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MOUKT 




Published by the Senior Class 



Mount St. Mary's College 



Los 





Angeles, California 



How to represent living, learning 
a disciplined life to train 

a mind in a free range of thought. 

We chose as our symbol the college seal: 

The lily 

symbol of Mary, 
the whole woman; 
patroness of four years 

of learning 

to realize life. 

The open book 

"Deus llluminatio Mea," 
God my light through 

four years of 

life-learning. 

The fleur-de-lis 

Sisters of St. Joseph, 
founders, builders; 
artists whose art is 
teaching. 

The wings of Los Angeles 
center of social activities, 
motion: lights, people, machines; 
Discovery. 




ADMINIS 



Sister Mary Rebecca, Presi 



College founders: 
administrators, 
teachers. 
Give 

Sympathize 
Control: 1 
the teaching-learning motion. 
God our light. 

l T. S. Eliot, THE WASTELAND 




Father James O'Reilly, Chaplain 



TRATION 




Sister Alice Marie, Dean of the Undergraduate School 




Sister Mercia Louise, Guidance Counselor 



Sister Rose Cecilia, Dean of Women 





sM*m&m 





Judith Schwiec 
President 



Judith Bleak 
Vice-President 




Senior Legislature Members: Carol Clem, Helen Jaskoski, Pat Kirk, Pat Thompson, Judy Bleak, Carole 
Cook, Rosemary Strano. Not pictured: Shefla Sausse, Judy Jones, Kathy Herman. 



Marian Menges 
Secretary 



Barbara Dummel 
Treasurer 



Peggy Carr 
Social Chairman 






SENIORS 

Lily of Mary, 

perfection of growth and maturity. 

The intent of life 

must rely on 

the discipline of learning. 

Progression, maturation of: 

Knowledge 

Love. 

To terminate to commence. 




PAT ALLINDER 
Los Angeles, California 

Nursing, Psychology 



KATHLEEN ARN 

Los Angeles, California 
Latin, Spanish 



BARBARA BELLE 

Pomona, California 
History, French 





SARAH JANE BOLGER 

Los Angeles, California 
Nursing, Psychology 



JUDY BELLUZ 

Lompoc, California 

English, Education 

MARY COLLETTE BOLAND 

Los Angeles, California 
English, Education 





MARY SUSAN BRICK 

Los Angeles, California 
History, Economics 



MARY BUSSINO 

Los Angeles, California 
Spanish, Italian 





JOAN BROSOVIC 

Los Angeles, California 

Mathematics, Chemistry 

BARBARA BUCKMAN 

Los Angeles, California 

Sociology, Psychology 



MARGARET BUXKEMPER 

Los Angeles, California 
Art, Biology 





KATHLEEN BUTTS 

Bakersfield, California 

Pre-Social Work, Psychology 



PATRICIA CALVANO 
Phoenix, Arizona 

Nursing, Psychology 




12 




BETTY CANFIELD 

South Pasadena, California 
English, Psychology 



NANCY CARPENTER 

Los Angeles, California 

Nursing, Psychology 





PEGGY CARR 

Phoenix, Arizona 

Pre-Social Work, Psychology 



13 




BARBARA CASALE 

Los Angeles, California 

History & English, Education 



CAROL CLEM 

Los Angeles, California 
Drama, History 




MARGARET CONLEY 

Los Angeles, California 
Spanish and Drama 



CAROLE COOK 

Torrance, California 

Home Economics, Merchandising 



14 




MARY COTTER 

Pacific Palisades, California 

History and English, Education 



MAUREEN CURRAN 

Hawthorne, California 
English, History 




LUCY DALEY 

Pomona, California 

Biology, Chemistry and Philosophy 



REGINA D'AMBROSIO 

Phoenix, Arizona 

Biology, Chemistry 



15 




KARYL DONOVAN 
Phoenix, Arizona 

English, Education 



BARBARA DEE 

Manila, Philippines 

Business Administration, Spanish 

MARY AGNES DeSOLENNI 

Culver City, California 

Nursing, Psychology 




16 




BARBARA MARIE DUMMEL 

Los Angeles, California 

Chemistry, Mathematics 



BE.RNICE FIJAK 
Los Angeles, California 

Home Economics, History 





KATHLEEN EARNHART 
Prescott, Arizona 

Nursing, Psychology 

ENID EVANS 
Los Angeles, California 
English, Education 



17 



HARRIET FRAPPIA 
Los Angeles, California 

History and English, Education 





GAIL FORMAN 

Los Angeles, California 

Pre-Social Work, History 



JOANNE FULLER 

Los Angeles, California 
Biology, Chemistry 




18 




MARIE GEORGES 

North Hollywood, California 
Nursing, Psychology 



GERI GHIZ 

Encino, California 

English, Philosophy 





DIANE GIACOMA 

Los Angeles, California 
English, Education 



19 




PATRICIA HARDISON 

Yakima, Washington 

Home Economics, English 



JUDITH LARAINE HARRIS 

San Diego, California 

English, Education 




MARY HARRIS 

Upland, California 

Home Economics, 



Music 



JANET HEBERT 
Los Angeles, California 
English, Education 



20 




AAARIE HEDIGER 

Los Angeles, California 
English, French 



JOAN AAARIE HEINZ 

Anaheim, California 

English, Education 




KATHLEEN HERAAAN 

Los Angeles, California 
English, Education 



LOIS HERNDON 

Los Angeles, California 
Nursing, Psychology 



21 




ELEANOR HORRIGAN 

Los Angeles, California 
French, English 

KATHLEEN JESTER 

Santa Barbara, California 
Nursing, Psychology 



JUDITH JONES 

Los Angeles, California 
Nursing, Psychology 




22 



PATRICIA KIRK 

La Jolla, California 

Chemistry, Biology 





RENATE KERRIS 

North Hollywood, California 
English, French 

PATRICIA KINERK 

Los Angeles, California 
History, Education 



23 




INGRID KLOPP 

Los Angeles, California 
French, English 



CAROL KROLL 

Northridge, California 
Biology, Chemistry 




JUDITH KROMMER 
Los Angeles, California 
English, History 



MARGARET LANGHANS 

Santa Ana, California 

English, Theology and French 



24 




JANICE LEAL 

Bell, California 

Spanish, Italian 



ROSEMARY LELLO 

Los Angeles, California 

Nursing, Psychology 




VIRGINIA LEITOLD 

Santa Monica, California 
Biology, Chemistry 



LOLA McALPIN 
Los Angeles, California 

Political Science, History 



25 





JUDITH MERINO 

Los Angeles, California 
Nursing, Psychology 



JOLENE MARY MULLINS 

Downey, California 

Nursing, Psychology 



MARIAN MENGES 

Fullerton, California 
English, French 

MARIE MORELLI 

South Gate, California 

Sociology, Psychology 




26 



JEAN O'MALLEY 
Van Nuys, California 

English, Psychology 





GERALDINE OKAMURA 

Wailuku, Maui, Hawaii 

Nursing, Psychology 

KATHLEEN O'LEARY 

Sibley, Iowa 

Nursing, Psychology 



27 



BARBARA PALUMBO 

Gloversville, New York 
Spanish, Education 





PATRICIA ORSELLI 

Pomona, California 

Home Economics, 
Business Administration 



JEANETTE PELLETIER 

Sylmar, California 

English, Education 




28 




LEANNE PETERS 
Los Angeles, California 

History, Business Administration 



CATHIE POCOCK 

Phoenix, Arizona 

English, Education 





MARGARET POTTER 

Needles, California 

Nursing, Psychology 



29 




MARIEL PRICE 

Los Angeles, California 

History, Education and Philosophy 



ANN-MARIE RIEGER 

Los Angeles, California 
History, English 




CATHARINE ROMANO 

Los Angeles, California 

Chemistry, Mathematics 



JEANNE RUIZ 

Van Nuys, California 
English, Education 



30 




DORIS RUSSELL 

Covina, California 

English, Education 



SHEILA SAUSSE 

Sherman Oaks, California 
History, Psychology 




MARIE SCHMIDT 

National City, California 
Art, English 



KATHERINE SCHREUDER 

North Hollywood, California 
Economics, English 




LINDA SCHUTZ 

Los Angeles, California 
Nursing, Psychology 



HIROKO SHIMOOKA 

North Hollywood, California 
Nursing, Psychology 



JUDITH SCHWIEGER 

Los Angeles, California 

History and English and Education 



NAN SLATTERY 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Nursing, Psychology 




32 




INGRID STEINWASSER 

Los Angeles, California 
Biology, Zoology 



ROSEMARY STRANO 

Los Angeles, California 
Biology, Chemistry 





REGINA STONER 

Lancaster, California 

Home Economics, Chemistry 
and Business Administration 



KATHLEEN STOUGHTON 

Anaheim, California 

Music, Education 



33 




EILEEN TAYLOR 

National City, California 

Home Economics, Chemistry 
and Business Administration 



PATRICIA ANN THOMPSON 

Bakersfield, California 

Mathematics, English 




LUANNE VONDER KUHLEN 

North Hollywood, California 

Nursing, Psychology and English 



MARION WILSON 

Lompoc, California 

Mathematics, Sociology 



34 




PATRICIA WRIGHT 

Beverly Hills, California 

English, Sociology 



ALICE ZAMORA 

San Fernando, California 
Spanish, Business 



SYLVIA CAFFREY 

Los Angeles, California 

Biology, Chemistry and English 



OLIVIA PLASCENCIA 
Los Angeles, California 

Economics and Spanish 



RITA LIN 

Pacific Palisades, California 

Home Economics, Business 



ELIZABETH CAHILL 

Beverly Hills, California 
Art, English 



CARMEN TEJADA 

Sepulveda, California 

Music, Music Theory and Spanish 



35 




36 



Underqw> u ates 



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37 





Jane Luecke 
Vice-President 



Ingrid Jacobson 
President 





Junior Legislature Members: Left to right: Karen Jacobson, Anne Dietz, Sue Murphy, Toni Turner, Dann! 
Hoffman, Cheri Haines. Standing: Mary Alice Alston, Hillair Bell, Sally Sands. 



Cathy Simmons 
Social Chairman 



Susan Kolp 
Treasurer 



Diana Leonard 
Publicity Chairman 






38 





Planning their project for second semester, a group of junior 
eagerly check the datebook. 



A "special feature" of Green Week was this serenade prepared by thei 
freshmen for Juniors Ingrid Jacobson and Lynn Albizati. 



JUNIORS 



The open book. 

To begin the end 

of mind-movement. 

Experience 

of life-learning balance. 

Almost-attainment. 




Taking lime out from poi and pineapples to pose witr 
their dates are juniors Sandy Olache, Pat Milhe anc 
Alice Koster. 



39 






Leigh Albizati 
Vice-President 



Michele Mayotte 
President 



Barbara Sartori 
Secretary 




Sophomore Legislature Members: First row: Eileen Murphy, Jackie Petras, Jane Zola. Second row: 
Naomi Takeshita, Nancy Reilly, June Hines, Diane Lawlor. 






Stephanie Simon 
Social Chairman 



Mikie Simon 
Treasurer 



Tina Tarantino 
Publicity Chairman 



40 





Sophomores check the Mount Handbook for the date of their sophomore 
dance. 



Members of Pi Theta Mu, sophomore service 
organization, prepare to usher a student body 
Mass. 



SOPHOMORES 



"Deus llluminatio Mea." 

Progression in the progress 

of training 

in freedom. 

How best to approach 

maturity: 

Live to learn. 




Carola Peus forgets her assignment for a moment as she 
anticipates the Mardi Gras. 



41 






Janet King 
Vice-President 



Richelle Petras 
President 



Sandra Villelli 
Secretary 




Freshman legislature Members- First row; Michelle Lundborg, Sue Scott, Sue Smernoff. Second rov 
Sue Schanz, Pauline Cipriano, Pat Sheehan, Mary Ann McCaffery, Agnes Armilage, Mary Clor 
Gorman. Not pictured: Cecilia Brewer. 









Mory Ann McCaffer 
Sooal Chairman 



Patricia Konoske 
Treasurer 



Kathleen Reed 
Publicity Chairman 



42 





The seven dwarfs perform at the freshmen Frosh Froli 



Funny wasn't it. Michelle Lundborg 
mistress of ceremonies, pauses for a 
moment during Frosh Frolics. 



FRESHMEN 



God my light. 
A volume opened 

on four years 

to strive to reach, 

to realize 

a purpose: 

Learn to live. 




In their joint project with the seniors, freshmen prepare decorations 
for the retarded children's Christmas party. 



43 




Downtown campus officers: Mary Cholewa, Downtown campus coordinator; 
Leslie Hannin, social chairman; Susan Matthews; president; Mary Mac- 
Donald, treasurer; Sybil Rousseve, secretary; Love Wharton, vice-president. 




DOWNTOWN 



Assimilation into the 

entity: 

a part-whole; 

absorbed and absorbing. 

Continuation, growth of 

relationships, 

ideas, 

of living-learning. 




Sister Eloise Therese 
Downtown campus director 



44 





Elaborately decorated rooms furnish the background for many classes 



CAMPUS 



Downtown campus students gather in the 
"oasis" between classes. 





Sewing class learns the importance of 
labels in choosing clothes. 



45 







46 



J\rJS amd Stwmes 







47 



FACULTY 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

Mr. Leone 



ART 

Mr. Bennett 
Mr. Fecht 
Mrs. Harrison 
Mr. Hooper 
Sr. Jeanne Marie 
Miss Smith 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Sr. M. Gerald 
Mrs. Grubbs 
Dr. LaDochy 
Miss Mirabal 
Mr. Shelton 
Miss Zeuthen 



BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Sr. Catherine Therese 

Mr. Ervin 

Sr. Raymond Mary 

Miss Rippon 

Mr. Turner 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Sr. M. Germaine 
Mrs. Katz 



Mr. Stodder 
Mrs. Tunberg 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 



Mrs. LaDochy 
Miss Oglesby 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 

Sr. St. Claire 
Mr. Delahanty 
Msgr. Dignan 
Miss Erchoen 
Sr. Mary Helen 
Dr. Oard 
Dr. Pereyra 
Sr. Robertine 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Sr. Cecile Therese 
Sr. Mary Irene 
Sr. Paulanne 
Mrs. Simpson 



MATHEMATICS 

Sr. Margaret Leo 

Fr. O'Reilly 

Sr. Rose Gertrude 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Sr. Aline Marie 

Dr. Andreani 

Sr. Anita Joseph 

Dr. Basi 

Sr. Eloise Therese 

Mr. Fortis 

Mr. Hanak 

Sr. M. Hildegarde 

Mr. Podryski 



MUSIC 

Mr. Compinsky 

Dr. Doran 

Sr. Dolores Cecile 

Dr. Evenson 

Sr. Maria Teresita 

Sr. Maura Jean 

Dr. Pierson 

Mr. Salamunovich 

Dr. Thomas 



NURSING 

Dr. Barnard 
Miss Davis 
Miss Ddrling 
Jean Felton, M.D. 
Miss Grafford 
Miss Harris 
Mrs. Hermer 
Sr. John Bernard 



DRAMA AND SPEECH 

Dr. Bennett 
Mr. Bottone 
Mr. O'Keefe 



EDUCATION 

Msgr. Clyne 
Sr. Georgine Marie 
Sr. Margaret Clare 
Sr. Mercia Louise 
Sr. Regina Clare 
Sr. Rose de Lima 
Miss Schiffilea 
Dr. Young 



ENGLISH 

Dr. Bennett 
Mr. Bottone 
Dr. Evans 
Mr. Hanak 
Sr. Laurentia 
Sr. Mary 
Sr. Mary Patricia 
Sr. Mary William 
Sr. Patricia Clare 



A rare opportunity to share interests is taken advantage of by teachers 
during lunch. 



48 




Sr. Mary Stephen 
Mrs. Nolten 
Miss Powers 
Sr. Richard Joseph 
Mrs. Williams 



PHILOSOPHY 

Mr. Buckenmeyer 
Dr. Esgate 
Mr. Graham 
Mr. Haas 
Fr. Kelly, O.P. 
Mr. Woods 



PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Dr. Bundy 

Sr. Cecilia Louise 

Dr. Han 

Fr. O'Reilly 




PSYCHOLOGY 

Mr. Leton 
Sr. Mercia Louise 
Dr. Rhulman 
Dr. Young 



SOCIOLOGY 

Sr. Mary Brigid 
Miss Rippon 



THEOLOGY 

Fr. Curran, O.P. 

Fr. Hall, O.P. 

Fr. Kelly, O.P. 

Sr. Rose Cecilia 

Fr. Scheuer, O.Carm. 



An informal discussion before class engages Sr. St. Claire 
and Dr. Oard. 



The fleur de lis, 

artistic formation: 

teaching, the art of 

forming, building. 

Our discovery, through form, 

of freedom. 



Not only do faculty members reach the students in the classroom, but also 
in informal counseling sessions. 



The patio provides an informal meeting place for teachers 
and students. 






Miss Smith points out the more humorous aspects of modern art. 



A 
R 
T 




Senior art students Elizabeth Cahill and Margaret 
Buxkemper listen as Marie Schmidt compares the 
techniques of different artists. 



Beginning art students learn the funda- 
mentals of drawing. 



50 



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Music students, under the guidance of Dr. Doran, learn 
to play the clarinet. 



DRAMA 



First year music majors begin their studies with a course in solfege 



Mr. O'Keefe sets the mood for the nex 



he directs a drama clc 



Learning the effects of staging is just one step in the making 
of an actress. 




ENGLISH 



<*fj^ 




Sister Patricia Clare conducts an open discussion to clarify the fine points of 
English composition. 



the advanced creative writing students criticize the novels they 
have written this semester. 



LANGUAGES 



To demonstrate proper pronunciation and inflection, Dr. Andrean 
reads to her Italian Class. 




Under Mrs. Demby's guidance students 
broaden their understanding of Russian 
life and language. 






Leaving for a day at the hospital to put classroom knowledge into 
practice are Pat Carroll, Margaret Bush and Lawreen Crain. 



Nursing students prepare to assist in the Health Office duties 
for students. 




N 
U 
R 

S 
I 

N 
G 



54 




Class reports aid future teachers in guid- 
ance of the adolescent. 



EDUCATION 




Student teachers discuss preparation for elementary school 
classes they teach. 




Future secondary education teachers talk over 
teaching methods with Dr. Young. 



55 




In the chemistry laboratory students learn to develop the practical methods and techniqi 
of the chemist. 



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Advanced bacteriology students discuss the results of their labora- 
tory experimentation with their instructor, Miss Zeuthen. 




Dr. LaDochy quizzes his students on current material in general life 



56 



MATHEMATICS 



Mathematics student explains to Sister 
Rose Gertrude and the class her solu- 
tion to a differential calculus problem. 




\^' 




Father O'Reilly gets his point across to his calculus students by 
means of a demonstration. 



Elementary analysis class listens as Sister Margaret Leo explains the 
new material on algebraic equations. 



57 



s 
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Dr. Oard's discussion in history class makes the subject come alive to the students. 




s 

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The complexities of current problems of governme 
Delahanty's political science class. 



are the discussion topic of Mr. 



58 




Future social workers listen intently as Sister Mary Brigid explains the history of social security. 




Economics class listens as Sister Catherine Therese informs them on economic 
trends in American business. 



The aspects of social relationships are explained to the 
class by Miss Rippon. 



59 




Seniors, Bernice Fijak, Mary Harris arid Pat Or 
learn the art of cookery through practice. 



HOME 
ECONOMICS 





Mrs. Simpson lectures her students on the devel- 
opment and use of textiles. 



Students question Sister Cecile Therese on problems 
occurring in child growth. 



THEOLOGY 




Students listen attentively as Sister Rose Cecilia discusses the meaning of 
moral theology. 



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PHILOSOPHY 



Mr. Buckenmeyer poses a question to his stu- 
dents on the meaning of philosophy. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Students learn the basics of psychology from Sister 
Mercia Louise. 




61 







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62 



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CLUBS ^A gTiyiTieS 



63 





Kathleen Baker 
Secretary 



•, 



Sharon Bowen 
President 




Lynn Albizati 
Vice-President 






Maureen Crean 
Social Chairman 



Catharine Romano 
Parliamentarian 



NSA Coordinator 




Margaret Conley 
Publicity Chairman 





NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

Freshman Sue Scott relates her experiences 
as young student leader to N.S.A. coordi- 
nator Lola McAlpin and her assistants, Diane 
de Anda and Diane Clarke. The N.S.A. on 
our campus functions to organize conferences 
to train freshmen in the art of leadership 
and to keep student citizens aware of cur- 
rent national problems. 



STUDENT LEADERS 



HONOR SYSTEM COMMITTEE 

The Honor System Committee under the guidance of Sister 
Catherine Anita strives to make each girl conscious of her 
responsibility to maintain the personal honor and integrity 
of a Christian woman. Seated: Dale Wright, Susan Ready, 
Sister Catherine Anita, Ann Kilgore. Standing: Pat Reilly, 
Sheila Sausse, Lynn Albizati. 



65 vm 




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RESIDENT 



The life of the "boarder" forms an important part of 
the Mount campus. Close friendships, mutual cooperation 
and impromptu get-togethers all add their part to the 
atmosphere. Headed by the Resident Council, organized 
events are planned which include formal banquets, holiday 
parties, movies and the traditional Christmas caroling. 



rm 



Peg Langhar 
President 



Resident officers: Diane Plou, Kathy Butts, Mi- 
chelle Lundborg, Social Chairman Chris Ceretto, 
President Peggy Langhans, Vice-President Sue 
Lee, Mary Emma Kazmierczak, Gail Fiedler, Re- 
gina D'Ambrosio. 




Entrance to the residence halls . . . 



:? 




STUDENTS 




In the newly decorated dining room, resident students enjoy their meals. 






In between classes in the fifth 
floor lounge . . . 





Senior day hops take advantage of their privilege to study at the round 
tables in the library. 




DAY 
HOPS 



HUSTLERS 




The "caf" is home away from home for day hops who 
gather there during leisure hours. 



The Browsing Room witnesses many activities of the day hops — studying, 
sleeping, and chatting. 



68 





That modern wonder — the vending machine— provides Mount 
day hops with such "necessities" as coffee, candy, cigarettes, 
soft drinks, and ice cream. 



The morning rush for a parking space and the flight up the narrow Mount 
road still remain a challenge to the day hops. 



Gtftx'&fc 




The patio is a favorite place for relaxation and animated d 



iscussion. 



69 




YOUNG CHRISTIAN STUDENTS 

Camille Esselle, Toni Turner, Naomi Takeshita, Vir- 
ginia Speltz, and Nancy Andres, Y.C.S. members, 
discuss and attempt to solve the many problems 
affecting the Christian student's life. 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 



OUR LADY'S SODALITY 

Sodality members become interested in 
spreading Christian principles in other 
lands through the talk by Miss Gloria 
Boyd, an alumna, on her experiences in 
Venezuela. 




70 



GAMMA SIGMA PHI 




Gammas, First row: Julie Psomas, Kathy Baker, Harriet Frappia, Sue Murphy, Ann Kilgore, Mikie Simon, 
Barbara Casale. Second row: Jeanne Schanhaar, Sandy Rogers, Mary Lee Storey, Sue Trombly, Mariel 
Price, Pat Wright. Third row: Janet Heberf, Sharon Curran, Marian Menges, Pat O'Gara, Sheila Sausse, 
Leigh Albizati. Fourth row: Eleanor Horrigan, Jeanne Fischer, Kathy Herman, Cheri Haines, Hillair 
Bell, Carole Cook. 



Gammas, arrayed in patched clothing, 
potato sacks, and various odds and ends, 
have good times at their annual Hard 
Times Party. 




KAPPA DELTA CHI 




wm •• 1 m — <f " ■ ' f 



Kappas, F,rst row: Margarita Samaniego, Pat Orselli, Margaret Buxkemper, Olivia Plascencia Marie 
Morelli. Mary Bussino. Second row: Marilyn Berutto, Diane Clarke, Sue Kowalensky, Mariya Truskol 
Dons Russell. Third row: Pat Kinerk, Michelle Pierrong, Marilyn Meyer, Elizabeth Cahill, Martha Sprigg. 
Fourth row: Joan Heinz, Kathy Stoughton, Maureen Curran, Carrie Skirlick. Fifth 
Camille Abdelnour, Jeanette Kroger, Alice Zamora, Barbara Buckman, Leanne Peters. 



Kathy Butts, 



Kappas, Joan Heinz, Mary Bussino, Carol 
Kroll, Pat Orselli, and Alice Zamora get 
in the spirit for the annual Polka Party. 




TAU ALPHA ZETA 




Taus, First row: Colleen Gillen, Peggy Leohy, Kathy Leahy, May Higgins, Tina Tarantino. Second row: 
Julie O'Connor, Susan Kolp, Gail Fiedler, Marianne Portl, Cecelia Schmahl, Mary Alice Alston. Third 
row: Bobbi Dummel, Janet Olimski, Gale Gilmore, Ingrid Jacobson, Pam Martin, Kathy Russey. 
Fourth row: Cathy Romano, Pat Kirk, Toni Turner, Nancy Sullivan, Linda Bezzelle, Carol Becker. 




Kathy Russey, Bobbi Dummel, and Janet 
Olimski set the mood fter Taz annual 
Roaring Twenties Party. 




PROFESSIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 



SIGMA ALPHA IOTA 



Sigma Alpha lota members Judith Atkins, Naomi Takeshita, and 
Mary Harris greet guests at a recent student recital. 



STUDENT CALIFORNIA TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 

Lectures and discussions of problems encountered in the field of education are the prime interest of 
SCTA members under the direction of Rosemary Moselli. 




74 



m$ 




MARION ART CLUB 

Marion Art Club members happily 
anticipate their Art Festival which is 
open to the entire student body. The 
Festival gives the students an oppor- 
tunity to exhibit their own talents and 
view those of other students. 



DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS 



LAMBDA OMICRON CHI 

Members of Lambda Omicron Chi, the 
home economics club, look over the 
current project of the tailoring class. 




75 



PARNASSIANS 



Parnassians, Judy Harris, Camille Esselle, 
Marian Menges, and Peggy Langhans en- 
joy discussing and analyzing a contem- 
porary novel. 




MASQUERS 




Masquers discuss plans with Mr. O'Keefe 
for a new play they will present. 



76 




Masquers rehearse current production they will present as one of the projects of the club. 



Stage manager, Regina D'Ambrosio, dis- 
cusses with her crew the sets and lighting 
for the forthcoming play. 




RING AROUND THE MOON 



The Masquers' fall production 
was "RING AROUND THE 
MOON." It was a satirical com- 
edy of manners complicated by 
a set of identical twins. 




"Would you good ladies be so kind to take a seat," says Joshua to ballerina Mandy Cuajun 
and mother Jackie Petras. 



Ken Palma and Mary Couture tango 
garden. 



in the winter- 



"Kiss me you lost dog and I'll find your way home for you." 
Frank Kilmond and Kitty Splaine. 




78 




Carol Clem and Maris Lindley reminisce 
about the good old days in piano class. 




Carmen Tejada as Madame De Mortes 
asserts her authority to the decadent old 
butler. 





Romanville and Hugo stir and manipulate 
the thickening plot. 



79 






^^ n c C 




HONOR 
SOCIETIES 



ALPHA MU GAMMA 

Alpha Mu Gamma is the Modern Language Honor Society. It is composed of those 
girls who have consistently maintained a high average in a modern language. 



SIGMA DELTA PI 

Jan Leal, Margaret Conley, Kathy Arn, Marga- 
rita Samaniego, Camille Esselle, Alice Zamora 
and Penny Hooper are the Mount's members of 
the National Spanish Honor Society. 




80 




PI THETA MU 

Poised Pi Theta Mu members: First row: Nancy Reiley, Catherine Cozy, Margaret Matta, Cordelia 
Reardon, Mary Ann Stacker. Second row: Pat Chapman, Margaret Norton, Diane Lawlor, Leigh 
Albizati, Ann Kilgore offer their services to the faculty and students organizations for various 
functions. 




LAMBDA IOTA TAU 

Lambda lota Tau, National Literature Honor Society. Members, left to right: Peggy Langhans, Helen 
Jaskoski, Judy Harris, Diane Nelson, Renate Kerris, Enid Evans, and Marian Menges must main- 
tain a high average in English and present a paper to the society for admission. 




HONORS 
SEMINAR 



Junior-Senior Seminar. First row: Judy Bleak, Helen Jas- 
koski, Marian Menges. Second row: Pat Kirk, Jane Luecke, 
Peggy Langhans. Third row: Kathy Arn, Bobbi Dummel, 
Mary Susan Brick. Fourth row: Jeanette Kroger, Virginia 
Speltz, Marianne Stanley, Sharon Bowen. (Not pictured: 
Enid Evans, Rosemary Moselli.) Members develop an abil- 
ity to relate and synthesize their various disciplines 
through the seminar. 




#4« «#* 




Sophomore Seminar. First row: Kathy Baker, Dianede Anda, Patri- 
cia Chapman, Mary Ann Stocker, Emily Deutsch. Second row: 
Diane Lawlor, Pat Smith, Camilla Tortoreto. Members discuss the 
social, philosophical, and scientific aspects of life. 




Freshman Seminar. First row: Michelle Lundborg, Yolanda Araiza, 
Kitty Carton. Second row: Sue Amerongen, Sue Schanz, Katherine 
Karnes, Janet King, Sue Scott, Judy Tarbet enjoy a discussion 
of Dante's Divine Comedy with Sister Mary Patricia. 



WHO'S WHO 




Nomination by the Senior Class, based on scholarship, leadership, citizenship, and future promise, 
places seventeen seniors in Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. First row: Marian 
Menges, Enid Evans, Peggy Carr. Second row: Kathy Herman, Peggy Langhans. 



First row: Helen Jaskoski, Margaret Conley, Carol Clem. 
Second row: Judy Schweiger, Judy Bleak, Lola McAlpin, 
Sheila Sausse. (Not pictured: Judy Harris, Mary Harris, 
Renate Kerris, Pat Kirk, Hiroko Shimooka.) 





THE VIEW 



Mount St. Mary's newspaper THE VIEW com- 
bines fine writing with excellent coverage of 
events on and off campus. The able staff, com- 
posed of Mount students from both campuses, 
helps readers to be well-informed and thinking 
Catholic women. 



' 



Enid Evans 
Editor 



Page editors Mikie Simon and Michele 
Mayotte discuss an article being written 
for the next issue. 





Staff members look over a current issue 
of The View and prepare assignments for 
the issue to come. 




WEST WORDS 



The WESTWORDS, the quarterly literary maga- 
zine at the Mount, displays the talents of the 
Mount students. The staff, with the full responsi- 
bility of preparing each issue, must select, for pub- 
lication, the poems, short stories, and essays 
submitted by the students in various fields of study. 



Marian Menges 
Editor 



Preparing to meet their deadline, the 
Westwords' staff organize and put to- 
gether the pages for the next issue. 





A time consuming and important part of 
the work of the staff is choosing the 
articles for each issue. 







This year marked the return of a student body 
annual. The co-editors, Kathy Butts and Joan 
Brosovic with Sister Mary moderating, burned the 
midnight oil many times in order to meet dead- 
lines. Finally the last pages were sent off and 
everyone rested. The entire staff deserves credit 
for their work. 



Joan Brosovic 
Co-editor 




Staff: Leanne Peters, Eleanor Horrigan, 
Marie Schmidt, Judy Harris, Peggy Carr, 
Judy Bleak, Kathy Butts, Bobbi Dummel, 
Pat Orselli, Marg Buxkemper, Rosemary 
Strano. 



The art staff, Marg Buxkemper, Marie 
Schmidt, and Nan Kubelka, combine their 
talent to develop a new technique in 
yearbook art. 




MOUNT 





Kathy Butts 
Co-editor 



The art, photography, and layout staffs combine their efforts to produce this year's annual. 



The literary staff discusses copy, captions 
and headlines for the yearbook. 




The activities of the year be- 
gan with the opening of the 
Downtown Campus. The two 
campuses of Mount St. Marys 
combined on many activities 
throughout the year. 




The freshmen began their college career 
with the traditional Green Week. Through- 
out the week, under the guidance of the 
junior class, they are introduced to the 
Mount campus and its activities. 




At the end of Green Week, the freshmen 
display their talent to the college through 
the production of Frosh Frolics. 




Motion of, flight of 
Wings. 

Social reinforces intellectual, 

(lights, 
light) 

Together shape the facets 
of person. 

To discover, to realize 
oneness. 



The formal initiation of the freshmen occurs on Founders Day with the 
traditional capping ceremony. 



In October we find the students going 
Hawaiian. Seniors pause with their dates 
for a picture before returning to their 
fish and poi. 





During the Founders Day program, the 
freshmen are also introduced to the his- 
tory of our college. 




Among the varied activities at the Mount are the many concerts held throughout the year. 





At the end of February music is heard throughout the campus as the girl 
practice for Spring Sing. 



The Art Festival, held annually, is produced through the com- 
bined efforts of each department. 



Peggy and Marian assist Barbara in pre- 
paring for the Junior-Senior Prom. 




91 



EASTERN 
RITE 
MASS 





Mount students stand with hands crossed while receiving Communion under the two 
species of bread and wine. 



Rev. Eugene Chromoga and Rev. William Levkulic co-celebrate 
Mass. Two priests celebrate one and the same Mass in the 
Byzantine Rite. 




92 




On the feast of Saint Nicholas, December 6, 
Mount students participated in the Byzantine 
Rite of the Eastern Church. The Mass, celebrated 
in the English language, was characterized by 
an active participation of the student body in 
directly sung responses. 



w 





SSL 




j ip - Jl 


^ * : -■'■ 
• as 




j 


.*! 


JS XT 




ft »e,^^> , 



w 



• "S* 





practice the theoretical 



(Deus llluminatio 


Mea) 


of learning; 




perfect the growth 




(knowing, 




loving) 




of life. 




To commence to terminate 



93 



We the editors and the staff of 
Mount '63 wish to thank all those 
who helped produce this book. 



American Yearbook Co. 
Mr. Hopkins, representative 



Christy - Shepherd Studio 



Marvin D. Chantry, photographer 



S. K. Smith Co. 



Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc., publishers 



96 



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