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Full text of "Motoring magazine and motor life"

4^F 

Ofct-Dec. 
1913 



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MOTOKING MAGAZINE 



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Published Monthly by the Proprietor Frederick Marriott, at the Office 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, California 

DEVOTED TO THE MOTORING INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Price 10 Cents 



San Francisco, Cal., October, 1913 



J 



$1.00 Per Year 



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I 1 



THE 

FISK 

RUBBER 

COMPANY 

of New York 



SAN FRANCISCO, 
CAL. 



I — I 



HEAVY CAR TYPE 

FISR-° 

Town Car 
Tread -^ 
Tires ' 



Prcvcnf Skidding 



I 1 



PACIFIC COAST 
BRANCH HOUSES 



Seattle. Wash. 
Portland, Ore. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Oakland, Calif. 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Fresno, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



I 1 



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Cut Down Your Gasoline Bills 



DEVELOP MORE POWER 



Avoid Carbon deposits and corroded valves by using 



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..'»S~'~^. 



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Mwm^ ; 



ANS MOTOR BOATS - 



M GEORGE A. HAWS : 

*:•":•- i..hricatin9 Oils* Creases. ; 
NewYorkCitr.US*-Jr 



No matter what brand of oil you are using Panhard 
Oil will give you better service. We have proved it to 
thousands. 



George A. Haws, New York 



BERNARD I. BILL 

SOLE DISTRIBUTER 

543 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco. Cal. 



WHY NOT 



let us take your automobile photo- 
graphs? Our reputation for 
exceptionally fine work guaran- 
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are reasonable and the same to 
everyone. Also you will find 
that our photographs reproduce 
w^ell for your advertising cuts. 

Our new studio, the largest w^est of 
New York, is completely equip- 
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for every branch of our busi- 
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large enough to accommodate 
two machines at once : : : : : 

Try us when you want a photograph 
of any kind. You will be pleased 
with our portraits, our com- 
mercial w^ork, and if you have a 
Kodak our finishing will be a 
pleasant surprise ::::::: 



ARTHUR SPAULDING CO. 

625-63.) Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones: Franklin 1184 C 4084 



Have You a Good Old 
Automobile 



^ We can bring it up-to-date — at a 
lesser cost than a trade on a new 
model. The Vesta Electric Lighting 
System and Crescent Air System is 
all that is needed to make your car 
more complete than any 1914 model . 

Give me a chance to convince you, 
informc^tion costs you nothing. 



B. I. BILL 

5J^3 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco 



"Hoover" Auxiliary Spring 
& Shock Absorber 




Action of "Hoover" Spring under ordinary load, or runnins 
on smooth roads 

Full factory equipment on all 
Packards, Oldsmobiles, Coles, 
Thomas and Seven others. 
Absolutely perfect. No com- 
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$14.00 to $18.00 



US' 

IMPOSSIBLE TO BREAK SPRINGS 

Under compression by heavy 
loads, rough roads or bumps. 
Under all conditions rides as 
easy as on asphalt. Impossible 
to break springs. 

Hoover Spring Company 

617 Turk St., San Francisco, CaL 





©CTOISEIR, 119 E3 

Editorial 2 

Seeing Crater Lake from the Motor Car 3 

To the Geysers in a Day 7 

Nocturnal Touring and a Ride at Sunrise 9 

Peninsula Touring 11 

Good Roads Department 13 

(a) Working Organization of Lincoln Highway and 
Plan for Raising Funds 13 

(b) Road Construction About San Francisco 14 

(c) The Fifth Transcontinental Route 14 

(d) Concerning the Pacific Coast Highway 14 

(e) Shell Roads of Galveston County 15 

Early Entries in 500-Mile Race 16 

Calendar of Events in Motordom for 1913-1914 17 

New Things for the Motorist 18 

Changes in the Trade 20 

What a Cycle Car is 20 

Items of General Interest 21-24 

The Blessings of Your Motor Car 22 

Poem ( Anon ) 23 



Vol. V 



October, 1913 




No. 4 



MOTORING MAGAZINE and MOTOR LIFE 

Published Monthly by the Proprietor Frederick Marriott 
at the Office 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, California 

DEVOTED TO THE MOTORING INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST 




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In this issue will be found an entertaining- 
compilation of information for the motorist 
and those interested in automobile affairs, on 
touring, on roads throughout the Pacific Coast, 
and -what the country is doing ^vith its good 
roads problem. The reader may learn of the 
Lincoln Hig-hway and its progress. Given are 
many ne^/v^ things for the motorist, with more 
to follow in succeeding issues. 

A trip to Crater Lake and to the famous 
Geysers is recounted in a manner to interest 
and appeal to automobile enthusiasts. Also 
may be read the story of a trip by night and 
sunrise in the Santa Clara Valley. 

It is the set purpose of Motoring- Magazine and 
Motor Life to give to the reader a complete, 
comprehensive and entertaining series of facts 
that will interest him — facts on roads, touring 
and everything related to the automobile and 
its influence on the coast. 



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MOTORING MAGAZINE 

AND MOTOR LIFE 



vSooiii;^; c'i':\i:oi' '/:\lo) i''i'0(i\ tlio iVlotor c'ai* 



ISy A. Lfelbos 



California o''!!ers much to the motorist 
for his pleasure in touring, much that is 
impossible of duplication elsewhere; but 
her sister States, Oregon, Washington 
and Idaho, also hold for him a wealth of 
natural beauty. Idaho has the Snake 
River, with its canyon of igneous rock, 
and the Saw Tooth Mountains; Washing- 
ton has mountains and vast stretches of 
virgin forests of Douglas fir, while Ore- 
gon comes to the front with one particu- 
larly excellent example of Nature's han- 
dicraft, which is known as the Crater 
National Reserve. Herein lies the mys- 
terious and beautiful Crater Lake. 

We had read much about Crater Lake, 
and the stories and descriptions of the 
place that reached our ears fired thi' 
imagination to a point of acuteness that 
left us practically no alternative but to 
see it ourselves. For this reason a trip 
to the Lake was planned and executed. 

Sacramento was reached by boat. The 
trip north through Redding, Shasta 
Springs to the State line, which was 




When Nature smokes. 



crossed at Ager, is ever a beautiful one, 
and has been enjoyed by many Califor- 



nia motorists for years. The roads in the 
main are smooth enough to permit of 
comfortable travel at a good pace; and 
surely the tourist could wish for a no 
more inspiring sight than is here offered 
hy Nature. For miles, the snow-steeped 
cone of Mount Shasta glistens in the 
warm sunlight, looms gray and sombre 
in the early morning hours, or melts into 
the most wonderful old rose shades and 
shadows as the evening settles down, and 
cool breezes sweep down the canyons 
and gulches. 

We made Redding our first night's con- 
trol; Shasta Springs, which was reached 
by way of Kennett, the second. Thus far 
had we traveled 244 miles. On the third 
day out of Sacramento, we crossed the 
Oregon line, and passed through a broad 
plateau country, where the roads are 
rocky, twisting and very poorly surfaced 
— to Klamath Springs. Arriving here in 
the evening added 72 miles more to the 
trip. 

From Klamath Hot Springs to Harri- 




Tlie pleasiriii vista of Pelican Bay. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 











^ 



/4 rocky, ragged rim. Remnants of a collapsed cove. 



man Lodge on Pelican Bay, the distance 
is 69 miles, and these miles were such as 
to make us remember them always. Leav- 
ing Klamath Hot Springs, one shortly 
comes upon a steady uphill pull for ten 
miles. This is known as Dorris grade. 
The road surface is adobe, and is fright- 
fully rough and unpleasant for the oc- 
cupants of the car. After Dorris Grade 
comes virgin forests to Keno, where the 
country opens up and spreads out in roll- 
ing hills of scattered and sometimes scant 
verdure, continuing like this to Klamath 
Falls. All the way from the Falls to 
Harriman Lodge is "first speed" work 
over a grade that the speedometer regis- 



tered as 25 per cent, and which is very 
rough and winding. 

We were now within striking distance 
of the lake. Our progress had been ever 
upward until we were close to 6,000 feet 
above sea level. A start was made 
early the fifth day for the rim of the lake, 
which is 1,000 feet above the surface of 
the lake itself. In fact, so far down is it, 
and the descent so tiresome and onerous 
that few people indeed have the courage 
and inclination for the task. Attracted by 
the prospect of good fishing, however, 
we determined to descend, and did so, 
although the effort involved can hardly 
be considered commensurate with the 




Engine still running with gallons of water aboard. 



number of fish that one is allowed to 
catch. The limit set by the government 
is five; and in less than five minutes each 
one of us had that many, for here is one 
body of water where fishing can be really 
and truly called "good." Also, it is a 
most inspiring sight to view the surround- 
ing sides of the lake, which tower pre- 
cipitously upward in ragged battlement 
of rock of volcanic nature. The coloring 
is really the most astonishing effect to be 
seen. Nature alone knows how to blend 
colors or contrast them, and the attempts 
of artists for centuries to emulate her 
feat as a colorist has been, and no doubt 
always will be, a stimulus if not an in- 
centive to artistic accomplishment. 

Snow was met up with 39 miles from 
th-^ Ledge on Pelican Bay. But the rim 
of the lake was drawing closer, so we 
plowed through it for several miles. Oc- 
casionally steep pitches appeared, where 
we found it necessary tc throw the limbs 
and foliage of trees beneath the wheels 
to obtain traction. Most of the road from 
Pelican Bay to Crater Lake was reason- 
ably good — that is to say, it wasn't at all 
bad, at least so bad as one might expect 
in that kind of wilderness. The pull on 
the motor, however, is a steady one, and 
careful and discreet driving is requisite, 
since the water in the radiator boils very 
easily in the high altitude, and most of 
the way the curves and turns — narrow 
themselves as to clearance — are flanked 
by most appalling precipices and de- 
nuded declivities. At Camp Arant, we 



October, 1913. 



AND MOTOR LIFE 




Snany peaks and pinnicles arnvc the take. 



were compelled to register before enter- 
intj the National Park. The roads in the 
Park are in very passable condition, and 
the motorist can find nothing to complain 
of in this respect, all the way to the rim 
of the lake, where sits the tavern. 

We were about the first automobile 
touring enthusiasts to penetrate the wil- 
derness protecting the lake, and at that 
time enjoyed the distinction of climbing 
farther through the snow than any other 
car. At that, we were unable to drive 
the car entirely to the tavern, as no road 
was cut, and the snow, beat upon by the 
hot sun, was mush like in consistency 
and in places very deep. The car was 
left standing in a sheltered place, while 
we, suit cases and baggage in arms, 
labored up the hill over the snow to the 
Tavern on the rim of the lake. 

The morning of the sixth day was sper.i 
fishing — that is to say, rowing about the 
limpid surface of the lake, for we fished 
but very few minutes — and that after- 
noon at 2 :40 we said good-bye to the lake 
and the lake's hostelry en route to Klam- 
ath Falls by way of Fort Klamath. We 
put up at the White Pelican Hotel, where 
accommodations are excellent, having 
covered, since leaving the Crater Lake, 
a fraction over 60 miles. 

Trexalls — a farm house on Eagle Lakr 
— proved our destination the night of tht 
seventh day. We traveled 160 miles by 
way of Merrill. Malin, Lookout, Adin and 
Grasshopper. To Merril the roads are 
good, but at Malin we missed the road 
that leads over a bridge, and were com- 



pelled to ford the stream. The water 
was deeper than we hoped, and as a re- 
sult, in midstream the engine stopped 
running. Water filled the pan and the 
muffler, even pouring into the body of the 
car. However, the carbureter was set 
high enough to clear, and therefore was 
able to fulfill its function properly. The 
starter turned over the motor. The muf- 
fler cleared out somewhat and the motor 
started humming. We were able to pull 
out on our own power, although a larger 
car, which followed us, was not quite so 
lucky. Once on shore, we drained two 
gallons and a half of water out of the 
crank case. Putting in a fresh supply of 



oil, the journey was resumed. 

Then came 68 miles of absolute deso- 
lation. The country assumed the shape 
of a plateau, sans trees, sans foliage, sans 
life. There was to be seen not one living 
object. No farm houses, no human be- 
ings, no animals, not even a jack rabbit 
greeted us. The road was in frightful 
condition. For miles the center of the 
road was so high as to make travel over 
it very uncertain. In many places it be- 
came necessary to straddle rocks. On one 
of these we noticed a deep scar, and a 
smear of oil. Then, for several miles, 
was visible a stream of oil. Some unfor- 
tunate tourist had knocked off the drain 




Seventy miles of Uod-forsakcn uastc. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



valve of the crank case. 

At Adin we encountered the grade 
known as Adin Hill. This is reputedly 
a hard pull for the motor car. According 
to the speedometer, the grade pitched at 
35 per cent. We passed five cars that 
were unable to make the climb; they at 
length gave up, and contented themselves 
with a twenty-five mile detour. We came 
upon Eagle Lake at sunset. This body 
of water is 25 miles long, and in the soft 
glow of evening, presented a very at- 
tractive and inviting front. 

We headed for Lake Tahoe and ar- 
rived there two days later, stopping at 
McKinney's. The first night out from 
Eagle Lake was spent at Campbell's Hot 
Springs, some 131 miles from the lake. 
We passed through Susanville, Crescent 
Mills, Indian Falls, Quincy, Mohawk. 
Near Quincy we ran into a cloud burst 
that certainly made good its name. We 
were up about 6,400 feet, and therefore 
it seemed to hit us harder. The thunder 
rumbled unpleasantly close, to say noth- 
ing of most alarming flashes of lightning, 
which seemed to strike all about us. 
These flashes were actually blinding. 

Turning back from McKinney's, we 
passed through Truckee, thence to Verdi, 
Reno, Carson City, Nevada. We found 
the roads slippery — dangerously so — and 
rain fell continually. Out of Carson City 














A glimpse of Nature's perfect mirror. 

we undertook the long climb up the 
Kingsbury Canyon, which is 16 miles 
long, a 23 per cent grade, and 7,400 feet 



above sea level. A strenuous climb,. in- 
deed. The return to Sacramento was un- 
eventful, though very muddy and wet. 
Leaving Sacramento, we toured to Skaggs 
.Springs, and from there to the Sausalito 
ferry. This last was a run of 84 miles, 
which was covered in three and one-half 
hours. This was really the first time on 
the trip that an effort was made at speed. 

Summing up the trip, we were away 
15 days; we traveled in that time 1,294.6 
miles. The little car used for that dis- 
tance 123 gallons of gasoline and 15 
quarts of oil. We had five punc- 
tures, but no blowouts; the tires served us 
very finely indeed, as did the car. 

Four people made up the party, includ- 
ing 100 pounds of baggage. Outside of 
extra tires, gas and oil, we carried noth- 
ing beside the water bag, which is indis- 
pensable. We crossed four mountain 
ranges between 6,300 and 6,500 feet high, 
with two of these over 7,400 feet. Ac- 
cording to the gradometer, the grades 
climbed ranged from 20 to 35 per cent. 

To properly praise the pleasures of this 
trip is impossible, but in concluding, let 
me suggest that the motor car enthusiast 
take this trip and observe its wonders, 
delights, opportunities for free thought, 
for himself. It would be hard indeed to 
single out and undertake a more com- 
plete one. 




iiiiappin^ ^^nod rodJ scenes on the pcninsiild. 



OCTOBER, 1913. 



AND MOTOR LIFE 




S. G. V. car in sccnically beautiful Sonoma County, near Geysers. 

To t'ho C/oysoi's In a T)ay 



The motor car is the thing. And gen- 
erally the moment one comes into posses- 
sion of a motor car, the thought runs to 
touring. Having conceived the idea — in 
California if not elsewhere — visualization 
is easy. Thousands of attractive tours, 
both long and short, at once present them- 
selves in inviting array. Choosing be- 
comes difficult, if not a positive problem. 
However, each one offers so many dis- 
tinctive scenic thrills, natural wonders 
and myriad out-of-door sensations that 
to make a wrong selection is but remotely 
possible. The condition of the road is 
the serious question. If good, "go to it," 
and the chances are that you will return 
home — tired, perhaps — but otherwise in 
the most pleasant frame of mind. 

We chose as our destination the Gey- 
sers in Sonoma County. Properly, the 
trip should consume the greater portion 
of two days, for when we arrived in Sau- 
salito, rounding out the trip, the speedo- 
meter showed 206 miles traveled; and 
here let it be said that 206 miles over 
winding mountain roads, where caution 



breeds tedium, is not so easy on nerves 
as the tyro might suppose. Then, again, 
the country one passes through on this 
most delightful of trips is so worth while 
seeing thoroughly that io hurry on against 
time seems a wanton affront to Dame 
Nature, the metaphorical lady having 
done so much to make herself attractive 
to the senses. Strange to say, Nature's 
appeal is ultra physical; it is metaphysi- 
cal, for the chords of the spirit are deftly 
struck. One is intensely aware of some- 
thing other than what is reflected on the 
retina of the eye or sensed through ears 
and olfactories. The Indians caught a 
glimpse of this underlying and sustaining 
something when they called a certain 
lake "the smile of the Great Spirit." 
White calls it "Silence," and devotes 
pages to the description, but it is enough 
to know that it is there, and that it adds 
much to the pleasure of touring. 

Yet a day was all we permitted our- 
selves for the trip, which included taking 
pictures and the complete, though cur- 
sory, exploration of that natural wonder 



— the Geysers. And we filled it full. At 
five-thirty a. m., preparations for the trip 
were under way, and three o'clock had 
struck — nearly twenty-two hours later — 
when "short sheets were making the bed 
seem longer." 

The 6:45 boat carried us to Sausalito, 
along with many other machines, motor- 
cyclists, "footers," etc., on their early 
way for a day's outing. At seven-thirty 
the speedometer was set at zero, and a 
start for the Geysers made. The road 
that winds along the bay leading out of 
Sausalito is not in good condition. It 
should be cared for at once, as much 
travel by automobile must go this way 
when touring Marin County. 

Most motorists have taken the trip to 
Healdsburg by way of Petaluma and 
Santa Rosa, so there is but little to be 
described, other than the condition of the 
road. In the main, roads between those 
named towns are reasonably good, and 
a steady pace of thirty miles an hour may 
be maintained with comfort to the pas- 
sengers in the car. Near Corte Madera 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



■ v'l IT V '■ ■ 




S. G. l^. car tint/ tuiirists at the Geysers. 



the highway is under construction for 
several miles, which wouldn't be so bad 
if the contractors were but thoughtful 
enough to provide "turn out" signs, as 
they are required to do by the Highway 
Commission. The lack of these caused 
us some delay, at night particularly, as 
we were returning, for we wandered far 
into som_e Stygian wilderness of redwood 
trees and live oak, and experienced diffi- 
culty in finding the main road again. 
This delay, and extra mileage, cost us 
more than at first appeared, inasmuch as 
we arrived at the ferry just ten minutes 
too late to catch the last boat for San 
Francisco. Ours was then not altogether 
a cheery outlook. It is quite certain that 
whatever Sausalito's charm, it is not her 
fine hotels and caravansaries, nor her 
restaurants. Suasion, neither moral, ethi- 
cal nor monetary, was of avail with the 
ferry boat officials, who politely refused 



to run a boat unless at least four 
machines of equal misfortune were at 
hand. Alas, we were but one: no others 
came, and we turned to a night watchman 
who, with mellow unction, suggested sev- 
eral most unprepossessing alternatives. 
But he was a friend indeed; and after a 
few glances at the various rooming 
houses nearby, which did not appeal, he 
led us to a thirty-foot launch, in which, 
a few minutes later, we snorted out upon 
the rolling bosom of the bay. This was 
about 2 a. m. We considered this trip 
a fitting finale for the day. The automo- 
bile was left in care of the watchman 
overnight on the Sausalito side, and was 
called for the next morning, or rather 
that same morning — later. 

Petaluma was passed through at 9:20 
a. m., and Santa Rosa at 10 o'clock. Go- 
ing over the rolling hills of Sonoma 
County was very good, and in the cool, 



clear air of the morning, very refreshing 
and invigorating. We reached Healds- 
burg at 11 o'clock. The road between 
Santa Rosa and Windsor, on the way to 
Healdsburg, is being improved by the 
Highway Commission for a distance of 
about ten miles. "Turn out" signs are 
here in evidence, and with one or two 
exceptions these byroads are in good con- 
dition, save for dust. In one place, how- 
ever, it is necessary to follow an impro- 
vised road that runs alongside of the 
main highway. This is unpleasant going, 
but will not be in use but a short time, 
as the main road at this point is nearly 
completed. 

We drove into Healdsburg, and to the 
Plaza, or main square, turning to the 
right, then left, to the highway that runs 
out of town for three miles to what is 
known as the "Forks Road House." Tak- 
ing the right hand road, which is plainly 
marked as the one leading to the Gey- 
sers, we passed through several gates, 
which, owing to defective opening and 
closing mechanism, we were compelled to 
operate by dismounting from the car. 
These, for the sake of the many tourists 
that pass this way each week, should be 
put in workinp condition. A very simple 
matter indeed, and calling for no great 
expense. 

Twenty-two miles in second speed 
came next, over roads that are twisted 
and curved most tortuously, and which 
are so narrow that the element of danger 
is very great. It will be at once observed 
that a car of long wheel base will meet 
with much difficulty here, as the curves 
and turns are of the hairpin variety, with 
steep declivities falling away from the 
outer edge of the road. The man un- 
used to driving in the mountains must be 
very careful. Speed is to be deplored, 
while the constant sounding of the horn 
is absolutely necessary. The scenery, 
though, is magnificent. 

Two separate ridges were climbed ere 
the descent to the Geysers began. The 
altitude at this point is very close to 4,000 
feet, and as is to be supposed, an excel- 
lent sweep of country — valleys, mountain 
ridges and timber — may be studied from 
here. At the Geysers we were advised 
that the altitude there was 3,300 feet. 

Our speedometer registered 99.2 miles 
when we pulled up in front of the Gey- 
sers Hotel, which will be found to snug- 
gle in quaint outline among the wooded 
steeps of the canyon. Although the sea- 
son was over October 1st, yet we were 
given an excellent, if impromptu, dinner, 
but a very few minutes after our arrival. 
By the time this narration appears, how- 
ever, it is quite likely that the hotel will 
have closed for the winter; and unless the 
tourist fancies a typical "batch" dinner 



October, 1913 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



with the care-takers, he had best provide 
himself with adequate luncheon. 

We allowed ourselves just time enough 
to make the round trip of the Geysers 
with which the canyon abounds. The 
trip is a frightfully hot one, and the climb 
a bit onerous, despite the stout alpine 
staffs which the loquacious guide makes 
it his duty to provide. Yet, withal, the 
sight of a hill boiling away in steam and 
sulphur is sufficiently out of the ordinary 
to repay one for the time and effort spent 
seeing it. 

At exactly 3:45 we left the Geysers, 
heading for Cloverdale. The route this 
way is easily the most beautiful, and is 
all down grade. For 15 miles we wound 
and twisted through picturesque moun- 
tains, primeval forests and rocky, pre- 
cipitous canyons, ever downward to the 
creek bottom where Cloverdale has its 
limited being. But the going is most 
painfully slow and tedious. Danger lurks 
at every turn or curve, and the bridges 
that span yawning chasms are but frail 
things at best. One in particular lurched 
and gave to the weight of the car in the 
most alarming fashion. Owing to the 
curving approach, the car must necessar- 
ily strike it with a side swing, to which 
condition one may attribute its shaky 
state. But the automobile stage crosses 
it each day successfully, so we could not 
bring ourselves to worry much. We were 
two tiresome hours making the descent. 
Gasoline was taken on at Cloverdale, 
whereupon we sped southward for 
Healdsburg. 

Nocturnal touring is ever pleasant, but 
the writer would like to have some one 
explain to him whence come those icy 
blasts of air that penetrate the warmest 
habiliment, and which are to be met with 
in almost every depression in that part 
of the country. The sea breeze is a heat- 
soaked trade wind compared with them. 

Just outside of Healdsburg we slowed 
up for the notorious "Death Curve," and 
found an overturned car in the ditch. A 
crowd was gathered, and the conversa- 
tion was hushed and the general atmos- 
phere solemn. A pool of blood told a 
grim story. One man killed and another 
injured was the result of attempting to 
take that right angle turn at high speed. 
Drivers of automobiles are a long time 
learning caution. Accounts of so many 
accidents cause us to wonder, however, 
if they are actually learning. 

Barring the incident of losing the road, 
due to careless contractors, as already 
chronicled, nothing of an exciting nature 
happened between here and the Sausalito 
ferry, which was reached at 12:10 a. m. 
Once home in San Francisco, we were 
immensely proud of the trip and the 
miles covered, but we feel constrained to 



■/ _ 
5ER.V/ILLE • 



^ir^DK MAD HOlJiE lAW-Oy 




'^.Jk^T<J--"- 



SANTA R.OSA 



PETALUMA 



'^AN RAFAEL 



SAUSALITO 



^^ap of road improvements to Geysers. 



advise that the trip, for the best to be 
had from it, be made in at least two days. 
The party included A. Weiland, who 
designed the first S. G. V. car, and who 
is visiting the Coast for the first time; 
Mrs. A. Weiland; W. H. Carey, manager 
of the De Luxe Oil Company of San 
Francisco, and the writer. The car was 
equipped v/ith the electric gear shift, and 
was really the introduction of the electric 
gear shift to mountain work. The result 
was a revelation. Being able to shift 
gears without removing the hand from 
the steering wheel is an important fea- 
ture in mountain work, for the danger on 



curves and turns is thereby greatly re- 
duced. 

All things said, there remains nothing 
more delightful than a tour through the 
mountains. The gentle purr of the motor, 
comfortable and swift progress whither so 
ever one wills, the splendor of the pass- 
ing view, are privileges not to be es- 
chewed. We owe mu :h to the motor car 
commercially, but in our heart of hearts 
alone, and there only, can we feel what it 
means to us as a means of pleasure. 
More cars and better roads, and we may 
enter the future holdin;j hands with Hap- 
piness and Prosperity. 



IM^ctoirinid Toifflriifiig m^ a W<q1© i^^ Sisiifiiirrs® 



It wasn't a tour exactly, being wholly 
unpremeditated; and we paid little or no 
attention to the passing of time, direction 
of travel, or the names of towns through 



which we passed. The idea was simply 
to ride in the country at night, and during 
sunrise in the morning. No more inter- 
esting time could have been selected. 



10 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 




^%/^'M-'W'^' 




^t^-^ 



\^ 



A shaky bridge near Cloverdale on the road to Geysers in an S. G. V. 



Night has her charm and mystery, sun- 
rise its color and startling splendor. 

Clocks in San Francisco were strik- 
ing 2 a. m. when we started out through 
the slumbering Mission. There was 
really but one general direction to take, 
and we took it — down the peninsula. The 
cool air held the sea tang which refreshed 
the lungs, and smelled sweet and fresh 
with autumnal fragrance. A full moon 
beamed encouragement; the motor 
whirred its steady song; and the road- 
bed through the Mission was smooth and 
invited speed. Somewhere in the hills on 
the left side, roosters were crowing. To 
the right, across a low gap in the opaque 
ridge, lay a vast expanse of ocean, shim- 
mering in the moon's reflection. 

Swiftly we sped along the edges of the 
garden spot where the dead rest — the 
cemeteries; and on beyond, between rows 
of windmills turning lazily in the sea 



wind, to the railroad crossing. Here we 
stopped, perceiving before us a wrecked 
machine. The train, perhaps; or struck 
by the electric car! But we were quite 
wrong, it later developed, in thus surmis- 
ing. The motor car — a new one — was 
collapsed against a telegraph pole, its 
front axle snapped, ladiator and wind 
shield ruined, its front wheels driven 
clear into the front seat. It was encour- 
aging to recognize no signs of human in- 
jury or death, though we marveled at this 
phenomena, considering the condition of 
the car. 

We drove on. We came to that silvery 
stretch of perfect road, the El Camino 
Real, giving the engine a trifle more 
throttle just to feel the delightful rolling 
sensation accompanying the gentle pres- 
sure. 

Five miles, and the headlight beat upon 
two figures walking in the shadow of the 



eucalypts. They signaled, but we ran 
past them, until there came to us the 
thought that here, possibly, were the oc- 
cupants of the wrecked car. We stopped 
and waited their approach. So it proved. 
They — a man and his wife — were 
deeply grateful for the lift we gave them 
to San Mateo, for, having been refused a 
ride in two cars, they had given up hope, 
believing themselves abandoned to a 
lonely, tiresome walk home to San Ma- 
teo. Singular, and very unfortunate; but 
two weeks before they were the unlucky 
participants in an auto wreck, and the 
car, that very day, had just been driven 
from the garage in San Francisco. In 
crossing the tracks, the man had lost con- 
trol of the m.achine for one instant — a dis- 
astrous instant and quite sufficient to 
wreck the car. But they philosophically 
held themselves very lucky to escape. 

We swung into San Mateo, and out 
again to avoid the stretch of highway 
under improvement. Redwood City soon 
blazed and glistened in the harsh glare 
of our penetrating headlights. So, in 
the friendly moonlight, with the sea tang 
in our nostrils, we rolled swiftly through 
and on, soon putting far into the gloom 
behind us Redwood City and the road to 
Palo Alto. 

But not so fast, this link of the noc- 
turnal journey! A long stretch of high- 
way under construction was met, where 
the contractor inadvertently neglected to 
label turnouts. We brought up in a ra- 
vine, where much timber grew and where 
a purling brook babbled musically sea- 
ward. The only alternative offering — 
that of turning around — we hastened to 
take advantage of. Back a quarter of a 
mile, by the railroad station, we detoured 
to the left, through wide-reaching or- 
chards and live oaks, ultimately to Palo 
Alto. 

This pretty village lay supinely, 
serenely asleep. We closed the muffler 
so as not to disturb its unconscious som- 
nolence. Once beyond it, however, there 
was more highway improvement, and at- 
tendant side rides none too comfortable 
or soothing. We did not lose our way, 
however. 

Then came a wonderful boulevard for 
many miles, almost to Santa Clara. Fruit 
trees in profusion, live oaks and euca- 
lypti The road runninij immediately into 
Santa Clara is a trifle rough, though per- 
mitting of good going. The town of Santa 
Clara then opened its arms and received 
us. Night still hung heavily over the hills 
and valleys when a few minutes later we 
stopped before a restaurant in San Jose 
for breakfast. Yet, ere we had done with 
the welcome matutinal meal, daylight, 
with startling suddenness, illumined the 
universe. A filling moon settled behind 



October, 1913 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



11 



a fringe of trees, its soft, cool glow 
strongly dimmed. 

Being Sunday, San Jose was still 
asleep when we left at six in the morning 
headed for Milpitas and Mission San 
Jose. In the refreshing glory of early 
morning, we sped through, booming an 
early greeting from the open exhaust. A 
few sleepy natives watched our advent 
and exit, unstirred, smiling. They had 
chores to do, it appeared — milking, feed- 
ing and watering, and all those sorts of 
rural things. 

We came, at length, to Niles, and 
climbed the canyon of that name, in spite 
of some unfavorable roads and twisting, 
treacherous turnouts. In the early morn- 
ing glow we found it beautiful. Small 
wonder that it is the scene of such stir- 
ring Western motion picture drama. 
Every imaginable setting is to be found 
there. 

Good roads now, the climb over, and 
the scant city of Sunol is at hand. We 
pass swiftly through; one needs but a 
cursory glance to see it all; but we are 
immensely grateful for the good road 
there. 

A long expanse of wonderful dirt road 
next, having turned to the left at a most 
elaborate "Four Corners," including iron 
fence and stone gateway, and rows of 
blue hills and distant vistas of valleys, 
orchards and more hills set in purple 
haze yet for the rising sun to dispel. The 
blase, the passive observer, here take 
heed, for enthusiasm can remain hushed 
and dormant no longer. Nature is at her 
best, and demands admiration and ap- 
proval; not to see, feel and enjoy this 
feast for the eye is to cheat the r.oblei 
instincts. California and climate l^oth 
begin with a "c," and "c" can be spelled 
"see," the three being wholly synony- 
mous. To see is to feel, and having seen 
and felt, we therefore may enthuse, en- 
thusiasm becoming perpetual. Wherein 
lies California's charm. 

The beautiful, quaint town of Pleasan- 
ton is inclined to be Eastern. Its pleas- 
ure to the eye, however, involuntarily 
lifts the foot from the throttle and invites 
leisurely approval. 

On to Livermore and Dublin. Splen- 
did roads and with inspiring panoramas 
on all sides! The cool air whips into the 
face and awakens that exhilaration that 
only early morning and a speeding motor 
car can inspire. 

At Dublin, more highway under con- 
struction compelled us to turn to the 
right toward San Ramon, turning again 
to the left, which led us through the only 
unpleasant part of the journey — the Cull 
Canyon. Dust, ruts, turns and curves, 
both while climbing and descending to 
Haywards. 




Lake County mountains. America's Switzerland in an S. G. V. 



From Haywards over a perfect road to 
the Foothill Boulevard is all that one can 
ask en tour. The time was but 10 a. m.; 
but to us, having traveled constantly 
since 2 a. m., the day seemed nearly gone. 
We were the only car going in, while 
hundreds passed us outbound. 



Dusty and tired, but in that contented 
frame of mind which attends, and only 
can attend, the finish of the perfect tour 
in the refreshing open country, the hills 
and valleys, we caught the eleven o'clock 
boat, and completed the trip when the 
ferry disgorged us at San Francisco. 



IP@inim§niik ToomrBim^ 



Many pleasant tours in the vicinity of 
San Francisco invite the motorist to a 
day's travel. One may roll through the 
park to the beach, follow the Sloat Bou- 
levard and the Junipero Serra Boulevard 
to the county road, thence past the ceme- 
teries to the smooth new highway which 
has lately taken the place of the famous 
El Camino Real; or, if one is so inclined, 
he may climb to the Corbett Road, which 
circles the Twin Peaks, to pursue it to its 



intersection with the Sloat Boulevard. 
Again he may tour through the Mission, 
or bounce over the cobblestones to South 
San Francisco, and travel that road which 
mounts the hill through which the rail- 
road tunnel passes. All are interesting, 
and are sufficient in number to provide 
variety. 

After reaching San Mateo, an inspiring 
drive in itself, the motorist has the choice 
of many trips through the hills that lie 



12 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



between the bay to the east and the Pa- 
cific Ocean, occupying the Western posi- 
tion. 

Probably the best route of several is 
to turn at San Mateo to the right to Half- 
Moon Bay, Arleta Purissima, Lobitas to 
San Gregorio. Following the coast, from 
where the view of the ocean is excellent, 
to Pescadero, one turns there to the east. 
This road leads to La Honda, to Wood- 
side, and from that point to Redwood 
City. Following the main road north 
to San Carlos and San Mateo is a pleas- 
ant, speedy trip. 

It is not considered advisable at the 
present tim.e for the motorist to attempt 
the trip to Pescadero by coming direct to 
Redwood City, thence to Woodside and 
La Honda; for the road between Wood- 
side and La Honda is in very poor con- 
dition and frightfully dusty. Much heavy 
hauling has been done over its once good 
surface, and the result is not exactly 
pleasing to the nerves, nor easy on 
springs and tires. Down hill this road is 
not so bad; but the climb is a hard one. 

Touring from San Francisco to Wood- 
side, by way of Redwood City, one may 




Sonoma Lininty mountains. A pleasant vista from an S. G. V. 



take with comfort and pleasure the road 
that leads over Kings Mountain. At 



Kings, the choice of three routes offers, 
all of which are marked. 



i/ 



lw»-:i 



'U 




The "Killarney Colleen," a nciv type of the town, siiluirhan or lonii distanee iourini; eoiipe of the landanlet type, in ap- 
pearance semi-American, semi-foreign, monntcd on famous self-startiuii, eleetrieally lighted Little Six Premier chassis. 



October, 1913 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



13 



r 



DI^lDE^n 



:g 



^ 



^IJ'^'I, 



The Oood lloa'^ls Ooj^ai'tinent 

W(S)irIkQii^g @!rg(3iiiiikatln®iRi ©ff th® LDini€®]liiii IHlnglhway affiKol (tlh® 
I ■■ ■ ■ — II " — "~" — " — II II — I I *i 



C3G 



We have taken the liberty of pre- 
senting as follows interesting information 
taken from the booklet issued by the 
Lincoln Highway Association, which has 
for its motive the complete explanation 
of the "ideals, plans and purposes" of 
the Association. It is the reasonable 
duty of patriotic citizens of this great 
commonwealth to assimulate these im- 
portant facts with the idea in mind of 
doing his share toward a great good to 
the county and the whole people. 

The working organization of the Lin- 
coln Highway Association, which is in- 
corporated under the laws of the State 
of Michigan, is as follows : 

First: A Board of Directors has been 
elected, consisting of twelve men rep- 
resenting various business interests 
throughout the country. 

Second : There is an Executive Com- 
mittee comprising five members of the 
Board of Directors, the places of resi- 
dence of whom are convenient to the 
National headquarters. This Executive 
Committee is clothed with the authority 
of the directors in the intervals between 
meetings of the directors. 

Third: The officers of the associatio.' 
consist of a president, two executive vice- 
presidents and three honorary vice-presi- 
dents, together with a treasurer and sec- 
retary. 

Comprised in the organization is a list 
of founders, made up, in large part, of 
the original contributors to the fund 
which will make possible the Lincoln 
Highway. There is an increasing list of 
contributing members representing prac- 
tically all of the States of the Union. 

In each of the States traversed by the 
Lincoln Highway, and in the States con- 
tiguous thereto, there is a Chief State 
Consul. This Chief Consul is the repre- 
sentative of the executive committee and 
the directors in the commonwealth in 
which he lives. These Chief Consuls 
are empowered with the authority to ap- 
point associate or vice-consuls in the 
counties, cities, towns and villages along 
the route of the Lincoln Highway. 

The organization also comprises a 



definite number of Consuls-at-Large, 
whose duties are to represent the Execu- 
tive Committee in company with the 
State Consuls throughout the territory 
along the route of the highway and the 
natural tributary routes,. 

The duties of the Chief Consul of each 
State, together with the Consuls-at-Large 
are varied. By various means they are 
engaged in stimulating interest and arous- 
ing patriotic enthusiasm for the Lincoln 
Highway, to the end that its early com- 
pletion may be possible. These means 
comprise interviews, publicity addresses 
to civic organizations, commercial clubs 
and good roads organizations, and in edu- 
cating the public generally to a full reali- 
zation of the Lincoln Highway; and to 
instil in the minds of the younger gen- 
eration reverence and honor for the name 
of Abraham Lincoln. 

Through the co-operation of these 
State Consuls and Consuls-at-Large, the 
directors of the association hope to com- 
plete the fund which they are seeking to 
raise by the first of July, 1914. Their be- 
lief is that if this fund be completed by 
that time, some of the sections of the 
Lincoln Highway can be improved and 
made available for the many thousands 
of Eastern tourists who are now planning 
motoring trips to the Pacific Coast, with 
the Panama-Pacific Exposition as the ob- 
jective. 

Upon completion of the ten million 
dollar fund, one-half of which has been 
nearly raised, the directors believe that 
three years of actual construction will 
be required to finish this great highway 
of traffic, and make it possible to tour 
from New York to San Francisco in com- 
fort in fifteen days of leisurely traveling. 

On the first day of September, 1913, 
the census returns show that there are 
approximately one million automobile 
owners in the United States. It is a part 
of the duty of each Consul to secure as 
a contributor each motor car owner whom 
he knows, or with whom he can commu- 
nicate, in the hope that this great body 
of good roads enthusiasts may be en- 
rolled as contributors to this great, en- 



during and useful memorial to Abra- 
ham Lincoln. 

Among the plans for securing the 
funds necessary to complete this great 
route are the following: 

A large number of automobile manu- 
facturers, manufacturers of sundries, 
parts, tires, etc., have already contributed 
on the basis of one per cent of their gross 
sales for the period of one year, with the 
understanding that the payments made 
may extend over a period of three years. 
Many of these subscriptions are guaran- 
teed as to amount. The cement industry 
of the United States, representing ap- 
proximately thirty-eight constituent com- 
panies, has voluntarily contributed of 
their output one million five hundred 
thousand barrels; hundreds of individ- 
uals and concerns throughout the coun- 
try already have pledged definite sums 
ranging from $100 to $10,000. The pub- 
lishers ol practically all of the automo- 
bile journals in the United States have 
contributed of their space to a broad, 
nation-wide advertising campaign. 

By these means, and as a supplement 
to the efforts of the State and Chief Con- 
culs, it is believed that the great mass 
of automobile owners will rally to the 
support of this association and contribute 
$5 each. As an evidence of their con- 
tribution, each is to receive an engraved 
certificate, a radiator emblem to be at- 
tached to the motor showing in outline 
the United States, together with the route 
from New York to San Francisco, or a 
beautifully engraved plate for the dash 
and a card of membership in the asso- 
ciation. The radiator emblem is pro- 
vided with loops or lugs in order that it 
may be conveniently attached to the radi- 
ator of the car. It is hoped that every au- 
tomobile owner who reads this declara- 
tion, and who is interested in seeing the 
construction of a trans-continental high- 
way, one which will permit our thousands 
of tourists to "See America First," will 
demonstrate his patriotism by contribut- 
ing the small sum named — $5.00. 

Statistics have recently been prepared 
which show that many million dollars 



14 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



were spent by automobile tourists in the 
New England States during the season of 
1912. This great outpouring of wealth 
by the leisurely, pleasure-seeking class 
of our populace demonstrates conclu- 
sively what good roads will do for any 
particular section of the country. The 
directors of the association are firm in 



the belief that when the Lincoln High- 
way is completed and usable by the tour- 
ing public, the many millions of dollars 
annually expended by our citizens who 
tour the British Isles and Continental Eu- 
rope will be diverted and the tide of 
travel directed across these United 
States. 



Ro^(i C@ii^§fl!riui©(ln©in\ Alb@isfl Sm^ Wirmichc© 



Sonoma County. — According to advice 
received by Motor Magazine from the 
State Highway Commission, along the 
main traveled route the road construction 
work is confined to a stretch of highway 
about thirteen miles long between Santa 
Rosa and Healdsburg, close to Windsor. 
Turnout signs have been provided here, 
and in the main are very passable. The 
motorist should experience no difficulty 
if he observes the signs closely, on which 
given directions appear. In the neigh- 
borhood of Corte Madera, for several 
miles the road is under construction. This 
stretch of highway will soon be open, 
however. 

Marin County. — Roads in Marin 
County are at present undisturbed by 
State Highway construction work, and 
are in reasonably good condition. 

On this side of the bay, down the pe- 
ninsula, the road is finished between Ba- 
den and Burlingame. At Burlingame it is 
advisable to turn to. the left and go 
through the town, and also through San 
Mateo, then to join the highway again 
just beyond. The turnouts here are 
plainly visible, and no difficulty should 
be experienced. 

After Redwood City, turn to left to 
Middleford. Proceeding to Palo Alto, 
follow temporary dirt road south parallel- 
ing the railroad to a point below May- 
field. Here turn to right, and soon join 
old road. Follow "Road Closed" signs 
directing traffic to side roads as far as 
Mountain View. There one may take the 
finished State road to Milligan Corners, 
south of Sunnyvale. Turn to the right 
here, leaving the main road. Turn again 
to left, passing through Santa Clara and 
San Jose. 

South of San Jose the road is under 
construction all the way to Gilroy. The 
turnouts are distinctly marked. The first 
occurs one mile south of San Jose, and 
continues for one mile in the vicinity of 
Coyote, then one mile immediately south 
of Morgan Hill. 

From Stockton to Fresno the road is 
torn up in four places, but turnout signs 
here direct the traveler properly. From 
Fresno to Los Angeles the road is not 
torn up. 



Between Oakland and Stockton no 
State Highway construction work is un- 
derway at the present time. 

Motorists are cautioned to follow the 
turnout signs carefully, for by so doing 
they may save themselves much time and 
trouble. It is frequently possible to pass 
the first barrier, but sooner or later the 
motorist will find himself blocked and 
be forced to turn. The contractors are 
required to provide lanterns at night to 
mark the turnouts properly. 

Work on State Highways is going for- 
ward as rapidly as possible until more 
road bonds are sold. The bond market is 
expected to be considerably improved 
now with a greater showing by the com- 
missioners attending. 

■& <? B' 



The most spirited competition ever en- 
countered by the American Automobile 
Association in laying out and develop- 
ing five different transcontinental routes 
has been in Texas, the entire length of 
which has just been traversed from west 
to east by W. O. Westgard, of the asso- 
ciation's field staff. Great importance is 
lent to this particular trip — the longest of 
all and the only one that can be traveled 
throughout the year — because the largest 
share of road improvement throughout 
that territory is likely to be along the line 
carefully selected by this routing and 
mapping expedition. 

From El Paso on the Rio Grande, the 
route finally chosen passes through Ala- 
magordo, Roswell, Sweetwater, Abilene, 
Mineral Wells, Fort Worth, Dallas and 
Paris, to Texarkana on the Arkansas 
River, the Texas-Arkansas border. Sur- 
prisingly good natural roads were found 
for hundreds of miles, while other long 
stretches were seen to need considerable 
improvement to fit them for the large 
amount of travel certain to come by 1915. 
Along the entire line the people of the 
Lone Star State were enthusiastic over 
the new through route, and pledged their 
support toward its building and mainte- 
nance. 



Kiglliiway 

That the Pacific Coast Highway, 
planned to extend from Vancouver, B. C, 
to Lower California in Mexico, is well 
under way, and will be practically fin- 
ished from British Columbia to San Fran- 
cisco by the first of 1915, is the announce- 
ment made by Samuel Hill of Maryhill, 
Wash., at the Hotel St. Francis recently. 
Hill has just returned from his thirty- 
eighth visit to England and Europe, and 
during this last trip spent several weeks 
inspecting the public roads of France, 
Belgium, Germany and Great Britain. 
Besides being president of the Pacific 
Highway Association, he is honorary life 
president of the Washington Highway 
Association, and president of the Ameri- 
can Road Builders' Association. The lat- 
ter organization comprises nearly all the 
practical road builders of the United 
States and Canada. 

"Washington and Oregon are showing 
an activity in road-building never before 
witnessed in any other State," said Hill. 
"Jackson County, Oregon, has voted 
$500,000 for road construction, and 
turned the building work over to the 
State. Multnomah County (Portland) 
has authorized the building of a road 
along the Columbia River forty-five miles 
long. Julius Meyer, president of the Co- 
lumbia Highway Association, has ar- 
ranged v/ith all the counties along the 
Columbia River to turn over to the State 
the work of building a highway from the 
south bank of the Columbia to the sea. 

"I expect to see a highway hard sur- 
faced through British Columbia and 
Washington, and an improved earth road 
hard-surfaced in part, through Oregon, 
built to the California State line by the 
early part of 1915, in time for the Expo- 
sition. 

"What we are trying to do is to bring 
the three Coast States and British Co- 
lumbia into closer contact, so they will 
work in harmony. Heretofore, Seattle, 
Portland and San Francisco have acted 
like children. Seattle tried to build over 
the Cascades east, and that road is only 
open sixty days a year. Portland insisted 
on building over the mountains, and I 
found snow on the ground on the second 
day of last May. San Francisco and 
California tried to ignore the forty-two 
miles of snowshed, and the experience 
of all the railroads, and has only recently 
realized that good roads can be built to 
the northeast and southeast, but great 
difficulties will be encountered in build- 
ing directly east 

"California has the most beautiful 
winter climate in the world to sell; Na- 



October, 1913 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



15 



ture makes it fresh every year, and all 
she has to do is to open the way, so the 
roads can be used in the winter. Other 
people have a summer climate, but Cali- 
fornia has a monopoly on winter climate." 
'6 'S b 



In the southernmost part of Texas lies 
Galveston County. On Galveston Island, 
in the Gulf of Mexico, lies the city of 
Galveston. From the city and county of 
Galveston have emanated reports of mu- 
nicipal improvements and commercial 
f^rowth that have caused the eyes of 
the world to center upon Galveston. Gal- 
veston credits her unsurpassed record of 
achievement to the willingness of her 
citizens to assume reasonable responsi- 
bilities through bond issues for perma- 
nent improvements. Little more than a 
decade ago, Galveston built a seawall 
five miles long, costing $62 a lineal foot, 
or a total of more than $1,500,000. Gal- 
veston then spent $2,000,000 to raise her- 
self permanently above flood level. An- 
other $2,000,000 was expended in the 
erection of a concrete two mile causeway 
connecting Galveston Island with the 
mainland. 

But the seawall, the causeway and 
Galveston's splendid system of shelled 
streets were attractions unavailable to 
auto tourists because of the absence of 
good county roads. The county of Gal- 
veston then proceeded to issue bonds in 
' the sum of half a million dollars for road 
betterment. Millions of humble oysters, 
long deceased, furnished the material 
that crowns the Galveston County shelled 
roads, and the few feeders constructed by 
means of the original bond issue. Gal- 
veston at once became a Mecca for auto 
tourists, and throughout the year visiting 
autos swarm over the city. The bene- 
fits derived from the roads established 
through the first bond issue created a 
hunger for more and more shelled roads, 
and on September 26, 1913, the taxpay- 
ers of Galveston County bonded them- 
selves to the extent ot an additional 
$250,000 for the construction of feeders 
to the main roads already built. 

The expenditure of this money will 
make the shelled road system of Galves- 
ton County one of the finest in the world, 
and will doubtless be justified through 
immediate good results. These roads 
will form the last lap of the Colorado to 
the Gulf Highway, the terminus of which 
will be the seawall boulevard at Galves- 
ton. If the plan of the Galveston Com- 
mercial Association carries, involving the 
working of State convicts on county 
roads, no available piece of road in the 
county will be left unshelled. 




!) 



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Dealers Everywhere. 



->^% T'Factories: 
^^^ Akron, Ohio 



There is nothing in Goodrich Adver- 
tising that isn 't in Goodrich Goods. 



16 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



Dlady ^uiii'hs k ii'iivD lluii^lrs^ 



^ 



Raci 






That the 500 mile Motor Speedway 
classic is the one and only race of the 
year has been proven beyond a doubt by 
the fact that makers and private owners 
already are entering cars for the fourth 
annual 500 mile International Sweep- 
stakes race which will be held at the In- 
dianapolis Motor Speedway, May 30, 
1914. The Stutz Company, of Indian- 
apolis, always among the first to support 
the event, has entered two cars, which, 
from their showing in recent road races, 
cannot help but be considered real con- 
tenders. Harry Thompson, of Battle 
Creek, Mich., the sportsman who en- 
tered the Anel, which Billy Liesaw drove 
last year, has come to the front with an 
entry. He says the car will be called the 
Anel Special, but will be entirely differ- 
ent from the car which raced last year. 

Mr. Thompson was an interested spec- 
tator at the recent Elgin races, and sat 
in the press stand watching the cars. At 
his side was Charles W. Sedwick, 
Speedway manager. During a conver- 
sation with Mr. Sedwick, Thompson re- 
marked that he viewed the Indianapolis 
race as the greatest in the world, and 
promised the first entry. He was more 
than anxious that his car be the first en- 
tered, and asked that if such was the 
case that he be given No. 1. His car 
has been entered, and will bear that num- 
ber. He asserted at the time of the con- 
versation that No. 1, although thought to 
be the bearer of bad luck by many 
drivers and owners, had no terrors for 
him, and that he would consider it an 
honor for his car to bear the number 
over which the "jinx" is said to hover. 

Harry Stutz, of the local concern, 
which has made such a remarkable show- 
ing in racing history, was right on the 
heels of Thompson with his entries for 
two cars. With a car which has made 
racing history, and which, but for an un- 
avoidable accident, would have carried 
off honors second to Goux in his Peugeot 
last year, Stutz is a national figure 
wherever racing is known. He is one of 
the men who is known as a true sports- 
man, and is just as good a loser as he is 
a winner. 

The Stutz concern had three cars in the 
race last year. Don Herr, who drove No. 
8, went out early with clutch trouble, but 
the other two cars were contenders 
throughout the race. Charley Merz was 
the driver who finished in the money and 
provided the big feature of the event, 
driving the last lap with his car ablaze. 
And that was not all the Stutz contingent 



provided. The one bit of hard luck equal- 
ing that of DePalma in the 1912 race was 
a Stutz offering. Gil Anderson, picked 
as the logical driver for one of the en- 
tries next May, was the recipient of a 
blow of Fate. In second place, with only 
a few laps to go, and with $10,000 al- 
most in his grasp, a small screw in the 
fan dropped out and fell into the only 
place where damage could be done. Con- 
sequently Anderson was unable to start 
his car after a last stop at the pits, and 
saw a sure second place go to another. 

The second Stutz entry probably will 
be driven by Earl Cooper, the driver 
who has set the West on fire with his 
cleverness in the various road races. Be- 
tween Cooper and Anderson, the Stutz 
cars have captured seven out of eleven 
of the season's races. Two of these 
events were for small cars, and the Stutz 
was not eligible. In the other events, the 
big white cars have breezed home in the 
lead in all but two. In one of the latter 
events the Stutz entry was a private one 
unknown to the factory, and driven by an 
amateur pilot. The record for the season 
gives the Siutz the title of the champion 
road race car and makes it a real con- 
tender, and one which will be feared in 
the coming event. With two such pilots 
under the guidance of Harry Stutz, known 
as one of the best race team managers 
in the country, the cars with any sort of 
luck should be in at the finish. 

Thompson says his car will be a con- 
tender this year, and is planning the con- 
struction of the speed monster with ex- 
treme care. Nothing will be left undone 
to make the creation the best that can be 
built, and as speedy as the best. Not 
only does Thompson believe in having 
the right kind of a car, but he is going 
after the best of drivers. 

Just who will be at the wheel of the 
car has not been determined, but the 
Michigan man is after the winner of the 
1912 race, Joe Dawson. The local boy 
drove the Deltal into second place in the 
first day's even at Elgin this year, and 
was still running in a Marmon in the big 
Elgin National when the race was called. 
His Speedway victory in the National in 



1912 long will be remembered, for he 
holds the track record, which the pick of 
foreign and American cars failed to 
lower last May. If Dawson finds it im- 
possible to drive, it is said that "Wild 
Bill" Endicott will have the next call. 
Bill is one of the older racing drivers, and 
has competed in most of the local events. 
He probably has done more racing than 
many of his fellow pilots, for he drives 
throughout the year, on dirt tracks, speed- 
ways and beaches. 

Speedway officials are enthusiastic at 
the early entries, and prophesy that 
others will be coming in before long. 
Numerous entry blanks were mailed out 
recently, and the coming race is expected 
to be bigger and better than ever. The 
foreign car victory of last year is bound 
to enthuse the French, English, German 
and Italian makers anl drivers, and the 
cream of the old country's racing cars 
and crews is expected to be here early 
for the practice season. 

According to Mr. Sedwick, everything 
points to an early closing of the entry 
list, as it is thought the limit will be 
reached much earlier than last year. In- 
quiries concerning the race are being re- 
ceived daily, and the manufacturers seem 
to be showing more interest than ever 
before. 

One big question which already is agi- 
tating the fans is the possibility of the re- 
turn of the previous winners, the Mar- 
mon and National cars, both Indianapo- 
lis-made products. Opinions are divided 
on the subject, but there seems to be an 
even chance that one or both makes of 
cars will be entered. 

?r B- ^ 

President W. J. Clemens of the 



Portland Automobile Club, which is as- 
sisting in drafting a new automobile or- 
dinance, stated that an effort would be 
made to pass a limit on the age of 
drivers. The State law forbids the driv- 
ing of a car not privately owned by any 
person under eighteen years of age. It 
is planned to have the Portland ordinance 
prohibit boys younger than 18 driving any 
car. 



THE Panama Canal will tend wonderfully tov/ard the development of the 
Pacific Coast, particularly California. The Lincoln Highway is the next 
great step in this development. The appeal for assistance is nation wide; 
the appeal to California is direct and significant. Patriotism is best expressed 
in a fusion of effort. California, as the terminus of the Highway, should there- 
fore be quick to respond. 



October, 1913. 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



(/aloiixlac c)i' JCvoiits lii .?/(oi:oi'c'lon\ t'oi' I'JD'VJVl 



October 27-28.— Fourth Annual Con- 
vention Electric Vehicle Association of 
America at Chicago, 111. Harvey Robin- 
son, Secretary, 1170 Broadway, New 
York City. 

October 18-Novemb2r 2— Dallas, Tex. 
Automobile Show. State Fair. Dallas 
Auto Dealers' Association. D. F. Staf- 
ford, Mgr. 

November 2-3 — Los Angeles to San 
Diego, Cal, to Phoenix, Ariz., Road Race. 
November 3-8 — Chicago, 111. Second 
Annual Motorcycle Show. Coliseum. A. 
B. Coffman, Nicholas Bldg., Toledo, 0., 
Chairman. 

November 4-5 — El Paso, Tex. Road 
Race to Phoenix, Ariz. 

November 4-5 — San Diego, Cal. Road 
Race to Phoenix, Ariz. 

November 6 — Phoenix, Ariz. Track 
Races, State Fair. 

November 7-15 — London, England. 
Automobile Show, Olympia. 

November 8-12 — Shreveport, La. 
Track Races. J. A. Sloan. 

November 8-15— Atlanta, Ga. Auto- 
mobile Show. Atlanta Auto and Acces- 
sory Association. Auditorium Armory. 

November 24 — Savannah, Ga. Auto- 
mobile Show. 

November 24 — Savannah, Ga. Van- 
derbilt Cup Race. Savannah Auto Club. 
November 27 — Savannah, Ga. Grand 
Prize Race. Savannah Auto Club. 

December — Newark, N. J. Automo- 
bile Show. Armory Building. New Jer- 
sey Auto Trade Association. 

December 9-12— Philadelphia, Pa. An- 
nual Convention of American Road 
Builders' Association. 

January 3-10, 1910— New York City. 
Automobile Show. Automobile Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Pleasure cars. Grand 
Central Palace. S. A. Miles, Mgr. 

January 2-10 — New York City. Auto- 
mobile Salon of Imported Cars. Hotel 
Astor. S. Kjeldsen, secretary. 

January 10-16 — Milwaukee, Wis. Au- 
tomobile Show. 

January 24-31 — Chicago, 111. Automo- 
bile Show. Pleasure Cars. Coliseum and 
First Regiment Armory. Automobile 
Chamber of Commerce, New York City. 
S. A. Miles, Mgr. 

January 24-31 — Rochester, N. Y. Au- 
tomobile Show. Exposition Park. 
Rochester Automobile Dealers' Associa- 
tion. C. A. Simmons, Mgr. 

January 26-31 — Scranton, Pa. Auto- 
mobile Show. Armory. H. B. Andrews. 
January 31-February 7 — Minneapolis, 
Minn. Automobile Show. Minneapolis 



Auto Trade Association. National Guard 
Armory. 

February — Elmira, N. Y. Automobile 
Show. Armory. Automobile Show Com- 
mittee. Frank D. Pratt and M. Doyle 
Marks. 

February — Fort Dodi^e, la. Automo- 
bile Show. Armory. Automobile Deal- 
ers' Association. 

February 2-7— Buffalo, N. Y. Auto- 
mobile Show. Pleasure Cars. Buffalo 
Automobile Dealers' Association. John 
J. Gilson, 401 Franklin St., Buffalo, N. 
Y., Secretary. 

February 7 — Omaha. Neb. Automo- 
bile Show. C. G. Powell, Secretary, 2119 
Farman street. 

February 9-14— Buffalo, N. Y. Auto- 
mobile .Show. Commercial Cars. Buf- 
falo Automobile Dealers' Association. 
John J. Gilson, 401 Franklin street, Buf- 
falo, N. Y., Secretary. 

February 18-21 — Bloomington, 111. Au- 
tomobile Show. McLean County Auto- 
mobile Club. 



February 21-28 — Newark, N. J. Auto- 
mobile Show. New Jersey Automobile 
Trade Company. R. B. Mann, Secretary, 
37 William street. 

February 24-March 1 — Cincinnati, O. 
Automobile Show. Cincinnati Auto 
Dealers' Association. 

March — Grand Rapids, Mich. Auto- 
mobile Show. Grand Rapids Herald. 
Klingman Furniture Building. 

March — Wichita, Kan. Automobile 
Show. Wichita Business Association. 

March 7-14 — Boston, Mass., Automo- 
bile Show. Pleasure Cars. Mechanics' 
Building. Boston Automobile Dealers' 
Association. C. I. Campbell, Mgr. 

March 17-21 — Boston, Mass., Automo- 
bile Show. Commercial Cars. Boston 
Commercial Motor Vehicle Association. 
C. I. Campbell, Secretary. 

April 9-15— Manchester, N. H. Auto- 
mobile Show. Mechanics' Hall. D. F. 
Sullivan. 

May 30 — Indianapolis, Ind. 500-mile 
Sweepstake Races. Indianapolis Motor 
Speedway. 



li^@w§ @f th(§ I^sifeiiiKaB Stows 



The dates for the two National automo- 
bile shows to be held next winter in New 
York and Chicago have been decided 
upon. The New York exhibition will be 
held in its entirety in the Grand Central 
Palace during the week of January 3-10. 
The Chicago exhibition will be held at 
the Coliseum and First Regiment Armory 
as formerly, the date being January 24- 
31. Each exhibition will be conducted 
under the auspices of the Automobile 
Chamber of Commerce, and each will be 
confined to passenger vehicles. This will 
be the first time one association has been 
in actual control of both exhibitions since 
the Selden-Patent litigation matters 
divided the membership of the N. A. A. 
M. into two camps which brought about 
several shows. 

Madison Square Garden, which has 
been the home of the New York show 
for many years, proved itself inadequate 
for exhibiting the products of the auto- 
mobile industry, and last year the exhibi- 
tion was held in both the Garden and 
Grand Central Palace. The Grand Cen- 
tral Palace, a magnificent show building, 
will this year house the entire exhibition, 
and the space which has been secured is 
greater by far than that which was util- 
ized in two buildings last year. Four 



floors of the Palace will be used for the 
exhibits and the additional space over 
that which was had last year is 50,000 
square feet, which will afford a com- 
fortable housing for all exhibitors. 

For the Chicago show, the gallery of 
the Coliseum will be extended at the 
sides and each end of the building will be 
lengthened by 24 feet, this arrangement 
adding 5,000 more feet of space for the 
exhibits. The aisles will extend around 
the inside of the balcony instead of the 
outside as heretofore, so that the exhi- 
bition space will be given greater depth. 

Motorists are pleased with the idea of 
utilizing only one building in New York 
for the show, and also the fact of having 
the New York and Chicago exhibitions 
under one management, for this will 
result in saving many thousands of dol- 
lars to the trade and space rentals will 
cost less than in former years. S. A. 
Miles, general manager of the Automobile 
Chamber of Commerce, is busily engaged 
on the plans for both exhibitions, and he 
expects that application blanks and 
diagrams will be issued by September 1. 
Applications for space and diagrams and 
other information can be had by writing 
to the Automobile Chamber of Com- 
merce. 7 East 42d street, New York City. 



18 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 




NEW TniNGsIMMrm 




THE NEW SPEEDIER. 
Among the gas savers on the market 
there is one called the Speedier, which is 
new to Coast motorists. The device, 
when inserted in the intake manifold, 
sprays gas into the cylinders, thus per- 
fecting the work of the carbureter. The 
use of the Speedier, it is claimed, makes 
for economy in the use of gasoline, in- 
creases the power and speed. The Speed- 
ier also acts as an air brake when neces- 




INTAKE— S 
PIPE 



sary, and when in use for this purpose 
cools the engine and fits it for the ne.xt 
long climb. 

The spray mixture, when fed into the 
firing chambers, is more combustible. It 
is said to remix the mixture of air and 
gasoline with atomizing thoroughness, 
and therefore flames quicker on the 
spark. The Lathan Auto Supply Com- 
pany have the agency for the Speedier 
on the coast. 

^ ^ B 
THE EAGLE CLAW WRENCH. 

The Eagle Claw Wrench is a new boon 
to the automobilist, designed to do the 
work of all wrenches and yet work which 
no other tool can do. This wrench will 
easily hold a round-headed bolt, by the 
head, to prevent it from turning while un- 
screwing the nut. It will act as pliers, 
and does work more effectively, such as 
holding round, square, oblong, hexagon 
or other shaped objects firmly. The 
wrench is one of the handiest tools to 
have around the car. It will not slip on 




oily, slippery grease cups, and gets a firm 
grip on set or lag screws, no matter how 
round or worn the corners are. 

For taking hold of spring bolts in case 
a spring leaf breaks, the Eagle Claw 
Wrench is unexcelled. It is designed and 



constructed for use ia difficult places 
where it is impossible to use any other 
wrench. The wrench comes to San 
Francisco through the Lathan Auto Sup- 
ply Company. 

?r 5 B^ 

A CARBON REMOVER. 

In the discovery of Wallin's Hydro- 
Carbon Oil Compound, a practical and 
scientific process for the removal of car- 
bon from gasoline motors without tear- 
ing them down or without fear of injury 
to any of its parts. Hydro-Carbon Oil 



Compound is a chemical process with an 
oil base, containing no free acids, and is 
endorsed by the leading automobile man- 
ufacturers throughout the country. The 
process of removing carbon with this 
compound is very simple, requiring but 
an hour for the work. Hydro-Carbon 
Oil Compound saturates and burns up the 
carbon soot, and resinous matter in an en- 
gine, thus restoring compression and 
valve action. The composition of chemi- 
cals used in this compound liberates all 
the chemicals and converts carboneous 




The Standard Oil for 
Motor Cars 

The perfect lubricating oil sold in the 
flat-shaped can — easy to handle. It fits 
readily in the tool box. 



mlB C^rr 







Sold by dealers 
everywhere and at 
all agencies of the 



STANDARD OIL COMPANY 



(CALIFORNIA) 

SAN FRANCISCO 



October, 1913. 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



19 



substances into smoke. This carbon re- 
moving compound is to be had of the 
Chanslor & Lyon Company. 
'6 'S ^ 

THE FORD AUXILIARY WATER 
CIRCULATOR. 

A new water 
pump to act in an 
auxiliary capacity 
to the thermo-sy- 
phon cooling sys- 
tem on Ford cars 
has just been ex- 
hibited locally. The 
auxiliary water 
pump attaches to the motor very con- 
veniently, and forces the water from the 
cooling chamber into the radiator when 
it cools. The pump is very practical, 





and serves a good purpose. Two views 
arc shown here in accompanying cuts — 
one of the pump itself, and when at- 
tached to the Ford motor. 



FORD ELECTRIC LIGHTING 
ATTACHMENT. 

An electric lighting system, ver. 
complete, ready and easy of attach- 
ment to Ford cars has recently 
made its appearance on the Coast. 
The lighting system is very simple 
and requires but little work to in- 
stall it on the car, and make the 
proper connections with the mag- 
neto, from which the lighting cur- 
rent is drawn. 

For some time there has been a 
demand for an attachment of thi- 
nature that would prove suitable for 
furnishing electric lights on Ford 
cars. The electric light fittings include 
reflectors, switch, Dean regulator, which 
governs the flow of current, and all nec- 
essary wiring. The Ford electric lighting 
attachment is handled in San Francisco 
by the Lathan Auto Supply Company. 

^ ■& 'tf 

A NEW MOTOR OIL. 

De Luxe Oil is a late lubricant to be 
had in San Francisco. This oil is com- 
pounded of McKean County, Pennsyl- 




^H^jrtO CO»*.««CT<0*I 



vania, crude oil, which is known the 
world over for its freedom from carbon. 
McKean County oil, in consuming, gives 
off a soft carbon in small amounts, which 
blows out very readily. Pure Pennsyl- 
vania oil is very suitable to the Califor- 
nia climate. De Luxe oil has a fire test 
of 480; flash 460; gravity 26-30, and the 
viscosity is 45 at 212 degrees. This oil 
is distributed by the De Luxe Oil Co., 
of San Francisco. 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 1865 

Announces the removal of their OITices anJ Factory' to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

Between California and Sacramento Sts. 
Phone Prospect 30 

Where tlieir entire attention will he devoted to the prompt delivery- ol 
tlie hest work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE L.\RCEST GROUND FLOOR KIREPROOF GAR.^f.E WEST OF CHICAOO 



STORE YOUR AUTOMOBILE 

Convenient to All Downtown 

HOTELS - CLUBS - THEATRES 



655 GEARY ST., near Jone». 



Phone Franklin 544 



Day and Night Washing and Storage— Supplies— Tires 
iviachine Shop— Vulcanizing— Electrics 



EMPIRE 

Model 31 

■ ■ The Little A ristocrat' ' 
Completely Equipped $950 



I he Complclcly Ex^uipped Empire five- 
passenger touring car $950 — Equipment 
includes Mohair Top and Top Envelope, 
Demountable Rims, Rear Double Tire 
Irons, Extra Rims, Accelerator, Vt'ind- 
shicld. Prest-O-Lite lank, Horn and 
SpKredo meter. 

The Empire Automobile Co. tndianapiits. U.S A- 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

^Vhll• anywhere in United Statea, Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 

PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 Cilifoniii Street. 



Sin Franciiro 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The Newfl Letter recommendt the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHERS New Garage for flrst-class servlcs. 
\\> cuter to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connat- 
tlon. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sla. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North hirst street. The beat French 
dinner In California, 76 cants, or a la carte. Automobile parties (Iven 
particular attention. 



PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE. 443 Emmerson SL Tel., P. A. 
3;i3. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries In stock. Gasoline, oil. 
ripalring. lathework. vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

PETALUMA.— PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 
& Murphy. Props. Cor. Third and C Sts; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 
general machine work and gear cutting: supplies, repairing, auto livery; 
liihricating oil and gasoline: the care and charging of storage batteries 



HOTEL VENDOME 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Headquarters tor Automobilists touring the beautiful 
Santa Clara Valley. 

American and European Plan. Reasonable Rates. 



20 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



€!kimg®s am th® Tradl® 

John F. McLain, who has been iden- 
tified with the Franklin factory as its 
Western representative since 1907, has 
purchased from the Franklin Company 
its entire Northern California business. 
Former factory branches in San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland will in the future be 
conducted by the John F. McLain Com- 
pany. 

?r ?• ^ 

C. A. Gilbert, manager of the Western 
division of the United States Tire Com- 
pany, announced recently that the United 
States Tire Company of New York, own- 
ers of the United States Tire Company 
and the Gorham-Revere Rubber Com- 
pany, had decided to merge these two 
concerns with the United States Tire 
Company of California. The new cor- 
poration will have charge of the New 
York Company's affairs on the Coast. 

?r ■& ?■ 
Having recently discontinued their San 
Francisco branch, the F. B. Stearns Com- 
pany will be represented in this city in 
the future by the Argonaut Motors Co. 

?: ^ ?• 
It has been recently stated that Baker 
& Hamilton will control the distribution 
of Savage Automobile tires in the San 
Francisco territory. 



The Bonnheim-Moore Company will 
handle the distribution of Maxwell cars 
in this section of the State. The an- 
nouncement of this change was made re- 
cently by J. J. Toner, Western represen- 
tative of the Maxwell Motor Car Co. 

'6 '6 O 

The San Francisco branch of the Thos. 
B. Jefferys Company has been purchased 
by a company headed by I. I. McMuUin. 
This new company will control the north- 
ern territory. 

S S ■ar 

WtoA ffl CycB® €(fflr fe 

What is a cycle car? 

That is the question which motor- 
cyclists and prospective motorists are 
asking to-day.' The cycle car is a tran- 
sition between the motorcycle, tricar and 
the Ford, which may be considered to 
hold the premier place among low-priced 
automobiles. But just what is this inter- 
mediate type of car, you ask? It is at 
present in a state of evolution in this 
country, and to a certain extent also 
evolving in Europe. For that reason no 
fixed definition of the cycle car can be 
set at this time. A tentative one, how- 
ever, has been proposed by "The Cycle 
Car," an English trade paper, which gives 
the following definition: 

"The cylinder capacity of the cycle car 



must not exceed 1,100 cubic centimeters 
(approximately 67 cubic inches.) The 
chassis weight must not exceed 6 cwt. 
(672 pounds) inclusive of the weight of 
the tires; or, in the case of those vehicles 
the bodies of which are not separable 
from the chassis, the total weight, all on 
and ready for the road, but without fuel, 
oil or water, must not exceed 7 cwt. (784 
pounds.) 

?^ B^ ?^ 



The best boost for the Lincoln 
Highway is to contribute something 
to the rapidly swelling fund to be de- 
voted to its immediate construction. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MAN- 
AGEMENT. CIRCULATION, ETC. 
Motoring Magazine and Motor Life, 
|iiil.li!-lii-.:l niiiiitlily at Siin Francisco, required by 
till' act nf August 24, VMZ. Editor. B. David- 
sun, L'l -Sutter St., .San Francisco. Business 
Manager, F. A. Marriott. -1 Sutter St., San 
Francisco. Publislier. Frederick Marriott. 21 Sut- 
ter St.,^an Francisco, Owner, F. Marriott, 21 
.Sutter St,, San Francisco. Known bondliolders, 
mortgagees and otlier security liolders, holding 
1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, 
niortijages or otlier securities: None, 

F. MARRIOTT, Owner. 

Sworn to and subscribed Ijefore me this 19th 
day of Septemlier, 1913. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public in and 
tor the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California. 

I My commission expires September 20, 1915.) 



Keenan Brothers 



Machinists 

and 
Eng'ineers 



AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 
A SPECIALTY 

350 GOLDEN GATE AVE., bet. Hyde and Larkin Sts. 

PHONES 
Franklin 6823 Home J 9012 



Samson 



And 



Peerless 



Inner Shoes 



Endless in shape and strength. 
Guarantee you double mileage 
and insure your pleasure. 

Agents wanted everywhere, 
liberal inducements. 



Jackson-Eno Rubber Co. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Manufacturers of Rubber 
Tire Sundries 



October, 1913. 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



21 





"You look happy this good morning," 
said one. 

"Happy? I have the habit," responded 
the other; "feel like the brightest June 
day God ever let the sun shine on. Old 
troubles and worries gone — killed them 
all. I'm the happiest murderer alive. 
Can't explain except that I discovered 
that Misery wasn't worth while, and I 
wrung its neck. In the last two months 
I have found things in life I never knew 
were there before. And the petty, an- 
noying things are dead — every one of 
'em. My wife first thought I was sick, 
then crazy; now she hai the virus herself. 
Business is better, home is happier, life 
is sweeter. Medicine ? Not on your life. 
I have always been troubled with too 
much good health. It wasn't that. Re- 
ligion? No, not that either. It's just 
plain emancipation — a casting away of 
the things that hung heavy on my heart, 
in order to give it a chance to receive and 
enjoy the worth-while things that come 
my way. I tell you, man, it's great" — 
and he smiled beamingly as he left the 
car. 

Emancipation! That's the word. Free- 
dom is self-made. It cannot be given by 
any act of Congress, or taken away by 
any tyranny. The liberty to enjoy life 
is innate. Whether one is happy or un- 
happy depends upon his own will. 

Misery is a disease of the will. Joy 
comes by willing to be joyous. — Ford 
Times. 

■S TS "S 

Al tHh© SaiM© IFramMSim 

Robert Owen was "the father of mod- 
ern business" — the world's first great 
business man. He invented the one-price 
system. He made it pay — therefore, it 
survived. Go back to the beginning of 
most of our best business methods of 
to-day and you go back to Robert Owen — 
who made a fortune at which even our 
moderns would not sneeze — and who died 
only a little more than fifty years ago. 

Also, Robert Owen invented the trade 
mark. 

It is related that when Owen went up 
to New Lanark to buy a cotton mill 
owned by David Dale, he met Mr. Dale's 
daughter. She acknowledged the intro- 
duction by saying: 

"So, you're the man v.'ho puts his name 
on the package?" 

You see, the trade mark was doing its 
work. 

"You must be proud of your name," 
she continued. 

"Wouldn't you be?" 

"Not of yours!" she snapped. 

But later she thought better of the sug- 



gestion, for she became Mrs. 
Owen. — Ford Times. 

'6 '6 c 



Robert 



Wlkitl Qm^ R&. ■. ...„._„ 

Good roads mean more cultivated 
farms and cheaper food products for the 
toiler in the cities; bad roads mean poor 
transportation, lack of communication, 
high prices for the necessaries of life, the 
loss of untold millions of wealth, and 
idle workmen seeking employment. Good 
roads will help those who cultivate the 
soil and feed the multitudes, and what- 
ever aids the producers and the farmers 
of our country will increase our wealth 
and our greatness and benefit all the peo- 
ple. We cannot destroy our farms with- 
out final decay. They are to-day the 
heart of our national life and the chief 
source of our material greatness. Tear 
down every edifice in our cities, and labor 
will rebuild them, but abandon the farms 
and our cities will disappear forever. — 
Governor Win. Siilzer. 

■S ^ ^ 

Wlkili Cal5ir(S«mDffl Is ID)®Smg 

In addition to the State system of high- 
ways now being constructed in California 
under the $18,000,000 bond issue, several 
other State roads are provided for by re- 
cent legislation. Appropriations were 
made totaling $115,000 for construction 
and maintenance of special highways; of 
this, $70,000 is for building a road from 
Saratoga Gap to Redwood Park, which 
will allow tourists traveling over the 
Coast route or through the Santa Clara 
Valley to easily make the run to the park. 
Other roads to be improved from the ap- 
propriation are the Myers-McKinley high- 
way, along the west side of Lake Tahoe ; 
the Trinity-Humboldt road; the Emigrant 
Gap road; the Alpine road; and the 
Placerville road to Lake Tahoe. Other 
legislation permits the State to pay one- 
third the cost of a county road, when re- 
quested by a majority of four-fifths of 
the members of the County Board, the 
amount not to exceed $50,000 in one year 
in any county. 

?r BT ?^ 

WhM. (DsobM is® ^mf®^ 

A thorough system of good roads 
would strike an immense blow at the 
high cost of living, and this, of course, 
would be added to whatever motors can 
be substituted for horseflesh. It is not 
too much to say that if modern methods 
for handling package freight can be sub- 
stituted for the medieval procedure that 
now goes on in railroad freight sheds, 
transfer wards and terminals, and if our 
railway stations were all accessible by 
good roads an amount equal to the annual 
expense of this government, plus the 



national debt and the expense of all our 
States, could probably be saved every 
year. — Secretary of Commerce Redfteld. 

"S "S "S 

Aontl® LaD8nti8®s by ths TTonn 

An order for 200,000 1914 automobile 
number plates and 20,000 motorcycle 
plates, of an aggregate weight of 165 tons 
and amounting in mass to from four to six 
carloads, was awarded to-day by H. A. 
French, purchasing agent of the State 
Engineering Department, to the Califor- 
nia Metal Enameling Company of Los 
Angeles. The contract, which illustrates 
the standing of California as a Mecca 
for automobiles and motorcycles, amounts 
to $38,800. 

The plates are to be furnished in pairs 
to owners of machines when they regis- 
ter with the department for 1914, under 
the new act, which changes the system of 
registration and requires the payment of 
taxes on a horsepower basis. A bright 
red background with white figures is to 
be the distinguishing characteristic of the 
1914 automobile and motorcycle plates. 
These colors will be changed in 1915, as 
the law provides for annual registration 
hereafter. Under the new law, which 
goes into effect January 1, 1914, each au- 
tomobile and each motorcycle must have 
two number plates, permanently attached 
to the machine, one in front and one in 
the rear, with a clearance of sixteen 
inches above the ground. Swinging 
plates will not be permitted after Janu- 
ary 1st, and the rear plate must be at- 
tached where the rear light can shine up- 
on it. The automobile plates will be of 
a size to accommodate six figures, and 
will be 5V2 inches wide and 16 inches 
long. 

ST » «r 

May lift IS® S©®iin 

That plans are well under way for the 
transformation of the Great Highway in- 
to an esplanade along the ocean front 
was the report made to the Mayor and 
the Board of Supervisors recently in re- 
sponse to a question by Supervisor An- 
drew Gallagher. George Gallagher said 
that the Street Committee and Finance 
Committee had well under way plans for 
permanently paving the great Highway 
from Sloat Boulevard to the county line. 
In addition, the Sloat Boulevard is to be 
improved and paved from Junipero Serra 
to the ocean. Supervisor McCarthy added 
tha*^ if finances permitted, two boulevards 
are to be built around Twin Peaks. Some 
of the work is dependent upon the 
amount received by the city from the 
State automobile license tax, which has 
been variously estimated at $50,000 to 
$75,000. 



22 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



[ecidmg j\niericcm. @rs 




American Motors California Co. 

476-482 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory 

Models 

4a2 4 Cylinder. 2 I'asseiiger .W H. P. 

&r2 r, Cylinder. 2 Passenger liO H. P. 

644 6 Cylinder, 4 Passenger iW H. P. 

fiir, i\ Cylinder, (i Passenger no H. P. 



Prices 

$ 15.50 
•27.50 
27.50 
29.50 




HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 
San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Models Prices 

24 Runabout $950 

25 Touring Car 1050 

30 Roadster 1126 

31 Touring Car 1285 

40 Touring Car 1650 




J. 1. CASE T. M. CO., INC. 
San Francisco. 
Standard Models 
Prices of Cars Completely Equipped F. O. B. 

Factory. 
Model H. P. Price 

5-Pass. Touring 25 $1250 

5-Pass. Touring 35 1850 

5-Pass. Touring 40 2300 



r-' 



Chalmers 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1913 Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model "e," Thlrty-slx. 

Touring Car, 5- pass $2400 $1960 

Touring Car, 7-Pass 2600 2150 

Torpedo. 4-Pass 2400 1950 

Roadster. 2-Pass 2400 1950 

All prices include full ecuipment and are f. o. b 
Detroit. 




PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO. 
Golden Gate Avenue and Polk St., San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. San Francisco. 
Modelp — 

4-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster $2050 

4-cyl. 5 Pass. Touring 2050 

4-cyl. Coupe 2500 

G-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster 2750 

6-cyl. 4 Pass. Demi-Tonneau 2750 

6-cyl. 7 Pass. Touring 2750 

G-cyl. Coupe 3150 

G-cyl. T^imousine 4150 




OSEN-McFARLAND AUTO CO. 
San Francisco and San Jose 

Model — Price 

Empire 31 $1050 

5-Passenger touring car. completely equipped. 




PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

We Sell on Easy Terms 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model— Price 

.Model "T" Touring Car $600 

.Model "T" Runabout 526 

.Model "T" Town Car 800 




HAYNES AUTO SALES CO. 

Turk at Polk St. 
Prices F. O. B. Pacific Coast. 

Model 24— 2, 4 and 5 Pass. (4-cyl.) $1,950 

Model 24— Coupe (4-cyl.) 2.400 

Model 23—2, 4 and 5 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2,700 

Model 23— 6 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2.950 

Model 23— Coupe (6-cyl.) 3,200 

Model 23— Limousine (6-cyl.) 3..S60 



F 



HUDSON 



H. O. HARRISON 



1036 Van Ness Avenue 

Standard 
Prices F. O. 
Model "37 37 h. P 

Touring Car $1875 

Phaeton 1876 

Roadster 1875 

Limousine 3250 

Coupe 2350 



San Francisco 



Models 
B Factory. 

Model "54" 
Touring Car 
Phaeton . . . . 
Roadster . . . . 
Limousine . . 
Coupe 



54 



h. I- 
$l45' 
215' 
245 
3751 
295" 




~. 'dM 



BEKINS-SPEERS MOTOR CO. 
Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 



Type 72 



Prices F. O. B. Factory Type 77 



Model — Price 

7-Pass. Touring $5000 

5-Pass. Touring 5000 

4-Pass. Touring 6000 

4-Pass. Toy Ton. 6000 

■:-Pass, Runab't 5000 

7-Pass. Limous'n 6500 



Model — Price 

5-Pass. Touring $3260 
2-Pass. Runab't 3250 
6-Pass. Limous'n 4450 
5-Pas3 I>imous'n 4450 
S-Pass. Coupe 3860 



r 




MARION MOTOR CAR CO. 

55.5 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

.Model H. P. Price 

37-A Touring 40 $1476 

48-A Touring 48 1850 

36-A Roadster 40 1426 

:)S-A Roadster 40 1476 

All Cars Completely Equipped. 



inARA^QN 



L. 



MORRIS KENNEDY CO., INC., 

545 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

New Series Marmon "Thirty-Two" 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



.Mod. Thirty-Two 

Chassis $2500 

Five-Pass. Tour- 
ing Car 3000 

Four-Pass. Sub- 
urban 3000 

Roadster 2900 

Siieedster 2860 

Limou.'^ine 4000 



Landaulet $4100 

Marmon "Six" 
2, 4, 5 and 7-pas- 

senger $5000 

Limousine 6280 

Landaulet 6350 

Berline I.imousine 

6450 



Tte IStesSimg ©1 

WHEN you loll in the tonneau of a modern touring car, with the purring 
motor transplanting you to your place of desire, swiftly, noiselessly— 
when the wind of the open country washes the ache out of your work- 
fagged brain, the while green things with their purplish-gray shadows swim past 
— when you, yourself, take the wheel a bit just for the sheer joy of feeling that 
trammeled power yield to your slightest wrist twitch; when you take your foot 
off the accelerator, throw out your clutch, press down on the foot brake and 
come to a gentle stop under a wide, cool tree, where she and the kiddies can open 
the hamper and spread a meal of cold fowl, and coffee, piping hot, out of the 
vacuum bottle; when you light your pipe and stretch your length on the grass, 
it is then that you sigh and offer up mute thanks for the blessing of the century 
your motor car. — Homer McKee in Cole Blue Book. 



The Automobile Club of Southern 

California is having a reconnaissance 
made of a new roadway that will give 
direct access to motorists from east of the 
Sierras into the Yosemite National Park. 
At present there is no motor highway by 
which the tourist can reach Yosemite, 
except over one of the roadways that ap- 
proach the park from the west, and this 
condition necessitates several hundred 
miles of extra travel upon the resident of 
Nevada or the Sierra country of Califor- 
nia who wishes to visit Yosemite Valley. 



October, 1913. 



AND MOTOR LIFE 



23 






Ooxrv^nience 



M 




MICHIGAN MOTOR CAR CO. 
Cnllfornla Brnnch 

283-291 Golden Gate Ave San Francisco 

Imperial Garage— Oakland 

Standard Models 

Model— Price 

■'I/' arul "O" 33 h. p 11690 

■■It" ;iTi(l ■•.=;■■ <0 ll. II 1876 





UN 


Polk 


St., 


Moilpl 


L'5, 


Model 


36, 


Model 


40, 


Mo.lPl 


60. 



Maxwell 



ITED MOTORS S. F. COMPANY, 
near McAllister San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

6-Pass. Touring Car 

5-ras9. Touring Car J1085 

5-Pas8. Touring Car 16B0 

7-rasr. Touring Car 2360 



MERCER 



SIMPLEX-MERCER PAC. COAST AGENCY 

1319 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. Price 

Type 35, Series G, 4-Pa38 32.4 h. p. $3100 

Type 36, Series H. 5-Pas3 32.4 h. p. 3100 

Type 35, Series .T, Race'b't 30.6 h. p 2850 

Type .16. Series K. Runabout .30.6 h. p. 285ii 



tcSf^brtaC 



MOWAHL) AuluMuBlLt UU. 

623 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Five Models, Improved Series V. 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Seinl-Raclng Roadster J2750 

Speedway Roadster 3150 

Toy Tonneau 3300 

Five -Passenger Touring Car 3300 

Seven-Passenger Touring Car 3400 

Also T>lmousines. Sedans and Coupes. 






J. W. LEAVITT «. 



CO. 
San Francisco 



301 Golden Gate Ave. 

Standard Models. 
MiKlr-l 7'.l TourlllK *'ar $107.'» 

Mo<lil 70 Kondnler 1107,') 

f. (». I(. Han Fnmcisco, ivltli Klectric Liichts 
Wlih RIectrli' LIkIiIs and <iray and Davis 
Starter. I. o. b. Pan Kniiieiseo Irjmi 



Pathfinder 



i /\ ; I li :,',L^l_U l-^Olh l>- I-,WJwrv OMLt^D CO. 

1219 - 1229 Van Ness Avenue 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

I''lve-Pas8. touring car, 40 horsepower $2185 

l'"our-Pass. phaeton, 40 horsepower 2186 

Two-Pass. Roadster, 40 horsepower 2160 

Three-Pass, coanh. 40 horsepower 2600 

Two-Pnss. rriilsf-r, .10 hors<'i>"'.v"r 2000 



9^ 



>j///- 



/(?rcey/rrow 



CltHL E ARROW 
Geary and Polk Sts. 



San Francisco 



Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Model 


H. P. 


3S-C 


38 h. p 


IS-B 


48 h. p 


r,r, V 


r.r. 1, ,. 



6-Pass. 

7-Pn<!S. 



Touring 

Touring 



Price 

$4300 

5000 



s^ 



FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

F. O. B. San Francisco. 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

.Model "T" Underslung Touring Car J1125 

Model "N" Underslung Roadster 1076 

.Model "H" Underslung Touring Car 1625 

Regal t'nderslung Colonial Coupe 1376 

Model "C" Standard Tourlns Car 1375 



REO 



REO-PACIFIC COMPANY 
Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



Standard Models. 



Model 

6-PaB«ienBer . . . 
2-Pa«gengcr . . . 
IH Ton Truck 



H. P. Price 

.30-35 h. p J1295 

.30-35 h. p 1296 

.30-35 h. p 197B 



STANLEY 



STANLEY STEAM CAR CO. 
■141 Golden Gate Ave. San Franclsro 

Model Price 

2-Pa88. 10 h. p 11360 

2-Pass. 20 h. p 1790 

4-Pa8s. 10 h. p 1450 

4 -Pass. 20 h. p iggj 

.■i-Pa.ss. 20 h. p ]ggo 

7- Pass. 30 h. p 3700 

12-P.1SS. no h. p 'tOn 



-J 

AUTO SALES CO. 
418 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

"40" 6-Pas9. Touring Car 12000 

■'40' 4-Pas3. Torpedo 2000 

"4tf Limousine 3000 

M Special 5-Pas?. Touring 1900 

"32" Model R 5-Pas8. Touring 1600 

"32" Moilel W 6-Pas8. Touring 1S50 

"33' Model RX Roadster H"!" 



^VINTON SIX 



THE WINTON MOTOR CAR CO 

S. E. Cor. Sutter and Van Ness 
Prices F. O. B. Factory 



Roadster 


7-Pas8. Touring 


►fiSO 


Toy Tonn..i 


Limousine 


liV) 


.^-Pass. Touring .«iw» 


Lsndaulet 


4.V10 


6-Pbss. Torpedo :«Vi 


Coupe 


4-i^ 



There is a poet in automobile row. 
Perhaps we had better say rhymster, 
judging by this particular paroxysm. Be- 
cause this anonymous rhymster is well 
known, do we venture to publish the 
verse, rather than because we think it 
possessing true literary merit. — Editor's 
Note. 



The poetic muse assails me. 

At Carmel-by-the-Sea ; 
The home of elusiVe mussels. 

And play-ground of the flea. 

A town where shops are honest — 
They do not lie or cheat; 

But, oh, you festive flealets. 
How you cling to one and eat! 

"Mood" is a precious treasure, 
And fish a common treat, 

The pine-tanged air a pleasure — 
But the flea is swift and fleet. 



The barber here is a painter; 

The plumber a writer of fame. 
The man who brings our firewood. 

To etchings signs his name. 

It's me for San Francisco, 

And good old "auto" row; 
Where "smoke" fogs blow in the evening, 

Where the bright lights gayly glow. 

When I left that small sea village. 

My heart beat gay and free. 
With due respect to Carmel, 

Give me "Frisco"-by-the-Sea. — Anon. 



24 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



October, 1913. 



ANOTHER WORLD TOUR. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Frederick Lee, of New 
York City, accompanied by a Russian 
friend who is an accomplished linguist, 
are now on the European Continent, on 
the first part of an automobile trip which 
is to cover 80,000 miles, and which will 
be brought nearly to an end at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific Exposition in 1915. They 
started August 1st from New York in a 
Buick, and their plan was to tour through 
Europe until September, and then to re- 
turn to London and set out for India and 
the Far East. Mr. Lee has no chauf- 
feur, and expects to take care of his own 
car throughout. 

?r ^ "S 

"LOOK OUT FOR THE COP!" 

The Two Hundred Club, unique in the 
ranks of motoring bodies, has been 
formed by the Contest Committee of the 
Chicago Automobile Club. Any motor- 
ist who drives 200 miles in ten hours 
without a motor stop and conforms to the 
rules of the test, will be eligible to mem- 
bership. Competition will be open to any 
motorist in the United States. As soon 
as twenty-five have qualified, a perma- 
nent organization will be effected. 
'S 'S 5 

Richard G. Badger and his brother 

Hard G. Badger of Boston, claim a new 
automobile record between New York 
city and Boston. They advise the Na- 
tional car manufacturers at Indianapolis 
that they made this run in a National 
roadster in elapsed time of six hours, fif- 
teen minutes, their actual running time 
being only five hours and forty-five min- 
utes. They claim to have made the run 
without one bit of tire trouble, and with- 
out any inconveniences at all. 



RING SHOWS UP IN TUBE OF TIRE. 

Last January J. W. Bradbury borrowed 
E. L. Campbell's automobile, and before 
he got off the main street was stopped 
by a tire blowout. He repaired the dam- 
age, but on reaching home discovered 
that he had lost a valuable ring. He em- 
ployed boys to shovel the snow off the 



street, but the ring was not found, even 
when the snow melted, although a per- 
sistent search was made. A few days 
ago the tire blew out again, this time 
while Campbell was in the machine. In 
repairing it, Campbell felt something be- 
tween the inner and outer casings, and 
found Bradbury's ring. 



"This top looked shabby and leaked like a sieve — g50 was the price of 
a new one, but my neighbor told me how, a year ago, he made his top 
clean and waterproof as new — for ONLY a $S bill. Now you see 



I'M SAVING $45 




RUB-R-TITE 

RENEWS AND REWATERPROOFS 



any worn and leaky top Leather or Imitation Leather. 

RUB-R-TlTE is a scientific laboratory product. Neither sun, storm 
or folding will cause it to peel, crack, blister or rot. If occasionally used 
(reduced) it prolongs the life and wearing qualities of any top indefinitely. 

It is applied with a brush, easily and quickly. It dries quickly. It 
is economical— $1.50 to $S renews a top (cost depends on size and kind 
of material.) 

Every Can Guaranteed to Satisfy or Money Refunded 

RUB-R-TITE ana other Rub-On Auto Aids are carried in stock by most dealers. Send 
for FREE samples of work and information today — NOW — Lest You Forget. 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 



VAN NESS AND SUTTER, 
San Francisco Fresno Los Angeles 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Seattle Spokane 



Portland 



LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LIGHTING SYSTEM 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

630 Varn Ness Averiue :::::::; San Francisco 

CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 



BETTS 

CRESCENT GRADE 
AUTOMOBILE SPRINGS 



Guaranteed against 
age or settling for 
one year 



Phone 
Kearny 2472 




Phone 
Market 6370 



Manufactured by 

BETTS SPRING CO 

888-890 Folsom St. 

San Francisco. Cal. 
Copyrleht 1912 Belts Spring Co 



PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



42 Van Nest 
Avenue 



A FEW BARGAINS 



BAKER ELECTRIC 
FLANDERS ELECTRIC 
WOODS ELECTRIC 
OVERLAND ROADSTER 
7 PASSENGER KNOX . 



NEW 
NEW 

NEW 

$ 500 

3,500 



BOX 101, NEWS LETTER 

21 SUTTER STREET, S. F. 



FOR SALE! 



Fireproof garage and 
machine shop fully 
equipped. More work 
than can be taken care of. Large list of satisfied cus- 
tomers. A fine paying proposition. Elegantly located 



near San Francisco. Must sell. 

Box 100, News Letter 



21 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



EQUIPMENT OF 
YOUR CAR 

MEANS "EVERYTHING" when comfort 
and convenience are considered 

TIRE HOLDERS serviceable and attract- 
ive. 

HIND VIEW MIRRORS show the road and 
prevent accidents from rear end collisions 

ROBE RAILS FOOT RESTS TIRE LOCKS 

LICENSE PAD HOLDERS 

All necessary for the Auto 



E. H. WHITEHOUSE MFG. COMPANY 

Newark. N. J. 



A FULL STOCK AT 



Chanslor & Lyon Co. 

1238 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 



The recognized Quality Standard in any line of 
production, merits and secures those choicest at- 
tributes of Success: Bountiful Remuneration; Con- 
sciousness of Superior Achievement; Consolation in 
Beneficent Service. 




THE KNIGHT TIRE & RUBBER CO.. Canton. Ohio 

HALLIWELL COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Dittributort 

San Francisco Los Angeles Portland Seattle 



You won't use second-rate gasoline 
Its far worse to use second-rate oil! 

H A W It I S 

OILS 



have set a standard for over 
26 years. Carefully made 
from the finest Pennsylvania 
Premium Crude Oil, scienti- 
fically tested as to quality. 
Absolutely free from carbon- 
izing matter. 

Small wonder that HARRIS 
and QUALITY are synony- 
mous. Small wondertheygive 
increased power and speed. 

"A little goes a long way and 
every drop counts!" 

A. W. HARRIS OIL COMPANY 

32* S. Water St.. Providence. R I. 143 No. W«b«sh Ave.. ChiuKO. III. 

PACIFIC COAST AQENTS, 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE FRESNO PORTLAND SPOKANE 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by raplacine worn out Bearinirs with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS All aizea carried In stock 




Pacific Coatt Dlitrlbulori 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

San Francisco Frtsno Lot Ane«l«f Portland Sflsttlt Spokan* 




FORD SEAT COVERS 




SEAT COVERS 



TOURING $25.00 
ROADSTERS $17.50 



A SET 



Equip your car with our Auto-fabric seat covers, 
trimmed witli Sterling leather and give it the same 
no.bby appearance as a high priced car. Our seat 
covers are absolutely waterproof and save the 
leather upholstery on a new car and cover up the 
w^orn parts on old cars, thereby adding to the appear- 
ance of your car and making it very easy to keep 
the upholstery neat and clean. 

This is an opportunity to secure a high grade set 
of seat covers at a hitherto unheard of price and 



every Ford owner should take advantage of our 
offer at once. Our seat covers are all bound with 
Sterling leather, while the arms are trimmed in 
genuine Patent Leather the same as furnished on 
seat covers costing up to $75. OO a set. 

TO rORD DEALERS 

Who have not yet taken up our Ford seat cover 
proposition — read the above story — ihe description 
spells QUALITY all the way through, and it ought 
to convince you that you can sell Ford seat covers.' ' 



HUGHSON & MERTON, mc 

DISTRIBUTORS 

530 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco, Cal. 



THE LONG HORN 




A powerful warning signal. All the effect of an electric horn 
but, NONE of the EXPENSE. 

MECHANICALLY OPERATED 

No batteries to keep charged: no wires or connections to break. 
It is there when you need it. TRY ONE. If not satisfied after 
5 days use, return it and get your money back. 

REGULAR TYPE— All Nickel, $20; Black and Nickel, $18; Black 

and Brass, $18. 
JUNIOR TYPE —All Nickel, $12; Black and Nickel $11; Black 

and Brass, $11. 
MOTORCYCLE TYPE— All Nickel, $10. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

HUGHSON & MERTON, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



Mr, Motorist 
Why Don't You Use 




TIRES ? 



Isn't a Reduction in Tire Expense 

of 30%, worth considering? That 
is what our guarantee of 5,000 
miles versus the usual 3,500, 
means. 

Figure it out, take list price of a 
34 X 4 tire $32 and divide that 
sum by 5,000, then 3,500, the 
two guarantees. Now figure on 
a basis of four tires and the mile- 
age you average each month; isn't 
that saving worth considering ? 



HUGHSON & MERTON, Inc. 



530 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 



Oakland Distnhiilori 

PEART & ELKINGTON 
12th & Telegraph 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



=^ 







Published Monthly by the Proprietor Frederick Marriott, at the Office 21 Sutter Street. San Francisco, California 

DEVOTED TO THE MOTORING INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Price 10 Cents 



THE 

FISK 

RUBBER 

COMPANY 

of New York 



SAN FRANCISCO, 
CAL. 



San Francisco, Cal., November, 1913 



Evolution op an Automobile Tire. 





HEAVY CAR TYPE 
Real Rubber - Real Servick. 



J 



SI. 00 Per Year 



PACIFIC COAST 
BRANCH HOUSES 



Seattle, Wash. 



Portland, Ore. 



San Francisco, Calif. 



Oakland, Calif. 



Sacramento, Calif. 



Fresno, Calif. 



Los Angeles. Calif. 



=^ 



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Cut Down Your Gasoline Bills 

= DEVELOP MORE POWER = 



Avoid Carbon deposits and corroded valves by using 



m-Oil. '■ 



,;;.;J^ /.MB MOTOR BOATS ■ 



':>; GEORGE A. HAWS I; 
>:■ ....:-niic* Greases. -, 



NewYorKCity.U.S.*_J, 



No matter what brand of oil you are using Panhard 
Oil will give you better service. We have proved it to 
thousands. 



George A. Haws, New York 



BERNARD I. BILL 

SOLE DISTRIBUTER 

543 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 



Have You a Good Old 
Automobile 



^ We can bring it up-to-date — at a 
lesser cost tlnan a trade on a new 
model. The Vesta Electric Lighting 
System and Crescent Air System is 
all that is needed to make your car 
more complete than any 1914 model. 

Give me a chance to convince you, 
information costs you nothing. 



B. I. BILL 

5I^3 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco 



WHY NOT 



let us take your automobile photo- 
graphs? Our reputation for 
exceptionally fine work guaran- 
tees satisfaction while our prices 
are reasonable and the same to 
everyone. Also you will find 
that our photographs reproduce 
well for your advertising cuts. 

Our new^ studio, the largest west of 
New York, is completely equip- 
ped with separate departments 
for every branch of our busi- 
ness and an operating room 
large enough to accommodate 
two machines at once : : : : : 

Try us when you want a photograph 
of any kind. You will be pleased 
with our portraits, our com- 
mercial work, and if you have a 
Kodak our finishing will be a 
pleasant surprise ::::::: 



ARTHUR SPAULDING CO. 

625-6,?3 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones: Franklin 1184 C 4084 



" Hoover " Auxiliary Spring 
& Shock Absorber 




a®- 



Action of "Hoover" Spring under ordinary load, or running 
on smooth roads 

Full factory equipment on all 
Packards, Oldsmobiles, Coles, 
Thomas and Seven others. 
Absolutely perfect. No com- 
petition. Full set of four- 
Si 4.00 to $18.00 



IMPOSSIBLE TO BREAK SPRINGS 

Under compression by heavy 
loads, rough roads or bumps. 
Under all conditions rides as 
easy as on asphalt. Impossible 
to break springs. 

Hoover Spring Company 

617 Turk St., San Francisco, Cal. 




CO 

(^ 

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CO 
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CO 
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CO 



Motoring- Magazine, this issue contains some 
very interesting information concerning the 
road problems of the day. The question of good 
roads on the Pacific Coast is of vital importance. 
The betterment of Highways and the result 
attained from them is recognized as one of the 
greatest assets to a community. 

From out the northwest from a story of how 
a school teacher has evolved a scheme by which 
the good road work may be increased by in- 
stalling in the minds of school children the value 
of the betterment of the public channels of 
transportation. She is working for tomorrow 
and not for today. 

The opening up of the connecting link of the 
road around Lake Tahoe has now^ made possible 
a most delightful week end tour as told in this 

issue. 

From the far north comes a most interest- 
ing tale of the motor car and its advantages in 
supposedly snow bound Alaska. With its advent 
those of the last frontier see the passing of the 
"Malaniute." 

There is also to be found in the pages of this 
issue many new and interesting things for the 
motorist. 



CO 
CO 
CO 
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(/) 

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^^pcocococxxococococo(^^^ 






Vol. V 



Editorial 1 

Tahoe Loop of the Lincoln Highway . 3 

Redwood Ring 6 

Quaint Town of Upper Lake 7 

The Marvelous Springs of California 7 

The Gun and Auto 7 

Connecting Dry Cells 7 

Proper Way to Prime 7 

From Out of the Northwest 8 

Auto Show for Seattle 8 

A Woman's Good Road Scheme 10 

Turnbull Canyon Road 10 

New Racing Track 11 

Road Patrol 11 

Of Interest to Motorists 12 

Touring the Sierras 15 

Good Roads Help Land Values 15 

To Prevent Accidents 15 

Women Motorists 15 

Don't Drive in Rut 17 

Just Missed a High Dive 17 

Passing of the Malamute 18 

Autos in Alaska 21 

A Ten Year Tour 22 

Troubles of Self-Starters 23 

Lights Ordinance for New York 24 



November, 1913 



No. 5 



MOTORING MAGAZINE and MOTOR LIFE 

Published Monthly by the Proprietor Frederick Marriott 
at the Office 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, California 

DEVOTED TO THE MOTORING INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST 





i 



iU. 



k^^M.. 



AVOTORING MAGAZINE 

AND MOTOR LIFE 



ralu)o l/Oop o{ Clio Miuu)ln ! (lylV/'/ay 



Ky IRo IR. fl'IKI®min!B©<fc!B 



The selection of the Auburn and 
Placerville roads as part of the Lincoln 
Highway by those who are responsible 
for the idea of a national transcontinen- 
tal route was one of the wisest selections 
that could be made. 



Coming direct across the sands of Ne- 
vada, the motorist who follows the Lin- 
coln Highway will cross the Sierras and 
drop down into the fertile Sacramento 
Valley just as did the pioneers and ar- 
gonauts of days of yore. 



The real United States history of Cali- 
fornia is centered around this section. It 
is here where gold was discovered which 
carried with it all the romances of the 
days of '49. 

These two routes, although quite well 




Western end of Emerald Bay on new road. 



Photos by Claude McGee. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 




-' _»,;»/-1 . I-. 



ggR-' ^"joir^iuis^r 



Near Cisco on the Auburn road, Lincoln Highway. 



Pliotos by Claude McGee. 



known by motorists, are not as popular 
as the grandeur of the scenery and the 
historic interest should demand. The 
main reason for this is that to make the 
Tahoe run without retracing one's course 
meant the taking of a loop through Ne- 
vada of a day's duration, or paying a 
heavy barge toll across the lake. 

Late this fall, the California State au- 
thorities announced the completion of 
the State road from Tahoe Tavern to Tal- 
lac. This cuts out the trip through Ne- 
vada, and also the necessity of being 
towed across the Lake. 

The connecting link will not only make 
the tour to the lake more popular, but 
also furnishes a drive that abounds in 
as beautiful scenery as can be found 
within the State of California. 

With the opening of this road, man 
and woman can cross the Rubicon. This 
was supposed to be a pleasure after 
death, but from the heights of Rubicon 
Point one drops down truly into a land 
of promise. 

Those who make this loop around the 
California section of the Lincoln High- 
way should, starting from Sacramento, 
take the Auburn Road. The road out of 
the capital is oiled and well kept, until 
one passes Roseville, the well kept road 
does not enter the railroad, but passes to 



the left of it, thence on past Rocklin to 
Auburn one finds a good macadam road 
— as one nears the latter place they find 
the road begins to wind in and out 
through the foothills. 

Auburn can be considered to be the 



commencement of the climb up the 
Sierras. 

In making the run from San Francisco, 
Auburn can be considered the stopping 
place for the night. To thoroughly en- 
joy the ride, an early start just after day- 




On the road to Upper lak? in « Mitchell. 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 




Summit of Rubicon Point, Lake Tahoe. 



Photos by Claude McOee. 



break should be made; from Auburn the 
route takes one past Colfax, Gold Run, 
Dutch Flat and Emigrant Gap, which 
by their names, stamps the existence of 
these towns as beginning in the days of 
the gold fever. It is around this section 
that some of the most interesting tales 
told by Bret Harte are laid. 

From Auburn, on past Emigrant Gap 
to the summit, it is a steady climb; it is 
constantly going up, up over easy grades 
through wonderful and picturesque coun- 
try which defies description of pen and 
ink, until the last hundred feet is 
reached, which is the heaviest grade to 
be encountered. 

Over the summit of the divide, one 
drops sharply to the left for two hundred 
feet to the snow-sheds, going through 
snow shed number six. It would be well 
to mention here that those making the 
trip, in passing through the snow sheds, 
should send some one ahead to see that 
no trains are approaching. From Emi- 
grant to the summit the snow sheds have 
to be crossed four times, and while it is 
easy to detect the approach of freight or 
passenger trains, yet it is impossible to 
hear the approach of returning locomo- 
tives which coast down the grade. 

As one crosses snow shed number six 



to the other side, there bursts into view 
the grandest picture of the trip in the 
foreground, and to the left mounts jagged 
rocks without the slightest sign of vege- 
tation. It is like the climax to earth's 



volcanic upheaval. Then as the eye 
turns to the right, it picks up the road, 
which drops down sharply through the 
jftgged rocks for nearly a thousand feet 
to the green, fertile plateau in which nes- 




James I. McMullen and a party of friends returning from a deer hunt 

Jeffery car. 



in their 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 



ties the indescribable blue waters of Don- 
ner Lake. Those who have never seen 
Donner Lake from the crossing of snow 
shed number six have not seen the grand- 
est picture to be witnessed in California. 
From the opening in snow shed number 
six there is a drop of about two hundred 
feet, which is the steepest on the Tahoe 
loop. It is for this reason it is by far 
preferable to go by way of Auburn and 
return by way of Placerville. 

From snow shed number six on down 
past Donner Lake into Truckee, it is an 
easy ride. Turning at the mountain rail- 
road town to the left, one takes the road 
to the right along the banks of the 
Truckee River to Tahoe City, where 
splendid accommodations to suit every 
one's purse can be had. From Auburn to 
Tahoe City is a nice day's drive. 

From Tahoe City the old road leads 
around to McKinneys, along the shores 
of Lake Tahoe. It is from the latter 
point to Tallac that the connecting link 
of the State road has just been finished. 
It is, in keeping with all the State roads, 
well built and abounds in beautiful sce- 
nic effect; from the summit of Rubicon, 



one can look for miles over the lakes into 
Nevada, and over the eastern boundary 
of the State of California. It is in keep- 
ing with the grandeur of the whole coun- 
try. 

At Tallac one meets the Placerville 
road. From the lake side to the foot of 
Meyer's grade, one travels through 
meadow country; the grade at Meyer's 
station is short, but one appreciates that 
it is as hard a climb as there is to be 
found in the West. Once at the summit, 
it is a continuous drop down into Placer- 
ville, a distance of nearly fifty miles. 

This fifty miles is replete with the his- 
tory of the stirring scenes of the early 
gold days in California. It was along 
this road that gold was first discovered, 
and one sees on every hand the scarred 
earth, the result of placer and hydraulic 
mining; in fact, the now quiet and se- 
date town of Placerville was once the 
roaring hangtown of '49 and early '59. 

From Placerville to Folsom one con- 
tinues to see the marks of early days. It 
is this Placerville road which Mark 
Twain made famous in his story of the 
wild ride of Horace Greeley. 



From Folsom to Sacramento is a bou- 
levard; the 22 miles is in strong contrast 
to the twenty-five miles between Placer- 
ville and Folsom. It would be hard to 
find a worse piece of road than the latter, 
and if Mark Twain to-day were to ride 
over this section, he would imagine his 
Greeley story was a joy ride on a moon- 
light night. 

Sacramento is the end of a good day's 
run from Tahoe City by the way of Tal- 
lac. From the capital it is merely up to 
the motorist how he wishes to return to 
San Francisco. 

s- ^ 3^ 



5(aiw®(sxal ^ 

It seems a shame that commercialism 
should have so ruthlessly cut its way 
through the Redwoods of California. One 
sees on every hand in touring the scars 
of the saw and axe. Those who would 
soften these scars have called the 
stumps the pulpit Redwoods, and in verse 
and prose have woven romance around 
the shoots coming from the roots that 
have developed into young trees, which 
they have called the Redwood ring. 




A pulpit redwood on the road to San Ansclmo. 



— Photo by Arthur Spaulding Co. 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 




Enjoying one of the cool mountain springs uliicli are to be juund on practically every turn of the beautiful mountain 
roads of California. —Photo by Arthur Spaulding Co. 



Q,wmii[t TowiHi ©If Ujpjpoir ILailk® 

One of the quaintest towns in Califor- 
nia is at the head of Clear Lake, and 
called Upper Lake; it might properly be 
called the Cross Roads. The highway 
from the south, east, west and north di- 
verge to this point, making it a sort of 
headquarters for the motorist. 

3^ 5 5 

TBii® Marv©l®iHis Spimgs ©IF 
CalK©™® 

The stranger within the State wonders 
and marvels at the harnessed electric 
power to be seen on every hand in the 
high powered wires that stretch all over 
the country. It these visitors were to 
tour throughout the mountains, they 
would appreciate why it is possible to 
collect this electric power. California is 
blessed with some of the best mountain 
streams in the world, and it is the force 
of these streams that generates this great 
electric power. In touring, one finds at 
every hand cool streams trickling down 
the mountain side. It is these streams, 
when combined, mak-es the mountain 
streams that generate the power. 



TTlsi® Qm^ smi Annft® 

"The motor car is extending the pleas- 
ures of mankind every day. Ten years 
ago a deer hunting trip was an occasion 
that had to be planned weeks ahead. Ac- 
comodations had to be secured, letters 
written, hiring guides and making elabo- 
rate preparations," comments J. I. Mc- 
Mullen. 

"To-day it is decidely different. This 
was brought to mind recently when a cou- 
ple of friends proposed a trip to the 
country for deer. We left San Francisco 
on a noon-day boat, and by night we 
were in the hunting grounds. 

"Up early the next morning, we were 
lucky enough to bring down a couple of 
bucks before ten o'clock. This was 
enough of the good eating, and before 
noon were on our way home, which we 
reached in good season, giving us plenty 
of time for a good night's rest. This 
meant a Saturday afternoon and Sunday 
away from the city and back to the desk 
in time Monday morning with a fine lot 
of venison in the larder. This would 
have been impossible before the day of 
the automobile. 



(C©i!Mi®dlmg IQ)iiy €/sM& 

Dry cells should be arranged so that 
the zinc binding posts are all equi-distant. 
and where they will not come in contact 
with each other or any other metal. The 
bunch of cells should then be finnly tied 
together so that the connectors will not 
shake loose, and after screwing the bind- 
ing post burrs down tightly, they should 
be fastened with a drop of solder. The 
best dry cells now have the zinc binding 
posts set in so that they are not likely to 
come in contact with each other or with 
other metal to short-circuit and run down 
the cell. 

V V V 

!Pir®p)©ir W(5iy d ' 

There is a "best" way i^ i.,;..^ .our 
engine to make it start easily. The prim- 
ing cups usually furnished on top of the 
cylinders hold just the right amount of 
priming fluid to do the work. If more 
than that amount is placed in the cylinder 
the mixture may be too rich, and the 
starting be difficult instead of easy. With 
stop-cocks closed, fill the cups with a 
priming fluid consisting of half gasoline 
and half ether, then open cocks and allow 
the fluid to run down into the cylinders. 



IE 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 
H I 



November, 1913. 



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Se®irai© IHlDglhiWsiy 

The Alps should be called the "Cas- 
cades of Europe," is the belief of State 
Forester E. W. Ferris, of the State of 
Washington, who is enthusiastic over the 
scenic possibilities of Washington, and 
who is perhaps the most ambitious per- 
son in the State to see the commonwealth 
develop along this particular line. His 
home is in Skagit County, and he knows 
the mountains of Washington like a well- 
read book. 

While he realizes that he is looking far 
into the future, he is already laying the 
foundations for an agitation in favor of 
a scenic highway that will loop the beau- 
ties of the mountains of western Wash- 
ington. 

Beginning with his home in Skagit, he 
proposes a trip over a well constructed 
highway up the Skagit River or its tribu- 
taries to the summit of the mountains, 
from where he would travel over the 
glacial areas that supply Lake Chelan 
with cold mountain water, down to that 
beautiful lake, and follow its borders 
sixty miles to where its blue waters tum- 
ble over rocky chasms five miles to the 
Columbia. Thence he would go down 
the Columbia to Wenatchee, thence 
across the mountain spur to North 
Yakima, thence westward through Nat- 
ches Pass at the summit of the mountain 
again, on past Mt. Rainier, through Ta- 
coma and Seattle, and along the shores of 
Puget Sound to his home in Skagit 
County. 

Forester Ferris believes that every 
mile of this road is practicable. 
-S ^ ^ 

In answer to the numerous inquiries 
as to how Clatsop County, Oregon, would 
expend the $400,000, provided the pro- 
posed bond issue for that amount is 
passed by the people at the coming elec- 
tion. County Judge Judd, of Clatsop 
County, made the following statement, 
which shows that the money will be 
turned over to the State Highway Com- 
mission by the County Court to be ex- 
pended on three trunk highways in the 
county under the direct supervision of the 



State Highway Commission. He says: 
"Believing that the trend of events 
points to the early passage of laws in this 
State, and also of the United States, for 
the building up of a great system of 
National and State highways; and, be- 
lieving that the only proper head to han- 
dle the development of this great work 
is that of the State Highway Commission, 
it will be the policy of the County Court 
of Clatsop County to place any funds de- 
rived from the sale of bonds under the 
direct supervision of the said State High- 
way Commission. 

"We will insist upon the surveying 
being made by the Highway Engineer, 
and that all data necessary for the proper 
letting of contracts be furnished from the 
office of the State Highway Commission, 
will submit the bids to the Commission 
before accepting the same, and will ap- 
point some person recommended by said 
State Highway Commission as county 
road master to superintend the improve- 
ments thus made — believing that this is 
the proper method to procure the best 
results from money expended in road 
building. We are very sure that all loca- 
tions of these three main highways will 
be made with a view to serve the most 
people — our own people first — and where 
existing roads are not located, which will 
meet with the approval of the general 
public. 

"These three highways, as described in 
the election notices, will pass through 



practically every settled part of Clatsop 
County, and will be of equal service to 
all of the people in the county. It was 
the object, in naming these three routes, 
to serve the best interests of all the resi- 
dents of the county, and it is the opinion 
of the court that this work should be done 
under the supervision as above stated, 
thereby making these three highways in- 
tercounty roads; that is, roads which will 
connect with the adjoining counties. 

"Road No. 1 will connect with Colum- 
bia County, along the Columbia River. 
Road 2 will connect with the south end 
of Columbia County and Washington 
County, making the most direct route to 
the Willamette Valley. Road No. 3 will 
connect the city of Astoria with the main 
thoroughfare in Tillamook County. At 
a day not far distant, these will be a link 
in the great highway which will be built 
along the coast in the State of Oregon. 

"There is no question but that at the 
next session of the Legislature large sums 
of money will be appropriated for the 
improvement of State highways or high- 
ways that are built by counties, under the 
supervision of the State Highway Com- 
mission; and it is very necessary that 
Clatsop County should be in a position 
to receive her proportion of these funds. 
Without a system of highways built un- 
der the supervision of the State High- 
way Commission, we will have no State 
highways — consequently will receive no 
State aid." 



?■ ?r ?r 



AoDtonffiioM® C@mv©im(lB©nii £©im(t©m[B)kft©al fey EmtlfeHiSDfflsftk ID)®aikrs 



The announcement that Seattle is to 
have an automobile show again this year 
should have much to do with influencing 
the manufacturers who are contemplating 
holding an automobile educational con- 
vention in the Northwest during the com- 
ing winter to select this city. 

As announced, the automobile show 
this year, which will be the second an- 
nual affair, will be held from February 
9th to 14th, both dates inclusive. 



Last year Seattle gave the most credit- 
able automobile show that has ever been 
held in the Northwest. This year it prom- 
ises to be even still better. No more 
suitable time could be selected for the 
automobile educational convention than 
that of the week of the show, and the two 
being held in conjunction should draw an 
attendance of thousands to this city. 

William I. Fitzgerald, who will pro- 
mote the show this year, states that he 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



would be f,'lad to have the automobile 
educational convention held durin^^ show 
week; that he would erect a lecture plat- 
form and give the delegates the use of 
the building free. He will make this of- 
fer to the various automobile factories in 
the East. 

"If such a proposition goes through as 
planned and discussed, it should be a 
great boon for the automobile in Seattle. 
It should not only prove of interest to 
the dealers, but should attract motorists 
from all over the Northwest. 

The purpose of the convention would 
not interfere in any way with the show — 
rather, one would help the other. As con- 
templated, the various automobile and 
automobile accessory factories would 
send a nationally recognized expert to 
this city to deliver lectures upon the sub- 
ject with which they are the best ac- 
quainted. Their object would not be so 
much to boost any one car or product as 
to impart general information of interest 
to motorists for the advancement of the 
cause as a whole. 

Not only should such a convention 
prove valuable to the owner, but to the 
lecturers themselves. Conditions in the 
Northwest, and particularly Seattle, are 
so different from most places that it has 
been suggested that a day be set aside 
for the owners to tell these experts their 
opinions and ideas of needed improve- 
ments and innovations here. 

Seattle is the logical city for such a 
convention, as it is situated midway be- 
tween Portland and Vancouver, and the 
average mileage from points in the 
States of Washington, Montana, Idaho, 
Oregon and British Columbia, is less than 
to any other city in the Northwest that 
could accommodate such large crowds as 
would doubtless attend. 

Local motorists and dealers, quick to 
see the advantages that would result from 
such a convention, intend to co-operate 
in an effort to secure this convention. 

Fitzgerald announces that he has al- 
ready had requests for spaces from six- 
teen firms for the automobile show, and 
it is probable that some late bidders may 
be unable to secure space. The Armory 
only accommodates thirty-six spaces, 
each space permitting of three cars. In 
order that the show may be a represen- 
tative one, not more than two spaces will 
be allotted to any one exhibitor. 
^ "5 ?r 

Slhalbfey T®[p DoOO&s ISaxal 

A dilapidated top gives a bad name to 
an otherwise good car. Remove the old, 
shabby top, shine up the brass, polish the 
varnished surfaces, remove all grease ac- 
cumulations, and the old car will look 
quite smart. 




Coiirtr'^V Rrittnrj & Rrv. I ithii(;r,ipherS. 



One of the most complete motoring maps that has ever been issued is given in 
this number of Afo/oring Magazine. It covers that section of California from Del 
Monte on the south to Woodland on the north. Calistoga on the west and Modesto 
on the cast. The grcjt value of the map is that the distances between points are 
distinctly marked. It is a complete bay map. 



10 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 



«« < :««cc<:<(C« c c<( '^ 






i 

I 

> / 



:\ VyoH\au':^ ck)od Road >ScIvd((\o 

From @[r(gg©ini 







Road building, a course of study for 
the rural schools of Lane County, Ore- 
gon, is to be introduced within a few days 
by Miss Goldie Van Biber, School Super- 
visor in the Siuslaw district. Instructions 
have been mailed. This is the first ex- 
periment of its kind ever tried in Oregon. 
Actual road building is the laboratory 
work which will accompany this course. 
The children of each district will build 
and maintain during the approaching 
rainy season a strip of county road near 
the school building.. The school whose 
road stands the winter and is found in the 
best condition will be the winner of a 
unique contest in which school children 
on the Siuslaw eagerly are awaiting to 
participate. 

County Judge Helmus W. Thompson, 
Lane County's most active good roads 
enthusiast, was so pleased with this wo- 
man's plan to teach the fundamentals of 
road building in the rural schools that he 
immediately offered two huge silver cups 
as prizes for this good roads contest. 

"I was afraid that perhaps the county 
court might not allow me to experiment 
on the roads, but it has even authorized 
its supervisors to furnish us rock and 
gravel, handle powder and do the work 
that children could not do alone," says 
Miss Van Biber, who has just made a 
60-mile stage trip to present her plans. 

The county court sees in the scheme of 
this small woman a plan to establish the 
fundamentals of good road-building in a 
new generation and at the same time to 
interest the present farming class in the 
principles of drainage and highway con- 
struction which the children learn at 
'school. It has eritered into the plan with 
enthusiasm. 

"It's a corking idea," exclaimed Judge 
Thompson, while telling of Miss Van 
Biber's plan. "It is a remarkable woman 
who will design a scheme like that. It 
will accomplish results that we have been 
longing for. It has taken that girl, a 
Supervisor over thirty-five districts in a 
mountainous seacoast district, without a 
railroad, to solve our good roads problem. 
Some of these school people go around 
with a mouthful of teeth, thinking of 
nothing at all, but that girl has a head 
on her shoulders. This is all her scheme, 
too. 



"This is the attitude in which the 
County Court received the plan which this 
girl Supervisor, scarcely out of college, 
brought timidly before that body re- 
cently, asking only the use of 100 yards 
of road in each school district. 

"Miss Van Biber has jurisdiction over 
700 square miles, extending into Lin- 
coln, Lane and Douglas counties. She 
is the idol of her district. All the year 
on horseback, by boat or on foot, she 
travels over the rough mountain high- 
ways and trails up the small rivers. Every 
homesteader is her friend; wherever she 
appears she is welcomed. It was she who 
introduced manual training in the Sius- 
law schools, and the exhibits of handi- 
craft, sewing, carpentry work, bead work 
from Florence, took first prizes at the 
Lane County fair ahead of the Eugene 
and advanced valley schools. She her- 
self supervised the installation of the in- 
dustrial work, placed it under proper 
supervision, and now roadbuilding is her 
next step. 

"She is a modest little woman, and was 
a student at the University only three 
years ago. When the County Judge sug- 
gested that her plan be made known in 
the newspapers, she protested; when the 
reporter interviewed her she protested. 
She pleaded that her name be left out. 

"'It's the plan that's important; that's 
all,' said Miss Van Biber. 'Don't men- 
tion me. And besides, it's only an un- 
tried plan. Yet I know it will succeed, 
because the people there are interested; 
they want it tried, and they have never 
attempted anything down there that did 
not succeed. 

"Those mountain people in the Sius- 
law territory are an unusual class. They 



have lived in that secluded region for 
years and yeais. They never had a 
school fair until two years ago; now they 
can hold the biggest and best school fair 
in Lane County. Whatever they take up 
they put through. 

"And moreover, this is no scheme to 
work children on the roads. They will 
care for only one hundred yards, and not 
necessarily that much if the district road 
be difficult. 

"The road building is not going to be 
taught by the teachers, because the av- 
erage teacher is not qualified to teach 
road building. We shall organize a good 
roads club in each school. We shall give 
schools credit for the hour or more a 
week that they spend on the roads. 
Those who undertake this road work, and 
it will be purely optional, will be ex- 
cused from studying the road chapter in 
the Agricultural Manual. The whole plan 
is to arouse interest in roads, and give 
adequate instruction, and the already 
overworked teachers will not be bur- 
dened with this additional work. 

"Of course, all districts will not be 
able to participate, because many of the 
schools are built on trails; they have no 
roads on which to work. Possibly these 
districts can compete for the prize by lay- 
ing out and actually building a piece of 
road past their school. 

"In the Siuslaw County we will work 
out this plan under the most difficult con- 
ditions. Everything is against it. The 
grades are narrow, scarcely more than 
trails, and the enormous rainfall is the 
most severe test a road can have. The 
Siuslaw roads are subject to more 
washing than any other roads in the 
country." 



Tifflirinilbiuii €®iniy@ini W.@m 



Actual work on the Turnbull Canyon 
road has been started. Colonel Scofield, 
president of the Board of Trade of Whit- 
tier, was accorded the honor of holding 
the plow handles for the first furrow. 
Grouped around him were the officers and 
directors of the two big boosting organiza- 
tions of the city, the Board of Trade and. 



the Whittier Commercial Club. Seated 
on the plow-beam was Dr. George Flan- 
ders, dubbed by his fellow boosters as the 
"Daddy of Turnbull Canyon Road." 

"Colonel Schofield made a short ad- 
dress, in which he called for three cheers 
for Supervisor Manning and his asso- 
ciates for the new road, and for Dr. Flan- 



NOVEMBEF*, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



11 



ders and his many able assistants. These 
were given with a vim. Mr. Scofield 
said: 

"Gentlemen, we have just started a 
work which will prove an epoch in the 
history of Whittier. With the comple- 
tion of this short piece of road, many 
new things will come to Whittier. We 
are going to open our city to the automo- 
bile travel of Southern California. We 
are opening the way for something which 
will call for vast improvements within 
our city. Paved streets must follow the 
great influx of travel which will be in- 
vited here by this beautiful canyon road. 
Let's all get behind the Supervisors, who 
have made this work possible, and follow 
the work right through the canyon. Let 
us stay behind the men who are cutting 
out the road, and the men who are boost- 
ing it, and we will experience a greater 
growth within the next few years in 



Whittier than has been our lot during the 
past twenty-five." 

Dr. Flanders was congratulated for his 
persistent efforts in behalf of the road, 
and in his modest reply he transferred 
the credit to others, and incidentally 
coined the phrase, "The Panama of the 
Puente Hills." This struck a popular 
note, and three cheers were given for 
Whittier's canal through the hills. 

The new road will be 16 feet wide, with 
a right-of-way 50 feet in width. It will 
be made in the same manner as are all 
of the county roads. The cost has been 
estimated at $20,000, but it is doubtful 
if this covers the entire expense. The 
Supervisors have agreed to expend at 
least $10,000 on the road this year, and 
that means work for every man and team 
available. The Turnbull Canyon road 
will present a busy scene for the next 
year. 



Wm® Motoir Sj^sodlwaiy T© IS© Coiasto'Bflcft®*^] Aft Seaftftll® 



Contracts for the construction of the 
$1UU,0U0 two-mile automobile racing 
course to be built by the Seattle Motor 
Speedway Corporation near Renton Junc- 
tion, eleven miles south of this city, 
were awarded recently. Grading is to 
begin within the next two weeks, and 
the track will be in readiness in ample 
time for the holding of the first big 
speed meeting on July 14th and 15th, 
when the pick of the world's fastest cars 
and premier pilots will clash for prizes 
amounting to $30,000. This represents 
the richest purse offered on any track 
with the exception of the brick speedway 
in Indianapolis. 

The topography of the 160-acre tract 
upon which the racing course is to be 
built is such that grading will be an easy 
task, and can be done without heavy ex- 
pense. The ground will be plowed up 
and rolled, and then permitted to settle 
during the winter months. In the spring 
it will be packed down thoroughly by a 
fleet of heavy steam rollers, after which 
will be applied a surfacing of asphaltic 
oil solution that will provide a smooth, 
hard track capable of withstanding the 
terrific pounding of the powerful steel 
monsters. 

The grand-stands and boxes, with a 
combined seating capacity for 34,000 per- 
sons, and the pagoda for the judges, offi- 
cials and press, will be ready at least a 
month before the date of the races. Space 
for additional stands will be reserved 
in the event that the predicted attendance 



of between 75,000 and 100,000 persons 
is realized. 

Directly across from the grand-stands 
and on the inside of the course at the 
turns there will be reserved parking space 
for 2,500 automobiles, while on the back 
stretch free room for upward of 8,000 au- 
tomobiles is available. This space will 
conveniently take care of the huge fleet 
of motor cars that is expected to bring 
thousands of speed enthusiasts from all 
parts of the Northwest and Pacific Coast. 
Numerous approaches have been pro- 
vided to obviate any congestion of traffic. 

Engineers have been working for 
months on the plans for the track to make 
it not only the swiftest racing course in 
the world, but the safest. The best fea- 
tures of the famous ovals at Indianapolis 
and at Brooklands, England, are to be in- 
corporated in the Seattle project. The 
straightaways will be three-quarters of 
a mile long, while the " curves, wide, 
highly-banked and scientifically con- 
structed, will reach a quarter of a mile. 
Speed of from 100 to 110 miles an hour 
will be possible on the turns, say the 
engineers, and it is hoped to dedicate it 
to the speed realm to the accompaniment 
of a world's record or two. 

An elaborate electric lighting system is 
to be installed, which will make possible 
the holding of twenty-four hour auto- 
mobile races and night speed events. 

The Seattle motor speedway is ideally 
situated, for it covers loO acres of prac- 
tically level ground in the Black River 



Valley, and is reached by two trunk roads 
the Pacific Highway and the Sunset 
Highway — four transcontinental rail- 
roads and an electric interurban system, 
offering unexcelled advantages for han- 
dling the enormous crowds that are ex- 
pected to witness the thrilling battle of 
cylinders." 

Z S S 

lR.®®(al IFsittor®!! 



3 ft© 



Pacific County, in the extreme south- 
western part of the State of Washington, 
has recently inaugurated a system of 
road patrol under the supervision of the 
County Engineer's office, which covers 
173 miles of highway, and is using 65 
men. The implements used are a King 
drag and a ditch cleaner, in addition to 
pick and shovel. This system was put 
in force under the immediate supervision 
of S. P. Davis, who has devoted several 
years to the study of the King drag and 
its operation. The average cost per mile 
is fifteen to seventeen dollars. 

The duties of these patrolmen are to 
keep ruts filled, ditches and cross-roads 
cleaned out, cut away obnoxious weeds 
and do any ordinary work that can be 
accomplished by one man to good ad- 
vantage. The added advantage of this 
is that the patrolman becomes responsi- 
ble for his section of road, and any other 
repairs that are needed which require a 
bigger crew are immediately reported to 
the Supervisors in charge of the district, 
and the work is done when it is most 
needed, which results in a saving of more 
than enough to pay for the work of the 
patrolmen. 

It is easy to see that it is to the interest 
of each patrolman to have big repairs 
made at once, instead of letting the road 
go on until it is impassable. 

Pacific County has the honor of be- 
ing the first section to put in this system 
of road patrols on anything like a defin- 
ite working basis. Other sections have 
attempted spasmodic efforts to gain the 
same results, but no regular line of ac- 
tion has been planned or carried out. 



-A small leak in a gasoline feed 



pipe may not be noticed, especially in 
summer, when the gasoline evaporates 
quite rapidly. This may not only be the 
reason for small mileage per gallon of 
fuel used, but it may be a dangerous 
source of fire. 



12 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 



^ )>> >>> >)>> > > > > )>>> > > >)> >> > > >)>> ^^ ^ 



Of Moi'DSi: tc) iV(otori^fo 



I 
i 




FOR TOWING WRECKS. 

A handy Ht- 

* tie device for 

towing, where 

Holmes Towing Device. ^^"^ wheels 

have received 
damage in collisions or otherwise, is be- 
ing made by Robert Holmes. This is an 
appliance under the rear or front axle of 
an automobile to tow in crippled cars. 
These trucks have two cast-iron wheels 
three inches in width, twelve inches high 
and equipped with hyatt roller bearings. 
By using this on either the front or rear 
wheels, a car can be towed in at full 
speed. 

'6 '5 -S 

A NEW VALVE TOOL. 

A New York company is marketing a 
tool for dressing and reseating valve 
seats without grinding. It is called the 
B. B. Valve Tool, and consists of a valve 
dresser which is so constructed that it 
will dress valves of any size of material 
at a perfect angle at forty-five degrees, 
and a reseating tool which reseats the 
valve seat quickly and accurately at a 




G. R. Valve Tool. 

perfect angle to meet the exact angle 
of the valve. This tool not only removes 
all carbon deposit, but will also dress off 
all imperfections on valve or seat, such 
as ridges, grooves, pits, etc. This tool is 
drop-forged, case-hardened steel, and the 
blade and seat cutter, high speed, oil- 
tempered tool steel. 

5 '6 ?r 

NEW SHOCK ABSORBER. 

A new shock absorber has been put on 
the market. This new absorber is of un- 
usual and inteiesting construction. In- 
stead of dampening the vibration of the 
car, caused by road inequalities by some 
sort of friction device, the force of the 
shock is absorbed by rubber cushions. 
This device consists of three balls, which 



run in tapering runaways, three in each 
arm of the shock absorber, these arms be- 
ing forced together by two rubber cush- 
ions, the whole held in place by a bolt 
and castle nut. When the body springs 
are compressed, the balls run up into the 
ends of the race, and force the two arms 
apart, thereby compressing the rubber 




Riihhei Disc Absorber. 

cushion. The greater the spring move- 
ment, the more the rubber discs are com- 
pressed and the more resistance they 
offer. Adjustment is obtained by screw- 
ing down the castle nut, being adjusted 
more tightly for use on heavier types of 
vehicles. Information concerning the 
shock absorber can be had at the office 
of the News Letter. 

'6 '6 5 

HUB ODOMETER. 

The Stewart-Warner Speedometer fac- 
tory of Chicago have added to their line 
a hub odometer which is said to fit any 
make of truck or electric car. It is a 
Stewart Odometer, such as used in the 
Stewart Speedometers, enclosed in a 
cylindrical casing with the dial on a flat 
face. It registers up to one hundred 




SteiVLirt Odometer. 

thousand miles, the numbers being black 
on a background of white, except the 
tenths of a mile, which are red figures. 

The drive is positive, consisting of 
pinions with worm and spiral gears, each 
pinion being made from a single piece 
of steel hardened and heat treated to re- 
sist wear. 



Through an ingenious application of 
the "Geneva stop" mechanism, the dials 
are locked except at the instant of regis- 
tering. Only those which are to be 
moved are then unlocked. There are no 
springs, pawls or ratchets in the entire 
mechanism. 

? "& ?r 

EXIRA JET FOR EASY STARTING. 
An extra jet for easy starting purposes, 
which can be installed by any automobil- 
ist, has just been brought out. This de- 
vice can be placed on any carburetor, and 
when starting the motor it furnishes a 
rich carburetor mixture directly to the 
upper part of the intake manifold. It 
carries the gasoline from the bottom part 
of the float chamber to the manifold 
through an independent lead, and is cai- 
bureted on its way to the motor by a de- 
vice in the line. After mixing with the 
gasoline, the mixture goes straight up 
by check valve and out the top through 
the copper tubing to the manifold at the 
highest possible point. The name extra 
jet describes this device very closely. It 
is impossible to leak because the gasoline 
is drawn up to the opening by suction, 




Extra Startiriii Jet. 

and instead of putting simply raw gaso- 
line into the intake pipe, it delivers a 
vaporized mixture, which will ignite eas- 
ily. It is used only at the time of start- 
ing, and does not affect the carburetor in 
any way. The method of operation is 
as follows: Through the dash handle to 
open position when it will lock, then with 
the throttle closed, crank the motor; it 
will in most cases start on the third or 
fourth pull if the spark is good; then, 
unless the weather is cold, release the 
dash handle, which will spring closed. If 
the engine starts, and after running a few 
revolutions stops, it means that the jet is 
giving too much gasoline, and the needle 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



valve should be slightly closed. After 
the engine has stopped from too much 
gasoline, throw off the extra jet and open 
the throttle slightly; the engine will then 
start on the first or second pull. Infor- 
mation concerning this jet may be had at 
the office of the News Letter. 
^ S t 

NEW PRIMER IMPROVEn. 
The Webb Jay primer, brought out 
some time ago, has been greatly im- 
proved. This new primer incorporates a 
sight feed whereby the driver is able to 
see just how much gasoline if any is sent 




I'hc Webb jay Primer. 

to the cylinders to gain a start. There 
are two pipes within the sight, the upper 
one connecting with the pipe which caps 
the gas line, and the lower one which 
runs to the intake manifold of the motor. 

'6 '6 '6 

A -DIFFERENT" BUMPER. 
M. J. LeClerc has a rear bumper that 
differs from the conventional type, as it 
can be attached without drilling the 
frame, removini; shack'o bolts or disturb- 
ing the construction of the car. Flat 




LcClerc Hamper. 

plates, which are clamped to the spring 
members hold the guides in which the 
bumper rods slide; these are fastened to 
the channel steel bumper by screwing in- 
to riveted cast-iron brackets. Adjust- 
ment is provided both as to height of 
bumper and angularity of same with the 
ground so that it can be easily and satis- 
factorily adjusted to any car. 
B s "a 

GRAVITY GASOLINE FEED. 

Webb Jay has brought out a system 
which changes pressure to gravity gaso- 
line feed. This system does away with 
hand and power pumps, and leaves the 
gasoline tank in the rear. This device 
is a brass can ten inches high and five 
inches in diameter, fitted with three cop- 
per pipe connections, one coming from 
the gasoline tank and one runnig to the 
intake manifold and third to carburetor. 



Wher in operation the ruction of the pis- 
tons creates a partial vacuum in the con- 
tainer, because the piston suction acts 
through the pipe leavin:; from the intake 
manifold to the container. Inserted in 







the container is a flat valve in order to 
prevent the piston suction affecting the 
carburetor. As soon as this suction takes 
place, the valv° closes, forming two com- 
partments in the container. As the level 
of gasoline arises in the container, the 
float rises, and when the container is full 
the needle valve will shut off the pipe 
from the intake manifold, thus stopping 
the suction. Owing to the weight of 
gasoline, the flat valve will now open, and 
this gasoline will drop to the lower cham- 
be' and thence to the carburetor. Water 
or dirt that accumulates in the fuel will 
drop to the bottom of the chamber and 
may be drained periodically. 

"S "S '6 

MAGNETIC TROUBLE LAMP. 

An electro magnet in the circuit with 
the trouble lamp for more convenient 
use has just been brought out. This 
causes the lamp to stick to any iron or 
steel part of the car and make it possible 
to get light in all inaccessable places; 
^ for engine repairing 

^^^- 4^Z?^iln '' ""^^ ^^ placed on 
^^^^|^Pl|uij available surface of 
^^^^^ ^^^> the cylinders 

frame, or on the 
axle, frame or fly- 
wheel in working 
underneath the car, fender or wheel hub 
in changing tires. It weighs only thirteen 
ounces, and exerts a pull of as many 
pounds, so there is no danger of shaking 
it off. In the absence of the usual long 
handle this lamp is smaller than the or- 
dinary trouble lamp. The silver plated 
reflector is two and a half inches in 
diameter, while the sticking face with one 
pull of the magnet in the center is one 
and five-eighth inches across. The case, 
which also is used as the handle, is made 
of aluminum, and four candle-power 
lamps of any voltage common in electric 
starting and lighting systems are pro- 
vided. 



Magnetic Trouble 
Lamp. 



NEW TIRE FOR MOTOR TRUCKS. 
A new cushion tire especially adapted 
for motor truck operation has just been 
produced by the Motz Tire and Rubber 
Company, of Akron, Ohio. Heretofore, 
the company has manufactured cushion 
tires exclusively for passenger vehicles 
and delivery wagons, and a solid tire of 
conventional form being made for the 
heavier commercial cars. This new tire 
in design follows the construction of the 
passenger car type closely, it having the 
characteristic under cut size and dual 
tread, which features give it its cushion- 




New Milt: Tire. 

ing effect. It is flatter in cross-section, 
and the non-skid feature is obtained by 
perpendicular indentations on the inside 
of each tread instead of by diagonal 
grooves across their faces. These tires 
are made in sizes up to four inches, and 
according to S, A. E. specifications, it is 
guaranteed for ten thousand miles, and 
against effected material and workman- 
ship for one year. 

■ff S » 
FOR A TRAILER. 

An apparatus for attaching trailing ve- 
hicles to automobiles, invented by an 
18-year-old boy in California, has proved 
successful in practical tests. This ap- 
paratus is simple, consisting of a steel 
fork, a double-acting spring buffer, and 
a draw-bar with an oscillating joint. One 
end of the device is attached to the rear 
axle of the automobile by collar bolts, 
which can be detached in less than two 
minutes, while similar collar joints fasten 
the fork at the other end to the front 
end of the trailer. The whole device is 
so flexible that the trailer follows the au- 
tomobile easily around the sharpest turns. 
At present this device is used only for 
hauling picnic parties, but it appears to 
be adapted as well to the heavier duty 
of attaching trailers to motor trucks. 

LUNCHEON OUTFIT. 

A luncheon outfit is shown on the 
market, which is almost a complete 
dining room, packs into a box small 
enough to fit snugly on the running board 
of an automobile. Glass, cutlery, crock- 
ery, table and chairs for six persons, are 
included in the set, and there is ample 
space for food and drink. 



14 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 




50 /(. p. six-cylinder ear. I'JIO model, mi which the Crescent 
has given satisfactory service for tiro years. 



THE CRESCENT SYSTEM. 

The Crescent System makes every car 
self-starting. It is no longer necessary 
for you to sell your old car and buy a 
new one, in order to have a motor that 
will start from the seat. You probably 
have now just the car you want. To sell 
it and buy a new one, just to set a self- 
starter, would mean a big loss — hundreds 
or perhaps even thousands of dollars — 
and with no real improvement except in 
that one item of a self-starting motor. 

Without making any other change in 
your present car, you can make it self- 
starting by simply equipping it with the 
Crescent system — a miniature power 
plant that creates and stores enough high 
pressure air to start any make of car un- 
der any conditions. 

This power is exerted directly on the 
crank shaft of the motor — just like hand- 
cranking, only twenty times more power- 
ful. The tank, which carries power for 
40 or 50 starts, is replenished at will in a 
few minutes — simply by pressing a but- 
ton while the car is in motion. 

No question about its efficiency. In 
the past fifteen months it has been in- 
stalled on over 67 different makes of 
cars, and not a single instance has been 
reported where it has failed to work with 
entire satisfaction. 

This system is guaranteed to hold the 
air absolutely and indefinitely. This has 
been accomplished by fittings of special 
design, and without the use of a shut- 
off or "night" valve. 

It enables a lady to handle and drive 
the largest gasoline cars with all the 
convenience of an electric. 

It not only cranks the motor, but fur- 
nishes power for inflating tires, cleaning 
and dusting the car and clothes, operating 
a signal and other important duties. 

Each outfit is complete, including all 



material necessary. It can be readily in- 
stalled by any good repair shop. It is 
fully guaranteed for twelve months. We 
invite you to call on any of our dealers 

On December 1st, an outfit especially 
designed for Ford car, and adaptable to 
any of the other small cars, will be ready. 

The Crescent Co., Inc., is located at 
1199 Woodward avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
Bernard I. Bill, of 543 Golden Gate ave- 
nue, is the Pacific Coast distributer for 
this novel device. 

5 5 B- 

TAIL LIGHT TO COMPLY WITH 
THE LAW. 
There has iu<:-t been brought out a rear 
light and registration number to meet the 
requirements of the State law for rear 
numbers that can be read. The figures 
on the number plate stand out with such 
distinctness and so effectually illumi- 
nated at night that they are perfectly 
legible and intelligible at a greater dis- 
tance than is required by the most exact- 
ing State law. It is one of the first prac- 




■fc^ 



A New Tail Liiiht. 

tical solutions of the illuminated number 
problem in accordance with scientific 
lighting principles, as well as embodying 
therein the graceful outlines which are 
naturally associated with the automo- 
bile. Instead of keeping the appearance 
of the car ugly, as is commonly the case, 
they add a note of elegance, making the 
combined lamp and number especially at- 
tractive when illuminated at night. The 
Stafford Lamp is handled by Chanslor 
& Lyon Company of this city. 




Liberty 
BelL 



NEW WARNING BELL POPULAR. 
The Liberty Bell, a new automobile 
warning accessory, has made a most 
favorable impression among 
the automobile owners in San 
Francisco. It is distinctly 
different than anything of its 
kind heretofore used. Al- 
though thoroughly ornamen- 
tal in design, yet it is at the 
same time one of the few warning signals 
that has received throughout the country 
recognition by traffic officials. Bull-dogs, 
elk heads, tigers, doctor's or hospital 
crosses and eagles are mounted on the 
bell, which is placed on the radiator cap, 
adding to the beauty of the car. 
3^ 5 ?^ 

CLEAN YOUR SPARK PLUG. 

It is very seldom that the points of a 
spark plug need cleaning, but grease and 
mineral dirt will accumulate both on the 
outside and on the inside of the porce- 
lain in such a manner that the current 
will pass without jumping the gap where 
ignition occurs. These are the parts that 
should be kept clean if you wish effi- 
cient service. A porcelain cover for the 
spark plug is an improvement not yet in 
general use. 

'S 'S 'S 

AN AUTOMOBILE BED. 

A piece of heavy canvas, four feet and 
nine inches by six feet and six inches, 
having a wide hem all around and the 
corners cut off six inches in, with one 
and one-fourth inch galvanized iron gas 
pipe in each side hem, and elbows at 
each corner for one-inch cross spreaders 
to slip in when wanted for use, makes a 
good bed. It is to be placed on the backs 
of the seats, between the top-bows, ex- 
tending partly over the front seats. 
'6 o o 

EXHAUSTION OF DRY CELLS. 

When dry cells are used for starting 
purposes only, they should give almost 
an entire season's use. When they rap- 
idly run down it means that there is a 
short-circuit leak somewhere, or that you 
have forgotten to throw off the switch 
when the engine starts. A small two- 
point switch placed in a very conspicuous 
place close at hand, arranged to open the 
battery circuit close to the battery, will 
often remedy the matter. 
?r 'ff ^ 

Gear case grease should not be too 

stiff. It should be able to flow between 
the teeth of the gears freely, and a small 
amount of graphite will be an improve- 
ment. 

^ ^ ^ 

Ordinary mud, when allowed to 

dry on, will dim the luster of the best 
varnish. Rinse it off with a gentle flow 
before it becomes dry. 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



15 




A. I). I'liiiihdft in the hifili iiicrrus in Ins Overland. 



"It is only until recently that the mo- 
torists have appreciated touring in the 
high Sierras," says A. D. Plughoff. "The 
great improvement in power and con- 
struction in the motor car has made it 
possible for others than experts to at- 
tempt to negotiate the steep grades of 
the high mountains. The improvement 
of mountain roads by the State has also 
opened up many new sections to touring. 
By the opening of the Fair, it will be pos- 
sible to drive anywhere in the high 
Sierras." 

^ ^ ^ 

The following from Bradstreets, con- 
tains another argument for good roads : 

"According to the data gathered by the 
Department of Agriculture, where good 
roads replace the bad ones the values of 
farm lands bordering on the roads in- 
crease to such an extent that the cost of 
road improvement is equaled, if not ex- 
ceeded. The general land values, as well 
as farm values, show marked advances 
following the improvement of roads. As 
the roads in no way affect soil fertility 
or quality of the farm, advances are as- 
serted to be due essentially to the de- 
crease in the cost of hauling products to 
market or shipping point. 

Farms are now regarded as plants for 
conducting the business of farming, and 
any reduction in their profits through un- 
necessary heavy costs for hauling on bad 
roads naturally reduces their capitaliza- 
tion into values. With reduced costs for 
hauling, profits are increased, with the 
result that the farm plant shows satisfac- 
tory earnings on a higher capital value. 
Immigration is particularly marked where 



road conditions are favorable; in fact, the 
figures of the department seem to indi- 
cate that good roads indirectly increase 
the demand for rural property, and the 
price of farm land, like that of any other 
commodity, is ruled by the relations be- 
tween supply and demand. 
<5 'S '6 

T® IPir©v®M AccniiiloDnfts 

While actual statistics show that only 
one and one-half per cent of automobile 
accidents occur at railway crossings, 
nevertheless this one and one-half per 
cent is so large that automobile associa- 
tions are co-operating with the railroads 
to minimize the number, and bring 
about a greater exercise of care on the 
part of pedestrians and drivers of motor 
vehicles. 

In making an effort to ascertain where 
the responsibility for crossing accidents 
might rest, some observations were re- 
cently made by one of the railroads with 
offices in San Francisco, and the state- 
ment of the result?, involving 16,522 mo- 
tor vehicles, 4,246 teams, and 4,526 pe- 
destrians, shows that 69 per cent of the 
drivers of motor vehicles took no precau- 
tions whatever to prevent being struck at 
crossings, 21 per cent passing at a high 
rate of speed. 

It is pointed out by railway officials 
that the millions necessary for added 
grade protectio"! would levy extra toll on 
the rates paid by shippers and passen- 
gers. There would be less necessity for 
this if more precautions were taken by 
pedestrians and drivers at the crossings. 

The observations were made in San 
Francisco, Lodi, Sacramento, Stockton 
and Oakland. The total of the pedes- 
trians and drivers of teams and motor 
driven vehicles who crossed tracks dur- 



ing the period of observation was 25,296. 
Of this number, 35 stopped and looked in 
both directions before crossing; 8,950 
kept moving and looked in both direc- 
tions; 1,694 kept moving and looked in 
one way only, and 14,617 kept moving 
and looked straight ahead. 

5 ar & 

London is at present suffering from 
an epidemic of women motor car drivers. 
Every one thought that motor driving for 
women, never a very popular pastime, 
had quite gone out, when suddenly :t 
has become the fashion. The Duchess of 
Westminster always drives herself now 
in a big yellow car, and may often be 
seen coming up to town from her sub- 
urban retreat near Richmond, a smart 
chauffeur by her side to act in case of 
accidents. Miss Pauline Chase, the 
American actress, is another ardent mo- 
torist, and frequently threads her way 
calmly through the busy strand, and 
drives up to the Savoy grill room for 
luncheon. 

Many of the prominent militant suf- 
fragettes employ female drivers, Mrs. 
Pethick Lawrence's able-bodied woman 
at the wheel being a particularly well 
known figure about the West End, and 
the fair taxicab driver threatens to be- 
come a fixture in the near future. Princess 
Mary, while at Balmoral, had some les- 
sons from her brother, the Prince of 
Wales, who is a keen motorist, but the 
Queen absolutely declines to hear of her 
taking up the sport seriously. A num- 
ber of the chorus lights at the Gaiety 
and Daly's are expert drivers, and can 
be met with on Sundays on all the main 
drives leading out of London. 



16 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 




The American Underslung Six 

Type 644— $2,750 Complete 
Four Speeds— 132-In. Wheelbase— 60 H. P.— Electrically Started and Lighted. 

THE "American Underslung Six" is complete; it meets the 
universal demand for more power with greater economy in 
gasoline, oil and tires. The quality is undoubted— the same 
goodness is continued in this model that has long made the 
name "American Underslung" synonymous with excellence in 
motor car construction. Distinctiveness and luxury have been 
the keynote of our endeavors, combined with the manifold 
merits of the underslung frame and proven six-cylinder con- 
struction. Refinement is apparent in every line; true luxury 
reflected in every detail; and good hard motor sense in every 
mechanical feature. It appeals immediately to the motorist of 
taste and occupies the enviable position of a car built to meet 
the requirements of those who know good motor cars and 
good motor car construction. 

These cars set another mile-stone in the wonderful progress 
of motor car building. 

A Demonstration at Your Convenience 



TYPE (.r.h 
Six cylinJers, 75 H. P., six 
passengers, electrically lighted 
and started. Price SI 500 



TYPH f.42 
Six cylinders, hO H. P. two 
passengers, electrically lighted 
and started. Price SZ750 



TYPE 122 
Four cylinders, 32 H. P. two 
Passengers, electrically lighted 
self-starting. Price SI 5 50 



American Motors California Co. 

fra^'kuTso. 476-482 Golden Gate Ave., ST. 

American Motors Company, Builders, Indianapolis 




llliill 



November, 1913. MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



17 



"Those mostly interested sometimes show the least considera- 
tion," says B. N. Pratt, Pacific Coast manager of the Fisk 
Rubber Company, in speaking about the use of highways by 
automobile owners. "What I mean by this is that automobile 
owners sometimes show a wonderful lack of appreciation of the 
value of saving of a bad road in their driving. 

"Nothing shows the carelessness of a driver more than a bad 
piece of road. Not long ago, I traveled over what is known 
as the middle road from Redwood City to Palo Alto. The traffic 
had been diverted from the main highway to this road on ac- 
count of the State road improvement. Before this road had to 
bear the whole traffic, it was a fair oiled road, in passable 
condition, and at times was better than the main county road. 

"Just as soon as it had to bear the whole county road traffic 
it commenced to show its poor construction. It had been well 
oil soaked, and during the hot spells was exceedingly soft. A 
few heavy teams or other vehicles had passed over it, and made 
a track from practically one end to the other. 

"These tracks from constant usage, that is c^ne driver follow- 
ing the other, soon became as distinct as the rails of a railroad. 
The result was that the drivers of horse-drawn vehicles, follow- 
ing also in these tracks, cut up the middle section, and made it 
impossible before long for any one to drive except in these 
tracks. 

"Finally they became so deep that they cut through the oiled 
surface into the road beneath. Every one knows that as soon 
as the oil crust is punctured, then comes a general breaking of 
the road.. The oiled surface breaks off, making dust holes, 
chuck holes, which are practically almost impossible to navi- 
gate. This is the condition at the present time of the middle 
road. If the drivers of vehicles had used a little forethought 
before driving over this road, and had not tracked and driven 
in the ruts made by other vehicles or started by them, tne road 
to-day would be fair, instead of practically almost impassable. 

"This same condition exists on the new State Highway. One 
has but to observe the smooth, tracking of vehicles to show that 
practically every driver is following the one before. This 
means that this particular section of the road has to bear the 
whole of the traffic instead of the whole road itself. If owners 
of motor cars would only bear this in mind, they will be able to 
enjoy the best condition of any road almost indefinitely. It 
will pay the owners of motor cars who employ chauffeurs to 
watch their driving, and to insist that they do not track after 
other vehicles." 

^ "S S 



Perched on the end of one leaf of a Chicago bascule bridge 
after a dash up the steep incline as the bridge opened, a heavy 
automobile not long ago hung by its front wheels until the 
bridge could be lowered. One of its occupants was thrown 
from his seat by the sudden stop high in the air, and was thrown 
into the river. The driver had not noticed the warning bell and 
red lights as he approached the bridge at a high rate of speed 
at night, and did not realize that the bridge was opening until 
his machine had started to climb the rising incline. While he 
struggled with the brakes, the car mounted to the end, thirty 
feet above the river, and stopped with its front wheels hang- 
ing over the edge. The bridge tenders reversed the machinery 
and lowered the bridge slowly, so that the car kept its position 
until it was brought down with its front wheels on one leaf and 
its rear wheels on the other. 






You really ride on 

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OEVENTY-FIVE per cent of 
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tires. 

Quality of rubber and fabric and 
quality of workmanship, together with 
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combine to make you realize that you 

really ride on 

GOODRICH Mo^Lu.oTI RES 

BEST IN THE LO.NG RUN 



Your Goodrich dealer is ready to supply 
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A satisfied customer is our best adver- 
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satisfied. 



IVrite tor the Goodrich Routt Book, 
(O-Vfriin; the iiuto tour you stUct. That 
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Everythinfz That's Best in Rubber 



Braochcs and 
Service Slalkiat in 
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Dealers Everywhere. 



%% 



Factories: 
Akron. Ohio 



There is rto thing in Goodrich Adzer- 
tising that isn 't in Goodrich Goods. 



18 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 



1 — 


II- 


1 <i 


-II II— II. II— II 


— II — 


II- 




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TGa® 


M@(t©r 


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"In the distance, a panorama of snow- 
capped, cragged mountains, forming an 
uneven horizon; in the foreground, a gray, 
colorless vista of small trees and swampy 
niggerhead flats, stretching to the foot- 
hills of the Alaska range — that is the 
picture that presents itself to him who 
wanders to the outskirts of Fairbanks, 
Alaska's biggest and most metropolitan 
mining camp," says E. E. Hurja, in a 
Seattle paper. "On Cushman street, 
scarcely three-quarters of a mile from 
the heart of the city, stands a sign post, 
holding aloft a finger-board. The finger 
is pointed south, along a well-defined 
wagon trail, and the board bears the in- 
scription, 'Valdez, 364 miles.' 

"This, then, is the northernmost termi- 
nal of the Valdez-Fairbanks wagon road, 
pushed through from the coast, across 
two mountain ranges and miles of stream- 
cut valleys, under the direction of United 
States army engineers. The road is the 
route of the longest stage line in the 
world, some say, and it winds through a 
rugged, primitive and undeveloped coun- 
try, gold-glamored and full of interest. 

"The road is due to become the great 
Alaskan overland auto route from tide- 
water on the southern coast to Fairbanks 
in the interior, on the navigable side 
streams of the Yukon waterway system. 
Already has the distance between Fair- 
banks and Chitina, a stretch of trail 311 
miles in length, been traversed by auto- 
mobiles. The first auto to make the trip, 
a F"ord touring car, took forty-five hours' 
running time to cover the stretch to the 
northern terminus of the Copper River 
and Northwestern Railway. 

In the early days of the North, when 
the Klondike was being gutted of its 
riches, the dog team was the pioneer's 
means of travel; soon after Fairbanks 
was discovered, some hundreds of miles 
up the Tanana Valley from the Yukon, 
automobiles began to appear on the newly 
graded streets of the citified mining camp 
on the shores of Chena Slough. Now the 
automobile is as much a part of the life 
of that twentieth century frontier com- 
munity as is the dog team. The noisy 
benzine buggy has displaced, in a meas- 
ure, the Malamute and the horse, so use- 



ful in the early pioneer life of the dis- 
trict. 

"The use of the motor car in Fairbanks 
may be described as being many-sided. 
Among other things, it is used for busi- 
ness, for pleasure, for emergency and for 
publicity. In business, it carries mer- 
chants from Fairbanks to the creek set- 
tlements on the occasional trips; it car- 
ries miners into town with their gold; it 
carries letters and packages to and from 
the creeks, and it is useful in freighting 
supplies from one district to another. In 
pleasure, the uses are manifold. Despite 
occasional severe sub-zero cold in the 
winter time, the cars can be used over the 
snow-covered trails as well as over the 
dry dirt roads of midsummer. For hunt- 
ing, fishing and picnicking, the car is now 
an invaluable adjunct. For 'joy rides' it 
is as useful as in many an outside com- 
munity. 

"The auto in Fairbanks is always in 
readiness for emergency calls from the 
creeks. In drawing attention to the met- 
ropolitan side of life on the last frontier, 
the automobile serves a more novel pur- 
pose. Considerable publicity has been 
given Alaskan communities through the 
presence of an auto in pictures coming 
from a land which popular fancy has pic- 
tured to be covered the year round with 
snow and ice, and which is believed to 
be devoid of flowers or other vegetation. 

"There is considerable roadway avail- 
able for automobiles in the immediate 
vicinity of Fairbanks, estimated of about 
150 miles' length, aside from the over- 
land trail. The roads are most of them 
graded; the little creeks are bridged, and 
the soft, mucky spots are corduroyed in 
substantial fashion. 

"The trails can be used by autos at all 
seasons, with the exception of a short 
period in summer, when there is an ex- 
cess of rainfall. Between Fairbanks and 
the various creek towns. Fox City, Gil- 
more, Chatanika, Cleary City, Fairbanks 
Cree, Dome City, Olnes, Ester City and 
other communities, the roads to the creek 
settlements take the autos through inter- 
esting stretches of country, and within 
sight of many regions of strife and squab- 
ble connected with the early mining life. 



The roads traverse the hilly country, 
with its groves of tall, stately, silvery- 
barked birches, past occasional road- 
houses where weary mushers and tongue- 
tired teamsters put up for rest. The cars 
thread their way between high flume- 
ways, under trestles that support long 
strings of sluice boxes, past large, for- 
bidding looking piles of tailings; then 
again, the cars move past ever-growing 
heaps of golden dirt, within hearing dis- 
tance of the boiler houses that dot the 
claims on the busy creeks, where the 
very atmosphere is saturated with the 
gold-getting fever. 

"On some creeks the traveler on the 
auto sees the transition from the placer 
to the quartz mining camp. The open- 
cut placer mining gives way, near the 
heads of the creeks, to quartz prospects, 
some with their noisy stamp mills busily 
crushing the gold-laden rock for its valu- 
able yellow contents. 

"When a miner is injured on the creeks 
— when a slab of dirt comes down on a 
worker in the drifts, when an explosion 
of much scalds the pointman, the auto is 
called into service. An emergency call 
to town usually brings out the doctor, or, 
if the injury is one that demands imme- 
diate surgical attendance, the miner is 
rushed to the hospital as fast as the 
roads will allow the chauffeur to operate 
his car. When a storm or slide takes 
down the telephone wires, the auto is 
pressed into use to carry messages to the 
creeks. The passenger and express busi- 
ness between Fairbank and the creeks 
is profitable to the automobile men as 
well as to the miners, who are able to 
bring in their pokes of dust and nug- 
gets, transact their business at the banks 
and in the stores, and return to their 
work on the creeks before a few hours 
have gone by. 

"Trucks, of which two have been im- 
ported and put into use in the Fairbanks 
district, are serviceable in carrying sup- 
plies and freight from city to camp. In 
1912 a truck came for Jacob Samuelson, 
a merchant at Richardson, some seventy- 
five miles from Fairbanks. He has made 
good use of the machine in hauling sup- 
plies to be used by the miners of the ten- 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



19 



derfoot mining district. During the past 
summer, J. H. Groves took in a powerful 
truck. As soon as it was wheeled off the 
barge on which it traveled from St. 
Michael to Fairbanks, a mechanic put it 
in operation, and within half an hour 
the truck was hauling a mammoth load 
of gasoline from the boat to the Groves' 
warehouses. The truck carried loads 
with ease that would have required at 
least three teams of horses to haul. 

"During the Fourth of July celebration 
at Fairbanks this year autos were very 
much in evidence. To some it looked 
as though every one of the twenty or 
more automobiles in Fairbanks was buz- 
zing along the streets in endless proces- 
sion. Many sourdoughs who were in 
from remote districts for the celebration, 
and who had not been outside since they 
first went North, were surprised and 
dumbfounded at this apparent metropoli- 
tan feature or Fairbanks life. 

There are women drivers in Fairbanks, 
too. Mrs. Roy Rutherford has the dis- 
tinction of being the first woman in Fair- 
banks to drive her own automobile. 

"In the fall, when the vacation period 
is on, autos make the trip over the Valdez 
trail for a distance of about sixty miles 
to Birch Lake, where there are hunting 
and fishing in abundance and where 
swimming and boating help to make the 



days pass quickly, liie run is made 
easily in a day, allowing ample time for 
stop-overs at the roadhouses along the 
trail. Not far from the train, moose, cari- 
bou and mountain sheep may be hunted. 

"Auto owners go out in the early morn- 
ing for five or six miles over the trail, and 
from their machines they shoot grouse 
and rabbits on either side of the trail. 

"In winter, pleasure parties hire autos 
and visit roadhouses as far away from 
Fairbanks as Munson's, forty miles dis- 
tant. The car leaves Fairbanks in the 
morning, and as the trails are hard and 
smooth, and the little ruts and holes are 
packed full of snow, the speeding is good. 
A stop for lunch is made at a roadhouse 
conveniently situated, and the car pro- 
ceeds on its way southward. In the dis- 
tance, the jagged peaks of Mount Hayes 
are visible, covered with snow and mag- 
nificent with the sun's rays striking the 
ice-pinnacled faces of the mountain. 

"Past the Indian vilages in the Salcha- 
ket district, with a noise that startles the 
peaceful Alaskan native in his mud- 
chinked cabin, the car proceeds until the 
snug-looking roadhouse of Munson's 
hoves into view within its fenced inclo- 
sure. There bountiful meals are provided 
by the general roadhouse people, and af- 
ter several hours of sight-seeing in the 



afternoon, the car starts back with the 
pleasure-seekers. 

"The auto is in Alaska to stay. There 
is no doubt of that. The present year has 
seen at least eight more automobiles go 
into the Tanana camp. They vary from 
the high-priced 60-horsepower touring 
car to the little, comfortable runabout. 
The sourdough has accepted the automo- 
bile with all its intricacies and troubles 
for the uninitiated, and the "Mush on, 
mush on," that he used to know when 
emitting blue-smoked words at a team of 
straining, tugging malamutes, is to be re- 
placed by the newer and more technical 
'cussing' that all automobile men know. 

"In Fairbanks, where the autos, in holi- 
day attire, carried loads of pretty damsels 
about last Independence Day, some of the 
natives from the nearby missions came in 
and got their first glimpse of the horse- 
less buggy. 

"From the North will soon be coming 
news of speed ordinances, passed and 
approved by the city council of Fair- 
banks. And when an ordinance comes, it 
will be an official recognition of the per- 
manence of the automobile in the biggest 
mining camp of the 'last frontier' coun- 
try. Besides, the speed ordinance will 
have the honor of being the 'farthest 
North' one on the North American con- 
tinent." 




The Standard Oil for Motor Cars 

The oil that keeps >()ur motor cool b>' means of 

its perfect luhricating qualities. ZFROLENE is 
[Hit up in the llat shaped can— easy to handle. Also in barrels 
and half barrels, and where we maintain tank wagon service, 
we will deliver Zerolene in bulk direct to your garage. 
This is the convenient, economical way to buy your 
ubricating oil. 

Dealers Everywhere and at all 
Agencies of the 

Standard Oil Company 

(CALIFORNIA! 
San Francisco 




20 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 



AUTO OWNERS 

Why take chances on your Ignition? Insist on using 

RAJAH PLUGS 



Do you know Rajah Plugs cost 
supply-houses three times as much 
as the cheap ordinary plugs? 

Some reason for their boosting the 
plug which pays them the long 
profit. 

Why are ail these plugs similiar in 
appearance to the "Rajah?" 

They all know that 

"Rajah m^^^s Quality" 

Insist on the Genuine 



Hughson & Merton, 



INC. 



530 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco 



For the first time in the history of the tire industry, 
the highest possible quality of automobile tires, regard- 
less of the necessary cost, are offered on the general 
market at a fair profit. 

Knight Tires reduce the possibility of tire troubles 
to an absolute minimum. 




THE KNIGHT TIRE & RUBBER CO., Canton, Ohio 

HALLIWELL COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Distributors 

San Francisco Los Angeles Portland Seattle 



Samson 



And 



Peerless 



Inner Shoes 



Endless in shape and strength. 
Guarantee you double mileage 
and insure your pleasure. 

Agents wanted everywhere, 
liberal inducements. 



Jackson-Eno Rubber Co. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Manufacturers of Rubber 
Tire Sundries 



Keenan Brothers 



Machinists 

and 
Eng'ineers 



AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 
A SPECIALTY 



350 GOLDEN GATE AVE., bet. Hyde and Larkin Sts. 

PHONES 
Franklin 6823 Home J 9012 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



21 



Ai!slt®§ m Akslka 



M®tor TimcGs [p[p®v®s niis Valac© @v®r ©ftliior 1 



Because of the unrestrictive conditions 
placed on railroad development in Alaska, 
five big motor trucks will be used to haul 
ore from the Mother Lode mines to the 
head of the Copper River and North- 
western Railroad next summer. Under 
other circumstances, a short spur railroad 
would have been built. 

Under the federal law that was passed 
many years ago, and by which railroads 
are taxed $100 per mile per annum, and 
every other form of business or industry 
in the territory was taxed in varying 
sums from $25 to $2,500 per mile — ex- 
cepting newspapers and barber shops — 



automobiles were overlooked and ex- 
empted from taxation. Another condi- 
tion that militates against the successful 
operation of railroads is the tax on coal 
that has to be brought from British Co- 
lumbia or Australia. Hence the Mother 
Lode Company decided in favor of the 
automobile. 

"We had planned to build a tramway," 
says George E. Baldwin, "but found that 
the taxes on it would be $100 per mile, 
the same as on the railroads. As we would 
only operate about 100 days a year, this 
would cost us a considerable sum, to say 
nothing of the cost of hauling coal from 



British Columbia with which to operate 
it. We can haul gasoline much cheaper. 
In addition to the $100 per mile tramway 
tax, we would be compelled to pay a 
dockage tax of $10 a ton on all ore 
shipped. I presume we may have to pay 
this, anyway. We were charged for 350 
tons which we shipped this summer. 

"Under these conditions, it is impos- 
sible to work anything but the highest 
grade ores at present, but we plan to put 
in a concentrating plant next year and 
ship the concentrates. If the Alaskan 
coal were opened to development, it 
would make a tremendous difference in 
our reduction cost, as the ore would be 
smelted on Prince William Sound, and 
we would be saved the cost of shipping 
the waste material, which is thrown away 
at the smelter at Tacoma, but upon which 
we have to pay freight and taxes." 



Of" ff^ /iipif^O CijSd^crY CotfPtJt// <^ ja^r THe: 

oA/f- Ygjj wi^^r. 



-Vf^yf- 






Phono Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROIINI) FLOOR HREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 186& 
Announces the removal of their Offices and Factory to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

Between California and Sacramento Sis. 
Phone Prospect 30 

Where their entire attention will be devoted to the prompt delivery of 
the best work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 



AUTO FENDER & RADIATOR WORKS 

Make and Repair 

Fenders, Radiators. Hoods, Metal Bodies, Tanks 

Dash Shields, Lamps. Mud Pans, Tool 

Boxes. Metal Spinning, Etc. 



466 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Franklin 6460 



32-34 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Market 6409 



EMPIRE 

Model 31 
"The lAttle Aristocrat" 
Completely Equipped $950 



The Completely Equipped Empire 6ve- 
pauenger louring car $950 — Equipment 
includes Mohair Top and Top Envrlopc. 
Demountable Rimv Rear Double Tire 
Ironi, Extra Rim*. Accelerator, Wind- 
shield. Prejt-O-Lite lanlt. Horn and 

Spi^^lnmrter. 

The Empire lutomotiiie Co iimnnipilit. U S 1 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AOAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While an>nA.'here in Unit«d Statea, Canada and Euron* 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 Cilifomia Street. 



Sin Fruci(c« 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The Newt Letter recommenda the following garagea, hotela and aupply 
houaea. Tourlata will do well to cut thia Mat out and keep It aa a guide: 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Gara«e for flrat-claaa aervlca. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connsc- 
II. >n. '"Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James St». 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North t irst street. Th« best French 
Jlnner In California. 7S cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties (Iren 
particular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE. 443 Emmerson St. Tel.. P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries In stork. Gasoline, oil. 
niialrlng. lathework. vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



PETALUIMA.— PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 
vtr .Murphy. Props. Cor. Third and C Sis; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 
seneral machine work and gear cutting; supplies, repairing, auto livery; 
lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storage batteries 



HOTEL VENDOME 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Headquarters tor Automobilists touring the beautiful 
S;inta Clara Valley. 

American and European Plan. Reasonable Rates. 



Phone 
Market 6370 



PEART & ELJUNGTON 

VULCANIZING 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



42 Vao Neu 
Avenue 



22 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 



[eciduig jf\niericcm. (ars 



AMERICAN 



American Motors California Co. 

476-482 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 



Prices K. O. B. Factory 

Models 

422 4 Cylinder. 2 Passenger ao H. P. 

CA2 G Cylinder. 2 Passenger TO H. P. 

644 6 Cylinder. 4 Passenger liO H. P. 

fiir, fi Cvlind'T, Ci Pass.-nger CO H. P. 



Prices 

S irai 

27.50 
27.5U 
29.'>l) 



^^ukk 



HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 
San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Models ^''iSf' 

24 Runabout \^°J> 

25 Touring Car JOSJ 

30 Roadster 1125 

31 Touring Car 1285 

40 Touring Car 1650 




CASE^ 

J. I, CASE T. M. CO., INC. 
San Francisco. 
Standard Models 
Prices of Cars Completely Equipped F. O. B. 

Factory. 
Model H. P. Price 

5-Pass. Touring 25 $1250 

5-Pass. Touring 35 1S50 

5-Pass. Touring 40 2300 



'»: 



Qialmers 



te'iirtiirrf.",", 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1913 Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Prices for 1914 Cars are as follows: 

M.id.-M'.i. I Cye. :;i', 11. 1'. 1 i.r .. I'ass. Cars $1:12.) 

Model 21. r. Cyc. l.i-lW H. P. 2-1 and -'i Pass. Cars 2i2i 

Moil.'l 21. i; Cyc. 4.')-60 H. V. i; Pass. Cars 242'. 

Morlcl 21. r, Cyc. I.'i-Wi II. p. Coupe :ifH«) 

Model 21. 1', Cyc. IWiii II. P. Limousine :;s:,o 
All prices Include full equipment and are f. o. b. 
Oetroit. 




PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO. 
Golden Gate Avenue and Polk St., San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. San Francisco. 
Model."" — 

4-cvl. 2 Pass. Roadster $2050 

4-cyl. 5 Pass. Touring 2050 

4-cvl. Coupe 2500 

6-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster 2750 

6-cyl. 4 Pass. Demi-Tonneau 2750 

6-cvI. 7 Pass. Touring 2750 

6-cyl. Coupe 3150 

n-cyl. Limousine 4150 

[ EMPIRE 

OSEN-McFARLAND AUTO CO. 
San Francisco and San Jose 



Model — Price 

Empire 31 $1060 

5-Passenger touring car. completely equipped. 




PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

We Sell on Easy Terms 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Model — 
Touring f'arg 
Runabouts 
Town C'ars - 



Price 

- .MiO 

-his 




HAYNES AUTO SALES CO. 

Turk at Polk St. 
Prices F. O. B. Pacific Coast. 

Model 24— 2. 4 and 5 Pass, \4-cyl.) $1,950 

Model 24— Coupe (4-cyl.) 2,400 

Model 23—2. 4 and 5 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2,700 

Model 23—6 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2,950 

Model 23— Coupe (6-cyl.) 3,200 

Model 23— Limousine (6-cyl.) 3.850 



IbiXii^^^ 



HUDSON 



H. O. HARRISON 



1036 Van Ness Avenue 



San Francisco 



Standard Models 



Prices F. O. 
Model "37 37 h. p 

Touring Car $1876 

Phaeton 1875 

Roadster 1875 

Limousine 3250 

Coupe 2350 



B. Factory. 
Model '•54" 64 h. p 

Touring Car $245n 

Phaeton 2450 

Roadster 2450 

Limousine 3750 

Coupe 2950 




.^- :.■_.-.. ijsdA 



BEKINS-SPEERS MOTOR CO. 
Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 



Type 72 

Model — 

7-Pass. 

5-Pass. 

4-Pass. 

4-Pass. 

2-Pass. 

7-Pass. 



Prices F. O. B. Factory Type 77 



Price 
Touring $5000 
Touring 5000 
Touring 6000 
Toy Ton. 5000 
Runab't 5000 
Limous'n 6500 



Model — Price 

5-Pass. Touring $3260 
2-Pass. Runab't 32B0 
6-Pa83. Limous'n 4450 
5-Pass Limous'n 4460 
J-Pass. Coupe 3850 



TTiwdon, 



MARION MOTOR CAR CO. 

.555 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. Price 

37-A Touring 40 $1475 

48-A Touring 48 1850 

36-A Roadster 40 1425 

38-A Roadster 40 1476 

All Cars Completely Equipped. 



MARiMLQN 



™ 



MORRIS KENNEDY CO., INC., 

545 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

New Series Marmon "Thirty-Two" 



Prices F. O. 

Mod. Thirty-Two 
Chassis $2500 

Five-Pass. Tour- 
ing Car 3000 

Four-Pass. Sub- 
urban 3000 

Roadster 2900 

Speedster 2850 

Limousine 4000 



B. Factory. 

Landaulet $4100 

Marmon "Six" 
2, 4, 5 and 7-pas- 

senger $6000 

Limousine 6280 

Landaulet 6350 

Berllne Limousine 

6450 



A T®im Y®ar Totuir 

Ur. L. C. Harvey, of Upland, Cal., 
near Los Angeles, after working for years 
to make an ideal touring outfit, has an- 
nounced that he has succeeded, and will 
start with his wife and son on a ten or 
twelve year tour throughout the United 
States, Canada and Mexico. Dr. Har- 
vey has constructed a trackless train 
which provides every comfort and 
even many of the luxuries of home. His 
motor caravan, consisting of the auto and 
two large inclosed wagons, has in the 



equipment electric lights, running water, 
screen doors, spacious beds, writing 
tables and a library. And, should the 
doctor decide to leave the bulky wagons 
of the train behind, he can detach the 
motor car and tour about with all the 
comforts still at his command. F"or on 
a smaller scale he has duplicated the liv- 
ing facilities in the auto, which serves as 
a tractor. The car, together with the 
various other conveniences, has cost 
nearly $10,000. The wagons are of 
special construction throughout. The 



running gear is the best, with roller bear- 
ings and springs, and equipped with air 
brakes. The floors are maple, the frame- 
work of hickory, and the siding and ceil- 
ing of oak. The couplings are arranged 
so that the two wagons pulled by the car 
will trail around corners and curves in 
the same tracks where the machine goes. 
The water system is arranged with a 
fifteen gallon tank under the car. This 
tank is connected to the air line that op- 
erates the air brakes, and the pressure 
forces the water to the sink for cooking, 



November, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



23 








//■ 



^If/ia/mf. 



REO 



MICHIGAN MOTOR CAR CO. 

California Branch 

283-291 Golden Gate Ave San Francl»co 

Imperial Garage— Oakland 



Model— 
"I," and 
■■|;" unci 



Standard Models 

Price 

33 h. p »I690 

40 h. p^ 1876 



! Maxwell 

UNITtU iViOlohiS S. F. COMPANY. 

Polk St., near McAllister San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model 25, 6-Pass. Touring Car 

Model 35. 5-Pas9. Touring Car »108B 

Model 40. 5-rnss. Touring Car 1B50 

ModPl 50. T-Paas. Touring Car 2360 



J. W. LEAVITT 



A CO. 

San Francisco 



Golden Gate Ave. 

Standard Models. 
.MimIbI 79 Tourlnu lur *1"T 

Mwl.'l 7'.) KondKt<-r |l"7 ■ 

f. I), h. .««n Francisco, wllli Eli'ctrlc LIkIh." 
Willi EliH'trlc MkIiIs an<l Un>y ami I>n%u 
SlartiT. f. I). 1). San Knuicl.«-o trJOii 



REO-PACIFIC COMPANY 
Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

Modev H. P. Prlc« 

B-PusFenger 30-SS h. p tl29S 

2-Pn».scnBer 30-35 h. p 129S 

Hi Ton Truck 30-35 h. p 1976 



Pathfinder 



MERCER 



f'r' "^ 



SI.\ll>LC,\Mi;i;CER PAG. 
1319 Van Ness Ave. 



COAST AGENCY 
San Francisco 
Standard Models 
Prices F. O, B. Factory. 
Model H. P. 

Type 36. Series G, 4-Pass 32.4 h. 

Type SB, Series H. 5-Pass 32.4 h. 

Type 35. Series J, Race'b't 30.6 h 

Type 36. Series K. Runabout . .30.6 h. 





Price 


p 


»3100 


p. 


3100 


p 


2850 


p 


2850 




PATHFINDER PACIFIC MOTOR SALES CO. 
1219 • 1229 Van Ness Avenue 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Five-Pass, touring car, 40 horsepower (2186 

Four- Pass, phaeton, 40 hor.sepower 2186 

Two-Pass. Roadster, 40 horsepower 2180 

Three-Pass, coach, 40 horsepower 2600 

Two-Pass, cruiser. 40 horsepower 2000 



/iprceyirrow 



PIERCE-ARROW SALES CO. 
Geary and Polk Sts. San Francisco 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



STANLEY 



Model 


H. P. 






Price 


38-C 


38 h. p. 


6-Pa5s. 


Touring 


543110 


48-B 


48 h. p 


7-Pas3. 


Touring 


SOrtfl 


««. V 


f.f. h n 


7-Pnss 


Tnurinc 


RiinA 



^^ 



MOV% Ah-D AUTOMOBILE CO. 

523 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Five Models, Improved Series V. 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Seml-Raclng Roadster '«Ici 

Speedway Roadster 3150 

Toy Tonneau j800 

Five-Passenger Touring Car 3300 

Seven -Passenger Touring Car 3400 

Also I.lniouslnos. Sedans and Coupes. 



FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

F. O. B. San Francisco. 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

Model "T" Underslung Touring Car Jli::6 

Model '"N" Underslung Roadster 1076 

.Model "H" Underslung Touring Car 1525 

Regal Underslung Colonial Coupe 1375 

Model "C" Standard Touring Car 1376 



STANLEY STEAM CAR CO. 
441 Golden Gate Ave. San Francls(0 

Model Price 

2-Pas9. 10 h. p 11350 

2-PaJis. 20 h. p 17»0 

4-Pas8. 10 h. p 1460 

4-Pass. 20 h. p 1890 

5-Pass. 20 h. p 1890 

7-Pass. 30 h. p 2700 

12-Pass. 30 h. p 2S00 



i ,„ - I ■>■> 

AUTO SALES CO. 

418 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

•■40" 6-Pas8. Touring Car »200« 

"40' 4-Pa»s. Torpedo 2000 

•■40" I.lmouslne 3000 

M Sppolal 5-Pas". Touring 1900 

•■.■!2' Model R 5-Pass. Touring 1500 

"3l'" Model W 6-Pass. Touring 1350 

"3:" Model RX Roadster 1450 



^VINTON SIX 



THEWINTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

S. E. Cor. Sutter and Van Ness 

Prices F. O, B, Factory 



K..a.l.-.ier $W00 

Toy Tonneau ;«0OO 
.Vl'ttss. Touring .'JWO 
fv-Pass. Torpe<lo :riO 



7 -rB-is. Tourinit 
I.uii<>u.<.ine 
LandsnU't 
roupe 






dish-washing and drinking. The radiator 
on the car is also connected to the water 
tank and is kept constantly filled for the 
extra cooking needed at the slow speed, 
while pulling the train. An air tank on 
the tractor is kept filled, the air brakes 
are operated, the water forced to the 
pipes, the horn blown, and the motor 
started. The electric lights are supplied 
from a storage battery, which is kept 
charged by a dynamo on the auto. This 
supplies all lights on the car, as well as 
furnishing light for all purposes. 



Electric cranking motors usually take 
the current through "brushes" from the 
storage battery. Sometimes these brushes 
fail to make good contact, and are the 
cause of inefficiency. When the electric 
motor fails in power, these brushes should 
be carefully examined. Sometimes one 
of the cells of a storage battery goes 
down before the rest, and the two re- 
maining cells cannot furnish required 
power to crank the engine. Sometimes a 
grain of dust will get between the contact 



points of a switch and make a whole lot 
of trouble. 

"(5 '6 S 
-Fifteen grains of Trional powder. 



taken in a little sweet milk at bedtime, 
after a long drive, will give refreshing 
sleep, with no harmful results. 

•S ^ -iS 
When a nut or bolt is in such a 



position that a wrench caimot be adjusted 
to turn it, cut a slot in it with a hack saw, 
and turn with a screw-driver bit. 



24 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



November, 1913. 



DttS 



Mayor Kline, of New York City, has 
approved an ordinance passed by the 
Board of Aldermen amending the rules 
of the road, as they apply to horse-drawn 
and motor vehicles. The amended or- 
dinance reads as follows: 

"458. Lights — Each and every vehi- 
cle using the public streets or highways 
of this city, except vehicles of licensed 
truckmen, shall show between sunset and 
sunrise a light or lights so placed as to 
be seen from front and each side; if 
dash lantern is carried, it shall be placed 
in the left hand side; such light or lights 
to be of sufficient illuminating power to 
be visible at a distance of 20 feet; said 
light or lights shall show white in front, 
but may be colored on the sides, except- 
ing licensed truckmen. Every automo- 
bile shall exhibit during the same period 
two lamps showing white lights visible 
at a distance of 300 feet in the direction 
toward which the automobile is proceed- 
ing, and shall also exhibit a red light, 
visible in the reverse direction. The 
lamps shall be so placed as to be free 
from obstruction to light from other parts 
of said automobile. No operator of any 
automobile or other motor vehicle, while 
operating the same upon the public high- 
way within the city shall use any acety- 
lene, electric or other headlight unless 
properly shaded, so as not to blind or 
dazzle other users of the highway, or 
make it difficult or unsafe for them to 
ride, drive or walk thereon. In the Bor- 
ough of the Bronx, excepting south of 
Tremont avenue and 177th street, east of 
Jerome avenue and west of the Bronx 
River, and in the Boroughs of Richmond 
and Queens, and in the Twenty-sixth, 
Thirtieth, Thirty-first and Thirty-second 
wards of the Borough of Brooklyn, every 
car or other vehicle between said hours, 
while moving on along or standing upon 
the portion of streets in said burroughs or 
parts of boroughs, shall carry a light or 
lights of such illuminating power as to 



be plainly visible 200 feet both ahead 
and behind said car or vehicle." 
'8 '5 (5 

One source of insufficient lubrica- 
tion of bearings is sometimes found to be 
clogged grooves in the bushings. Sedi- 
ment will accumulate in the grooves, 
which are intended to carry the lubricat- 
ing oil, and shut off the supply. An ex- 
cess of graphite will often produce this 
effect. 

■5- ?• ?• 

Non-reversible steering gears usu- 
ally have a certain amount of back lash 
to allow the wheels to follow ruts without 
side resistance on the tires. 



A device for pulling motor cars onto 
solid ground when their rear wheels have 
sunk into mud holes or deep mud, and the 
car cannot be moved by its own power, is 
now out. In using the appliance, one 
end of it is attached to the front of the 
rear wheel, and when the motor is started, 
the device, which somewhat resembles a 
large razor strop, is dragged under the 
wheel. The loose end of the appliance 
is then carried forward, and fastened to 
a stake in the ground. Upon starting the 
motor a second time, the car is quickly 
drawn out of the mud and onto solid 
ground. 



"This top looked shabby and leaked like a sieve— $50 was the price of 
a new one, but my neighbor told me how, a year ago, he made his top 
clean and waterproof as new— for ONLY a $5 bill. Now you see 



I'M SAVING $45 




RUB-R-TITE 

RENEWS AND REWATERPROOFS 



any worn and leaky top Leather or Imitation Leather. 

RUB-R-TITE is a scientific laboratory product. Neither sun, storm 
or foidmg will cause it to peel, crack, blister or rot. If occasionally used 
(reduced) it prolongs the life and wearing qualities of any top indefinitely. 

It is applied with a brush, easily and quickly. It dries quickly, it 
is economical— p. 50 to $S renews a top (cost depends on size and kind 
of material.) 

Every Can Guaranteed to Satisfy or Money Refunded 

RUB-R-TITE and other Rub-On Auto Aids are carried in slock by most dealers. Send 
lor FREE samples of work and information today— NOW— Lest You Forget. 

CHANSLOR &. LYON COMPANY 



VAN NESS AND SUTTER, 
San Franciico Fresno Lo» Angeles 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Seattle Spokane 



Portland 



LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LIGHTING SYSTEM 



GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Coast Aerents 
630 Van Ness Avenue ::::::: 

CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 



San Francisco 




BETTS SPRING CO 

888-890 Folsom St. 
Ssn FrsneiKS, Ctl. 

Copyright 1912 Betta Bprlnf Co. 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing worn out Bearinfirs with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. All sizes carried in stock 




■V 1^' 



P«clfic Co«» .Distributors 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

San Frtncltco Fratno Lot An(tl«i Portlinil Setttit Spokant 



HARRIS 

ILBAOE MARK REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 

OILS 



SAVE MONEY— because you require a smaller quantity 
than you do when using inferior 
lubricants. 



ADD TO EFFICIENCY— because they are all lubrication. No waste, no injurious 

nnatter, nothing to harm the engine. 

INCREASE POWER— because they give perfect lubrication. The engine runs 

smoothly. All frictional parts are coated with a film 
of lubricant. 



Prove It. 



Try HARRIS OILS. 



See for yourself the big improvement in your engine. 



A. W. HARRIS OIL CO. 



326 S. Water St.. Providence, R. I. 



143 No. Wabash Ave , Chicago. Ill 



CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

Los Angeles San Francisco Seattle Spokane Fresno Portland ' 




The Lining That 
Forces Brakes 
To Make Good 




REO.^ U3. PAT. OFF 
"THE ORIGINAL AND BEST ASBESTOS BRAKE LINING" 

It Makes Brakes Grip. 
It Insures Your Safety. 

Will Not Wear Out— Can 
Not Burn Out. It Made 
The Automobile Safe. 

RAYBESTOS is Made of 
Long Fibre Asbestos 
Specially Treated. It is 
Oil-Proof and Water- 
Proof. The Name is 
Stamped on Every Foot 
For Your Protection. 




%S^^oi> 



THE ROYAL EQUIPMENT CO. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

San Francisco Los .\nBclc.s Fresno Seallle Spokane 



Portland 



EQUIPMENT OF 
YOUR CAR 

MEANS "EVERYTHING" when comfort 
and convenience are considered 

TIRE HOLDERS serviceable and attract- 
ive. 

HIND VIEW MIRRORS show the road and 
prevent accidents from rear end collisions 

ROBE RAILS FOOT RESTS TIRE LOCKS 

LICENSE PAD HOLDERS 

All necessary for the Auto 



E. H. WHITEHOUSE MFG. COMPANY 

.Newark. N. J. 



A FULL STOCK AT 



Chanslor & Lyon Co. 

1238 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 



FORD SEAT COVERS 




SEAT COVERS | ''°™"''' *''"° 

^^===z=^^^== [ ROADSTERS $17.50 



A SET 



Equip your car with our Auto-fabric seat covers, 
trimmed with Sterling leather and give it the same 
nobby appearance as a high priced car. Our seat 
covers are absolutely waterproof and save the 
leather upholstery on a new car and cover up the 
worn parts on old cars, thereby adding to the appear- 
ance of your car and making it very easy to keep 
the upholstery neat and clean. 

This is an opportunity to secure a high grade set 
of seat covers at a hitherto unheard of price and 



every Ford owner should take advantage of our 
offer at once. Our seat covers are all bound with 
Sterling leather, while the arms are trimmed in 
genuine Patent Leather the same as furnished on 
seat covers costing up to $75. OC) a set. 

TO FORD DEALERS 

Who have not yet taken up our Ford seat cover 
proposition — read the above story — i he description 
s-pells QUALITY all the way through, and it ought 
to convince you that you can sell Ford seat covers. 



HUGHSON & MERTON, mc 

DISTRIBUTORS 

530 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco, Ca). 



THE LONG HORN 




A powerful warning signal. All the effect of an electric horn 
but, ^ONE of the EXPENSE. 

MECHANICALLY OPERATED 

No batteries to keep charged; no wires or connections to break. 
It is there when you need it. TRY ONE. If not satisfied after 
5 days use, return it and get your money back. 

REGULAR TYPE— All Nickel, $20; Black and Nickel, $18; Blark 

and Brass, $18, 
JUNIOR TYPE All Nickel, $12; Black and Nickel $11; Black 

and Brass, $11. 
MOTORCYCLE TYPE-All Nickel, $10. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

HUGHSON & MERTON, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



Mr. Motorist 
Why Don't You Use 




TIRES ? 



Isn't a Reduction in Tire Expense 

of 30%, worth considering? That 
is what our guarantee of 5,000 
miles versus the usual 3,500, 
means. 

Figure it out, take list price of a 
34 X 4 tire $32 and divide that 
sum by 5,000, then 3,500, the 
two guarantees. Now figure on 
a basis of four tires and the mile- 
age you average each month; isn't 
that saving worth considering ? 



HUGHSON & MERTON, Inc. 



530 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 



Oakland Dislributorl 

PEART & ELKINGTON 
12th & Telegraph 






^!^- - 7 



MOTORING MAGAZINE 



==^ 




Published Monthly by the Proprietor Frederick Marriott, at the Office 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco. California 

DEVOTED TO THE MOTORING INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Price 10 Cents 



San Francisco, Cal., December, 1913 



=J 



SI. 00 Per Year 



THE 

FISK 

RUBBER 

COMPANY 

of New York 



SAN FRANCISCO, 
CAL. 



Evolution of an Automoi^'LE Tire, 



v 



T 



J 



HEAVY CAR TYPE 
Rem. Rubber - Real 5tRVice 



% 





PACIFIC COAST 
BRANCH HOUSES 



Seattle. Wash. 
Portland. Ore. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Oakland. Calif. 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Fresno. Calif. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 




J 



Cut Down Your Gasoline Bills 



DEVELOP MORE POWER 



Avoid Carbon deposits and corroded valves by using 




No matter what brand of oil you are using Panhard 
Oil will give you better service. We have proved it to 
thousands. 



George A. Haws, New York 



BERNARD I. BILL 

SOLE DISTRIBUTER 

543 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco, Gal. 



Have You a Good Old 
Automobile 



^ We can bring it up-to-date — at a 
lesser cost than a trade on a new 
model. The Vesta Electric Lighting 
System and Crescent Air System is 
all that is needed to make your car 
more complete than any 1914 model. 

Give me a chance to convince you, 
information costs you nothing. 



B. 



BILL 



5I^3 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco 



WHY NOT 



let us take your automobile photo- 
graphs? Our reputation for 
exceptionally fine work guaran- 
tees satisfaction while our prices 
are reasonable and the same to 
everyone. Also you will find 
that our photographs reproduce 
well for your advertising cuts. 

Ovir new studio, the largest \vest of 
New York, is completely equip- 
ped with separate departments 
for every branch of our busi- 
ness and an operating room 
large enough to accommodate 
two machines at once : : : : : 

Try us w^hen you want a photograph 
of any kind. You will be pleased 
with our portraits, our com- 
mercial work, and if you have a 
Kodak our finishing will be a 
pleasant surprise ::::::: 



ARTHUR SPAULDING CO. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Frandsco, Cal. 
Phones: f-ranklln 11R4 C 4084 



"Hoover" Auxiliary Spring 
& Shock Absorber 




Action of "Hoover" Spring under ordinary load, or running 
on smooth roads 

Full factory equipment on all 
Packards, Oldsmobiles, Coles, 
Thomas and Seven others. 
Absolutely perfect. No com- 
petition. Full set of four- 
Si 4.00 to $18.00 



IMPOSSIBLE TO BREAK SPRINGS 

Under compression by heavy 
loads, rough roads or bumps. 
Under all conditions rides as 
easy as on asphalt. Impossible 
to break springs. 

Hoover Spring Company 

617 Turk St., San Francisco, Cal. 






CO 
CO 

fo 

CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 

^ 

CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 

^ 

CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 
CO 




M 
A 



As Father Time leads the decrepited 
year of 1913 to oblivion Motor Mag- 
azine in this, the December number, 
reviews some of the interesting inci- 
dents of the past. 

One w^onders where the racing cars 
of yesterday have gone. Some are still 
struggling for existence and of these a 
record is now^ here given. 

Still with the thought of yesterday 
a chronicler tells for the first time of a 
■wild ride through Pacheco Pass to meet 
the w^orld famed racing car that w^as 
struggling for supremecy in hard 
winter's drive through snow, sleet, and 
rain from New York to Paris. 

Also is review^ed much of the good 
road w^ork accomplished during the 
last tw^elve months on the Pacific Coast. 



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Editorial 1 

Pacheco Pass 3 

Good Roads Make Good Roads 5 

Firestone Service Station 6 

Big Increase in Auto Exports 7 

Hard Mud Plugs in Oregon 8 

Where are the Racing Cars of Yesterday? 9 

Mayfield Street to be Paved 10 

Of Interest to Motorists 12 

Queer Requests for Auto Numbers 14 

Believes in National Highway 15 

Umatilla County's Tax Levy for Good Roads 15 

A. A. A. Elects Officers 15 

Guests Take Risks 15 

No Auto Tax i;, Machine Men Win 15 

From Out of the Northwest 17 

Olympic Highway 18 

Over the Siskiyou Mountains 19 

Baker County Roads 19 

The New Chandler for 1914 22 

Repair Roads 24 

Rajah vs. Rex 24 

Repair Cuts in Treads 24 




Vol. V 



December, 1913 



No. 6 



MOTORING MAGAZINE and MOTOR LIFE 



Published Monthly by the Proprietor Frederick Marriott 
at the Office 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, California 

DEVOTED TO THE MOTORING INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST 






( 



I 






hk 



mOTO RINQteV^G AZIN E 

And motor life 



©im® ©If th® Mo^t Ssomk IPsiirds ©IT ^h® 



The boulevard or improved highway 
known as the Yosemite-to-the-Sea, takes 
in one of the most picturesque passes in 
the State of California. This road is 
known as Pacheco Pass, and connects 
Santa Clara Valley with San Joaquin. It 
is by far the shorter route to Fresno and 
the other important cities of the San 
Joaquin Valley than by way of the passes 
over the mountains south of Oakland. 

The mention of Pacheco Pass brings 
very forcibly to mind a wild ride that 
took place some years ago when the offi- 
cial pilot of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia went through the Pass to meet the 
Thomas car which was leading in the 
race from New York to Paris. 

The pilot car was driven by Calvin C. 
Eib, one of the pioneers in the automo- 
bile trade of San Francisco. In the car, 
besides the writer, was William Hunt, 
the official representative of the Santa 
Clara Automobile Association and the 
official photographer. 

The pilot car left San Francisco by the 
Oakland ferry to pick up the racing car. 
Word had been received that it had 
reached Bakersfield and was coming up 
the San Joaquin Valley. Reaching Hay- 
wards, telephone communications were 
opened with the city and down through 
the valley to find just where the racing 
car was. In this the pilot was unsuc- 
cessful, inasmuch as no word could be 
obtained as to their location. Then 
traveling further on down to San Jose, 
the telephone lines were again brought 
into use, but with the same results. 

It was a certainty that the racing car 



% 1. E. D'HoiTi .■: 

was coming up the San Joaquin Valley, 
but whether it would come through Pa- 
checo Pass or continue on up to Liver- 
more and then over by Dublin was not 
known. It was decided to travel on and 
take Pacheco Pass. 

Reaching Gilroy, the telephone was 
brought into play again, but with the 
same result. By this time it was almost 
time for dinner; in fact, those in the car 
felt the necessity for food, but as the rac- 
ing car had not been located, it was de- 
cided not to stop, but to proceed on 
through Pacheco Pass and try and head 
them off before they reached Los Banos. 
Leaving Gilroy, the run to San Felipe at 
the beginning of Pacheco Pass was made 
in short order. 

It was found there that San Felipe 



would be tnc last telephone station that 
could be used until the car had got 
through the pass. Therefore, it was de- 
cided to again try and locate the racing 
car. After opening up the wire with 
San Francisco and practically every 
principal town in the San Joaquin Valley, 
it was found that the car had passed 
Fresno, but that was all the information 
that could be learned. 

While the telephone was being used, 
some one suggested a sandwich to ap- 
pease the hunger of the party, a fried- 
egg sandwich was ordered, when some- 
body else suggested "make it two." The 
brainy cook of the hotel took the order, 
and when he appeared, he had two fried 
eggs between two large pieces of bread 
measuring over three inches thick. 




In the heart o; t'Jchcco F^ss, on mc ca^c oj inc rwuniain sue u-nicn drops al- 
most perpendicular two hundred feet to the bottom of the canyon. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 




The Mountain House, which crowns the summit oj Facheco Pass. 



There was no time to stop to get extra 
bread to segregate the eggs, so those in 
the party proceeded to stretch their 
mouths over the eats. This produced 
some great gymnastics on the part of 
those who indulged in the feast, inasmuch 
as the eggs had not been cooked hard, 
and after a couple of bites broke, and 
there was some fine work trying to save 
the contents of the sandwich. 

Half-past nine saw the pilot car on Its 
way. Eib, who was driving, had never 
been through the Pass, but put on all 
speed, and shortly we were in Bell sta- 
tion. A stop was made at this point to 
try and see if any word had been re- 
ceived of the racing car. The pilot car 
had no more than come to a stop than it 
was realized that something unusual had 
happened at the station. Investigation 
proved that there had been some sort of 
trouble, and that one person was sh'".* 
dead, which heightened the excitement 
of the trip that was already at a nerve 
racking point. 

Leaving Bell station, the car was 
whipped through the Pass at a tremen- 
dous speed. Soon the Mountain House 
came in sight. A stop was made here to 
ask for road instructions, as the country 
there looked as if we were going into 
the open. Some half hour was necessary 
to wake up the inhabitants, who seemed 
to be dead to the world in sleep. 

Finally getting under way once again,, 
the rest of the pass was made, and the 
start out into the open country, follow- 
ing the instructions given at the Moun- 
tain House. 

A finer lot of roads set at right angles 
cannot be found anywhere outside of the 
country just leaving Pacheco Pass. Af- 
ter turning up and down several of these, 
the party finally realized that they were 
lost, especially when they were brought 
up in the backyard of a rancher who came 



to the window after a flock of dogs had 
made the night hideous with their snarls 
and barks. 

Finally the road to Volta was found, 
and then on through Volta the car soon 
reached Los Bancs at 1 o'clock in the 
morning. 

Luck was with us, for when we reached 
the town we found that the Thomas car 
had arrived about an hour earlier, and af- 
ter taking a midnight meal, the racing 
crew had gone to bed with the instruc- 
tions to be called at four-thirty. 

There was nothing to do now but to 
wait until four-thirty, and in the mean- 
time some one suggested that the party 
partake of the postponed dinner. Wak- 
ing up a Chinese restaurant keeper, some 
cold meat and hot coffee was produced, 
and the inner man appeased. 

Then all hands went over to the hotel 
to take a couple of hours' rest. One can 
imagine the chagrin and surprise when 
informed that the hotel was full, and not 
a room could be had. After skirmishing 
around town another one with dubious 



accommodations was found and the party 
went to bed. 

The aspect of the hotel was not invit- 
ing, but it was "any port in the storm," so 
most of the party laid down with their 
clothes on. The official photographer 
happened to be in the room with the 
writer, and hardly had sleep overcome 
the party when the writer was awakened 
by the photographer, who was hunting 
for a flea that he said was biting him. 
He was informed to roll over on it and try 
and kill it, but this did not seem to suit 
his fancy. 

Hardly getting to sleep again, there 
was another noise in the room, and all 
the visions of burglars, cut-throats and 
wild mountain men came up before one's 
eyes. Awakening and shouting for the 
cause of the disturbance, the photo- 
grapher asked that some one come and 
hold up the window, as he wanted to shut 
up a dog that was howling at the moon. 
An empty flask left by a previous visitor 
was the ammunition which, with a true 
aim, the photographer landed on the cra- 
nium of the dog. Hence no more noise 
from that dog that night. 

As it was then a quarter to three, it 
was decided as four-fifteen was the hour 
of calling that it would be just as well to 
get up and wash. 

It was a sleepy party that strolled 
up to the restaurant for the morning meal. 
However, the lack of sleep was soon lost 
in the excitement of following the vic- 
torious Thomas crew. A hasty breakfast 
and soon all hands were aboard with the 
pilot car in advance, starting on the 
homeward journey of the first lap of the 
race to San Francisco. 

Only those who have started out tour- 
ing with the breaking of the day can ap- 
preciate the ride that March morning. 
The air was just sharp enough to keep 
the blood in circulation. Back over the 




Bell Station thfif mgirHs the mid-way point through Pacheco Pass. 



December, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZI^. :. AND MOTOR LIFE 



road to Pacheco Pass led the route, and 
shortly the pilot car and racer entered 
this well known road over the mountains. 
The party was somewhat startled to 
see how close Eib had been driving the 
night before to the edge of the precipice. 
The tracks of the pilot car was still 
fresh, as no traffic had passed since the 
trip. While Pacheco Pass is marked by 
sharp declivities along its side, yet it has 
easy grades and good turns, and when 
put in first class condition will be a 
mountain pass that even the novice can 
easily make with safety. 

Once through the pass, Gilroy was 
soon reached; then began the triumphant 
entry of the victorious car into San 
Francisco, for from this point on it was 
a greeting to victory. This, however, is 
another story, and does not affect the 
Pacheco Pass. 

A week later the same party with an- 
other car and driver went across the pass 
to meet the French car which B. S. St. 
Cheffery was in command. On their re- 
turn from Los Banos, the party had a bet- 
ter chance to appreciate the beautiful 
scenery of Pacheco Pass, having once 
been over it, the novelty of watching the 
route itself was gone, and there was time 
to pay attention to the scenic beauties of 
the road. There is no other pass in Cali- 
fornia that is more inviting than this one, 
especially when the summit is reached 
above San Felipe. Coming up through 
the pass, a sharp turn is made in the road 
at the summit, and at this point suddenly 
bursts into view the wonderful Santa 
Clara Valley. 

We had been coming along at a fast 
clip with St. Chaffery driving the French 
car for all it was worth. As the summit 
was reached, a shouting in the French 
car attracted our attention, and we saw 
that they had come to a stop. Thinking 
that something had happened, we backed 
up, only to find that the wonderful beauty 




The easy grade after leavirtg San 1 . .., . ..^ one enters Pacheco Pass. 



of the valley had held them spell-bound, 
and they wished to take in more of this 
wonderful picture. 

One cannot appreciate the beauties of 
Santa Clara Valley without they see it 
on a March morning when the country is 
in bloom. Down on the floor of the val- 
ley were acre after acre of fruit trees be- 
decked in their white blossoms. Here and 
there was a large field of the California 
poppy, bright in its golden hue, standing 
out in all its glory of color. Then again 
were acres of the blue lupin and other 
wild flowers, massed together in a har- 
monious whole, that charmed the artistic 
mind of mankind. It was a picture 
painted by a masterhand — by the Great 
Creator of the world. 

The picture on that March morning is 
one that will never fade from the mem- 
ory. While Pacheco Pass is but one of 
the several passes that are a part of the 
road from Yosemite-to-the-Sea, yet it will 
stand out the most prominent from its 
many attractions. 

The completion of this road will mean 
that the motorists leaving San Francisco 




The open road on the Santa Clara side as one approaches Pacheco Pass. 



can tour down to Santa Cruz, then across 
this Yosemite to the Sea road, visit the 
great natural wonders of the valley, and 
thence proceed back by way of Stockton 
and over through Livermore, and thence 
through the beautiful Dublin Pass to San 
Francisco, making a loop out of San 
Francisco that will be well worth the 
journey. 

'6 '6 75 

GoM Kmrt: M^® Oooi IRofiifls 

It is universal experience that one mile 
of good road breeds another mile. Put 
a State-wide good road down anywhere 
in this country, and in ten years there will 
be dozens of good roads reaching it from 
all parts of the State. Put down a system 
of National highways, built and main- 
tained by the National Government, and 
the various State legislatures and county 
officials would soon see the advantages of 
connecting all parts of the States with 
those National roads. 

There are 2,000,000 miles of roads in 
the United States, says the National 
Highway Association. The 50,000 miles 
of highway shown on the map is but a 
fraction over 2 per cent of this mileage. 
But improve these 50,000 miles into good 
roads, and keep them good roads by 
proper maintenance, and 50,000 miles 
more would grow almost over night, and 
then another 50,000 and another and an- 
other, until our great country, with its 
huge territory, would be crossed and re- 
crossed with good roads, as France is to- 
day. 

^ ■& S 

'Exlira 1S©K 

By cutting out a square in the floor of 
the tonneau and attaching a proper-sized 
box underneath, you can have a very con- 
venient carrying receptable m space that 
is not otherwise taken up. It makes a 
good place to put a carbon foot-warmer 
in winter, and may be used for tools and 
jack at other times. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 




Tte IFiir©§ft©Bii© 2(Sirvk© SHaftfem 

The word service, as applied to the au- 
tomobile trade of San Francisco, is at 
times a misnomer. There are, however, 
some companies whose service is all that 
the word implies. This is the case with 
the service station of the Firestone Tire 
and Rubber Company. The Firestone 
Service Station is the most completely 
equipped tire service station west of Chi- 
cago. It occupies the entire building at 
1464 Bush street, which is just around 
the corner from the offices and sales de- 
partment, but under the same roof. 

Pacific Coast Manager W. H. Bell, in 
speaking of the service station says: 
"We have complete in one building the 
most modern machinery of every kind for 
making wood spokes and felloes, also for 
applying steel bands and rims for every 
size and description, damage wheels and 




Bhick.sinitli drilliiit; holes in wood fellou of G in. dual \vl 1. Thf :iulcmiatir cariiagf ciinnoctod 

Willi drill insures in-rftct results. 

Viow .showiiiK front portion of wheel shop on scroiid floor service buiUIinB— eciiiipped with every 
modern appliance to fucilitiite the completion of wheel, rim or tire worlt of all kinds. 

View showiiiK a portion of our Steel S A K Band Stock. 'I'liis stock, as well as all necessary 
parts for our Hemovable Him is always complete. 

Photos by Spaulding. 



The San Francisco Service Station at 1464 
Hli.'^h street. 

spokes and worn out tires mean little 
delay to the Firestone customers. 

"There is no waiting for wheel parts 
or tires; our stock is complete at all times 
and our facilities and equipments are 
ample to perform real Firestone service 
to every truck owner in San Francisco 
and surrounding territories. 

"This big plant, the only one of its 
kind on the Pacific Coast, is maintained 
not only for the matter of profit, but to 
serve the company's customers. 

"When one buys Firestone tires and 
rims, the deal is only half completed; the 
other half is the service we render by 
keeping their truck in continuous opera- 
tion. 

"Idle time is lost money; a loss of 



money a loss in business. Tires to the 
motor truck losers largely determines the 
extent of this loss. Tires must meet the 
constant abuse of all roads, rough pave- 
ments, high speed and careless driving. 

"No other part of the truck is so di- 
rectly affected by this severe usage as 
the tires. It naturally follows that in 
time a new tire will be necessary, or an 
accidental injury to wheels or tires will 
require immediate repair. 

"Now the question arises what facili- 
ties are at hand for getting the truck on 
the road with a minimum loss of time. 
The answer to this question is to be had 
in a visit to our service station. The dif- 
ferent departments show how thoroughly 
we meet all emergencies, thus guarantee- 
ing quick repair, which means dollars 
and cents to our customers. 

"This unit service station is maintained 
for our customers' accommodation. No 
matter how large or how small the truck 
may be, we have the part in stock. A cus- 
tomer can get what he wants when he 
wants it. 

"Our Firestone equipment on a truck 
insures the owner against irritating delays 
and secures for him the thorough-going 
co-operation of a complete and efficient 
local service station, which is the best 
that money can buy and brains invent." 

'6 ^6 'S 

ISng D[R\(cir©(5is® M Araft® Exqpjirtis 

According to the latest government re- 
ports up to September, 1913, there has 
been a tremendous increase in the last 
two years in the number of automobiles 
exported by the United States. 

The reports are for nine month ending 
September in each case. In 1911 there 
were exported, both pleasure and com- 
mercial cars, 11,244 vehicles, valued at 
$11,565,034. In 1912 the commercial cars 
were recorded separately from the pleas- 
ure cars at $4,187,064, or a total of 18,- 
405 cars valued at $18,252,299. 

This year, for the nine months ending 
September the exportation of trucks 
jumrod from 175 to 778, valued at $1,- 
351,140, or an increase of one year in the 
value of trucks exported of 258 per cent. 
This shows conclusively that our com- 
mercial car makers now recognize the 
foreign demand for American trucks and 
have begun to supply it. 

The pleasure cars exported in the nine 
months of this year are 20,175 in number, 
valued at $19,950,718, and all cars ex- 
ported for this year total 20,953, valued 
at $21,301,858. 

Comparing this with the value given 
for 1911 of $11,565,034, we find that auto- 
mobile exports have practically doubled 
in the last two years. 







S^X0«f 




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view showlnp vvlioolwrtplit outtlnB down and snapinc up 
foie applioation i<f band— wli.clwrlght In rear cuttlnp out 
wheel. 

View of Band Heater and Tank. With this Intense heat, the largest size steel bands are made 
red hot and then applied to who*"! ovur txnk Wlmn e^ivj-n 
band shrinks, making an a!' 

View of tho rti-st floor of "1 
traiue. which is on street U 

\vi- liave every facility to car.- ;■■• .11 tvi ks r..; :: i.- i;re ■ 
and original "Firestone Service" feature on the Coast. 

View sliowiiip a portion of our Solid Tire !?lo. k. .Vll sizes are kept i-onstantly on hand, 
is a very important feature of "Firestone Service. 



nsiuns bv- 
1 for dual 



quirk hath of cold water, metal 

from the front en- 
ny size truck. Here 
This is an exclusive 



v.n- 



This 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 



J^ 111 



i 

I 



a 
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I 



^^^j^JS^Xi^^MMMX^MtMMMM^XOX^M/tgMMM^XaHXa^Si^f^^jrMiMMMrj^ 









OregOii 



Trap ©v@!r Monsnatliiniia IP®§s@§ Fir^ina 



f 



S 



§ 



Probably one of the greatest automo- 
bile feats ever performed in the State of 
Oregon at this season of the year was re- 
cently accomplished by W. S. Dulmage, 
accompanied by E. N. Brandt, of Detroit. 

Brandt, when he arrived in Portland 
and informed Dulmage that he would 
like to make a trip across the State, 
through the mud, Dulmage remarked: 
"You have no conception of what our 
Oregon roads are at this season of the 
year, or you would not ask an impossi- 
bility of the car." 

Brandt's answer was that he did not be- 
lieve there were any roads that would be 
impossible, so Dulmage was inclined to 
call his bluff, and without any further 
ceremony the pair set out the next day 
at noon on a tour of the State. 

This is Dulmage's description of the 
tour: "The first portion of the trip to 
Eugene was made without any stops. Up- 
on leaving Eugene the crowd that sur- 
rounded the car informed us that there 
had not been a machine through for some 
time, and that it was an utter impossi- 
bility for us to secure traction on ac- 
count of the deep mud that we would en- 
counter in Pass Creek and Cow Creek 
Canyons. 

"When leaving Cottage Grove we were 
also apprised of the fact that several 
teams were in waiting in the canyons and 
at nearby farms, and that the drivers of 
said teams were making automobiles their 
prey to the tune of $25 per haul. Most 
of this bad road was encountered after 
dark, the chuck holes being so deep that 
the drivers were obliged to hang on to the 
car in order to keep from being thrown 
into the ditch. In a great many places it 
seemed as though the whole car would 
become submerged, but owing to its light 
weight, combined with its extreme power, 
it negotiated the hills beautifully, and 
pulled us out of the mud time and again. 
In fact, the motor never missed a shot, 
neither did the water require replenish- 
ing on the heavy grinds that we were 
compelled to take on the extremely long 
hills going through the canyon. About 
2:30 o'clock in the afternoon, when we 
were within eight miles of Oakland, we 
overtook an automobile that had buried 
itself in the mud, and the occupants were 



WX^^^j^^^^tSlXXlXIB»tWJtS)BXOXiMifjr£J^^^ 



r 



trying to keep warm by a bon-fire, with 
the expectation ot remaining there all 
night, or until help could be procured. 

"Well, of course, we offered our own 
services as well as the services of the car, 
and hooked on the cripple, hauling it and 
its occupants up Rice Hill, which, by the 
way, is some hill, and Oakland was fin- 
ally reached at about 2:30 a. m. This 
was really one of the most spectacular 
performances ever made by a car in that 
territory; in fact, every one seemed sur- 
prised to know that an automobile had 
come through, as we were informed that 
those who had tried it a few days pre- 
viously had been compelled to call for 
help, and were hauled through by horses. 

"A great many of the residents of Oak- 
land advised up that we had better not 
attempt to go any farther, as it would be 
impossible for us to get through Cow 
Creek Canyon, and that some grades 
were as steep as 42 per cent, and also 
that the road was very heavy going. But 
after our previous experience in the mud, 
our appetites were only whetted for 
more hills to conquer, so on we went. 

"We reached the famous Cow Creek 
Canyon about dark, and as we had 
brought mud hooks, we decided that it 
might be wise to keep them where they 
could easily be reached in case of neces- 
sity. Up to this time we had used noth- 
ing but chains on all wheels. Our car 
seemed working better as it limbered up, 
the motor having a beautiful purr, and 
the powerful electric lights threw their 
luminous rays a great distance ahead. 
We found ourselves sending our way up 
the canyon through exceedingly dense 
timber in this mountainous country, but 
we really enjoyed the six-mile climb, 
and after reaching the summit, we found 
that we were only 12 miles from Glen- 
dale, which is located in a beautiful spot 
in the hills. 

"After having dinner in Glendale, the 
people we met there informed us that it 
was useless for us to presume to go on 
to Grant's Pass. Having made the trip 
so far in such a successful manner, we 
both felt as though there was nothing im- 
possible in the way of mountain grades 
or mud, so concluded that we would try 
the ascent of Wolf Creek, a distance of 



about five miles of very heavy mountain 
grade, with some very dangerous curves. 
Luck was with us in keeping the road, as 
at many places we were compelled to 
hug the mountain sides very closely in 
order to keep from going into the can- 
yon. After passing Wolf Creek, our dan- 
ger was over. Upon arriving at Grant's 
Pass, we concluded that we would pro- 
ceed to Medford that night. 

"When we returned to Medford, the 
heavy rains set in, and we were forced to 
make the return trip over the same roads, 
only under much more disagreeable cir- 
cumstances. There were times when we 
encountered hard going, and we did not 
see how it would be possible for any 
heavy car to proceed over the same road 
without sinking out of sight. Most of the 
return trip through the canyons was 
made after dark, in a heavy downpour of 
rain, which made it exceedingly difficult, 
notwithstanding the fact that our electric 
lights were everything that could be de- 
sired. Our greatest difficulty lay in 
keeping the windshield clear of mud in 
order to see the road. All of the auto- 
mobile dealers we met en route seemed 
wonderfully pleased with the perform- 
ance of the car." 

"S ^ ^ 

A Tw® [FraiMig) 

The common impulse tire pump may 
be attached permanently to a priming cup 
opening by means of a short curved tube 
having a cut-off in it. The pump should 
be fastened to some stationary part not 
too near the exhaust manifold. This way 
of attaching the pump obviates the neces- 
sity of handling it while hot, and renders 
the removal of the spark plug unneces- 
sary, but the ignition cable to that cylin- 
der must be detached when the pump is 
used. When is is very convenient to 
pump up tires, they will be much more 
apt to be kept full of air. 
«• «• «■ 



If the handle of a wrench is too long 
for the capacity of the jaws, there will be 
danger of stripping threads. For this rea- 
son, the mechanic's "S" wrench is the 
safest wrench to use. These wrenches 
are scientifically proportioned for the 
work required of them. 



December, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



':W^^m^^m)^m^y^>' 



>^y««« «i < m i 






6(ST 



it. 






Where are the racing cars of yester- 
day? If a staid, sober old age hasn't 
engulfed them, most probably they have 
ended their last lap a twisted heap of 
steel and wood. 

From the idol of a wildly cheering, 
speed mad crowd to respectable daily 
labor; a serene domestic life, or a mildly 
exciting private career, is but a step in 
the racing game, and one by one these 
speed demons of the days gone by have 
slipped behind the portals of the yester- 
days, have slowed down and allowed the 
newer and more powerful cars to pass 
them. 

What has become of Casey Jones, 
Black Bess, the Peerless Green Dragon, 
the Cyclone, Whistling Billy, Reo Bird, 
Ford 999, and a score of other fast trav- 
elers? 

To the "four winds" for many; daily 
grind for some; for others a more or less 
speedy career under private tutelage; ob- 
livion for the balance. 

With a flaming gasoline torch throwing 
smoky shadows on a score of upturned 
faces, Casey Jones, the trim gray Loco- 
mobile, winner of the twenty-four hour 
race at Ascot Park, began its downward 
career as demonstrating car for an ad- 
vertising dentist. 

Night after night poor old Casey drew 
up to the curb with a defiant snort, and 
soon a crowd of curious people gathered 
about. Not drawn because of the gray 
car that had won a well-fought race in 
the past, but attracted there by the gaudy 
red plush dentist's chair; the metallic 
bark of the advertiser; the licking flames 
of the torch. In some small hamlet in 
Southern California to-night, when dusk 
purples the shadows, you will find old 
Casey Jones still pursuing its new career 
at the will of the painless one. 

Like ashes scattered to the wild winds, 
nothing tangible remains of Reo Bird, the 
little racer that, at one time, held all 
the middleweight records. It was 
broken up and its parts put back into 
stock years ago. Because of the two Reo 
engines which the Bird sported, this car 
was widely discussed. It was raced in 
all parts of the East by Bruno Siebel and 
Charles Bigelow. 



"Whistling Billy," the notorious White 
Steamer that Bert Dingley drove in 1906, 
is to-day. as Dingley says, "just scrap." 

Billy the Whistler was some high 
stepper, if all the stories of his past are 
to be believed. After turning over with 
Webb Jay a couple of times, Dingley 
broke it up a few times more to sort of 
settle it, but it refused to become "bridle 
wise." After being put in first-class 
shape at the factory, Whistling Billy 
made a beautiful ascension with Gus Sie- 
fried, at Ascot Park. Just why, nobody 
knows, but Billy struck his nose into the 
track, and made three beautiful somer- 
saults, and there wasn't enough left of 
the Whistler to rebuild. 

In Barney Oldfield's past there have 
been many unusual racers (autos, of 
course) associated, for Barney has hit 
some high places in his time, but his little 
Ford 999 had perhaps the most interest- 
ing finish of any of his string. 

Named by Earl Kiser, the driver whose 
leg was torn off by Oldfield's Winton 
Bullet six years ago, the little yellow car 
met its first real accident when the 999 
and a car known as the Red Devil, were 
both wrecked in Milwaukee in 1903, 
Driver Frank Day being killed outright. 
Soon after. Ford 999, which was the first 
racer Oldfield ever drove, and the first 
car to make a mile in less than a minute 
on a dirt track, was rebuilt and sold to 
Bill Pickens, Oldfield's manager, who 
shipped it to Los Angeles. Because of 
the condition of the car, Pickens refused 
to accept it, and it was held by the South- 
ern Pacific for some time, and at last 
sold for the freight and storage charges 
to Dana Burks, former Mayor of Ocean 
Park. Burks tried to race it at the open- 
ing of the Motordrome, but Ford 999 had 
run its last successful race; there wasn't 
a go left in it. 

Oldfield's Green Dragon was one of 
the racers to land right. The Peerless 
Green Dragon was the only one of his 
cars that he says he hated to sell. 

It was back in 1905 that Barney sold 
the emerald-hued car that every automo- 
bile fan in the country knew, to George 
Clark, of New York City. The follow- 
ing year Oldfield, on a visit to the little 



old town, saw his Green Dragon, serenely 
purring in front of one of the fashionable 
shops in Fifth avenue. 

A second seat had been added, and the 
exhausts had been covered, but to Barney 
it was the same old car. As he gazed at 
his old sweetheart, feeling as though he 
would like to get in and drive away, a 
good-looking female person waltzed out 
of the shop and hustled to the car. 
Dressed in green from slippers to hat, 
she was something of a Peerless green 
fairy herself. Barney says the last im- 
pression he had of his car was a pair of 
snappy black eyes and yards and yards 
of green veiling floating out behind the 
auto as the green racer with its old-time 
falsetto bark beat it up Fifth avenue. 

There was a dark-haired girl mixed 
up with one of Tetzlaff's ex-racers also — 
that is, there was one he is willing to tell 
of. The Fiat he drove in the 1911 Phoe- 
nix race as far as the San Diego tele- 
graph pole, into which he smashed early 
in the game, was rebuilt and used later 
as a demonstrating car. The pretty 
daughter of a Kansas farmer fell in love 
with the car (as Teddy demonstrated it), 
so the big Fiat was shipped back where 
they grow com and good-looking girls. 
Home life for this racer. 

The Toledo steamer, which Charles 
Soules piloted to victory in the first 100- 
miles endurance race ever held over what 
is now the Vanderbilt course, caught fire 
and was completely destroyed at Bir- 
mingham, Ala., in 1902. 

Soules said he averaged fifteen miles 
an hour in that 100-mile race, and every- 
body was delighted with the speed. Af- 
ter such a record, it would seem as if no 
place would be too warm for the Toledo 
steamer. 

Eddie Maier sort of makes a specialty 
of driving ex-racing cars, and in his 
stable is Big Ben, Oldfield's mighty 
Steams, as well as a number of other 
machines. 

Frank A. Garbutt, vice-president of the 
Los Angeles Athletic Club, numbers the 
Nazzaro car in his auto stable. This is 
one of the few ex-racing cars whose life 
has fallen into pleasant lines. The big 
red Fiat looks as strong and bright as 



10 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



the day it led the Grand Prix, and was 
acclaimed the fastest 90 Fiat ever made. 
Garbutt is justly proud of the Nazzaro 
Fiat, every part of whose engine was se- 
lected by the clever Italian driver, each 
bearing the initial "N." Wherever Gar- 
butt goes, the splendid workmanship on 
the engine awakens admiration. 

Garbutt's old racing car, known as the 
Stewart-Garbutt car, which Garbutt built, 
and with which he broke the amateur 
record for a mile, was sold and never af- 
terwards heard from. It dropped from 
the knowledge of the man who made it 
as completely as if it had taken wings. 

This has been the case with ever so 

many of the ex-racing cars. As soon as 

their speed days are over, they are re- 

, built or taken apart, and form integral 

parts of a host of other racers. 

Bert Dingley's Pope-Toledo racer, 
known as EI Valiente, was sold to ex- 
Mayor Hazzard, who attempted to dupli- 
cate the spectacular flights of the Reo 
Bird by installing two engines in the car. 
The Pope-Toledo, however, refused to do 
double duty. 

Tetzlaff's white Lozier that turned the 
fastest lap in the first Santa Monica road 
race, was rebuilt, as was his 90 Fiat. This 
latter car was driven in the Corona race 
by George Hill. 

The Lozier car, with which Tetzlaff 
broke the world's stock car record and 
the American road race record at Santa 
Monica in 1909, was sold to Charles 
Twitchell, the inventor of the Twitchell 
air gauge, Tetzlaff getting $500 more than 
the car originally cost him. 

Dingley's Pope-Toledo No. 2 is now 
the property of Carl F. Fischer, president 



of the Indianapolis Speedway. A quiet 
family life is to be hoped for this old car. 
The Marmon Wasp, that long, taper- 
ing skyrocket on wheels, which Ray Har- 
roun piloted to victory in the first 500- 
mile speedway race ever run, is now in 
the proud possession of Howard Marmon, 
head of the automobile corporation of 
which his name is a part. In the wonder- 
ful machine, Harroun covered the five- 
century at a rate of speed better than 
seventy-four miles an hour. 

Old No. 8, the blue-bonneted National 
which little Joe Dawson drove into first 
place in the second 500 mile sprint with 
an average of better than seventy-eight 
miles an hour, is an object of much inter- 
est in the National factory at Indianapo- 
lis. Last May it was given a few sprints 
around the track, and the famous old boat 
proved that it was far from flirting with 
the scrap heap. 

It was respectable service for the 1911 
Cadillac that captured the American 
twenty-four hour record of sixty-three 
and one-third miles an hour. Since re- 
tiring from speed stunts, the Cadillac, as 
a service car for Don Lee, has covered 
75,000 miles, and as Don Lee says : "She 
still has speed." 

Speed! The thing that made the fame 
of these cars, and which counts more with 
their drivers than faithful service. 

Speed gone or on the wane, and one 
by one these racing cars are dropped from 
the roll of honor, and even their names 
pass from the memory of man. 

The Blue Streak, the Yellow Peril, the 
Black Death, the Gray Wolf, and all 
others — may Mercury, the god of 
speed, justly reward their efforts. 




Mrs. J. B. Mitchell, wife of Manafrer of Borland Electric Car Co., distributors for 
Southern California, in her Borland Roadster. 



December, 1913. 

M(3iylS(gM Mr®®t ft® h® Wmf®^ 

In this season of glad tidings and good 
cheer comes an announcement that makes 
the motorist stop and wonder if really the 
age of miracles has passed. 

Quietly, without the blare of trumpets, 
the ringing of bells, or the firing of 
canons, it has been announced that the 
main street of Mayfield, the connecting 
link in the highway down the peninsula, 
is at last really going to be paved. 

One has to pinch himself on hearing 
this announcement to make sure that it is 
not a dream. 

The amount of money expended on 
printer's ink and other incidentals neces- 
sary to publish the articles of scorn that 
have been written concerning this road in 
the last ten years would almost have 
paid for its construction. The town with 
the name that brings thoughts of the aris- 
tocratic section of London has evidently 
awakened from its Rip Van Winkle 
slumber. It is to be hoped that it is a 
real awakening, and that it will not turn 
over and go to sleep again, for it has been 
impossible for those using the El Camino 
Real to pass this town by. They had to 
go through it in a Dante's passage to the 
other side. 

There is supposed to be an end to 
everything, and it is hoped that kind fate 
has at last put an end to the bad roads of 
Mayfield. 

Yet the News Letter fearing that this 
report may not be true, quotes from a late 
issue of the Daily Palo Alto Times the 
following : 

"At the regular meeting of the May- 
field town board of trustees, recently, a 
contract was signed to pave Main street 
under the plans prepared by F. A. Ni- 
kirk, city engineer. The construction 
company was placed under $2,000 bonds 
to complete the work within 120 days. 
"The action of the board will result in 
the closing of a gap of about one mile of 
bad roadway through Mayfield. The 
proposed work has been under discussion 
for two and a half years, and has been 
strongly urged by residents of Mayfield 
and Palo Alto and by motorists who use 
the peninsula road from San Francisco to 
San Jose. 

"The new roadway will be built the 
width of the street from gutter to gutter 
for about one-half mile, and the remain- 
der of the distance it will be twelve feet 
wide on either side of the Peninsula 
electric right of way, later broadening out 
to twenty-four feet. This is considerably 
wider than the State highway." 

It is "Big Bill" Hanrahan who has the 
contract, and woe unto Bill if the job is 
not done quicker and better than man has 
ever known. 



^ 



December, 1913. MOTORING MAGAZINh AND MOTOR LIFE H 



How enterprising dealers are 
enjoying year Vound profits 

MR. Gasoline Car Dealer, why let the stack of dollars you 
have already earned, dwindle— sinr»ply to keep up your organ- 
ization—waiting for the "season?" Think what other dealers are doing; 
how their business is kept booming; and profits kept coming in month 
after month ! THEY have taken time by the forelock— THEY are 
selling electrics— and are enjoying splendid, steady incomes. Now. right 
now. YOU have the chance to do EVEN BETTER; for, dealer territory 
for the BORLAND ELECTRIC is open-the BORLAND ELECTRIC, the 
most extensively advertised electric on the nriarket today. 

'^The car with the clean-cut thoroughbred air'' 




5-passenger coupe; 7-passenger limou- 
sine; open body, wheel steer roadster 

Why not strike now while the iron is hot? Mold the pros- 

pects, our national advertising is creating, into prospects for 
you Thmk how gratifying it will be to your own oank account to 
get outside assistance like the sales of BORLAND ELECTRICS will give. 
Cash-in on this opportunity NOW. The BORLAND ELECTRIC is the 
car with ALL the BEST features; backed by financial strength many a 
bank would envy; thoroughly, sturdily built and graceful of line and 
design. The car that's easy to sell and certain to satisfy. 



SPECIFIC A TIONS 



Extra roomy flve-passenger. coupe bod^': wheel base 
96 inches; left side drive with horizontal lever control 
rrom either front or rear seat: six speeds forward and 
three rev. rse Autoinatic cut-out disconnects pcwer 

,,^ when emereency brake is applied. Regular equipment 

AND EQUIPMENT includes **£xiOe" batteries; standard mpkes or cush- 
^ sion or "special pneumatic electric tires; Klaxet Hcrr : 

"Hull" silk umbrella; non-skid chains; etc. 



Dealer Territory Still Open 

Sales rights for the BORLAND ELECTRIC in the stales of California. 
Nevada Arizona. Oregon. \X/ashington, end Idaho, also in British 
Columbia are under the direction of Henry L. Hornberger. Dealers 
will find it profitable to caL and see the BORLAND ELECTRIC car; 
or, write or wire the address below for particulars of liberal dealers" 
proposition. 

Henry L. Hornberger 

Pacific Coast Station 

1909 Pacific Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



12 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 




I 01 (iicoi'o^x U) MotorUU 

S Gsiflte[r(B(al T[h\©iuigM§ ®f Mam Wlh© IHltai l3®iR\ TTIliKgir© ixgfeir© 1 

5BJl Information concerning any of the articles described in ttiis department may be had by applying at the News Letter office 




NEW PILOT HORN. 

The Pilot horn is mechanically oper- 
ated, dispensing with batteries, wires, 
etc., and there is no other expense in- 
volved than its first cost. It is operated 
by a small, conveniently located hand- 
wheel, a slight turn of which causes a low 
and pleasing tone. The sound may be 
increased to a loud blast by increasing 
the speed of rotation, and the maker 




states that this construction permits a 
wide range of sound as desired. It is 
furnished with brackets for attaching to 
either the right or left hand side of the 
car, and is also made with a straight pro- 
jector and a fore door bracket. The fin- 
ishes are all black, black and brass, 
black and nickel. A design for the steer- 
ing column is constructed, a special 
bracket being made. 

'6 'S 'S 
POLARITY INDICATOR. 

In charging storage batteries, and in 
wiring some circuits, it is essential that 
polarity be observed, and this is not al- 
ways easily determined, as the identifica- 
eion marks may be obliterated. The 
Manhattan polarity indicator which, 
when connected in the circuit, will in- 
stantly detect the negative and positive 




poles. It is very compact, being 3.5 by 
.75 inch, and a nickel plated shell en- 
closes and protects the glass tube from 
injury when carried in the pocket or in 
the tool box. It is made for battery ser- 
vice, also for service with current rang- 
ing from 50 to 600 volts. 



NEW VALVE LIFTER. 

A new valve lifter, which is a U- 
shaped member with integral tapered 
points, has just been put on the market. 
It may be utilized in the conventional 
manner or to compress the springs by 

^1 



The Dalitz spark plug tester and termi- 
nal is a simple device for attachment to 




placing the points between the coils. It 
is operated by a wing-headed screw bolt 
having sufficient leverage to compress 
the spring with a minimum of effort, and 
one of the features of the device is that 
both hands may be used in displacing 
the locking position. The maker states 
that it will fit all types of motors. It is 
moderately priced. 

3^ ?r ?r 

ANTI-RATTLE. 

The Perfect Anti-Rattle, which is de- 
signed to be placed between the door 
and jamb of a motor car body and to 
eliminate existing rattles due to warping 
or faulty fitting of the door, is the latest. 
The device comprises a barrel member 
in which is a spiral spring. The design 



^ss^e:zss^^:s!z:ss:ssss:zss: 



VmmiiIIIIIUMiiiiiiiii h 



p 




^'■- "^ '^ • ^ VV V ' ^ V- " 



also includes a bumper or plunger. The 
barrel is constructed of brass, and fits 
tightly into the hole bored in the door 
jamb. When the door is closed the spring 
pushes the bumper against the door, 
holding it firmly and eliminating, it is 
said, all rattling. 

'S V '6 

SPARK PLUG TESTER. 

The usual method of locating a miss- 
ing cylinder is to short circuit the second 
wire at the spark plug with magneto ig- 
nition or to hold down a vibrator with the 
coil and battery system. When using a 
screw driver for testing, one is likely to 
receive a shock unless care be exercised. 




the plug. It comprises a flat strip of 
metal, having at one end a terminal for 
the reception of the secondary wire, and 
an opening at the other in which is in- 
serted a movable arm of metal. This arm 
is equipped with a non-conducting han- 
dle, preventing any possibility of shocks 
when using the device. To cut out the 
ignition to a cylinder, the movable arm is 
slid downward until its end comes in con- 
tact with the base or shell of the plug. 
This effectually grounds or short circuits 
the current, preventing it from reaching 
the air gap. The device may be utilized 
for a number of other purposes, includ- 
ing that of testing the strength of the sec- 
ondary current. This is performed by 
moving the arm in proximity to the base 
of the plug and noting the intensity of the 
spark. The tester may also be employed 
to note the compression of each cylinder 
when in operation, by the strength of 
the explosion. Another use for the de- 
vice is locking the ignition. This is ob- 
tained by grounding each arm when the 
car is left unattended. 

^ ? ?^ 

NEW TIRE PUMP. 

Power tire pumps on the motor car are 
a valuable addition to the equipment, 
saving as they do the work of pumping 
by hand. A design for model T Ford 




cars, which is driven from the extension 
of the crankshaft of the motor, and is at- 
tached by drilling a single hole, has just 



DliCEMUHH, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINi AND MOTOR LIFE 



13 



been placed on the market. A special 
fan pulley is furnished to replace the 
old member, and it is claimed that the 
power pump may be installed easily. The 
pump cylinder is cast iron, and the pis- 
ton rings are carefully fitted. All bear- 
ings are brass. The pump is operated by 
a rod extending to the front of the radia- 
tor. The company claims it is the first 
pump to be driven from the engine shaft. 
It is moderately priced. 
^ -g '6 

NEW CURRENT INDICATOR. 

A new current indicating device is 
termed the C. O. D.. from its three indi- 
cations, "Charge," "Off" and "Dis- 
charge." It is designed for service with 
electric lighting and motor starting sys- 
tems, and to indicate whether the bat- 
tery is being charged, discharged or the 



Means are provided lor suitably tension- 
ing the spring to ret;ulate the amount of 
air admitted. The principle involved is 
that of atomizing any particles of fuel 
not properly vaporized by the carburetor, 
thus permitting less luel to be used. 
'6 >. '6 

ADJUSTABLE WHEEL PULLER. 

The Ridlon adjusiable gear and wheel 
puller comprises a 12-inch screw with a 
.75 inch standard thread upon which 
travels a 1.5 inch conical block. On each 
of the opposite sides of this block are a 



NEW TALKING HORN. 




generator is inoperative. The device is 
located on the dashboard, and has rec- 
tangular dial opening through which in 
the condition shown appears the word 
"Off." When current flows from the 
generator through the indicator to the 
cells of the battery, the word "Charge" 
immediately appears, no matter how 
slight the rate of current. When the 
battery is called upon to supply electri- 
city to the lamps, for example, the word 
"Discharge" appears. It is claimed that 
no springs, cams, levers, or mechanical 
multiplying means are employed, there 
being but one moving part. The circuit 
through the instrument is of heavy cop- 
per strap of a cross section greater than 
that utilized for the ordinary wiring cir- 
cuit, so that losses are negligible, and 
there is no possibility of a burn-out. 
■<5- ^ '6 

NEW GAS SAVER. 

A device which is stated will save 25 
per cent of the fuel and increase the effi- 
ciency of the motor is the Automatic 
Gasoline Saver. It is utilized with the 
carburetion system, and comprises a 
hollow circular metal member having an 
air inlet at the bottom. A metal ball 
seats in this opening and normally closes 

jfUllilMllllll""" 





A signaling device which presents in- 
teresting features, in that it may be util- 
ized as a signaling horn or to produce 
sounds closely resembling the human 
voice, is the Talking Horn. It resem- 
bles in appearance the conventional types 
of signaling members, but is manually 
operated, a small handle being fitted. 



the aperture by the pressure of a spiral 
spring. The movement of the ball from 
its seat is regulated by the spring and 
by the suction of the piston of the motor. 




pair of pulling arms, retained in posi- 
tion by a shoulder screw. Each arm 
member has nine openings, through 
which the shoulder screw may be placed, 
providing nine different adjustments. 
The pulling arms have a hook end placed 
at an angle of 135 degrees to the long 
section of the arm, so that when the long 
part is at 45 degrees to the screw, the 
hook end will be parallel with it. This 
position allows the hook to bear against 
the gear with its entire face, insuring a 
firm grip. 

"S o o 

l-MHRGENCY SPRING REPAIRER. 

It is decidedly inconvenient to be 
caught on the road some distance from 
home with a broken spring. While tem- 
porary repairs may be effected with 
blocks, etc., considerable care must be 
exercised in the operation of the car. A 
practical device called the Kantalever 
emergency spring repairer, which, when 
applied properly, is stated to be able to 
sustain a broken spring for an indefinite 





When this is moved to certain positions, 
then rotated to the left, it is stated that 
it will talk, producing one of three 
phrases, "Hello Mamma," "O Mamma," 
and "Mamma." The maker of the de- 
vice claims that the resulting effect is 
pleasing to the pedestrians, and that 
sound can be heard for a considerable 
distance. By rotating the handle anti- 
clockwise, a plain sound is produced. 
The positions for the different phrases 
are lettered on a dial under the handle, 
and it is stated that with a little practice 
one can manipulate the handle without 
reference to the marks. The device 
comes finished in brass or nickel to 
match the car. The company also pro- 
duces the O. B. horn, similarly operated, 
but without the talking feature, and one 
adapted to the motorcycle. 
'6 'S '6 

LEAK PROOF PISTON RINGS. 

One of the latest accessories and neces- 
sities to reach the local market is the 
Leak Proof Piston Rings, manufactured 
by McQuay-Norris Manufacturing Com- 
pany. Leak Proof Piston Rings justify 
their name because of their construction 
and performance, which eliminates leak- 
age — two concentric sections, one fitting 
within the other, the opening in each 
section being absolutely closed by the 
flange on the opposite section. The re- 
sult is the only practicable piston ring 



period. The Kantalever may be utilized 
for any type of brake, including that of 
the main leaf near the spring horn, as the 
device is provided with an opening 
through which a bolt may be inserted, 
practically providint: a new horn. The 
repairer can be applied to any broken 
section as suitable .damping bolts, etc.. 
accompany the device. The Kantalever 
is made of 50 point carbon steel, and is 
guaranteed not to break under the strain 
of any car load. 




Piston HE AD PACKING RINGS 



made which is continuous and power 
tight. 

They are in use to-day in over 150.000 
automobiles along in the United States. 
There are hundreds in use in stationary 
and marine gas engines, steam engines, 
street cars, pumps, air and ammonia 
compressors. Leak Proof Piston Rings 
are not an accident, nor an experiment. 
They are built only after years of experi- 
menting. 



14 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 




NEW INNHR SHOE. 
One of the latest accessories to be 
placed on the market, and at the same 
time one of the most useful, is the Sam- 
son and Peerless inner shoe. It is end- 
less in shape and strength, being guaran- 
teed to double the mileage of tire equip- 
ment and pleasure. This new product is 
handled by Jackson-Eno Rubber Com- 
pany. 

■5 '5 'S 

WATCH HIGH TENSION CABLE. 

In some cars, the two longest high ten- 
sion cables running to the spark plugs 
sometimes hang close to, or even touch, 
the hot metal of the cylinders. After a 
time, the insulation becomes inefficient, 
and when the jar of the car brings the 
cable in certain positions, there will be 
a short circuit or no spark. It is usually 
only when the car is in motion that these 
misses occur, and they are thus difficult 
to locate. The remedy for this trouble 
consists in suspending the cables to the 
radiator rod, so that they will not get 
close to the cylinders. 

'S "S 'S 
TO REPLACE WINDOWS. 

When you are called upon to replace 
the celluloid window in your back cur- 
tain, do it in this way. After cutting the 
celluloid to proper size and shape, fasten 
it temporarily in place by pushing pins 
through at each corner. Then button the 
curtain taut, and with a second person on 
the inside to pass the needle through out- 
wardly, sew it in place, using the original 
needle holes as far as possible. 
'6 '6 '6 
TO MIX GAS. 

The factors of maximum fuel economy 
in a gasoline engine are complete gasifi- 
cation of the liquid fuel, a correct propor- 
tion of air with the fuel, and a hot spark. 
The first of these is favored by warming 
the air that goes in to make the mixture. 
A fine meshed wire cloth clamped in the 
joint of the carburetor and intake mani- 
fold will favor fine subdivision of the 



spray from the feed nozzle, and is of 
some advantage. Protecting the intake 
manifold from the cooling effect of the 
fan will also help to make a good mix- 
ture. ■ 

¥ ^ ?r 

TO ADJUST FOOT BRAKE. 

To adjust foot brake, push the pedal 
iLrward about two inches and retain it in 
' I e with a small block of wood. Now 
.len up the turn-buckle until the 
I rakes are snug, and when the block of 
weed is removed, the slack will be cor- 
rect. 

(5 ?r S 

PAINT ON AUTOS. 

Paint on an automobile is not exclu- 
sively for appearance. The protection af- 
forded to wood by paint renders it perma- 
nent in its strength and usefulness for a 
much longer time than could otherwise 
be expected. Its principal function is to 
exclude moisture, which quickly rots the 
wood. Automobile wheels should be 
kept well painted. 

'6- ■& ? 
FUEL TANK. 

A fuel tank of two compartments, one 
for gasoline and one for kerosene, with a 
two-way cock in the feed tube that may 
be easily operated from the seat, will 
make it possible to burn kerosene part of 
the time. If the carburetor is hot-jack- 
eted, and the engine first made hot by the 
use of gasoline, kerosene may be used 
quite successfully. 

■5 V "S 
TO FILL A GREASE GUN. 

To fill the grease gun properly, remove 
the nozzle end, and with the piston clear 
in, push the piston down with the grease 
as you feed it in with a flat paddle of 
wood. If the piston works hard, pull it 
down about one inch, fill the space with 
grease, and then pull the piston down 
another inch and fill again. Repeat until 
it is full. The suction of the piston will 
draw the grease down so that the vacant 
space can be easily filled. 
■5 ?• B 

Nine miles from town, the dry 

cells exhausted, so that they would not 
start the engine, said an automobilist. I 
borrowed the telephone cells of a nearby 
house, started the engine, and returned 
the cells while the engine was running 
idle. 

-S ■3- '5- 

A short piece of rubber garden 

hose makes a good protector for spark 
plugs. 

•» ^ ■8- 

Acetone varnish will restore the 



^ini®®r lFl®(Sjiia©§tts feir Aiinft® 



A number of applicants to Secretary of 
State Olcott, of Oregon, for registration 
of motor vehicles make peculiar requests. 
One application requested a particular 
number running in the hundreds, stating 
it was easy for the applicant to remember 
and represented the cost a month for op- 
erating his first car, the number of miles 
traveled the first year, and the number of 
punctures and blow-outs experienced. 

Another request was for the number 
used by "Old Doc Yaak" on his car. Still 
another applicant said that his car, while 
presumably operated for pleasure, was 
mostly a nuisance. 

The following letter was received by 
the Secretary of State a few days ago : 

"I got about one day's use out of my 
old rattletrap of a runabout — yes, it will 
run about a mile and stop or break some 
of the gearing. 

"So I thought last summer it was to 
high to pay $3 for one day's ride in my 
old car so I walked the rest of the season 
and it isn't fixed up yet or I haven't got 
the repairs from the factory yet I did not 
have the courage or the money to get it 
fixed up, yet some times I have a noshin 
not to fix her up for it is just an old bill 
of expence maby if you would come down 
I might give the old rattletrap to you and 
get read of it — and or maby if I can fix 
her up a little and run her careful and 
maby I can trade it off for a yeler dog or 

a cat." 

?^ ?r ^ 

The proper time to examine and 

adjust push rods is when the engine is 
hot. They should have just enough clear- 
ance to allow the valve to seat firmly 
when it is hot. If adjusted when cold 
the heat expansion may keep the valve 
from seating securely. 

'S" ■& ■& 
"Stockings" for dry cells, made of 



I 



transparency of celluloid windows. 



sections of old inner tubes, protect them 
from short-circuiting influences. 

S -s ^ 

Denatured alcohol, squirted into 

the cylinders when they are hot, and the 
engine run fairly fast for two minutes, 
will clean out the carbon. 

Z -s V 
WHO GETS THE ORDER? 

Some mean man in Seattle has started 
a riot movement of the automobile deal- 
ers of that city. The trouble is all over 
the decision of the city council of Port- 
land, which has appropriated $5,500 for 
the purpose of purchasing an automobile 
to be used in escorting distinguished visi- 
tors about the city. Every dealer is try- 
ing to land the order. 



De(;i:mi'.i;r, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



15 



The idea of national highways, built 
and maintained entirely by the govern- 
ment, has no stauncher advocate than 
Judge J. M. Lowe, of Kansas City, Mo. 
Judge Lowe, who is vice-president of the 
National Highways Association, and 
president of the National Old Rails Road 
Association, the national old trails road 
department of the National Highway As- 
sociation, does not believe that good re- 
sults can be effected by what is known 
as "Federal aid" or "National aid;" least 
of all, by that form of aid which proposes 
that the government appropriations 
should be spent, not on main roads, but 
on roads radiating from railroad stations. 
In a letter to Governor Major, of Mis- 
souri, Judge Lowe says: "If $50,000,- 
000 were appropriated annually, it would 
average about one million to each State 
if distributed equally. 

"If Missouri should get $1,000,000 and 
should distribute it equally to every 
county throughout the State, she could 
build about four-fifths of a mile of hard- 
surfaced road in each county. 

"But there are those in Congress (I do 
not think they are to be found else- 
where) who seem to have a vague notion 
that the thing to do is to make the rail- 
road depot the hub, and radiate from that 
point to reach the farmer's produce ; but 
let's see how that would work: 

"In a great many counties there are 
several lines of railroad. Who will de- 
cide which line to prefer? If all lines 
are to be treated equally, what would 
the result be? 

"Take Missouri for example. She has 
an average of, say, ten depots in each 
county. If each county can build only 
four-fifths of a mile out of each $50,000,- 
000, appropriations were kept up. 

"At that rate, it would take twelve and 
ore-half years to get one mile of road out 
from each depot. 

"The average haul in Missouri is nine 
miles, so it would take 12 years to build 
one road out from each depot to meet the 
requirements of an average haul, and to 
'radiate' in only four directions would 
take 448 years if an appropriation of 
$50,000,000 were made annually. 

"What is the reasonable thing to do? 
And how are we to get roads? If $50,- 
000,000 is appropriated annually for only 
six years, and applied to a system of 
National highways, it will build 30,000 
miles at an average cost of $10,000 per 
mi'e. I believe that this is a reasonable 
estimate for a first-class road. 

"This system could be made to furnish 
an average of two trunk lines, across each 
State and across the continent, and all 
connected with the national capital." 



Umatilla County'- lax levy for road 
purposes is 2V2 mills. As the assessed 
valuation of the pro, -,rty subject to the 
county road tax is about $40,000,000, 
this will provide a fund of $100,000. No 
road districts in this country have made 
special tax levies. 

In speaking of the purposes and plans 
of the court in expending this money. 
County Judge Maloney said: "It is the 
policy of the court to avoid a bond issue 
if possible. We are, therefore, building 
permanent roads just as fast as we can get 
to them. During the past two years we 
have built about 10 miles of macadam 
road each year at an average cost of $5,- 
000 a mile, and we expect to build at least 
10 miles this year. 

"By the end of the month we will have 
spent $118,000 for roads and bridges in 
the country during 1913. There has not 
been a wooden bridge built in the county 
since I have been a member of the court, 
and there will not be one built with my 
consent so long as I am a member. We 
believe there is economy in permanent 
bridges. 

"We constructed 14 steel bridges dur- 
ing 1913. Most of these were small. We 
have our own engineer, do our own ce- 
ment work, and are as well equipped as 
any contracting firm in the country. By 
having our own equipment we are able 
to cut the cost of constructing concrete 
piers and abutments nearly in half. As 
an illustration, the court recently asked 
for a bid on a piece of concrete work. 
The bid was $22 a cubic yard, whereas 
we have been doing the same class of 
work for approximately $6.50 a cubic 
yard. 

"Approximately half of our road fund 
is consumed each year in the repair of 
dirt roads. This work has to be 
done over each year, but there is no way 
to avoid the difficulty until permanent 
roads are constructed. 

"The first ambition of the court is to 
complete the Pendleton State Line High- 
way. This will extend from Pendleton 
through the towns of Adams, Athena, 
Weston, Milton and Freewater, to the 
State line. In addition to the towns 
named, it will pass through a number of 
wheat shipping stations, thereby proving 
a great benefit to the farmers. At pres- 
ent, but 15' 2 miles of the 40 have been 
built. The road now built is in three sec- 
tions. The first section extends from 
Pendleton to Havana station, a distance 
of eight miles. This section is being ex- 
tended daily. The second section is the 
three and a half miles connecting the 
towns of Athena and Weston, while the 



third section extends from the State line 
southward for a distance of four miles. 
We are making the road 14 feet wide, 
and are constructing it of water-bound 
macadam." 

» S 5 

A. A, A. ISftsdts ©IRIksire 

John A. Wilson, of the Pennsylvania 
Motor Federation, has been elected presi- 
dent of the American Automobile Asso- 
ciation, succeeding Laurens Enos of New 
York, who declined a second term. Dr. 
H. M. Rowe, of the Automobile Club of 
Maryland, was advanced to the first vice- 
presidency; R. W. Smith, of Colorado, 
was named as second vice-president; F. 
L. Baker, of California, third vice-presi- 
dent; H. J. Clark, of Minnesota, fourth 
vice-president; and Preston Belvin, of 
Virginia, fifth vice-president. John N. 
Brooks, of Connecticut, continues as sec- 
retary; H. A. Bonnell, of New Jersey, as 
treasurer; and A. G. Batchelder as chair- 
man of the executive board. In the ap- 
pointment of board chairmen. President 
Wilson named the following: Good roads, 
George C. Diehl, New York; legislative, 
C. C. Janes, Ohio; touring, Howard 
Longstreth, Pennsylvania; contests, Wm. 
Schimpf, New York. The executive 
board contains members from practically 
every State. 

The Supreme Court of Wisconsin has 
decided that if a man rides in a motor 
car on the invitation of another, he takes 
the risk for whatever may happen during 
the ride. The decision was made recently 
and reverses the decision of the circuit 
court in the suit of M. J. Hannon, of 
Green Bay, against the Van Dycke Co., 
of Green Bay, for $2,500 damages and 
costs as compensation for two broken legs 
and other personal injuries. The Van 
Dycke Co. hired a touring car to take 
Hannon into the country to inspect a 
farm, which it was offering for sale, and 
on the journey homeward the party met 
with an accident, in which Hannon was 
thrown from the car and badly injured. 

s s s 



There will be a clear saving of $1,000,- 
000 to $1,500,000 to automobile owners 
and a loss of the same sum to the State, 
if the fight against the new auto tax is 
successful. At the office of Attorney- 
General Webb it is said that the elimina- 
tion of the tax provision of the new auto 
law will remove all possibility of a tax 
on motor driven vehicles for the time be- 
ing, as the law contained no saving 
clause. 



16 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 



AMATA 



A Novel By 



J* 



LOUISE E. TABER 
Jiulhor of '"^he Flame" 

Will begin in the January number of OVERLAND 
MONTHLY. The scene of this intensely interesting story 
is laid in San Mateo, a fashionable country residence 
section, some twenty miles south of San Francisco. Those 
readers acquainted with Miss Taber's work will know 
that this new serial grips the attention. 

With the New Year, OVERLAND MONTHLY will 
offer a number of attractive features designed to appeal 
specially to that large group of readers who are interested 
in the WEST and the trend of the dynamic forces now 
completely transforming it through commercial, financial 
and social processes. Events and the LIFE pertaining to 
the GREAT WEST, and that new theatre of WORLD 
WIDE INTEREST, the Eastern countries bordering the 
Pacific, and the Island Groups therein, will be the 
SPECIAL FIELD covered by OVERLAND MONTHLY. 
Whenever obtainable, COPIOUS ILLUSTRATIONS will 
be furnished. If you are interested ''n this line of reading 
blazed by Bret Harte, the first editor of OVERLAND 
MONTHLY, subscribe for it. $1.50 per year. 

A ddress 

OVERLAND MONTHLY 

21 SUTTER ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



December, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZir.;-: AND MOTOR LIFE 



17 




< << <(<^ ( << ( < i <m '> >>y)ym> > >^^ ^ ^ 








i 



^5 



<« c c«c« c c«« 









mM A«8to Slla©w Win IS© A 
Mg Ev©M 

Success is assured the second annual 
battle automobile show, which is to be 
hid in the National Guard Armory on 
hbruary 9th to 14th inclusive. Mana- 
ge William I. Fitzgerald has received 
aplications for every foot of space in 
th huge structure, and when the doors 
an thrown open to the public there will 
beassembled under a single roof the 
mat representative display of automo- 
bile in the history of the Northwest. The 
sucessful show of last year, and the big 
exhoition a few weeks later in Portland 
willbe eclipsed by a wide margin. A 
recoi breaking attendance is predicted. 
Atleast seventy-five automobiles will 
be ehibited in the armory in addition 
to seeral displays of motorcycles, tires 
and atomobile accessories. Upwards of 
fifty iakes will be represented on the 
floor. Vlanager Fitzgerald is bending his 
effortSoward getting as many different 
makes f machines in the show as possi- 
ble, an it will give the persons attend- 
ing anjpportunity to compare all the 
leading jroducts of the industry under 
one roo^ 

To Bize Brier, manager of the Mit- 
chel Le\^ & Staver Company, goes the 
distinction of being the first to sign a 
contract \ space in the second annual 
show. Ti Mitchell factory is anxious 
to particifte, and has arranged to have 
a splendid:xhibit at the Seattle affair. 
Tom Whit^anager of the J. W. Leavitt 
Company, k decided upon his exhibits 
of Overlani and he predicts even 
greater benU than were derived from 
last year's si 

The Metz Wpany's northwest branch 
will display fc sturdy little gearless 
transmission Vs, and also the Glidden 
trophy, whichWs captured by a team of 
three Metz caWn the run from Minne- 
apolis to Glair National Park. Pos- 
session of the \phy carries with it pre- 
mier honors iitouring events of the 
year, and the ciKs bound to draw many 
visitors to the ^vv and the Metz ex- 
hibit. 

The Northwesfeuick Company, dis- 
tributors of the ^k and National cars, 
has decided to gcito the show. Mana- 



ger Eldridge promises an exhibit tnat 
will create no small end of conversation. 

Manager Robert Atkinson, of the Pa- 
cific Car Company, is anxiously awaiting 
the coming of the show, for he has some- 
thing interesting to display in the form 
of the sensational new Hudson light six. 
He also will show a Paige-Detroit model, 
which car is attracting much attention in 
Seattle. 

Manager W. A. Wicks, of the Franklin- 
Wicks Company, was a participant in last 
year's show, and he is so well pleased 
with the results obtained from that event 
that he will exhibit at the February 
show. The new Franklin light six model 
will serve to draw visitors to the Franklin 
booth. The Wicks company recently 
took over the agency for the Stewart 
truck, and that machine will be included. 



Ihe Seattle Automobile Company will 
show its Maxwell "25," the machine that 
has become known in motoring circles as 
the "biggest automobile in the world," 
and also a model of the Stearns, the 
agency for which the firm recently ac- 
quired. 

The Gerlinger Motor Car Company 
will create some splash in the show with 
its Oldsmobile pleasure cars and the Fed- 
eral, Menomimee and Standard trucks. 
The Parker Motor Car Company will 
make its first appearance in the automo- 
bile field, with its Pullman machines. 
They will be here in ample time for the 
show, and should attract considerable at- 
tention. 

The Waterhouse Trading Company will 
exhibit the latest models of the Stude- 
baker pleasure cars and the Lippard- 



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THE KNIGHT TIRE & RUBBER CO.. Canton, Ohio 

HALLIWELL COMPANY 

Pacific Coa>t Distributors 
San Francisco Los Angeles Portland Seattle 



18 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 



Stewart and Garford trucks. The Wash- 
ington Carburetor Company will have an 
interesting display of Cartercars; F. H. 
Bardshar will exhibit his latest models of 
Stevens-Duryea, Cole and King cars; 
the Metropolitan Motor Car Company 
will show its new Kissel pleasure models 
and trucks, while the Abbott Motor Car 
Company will bid for popularity with its 
pretty new Oakland and Marmon cars. 
-g 'S 'S 

©Bymp© IHISglhiWoy 

Within the next two or three years 
there will be opened to traffic a splendid 
highway encircling the Olympic-Penin- 
sula-Washington opening to automobilists 
and nature lovers a vast field of scenic 
wonders. 

Clallam County and the State Highway 
Commission are taking advantage of 
every day of good weather to push con- 
struction work now under way to com- 
pletion. 

The crews are far apart, but they are 
striving toward one end, namely: the 
laying down of a good road from Oiym- 
pia, and encircling the peninsula, pass- 
ing through Shelton, Hoodsport, Ducka- 
bush, Brinnon, Quilcene, Port Angeles. 
Beaver, Forks, Bogachiel, Humptulips, 
Hoquiam, Aberdeen, Montesano, Elma 
and McCleary. 

For the eastern part of the Olympic 
highway between Hoodsport, in Mason 
County, and the Duckabush River, the 
Legislature appropriated $111,814, and 
an additional sum of $9,220 for mainte- 
nance. Active work already is pro- 
ceeding on the eastern portion of the 
route. Honro Camp No. 1, containing 
thirty convicts under charge of Frank 
Randolph, has been operating a little 
more than two months on heavy rock 
work out of Hoodsport. 

It has been decided to allot to the con- 
victs as much work as it is estimated 
they can do by October 1, 1914. This, it 
is expected, will take them through 
Hoodsport to a mile or two north of Lilli- 
waup, a total distance of about seven 
miles. Progress is slow, because the 
highway is blasted out of solid rock. 

About a month ago, contract for nine 
miles of the northern part of the eastern 
wing of the highway was let, and some 
work will be done this winter. As soon 
as the work that the convicts in the honor 
camp can do by next fall is more defin- 
itely estimated, contract for the middle 
portion of the east side division, that 
between the northern end of the convicts' 
work and the southern end of the nine 
mile stretch, will be awarded. The high- 
way commission has just approved plans 
for the portion of the route between 
Sunds Landing and Hama Hama. 



Clallam County is making rapid pro- 
gress with its road programs, for which 
$300,000 was voted some time ago. 
Twelve miles of the Olympic Highway 
near Sequim has just been completed, 
and sixty miles more will be constructed, 
al! to be finished within two years. The 
twelve mile stretch winds about the 
shores of Discovery and Sequim Bays, 
crosses the rich valleys of Sequim and 
Dungeness, and then leads up into the 
Olympics to Lake Crescent, that gem-set 
body of crystal pure water in the heart of 
the snow-capped range. 

For the western wing of the Olympic 
highway from Hoquiam north, the State 



set aside $44,727. It has practically been 
decided to establish a double route be- 
tween Hoquiam and HumptuUips by co- 
operation between the State and Che- 
halic County. The understanding is that 
the State is to improve the road as lo- 
cated on the State Highway Commis- 
sion's map, while the county is to con- 
struct a new and shorter road direct be- 
tween the two points. The new route is 
known as the Hanson road. 

Construction of the Olympic Highway 
means much to the peninsula counties, a 
it will give them a passable route to tb 
Puget Sound country; also it will opei 
a vastly rich scenic touring ground for th 



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"^i I-. A ,. .'-^' 



December, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



19 



motoring devotee. The peninsula abounds 
in rare views of verdant fields, torrential 
glacial streams, towering firs and rugged 
mountain peaks. Its fame is little known 
now, but with the opening of good roads 
that section of the State is destined to 
draw hundreds of touring parties each 
year. 

Automobiles have been driven from 
Seattle to Lake Crescent by way of Ta- 
coma, Olympia and Shelton, but the jour- 
ney's pleasures are somewhat minimized 
by the rough condition of the highway in 
places and by steep grades. Those who 
have made the trip, however, are loud 
in their praises of the grandeur of the 
country, and hail with great delight the 
progress that is being made by the State 
Highway Commissioner's office and the 
crew of Clallam County. 

A number of automobile owners have 
shipped their machines by boat to Port 
Townsend, and toured from that city to 
Port Angeles, and thence to Lake Cres- 
cent. Out of Port Angeles the highway 
is in fairly good shape for about six 
miles, and then comes a long stretch of 
roadway of boulevard smoothness. 

It passes through fertile valleys and 
giant forests to the mighty valleys and 
giant forests to the mighty Elwha River. 
After crossing the raging stream, the 
highway ascends the slopes of the Olym- 



pics to Lake Crescent. From this point 
the road continues in a westerly direction 
to Beaver, and thence south through Jef- 
ferson and Chehalic Counties to Olympia 
— the State capital. 

When the routes now under construc- 
tion are completed, automobilists will not 
have to depend upon boat service, but 
will be able to motor from Seattle to the 
mountain fastness over splendid thor- 
oughfares. 

The new routes are expected to be of 
inestimable value in developing the ex- 
tensive resources of the peninsula coun- 
ties, which are now practically without 
vehicular communiaction with the coun- 
try on the eastern shores of Puget Sound. 
The peninsula contains vast areas of tim- 
ber land and thousands of acres that are 
admirably suited to agricultural and 
dairying purposes. 

TS TS -6 

©voir ftlb© Sfis&SyiSBn Monimilamis 

The contract for the construction of the 
Siskiyou Mountain section of the Pacific 
Highway has been awarded. The work 
included in the contract, which was 
awarded, will be grading of the road be- 
tween the California line and Medford, 
a distance of 13 miles, and it will also be 
macadamized. 

The work included in the Central Point 



project will be the paving of three miles 
of road; bids for this work were rejected. 
The following is the engineer's estimate 
for quantities on the Siskiyou road: 134,- 
428 cubic yards of earth excavation; 21.- 
804 cubic yards loose rock, 43,412 cubic 
yards solid rock; 13,913 square rods 
clearing and grubbing; 4,036 lineal feet 
12-inch corrugated iron pipe; 40 lineal 
feet 180 inch corrugated iron pipe; 576 
lineal feet 24-inch corrugated iron pipe; 
593 cubic yards concrete, class A; 89 
cubic yards concrete, class C; 70,000 
pounds reinforced steel 
15 Z S 

• -^ Coianmfty IR.ot'fe 

)unty has many good roads, 
but it needs and wants more. Roughly 
estimated, there has been spent much 
more than $1,000,000 on roads in the 
county within the last fifteen years, and 
while some of this has gone for repairs, 
the bulk of it was for pushing the nose of 
better transportation into country that be- 
fore was isolated at least part of the year. 

There are 3,000 miles of roads in the 
county, and most of them are in good con- 
dition, either naturally or through the 
work of man. The same figures will ap- 
ply, only to a much lesser extent, in Har- 
ney and Grant Counties, adjoining Baker 
County. 

The two bordering counties are as anx- 



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20 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1918. 



ious to develop their roads, but they are 
less thickly settled, and therefore have 
not the funds, nor the use, for the roads, 
that Baker County has. 

Waterspouts played havoc with some 
roads in all three counties this spring, but 
especially so in Harney and Grant Coun- 
ties, one automobile party from here 
having many narrow escapes from bad 
road accidents last June in going through 
Harney and Grant Counties. 

Naturally, this repair work has taken 
away from the active campaign for build- 
ing good roads, for out of the road fund 
several bridges had to be built. Baker 
County is preparing for the future by in- 
stalling steel bridges wherever feasible. 

Six were built this year at a cost of 
about $25,000, while of the other $30,000 
spent here, much of it went for repairs. 
Consequently, the County Commission- 
ers have little funds for additional road 
building this year, according to County 
Judge Peter Basche. 

One road that lies in Grant County, 
but which Baker County opened, was in 
the Granite District, because the business 
all came to Baker, and therefore Grant 
County did not wish to improve, because, 
it argued, that the road was of less bene- 
fit to the people across the line than to 
Baker County. 

While the waterspouts did their dam- 
age in the extreme western part of the 
county, they did little harm to those in 
the remainder, and Baker County roads 
are always praised by automobilists when 
traveling through here. They speak es- 
pecially high of the road between here 
and La Grande, saying it is one of the 
best in this part of the country. 

This has made Baker City interested in 
the highway along the Columbia River 
from Portland to The Dalles, because the 
people believe that it will open a way for 
automobilists to come into this country, 
which can now not be done unless cars 
are transported from Portland to The 
Dalles. And Baker County is always in- 
terested in any plan to bring people 
here, because it is anxious to let people 
see what is here. 

Another reason that Baker County 
wants good roads is because it wants bet- 
ter transportation. The railroads are 
slow to enter certain parts, especially into 
the fruitful Eagle and Pine Valleys, and 
the people feel that until that time the 
auto truck can care for the needs. If auto 
truck service can be established, it will 
save hours and dollars in hauling freight 
and passengers between Baker, the 
county seat, and the parts 100 miles 
away. 

The county has connected Pine and 
Eagle Valleys with a road, 14 miles long. 



and at a cost of $15,000 through the 
mountains. It is the Sag Road, famous 
for its steep grades and good condition in 
all parts of the year, and is used by six- 
horse freight teams and every kind of 
vehicle up to the automobile, but at 
the expiration of four years it is in as 
good condition as at first. This is be- 
cause the road was dug out of solid rock 
and needed no dressing. 

Most of the roads are of gravel or 
crushed stone, and the road supervisors 
have a friendly rivalry in making their 
own the best, so that they may be kept in 
good condition. 

In all parts of the country there are 
many good roads. They are required not 
only for the farmers, but the mines, which 
are in all parts, and the mining industry 



is recognized as worthy of fostering. 
Many of the mines have built roads of 
their own, which has helped the general 
condition. The Ben Harrison mine is 20 
miles from a railroad, and therefore made 
a good road, and is installing an auto 
truck of the caterpillar type for freight- 
ing. The Gem mine is putting in a five- 
ton truck to run between Baker and 
Sparta, a distance of 40 miles. The lum- 
ber companies have built into their 
camps many serviceable roads, all of 
which join with the general road system. 
The good roads problem's importance 
is fully realized here, and the people are 
always asking for more. It has been 
generally talked of as having good roads 
days, similar to those in Missouri and 
Arizona. This city, people have been es- 



"This top looked shabby and leaked like a sieve — $50 was the price of 
a new one, but rny neighbor told me how, a year ago, he made his top 
clean and waterproof as new — for ONLY a $S bill. Now you see 



I'M SAVING $45 




RUB-R-TITE cir 

RENEWS AND REWATERPROOFS = 



any worn and leaky top Leather or Imitation Leather. 

RUB-R-TITE is a scientific laboratory product. Neither sun, storm 
or folding will cause it to peel, crack, blister or rot. If occasionally used 
(reduced) it prolongs the life and wearing qualities of any top indefinitely. 

It is applied with a brush, easily and quickly. It dries quickly. It 
is economical— $1.50 to $S renews a top (cost depends on size and kind 
of material.) 

Every Can Guaranteed to Satisfy or Money Refunded 

RUB-R-TITE and other Rub-On Auto Aids are carried in stock by most dealers. Send 
(or FREE samples of work and information today — NOW — Lest You Forget. 

CHANSLOR &. LYON COMPANY 

VAN NESS AND SUTTER. SAN FRANCISCO 
San Franciaco Oakland Fresno Lo» Angeles Seattle Spokane Portland 



I 



LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LIGHTING SYSTEM 



630 Van 



GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Coast Agents 
Ness Avenue ::::;:: 

CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 



San Francisco 




PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 
We Sell on Easy Terms 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model— 



'rouriiitf Care 
lUinatiouts 
Tow 11 <'ars - 



Price 

- f>(l(l 



AMERICAN 



American Motors California Co. 

476-482 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Pricos F. (). B. Factory 
Models 
■122 1 CyUiider. 2 Pnssonger 
M'2. CyliiukT. 2 I'lissi'iiKer 
(ill (t (^^ylhider, 1 Passt'iiger 
r.ir. ('. CyliiuiiT. Ti PassiMiffcr 





Prices 


■A) n. I". 


1 1550 


CM n. r. 


2760 


rti H. r. 


■2750 


CO II. I'. 


■.'950 



December, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZIKli AND MOTOR LIFE 



21 



pecially in favor of the plan because they 
say that it will not only make better 
roads, but it will give them an opportu- 
nity to show the farmers that they are 
willing to join, and thus are interested 
in the development of the county as well 
as the city. 

Another road that Baker is anxious to 
see developed is that from Prairie City, 
in Grant County, to Long Creek. They 
now have to go over 30 miles to Heppner, 
but if the road is built, they can be within 
14 miles of the railroad at Prairie City, 
and thus easily reach Baker. 



The correct principle for a shock ab- 
sorber is resistance to the upward motion 
of the spring, but no resistance to the 
downward motion. This may be accom- 
plished by attaching a broad and strong 
strap to the frame of the car, have it pass 
underneath the axle and forward to a stiff 
coiled spring as nearly horizontal as 
possible. When the weight depresses the 
springs the coiled spring draws up the 
strap, and when the body of the car rises 
the friction of the strap around the axle 
retards the action. 



When an amateur driver shifts his gear 
the excess of sound makes an expert 
smile. To shift gears noiselessly, release 
the clutch to its fullest extent, then push 
the change gear lever with a quick, jabby 
motion until the gears go in. Do not 
slowly push the lever into position. This 
causes the teeth of the gear wheels to 
strike and be thrown back, and each ap- 
proach repeats the noise. The expert 
endeavors to secure co-ordinate speed of 
the gears before trying to throw them 
into mesh. 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing worn out Bearingrs with th« world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. All sizea carried tn stock 



..-— AwK 




rnciiic ('oust iMsinl.iitoi-s 



CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

Sun Francisco Onklmi.t Krosno Los Amtcli-s PorllBnd Seattle Spokane 



Of" -ff^ iiip(,tj'^0 C^sd^)(r/ Coi'/P^t// 1^ ju^r -rne: 
OA/f YeilJ ^i)>if. 



Phono Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co.. Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San iviateo 
County is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 
THE lARCEST r.ROUNI) FLOOR KiREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 1865 
Announces the removal of their Offices and Factor)- to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

Between California and Sacramento Sta. 
Phone Prospect 30 

Where their entire attention will be devoted to the prompt delivery- of 
the best work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 



EMPIRE 

IVlodel 31 
••The Little Aristocrat" 

Completely Equipped $950 



The Complelcly Equipped Empifc ive- 
pBUcnget touring car $950^E^uipmrol 
include! Mohair Top and Top Envelope, 
Demountable Rimt, Rear Double Tire 
lioni, Exlia Rim», Accelerator. Wind- 
•hicld. PreH-O-Ule lank. Horn and 
Sp*'*-^iom*H'^. 

The Empirt HuloinQbiH Co inCumpil s. U S > 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in Unll»d StBtea. Canada and Europe 



>ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 

PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 Cilifomia Street, 



San Franciic« 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The Newa Letter recommenda tiie following oaragea, hotels and supply 
houiea. Tourltti will do well to cut thia Mat out and keep It aa a guide: 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at UETCHICR'S New Garage for flrat-claaa aervlca. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garase next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE. — Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North I' irst street. The beat French 
dinner in California. 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties (Iven 
particular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE. 443 Emmerson SL Tel.. P. A. 
33S. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries In stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

PETALU M A.— PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 
«- Murphy. Props. Cor. Third and C Sts: Phono Main 3. Automobiles; 
gener.-U machine work and ge.ar cutting: supplies, repairing, auto livery; 
lubricating oil and gasoline: the care and charging of storage batteries. 



Phoof 
MariiFl 6370 



PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



42 Via Nni 

AvFaoc 



HOTEL VENDOME 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Headquarters for Automobilists touring the beautifu 
Santa Clara Valley. 

American and European Plan. Reasonable Rates. 



AUTO FENDER & RADIATOR WORKS 

Mai\e and Repair 

Fenders, Radiators, l-loods, Metal Bodies, Tanks. 

Dasl^ Shields, Lamps, Mud Pans. Tool 

Boxes. Metal Spinning. Etc. 



466 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Frani^iin 6460 



32-34 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Market 6409 



22 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 



Th(B IM@w ^(SiffiKalkir f®ir Hf 114 



We're Tna.rketing a nt-w sUindard of automobile 
s itist'artion in a way that leaves no room for 
doulpt and Kives each buyer an intelligent know- 
ledgt- of wherein the Chandler, point-by-point, 
surpasses any other car for low first cost and 
low upkeep. 

Rather than follow tlie ordinary way of en- 
thusing over the beaxitiful appearance and re- 
linenients of the Chandler Li^ht Weig:ht Six. we 
h.iiid you, at your request, a PROOF SHEET, 
will) fiO questions on it. and the answers filled in 
for the Chandler. Spact-s are left for fourteen 
other ears so that you or your dealer can fill 
in the corresponding answers for the other cars 
and then note by direct, unfailing comparison, 
how the Chandler represents a greater collection 
of advantages than embodied In any of the other 
cars. 

And you won't have to carry these things in 
yo\n- head to forget them or be confused by them 
and you won't have to worry about the claims 
and counter claims of rival dealers or be misled 
by subtle knocks or imposed upon with glitter- 
ing generalities. Make 'em prove it — that's all. 
Send for the PROOF SHEET. 

Either write or call at onet — and, at the same 
time, let us demonstrate the Chandler and give 
you an exhilarating, enlightening experience 
with its impressive flexibility, easy riding, lux- 
ury and economy. 

Less than a year ago. when we made the 
Chandler a sensation by basing automobile 
economy on the only scientific basis — weight — 
we knew that we would have imitators. 'J'hen 
the Chandler was alone in this regard — but 
others to-day are trying to follow. Only correct 
scales can be depended on for the correct weight 
of any car — verbal estimates miss the mark from 
200 to 700 pounds. We guarantee the Chandler 
to be only 2.879 pounds, shipping weight, fully 
etjuipped. 

One of the purposes of our PROOF SHEET is 
to help you to get this weight question right. 
I>on't risk your car economy on guesses. It has 
51) other important purposes because the Chand- 
ler has 60 distinct advantages, all of which can- 
not be found in any other one car. And these 
60 advantages do not include incidentals like 
Thermos Bottles or Tire Inflators, but big. vital 
features, some of which can be duplicated only 
on the highest priced cars. 

Can you see in your mind this handsome 
streamline Chandler, light weight obtained by- 
using pressed steel and aluminum^ with a motor 
which cannot be obtained in any other ear. 
running 
1360 Miles — at 17 1-6 miles a gasoline gallon — on 

7 quarts of oil. 
or being driven from Cleveland to Cedar Rapids. 
Iowa, on high gear only? These are only two 



(if hundreds of sensation;il Chandler records 
made during the last year. 

The Chandler, at 35 h. p.. develops 3 to 55 
miles per hour on high, and tames hills like 
valleys, turns in 37-foot radius, and pulls out of 
streams and hub-deep mudholes under its own 
electric power. 

While you are waiting to see your Proof Sheet 
look carefully over these Chandler Specifications. 
If you have ever driven a car. they will tell you 
the Chandler must be considered seriously if you 
ai'f in thf mark't. 

Not a Single Experimental, Untried. Doubtful 
Feature. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

LEFT SIDE drive— CENTER CONTROL. 

WHEEL BASE— 120 inches. 

ROAD CLEARANCE— 10 1-2 inches. 

WHEELS artillery type — 34x4 inches Firestone 
demoL n table ritns. 

MOTOR — Chandler Six Cylinders, 35 h. p. 
3 3-£x5 inches. "L" Head type. Cylinders cast 
in two blocks. Valve enclosed. 

OILING — Positive-gear pump in oil-base. Oil- 
gauge on motor -base. 

IGNITION — Bosch High -Tension Magneto. 

CARBURETOR— Stromberg "Little Six" Hot- 
air and dash priming attachments. 

SELF-STARTER— Westinghouse Electric built 
into motor. 

COO LI NG — Centrifugal pump. Mayo genuine 
Mercedes type Honey-comb Radiator. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTING— Westinghouse Elec- 
tric lighting Generator with large storage bat- 
tery. Solar lamps, illuminated license-bracket. 

CLUTCH — Multiple disc. Raybestos and steel 
ball ■ bearing. 

TRANSMISSION — Three speeds forward and 
reverse. F & S imported ball bearing. 

REAR AXLE — Floating type. F <£, S imported 
ball -bearing. 

STEERING GEAR— Irreversible and adjust- 
able. 

GASOLINE SYSTEM— 20 gallon tank in rear. 
Gasoline gauge. 

STREAM LINE BODY — Five passenger coach 
type. 

UPHOLSTERING— 10-inch cushions. High- 
grade tufted leather. High grade springs. 

WIND-SHIELD — Built in without rods or 
braces. Adjustable for rain vision or ventila- 
tion. 

TOP — Mohair top with "Jiffy" curtain. 

HORN — Genuine motor -driven electric. 

JONES SPEEDOMETER. 

CLOCK — 8-day New Haven. 

COLOR AND FINISH — Bodies, wheels, frame 
and running gear finished in handsome dark 
blue with silver stripe. Fenders, hood and 



cowl black. All hardware, lamps and fittings 
nickeled. 

You can get equally light weight in other cars 
for less money, but you cannot get Chandler 
power, flexibility and quality. At a higher price 
it is impo.ssible to get light weight and Chandler 
economy of upkeep. The Chandler is probably 
the lightest ear of its size and power ever built, 
and yet as strong as a car can be made. The 
t'handler offers you the flexibility of a Six with 
tlie ecoiiom>' of the most '(onomiial Fours. 

Built by Men Who Krow. 
This organization has had nearly a decade nf 
experience in the building of world-famous 
sixes, Seven yeais before the Chandler was 
produced these men were building Sixes, 
an 1.1 when they produced the Chamller Light 
Weight Six it represented their most sea- 
soned judgment, which has l;een borne out by 
the events of the year past in the automobile 
world. Tliese men are - 

F. C. CHANDLER, former Vice-President. Gen- 
eral Manager and Director Lozisr Motor Co. 

C. E. EMISE. former Sales Manager and Direc- 
tor. Lozier Motor Co. 

W. S. M. MEAD, former Foreign Sales Manager 
and Director. Lozier Motor Co. 

S. REGAR. former Treasurer and Director, Lo- 
zier Motor Co. 

J. V. WHITBECK, former Engineer, Lozier Mo- 
tor Co. 

C. A. CAREY, former Purchasing Agent, Lozier 
Motor Co., Assistant Purchasing Agent, Ford 
Motor Co. 

J. R. HALL, former Manager supply, repair and 
service departments, Lozier Motor Co. 

The Chandler will always be a year ahead of 
all the so-called Light Weight Sixes now ap- 
pearing — they can never catch up. You do not 
want to pay for experimenting. Send for our 
PROOF SHEET now— or call— and find how not 
only first cost, $178.5, but upkeep is lowest in the 
Chandler, especially when the whole 60 advan- 
tages are compared point by point with any 
other automobile. 

^ ^ ^ 



There has been brought out a trouble 
light attachment which is designed for 
service with the standard model lighting 
switch, providing a means for attaching 
an inspection light without any addi- 
tional wiring. The lamp is operated by 
a simple socket and plug connection. 



AUTO OWNERS 

Why take chances on your Ignition? Insist on using 

RAJAH PLUGS 



Do you know Rajah Plugs cost 
supply-houses three times as much 
as the cheap ordinary plugs? 

Some reason for their boosting the 
plug which pays them the long 
profit. 

Why are all these plugs similiar in 
appearance to the "Rajah?" 

They all know that 

"Rajah ^eans Quality" 

Insist on the Genuine 



Hughson & Merton, 



INC. 



580 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Fran».'isco 



Keenan Brothers 



Machinists 

and 
Eng-ineers 



AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 
A SPECIALTY 



350 GOLDEN GATE AVE., bet. Hyde and Larkin Sts. 

PHONES 
Franklin 6823 Homs J 9012 



December, 1913. 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



23 



FORD SEAT COVERS 




SEAT COVERS ! ''°'''''^^ ''"^ 

[ ROADSTERS $17.50 



A SET 



Equip your car with our Auto-fabric seat covers, 
trimmed with StC' ling leather and give it the same 
nobby appearance as a high priced car. Our seat 
covers are absolutely waterproof and save the 
leather upholstery on a ne\v car and cover up the 
worn parts on old cars, thereby adding to the appear- 
ance of your car and making it very easy to keep 
the upholstery neat and clean. 

This is an opportunity to secure a high grade set 
of seat covers at a hitlierto unheard 'of price and 



every Ford owner shoi^ld take advantage of our 
offer at once. Our seat covers are all bound with 
Sterling leather, while the arms are trimmed in 
genuine Patent Leather ihe same as furnished on 
seat covers costing up to $7.5. OC) a set. 

TO rORD DEALERS 

Who have not yet taken up our Ford seat cover 
proposition — read the above story — the dcBcripljcn 
spells QUALITY all the way through, and it ought 
to con\ince you that you can sell Ford seat covers. 



HUGHSON & MERTON, mc 

DISTRIBUTORS 

530 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco, Cal. 



THE LONG HORN 




A powerful warning signal. All the effect of an electric horn 
but, NONE of the EXPENSE. 

MECHANICALLY OPERATED 

No batteries to keep charged; no wires or connections to break. 
It is there when you need it. TRY ONE. If not satisfied after 
5 days use, return it and get your money back. 

REGULAR TYPE— All Nickel. $20; Black ind Nickel. $IS; Black 

and Brass. $IS. 
JUNIOR TYPE All Nickel. $12; Black and Nickel $11: Black 

and Brass. $11. 
MOTORCYCLE TYPE-All Nickel, $10. 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

HUGHSON & MERTON, Inc. 



530 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco 



Mr. Motorist 
Why Don't You Use 




Isn't a Reduction in Tire Expense 
of 30%, worth considering? That 
is what our guarantee of 5,000 
miles versus the usual 3,500, 
means. 

Figure it out, take list price of a 
34 X 4 tire $32 and divide that 
sum by 5,000, then 3,500, the 
two guarantees. Now figure on 
a basis of four tires and the mile- 
age you average each month; isn't 
that saving worth considering ? 



HUGHSON & MERTON, Inc. 



530 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 



Otkljad Distnhulon 

PEART & ELKINGTON 
12th & Telegrraph 



24 



MOTORING MAGAZINE AND MOTOR LIFE 



December, 1913. 



Logan W. Page, chief of the office of 
public roads of the department of agri- 
culture, is bending every energy to im- 
press upon the people of the country that 
maintenance and effective repair are of 
equal importance with the actual im- 
provement of bad roads. Investment of 
money in new roads does not become real 
economy until provision is made for keep- 
ing these new roads in condition after 
they are built. If a new road was built 
and then allowed to fall into disrepair, 
much of the original investment is sim- 
ply wasted. 

Quite frequently the office of public 
roads, when called upon for assistance by 
the various States points out that road 
building is an art based on a science, and 
that trained men and experienced men 
are necessary to secure the best results 
from the expenditure of road funds. 

Statisticians have figured out that al- 
though the average expenditure on the 
improvement of roads exceeds $1,000,- 
000 a day, a large portion of it is wasted 
because of the failure to build the right 
type of road to meet local requirements 
or the failure to provide for the continued 
maintenance of the improvement. 

During the past six months the various 
States and counties have taken a greater 
interest in road improvement than ever 



before in the history of the United States, 
and there is now a strong movement to 
conserve the roads of the country when 
they are improved. The latest evidence 
of this interest is in the enthusiasm with 
which nearly 400,000 men and boys re- 
sponded to the proclamation of the Gov- 
ernor of Mississippi, setting apart two 
days for work on the roads. 
^ -& ^ 

Some time ago the Rajah Auto Supply 
Company, of Bloomfield, New Jersey, 
brought action against the Rex Ignition 
Manufacturing Company of New York 
City for infringement. It was charged 
that the Rex Company had been selling 
porcelain parts with the knowledge that 
they were to be used in Rajah plugs. The 
court enjoined the Rex Company and 
recognized the Rajah's right to specify 
what porcelain should be used in Rajah 
plugs. The judge's opinion set aside the 
contention of the Rex Company that he 
did not know that the porcelain was to be 
used in Rajah plugs. 

The Rex people contended that the 
license covering the sale of Rajah plugs 
is null and void, and therefore that it has 
an absolute right to sell Rex porcelain 
even with the knowledge that the pur- 
chasers intended to use them in Rajah 
plugs. 



This was also denied, as the court ruled 
that although the Rajah Company might 
not control the price of its goods, yet 
at the same time could control the pro- 
duct after it had left their hands, inas- 
much as parts could not be substituted 
and used or sold under the Rajah license. 

Hence it is that an injunction was 
granted of a preliminary order with a 
good possibility of it being made perma- 
nent. 

^ ?r ?r 

Cuts in the tread of a tire should be 
repaired "instantly." The little gasoline 
vulcanizer that is now to be found in al- 
most all tool kits can be used easily to get 
good results. Jack up the wheel, and 
while the gasoline is burning in the vul- 
canizer, clean out the cut thoroughly with 
gasoline, scraping it well with the blade 
of a pocket-knife, and filling with shreds 
of unvulcanized rubber tissue wet with 
cement. When the vulcanizer has be- 
come hot, place it on the ground under- 
neath the wheel, and unjack the wheel so 
that the place to be vulcanized shall rest 
on the vulcanizer and the weight of the 
car furnish the pressure. In thirty min- 
utes the wheel will be ready for use, but 
if left all night it will be a more perma- 
nent job. 



SAFETY FROM SKIDDING AND PERFECT TRACTION 

On any Roads are Offered Without Ultimate Expense 
in the Woodworth Treads 

Woodworth Treads are without an equal as an anti-skid and 
traction device : they need to be put on only once to furnish you 
an equipment for thousands of miles of running: they are prac- 
tically puncture-proof, and they protect the tires from all out- 
side injury and wear, so that if used over good tires kept prop- 
erly inflated, they prolong the life of the tires enough to pay 
more than their cost. 

In other words, you get a perfect traction device, you get 
safety from skidding accidents and punctures not only without 
ultimate expense, but with an actual saving over the cost of bare 
tires. 

But putting a set of Woodworth Treads on, you will be pre- 
pared for any roads you encounter. You will prevent the danger 
of having to repair punctures in bad weather and your tires will 
be practically as good when the treads are worn out as when 
they are put on, provided, of course, they are good and strong 
and properly inflated. 

Woodworth Treads are sold by the CHANSLOR & LYON 
CO., at San Francisco and at all their branches. 

Send for full information to the 

LEATHER TIRE GOODS COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK 




EQUIPMENT OF 
YOUR CAR 

MEANS "EVERYTHING" when comfort 
and convenience are considered 

TIRE HOLDERS serviceable and attract- 
ive. 

HIND VIEW MIRRORS show the road and 
prevent accidents from rear end collisions 

ROBE RAILS FOOT RESTS TIRE LOCKS 

LICENSE PAD HOLDERS 

All necessary for the Auto 



E. H. WHITEHOUSE MFG. COMPANY 

Newark, N. J. 



A FULL STOCK AT 



Chanslor & Lyon Co. 

1238 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 



The Lining That 
Forces Brakes 
To Make Good 




REG. Mm U.3. pat. off 
THE ORIGINAL AND BEST ASBESTOS BRAKE LINING" 



It Makes Brakes (irip. 
It Insures Vour Safety. 

Will Not Wear Out— Can 
Not Burn Out. It Made 
The Automobile Safe. 

RAVBKSrOS is Made of 
Lonf; Fibre Asbestos 
Specially Treated. It is 
Oil-I'roof and Water- 
Proof. The Name is 
Stamped on Kvery Foot 
For Vour Protection. 



THE ROYAL EQUIPMENT CO. 

Bridgeport. Conn. 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

Ssn KranciT.i Oakland \.n\ \f\^y\rs Fre*no Sraillr Spokanr PortlarJ 




HARRIS 



SAVE MONEY— because you require a smaller quantity 
than you do when using inferior 
lubricants. 



ti^ADE MARK REG. U.S. PAT OFF. 

OILS 

ADD TO EFFICIENCY— because they are all lubrication. No waste, no injurious 

matter, nothing to harm the engine. 

INCREASE POWER — because they give perfect lubrication. The engine runs 

smoothly. All frictional parts are coated with a film 
of lubricant. 



Prove It. 



Try HARRIS OILS. 



See for yourself the big improvement in your engine. 



A. W. HARRIS OIL CO. 

326 S. Water St.. Providence. R. I. 143 No. Wabash Ave . Chicago. IlL 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

Los Angeles San Francisco Oakland Seattle Spokane Fresno Portland 




«■ 1, 



^a. Lit 



Distributors for 

HEATH 

COATS 



LENIGAN 

SUITS 




The Motorist 



will do well from a 
fashionable, economical and serviceable standpoint 
to look into the merits of the suits and overcoats 
/ we have especially provided for his use. They are 

intelligently adapted to his requirements by makers who specialize on 
automobile clothing. 

The chief essentials embodied in our automobile clothes are warmth, 
strength in construction, shape permanency and attractive stlye. Price 
moderation is of course characteristic in these clothes, as in all of our 
offerings. 

Suits, ^Ttie S^fllb Overcoats, 



$20 to $50 



Chas.Kcilus firCo.dnc.) 

726- MARKET STREET 



$20 to $75 



Bill 



1