(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Advanced Microdevices Manuals | Linear Circuits Manuals | Supertex Manuals | Sundry Manuals | Echelon Manuals | RCA Manuals | National Semiconductor Manuals | Hewlett Packard Manuals | Signetics Manuals | Fluke Manuals | Datel Manuals | Intersil Manuals | Zilog Manuals | Maxim Manuals | Dallas Semiconductor Manuals | Temperature Manuals | SGS Manuals | Quantum Electronics Manuals | STDBus Manuals | Texas Instruments Manuals | IBM Microsoft Manuals | Grammar Analysis | Harris Manuals | Arrow Manuals | Monolithic Memories Manuals | Intel Manuals | Fault Tolerance Manuals | Johns Hopkins University Commencement | PHOIBLE Online | International Rectifier Manuals | Rectifiers scrs Triacs Manuals | Standard Microsystems Manuals | Additional Collections | Control PID Fuzzy Logic Manuals | Densitron Manuals | Philips Manuals | The Andhra Pradesh Legislative Assembly Debates | Linear Technologies Manuals | Cermetek Manuals | Miscellaneous Manuals | Hitachi Manuals | The Video Box | Communication Manuals | Scenix Manuals | Motorola Manuals | Agilent Manuals
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of ""Mother Hubbard's cupboard" .."

cr jhubfcrd's lupkanl, 



n 



Double, doultle, toil atttl troubie 
I <>> burn, and r, million bubble 



Established 1844. 



HENRY LIKLY & CO., 

Manufacturers of 

Trunks and Bags, 

And Dealers In all kinds of 

TRAVELING GOODS, 

Sample Trunks and Sample Cases a Specialty. 

e Sure yoc ake in the Right Store._^j 

.te Street, BQfHlS^lB, M*T* 



Next door to 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



ShelfE.fefc.5' 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 




f 

IGES 



tore. 



aooltsellers 



STATIONERS AND ENGRAVERS, 
JVo. 54 West Main Street, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



verything New in Choice Books and Fine Stationery received as 
soon as out. 



Burke. Fitz Simons, Hone & Go. 

Cor. East Main and X. St. Paul 8ts, 9 

ROCHESTER, N. Y., 



1 IMPORTERS OF 



Fine Dress Goods, 

BLACK DRESS SILKS, 

COLORED DRESS SILKS, 

BLACK SILK VELVETS, 

COLORED SILK VELVETS, 








CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, 

Underwear, Gloves 8 Mosier y 

WITH THE LARGEST STOCK OF 

EMBROIDERIES, 

Heal Laces and Fine Linens 

ill ANY HOUSE IN THIS COUNTRY. 



THE 



OF WESTERN NEW YORK, 

L. SuNDERLIN <Sl Co. 

Successors to C. A. Burr, 1864 ; Sunderlin & Weaver, 1869 ; 
Sunderlin & McAllaster, 1879. 

No. 1 8 State Street, Cor. Exchange Place, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

This is the largest and most elegant establishment of the kind in Western 
New York, together with the choicest variety of goods, selected with care, to 
please the demands of our large and increasing trade, and selling at the lowest 
possible prices. 

Watclies of the most approved makers in Europe and America. 

Diamonds frnm the old and new mines. 

Sterling silver Ware in endless variety, of different manufacture. 

'Wedding CiiltS may here be found to please the eye and depth of purse. 

Citizens and strangers will save time and money by coming direct to this establishment 
for anything in the line of Watches, Jewelry, Diamonds, Silver Plated Ware, Knives, Forks, 
Spoons, and thousands of articles not enumerated. 

83^~AU are cordially invited to examine Stock, Styles and prices. 

ALL GOODS WARRANTED AS REPRESENTED. 

Established 1840. 



H. C. WISJSTEItt, 



No. 33 STATE STREET. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

CERAMIC ART POTTERY, 

CHINA, GLASS and EARTHEN WARE, 

SILVER PLATED WARE 
LAMPS, CHANDELIERS, Etc. 

ENGLISH STAG HANDLE CARVERS, 

IVORY and CELLULOID KNIVES. 



HIRAM SIBLEY & CO., 

91jind 03 STATE STREET. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y 








FLOWER SEEDS, 



OF EVERY KNOWN VARIETY. 



lyCALL AND GET CATALOGUES FREE.^^I 



(g 



M 

w 



m 



H 
H 

R 

H 

B 

o 

m 

g 

H 

P <« 

■ P3 
SB 
IN 



N* 






■j 



I X 



U _' 

£ggO 

£^ £ . 



2 fcjt.E ~ 



a „■•=- 



**■ Jl ^ rt 

- O J, o 

■S-SJ3 >« 

J— 5 



THE STUDENT 

Portable Bracket Lamp. 




Warranted Non-Explosive. 



The r.,'s! and Most Convenient Kerosene Lamp ever 
used It is entirely out of the way, being attached to 
the wall by a small hook (see cut i which does nol de 
face the wood-work or walla. These Lamps have the 
celebrated Leader Burner, (riving nearly double the 
light of ordinary lamps. CALL AND SEE it. at 

0"<03xt:es c*s sugru, 



MAXt/KACTlHEltS, 



No, 43 STATE STREET, 



ROCHESTER, N, Y. 



>t. 



2:2." 






2r 

="2 



89 



r» -jo 
ns.S 



s»s 2 



CD U 

5 d 



H " 



M 



S 



S. Rosenblatt. Geo. J. Oaks. 

S. ROSENBLATT & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Millinery Goods 

DRESS TRIMMINGS, 

Buttons, Laces, Worsteds, 

HOSIERY AND FANCY GOODS, 

42 State and 13 Mill Streets, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

SCOFIELD & STRONG. 



^ 



">. 



a >pec 



> fc% W|iVVlMXlJ# 



NOVELTIES LADIES' UNDERWEAR 

-A. SFECIAUTY. 



No. 8 Main Street Bridge, So. Side, ROCHESTER,, N. Y. 

Dyeing and Cleansing 

ESTABLISHMENT, 

200 Yards North of N. Y. C. R. R. Depot, 

Mill S**<es% *»*« rim** Str#*tj 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Goods Received and Returned by Jflxpress. ([^"Packages Called for and 
Delivered to any part of the City, Free of Charge. 



r 

" llttitlicr Ijubliiinlci (J u|iluiaul." 



' Double, double, toil and trouble ; 
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.'' 



» — w 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Young Ladies' Society, 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, 



ROCHESTER. V V 



:£- 



d>— - 



I88O 



— <2)_ 






A copy of the Cook-Book will be mailed to any one on receipt of fifty cents 
Address Mrs. Wm. T. Mills, East Ave., opp. Meigs St., Rochester, N. V 



i utered according' to Act of Congress, in the year L880, by the young Ladies' Society 

of the first Baptist Church, Rochester, N. v.. in the office of the 

Librarian of Congress, at Washington, 



VNDREWS, PRINTER AND bOOKHINM.K, I IQUEDUCT STREE1 



J 






A' 



SAFE BITT E R S 
SAFE TONIC 

3 *r E pilCS- 



cUR E c u R| 

_ . «" O F» . 

brigh.ts disease 

"UbetE 5 " 



'-*;il 




Warners Safe Kidney Liver Cure. 

A vegetable preparation and the only sure remedy in the world for Bright's Disease, 
Diabetes and all Kidney, Liver and Urinary Diseases. 

{^"Testimonials of the highest order in proof of these statements. 

fslTor the cure of Diabete«, call for Warners Safe Diabetes Cure. 

l^~For the cure of Bright's and the other diseases, call for Warner's Safe 
Kidney and Liver Cure. 



Warner's Safe Bitters. 

A medicine which Stimulates the Appetite, Improves Digestion, Restores Lost 
Strength and Purifies the Blood. 

Bottles of two sizes; prices, 50 cents and $1.00. 



Warner's Safe Nervine. 

Quickly Soothes Pain of all kinds ; Cures Headache, Neuralgia ; gives Sleep 
Natural Rest, and is the Best Remedy known for Nervous Prostration. 
hottles of two sizes i prices, SO cents and $1.00. 



Warner's Safe Pills. 

A Remedy for Costiveness, Torpid Liver, Dyspepsia, Biliousness, Malaria and 
Fever and Ague. The best known Laxative, 'iS cents per Box. 



Warner's Safe Tonic. 

Invigorates the whole system, and for Invalids, or persons recovering from severe sick- 
less, who require a Nourishing Tonic, it is invaluable. 

Bottles of two sizes; prices SO cents and $1.00. 



WARNER'S SAFE KrJIKIIIKK are sold by Druggists and Dealers in Medi- 
cine everywhere. Send for Pamphlets and Testimonials. 

H H. WARNER & CO., 

ROCHKSTKR. N. Y. 






INDEX 



Page. 
Soups, --------- 5 

Fish, --------- 

Sundries - - - - - - - - -12 

Vegetable*. - '<> 

Bread, - - ----- 25 

Ties, - - - - 34 

Plain and Fancy Desserts. - - - - - - 39 

Cake, - - - - - - - - • 53 

Tickles, Canned Fruit, &c, - - - - -68 

Salads, - - ... 76 

Beverages, - - ----- 78 

Sweets, ...-----80 



SAnj^RJLTUS AJVI) SODA. 



Established 1852. 



H. A. DeLAND & CO. 



Successors to D. B. DeLAAW &* CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

BEST CHEMICAL 



X- 






*■ 



4> 4. 



WARRANTED SVl'ERIOR TO ANY OTHER. 

ALSO, MANUFACTURERS OF 

Healthy and Pure Saleratus, Soda, Etc. 

Reliable Goods, Always Pure, Uniform and Full Weight. 



Saleratus. 



D. B. DeLand & Co.'s BFST CHEMICAL. 

D. B. DeLand & Co.'s HEALTHY. 

D. B. DeLand & Co.'s PURE. 



Sod 



« D. B. DeLand & Co.'s Pure Bi-Carbonate. 

J\ . D. B. DeLand & Co.'s Super-Carbonate. 

Granulated Sal Soda. Superior Sal Soda, in casks, kegs and boxes. 



H, A. DeLAND & CO., FAIRPORT, N. Y. 



Farewell. — Farewell is a lonely sound and its echo has caused many a sad heart ; but 
none would feel saddened but rather be greatly cheered and benefitted liy saying farewell 
to all kinds of Soda and Saleratus except D. B. DeLand & Co 's Best Chemical Saleratus, 
which will scatter rays of sunshine and happiness in every household, being always unitorm 
and perfect. 

The Light of the Household. — Smiling faces are the household lights. Can a wife 
expect her husband to smile when she sets before him poor bread? Can a husband look for 
smiles from his wife if he offers her inferior materials for making bread ? If you, sir, will 
please your wife, get D. B. DeLand Hi Co.'s Best Chemical Saleratus, and she will produce 
bread and biscuits that will please you — that will please her, and there will be light in the 
household — smiles all around. Use it instead of Soda or Baking Powder. 

The Best is the Cheapest. — This maxim was never better illustrated than in the use of 
D. B. DeLand & Co.'s Best Chemical Saleratus. It is the best in the world, and the pur- 
chaser gets a full equivalent for the money paid in a pure healthy article. To buy any 
other is a waste of money. To use any other is trifling with a great blessing — health. Use 
it in place of Soda or Baking Powder. 

Misfortune. — This is a world of misfortune, and one of the saddest to a good house- 
keeper is to be afflicted with heavy, yellow, sour bread, biscuit, &c. II you are ever troubled 
in this way, use D. B. DeLand St Co.'s Kcst Chemical Saleratus, when you will be surprised 
at its charming results in removing the cause of your misfortune. 

Union. — Unite your good flour with D. B. DeLand & Co.'s Best Chemical Saleratus if 
you want extra bread, biscuit and pastry of all kinds. United they rise, divided they fall. 



Mother Hubbards Cupboard." 



SOUPS 



BEEF SOUP. 

Boil a souj) bone the day before wanting it ; skim the 
grease off next day, and melt the jelly ; add spices to taste, a 
little brandy, a small teacup of butter rubbed in browned flour, 
a little vermicelli, and a grated carrot. 

Boil three eggs hard, mash smooth, put in tureen, and pour 

soup over them. 

Washington. 

MACARONI or VERMICELLI SOL' J'. 

Two small carrots, four onions, two turnips, two cloves, one 
tablespoon salt ; pepper to taste. Herbs — marjoram, parsley 
and thyme. Any cooked or uncooked meat. Put the soup 
bones in enough water to cover them ; when they boil, skim 
them and add the vegetables. Simmer three or four hours, 
then strain through a colander and put back in the sauce-pan to 
reheat. 

Boil one half pound macaroni until quite tender, and place 
in the soup tureen, and pour the soup over it — the last 
thing. 

Vermicelli will only need to be soaked a short tinu — not 
boiled. 

I DA S A I I !• KI.KK. 



" Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



SPLIT PEAS SOUP. 

One gallon water, one quart peas soaked over night, one- 
quarter pound salt pork, cut in bits ; one pound lean beef, cut 
the same. Boil slowly two hours, or until the water is reduced 
one-half. Pour in a colander, and press the peas through. 
Return to the kettle, and add one small head celery, chopped 
fine, a little parsley and marjoram. Have three or four slices of 
bread, fried brown in butter, cut up and put in the soup when 
served. 

Mrs. M. K. W. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Boil in one quart of water a small slice salt pork, one or two 
onions, six or eight good size potatoes, boiled, mashed fine and 
put with the pork and onions. Boil half an hour, then add 
milk to make about as thick as peas soup. Pepper and salt. 

Just before taking up, add a small piece of butter ; strain 
through a colander. 

Mrs. M. K. Woodbury. 



TURTLE BEAN SOUP. 

One pint black beans, soaked in cold water over night ; add 
one gallon water, one-half pound salt pork, one-half pound beef, 
one or two onions and a grated carrot. Strain after boiling three 
or four hours, and add a little wine, one lemon and one hard 
boiled egg, sliced, into the tureen. Pour the soup over them. 

Washington. 

NOODLES. 

Three eggs slightly beaten, two tablespoons of water, pinch of 
salt ; add flour to make a stiff dough ; roll as thin as wafer, 
sprinkle over flour, and roll into tight roll ; cut into thin slices 
and let dry for an hour before putting into sou]). 



Soil's. 



TOMATO SOUP. 



One can of tomatoes, oik- quart boiling water; strain, and 
add one teaspoon soda, one pint milk, a little butter, pepper 
and salt ; let it scald, not boil : add two rolled crackers. 



SPICED SOUP. 

Boil a shank hone of beef all day for a soup of four quarts ; 
one can of tomatoes ; boil two hours, then strain ; add one tea- 
spoon cloves, one-half teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon 
allspice. Mace, pepper and salt to taste. Grated peel and 
juice of one lemon. 

One teacup browned flour, moistened with water, pour into 
soup and boil half -an hour. 

One-half dozen eggs, boiled hard ; chop the whites, leaving 
the yolks whole ; add to soup when serving. 



BLACK BEAN SOUP. 

Three pounds sou]) bone, one quart black beans, soaked over 
night and drained ; one onion, chopped fine ; juice of one 
lemon. Pepper, salt and Worcestershire sauce to taste. Boil 
the soup bone, beans and onions together six hours ; strain, and 
add seasoning. Slice lemon and put on top when served. 

Mrs. Wm. Pitkin. 



MILK SOUP. 

Four potatoes, two onions, two ounces of butter, one-quarter 
ounce of salt ; pepper to taste ; one pint milk, three tablespoons 
tapioca. Boil slowly all the vegetables with two quarts of water 
several hours, then strain through the colander, and add the 
milk and tapioca. Boil slowly and stir constantly fifteen 
minutes, and it is ready to serve. 

[DA Sam ER1 I I 



" Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



FISH 



TO FRY BROOK TROUT, OR ANY OTHER SMALL 

FLSH. 

Clean the Fish and let them lie a few minutes wrapped singly 
in a clean dry towel ; season with pepper and salt ; roll in corn 
meal, and fry in one-third butter and two-thirds lard ; drain on 
a sieve, and serve hot. 

BROLLED WHLTE FLSH. 

Wash the fish thoroughly in salt and water ; spread it out flat 

on a wire broiler ; sprinkle with salt and set in a dripper in the 

oven ; bake twenty minutes, then brown over hot coals. Pour 

melted butter over and serve. 

A medium sized fish is preferable. 

Ellen. 

BAKED FLSH. 

A fish weighing from four to six pounds is a good size to 
bake. It should be cooked whole to look well. Make a dress- 
ing of bread crumbs, butter, salt and a little salt pork, chopped 
fine (parsley and onions, if you please); mix this with one egg. 
Fill the body, sew it up, and lay in large dripper ; put across it 
some strips of salt pork to flavor it. Put a pint of water and a 
littte salt in the pan. Bake it an hour and a half. Baste fre- 
cmently. After taking up the fish, thicken the gravy and pour 
over it. 

CREAM GKAW FOR BAKED FISH. 

Have ready in sauce-pan one cup cream, diluted with a few 
spoonsful hot water ; stir in carefully two tablespoons melted 
butter and a little chopped parsley; heat this in a vessel filled 



Fish. 



with hot water. Pour in the gravy from the dripping pan of 
fish. boil thick. 

SAUCE FOR FISH. 
Two ounces butter, one-half cup vinegar, one teaspoon ground 
mustard, one teaspoon salt, a little pepper ; let this boil, then 
add one cup milk and yolks of two eggs. Let this just boil, stir- 
ring all the time. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

Cut two or three slices of salt pork into dice pieces, fry to a 
crisp, and turn the whole into your chowder kettle. Pare half 
a dozen medium sized potatoes and cut them in two. Peel a 
small onion and chop it fine. Put the potatoes into the kettle 
with part of the onion. Cut the fish (which should be fresh cod 
or haddock) into convenient pieces and lay over the potatoes ; 
sprinkle over it the rest of the onion, season well with salt and 
pepper, and add just enough water to come to the top of the 
fish. Pour over the whole a quart can of tomatoes, cover 
closely, and allow about as long to cook as it takes to boil 
potatoes ; then add two quarts of milk, and let it scald up 
again. Season with " Sauce Piquant " or tomato catsup, and 
more salt and pepper if required. 

While the chowder is cooking, break some sea-biscuit into a 
pan, pour water over them, and set them where they will soften 
and keep hot. Dip the chowder into your tureen, and lay the 
crackers on the to]). 

Mrs. \V.\i. N. Sage. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Twenty-five clams, one-half pound salt pork, chopped fine ; 
six potatoes, sliced thin ; six onions, sliced thin. Put the pork 
in kettle ; after cooking a short time, add the potatoes, onions 
and juice of clams. Cook two and one-half hours, then add the 
(lams. 

Fifteen minutes before serving, add two cpiarts of milk. 

Mrs. J. M. Pitkin. 



io "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Forty-five clams "chopped"; one quart sliced potatoes, one- 
half pint sliced onions. Cut a few slices salt pork, fry to a crisp, 
chop fine. Put in kettle a little fat from the pork, a layer 
potatoes, clams, onions, a little pepper and salt ; another layer 
of chopped pork, potatoes, etc., until all are in. Pour over all 
the juice of the clams. Cook three hours, being careful not to 
burn. 

Add a teacup of milk just before serving. 

Mrs. Horace Candee. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

Put the fish in cold water, set on the back of the stove ; when 

water gets hot, pour off and put on cold again until the fish is 

fresh enough ; then pick it up. Roil potatoes and mash them ; 

mix fish and potatoes together while potatoes are hot, taking 

two-thirds potatoes and one-third fish. Put in plenty of butter ; 

make into balls, and fry in plenty of lard. Have the lard hot 

before putting in balls. 

A. M. 

CREAM OYSTERS. 

Fifty shell oysters, one quart sweet cream ; butter, pepper and 
salt to suit taste. Put the cream and oysters in separate kettles 
to heat, the oysters in their own liquid, and let them come to a 
boil ; when sufficiently cooked, skim ; then take them out of the 
liquid and put in some dish to keep warm. Put the cream and 
liquid together. Season to taste, and thicken with powdered 
cracker. When sufficiently thick, stir in the oysters. 

I. Teal. 

SCOLLOPED O YSTERS. 

Put layer of rolled crackers in bottom of pudding dish, layer 
of oysters, drained ; season with butter, pepper and salt — so on 
until the dish is full, then pour over coffeecup of milk. Bake 
three-quarters of an hour. 



Fish. m 



OYSTER PIE. 



One quart oysters, drained ; pepper, salt and butter to taste. 
One quart flour, two tablespoons lard, one teaspoon salt; mix 
with water for pie crust. Line the pie plate with the crust ; fill 
with the oysters, seasoned ; put over a crust, and bake 

I '.I U.K. 

SCOLLOPED CLAMS. 

Put stale bread in oven to dry ; roll fine, then put in dish a 
layer of crumbs, layer of clams, cut in small pieces; season with 
butter and pepper ; so on until dish is full. Pour over the 
clam juice ; bake one-half hour. Cracker crumbs may be used 
in place of bread. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

One quart oysters, drain off the liquid ; add one cup of vine- 
gar, one cup of water; let it boil, and skim off the top while 
boiling. One teaspoon of white pepper, one-half teaspoon of 
allspice, one teaspoon of salt, little stick cinnamon. Let the 
spices boil with the liquid ; when cool, pour this over the 

oysters. 

Mrs. C. K. Paine. 

PICKLED O V SEERS. 

Two gallons of large oysters, drain and rinse them ; put one 
pint of the oyster juice and one quart of vinegar over the fire, 
scald and skim until clear ; add one tablespoonful of whole 
pepper, one tablespoonful of cloves, one teaspoonful of mace 
and one even tablespoonful of salt ; scald a minute, then throw 
in the oysters, and let them just come to a boil. 

The oysters should be pickled the day before they arc wanted, 
as they grow tough after standing a few days in the vinegar. 

Mrs. W. V S. 



i2 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



FRIED OYSTERS. 

Take large sized oysters, drain and dry ; dip in egg and 
bread or cracker crumbs. Fry in hot butter or lard. 



SUNDRIES. 



HAM COOKED IN CIDER. 

Put a pint of cider and a cup of brown sugar into enough 
water to cover the ham ; boil three hours, or until the skin will 
peel off easily. Remove the skin, cover the ham with a crust 
of sugar, and bake in a slow oven three hours. 

Dissolve a cup of sugar in a pint of cider and baste the ham 

frequently while baking. If the cider is very sweet, use less 

sugar. 

Mrs. W. N. Sage. 



STEWED BEEF. 

Have a steak weighing two pounds, and an inch and a half 
thick. Put two ounces of butter in a stew pan ; when melted, 
put in the steak with one-quarter pound of lean bacon, cut in 
small pieces. Place the stew pan over the fire; turn the steak 
occasionally until a little brown, then lay it off into a dish. Add 
one tablespoon of flour to the butter in the pan, and continue 
stirring until brown ; then again lay in the steak. Add one pint 
of water, one glass sherry, a little pepper and salt ; let simmer 
slowly one hour. Skim off all the fat, and add twenty button 
onions ; simmer until onions are very tender ; remove the steak 
to hot platter, and pour the onions, sauce, etc., over. 

Mrs. M. K. Woodbury. 



Sundries. 13 



MOCK TERRAPINS {Supper Dish). 

Half a calf s liver ; season and fry brown ; hash it, not very 
fine ; dust thickly with flour, a teaspoon of mixed mustard, as 
much cayenne pepper as will lie on half a dime ; two hard 
boiled eggs, chopped fine ; a piece of butter, size of an egg ; a 
teacup of water. Let all boil a minute or two, then serve. 

Cold veal is also nice dressed in this way. 



BEEF STEAK BALLS. 

One and one-half pounds round steak, chopped fine ; two 
eggs, one tablespoon flour, two tablespoons milk ; salt and pep- 
per to taste. Drop in spider and fry until done. 



VEAL LOAF. 

Three pounds of the nice part of a leg of veal, chopped fine ; 
six crackers rolled fine ; two eggs, well beaten ; a piece of but- 
ter, size of an egg ; one tablespoon of salt ; one teaspoon of 
pepper, one-quarter of a nutmeg. Work all well together ; then 
make into a loaf, and put into a dripping pan ; cover with 
cracker crumbs and bits of butter. Have a little water in the 
pan, and baste often until done. 

Miss Ella I. Gould. 



VEAL OMELETTE. 

Two pounds veal, and one quarter pound salt pork, chopped 
fine ; one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon pepper, two crackers, 
rolled fine ; two eggs, eight tablespoons cream. Mix crackers 
and meat ; add the eggs and other ingredients. Bake two hours, 
covered with a pan. 

If you have not cream use six tablespoons of melted butter. 

Miss Jennie Mori; ax. 



i4 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



BAKED OMELETTE. 

Four or six eggs ; beat whites separate ; small teacup milk ; 
piece butter, size of a walnut ; one tablespoon flour, a little salt. 
Beat yolks ; add butter, milk, flour and salt, lastly the beaten 
whites. Butter a dish just the right size to hold it and bake in 
quick oven. 

Jennik Morgan. 

OMELETTE. 

Soak a teacup of bread crumbs in a cup of sweet milk over 
night ; three eggs, beat yolks and whites separately ; mix the 
yolks with the bread and milk ; stir in the whites, add a tea- 
spoon of salt, and fry brown. This is sufficient for six persons. 

Mrs. Ambrose Lane. 

SWEET ERE: ADS. 

Scald in salted water ; remove the stringy parts ; put in cold 
water five or ten minutes ; drain in towel ; dip in egg and bread 
or cracker crumbs, and fry in butter, or boil them plain 

FROGS' LEGS. 
Fry in hot butter or lard. 

SOFT SHELL CRABS. 
Fry in hot butter or lard. 

HONED CHICKEN. 

Boil a chicken in as little water as possible until the meat will 
fall from the bones ; remove all of the skin, chop together the 
light and dark parts ; season with pepper and salt. Boil down 
the liquid in which the chicken was boiled, then pour it on the 
meat ; place in a tin, wrap tightly in a cloth, press with a heavy 
weight for several hours. When served cut in thin slices. 

Ida Satterlee. 



Si ndries. i 5 



CHICKEN PIE. 

Two chickens, jointed small ; cook them tender ; season with 
butter, salt and pepper ; thicken the gravy with Hour. Make a 
crust as for soda biscuit ; line the sides of pie dish with crust, 
half an inch thick ; fill the dish with the chicken and gravy : 
cover with crust ; bake half hour. 

QUICKEN POTPIE. 

Two large chickens, jointed and boiled in two quarts of 
water ; add a \\-\v slice of salt pork ; season. When nearly 
cooked, add a crust made of one quart flour, four teaspoons 
baking powder, one saltspoon salt ; stir in a stiff batter with 
water ; drop into the kettle while boiling ; cover close and cook 
twenty-five minutes. 

Ellen. 

SMO THERED C 'HICKEN 

Open the chicken as for boiling ; put into dripping pan, with 
a little water ; season with butter, pepper and salt ; cover with 
another pan and cook until done ; take off cover and brown 
them. Make a gravy in dripping pan of milk and browned 
flour ; pour over chicken. 

( HICKEN C ROQ ( 'E TTES. 

The breast of two boiled chickens, chopped ; one cup of soft 
bread, two eggs, two spoons chopped parsley. Mix well 
together ; pepper and salt to taste. Roll six crackers ; mix 
with one egg, well beaten. Make the croquettes into pear 
shapes with your hands, put in wire basket, and boil in lard. 

S 7 E 1 1 ED M USHROO. 1/ .V. 

Let them lie in salt and water an hour; cover with water and 
stew until tender ; season with butter, salt and pepper ; cream, 
if you wish. 



16 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 

LOBSTER CROQUETTES. 

One can of lobsters, chopped ; one cup bread, softened with 
water ; two eggs ; pepper and salt to taste. Mix all together. 
Roll fine eight medium sized crackers ; one egg, beaten and 
mixed with the crumbs. Make the lobster into round or pear- 
shaped balls, and roll in the cracker crumbs. Fry in a spider 
with lard. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Chop two quarts cold boiled potatoes ; mix one teaspoon 
salt, one-half teaspoon pepper, two tablespoons parsley, two 
tablespoons grated onion, one gill vinegar, one-half gill oil or 
melted butter ; pour over potatoes ; stand half an hour before 
serving. 

STEWED CRANBERRIES. 

Look them over carefully ; wash and put them over the fire, 
more than covered with water ; cover the sauce pan, and stew 
until the skins are tender, adding more water if necessary ; add 
one pound of sugar to a pound of berries. Let them simmer 
ten or twelve minutes ; then set away in a bowl or wide- 
mouthed crock. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

Toast the bread ; butter it, and spread with mustard ; then 
melt the cheese and spread over, and put together the same as 
sandwiches. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

One cup boiled rice, one egg, well beaten ; thicken with bread 
and cracker crumbs ; then roll in cracker crumbs, and fry in 

lard. 



Sundries. 17 



1 r RKSH I R E T UDDING. 

Six large spoons Hour, three eggs, saltspoon salt, milk enough 
to make like soft custard ; pour into shallow pan, in which there 
is. a little beef dripping. 



STUFF! XG FOR TURKEY OR ROAST MEATS. 

Mix stale bread crumbs or pounded cracker with butter, salt, 
pepper and an egg; add summer savory or sage. If wished, 
oysters chopped may be added. Mix thoroughly together, 
adding a little warm water for wetting, if necessary. 



YSTER DRESSING. 

Two tablespoons flour, two tablespoons butter ; brown the 
butter and flour in dripper ; add water to make thin for gravy ; 
boil ; add one pint oysters, chopped ; pepper and salt to taste. 



CAFER SAUCE. 

Two tablespoons of butter, one tablespoon of flour ; mix 
well ; pour on boiling water until it thickens ; add one hard 
boiled egg, chopped fine, and two tablespoons of capers. 

Mrs. A. W. Mudge. 

MINT SA UCE. 

Mix one tablespoon of white sugar to half a teacup of good 
vinegar ; add mint, chopped fine ; one-half teaspoon of salt. 
Serve with roast lamb or mutton. 

Mrs. A. \V. Mudge. 



GRAVY FOR ROAST A! FATS. 

Alter taking out the meat, pour off the fat ; add water, 
season, and thicken with flour. 



i8 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



DRAWN BUTTER OR EGG SAUCE. 

Half a cup butter, two tablespoons flour ; rubbed thor- 
oughly together, then stirred into pint boiling water ; little salt ; 
parsley, if wished. 

For egg sauce, add one or two eggs, boiled hard and chopped. 

GRAVY EOR TURKEY. 

Boil the giblets very tender ; chop fine ; then take liquor in 
which they were boiled, thicken with flour; season wiht salt, 
pepper and a little butter ; add the giblets and dripping in 
which the turkey was roasted. 

'ROLLED SANDWLCHESr 

When bread is ready to make into loaves, put one into a long 
bar tin ; let stand until light, then steam one hour. Make a 
dressing of ham, veal and smoked tongue, chopped very fine 
and mixed with salad dressing. When the bread is quite cold, 
cut in thin slices, spread with the chopped meats, and roll. 

RAGOUT OE BEEF. 

For six pounds of the round, take one-half dozen ripe 
tomatoes, or canned tomatoes, and three onions, a few cloves, 
stick cinnamon, whole black pepper, and salt ; cut gashes in 
meat and fill with small pieces of salt pork ; put meat in dish or 
pan with other ingredients ; over this pour one cup water, one- 
half cup vinegar ; cover tightly and bake slowly four or five 
hours ; when done, strain the gravy and thicken with flour. 

LAMB COOKED\ WITH PEAS. 

The breast of lamb and salt pork cut in medium pieces, put 
in stew pan with water enough to cover ; stew until tender ; 
skim and add green peas ; when done, season with butter rolled 
in flour and pepper. 



Vegetables. . 19 



PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil two chickens until dropping to pieces ; pick meat off 

hones, taking out all skin ; season with salt and pepper ; put in 

deep tin or mould ; take one-fourth box of gelatine, dissolved 

in a little warm water, add to liquid left in kettle, and boil until 

it begins to thicken, then pour over the chicken and set away to 

cool ; cut in slices for table. 

Mrs. E. H. S. 

HAM FOR SI' P PER. 

Chop boiled ham fine ; season with mustard, pepper, beaten 
yolk of an egg, and oil if desired. 



VEGETABLES. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

FlRST. Have them fresh as possible. Summer vegetables 
should be cooked on the same day that they are gathered. 

Second. Look them over and wash well, cutting out all 
decayed or unripe parts. 

THIRD. Lay them when peeled in cold water for some time 
before using. 

Fourth. Always let the water boil before putting them in, 
and continue to boil until done. 

Turnips — Should be peeled, and boil from forty minutes to 
an hour. 

BeetS — Boil from one to two hours ; then put in cold water, 
and slip the skin off. 



20 ".Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 

Spinach — Boil twenty minutes. 

Parsnips — Boil from twenty to thirty minutes. 

Onions — Best boiled in two or three waters, adding milk the 
last time. 

String Beans — Should be boiled one hour. 

Shell Beans — Require from half an hour to an hour. 

Green Corn — Boil twenty or thirty minutes. 

Green Peas — Should be boiled in as little water as possible ; 
boil twenty minutes. 

Asparagus — Same as peas ; serve on toast with cream gravy. 

Winter Squash — Cut in pieces and boil twenty to forty 
minutes, in small quantity of water ; when done, press the water 
out, mash smooth, and season with butter, pepper and salt. 

Cabbage- — Should be boiled from one-half hour to one 
hour, in plenty of water; salt while boiling. 



POTATOES BOILED IN LARD. 

Pare and slice thick eight or ten large potatoes. Half fill a 
good sized kettle with lard or drippings. When boiling put in 
the potatoes ; cook until tender and brown ; then take out with 
a skimmer into a colander to drain off any grease. Sprinkle 
salt over them. Be sure and not fill the kettle too full with 
potatoes, as it is better to cook at a time only what the lard 
rovers. 

STIRRED FRIED POTATOES. 

Put a tablespoon of lard into a kettle ; pare and slice fine as 
many potatoes as needed. When the lard is hot put in the 
potatoes and cover closely; watch and stir frequently, to prevent 
burning. When nearly cooked, remove the cover and brown 
them ; then stir in salt, pepper and a heaping teaspoon of butter. 



All Soaps Bearing the Name of 

L. I. Fisk & Co. are Warranted 

FREE FROM ALL ADULTERATIONS, 

\NI> ARE 

the ST^nsrrj^iR,!} soaps 

For Economy, Purity, Cleanliness and Washing Qualities. 



Do your Clothes, after a few washings, become yellow or have the appear- 
ance of not having been thoroughly washed, and it becomes necessary to "put 
them out to bleach?" This is caused by the use of Soap filled with Rosin. 
Sal. Soda, Silex, Silicic Acid, Silicon Clay, and other adulterations, of no wash- 
ing qualities, but "fill up" and add weight. 

TRY L. I. FISK & CO.'S JAPANESE, 

and remedy this — have your Clothes become -white as snow, fragrant and 
perfectly clean. 

Do you have Chapped, Cracked ox Sore Hands, or do they become "pa>- 
boiled" by "doing a washing? This is caused by the use of Soaps filled with 
caustic, soda, acids, or vitrol, which ruin the hands, tot and eat the clothes 

USE L. I. FISK & CO.'S JAPANESE, 

and you will never have these troubles — your hands, no matter how badly 
injured, will become perfectly soft and smooth. Warrant) dft ee ft om all adnl- 
terations, and will not injure the finest Laces, and by its exclusive use for a 
short time, you will readily see its superior benefits, as it is pronounced by all, 
after one or two trials, to be the best Soap ever used. 

We are the Patentees and Sole Makers of the genuine JAPANESE 
SOAP. See that our name is on each wrapper, and take no other . 

Letters Patent Issued to us October n, 1875, September 18, 1877. 

^*T°\Ve especially recommend it to persons employed in Factories, Ma- 
chine Shops or mechanical pursuits, for the cleansing of the hands of Grease , 
Grit ox Grime, Ask your friend or neighbor of its qualities, ASK YOUR 
GROCER TO SEE IT and YOU WILL TRY IT. 

EACH BAR CONTAINS TWO CAKES. 

Cut the bar, — dry hard — each cake will out-last the five cent Soaps now 
being sold. 

Also, the REST PALE SOAP in America, in I, 2, 3 and 4 pound bars, 
unlike most family Soaps, are put up FULL WEIGHT for every patron, and will 
last one-third longer than any other liar Soaps, and are GUARANTEED 
TO BE PURE. 

Ask your Grocer for L. I. FISK & CO.'S SOAPS, and get the 
Best, Purest, CLEANEST, ami the most SOLID SOAPS in the market. 

NO RANCID OR FILTHY GREASE USED IN OUR GOODS. 



William H. Goss. 



(^ 



Qg WAM 1'APEM §J) 



WINDOW SHADES, 



LACE AND DEAPEBY CURTAIN 



CORNICES 



olstoiT Cleocin g3 



No. 2 East Main Street, opp. Front, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

HOUSTON & DRAPER, 



(Successors to S. NEALE', 

MANUFACTURERS OF 




AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 
COSTUM WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Covering & Repairing Promptly Attended to. 

ALL STYLES OF PINKING NEATLY DONE. 

37 If est Main Street, (oorner £xchanoe, 

Opi\ Powers' Block, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Vegetables. .21 



BAKED POTATOES. 

Pare eight or ten potatoes, or as many as needed ; bake in a 
quick oven half an hour. 

SARA TOO A /'OTA TOTS. 

Pare and slice the potatoes very thin with potato slicer ; let 
them stand in alum water for half an hour; wipe dry, and fry in 
very hot lard a light brown ; salt while hot. 

Mrs. I,. SUNDERLIN. 

SARATOGA TO 'J A TOTS. 

Take white Peachblow potatoes ; peel and slice very thin with 
potato slicer ; let them stand in cold salt and water for half an 
hour ; dry them, and fry in boiling hot lard, taking out as soon 
.is they rattle against the spoon ; salt hot. 

Mrs. A. S. Mann. 

SCO L L OP ED TO T. A TO TS. 

Use boiled potatoes ; slice them thin ; put in a pudding dish 
a layer of potatoes, a thin layer of rolled crackers ; sprinkle in 
pepper and salt and three or four small pieces of butter; then 
add another layer of potatoes, crackers, etc., until the dish is 
filled. Over all pour a cup of cream or rich milk. Bake from 

one-half to three-quarters of an hour. 

H. 

* 

POTATO ROLLS. 

Take five or six potatoes, boil and wash them ; add salt, 
pepper and a little milk. Heat three eggs light and mix with 
them. Make out into little rolls, and cover with (lour. Fry in 
hot lard. 

M rs. Ira Nor rHROP. 



22 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 

BROILED POTATOES. 

Boil eight or ten large potatoes ; ' when cold, slice them 
lengthways and put on a toaster or fine wire broiler over a hot 
fire ; when browned, remove ; salt, and pour melted butter over 
them. 

TRIED TOMATO. 

Cut the tomato in slices without skinning ; pepper and salt 
them ; then sprinkle a little flour over them and fry in butter 
until brown. Put them on a hot platter and pour milk or cream 
into the butter and juice. When boiling hot, pour over the 
tomatoes. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Skin the tomatoes, slice in small pieces ; spread in bottom of 
a pudding dish a thick layer ; cover with a thin layer of bread 
crumbs, and sprinkle salt, pepper and a few small pieces of 
butter over them ; add layers of tomatoes, &c, until the dish is 
filled — sprinkling over the top a layer of fine rolled crackers. 
Bake one hour. 

H. A. 

BROILED TO MA TOES. 

Cut large tomatoes in two, crosswise ; put on gridiron, cut 
surface down ; when well seared, turn, and put butter, salt and 
pepper on, and cook with skin-side down until done. 

C. M. 

SPICED TOMATOES. 

To one pound of ripe tomatoes, peeled and sliced, add one- 
half pound brown sugar, one-half pint vinegar, one teaspoon 
cinnamon, one teaspoon allspice, one teaspoon cloves. Boil 
two hours. 

BAKED CORN. 

Grate one dozen ears sweet corn, one cup milk, small piece 
butter; salt, and bake in pudding dish one hour. 



Vegetables. 23 



CORN CAKES. 

One pint grated corn, two eggs, one tablespoon melted butter, 

three tablespoons sweet milk, two and one-half tablespoons 
Boston crackers, rolled. Fry in spider. 



Mrs. \V. 



CORN OYSTERS. 



Eight ears of sweet corn, grated ; two cups of milk, three 
eggs, salt and pepper; flour enough to make a batter. Put a 
tablespoon of butter into a frying pan and drop the mixture into 
the hot butter — a spoonful in a place ; brown on both sides. 
Serve hot for breakfast or as a side-dish for dinner. 

Mrs. Sage, 

SUCCOTASH. 

Ten ears green corn, one pint Lima beans ; cut the corn from 
the cob, and stew gently with the beans until tender. Use as 
little water as possible. Season with butter, salt and pepper — 
milk, if you choose. 

I'.GG PLANT. 

Pare and cut in slices half an inch thick ; sprinkle with salt : 

cover, and let stand for an hour. Rinse in clear cold water ; 

wipe each slice dry; dip first in beaten egg, then in rolled 

cracker or bread crumbs. Season with pepper and salt, and fry 

brown in butter. 

Mrs. Miller. 

MACCARONI. 

Three long sticks of maccaroni, broken in small pieces ; soak 
in a pint of milk two hours. Grate bread and dried cheese. 
Put a layer of maccaroni in a pudding dish ; add pepper, salt 
and butter; then sprinkle the bread and cheese crumbs over it, 
and so continue until the dish is filled. Hake until brown. 

Beli 1 



24 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



VEGETABLE OYSTERS. 

One bunch of oysters ; boil and mash. One pint sour milk, 
half a teaspoon soda ; flour to make a batter ; add two eggs, 
beaten, and the oysters. Fry in hot lard — drop in spoonfuls. 

C. M. 

MOCK OYSTERS. 

Three grated parsnips, three eggs, one teaspoon salt, one tea- 
cup sweet cream, butter half the size of an egg, three table- 
spoons flour. Fry as pancakes. 

Mrs. M. K. W. 

BAKED BEANS. 

One quart beans, soaked over night ; in the morning put them 
in a kettle with cold water and boil ten minutes ; change the 
water, and put with them a small piece of salt pork. Let them 
boil until nearly tender, then take them out of the kettle with a 
skimmer ; put in a baking dish, with the pork in the center ; cut 
the rind in small squares ; sprinkle over the top one tablespoon 
of white sugar ; bake three hours. If they bake dry, add the 

bean broth. 

Mrs. Adelbert Mudge. 



Bread. 



BREAD 



POTATO YEAST. 

Three potatoes; boil and mash them in the morning; add 
one-quarter cup sugar, one-half cup flour, a little salt ; after 
stirring well, pour over one-half pint boiling water ; stir and add 
one-half pint cold water; stir that, and add one-half cup yeast, 

and put it in a warm place. When it is risen well and rounds 
up to the top of the dish, stir it down. Do so several times 
during the day, and at night strain and put it in a jug. Keep in 
a cool place. It will be good a week. 

Mrs. C. J. Baldwin. 

YEAST CAKES. 

boil one-half pound of hops in eight quarts of water until the 
liquid is very strong; then put in fifteen or twenty large- 
potatoes ; let them boil till they arc thoroughly done ; take them 
out ; pare and mash them fine. Put in the mashed potatoes a 
pint bowl of flour, and strain your boiling hop liquid on to the 
flour and potato — taking care that the flour is well scalded. 
Add one pint of molasses, one tablespoonful of ginger and one 
handful of salt ; when the mixture is cool enough to put the 
hand in, rub it through a colander to reduce it to a i'\nc pulp. 
Add a sufficient quantity of \ east to raise it, and let it stand in 
a large covered jar until morning ; then add another bowl of 
flour, and mix the cakes with Indian meal. They must be hard 
enough to take up a quantity of dough in the hand, pat it 
together and cut it into slices. Lay the cakes as you cut them 
on plates or something that will not impart any taste to them 
The cakes must be turned once the first day, ami after that 
twice a day until they are thoroughly dry. 

Mrs. ( >ki \ S VG1 



26 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



YEAST. 

One handful hops, six large potatoes ; boil together until 
well done, and strain through a colander ; add sufficient water 
to make two quarts, and when boiling stir quickly into one 
quart of flour and a little salt. When lukewarm add one cup of 
yeast. 

Ellen. 

POTATO BREAD. 

Three and one-half quarts of sifted flour, one boiled potato, 
large ; one quart warm water, one teacup yeast, one even table- 
spoon salt. Mix at night ; put the flour in a large bowl ; 
hollow a place in the centre for the potato mashed, water and 
salt. Stir in enough flour to make a smooth batter ; add yeast ; 
stir in the rest of the flour. Put the dough on the floured 
board ; knead fifteen minutes, using barely enough flour to 
prevent sticking. Flour the bowl, lay the dough in it, cover, 
and leave to rise. In the morning, divide in four parts ; mould 
into loaves ; when light, prick, and bake in a moderate oven. 



SALT RISING BREAD. 

Pour a pint of hot water in a two-quart pail or pitcher on 
one-half tablespoon of salt ; when the finger can be held in it, 
add one and one-third pints of flour ; mix well, and leave the 
pitcher in a kettle of water, as warm as that used in mixing. 
Keep it at the same temperature until the batter is nearly twice 
its original bulk (which will be in from five to eight hours). It 
may be stirred once or twite during the rising. Add this to a 
sponge made of one quart of hot water, two and one-half quarts 
of flour — adding as much more as may be necessary to make a 
soft dough ; mix well, and leave in a warm place to rise. When 
light, mould into loaves, keeping them as soft as possible; lay in 
buttered tins. When light again, prick, and bake. 



Bread. 

BREAD. 

Five quarts Hour, one tablespoon salt, two quarts lukewarm 
water, one cup of yeast. Knead thoroughly, and leave in warm 
place all night. In the morning make into five loaves, and 
when light hake one hour. 

E I. T.K.N. 

BISCUIT. 

Two quarts flour, (full); one quart milk or water, one cup 

lard, one-half cup yeast, one tablespoon sugar, salt. Melt the 

lard in half the milk (or water); when it comes to a boil, pour 

on the flour, thoroughly scalding the quantity it will wet ; then 

put in the remaining milk, cold; add the other ingredients: 

mould thoroughly, like bread, and let stand to rise very light 

(which will take from five to six hours); then stir down, and put 

where it will be cold. As fast as it rises, work it down, until 

entirely cold ; then mould it, and leave where it will be cold as 

possible without freezing. This dough will keep a week, and 

when wanted can be rolled, cut, and baked like soda biscuit — 

letting them stand to rise ten minutes on the pans before 

baking. 

Mrs. A. A. Morg w. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

One pint of milk, scalded ; put into it while hot half a cup of 
sugar and one tablespoon of butter; when the milk is cool, add 
a little salt and half a cup of yeast, or one compressed yeast 
cake ; stir in flour to make a stiff sponge, and when light mix as 
for bread. Let it rise until light, punch it down with the hand, 
and let it rise again — repeat two or three times ; then turn the 
dough on to the moulding board, and pound with the rolling-pin 
until thin enough to cut. Cut out with a tumbler, brush the 
surface of each one with melted butter, and told over. Let the 
rolls rise on the tins; bake, and while warm brush over the 
surface with melted butter to make the crust tender. 

Mrs. w. N. S 



28 " Mother Hubbard's Cufboari; 



PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

One teacup home-made yeast, a little salt, one tablespoon 

sugar, piece of lard size of an egg, one pint milk, flour sufficient 

to mix. Put the milk on the stove to scald with the lard in it. 

Prepare the flour with salt, sugar and yeast. Then add the 

milk, not too hot. Knead thoroughly when mixed at night ; in 

the morning but very slight kneading is necessary. Then roll 

out and cut with large biscuit cutter. Spread a little butter on 

each roll and lap together. Let them rise very light, then bake 

in a quick oven. 

Mrs. E. Foster Hoyt. 



PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

One quart flour, one ounce lard, one-half pint milk, one-half 
gill yeast, one-half tablespoon sugar, one-half teaspoon salt. In 
the evening put the flour in a bowl ; put the salt and lard in the 
milk, and warm until the lard is melted. When the milk is 
lukewarm, add the yeast ; mix well, and pour into the centre of 
the flour. Do not stir it. Cover and leave it in the cellar. In 
the morning work it thoroughly and let it rise ; two hours 
before tea, roll it out two-thirds of an inch thick ; cut with a 
tin cutter four inches across. With a feather coat half of the 
top with melted butter, and lap it nearly over the other half. 
Then draw them out a little, to make them roll-shaped ; lay 
them apart in buttered pans, and when light bake. 

Mrs. Miller. 

R USE. 

Four eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter, one pint milk, 
three-fourths cup yeast. Beat eggs and sugar together, and mix 
all soft with Hour. Let them rise over night ; mix again, and 
when light make into biscuit ; put in tins, and rise again before 
baking. 

When taken from the oven, rub the top with sugar and cream. 

Mrs. Woodbury. 



Bread. 29 



TEA RISK. 

Three cups of flour, one cup of milk, three-fourths cup of 
sugar, two heaping tablespoons of butter, melted ; two eggs, 

three teaspoons baking powder. 

Mrs. \Y. I,. Sage, 



BROWN BREAD. 

Three cups corn meal, two cups brown flour, one cup 
molasses, little salt, one teaspoon saleratus, three and one-half 
cups warm water. Steam two and one-half hours. 

Mrs. M. K. W. 

RYE BREAD. 

One pint rye meal, one pint Indian meal, one cup molasses, 
one teaspoon saleratus, one teaspoon salt, two cups sour milk. 
Mix the rye, Indian, salt and saleratus together ; put in the 
molasses and mix with the milk. Steam four hours. 

Mrs. Woodbury. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One quart of sour milk, one-half cup of molasses, one-half 
cup of sugar, two eggs, three tablespoons of melted butter, one 
teaspoon of soda. Mix with brown flour as stiff as you can stir 
it with a spoon. 

To make gems or puffs for breakfast, use a little less flour, 
and bake in muffin rings or gem pans. 



BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One and one-half pints Indian meal, one and one-half pints 

rye meal, one cup molasses, two tablespoons vinegar, one tea- 
spoon salt, two teaspoons saleratus, one quart lukewarm water. 
Boil or bake five hours. 

Mrs. E. W. Sage. 



30 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



GRAHAM BREAD. 
One bowl soft bread sponge, one-half cup brown sugar, three 
tablespoons butter, very little soda. Dissolve in warm water"; 
stir to a thick batter with Graham flour ; put in tins, and let rise 

until very light ; then bake. 

Mrs. B. N. Hurd. 



CORN BREAD. 

One quart Indian meal, one pint Graham flour, one pint 
sweet milk, one pint of butter or sour milk, one-half teacup of 
molasses, one full teaspoon of soda. Steam three hours. 

Mrs. Edwin O. Sage. 



CORN BREAD. 

One pint corn meal, one pint bread sponge, two-thirds cup 
molasses, one teaspoon soda. Scald the meal ; when cool, add 
the sponge, molasses and soda. Mix with Graham flour stiff as 
cake ; put in tins, and when light bake one hour. 

Seneca Point. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

Two eggs, three cups butter milk or sour milk, one-half cup 
lard, one-half cup sugar, one cup flour, one teaspoon saleratus, 
one-half teaspoon salt, three cups Indian meal. 

Mrs. H. E. B. 



BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

One quart flour, four teaspoons baking powder, a little salt — 

sifted together ; add a full teaspoon of butter and sufficient 

water to make soft dough. Roll out, and cut in cakes an inch 

thick. Bake in quick oven. 

Ellen. 



Bread. 31 



TEA PUFFS. 

Two and one-quarter cups flour, three cups milk, three eggs 
— whites and yolks beaten separately ; three teaspoons melted 
butter, a little salt. Bake in cups, in a hot oven. 

Mrs. Geo. Darling. 

INDIAN CORN MUFFINS. 

Beat one egg thoroughly ; put in a coffee-cup ; add one 
tablespoon brown sugar, one tablespoon thick cream or butter ; 
fill with butter milk or sour milk, two handfuls corn meal, one 
small handful wheat flour, one-half teaspoon soda — rubbed into 
the flour. Bake in muffin rings on a griddle. 

Mrs. Edwin Pancost. 

MUFFINS. 

One cup of home-made yeast or half of a compressed yeast 
cake, one pint of sweet milk, two eggs, two tablespoons of 
melted butter, two tablespoons of sugar. Beat the butter, sugar 
and eggs well together ; then stir in the milk, slightly warmed, 
and thicken with flour to the consistence of griddle cakes. When 
light, bake in muffin rings or on a griddle. 

Muffins should never be cut with a knife, but be pulled open 
with the fingers. 

If wanted for tea, the batter must be mixed immediately after 

breakfast. 

M ks. S. 

MUFFINS. 

Three pints flour, one quart milk, two eggs, four teaspoons 
baking powder, one teaspoon salt, (one teaspoon butter, one 
teaspoon lard — melt together). Bake in quick oven. 

BREAKFAST PUFFS. 

Four eggs, four cups milk, four cups flour. Beat milk, yolks 
of egg and flour together ; add the whites beaten stiff. Bake 
in quick oven, in gem irons. Mrs. E. F. Wilson. 

3 



32 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 

GEMS. 

One pint warm water, one teaspoon salt, Graham flour enough 
to make stiff hatter. Have your irons and oven both hot. 

GRAHAM PUFFS. 

One quart of Graham flour, one pint of milk, one pint of 
water, two eggs, a little salt. Bake in cups or gem pans. 

HUCKLEBERRY CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of milk, two and one-half cups ot 
flour, one egg, butter the size of an egg, two teaspoons of 
baking powder, one and one-half cups of huckleberries. To be 
eaten hot, with butter. This makes a very delicate tea rusk by 
leaving out the huckleberries, and using only half a cup of 

sugar. 

Mrs. Sage. 

SHORT CAKE. 

Three teaspoons baking powder, sifted with one and one-half 
pints flour; three tablespoons butter, rubbed into the flour; one- 
half cup sugar ; teaspoon salt ; one egg, beaten with one pint 
milk. Bake in jelly tins. Spread with butter, and put berries 
between layers. 

Matie C. Dayfoot. 

DEM OCR A TS. 

One-half cup of sugar, one-quarter cup butter, one cup sweet 

milk, one pint flour, three eggs, two and one-half teaspoons 

baking powder. Bake in cups for tea. 

Mrs. J. M. P. 

RICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 

For a small quantity, say one quart bowl full, take one egg, 
two-thirds of rice (cooked) to one-third flour ; one teaspoon 
soda, two teaspoons cream tarter, or three teaspoons baking 
powder; sweet milk enough to make it the right consistency. 

Mrs. Oren Sack. 



Bread. 33 



WHEAT CAKES. 

One pint sour milk, teaspoon soda, a little salt, two eggs, flour 
to make a thin hatter. 

WAFFLES. 

If you want your waffles for tea, take one quart warm milk 

after dinner; put in two eggs, beaten; a small piece of butter; ;i 

small cup of yeast. Mix with flour a little thicker than wheat 

pancakes. Set by warm stove and they will he light for tea. 

Bake in waffle irons, greased. 

Mrs. J. H. HuRD. 

WAFFLES. 

Three eggs, one quart sour milk, one teaspoon soda, a little 
salt, two tahlespoons melted butter. Beat the yolks thoroughly; 
stir in the milk, butter and soda, lastly the whites, beaten stiff. 
Use flour to make stiffer than pancakes Hake in waffle irons. 
Serve with butter and sugar. 

EGG TOAST. 

For six persons, take two eggs, one-half cup milk, flour enough 

to make a good stiff batter. Cut old bread in thin slices; dip 

into the batter, and fry brown in butter. Serve hot. 

Mk>. I.. 



34 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



PI ES. 



PIE CRUST. 

One-half cup lard, one-half cup butter, one quart sifted flour, 
one cup cold water, a little salt. Rub the butter and lard 
slightly into the flour; wet it with the water, mixing it as little 
as possible. 

This quantity will make two large or three small pies. 

Mrs. W. N. Sage. 

PIE CRUST GIAZE. 

To prevent the juice from soaking the under crust, beat up 
the white of an egg, and before filling the pie, brush over the 
crust with the beaten egg. Brush over the top crust also, to 
give it a beautiful yellow brown. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

One pint of milk, three eggs, a little salt, three tablespoons of 
sugar. Flavor with vanilla or nutmeg and essence of lemon. 
If the milk is scalded, it will require but two eggs to a pint. 

COCOA NUT PIE. 
Make a custard and add a small cup of cocoanut. 

RICE PIE 

For two pies, take two tablespoons of rice ; wash and put it 
into a farina boiler with a quart of milk ; cook until perfectly 
soft. Let it cool ; add three eggs, well beaten, with three table- 
spoons of sugar and one of butter; a little salt, cinnamon and a 
few stoned raisins. Bake with under crust. 

Mrs. W. N. S. 



Pies. 35 

CREAM PIE. 

One pint of milk, scalded ; two tablespoons of corn starch, 

three tablespoons of sugar, yolks of two eggs. Wet the starch 

with a little cold milk ; beat the eggs and sugar until light, and 

stir the whole into the scalding milk. Flavor with lemon or 

vanilla, and set aside to cool. Line a plate with pie crust and 

bake ; fill it with cream, and cover it with a frosting made of 

the whites of the eggs, beaten dry, with two tablespoons of 

sugar. Bake a delicate brown. 

Mrs. Edwin Pancost. 

CREAM PIE ELEGANTE. 

For one pie, beat together one cup sugar, one-half cup corn 
starch, two eggs. Stir into one pint hot milk ; when well cooked 
and cool, flavor and put between crusts which have been baked 
and are cold. 

CRUST FOR PIE. 

One pint flour, one-half teacup lard, one-quarter teacup ice 
water, teaspoon salt. Bake upper and lower crusts in separate 
plates, and put the cream between. 

PLAIN APPLE PIE. 

Line your plate with pastry; fill with sliced sour apples; cover 
witli crust without pressing down the outer edge. Bake light 
brown, and when done remove the upper crust, and season with 
butter, sugar and spice to taste. 

LINCOLN PIE. 

One pint stewed sour apples, sifted ; butter size of an egg ; 

two tablespoons flour; grated rind and juice of a lemon ; yolks 

of three eggs, beaten. Sweeten to taste. Bake with lower 

crust, and when done spread a meringue of the whites of three 

eggs, beaten with three tablespoons sugar over the top, and 

brown in oven. 

Mrs. M. K. W. 



Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



P UMPKIN PIE. 

One quart pumpkin, three pints milk, three or four eggs. 
Spice and sweeten to taste. A little salt. 

C. M. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

One cup stewed pumpkin, one coffeecup milk, three eggs, 
piece of butter size of a walnut, two teaspoons cinnamon, one 
teaspoon ginger, a little salt and pepper. Sweeten with 
molasses. 

Mrs. Sugku. 

SQUASH PIE. 

One full cup stewed squash, one scant cup sugar, one pint 
milk, two eggs, two tablespoons melted butter, a little salt, 
ginger and cinnamon. 

Mrs. W. N. S. 

PIE PLANT PIE. 

Two cups pie plant, one tablespoon water, one-half cup sugar, 
a little butter. Crust : one pint flour, one-half cup lard ; pinch 
salt; water to roll out. 

PORK PIE. 

Cover the dish with crust ; put layer of apples, sliced thin ; 
a layer of pork (salt and raw), sliced very thin and in small 
pieces. Black pepper and spices to taste. Sugar upper crust. 
Bake one hour and a half. 



COCO AN UT PIE. 

One cup powered sugar, one-half cup butter, four eggs, 

one cup grated cocoanut, one quart milk. Put the cocoanut 

with the butter and sugar ; add the milk and eggs. Makes two 

pies. 

Buffalo. 



Pies. 37 



COCO AN UT PIE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half grated cocoanut, 
one quart milk, four eggs, one teaspoon of corn starch. Beat 
sugar and butter together ; add the eggs, then the cocoanut, 
lastly the milk. This will make two pies. 

M rs. H \ i i ii Gilbert. 

A VERY RICH LEMON PIE. 

One large lemon, one tablespoon of butter (heaping) ; one 
and one-half cups of sugar, three eggs, one heaping teaspoon of 
flour, one-half glass of brandy, (irate the yellow part of the 
rind and squeeze the juice of the lemon ; beat the butter and 
sugar to a cream with the yolks of the eggs ; then stir in the 
grated rind and juice, Hour and brandy ; lastly whip and stir in 
the whites. Hake with an under crust. 

LEMON J'JE. 

( )ne cup sugar ; yolks of three eggs, stirred to cream ; add table- 
spoon flour ; grated rind and juice of two lemons ; one coffee- 
cup milk. Bake with under crust. Make a meringue of whites 
of the eggs and three tablespoons of sugar ; spread over the top 
of pie. Set in oven and brown slightly. 

E. I. G. 
CHOCOLATE PIE. 

One coffeecup milk, two tablespoons grated chocolate, three- 
fourths cup sugar, yolks of three eggs. Heat chocolate and 
milk together ; add the sugar and yolks together, beaten to 
cream. Flavor with vanilla. Bake with under crust. Spread 

meringue of the whites over the top. 

Ella 1. Could. 

RICH MINCE PIES. 

Four pounds of meat, two pounds of suet, eight pounds of 
apples, six pounds of sugar, four and one-half pounds of raisins 
(stoned); one pint of brandy; ten nutmegs; add cinnamon, 
cloves, salt and citron to your taste. Wet with boiled cider. 
This quantity will make twenty-four pies on the largest size plates. 



38 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



MINCE MEA T FOR PIES. 

Four pounds of round of beef, seven pounds apples, five 
pounds raisins (chopped or stoned); two pounds suet, seven 
pounds sugar, one pint brandy, ten nutmegs, grated ; cinnamon 
and cloves to taste ; a little salt, three-fourths pounds citron, 
sliced fine. Boil beef until tender ; when cold chop fine, add 
the apples, chopped also, and the other ingredients. This 

quantity makes a three gallon crock full. 

Mrs. A. S. Lane. 

MINCE PIES. {Makes 17.) 

Boil one large or two small beef hearts ; one and one-half 
pounds fine chopped suet, six pints fine chopped sour apples, 
two pounds fine chopped raisins, two pounds currants, one 
pound fine chopped citron, one quart molasses, two pounds 
brown sugar, one quart brandy, two quarts cider, one ounce 
allspice, one ounce cinnamon, three nutmegs. Chop the meat 
when cold, add the other ingredients and cook one hour ; let it 
stand two days before making into pies, then if too rich add 
more apples. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

Two cups sugar, one small cup butter, one- half cup of 
molasses, two eggs, one cup rolled crackers, one cup cold water, 
one cup wine, one-half cup boiled cider, one cup chopped 
raisins, a little salt, cinnamon and cloves. 

Mrs. Sage. 



CHOICE COFFEES. 



Nothing helps a Breakfast so much as good Coffee. 
Pure Old Java, or Mocha and Java Combined, fresh 
roasted daily, can be found at Moore cS: Coin's. Powers' 
Block. 



Minnesota lew Process Flour. 



The Finest Flour in the United States is made in 
Minnesota. We receive it direct from the mills and sell 
it in barrels, half barrels and sacks. 



Always Use the Following. 

Colton's Extracts — Vanilla, Lemon, Rose, &c. 

Baker's Chocolates, Cocoa, Broma, &c. 

Harries', or the Royal Baking Powder 

Kingsford's Pure, Silver Gloss and Corn Starch. 
Dansville Graham Flour. 

Akron Oatmeal, Wheat, Hominy and Barley. 

Fisk's Pure Family Soap. 

Barton & Guestier's Olive Oil. 

Jackson Spice Co.'s Pure Spices. 



We recommend the above articles as the best to be had. 

MOORE & COLE, 

GROCERS, Power* Block, ROCHESTER, A. V 



SIBLEY. LINDSAY & GURR 



IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



mmt #©€© 



FANCY GOODS AND 



NOTIONS, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



LADIES' UNDERWEAR, CLOAKS aid DOLMANS, 

69, 71, 73 MAIN STREET. 



SIBLEY, LINDSAY & CURR 



HAVE THE 



Largest Cash Business 

In Western New York, and offer 

GREAT INDUCEMENTS TO CASH CUSTOMERS. 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Plain and Fancy Desserts. 39 



Plain & Fancy Desserts 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

Flour — Should always be sifted just before you wish to 

use it. 

Cream of Tartar or Baking Powder — Should be thor- 
oughly mixed with the Hour. 

Soda— Should always be dissolved in the milk. 
Butter and Sugar for Cake — Should always be beaten 
to a cream. 

EggS — Beat the yolks until you can take up a spoon full ; 
whip the whites to a stiff froth and stir them into the cake with 
the flour the last thing before putting the cake into the tins. 

To Boil a Pudding in a Bag — Dip the bag (which should 
be made of thick cotton or linen in hot water, and rub the 
inside with flour before putting in the pudding ; when done, dip 
the bag in cold water and the pudding will turn out easily. 
Always put a plate on the bottom of the kettle to keep the 
pudding from burning. 

To Steam a Pudding — Put it into a tin pan or earthen 
dish, tie a cloth over the top and set it into a steamer, cover the 
steamer closely ; allow a little longer time than you do for 
boiling. Mrs. \V. N. Sage. 

W'l'./UJf'J'S AND MEASURES. 

Two cups of sifted flour weighs one pound. 

One pint of sifted flour weighs - - - one pound. 

One pint of white sugar weighs - one pound. 

Two tablespoons of liquid - one ounce. 

Eight teaspoons of liquid one ounce. 

One gill of liquid - • . - four ounces. 

One pint of liquid - - sixteen ounces. 

Mrs W. N. SaGI 



40 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup suet or butter, one cup molasses, one bowl of raisins 
and currants, one egg, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoon salera- 
tus, dissolved in milk ; one-fourth teaspoon cloves, one-half 
nutmeg. Mix stiff with flour and steam three hours. 

SAUCE. 

One cup butter and two cups sugar, beat to a cream ; add 
three eggs beaten very light ; stir in two tablespoons boiling 
water. Flavor with wine, brandy, or vanilla. 

Mrs. M. B. B. 

PL UM P UDDING. 

One pound raisins, stoned ; one pound currants, three-fourths 
pound suet, chopped fine ; three eggs, one coffeecup sugar, one 
teaspoon soda, a little nutmeg and salt ; moisten with milk, and 
add flour to mix soft. Tie in a bag, leaving room to swell, and 
boil from three to four hours. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. A. S. Lane. 

ENGLISH PL UM P UDDING. 

Two pounds suet, chopped ; three pounds raisins, seeded ; 
two pounds currants, one-half pound citron, two pounds sugar, 
five eggs, one pint milk, one-half pint brandy, two or three nut- 
megs, a little salt, flour to make very stiff. Put in one or two 
bags, and boil in a large quantity of water seven or eight hours. 
Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. A. S. Lane. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

One and one-half cups Graham flour, one-half cup molasses, 
one-fourth cup melted butter, one-half cup sweet milk, one egg. 
even teaspoon soda, little salt, one-half cup raisins, one-half cup 
currants, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon cinnamon, one- 
fourth of a nutmeg. Steam two and one-half hours. Serve 
with warm sauce. 

Mrs. Woodbury. 



Plain and Fancy Desserts. 41 



SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 

One-half do/en good sized potatoes, grated raw ; one table- 
spoon of butter, one tablespoon of lard, one pint molasses, three 
tablespoons brown sugar, one-half pint milk, one egg, one tea- 
spoon cloves, allspice and ginger, two teaspoons salt, water to 
make a soft batter. Stir two or three times while baking, bake 
slow for two hours. Mrs. Battelle. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Fill a dish with apples nicely sliced, sweeten them, add spices, 
nutmeg, a little lemon or vanilla, and cover with a crust ; set on 
top of the stove until the crust rises, then bake a nice brown. 

CRUST. 

One quart flour, three teaspoons baking power, piece of butter 
size of an egg, salt, milk enough to mix soft dough. 

SAUCE FOR ABOVE. 

One egg, one cup fine sugar, beaten very light ; pour a little 

boiling water over until the consistency of cream. Flavor with 

vanilla, and grate a little nutmeg on top. 

Miss Fosoick. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

One pint bread crumbs, one quart milk, rind of one lemon 
grated into milk ; yolks four eggs, beaten and mixed with one- 
half cup sugar. Bake one-half hour. Spread meringue on top. 

Mrs. Pitkin. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

One egg, one large teacup sour milk, a little cream or butter, 
one teaspoon soda. Mix soft and put in deep pie plates or a 
pudding dish. Fill with blackberries or other pressed fruits. 
Steam one hour, and serve with sweetened cream, or sauce. 

M A R Y . 



42 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 

QUAKER PUDDING. 

Six eggs, beaten with nine or ten tablespoons flour and one 
quart milk. Bake about twenty minutes. Serve with sauce. 

Grandma B. 
RICE PUDDING. 

One teacup rice, one teacup sugar, one teacup raisins, small 
piece butter, a little salt, two quarts milk. Bake from an hour 
and a half to two hours. Serve with sauce. 

QUEENS PUDDING. 

One pint of bread crumbs, one quart of milk, warmed and 
poured over the crumbs ; yolks of four eggs, well beaten with 
one cup of sugar and one teaspoon of butter. When baked, 
spread over the top a layer of jelly or preserves. Beat the 
whites of the eggs dry, and add two tablespoons of sugar and 
spread over the top. Bake a light brown. Serve warm with 
sauce, or cold with sugar and cream. 

ANGELS' EOOD. 

Dissolve one-half box of gelatine in one quart of milk ; beat 
together the yolks of three eggs ; one cup of sugar, and the 
juice of one lemon ; stir it into the gelatine and milk, and let it 
just come to a boil ; flavor with vanilla. When nearly cold, 
whip the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and stir through the 
custard. Pour into moulds and set away to cool. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

Two tablespoons melted butter, one cup sugar, three small 
cups flour, one cup milk, one egg, three teaspoons baking 
powder. 

POOR MANS PUDDING. 

One-half cup of rice washed thoroughly ; three-fourths cup 
of sugar, one teaspoon cinnamon, one and one-half quarts sweet 
milk. Stir occasionally ; add milk as it boils away, until it is 
the consistency of thick cream, and quite brown. 

Mrs. W. T. Mills. 



Plain and Fancy Desserts. 43 

brown bet tie. 

One-third of bread and two-thirds of apples. Crumb the 
bread fine and chop the apples ; two cups of brown sugar, one- 
half cup butter, two teaspoons of cinnamon, little nutmeg. Mix 
thoroughlv and spread over the apples and bread. Bake very 
brown. 

SAl'CE. 

One teaspoon butter, one-half cup brown sugar, one pint 

boiling water, one teaspoon of flour ; flavor with vanilla or 

wine. 

Mrs. C. F. Paine. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Add to one quart boiling milk two well beaten eggs ; three 
tablespoons Indian meal, one tablespoon flour, a little salt. 
Bake three-quarters of an hour. Serve with sugar and cream. 

Mrs. A. A. Morgan. 



APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Fill a dish two-thirds full of apples, pared and quartered ; 
cover with biscuit-crust one-half inch thick. Steam one-halt 
hour. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

Six eggs, one quart milk, six tablespoons sugar, scald milk. 
Add the sugar and eggs beaten together. Stir until done. 



BAKED CUSTARD. 

One quart milk, four well-beaten eggs, four tablespoons sugar. 
Flavor to taste. Hake in moderate oven. 



44 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One small cup of tapioca, one quart of milk, one teaspoon of 
butter, three tablespoons of sugar. Soak the tapioca in water 
four or five hours, then add the milk ; flavor with essence of 
lemon or anything else you prefer. Bake slowly one hour. To 
be made the day before it is wanted, and eaten cold with cream 
or milk and sugar. Some prefer the pudding made with three 
pints of milk and no water. 



APPLE TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Pare and core enough apples to fill a dish ; put into each 
apple a bit of lemon peel. Soak half a pint of tapioca in one 
quart lukewarm water one hour ; add a little salt ; flavor with 
lemon ; pour over the apples. Bake until apples are tender. 
Eat when cold, with cream and sugar. 



TAPIOCA AND COCOANUT PUDDING. 

One cup tapioca, soaked over night ; one quart milk, yolks of 

four eggs, white of two, one cup sugar, two tablespoons grated 

cocoanut. Bake one-half hour. Make frosting of whites two 

eggs, three tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons grated cocoanut ; 

spread over the pudding when baked. Set in the oven until a 

light brown. 

Delia. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Three tablespoons tapioca, soaked in a teacup of water over 
night ; add one quart of milk ; stir together and boil twenty 
minutes. Beat the yolks of three eggs, and one cup sugar 
thoroughly ; stir into the milk ; flavor with vanilla. Beat the 
whites very stiff, put in the bottom of the dish and pour the rest 
over it. Serve cold. 



Plain and Fancy Desserts 45 



PUFFS. 

Two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder sifted together ; 
add one and three-fourths cups sweet milk, one teaspoon melted 
butter, one-half cup sugar, one egg ; stir quickly. Hake in patty 
tins twenty minutes. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. H. C. 

FRITTERS. 

Two cups Hour, two teaspoons baking powder, two eggs, milk 
enough for stiff batter, a little salt. Drop into boiling lard ; fry 
light brown. Serve with cream and sugar or sauce 

FRITTERS. 

One cup sour milk, one egg, one-half teaspoon salt ; Hour to 
make stiff batter; one even teaspoon soda — last thing. Fry in 
lard. To be eaten with lemon and sugar, or cider sweetened 
and hot. 

E. I! 

TAPIOCA MERINGUE. 

One small cup of tapioca, three pints of milk, three eggs. 
Soak the tapioca in the milk two hours or more ; cook in a 
farina boiler until soft ; beat the yolks of the eggs and stir in. 
Sweeten, flavor and set away to cool. before sending to table, 
whip the whites to a stiff froth and stir in lightly. 

Mrs \\ N. S 

RICH MERINGUE 

One-half teacup of rice, one quart of milk, four eggs, eight 

tablespoons of fine sugar, a littk' salt. Boil the rice in the milk 

until it is soft ; beat the yolks of the egg with four spoons of 

the sugar and stir into the rice while it is hot. Flavor with 

vanilla, and put the mixture into your pudding dish. beat the 

whites of the egg dry ; stir in the other four spoons of sugar ; 

spread the frosting evenly Over the pudding, and bake a light 

brown. 

Mrs. W. N. S 

4 



46 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard.'' 



CAKE MERINGUE. 



Line a pudding dish with cake ; fill it with boiled custard 
spread a meringue over the top, and bake a light brown. 

Mrs. A. S. Mann. 



COCOA NUT PUDDING. 

( )ne pint rich milk, two tablespoons corn starch, whites of 
four eggs, scant half cup sugar, a little salt. Put the milk over 
the fire, and when boiling add the corn starch, wet with a little 
cold milk ; then the sugar, stirring constantly, until it makes a 
smooth paste. Then take from the fire and stir in the beaten 
eggs. Flavor with lemon or vanilla, and when slightly cooled 
add half a grated cocoanut. Pour into a mould ; set in a cold 
place. Serve with soft custard. 

Miss Morgan. 



COCOA NUT P UDDING. 

One-half pound sugar, one-quarter pound butter, one-half 
pound grated cocoanut, whites of three eggs, one tablespoon 
rose-water, two tablespoons cherry wine. Beat the sugar and 
butter to a cream ; beat whites until stiff and add to the butter 
and sugar. Add the cocoanut last. Bake and serve with 
sauce. 

Mrs. E. H. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One quart milk, scalded ; one and one-half squares of choco- 
late, grated ; wet with cold milk, and stir into the scalded milk. 
When the chocolate is dissolved, pour into a pudding dish ; add 
the yolks of six eggs, well beaten, and six tablespoons sugar. 
Hake about three-quarters of an hour. Beat the whites of the 
eggs to stiff froth; add six tablespoons sugar. Spread the frost- 
ing over the top ; set again in the oven until a light brown. 

Mrs. E. W. Sage. 



Plain and Fancy Desserts. 47 



SPONGE PUDDING. 



One small stale sponge cake, one coffeecup seeded raisins, 
one-quarter cup currants, one quart milk, three eggs. Must 
have a tin mould with a chimney. Butter the mould well : 
flatten the raisins, and put thick on the mould. Crumb the cake 
in the mould with the currants. Mix the eggs and milk as for 
a custard, and pour in the mould ; cover tight and boil three- 
quarters of an hour ; then put it on a platter, and set in the 
oven for a few minutes. 

For sauce, make a thin boiled custard. 

Mrs. ( ii-D. Darling. 



SPONGE PUDDING. 

One heaping coffeecup of flour, stirred perfectly smooth in 
one quart milk. Set in boiling water and stir constantly until 
Hour is well cooked. When nearly cold, add two teaspoons 
melted butter, one small teacup sugar, volks twelve eggs (beaten 
to froth) — mix together. Just before baking, add the whites of 
twelve eggs, well beaten. Have in oven a dripping pan half full 
of boiling water; put the pudding in buttered tin dish, and set 
in dripping pan. Bake in moderate oven three-quarters of an 
hour. Serve with sugar and cream or sauce. 

Syracuse. 



ORANGE SPONGE PUDDING. 

Cut five or six oranges in small pieces and place in a pudding 
dish ; pour over them one coffeecup sugar ; then make a boiled 
custard of one pint milk, yolks of three eggs, one-half cup sugar, 
one large tablespoon com starch ; pour this over the oranges 
Make a meringue of the beaten white-, of the eggs with three 
tablespoons of powdered sugar, and put Over the top of the 
pudding, and brown it slightly in the oven. 

l.MM \ S.\ 1 1 ERLE 1 . 



48 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



ECLAIR PUDDING. 

Four eggs, one cop sugar, one cup flour, one teaspoon vanilla, 
one teaspoon baking powder. When baked spread the top with 
chocolate icing. 

icim;. 

White of one egg, one-half teacup milk, one-half teacup sugar, 
four tablespoons grated chocolate ; boil until thick and smooth. 
Just before serving the pudding, split and fill with the following: 

CUSTARD. 

( >ne pint milk, a little salt, yolks of three eggs, one-half cup 
sugar, two tablespoons corn starch ; flavor with vanilla and 

lemon. 

Ida M. Satterlee. 

DELMONJCO PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, four eggs (leave out the whites of three) ; 
three tablespoons of sugar, two tablespoons of cornstarch, one 
cup of cocoanut, a little salt. Put the milk in a farina boiler to 
scald ; wet the starch in cold milk ; beat the eggs and sugar, 
and stir all into the scalding milk ; add the cocoanut, and pour 
the whole into a pudding dish ; whip the three whites dry with 
three tablespoons of sugar ; flavor with lemon or vanilla; spread 
over the pudding and bake a light brown. Eat hot or cold. 

Mrs. W. N. S. 

ORANGE P UDDING. 

four sweet oranges, sliced small ; one quart milk, one cup 
sugar, two tablespoons corn starch, yolks of three eggs. Heat 
the milk, when nearly boiling add the corn starch (wet with a 
little cold milk), the sugar and eggs, thoroughly beaten. Boil 
until thick as custard ; when cold pour over the sliced oranges. 
Make a meringue of the whites of three eggs and one small tea- 
cup of sugar : spread on pudding, and put sliced oranges on top 

of this. 

E. I. G. 



Plain and Fancy Desserts. \g 



PORCUPINE PUDDING. 

One cup sugar, one cup Hour, three eggs, three teaspoons 
baking powder, dissolved in teaspoon milk; bake in a round 
tin. Frost cake, top and sides, thickly ; stick blanched almonds 
over top of cake with points up ; make floating island ; put cake 

on glass standard ; pour a little custard with snow around the 
edge of standard; on each spot of snow drop a little jelly ; use- 
rest of custard as sauce. 

Mrs. H. C. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

One-half box gelatine, soaked in cup of water one hour; two 
lemons, grated ; three eggs, one and one-half cups sugar. Add 
sugar and lemons to gelatine, then pour over one-half pint boil- 
ing water. When dissolved beat until all sparkles ; then add the 
whites of eggs beaten stiff. Make a custard of yolks. 

Ella. 
PUDDING SAUCE. 

One tablespoon flour, butter size of an egg, one-half pint 

sugar, grated peel and juice of one or two lemons, to suit taste ; 

mix flour and butter together, then add sugar and lemon ; then 

put into one-half pint boiling water, boil until it thickens, cool a 

little, then add well beaten egg. 

M. C. 

FOAM SAUCE. 

One cup pulverized sugar, two eggs; beat sugar and yolks 

together in a bowl; set in boiling water ; stir until hot; then add 

whites beaten still". but a small piece of butter and tablespoon 

of brandy in a dish; pour over them the sugar and eggs just 

before serving. 

Ella 1. G. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

One cup sugar, two eggs; beat the yolks very light, add sugar, 
mix thoroughly, add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth; then 
add two tablespoons brandy. Serve as soon as made. 

E. B. P. 



50 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard. 



P UDDJNG SA UCE {Cold). 

One heaping tablespoon of butter, one cup of fine sugar, one 

glass of sherry or Madeira wine. Beat the butter and sugar to a 

cream, and gradually beat in the wine; grate a little nutmeg 

over it before sending to table. 

Mrs. W. N. S. 

WINE SA UCE {Hot). 

Boil one-half of pint water with a tablespoon of flour, and 

strain on the sauce made as above just before sending it to 

table. Set it over the top of the tea-kettle three or four 

minutes. 

' Mrs. W. N. S. 

CHOCOLA TE BLANC MANGE. 

One quart milk, one-half box gelatine, soaked in one cup 
water ; four tablespoons grated chocolate, rubbed smooth in a 
little milk ; three eggs, vanilla. Heat the milk until boiling, 
then add the other ingredients; boil five minutes, pour into 
mould. Serve cold with sugar and cream, or custard. 

Eli, a I. Gould. 

CORN STARCH BLANC MANGE. 

One quart milk, one cup sugar, three tablespoons corn starch; 

flavor with lemon or vanilla. Boil the milk and sugar together, 

flavor, then stir in corn starch dissolved in a little cold milk. 

boil and turn into mould. 

Mrs. Gilbert. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

Put two dessert spoons of crushed sugar in a tin pan. Let it 

stand on the stove until it begins to brown, then stir constantly 

until it is a thick, black syrup. Pour it into a quart of scalding 

milk ; add six ounces of white sugar and the yolks of six eggs. 

Beat and pour into cups, set in a pan of hot water in the oven, 

and bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. M. K. W 



Plain and Fancy Desserts. 51 

APPLE SNOW. 

Mash the pulp of three baked apples with silver spoon; add 
one cup sugar, and the beaten white of an egg; flavor and beat 
one-half hour. Serve Oil soft custard or alone. 

Jennie Morg \n 

SNOW DRIFT. 

Two strips (or one-half ounce) isinglass, soaked in cold 
water twenty or thirty minutes. Take it from the cold water 
and pour over it one pint boiling water ; add two cups granu- 
lated sugar and the juice of two lemons. Put it on the ice, and 
when thick beat into the beaten whites of four eggs. Then 
put in mould and place on ice. Serve with boiled custard. 

Mrs. M. K. W 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE ELEGANTE. 

One-half package Coxe's gelatine dissolved in a very little 
water ; one quart whipped cream ; flavored and sweetened to 
taste. Line a mould with sponge or white cake. Stir the 
gelatine into the cream and pour into the prepared mould. 
The cake may be soaked in a little wine if preferred. 

Mrs. H. Candee. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Two tablespoons gelatine soaked in a little cold milk two 
hours; two coffee cups rich cream; one teacup milk. Whip 
the cream stiff in a large bowl or dish; set on ice. Boil the 
milk and pour gradually over the gelatine until dissolved, then 
strain; when nearly cold add the whipped cream, a spoonful at 
a time. Sweeten with pulverized sugar, and flavor with 
vanilla. Line a dish with lady lingers or sponge cake; pour in 
the cream and set in a cool place to harden. 

Ella I Gould. 



52 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard," 



SPANISH CREAM. 

Make a soft custard of one quart milk, yolks of six eggs, six 
tablespoons sugar. Put one box gelatine dissolved in one-half 
pint water over the fire ; add the custard; flavor with vanilla. 
Strain into moulds. Set in cool place. Delia. 

RUSSE CREAM. 

One-half box gelatine, soaked in a little water one-half hour; 
one quart milk, one cup sugar, four eggs. Mix sugar, milk r 
yolks of eggs and gelatine together; put in a pail set in a kettle 
of water, and boil twenty minutes. Beat the whites of the eggs 
stiff, and stir into custard after taking off the fire. Flavor with 
vanilla, and pour into moulds. Serve with sugar and cream or 
custard. 

WHIPPED CREAM. 

To one quart cream whipped very thick, add powdered sugar 
to taste ; then one tumbler of wine. Make just before ready to 
use. Mrs. W. C. R. 

SNOW JELLY. 

One-half box gelatine covered with cold water. Let it stand 
while mixing. Two cups sugar, juice two lemons, whites of 
three eggs beaten stiff. Add to gelatine one pint boiling water, 
the sugar and eggs ; beat thoroughly and strain tinto moulds. 
Make a custard of one pint milk, three eggs' yolks; turn over 
the jelly just before serving. Mrs. Lank. 

WINE JELL Y. 

One-half box Coxe's gelatine, soaked in one-half pint 
cold water one hour; add one pint boiling water, two cups 
sugar, two lemons, grated ; two-thirds pint sherry wine. Let 
all come to a boil, then strain into moulds and set in a cool 
place to harden. A. H. 



BEWARE -ADULTERATIONS. 



AN EMINENT CHEMIST in England recently made 
an analysis ol several samples ol Starch, bought at 
different places, and in each sample found adulterations 
of mineral or earthy matter to the extent of twenty per 
cent, and in some even as high as forty percent. Kings- 
ford's Oswego Pure and Silver Gloss Starches were 
found to be ENTIRELY FREE FROM ADULTER- 
ATIONS of any nature. 

When tlu- very delicate article of Corn Starch, which 
is so largely used in the family for FOOD, and especially 
for CHILDREN and INVALIDS, is adulterated with 
UNHEALTHY or POISONOUS substances, it becomes 
very important that every Housekeeper should be cau- 
tioned, and know what kind is used. 

Only a careful Chemical Analysis will show the PURE 
ARTICLE from the ADULTERATED. 

jf{tniiofoti( 5 xfsuicgo f wit Starrlj 

Has been thus tested and analyzed, and proved to be 
PERFECTLY PURE and free from any foreign sub- 
stance. 



In order to get THE 15 EST the UNADUL- 
TERATED ARTICLE— see that the name, 

T. Kingston! & Son, Oswego, I. Y. 

IS ON EVERY BOX AND EVERY PACKAGE 



,3= In a Sale of Thousands of Gross, from the day these 
STRICTLY PURE FLAVORING EXTRACTS, of Un- 
equaled Strength, were offered in the market, to the present 
time, not one particle of Coloring or Adulteration has ever 
been used. Dealers treble sales with them. 



Colton's Select Flavors 

OF THE CHOICEST FRUITS, 




RECEIVED THE ONLY MEDAL AWARDED TO 

' FRUIT FLAVORS," 

AS FOLLOWS: 

"J. IV. COL TON, West field, Mass., Fruit Flavors, Per- 
fumes." "For the Excellency of his Fruit Flavors." By 
fudges of Award at 

The Great Centennial Exhibition of 1876. 



They have taken the Prize in the New England Fair, American 
Institute, New York City; Middlesex Mechanics' Fair, at Lowell, Mass., one 
of the finest Fairs held in Massachusetts, and at every Fair where exhibited 
in competition. 

NEW YORK AGENCY: 

Bogle & Lyles, 87 and 89 Park Place. 



(H^-MOORE & COLE, and other FINE GROCERS, Rochester, N. Y 
SELL THEM. 



Cake. 53 



LEMON JELLY. 

One-half box Coxe's gelatine, soaked in one-half pint cold 
water one hour; and one pint boiling water, and one and one- 
half cups sugar, three lemons, grated. Stand on stove until 
boiling. Strain into a mould and set in cool place. 



CIDER JELL V. 

One box gelatine dissolved in one pint cold water. In twenty 
minutes add one pint boiling water, then one quart cider and 
one pint sugar (granulated), and the grated rind and juice of 
two lemons. Let it stand on the stove until hot, but not boil. 
Then strain into moulds. Mrs. E. S. Converse. 



CAKE. 



SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

One-half cup butter, two cups molasses, one cup sugar, four 
cups flour, one cup sour milk, four eggs, one teaspoon saleratus, 
ginger and cloves. M ( ' 

GINGERBREAD. 

One cup brown sugar, and one tablespoon butter, stirred to a 
cream ; add one cup New Orleans molasses, and mix well ; then 
add one cup sour milk, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in 
a little of the sour milk. Mix all together, and stir in two 
and a half cups flour; put in ginger or spice to taste. Bake in 
one large loaf one hour, or two small loaves one-half hour. 

Ellen. 



54 "Mother Hubbards Cupboard." 



GINGERBREAD. 

One cup Brown sugar, one cup molasses, three-fourths cup 
butter, one teaspoon cinnamon, two teaspoons ginger. Stir to- 
gether and put on the stove and warm, while sifting flour and 
beating the eggs. Then add one teacup sour milk, two eggs, 
four and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in a 
little hot water. Put in after the sour milk, one teacup chopped 
raisins. Mrs. E. Holmes. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One cup molasses, one-half cup lard, one-half cup boiling 
water, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon ginger, a little salt, flour 
to roll out. 

SEED COOKIES. 

Two small cups of sugar, one cup butter, one-half cup sweet 
milk, one egg, two teaspoons baking powder, caraway seed. 
Mix very soft, roll out, cut in shapes ; sprinkle sugar over the 
top and bake. Mrs. G. Gould. 

MOLASSES COOKIES. 

One cup butter, one cup brown sugar, one cup New Orleans 
molasses, three eggs, three even teaspoons soda, two small tea- 
spoons ginger. Stir butter and sugar together; then add the 
other ingredients, with flour enough to make a soft dough. Roll 
thick, cut, and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. George F. Hurd. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One-half cup butter, one cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, 
one cup sour milk, one teaspoon ginger, one-half teaspoon cin- 
namon, one-half teaspoon nutmeg, one egg, one cpaart flour, one 
teaspoon saleratus — dissolved in the milk. Bake in cups. 
Very nice hot for tea. 

Mrs. G. Darlim; 



Cake 



GINGER SNAPS. 

One cup of molasses, one cup sugar. Put four tablespoons 

of boiling water into a cup and fill the cup with melted butter. 
One teaspoon of ginger, one of salt and one of soda. Mix as 
soft as you can roll out ; roll as thin as a knife blade. 

COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, two-thirds cup butter, two tablespoons sour 
milk, one large egg or two small ones, a little soda. 

A: 1 fSEB DO UGHN U TS. 

One pint sweet milk, one-half pint lard, one pint sugar, three 
eggs. Mix soft at night — using the milk, one-half the sugar and 
lard and one-half pint of yeast. In the morning add the rest 
with the eggs, one nutmeg, two tablespoons whiskey, and a little 
soda. Knead well, and raise; when light, roll out thin, and 
after cutting let raise again before frying. One-half beef suet 
and one-half lard is better to fry them in than all hud. 

Mrs. Woodbury. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One and one-half coffeecup sugar, one-half coffeecup lard, one 
and one-half coffeecup milk, three eggs, four teaspoons baking 
powder, one teaspoon salt, one nutmeg, flour enough to mix soft. 

FRIED CAKES. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, three tablespoons 
of butter, three teaspoons of baking powder, two eggs, one quart 
of flour. Mrs. \V. T. Mills. 

CRULLERS. 

One cup sour cream, one cup sugar, one egg, small teaspoon 
soda, a little salt; spice to taste. Mix soft. fry in boiling 
lard. \n\ i Jan i 



56 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



COMFORTS. 

One cup milk, one cup sugar, two eggs, a little salt, two and 
one-half cups of flour, three teaspoons baking powder. Mix 
thoroughly, and drop from a spoon into boiling lard; fry a light 
brown. Mrs. Candee. 

PEPPERNUTS. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, four eggs, one teaspoon 
cloves, one of cinnamon, one-half pound citron, one cup blanch- 
ed almonds, one-half teaspoon black pepper, one-half teaspoon 
salt. Rub flour and sugar together ; add the other ingredients. 
Roll out aud cut in small square cakes. Bake a light brown. 

Mrs. Winans. 

ANGEL FOOD. 

One gill flour, one and one-half gills sugar, the whites of 
eleven eggs, one teaspoon of cream tartar (just even full); one 
teaspoon of vanilla. Beat the eggs to a stiff froth, then add 
sugar after sifting twice ; sift the flour five times and mix the 
cream tartar in it well ; put a pan in the oven and set your tin 
on that, or it will bake too fast. Bake in a new tin and do not 
grease. Time one hour in a slow oven. A very nice and deli- 
cate cake. Mrs. A. Prentice. 

LADY FLNGERS. 

One-half pound pulverised sugar and six yolks of eggs, well 
stirred; add one-fourth pound flour, whites of six eggs, well 
beaten. Bake in lady finger tins, or squeeze through a bag or 
paper in strips two or three inches long. These are nice placed 
together after baking, with frosting or chocolate icing. 

I. M. S. 
FRUIT JUMBLES. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three and one-half cups flour, 
one-half cup milk, three eggs, one-half nutmeg, grated; three 
teaspoons baking powder, one cup currants. Bake in a broad 
shallow tin, and cut in squares while warm. 

Mrs. Emma W. Sage. 



Cake. 57 



ECLAIRS A 'LA CREME. 

Three-fourths pound flour, one pint water, ten eggs, one-halt 
cup butter. Put the water on the fire in a stew-pan with the 
butter ; as soon as it boils stir in the sifted flour; stir well until 
it will leave the bottom and sides of the pan, when taken from 
the fire ; then add the eggs one at a time. Put the batter in a 
bag of paper, and press out in the shape of fingers on a greased 
tin. When cold fill with cream. 

CREAM. 

One and one-half pints milk, two cups sugar, yolks of five 
eggs, one tablespoon butter, three large tablespoons corn starch, 
two teaspoons extract vanilla. They are very nice frosted with 

chocolate. 

1. M. S. 

SCOTCH SHORT BREAD. 

Four pounds flour, two and one-half pounds butter, one and 

one-fourth pounds sugar, one wine glass rose water, one-half 

pound caraway comfits, one-half pound citron. Rub the butter 

and sugar to a cream, add the rose water, then the flour ; roll 

out to rather less than one-half an inch in thickness, and strew 

the i omfits and citron on top; pass the rolling pin over them, 

and then cut into squares and diamonds with a paste jigger. 

Good for three months. 

Mrs. M. K. W. 

BREAD CAKE. 

Two coffee cups bread dough, two teacups sugar, two eggs, 
one teacup butter, two teaspoons essence lemon, one nutmeg, 
teaspoon ea< 1) cloves, cinnamon and allspice, wine glass brandy, 
coffee cup raisins. Let rise before baking. 

Mrs. A. S. I .a m 



5<s "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



COFFEE CAKE. 

One cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one cup butter, one 
cup strained coffee, wine glass brandy, one pound raisins, one 
pound currants, one tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon 
cloves, two nutmegs, one teaspoon soda, four cups flour. 

Mrs. L. Winans. 

FRUIT CAKE WITHOUT EGGS. 

One pound fat pork, chopped fine; pour over it one pint 
boiling water or coffee, two cups molasses, one cup sugar, one 
and one-half pound raisins, one-half pound currants, one table- 
spoon cinnamon, one teaspoon saleratus, eight cups flour. 

Mrs. H. Dot v. 

RAISED LOAF CAKE. 

Four cups flour, one cup butter, one-half cup yeast, one cup 

milk ; let it rise over night, then add two cups sugar, two eggs> 

one-half teaspoon saleratus, one pound raisins; put in tins; 

let rise again and bake. 

Mrs. Flint. 

NUT CAKE. 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
sweet milk, one and one-half cups sifted flour, two teaspoons 
baking powder, one large cup chopped walnuts. Frost when 
baked, mark in squares and put half a nut on each square. 

Mrs. Matie C. Dayfoot. 

NUT CAKE. 

Two-thirds cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three 
eggs, three cups flour, three teaspoons baking powder, one cup 
nuts; bake in shallow tins about two inches thick, cut in squares, 
frost and put walnut meat on each piece. 

E. li. 



Cake. 59 



POUND CAKE 

One and one-half cups flour, one cup butter, one and one- 
half cups sugar, one cup eggs, one-half teaspoon baking powder. 
Beat butter and flour to a cream; beat the eggs and sugar 
very light; put all together and add the baking powder. 

Mrs. M. K. Woodbury. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, two and one-half cups flour, 
one-half cup sweet milk, whites eight eggs, two teaspoons bak- 
ing powder. Mrs. VV. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, three cups flour, one cup butter, one-half 
cup sour milk, whites of eight eggs, two teaspoons baking pow- 
der, one teaspoon bitter almond, one cup blanched almonds. 

Mrs. A. Churchill. 

SNOW CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons 
cream tartar. Sift all together through a sieve; add the whites 
of ten eggs beaten stiff. Bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. R. W. Sage. 

LEMON CUP CAKE. 

One cup butter, three cups sugar, five cups flour, one cup 
milk, one teaspoon saleratus, six eggs, peel and juice of one 
lemon. 

Mrs. C. 

IMPERIAL CAKE. 

One pound sugar, one pound butter, one pound flour, two 
pounds raisins, one pound citron, one pound sweet almonds, 
two tablespoons wine or brandy, one nutmeg, mace, ten eggs. 

Mrs. C. 

5 



6o " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



CORN STARCH CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, one and one-half cups sugar, one and 
one-half cups flour, one-half cup corn starch, one-half cup milk, 
whites six eggs, one and one-half teaspoons baking powder, a 
few blanched and chopped almonds. 

CLA Y CAKE. 

One pound sugar, one pound flour, one-half pound butter, six 
eggs, one-half pint sweet cream, one and one-half teaspoons 
baking powder, little nutmeg. 

SODA POUND CAKE. 

One and one-half coffeecups sugar, three-fourths coffeecup 
butter, two coffeecups flour, one-half coffeecup milk, four eggs, 
one and one-half teaspoons baking powder. Flavor with lemon. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

One pint flour, one pint sugar, six eggs, one-half cup water, 

three teaspoons baking powder. Mix the yolks and sugar, then 

add the water, then flour, then the whites of eggs on top. Stir 

as little as possible. 

L. B. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, one-half pound flour, a little salt, ten 

eggs; flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

Mrs. W. N. S. 

EEATHER SPONGE CAKE. 

One and one-half goblets sifted sugar, one goblet sifted flour, 

two teaspoons cream tartar, one-half teaspoon salt. Sift all 

through a sieve; add whites of ten eggs well beaten. Bake in 

two square tins in quick oven, frost, flavoring with bitter almond 

or rose. 

Jennik. 



Cake. 6i 



SPONGE CAKE. 



One cup of sugar, one cup Hour, mix thoroughly; four 
(beaten separately), mix the whites in first; two teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, little salt, lemon or vanilla. 

M rs. Wm. T. Mills. 



QUEEN'S CAKE. 

One pound sugar, one pound flour, one-half pound butter, 
four eggs, one and one-half gills sour cream, one gill wine or 
brandy, one nutmeg, small teaspoon soda, one pound raisins, 
one-half pound < itron. 

/ / ASHING TON CA KE. 

Three cups sugar, two cups butter, one cup milk or water, 

four cups flour, five eggs, three teaspoons baking powder, one 

pound raisins one-half pound citron, one teaspoon ground cin- 

namon, one nutmeg. 

Mrs. Ambrose Lank. 



SPICE CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups brown sugar, three and one-half 
cups flour, one cup cold water, two teaspoons baking powder, 
three eggs, two teaspoons cinnamon, one-half teaspoon cloves, 
one-half nutmeg, one large cup raisins and currants. 

Mrs. H. E. Birdseyk. 

JUMBLE CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sour milk, and one- 
half teaspoon soda, one nutmeg, live eggs, little less than one 
quart Hour, two teaspoons baking powder. 



62 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



COCO AN UT CAKE. 

Three-fourths pound butter, one pound sugar, three-fourths 
pound flour, eight eggs, the grated meat of a cocoanut. 

C. U. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

One pound sugar, one-half pound flour, two teaspoons baking 
powder, one-half pound butter, six eggs or whites of twelve, two 
grated cocoanuts, save enough of it for the frosting, put the rest 
in the cake. Will make one large cake. 

Mrs. Fannie B. Northrop. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three 
cups flour, whites four eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. 

Mrs. A. A. Morgan. 

COMPOSITION CAKE. 

One pound of flour, three-fourths pound of sugar, one-half 
pound of butter, three eggs, one-half pint of sweet milk, one- 
half teaspoon^of soda, one nutmeg, a little cloves, one glass of 
brandy, one pound of fruit. If you wish the cake rich, add as 
much more fruit as you like. 

LEMON CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one- 
half cup of milk, two cups of flour, two eggs, juice and grated 
rind of one lemon, one-half teaspoon of soda. 

WHITE ERUIT CAKE. 

Whites of eight eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup 
milk, four cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, two cups 
raisins, one-half cup citron, sliced fine. 

Mrs. Emma W. Sage. 



Cake. 63 



WEDDING CAKE. 

One pound flour, one pound butter, one and one-half pounds 
brown sugar, twelve eggs, eleven pounds raisins, two pounds 
citron, one-half ounce cinnamon, three-fourths ounce cloves, 
one ounce mace, three gills brandy, one teacup milk, two tea- 
spoons baking powder. 

WEDDING FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, one pound butter, two 
pounds currants, one pound raisins, one-half pound citron, one 
ounce mace, one ounce cinnamon, four nutmegs, one ounce 
cloves, eight eggs, wineglass brandy, one-half ounce rose water. 

Mrs. Alfred S. Lane. 

WEDDING FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound butter, one pound brown sugar, one pound flour, 
slightly browned ; twelve eggs, six pounds raisins, four pounds 
currants, one pound citron, four nutmegs, one tablespoon 
mace, two tablespoons cinnamon, one-half tablespoon cloves, 
two wineglasses white wine, two wineglasses brandy, one wine- 
glass rose water. 

Mrs. H. E. B. 

WHITE FROSTING. 

To the white of an egg when thoroughly beaten, add five 
tablespoons sugar, beating all the time. Will frost one medium 
sized cake. 

CHOCOLA TE FROSTING. 

Whites of three eggs, fifteen tablespoons pulverized sugar, four 
tablespoons grated chocolate. Beat whites thoroughly ; add the 
sugar and chocolate. 



64 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



COCOANUT FROSTING. 

Whites of three eggs, twelve tablespoons sugar, one grated 
cocoanut. Beat the sugar and eggs together ; spread on the 
cake, and sprinkle the cocoanut over thickly. This will make 
a whiter frosting than stirring in the cocoanut. 

ORANGE ICING. 

Whites of two eggs, twelve tablespoons sugar, two oranges, 

grated. 

LEMON ICING. 

Whites of two eggs, two cups sugar, juice and part of the rind 
of two lemons. 

ALMOND ICING. 

The whites of three eggs, beaten light ; one cup of blanched 
almonds, chopped fine or pounded ; ten tablespoons pulverized 
sugar. Flavor with little bitter almond. 

COOKED FROSTING. 

One small teacup of granulated sugar, wet with very little 
water. Set on the stove and let it boil, without stirring, until it 
begins to thicken. Take whites of two eggs, beat very light. 
Strain the boiled sugar into them slowly, beating all the time. 
Flavor to taste. 

MARTHA WASHINGTON CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, two cups flour, one egg, 
two teaspoons baking powder, two tablespoons butter. Bake in 
three layers. 

CUSTARD. 

One egg, one-half pint milk, one teaspoon corn starch, one 
tablespoon flour, two tablespoons sugar. Scald the milk ; beat 
the sugar, flour, egg and cornstarch together ; add the milk, boil 
until thick. Flavor, and when cold, spread between cake. 

Mrs. Candee. 



Cake. 65 



ALMOND CREAM CAKE. 

Two cups sugar (pulverized), one-fourth cup butter, one cup 
sweet milk, three cups Hour, three teaspoons baking powder, 
whites four eggs, beaten very light ; one-half teaspoon vanilla. 
Hake in four layers. 

FOR THE CREAM. 

Whip one cup of sweet cream to a froth ; stir gradually into 
it one-half cup pulverized sugar, a few drops vanilla, and one 
pound of almonds, blanched and chopped. Spread quite thickly 
between the layers of cake, and frost the top and sides. 

Mrs. Henry Barnard. 

JELLY FRUIT CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, three cups flour, three teaspoons baking 

powder, two-thirds cup butter, one cup milk, three eggs. Flavor 

with vanilla. To half the cake add one tablespoon molasses, 

one tablespoon brandy, one tablespoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 

cloves, one-half teaspoon allspice, one-half nutmeg, one cup 

chopped raisins, one-half pound citron. Make in jelly tins, two 

layers of light and two of fruit cake. Spread jelly between the 

layers, when slightly cool, putting a light one on top. Over all 

spread white frosting. 

H A 



CONFECTIONER V CAKE. 

One coffeecup sugar, three-fourths coffeecup butter, two 
<:offeecups flour, one coffeecup milk, whites five eggs, three tea 
spoons baking powder. Flavor with vanilla. Take one table- 
spoon of this cake, add one-half cup (hopped raisins, one-halt 
cup citron, one-half cup flour, one-half cup molasses, two tea- 
spoons cinnamon, one-half teaspoon cloves, one wineglass 
brandy. Hake in three layers, two light and one dark. Put 
together with soft frosting. 

M RS. Wm. Hurd. 



66 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



BLACK CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, two and one-half cups 
flour, five eggs, one cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda dissolved 
in a little boiling water ; one-half cake " Baker's " chocolate, 
grated and put in the cake before stirring in the flour. Bake in 
Jelly tins, in four layers. 

FILLING. 

One pound white sugar wet with a little cold water ; add the 
whites of three eggs, slightly beaten ; one-half cake grated cho- 
colate. Cook in boiling water until it thickens. Flavor with 
vanilla. Spread between the layers, and outside the cake. 
Sprinkle grated cocoanut over the top. 

Mrs. J. A. S 

LEMON COCOANUT CAKE. 

One pound sugar, one pound flour, one-half pound butter, six 
eggs, one-half pint cream, one teaspoon cream tartar, one-half 
teaspoon soda. 

DRESSING BETWEEN LAYERS. 

One grated cocoanut, three-fourths cups sugar, two eggs, 
juice of one lemon. Beat the eggs thoroughly, add sugar and 
lemon, lastly the cocoanut ; put all on the stove and cook 
enough to cook the egg, being careful not to burn. Frost the 
cake and strew cocoanut over the top. 

Mrs. Gilbert. 



JELL Y CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, 
three and one-half cups flour, and three teaspoons baking pow- 
der, four eggs. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. Bake in jelly 
tins. 

Mrs. W. T. Mills. 



Cake. 67 



GERMAN CAKE. 

One cup sugar, two tablespoons butter, one cup flour, four 
eggs, one teaspoon baking powder. Hake in two layers. 

KILLING. 

Whites of five eggs, fifteen tablespoons sugar ; add grated 
cocoanut. Spread between and on top of layers. 

Mrs. A. S. Mann. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, on« cup butter, one cup sweet milk, three 
cups flour, five eggs (yolks of two and whites of five); three tea- 
spoons baking powder, two Oranges (grated peal and juice of 
one). Bake in four layers. 

FILLING. 

Whites of three eggs, juice of one orange, fifteen tablespoons 
of sugar. Beat together, spread between layers and outside of 
cake. Pare and pull in small pieces two oranges ; put on top of 
cake. 

Belle. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup sweet 
milk, one-half cup corn starch, one cup flour, whites of six eggs, 
a little vanilla, two teaspoons baking powder. Bake in layers. 

FROSTING FOR ABOVE. 

\\ hites of five eggs, twenty tablespoons sifted sugar, beaten 
very light ; a little vanilla. Spread between layers and outside 
of cake. 



68 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



PICKLES, CANNED FRUIT, &C, 



CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Make a weak brine, hot or cold ; if hot, let the cucumbers 
stand in it twenty-four hours, if cold forty-eight hours ; rinse, 
and dry the cucumbers with a cloth, take vinegar enough to 
cover them, allow one ounce of alum to every gallon of vinegar, 
put it in a brass kettle with the cucumbers and heat slowly, turn- 
ing the cucumbers from the bottom frequently; as soon as they 
are heated through skim them out into a crock, let the vinegar 
boil up, turn it over the pickles and let them stand at least 
twenty-four hours; drain off the vinegar and throw it away. 
Take fresh vinegar, and to every gallon allow two tablespoons 
of white mustard seed, one of cloves, one of celery seed, one of 
stick cinnamon, one large green pepper, a very little horse 
radish, and if you like one-half pint sugar. Divide the spices 
equally into several small bags of coarse muslin, scald with the 
vinegar and pour over the pickles. If you like your pickles 
hard, let the vinegar cool before pouring over them. 

PICKLED CUCUMBERS. 

FOR ONE THOUSAND. 

Sprinkle salt and pour boiling water over for three successive 
days, then prepare vinegar as follows : One-fourth pound whole 
cloves, one-fourth pound cinnamon, one-fourth pound allspice, 
one-fourth pound black pepper, one-fourth pound white mustard, 
alum size of an egg, one pound brown sugar, a little horse radish 
root. Boil with vinegar ten minutes and pour over pickles; put 
the spices in a bag or leave loose in vinegar, as you choose. 

M. C. 



GEORGE GOULD & SON, 

SPECIALTY OF 

perfect ifittin0 ifine Jljoco. 

No. 16 STATE STREET, 

AND 

N os. 3 & 5 Exchange Place. 

DONALD GORDON, 

JVos. 79 V Si £. Alain St., "Rochester, JV. If. 



•*^>4 tMP0BTER_0F FASHIONS fe« -» 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

S>ry Coo4s> $ttilU»ery^ 

FANCY GOODS and CLOAKS. 



flfalcsah <# Retail {§ook tQonse, 



M 



1846 JLAM 1880 



JVo. 67 JSast Jllain Street, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
fg^MoTMKK Hubbard's ami all tin- cook Books for sale 



THIS IS FOR YOU. 




Oldest, Purest and Most Reliable in the Market 
and sold under a 



UFO 



It has bee?i before the 'Public over Thirty Years, 
a?id the rapidly increasing demand is the best 
evide?ice of its great merit. Peing a strictly 
PUPK Cream of Tartar Saving Powder, it con- 
tains ?io Alum, Ammotiia, Starch or other adulter- 
atio?i, nor anything whatever in t?ie least injurious . 
ASK TO HP G7Z0CKP for it, and TAKE JVO 
OTHEP, for the numerous low p?'iced 2$ a king 
Powders now on the market are AH adulterated. 
If he does not keep K. Harries', have him order 
it at once, and if satisfaction is not given, money 
will be refunded. For sale by the trade generally . 

MANUFACTURED BY 

POWELL & PLIMPTON, 

BUFFALO, IN. Y. 



Pickles, Canned Fruit, &c. 69 



CUCUMBER PICKLES. 



SIX HUNDRED CUCUM1SERS. 



Make a brine that will hear up an egg, heat it boiling hot, 
pour it over the cucumbers ; let them stand twenty-four hours, 
or make a cold brine and let it stand forty-eight hours. Take 
the cucumbers and wipe the black specks from each one, then 
take sufficient quantity of vinegar to cover them, and add a 
small lump of alum ; put the cucumbers in the brass kettle with 
the vinegar cold, heat them slowly, turning them from the bottom 
several times ; let them stand twenty-four hours ; afterwards 
take three gallons of vinegar if needed to cover them ; the size 
of the cucumbers vary so much, judgment must be used. Then 
put three pints of brown sugar, three gills of mustard seed, a 
handful of cloves, a handful of stick cinnamon, six green pep- 
pers, one tablespoon of celery seed, ginger root, a piece of alum 
the size of a walnut ; tie in a muslin bag all the spices, with the 
peppers, and scald with the vinegar, then pour it over the cu- 
cumbers hot ; add green grapes and horse radish, cold. 

M RS. ( )ri.n Sack. 



HAST INDIA PICKLE. 

One hundred cucumbers (large and small), one peck green 
tomatoes, one half peck onions, four cauliflowers, four red pep- 
pers (without the seeds), four heads celery, one pint bottle 
horseradish. Slice all, and stand in salt twenty-four hours; 
then drain, pour on weak vinegar, stand on stove until it comes 
to a boil; then drain again. One ounce ground cinnamon, one 
ounce ground tumeric, one-half pound mustard, one-quarter 
pound brown sugar; wet these with cold vinegar; add to this 
sufficient vinegar to moisten all the pickles. Cook ill together, 
ten minutes. Seal in bottles while hot. 

M RS. Pi L'KIN 



yo "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard. 



FRENCH FICKLE. 

One peck green tomatoes, sliced ; six large onions, a teacup 
of salt thrown on over night. Drain thoroughly, then boil in 
two quarts of water and one quart of vinegar fifteen or twenty 
minutes ; drain in colander ; then take four quarts vinegar, two 
pounds brown sugar, one-half pound white mustard seed, two 
tablespoons cloves, two tablespoons cinnamon, two tablespoons 
ginger, two tablespoons ground mustard, one teaspoon cayenne 
pepper ; put all together and cook fifteen minutes. 



M. ('. 



PICCALLIL Y. 



One peck green tomatoes sliced, one-half peck onions sliced, 
one cauliflower, one peck small cucumbers. Leave in salt and 
water twenty-four hours ; then put in kettle with handful scraped 
horseradish, one ounce tumeric, one ounce cloves (whole), one- 
quarter pound pepper (whole), one ounce cassia buds or cin- 
namon, one pound white mustard seed, one pound English 
mustard. Put in kettle in layers, and cover with cold vinegar. 
Boil fifteen minutes, constantly stirring. 

HIGDOM. 

One-half dozen large cucumbers, one dozen small cucumbers, 

one-half dozen large onions, two dozen green tomatoes, one 

cabbage, four large green peppers, two large red peppers ; chop 

fine, and sprinkle over a coffee cup of salt ; let it stand over 

night, then drain through a colander. Put two quarts of vine 

gar, one quart of water with this, and boil fifteen minutes ; 

drain again, and add one pound brown sugar, one-half pound 

white mustard seed, three tablespoons cloves, three tablespoons 

cinnamon, two tablespoons allspice, two tablespoons ginger, 

two tablespoons mustard, one small teaspoon cayenne pepper, 

one small teaspoon black peeper, alum size of a walnut ; add 

vinegar enough to cover all. Let it just boil. 

M. ('. 



Pickles, Canned Fruit, &c. j\ 



TOMATO SOY. 

One-half bushel green tomatoes, three onions, three green 
peppers, one-quarter pound mustard seed, three cups sugar, 
three cabbages. Chop the tomatoes and onions together (fine); 
add to one gallon of the tomatoes one cup of salt ; let stand 
twenty-four hours, drain and add the peppers (chopped fine), 
mustard seed, sugar, and other spices, to taste. Moisten all with 
vinegar and cook until tender. Before bottling, add the cab- 
bages (chopped), and one cup chopped horseradish. 



CHILI SAUCE. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, six green peppers, six onions, two 
teaspoons ground allspice, two teaspoons ground cloves, two 
teaspoons ground cinnamon, two cups brown sugar, five cups 
vinegar, salt to taste. Scald and skim the tomatoes, (hop the 
onions and peppers fine ; boil all together slowly, three or four 
hours, then bottle. 

Mrs. Lane. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One quart large cucumbers, one quart small cucumbers, two 
quarts onions, four heads cauliflower, six green peppers, one 
quart green tomatoes, one gallon vinegar, one pound mustard, 
two cups sugar, two cups flour, one ounce tumeric, l'ut all in 
salt and water one night ; cook all the vegetables in brine until 
tender, except large cucumbers. Pour vinegar and spices over. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

One gallon of tomatoes (strained), six tablespoons salt, three 
tablespoons black pepper, one tablespoon cloves, two table- 
spoons cinnamon, two tablespoons allspice, one and one-halt 
pints vinegar; boil down one-half. One peck of tomatoes will 
make one gallon strained. 



72 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



GREEN TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck of green tomatoes, one dozen large onions, one-half 
pint salt ; slice the tomatoes and onions. To a layer of these 
add a layer of salt ; let stand twenty-four hours, then drain. Add 
one-quarter pound mustard seed, three dessertspoons sweet oil, 
one ounce allspice, one ounce cloves, one ounce ground mus- 
tard, one ounce ground ginger, two tablespoons black pepper, 
two teaspoons celery seed, one-quarter pound brown sugar. 
Put all ingredients in preserving pan, cover with vinegar, and 
boil two hours. L. B. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, cut up, boil tender and sift through 

a wire sieve ; add one large tablespoon ground cloves, one large 

tablespoon allspice, one large tablespoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 

cayenne pepper, one-quarter pound salt, one-quarter pound 

mustard, one pint vinegar. Boil gently three hours. Bottle and 

seal while warm. 

Mrs. Lane. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

Five pints of grapes, simmer until soft, then put through a 
colander ; add to them two pints brown sugar, one pint vinegar, 
two tablespoons allspice, two tablespoons cinnamon, two table- 
spoons cloves, one and one-half teaspoons mace, one teaspoon 
salt, one and one-half teaspoons red pepper. Boil till thick ; 

then bottle. 

E. & I. 

RIPE CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Pare and scrape out the inside of the cucumber ; put in a 
weak brine for twenty-four hours. Make a syrup of sugar and 
vinegar ; boil a few slices of the cucumber at a time in this, 
until they look clear. When the cucumbers are all cooked, boil 
down the syrup and pour over them. 

M. C. 



UPDIKE'S 




For flavoring dishes 
it will suit a greater 
diversity of tastes 
than any other rel- 
ish in the market. 

Recommended by 
experienced tasters 
as superior to the 
Worcestershire, or 
any other sauces of 
high repnte. 

It is made entirely 
from vegetable in- 
gredients, its found- 
ation being ripe 
tomatoes. 

It much improves 
Soups,Stews,(how- 
ders, and Salads, 
and imparts a deli- 
cious flavor to Fish, 
Steaks, Chops, and 
all kinds of Meats. 




The greatest care 
and cleanliness is 
exercised in prepar- 
ing it for the mar- 
ket. 

Chemists certify 
to the purity of its 
ingredients. 

It is a splendid 
tonic to an enervat- 
ed system, giving 
health and vitality 
to the stomach and 
producing not the 
slightest bad effect. 

In use at the prin- 
cipal Hotels and 
Restaurants. 

On Sale at the 
hailing grocer- 
ies 



TRADE MARK. 



PRONOUNCED BY CONNOISSEURS 



,\i 



1G 



NOW ON SALE, 
FOR KVKRY VARIETY OF 1 DISH. 



UPDIKE & CO., 



Ma. rt a, fa ctULVeTS, 



Rochester, iV, Y. 



D. H. TAYLOR, 

GLAZING A SPECIALTY. 

(Sox No. 4 ExcKccnge Street. 



ISP* I Paint Rooms; also dress-over Furniture. Class set 
in Windows, Show Cases, Aquariums, &c.,— Large and Small, 
Grained Glass or Stained. All orders attended to in any part 
of the city. 



Picki.es, Canned Fruit, &c. 73 



RIPE CUCUMBER PICK/./:. 

Peel and take out the inside of the cucumbers; cut in pieces, 
put in cold vinegar, let them lie twenty-four hours ; then to a 
quart of vinegar put two pounds of sugar and one ounce cinna- 
mon buds. Boil the whole together, until the cucumbers are 
clear. 

PICA' LED WA TERMELON. 

Take the green part of the rind of the melon, pare and cut 
into small pieces. To one quart of vinegar add two pounds of 
sugar, one ounce of cassia buds. In this boil the rind until clear 
and tender. 

I,. H. 

SPICED PEACHES. 

Seven pounds fruit, one pint vinegar, three pounds sugar, two 
ounces cinnamon, one-half ounce cloves. Scald together sugar, 
vinegar and spices ; pour over the fruit. Let it stand twenty- 
four hours ; drain off, scald again and pour over fruit, letting it 
stand another twenty-four hours. Boil all together until the 
fruit is tender. Skim it out, and boil the liquor until thickened. 
Pour over the fruit and set away in a jar. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

Seven pounds grapes, three pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, 
one tablespoon cloves, one tablespoon cinnamon. 

SWEET PICKLED PEACHES. 

One peck peaches, three pounds brown sugar, one quart vine- 
gar. Dip each peach in a weak solution of soda water, and wipe 
dry to remove roughness. Stick three or four cloves in each 
peach. Heat the vinegar and sugar, then put in the pea< lies and 
cook until tender. 

Mrs. E. s. Converse, 
6 



74 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



PICKLED PEACHES. 

One peck peaches, three pounds sugar, one cpiart vinegar, 
cloves. 



PICKLED PLUMS. 
Four pounds plums, two pounds sugar, one pint vinegar. 

PLCKLED PEARS. 

One-half bushel pears, three quarts vinegar, five pounds sugar, 
cinnamon to taste. 

SPICED BLACKBERRIES. 

To six pints fruit take two and one-half pints sugar, one and 
one-half pints vinegar, one-half ounce cinnamon (ground), one- 
half ounce cloves, one-half ounce allspice, a little mace broken 
in small pieces. Boil the sugar and vinegar together, with the 
spices, putting these last into muslin bags. Then put in the 
berries and let them scald, not boil. 

Mrs. M. K. Woodbury. 



In canning fruit, to a pound of fruit allow one-fourth to 
one-half pound sugar, according to taste. 

CANNED PINE-APPLE. 

Pare the fruit, and be very particular to cut out the eyes. 

Weigh it and chop fine. Add to it the same weight of sugar. 

Mix thoroughly in a large crock, and let it stand twenty-four 

hours. Then put in cans, filling them full, and seal tight. After 

leaving them about two weeks it is well to look and see if there is 

any signs of working. If so, pour into a pan and warm through, 

then replace in cans. 

Mrs. A. S. Lane. 



Pickles, Canned Fruit, &£. 75 



CANNED CHERRIES. 

One-fourth pound sugar, one pound fruit, one teacup vinegar 
to five pounds fruit. 

CANNED PINE-APPLE. 

Three-fourths pound sugar to one pound of fruit. Pick the 
pine-apple to pieces with silver fork. Scald, and can hot. 

Mrs. A. S. Mann. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Put the fruit on and scald thoroughly ; strain, and for one 
pint juice allow one pound sugar; when juice boils, stir in 
sugar; boil until dissolved. Pour into glasses. 

RASPBERRY JAM. 

Six pounds sugar to eight pounds fruit, one pint currant 
juice, with an additional pound of sugar. Jam all together, 
and boil down until a good, rich flavor. Then can. 

Mrs. A. S. Mann. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Peel the oranges, and put peel in water; let boil until tender; 
then with a knife scrape off the white lining, which is bitter; 
then cut up peel fine. Take the oranges, divide into sections 
as they separate naturally. With a pair of scissors cut off the 
stringy edge in middle of piece, the seeds will then come out 
easily. Chop or cut fine, and add to peel. Then to one pint 
of orange, add one pound of sugar, and boil until thick enough, 
it thickens a little in cooling. 

J. M. 



y6 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



SALADS 



CABBAGE SALAD. 

To a dish of chopped cabbage, four teaspoons of celery seed, 

or one bunch of celery. Put in a bowl, yolks of two eggs, one 

teaspoon of sugar, one teaspoon of butter, one teaspoon of 

pepper, one teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon of made mustard, 

one-half tea-cup of vinegar. Set the bowl into hot water, stir 

carefully until it begins to thicken. Let it get cold. Pour 

over the cabbage. If it does not moisten it enough, put in a 

little more vinegar. 

Mrs. W. T. M. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

Two cabbages, chopped fine; sprinkle with salt; let stand 
over night. One pint vinegar, one-half cup ground mustard, 
three eggs. Beat eggs thoroughly and add to boiling vinegar; 
Wet the mustard with cold water or vinegar ; add to the boil- 
ing vinegar; pepper and salt to taste, and let all come to a boil. 
Pour over cabbage, and stir thoroughly together. 

Mrs. M. B. Birdseye. 

DRESSLNG FOR CABBAGE. 

One egg, one teaspoon mustard, one teaspoon salt, one tea- 
spoon sugar, one-half cup vinegar, one-half cup milk. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Yolk of one egg, salt-spoon of salt, mustard-spoon of mustard, 
one cruet of oil put in very slowly, and when well beaten add 
one tablespoon of vinegar. 



Salads. yy 



SALAD DRESSING. 

Beat four eggs light, add one tablespoon mixed mustard, one 
half teaspoon salt, five tablespoons vinegar, a little cayenne pep- 
per; mix well, then stand in a dish filled with boiling water ; 
when warmed thiough add a tablespoon of butter; cook until a 
little thicker than custard, stirring constantly. If desired it 
may be boiled until thicker, then thinned with milk or cream. 

Mrs. Gilbert. 



CHICKEN SALAD. 

Boil the white meat of two large chickens; cut it coarse and 
add the white part of celery cut coarse; a little more chicken 
than celery. 

DRESSING. 

Three yolks of eggs, well beaten ; one pint of oil added drop 
by drop, and beaten; the juice of two lemons, one teaspoon of 
dry mustard, a little cayenne pepper, a little salt. If not moist 
enough beat the whites of two eggs and add to it. 

Mrs. Geo. Gould. 



CHICKEN SALAD. 

Use the white meat of two good sized chickens, and celery 
enough to make the proportion one-third chicken and two- 
thirds celery ; boil ten eggs hard, rub the yolks perfectly smooth 
with a silver spoon, adding gradually four tablespoons of olive 
oil, one tablespoon of made mustard, two teaspoons of salt, one 
teaspoon of black pepper, half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper, 
and one tablespoon of sugar; add sweet cream by degrees until 
about the consistency of batter. Just before sending to table, 
mix the dressing with the chicken and celery, and moisten with 
sharp vinegar. The juice of two lemons is an improvement. 

Mrs. W. N. Sage. 



78 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



MYONAISE DRESSING. 

Yolks of three eggs, beaten ; oil added gradually until as stiff 

as cake batter; salt-spoon of salt, lastly the white of one egg, 

beaten stiff. This is very nice for lobster or chicken salad, or 

as a dressing for celery. 

Mrs. G. D. 

SALMON SALAD. 

One can fresh salmon, four bunches celery ; chop as for 
chicken salad ; mix with the salmon. 

DRESSING. 

One teaspoon of mustard, two tablespoons vinegar, yolks of 
two eggs, salt to taste, and a little cayenne pepper; mix thor- 
oughly, add it to the salmon just before serving. 

Mrs. C. F. Paine. 



BEVERAGES. 



VIENNA COFEEE. 

Equal parts Mocha and Java coffee; allow one heaping table- 
spoon of coffee to each person, and two extra to make good 
strength ; mix one egg with the grounds, pour on the coffee half 
as much boiling water as will be needed, let the coffee froth* 
then stir down the grounds, and let it boil five minutes; then 
let the coffee stand where it will keep hot, but not boil, for five 
or ten minutes, and add the rest of the water. To one pint of 
cream add the white of an egg, well beaten ; this is to be put in 
the cups with the sugar, and the hot coffee added. 

Mrs. A. W. Mudoe. 



Beverages. 79 



ELLEN'S COFFEE. 

FOR SIX PERSONS. 

Take one full cup ground coffee, one egg, a little cold water; 
stir together, add one pint boiling water, boil up; then add 
another pint boiling water, and set back to settle before serving. 

TEA. 

One teaspoon of tea is allowed for each person ; pour on a 
little boiling water and let come to a boil ; add as much hot 
water as is necessary. 

CBOCOLA TE. 

Tablespoon chocolate for each person. Pour on boiling 
water and allow to thicken up; milk enough to cool; then stir 
in well beaten egg and sugar to taste, add milk and boil fifteen 
or twenty minutes; flavor with vanilla. Beat whites of eggs 
and pour over when ready to serve. 

WINE WHEY. 

One pint sweet milk, boil, and pour sherry wine until it 
curdles; then strain and use the whey. 



E. H. H. 



BLACK CURRANT CORDIAL. 



Five quarts black currants, two ounces ginger root, one 
ounce cloves, two ounces stick cinnamon, two ounces allspice, 
four nutmegs, one teaspoon cayenne pepper. Bruise the cur- 
rants, the ginger root and cinnamon, add all the other spices 
except pepper. Put into a thin muslin bag; put the pepper in 
another bag; pour over all one-half gallon whiskey. Let it 
stand forty-eight hours, stirring occasionally; strain this off, 
and put over the currants another half-gallon of whiskey; stir 
thoroughly, and strain into the other whiskey ; add to this 
liquor, four pounds granulated sugar. If too strong dilute with 

a little water; then bottle. 

Grandma Reid. 



-8o " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



BOUILLON. 

Two pounds lean beef, chopped fine ; pour over it one quart 

cold water, put it in a porcelain kettle, cover tight, and let it 

simmer four hours. Strain off the tea and let it cool, beat the 

white of one egg and add to the tea ; put it on the stove and 

stir until it come to a boil ; let it boil until it becomes perfectly 

clear, skimming; then strain through a fine napkin; season with 

salt to taste. 

Mrs. Edgar Holmes. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

Cover the berries with vinegar; let them stand forty-eight 
hours. Strain them through a sieve; add one pound white 
sugar to one pint of juice; boil one-half hour, then bottle. If 
possible, use half red berries ; they give a richer flavor, and the 
black ones the color. 

Mrs. A. Lane. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

Three pints red berries : pour over them one pint cider vin- 
egar and let stand twenty-four hours. Strain, and to one pint 
of juice, add one pound of sugar; boil one-half hour, and when 

cold, bottle for use. 

Mrs. Hiram Doty. 



SWEETS 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

Granulated sugar is preferable. Candy should not be stirred 
while boiling. Cream tartar should not be added until the 
syrup begins to boil. Butter should be put in when the candy 
is almost done. Flavors are more delicate when not boiled in 
the candy. 



Sweets. Si 



CREAM FOR BON-BONS. 

Three cups sugar, one and one-half cups water, one-half tea- 
spoon cream tartar; flavor with vanilla. Boil until drops will 
almost keep their shape in water ; then pour into a howl set in 
cold water; stir steadily with a silver or wooden spoon until 
cool enough to hear the hand ; then place on a platter and 
knead until of fine even texture. If too hard, a few drops of 
warm water may he stirred in ; if too soft it must be boiled 
again. This is the general foundation of Cream Hon-Bons. It 
may be flavored with chocolate, by adding a tablespoon of 
melted chocolate while the syrup is hot. 

Miss Hki i \ W. I [OOKER. 

CHOCOLA TE CR EAM S. 

Set one-half cake cooking chocolate on a plate or flat dish, in 
the oven until soft. Prepare the cream (as cream bon-bons); 
roll into small balls; leave a few moments to dry, then roll in 
the melted chocolate and place on buttered paper. Two two- 
tined forks will be found most convenient for rolling in the cho- 
colate. 

H. W. H. 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

One-half cup water, one-half cake chocolate, two cups sugar; 

flavor with lemon or vanilla. Boil the sugar and water to a 

thick syrup, put aside until a little cool, then heat to a thick 

cream; add flavoring and make it into balls. Dip quickly into 

melted chocolate, place on buttered plate, and put in a cool place 

to dry. 

Miss Nellie SiDDONS. 

ALMOND CREAMS. 
Boil sugar, water, etc., as directed for cream, and when par- 
tially stirred, add a cup of blanched almonds (chopped line). 
Treat as plain cream, and when well moulded, cut in squares <>r 
bars. Almond cream is very nice flavored with chocolate. 

H. W. H. 



$2 " Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



COCOANUT CREAM. 

Make like almond cream, substituting grated or dessicated 
cocoanut for the almonds. 

H. W. H. 

CREAM ALMONDS. 

Take enough of the plain cream in the hand to cover an 
almond, and roll the almond up in it. Almonds thus prepared, 
look and keep better, if rolled in powdered sugar. They are 
very nice made with chocolate flavored cream. 

H. W. H. 

COCOANUT DROPS. 

One pound cocoanut (grated and dried), one pound white 
sugar, two eggs (well beaten). Mix this together, make them 
up pear shape; lay on a sheet of paper on a tin, about an inch 
apart. Bake fifteen minutes. 

COCOANUT CREAM CANDY. 

One cocoanut, one and one-half lbs. granulated sugar. Put the 
the sugar and the milk of the cocoanut together and heat slowly 
until the sugar is melted ; then boil for five minutes ; add the 
cocoanut (finely grated), and boil for ten minutes longer, stirring 
constantly to keep from burning. Pour on buttered plates, and 
cut in squares. Will take about two days to harden. 

Nellie Siddons. 

CREAM WALNUTS. 

Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup water. Boil without stirring, 
until it will spin a thread ; flavor with vanilla. Set off into a 
dish with a little cold water in ; stir briskly until white and 
creamy. Have the walnuts shelled ; make the cream into small 
round cakes with your hngers; press half a walnut on either side, 
and drop into sifted granulated sugar. For cream dates, take 
fresh California dates, remove the stones and fill the centre of 
dates with this same cream. Drop into sugar. 

A. H. 



Sweets. 83 



HICKORY NUT CANDY. 

One cup hickory nut meats, two cups sugar, one-half cup 
water. Boil sugar and water without stirring, until thick enough 
to spin a thread. Flavor ; set off into cold water ; stir quickly 
until white, then stir in the hickory nuts ; turn into a flat tin, 
and when cold cut into small squares. 



FRUIT CANDY. 

One cocoanut, one and one-half pounds granulated sugar (wet 
with milk of cocoanut). Put in sauce pan, let it heat slowly ; 
then boil rapidly five minutes ; add the cocoanut (grated very 
fine), and boil ten minutes, stirring constantly. Try a little on 
a cold plate, and if it forms a firm paste when cool, take from 
the fire. Pour part of it out on to a large tin lined with greased 
paper ; then add to the remaining cream one-quarter pound 
raisins (stoned), one-half pound blanched almonds, one pint 
pecans, one-half cup chopped walnuts. Pour over the other 
cream, and when cool cut in bars and squares. 

Mrs. Nelson Sack. 



VANILLA CREAM CANDY. 

Three cups sugar, one and one-half cups water, one- half tea- 
spoon cream tartar, butter size of a walnut ; flavor with vanilla. 
Boil until it begins to thread, or until the drops are somewhat 
brittle if dropped in cold water ; pour into buttered platters, 
and when sufficiently cool pull over a hook, or in the hands. It 
may be flavored with peppermint, lemon, &c. If chocolate fla- 
voring is desired, grate it over the hot candy, or place some 
melted chocolate on it before pulling. A pretty variety may be 
made by pulling the vanilla and chocolate candies together a 
few times, thus leaving it striped. Pulled candy should never 
be moved, after pouring into platters, until ready for pulling. 

It will be sure to granulate. 

H. W. H. 



84 "Mother Hubbard's Cupboard." 



CREAM CANDY. 

One pound white sugar, three tablespoons vinegar, one tea- 
spoon lemon extract, one teaspoon cream tartar. Add a little 
water to moisten the sugar, and boil until brittle. Put in the 
extract ; then turn quickly out on buttered plates. When cool, 
pull until white, and cut in squares. 

Miss N. Siddons. 



BUTTER SCOTCH. 

Two cups sugar, two tablespoons water, piece of butter the 

size of an egg. Boil without stirring, until it hardens on a spoon. 

Pour out on buttered plates to cool. 

Hattie. 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

Three cups brown sugar, one cup milk, one-half cake choco- 
late, one piece butter (size of an egg). Boil until thick ; pour 
in a buttered pan, and when cool cut in squares. 

Nellie Siddons. 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

Two cups molasses, one cup brown sugar, one cup cream or 
milk, one-half pound Baker's chocolate, piece of butter size of 
an egg. Beat all together ; boil until it thickens in water ; turn 
into large, flat tins, well buttered. When nearly cold, cut into 
small squares. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

Three cups yellow coffee sugar, one-half cup molasses, one 
cup water, one-half teaspoon cream tarter, butter the size of a 
walnut. Follow the directions for vanilla cream candy. 

H. W. H. 



COLGATE & CO.'S 



■PBC?IAI*1?M5S 




-♦»--♦-♦-<♦- 



Cashmere Bouquet Toilet Soap. 

Cashmere Bouquet Handkerchief Extract. 
Cashmere Bouquet Toilet Water. 

Cashmere Bouquet Toilet Powder. 

Cashmere Bouquet Sachet Powder. 
Vaseline Toilet Soaps. 

Viang Viang Toilet Soap (New). 

White Rose Toilet Soap (New). 
7th Regiment Bouquet Toilet Soap (New). 
Violet Toilet Water. 

Rosodora Toilet Water. 

Vaseline Pomade. 

Vaseline Cold Cream. 



The above are a few out of the many styles of Toilet Preparations made 
by COLGATE & CO., which have attained a widespread reputation and sale. 
They are all noted for excellence of quality, delicacy and strength of perfume, 
and elegance of style. 

tWFor Sale by all Dealers in Toilet Articles. .,<gj 



JACKSON 



Spice Company, 



n*^ 



■*>♦»!». 



HART & LEAVEY, 



PROPRIETORS. 



<»> ♦ » <». 



^ 



OE ($ 




I 



DEALERS IN 



STRICTLY 



HI ,4-i 



PI 



m 



■<>«»<»> 



WE CHALLENGE COMPARISON. 



j^mjss vick:, 




60 STATE STREET, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y 



<£S 



mmt 



BRACKETS, FLOWER POTS, etc., 






FOR HOUSE DECORATION. 



FLORAL DESIQTSTS, 

OF ANY DESCRIPTION, 

For Funerals, Parties, Weddings, &c, &c, furnished on short 
notice. Telegraph orders receive prompt attention. 



ROGERS & CONVERSE, 



DEALERS IN 



€IAiaiPIIIflllM1€ 



Oil Cloths, Mattings, &c, 



14 EXCHANGE STREET, 



Lafayette Rogers, } 

Charles T. Converse. \ 



Rochester, N. Y. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




014 488 885 6 •