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Full text of "Mount"

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What is a puzzle? A puzzle unsolved is a chal- 
lenge; a puzzle complete is an achievement. Life is 
a puzzle. Putting its pieces together — not just any 
way, but the right way — is a challenge. 

During our years at the Mount we work at this 
puzzle by assimilating the correct spir tual, intellec- 
tual and social experiences so that we may become 
the women we are meant to be. 

Through the pages of MOUNT '59 our experi- 
ences are relived in pictures and words so that the 
challenge which we accept — the achieving of 
Christian womanhood — will be demonstrated. 



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^Dedication 

The Senior Class of 1959 
dedicates MOUNT '59 

to the memory of Pius XII, Pope of 
Peace, with the hope that our work to 
order the world of our own lives will 
be reflected in a world order — a world 
peace. 



faculty P<zye6 

Studies Paye 20 

/tctiutftet , , , , Pa^e36 

tf,*€idu<xte& . . . < Pa$e ttO 





Almost beginners in puz- 
zle solving, we needed help. 

With the guidance and in- 
struction of the Faculty we 
shaped the framework of 
our puzzle. 



7 "*** 



' 



^acutfy 




Sister Rose Gertrude 
President 



Sister Alice Marie 
Academic Dean 



Sister Mary Annette 
Treasurer 




Reverend James O'Reilly 
Chaplain 



You came to college and were surprised that the 
faculty soon knew your name and always had a 
friendly hello. 

You learned that knowledge was not all they 
could impart to you. Educators in all fields, the 
faculty is ever aware that the salvation of your 
soul is their most important subject. 




Sister Mercia Louise 
Dean of Women 



Sister Mary Germaine 
Dean of Graduate School 



Sister Mary Berenice 
Dean of Resident Students 




W**m 




\Kjtr 




Health Service, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Dr. William I. Dean, Sister 
Genevieve Marie, Dr. R. Britt 
Dalby. 



Library Staff, LEFT to RIGHT: Mrs. Danuta Kaczynski, Sister Mary Vivian, Sister 
Catherine Anita, Mrs. Mary Bubien, Mrs. Ruth Thomas. 



10 





Department of English, LEFT to RIGHT, Standing: Sister 
Patricia Clare, Sister St. George, Sister Thomas Bernard, 
Sister Mary Laurentia. Seated: Sister Marie de Lourdes, 
Sister Mary Patricia. 




Department of Drama and Speech, LEFT 
to RIGHT: Mr. Joseph S. Morton, Mr. Dale 
O'Keefe. 



Department of Economics and Business 
Administration, LEFT to RIGHT: Mrs. Ethel 
B. Keithley, Sister Catherine Therese, Dr. 
Bernard Bierman. 



11 







Department of Art, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Miss Nina Shepherd, Sister Mary 
Ignatia, Mr. David Cressey. 



Department of Biological Sciences, LEFT to RIGHT: Sister Margaret 
Marie, Miss Carol Doyle, Miss Marie Zeuthen, Sister Gertrude 
Joseph, Mr. James Fonseca, Mr. Hisao Arai. 





Department of Modern Languages, LEFT to RIGHT: Mrs. 
Mary Valis Rejlek, Sister Aline Marie, Sister Eloise Therese, 
Sister Hildegarde. 



Department of Mathematics, LEFT to RIGHT: Sister Rose 
Gertrude, Reverend James O'Reilly, Sister Margaret Leo. 





Department of Home Economics, 
LEFT to RIGHT: Mrs. Sybil Line, 
Miss Grace Trumbo, Sister Cecile 
Therese. 



Department of Music, LEFT to RIGHT: Mr. Matt Doran, Mr. Joseph 
Rottura, Dr. Will Garroway, Sister Celestine, Sister Timothy, Mr. Paul 
Salamunovich, Miss Margaret Stromer, Mrs. Helena Gerard, Sister 
Miriam Joseph. Seated: Mr. Pattee Evenson. 





Department of Nursing, Above, LEFT to 
RIGHT: Sister John Bernard, Dr. Jessie 
Rhulman, Sister Richard Joseph, Mrs. Mar- 
lene Hermer, Miss Eloise King. At Right, 
BACK ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: Mrs. June 
Konrad, Miss Marjorie Cogan, Miss Anne 
Wiebe, Sister Albert Mary, Miss Mildred 
Grafford, Mrs. Betty Williams. Seated: 
Sister Mary Rebecca. 



Department of Music: 
Reverend John P. Cremins 





Department of Psychology: 
Dr. M. John Schumacher 



15 



Department of Classical Languages: 
Sister Mary Germaine. 





Department of Philosophy: Sis- 
ter Cornelia Mary, Mr. Patrick 
Hughes. 



Department of Physical Sciences, LEFT to RIGHT: Sister Alice 
Marie, Miss Carol Doyle, Reverend James O'Reilly, Mrs. 
Alice Crilly, Sister Cecilia Louise. 




Department of Sociology and 
Social Welfare: Mrs. Barbara 
Stapleford, Sister John Mar- 
garet. 



Monsignor Patrick J. 
Dignan, Department of 
History. 





Department of History, LEFT to RIGHT: Sister Rose Catherine, Sister Agnes 
Bernard, Reverend John Courtney, M.H.F., Sister St. Francis, Sister St. Claire. 




17 




Department of Education, LEFT to RIGHT: Dr. F. Roman Young, Sister Mar- 
garet Clare, Sister Rose de Lima, Miss Doris Schiffilea, Sister Mary Hortensia. 



Reverend Michael Cody, C.M.F. 
Department of Theology. 



Reverend Denis Meehan, Depart- 
ment of Theology. 



18 




r*rC' 






Miss Delores Blackstone, 
Department of Physical 
Education. 



Miss Joan Ferguson, De- 
partment of Physical Edu- 
cation. 





1 



Department of Theology, LEFT 
to RIGHT: Reverend Kevin 
Wall, Reverend Joseph 
Kenney. 



19 



Arts and sciences join the 
core of the puzzle — you. Key- 
shaped curiosity opens the 
golden doors to discovery, 
creativity, and satisfaction. 



20 




Studied, 



21 



i mm 





& 



aeuce 



Students listen intently as Father 
O'Reilly illustrates Charles' Law of 
Constant Pressure. 




Joan Wombacher and Carolyn Rod- 
riquez wait and hope for the desired 
reaction. 



Students of General Life Science dis- 
cover new facts about living matter. 



The systematized knowledge of 
organic and inorganic matter aids 
you to develop an understanding 
and appreciation of the glory of cre- 
ation. 



Guided by Mr. Arai, Mary Anne 
Wormsted examines cells through a 
microscopic lens. 



22 





Upper division history students 
prepare for the activities of 
United Nations Week. 



You realize the importance of 
the facts and events of yesterday 
and today, together with their 
causes and effects. 



economics, 




Freshmen take notes as Sister Rose Catherine discusses the reasons 
for the disintegration of the Roman Empire. 



Business Administration students master the keyboard through 
frequent practice. Knowledge and efficiency are their goals. 





/tit 



You realize that art is "the right mak- 
ing of that which needs to be made' 
and because you must, you make it. 



•^Hifsa* 



The cultural contributions of art through the ages 
are made apparent through visual aids and the 
interpretation of the instructor. 



The discovery in the ceramics lab that you 
could create with your hands was an ex- 
citing one. 




Under the direction of Miss Shepherd, 
the art majors work at their easels. 



Connie Herman adds final 
touches to modernistic pin 
in jewelry-making class. 



You discover the wonders 
of literature through reading 
and the elation of creating 
through writing. You receive 
insights into the thoughts and 
times of past and present. 



SaylcsA 




A panel discusses the works of 
Hemingway and his particular 
techniques of writing. 



Students exchange ideas concerning the trends in Ameri- 
can poetry. 




Among their other functions, the jour- 
nalism class proofreads the next issue 
of the VIEW. 



25 




You gain experience at 
Regis House, working with 
children. You care for them 
and provide the understand- 
ing that is so necessary for 
their growth and develop- 
ment. 



Socioiaaty a*td 



Social 7iJe(l<vic 



fHat&em<ztic& 



You accept the challenge of today 
and become a Math major. You 
know the satisfaction of a problem 
correctly solved. 



26 





You stepped into the realm of music 
and found a world of ordered har- 
monies, rhythms, and beats. A pleas- 
ure that can only come through 
music was yours whether you 
listened, played, or sang. 



Sociology majors seek answers to the questions 
arising in their study of Population Problems. 



*Mtu4*C 



A local opera workshop entertains Mount students. 




r*"" 



Mr. Paul Salamuno- 
vich accompanies 
choral members in 
preparation for enter- 
tainment at the Christ- 
mas Assembly. 




^a^uac^e 



It is within your power to foster 
better relations between peoples. 
You try to do this through the study 
of nations, language and culture. 



Sister Eloise Therese conducts 
an elementary Spanish class. 





Student teacher, Elsie Szandy stimulates her read- 
ing group as witnessed by their eager response. 



Time out from the classroom is 
spent by student teacher Carol 
Robinson in supervising play. 



Zducatctot 



As you are being taught you are 
learning to teach. You realize the 
value of education and anxiously 
await the time when you will stand 
before a class. 



28 





You acquaint yourself with the 
various philosophers of the Ro- 
man nation as you discuss their 
literary works in your Latin class. 



irame Gca*iamic& 



As a dietician, food demon- 
strator, or home maker you play 
an important role in American 
society. 



Students take turns giving an 
original demonstration in the 
cooking class. 



Miss Grace Trumbo guides 
future seamstresses in sewing 
lab. 




29 




From a speech or drama 
class you may graduate to a 
starring role in a Mount play. 
Through your drama courses 
you develop poise and self- 
assurance. 



unamfi, 



Stagecraft students learn make-up 
techniques and employ them dur- 
ing staging of fall play, MEDEA. 



Advanced drama students Dora 
Szabo and Barbara Clem enact 
a scene from O'Neill's "Mourning 



30 




P^4^j/ Education 



By learning the basic rules 
and steps to group sports you 
develop sportsmanship as 
well as self-confidence. 



Three freshmen take advantage 
of a beginner's bowling class of- 
fered by the Physical Education 
department. 



Miss Blackstone lectures to the 
tennis class concerning the scor- 
ing of mixed doubles. 



exercise 




Physical Education class 




V 






/ 




Mr. Patrick Hughes answers the questions of his 
students in the History of Modern Philosophy 
class. 



To know, love and serve God 
— this is the aim of your life. You 
are guided toward this goal 
through your theology class, a 
very important subject in the cur- 
riculum. 



# /W0&^ 



Father Wall conducts a 
sophomore theology class. 



r&ilcteofc&tfr 



You ask questions about caus- 
es; about the beautiful; and 
about yourself. You discover 
where to find the answers 
through your study of philoso- 
phy. 



Sister Corneila Mary questions the Scholastic 
argument for freedom of the will. 



32 




You find satisfaction in giving. 
You desire to help those in pain. 
Your life is dedicated to God and 
to man. 



rlcvteinfy 




Sophomore nursing students make 
friends with a new patient. 





"Constructions", 
Connie Herman 



(yieated. . . 




'Street Scene", 
Judy Endler 



"Encounter", 
Dianne Smith 



34 




From Jewelry class . . . 
Ring, Dianne Smith 
Silver Pendant, Connie Herman 
Ring, Connie Herman 



Oty 1pMC 



Excerpt from "Psalm I5l" 

Carlisle Van Home 

With thanks for a work that stays in my mind 

I like that literary piece, Lord, There's a green world in it. 

Not just green acreage — any nature boy 

Can write on that a dozen lines a minute; 

Put a bluebird in it if you're out for joy, 

Put in a haystack if you're out for plot, 

Put in a dead tree if you're out for thought . . . 



Childhood 

Miriam Tse 

The hours of make believe 

Flow out 

In deepening streams. 

The years of reality 

Hurry in 

with turbulent peaks. 

That seagull 

Black against the blue 

Flaps heavily 

at my heart. 



Cousin 

Ann DeVaney 

With this ring 

My father's showy, shiny sharp 

Cigar wrapper 
You are my pal 
To fight, to race, to climb and 
To listen. 
Come 

We will put our soldiers on 
The big rock 

(They rust unused.) 
With this ring, 

The dime store's silver 

Forget-me-nots, 
You are my friend 
To swim, to sail, to sing, and 
To listen. 
Come. 

We will skip flat rocks 
across the water. 

(They collect untouched.) 
With this ring, 

The final separate band you do not give 

To me, 
We are unloosed 
And forget 
To listen. 

You give the gaudy cigar bands 

To your children. 



35 




Clubs, plays and dances fit 
snugly alongside your honor 
societies, religious functions 
and student government. 
With enthusiasm you gather 
these varied pieces to add to 
your puzzle. 



36 




frcttvitteb 



37 



Student yavenrtmeHt 



The representatives you elected com- 
menced the year with the first annual Stu- 
dent Council Workshop. They discussed the 
policies and programs for more efficient 
government for you. The Student Council 
made you aware of this program. Para- 
mount was their effort to bring YOU into 
student government. 



Joan Wombacher 
President 





Judi Bauerlein 
Vice-President 





Jo Ann Holbery 
Secretary 



Kathleen McGowan 
Treasurer 



Student Council members discuss the parking space situation. LEFT to RIGHT: Judy Scherb, 
Junior Class President; Dianne Smith, Boarder President; Donna May, NSA Coordinator, 
Gloria Travaglini, Senior Class President; Kathleen McGowan; Judi Bauerlein; Joan Wombacher; 
Jo Ann Holbery; Linda Feinberg, Parliamentarian; Nancy McCook, Public Relations; Donna 
Schneider, Sophomore Class President; Patricia Funaro, Freshman Class President. 





Student (famed 



Members of Student Council prepare for a meeting in the new 
Student Body office. Seated, LEFT to RIGHT: Kathleen McGowan, 
Joan Wombacher, Joanne Holberry, Donna Schneider, Nancy 
McCook, Gloria Travaglini, Linda Feinberg. Standing, LEFT to 
RIGHT: Judy Scherb, Judi Bauerlein, Pat Funaro. 



Student faculty S&znd 



Student needs and problems are discussed by your represen- 
tatives and faculty members. LEFT to RIGHT: Sister Rose Ger- 
trude, College President; Christie Ward; Sister Alice Marie, 
Academic Dean; Judi Bauerlein; Dianne Smith; Sister Mercia 1 
Louise, Dean of Women. 




(fanditoatutfy @ou*ieil 



Coordinating Council members double check the spring semester calendar. LEFT to RIGHT: Irene 
Riordan, Ann Lentz, Mary Connolly, Mary Ann Bonino, Barbara Clem, Judi Bauerlein, Connie Herman, 
Beverly McClure, Joan Spaeth. 




39 




Dr. Kuehnelt-Leddihn emphasizes, in one of a series of 
lectures, that the Far East is not a lost cause. 



Joan Wombacher and Sister Alice Marie thank 
philosopher Anton Pegis for his lecture to the 
Student Body. 




40 



CicenfaUltot^atf, 



Departmental clubs, Student Body organ- 
izations and sororities held orientation dis- 
plays in order that you might select the 
organizations that suited your special in- 
terests. 








Who's Who representatives: FRONT ROW SEATED LEFT TO RIGHT: Joan Spaeth, Paula Duncan, Joan Wambacher, and 
Rosemary Orsini. STANDING BACK: Barbara Sullivan, Diane Smith, Sharon O'Connor, Elizabeth Matz, and Gloria 
Travaglini. 



You were selected to appear in the publi- 
cations "Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities" on the basis of scholarship, 
personality, activities, and service to the 
school. 



Honor graduates SEATED LEFT TO RIGHT: Joan Wombacher and Joan Spaeth, Cum 
Laude. BACK STANDING: Diane Smith, Cum Laude, Gloria Travaglini and Paula 
Duncan (not pictured) Magna Cum Laude. 



irtoun &i&ctu&£e& 



As honor graduates you have maintained 
laudable academic achievement over a four 
year period in your respective fields of 
Chemistry, English, Art and Languages. 




USA 



National Students Association served you through 

. . . representation on a national and international scale 

. . . training student leaders 

. . .improving the intellectual climate on campus 

. . . effective measures toward solution of student problems. 





NSA Campus Coordinator 
Donna May 



NSA members attending the regional meeting at Berkeley, 
California, are, Front Row, LEFT TO RIGHT: Jo Ann Hol- 
bery, Linda Feinberg, Donna May, Mary Ann Wormsted, 
Elsita Pineda-Adames. SECOND ROW: Kathy McGowan, 
Dianne Smith, Joan Wombacher, Rita Simeon. BACK ROW: 
Ann DeVaney, Judi Bauerlein, Gloria Travaglini 







NSA display board explains several of the organization's func- 
tions. 



r 



J 



NSA Sub Coordinator and Assistant, LEFT to RIGHT: Arlene Howsley and 
Darlene Knudson. 



42 




'Resident StcccUttfo 




The verve and imagination of Dianne 
Smith, boarder president and Colleen Wil- 
son, vice-president^ produced well organ- 
ized, unforgettable events. 




Boarder Council members, LEFT to RIGHT: Rosemary Kehl, Connie Herman, Lizanne Murphy, Dianne 
Smith, boarder president; Mrs. Harrington, Miss Torres, Jan Fox, Palma Ciarocchi, Colleen Wilson, vice- 
president. 




Your home away from home buzzed with 
chatter, laughter and a napping room- 
mate until the 7:30 study bell. Then only 
clacking typewriters, an occasional stifled 
laugh and the feeling of belonging filled 
your room. 



43 




You solve the boarder's 
dilemma of neatly moving 
suitcases, typewriters, books 
and clothes into your room 
on the first day. Hustle- 
bustle days that followed 
told of your success in keep- 
ing this peace and order. 




Patiently, you wait for a slim chance to make or receive that all important 
phone call. 



"Mail call," two magic words you listened 
for all morning, came true at noon. 



44 





At your Halloween social 
night, you previewed the lat- 
est in costume capers and 
combined the tricks with the 
treats. 



I*! 







'Re&icUat Students 



Carla Cosgrove, Marie Treacy, Mary 
Flanagan, Barbara Merandi and Jan 
Fox enjoy cake at-a-come-as-you-are 
birthday party. 




A comfortable place to relax and laugh at a good comedy show is your newly decorated lounge. 
Smiling faces provide proof of comedian's ability. 



An informal party provided the perfect occasion 
for decorating the Christmas tree. The picture 
(below) attests to the many hands that added 
tinsel. 







if. 




IvTT, 



m 



- 'jjm*!4 



You held your annual Presents in the Regency Room of the Sheraton-West Hotel and posed for your sorority picture. LEFT TO RIGHT, BOTTOM ROW 
(SEATED): Mary Rose Pasic, Marguerite Roth, Linda Feinberg, Margaret Rude, Dorothy Schaefer (president), Patricia Stack, Diana Souva, Donna Puc- 
cinelli, Judy Scherb, and Judy Kelly. SECOND ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Joanna Arlotti, Patricia Levya, Marilyn Jamison, Ann Sullivan, Colleen Wilson, Mary 
Elizabeth Swiertz, Barbara Clem, Jo Lambert. BACK ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT (STANDINGI: Rosemary Manning, Joan Hamil, Mary Jane Costa, Carolyn Rodri- 
quez, Cheryl Bockhold, Sharon Lisle, Linda Cox, Gloria Travaglini, Kathleen Crowe, Joan Spaeth, Carol Glanville, Roseanna Smith, Donna Schneider, 
Claudia Birdsong, Judy Brow, and Betty Jordan. 







Honorary members, Rosemary Orsini, Kathy 
Crowe, Donna Welk, and Marilyn Jamison 
were warmly received at the honorary dinner 
at Petri lii's on September 29. 



Refreshments and brain storming sessions at Don- 
na's home gave you memorable events like the 
Hard Times Party, Gamma Presents, the Lulu and 
exchanges. 



A Christmas Date Buffet filled Gam- 
mas and their escorts with holiday 
cheer and high spirits. 




rC&fcft^ 



TtdU&li 



You found your sorority took care of 
the social aspect of your development. 
As a Kappa you made new attach- 
ments, faced new experiences and 
made memories. 




Kappa Delta Chi Actives, FRONT ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Joan McPhillips, Martha Davidson, 
Patricia Mooney, Patricia Goodmanson. SECOND ROW: Mary Grimmett, Kathy Gomez, 
Mary Prendergast, Sue Ecberg, Patricia Connors. BACK ROW: Linda McCarthy Remley, Pat 
Skrocki, Teresa Griffin, Kathryn Kelly, Sally Sprigg, Sandra Nolan, Ann Bouchard. 



Kappa honoraries pose for formal picture: LEFT 
TO RIGHT: Denise Sullivan, Terry Griffin, Pat 
Conners, Kathy Pigeon, Nancy King, Pat Mooney, 
Pat Skrocki, Marty Davidson. 





Kappas and dates attend a pre-party before the 
Senior Luau: FRONT: John McGuinly, Martha 
Stang. BACK: Joan McPhillips, Ray Wall, Jim 
Lenihan, Chere Stark, Jean Robbie, Cyril Bauman, 
John McPhillips. 



47 






X 



Toy Alpha Zeta Actives, FRONT ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Elaine Derminghem, Janet Sebastian, Jody Smith, Barbara Bernard, Mary Lou 
LeMaster, Jo Ann Hartman, Marilyn Marcus, Sharon Leahy, Kathy Feeley, Cindy Power. SECOND ROW: Mary Connolly, Barbara Sullivan, 
Linda Ruby, Gail Kinzer, Ann Riordan, Judi Bauerlein, Rose Herman, Sue Ekberg, Karen Andree. BACK ROW: Jane Lockwood, Mary Karig, 
Priscilla Engle, Linda Lathrop, Joan Wombacher, Jo Ann Holbery, Dolores Collins, Jeryl Callahan, Marilyn Brassor, Pat McGinity, Ann Lentz, 
Kathleen McCoy, Kathleen McGowan, Peggy Leary, Kathy Covelli, Beverly McClure. 



7<2# Atfi&a %efa 




Being a member of Tau Alpha Zeta meant 
that you had opportunities for closer ac- 
quaintances and enjoyable events. 



Taz honorary members are Dolores Collins, Marilyn Ser- 
eno, Mary Lou Apalategui, Lynette Hamano, and Pat 
Crawford. 



Taz and friends enjoy themselves at a pre-party before 
the Mardi Gras Ball. 



Ann Riordan and Dick Westphal go Indian at the Taz 
annual Safari Party. 



48 




KAX 



Kappa Delta Chi Pledges, BACK ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: 
Cecilia Betanzo, Sandy Durham, Mary Jo Theis. SECOND 
ROW: Barbara Cahill, Martha Stang, Joanne Dalesandro. 
FRONT ROW: Martha McCarthy, Kinda Frye. 






Gamma Sigma Phi Pledges, 
BACK ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: 
Kathy McDonald, Mary Lee Pol- 
chow, Joanne Crowley, Judy 
Endler, Linda Bockhold, Donna 
Frauenheim, Sheila Curran, 
Joyce Gonzalez, Pat Funaro, 
Sue Donovan. SECOND ROW: 
Peggy Beauclair, Palma Ciaroc- 
chi, Dee Dee Schurter, Marie 
Bruce, Dawn Ferry, Mary Col- 
lins, Marcia Kislingbury, Kath- 
leen Lenihan. FRONT ROW: 
Peggy Cleary, Ann Francis, 
Gerry Mirabal, Lois Pelletier, 
Mary Lou Poloni. 





TAZ 



Tau Alpha Zeta Pledges, BACK 
ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Sheila 
Brennan, Ana Aldrete, Rachel 
Rendon, Carol Trindl, Nancy 
Smith, Nancy MeCook, Lizanne 
Murphy, Phyllis Lieb, Janice 
Pemberton, Loretta Tunney, 
Helen Kirk, Jean Moynier, Pat 
Blazevich, Alice Scott. FRONT 
ROW: Janice Smith, Joan Her- 
shey, Dorothy McGowan, Joan 
Chappell, Carmela Partipilo, 
Joan Hourigan, Mary Graham. 




Beverly McClure 
President 




Deanna Dugas explains membership in the Home Economics Association to club members. 



You combine skills and science 
to make a house a home. 



Future home makers look over patterns at the Gladding-McBean china display. 





Receiving solemn ceremonial instructions, Gloria Ma- 
drid, JoAnn Hartman, Betty Jordan, Marty Davidson 
and Carole Grimmett hold candles. 




Kathy Crowe and Jo Ann Hartman model for the Home Economics Club Vogue Fashion 
Show. 



irome &cxwamic& 




Together with other college Home Ec- 
onomics students Jo Ann Hartman (far 
right) sells Betty Lamps, symbols of 
their field, at the Home Economics 
Fall Workshop at Whittier College. 



Betty Jordan, Marty Davidson, and 
Ann Sullivan look over the child care 
display set up to introduce freshmen 
Home Economics students to the courses 
of study. 



51 




Members, Front Row, LEFT to RIGHT: Miriam Tse, Marilyn Ball, Eileen Brick, Lori Perea. Second Row, 
Carmen Deutchman, Jean Moynier, Becky Tassio, Judy Greenough. Third Row, Maria Pia Reidemann, 
Martha Stoering, Shirley Briggs, Mae Guzman, Gloria Travaglini. Back Row, Antoinette Fogliani, 
Kathleen Delaney, Mary Connolly, Elaine Derminghem, Angela Figini. 



iie 



As International Language Club 
members you have a definite bond 
of unity. This bond is your interest 
in all people. 




Mary Connolly 
President 



A Javanese dancer entertains at Festival. 




Dancing at Festival was this spirited Spanish trio. 




1 4 6 "?c*ta*l 



Songs of China were sung by Lio Pang 
and Rose Chiang. 



The International Lan- 
guage Club Festival was 
highlighted by performers 
representing many nations of 
the world. 



Dancers, representing the Philippines, dis- 
played their skills. 






Betsy Fleming's professional 
playing of the marimba ex- 
hibited the musical talents 
of the United States. 




Graduate student, Hyma Araujo of India, 
enchanted the audience with a song from 
her homeland. 



The Mexican song "Cielito Undo" was sung by Gloria Left. 




53 



Itetout, (?tcd 



You share a common heri- 
tage and strive to heighten 
interest in "the grandeur 
that was Rome's." 





Mary Ann Bonino 
President 



Italian Club members, LEFT to RIGHT, seated, Mary Ann Bonino, Jo Ann Barone, Nancy 
Bergin, Jill Caracillo. Standing, Rosemary Kehl, Colleen Wilson, Charleen McArdle, Joanna 
Arlotti, Donna Frauenheim, Palma Ciarocchi, Pat Stack, Jo Lambert. 



TVtute&rfu 



Pat Gornick, Cindy Power, and Caroline Bergschneider enter their 
San Francisco hotel during the Student Nurses' Convention held 
early in the fall semester. 



Caroline Bergschneider presides over first White Cap meeting of 
the year while Elaine Mello takes the minutes. 





54 



As nurses you are a part of a very 
womanly profession — the giving of 
self. 





Carolyn Bergschneider 
President 








r M ( 

Officers: Cathy Covelli, treasurer; Pat Gornick, vice-president; 
Elaine Mello, secretary. 



Nurses take the October temperature of Playa del Rey Beach with 
pleasure. LEFT to RIGHT: Mary Kolbert, Miss King, Miss Weebe, 
Nancy Mclntire, Elaine Mello, Mrs. Herrner, Mitzie Muth, Carol 
Bergschneider, Cindy Power. 



Bottom row, LEFT to RIGHT: Mary Weber, Marilyn Marcus, Jo Kleemann, Ann Galleazzi, Sue Ekberg, Elaine 
Mello. Second row, Darlene Knutson, Jere Callahan, Sharon Leahy, Carol Romanoski, Annie Muto, Mary J. 
Gaughan, Sandy Geeson. Third row, Billy Tucker, Pat Diltz, Mary Flanagan, Mary Lannert, Carol Bergschneider, 
Pat Gornick, Marilyn Anguay, Loretta Millek, Claudia Birdsong. Fourth row, Nancy Gardner, Paula Fleming, 
Linda Lee, Kathy Fitzharris, Mary Lou Fisher, Marianne Kainz, Mary Murphy, Pat Leyva. Fifth row, Jeannette 
Binder, Mitzie Muth, Gloria Leon, Kathey Snedden, Lizanne Murphy, Kathy Covelli, Mary Lou LeMaster. Sixth 
row, Delilah Olsen, Carol Wojciechowski, Nancy Mclntire, Diane Souva, Jane Hancuff. 





Maryvon Laumann 
President 



S^l 




SAI vice-president, Betsy Fleming, Secretary Palma Ciarocchi, and Treasurer, Mary Ann 
Bonino make arrangements for Spring Sing. 




Members test their voices. Front row, Gloria Sherno, 
Graciela Alvarado, Mae Guzman, Joann Dalesandro, 
Maryann Glasser. Second Row, Betsy Fleming, Palma 
Ciarocchi, Maryvon Laumann, Mary Ann Bonino, Mary 
Lee Polchow. Carol Robinson accompanies them at the 
piano. 



The Boarder Notes won first prize in 
the music fraternity's Spring Sing with 
an original rendition of "What are we 
Gonna do Tonight?" 



Sigma Alpha lota, Mount chapter of the national music fraternity, makes it possible for you 
to participate in events of member chapters in other schools and to sponsor activities on 
campus such as the Spring Sing. 



56 





The Kappas perform the old favorite "Me and My Shadow.' 



The Parnassians won second place for their version of "Dante's Inferno" set to 
the music of "Tom Dooley." 



Each March you usher in the new season 
with the Spring Sing. You choose a song and 
practice, practice, practice. On the big 
night you enjoy yourself and provide enjoy- 
ment for others. 



SWES captured third place prize with the Scottish ballad, "Bonnie Jean. 



SfarUvtfy Slaty 



ILC makes festive preparation for the "Hawaiian Wedding Song. 




7%&u&k /tit (?ltd 




Connie Herman 
President 



Art club members indicate the fine points of composition. Bottom row, LEFT to RIGHT: Cathy Olenicz, Nancy Bergin, 
Dianne Smith. Top row, Kafhy Jeffares, Judy Endler, Kay Hansen, Lio Pang, Connie Herman, President, Rachel Rendon. 



Officers Nancy Bergin, Vice-President, Rachel Rendon, Historian, Judy Endler, Secretary-Treas- 
urer, and Cathy Olenicz, Publicity, admire student's work. 



58 





Art L 
marvelta 
mics, fui .. 
sculpture dis 
sembled by 
direction of 




Parnassian profiles. Bottom Row, LEFT to RIGHT: Rosemary Orsini, Eleanor Gillet, Arline Martin, Linda 
Cox. Second Row: Liz Shanahan, Mary Maechling, Mary Rose Pasic, Joan Spaeth, Barbara Sullivan. 
Top Row: Connie Serbent, Liz Matz, Celia Sharp, Betsy Fleming, Jean Robbie. 



Elizabeth Matz 
President 



LEFT to RIGHT: Joan Spaeth, Vice-President; Joan Hamil 
urer; Liz Shanahan, Secretary. 



Treas- 





P< 



Wlrt&44l4M& 



You had a busy year. You held a book sale . . . 
hosted guest speakers at each meeting . . . en- 
joyed a festive Twelfth Night Party ... attended 
the theatre . . . were enlightened at 3:40 discus- 
sions. You created, shared and learned, and with 
each experience you grew. 



Rosemary Orsini and Sister Patricia Clare 
select books to be displayed at Annual 
Book Sale. 



Sister Mary Patricia discusses 
Joyce's PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST 
AS A YOUNG MAN at the first in- 
formal 3:40 Discussion held in the 
new Parnassian Office. 



60 





You may be in either the physical sciences 
or the biological sciences, but you find you 
have much in common with each other. You 
observe, experiment and formulate in an 
effort to discover truth. 




President 
Betty Navaroli 




Members wait and watch as Carolyn Rodriquez gives demonstration. Front Row, LEFT to RIGHT: Mary 
Kosfer, Phyllis Lieb, Carolyn Rodriquez, Betty Navarroli, Dorothy Richardson, Mary Yurich, Donna 
Frauenheim. Second Row: Nancy Westberg, Pat Reap, Olga Coronado, Irene Riordan. Top Row: Lutier 
Bernard, Virginia Hatt, Gail Kinzer, Sharon Lisle, Evelyn Hatt. 




Betty Navarroli hands Carolyn Rodriquez, 
Vice-President, a bottle of chemicals for 
an experiment in preparation for the Sci- 
ence Fair. Assisting are, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Gail Kinzer, Irene Riordan, Treasurer, and 
Sharon Lisle, Secretary. 



Joan Spaeth thanks panel members Ann 
DeVaney, Paula Duncan, Susan Crowe and 
Liz Matz after discussion on "Why ... an 
English Major?" 




61 




Eusebian members at Seminar table are 
LEFT to RIGHT: Palma Ciarocchi, Rosanna 
Smith, Annette Shamey, Pat Fine, Maggie 
Roth, Gayne Pinto, and Mary Grimmett. 




Through your study of people and 
events you learn man's place in the 
universe. Your members represented 
Ecuador at the model United 
Nations. 



Liz Austin introduces topic and speaker at 
Eusebian-sponsored Current Events Forum. 



Elementary and secondary student teachers honor 
their supervisors at the annual CSTA banquet in the 
Senior Dining Room. 



62 






CSTA officers on campus are Pat Skrocki, Treasurer; Barbara Bernard, Vice-President; Joanna 
Arlotti, Secretary. 



Sharon O'Connor 
President 



esi/i 



As California's student 
teachers, you and your pro- 
fession grow to meet the 
challenge of youth. 





Dr. S. J. Conrad discusses some of the edu- 
cational problems he faces as chief psychia- 
trist at the Los Angeles State Mental Hygenic 
Clinic. 



Linda Cox spins the hula hoop for an initia- 
tion contest at the first CSTA meeting. 



CSTA club members, upper and lower division. LEFT to RIGHT, Front Row: Carol Robinson, Rosemary Manning, Loretta Tunney, 
Mary Lou Wehan, Marilyn Sereno, Eileen Brick, Susan Kelsey, Linda Cox, and Marilyn Brassor. Second row, Barbara Bernard, Vir- 
ginia Halt, Cecilia Ingersol, Carla Cosgrove, Rosemarie Lemus, Patricia Mooney, Kathy Gomez, Janet Sebastian, and Mary Grimmett. 
Third Row, Arline Martin, Mary Collins, Alana Riordian, Evelyn Hatt, Mary Rose Pasic, Elizabeth Matz, and Mary Maechling. Top 
Row, Joanna Arlotti, Pat Skrocki, Luanna Castellucci, Eleanor Gil let, Maggie Roth, Marilyn Jamison, Cheryl Bockhold and Elsie 
Szandy. 




63 




As Sodality members you form a prin- 
cipal religious association on campus. 
Together with the Young Christian Stu- 
dents and the Legion of Mary you pro- 
vide a well formulated program of char- 
ity works and self betterment. 





Mary Lee Verderaime, Vice-Prefect (standing), outlines 
Lenten program for the Missions to committee mem- 
bers (left to right) Mary Lou Poloni, Margaret Senese 
and Cecelia Ingersoll. 



Sodality members display toys 
collected during Advent for the 
Annual Christmas toy drive. 



The sale of Christmas cards was a successful project 
and welcomed by students. 




Sodality Prefect 
Rosemary Byrnes 




Sodality members, LEFT to RIGHT: Bottom Row: Antonia 
Yednakovitch, Marilyn Ball, Marie Alfidi, Mary Lee Verde- 
raime (Vice-Prefect). Second Row: Nancy Gardner, Phyllis 
Lieb, Linda Feinberg, Sally Sprigg (Secretary), Evelyn Hatt, 
Sharon Mooney. Top Row: Marie Treacy, Cecelia Ingersoll, 
Margaret Senese, Arline Martin, Ruby Conaway, Virginia 
Hatt. 








YCS members ore, Front: Donna Schneider. Second Row, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Barbara Sullivan, Betty Jordon, Palma Ciarocchi, Elizabeth Austin, Pat 
Leyva. Back Row: Judi Bauerlein, Joan Chappell, Betsy Fleming, Gloria 
Travaglini, Mary Ann Bonino, Diana Schurter, Lizanne Murphy. 

Students 

As Young Christian Students you strive 
to encourage the practice of the corporal 
works of mercy. 



You are dedicated to Mary, the Mother 
of God, and promote devotion to her. 



*• 




Barbara Sullivan 
YCS Chairman 




Sister Laurentia and a YCS discussion group exchange ideas on the 
necessity of knowledge in human relations. 



Legion of Mary membership includes Marilyn Anguay, Patricia Stack 
and Donna Fraunheim. 



ts 




YCS members and Sister Catherine Therese outline their objectives for 
the second semester. 




65 



Ann Lentz 
President 




Lower Division SWES members: Front Row, 
LEFT to RIGHT: Joy Shallenberger, Carol 
Trindl. Top Row: Jody Smith, Diane Couts, 
Carmela Partipilo. 



Members await start of meeting. Front Row, LEFT to RIGHT: Mary 
Hogan, Carol Glanville, Marilyn Sereno. Second Row: Ann Lentz, 
Carmela Partipilo, Joy Shallenberger, Lorie Lasley, Donna Welk, 
Colleen Treinen. Top Row: Jody Smith, Carol Trindl, Lorette Studer, 
Diane Couts, Elsita Pineda-Adames. 






Your chief interest is people. You major 
in Sociology, Economics or Social Welfare 
and find a deep satisfaction in learning 
about — and working with — people. 



Colleen Treinen, Treasurer, and Elsita Pineda-Adames, Social Chairman, 
listen as Jody Smith, Vice-President, reads circular concerning the Cali- 
fornia Conference on Social Welfare. 



Members enjoy an informal gathering to wrap 
Christmas gifts to be distributed at Regis House 
by the Sisters of Social Service. 




New SWES members pose for for- 
mal picture during informal get- 
acquainted party. 





Rosanna Smith 
Senior Delegate 



On campus NFCCS representatives, LEFT to RIGHT, seated, Palma Ciarocchi, 
Joan Wombacher, Donna May (Regional President) Rosanna Smith (Senior 
Delegate, and Dianne Smith. Standing, Judi Bauerlein, Elizabeth Shanahan, and 
Judy Weber. 



iivees 



As members of the Na- 
tional Federation of Catholic 
College Students, you chose 
as this year's theme "The 
Catholic Student, a Positive 
Force in the Educational Com- 
munity." You directed your 
study toward Latin American 
Student Relations. 



SW^W 



You conducted the annual 
Blood Drive and you bene- 
fited those whose names you 
know as "A", "B" or "O". 



Discussing the Blood Mobile Unit are LEFT to RIGHT: 
Joy Shallenberger, Carol Trindl, Margaret Lam, Jody 
Smith and Janet Young. 



The Red Cross programming committee, LEFT to 
RIGHT, bottom row: Carol Trindl, Margaret Lam, 
Janet Young, and Joy Shallenberger. Top row, Mari- 
lyn Sereno (chairman of the Blood Drivel and Jody 
Smith. 





Barbara Clem 
President 



LEFT to RIGHT, Bottom Row: Rachel Rendon, Margaret Cole, Marie Treacy, Barbara Clem, Donna 
Schneider, Marilyn Jamison. Middle Row: Joan Kitchen, Dora Szabo, Dolores Schiffert, Marguerite 
Roth, Jodi Kleemann. Top Row: Kay Kendall, Louise Hill, Wanda Kociencki, Loretta Studer, Cheryl 
Bockhold. 




LEFT to RIGHT, Masquer Officers, Bottom: Dolores Schiffert, 
Treasurer. Middle, Dora Szabo, Secretary; Louise Hill, Vice- 
President. Top: Rachel Rendon, Social Chairman. 



Jason puts on the finishing touches for his 
role in "Medea." 




68 




Robert Dornan as 
Jason and Czarina 
Huerta at Medea 
bring Euripides' Greek 
tragedy MEDEA to 
life. 





69 



Tttattwafyuld 



The Mothers' Guild provides our mothers with the op- 
portunity to get acquainted. At the same time, by sponsor- 
ing social activities — fashion shows, dinners, Family Mass 
and Breakfast — they benefit the Mount by raising funds 
for college expansion. 





Mrs. S. D. Herman 
President 



The Lecfure Hall puts on a new face to serve as a dining room for the Mothers' Guild Novem- 
ber luncheon. 



Mrs. Schott, Mrs. Herman and Mrs. Plum- 
mer discuss preliminary plans for he An- 
nual Scholarship Luncheon. 



The Executive Board of the Mothers' Guild poses for a formal picture before attending their 
monthly luncheon. 




WffM 







Me^&cd 



The Men's Club is the newest and one 
of the most promising organizations com- 
posed of fathers of students as well as other 
men interested in the college's welfare. 





Sister Rose Gertrude looks over plans for new patio, one of 
the "improvement" programs the Men's Club worked on during 
the year. 



The discussion includes activities ranging 
from father-daughter Communion break- 
fasts to building a paved patio and im- 
provement of the traffic and parking sys- 
tem on campus. 








*£fa4wcta, /ofo ^7 cue 



Your members comprise one of the young- 
est chapters of the National Literary Honor- 
ary Society. This year you received six new 
candidates on the basis of their scholastic 
achievement and interest in the field of 
English. 



Lambda lota Tau members attending a business 
meeting in the Browsing Room are FRONT ROW, 
LEFT TO RIGHT: Barbara Sullivan, Elizabeth 
Shanahan and Judi Bauerlein. BACK ROW, LEFT 
TO RIGHT: Joan Spaeth, Elizabeth Matz, Ann 
DeVaney (LIT president), Julie Wilson and 
Judy Weber. 



'Detta &f2&tf<M Siyma 



Your membership in Beta Xi Chapter of 
Delta Epsilon Sigma, National Scholastic 
Honor Society for Catholic Colleges and 
Universities, attests to your academic ac- 
complishments and leadership qualities. 



Honor members of Delta Epsilon Sigma are, 
LEFT TO RIGHT: Dora Szabo, Dianne Smith, 
Kathleen McGowan, Joan Wombacher, and 
Mary Connolly. 





r^afefa^ tfawMtft i^C 



Kappa Gamma Phi, National Catholic 
Scholastic Honorary Society, have members 
who have an accumulative grade point 
average of 2.6 and over. 



Paula Duncan and Gloria Travaglini, recipients 
of the Kappa Gamma Phi key. 




Members of the National Foreign Language honor society include LEFT to RIGHT Front Row: Linda 
Lathrop, Mary Connolly, Palma Ciarocchi, and Mariam Tse. Second Row: Mary Ann Bonino, Kathy Feely, 
Mi. Roger Marchetti, Eliane Derminghem and Gloria Travaglini. Back row: Maryvon Laumann, Mary 
Frances Diaz, and Shirley Briggs. 



rflft&a/ftci y&mma 




i 



\ 



Angela Figini 
President 



Linda Lathrop 
President 




Pi T>dt* P61 



Eliane Derminghem, Mary Connelly, Angela Fingini, 
and Kathy Feely are the active members of Phi Delta 
Phi, National French Honor Society. 



73 




'WeAtcuwidb 



You moved into a new adven- 
ture when you published the new 
quarterly — WESTWORDS. 

You collected and counted 
thousands of words in prose and 
poetry written by students in all 
majors. 

And when you read the first 
copy you had the satisfaction of 
a pioneer. 



Editors-in-Chief, Rosemary Orsini and Elizabeth Matz, 
proudly read first issue of WESTWORDS. 



Associate Editors, Paula Duncan, Dianne 
Smith, Peggy Leary and Dora Szabo listen 
as Associate Editor, Connie Serbent 
(seated) discusses ideas for the Spring 
issue. 




74 



*7fe viecu 



Before the "baby is put to bed" and 
the press begins to roll; behind that 
peaceful stack of VIEW's in the foyer, 
cafeteria, or library are many hours of 
planning, writing, running, and worry- 
ing. 

You know because you do the plan- 
ning, writing, running and worrying. 




Page editors meet with Fall semester Editor-in-Chief, 
Ann De Vaney, to plan the next issue of the VIEW. 
LEFT to RIGHT: Colleen Wilson, Editor-in-Chief Ann De 
Vaney; Judy Weber, Julie Wilson, Sister Thomas Ber- 
nard, Faculty Moderator, and Barbara Thomas. 



Headlines announce the se- 
lection of Judy Weber as 
Spring semester Editor-in- 
Chief. 



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75 



WotM* 59 



You started planning for it 
early in the summer. 

You learned new terms, new 
methods, and new pains. 

You worked and worked be- 
cause you knew that the stu- 
dents' delight and the finished 
work would be your reward. 



Joan Spaeth 

Editor-in-Chief 

Elizabeth Shanahan 

Assistant Editor 

Associate Editors 
Art — Connie Herman 
Copy — Elizabeth Matz 
Photography — Connie Serbent 
Business — Dorothy Schaeffer 



Staff: 



Nancy Meehl 
Rosemary Manning 
Mary Ann Wormsted 
Denise Sullivan 
Rosemary Orsini 
Barbara Sullivan 
Ann De Vaney 
Eleanor Gillet 
Dolores Schiffert 
Pat Leyva 
Valerie Valliquette 




Editor-in-Chief Joan Spaeth (right) looks ap- 
provingly over layout of MOUNT 59 with As- 
sistant Editor, Elizabeth Shanahan. 




Associate Editors, a tired 
but happy group, prepare 
for final deadline. LEFT 
to RIGHT: Art Editor, Con- 
nie Herman; Photography 
Editor, Connie Serbent; 
Copy Editor, Elizabeth 
Matz; Business Editor, 
Dorothy Schaeffer. 



76 



Staff members work in new Pub- 
lications Office, fighting deadline 
time. LEFT to RIGHT: Dolores 
Schiffert, Pat Leyva, Barbara Sul- 
livan, Rosemary Manning, Rose- 
mary Orsini, Eleanor Gil let. 



Art Staff, Connie Herman, Editor; Do- 
lores Schiffert and Valerie Valliquette 
make final decision on division sheet 
design. 





Many warm summer evenings were spent at Connie 
Herman's home laying plans for MOUNT 59. 




Copy Staff works together identifying 
class pictures and writing copy for 
Studies Section. LEFT to RIGHT: Rose- 
mary Orsini, Joan Spaeth, Liz Matz, 
Editor; Eleanor Gillet (standing) and 
Rosemary Manning. 



77 



Eagerly you place heart, 
mind, and body-shaped piec- 
es on the scholastic table. 
You arrange and rearrange 
hope with ability, searching 
for bold-faced confidence. 



78 



7iMcL&iwiadcccLte& 



79 



fi 



cuti&i& 



Judy Scherb 
President 





i ' 

Dolores Schiffert 
Secretary 



Kathy Feeley 
Vice-President 



LEFT to RIGHT: Lynda Lathrop, Jo 
Ann Hartman, Caroline Berg- 
schneider, Pat Connor. 



You are a Junior, past the half-way mark 
and beginning to assimilate knowledge 
more readily. The framework is set and now 
the filling-in process begins. Sure of your 
academic goal, you move toward it with 
confidence and eagerness. 




fix 




Sharon Leahy 
Treasurer 



Jo Ann Hartman 
Social Chairman 



80 





LEFT to RIGHT: Pat Crawford, Margaret Lam, Mary Kolbert, Mary 
Connolly. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: Arline Szandy, 
Mary Pendergast, Pat Mooney, 
Betty Mayhew. 



LEFT to RIGHT: Wanda Kociencki, 
Luana Castellucci, Theresa Grif- 
fin, Cheryl Bockhold. 





Rita and Verdun 
Clint and Karen 



:«*i* P"; '?!*■'; j^,-;! 



Snowflakes and tinsel create a wonderland filled 
with music, laughter, and the holiday spirit. 



ravtta&ty «^5W^ 



82 





You waltzed through "A Fantasy in Frost", the 
Christmas Ball sponsored by the Junior class. 



Kathy and Dave 
Jerry and Sharon 



84 





LEFT to RIGHT: Bottom Row, Judy 
Weber, Beverly McClure. Top Row, 
Carolynne Rodriguez, Julie Wilson. 



LEFT to RIGHT: Judy Scherb, Marguerite Roth, Rosemary Manning, Marilyn Jamison. 

m 




85 




LEFT to RIGHT: Arlene Hows- 
ley, Sue Ekberg, Barbara Ca- 
hill, Priscilla Engle. 



LEFT to RIGHT: Dolores Schif- 
fert, Mary Lee Verderaime, 
Kathleen Feeley. 




86 








LEFT to RIGHT: Cindy Power, 
Claudia Birdsong, Barbara 
Bernard, Joanna Arlotti. 



LEFT to RIGHT: Kathleen McGowan, 
Patricia McGinity. 




ip^pip'l | MWy tB BS Bffl 



LEFT to RIGHT: Rita Simeon, 
Pat Skrocki, Claudia Buvens, 
Charlotte Carrari. 




LEFT to RIGHT: Pat Gornick, 
Sharon Leahy, Karen Andree, 
Dora Szabo. 



87 




You emerged from your first class meeting of the year filled with sug- 
gestions and plans for activities long to be remembered. 




LEFT to RIGHT: Maryvon Laumann, Diane Gal- 
loway, Jo Ann Holbery, Marilyn Sereno. 



88 




"What a little salt will do for the intellectual climate of the 
campus!" Pat Skrocki adds a dash of salt to Vinnie Cahill's 
tomato as Marilyn Brassor, Sue Ekberg, and Kathy Feely 
meditate on the consequences. 



Juniors Rosemary Manning, Luanna Castelluci and Dolores Schif- 
fert listen attentively as Dora Szabo and Wanda Kociencki go 
over their lines for the spring play "Madam Pepita." 












The economic returns of the recently installed 7-UP machine 
are speculated on by Diana Galloway, Mary Lee Verde- 
raime, Vinnie Cahill and Donna May. 



"Where did the time go?" Rita Simeon, JoAnn Holbery, 
Judy Scherb and Marilyn Sereno reflect on the past two 
years and anticipate the last. 





Safe&omone& 



Elizabeth Fleming 
Vice-President 



Donna Schneider 
President 



Palma Ciarocchi 
Secretary 





A day came when you re- 
alized that you were ap- 
proaching the half-way mark 
in college. You were now a 
Sophomore — still uncertain 
of your goal but beginning to 
perceive what the Mount had 
to offer. The newness was 
past and you began to ex- 
press yourself with added 
confidence and conviction. 





Nancy McCook 
Treasurer 



Judith Kelly 
Social Chairman 



LEFT to RIGHT: Linda Feinberg, Carole Han- 
sen Grod, Judy Greenough, Sandra Durham 



90 





CLOCKWISE: Nancy McCook, Mary Collins, Judith Endler, 
Ruby Conaway, Marilyn Anguay, Peggy Beauclair. 



Your parade and mock auction de- 
lighted everyone and encouraged 
all to "come to the Mardi Gras". 



In all the fun and excitement of plan- 
ning the Mardi Gras you captured an- 
other first experience which you will 
not forget. 



91 



TWandifate 



Crystal chandelier, gay 
decorations, and good music 
impressed the Freshmen, Jun- 
iors, and Seniors as they 
came to your Mardi Gras in 
the Grand Ballroom of the 
Beverly Hilton. 




Kathy Whitlatch, Lorey Lasley, Diana 
Galloway, Gloria Left, Anne Dunham 
and escorts take time out for a picture. 



Nancy Bergen, Pauline Spanier, Kathy 
Schott, Gerri Mirabal, Mary Karig, and 
escorts take breather between dances. 



BELOW: Darlene Knutson, Frank Gil- 
let; Maggie Albers, Hugh Redman; 
Palma Ciarocchi, Don Derouin. 



* ft 




m 



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92 





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B 



LEFT to RIGHT: Elaine Mello, 
Marilyn Mohr, Mary Jane Koster, 
Nancy Meehl, Betty Jordan, 
Joan McPhillips, Joan Hamill. 





LEFT to RIGHT: Ann Sullivan, 
Ive Padin, Sharon Mooney, 
Rosanna Smith, Martha 
Mary Stang. 






LEFT to RIGHT: (Bottom 
row) Maria Pia Riedemann, 
Nancy Mclntire, Donna 
Schneider, Barbara Clem. 
(Second row) Christy Ward, 
Annie Muto. (Top row) 
Kathy Sneeden. 



94 




BOTTOM to TOP: Joan Kitchen, 
Jo Lambert, Mary Karig, Joyce 
Gonzales, Gail Kinzer, Evelyn 
Hatt. 



.->•»..- ' " 



CLOCKWISE: Gloria Leon, 
Sharon Lisle, Arline Martin, 
Mary Ann Russell, Rosemary 
Palermo, Deiilah Olson. 









/fnS 




LEFT to RIGHT: (Bottom Row) 
Duke Flores, Bonnie Mae Dom- 
rose. (Second Row) Palma 
Ciarocchi, Kathy Covelli. (Top 
Row) Donna Marie Frauenheim. 



95 




v**^ 1 ^ 

A 



'U- 



"V N 



FROM BOTTOM UP: Mary Jane 
Zinkhon, Phyllis Lieb, Mary 
Weber, Elizabeth Fleming, 
Mary Beise, Diane Souva. 



With net, sequins, glue, and 
much laughter and determina- 
tion you finished all the masks 
before the dance. 





LEFT to RIGHT: Mary Jane Gau- 
ghan, Loretta Millek, Ann 
Duerr, Pamela Foley, Mae Guz- 
man. 




LEFT to RIGHT: (Seated) Judith Kelly, Barbara Mullen, Katharine 
Jeffares. (Standing) Mary Ann Bonino, Patricia Leyva, Elizabeth 
Howard. 



CLOCKWISE: Jill Caraccilo, Jody Smith, Graci- 
ella Alvarado, Jo Ann Barone, Diane Gisler. 







LEFT to RIGHT: (Bottom Row) Janet 
Sebastian, Noreen Sunderland, Bar- 
bara Thomas. (Top Row) Marlene 
Seminario, Kathryn Schott, Carol 
Trindl, Janet Young, Carlisle Van 
Home. 





With grins and applause you 
reached a final decision on 
that all important band. 



CLOCKWISE: Pat Stack, Colleen 
Wilson, Rosemary Kehl, Joy Shal- 
lenberger, Virginia Hatt, Mary Lee 
Polchow, Mercedes McGlynn. 





LEFT to RIGHT: (Bottom Row) Mar- 
gareta Albers, Kathryn Gomez, 
Anne Louise Dunham. (Second 
Row) Judy Brow, Linda Cox, Shari 
Winter. (Top Row) Hannah Dugas, 
Sally Sprigg, Catherine Ernster, Lu- 
tier Bernard. 






You built a float, rode in a parade or just 
watched it. You were filled with the spirit of 
Homecoming and furnished Loyola University 
with its Queen and one Princess. Queen Sheila 
Curran and Princess Pam Foley had fun — you 
had fun because Homecomings are fun. 




Dave Klein, Loyola University Student Body 
President, presents the Queen's bouquet to 
Sheila Curran. Looking on are her court, 
Loretta Coles, Evelyn Pohl, Crikett Smith, 
Judy Ybarrola, and Pam Foley (Mount). 



Homecoming Queen Sheila waves to crowd during parade in Westchester. 



Keeping with the South Seas theme of the Homecoming are 
Mount dancers, LEFT to RIGHT: Linda Cox, Linda Lathrop, 
Marilyn Sereno and Jo Ann Hartmann, on the Mount float. 



Mount students and friends ride in Mount car dur- 
ing parade. 




99 




The newness of it all overwhelmed 
you. New friends, new teachers, new 
subjects, new homework. Suddenly it 
was not new — you belonged. 



Vice-President 
Joan Chappell 



Secretary 
Louise Hill 



Treasurer 
Dorothy McGowan 





President 
Patricia Funaro 



Social Chairman 
Sheila Curran 





5 *#? : fli 



*" a ^ it -- ^ -;^fj 



=9L£k 



. # 




Supreme Allied Commander Judy Scherb smiles approval 
as a platoon stands at attention. 



100 



They called it Green Week and told 
you its purpose was to let you get ac- 
quainted and make you feel at home. 
They said it would be fun — it was. 



Privates for one week, you pass in re- 
view as Student Body looks on. 





Orientation Day provided an opportunity for you 
to meet student leaders. 







The mock Student Council meeting allowed you to 
view student government in action. 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Kathleen Lenihan, Michele Con- 
nors, Paula Fleming. SECOND 
ROW: Susan Donovan, Alana Ri- 
ordan, Loretta Tunney. BACK 
ROW: Dawn Ferry, Kathleen De- 
laney, Linda Kasper. 



FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Joan Hershey, Margaret Cleary, 
Marie Bruce, Diane Schurter, 
Sheila Curran. BACK ROW: Linda 
Marsh, Loretta Studer, Sheila 
Brennan, Kathleen Hanson, Ra- 
chel Rendon. 




You soon learned that the library was the place to 
go. Everyone was there. 




Your first class 
meeting is one you 
won't soon forget. 
The Class of '62 
became a living 
thing. You were a 
part of it. 





LEFT to RIGHT, SEATED: Kathleen 
Fitzharris, Jeanette Binder, Joan 
Chappell, Kathryn Kniazeff, Pa- 
tricia Funaro. STANDING: Mary 
Lou Fisher, Patricia Diltz, Nancy 
Gainey, Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Ann 
Mary Galleazzi. 



FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Mary Lannert, Mary Landy, Linda 
Lee. SECOND ROW: Barbara Mer- 
andi, Roberta Hochman. BACK 
ROW: Lizanne Murphy. 



102 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: Elizabeth McCready, Mary 
Graham, Lois Hetz, Patricia Crampton. BACK ROW: 
Carole Grimmett, Mary Caratan, Diane Coutz, Carmela 
Partipilo. 



BOTTOM to TOP: Kathleen Kendall, Marie 
Treacy, Frances Miller, Arline Savellano, Mary 
Lou Wehan, Nena Jeffares, Joan Hourigan, 
Ana Maria Aldrete. 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Jane Hancuff, Susan Kelsey, Nan- 
cy Gardner. SECOND ROW: Emma 
Hamilton, Josephine Kleeman. 
BACK ROW: Marianne Kainz. 



103 



Green Week ended in triumph for 
you as your entertainment was labeled 
a hit by upper classmen and guests. 

Freshman Frolics was your first op- 
portunity to work with new found 
friends. Through the experience you 
really became a "class." 





Marcia Kislingbury exhibits musi- 
cal abilities during Frosh Frolics. 



SEATED, LEFT to RIGHT.- Dorothy 
McGowan, Olga Coronado, Jean- 
ette Squatrito, Margaret Senese. 
STANDING: Judy Secor, Irene Ri- 
ordan, Patricia Blazevich, Lillian 
Porter, Judy Radvanczy. 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: 
Eileen Brick, Margaret Beauclair, 
Ann Francis. BACK ROW: Louise 
Hill, Lois Pelletier, Mary Kathleen 
Norton, Linda Schafer. 



105 



Founders Day impressed you 
with its ceremony and its double 
significance. You celebrated the 
founding of the college and the 
granting of the charter. 

You were officially welcomed 
into the Student Body as you re- 
ceived your academic cap — a 
symbol of belonging. 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: Linda Frye, Ro- 
berta Atkinson. BACK ROW: Barbara La Chi- 
mia, Dolores Murphy, Marilyn Tecca. 



LEFT to RIGHT: Martha Stoering, Elizabeth Burgett, Teresa Iribarren, Roberta Caha- 
lane, Lorey Lasley, Marcia Kislingbury, Jan Fox, Celine Hatcher. 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: Elena Villalobos, Mary Jo 
Drake, Kathy McDonald, Janice Pemberton. BACK 
ROW: Mary Frances Muth, Roberta Hagerty, Nancy 
Ellen Smith. 



FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: Jean Moynier, 
Mary Lou Poloni, Mary Anne Glasser. SECOND 
ROW: Patricia Miller, Ellen Thumann, Carlo 
Ann Cosgrave. BACK ROW: Linda Bockhold, 
Millicent Hutson, Gloria Sherno. 




LEFT to RIGHT: Pauline Spanier, Patti Lee Stehle, Becky Tassio, Geraldine Mirabal, 
Phyllis D'Amico, Irene Ninomiya, Mary Yurich, Katharine Herzog. 




^ S 







.Ik % 



LEFT to RIGHT: Alice Scott, Carole Noonan, 
Jane Moriuchi, Nancy Westberg, Cecilia Bet- 
zanzo, Cecilia Ingersoll, Judith McHugh, Mary 
Erschoen, Sonia Dominguez. 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: Isabel Olaso, Dorothy 
Richardson, Katharyn Whitlatch. BACK ROW: Rose 
Marie Lemus, Pat Marinoni, Martha Mandujan. 



FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT: Zoe Vernon, Robbie 
Collings, Carrie Romanoski. SECOND ROW: Lio 
Pang, Caroline Hayes, Barbara Longnecker. 




108 




FRONT ROW, LEFT to RIGHT.- Gloria Left, 
Judith Whitcomb, Joanne Dalesandro. BACK 
ROW: Janice Smith, Mary Flanagan, Pat 
Wedemeyer, Heidi Von Gunden. 



FRONT ROW: Heidi Muller. SECOND ROW, 
LEFT to RIGHT: Elaine Lutfy, Carmen 
Deutschmann. BACK ROW: Carolyn Tecca, 
Nelle Wormsted, Helen Kirk. 




Your first Student Body 
Mass was only one of 
many to come. You soon 
knew why Mary Chapel 
is the center of the Mount 
life. 




_ 



The multi-colored pieces of 
your experiences during your 
four years at the Mount initi- 
ate a dynamic start aimed at 
your goal — Christian wom- 
anhood. 



110 




i 





Ill 




Ann Lee Allen, B.A. 

Long Beach, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 



Elizabeth Catherine Austin, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — History 
Minor — Home Economics 







Marilyn Louise Ball, B.A. 

Glendale, California 
Major — English 
Minor — French 



Barbara Ann Bouchard, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 



1 12 






Shirley Rose Briggs, B.A. 

Santa Monica, California 
Major — Spanish 
Minor — Business Administration 



Colleen Anne Brockett, B.A. 

Redondo Beach, California 
Major — Home Economics 
Minor — Social Studies 



Dolores Ann Collins, B.A. 

Highland Park, California 
Major — Dietetics 
Minor — Chemistry 



Patricia Elaine Concepcion, B.A. 

Laguna Beach, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 




113 




Dolores Anne Coronado, B.A. 

Moorpark, California 
Major — Bacteriology 
Minor — Chemistry 



Evangeline JoAnn De Baca, B.S. 

Bernalillo, New Mexico 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 



Eliane Therese Dermingham, B.A. 

Fellows, California 
Major — French 
Minor — Spanish 




Ann De Vaney, B.A. 

Pacific Palisades, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Philosophy 




114 




Gloria Strangman Doran 

Van Nuys, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 




Mary Frances Diaz, B.A. 

La Habra, California 
Major — Spanish 
Minor — History 




Gail Helen Esker, B.S. 

Sunnyslope, Arizona 
Major — Bacteriology 
Minor — ■ Chemistry 




Deanna Elizabeth Dugas, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 

Major — Home Economics 
Minor — English 





1 15 



Angela Figini, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — French 
Minor — Italian 





Sally Marie Fanning, B.A. 

Redondo Beach, California 
Major — Social Studies 
Minor — Education 



Antoinette Fogliani, B.A. 

Laguna Beach, California 
Major — History 
Minor — Education 
English 



Patricia Helen Mears Fine, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — History 
Minor — Classical Languages 



116 




Frances Marian Gallegos, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 





Rose Marie Fuentes, B.S. 

Mexicali, Baja California 
Major — Bacteriology 
Minor — Chemistry 



Sandra Lee Geesen, B.A. 

Seward, Nebraska 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Social Sciences 



Eleanor Frances Gillet, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 




117 




Carol Ann Glanville, B.A. 

Santa Monica, California 
Major — Sociology 
Minor — Psychology 



Mary Therese Grimmett, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Group Major — History 
English 
Education 




Luise Jane Guettinger, B.A. 

Oakland, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 



Kathleen Ann Halloran, B.A. 

Santa Ana, California 

Major — Home Economics 
Minor — Social Studies 




118 





Judith Ann Henry, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Music 
Minor — English 

Education 



Connie Jeanne Herman, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Art 
Minor — English 



Rose Lea Herman, B.A. 

Costa Mesa, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Social Sciences 



Mary Louise Hogan, B.A. 

Canoga Park, California 
Major — Social Welfare 
Minor — Nursing 




119 




Katherine Kelly, B.A. 

South Saint Paul, Minnesota 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Social Sciences 



Margaret Ann Leary, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 



Mary Lou LeMasfer, B.A. 

Long Beach, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Social Sciences 




Ann Lentz, B.A. 

San Bernardino, California 
Major — Social Welfare 
Minor — Psychology 




120 




Eileen Mary McCabe, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 




Mary Therese Litjen, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 




Kathleen McCoy, B.A. 

Fullerton, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Social Sciences 



Mary Maechling, B.A. 

Inglewood, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 




Deanna Jean Maraccini, B.S. 

Bakersfield, California 
Major — Bacteriology 
Minor — Chemistry 






Lupe Gloria Madrid, B.A. 

Glendale, California 

Major — Home Economics 
Minor — English 



Rosalie Meggiolaro, B.S. 

Phillipsburg, New Jersey 
Major — Bacteriology 
Minor — Chemistry 



Elizabeth Susanna Matz, B.A. 

Inglewood, California 
Major — English 
Minor — History 




122 



Elizabeth Navarroli, B.A. 

Inglewood, California 
Major — Mathematics 
Minor — English 





Aurora Margaret Morett, B.S. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Bacteriology 
Minor — Chemistry 



Nancy Elizabeth Norton, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 



Sharon Louise O'Connor, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — History 
Minor — Education 





123 




Catherine Mary Olenicz, B.A. 

Van Nuys, California 
Major — Art 
Minor — Music 



Rosemary Orsini, B.A. 

Torrance, California 
Major — English 
Minor — History 




Mary Rose Pasic, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 



Lori Paula Perea, B.A. 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 




124 





Catherine Cecile Pigeon, B.A. 

Wasco, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 



Elsita Ismenia Pineda-Adames, B.A. 

Panama City, Republic of Panama 
Major — Sociology 
Minor — Psychology 
English 



Gayne Anne Pinto, B.A. 

Van Nuys, California 
Major — History 
Minor — Art 



Donna Louise Puccinelli, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 








125 



^Upv 




Geraldine Haven Rios, B.A. 

Taft, California 
Major — Deitetics 
Minor — Social Studies 





Ann Riordan, B.A. 

Phoenix, Arizona 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 



Jean Robbie, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Mathematics 
Minor — English 



Claire Therese Roach, B.A. 

San Diego, California 

Major — Business Economics 
Minor — Philosophy 



126 





Carol Lynne Robinson, B.A. 

Santa Monica, California 
Major — Music 
Minor — English 



Margaret Mary Rude, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Sociology 



Dorothy Ann Schaefer, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — History 
Minor — English 

Education 




Constance Ann Serbent, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Psychology 




127 



Celia Sharp, B.A. 

Culver City, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 





Elizabeth Moire Shanahan, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Art 



Dianne Smith, B.A. 

Fullerton, California 
Major — Art 
Minor — Philosophy 



Dolores Swigart Simon, B.S. 

Columbia Falls, Montana 
Major — Nursing 
Minor — Social Sciences 




128 



Chere Major Stark, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 

Major — Home Economics 
Minor — Business Administration 





Joan Veronica Spaeth, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Business Administration 



Barbara Mary Sullivan, B.A. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
Major — English 
Minor — History 



Elizabeth Mary Sullivan, B.A. 

Long Beach, California 

Major — Home Economics 
Minor — Social Studies 




129 




Elsie Mary Szandy, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 



Gloria Nina Travaglini, B.A. 

Encino, California 
Major — Spanish 
Minor — Italian 
History 




Colleen Steele Treiner, B.A. 

West Los Angeles, California 
Major — Sociology 
Minor — Psychology 



Maria Judith Vasquez, B.A. 

Hebbronville, Texas 
Major — English 
Minor — Education 




130 









Marilyn Vaughan, B.S. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Bacteriology 
Minor — Chemistry 



Donna Welk, B.A. 

West Los Angeles, California 
Major — Sociology 
Minor — English 



Joan Bernadette Wombacher, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Chemistry 
Minor — Mathematics 



Mary Ann Wormstead, B.A. 

Calexico, California 
Major — Zoology 
Minor — English 

Chemistry 



Joan Marie Ziegler, B.A. 

Los Angeles, California 
Major — Spanish 
Minor — Sociology 









SetUwi Scyuatuneb 



132 




President 
Gloria Travaglin 



Treasurer 
Elizabeth Sullivan 



Se*Ui 



e*tcwi& 



Vice-President 
Carol Glanville 




President, Gloria Travaglini wel- 
comes Seniors back for their last 
year at the Mount during the first 
class meeting of the year. 



Social Chairman 
Rose Herman 



Secretary 
Eleanor Gillet 






The senior boarders practice one of their "Heavenly Band" numbers. 



Se*U<n rfcttvitceb 



Kathy Crowe explains dance steps during a 
Senior Night Out at Connie Herman's. 



"Hail, hail the gang's all here" at Seniors 
Christmas party. 

Shirley Briggs receives her ticket for "South 
Seas Adventure" from Gloria Travaglini at a 
memorable Senior Night Out. 



Mary Hogan relates to Sister Mary Patricia the 
plans for the Senior Panel, "Psychiatry in Mod- 
ern Life." 



134 





"Psychiatry in M 
the Senior Panel 
ed ideas for st 
cussion. Other panels were 
held on Christian Marriage, the 
Right to Work Law, and Capi- 
tal Punishment. 




Life at a Luau — this was your eve- 
ning for Hawaiian war chants and 
Conga lines. 




135 





Each year you set aside three days 
in which to do spiritual inventory. 
You found in Father Collins a Retreat 
Master who helped you to put your 
accounts in order. 



Father Edward J. Collins, O.M.I., 
Retreat Master, addresses Student 
Body at the first of many confer- 
ences. 



Your campus provides excellent 
surroundings and the proper soli- 
tude in which to make a good 
retreat. 





You found spiritual reading a great 
help in making your retreat. You 
took advantage of the time between 
conferences to read. 



GwiA/ieui 




Nurses take time out from 
their busy schedules for a 
moment of relaxation in 
the patio. 



The smoker is the place to hold intellectual 
discussions, or better still, to play bridge — 
with help from onlookers, of course. 





The Editors and staff of MOUNT '59 wish to express 
our sincere thanks to the £, aT, StHctte @0-fHfe&fUf 

for our Smith-Crafted cover. We appreciate the time spent 
and the helpful suggestions given to us. 



Also, we would like to express our appreciation to 
JTCci'Ul- (£%Ofi/iic tyeCVl&<Ml64, and especially to Mr. 
Hopkins for his sincere interest in the production of this 
book. 



io(?tio€vletf-S*Kit& P6atayiajk6ybe\ov\Qs the 

gratitude of each member of the staff. Mr. Smith, in par- 
ticular, we wish to thank for his willingness to go any- 
where at any time to capture this past year in pictures. 
Without his help, this book would not be. 



138 



Social PatnoHA, 



Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R. Allen 

Dr. and Mrs. C. Clinton Andree 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Apalategui, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. William D. Bergin 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Bernard 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Caraccilo 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene L. Ciarocchi 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Clark 

Class of 1959 

Class of 1960 

Class of 1961 

Class of 1962 

Dr. and Mrs. K. Cary Clem 

Dr. and Mrs. R. Z. Callings, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Curran, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. DeVaney 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Erschoen 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Feeley 

Mr. and Mrs. Orlando Figini 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent G. Fleming 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Foley 

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Funaro 

Gamma Sigma Phi Sorority 

Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Gillet 

Mr. and Mrs. William Glanville 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Glasser 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gomez 

Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Gornick 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Hamano 

Rear Admiral and Mrs. R. S. Hatcher 

Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Herman 

Home Economics Club 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ingersoll 

International Language Club 

Mr. and Mrs. Earle J. Jamison 

Kappa Delta Chi Sorority 

Kappa Theta Mu 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell V. Kasper 

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew J. Kolbert 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard J. Kroger 



Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Squatrito 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Stack 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Steele 

Tau Alpha Zeta Sorority 

Tri-Rho 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Viero 

Mr. and Mrs. Olin L. Wormstead 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Ziegler 

Mr. and Mrs. David Lannent 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Lathrop 

Mr. and Mrs. Salvador Lemus 

Dr. and Mrs. R. J. Lentz 

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Lufty 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Mclntire 

Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Maechling 

Marian Art Club 

Mrs. Josephine M. Mears 

Mrs. Michiko K. Moriuchi 

Mount Masquers 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Mullen 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Muth 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude J. Norton 

Mrs. Theda E. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Olenicz 

Parnassians 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip S. Pavlick 

Mr. and Mrs. Leopoldo Perea 

Dr. and Mrs. James Riordan 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Riordan, Jr. and Girls 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland Roach 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Rude 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas F. Schaefer 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl H. Schiffert 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Schneider 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Serbent 

Sigma Alpha lota 

Social Welfare, Economics, and Sociology Club 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Spanier 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gordon Spiegle 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Sprigg 



3 



U&MCte, 



'P<Zt>KM& 



Bell Bottom Real Estate Co. 

6530 Orange Avenue 

Long Beach, California 

Charles F. Clark Co., Inc. 

Leather Goods 

1403 West Congress Street 

Chicago, Illinois 

Alfred J. Collins 

Collins Bros. Service 

1789 So. La Cienega 

Los Angeles, California 

Crowley & Smith of Sherman Oaks 

Fine Photography 

15476 Ventura Boulevard 

Sherman Oaks, California 

Duralastic Products Co. 

5353 Concord Avenue 

Detroit 1 1, Michigan 

Henry Dalesandro 

Henry's Market 

9624 Exposition Boulevard 

Los Angeles, California 

James J. Fitzharris 

Record Nook 

4860 West 190th Street 

Torrance, California 



Theodore J. Fogliani 

Farmer's Market 

427 North Coast Boulevard 

Laguna Beach, California 

Robert E. Lenihan 

Mud Jack Contractor and Equipment Rentals 

1234 West Cowles Street 

Long Beach 13, California 

Frank J. Matz 

Ontario Sheet Metal Works 

119 South Lemon Avenue 

Ontario, California 

Nick Schaefer Golf Agency 

474 South Robertson Boulevard 

Los Angeles, California 

Travaglini's Restaurant 

17500 Ventura Boulevard 

Encino, California 

"Musically Yours, Lawrence Welk" 

Lester A. Wombacher 

Four S. Baking Company 

1801 Blake Avenue 

Los Angeles, California 



139 



^adex 



Acknowledgements 
Administration 
Annual Staff 
Boarder Activities 
Christmas Formal . 
Classes 

Freshman 

Junior 

Senioi 

Activities 
Luau . 
Officers 
Panels 

Sophomore 
Clubs 

CSTA 

Eusebians 

Home Economics 

ILC 

KTM 

Legion of Mary 

Marian Art Club 

Mount Masquers 

Parnassians 

Red Cross 

SAI 

Sodality 

SWES 

White Caps 

YCS 
Coordinating Council 
Crafts West 
Dedication 
Faculty 

Art 

Biology . 

Business . 

Drama 

Education 

English 



138 


History 


8-10 


Home Economics 


76 


Language 


43-45 


Mathematics 


83 


Music 




Nursing . 


100-109 


Philosophy 


80-89 


Physical Education 


112-132 


Physical Science 


133-134 


Sociology 


135 


Theology 


133 


Graduates . 


135 


Guest Speakers 


90-99 


Homecoming Queen 




Honor Graduates 


63 


Honor Societies 


62 


Mardi Gras Ball . 


50-51 


Men's Ciub . 


52-53 


Mother's Guild 


69 


NFCCS 


65 


NSA . 


58 


Patrons 


68-69 


Productions 


68 


Frosh Frolics 


67 


Play 


56 


Spring Sing 


64 


Retreat 


66 


Special Events 


54-55 


Sororities 


65 


Gamma Sigma Phi 


39 


Kappa Delta Chi 


59 


Tau Alpha Zeta 


4 


Student Council . 




Student-Faculty Board 


11 


Studies 


1 1 


Theme 


12 


View Staff . 


13 


Westwords Staff 


12 


Who's Who 


13 





16 
15 
15 
19 
14 
17 
16 
19 
18 
19 
18 
12-132 
40 
99 
41 
72-73 
92-93 
71 
70 
67 
42 
136 

104 

69 

59 

136 

137 

46 
47 
48 

38-39 
39 

22-34 

3 

75 

74 

41 



140 






s 



MIRRO-GRAPHIC 



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GLENDALE 4, CALIFORNIA 




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