Secretary-Treasurer 

WALTER J. COLLINS Historian 

PROF. J. L. HAYMOND - .. Faculty Aviser 

H. T. Moors R. D. Monday T. L. Williams 

G. A. Gaston V. D. Lyons T. L. Peters 

Luke A. Oleano James Donlan 1. C. Strosnider 

H. C. MucCulloh M. A. Rafferty R. S. Sires 

W. J. Collins W. A. Plate G. H. Pietio 




Page 1 In-ee Hundred Forty-Five 



JV, V, U. Dramatic Club 

Sponsor 

Professor Wilbur Jones Kay 

Faculty Members 

Miss Ruth J. Simonson Mrs. M. S. Fear 

Officers 

A. BATES BUTLER President 

HAROLD D. SLAVEN - Vice-President 

HENRIETTA AMOS - .. Secietary 

PROF. W. J. KAY - - Treasurer 

Members 

Henrietta Amos James Johnson Dortha Rinard 

A. Bates Butler EUingwood Kay Edwin Peters 

Stewart Brown William Lively .Margaret R. Shriver 

Barbara Dowd Kathleen McCray Jane Seabright 

William Doll JohnMusgrove Harold Slaven 

Leora Dunn Wilbu. McCuIloch Charles W. Zoeckler 

Evert Given John Mark Moore Mary Eleanor Ream 

Charles Ihlenfeld David Hexter Martha M. Shawver 



Page Three Hundred Forty-Six 



Delta Sigma Rho 

Honorary Forensic Fraternity 
Officers 

HARRIET FRENCH President 

BERNARD SCLOVE .. Secretary-Treasurer 

WILLIAM MCORE Vice-President 

WILLIAM LARCENT -. ^ anaser Men's Debating Team 

GROVE MOLER Manager Freshman Debate Team 

DARLENE BRECKINRIDGE Manager Women's Debate Team 

PROF. WILBUR JONES KAY Faculty Coach 

Members 

John Zevely Fletcher Mann William Petropnlus 

Byron Randolph Ben Humphreys 



Kappa {Kappa Psi 

National Honorary College Bandsmen Fraternity 
Omicron Chapter Founded at West Virginia University in 1924 

Officers 

EVAN L. HARRIS . President 

EDGAR F. SPEIDEN Vice-President 

EDWARD McHALE Treasurer 

JAMES A. WEST Secretary 

D. C. KENNEDY ..., Editor 

Members in Faculty 

WALTER A. MESTREZAT Band Director 

LIEUT. E. L. ADAMS Military 

Seniors 

James A. West Harold V. Locker Rupert W. Powell 

Evan L. Harris John Keister John M. Moore 

Juniors 

Edgar F. Speiden Charles L. Timblin Martin Epstein 

D. C. Kennedy Elmer E. Myers Ed Taylor 

Edward McHale John S. Merritt Phil Skaff 

Sophomores 

Merwin Eogue Karl Kanalz Joe Romino 




Page Three Hundred Fifty-One 



The Mountain 



JOHN PHILLIPS 

MARSHALL GLENN 
WILLIAM BEHNKE 

GORDON BRILL 

NELSON LANG 

JACK ZEVELY 



Honorary — W. V. U. 
Otficais 



Summit 

Guide 

. Trail 

. Cache 

.... Pass 



Trapper 



wi: 


ard Ayers 


Crr 


don Brid 


Wil 


iam Fahey 


Nee 


Georce 


Mar 


shall Glenn 


Ceo 


rge Jackson 


Nels 


on Lang 


Win 


Chester Lath 


I ou 


IS Meisel 


Geo 


rse Nixon 


John Phillips 



Julan ocoit 
Harvey Simmons 
Truehart Taylor 
Edward Vacheres 
Jack Zevely 
Charles Zoeckler 
Earle Wolfe 
Gregory Krehs 
Tom lohnson 
Richard Ralston 
"Russell LaRue 



Lyle Jones 
Christy Wildt 
Ferd Browning 
Walter Gordon 
Edward Stumpp 
Clinton Carrico 
William Behnke 
Edward BarSrug 
Enoch Latham 
Stuart Brown 




Page Three Hundred Fifty-Three 



The Sphinx 



Honorary Senior Oi-ganizatior 



W, B. Johnston 
M. V. Martin 
Edward Krieger 
Earl Croushore 
F. W. D. Parsons 
Charles F, Solenberger 
H. S. Raines 
Stewart Brown 
Richard Ralston 
Ralph Kirchner 



E. L. Peters 
L. C. May 
W. C Ayers 
CuUen Hall 
Charles Ihlenfeld 
James Vermillion 
George Ratcliffe 
George Jackson 
John Phillips 
Harvey Simmons 



Malcolm Lowe 
Wilton Davis 
B B. Parsons 
H. J. Paiigh 
Ben Bird 
Jack Zevely 
George Ballard 
Henry P. Snyder 
Cyril F. Ruble 
Howard Batson 



Page Three Hundred Fifty-Four 




Page Three Hundred Fifty-Five 



Mortar Board 



Senior Women's Honorary Organization 

Founded, University of Syracuse 1918 

Laurel Chapter, Installed at W. V. U. 1925 

The purpose of the Laurei chapter of Mortar Board is to encouraa:e and recognize 
leadership in student activities among women of the University. In the spring of each 
year such junior women as have become eligible through activity in student affairs are 
chosen to membership. The organization strives to promote movements for the best in- 
terest of the state and for the sudent life at West Virginia University. 

Officers 

GENEVIVE BROWN , President 

JANE SEABRIGHT Vice-President 

FRANCES DOAK .. Treasurer 

CHRISTINE ARNOLD Secretary 

MARGARET WELLS Historian 

EVELYN CARSKADON -. Keeper of the Scrapbook 

Members 

Christine Arnold Evelyn Carskadon Jane Seabright 

Genevieve Brown Frances Doak Margaret Wells 




Page Three Hundred Fifty-Seven 



Torch and Serpent 

Honorary Sophomore Organization 

Officers 

DAVID PARSHALL President 

SAMUEL HAMMER Vice-President 

WALTER GERWIG Secretary 

JAMES CHAMBERS Tr^asuror 

Members 

Richard Currence Robert Munchmeyer Robert Hillard 

Ralph Welch Lloyd Ditmar Russell Calloway 

Thomas Vir^in Earl Engle Lee T^agardsn 

William Bell Shaffer Staub John Wilson 

Albert Blair James Merideth George Smoot 

Earl Jackson Cyrus Kump Irvin Foote 

William McCue Vental Waggoner Richard McNamar.i 

William Sonderman Edward Taylor George Hervey 

Bonn Brown Junior Jones 




Page Three Hundrea Fifty-Nine 



Rhododendron 

An Honorary Organization for Junior Girls 

Purpose: To promote democracy and scholarship on the campus of West Virginia 
University. 

Officers 

President BERTHA HANDLAN 

Vice-President JEANNETTE BROOKS 

Secretary FREDA BRAUN 

Treasurer - MARGARET HATFIELD 

Keeper of Cauldron KATHRYN HINKLE 

Honorary Members 
Dr. Thomas L. Harris Mrs. Thomas L. Harris 

Members 

Seniors 

Genevieve Brown Margaret Wells Mary Gorrell 

Evelyn Carskadon Ruby Koon Elma Hicks 

Frances Doak Katheri-ne Schaaf Dorthy Matics 

Scholastica Gaydosh Jane Seabright 

Juniors 

Elizabeth Hagy Eloise Kerr .Margaret Hatfield 

Freda Braun Irma Ayers Kathryne Hinkle 

Rena Walter Dorothy Brand Jeannette Brooks 

Faith Lawrence Bertha Handlan 




Page Three Hundred Sixty-One 




Fi Bater Cap par 

Founded at West Virginia University 

Colors — Black and Brown 
Flower — Roses (Four) 

Officers ^,, ^r.,,„, ., 

, H P p JACK ZEVELY 

V- I H r p " cu'^'e: wolf 

Vice L. ^■^■^- EDWARD FOX 

Keeper of the Conklin HARVEY SIMMONS 

Keeper of the Hoard - LELAND BROWN 

Cheerleader - - - 

Keeper of the Bull " GORDON BRILL 

Fore Legs qq^ EPLING 

Hind Legs - 

Members 

lohn Phillips Lawrence Plaster Slim Snyder 

George Cole Red Ayers Gene Joseph 

Francis Glenn Jim Higginbotham Ked (cordon 

Marshall Glenn Fred Riley Emory Lepera 

Dii ui • 1 VA H.-iward Bill Wmfield 

Bill Harrick i^o nowara 

George Jackson Ed Stumpp Bill McChesney 

Julian Scott Vent Waggoner ?°m^'''^"1 

T- L 1 T 1 Rr,K Hamihor. 5i Meredith 

Trueheart Taylor ^°^ namuton -" 

Stewart Brown Ben Stunkard Lyle Jones 

Bus LaRue Sprig Jacobs Ned George 

Harvey Simmons Charles Hart Max Mland 

Eddie Fox Ches Latham P^"l L^ngo" 

Gordon Brill Dally Beall Dave Jacobs 

Paul Bottome Ted Nixon 1'?,"^^"'"''' 

George Ratcliffe Herb Hardy Bill Morris . 

Homer Hogue Cy Ruble Ned R^gland 

Clmt Cameo Curly Johnson Mickey Brand 

Bill Fahey Charley Zoekler Bill Ruck 

Earle Wolfe Mike Hardy Len Hawkins 

Bill Behnke Nick Latham Charley H. 1 

Nelson Lang Gregg Krebs Christy Wildt 
Ed Bartrug 

Page Three Hundred Sixty-Two 




Page Three Hundred Sixty-Three 



University Choir 



LOUIS BLACK, Director 



Louise Akins 
Charlotte Blair-Bake: 
Loisbelle Baker 
Monna Bland 
Russell Bland 
Mary Ellen Burke 
Lois Butler 
Frances Chenoweth 



Sopranos 

Marie Clutter 
Virginia Davies 
Lucy Beltzhoover-Dille 
Pauline Englehart 
Elizabeth Evick 
Madelyn Fitzpatrick 
Martha Fox 
Evelyn Grogg 



Christine Gilhooley 
Beulah Lawler 
Beatrice Lough 
Katharine Lough 
Josephine McBride 
Brenice Prather 
Etta Mawkins-Sherwood 
Evelyn Shaw 



Rogene 


Boyles 


Beatrice 


Donle 


Eleanor 


E.chh 



Altos 

Virginia Ewing 

Marian Fuller 

Edna Leyman-Morrii 



Marie Courtney-Smith 
Georgia Wade 



Lloyd Deffenbaugh 
Herman DeVol 
Richard Edmondson 



Tenors 

Lawrence Gallagher 
William Hanes 



Carl Schmeichel 
Paul Vannoy 



James Bas 
Kellar Bev 
Reid Bracl 
Lewis Bro^ 
Charles Er 



Basses 



lames Fahey 
Frederick Ford 
Charles Hoult 
Hugh McNeill 



Fred Sperow 
John Topper 
Auther Whitener 
Charles Young 




Page Three Hundred Sixty-Five 



University Girls Glee Club 

Director— Lydia I. Hinkle 
Accompanist Marian Fuller 

Officers 

President . ROGENE BOYLES 

Secretary ELEANOR EICHHORN 

Treasurer . EVELYN BROWN 

Business Manager MARY ELLEN BURKE 

Members 

Loisbelle Baker Pauline Enelehart Ru'h Martin 

Monna Bland Elizabeth Evick Josephine McBride 

Rogene Boyles Virginia Ewing Jean Mcintosh 

Mary Bradford Madeline Fitzpatrick Doris McLaughlin 

Evelyn Brown Martha Fox Ruth Morris 

Virginia Burdette Christine Gilholley Ettn Null 

Mary Ellen Burke Lima Hartley Lena Reed 

Frances Chenoweth Beulah Lawler Genevieve Rogers 

Virginia Davies Virginia Laishley Magdalene Servais 

Nancy Delli-Gatti Martha Lewis Evelyn Virginia Shaw 

Beatrice Donley Beatrice Lough Virginia Thacker 

Leora Dunn Katherine Lough Maude Weimer 
Eleanor Eichhorn 




Pas-e Three Ilumlred Sixty-Seven 



Kappa Delta Pi 

Honorary Education Fraternity 
ALPHA UPSILON CHAPTER W. V. U. 1927 

Honorary and Faculty Members 

Dr. J. N. Deahl Sylvia Soupart Oliver P. Shurtleff 

Dr. L. B. Hill Mary L. Wilt George Hand 

Dr. J. E. Bohan Grace Griffin Dr. J. E. Winters 

Dr. Rebecca Pollock Mrs L. F. Roberts Dr. J. A. Cresswell 

Margaret Hayes Gertrude Roberts W. C. Cook 

Lucy May Caplan Prof. E. F. Kimball 

Officers 

W. J. McCOLLOCH President 

ELMA HICKS Vice-President 

HULDA SUDER Recording Secretary 

RUSSELL CURTIS Corresponding Secretary 

LORA MILAM Treasurer 

DR. J. E. BOHAN Counselor 

Members 

Mary Garrell Fred Rogers W. J. McColloch 

Lora Milam Joseph Ashcroft Hunter L. Pinney 

Hulda Suder Genevieve Brown Mrs. Helen Yolk 

Merle Stemple Irene Carney Frances Doak 

Charlotte Grayson Rus.sell Curtis Elma Hicks 

Susan Hammer 



Mary Sturm 
Ruth Linger 



Edv 



Initiates 

rd W. Noland 



Eleanor Stone 
Claude Warins 




#»Vl 4 




Page Three Hundred Sixty-Nine 



Y. W, C. A 

Officers 

CHRISTINE ARNOLD President 

LOUISE WELLS Vice-President 

FREDA BRAME Treasurer 

MARGARET WELLS - Assistant Treasurer 

KATHLEEN McCRAY Secretary 

Cabinet Members and Group Heads 

Frances Doak Mary Sturm Bertha Han.llan 

Katherine Hinkle Ruth Bane '7"^"^ ^ 

Marjorie King El°'== Kerr 

Advisory Board 

^^I■ -VT/- t J ru„„=„ General Secretary 

Miss Winirred Cheney - 

Miss Ruth D Noer Miss Martha Fulton Mrs. Leslie French 

Miss Pauline Spangler Miss Rebecca Pollack Mrs. Albert Reese 



rage Three Hundred Seventy 




Pasf Three Hi.ndreJ Seventy-Ona 



Beta Pi Theta 

Honorary French Fraternity 
Established at W. V. U. in 1927 

Officers 

ALFRED MENEDIS President 

CATHRYN THOMPSON .. Vice-President 

BARBARA GATHER Secretary-Treasurer 

JILL SMITH _ Corresponding Secretary 

BERTHA HANDLAN Sentinel 

MR. J. A. JAMES -. Faculty Adviser 



Genevieve Brown 
Jean E. Kyle 



Members 

Fred Landolphi 
Catherine Liller 
Robert G. McClelland 



Rul.y McQuilh 
Hazel B. Piper 



Mrs. Frnncis Lepera 
Vir.sinia F. Bickerton 
George Boyd 
Beryl M. Burchinal 
Jean Crile 
Lillian Grow 



Pledges 

Elizabeth Hayi5S 
E'oise. Kerr 
Vivian Kester 
Mary Mayfield 
Jean Rogers 



.Salvadora Santos Re 
George D. Stathers 
Elizabeth Taylor 
.Anna M. Tropf 
Elizabeth Weidener 
Annette Wiley 



Americati histitute of Electrical Engineers 

Established 1884 
West Virginia Branch EstabKshed 1915 

The West Virginia branch of the American Institute of E'ectrical Engineers is one 
of the sixty-eight student branches in the United States. It was organized in 1915 under 
the direction of Professor V. Karapetoff of Cornell University and Prof. W. E. Dickenson 
of West Virginia University. 

The objects of the institution are the advancement of the theories and practice of 
electrical engineering and of allied arts and sciences, the maintenance of a high profes- 
sional standing among its members and the deve'opment of the individual engineer. 

Officers 

C. E. MOVERS - President 

J. L. STEELE . .. Vice-President 

G. H. MOLLIS . - Secretary 

E. M. HANSFORD Treasurer 



O. R. AUer 
G. C. Barnes 
R. 1. Boone 
S. W. Boone 
C. A. Bowert 
C. J. DeLancey 
A. Diksa 
S. G. Garrett 
A. H. Goddin 
E. D. Harris 
A. H. Huggins 
P. J. Johnson 
H. H. Kincaid 



Members 




Creed Malone, 'r. 


P. H. Steenbergen 


T. F. Manion 


C. F. Stewart 


J. S. Merr.tt 


W. H. Sutton 


J. E. Morgan 


C. V/. Thrall 


J. E Newcomer 


W. H. Unger 


I. R. Notingham 


R. C. Warder 


C. J. O-Leary 


W. C. Warman 


L. E. Oneacre 


F. E. Watson 


R. H. Pell 


H. O. Webb 


G. W. Pride 


V. O. Whitman 


W. H, Ross 


G. B. Withers 


C. B. Seibert 


J. E. Winter 


O. B. Spangler 


S. B. Wolfe 



Ilinulred Sfventy-Four 




Page Three Hundred Seventy-Five 



Kappa Phi 

National Methodist Girls' Club 

Founded at Kansas University 1916 
Pi Chapter Installed at West Virginia University 1926 

Colors— Sky Blue, Pea Green, and White 
Flower Pink Rose 

Officers 

Sponsor - MRS. MYRON S. COLLINS 

President GENEVIEVE BROWN 

Vice-President - FAITH LAWRENCE 

Assistant Vice-President , ..- MARY STURM 

Recording Secretary EUNICE LINDERMAN 

Corresponding Secretary ELIZABETH HAUGHT 

Treasurer - MILDRED ARNETT 

Historian - LORA MILAM 

Chaplain MARY GORRFLL 

Reporter _ IRETA HAWLEY 

Candle Beam Editor BONITA BLAIR 

Committee Chairmen 

Program LOUISE LANTZ 

Membership KATHRYN HINKLE 

Christian Service - MARIE CLUTTER 

Social . VIRGINIA SELLERS 

Art MILDRED BAYLES 

Music - .. RUTH MILLER 

Invitation :-.. LUCILLE KING 

Patronesses 

Mrs. R. A. Armstrong Mre. L. L. Friend Mrs. W. S. Bell 

Mrs. T. L. Harris Mrs. L. S. Brock 




Page Three Hundred Seventy-Seven 



Pf^estminster Girls ' CJuh 

Founded W. V. U., May 1927 

Colors — Orange and Silver 
Flower— White Rose 



N'rs. F. E. Clark 
Mrs. J. R. Moulard 



Patronesses 

Mrs. W. E. Brooks 



N"i;-s. I. S. Stewart 
M ss Bvrd Turner 



Miss Mary Elizabeth Behner 



Honorary Members 



Miss Claire Livesay 



Alumnae in Town 

Kathryn Sneddon 
Dorothea Vieweg 



Juanita Wilson 



Officers 

Sponsor . MRS. J. LESLIE FRENCH 

President DOROTHY BRAND 

Vice-President JEANETTE BROOKS 

Secretary PAULINE NICHOLSON 

Corresponding Secretary . MARJORIE KING 

Treasurer . CAROL SC.^NLON 

Chaplain MARY JANE RIGGS 

Historian PAULINE SHORTRIDCE 

G'eam Editor ELEANOR STONE 

President of Alumnae Council . DOROTHEA VIEWEG 



Rorothea Allman 


Bertha Antram 


F rn Bickerton 


Virginia Bowser 


Dorothy Brand 


Darlene B. Bradley 


Jeanette Brooks 


Margaret Brooks 


Louida Colebank 


Sara Cree 


Mary Alice Davis 


Helen Emslev 


Margaret French 


Nary Goodwin 


Virginia Gross 


Louise Hamilton 


1 ynel! .Agee 


Mildred Boggs 


Carrie Brown 


He en Burns 


Naomi Browmiester 


A icia Brownfield 


Mary Conwell 


Edna Cowie 


Wilma Cuppett 


Jean Drinkard 


Nellie Dulaney 


Ruth Dupuy 





Members 


Marv 


Jones 


Marjo 


rie King 


Katha 


rine Lough 


Marth 


a Lewis 


Josephine McBride 


Anne 


MacMillan 


lanne 


Nutter 


Evelyr 


1 Preest 


Mary 


Jane Riggs 


Agnes 


Rush 


Carol 


Scan'on 


Virgin 


■^ Schiffler 


Harrie 


t Havener 



Ste! a Keister 
Nell Shepherd 
Pauline Shortridge 

Pledges 

Virg'nia Giltner 
Betty Hall 
Marv Hiner 
Betty Brocks Harr 
Geraldine Hud 
Virginia Kell, 
Frances Kum 
Ruth Linger 
1 eslie Martin 
Bettv McKee 
Elizabeth Per 
Helen Pyles 



gir 



Mab'e Slagel 
E eanor Stone 
Bettv Weidner 
Eva Wharton 
Marv Williams 
Sue Fredlock 
Lillian Grow 
ICtherine Wilso 
i-ilLan Yocke 
Mnr-r Davidson 
Ora Bowser 
Doro'h" Connel 
N'^arie Cox 
Helen Cattrell 
Garnet Dearien 
Jean Emerson 



J.^an Rosers 
Frances Sholz 
Ruth Scho'? 
Dorothy Smith 
M-.ry Steger 
Helen Swearingen 
Ei:z3beth Thompso 
Virein.a Trenary 
Gladys Wagner 
Martha O'Gilvie 
Virginia Highland 
Ann Fortney 



Page Three Hundred Seventy-Eight 




Paso Throe Hmulred Seventy-Nine 



Sigma Gamma Epsilon 

National Honorary Geological Society 

Honorary Members 

Dr. 1. C. White, Deceased 
Robert M. Lambie, Chief W. Va. Dept. of Mines 

Associate Members 

Prof. William A. Staab Prof. Walter ). Eaton Delmar C. Runner 

Prof. Harry M. Fridley Prof. lames H. C. M-jrtens Ritz C. Tucker 

Prof. Sidney L. Galpin Prof. Willard W. Hodge Clyde B. Jenni 

Prof. John L. Tilton Prof. Walter A. Koehler Paul H. Price 

Prof. Charles E. Lawall 

Active Members 

SAMUEL N. HEADLEE . President 

HOMER A. HOSKINS Vice-President 

BYRON F. KING Secretary-Treasurer 

CHARLES C. LEET -. Corresponding Secretary, Editor 

DENNIS L. McELROY Research Fellow 

RICHARD NEWTON Research Fellow 

Harvey Simmons Donald E. Moran William D. Musgrovo 

Lee Morris Edward J. Fox loseph B. Sutton 

Arthur W. Cech Walter W. Murrill Marvin L. Steeley 

Raymond W. Walker Paul N. Brown William P. McCue 

Leonard C. Swing Joseph J. Sacher 



Page Three Hundred Eighty 




Page Three Hundred Eighty-One 



Chi Sigma Delta 

Honorary Economics Fraternity 
Founded at West VirninJa University 1927 



Officers 

EDWARD REED - Presiclent 

C. H. JENKINS Vice-President 

STEWART BROWN Secretary-Treasurer 

Members 

Maurice Coley Richard Currence Bennett White 

Herschel De Vol Robert Hale Paul Er'o 

Stewart Brown O. Paul Myers Azel Meadows 

Edward Reed John Clifford Stan'ey Fisher 

C. H. Jenkins George Smoot Otho Le Fever 

Howe Stidger 




Pase Three Hundred Eighty-Three 



Eta Sigma Phi 

Honorary Latin Fraternity 

DORA LONG President 

ANGELA SWINT Vice-President 

FAITH LAWRENCE - Secretary 

WANDA MITCHELL - - - Treasurer 

CATHERINE THOMPSON , Sergeant at Arms 

DR. C. G. BROUZAS Patron 

DR. LYDIA LOTHROP Patroness 

Members 

Walter Applegate Marian Williams Frank Baker 

Charles Barrickman Dora Long Alfred Menedes 

Francis Bradley Maxine Thacker Wanda Mitchell 

Catherine Hmkle Jeanette Brooks Charlotte Ramsey 

John Keller Faith Lawrence Angela .Swint 

Louise Lantz Louis Neuberger Catherine Thompson 

Robert McClelland David He^xter Edwin Howard 

Mary Jane Riggs Virginia Ferryman Genevieve Poe 



Three Hundred Eighty-Four 



The Anthony Dairy Club 

Founded West Virginia University 1921 

Officers 

President R. CLARKE BUTLER 

Vice-President C. L. FLE3HMAN 

Secretary J. M. DUNCAN 

Treasurer ROBERT R R03SNS0N 

Honorary Members 

Dr. H. O. Henderson Dr. L. M. Thurston 

Prof, K. S. Morrow 

Active Members 

William F. Coull Ira Gould Rufus P. Reed 

Burdette Crow R. E. Harbert C. R Ripey 

J. T. Dransfield E. D. Hildreth W. Jason Rumble 

Russe 1 G. Ellyson Ivan McKeefer Starkev Shafer 

George W. Emrick Harold "C. Olson Harrv C. Tr^^loRan 

R, L. Goddin Ernest H Wotring 



Huudrea Eighty-Six 




Page Three Hundred Eighty-Seven 



The Journaliers Club 

Founded at West Virginia University in 1926 
Members in Faculty 

W. A. Evans and Dr. P. 1. Reed 

Officers 

ARTHUR A. MAUST - President 

DANIE',. BOUGHNER Vice-President 

JAMES A. WEST Secretary-Treasurer 

Honorary Members 

J. Monroe Boyer Charles Hodges Dr. Alien W. Porterfield 

George B. Short Dr. A. L. Darby 

Seniors 

Richard Ralston James A. West James Wilson 

John H. Martin Daniel Boughner S. C. Warman 

Juniors 

Clay F. Peters Clarence May Dana Reynolds 

Ira N. Gould Ferd Browning, Jr. Boyd Dotson 

Edwrard F. Higgs ■ Harry Trelogan 

Sophomores 
William Doll William Corwin 

Pledges 

Charles Conoway James Love 




Pase Three Hundred EiglUy-Niii. 



Minutes of Fraternity Meetings 



PHI DELTA THETA 



The members did away with dinner on the evening of the meetii 
their time to the glorification of old Phi Delta Theta. Brother Radcliffe 
stew, demanded that the guilty member leurn his purple knickers, sii 
got a date somewhere and wanted to wear them. Brother Wiseman ass 
cliffe that they would surely be returned since he knew of n 
to wear them. Brother Meyers let it be known that h 



nd devoted all 

somewhat of a 

he had finally 

man assured Brother Rad- 

that would have the nerve 

ig to become a ladiej man 



starting next month, and asked that he mei 
Ashworth said he favored turning in their 
liked their pins better. This was voted dov 
boys wise in a political way and told them 



Brothe 



bers give him their hearty 
charter and petitioning Phi Gam because he 
n on the tenth ballot. Brother Healy put the 
3 write down the name of the candida^e they 



were to back 
he would like 



rder to be sure of which side they w 
glass of beer so the meeting ended. 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA 



Someone suggested that 



Cyrus S. Kump, a man about town, was a visitor at the house on this particular even- 
ing and insisted that they let him in the meeting. The boys finally broke down and al- 
lowed him to enter, but were sorry for it after a few minutes for this stranger insisted 
that they let him make a speech. Once he was on the floor there was no stopping him. 
He spoke of something he called "politics" that none of the members seemed to under- 
stand. However they allowed him to speak for two hours, after which time he seemed 
to feel better and the boys got to like him a little. After he was through there were loud 
cheers and some talk of making him an honorary member. At this time Broth.^r Hart- 
man told the members of the advantages of being well dre.vsed. As he put it, "It isn't 
ity or automobile that puts me over, the secret is the cut of my clothes." 



my pers 

One member agreed with him 
Brother Wood suggested that s 
to have the school year split 
semesters. This seemed to rei 



gave 



v^hile the rest formed a group and put him out of the house, 
imeone see the President of the L'niversity to try to arrange 
rp into quarters so they could have more parties between 
lind the boys of a lot of things so the meeting was deserted. 

DELTA TAU DELTA 

With Brother Simpson back in the fold the lodge faced the coming semester with an 
air of confidence. Early in the meeting a vote was taken to determine who was the slick- 
est member in the house. The competition quickly narrowed down to Brothers Cochran 
and Jarvis. Each of these illustrious gentlemen was given the floor for an hour in whicV 
to brag about his smoothness and technique. Brother Cochran took the stump first and 
list of statistics that showed his ability as a breaker of female hearts. He read 
ist of those that he had conquered, told something of their family history, and explained 
how he had done the trick. Brother Jarvis took the stand and told, with spicy adjectives. 
of his many feats as a lover. After hearing both sides of the story the members w.-nt into 
a huddle and Brother Brown was instructed to throw the two killers out the nearest win 
dow. It was suggested that a row of flower pots be placed around the porch; but it was 
finally decided to borrow some pots from the Chi Omegas and steal the flowers when 
spring came. Brother Scott fell dead at this time and the meeting ended to carry him out. 

ALPHA PHI 

In bloomers, kimonos and beach pajamas the bewitching damsels strolled Into the 
place of meeting. Between yawns one of the fairer sisters e.-iplained that she iust couldn't 

stand another tea this week the week-end at Yale being too much for her. The head' 

of the social committee checked up to make sure that every sister had received at least 
three invitations to the coming Pan Hellenic. The freshmen now entertained with their 
weekly style show, while the members fired up their Murads and showed a bored interest. 
Quite a bit of interest was aroused over a new creation in cheese cloth that one of the 
frosh displayed. Six of the sisters wanted to purchase the same gown, and a rather heat- 
ed discussion arose over the matter; however it was finally decided to pilch pennies for 
it. The group on etiquette now demonstrated the proper method of retrieving a dropped 
handkerchief, and instructed the members on how to carry on a conversation between 
courses at the Comuntzis Club. The yawning now became pronounced so the meeting 
adjourned to allow the sisters time to dress for the evening. 



Phone 781 




235 Potted Plants and Cut Flowers Morgantown, 

Spruce Street always on hand also W. Va. 

Canary Birds and Gold Fish 



The well dressed girl chooses her apparel 
at 

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"In the heart of Morgantown" 

H.C BAKER HARDWARE CO. 

MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 
FRATERNITY AND SORORITY HOUSEHOLD NEEDS 

Phone 88 



DEMAND PERFECT PERFORMANCE 
You Can Get It In 

Spartoti or Victor Radios 

Hear Them Before You Buy. 
For Sale by 

THE MELODY SHOPPE 



Phone 961 



248 Walnut Street Morgantown, W. Va. 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO 

Meeting in the stable at the University farm the hoys got down to work at once. A 
hog judging contest took up the first hour; but the contest was thrown into confusion 
when Brother Parsons got mixed up with the hogs and several of the contestants picked 
him as the prize wmning sow. Following th:s was a short intermission during which cider 
and pie were served, and the new Alpha Phi's entered in a body to participate in an old 
fashioned barn dance. The question of getting a better foothold in New York was brought 
up and it was unanimously decided that the brothers should wear white collars for at least 
a week during the next rushing season. A discussion of what to do about the grass on 
the front lawn grew into a heated debate. Some favoring one fertilizer, some another. 
However it was finally terminated by arranging to have at least two of the brothers stand 
out on the lawn all during the day and carry on a lengthy conversation. It was agreed 
that this would surely be an inexpensive way to raise a fine crop of grass. A report was 
now given on the Japanese beetle. It was explained why the Japanese beetle didn't live 
with the common potato bug and vice versa. However this educational talk was rudely 
interrupted when one of the brothers got his beetles mixed and started to spin a yE.rn 
about a girl he knew in Benwood. At the mention of a woman the members became con- 
fused and the meeting ended. 

DELTA KAPPA PSI 

Meeting was held two hours late because Brother Foote was taking the boys three 
at a time ancj riding them around the block in THE automobile. However they finally 
gathered in the music room and got down to the terrible facts. Brother Cooper quizzed 
the members for two hours to try to find which one had taken a pot shot at him while he 
was out in the back yard picking violets. Everyone denied any connection with the hei- 
nous affair, and Brother Cooper was quickly flying into a rage when Brother Casto said 
that he had fired both barrels of his shot gun at a Be'gian hare he had seen out in the 
yard the night before: however Brother Casto said he had no idea it was Brother Cooper 
that received the shot. There followed a short game of Truth in which Brother Ebling 
stole the show with his many stirring narratives of the women he had known. 

Brother Burdette now demonstrated to the brethren the correct form of a letter to 
write home to get the extra money for a special week-end. Several members look down 
the form and decided ot try it out the next week, even though it would not be a special 
affair. Brother Randolph brushed the dust from his ears and rendered a long lecture on 
the advantages of having the upper hand on the textbooks. The Brothers quietly agreed 
and got up and left the room. 

KAPPA MU 

A wire was sent to the Pope, but he was unable to attend due to family troubles; 
therefore the usual meeting occurred. Brother Duffy \varned the menibers that Saint 
Patrick's day was coming and that they should be storing up their celebrating tools. 
Brother Erb amused the members for a few minutes by knocking up a few flys for the 
Freshmen to catch. Brother Donlan said thai Morgantown didn't agree with him and that 
he thought they should move the house out to Notre Dame where the atmosphere WiS bet- 
ter. He was ruled down by a close vote. Brother Moore suggested that a party be thrown 
out at Cheat real soon. This seemed to interest most all the boys, so they arranged the 
details at once. Lemonade was to be the only drink, and pretzels the only form of solid 
nourishment. Several members said they would have to write home and get their family's 
permission before they could go. Brother Moran felt warm by this time so the members 
adjourned and played a few hands of Red Dog. 

SIGMA DELTA PHI 

The charter, ritual and password were all forgotten so a prep had to run down to 
Comuntzis and get Brother Pike to come up and conduct the meeting. Having nothing 
to do Brother Pike accepted the responsibility; and also gave a long talk in which he told 
the members how easy to was to make money after leaving college. Brothers Ruth and 
Rose assumed control of the next hour and presented a short play, without theme or title; 
however it was suggestive enough to get a great deal of applause from most of the boys. 
Brother Sutton passed the plate and the members gave liberally to the fund to keep the 
Alumni from starving. Brother Bledsoe was going out so. the meeting was stopped half 
an hour early in order to give the boys plenty of time to get him dressed. 



Three Hundred Ninety-Five 



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GRENADA SHOES 



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and STADIUM SHOES 

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Under Laidley & Selby 
INTRAMURAL HEADQUARTERS 



Post Office is Opposite Us 

RICHARD RESTAURANT 

MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 



Compliments of 

Purity Ice Cream Co. 



P.ige Three Hundred Ninety-Six 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

President Turner was invited over for dinner, but he was smart enough to go to 
Comuntzis instead. In the absence of President Turner Brother Hannah ate too much 
and was sent to bed with a swoi ^n stomach. Brothers Cubbons and Flowers had n bare 
knuckle encounter in the meet ng hall to dec.de once and for all which was the better s'de 
of Spruce street. Brother Flower.s was on a t ichnica.ity. Brother Flowers was elected 
the Dream Gir. for the com;ng semester, and presented with a large bouquet of Orange 
Bosscms. In repiy to th s presentat.on Broth r Flowers gave an interesting talk on what 
Pi Kappa Aipha meant to him and his. Very few of the members knew what he was talk- 
ing about so he was finally thrown out of the room. Brother Cubbons then took the floor 
with a club in his hand and demanded that he be heard. His grievance was that the n. em- 
bers didn t take advantage of the shower baths as much as they should. He explained 
that he had once lived on a farm and had swept out lots of stables; but he could not stand 
the way the brothers disregarded their Saturday night social dut.es. It took five of the 
members to silence Brother Cubbons, so the meeting terminated for want of a good i,?5ue. 

KAPPA SIGMA 

The meeting was called to order in the Stadium since most of the brothers were to 
be found there. Brothers Larue and Lang engaged in a debate as to the advantages of 
being tall and short. By mathematica ca culations Brother Larue showed that should he 
fall down on the sidewalk, he would have a much better chance of not breaking i bott.e 
in his hip pocket than would Brother Lang. The figures were rather varue but most of 
the members accepted the story. Brother Stumpp said that something should be done 
about the promiscuous chewing of finger nai.s at the dmner table. Brother Johnson said 
the answer was that there was nothing else to chew. At th s remark Brother Stumpp 
threw his left crutch at Brother Johnson, hiting Brother Joseph ,n the ear. Brother Joseph 
started swinging and soon everyone had joined in. In two hours they were all on the sod 
and were found in this condition the next morning by the caretaker. 

THETA CHI 

Following an ancient Russian tradition the members assembled in high top boots and 
sombreros. broitier Mcore suggested that tnty turn ;n their charter and join a c.rcus. 
assuring those reluctant ones that they could surely get jobs in the side shows as some 

sort ot rreaks. i ac nt use oe.ng uuu^. wut ■, s_ve. .; ac,u ic s.jrs enieri.iinecl t.io: 

members with a display of fancy diving and swimming. Brother Kreiger's activities along 
chis l.ne stamped him as one of the most likely looking fish in the lodge. After tj.is a 
short business meeting was held during which it was decided tha tthey needed i new 
house, charter and members; however nothing was done about any of these things. A 
spr.ng party was discussed but it was said to be too expensive, so it nnally narrowed down 
to the choice of a tafiy pel at the Kappa hcise, or a picnic on the front awn. .After 
arguing on the question both ways it was decided to have the taffy pull, because it less 
expensive and offered a good chance for the members to get their hands real claan. A 
bill collector came to the door ana the meet.l.g ci.oe„ nuir.eaiy. 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Sister French opened the meet ng w th a short prayer for Dean Arnold, nore com- 
fortable and spacious divans on the first floor and better Wheeling Stogies. After a bit 
of preliminary debate, S st3r Moore suggested that the three s ngle girls in the lodge ac- 
cept the Theta Chi pins s nee it didn't look like they wou d get any other offers. In her 
coy way Sister Currence rem ndcd the girls about keeping the blinds down aftir tour 
o'clock in the morning. Under the head of new bus ness Sister Miller, (just plain Daisy 
Mae to the boys I boasted that a full grown man had foUcwed her up the street the night 
before. At th's remark vivacious Sister Highland 'eaperi to the center of the floor and 
demanded h s address, but she wes ru ed out of order. S ster Seibright then gave a abort 
'-ut interesting talk on what Phi Beta Kappa meant to the Sigma Chi's. Sisters Pveston 
and Bcttcme engaged in a lively debate as to whose night it was in the Wooing Room. 
Sster French ruled that Sister Bottome nc-sded t the mosb. Sister Smith had just narted 
to read her latest note from New York when a Freshman announced that there was a man 
down stairs. The meeting ended in wild confusion. 



rage Three Hundred Ninety-Seven 



Compliments 
of the 

WEST VIRGINIA STATE BUS ASSOCIATION 
1930 



LACOLCyttftSELftV 



STATIONERY 



OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



r.igc Three Hiimlrc il Ninety Eight 



CHI OMEGA 

In a dead silence the maids assembled. Sister Murphy quietly suggested that the 
swing on the front porch be oiled and repaired for the spring rush. Sister Williams 
thanked Sister Murphy for being so considerate toward the other girls. Sister Dowd, 
on behalf of the alumni, gave an inspired talk on what qualities to look for in a young 
man. Sister Straley assured the girls that it took brains as well as beauty to really be at- 
tractive. Sister Davis, of Indiana fame, rendered a lengthy oration on Home Life, in 
which she compared the renowned Indiana corn to that of West Virginia. Sister Casto 
explained to the members how easy it was to smart in the classroom. Sister Straley asked 
that the chapter consider seriously the question of chartering a bus every Sunday after- 
noon to ride up and down High street. Sister Armstrong was excused at this time to 
take up her watch at Pierce's. Having no business to transact the girls staged a short 
game of Truth and then went to bed. 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 

Circular letters were mailed to the members three days ahead so that most of them 
vv^ere present for the meeting. A fine point of rules came up when Brother Boughner 
asked permission to bring a textbook into the meeting. Most of the boys said it would 
take all the joy out of the gathering; but the committee on scholarship had an impromptu 
meeting and decided in favor of Brother Boughner. This at once caused an argument 
because Brothers Glenn and Nixon wanted to get permission to let their families sit in at 
the meetings. After much wrangling it was decided that a textbook was entirely different 
than a family, so the requests of Brothers Glenn and Nixon were not granted. The 
morals court now held its session and severely reprimanded several of the members for 
their questionable actions over the week-end. Brother Noel told the chapter of a maga- 
zine article he had read that had convinced him that drinking didn't pay he urged all 

the brothers to read the article. Brother Davis suggested that the athletes in the house 
that had to run to the meeting from the athletic field without showering should be given 
a bench of their own to sit on. Broher Noel was sleeping by this time so it was decided 
to adjourn. 



-^ 




FREAKS 





•lieatioff)^ 




TAU KAPPA EPSiLON 

Some of the members wanted to watch the girls wa'k by the front of the house so 
the meeting was held on the front porch. Brother Ruble didn't have his varsity sweater 
on so he was sent out to get it. Gazing out on the spacious lawn a great majority of the 
brothers w^ere contemplating on the joys of spring, and the happiness of living, when they 
were rudely aw^akened from their dreams by hearing Brother Chambers announce thai 
there would be another special assessment next month. This brot them to their feet in a 
cry of opposition, but Brother Chambers stuck by his cannon, and they had to admit that 
he was right. Brother Ruble, after much persuasion, decided to tell the boys what he 
thought about as he soared over the crossbar at about twelve feet. He said that it was a 

strange thing but he usually bought of a huge piece of apple pie althout^h after a bit of 

proding he admitted that occasiona'ly he would get his mind on a certain maid over in 
Sunnyside. Brother Fittro wanted to go ice skating, so the gathering was dissrlved. 

PI KAPPA PHI 

Being the most adept at throwing the bull. Brother H'll assumed command of the 
meeting from the outset. Brother Musgrave was apoointed as head of the inspection 
committee to look over the boys before they went to the Junior Prom. Brother Oneacre 
was on a rampage, and gave the members a severe bawl'ng out for not being more active 
on the campus. At this Brother Van Voorhis entered the fray and told his tearful story 
of having been a track candidate for four years with little or no success Everybody felt 
sorry for Brother Van Voorhis, and assured him that he was absolutely right. At this 
time a short business meeting was called and it was agreed that they needed more money, 
preferably hundred doUar bills in carload lots. Brother Wi'son suggested that they start 
brewing a little beer and dispose of it around the neighborhood in order to bring in a 
little surplus . This was discussed at some lens?th, and it was finally decided to go out and 
get a few beers so they would have the proper atmosphere in which to discuss the ii>at- 
ter. So the meeting adjourned to Star City and the beer question became the center of 
all eyes. 

PHI KAPPA TAU 

In spite of Brother Smith's disapproval, Brother Board had a sDec'al meeting to warn 
the members to vote for him in the coming elect-on"!. Brother Board's reasons for not 
wanting to be elected were rather questionable. He c'aimed he didn't have time, and also 
said he didn't like the way po'itics W£s run at the University. However most of the 
brothers were smart enouph to real'ze that there was a woman at the bottom of it all. 
Since the meeting was he'd on an off evening there were only four members present, so 
this select group got together and passed some rules ae-reeab'e to themselves. Brother 
Bowers had a law passed that the Freshmen should serve h's breakfast in bed for the rest 
of the year. Brother Knotts ordered three cases of beer and charged them to the lodge. 
Various other bits of choice legis'ation were pushed through, until Brother Smith wanted 
to have the fraternity buy him a suit cf clothes for the work he had put forth for the 
group. This was a little too much and a fight ensued that broke up the meeting. 



PI LAMBDA PHI 

After the famous Irish custom the brethren gathered in their flowing green robes. 
Brother Goldstein interrupted the dignity of the gathering a bit when he tripped on his 
garments and fell sprawling on the floor; however he was soon retr-eved and the meeting 
continued. Brother Hexter made a very touching little talk in which he apologized most 
profusely for the poor grades he made the first semester and promised the members that 
it would not happen again. Brother Ferderber accepted the apolopy, but warned Brother 
Hexter that they would tolerate such actions very long. As head of the athletic commit- 
tee Brother Brownstein reported that after much inve^tigat'on bf had found that eating 
pineapples at night was not beng done by the country's best athletes therefore it should 
be stopped in the house. The financial statement for the month was read and it was 
found that there was a profit of forty-five cents. At once there was a demand to know 
where this surp'us had gone. Confusion reigned in a very few minutes with everyone 
accusing someone else of pilfering the profits. The money was never located but the 
members had to adjourn the meeting to send their suits to the pressing shop. 



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James Harris at 
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Ike Lewis workinR on the right leg 




Local matron thumbing a ride ho 
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Co-eds third Liter hon.e asking per 
mission to attend the Hill Parties. 




Bruns on Foggarty's Kno 



Glenn doing famous nose dive. 




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I'ast^ Four Hiiiulreil Five 




M. A. C. doing her spring training 
for the May Pole Team. 




The Glenn family on ^ Sunday 
afternoon. 




Cy Kump on hi'^ way to the po!! 
ection day. 




New candidate having his picture 
taken the first day out. 



mM^^^^^mM. 



Making dates for the Junior Pror 




Christy Wilat talking things over 
with a fish peddler in back of Worn ins 
Hall. 



/"^ 



V^ 



Piaster assuming the angle. 




That famous vaudeville tea 
May and Sperry. 



Gordon taking unfair advanta 



Bartrug getting off a lent. 



Lang caught with his hair down on 
iong end run 



Tarxf F.nir Hundreil Sh; 



MINUTES OF FRATERNITY MEETINGS— Continued 

PHI SIGMA DELTA 

Half cocked the boys trickled into the sacied shrine to do their bit for dear old Phi 
Sigma Delta. Brother Katz waxed warm w th a short parody on the famous 'Dis irtation 
on Roast Pig". This was we'l received, and at this time Brother Sebulsky passed out ham 
sandwiches that were declared to be very tasty by the entire group. Brother Fisher re- 
mmded the members that breakfast waf still being served in the mornings, and that son.e 
of the brothers should take it a little s'ower during the evening meals. There was some 
talk of having Paul Whitman and his orchestra down for the formal party, but they hnally 
decided to rely on Carson Howard again. It wasn't the money involved that mada the 
difference, it was just a case of being possessed of a little community spirit. Brother 
Cohen jacked the boys up a bit on a few social points, after which they sang The Side-', 
walks of New York, and the meeting broke up. 

PHI KAPPA PSI 

At exactly seven o'clock the roll was called and ten member,? were found to be pres- 
ent. Brother Hart was given the honor of sitting in the green plush chair, due to his 
recent triumph in the fashion show. Brother Hart was also given permission to wear his 
new hat in the meeting hall. Brother Lowe announced that the Monticola was going to 
be the best ever published and admonished the brothers to place their orders early. Sev- 
eral members booed at this statement. At this time tea was served by six neophytes 
attired as Japanese flower girls. Over the teacups the members discussed the question of 
singing in the shower bath. Brother Phillips said he understood the English did it. As 
the discussion seemed to be going in a circle. Brother Beardsley was .appointed ►o wire 
Emily Post and get the correct answer. .After a ten minute wait a telegram was receiv- 
ed from Miss Post which read as follows. "If you can't find anything else to do then sing." 
For the next two hours a whi.st game took the center of the stage. Brother Maynard had 
the highest score and was given the prize of a handsome pair overshoes. Brother May- 
nard announced that he could certainly use both of them. Meeting adjourned. 

SIGMA CHI 

Brother Krebs took off a batch in the afternoon so the members were ready for any- 
thing by evening. Brothers Wildt and Marker were on the wagon, so they were given 
yeast cakes in order to feel at home. Brother White recited. Crossing the Bar, which was 
well received. Brother Zever'y was fined for amusing himself in the corner and not pay- 
ing attention to the discussion. Brother Wlldt gave a short skit in which he imitated the 
Four Marx Brothers on a vacation in Somerset, New Jersey. Brother Gordon came in late, 
covered with blood and gravel, and explained that he had had a terrible time trying to 
get in the meeting hall at the Phi Sig house. He was fined fifty cents for faulty judgment. 
A committee was appointed to try and decide why the scholastic standing was so low. 
A discussion of this Question arose at once, and it was held by all that the professors were 
entirely to b'ame. The subject was dropped at this convenient point. The fire v/histle 
blew at this time and the meeting disbanded. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

A leaking roof forced the brothers to meet in the cellar. Brother Ayres presided 
at the urn, while Brother Hamilton greeted the members at the door. After thir'y-hve 
had squeezed in the room the door was bohed and he late members were excluded. 
Brother Meisel again warned the brethren about leaving too much food on their plates 
after meals. Brother Cal'owav submitted his report, that had taken months to complete, 
on how to have a gir' in the Universitv and also one out of town at the same time. An 
argument came up as to whether the Freshmen should be allowed in pool rooms or not. 
Brother Ayres claimed it would undermine their morals and teach them bad habits: but 
he was vigorouslv oonosed bv Brother Wittenberg, who, in strong language and with 
many gestures, said that pool was a gentleman's game and had absolutely no connection 
with morals. He also went on to say that as far as learning bad habits was concerned 
he had no fear of the bil'iard halls; so far, he said, the F.eshmen had learned nothing, so 
why deny them this ooportunity to grasp a little knowledge, even if it were bad. By this 
time most of the Brothers were asleep, so the rest of the members left. 



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PI BETA PHI 



In scholarly fashion the 
they took their respective s 
Miller then passed around lo! 
Rodgers at the Steinway, Si 
on a week-end trip to Cairo. 
Freshmen arose, and 



bers filed 
With joii 
Uy pops and the 
ster Wiley gave 
Indiana. The f 
decided to farm 



nto the meeting hall. In faultless precision 
;d hands they blessed Pi Beta Phi. Sister 
meeting was declared informal. With Sister 
her interpretation of Charlotte Greenwood 
irtinent question of what to do with the 
four or five of them out to the Kappas for 



further seasoning. 
the first semester, 
of spring. Politic; 
asked that the girl 
meeting adjourned 



Sister Handlan thanked the | 
They insisted that she think r 
seeped into the meeting and 1 
s back her in her race for the 
with nothing accomplished. 

SIGMA NU 



iris for their high scholastic marks of 
othing of it m face of the early arrival 
lasted about two minutes. Sistii- Fox 
coveted position of May Queen. The 



Brother Glenn called the members together beneath the White Star. Brother Epl.ng 
couldn't see the White Star so he was led over to it. Brother Edmunsen trickled in and 
was fined for eating three sour apples in one day. Brother Snyder gave a talk on the 
practical side of morals that had everyone in tears. The idea of burning down the house 
fermented in Brother Epling's fertile mind; but it was decided to suspend the question 
until after the spring party. Brother Glenn warned those members that had been taking 
tramps in the woods to be sure and clean their feet off before they came into the house. 
As he quietly put it, -The place is beginning to look like the Delt house. For the next 
fifteen minutes a rousing game of drop the handkerchief took place, until some of the 
members began to perspire; the game was dropped with Brother Lively holding the hand- 
kerchief. Following this there was a warm discussion on the question of dates lor the 
partners from some of the larger towns of the state. But Brother Snyder stood up for 
spring party. A small group, headed by Brother Lively, wanted to import for their dance 
the local girls, for no apparent reason. They were still on the subject of women when 
the breakfast bell broke up the meeting. 



BETA THETA PI 



In 



n and about the house- 
n made a motion to thi 
onded by Brother Levis 
vhile he entertained the 



spite of a heavy fog 
order as usual. Brother Bro' 

in the house at all hours se 

gess held Brother Waddell up 

tricks and rendered the more touchins scenes from 
Duck Hunt. Brother Mevers suggested that the mer 
of buying a new house. Most of the brothers agreed 
to them, so they let the matter droD. Brother Chai 
on those members that couldn't walk on the boardv 
always stepping off on the new grass. Brothers Levis 
strenuously clai 
No decision wa. 



— the gavel called the Brothers to 
: effect that town girls be lUcwed 
. failed. Brothers Davis and Bur- 
members with some slight of hand 



the old Irish melodrama The Silent 
bers consider seriously ihe question 
►hat the word BUY was disagreeable 
e thought a fine should be imposed 
alk in front of the house, but were 
Burgess. Wadell and Davis objected 

that the boardwalk was very hard to see on late Saturday nights. 

hed on the matter. A fight at the door of the meeting room now 



attracted all the attention. Bmther 
that he be allowed to enter. Brothe 
on. For three hours the battle rag< 
meeting ended. 



Winchester Latham forgot the password but insisted 
r Chase waved the bloody shirt and the struggle was 
d; but Brother Latham was finally seated just as the. 



PHI ALPHA 



Meeting for no pnod reason the members declared the gathering informal and loung- 
ed at ease. Brother Epstein •'ave the Freshmen a severe reprimand for not shining has 
baton better, whereupon the Freshmen agreed that if it weren't for the baton there would 
be nothing outstanding about the band leader. Following this plans were laid for the 
party to be held on the train on the way home for the Easter holidays. Brother Blickman 
was appointed to supply the r-freshments for the affair. As a business move the Brothers 
discussed the ouest^on of pledging Legs Taylor; however after a warm discussion it was 
decided to black ball him and take up orangeade as the fraternal drink. Brother Weiner 
now gave a short ta'k on how it felt to be a varsity basebtll player. Several of the mem- 
bers couldn't see how Brother Weiner could get such a feeling, but they let ,t pass with- 
out much argument. Next year's rushing was discussed and several of the boys said they 
had some clean cut lads lined up for the fall. Meeting adjourned with Brother Epstem 
leading. 



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ALPHA XI DELTA 

Sister Dunn and her hand maids assembled in the pantry and got down to the cold 
facts. A piano was borrowed from the Kappa house, and Si?ti;r Brown rendered the 
catchy yet touching tune, Down in the Old Cherry Orchard. At this juncture eighteen of 
the more gifted Freshmen presented a stirr ng drama. The Silent Suffocation of Sargaret 
Mtraley, that was met with wild cheers and much hand clapping. Sister McConnell re- 
lated, with reservations, varicus experiences of her last summer school, and urged all the 
Sisters to stay and attend the session this summer. At this point tea was served and the 
members disbanded to do their Easter duties. 

DELTA GAMMA 

None of the sisters had dates .so they settled down for a quiet meeting. Sister Car- 
skadon reported that after a two months investigation she had found the hidden secret 
as to why the Pi Phi's had more dates than their own girls. Several of the membars de- 
manded that Sister Carskadon divulge the secret in open meeting, but she explained that 
it would have to be whispered to each girl individually after the meeting ended. Sister 
Bromberg, at the request of the chapter, submitted a short article on the activities at a 
typical W. & J. house party; while the Freshmen sat around with popped eyes. The sub- 
ject of a new house arose, and immediately a warm discussion as to whether the old tra- 
ditions should be carried into the new house. Some of the girls thought they should 
start with a clean slate and establish their traditions; v/hile others were of the impression 
that the old slate was a great piece of work and should be carried into the new abode. 
No action was taken and the meeting was terminated for want of discussion. 

TAU DELTA THETA 

Brother Fahey was feeling badly but he came to the meeting in spite of it. Brother 
Reed threw the gavel at Brother Burton for eating peanuts; however the gavel hit Brother 
Hamstead by mistake, and a free for all resulted. But having quieted down again the 
meeting continued. Brother Fahey suggested that they petition for a charter from the 
Kappa Alpha fraternity, and the motion had passed when someone said they thought 
there was a chapter here now. The recheck man looked it up and found that there \\fas 
already one chapter of it here, so they dropped the matter since they all agreed that one 
chapter was enough. Brother Sylvester asked the chapter to back him in his run for as- 
sistant trainer of the girls in the May Pole Show. Brother Pickering suggested that Pres- 
ident Turner be invited over for a meal, so he could understand why their minds didn't 
function well enough for them to get their classwork. Brother Fahey left so the meeting 
was over. 

ALPHA DELTA PI 

The pledges were in a good humor so they allowed the older girls to sit in on the 

meeting but they were not allowed to talk. Pledge Cottrell presided and it developed 

into a very good meeting. P. edge Simpson reported for the Freshmen Committe'^ th?it 
Sister Smith had broken Rule 9 of the by-laws. There was a gasp when this was heard, 
and several of the Pledges looked slant eyed at Sister Smith. However Sister Smith faced 
the issue squarely and said that she would not have broken the rule unless it had been 
necessary. But she contended that there was no other way for her to get across the pud- 
dle unless the young man had carried her, and she was sure it would not happen again. 
She was excused but given a lengthy talk by Pledge Ross. The next thing was a party; 
and the Pledges easily forced the actives to give it for them by the following week. After 
a little more legislation favorable to themselves the Pledges left while the rest cleaned up 
the room. 



The 



PHI MU 

estion of what to do about last year 



pring dresses that are too short for 
this spring took up the greater part of the meeting. Sister Parsons said they should set 
their own styles and the rest of the campus would follow them. She contended that they 
should wear the dresses as they are and be truly different. Sister Herd saw her chance 
and at once assured Sister Parsons that she was different without having to wear a certain 
type of dress. In the tussle that followed there was a great deal of scratching and kick- 
ing, but they both agreed when it was over that it had all been in fun sure, just a little 

fun. Sister Thompson now threw her spell over the group and proceeded to get a few 
bills through. A proposal to do away with house rules was now presented, but Sister 
Sturm stood firm against it; she claimed that the girls should be smart enough to get 
around them or else suffer the consequences. The meeting adjourned to think over this 
proposition. 



je Four Hundred Eleven 



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BIOGRAPHY OF A ROADS SCHOLAR 

On a murky September day. back in the year nineteen hundred and twenty-four, a 
smooth faced popeyed lad boarded the train at Clarksburg West Virginia and rode all 
the way to Lexington. Virginia, by himself. Alighting at Lexington he procured a Bromo 
Seltzer, and wended his way out to the dancing instructor's office of the Washington and 
Lee University. Presenting his credentials, he was ushered into the presence of this 
illustrious heel and toe man. The instructor, a genial old gentleman for all his false teeth, 
bade the stranger have a chair. The young man sat down, nervously pulling at the 
woolen underwear that protruded out his sleeve. "Well, my little man," said the aged 
ballroom sage, "Might 1 ask your name, and why you have come to school here? ' The 
bowlegged boy struggled to his feet. "My name sir. is John Davidson Phillips, and 1 am 
here to play left tap on the Soft Shoe team, or know the reason why. Back in Harrison 
County they call me Loose Feet Phillips; although I assure you sir. the loose part refers 
only to my feet. I've burned up the hardwood on every hall in Clarksburg, and though 
1 may be a bit forward 1 still feel that lean make your damn dancing team." 

Thus, dear children, was launched the stirring career of this brave mountain youth. 
A career that was to carry him from a humble backwoods cabin to the collegiate Hall of 
Fame. For. as many a rosy cheeked maid has said, he had that certain thing. Regardless 
of the opposition, this fearless lad faced the storm with a blunt determination; and with 
him at all times was his invisible banner bearing the oath he lived by, 
Always try to get all you can 
Fill your pockets as well as your hand. 

But to continue the life of this happy warr.or. After three months in Lexington he 
had the village by the forelock. His sterling "dogs" stood by him and he danced his way 
into the hearts of those simple country folk. His name became a household fixture. in 
spite of the fact that several men of the neighborhood swore he could not see their daugh- 
ters again; still his winning smile and shifty feet made him the idol of the town. Aged 
spinsters on the way to market stopped to gossip about his latest steps, and it was no un- 
common sight to see two or three elderly matrons stop in the middle of Plumb street and 
try to execute his famous Harrison County Tw^ist. 

However, as is the way with great ones, our stalwart champion soon tired of such 
small time show. Therefore the fall of nineteen hundred and twenty five found this ex- 
traordinary youth hanging around the poolrooms of Morgantown, West Virginia. But he 

didn't forget his dancing children not for a minute. .'\s a matter of fact he had been 

practicing all summer on some new steps, and when the social season opened he simply 
stunned the hamlet with h s intricate Blind Mule Stomp. Really kiddies, it was sich a 
hoof fest as to make you forget all about Old Mother Hubbard and her simple Scotch 
husband. From every house top the face of this rollicking gambolier was shouted until 
the frosty mountains echoed the call. Instead of saying "Good morning," the residents 
would greet each other with. "Have you seen HIS latest act?" Mothers began to boast 
that their infant sons resembled "Loose Feet." although of course the famous dancer had 
nothing to say on that matter. No, no, of course he didn't. 

And through it all, "Loosey," as the boys called him, kept both feet on earth. True, 
he got intoxicated three or four times a week, but he still managed to pedal extremities 
pointing earthward. For as he was -wont to remark, 'Ts hell when you get them both 
above your head." 

But now children, it's time to go to bed and we must end this narrative of the little 
country boy. But before we stop I must tell you that after five years at Morgantown the 
fame of this high stepping lad has become international in scope; and the first of next 
fall W4II find him over at England's great University at Oxford to show people of that 
country his remarkable ability as a soft shoe artist. One country could not hold this 
ambitious youth, and I'm sure that we all wish him luck in his conquest of the British 
Empife. Now gwan to bed. 



p.,cr,. Four Hundred Thirteen 



PRINTERS BINDERS 
RULERS 

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THAT FAMOUS CHI OMEGA SWING 



I don't believe you have been kissed in a blue moon. 
No but I've been kissed in a red Cadillac. 



Why is a k-ss like a rumor. 

Dunno. Why? 

Because it goes from mouth to mouth. 



Guest: An do you know every bit of furniture in our home goes back to George the 
Third? 

Phi Sig: Well, we're in the same boat. Every bit of furniture in our house goes 
back to Homes, if we don't pay our installments by Monday. 



She was only a miner's daughter, but oh what natural resource 



Dr. Fromme If a hen can eat a quart of sawdust in a week, how long will it take 

her to lay a shingle? 

M. Glenn— Give up. 

Fromme — So did the hen. Too many splinters. 



r:ige Fi'iir HuiHlr.'.l Filtoeii 



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OTLN&ON* 

•*Atwaya Reliable*' 
MEN'S WEAR 



Seniors of 1930 

WE, WISH to take this means of 
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wish you the most of heatlh 
success, and prosperity in the future 
— and remember, clothes don't make Q ^'/, 
the man but they certainly do help ^ — ^' 
in bringing about success. 




The Ortolan Cafeteria 

WHERE MORGANTOWN COMES TO DINE 
Parties of Dainty Appointments 
239 Spruce Street 
Phone 1597 



WEST VIRGINIA ALUMNI 

For more than fifteen years have many pleasant memories of both the campus and busi- 
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MASTER <^lfe^/^^^^^ CLEANER 



473 High Street 
Phone 1234 




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Page Pour Hundred Sixtenn 



Photocrafters 



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for the 



MONTICOLA 

1925 - 1926 - 1927 - 1928 - 1929 
1930 - 1931 




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Page Four Hundred Seventee 



From One World to Another 

After college — the world of study — what next? A 
new w^orld — the World of Work — a world that moves with 
constantly increasing speed. 

In this new world where quick communication is so 
essential, the telephone has come to be a vital factor. Each 
day hundreds of thousands of messages carrying estimates, 
prices, orders to buy and sell — every conceivable transaction 
— fly from one end of the country to the other — even across 
the ocean — by telephone. 

There is no medium of communication that can com- 
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moderns — if you would make and keep your places in the 
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Offices Also at 
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Page Four Hundred Eighteen 




Did you hear about the new shot put Hquor? 
Nope. What about it? 
One drink and you heave. 



Now that you've kissed me Prof, what do vou think of me? 
Oh, you'll pass. 



One Do you know how to makea peach cordial? 

Tw^o Surely. Get her half soused. 



Have a cigarett? 
Sir, I am a Kappa. 
Pardon me. Havea cigar. 



Page Four Hundred Nineteen 



Greater Service— 
Lo^wer Cost— 

HAVE YOU ever considered that in a few years usefulness 
of electricity in every-day life has increased a thousand- 
fold? Little more than a decade ago electric lights at 
a few widely-separated places in the home represented 
the total utility of electricity. 



TODAY there is scarcely a task in the home, office, store or 
industrial plant that electricity does not do at reason- 
able rates. While the uses of electricity have increased 
miraculously, figures reveal a constant reduction in its 
cost. In other words, as it became more valuable to 
men's needs, electricity, unlike every other commodity, 
became easier to obtain at a lower price. Existing rates 
today provide low^est cost for greatest use. 



MONONGAHELA WEST PENN 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

"We Value Your Friendship As We Do Your Patronage. " 



Compliments of 

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DO NOT DO WITHOUT BREAKFAST! 
FOR YOUR HEALTH'S SAKE 
ON YOUR WAY TO SCHOOL 

Stop at the 

White Front restaurant 

WILLEY STREET 

A good, healthy Special 

Warm Meal INSTANT SERVICE . Student 

at All Hours Dishes 



Page Four Hundred Tweiit> 



0. J. Morrison Department Stores Co, 



*A West Virginia Organization" 



CHARLESTON, W. VA. 
CLARKSBURG, W. VA. 
RIPLEY, W. VA. 
LOGAN, W. VA. 
FAIRMONT, W. VA. 



MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 
WEST UNION, W. VA. 
SPENCER, W. VA. 
CLENDENiN, W. VA. 



ASSOCIATED STORES 



Compliments 
of the 



Yellow Cab Company 



Rogers Pharmacy 



DRUGS 



CANDIES 



PRESCRIPTIONS 



TOILET ARTICLES 

HOME OF PERK - ANNE CANDIES 

The Sterling of Sweets 



Dependable 

Dairy Products 

Sanitary Milk & Ice Cream Co. 



"THE HOME PLANT" 

MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 



ra;^!' Four Huudi'Ld Twenty-Oiio 



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