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Full text of "The Monticola"

REFLECTIONS 



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West Virginia University Libraries 




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Graphic Design by 
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1976 Monticola 
''Reflections'' 

Volume LXX 

West Virginia University 
Morgantown, West Virginia 

Loretta Lewis, Editor-in-Chief 



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wli^iisi•:' 



Ta ble of Con ten ts 

Opening Section 

Seniors 

Student Life 

Entertainment 

Organiza tions 

Greeks 

Sports 

Intramurals 

Royalty 

Ads 

Closing Section 



You would measure time the measureless and the 

immeasurable. 
You would adjust your conduct and even direct the 

course of your spirit according to hours and seasons. 
Of time you would make a stream upon whose bank 

you would sit and watch its flowing. 

Yet the timeless in you is aware of life's timelessness, 
And knows that yesterday is but today's memory and 

tomorrow is today's dream. 
And that that which sings and contemplates in you is 

still dwelling within the bounds of that first moment 

which scattered the stars into space. 

But if in your thought you must measure time into 
seasons, let each season encircle all the other 
seasons, 

And let today embrace the past with remembrance and 
the future with longing. 



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Small shrubs 

a silver maple 

smooth brown bark 

branches tear, 

limbs point upward. 

The U.S.S. W. Va. 

grey rimmed crowsnest 

steel strength 

embedded mast 

in a cement plaza. 

Feb. 1973 

Hood Frazier 














i 




^««9 





The Bicentennial, our nation's two 
hundredth birthday. A time for reviving 
colonial arts and crafts, as well as, partaking 
in the modern crafts. It is also a time for 
Reflection, solitude, and planning for the 
next two hundred years. 





FIX PITT, 

tiKE B0£1NG 



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One will long remember the rush of 
the football team onto the field for 
the first game of the season, the roar 
of the crowd, the Pitt game, the 
selection of Mr. and Miss 
Mountaineer, a brisk walk to classes 
on a winter's morn, the excitement of 
a skater's train, or the peacef ulness of 
playing f risbee on the Mountainlair 
plaza. 









10 






Whirling, rwirling, swinging, 
singing: They've rediscovered square 
dancing. In pioneer days dancing 
played a big part in the lives of the 
settlers. 

Square dancing, browsing among the 
b{X)ths and exhibits, testing one's dart 
throwing skill, and enjoying some 
good ol' time f iildling were a few of 
the events offered during 
Mountaineer Week. 











12 






A look at the new with an eye toward 
the old can deliver a provoking 
message in this year of history. 
Contrast the clothing habits of 
present day students with the 
Priscillas and Zacharys of days gone 
by. Transportation and pastimes have 
changed also, and so have dance and 
music. As a matter of fact, the whole 
business of going to school has 
undergone vast changes in the history 
of our country. 

Governor and Mrs. Arch A. Moore 
visit WVU for the Homecoming 
activities. 



13 




14 






America has come a long way in 200 years 
. . . from a loosely knit group of 13 
colonies carved out of a wilderness to the 
most prosperous country in the world. And, 
we've made a lot of contributions to 
mankind in the process. So what that our 
forefathers' "Great American Dream" has 
yet to be fully realized. Few dreams are ever 
completely fulfilled. If they were, we'd 
have no reason to keep on striving. 

TAYLOR TALK 




15 



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SENIORS 



In one's freshman year everything 
is new, strange, fresh, and a little 
frightening. It's a time to adjust to 
the hectic rush of University life. The 
sophomore and junior years are times 
to build one's self confidence, become 
aware of one's expectations and lim- 
its, gather new and lasting friend- 
ships, and sorting out one's direction 
and goals for his life. In the SENIOR 
year, you have adjusted to your sur- 
roundings and have created a pattern 
of living much different from any 
past or future life style. Now that 
you know who sells the best pizzas 
and the coldest beer, have struggled 
through pre-registration and add/ 
drop periods till it's no longer a strug- 
gle, have established a circle of 
friends who will stick with you 
through all the partying and the all- 
nighters, have become involved with 
your school and know your instruc- 
tors, know when to avoid the down- 
town traffic jams, know which 
courses to take and not to take, know 

' about the towing companies, the 
parking tickets, and the "safe" places 

h to park, found the ideal college apart- 
ment. It's time to leave, graduation. 

., No more 8 am or 7 pm classes, no 
longer will you drive to field place- 
ments, no more all-night cram ses- 

t^sions or finals, not having to move 
every four to eight months, and the 

t times of loafing in the Lair, dodging 
traffic at Grimland's Island, and eat- 

* ing at the local hamburger place has 

?come all TOO suddenly to an end. 

\.The cloudy realization that your one 

- long time dream has become a reality. 

. It's a time to say good-bye to friends 
you'll never see again and to seriously 
begin looking for a job. It's a sad/ 
happy time filled with hope. 

Loretta Lewis, 

Anita Weiner, Section Editors 




17 



College of Agriculture and Forestry 



BARRY ADKINS 

GEORGE ALBERTSON 

NORMAN ANDERSON 

GREGORY ARMS 



STEVEN BITTNER 

GEORGE BOYLES 

DAVID BURNER 

ALAN BURRELL 



BARBARA BUSSE 

CHARLES CARLE 

EILEEN CARROLL 

JOHN CASSIDY 



ROBERT CLARKE 

CAROL CLEARY 

CHARLES CONAWAY II 

ROY COOPER 



THOMAS CROVEN 

HARR\' CROSBY 

DIANE CROSS 

DARRELL DARNELL 




^aJ^ 



i^i *. 



18 



College of Agriculture and Forestn- . . . Dean Dale Wendel Zinn 

College of Arts and Sciences . . . Dean William Edgar Collins 

Creative Arts Center . . . Dean Gilbert Trythall 

College of Engineering . . . Dean Bill Lee Atchley 

College of Mineral and Energy Resources . . . Dean Jay Hilary Kelley 

College of Human Resources and Education . . . Dean William Gregory Monahan 

School of Pharmacy . . . Dean Louis Anthony Luzzi 

School of Physical Education . . . Dean Charles Peter Yost 

School of Journalism . . . Dean Guy Harry Stewart 

College of Business and Economics . . . Dean Jack Thome Turner 

School of Medicine . . . Dean John Evan Jones 

School of Medicine . . . Dean John Evan Jones 

School of Nursing . . . Dean Lorita Duf field Jenab 

School of Dentistry . . . Dean William Robert Biddington 

School of Social Work . . . Dean Leon Herman Ginsberg 




MICHAEL DAUGHENBAUGH 
CHARLES DAVID 
ROLAND DAVIS 
PATRICK DeBERRY 



m. STEVEN DIETRICH 
EDWARD DiPAOLO 

ANDREW DOMAN II 
KENNETH DUFFUS 



NEVA EARLEY 
MARY ELLIOTT 
TIMOTHY' FITZSIMMONS 
DON FLEGEL 



EDWARD TOGTMAN 
JOE F(3LEY 
JOHN FREY 
GERALD FRISCHKORN 



19 



MAUREEN FRUMEN 

ROBERT GANO 

RICHARD GAVIN 

GLENN GERNERT 



CHRISTOPHER GRECO 

JAMES GREEN 

JEFERY HALL 

THOMAS HALL 



DANIEL HELMES 

STEVE HERSH 

RONALD HICKMAN 

PETER HILDEBRANDT 



DALE HILL 
MICHAEL HISCAR 

WILLIAM HOSTUTLER 
ARTHUR lEWELL 



RICHARD JOHNSTONE 

DAVID KAISER 

SORIE KANU 

JOHN KARAFFA 



RUSSELL KEATON 

BECKY KING 

ROY KING 

DIANE MEDWICK 







20 




PAUL KLACIK 
MICHALE KROMER 
GREGORY KNORR 
CRAIG LOCKWOOD 



c;lenn McCurdy 
patrick meckley 
neil merkel 
wayne merkel 



DONALD MOORE 
RUSSIiLL MOORE 
GARY MURPHY 
DONALD M\'ERS 



ANTHONY NAPOLILLO 
JEFFREY NELSEN 
KATHRINE OLWEILER 
MICHAEL OTT 



CHARLES OWENS. JR. 
PHILIP PANNILL 
MARK PARRY 
RANDY PEIFFER 



GERALD PORTERFIELD 
MARKQUINLAN 
RONALIJRAMBO 
MARC;ARET REESE 



21 



CHARLES REYNOLDS 

KURT RING 

GERALD ROSKOVENASKY 

MICHAEL RUBIN 



GENE SCHELLER 

KAREN SCHLAMP 

TERRY SHAW 

BRADLEY SHEEHAN 



JEFFERY SLAVICH 

DEAN SOMERVILLE 

ALLEN STAGGERS 

MARK STALLMAN 



PAUL STERN 

ROBIN STRAIN 

ROBERT STUART 

JOHN SWEETLAND 




RICHARD TABB 

JEFFREY THOMPSON 

WILLIAM VOPELIUS 

MICHAEL WADE 



JUDITH WOJEIAK 

CHARLES WOLFE 

KIRK WRIGHT 

JOHN WYSOLMERSKI 



M^mWL^m 




22 



College of Arts and Science 




JACK ALI.ARA 
DENISH ALTHOUSE 
MARTHA AMOS 
I.HA ANDERSON 



JOAN ANTOLINI 
BRUCE AVE^' 
CHARLES ARBAUGH 
DAVID ARD 



LINDA ARNOLD 
DEBORAH AYERSMAN 
SUZANNE BABB 
STEVE BAILES 



john barath 
sterlin bare 
john barnes 
robl:rta bastin 



david bartlett 
rachl:l barton 

JOHN BA^' 
mark BENNETT 



23 



JAN BELJAN 

LORI BERARDI 

SAM BENKIEL 

JUDITH BENNETT 



JAMES BERO 

JEANNE BEVERLY 

STEPHANIA BIALOBOK 

CYNTHIA BISSETT 



TERESA BLAKE 

THOMAS BOLYARD 

WAYNE BOOKER 

SAN FORD BOSIN 



DAWN BOTSFORD 
RICHARD BOYLE 
GEORGE BOYLES 

LYNN BRADFIELD 



DEBORAH BRADY 

CHRISTINE BRADSHAW 

PATRICIA BRANCY 

MARK BRAND 



DAVID BROWN 

BEN BROWN 

DOUGLAS BROWN 

VIRGINIA BROWN 




24 




DOUGLAS BROWNLEE 
DAVID BRNILOVICH 
FRED BUCHANAN 
GLEN BUCO 



KITHA BURDETTE 
FRANK BURJA 
MICHAEL BURKE 
SCOTT BURKE 



KATHLEEN CAHAYLA 
DAVID CAIN 
C^'NTHIA CAPITO 
RICHARD CAPITO 



LARRY CARR 
SHARON CARTER 
DINO CATIGNANI 
PH\'LLIS CERASO 



PAULA CICCARELLI 
WILLIAM CIES 
LeGRAND CLARK 
VICTORIA CLAYMAN 



THOMAS COLLINVITTI 
JAMES COMFRCI 
MAR\' CONNOLLY 
JOHN CONTOVEROS 



25 



CAROLYN COOMBS 

ANNF. CORNELL 

LOULSE CONNELL 

SANDRA COUAN 



THOMAS CRAIN, JR. 

WESLEY CRAMER 

JERRY CRITES 

NANCY CRLSLIP 



DIANE CROSS 

PETER CSANADY 

PAUL DALTON 

WILMA DANIELS 



DICHALE DANN 

GARY DAVIS 

REGECCA DECK 

RICHARD DERBY 



ETHEL DETCH 

KAREN DeVINCENT 

RICHARD DiBACCO 

MICHAEL DiCLEMENTE 



MAR^- DiGIOIA 

DANIEL DISHART 

MICHELLE DiSTAZIO 

STEVEN DODDS 




26 




STEPHEN DOE 
NOEL DOHENY 
STEPHEN DOLLY 
JAMES DORIA 



DENNLS DRENNING 
BRYAW DUGAW 
DUGAN MICHAEL 

GAR^' Dubois 



MARY DUNCAN 
TANIS DUNIVAN 
ELIZABETH DUNKLE 
WILLIAM DUTY 



DAVID DAVIS 
JAMES EASTON 
PATRICIA EVANS 
STEPHEN EVRARD 



LISA EYE 
MARK FEDER 
DAVID FATTAIEH 
STEVEN FERGUSON 



SUSANN FINDO 
JACK FINNEY 
HARVEY FISHEL 
LORELEI FISHER 



27 



MICHAEL FISHER 

MICHAEL FITZERALD 

DAVID FLESHMAN 

THOMAS FLORENCE 



CLAYTON FULLER 

BRENDA GASTON 

NL\RIAN GAYDOS 

NORMAN GEORGE 



ELIZABETH GERWIG 

JACK c;erwig 

LARR^' GIBSON 
KELLY GODSEY 



DEBORAH GOETZ 

MARC GOLDEN 

RONALD GOMBOS 

MARIAN GONDOLA 



JAMES GOODE 

HAROLD GOODWIN 

CHARLES GRACIE 

SUSAN GRAMLICH 



LINDA GREGORY 

JAMES GRIFFIN, JR. 

SUE ANN GURSKY 

JOHN HAGAN 




28 




ALAN HALL 
KATHERN HALL 
RICHARD HALL 
CECILIA HAMRICK 



STEPHEN HARMAN 
SHERLY HATLEY 
CECILLIA HAMRICK 
ARLYN HASLACKER 



HARLAN HAWKINS 
ELIZABETH HAYES 
BENJAMIN HAYS 
R. T. HEARHOOF 



JOHN HELEAN 
ANDREW HANSON 
MARYELLEN HEREDA 
SHERYL HIGGINS 



THOMAS HILL 
STEVEN HINES 
STEPHAN HISE 
CLYDE HOALCRAFT 



DEBRA HODGES 
ROBERTA HOLLAND 
ERIC HUMPHREYS 
JEFFREY HUNT 



29 



ALMA HURST 

JAMES HURST 

HELEN HUDAK 

KEBORAH IMLER 



RICHARD ISRAEL 

RICHARDJOCOBS 

CAROLYN JANES 

MICHAEL JOPLING 



JACKSON JARVIS II 

MICHELE JOHNS 

DEN ISE JOSEPH 

ODETTE JOSEPH 



DEBORAH JUDGE 

HARRY KAMMER 

WILLIAM KEELER 

ROBERTA KELLER 



ADDISON KELLEY 

BARRY KELLY 

PAUL KENT 

JOHN KENT 



JOHN LETENDRE 
STEFANIE KETNER 
WILLIAM KETNER 

WILLIAM KEYSER 




30 




GREG KICH 
DOUGLAS KINKEAD 
RICHARD KIRIK 
EUGENE KIRK 



RICHARD KLABANSKY 
STEPHEN KNOPP 
LAURIE KOCH 
JAMES KRATSAS 



DOLORES KUKULSKI 
RICHARD KUNKEL 
GAR^' LiiBROSSE 
CHER^'L LAMER 



JAMES LAMP 
GARY LANCASTER 
LAWSON LAWRENCE 

lOEL^'N LeDONNE 



WALTER LENZ 
WA^'NE LIBERATI 
DANIEL LINGER 
GARRETT LINGER 



CORA LIVELY' 
SAMUEL LOPEZ 
KATHRYN LOUGH 
DANIEL LOVE 



31 



DIANE LOWERY 

SHERRY LOWERY 

PATRICK LUPINETTI 

BRUCE LUDWICK 



DEBORAH MADER 

MARTHA MAJOR 

DIANE MALONE 

KEN MANSFIELD 



ROBERT MARKS 

MELISSA MARYLAND 

LINDA MARTIN 

PHILIP MASON 



MARY MATHEWS 

DINA MATTINGLY 

NEILMAXSON 

RAY MAYHEW 




MICHAEL MAZZOCCO 

DANA McCORKLE 

MICHAEL McGINNIS 

DOUGLAS McGUIGAN 



^^^Bm^ JKKm, 



ROBERT McVAY 

JANIS MEEK 

DEBBIE MEISE 

EDMUND MELIA 




32 




ROBERT MESSINGER 
MARYANN McNEIL 
SANDRA MICHAEL 
BARBARA MILLER 



GAILMILNER 
JERAL MILTON 
ALAN MITCHELL 
VICTORIA MITCHELL 



DUANE MOLNAR 
DONALD MOORE 
LINDA MOORE 
JEFF MONCMAN 



GARY MONEYPENNY 
SAMUEL MORRIS 
JANE MORRISON 
JERRY MOWERY 



RHONDA MUNSON 
G. A. MURRAY 
JANET MURTLAND 
HENRY MYKICH 



CHARLES MYERS 
MARIANNE NARICK 
ELI AS NASR 
PATRICIA NIEMER 



33 



DENNIS NIESS 

MELANIENORBUT 

RAYMOND NUNGESSER 

DEBORAH NUTTER 



WILLIAM NUTTER 

MURICE OFSA 

MEGAN O'NEIL 

SANDRA ONELLION 



THOMAS OSHANSKY 

NOZE OTOTE 

GEORGE PANDELIOS 

WILLIAM PARKER 



CHARLENE PASCOE 

MICHEL PASSALACQUA 

MICHAEL PAUGH 

RONALD PAUGH 



MAR^'ELLEN PAYNTON 

NIEL PETERSEN 

CHRIS PELUCHETTE 

AMANDA PENCE 



ROBERT PERFETTO 

FRANK PINO 

CAROL PIOLI 

ROBERT PITROLO 




34 




FRANK PEYOR 
ROY PODBESEK 
LUCILLE POTTS 
LOULSE PROSTKO 



LINDA PULEO 
SHEILA PULICE 
RANDALL PETERSON 
ALVIM PLUMMER 



VALERIE PRICE 
DEBRA RANSONE 
MICHAEL REESER 
E. READARIS 



HAROLD REYNOLDS 
STEVEN RHEAULT 
KATHY RIEGER 
THOMAS ROCHE 



KEVIN ROLLS 
JAMES ROSSI 
DOUGLAS ROY 
BRADLEY ROZANSKY 



THOMAS RUANE 
JANE RULE 
ANITA RUMORA 
SANDRA RUNZO 



35 



EBERLY RUSH 

CATHERINE SAYRE 

TRUNMAN SAYRE 

MARY SCHERER 



SUSAN SCOTT 

PEGGY FEUFER 

MARTIN SHAFFER 

JEANETTE SHAHAN 



JERRY SHAULIS 

KEVIN SHEERIN 

ROBERT SHIREY 

PAUL SHIVES 



JAMES SHREVE 

ROBIN SHUMAKER 

THOMAS SIMCHAK 

KATHLEEN SKEHAN 



SUZANNE SMITH 

CARTER SNIDER 

ELLEN SNYDER 

PATRICIA SNYDER 



NANCY SPEARS 

LORIE SPOHN 

STEPHEN STARKLY 

RONALD STATLER 




36 




SALLY STEEL 
MARYJOSTEHNEY 
MICHAEL STEINLE 



ANNE STEVENSON 
KAVIN STEWART 
JAMES STOUT 
NANCY STOUT 



STEPHEN SWADLEY 
TERRI SWARTZ 
JULIE TABOR 
NICK THEOFANIS 



NANCY THIMGAN 
ROSEMARY TORRE 
EDWARD UMLAUF 
KATHY URSO 



STEVEN VANDERGRIFT 
BARBARA VERROCCHIO 
MICHAEL VICTORSON 
ROBIN WAGNER 



SHARON WALLACE 

WILLIAM WALLS 
ANNE WALTO^^' 
SUSAN WASCl 



37 



SHARON WARD 
JUDITH WARDEN 

KENT WATKINS 
GAR^'WEINER 



CONSTANCE WHITE 
EDWARD WHITE 

RICHARD WHITING 
BRIAN WILLIAMS 



MARY JANE WILSON 

SAMUEL WINANS 

REBECCA WINTERS 

JEAN WOLOSHUK 



HAROLD WRIGHT 

ALLEN YEARICK,JR. 

KAREN YOHO 

ROGER YOUNG 




BEVERLEY ZINN 
LUCRETIA ZIVIELLO 



# 




Creative Arts Center 




CAROL RARTLETT 
CATHHRINE BHRTALAN 
JOHN DeSANTO 
KENNETH KINCAID III 



TIMOTHY MENDENHALL 
BETT^' MONTGOMERY 
JOSEPH MUSCO 
DREMEA POWELL 



RANDALL POWERS 
JOHN REGAN 
ROBERT RYCYEK 
MUNEERA SPENCE 



LORIE SPOHN 
VALERIE STEWART 
MI-HUE SUH 
LAWRENCE WA\' 



39 



College of Engineering 



RODNEY BRINKER 

PAUL CARTER 

RAMZI CATER 

MICHAEL CERAN 



VINCENT CICHOCKI, JR. 

CHARLENE CRUMRINE 

TIMOTHY CURRY 

DONALD DAVID 



CARL DdCAS 

ZVI EIZENBERG 

JAMES FABER 

SHAFIC FAYYAD 



ROBERT FOX 

CARLOS GARCIA 

THOMAS GEIER 

JOSEPH GENNETTEE 



DANA GENUA 

SAWANG HANSIRISAWASDI 

RANDY HARNED 

JAMES HODGES 




40 




ROBERT HOLLIS 
e;ECIL HOUCHIN 
DAVID JOHNSTON 
JOHN KENT 



JOHN LEACH 
CHRISTOPHER McCUNE 
PRAKASH MEHTA 
JAHN MENTZER 



RANDALL MILLER 
RANDY MOULTON 
MICHAEL Ivn'ERS 
DANIEL NAIIMIAN 



GERARD POHL 
BRADLEY' PRIDDLE 
PAUL PUSKAR 
ALAN PVLE 



GHASSEM RAMEZAN 
JOSEPH RAPP 
RICHARD SHERREN 
WILLIAM SMITH 



ANDREW SPENCE 
HARR^SUMPTER 
MOHAMMAD TABRIZI 
WILLIAM THORNTCW 



41 



LONNIE TUSTIN ^^H 


IP 


STEVEN VANDERGRIFl ^V^ 


* p^S^L 


PHAISAL VEJPONGSA ^B ^ 


_1 M: 


TERRY WALES ^^L0- 


3r 




f'^N* 



MIHHAELWE.AVER 

THOMAS WELCH 

MICHAEL WIERCINSKI 

DAVID WILSON 





MOHAMMAD YAZDI 

ALBERT YOST 

KENNETH YOST, JR. 



College of Mineral and Energy Resources 



DAVID BARTSCH 

DAVID BENNETT 

HENRY COOK, JR. 

CHARLES ERNST 



PALIL GOOD 

KEITH HORTON 

MYRON NEHREBECKI 

CHRIS pellk;hette 





4n^ 




42 



College of Human Resources of Education 




RICHARD AGOSTINE 
KRISTINA ALLEN 
SANDRA ALLBAUGH 
PAULA ALLMAN 



ANTONIA ANDRIOTTO 

SANDRA ANTHONY 
MARY BADALI 
HOPE BAILES 



JEANNE BAILEY 
WILLIAM BARAN 
JOSEPH BASIL 
BETTi' BELCHER 



LOIS BENNETT 
JACQUELINE BERRY 
MICHAEL BI LEAK 
LOISBIRURAKIS 



KIMBERIY' BLOOM 
PAMELA BOGGS 
CATH^' BRICKER 
ANITA BROSLAWSKY 



43 



CYNTHIA BROWN 

BERNETTA CANTON 

CYNTHIA CAPITO 

KATHERINE CARPENTER 



ROBERT CARPENTER 

DIANE CHIADO 

SHARON CICCOLELLA 

CATH\' CONRAD 



SUSAN COLLINS 

MARY COOPER 

PATRICIA CRAWFORD 

JOHNCULLENJR. 



SUSAN CULLEN 

JENENE DAVIS 

SANDRA DAWSON 

PAMELA DOUGHERTY- 



NANCY DOWNS 

THERESE DRAGICH 

NANCY DUNAWAY 

DRUCILLA DUNHAM 



TERRY EDWARDS 

KATH^' EICHELBERGER 

MADGE ESTES 

PATRICIA FEATHERSTONE 





MARCELLA FLOYD 
CONSTANCE FRYE 
BETH FULTON 
PATRICIA FUSCO 



DARYL GALBREATH 
DEBORAH GALBUS 
JACQUELINE GAMBINO 
ANNE GARDNER 



GANDRA GARRISON 
BRENDA GASTON 
ELIZABETH GERWIG 
PAMELA GIBSON 



NANCY GIBSON 
HELEN GILBSON 
VICKI GLISAN 
FRANCES GLOVER 



MICHAEL GROVES 
SANDRA WAGNER 
CASSANDRA HARRIMAN 
KATHE HARRIS 



DEBORAH HEPLER 
JOANNA HONAKER 
MARTHA HOPKINS 
KARAN ISRAEL 



45 



SANDRA JONES 

MARYLEE KASTELIC 

ROBERTA KAYE 

ANGELA KIMBLE 



ELAINE KLADAKIS 

CELESTE KNAUS 

WILMA LAMBERT 

PETE LaMONACA 



KATHANEEN LAZZELL 

SUZANNE LeMOINE 

GAIL LILLER 

DARLENE LILL\' 



BEVERLY LINDBERG 

KAREN LITTEN 

TERESA LUCAS 

GLENN MAERKL 



REBECCA MACK 

FRANCES MAMS 

CATHY MARKHAM 

MARLENE MARINCIC 



KATHERINE MENEAR 

CAROLE MESTON 

SUSAN MEYER 

KAREN MIESNER 




46 




BRENDA MOORE 
TERI MOORE 
BRENDA McCAFFERY 
lUDITH McCOY 



CHRISTINE NADOLSKI 
VALERIE NAKONECZNY 
ROBIN NESTOR 
KATHYO'HARA 



MARTHA OLSON 
MARIAN PASKOVITCH 
LAURIE PASTER 
CATHERINE PIERCE 



MAR^' PRESTON 
CAROL PRICE 
JANICE QUAI LEY 
MICHAEL RAFA 



SONJA HEIDI REINTHAL 
DEBRA RIDENOVR 
CHRISTY' ROBERTS 
GEORGE ROSCOE 



MAR^' ROSS A NO 
MARCIA SANSONE 
LINDA SCOTT 
NANCY SC:OTT 



47 



g retch en si dow 

carol sickles 

nesbitt singleton 

iei-i-rl:y smay 



MARSHA SMITH 

ANDREA SPEAKER 

NANC^' SPINKS 

LINDA SPISHOCK 



DIANE STERN 
LORRAINE STICCO 

DENSIESTRICKLER 
DEBRA STRLTZ 



LINDA SUTHERLAND 

NOLA TARANTINO 

REBECCA THACKER 

LINDA THOMAS 



MARY TIANO 

VICTORIA TIGHE 

DEANNA TODESCHINI 

SANDRA TOTH 



SM.VIA TRAPUZZANO 

EMIL^' TLJCKWILLER 

DIANE TURNER 

CR^'STAL WALTON 




48 



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DEBORAH WILCHER 


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BRADLEY' WILLIAMS 


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JO^'CE WINESBURG 


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MAR^' WOLESLAGLE 



School of Pharmacy 





SARA BETH CLENDENIN 
DENTAL HYGIENE 



PARVIZ AEIATPOUR 
AUDREY CHAMELI 
CHARLES COLLINS 
MELINDA 
CRAWFORD 
BRADFORD LAWSON 



MARY ANN McNEIL 
RHONDA 
RODEHEAVER 
STEPHEN SMALL 
DIANE TLJRNER 
SANDRA TURNER 



49 



School of Physical Education 



NANCY BROOKOVER 

BRUEE CASWELL 

JOHN COKER 

STEVEN COLE 



GEORGE COPPOLA 

SANDRA CRAMEN 

JOSEPH CRUM 

DEBORAH DelCOL 



SALL\- DORWART 

SUEANN FINDO 

KATHERINE GIESEKE 

TRESSA GORMAN 



THOMAS GREGG 

BELINDA HALSTEAD 

LINDA HARLESS 

CHARLES HAYES 



MARY HORTON 

PATRICIA LOONEY 

SHERRY LOWERY 

PATRICIA LUCKEY 




50 




GILES UNGVARSKY 
LUCRETIA ZIVIELLO 



BARBARA MILLER 
MELINDA MORRIS 

SUSAN MURPHY 
GAIL OBERHDLTZER 



DONNA ROMINO 
RICHARD ROSENBLUTH 
PETER ROTH 
BETH SHANK 



TIMOTHY STANLEY 
VINCENT TALLARICO 
JUDY TAYLOR 
WILLIAM TIBBETTS 





I 



■-^^ is^a^ 



51 



School of Journalism 



LINDA ARNOLD 

CHARLES BALLEY 

SIDNEY BELL 

RICHARD BETO 



BONNIE BOLDEN 

JANET BOYLE 

CHRISTINE BROWN 

REBECCA BYRD 



CANDACE CALHOUN 

MARK CASEY 

JENNIFER CASKEY 

DAVID CASTAGNACCI 



CHERYL CASWELL 

NANCY CRISLIP 

BRADLEY CROUSER 

EMMY LOU DAUGHERTY 



DAWN DAYTON 

CLAUDIA DclGLIIDICE 

MICHAEL DICKMAN 

THOMAS DRUMMOND 




52 




CRAIG FALKENSTINE 
PATRICIA GLASS 
STEVE GOFF 
PATRICIA HASTINGS 



BRENT HAWKINS 
DONNA HEBB 
THOMAS HIDALGO 
SANDRA HILTON 



CHIP HITCHCOCK 
MELVIN HOBBS 
CYNTHIA HURRIN 
GERDA JACKSON 



GRECiORY KENNEY 
MICHAEL KERN 
DAVID KOSAR 
DEBORAH LiRUE 



DAVID LIED 
JOSEPH LOEBER 
WILLIAM MACKEY 
KRISTINE MAFFETT 



JESSE MANCINI 
JACKIE MARHEFKA 
JAMES McGOLDRICK 
PATRICK McCjREGOR 



53 



STHPHl'N MORF.LAND 

HOY MLIRPHY,JR. 

BOBIMF, NOWHLL 

R0H1:RT RANDOLPH 



MI LDRP.D ROBERTS 

EDWARD SANTRY 

CHARLES SHREVES 

SUSAN SILMAN 



O'NTHIATAWNEY 

TAMARA TELESKO 

LOR ETTA UCELLI 

ROS1-: VARGO 




TERRY WIMMER 
DAVID WOZNIAK 



College of Business and Economics 



RICHARD ALBERT 

RICHARD ALLEN 

DAVID ARD 

DANA BACKSTROM 




54 




VERNON BARKER 
JOHN BARNF.S 
MARKBRCII.LA 
C;AR^' BECKER 



GEORGE. BE.NDEL 
DENNLSBEVINS 
JOSEPH BOHNERT 
ANDRIAV BORASH 



ALAN BOSTON 
WILLIAM BRANCH 
ROBERT BIRD 
JOHN BRIZZI 



jERR^' blirc;hard 

JAMES BURKE 
DENNIS CAIN 
CLARISSA CALLEN 



DAVID CAMPBELL 
HON CHAN 
JOSEPH CHEEKS 
REBECCA CLINE 



JOHN COBURN 
GREGORY' COCKERHAM 
WILLIAM COPPULA 
MARK COLAVINCENZO 



55 



CHARLES COMER, JR. 

JOHN CORTESE 

BRITTON COTTER 

DAVID COUSEY 



BRUCE COX 

LAWRENCE DAMICH 

DONNA DASCHBACH 

MICHAEL DAUGHERTY 



PHYLLIS DAVIS 

JAMES DeCARLO 

DAN DETAR 

ELENA DIAMOND 



MICHAEL DiCLEMENTE 

RAYMOND DORTENZO 

THOMAS ELYARD 

BENJAMIN ENNIS 



JOSEPH FALLER 

JAMES FANOK 

FREDERICK FARRIS 

ROBERT FAULKNER 



JOHN FLOWER 

SAMUEL EREESE 

DANIEL FRENCH 

EARLGARBER 




56 




THOMAS GEORGE 
BARin' GLADYS 
WILLIAM GROOMS 
WAYNE HALL 



PATRICIA HANKIN 
SCOTT HAYDEN 
MELINDA HERRICK 
DAVID HICKS 



NANC^' HISSAM 
FREDERICK HOLLIDA 
ROBERT HOMER 
THEODORE HOOK 



TERR^' HOOVER 
PRISCILLA HOPKINS 
NICK HOROSZKO 
DEREK HOWELL 



MELISSA HUMPHREY 
DAVID HUSK 
STEVEN ISAAC 
GE0RC;E JACOBS 



MARGARET JANECK 
STEPHEN JENNINGS 
ROBERT JOHNSTON 
KEVIN KENDRALLA 



57 



C.LEN Kl'TTFRING 
DANII-LKIMBLF 

MARTIN KIMBALL 
MICHALL KING 



DHNNIS KLINGENSMITH 

FRANCIF. KLINK 

SCOTT KOCHER 

DAVID KOCHIS 



mk:haelkokenos 

joseph kolarik 

kavidkot 

linda kratz 



di;bra kuhl 

bernard kushnir 

guy laroche 

walti;r la^'man 



RICHARD LEWIS 

SCOTT LEWIS 

jAN LIESKE 

CHARMAINE LONGUIL 



THOMAS MARAS 

ROBERT MARKS 

DANIEL MA7.ZARINI 

WALLACE McCARRELL 




58 




DANIEL McCUTCHEON 
MAR^' McCLOSKEY 
PAULMcCROBIE 
ROBERT McINTYRE 



THOMAS McNEISH 
SUZANNE MEADOWS 
EDITH MEHALIK 
SANDRA MILAS 



DAVID MILLER 
JAMES MINNEMEYER 
RICHARD MORCINI 
MARK OBERMANN 



ELLA DWENS 
EDGAR PAINER 
THOMAS PALMQUIST 
DEBB^' PELLEGRIN 



DEBRA PENNINGTON 
RICHARD PENNESI 
MARR^'N PHILLIPS 
SHARON PHILLIPS 



JAMES POPERNACK 
DEBRA PYLE 
CY'NTHIA RATCLIFF 
STEPHEN REBROVIC 



59 



MARI.A HITTER 

RICHARD ROBEY 

ALBERT ROIMNSON 

AIJ.F.N ROSS 



david ryan 
ke:nni-:th sechler 

JOSIiPHSCHRADER 
RICHARD SCHAFFER 



JAMES SHEPHERD 

MICHAEL SHEPHERD 

PEGGY SHEPPARD 

MARTHA SHIRER 



JOSF.PH SIMMS 

KEITH SIMON 

GARY SMITH 



LAURIE SNYDER f 



MICHAEL SOLE 

JAMES SPANO 

ANTHONY SPAROCINO 

BERT SENCER 



DONALD SPICKLER 

JAMES SPURGEON 

ELI/.ABFTH STASNY 

GROVIiR STUCXEY, III 




60 




JOHN SUNDIN 
ARDI;N SUFiCKHR 
LHSLIF.TAKACS 
DAVID TAYLOR 



JOSHPHTFRI.HSKY 
HARLHNTILLHR 
ALBHRT TIMPANO 
DOUGLAS TROMPAK 



JOHN TUCKHR 
^' MAHF.NDRA VORA 
WILLIAM WAMSLEY 
TERRING WFAVER 



TIMOTHY WHGHORST 
BRUCE WEISER 
RONNIE WENTZ 
RONALD WEST 



ERNEST WHITE 
PHILIP WHITWORTH 
CLARENCE WILLIAMS 
MARY WILSON 



samuel winans 
gary wolfe 
albf:rt woodfield 
echo wright 



6) 



School of Nursing 



KIMBERLY BARB 

KATHY BERARDINELLI 

PAMELA BONAVENTURA 

LOLA BURCHETT 



BROOKE CURTIS 
PAMELA DEIRIGGI 
ELEANOR FRAZEE 

DEBORAH FRITZ 



LEANN GIVEN 

DEBRA HORNYAK 

DEBBIE HOVISTA 

PRISCILLA KORN 



SUSAN KROPEL 

BARBARA LILLY 

MARION MORGAN 

SUZANNE PRITTS 



KATHY REDFOOT 

KATHLEEN SCHOONOVER 

DEBRA SOBECK 

SUSAN STACY 




62 



School of Medicine: Medical Technology 




JANET CAMPBELL 
JANE CHEN 
ABRA ELKINS 
AVA FATIGATI 



SANDRA FORD 
CATHERINE HACKETT 
CORI JORDAN 
DEBORAH JUSTICE 



MARTHA LAKE 
PATRICIA LESTER 
FRED MANLEY 
JOYCE MAY 



NANCY SHINGLETON 
SUZANNE SMITH 
JENNIFER STROTHER 
DEBORAH TILLMAN 



63 



School of Social Work 



NANCY BERSETH 

ELLEN BLUE 

JVDY BUSTER 

LINDA BROWN 



ELEANORE COYNE 

NOREEN DEVINE 

JANICE ELLSWORTH 

KAREN HOBBS 



SUSAN HOPKINS 

PATRICIA HORST 

DARLENEJARZYNKA 

ROBERT KENT 



THERESA LASHER 

LILLIAN LENTCHNER 

LORETTA LEWIS 

HILDA LYNCH 



KAREN MARIANO 
TOBY McCORMICK 

MARIL^'N MILNES 
NANC^' MYERS 




64 




JOSE DANG 
DAVID PICKERT 

ANN RANDALL 
PAMELA REDMOND 



CYNTHIA WALTERS 
VIRGINIA WYSOCKI 



CHARLES REYNOLDS 
LOIS ROBERTSON 
LINDA RODIGHIERO 
MICHELE SCHMINT 



PAMELA SHAFFER 
PAIRICIA TOLLE 

NANCY TONKIN 
SHERRY TRICKETT 




65 






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STUDENT 
LIFE 



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What does it mean to be a student at 
\X^U? First, the fact that you're in col- 
lege and away from all strings attached at 
home. You usually go through your 
"wild streak" your freshman year and 
later settle down; but some never do. You 
must adjust to living in a totally different 
environment; either a dorm or an apart- 
ment. 

You become accustomed to your 
classes and learn the tricks of the trade of 
how to get around the rules of the Uni- 
versity. It doesn't take long to learn what 
classes are "cake" and which ones that are 
hard; either by personal experience or by 
of mouth. 

It depends if you live within walking 
distance if you have to cope with the 
problems of transponation and wonder- 
ing how to get to class on time. If you 
drive, you have to get to the Lair early or 
wait in line for an hour to park your car. 
If you are not careful, the towing syndi- 
cate will take your car away when you 
have collcaed enough unpaid tickets. 

We are so fortunate that we can 
depend upon the PRT. It only works, of 
course, when you're late for class and 
after waiting fifteen minutes, a car finally 
arrives and you "squish" on to one of the 
cars. After classes, one may go to the 
plaza, rela.x with some friends, throw a 
frisbee. or watch the dogs chase each 
other. 

Morgantown is a winter wonder land. 
You wonder how to walk down a hill 
without slipping and rolling down it or 
how to drive your car on a sheet of ice 
and snow. Of course, everyone enjoys a 
good snowball battle and sleigh riding. 
The more experienced skiers have their 
favorite weekend hide away. 

The weekend for 'WVU starts Wed- 
nesday night to celebrate that half the 
week has passed. In between all of this 
you study and cram for tests. Before you 
know it Finals have arrived. A time for 
all nighters, crammers, headaches, and 
saying good-bye to friends; some for the 
summer and some forever. Last but not 
least, packing all one's belongings and 
moving out. Funny how much one can 
accumulate during the year. After the 
rwentieth trip to the car you will wonder 
where all of the stuff came from. But 
such is the life of a WVU student. 




Anita Weincr, Section Editor 




67 



Dorm Life 



Dorm Living; Living in a dorm is 

quite an experience; some good and 

others . . . You have to get 

accustomed to living away from 

home; adjust to your roommate which 

is not always an easy process. Your 

RA can make life comfortable, 

enjoyable if you have an 

understanding one or make life seem 

like hell! One thing for sure and 

that's the dorm is rarely boring. One 

can always find a water fight, dirty 

magazines, a broken vending machine 

to kick and swear at or a friend to kick 

and swear at. Your friends are around 

and have something to drink or 

smoke. If you want to try something 

risky, bring up a keg and do not invite 

the RA to participate in the drunken 

brawl which soon follows. 




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69 



Apartm en t Life 






70 




Apartment Life; Life away from campus is not always 
rosy. In Morgantown finding an apartment is always a has- 
sle. One must cope with landlords and prices that coincide 
with living in either luxurious or dirt cheap apartments. 

But, there is nothing better than after a hard day of 
classes when you go home to your bungalow and head for 
your favorite chair, prop your feet up on a cluttered coffee 
table with beer cans, dishes, stale munchies left over from 
the all-nighter and then you hear your roommate yell, "It's 
your turn to cook dinner!" 

Yet, off-campus living has its advantages, quiet place to 
work, or party and you have your own personal property. 
Oh! Such is the price of the good life. 




71 



How to Get to Class . . . 




72 




The West Virginia University- 
Morgantown Personal Rapid Transit 
(PRT) System is the first of its kind 
in the world — one of the few fully 
automated mass transit systems that 
truly gives its passengers a ride into 
the future. 

PRT is controlled by a system of 
computers with no vehicle operators 
or ticket takers. During rush hours, 
the cars leave the stations on a 
computer-arranged schedule. During 
off hours, they work just like an 
elevator — push the button and your 
personal car will arrive. And unlike 
your private car, PRT vehicles take 
care of themselves after you reach 
your destination. 



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73 



Hitchhikers. . . 





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75 



Two and Four 
Wheel Travel 






76 




77 



Crashed! 




78 









79 



Plaza People 






80 



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81 




82 



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83 




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85 



Frisbee and Skateboards 




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86 




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87 



Sun Bathers 





88 




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Autumn Frawlick 










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91 



Snow in Morgantown 



Winter in Morgantown usually 

creates some problems when it comes 

to transportation. Everybody slips and 

slides either on wheels or on foot. But 

that's only one aspect of the snow in 

the university town. There is nothing 

more beautiful than on a snowy night 

to walk in the moonlight and see the 

snow sparkle and glimmer like a sea 

of diamonds. What could be more 

fun than to go out with a group of 

friends to sleigh ride — on inner 

tubes, garbage bags, cafeteria trays, or 

if you are lucky, a sleigh.' It's great to 

regress to your childhood and have a 

good old fashioned snowball battle. 






92 






93 






94 



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95 






96 






97 



Homecoming Carnival 




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Homecoming Crafts Exhibit 






100 



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101 



Student Art Exhibits 





102 






103 



Volunteers 




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104 




# *1^ 

/\.\: ',*«**.• 



1976 marked the first Agency Fair 
to be held in Monongalia County and 
was sponsored by the Project 
Development Continuity. The 
Agency Fair was coordinated by two 
social work students, Elizabeth Evans 
and Patricia Horst (pictued left to 
right in the picture top left on this 
page) under the auspices of the PDC. 
The aim of the Agency Fair was to 
educate the public to the social 
services available to the community in 
the Monongalia County area. The Fair 
was held at the Mountaineer Mall; the 
booths were manned by agency 
personnel and social work students 
doing their field placements at the 
respective agencies. 



OPPOSITE PAGE: Students give their time, 
skills, and blood to help others in need. 









105 



Kings of Partying: WVU! 




106 






107 






108 






109 




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110 



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Moving Out 





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113 



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ENTER TAINMENT 



To brighten the WVU student's 
life, the University provides many 
facilities and planned entertainment; 
such as, plays, concerts, and speakers. 
There are a variety of different con- 
certs students can attend, from Wet 
Willie to Bach concerts performed at 
the CAC. The sf>eakers run the gamut 
from "the white witch," Sybil Leek, 
to A. J. Manchin, former West Vir- 
ginia REEP Director who campaigned 
to clean up the state by collecting 
junked cars. The Theatre has had a 
vintage year with the musical hit 
"Gypsy," and the satire-comedy "The 
Women," and many other successful 
productions. 

One can usually find entertainment 
on the WVU campus. If it's going to 
the Blue Ticket Tavern to hear a fid- 
dle contest or a free movie in the Lair 
on a Friday night! 

Anita Weiner, Section Editor 




115 



WVU CONCERTS: 



Fleetwood Mac 



FLEETWOOD MAC didn't enjoy 
playing at the Coliseum, according to 
post-concert remarks made by their 
road manager, but their performance 
certainly failed to show it as the Brit- 
ish rock band captivated a crowd of 
pre-Thanksgiving University concert- 
goers. The group displayed a thor- 
oughly professional demeanor 
throughout their show, although the 
band felt that the Coliseum's size and 
structure was unsuited to Fleetwood 
Mac's musical style. Eileen Smith 

OPPOSITE PAGE: AMERICA 
and ERIC CARMEN: The music of 
America and Eric Carmen reverber- 
ated through the Coliseum and a cap- 
tivated crowd experienced an evening 
of rock. 

The Pop Art Committee had a 
slow start this year in booking top 
name acts; but near the end of the 
year they surprised us with America, 
Eric Carmen, Billy Joel, and The Out- 
laws. As is typical in university life, 
one must wait in line for hours to get 
the "good" tickets and/or just obtain 
tickets. 



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(OHN PRINE: The only bad thing 
.ibouijohn Prine's Saturday night per- 
formance at the Lair was that a lot of peo- 
ple who wanted to did not get to see him. 

He was accompanied by no one other 
than his fans, several of whom sang 
along. They knew ALL the words. 

Prine's style lies somewhere between 
Bob Dylan and Kris Kristofferson, with 
a helping of country twang added. And 
like them, his voice will never be called 
melodic. But it's a strong voice and it 
never faltered; he handled his acoustic 
guitar masterfully. 

He sang everything from "Paradise," 
his anti-strip mining song, to "Grandpa 
Was A Carpenter" and "Everybody," a 
conversation with Jesus, from which he 
concludes that "everybody needs some- 
body that he can talk to." His versatility 
and genius were reflected in his ability to 
entrance his audience with the moving, 
pensive "Hello In There," a groping 
poem about old people's loneliness, a few 
minutes after they had laughed along 
with his raucously humorous "Dear 
Abby." Sidney Bell. 

CHARLIE DANIELS BAND per- 
formed at the WVU Coliseum with Wet 
Willie to an enthusiastic group of cheer- 
ing students as exhibited in photograph 
below. Charlie Daniels and the members 
of his band may claim to be just a bunch 
of "long-haired country boys," but they 
present some exceptionally fine Tennes- 
see mountain-grown music that enthusi- 
asts from the Appalachians to the Rock- 
ies can appreciate. 

The group's performance reached its 
zenith when Daniels got out his magic 
fiddle and the band swung into "The 
South's Gonna Do It Again" and the per- 
ennial goodie, "Orange Blossom 
Special." Eileen Smith 



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JOHN HARTFORD performed 
with the New Grass Revival in a 
Mini-Events concert held November 
23, 1975, in the Lair Ballrooms. 

PATTI SMITH: It was a concert 
to remember. From the opening 
strains of "We're Gonna Have a Real 
Good Time Together" to the final 
ones of "My Generation" encore, 
Patti Smith captivated a sell-out 
crowd in the Lair Ballrooms. Intensity 
is the word. 

Patti Smith performed with a phys- 
ical, emotional and sexual intensity 
others could only dream of matching. 
To the simple, primitive but powerful 
three-chord rock and roll of her band, 
she moved around the stage — fists 
pounding air, hips undulating — diz- 
zily spinning in an often uncontrolled 
frenzy. And the energy flowed. It 
poured forth from her flailing tooth- 
pick frame and poised lips and 
viciously thrust itself onto the audi- 
David Singlenton 



Wishbone Ash 



WISHBONE ASH took a few bruises a while back 
when lead guitarist Ted Turner made his exit in search of 
greener pastures. But his replacement, 23-year-old Wise- 
field, is a genuine asset to the group on both guitar and 
vocal, displaying all the talent and expertise of the departed 
Turner. Percussionist Uptok seemed a bit disappointed with 
the audience reaction to the band's performance. "We don't 
know whether it was us or the audience, but the crowd 
didn't really seem to get into it," he commented in a post- 
concert interview. Eileen Smith 

OPPOSITE PAGE: MANDRILL slated as the evening's 
'B' group, played to a mixture of cheers and jeers, but they 
featured one of the most dynamite brass sections to grace a 
Coliseum stage. 



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122 



Gypsy 




"Let me entertain you/Let me make 
you smile/. . . I'm very versatile . . ." 
says it all for "Gypsy." This delightful 
production, performed at the Concert 
Theatre of the Creative Arts Center 
(CAC), is comic, quasi-tragic and a fine 
evening of musical and dramatic enter- 
tainment. 

The story of "Gypsy" is set in the 
years 1921-36. It revolves around Rose, a 
stage mother to end all stage mothers. 
Rose wants to make her daughters stars. 
She glorifies her daughter June and 
pushes the no-talent Louise into the back- 
ground. When June elopes, Rose turns 
her attention to Louise. Louise is Rose's 
last hope to propel one of her daughters 
to the stardom that she always wanted, 
but never had. Rose refuses to believe 
that the heyday of Vaudeville is over. 
When the show falls on hard times, she 
is forced to book her daughter in what 
she considers the lowest of theatres — 
the burlesque house. It is there that 
Louise makes her monumental decision 
and takes her first step to fame as Gypsy 
Rose Lee. 

Louise was played by Mary Beth Derry 
and sister June was portrayed by Mary 
Ann Vingle. In what director J. Mcllwee 
called "most demanding role" Nancy 
Myers played Mama Rose. 




123 







124 






126 




126 



The Women 




The play, set in the late thirties, 
involves the efforts of a clique of 
women to play respective roles in 
their high class, artificial society 
wrought with "vain show, comedy, 
tragedy, hope, and disappointment." 

After watching Clare Boothe 
Luce's THE WOMEN, one might 
suspect there is some truth in that old 
cliche, "Hell hath no fury like a 
woman scorned." The play depicts the 
lives of a group of women who 
belong to the social butterfly class of 
elite. They are those distinctively 
known as the "pillars of society." 

Their loves and hates are each 
other, as they delight in hearing the 
latest gossip about each other and 
manipulating each other's lives. They 
are there to help each survive various 
crises, but somehow they also long 
for each other's destruction. 

Director Charles Neel chose the 
play largely because of the opportuni- 
ties for women it offered; the cast 
consisted of twenty-one women por- 
traying a wide range of women. 
Teresa Smith and Greg Paxton 



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127 



W. V. U. and Morgantown 
Celebrate the Bicentennial 






128 






129 






130 




Crea tive Arts 
Orchestra 





131 



ERICH VON DANIKEN: Were 
the ancient Gods actually foreign 
space cosmonauts? This is the ques- 
tion that Erich Von Daniken 
addressed himself before an overflow- 
ing crowd at the Mountainlair ball- 
room. Von Daniken said the "reli- 
gious doubts" started him on his 
searcli to find evidence of foreign vis- 
itors. 

Von Daniken believes that these 
visitors had great influence upon the 
minds of ancient man, and perhaps 
the minds of modern man as well. 
"The list," said Von Daniken, "goes 
on and on." In speaking of these vari- 
ous findings, he was careful to note 
"These are all pure speculations — 
they have never been proven." But, as 
he adds, "They have never been dis- 
proven, either." The fact that these 
visitors left behinds tcK)ls for ancient 
man is the only way Von Daniken 
believes the pyramids of Egypt could 
have been built. George Skandalis 




132 



BETTY FREIDAN: Terming the 
women's movement the "second 
American revolution," Betty Freidan, 
feminist leader and founder of the 
National Organization for Women, 
outlined the stages of the revolution. 
Friedan spoke to a large audience in 
the Lair Ballrooms and was sponsored 
by the Forum Festival Committee. 

"You have grown up taking for 
granted that women are people," she 
said addressing the women in the 
audience. "Twenty years ago, we had 
to consciously tell ourselves that over 
and over." 

Women then recognized that they 
were being kept in these roles by soci- 
ety, she said. Once women recognized 
that they were people, they were made 
to feel guilty. They were told that 
they were hurting their husband's 
masculinity or the growth of their 
children. After women realized who 
they were, they started to band 
together. "At first, it seemed all we 
needed was numbers," she said. "In 
those first few years, cries of sex dis- 
crimination overshadowed race dis- 
crimination." 

Changes were forthcoming in the 
practices of employers. Women vot- 
ers now outnumber men. Friedan 
terms the economic powers of women 
as "enormous." Ray Betzner 





DAVID SCHOUMACHER, for- 
mer ABC News Washington corre- 
spondent, doesn't have a philosophy 
of journalism. But, he does have an 
attitude. Schoumacher's attitude 
toward journalism found its begin- 
nings in the Washington press corp. 

Though there are about 4000 
reporters covering Washington, the 
press corp is more exclusive. "The 
business of Washington is not run- 
ning the government," he explained. 
"The business of Washington is get- 
ting re-elected. So it is the reporters 
who cover that process who really 
make up the press corp." Schoum- 
acher, the present anchorman of 
WMAL-TV in Washington, D.C., 
described this corp as a press estab- 
lishment. "There is no conspiracy, but 
we do talk . . . almost exclusively to 
each other." 

There is also a race among this 
group of reporters to get the most 
insignificant things as soon as possi- 
ble on the air, he said. Ray Betzner 




OTTO PREMINGER: Producer- 
director Otto Preminger spent 45 
minutes responding to questions with 
humorous quips, sound advice and 
educated comments, before he 
showed one of his films, "The Man 
with the Golden Arm." 

"People don't fight censorship 
enough," said Preminger in his most 
emphatic statement of the evening. "I 
feel that one of our most precious 
fights in America is for free expres- 
sion. If this is ever diminished, then it 
is only one step toward dictatorship." 

Preminger explained he had prob- 
lems with censors trying to cut words 
from films such as "The Moon is 
Blue" and "The Man with the Golden 
Arm." He described "Moon" as a 
harmless comedy that used the word 
"virgin." In "Golden Arm" the word 
"narcotics" caused trouble. "That was 
20 years ago," said Preminger. "Can 
you imagine what would happen if 
the censors tried that tcxday.'" Hoppy 
Kercheval 



133 



A. JAMES MANCHIN, former 
KEEP Director of West Virginia, vis- 
ited Morgantown to serve as master 
of ceremonies in the "Pound Your 
Professor" contest. A Volkswagen 
was demolished as the result of the 
contest. The professors were not 
physically assaulted; WVU students 
were given the opportunity to take 
their frustrations against their "favor- 
ite" professor by hitting a junked car 
with WVU professors" painted on it. 

DICK GREGORY: Comedian, 

civil rights worker and former politi- 
cian Dick Gregory began his career as 
a comedian working only in black 
clubs and theaters. In 1961, he was 
called as a last-minute replacement at 
Chicago's Playboy Club. Gregory 
spoke before a convention of the Ku 
Klux Klan. Not only was he allowed 
to finish his routine, he was a success. 

Gregory was one of the first black 
comedians to break through the barri- 
ers of a white-dominated entertain- 
ment industry. During the civil rights 
movement of the '60's, Gregory par- 
ticipated in every major demonstra- 
tion. He devoted his time and talent 
to giving benefits for civil rights 
groups, peace groups and other 
reform movements. 

Gregor>''s appearance at the Uni- 
versity was sponsored by the Black 
Experience Committee. 




134 





SYBIL LEEK: "Writing is my profession, 
witchcraft is my religion, and the occult is my 
science." Leek explained that there is a misun- 
derstanding of witchcraft in the U.S. In 
Europe, where Leek was born and raised, 
witchcraft is accepted and is known as a reli- 
gion. Leek was raised in a family that 
accepted the supernatural as the natural. She 
went out at age eight to become a journalist 
and used her "extra senses" in her work. 

In her lecture. Leek described a revolution 
in the occult. TTiis revolution will take away 
the limits on the mind. It will allow among 
other things the reception of knowledge from 
other sphere. 

Parts of the Occult science revolution 
included: astrology; graphology or handwrit- 
ing study (which is now acceptable in Euro- 
pean courts of law); yoga; palm reading; tele- 
pathy and ESP. One of the problems people 
have with the revolution is that they do not 
accept and trust their senses. It is incorrea, 
says Leek, to always associate ESP experiences 
with "nasty events." Sybil Leek refers to her- 
self as a "white witch" meaning that she does 
not use her talents for evil uses. Ray Betzner 



RALPH NADER: "We have learned ev- 
erything that is inconsequential," Ralph 
Nader said as he blasted America's educa- 
tional system. "Very little education refers to 
where power is and who has it," Nader added. 
"There are very few of life's skills taught 
. . skills needed if you are going to be a tax- 
payer and a citizen." 

The consumer advocate charged that many 
of the nations problems today could be cor- 
reaed through more relevant education. He 
said students graduate from college and can- 
not write an essay on nutrition, even though 
it is a problem that faces everyone. They can- 
not write an essay on chemicals, insurance, 
banking, petroleum or any company; all of 
which are relevant to becoming an aware citi- 
zen. Nader offered three solutions: L applica- 
tion of one's field to specific problems. 2. 
self-teaching, and 3. curriculum changes. 

Nader implied through the entire speech 
that the most valuable education lies in com- 
munity involvement and citizen aaion. He 
pointed out that students have an excellent 
opportunity while at college to receive both a 
um versify education and a civic education. 

"We have been taught to believe rather 
than to think," Nader said. We have con- 
sumed knowledge, but we are not taught how 
to use it. He said that students are at their 
peak of imagination and independence. 

Not only challenging education, the con- 
sumer advocate related his traditional gripes 
against industry. "What right do industries 
have to inflia pollution on Americans with- 
out paying any compensation.' Why should it 
be against the law in a state to relieve yourself 
in a river when there are no restrictions on a 
faaory doing the same thing.'" asked Nader. 

Nader said that in many cases "might 
makes right." If you pollute enough, you can 
get away with it. He added that studies show 
that over the next ten years it would take only 
rwo per cent of the nation's gross national 
produa to clean up pollution. Hoppy 

Kercheval 



]35 



JACK WHITAKER brought the 
marriage between television and 
sports into focus when he spoke to a 
small crowd in the Lair ballrooms. He 
was sponsored by the Forum Festival 
Committee. 

The CBS sportscaster described 
what it was like in the early days of 
television. 

"Two things sold television sets in 
those days: Milton Berle and sporting 
events," he said. 

"Television was a lot easier then. 
Unfortunately, we had too many peo- 
ple doing radio broadcasts with pic- 
tures." In those early days of televi- 
sion, (the 1950's) football was not 
broadcast nationally. "That didn't 
come about until the Green Bay Pack- 
ers beat the Kansas City Chiefs and 
the Madison Avenue crowd got 
behind the game," said Whitaker. 

"Professional football became so 
popular so quickly that no kid can 
afford to attend any games," said 
Whitaker. 

Whitaker, who has covered foot- 
ball off and on since 1952, thinks the 
game is still healthy, but its golden 
age could be over. 

Testifying as a witness at the Presi- 
dent's Commission on Amateur Ath- 
letics last fall in New York, Whitaker 
said, "the trouble with amateur athlet- 
ics is the administrators are amateurs 
and the amateurs are professionals." 

Whitaker isn't certain whether any 
problems were resolved last fall, but 
he feels the commission is the strong- 
est of any in past history. 

The Philadelphia native went on to 
stress that a power struggle exists 
among the National Collegiate Asso- 
ciation of Amateur Athletics, the 
Amateur Athletic Union, and the U.S. 
Olympic Committee. All three will 
have to relinquish some of their pow- 
ers, said Whitaker, if the amateur pro- 
gram is to improve. On the subject of 
government subsidies for its athletes, 
Whitaker would like the U.S. athletes 
to remain independent, but still 
receive some help from the govern- 
ment. Norman Eisenberg and Ray 
Betzner 




136 



1 Q76 (J/{m c/HefttteXi 




The Miss Monticola Search Osmmittce along with members of the yearbook staff have seleaed two women to bestow the honor of "Miss Monticola." 
Ms. Loretta Lewis (left) and Ms. Anita Weiner (right) have been chosen for their originality, creativity, and dedication which is necessary in the 
design, production, and completion of the 1976 issue of the MONTICOLA. 

Ms. Loretta Lewis is a Social Work senior and the daughter of Mr. James H. and Janet L. Fox of Danese, West Virginia. In 
Ms. Lewis' senior year, she has been Editor-in-Chief of the WVU MONTICOLA, Co-ordinator of the 1976 BSW Sympo- 
sium/Career Day, Chaiqserson of the WVU-Undergraduate Student Social Work Organization, and has written several arti- 
cles for the USSWO Newsletter. She has, also, been a delegate and representative to the National Federation of Student 
Social Workers Conference and the Council on Social Work Education held in Philadelphia, PA; the Annual Welfare Con- 
ference held at Huntington, WV; the CCS Social Action Work Shop held at Jackson's Mill, WV; and the Regional Child 
Welfare Conference held at Charleston, WV. During her college career she has been active in the Sigma Phi Omega Honor- 
ary, WV-SPRIG, PSC Photography Club, Editor-in-Chief of PSC CATAMOUNT, secretary-treasurer of the Student Volun- 
teer Organization, a tutor in the Keyser Elementary Special Education Department, and a counselor for the Potomac Valley 
Sheltered Workshop. Ms. Lewis has been awarded the Who's Who Among American Junior College Students, attendant to 
PSC Homecoming Queen, and will graduate Magna Cum Laude from WVU. 

Ms. Anita Weiner is an education junior and is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Weiner from Charleston, West Vir- 
ginia. She is editor of the Student Life and the Entertainment Sections for the MONTICOLA. Ms. Weiner is specializing in 
special education and plans to teach deaf children after graduation. Ms. Weiner enjoys sketching, rowing, and hiking. 



137 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



West Virginia University students 
have a large variety of organizations 
to choose to take part. One can join 
clubs whose interests range from 
social, entertainment, and fellowship 
to service, civic, and professional 
organizations. 




'rjV5H5/GN-UF 
/^7c?8.*?.l2l3l1 

^^ 'f^ /aoo-3.00 

^fJ^H \JEEK 




139 



In commemoration and celebration 
of our county and nation's Bicenten- 
nial Birthday, the art of interpretive 
dance salutes this monumental event. 

AMERICAN REFLECTION is a 
choreographic interpretation that 
reflects the mood of early America in 
a country scene depicting the unity of 
the people, their spirit and religious 
beliefs. LEGEND OF MONON- 
GALHEA: To those who know and 
love the Monongahela, it is more than 
a river. It lives, breathes and tells 
again the story of age-old loves and 
sorrows. Mary Kathryne Wiedebush, 
Director and Choreographer 

AMERICAN: FRONTIER'S OF 
HOPE is an orginial and artistic work 
created by West Virginia University 
faculty and performed by students of 
WVU. Orchesis is associated with the 
School of Physical Education, and 
Percussion "70" with the Division of 
Music, Creative Arts Center. 

ORCHESIS PERSONNEL: Nancy Black- 
shaw, Jane Bone, Natalie Capapclle, Michele 
Congelio, Tammy Critchficid, Carol Curey, 
Joy Fiani, Tressa Gorman, Becky Hess, Mary 
Cole Honon, Bill Kelley, Sarah Krakaver, 
Julie McKinney, Suzanne Meadows, Colleen 
Nesbitt, Anna Payne, Deanna Priday, Jim 
Sayger, Cindy Stillings, Sheila Scumaci, Carol 
Young, Mary Jane Young, Janelle Walters, 
Carole Wiedebusch, Sandy Thompson, Judy 
Taylor. 



■ 





ORCHESIS 



TOP RIGHT: AMERICAN REFLECTIONS, Religious Group, by Aaron Coplan. 

TOP LEFT: BALLADS AND FOLKLORE, Mad Anne Bailey. 

BOTTOM RIGHT: LEGEND OF MONONGAHELA, Chief Monongahela and Star Maiden. 

BOTTOM LEFT: AMERICA: FRONTIER'S OF HOPE 





140 



I 



Dolphins 




141 



ROTC 




ROW 1: Steven L. Cole, Thomas J. Oshansky, Dewayne A. Rudd, John J. Conese, Charles V. Meyers, Harold J. Wright. BACK ROW: Col. Brent A, 
Cool, Kenneth Hovatter, Jerry W. Carbaugh, Peter R. Csanady, Walt A. Lenz, Capt. William L. Bush. 



/\LJD Professional Advertising Fraternity 




ROW 1: Don Proudfoot, Cheryl Lamer, Toni Kasmoch, Dave Lied, Rose Vargo, Anne Henderson, George Singleton. ROW 2: Claudia DelGiudice, 
Dave Wozniak, Cecelia Hays, Craig Faulkenstine, Mel Hobbs, Jim Barney, Mike Petrisak. 



142 



Q^ YLJ Home Economics Professional Fraternity 




ROW 1 : Roberta Kay, Barb Matheny, Pam Boggs, April Davisson, Judy McCoy, Rebecca Deck, Kathy Lazelle, Martha Walker, Denise Althouse, 
Patry Featherstone. ROW 2: Jane Gallagher, Martha Olson, Ann McKendrick, Luanne Smith. Judy Sowinski, Debbie Sickles, Dixie Funk, Joannie 
Shuler, Mary Louise Woleslagle, Betty Belcher, Kris Allen, Kristen Hildebrant. 



lD/\ y^ Professional Accounting Fraternity 




ROW 1: James Shephers, Dr. Jay Coats, Vicki Obenchain. ROW 2: Greg Bennett, Ted Hook, Randy Greely, Lisa Pyless, Gail Goldstein, Charlene 
Pascoc, Tom George, Scot Deringer, Robert Perfetto, Michael Urtso. ROW 3: Robert Maust, Charles Hagedorn, G. C. Studkey, Marcia Frashure, 
George Jacobs, John Griffith, Diane Knicely, Michael Daugherty, Suzanne Meadows, Anne Murphy, William Faust, David Fulton, Debbie Kuhl, 
Frank Tokas. 



143 



WVU Hockey Club 




KNEELING: Jim Meyers, Paul Shaffer, Dave Anthony, Jim Manning, Ron Front, Bruce Nilson, Greg Gensheimer, Dave Colt. STANDING: Steve 
Bradley, Craig Clifford, Bob Leslie, Bob Dejean, Jeff Lowe, Paul Clifford, Pat Fitzgerald, John Rider, Scott Hutchinson, Gary Person, Dave 
DiCiwcio, John Kovach, Al Boyton (Coach). NOT PICTURED: Al Davis, Ray Ehrig. 




I 



144 




>^' i^ 






Vfc**:-^!^' 




Cheerleaders 



145 



W. V. U. Marching Band 









146 







147 



1976 Monticola 





Roberta Bastin and Anne Conley 



Loretta Lewis 




Carla Smallbridge and Diana Epling 



'PM 


jR^^^B 


^■^^^^ 1H 








.^ iPmi 




^^1 




Sue Day 



Val Price and Emily Tuckwiller 



148 




1976 Mondcola Staff 

Editor-in-Chief Loretta Lewis 

Business Manager Gina Rinehart 

Business Staff Sandi Milas, Assistant Business Manager; Dave Wozniak, Steve Webb 

Business Advisor Brentz Thompson 

Photographers Arthur Jordon, Marty Heavner 

Graphic Designers Jim Stump, divider pages; Eve Faulkes, cover 

Greeks Val Price, Emily Tuckwiller 

Sports Rob)crta Bastin 

Intramurals Anne Conley 

Seniors Loretta Lewis, Anita Weiner 

Student Life Anita Weiner 

Opening and Closing Sections Loretta Lewis 

Organizations Janet Boyle 

Entertainment Anita Weiner 

Royalty Sue Day 

Historical Research Committee Carla Smallbridge, Diana Epling 

*** 

Acknowledgments 

+** 

Special thanks to the West Virginia University Library Archives and Manuscripts Section of 
the West Virginia Collection for providing the photographs used in the Closing Section; 
WVU Sports Information Department; Mrs. Katherine Jamison, AJ and Marty for their 
"rush" jobs. Bob Gay and Roy Kelly for providing additional photographs, Trish Horst for 
helping the staff in the last moments of production, and Mr. Ron Richardson for ALL of 
his help. Mary Ellen Chittum for typing and sorting the senior section. 



Gina Rinehart 





Steve Webb 




H- 




Dave Wozniak and Sandi Milas 



Janet Boyle 



Anita Weiner 



149 



:r7' 






m.i,Km^ 


mm 


fwi^^ 



GREEKS 



The Greek system has been at 
West Virginia University almost as 
long as there has been a campus in 
Morgantown. As sororities and frater- 
nities gained national acceptance, 
WVU received its share of distinctive 
organizations and houses. The Beta 
Theta Pi house at 225 Belmar Avenue 
was the first Greek house on campus; 
now there are over twenty-five. These 
houses are filled with enthusiastic, 
bright young people who find their 
special wants and needs fulfilled by 
the brother and sisterhood which the 
Greeks offer. 

Greeks on campus participate fully 
in established campus activities, with 
their own divisions in float and ban- 
ner contests, intramurals, spirit com- 
petitions and pageants. Distinctive 
Greek activities also make their mark 
on the WVU campus. Greek Week, 
Sigma Chi Derby Days, and Rush are 
all part of the system which the stu- 
dents recognize as truly Greek. Today, 
and in the future, the Greeks are 
proud and dedicated — and they are 
here to stay! 

Emily Tuckwiller and Val Pricer, Sec- 
tion Editors 




151 



Panhellenic Council 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Donna Powers r4>B, Barbara Solomon KA, Dawn Clarkson AAA, Debbie Dickert AF, Tern Moore A$, Pjtry Fusco 
AAn. SECOND ROW; Sally Holland — treasurer r$B, Debbie Sawczyszyn — secretary A$, Tressa Gorman — vice president AZA, Mary Ellen 
Hereda — vice president KKF, Janet Boyle — president KA. THIRD ROW: Vicki Salentro ITB*, Deedy Strickler IIB^, Sue Smith AF, Carla 
Smallridge AAII, Nancy Duf field KKF, Cathy Weber AAA, Melinda Gorman AZA. NOT PICTURED: Sandy Urso Xfl, Kathy Rowland XQ. 



Panhellenic Council consists of 2 representatives, a junior 
and senior, from each sorority on campus. The representa- 
tives are elected by their own sorority. 

Panhellenic conducts formal rush during the fall term 
and informal rush during the spring term. Besides rush, 
Panhellenic tries to promote better relationships between 
sororities. 



152 



Alpha Delta Phi 



Alpha Upsilon Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi was 
established on the WVU campus in 1924. To an A D Pi her 
sorority is a very important part of her life. Friendships and 
fun are a very important part of the sisterhood. A D Pi's are 
well known for their high standards. They consistently rank 
high scholastically. A D Pi's are individually and as a group 
involved in many campus activities. 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Pam Brisky, Annette Pryor, Susan McRoben — secretary, Terry Amuso, Amy Billig, Kathi Harrison, Pat Bnsky, Patty 
Fusco — vice president, Brooke Cunis. SECOND ROW: Kathy Smith, Carla Smallridge, Teresa Casto, Diana Long, Stephanie Yanero, Sandy Boken- 
kamp, Manha Clark, Lynn Hartung, Marty Shirer — president, Kathy Hodges, Kay Brooks, Donna Lipke, Diana Epling, Pam Lewis — treasurer, 
Cathy Bokenkamp, Lori Fisher. 

NOT PICTURED: Janet Owens, Cathi Billig, Donna Early, Gina Stanellis, Irma Tiggelback. 



153 



Alpha Phi 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Debbie Fogle, Teri Moore, Mary Jane Wilson, Kathy Eichelberger — vice president, Sharon Wallace, Shelley Beclcwith, 
Linda Thomas — president. SECOND ROW: Kathy Berardinelli — secretary, Mary Miller — vice president, Elizabeth Gerwig, Liz Martz, April 
Davisson, Patti Branch, Lisa Nard. THIRD ROW: Paula Lattanzi, Mary Badali, Janice Knopp, Leigh Komoroski, Helen Gilben, Diane Mapes, 
Nancy Thimgan, Bridget Watts, Kathy Wilburn — vice president, Linda Klein. 

NOT PICTURED: Dee Dee Adams, Janet Butts, Paula Coleman, Mary Kris Fischer, Debbie Galbus, Kelly Gcxlsey — secretary, Libby Inghram, 
Marlene Kalo, Sarita Lantz, Susan Stocking, Ricki Wiles, Lori Zvonar, Pat Murdock, Cathy Eagloski, Cindy Gnagey, Tracy Horchler, Nina Larsen, 
Kathy Shinn. 



154 



Alpha Phi 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Cheryl Evans, Kim Magistri, Karen Warfield, Robin Aide, Barb Marcus, Becky Spanogians, Cheryl Lamer. SECOND 
ROW: Emily Tuckwiller — treasurer, Yonnie Lambert. Diane Kirshenbaum, Debbie Sawczyszyn, Anne Street, Marty Street, YoYo Mairs, Val Price. 
THIRD ROW: Nancy Fishman, Rachel Victorson, Pam Stuck, Laura Skidmore, Ruann Miller, Candi Keiter, Vicki Adams, Cathy Caruso, Kim Mitc- 
hell, Pam Johnson, Donna Alexander, Carolyn Gerwig. 



A . . . is for always being together, 

L . . .is for tfie love we share together, 

P . . . is for the part we each have, 

H . . .is for the happiness we have together; working, studying, partying, 

A . . .is for the all for one attitude we share 



P . . .is for the PHIS as we are known around the country, 

H . . .is for the Heart Fund which we put our heart and support into, 

I . . .is for the individuals that make up the Phis, all 

different, but all one in Alpha Phi. 



155 



Alpha Xi Delta 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Cheryl Walton, Kathy Cobb, Holly Elsbury, Lea Anderson, Tressa Gorman, Debbie Jones, Georgie Trusio. SECOND 
ROW; Linda Lloyd, Jeanine Auth, Kim Ballock, Leslie Buck, Nada Bcneke, Pam Kain, Carol Heeney — treasurer, Ava Fatigati, Emmy Daugherty 
— president. 



156 



Alpha Xi Delta 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Mary McFadden, Chris Latstetter. SECOND ROW: Leslie Neal, Patsy Paugh, Teresa Lucas, Susan Fox, Susan Fraser, 
Diane Dunn, Renee Senseney. THIRD ROW: Melissa McVey, Marsha Mattingly, Nancy Bruno, Wendy McCune, Teri Forrester, Tina Duplaga, Kim 
Fiorletta. 



I don't meddle 
With what my friends 
Believe or reject 
Anymore than I ask whether 
They are rich or poor 
I love them. James Russell Lowell 
Alpha Xi Delta — a group of girls, individuals, who have one thing in common — 
their pledge to the golden quill of Alpha Xi Delta. 

By participating together in such activities as intramurals, Greek Week and Home- 
coming and individually in Student government, cheerleading and gymnastics, the girls 
experience the friendship and uniqueness that make our sisterhood grow. 

A place where girls can live, learn and love each other — ALPHA XI DELTA!! 



157 



Alpha Xi Delta 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Rosemary Torre, Maria Torre, Susan Anderson, Cheylen Martin, Julie Paxton, Ellen Welty, Melinda Gorman, Debbie 

Holler, Joansie Vaccaro, Roxanne Martin, Linda O'Lenic. SECOND ROW: Chris Grubler, Joyce Harshbarger, Lee Ann Watldns, Anne Kaiser, Mary 

Hennen. 

NOT PICTURED: Nanc7 Hart, Becki Bruno, Meg McCreary, Lydia Droppa, Jan White, Cathy Lambert, Joanne Christian, Michelle Gessler, Dede 

Smiley, Nancy Wood, Debbie Ronis, Lou Ann Lynch, Terri Reed, Michelle Latagliata, Sandy Allbaugh, Bctsie Baldwin, Angel Batlas, Kim Bessie, 

Elaine Dickie, Michelle HoUick, Cindy McCune, Meg Merry, Bradley Thorn. 



I 



158 



Gamma Phi Beta 



Alpha Pi chapter of Gamma Phi Beta is one of 177 Inter- 
national chapters. Gamma Phi's at WVU are growing; we 
are proud, vivacious, hard-working and fun loving. 
It is a privilege to be in college 
It is an honor to be in a sorority 
And, it is a distinction to be a 
Gamma Phi. 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Claire Collier — secretary, Sheryl Bargeski, Joyce Falbo — president. Donna Powers, Nancy Nicholson, Nancy Ferguson. 
SECOND ROW: Stevie Bohanek, Marcia Schoeffel, Sally Holland, Elizabeth Rippctoe, Liz Ann Parker — treasurer. THIRD ROW: Shirlynn Min- 
nix, Lugene Florio, Ellen Yetter, Pa ulette Justice — vice president, Bernice Abramson, Jeannie McNulty. 
NOT PICTURED: Melinda Parker, Judy Dunmire. 



159 



Chi Omega 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Liz Solomon, Linda Outsell, Sheila DeWeese, Fran Kudja, Marcia Heavner, Andy Ice, Janie Lenihan, Sharon Ovies, Nancy 
Hill — vice president, Elaine Shaw — president. SECOND ROW: Nancy Spears, Becky Byrd, Susan Ames, Karen Hindman, Karen Given, Mary 
Beth DiVecchio, Sandy Urso, Ellen White, Kathy Rowand, Kathy Carr. THIRD ROW: Paula Sova, Judy Cann, Gwen Cotter, Susan Shockey, Jane 
Snyder, Diane Paletta. 

NOT PICTURED: Lettie Floyd — secretary, Sara Beth Clendenin, Cindy Bisset, Barb Mason, Donna Sebastian, Lisa Pisegna, Linda Ross, Susan Hurd, 
Linda Stone, Michele Congelio, Beth Murphy, Lisa Furbee, Valerie Ross, Mindy Shaw, Linda Washington, Valerie Deem. 



160 



Chi Omega 



Ours is a proud fraternity . . . our 
heritage comes to us as a gift from 
others who have gone before. And it 
is given in trust that we shall nurture 
and cherish it and, in our turn, pass it 
on to new generations . . . stronger 
and more vital than when it came to 
us. 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Isabel Almase, Diane Mabee, Alma Angotti, Suzy Ross — treasurer, Debbie Mikulski, Nancy McCormack, Susie Naylor, 
Kathy Lacko, Jerri Zak, Susan Longacre. SECOND ROW: Jane Shay, Jackie Hayes, Amy Veeck, Ivy Goldstein, Billie Ann Elmore, Patti Griffin, 
Cindy Stillings, Kay King, Vicki Galati, Carol Ciancutti. 



161 



Delta Delta Delta 




FIRST ROW, left to right; Anne Henderson, Ann Ullum, Regina Fknigan, Mary Lou Featherstone. SECOND ROW: Patry Featherstone — presi- 
dent, Marylee Kastelic, Marsha Jordan, Cathy Weber, Jane Bone — secretary, Jody Clarkson, Gina Quattro, Marsha Malloy, Kim Peraldo, Carol 
Young. THIRD ROW: Luanne Smith, Jan Cantarelli — vice president. Barb Gould, Susan Sartoris, Susie Bane, Meg Havens, Elaine George, Robin 
Beard, Sandy Justice, Sue Metro, Robin Franklin, Gina DeMarco, Sarah Stemple. 
NOT PICTURED: Joyce Maslyk, Carol Marolo, Di Mather, Janice Miller, Patti Bonner. 



162 



Delta Delta Delta 



Membership in Tri-Delta is more than being part of a 
group. Tri-Delta promotes development of one's individual- 
ity. Tri-delts feel a common bond with their sisters, yet are 
never discouraged from pursuing their own interests. 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Jan Antonelli, Kerry O'Brien, Sandy Bioux, Carol Lutes, Sue LeMoinc. SECOND ROW: Suzie Murtland, Debbie Patter- 
son — secretary, Diane Belknap, Doris Keith, Gayle Armstrong, Cindy Wheaton, Linda Gray, Becky Norman, Patti Wyant, Joanne McAleer, Maureen 
Kenney, Lynne Brown. THIRD ROW: Cathy Cava — treasurer, Sally Swanson, Gretchen Gross, Valerie Vandcnberg, Christy Venham, Debbie 
Flynn, Mary Sue Bridi, Jean Ann Kelly, Dawn Clarkson, Pam McGinley, Sue Burkett. 



163 



Delta Gamma 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Connie DeFazio, Sheila Scumaci, Lynda Gorrcll, Bridgette Robey, Nancy Klausing, Debbie Shepler, Cathy Iden. SEC- 
OND ROW; Sara Hardman, Becky Hammett, Ann Davies, Bridget Park, Carol Curry, Becky Alrutz, Francine Pulice, Sara Hushion, Lynn Barron, 
Melinda Cook, Polly Walters, Tina Wunduke. 



164 



I 



Delta Gamma 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Jane Mainella, Kathy Freeman — vice president, Loni Henn, Sherry Thompson, Susan Davis, Debbie Dickert. Knsty 
Winkler, Kathy Hampton, Linda White, Sharon Lovrich. SECOND ROW: Anne Gather, Patty Chambers, Dina Mattingly, Becky Davis, Jan Howes, 
Dremea Powell — vice president. Tee Edwards — vice president, Linda Arnold, Sue Gall, Betsy Stevenson, Sue Smith, Susie Silman, Cathy Bertalan — 
president, Patty Kilcollin. 

NOT PICTURED: Leslie Bartlctt, Amy Beck, Sally Christopher, Mary Corbitt, Dana Davis, Cheri Earl, Milly Eyer, Dana Grant, Mindy Herrick, Lora 
Hickman, Martha Herscher, Kim Holmes, Susie Howes, Kim Kessel, Laurie Litwinko, Amy Long, Lucy Moore, Patricia Murray, Diana Oliver, Bev- 
erly Ratliff, Mary Lou Santonas, Jeanne Skirboll, Donna Trapp, Tamora Wilson, Adele Winkler, Sara Wolfe, Stephanie Yanero, Tonya Godfrey, Pam 
Pierpont. 



Delta Gamma is one of the oldest Greek organizations, 
recently celebrating its 100th anniversary. The Delta 
Gamma Foundation is widely known for service in Educa- 
tional grants and loans. International Education and Sight 
Conservation and Aid to the Blind. Delta Gamma tries to 
create an environment for its members in which lasting 
friendships are established. 



165 



Kappa Delta 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Cathy Markham, Joan Tallarico, Tammy Telesko, Pat Synder. SECOND ROW: Nancy Matzke, Debbie Springer, Janet 
Boyle, Mrs. Mary Austin — housemother, Brenda Gaston — president, Judy Kalkreuth, Libby Issack — treasurer. THIRD ROW: Ginny Young, Sue 
Richardson, Pat Glass — editor, Kathy Geiseke, Nancy Jones, Jane Johnston, Karen Barr — vice president, Susan Crews, Kathy Keener, Cheryl Dan- 
ley. 



Beta Phi chapter of Kappa Delta is a sisterhood of div- 
erse interests. Sisters' activities range from intramurals, stu- 
dent government, and campus honoraries to local philan- 
thropies, university sports, and campus social functions. 

Individualism, a true measure of Kappa Delta's sister- 
hood, is a guarantee that each member will serve to compli- 
ment the other resulting in a stronger and a better Kappa 
Delta — of true sisters. 



I 



166 



Kappa Delta 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Debbie Flaherty, Patty Dann, Elizabeth Nagle, Sandy Hohman. SECOND ROW: Denise Powley, Suzanne East, Peggy 
Guinn, Kathy Bunon, Susan Simmons, Becky Bailey, Debbie Albright, Debbie Bromfield. THIRD ROW: Marianne O'Connell, Denise Berry, Alice 
Frey, Pat Reeder, Joanie Boyle, Sara Reedy, Sandy Special, Gale Anderson. 

NOT PICTURED: Jenny Boyles — secretary, Karen Colbert — membership chairman, Nanc>- Gladwell, Cindy Brown, Celeste Miller, Sandy Murray, 
Valerie Stewan, Paula Lauffer, Barbie Soloman, Terri Thumm, Penny George, Kim Dunkle, Pam Harper, Kim Smith, Pam Mitchell, Mickey Win- 
free, Debbie Eastep, Leigh Goldsmith, Joyce Lookabill, Sissy Roberts, Anne Rushton, Ann Sandor, Julie Pintar, Ann Jeffreys. 



167 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Tcrri Selletti, Diane Person, Karen Hamrick, Kim Petrie, Anne Welch, Debbie TTioma, Debbie Thorpe, Pam Campbell. 
SECOND ROW: Cheryl Prandini, Cathy Henderson, Mary Ellen Hereda, Megan O'Neill, Carla Braham, Jeannine Crites, Denise Dowler. THIRD 
ROW: Mary Sue Preston — secretary, Priscilla Fenton, Jane Rule — secretary, Liz Randolph, Peggy Janeek, Cecilia Hamrick, Marilyn Phillips, Lynn 
Leach, Ann Wilson, Judy McCoy — vice president, Dize Lloyd, Marianne Wares, Mary Cole Horton, Melissa Haught, Valerie Lazzell, Dyan McClain. 
NOT PICTURED: Janice Bunn, Clorinda Colanero, Nancy Dufficld, Tanis Dunivan, Sally Gall, Alexandria Hatcher, Nancy Henning, Allyson 
Kolle, Debbie Kudla, Patty May, Pippa McCoy, Vicki Pyles, Margaret Shaffer, Melanie Smith, Janie Young. 



168 



Kappa Kappa 
Gamma 



The Beta Upsilon chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma is 
now celebrating its 70th year at WVU. Although Kappa 
places a strong emphasis on academics, we also strive to 
develop individualism. Our members and the sorority as a 
whole participate in various campus activities with spirit 
and enthusiasm. Friendships formed here will continue to 
grow throughout our lives and we'll always remember the 
owl, the key and the fleur-de-lis! 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Betty Henderson, Judy Penn, Carole Wiedebusch, Tricia Niemer, Michelle Ford, Suzanne Morgan, Kathy Shaffer. SEC- 
OND ROW: Darlene Kufrin, Malanie Saxer, Andy Speaker, Daria Louise Calvin, Harriet Nelson, Patti Crawford, Jane Morrison, Betsy Klebc. Ann 
Full, Kathy Lazzell, Sarah Palmer. THIRD ROW: Mary Ann Barnard, Jill Britton, Susie Hicks, Sandy Dawson, Jenny Mitchell, Di Badger, Ann 
Watson, Mary McCloskey — president, Mimi Butler, Kathy Kersting, Carol Critchfield, Nancy Dennis. 



169 



Pi Beta Phi 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Carol Cordyack, Beth Fulton, Barbie Hopkins, Cindy Anrulov, Ann Joslyn. SECOND ROW: Pam Harris, Bcv Lindberg, 
Debbie Judge — treasurer, Cindy Butcher, Karen DcVincent — vice president, Jenny Lee, Dee Dee Kelly. THIRD ROW: Jeri Grimm, Margret 
Farrell, Patty Tyson, Audrey Frederick, Debbie Ardisson, Kara Johnson, Alisa Barkey, Susie Joseph, Chris Bucher, Kelly Ford, Vicki Salentro, Mary 
Anne Yoschak, Amy Wildman. 
NOT PICTURED: Donna Cross, Jennifer Kendall — president, Maria Mancini, Marianne Narick, Julie Spencer, Lisa Zannoni, Cindy Crockett. 



170 



I 



Pi Beta Phi 



\Mi^ f ?itlil 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Terry Ayers, Linda Dodd, Lori Berardi, Barb Fehr, Marilyn Dahmer, Catherine Graham. SECOND ROW: Cindy Etter, 
Maggie Foster, Janice Kincaid, Lisa Gerwig, Patti Barnes, Leslie Ward — secretary, Mary Jane Gallagher — vice president, Rita Frazies, Susan Jarvis — 
housemother. THIRD ROW: Barb Alexander, Carolyn Morris, Barb Crow, Carolyn Coombs, Deedy Strickler, Amy Stalnaker, Marion Paskovitch, 
Ethel Detch — vice president, Dana Sharp, Susan Meeker, Susan Morgan. 



Don't call her a sorority girl — call 

her a Pi Phi. 
She is an individual who is a member 

of the first national fraternity for 

women. 
Her goals are limitless, her sisters add 

to her array of friends, her feeling 

of belonging and of being loved. 
Who can be a Pi Phi? An individual, 

someone who wants to share, live, 

and love . . . call her a Pi Phi. 



171 



Intrafraternity Council 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Treasurer Kevin Zech $K'4', President Stoney Burke 24>E, Vice-President Ed Riley ^K^, Secretary Rick Corbitt ATA. 

Intrafraternity Council is the intermediate organization 
between WVU and the 19 existing fraternal organizations. 
The council is responsible for fraternity rush, house com- 
posite pictures, Greek Week activities and upholding the 
constitution. Recently the IFC constitution was ratified to 
meet the changing times, and currently IFC is promoting 
brotherhocxl throughout the fraternal system. 



172 



i 



Alpha Phi Delta 



"Getting involved" at 658 Spruce Street, in their recently 
remodeled house, the Alpha Phi Delta brothers are carrying 
on their Mountaineer spirit as they have been for the past 
52 years at WVU. 




SEATED, left to right; John Snuffer, Al Jones, Dave Rahall. STANDING: Chuck Clement, Jeff Haye, John D. May, Dan Esposito, Steve Hines — 
secretary, Gary Jones — treasurer, Pete DiNardi, Fred Barley — vice president, Ann DiNardi — housemother, Kevin Schane, Tom Catapano, Greg 
Brown — president. Bob Pema, Rusty Harper. 
NOT PICTURED: John Harper, Dave Case, Rocky Holland, Nick Husson. 



173 



Beta Theta Pi 



We, as Betas, are proud of our academic and social 
achievements in recent years, and the chapter's progress 
since 1900. Beta is a feeling that we know is unique in many 
respects on the WVU campus. 










FIRST ROW, left to right: Nick Volakis, John Poalao, John Durbin, Robert Fisher — ie>.retary, Pete Vaziri, Haney Bell, Roger Hager, John Norman. 
SECOND ROW: Jamie Ferguson, Jeff Bumgardner, Jim Beck — president, David Henderson, Walker Ferguson, Paul Virtue, Sweetheart Tec 
Edwards, Dave Fatalleh — secretary, Mike O'Brien — treasurer. THIRD ROW: Doc Daugherry, Jim Stump, Flip Diehl, Mike Guerecka, Crank 
Davis, Mark Rankin, Buddy Watson, Charlie Mishner, Bob Foster, Mack Ingram, Doug Rice. 



I 



174 



Beta Theta Pi 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Doug Wood, Clay Whitlach, Shawn Shepherd, Randy Fazio, John Hushion, Rich Duggan, Carl Hutton, Jim Sponaugle. 
SECOND ROW; Rod Sapp, Bill King, Mark Brown, Dave Jones, Rick Sponaugle, Jackie Edwards, Fred Early, Trent Crable, Dee McLaughlin. 
THIRD ROW: Bruce Gresham, John Wakim, Dee Smith, Mack Ingram, Jeff Rawley, Kirk Hosfelt, Scott Schwanz, Fred Pence. 
NOT PICTURED: Ray Keener, Eddie Marshall, Brad Magro, Jeff Kasmer, Jim Fanok, Jim Copenhagen, Steve Mathias, Bobby Krieg, Kevin Mes- 
singer, Ron Kasserman, Tom Kurre, Rick Zambito, Kevin Eads, Chip Shaffer, Mark Edge, Dave Byers, Doug Olds, Dave Friedberg, Billy Krieg, John 
Gallagher, Nick Nichols, Jeff Davidson, Merg Hoffman, Dave Kayuha, Jim Selletti, Jim Laise, Chip James, Tony Bennett, Rusty Mechling, Bear 
Nebera, John Barrett, Eric Fitzer, Rick Norcini, Mike Mattingly, Jeff Maggied, Brad Connor, Tom Haddad, Mike Daugherry, Bob Marks, Buzz Van 
Kirk, Grunt McClure, Rich Kesselring, Jim Easton, Jeff Van Valey, Dave Ranson, Dave Tuel, Rob Johnson, Ale.x Fortuna, Bill Blake, Jim Spano, 
Brad Messinger, Charles Heyl, Mike Elliot. 



175 



Delta Tau Delta 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Rick Sale, Greg Sproles, Wally McCarrell, J. R. SlaJDC, Jim Morgan, Sundance, Jeff Vandervcxjrt, Jim Zellers — secretary, 
Gary Wiener, Blackie. SECOND ROW: Moses Skaff — vice-president, Kim Germondo, Mike Fitzgerald, David Crivaro, Peter Roth, Dan Dishart, 
Ed Santry, Ed White — president, John Byard. THIRD ROW: Bill Ford, Gary Lancaster, Greg Keane, Steve Brown, Roland Davis, Jim Buzzerd, 
Chuck Waugh, Mike Wilson, Joe Casto, John Riccio — treasurer, Tom linger, Jahn Mentzer, Evan Thurmond, Roger Lockhart, John Scott, Vince 
Quigg, Mike Cavendish, Mark Kessel. FOURTH ROW: Frank Burja, Neal Hogan. 

NOT PICTURED: Roy Ruddle, Dave Johnson, Dick Miller, Dave Broshears, Bill Zipf , Steve Britt, Joe Safety, Doug Malloy, Tim Fisher, Doug 
Korczyk, Tim Thompson, Andy Seymour, Ade Dillon, John Morgan, Gary Mordacci, Bruce Heisler, Tom Kisner, Dick Craft, Mike Pagani, Mike 
Halterman, Joel Burkhalter, Eddie Rinker, Rich Wilson, Jeff Yates, John Matthews, Frank Remchek, Vince Tallarico, George Hott, Mike Powell, 
Steve Rebrovic, A. J. Spcracino, Brett McAtee, Steve Wehner, Tom Turner, Joe Fisher, Mike Delia Mea, Rick West, Marty Becker, Jay Hart, Bill 
Stunz, Dave Anthony, John Conway, Dave Nitsche, Chris Scolata. 



176 



Delta Ta u Delta 



Delta Tau Delta, one of the oldest, largest and strongest 
organizations on this campus, and a recognized leader in the 
Greek system, has enjoyed a year which has only strength- 
ened this tradition. The brothers will always remember the 
Funeral and Christmas Parties, formals, Thanksgiving din- 
ners with Bobby Bowden, the Peach Bowl, Spring break, 
Price Street and EACH OTHER. 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Greg Arnott, Greg Charnok, Neal Hogan, John Enke, Gary Booth, Chuck Zyna. SECOND ROW: Jeff Vance, Rick 
Corbitt, Allen St. Clair, Bob Mohr, Doug demons, Rob Wiggins, Tom Allen. THIRD ROW: Dan Farabaugh, Mike Thompson, Rob Paladino, Bill 
Martin, Kevin Zabian, Chuck Cheatham. FOURTH ROW: Greg Chancy, Greg Luoni, Wayne Doverspike, Rob Newton, Bill Wilson, Jeff Hutton, 
Ron Lombardi, Boo Wooten, Vic George, Jim Ford, Dave Hawkins, Jimmy Herold, Randy Donahoe, Dick Hott, Mark Williams, Duke Hudson, 
Dino Zagarelli. 



177 



Kappa Alpha 




FIRST ROW, left to right: George Arata, Garry Thompson, Brent Hawkins — secretary. Max Maksemetz, Joe Folmar, Randy Shepler, Bill Hagedorn. 
SECOND ROW: Bill Baird, Mike Struble, Jim Bero, Doug Pell, Bill Work, Ted Glaser, Ed Pendleton, Bill Roberts. THIRD ROW: Tom Ponzurick, 
Joe Magnone, Clayton Chacko, Tom Rowe, Jordan Weber, Bill Vanek, Jim Hawkins, Dave Ruse, Harry Kemmer, Steve Crowell, Mike Urtso — vice 
president, Paul Holder, Dave Gif ford, John Robens, Art Harford, Keith Kirby, Brent Bush, Frank Lawson, Joe Kolarik — treasurer, Paul Puskar, Bill 
Brewer — president. 



Chivalry is the order of the day. 
As the men gather round at oV KA 

Southern hospitality, there's nothing grander; 
Is at its best at this stately manor. 



"We're brothers for life — Not day-to-day. 



4 



178 



Kappa Alpha 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Mark Re, Bill Kusniar, Gftg Diserio, Mark Kennemond, Rande Whitam, Chuck Mooney, Mike Jarrett, Dave Forman. 
SECOND ROW: Kevin Peterson, Jim Citro, Eric Golden, Jeff Kirby, Derrick Barr, Bruce Bowling, John Hagedom, Jay Kelley, Chris Hawkins, 
Chris Vining. THIRD ROW: Jim Jackson, Bill Rumbaugh, Tom Beggs, Mike Ganier, Mark Myers, Doug Bartoe, Wes Kindleberger, Bud Warman, 
Dennis Boyle, Kevin Peterson, Woody Miller. 

NOT PICTURED: Ron Gigliotti, Daniel Meyer, Kenneth Cole, Ron Swantek, James Romine, Dave Mayfield, Scott Mayo, Bill Mclntyre, Steve 
Maggied, Mike Randall, Randy Mundell, Jef f Fox, Steve Johnson. 



179 



iMMlUf 








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SL^^^MMW^ ^^lEE 





2T^1E f ' 



3 '«3ela riicla IJi 




\9 ^ 75 



lUcsl 'JiriijiniQ UiuultsUij 








180 



Phi Gamma Delta (Fiji) 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Donny Hehr, Lucky, Andy Addy, Dave White Sl'X.OND R( AV: Joe Cavallo, B^.b Sotak, Jim Erb, Mrs. Jamison — 
housemother, C. D. Patton, Lenny DeCarlo, Fall Sweetheart Ann Ullum, Dickie Doheny, Chris Erb, Sam D'Andelet. THIRD ROW: Bob Snyder, 
E)on DeCarlo, Nick Bombardiere, Scott Jones, Mark Obermann — treasurer, Ed Harbert, John France, Jim Rinker, Tom Palmquist, Steve Jennings, 
Steve Evrard, Bob Deck, Tom Lenhart, Mark Roth — secretary, Dave Wakely, Bob May — secretary. FOURTH ROW: Steve Bittner, Bob Harman, 
Dan McCaf ferry, John Fornal. 

NOT PICTURED: Jim Comerci — president. Bill Holcomb, Noel Doheny, Rich Lukowski, Bill Martinelli, Jay Mills, Eddie Parker, Mike Rafa, 
Doug Loudon, Rick Shaffer, Jim Snyder, Allen Wilson, John Chandler. 



"Friendship the Sweetest Influence" best describes the feelings of the 
members of Phi Gamma Delta, for friendship is the essence of brotherhood. 
Through our total involvement in all aspects of college life, we can claim, 
"it's truly a distinction to be a Fiji!" 



181 



Kappa Sigma 

K2. 




- -. . V 



FIRST ROW, left to right: Bill Brubakcr, Kevin Bums, Chip Ball, Scott Andersen, Tom Clerkin — secretary, Lurch. SECOND ROW: Randy Hoff- 
man, T. J. Vogel — vice president. Bob Chiesi — president. Bob Knight, Mike Shepherd, Rich Mallory, Steve Balombini, Todd Burke, Steve Matulis, 
Tim Priddy, Tom Baird, Tom Whaling. 

NOT PICTURED: Todd Foster — treasurer, Bernie Kania, Jack Baird, Jeff DeVore, Keith Connor, Charlie Appel, Leon Ryan, Jeff Berg, Dick Billo, 
Ned Durban, Ralph Pelham, Gerry Howard. 



The Gamma Phi chapter received its charter in 1918. The 
chapter is one of 177 across the U.S. and Canada. We at 
WVU are proud of our brotherhood and friendship. 



182 



Phi Delta Theta 



Constantly growing and becoming more active on the 
WVU campus. Phi Delta Theta remains large enough to 
give you the spice and variety from life, but small enough 
to keep the brotherhocxl alive. Phi Delt's are active intramu- 
rally, and along with our outside activities, we rank among 
the best academically. West Virginia's Alpha chapter says 
"It's great to be a Phi Delt." 




FIRST ROW, left to right; Dave Yaeger, Rick Falascino, Bruce Spinnenweber, Rich Kunkel — secretary, Michael Sabo, Bob Turner, John Parrel], Ed 
Bashan, Clint Moreland, Arthur Scott. SECOND ROW: Greg Paxton, John Russell — president, Scott Doddrill, Phil Gazarelli, Tom Kaiser, Kirk 
Doddrill, Bill Knott, Brad EUing, Bill Tomajko. 

NOT PICTURED: Joe Loeber, Andrew Doman — vice president, Dave Kot, Tom George, John Plansky, Dave Hicks, Richard Stewan, Randy Peter- 
son, Richard Walters, Mike Shepherd, Richard Dattola, Robert Schuler, Jim Wolfe, Bruce Raker — treasurer. Kirk Spiegel, Louie Daugherty. 



183 



Phi Kappa Psi 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Bill Wymcr, Mike Hopkins, Kim Craig, Bill Appleby, Andy Good — vice president, D. B. Teter, Bob Bird — president. 
SECOND ROW: Dale Ruben, Keith Mangini, Jeff Tennant, Steve Jenkins, Dave Morris, Charlie Linaburg, Doug Mundy, Jim Lorenze, Gary 
Waters, Tim Whalen, Larry Gof f , Doug Hall, Dave Burkhardt, Dave Zeigler, Dennis Elliott, Sam Wagner, Tim Miller. THIRD ROW: John Idone, 
Jeff Westfall. Bill King, Roy Sctzer, Roger Cutright, Jay Barron, Mark Nelson, Rick Ott, Bob Myers, Paul Wallis, Wayne Hall — treasurer, Tim 
Maddox, Rick Jones. 



West Virginia Alpha represents not only Phi Kappa Psi, 
but indeed the spirit of all fraternities. Founded at W. Va. 
in 1890, her life and name are inseparable from the tradi- 
tions, achievements, and purposes of West Virginia Univer- 
sity. 



)84 



Phi Kappa Psi 




FIRST ROW, left to right: John Morris, Dave Pill, Clay Wymcr, Pat Whakn. SECOND ROW: Tim Lannan, Greg Lehman, Junior Taylor, Bruce 
Caveney, Phil Stevens, Jeff Carmichael, Mike Waldeck. THIRD ROW: Rory Galloway, Jeff Stevens, Scott Wilcher, Brian Hall, Fred Fitzhugh, Mark 
Calabrace, Ed Peer, Mark Starcher, Greg Veach, Mike Clowser — secretary. Rick Gallagher, Pat Parsons, Butch Hannah, Doug Schetzel, Charlie For- 
ren, Al Bonner, Bob Minehart, Buck Morrison, Bill Blankman, Rob Sites. FOURTH ROW: Tom Wiley, Chip Bartoletti, George Warner, Steve 
Roderick — secretary, Charlie Haslebacker, Ron Gaydos, Paul Nichols, Joey Thorn, Paul Pack, Jay Koch, Mark Erwin, Grant Zech, Frank Hutton. 
NOT PICTURED: Mike Bowen, Bob Holland, Dan Pears, Kevin Zech, Marc Haugen, Ed Riley, John Brizzi, John Davis, Ed Furbee, Tony Tuckwil- 
ler, Dick Ratcliff, Bob Fox, Chip LaCava, Ray Ponceroff, Butch Riley, Terry Bowden, Paul Payne, Doug Laughlin, John Blair, Bob Visotcky, John 
Wilson. 



185 




Phi Sigma Kappa 




KNEELING, left to right: Jeff Rueff, Luke Kelly. FIRST ROW: Brian Black, Joe Blaszkow, Dave Sandy, Alan Berg, Doug Prostko, Zack Ncu- 
meyer, Dave Poling, Chad Rolfe, Dan Dicky, Dave Kosar — secretary. SECOND ROW: John Shipley, Mike McCutcheon, Mike Mahalik, Bob 
Mc-Ginnis, Chuck Chabal — vice president, Jim Miller, Mike Johnson. THIRD ROW: Ken Duffus — treasurer, Allen Staggers — president. Rick 
Johnson, Tom Roesser, Mark Rorrer, Bill Wilson, Chuck Mason. 

NOT PICTURED; Kelly Wright, Roger Knopp, Ed Craft, Jim Lester, Warren Kelly, Bill Keeler, Martin Woodall, Mike Solmon, George Farmer, 
George Turdnchik, Roger Glover. Verna Edgell — housemother. 

Founded February 24, 1893, Delta chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa is the second oldest fraternity on campus. The WVU chap- 
ter boasts to having initiated more than 1,400 members; more than any chapter in the country. The primary goal of Delta 
chapter is to promote individuality. 



186 



Sigma Nu 



Gamma Phi chapter of Sigma Nu has the unique distinc- 
tion of being one of the oldest fraternities on campus, while 
also being the youngest. Founded in the early 1900's the 
chapter was re-founded late last year. Sigma Nu is a small, 
but growing chapter. Activities of the year have run a spec- 
trum from numerous social activities and a broad involve- 
ment in the intramurals program to social services for such 
organizations as UNICEF and the Heart Fund. 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Scott Leurquin — president, Shan McKwean, Dave Unger, Jeff McDougal — vice president, John Shanlc. SECOND 
ROW: Tom Holfiert, Vince George, Romaine Keseaker, Allen Yearick, Dave Zdrojewski — treasurer, Jay McBce. THIRD ROW: George Hansen, 
Tim McGaha, Doug Divirgilio, Dave Koval, Steve McBee. 
NOT PICTURED: Randy Mooney — secretary. 



187 



Sigma Chi 



Chartered in 1895, Sigma Chi is now in its eightieth year 
at WVU. With a membership from such diverse back- 
grounds as Landscape Architecture and Mining Engineering 
to Political Science and History, Sigma Chis can be found 
all over the University's campus. The fraternity itself is 
active in many different aspects of "college life," too. The 
UNICEF drive, Christmas parties for underprivileged chil- 
dren, fund raising for Wallace Village for Children, and 
Derby Days are permanent fixtures on Sigma Chi's calen- 
dar. 




bfill 



n 



u 



UJlL 




FIRST ROW, left to right: John Mullen, Rob Johnson, Rick Gorrell, Phil Sabree. SECOND ROW: Dave Shipley, Rocky Stout, Chuck Comer, Marc 
Golden — vice president, Phil Mason, Michael Victorson — president. Brad Parker, Trey Henshaw, Jim Ray. THIRD ROW: Ken Mansfield, Jim 
Blackwell, Steve Goad, Bart Hillenbrand, Keith Simon, Harry Kammer, Jon Walls, Dan Mazzarini, Mark Pennington, Paul Buechler, Louis Halstead, 
Dave Drennen, Sam Crawford, Dave Hincy. 



188 



Sigma Chi 



>! ? 



IT > i 






nJl 





FIRST ROW, left to right: Terry Richardson, Alan Bloom, Jamie Williams, Jim Pohl, Jim Lienbach, Doug Taylor, David Silver, Bruce Mahin. SEC- 
OND ROW: Randy Carpenter, Keith Colgan, Wally Helmer, Scott Randolph, Gage Lightner, Bruce Kuhn, Bill Wolko, Jed Di Paolo, Kevin Ken- 
dralla. Jay Gamer, Barry Birckhiad, Mike Crawford, Jerry Nemeroff , Woody Runner, Bert McCabe. THIRD ROW: Don Lucas, Ray Nungesser, 
Steve White — treasurer, Dave Bishop, Jeff Miller, Scott Albertson, Ed Painter, Jim Sutherland, Gary Baiocchi, Tom Phipps, J. C. Powell, Tom 
Shemberger, Kim Wade, Dean Somerville, Rich Ford, Brian Vallandingham, John Stark — secretary, Frank Surotchak, Rich DelGrande, Jeff Everhart, 
Greg Glass, Roben Woodrum. 

NOT PICTURED: Rick Whiting, Jerry Pohl, Don Spickler, John Harman, Brian Wilson, Rick Hill, John Kearnery, John Robenson, Ralph Ballard, 
Marc Bloom, Dave Johnson, Jerry Joy, Nick Fanto, Mike Kearns, John Burdette, Mark Halbritter, Kent Geis, Ray Burke, Mike Yanero. 



189 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Debbie Fritz, Jim Kratsas. Ken Kraft. SECOND ROW: Steve Knopp, John Baker, Bob Basinger, Steve Bush, Roy 
Heidelbach, Scott Burke, Joe Connell, Tom Hager, Lynda Arnold, Sherry Ward, Bob Legg, Herb Mullens, Beth Dcicas, Dan Lucarini. THIRD ROW: 
Bob Dosier, John Duske, Debbie Wilseck, John Cook, Bernie Bachmann. Jamie D'Agostico, Steve Edens, Tom Berry, Tracy Hough, Jeff Myers, Ron 
Montgomery, Jack Williams, Steve Lochbaum. FOURTH ROW: Ken Schroeder, Jim Pierce, Betsy Peterson, Griff Graham, Susan Blair, John Van 
Skiver, Keith Horton, Lynn Berkely, Gary Springer. 

NOT PICTURED: Matt Bardes, Ron Laupp, Mark Constance, Ken Wallen, Blair Parker, Dave Michaek, Rusry Davis, Joe Braley, John Baker, Mark 
Stewart, Jim Fasnacht, Jim Elliot, Dave Loy, John Ryan, Derby Laskin, Caren Lehmann, Brroke Curtis, Patty Evans, Laurel Simpson, Jo Ann Schauss, 
Linda Stone. Leilani King. 



190 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Randy Hill, Diane Cross, Tom McNeish, Karla Strehle, Scott Engle, Rich Williams, Roger Williams. SECOND ROW: 
Bill Lylc, Bill Peard, Justin Cunningham, Greg Tilley — treasurer, Alice Parker, Mary Jo Stehney, Heather Lackey, Bruce O'Neil — secretary, John 
Graff, Dennis Klingensmith, Sam Wash. THIRD ROW: Doug Harman, John Reinauer, Jim Steed, Gary Brown, Jackie Donnellon, John Peard, 
Oscar Sanchez, Sally Christopher, Greg Housman, Mike Rich, Larry Schoonover, Kathy Schoonover, Chip Poleway, Bill Courtney. FOURTH ROW: 
Mike Scott, John Hall, Leonard Paul, Tom Hill — president, Stan Gwinn, Rich Hermann, Kevin Burke — vice president, Jan Meek, Barb Lilly, Dave 
Davis. 



Since its national founding in 1901, one 
of the main ideals of Sigma Phi Epsilon has 
been a constant striving to maintain a 
closely knit brotherhood and the WYU 
Beta chapter has been no exception. It is 
brotherhood that detonates the explosive 
Sig Ep parties and we share our brother- 
hood with our Golden Heart Little Sisters 
who have also grasped on to our unique fel- 
lowship. 



191 



Ta u Kappa Epsilon 



Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, established on 
January 3, 1923, has been a unique learning expe- 
rience for over 50 years providing men with 
social; educational, and leadership opportunities. 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Mark Mickey, Davis Arbuckle, Bob Bradey, Dick Hellman, Mark Weincr, Ed Mickey. SECOND ROW: Stephenie Ven- 
tura, Lee Barko, Liz Doane, Kathy KJemm, Diane Epling, Janet Owens, Kathy Westfall — sweetheart, Teresa Caste, Teresa Westfall, Jo Ann Lewis, 
Mary Ellen Koerner. THIRD ROW: Larry Barlow, Rex Buckley, Danny Fernandez, Vasilio Makrs, Randy Duff, Brad Armentrowel, Ed Ball — vice 
president. Chuck McCreery, Dan Christy, Adam Leiden, Greg Bail, Duane Thorpe — treasurer. FOURTH ROW: Doug McGuigan, Russell Carolli, 
Greg Kenny — secretary, John Schmitz, Phil Day — president. 



192 



Pi Kappa Alpha 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Daniel Snyder, Bill Robens, Tim Murphy, Steven Carey, Lou Lemon, Mike McGee. SECOND ROW: Darryl Allen, Mark 
Fitzpatrick, Joe Pompei, Mike Reggerrio, Doug Tregoning, Bill Bridy. George Anton, Bruce Kidd, Jeff Moncman. THIRD ROW: Gary Gorecki, Jim 
Virtue, Bob Kidwell, Vic Warzinski, Ray Mayhew — president, Dallas McGinnis, Owen Reeves, Tom Horvath, Jim Baker, Dave Duralia, Steve 
Buelich — vice president, John Travanti, Bill Wallace — treasurer, Chester Kiska, Bob Ringel, Dave Willman, Ken Virgin, Mark Sahuerger, An 
Lallone, Tony Mastromichalis. FOURTH ROW: Rich Harcharic, Gary Comisso, Greg Tisik. 

NOT PICTURED: Gene Kline — secretary, John Tecca, Pat Buttl, Jim Werling, Randy James, Mike Rose, Ron Rambo, Bill Palica, John Gillespie, 
Neo Malonas, Dave Camalletti, Paul Camalletti, Phil Kennedy, Al Davis. 



Pi Kappa Alpha was founded on March 1, 1868 on the Univer- 
sity of Virginia and was established at WVU on December 6, 
1904. Currently Alpha Theta supports a 50 man chapter. Two 
outstanding Pikes on campus are Dr. Leyland Byrd and Bobby 
Bowden. 

The Pikes pride themselves in their 1940 chevy fire truck. 



193 



Theta Chi 



Theta Chi has been on this campus since 1921 and has 
been a fraternity based on its proud traditions and a close 
brotherhood. This brotherhood is further strengthened by 
strong intramurals and our hellish social life. Theta Chi has 
acquired a new branch of its organization, "The Daughters 
of the Crossed Swords." 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Shelly Hassen, Jeff Brinkman, i r.in.mc Pulice, Larry Clark, Kim Smith. SECOND ROW: Mark Fowler, Sandy Justice — 
Dreamgirl, Paulette Justice, Gary Dalby, Lissa Craig, John Pulice, Patti Wyatt, Ron Bottoif. THIRD ROW: Steve Gylovich, Nancy Eakin, Nancy 
Whitlock, Paul Weilgus, Diana Mihalec, Poe Reed, Lindsey Allen, Susie Murtland, Cathy Koerbcr, Calvin Green, Jamie Miscio, Gayle Armstrong, 
Gayle Young, Walter Kozlowski, Monica Sturges,John Helean — president, Kathy Lewis. 



1 



194 



Theta Chi 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Chico Ruiz, Mike Wright. SECOND ROW: Pat Connors — vice president. Rich Rujak, Joyce Pritchett, George Drake, 
Joni Shrewsbury, Gary Dalby, Gina Quattro, Kim Magistri, Bill Gaunt, Rocky Clark. THIRD ROW: Marc Law, John Helean — president, Lisa 
Pfohl, Lugene Florio, Linda Dancoff, Kathy Jacobus, Nancy Nicholson, Anthony Lattanzi, Donna Powers, Therea Manning, Tammy Thorpe, Claudia 
Smith, James Champlain. FOURTH ROW: Mike Mason, Keith Kokal, Jim Vizzini, Jack Martin, Scott Thompson, C. Preston Peters Barb Marcus, 
Hank Seidel — treasurer, Maynard Honabach, Carol Lutes, Bill Altman. 

NOT PICTURED: Terry Craig, Steve Baldal — pledge marshall, Steve Holt, Rusty Hover, Nick Lalich, Rodney Louck, Dennis Barrick, Tracey Hor- 
chler, Sally Swanson, Jeannie Vorko, Paula Stanton, Judy Black, Jan Hemphill, Sue Snavely, Mindi Huff, Ann Murphy, Dawn Goho, Louisa Coffin, 
Chris Coburn, Gretchen Gross, Jenny Lee, Nancy Gladwell. 



195 



Rush . . . 



Each semester a week of rush goes on in each Greek house. Men and women rush 
the sororities and fraternities ending the week by joining the Greek system. Pledge 
Day finds a mad rush to the chosen house. 








^4^. -- '*i<f *>*«« 




196 




Greeks do not just do things with other Greeks, they get 
involved on campus too. For instance, the Ugly Man on 
Campus Contest. 





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197 



Greek Week 



Greek Week combines all sororities and fraternities in 
teams for the Chariot races and Greek games. Helen of 
Troy is voted for and Hercules drinks for his fame. This is a 
week for fun and games and all Greeks. 







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198 








199 



Sigma Chi Derby Days 




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Sigma Chi Derby Days had their start in California in 
the 1920's with a Sadie Hawkins Day-type aaivity. By the 
1950's the event was a day of field games including various 
relay races and contests. In 1976 Derby Days lasted a week 
and was packed with events to raise money for Wallace Vil- 
lage. 










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201 



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SPORTS 



Victory and Defeat, Winners and 
Losers, the Spectator and the Partici- 
pant — each in their own way striving 
for success. Sports have helped fulfill 
our desire for competition and recog- 
nition. This desire is felt keenly by 
the athlete and the fan. 

Sports have affected all of us. To 
some it is a brief respite — relaxing 
with a game of tennis or cooling off 
with a swim. To others it is a religion 
— sitting in 30° weather waiting for 
the game to begin or standing in line 
for hours to get seats at the Coliseum. 
To some sports is a meal ticket to an 
education, recognition, or fortune. 

This section tries to cater to all 
these — the fair weather sportsman, 
the sportsmaniac, and the fame- 
seeker. In essence, however, it is dedi- 
cated to the man and woman who 
sfjend hours a day, days a week, and 
weeks a year honing their talents and 
skills in an effort to satisfy them- 
selves and their fans. 

Athletics are a vital part of life at 
WYU. The dedication and enthusi- 
asm of WVU ATHLETE 1973-1976 
has helped formulate a record of 
which we can all be proud. 

While we may have lost some con- 
tests, the memories of SPORTS 
WVU 1975-1976 were ones of victory 
and success. 

Roberta Bastin, Sports Editor 
Anne Conley, Intramural Editor 




203 



The 1975 Football season proved to 
be the big surprise in the WVU 
sports scene. Predicted by some to 
finish 0-10-1, the Mountaineers put 
some "mountain magic" together to 
end the season with an 8-3 record. To 
top off a fantastic football season and 
to ring in the New Year, they 
defeated North Carolina State 13-10 
in the Peach Bowl. 



WVU 
50 
28 
35 
28 

14 
10 
38 
17 
31 
19 



Temple 
California 
Boston Col. 
So. Meth. 
Penn St. 
Tulane 
Va. Tech 
Kent St. 
Pitt 

Richmond 
Syracuse 



PEACH BOWL 

13 N.C. State 



7 

10 
18 
22 
39 
16 

7 
13 
14 
13 
20 

10 










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204 




BELOW — FRONT ROW, left to right: Assistant Coach Chuck 
KJausing, Ben Williams, Dan Kendra, Jack Eastwood, Vance Pettigrew, 
Tom Loadman, Kirk Lewis, Jeff Fette, Tom Bowden, John Schell, 
Chuck Braswell, Dan Williams, Rory Fields, Tom Florence, Leon Car- 
ter, Glen Corbin, Tom Pridemore, Anhur Owens, Mark Burke, Assist- 
ant Coach Garrett Ford. SECOND ROW: Assistant Coach George 
Henshaw, Bill McKenzie, Rocky Gianola, Paul Holland, Emil Ros, 
Dave Riley, Steve Lewis, Sterling Price, Paul Lumley, Terry Bowden, 
Rich Cecil, John Lasavage, Greg Anderson, Dwayne Woods, Chuck 
Brooks, Heywood Smith, Paul Jordan, Jim Miller, Ken Culdertson, 
John Ansell, Fran Gleason, Bruce Collins, Al Gluchoski, Tom Anton. 
THIRD ROW: Equipment Manager Carl Roberts, Assistant Coach 
Paul Moran, Assistant Coach Jerry Bruner, Assistant Coach Don 
Young, Greg Dorn, Tony Napolillo, Chris Ferguson, Rich Miskiel, 
Steve Dunlap, Mark Eliopulus, Charlie Gaston, John Figurski, Terry 
Kittlewell, Tom Brandner, Brian Gates, Roy Podbesek, Dave Wilcher, 
Ray Marshall, Lester Johnson, Rick Pennypacker, Randy Weppler, Clay 
Singletary, Rich Luchowski, Scott Rummell, Tom Creeden, Assistant 
Coach Frank Cignetti, Assistant Coach Greg Williams, Assistant Coach 
Mike Working, Head Coach Bobby Bowden. FOURTH ROW: Bob 
Kaminski, Steve Farley, Wayne Gatewood, Rick Shaffer, Chuck Smith, 
Dave Van Halanger, Chuck Kelly, Benny McDay, Bill Robb. Ed Bed- 
narik, Scott MacDonald, Randy Swinson, Buzzy TTiornton, Larry Ket- 
tlewell, Gary Lombard, Bubba Coker, Gary Bane, Joe Saunders, Andy 
Peters. 




205 



The Mountaineers opened the season with an impressive victory over the 
Temple Owls in Morgantown. Fine rushing by Artie Owens, Dwayne Woods, 
Ron Lee, and Heywood Smith offset Chuck Muncie and the California Bears as 
the Blue and Gold defeated the PAC-8 runners-up 28-10. 




206 




Returning to Morgantown the 
Mountaineers squared off against 
Boston College. This pivotal eastern 
game saw WVU come out on top 35- 
18 in front of a capacity crowd. 





207 






Win number four came against Southern Methodist of the powerful Southwest 
Conference. WVU defeated the Texas team 28-22. 






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208 



TM 





The Mountaineers faced a mid-season slump as they were 
defeated by Penn State, 39-0 at University Park. The team 
returned to Morgantown to face Tulane in the 1975 
Homecoming Game. Once again they were defeated, 16-14. 



iW^a^v^k^nB 




209 



The Mountaineers got back on the 
winning track with a 10-7 win over 
Virginia Tech. Their sixth win came 
against Kent State by a score of 38-13. 

The following week arch-rival Pitt 
invaded Mountaineer Field. In one of 
the greatest games ever seen in the 
history of Mountaineer Field, a last 
second field goal by Bill McKenzie 
lifted WVU over the Panthers by 17- 
14. Cheering and celebrations lasted 
throughout the week. Buoyed by the 
Pitt thriller, the Mountaineers 
defeated Richmond on the road 31-13. 
They closed the regular season with a 
heartbreaking loss to Syracuse, 20-19- 






210 






211 










212 





Several records were broken during 
the 1975 season, Artie Owens set a 
career rushing mark of 2,552 yards. 
His performance against Southern 
Methodist gained him the honor of 
Offensive Player of the Week by 
Sports Illustrated. 

Bill McKenzie set a new 
consecutive extra point mark with 34 
straight. Dan Kendra completed 28 
passes against Syracuse. 

A new attendance record for home 
games was set with nearly 200,000 
attending the six home games. 





213 



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214 






215 




PEACH 

BOWL 

1975 





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The 8th annual Peach Bowl was 
played in Atlanta December 31, 1975, 
in Atlanta Stadium. Both WVU and 
N.C. State had played in this post- 
season classic. In 1972 the Wolfpack 
defeated the Mountaineers, 49-13. 

In 1975 the story was a little 
different. Buoyed by an aerial 
touchdown from Dan Kendra to 
Artie Owens with four seconds left in 
the first half, the Mountaineers 
dominated the second half. 

The winning score came on a 
touchdown pass from Dan Kendra to 
Scott McDonald in the fourth quarter. 

Kendra was named the game's 
outstanding offensive player and Ray 
Marshall was the outstanding 
defensive player. 

The Peach Bowl was Bobby 
Bowden's final game as Mountaineer 
mentor as he takes over the reins at 
Florida State. Frank Cignetti, 
Bowden's offensive coordinator was 
named head coach. 

If the 1975 season is any indication, 
1976 should be a real fireworks of 



excitement. 



217 




BACK FROM LEFT: Head Coach Joedy Gardner, Graduate Assistant Jackie Joe Robinson, Sid Bostick, Russell Chapman, ^^0"^"^;^ ^^J^^' ^""i"' 
Lewis, Mauricce Robinson, Stan Boskovich, Warren Baker, Associate Coach Jim Amick and Associate Coach Bill Rycza). FRONT FROM Lhi- . 
Graduate Assistant Jeff Deyo, Equipment Mgr. Ed Crawford, Dana Perno, Tony Robertson, Earnest Hall, Dave McCardle, Bob Huggins, Trainer Sam 
Keggeris and Manager Bill Hines. 



I 



218 



Men's 



Basketball 







219 



The Men's Basketball Team had 
their finest season since 1968. They 
finished the regular season with a 15- 
13 record. For the second year in a 
row the Mountaineers hosted the 
ECAC Southern Division Tourna- 
ment. They were defeated by George 
Washington in the opening contest. 
In the Consolation Game, they 
defeated Villanova for 3rd place in 
the tournament. Four year senior 
starter Warren Baker was a member 
of the All-Tournament Team in the 
ECAC play-off. 






220 






221 



The Mountaineers, under the guidance of Joedy Gardner 
enter the 1976-1977 season without four seniors from this 
year's team. Gone is Warren Baker, four year starter and fan 
favorite; Stan Boskovich, leading scorer; Earnie Hall, floor 
general and playmaker; and Dave McCardle, an experienced 
letterman. 







222 







223 



An experienced nucleus formulates 
the 76-77 team. Returning to lead 
the Mountaineers will be the quick 
play maker Bob Muggins; Russell 
Chapman, a strong rebounder and 
shooter; and Tony Robertson, a fine 
guard who dazzled the fans with his 
shooting expertise. 






224 





Sophomores saw a lot of action on 
the hardwoods this year. Sid Bostick 
proved to be an outstanding defensive 
player; junior college transfer Tommy 
Roberts contributed with his height 
and rebounding; and Maurice 
Robinson continued to improve in all 
aspects of play to emerge as one of 
the outstanding young players in the 
area. 

Freshmen Junius Lewis and Dana 
Perno saw action and showed a lot of 
control and poise against the more 
experienced players. They should 
offer three more outstanding seasons 
for the Mountaineers. 




y 



225 



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A 



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226 




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C 



T 




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227 



The 1975-1976 Women's Basketball Team had one of 
their best seasons as they posted a 13-6 record. The team 
broke several records and won their last nine regular season 
games. In the West Virginia State Basketball Tournament, 
they were runners-up. This qualified them for the Mid- 
West Regionals of the Women's NCAA Basketball 
Tournament. This team was the first to qualify for 
tournament play in WVU's history. 






FRONT ROW, left to right: Tern Rosenwald, manager; Ed Crawford, equipment manager; Pam Harper, Beth Shank, Carol Mousseau, Sara Roberts, 
Lynn Buckley, Linda Findo, Cindy "Sam" Booth, captain; Brian Lee, Buckskin Man; Mary Scott, manager. BACK ROW: Kittie Blakemore, head 
coach; Pam Crawford, assistant coach; Jean Mewshaw, Mary Hennen, Susann Schuesler, Cindy Atman, Marianne Rice, Joanne Herald, Leslie Sergy, 
captain; Becky Franklin, Micki Borshaw, trainer; Debbie Imler, trainer; Sue Halstead, trainer. 



228 



Women^s Basketball 







229 






230 





231 



Baseball 
Team 










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232 



FIRST ROW; Frank Pryor, Mickey Kocur, Alfie Riley, Jack Langmaack, Steve Snyder, John Ship- 
ley, Tony Pryor, Mike Stone, Tom Emsweller, Dave Manno, Mark McCarty and Mike Johnson. 
SECOND ROW: Assistant Coach Jim Bialek, trainer Rich Tibbetts, Dick Burns, Tom Gilbert, 
Bruce Clinton, Bill Keeler, Gary Gray, John Henderson, Sam Brock, Jeff Pickering, Tim Don- 
nelly, trainer Steve Cole, Head Coach Dale Ramsburg. 



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The West Virginia Baseball Team, 
19-9, hoped for an ECAC play-off bid 
in the NCAA. 

Having completed one of their 
finest seasons in years, the team was 
led in hitting by Jeff Pickering, Steve 
Snyder, and Bruce Clinton. Jerry 
Mahoney led the team in runs batted 
in. Leading pitchers were Sam Brock 
with a 5-0 record and earned run 
average of 1.29 and Tim Donnelly 
with a 6-1 record and earned run 
average of 2.85. 



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233 



1975 Soccer Team 






234 





Though riddled with dissention, 
the 1975 WVU Soccer Team finished 
the season with a respectable 8-5-1 
record. An experienced nucleus 
returns for the 1976 season. 

Team members are Bob Baker, Rusty Bell, 
Tony Borges, Roberto Calzadilla, Jack Car 
dosa. Bob Cardoza, Steve Cataldo, Paul Cayer, 
John Colombo, David Colt, Fran Girona, 
Gary Glass, Fred Hibbs, Rusty Jacobs, Guy 
LaRoche, Vince Manccini, Jim Mathiowdis, 
Scott Millar, Dan Mullen, Herman Pinto, 
Andy Rees, Jim Smith, Melvin Sourbeer, 
Barry Sullivan, Jeff Van Dine, Rich Wil- 
liams, Doug Zellem, Jim Zylberberg, assist- 
ant coach Ron Shewcraft, head coach John 
McGrath. 




235 







236 



Women^s 
Tennis Team 




The women's tennis team finished 


the 1975 season with an 8-1-1 record 


and a second place finish in the 


state 


championships. 




WVU 






7 


Fairmont State 





7 


West Liberty 





4 


Marshall 


3 


3 


Morris Harvey 


3 


6 


Frostburg 


1 


7 


Fairmont State 





6 


Slippery Rock 





6 


WV Wesleyan 


1 


7 


Salem 





3 


Pitt 


4 


State Tournament 


2nd 


1975 Tennis Team is pictured 


on the 


preceding 


page. 






237 



The 1976 Men's Tennis Team 
finished a fine season with a 15-6 
record. This included a 6-2 home 
record and a 9-4 record on the road. 
Seven shut-outs were recorded by the 
Mountaineers. Double victories were 
taken over Fairmont State and Morris 
Harvey. They also defeated archrival 
Pitt. 





Team members of the Men's Tennis Team are Richard Cole, Tim Dorsey, Dan Haller, Steve Lauria, Dart Meadows, Bill Marshall, Sam Moore, Arnold 
Rotruck, Roben Wilson. They are coached by Stanley Farr. 



238 



Mens Tennis 




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239 



Track and 



Cross Country 





240 



AU-American 
Alex Kasich 



West Virginia University is privileged to have All-Amer- 
ican honors bestowed on cross-country star Alex Kasich. 
The senior from Sharon, Pa. was a consistent and dedicated 
leader well-deserving of the honors he received. 








s 



»■:*■ 





241 



The West Virginia University 
Track Team completed a successful 
season with a 3-0 record. Led by out- 
standing track stars such as Mark 
Burke and Alex Kasich, they took 11 
firsts in the Mountaineer Relays. 
After exams the team will participate 
in the Pitt Invitational and the IC4A 
championships in Philadelphia. 

The Cross Country Team led by 
Ail-American Alex Kasich posted a 4- 
3 record. They posted second place 
finishes in the California State Invita- 
tional and in the Marshall Invita- 
tional. 





242 




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243 



Golf Team 



The West Virginia University Golf Team had a 
disappointing season going into the final week of the year 
with a 4-11 record. They defeated Pitt, Cal. (Pa.) State, 
Muskingum, and Cal. State a second time. They participated 
in the Penn State Invitational, a tournament with a strong 
field. 



r^. 






244 




Women^s Softball 



The West Virginia University's Softball Team initiated its season on the 
WVU athletic scene with an 8-3 record. They took double victories over Morris 
Harvey, Salem, and Ashland College. They split in their series with Ohio State 
and Muskingum. They lost their only contest with Ohio University. 





245 



Men s and Women^s 
Gymnastics 




j^ 



LEFT, TOP TO BOTTOM: Stephanie Judge, Dcbra Thoma, Vanessa Rotruck, Garnet Robinson, Melcena Hunter, Linda Lloyd, Linda Burdctte 
coach, RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM: Teresa Lucas, Rosemary Torre, Dana Morse, Joan Monahan, Maria Torre, Dana Davis, Lavon Smith, Patty 
Morrison assistant coach. 




KNEELING, left to right: Glen Buco, Scott Gembcrling, Herb Amato. SITTING, left to right: Jim Goroney, Dave Grimm. BACK ROW, left to 
right: Gene Diaz assist, coach, Jeff Scott, Dave Hamilton, Steve Swanson, Lenny Hlasnick, Jeff Smay, Phillip Cameron, Bill Bonsall coach, Neil 
Robinson. 



246 




Both of West Virginia's Gymnastic teams finished their seasons with winning 
records. The men's gymnastic team finished their season with a 5-4 slate. Included 
in their losses was a close 169.30-169.10 defeat at the hands of William and Mary. 

The women's gymnastics team was the first in WVU's history to qualify in 
Regional Tournaments. The team, 7-4, qualified for the Mid- West Regionals. 
Their victories included one over Ohio State. 






247 



Men's and Women's 
Swim Teams 




FRONT ROW: Sue Metro, Nancy Patrick, MaUnda Parker, Pam Mauro, Patty KHcollin, Karen M>«ner Denise Ostrom, Meg PhilHps^ SECOND 
ROW: Barb Ewens coach, Nancy Kidd manager, Susan Lefevre, Kathy Veltn, Barb O'lxary, L.z Ann Parker, Nancy Th.mgan, Jane Laughlm, Holly 
Travis, Jane Lefevre, Mary Ann Maschke trainer. Donna Buniski manager. 




248 




The West Virginia University Women's and Men's Swimming Teams finished 
the season with fine records. The women's team finished with a 7-3 record and 
qualified two women for national competition. They hosted the West Virginia 
State Championships and finished first. 

The men's team posted a 8-3 record and placed 7th in the Eastern Regionals. 
Like the women's team, they hosted the State Tournament where they took first 
place. 





249 



Wrestling Team 



The men's wrestling team set a new University record 
(14-5) in 1975. They are coached by Fred Liechti and were 
led by Bob Mendenhall and George Mendenhall. 





^>* 




250 



Women^s Volleyball 




In their second season, the 
Mountaineer Volleyball Team had a 
fine season as they finished with a 16- 
13 record. 

Members of the Team are: FRONT ROW, 
left to right: Carol Houser, Sally Dorwan, 
Judy Onks, Cindy Rigers, Liz Harding, Janet 
Thomas. BACK ROW, left to right: Debbie 
Thorpe, Pat Fey, Marsha McCaslin, Melinda 
Gorman, Arlene Roberts, Lynn Davis, Sue 
Ann Findo. 



Rifle Team 




The WVU Rifle Team culminated 
an outstanding season by winning the 
National Rifle Assoc. Championship. 
They were first out of 620 teams. 

The National Champs are: FRONT, 1. to r.: 
Phil Whitwonh, Kathy Kelly, Steve 
Northway, Elliot Hutchinson, Gary 
Whitman, Scott Bcamon. BACK, 1. to r.: 
Coach Charles Neal, Leonard Paul, John 
Cole, Kevin Richards, Bill Amett and Dan 
Young. 



251 



INTRAMURALS 







252 




Take a group of unorganized, bored, out of shape 
students, looking for fun, add some work, sweat, laughter, 
tears and a tough competitive spirit — what have you got? 
— an intramural team. More and more students every year 
are discovering intramural sports at West Virginia 
University. There are a great many sports offered, ranging 
from flag football to swimming and diving. 

Just sign up on a team and the recreation-intramural 
office takes care of organizing where, when and who you 
will play. Don't worry if you are not really athletically 
inclined, intramural sports are designed primarily to provide 
fun and recreation. If your team is good enough you might 
even win the all campus championship in your sport. In any 
event, you will be sure to meet new people, get some 
exercise and have a great deal of fun, too. 




253 






254 



i 




255 




256 




The 1975-76 All Campus Champions are: 

For Men: 

Football Summit 

Tennis Law School 

Bowling Phi Kappa Psi 

Golf Dadisman 4 

Soccer Old Pros 

Field Goal Kicking Summit 

Basketball BUO A 

Volleyball Old Pros 

Mountain Climb Pi Kappa Alpha 

Cross Country Dadisman 4 

Diving Delta Tau Delta 

Table Tennis Med School 

Swimming Summit 

Handball Old Pros 

Billiards Delta Tau Delta 

Tug-of-War Camputer Center 

Foul Throw 604 Jazz 




257 







258 





The 1975-76 All Campus Champions are: ' 

For Women: 

Flag Football B.Y.A. 

Tennis Beer 

Softball B.Y.A. 

Mock-Track-Meet Arnold 

Waterpolo B.Y.A. 

Volleyball Harv's Honeys 

Swimming Alpha Xi Delta 

Diving Alpha Xi Delta 

8-Ball Stalnaker 

Table Tennis Beer 

Basketball B.Y.A. 

Soccer Campus Crusade for Christ 

Tug-of -War Delta Delta Delta 

Foul Throw Kappa Kappa Gamma 

For Co-Rec: 

Flag Football 604 Grant Avenue 

Volleyball A.CC. 




259 



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ROYALTY 



This 1976 Bicentennial year contin- 
ues to be portrayed as the Royalty 
division opens with Mr. and Miss 
Mountaineer as she appears in her 
"Southern Belle" dress and he in his 
traditional mountaineer attire. Cele- 
brating our past, WVU honored the 
alumni with Homecoming 1975 
including crowning of the queen by 
Governor Arch A. Moore. The Roy- 
alty section closes with today's Miss 
West Virginia University and frater- 
nity sweethearts. 

Sue Day, Section Editor 







261 



Mountaineer 












tiSSU 




262 



Week 





1975 Mr. and Miss Mountaineer are Jim Comerci and 
Rose Vargo. Rose was sponsored by Mortar Board. A senior 
majoring in advertising and journalism, Rose enjoys tennis, 
swimming, dancing, art and guitar. Jim was sponsored by 
Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity. He's a senior in Chemistry 
and enjoys intramural football, basketball, piano and guitar. 

Contestants were judged on university and state 
contributions in leadership, scholarship and spirit. 





263 



Homecoming '75 



Homecoming '75 came to a climax with the 

crowning of Miss Emmy Lou Daughtery of New 

Castle, Pa. She was sponsored by Alpha Xi Delta 

sorority and is a public relations major. Her 

hobbies are growing plants, painting, 

needlepoint, hook rugmaking, ceramics and 

candlemaking. 





»*_ 



>. 



,*" 




264 



That's Entertainment 




265 



Miss WVU Bea u ty Pagean t 



TOP LEFT — 1975 Miss WVU — Tammy Zelenko receiving her 

crown from 1974 Miss WVU Theresa Lucas. 

TOP RIGHT — Miss WVU — Tammy Zelenko. 

BOTTOM — LEFT TO RIGHT: First runner-up — Barbara Hopkins, 

Miss 75 WVU, Miss 74 WVU, Second runner-up — Lesa Furbce. 





266 




Contestants were judged according 
to talent, bathing suit competition, 
evening gown competition, and a 
personal interview. 



TOP RIGHT — 1975 Miss West Virginia 

Kristi Wick. 






267 



Derby Darling 



Miss Beverly Ratliff was selected 

as Derby Darling for 1976 by Sigma 

Chi fraternity. She represented Delta 

Gamma sorority and is a junior 

majoring in accounting. Beverly is 

president of Delta Gamma and enjoys 

exercising and sewing. 




^^Sii. A 






268 



Helen of Troy 




Miss Jan Hower was named Helen 
of Troy for 1976 after winning a 
charitable contest. Jan is a senior in 
Speech Pathology and Audiology and 
a member of Delta Gamma Sorority. 
She enjoys tennis and swimming. 







269 



Fraternity 




Connie Frye 
Alpha Gamma 



Kay King 

Phi Kappa Psi 



270 



Sweethearts 




Leslie Buck 
Sigma Chi 



Melanie Saxer 
Delta Tau Delta 



Rose Vargo 
Kappa Alpha 



271 



BUO Queen 



1976 BUO Queen, Yvette Jones, and her attendants take 
part in the University's Homecoming Parade. 






272 



Parent Patrons 



Donald C. S+rimbeck 

Mr. Paul Bar+lett and Family 

Dr. and Mrs. R. S. Birckhead 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Powell.Jr. 

Robert Coram 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Landau 

Mr. and Mrs. Dominic V. Pryor 

C. B. Prit+s 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Castagnacci 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Legg 

Jackson L. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. John N. Harvison 

Loyd C. King 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Tyson 

Tony Tiano 

Mrs. Alice M. Icard 

Mr. and Mrs. George S. West 

Pa+ Sheehan 

Mrs. Nancy L. Kent 

Mr. and Mrs. Vance Dei Cas 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Nungesser, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James I. Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Barnes 

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Smith 

Nick and Louise Librich 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Neely 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bavalina 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard N. Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Leroy Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Schneider 

Mrs. James K. Baum 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bradshaw 

Mr.andMrs. O. K.Watkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Dale L. Barnett 

George H. Cosr, Jr. 

Mrs. Kenneth C. Sharret+s 

Mr. and Mrs. James Tallarice 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. DeSanto 

Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Cichock, Sr. 

Maynard and Betty Hunt 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Peters 

Edward G. Schmitz 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Mon 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. Duncan 

J. D. Worley 

Mrs. Doris Ramsey 

Mike Sutyak 

Buly K.Clark 

George P. Kelminsky 

Chester A. Shwmar 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald J. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Canton 

Mr. and Mrs. Waliam B. Legg 

Dr. and Mrs. John M. Daniel 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis G.Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Bowman Beverly 

Mr. and Mrs. John V. Roberts 




273 



Mr. and Mrs. C. R. McComb 

John M. Dougherty 

Mr. and Mrs. James V. Markley 

Harry C. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Es+es 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Boyle, Sr. 

Albert Tompare 

A. L. Prus 

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton W. Hersh 

Mr. and Mrs. G. G. McAllister 

Mr. and Mrs. Q. J. hlumphreys 

Frank M. Cleany 

Walter Koistka 

Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Spanogians 

Mr. and Mrs. N. L Montgomery 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Warden 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Weaver 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry O. Howell 

Mr. and Mrs. James R.Webb 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Smith 

Sheldon R. Brinker 

Mr. and Mrs. L Davis Coombs 

A. B. Forrester 

Mrs. Joyce Markham 

Mrs. Charles Fenton, III 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Smallbridge 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Linger 

Mr. and Mrs. Regis F. Fey 

Mrs. Om Lee J. Kirk 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Zak 

Mr. and Mrs. America Rodighier 

Edmund B. Donner 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Alder Pope 

Mr. and Mrs. Pocca A. Fazio 

Mrs. Claire A. Halden 

Mr. and Mrs. Emeric Bennett 

Dr. Henry M. Bernard! 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester A. Nadolvki 

V. Rev. Fr. Zacharia Nasr 

Glenn L. Schrader 

Thomas A. White 

Jackson M. Farvis 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Valestire 

Mrs. Irene R. Besaha 
Virgil M. Maxson 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Roth 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Romins 

Joe T. Higgins, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Eaglehouse 

Mr. andMrs.WilbertAnsell 

Michael J. Visnic 

Mr. and Mrs. Rine D. Rheault 

David Z. Morgan, MD 

Mrs. Mariorie E. Dorn 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Solow 

Mr. and Mrs. James Mattingly 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony M. Jariynlia 

Colman K. Bero 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Filiaggi 

Charles C. Cyphert 

Robert E. Agsten III 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hohman 

Wisley T. Bitier, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Flower 

John B. Baird 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Boyhont 

James J. Lake 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. George Jacobs 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew M. Baran 

Mr. Arthur Alello 

Anthony L. Ciccolella 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Barnette 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Tabor 

Mark Samsone 

Mr. and Mrs. Stefano Mareini 

Edgar and Carmer Setbff 

James Kevin Burke 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred E. Ratort 

John M. Chameli 

Mr. and Mrs. Judson J. Hodges 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Jebbia 

Dr. and Mrs. R. Edward Hamrick 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Klock 

Mrs. John M. Cole, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Page 

Mr. and Mrs. G. O. Scott 

Carol Fay Kenney 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene R. Kersting 

Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Bardette 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Calabro 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Allen 



J"' 


• 


v 


1 


^ 




iw Ji^B^ 




1^ 



^la 



tf 



IV 



'P 



274 



Dr. George A. Chapman 

Mrs. Joseph Rlchara 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester L. Clina 

Mrs. Virginia L. Yerkovich 

Richard D. Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Hudak 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brewer, Jr. 

Michael J. Reeser 

Rev. and Mrs. L. A. La Prade 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. C. Hammett 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Mams 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Noyes Kinder 

Robert J. Kus+er 

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Hook 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Bonnies 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Hollard 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank D. Hereda 

Dr. and Mrs. Bernard J. Grubler 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Hildebrant, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Danw J. Laoney 

Mildred M. Bruce 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Yost 

Con Jordan 

Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Welsenstein 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. SIdow 

Chester O. Williams 

Keith W. Bailes 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Connally 

Mr. and Mrs. William O. Barnard 



Mr. and Mrs. Jay Kalo 

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory H. Paskovitch 

Vincert Rellly 

William and Patricia Truax 

J. H. McCloskey, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Billy A. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Becker 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Somervllle 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Slawson 

Herbert Haslebacher 

Frank J. Vanek 

James Y. Longacre, Jr. 

Robert C. Bricker, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. DeBiase 

Milton and Virginia Bailes 

Mr. and Mrs. Domenic J. CatlgnonI 

Chester E. Elklns 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mendenhall 

Mr. and Mrs. Noel Dohery 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ungvarky 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Kratzer 

Fred B. Arnold 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy G. Arnott 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd R. Daughterty 

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Burks 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Rebrovic 

Fred H. HIbbs, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Chesny, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Keith Zech 

Mr. and Mrs. Forrest L. Aethtel 





275 





Mr. and Mrs. Harley J. Ellsworth 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Schumacher 

Nicholas J. Skezas 

Mr. and Mrs. William W. McCarrel! 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Darley 

Mrs. Therisa A. Lasher 

Harry Reinhorn 

Alvin O. Foster 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Mainella 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Gorman 

Muriel M. Dodds 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Garber 

Mrs. Evelyn D. Fisher 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald G. Griffin 

Mr. and Mrs. Austin H. Garder, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayman Hoalcraft 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer M. Padon 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Bone, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Blake 

Angilo Comerci 

Mrs. Charlotte Parich 

Mr. and Mrs. Griel E. Goff 

Susie A. Weimer 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Felice 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Knotts, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Fators, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roberts Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Schroder 

Dr. and Mrs. Olin C. Glass 



276 




M M^i^ * .^ mm 







Mr. and Mrs. John F. Snyder 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Wright 

Milford Gibson 

John R. Gillispie 

Norman E. Anderson 

Dr. and Mrs. John P. McGee 

W. M. Isiminger, O.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lofher Shaulis 

Mr. Ruth Raines 

Patti A. Gage 

Dawn A. Bo+sford 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. White, Sr. 

Lewis Q. Baxter 

Dr. and Mrs. Wllllann A. Yates 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Beneke 

Mrs. Violet P. Husk 

J. H. Beile 

Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Hankin 

George B. Ordeck 

Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Stuck 

Barbara and Harry Slavich 

Fred and Kay Craig 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Maksenntz 

Mr. and Mrs. Siegel R. White, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Spencer, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gluchoski 

Mr. and Mrs. Jos. B. Brandner 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Dotesta 

Roy C. Taplin 

Mr. and Mrs. F. L. McGaha 

Mr. and Mrs. Marion J. Gongola 

Mr. and Mrs. Dominick J. Urso 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Rodgers 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Shumaker 

Dr. Frederick P. Farris 

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Lieske 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Young 

John B. Gardner 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Hurst 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray M. Mayhew, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Urbar E. Dishart 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Niess, Sr. 

Mrs. Thelma Piper 

William R. Fisher 

Stephen J. Bialoblk 

G. L. Beorn 

Mr. and Mrs. Casimir J. Front 

Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Torre 

Mr.andMrs.Wm. A. Ratditf 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. Altman 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernart Stern 

Haland and Kathleen Miesner 

Dr. H.T.Burleigh 

Susan Pollart 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kendralla 

Robert L. Law, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Bibbo 

Dr. Samuel T. Ceraso 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Kretier 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. MoneyPenny 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Naggy 



277 




Mr. and Mrs. Don Whitlatch 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Del Col 

William Allen Uopellus 

Charles F. Hifchcock, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor W. Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pertetto 

Joseph F. Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Dorial 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawerce Fishel 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Florio 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Blair 

Colonel and Mrs. L. Paul Farley 

Marcus D. Chandler 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett S. Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Winesburg 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Shirer 



Mr. and Mrs. Julian R. Barton 

Debra A. Pyle 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. G. Hemelt 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Mullins 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh F. Maffett 

Mr. and Mrs. James O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Robert Carr 

Carl and Ethel Whettalcer 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomal E. Ganter 

B. B. and Louive Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Bishop, Jr. 

Epp Hatfield, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. John E. Meyer 

Mrs. Margery Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. James Coyre 

Charles F. Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Ford 

Dr. and Mrs. Douglas O. Hill 



278 





Mr. and Mrs. Roland J. Davis 

Edward B. Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis D. Art 

R. E. He+herington 

Mr. William H.Seilir 

Mrs. Mary E. Seiler 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hor+on, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy V. Lewis, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Stone 

John D. Heckert 

Mrs. Margaret Roles McBinnis 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Browning 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Fieshman 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph R. Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Jack Johnson 

Joseph Buco 

Carson and Irma Cockerham 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Finley Lackey 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Emerson 

H. W. Zimmerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul McKimmey 

Mrs. Mary S. Wales 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Abbey 

Mr. and Mrs. Jaho S. Holland, Jr. 

Robert W. Doe 

James D. Campbell 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Cordyock 

Mr. and Mrs. James Crawford 

Raymond J. Dortanzo 

J. R. Wood 

George and Marion Price 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan E. Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis J. Robertson 

James Frederick Davis 

S. W. Lewandowsky 

Charles L. Howell 

Ms. Dorothy F. Paugh 

Beverly Ann Powers 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Fields 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Buckley, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomal Strope 

Sandra M. Special 

Mr. and Mrs. John De. Gorraro 

Paul Marksteiner 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Woloshuk 

Mr. Rheinild Weghorst, Sr. 

Arthur Jewell 

Mrs. Myrtle E. Somers 

S. Allen Staggers 

Ivan Staggers 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert L. Pope 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley B. Tennant 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Faris 

James A. McGinnis 

Mr. and Mrs. William Fritz 

Rev. and Mrs. John Adams Springer 

Louis Galetto 

Lt. Col. and Clement H. Armstrong 

Cecil Workman 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Gibson McCoy 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Burns 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. Knott 



279 



Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Shirey 

Harold Emch 

Mr. and Mrs. Petl J. Guariglia 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Peterson 

Murl E. Chestnut 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde E. Feet 

P. Stuart Carter 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman E. Honaker 

John K. Beard 

Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Duplaga 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Ford 

Mr. and Mrs. Kyle Dunlap 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin P. Short, Sr. 

Donald B. Helmes 

James Stewart Ray 

Carol J. Spronger 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Roesser 

Mr. and Mrs. Murphy, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burtord A. Booth 

Paul R. Rowand 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Way, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Gray 

Bui and Frances Simmons 

Mr. and Mrs. Waiter S. Donila 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Meek 

Dr. and Mrs. Jack G. Robertson 

Rev. John LWilkins 
Wilson R. Caskey 

Mr. and Mrs. George Maskus 

Frances R. Holiway 

Lois Benet Ginsna 

Mr. and Mrs. Ren Jones 

Leonard L. Paw 

Larry L. and Marybelle Thimgon 

Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Sauper 

Ltc. and Mrs. C. N. Howard, Jr. 

Audrea H. Gue 

Mr. and Mrs. B. K. Peterson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Potf 

Shevane Walp 

E. S. Mann 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Barna 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack W. Begley 

Harold I. Goodwin 

Ary de Vries 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Green 

James R. Burton 

Dr. J. Gordon Butterfield 

David Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Rinehart 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Ailbough 

Mr. and Mrs. Standish Miller 

Debbie Milulski 

Dr. and Mrs. Emil Capito 

Mr. and Mrs. Lilburn M. Hopkins 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. and Janet L. Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Curly Weiner 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles William Lewis, Jr. 





280 



The Mountaineer: 



Proud, Dignified, 

The Symbol 

of 

West Virginia's 

Heritage 



He stands atop a jagged mourrtain peak, a long rifle in 
one hand, a coonskin cap in the other. 

The spirit of the noble mountaineer has been embod- 
ied for the first time in a 15 inch high reproduction of 
sculptor Donald DeLue's original model. Made of 
semistone, and sold exclusively through the WVU 
Book Store, this stately reproduction is modestly 
priced at $39-95. 




The West Virginia University 

Book Store 



Congratulates All 
1976 Graduates! 



281 




Farmers & Merchants' Bank 



High Street 
Morgan+own, WV 



Congratulations to All 
1 976 Graduates! 



282 



YOUR Progress is OUR Progress 

"Partners in area progress" is 
WVU's motto as well as ours. 

Best Wishes for your 
continued achievement! 



The First IMational Bank 

of MORGAISTTOWN 




Morgantown, 
West Virginia 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



• Member Federal Reserve System 



283 





WALKER'S STORE 



Rainelle, WV 



REINER & CORE 



Fine Clothes for 

Men and Women 

217 High S+. 

Morgantown, W. Va. 



DIAMONDS 
CHINA 



WATCHES 



JEWELRY 
SILVERWARE 




MOUNTAINEER 
SPORT SHOP 

439 High Street 
Morgantown, W. Va. 

"Specialist in Sports" 



ROBERT A. YAGLE 

Jeweler 



379 High Street Morgantown. W. Va. 

Phone 296-77 1 3 



284 



JfimtkA iQ76 



It's something special . . . 




It's just for you! 



285 




a.jtJ^^'f'* 




he iB o o k Hx c h a n 9 c 



fliibii 








■*■■.:*■■ 



iiiin I! 

^^iili i!g 

j-^ m i^ll 

THE BOOK EXCHANGE. INC. 




1 52 Willey St. Morgantown, W. Va. 

ACROSS FROM MINERAL INDUSTRIES BUILDING 



Textbooks 



School Supplies 



286 



9«^pi 


^Jl 




■■M::^ 


^ 




. .^^>K.H,i»«, '-'■' " - 




ISNm 


, 'JW*""***-^^.^....^^^ 1. 












7-k.S'btfK 


-' uvtff.v^i fl^ 



luman Felicity is produced 
t so much by great pieces 
good fortune that seldom 
lajipen, as by little 
advantages that occur every 
day. . ." 

Benjamin Franklin 




<»>«*> 

- >,•.'<- 



iJUll^; 





p. O. BOX 785 

RAINELLE, WEST VIRGINIA 25962 



Haynes Radio & Refrigeration Service 



DIAL 438-610 1 



23 Main Street 



Ralnelle, W. Va. 25962 



Compliments of 

WESTERN GREENBRIER NATIONAL BANK 



Rainelle, West Virginia 25962 



Established 1921 



288 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



Congratulations, Seniors 
from 



DANIELS 



,«EMBE» 



*^. 



^, 



'^'C'^H GEM ^°^ 

H. A. Dodge Jeweler 



Morgantown Fairmont 

West Virginia 



'dLe^^eh^'dfw 2)o^^ 




HISTORY REVISITED****** 

The Bicentennial year provides the 
opportunity for us to relish our 
nation's 200 years of history and to 
view the life of Morgantown and 
West Virginia University in the mid 
1800's. During 1976, we should 
reflect upon the rapid changes that 
have occurred across our nation's life 
span. Modes of transportation have 
evolved from students riding horses 
and taking trolly cars to classes to 
riding inter-campus bus system and 
the PRT; although horses may be 
considered more reliable. 




289 







290 




When was the last time you saw 
chickens and cattle grazing in 
downtown Morgan town? The horse 
and buggy was the favorite delight of 
the Sunday driver in the days of dirt 
roads and derby hats. Through the 
week the students had to struggle up 
the hill to classes in Woodburn Hall; 
but there was always time to stop and 
pose for a picture with one's best 
friends in the day's hottest fashion. 
The size of the University's 
graduating classes have increased in 
size from 17 to more than 3,000 
students. The women wore mutton 
sleeves, starched blouses, and yards of 
dresses. The men wore narrow ties, 
vests, watch chains, and parted their 
hair in the middle. 





291 



West Virginia University had a burning desire for sports even in the early days of its establishment. The Football team 
played its first game in 1896 on a clearing near the main campus. The football player's uniform consisted of nickers, striped 
socks, shoes, a jacket, and a helmet resembling a night cap. The first basketball team was organized in 1904. WVU boasted 
of one of the first baseball teams in 1896. For many years the football games were played on a loose dirt field in front of 
the now women's hall. WVU showed its spirit in creating the huge Mountaineer that towered over the football field, 
players, and crowd. Many famous sports players have had their start at WVU, Hot Rod Hundley was among this acclaimed 
group. 






,4fiTr 




292 



1 








293 



w . > 



)N OF THE MORGAN STOCKADE FORT 177 

MorgantowR wis founded fiom ikis site by 

\CKWELL MORGAN IN lit 

kjs Fliostiff elected jby 
ONONGALIA HISTORICAL SOCIE 







294 



J. 



.^ > 




The Morgan Stockade Fort was 
established in 1772 to protect the 
settlers from Indian attacks. Col. 
Zackwell Morgan founded the city of 
Morgan town in 1785 upon this site. 
One aspect that present West 
Virginians and the pioneers share in 
their daily living is the condition of 
the roadways. There was a time when 
each household had its separate "Out 
House" as compared to modern 
indoor plumbing. A noticeable 
change in the landscape is in the 
increase of buildings that can be seen 
in each of these pictures; along the 
Monongalia River, Woodburn Circle, 
and the country side surrounding the 
University grounds. 





295 



The Monongalia Academy was 

incorporated by an act of the Virginia 

legislature in 1814. The first academy 

building was located on the corner of 

Spruce and Wiley streets. It was 

divided into two school rooms. In the 

year 1828, two lots were bought, 

located on the corner of Walnut and 

Spruce streets and between' 1828 and 

1831 a two-story brick building was 

erected for the use of the Academy. 

During this period the school 

widened its sphere of usefulness and 

Morgantown became the educational 

center of the state. 







296 




For over Vi a century Monongalia Academy flourished! 
Congress passed an act on July 2, 1862, donating lands to 
the states and territories to establish "Colleges for the 
benefit of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts." In 1864 this 
act was extended to the new born state of West Virginia. 
WY Agricultural College was founded in 1867; the name 
was changed the next year to West Virginia University. 

The Trustees of the Monongalia Academy offered the 
legislature all the real estate and personal effects of the 
Academy, including the property known as Woodburn 
Female Seminary, provided that Morgantown be selected as 
the seat of the college; the offer was accepted. 




297 



Rev. Alexander Martin, D.D., was elected first President of 

WVU. His inaugural address explained the condition of 

education at that time. "It is a most humiliating truth, and 

enough to make one weep, that the unhappy and illiberal 

legislature from across the mountains has left us here in 

West Virginia — an inheritance of lOO's and lOOO's and 

10,000's of our fellow citizens — unable to write their 

names or read God's work." 





298 




WEST VIRGINIA 
UNIVERSITY 

MOUNTAINEER FIELD 






299 





300 




"Even should the present generation 
fail to appreciate, improve and 
increase its power, it will still live, 
and coming ages shall build on the 
foundation which here, by faith and 
prayer, we lay, a fabric whose majestic 
proportions may exceed our most 
sanguine expectations." 

Dr. Martin 

first WVU president 






301 







302 




There were 124 people enrolled in the first year of the 
WVU's history. The Graduating Class of 1896 had very dif- 
ferent ideas about the manner of hair styles and notice the 
men's ties. Many hours of study occurred at WVU's first 
library, now Stewart Hall. In the '60's, students enjoyed 
entertainment and snacks in the old Mountain Lair. During 
the mid 1800's, people would gather in front of their favor- 
ite store to exchange bits of news. 





303 




Being !•: 

Dc si en in:: 



f to thank a 1 
k. Anita, t 




' f ot the 19^6 MONTICOLA has been an experience 1 xaiII long remember, 
nizmg the various sections, and working wuh the staff has prpv.dedan insight 
: asiness world that.could nM have been gained any where else. 
- not aK% ays been an easy or. enjoyabf task. There have been umes of 
-. meet a dead line, trying to Ia\ i -ut a 304 page publicatioti^n kitchen. 
he West Virginia llniversitN would not pro^■ide office space for 
,:. that unreplaceable pictures haAe been lost, and realizing that a sectioisi,e4its 

^ssiiznment . . . 
penences that I have gained in connection with the yearbook have been ones 
...._. , .r vears to come and may be "Reflections" of W¥U 1976. At this time, I would 
1 those ^x\^o gave of their time and skills to make«i|^ publication a reality _^^ 
.is P.IUC IS dedicated r all the effort and time"\hat you gave sQ-II^aMlLv m the 





^(yijCt^c^f^oo^ 



iH 



^. 



304 




\^