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s 

University of California Berkeley 

Frcm the estate of 
JOAN WESCOTT 




) 





WITH 



APHORISMS, ADAGES, AND PROVERBS, 
OF ALL AGES AND NATIONS, 

FROM 

JACOB CATS AND ROBERT FARLIE. 



WITH ILLUSTRATIONS FREELY RENDERED, 

FROM DESIGNS FOUND IN THEIR WORKS, 

BY JOHN LEIGHTON, F.S.A. 

THE WHOLE 

TRANSLATED AND EDITED, WITH ADDITIONS, 

BY RICHARD PIGOT. 




LONDON : 

LONGMAN, GREEN, LONGMAN, AND ROBERTS. 

1860. 



V, P3INTKH, 1I1IKA1) STIIKKT Hill.. 



LIBROS Y AMIGOS, 



TO 

WILLIAM STIRLING, ESQRE. (OF KEIR) M.P. 
A LEARNED COLLECTOR OF THE PROVER- 
BIAL PHILOSOPHY OF ALL AGES AND 
NATIONS, THIS ATTEMPT TO REVIVE 
A LOVE FOR EMBLEMATICAL 
LITERATURE AND ART 
IS DEDICATED 

BY 
JOHN LEIGHTON. 



LONDON 1860. 



POCOS Y BUENOS. 



A GOOD NAME IS BETTER THAN A GOLDEN GIRDLE. 



INTRODUCTION. 



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ALTHOUGH the Typification of Moral truths and Doctrines by Symbolical 

Images and Devices had its origin in remote antiquity, and subsequently became a Q 

j favourite method of imparting counsel and instruction with the Greeks and Romans, UJ 

it was not until the middle of the sixteenth century that it began to assume (first 

in Italy) the character of a distinct kind of literature. Ul 

Towards the 'end of that century, the poetic genius of the erudite Andrea 
Alciati, of Milan, imparted so pleasing an impress to this new style of literature, 
as to direct thereto the attention of men of letters, with whom it soon became 

a favourite medium for the diffusion and popularization of moral maxims applicable 
to all the phases and circumstances of human life. 



The Emblems of Alciati, written in Latin verse, and eulogized by such men UJ 

as Erasmus, Julius Scaliger, Toscan, Neander, and Borrichius, were soon translated 
into the Italian, French, and German languages, and became so highly esteemed, 
h that they were publicly read in the Schools, to teach youth the Art of Emblematic 

writing. 0) 
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Thus established, as an elegant and useful method of inculcating, both by D 

"Word and Eye-pictures, the virtues of civil life ; men of learning, poets, and states- 
men, in France, Holland, Germany, Spain, and England, vied with each other, as it (t 

were, throughout the seventeenth century, in the cultivation of this branch of 
Composition, insomuch that it had become a favourite and admired medium for 

the diffusion of Religious, Social, and Political maxims, and maintained that position 

in public favour up to the end of the eighteenth century. 

In the seventeenth century, Printing, and its sister art Engraving, had attained 
in Holland to a higher grade of perfection than in any other country of Europe ; 
and, favoured by circumstances so auxiliary to the artistic illustration of works in 
the then not inaptly-termed " Picture Language," the poetic genius of a Jacob 
Cats found, in the pencils of Jan and Adrian Van De Venne, and the burins 
of Matham, Pet de Jode, Verstralen, Van Bremden, and others, artistic exponents 
worthy of his muse, and equal to his most ardent desires. 



WISDOM FREQUENTLY CONQUERS FORTUNE. 

ix 



WISDOM IS BETTER THAN RUBIES: 



Introduction. 

D. JACOB CATS, the eminent Dutch Jurisconsult, Statesman, and Poet, was born 
at Brouwershaven in the Isle of Schouwen, province of Zeeland, on the loth 
November, 1577. His father was a counsellor of some standing ; and his son Jacob 
was first destined to the profession of the law. Having completed his course of phi- 
losophy, he proceeded to the University of Leyden, to study jurisprudence. From 
thence he went to France, and was some time at the University of Orleans, where 
he took the degree of Doctor of Laws. He subsequently went to Paris, and was 

Q very desirous to visit Italy ; but his family opposed his going thither, and he was 

obliged to return to Holland. Arrived at the Hague, he applied himself wholly to 
jurisprudence, and was assiduous in his attendance at the Public Pleadings of the 
most distinguished lawyers. To perfect himself still more in his profession, he put 

JJj himself under the direction of the jurisconsult, Cornelius Van der Pol, one of the 

most eminent pleaders of the Dutch Bar. Some time afterwards, Cats practised with 
distinction at Zieuwreckzee, and at Brouwershaven. At this period it would seem he 
applied himself no less assiduously to Poetry, and not only became distinguished 
among the literati of Holland for the purity and elegance of his Latin verses, but 
soon took rank as one of her first lyrists in his native tongue. Falling seriously 

0) ill of an hectic fever, induced by over-application to study, he was advised by his 

physicians to seek a change of air. 

Hereupon he repaired to England, and visited the Universities of Cambridge 
2 and Oxford. When in London he consulted the then celebrated physician, Dr. 

Butter, on the subject of the obstinate fever which still afflicted him; but that 
physician was not more fortunate in his prescriptions than those of Holland. Upon 
his return to his native country, he was eventually cured, says his biographer, Moreri, 

by an old alchemyst. 

Distinguishing himself by his legislatorial and statesmanlike qualifications, no 
Q less than he had done by his poetic genius, Jacob Cats rose subsequently to high 

Official rank, and for several years filled the post of State Pensionary and Chief 
Magistrate of Middleburgh and Dordrecht. He was eventually promoted to the 
rank of State Counsellor and Grand Pensionary of the province of West Friesland, and 
0) made Keeper of the Great Seal of Holland. After filling these important Offices for 

eighteen years, having now attained the age of seventy-two, he requested permission 
to retire into private life ; which was at length granted by the States. His valuable 
Z services were, nevertheless, once more required, and he was solicited to form a 

member of the Embassy sent at that time to England, to arrange a treaty of com- 
merce between the two countries. After discharging the important duties therein 
delegated to him, he retired wholly into private life, and devoted himself with 
faculties still unimpaired to the Muses, up to the advanced age of eighty-three years, 
when he may be said to have expired with the pen in his hand. Few men have left 
behind them greater proofs of indefatigable industry than Jacob Cats ; and his 
numerous lyrical works are as rich in poetic genius as they are replete with evidence 
of world-knowledge and genial with the love of mankind. 



ITS FRUIT IS BETTER THAN GOLD. 



HONOUR TO WHOM HONOUR IS DUE. 



Introduction. 

Would the limits allotted to this Introduction permit of a more detailed 
account of the life and works of this highly gifted, good man, numerous incidents 
and passages in both might be adduced, which would awaken in the breasts 
of Englishmen and women (for he was especially the poetic champion of the 
worth and virtues of the fair sex) an appreciation and esteem of his genius and 
character, as great Almost as that felt for him by his own countrymen and women : 
Q among whom Father Cats, as he is affectionately called, is honoured as the bard of 

Home and of the Domestic hearth, the still popular and revered instructor of his 

countrymen in the Virtues of Social life, and in the Maxims of purest world-wisdom. 



The " Moral Emblems " of Jacob Cats, to which Daniel Heinsius rendered 

his tribute of eulogy, as also two of Holland's greatest lyrists, Hoogstraaten and 
< Zeeuwes, are almost unknown, even by name, in England, from being chiefly written 

in the Dutch language, of which it has been truly said, that " it has been a language 
too hastily neglected and despised by Englishmen." 

They form, nevertheless, in the collect, a series of the most admirable com- 
positions in Emblematic Literature which any language can boast, though written at 
a period when the Dutch tongue, like the rest of the northern European languages, 
was yet rigid and quaint in its structure, and so different in its orthographical style QJ 

IJJ and idiom to the Dutch of the present day, that to most modern Dutch scholars his 

earlier works are almost a sealed book. Nevertheless, when Cats wrote in the verna- QJ 

ill cular of his day, the Dutch language, like that of his contemporary, Shakespeare, had - 1 

been developing capabilities of harmony combined with vigour of expression, quite 

U equal to our own, as an exponent of poetic thought and imagery, and was one in 

which no writer of his day knew better how to speak to the feelings of his country- ' QJ 

3C men, and win their hearts by the pleasantly conveyed wisdom of his " household 

words" than Jacob Cats. 

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By his " Sinne en Minne Beelden," and his " Emblemata Moralia et CEcono- 

mica, " Jacob Cats first established his fame, both as a classical writer, an amiable QJ 

moralist, and a popular poet. The former written in Dutch and Latin verse, each 0) 

theme accompanied by a short distich in French verse, gave evidence both of the 
versatility of his poetic genius and of his linguistic talent. The success achieved Q_ 

< by these compositions encouraged him to carry out his predilection for this style of 

writing in a yet more extended form ; and some time after he gave to the world his 
" Spiegel van den Voorleden en Tegenwoordigen Tyt," or " Mirrors of the Past and 
Present Time," in which he emblematised, in Dutch verse, the numerous proverbs 

5 and sayings of antiquity, together with the most popular and current adages of his 

day, in most of the European languages. 

The above-named Emblematic works comprise many hundred subjects, in the 
treatment of which he evinced as much ingenuity as poetic grace, in working them 
out so as to render them a charming Code of Moral Instruction, addressed alike to 
the Youth of both sexes, and applicable to every phase of Civil and Political life. 



INGENIO STAT SINE MORTE DECUS. 

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INQENUAS DIDICISSE FIDELITER ARTES, 

Introduction, 

To every subject of his Word-Pictures, he appends, in support of the moral he 
inculcates, the most pertinent quotations from the Ancient writers, and a most inte- 
resting collect of Popular adages, bearing upon the sense of each theme. 

From so rich a mine of Emblematic lore, the present volume forms, of course, 
but a selection from each of the above-named series, the subjects of which could not 
therefore be placed in the same order as in the originals, without the appearance of 
meagreness ; while the embodiment of the subjects selected in the present form will, 
it is hoped, be found more pleasing as a whole, and best calculated to give an idea 
of the diversity of subject treated by the Author. 

Sir Joshua Reynolds, when a youth, was much influenced by the Artistic 
excellence of Adrian Van de Venne's Designs for the illustration of the Dutch 
Folio Edition of Cats' Works, of which he made careful copies ; and Sir Wm. 
Beechy, in his Life of Reynolds, states that "Sir Joshua's richest store was Jacob 
Cats' Book of Emblems, which his grandmother, a native of Holland, had brought 
with her from that country." 

Reproduced with the best appliances of Modern Art, in the Pictorial Illustration 
of the word-pictures of the Author, the original designs of Adrian Van de Venne, in 
a few instances only, have been deviated from, in so far as was deemed most con- 
sistent with the more elevated taste of the present day in pictorial embellishment. 

The Proverbs of the different nations, that wisdom which of all others sprang 
from the bosom of the Peoples in every land, and was handed down from generation 
to generation, rather orally than by books, form so pleasing and instructive a feature 
in the Emblems of Cats, that they have been for the most part preserved in their literal 
garb of Cats' day, an adhesion to the original which it is believed will have a greater 
charm and interest for the student of Languages, curious to see the shape in which 
the traditionally acquired wisdom of long past days was expressed until it reached us 
in the more polished garb of modern times. 

Wherever admissible, passages from English and other Authors, having an affinity 
in sense, and moral, to the Emblem or theme, have been introduced, by way of 
elaborating, or of giving more weight to the doctrine inculcated by the Author. The 
appendage to this selection from Cats' Moral Emblems of a reprint of the now 
exceedingly rare and curious Poems and Emblems of his contemporary Emblematist, 
the pious Scot, ROBERT FARLIE, published in London under the title of " Lychnocausia," 
in 1638, will, it is hoped, be considered a not unpleasing associate for the Dutch 
moralist, and their juxtaposition in the same volume give an additional interest 
to the whole. 

THE TRANSLATOR. 



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EMOL.LIT MORES, NEC SINIT ESSE FEROS. 



NON G^UO, SED QUOMODO. 



LIST OF 



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PORTRAIT OF JACOB CATS Under allegorical figure of Universal Justice, supported on one side 

CD by Solomon, Confncius, and ^Esop ; upon the other by Age instructing Infancy and 

-v Adolescence, in the presence of Labour and Travel ; whilst in the background Peace and 

Plenty are contrasted with the violent acts of man against the will of Supreme Power. In 
the centre foreground is a vase of flowers surrounded by choke-weeds type of elevated nature 
a constant prey to the coarser elements. On the base are sculptured bas-reliefs, " Suum 
cuique " Let each apply to himself that which him fits ; " Bonus cum bonis " The just with 
the true ....... . . Frontispiece, engraved by LEIGHTON. 

None can clean their dress from stain, but some blemish will remain . . LEIGHTON. 
4 / lurke and shine .... ........ GREEN. 

IN 5 Act wisely and thou shall't be free . .... . . . DALZIEL. 

03 8 Diogenes Lanterne . ..... .... DALZIEL. 

\ 9 Whither the breath of my mistress calls me ...... GREEN. 

12 Whilst I breathe, I hope . ..... . . LEIGHTON. 

13 If poor, act cautiously . ......... WHYMPER. 

16 Light onely is my praise . . . . . . . . . LEIGHTON. 

1 7 Rest content where thou art . . . . . . . . GREEN. 

20 Better with a little ...... .... DE WILDE. 

2 1 Love takes possession of the mind insensibly . ..... LEIGHTON. 

24 I lay open here onely .... ....... DE WILDE. 

25 The inexpert are wounded .......... GREEN. 

28 Hence commeth my filth . ........ LEIGHTON. 

29 While we draw, we are drawn ..... . . . . GREEN. 

32 Upward . . . . . . LEIGHTON. 



MANY MEN, MANY MINDS, 
xiii 



LABOUR IS THE SALT OF 



Contents and Illustrations. 

33 Both sides should be seen Engraved by LEIGHTON. 

36 Darknesse addeth glory to me LEIGHTON. 

37 Who is hurtful to himself, benefits no one .... GREEN. 

40 So I am undon. by doing good LEIGHTON 

41 The pot goeth so long to the water, til at last it commeth broken home . GREEN. 

44 Whither my soule . GREEN. 

45 Play, but chastely GREEN. 

48 My life is my death LEIGHTON. 

49 Hasten at leisure LEIGHTON. 

52 So to die is miserable . . ' . LEIGHTON. 

56 The Lanterne leades the way ..,. GREEN 

57 Smoke is the food of Lovers GREEN. 

jjj 60 Fire fottoweth smoake LEIGHTON. 

61 Each deplores his own lot GREEN. 

64 I nourish myselfe DALZIEL. 

65 Every flower loses its perfume at last .. DALZIEL. 

'68 I will dye, but I shall ascend LEIGHTON. 

69 Many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip . . . , .. . GREEN. 

UJ 7 2 Light me, I shal sigh no more . . .. LEIGHTON. 

7 3 Love, like a ball, requires to be thrown back DALZIEL. 

UJ 76 Quickly or I am consumed D E WILDE. 

77 The biter bitten GREEN. 

80 My light is net the lesse . GREEN 

U 8 1 The branches may be trained, but not the trunk . . . . . LEIGHTON. 

^ 84 In vaine thou puttest me out LEIGHTON. 

85 When slovenly servants get tidy, they polish the bottoms of the saucepans . LEIGHTON. 

h 'Tis better to tarry LEIGHTON. 

89 Grease the fat sow SMYTHE. 

92 Altero extinguor, Altero accendor (The one puts me out, the other kindles me) GREEN. 

93 Play with the dog, and he'll spoil your clothes GREEN. 

< 96 I am consumed more, and shine less. (Magis consumer minus luceo) . GREEN. 

97 Bees touch no fading flowers .... DALZIEL 

too You feared me whilst I skined LEIGHTON 

101 One rotten apple infects all in the basket JACKSON. 

104 Farewell DE WILDE. 

105 I am touched, not broken by the waves GREEN. 

108 I envie not thy light GREEN 

109 Birdes of one feather will flocke together '. JACKSON. 

112 If thou abroad, I at home . LEIGHTON. 

113 The ripe pear falls ready to the hand LEIGHTON. 

116 My light escapes thee LEIGHTON. 



PERSEVERANCE VIENT A BOUT DE TOUT. 

xiv 





THE USEFUL. AND THE BEAUTIFUL. 




Contents and Illustrations. 




IS THE ARCHITECT 


Page ii 7 Who has not felt love ? Engraved by 


GREEN. 
GREEN. 
GREEN. 
LEIGHTON. 
BOLTON. 
LEIGHTON. 
LEIGHTON. 
DE WILDE. 
THOMAS. 
LEIGHTON. 
DALZIEL. 
DALZIEL. 
GREEN. 
GREEN. 
GREEN. 
GREEN. 
GREEN. 
GREEN. 
SWAIN. 
DE WILDE. 
DALZIEL. 
DALZIEL. 


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121 The higher the rise the greater the fall 


125 The hunchback sees not his own hump, but he sees his neighbour's . 


129 Enter not, or pass through 


133 A hen lays every day, but an ostrich only once a year . . . 


137 When the eyes are won, love is begun 


141 Who cuts off his nose, spites his own face 


145 Though taken to the water's brink, no blows can force the horse to drink . 
148 morning star re, shew ye day 
149 Excess of liberty leads to servitude 


153 Who would learn to shave well, should first practise on a fool's beard 
156 At the bottom least and worst . 
157 What the sow does, the little pigs must pay for 
160 On mine own cost 


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161 A ship aground, is a beacon at sea 
164 I seeke mine hurt .......'.. 


GREEN. 
LEIGHTON. 


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1 65 The goose hisses well, but it don't bite ......'. 
168 The end tryeth all 
169 With unwilling hounds it's hard to catch hares ...... 


GREEN. 
DE WILDE. 
LEIGHTON. 


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172 Thus must I be consumed quickly . .. ... 
173 A whole mill to grind a peck of corn ....... 


LEIGHTON. 
BOLTON. 


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1 76 Not under a bushell 


LEIGHTON. 






177 The dogs and the bone 
1 80 I doe not put out myselfe ...... . 


LEIGHTON. 
LEIGHTON. 
HARRAL. 
DE WILDE. 
LEIGHTON. 
LEIGHTON. 




181 No one can love Thetis and Galatea at the same time .... 




1 88 It is a token that I shined 




189 When the wolf comes, the oxen leave off fighting to unite in self-defence . 


GREEN. 






192 / save others, I waste myself 


GREEN. 






193 While she weeps, she devours . . 


SWAIN. 






196 Fessa tibi nunc lampada trado. (I weary give my light to thee) . 


LEIGHTON. 






197 By yielding thou may'st conquer ... k .... 


GREEN. 






200 Compare small with great 


GREEN. 




^x^-^^Sx^^*- ARE NEVER APART. ^^& '*&*>*Sx& 



AS MUSIC TUNES THE EAR, AND COLOURS TUTOR THE EYE, 



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Contents and Illustrations. 

Page 201 Great cry and little wool -..-... Engraved by SWAIN. 

204 Sursun Peto, deorsiim trahor. (I bend up, and am drawn down) . LEIGHTON. 

205 Cripple will always lead the dance LEIGHTON 

208 Herostratus his light . . .. .. . ..../' : ...'.'. LEIGHTON. 

209 Fire, Cough, Love, and Money are not long concealed . . LEIGHTON. 

Death is gaine to me DE WILDE. 



212 



213 Every bird sings according to his beak LEIGHTON 

2 16 Aut splendors aut situ consumer. (Either by light or mouldiness I die) DE WILDE. 



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217 Hares are not caught with beat of drum, nor birds with tartlets . . EVANS. 

220 I faide things lost . ... ,. . ; . .. ., . / f % ^ LEIGHTON. 

221 The Gnat stings the eyes of the Lion -.... LEIGHTON 

224 How great a light . . . ... . t ^. f . LEIGHTON. 

225 Like melons, friends are to be found in plenty, of which not even one is good 

intwent y ..>.." SMYTHE. 

228 I see all and say nothing . LEIGHTON. 

229 Every cock scratches towards himself LEIGHTON 

232 An evill-doer hateth light ... . . . . . .. ^ % LEIGHTON. 

233 Well set off is half sold . .... . DALZIEL 

236 Finis ^ . . . . DE WILDE. 

237 One stroke fells not an oak HARRAL 

240 THE END. Study me in thy prime, bury death and weary time . LEIGHTON. 



OF TASTE REFINE THE MIND, 
xvi 



MORAL EMBLEMS. 



On ne peut decrotter sa robe sans emporter le poil. 



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NONE CAN CLEAN THEIR DRESS FROM STAIN, BUT SOME 

BLEMISH WILL REMAIN. 

|OW I've fplafh'd and foil'd my gown ! 
With this gadding through the town : 
How bedraggled is my fkirt, 
Trapefing through the bye-ftreets dirt : 
In what a ftate for me to be, 
From this Town-life gaiety ! 



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EHRE QLAUBE, UNO AUGE KEIN SCHERTZ. 



FILLE TROP EN RUE, EST TOST PERDUE. 

Come girls here, come all I know, 
Playmates mine, advife me, mew 
In this plight that I'm come to, 
What is beft for me to do ? 
How mail I remove this ftain, 
And reftore my gown again ? 





Z If to warn it out I try 

Q Warning fhrinks the cloth when dry ; 

UJ Makes the colour often fade, 

Or elfe gives a darker made : 
ro If I cut it out, there'll be 

^ Such a hole that all muft fee : 

If I rub it hard, 'twill take 

All the nap off then, and make 

Yet more plain, the ftain that ne'er 

DL . 

Q_ Honeft maiden's drefs mould bear. 

0* Pray then tell me fome of you, 

What in this mifhap to do ? 
Thus fo flut-like to be ftain'd, 

0- Makes me of myfelf afham'd ; 

UJ For wherever I may go, 

j People will look at me fo, 

And think perhaps, fuch dirt to fee, 

I 'm not what I ought to be. 

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Say, can none of you fuggeft, 
What in fuch a cafe is beft ? 

LL No ? then this I plainly fee, 

You muft warning take by me ! 
If you would not foil your gown ; 
Go not gadding through the town : 
In the ftreets who plays the flirt, 
Never yet efcaped fome dirt : 
Run not therefore Eaft and Weft, 
Home for girls is much the beft. 



RARA VAGA VIRGO PUDICA EST 



Maidens, wherefoe'er you go, 
Walking, traveling to and fro ; 
Over land or over fea, 
In whatever way it be ; 
In the Country or the Town, 
Over meadow, dale or down, 
Over hill or over moor, 
In the houfe or out of door, 
Over road or over ftreet, 
< Girls, where'er you bend your feet, y 

Keep your Clothes and Kirtles neat. 

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A GOOD name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving favour rather than D 
silver and gold. Proverbs xxii. i. 

Q Redire, cum periit, nescit pudor. SENEC. Agam. 

Ego ilium periisse puto, cui periit pudor. PLAUT. 

Omnia si perdas ; famam servare memento ; 

Qua semel amissa postea nullus eris. 
Etiam sanato vulnere cicatrix manet. 

Although the wound be healed it always leaves a scar. (!) 

Of schoon de wond'al is genesen, 
Daer sal noch al een teyrken wesen. Old Dutch Proverb. 

Die in een quaet geruchte kommt, is half gehangen. Ibid. 

Who comes to an evil repute is half hanged. > 

Give a dog a bad name and hang him. , 

(j CONDUCT thyself always with the same prudence, as though thou wert observed 

Q by ten eyes, and pointed at by ten fingers.' CONFUCIUS. 

Q. PUT a curb upon thy desires if thou would'st not fall into some disorder. ARISTOTLE. 

IT is better to be poor, and not have been wanting in discretion, than to attain 
the summit of our wishes by a loose conduct. DIOGENES. 0) 

BE discreet in your discourse, but much more in your actions ; the first evaporates, 
the latter endure for ever. PHOCYLIDES. 

SHUN the society of the depraved, lest you follow their pernicious example, and lose 
yourself with them. PLATO. 

Eer is teer. Honour is tender. 
The finest silk will spoil the soonest. 
Celle n'est pas entierement chaste qui fait douter de sa pudicitd 



MUCH IN THE STREET, LIGHT OF REPUTE. 



LASSES AND GLASSES ARE ALWAYS IN DANGER. 



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BEFORE my Light was to the winds a fcorne, 
My body likewife fubject to be torne ; 
Now for a fafeguard I this lanterne have, 
So whilft I fhine from wrong it doth me fave ; 
Even as the Diamond his light forth fends, 
And with his hardnelTe ftill himfelfe defends. 
Honour is fubject to unconftant chance, 
Nor can it without envy 't .felfe advance : 
Vertue to honour is a brafen wall, 
Guarded with which, it is not hurt at all; 
And how fo ever Fortun's ftormes doe blow, 
Yet Glory lurking thus, his light can mow. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




FIGLIE E VETRI SON SEMPRE IN PERICOLO.^>=^ 



STRAW BANDS WILL- TIE A FOOL'S HANDS. 



Fac Saptas, et Liber ens. 





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ACT WISELY AND THOU SHALL'T BE FREE. 



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UCH Men do is Folly merely ; 
And if afked the reafon, why ? 
Seldom, truthfully and clearly, 
To the queftion they reply. 
If reply they make, 't is ever, 
With them all, the fame excufe ; 
And fome think the anfwer clever : 
"'Tis the Famion" "cuftom" " ufe ! " 



CE QUE ME LIE, C'EST MA FOLIE. 



EVERY MAN HATH A FOOL IN HIS SLEEVE. 

Thus it ever is with fools; 

Cuftom more than Reafon rules : 

And where Reafon fhould be law, 

Fafliion Cuftoms, flight as ftraw, 

Stronger chains on them impofe, 

Bonds more binding far than thofe, 

Tyrants fince the world began, 

Laid upon their fellow man. 
He vainly boafts that he is free, 

Who fears t' infringe on Fafhion's rule ; 
For worfe than flave, already, he 

01 Is both at once a flave, and fool. 

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TNTER causas malorum nostrorum est, quod vivimus ad exempla, nee ratione com- 

ponimur, sed consuetudine abducimur. Quod pauci faciunt, nolumus imitari : quum 
plures facere coeperunt, quasi honestius sit, quia frequentius, sequimur, et recti apud 
0) nos locum tenet error ; &c. SEN. Epist. 58. 
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"XT7"HAT less, than Fool, and greater Fool, than he, 

Who knows no Heaven but his mistress' smiles, 
And bows his reason to the tyranny 

Of her caprice and ever changing wiles 1 

< Than he, whose brain-sick fantasy can find 

Subject for Love, in each insensate whim, 
And in her very faults of heart and mind, 

A grace, to none apparent but to him ! 
Who sees not, when she most affects the Dove, 

She but derides the passion he reveals ; 
And that most false when most she vows her love, 

'Tis but to seem what least she is and feels. 
If true that, he who wills it may be free : 

Who hath no Will, must have a lack of brains ; 
A straw-tied Fool ! who for his stultity, 

In Love, as in aught else, deserves his chains. 



A WISE man's heart is at his right hand, but a fool's heart is at his left. Ecclesiastes x. 2. 



FOLLY IS THE POVERTY OF THE MIND. 



FAITES MESSAG.ERS DES F O L S . 



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TLJE that sendeth a message by the hand of a Fool, cutteth off the feet, and drinketh 

damage. Proverbs xxvi. 6. 
As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a Fool returneth to his folly. Pro-verbs xxvi. n. 



Non ex omni ligno fit Mercurius. 
Magna Negotia viris magnis committenda. 



BY so much the more are we inwardly foolish, by how much we strive to seem 
outwardly wise. S. GREG. 

Ex thymbra nemo lanceam conficiet ; 

Neque ex Socrate bonum militum. ATHEN. lib. v. 



' upward soaring spirit ever 
Craves the joys of heaven to know, 
But alas ! the vain endeavour ! 
Bondslave of the flesh, below : 
Though they be but frail as straw, 
Worldly joys more strongly draw. 



FOR, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty ; only use not liberty for an occasion 
to the flesh, but by love serve one another. Galatians v. 13. 



THE weak may be laughed out of anything but their weakness. M. DE GENLIS. 



talk of acquiring' a habit ! we should rather say being acquired by it. Habit is 
the janissary power in man ; Passion and Principle the antagonist revolutionary 
powers for evil and for good. 



may as well go stand upon the beach, 
And bid the main flood 'bate his usual height ; 
You may as well use question with the wolf, 
Why he hath made the ewe bleat for the lamb ; 
You may as well forbid the mountain pines 
To wag their high tops, and to make a noise 
When they are fretted with the gusts of heaven, 
As seek to soften that (than which what's harder?) 
A foolish heart. SHAKESPEARE. ' 



A NATION deserves no better laws than those it will submit to. GOETHE. 



THE Nation, like the man who would be free, 
Must merit first the rights of liberty. 



A FOOL. IS LIKE OTHER MEN AS L.ONO AS HE IS SILENT. 



FOOLS AND THE PERVERSE, 




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HOSE purchafe was his pouch, his houfe a tun, 

Criticke of actions whatfoever done, 
That learned dogge, at noone-tyde tinn'd his light, 
Searching for one, whofe actions were upright. 
The Eagles young ones by the Sunne are try'd, 
Mens actions by the lamp are beft efpy'd; 
For men in day time mafkt with vizards goe, 
Of truth and faith making an outward mow. 
But when they can nights fecret filence find, 
Before the lamp they doe unmaike their mind. 

Happy is he whom Sunne and Lamp fees one, 
Who's honeft ftill, though witnefle there be none. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




FILL THE LAWYER'S PURSE. 



AS THE WIND BLOWS, SO THE WEVELL GOES. 



Domin<, quo me vocaf, aura. 



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WHITHER THE BREATH OF MY MISTRESS 
CALLS ME. 

PORT of thy miftrefs' fickle mind, 

Haplefs lover ! turning ever 
Like the wevell with the wind, 
Haft not ftrength fuch bonds to fever ? 

Look around thee, fenfelefs lover ! 

Fair as me thou IPt many find ; 
Many who pofTefs moreover, 

Far more charms of heart and mind. 



OU G^UE SPIRE, ME TIRE. 



EL. SABIO MUDA CONSEJIO, IL_ NECIO, NO. 



Slave of her defpot frown or fmile ; 

Haft no other will to guide thee, 
Than her changeful will, who while 

Ruling thee, doth but deride thee ? 

He who thus fubjects his reafon 

To a fickle woman's rule, 
Merits juft as much derifion 

As the witlefs ftraw-tied fool. 



UAM misere servit, cui mulier imperat, cui leges imponit, praescribit, jubet, vetat 
quod videtur : qui nihil imperanti negare potest, nil recusare ; poscit, dandum 
UJ est ; ejicit, abeundum ; vocat, veniendum ; minatur, extimescendum ! CICERO. 

UJ IMPONIT leges vultibus ilia tuis. OVID. 

a. 



o 

ghio nos Numen agit. 
Whither God directs us. 

TLJE is the wisest, who has school'd his mind 

T' adopt the current of the ruling wind. 
Blow whence it will, prepared for all event, 
With fortune's dispensations e'er content, 
Who with discernment both in time and place, 
~ Bends his opinion with a cheerful grace ; 

To him unknown the troubles which impart 

The constant fever of the stubborn heart, 

That 'mid a world of change would stand aloof, 

To stem the torrent with his vain reproof. 
UJ 

To change opinion and yet constant be, 

Is possible alone to such as he 

Whose strength of mind is in its pliancy. 



T IT acerbitates multas ac molestias evitemus, consilia ad eventus ac tempora flectenda 

sunt. SENECA. 

OPORTET enim tanquam in talorum jactu, ad id quod ceciderit, res suas accommodare. 

PLATO. 

LEVE fit quod bene fertur onus. OVID. 

QUONIAM id fieri quod vis non potest, velis id quod possis. TERENCE. 
TEMPORI enim cedere, id est necessitati parere, semper sapientis habitum est. CICERO. 
DECET id pati sequo animo ; 
Si id facietis, levior labos erit. PLAUTUS. 



THE WISE MAN CHANGES HIS OPINION THE FOOL. NEVER. 



"pHROW aside prejudice and thou art saved. Who prevents thee from doing so ? 
MARCUS AURELIUS. 

ALL things change You yourself continually change, and destroy yourself in some 
part. It is the same with the whole world. 

WE should take counsel of reason upon that which befalls us, and correct by our 
prudent conduct the injustice of fortune, as a gamester repairs a stroke of ill luck by 
his skill. PLATO. 

A SURE means to become inaccessible to disappointment, is to become penetrated 

with the inconstancy of fortune, and to be prepared for all her capriciousness. PLUTARCH. 

NECESSITATI ne quidem Dii resistunt. ERASMUS. ~ 

UJ ^ 

Les hommes legers et flottans, 

Perdent toujours leur avantage : 

( ) ~ 

Aussi n'appartient-t'il qu'au sage, 

De sgavoir bien prendre son temps. GOMBERVILLE. 

.. THE goal of yesterday will be the starting-point of to-morrow. CARLYLE. I 

WHEN things will not suit our will, it is wise to suit our will to things. Arabic Prov. 

ALL our undertakings should be bent in accordance with the circumstances of the UJ 
moment. Q/ 



. 

In Domino quies. 

Reft is in God. 



"T^IX'D to no point, the wevell sways about, 

Q: Obedient to th' uncertain wav'ring blast ; m 

jf 

But when the wind has ceas'd to blow in doubt, - 

(y 

The wevell to one point is fix'd at last. 

~ Vain heart ! go search the world's remotest nook, 

Q. Pry into all, examine every book, Q_ 

With equal thirst and hunger still oppress'd, 

In God, the Lord, thou ll't find alone true rest. 
Z Z 

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unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 

^^j 

Matthew xi. 28. 

WHOM have I in heaven but thee ? and there is none upon earth that I desire 
beside thee. Psalm Ixxiii. 25. 

TAKE my yoke upon you and learn of me ; for I am meek and lowly in heart : and 
ye shall find rest unto your souls ; for my yoke is easy and my burden is light. 
Matthew xi. 29, 30. 



ll_ SAVIO, FA DEL-LA NECESSITA VIRTU. 

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WHAT CAN'T BE CURED MUST BE ENDURED. 



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P THOUSAND evils this my life doth fpend, 
At length fierce Boreas thereto puts an end : 

My light, my heat, my flame and all is paft ; 

Onely, whilft breath remaines, my hope doth laft. 
This life of ours is toft to and againe, 
Time and unconftant Fortune workes our bane : 
Care kils us, griefe, difeafes doth outweare 
This life, Death dragges us to the dolefull biere. 
Fortune takes what me in the morning gave ; 
Or enemies robbe and spoile what e're we have ; 
Strength, beauty perifh, honours flye away, 
Falfe friends, when meanes are gone, they will not ftay. 
Hope's onely conftant in adverfity, 
Before fhe's kild by death, me will not fly. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



WHILST I BREATHE, 






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ll_ FAUT SOUFFRIR CE G^U'ON NE PEUT GUERIR. 



THE WEAKEST GOES TO THE WALL. 



Pauper agat caute. 




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IF POOR, ACT CAUTIOUSLY. 

ITTLE fifh! why come you flamming 
JL|j On the furface as you do ? 
Deeper down you mould be fwimming, 

That's the fitter place for you. 
Here above, great fea-mews hover, 

Keen of eye, and fwift of flight ; 
And for fuch as you moreover, 

Have a wondrous appetite. 



HE WHO CLIMBS TOO HIGH, IS NEAR A FALL. 

13 



CHACUN A SA PLACE. 



Here alone, the kings of ocean 

May with fafety dare the light, 

UJ But how came you by the notion 

ft: Thus to brave the eagle's fight ? 

(I) Every kind of little creature 

Should its proper ftation know ; 

Ul And your fitter place by nature, 

_ Is much rather down below. 

< But if little Bleaks difport them, 

h Like the porpoife and the whale, 

While fo heedlefs they comport them, 

Danger muft their lives alTail. 

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Little fimes undertaking 

. What the great alone may do, 

I Like all, who their part miftaking, 

Soon or late their folly rue. 

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"C^VERY little fish expects to become a whale. He who would be every where will 
I be no where. Danish Proverb. 

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THOSE who wade in unknown waters will be sure to be drowned. 

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AN ounce of discretion is better than a pound of wit. 



UJ WHO always does that which pleases him 

Does not always what he ought. 



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SEMPRE ha torto il piu debole. 

Q A cader va chi troppo in alto sale. 

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UJ ON ne doit jamais pretendre a des droits qu'on ne scauroit soutenir. 

Ct 

Q. 

Quien siempre hace lo que quiere. 

No hace siempre lo que debe. Spanish Proverb. 



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TRASPASA el rico las leyes, y es castigado el pobre. 

THE rich man transgresses the law, and the poor man is punished. 



ALL THINGS IN THEIR PLACES. 
14 






HE WHO STANDS HIGH IS SEEN FROM AFAR. 



CEEKEST thou great things for thyself? seek them not : for behold I will bring evil 
upon all flesh, saith the Lord. -Jeremiah xlv. 5. 

As a bird that wandereth from her nest, so is a man that wandereth from his 
place. Proverbs xxvii. 8. 

A PRUDENT man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself ; but the simple pass on, and 
are punished. Proverbs xxvii. 1 2. 

HE that exalteth his gate, seeketh destruction. Proverbs xvii. 19. 



shall go about 

To cozen Fortune and be honourable 
Without the stamp of merit ! Let none presume 
To wear an undeserved dignity. SHAKESPEARE. 

POOR and content, is rich and rich enough. Ibid. 

0) THRASO is Gnatho's prey. LORD BACON. 



TRUE happiness is to no place confined, 

But still is found with a contented mind. (0 



WHEN we have reached the summit of a vain ambition, we have only reached a , 

h pinnacle where we have nothing to hope, but everything to fear. COLTON. Lacon. < 

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2 PARVUM parva decent. HORACE. 

FELIX est qui sorte sua contentus vivit. HORACE. 
. NE te quaesiveras extra. Ibid. -I 

~! CUT non conveniat sua res, ut calceus olim, < 

Si pede major erit subvertit, si minor uret. Ibid. 

Ne quid nimis. TERENCE. 

HAUD facile emergunt quorum virtutibus obstat 
Res angusta domi. JUVENAL. 

Pauper amet caute, timeat maledicere pauper, 
Multaque divitibus non patienda ferat. OVID. 

Quid fuit ut tutas agitaret Daedalus alas, 

Icarus immensas nomine signet aquas ? 
Nempe, quod hie alte, demissius ille volaret, 

Nam pennas ambo non habuere suas, 
Crede mihi, bene qui latuit, bene vixit, et intra 

Fortunam debet quisque manere suam. OVID. 

Nullum Numen abest si sit Prudentia. JUVENAL. 



HE WHO PITCHES TOO HIGH WON'T GET THROUGH HIS SONG. 

15 



CONTENTEMENT PASSE RICHESSE. 



IGHT is the Torches life of heavenly kind, 

^1 Thus to a fraile and greafie mafle combind, 

To which the Painter beauty doth impart, 

Giving it glofTe and colour from his Art. 

The painting's nought, light doth the Torch commend 

Which firft was framed onely for this end. 

It is our mind that doth our life approve, 

Shewing our race derived from above. 

Blind Fortunes goods, kins generofity 

Youths ftrength, and beauties curiofity 

Make not, unlefle the fpirit doe us feafon 

With that Heav'n-bred fparkle of divine reafon. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



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LIGHT ONELY is- MY 
PRAISE. 




PRIDE THAT DINES ON VANITY, SUPS ON CONTEMPT. 

16 



EST BIEN, G^U'IL SY TIENNE. 



Vry dae-r gy zyt. 



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REST CONTENT WHERE THOU ART. 

'HERE is a Fifh, fo Fifhers fay, 
Of mood fo giddy and fo gay ; 
So fond of glare and dazzling light, 
That even in the darkeft night, 
'Twill crowd thereto in fportive play, 
And e'en more ready than by day 
Become the wily Fifher's prey. 



WHOSO IS WELL, LET HIM KEEP SO. 

17 



Tl MIELE E Tl MANQERAN l_E MOSCHE. 



The Fimer who thefe fifh would get, 
Needs neither baited hook nor net : 
A blazing torch, his only lure, 
Fix'd in his boat, is far more fure 
Than bow-net, feine, or hook and bait, 
His fluff in little time to freight. 
For while his mates propel the boat, 
As up and down the ftream they float ; 
The fifh enchanted with the light 
That makes a mimic day of night, 

j From far and near toward the blaze 

Directing their enraptur'd gaze, 

O Swim up in moals, and fport around, 

Till giddy with delight they bound 
Into the fimer's bark, and there 
Forfeit their life for love of glare. 
Thofe who on Love or Pleafure bent, 
Leave their own home and element ; 
And wander far to court the grace 
Or win the fmile of ftranger face, 

111 Of whom they nothing farther know, 

Than their mere outward charm and show ; 

ill Have frequent reafon to repent 

They were not with their home content ; 
And like the fifhes of our tale, 

CO Their folly, when too late, bewail. 

Wooers and wooed ! to both of you, 

Alike applies a maxim true, 

. 

1 Which cannot be too oft repeated : 

Who far away a-courting goes, 
Where one of t'other little knows, 
Or goes to cheat or to be cheated. 



/^\UIEN lejos va a casar 
^^- O va enganado 
O va a' enganar. 



MAKE THYSELF HONEY AND THE FLIES WILL EAT THEE. 

18 



A NEAR NEIGHBOUR IS BETTER THAN A DISTANT COUSIN. 



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FALLITUR ignotis, aut fallit amator in oris. 



UT cephalum Venetis fallat piscator in oris, 

Prsefiget parvae lumina magna reti : 
Mox piscis, qua teda micat, salit, inque phaselum 

Cum ruit, in praedam navita promptus adest. 
Quid tibi cum flammis, cum sint tua regna sub undis, 

Quid salis in Cymbam stulte, natare tuam est : 
Ni cupiat vel fraude capi, vel fallere quemquam, 

Errat, in ignoto littore si quis amat. 



Domus arnica, domus optima. 

'"PHE finger of God points to home, and says to us all, " There is the place to find 
your earthly joy ! " REV. J. ABBOTT. 

IF you find a young man who does not love home, whose taste is formed for other 
joys, who can see no happiness in the serene enjoyment of the domestic circle, you may 
depend upon it he is not to be trusted. Ibid. 



'Mm pleasures and palaces though we may roam, 
Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home ; 
A charm from the sky seems to hallow us there, 
Which, wherever we rove, is not met with elsewhere. 
Home ! Home ! sweet, sweet home ! 
There's no place like home ! B. CORNWALL. 



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DRY BREAD AT HOME IS BETTER THAN ROAST MEAT ABROAD. 

19 



TRUST, BUT NOT TOO MUCH. 




Y Light is beft maintain'd with little Oyle, 

Too much of that which feeds me, doth me fpoile. 
Deluge of waters drownes the fertile ground, 
Soft dropping raines makes it with grafie abound : 
Riot in cheere the body kils and minde, 
The meaneft fare, the beft for both we finde : 
Rather in Mica than Apollo dine, 
If thou wouldft wit and health ftill to be thine. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



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BETTER WITH A 
LITTLE. 




TRUST, BEWARE WHOM. 



20 



TIME BRINGS ALL THINGS TO LIGHT. 



Sensim amor sens us occupat. 




LOVE TAKES POSSESSION OF THE MIND INSENSIBLY. 

CHOUGH fcarce at firft apparent to the fight, 

The words which on the tender bark we write ; 
Yet how diftinct, 'ere long, the letters mew 
In fize increafed, as with the rind they grow ! 
So by degrees, as on that lettered bark, 
Doth Time expand to flame, Love's flighteft fpark : 
So to the germ of Vice in early youth, 
Time gives the increafe with the body's growth; 



SLOW AND SURE. 



A LITTLE LEAVEN, LEAVENS A GiREAT MASS. 

And errors deem'd at firft too flight to trace, 
Spread to a depth no efforts can efface. 
From fmall beginnings rife the fiercer! ftrife ; 
Nor Love, nor Vice, at once leap into life : 
The breeze at firft fo zephyr-like and warm, 
Is but too oft the prelude of the ftorm. 
That fo it is ; how many have to grieve ! 
The mifchief when full grown we can perceive ; 
But how it grew we fcarcely can believe. 



A MOR neque nos statim, neque vehementer ab initio, quemadmodum ira, invadit ; 
(D neque facile ingressus, decedit, quamvis alatus : sed sensim ingreditur ac molliter, 

manetque diu in sensibus. PLUTARCH. 

X LABITUR sensim furor in medullas, 

Igne furtivo populante venas, 
Non habet latam data plaga frontem, 
Sed vorat tectas penitus medullas. SENEC. Hippol. 

fc " 



LONG-WAITING love doth entrance find 
D Into the slow-believing mind. SYDNEY GODOLPHIN. 

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THERE is no argument of more antiquity and elegancy than is the matter of Love ; 

for it seems to be as old as the world, and to bear date from the first time that man 
and woman was : therefore in this, as in the finest metal, the freshest wits have in all 
ages shown their best workmanship. ROBERT WILMOT. 



"V\7"E are not worst at once the course of evil 

Begins so slowly, and from such slight source, 
An infant's hand might stem its breach with clay ; 
But let the stream get deeper, and Philosophy 
Aye, and Religion too shall strive in vain 
To turn the headlong torrent. Old Play. 



Tern-pus omnia revelat. 

TERTULLIAN. 

THERE is nothing covered that shall not be revealed ; and hid that shall not be 
known. Matthew x. 26. 



PEU DE LEVAIN AIGRIT GRAND' PATE. 

22 



EX UMBRA IN SOLEM. 



Genera Pietatis principia. 
BY degrees, until Chrift be formed in you. Galatians iv. 19. 

' I A ILL we all come in the unity of the Faith, and of the Knowledge of the Son of 
God into a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ. 
Ephesians iv. 13. 



"T\ESPAIR not that the writing on the tree, 

So indistinct at first appear to thee : 
Of one day's growth was Virtue never known ; 
The Light of Grace spreads by degrees alone : 
Until throughout illumin'd by its ray, 
The Soul of Man made perfect in each way 
By Faith and Works, is fitted to partake 

The joys of Heav'n for his Redeemer's sake. 



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ALTHOUGH the operations of Nature are hidden, we must acknowledge the hand of 

a Power which acts in secret, as we acknowledge a force which attracts heavy bodies 

to the earth, or which carries light bodies upwards. MARCUS AURELIUS. UJ 

UJ 

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Medium Sol aureus orbem 

OrcM-hat. ft raA 



- Occupat y et radiis ingentibus omnia luftrat 



HpHE pitchy darkness of the night 

Is not immediate changed to Light : 
'Ere morning shews his ruddy face, 
First breaks the dawn with gentle pace ; 
And then, the Sun, the World's bright eye, 
Rises and gradual mounts the sky; 
Until at last his fullest ray, 
Floods sea and earth with brightest day. 



BETTER is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof : and the patient in spirit 
is better than the proud in spirit. Ecclesiastes vii. 8. 



DESERVE SUCCESS AND YOU SHALL COMMAND IT. 

23 



THE SUN WILL. BRING TO LIGHT WHAT LAY UNDER THE SNOW. 



'HIS little rift and chap workes all my woe, 

Whilft thorow it fierce Boreas doth blow ; 
A crevice is a city gate to death, 
Who ftill in ambufh feekes to flop our breath : 

A little chinke doth drowne the loaded barke, 
A ftately houfe is burned with a fparke : 
And one difeafe doth this our health annoy, 
One wound our life is able to deftroy : 
One finne can Soule and Body overthrow 
Into the hell, and darknefTe that's below. 
Doe not a danger which is meane defpife, 
From meaneft caufes greateft evils arife. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



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ONELY. fi 




LITTLE BY LITTLE THE BIRD BUILDS ITS NEST. 



WITHOUT KNOWLEDGE MEDDLE NOT. 



L<zdit inept os. 



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THE INEXPERT ARE WOUNDED. 

PS food for man, like many other fim, 
A well drefT'd Thornback is a dainty difh ; 
But in the cooking, lefs of art there lies, 
Than how to hold it when you've caught the prize 
For he who doth not know this fifh's ways, 
And grips him juft as he would take another, 



CUSTOM MAKES ALL. THINGS EASY. 



H 



NESSUNO NASCE M AESTRO. 



Moft dearly for his want of knowledge pays 
With unexpected pain, too great to fmother : 

While the more fkill'd and cautious fifher, he 
Seizing him firft by one gill, then the other, 

Short work of him foon makes, and as you fee, 
Laughs in his fleeve to hear his neighbour's pother. 



Non omnibus omnia. 
All things are not good for all. 



think that they the faculty possess, 
All things alike to do with like success ; 
And that alike all things may be achiev'd, 

Ne'er fail'd alike to find themselves deceiv'd. 

> Not ev'ry one is apt to ev'ry thing, 

Nor the same talent to the purpose bring : 

To take or this or that be what it may, 

Each certain thing has its own certain way. 

(I) T' achieve success in all we would acquire 

. ' Needs something else beyond the mere desire. 

And when obtain'd how oft 'tis but to find, 
The thing desir'd, nor suited nor design'd 

^ Or to our talent, health, or frame of mind. 

All is not good for all, though all would be 
Alike possessors of some thing they see : 
What joy to one imparts and is his gain,- 
Is both at once another's loss and pain, 
And ev'ry day doth some example shew 
That one man's weal is but another's woe. 



ARTE citae remoque rates veloque reguntur, 

Arte leves currus, arte regendus amor. OVID I. Amand. 

Qui secundos optat eventus, dimicet arte, non casu. VEGET. lib. 3 in Praf. 

AMABIT sapiens, cupient cseteri. APUL. ex A/ran. 



NO ONE IS HIS CRAFT'S MASTER IN ONE DAY. 

26 



SAQESSE VAUT MIEUX G^UE FORCE. 



Without knowledge meddle not. 

DILUIS helleborum certo compescere puncto 
Nescius quantum ? vetat hoc natura medendi. 

Wilt thou mix hellebore, who doth not know 
How many grains should to the mixture go 1 
The art of medicine this forbids, I trow. 



Felix quern faciunt aliena pericula cautum. 

'T'HAT is a twofold knowledge, which profits alike by the folly of the foolish, and j W 

the wisdom of the wise ; it is both a shield and a sword ; it borrows its security 
from the darkness, and its confidence from the light. COLTON. Lacon. \ l~ 

IL < 

ONE man's meat is another man's poison. Z 

One man's fault is another man's lesson. QJ 

IT is better to learn late than to remain ignorant. PHOCYLIDES. 2 

WHAT is the true good ? Knowledge. 

And the true evil ? Ignorance. SENECA. UJ 

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'Disappointment in Marriage. \- 

0) 
ISTEN, I pray you, to the stories of the disappointed in marriage : collect all their UJ 

UJ complaints : hear their mutual reproaches ; upon what fatal hinge do the greatest m 

(D part of them turn 1 " They were mistaken in the person." Some disguise either of body 

or mind is seen through in the first domestic scuffle : some fair ornament perhaps the P 
I) very one which won the heart, the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit falls off ; // is GO 
not the Rachael for whom I have served, Why hast thou then beguiled me 1 5: 

Be open be honest : give yourself for what you are ; conceal nothing, varnish j 
nothing, and if these fair weapons will not do, better not conquer at all, than con- 
quer for a day : when the night is passed, 'twill ever be the same story, And it came 
to pass, behold it was Leah ! 

If the heart beguiles itself in its choice, and imagination will give excellencies 
which are not the portion of flesh and blood : when the dream is over, and we awake 
in the morning, it matters little whether 'tis Rachael or Leah be the object what it 
will, as it must be on the earthly side, at least, of perfection, it will fall short of the 
work of fancy, whose existence is in the clouds. 

In such cases of deception, let not man exclaim as Jacob does in his, What is 
it thou hast done unto me ? for 'tis his own doings, and he has nothing to lay his fault 
on, but the heat and poetic indiscretion of his own passions. STERNE'S Sermons, vol. iv. 
p. ii. 



EXPERIENCE TEACHES FOOLS. 

27 



L.A EXPERIENCIA ES MADRE DE I_A SCIENCIA. 



OMETIMES I was the brood of Gold'n-haird funne, 

More pure, more chaft, than Vefta's watchfull nunne, 
Purer than Eafterne gemmes, than Saphirs bright, 
Purer than Ophirs gold, than Rubies light, 
Purer than Pactols gravell often try'd 
In fire, and furnace feven times purify'd : 
But fince the fates to greafe did me combine, 
His filthy dregges are judged to be mine : 

For why conjunction doth contagion make, 
And from th' impure the pure infection take. 
The foule once plung'd into the body darke, 
Forgets it was a chaft and divine fparke. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



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S^EXPERIENCE IS THE BEST MASTER. 

28 



TON NON MOUVOIR, MOUVOIR .ME FAIT. 



Dum TrahimuSy Trahimur. 



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WHILE WE DRAW, WE ARE DRAWN. 

JSEEK to move thee to my mind : 
But in fo doing, this I find ; - 
That 'tis not I who give to thee 
The fond emotion I would fee ; 
But thine immobility, 
That moves me rather, more to thee. 
Strange ! that the coldnefs of thine heart, 
Should thus to mine more warmth impart; 



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THINE IMMOBILITY MOVES Ml 



29 



WHO IS GOD SAVE THE LORD? WHO IS A ROCK SAVE OUR GOD? 



And thus, what I would draw, to fee 
Draw me, who would the drawer be ! 
The more thou doft my pray'r deny, 
Alas ! the more I burn and figh, 
Lamenting Love's perverfity. 



AdtrahenSy abftrahor. 
The Puller is pulled. 

T IFE'S high-rais'd landmark is the firm set rock, 

Emblem of HIM who moveth all around, 
Himself quiescent, yet who gives the shock 
Of Life and Motion which throughout abound. 
Man, whose weak hand, and as it suits his will, 
Would pull to him that rock, shall strive in vain, 
And learn therein, his Destiny is still 



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Thereto but to be drawn, howe'er he strain. 

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Sure guide to those who unreluctant hale 
Their bark thereon their toil shall best avail ; 

And those who doubt, shall find it still prevail. 
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Si nunquam Danaen habuisset ahenea turris, 

Non esset Danae de Jove facta parens. OVID, Amor. Eleg. 19. 
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Saepe ego cum possem facilem exorare puellam, 



Difficilis mentem coepit habere meam. 



Quod movet, quiefcit ! 
That which moves, is at reft ! 

the Immoveable Rock, moves all. Psalm xviii. 

EVERY good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the 
Father of Lights, with whom is no variableness neither shadow of turning. -James i. 17. 



DIEU N'A RIEN FAIT QUE DE BON. 

3 



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movetur,Jed in quiejcente, et id quod movet, quiefcit. 

HERM. Pcemand. cap. xi. 

IMMUTABLE, yet changing all 

On high, around, below ; 
Immoveable, yet moving all 

The way that all should go : 

Fount of all Life and Light, 

All Good, all Love, all Grace; 
Encompassing with thought and sight, 

Eternity and space : 

All Peace, all sweet repose and rest, 

Yet ever moving still 
Earth, Sea, and Sky, as He knows best, 

His purpose to fulfil : 

Changeless, where endless change we see, 

Unmov'd the Mover moves 
All else in changeful harmony, 

And though unmov'd HE LOVES. 



TT7 HAT is God 1 The Soul of the world. What is God ? All that we see, and 



V V 



that we do not see. The grandeur of God is infinite ; alone He is all ; for He 
wills and directs His work. SENECA.* 

AN Eternal God moves this mortal world ; an Incorruptible Spirit breathes life into 
our frail organs CICERO. 

WE cannot understand God other than as a simple, free Being, divested of all 
perishable admixture : knowing all things, impressing motion upon all, and enjoying in 
and of Himself an eternal activity. 

How do the Heavens speak to us ? In what language doth it instruct us ? The 
seasons run their course ; all is reborn, all things are renewed. It is with this eloquent 
silence that they discourse to us the great Secret Principle by which all is moved. 
CONFUCIUS. 



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Mon Dieu conduisse moy, par la voie ordonnee, 
Je suivray volontiers, de peur qu'un fort lien 
Ne m'entraine mechant, ou en homme de bien 
Je pourrois arriver, suivant la destine'e. 

The Prayer of Rpictetus. LE SIEUR DU VAIR. 



(Manuel d" 



THE HEAVENS DECLARE THE GLORY OF (3OD. 



BLESSED IS THE MAN THAT FEARETH THE LORD. 




| Y light from whence it came, mounts ftill on high 
Unto the fource of light that's never dry. 
Like as the Rivers to the Ocean runne, 
From whence their fecret fountaines, firft begun ; 
Like as the ftone doth to the center fway ; 
So to the Spheres my light ftill makes his way. 

No joyes, delights, and greateft weights of gold, 
Nor pampering pleafure faft our foule can hold. 
The panting foule refts not, untill it fee 
His maker God, a Tri-une Deitie. 

FAR HE'S Emblems. 




REJOICE IN THE LORD >6LWAY; AND ^GAIN I SAY REJOICE! 



l_A PEUR EST GRAND INVENTEUR. 



Inverfe, et Avertes. 



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BOTH SIDES SHOULD BE SEEN. 

fMASK, leen firft in front, by children's eyes, 
Strikes them with terror and with wild furprife 
But would'ft reftore to calm the urchin mind, 
Avert the face, and let them fee behind. 
With men no lefs, how oft doth it appear, 
The worft interpreter of things is Fear ! 
How oft the crowds of men and women grown, 
Quailing like children at fome form unknown 



FEAR IS A GREAT INVENTOR. 



33 



FOOLISH FEAR DOUBLES DANGER. 

Or when fome found unufual ftrikes their ear, 
Fly, to meet ills far worfe than thofe they fear ! 
And yet how frequent, would they but reftrain 
The fudden terror of their fever'd brain, 
And calmer wait t' examine and to fee 
The how, or end of what the thing may be ; 
Puerile as that which fill'd the child with dread, 
They 'd find the fancied peril which they fled ; 
And fcann'd with coolnefs, learn more probably, 
That what in front is terrible to fee, 
Seen from behind provokes hilarity ! 



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j Timiditas est corruptio judicii. 

\- SENECA. 

D 

i >"lpHE Imagination (says Seneca) appals us usually more than the thing itself; in like 

manner as the mere whizzing sound of a sling frightens birds, and makes them take 
wing, so are we alarmed more by the noise than by the act. As the forms of bodies 
appear increased in size in misty weather, so are all things magnified to us by Fear : in 
so much that many through fear of coming into danger, fall, daily, into the most 
extreme peril. Men have been known, in peril of shipwreck, to throw themselves 

QJ overboard through fear of being drowned ; drowning themselves, therefore, in order not 
to be drowned, and dying to avoid death. What folly so great (says Seneca) as to 

> , become troubled at approaching difficulties, to spare ourselves no anguish, but rather 

call an increase of sufferings to those that threaten ? 
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PERU, interii, occidi quo curram? quo non curram? 
Tene, tene quern ? quis ? nescio nihil video. 

I'M lost, undone, I'm kill'd, oh whither shall I flee ? 

Whither shall I not flee? 

Hold ! hold ! whom ? what ? who 1 I know not I do nothing see. 

THE novelty of the danger is not unfrequently its chief and only terror. 

^EQUAM memento rebus in arduis servare mentem. 

IN peril, still preserve an unmov'd mind, 
And oft no peril in the thing you'll find. 

APPEARANCES ARE DECEITFUL. 
34 



FEAR ARGUES A DEGENERATE MIND. 



rationem difficultatibus, possunt et dura molliri, et angusta laxari, et gravia 
scite ferentes minus premere. SENECA. 

TERROR absentium rerum ipsa novitate falsb augetur; consuetudo autem et ratio 
efficit, ut ea, etiam quse horrenda sunt natura, terrendi vim amittant. PLUTARCH in Mor. 

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Mor s larvae similis: tremor him, nihil inde maligni. > 

i CORINTH, xxv. 54. 

Death, where is thy Sting? 

Q 

U* EN as the mask, in front seen, only, fills (/) 

The mind of children with a panic fear, 

So Death by men is feared : yet least of ills, Z 

Alike of both the terrors disappear 

When seen by Reason's light on every side. 

And why fear Death, ere we its nature know? : 

'Tis but a livid mask, which, seen behind, 
Hath terrors none, but balm for every woe, 
Hope, peace, and comfort to the righteous mind ; I 

Opening to realms more bright, the portals wide. 

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pUERI larvas timent, ignem non timent; sic nos timemus mortem quse est larva, Q 

contemptu digna, peccatum non timemus. CHRYSOSTOM, Horn. 5 ad Pop. h 

YEA, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of Death, I will fear no evil : 
for thou art with me ; thy rod and thy staff comfort me. Psalm xxiii. 4. 

THE Lord is my light and my salvation ; whom shall I fear ? The Lord is the strength ft: 

of my life ; of whom shall I be afraid IIbid, xxvii. i. n 

WHY are ye fearful, O ye of little faith ? Matthew viii. 26. 

Sic nos in Luce timemus. LUCRET, /. 2. UJ 

(3 

PRECIOUS in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints. Psalm cxvi. 15. 5j 

FOR I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ : Q 

which is far better. Philippians i. 23. 



PRESENT fear begetteth Eternal security : Fear God, which is above all, and no 
need to fear man at all. S. AUGUST, super Psal. 



EXPERIENTIA DOCET. 
35 



EXPERIENTIA STUL.TORUM MAGISTRO. 



O glory could I mew, wer't not the night 

In fable clouds did mantle up heavens light, 
When ftarres are vail'd, and Phceb' her homes doth hide, 
Laying her creflet and attire afide. 

The more nights fbgge doth mafke the fpangled fpheare, 
The more in darkenefle doth my Light appeare ; 
Nights foggy cold doth make my flame more ftrong, 
And light's more glorious pitchy clouds among. 

If you together contraries parallel, 

By contrary oppofition they excell. 

Vertue compare with Vice; and you mall fee, 

This mew his glory, that his infamie. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




EXPERIENCE IS THE INSTRUCTOR OF FOOLS. 

36 



HE IS A QREAT FOOL WHO FORQETS HIMSELF. 



Sibi nequam, cui bonus. 




j 



WHO IS HURTFUL TO HIMSELF, BENEFITS 
NO ONE. 

JfAKE Love with cheerful heart, 

Of what ufe thoughts of fadnefs ? 
Do as the Partridge doth,* 
That fattens on Love's gladnefs : 
Do as doth the pretty birdf 
Which on the banks of Nile, 



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* La perdrix s'engraisse a couvrir la femelle. PLUTARCH. 

t On the subject of this bird, the Trochilus of Pliny, see Plin. lib. 8, cap. 25. De Trochilo sive 
avium rege, crocodile clentes scalpente et se saginante. 



HELP THYSELF, AND C3OD WILL HELP THEE. 

37 



SELF-PRESERVATION IS THE FIRST LAW OF NATURE. 



The while he feafts his fill, no lefs 
Doth fervice to the Crocodile. 

Nay ne'er repine, fweet youth, 
'Tis fenfelefs, downright Folly, 

To let thine ardent flame 
Give caufe for Melancholy : 
He that loves and ferves a maid, 

In truth, achieves two ends ; 
For while her wifh he pleafes moft, 
So he no lefs himfelf befriends. 

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0) Ex puer es, nee te, quidquam nisi ludere oportet. UJ 

Lude, decent annos mollia regna tuos. 
Cur aliquis rigido fodiat sua pectora ferro ? UJ 

Invidiam csedis pacis amator habes. >. 

OVID, lib. i. de Remed. Amor, ad Cupidinem. 

AMOR immoderatus ipsi amori novissime inutiles sic facit : nam quum fruendi CD 
cupiditate insatiabili quis flagrat, tempora suspicionibus, lachrimis, querelis perdit, otium 
sui facit et novissime sibi est odio. HIERON. 

(I) LES violences qu'on se fait pour s'empecher d'aimer sont souvent plus cruelles que j > 

j les rigueurs de ce qu'on aime. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD. 

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Non id agis, quod agis. 
Publica praetexuntur, privata curantur. 

QUELQUE personage que 1'homme joue, il joue toujours le sien parmy. MICH. DE 
MONTAIGNE. 



Public men, great fault the Public find, 
That while the business of the State they do, 
They shew themselves the while somewhat inclin'd 
To look to self, and mend their own state too. 
In this withall, we see not much to blame ; 
And those who most the impulse oft condemn, 



IT IS EASY TO HELP HIM WHO IS WILLING! TO BE HELPED. 

38 



WHO IS OVER NICE, LOSES MANY A SLICE. 



Would ten to one in office do the same, 

Or even worse than those whom they contemn. 
In this as in all else 'tis the excess 

That constitutes the fault, and those alone 
Who steer the middle course, the best express : 

" Serve well the Public ends, but serve thine own." 
The wisest Statesman of a surety, 

Is he who lab'ring for the Public weal, 
His own alike with the same glance can see 

And feel for that for which none else would feel. 
On this world's stage, whate'er the Part man plays ; 

In act and speech however seeming fair ; 
He always something of his own betrays, 

And in the Part the Man himself is there. 



A LA cour du Roy, chacun pour soy. 

Sois serviteur, sans creVecreur. 

Onder Vrientschaps schyn, besorght hy't syn. 



O -prodiga rerun luxuries ! 

"VVTHEN gorged with food, the greedy Crocodile 

Extended lies upon the sands of Nile ; 
The pretty King bird with an appetite 
Gross as the Vulture, or the bird of Night ; 
Hies to the monster's wide extended jaws 
To cleanse his fetid teeth with beak .and claws. 
That bird so pretty ! should a taste display 
For food so filthy, doth too well pourtray 
And symbolise the grosser appetites 
Which some men shew for sensual delights ; 
And who while doing service as they seem, 
The service of their bellies most esteem. 



WHOSE end is destruction, whose God is their belly, and whose glory is in their 
shame, who mind earthly things. Philip, iii. 19. 

STOLEN waters are sweet, and bread eaten in secret is pleasant. Prov. ix. 17. 



IT IS QOOD TO HAVE FRIENDS IN ALL PARTS. 

39 



HE WHO WOULD TAKE MUST GIVE. 




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HILST ftormy winds about the Lanterne rage, 
The light ought to have lurked in his cage ; 
Untimely love undoes him, while he lends 
His Light, loe how his harmelefTe life he fpends. 
When troops of enemies befiege the wall, 
For feare of hurt, fhut gates, though friends doe call. 
If that a friend accompanyed with a foe 
Doth come, feare neighbour danger, let him goe. 
If thou lov'ft to be charitable, doe 
So good to others, that it hurt not you. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



SIC^PIO PERM OFFICIO. | 



SO I AM UNDON BY I 

DOING la 
GQOD._ 




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G^UIEN QUIERE TOMAR CONVIENELE DAR. 

40 



KNOW, ONE FALSE STEP IS NE'ER RETRIEVED. 



De Kanne gaet soo lang te water > totse eens breeckt. 



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THE POT GOETH SO LONG TO THE WATER, TIL AT 
LAST IT COMMETH BROKEN HOME. 

IDJFLAS! Alas! What have I done? 

\* Oh ! Woe is me this day : 

My Pitcher's broke! all from this fun, 

This filly, romping play. 
Oh! fad! what will my Mother fay? 

Her words have come too true ! 



DONNA CHE PRENDE, TOSTE SE RENDE. 



M 



NEGLIGENCE AMENE DECHEANCE. 



On me alone the blame (he'll lay, 

Whatever (hall I do? 
And yet full many a time and oft, 

In this fame Pitcher too, 
I've water drawn both hard and foft, 

Nor had mimap to rue : 
Pumpt water in ana thrown it out, 

And pumpt it full again, 
Nor e'en fo much as chipp'd the fpout, 

For Mother to complain. 
UJ Alas! that I could ever be 

I- So heedlefs of her fay 

t The warning (he would give to me, 

And, almoft ev'ry day ! 
But here about young fellows are 

So rollicking and free ; 
Pull girls about fo much, nor care ; 
Q And moft of all p'rhaps me. 

Z That Hans there of our Village, he's 

k So rough and wild alway ; 

It I won't fpeak, he'll fulk, or teafe 
CO Whene'er I pafs his way. 

And I'm good natur'd too I know, 
9 And where is then the blame, 

Q I love a laugh fometimes, and who 

UJ At heart but does the fame ? 

\- And I and other girls when we 

Perchance together meet, 
Some lads are always fure to be 

At games about the ftreet ; 
And fo it was juft now, although 

I did all I could do, 
For Water firft my way to go, 
When Hans he joined us too. 
Then there began a game all round 

Of running jibe and joke, 
When down we came upon the ground, 
And I my pitcher broke ! 



IDLE MEN TEMPT THE DEVIL. 
42 



AS YOU SOW SO MUST YOU REAP. 



And thus I've found the faying true, 
I've many times heard fpoken, 

"The Pot that goes too oft unto 
The Well, at laft gets broken." 



TANTES va la secchia al pozzo, che vi lascia il manico. 



'JpANT va la cruche a 1'eau, que le manche y demeure. 

DER Krug gienge fo lang zur buch 
Bis er zu lest zerbruch. 

DER Krug gehet so lang zum brunnen, bis das er bricht. 
va la secchia al pozzo, che vi lascia 
CONSUMITUR peccando saspius pudor. 

TANTO va la capra al cavolo, che vi lascia la pelle. h 

HET geytjen loopt soo dickwils in de koolen, tot het eens de vacht laet. fl) 

DE mug die om de keerse sweeft, 
't Is wonder soo die lange leeft. 

WIE veel wil mallen, "^ 

Moet eenmael vallen. 

KaKots ofj.i\(Zv V'TOS !/c/3j'<7Jj KQKOS. 

Id est, 
MALOS frequentans ipse et evades malus. 

UNE folie est tost faite. h 

LET ! vrysters ! wie ontruet u gaen 
Een malle greep is haest gedaen. 

BE cautious, maidens, how ye run ; 
A foolish thing is speedy done. 

a 

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Avoid too much Familiarity. 

TT is unwise both to use and to permit too great Familiarity. Who become 
familiar, soon lose the superiority which their previous reserve gave to them ; and, 
consequently, their credit. We should be familiar with none never with our superiors, 
because it is dangerous ; nor with our inferiors, because it is derogatory ; and still 
less with the vulgar, whose ignorance renders them insolent, and, unable to perceive 
the honour that is done them, they presume that it is their due. Familiarity is one 
of the tendencies of a weak mind. GRACIAN. 

THE purest treasure mortal times afford 

Is spotless reputation ; that away, 

Men are but gilded loam, or painted clay. SHAKESPEARE, Rich. III. 

L'OISIVETE EST MERE DE TOUT VICE. 

43 



L.E MECHANT EST COMME LE CHARBON, 



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|f3[ND loth'ft thou me, my Soule, loving to goe 

IJL 

J Elfewhere, I pray thee whither, let me know, 
Was thou not all this while my deereft mate, 
My gueft, my convoy, confort in eftate ; 
While I did florim, thou didft conftant prove, 
My times are darkned now, fo is thy love ? 
SOULE. Here as a captive to a keeper, fo 

I tyed was with thee, at lift, to goe, 

Banifht from home : loe now my bonds are loofe, 

Thou dy'ft, I glad runne to my fathers houfe. 

Soules bond with body hardly maketh breach, 

Yet this doth dye, and that Heav'ns dwelling reach. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



llIh/VHITHER MY SOULE 




S'lL. NE VOUS BRULE, II- VOUS NOIRCIT. 

44 



BE MERRY AND WISE. 



Ludite, Jed Cafte. 



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PLAY, BUT CHASTELY. 

HE cunning Hedgehog, with inftindive art, 

In ball-like fhape, rolled up, upon the ground, 
With open hole-like mouth, knows well his part, 
T' entrap the giddy mice that fport around. 
And lo ! when one, more prying than the reft, 
Draws near, to peep within a hole fo nice, 



RIRE SANS MAL-ENGIN. 



45 



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QIVE A SPRAT TO CATCH A MACKREL. 

The Hedgehog fnaps him up with eager zeft, 
And moufey pays for peeping, in a trice ! 
Let caution guide your fport, be what it may ; 
For where expected leaft, fome (hare may lay : 
And Venus' boy was painted blind of yore, 
For that in darknefs he worked mifchief more. 



FORMOSAS intueri jucundissimum, tangere autem et tractare sine periculo non licet. 

PLUTARCH. 

AMOR latebricolarum hominum corruptor. PLAUT. Trin. 

DETUR aliquid setati, sit adolescentia liberior, non omnia voluptatibus denegentur. 
Dummodb ilia in hoc genere praeseriptioque moderatioque teneatur, parcat juventus 
pudicitiae suse, ne spoliet alienam, ne probrum castis, labem integris, infamiam bonis 
inferat. Cic. pro Mar. C<zlio. 



Parva Patitur ut Magnis Potiatur. 

NIUNO piu facilmente inganna gli altri, che chi e solito, e ha fama, di non gli 
ingannare. GIUCCIARDIN. 

No one so easily deceives others as he who is expert in deceit, and has a repute 
for Integrity. 



He is not the greatefl cheat who begins with cheating. 

HpO gain his ends, the Hedgehog first permits 

Each sportive freedom that the mouse would take ; 
For well he knows if he to that submits, 
More sure is he, his prey of him to make. 
So is't with those who most to wrong intend ; 
They first assume the semblance of the friend ; 
And e'en sometimes to make the cheat more sure, 
Some favour offer, or some loss endure : 
Till having gain'd the vantage ground they sought, 
And lull'd suspicion with most fair pretence, 
Their too reliant dupe at length is caught, 
And rues too late his ill plac'd confidence. 



SUPPORTER PEU, POUR EMPORTER TOUT. 

46 



GIVING IS FISHING. 



VIGOR ingentibus negotiis par, eb acrior, quo somnum et inertiam magis ostentat. 

TACITUS. 

PELLICULAM veterem retines, et fronte politus, 

Abstruse rapidam gestas sub pectore vulpem. PERS. Satyr. 5. 

FRAUS in parvis fidem sibi preestruit, ut, cum operae pretium est, cum mercede 
magna fallat. LIVY. 



J 
J 

ObjeEta movent. 

BE sober, be vigilant ; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh h 

UJ about, seeking whom he may devour. i Peter v. 8. J7j 

< '"pHE Hedgehog knows the mouse's wanton ways, 

And knowing this, knows well to profit by it : 
He shows the mouse a hole, nor aught betrays 

That might abate his innate bent to try it : 

O 

I Within his mouth in hole-like fashion hollow'd 

Q The mouse soon creeps and is as quickly swallow'd. 

Z With just such baits as these Man's mortal foe 

< UJ 
Lures man to ill, and fills this world with woe : 

He knows our hearts, he knows our love of sin, 
Z And by that knowledge strives our, souls to win, 

Tempts each alike, by that which most allures J 

<f The heart of each, and thus his prey secures. ! 

\- 

UJ CD 

D 





E z 

BUT I fear, lest by any means, as the serpent beguiled Eve through his subtilty, so h 

your minds should be corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ. 2 Corinth, xi. 3. :!; 

> 




IT is the Devil's part to suggest : Ours, not to consent. As oft as we resist him, 
so often we overcome him : As often as we overcome him, so often we bring joy to 
the Angels, and glory to God, who opposeth us, that we may contend, and assisteth 
us, that we may conquer. S. BERNARD in Ser. 



DONAR SI CHIAMA PESCAR. 
47 



UNLOOKED-FOR, OFTEN COMES. 



UJ 
CD 
J 
UJ 



i 
h 

UJ 

2 


CO 

CO 
UJ 

o: 

LU 

I 
h 

I 
h 



J 


* 



< 

CD 

UJ 

I 
h 

cr 
UJ 

Q 
Z 

D 



JpOURE Elements in this my body are 

All yockt in one, yet ever ftill at warre ; 

As all agree to nourifh this my light 

So to my mine they combine their might : 

Aire maketh way for flame, Earth builds a pyre, 

My moifture feeds the ftill confuming fire. 

Still as I mine by light, by light I dy, 

As caufe of life, fo of mortality, 

It was Prometheus fault who ftole away 

Heav'ns fire, and joyn'd it to his mortall clay. 

Moifture doth heat, and heat doth moifture quale, 
That dryes our body, this makes it dampe and fraile, 
That which doth give, doth likewife fpend our breath ; 
The firft of being, is firft houre of death. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




UNDER FAIR WORDS BEWARE OF A FRAUD. 

48 



ONE SWALLOW DOES NOT MAKE A SUMMER. 



17, met Wyl 




HASTEN AT LEISURE. 

'HE Peach-tree with too eager hafte 
To fhew its bloflbms to the fun, 
Gives oft its pretty bloom to wafte 
Before the frofts of Spring are done. 

Much wifer is the Mulberry, 

Which only thinks its leaves to fhew, 



UNA HIRUNDO NON FACIT VER. 



49 



HASTE MAKES WAST E. 



When leaves are green on ev'ry tree, 
And rofes have begun to blow. 

They moft enfure Succefs and Praise, 
Who, guided by the Rule of Reafon, 

Do fitting things on fitting days, 

And drefs as most becomes the feafon. 



meuner, 
Qu'amandrier. 

D'AMANDEL bloeyt vroeg, de Moerbesy laet ; 
Maer let eens wie het beter gaet ! 

SAT citb, si sat bene. 
Assez tost, si bien. 

HAEST genoeg, 
Is't wel genoeg. 

SOON enough begun, 
Q_ That which is well done. 

DRESS drains our Cellar dry, 

0) 

And keeps our Larder lean. COWPER. 

FOND pride of Dress is sure a very curse. 

Ere fancy you consult, consult your purse. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 

U. THE most violent Passions will sometimes allow us a respite, but Vanity leaves us 

QJ no repose. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD. 

Z 
D 



quidquid est, da tempus ac spatium tibi : 
Quid ratio nequit ssepe sanavit mora. SENECA, Agam. 

Si quid bene factum velis, tempori trade. Ibid. 

DA spatium tenuemque moram, male cuncta ministrat 
Impetus. STATIUS . 

DIFFER, habent parvse commoda magna morse. OVID. 

f 
THE mean, is the point nearest to Wisdom : it is better not to reach it at all, 

than to over-run it. Chinese Proverb. 

LET Reason guide you at all times, even in the most unimportant things. 

PYTHAGORAS. 



HASTY SPEED DON'T OFTEN SUCCEED. 



HASTE TRIPS UP ITS OWN HEELS. 



AVOID doing that which may draw down upon you the reproaches and the envy 
of your neighbours. PYTHAGORAS. 

KNOW your opportunity, and do not speak before-hand of that which you will 
do. Should your project fail, you will furnish subject for ridicule to those who are 
jealous of you. THALES. 



Esto Cultu modicus. 

I 

|- V\/"E are told by Jewellers that there is no Diamond of so fine a water, but it 

requires some aid to improve its lustre. This observation has been also 

IF 

> applied to young women. 

No objection can be made thereto, provided it be understood in a fitting and 
healthy sense. For it is indisputable that Virtue and Modesty are the greatest 
ornaments or auxiliaries to the Beauty of Woman. 
Z 

LA chastete est la premiere beaute. 
Z 

EXTERNAL Show and costliness of Dress are pernicious in their effects upon the 
r; female mind, and tend to sap the principles of Virtue and Modesty. As regards her 

attire, the motto of a virtuous young Woman should be : 
LU 

I Nitide, non delicate. 

0) Reyn gekleet, 

En niet te breet. 

CD 

UJ Clean in Dress, 

Without Excess. 

I NE sois Paon a toy parer, 

I Ny Perroquet en ton parler, 

Ny Cicogne en ton manger, 

Ny Oye aussi en ton marcher. 

SUSPECTA semper ornamenta ementibus. 
VEEL vlaggen, luttel boters. 

WHOSE adorning let it not be that outward adorning of plaiting the hair, and of 
wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel. i Peter iii. 3. 



MORE HASTE, WORSE SPEED. 



HI 



WHO LOSES, SINS. 



HE Crafts-man did me of pure tallow frame, 
And made me fit to nourifh heav'ns flame ; 
One thing remain'd, that I mould take with fire, 
When feafon due, and fit houre doth require : 
Loe how the rats catching me all alone, 
With envious teeth my body ceafe upon ; 
I dye before my day, they life prevent ; 
Before I live, my livelefle body's fpent: 
I dying could with teares my death bemoane, 
But this untimely death doth yeeld me none. 
The infant fo oft doth it felfe entombe, 
Before it fee the day, in mothers wombe. 
So by untimely death youths hope decayes, 
Which might have well deferved many daies. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



SIC PERIRE MISERUM EST. 



SO TO DIE IS MISE- 




G^UI PERD, PECHE. 



THE LORD IS MY LIGHT AND MY SALVATION. 



Luceat Lux Veftra coram Hominibus. 



(0 

Q 
o: 





fif NXIOUS, tempeft tofT'd and weary, 
I* To the feaman's gladden'd fight, 
'Mid the night-ftorm, what fo cheery 
As the gleaming beacon's light ? 

Though the wild waves wilder threaten, 
Calmer now, he fteers his way 



SHEW ME THY WAYS, O LORD; TEACH ME THY PATHS. 

53 p 



To the long defir'd haven, 
Guided by its friendly ray. 

Like unto that beacon, truly, 
0) ! 

He of upright heart and mind, 

Holding high his light mould mew the 
Heav'nward way to all mankind. 

Chriftian ! lift your light on high then, 
Let it mine o'er all, and mew, 

In this darkfome world to all men, 

How and where that men mould go. 





LU 

I 
h 

~ T ET your Light so shine that men seeing your good works may glorify your Father 

which is in Heaven. Matthew v. 16. 
Ill 

WE labour in the boisterous sea : Thou standest upon the shore and seest our 
J dangers : give us grace to hold a middle course betwixt Scylla and Charybdis, that 
both dangers escaped, we may arrive at our Port secure. S. AUGUST. Soliloq. cap. 35. 

O LIGHT inaccessible, in respect of which my Light is utter darkness ; so reflect 
upon my weakness, that all the world may behold thy strength : O Majesty incompre- 
hensible, in respect of which my glory is mere shame ; so shine upon my misery that 
Q | all the world may behold thy glory. HUGO, Pia Desid. 

Z ' 

CO 



to 

> IVT^ ^ 0( ^' m y ^ lt: * s ^ ar k enou gh at lightest, 

Increase its flame, and give it strength to shine : 
LJ 'Tis frail at best : 'Tis dim enough at brightest, 

But 'tis its glory to be foil'd by thine, 

Let others lurk : my light shall be 
Propos'd to all men ; and by them to Thee. QUARLES, Hieroglyph viii. 

' 

(0 



HE does wickedly, that does not shew the right to one who is in the wrong. 

VIRTUTIS ENIM LAUS OMNIS IN ACTIONE CONSISTIT. 

54 



QOD IS A LIGHT THAT IS NEVER DARKENED. 



"LJEAVEN doth with us, as we with torches do, 

Not light them for ourselves ; For if our virtues 
Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike 
As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely touched, 
But to fine issues ; nor Nature never lends 
The smallest scruple of her excellence; 
But, like a thrifty goddess, she determines 
Herself the glory of a creditor, 

Both thanks and use. SHAKESPEARE. 

Z 

UJ So far the little candle throws its beams, 

j 

So far shines a good deed in a naughty world ! 
IL 



I 
h 

/~\UI in occulto bene vivit, sed alieno profectui minime proficit carbo est. Qui verb 
;:: ^^^ in imitatione sanctitatis positus, lumen rectitudinis ex sese multis demonstrat, 

> lampas est : quia sibi ardet, et aliis lucet. GREG. Super Ezech. homil. 5. 

NUMQUAM est mutila opera civis bonis. SENECA. 
UTILE etiam exemplum quiescentis. 

MELIUS homines exemplis docentur, quse in primis hoc in se boni habent, quod 

approbant, quse praecipiunt, fieri posse. PLINIUS, Paneg. 

Z DOCTUS sine opere est ut nubes sine pluvia. Adag. Arab. 

Sic luceat lux vestra coram hominibus ; id verb ex hoc fit, cum apparet miseri- 
QJ cordia in affectu, benignitas in vultu, humilitas in habitu, modestia in cohabitatione, 
patientia in tribulatione. HUGO, De Claustro Animce, lib. 3. 

Sic agitur censura, et ne exempla parantur, 
Cum judex, alios quod manet, ipse facit. OVID. 



J 


I 

O LORD ; who art the Light, the Way, the Truth, the Life ; in whom there is no 
darkness, error, vanity nor Death : the Light, without which there is darkness ; the 
Way, without which there is wandering ; the Truth, without which there is error ; the 
Life, without which there is Death : say, Lord, let there be Light, and I shall see Light, 
and eschew darkness ; I shall see the Way, and avoid wandering ; I shall see the Truth, 
and shun error ; I shall see Life, and escape Death : Illuminate, O illuminate my blind 
Soul, which sitteth in darkness, and the shadow of Death ; and direct my feet in the way 
of Peace. S. AUGUST. Soliloq. cap. 4. 



YET A LITTLE WHILE IS THE LIGHT WITH YOU. 

55 



HE THAT DOETH GOOD, IS BETTER THAN THE GOOD HE DOETH. 




HEN ftormie Boreas puts the feas in rage, 

And fwelling waves inteftmg warre do wage ; 
When fun is darkn'd, when night doth heav'n confound, 
And foaming billowes give a difcord found. 
My light then leads the way through reeling ftrands, 
Guiding by Scyllas rocks, Charybdis fands. 
Here we are tofTed in a maine of feares ; 
But Chrift our admirall the lanterne beares ; 
Leaft we fhould fuffer fhipwracke in the night, 
He leads us through all dangers by his light. 
Who then wouldft come to Heav'ns long wimt-for bay, 
Follow thy Saviour who's Truth, Light, and Way. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




THE PRACTICE OF DOING GOOD ENGENDERS GOOD WORKS. 

56 



LOVERS LIVE BY LOVE, AS LARKS BY LEEKS. 



Fumo pascuntur amantes. 



h 
D 
LU 

> 
LU 






SMOKE IS THE FOOD OF LOVERS. 

HEN Cupid open'd Shop, the Trade he chofe 
Was juft the very one you might fuppofe. 

Love keep a {hop ? his trade, Oh ! quickly name ! 

A Dealer in tobacco Fie for fhame ! 

No lefs than true, and fet afide all joke, 

From oldeft time he ever dealt in Smoke ; 



AMANT, TON BONHEUR N'EST G^UE VAPEUR. 



57 



AS JET DRAWS A STRAW, 



Than Smoke, no other thing he fold, or made ; 
Smoke all the fubftance of his flock in trade ; 
His Capital all Smoke, Smoke all his ftore, 
'Twas nothing elfe ; but Lovers aflc no more 
And thoufands enter daily at his door ! 
Hence it was ever, and it e'er will be 
The trade moft fuited to his faculty : 
Fed by the vapours of their heart's defire, 
No other food his Votaries require ; 
For, that they feek the Favour of the Fair, 

Z Is unfubftantial as the Smoke and air. 





N 

Q A MORES et delicise mature, et celeriter deflorescunt. CICERO pro. M. CceL 

h OMNIA speramus, promissaque vana fovemus 

Molliter: et faciles ad nova vota sumus. 
Interea totum paupertas possidet aevum, 
(0 Caecaque volvendo somnia, vita perit. DANIEL HEYNS. 

Ill 
Q 

\- Love. 

THE cherish'd Fire, 

Which blindly creeps through every vein and dries 
The fluent blood, whence grosser vapours rise, 
j Sadding the soul with fearful phantasies. 

It is to be all made of fantasy, 
All made of Passion, and all made of wishes ; 
All adoration, duty, and observance ; 
All humbleness, all patience, and impatience ; 

All purity, all trial, all obedience. SHAKESPEARE. 

LOVE reigns a very tyrant in my heart, 

Attended on his throne by all his guards 

Of furious wishes, fears and nice suspicions. OTWAY. 

O MIGHTY Love ! from thy unbounded power, 

How shall the human bosom rest secure 1 

How shall our thoughts avoid the various snares? 

Or Wisdom to our cautioned soul declare 

The different shapes thou pleasest to employ, 

When bent to hurt, and certain to destroy ! SOLOMON. 

THERE'S nothing half so sweet in Life as Love's young Dream. MOORE. 



SO DOES BEAUTY LOVE. 

58 



AS TOUCHWOOD TAKES FIRE, 



Love and Hope. 

I HAVE heard many say : 

Love lives on Hope ; they knew not what they said. 

Hope is Love's Happiness, but not its Life. 

How many hearts have nourished a vain flame 

In silence and in secret, though they knew 

They fed the scorching fire that would consume them. L. E. L. 

LIGHTER than air Hope's summer visions die ; 

If but a fleeting cloud obscure the sky ; 

If but a beam of sober reason play, 

Lo ! fancy's fairy frost-work melts away. ROGERS. 



SIR KENELM DIGBY, in his Private Memoirs, makes a lover say, "I will go to the 
other world to preach to damned souls that their pains are but imaginary ones, in 
^ respect of them that live in the hell of love." P. 38. 

m LOVE is a species of Melancholy. BURTON. 



Cure for Love. 

TVT^' CARTER was for half an hour one evening entirely in love with a Dutchman ; 



and the next morning she took a dose of algebra fasting, which she says 
entirely cured her. Memoirs, vol. i. p. 36 7. 

0) 
III 

Z 

Love and Legislation. 

OTRANGE, and passing strange, that the relation between the two Sexes, the Passion 
of Love, in short, should not be taken into deeper consideration by our Teachers 
and our Legislators. 

People educate and legislate as if there was no such thing in the World : but ask 
the Priest, ask the Physician let them reveal the amount of Moral and Physical 
results from this one cause. 

Must Love be always discussed in blank verse, as if it were a thing to be played 
in Tragedies or sung in Songs a subject for pretty Poems and wicked Novels, and 
had nothing to do with the prosaic current of our every day existence, our Moral 
Welfare and Eternal Salvation ? Must Love be ever treated with profaneness, as a mere 
illusion 1 or with coarseness, as a mere impulse 1 or with fear, as a mere disease ? or 
with shame, as a mere weakness ? or with levity, as a mere accident 1 Whereas it is 
a great Mystery, and a great Necessity, lying at the foundation of Human Existence, 
Morality, and Happiness mysterious, universal, inevitable as Death. Why, then, should 
Love be treated less seriously than Death ? It is as serious a thing. MRS. JAMESON. 



SO DOES AN IDLE PERSON LOVE. 
59 



THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE 




CO 

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h 

2 

CO 

* 




J 



HO fearft outragious Vulcans damned ire, 
And wouldft be fafe from night-furprifing fire ; 

Put out the flame, the fmoaking fnuffe supprefTe, 

Leaft from the fmoake the fire it felfe redrefle ; 

For fire is next to fmoake, and oft its feene, 

That reaking fnuffe a blazing fire hath beene. 
Who feares the damned fire of inward luft, 
And Cupids flames, obferve this rule he muft. 
Hearts concupifcence, 'fore it 's vehement, 
Looke that in words he fuffer 't not to vent ; 
For words are fmoake of burning hearts defire ; 
Smother his words, he needs not feare the fire : 
But otherwayes a wanton complement, 
Doth blow his fire, and makes him give confent. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



FLAMMA FUMO PROXIMA EST 








J 



z 

CO 





z 



NEVER YET RUN SMOOTH. 



60 



CONTENT IS HAPPINESS. 



Su<e quemque Fortune pcenitet. 




EACH DEPLORES HIS OWN LOT. 

'HE Fim that in the Weel are taken, 

When they find no iflue more, 
Feel the ftronger wifh awaken 

To be where they were before : 
But the Fifh that fee them in it, 

Think it far more pleafant there ; 
And they ftrive their beft to win it, 
Swimming round it ev'rywhere. 



THOU SHALT NOT COVET. 



61 



COVETOUSNESS BRINGS NOTHING HOME. 



Thus it is that men, like Fifties, 

Ne'er contented with their lot, 
Ever reftlefs in their wifties, 

Craving more than what they've got; 
In their greed of wealth and ftation, 

Coveting yet more and more, 
Oft in change of fituation, 

Find it worfe than t'was before. ui 

I 

ffl 

pISCIS cum modo ingrediendi nassam videat, egrediendi non videat, et nihilominus (0 

ingrediatur, piscatoribus fit prseda : non est ergo suscipiendum negotium, nisi 
prius perspecta ratione qua te possis inde rursus explicare : nee enim labyrinthi 

ingrediendi sunt sine filo, quo securus possis redire. 

< 

(D 

> NEMO est, quin ubivis, quam ibi, ubi est, esse malit : nam suam quisque conditionem Q 

miserrimam putat ; cum tamen contentum suis rebus esse, maximse sunt certissimae- 

Z que divitiae. CICERO. n 

111 u - 

Non esse cupidum, pecunia est. 

LU 

Si vis gaudere per unum diem, radas barbam, si per septimanam, vade ad nuptias ; 
si per mensem, erne pulchrum equum ; si per semestre, erne pulchram domum ; si per 
annum, ducas pulchram uxorem ; si per biennium, fias sacerdos ; si semper vis esse 

Isetus et gaudens, vives tua sorte contentus. Thesaurus ridendi. I 

CO h 

< I CO 
LU 

AMONG good things I prove and find \L 

The quiet lyfe doth most abounde, UJ 

U And sure to the contented mynde 

D There is no riches may be founde. Songs and Sonnetes. 

LET not what I cannot have 

My cheer of mind destroy. COLLEY GIBBER. Q 





A LL men have their trials and afflictions, but a contented mind accommodates itself 
to every vicissitude of life ; neither poverty nor distress, neither losses nor 
disappointments, neither sickness nor sorrow, can affect its equanimity. DR. BREWER. 

A CONTENTED mind is free from the distressing passions of ambition, covetousness, 
jealousy, envy and the like, which prey like Vultures upon the peace of the 
discontented. Ibid. 



AVARICE BURSTS THE BAG. 
62 



OUT OF DEBT, OUT OF DANGER. 



MEN always desire more than they possess, yet scarcity has been the ruin of fewer 
People than abundance and repletion. THEOGNIS. 

I AM richer than you, if I do not want things, which you cannot do without. 

SOCRATES. 



THERE is a jewel which no Indian mine can buy, 

No chemic art can counterfeit j 
QJ It makes men rich in greatest poverty, 

Makes water wine, turns wooden cups to gold, 

The homely whistle to sweet music's strain ; 

Seldom it comes, to few from heaven sent, 
Q That much in little all in nought Content. 

WILBYE'S Madrigals. 



Hi 

tt 

IF there be any happiness to be found upon earth, it is in that which we call 
contentation : this is a flower that grows not in every garden : the great Doctor of the 
Gentiles tells us that he had it ; I have learned (saith he) in what estate soever I 

(0 am, therewith to be content. BP. HALL. Of Contentation. 

UJ 






IF solid happiness we prize, 
Within our breast the jewel lies ; 
|_ And they are fools who roam : 

The world has nothing to bestow; 

>. From our own selves our joys must flow, 

And that dear place our home. 

COTTON. 



h 
0) 

Vain is alike the joy we seek, 
And vain what we possess, 

Unless harmonious reason tunes 
The Passions into peace. 

To temper'd wishes, just desires, 

Is happiness confm'd ; 
And, deaf to folly's call, attends 

The music of the mind. 

CARTER. 



HE THAT IS WARM THINKS Al_l_ ARE SO. 

63 



BE CONTENT WITH 



-SHrJ^ 

ISF LL living things with others loffe maintaine 

J Their life, not fo my harmelefle light I gaine. 

The plant doth feede upon the fertile foile ; 

And bruitifh beafts the pleafant plants doe fpoile ; 

So harmelefle heart, and bird, and fifh must dy, 

To pamper mans too licorim gluttony. 

But of condition though I mortall be ; 

Yet this my Light is onely nurft by me. 

The moft of men doe live by others lofTe, 
Whilft others goods they to themfelves engrofle : 
So man proves wolfe to man, and robbery gives 
Moft gaine to him, who moft unjuftly lives. 
Thrice happy's he, who's of his ftate content, 
As if it were CrafTus or Crcefus rent. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




SUCH THINGS AS YE HAVE. 



64 



BEAUTY IS NO INHERITANCE. 



Ogni Fiore al fin perde l y odore. 



UJ 

* 

J 

(D 

UJ 

D 
h 




EVERY FLOWER LOSES ITS PERFUME AT LAST. 

[AIDEN ! will you never learn 
All the leflbns Flowers teach, 
And that each of them in turn 
Hath its potent power of fpeech ? 
In the early violet's bloom, 
Modest mien, and fweet perfume, 



BEAUTY IS THE SUBJECT OF A BLEMISH. 

65 



BEAUTY AND FOLLY ARE OFTEN COMPANIONS. 



In the daify of the mead, 
If you have the mind to read, 
Simple though to you they seem, 
Each affords its moral theme ! 

Ev'ry Rofe that here you fee, 

Ev'ry Flower that blooms a-field, 
t Whatfoe'er their Beauty be, 

Muft alike that Beauty yield ! 
Aye ! believe me, maiden fair, 
Whatfoe'er the Gard'ner's care, 
Whatfoe'er his fkill may be, 
It but little needs, to fee 
That which is fo fair to day [jj 

UJ Vanifh like a dream away ! ~ 

i 
Z 

Let there come a chilling rain, 

Nipping wind or flighteft froft, 
Few would lift their heads again- 
All their Beauty would be loft ! 
Or, e'en let the Sun, whofe light 

Calls to life their colours bright, >. 

UJ But too fiercely on them mine, 

< i Straight you'll fee their bloom decline, 

Wither'd by too great excefs 00 

Of that very Sun's carefs ! 

l_ Maidens ! and Young Women all ! 

Learn then as you mould from this, 
All the ills that youth befall, 
And how fleeting Beauty is! 

Lips that with, the coral vie, 

Witching Beauty of the eye, 

Ev'ry charm of form and face, 

Whatfoe'er their winning grace, 

Have their Emblem of decay 

In the Rofe of yefterday ! 



BEAUTY IS BUT DROSS IF HONESTY BE LOST. 

66 



BEAUTY IS A BLOSSOM. 

Maiden, there is fomething too, 
Woman's Beauty ne'er defied, 

Though as rich in charms as you, 
And as full of youthful pride. 
You have but to look at me, 
And you may that fomething fee, 
That can fteal away each grace, 
And in little time deface, 
Whatfoever be your care, 
All that makes you now fo fair. 

Time ! it is, whofe ftealthy wing 
Throws on all alike its made, 

Fades the bloom of ev'ry thing, 
Howfoever fair 'twas made ! 

Time ! though it fo foftly treads, 
Silent ruin round us fpreads ; 
And as Age has done by me, 
If you live, you'll furely fee 
Beauty J s but an idle boaft, 
Your's to-day ; to-morrow loft ! 

But, there is a Beauty yet, 
Far more lafting in the wear ; 

That which Virtue doth beget, 

Fadelefs bright beyond compare : 
Make that Beauty your's, fair maid; 
Time o'er that can caft no made; 
And when wrinkled that fair brow, 
'Twill be fairer far than now, 
With a Beauty that mall gain 
Lafting Love in God's domain. 



As for Man, his days are as grass : as a flower of the field, so he flourisheth. 
For the wind passeth over it, and it is gone : and the place thereof shall know it no 
more. Psalm ciii. 15, 16. 



PRETTINESS DIES QUICKLY. 
67 



VANITY HAS NO GREATER FOE THAN ITSELF. 



h 

LL 
<D 

h 
< 
I 
h 

UJ 

z 

LL 
0) 

J 
J 



UCH is lights love to Heaven, that ftill above 

It mounts, and cannot to the center move ; 
Hold you it under, it will upward reach, 
And through its ruinous body make a breach. 

Our foule doth bend our bodies ftraight and even, 

As with it felfe, it would them raife to Heaven ; 

But all in vaine it undergoes fuch toyle, 

The body will not leave its native foyle : 

Age puls it downe, and makes it ftoope full low, 

Till death doth give his fatall overthrow 

Then through the bodies breach the Soule doth rife, 

And like a conquerour, mount to the fkyes. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



XTINGUAR QUIN ASOENDAM 




VANITY WILL. PROVE VEXATION. 
68 



EN AMOUR, EN COUR, ET A l_A CHASSE, 



Inter manum et mentum. 




MANY A SLIP 'TWIXT THE CUP AND 
THE LIP. 

i 
WIFT, through the flood, cheer'd by his matter's praife, 

With vig'rous ftroke the Spaniel cleaves his way, 
And lo ! already with his ardent gaze, 
He marks the wounded wild-fowl as his prey. 



CHACUN NE PREND CE G^U'IL. POURCHASSE. 

69 



HOPES AND FEARS CHEQUER HUMAN LIFE. 



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Near and more near upon the bird he gains, 

And as the fpace that parts them fmaller grows, 
With fpeed increafed, he plies the foot and strains 

Towards the game, now clofe before his nofe. 
Then bounding high- at once from out the wave 

With fudden rum to feize the certain prize : 
That which he thought no means of flight could fave, 

Dives 'neath the flood, before his wond'ring eyes. 

In Love affairs, as in intrigues at court, 

It oft occurs as in the field of fport; 

Almoft before the chafe we have begun 

We deem the Fair, the place, and game are won ; 

And when moil fure we've grafp'd the prize aright, 

We fee it quickly vanifh from our fight. 

'Tis not alone in fleep that dreams arife ; 

Our hopes are oft but dreams with waking eyes ; 

As vifionless and vain by day as night, 

We think them real, and they fade from fight, 

Leaving the heart to grieve and to complain, 

To find itself fo cheated by the brain. 



caQa e amores 
Per um prazer cem dores. 

POTIUNDI tempore in ipso, 
Fluctuat incertis erroribus ardor amantum. LUCRET. lib. 4. 

FALLITUR augurio spes bona saepe suo. OVID. 

MULTA cadunt inter calicem supremaque labra. 
Inter os atque escam multa interveniunt. 
Inter os atque offam multa intercident. 

NON esse sapientis praefidere constanter iis, quae aliter evenire nata stint. POLYB. 
FERE libenter homines id quod volunt, credunt. C/KSAR. 



SPEM PRETIO NON EMAM. 



70 



WHILE THERE'S LIFE THERE'S HOPE. 



O FALLACEM hominum spem, fragilemque Fortunam ! et inanes nostras contentiones ! 
quse in medio spatio saepe franguntur et corruunt ; et ante in ipso portu obruuntur, 
quam portum contingere potuerunt. CICERO. 3. de Orat. 

PLERUMQUE hominum proprium est quod ration e difficile cognoscunt, id sibi 
cupiditate et spe facile fingere. FRANSC. GIUCCIARD. Hist. lib. 4. 

WE readily believe what we wish. Our wishes are fathers to our thoughts. We 
believe unwillingly that which we do not wish. 

FORTUNE is fond of change ; she allows herself to be possessed, and she escapes from 
us. Dost thou suffer from her fickleness ? Learn to bear it with patience. PYTHAGORAS. 



God's Providence, alike in the Smiles and Frowns of Fortune. 
Ferendum et Sperandum. 

'T'HAT Fortune is so changeful in her moods, 

Is scarcely to be blam'd in such degree 
rr; As we are wont to hear. 

Did we but put the question to ourselves ; 

We, who do change each moment of our lives ! 
h i In her so fickle nature we should see 

That which our changeful nature best befits. 

The only difFrence lies therein ; that we 
Z Find Fortune's changes more abrupt and loud 

Than those which daily in ourselves take place 

Which like the Shadow of the Dial, mark 

n 

~ Their silent progress but a progress still, 

Not the less certain that it seem to us 
Less evident, because insensible ! 

< Yet, mutative in body as in mind, 

With faculties that change with ev'ry day 

Their pow'r t' enjoy, or estimate aright 

The lights and shades which fall across our path 

We still repine ungrateful for the Light, 

And deem the Shadows more than we can bear : 

And this withal, forgetful of that Power 

Who in His Wisdom, wiser far than we, 

Knew best what our frail nature would befit, 

To make us that He will'd that we should be. 

With humble joy bear Fortune's transient smile, 

Nor let her frown to discontent beguile : 

With stedfast Hope, Columbus-like, at last 

Thou'lt find the New World when the storm is pass'd. 



FINCHE VI E FIATO VI E SPERANZA. 

71 



THOUGH THE BIRD'S IN THE NET, 




HEN as my Light with beames did brightly mine, 
And ftarre-light was but equall unto mine ; 

I was in great requeft and fet above, 

Was deare to all, who faw me, did me love : 

Now breathing fighes, and languishing I grone : 

I'm hatefull to my felfe, belov'd of none. 

If once againe my light beginne to burne, 

With it my light and honour mall returne. 

When Fortune {landing on her flippery ball, 

Doth favour, then are we admir'd of all ; 

But if me frowne, then flatterers flye away, 

No friends abide, if once your meanes decay : 

O but if Fortune change, and fmile againe, 

Then fawne thefe flatterers, and beare up your traine. 

Much like the Sea thefe Clients flote and flow; 

And Fortune turnes her coat, at every mow. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




IT MAY GET ANA/AY 



LOVE IS THE LOADSTONE OF LOVE. 



Amor, ut Pi/a, vices exigit. 



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LOVE, LIKE A BALL, REQUIRES TO BE 
THROWN BACK. 

'AIDEN fair ! if you would learn 

Well to play this pleafant game ; 
You muft ftrike in quick return. 

So that I may do the fame. 
Should you fail to ftrike at all, 
And that I make play alone, 



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LOVE SEES NO FAULTS. 



Then the fhuttle's fure to fall, 

And the game at once is done. 
Mark, fweet maiden, when I ftrike, 

And attend to what I fay : 
Tennis and Love's game alike 
^' Need a quick return of play : 

Who their pleafure moft would know, 

And in equal mare partake, 

2 In both games alike muft fhew 

Equal zeft to give and take. 
Love and Tennis both, play'd ill, 
I Soon upon the players pall, 

When one mews a want of will 
^ To hit back the flying ball. 

<( Love, to Love is demonftrative ; 

Love, gives life and ftrength to Love, 
And in being thus creative, 

Love doth moft its power prove. 
Love, of Love's at once the Price, 

And Reward that Love loves beft ; 
Nothing can to Love fuffice, 

But the Love that gives it reft. 
If from me to Love you'd learn, 

Love ; and be my Sweetheart true ; 
j But if you give no return, 

Then I'll fay good-bye to you. 



LU 




JAMAIS 1'Amour ne se paye que par Amour reciproque. 
ET Pretium, et Merces solus Amoris Amor. 

BENEFICIUM non est aurum, sed Amor per quern datur. 
Amor enim Beneficii anima. Vid. SENECA de Benef. 

Divinissimus est, quern redamare piget prius amantem. 

AUGUST, dc Amore divino- 



LOVE WILL CREEP WHERE IT CANNOT <3O. 

74 



LOVE IS THE TOUCHSTONE OF VIRTUE. 

AMA a chi t'ama, 
Rispond a chi ti chiama. 

Antwoord dieje vraegt, 
Min dieje Liefde draegt. 

Answer him who calls unto you, 

And love him who brings Love to you. 

UNA mano lava 1'altra, e le due lavano il viso. 

L'une main lave 1'autre, et les deux le visage. 
Als d'eene hant d'ander wast, soo wordense beyde reyn. 

D'eene Min brengt d'ander in. 



Z MANUS manum fricat, gratia gratiam parit. 



FERRO ferrum acuitur. 
UJ Fructus Amoris Amor. 

AMOUR au creur me poind, 

> Quand bien aime je suis ; 

Mais aimer je ne puis, 
Quand on ne m'aime point. 
Chacun soit adverti 

De faire comme moi ; 
Car d'aimer sans party, 

C'est un trop grand esmoy. MAROT. 

h 

h EXCUTE mihi ignem, et allucebo tibi. Proverbium Arabicnm ex Erpenio. 

J 

Id est, ut Jo Scaliger interpretatur , 

Esxo mihi, ero tibi. Be mine, I will be thine. 
QJ UT ameris, amabilis esto. OVID. 

AIMER sans Amour est amer. 
Vriendtschap van eener zijde en duert niet lang. 
Friendship all on one side lasts not long. 



Xapis X&pw <ji>pei. 



Amare recuso. 



Ilium quem fieri vix puto posse meum. OVID. Ep. Helen. 

AMOUR est d' Amour recompense, 

Et celui est trop a blamer 
Qui pour le moins (s'il ne commence) 

Ne veut pas, quand on 1'aime, aimer. 



LOVE AND HARDSHIP LIKE NO FELLOWSHIP. 

75 



FOLLOW LOVE AND IT WILL 




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HEN I this wimt-for light to tinne defire, 
I proftrate crave it from this flaming fire ; 
From whence if light come not in fitting time, 
I am confum'd before the light be mine. 

o 

Whofe meanes are fmall, whom Fortune favours not, 

They take their patrons mercy for their lot ; 

To them their fupplications they direct, 

Attending ftill with homage and refpecl: ; 

Delay undo'th them, makes them fpend their oyle, 

Their hopes grow lerTe, and greater is their toyle ; 

UnlefTe their Patrons timely mew their love : 

For gifts, by timely giving, double prove. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



QUICKLY OR I AM 

COfNj- 

SUK/IED. 




FLEE LOVE, AND IT WILL FOLLOW THEE. 

76 



LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP. 



Qui Captat, Capitur. 



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THE BITER BITTEN. 

1GH up in air, the fea-mew fpies 
An oyfter lying on the ftrand, 
Gaping with open fhell t' inhale 

The fummer breeze from off the land. 
To feize the lufcious morfel quick 
With fudden fwoop and deadly pick, 
The fea-bird darts his horny beak 
Between the oyfter's fhell : 



HOLD-FAST IS A GOOD DOG. 



77 



FORCE WITHOUT FORE-CAST IS OF LITTLE AVAIL. 



But clofing on it quick as thought. 

The bird is by the oyfter caught ! 
And nipped fo tight and well ; 

That ftrive and ftruggle as he may, 

To free his beak, and get away ; 

He keeps him captive, firmly bound, 

Till with return of tide he's drowned. 
Who to themfelves would all appropriate 
Of that they fee, deferve the fea-mew's fate ; 
Nor doth he fail to meet it, soon or late, o 

Whofe nofe is thruft in everybody's plate. 



'The Event is often different from the Intent. 

P\EFEATING our intent and expectation, 

In strange reverse of that we think to see ; 
When certain most, we find ourselves mistaken, 

And he is caught, who would the catcher be. J 

UJ 
To curb the pride and malice of man's nature, (/) 

'Twas wise ordained, that he should sometimes see,- 
In his own toils the hunter captive taken ; 

And he despoiled, who would the spoiler be ; Q 

The evil doer, 'gainst his calculation, 

By his own mischief foiled and hurt, alone, 
The slander of a neighbour's reputation, 

Recoil with deeper wound upon his own. 

C 

The fame in another fenfe. 

Konst van besiuaren, gaet voor't vergaren 

How to retain, is more than how to gain. Q 

HpHE mew is in a fix, as we have seen ; 

With beak well jamm'd the oyster's shells between : It 

But what avails the shell-fish his success ? 
Strange case it is yet nothing less than true, 
His very fortune causes him distress, 
Nor knows he with his capture what to do ! 
A very load to him, a trouble quite, 
The catcher would be well rid of the caught, 
'Tis almost 'gainst his grain to hold him tight 
Yet, to let go were perhaps with peril fraught ! 
Just so in life, whom management doth fail, 
Success nor riches to their good avail. 



A HASTY MAN NEVER WANTS WOE. 



FORTUNAM CITIUS REPERIAS G^UAM RETINEAS. 



HARM seek, harm find. 

A 

m As you sow, so you must reap. 

<[ As you make your bed, so you must lie on it. 

0) 

Qui mal cherche, mal trouve. 

Q Ut sementem feceris, ita metes. CICERO. 

|_ Comme on fait son lit on se couche. 

Tute hoc introisti, tibi omne est exedendum. TERENCE. 

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'"TpHE Power and the Riches acquired by a life of anxious toil, slip not unfrequently 
from their possessor's hands, from defective government, or mismanagement : 
because it is easier to acquire power and to gain wealth than to keep and use them 
Z prudently when gotten. An especial virtue is needful to this, more than is required 
for the gradual heaping up of riches. 



Z 

03 

Non laborc* fed munificentid Domini. 
(D 

Not by labour, but by the bleffing of the Lord. 

' I 'HE oyster without change of place, or toil, 

Prospers in peace, and easy takes his spoil : 
The sea-mew, restless, sweeps the shore and main 
In quest of food, and, little oft to gain : 
The oyster toils but little, yet he thrives ; 
The sea-mew, less from his great toil derives ; 

And so all labour is in vain, unless 

2 God of His blessing doth our labour bless. 

LU 

CO 



Eccleftaftes IX. 1 1 . 

T SAW under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, 
neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet 

h favour to men of skill ; but time and chance happeneth to them all. 
LU 

CO 

D 

'~pHE Righteousness of the upright shall deliver them : but. transgressors shall be 

j taken in their own naughtiness. Proverbs xi. 6. 

Go not forth hastily to strive, lest thou know not what to do in the end thereof, 

when thy neighbour hath put thee to shame. Proverbs xxv. 8. 
Z WITHOUT counsel, purposes are disappointed. Proverbs xv. 22. 

HE that is greedy of gain, troubleth his own house. Proverbs xv. 27. 



FORTUNE IS EASIER TO FIND THAN TO RETAIN. 

79 



ENQUIRE NOT, WHAT IS IN ANOTHER'S POT. 



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HE glaflie gulfe joyn'd with Earth's globe in one 

Gives waters to the rivers, loofeth none; 
The Sunne that makes fo many glorious dayes, 
Doth loofe no light, and ftill he waft's his rayes : 
The Loadftone to the iron gives vertue rare, 
And yet no wayes his owne he doth impaire ; 
So this my torch can give to others light, 
And ftill, as is his wont, fhine perfect bright. 

Thus Divine Wifdome doth communicate 
Herfelfe, that others may participate. 
The good more common, better is, and grace 
Wimeth, all were partakers of her cafe. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



NEC MINOR EST MEA I_UX. 




EVERY MAY-BE HATH A MAY-BE-NOT. 

80 



AS THE TWIGi IS BENT, SO THE TREE'S INCLINED- 



Rami correcti rectificantur ; trabs minime. 



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THE BRANCHES MAY BE TRAINED, BUT NOT 

THE TRUNK. 

|pf S I want wood to build a houfe, 
VI, I would cut down this tree : 

'Tis a fine ftem, although in truth 

It fomewhat crooked be. 
I've funk this pole, in hopes to bend 

It fomewhat ftraighter by ; 



YOUTH AND WHITE PAPER TAKE ANY IMPRESSION. 



81 



TRAIN UP A CHILD IN THE WAY HE SHOULD GO. 



Yet fear, though I the trunk e'en with 

A hundred withies tie 
(It is fo ftiff in heart and growth,) 

That it will never take 
A better fhape, whatever be 
The efforts I may make. 
But while here on the ladder, I 
j~j | Some perfon hear below ! 

Some voice unknown that calls to me, 
Holloa ! up there ! holloa ! 

And fomehow (why I know not) I 

Leave off to hear what he 
Has got to fay, and this is the 

Difcourfe he holds to me : 
Eh ! man, what art about ? wouldft bend 
m A full grown tree like this ! 

Doft take it for a fapling, eh ? 

Why what's with thee amifs ! 
There is no fenfe in what thou do'fl, 

So fpare thy labour, friend ; 
LU 'Tis only when the tree is young 

That thou the ftem canft bend ! 

CD Go, get thee home, and rather let 

UJ Thy children have thy care : 

The labour that thou here beftow'ft, 

Were better given there. 
(0 Thofe are the trees whofe growth once fet 

Will give thee moft concern ; 
And from th' experience of my years, 

This leflbn thou may 'ft learn : 
In tender youth alone, the mind 

To Virtue can be train'd ; 
But that once pafs'd, its growth and bend 
Are not to be reclaim'd. 



' I A HE above adage is taken from the collection of Arabic sayings collected and 

translated by the learned Polygot D. Erpenium, who was Professor in the high 

school of Leyden. This saying admonishes all parents and guardians that the years 



VIEIL ARBRE MAL AISE A REORESSER. 

82 



CE G^U'ON TETTE AVEC L.E L.AIT 



of childhood only are fitted for instruction, and that therefore a special regard 
should be had to them for that purpose. "Bend the neck of thy child whilst he 
is yet young, so that he become not stiff-necked," saith the Lord. Many sayings of 
our time, either in word or spirit, and frequently in both, correspond with that divine 
admonition. In allusion hereto, Scaliger in his day, cited in his Collection of Proverbs 
as coincident in meaning the French adage : 

VIEIL arbre mal aise a redresser. 
Alte Baume sind bose zu biegen. 
Alte Hunden boss bandig zu machen. 
Old dogs are hard to train. 

ETH moet vroeg krommen dat een goede reep worden sal. 
To make a good rope it must be bent early. 

MEN mag sijn oude schoenen verwerpen ; maer niet sijn oude seden. 
A man can throw away his old shoes, but not his old habits. 

GEWOHNTE maeckt eelt. 

UJ UJ 

(I) Custom makes things hard. Q 

WAT heeft geleert de jonger man, UJ 

Dat hangt hem al sijn leven an. 

What the young man has learnt sticks to him through life. < 

< NUTRITURA passa natura. 

J 

DELLA matina si cognosce il buon giornb. 

UJ 

L 'HAVER cura de putti 
111 

Non e mestiere de tutti. 



TAGYRI adeth gaiet mischkhiuldur. Turkish Proverb. 

Id est, 
It is difficult to change customs. 

Tepoi'Ta 8' 6p6ovv, (f>\avpov } os vt<j> Trecrot. 

ARISTOPH. apud Suidam. 

Id est, 

Erigere durum est, qui cadit juvenis, senem. 
Annosam arborem transplantare. Eodem sensu adagium refertur ab Erasmo. 

Castigar vieja, y espulgar pellon, dos rivancos, son. 

'Tis Education forms the common mind ; 
Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclin'd. 

TRAIN up a child in the way he should go : and when he is old, he will not 
depart from it. -Prov. xxii. 6. 



AU SUAIRE SE RESPOND. 
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AS YOU SOW, YOU SHALL REAP. 



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[ HOU goeft about mifchiefe and ftill doft feare, 

Leaft this my light 'gainst thee mould witnefle beare ; 
So having put me out thou think'ft to worke 
Thy will, and yet in fecret ftill to lurke. 

Thou art deceiv'd, the darknefle of this cell 
Containes a light, that fees the loweft hell. 
But thou a Want, canft not perceive this light, 
Neither difcerne Sun- mine from cloudy night. 
Then malt thou fee it, when the Deity 
Shall kindle that fparke which in thy bread doth ly. 
What e're thou doft, looke to that Light which made 
All Lights, and mines as day in midnight made. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



IN VAINE THOU 
PUTTEST 
ME OUT. 




WE LEARN BY TEACHING. 



84 



EXTREMES MEET. 



morfige lieden Kuys warden, foo r chuerenfe de Panne van achteren. 




WHEN SLOVENLY SERVANTS GET TIDY, THEY POLISH 
THE BOTTOMS OF THE SAUCEPANS. 

OOK & thefe Girls ! When they firft came to me, 
ILJJI They were fo fluttifh and untidy both, 
I never had a faucepan fit to fee, 

And fcarcely ever a clean kitchen cloth. 
But now it is a pleafure to behold ; 

They are become fo wondrous clean and neat ; 



NEITHER A LOG, NOR A STORK, GOOD JUPITER. 

85 a 



TOO MUCH IS STARK NAUGHT. 



I never have to rate them, nor to fcold, 

Nor ever now an order to repeat. 
They're fcouring, fcrubbing things continually, 

'Tis rare indeed fuch girls as them to meet ; 
Their kitchen's quite a palace, as you fee, 

And look, their drefier ! isn't it a treat ? 
They never now require to be told 

A fingle thing : and, what is even .more, 
I'm often now almoft obliged to fcold, 

They've got fo over nice, 'tis quite a bore ! 
They're now what I call cleanly to excefs, 

And make themfelves more work than need be made. 
So much, that oft I'd rather fee a mefs, 

That I might have fome reafon to upbraid. 

"* "7' 

There, look ! 'tis quite ridiculous to fee ! - 

ill Thofe pans and kettles which they're fcrubbing fo ; h 

Although I've faid it don't require to be, 
Q- They clean the very bottoms of them too ! 

'Tis juft the way with foolifh people all, 
When once their old bad habits they forfake, 

In th' oppofite extreme too oft they fall, 
And of a virtue then a folly make. 



h The Spendthrift, when he takes to fave, a Mifer oft becomes, 

And, where he fquander'd thoufands once, will make his meal of crumbs. 
The niggardly, when he the part of liberal would play, 

Is generous beyond his means, to give, to lend, or pay. 
But both are in excefs, and act in oppofition quite 

To Sense and Reafon's rules for doing e'en the thing that's right. 
So be advifed by me, my friends, and keep within the mean ; 

The path of Light, the line of Right, lies all extremes between. 



DOR Medio y no caereys. 
ALLEZ par le Milieu, et vous ne tomberez. 

MEDIO intissimus ibis. 

IL n'y a banquet que de chiches. 



TOO MUCH BREAKS THE BAG. 
86 



TOO TOO WILL IN TWO. 



Zu wenig und zu viel 
Verderbet alle Spiel. 
Zu viel ist ungesund. 

AL zu scharff macht schartig. 

Ii, molio e '1 poco. 
Rompe le givoco. 

Ni tan hermosa que mate, 

Ni tan fea que espante. 

Ni tant belle, qu'elle tue : 

Ni tant laide, qu'elle espouvente. 

Noch y ! noch fy. 

OGNO bel givoco vupl durar poco. 
00 Tien la Strada di mezzo. 

rn 

PERGE via media : medium tenuere beati. 

I ill 
Qui commence a etre liberal, devient prodigue. I 

CD J 

BAULLU curium etion vetra mensaran carnadu. Turkish Adage. 

> UJ 

^ OMNIS intemperantia est a tota mente ac a recta ratione defectio. CICERO. 

INCIDIT in Scyllam cupiens vitare Charybdim.^-HoRACE. 


< ID arbitror adprime in vita esse utile "ne quid ntmis." TERENCE. T; 

Z 

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^void Extremes. 


h 'Tis all in vain to keep a constant pother 

About one Vice, and fall into another; 

Betwixt excess and famine lies a mean ; 

Plain, but not sordid ; though not splendid, clean. POPE. 



Never exaggerate. 

pHE Wise never speak in the superlative, for that mode of speech always offends 

either Truth or Prudence. Exaggerations are so many prostitutions of reputation, 

inasmuch as they expose the shallowness of the understanding and 'the bad taste of 

the speaker. Exaggeration is a species of lying ; he who exaggerates shews himself to 

be a man of bad taste, and, what is worse, a man of mean intellect. GRACIAN. 



TOO MUCH CORDIAL WILL DESTROY. 

87 



TOO MUCH COURTESY, TOO MUCH CRAFT. 



FY Light into a fnuffe is almoft turn'd, 
And now the candle to fmoaking afhes burn'd, 
Behold another Light ftands ready by, 
Which to enjoy my place will make me dye. 
Yet not unpunim'd it' puts out my breath, 
My very ames doe revenge my death. 

So doth the fonne his Father make away, 

If not with fword, with griefe, before his day, 

That he his Fathers goods and meanes may joy, 

Which Nemefis revenging doth convoy. 

For oft the fpendthrifts goods fo evill gotten 

Are fpent before his Fathers bones are rotten. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




DO BUSINESS, BUT BE NOT A SLAVE TO IT. 



PROSPERITY GAINS FRIENDS, 



When the IVind serves, all aid. 





GREASE THE FAT SOW! 

HO claimeth kindred with the Poor ? " 
So few ! that 'twas the reafon why 
The queftion was firft put, no doubt, 

And truly ! it doth much imply. 
Replete with meaning are thofe words, 
Though few to picture and exprefs 
In time of yore, as even now, 
Man's all-abforbing felfimnefs. 



ADVERSITY TRIES THEM. 



A A 



CHANQE OF FORTUNE IS THE LOT OF LIFE. 

The fage * who said in antient days : 

"When the ftrong-box contains no more, 
And that the kitchen fire is out, 

Both friends and flatt'rers mun the door," 
< Attefted then, what even now 

Is daily feen on every hand : 
The profperous in life, alone 

Z Have profTer'd fervice at command. 

Let Fortune with propitious winds 

Waft but the laden bark to more, 
He finds a hoft of helping friends, 
CD Who never had a friend before. 

IU Beyond his need on ev'ry fide, 

l_ He fees unafk'd-for fympathy ; 

Officious zeal to help and aid 
Z The tide of his profperity. 

' Greafe the fat fow ! all help! all aid!" 
2 On ev'ry hand the harpies cry ; 

'Tis eafy rowing in the wake 
Of others' toil and induftry ! 



Thus 'tis in life, we conftant fee 
The Drones and Idlers of our 
Prey on the labours of the Bee, 

h And fatten on what others find. 

The Foxes of the human race, 

The Beavers of their own defpoil ; 
- Craft, lord it in poor Merit's place, 

< And take the credit of his toil. 

Ill 



UJ 

Z 

T^ONEC eris felix, multos numerabis amicos 

(t Tempora si fuerint nubila, solus eris. 

I, Aspicis ut veniant ad Candida tecta columbje, 

Accipiat nullas sordida turris aves 



* Plutarch. 

ALL IS LUCK OR ILL LUCK IN THIS WORLD. 

90 



A' THINGS HAE AN END, AN' A PUDDING HAS TWA. 

Horrea formicse tendunt ad inania nunquam : 

Nullus ad amissas ibit amicus opes. 
Utque comes radios per solis euntibus umbra est : 

Cum latet hie pressus nubibus, ilia fugit : 
Mobile sic sequitur fortunse lumina vulgus : 

Quse simul inducta nube teguntur, abit. OVID, i. Trist. 8. 

GRANARO vuoto formica non frequenta. Italian Proverb. 

U. 

D OP ledige solders en komen geen Kalanders. Dutch Proverb. 

WER da liegt, iiber dem lauft alle Welt hin. German Proverb. 

D PARENTE con parente 

Guai a chi non ha niente. 

UJ 

LL VRIENDEN sijn vrienden, maer wee diese van doen heeft. 



A BON vent chaque sainct aide. 

I 

IN borsa serrata, amico non si trova. Q 

VRIENDEN in der noot 
Vier-en-twintigh in een loot. 

h 
FELICIUM omnes consanguinei. 

1 CO 
l~ MEN kent geen vrient als in der noot ; 

Den rijcken na den doot. 

<LL 

DIEWEIL die Henn' Eier legt, legt man ihr auch. Old German Proverb. 

UJ 
WHILE the Pot boils, Friendship blooms. I Z 

IN Prosperity Friends are numerous and cheap. 

UJ 
Q INFELICIUM nulli sunt affines. Q 

9: L'HOMME pauvre est toujours en pais etranger. JUAN RUFO, Apoph. 541. 

UJ 
THE Vulgar find Friends neither in Prosperity nor Adversity : because in the former I 

UJ they know nobody, and that in Adversity nobody will know them. GRACIAN. 

INTEREST makes all seem Reason that leads to it. DRYDEN, Sec. Love. 

J 

J The noblest Friendship ever shown, 

The Saviour's history makes known, 

Though some have turned and turned it : 
And whether being crazed or blind, 
Or seeking with a biassed mind, 

Have not, it seems, discerned it. COWPER. 



Al_l_ BITE THE BITTEN DOG. 
91 




THE MORE SERVANTS, THE WORSE SERVICE. 



HILST I did mine fierce Boreas put me out, 
Againe he kindles me at the fecond bout : 
As fometimes did the clowne, now Boreas doth, 
Both heat and cold he breatheth from his mouth, 
The billow whom it caft into the maine, 
Returning threw him in the Shippe againe ; 
Fortune throwes downe, then raifeth from the ground; 
Achilles fpeare doth cure whom it did wound. 
Lofles prove good to fome ; whom Greece condemnd, 
The Perfian for his vallour could commend. 
Be not cast downe, difpaire not at mifchance, 
God who hath crofTed thee, will thee advance. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




TIME PAST NEVER RETURNS. 



92 



TOO MUCH FAMILIARITY BREEDS CONTEMPT. 



Faites feste au chien, il te gastera ton habit. 






LU 
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Q. 
CO 



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PLAY WITH THE DOG, AND HE'LL SPOIL YOUR 

CLOTHES. 

PS in the garden yefterday, 
In full Court fuit, I coax'd our Tray, 
And with each friendly pat and ftroke, 
The ufual words of kindnefs fpoke ; 
He in return for my carefs, 
Sprang up, unmindful of my drefs, 



I_A FAMIL.IARITE ENQENDRE L.E MEPRIS. -S-. 



93 



BB 



PLAY WITH AN ASS, AND HE 



And with his dirty feet and nofe 
Befmear'd my handfome cloak and hofe. 
In fpite of all that I could fay, 
To keep in bounds his ruthlefs play ; 
Grown bolder ftill, the vexing brute, 
As though intent to fpoil my fuit, 
Jump'd up again my fhoe-ties foil'd, 
My fatin knee-bows fray'd and fpoil'd ; 
Till finding all my chiding vain, 
His wanton fondnefs to reftrain ; 

I In wrath I kick'd th' unmanner'd hound. 

h 

And laid him fprawling on the ground. 
\~ | As with the brute, with man no lefs, 

0. The friendfhip of th' uncultur'd mind 

Uj Is irkfome oft, from fheer excefs 

Of zeal to do the thing that's kind. 
However friendly you may be 
Difpos'd your ferving-man to treat, 
Let not your partiality 
Z Be fhewn beyond the bound that's meet : 

With equal care your fondnefs fhew, 
When you your child or dog carefs ; 
For both alike as little know, 
How far the frie'ndfhip may tranfgrefs, 

That ruffles felf-love through the Drefs. 


Z 



u 

T5URLAOS con el asno, daros ha en la barba con el rado. 

Cria corvo, y sacar te hal el ojo. Old Spanish Proverb. 

LES enfans et serviteurs il ne les faut mignarder, si tu veux en jouir. 

FAITES feste au chat, il vous sautera au visage. 
Nimia familiaritas parit contemptum. 
II troppo conversar partorisce dispregio. 

NULLI te facias nimis sodalem. 

Gaudebis minus? Et minus dolebis. MARTIAL. 

JAMAIS trop compagnon k nul ne te feras : 

Car bien que moins de joye, moins d'ennuy tu auras. 



WILL WHISK HIS TAIL IN YOUR FACE. 

94 



DO NOT SPUR A FREE HORSE. 



UJ 
(D 



DL 







CHOSE accoustumee 

N'est pas fort prisee. |_ 

I 

(9 
A CASA de tu tia, 

Mas no cada dia : 



A caso de tu hermano, 



Mais non tous les soirs. 

Q. 



Non iras cada ferano. 

A la maison de ta tante, ~ 

UJ 

UJ 




Mais pas tous les jours : 
A la maison de ton frere 



3 Ale luporum catulos. 



TN eos qui Iseduntur ab iis, de quibus bene meriti sint, aut in ingratos. Nam plerunque 
solet id usu venire illis, qui catulos luporum enutriunt. ERASM. in Adagio. 

Qui se fait brebis, le loup le mange : 

Qui se fait porceau, se met dans la fange : 

Amignotte ton enfant, et il te donnera maint effroy : 
Joue-toi avec lui, et il te contristera. 

Ne te joue point avec un homme mal appris. 

t- 

i TN reverse sense of what has been said above, the Hebrew proverb saith, " If your 

friend be sugar you must not eat him all up," /. e. that we must not require too 
(5 I much of those who are willing to serve us ; that we should never misuse any one's 
courtesy ; nor over-ride a willing horse : 

CHOULD any ask the reason why 



I use nor whip nor spurs to ply 
The mare I ride? It is that she 
Requires nor whip nor spur from me : 



Z Because her mettle is so good, 

And she's so willing in her mood, 

That since I've her besirode, I ne'er 

UJ Found her dispos'd her legs to spare. 

For whip or spur no use I see 
Whene'er a horse goes willingly : 
And this I hold : From horse nor man 
That willing gives, take all you can : 
Nor is he wise who tries his friend 
Beyond his will to give or lend. 



UJ 
* 

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Z 

T' obtain his wish the worst way chooses : 



Who overloads his ass, no less 
T' obtain his wish the worst 
[is ass stands still from sheer 
And greed of gain the market loses ! 



His ass stands still from sheer distress, 







IL NE FAUT PRENDRE DE SON AMI TOUT CE G^U'ON PEUT. 

95 



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MEN KAN'T KINT WEL. TE VEEl_ WIEQEN. 



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OW Boreas puffing in his boiftrous ire 

Blows as he were to kindle Vulcans fire : 
He doth undoe me by his churlimnefTe, 
I am confumed more, and mine the lefle : 
He fpends his labour, fo I lofe mine oyle, 
As no wayes fit to undergoe fuch toyle. 

You beat the AfTe lingring under his load, 

The generous Horfe deferveth not a goad : 

The Mufes Tonnes cannot away with lames, 

Which are more fitting for Arcadian afles. 

Each ftrength within his limits, Nature bounds, 

Which who fo pafleth, Nature he confounds. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



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THE CHILD MAY BE ROCKED TOO HARD. 

96 



ROSE FLETRIE NUL. NE 



Tur-pe Senilis Amor. 




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BEES TOUCH NO FADING FLOWERS. 

HE Rofe round which of late in fuch difport, 
So many came t' admire and to court; 

With drooping head now mourns that me mould be 

By all forfaken me was wont to fee. 

No gentle Zephyr now as yefter-noon, 

Comes near to revel in her fweet perfume ; 

THE FADED ROSE NO SUITOR KNOWS. 



c c 



WEALTH MAKES WORSHIP. 



No Butterfly with wings of varied hue, 
Now hovers near, and ftays his flight to view 
Her full-blown beauties nor as hitherto, 
To kifs from ofF her breaft the pearly dew : 
No tuneful Bee* now hies on eager wing 
His admiration of her charms to fing, 
Nor longer feeks to rifle and to fip 
The honied treafures of her fragrant lip. 
And why is this ? the reafon foon is told : 
_ Nor Butterflies nor Bees are grown more cold 

But thou, poor Rofe ! 'tis thou art growing old ! 

Thy beauties in their prime but yefterday ; 

h 

Yield thee to Love, fweet youth, while youth is thine; 

Seek thee a mate e'er yet thy youth decline, 
Nor make delay to love, to woo and wed, 
Till Age has ftrewn its fnows upon thine head. 
Of Life's beft years wafte not the richeft bloom 

In fruitlefs ufe, for Time is Beauty's tomb ; 
Youth, Strength, and Beauty have not long to ftay, 

To-day they're thine to-morrow pafs'd away ! 
CD 
h 

Q. 
(I) A MARE juveni fructus, crimen seni. SENEC. in Proverb. 



DESINE, dulcium 
jrj Mater saeva cupidinum, 

Circa lustra decem flectere mollibus 

Tarn durum imperiis. Abi 
Quo blandse juvenum te revocant preces. HORACE. 

E 



In Caducum Parietem non inclinandum. 



the fresh rose first opens to the day, 
Tis wooed by all that love round flowers to play: 
But when it droops and all its bloom is o'er, 
No Bee then seeks it for its honey more. 



*Apes a marcidis floribus abstinere solent : mortuis, ait Plinius, floribus ne quidem corporibus insidunt. 

POVERTY TRIETH FRIENDS. 
98 



PROSPERITY GAINS FRIENDS, ADVERSITY TRIES THEM. 



So fares it ever with the rich and great 
To poverty reduc'd by adverse Fate : 
Few know them then, or their acquaintance boast ; 
Not even those who fawn'd on them the most ; 
Smil'd when they smil'd, and made without a cause 
Each look and word their subject for applause ; 
In sordid worship of that wealth and state 
Which grov'lling minds then pay towards the great. 
Then like the Rose deserted by the Bee, 
When all its wealth of sweets has pass'd away, 
Each shuns the fall'n, nor merit more can see 
In him whose call they truckl'd to obey. 



off. Psalm xxxviii. n. 



J 
> 

Q. n 

THERE is a companion which rejoiceth in the prosperity of a friend, but in the 
time of trouble will be against him. There is a companion which helpeth his friend 
for the belly, and taketh up the buckler against the enemy. Ecclesiasticus xxxvii. 4, 5. 

WHERE the carcase is, there the eagles will be gathered together. Matt. xxiv. 28. 



CUM Fortuna manet vultum servatis amici, 
Cum cedit, turpi vertitis ora fuga. OVID. 



A /TY lovers and my friends stand aloof from my sore ; and nay kinsmen stand afar 0) 



UJ 



MANY will entreat the favour of the prince, and every man is a friend to him that 
giveth gifts ; [But] all the brethren of the poor do hate him : how much more do his 3 



h 



friends go far from him ? Prov. xix. 6, 7. - 

SOME friend is a companion at the table, and will not continue in the day of thy 
affliction. In thy prosperity he will be as thyself, and will be bold over thy servants : 
[But] if thou be brought low, he will be against thee, and will hide himself from thy 
face. Ecclesiasticus vi. 10 12. 

A FRIEND cannot be known in prosperity, and an enemy cannot be hidden in 
adversity. In the prosperity of a man enemies will be grieved, but in his adversity Z 
even a friend will depart. Ibid. xii. 8, 9. 

WEALTH maketh many friends; but the poor is separated from his neighbour. 

Prov. xix. 4. 



RICH MEN HAVE NO FAULTS. 
99 



FLATTERERS HAUNT NOT COTTAGES. 



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HEN as my Light much like an ev'ning ftarre, 
Did caft his glittering beames both neare and farre ; 
Then light me glorious, flame me dreadfull made, 
And none injurioufly durft me upbraide ; 
But when my Light into a fnuffe did turne, 
And cloth'd with darkenefle, I did ceafe to burne, 
Loe how without defence I naked ftand, 
Thus torne and rent by this devouring band. 
Glory, as envy, fo it terrour lends 
To Mortals : Majefty it felfe defends ; 
But after treacherous Fortune flies away, 
To an unarmed dwarfe its made a prey. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



YOU FEARED ME 
WHILST I 
SHINIED. 




MEN USE TO WORSHIP THE RISING SUN. 



100 



ONE ILL. EXAMPLE SPOILS MANY 



Pomme pourrie gate sa compagnie. 





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ONE ROTTEN APPLE INFECTS ALL IN 
THE BASKET. 

FAIR Maid! who comes fo oft this way, 
Your fruit of me to buy ! 
In guerdon of your kindnefs, pray! 

Before my fruit you try, 
Give ear to what I have to fay, 

For I would fervice do 
To fuch as buy of me to-day, 
Good cuftomers like you ! 





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Q. 


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ONE MANG.Y SHEEP SPOILS A WHOLE FLOCK. 

D D 



101 



BETTER BE ALONE THAN IN BAD COMPANY. 

Full many years have I fold fruit, 

And well its nature know ; 
As that of ev'ry herb and root, 

That in the garden grow ; 
And this I've found, and heard it too 

From all who fruit have grown, 
cc However fine and frefh to view, 

The good, keep beft alone." 
No rotten pear, however flight 

The token of decay, 
But foon as e'er it meets the fight, 

OL It mould be thrown away : 

W 

Iti I For be the damage e'er fo fmall, 

In little time, I've known 
The taint will often fpread to all, 

From that one pear alone. 
>- I've had of Jargonels a lot, 

< As found as fruit could be, 

All from one apple take the rot, 

And prove fad lofs to me. 
Nor is there fruit that ever grew, 
I When fpoil'd in any part, 

But foon fpoils all that's near it too, 

So take thefe truths to heart : 
A tainted grape the bunch may fpoil ; 
J A mildew'd ear, the corn in mock ; 

A fcabby fheep, with rot and boil, 

Infect and kill the fineft flock. 
Hence, maiden, I would have you know 
The ill that evil contact brings 
To all the fineft fruits that grow, 
And faireft maids, like other things. 
Seek only all that's good to learn ; 
Thine ears from evil counfel turn ; 
For all the more the fruit is fair, 
The greater is its need of care. 



BE CAUTIOUS IN CHOOSINQ THY COMPANIONS. 

102 



SE COUCHE AVEC DES CHIENS SE LEVE AVEC LES PUCES. 



/^lUCCIARDINI, in his Book entitled "Hours of Recreation," says that it is a 

singular and sure way to acquire a knowledge of the inner nature and 

character of a person, if one diligently observes the kind of society he most 
frequently keeps : 

For two of a kind, whate'er they be, 
Are forthwith certain to agree, 

as Cicero said formerly when speaking of Cato : because Nature always inclines to its 
like ; and hence, specially applicable to the foregoing subject is the Spanish proverb : 

Di me con quien iras 
Dizir te he lo que haras. 

Tell me, with whom thou goest, 
And I'll tell thee what thou doest. 

To shun evil company is therefore one of the most important things to be 
impressed on the mind of the youth of both sexes ; and the extent of mischiet 
which it leads to, may be well inferred from the writings of David, a man after 
God's heart, and of Solomon, the wisest of kings ; both of whom gave this subject 



the first place in their writings. David in his first Psalm, and Solomon in the first 
chapter of his Proverbs, coincide with the sense expressed in the Proverbs of all 
nations, as may herein be seen : 

HE that handles pitch shall foul his fingers. 



UJ 

HANDELT gy't peck, 

Gy krygt een fleck. 



BREBIS rogneuse 
Fait 1'autre tigneuse. 

ONE rotten sheepe wille marre a whole flocke. 

LA mancana podrida 
Pierde a su compannia. 

UNICA prava pecus inficit omne pecus. 
Dum spectant laesos oculi, laeduntur et ipsi. OVID. 

GREX totus in agris 

Unius scabie cadit, et porrigine porci : 

Uvaque conspecta livorum ducit ab uva. JUVENAL, Sat. 2. 

WER unter den Wolfen ist, muss mit ihnen heulen. 
Ein reudig Schaf macht die ganze Heerde reudig. 

EIN schurft schaep maeckt'er veel. 

Die by de kreupelen woont, leert hincken. 

Vuyle gronden bederven de Kabels. 

DIE met den goeden omme gaet, 
En acht ick noyt myn leven quaet. 



HE WHO KENNELS WITH WOLVES MUST HOWL 

103 



KEEP YOURSELF FROM OPPORTUNITIES, 



JplLAME goes to heav'n, from whence it once did come, 

* Bids earth adue, and what it hath therefrom. 

The fnuffe to afhes, fmoake turnes into ay re ; 

Lights beauty 's gone, which fometime was fo faire ; 

When Death hath giv'n his laft and fatall blow, 

Our foule to Heaven, our Earth to earth doth goe ; 

Riches and honours, which it once did love, 

The Soule now lothes ; and feekes to dwell above : 

Learne Mortals, all falfe pleafures to contemne, 

And treafures, which the foule muft once condemne : 

Seeke rather for the graces of the minde, 

Which you your convoy to the Heaven will finde. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




AND GOD WILL. KEEP YOU FROM SINS. 

104 



EVERY SUITOR IS NOT A HE ART- BREAKER. 



Tangor, non Frangor, ab undis. 



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I AM TOUCHED, NOT BROKEN BY THE WAVES. 

''^^e 

ev'ry feftive board th' admir'd gueft, 
At ev'ry Ball the partner in requeft ; 
'Mid Fafhion's throng wherever thou art feen 
Th' acknowledg'd faireft type of Beauty's Queen : 
And yet with all this tribute to thy grace, 
This fervent homage of thy form and face ; 




ALL.E AANSPRECKERS, aEEN HERTE-BREKERS. 



E E 



BIEN TE BAIONE, MAIS SANS MEL.ANC3E. 



Unmov'd, unchang'd, thou art in all the fame 
As heretofore ; nor Love, nor praife, nor blame, 
To thee or pleafure or annoy impart 
Such is the icy coldnefs of thine heart ! 
That thou art thus, explains full well to me, 
What I once deem'd mere fabulous to be : 
That even 'midft the Ocean's rolling wave, 
Where all earth's waters find a common grave ; 

Hj There flow fome Rivers which no lefs maintain 

F Their courfe unbroken, and unmix'd retain 

Their Water's fweetnefs 'mid the briny main ! * 

< So thou, who kindleft in all hearts, defire, 

Mov'ft cold and ftill unfcath'd amidft the fire! 

o' 

IL 



/"\U 
^s^ 



UIS fornacem Regis Babylonii sine adustione ingressus est, inquit, cujus adolescentis 
^Egyptica Domina pallium non terruit ? Inter illecebras voluptatum etiam ferreas 
mentes libido domat. Difficile inter opulas servatur pudicitia. HIERON. lib. iii. Epist. 5. 

PERICLITATUR castitas in diliciis, humilitas in divitiis, pietas in negotiis, veritas in 
multiloquio, charitas in hoc mundo. BERNARD, in quod. Serm. 





ll / ~PHE rolling wheel that runneth often round, 

The hardest steel in tract of time doth tear; 

And drizzling drops, that often do redound, 

The firmest flint doth in continuance wear : 
> Yet cannot I, with many a dropping tear 

And long entreaty, soften her hard heart, 

_ That she will once vouchsafe my plaint to hear, 

< Or look with pity on my painful smart. 

But, when I plead, she bids me play my part ; 

And, when I weep, she says ; Tears are but water ; 

And, when I sigh, she says ; I know the art ; 

And, when I wail, she turns herself to laughter. 

So do I weep, and wail, and plead in vain, 

While she as steel and flint doth still remain. EDMUND SPENSER. 



* This was antiently affirmed and believed of the River Alpheus, in its course through the 
Sicilian Sea. 



106 



THE LAST COMERS ARE OFTEN THE MASTERS. 



T PR'YTHEE send me back my heart, 

Since I can not have thine ; 
For if from yours you will not part 

Why then shouldst thou have mine 1 
Yet now I think on't, let it lie, 

To find it were in vain ; 
For thou'st a thief in either eye 

Would steal it back again. SIR J. SUCKLING. 

CO 
Hi 

OH ! who would love ? I woo'd a Woman once, Q 

Q But she was sharper than an eastern wind, 

And all my heart turn'd from her, as a thorn 
It Turns from the sea. TENNYSON. 

J 0) 

THE fair Lauretta's eyes, so blue and bright, 

~- Look blank and cold when / am in her sight. 

Paint her not thus, kind limner ! give her that 

00 Sweet smile she wears when talking to her cat. 

<{ So shall I fondly think, whene'er I see (/) 

The beaming Portrait, that it smiles on me. Anon. \ 

o ; jj! 

y K 



"D 



Mediis immixtus in undis. 

EADER ! from this our Emblem learn to be 

Th' unmingling River, flowing through the sea 
I Of this World's brackish waters. Thou too, keep 

Thy course unbroken 'mid the briny deep 0) 

Of all its lures, its lusts and vanity. Q, 

Though living in men's 'midst, yield not thine heart h 

UJ To those who would their taint to it impart ; 

Lest soon commingling with the 'whelming tide 
< Of Passion's waves which press on ev'ry side, 

Thy Soul's sweet waters lose their purity. I 

DISCITE in hoc mundo, supra mundum esse ; et si corpus geritis, volitet in vobis 
ales interior. AMBROS. de Virg. 

THAT ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God, without rebuke, in 
the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in 
the world. Philip, ii. 15. 

AND they that use this world, as not abusing it : for the fashion of this world 
passeth away. i Corinth, vii. 31. 



HE WHO CAN WAIT OBTAINS WHAT HE WISHES. 

107 



HE WHO DEMANDS DOES NOT COMMAND. 




HEN thou in darkenefle of the night didft blaze, 
I could not without envy on thee gaze; 

But when the Cyclop Titan comes in fight, 

There is no ods twixt darkenefle and thy light : 

I doe not envy thee, although thou fhine ; 

No glor' I have nor is the glory thine. 

As lightfome bodyes doe a fhaddow give ; 
So glory without envy cannot live : 
When greater glory doth the meane fupprefle, 
It likewife takes the envy from the lefle. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



(D 




CHI DIMANDA NON COMMANDA. 
1 08 



LIKE TO LIKE. AND NAN TO NICHOLAS. 



Eirdes of one feather will flocke together. 








HAT ! are you then in earneft, friend ? 

Oh, no ! it cannot be : 
It's quite impoffible that you 

Should think of courting me ! 
Indeed you'd better take your love 

Elfewhere ; for fure am I 
We are by no means fuited for 
The Matrimonial tie. 



LIKE WILL TO LIKE. 



109 



F F 



CHACUN CHERCHE SON SEM BL ABLE. 



You ! who by all are faid to be 

A roving, ruffling blade 
And I, as ev'ry body knows, 

A quiet, gentle maid; 
From early youth accuftom'd to 

The peaceful joys of home, 
Amid the rude and buftling world 

I have no wim to roam : 
Im Houfewif'ry and its behefts, 

The greateft charm I find, 

And when from thefe I feek relief, 

UJ 
Why then with humble mind jj J 

I read fome holy book, or fpm, 

And often take delight 
ft: To imitate in 'broidery Q. 

Q. Some pofie's colours bright: 

'Tis feldom I go out to walk, 
And in the Street but rare, 
Excepting to and fro from Church, > 

Or when I go to bear 

UJ 
Some comfort to the fick and poor, I j 

Jjj For we are taught to give 

^ Some mare of that we have, to thofe 

Who labour hard to live. 

Ill 
Q i But you without reftraint give loole 3 

To paflion's wilder fway, 
Love feafting, wine and riot, 

And are giv'n much to play : 

You know no reft, and to your mind 

No moment hath fuch charms, 
As when the drum or trumpet mrill 

Calls all the Camp to arms. 
Methinks fome Trooper's daughter were 

For you a fitter bride, 
Who in the Soldier's ruder life 

And habits takes a pride : 
Whofe eye unmov'd could look upon 

The blood-ftain'd battle-field, 



A UN BOITEUX, FEMME QUI CLOCHE. 

no 



SE MARIER ET FAIRE COMPARAISON, 



Can fwing a fword and trail a pike. 

Nor to the beft one yield. 
Who when me hears the cannon roar, 

Would ftand unmov'd by fear, 
And fay, what others terrifies 

Is mufic to her ear. 
Such is the Bride would fuit you beft, 

The Wife whom you would find 
Moft fuited to your habits, 

And your rougher tone of mind. 
Who without dread would pafs her hand 

Upon your Rapier's blade, 

< And bid you fight until you fell, 

And 'neath the turf were laid : 
But I who am a timid thing, 

9 Who even fear the fmoke 

< 

Of Petronel and Arquebus, < 

Much lefs the cannon's ftroke ; m 

Who fee in you alone what would 

< Make me much mifery, 

u r 
I am no ways a match for you, 

Nor are you fit for me. 

Look but around and you will fee 
Where'er you turn your eye, 

< The Birds which on the water fwim, 

And thofe which foar on high 
All choose their mates as moft befeems, 

And concord every where ; 
Each woos his like, as it mould foe, 

And like with like doth pair. 
Nought can induce the Dove to take 

The Eagle for her mate, 
The Partridge to the Buzzard-hawk 

Will never link her fate ; 
The Raven black weds not the Swan, 

'Twas not by Nature meant, 
For " Like with like " alone, my friend, 

Can give the heart content. 



CHACUN AVEC SON F A R E 1 1_ . 
III 



ENTRE OEMS DE MEME NATURE 



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HIS waxen torch is able to endure 

The winds, when ^Eolus puts them in ure, 
It leads the way in darknefTe of the night, 
And, though the ferene fall, it fhewes his Light : 
The candle ftill lurks at home, and there doth mow 
Its light, not caring how the winds doe blow, 
This as the houfes joy at home doth ftay, 
The other ftill abroad doth make his way 

The hardy hufband from his houfe goes forth 

Seeking to compafle bufinefs of worth ; 

He failes by rockes and fands, earely and late 

He toiles, and feekes to purchafe an eftate : 

The wife at home much like a fnaile me fits 

On hous-wifry employing all her wits : 

UlyfTes in his travels hard did fhift, 

Penelope at home did ufe her thrift. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




L'AMITII 



SE FAIT ET DURE. 



112 



EVERYTHING! IS GOOD IN ITS SEASON 



Mite Pyrum vel Sfonte Fluit. 




THE RIPE PEAR FALLS READY 
TO THE HAND. 

OULD'ST early be fuccefsful in thy fuit, 

Nor languish long in Love's confuming flame ?- 
In Beauty's garden, fhun the unripe fruit, 
And breathe thy paflion to the riper dame. 
The fruit that's green clings longeft to the tree, 




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NA/OO THE WIDOW WHILST SHE IS IN WEEDS. 



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THERE IS A CRITICAL MINUTE FOR ALL THINGS. 

Nor willing yields to leave the parent fpray ; 
While that which has attain'd maturity, 
Warm'd to the core beneath the funny ray, 
Yields to the touch and quickly comes away. 



CO 

TOLLE cupidinem 
Immitis uvse : 
f_ Jam te sequetur, jam proterva 

Fronte petet Lalage maritum. HORACE, lib. 2, Car. Od. 5. 

Primis et adhuc crescentibus annis. 

Non mentem Venus ipsa dedit 



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Homo forno fimilis. 

Oj T IKE unto Man whose course is nearly run, 

The Apple, ripen'd by the autumn sun, 

Yields to the touch, or to the slightest breath, 
UJ And falling is the image of his Death. 

But not alone in this the semblance lies 
h Between the Man's and Apple's destinies : 

The ripe, in Age, part ready from the spray 

The green, in Youth, are torn by force away. 
0) 

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Un homme, une pomme. 

Nos corps, comme les fruits aux arbres attaches, 

Ou meurent, tombent en terre, ou verds sont arraches. Du VAIR'S Epictetus. 

-J IL me semble, que la dite comparaison est propre et vive, pour exprimer la faQon 

de mourir, et d'un robuste jouvenceau, qui est encore en la fleur de son age, et d'un 
bon vieil homme, qui ja va penchant vers la terre. Du VAIR. 

IT is said, by the Philosopher, "Omnia quse secundum naturam sunt, sunt habenda 
in bonis." But all that happens to us contrary to the usual course of nature, is gene- 
rally considered lamentable. Cicero, who seems to share the sentiment of Epictetus, 
and who borrowed from him in his book " De Senectute," expresses himself in yet 
more elevated and impressive terms : 



DEATH MEETS US EVERYWHERE. 
114 



DEATH DEVOURS LAMBS AS WELL. AS S H E E P . 



Adolescentes mihi mori sic videntur, ut aquae multitudine flammse vis opprimitur. 
Senex autem, sicut sua sponte nulla vi adhibita consumtus ignis extinguitur : et quasi 
porria ex arboribus, cruda si sint, si velluntur ; si matura et cocta, decidunt. Sicut vitam 
adolescentibus vis aufert, sic senibus maturitas. 

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Qtuod crudum^ idem et per tin ax. 

HpHE fruit that's ripe, parts willing from the tree; 

Unripe, 'tis not so willing to comply : 
Who call'd by Death resists his destiny, 
Proves most that he is unprepar'd to die. 

LL UJ 

IT is sad to die before the time : idle speech ! Before what time ? Before that JL 

2 prescribed by Nature ? But Nature lent life to us only, without fixing the term of J 
its withdrawal. CICERO. 

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Offeramus Deo pro munere> quod pro debito teneamur reddere. 

CHRYSOS. Super Matth. ro. t_ \ 

TN the hope of a better award, D 

Forgetful that Life is a loan; 
~ We but offer to God, as reward, 

The Life which is His not our own, 
UJ 



OUR Life is taken from us but to give 
A better life wherewith in Heav'n to live ; 
Unquench'd our Spirit, by our body's death, 
Rises refreshed to breathe with purer breath. 




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THE glories of our blood and state 

Are shadows, not substantial things ; l_ '< 

There is no armour against fate, 

<t Death lays his icy hand on kings : 

Sceptre and crown 
Must tumble down, 
And in the dust be equal made 
With the poor crooked scythe and spade. SHIRLEY. 

h 



WE spend our years as a tale that is told. Psalm xc. 9. 

THE days of our years are threescore years and ten ; and if by reason of strength 
they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow ; for it is soon cut 
off, and we fly away. Ibid. 10. 



DESTINY LEADS THE WILLING!, BUT DRAQS THE UNWILLING. 



THERE IS NO APPEAL. FROM TIME PAST. 




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HEN firfl my light did mine, you lik'd me well. 

Now that is gone ; you hate my loathfome fmell ; 
You with prolongers made me live, and art 
Preferv'd my light ; but now Time acts his part, 
Triumphant Time, fhewes now my glaffe is runne, 
(What way God knowes) I finde my threed is fpunne ; 
Envy hath playd its part, and I doe goe 
To Coffin : as I doe, all muft doe fo. 
Time breaths a mrewd and life-bereaving blaft, 
Yet upward flyes my light, where it mail laft. 
I 'me glad to part from body, which I lov'd 
So deere, that many wayes and arts I prov'd 
The mudwall to maintaine, and body fave, 
But yet in fpight of me 'twill go to grave. 
This is my comfort, Body, that thy tombe 
Which is thy grave, mail be thy mothers wombe 
To bring thee once againe unto the light, 
And life, which death mail never know, or night : 
Then be content, though you and I depart : 
Yet Soule and Body ftill fhall have one heart. FARLIE'S Emblems. 




THERE IS NO MEDICINE AG5AINST DEATH. 

116 



LOVE IS THE LOADSTONE OF LOVE. 



Quid non fen/it amor ? 




WHO HAS NOT FELT LOVE? 

EHOLD the wond'rous fympathy between 

The firings of yonder lute, and this I play ! 
Is it not juft as though fome hand unfeen 
Swept the fame chords, and tun'd the felf-fame lay ? * 



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* The cause of this phenomenon is assigned by Cardanum in his 8th book De Subtilit. Du Pleix, 
in his Corps de Philosophic, 1626, accounts for it also in nearly similar terms. 



AMOR REGGE SENZA LEGGE. 



117 



H H 



LOVE SEES NO FAULTS. 



So lov'd one though untouch'd by thee, I feel, 




Senfe of thy touch through all my being fteal ; 



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VETUS verbum esr, similitudinem amoris auctorem esse. PLATO, lib. 6, De Leg. 

o: 



Experientia notum est arcanam quandam et occultam inter homines esse natu- 



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Hear thy lov'd voice though filent thou may'ft be, 
See thy lov'd form though far away from me, 
And all the radiance of thy Beauty's light, 
Undimm'd to me by diftance, mine no lefs 
To me effulgent in my dream of night, 
As doth by day its light of lovelinefs. 



rarum affinitatem aut odium, vel naturae quadam occulta vi, vel astrorum influentia, 
vel, &c. Unde fit ut aliquis ab altero toto pectore abhorreat, in alterum verb pro- 
pensus sit, nee rogatus causam dicere posset cur hunc amet, ilium oderit, juxta illud 
Catulli, 

Non amo te, Volusi, nee possum dicere quare, 

Hoc tantum possum dicere, non amo te. 

CYPR. Tract, de Spans, cap. 7. 

QUID non cernit Amor ! quid non vestigat Amator ! BEROALD. 



T OVE looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, 

And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind ; 
Nor hath Love's mind of any judgment taste, 
Wings and no eyes, figure unheedy haste ; 
And therefore is Love said to be a child, 
Because in choice he often is beguil'd. SHAKESPEARE. 

THINGS base and vile, holding no quality, 
Love can transpose to form and dignity. Ibid. 



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AH ! I remember, and how can I 



But ever more remember well, when first 

Our flame began ; when scarce we knew what 'twas, 

The flame we felt ; when as we sat and sigh'd, 

And looked upon each other and conceived 

Not what we ail'd, yet something we did ail ; 

And yet were well, and yet we were not well : 

And what was our disease we could not tell. Old Poet. 



O AMOR NAO TEM LEI. LOVE KNOWS NO LAW. 

118 



LOVE DEMANDS FAITH, AND FAITH FIRMNESS. 



LOVE refines 



The thoughts and heart enlarges : hath its seat 

In reason, and is judicious : is the scale 

By which to Heavenly love thou mayest ascend ; 

Not sunk in carnal pleasure : for which cause 

Among the beasts no mate for Love was found. MILTON. 

OH ! there are looks and tones that dart 

An instant sunshine through the heart ; 

As if the soul that minute caught 

Some treasure it through life had sought ; 

As if the very lips and eyes 

Predestin'd to have all our sighs, 

And never be forgot again, 

Sparkled and spoke before us then. MOORE. 

WHY should I blush to own I love ? 
'Tis love that rules the realms above ! 

Why should I blush to say to all, 

111 That virtue holds my heart in thrall 

.. Is it weakness thus to dwell 

5 On passion that I dare not tell ? 

~ Such weakness I would ever prove 

'Tis painful, but 'tis sweet to love. KIRKE WHITE. 
' 

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2 Gaudendum cum Gaudentibus. 

Joying with the Joyful. 


AS lute to lute in harmony attun'd, 

^ Vibrates in glad response, as though it shar'd 

<( The joy that thrills the other's waken'd strings ; 

So let thine heart responsive share the joy 
Thy neighbour feels ; nor look with sullen eye 
On eyes where gladness beams. Learn thou from this 
To share in the delight which others feel, 
And banish rankling envy from thy breast 
When fortune smiles upon thy fellow man. 
Learn thou from this no less his grief to soothe 
With brotherly response ; for just as joy 
Gains increase more from that which it bestows, 
So grief grows less, lull'd by the soothing tones 
Of Pity's kind compassion for her woes. 

THOU wilt shew me the path of life : in thy presence is fulness of joy ; at thy 
right hand there are pleasures for evermore. Psalm xvi. n. 



LOVE KNOWS NOT LABOUR. 
119 



LIEBESZORN 1ST NEUER LIEBESZUNDER. 





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ERO who dwelt by Hellefponticke ftrand, 

Hang'd forth a Light, Leanders marke for land, 

Whither his helmelefle courfe he fleerd and mov'd, 

Whilft he made hafte to fee his welbelov'd, 

Which when fierce Boreas with his bluftring blaft 

Put out, he in the floods away was caft : 

So that his wedding light became a torch, 

To convoy him to Proferpines blacke porch. 

Almighty God who made all by his power, 

Holds forth his Light from the Celeftiall Tower : 

That when the ftormes our to fled foules annoy, 

It may direct us to our heav'nly joy. 

No ftorme againft this Light can fo prevaile 

But Saints unto their wifht-for Haven may faile. 

Where for their Wedding torch this Light they have, 

Which never fhall convoy them to their grave. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




LOVE'S ANGER IS FRESH FUEL. TO LOVE. 



1 20 



Ut lapfu graviore ruant. 




THE HIGHER THE RISE THE GREATER 
THE FALL. 

|gf TORTOISE of ambitious mind, 
lH Such as in Men we fometimes find, 

Puff'd up with an egregious fenfe 
Of his fuperior excellence, 
Much wifh'd to change his lot on earth 
For one more fitted to his worth; 

PRIDE IS THE BEGINNING OF ALL DESTRUCTION. 



121 



I I 



PRIDE AND POVERTY ARE ILL. MET, 



Which in his felf-conceit he deem'd 

Too little by his friends efteem'd 

Who neither would allow nor fee 

That he pofTefs'd a quality 

Of form or of intelligence, 

Beyond their Tortoife common-fenfe. 

Refolv'd ne'erlefs that they mould be 

Convinc'd of his ability 

To mine where they could never hope 

With his fuperior mind to cope, 

t Seeing one day the bird of Jove 

Alighting from the clouds above, 
He urged him with addrefs polite 
To bear him upward in his flight ; 

9: That he might prove to all his race 

How qualified he was to grace 
A ftation more exalted than 

I- Their weak intelligence could fcan : 

< Whence he at once might grafp and fee 

The glories of the land and fea, 

And like the eagle gaze upon 

< The full effulgence of the fun, 

High up above the puny ken 
Of grov'lling Tortoifes and men. 

3 The Eagle, quick as thought to fee 

tti The filly reptile's vanity, 

Exprefs'd himfelf but too content 
To do what from the firft he meant : 
And feizing him right quickly too, 
He upward with the Tortoife flew, 
So high into the realms of light, 
That almoft lofing fenfe and fight, 
The Tortoife wimed himfelf again 
Below upon the humble plain. 
But upward ftill the Eagle rofe, 
As though pretending to difclofe 



YET OFTEN TOGETHER. 



IN MEDIO STAT VIRTUS. 



A range of view as high and wide 
As moft would fatisfy his pride. 
Like filver threads the rivers flow, 
And wind fome thoufand feet below : 
Like mole-hills are the mountains high 
In vaft expanfe Earth, fea and fky 
Lit up and flooded with a light 
Too glorious for the reptile's fight. 
Anon, the Eagle aiks him how 
He liked the change from things below ? 
If higher yet he'd like to rife ? 
And felt at home ? and how the ikies 
Agreed with his abilities ? 
When lo ! the Tortoife, all difmay, 0) 

Had not a fingle word to fay ! 
With fcornful and derifive mriek, 
Unloofing then both claws and beak, 
h The Eagle lets the Tortoife go ; UJ 

Which, dafh'd upon the rocks below, Uj 

Became his prey, and learnt too late l_ 

The ills that on ambition wait. 

m E'en fo at Courts, when men of low degree, UJ 



l_ And menial minds, are raifed to rank and place ; 

How oft are they uplifted but to be 

Caft down with greater force and more difgrace ! 



pORTUNA vitrea est ; turn, cum splendet, frangitur. P. SYRUS. 
MAGNA ruunt, inflata crepant, tumefacta premuntur. LUCAN. i. ver. 17. 

SUMMISQUE negatum 

Stare diu, nimioque graves sub pondere lapsus. SYRACH. iii. 12. 

SEEKEST thou great things for thyself? seek them not : for, behold, I will bring evil 
upon all flesh, saith the Lord. -Jer. xlv. 5. 

GOD hath a special indignation at Pride, above all sins. BISHOP HALL. 



VERTU QIT AU MILIEU. 
123 



IT'S HARD FOR AN EMPTY BA<3 



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chinke there was and not another way 
For Boreas, his fury to eflay ; 
So Hectors fatall gift Ajax confounded, 
And ftob'd him where he onely could be wounded ; 
Apollo fo directed Paris dart 
To wound Achilles foote, and kill his heart. 
Death lies in ambufh like an enemy, 
And brafheth where our fconces weakeft be. 
Whether an icecle or drop of water, 
Or gnat, or Londons Scholler-killing letter. 
A thoufand trickes we fee of cunning death ; 
He makes or finds a way to ftop our breath. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




TO STAND UPRK3HT. 



124 



REPROVE OTHERS, BUT CORRECT THYSELF. 



El cor cob ado ne vee su corcoba, y vee la de su com f anon. 





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THE HUNCHBACK SEES NOT HIS OWN HUMP, BUT HE 

SEES HIS NEIGHBOUR'S. 

ITH rare exception, almoft ev'ry one 

Is wondrous apt his Neighbour's faults to {ee; 
And yet, however evident his own, 

To them he's blind or thinks that only he 
From imperfection and from fault is free. 




EVERY MAN HATH A FOOL. IN HIS SLEEVE. 



125 



KK 



AUNQUE NEGROS, SOMOS GENTE. 



A Hunchback here, brimfull of felf-conceit, 

Derides a fellow-Hunchback patting by ; 
And points to him, that ev'ry one they meet 

May ridicule the man's deformity. 
Yet he himfelf; the Jeerer, what is he ? 

A crooked Dwarf, mis-fhap'd from head to toe, 
With bofs behind of fuch enormity, 

As though a mountain on his back did grow ! 
And what is Man, that he would cenfor be 

Of that which Nature gave his fellow-man ! 
In what deriving from ourfelves, are we 

In aught entitled other men to fcan ? 
Shall we aflume in figures of our own 

To reckon up another man's account ! 
And carp at him for flaws and faults alone, 

When our own ledger mews no fmall amount ! 
j To ev'ry man, we know to indicate 

<( Wherein he fails and ftrange fagacity! 

To make the moft unerring eftimate 
Of what he is and what he ought to be ! 

But on himfelf, who turns his eye ? not one ! 
Q- And though fo keen our neighbour's humps to fee, 

We're blind to that upon our back alone, 

E'en though that hump by far the greater be ! 
It was not thus, my friends, that we were taught 
I- That practice fweet of Love and Charity, 

0) By which the Man-God our Redemption bought, 

In pity for our mortal frailty ! 
h ! Look not in fcorn upon thy brother's ftiape, 

If nature chofe to vary it from thine; 

1 For though it may refemble more the Ape, 

It may have Light within far more divine! 
Turn thine eyes inward on thine heart, and fee 

What flaws are there, what feething germs of ill 
That need thy care, left their malignity 

Shall render thee one day more hideous ftill. 



THOUGH BLACK, WE ARE HUMAN BEINGS. 

126 



WHERE VAIN-QL.ORY REIGNS, 



Who ridicules his neighbour's frailty, 
Scoffs at his own in more or lefs degree : 
Much wifer he who others' lets alone 
And tries his talent to correct his own. 



A ND why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest 

not the beam that is in thine own eye ? 

Thou Hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye ; and then shalt thou 
see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye. Matt. vii. 3, 5. 





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Z Regarde soy ; et il taira. ft: 

No ay quien sus faltas entienda, 

Como las de su vecino. I 

r II n'y a personne qui reconnoit ses fautes, 

Comme celles de son voisin. W 

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Z Dal biasima altrui, che se stesso condanna. 

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Ziehe Dich selber bei der Nase. I 

Een ander heeft altyt de schult. 
D Geen mensch en siet syn eygen bult. 

}Jj CRIMINA qui cernunt aliorum, nee sua cernunt, 

Q. Hi sapiunt aliis, desipiuntque sibi. OWENUS. 

THERE are those who can see the faults of others, but who cannot discern their 
own. These people are wise for others, and fools to themselves. 

Esx proprium stultitiae, aliorum vitia cernere ; oblivisci suorum. CICERO. 
NIHIL turpius est convitio quod in auctorem recidit. PLUTARCH. 

OF all the causes which conspire to blind 
Man's erring judgment, and misguided mind, 
What the weak head with strongest bias rules 
Is Pride, the never-failing Vice of Fools. 

POPE. 



FOLLY IS PRIME COUNSELLOR. 
127 



WHERE YOU ARE JACK, THERE I AM JILL. 



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JN vaine thou mantles up this light of mine, 
Thinking that no man mall perceive it mine. 
But all in vaine, flame will it felfe bewray, 
And through thy coat, by burning, make his way. 
Who in his lower heart doth hurt conceale, 
Hoping that nothing mail the fame reveale, 
He hides the torches of the hellim rout, 
Which will at length with violence burft out : 
Who doth conceive Oreftes' impious thought, 
It will ere long to furious fact be brought. 
Diflemble what thou can'ft, that inward fparke 
Will burft forth into Light, though now its darke. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



FRUSTRA ME TEQIS ] 



IN VAINE THOU 
COVER- 
EST ME. 




SELF-CONCEIT PRECLUDES IMPROVEMENT. 

128 



NOTHING! IS IMPOSSIBLE TO A WILLING MIND. 



Non intrandum, aut penetrandum. 




ENTER NOT, OR PASS THROUGH. 

PS with the Web fpun by the Spider's care, 
T' entrap the flies and gnats which fill the air, 
So with th' entangling nets by Venus laid 
T' enfnare the hearts of heedlefs youth and maid : 
For in the Love net, as the Spider's too, 
The gnat is taken, but the Bee breaks through. 



VOLONTE REND TOUT POSSIBLE. 



129 



L L 



WHERE THERE'S A WILL THERE'S A WAY. 

Hence, young folks, learn thro' Venus' nets to break, 

Nor let their flimfy memes captive take 

Both heart and mind : Take pattern by the Bee : 

Like him refift the lofs of liberty ; 

Break boldly through ; but if the ftrength you lack, 

Take my advice, and cleverly turn back. 



Q 

UJ Qui trop embrasse, feu estreint. 

Q. 

HpHE Spider which too widely spreads his net 

Before a door, or window's open space ; 
> Incurs more risk his livelihood to get 

Than one which chooses a more humble place. 

A Horse-fly now, and now a bird flies through, 

~ Making vast rents, through which the flies make way ; 

(0 And he, poor fool, has little else to do 

Than mend his net, and fast throughout the day. 
C! He who from failure would secure disgrace, 

UJ Must never all at once too much embrace : 

Who seek to compass least, and least aspire, 
111 j Achieve most oft the things which they desire. 

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Hoc unum moneo, si quid modb creditur arti, 
i_ Aut nunquam tentes, aut perfice. OVID, de Art. i. 

tt 

UJ LE vice est de n'en pas sortir ; non pas d'y entrer. 

MICH. MONTAIGNE, Essais, lib. iii. cap. 5. 

IN vulnus majora patent. 

Forti et fideli nihil difficile. 

Possunt, quia posse videntur. VIRGIL. 

AUDACES fortuna juvat. 

Camelus desiderans cornua etiam aures perdidit. 

Qui totum vult, totum perdit. PUBL. SYRUS. 

INTRA fortunam quisque debet manere suam. OVID. 
MIEUX reculer que mal assaillir. 



MAKE A VIRTUE OF NECESSITY. 

130 



QRASP AL.L, LOSE Al_L_. 



Pervia virtuti, sed vilibus trivia. 

A ND that they may recover themselves out of the snare of the Devil, who are 
taken captive by him at his will. 2 Timothy ii. 26. 

As in the mesh spread by the Spider's skill, 

The weaker flies and gnats alone are caught, 
While insects more robust of wing and will, 

Break boldly through, nor heed his toils in aught : UJ 

What to the virtuous heart shall bar the way, 

Or hold it from the chosen path of good ? 
Since this World's snares are but as frail a stay, Q 

And as the Spider's easily withstood, U. 

When heart and mind with one accord unite 
To force through ev'ry stop the road to Right. 

Hold on thy course to Virtue, nor refrain ; 
The wind the chaff disperses, not the grain. 

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His own iniquities shall take the wicked himself, and he shall be holden with the (_ 

cords of his sins. Proverbs v. 22. I 


DIABOLUS non invalesceret contra nos, nisi viros ex vitiis nostris prseberemus, et E 

locum ei dominandi nobis peccato faceremus : unde nolite locum dare diabolo. 

AUGUST. Horn. 3. UJ 

CUORE forte h 

Rompe cattiva sorte. /A 

Vaine peur certaine misere. 

Een moedig hert 
Vermint de smert. 

Beter is't te rug gegaen 

Als een quaden sprong gedaen. > 

UJ 



HE that begins without reason, hath reason enough to leave off, by perceiving he 
had no reason to begin. J. TAYLOR, vol. xii. p. 28, 



QUI TOUT CONVOITE, TOUT PE.RD. 



THE MORE YOU HAVE THE MORE YOU DESIRE. 



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JSHINED brightly whilft I flood upright, 
And firmely feated gave a perfect light ; 

But after that mifchance did me furprife, 

I am caft downe and know not how to rife. 

Helpe, helpe, who fees my cafe, now fuccour me, 

So, as before, my Light mall glorious be. 

A man may fall, this brittle life of ours 
Is fubject to more chances than to houres : 
Or fortune falfe, or errours flippery fall 
Suffers us not, conftant to proove at all : 
Happy is he who falling findes a man, 
Much like a God, fupporting what he can. 
By hurt he learning gaines, he wifer growes, 
And with the weary Oxe more warily goes. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 






HELPE, OR ELSE 
DYE. 




BE ANXIOUS FOR NOTHING. 



132 



LIGHT C3AYNES MAKE HEAVYE PURSES. 



Ein klein henn leget alle tag, da ein Strauss im iahr nur ems. 




A HEN LAYS EVERY DAY, BUT AN OSTRICH ONLY 

ONCE A YEAR. 

TEAR now what has befallen me ; I'm nicely taken in ! 

All through my Wife ! who thought at once a mine of wealth to win : 
A Dealer mew'd this Oftrich and its egg to her one day, 
And making her believe 'twas fuch a wondrous bird to Jay ; 
I bought it at her bidding brought it home, and, like her, thought 
A Bird that lay fuch eggs as that, could not be dearly bought. 



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A PASSO 



A PASSO SE VA L.ONTANA. 
133 



M M 



LITTLE BY LITTLE THE BIRD BUILDS ITS NEST. 

Hens' eggs (thought I), however good, were at the best but fmall, 

And, as compar'd to Oftrich eggs, were of no fize at all. 

Off fuch an egg as that, why, two could make a dinner quite, 

'Twas big enough to fatisfy a ploughman's appetite. 

Such was my mind : but very foon I'd reafon to regret 

I'd parted with my money, or an Oftrich ever met. 

It eat ! Oh ! fuch a bird to eat as that I never faw ! 

No end of food and things could fatisfy its hungry maw ; 

But Eggs ! not one it laid ! though all the while I did my beft 

With hay and ftraw and feathers foft to make the bird a neft. 

When, after waiting long, 'twas juft about the month of May 

I found one egg ! Eh ! now, thought I, it has begun to lay ! 

But all my joy was very fhort, for from that time till now, 

It hasn't laid another egg, nor will it any how. 

Yet all this while our Hens, as is with Hens the ufual way, 

They've always laid at intervals, and often ev'ry day. 

At length, all patience lofing, and my temper put about, 

I went up to the Oftrich, and I call'd to him ; Turn out ! 

Away with you, you rav'nous brute, you mall no longer ftay ! 

You're big enough, and eat enough, and yet no eggs you lay. 

I fee how 'tis with you, you're all appearance, nothing more ; 

In buying you I've learnt what I ought well t' have known before : 

The biggeft things are not the beft, the brighteft often drofs ; 

And when we grafp -at profit moft, we oft get greater lofs. 



A PIUMA a piuma se pela 1'oca. 

A gotta a gotta il mar si secherebbe. 

VON kleinen fischlin werden die hecht gross. 
PEU a peu file la vieille sa quenouille. 
Qui s'agite, s'enrichit. 
LITTLE pot, soon hot. 

IL bue s'e fatto grande, e la stalla piccola. 
The ox fattens in a little stall. 

EN petite maison Dieu a grand part. 



LITTLE BROOKS MAKE GREAT RIVERS. 

T 34 



OREAT PROMISERS, BAD PAYMASTERS. 



FORTUNAM qui avide vorare pergit, 

Hanc tandem male concoquat necesse est. 

CELUI qui meprise les petites choses, tombera petit a petit. Syrach. xxix. i. 
LE peu est suffisant a Fhomme bien appris. Ib, xxx. 21. 

KLEYN visje, soet visje. 

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It MAJORA perdes, parva ni servaveris. 



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vviiu neglects me lime, luses me greaier. 

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Who neglects the little, loses the greater. 



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ADDE parum parvo, tandem fit magnus acervus. j Q 

Gutta cavat lapidem. OVID. 

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WER keinen Pfennig achtet, i |_ 

|- Der auch nimmer eines Gulden Herre. ' m 

CO 

_ ALBAXANSE los adarves, 

Y alcanse los muladeres. (0 

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1 MET veel schlagen wort de Stockvisch murvv. 

GRANO a grano hinche la gallina el papo. Q 

2 Grain a grain ~ 

Amasse la fourmy son pain. 

DOET by een kleyntje diekmael wat, 

Soo wort'et noch een groote shat. 
CO 

DOS proximus est, quicunque eget paucissjmus. 

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Tandem fit Surculus Arbor. 

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m TTOW small soe'er your Profit be, h 

Despise it not, but learn to know, 
That almost ev'ry thing you see 

From small at first to large did grow 
Do but a little oft, and you 

Will find that little grow apace ; 
The Penny to the Pound accrue, 

And "slow and sure oft win the race. 



GREAT BOASTER, LITTLE DOER. 



A LITTLE STREAM DRIVES A LIGHT MILL. 



HE Smith the fteele, fo tempers in the fire, 
As that it may indure flints ftroke and ire ; 

The flint and fteel, 'gainft others while they ftrive, 

Give fparkles, which the tinder keeps alive ; 

Untill the fulphure to the match gives flame, 

Which keeps, and to the candle doth give the fame ; 

The candle thus lighted proper ufe hath none : 

Thus all ordained is for man alone. 

Dame Nature fo commandeth ev'ry thing 

In his owne kind to ferve his Lord and King ; 

Things of meere being, and which doe not live, 

As Elements, food to the living give ; 

The living herbs doe beafts with fenfe mainetaine, 

And thefe, to feede us, ev'ry houre are flaine : 

So every thing is for the ufe of man, 

To God mould he not doe then, what he can ? 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



SO YOU ARE BORNE 

FOR 
OTHERS. 




CHICKENS FEED CAPONS. 



136 



WHO WINS THE EYES WINS ALL. 



Verwonnen Oog, begonnen Min. 





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WHEN THE EYES ARE WON, LOVE IS BEGUN. 



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WAS faid of Old, and, like moft fayings too, 

It hath been proven by experience true, 
That e'en despite his fierce majeftic might, 
" Who wins the Lion's eyes, subdues him " quite. 
Herein is well explain'd and typified 
Another truth that cannot be denied : 



CEIL GAGNE, CORPS PERDU. 



137 



N N 



EL CARACOL, PER G^UITAR DE ENOJOS, 



The eye of Man once taken by the grace 
And 'witching beauty of a Maiden's face, 
However ftern his nature hitherto, 
AlTumes a foftnefs it before ne'er knew. 
Ah ! then how chang'd the cold imperious look 
Which fcarce the gaze of other eyes could brook ! 
How pliant then the fternly moulded mind 
Of Sage and Soldier, as of rugged hind ! 
Each then alike, as though himfelf defpite, 
Submits his ruder to the gentler might ; 
'And, Strength to Softnefs through the eyes betray 'd, 
The Lion gentle as the Lamb is made. 

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bene convemunt, nee in una sede morantur 

Majestas et Amor. OVID, Metam. 3. 

QUISQUIS amat, servit ; sequitur captivus amatam, QJ 

Fert domita cervice jugum, fert dulcia tergo 

QJ j Verbera, fert stimulos, trahit et bovis instar aratrum. MANTUAN. 

I IL 

UJ I PAR des yeux les deux fenestres, 

Dards d' Amour deviennent maistres. 

PRIMI, in omnibus prceliis, oculi vincuntur. TACIT, de Morib. Germ. D 

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I CLAMOR repentinus aliquis, aut imago, aut aspectus fuga ssepe exercitum implevit : 

et haec talia magis, quam gladius, consternant hostem, videbisque militem vanis et 
inanibus magis, quam justis formidinis causis moveri. LIPS. Doct. Civil, lib. v. cap. 16. 

NIHIL tarn leve est, quod non magnae interdum rei momentum faciat. F 

LES Femmes peuvent tout, parce qu'elles gouvernent les personnes qui gouvernent 
tous. 

-I HAVE mark'd 

A thousand blushing apparitions, 
To start into her face, a thousand innocent shames, 
In Angel whiteness, bear away those blushes ; 
And in her eye there hath appeared a fire 
To burn the errors that these princes hold 
Against her maiden truth. SHAKESPEARE. 

BEAUTY with a bloodless conquest finds 

A welcome sov'raignty in rudest minds. WALLER. 



POR LOS OUERNOS TROCO LOS OJOS. 

138 



THE EYES BELIEVE THEMSELVES ; 



-WHOSE radiant look strikes every gazing eye 



Stark blind, and keeps th'amaz'd beholder under 
The stupid tyranny of Love and wonder. Old Poet. 

THEN only hear her Eyes ; 

Tho' they are mute, they plead, nay, more, command : 
For beauteous Eyes have . arbitrary pow'r. DRYDEN, 

WHO knows how eloquent these Eyes may prove, 
Begging in Floods of Tears and Flames of Love. ROCH. 

THE Bloom of op'ning Flowers, unsully'd Beauty, 

Softest and sweetest Innocence she wears; 

And looks like Nature in the World's first spring. Ro WE. 



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Duces, Oculi. 

THE light of the Body is the Eye : therefore when thine eye is single, thy whole 
body also is full of light ; but when thine eye is evil, thy body also is full of dark- 
ness. Take heed therefore that the Light which is in thee be not darkness. Luke 
xi- 34, 35- 

BUT if thine Eye be evil, thy whole Body shall be full of Darkness. If therefore 
the Light that is in thee be Darkness, how great is that Darkness ! Matt. vi. 23. 



Love in the Godhead. 

rpOR Love it was, that first created Light, 

Mov'd on the Waters, chac'd away the Night 
From the rude Chaos, and bestow'd new Grace 
On Things, dispos'd of to their proper Place ; 
Some to rest here, and some to shine Above : 
Earth, Sea, and Heav'n, were all th' Effects of Love, WALL. 

LOVE is that Passion, which refines the Soul ; 

First made Men Heroes, and those Heroes Gods : 

Its genial fires inform the sluggish Mass ; 

The rugged soften, and the tim'rous w&rm. 

Give Wit to Fools, and Manners to the Clown : 

The rest of Life is an ignoble Calm ; 

The Soul, unmov'd by Love's inspiring breath, 

Like lazy Waters, stagnates and corrupts. HIG. Gen. Con. 



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THE EARS, OTHER PEOPLE. 
139 



WHAT THE EYE SEES NOT, 



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Y fplendor with his bright and Sun-like ray, 

Doth cheere the houfe, and darkeneffe chafe away ; 
To thee wh' art blind, I'm darke as fable night, 
It's thy default, not mine; thou lak'ft thy fight. 
The Moule cannot Hyperions glory fee ; 
Who want their eyes, no comfort have by me. 

Chrift is the glory of that light from hie, 

Which can the darkeft Chaos full defcry ; 

And yet we fee him not untill our eyes 

He open, which thicker! darkenefle doth furprife ; 

Then doth his light unto himfelfe reflect 

From us as mirrours, with a new afpect. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




THE HEART RUES NOT. 



140 



IT IS NOT LAWFUL. TO DO EVIL. 



Snijt men fan Neus af men fcheut fijn Aenficht. 




WHO CUTS OFF HIS NOSE SPITES HIS OWN FACE. 

jHlOME here, all Friends, who know, and would 
^ Advise me for the beft ; 
I've got a Nofe, the fight and thought 

Of which deftroys my reft. 
A Nofe, alas ! with wens and wheals 

Surcharged and cover'd o'er ; 
A huge unfightly Nofe, fuch as 
No man e'er had before. 



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THAT G.OOD MAY COME. 



141 



O O 



AVOID EXTREMES. 



It looks juft like a bald-coot's nofe, 
It's fcirlet-red and blue, 

And juft as if a younger lot 
Of Nofes on it grew. 

Oh, fuch a Nofe ! a fnout fo ftrange ! 

That when I'm in the ftreet, 
Each looks at it furpris'd, and all 

The children that I meet 

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h Point after me and fay, " Oh ! what 

- 

A Nofe that man has got ! 
Who ever faw the like of that ? 
ft: 'Tis like a Porter's knot ! " 

And in forfooth, my Nofe is like 

An Oftrich-egg in (ize, 
'Tis like a huge black-pudding that 

Stands out between my eyes. 
Q At fight of it, myfelf, fometimes 

I'm terrified, nor know 
What with it I'm to do, or if 
Z Yet larger it may grow. 

A Nofe ! but there, I've faid enough ; 

I cannot longer bear 
So hideous a thing as this 

Upon my face to wear. 

I often think I'll cut it off!- 

1 And why not ? why delay 

To do what one hears fpeak of in 

The Proverb ev'ry day ? 
But hold! are Nofes after all 
:= No ufe upon the face ? 

Ul I Although their fhape and fize be not 

Confident quite with grace ? 

If cut it off I do Why what 
UJ 
(5 An awful gap there'll be ! 

^ Without a Nofe, my face will then 

Be horrible to fee ! 

Y 

Eh ! friend, put by thy knife, nor lift 

A fuicidal hand 
Againft thyfelf ! for as thou art, 

'Tis meet to underiland, 
Lies neither in thy will nor right 



ANGER AND HASTE HINDER GOOD COUNSEL. 

142 



TO ERR IS HUMAN, TO FORGIVE DIVINE. 



To mar, nor to upbraid ; 
Bow meekly rather to His Will 

Who thine affliction laid ! 
Seek not with violence to do 

What patience may effect ; 
By gentle means 'tis eafier oft 

To heal and to correct. 
Try thefe, my friend, they may avail, 

But mould they not fucceed, 
Spare thine own flem, nor mar thy face 

By fuch ungodly deed. 
Wouldft further know, my friends, fome rule 

Of conduct to deduce UJ 

From this my theme ? Read on my aim 

HI T i 1 \ c ' r 

Is but to be or ule. i 0) 

' * 

Herefrom learn alfo to refpect 
The failings of thy friend, 

To him who to thy blood belongs, 

Thine helping hand extend : Q 

""" 1C? ., 

When hufband or the wife have left Q 

Their duty's path awhile 

A mother, brother, fitter err'd, 
UJ Strive thou to reconcile. 

Forfake thy kindred not that they 

Have falPn their crofs beneath ; 
The ftrength has not been giv'n to all 

To gain the Victor's wreath : 
Though thou their errors mayeft hate, U. 

Let judgment be deferr'd; 
Hate thou not them, but pity more 

That they mould fo have err'd. 
Drag not their faults into the light, 

But kindly draw the veil, 
As teaches Love, that other eyes 

May fee not where they fail. 
Be the Phyfician thou, and ftrive 

All that thou canft to cure ; 
Canft thou not heal, then learn, and teach 

How others may endure. 

The fufFring limb by force is not made whole , 
Nor heals Reproof the gangrene of the foul. 



CHARITY SHALL. COVER THE MULTITUDE OF SINS. 

M3 



FORGIVE, AND YE SHALL BE FORGIVEN. 





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|Y Light is pleafant, when the night doth gloome, 

And pitchy darkenefle lines the mourning roome; 
Whither thou lifts Cleanthes fmoake to blow, 
Or if the Matron like to twift her tow. 
When Phoebus fetteth, I watch centenall 
Untill he from my ftation doth me call. 

Spare me, lend not my light to Titans ray ; 

So malt th' enjoy me when there is no day. 

If thy eftate be meane, hufband it well, 

And it Attalick wealth mail parallell. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




BE YE KIND ONE TO ANOTHER. 



144 



DRINK LITTLE THAT YE MAY DRINK LANG. 



Noch vinnigh Slaen, noch harden Divanck, 
En brengt den Esel tot den Drank. 



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THOUGH TAKEN TO THE WATER'S BRINK, 
NO BLOWS CAN FORCE THE HORSE TO DRINK. 

fN vain with cheering words I've tried, 
And ev'ry means that I can think 
Of oaths, and blows, and kicks befide 
To get this plaguey beast to drink ! 
I've led him by the bridle thrice, 

And coax'd and pull'd, and coax'd again, 



WHEN THE WINE IS IN, THE WIT IS OUT. 



P P 



WHEN WINE ENTERS, MODESTY DEPARTS. 

But he wont drink at any price, 

And blows and words alike are vain. 
Yet when I turn the matter o'er, 

I really think, myfelf defpite, 
That I in fenfe am wanting more, 

And of the two the Horfe is right ! 
Why, after all, mould I feel fore 

And lofe my temper in this way ? 
The beaft p'rhaps drank enough before, 

And feldom drinks three times a day ; 

That's why he had no will thereto, 

J 

Nor would approach the water's brink : 
But how could I expect him to ? 

If he'd nor thirft nor need of drink ! 
And if the brute himfelf but had 

The pow'r of fpeech, afTuredly, 
0) Brute as he is, he'd call me mad, 

I And much the greater fool than he ! 

Hence it is plain that even Man, 

So bent each beaft with fcorn to treat, 
May learn from them more wifdom than 
HI In his own fellow oft he'll meet ! 

For lo ! no force can bring the beaft 

To drink, if not his thirft to flake, 
While Man, creation's lord at leaft, 

Will drink all day for drinking's fake ! 
h The faying is well known and true, 

That when a beaft has drank his need, 
E'en though a King himfelf might fue, 

He'll drink no more, not he, indeed ! 
Fie ! Man ! fie ! you, the lord of Mind ! 

Who, fway'd by fenfelefs appetite, 
In needlefs drink enjoyment find, 

'Gainft nature, reafon, and 'gainft right ! 
Your thirft once quench'd, defift, nor let 

The taunts of fools, nor warmth of friends 
Prevail to make you once forget 

The bound where Reafon's empire ends. 



DRUNKENNESS IS VOLUNTARY MADNESS. 

146 



DIE WIJN DRINKEN SONDER SMAECK, 



Are you your Senfes', Paflions' flave, 

More than the humble brute a-field ? 
Or in the pow'r of Mind you have, 

Muft it before his Inftinct yield ! 
What would the people fay to fee 

Good wine into the Kennel caft ? 
And yet, the Drunkard, is not he 

A human Kennel to the laft ? 
UJ Why good drink down the Sewers throw? 

Worfe than the brute art thou, Man-fool ! Z 

J- Wouldft thou a nobler duty know, 

Betake thee to the Horfe to fchool. 

Z If 't's more than Horfes' work to think ; 

In one thing yet the Horfe ftands firft, 
It's more than Horfes' work to drink 

Without the need or fenfe of thirft. 



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JL n'est manger, qu'a bonne faim. 

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A COULONS souls cerises ameres. !l 

JAMAIS homme sage on vit 
0) Buveur de vin sans appetit. 

-7 VIN dentro, sermo fuori. Z 

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Z Wen Wein eingehet, da gehet wiss auss. 

NE monstre pas ta vaillance a bien boire : car le vin a faict pe'rir plusieurs. 

SYRACH. xxxi. 29. 

WINE measurably drunk, and in reason, bringeth gladness of heart and cheerfulness 
of the mind ; but wine drunken with excess maketh bitterness of the mind diminishes < 
strength, and maketh wounds. Ecclesiasticus xxxi. 28, 30. 

THE first glass for thirst, the second for nourishment, the third for pleasure, and 
the fourth for madness. ANACHARSIS. 

As surfeit is the father of much fast, 
So every scope by the immoderate use 
Turns to restraint : our natures do pursue 
(Like rats that raven down their proper bane) 
A thirsty evil, and when we drink we die. 

SHAKESP. Measure for Measure. 



EEN ONBESUYSDE SAECK. 
t47 



U DRANCK EN ETEN 




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HEN Phoebus fets in the Hefperian ftreames, 
And Westerne fhores blufh with his drowned beames ; 
Then I as Phoebus fecond muft give Light, 
And aft my part in darkenefle of the night : 
But now my Light complaines that I decay, 
And into greafie teares doe melt away ; 
So I am forft to yeeld. O turne thy teame 
Phoebus, and Phofpher mew thy morning beame. 

When Chrift the Sonne of righteoufnefle did goe 

Vnto his Heavenly manfions from below, 

Then he his holy fervants did command, 

Confpicuous to the world, like lights, to ftand; 

But when they faile with watching, toile, and age, 

And now are ready to goe off the ftage, 

Then up they yeeld the light of life and cry ; 

O come thou Sonne of righteoufnefle, we die. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



MORNING STARRE 
SHEW YE 
DAY. 







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NIET UYT LUST, MAER OM TE L.EVEN. 

148 



WHO RUNS FAST CANNOT RUN L-ONQ. 



Nimia libertas fit servitus. 




EXCESS OF LIBERTY LEADS TO SERVITUDE. 

NTIL this haplefs moment I was free, 

And went where'er my will or fancy led ; 
But now oh ! where where is that liberty 
So long my boaft ? alas ! for ever fled. 
Ah ! woe is me that ever I was lur'd 
By aught fo poor and taftelefs as this rind, 
To enter here, before I was aflur'd 
Some means of exit and efcape to find. 



EXTREMES ARE EVIL. 
M9', 



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NA LANGE LOOPEN, MOET MEN'T BEKOOPEN. 

Till now without reftraint I ran about, 

Each place alike, a houfe fecure for me ; 

I 'd holes in plenty to go in and out, 

Nor fear'd our race's direft enemy. 

Now here, now there, the barn, the granary, 

The kitchen, larder, parlour, and the ftore 

Were mine to roam in full fecurity, 

And feaft my fill ; what could I wifh for more ? 

Fool that I was, thus to be captive made ! 

I tremble at the doom that waits me now ; 

Yet whom have I to blame or to upbraid ? 

Myfelf alone ; and to my fate I bow, 

Convinc'd too late, that he is caught at Ian:, 

Who runs about too much and lives too faft. 



TMBERBIS juvenis, tandem custode remote ; 

Gaudet equis, canibusque, . et aprici gramine campi, 
Cereus in vitium flecti, monitoribus asper, 
Utilium tardus provisor, prodigus aeris, 
Sublimis, cupidusque, et amata relinquere pernix. 

MINIMUM debet libere, cui nimium licet. PLUTARCH, de Edncat, lib. in fin. 

WHO most would act according to his will, 
Requires most to be restrain'd from ill. 



Fit fpolians fpolium. 

'The Spoiler -is made Spoil. 

/^vNE summer eve, beneath the greenwood shade, 

I found young Phillis sitting fast asleep. 
With noiseless step before th' unconscious maid, 
Joying to catch her in that slumber deep, 
I stood and gazed ; as though to feast my sight 
On ev'ry feature of her charming face : 
And though her eye-lids veil'd from me their light, 
Her rosy mouth, with such bewitching grace, 
Seem'd as it were to proffer me the kiss 
So oft denied me with a smart rebuke ; 



LONG INDULGENCE IS ITS OWN PAYMASTER. 



150 



THOU SHALT NOT COVET. 



That turning Thief at once, I stole the bliss ; 
But in that theft, lost more than what I took. 
So, gentle reader, in the Love-chase too, 
As with the mouse entrapp'd for love of bacon ; 
We're often made our very luck to rue, 
Just when the thing most wished for has been taken. 
I stole from her a kiss, but Phillis, she 
At once stole heart and peace of mind from me ; 
The mouse, poor thing, lost life with liberty ; 
But without Phillis, what were life to me ? 
Oh ! Love, thy pow'r surpasses all belief 
, That Phillis sleeping, thus should steal the Thief ! 

Who poaching goes on Love's domain, 
Oft loses where he thought to gain : 
And when least thinking such may be, 

2 To his surprise doth ofttimes see, 

3 Just like the mouse above pourtray'd, 0) 

Himself ensnar'd, and captive made. 

Z 

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Carpitque et carpitur una, 



Suppliciumque sui est. OVID. U. 

r~ i 





UJ Pcena comes Sceleris. l_ 

Punifliment is the companion of Crime. (/) 

TUST as the greedy rat has seiz'd the bacon, (D 

J Down falls the trap, and lo ! the thief is taken. 

The prey though seized, of what avail to him ? 3 

That blow struck terror into every limb ! 

'Tis not enough to say : the evil deed 
1{J Brings its requital as the doer's meed : 

The culprit from the moment of his crime, 

Stung by his conscience through each hour of time, 

Though none pursue, in each a captor sees, 

Starts at each sound that's borne upon the breeze, 

And where none other aught of terror deems, 

Quails 'fore the hangman of his nightly dreams. 

THE wicked flee when no man pursueth. Prov. xxviii. i. 

OH coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me ! 
Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh 
What do I fear? Myself? SHAKESPEARE. 

WHICH way I move is Hell ; myself am hell. MILTON. 



TREASURES OF WICKEDNESS PROFIT NOTHINC3. 



HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 



0) 




HEN as the conqu'ring fleete return'd from Troy, 

And Pallas ftormy wrath did them annoy ; 
Then Nauplius fought revenge upon the Greekes, 
And hang'd out Lanterns on the rocky creekes ; 
The Greekes deceived did the rockes miftake, 
And darning gainft them did nights mipwracke make. 

Whilft we unto our wimt-for Country goe, 

This lifes fierce billowes tofTe us to and fro ; 

Honour and glory hang out lights fo faire, 

And Siren-like doe feeke us to enfnare : 

A joy full, quiet haven they doe pretend ; 

But oft they drave us to a dolefull end : 

If thou be wife fhunne honours lights fo hy, 

And from fhipwracking Siren pleafure fly. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




LEARN TO RESTRAIN THINE HAND, AND TO CURB THINE ANGER. 

152 



HE WHO IS BORN A FOOL IS NEVER CURED. 



A Bar be de Fol apprent a raire. 



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WHO WOULD LEARN TO SHAVE WELL, SHOULD 
FIRST PRACTISE ON A FOOL'S BEARD. 

HE Proverb is of antient date, 

That he who well would learn to {have, 
His fulleft wifh to confummate. 

Should on a Fool's beard practice have. 
As with each phrafe of antient lore, 
The fenfe implied hath ta'en its rife 



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A WISE LOOK MAY SECURE A FOOL. IF HE TALK NOT. 



153 



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From long experience gone before, 

That Fools to deal with maketh wife. 
For Fools, of all men moft precife 

In things of import leaft, e'er gave 
The wideft fcope for practice nice 

Of Patience and of Virtues grave. 
In fhaving Fools the barber '11 find 

Thofe Virtues to the utmoft tried, 
And howfoe'er to pleafe inclined, 

Both (kill and patience mifapplied. 
Of head and beard each fep'rate hair 

Muft have the fame attention paid, 
Muft be arranged with niceft care, 

And juft as Fool will have it laid : 
At ev'ry clip he fays, "Take heed!"- 

And in the looking-glafs muft view 
If all is done as he decreed, 

And what the Barber next muft do : 
This lock is now fomewhat too long, 

And this too mort now here, now there, 
There fomething ails, a curl lies wrong 

In beard or whifker, or fomewhere. 
On this fide now there needs anew 

Juft juft a leetle fnipp'd away, 
" So ! let me look ! yes ! that will do 

But here! this turn! looks well? nay! nay! 
No mouftache ever look'd well fo, 

Like that indeed it cannot ftay !" 
And all the Barber ftrives to do 

Is vain as all he tries to lay : 
Yet ! juft this place behind the ear ? 
Aye ! Fool ! that's juft the place that ail'd thee ! 

From what we've feen 'tis very clear 
It was the brains from firft that fail'd thee ! 

Who wants now this, now that, nor knows 
What 'tis he needs, doth clearly mow it : 
For lacking brains, he feels and mows 
He wants within the means to know it. 



THERE IS NO CONCLUSION. 



154 



A FOOL'S HEAD NEVER WHITENS. 



D Y moeyelicke heeren 
Is veel te leeren. 

'T moet een wijse hant sijn, die een sotten Kop wel scheren sal. 
It must be a wise hand to cut the hair of a Fool's head. 

WAT let, dat leert. 
Quae nocent, docent. 



VEXATIO dat intellectual. 

HOMINE imperito nil quidquam est injustius, qiii, nisi quod ipse facit nihil rectum 
putat. TERENT. Adelph. 

MEN heeft groote kunst van doen 
Om de narren te voldoen. 



IL 



All those who appear Fools, are so, and no less, half of those who do not appear to be so. 



TROLLY has a wide dominion in the World ; and if there be some little Wisdom, 
UJ it is pure Folly compared with the Wisdom of the Most High. But the greatest ~. 

7 Fool is he, who does not believe that he is so, and who imputes Foolishness to every U 
D body else. To be Wise, it is not sufficient to appear so to one's self. He is Wisest 
y who does not think that he is Wise; and he who does not perceive that others see, UJ 

J does not see himself. How full soever the World be of Fools, there is no person who 
Q i thinks himself one, nor even, who suspects himself of folly. GRACIAN. 
li THERE are People (in every class of Society) who entertain a high opinion of them- 

selves, but those more particularly, who are the least worthy. Each considers himself 
the centre of the Universe, and destined for an exalted position. Hope undertakes 
L rashly, and Experience renders it no assistance. Vain imagination finds an executioner 
^ in Reality, who undeceives it. Every one should know his proper sphere of action, 
and his fittest condition. Reality would then be the regulator of Self-Opinion. Idem. 



FORTUNE takes care that Fools should still be seen : 

She places 'em aloft, o' th' topmost spoke 

Of all her wheel. Fools are the daily work 

Of nature, her Vocation : If she form 

A.Man, she loses by't ; 'tis too expensive; 

'T would make ten Fools : A Man's a Prodigy. 

DRYDEN, CEdip. 

UN Sot n'a pas assez d'e'toffe pour etre bon. LA ROCHEFOUCAULD. 



A WAQER IS A FOOL'S ARGUMENT. 
155 



HE THAT TEACHES HIMSELF 



UCH like as wine the nurfe of Poets veine, 

When prifon-like the cafke doth it conteine ; 
Farre from the bottome while you draw the wine, 
You will it find more plenteous and more fine ; 
But when you come to dreg, no wine abounds. 
Both leaft and worft remaineth in the grounds: 
Such like the mining of a candle we fee, 
Which kindled once burnes not ftill equally ; 
At firft it giv's greater and clearer light, 
And is more pleafant both to fmell and fight ; 
But when it comes to fnuffe and even fpent, 
It fhineth lefTe, and gives a filthy fent. 

The candle and wine's our life, which, in its prime, 
Doth flourifh more, and hath more hope of time; 
But when with muftie age our life decayes, 
Then many forrowes have we, and few dayes. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



IN IMO MINIMUM ET PESSIMUM 



AT BOTTOM LEAST 

AND 
WORST. 




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HAS A FOOL FOR HIS MASTER. 



156 



ONE DOTH THE SCATH, ANOTHER HATH THE HARM. 



Wat de seuge doet, moeten de biggen ontgelden. 



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WHAT THE SOW DOES, THE LITTLE PIGS MUST 

PAY FOR. 



HEN the old Sow has play'd her pranks, 

And upfet tubs and pails around her, 
Out comes the Mafter in a rage. 

With broom in hand, refolv'd to pound her : 




INNOCENCE IS NO PROTECTION. 



157 



s s 



THE CROW GiETS PARDONED, AND 



But fhe, well vers'd in all his oaths, 

And in their meaning full confiding, 
Runs off and leaves her pigs behind 

To bear the blame and get the hiding. 
And they, poor pigs, though innocent 

Of all the harm, defpite their fqueaking, 
Get beat all round and made to fmart 

For all the big Sow has been breaking. 

'Tis thus we often fee in life, 

The great misdoers fave their bacon, 

While blame and punimment alike 

Fall on the fmaller folks when taken : 

How Kings and Statesmen for their faults 
W I 
Get fcathelefs off, nor fear vexation, 

While all the ills which they have wrought 

Are felt and paid for by the nation. 
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Q C^^ C l ue ^ a truye forfait, les porceaux souffrent. 

OL 

. QUIDQUID delirant Reges, plectuntur Achivi. HORACE i. Epist. 2. 

X 

\- DAT veniani Corvis, vexat censura Columbas. JUVEN. Sat. 2. 



IloXXaci KO.I ZvfjLiraaa TTO\IS KUKOV dvcSpos Travpei. 

Id esf, 
S^EPE universa civitas viri mali scelera luit. 

IL peccato del Signore souvente fa piangere il vassallo. 
Un fa il peccato, 1'altro la penitenza. 

DER Herrn siind, der bauren buss. 

WANNEER een Prinz springt uyt den bant, 
Daerom lijdt dickmael al het lant. 

MANCHER muss entgelten des er nie genossen hat. 

QUID agimus hoc casu ? feramus. Nam quemadmodum sterilitatem, aut nimios 
imbres, aut caetera naturae mala; ita luxum, ambitionem et avaritiam dominantium 
habeamus. 



DOVE HAS THE BLAME. 
158 



EEN PLOEQ DIE WERCKT, BL.INCKT. 
SICHEM rapuit, et agricola plectitur. Arabian Adage. Vid. RIGHT. Axiom. (Econ. 24, 25. 



[The same in another sense.~\ 

IT'S GOOD FISHING IN TROUBLED WATERS. 

The Reader will imagine a picture, representing a Fisher disturbing the water with a 
long pole, and driving the fish towards the net. 

"Y^OU wish to know what I'm about ? 

My bus'ness is soon told : 
I'm going to fish upon a plan 

Advis'd from time of old. 
In waters that are most disturb'd, 

Most fish are caught, they say ; 
But when the water's calm and clear UJ 

h The fish all swim away : 

(0 

For then too cautiously they scan D 

CD The meshes of the net, 

(0 Or be your bait however good, j- 

^ No bite from them you get. , 

But quite another sport it is JL, 

Q If you disturb the stream ; UJ 

The troubled water then gets thick, *~ 

UJ And roach, perch, eels and bream > 

Are taken then alike at once, 
Q Large fish as well as small, 

All caught together in the net ; 

That's what I fishing call ! 2 

UJ 

Need I say more ? He who knows not 

To make a stir in this World's stream, 
Will but a sorry Fisher prove, 
Nor minnows catch, much less a bream. 
Stir, Fisher, stir ! Stillness does harm ; 
It little profits when the water's calm. 



-Ex multis utile bellum. LUCAN. i. v. 182. 



OPPORTUNI magnis conatibus transitus rerum. TACITUS. 

MULTI honores quos quieta republica desperant, perturbata se consequi posse 

arbitrantur. LIVY. 

EAU trouble gain de pecheur. 



NAER STIL.LE WATER 
159 



SCAVOIR, VIENT AVOIR. 



f CARRY about with me. my frugall ftore, 
* */ O ^ 

With which I am content, and feeke no more; 
If it be meane, I can with it agree, 
What ftate foever, welcome comes to me : 
I never begge, alive, what is diftrefle, 
I know not; but once dead, I care for 't lefle. 
Some live on others trenchers, and doe eate 
The bread of floth, for which they never fweat : 
They 're greedy ravens of mankind, kitching drones, 
Rich tables harpyes, rats, Chamelions. 
The wifeman howfoever he doth finde 
Fortune, to it he fits and frames his mind, 
He doth proferre his courfe and country faire, 
Unto his Patrons dole and dimes rare. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



ON MINE OWN COST. 




STIRRINQ MASTERS MAKE A RICH HOUSEHOLD. 



160 



EXAMPLE IS STRONQER THAN PRECEPT. 



Een Schip op een Zant> een Eaken in Zee. 



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A SHIP AGROUND, IS A BEACON AT SEA. 



fORT ! hard a-port ! ftarboard your helm ! look out 
See what our neighbour in the Schuyt's about ! 
Upon a fand-fpit there as fure as day, 
He's hard and fair. ; right in the courfe we lay ! 
Give her a good wide berth, my mate, that we 
Clear well the fand-tail where thofe breakers be. 



WISE MEN L.EARN BY OTHERS' HARM. 

161 



T T 



IT IS EASIEST LEARNING AT ANOTHER'S COST. 

They'll never pole her off to ftrive is vain ; 

With ebbing-tide as now, there fhe'll remain : 

And mould the wind chop round and blow to more, 

She'll break her rudder, or get damage more. 

Reader ! look well to this, and let it be 

A caution in Life's voyage unto thee. 

The Skipper who defcries a mip aground, 

No beacon needs to guide, nor lead to found : 

And truly prudent is that man alone, 

Who by another's fault can mend his own. 

Many who have themfelves but little {kill 



To mape their courfe where peril may accrue, 
X Avert full oft the greater mare of ill, 

- Who take example from what others do. 

For Youth, than this, there is no better fchool ; 
D For Men, no milder difcipline and rule, 

Than well t' obferve, and weigh with prudent care 



The acts of others from the fruit they bear. 



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~ Ex vitio alterius Sapiens emendat suum. P. SYRUS. 

FELIX quern faciunt aliena pericula cautum. 

HOMINES amplius oculis quam auribus credunt. SENECA. 

LONGUM iter est per prsecepta, breve et efficax per exempla. Ibid. 
HI 

CL WE do not want precepts, but patterns, for example is the gentlest and least invidious 

way of commanding. PLINY. 

EXAMPLE is a living rule that teaches without trouble to the learner, and lets him 
see his faults without open reproof and upbraiding. SERJ. PALMER'S Aphorisms. 

EXAMPLE works more than precept ; for words without practice are but counsels 
without effect. Ibid. 

I HAVE given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you. 
John xiii. 15. 

CHRIST suffered for us, leaving us an example that we should follow his steps. 
i Pet. ii. 21. 



PRECEPTS LEAD, EXAMPLES DRAW. 

162 



BAD NEIGHBOURS HAVE A 



Chi ha mal vicin, ha mal matin. 

"~pIS well that ev'ry one should know, 
UJ Something of his next door neighbour; 

What are his hours of to and fro ? 
Habits of life, and trade or labour? 

For, whate'er our love of quiet, 

And our care to keep aloof, 

l_ If he's giv'n to drink and riot, 

Mischief soon may reach our roof. 
U, 

Peaceful neighbours are a treasure 

To be wish'd for in this life; 
B 



LL But distressing beyond measure, ~ 



S Neighbours prone to noise and strife : 

All such people much require 

QJ Watch and ward on all they do ; 

dl Lest if their house should take fire, 

It perchance may spread to you. |- 

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TUNC tua res agitur paries cum proximus ardet. HORACE, i. Epist. 18. 



QUANDO egli arde in vicinanza, 
Porta 1'acqua a casa tua. 



IN the house of the righteous is much treasure : but in the revenues of the wicked 
is trouble. Proverbs xv. 6. 



QUADE GEBUEREN MOET MEN BESUEREN. 

163 



NE mala vicini pecoris contagia laedant. VIRGIL, Eel. i. 

D 

HINC bene commendavit Philosophus domum a bonis vicims, 

Aliquid mali propter vicinum malum. PLAUTUS, Merc. 
D 
MIEUX vaut etre seul, que mal accompagne. 

Brebis rogneuse font les autres tigneuses. h 

EVIL communications corrupt good manners. 

Better alone than in bad company. 

DIE ontrent den molen woont, 
Bestuyft het meel. 

CHI ha mal vicin, 
j. Ha mal matin. 



HE WHO TOUCHES PITCH SOILS HIS FINGERS. 





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>IGHTS ftarre-like fplendor doth allure this flye, 
Not knowing that me may be burnt thereby : 
Thus whilft fhe kindled with a great defire 
Of Light, loe now fhee dies in flaming fire. 
Glory in purple robes is fet on hie, 
Envious to many, lovely to the eye : 
But many times glory doth fooles undoe, 
Whilft, without wit and reafon, they it wooe : 
It raifeth them that with the greater fall, 
It may them overthrow and crum withall. 
Whilft Icarus foares to Hyperions beames, 
He headlong fals into th' Icarian ftreames ; 
And Pha'ton daring for to rule the day, 
Was thunder-beate, and burnt with Phoebus ray. 
We nearer to the Sunne more glorious are, 
If of the fcorching rayes we be aware. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



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I SEEKS MINE HURTji 




CHI TOCCA L_A PECE, S'IMBRATTA LE MANI. 

164 



De gam blaeft wet y maer en bin niet. 





THE GOOSE HISSES WELL, BUT IT DON'T BITE. 

HEN firft thefe Geefe I faw, and heard 

Them hifs fo fierce at me ; 
With fear o'erwhelm'd, I fled the bird, 

And thought therein to fee 
Some winged bead, or dragon fell, 
Whofe peftilential breath 



WORDS ARE BUT WIND, BUT BLOWS UNKIND. 



165 



u u 



GREAT CRY, LITTLE WOOL. 



Alone fufficed, as I'd heard tell, 
To fpread difmay and death. 
At length their fnappifh noife defpite, 

I felt within my breaft 
A ftrange refolve to ftay my flight, 

And meet them at my beft. 
So looking round as fiercely too, 

I was about to draw, 
And pierce the hifling monfters through; 

When all at once I faw 

CD I And faid, as plain as I could fpeak : 

UJ Why I'm a fool outright ! 

The beaft 's a flat and toothlefs beak ! 

L With that he cannot bite ; 

No claws upon his feet has he 

That I had need to fear, 
No crooked talons that I fee 

With which my flefh to tear. 
'Tis all mere empty wind, e'en though 

So dread to th' ear and fight ; 
(I) Fear not, my mates ! who hifs and blow 

m Are feldom fierce to bite. 

j 
h 



|- TX^IJT gapen, en bijt niet : 

Veel blasen en smijt niet. 



SY en bijten niet al, die haer tanden laten sien. 

CHAT mioleur ne fut jamais bon chasseur, non plus qu'homme sage caquetteur. 
Een Kat die veel maeuwt, vangt weinigh muisen. 

A MUCHA parola, obra poco. 
CAN ch' abbaja, non vuol nocer. 

HUHNER die viel schwatzen, legen wenig Eier. 
Dov' e manca cor, quivi e piu lingua. 

DE grands vanteurs 
Petits faiseurs. 

Wenn die Worte Leute schlugen, so war er ein tapferer Mann. 



WORDS ARE GOOD WHEN WORKS FOLLOW. 

166 



BEWARE OF A MAN THAT DOES NOT TALK, 

VASA inania plurimum tinniunt. 

AN tibi Mavors 

Ventosa in lingua, pedibusque fugacibus istis, 
Semper erit 1 ? VIRG. sEn. n. 

Jam senectus mundi est, quse est garrula. 
Magis metuendi taciturni et lenes, quam feroces et clamatores. 

VANA est sine viribus ira. 

MINARUM strepitus, 
Asinorum crepitus. 

VALIDIOR vox operis, quam oris. 

Z IGNAVISSIMUS quisque et in periculo minimum ausurus nimii verbis, lingua feroces. 

TACITUS. 
UT quisque ignavus animo, procax ore. Ibid. 

Ill 

Q QUID dignum tanto feret hie promissor hiatu 1 

Parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. HORACE. 



MONS parturibat gemitus immanes ciens, 
Eratque in terris maxima exspectatio. 
At ille murem peperit. Hoc scriptum 
Qui magna cum minaris, extricas nihil. 



Eratque in terris maxima exspectatio. 

At ille murem peperit. Hoc scriptum est tibi, 



PH^EDRUS, FabuL Ixxix. 

< CANIS timidus vehementius latrat, quam mordet. CURTIUS. 

QUID verbis opus est ? spectemur agendo. OVID. xiii. Metam. 

CD 

MULTA verba, modria fides. RICHTER, Axiom. Oecon. 221. 

h 

DIE Kiihe die sehr briillen, geben wenig Milch. 

(/) Hunde die sehr bellen, beissen nicht. 

UJ 

'T is een wijse van het lant. 

Lange tonge kort van hant. 
TEL menace, qui est battu. 
Tel menace, qui a grand' peur. 
De grand menaceur peu de fait. 

h 



WHO knows himself a braggart 

Let him fear this ; for it shall come to pass 
That every braggart shall be found an ass. 

SHAKESPEARE, All's Well that Ends Well. 

BRAGGARTS must needs be factious, for all bravery stands upon comparisons. 
They must be violent to make good their vaunts. Neither can they be secret, and 
therefore not effectual. LORD BACON. 



AND OF A DOQ THAT DOES NOT BARK. 

167 



MANY WORDS DON'T FILL THE SACK. 




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HEN as the waxen light and candle did mine, 

As was the taper, fo the candle was fine : 
When light is gone, this gives an odious fnuffe, 
That fmels of Hyblas fweete nectarian ituffe. 
So when the wicked fits in honours chaire, 
Unto the good man all doe him compare ; 
But when Death fparing none, his maike puls off, 
And changing Fortune fets him for a fcofFe : 
Then to the frittle people he doth ftinke, 
His name fmels like a common-more or finke : 
The good againe, even in adverfity, 
Cares not for Fortunes falfe inconftancy ; 
And when againft him death hath done her beft, 
His name fmels like the Phenix fpicy neft. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




1 68 



TOUT PAR AMOUR, RIEN PAR FORCE. 



Met onwillige honden is't quaet ha r en vangen. 



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WITH UNWILLING HOUNDS IT'S HARD TO 
CATCH HARES. 

OT far from here there lives a Maid, 

Who, as I've heard by many faid, 
Will bring a good dow'r of gold and land 
To him on whom me beftows her hand. 
A buxom, cheerful, buftling lafs, 
She leads her father's kine to grafs, 




NO STRIVING; AGAINST THE STREAM. 



169 



X X 



HAPPY IS THE WOOING THAT IS NOT LONG IN DOING. 

She bakes and she brews, she spins and she sews, 
And all a good housewife's duty knows. 

Nimble and neat of limb is she, 

Good temper'd too as a lass can be ; 
With pouting red lips, and a cheek that glows 
With the freshest hues of the opening rose ; 
No burgher maid in Leyden town 

Can match her eyes of lustrous brown ; 
And were I again in my youthful prime, 
To woo and to win her I'd lose no time, 

I wish our Claes, that son of mine, 

Would but to my advice incline, 
And court her close like a sensible lad, 
While she and her dow'r are yet to be had : 

For oft I 've heard her father say : 

Whoe'er she choose, he'll not say nay ; 
But give her a well stock'd farm and land, 
And a well fill'd purse besides in hand. 
~ But my son Claes, he is so slow, 

Q To her he will not courting go : 

,! He only fancies the town-bred grace 

It Of a Courtly dame and a painted face. > 

But what's your Court or burgher dame, 

With pride of birth and empty name, QJ 

h To a village lass with a purse well lin'd, -I 

~ And wholesome alike in body and mind ? 

But, Oh ! this boy ! 'tis vexing quite ~j 

At bait so fair he will not bite ; 
And all J can do, or think, or say, 
Alike on the lad are thrown away. 

How oft have I not brought him to 0) 

DC The lass, in hopes that he would woo : 

But there he'd stand like a tongue-tied lout ! 
Nor open his mouth but gape about ! 

In vain to cheer him on I strive, 

And wink to make him more alive ; 
But not e'en once will he take her hand, 
Nor speak one word she can understand. 

E'en though 'tis Fair-time now, yet he 

Buys her no Cakes nor Christmas tree ; 
No girdle, nor ring, nor handsome coif 
To set the young damsel's head-dress off. 

He writes no Sonnets in her praise, 

As is the custom now-a-days, 
But cold as a stone, not a word will say, 
That hints in the least at a Wedding-day. 

But, setting all such gifts aside 

Though gifts are proper to a Bride-^ 
E'en from her he'll not take a thing, 
Nor new neck-ruff, nor handsome ring ! 



WHO SO BLIND AS HE THAT WILL NOT SEE? 

170 



FAIR IS NOT FAIR, BUT THAT^WHICH PL.EASETH. 

Yet lovers mostly have the sense 

To look on gifts as no offence ; 
And if a young man will aught receive, 
'Tis a sign at least, so girls believe 

That he next day may come again, 

And then p'rhaps speak his mind more plain ; 
For Love doth ever more hopeful burn, 
When the receiver doth make return. 

But oh ! this Claes ! he will not woo 

At all as other people do ! 0) 

E'en when she herself asks him to dance, ffj 

He says that he can't, and looks askance : Q 

For her he has no pleasing talk ; 

He never takes her out to walk, 
And when she kindly bids him stay, 
He takes up his hat to walk away ! 

- To lose such a chance to me is odd ! 

Q Now isn't my Claes a downright clod ? 

But now I find my wife was right, 

When she said to me t'other night : 
I Do hold thy tongue, now, Father, do! 

'Tis plain our Claes don't care to woo. 

Thou'lt never bring the match to pass, 

He has no taking to the lass : I 

j He's p'rhaps some other girl in view, 

h And take my word you may for true ; Q 

The Love that's forc'd will never do ! UJ 

Is not a lover, after all, 

Best judge on whom his choice should fall ? 

Is courting not an impulse free, 
UJ That knows no force nor law's decree 

Do, Father, let the boy alone ; 

Compulsion never yet was known 

GO To rule th' affections of the heart, 

Nor guide the course of Cupid's dart. 
Z Let him be free to choose his mate < 

According to his heart's dictate : 

"No Well so bad as that, we think, 

Whose water we're compelled to drink." 

Is not the Love-chase just the same l_ 

As hunting any other game 1 

What though the sportsman even see 

The hare, so tame as not to flee, 

Squat here and there at distance short, 

As though the very dogs to court ; 

Yet none the more the hare is won 

If that his dogs refuse to run : 

For hounds which hunt against their will, 

Were seldom known the game to kill. 

THERE IS NO DISPUTING OF TASTES AND FANCIES. 

171 



LET EVERY TUB STAND ON ITS OWN BOTTOM. 



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fAM confumed with devouring fire, 
Whilft Vulcane gainft me doubles thus his ire : 

The hand, much like an Ifthme, doth feparate 

The flames, and doth it felfe praecipitate 

Into open danger, mewing fb its love, 

The fcorching flames compels it to remove. 

A thriftlerTe hufband if he fpend his ftate, 
And fo the wife loving to goe too neat ; 
Their ftocke and meanes quickely goes to decay, 
And late repentance comes, when all's away. 
But if a friend their ruine would prevent, 
And flay their fall ; be fure he mall be fhent : 
He lofing labour fcarce fhall harmelefle goe, 
They both againft him turne their malice fo. 
Oft times who parteth quarrels and debate, 
Againft himfelfe doth turne the parties hate. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



CONSUMAR NECESSE EST. j 



i'fTHUS MUST I BE CON 
SUMED 




LAST SUITOR WINS THE M A I D . 



172 



GREAT DESIGNS REQUIRE GREAT CONSIDERATION. 



Om weynigh Graens een gansche Moole. 



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A WHOLE MILL TO GRIND A PECK OF CORN. 

lp H ! Matter, what is all this work, 
<2t| This hamm'ring, fawing, clatter ? 
Each morning that I wake of late 

I wonder what's the matter ! 
What is't that you are building here ? 

A Mill, forfooth! but furely 



GREAT FOOLS MUST HAVE GREAT BELLS. 



173 



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CUT YOUR COAT ACCORDING! TO YOUR CLOTH. 

So large a Mill as this will be 

A lofs ot money purely ; 
For in this fack of yours I feel 

So little corn for grinding, 
That when you've made it into meal 

'Twill fcarce be worth your minding. 
A Hand-mill would be large enough 

To grind this corn, good neighbour ! 
And if you'd be advifed by me 

You'd ceafe your ufelefs labour. 
You may rely, this Mill of yours 

Will yield you little profit, 
'Twill foon ftand ftill, or, what is worfe, 

You'll be obliged to let it: 
Don't fpend your money thus, my friend, 

'Tis hard enough to find it; 
Who only hath a peck of corn 

Need build no Mill to grind it. 



'pRUDITUR dies die, 

Novseque pergunt interire lunse. 
Tu secanda marmora 

Locas sub ipsum funus, et sepulcri 
Immemor struis domos. HORAT. ii. Od. 18. 

Senes, inquit Arnisceus, spolia opima marina Dece suspendere debent, cum hac 
inscriptione, (De Jur. Connub.} 

Vixi puellis nuper idoneus, 
Et militavi non sine gloria, 

Nunc arma defunctumque bello 
Hunc gladium paries habebit. 

HORAT. iii. Od. 26. 



-DESINE dulcium 



Mater saeva Cupidinum. Idem iv. Od. i. 



DON'T FLY TILL YOUR WINQS ARE FEATHERED. 



174 



GOT WITH THE FIFE, 



CIRCA lustra decem flectere mollibus 

Jam durum imperiis : abi 

Quo blandae juvenum te revocant preces. 

EEN oudt man met een jonge vrou, 
Wat kan het wesen als berou ? 

C'EST chose aussi follastre de voir le gendarme qui va au baston, que 1'amoureux 
qui ne peut marcher sans aide. 

VEEL geschreeus en luttel wolle. 
Veel vlagen luttel boter. 

LA piu guasta rota del carro 
Fa sempre maggior strepito. 

Viel geschrey, wenig wollen. [~ 

~ Grosse word und nichts da hinder. Q 

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Ne'er put the Plough afore the Owsen. UJ 

IN every undertaking, that which is Essential should have the first place ; and the 
Accessory, if there is occasion for it, should be considered afterwards. Many men 

UJ commence with that which is of least moment to them, and defer the consideration of Z 
those things which would be useful and profitable, to a period when it is too late to 

I reap the advantages which would accrue from them. We thus frequently see men who 

have no sooner begun to prosper in life, than they become eclipsed as it were in their J 
very success, and emerge in poverty. Method is as necessary to the art to Live, as to 

the acquirement of Knowledge. 

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SELON le pain il faut le couteau. rj 

UJ Selon ta bourse gouverne ta bouche. 

9: Fou .est qui plus depense que sa rente ne vaut. 

STRETCH out your legs according to the length of your blanket. 

00 

Qui trop embrasse, mal etreint. 

CHI tutto abraccia, nulla stringa. 
CE qui vient au son de la flute s'en va au son du tambour. 

MAKE no more haste than good speed. 
CAVENDUM est, ne in festinationibus suspiciamus nimias celeritates. CICERO. 

Qui unumquodque mature transegit, is properat ; qui multa simul incipit neque 
perficit, festinat. CATO. 



SPENT WITH THE DRUM. 
175 



MORE BELONGS TO RIDING THAN A PAIR OF BOOTS. 



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'ITANS day burning lamp is fet on high, 

The more to light'n the Earth from faphir fky ; 
His beames more glorious and confpicuous mine 
From Eaft to Weft, from South to midnight line : 
My light you muft not under bumell put, 
Nor in a chinky corners prifon mut; 
That lights may cleare the chambers all throughout, 
They muft aloft be hanged round about. 

You holy Priefts, to whom the word of light 
Is truft, advance your torches in the fight 
Of mortals, mew them who in darkenefle dwell, 
The narrow way that leads to Heaven, from Hell. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




DO NOTHING HASTILY, BUT CATCHING OF FLEAS. 

I 7 6 



TAKE HOLD OF A GOOD MINUTE. 



Two ~Dogges strive for a Bone, and the third taketh it away. 



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THE DOGS AND THE BONE. 

PLL ye who would a Moral learn, 
Your eyes upon this Emblem turn : 
Two dogs in combat fierce you fee, 
For Dogs, like Men, will difagree. 
The caufe of quarrel was a bone, 
With dogs a very frequent one ; 



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IT'S AN ILL WIND BLOWS NOBODY G.OOD. 



But while the two in deadly fight, 

Half blind with rage, bark, tear and bite, 

More bent each other's flefh to wound 

Than heed the bone upon the ground ; 

Up comes a third, attracted by 

The brawl, and, quick the caufe t' efpy, 

Snaps up the bone without ado, 

And with it difappears from view. 

The combatants, whofe kindled bile 

Had fomewhat fettled down the while, 

Exhaufted almoft with the fight, 

At once both mifs the bone from fight ! 

And quick as thought, with one confent, 

They ceafe the fray, and, both intent 

To find the prize for which they fought, 

With eager hafte the bone is fought : 

But all in vain, no bone is there, 

But foam and bloodftains everywhere, 

Mingled with clotted flakes of hair. 

At length away the dogs depart, 

In pain and discontent of heart, 

That they, who fought the prize to gain, 

Should doubly lofers thus remain ; 

While fome one, who no rifle had run, 

The " bone of their contention " won. 

Such things and like refults are feen 

T' occur full oft young folks between ; 

Among the People oft'ner ftill, 

And Princes, where there's want of {kill. 

But while I'm on this fubject now, 
'An inftance I'll relate to you, 
Of which I've known before to-day 
Full many end the felf-fame way. 
Two fuitors woo'd a Burgher maid, 
With dow'ry rich, and each afraid 
His rival mould with her prevail, 
Bethought him all he could t'aflail 
And prejudice the other's name, 



WHAT FORCE CANNOT DO, ING.ENUITY MAY. 

I 7 8 



That he might beft fecure the game. 
With feelings fuch on either fide, 
Throughout the City, far and wide, 
Reports were current foon of each, 
Which did fo mutually impeach 
Their name and fame, that fwords alone 
Could for fuch calumnies atone. 
They met they fought the younger fell ; 
His rival's blade prov'd all too well 
h The bitter rancour of the thruft 

That ftretch'd him proftrate in the duft. 
Though victor, yet compell'd to fly, 

< T'efcape the Duel's penalty, UJ 
The field at once of both made clear, 

< Another fuitor now drew near ; 
Who, though before but little feen, 

Had ne'er the lefe, like them too, been h 

A Fifher in the felf-fame ft ream, 

Though not prefuming fuch to feem : 

And boldly now he fets his fail, 

To profit by the fav'ring gale ; UJ 

Declares in all its honest truth 
. The love that had o'ercaft his youth ; lj - 

Subdues at once the damfel's pride, 

. 

Q And changes Sweetheart into Bride. 



The Brawlers, when they both return'd UJ 

To health and home, the tidings learn' 
That one far more difcreet than they,. 



To health and home, the tidings learn'd, 



(0 Advantage taking of their fray, 

Had won the Prize the proper way. 



"pvUMOS concussi, sustulit alter aves. 
Sic vos non vobis nidificatis aves. 
Sic vos non vobis vellera fertis oves. 
Sic vos non vobis mellincatis apes, 
Sic vos non vobis fertis aratra boves. 

TEL bat les buissons 
Qui n'a pas les oisillons. 



WAR IS SWEET TO HIM WHO DOES NOT QO FOR IT. 

179 



WHEN THE FRIAR'S BEATEN, THEN COMES JAMES. 






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HAT e're my flat's my love proves conftant flill, 

To this my Soule, we part againft our will ; 
Or when fierce Boreas with his bluftring gale, 
Or fome mifchance my lovely light doth quale : 
Elfe I and Light my life, would never part, 
Before to afhes fates did me convert. 

Nature commands us to maintaine our breath 

And being, munning life-deftroying death. 

Yet man from Atropus oft takes the knife, 

And cuts his fatall thred devouring life : 

For why, he fearing death before his day, 

Before th' allarum, makes himfelfe away. 

Ah wretch ! unworthy to behold the fkye, 

Who will not live, and knowes not how to dye. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




TWO SIR POSITIVES CAN'T MEET WITHOUT A SKIRMISH. 

180 



BETWIXT TWA STOOLS THE DOUP FA'S DOUN. 



]\emo potest Thetidem simul et Galatean amare. 



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NO ONE CAN LOVE THETIS AND GALATEA 
AT THE SAME TIME. 

,ISTEN, Mates! attend to me, 

I would fomething to you fay, 
Which, may of fome fervice be 

Rather curious in its way ! 
I've a fondnefs for the Fair, 

Which, my reafon all defpite, 
Makes me ev'ry day defpair 
Where to fix my heart aright. 



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GRASP ALL, LOSE ALL. 
181 



CH\ DUE L.EPRI CACCIA, 



Ev'ry pretty girl I meet, 

Sets my heart in fuch a ftir, 
That, without the leaft deceit, 

I would make ftrong love to her. 
Thus fo wav'ring in my mind, 

Two girls now at once I woo ; 
But I've long begun to find 

'Tis much more than I can do. 
One is Galatea nam'd, 

And the other, as you know, 
Thetis for her beauty fam'd, 

Spoken of where'er you go. 
Thetis lives down by the Sea, 

Galatea on the Moor ; 
Thetis talks of fhips to me, 
l~ And of things along the more. 

0) Galatea, lively lafs ! 

Speaks of dairies, and of cows, 
Of the meadows, and the grafs, 

And the crops her father grows; 
Of the tuneful woods and fields, 
rj Where the fheep in hundreds ftray, 

> What their fleece in profit yields, 

And the joys of market-day : 
Speaks of fhady lanes to me, 

With their hedgerows green and gay, 
And the Linden trees where we 

Often chat an hour away. 
Thetis too tells pleafing tales 

In the Fifhers' homely talk ; 
How in Greenland they catch whales, 

Charming 'tis with her to walk : 
Herring nets to make and mend 

Then me tells me how, and I 
Long a helping hand to lend, 

When me fpreads them out to dry. 
Plaice and flounders how they take, 

And how dry them on the more ; 

UNA NON PIGLIA E L'ALTRA LASCIA. 

182 



HE WHO SERVES TWO MASTERS 



How one man of fifh may make 

Oft a catch of twenty fcore : 
How they fifh with hook and net, 

All fo pleafing like and true, 
That by her bright eyes of jet 

I'm both hook'd and netted too. 
Galatea fays that me 

Likes no fifh, nor those who live 
Or by fiming, or the fea, 

But the reafon me won't give. 
Galatea's conftant theme 

Is her butter and her cheefe ; 
<c What's your fish compared to cream ? 

Soles or plaice (fays me) to thefe ! " ft: 

If I speak of fields and trees, 

Or the leaft of farm-things fay, 

Thetis' look's enough to freeze, 

And me takes her hand away : 
If I wear a rimer's drefs, 

Galatea from me turns, 
And, when in farm-clothes, no lefs, 

Thetis all my wooing fpurns. 
When my fimer's cap I've on, (0 

Q Flumings loofe and jacket rough, j 

Galatea fays, Begone ! 

But her look is quite enough ! 
If in fhepherd's flouch I go, 

Thetis, if fhe chance to fee, 
Calls me Boor ! and jeers me fo, 

That all eyes are turn'd on me ! 
Thus for two long years have I 

Chafed this game, and nothing caught ; 
Juft as one " who hunts two hares, 

Lofes both, and catches naught." 
So, Mates, when you wooing go, 
Fool is he who my way choofes ; 
Who at once courts sweethearts two, 
Pleafes neither, and both lofes ! 



MUST LIE TO ONE OF THEM. 



THE FOX IS CUNNING, 



BEHOLD the Bridegroome comes, he takes his way, 
Nor Man, nor Angell knowes the houre or day ; 
He faies, he 'Ie come, much like a theefe in night, 
To judge the world with equity and right ; 
Angels mall charge with trumpets founding cleare, 
And Chrift as Judge mail in the clouds appeare ; 
The righteous and the wicked mall arife, 
Bodies and Soules, to pafle upon that fize ; 
He who the oyle of preparation hath, 
Whom Chrift mall find furnim'd with faving faith ; 
Shall with the blefTed Bridegroome mount on hie, 
Mongft Seraphimes triumphing glorioufly ; 
But he who hath no oyle, nor faith at all, 
Heavens dreadfull Judge mall that man curfed call, 
And banim him into the pit of hell, 
Where with the fiends for ever he muft dwell. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




BUT MORE CUNNING HE WHO CATCHES HIM. 

184 



FAIR TO THE EYE, THAT'S ALL. 



In Recessu Nihil. 



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WITHIN IS EMPTINESS. 

OU fay that Ifabella is of fuch furpaffing grace, 

So beautiful in form and ev'ry feature of her face ; 
That you're furpris'd I do not afk her hand at once, as you 
Affirm, if you were in my place, you would without ado. 
But, Friend, you are miftaken, and you eftimate too high 
The beauty of a figure, and the luftre of an eye : 
Thefe I admit me has, but fomething wanting ftill I find 
Though beautiful in face, me wants the beauty of the mind. 





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BELLE CAGE, SANS OISEAU. 



TWO EYES ARE NOT SUFFICIENT 



She's like the handfome Monument, to which the fculptor's art 
Has given grace and fymmetry to every outward part ; 
Externally adorn'd with all that mofl the eye can win, 
All outward mew like that is me, but empty all within. 
Pay lefs regard to Form and Face, when you felect a wife ; 
The Beauty of the Mind alone is that which lafts for life. 



0) JV/TISTAKEN Nature here has join'd 

Z A beauteous face and ugly mind ; 

2 In vain the faultless features strike, 

L. When soul and body are unlike : 

Pity that snowy breast should hide 

Deceit and avarice and pride. POPE. 

Q. 

NAM divinitus interdum, Venerisque sagittis, |J{ 

D Deteriore fit ut forma muliercula ametur; 

JT- Nam facit ipsa suis interdum fcemina factis, 

Morigerisque modis, et mundo corpore culta, 

Ut facile insuescat vir secum ducere vitam. LUCRET. p 

PLUS aliquid forma est, plus est oculisque genisque ; 

Plus aliquid toto corpore, quidquid amo. DAN. HEYNSIUS. 3 

SIT procul omne nefas, ut ameris amabilis esto ; 
Quod tibi non facies, solaque forma dabit. OVID. 

TEMERARIIS judiciis plena sunt omnia, de quo desperamus subito convertitur, et fit 
< optimus; de quo multum prgesumpseramus, deficit et fit pessimus, nee timor noster 
certus est, nee amor. AUGUST, de Past. 



JUDGE not according to the Appearance, but judge righteous judgment. 

John vii. 24. 

THE Lord seeth not as man seeth ; for man looketh on the outward appearance, 
but the Lord looketh on the heart. i Sam. xvi. 7. 

FAVOUR is deceitful, and Beauty is vain ; but a woman that feareth the Lord, she 
shall be praised. Proverbs xxxi. 30. 

TEL semble sage en apparence, 
Qui fol est en quintessence. 



TO CHOOSE A WIFE. 
186 



APPEARANCES ARE DECEITFUI 



Fronti nulla Fides. 



travellers first the Pyramids behold, 
Lifting their sun-lit tops in contrast bold 
Against the splendour of th' Egyptian sky ; 
Their grand dimensions to the fancy brings 
The semblance of the Palaces of Kings ; 

So great is their external majesty ! 

But what are they within ? No Halls are there, 
|J No Royal Courts, nor Princely Chambers fair, Z 

The imaged scenes of Eastern pageantry. 

What then 1 mere dust ! the Ashes of the Dead ! Q 

Around, within, on every side outspread 
In one drear, dread Sepulchral mockery ! 

'Tis thus we are instructed to beware I 

r: Of judging from Appearances alone ; 

Z " The Castles that we image in the air " 

Q. Are not more empty when the truth is known. ;- 



Plus on a de fonds, et plus on est homme. 

UJ 
'"pHE Inside ought always to be worth as much again as the outward appearance. I 

I There are people who have exterior only ; resembling houses which have not 

been finished for want of funds : the entry is palatial, the inside a hovel. This kind 0) 
of Persons presents nothing to fix the attention, or rather, all within them is fixed ; 
- for after the first salutation the conversation is ended. They make their introductory h 
bow, after the fashion of the Sicilian horses, which after one or two caracoles become 
suddenly metamorphosed into motionless taciturnity. For words are soon exhausted 

when the mind is barren. It is easy for them to deceive others who like themselves yj 
have nothing but appearance, but they are objects of pity to persons of discernment, 
who soon discover that they are empty within. GRACIAN'S Maxims. 
K. 

Tinnit ; inane est. 

IT'S empty: hark, it sounds: 'tis vain and void, 

h What's here to be enjoy'd UJ 

But grief and sickness, and large bills of sorrow, 

Drawn now, and cross'd to-morrow 1 
Or what are men, but puffs of dying breath, 

Reviv'd with living death ? 
Fond youth, oh, build thy hopes on surer grounds 

Than what dull flesh propounds : 
Trust not this hollow world, 'tis empty : hark, it sounds. 

QUARLES' Emblems. 



A FOOLISH WOMAN IS KNOWN BY HER FINZIRY. 

187 



FAIR IS NOT FAIR, BUT THAT WHICH PLEASETH. 






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HO fo beholds this fmoaky fnuffe of mine, 

He muft needs thinke that fometime I did fhine; 
But now my Light is gone, my glory's darke, 
Onely of light I have the brand and marke. 

Who for his Country hath with valour ftood, 

His wounds doe mew, that he hath fpent his blood : 

In Venus training who hath beene practifed, 

Some token he beares of what he exercifed. 

The Schollars badge, are fallow lookes and blanch, 

The gluttons is the fatnefle of his panch. 

Vertue and vice doth leave fome token behind, 

Which of themfelves doe put us ftill in minde. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



IT IS A TOKLEN THATJ 
I SHINED. 




OGNI DONNA A G^UALCHE T ACCA. 
188 



UNION GIVES STRENGTH. 



Vechtende Koeyen voegen haar te samen, ah de Wolf komt. 




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WHEN THE WOLF COMES, THE OXEN LEAVE OFF 
FIGHTING TO UNITE IN SELF-DEFENCE. 

OT long ago, fome oxen of our herds upon the moor, 
In furious fight among themfelves, as oft I've feen before, 
Were fuddenly furpris'd to fee fome Wolves, which, crouching low, 
Were dealing on the herd to ftrike an unexpected blow. 
Like magic, all at once, th' inteftine feuds and bloodmed ceafe, 



EENDRAGT GEEFT MAGT. 
189 



WITHOUT, MAKE PEACE AT HOME. 



As though the common danger had fubdued them all to peace : 
And quick, as if imprefs'd with all the folly of their ftrife; 
Made fenfible that Union alone could fave the life 
Of each and all, to face the foe they hafte a ring to form, 
And croup to croup clofe prefs'd make front to meet th' impending ftorm/ 
'Twas just in time ! for fcarcely were they marmall'd back to back, 
When down upon the herd already burfts the rav'ning pack : 
But all in vain the Wolves afTail ; for everywhere they meet 
A phalanx of oppofing horns, their onfet fierce to greet ; 
n And high in air uptofs'd, or difembowelPd on the plain, 
Z The few remaining take to flight, nor dare th' aflault again. 



So mould confed'rate States and Peoples hum all inward ftrife, 

When from without a foreign foe afTails the Nation's life ; 
UJ I 
I All difcords then out-trodden 'tis by Unity alone 

The Free mall fave their Freedom, and the Brave preferve their own. 


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^ONCORDIA parvae res crescunt : discordia autem maximae dilabuntur. 

SALLUST. Jugurth. 
l TWIST verquist. 

UJ EENDRAGT geeft magt 

Eenigkeyt vermag veel. 



VERDEILT vyer brandt qualick. 

Scatter' d fire burns badly. 

i 

SACRUM est Pacis nomen, et quod vix terram sapiat : nee alio nomine Hebraei To 
jv, ipsam adeb perfectionem, innuebant : nee quid aliud humano generi lubentius 

Q vel gratulati sunt Angeli, vel legavit Christus, vel Apostoli prseceperunt, &c. 

^ JOSEPH HALL, Rom. Irreconciliab. 

KRIJG van buiten 

Doet vrientschap sluiten. 

COMMUNE periculum dissidentes conjungit. Instante communi periculo, conciliari 
solent dissidentium animi. DIONYS. Halicarn. lib. 8. 



* The instinctive resort of horned cattle to this mode of defence against the wolf, is more especially 
remarkable, and of very frequent occurrence, among the herds of half wild horses in the Bukowina, and 
on the Pusztas of Hungary, with the difference that these form the "Karika" or Ring, with their heels 
outwards, in order to give the wolves the full advantage of that characteristic and efficient mode of 
defence of the horse. Note of Translator. 



DIVERSITY OF HUMOURS ENGENDERS TUMOURS. 

190 



SCATTERED FIRE BURNS B A D l_ Y . 



Ne point montrer le doigt malade. 
Shew not where your finger ails. 

FOR every one will strike you there. Beware also to complain of it, for in as much 
as Malice always attacks the weakest point, the show of resentment and suffering only 
serves to gratify and to divert it. The malice of mankind always endeavours to unhinge ; 
it gives utterance to cutting words, and resorts to every expedient, until it has dis- 
covered the sore, where it can pierce to the quick. The man of sense and tact 
never exposes his weak point, whether personal or hereditary ; because Fortune herself 
takes delight sometimes in wounding the place where she knows the pain will be felt 
most acutely. She always mortifies to the quick. Consequently it is requisite to 
conceal from mankind all knowledge both of that which mortifies, and of that which 
gives satisfaction ; in order to bring the former to the speediest termination, and to 
make the latter endure the longer. GRACIAN. 

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THE fast faggot is not easily broken. 

L'UNION fait la Force. : 

AUXILIA humilia firma consensus facit. ! UJ 

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UNIUS dissensione totus consensionis globus disjectus sit. NEPOS. Z 

Q UJ 

j ADVERSITY tries friends. Q 

IN angustis amici boni apparent. 
GOD helps those who help themselves. 

FORTES Fortuna juvat. [~ 

TIMIDI nunquam statuere tropseum. SUIDAS ex Eupolide. 

IL n'y a que les honteux qui perdent. 
5 AUDACES Fortuna juvat, timidosque repellit. UJ 



hti ipsi sibi sapiens prodesse nequts, ne quidquam sapit. 

CICERO, Ep. lib. vii. 

IN circumstances of difficulty, there is no better company than a resolute heart ; 
and if that should happen to fail, it should be aided by the Mind. Difficulties grow 
less for them who know how to help themselves. Submit not to the strokes of ad- 
versity without an effort to overcome them, lest they become less endurable. Some 
persons help themselves so little in their troubles, that they increase them, for want of 
knowing how to meet and bear them with courage. He who knows himself well, finds 
assistance to his weakness in reflection. The man of judgment comes out of every 
dilemma with credit and advantage to himself. 



WHERE THE KNOT IS LOOSE, THE STRING! SLIPPETH. 

191 






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WHERE NECESSITY PINCHES, 

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HILST I give light to others, I decay ; 
I lofe my felfe, whilft I to others play : 

I watch all night with an unfleepy eye, 

And oft, before the day doth dawne, I dye : 

How oft am I by bluftering Boreas mockt, 

And lighting others, I my felfe am chokt ; 

If tumult, of a night afTailing be, 

I am employ'd, no reft, no peace for me : 

What moft of men neglect, that I obferve, 

To fuccour others, though my felfe mould ftarve : 

A Law but not of nature, which directs 

All of themfelves to have the prime refpects. 
Codrus the King, his Country to defend, 
Much like a Prodigall his life did fpend ; 
The Pelican to feede her plumelefle brood, 
Doth . lance her breaft, and ftraine her pureft blood, 
The watchfull fheepherd feldome feeing fleepe, 
Directs, and keepes from wolves his ftraying sheepe : 
Even Chrift himfelfe, the Sonne of the moft Hie, 

Did fufFer death, left mortall man mould die. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



MIHI NOCEO, ALMS PROSUM 




BOLDNESS IS PRUDENCE. 



192 



SEMPER OB INSIDIIS CYNTHIA FLERE SOL.ET. 



Dum p/orat, vorat. 



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WHILE SHE WEEPS, SHE DEVOURS. 

dA-LLING a few days fince to pay 
A viiit to my miftrefs fair, 
Her face quite fill'd me with difmay, 

She look'd fo pale and wan with care. 
That me, fo full of life and fong, 

As was her wont, thus fad mould be, 
Made me conclude, that fomething wrong 
Had her befall'n or p'rhaps that me 
Had got fome filly doubts of me. 



VRIENT, LET'ER OP; MEN VINT'ER NOCH. 



BEAUTE ET FOLIE SONT SOUVENT 



Well, deareft love ! but what is this ? 

What ails ? what has occurr'd to thee ? 
Why then so cold ? not e'en one kifs ! 

Art ill or difcontent with me ? 
Nay, nay, thou'rt ill I'm fure I fee, 

I know it by thy drooping eye, 
Thou lookft not as thouVt wont on me, 

Come let me know, why then that figh ?- 

Speak, speak, did I yet aught deny ? 

But long ftie made me no reply, 

Though ftill me figh'd, and I could fee, 
The more I faid, the more her eye 

Was fill'd with tears, and turn'd from me ; 
Z Until at length quite griev'd, I faid, 

Come ceafe this weeping fpeak then, do- 
|" Tell me thy grief, nor be afraid; 

If iilent thus, how can I know 
z In what to aid or comfort you ? 

Hi 

On this upon my arm fhe laid 

< Her pretty hand, and murm'ring low 

Alas! 'tis this (fhe fighing faid) 

My caufe of grief, fince you will know : 
A fad misfortune I have had ! 

That e'er fo lucklefs I could be ! 
I've loft I'm fure I mail go mad 

That handfome ring you gave to me ! 

Which all admir'd who us'd to fee. 

And then Oh ! woe is me ! to-day, 

While walking in the Park, I felt 
The Bracelet on my arm give way, 

I really thought my heart would melt : 
I look'd, and lo ! the diamond clafp 

Which held the ftring of pearls I wear, 
Had broken fomehow at the hasp ! 

You know what fplendid pearls they were ? 

Well ! eight are loft, I do declare ! 



EN COMPAQNIE. 

194 



FEMME CROIT, ET ANE MENE, 

Oh ! how shall I this loss repair 1 

All thy best presents thus to lose ; 
I've scarce a jewel now to wear ! 

And fifty pounds won't replace those ! 
When she had ended this lament, 

Her sobs and tears came fast anew, 
And I, upon her grief intent, 

Knew neither what to say or do, 

Z And truth to say, 'twas vexing too. 

LU 

> When just as I was deep in thought, 

How best her grief somewhat t' allay, 
A Jeweller my notice caught, 

J Who seem'd by chance t' have come that way 

, Greeting us both with much respect, 

He op'd his caskets to our view 
And said Sir, p'rhaps you'll not object 
To let me shew some rings to you 
And to my lady, something new ! 

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She, (so it seem'd) her grief appeas'd 

5, At once, at sight of all his ware, J 

A costly diamond ring first seiz'd, 

The finest, largest he had there ; 
And said : Eh ! this is just the kind 

Of ring that I have wish'd for so ! (D 

l~ Had I but now a generous friend 

To buy me that ! 'twould soothe my woe ! 

And, as she spoke, she kiss'd me too. , 

< 

< I, mov'd to see her mournful face, 

/ Ask'd him the cost ; and being told, 

Began to bid for it apace ; , 

I found I'd just the sum in gold : IU 

But nothing in the price would he 
Q Abate and she, with eyes still red, 

Look'd in my face so anxiously ! 

Q That e'er I well knew what I said, 

CD The ring was bought, and money paid. 

0) That I'd been cheated to my face, 

S Since then I found to my surprise ! 

The thing was plann'd to time and place, 

It was her Brother in disguise ! 
'Twas her own diamond ring that I 

Had bought and paid for o'er anew ! 
So when you see your Mistress cry, 
Take heed, my Friends, what 'tis you do. 
But laugh or cry 'tis much the same, 
They're both the sex's Winning Game. 



SON CORPS NE SERA JAMAIS SANS PEINE. 



LA FEMME FOLLE EST BRUANTE. 




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HEN that my clammy fubftance was entire, 
I was an earthly nurfe of heav'n-bred fire ; 
Now envious time doth me in afhes turne 
And to a tedious fnuffe my light doth burne : 
Loe I have done, take thou this light of mine; 
I yeeld, doe what thou canft, the turne is thine. 
So the Comedian having plaid his mare, 
Gives place to others, who then actors are: 
A King his weighty office having done, 
Dying transfers his Scepter to his fonne : 
When that the craiie Souldiers ftrength doth faile, 
The younger muft the enemy aflaile. 

Happy is he the evening of whofe dales 
Doth crowne his death with ever-living bayes. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




A FOOLISH WOMAN IS CLAMOROUS. 
196 



BETTER BEND THAN BREAK. 



Cedendo Victor abibis. 





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BY YIELDING THOU MAY'ST CONQUER, 



HAT the (lender Reed you fee, 

Chafd and driven by the blaft, 
Should not foon uprooted be, 
Or upon the waters caft ; 
That fo frail a thing in form 
Is not quickly borne away, 
Rent to tatters by the ftorm, 
Is a wondrous thing, you fay ? 



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FLECTI NON FRANGI. 



197 



HE THAT ENDURETH, IS NOT OVERCOME. 

Since fo oft the ftately Oak, 

Tow'ring upward to the fkies, 
Is uprooted by the ftroke, 

E'en defpite its ftrength and fize ! 
Strange as this may feem to thee, 

'Tis with wife inftruction rife, 
And imports how men may be 

Victors in the ftorms of Life. 
Things of lowly growth and height 

Have but little weight to bear ; 
And, whate'er the tempeft's might, 

Feel it in diminifh'd mare : 
Lefs expos'd to every wind 

Than the lofty foreft trees, 

. Humbler plants a quiet find 

That is feldom known to thefe. 

Fragile though the Reed appear 

To refift fo fierce a blaft, 
Yet it hath no need to fear; 

CQ I For when once the gale is paft, 

0) Lifting then its head anew, 

Still unharm'd, o'er fen and lake, 
Proves the antient maxim true, 

"That which bends, doth- feldom break." 



A UREAM quisquis mediocritatem 

Diligit, tutus caret obsoleti 
Sordibus tecti, caret invidenda 
Sobrius aula, 

HORACE, lib. ii, Od. 10. 

FELIX, mediae quisquis turbse 
Parte quietus, aura stringit 
Littora tuta, timidusque mari 
Credere cymbam, remo terras 
Propriore legit. SENECA, Agamem. 

CREDE mihi, bene qui latuit, bene vixit, et intra 
Fortunam debet quisque manere suam. OVID. 



L.IQHT BURDENS BRAK NAE BANES. 
198 



YIELDING STAYS NA/AR. 



REBUS in adversis facile est contemnere vitam, 
Fortiter ille facit qui miser esse potest. 

In adverse times, 'tis easy of life's burdens to complain ; 
But nobler far, with fortitude to suffer, and sustain. 

THE gods take pleasure oft when haughty mortals 
On their own Pride erect a mighty fabric, 
By slightest means to lay their towering schemes 

Low in the dust, and teach them they are nothing. (jj 

THOMSON. 

THOUGH plung'd in ills, and exercis'd in care, 

UJ Yet never let the noble mind despair : 

~ When press'd by dangers, and beset by foes, U. 

The gods their timely succour interpose ; 

And when our Virtue sinks, o'erwhelm'd with grief, j H 

By unforeseen expedients bring relief. PHILIPS. 

STORMS often fell the stately oak, 

High mountains feel the thunder's stroke ; 

And lofty tow'rs, when winds assail, ^ 

OIL 
In their resistance less prevail UJ 

Than doth the reed upon the shore, H 

Which rises when the storm is o'er. 

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Z Confidoj conquiesco. (I) 

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/^\H ! Source of every good, and every joy, CD 

Q Meek resignation felt without alloy ; U 

Jehovah ! from whose ever bounteous store, 
>. j 
l_ Mercy, and joy, untainted blessings pour ; 

j Who bidst us ask, and asking not amiss, 55 

Convey'st an heavenly, in an earthly bliss ; 
^ Whose hand protects us, and whose eye pervades, 

Whose promise cheers us, and whose grace persuades ; 

Though thron'd on high, where blessed spirits bow, '< r 

And blissful saints sublimest raptures know : < 

Yet stooping low as earth, our prayers are heard, 

Our wants reliev'd, and all our sorrows cheer'd : 

Alike thy fondness to thy creatures shew'd 

In what's withholden as in what's bestow'd. 

Then let me pause and if presumptuous thought 

My humble state bewails, or grieves at aught ; 

O soothe with calm content, that I may share 

Thy gifts with grateful heart, whate'er they are. Anon. 



THE END MAKES ALL. EQUAL. 
199 



HIQH BIRTH IS A POOR DISH ON THE TABLE. 



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I F thus my light nights fable filence glads, 

Making a cheerefull roome in midnight mads ; 
If Gold'n-like Phoebus and his filver fitter, 
He in the day, fhee in the night doth glitter ; 
What thought-furpamng light then mail that be, 
When we in Heaven Empyrean God mail fee ? 
Sooner thoil canft the world hold in thy hand, 
Or in a mell containe the glaffie ftrand ; 
Than tell how glorious is the light of Heaven, 
That dark'ns the Sunne, Moone, Stars, and Planets feven : 
This onely tell : it is not Phoebus light, 
Nor Phoebes, nor the fpangles of the night. 
That light which tongue cannot, nor mind defcry, 
Once malt thou fee, a fupreame Deity. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



PARVIS COMPONERE MAGNA 



COMPARE SMALL 
WITH 




ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL. 



WHO BEGINS AMISS ENDS AMISS. 



Assdi rumor 7, <? 



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GREAT CRY AND LITTLE WOOL. 

^EREIN we fee a fomewhat novel Sight, 

To which the Reader's notice we invite : 
One -man doth fhear a Sheep, and ftrange to fee, 
Another {hears a Pig in company. 
Let us confider what this thing may mean ; 
Perchance therefrom fome leflbn we may glean. 
He, who the Pig doth fhear, the fenfelefs lout, 
Believes he knows full well what he's about ; 




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VEEL GESCHREEUWS, EN L.UTTEL WOL_. 



2OI 



DON'T LEAVE THE HIGH ROAD FOR A SHORT CUT. 

And that when done, to him there will accrue 
By far the greater profit of the two. 
The Pig's the heavier! beaft he thinks, no doubt, 
Has thicken 1 fat, and much the longeft fnout ; 
But the unruly brute, like all his kind, 
Is hard to manage, nor at all inclin'd 
To yield fubmiflive to his treatment new, 
And gives his Shearer roughim work to do. 
Rending the air with mrilleft, piercing mrieks, 
He kicks and ftruggles, twifts about and fqueaks 
With fuch untiring ftrength and energy, 
That all the neighbours round look out to fee ; 
< Or gather near to afcertain aright 

The real meaning of fo ftrange a fight. 

(D 

He mortly finds his profit very fmall, 

I,. For in the place of Wool, what is't he gains ? 

I 

Now turn we to our friend who mears the Sheep : 
Z Unlike the Pig, he lies as though alleep ; 

He wreftles not, he neither kicks nor mrieks, 
In gentle tones the Shearer to him fpeaks, 
And moves at will the (Hears o'er every part, 
Z Nor fears a motion that his will may thwart. 

(0 To all men's eyes who watch the procefs here, 

The labour's eafy and the gain is clear : 
Not fcrubby briftles, but of fineft wool 
His lap not only, but his bafket full, 
Atteft which Shearer hath the better gains, 
Both as to profit and to gift of brains. 
'Tis thus in life we not unfreqxient fee, 
How fome Men labour long and wearily, 
T' achieve a purpofe which they have in view, 
Yet lofe their labour and the object too ; 
The while that others eafily attain 
A kindred purpofe, with completeft gain. 
In all men do, fo much on tact depends, 
That where that fails, fuccefs but rare attends; 



RECKON WITHOUT YOUR HOST. 

202 



DO THE LIKELIEST AND HOPE THE BEST. 



That which is well confidered belt iucceeds ; 
That which is well conducted fureft fpeeds : 
Hence who in Shearing would no profit lack, 
Should choofe a beaft with wool upon its back ; 
Confider well all he would take in hand, 
Nor mix with matters he don't underftand : 
What one Man does, another fails to do ; 
What's fit for me, may not be -fit for you. 



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Al te geek kan niet versinnen ; 
Tusschen mai, en tusschen vroet, 

Wint men wel : het meeste goet. > 

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Hv moet wagen 

Die wil bejagen. |_ 

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DfE dit en gint geduetig schroomen, 

Hoe konnen die tot riickdom komen ? 

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GATO guantato non prese mai sorci. 



'T MACH wayen, stil zijn, vloeyen, of ebben, Z 

Die niet en waegt en sal niet hebben. 

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SUMPTUM facial oportet is qui lucrum quaerit. j LU 

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RIEN ne s'acquiert sans aventure, et rien se conserve sans Industrie. 

CHI guerda a ogni piuma, non fa mai letto. 

SONDER wagen niet vergaren, 
Sender wijsheyt niet bewaren. 

DIE elcke veer wil sien en raken, 
Hoe kan die oyt een bedde maken ? 

Qui na' guerre, 
N'a guerre. 

NERINGH en is geen erf. 
Qui perd le sien, perd le sens. 



WHO DOES TOO MUCH OFTEN DOES LITTLE. 

203 



WHO PROVES TOO MUCH PROVES NOTHING. 



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Y Light up to Heav'ns Manfions ftill doth move, 
Seeking his native place of reft above ; 

But being ty'd in bondage to this frame, 

It ftoopes to feeke his food, and feed his flame : 

So ftill it finkes downeward, untill it turne 

Into a fnufte, and afhes ceafe to burne. 

My mind, I know not how, longeth to flye, 
Unto the Heavenly Courts and Saphire fky, 
But ftill its plung'd, fo to the body bound, 
That its compel'd to grovell on the ground : 
Thus cralling for its food my foule can fret, 
And tafting Lote, his Country doth forget. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




DRIVE THE NAIL THAT WILL. GO. 



204 



THE EMPTY CASK MAKES THE MOST SOUND. 



Krepel wil altHdt voor dan<en> 



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CRIPPLE WILL ALWAYS LEAD THE DANCE. 

CROSSING o'er a Village green, 
V Once I faw a pleafant fcene ; 

Country lads and lafles gay, 

Dancing on the firft of May, 

Singing, fhouting, full of glee ; 

'Twas a pleafant fight to fee 

How they danc'd the May-pole round, 

To the Bagpipe's merry found. 



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THE WORST WHEEL CREAKS MOST. 



205 



AN UNPLEASANT GUEST 



When the Piper mrilleft play'd, 

Greater was the noife they made ; 

And not one but feem'd to be 

Almoft mad with jollity. 

But among them all was one 

Who in noife the reft outdone, 

He, the leader of the game, 

Was both bandy-legg'd and lame, 

With a club-foot of fuch fize, 

As quite fill'd me with furprife, 

That fo clumfy fhaped a thing 

Should be leader of the ring. 

So it was ne'erlefs, and he - 

Firft in everything would be : UJ 

Whatfoe'er was piped or fung, 
It Cripple's voice the loudeft rung. 

I Nimble though young Hans might be, 

Great though Claes' agility, 

And though Jordan knew the way 

Smarteft things to Tryn to fay, 
Whether jump, joke, ring or bawl, 5 

/R 

Cripple will eclipfe them all. J 

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But, as on that Village green, _ 

li> Juft the fame is elfewhere feen : Z 

For in Town-life much the fame, 
Cripple oft will lead the game : 
Though to limp is all he can, 
Cripple is a clever man, 
And whatever may befall, 
Cripple muft be firft of all. 
Is it not a curious thing, 
When thereto our thoughts we bring, 
That a mallow- pated fool 
Juft efcaped from boarding fchool, 
Wanting mereft common fenfe, 
Full of prate and vain pretence, 

IS AS WELCOME AS SALT TO A SORE EYE. 

206 



MORE FRIENDLY THAN WELCOME. 



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Is the firft to have his fay, 
And, unalk'd, will lead the way 
With opinions and conceits, 
Where the world-wife hefitates ? 

Would you know whence this derives ? 
'Tis that wifdom flower drives : 
Wife men ever cautious weigh 
That which they may have to fay ; 
Give opinions ne'er by guefs, 
Nor unafk'd their thoughts exprefs ; 
But a Fool, all hafte that he 
Something may be thought to be, 
Do or fay, be what it may, 
Will in all things lead the way. 
Hence the faying doth derive, 
" Fools are they who fafteft drive," 
And its well known proverb twin, 
" Cripple will the dance begin." 



T7ATALIS imperitise pedissequa est Impudentia, et inanis jactatio. 

At initium Sapientiae, imperitiae suae agnitio. 
Spes est melior de stulto, quam de sapiente in oculis suis. Arab. Adag. 

Qui plus balbutiunt, plus loquuntur. 
L'ABBATU veut tou jours lutter, 

GODT beware my voor jemant die maer een boeckrken gelesen faeeft. 
HOE slimmer timmer-man, hoe meerder spaenders. 

VEEL roemen melt een dommen geest : 

Een ydel vat bomt aldermeest. 

Hoe slimmer wiel, hoe meer het raest. 

EEN penning in den spaer-pot maeckt meer geraes dan als hy vol is. 
C'EST la plus meschante roiie du chariot, qui mene le plus grand bruit. 

In another sense. 

QUANDO la cornemusa e piena, commincia a sonare. 
When the bag-pipe's full it begins to sound. 

STULTUM, quam semi-stultum ferre, facilius est. Ben-Syra. 
A FOOL WHO HOLD3 HIS TONQUE PASSES FOR WISE, 



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207 



A FULL SACK PRICKS UP ITS EARS. 




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wretch unworthy of thy infamous name, 
Burne not this facred Church, to raife thy fame : 
For though twas built by Heath'ns impiety, 
Yet ought it not be thus deftroy'd by thee : 
Truft me impiety every where is nought, 
And Heath'ns their heathen profanenefle dearly bought : 
Let Tolofe gold, and Delphus robbery, 
And Hammons fandy ire this teftifie : 
It's thine, not my default, for I was made 
For facrifice, and to make Creatures glad. 

Nothing fo harmelefTe and fb good can be, 
Which may not hurt,, by mans impiety. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




A FOOL WILL HAVE HIS FLING. 

208 



G.LI DENARI SONO SPIRITI FOLLETTI. 



Feu, Toux, Amour, et Argent ne se cachent longuement. 




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FIRE, COUGH, LOVE, AND MONEY, ARE NOT LONG 

CONCEALED. 

HIS Candle I would carry fo 
That neighbours cannot fee 
A gleam of Light that may in aught 

Reveal a glimpfe of me; 
For if I can, no one will watch 
Me then, and I may go 



ENIM BENE CELET AMOREM 



209 



DAER DE SCHAT IS, IS MET HERTE, 

Where'er I lift, without the fear 

That any one will know. 
But {till, in fpite of all I do, 

I fear the light is feen ; 
Its rays ftill ftream thro' all the holes 

And Lanthorn's chinks between ; 
Whatever care I take, howe'er 

I ftrive to fhade it o'er, 
Some gleams pierce thro' behind, or at 

The fide, or thro' the door. 
My neighbour's very old, and as 

Old people often are, 
|L He's very much afflicted with 

A cough, and bad catarrhe ; 
J But ne'erthelefs, ftrange though it feem, 

As ev'ry one muft own, 
The good man has a great diflike 
-.! To lie at night alone. 

He's courting a young maiden now, 

And while he's fo engaged, 
He ftrives his beft to ftop the cough,- 
But 'twill not be afluag'd : 

I- And while he fits and looks his beft, 

To make his courtlhip fure, 
The fprightly lafs, tho' ftriving all 

She can to look demure, 
Says, that is not the Mufic a 

Young Maiden's heart to gain, 
And bids him reft content to deep 

Alone, and not complain : 
But if a Wife he's bent to have, 

The beft thing he can do, 
Is one of his own age to choofe, 

Who has a bad cough too. 
A fellow who to gain his bread, 

Runs errands here and there, 
Found recently, a purfe well fill'd 

With ducats, in the Square : 

EN DE HANDT IS BY DE SMERTE, 

2IO 



HOE DATJE GELT OF LIEFDE SLUYT, 



With joy elate he took it home, 

And to his Wife he faid : 
Look here ! dear Trijn ! I've found a prize ! 

Our fortune now is made ! 
But you ! you muft not breathe a word ; 

So mind you what you do ! 
No one, Trijn, fave yourfelf, muft aught 

Of this good Wind-fall know ! 
No longer now with meflages 

Will I run here and there ; 
But like a Burgher live at eafe, 

And have the beft of cheer ! 
Therefore ftitch thou this purfe infide 

Thy fleeve, or elfe fomewhere. 
Trijn fwore me would, and with an oath 

To take the beft of care. 

<( 

But, mark ! e'en from that very time, Q 

The Wife began to fpend; l_ 

Drefs fine, prate large, and treat or this 

Or that dear-goffip-friend ; > 

The Man, too, he will so no more UJ 

Q_ 

With mefTages not he ; 
Such paltry jobs he fays are quite 

Beneath his dignity. 
The Daughter, me is drefs'd as fine 

The babe put out to nurfe, 
'Tis wondrous ftrange ! but money ne'er 

Will ftop within the purse ! 
At length the truth gets wind, and lo ! 

The man is prifoner made, 
And mourns within a cell, that he 

Had left an honeft trade. 
The fprightly Trijn in forrow blames 

Her foolish fpendthrift-riot ; 
And all becaufe the money would 

Not reft in peace and quiet. 



MET WYL, MET SAL, MET MOET'ER UYT. 

211 



THERE IS NOTHING SO SECRET 



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Y Light is gone, yet hope doth ftill remaine, 
That Light revived fhall me quick'n againe. 
I gaine by death, for fo I longer laft, 
Life fhall returne, after fome houres are paft. 

All of us dye, when this our threed is fpunne, 

And cut, deaths droufie fleepe is then begunne. 

After the ghueft is gone, the Innes decay, 

Our body's turn'd to rubbifh and to clay ; 

Untill the foule returning doe polTefTe 

Our bodies in Eternall happinefTe. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




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BUT IT TRANSPIRES. 



'12 



EVERY ONE SPEAKS AS HE IS. 



Elck Vogeltje singt soot gebeckt is. 



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EVERY BIRD SINGS ACCORDING TO HIS BEAK. 

'IS an old Saying and a true, 

That ev'ry bird fings its own note ; 
Nor can it any other do 

But as permits its beak and throat. 
Whene'er you rove thro' field or wood, 
And well attend with ears and eyes, 





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EVERY MAN TO HIS TRADE. 



213 



EVERY ONE TO HIS OWN CALLING, 



You'll find the Proverb juft and good, 

Whate'er the bird in fhape or fize. 
Thofe which a hook'd fharp beak have got, 

Are for the moft part Birds of Prey, 
And bent alone on War, they wot 

No note of fong or minftrelfy. 
Whene'er near rivers, lake or flood 

You chance a flat-beak'd bird to meet, 
From groping in the flufh and mud, 

Be fure his voice is never fweet. 
The birds with longer flute-like beak, 

Might more be thought to fong inclin'd, 
But in their thrumming note and fhriek, 
jl No turn for melody you'll find. 

I therefore fay, as far as fize 
And fhape of beak, nor fear proteft, 

That of all birds beneath the fkies, 
h The little beaks they fing the beft. 

JE'en thus among mankind, we fee, 
I- God gives the little now and then, 

! A talent rare and quality 

Z '. Which He gives not to bigger men. 

Of little beaks, what bird like he 

Which night-thro' fings in wood and dale ? 
That feather'd Soul of Harmony, 
^ That little beak, the Nightingale ! 

And would you feek a tuneful throat, 

You'll find throughout the feather'd throng, 
The greater beak the harfher note, 

The fmaller beak the fweeter fong. 
As with the Fowls of earth and air, 

Not fo with Man he hath no beak, 
But in his mouth beyond compare 

The nobler Godlike power to fpeak ! 
And when he fpeaks in fpirit kind, 

What note of bird more foftly fweet 
To breathe the mufic of the mind, 

When kindred hearts and fpirits meet ! 

AN V D THE OX TO THE PLOUGH. 

214 



EVERY ONE SNEEZES AS <3OD PLEASES. 

But when the mouth of Man outpours 

The blaft of Parlion's wrathful breath, 
The Lion not more fiercely roars 

His angry note of blood and death ! 
Hence what befalls mankind between, 

Comes from a deeper fource exprefs'd, 
Where fits, by ev'ry eye unfeen 

But God's, the impulfe of the breaft. 
The Mouth commands, implores, decries, 

As moves the Heart, and gives thereto 
The tone which moft its will implies, 
Z By force or foftnefs to fubdue. 

PTpnrp VP wlir -fnpalr in Kiff**r fnnp 

GO And fiercely wound another's heart, 

Z Beware,, and learn to curb thine own, h 

Left it repay thee fmart for fmart. 

As " by his ears the Afs is known," 
A truth which no one can impeach, 
The Man," as Proverbs long have mewn, 
" Is known as truly by his fpeech." 



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DIE rede verrath das hertz. 
Q 

> The speech betrays the man. 

ID 

Et au parler le bon cerveau. 



Au chant cognoit on 1'oiseau, 



AL suono si cognosce la saldezza del vaso. 

Was der Man kan, 
Zeiget seine rede an. 

NABAL nabala idaber. Turkish Adage. 

Id est, 
STULTUS stulta loquitur. 

OUT of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh. Matthew xii. 34. 



EVERY MAN IN HIS WAY. 
215 



EVERY MAN IN HIS HUMOUR. 




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ATURE propounds a dilemme, chufe I muft, 
Either to dye by light, or rot by ruft : 

If I feeke eafe and reft, then lafinefle 

Doth me confume with mouldy hoarinefle ; 

But if I love to mine with glorious ray, 

Then by my flames in teares I melt away. 

Patience doth light'n this evill: I wim to live 

In glorious light, and light to others give, 

This life is worne out with laborious toile, 
And flothfull reft doth minde and body fpoile ; 
But yet it's better for to dye a fparke, 
Than like a laizie moule to live in darke. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 




EVERY MAN AS HIS BUSINESS LIES. 

216 



A STILL. TONGUE MAKES A WISE HEAD. 



On ne prend Lievre au c tabourin^ ny Oiseau a la Tartevelle. 



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HARES ARE NOT CAUGHT WITH BEAT OF DRUM, 
NOR BIRDS WITH TARTLETS. 

E who by beat of drum would catch a hare, 

Took the beft means his purpofe to defeat ; 
For foon as Pufs the noife began to hear, 
With ears erect me quickly left her feat, 



A MUCHA PAROLA OBRA POCA. 



217 



BIRDS ARE ENTANGLED BY THEIR FEET, 

And making nimbly for the neareft wood, 

Within its leafy cover got away, 
Leaving our friend and dogs, however good, 

But little chance their fleetnefs to display : 
So that at eve, returning from his sport, 

With empty game-bags and dejected look, 
He found but little reafon to report 

His ftrange device for not a hare he took ! 
He who in Council fits, or would attain 

Knowledge of aught, or fee his plans fucceed, 
Of all things firft his tongue mould well reftrain, 

Nor fpeak a word beyond the matter's need : 
For he who lets his tongue his wits outrun, 

And blabs his businefs into all men's ears, . 
Will find it fpoil'd e'er yet it hath begun, 

And reap no other harveft than their jeers. 
In Love affairs as in State Government, 

The Lover and the Prince fucceeds the beft, 
Who Silence keeps upon his mind's intent, 

Nor e'en permits his purpofe to be guefs'd. 
Nothing by chatter ever yet was done, 

Conquer): achiev'd, nor battle ever won ; 
But who with " ftill tongue " doth his aim purfue, 

Wins beft as Lover, and as Warrior too. 



Ila'Xai 7-0 oiyav QapfJiaKov /3\a/3;/e *X. W - -^SCHYL. Again. 
Id est, 

SILERE p.ridem remedium damnis puto. 
EXIMIA est Virtus, praestare silentia rebus : 

At contra gravis est culpa, tacenda loqui. OVID, 2 Art. 

WEISE Leut' haben ihren Mund em Herzen. 
Alle vogels schouwen d'openbare netten. 

CHI dice tutto quel ch'egli sa, fa tutto quel ch'egli pub, e mangia cib ch'egli ha 
non gli resta niente. 



AND MEN BY THEIR TONGUES. 
218 



G >SSIPS AND TALEBEARERS SET ON FIRE 

SAG' nicht Alles das Du weist, 
Glaub' nicht Alles das Du horest, 
Thue nicht Alles das Du kannst, 
Wisse nicht Alles das Du lisest. 

MULTORUM conscii pauca loquuntur. 
IN ira- nihil decentius quam cum adest silentium. PLUTARCH, de Cohib. Ir&. 

VESTIGATORIBUS et venatoribus diurni nocturnique labores essent irriti, si non 
silentio priusquam venabulis et impetu, feras interciperent, 

CAROL. PASCHAL. Virt. et Vit. cap. 32. 

Qui veut prendre oiseau, ne faut l'effaroucher. 



o 

Silence is the Sanctuary of Prudence. 

\ RESOLVE loudly expressed was never yet much esteemed. He who declares his 
(5 intentions, exposes himself to censure, and if he does not succeed he is doubly 

unfortunate. (/) 

> 

-I A man is always in time to speak, but not to refrain from speaking. We should 

Q speak as we make a Will ; the fewer the words the less ground for law-suits. We 

should accustom ourselves thereto in matters of little moment, so that we may not fail 

f~l 
to do so in affairs of importance. Whosoever is prompt to speak, is always upon the 

point of being conquered and convinced. 

OL A heart without a secret is an open letter. Where there is depth, the secrets lie 

deep ; for there must be great space, and a great vacuum, which will hold all that is 
Q thrown into it. Reserve derives from the great controul a man has over himself, and ' (/) 
that is a real triumph. We pay tribute to all to whom we disclose our affairs. The ~ 
security of Prudence consists in interior moderation. The things we would do should 
be kept to ourselves, and those which may be told may not be good to do.* 

WE should hear and see, but thereby be silent. GEACIAN'S Maxims. 

S'IL y a beaucoup d'art a parler, il n'y en a pas moins a se taire. 

LA ROCHEFOUCAULD. 



* It was said of POPE ALEXANDER VI. and of his Son the Due DE VALENTINOIS, that the father 
never did what he said, and the son never said what he did. 



ALL. THE HOUSES THEY ENTER. 

* 219 



SAY NOT ALL. THOU KNOWEST. 



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'HE carefull Matrone in her cell below, 

Let fall a groat, yet where fhe did not know : 
Forthwith fhe tinnes a Light, then with her broome 
She neatly fweepes the corners of the roome: 
Thus from the duft and darkenefle when fhe finds it, 
More than the Phrygian Midas wealth fhe mindes it. 
Our foule a divine fparke fince that it fell 
Into Cimmerian darkenefle of this cell, 
The foules true knowledge doth appeare no more 
Which goeth beyond Pygmalions richeft ftore. 
Then muft we light Cleanthes Lamp and find 
By ftudy, the loft treafure of our mind. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 




BELIEVE NOT ALL THOU HEAREST. 



LITTLE CHIPS KINDLE A LARGE FIRE- 



Culex fodit oculum Leonis. 



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THE GNAT STINGS THE EYES OF THE LION. 

FRIENDS ! come here and lift to me ! 
Something ftrange I would relate ; 
Should it prove of ufe to thee, 
That will me well compenfate. 
Though fo ftrong the Lion be, 
Though fo full of Majefty, 



LITTLE BROOKS MAKE GREAT RIVERS. 



221 



LITTLE BODIES HAVE GREAT SOULS. 



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Though his eyes fo fiercely gleam, 
And fo terrible he feem ; 
That no man, whoe'er he be, 
Can unmov'd his anger fee ; 
Yet the gnat, though he's fo fmall, 
And fo flight of limb withal, 
Is fo wond'rous brave and keen, 
That the Lion oft is feen 
Fill'd with dread as foon as he 
Gnats perceives but two or three ! 
Yet the gnat doth not attack 
Slyly, or behind his back ; 
But, firft, like a gen'rous foe, 
Scorning all advantage low, 
When the Lion comes in fight, 
Sounds his challenge to the fight ; 
And forthwith bids him prepare 
All his fiercest wrath to bear. 
Nor doth he aflault his foe 
Where he leaft defence can mow ; 
Though fo fmall, yet keenly bold, 
Like a Paladin of old, 
He the Lion fcorns t' arTail, 
On the flank or on the tail. 
Front to front in open fight, 
Heedlefs of the Lion's might, 
Headlong at his face he flies, 
And attacks his rage-lit eyes. 
Where the Lion beft can fee 
All his foe's hoftility, 
There the gnat, his rage defpite, 
Rufhing 'mid their flaming light, 
Deeply ftings the fount of fight ; 
Till half blind and mad with pain, 
The Lion flees acrofs the plain. 

Let Arrogance by this be taught, 

That whatfoe'er its Strength and Size, 



LITTLE MISCHIEF, TOO MUCH 



222 



SMALL GAINS BRING GREAT WEALTH. 



There's nothing with more danger fraught 
Than what is little, to defpife ; 

There's neither man nor brute fo great 
But, like the Lion pictur'd here, 

May learn to rue the wrath and hate 
Of that which feem'd too fmall to fear. 



TNIMICUM quamvis humilem docti est metuere 

A cane non magno saepe tenetur aper. OVID. Art. 

LEO etiam minimarum avium fit pabulum. CURTIUS. 
j UN petit homme abat bien grand' chesne. 

EEN kleyn man, met een kleyn geweer, _ 

Velt wel een grooten boom ter neer. UJ 

INEST et formicse sua bilis. 
Habet et musca splenem. 



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NE despicias debilem ; nam Culex fodit oculum leonis. STRABO. OQ 



ET pueri nasum rhinocerotis habent. MARTIAL, i. Ep. 4. 
UJ UJ 



A MOUSE in tyme maye bite in two a cable. Old English Proverb. 2 



TREAD a worm on the tayle, and it wil turne againe. Ibid. 

m 

>. TWAS the Mouse that set the Lion free. Ibid. 

QJ WEN der feind ist wie ein omeiss, 

So halt ihn doch far ein elephant. 
Q_ 
(I) UN petit moucheron pique bien un grand cheval. 

UJ 

Q EEN Kat siet wel op een Koning. 

A CAT maye looke at a Kinge. Old English Proverb. 

IL n'y a si grand, ni si sage, 
Qui de petit n'ait bien dpmmage. 

IL est bien petit qui ne peut nuire. 

GESELLEN, wilt uw wel beraden, 

Hy is wel klein die niet kan schaden. 

IL n'est pas sage qui n'a peur d'un fol. 
Es ist nicht an der grosse gelegen, 
Sonst erliefT eine kuh einen hasen. 

GRANDE Ville rien dedans ; 

Petite chose nuist souvent. 
ANCHE la moscha ha la sua collera. 



SMALL RAIN LAYS A. GREAT WIND. 

223 



DON'T DIVIDE THE SPOIL BEFORE THE VICTORY IS WON. 



ONE candle difpels the darkenefle of the night, 
And many doe refemble Phoebus light : 
One Sunne illight'ns the round globe every where, 
What way th' horizon bounds the hemifphere : 
If you ten thoufand thoufand Sunnes fhould fee 
At once, O what a daylight would that be ! 

When Chrift amidft the clouds our doome shall plead, 
When Earth and Sea mall render up their dead, 
Saints more then ftarres at once mall mount on hye. 
As glorious Sunnes, to meete Chrift in the fkye. 
That day mail drive away the darkenefl'e fo, 
That after that, no day mall darkenefle know. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



HOW GREAT A 
LIGHT. 




LITTLE BIRDS MAY PICK A DEAD LION, 



224 



TRY YOUR FRIEND ERE YOU TRUST HIM. 



Amis font comme le Melon ; De dix Jouvent pas un de bon. 



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LIKE MELONS, FRIENDS ARE TO BE FOUND IN PLENTY, 
OF WHICH NOT EVEN ONE IS GOOD IN TWENTY. 

fN choofing Friends, it's requifite to ufe 
The felf-fame care as when we Melons choofe : 
No one in hafte a Melon ever buys, 
Nor makes his choice till three or four he tries; 
And oft indeed when purchafing this fruit, 
Before the buyer can find one to fuit, 



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"TRY THE ICE BEFORE YOU VENTURE ON IT. 



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TRUST NOT A NEW FRIEND, 



He's e'en obliged t' examine half a fcore, 
And p'rhaps not find one when his fearch is o'er. 
Be cautious how you choofe a friend; 

For Friendmips that are lightly made, 
Have feldom any other end 

Than grief to fee one's truft betray'd ! 
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^ "DEPROEF uw vrient, 

Beproef uw sweert, 
Dat is uw groote schatten weert. 

WHO from mishap himself would guard, 
Q Must prove his Friend as he'd prove his sword. 

UJ 

LES amis sout comme le melon, 

II faut essayer plusieurs, pour rencontrer un bon. 

LE compagnon ou 1'ami qui se tourne a inimitie, n'est-il pas une tristesse qui 

UJ demeure jusque a la mort 1 Syrach. xxxvii. 2. 

ESPROUVE tes amis selon ton pouvoir. Ibid. ix. 21. 
UJ 

Si tu acquiers un ami, acquiers-le en 1'esprouvant, et ne te fie point en luy 
> legerement. Ibid. vi. 7. 

Kpt'vei <t'Xovs 6 KcupoS; ws xpvcrov TO irvp. MENANDER. 
Id est, 

AURUM probatur igne, amicus tempore. 
J 
J As Fire, of Gold is e'er the surest test, 

So Time doth prove the worth of Friendship best. 

UJ '' 

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THERE is nothing better or. more advantageous to mankind than prudent Diffidence ; 
'tis the guard and preservation of our lives and fortunes, our own security obliges us 

to it ; without it there would be no caution, without which no safety For 

who can secure himself of Man's heart, hid in the privatest corner of the breast, 
whose secrets the tongue dissembles, the eyes and all the motions of the body 
contradict. ASTRY'S Saavedra Faxardo. 

THE heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked : Who can 
know it? Jeremiah xvii. 9. 



NOR AN OLD ENEMY. 
226 



TRUST NOT STILL WATER 



False Judgment of the Many. 

FORTUNE now 



To my heart's hope ! gold, silver and base lead. 
"Who chooseth me, must give and hazard all he hath." 
You shall look fairer, ere I give or hazard. 
What says the golden chest ? ha ! let me see : 
"Who chooseth me, shall gain what many men desire." 
What many men desire! That many may be meant 
Of the fool multitude, that choose by Show, 
Not learning more than the fond eye doth teach : 
Which pries not to the interior, but, like the martlet, 

Builds in the weather on the outward wall, ^ 

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h Even in the force and road of casualty. 

r I will not choose what many men desire, ^ 

(0 Because I will not jump with common spirits, \- 

x- And rank me with the barbarous multitudes. -* 

H 

SHAKESPEARE, Merchant of Venice. I 

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* 2 

BE not in haste to make new friends, nor to abandon those thou hast. SOLON. 

< 
THE friendship of one wise man is better than that of a host of fools. DEMOCRITUS. 

CONTRACT no friendships with persons of less worth than yourself; you will derive 
. more harm than benefit from them. CONFUCIUS. 

IF you desire to know a man's sentiments towards you, consult him upon something UJ 
which interests you ; his reply will reveal to you his whole heart, and whether he is 
your friend or your enemy. PLATO. 

CD ! 

TAKE not your friends at hazard ; attach yourself only to men worthy of your 

friendship. ISOCRATES. 

D 
THE friendship of the wicked has no duration ; but Time worketh no change in 

the friendship of the good. Ibid. 

AMICUM ita habeas, posse ut fieri hunc inimicum scias. LABERIUS. 

Be on such terms with your friend as if you knew that he may one day become 
your enemy. 

IT is better to untie, than to break a friendship. CATO. 

OUR friends sometimes exhibit vices which have long been concealed. The best 
thing then to be done is to abate your intercourse gradually. You should unstitch, but 
not tear. CICERO. 



NOR A SILENT MAN. 

227 



TRUST MAKES WAY FOR TREACHERY, 



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JN fecret filence of the night what's done 
Is truft to me, concealed from the Sunne 
Phoebus did Mars and Venus love betray, 
And turning backe did greater crimes bewray : 
What I doe fee when witnefle is afleepe, 
That like Harpocrates I clofely keepe. 

Let mortals learne to rule their tongue by me, 
What lawfull fecret they doe heare or fee. 

FARLIE'S Emblems. 



SEE ALL AND SAYlt 
NOTHING. 




TRUST NOT A GREAT WEIGHT TO A SLENDER THREAD. 

228 



EVERY ONE FOR HIMSELF AND GOD FOR US ALL. 



Ogni Gallo ruspa a Ce. 



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EVERY COCK SCRATCHES TOWARDS HIMSELF. 


ENTLE Reader, would you fee 

Would you fomewhat wifh to know 
Life, depifted truthfully, 
And how things in this World go ? 
Simple though this Emblem be, 
In thefe bufy Fowls you'll find, 



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EVERY MAN FOR HIMSEL', G^UO' THE MARTIN. 



229 



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SELF DO, SELF 



Symbolifed moft faithfully, 

Type moft apt of Human Kind. 
Well obferve how ev'ry one, 

Picking, fcratching here and there, 
Looks to felf, and felf alone, 

Recklefs how his neighbours fare. 
Not a bird among them all 

Shews another bird a grain, 
Tells him where he faw one fall, 

Nor aflifts, that he may gain : 
Each, on his fole profit bent, 

Plies with beak and claws apace ; 
Woe to thofe who, negligent, 

Lofe their chance, or mifs the place ! 
Poultry of the felf-fame mould, 

Grafping, fnatching all they can, 
Have been found 'mong Young and Old, 

Ever fince the World began. 
Hence, young friends, if you would get 

Something in Life's Scramble too, 
Keep a fharp look-out, nor let 

Others match the grain from you. 



sum egomet mihi. TERENT. And. iv. i. 
WIE brengt'er water tot sijn buer-mans buys, als sijn eygen buys brant ? 

ELCK wil de boter op sijn koeck hebben. 
ELCK voor hem selven, en Godt voor ons alien. 

CHACUN tire 1'eau a son moulin. 
CHACUN estudie pour soy. 
CHACUN tire a son profit. 

QUISQUE suae casas. 
A LA Cour du Roy 
Chacun pour soy. 



AIDE TOI, DIEU T'AIDERAS. 
230 



A' WA'D HAE A' 



Es denckt ein yeder in seinen Sack. 

OGNI grille grilla a se. 

Ognun tira 1'acqua al suo mulino. 

TUTTI vogano alia galiota. 
Tirano a se. 

OGNIUNO caccia con la rete al suo fratello. 
LES vertus se perdent dans 1'inte'ret comme les fleuves se perdent dans la mer. 



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A KING of England being at table in the house of one of his Courtiers, and finding 

, the dwelling spacious and full of costly furniture and plate, although the owner ~ 

had been in but very narrow circumstances previous to his appointment to the office |- 

he then held, the King became very desirous to learn from him how he amassed so } 

QJ much valuable property in so short a period : assuring him at the same time that no j fl) 
mischief should come to him if he told the truth. Whereupon the Courtier, thus 
pressed, said incontinently, that he had always been a man of exceeding diligence 
and industry : that he had constantly made it a rule to rise early in the morning, and 

^ always looked after his own concerns first ; having completed which, he then attended 

to the King's business. Upon this the King made answer that he should have just 
done the very reverse ; that he should have first minded the King's business, and then 
his own. The Courtier forthwith assured the King that he had thereby never done 

the least prejudice to his Majesty's affairs; for that he had only appropriated the time 
passed by others in sleep to the care of his own personal concerns; having effected 

>- which, he still got to the duties of his Office before those who, having indulged in long 

{j: sleep, had got to theirs, and had neglected their own affairs. 

> 

III 



COLLIDE, non omni tempore messis erit. 

Vergader graen in uwe schuren, 

De Oegst en sal niet eeuwigh dueren. 

Es ist alle tage Jagen-tag, 
Aber nit alle tage fange-tag. 

PROVISION faite en saison, 
Fait de bien a la maison. 



SELF'S THE MAN. 
231 



EVERY ONE RAKES THE FIRE UNDER HIS OWN POT. 




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HILST theeves doe digge at middle of the night, 
Working the works of darkenefle, not of Light ; 
No fooner through the window they me fpy 
But they affrighted turne their backes and fly. 
This Light ill-doers no wayes can abide, 
Simply revealing, what they falfely hide. 

There was a time when all in darkenefle lay, 

When mortals had a naturall night, no day ; 

Then Satan that arch-theefe did range abroad, 

Seeking in hearts and houfes his aboad ; 

But fince that Chrifts bright Starre had mewne his Light, 

Great Pan is dead, the Devill is put to flight. 

FAR LIE'S Emblems. 



QUI MALE FACIT ODIT LUCEM 



AN EVILL-DOER 

HATETH 

LIGHT. 




MOST, TAKE ALL. 
232 



SHEW THE BEST SIDE TO LONDON. 



Schoon voor-doen is half verkocht. 







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WELL SET-OFF IS HALF SOLD. 

HO would learn the art of wooing, 

And enfure the moft fuccefs : 
Or acquire the art of doing 

Winning things with moft addrefs; 
Need not learned volumes open, 
Writers old, in foreign fpeech, 
But may fee it plainly fpoken 
In the lefTon I now teach. 



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WELL. BEQUN IS HALF DONE 



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WELL DONE OUTLIVES DEATH. 



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In your manner unpretentious, 

Yet, be diligent to fhow, 
Without being too fententious, 

All the pleafing things you know. 

While you ftrive to pleafe and ferve all 

To attain the end in view, 
Well examine, and obferve all 

Without feeming fo to do. 
If in them you faults difcover, 

Shew not you thofe faults perceive; 
But if difficult to fmother, 

That they're flight, let them believe. 
By this rule abide in all things, 

And you'll be efteemed the more, 
Nothing in life more fuccefs brings 

Than to hide your neighbour's fore. 

Or in wooing, or when married, 

Bear this maxim ftill in mind : 
Seldom Wedded Life mifcarried 

Where both fides were fomewhat blind. 
Shew your brighter fide to all men, 

And mew them that you fee theirs, 
Friends more readily you'll find then 

To advance your own affairs. 
Who moft tafte and judgment ufes 

To difplay his wares to view, 
Beft the Buyers eye feduces, 

And moft quickly fells them too. 



quacunque potes dote placere, place. OVID. 



OCCULE mendas, 

Quaque potes, vitium corporis abde tui. Idem. 



WEEL IS THAT WEEL DOES. 



234 



A GOOD BEGINNING 



MULTA viros nescire decet. Pars maxima rerum 

Offendit, si non interiora tegas. 
Cui gravis oris odor, nunquam jejuna loquatur : 

Et semper spacio distet ab ore viri. 
Si niger, aut ingens, aut non sit inordine natus 

Deus tibi, ridendo maxima damna feres. OVID. 

Ante omnia tamen. 

pRIM A sit in nobis morum tutela, puellae : 
Ingenio fades conciliante placet. 

BRENGH alles by, o frissche Jeught, 
Daer ghy uw lief, door maken meught. 

METTRE en evidence et faire valoir les bonnes parties. 

SCIPIO and other great men of antient and later times excelled in this useful art ; 
one which Ovid especially recommends to the attention of young persons as a 

fundamental rule of conduct. 

IL 
C'EST la raison pourquoy les gens d'Estat conseillent aux Princes de monstrer leurs 

bonnes parties et de dissimuler leurs imperfections ; imitant le bon Architecte, qui loge 
(comme ils disent) ses plus beaux materiaux au frontispice de son bastiment. Q 

JEAN MARNIX aux Rers. Polit. Res. 5. 

AENSIEN doet Vryen. 

Het oogh is leydtsman van de min, 2 

En vreught voor eerst de lusten in. 
Wat het ooge niet en siet, 

Dat begeert het herte niet. Z 

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Ex aspectu nascitur amor. I 

ASEYTA un cepo 
Parecera mancebo. 

ACCOUSTRE un tronq, il semblera un jeune adolescent. 
OCULI sunt in amore duces. PROPERT. 2. El. 12. 

CE qui plaist 
Est a demy faict. 

WAS das aug nicht siht, 
Beschwehrt das hertz nit. 
'EK TOV tlaopav yap ytverai aV^pwVots epai. 

Id est, 

Ex intuendo nascitur hominibus amor. 
Ut vidi, ut perii ! VIRGIL. 



MAKES A GOOD ENDING. 
235 



POLICY GOES BEYOND STRENGTH, 




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lengthe my Store of Light hath reach'd its ende, 
Nor have I wherewithal more light to lende ; 

O 

Greafe fpente, wick burned and fmoake all pafled away, 
Of Light berefte, what bootes it here to stay ? 
Yet while I am permitted to remaine, 
It is to mewe that I may ferve againe : 
In patient Hope I therefore byde my time, 
Until in me freme Light the Fates do trimme ; 
And if the greafe and wick be equale goode 
To holde fuch Light I reft of willinge moode. 

For while to ferve, the means to us is given ; 

Who willinge ferve, mail have their faults forgiven. 




SMOOTH WORDS MAKE SMOOTH WAYS. 

236 



PERSEVERANCE ACHIEVES SUCCESS. 



Geen Boom en valt ten eersten Slag. 





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ONE STROKE FELLS NOT AN OAK. 

Ifl H ! friend, why then fo fad, I pray ? 
| Thy woeful mien and looks betray 
Some deep diftress, fome poignant grief, 

To which I fain would bring relief. 

Methinks fome crofs-grain'd, haughty maid 

Hath thine affection ill repaid, 



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FAINT HEART NEVER WON FAIR LADY. 

237 



NINETEEN NAY-SAYS O' A MAIDEN 



Treated thy fuit with cold difdain, 

And bade thee from all hope refrain ? 

Yes, yes ! Young man, I fee I know 

'Tis that which thus dejects thee fo ; 

But never be like this caft down ! 

Full many other men have known 

A like repulfe, when firft they ftrove 

To win a wav'ring woman's love. 

Come, come ! aroufe thee from this mood ; 

It ill befits thee thus to brood, 

And fret, and fume fo woebegone 

0) For lofs of what may yet be Won ! 

- Caft but thine eye upon this tree, 

And therefrom thou fhalt quickly be 

Inftrucled in the art to gain 

The fair one who hath caufed thy pain. 

This tree, which now fo lowly lies, CO 

But lately lifted to the flues j 

Its lofty crown ; and though in fize, 

And girth, and grain fo fair and found, 

Its pride is proftrate on the ground ! 

Thou feem'st to wonder how 'twas done ; ffl 

How that alone the arm of one 

m So great a conqueft. could achieve ? 

Lift then to me, nor longer grieve ; 

I For as that oak was fell'd, fo thou 

> 

Thine haughty fair one's heart may'ft bow. 
Arm'd with an axe of trenchant fteel, 
I faw yon fturdy Woodman deal, 
In long repeat, ftroke after ftroke 
Againft this mamve heart of oak ; 
Till with the oft repeated blow 
He brought the foreft monarch low. 

Learn thou from this, young man, no lefs, 
How truthful from all time was held 

The pithy Maxim for Succefs : 

" At the firft ftroke no tree is fell'd." 



ARE HA'F A GRAUT. 
238 



JHE WHO WOULD REST, MUST WORK. 



Would'ft thou, my friend, as Lover fo fucceed, 
Do thou the like, nor one repulfe bemoan, 

Succefs, of Perfeverance is the meed ; 

"The conftant drop will wear the hardeft ftone." 



NON uno ictu dejicitur quercus. 
OMNIA conando docilis solertia vincit. 
MIT viel Streichen wird der Stockfisch lind. , - 

VEEL slagen maken den Stock-vis murw. pj , 

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THE wise and active conquer difficulties 
Q By daring to attempt them : sloth and folly 

Shiver and shrink at sight of toil and hazard, 
j_ j And make th' impossibility they fear. ROWE. 




CD Q 

Perseverance achieves Success. 


"JV/TANY are the sayings of the Wise, 

In ancient and in modern books enroll'd, < 

HI Extolling Patience as the truest fortitude ; if; 

T 

And to the bearing well of all calamities, 

All chances incident to Man's frail life, 

Consolatories writ 

With studied argument, and much persuasion fraught, 

Lenient of grief and anxious thought ; 

But with th' afflicted, in his pangs, their sound 

Little prevails, or rather seems a tune 

Harsh, and of dissonant mood from his complaint ; 

Unless he feel within 

Some source of consolation from above, 

Secret refreshings, that repair his strength, 

And fainting spirits uphold. MILTON. 



FIR^T OBSERVE, AND THEN DESIRE. 

239 



OUR THEME RELATES TO MAN. 




BEING ADMONISHED LET US FOLLOW BETTER THINGS. 



K BOUND BY 
^OS&REM 

v LONDON