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Full text of "Mount St. Mary's College 1978-1980"

"The se precious years should be aimed toward being 
a better person, a happier person, a more productive person! 



Sister Magdalen Coughlin 
President, Mount St. Mary's College 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/mountstmaryscollOOmsmr 



Mount St. Mary's College is a small, Catholic, liberal arts college, 

primarily for women. We stress these four distinctions, because 

they are vital in helping you decide whether we are right for you. 

Our size is important. We are small enough for each student to be 
an individual who matters. Small enough for us to know your name, 
and to call you by it. Small enough for you to be a face, not a number. 

Our Catholic heritage matters. It puts you in touch with 

questions of substance about the universe, people, God, yourself. 

It shapes our values and will affect yours. It will not restrict you. If 

you happen not to be Catholic, you will not feel out of place here. 

Our liberal arts emphasis gives dimension to life. It will open doors for 
your eyes and ears, and for your heart and mind and soul. 

Though men are welcome in our departments of nursing and music, 

we are a women's college. We nurture the difference 

between women and men, even as we prepare you to enjoy and 

contribute to and excel in the world of both. 

In the next pages, we will try to show you who we are. We have tried 
to be as candid as possible. Your life is precious, and we want 

you to make as much of this gift as possible. If we 
are right for you, and you for us, we can enrich each other. 



Welcome to the Mount! 



Walking across the campus, you notice first 
the friendliness. Whether you're with a student or 
a secretary or a Sister, everyone you meet smiles 
and speaks. It's a good feeling. 

Look into a classroom, and you discover 
another mark of the Mount. Classes are small. The 
atmosphere is involved, intense, highly personal. 
Learning is obviously of paramount importance. 

Mount St. Mary's College is unique, even as 
you are. We hope our description and photographs 
will be helpful to you in determining whether it is 
right for you. And vice versa. 
The bare facts. 

Mount St. Mary's was founded in 1925 by the 
Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. The school was 
dedicated to educating women within a Catholic, 
liberal arts tradition. Though many things about 




"When I started at Doheny last fall, my goal was to get my 
A. A. degree and become a legal secretary. The school helped me 
get a job in a law firm. This was good experience, mainly 
because it made me realize I wouldn't be all that happy as a legal 
secretary. I took the Career Planning class, and now I'm going 
to work for my bachelor's in Business at Chalon, and go into 
advertising. Dr. Sawchuk really helped me -she's a fantastic 
person." Lynne Broderick, 1979, A. A., Business. 




"I feel I'm ready to leave. I 
think the Mount has given 
me enough background to go 
out and make my own life. 
One thing I've really learned 
here is you can do what you 
want to do. You just figure 
it out and you put your mind 
to it, and you can do things 
the way you want to do them 
as long as they're not 
completely and utterly crazy." 
AnneZachary, 1978, B.S., 
Nursing. 



"When we came here as fresh- 
men, we rushed down to 
Bullock's to buy matching 
bedspreads, and we couldn't 
wait to get them. We kept 
checking with Receiving. One 
day, we went down and ex- 
plained to the Sister who was 
there that we'd been expecting 
this package for days. She said 
she'd certainly look into it. A 
few hours later, she delivered 
it to our room. K It turned out 
she was the college President, 
and she'd just happened to be 
in Receiving that afternoon!" 
Katina Zaninovich, 1978, B.S., 
Nursing. 

the college have changed since 1925, our reason for 
existence has not. 

On the Chalon Campus in Brentwood, we 
offer four-year courses of study leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Bachelor of Music. 

At our Doheny Campus, in the heart of 
downtown Los Angeles, we offer two-year 
Associate Degree programs, as well as Community 
Outreach activities which involve students in social 



action and fieldwork, both on-campus and off. 

Also at Doheny, men and women may earn 
graduate degrees and advanced teaching 
credentials. 
A very personal place. 

To say that Mount St. Mary's is a personal 
college is an understatement. With some 250 
undergraduate students at Doheny, and 
approximately 650 at Chalon, it's easy to 
understand why life is on a first- name basis. 

With one faculty member for each 11 
students, you will benefit from far greater personal 
concern for your academic performance than you 
would find at larger colleges. 

This smaller size also allows greater 
opportunities for you to express your talents and 
develop leadership. 

You will find many opportunities to know 
your professors outside the classroom. You will be 
invited to their homes for discussion and dessert 
after lectures or programs, for honor society 
initiations, and for departmental parties. 



You may also work with faculty members on 
special projects, including research, Model United 
Nations, chamber music concerts, and 
organizations such as Athenaeum. These 
experiences can be among the finest educational 
advantages available to you at Mount St. Mary's. 
A diverse student body. 

You will learn, too, from your fellow 
students. They come from many states, including 
Alaska and Hawaii. Approximately 11 percent are 
from other lands, such as Japan, Hong Kong, 
Central and South America, India, and Africa. 

About one-half are Catholic, with all the 
other major faiths represented in the other half. 
Blacks, Orientals, Spanish- Americans, and 
American Indians make up over one-fourth of our 

"My sister attended Mount St. Mary's and I decided to come 
here, too. Being from Africa, I like the small size of the school, 
and the friendliness. I don't think I'd have done as well 
anywhere else. I have a scholarship for graduate work at Notre 
Dame, and I think I'm ready for that, because of the Mount." 
Cecilia Diaz, 1978, B.S., Biochemistry. 





r t J 




student body. About ten percent are women 
returning to school after an absence of several 
years. 

The chance to exchange points of view and 
make friends with people whose backgrounds are 
different from your own will deepen your 
understanding of the world and society. 
And when you need it, help. 

If you face an academic problem, a faculty 
advisor is here to discuss it and counsel you. 
Personal guidance is available when you feel the 
need to talk over an individual dilemma. 

Your special questions can be answered by 
someone in our Academic Counseling Center 
where you will also receive assistance in planning 
your schedule and discussing your choice of major. 

If you find yourself having trouble with your 
classes, you're not unique. We offer group sessions 
with suggestions on time management, reading, 
note taking, and preparing for exams. Individual 
counseling is also available. 

"After getting my degree from Doheny, I transferred to Chalon, 
where I'm working for my bachelor's in Business. On both 
campuses, classes are really small, so you get lots of attention. 
But they don't smother you and they don't baby you." 
Bernadette Gonzaque, 1977, A. A., Business, now at Chalon. 





"After about two-and-a-half 
years in Nursing, I decided I 
wanted to change to 
American Studies. My 
department chairman and 
teachers helped me design my 
major and they worked with 
me so I could apply as many 
of my credits as possible. A 
larger school couldn't 
possibly be that flexible. I 
really appreciate their 
counseling." Mary Anne 
McAlea, 1979, B.A., 
American Studies. Student 
Body President, 1978-79. 



Campus Ministry offers spiritual counseling, 
retreats, liturgical celebrations, interfaith 
discussions, prayer groups, and social action. A 
full-time chaplain and campus minister together 
staff the Campus Ministry Office. 

Should you become ill, medical services are 
available at both campuses. Emphasis is placed on 
preventive medicine. 
A strong academic program. 

Mount St. Mary's College offers 29 majors 
and four different baccalaureate degrees at Chalon. 
The two-year Associate in Arts degree from the 
Doheny Campus may be earned with seven 
specializations. These are all described in detail, in 
succeeding pages. 

Our college has a proud tradition of academic 
excellence, a tradition we guard jealously. We 
choose our faculty members carefully, and support 
them with encouragement and the best of physical 
facilities. 

But far more important than their academic 
credentials, they are enthusiastic, sympathetic, and 
dedicated men and women, whose primary 
commitment is to teaching. 



Plan your own major. 

Because of your special interests, you may 
wish to combine one or more areas of study. Our 
individualized major allows you to design your 
own course of study, with the supervision of a 
faculty committee. For example, if you are 
interested in public relations, you may wish to 
build a program combining classes in journalism 
and writing, business, psychology, and sociology. 

Or perhaps you would like to investigate a 
special topic in depth. You may draw up a proposal 
for independent study, with the help of a faculty 
sponsor. When approved, you study on your own, 
reporting at intervals to the faculty member for 
guidance. 
The rewards of leadership. 

Everyone talks about how important 
leadership is. Our Leadership Program specifically 
develops and rewards this attribute. 

"I was editor of the college paper last year, and we raised some 
questions about the way some students were being treated. 
Finally, the administration met and decided to hold an open 
forum. The President and the Dean and a lot of the staff were 
there. We got answers and things that couldn't be answered 
were looked into. Nothing got swept under the rug. I don't 
think this could have happened in most schools." Valerie 
Holcomb, 1979, B.A., English. 



"I had heard about the Mount through a friend of my parents. I 
decided to come here basically because of the size - J like a 
smaller school -and the people I met here the first time I . 
visited. They were really outgoing. There's a lot of support here 
for you." Chris Potvin, 1978, B.A., English. 





If you have held responsible positions in 
your school, community, or church, you may be 
eligible. If you are chosen for the program, you 
may also apply for a scholarship ranging from $50 
to full tuition. 

Leadership students take part in programs to 
nurture their special skills through study and 
practice. As a member of the program, you will 
attend workshops on how to delegate 
responsibility, how to motivate groups of people, 
how to provide constructive criticism and support. 
You will have the opportunity of working with 
successful women leaders on and off campus. 

This program can prove invaluable in 
preparing you for a satisfying and successful role in 
your community, your career, and in your home. 

For further information, and an application 
for the award, contact the Admissions Office. 



One college, two campuses. 




Laura Ortiz relaxes on Chalon Campus. Reassuring sign tells you you're on the Brady Hall, one of two dorms on Chalon. 

right road to Chalon. 




Doheny mansion, which lends its name and character to 
downtown campus. 



-». m 

Ancient trees provide a backdrop of serenity to Doheny 

Campus trio. ^Hl 



Four years after the Sisters of St. Joseph of 
Carondelet established Mount St. Mary's, the 
college moved to 56 acres in what was then a 
remote location in the Santa Monica Mountains, 
high above the distant outskirts of Los Angeles. 
The campus borrowed its name from Chalon Road, 
which winds up to it via Bundy Drive from Sunset 
Boulevard. 

In 1962, a second campus became part of the 
college. This is the Doheny Campus, 15 acres on 
the former estate of oil millionaire Edward L. and 
Countess Estelle Doheny, very near the heart of 
the Los Angeles Civic Center. 

Vastly different in architectural character, the 
two campuses share many qualities. Both offer a 
great degree of tranquility, especially conducive to 
learning. Yet both are just a few minutes away 
from all the urban amenities of one of the world's 
most exciting cities. 
Chalon: On a clear day . . . 

If not forever, you can certainly see one of 
the most spectacular views in Southern California. 
The Pacific stretches to infinity. The Santa Monica 
Mountains, guarding the campus, remind you that 
we share this world with deer and hawks and 
coyotes. Below, UCLA, Century City, and the busy 
freeways reassure you that all the fascinations and 
frustrations of the 20th Century are waiting. 

The architecture is Spanish, white masonry 
with red tile roofs, graceful arches, timeless serenity. 
The Campus Circle, an island of flowers, is the hub 
from which all Chalon buildings 
radiate: the chapel, 



the classroom building, dormitories, administration 
building, Coe Library, and the new Jose Drudis- 
Biada Art Building. Behind the residence hall, 
tennis courts and an Olympic-sized pool offer 
welcome respite from classes. 
Doheny: One step back . . . 

The Doheny Campus, within minutes of the 
Music Center, Chinatown, Olvera Street, USC, and 
the Museum of Natural History, takes you back to 
the elegance of the 1890s. But its academic eyes 
are firmly fixed on the 21st Century. 

A private residential development for 
decades, Chester Place lies between Adams 
Boulevard on the south and 23rd Street on the 
north. The Doheny mansion dominates the street, 
just as its owners once dominated its social life. 

Today, this house remains much as 
Countess Doheny left it, with stained glass 
windows, marble floors and columns and mantels, 
and the great Tiffany- domed Pompeian Room. 
Yet change has come to Chester Place. Classrooms 
occupy the mansions. The chalet serves as a 
library. A gracious old home listens as students 
practice their music and rehearse their nursing 
skills. In gardens where a USC Chancellor once 
strolled, neighborhood children swing and play in 
the sand and learn the wonders of 
nature from a pet rabbit. 



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Rose Bowl 



Pacific Palisades 



Getty 
Museum 



Chaloi 
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Hollywood Oq> 



Pacific Ocean ^ Brentwood!^ 
Santa Monica \ ^ 



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Beverly L- A. County 

' UCLA Hills Museum 

Westwood 



Santa Monica Frwy 



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Dodger \%^^^ 
Stadium \>T 



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Catalina Island 






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San Bernardino Frwy 



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Student life. 




Many things to do. 

How will you spend your time outside the 
classroom and the laboratory? Do you have a 
special interest in the arts? Join the Mount Chorus 
and Orchestra. Take a role in the production of the 
school play, either on-stage or off. 

Students publish a yearbook and a school 
newspaper called View. Writers and editors and art 
directors, proofreaders and "go-fers" are always in 
demand. 

The Jose Drudis-Biada Art Gallery frequently 
offers a fascinating exhibition of superb paintings, 
sculpture, weaving, ceramics, or serigraphs. 




Studio in the new Jose Drudis-Biada Hall at Chalon is an 
inspiration for artists, with its perfect light, great space, and 
excellent technical facilities. Building also contains spacious 
galleries, offices, and well-equipped classrooms. 




Chalon students laze beside outdoor swimming pool. 

"I must be crazy -I could still be sleeping." Early 
morning joggers from the Chalon Campus give 
San Vicente Boulevard a run for its money. 



Government of the students . . . 

The Associated Student Body shapes the 
social, cultural, recreational, and religious activities 
of the college to serve students' needs within the 
framework of the administrative philosophy. Five 
committees assess student priorities, mediate 
among the various interests, and allocate funds 



Two kinds of bread. A 
number of studen ts find jobs 
in the campus cafeteria, 
helping to pay for their 
education. 



Olvera Street, where Los 
Angeles began nearly two 
centuries ago, is a favorite 
attraction for Doheny 
students. 




from its annual budget. 

This governing body runs the Fine Arts 
Festival, the Fleur de Lis and Graduation Balls, Red 
Cross blood drives, and fund-raising campaigns for 
such worthy charities as Los Nirios Orphanage. 
They also arrange special group tours — ski trips, 
back-packing expeditions, and weekend excursions 
to nearby attractions. 

The small size of the college makes it entirely 
feasible for you to find a role in this student 
government, if you are interested. In fact, one 
priority of Mount St. Mary's College is to 
encourage the development of leadership qualities 
through organizations of this type. 
Social, professional, and service groups. 

You may wish to join professional 
organizations relating to your academic major. 
There are many — Student California Teachers' 
Association; Student Nurses' Association of 
California; Women in Consumer Studies; Women 
of Management and Enterprise; the American 

James Delahanty, Professor of Political Science, (right), and 
Ronald J. Oard, Professor of History and Political Science, are 
among MSMC's most enthusiastic tennis contenders. Both 
Chalon and Doheny Campuses boast excellent courts. 






m ' . / __. 



w & 



Chemical Society Student Affiliates; and Phi Alpha 
Theta, which is associated with the American 
Historical Society — to name just a few. 

Pi Theta Mu is a service organization whose 
members work as hostesses for on-campus events. 
Kappa Delta Chi is a local social sorority, which 
arranges its own cultural and social events. 
Campus Ministry also organizes students to help 
out within the community in places such as the 
House of Hospitality, which serves meals to the 
hungry of the inner city. 

You may wish to become a member of 
Athenaeum. This group attends the diverse and 
excellent theatre in the Los Angeles area, at 
attractively reduced rates. 




Behveen-classes break, Doheny Campus. 

Plus other pleasures. 

On both the Chalon and the Doheny 
Campuses, you'll find tennis courts and at Chalon 
a swimming pool, to help you stay in shape. The 
hiking trails in the Santa Monica Mountains at 
Chalon are challenging and exhilarating. At the 
beginning of each term, you may sign up for sports 
such as gymnastics and softball. With enough 
interest, sailing, horseback riding, and scuba 
diving may be available. 

And as you can see, the proximity of our 
campuses to UCLA and USC results in other 
pursuits. 




Brahms would probably have felt at home in the Pompeian 
Room of the Doheny mansion, setting for a May concert by The 
Women's Chamber Ensemble, which opened with four of his 
songs. Siena marble pillars and floor, and furniture copied from 
Pompeian pieces in a Rome museum, inspired the present name 
of the room, originally known as the Palm Court. Louis 
Comfort Tiffany designed the Favrile glass dome which encloses 
the once-open court. 




Officially, it's Prague Hall, the Doheny student residence. But 

Where will you live? 

Chalon has two residence halls. Brady Hall 
has large rooms with high ceilings, many with 
balconies. The newer Carondelet Hall has more 
compact rooms, with built-in desks and 
bookshelves. Each accommodates about 150 
residents, with both single and double rooms. 
Basic furnishings are provided, but you may 
furnish and decorate your room as you wish. 

Each floor of these dorms has a lounge, 
which is the center of activities. Students gather 
here for monthly meetings to thrash out problems, 
elect representatives to Residence Council, and 
plan events. Many floors hold monthly parties. 

Resident assistants work with the staff to 
oversee all house activities. These are junior, 
senior, or graduate students chosen on the basis o 
their maturity and ability to work with others. 



occupants call it "the Castle." 

Doheny has on-campus rooms in one house, 
which its 27 occupants call "the Castle." The red 
stone Victorian building is distinguished by its 
three-story tower and a wide veranda that curves 
around the entire house. As on Chalon, social life 
here is informal and easy-going. 

After you are accepted by the college, 
residence request forms are sent to you. Early 
application is advisable, because rooms are filled 
on a first-come, first-served basis. 

About half the students at Chalon, and 90 
percent at Doheny commute. Commuter student 
needs are given careful consideration at both 
campuses. The college also provides a service to 
match commuters from the same area who want to 
car-pool on either a short-term or long-term basis. 
f 




Santa Monica Pier and friend provide The best view in town. Two Chalon 

happy respite from academic grind for one Campus residents greet the dawn from 
MSMC student. their sleeping quarters on top of a building. 



For students at Chalon, the Pacific Ocean 
is much more than a magnificent view. 
It's also a playground. 




"I've been working in a doctor's office since I started at Doheny 
last year. It's good experience, and makes it possible for me to 
stay in school. I'll get my A. A. in Business in May, 1979, and 
then I want to get my bachelor's. At Doheny, they work with 
you to make sure you succeed. I know in other schools, they just 
have big lecture classes and they can't take the time to help 
you." Emily Gonzales, 1979, A. A., Business. 



"I came from a public high school, and Mount St. Mary's is 
really different. If you're absent, they're concerned. They want 
to know why you're out, and if you're having problems, they 
want to help you. It's really more like a family than a college. 
I'm working for a bank now. I'll get my A. A. in Business next 
year, and get a job as a legal secretary. " Letitia Delgadillo 






vj Chalon Campus student 



In the filtered sunlight of 
finds the bed in her Chester Place, a guardian 

Carondelet Hall room the lion naps peacefully, smiling 

ideal place for concentration. as he recalls another era. 







Staying ahead of the healthy appetites at Doheny keeps George 
and Andrea hard at work in the kitchen - but still smiling! 



If only these walls could talk! Victorian mantel and lamp 
contrast sharply with animated conversation between two 
occupants of "the Castle," as students have nicknamed Prague 
Hall, a Doheny Campus mansion which has been converted to 
student residence. 

In Father Sylvester Ryan, 
Mount St. Mary's students 
find a friend, counselor, and 
chaplain. He also serves as a 
Lecturer in Religious 
Studies. 




Academic Programs. 




Sister Magdalen Coughlin 
President, Mount St. Mary's College 



From our President. 

Few times have been more exciting, more 
challenging to a young woman than today. Your 
opportunities for influencing the world you live in 
are almost without limit. 

But that opportunity carries responsibility, 
and your responsibility right now is to fulfill your 
own potential. This is where the right college can 
make a difference. 

For over half a century Mount St. Mary's 
College has been making a difference in the lives of 
our students. This difference flows from what the 
Mount is — a Catholic, liberal arts college, 
primarily for women. The Catholic tradition 
provides a value orientation for one's personal and 
professional life as well as a motivation for a 
Christian commitment that views professional life 
as service. 

We emphasize liberal arts because we believe 
that education should greatly enrich your own life 
and every life that touches yours. We believe 
fiercely in the promise of the individual student 
and in her responsibility to improve her own time, 
that each individual can gain a knowledge of truth, 
can recognize and create beauty, and can be a vital 
agent of love and, therefore, justice in her time. 

Finally, we offer an environment in which 
you can learn to be a leader. At a time in history 
when women are finding more opportunities than 
ever before to shape events, we believe it is 
imperative that the art of leadership be developed. 
Mount St. Mary's College will encourage you, will 
guide you, and will give you the opportunities and 
the setting in which you can develop your potential 
to its greatest, and then we will urge you to make a 
difference in whatever milieu becomes yours. We 
believe you will graduate from the college a better 
person, a happier person, and a more productive 
person. 



u^fe, ^jtyaUL, (***jlL; 



Associate in Arts Degree Programs: 
Doheny Campus 

Associate Degree programs, conducted on 
the Doheny Campus, prepare you for immediate 
entry into a career, or for transfer to a baccalaureate 
degree program. 

If your interest lies in earning a bachelor's 
degree, the transfer program is ideal. 

Degrees are offered in Art, Business, 
Nursing, Pre-School Teaching, and Liberal Arts, as 
well as in Respiratory Therapy and Physical 
Therapy Assistant. 
Art — Doheny 

This program provides basic preparation for a 
beginning career in commercial art, or for 
transferring to a B.A. or B.F.A. program. Small 
classes, taught by practicing artists, develop a 
comprehension of basic design. Students 
particularly enjoy the converted carriage house 
which serves as a working studio. 

Special Experience classes, tailored to your 
career goals, combine field work with studio 
projects to provide practical experience. 

"I try to give assignments 
that students can deal with 
personally, so they can get 
involved conceptually . I 
encourage them to draw 
upon their own backgrounds 
to come up with solutions for 
class problems. We hope they 
come away from their courses 
in art knowing that there's 
more to art than 
craftsmanship. There are 
ideas." Jake Gilson, 
Assistant Professor of Art. 




• A 3fX 



/ 



se\ ■» 



Business — Doheny 

The combination of practical secretarial skills 
with business management fundamentals prepares 
you for immediate employment as an executive, 
legal, or medical secretary, or administrative 
assistant. In addition, classes in history, literature, 
and psychology will enrich your entire life. 

As a background for further development, 




you'll take courses in business management, 
business law, and mathematics for business. In 
your sophomore year, you'll serve an internship in 
a business firm, law 
office, or health care 
facility, to bridge the 
gap between class- 
room and office. This 
often leads to 
permanent employ- 
ment. 

Sister Marie Loyola Sanders, 

CSJ, Assistant Professor of 

Business, planned, 

organized, and administers the A. A. Business program, and 

designs from 20 to 25 semester-long internships for 

Doheny students. 

Liberal Arts — Doheny 

If you are undecided on career goals, or if 
you wish a career that combines many 
specializations, this program may be ideal. Your 
advisor will help you design your own program to 
meet the general requirements for an Associate in 
Arts Degree. 

In this way, you may explore a variety of 
fields, or select courses to develop the special skills 
you need. As you do, you may wish to work with 
the Office of Career Planning counselors. 
Nursing — Doheny 

This program combines clinical nursing 
courses with classes in psychology, sociology, and 
religious studies, to develop both technical skills 
and human understanding. The content of classes 
is based upon the Roy Adaptation Level Theory of 
Nursing, which stresses respect for the patient as a 
human being. 

At the program's completion, you will be 
granted an Associate in Arts Degree, and be 
eligible to take the California State Board 
examination for a registered nurse (RN) license. If 
you are an LVN and have taken required 
prerequisite classes, you may wish to inquire about 
challenging the first-year clinical courses. 



Respiratory Therapy — Doheny 

Whenever breathing is impaired, the 
Respiratory Therapist, for which this program 
prepares you, helps doctors restore normal heart 
and lung functions. The human services core of 
this program helps you deal with the fears of 
patients confronted by strange equipment. Clinical 
classes develop required technical skills, and allow 
you to apply your skills in a health care facility. 
Your two years will prepare you for the year of 
practice required before taking the exam to become 
a Registered Respiratory Therapist. 

Or you may transfer to Chalon to earn a 
bachelor's degree in a related field. For example, a 
major in Health Services Administration within the 
Business Department could develop the abilities 
needed to become administrator of the Respiratory 
Therapy service in a hospital. 
Physical Therapy Assistant — Doheny 

Under the direction of a Registered Physical 
Therapist, the Physical Therapy Assistant helps 
people with disabilities caused by age, accident, 
illness, or birth defects. 

Special courses and actual experience in a 
clinical setting will help you develop both the 
professional skills and the understanding needed 
to work constructively with patients and other 
medical specialists. Upon graduation, you will be 
qualified to work in hospitals and nursing homes, 
or to continue at Chalon to become a Registered 
Physical Therapist with a baccalaureate degree. 
Pre-School Teaching — Doheny 

This program will enable you to teach in a 
private nursery school, in Head Start programs, in 
Los Angeles County Unified School District 
Children Centers, or in a family day-care home. 

Throughout the program, classroom learning 
is integrated with experience in the Child 
Development Center on campus. Even before your 
semester of supervised teaching, you'll work with 
three- and four-year olds. You may choose the 
bilingual program, with its four semesters of 
Spanish, or a special program concentrating on the 
needs of handicapped children. These choices 
widen employment opportunities in Southern 
California. 



"From their very first course, our Education students at 
Doheny gain first-hand experience with three- and 
four-year-old children. We have about 50 youngsters from the 
neighborhood in our Child Care Center. Working and observing 
and interacting with them complements the theory our students 
learn in class. It's a rare opportunity." 
Sister Imelda D'Agostino, CSJ, Instructor in Education. 




Bachelor Degree Programs : 
Chalon Campus 

On the Chalon Campus, Mount St. Mary's 
College conducts all of its four-year Bachelor 
Degree programs. These comprise 29 majors, and 
combine a strong liberal arts foundation with 
preparation for a wide diversity of careers or for 
graduate study. 

The degrees offered by these programs 
include Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
Bachelor of Music with a major in Music, and 
Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major in Art. 
American Studies — Chalon 

Exploring the influences, past and present, 
which have affected American character, 
experience, and institutions, this major offers an 
excellent foundation for a career in government, 
business, economics, political writing, teaching, or 
law. Introductory classes in English, history, and 
sociology, with emphasis upon American 
approaches to these subjects, provide a basis for 
specialized upper division studies in American art, 
business, history, music, and philosophy. 

You will be encouraged to serve an internship 
in political science or government service. This may 
take you into local law firms, legal aid societies, or 
the offices of California's senators or congressmen. 
Art — Chalon 

The Art program presents art as an essential 
activity of man, and provides professional training 
if you wish a career as an artist or art teacher. You 
may earn either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of 
Fine Arts. Both programs begin with courses in 
drawing, design, painting, and art history. Areas 
of study are also available in photography, graphic 
design, printmaking, figure drawing, weaving, 
fiber arts, ceramics, and sculpture. The B.F.A. 
student will choose an area of concentration which 
leads to an exhibit at the end of her senior year. 

Jose Drudis-Biada Hall offers excellent 
facilities including modern equipment and spacious 
studios. 
Biochemistry — Chalon 

An interdisciplinary study of biological 
sciences, chemistry and physics, this major 



introduces you to the minute, fundamental life 
processes. It offers excellent preparation for 
graduate study if you wish a career as a doctor, 
dentist, pharmacist, veterinarian, or biochemist. 

You prepare for the major with classes in 
biological dynamics, general and organic 
chemistry, mathematics analysis, and physics. In 
your junior and senior years, you study genetics, 
cellular physiology, qualitative organic analysis, 
and advanced biochemistry. You will have the 
chance to do independent, original research, an 
opportunity rarely offered to undergraduates. 




Marie Zeuthen, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, is a 
Mount St. Mary's graduate, and has been on the faculty for 
over 15 years. Her expertise in Medical Technology is 
particularly helpful in arranging student placements and 
hospital internships for students in this field. 

Biological Sciences — Chalon 

This major allows you to examine the 
behavior of living cells, organs, and systems, and 
learn how to modify or control their function. You 
explore their origins and development, and 
investigate their interaction with other living 
things. 

These studies will prepare you for careers in 
environmental control, medical or dental schools, 
teaching, pharmaceutical companies, medical 
technology, research or graduate school. 



Business — Chalon 

You may specialize here in one of the two 
fastest-growing fields in private industry: 
management and accounting. In Business 
Administration, you'll study various types of 
companies and the functions they perform: 
advertising, public relations, personnel 
management, and marketing. In Accounting, you 
will learn to solve the various problems 
accountants handle, regardless of the size of the 
firm. 

In both programs, you'll have the 
opportunity as a senior to do an internship with 
the type of organization that interests you. 
Chemistry — Chalon 

This major provides you with a 
comprehension of the principles of chemistry, 
opening the doors to careers in the chemical 
industry and allied fields of food, petroleum, and 
textiles. Women chemists work as laboratory and 
research assistants, technical writers, research 
librarians, and chemical analysts. Or you may go 
on to a career in health or education, industrial 
management, or patent law. 

You may earn either a B.A. or a B.S. in 
Chemistry. If you plan on graduate study or 
medical school, a B.S. is recommended. 

Throughout your study, you'll enjoy small 
classes and personalized laboratory instruction. 
Child Development — Chalon 

A major in Child Development prepares you 
to help pre-school and primary school children 
learn and grow. Graduates work in day care 
centers, nursery schools, and community agencies, 
or go on to advanced study in social work or 
psychology. The program is interdisciplinary, 
giving you a broad understanding of the needs, 
abilities, and emotional responses of the small 
child. As an area of special emphasis, you will 
choose consumer studies, psychology, or 
sociology. 

You will be encouraged to take classes to 
expand your own creativity, and will spend time 
working with young children for first-hand 
experience. 



Consumer Studies — Chalon 

This major helps you become a more careful 
consumer, better able to conserve your resources in 
the marketplace and at home. It offers a number of 
career options. You may enter consumer relations 
in business, government, or specialize in consumer 
journalism, with a Consumer Affairs emphasis. For 
retailing, advertising, journalism, and public 
relations, choose Fashion Merchandising. The 
Home Economics emphasis, plus the requirements 
for the California teaching credential, qualifies you 
to teach this subject. 

Whatever your choice, you'll have the 
opportunity for an internship. In many cases, this 
had led to full-time employment. 

Dr. F. Roman Young has 
been a faculty member and 
advisor in the Education 
Department since the 
mid-1950s. For the ten years 
preceding his retirement in 
1978, he served as Chairman 
of the department. His 
philosophy and dedication 
have been major factors in 
building the department's 
reputation in academic 
circles. 



Education — Chalon 

The Diversified major concentrates on 
English, natural sciences, social sciences, and the 
fine arts to prepare you to teach in elementary 
school. It leads to the Preliminary Multiple Subject 
Teaching Credential. You will take 18-21 units in 
each area. Classes such as Communication and 
Mathematics will develop teaching techniques, and 
you will also work as a student teacher for one 
semester. 

The Single Subject Major leads to the 
Preliminary California Single Subject Credential for 
secondary school teaching. You will complete 
requirements for an academic major, plus 




education courses, and student teaching. 

You may remain a fifth year to earn a Life 
Credential. 




"Our internship program is unique, because we work with our 
students, evaluating their abilities and challenging their 
direction. They are given leads which they must pursue, setting 
up their own interviews and following through on them. Then 
they submit a proposal, establishing their own goals and criteria 
for performance. Aftenvard, they evaluate their internship .W 'e 
have women in airlines, insurance, banking, personnel, and 
department stores. We're not just paying lip service to practical 
experience. We're actually making every intelligent effort to help 
our students build an economic base from which to pursue their 
values." David Leese, Ph.D., Chairman of Business 
Department. 

English — Chalon 

English majors work as journalists, writers, 
and reporters for radio and TV, advertising writers, 
public relations specialists, editors, and technical 
writers. With a double major in Business, you may 
enter private industry. 

Classes in writing sharpen your technical 
competence and develop your personal style. The 
study of literature presents a wide variety of 
human motivations, while critical analysis of 
literary works trains you to organize your 
thoughts. 

During your senior year, you may take an 
internship, applying your skills in writing grant 
proposals, raising funds, or working in advertising. 



French — Chalon 

This major will bring you to proficiency in 
speaking, reading, and writing French, the 
traditional diplomatic language. French literature 
and history will help you understand the nation's 
values and philosophy. 

The major can lead to careers in translation 
and diplomatic services, as well as education, the 
travel industry, or with a multi-national company. 
Courses cover the language thoroughly, French 
literature, theatre, history, and composition. 

Gerontology — Chalon 

This explores the biological, environmental, 
social, and psychological aspects of aging in 
American society. It is an increasingly important 
area because of today's greater life expectancy. 

Classes in the social and behavioral sciences 
include General Psychology, Sociological 
Perspectives, Developmental Psychology, and 
Biology of Aging. You will also take courses such as 
Psychology of Development and Aging, 
Psychology of Disability and Adjustment, 
Sociology of Aging, Art or Music Therapy, Death 
and Dying, and Bioethics. Then you will practice 
what you've learned by working with the elderly in 
a health care facility. 

History — Chalon 

History provides a good foundation for a 
career in law, business, government, or teaching. It 
begins with courses in Western Civilization, 
American Government, Political Concepts, and 
Cultural and Historical Geography. In your junior 
and senior years, three classes will be in U.S. 
history, three in European history. 

As a History major, you may wish to become 
a delegate to the Model United Nations. Each 
participating school is assigned a country to 
represent at the national conference in New York. 
After studying the country's politics, society, 
economy, and foreign policy, you will speak for 
that nation during a simulated session of the U.N. 

International Business — Chalon 

This major blends courses in international 
business management, finance, and leadership 
training with the language and culture of the 



Western world. Classes and seminars in business 
law, personnel, international marketing, and 
business management will develop management 
skills. You will acquire proficiency in either French 
or Spanish, along with a liberal arts base. The 
program includes an internship with a government 
agency or an international firm, either here or 
abroad. 

A B.A. in International Business prepares 
you for a career with an international firm or in 
government service, the travel industry, 
advertising, or transportation. 
Mathematics — Chalon 

Because mathematical theorems and 
equations define, clarify, and even predict events 
in the physical universe and in our social 
environment, a Mathematics major may choose to 
be a statistician, actuary, data processor, and with 
further training, an engineer, computer 
programmer, or systems analyst. Women are in 
great demand in these areas. 

You'll take Mathematical Analysis I and II as 
preparation. Then in your junior and senior years, 
you'll take eight advanced courses, including 
Topics in Geometry, Advanced Calculus, Real 
Analysis, and Modern Algebra. 
Medical Technology — Chalon 

If you enjoy using your hands and mind 
precisely, a career as a medical technologist will 
allow you to perform vital tests and interpret their 
results. A major in Biological Sciences with a 
Medical Technology emphasis prepares you for this 
specialty. 

Following the Biological Dynamics sequence 
of classes in your first two years, you will study 
Medical Bacteriology, Immunology, Genetics, and 
Cellular Physiology. As a senior, you'll do 
independent research. After earning your B.S., you 
will serve a one-year internship in a hospital 
laboratory to be eligible for the California 
examinations to become a licensed Medical 
Technologist. 




"Our teachers are very available to our music students. One of 
our most talented girls had gone to a big Eastern school, and 
from there to Paris for a year. When she came to us, she was 
very disheartened because she hadn't found the kind of personal 
teaching she knew she needed to develop. She's really bloomed 
here, because she's gotten lots of attention from teachers who 
want to see her make the most of her talent." 
Sister Teresita Espinosa, CSJ, Associate Professor of Music. 

Music — Chalon 

Here you may earn either a Bachelor of Arts 
or Bachelor of Music degree. Both programs 
combine individual instruction, solo and ensemble 
performance with classroom study, discussions, 
and lectures, to provide a wide range of musical 
learning. For the B.A., two-thirds of your study 
must be in the liberal arts, placing music in the 
context of one's search for truth and beauty, and 
combining music with other interests. The B.M. 
prepares you to be a performing artist, conductor, 
composer, teacher, church musician, or 
musicologist. Two-thirds of your classes will be in 
music. 

In either program, you may choose an 
emphasis in Performance, Music Education, Music 
History, or Music Theory. B.M. students may also 
focus on Church Music. 
Nursing — Chalon 

To develop the technical skills, clear 
thinking, and compassion for the whole patient, 



this program combines a broad education in liberal 
arts and sciences with rigorous clinical training, 
based on the Roy Adaptation Level Theory of 
Nursing. 

The first two years are spent on campus in 
preprofessional studies, combined with liberal arts, 
to deepen your knowledge of man. Both junior and 
senior years are devoted primarily to the Nursing 
major, with work as a nurse in clinical settings. The 
program qualifies you to take the California State 
Board examination to become a Registered Nurse. 
At graduation, you'll also be qualified for the 
Public Health Nursing Certificate, and for graduate 
study in surgical, pediatric, and psychiatric 
nursing. 

The Roy Adaptation Level 
Theory of Nursing, which is 
now a part of the curriculum 
of many schools throughout 
this country and Canada, 
took its name from Sister 
Callista Roy , CSJ ', Chairperson 
of the Nursing Department 
at Mount St. Mary's College. 
She is herself a graduate of 
the Mount. "This Theory 
emphasizes the patient's 
abilities to deal with his own 
problems. The nurse 
reinforces and strengthens 

these abilities, so that, ideally, the patient emerges from his 

illness better able to cope." 

Philosophy — Chalon 

This major trains you to think logically and 
be aware of the implications of your statements. It 
is excellent preparation for any career requiring 
careful analysis of situations, precise expression of 
ideas, and a clear grasp of issues. Students 
working toward careers in law, business, 
government, or religion study Philosophy, often 
with a double major in English, Business, 
American Studies, or Religious Studies. 

The major begins with such courses as Logic: 
Structures of Reasoning, Knowledge and Reality, 




Values and Human Existence. As a junior and 
senior, you'll choose from Metaphysics, Theory of 
Knowledge, Contemporary Moral Problems, 
Philosophy of Science, Existentialism, Aesthetics, 
and History of Philosophy. 
Physical Therapy — Chalon 

This major trains you in rehabilitation skills 
to help people with disabilities make the fullest use 
of their physical capacities. The program includes 
basic science classes, plus courses to help you 
understand the emotional needs of patients. Junior 
and senior year classes develop skills in the various 
types of therapy to improve patients' physical 
functions. 

You'll work in a clinical setting, designing 
programs with other health care specialists and 
learning to supervise assistants. The major 
prepares you for the year of practice needed for 
taking the exam to become a Certified Registered 
Physical Therapist. 
Political Science — Chalon 

Politics can help you understand how the 
government affects you and how you can affect it. 
It can lead to a career in public administration, 
education, community organizations, business, 
and politics. 

You will investigate political theory, 
institutions, international relations, comparative 
politics, and public law as they relate to historical 
developments and to today's political world. You 
may combine this program with a major in 
American Studies, History, or Business. During 
your senior year, you will be able to take an 
internship in an elected official's office. You may 
also serve as a delegate to the Model United 
Nations (described under History). 
Pre-Law — Chalon 

Because government regulations control so 
many areas of our lives, the study of law can be 
endlessly useful. The legal profession also gives 
women access to power in many walks of life. 

Law schools require certain courses, but do 
not specify a major, so you may choose from a 
wide variety of fields. Majors in American Studies, 



Business, Consumer Studies, English, History, 
Foreign Languages, Philosophy, Politics, Science, 
Psychology, Social Science, and Sociology may 
apply to law schools. The Pre- Law Program 
requires Accounting, Logic: Structures of Reasoning, 
and Symbolic Logic. 
Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental — Chalon 

If you wish to become a doctor or dentist, 
Mount St. Mary's offers excellent preparation for 
the competitive world of professional schools. 
First, you have a choice of majors: i.e., Biological 
Sciences, Biochemistry, and Chemistry. The 
Biological Sciences Department has a special 
Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental emphasis. 

You will also be able to do research, working 
closely with faculty members. This can prove 
invaluable. Perhaps most important of all, your 
liberal arts education will help you understand 
your patients as human beings. 

Discuss your career goals with the 
department chairperson. 
Psychobiology — Chalon 

You will examine the relationships between 
the biological makeup and the behavior of the 
human personality. As the name of the major 
suggests, courses concentrate heavily upon both 
Biological Sciences and Psychology. As a junior 
and senior, you will choose 12 courses in these two 
fields, including Endocrinology, Experimental 
Psychology, and Physiological Psychology. You 
will also be encouraged to participate in a clinical 
practicum in Psychology. 
Psychology — Chalon 

This major focuses upon the study of 
emotion, learning, motivation and personality as 
interacting human processes. You will explore 
theories of personality formation, of mental health, 
and of counseling. 

Psychology is an excellent foundation for 
graduate study for anyone interested in becoming a 
practicing psychologist. It is helpful, too, in 
business, law, social work, education, and 
medicine. 



Courses include Experimental Psychology, 
Personality, Human Learning, Social Psychology, 
Physiological Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, 
and Counseling. As a senior, you will practice the 
techniques you've learned in a mental health facility. 

"Two factors make Religious Studies especially challenging 
today: first, the hunger for religious experiences, as shown by 
prayer groups, meditation courses, and self-improvement 
programs; and second, the growing acceptance of how much 
women can offer the church in responsible roles. It's an exciting 
time to be in this field!" Sister Joan Henehan, CSJ, Assistant 
Professor of Religious Studies. 




Religious Studies — Chalon 

Here is a chance to explore the various 
theological, ethical, and spiritual ideas with which 
people have responded to the mystery of life and 
their relationship with God. You will investigate 
Hebrew and Christian scriptures; Eastern, Jewish 
and Protestant theological thought; and the 
Catholic tradition. 



This program will prepare you for a career in 
various kinds of ministries — hospital, parish, and 
campus — and for a career with religious 
organizations, and for graduate study. You will 
take a practicum, working with people in a 
ministry which you select. 




"I'm very interested in society and the changes - the very rapid 
changes - that are taking place in our social structure today, 
especially in family relationships. It seems terribly important 
that students have some understanding of this structure, no 
matter what they finally specialize in. This is part of the 
strength of a liberal arts approach to education." 
Mimi A. Simson, Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Social Science — Chalon 

This is an expanded area major with a choice 
of five emphases: Hispanic Studies, History, 
Political Science, Public Administration, and 



Sociology. This flexibility makes it a fine 
preparation for careers in federal, state, or local 
government, diplomatic service, or business. You 
may go on to graduate work in law, political 
science, history, sociology, urban planning, and 
public administration. 

A core of studies is directed toward fiscal 
problems, employment, technology, societal roles, 
and the general strategy of government. 
Sociology — Chalon 

Sociology studies the way people live 
together in groups, with special emphasis upon 
urban conditions, race relations, education, 
poverty, and crime. The major can lead to careers 
in civil service, market research, or business and 
industry. Students may also go on to graduate 
work in social organization, social psychology, 
family relations, or urban studies. 

You'll take Cultural Anthropology, 
Probability and Statistics, and General Psychology. 
As a junior and senior, you'll study The Family, 
Deviant Behavior, Social Psychology, Racial and 
Cultural Minorities, and Urban Sociology. 
Spanish — Chalon 

This major leads to a proficiency in reading, 
writing, and speaking the language, as well as an 
understanding of the culture of Spanish-speaking 
nations. It prepares you for teaching, research, 
graduate study, translation, and diplomatic service. 

You will take Intermediate Spanish, 
Phonetics and Conversation, History and 
Civilization of Spain, and Advanced Grammar. As 
a junior and senior, classes include Stylistics and 
Composition, Spanish Literature, and 
Spanish-American Civilization. You will also write 
a senior thesis. 



Admissions and general information. 



How to apply for admission. 

Each student is considered individually, and 
all factors bearing on admission are assessed. To 
enter any degree program you must present the 
following information: completed application form, 
transcripts of total previous academic records, SAT 
or ACT scores, and three letters of 
recommendation. Foreign students must also 
present evidence of proficiency in oral and written 
English by TOEFL scores over 550 or satisfactory 
completion of the advanced level at an ELS 
Language Center, as well as a guarantee of 
financial support. 

Students entering Bachelor Degree Programs 
as freshmen must be graduates of accredited high 
schools and have completed a college preparatory 
program with at least a B average in all academic 
subjects. 

Students transferring to Bachelor Degree 
Programs from another college should have a 
cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in 
transferable courses. Nursing majors must have a 
2.5 grade point average. Transfer students with 
more than 30 units are not required to submit SAT 
or ACT scores. 

The fundamental consideration for admission 
to the Associate Degree Program is your ability to 
benefit from the program. Individual 
specializations may have additional requirements. 
Please consult program fact sheets for details. 

It is also highly desirable that you come to 
the college for an interview, to discuss your record, 
motivation, and personal circumstances. We are 
very interested in finding the best ways to help you 
achieve your academic goals. 

Mount St. Mary's College does not, of 
course, discriminate against any applicant or 
student on the basis of race, age, religion, or 
national or ethnic origin. 
And when. 

There is no deadline for application to the 
college. But your chances for acceptance are better 
if your application is on record by March 1 before 
the fall semester in which you wish to enroll. The 
nursing program admissions may close earlier. 



For further information, write or call the 
Director of Admissions, Mount St. Mary's College, 
12001 Chalon Road, Los Angeles, California 90049, 
(213) 476-2237. 
The college calendar. 

Our school year is based on the 4-1-4 
structure. The fall semester runs from September 
through December, and the spring semester from 
February through May. January is reserved for 
Interterm, when you may concentrate on one 
course in depth. 
Interterm. 31 days of possibilities. 

Our students use Interterm for a wide variety 
of learning experiences. Many use it to work on a 
project they have designed themselves. Others 
explore such subjects as "The Arts in Los 
Angeles," going to museums, libraries, and 
galleries, and going to concerts and plays. Or they 
visit a Buddhist or Mormon temple, a Jewish 
synagogue, and a Byzantine church to study their 
architecture while learning about other religions. 
Junior Year Abroad. 

During one or both terms of your junior year, 
you may be able to study in a foreign country. We 
have made special arrangements with universities 
in Mexico City, Quebec, and Vienna to accept 
students from Mount St. Mary's and transfer their 
grades. 

Further details may be secured from the 
Office of the Academic Dean. 
From internships, practical experience. 

Internships allow you to work in major 
corporations or in educational or public offices, 
earning academic credit while you gain valuable 
experience. As a junior or senior, you may apply 
what you have learned in school and confront 
practical problems in business, health care, 
psychology, communications, and many other 
fields. 

Our students have interned in banks, savings 
and loans, specialty department stores, 
congressional offices, schools for special children, 
and health care facilities. They've served with 
airline executives, attorneys, and political parties. 



If you wish to be an intern, you and your 
department chairman will discuss your interests, 
skills, career goals, and schedule to design the 
most beneficial program. The opportunity to be an 
intern will help you confirm your choice of a major 
and test career possibilities. But even more 
important, it gives you an impressive answer to a 
future employer's most difficult (and inevitable) 
question, "What experience have you had?" 
After graduation, what? 

As a woman in today's world, you are 
particularly fortunate. Your career choices can be 
virtually unlimited. But to make the most of these 
opportunities, you need to know where you are 
going. 

Whether you already know what you want to 
do after completing college, or are still trying to 
figure out your goals, we have a plan to help you 
make the most of your life. Our Office of Career 
Planning will spend time in testing and personal 
counseling to discover what career fits you. You 
can explore your interests, values, and skills, and 
we will work with you to relate this knowledge to 
data about job opportunities and labor trends. 

This office will also teach you traditional and 
non- traditional ways of looking for a job. Special 
workshops will sharpen your job-hunting 
techniques, give you a chance to practice your 
approach to job interviews, and help you write an 
impressive resume. 
How can I pay for it? 

Well over one-half of our students receive 
financial aid of one kind or another. This takes 
many forms: 

Scholarships/Grants/ Awards : Basic 
Educational Opportunity Grants, Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grants, Federal Nursing 
Grants, California Grants A, B, C, Art and Music 
Scholarships, Alumnae Scholarships, Dean's 
Awards, Leadership Awards, and other grants and 
awards administered bythe college. 

Loans : National Direct Student Loans, 
Guaranteed Student Loans, Federal Nursing 
Loans. 



Em ployment : College Work-Study, Service 
Contracts. 

If part-time employment is part of your 
financial aid package at Mount St. Mary's, you may 
work up to 15 hours per week, depending upon 
financial need and the availability of jobs. Jobs may 
be on campus, in faculty offices, cafeteria, or 
library, and they pay an average of $2.65 per hour. 
This experience often proves a valuable asset when 
you seek full-time employment after graduation. 
Training workshops are provided for all student 
employees. 

Many of our students pay for their education 
through a combination of two or more of these 
programs. Whatever form it takes, all financial aid 
is administered in accordance with nationally 
established principles, and awarded on the basis of 
satisfactory academic progress and financial need, 
without discrimination by race, national and ethnic 
origin, or religion. 

Because all forms of aid must be coordinated 
with awards from the California Student Aid 
Commission and Basic Educational Opportunity 
Grants, applicants are urged to complete the 
Financial Aid Form/BEOG, common application, 
and Cal Grant supplements by the designated 
deadline. Application will be reviewed when all 
paperwork is on file. First priority will be given to 
students who meet the college deadline of March 1. 
Students' needs will be met with a combination 
package of scholarship, grant, loan, and 
employment, based on the availability of funds and 
an individual evaluation of each student's needs. 

A financial aid brochure giving complete 
information and application may be obtained by 
writing to the Financial Aid Office at either the 
Chalon or the Doheny Campus. 

As a further financial assistance, you may be 
able to live off-campus in a nearby home, earning 
room and board in exchange for 12 hours per week 
of baby-sitting or light housekeeping. 

The Office of Student Development 
coordinates these housing arrangements, with an 
eye toward matching families with students. 



Continuing Education. 



Coming back and going on. 

"I felt I needed to put myself through a rock 
tumbler. I needed to define myself, to internalize 
my experiences and background. The Mount has 
done that for me. Everyone there has been wide 
open to me, and helped me work toward my own 
goals." 

Laurie Ostrow is in her mid- fifties, with a 
husband, two grown sons, and a successful career 
in personnel management and education. By most 
standards, her life has been rewarding. "But I 
wasn't growing." This thought, expressed in 
different ways by different Continuing Education 
students, sums up the reason most women return 
to college. They are looking for self- fulfillment, for 
knowledge for its own sake, in order to grow. 

"I used to see the college from my home," 
Laurie continued. "One day, I called to ask about 
going back to school. They told me the semester 
had already started, but to come on in just the 
same. The Director of Admissions herself took me 
over to the department head. Can you imagine 
anybody doing that at most colleges?" 

Like most returning students, she admits that 
going back to college has been difficult. "But I 
wouldn't trade it for anything. And the faculty, the 
other students, everybody has been absolutely 
marvelous. They've done everything to make me 
feel I belong." 

Carolyn Harris had gone to UCLA before 
marrying, and had even gone back for some 
extension courses. "But just finding a place to park 
there is traumatic." Now, with the last of their four 
children in high school, she wanted to get her 
degree. 

She happened to get a flyer describing the 
Focus course at the Mount. This seminar, 
conducted especially for women who wish to 
return to college, covers two semesters. The first 

Continuing Education students discuss experiences in Charles 
Willard Coe Library on Chalon. Library contains more than 
106,000 volumes, 580 current periodicals, 1200 microfilm reels, 
and 4900 Audio/Visual titles. Doheny library adds 20,800 
volumes, 125 periodicals, 177 microfilm reels, 542 recordings. 



seeks out and attempts to define personal concerns 
for growth. The second considers the application of 
knowledge in today's world. 

"One of my professors told me she thought I 
belonged in English, even though I'd majored in 
nutrition at UCLA. I've started reading again. I'm 
more alert, more alive. My husband says the 
Mount makes me more interested and more 
interesting. 

"Sure, it's been hard getting back into 
studying. But I look at learning in a totally different 
light now. I'm doing it for me, not because I think I 
should, or because somebody tells me I must. 

"Every time I drive up the hill to the Mount, 
my spirits rise." 




Many Continuing Ed students return to 
college to realize a specific career goal. Mary 
Hesburgh is one of these. "Before I married, I 
taught third grade. But I'd always wanted to be a 
nurse. I thought I'd fulfill that desire by doing 
volunteer work, and at first, that was fine. But after 
a while, it just wasn't enough. 

"So when Chris, our youngest, went into 
kindergarten, I decided it was time to try. Mount 
St. Mary's is close, and it has the kind of 
philosopical approach I wanted. I went to see 
them, scared and tongue-tied, knowing they'd 
never let me in. Instead, I got all the 
encouragement I needed, from everybody — 
Admissions staff, the faculty, even the students. 

"I've never felt out of place, never had a 
single day when I felt uncomfortable. There's no 
kind of segregation just because I'm older — with 
three kids in college and two in high school. When 
I've had to go on a trip with my husband, I've 
always been able to get notes and make up the 
classes. 

"I've been there two-and-a-half years now 
and it's just great being in a school where 
everybody cares and wants you to succeed." 

For Muriel Friedman, Mount St. Mary's has 
proved the end of a long search. She and her 
husband, a dentist who is also head of a 
department at USC, have two daughters, one 
grown and the other a teenager. Eight years ago, 
finding herself with time on her hands, she went to 
UCLA and took courses and psychological tests to 
determine her talents and aptitudes. One of the 
answers was art. 

She took drawing classes at UCLA, at Otis 
Art Institute, and from a private instructor. But 
none seemed quite right for her. 

"Then one day I was ironing, and I saw a 
commercial on TV for Mount St. Mary's. My 
daughter Susie knew about the school, and that 
same day, I called them up and went up to see 
them. I enrolled in Art. At first, I thought I'd go for 
my degree, but now, what I want to do is learn all I 
can about the subject I love." 



She goes to classes every day for half-days, 
"just to satisfy my own curiosity and develop my 
talent as much as I can." 

On Mount St. Mary's, "I think it's fantastic. 
I've been encouraged by everybody, and that 
includes all the students. They never make you feel 
out of place. I never get a 'No' from anybody — 
doors are never closed. I feel alive again. And 
would you believe it, I made the Dean's List this 
semester!" 

Another bonus was summed up by a 
member of the college staff who has known her 
since the day she applied for admission. "Every 
time I see Muriel, she looks younger." 

Barbara Gordon came back for still another 
reason. "I graduated in 1961 with a B.A. in 
Sociology from UCLA. Then I married and had two 
children. Last year, I decided I wanted to go back 
to school for my master's, after working as a 
para-professional in child development at 
Cedars-Sinai Hospital. My goal has always been 
social work. But when I applied to USC, they 
turned me down because I hadn't been in school 
for a long time, and my grade average wasn't very 
high." 

To overcome these problems, she came to 
Mount St. Mary's. She spent an Interterm and two 
semesters with us, and got good grades, even 
though she admits to terrible anxiety. "I never 
have thought of myself as a student. But at the 
Mount, I got tremendous support. The smallness 
allows individual attention and gives you a chance 
to express yourself. The teachers go out of their 
way to know you as a person, not just a name on 
the class roll. 

"I'm Jewish and I was a little concerned 
about being in a Catholic school. But there's such 
an open attitude, my background just added 
another point of view to our discussions. I feel very 
sad about leaving." 

But her reason is a happy one. She was 
accepted for graduate work by USC. 



Four alumnae look back at the Mount. 




Sister Suzanne Jabro 




Sister Suzanne J abro, CSJ, B.A., Sociology, 1969. 
Chaplain at Los Angeles Central Juvenile Hall. 
"We work with kids in juvenile detention, trying to 
help them realize God's love, and their own 
self- worth. I could never have gotten to this point 
if it hadn't been for my years at the Mount, 
because I grew up in an upper middle class home, 
and had always been pretty sheltered. Dr. 
Hoffman's classes in Sociology helped make me 
aware of how much people need help, and made 
me want to become more involved." 
Kathy Janeski, B.A., Social Science, 1971. Account 
Executive with office supply firm, San Fernando Valley. 
"I handle over 125 accounts for my firm. The 
people are so different from the ones I grew up 
with and saw at Mount St. Mary's, there have been 
times when I've wondered whether all the things I 
learned in college were going to waste. But I've 
found in business that I have a lot of strength, and 
that comes from my church and my family and 
especially from my years at the Mount." 
Lola McAlpin-Grant, B.A., Political History , 1963; J. D. 
Assistant Dean, Loyola- Mary mount Law School; former 
Deputy Attorney General for California. 
"Mount St. Mary's helped me merge my identity 
as a woman, as a black, and as a Christian." 
Cristine Ferrero, B.S., Nursing, 1971, Liaison in 
Oncology, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles. 
"I've taken a much closer look at what I learned at 
the Mount since leaving school. My years there 
gave me a very solid base for living, and helped me 
develop a sense of self-worth. They nurtured a lot 
of confidence, and that's very precious to me." 



Lola McAlpin-Grant 



Cristine Ferrero 



Mount St Marys College • 1978-1980 

General Information 2 
Associate Degree Program 10 
Bachelors Degree Programs 26 
Graduate Degree Programs 62 
Courses of Instruction 12 
Administration and Faculty 108 
Index HI 



2/General Information 



Degree Programs 

Associate Degree Program 

At the Doheny Campus two-year courses of study are 
offered which lead to the Associate in Arts degree. With 
prime emphasis on the student as an individual, the 
program attempts to enhance self- development through 
involvement on and off campus in OUTREACH activities 
— social action and fieldwork — and in institutional 
involvement. Extensive advisement and counseling 
programs and a core program in communication skills 
support the regular course work. 

Students may specialize in Art, Business, Liberal Arts, 
Nursing, Physical Therapy Assistant, Pre-School 
Teaching, and Respiratory Therapy. The Nursing 
program makes the student eligible to write the licensing 
examination to practice as a registered nurse and to use 
the title R.N. The two-year program can also prepare the 
student to transfer to the Chalon Campus, or can lend 
itself to individually designed study programs. For 
further information, see the associate degree section. 

Bachelors Degree Programs 

Mount St. Mary's College offers four-year courses of 
study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Science. 
Primarily these are offered at the Chalon Campus. See 
the bachelors degree section. 

Within the liberal arts tradition, the curriculum provides 
the student with a broad and liberating background in the 
arts and sciences, and aims at developing her ability to 
communicate knowledge and to apply appropriate 
principles and techniques to particular problems. During 
the junior and senior years, the student pursues deeper 
study in her major areas of concentration and takes 
related elective courses. 

Masters Degree Programs/Teacher Credential Programs 

Since 1931, the graduate division of Mount St. Mary's 
College has extended and deepened the work of the 
undergraduate departments by offering to qualified men 
and women the opportunity to pursue advanced courses 
and to obtain professional training. 

Students may earn the degrees of Master of Arts in 
Teaching with a major in History or Spanish, and Master 
of Science in Education with specializations in 
Administrative Studies, Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Studies, 
Individually Designed Program, Early Childhood 
Education, Pupil Personnel Services, and Special 
Education (Learning Handicapped). This latter 
specialization is in collaboration with the Leadership 
Program of the Marianne Frostig Center of Educational 
Therapy. 



The graduate division also offers courses which qualify 
the student for various specializations in the California 
Teaching Credentials and for the California Services and 
Specialist Credentials. See the graduate section. 

Characterization of Mount St. 
Mary's College 

Academic Focus 

Mount St. Mary's College is an academic community 
devoted to continuing exploration of our relation to God, 
other persons, and nature. This exploration takes the 
form of programs designed to provide experience in the 
principal modes of thought by which we reach 
understanding, and the strengths and limitations of these 
modes. The objectives are to assist the student to develop 
a disciplined and continuing curiosity, a receptivity to 
new ideas, and a base for evaluation of these ideas. 

Within the framework of these same major objectives, the 
College also offers programs, undergraduate and 
graduate, in which the student engages in more intensive 
study appropriate to a specific career. In this way the 
College ensures that it will not only directly serve the 
society that supports it, but will also enhance the 
student's awareness of an ever-changing context within 
which values of the individual must operate. It is in this 
latter context of a dynamic society that programs of 
continuing education will find and play their role. 

The Religious Commitment 

The Catholic commitment of the College manifests itself 
in many ways. It is found in opportunities for worship. It 
is found in academic programs. It is found in the way the 
College functions. Above all, it is found in the whole 
environment in which inquiry and learning take place. 
Thus, the College embodies Christian convictions 
supportive of lives of commitment and Christian concern 
in a secular society. 

Distinctive Services 

Several factors emerge from the history and environment 
of the College that create a distinctive community. A true 
academic community becomes possible: the total college 
— not just the classroom, the academic major or the 
course — is a learning environment. Historically, the 
College is a liberal arts institution with a special concern 
for the education of women; however, men are admitted 
to undergraduate music and nursing, to graduate and 
extended day programs, and to summer sessions. It is a 
small college of about 1000 students on two campuses. 



General Information/3 



The Chalon campus primarily offers baccalaureate 
programs in liberal arts and sciences, and related 
professional training. The Doheny campus offers a 
variety of programs ranging from two-year through 
graduate, in which the metropolitan setting is a 
significant factor in learning. 

Academic Government 

The academic community that is the College requires of 
each constituent group a distinct role related to the 
welfare of the whole. As such, it is not a microcosmic 
political society of identical and equal units in which 
egalitarian principles can operate. Rather, functional 
distinctions produce different kinds of responsibilities 
which in turn must determine kinds of authority. 

For example, students and alumnae are helpful when 
they advise on the quality of teaching and the adequacy 
of programs. Faculty are best equipped to determine 
academic content and to advise on program needs. 
Administrators and staff perform their function when 
they allocate scarce resources and provide the services 
necessary to achieve the academic purposes of the 
College most effectively. Regents assist through 
participation in College functions and in support of 
advancement programs. Trustees best discharge their 
responsibility by defining College goals, reviewing 
collegiate performance, and providing effective liaison 
with concerned extra-mural groups. 

Because Mount St. Mary's College is a community, each 
group has an additional responsibility for keeping the 
others informed and for soliciting the views of others on 
matters of mutual or overlapping concern. The separation 
of function must, however, always parallel the division of 
authority, and the exercise of authority must always 
recognize the interdependence of each group in achieving 
the welfare of the College. 

Accreditations 

Chartered by the State of California in 1925, Mount St. 

Mary's College is accredited by: 

The Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and 

Universities of the Western Association of Schools and 

Colleges 

The California State Board of Education. 

The California Board of Registered Nursing. 

The National League for Nursing. 

The National Association of Schools of Music. 

Affiliations 

The Frostig Center for Educational Therapy, established 
in 1948, became associated with Mount St. Mary's 
College in 1969. 



The Center-College association provides for a sharing of 
faculties and facilities, with Mount St. Mary's granting 
the Master of Science degree with a specialization in 
Special Education in the area of Learning Handicapped, 
and the California Specialist Credential in Special 
Education — Learning Handicapped. The program 
prepares leadership personnel for school systems that 
give help to the educationally handicapped. 

The Frostig Center is in Culver City, off the Santa Monica 
Freeway, within twenty minutes of the Doheny Campus. 

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act 

Mount St. Mary's College fully conforms with the Family 
Education Rights and Privacy Act (the Buckley 
Amendment) of 1974. In accordance with this act, official 
records are made available to students and are not made 
available to off-campus persons or agencies without the 
express consent of the student, except under legal 
compulsion or in cases in which the safety of persons or 
property is involved, or for educational improvement. 
See current Student Handbook for policy statement. 

Legal Responsibility of the College 

The college endeavors to safeguard students in the use of 
physical facilities, laboratories, and athletic equipment. It 
is clearly understood that students who use college 
facilities do so entirely at their own risk. Emergency first 
aid treatment is available, but the college has no legal 
responsibility for injury or other damages suffered by 
students on or off the campus, or in travel to and from 
such activities or for any expenses in connection 
therewith. 

Nondiscrimination Policy 

Mount St. Mary's College admits students of any race, 
color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, 
privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or 
made available to students. It does not discriminate on 
the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in 
administration of its educational policies, admissions 
policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and 
other college-administered programs. 



4/General Information 



Academic Calendar, 1978-1979 

Undergraduate Programs 



Fall, 1978 




August 31-S 


September 1 


September 


2,3,4 
5,6 




7 




10 




18 




27 


October 


2 




23 


November 


1 




13-17 




15 




22 




23-26 




27 


December 


8 




11-15 




16 


Interterm, 1979 


January 


2 




5 




12 




25, 26 




26 


Spring, 1979 
February 


5 




6 




14 




19 


March 


21 


April 


4 
12-17 




18 




29 




30 


May 


14-18 
19 




20 


Summer Session - 2979 


June 


25 


July 


4 


August 


3 



Faculty and staff orientation 

Orientation for new Chalon students 

Advisement; registration for all students, 9:00 a.m. -12:00 noon, 1:00-4:00 p.m. (late 

registration begins at 4:00 p.m.) 
Classes begin 

Mass of the Holy Spirit, 4:00 p.m. (Chalon) 
Last day to add a course and file computer cards; to register late; to file Fall Term Independent 

Study proposals 
Horizons Convocation (classes will not meet 9:30-12:00 p.m.) 

Last day to file for December/January graduation 
Notice of mid- semester academic difficulty 

All Saints Day (classes will meet) 

Last day to withdraw from courses with grade of W; to file for CR/NC; to declare AUDIT 

Interterm registration 

Last day to submit Interterm Independent Study proposals 

Last day for Chalon students to file for May graduation 

Thanksgiving vacation 

Classes resume 

Feast of the Immaculate Conception (classes will meet) 
Final examinations 
Christmas vacation begins 

Classes begin; late registration for returning students; registration for new and exchange 

students 
Last day to add a course 

Last day to withdraw from courses with grade of W; to declare CR/NC; to declare AUDIT 
Payment of Spring Term tuition and fees 
Final examinations; Interterm ends 

Advisement; registration for all students, 9:00 a.m. -12:00 noon, 1:00-4:00 p.m. (late 

registration begins at 4:00 p.m.) 
Classes begin 
Last day to add a course and to file computer cards; to register late; to file Spring Term 

Independent Study proposals 
Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

Notice of mid- semester academic difficulty 

Last day to withdraw from courses with grade of W; to file for CR/NC; to declare AUDIT 

Easter vacation 

Classes resume 

Siena Day 

Last day for sophomores to declare major 

Final examinations 

Mary's Day, Laurel Day, Baccalaureate 

Graduation 

Classes begin 

Registration for those who have not pre-registered; late registration begins at 4:00 p.m. 

Holiday 

Summer Session ends 



General Information/5 



Academic Calendar, 1978-1979 

Graduate and Extended Day 

Fall, 1978 

September 14 Registration, 2:30-6:00 p.m. (late registration begins at 6:00 p.m.) 

16 Saturday classes begin 

18 Late afternoon/evening classes begin 

25 Last day to add a course; to register late 

October 13 Student must file intention to receive degree in January, 1979 and pay $50.00 graduation fee in 

Graduate Office 

November 11 Veteran's Day — Holiday 

22 Last day to withdraw from a course with grade of W; to declare AUDIT 
23-26 Thanksgiving Vacation 

27 Classes resume 

December 18 Christmas vacation begins 

January 2 Classes resume 

15-20 Final examinations 

Spring, 1979 

January 29 Registration, 2:30-6:00 p.m. (late registration begins at 6:00 p.m.) 

30 Late afternoon/evening classes begin 

February 3 Saturday classes begin 

7 Last day to add a course; to register late 

23 Student must file intention to receive degree in May, 1979 and pay $50.00 graduation fee in 

Graduate Office 

April 4 Last day to withdraw from a course with grade of W; to declare AUDIT 

9-14 Easter Vacation 

16 Classes resume 

May 14-19 Final examinations 

17 Graduate Hooding ceremony 
20 Graduation 

Summer Session - 1979 

June 25 Classes begin 

Registration for those who have not pre-registered; late registration begins at 4:00 p.m. 
30 Student must file intention to receive degree in August, 1979 and pay $50.00 graduation fee in 

Graduate Office. 

July 4 Holiday 

August 3 Summer Session ends 

Expenses for 1978-1979 

Tuition. Payable at registration. 

Undergraduate students 

Full-time (12-17 units/semester plus Interterm) $2,700 per year 

1,350 per semester 

Full-time (units in excess of 17/semester) 90 per unit 

Part-time (less than 12 units/semester including Interterm) 90 per unit 

Tuition deposit required of all incoming full-time undergraduate students. 
Not refundable. Applicable only to tuition 50 

Graduate students 

Tuition (per unit) 90 



6/ General Information 



Special Programs 

College classes for high school students (1-6 units) 50 per semester 

Junior year abroad registration 35 per semester 

Tuition and fees for cooperative courses/programs will be calculated on an individual basis. 

Auditing courses 

Students register for audit in the same manner as for credit and pay the same fees. 

Fees 

Student Body Fees 

Chalon Campus Students 7.50 per semester 

Doheny Campus A. A. Students 7.50 per semester 

Doheny Campus Graduate and Extended Day Students 3 per semester 

Orientation Fee (for new students) 20 

Health Service Fee 

Chalon Campus Students 15 per semester 

Doheny Campus A. A. Students 15 per semester 

Doheny Campus Graduate and Extended Day Students (optional) 16 per semester 

Studen t Health and Acciden t Insurance (subject to change in 1978): 55 per year 

Nursing students and students living away from home are required to carry the student Health 
and Accident Insurance or show evidence of other health insurance coverage. Other students 
carrying nine units or more may elect to purchase Student Health and Accident Insurance. 

Examinations 

Comprehensive Examinations (graduate students) 50 

Credit for a course by examination (non- refundable) 

Clinical courses, per course 100 

Others, per course 50 

Portfolio evaluation (credit for prior/extra-institutional learning; non-refundable) 50 

General 

Application for admission (all students) 20 

Late registration (after published dates and time of registration) 10 

Late filing of registration materials 1 per day 

Adding/dropping courses (per course) 1 

Adjustment in course schedule after published dates 5 

Graduation fee — Undergraduate students 25 

Graduation fee — Graduate students 50 

Transcripts (When more than one is ordered at the same time, $2 is charged for the first 

and $1 for each additional) 2 

Evaluation of academic records (non-refundable but can be applied toward application fee) 20 

Teacher Placement File 5 

Teacher Placement file copies sent out at the request of the student (each copy) 2 

Project/Thesis Binding (per copy) 10 

Removal of grade of INC 10 

Deferred payment fee 10 per semester 

Administrative fee for handling returned checks 3 each 

Courses 

Student teaching — Elementary 5 per unit 

Student teaching — Secondary 5 per unit 

EDU115ABCD 7 per course 

EDU 360AB (per seminar and practicum) 100 

NUR 40 (equivalent to six-unit course) 540 

NUR 100 (equivalent to six-unit course) 540 

Applied music — part-time student 35 per course 

Private music lessons — fee paid to instructor 



General Information/7 



Full payment of all expenses is due on or before registration day of each semester, including all previous unpaid 
obligations. 

Members of religious communities receive a 40% tuition discount during the academic year. 

Residence 

Board and small double room $1,490 per year 

745 per semester 
Board and large double room 1,580 per year 

790 per semester 
Board and single room 1 ,650 per year 

825 per semester 
Board, single room, private bath 1,770 per year 

885 per semester 

Board and room, Interterm only 180 

Room and Board, Doheny Campus 1,800 per year 

900 per semester 

A guest rate of $9.00 per day is required for residence during vacation periods. 

An advance payment of $100.00 is required for a room reservation. $75.00 is applied to the student's account for the first 
semester; $25.00 is retained from the first payment as a room deposit (to be applied against unusual cleaning and 
damage costs) until such time as the student discontinues residence. 

Students already in residence make an advance deposit of $75.00 for priority in requesting a room for the following year. 

Rooms are reserved for the year. Room assignments are made in the order of the receipt of the reservation payment. 

Advance payment is forfeited if notice of withdrawal is received after August 1. Room deposit is forfeited if notice of 
intention to withdraw from residence is not given to the Director of Residence prior to the close of the fall semester. 

Refunds 

All students complying with the procedure established for withdrawal from the college or from a course are entitled to a 
refund according to the following scale: 

Period of time Refundable 

During first week (tuition) 100 % minus $25 

administrative 
fee 

During first week (room and board) 75 % 

During second week (tuition, room and board) 75 % 

During third week (tuition, room and board) 50 % 

During fourth week (tuition, room and board) 25 % 

After fourth week 

The date on which the notice of withdrawal is filed with the Registrar's Office is used to calculate the amount of refund 
of tuition and/or room and board. Refunds will be first credited against a student's financial aid, if any, before a balance 
accrues to the student. No refunds will be made for fees. 

Refunds will not be made in cases of suspension or dismissal. 

When outside agencies, grants, scholarships or loans do not cover the withdrawal or change of unit charge, the 
individual will be responsible for the amount due. 

Note Regarding Interterm 

For full-time students no additional charge is made for Interterm; consequently, no refund will be made to anyone not 
attending. The tuition charge for the first half of the academic year which is paid in September covers the fall semester 
and Interterm. The second half of the tuition charge for the academic year which is paid in February covers the spring 
semester. For a full-time student entering the college for the first time after Christinas, payment for the spring semester 
includes Interterm. Payment is made at the time of registration. No refund will be made if the student does not attend 
Interterm. 

The same policy applies to room and board charges. Since additional charges are not made, no refunds will be made. 

Students who come to the college only for the Interterm and come outside the established exchange process will pay the 
regular per unit tuition and the board and room fee established for the Interterm. 



8/General Information 



Financial Aid 

All financial aid at Mount St. Mary's College is 
administered in accordance with principles which have 
been established nationally. These are based on the belief 
that parents have a responsibility for assisting their 
children to meet educational costs, and that financial aid 
is available to fill the gap between a family's contribution 
(including the student's own potential resources) and the 
student's yearly academic expenses. 

The amount of the contribution expected from a family is 
determined by a careful analysis of the family's financial 
strength, based on the "Financial Aid Form" (FAF) which 
is submitted to the College Scholarship Service of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. 

There are many financial assistance programs available 
from sources outside the college such as Cal Grants A, B, 
C from the State, Federal Basic Educational Opportunity 
Grants, Federal loans, and scholarships given by 
foundations, business firms, and clubs. High school 
seniors who have financial need should investigate all of 
these sources of aid. High school seniors should also 
obtain information on how to apply for a Basic 
Educational Opportunity Grant from their counselors. 

The financial aid programs available at MSMC are: 
ScholarshipslGrantsi 'Awards: Art and Music scholarships, 
Alumnae scholarships, Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grants, Federal Nursing Grants, Dean's 
Awards, Leadership Awards, other MSMC grants and 
awards. 

Loans: National Direct Student Loans, Guaranteed 
Student Loans, Federal Nursing Loans. 
Employment: College Work-study, Service Contracts 

Financial aid at MSMC is awarded on the basis of 
satisfactory academic progress and financial need and 
without discrimination by sex, race or religion. Assistance 
is also dependent upon the availability of funds. Since all 
forms of aid must be coordinated with the awards from 
the California Student Aid Commission and BEOG, 
applicants are urged to complete the FAF/BEOG, 
common application and Cal Grant supplements by the 
designated deadline. Applications will be reviewed when 
all paperwork is on file and first priority will be given to 
students who meet MSMC deadline of March 1. 
Students' needs will be met with a combination package 
of scholarship, grant, loan and employment, based on the 
availability of funds and the individual situation of the 
student. 

Financial aid brochure giving complete application and 
program information may be obtained by writing to the 
financial aid office at the Chalon or Doheny campuses. 



The Alumnae Association 

The Alumnae Association works toward the goals and 
interests of the college and toward strengthening avenues 
of communication and bonds of loyalty between the 
college and graduates of the Mount. 

The Alumnae Association is a member of the Council for 
Advancement and Support of Education. Its members 
qualify for membership in the American Association of 
University Women; the International Federation of 
Catholic Alumnae; Kappa Gamma Pi, the honor society 
for the graduates from Catholic colleges for women; and 
Delta Epsilon Sigma, honor society for graduates of 
Catholic universities and colleges. 



Associate Degree Program 



10/ Associate Degree Program 



Associate 
Degree Program 



The Associate in Arts program gives students the 
opportunity to explore new beginnings. It offers 
excellence in its specialized fields and concern for the 
individual student who hopes to become a more educated 
and a finer person. Each student is unique: each 
possesses different strengths and capacities, has different 
criteria and motivation for success, and has the capacity 
to change, to grow, and to make responsible choices. 
Each is offered the personalized atmosphere of the 
Doheny program. The fundamental goal of this program 
is to provide knowledge and skills required to make a 
living within the larger context of making a life. An 
environment based on Christian principles is geared to 
enable students, faculty, and administrators to live a life 
of concern and commitment in accord with those 
principles. 

Special Features 

The academic program at Doheny centers around the 
personal development of each student and emphasizes 
three asepcts of her learning environment: organized 
instruction, experience, and support. 

Organized instruction aims at the transmission of 
knowledge, skills, attitudes, and motivations derived 
from academic disciplines and theories. Experience, a 
second dimension of the program, endeavors to relate 
personal growth and learning to the more practical 
aspects of life. Support, a third feature of the program, 
attempts to reinforce personal strengths and, at the same 
time, to remove obstacles to personal growth. Thus the 
A. A. program has a dual focus — classroom learning and 
experience-oriented learning, both forms of learning 
taking place in a climate of support and encouragement. 

Organized Instruction 

The college provides three major curriculum options: a 
specialization, transfer to a baccalaureate major, or the 
liberal arts option. A student may study one of six 
specializations: art, business, nursing, physical therapy 
assistant, pre-school teaching or respiratory therapy. She 
may begin preparation for transfer to one of the 
baccalaureate majors at the Chalon Campus of Mount St. 
Mary's, or she may elect to experiment with various fields 
of study while earning the A. A. degree. 

Experience. 

Opportunities for experience can occur both inside and 
outside the college. Experiences within the college are 
called College Involvement, and those outside the college 
are organized into a three-level program called Outreach. 



College Involvement. Students are encouraged to become a 
vital part of college. They are invited to serve on major 
committees and to initiate religious, cultural, and social 
activities at Doheny. 

Outreach. This program extends the learning process 
beyond campus limits. The student becomes aware of 
important issues in society by dealing with them. 
Opportunities are offered for career-related experiences 
and the blending of theory and practice. Regular 
volunteer aid to community agencies, centers, and 
institutions is made available. 

Off-campus college-related experiences occur at several 
levels: 

Social Action. The student may perform supervised 
volunteer services: tutoring, hospital volunteer work, 
child care, home visiting, and the like. 

Fieldwork. The student may engage in supervised 
field work directly related to a course or to her 
program of studies: clinical nursing, supervised 
teaching, business internship, or similar work. 

Outreach Term. The student spends a term in an 
off-campus experience involving problem-solving 
with the guidance and instruction of a faculty 
member. 

In all of these experiences, the goal is the development of 
the student through the practical application of 
knowledge to life situations. 

Support Programs. 

At Doheny, support occurs as an outgrowth of the total 
philosophy of the college. The Support Program is 
designed to help the student achieve success in college. It 
is a combination of course work, such as Communication 
Skills, group and individual counseling, student- faculty 
relations, and personal interest. 

Communication Skills. The ability to communicate is one of 
the basic tools of learning. A student must be able to 
receive and to transmit information accurately. This 
process involves reading, writing, speaking, and 
listening, as well as understanding non-verbal messages. 
She must be able to think logically and apply knowledge 
to problems and situations at hand. A student usually 
enrolls in Communication Skills during her first term at 
Doheny so that these skills may be integrated throughout 
her academic program. 

Four levels of instruction in Communication Skills are 
offered: (1) Large group instruction on principles; (2) 
Small group workshops to apply these principles; (3) 
Individual tutorial help as needed; (4) Self- teaching, 
using machines and programmed materials iri the 
communication skills lab in the Learning Resource 
Center. 



Associate Degree Program/11 



Counseling. Counseling services are offered as an integral 
part of the college experience, to assist students in 
self-evaluation and attainment of their potential. 

Group Counseling. This is an attempt to enable the 
student to make responsible choices while recognizing 
her own values, setting her own goals and priorities, 
and at times facing conflict. Usually the student 
participates in Group Experience during the first term 
at Doheny as an orientation to the total college 
experience. 

Academic Counseling. Assistance in selecting program 
and courses is available in the Counseling Center. 

Personal Counseling. If the student desires personal 
counseling, it is built into the program. Informed and 
concerned faculty and staff are available for personal 
and religious counseling. Doheny students are also 
eligible to use the full scope of services provided at the 
Counseling Center of the University of Southern 
California under the provisions described in Health 
Services. 

Career Counseling. Through the assistance of 
counselors and an elective course in career planning, 
students are offered help in making career decisions 
. and in planning an appropriate program of studies, 
reference materials on career possibilities and further 
education are available in the Counseling Center. 

Associate Degrees 

Mount St. Mary's College confers the following associate 
degrees: 

The Associate in Art with specializations in 

Art 

Business 

Liberal Arts 

Nursing 

Physical Therapy Assistant 

Pre-School Teaching 

Respiratory Therapy 

Associate in Arts 

Freshmen Admission Requirements 

Applicants for the Associate Degree Program should be 
graduates of an accredited high school and should have 
completed a college preparatory course of study. While 
individual majors in the Associate in Arts program may 
have additional requirements the basic criterion for 
admission is the ability to benefit from the program. All 
majors are open to women. Men may be admitted into 
the Nursing Program. 



Freshmen Admission Procedures 

Freshmen applicants for admission must submit the following: 

1. Completed application form with an application fee of 
$20.00. This processing fee is not refundable nor 
applicable to tuition. Application fee waivers are 
granted upon evidence of financial need. 

2. High school transcript which should include the first 
semester grades of the senior year. The following 
courses are used in computing grade point average: 
Algebra, geometry, English, U.S. History government, 
lab sciences, foreign languages and advanced 
mathematics. 

3. Scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Test (ACT). Information concerning 
registration for either of these tests is available in the 
Admissions Office. 

4. Three letters of recommendation. 

5. Other information a student may wish to provide in 
support of her/his application: awards, honors, special 
experiences. 

6. Foreign students must present evidence of proficiency 
in oral and writtten English by TOEFL scores of 550 or 
better or satisfactory completion of the ninth level at 
an ELS Language Center. A statement guaranteeing 
financial support is also required. 

A personal interview is strongly recommended and can 
be arranged through the Admissions Office. 

Transfer Admission Requirements 

Applicants with more than 15 transferable semester units 
may be considered for admission as a transfer student 
and are not required to submit high school transcripts or 
SAT/ ACT scores. Applicants with fewer than 15 
transferable units must satisfy freshmen admission 
requirements and procedures as well as submit 
transcripts of all college work. A previous college record 
may not be disregarded. 

While individual majors in the Associate in Arts program 
may have additional requirements the basic criterion for 
admission is the ability to benefit from the program. All 
majors are open to women. Men are admitted into the 
Nursing Program. 

Transfer Admission Procedures 

Transfer applicants for admission must submit the following: 

1. Completed application form with an application fee of 
$20.00. This processing fee is not refundable nor 
applicable to tuition. Application fee waivers are 
granted upon evidence of financial need. 

2. Transcripts of credits. College transfer students should 
request the Registrar of each college they have 
attended to forward two copies of their transcript, 
including work in progress, directly to the Admissions 
Office. Transcripts submitted become the property of 
Mount St. Mary's College and cannot be returned to 
the applicant. 



12/ Associate Degree Program 



3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. Other information a student may wish to provide in 
support of her/his application: awards, honors, special 
experiences. 

5. Foreign students must present evidence of proficiency 
in oral and written English by TOEFL scores of 550 or 
better or satisfactory completion of the ninth level at 
an ELS Language Center. A statement guaranteeing 
financial support is also required. 

A personal interview is strongly recommended and can 
be arranged through the Admissions Office. 

Conditional Admission 

A student who qualifies for admission but whose 
academic history indicates possible difficulty in college 
may be admitted conditionally. The conditions are 
established at the time of acceptance into the associate 
degree programs. 

To have the conditions removed a student must maintain 
good academic standing (2.0 minimum grade point 
average) for two semesters and meet the other 
requirements established at the time of acceptance. For 
further details on conditional admission, consult the 
Admissions Office or the Academic Counselor in the 
Counseling Center. 

Transfer of Credit 

The extent of the transfer student's advanced standing is 
determined on an individual basis and is not decided 
until an evaluation of all previous academic work has 
been completed. 

Credit for courses taken in other accredited colleges or 
universities is transferable provided that the transferred 
courses satisfy curriculum requirements at Mount St. 
Mary's College. A maximum of 36 semester units or 54 
quarter units for course work taken in an accredited 
college is transferable toward the associate degree. Credit 
for extension course is not automatically transferable. 

A final credit summary and determination of advanced 
standing will be prepared by the registrar after the 
applicant is accepted for admission and all final 
transcripts have been submitted. 

Once admitted to and enrolled in the college, the student 
is normally expected to pursue study only at Mount St. 
Mary's College. 

A student seeking an exception to this policy must file a 
Transfer of Credit Clearance with all approvals in the 
office of the registrar prior to registration in course for 
which approval has been obtained. 

Special Admission 

Special admission may be granted to students who are 
returning to the classroom after an absence or to students 
who wish to take courses for enrichment but do not wish 
to pursue a degree at this time. 



Up to twelve units may be earned as a special part-time 
student. After taking twelve units, the student will be 
reviewed for formal admission to a degree program. The 
units taken as a special student may be applied toward 
the degree unless otherwise noted. 

Academic Policies 

Degree Requirements 

1. A minimum of sixty semester hour units of credit are 
required with a grade point average of at least 2.0. The 
last 24 units immediately preceding graduation 
normally must be completed at Mount St. Mary's 
College. 

2. The following courses are required: 

a. A course in religious studies 

b. A three -unit course in humanities outside the 
specialization requirements: 

Art, music, literature, cultural history 

c. At least one term in Communication Skills 
(DO10A). 

d. At least one term in Outreach by participation in 
one of the following: 

— Social Action 

— Fieldwork or clinical experience associated with 
the specialization 

— An Outreach term 

e. At least one term in group counseling. 

3. Satisfaction of the residence requirement. Residence is 
defined as the last twenty- four units before graduation 
which must be taken at Mount St. Mary's College. At 
least some of these units are in the student's 
specialization and are earned in regular course work. 

4. Fulfillment of Mount St. Mary's College bachelors 
program general studies requirements is strongly 
recommended. A wide background of study is 
considered important. Electives should be chosen with 
this in mind. 

Specialization Requirements 

To obtain a degree with a specialization, the particular 
requirements in that area must be met. Basic curricular 
patterns listed in this bulletin should be followed with the 
consent and approval of academic advisors. 

Maximum Credit Load 

During the first term of the freshman year, a student is 
encouraged to select a minimum program of courses 
unless her area of specialization prescribes a certain 
pattern, or unless her grade point average is exceptionally 
high. 

Learning Resource Center 

In order to enable each student to achieve maximum 
benefit from the academic programs at the college, the 
Learning Resource Center is available. Students enrolled 



Associate Degree Program/13 



in Communication Skills programs, nursing, business, 
and human services programs will find learning materials 
pertinent to course content as well as study materials for 
individual skill building. 

The center provides referral and individualized and 
group sessions. A volunteer program of student tutors is 
provided. Communication Skills tutors assist students 
with course-related assignments as well as special 
experience courses for academic credit. 
Testing programs for placement and assessment are 
arranged in conjunction with the academic counselor in 
the Counseling Center. 

Academic Counseling Services 

Mount St. Mary's College is currently implementing a 
Counseling Center at the Doheny Campus for Associate 
in Arts students. This center will provide on an on-going 
basis academic counseling and referral services. The 
academic counselor will provide a system for academic 
advisement, will establish an academic testing and 
referral program, and will coordinate the services of 
several faculty advisors in the center. Once a student has 
been admitted to the college, she will plan her program 
with an academic advisor who will assist her with goal 
achievement and who will further clarify college policies 
and procedures. 

Although the college makes every effort to provide 
academic counseling to the student, it is ultimately the 
individual student's responsibility to see that all 
specialization and degree requirements have been 
fulfilled. 

Independent Study/Directed Reading 

Opportunity for independent study and directed reading 
is available to qualified students. In independent study, 
the student has responsibility for planning, 
implementing, and presenting the project; the faculty 
member approves the project, meets with the student 
several times in the term, and evaluates the final results. 
In directed reading, the faculty member shares the 
responsibility with the student, generally planning the 
readings and/or projects and meeting with the student 
regularly. 

Guidelines for Independent Study Directed Reading: 

1. Introductory courses to discipline will not be taken in 
this mode. 

2. Freshmen will take neither independent study nor 
directed reading. 

3. Neither independent study nor directed reading will 
be taken in Interterm to fulfill a General Studies 
requirement. 

4. No more than two independent studies or directed 
readings will be taken in any one semester. 

5. In extraordinary circumstances, the above guidelines 
may be waived by petition. 



Prior to registering for independent or directed study, the 
student discusses plans with the sponsoring faculty 
member, prepares a proposal which should include goals, 
methodology, bibliography, target dates, and evaluative 
criteria, and files an approval form for the projected study 
in the office of the academic dean. 

Interterm 

Full time students at Mount St. Mary's College are 
expected to participate in the Interterm program as part 
of the academic year. During the month of January, 
students will ordinarily concentrate on a single activity. 
Thus, the student should plan on devoting her full time 
(30-40 hours a week) to the study she chooses to pursue. 
Opportunities for interdepartmental work, for in-depth 
study in one area, for research, for internships, for 
experience-oriented courses, for independent study, and 
for travel will be available during interterm. 
Opportunities are also available for students to participate 
in Interterm experiences at other colleges on an exchange 
basis. 

Students are encouraged to explore interest areas both 
inside and outside their major department on either the 
Chalon or the Doheny campus. 
Students should note that a maximum of six 
non-required units in special programs may be counted 
toward the baccalaureate degree. 

Students may take a maximum of four units during an 
Interterm session. These units are not computed with the 
12-17 units which a full-time student may take during the 
fall or spring semesters. 

Enrollment in Interterm courses is determined on a first 
come, first served basis. However, any sophomore who 
enrolls in a class during the registration period may have 
first preference. All courses taken during the Interterm 
period must be completed by the end of January. 
Incompletes may not be given except in extraordinary 
circumstances and with the consent of the A. A. dean. 

Honors 

Honors at Entrance: 

Applicants who have at least a 3.3 GPA in academic 
subjects in high school and who score a minimum of 1150 
on the CEEB Aptitude Test or 26 on the ACT test, or 
applicants who have been recommended by the Honors 
Committee, are awarded Honors at Entrance. 

Dean's List 

To give public recognition to academic achievement, the 
academic dean posts a list each term with the names of 
full-time students who have obtained a grade point 
average of 3.5 or higher for the preceding term. 



14/Associate Degree Program 



To qualify for the Dean's List, a full-time student must 
have taken at least 12 letter-graded units in the preceding 
semester. To qualify for the Dean's List, a part-time 
student must have taken at least 5 letter-graded units in 
the preceding semester (excluding students who register 
full-time, but who drop units or take an Incomplete 
during the semester). 

Graduation With Honors (Associate in Arts Degree) 

With honors shall be granted to a student who has earned 

the Associate in Arts degree while maintaining a 

cumulative 3.5 grade point average prior to the final 

semester. 

The overall GPA at the end of the fall semester of the 
academic year is used in determining honors. The 
student's grade point average will be calculated on the 
basis of grades earned at Mount St. Mary's College as 
well as grades transferred into the College at the time of 
matriculation. Courses at another institution after 
matriculation are not counted into the cumulative grade 
point average. 

Placement and Acceleration 

Acceleration Program for High School Students 
Superior high school juniors or seniors who are 
recommended by their principals may be permitted to 
enroll in regular on-campus classes and earn college 
credit. A special reduced fee is available for 1-6 units per 
semester. 

Advanced Placement 

Students who earn scores of 3, 4, or 5 in Advanced 
Placement Examinations (ETS) may receive credit for 
equivalent courses provided they are accepted and 
registered students at Mount St. Mary's College. 
Students taking the Advanced Placement Examinations 
should arrange to have test results sent to the Office of 
Admissions. 

Placement Examinations 

Examinations used to place a student at a level of study 

may result in lower levels of study being waived. No 

credit will be awarded as a result of these placement 

examinations. 

Credit by Examination, Extra-Institutional Learning, and 
Non-Collegiate Coursework 

Mount St. Mary's College recognizes that learning can 
and often does occur outside the formal setting of the 
classroom. The college provides for this in the following 
ways: credit by examination, credit for extra-institutional 
learning, and credit for non-collegiate coursework. 

Credit by Exam 

There are two ways a student may demonstrate her 
knowledge of content areas: by challenging course exams 
and by taking standard proficiency exams. Credit for 



certain courses in the college may be earned by 
successfully passing departmental exams. A list of these 
courses is published each fall. A student must notify the 
department of her intention to challenge a departmental 
course one month in advance of the date of the exam. 
Successfully passing the exam, she may receive credit for 
the course. A fee is required to conduct and process this; 
see Tuition and Fees. 

Students may also take externally administered exams 
such as CLEP (College- Level Examination Program from 
CEEB) and PEP (Professional Equivalency Program from 
ACT) in those areas approved by the college. Information 
about these exams and a current list of approved exams 
are available from the dean's office, the registrar's office, 
or the Counseling Center. Students who have taken 
CLEP or PEP exams prior to enrolling at Mount St. 
Mary's College must present original transcripts from 
ACT or CEEB in order to receive credit. 
Credit for non-traditional, extra-institutional learning 
When a student has acquired college-level skills and 
learning relating to her academic goals through 
experiences such as work, travel, and reading, she may 
have this learning evaluated for credit by preparing a 
portfolio containing an application, supporting evidence 
and documents and a narrative relating the 
extra-institutional learning to her educational objectives. 

Credit for college-level course offered by non-collegiate agencies 
Students who have taken courses sponsored by business, 
industry, the armed forces, or other non-collegiate 
agencies may apply for an evaluation of these learning 
experiences. If the course has previously been evaluated 
by the American Council on Eduation (ACE) and appears 
in The National Guide, a student may not have to prepare 
a portfolio. In all other cases, a student requesting credit 
for non-collegiate courses must prepare a portfolio for 
evaluation by a faculty committee. 

These portfolios should be prepared according to the 
guidelines in CAEL Student Handbook with the guidance of 
an advisor. If the portfolio is approved by a faculty 
committee, the student may earn college credit 
appropriate to the experiences. A fee is required to 
conduct and process this evaluation: see Tuition and 
Fees. For further details, see the Dean for Associate in 
Arts Programs or the Academic Counselor in the 
Counseling Center. 

An A. A. student may earn a maximum of 9 units for 
credit by exam. An LVN applicant to the second year of 
the A. A. program in nursing may earn 15 units by taking 
the NLN challenge exam and by completing NUR 40 
successfully. 

An A. A. student may earn a maximum of 10 units in 
credit for extra-institutional learning and 10 units in credit 
for non-collegiate course work. 



Associate Degree Program/15 



Credit examinations and portfolio evaluations will 
ordinarily be given only to students who are admitted to 
the college. After satisfactorily completing the 
examination or evaluation, the student will register and 
receive credit for the corresponding course(s). Only 
"credit" (i.e., no letter grades) will be given; no record of 
failures will appear on the transcript. 

Credit will only be awarded at the end of one semester's 
study at the college. The residence requirement stipulates 
that the last 24 units to be counted toward the degree be 
earned in course work. 

Classification of Students 

To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have 
satisfactorily completed 30 semester units (10 standard 
courses), or the unit equivalent. 

A student with full-time status must carry 12-17 units per 
semester. Part-time students carry less than 12 units per 
semester. Foreign students (with nonimmigrant "F-l" 
student status) enrolled in beginning ESL (on or off 
campus) plus nine semester units may be considered as 
students with full-time status. 

Special students may take a course or courses for 
academic credit without following a prescribed 
curriculum toward a degree. After twelve units of study, 
a special student, unless exempted by the dean, should 
make application for admission to the college. 

Auditors attend class sessions regularly but are not 
obligated to take examinations. They receive no credit for 
courses audited. 

Ordinarily a student should be a sophomore before 
enrolling in upper division courses. It is the student's 
responsibility to be aware of prerequisites or 
requirements for enrolling in upper division courses. 

Degree Application 

May graduates must file for the appropriate degree 
during the fall semester of the sophomore year. Students 
who plan to graduate at other times should file for the 
degree not later than three weeks after the start of the 
final semester. 

Attendance 

Since regularity and punctuality are essential to the 
successful pursuit of study, the number and character of 
student absences will be taken into account in 
determining academic grades. Unless proof to the 
contrary is furnished, an instructor will assume that an 
absence is without serious cause. 

There is no provision for a system of allowed cuts and 
absences. In the case of a prolonged absence because of 
illness or other serious reasons, the recommendation of 
the academic dean is required for the student to be 
reinstated in class. Students may be dropped from a class 



for excessive absences when, in the opinion of the 
instructor, further enrollment in the class would be of 
little value to the student. Occasionally, a student is 
excused from class attendance by the academic dean in 
order to represent the college at some function. The 
student should inform her instructors of such excused 
absences and secure from them assignments for the next 
class. 

Course Examinations 

All undergraduate sudents are required to take the 
regular course examinations. 

Grades 

At the end of each term, the student receives a grade in 
every class. The grade indicates results of examinations, 
term reports, and general scholastic standing in the entire 
course. 

The student's grade point average is computed according 
to this scale: 

A, excellent, 4 grade points per unit 

B, good, 3 grade points per unit 

C, average, 2 grade points per unit 

D, poor but passing, 1 grade point per unit 
F, failure, grade points per unit 

The following grades are not computed in the GPA: 

AU, audit 

CR, C or better; credit given 

I, incomplete 

IP, deferred grading for graduate thesis, senior project, 

or undergraduate research work in progress. 

NC, D or F; no credit given 

W, withdrawn 

Grading Policies 

CreditlNo Credit 

To encourage a wider choice of courses by lessening the 
student's concern for the grade point average, selected 
courses may be taken for CR/NC. The following 
regulations apply to this option: 

Students may apply a maximum of 9 semester units of 
CR/NC to the Associate in Arts degree, and a maximum 
of 18 semester units of CR/NC to the baccalaureate 
degree; not more than 5 units each term may be taken for 
CR/NC. 

Courses taken for CR/NC may not be applied to the 
General Studies requirements; nor may they be applied 
to requirements for the student's major, except at the 
discretion of the major department. 

The student must indicate intent to take a course CR/NC 
no later than the last day to drop a class, as indicated on 
the academic calendar, by filing with the Registrar a form 
signed by the advisor, the instructor, and the student. A 
change to letter grade may not be petitioned after the 
form has been filed. Signings are a form of active consent 
and not pro forma. 



16/Associate Degree Program 



Incomplete 

An Incomplete is given only when a student: 

1. has fulfilled the majority of the course requirements, 

2. has a passing grade in the class work, 

3. is prevented from completing the assigned work for 
serious reasons, 

4. has consulted the instructor prior to the grading 
period, and the instructor has determined that the 
student can realistically complete the work within one 
semester. 

An Incomplete will remain as such unless removed by the 
instructor within one semester. The Incomplete is ignored 
when computing the GPA. An Incomplete can be 
extended beyond one semester only upon petition to the 
academic dean. 

Repetition of courses with D IF INC grades 
Only courses for which D, F, and NC were assigned may 
be repeated for a higher grade/CR. Courses may be 
repeated only once. In cases of repeated courses, the 
units are counted once and the higher grade is computed 
in the GPA. 

Withdrawal From Courses 

The grade W indicates withdrawal from a course, 
according to the following policy: Withdrawal (W) 
indicates that a student withdrew from a class during the 
period scheduled on the college calendar with the 
approval of the instructor and advisor. After the 
scheduled date, the approval of the A. A. Dean is 
required. A withdrawal form must be filed in the 
Registrar's office to have an official withdrawal with the 
grade of W. The W carries no connotation of quality of 
student performance and is not calculated in the grade 
point average. Students who do not officially withdraw 
receive a grade of F. 

Transcripts 

Transcripts are issued at the written request of students 
or graduates to the office of the registrar. The first 
transcript is free. All other transcripts are $2.00 each. One 
week should be allowed for processing. 

Full payment of all expenses incurred during a given term 
or semester must be made before the credit for courses 
taken during that term or semester will be recorded on 
the student's transcript. 

Academic Petitions 

Any academic policy or regulation (e.g., degree 
requirements, academic dismissal, etc.) may be waived or 
modified for good reason for individual students by use 
of a petition form. Reasons must be presented by the 
student. After consultation with the student, the 
student's advisor and department chairman as 
appropriate, the dean of the A. A. program has the 
authority to approve or disapprove any petition. The 



dean for academic development has the authority to 
approve or disapprove any petition for any academic 
program at Mount St. Mary's College. A copy of any 
approved petition must be sent to the office of the 
registrar to be placed in the student's permanent file. 

Withdrawal From College 

Students thinking of withdrawing from college should 
schedule an exit interview with an academic advisor or 
the dean in order to explore other options or assistance. 
Students who must withdraw from the college at any 
time must file a withdrawal notice in the office of the 
registrar. Forms are available from the office of the 
academic dean. Honorable dismissal may be granted 
when this form is filed. 

Students who leave the college in good standing for one 
semester and do not attend another postsecondary 
institution in the interim period may re-enroll through 
the office of the registrar. Other students wishing to 
re-enter must file an application for readmission with the 
admissions office. 

Probation 

A student is placed on probation if she fails to maintain a 
2.0 GPA for all courses undertaken in a term. A student 
on probation must achieve a GPA of 2.0 or higher during 
the following term in order to be readmitted to regular 
standing. 

Dismissal 

A student is subject to dismissal for the following 
reasons: 

1. Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 1.0 during any 
term. 

2. Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 during a 
probationary term. 

The A. A. dean has the power to dismiss students and to 
suspend dismissal. She may also recommend that the 
Admissions Committee reinstate a dismissed student on a 
probationary basis. 

When extenuating circumstances, such as prolonged 
illness, account for the student's disqualification, she may 
be permitted, on petition to the dean, to continue on 
probation until the next term. 

Enrollment in the college implies willingness on the part 
of the student to comply with the requirements and 
regulations of the college. If the student fails to comply 
with these requirements and regulations, or if it is 
determined by the dean for Associate in Arts programs 
and the associate dean for student development that she 
is not able to benefit from the opportunities offered by 
the college, her withdrawal may be requested even 
though she is charged with no specific breach of 
discipline. 



Associate Degree Program/17 



Student Development 

Mount St. Mary's College provides students with 
programs and experiences conducive to personal, 
cultural, ethical, social and intellectual growth. Student 
initiative and responsibility are encouraged in an 
atmosphere of close interrelation among students, 
faculty, administration and staff. 

Membership on various college committees permits 
interaction with members of the faculty and 
administration and allows for student contribution to the 
policy and procedures of the college. 

These and other opportunities supply the broadening 
experience of organized discussions and planned 
activities and foster interest in the special fields which the 
students are pursuing. 

Leadership Program 

The Leadership program is designed to provide for a 
selected group of students the development of their 
potential leadership skills. It offers workshops and 
seminars on how to delegate authority, how to motivate 
groups of people, and how to provide constructive 
criticism and support. Leadership students not only 
study leadership techniques but have the opportunity to 
put them into practice. 

Associated Students of Mount St. Mary's College 

The Associated Student organization sponsors a wide 
range of social, cultural, recreational, and religious 
activities. Students are invited to take part in the many 
activities of the surrounding colleges and the many 
opportunities available in the greater Los Angeles area. 

Student Nurses Association of California 

The Student Nurses Association of California prepares 
future nurses for participation in their professional 
organization. It provides a vehicle for student sharing, 
has malpractice coverage for student clinical experience, 
disseminates information about future directions in 
education and current trends in nursing care delivery. 

Delta Service Organization 

Delta members act as official hostesses for receptions, 
open house tours, programs, and other social events. 
This organization gives service to campus events and also 
enriches the lives of the members by helping them to 
learn the skills required of an excellent hostess. 

Religious Opportunities 

The campus is located next door to St. Vincent's Church 
and a few blocks from the Newman Center of the 
University of Southern California. Both facilities are open 
daily to Mount students. Liturgy is celebrated monthly on 
the Doheny Campus. A Catholic chaplain is on campus 
once a week, providing the students with a sense of 
Christian living. 



Residence Life 

The Doheny residence hall accommodates a small 
number of students and provides an opportunity for a 
group- living experience in a warm and friendly 
atmosphere. Student life is largely self-regulated under 
the guidance of the director of residence, residence 
assistants and the student residence council. Every effort 
is made to allow for student privacy while providing 
opportunities for a good community-living experience. 

Health Service 

Students at the Doheny Campus have available to them 
the full scope of health services offered by the Student 
Health Service of the University of Southern California. 
All Doheny students must have a preliminary statement 
of health submitted to the USC Student Health Center. 
To use the Center, students need only show their MSMC 
identification card. Students are expected to provide their 
own transportation to the Center. 

Insurance 

All students living away from home are required to carry 
sickness insurance. This rule applies even if students are 
living with relatives if these are not their legal guardians. 
Evidence of insurance coverage must be provided at the 
time of registration. Insurance may be obtained through 
the college. The decision to take out the college insurance 
must be made before the second week of each term. 

Student Placement Service 

Students who desire part-time employment may 
participate in the student placement program by applying 
to the Financial Aid Office. Employment opportunities 
are available both on and off campus. Jobs are filled 
according to students' financial need and skill. 

Counseling Services 

Students may find assistance in an atmosphere of 
responsible freedom in a variety of counseling situations. 
Counseling may range from an informal chat to long-term 
therapy as a result of referral to an outside resource. The 
College Chaplain, the Student Development staff, the 
faculty and the Counseling Center are all available to 
serve the needs of the students. 



:8/Associate Degree Program 



Associate Degree Specializations- 
Descriptions and Requirements 

The Art Program 

The A. A. art program emphasis is design treated as an 
introduction to all forms of art. The instruction is 
thorough and comprehensive. Small classes allow for 
concentrated personal direction. Special experience 
courses provide field work related to each student's 
career goals. The program prepares students wishing to 
transfer to Mount St. Mary's B.A. and B.F.A. programs 
or to other institutions for further study. It also 
introduces students to the processes and techniques used 
in various commercial design areas. 
Art courses are taught in a converted carriage house, a 
unique studio space and an atmosphere conductive to the 
making of art. 



The A. A. Degree With a Specialization in Art 




Freshman Year 




Fall Semester 






ARTl 
ART 2 
ENG 10A 
SPR 80 


Drawing 
Design I 

Communication Skills 
Group Experience 
Elective 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(1) 
(3) 


Interterm 






ART 5 


Fundamentals of Art 


(3) 


or 
ART 7 


Modern Art Survey 


(3) 


Spring Semester 

ART 6 Design II 

ART 22 Drawing II 

— Humanities Course 

— Elective 
SPR 60B Outreach 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(1-3) 


Sophomore 


Vear 




Fall Semester 






ART 4 
ART 99 
RST 


Painting I 

Special Experience 

One course in religious studies 

Electives 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(6) 


Interterm 






— 


Elective 


(3) 


Spring Semester 

ART 30A Graphic Communication 


(3) 


or 

ART 
ART 99 


Elective 

Special Experience 

Electives 


(3) 
(3) 
(9) 



The Business Program 

The Associate in Arts Degree in Business is attained by 
completion of a two-year career-oriented program with a 
specialization in one of three areas: Executive Secretary, 
Legal Secretary, Medical Secretary. The Medical Secretary 
specialization offers core courses in the Human Services 
Program, giving the student a background in gerontology 
(human development and aging). This emphasis adds 
another area of career opportunities in the wide field of 
health-care agencies. 

In each area of specialization the curriculum has been 
designed to meet one of the most pressing needs of 
business today: college-trained secretaries, able to accept 
responsibility, make intelligent decisions, and function as 
a member of a team. 

The program includes courses in the skills necessary for 
entry positions; in Business Administration to give the 
background for advancement; and in the Liberal Arts to 
provide the "plus" of wider horizons and broader 
interests — all of this in an atmosphere of support and 
encouragement conducive to personal growth and 
development. 

With this preparation, graduates of the business program 
are ready for entry-level positions of responsibility in 
many areas and are equipped to advance in the business 
and professional world as far as their individual talents 
and abilities will take them. 

A special feature of the business program is the 
internship which bridges the gap between formal 
education and life situations by providing work 
experience in a business firm, a legal office, or a 
health-care setting. It helps the student to develop 
personality and poise and to acquire good working 
habits. In the weekly seminar session the students 
evaluate experiences and develop an appreciation for and 
an understanding of the relationship between formal 
education and career success. 

Requirements for admission into the business program: 

1. Good records in high school business courses. 

2. Well developed business skills (or adequate substitute 
as determined through a screening process). 

3. The personal qualities needed to function well in an 
office or a health-care setting. 



Total units — 62 



Associate Degree Program/19 



The Associate in Arts Degree with a Specialization 

in Business 

Concentrations: 

Executive Secretary 

Legal Secretary 

Medical Secretary 
General requirements for i 



concentratbns: 



ENG 10 



Communications Skills 
— Humanities Course 

RST One course in religious studies 

SPR 60B Outreach 

SPR 80 Group Experience 

A minimum of three courses from three of the following areas 
art, literature, music, philosophy, psychology, sciences 
sociology. 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(0-1) 
(1) 



Requirements for the Executive Secretary concentration: 


BUS 4 


Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


BUS 5 


Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15 
BUS 20 


Principles of Accounting 
Office Administration 


(3) 
(3) 


BUS 21 


Business Communications 


(3) 


BUS 22AB 
BUS 23 


Advanced Typewriting 
Mathematics for Business 


(2-2) 
(3) 


•BUS 25 
BUS 26 
BUS 85 
BUS 90 


Machine Transcription 
Adding and Calculating Machines 
Business Management 
Business Internship 


(2) 
(1) 
(3) 
(3) 


ECOl 


Microeconomics 


(3) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


Recommended: 






BUS 24AB 


Shorthand Transcription 


(3-3) 



Requirements 


for the Legal Secretary concentration: 




BUS 4 


Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


BUS 5 


Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15 


Principles of Accounting 


(3) 


BUS 20 


Office Administration 


(3) 


BUS 21 


Business Communications 


(3) 


BUS 22AB 


Advanced Typewriting 


(2-2) 


BUS 23 


Mathematics for Business 


(3) 


BUS 25 


Machine Transcription 


(2) 


BUS 26 


Adding and Calculating Machines 


(1) 


BUS 27 


Legal Secretarial Procedures and 






Terminology 


(3) 


BUS 85 


Business Management 


(3) 


BUS 90 


Business Internship 


(3) 


ECOl 


Microeconomics 


(3) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


Recommended: 






BUS 24AB 


Shorthand Transcription 


(3-3) 



Requirements for the Medical Secretary concentration 




BUS 4 


Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


BUS 5 


Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15 
BUS 20 


Principles of Accounting 
Office Administration 


(3) 
(3) 


BUS 21 


Business Communications 


(3) 


BUS 22AB 
BUS 23 


Advanced Typewriting 
Mathematics for Business 


(2-2) 
(3) 


BUS 25 
BUS 26 
BUS 28 


Machine Transcription 

Adding and Calculating Machines 

Medical Secretarial Procedure and 


(2) 
(1) 


BUS 85 
BUS 90 
ECOl 


Terminology 
Business Management 
Business Internship 
Microeconomics 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


Recommended: 






BUS 24AB 


Shorthand Transcription 


(3-3) 


Human Services Program Core Courses replacing the elec- 
tives of the other concentrations: 


HSP94 
PHI 21 


Gerontology Seminar 

Moral Values and Ethical Decisions 


(2) 
(3) 


PSYl 
RST 78 
SOC5 


General Psychology 

Death and Dying: Religious Aspects 

Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



The Liberal Arts Program 

The liberal arts option is available to students who are 
working to develop career plans, who have not decided 
on a specialization, or who wish to select a baccalaureate 
major for which there is no A. A. specialization. Students 
fulfill Mt. St. Mary's College general associate in arts 
requirements as well as lower division requirements for 
the intended major. Mt. St. Mary's College general 
studies requirements for the baccalaureate degree are 
recommended but not required for this option. The liberal 
arts program provides experience in a variety of 
disciplines so that a student has maximum freedom to 
design her own program with the assistance of her 
advisor. 

The Nursing Program 

The associate degree program offers a two-year course in 
nursing which combines general studies and clinical 
nursing courses during both years. The content of 
nursing courses is based upon the Roy adaptation model 
of nursing. Upon completion of the program, the student 
is granted the Associate in Arts degree and is eligible to 
write the licensing examinations to practice as a 
registered nurse and to use the title R.N. 



20/Associate Degree Program 



Requirements for Admission to the Program 
In addition to meeting the general admission 
requirements, acceptance into the Department of Nursing 
is determined by the Admission Committee of the 
department. Admission is based upon a consideration of 
the student's academic achievement, personality, health, 
and aptitude for the nursing profession. There is a formal 
review of the student's high school record and grade 
point average, College Entrance Examination scores, 
previous college experience (if any), letters of 
recommendation and an interview. 

In order to be eligible for review, applicants must have 
achieved a minimum of 2.5 (C+) grade point average in 
high school. Students who intend to major in nursing are 
required to take two high school laboratory science 
courses, including chemistry and either physics or a 
biological science. Students who have had previous 
college experience must also have achieved a 2.5 
cumulative grade point average. 

The faculty of the Department of Nursing have the right 
and the responsibility for judging and evaluating the 
quality of the student's achievement, both in the mastery 
of theoretical content and in clinical competence. 
Midterm warning, probation or disqualification may be 
used when deemed necessary. Disqualification from the 
Nursing Program will occur when a student receives a 
"D" or "F" in a nursing course or a course required by 
the department, i.e., Anatomy and Physiology, 
Microbiology, Nutrition, Sociology and Psychology. If a 
student's level of clinical practice is unsatisfactory or 
unsafe, the student may be disqualified before the end of 
the semester. In the event of unsatisfactory performance, 
which could result in the student's disqualification, the 
student's record is reviewed by the faculty before a final 
evaluation is made and action taken. Reinstatement will 
be granted only by special action of the Admission 
Committee of the Nursing Department. 

A student will bring a written report of a chest X-Ray, 
up-dated immunizations, and a physical examination done 
in the late spring or summer preceding the first clinical 
assignment, and another before beginning the second 
clinical year of the program. 

During the clinical portion of the program, students must 
carry malpractice insurance obtained through the Student 
Nurse Association of California organization. 

A program exists for LVNs who have the general studies 
requirements of the first year to challenge first year 
nursing courses and move directly into the second year. 

The course NUR 40 is taken prior to beginning the second 
year course. 



The A. A. Degree with a Specialization in Nursing 


Requirements 






Freshman Year 




BIO 41AB 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 


(4-4) 


CST10 


Human Nutrition 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


ENG 10A 


Communication Skills 


(3) 


ENG 11 


Communication Skills for the 






Medical Profession 


(3) 


NUR 20 


Introduction to Medical Science 


(3) 


NUR 21AB 


Nursing Science Theory I 


(2-2) 


NUR 24AB 


Nursing Practicum I 


(4-4) 


Sophomore 


Year 




BIO 3 


General Microbiology 


(4) 


— 


Humanities Course 


(3) 


RST 


Religious Studies 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


NUR 30ABCD Medical Science (1 V2-I % 


-IV2-IV2) 


NUR 31ABCD Nursing Science Theory II 


(1-1-1-1) 


NUR 33ABCD Professional Practicum (2 1 /2-2 1 / 2 -2 1 /2-2 1 /2) 


NUR 34 


Sophomore Seminar 


(2) 


Total units 


in Nursing — 37 





The Physical Therapy Assistant 
Program 

The graduate of the Pysical Therapy Assistant program is 
prepared to assist the professional (licensed) Physical 
Therapist in patient-related treatment activities. 

The program is designed in accordance with the 
guidelines of the American Physical Therapist 
Association. 



The A. A. Degree with a Specialization in Physical 


Therapy Assistant 




A. A. Degree Requirements 




ENG 10 


Communication Skills 


(3) 


— 


Humanities Course 


(3) 


SPR 60B 


Outreach 


(0-1) 


SPR80 


Group Experience 


(1) 


Preparation 






BIO 3 


Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 41AB 


Anatomy and Physiology 


(4-4) 


PHS 1 


Scientific Concepts 


(3) 


Requirements 


- Human Services Core 




ART 46 


Art as Therapy 


(3) 


or 
MUS64 


Music and Life 


(3) 


HSP94 


Gerontology Seminar 


(2) 


PHI 21 


Moral Values and Ethical Decisions 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


RST 78 


Death and Dying: Religious Aspects 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 



Associate Degree Program/21 



Requirements - 


- Physical Therapy 




BIO 42 


Introduction to Physical Therapy 






Assistant 


(3) 


BIO 43 


Physical Therapy Assistant 






Procedures I 


(3) 


BIO 44 


Physical Therapy Assistant 






Procedures II 


(10) 


BIO 45 


Physical Therapy Assistant 






Procedures III 


(4) 


BIO 46 


Physical Therapy Assistant 






Procedures IV 


(10) 


Total units ir 


Physical Therapy — 30 




Total units in 


Human Services Core — 17 





The Pre-School Teaching 
Program 

The Associate Degree Program with a specialization in 
Pre-School Teaching is the first step in the career-ladder 
program in teaching offered by Mount St. Mary's 
College. 

The two-year program at the Doheny Campus fulfills the 
requirements for a Child Center Instructional Permit with 
postponement of requirements. These requirements as 
established by the Commission for Teacher Preparation 
and Licensing and the State Board of Education are the 
following: 

a. Sixty semester hours of course work, including at least 
twelve semester hours related to the major; 

b. Field work course in a pre-school program. 

This permit is valid for two years and may be renewed for 
successive two-year periods if, during these periods, the 
student takes a minimum of four units in a subject field 
related to the major. 

At the end of the two-year program, the student may 
begin to teach in a children's center (pre-kindergarten) or 
transfer to the four-year program at the Chalon Campus 
to complete a bachelor of arts degree with a major in 
Child Development which qualifies the student for the 
Child Center Instructional Permit. Another alternative is 
to transfer to the Chalon Campus to complete the 
requirements for the bachelor of arts degree with a 
diversified major and the preliminary Multi-Subject 
Teaching Credential. The fifth year requirements for this 
credential could be met with the Specialist Teaching 
Credential — Early Childhood Education. For other 
California teaching credentials and for a description of the 
graduate programs leading to a Master of Science in 
Education degree, see the Graduate Section of this 
bulletin. 

Students in the Education Department fulfill the state 
requirement in American History and Institutions for all 
credentials by satisfying the Contemporary Political 
Experience (CPE) requirement. (See p. 28.) 



The Associate Degree Program 

The teacher of the pre-school child must have ability of a 
special sort. She must be able to establish rapport with 
the very young child and his family, and she must be able 
to sustain him in his needs. To do this, she needs wide 
knowledge and a mastery of the tools of learning. Course 
work, including observation and supervised teaching, is 
designed to achieve these basic goals within a two-year 
period. 

Criteria for Admission Into the Pre-School Teaching Program 
Students entering this program must meet the general 
admission requirements of the associate degree program. 
Academic ability, health, personality, and ability in basic 
skills (reading, arithmetic, language, handwriting, and 
spelling) are all considered. Letters of recommendation 
and the personal interview are important. 



The A. A. Degree with a Specialization in 




Pre-School Teaching 




Freshman Year 




Fall Semester 






ART 45 


Creative Art Experience 


(3) 


EDU31 


Introduction to Early Childhood 






Education 


(3) 


ENG 10A 


Communication Skills 


(3) 


MUS31 


Music for the Young Child 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SPR80 


Group Experience 


(1) 


Interterm 






— 


Humanities Course 


(3) 


Spring Semester 




EDU33 


Language Development of the Child 


(3) 


ENG 34 


Pre-School Literature 


(3) 


PSY13 


Early Child Development 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


— 


Elective 


(3) 


Sophomore Year 




Fall Semester 






EDU 35A 


Cognition and the Young Child 


(3) 


HIS/POL 


American History and Institutions 






Requirement 


(3) 


PHI 


One course in philosophy 


(3) 


SOC4 


The Family 


(3) 


— 


Elective 


(3) 


Interterm 






EDU 35B 


Creativity and the Young Child 


(3) 


Spring Semester 




CST9 


Maternal and Child Nutrition 


(3) 


EDU 333 


Supervised Practicum — Pre-School 


(4) 


RST 


One course in religious studies 


(3) 


— 


Elective 


(3) 



22/Associate Degree Program 



The A. A. Degree With a Specialization in 




Pre-School Teaching — Bilingual (Spanish) 




Freshman Year 




Fall Semester 






EDU 31 


Introduction to Early Childhood 






Education 


(3) 


ENG 10A 


Communication Skills 


(3) 


MUS31 


Music for the Young Child 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SPA 


One course in Spanish 


(3) 


SPR80 


Group Experience 


(1) 


Interterm 






— 


Humanities course 


(3) 


Spring Semester 




EDU 33 


Language Development of the Child 


(3) 


ENG 34 


Pre-School Literature 


(3) 


PSY13 


Early Child Development 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


SPA 


One course in Spanish 


(3) 


Sophomore Year 




Fall Semester 






ART 45 


Creative Art Experience 


(3) 


EDU 35A 


Cognition and the Young Child 


(3) 


HIS/POL 


American History and Insitutions 






Requirement 


(3) 


PHI 


One course in Philosophy 


(3) 


SPA 


One course in Spanish 


(3) 


Interterm 






EDU 35B 


Creativity and the Young Child 


(3) 


Spring Semester 




CST9 


Maternal and Child Nutrition 


(3) 


EDU 333 


Supervised Practicum — Pre-School 


(4) 


RST 


One course in Religious Studies 


(3) 


SPA 


One course in Spanish 


(3) 



The A.A. 


Degree with a Specialization in 




Pre-School Teaching — Special Education 




Freshman Year 




Fall Semester 




ART 45 


Creative Art Experience 


(3) 


EDU 31 


Introduction to Early Childhood 






Education 


(3) 


ENG 10A 


Communication Skills 


(3) 


MUS31 


Music for the Young Child 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SPR80 


Group Experience 


(1) 


Interterm 






— 


Humanities Course 


(3) 


Spring Semester 




ENG 34 


Pre-School Literature 


(3) 


PSY13 


Early Child Development 


(3) 


PSY 77 


Language Development of the Child 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


— 


Elective 





Sophomore 


Year 


Fall Semester 




EDU 35A 
EDU 70 


Cognition and the Young Child (3) 
Introduction to Children with 


HIS/POL 

PHI 

SOC4 


Special Needs (3) 
American History and Institutions 

Requirement (3) 
One course in philosophy (3) 
The Family (3) 


Interterm 




EDU 35B 


Creativity and the Young Child (3) 


Spring Semester 


CST9 


Maternal and Child Nutrition (3) 


EDU 72 

EDU 333 
RST 


Early Childhood Education and the 

Exceptional Child (3) 
Supervised Practicum — Special Education (4) 
One course in religious studies (3) 



The Respiratory Therapy 
Program 

The graduate of the Respiratory Therapy program is 
prepared to assume the responsibility of a staff position 
under medical direction in large hospitals or health-care 
facilities and/or departmental supervisory positions in 
smaller hospitals. 

The Respiratory Therapy program is designed in 
accordance with the guidelines of the American Medical 
Association Council on Medical Education. 



The A.A 


. Degree with a Specialization in 




Respiratory Therapy 




A.A. Degree Requirements 




ENG 10 


Communication Skills 


(3) 


— 


Humanities Course 


(3) 


SPR 60B 


Outreach 


(0-1) 


SPR80 


Group Experience 


(1) 


Preparatior 






BIO 3 


Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 41AB 


Anatomy and Physiology 


(4-4) 


PHS1 


Scientific Concepts 


(3) 


Requirements -Human Services Core 




ART 46 


Art as Therapy 


(3) 


MUS64 


Music and Life 


(3) 


HSP94 


Gerontology Seminar 


(2) 


PHI 21 


Moral Values and Ethical 






Decisions 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


RST 78 


Death and Dying: Religious Aspects 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 



Associate Degree Program/23 



Requirements -Respiratory Therapy 




BIO 12 Fundamentals of Respiratory Therapy I 


(3) 


BIO 20 Principles of Respiratory Therapy 




Equipment II 


(2) 


BIO 30A Applied Respiratory Therapy III 


(10) 


BIO 30B Applied Respiratory Therapy IV 


(4) 


BIO 40 Directed Studies in Respiratory 




Therapy V 


(10) 


Total units in Respiratory Therapy — 29 




Total units in Human Services Core — 17 





The Transfer Program 

A student may begin her college work on the Doheny 
Campus with the intention of transferring to the Chalon 
Campus. In this case she enrolls in the transfer program 
and works out her program in close cooperation with her 
advisor. She fulfills MSMC general studies requirements, 
lower division prerequisites for her intended major, and 
general associate in arts requirements. If she intends to 
apply for the A. A. degree, she also fulfills A. A. program 
requirements. 



Bachelors Degree Programs 



26/Bachelors Degree Programs 



Bachebrs Degree Programs 

Mount St. Mary's College confers the following 
baccalaureate degrees: 

The Bachelor of Arts with majors in 

American Studies 

Art 

Biological Sciences 

Business 

Chemistry 

Child Development 

Diversified major 

(for elementary teaching credential students) 

English 

French 

Gerontology 

History 

Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychobiology 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Social Science 

Sociology 

Spanish 

The Bachelor of Science with majors in 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Consumer Studies 

Health Services Administration 

Home Economics 

Nursing 

Physical Therapy 

Psychobiology 

The Bachelor of Music with a major in Music 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major in Art 

Admissions 

Freshmen Admission Requirements 

Applicants must be graduates of an accredited high 
school and should have completed a college preparatory 
course of study including the following: algebra, 
geometry, three years of English (literature and 
composition), U.S. History, government, a lab science, 
two years of a foreign language and an advanced course 
in either mathematics, science or a foreign language. 
Some majors may have additional requirements. 

Students should have an average of B or better in these 
college preparatory courses as well as satisfactory SAT or 
ACT scores. 



All majors are open to women; men may be admitted into 
the Music and Nursing Programs. 

Freshmen Admission Procedures 

Freshmen applicants for admission must submit the following: 

1. Completed application form with an application fee of 
$20.00. This processing fee is not refundable nor 
applicable to tuition. Application fee waivers are 
granted upon evidence of financial need. 

2. High school transcript which should include the first 
semester grades of the senior year. Students with a 
grade point average above 3.3 may be considered for 
admission without senior year grades. Transcripts 
submitted become the property of Mount St. Mary's 
College and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

3. Scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Test (ACT). Information concerning 
registration for either of these tests is available in the 
Admissions Office. 

4. Three letters of recommendation. 

5. Foreign students must present evidence of proficiency 
in oral and written English by TOEFL scores of 550 or 
better or satisfactory completion of the ninth level at 
an ELS Language Center. A statement guaranteeing 
financial support is also required. 

While a personal interview is not required, it is strongly 
recommended and can be arranged through the 
Admissions Office. 

Transfer Admission Requirements 

An applicant who has taken any college level classes 
since graduation from high school must apply for 
admission to advanced standing as a transfer student. A 
previous college record may not be disregarded. The 
transfer student who, as a high school graduate, was 
qualified for admission as a freshman may be admitted to 
the college with a cumulative grade point average of at 
least 2.25 for all transferable college work attempted. 

The transfer student who, as a high school graduate, was 
not qualified for admission as a freshman may be 
admitted to the college after completing a minimum of 30 
transferable units with a cumulative grade point average 
of at least 2.25. Some majors may have additional 
requirements. 

All majors are open to women. Men may be admitted 
into the Music and Nursing Programs. 

Transfer Admission Procedures 

Transfer applicants for admission must submit the following: 

1. Completed application form with an application fee of 
$20.00. This processing fee is not refundable nor 
applicable to tuition. Application fee waivers are 
granted upon evidence of financial need. 

2. Transcripts of credits. College transfer students should 
request the Registrar of each college they have 



Bachelors Degree Programs/27 



attended to forward two copies of their transcript, 
including work in progress, directly to the Admissions 
Office. Transcripts submitted become the property of 
Mount St. Mary's College and cannot be returned to 
the applicant. Official transcripts of all prior college 
work must be on file in the Office of the Registrar by 
the end of the first semester of attendance. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. Transfer students with less than 30 transferable units 
must also submit their high school transcript and SAT 
or ACT scores. 

5. Foreign students must present evidence of proficiency 
in oral and written English by TOEFL scores of 550 or 
better or satisfactory completion of the ninth level at 
an ELS Language Center. 

In addition, foreign students must submit an English 
translation of their official college transcripts including 
the following information: descriptive titles of courses 
studied (i.e. European History, Inorganic Chemistry), 
the number of lecture hours and laboratory hours per 
week devoted to each course, the number of weeks of 
lecture and laboratory work in each course, and the 
grades earned with an explanation of the marking 
system. 

A statement guaranteeing financial support is also 
required. 

Conditional Admission 

A student who qualifies for admission but whose 
academic history indicates possible difficulty in college 
may be admitted conditionally. The terms of the 
condition are: 1) a reduced course load (12-13 units), and 
2) placement testing and follow-up skill building as 
indicated by the placement tests. 

To have the conditions removed, a student must maintain 
good academic standing for two semesters and 
successfully complete the follow-up required by the 
placement tests. For further details on conditional 
admission, consult the Admissions Office or the Director 
of the Learning Assistance Program. 

Special Admission 

Special admission may be granted to students who are 
returning to the classroom after an absence or to students 
who wish to take courses for enrichment but do not wish 
to pursue a degree at this time. 

Up to twelve units may be earned as a special part-time 
student. After taking twelve units, the student will be 
reviewed for formal admission to a degree program. The 
units taken as a special student may be applied toward 
the degree unless otherwise noted. 

Transfer of Credit 

The college will evaluate all credits submitted by the 
transfer applicant and reserves the right to accept or 
reject any of the credits offered for transfer. 



Credit for courses taken in other accredited colleges or 
universities prior to matriculation at Mount St. Mary's 
College is transferable provided that the transferred 
courses satisfy curriculum requirements at Mount St. 
Mary's College and the courses are transferred prior to 
fulfillment of senior residence. 

No more than 66 semester units may be transferred from 
an accredited community college. Credit for extension 
courses is not automatically transferable. 

A final credit summary and determination of advanced 
standing will be prepared by the registrar after the 
applicant is accepted for admission and all final 
transcripts have been submitted. 

Once admitted to and enrolled in the college, the student 
is normally expected to pursue study only at Mount St. 
Mary's College. 

A student seeking an exception to this policy must file a 
Transfer of Credit Clearance with all approvals in the 
office of the registrar prior to registration in courses for 
which approval has been obtained. 

Academic Policies 

Degree Requirements 

1. Completion of at least 129 semester units (43 standard 
courses) with a grade point average of 2.0 (C average) 
for all college work undertaken at Mount St. Mary's 
College. A minimum of 45 semester units (15 standard 
courses) must be in upper division work. 

2. Completion of a major, as designated by the major 
department, with a maximum of 15 courses in one 
field. 

3. Satisfaction of the senior residence requirement. 
Residence is defined as the last twenty-four units before 
graduation which must be taken at Mount St. Mary's 
College. At least some of these units are in the 
student's major and earned in regular course work. 

4. Completion of a Mount St. Mary's College General 
Studies Program. 

The General Studies Program 

An educated person is one who is not only academically 
prepared in an area of specialization but also one who has 
knowledge and appreciation of the diverse fields of 
human endeavor. To achieve this, a student is expected 
to explore areas of learning outside the major through the 
general studies program. Intended to expand the 
student's world, the requirements include units in 
religious studies and philosophy as the student reflects 
on questions of values and meaning in human experience 
and grapples with the mystery of the divine; units in 
humanities as one explores the creative and artistic 
expressions of humankind; units in the natural sciences 
as one confronts and examines the physical world; and 



28/Bachelors Degree Programs 



unts in the social and behavioral sciences, as one 
approaches avenues to understanding the complexity of 
the human person as a social, political being. 

In addition to this, the college expects that every 
educated person should have the ability to express one's 
thoughts with clarity and be knowledgeable about 
government and its structure and organization. 
Moreover, students earning a bachelor of arts degree are 
expected to study a foreign language in order to better 
appreciate diverse peoples and cultures. 

General Studies Requirements 

The current schedule of classes will indicate courses 
offered for General Studies credit. No single course may 
satisfy more than one General Studies requirement. 



General Studies Requirements for the Bachelor of 

Arts Degree 

Required: 

A minimum of 27 units selected from three divisions: 
Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social and Behavioral Sci- 
ences; only nine units of general studies credit allowed in the 
student's major division. 

Division I: Humanities 
Areas: 

Art 

Cultural History 

Literature 

Music 

Required: 

6 to 15 units in two areas outside the student's major field. 

Division II: Natural Sciences 

Areas: 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Physics and Physical Sciences 

Required: 

6 to 15 units in two areas outside the student's major field. 

Division III: Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Areas: 

Economics 

History 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Required: 

6 to 15 units in two areas outside the student's major field. 

Philosophy 

Required: 

9 units, 6 of which should be lower division. 



Religious Studies 
Required: 

9 units. 

Recommended: 

Introductory course in Scripture. 

Requirements which may be satisfied by examination or by 

course work: 

Contemporary political experience requirement 

Foreign language requirement 

Writing competency requirement 
See additional information on these requirements. 



General Studies Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Fine Arts Degree 

Division I: Humanities 
Areas: 

Cultural History 

Literature 

Music 

Required: 

6 units 

Division II: Natural Sciences 

Areas: 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Physics and Physical Sciences 

Required: 

6 units 

Division III: Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Areas: 

Economics 

History 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Required: 

6 units 

Philosophy 

Required: 

9 units, six of which should be lower division. 

Religious Studies 

Required: 

9 units. 

Recommended: 

Introductory course in Scripture. 

Requirements which may be satisfied by examination or by 

course work: 

Contemporary political experience requirement 

Writing competency requirement 
See additional information on these requirements. 



Bachelors Degree Programs/29 



General Studies Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Music Degree 

Division I: Humanities 
Areas: 
Art 

Cultural History 
Literature 
Required: 
6 units 

Division II: Natural Sciences 
Areas: 

Biological Sciences 
Chemistry 
Mathematics 

Physics and Physical Sciences 
Required: 
3 units 

Division III: Social and Behavioral Sciences 
Areas: 
Economics 
History 

Political Science 
Psychology 

"Sociology and Anthropology 
Required: 
6 units 
Philosophy 
Required: 

9 units, 6 of which should be lower division. 
Religious Studies 
Required: 
9 units. 

Recommended: 

Introductory course in Scripture. 

Requirements which may be satisfied by examination or by 
course work: 

Contemporary political experience requirement 

Writing competency requirement 
See additional information on these requirements. 



General Studies Requirements for the Bachelor 

of Science Degree 

Required: 

A minimum of 27 units selected from three divisions: 
Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social and Behavioral Sci- 
ences; only nine units of general studies credit allowed in the 
student's major division. 

Division I: Humanities 
Areas: 

Art 

Cultural History 

Literature 

Music 



Required: 

6 to 15 units in two areas outside the student's major field. 

Division II: Natural Sciences 

Areas: 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Physics and Physical Sciences 

Required: 

6 to 15 units in two areas outside the student's major field. 

Division III: Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Areas: 

Economics 

History 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Required: 

6 to 15 units in two areas outside the student's major field. 

Philosophy 

Required: 

9 units, 6 of which should be lower division. 

Religious Studies 

Required: 

9 units. 

Recommended: 

Introductory course in Scripture. 

Requirements which may be satisfied by examination or by 

course work: 

Contemporary political experience requirement 

Writing competency requirement 
See additional information on these requirements. 



Areas in Which Requirements Can be Satisfied by 
Examination OR Course Work: 

1. Contemporary Political Experience (0-3 units). 

Mount St. Mary's College requires that students fulfill 
by examination or course work a study of 
contemporary American political institutions and their 
conceptual framework on the federal and state levels. 

Students may choose one of the following ways to 
satisfy the Contemporary Political Experience (CPE) 
requirement: 

— Satisfactory performance in a comprehensive 
examination. 

— Satisfactory completion of one of the following 
courses: HIS 7GHI, HIS 27, HIS 75/175, HIS 76/176, 
HIS 179, POL 1, POL 70/170, POL 75/175, POL 107, 
POL 108, POL 180, ECO 107. 

— Satisfactory completion of any other course 
designated in the current schedule of classes as 
fulfilling the requirement. 



30/Bachelors Degree Programs 



Students in the Education Department fulfill the state 
requirement for all credentials by satisfying the 
Contemporary Political Experience (CPE) requirement. 

2. Foreign Language (0-9 units). 

This requirement may be fulfilled in one of the 
following ways: 

— Successfully passing a proficiency examination at 
the level equivalent to completion of the third 
semester of college language. This examination is 
to be administered either by Mount St. Mary's 
College or by an approved testing center. 

— Study of one of the following foreign languages — 
French, Spanish — to the completion of level three 
(three semesters of college language study). The 
beginning course for each student is to be 
determined by a placement examination 
administered several days before registration each 
fall term. 

Students whose native language is not English have 
another alternative. They may satisfy the requirement 
by demonstrating full academic proficiency in English 
as a second language. Full academic proficiency is 
equivalent to (1) passing the TOEFL examination with 
scores above level nine; or (2) sequential work in ESL 
to raise student performance to level nine or above. 

In the case of a bilingual or multilingual student, the 
Department of Foreign Languages will determine 
which is the student's first, or native language, and 
which is the second, or foreign langauge. 

3. Writing Competency (0-7 units). 

A student may fulfill the writing competency 
requirement by successfully completing the college 
writing program (1978-79: ENG 1AB or ENG 4, 1AB). 

Learning Assistance Center 

In order to enable each student to achieve maximum 
benefit from the academic programs at the college, a 
Learning Assistance Program is available. Students 
whose previous performance would indicate they might 
experience academic difficulty at Mount St. Mary's 
College take part in the program through assessment 
testing and follow-up programs in composition, reading, 
and math. 

The center provides referral and individualized and 
group sessions. A volunteer program of student tutors in 
composition, chemistry, and other areas as need dictates 
is also provided. 

Placement and assessment testing are available to all 
students who request it. Students may be referred to the 
Learning Assistance Center by faculty, or deans, or may 
seek assistance themselves. Lab fees may be assessed for 
long-term use of the Center. 



Academic Counseling Center and Services 

Mount St. Mary's College is currently implementing an 
Academic Counseling Center. This center will provide on 
an ongoing basis academic counseling and referral 
services. 

Once a student has been admitted to the college, she will 
be assigned an academic advisor, in the area of her major if 
she is ready to declare an academic major, or a liberal arts 
advisor if she is undecided. A special student-to-student 
assistant will meet with each new student to answer any 
questions and to discuss college requirements. The 
student's academic program will be planned with an 
academic advisor who will further clarify college policies 
and procedures. 

Although the college makes every effort to provide 
academic counseling to the student, it is ultimately the 
individual student's responsibility to see that all General 
Studies and major requirements have been fulfilled. 
Independent Study/Directed Reading 

Opportunity for independent study and directed reading 
is available to qualified students. In independent study, 
the student has responsibility for planning, 
implementing, and presenting the project; the faculty 
member approves the project, meets with the student 
several times in the term, and evaluates the final results. 
In directed reading, the faculty member shares the 
responsibility with the student, generally planning the 
readings and/or projects and meeting with the student 
regularly. 

Guidelines for Independent Study /Directed Reading: 

1. Introductory courses to a discipline will not be taken in 
this mode. 

2. Freshmen will take neither independent study nor 
directed reading. 

3. Neither independent study nor directed reading will 
be taken in Interterm to fulfill a General Studies 
requirement. 

4. No more than two independent studies or directed 
readings will be taken in any one semester. 

5. In extraordinary circumstances, the above guidelines 
may be waived by petition. 

Prior to registering for independent or directed study, the 
student discusses plans with the sponsoring faculty 
member, prepares a proposal which should include goals, 
methodology, bibliography, target dates, and evaluative 
criteria, and files an approval form for the projected study 
in the office of the academic dean. 

Educational Alternatives Program 

The Educational Alternatives Program is available to the 
student interested in giving further creative direction to 
her own education. The EAP student is encouraged to 
utilize alternative modes of education and to assume 



Bachelors Degree Programs/31 



leadership in initiating educational and cultural 
experiences. Admission to EAP presumes the ability on 
the part of the student to engage in independent study. 
Freshmen are eligible to apply for membership after the 
successful completion of their first semester at Mount St. 
Mary's College. 

With the approval of the academic dean, EAP students of 
demonstrated ability may also apply to earn a bachelors 
degree in an individually constructed program of study 
directed by a board of three faculty members. 

ROTC 

Through a cross-town agreement, Mount St. Mary's 
College students may take part in the Loyola-Marymount 
University Air Force ROTC program. (See courses listed 
under Aerospace Studies.) 

Army and Air Force ROTC programs are available to 
qualified Mount St. Mary's College students through 
agreement with UCLA. 

Further information may be obtained from the Office of 
the Academic Dean. 

Interterm 

Full-time students at Mount St. Mary's College are 
expected to participate in the Interterm program as part 
of the academic year. During the month of January, 
students will ordinarily concentrate on a single activity. 
Thus, the student should plan on devoting her full time 
(30-40 hours a week) to the study she chooses to pursue. 
Opportunities for interdepartmental work, for in-depth 
study in one area, for research, for internships, for 
experience-oriented courses, for independent study, and 
for travel will be available during Interterm. 
Opportunities are also available for students to participate 
in Interterm experiences at other colleges on an exchange 
basis. 

Students are encouraged to explore interest areas both 
inside and outside their major department on either the 
Chalon or the Doheny campus. A maximum of two 
Interterm courses (during the four years) may be taken in 
any one department. Students should also note that a 
maximum of six non-required units in special programs 
may be counted towards a degree. 

A maximum of four units may be taken during an 
Interterm session. These units are not computed with the 
12-17 units which a full-time student is allowed to take 
during the fall term or during the spring term. 

Enrollment in Interterm courses will be determined on a 
first come, first serve basis. However, any senior who 
enrolls in a class during the registration period may have 
first preference. 

All courses taken during the Interterm period must be 
completed by the end of January. Incompletes may not be 
given except in extraordinary circumstances and with the 
consent of the dean. 



Junior Year Abroad 

Mount St. Mary's College offers several opportunities for 
foreign study during one or both terms of the junior year. 
Arrangements have been made with the following foreign 
universities to accept students from Mount St. Mary's 
College and to transfer their grades: La Universidad 
Iberoamericana, Mexico City, Mexico; Laval University, 
Quebec, Canada; The Institute of European Studies, 
Vienna, Austria. In addition, other foreign universities 
may be approved by the academic dean on an individual 
basis. 

Students who wish to take part in this program must 
obtain the approval of the academic dean and the 
chairman of their major department. They must qualify 
by a grade point average of 2.5. If they plan to attend 
classes in which the lectures are given in a foreign 
language, they should have sufficient proficiency in that 
language before entering the program. 

To facilitate transfer of credits from foreign universities, 
students should observe the following procedure: 

1. Work out with the assistance of their advisors, an 
acceptable program of courses for the year; a record of 
the approved program is kept on file in the office of 
the academic dean. 

2. Maintain status as Mount St. Mary's College students 
by registering in the office of the registrar for the year 
abroad; the fee for registration is $35.00 per semester. 

3. Register as regular students at the foreign university 
and request that transcripts of credits be sent to the 
registrar at Mount St. Mary's College; courses taken 
abroad are treated in the same manner as other 
transfer courses. 

The GPA earned by a student during the year abroad is 
included in determining the student's overall GPA for the 
conferral of honors at graduation. 

Further information may be obtained from the office of 
the academic dean. 

Honors 

Honors at Entrance: 

Applicants who have at least a 3.3 GPA in academic 
subjects in high school and who score a minimum of 1150 
on the CEEB Aptitude Test or 26 on the ACT test, or 
applicants who have been recommended by the Honors 
Committee, are awarded Honors at Entrance. 

Dean's List 

To give public recognition to academic achievement, the 
Academic Dean posts a list each semester with the names 
of students who have obtained a grade point average of 
3.5 or higher for the preceding term. 



32/Bachelors Degree Programs 



To qualify for the Dean's List, a fulltime student must 
have taken at least 12 letter-graded units in the preceding 
semester. To qualify for the Dean's List, a part-time 
student must have taken at least 5 letter-graded units in 
the preceding semester (excluding students who register 
as fulltime, but who drop units or take an Incomplete 
during the semester). 

Honor Societies: 
Alpha Mu Gamma 

National Foreign Language Honor Society 
Delta Epsilon Sigma 

National Catholic Honor Society 
Kappa Gamma Pi 

National Catholic Women's Honor Society 
Lambda Iota Tau 

National Literature Honor Society 
Phi Alpha Theta 

International History Honor Society 
Pi Delta Phi 

National French Honor Society 
Pi Gamma Mu 

National Social Science Honor Society 
Pi Theta Mu 

Service Honor Society 
Sigma Delta Pi 

National Spanish Honor Society 

Graduation With Honors 

Summa cum laude shall be granted to a student who has 

received a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or 

higher.* 

Magna cum laude shall be granted to a student who has 
received a cumulative grade point averge of 3.7 or 
higher.* 

Cum laude shall be granted to a student who has received 
a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher.* 

*Effective with the graduating class of 1982. 

The overall GPA at the end of the Fall Semester of the 
academic year is used in determining honors. To be 
eligible, the student must have completed 48 
letter-graded units at Mount St. Mary's College. The 
student's grade point average will be calculated on the 
basis of grades earned at Mount St. Mary's College as 
well as grades transferred into the College at time of 
matriculation. Courses at another institution after 
matriculation are not counted into the cumulative grade 
point average, with the exception of approved junior year 
abroad programs. 



Placement and Acceleration 

Acceleration Program for High School Students 
Superior high school juniors or seniors who are 
recommended by their principals may be permitted to 
enroll in regular on-campus classes and earn college 
credit. A special reduced fee is available for 1-6 units per 
semester. 

Advanced Placement 

Students who earn scores of 3, 4, or 5 in Advanced 
Placement Examinations (ETS) may receive credit for 
equivalent courses provided they are accepted and 
registered students at Mount St. Mary's College. 
Students taking the Advanced Placement Examinations 
should arrange to have test results sent to the Office of 
Admissions. 

Placement Examinations 

Examinations used to place a student at a level of study 

may result in lower levels of study being waived. No 

credit will be awarded as a result of these placement 

examinations. 

Credit by Examination, Extra-Institutional Learning, and 
Non-Collegiate Coursework 

Mount St. Mary's College recognizes that learning can 
and often does occur outside the formal setting of the 
classroom. The college provides for this in the following 
ways: credit by examination, credit for extra-institutional 
learning, and credit for non-collegiate coursework. 

Credit by Exam 

There are two ways a student may demonstrate her 
knowledge of content areas: by challenging course exams 
and by taking standard proficiency exams. Credit for 
certain courses in the college may be earned by 
successfully passing departmental exams. A list of these 
courses is published each fall. A student must notify the 
department of her intention to challenge a departmental 
course one month in advance of the date of the exam. 
Successfully passing the exam, she may receive credit for 
the course. A fee is required to conduct and process this; 
see Tuition and Fees. 

Students may also take externally administered exams 
such as CLEP (College-Level Examination Program from 
CEEB) and PEP (Professional Equivalency Program from 
ACT) in those areas approved by the college. Information 
about these exams and a current list of approved exams 
are available from the dean's office, the registrar's office, 
or the Academic Counseling Center. Students who have 
taken CLEP or PEP exams prior to enrolling at Mount St. 
Mary's College must present original transcripts from 
ACT or CEEB in order to receive credit. 

Credit for non- traditional extra-institutional learning 
When a student has acquired college-level skills and 
learning relating to her academic goals through 



Bachelors Degree Programs/33 



experiences such as work, travel, and reading, she may 
have this learning evaluated for credit by preparing a 
portfolio containing an application supporting evidence 
and documents and a narrative relating the 
extra-institutional learning to her educational objectives. 

Credit for college-level courses offered by non-collegiate agencies 
Students who have taken courses sponsored by business, 
industry, the armed forces, or other non-collegiate 
agencies may apply for an evaluation of these learning 
experiences. If the course has previously been evaluated 
by the American Council on Education (ACE) and 
appears in The National Guide, a student may not have to 
prepare a portfolio. In all other cases, a student 
requesting credit for non-collegiate courses must prepare 
a portfolio for evaluation by a faculty committee. 

These portfolios should be prepared according to the 
guidelines in CAEL Student Handbook with the guidance of 
an advisor. If the portfolio is approved by a faculty 
committee, the student may earn college credit 
appropriate to the experiences. A fee is required to 
conduct and process this evaluation; see Tuition and 
Fees. For further details, see the Associate Academic 
Dean or the Director of the Academic Counseling Center. 

A student may earn a maximum of 30 units for credit by 
exam, 10 units in credit for extra-institutional learning, 
and 10 units in credit for non-collegiate course work. All 
units earned in this manner are held in escrow until the 
student has successfully completed 30 units of course 
work. 

Credit examinations and portfolio evaluations will 
ordinarily be given only to students who are admitted to 
the college. After satisfactorily completing the 
examination or evaluation, the student will register and 
receive credit for the corresponding course(s). Only 
"credit" (i.e., no letter grades) will be given: no record of 
failures will appear on the transcript. 

Classification of Students 

To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have 
satisfactorily completed 30 semester units (10 standard 
courses), or the unit equivalent; as a junior, 60 semester 
units (20 standard courses); as a senior, 90 semester units 
(30 standard courses). 

A student with full-time status must carry 12-17 units per 
semester. Part-time students carry less than 12 units per 
semester. Foreign students (with nonimmigrant "F-l" 
student status) enrolled in beginning ESL (on or off 
campus) plus nine semester units may be considered as 
students with full-time status. 

Special students may take a course or courses for 
academic credit without following a prescribed 
curriculum toward a degree. After twelve units of study, 
a special student, unless exempted by the dean, should 
make application for admission to the college. 



Auditors attend class sessions regularly but are not 
obligated to take examinations. They receive no credit for 
courses audited. 

Ordinarily a student should be a sophomore before 
enrolling in upper division courses. It is the student's 
responsibility to be aware of prerequisites or 
requirements for enrolling in upper division courses. 

Declaration of Major 

Students generally declare their major not later than the 
second semester of the sophomore year. Transfer 
students may declare their major at entrance or no later 
than second semester sophomore year. Approval of the 
departmental chairman is required. Students who fail to 
attain a GPA of 2.0 (C average) in work taken in the 
prerequisites for the major may, at the option of the 
department, be denied the privilege of entering that 
major. The student must maintain a GPA of 2.0 (C 
average) in all her major courses. After entering the 
junior or senior year a student may change a major only 
with the consent of the chairman of the department to 
which she is transferring. 

Degree Application 

May graduates must file for the appropriate degree 
during the Fall semester of the senior year. Students who 
plan to graduate at other times should file for the degree 
no later than three weeks after the start of the final 
semester. 

Attendance 

Since regularity and punctuality are essential to the 
successful pursuit of study, the number and character of 
student absences will be taken into account in 
determining academic grades. Unless proof to the 
contrary is furnished, an instructor will assume that an 
absence is without serious cause. 

There is no provision for a system of allowed cuts and 
absences. In the case of a prolonged absence because of 
illness or other serious reasons the recommendation of 
the academic dean is required for the student to be 
reinstated in class. Students may be dropped from a class 
for excessive absences when in the opinion of the 
instructor, further enrollment in the class would be of 
little value to the student. Occasionally, a student is 
excused from class attendance by the academic dean in 
order to represent the college at some function. The 
student should inform her instructors of such excused 
absences and secure from them assignments. 

Course Examinations 

All undergraduate students are required to take the 
regular course examinations. 



34/Bachelors Degree Programs 



Grades 

At the end of each term, the student receives a grade in 
every class. The grade indicates results of examinations, 
term reports, and general scholastic standing in the entire 
course. 

A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required 
in lower division work before a student can be granted 
junior standing. The same GPA is required in upper 
division work before the student can be graduated. 

The student's grade point average is computed according 
to this scale: 

A, excellent, 4 grade points per unit 

B, good, 3 grade points per unit 

C, average, 2 grade points per unit 

D, poor but passing, 1 grade point per unit 
F, failure, grade points per unit 

The following grades are not computed in the GPA: 

AU, audit 

CR, C or better; credit given 

I, incomplete 

IP, deferred grading for graduate thesis, senior project, or 

undergraduate research work in progress. 

NC, D or F; no credit given 

W, withdrawn 

Grading Policies 

CreditINo Credit 

To encourage a wider choice of courses by lessening the 

student's concern for the grade point average, selected 

courses may be taken for CR/NC. The following 

regulations apply to this option: 

Students may apply a maximum of 9 semester units of 

CR/NC to the Associate in Arts degree, and a maximum 

of 18 semester units of CR/NC to the baccalaureate 

degree; not more than 5 units each term may be taken for 

CR/NC. 

Courses taken for CR/NC may not be applied to the 
General Studies requirements; nor may they be applied 
to requirements for the students's major, except at the 
discretion of the major department. 

The student must indicate intent to take a course CR/NC 
no later than the last day to drop a class, as indicated on 
the academic calendar, by filing with the Registrar a form 
signed by the advisor, the instructor, and the student. A 
change to letter grade may not be petitioned after the 
form has been filed. Signings are a form of active consent 
and not pro forma. 

Incomplete 

An Incomplete is given only when a student: 

1. has fulfilled the majority of the course requirements, 

2. has a passing grade in the class work, 

3. is prevented from completing the assigned work for 
serious reasons. 



4. has consulted the instructor prior to the grading 
period, and the instructor has determined that the 
student can realistically complete the work within one 
semester. 

An Incomplete will remain as such unless removed by the 
instructor within one semester. The Incomplete is ignored 
when computing the GPA. An Incomplete can be 
extended beyond one semester only upon petition to the 
academic dean. 

Repetition of courses with D IF INC grades 

Only courses for which D, F, and NC were assigned may 

be repeated for a higher grade/CR. Courses may be 

repeated only once. In cases of repeated courses the units 

are counted once and the higher grade is computed in the 

GPA. 

Withdrawal From Courses 

The grade W indicates withdrawal from a course, 
according to the following policy: Withdrawal (W) 
indicates that a student withdrew from a class during the 
period scheduled on the college calendar with the 
approval of the instructor and advisor. After the 
scheduled date, permission of the Dean is required. A 
withdrawal form must be filed in the Registrar's office to 
have an official withdraw with the grade of W. 

The W carries no connotation of quality of student 
performance and is not calculated in the grade point 
average. Students who do not officially withdraw receive 
a grade of F. 

Transcripts 

Transcripts are issued at the written request of students 
or graduates to the office of the registrar. The first 
transcript is free. All other transcripts are $2.00 each. One 
week should be allowed for processing. 

Full payment of all expenses incurred during a given term 
or semester must be made before the credit for courses 
taken during that term or semester will be recorded on 
the student's transcript. 

Academic Petitions 

Any academic policy or regulation (e.g., degree 
requirements, academic dismissal, etc.) may be waived or 
modified for good reason for individual students by use 
of a petition form. Reasons must be presented by the 
student. After consultation with the student, the 
student's advisor and department chairman as 
appropriate, the program dean (i.e. dean of the A. A. 
program, dean of the graduate division, etc.) has the 
authority to approve or disapprove any petition. The 
dean for academic development has the authority to 
approve or disapprove any petition for any academic 
program at Mount St. Mary's College. A copy of any 
approved petition must be sent to the office of the 
registrar to be placed in the student's permanent file. 



Bachelors Degree Programs/35 



Withdrawal From College 

Students thinking of withdrawing from college should 
schedule an exit interview with an academic advisor or 
the dean in order to explore other options or assistance. 

Students who must withdraw from the college at any 
time must file a withdrawal notice in the office of the 
registrar. Forms are available from the office of the 
academic dean. Honorable dismissal may be granted 
when this form is filed. 

Students who leave the college in good standing for one 
semester and do not attend another postsecondary 
institution in the interim period may re-enroll through 
the office of the registrar. Other students wishing to 
re-enter must file an application for readmission with the 
admissions office. 

Probation 

A student is placed on probation if she fails to maintain a 
2.0 GPA for all courses undertaken in a term. A student 
on probation must achieve a GPA of 2.0 or higher during 
the following term in order to be readmitted to regular 
standing. 

Dismissal 

A student is subject to dismissal for the following 
reasons: 

1. Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 1.0 during any 
term. 

2. Failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 during a 
probationary term. 

The academic dean has the power to dismiss students 
and to suspend dismissal. She may also recommend that 
the Admissions Committee reinstate a dismissed student 
on a probationary basis. 

When extenuating circumstances, such as prolonged 
illness, account for the student's disqualification, she may 
be permitted, on petition to the academic dean, to 
continue on probation until the next term. 

Enrollment in the college implies willingness on the part 
of the student to comply with the requirements and 
regulations of the college. If the student fails to comply 
with these requirements and regulations, or if it is 
determined by the dean for academic development and 
the dean for student development that she is not able to 
benefit from the opportunities offered by the college, her 
withdrawal may be requested even though she is charged 
with no specific breach of discipline. 

Student Development 

Mount St. Mary's College provides students with 
programs and experiences conducive to personal, 
cultural, ethical, social and intellectual growth. Student 
initiative and responsibility are encouraged in an 
atmosphere of close interrelation among students, 
faculty, administration and staff. 



Student Activities 

Students are encouraged to become members of various 
college committees where, with members of the faculty 
and administration, they may contribute to the policy and 
procedures involved in their own educational process. 

The limited enrollment at Mount St. Mary's College offers 
many opportunities for participation in student 
government and campus organizations. In fact, a priority 
of the college is to provide women with distinctive 
leadership opportunities. 

To supply the broadening experience which organized 
discussions and planned activities furnish and to foster 
interest in the special fields which students are pursuing, 
many opportunities and organizations are open to Mount 
St. Mary's College students in campus life. Among them, 
the Associated Students of Mount St. Mary's College sponsors 
a wide range of cultural, educational, recreational, 
athletic, volunteer and social activities. The governing 
board of the Associated Students of Mount St. Mary's 
College meets at regular intervals to analyze student 
concerns, reflect student attitudes on questions of 
administrative policy, promote student activities, 
consider appointments, and appropriate student body 
funds. Residence Council addresses residence issues and 
promotes activities. Mount St. Mary's College has a 
student-run newspaper and yearbook. Several of the 
students' special interests include Athenaeum which 
sponsors theater excursions in Southern California, an 
active Model United Nations program (annually attends 
New York conference), the Mount Chorus and Orchestra, 
Pi Theta Mu (an honorary service sorority), professional 
student affiliations (Student California Teachers' 
Association, Student Nurses' Association of California, 
Women in Consumer Studies, Women of Management 
and Enterprise, the American Chemical Society Student 
Affiliates), and a local social sorority, Kappa Delta Chi. 

In addition to the many on-campus activities, Mount St. 
Mary's College's urban location offers the cultural and 
recreational opportunities available in the greater Los 
Angeles area. 

Counseling Services 

Students at Mount St. Mary's College may find assistance 
in an atmosphere of responsible freedom in one or more 
counseling situations. Counseling may range anywhere 
from a fifteen-minute informational chat with an 
instructor on the campus to a long-term therapy as a 
result of a referral to an outside resource through the 
college health services or the department of psychology. 

Students (either individually or in a group) have the 
opportunity to talk over problems of concern in academic, 
personal, or vocational matters in an atmosphere of 
acceptance and in a confidential manner, with a staff of 
professionally trained psychologists who are also 



36/Bachelors Degree Programs 



members of the teaching staff. The goals of such 
counseling are the realization and development of 
individual resources and increased self-understanding. 
Psychological testing is also provided when it is deemed 
appropriate. 

Campus Ministry 

Campus Ministry is a pastoral apostolate of service to 
members of the entire Mount Community through 
concern and care for persons, the proclamation of the 
Gospel and the celebration of the Eucharist. Campus 
Ministry provides for: retreats, liturgical celebrations, 
religious activities, counseling, interfaith discussions and 
social action. The College Chaplain works with the 
Campus Ministry Office to provide students with a sense 
of Christian living. 

The Student Placement Office 

The Student Placement Office offers a variety of services 
and employment opportunities for enrolled students. Job 
opportunities on campus are available in the library, the 
food service, the student bookstore, the switchboard, 
faculty offices and other places. Jobs are filled according 
to students' financial need and skill. Students interested 
in on-campus employment are encouraged to file 
applications early in the Financial Aid Office and in the 
Student Placement Office. Off-campus jobs, including 
seasonal and summer employment opportunities, are 
posted in the Student Placement Office and Campus 
Center. 

The Office of Career Planning 

The office of career planning assists the student in finding 
the major or career best suited to her interests. The 
director of career planning is available to discuss 
individual students' planning and offers seminars to 
provide students with the self evaluative tools, labor 
trend information, and job search skills that will enable 
them to build satisfying and influential careers. The 
director will also aid the student in using a research 
library of information on various careers related to college 
majors. 

Residence Life 

Primary emphasis in the residence halls is on a close 
interrelationship of students and staff to create a social 
situation which fosters the formation of personal values 
and integrity. On-campus living affords increased 
opportunities to develop personal relationships and to 
participate in the many enriching programs which Mount 
St. Mary's College offers. Student resident life is largely 
self-regulated, under the direction of the residence 
council which is composed of elected residence officers 
and floor representatives, resident assistants, faculty 
members in residence, the associate director of residence 
and the director of residence. 



In addition to the director of residence and associate 
director of residence, several other staff members help to 
contribute to the general well-being of the resident 
students. These include the assistant director, a 
dormitory assistant, and senior students who serve as 
resident assistants. A religious faculty member lives on 
each floor of the residence halls. 

The residence staff gives much time and attention to 
assigning rooms and roommates. They make every effort 
to provide a living/learning environment which will allow 
the student both privacy and the freedom to develop 
relationships conducive to her social and educational 
growth. 

Housing arrangements for unmarried students are the 
responsibility of the students and of their parents. The 
college offers assistance in making these arrangements. 

Health Services (Chalon Campus) 

The Mount St. Mary's College Health Center offers the 
services of a registered nurse and a part-time physician to 
students, administration, faculty and staff. Emphasis is 
placed on preventive medicine. Consultations, 
examinations, first aid treatment, whirlpool, ultrasonic 
therapy, hydrocollator therapy, clinical laboratory tests 
and medical counseling for various matters (e.g., weight 
control and skin problems) are available. 

Students living away from their own homes and all 
nursing majors are required to carry health and accident 
insurance. This applies even if the student lives with 
relatives if these are not legal guardians. Evidence of 
coverage must be presented at registration. The college 
offers a reasonably priced insurance. Students wishing 
this particular coverage must obtain it before the second 
week of each semester. 

Incoming students, freshmen and transfer, must submit 
the results of a recent physical examination (within the 
previous six months) by a private medical doctor to the 
Health Center prior to entrance. Thereafter, members of 
the college community are encouraged to avail 
themselves of the Health Center for yearly physical 
examinations and laboratory testing. 



Bachelors Degree Programs/37 



Bachelors Degree Programs- 
Descriptions and Requirements 

American Studies 

What is distinctive about American culture? What are the 
developing trends in American society, in public policy, 
in consumer behavior? What values do Americans 
treasure? The major in American Studies focuses on the 
influences of the past and present which have affected 
American character, experience, and institutions. 

This major is of particular value to students interested in 
entering government service, business, economics, 
management, political writing, teaching, and law. 

It is possible to have a double major combining American 
Studies with a major in English or in history. Either 
combination is excellent. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in American Studies 


Preparation 






ENG 26/126 


The American Experience 


(3) 


HIS 7A-I 


American Civilization 


(9) 


SOC 5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


Recommended 


preparation 




ECO 2 


Macroeconomics 


(3) 


POLIO 


Political Concepts 


(3) 


Requirements 






Eight upper division courses chosen from the following areas: 


Art 






ART 174 


History of Art: Art of the 






United States 


(3) 


Business 






BUS 4 


Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


English 






ENG 154 


Selected American Writers 


(3) 


ENG 181 


Theory and Criticism 


(3) 


ENG 192 


Special Studies: 






Selected American Studies 


(3) 


History 






HIS 170 


The Expanding Atlantic Community: 






Colonial Era 


(3) 


HIS 171 


Revolutionaries and Constitutionalists: 






1763-1800 


(3) 


HIS 172 


U.S.: Jeffersonianism and Jacksonianism 


(3) 


HIS 173 


U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction 


(3) 


HIS 174 


U.S. Industrialism, Populism and 






Progressive Reform 


(3) 



HIS 175 


U.S. The Twentieth Century 


(3) 


HIS 178 


Diplomatic History of the U.S. 


(3) 


HIS 179 


Constitutional History of the U.S. 


(3) 


HIS 181 


The American West 


(3) 


HIS 188 


California History 


(3) 


Music 






MUS 163 


American Music: Imitation to Creation 


(3) 


Philosophy 






PHI 134 


American Thought 


(3) 


PHI 174 


Aesthetics 


(3) 


Political Science 




POL 107 


Political Economics 


(3) 


POL 108 


American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


POL 113 


American Political Theory 


(3) 


POL 116 


Democracy and Democratic Theory 


(3) 


POL 125 


Foreign Relations of the U.S. 


(3) 


POL 170 


American Party Politics 


(3) 


POL 180 


State and Local Government 


(3) 


POL 181 


Political Participation 


(3) 


POL 196 


Experience-Oriented Courses 






in Political Science 


(3) 


Sociology 






SOC 104 


The Family 


(3) 


SOC 137 


Culture and Personality 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 175 


Urban Sociology and Demography 


(3) 


SOC 185 


Political Sociology 


(3) 


At least three of the eight upper division courses must be in 


humanities (literature, philosophy, art, music); at least three 


courses must be in the social sciences (history, political 


sci- 


ence, sociology, economics). 




Two Seminars in American Studies 


(6) 


AST 174 


Seminar in American Studies I 




AST 175 


Seminar in American Studies II 




Recommended Electives: 




POL 190 


Internship in Political Science 


(3) 


POL 191 


Internship in Government Serivce 


(3) 


Total units in 


American Studies — 48 




Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The Minor in American Studies 

A minimum of 21 units selected from American Studies offer- 
ings. 

Students interested in an American Studies minor should 
arrange their total programs with the department chairman. 
Because of the variety of careers to which an American Studies 
program may lead, the choice of courses is flexible. 



38 /Bachelors Degree Programs 



Art 

The art major is directed toward several goals. It provides 
the undergraduate student with a thorough and 
comprehensive understanding of art as an essential 
activity of man. It prepares students who wish to 
continue as professional artists or teachers of art. It offers 
areas of specialization for those students who will pursue 
graduate study in art. 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art offers the student 
thorough course experiences in drawing, design, 
painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, 
fiber design, and art history. 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Art offers greater 
possibilities for personal concentration and development. 
In addition to the regular course work in drawing, 
design, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, 
ceramics, and art history, the student chooses an area of 
specialization for further study and experimentation. The 
B.F.A. candidate will prepare a portfolio and present her 
work in an exhibition at the end of the senior year. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Art 




Preparation 






ARTl 


Drawing I 


(3) 


ART 2 


Design I 


(3) 


ART 3 


Three-Dimensional Design 


(3) 


ART 4 


Painting I 


(3) 


ART 5 


Fundamentals of Art 


(3) 


Requirements 






ART 106 


Design II 


(3) 


ART 122 


Drawing II (Figure) 


(3) 


ART 111 


Printmaking I 


(3) 


One course from the following 




ART 112 


Ceramics I 


(3) 


ART 109 


Fiber Arts 


(3) 


ART 125 


Weaving I 

Six upper division courses in art. 

Two of these must be in 


(3) 




art history. 


(18) 


Total units in art — 45 




Plus general 


studies requirements and elective 


totaling 129 


semester units. 





The B.F.A. 


Degree With a Major in Art 




Preparation 






ARTl 
ART 2 
ART 3 


Drawing I 

Design I 

Three Dimensional Design 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 


ART 4 
ART 5 


Painting I 
Fundamentals of Art 


(3) 
(3) 



Requirements 








ART 106 


Design II 




(3) 


ART 122 


Drawing II (Figure) 




(3) 


ART 111 


Printmaking I 




(3) 


One course from the following 






ART 112 


Ceramics I 




(3) 


ART 109 


Fiber Arts 




(3) 


ART 125 


Weaving I 




(3) 


Fifteen additional courses in art, including the 


following 






Three courses in Art History 




(9) 


ART 175 


Critical Theories of the 








Visual Arts 




(3) 


ART 176 


Portfolio and Exhibition 




(3) 


Upper division work should reflect a concentration in one of » 


the following 


areas: 






Ceramics 


Painting 






Design 


Photography 






Drawing 


Printmaking 






Fiber 


Sculpture 






All B.F.A. candidates must prepare and produce a portfolio 


and exhibition at the end of the senior year (ART 176). 




Total units in 


art — 72 






Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 







The Minor in Art 

A minimum of seven courses in art: 
ART 1 Drawing I 



ART 2 

ART 4 

ART 5 

Three additional courses. 

Total of 21 semester units 



Design I 
Painting I 
Fundamentals of Art 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



The Minor 


in Art History 




A minimum of 


seven courses: 




ART 5 


Fundamentals of Art 


(3) 


ART 170 


History of Art: Ancient to Medieval 


(3) 


ART 171 


History of Art: Renaissance to 






Romanticism 


(3) 


ART 172 


History of Art: Modern World 


(3) 


ART 175 


Critical Theories in the Visual 






Arts: Seminar 


(3) 


ART 199 


Independent Study: 






Research Paper in Art History 


(3) 


One course from the following: 




ARTl 


Drawing I 


(3) 


ART 174 


History of Art: Art of 






the United States 


(3) 


ART 177 


History of Art: Christian 


(3) 


Total of 21 semester units. 





Bachelors Degree Programs/39 



Biochemistry 



Area Major: Chemistry and Biology 

The major in biochemistry offers the student an interdiscip- 
linary study of biology and chemistry, and provides an 
excellent preparation for all preprofessional areas leading 
into medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy. 



The B.S. Degree With a Major in Biochemistry 


Preparation 






BIO 1ABCD 


Biological Dynamics 


(6) 


CHE 1AB 


General Chemistry 


(4-4) 


CHE5A 


Elementary Organic Chemistry 


(4) 


CHE5B 


Organic Synthesis 


(3) 


CHE 7 


Elementary Biochemistry 


(4) 


MTH 3AB 


Mathematical Analysis I 


(3-3) 


PHY1A 


Elementary Physics 


(3) 


PHY IB 


Intermediate Physics 


(4) 


Requirements 






BIO 130 


Genetics 


(3) 


BIO 151A 


Cellular Physiology 


(4) 


CHE 104 


Qualitative Organic Analysis 


(3) 


CHE 108 


Intermediate Biochemistry 


(3) 


CHE 110AB 


Physical Chemistry 


(3-3) 


CHE 199 


Research 


(3) 


One additional upper division course in chemistry 


and three 


additional courses in biology selected from BIO 118 


BIO 120, 


BIO 126, BIO 151B. 




Total units ir 


chemistry, biology, mathematics, and physics 


— 72-73 






Plus general 


studies requirements and electives to 


taling 129 


semester units. 





Biological Sciences 

Students in the Department of Biological Sciences may 
elect to major in one or more of the following options: 
environmental studies, general sciences, medical 
technology, physical therapy, pre-medical program, and 
psychobiology. See also the Associate in Arts programs in 
physical therapy assistant and respiratory therapy. 

These options will prepare the student to enter medical 
school, graduate study, clinical and research laboratories, 
allied health therapy fields, or teaching. 

Students may earn a B.A. degree or a B.S. degree. For 
the B.A. degree it is necessary to complete the foreign 
language requirement. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Biological 




Sciences 






Preparation 






BIOIA 


Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts 


(2) 


BIO IB 


Biological Dynamics: Microbial World 


(1) 


BIOIC 


Biological Dynamics: 






Basic Human Physiology 


(1) 


BIO ID 


Biological Dynamics: The Environment 


(2) 


Plus courses 


in mathematics, chemistry, physics. 




Requirements 






Seven to nine upper division courses including: 




BIO 130 


Genetics 


(3) 


BIO 150 


Biology of Aging 


(3) 


BIO 151 A 


Cellular Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 195 


Senior Seminar 


(2) 


Total units in biological sciences — 30-36 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The B.S. Degree With a Major in Biological 




Sciences 






Preparation 






BIOIA 


Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts 


(2) 


BIO IB 


Biological Dynamics: Microbial World 


(1) 


BIOIC 


Biological Dynamics: Human Physiolog) 


' (1) 


BIO ID 


Biological Dynamics: The Environment 


(2) 


Plus courses 


in chemistry, mathematics, physics. 




Requirements 






Nine to ten 


jpper division courses including: 




BIO 130 


Genetics 


(3) 


BIO 151A 


Cellular Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 195 


Senior Seminar 


(2) 


BIO 197 


Research Readings 


(1-2) 


BIO 198 


Biological Research 


(1-3) 


Recommended Courses 




BIO 118 


Endrocrinology 


(4) 


BIO 120 


Human Embryology 


(4) 


BIO 150 


Biology of Aging 


(3) 


BIO 151B 


Medical Physiology 


(3) 


BIO 165 


Marine Biology 


(4) 


Total units in biological sciences — 33-39 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 





The B.S. Degree With a Major in Biological 

Sciences 

Medical Technology Emphasis 

Preparation 

BIO 1A Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts (2) 

BIO IB Biological Dynamics: Microbial World (1) 

BIO 1C Biological Dynamics: Human Physiology (1) 

BIO ID Biological Dynamics: The Environment (2) 

BIO 3 General Microbiology (4) 

Plus courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. 



40 /Bachelors Degree Programs 



Requirements 








Nine to ten 


upper division courses i 


ncluding: 




BIO 104 


Medical Bacteriology 




(4) 


BIO 105 


Immunology 




(4) 


BIO 130 


Genetics 




(3) 


BIO 151A 


Cellular Physiology 




(4) 


BIO 195 


Senior Seminar 




(2) 


BIO 197 


Research Readings 




(1-2) 


BIO 198 


Biological Research 




(1-3) 


Recommended Courses 






BIO 106 


Medical Mycology 




(3) 


BIO 107 


Parasitology 




(3) 


BIO 108 


Hematology 




(4) 


BIO 151B 


Medical Physiology 




(3) 


Total units i 


n biological sciences — 


■ 33-39 




Plus genera] 


studies requirements and electives 


totaling, 129 


semester units. 







The B.S. Degree With a Major in Biological 




Sciences 






Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Preparation Emphasis 




Preparation 






BIOIA 


Biologicsl Dyanmics: Basic Concepts 


(2) 


BIO IB 


Biological Dynamics: Microbial World 


(1) 


BIOIC 


Biological Dynamics: Human Physiolog) 


' (1) 


BIO ID 


Biological Dynamics: The Environment 


(2) 


Plus courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics. 




Requirements 






Nine to ten i 


ipper division courses including: 




BIO 118 


Endocrinology 


(4) 


BIO 120 


Human Embryology 


(4) 


BIO 130 


Genetics 


(3) 


BIO 151A 


Cellular Physiolsogy 


(4) 


BIO 151B 


Medical Physiology 


(3) 


BIO 195 


Senior Seminar 


(2) 


BIO 197 


Research Readings 


(1-2) 


BIO 198 


Biological Research 


(1-3) 


Recommended Courses 




CHE 110AB 


Physical Chemistry 


(6) 


BIO 50/150 


Biology of Aging 


(3) 


Total units in biological sciences — 33-39 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 





The Minor in Biological Sciences 

A minimum of 20 units including: 

BIO 1A Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts (2) 

BIO 1C Biological Dynamics: Human Physiology (1) 

At least three upper division courses. 



Business 

The major in Business is designed to prepare students for 
careers in business and for graduate study. 

The emphasis in Accounting qualifies students to enter 
the most rapidly expanding areas of business activity, 
namely, accounting and computer science. Graduates will 
not only be qualified for employment with public 
accounting and computer firms, but they will also be 
minimally qualified to take the certified public accountant 
(CPA) examination. 

The emphasis in Business Administration offers a 
curriculum centered around the practical, applied courses 
that qualify students to enter administrative positions 
immediately after graduation. Courses cover the broad 
spectrum of business activity and allow the students to 
choose from a variety of possible career opportunities — 
advertising, finance, personnel, and retailing. 

The emphasis in Fashion Merchandising prepares 
students for positions in retail buying, selling and 
promotion of fashion apparel and accessories in 
department stores and specialty shops. A graduate may 
find employment as a buyer, fashion consultant, fashion 
coordinator, department manager or researcher of market 
trends. Business courses included in the emphasis make 
available the option of self-employment as 
owner/manager of a boutique. 

The emphasis in Marketing prepares a student for careers 
in marketing, marketing research, sales, and real estate. 

Information for Majors 

Business Internship (BUS 190) is restricted to seniors 
whose academic performance qualifies them for the 
internship experience. The department will attempt to 
place such students in administrative positions where 
they can increase their competency and acquire practical 
business experience. 



The B.A. Degree with a Major in Business 




Accounting Emphasis 




Preparation 




BUS 4 Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


BUS 5 Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15 Accounting I 


(3) 


BUS 16 Accounting II 


(3) 


ECO 1 Economics I (Microeconomics) 


(3) 


ECO 2 Economics II (Macroeconomics) 


(3) 


MTH 1 College Algebra (or completion of 




equivalency exam) 


(3) 


MTH 9 Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MTH 38 Elements of Probability and Statistics 


(3) 


PSY 1 General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 



Bachelors Degree Programs/41 



Requirements 






Nine upper 


division courses including: 




BUS 137 


Intermediate Accounting I 


(3) 


BUS 138 


Intermediate Accounting II 


(3) 


BUS 153 


Computer Programming 


(3) 


BUS 154 


Cost Accounting 


(3) 


BUS 155 


Systems Design and Analysis 


(3) 


BUS 185 


Business Management 


(3) 


BUS 186 


Tax Accounting 


(3) 


BUS 188 


Auditing 


(3) 


Total units in business — 42 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The B.A. Degree with a Major in Business 




Business Administration Emphasis 




Preparation 






BUS 4 


Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


BUS 5 


Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15 


Accounting I 


(3) 


BUS 16 


Accounting II 


(3) 


BUS 75/175 


Principles of Salesmanship 


(3) 


ECOl 


Economics I (Microeconomics) 


(3) 


ECO 2 


Economics II (Macroeconomics) 


(3) 


MTH1 


College Algebra (or completion of 






equivalency exam) 


(3) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MTH38 


Elements of Probability and Statistics 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


Requirements 






Nine upper 


division courses including the following: 




BUS 130 


Business Finance 


(3) 


BUS 157 


Personnel 


(3) 


BUS 160 


Marketing 


(3) 


BUS 161 


Advertising 


(3) 


BUS 184 


Organizational Behavior 


(3) 


BUS 185 


Business Management 


(3) 


BUS 192 


Business Policy and Ethics 


(3) 


Total units 


in business — 42 




Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





B.A. Degree 


in Business 




Fashion Merchandising Emphasis 




Preparation 






ART 2 


Design I 


(3) 


BUS 4 


Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


BUS 15/115 


Accounting I 


(3) 


BUS 75/175 


Principles of Salesmanship 


(3) 


ECO 2 


Macroeconomics 


(3) 


MATH 9/109 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


SPE 10/110 


Public Speaking 


(3) 



Requirements 








BUS 85/185 


Business Management 




(3) 


BUS 160 


Marketing 




(3) 


BUS 161 


Advertising 




(3) 


BUS 162 


Retailing 




(3) 


BUS 180 


Merchandising: Demonstration 








and Display 




(3) 


BUS 192 


Business Policy & Ethics 




(3) 


CST21 


Clothing Construction 




(3) 


CST24 


Textiles for Consumers 




(3) 


CST 120 


Clothing Selection 




(3) 


CST 128 


The Fashion Industry 




(3) 


CST 194 


Seminar: Business and Consumer Studies (3) 


PSY 148 


Personnel and Consumer Psychology 


(3) 


SPR18 


Career Planning 




0) 


Recommended Electives 






BUS 130 


Business Finance 




(3) 


BUS 157 


Personnel 




(3) 


BUS 190 


Business and Consumer Studies 








Internship 




(3) 


Total units in business and consumer studies - 


-42 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives 


totaling 


129 


semester units. 







The B.A. Degree With a Major in Business 




Marketing Emphasis 




Preparation 






BUS 4 


Introduction to American Business 


(3) 


BUS 5 


Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15 


Accounting I 


(3) 


BUS 16 


Accounting II 


(3) 


BUS 75/175 


Principles of Salesmanship 


(3) 


ECOl 


Microeconomics 


(3) 


ECO 2 


Macroeconomics 


(3) 


MATH1 


College Algebra (or completion of 






equivalency exam) 


(3) 


MATH 9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MATH 38 


Statistics 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


Requirements 






Nine upper division courses including the following: 




BUS 160 


Marketing 


(3) 


BUS 161 


Advertising 


(3) 


BUS 170 


Real Estate 


(3) 


BUS 180 


Merchandising: Demonstration 






and Display 


(3) 


BUS 192 


Business Policy and Ethics 


(3) 


Total units in business — 42 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The Minor in Business 

A minimum of 21 units selected from Business offerings. 
Students interested in a business minor should arrange their 
total programs with the department chairman. Because of the 
variety of careers to which a business program may lead, the 
choice of courses is flexible. 



42/Bachelors Degree Programs 



Chemistry 



A student majoring in chemistry receives a 
comprehensive view of the principles of this science and 
participates in personalized laboratory instruction and 
individual research. 

The chemistry major is excellent preparation for all health 
science careers, education, scientific writing, and careers 
in food, petroleum, and textiles. 

The minimal major in chemistry — leading to a B.A. 
degree — is designed for those interested in secondary 
science teaching, chemical technology, and other 
broadly-based careers requiring a science background. 

The bachelor of science degree in chemistry or 
biochemistry is recommended for those who wish to 
pursue graduate or medical studies. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Chemistry 


Preparation 




CHE 1AB 
CHE5A 
CHE 7 
MTH 3AB 
PHYIA 


General Chemistry (4-4) 
Elementary Organic Chemistry (4) 
Elementary Biochemistry (4) 
Mathematical Analysis I (3-3) 
Elementary Physics (3) 


Requirements 




CHE 110AB 


Physical Chemistry (3-3) 


Three additional upper division courses in chemistry (9) 


Total units ir 


chemistry — 31 


Total units ir 


mathematics and physics — 9 


Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
semester units. 



The B.S. Degree With a Major in Chemistry 




Preparation 






CHE 1AB 


General Chemistry 


(4-4) 


CHE5A 


Elementary Organic Chemistry 


(4) 


CHE5B 


Organic Synthesis 


(3) 


CHE 7 


Elementary Biochemistry 


(4) 


MTH 3AB 


Mathematical Analysis I 


(3-3) 


MTH 4AB 


Mathematical Analysis II 


(3-3) 


PHYIA 


Elementary Physics 


(3) 


PHY IB 


Intermediate Physics 


(4) 


Requirements 






CHE 110AB 


Physical Chemistry 


(3-3) 


CHE 111 


Physical Chemistry Laboratory 


(2) 


CHE 199 


Research 


(3) 


Five additional upper division courses in chemistry 


(15) 


Total units in Chemistry — 45 




Total units in mathematics and physics — 19 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 





The Minor in Chemistry 

CHE 1AB General Chemistry (4-4) 

CHE 5A Elementary Organic Chemistry (4) 

CHE 5B Organic Synthesis (3) 

CHE 7 Elementary Biochemistry (4) 
Plus one upper division course in chemistry. 



Child Development 

Area Major: Psychology and Sociology 

This interdisciplinary major provides a broad base for 
understanding young children as individuals and as 
members of society. It is recommended primarily for 
persons who will be working with preschool children. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Child 


Development 


Psychology oi 


Sociology Emphasis 


Preparation 




PSY1 


General Psychology (3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives (3) 


Requirements 




Eleven upper 


division courses from the fields of psychology 


and sociology 


with a minimum of five and a maximum of 


seven from each area including: 


CST 109 


Maternal and Child Nutrition (3) 


PSY12 


Developmental Psychology (3) 


PSY 132 


Personality (3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority- Minority Relations (3) 


SOC 175 


Urban Sociology (3) 


Recommended 




ART 145 


Creative Art Experience (3) 


ENG 134 


Children's Literature (3) 


MUS31 


Music for the Young Child (3) 


Majors must maintain a grade of C or higher in all major 


courses. 




Total units in 


major areas — 39 


Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 



Consumer Studies 

The major in Consumer Studies focuses on human 
physical needs, such as food, clothing and shelter and 
how those needs are met through the selection and 
purchase of goods and services offered in the retail 
market. Courses in the major provide an understanding 
of the buying process from the viewpoint of both the 
seller and the buyer, by examining the operation of 
businesses by sellers and the management of physical 
resources by consumers. The major also gives specific 
attention to consumer problems and how they may be 
solved. 



Bachelors Degree Programs/43 



Graduates may find employment in consumer services 
departments of banks, finance companies, department 
stores, product manufacturers, government agencies or 
radio and television stations. The major provides 
excellent preparation for graduate study in business, law 
and family economics. 



Diversified Major 



The B.S. Degree with a Major in Consumer Studies 


Preparation 






BUS 5/105 


Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15/115 


Accounting I 


(3) 


CST 2/102 


Consumer Issues 


(3) 


CST 40/140 


Management of Personal and Family 






Resources 


(3) 


ECO 2 


Macroeconomics 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


SOC 104 


The Family 


(3) 


SPE 10/110 


Public Speaking 


(3) 


Requirements 






BUS 160 


Marketing 


(3) 


BUS 161 


Advertising 


(3) 


BUS 170 


Real Estate 


(3) 


CST 10/110 


Human Nutrition 


(3) 


CST 108 


Meals, Money and Markets 


(3) 


CST 154 


Housing 


(3) 


CST 160 


The Consumer and the Market 


(3) 


CST 180 


Merchandising: Demonstration 






and Display 


(3) 


CST 194 


Seminar: Business and 






Consumer Studies 


(3) 


ENG 108A 


Journalism 


(3) 


POL 108 


American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


PSY 125 


Introduction to Counseling 


(3) 


PSY148 


Personnel and Consumer Psychology 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority- 






Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 175 


Urban Sociology 


(3) 


SOC 189 


The Sociology of Aging 


(3) 


SPR18 


Career Planning Seminar 


(1) 


Recommended Elective 




BUS 190 


Business and Consumer Studies 






Internship 


(3) 


Total units in business and consumer studies — 39 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The Minor in Consumer Studies 

A minimum of 21 units selected from consumer studies offer- 
ings. 

Students should arrange their total programs with the de- 
partment chairman. Because of the variety of careers to which 
such programs may lead, the choice of courses is flexible. 



Multiple Subject Credential: Elementary 

The diversified major is designed for the student 
qualifying for the Multiple Subject Credential to teach in 
the elementary school. 



The B.A. Degree With a Diversified Major 




Elementary Teaching Credential 




General requirements: Eighty-four units in four areas of 




concentration 


with a minimum of 18 units in each area. 




Area I — English and Speech 




Requirements 






ENG 1AB 


College Writing 


(2-2) 


ENG 105 


Advanced Composition 


(3) 


ENG 134 


Children's Literature 

One upper division course in 


(3) 




American Literature 


(3) 




One elective course in English 


(3) 




One course in Speech 


(3) 




One course in Linguistics 


(3) 


Area II — Mathematics and Science 




Requirements: 






Biology 






BIOIA 


Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts 


(2) 


BIO 10 


Health Science 


(3) 


One course from the following: 




BIO IB 


Biological Dynamics: 






The Microbial World 


(1) 


BIOIC 


Biological Dynamics: 






Basic Human Physiology 


(1) 


BIO ID 


Biological Dynamics: The Environment 


(2) 


One elective 


course from the following: 




BIO 3 


General Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 165 


Marine Biology 


(3) 


BIO 167 


Field Biology 


(3) 


Mathematics 






MTH10 


Mathematical Ideas 


(3) 


MTH50 


Modern Math 


(3) 


MTH51 


Modern Geometry 


(3) 


Physical Science 




PHS1 


Scientific Concepts 


(3) 


PHS4 


Elementary Environmental Studies 


(3) 


— 


One elective course in biology 






or physical science 


(3) 


Area III — Social Sciences 




Requirements: 






History 






HIS 176 


The American Democratic Republic 


(3) 


or 
HIS 175 


U.S., The Twentieth Century 


(3) 


Political Science 




POL 170 


American Party Politics 


(3) 


One elective 


:ourse from economics, history, or politica 


sci- 


ence 







44/Bachelors Degree Programs 



Psychology 

PSY 1 General Psychology (3) 

PSY 113 Child Development and the 

Learning Process (3) 

Recommended electives: 

PSY 132 Personality (3) 

PSY 135 Group Dynamics (3) 

PSY 145 Social Psychology (3) 

Sociology 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives (3) 

One course from the following: 

SOC 104 The Family (3) 

SOC 161 Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations (3) 

SOC 175 Urban Sociology (3) 

Area IV — Humanities, Fine Arts, Foreign Languages 

Requirements: 

ART 145 Creative Art Experience (3) 

MUS 130 Creative Music Experience (3) 

— Three courses in philosophy (9) 

— One to three courses 

in foreign language (3-9) 

In addition, 12units in education and 12 units in student 
teaching arerequired. 

EDU 101 Perspectives in Education (1) 

EDU 114 Diagnosis and Prescription (1) 

EDU 115A Communication — Elementary Curriculum (2) 
EDU 115B Mathematics — Elementary (2) 

EDU 115C Reading — Elementary (3) 

EDU 115D Science and Social Studies — Elementary 

Curriculum (3) 

EDU 116A Supervised Teaching — Elementary (12) 

Total units in four areas — 84 
Total units in education — 24 

Students who are considering this major should consult with 
the education department as early as possible to obtain indi- 
vidual advisement. 
For graduation, 129 units are required. 



English 



The English major emphasizes creative writing and 
thinking, and offers training in communication and in the 
perceptive criticism of literature. Students may structure 
their English programs for an emphasis in such areas as 
literature, television, speech and drama, journalism, and 
English as a second language. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in English 




Preparation 




ENG 1AB College Writing 


(2-2) 


ENG 2 Introduction to Literature 


(3) 


HIS 1AB Western Civilization 


(6) 


One course selected from the following: 




SPE 10 Public Speaking 


(3) 


SPE 13 Oral Argument 


(3) 


SPE 15 Drama in Action 


(3) 



Strongly recommended: 

PHI 5 Logic: Structures of Reasoning (3) 

Requirements 

ENG 106 Creative Writing (2) 

ENG 142 Literary History of England and America (3) 

ENG 181 Theory and Criticism (3) 

ENG 199 Senior Paper (0-1) 

Twenty-five units selected from English and Journalism offer- 
ings, at least eighteen of which are upper division. Each stu- 
dent works out a total program with an adviser and the de- 
partment chairman. 

Majors may fulfill any department requirements by indepen- 
dent study provided that a faculty member agrees to direct the 
work. 

Majors must maintain average or above-average grades in all 
English courses. 
Total units in English — 40 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
semester units. 



The Minor in English 

A minimum of 21 units selected from English offerings. 
Students intersted in an English minor should work out their 
total programs with the department chairman. Because of the 
vareity of careers to which an English program may lead, the 
choice of courses is flexible. 



The Minor 


in English 




Teaching Emphasis 




A minimum 


of 21 units selected from English offerings 




Requirements 






ENG 1AB 


College Writing 


(2-2) 


ENG 181 


Theory and Criticism 


(3) 


One course i 


n American Literature 




Strongly recommended: 




ENG 101 


Structure of Modern English 


(3) 


ENG 106 


Creative Writing 


(2) 


ENG 173 


Shakespeare 


(3) 



English as a Second Language 



The Minor in English as a Second Language (ESL) 

Prerequisites 

Certification of English proficiency and background by the 

department of English. 

Recommended: 

Certification of Spanish proficiency and background by the 

department of Foreign Languages. 

Requirements 

A minimum of 21 units including: 

EDU 351 Methods and Materials in Teaching 

English as a Second Language (3) 



Bachelors Degree Programs/45 



EDU336 


Supervised Teaching: English as a 






Second Language — Elementary 


(3) 


EDU 378 


Supervised Teaching: English as a 






Second Language — Secondary 


(3) 


ENG 102/202 


Structure of Modern English 


(3) 


ENG 204 


Comparative Bilingual Studies 
(Prerequisite: ENG 102/202) 


(3) 


Recommended electives 




EDU 203 


Social Foundations of Education 


(3) 


EDU 222 


Curriculum and Methods for the 






Urban School 


(3) 


EDU 230 


Language in the Urban School and 






Community 


(3) 


ENG 100/200 


English Linguistics 


(3) 


ENG 105 


Advanced Composition 


(3) 


HIS 165B/265B History of the Spanish-Speaking 






Peoples of the United States 


(3) 


SOC 125/225 


Comparative Social Structures 


(3) 


SOC 161/261 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 212 


Contemporary Social Issues 


(3) 


SPA 115/215 


Applied Linguistics: Spanish as a 






Second Language 


(3) 


SPA 118/218 


Historical Grammar: Spanish as a 






First Language 


(3) 


Completion of this minor also includes completion of the 


program for the Graduate Certificate in Teaching English 


as a 


Second Language. 





French 

The major in French is a comprehensive program leading 
to a proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing French, 
and to a deepening of the humanistic spirit through 
understanding the ideas and ways of life of the 
French-speaking nations. It offers preparation for 
teaching, research, graduate study and travel. 

Admission to a major in the Department of Foreign 
Languages is determined by the department when the 
student applies in the spring of her sophomore year. A 
grade point average of 2.5 in courses in foreign language 
is required. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in French 




Preparation 






FRE 4AB 


Intermediate French 
(May be challenged by examination) 


(3-3) 


FRE25 


Advanced Grammar 


(3) 


FRE 32 


History and Civilization of France 


(3) 


Requirements 






FRE 101 


Stylistics and Composition 


(3) 


FRE 112AB 


Introduction to the Study of Literature 
Five upper division courses 
covering at least three of the 


(3-3) 




literary periods 


(15) 


FRE 191 


Senior Thesis 


(1) 


Total upper 


division units in French — 25 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totalling 129 


semester units. 





The B.A. Degree With a Major in French 




French Studies Emphasis 




Preparation 






FRE 4AB 


Intermediate French or approved 






alternate 


(3-3) 


Requirements 






FRE 101 


Stylistics and Composition 


(3) 


FRE 112AB 


Introduction to the Study of 






French Literature 


(3-3) 


FRE 132 


History and Civilization of France 


(3) 


FRE 191 


Senior Thesis 

Two approved upper division 
courses chosen from stylistics, 
linguistics, study-travel, or 


(1) 




related area courses. 


(6) 


Total upper 


division units in French — 25 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 





The Minor in French 




A minimum of 21 units including: 




FRE 4AB Intermediate French 


(3-3) 


(may be challenged by examination) 




FRE 25 Advanced Grammar 


(3) 


FRE 32 History and Civilization of France 


(3) 


FRE 101 Stylistics and Composition 


(3) 


Two upper division courses 


(6) 



Gerontology 



The major in gerontology (psychology of development 
and aging) emphasizes the exploration of behavioral 
development over the lifespan. Special focus is placed on 
the biological, environmental, and psychological aspects 
of aging in American society. 



The B.A. Degree with a Major in Gerontology 


Preparation 




BIO 50 
PSYl 
PSY 12 
SOC 5 


Biology of Aging (3) 
General Psychology (3) 
Developmental Psychology (3) 
Sociological Perspectives (3) 


Requirements 




Thirteen upper division courses including: 


ART 146 


Art as Therapy (3) 


MUS 164 


Music and Life (3) 


HSP 194 
HSP 196 
*PHI 168B 


Gerontology Seminar (2) 
Thanatology Seminar (3) 
Bioethics (3) 


PSY 127 
PSY 133 
PSY 168 
*RST 178 
SOC 189ABC 


Psychology of Development and Aging (3) 
Psychology of Disability and Adjustment (3) 
Abnormal Psychology (3) 
Death and Dying (3) 
Sociology of Aging (1-1-1) 



46/Bachelors Degree Programs 



Recommended: 






PSY 125 


Introduction to Counseling 


(3) 


PSY 132 


Personality 


(3) 


PSY 135 


Group Dynamics 


(3) 


PSY 145 


Social Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 192 


Clinical Practicum 


(3) 


SOC 137 


Culture and Personality 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 190 


Social Change 


(3) 


*Can fulfill General Studies requirement. 




Majors must obtain a grade of C or higher in all major courses . 


Total units in 


major — 50 




Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





Health Services Administration 

Health Services Administration is designed to prepare 
students for administrative positions in medical, hospital 
and nursing-care facilities. The major provides students 
who have already satisfied an approved program in 
health services (such as respiratory therapy, physical 
therapy assistant, nursing, and medical secretary) with 
the business skills to assume leadership in administering 
health-care facilities. 



The B.S. Degree with a Major in Health Services 




Administration 




Preparation: 






Completion of an approved program in Health Services (Phys- 


ical Therapy Assistant, Nursing, Respiratory Therapy, Medi- 


cal Secretary, 


etc.) 




PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC 5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


Requirements: 






MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MTH38 


Elements of Probability and Statistics 


(3) 


ECOl 


Microeconomics 


(3) 


BUS 5 


Business Law 


(3) 


BUS 15 


Accounting I 


(3) 


BUS 16 


Accounting II 


(3) 


BUS 130 


Business Finance 


(3) 


BUS 185 


Business Management 


(3) 


BUS 192 


Business Policy and Ethics 


(3) 


BUS 111 


Management of Health Services 


(3) 


Total units in Business — 21 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





History 

The student who majors in history examines and 
analyzes the heritage of the recorded past in an effort to 
better understand and evaluate events and developments 
of the present. Emphasis is placed on American, 
European, and non- Western civilizations. 



Other options are offered in the closely-allied area majors 
offered in Social Science with emphasis in hispanic 
studies, history, political science, public administration 
and sociology. 

It is possible to have history and American Studies as a 
double major. See American Studies. Such a combination 
is highly desirable and very useful, combining as it does 
with the general major, a specialized study of the 
character and developing trends of American society. 

Information for Majors in History. 

Students must maintain average or above-average grades 

in all courses in the major. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in History 




Preparation 






HIS 1AB 


Western Civilization 


(3-3) 


POL1 


American Government 


(3) 


POLIO 


Political Concepts 


(3) 


Recommended 






HIS 25 


Cultural and Historical Geography 


(3) 


Requirements 






Ten upper division courses including: 




HIS 101 


Writing of History 


(3) 


HIS 198 


Historiography 


(3) 


INT 180 


Seminar in Ideas and Culture 


(3) 




Three courses in U.S. history 


(9) 




Three courses in European history 


(9) 




Two courses selected from the 






history of other areas 


(6) 


Total units in 


history — 39 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 





The Minor 


in History 








HIS 1AB 


Western Civilization 






(3-3) 


HIS 101 


Writing of History 






(3) 


Two upper c 


ivision courses in U.S. 


history 






Three upper 


division courses in the 


history 


of other 


areas 



Home Economics 

The fundamental sociological unit of study in Home 
Economics is the family. The major focuses on the 
interaction of individuals with their environment and 
with each other and on how the quality of life may be 
improved for all people. The Home Economics major 
together with the completion of requirements for the 
California teaching credential (single subject) qualifies 
graduates to teach home economics subjects in 
elementary and secondary schools (K-12). The major may 
also be combined with courses from other disciplines to 
meet the individual needs of students. Depending upon 



Bachelors Degree Programs/47 



their academic preparation, graduates may find 
employment with various types of community agencies 
or continue their study on the graduate level. 



B.S. Degree 


with a Major in Home Economics 




Preparation 






ART 2 


Design I 


(3) 


BIOIA 


Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts 


(2) 


plus one of these: 




BIO IB 


The Microbial World 


(1) 


BIOIC 


Human Physiology 


(1) 


BIO ID 


The Environment 


(2) 


CHE 2 


Chemistry of Life 


(3) 


CST 2/102 


Consumer Issues 


(3) 


CST6 


Food Study 


(3) 


CST 21 


Clothing Construction 


(3) 


PHS 1 


Scientific Concepts 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


SPE10 


Public Speaking 


(3) 


SPR18 


Career Planning Seminar 


(1) 


Requirements 






CST 10/110 


Human Nutrition 


(3) 


CST 24 


Textiles for Consumers 


(3) 


CST 40/140 


Management of Personal and Family 






Resources 


(3) 


CST 108 


Meals, Money, and Markets 


(3) 


CST 120 


Clothing Selection 


(3) 


CST 154 


Housing 


(3) 


CST 180 


Merchandising: Demonstration 






and Display 


(3) 


CST 194 


Seminar: Business and Consumer Studies (3) 


PSY12 


Developmental Psychology 


(3) 


SOC 104 


The Family 


(3) 


Additional Req 


uirements for California Teaching Credential 




BIO 10 


Health Science 


(3) 


EDU 101 


Perspectives in Education 


(1) 


EDU 124 


Diagnosis and Prescription 


(1) 


EDU 125A 


Secondary Curriculum 


(3) 


EDU 125B 


Emerging Trends in Education 


(2) 


EDU 125C 


Reading: Secondary 


(3) 


EDU 125D 


Secondary Methods 


(2) 


EDU 126A 


Supervised Teaching 


(12) 


PSY 123 


The Adolescent and the Learning 






Process 


(3) 


CST 198 


Methods in Teaching Home Economics 


(3) 


Total units in 


consumer studies — 33 




Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The Minor in Home Economics 

A minimum of 21 units selected from consumer studies offer- 
ings. Students should arrange their total programs with the 
department chairman. Because of the variety of careers to 
which such programs may lead, the choice of courses is flexi- 
ble. 



Human Services Program 

The Human Services Program is designed to reflect 
opportunities for career development particularly suited 
to today's needs. It combines professional skills with a 
philosophy of concern. Based in a liberal arts setting, it 
provides a broad view of human needs and how to 
respond with compassion. Courses enable graduates to 
work successfully in growing, vitally-needed and 
people-related professions offering interaction with 
others and excellent chances for advancement. Within the 
Human Services Program the following options are 
available: 

A. A. degree in Physical Therapy Assistant 

A. A. degree in Respiratory Therapy 

A. A. degree in Medical Secretary 

B.A. degree in Gerontology 

B.S. degree in Health Services Administration 

B.S. degree in Physical Therapy 

Each of these options is listed alphabetically in this 

bulletin. 

Mathematics 

While offering students an opportunity to study 
mathematics as part of a liberal education, the 
mathematics major can also serve as preparation for work 
in mathematically-based fields such as the computer 
sciences or statistics, for secondary teaching, or for 
graduate study. 



The B.A. Degree with a Major in Mathematics 
Computer Science Emphasis 

Preparation 

MTH 3AB Mathematical Analysis I (3-3) 

MTH 4AB Mathematical Analysis II (3-3) 

MTH 9 Introduction to Computer processes (3) 

MTH 20 Advanced Programming (3) 

Students who can demonstrate their proficiency in any of the 
above courses may enroll in the next course in the sequence. 
Students who need further preparation in algebra and 
elementary functions should take MTH 1 College Algebra 
before MTH 3A. 

Requirements 

MTH 102 Advanced Calculus 

MTH 103 Linear Algebra 

MTH 105 Complex Analysis 

MTH 111 Abstract Algebra 

MTH 113 Probability and Statistics 

MTH 128 Numerical Analysis 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

MTH 133 Systems Analysis and Operations Research (3) 

MTH 137 Information Systems Seminar (3) 

Total units in mathematics — 42 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 

semester units. 



48/Bachelors Degree Programs 



The Minor 


in Computer Science 


Preparation 




MTH 3AB 


Mathematical Analysis I (3-3) 


MTH9 


Introduction to Computer Processes (3) 


MTH 20 


Advanced Programming (3) 


MTH 38 


Elements of Probability and Statistics (3) 


MTH 113 


Probability and Statistics (3) 


Requirements 




Two upper d 


ivision courses chosen in consultation with the 


student's adviser, from the following: 


BUS 187 


Management of a Data-based System (3) 


MTH 103 


Linear Algebra (3) 


MTH 111 


Abstract Algebra (3) 


MTH 113 


Probability and Statistics (3) 


MTH 128 


Numerical Analysis (3) 


MTH 133 


Systems Analysis and Operations Research (3) 


MTH 137 


Information Systems Seminar (3) 



Introduction to Computer Science 

Students who want an introduction to computer science 
should take some or all of the following courses: 

MTH 9 Introduction to Computer Processes (no 
prerequisite), MTH 19 Machine Language Programming 
(MTH 9 prerequisite), and MTH 20 Advanced 
Programming (MTH 9 prerequisite). 



The Minor 


in Mathematics 






A minimum 


of seven courses including: 






MTH3AB 


Mathematical Analysis I 




(3-3) 


MTH4A 


Mathematical Analysis II 




(3) 


MTH 111 


Abstract Algebra 




(3) 


Three additional upper division courses 


chosen in 


consulta- 


tion with the 


department. 







Music 

The music major is a program combining individual 
instruction, solo and ensemble performance, with 
classroom study, discussions and lectures, all carefully 
designed to provide a wide range of musical learning and 
experience. 

Two degrees are offered. The B.A. degree offers 
preparation in music for students desiring a thorough 
knowledge of music for teaching, research, performance, 
personal enjoyment, or cultural development. The total 
curriculum includes two-thirds of the studies in the 
liberal arts, and one-third in music. 

The B.M. degree is a broad basic preparation for students 
intending a career in music as performing artists, 
conductors, composers, scholars, or teachers. The total 
curriculum includes one-third of the studies in the liberal 
arts, and two-thirds in music. 



Students interested in music as an elective may 
participate in performance classes (chorus, orchestra, 
instrumental ensembles, piano, or voice class), or in the 
study of music as an art. 

Requirements for admission as a music major or minor 

1. Audition showing potential in the field of 
performance. 

2. Theory examination for placement purposes. 

3. Interview with chairman and other faculty members. 

4. Recommendations which indicate enthusiasm, 
motivation, and interest. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Music 
Applied Music Emphasis 

Prerequisites: 

See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 

Core Courses 

MUS 1AB Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 1CD Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 5ABCD Music Literature Repertoire (%-lVi-l%-l%) 

MUS 8 Piano Class (1) 

Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 

the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 

three units of piano class may be taken for credit. 

MUS 15 Applied Music — At least one unit 

every semester 
MUS 24/124 Musical Style Through the Ages (3) 

MUS 133 Music Analysis (2) 

MUS 139A Instrumental conducting (2) 

MUS 140A Choral Techniques (2) 

Requirements 
MUS 115 Applied Music — at least 9 units 

Half-length recital 
MUS 122 Ensemble/coaching (1) 

or 

MUS 150 Accompanying 

MUS 
141,142A, 

143A, 144A Music History Surveys — any two courses (6) 
MUS 151 Creative Teaching (piano, voice 

or instrumental) (2) 

For the special needs of the individual, the department may 
substitute other courses for these music requirements. See 
also additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. degrees. 
Total units in music — approximately 45 
Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 



Bachelors Degree Programs /49 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Music 
Music Education Emphasis 

Prerequisites: 

See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 

Core Courses 

MUS 1AB Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 1CD Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 5ABCD Music Literature Repertoire (V2-IV2-IV2-V2) 

MUS 8 Piano Class (1) 

Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 

the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 

three units of piano class may be taken for credit. 

MUS 15/115 Applied Music — At least one unit 

every semester 
MUS 24/124 Musical Style Through the Ages (3) 

MUS 133 Music Analysis (2) 

MUS 139A Instrumental Conducting (2) 

MUS 140A Choral techniques (2) 

Requirements 

MUS 7 Voice Class (1) 

MUS 26 Brass Instruments (1) 

MUS 27 Woodwind Instruments (1) 

MUS 28 Percussion Instruments (1) 

MUS 29 String Instruments (1) 

MUS 147A Seminar in Music Education (3) 

MUS 147B Seminar in Music Education (3) 

or 

MUS 147C Seminar in Music Education (3) 

One course in music history chosen from 
MUS 141, 142A, 143A, 144A (3) 

Recommended supplementary courses: Minimum 3 units 

MUS 116 Development of Jazz (1-2) 

MUS 162 Folk Music of Europe and America (2) 

MUS 166 Music in Non-Western Cultures (2) 

For special needs of the individual, the department may sub- 
. stitute other courses for these music requirements. See also 
additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. degrees. 
Total units in music — approximately 45 
Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
units. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Music 
Music History Emphasis 

Prerequisites: 

See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 

Core Courses 

MUS 1AB Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 1CD Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 5ABCD Music Literature Repertoire ( 1 /2-l 1 /2-l 1 /2- 1 /2) 

MUS 8 Piano Class (1) 

Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 

the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 

three units of piano class may be taken for credit. 



MUS 15/115 


Applied Music — At least one unit 
every semester 




MUS 24/124 


Musical Style Through the Ages 


(3) 


MUS 133 


Music Analysis 


(2) 


MUS 139A 


Instrumental Conducting 


(2) 


MUS 140A 


Choral Techniques 


(2) 


Requirements 






MUS 141, 142AB, 




143AB, 144AB Music History Surveys — any 






three courses 


(12) 


MUS146C 


Special Projects in Music 


(3) 


For the special needs of the individual, the department 


may 


substitute other courses for these music requirements. 


See 


also additional requirments for the B.A. and B.M. degrees. 




Total units in music — approximately 45 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


units. 







The B.A. Degree With a Major in Music 
Music Theory Emphasis 

Prerequisites: 

See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 

Core Courses 

MUS 1AB Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 1CD Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 5ABCD Music Literature Repertoire {Vi-Wi-Wi-Vi) 

MUS 8 Piano Class (1) 

Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 

the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 

three units of piano class may be taken for credit. 

MUS 15/115 Applied Music — At least one unit 

every semester 
MUS 24/124 Musical Style Through the Ages (3) 

MUS 133 Music Analysis (2) 

MUS 139A Instrumental Conducting (2) 

MUS 140A Choral Techniques (2) 

Requirements 

MUS 2AB Musicianship II (3-1) 

MUS 134A Orchestration (2) 

MUS 136 Technique of Arranging (2) 

MUS 138 Advanced Musicianship (2) 

MUS 144A Music History: Post Romantic and 

20th Century (3) 

For the special needs of the individual, the department may 
substitute other courses for these music requirements. See 
also additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. degrees 
Total units in music — approximately 45 
Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
units. 



50/Bachelors Degree Programs 



The Minor 


in Music 


Prerequisites: 

See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 

Requirements 

A minimum of 21 units including: 


MUS 1AB 
MUS 1CD 


Musicianship I (3-1) 
Musicianship I (3-1) 


MUS 3AB 

MUS 5BC 
of 

MUS 24 


Creative and Theoretical Concepts 

of Music (4) 
Music Literature Repertoire (3) 


Musical Style Through the Ages (3) 



For the special needs of the individual, the department may 

substitute other courses to fulfill music requirements. See also 

additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. degrees. 

Total units in music — approximately 88 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 133 

semester units. 



The Bachelor of Music Degree 


Church Music Emphasis 


Prerequisites: 




See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 


Core Courses 




MUS 1AB 


Musicianship I (3-1) 


MUS 1CD 


Musicianship I (3-1) 


MUS 2AB 


Musicianship II (3-1) 


MUS 2CD 


Musicianship II (3-1) 


MUS 5ABCD 


Music Literature Repertoire i}k-\ x k-V-k- x li) 


MUS 8 


Piano Class (1) 


Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 


the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 


three units of 


piano class may be taken for credit. 


MUS 15/115 


Applied Music — each term 


MUS 105 


Music Literature Repertoire — required 




each term in upper division (tyi) 


MUS 132A 


Counterpoint (2) 


MUS 133 


Music Analysis (2) 


MUS 134A 


Orchestration (2) 


MUS 138 


Advanced Musicianship (2) 


MUS 139A 


Instrumental Conducting (2) 


MUS 140A 


Choral Techniques (2) 


MUS 141 


Music History: Ancient, Medieval, 




Early Renaissance (3) 


MUS 142AB 


Music History: Renaissance and Baroque (3-1) 


MUS 143AB 


Music History: Classical and Romantic (3-1) 


MUS 144AB 


Music History: Post-Romantic and 




20th Century (3-1) 


Requirements 




*MUS7 


Voice Class (1) 


"MUS 9 


Organ Class (1) 


MUS 110 


Gregorian Chant (2) 


MUS 112 


Music and Worship (3) 


MUS 136 


Technique of Arranging (2) 


MUS 146D 


Special Project in Music (3) 


MUS 157 


Seminar in Church Music (2) 


*If voice is not principal instrument 


**If organ is not principal instrument. 


Every student must pass a proficiency test in his or her second 


instrument. 





The Bachelor of Music Degree 


Music Education Emphasis 


Prerequisites: 




See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 


Core Courses 




MUS 1AB 


Musicianship I (3-1) 


MUS 1CD 


Musicianship I (3-1) 


MUS 2AB 


Musicianship II (3-1) 


MUS 2CD 


Musicianship II (3-1) 


MUS 5ABCD 


Music Literature Repertoire (V2-IV2-IV2-V2) 


MUS 8 


Piano Class (1) 


Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 


the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 


three units 


piano class may be taken for credit. 


MUS 15/115 


Applied Music — each term 


MUS 105 


Music Literature Repertoire — required 




each term in upper division (V2) 


MUS 132A 


Counterpoint (2) 


MUS 133 


Music Analysis (2) 


MUS 134A 


Orchestration (2) 


MUS 138 


Advanced Musicianship (2) 


MUS 139A 


Instrumental Conducting (2) 


MUS 140A 


Choral Techniques (2) 


MUS 141 


Music History: Ancient, Medieval, 




Early Renaissance (3) 


MUS 142AB 


Music History: Renaissance and Baroque (3-1) 


MUS 143AB 


Music History: Classical and Romantic (3-1) 


MUS 144AB 


Music History: Post Romantic and 




20th Century (3-1) 


Requirements 




*MUS 7 


Voice Class (1) 


MUS 26 


Brass Instruments (1) 


MUS 27 


Woodwind Instruments (1) 


MUS 28 


Percussion Instruments (1) 


MUS 29 


String Instruments (1) 


MUS 136 


Technique of Arranging (2) 


MUS 146F 


Special Projects in Music (1-3) 


MUS 147A 


Seminar in Music Education (3) 


MUS 147B 


Seminar in Music Education (3) 


or 

MUS 147C 


Seminar in Music Education (3) 


One course from the following: 


MUS 154 


The Art of Teaching Choral Music (2) 


MUS 155 


Teaching Music Theory (2) 


MUS 156 


Teaching Music Literature (2) 


*If voice is not 


principal instrument. Every student must pass a 


proficiency test in voice if this is not his or her principal 


instrument. 





Bachelors Degree Programs/51 



Recommended supplementary courses: minimum 4 units 
MUS 116 Development of Jazz (1-2) 

MUS 162 Folk Music of Europe and America (2) 

MUS 166 Music Cultures of the Non-Western World (2) 

For the special needs of the individual, the department may 
substitute other courses to fulfill music requirements. See also 
additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. degrees. 
Total units in music — approximately 88 
Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 133 
semester units. 



The Bachelor of Music Degree 
Music History and Literature Emphasis 

Prerequisites: 

See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 

Core Courses 

MUS 1AB Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 1CD Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 2AB Musicianship II (3-1) 

MUS 2CD Musicianship II (3-1) 

MUS 5ABCD Music Literature Repertoire {Vi-Wi-Wi-Vi) 

MUS 8 Piano Class (1) 

Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 

the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 

three units of piano class may be taken for credit. 

MUS 15/115 Applied Music — each term 

MUS 105 Music Literature Repertoire — required 

each term in upper division (V2) 

MUS 132A Counterpoint (2) 

MUS 133 Music Analysis (2) 

MUS 134A Orchestration (2) 

MUS 138 Advanced Musicianship (2) 

MUS 139A Instrumental Conducting (2) 

MUS 140A Choral Techniques (2) 

MUS 141 Music History: Ancient, Medieval, 

Early Renaissance (3) 

MUS 142AB Music History: Renaissance and Baroque (3-1) 
MUS 143AB Music History: Classical and Romantic (3-1) 
MUS 144AB Music History: Post-Romantic and 

20th Century (3-1) 

Requirements 

MUS 145AB Seminars in Music History and Literature (3-3) 
MUS 146C Special Projects in Music (3) 

MUS 148 Collegium Musicum (V2-I) 

Minimum of 4 units from the following 
MUS 116 Development of Jazz (1-2) 

MUS 162 Folk Music of Europe and America (2) 

MUS 166 Music Cultures of the Non-Western World (2) 

For the special needs of the individual, the department may 
substitute other courses to fulfill music requirements. See also 
additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. degrees. 
Total units in music — approximately 88. 
Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 133 
semester units. 



The Bachelor of Music Degree 




Performance Emphasis 




Prerequisites: 






See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 


Core Courses 






MUS 1AB 


Musicianship I 


(3-1) 


MUS 1CD 


Musicianship I 


(3-1) 


MUS 2AB 


Musicianship II 


(3-1) 


MUS 2CD 


Musicianship II 


(3-1) 


MUS 5ABCD 


Music Literature Repertoire ( V2 -1 V2-I V2- V2) 


MUS 8 


Piano Class 


(1) 


Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 


the piano proficiency examination before graduation. 


Only 


three units of 


piano class may be taken for credit. 




MUS 15/115 


Applied Music — each term 




MUS 105 


Music Literature Repertoire — required 






each term in upper division 


(V2) 


MUS 132A 


Counterpoint 


(2) 


MUS 133 


Music Analysis 


(2) 


MUS 134A 


Orchestration 


(2) 


MUS 138 


Advanced Musicianship 


(2) 


MUS 139A 


Instrumental Conducting 


(2) 


MUS 140A 


Choral Techniques 


(2) 


MUS 141 


Music History: Ancient, Medieval, 






Early Renaissance 


(3) 


MUS 142AB 


Music History: Renaissance and Baroque (3-1) 


MUS 143AB 


Music History: Classical and Romantic 


(3-1) 


MUS 144AB 


Music History: Post Romantic and 






20th Century 


(3-1) 


Requirements 






MUS 111 


Master Class Sessions in Interpretation 






(piano and voice students only) 


(1) 


MUS 122 


Ensemble/Coaching 


(1) 


MUS 145 


Seminar in Music History and Literature (3) 


MUS 146A 


Special Projects in Music 


(2) 


or 

MUS 146B 


Special Projects in Music 


(1-3) 


MUS 150 


Accompanying (piano students only) 


(1) 


Voice students study two languages. One course in diction is 


recommended. 




Half-length junior recital 




Full-length senior recital 




For the special needs of the individual, the department may 


substitute other courses to fulfill music requirements. See also 


additional requirements for the B.A. and B.M. degrees. 




Total units in music — approximately 88 




Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 133 


semester units. 






52 /Bachelors Degree Programs 



The Bachelor of Music Degree 
Theory and Composition Emphasis 
Prerequisites: 

See requirements for admission as a music major or minor. 

Core Courses 

MUS 1AB Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 1CD Musicianship I (3-1) 

MUS 2AB Musicianship II (3-1) 

MUS 2CD Musicianship II (3-1) 

MUS 5ABCD Music Literature Repertoire (Vi-lVi-lVi-Vi) 
MUS 8 Piano Class (1) 

Required of all but keyboard majors. Every student must pass 
the piano proficiency examination before graduation. Only 
three units of piano class may be taken for credit. 
MUS 15/115 Applied Music — each term 
MUS 105 Music Literature Repertoire — required 

each term in upper division (V2) 

MUS 132A Counterpoint (2) 

MUS 133 Music Analysis (2) 

MUS 134A Orchestration (2) 

MUS 138 Advanced Musicianship (2) 

MUS 139A Instrumental Conducting (2) 

MUS 140A Choral Techniques (2) 

MUS 141 Music History: Ancient, Medieval, 

Early Renaissance (3) 

MUS 142AB Music History: Renaissance and Baroque (3-1) 
MUS 143AB Music History: Classical and Romantic (3-1) 
MUS 144AB Music History: Post-Romantic and 

20th Century (3-1) 

Requirements 

MUS 26 Brass Instruments (1) 

MUS 27 Woodwind Instruments (1) 

MUS 28 Percussion Instruments (1) 

MUS 29 String Instruments (1) 

MUS 132B Counterpoint (2) 

MUS 134B Orchestration (2) 

MUS 135 Composition each term plus recital (1-3) 

MUS 136 Technique of Arranging (2) 

MUS 146E Special Projects in Music (3) 

For the special needs of the individual, the department may 
substitute other courses to fulfill music requirements. See also 
additional requirements for the B.A. and BM. degrees. 
Total units in music — approximately 88. 
Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 133 
semester units. 



Additional requirements for the B.A. and BM. degrees 

1. Attendance at department-sponsored recitals, 
concerts, lectures. 

2. Participation in at least one major ensemble every 
semester. 

3. Evidence of academic and musical maturity prior to 
admission to junior standing. 

4. Participation as a performer in student recitals, 
coaching sessions, and jury examinations in major 
instrument. 



Nursing 

Baccalaureate Program 

The baccalaureate degree program offers professional 
education in nursing based upon the Roy adaptation 
model of nursing. In the standard program two years of 
study are spent on the college campus pursuing liberal 
arts and pre-professional studies. During the last two 
years the student completes the courses of the nursing 
major, including clinical experience, as well as the 
remainder of the general studies requirements and 
electives. 

Upon the completion of the degree requirements the 
graduate is eligible to take the California State Board 
examination for registered nurse (R.N.) licensure. The 
graduate is also qualified for the Public Health Nursing 
Certificate issued by the California Department of Public 
Health. 

In compliance with California State law an optional 
three-year program is offered, in which the student 
completes all pre-nursing requirements in the freshman 
year, and then enters the two years of the nursing major. 
After the junior year she may take the California State 
Board examinations for the registered nurse (R.N.) 
licensure. The senior year is spent taking liberal arts 
requirements to qualify for the baccalaureate degree. 
Since this option involves certain academic and 
professional risks for the student, special counseling is 
offered before admission to this program. Additional 
information on this optional program may be obtained 
upon request. 

Registered nurses enrolled in the baccalaureate program 
meet the same requirements as those for the basic 
nursing students. Ordinarily, for courses required by the 
Nursing Department, credit will be given only for those 
courses taken within the past fifteen years. Provision is 
made for R.N. students to receive credit for certain 
pre-professional and junior-year nursing courses through 
"challenge examinations." One summer course, NUR 
100, Introduction to Professional Nursing, is a required 
course offered during the summer session preceding the 
senior year of clinical study. Information may be obtained 
by writing to the department of nursing. 

For a description of the Associate Degree Program, see 
Doheny Campus programs. 

Information for Majors in Nursing: 

Admission to the Department of Nursing for enrollment 
in upper division nursing courses is determined by the 
Admission Committee of the department in the spring 
semester of the sophomore year. The committee acts after 
consideration of the student's personality; health, and 
aptitude for the nursing profession. A cumulative 



Bachelors Degree Programs/53 



grade- point average of at least 2.5 is required, as well as a 
satisfactory and consistent pattern of grades, showing a 
mastery of the natural and social sciences and the use of 
English. 

Students who intend to major in nursing must have had 
two high school laboratory science courses, including 
chemistry and either physics or a biological science. 

Nursing students are required to pass a basic math test 
before entrance into the clinical nursing program, and to 
complete an approved course in cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation. 

A student who receives a D or F in any course listed 
under "Preparation" is responsible for repeating the 
course. 

The faculty of the Department of Nursing have the right 
and the responsibility for judging and evaluating the 
quality of the student's achievement, both in the mastery 
of theoretical content and in clinical competence. If a 
student's level of clinical practice is unsatisfactory or 
unsafe, the student may be asked to withdrew before the 
end of the semester. In the event of unsatisfactory 
performance which could result in the student's 
disqualification, the student's record is reviewed by the 
entire team (first or second year) before a final evaluation 
is made and action taken. 

Departmental policy statements regarding grading, 
mathematical competence, incompletes, probation, 
absences, disqualification, and readmission to the 
program are provided for the student at the beginning of 
the nursing major. 

A student will bring a written report of a chest X-Ray, 
up-dated immunizations, and a physical examination done 
in the late spring or summer preceding the first clinical 
assignment, and another before beginning the second 
clinical year of the program. 

During the clinical portion of the program, students must 
carry malpractice insurance obtained through the Student 
Nurse Association of California organization. 



TheB.S. 


Degree With a Major in Nursing 




Preparation 






BIO 3 


General Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 51AB 


Human Physiology and Anatomy 


(4-4) 


CHE 1AB 


General Chemistry 


(4-4) 


CHE 2 


Chemistry of Life 


(3) 


and 






PHS 1 


Scientific Concepts 


(3) 


PHI 21 


Moral Values and Ethical Decisions 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


PSY2 


Psychology of Communication 


(2) 


PSY12 


Developmental Psychology 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 



Recommended 






PHI 168B 


Bioethics 


(2-3) 


SPA9A 


Spanish for the Medical Worker 


(3) 


Requirements 






NUR5 


Orientation to Nursing 


(2) 


NUR 120AB 


Medical Science 


(3-3) 


NUR 121AB 


Nursing Science 


(8-9) 


NUR 131AB 


Nursing Theory 


(2-2) 


NUR 133AB 


Nursing Practice 


(10-10) 


NUR 134AB 


Issues in Health Care 


(3-3) 


CST 10/110 


Human Nutrition 


(3) 


PSY 168 


Abnormal Psychology 


(3) 


Total units in 


nursing — 55 




Plus general < 


studies requirements and electives 


totaling 129 


semester units. 





Philosophy 



Philosophy endeavors to discover and evaluate insights 
into the meaning of man, knowledge, human thought, 
nature, values, and man's relationship to himself, to 
others, and to the transcendent. 

This major serves as an excellent preparation for graduate 
study or a career in college teaching, law, religious 
studies, social sciences, or research. 



The B.A. Degree with a Major in Philosophy 




Preparation 






PHI 5 


Logic: Structures of Reasoning 


(3) 


PHI 15 


Challenges in Philosophy 


(3) 


PHI 21 


Moral Values and Ethical Decisions 


(3) 


Requirements 






I. Ten upper division courses including: 




PHI 150 


Metaphysics 


(3) 


PHI 152 


Theory of Knowledge 


(3) 


PHI 168A 


Contemporary Moral Problems 


(3) 


II. Two courses in history of philosophy: 




PHI 24/124 


Problems of Ancient Philosophy 


(3) 


PHI 125 


Problems of Medieval Philosophy 


(3) 


PHI 126 


Problems of Modern Philosophy 


(3) 


III. At least one course from each of the following groups: 


A. PHI 155 


Symbolic Logic 


(3) 


PHI 158 


Philosophy of Science 


(3) 


B. PHI 130 


Existential Thinkers 


(3) 


PHI 160 


Philosophy of Religion 


(3) 


PHI 170 


Social and Political Philosophy 


(3) 


PHI 174 


Aesthetics 


(3) 


C. PHI 128 


Contemporary Analytic Philosophy 


(3) 


PHI 134 


American Thought 


(3) 


PHI 136 


Major Philosophers 


(3) 




Three elective courses in Philosophy 


(9) 


Total units in 


i Philosophy — 39 




Plus General Studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





54/ Bachelors Degree Programs 



The Minor in Philosophy 

A minimum of seven courses in philosophy approved by the 
department of philosophy. 



Physical Therapy 



The graduate of the Physical Therapy Program is trained 
both in rehabilitation skills and in the psychology of 
illness and aging. Through the combination of course 
work and clinical training, the student learns how to help 
the patient grow as a whole person despite physical 
limitations. 

The Physical Therapy Program is designed in accordance 
with the guidelines of the American Physical Therapy 
Association and the American Medical Association 
Council on Medical Education. 



The B.S. Degree with a Major in Physical Therapy 


Preparation 






BIOIA 


Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts 


(2) 


BIO IB 


Biological Dynamics: Microbial World 


(1) 


BIO 3 


General Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 51AB 


Human Physiology and Anatomy 


(4-4) 


BIO 60 


Introduction to Physical Therapy 


(3) 


Plus courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics 




Requirements - 


- Human Services Core 




ART 46 


Art as Therapy 


(3) 


or 

MUS 64/164 


Music and Life 


(3) 


BIO 50/150 


Biology of Aging 


(3) 


HSP 194 


Gerontology Seminar 


(2) 


HSP 196 


Thanatology Seminar 


(3) 


PHI 168B 


Bioethics 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 127 


Psychology of Development and Aging 


(3) 


PSY 133 


Psychology of Disability and Adjustment (3) 


PSY 168 


Abnormal Psychology 


(3) 


RST 78/178 


Death and Dying: Religious Aspects 


(3) 


SOC5 


Sociological Perspectives 


(3) 


SOC 189ABC 


The Sociology of Aging 


1-1-1) 


Requirements - 


- Physical Therapy 




Ten upper division courses, including: 




BIO 154AB 


Medical Lectures for Physical Therapists (2-2) 


BIO 155 


Physical Therapy Procedures I 


(3) 


BIO 156 


Physical Therapy Procedures II 


(3) 


BIO 157 


Physical Therapy Procedures III 


(3) 


BIO 158AB 


Applied Anatomy and Physiology for 






Physical Therapists 


(3-3) 


BIO 160 


Clinical Neurophysiology 


(3) 


BIO 162 


Administrative Organization 


(2) 


BIO 163 


Seminar in Physical Therapy 


(2) 


BIO 169AB 


Clinical Internship 


(0-0) 



Recommended 






BIO 120 


Human Embryology 


(4) 


BIO 130 


Genetics 


(3) 


CHE5A 


Elementary Organic Chemistry 


(4) 


CHE 7 


Elementary Biochemistry 


(4) 


PHI 168CDE 


The Individual and the Common Good (1- 


1-1) 


PSY 109 


Movement Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 125 


Introduction to Counseling 


(3) 


SOC 137 


Culture and Personality 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 190 


Social Change 


(3) 


Majors must obtain a grade of C or higher in all major courses. 


Total units ir 


Biological Sciences — 44 




Total units in 


Human Services Core — 35 




Plus general 


studies requirements an electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





Political Science 

The student who is majoring in political science 
investigates political theory, institutions, international 
relations, comparative politics, public administration and 
public law as they relate to historical developments and 
to the political world as it is now. A maximum choice is 
allowed so that the major can be designed according to 
the dominant interests of the student. 
Information for Majors in Political Science. 
Majors must maintain average or above-average grades in 
all major courses. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Political Science 


Preparation 




POLIO 


Political Concepts (3) 


HIS IB 


Western Civilization (3) 


Recommended 




HIS 7A-I 


American Civilization (9) 


Requirements 




— 


Ten upper division courses in 




political science (30) 


Total units in political science — 36 


Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 



The Minor in Political Science 

A minimum of six courses in political science including POL 10 
and five upper division courses approved by the department 
chairperson. 



Bachelors Degree Programs/55 



Pre-Law Program 



An undergraduate major in the social sciences or 
humanities is the preferred preparation for legal study. 
The major program should be supplemented with other 
courses designed to develop the analytical and expository 
skills requisite for the study of law. The Pre-Law 
Advisement Program identifies potential law students 
early in their undergraduate education and assists them 
to plan courses of study suited to the rigorous demands 
of the profession. 



The B.A. Degree and the Pre-Law Program 

Required: 

Completion of a major in social sciences or humanities. 

Required supplementary courses: 

BUS 15 Accounting (3) 

PHI 5 Logic: Structures of Reasoning (3) 

PHI 155 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Strongly recommended: 

BUS 105 Business Law (3) 

PHI 152 Theory of Knowledge (3) 

PHI 168A Contemporary Moral Problems (3) 

POL 108 American Constitutional Law (3) 

SPE 13/113 Oral Argument (3) 

"One course in computer processes using Fortran IV language. 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 

semester units. 



Psychobiology 



Area Major: Psychology and Biology 

The major in psychobiology examines the relationships 
between the biological makeup of the human person in 
such areas as personality, behavior, knowledge, health, 
and personal goals. 



The B.A. or B.S. Degree With a Major in 
Psychobiology 


Preparation 




BIOIA 
BIOIC 

CHE 2 
MTH38 
PHI 158 
PSYl 


Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts (2) 
Biological Dynamics: Basic Human 

Physiology (1) 
Chemistry of Life (3) 
Elements of Probability and Statistics (3) 
Philosophy of Science (3) 
General Psychology (3) 


Requirements 




Twelve upper division courses in biology and psychology — 
five to seven courses in each field, including the following: 


BIO 118 
PSY 106 
PSY 152 


Endocrinology (4) 
Experimental Psychology (3) 
Physiological Psychology (3) 



Recommended Courses 




Biological Sciences: 




BIO 131 


Human Sexuality 


(3) 


BIO 10 


Health Science 


(3) 


BIO 120 


Human Embryology 


(4) 


BIO 130 


Genetics 


(3) 


BIO 151A 


Cellular Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 151B 


Medical Physiology 


(4) 


BIO 187 


Selected Topics in Biology 


(1-3) 


BIO 199 


Independent Study 


d-3) 


Psychology: 






PSY 12 


Developmental Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 134 


Learning 


(3) 


PSY 145 


Social Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 168 


Abnormal Psychology 


(3) 


PSY 192 


Clinical Practicum 


(3) 


PSY 199A 


Special Problems 


(1-3) 


PSY 199B 


Special Problems 


(1-3) 


Total units in psychology and biological sciences — 42-45 


Plus general 


studies requirements and electives 


totaling 129 


semester hours. 





Psychology 



The major in Psychology is concerned with the scientific 
study of human behavior and experience as a means for 
understanding oneself and others in the broad context of 
human society. Focus is on personality, learning, 
motivation, and perception as interacting human 
processes. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Psychology 


Preparation 




PSYl 
PSY 40 


General Psychology (3) 
Statistics (3) 


Requirements 




Nine upper ( 


division courses including: 


PSY 106 
PSY 132 
PSY 134 
PSY 145 
PSY 152 
PSY 192 


Experimental Psychology (3) 
Personality (3) 
Learning (3) 
Social Psychology (3) 
Physiological Psychology (3) 
Clinical Practicum (3) 


Majors must obtain a grade of C or higher in all psychology 


courses. 




Total units in psychology — 33 


Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
semester units. 



The Minor in Psychology 

A minimum of 18 units approved by the department. At least 
four upper division courses. 



56/Bachelors Degree Programs 



Religious Studies 



The Department of Religious Studies makes available to 
the student a broad choice of courses in Scripture, 
Christian Tradition and the relationship of Religion to 
Human Experience and Culture. It considers the study of 
religion basic to a liberal education and to the goals of a 
Catholic college. The major in Religious Studies prepares 
a student for graduate work in this field and/or for 
various ministries. 



The B.A. Degree with a Major in Religious Studies 

Preparation 

RST 4 Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (3) 

RST 5 Introduction to the Christian Scriptures (3) 

One lower division elective in 

religious studies (3) 

Requirements 

RST 180 Practicum (1) 

RST 185 Senior Seminar (3) 

Eight additional upper division courses selected in consulta- 
tion with department adviser. Selections may be made from 
religious studies offerings or from courses approved for such 
credit by the department. Total program should represent a 
balance of the following areas, with at least two courses from 
each area: 

1. Hebrew and Christian Scriptures 

2. Christian Tradition 

3. Religion, human experience and culture 

Majors must maintain a C or better in all courses taken for 

religious studies credit. 

Total units in religious studies — 37 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 

semester units. 



The Minor in Religious Studies 

A minimum of 21 units selected in consultation with the de- 
partment adviser. 



Social Science 

The Social Science major is an expanded area major with 
a choice of five emphases; hispanic civilization, history, 
political science, public administration, and sociology. 
The variations within the major make it possible for the 
student to direct her studies into particular areas of 
interest. A core of studies is directed toward fiscal 
problems, employment, technology, societal roles, 
ecology, and the general strategy of government. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Social Science 


Hispanic Civilization Emphasis 


Preparation 




HIS 1AB 


Western Civilization (3-3) 


SPA 25AB 


Advanced Spanish Grammar or its 




equivalent (2-2) 


— 


Six lower division units in history or 




in the Culture and Civilization series (6) 


Requirements 




SPA 112AB 


Introduction to the Study of 




Spanish Literature (3-3) 


HIS 162AB 


History and Civilization of 




Latin America (3-3) 


18 units from the following elective courses or approved sub- 


stitutes: 




SPA 42/142 


History and Civilization of Spain (3) 


SPA 109 


Stylistics and Composition (3) 


SPA 115 


Applied Linguistics (3) 


SPA 118 


Historical Grammar (3) 


SPA 123 


Literary Expression of Medieval Thought (3) 


SPA 124 


Golden Age Literature (3) 


SPA 130 


19th Century Spanish Literature (3) 


SPA 132 


Studies in the Generation of 1898 (3) 


SPA 135 


Peninsular Literature of the 20th Century (3) 


SPA 140 


The "Modernista" Poets (3) 


SPA 141 


The Spanish- American Novel from 1910 to 




the Present (3) 


SPA 143 


The Spanish- American Short Story (3) 


SPA 190 


Special Studies (3) 


HIS 125 


Cultural and Historical Geography (3) 


HIS 160 


Social History of Spain (3) 


HIS 165A 


Latin American Culture (3) 


HIS 165B 


The Spanish-Speaking in the United States (3) 


HIS 193 


Studies in Selected Historical Topics (3) 


Total units in history, Spanish — 46 


Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Social Science 
History Emphasis 

Preparation 

HIS 1AB Western Civilization (3-3) 

POL 1 American Government and Institutions (3) 


POLIO 

Recommended 
ECOl 


Political Concepts (3) 
Economics I (Microeconomics) (3) 


ECO 2 Economics II (Macroeconomics) (3) 
Two modules from 
HIS 7ABCDEFGHI 

American Civilization (2) 
HIS 25 Cultural and Historical Geography (3) 



Bachelors Degree Programs/57 



Requirements 

Ten upper division courses including: 

HIS 101 Writing of History (3) 

— Two-course sequence in American history (6) 

— Two-course sequence in European history (6) 

— Three upper division courses in economics, 

political science, or sociology (9) 

Total units in social science — 39 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
semester units. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Social Science 
Political Science Emphasis 

Preparation 

HIS 1AB Western Civilization (3-3) 

POL 10 Political Concepts (3) 

Recommended 

HIS 7ABCDEFGHI 

American Civilization (9) 

Requirements 

— Seven upper division courses in 

political science (21) 

— Three upper division courses in history or 

economics or sociology (9) 

Total units in major courses — 36 

Plus general Studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
semester units. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Social Science 




Public Administration Emphasis 




Preparation 






POL1 


American Government and Institutions 


(3) 


or 

HIS 76 
POLIO 


American Democratic Republic 
Political Concepts 


(3) 
(3) 


Recommended 






BUS 115 
ECOl 


Accounting I 

Economics I (Microeconomics) 


(3) 
(3) 


ECO 2 


Economics II (Macroeconomics) 


(3) 


Requirements 






POL 185 


Public Personnel Administration 


(3) 


POL 186 


Introduction to Public Administration 


(3) 


POL 187 
POL 191 


Organizational Theory and Governmental 

Management (3) 
Internship in Government Service (3) 



Eighteen units from the following courses: 




ECO 131 


Public Finance 


(3) 


MTH109 


Introduction to Computer Processes 


(3) 


MTH 138 


Elements of Probability and Statistics 


(3) 


POL 102 


Comparative Politics 


(3) 


POL 107 


Political Economics 


(3) 


POL 108 


American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


POL 134 


International Organization 


(3) 


POL 170 


American Party Politics 


(3) 


POL 175 


Selected Topics in the American 






Political Structure 


(3) 


POL 180 


State and Local Government 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 175 


Urban Sociology 


(3) 


Total units in social science — 36 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The B.A. Degree With a Major in Social Science 
Sociology Emphasis 

Preparation 

ANT 2 Cultural Anthropology (3) 

MTH 38 Elements of Probability and Statistics (3) 

POL 10 Political Concepts (3) 

PSY 1 General Psychology (3) 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives (3) 

Requirements 

Six upper division courses in Sociology including: 

Research Methods in the Social Sciences (3) 

Social Psychology (3) 

Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations (3) 

Development of Social Thought (3) 

(3) 



SOC 117 
SOC 145 
SOC 161 
SOC 165 
or 
SOC 166 



Contemporary Sociological Theory 
Three upper division courses in economics, history, or politi- 
cal science 

Total units in social science — 42 

Plus general studies requirements and electives totaling 129 
semester units. 



Sociology 



The major in sociology is basically a study of people as 
they live together in groups. Sociologists in the past have 
contributed important information and insights to 
discussions of urbanism, education, the racial situation, 
and legislation to prevent poverty and to eliminate crime. 
By inquiring into the structure and dynamics of modern 
society, the student develops a capacity for viewing our 
changing social world objectively, critically, and 
creatively. 



58/ Bachelors Degree Programs 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Sociology 




Preparation 






ANT 2 


Cultural Anthropology 


(3) 


MTH38 


Elements of Probability and Statistics 


(3) 


POL1 


Political Concepts 


(3) 


PSY1 


General Psychology 


(3) 


Requirements 






SOC 104 


The Family 


(3) 


SOC 195 


Sociology of Religion 


(3) 


SOC 110 


Deviant Behavior: Juvenile Delinquency 


(3) 


SOC 111 


Deviant Behavior: Criminology 


(3) 


SOC 117 


Research Methods 


(3) 


SOC 145 


Social Psychology 


(3) 


SOC 161 


Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 


(3) 


SOC 165 


Development of Social Thought 


(3) 


OSC 166 


Contemporary Sociological Theory 


(3) 


SOC 175 


Urban Sociology 


(3) 


— 


Plus any two other upper division courses 


(6) 


Total units in Sociology — 36 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The Minor in Sociology 

A minimum of seven courses in sociology, including: 
SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives 

One course in sociological theory 
One course in research methods 



Spanish 



The major in Spanish is a comprehensive program 
leading to a proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing 
Spanish, and to a deepening of the humanistic spirit 
through understanding the ideas and ways of life of the 
Spanish-speaking nations. It offers preparation for 
teaching, research, graduate study, and travel. 

See also the M.A.T. degree program with a major in 
Spanish offered at the Doheny Campus, graduate 
division. 

Admission to a major in the Department of Foreign 
Languages is determined by the department when the 
student applies in the spring of her sophomore year. A 
grade point average of 2.5 in courses in foreign language 
is required. 



The B.A. Degree With a Major in Spanish 




Preparation 




SPA 4AB Intermediate Spanish 


(3-3) 


May be challenged by examination 




SPA 8 Phonetics and Conversation 


(3) 


SPA 25AB Advanced Grammar 


(2-2) 


SPA 42/142 History and Civilization of Spain 


(3) 



Requirements 






SPA 109 


Stylistics and Composition 


(3) 


SPA 112AB 


Introduction to the Study of Literature 


3-3) 


— 


One course in the golden age 


(3) 


— 


One course in the contemporary period 


(3) 


— 


Two upper division literature courses 


(6) 


— 


One upper division course chosen from 
Literature, civilization of 






Spanish-America, linguistics 


(3) 


SPA 191 


Senior Thesis 


(1) 


Total upper 


division units in Spanish — 25 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 


129 


semester units. 





The B.A. Degree With a Major in Spanish 




Spanish Studies Emphasis 




Preparation 






SPA 4AB 


Intermediate Spanish or approved 






alternate 


(3-3) 


SPA 8 


Phonetics and Conversation 


(3) 


Requirements 






SPA 109 


Stylistics and Composition 


(3) 


SPA 112AB 


Introduction to the Study of 






Spanish Literature 


(3-3) 


SPA 115 


Applied Linguistics 


(3) 


SPA 125AB 


Advanced Grammar 


(3-3) 


SPA 142 


History and Civilization of Spain 


(3) 


— 


One upper division course chosen from 






hispanic language, literature, civilization, 




study-travel, or an approved related 






area course 


(3) 


SPA 191 


Senior Thesis 


(1) 


Total upper 


division units in Spanish — 25 




Plus general 


studies requirements and electives totaling 129 


semester units. 





The B.A. Degree With a Major in Spanish (Doheny 
Campus) 

For native speakers of Spanish who hold a "Bachillerato" or 

equivalent. 

Requirements 

SPA 109 Advanced Composition — May be taken 

by examination (3) 

SPA 142 History and Civilization of Spain (3) 

SPA 147 Literary Analysis (3) 

— One course in the golden age (3) 

— One course in the contemporary period (3) 

— Two upper division literature courses (6) 

— One upper division course chosen 

from literature or linguistics (3) 

A course in morphology and syntax is strongly recommended. 
Total upper division units in Spanish — 24 
Plus general studies requirements (or equivalents) and elec- 
tives totaling 129 semester units. 



Bachelors Degree Programs/59 



The Minor in Spanish 


Minimum requirements: 


SPA 4AB 


Intermediate Spanish — May be challenged 




by examination (3-3) 


SPA 8 


Phonetics and Conversation (3) 


SPA 25AB 


Advanced Grammar (2-2) 


SPA 42 


History and Civilization of Spain (3) 


SPA 109 


Stylistics and Composition (3) 




Two upper division courses (6) 



Teacher Education Program 

The Department of Education is accredited to recommend 
students for California Teaching Credentials in both the 
Multiple Subject (elementary teaching) and the Single 
Subject (secondary teaching). Either of these credentials 
may be obtained in a four-year baccalaureate degree 
program. When the student has completed the 
Diversified or Single Subject major, the professional 
courses, including supervised teaching, and any other 
requirements of the college for the baccalaureate degree, 
a Preliminary Credential can be obtained. 

The Preliminary Credential is valid for five years. Within 
these five years, a fifth year of approximately thirty 
semester hours and a minimum of two years of teaching 
experience in California must be completed to qualify for 
a Life Credential. 

The fifth year program to fulfill these requirements is 
defined at Mount St. Mary's College as an approved 
program of thirty semester hours of postbaccalaureate 
work. 

The fifth year of study may be used to complete a 
Master's Degree in a particular subject, or to qualify for 
the 

1. Administrative Services Credential 

2. Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist Credential 

3. Early Childhood Specialist Instructional Credential 

4. Pupil Personnel Services Credential 

5. Special Education Specialist Credential (Learning 
Handicapped) 

The Department of Education also offers the Master of 
Science Degree in Education with concentrations in 
various areas. (See Graduate Division.) 

The B.S. Degree and the Teacher Education Program 

Admission to the Program 

Students wishing to enter the teacher education program 
should make application in writing no later than the 
beginning of the first semester of the sophomore year. 



A screening committee made up of members of the 
Department of Education will review the data submitted 
by the student. The information should give evidence of 
the following: 

1. Completion of the application form for the teacher 
preparation program, with statements affirming the 
moral character of the student. 

2. A pattern of academic competence — a minimum GPA 
of 2.5 for multiple subject majors and 2.75 for single 
subject majors — documented by transcripts. 

3. Good health sufficient for teaching. The health 
appraisal form from the Student Health Services will 
affirm this. 

4. Competence in oral reading and speech. Examinations 
will be given by the English and Education 
Departments. 

5. Completed recommendation forms from three faculty 
members evaluating the student's suitability for 
teaching. 

6. At least twelfth grade mastery of the basic skills of 
reading, grammar, spelling, mathematics, and study 
skills. Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills will be 
administered in October each year. 

7. Interview by at least two members of the Education 
Department to determine professional aptitude, 
goal-intent, and personal qualifications. 

8. Prior experience with children and youth groups 
through volunteer tutorial programs or community 
action courses for credit and monitored experiences in 
required courses: SOC 5, Sociological Perspectives, 
ENG 134, Children's Literature, EDU 101, Perspectives 
in Education. 

The Multiple Subject Credential (Elementary Teaching) 

The Muiltiple Subject Credential candidate must fulfill 
the California requirement of either passing a subject 
matter examination OR completing the college-approved 
program for the Diversified Major. 

Requirements for the Multiple Subject Credential: 

1. Admission to teacher education program. 

2. Completion of a Diversified Major. (See diversified 
Major, p. 43) 

3. Professional education courses as designated in the 
college-approved program including the teaching of 
reading prior to Supervised Teaching. 

4. Twelve units in Supervised Teaching. Consult the 
Education Department. 

5. A minimum scholastic average of 2.50 must be 
maintained to remain in credential status. 



60/Bachelors Degree Programs 



6. A fifth year of postgraduate study which must be 
completed within five years. 

7. Candidates for this credential must consult the 
credential advisor each semester before filing course 
cards. 

For further information see the B.A. degree and the 
diversified major. 

The Single Subject Credential (Secondary Teaching) 

The Single Subject Credential candidate must fulfill the 
California requirement of either passing a subject matter 
examination OR completing the college-approved 
program for the Single Subject Major. 

Requirements for the Single Subject Credential: 

1. Admission to the teacher education program. 

2. Completion of a Single Subject Major. 

3. Professional education courses as designated in the 
college-approved program, including teaching of 
reading. 

4. A minimum scholastic average of 2.75 to remain in 
credential status. 

5. Twelve units in supervised teaching. 

6. A fifth year of postgraduate study which must be 
completed within five years. 

7. Consultation with the department and with the 
credential advisor each semester before filing course 
cards. 

Students in the Education Department fulfill the state 
requirement in American History and Institutions for all 
credentials by satisfying the Contemporary Political 
Experience (CPE) requirement. (See p. 29.) 

Equivalence Options 

Options to meet equivalence for supervised teaching for 
those candidates who are admitted to Mount St. Mary's 
College Approved Programs: 

Option I: Designed for teachers in schools too remote for 
effective supervision by the college coordinator and those 
who enter California to teach in public schools. 

Requirements: 

A. Two (2) years of full-time teaching experience 
appropriate to the credential. 

B. Evaluations, using Mount St. Mary's College 
instruments, by the (1) principal and (2) supervisor or 
chairman for the last 2 years of full-time teaching. 

C. Supervised teaching — summer school for 6 weeks, 
4-6 units. This will be at a different grade level and 
with a different ethnic group where needed and 
possible. 



D. A weekly seminar will be required. 
Option II: School Site Evaluations 
Requirements: 

A. Two (2) years of full-time teaching experience 
appropriate to the credential. 

B. Evaluations, using Mount St. Mary's College 
instruments, by the (1) principal and (2) supervisor or 
chairman for the last two years of full-time teaching. 

C. Candidate is observed and evaluated by the college 
coordinator during a semester in the candidate's 
classroom with the principal's permission and 
cooperation. The school principal and/or chairman 
will be involved in the evaluation of the candidate's 
competency. 4-6 units. 

D. Monthly seminars are required. 



Graduate Degree Programs 



62/Graduate Programs 



Graduate 
Degree Programs 



Mount St. Mary's College in Los Angeles offers to 
qualified men and women the following graduate degrees 
and programs: 

The Master of Arts in Teaching with majors in History 
and Spanish. 

The Master of Science in Education with concentrations 
in Administrative Studies, Bilingual/Cross-Cultural 
Studies, Individually Designed Program, Early Childhood 
Education, Pupil Personnel Services, and Special 
Education (Learning Handicapped). 

The Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a 
Second Language. 

The Graduate Division also offers courses which qualify 
the student for the following: 

California Teaching Credentials with specialization in 
Elementary Teaching (Multiple Subject Credential) and 
Secondary Teaching (Single-Subject Credential). 

California Services and Specialist Credentials. Mount St. 
Mary's has approval from the Commission for Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing for the following programs: 

— Administrative Services Credential 

— The Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist Credential 

— Early Childhood Specialist Instructional Credential 

— Pupil Personnel Services Credential 

— Special Education Specialist Credential (Learning 
Handicapped) 

These programs are designed to fulfill the fifth year 
requirement. For additional information, consult the 
Department of Education. 

Application Procedures for Graduate Programs 

A student who holds a bachelors degree or its equivalent 
from an accredited college or university is eligible to 
apply for admission. The student's previous academic 
record must give evidence of the ability and preparation 
necessary for successfully pursuing graduate study. 

Procedure for admission: 

The applicant forwards to the Graduate Office, (10 Chester 
Place, Los Angeles, CA 90007): 

1. Application and application fee. 

2. Medical Certificate 

3. Three letters of recommendation from college 
instructors (one may be from an active administrator) 
who have had ample opportunity to judge the 
applicant's academic qualifications. 

4. Two official transcripts of all previous college work, 
both undergraduate and graduate, sent directly by the 
particular institutions. 



5. Foreign students must present evidence of proficiency 
in oral and written English by TOEFL scores of 550 or 
better or satisfactory completion of the ninth level at 
an ELS Language Center. 

In addition, foreign students must submit an English 
translation of their official college transcripts including 
the following information: descriptive titles of courses 
studied (i.e. European History, Inorganic Chemistry), 
the number of lecture hours and laboratory hours per 
week devoted to each course, the number of weeks of 
lecture and laboratory work in each course, and the 
grades earned with an explanation of the marking 
system. 

A statement guaranteeing financial support is also 
required. 

Policies for admission: 

1. Graduate Record Examinations (Aptitude and/or Area) 
may be required by the Graduate Dean/Department in 
special cases (degree programs only). 

2. In the event that the applicant's undergraduate record 
does not include all the requisite courses or a 
satisfactory average, he may be obliged to take 
supplementary undergraduate work to fulfill the 
prerequisites of his major department. 

3. Ordinarily, the applicant enrolls in the first semester of 
graduate work with conditional acceptance in the 
graduate division. 

4. The applicant should arrange for a personal interview 
with the assigned graduate advisor in order to plan a 
program before registering for courses. Before 
registering each semester/summer, the applicant must 
obtain his advisor's signature on his course card. 

Departmental Program Acceptance 

Departmental program acceptance may be approved by 
the graduate dean after all requirements for admission are 
fulfilled, and after the applicant has successfully 
completed at least one graduate course at Mount St. 
Mary's College. Notice of admission to the program is 
sent directly to the applicant. 

Admission to the graduate division or to the 
departmental program does not constitute advancement 
to candidacy for the masters degree. 

Credential Status 

Admission requirements for credential programs are the 
same as those for masters programs. 

Candidacy 

Students must be admitted to candidacy not later than 
one semester before the date of completion of the 
requirements for the degree. To be eligible for candidacy 
for masters degree, students must 

1. Have been accepted into a departmental program. 



Graduate Programs/63 



2. Have completed a minimum of twenty- four semester 
units of graduate work or be in the final semester of 
study. 

3. Had their thesis/research report topic, or examination 
areas (as required by the department) approved. 

Written notice of the above approval and advancement to 
candidacy is sent to the student directly from the 
graduate office. 

Application for Degree 

Candidates for the masters degree must file a formal 
degree application in the graduate office. The final date 
for this application is published in the current graduate 
and extended day calendar. 

Commencement 

Candidates receiving degrees are expected to be present 
at commencement. 

Continuing Education 

A student who holds a bachelors degree from an 
accredited college or university is eligible to take courses 
at the Mount even without the intention of pursuing a 
graduate degree or credential. He may take either 
undergraduate courses in subjects of his special interest 
or graduate courses for which he is qualified. 

The' student should fill out an admission form at the time 
of his first registration at the Mount, at which time he will 
be assigned an advisor. 

Students are expected to observe the prevailing standards 
of scholarship and attendance. If a student, after taking 
courses at the Mount, should later alter his decision and 
become an applicant for a degree, only that work may be 
accepted which satisfies the requirements of the program 
the student is entering, and which meets with the 
approval of the department and the graduate dean. 

Foreign Students 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to 
the graduate division, students from foreign countries are 
required to present evidence of proficiency in oral and 
written English and a guarantee of financial support 
during their period of study at Mount St. Mary's College. 
Further details will be found in Information for Prospective 
Students from Other Countries which will be sent from the 
graduate office upon request. 

Academic Policies 

The Graduate Council has general supervision over those 
rules and regulations of the college which concern 
graduate work and advanced degrees. It determines the 
qualifications for membership in the graduate division 
faculty and approves all graduate programs. 



Responsibility for complying at the proper time with 
regulations and procedures rests with the student. The 
written authorization of the graduate dean is required for 
any exception to printed regulations. Since graduate 
degrees are awarded for scholarly accomplishment, any 
quantitative requirements of specific degree programs 
must be considered as minimum standards. 

The student's program should be planned as an 
integrated area of study. The program will be directed by 
the professor in charge of graduate studies in the major 
department. 

Residence and Time Limit 

All courses toward the masters degree should ordinarily 
be taken in residence at Mount St. Mary's College. The 
minimum time of residence for the degree is three 
semesters, or one semester and three summer sessions, 
or two semesters and one summer session, or four 
summer sessions. 

The degree must ordinarily be earned within five 
consecutive years or nine consecutive summer sessions. 
Credit will not be granted for work extending beyond 
these limits. Any term or summer session in which the 
student fails to register in the graduate division is 
included in these limits. 

Students may work concurrently toward a masters degree 
and a credential. Such a combined objective will generally 
require more total credit hours and longer residence. 

A leave of absence for a specified period of time may be 
obtained by petition. Forms are available in the Graduate 
Office. The granting of a leave of absence does not 
automatically change the time limit for completing the 
masters and/or credential programs. 

Graduate Study in Summer Session 

The graduate division offers summer session programs 
which will usually enable the student to complete his 
work for the masters degree in five summers. Graduate 
students in the summer session are subject to the same 
scholastic requirements as those in the regular academic 
year. 

Credit Limit 

The number of semester hours of work taken in the 
respective terms or summer sessions shall be determined 
by consultation with the departmental advisors. Students 
normally carry nine semester hours of graduate work 
during a regular term and six semester hours of graduate 
work during the summer session. 

Course Numbers 

While all of the work counted toward the masters degree 
must be of distinctly advanced character, not all the 
courses need be taken from the 200-level. With the 
approval of the graduate advisor in the major field, a 



64 Graduate Programs 



maximum of nine semester units of upper division 
courses suitable for a well-rounded program may be 
included provided that the student earns at least a B 
grade in them. 

Grades 

The grade point average for all work presented for an 
advanced degree must be at least 3.0 or B average. A 
required course in which an unsatisfactory grade has 
been received must be repeated. 

The student's grade point average is computed according 
to this scale: 

A, excellent, 4 grade points per unit 

B, good, 3 grade points per unit 

C, average, 2 grade points per unit 

D, poor but passing, 1 grade point per unit 
F, failure, grade points per unit 

The following grades are not computed in the GPA: 

AU, audit 

CR, C or better; credit given 

I, incomplete 

IP, deferred grading for graduate thesis, senior project, or 

undergraduate research work in progress. 
NC, D or F; no credit given 
W, withdrawn 

Grading Policies 

CreditINo Credit 

CR/NC applies only to the Supervised Field 

Experience/Work in graduate programs. 

Incomplete 

An Incomplete is given only when a student: 

1. has fulfilled the majority of the course requirements, 

2. has a passing grade in the class work, 

3. is prevented from completing the assigned work for 
serious reasons, 

4. has consulted the instructor prior to the grading 
period, and the instructor has determined that the 
student can realistically complete the work within one 
semester. 

An Incomplete will remain as such unless removed by the 
instructor within one semester. The Incomplete is ignored 
when computing the GPA. 

An Incomplete can be extended beyond one semester only 
upon petition to the academic dean. 

Repetition of courses with D IF INC grades 
Only courses for which D, F, and NC were assigned may 
be repeated for a higher grade/CR. Courses may be 
repeated only once. In cases of repeated courses, the 
units are counted once and the higher grade is computed 
in the GPA. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

The grade W indicates withdrawal from a course, 

according to the following policy: 



Withdrawal (W) indicates that a student was permitted to 
withdraw from a class during the period scheduled on 
the college calendar with the approval of the instructor 
and advisor. After the scheduled date, petition to the 
Dean is required. 

The W carries no connotation of quality of student 
performance and is not calculated in the grade point 
average. Students who do not officially withdraw receive 
a grade of F. 

Credit by Examination 

Credit for specific courses listed in the catalog will be 
given for satisfactory completion of examinations offered 
by the departments. Petition to take such examinations is 
made through the coordinator of the respective 
department. Forms for such petitions may be obtained 
from the Graduate Office. 

Credit examinations will ordinarily be given only to 
students who have been admitted to a graduate program 
and have maintained a 3.0 GPA in at least one semester 
or six units of study at Mount St. Mary's College. After 
satisfactorily completing credit examinations, students 
will register and receive credit for the corresponding 
course(s). Only "credit" (i.e., no grade) will be given for 
passing these examinations; no record of failures on these 
examinations will appear on the transcript. 

A maximum of nine units, which may be included in the 
twenty- four units of residency, may be earned by credit 
examinations. 

Services and Specialist Credential Program Equivalency 

Seminars are provided for those who have had 
courses/experiences which apply toward the Services or 
Specialist Credentials. Prior to enrollment, students must 
confer with the advisor of the specific credential area. At 
this time, they must present all documents (including 
transcripts) and verifications of experience. 

Only "credit" (no grade nor units) will be given. 
Equivalency will be determined by (a) evaluation of past 
experience and course work, and (b) assessment of course 
content and demonstrated performance competency. 

Please note: These seminars are available only to those 
who wish to meet the requirements of the Services or 
Specialis t Creden tials . 

Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate work taken 
in a recognized graduate school prior to matriculation at 
Mount St. Mary's College is transferable provided that: 
1. The transfer courses satisfy curriculum requirements at 

Mount St. Mary's College and a grade of "B" or better 

was earned; 



Graduate Programs/65 



2. the courses are transferred after program acceptance 
and prior to candidacy for the degree. The student 
may obtain Transfer of Credit forms from the graduate 
office; 

3. Correspondence and extension courses are not 
transferable; 

4. Courses must have been taken within five years of 
date on which the student was accepted in a Mount 
St. Mary's College graduate program. 

Students once admitted to a graduate program are 
expected to pursue study only at Mount St. Mary's 
College. For credential students, the Ryan Act requires 
residency in one college program. 

Probation 

Failure to maintain a 3.0 GPA places the student on 
probation. A student on probation must achieve a GPA of 
3.0 or higher during the next term in order to be 
readmitted to regular standing and may be required to 
take fewer units of work while on probation. 

Dismissal 

A student is subject to dismissal for failure to maintain a 
3.0 GPA during probationary period. The graduate dean 
and/or the graduate coucil has the power to dismiss 
students and to suspend dismissal. 

Withdrawal 

Students who withdraw from a graduate program at any 
time must file a withdrawal notice in the graduate office. 

Withdrawal from a course without authorization results 
in a grade of F. 

Grievance Procedure 

Copies of Mount St. Mary's College Graduate Student 
Grievance Procedure are available upon request at the 
graduate office. 

Degree Programs 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

Eighteen semester hours of course work are required in 
one of the following major fields, 12 semester hours in 
Education, and an examination at the conclusion of the 
program. 

Master of Arts in Teaching with a Major in History 

Prerequisites: 

An undergraduate major in history, or the equivalent, 

including 

HIS 101 The Writing of History 

HIS 198 Historiography 

PSY 123 The Adolescent and the Learning Process 

or an equivalent course. 



Requirements: 

1. HIS 293 Problems in Methods and Techniques in 
Teaching History and the Social Sciences, or the 
equivalent; 9 units of upper-division history specified 
by the department as acceptable toward the masters 
degree; two selections from graduate seminars, with 
the approval of the graduate advisor. 

2. Completion of twelve semester hours of education 
selected from the M.S. in Education degree programs 
or from courses offered for the Services or Specialist 
Credentials. 

3. A written examination, upon completion of course 
work, in an area not previously covered by course 
work, the preparation for which is largely on the 
student's own initiative. This examination may not be 
taken more than twice. 

Master of Arts in Teaching with a Major in Spanish 

Prerequisites: 

An undergraduate major; methods of teaching Spanish; 

and PSY 123 — The Adolescent and the Learning 

Process, or an equivalent course. 

Requirements: 

1. SPA 115/215 Applied Linguistics: Spanish as a Second 
Language 

SPA 118/218 Historical Grammar: Spanish as a First 

Language 

SPA 147/247 Literary Analysis plus three graduate 

courses in Spanish. 

2. Completion of 12 semester hours of education selected 
from the M.S. in Education degree programs or from 
courses offered for the Services or Specialist 
Credentials. 

3. A written examination taken after completion of 
course work. This examination may not be taken more 
than twice. 

Master of Science in Education 

Thirty semester hours of graduate course work are 
required. These include the required core courses plus 
specialization in an area of concentration. A thesis or a 
masters seminar in the field of educational practice is also 
required. 

Prerequisites: 

A bachelors degree and a valid teaching credential or its 
equivalent (including 12 semester hours of upper division 
courses in education in the areas of educational 
psychology, foundations of education, and curriculum). 
Required core courses for all areas of concentration: Nine 
semester hours including: 

EDU 200 Methodology of Educational Research 
EDU 214* Philosophical and Historical 
Foundations 

of Education in the U.S. — Integrating 
Modern and Emerging Trends 



66/Graduate Programs 



EDU 295 Thesis Guidance 

or 

EDU 296 Masters Seminar 

""(Students in Pupil Personnel Program substitute EDU 
203 — Social Foundations of Education — for EDU 214.) 

Areas of Concentration 

1. Administrative Studies 

Additional prerequisites: 

One or two years of successful fulltime teaching 

experience and a GPA of 2.8 or better. 

Courses: 

A. Administration (of schools and/or pupil personnel 
services): 

EDU 205 Development and Evaluation of the 

Curriculum 
EDU 214 Philosophical and Historical 

Foundations 
EDU 215 Organization of School Systems — 

Legal and Financial Aspects 
EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and 

Programs 
EDU 217 Administration of Schools and 

Personnel 
EDU 258 Sociological Aspects of Administrative 

Leadership 
EDU 263 Laws Relating to Schools and Youth 
EDU 298 Supervised Field Experience — 

Administration and Supervision 

B. Supervision only (instruction and/or programs): 
EDU 205 Development and Evaluation of the 

Curriculum 
EDU 214 Philosophical and Historical 

Foundations 
EDU 215 Organization of School Systems — 

Legal and Financial Aspects 
EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and 

Programs 
EDU 257 Seminar: Supervision of Instruction 
EDU 263 Laws Relating to Schools and Youth 
EDU 298 Supervised Field Experience — 

Administration and Supervision 
EDU 217 Administration of Schools and 

Personnel 
or 
EDU 258 Sociological Aspects of Administrative 

Leadership 

2. BilinguallCross-Cultural Studies 

Additional prerequisite: 
Screening for Spanish fluency. 

Requirements: 

EDU 280 The Spanish-Speaking Learner: 

Development and Learning 



EDU 281 Implementing the 

Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Program 
Professional Practicum for the 
Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist 
English Linguistics 
Comparative Bilingual Studies 
HIS 165 A/265 A Latin American Culture 
HIS 165B/265B The Spanish-Speaking in the United 
States 

Comparative Social Structures 
Contemporary Social Issues 
Applied Linguistics: Spanish as a 
Second Language 

Historical Grammar: Spanish as a First 
Language 



EDU 282 

ENG 100/200 
ENG 204 



SOC 125/225 
SOC 212 
SPA 115/215 

SPA 118/218 



3. Early Childhood Education 

Requirements: 

EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and 

Programs 
EDU 231 Introduction to Early Childhood 

Education 
EDU 232 Cognitive Processes for the Young 

Child 
EDU 233 Language Experience of the Young 

Child 
EDU 234 Techniques of Early Identification, 

Prevention and Remediation of 

Learning Problems 
EDU 235 A Social and Scientific Discoveries of the 

Young Child 
EDU 235B Creative Expressions of the Young 

Child 
EDU 238 Seminar: Contemporary Problems in 

Early Childhood Education 
EDU 239 Professional Practicum for the Early 

Childhood Specialist 
EDU 272 Disturbances in Child Development 

4. Individually Designed Program (IDP) 

For those who wish to earn a Masters degree without a 
Services or Specialist Credential, this program is 
flexible and not structured into required course work. 

The Individually Designed Program could focus on 
two areas of study and permit related courses in other 
than these two areas; could be centered around a 
core-career objective; could combine disciplines with 
educational theory; or could be so planned as to 
permit in-depth study in an area of special interest. 

Qualified candidates, under the direction of a faculty 
committee and a program advisor, construct a 
cross-disciplinary program to meet their special 
interests or needs. 



Graduate Programs/67 



This student- faculty designed program must be 
approved by the Coordinator of Graduate Programs in 
Education and by the Dean of the Graduate Division. 

Requirements: 

In addition to the required core courses for the M.S. in 
Education degree, twenty-one units in course work are 
selected under the direction of a faculty committee and 
the program advisor. Fifteen to eighteen units must be 
in the field of Education. A Thesis or Seminar Report 
in the field of educational practice is required. 

5. Pupil Personnel Services 

Requirements: 

A distribution of 21 units chosen from the list of 
courses required for the Pupil Personnel Services 
Credential, in consultation with the program advisor. 

6. Special Education (Learning Handicapped) 

Requirements: 

EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and 

Programs 
EDU 270 Survey of Programs for Child with 

Exceptional Needs 
EDU 271/PSY 271 Appraisal of Exceptional Children 
EDU 272/PSY 272 Disturbances in Child Development 
EDU 273/PSY 273 Development of Programs for 

Children with Specific Learning 

Abilities 
EDU 274/PSY 274 Counseling and Guidance of 

Exceptional Children 
EDU 275 Teaching of Language Arts for the 

Learning Handicapped 
EDU 276 Teaching of Mathematics, Science 

and Social Science for the Learning 

Handicapped 
EDU 277/PSY 277 Language and Speech Disorders 
EDU 278 Supervised Teaching: Learning 

Handicapped 

(15-18 units must be in education.) Students may work 
concurrently for a Specialist Credential while pursuing 
the Masters degree. In this case, more than 30 
semester hours may be necessary to complete 
requirements for both the degree and the credential. 
See credential requirements. 

Research Requirements 

Candidates for the Master of Science in Education are 
required to present a thesis or to participate in a masters 
seminar in the field of educational practice. 

Thesis 

This thesis provides an opportunity for the student to 
obtain firsthand experience in research methods under 
competent direction. The thesis should be limited in 
scope and give evidence of the student's ability to 
organize knowledge, to analyze critically, and to present 



the results in a readable and accurate form according to 
Mount St. Mary's College regulations. A brief description 
of the topic and of the proposed method of investigation 
must accompany each topic presented for approval. 

The candidate must present his complete thesis to his 
director not later than the date established in the current 
academic calendar. It must be approved by the director 
before being finally typed according to the prescribed 
form. Two copies must be filed in the graduate office on 
the date listed in the current calendar. Specific directions 
regarding the format and typing of theses may be 
obtained from the college bookstore. 

Masters Seminar 

When a student has completed a minimum of 24 units of 
graduate credit or when he has reached the last semester 
of course work, he may enroll in EDU 296 Masters 
Seminar. Specific directions regarding format and other 
requirements may be obtained from the seminar advisor. 
One copy of the completed work is to be approved by the 
seminar advisor who files it with the graduate office. 

Credential Programs 

The Department of Education is accredited to recommend 
students for California Teaching Credentials in both the 
Multiple Subject (elementary teaching) and Single Subject 
(secondary teaching). Either of these credentials may be 
obtained in a four-year baccalaureate degree program. 
When the student has completed the diversified or single 
subject major, the professional couses, including 
supervised teaching, and any other requirements of the 
college for the baccalaureate degree, a Preliminary 
Credential can be obtained. See Teacher Education 
Programs. This Preliminary Credential is valid for 
five years. Within these five years, a fifth year of 
approximately 30 semester hours is required for a clear 
credential. Five years of teaching experience, two of 
which must be in public school in California, must be 
completed to qualify for a life credential. This fifth year of 
study may be used to complete a masters degree in a 
subject matter area or to qualify for a Services or 
Specialist Credential. 

Mount St. Mary's College offers the following credential 
programs, approved by the Commission for Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing. (See Application Procedures 
for Graduate Programs, page 61. 

Services Credential: Administrative Services 

Prerequisites for admission: 

1. A bachelors degree with an acceptable major according 
to state regulations. 

2. A valid teaching credential as specified in the 
Education Code; a Services Credential in Pupil 
Personnel Services for that career option. 



68/Graduate Programs 



3. A minimum grade point average of 2.8. 

4. Verification of one to two years of successful teaching 
experience. For PPS Administration, additional three 
years of successful service in that field. 

5. Recommendations from two active professional 
persons associated with the applicant within the past 
five years. 

Courses: 

1. Administration (of schools and/or pupil personnel 
services): 

EDU 205 Development and Evaluation of the 

Curriculum 
EDU 214 Philosophical and Historical Foundations 
EDU 215 Organization of School Systems — Legal 

and Financial Aspects 
EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and Programs 
EDU 217 Administration of Schools and Personnel 

EDU 258 Sociological Aspects of Administrative 

Leadership 
EDU 263 Laws Relating to Schools and Youth 
EDU 298 Supervised Field Experience — 

Administration and Supervision 

2. Supervision only (instruction and/or programs): 
EDU 205 Development and Evaluation of the 

Curriculum 
EDU 214 Philosophical and Historical Foundations 
EDU 215 Organization of School Systems — Legal 

and Financial Aspects 
EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and Programs 
EDU 257 Seminar: Supervision of Instruction 
EDU 263 Laws Relating to Schools and Youth 
EDU 298 Supervised Field Experience — 

Administration and Supervision. 
EDU 217 Administration of Schools and Personnel 
OR 
EDU 258 Sociological Aspects of Administrative 

Leadership 

Specialist Credential: 
Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Studies 

Prerequisites for admission: 

1. GPA 2.75 and a valid teaching credential (unless 
concurrently fulfilling requirements for a teaching 
credential). 

2. Screening for Spanish fluency. 

Required: 
EDU 280 

EDU 281 

EDU 282 



The Spanish Speaking Learner: 
Development and Learning 
Implementing the 
Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Program 
Professional Practicum for the 
Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist 



ENG 204 Comparative Bilingual Studies 

HIS 165A/265A Latin American Cultures 

HIS 165B/265B The Spanish-Speaking Peoples of the 

United States 
SOC 125/225 Comparative Social Structures 
SOC 212 Contemporary Social Issues 

SPA 115/215 Applied Linguistics: Spanish as a Second 

Language 
SPA 118/218 Historical Grammar: Spanish as a First 

Language 

Specialist Credential: 
Early Childhood Education 

Prerequisites for admission: 

GPA 2.75 and a valid teaching credential (unless 
concurrently fulfilling requirements for a Multisubject 
Teaching Credential). 

Required: 
EDU 131/231 



EDU 132/232 
EDU 133/233 
EDU 134/234 



EDU 216 

EDU 235A 

EDU 235B 
EDU 238 

EDU 239 

EDU 272 



Introduction to Early Childhood 

Education 

Cognitive Processes for the Young Child 

Language Experience of the Young Child 

Techniques of Early Identification, 

Prevention and Remediation of Learning 

Problems 

Supervision and Instruction of Programs 

Social and Scientific Discoveries of the 

Young Child 

Creative Expressions of the Young Child 

Seminar: Contemporary Problems in 

Early Childhood Education 

Professional Practicum for Early 

Childhood Specialist 

Disturbances in Child Development 



ENG 100/200 English Linguistics 



Services Credential: 
Pupil Personnel Services 

Prerequisites for admission: 

GPA 2.75 and a valid teaching credential 

Required: 

EDU 202 Psychological Foundations 

EDU 203 Sociological Foundations 

EDU 261 Education and Career Planning 

EDU 262 Laws Relating to Schools 

EDU 263 Pupil Personnel Services and Their 

Organization 

EDU 269 Field Experience 

EDU 270 Survey of Programs for Children with 

Exceptional Needs 

PSY 224 Dynamics of Individual Behavior 

PSY 225 Counseling: Theories and Procedures 

PSY 230 Measurements: Theories and Procedures 

PSY 235 Group Dynamics 

SOC 261 Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations 



Graduate Programs/69 



Specialist Credential: Special Education 
(Learning Handicapped) 

Prerequisites for admission: 
A valid teaching credential. 

Required courses: 

EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and 

Programs 
EDU 270 Survey of Programs for the Child with 

Exceptional Needs 
EDU 271/PSY 271 Appraisal of Exceptional Children 
EDU 272/PSY 272 Disturbances in Child Development 
EDU 273/PSY 273 Development of Specific Learning 

Abilities 
EDU 274/PSY 274 Counseling and Guidance of 

Exceptional Children 
EDU 275 Teaching of Language Arts for the 

Learning Handicapped 
EDU 276 Teaching Math., Science and Social 

Science for the Learning Handicapped 
EDU 277/PSY 277 Language and Speech Disorders 
EDU 278 Supervised Teaching: Learning 

Handicapped 

(15-18 units must be in education.) 

Graduate Certificate for Personnel in Catholic Schools 

Co-sponsored by Mount St. Mary's College and the 
Department of Education, Archdiocese of Los Angeles 

Requirements: 

EDU 210C Seminar: Contemporary Problems for Lay 

Faculty in the Catholic School (3) 

RST 232 The School as a Faith Community (3) 

RST 272 A Philosophy and History of 

Christian Education (3) 

Two additional graduate courses chosen from the areas of 
administration and supervision, curriculum, counseling 
and guidance, special education. 

Graduate Certificate in Teaching 
English as a Second Language 

A. For non-native speakers of English 

Prerequisites: 

1. ENG 104J, ENG 105J, ENG 106J, ENG 128J, ENG 129J. 

2. Acceptance into Mount St. Mary's teacher preparation 
program. 

3. Passing of a written and oral proficiency examination 
in English. 

Requirements: 

1. EDU 350J. Prerequisites: ENG 104J and passing of the 
English proficiency examination. 

2. EDU 336 — Supervised Teaching: ESL — Elementary, 
or EDU 378 — Supervised Teaching: ESL — 
Secondary. Prerequisites: EDU 250J and approval of 
the Education and English Departments. 



3. All courses required for the California Teaching 
Credential. 

B. For native speakers of English 

Prerequisites: 

1. An acceptable undergraduate background in English 
language and literature. 

2. Some foreign language study at the college level 
strongly recommended. 

3. Acceptance into Mount St. Mary's teacher preparation 
program, or a valid California credential. 

Requirements: 

1. ENG 204. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 102/ENG 202. 

2. EDU 351, Prerequisite: ENG 204. 

3. EDU 336 — Supervised Teaching: ESL — Elementary 
or EDU 378 — Supervised Teaching: ESL — 
Secondary. Prerequisites: EDU 351 and the approval of 
the Education and English Departments. 

4. All courses required for the California Teaching 
Credential. 

Recommended courses in allied fields for both programs 
A and B: EDU 230AB, PSY 134, PSY 135, SOC 137, SOC 
161/SOC 261. 



Courses of Instruction 



72 'Courses of Instruction 



Designation of Credits and 
Courses 

All credit is recorded in semester units. The standard 
course is equivalent to three semester units. The standard 
semester unit is equivalent to fifteen 50-minute periods, 
which is satisfied by thirteen 60-minute periods per term 
or the equivalent. The standard semester unit for a 
laboratory course is equivalent to forty-five 50-minute 
periods, which is satisfied by thirty-eight 60-minute 
periods per term or the equivalent. 

Courses are numbered according to the following 

classifications: 

Levels of instruction: 

000-to 099-Lower division 

100- to 199- Upper division 

200-to 299-Graduate 

300-to 399-Professional 

340-to 349-Professional Credit Courses 

(Any course identified as a Professional 
Credit Course may be submitted for 
equivalency evaluation to be applied to a 
credential or masters program.) 

Fields of Study 

AER Aerospace 

ANT Anthropology 

ART Art 

AST American Studies 

BIO Biological Sciences 

BUS Business 

CHE Chemistry 

CST Consumer Studies 

ECO Economics 

EDU Education 

ENG English 

ESL English as a Second Language 

EXT Extension 

FRE French 

GER German 

HIS History 

HSP Human Services Program 

INT Interdisciplinary 

ITA Italian 

JRN Journalism 

MTH Mathematics 

MUS Music 

NUR Nursing 

PED Physical Education 

PHI Philosophy 

PHY Physics 

PHS Physical Science 

POL Political Science 

PSY Psychology 



SOC Sociology 

RST Religious Studies 

SPA Spanish 

SPE Speech 

SPR Special Programs 

For courses offered any given term, consult the schedule 
of classes, which is distributed each term prior to 
registration. 

The college reserves the right to cancel any course listed 
in the schedule of classes. 

Aerospace 

Courses offered as part of the Loyola-Marymount 
University Air Force ROTC Program. 

AER 95AB The United States Air Force (1-1) 

The study of the mission and organization of the United States Air 
Force. 

AER 95CD Leadership Laboratory I, II (0) 

AER 96AB Development of Air Power (1-1) 

AER 96CD Leadership Laboratory III, IV (0) 

AER 197AB American Defense Policy (3-3) 

Prerequisites: AER 095ABCD; AER 096ABCD. Corequisitie: AER 
197CD. 

AER 197CD Leadership Laboratory V, VI (0) 

AER 198CD Leadership Laboratory VII, VIII (0) 

AER 198E Ground Instruction (2) 

Preparation for flight. 



American Studies 



(1-3) 



AST 172 Special Studies in American Civilization 

May be repeated for credit. 

AST 174 Seminar in American Studies I (3) 

This seminar will study certain "classic" texts about American cul- 
ture from an interdisciplinary point of view. Works such as de 
Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Adam's Education of Henry 
Adams, Bradford's Plymouth Plantation, Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter, 
Melville's Moby Dick, and Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom will be dis- 
cussed through the perspective of literary, philosophical, historical, 
sociological, political, and aesthetic disciplines. May be repeated for 
credit. 

AST 175 Seminar in American Studies II (3) 

This seminar is a study of a recurrent theme in American life from a 
variety of perspectives. Students will consider how the theme man- 
ifests itself in the art, literature, philosophy, history, and political 
and economic order of American society. The particular theme cho- 
sen for study will vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. 



Anthropology 



ANT 2 Cultural Anthropology (3) 

A study of the basic components of culture and social structure; the 
varied patterns whereby human needs are met in both primitive and 
modern societies; cultural change. 

ANT 125 Comparative Societies (3) 

See SOC 125. 



ANT 137 Culture and Personality 

See SOC 137. 



(3) 



Courses of Instruction/73 



Art 

ART 1 Drawing I (3) 

Development of basic drawing skills. Emphasis on fundamentals of 
form, structure, and composition. Various black and white media 
are explored. 

ART 2 Design I (3) 

An investigation of the elements and principles of design through 
specific visual problems. Color theories are explored and sub- 
sequent interaction of color is studied through application. 

ART 3/103 Three-Dimensional Design (3) 

The study of design as applied to three-dimensional problems. 
Various materials and techniques will be explored. The develop- 
ment of skills in the handling of material, tools and equipment will 
be included. 

ART 4/104 Painting I (3) 

The development of skills relative to composition, color and other 
structural elements of painting. Primarily acrylic paint will be used 
although various materials can be considered. Building a stretcher 
bar and stretching canvas will be included. 

ART 5/105 Fundamentals of Art (3) 

Illustrated lecture through the use of slides and films on the de- 
velopment of art forms from historical periods through contempo- 
rary life. Various modes of painting, sculpture, architecture, and 
crafts will be studied. 

ART 6/106 Design II (3) 

The application of the elements and principles of design to further 
the development of creative ideas. Includes graphic processes and 
techniques. Prerequisite: ART 2. 

ART 7/107 Modern Art Survey (3) 

The aim of this course is to help students develop a greater aesthetic 
awareness through direct exposure to the visual arts. Emphasis on 
visits to artists' studios, major museums, and galleries. 

ART 9/109 Fiber Arts I (3) 

The development of design and visual concepts through the use of 
fiber and other related materials. Techniques of non-loom processes 
will be explored. Prerequisite: ART 2 or permission of instructor. 

ART 10/110 Photography I (3) 

A laboratory and theory course introducing techniques of shooting, 
developing, and printing. Students are expected to supply their 
own cameras. 

ART 11/111 Printmaking I (Intaglio) (3) 

A laboratory course involving intaglio, collagraph, and relief print- 
ing processes. Historical development and the aesthetic value of the 
print image will be considered. Creative experimentation with 
materials and technique is emphasized. Prerequisites: ART 1 and 
ART 2. 

ART 12/112 Ceramics I (3) 

Foundation course emphasizing wheel- thrown forms. The student 
will be introduced to all aspects of ceramic processes. Emphasis will 
be on personal development of visual concepts through the use of 
clay. 

ART 20/120 Painting II (3) 

Contemporary modes of painting will be explored and traditional 
approaches re-examined. Emphasis will be on the further develop- 
ment of skills and techniques. Various painting materials will be 
investigated. Prerequisite: ART 41104. 



ART 22/122 Figure Drawing II (3) 

Drawing from life in various media, preceded by introductory 
anatomical studies. The accurate and creative use of the figure in 
composition will be an objective of the course. Prerequisite: ART 1. 

ART 30AB/130AB Graphic Communication (3-3) 

The development of visual ideas for the purpose of communication . 
A variety of techniques and graphic processes will be explored. 
Students will develop visual images relative to social, industrial and 
institutional concerns. Prerequisites: ART 2 and ART 61106. 

ART 45/145 Creative Art Experience (3) 

The study of the child and environment in relation to art. Materials 
and ideas developed to stimulate personal expression in children. 

ART 46/146 Art as Therapy (3) 

Through the use of various techniques, this course will familiarize 
the student with the experiential and cultural dimensions of work- 
ing in art with exceptional individuals who are physically or men- 
tally handicapped. 

ART 53/153 Serigraphy (3) 

An introduction to silk screen printing. The study of techniques 
through the use of various stencils, chemicals, and photo-processes. 
The course will include building a printing unit. 

ART 77/177 History of Art: Christian (3) 

Explores the role of art in the evolution of Christian faith. Slide 
lecture. 

ART 94/194 Study/Travel (1-6) 

ART 99 Special Experience (3) 

An individually designed course combining field experience with 
studio projects. May be repeated for credit. 

ART 123 Ceramics II (3) 

Handbuilding methods stressed in the designing, forming and glaz- 
ing of individualized ceramic forms. Further techniques for im- 
provement and development in the areas of decoration, glazing, 
kiln loading and firing will be introduced. Prerequisite: ART 121112. 

ART 125 Weaving I (3) 

An introduction to materials and techniques of loom weaving. Em- 
phasis will be on development of skills, understanding processes, 
and application of design concepts. 

ART 131AB Rendering Techniques (3-3) 

The experimentation and exploration of materials and techniques 
used in rendering. Various media, papers and tools will be utilized 
relative to appropriate application. Graphic presentation and illus- 
trative treatment will be pursued as these techniques relate to the 
reproduction and graphic process. Prerequisites: ART 1 and ART 2. 

ART 149 Sculpture I (3) 

An introduction into basic sculpture processes and techniques. Em- 
phasis on the creative development of three-dimensional form in 
space. Various materials will be explored. Prerequisite: ART 31103. 

ART 150 Photography II (3) 

The further development of camera and darkroom techniques. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the study and creative use of controlled 
lighting. Prerequisite: ART 101110. 

ART 151 Printmaking II (Lithography) (3) 

Introduction to the graphic processes of lithography; work in black 
and white and color. Exploration of both traditional and contempo- 
rary techniques. Prerequisite: ART 101110. 



74/Courses of Instruction 



ART 154ABC Fiber Arts II (3) 

The further development of fiber techniques as applied to sculptural 
form. Emphasis will be on individual growth and the development 
of visual concepts. A wide range of materials will be explored. 
Prerequisite: ART 91109. 

ART 155ABC Weaving II (3) 

The further development of loom weaving processes. Emphasis will 
be on visual concepts explored through individual projects. Related 
fiber processes will be introduced. Prerequisite: ART 125. 

ART 159ABC Sculpture II (3-3-3) 

Advanced problems which encourage conceptual development and 
technical control. Individual direction and choice of materials are 
encouraged. Prerequisite: ART 149. 

ART 160ABC Photography III (3-3-3) 

The exploration of contemporary processes such as litho- 
breakdown, arbitrary color, photo-composites, and solarization. 
Personal direction and the development of photography as an art 
form will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ART 150. 

ART 161ABC Printmaking III (3-3-3) 

Coordination of individual problems in specific areas of printmak- 
ing. Techniques of photo-etching, photo-litho, and color printing. 
Personal direction will be encouraged. Prerequisite: ART 151. 

ART 162ABC Ceramics III (3) 

Increased emphasis on wheel-formed and handbuilt objects, glaze 
formulation and kiln supervision. Stresses further concepts of de- 
sign, craftsmanship and development of personal standards of 
evaluation. Individual direction through selective problems will be 
encouraged. Prerequisite: ART 123. 

ART 163ABC Drawing III (3-3-3) 

Individual problems in drawing will be coordinated. Models will be 
available for further figure and life composition studies. Research of 
materials and techniques will be encouraged. Prerequisite: ART 
221122. 

ART 167 ABC Painting III (3-3-3) 

Individual problems in painting will be coordinated. The develop- 
ment of related works and continued technical research will be 
emphasized. Prerequisite: ART 201120. 

ART 170 History of Art: Ancient to Medieval (3) 

Illustrated lecture. Art from the prehistorical period to 1400 A.D., 
including Egypt, Greece, Rome, and the late middle ages. Relation- 
ships of painting, sculpture, and architecture to the social and cul- 
tural environment. 

ART 171 History of Art: Renaissance to Romanticism (3) 

Illustrated lecture. The arts in Europe from 1400 to 1850. Study of 
major styles and artists, including Michelangelo, Rubens, Rem- 
brandt, Delacroix, and their relationship to their culture. 

ART 172 History of Art: Modern World (3) 

Illustrated lecture. Major art movements and personalities from 
1850 to the present, including Impressionism, Cubism, Surrealism, 
the Mexican muralists, Abstract Expressionism, and current trends. 
Emphasis on the cultural trends which provide the visual and 
theoretical background of contemporary art. 

ART 174 History of Art: Art of the United States (3) 

Illustrated lecture. Survey of art produced in the United States from 
the colonial period to the present day. Traces the development of 
American tradition, European influence, and the relationship to the 
social and cultural environment. 



ART 175 Critical Theories in the Visual Arts: Seminar (3) 

A systematic approach to art theory, criticism and evaluation. In- 
cludes visits to museums, galleries, and exhibits. Lecture and dis- 
cussion. Prerequisite: Major or minor in art (upper division). 

ART 176 Portfolio Exhibition (3) 

Open only to graduating seniors. Emphasis placed on professional 
readiness. All students must prepare a portfolio that will be shown. 
(B.F.A. Program only.) 

ART 190 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

ART 191 Directed Readings (1-3) 

ART 195 B.F.A. Studio (3) 

ART 199 Independent Study (1-3) 

Advanced individual problems. May be repeated for credit. 



Biological Sciences 



BIO 1A Biological Dynamics: Basic Concepts (10 weeks) (2) 

Content is selected in a manner designed to illustrate the underlying 
logic of scientific investigation. Topics include theories of evolution, 
cellular structure and function, energy metabolism, and genetics, 
Laboratory experiences give students the opportunity to participate 
in a variety of the processes appropriate to science. 

BIO IB Biological Dyanmics: The Microbial World (3 weeks) (1) 

An introduction to the microscopic organisms and how they affect 
the world of man. Laboratory. Prerequisite BIO 1A. 

BIO 1C Biological Dynamics: Basic Human Physiology (4 
weeks) (1) 

An introduction to the integrating systems of the human body. 
Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1A. 

BIO ID Biological Dynamics: The Environment (9 weeks) (2) 

An introduction to the physical and biological factors that support 
community life systems. The ecological interrelationships of plants 
and animals will be examined. Laboratory /discussion. Prerequisite: 
BIO 1A. 

BIO 2 Botany (3) 

Study of plant biology including basic concepts of anatomy, mor- 
phology, taxonomy, genetics, and reproduction with phylogenetic 
relationships. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs. 

BIO 3/103 General Microbiology (4) 

Basic principles of microbial growth and metabolism, morphology, 
taxonomy, pathogenicity, immunity and control. Microorganisms 
as agents of disease and normal inhabitants of man's environment. 
Techniques of isolation, cultivation and identification of these or- 
ganisms. Lecture 3 hrs., laboratory 4 hrs. 

BIO 4 Fundamentals of Biology (3) 

An introductory course in biology. Presents the main principles of 
organization, function, heredity, and evolution of plants and ani- 
mals, and introduces the student to methods of study in the life 
sciences. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 2 hrs. 

BIO 10 Health Science (3) 

An interdisciplinary course designed to provide the student with a 
basic understanding of the functioning of the human body as it 
relates to common health problems. Included are such topics as 
nutrition, infectious disease, and the effects of alcohol, drugs, and 
tobacco. Lecture 3 hours. 



Courses of Instruction/75 



BIO 12 Fundamentals of Respiratory Therapy I (3) 

A course designed to present key concepts in the field of respiratory 
therapy. Areas covered will include: cardio-pulmonary structure 
and function, the process of ventilation and effective respiration, 
acid-base balance, as well as methods of assessing cardio- 
pulmonary adequacy. Basic concepts of cardio-pulmonary dysfunc- 
tion will be introduced. Lecture 3 hrs. Clinic none. 

BIO 20 Principles of Respiratory Therapy Equipment II (2) 

Basic physical laws and mathematical principles as they apply to 
respiratory therapy equipment will be presented. Emphasis will be 
on the design, classification, and operation of commonplace re- 
spiratory therapy equipment. Equipment maintenance workshops 
are included. Lecture 2 hrs. Clinic none. 

BIO 30A Applied Respiratory Therapy HI (10) 

Focus will be on the practice of respiratory therapy in the acute care 
health facility. Areas developed will include: basic life support, 
airway management, gas therapy, positive pressure ventilation, 
aerosol therapy, chest physiotherapy and arterial blood gas 
analysis. The clinical management of the patient in or with pending 
respiratory distress will be emphasized. Lecture 4 hrs. Clinic 21 
hrs/week. 

BIO 30B Applied Respiratory Therapy IV (4) 

A continuation of BIO 30A. The concentrated interterm format af- 
fords extended clinical assignments and experiences. Students will 
obtain and be expected to demonstrate proficiency in prescribed 
respiratory therapy procedures in accordance with the National 
Board for Respiratory Therapy certification criteria. Lecture none. 
Clinic 30 hrs/week. 

BIO 31/131 Human Sexuality (3) 

An introduction to the physiology of human sexuality. Current 
views on sexual behavior examined from the psychological, psych- 
osocial and physiological aspects of function and behavior. 

BIO 40 Directed Studies in Respiratory Therapy V (10) 

Focus will be on establishing performance competency in selected 
areas of applied respiratory therapy. Internships will be available in 
one of the following specialty areas: Clinical Practice, Neonatal/ 
Pediatrics or Pulmonary Diagnostics. Students will obtain and be 
expected to demonstrate proficiency in prescribed respiratory 
therapy procedures in accordance with the National Board for Re- 
spiratory Therapy registration criteria. Lecture 2 hrs. Clinic 24 hrs/ 
week. 

BIO 41AB Human Anatomy and Physiology (4-4) 

Study of the structure and function of the human body. Lecture 3 
hrs., laboratory 3 hrs. Course specifically designed for students 
enrolled in the two-year R.N. program. 

BIO 42 Introduction to Phsyical Therapy Assistant (3) 

The role of the physical therapy assistant as a member of the health 
team will be examined. Principles and techniques of patient handl- 
ing will be applied through laboratory practice and clinical observa- 
tion. Consideration of rehabilitation philosophy, ethical and moral 
conduct, and legal implications of the profession will be discussed. 

BIO 43 Physical Therapy Assistant Procedures I (3) 

Integration of concepts of therapeutic theory and skills. Develop- 
ment of observational skills, interpersonal relationships and their 
practice in the clinical setting. Examination of vital signs, and 
pathophysiological conditions commonly resulting from disease or 
injury. 



BIO 44 Physical Therapy Assistant Procedures II (10) 

Theory, principles and skills of selected hydrotherapy; radiant and 
electrical modalities; theory and techniques of massage; application 
of techniques employed in ambulation and functional activity. 
Supervised clinical experience. 

BIO 45 Physical Therapy Assistant Procedures HI (4) 

Study of therapeutic exercise and equipment employed with appli- 
cation to patients with various disabilities. Exercise techniques prac- 
ticed in the classroom laboratory and supervised in the clinical 
setting. 

BIO 46 Physical Therapy Assistant Procedures IV (10) 

Study of special therapeutic procedures, e.g. cervical and pelvic 
traction, intermittent pressure apparatus, ultrasound, etc. Super- 
vised experience in clinical setting. 

BIO 50/150 Biology of Aging (3) 

An examination of the various physiological aspects associated with 
the effects of aging on the human body. Emphasis will be placed on 
the five leading causes of death in the United States and preventa- 
tive medicine theories related to these diseases will be discussed. 
Prerequisite: BIO 1AB or 51 AB. 

BIO 51AB Human Physiology and Anatomy (4-4) 

The study of the basic chemical and physical principles which relate 
to the structure and function of the human body. The aim of the 
course is to provide students with an understanding of the inter- 
dependence and interrelationships at each level of organization 
beginning with the cell and progressing to the organism as a whole. 
Lecture 3 hrs, laboratory 3 hrs. 

BIO 60 Introduction to Physical Therapy (3) 

Orientation to the physical therapy profession, recent trends, rela- 
tionships with community agencies and paramedical groups, de- 
partmental responsibilities, professional ethics, techniques of pa- 
tient care, legal implications, and rehabilitation philosophy. 

BIO 65/165 Marine Biology (3) 

Interrelationships of marine populations; morphology, physiology, 
evolution, and distribution of the plant and animal organisms. Lec- 
ture 2 hrs., laboratory and field trips 3-5 hrs. 

BIO 67/167 Field Biology (3) 

An introduction to the concepts of field biology. Basic principles of 
plant and animal taxonomy and ecology. Identification of local 
species. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory and field trips 3-5 hrs. 

BIO 87 Fundamental Concepts (1-3) 

An acyclic series of basic concepts in the field of biological sciences. 

BIO 92AB/192AB Special Studies (3-3) 

BIO 104 Medical Bacteriology (4) 

Morphology, taxonomy, metabolism, and immunology of bacteria 
pathogenic to man. Techniques of isolation, cultivation, and iden- 
tification of these organisms. Lecture 2 hrs. , laboratory 4 hrs. Prereq- 
uisite: BIO 3. 

BIO 105 Immunology (4) 

Basic principles and theories of the body's immune mechanisms. 
Native immunity, antibody production, antibody-antigen reac- 
tions, tissue transplants, autoimmune diseases, hypersensitivity. 
Lecture 3 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 3. 

BIO 106 Medical Mycology (3) 

Introduction to the morphology, physiology, and taxonomy of the 
fungi which cause disease in man. Techniques of isolation, cultiva- 
tion, and identification of these organisms. Lecture 2 hrs., labora- 
tory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 3. 



76/Courses of Instruction 



BIO 107 Parasitology (3) 

Study of the morphology, habits, and life cycles of animal parasites 
and their relation to disease in man. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs. 
Prerequisite: BIO IABC or BIO 103. 

BIO 108 Hematology (3) 

Normal blood formation and abnormal blood conditions. Labora- 
tory observation of blood cells, techniques of enumeration and 
identification of normal and abnormal elements in the blood. Lec- 
ture 2 hrs., laboratory 4 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1AC. 

BIO 110 Microbial Physiology (3) 

The course intended to provide the student with a basic understand- 
ing of the biochemical activities of bacteria as related to their growth, 
nutrition, metabolic activities, and genetics. Lecture 2 hrs., labora- 
tory 6 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 7. 

BIO 118 Endocrinology (4) 

The chemical coordination mechanisms whereby major functions of 
the body are integrated through the secretions of the nervous and 
endocrine systems. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 6 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 
ABCD. 

BIO 120 Human Embryology (4) 

Causal mechanisms of development: physiological processes in- 
volved in growth and repair, induction mechanisms, and im- 
munological capacities. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 6 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: BIO 1ABCD. 

BIO 126 Biology of the Vertebrates (3) 

The evolutionary development of structural relationships with their 
functional significance; a comparison of physiological dynamics at 
various stages of complexity of development. Lecture 2 hrs . , labora- 
tory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1ABCD. 

BIO 130 Genetics (3) 

A study of the principles of heredity. Classical viewpoints are 
examined and explained by modern molecular analyses. Molecular 
aspects of reproduction and their significance to evolution are con- 
sidered. Lecture 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1ABCD. 

BIO 151A Cellular Physiology (4) 

The physiochemical principles of cellular control mechanisms in- 
cluding: energetics, photoresponse, cellular integration and en- 
vironmental effects, transport systems, muscle enervation, 
antigen-antibody reaction. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 6 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: BIO 1ABCD. Biochemistry recommended. 

BIO 151B Medical Physiology (4) 

Detailed study of the functional processes of the body; interrelation- 
ships of the systems; dynamics of fluid balance, control 
mechanisms, transport systems, metabolic activity. Lecture 3 hrs., 
laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1ABC. Biochemistry recommended. 

BIO 152 Animal Physiology (3) 

Detailed study of the functional processes of animal systems; inter- 
relationship of these systems, development, differentiation, and 
growth. Lecture 2 hrs., laboratory 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 1ABCD. 
Biochemistry recommended. 

BIO 153 Physiological Chemistry (4) 

An introductory study of the physiochemical principles of living 
systems. Emphasis will be placed on membrane control 
mechanisms, nucleic acid and protein synthesis, biotransformations 
of nutrients, ionic balance and detoxification, enzymes, and 
neuroendocrine integration and coordination. 

BIO 154AB Medical Lectures for Physical Therapists (2-2) 

The pathophysiology of disease and injury with the medical and 
physical therapy management of orthopedic and neurologic dys- 
function. 



BIO 155 Physical Therapy Procedures I (3) 

Therapeutic techniques and procedures for abnormal neuromuscu- 
lar action; theory, application, and evaluation of exercise as a 
therapeutic agent. Lecture and laboratory. 

BIO 156 Physical Therapy Procedures II (3) 

Principles and techniques of electrotherapy procedures and effects 
of selected mechanical, thermal, chemical modalities on neuromus- 
cular and cardiorespiratory function. Lecture and laboratory. 

BIO 157 Physical Therapy Procedures III (3) 

Principles and techniques of exercise and treatment practices in 
physical therapy, synthesis of theory, practice and evaluation of 
techniques. Lecture and laboratory. 

BIO 158AB Applied Anatomy and Physiology for Physical 
Therapists (3-3) 

Gross anatomy of neuromuscular and skeletal systems, coordina- 
tion and integration of physiological functions with analysis of 
pathological conditions and evaluation of the body's ability to re- 
spond to various procedures of physical therapy. 

BIO 160 Clinical Neurophysiology (3) 

Relationship of physical therapy procedures to neurological disor- 
ders, evaluation of therapy management of patients with common 
neurological disabilities. 

BIO 162 Administrative Organization (2) 

Principles and procedures of good management of departments of 
physical therapy in clinical settings. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

BIO 163 Seminar in Physical Therapy (2) 

Role of physical therapist as health team member, management of 
patient care, communication skills with other health professionals, 
patients and families, moral, ethical, and legal problems. 

BIO 169 AB Clinical Internship (0-0) 

Introduction to clinical departments of physical therapy, patient 
care treatment and directed practice of physical therapy procedures 
in clinical applications. (19 40-hour weeks.) 

BIO 187 Selected Topics in Biology (1-3) 

An acyclic series of topics of current interest in the field of biological 
sciences. 

BIO 190 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

BIO 195 Senior Seminar (2) 

Development of biological principles. An integrating course that 
will apply these principles to living systems at various levels of 
organization. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

BIO 196TA Tutoring in Biological Sciences (1-3) 

Assisting in course presentation under the direction of the faculty. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing with a major in biological sciences. 

BIO 197 Research Readings (1) 

Directed reading in a special interest area for the departmental 
research requirement. 

BIO 198 Biological Research (1-3) 

Directed research project. May be taken under the guidance of a 
biology or biochemistry staff member. 

BIO 199 Independent Study (1-3) 

Readings in a special interest area of the initiation or continuation of 
a research project. Work should culminate in a written project. 



Courses of Instruction/77 



Business 



BUS 4 Introduction to American Business (3) 

A general survey of the principles of accounting, marketing, fi- 
nance, management, and government policies as they apply to 
modern American business. 

BUS 5/105 Business Law (3) 

An introduction to the development of legal principles for business 
activity, as found in common law, statutory laws, and the Uniform 
Commercial Code. Use of case studies for practical applications. 

BUS 9 Introduction to Computer Processes (3) 

See MTH 9. 

BUS 15/115 Accounting I (3) 

An introduction to the processes of recording, sorting, and sum- 
marizing data resulting from business transactions and events, 
including derivation and use of balance sheets, income statement, 
and funds flow and cash flow statements. 

BUS 16/116 Accounting II (3) 

A continuation of the accounting procedures outlined under Ac- 
counting I. Special emphasis is given to corporate and partnership 
financial statements. 

BUS 20 Office Administration (3) 

Planning and executing projects related to office adminstration; use 
of judgment, initiative, and creativity in solving problems encoun- 
tered in business offices; learning to assemble data for executive 
decisions; creative thinking and proper attitudes in interpersonal 
relations. 

BUS 21 Business Communications (3) 

Mechanics and techniques of effective business writing; theory of 
and practice in composing various types of business letters and 
reports, with emphasis on the human relations aspect; handling 
business meetings and minutes. 

BUS 22AB Advanced Typewriting (2-2) 

Refining speed and accuracy rates; advanced office production prob- 
lems; statistical typewriting; manuscripts; special emphasis on legal 
and/or medical forms. Prerequisite: Typing speed of 40 wpm with accept- 
able accuracy. Credit for BUS 22 AB may not be counted toward the 
baccalaureate degree. 

BUS 23 Mathematics for Business (3) 

Fundamentals of mathematics as applied to business: percentage, 
discount, interest, tax, commission, mark-up, insurance, etc. 

BUS 24AB Shorthand Transcription (3-3) 

Continued development of speed and accuracy in taking dictation; 
development of business vocabulary; preparation of mailable tran- 
scripts. Credit for BUS 24AB may not be counted toward the bac- 
calaureate degree. 

BUS 25 Machine Transcription (2) 

Instruction in the operation of various kinds of transcribing equip- 
ment. Emphasis on speed and accuracy in transcribing mailable 
letters and forms. Credit for BUS 25 may not be counted toward the 
baccalaureate degree. 

BUS 26 Adding and Calculating Machines (1) 

Instruction in the operation of ten-key adding machines and of 
rotary, printing, and electronic calculators. Emphasis on using 
machines as an aid to solving the variety of mathematical problems 
encountered in business. Credit for BUS 26 may not be counted 
toward the baccalaureate degree. 



BUS 27 Legal Secretarial Procedures and Terminology (3) 

An intensive course in specialized secretarial procedures for law 
offices; development of legal vocabulary; correct techniques in pre- 
paring legal documents and papers. 

BUS 28 Medical Secretarial Procedures and Terminology (3) 

An intensive course in specialized procedures for secretaries in the 
doctor's office or in the health-care setting; development of medical 
vocabulary; emphasis on medical correspondence and forms. 

BUS 75/175 Principles of Salesmanship (3) 

A study of the sales function and its relationship to the over-all 
marketing program. Topics considered include setting sales objec- 
tives, formulation of sales strategy, development of a sales organiza- 
tion, selecting and working with distributors and dealers, mea- 
surement of salesmen's performance, evaluation of sales manage- 
ment performance, control of sales operations, and integration of 
sales and other marketing activities. 

BUS 85/185 Business Management (3) 

Introduction to principles of organization, decision making and 
control; analysis of line and staff structures, production and quality 
standards, responsibility and business-community relationship. 
Use of case studies and experiences in the field. 

BUS 90 Business Internship (3) 

Work experience in a business firm, legal office, or a health-care 
setting. Students increase their knowledge and understanding of 
business and professional fields by analyzing and evaluating their 
experiences at seminar sessions with fellow students and the faculty 
coordinator. 

BUS 111 Management of Health Services (3) 

Study of special problems which a manager encounters in the ad- 
ministration of health services programs. Business methods of hos- 
pital administration; management of physical therapy, respiratory 
therapy, and nursing departments; administration of nursing-care 
facilities. Prerequisite: This course is open only to Health Services Admin- 
istration, Consumer Studies, Nursing, Business Department majors unless 
written consent of the department chairman is obtained. 

BUS 117 Methods of Research (3) 

See SOC 117. 

BUS 123 Mathematical Analysis for the Business Student (3) 

Probability, application of Matrix Theory to business problems 
(Markov chains, game theory, linear programming), mathematics of 
finance. Emphasis is placed on the application of mathematics to 
problems in business. 

BUS 130 Business Finance (3) 

A study of the forms and sources of financing business firms; tech- 
niques of raising funds, appraising risks, allocating and controlling 
capital, and evaluating performance. Prerequisites: BUS 15, BUS 16, 
and MTH 38. 

BUS 133 Government and Business (3) 

The spectrum of government influence on and control of business; 
the regulation of competition and monopoly, the protection of con- 
sumers, and the control of environment and quality of life. 

BUS 137 Intermediate Accounting I (3) 

Accounting theory and practice relating to problems of asset valua- 
tion and classification in accounts and statements. Theory and prac- 
tice relating to problems of valuation and classification of liabilities 
and stockholders equity. 

BUS 138 Intermediate Accounting II (3) 

Inventory control theory, valuation methods and systems, capitol 
budgeting alternatives, debt management and cash flow. 



78/Courses of Instruction 



BUS 153 Computer Programming (3) 

Computer system fundamentals, flowcharting, programming in 
Fortran and Basic; file organization and maintenance; program- 
ming; graphics and techniques; de-bugging programs. 

BUS 154 Cost Accounting (3) 

Budgeting; responsibility accounting; inventory planning; perfor- 
mance measurement; costing methods; job order and standard 
costs; direct vs. full costing; cost allocation; cost- volume profit 
analysis; analytic cost reports. 

BUS 155 Systems Design and Analysis (3) 

Basic techniques for design of information systems; computer 
hardware and software needed in computer-based systems; infor- 
mation determination, need evaluation, presentation, and analysis. 

BUS 157 Personnel (3) 

Principles relating to administration of an employee-benefits sys- 
tem. Techniques of job-applicant screening; job-performance 
evaluation; firings vs. lay-offs vs. transfers. Elements of psychology 
in production and employee relations. 

BUS 160 Marketing (3) 

Basic marketing institutions, practices and legislation; the subjects 
of merchandising, wholesaling, distribution channels, pricing, ad- 
vertising, and marketing research. Practical applications enhanced 
through case studies and experiences in the field. 

BUS 161 Advertising (3) 

This course examines the major problems of modern advertising 
and promotion. Among these are the social and economic role of 
advertising; controls over advertising; planning the campaign; the 
role of research; the media strategy and coordination with other 
elements of the marketing communication mix. 

BUS 162 Retailing (3) 

Principles of retailing applied to the problems of organization and 
operation of retail establishments. The business aspects of buying, 
stock planning, inventory control, markup, stock accounting and 
pricing. Special problems of retail management will be discussed 
including departmentalization, personnel control, supervisory 
training, store layout and store location. 

BUS 170 Real Estate (3) 

Introduction to economics of land ownership and use; fundamen- 
tals of ownership; financing; appraisal; management and transfer of 
residential and other real property. 

BUS 180 Merchandising: Demonstration and Display 

See CST 180. 

BUS 181 Operations and Production Management (3) 

Three basic areas are covered: planning, analysis and control. Plan- 
ning gives exposure to quantitative methods of forecasting, allocat- 
ing, scheduling and financially evaluating strategic alternatives. 
Analysis emphasizes the qualitative aspects of men, machines, 
materials, money and management systems. Control considers 
quality, quantity and process control and operational maintenance 
of production facilities. 

BUS 184 Organizational Behavior (3) 

Emphasis on the "contingency view" for understanding the "whys" 
of behavior and the "hows" of increasing effectiveness. (The con- 
tingency view contends there is no one way of managing all situa- 
tions.) The student will develop conceptual skills involved in: 1) 
diagnosing the human problems in management; 2) recognizing the 
situation and how it relates to the organization as a whole as well as 
to the external environment; 3) understanding how the individual's 



actions and actions of the parts of the organization are interdepen- 
dent and impact one another; 4) knowing how and when to use 
models for managing organizational problems. 

BUS 186 Tax Accounting (3) 

Statutes, regulations, administrative rulings, and court decisions 
relating to federal and California income taxes. Audit procedures; 
partnership and corporate tax returns. 

BUS 187 Management of a Data-Based System (3) 

Planning and development of an integrated management informa- 
tion system: data base design; data management systems; operating 
systems, standards, and documentation; data security; performance 
evaluations; monitoring, hardware, and economics of a data-based 
system; problems of conversions. 

BUS 188 Auditing (3) 

Audit functions of the CPA. Nature of audit evidence, audit proce- 
dures, audit work papers, audit reports, evaluation of internal con- 
trols and internal auditing, statistical sampling in auditing; prob- 
lems of auditing computer-based accounting records. 

BUS 190 Business and Consumer Studies Internship (1-6) 

Qualified seniors majoring in Business or Consumer Studies may 
receive supervised, on-the-job training related to their major. The 
student is responsible for setting up the internship, which must be 
approved by the department chairperson. 

BUS 192 Business Policy and Ethics (3) 

A study of social justice relative to business practices regarding 
strategy formulation, profitability, competition, advertising, pro- 
duction, customer relations. Extensive use of case studies. 

BUS 193 Selected Problems (3) 

Course, independent study, seminar, or directed readings in cur- 
rent issues and policies. 

BUS 197 Independent Study (1-3) 

Course, independent study, or directed readings on a topic of inter- 
est to the student. Prerequisite: Senior standing; consent of faculty spon- 
sor and approval of department chairman. 



Chemistry 



CHE 1A General Chemistry (4) 

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Lecture: atomic theory, 
atomic structure and the periodic table; molecular structure and 
bonding, introductory organic chemistry; structure and properties 
of solids, liquids, and gases; kinetic theory and colligative proper- 
ties. Laboratory: use of the analytical balance and volumetric 
equipment; stoichiometry; molecular and equivalent weights. Pre- 
requisite: high school chemistry or PHS 1; three years of high school 
mathematics or MTH 1. 

CHE IB General Chemistry (4) 

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Lecture: chemical reac- 
tions, equilibria, kinetics, oxidation-reduction. Metals, non-metals, 
metalloids, radioactivity, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. 
Laboratory: quantitative analysis using gravimetric and titrimetric 
techniques. Prerequisite: CHE 1A. 

CHE 2 The Chemistry of Life (3) 

Lecture, three hours. An introductory course in organic and 
biochemistry. This course is designed to fulfill the science require- 
ment for the health-related major. Prerequisite: PHS 1 or a college 
chemistry course. 



Courses of Instruction/ 79 



CHE 5A Elementary Organic Chemistry (4) 

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Nomenclature and 
simple reactions of hydrocarbons, organic derivatives of water, 
ammonia and halogen acids; carbonyl compounds, aromatic com- 
pounds; stereoisomerism; synthesis and mechanisms of reaction of 
organic compounds. Laboratory: extraction, chromatography, 
synthesis, oxidation, isomerism, equilibria, kinetics. Prerequisite: 
CHE IB. 

CHE 5B Organic Synthesis (3) 

Lecture one hour; laboratory eight hours. This course provides an 
experience for the chemistry major in specific organic synthesis 
procedures. A physiologically active compound or some material 
useful in further experiments is synthesized. Prerequisite: CHE 5 A. 

CHE 7 Elementary Biochemistry (4) 

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Lecture: amino acids, 
proteins and enzymes; nucleic acids and biochemical genetics; 
metabolism and metabolic interrelationships. Laboratory: biochem- 
ical preparations and analyses. Prerequisite: CHE 5A. 

CHE 104 Qualitative Organic Analysis (3) 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Microtechniques, sep- 
aration of mixtures, derivatives, identification of unknown organic 
compounds, spectroscopic methods. Prerequisites: CHE 5AB. 

CHE 106 Intermediate Organic Chemistry (3) 

Lecture, three hours. Mechanism and structure in organic chemis- 
try. Linear free energy relationships, stereochemistry of complex 
systems, condensations and rearrangements. Prerequisites: CHE 
5AB. 

CHE 108 Intermediate Biochemistry (3) 

Lecture, three hours. Survey of biochemistry with emphasis on 
cellular metabolism; interrelationships and control mechanisms; 
chemical structure and biological function. Prerequisite: CHE 7. 

CHE 110A Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics (3) 

Lecture, three hours. Laws of thermodynamics and chemical 
equilibria and cell emf. Prerequisites: CHE 1AB, MTH3AB, PHY1AB. 

CHE HOB Physical Chemistry: Dynamics (3) 

Lecture, three hours. Kinetic theory and chemical kinetics; transport 
processes; viscosity, conductance, diffusion. Prerequisite: CHE 110 A. 

CHE 111 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Lecture and laboratory: 
chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics and trans- 
port processes, conductance, diffusion. Prerequisite: CHE 110 A. 

CHE 120 Instrumental Methods of Analysis (3) 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Theory and applications 
of modern instrumental methods including gas chromatography, 
radiochemistry, various spectroscopic methods and selected elec- 
trochemical methods. Prerequisite: CHE 1AB. 

CHE 190 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) 

Lecture, three hours. Chemistry of inorganic systems with em- 
phasis on reaction mechanisms, complexes, bonding and periodic 
relationships. Prerequisite: CHE 110 AB. 

CHE 197/297 Seminar (1-3) 

CHE 199/299 Research in Chemistry (1-3) 

Research problems to be arranged with individual faculty members. 
Prerequisite: Consent of chemistry staff. 



Consumer Studies 



CST 2/102 Consumer Issues: Problems and Solutions (3) 

A study of problems often encountered by consumers in areas such 
as credit, mail-order, warranties, auto repair and landlord-tenant 
relationships. Explores consumer rights and responsibilities and 
laws that govern consumer problems. 

CST 6 Food Study (3) 

Application of scientific principles in selected areas of food purchas- 
ing, storage, preparation; evaluation of food products according to 
quality standards; integration of nutrition principles, food protec- 
tion regulations, and socio-economic influences; sanitation, safety 
and equipment. Laboratory included. Prerequisite: High school 
chemistry or equivalent or permission of instructor. 

CST 9/109 Maternal and Child Nutrition (3) 

A study of the nutritional needs of the body in relation to a variety of 
cultural, economic, environmental, ethnic, psychological, and so- 
cial factors; analysis of food misinformation and nutrition education 
principles; controls for safety and nutritive value of food supply; 
limited integration of diet therapy. 

CST 10/110 Human Nutrition (3) 

A study of the principles of nutrition and their application with 
emphasis on nutritional requirements of the body at different age 
levels in the maintenance of health and prevention of deficiency 
diseases; cultural, social and psychological influences on food 
habits; analysis of food misinformation and nutrition education 
principles; controls for safety and nutritive value of food supply; 
introduction to nutritional therapy in various diseases. Prerequisite: 
knowledge of basic chemistry and human physiology. 

CST 21 Clothing Construction (3) 

Principles and techniques of construction to insure a professional 
look to apparel; course includes use of equipment, the selection of 
appropriate sewing techniques and commercial patterns for woven 
knit fabrics. 

CST 24 Textiles for Consumers (3) 

Discussion and identification of fibers, yams and finishes; descrip- 
tions of various processes used for woven and knit goods now- 
available to the consumer. 

CST 40/140 Management of Personal and Family Resources (3) 

A study of the efficient use of human and financial resources by 
individuals and families. 

CST 91/191 Directed Readings (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

CST 92/192 Selected Problems and Projects (1-3) 

Courses, workshops, or seminars. Subjects announced in term 
schedule. May be repeated for credit. 

CST 108 Meals, Money and Markets (3) 

Principles of meal planning, preparation, and service; food buying 
with emphasis on special situations such as modified diets, enter- 
taining, low-budget meals, and meals for large and small groups. 
Also includes a close look at the modern supermarket. Laboratory. 

CST 120 Clothing Selection (3) 

A study of all the factors involved in making a clothing purchase 
decision including fashion trends, individual needs and comple- 
ments, sociological influences; ways to identify quality fabrics, 
sound construction, and reasonable prices. Prerequisite: ART 2 or 
consent of instructor. 



80/Courses of Instruction 



CST 128 The Fashion Industry (3) 

Follows apparel from designer's drawing board to garment factory 
to wholesale market to retail rack and consumer. Includes a study of 
pricing procedure along the way and the development of fashion 
trends. 

CST 145 Management of Household Resources (3) 

Principles of management applied to resources in the home for most 
efficient use. Resources studied include time, energy, leisure, and 
money; their interrelationships with family and individual well- 
being and happiness. Values, goals, and decision-making also in- 
cluded. 

CST 154 Housing (3) 

A broad study of the alternative ways of satisfying human housing 
needs. Includes what housing may symbolize to the individual or 
family. Also explores design and construction as related to needs 
and aesthetics. Financing and business dealings with architect, 
landlord, and realtor. 

CST 160 The Consumer and the Market (3) 

A look at the interrelationship between the consumer and the mar- 
ket, by examining topics such as consumer demand, fraud, pricing, 
standards, labels, consumer protection, and redress. Prerequisites: 
CST 21102 and CST 401140. 

CST 180 Merchandising: Demonstration and Display (3) 

Students apply knowledge from other courses in their major in 
planning, organizing and executing promotional and educational 
demonstrations and displays. Includes an examination of the prin- 
ciples of store layout and shelf placement. Prerequisite: SPE 10 and at 
least 2 courses in Consumer Studies. Recommended prerequisite: ART 2 
Design I. See BUS 180. 

CST 194 Seminar: Business and Consumer Studies (3) 

Offers juniors and seniors an opportunity to relate their specific area 
of emphasis to contemporary issues and situations and to learn to 
articulate their own talents and expertise. Examines the current 
employment outlook for the major. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. 

CST 198 Methods in Teaching Home Economics (3) 

Techniques and materials applicable in a wide variety of home 
economics teaching situations. 

CST 199 Independent Study (1-3) 

Research on topic(s) of particular interest. Prerequisite: consent of 
faculty member. May be repeated for credit. 



Economics 



ECO 1 Economics I (Microeconomics) (3) 

An exploration of the economic affairs of the individual and the 
individual business firm. This course introduces the law of supply 
and demand and economic analysis of individual markets such as 
labor or international trade. 

ECO 2 Economics II (Macroeconomics) (3) 

An introductory analysis of the aggregate economic system. This 
course discusses methods of recording and determining gross na- 
tional product, national income, and employment and participation 
rates. 

ECO 44/144 Personal Finance (3) 

Emphasis on the principles underlying financial security and in- 
vestment planning; the study of credit institutions, the stock mar- 
ket, and home buying through special projects and experiences in 
the field. 



ECO 107 Political Economics (3) 

A brief survey of the history of economic and governmental rela- 
tions. In-depth analysis of the current relationship between the 
economy and government. Fulfills CPE requirement. See POL 107. 

ECO 113 Economic History of the United States (3) 

A study of the economic development of the United States: agricul- 
ture, industry, labor, commerce, finance, and transportation. 

ECO 131 Public Finance (3) 

Income and expenditure of federal, state, and local governments; 
theories of tax incidence; nature and implications of the public debt; 
fiscal policy; and inter-governmental fiscal relations. 

ECO 135 Money and Banking (3) 

The nature and functions of money and credit, the banking system, 
monetary policy in the domestic and international economies. 

ECO 150 Labor Economics (3) 

The evolution of trade union organization in the United States and 
labor legislation affecting it; an economic analysis of wage determi- 
nation and its effect on employment; union-management relations 
in the collective bargaining process. 

ECO 175 Urban Sociology (3) 

See SOC 175. 

ECO 193/293 Selected Problems (1-3) 

Courses, workshops, seminars, or directed readings. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

ECO 195 International Economics (3) 

The general principles of international relations and trade; the prob- 
lems of underdeveloped countries and theories of growth and de- 
velopment; progress toward economic integration and cooperation 
in Europe, Latin America and Africa. 



Education 



EDU 31 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3) 

A study of the history as well as current philosophies of early 
childhood programs. Significant leaders and local and state pro- 
grams will be analyzed. Discussions, lectures, readings, and visits to 
pre-school sites, will provide an opportunity to study and observe 
young children and the ways in which they learn. 

EDU 33 Language Development of the Child (3) 

Introduction to theories of language learning and development. 
Study of normal verbal and non-verbal patterns as well as com- 
munication disorders. Methods and materials that enhance lan- 
guage development are studied and developed. Students are re- 
quired to observe and participate in a pre-school setting. 

EDU 35A Cognition and the Young Child (3) 

A study of those experiences which foster cognitive development in 
the young child. Emphasis will be on exploration, problem solving, 
numbers, ordering, classifying, and concept building. Application 
of growth patterns, individualization, prescriptions, and evaluation 
will be included. Students are required to observe and participate in 
a pre-school setting. 

EDU 35B Creativity and the Young Child (3) 

A study of those experiences which foster creativity and self- 
expression in the young child. Emphasis will be on art, music, play, 
and movement. Application of growth patterns, individualization, 
prescription, and evaluation will be included. Students are required 
to observe and participate in a pre-school setting. 



Courses of Instruction/81 



EDU 70 Introduction to Children with Special Needs (3) 

An introduction to the various exceptionalities. A survey of special 
education programs. Study of the learning and behavioral charac- 
teristics of exceptional children and their families. Fieldwork is a 
required part of this course. 

EDU 72 Early Childhood Education and the Exceptional Child (3) 

Emphasizes the importance of early intervention in the education of 
exceptional children. Stresses the role of the teacher assistant. De- 
velops specific skills for working with children with special needs. 
Specific suggestions for successful mainstreaming of special chil- 
dren will be discussed. Fieldwork is a required part of this course. 

EDU 101 Perspectives in Education (1) 

An investigation of the school community, the role of the classroom 
teacher, and the teacher-aspirant's suitability for teaching. This 
course includes guided self-assessment, health and speech exam, 
standardized test of basic skills, and completion of other require- 
ments for admission to the teacher education program. This course 
is required for admission to the credential program. 

EDU 114 Diagnosis and Prescription (1) 

Instruction in techniques of evaluation and diagnosis of learning 
problems. Case studies and laboratory participation are utilized to 
aid students in translating diagnostic findings into prescription. 
Prerequisite: PSY 113. 

EDU 115A Communication — Elementary Curriculum (2) 

A study of the child and the elementary school curriculum with 
special emphasis on the communication skills of listening, oral and 
written expression, and non-verbal communication. This course 
includes developing an understanding of general principles, objec- 
tives, strategies, materials, and evaluation. Personal competence 
through testing and self-assessment leads to a program for self- 
improvement. Observation, participation, and some supervised 
teaching in actual classroom situations are an integral part of this 
course. 

EDU 115B Mathematics — Elementary Curriculum (2) 

The course is designed to reinforce math concepts, theories and 
their application. However, the main thrust is on methods, process- 
es, evaluation procedures, materials, both manipulative and other, 
for lab and classroom, focusing on individual and group participa- 
tion. Elementary school observation and participation are an essen- 
tial component of the study. 

EDU 115C Reading — Elementary Curriculum (3) 

A study of the developmental process of reading in the elementary 
school encompassing word attack skills and comprehension skills. 
The course covers methods, materials, objectives and principles 
required for a teacher of reading. Evaluation processes researched 
are both diagnostic and achievement-oriented in nature. Observa- 
tion and participation in an elementary school setting give oppor- 
tunities for application of the theories. 

EDU 115D Science and Social Studies — Elementary Curriculum (3) 

A study of the child in the elementary school curriculum with special 
emphasis on the teaching of science and social studies. Individual 
and group instruction is applied both to subject and to general 
principles, objectives, instructional procedures and materials, and 
the evaluation process. Observation and participation in actual 
classroom situations focus on these subjects, including some super- 
vised teaching experience. 

EDU 116A Supervised Teaching — Elementary (12) 

EDU 116B Supervised Teaching — Elementary (6) 



EDUC 116C Supervised Teaching — Elementary (6) 

A study of children in an instructional program on different grade 
levels and in different socio-economic communities. This involves 
fulfilling the responsibilities expected of the in-service teacher. 
Throughout the continuum, the student, college instructors, super- 
vising teachers, and other designated personnel measure the effec- 
tiveness of the student's interaction within the school community. 
The goal to be attained is an exemplary, personally secure and 
professionally competent individual. Prerequisite: Approval of the 
Education Department Screening Committee. 

EDU 124 Diagnosis and Prescription (1) 

Instruction in techniques of evaluation and diagnosis of learning 
problems. Case studies and laboratory participation are utilized to 
aid students in translating diagnostic findings into prescription. 
Prerequisite: PSY 123. 

EDU 125A Secondary Curriculum (3) 

Courses of study, materials, and equipment used in teaching in 
junior and senior high schools. Observations at Pasteur junior High 
School and Hamilton High School are part of this course. Prerequi- 
site: PSY 123. 

EDU 125B Emerging Trends in Education (2) 

A study of the philosophical and sociological factors influencing 
innovation and change in education with emphasis on those 
developments that are becoming established through evaluation, 
accountability, and experimentation. 

EDU 125C Reading — Secondary (3) 

The course reviews the basic skills, methods and materials required 
in beginning reading. Approaches, methods and materials more 
appropriate to the older student will be studied and tested in indi- 
vidual and group tutoring within a regular junior or senior high 
school. Attention will be given to the remedial aspects of reading as 
well as subject matter reading skills. Evaluation processes will in- 
clude both diagnostic and achievement types. 

EDU 125D Secondary Methods (2) 

A study of the rationale underlying the content, placement, and 
methodology, as it specifically relates to the teaching major. This 
course includes practice in the development and use of materials 
and equipment for teaching in the junior and senior high school. 
Observation and participation in the classroom are a part of this 
course. 

EDU 126A Supervised Teaching — Secondary (12) 

EDU 126B Supervised Teaching — Secondary (6) 

EDU 126C Supervised Teaching — Secondary (6) 

Instructing students in a junior and a senior high school class the 
duration of one semester plus additional assignments comprising a 
total school day. Weekly conferences are included. Provisions are 
made for students to fulfill Supervised Teaching at Pasteur Junior 
High School and Hamilton High School. Prerequisite: Admission by 
approval of the department. 

EDU 131 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3) 

See EDU 231. 

EDU 132 Cognitive Processes in the Young Child (3) 

See EDU 232. 

EDU 133 Language Experience of the Young Child (3) 

See EDU 233. 

EDU 134 Techniques for Early Identification, Prevention, and Re- 
mediation of Learning Problems (3) 

See EDU 234. 



82/Courses of Instruction 



EDU 136 Child Development and the Educative Process (3) 

A systematic study of the developmental characteristics of the child 
beginning with prenatal life. Emphasis is placed on how develop- 
mental factors influence the child's ability to learn, and how these 
factors affect the content and organization of curriculum. Principles 
are derived from interpretation of reliable data of experimental 
studies and surveys regarding physiological, emotional, social, 
mental, and moral growth and development. Observation and par- 
ticipation in pre-school and elementary classrooms provide oppor- 
tunities to apply those principles learned in class. 

EDU 170/270 Survey of Programs for Children with Exceptional 
Needs (3) 

Provides an introduction to the problem of exceptionalities of all 
types; the history of special education, the legal and administrative 
framework for special education in California; education, socio- 
cultural, and psychological rationale for grouping children, while 
retaining the basic principles of normal growth and development 
underlying the deviations of the special exceptionalities. Types of 
special education programs are studied in relationship to the 
mainstream of regular education. 

EDU 172/272 Disturbances in Child Development (3) 

Includes a study of the learning and behavioral development charac- 
teristics of five major groups of exceptionality as they arise from: 
genetic and hereditary, neuro- physical traits, prenatal and neonatal 
development, nutritional factors, disturbances in sensory-motor, 
language, auditory, and visual development, learning and 
problem-solving, social and emotional development, physical, 
locomotor, disease, physical injury, etc., and other specif ic effects of 
environmental and developmental processes. See PSY 272. 

EDU 174/274 Counseling and Guidance of Exceptional Children(3) 

Primarily a study of human relations which provides the basis for 
the effective working relationships, both interpersonal and inter- 
professional, involving the complex situation of persons interacting 
with one another at all levels of the organization social structure. 
The student develops the ability to relate effectively to pupils, par- 
ents, co-workers, and resource personnel; becomes sensitive to the 
feelings and needs of others by understanding his own, develops 
skills of communication, and learns to appreciate and use available 
resources. This course also helps the student develop the ability to 
work harmoniously and effectively with all personnel — a necessary 
condition for the success of the concerted efforts of all members of 
the staff toward a common goal of promoting the learning of chil- 
dren. See PSY 274. 

EDU 177 Language and Speech Disorders (3) 

See EDU 277. 

EDU 190 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

EDU 199AB Special Studies (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing or 
consent of department. 

EDU 200 Methodology of Educational Research (3) 

The various techniques of research which include the theory of 
research, experimental design, gathering data, and interpreting 
data. 

EDU 202 Psychological Foundations of Education (3) 

Contemporary psychology as applied to education. Research and 
writing are offered to meet the individual needs of students concen- 
trating in either elementary or secondary education. 



EDU 203 Social Foundations of Education (3) 

Sociological bases of education, the structure of society, its institu- 
tions and trends. 

EDU 205 Development and Evaluation of the Curriculum (3) 

Basic principles of curriculum development. Study of the tech- 
niques of curriculum planning and evaluation of curriculum organi- 
zational patterns. 

EDU 207 Reading Improvement in the School (3) 

Principles and procedures including phonics, employed for the 

improvement of reading abilities. Emphasis is placed upon the 
reading difficulties of students. 

EDU 208 Science in the Elementary School (3) 

Science adapted for children in the first six grades. Includes the 
planning of units, classroom demonstrations, experiments, compil- 
ing bibliographies, and collecting instructional materials pertinent 
to the subject. 

EDU 209 Social Studies in the Elementary School (3) 

Recent research in respect to curriculum, materials, and methods 
affecting the teaching of the social studies. 

EDU 210AB Seminar in Modern Education (1-3; 1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. The curricular, administrative and in- 
structional issues at the elementary, junior or senior high school 
levels. Planned in order to present to teachers a better understand- 
ing of the modern school. 

EDU 210C Seminar: Contemporary Problems for Lay Faculty in the 
Catholic School (3) 

Through group process and discussion, a discovery of one's own 
values and one's image of oneself, and comparison with the values 
of the Church. A study of how the philosophy of Catholic education 
affects the actual subject areas; in-depth exploration of the differ- 
ences between the curriculum of the public school system and the 
Catholic school system; methods of keeping Christian ideas alive in 
the classroom. Includes study of the organization and administra- 
tion of Catholic schools: legal status, legal issues, fiscal problems, 
accountability, etc. 

EDU 211 Administration in a Changing Environment (4) 

Course work is specifically designed to focus on organizational 
patterns of the public schools; on effective techniques in school- 
community relations; on principles and practices of public school 
management. Taken concurrently with EDU 218 and EDU 297. 

EDU 212 Administration of the Elementary School and Its Person- 
nel (3) 

A course in the organization and administration of the elementary 
schools and in the techniques of personnel administration. Course 
work is specifically designed to prepare for service in elementary 
school principalship. 

EDU 213 Administration of the Secondary School and Its Person- 
nel (3) 

A course in the organization and administration of the secondary 
schools and in the techniques of personnel administration. Course 
work is specifically designed to prepare for service in secondary 
school principalship. 

EDU 214 Philosophical and Historical Foundations of Education in 
the United States — Integrating Modern and Emerging Trends (3) 

This course deals with the issues and challenges of today's schools 
integrating modern and emerging trends in education. It is designed 
to reveal the unique characteristics of the American school system 
by presenting the philosophical and historical influences in its de- 
velopment. 



Courses of Instruction/83 



EDU 215 Organization of School Systems — Legal and Financial 
Aspects (3) 

A study of the organization and administration of school districts 
and school systems in the United States: considers the respective 
roles of federal, state, and local governments in education; examines 
legislation and litigation affecting school districts and theory and 
practice of school finance. 

EDU 216 Supervision of Instruction and Programs (3) 

This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to 
develop those competencies required for effective supervision of 
instruction and educational programs. Such competencies as the 
following are to be emphasized: proficiency in effecting change in 
personnel for the improvement of educational programs and of 
teaching, effective interpersonal relations, development of skills in 
decision-making and in all aspects of program planning, implemen- 
tation, and evaluation. 

EDU 217 Administration of Schools and Personnel (3) 

A course in the organization and administration of schools and in 
the techniques of personnel administration. Course work is specifi- 
cally designed to prepare for service in elementary and secondary 
schools. 

EDU 218 Personnel Factors in School Administration (4) 

An understanding of sound personnel management; students ac- 
quire a working knowledge of procedures and techniques in the 
selection, supervision, and evaluation processes of school person- 
nel. Taken concurrently with EDU 211 and EDU 297. 

EDU 219 Educational Leadership Processes (4) 

Concentrates on administrative behavior, educational decision- 
making, group-leadership functions, and understanding of com- 
munity relationships and forces affecting schools. Prerequisites: EDU 
211, EDU 218, and EDU 297. 

EDU 222 Curriculum and Methods for the Urban School (3) 

In this course, emphasis is placed on methods of teaching children 
of minority groups in culturally different communities. Findings of 
current research are related to various approaches to content and 
process. 

EDU 223 The Teacher and the Child in the Urban School (3) 

This course is designed, through the study of the culturally different 
child, to make the teacher more aware of attitudes and skills needed 
to effect better interaction. 

EDU 230 Language in the Urban School and Community (3) 

Linguistic skills as they apply to the speech patterns of the city child. 
The emphasis in this course is on speech patterns of minority 
groups. 

EDU 231 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3) 

A systematic study of the developmental characteristics of the 
young child beginning with prenatal life. Emphasis is placed on the 
relationship between these factors and the theoretical bases upon 
which early childhood programs have been and currently are being 
developed. Through lecture, discussion, films, review of research, 
and field study, fundamental theories of child development, 
philosophies of curriculum and established programs will be 
analyzed. Candidates will be encouraged to assess themselves in 
relation to the competencies and functions of early childhood 
specialists now and in the predictable future. 

EDU 232 Cognitive Processes in the Young Child (3) 

Discussion of changing views as to how children develop intellectu- 
ally. Focus on perceptual development including cognitive stages 
and changes in perceptual style. Consideration of thought patterns 



in young children — imagery, generation of ideas, schemata, con- 
cepts, rules, and problem-solving behavior. Attention to the de- 
veloping integration of language and cognition with exploration of 
social influences, cognitive deprivation, second language learning 
and memory processes. Field work will involve analysis of several 
existing early childhood programs in terms of developmental se- 
quence and interconnections between cognition, perception, and 
language. 

EDU 233 Language Experience of the Young Child (3) 

Study of theories of language acquisition and development in early 
childhood. Concentration on normal and deviant patterns of growth 
in communication skills. Classroom procedures for improved 
speech and language functioning in young children. Instructional 
techniques and materials in pre-reading and beginning reading. 
Supervised professional practicums in diverse sociocultural settings 
and with multi-age groups will focus on differing language patterns, 
skill development and the necessity of individualization of experi- 
ence. 

EDU 234 Techniques for Early Identification, Prevention, and Re- 
mediation of Learning Problems (3) 

Advanced instruction in techniques of evaluation and diagnosis of 
current and potential learning problems. Training in interpretation 
of diagnostic data, selection and development of effective teaching 
techniques and construction of prescriptive plans which comple- 
ment student strengths, developmental and experiential levels, 
socio-cultural backgrounds, and learning styles. Supervised field 
work will include laboratory participation in diagnosis, interpreta- 
tion, selection of instructional activities, recording and continual 
evaluation of pupil progress, consultation with parents and profes- 
sionals, selection of appropriate referral agencies and follow- 
through implementation. 

EDU 235 A Social and Scientific Discoveries of the Young Child (3) 

A study of the instructional program in social studies, science, 
mathematics, and health designed to promote self-esteem, positive 
social interaction, and subject matter competence in the young 
child. Individual and group instruction will be utilized to develop 
principles, explore techniques of diagnosis, create strategies, select 
and develop materials, plan evaluation, and design the environ- 
ment for the young child. Supervised professional practicums in 
differing socio-cultural settings and with different age groups will 
focus on the necessity of considering the individual child when 
developing curricula and planning for continuity of learning experi- 
ence regardless of age. 

EDU 235B Creative Expressions of the Young Child (3) 

A study of the instructional program in movement, drama, art and 
music, designed to promote self-esteem and creative expression in 
the young child. Individual and group instruction will be utilized to 
develop principles, explore techniques of diagnosis, create 
strategies, select and develop materials, plan evaluation, and design 
the environment for the young child. Supervised professional prac- 
ticums in differing socio-cultural settings and with different age 
groups will focus on the necessity of considering the individual child 
when developing curricula and in planning for continuity of learn- 
ing experiences regardless of age. 

EDU 236 Seminar: Parent and Community Involvement in Early 
Childhood Education (3) 

In-depth study of the community(ies) to be served, with emphasis 
on the similarities and differences among cultural groups in lan- 
guage, child-rearing practices, values and customs. Methods of 
effectively encouraging parent and community participation, for 



84/Courses of Instruction 



facilitating productive parent conferences, and for planning pro- 
grams to strengthen home-school cooperation, including parent 
education as related to individual child development. Development 
of criteria for working with volunteers, tutors, parents, teachers, 
and paraprofessionals from diverse cultures. 

EDU 238 Seminar: Contemporary Problems in Early Childhood 
Education (3) 

Exploration of controversial issues such as fixed intelligence, pre- 
determined development, importance of early experience, reversi- 
bility of deprivation and the relationship of these theoretical issues 
to curriculum. Review of research, preparation of professional re- 
ports, development of proposals, and investigation of methods to 
obtain cooperation and community understanding in the alleviation 
of contemporary problems within early childhood education. 

EDU 239 Professional Practicum for the Early Childhood 
Specialist (3) 

Supervised field and practicum experiences will take place in repre- 
sentative cross-cultural settings of public and private schools and 
agencies. Personnel will include all adults involved in early child- 
hood education and children in at least one pre-kindergarten de- 
velopmental level (and one level at kindergarten or primary where 
needed). Throughout the continuum, the candidate, college instruc- 
tors, and the supervising personnel measure the effectiveness of the 
candidate's interaction in the early childhood community. 
EDU 255 Seminar: Principles of Curriculum and Instruction (1-3) 
Principles and procedures of curriculum program planning. Study 
of trends in major curricular fields. 

EDU 256 Seminar: School Administration (1-3) 

Aspects of school administration in varied organizational struc- 
tures. 

EDU 257 Seminar: Supervision of Instruction (1-3) 

Examination of current trends in school supervision and of new 
dimensions of the supervisory role. 

EDU 258 Sociological Aspects of Administrative Leadership (3) 

A study of the knowledge, theory, and research of the behavioral 
sciences that are transforming school administration, the behavior 
of individuals and groups in an organizational setting, and its appli- 
cation to current professional problems in education. 

EDU 261 Education and Career Planning (3) 

Seminar in counseling and guidance. A study of the agencies, 
sources, and research data needed by the school counselor. 

EDU 262 Pupil Personnel Services and their Organization (3) 

An introduction to the basic principles of guidance and counseling 
and a study of the organization and administration of pupil person- 
nel services in the school. 

EDU 263 Laws Relating to Schools and Youth (3) 

A study of legal regulations relating to schools, school personnel, 
and children. Students become familiar with the codes and legal 
references and with agencies which implement these regulations. 

EDU 269 Field Experience — Pupil Personnel (1-3; 1-3) 

Field work in counseling and guidance. Supervised field work for 
two semesters. 

EDU 270 Survey of Programs for Child with Exceptional Needs (3) 

Provides an introduction to the problem of exceptionalities of all 
types; the history of special education, the legal and administrative 
framework for special education in California; education, sociocul- 
tural, and psychological rationale for grouping children, while re- 
taining the basic principles of normal growth and development 



underlying the deviations of the special exceptionalities. Types of 
special education programs are studied in relationship to the 
mainstream of regular education. 

EDU 271 Appraisal of Exceptional Children (3) 

A study of the use of tools for assessing exceptionalities in children; 
statistical concepts in measuring abilities; principles of assessment; 
methods of administration and interpretation; assessment instru- 
ments; and the relationship of the results of assessment to the total 
evaluation of the child. See PSY 271. 

EDU 272 Disturbances in Child Development (3) 

Includes a study of the learning and behavioral development charac- 
teristics of the five major groups of exceptionality as they arise from 
genetic and hereditary, neuro-physical traits, prenatal and neonatal 
development, nutritional factors, disturbances in sensory-motor, 
language, auditory and visual development, learning and 
problem- solving, social and emotional development, physical, 
locomotor, disease, physical injury, etc., and other specific effects of 
environmental and developmental processes. See PSY 272. 

EDU 273 Development of Programs for Children with Specific 
Learning Abilities (3) 

Provides the opportunity for the candidate to use the outcomes of 
assessment to plan specific programs of remediation or amelioration of 
basic psychological functioning, and enables him to participate in 
the actual implementation of these plans through work with indi- 
vidual or small groups of children in the various categories of excep- 
tionalities. See PSY 273. 

EDU 274 Counseling and Guidance of Exceptional Children (3) 

Primarily a study oihuman relations, which provides the basis for the 
effective working relationships, both interpersonal and interprofes- 
sional, involving the complex situation of persons interacting with- 
one another at all levels of the organization social structure. The 
student develops the ability to relate effectively with pupils, par- 
ents, coworkers, and resource personnel; becomes sensitive to the 
feelings and needs of others by understanding his own, develops 
skills of communication, and learns to appreciate and use available 
resources. This course also helps the student develop the ability to 
work harmoniously and effectively with all personnel — a necessary 
condition for the success of the concerted efforts of all members of 
the staff toward a common goal of promoting the learning of chil- 
dren. See PSY 274. 

EDU 275 Teaching of Language Arts for the Learning Handi- 
capped (3) 

In this course, the student draws upon the knowledge and skills 
requisite for effective teaching of reading and language arts in the 
regular classroom. He learns to adapt them to the learning abilities 
of learning handicapped children. This course may be taken concur- 
rently with student teaching or completed before that semester. 

EDU 276 Teaching of Mathematics, Science and Social Science for 
the Learning Handicapped (3) 

In this course the student draws upon the knowledge and skills 
requisite for effective teaching of mathematics, science and social 
science in the regular classroom. He learns to adapt them to the 
learning abilities of learning handicapped children. This course may 
be taken concurrently with student teaching, or completed before 
that semester. 

EDU 277 Language and Speech Disorders (3) 

Designed to acquaint the candidate in special education with the 
normal language development, and with the causes, characteristics, 
and remediation of speech disorders and defects in the handicapped 
child. Includes observation evaluation, and participation in pro- 
grams of speech development and therapy. See PSY 277. 



Courses of Instruction/85 



EDU 278 Supervised Teaching: Learning Handicapped (2-4) 

Gives the candidate the opportunity to develop his skills in translat- 
ing the theory and content of the pre-professional and professional 
courses into practice in the actual classroom situation. It provides 
experience in all aspects of teaching the learning handicapped chil- 
dren: assessment, programming, instruction, management, record 
maintenance, evaluation of progress, and contacts with families and 
community. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 4 units. 

EDU 280 The Spanish Speaking Learner: Development and Learn- 
ing (3) 

A systematic study of the developmental characteristics of the 
learner in a Spanish-speaking home and a Spanish-American cul- 
ture. Emphasis is placed on those factors influencing social adjust- 
ment, aptitudes, achievement, and motivation. The relationship 
between these factors and current curriculum content and teaching 
strategies is examined. Established and emerging philosophies and 
theories of bilingual education are analyzed by means of lectures, 
research reports, discussion, observations, and participation. 

EDU 281 Implementing the Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Program (3) 

A course designed to reexamine the curricula of the schools as 
approved by the California State Board of Education. Special atten- 
tion will be given to the Frameioork for Reading and the Frameioork for 
Bilingual-Bicultural Education and English as a Second Language for 
elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisite: EDU 280. 

EDU 282 Professional Practicum for the Bilingual, Cross-Cultural 
Specialist (3) 

This course is designed to give the specialist-candidate the opportu- 
nity to obtain firsthand knowledge and competency in effecting the 
instructional program for the bilingual, cross-cultural student under 
the supervision of authorized public school and college personnel. 
This involves two ten-week periods of classroom teaching and the 
fulfillment of the related responsibilities expected of the in-services 
specialist. Equivalency for one period may be arranged with the 
Chairman of the Department of Education. Provision for K-12 field 
work will be based on applicant's experiences and basic teaching 
credential. 

EDU 295 Thesis Guidance (3) 

EDU 296 Masters Seminar (3) 

Designed to provide opportunity for the candidate to develop com- 
petency in researching a current issue in education, analyzing its 
operational problem, and making a research report. Failure to com- 
plete the seminar work in one semester requires the student to 
re-register for another three units in EDU 296. 

EDU 297 Fieldwork (Administrative Internship) (4) 

Provides students with opportunities to gain knowledge and to 
develop competencies in those attitudes, skills, and techniques re- 
quired of an educational administrator. One semester of work is 
devoted to experiences in schools and school districts. Taken con- 
currently with EDU 211 and EDU 218. 

EDU 298 Supervised Field Experience — Administration and 
Supervision (3 or 2-2) 

Directed and supervised experience in the supervision of instruction 
and in administrative activities. A wide variety of experiences is 
offered to prepare the student to meet many situations in supervi- 
sion and administration. Approval of faculty advisor is required. 

EDU 299AB Special Studies (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of department. May be re- 
peated for credit. 
EDU 301 Inservice Education (1-6) 



EDU 302 Inservice Education 



(1-6) 



EDU 330A Seminar and Practicum (1-3) 

A course designed to present content and evaluation in connection 
with on the site field experiences in a variety of activities. Class 
meetings accompany the field work either on campus or at the site. 
The amount of credit for this course will be determined by the 
department. 

EDU 330B Seminar and Practicum (1-3) 

A continuation of EDU 330A. Approval of the department is re- 
quired. 

EDU 333 Supervised Practicum: Pre-School (4) 

Instruction of children in the pre-school under the direction of a 
master teacher. Conferences with teachers and supervisors accom- 
pany this work. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 

EDU 336 Supervised Teaching: English As A Second Language — 
Elementary (4) 

Instructing students in English as a Second Language in the elemen- 
tary school under the direction of master teachers. Conferences with 
teachers and supervisors accompany this work. Prerequisites: EDU 
350] or EDU 351, and the approval of the Education and English Depart- 
ments. 

Professional Credit Courses (340-349): Any course identified as a 
Professional Credit Course may be submitted for equivalency 
evaluation to be applied to a Credential or Masters program. 

EDU 340 Seminar and Practicum: Teaching Learning Handicapped 
Children (6) 

Designed to meet the needs of experienced teachers who wish to 
become more proficient in evaluation, programming, and teaching 
exceptional children. Six weeks of supervised teaching in conjunc- 
tion with planning periods, observation, and seminars. Two weeks 
of lecture and demonstration. Teaching methods and materials, 
approaches to evaluation and programming are included. 

EDU 341 Individualized Educational Programming for Learning 
Handicapped Children: Early Childhood (2) 

Focus on children 4-8 years of age, kindergarten through third 
grade. Pre-academics, ability training, and beginning academic 
skills. Opportunities to explore a variety of manipulative materials 
which make concepts and skills more meaningful and interesting for 
young children. Development of Individual Educational Program- 
ming using techniques demonstrated. 

EDU 342 Individualized Educational Programming for Learning 
Handicapped Children: Elementary (2) 

Focus on children 9-12 years of age, fourth through sixth grade. 
Approaches for teaching intermediate academic and remedial skills. 
Methods, materials, and classroom structure for children with learn- 
ing problems are explored to assist the teacher to individualize 
instruction effectively. 

EDU 343 Individualized Educational Programming for Learning 
Handicapped Children: Adolescent (2) 

Focus on students 12-16 years of age. Emphasis on assessment of 
learning problems, analysis of special problems faced by the adoles- 
cent, individualization of instruction. 

EDU 345 Workshop in Special Education (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

EDU 350J Methods and Materials in Teaching English as a Second 
Language (3) 

Instruction on techniques and materials applicable in a wide variety 
of English as a Second Language teaching situations. For non- 
native speakers of English. Prerequisites: ENG 104} and passing of the 
English proficiency examination. 



86/Courses of Instruction 



EDU 351 Methods and Materials in Teaching English as a Second 
Language (3) 

Instruction on techniques and materials applicable in a wide variety 
of English as a Second Language teaching situations. For native 
speakers of English. Prerequisite: ENG 204. 

EDU 360AB Seminar and Practicum for Services and Specialist 
Credential Program Equivalency (0) 

Only those who have had courses/experience which apply toward 
the services or specialists credentials may enroll. Approval of adviser of 
specific program is required. 

EDU 378 Supervised Teaching: English As A Second Language — 
Secondary (3) 

Instructing students in English as a Second Language in the second- 
ary school under the direction of master teachers. Conferences with 
teachers and supervisors accompany this course. Prerequisites: EDU 
350] or EDU 351 and the approval of the Education and English Depart- 
ments. 



English 



ENG 1AB College Writing (2-2) 

Principles and practice of writing, chiefly expository, with attention 
to critical thinking and analytical reading. 

ENG 2 Introduction to Literature (3) 

Selected novels, plays, and poetry studied for enjoyment and to 
introduce the student to the criticism of literature. 

ENG 3 Basic Writing (3) 

A study of basic elements of writing including sentence structure, 
paragraph development, and mechanics. Does not fulfill college 
writing requirement. Student must obtain a C or better to qualify for 
ENG 10A or ENG 10B. 

ENG 4 Introduction to College writing (3) 

From thought to theme: the selection of a suitable, limited topic; the 
formulation of a topic sentence; the planning and organization of 
ideas; writing the first draft; revising and editing. Admission by 
placement; 2 hour lab requirement. ENG 1 must follow successful 
completion of ENG 5. Credit for ENG 4 may not be counted toward 
the baccalaureate degree. 

ENG 5AB Honors English (1-1) 

Offered, upon invitation by the Department, to outstanding 
freshmen. First semester reading of selected literature; second 
semester imaginative writing. 

ENG 6 Imaginative Writing (3) 

An introduction to free and structured writing; the writing of 
poems, essays, and stories to develop creativity and critical appreci- 
ation. Prerequisite: ENG 10 A or ENG 10B. 

ENG 7 College Writing and Lab (2) 

Principles and practice of writing, chiefly expository, with attention 
to critical thinking and analytical reading. Admission by placement. 
Students will work in writing lab as prescribed by instructor. This 
course should be followed by ENG IB. 

ENG 10AB Communication Skills (3-3) 

A core element of the Associate in Arts program, offering integrated 
experiences in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. One 
semester required for A. A. degree. 

ENG 11 Communication Skills for the Medical Profession (3) 

Principles of written and oral, individual and group communication 
with an emphasis on oral techniques in producing coherent reports, 
specific descriptions, clear directions, and logical conclusions. 



ENG 17 Literary Focus (3) 

In-depth study of works selected by author, theme, or genre. May 
be repeated for credit. 

ENG 18 Studies in World Literature (3) 

Study of major works in world literature, representing a variety of 
periods, themes, and genres. 

ENG 21/121 Classical Epic and Drama (3) 

Reading of the Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, and several Greek tragedies. 
Study of their origins, development, meaning to the ancient world 
and to the contemporary reader. 

ENG 22/122 The Bible as Literature (3) 

Aspects of the Bible as art shaped by human artifice. Concerned 
with characters and their development in freedom; with literary 
elements such as theme, structure, voice, images, movement. 

ENG 24/124 Study of Film (3) 

Film as an art form, a study of techniques, with practice in viewing to 
increase awareness and enjoyment. 

ENG 26/126 The American Experience (3) 

An introduction to significant American myths and ideas through a 
study of selected American writing. 

ENG 34 Pre-School Literature (3) 

A survey of children's literature for lower division students in- 
terested in working with pre-school and primary grade children. 

ENG 54 Studies in American Literature (3) 

A study of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction representative of periods 
or trends in American literature. 

ENG 61 How to Read Fiction (1) 

Introduction to the reading of fiction, both short and long, as an art 
form; some emphasis on its evolution and power to widen the 
reader's experience. 

ENG 62 How To Read Poetry (1) 

Introduction to poetry reading and explication, moving from simple 
to complex forms, intended to enable the student to experience and 
enjoy poetry as an art. 

ENG 63 How To Read a Play (1) 

Introductory study of ways to respond to a printed play; attention to 
translating the written text into visualized mental performance. 

ENG 73 Shakespeare (3) 

A study of selected Shakespearean plays and poetry. 

ENG 75/175 Selected Novelists (2-3) 

Reading of major novelists from selected literary periods. Close 
study of language and structure as they embody and reveal mean- 
ing. Prerequisite: ENG 2 or ENG 61. May be repeated for credit. 

ENG 76/176 Selected Poets (2-3) 

In-depth reading and study of the work of several major poets from 
various literary periods. Comparison and contrast of related poems/ 
themes/forms. Prerequisite: ENG 2 or ENG 62. May be repeated for 
credit. 

ENG 77/177 Selected Dramatists (2-3) 

Reading of major playwrights from selected literary periods; consid- 
eration of literary, historical, and technical questions. Prerequisite: 
ENG 2 or ENG 63. 

ENG 91 Directed Study (1-3) 

Study in a field of special interest, under the direction of a depart- 
ment member. May be repeated for credit. 



Courses of Instruction/87 



ENG 92 Special Studies (3) 

Exploration of special interest areas in the study of language and 
literature. May be repeated for credit. 

ENG 93/193 Independent Reading (1-3) 

Reading from works of some importance; student choices guided by 
lists arranged by period or genre. Although course may be repeated, 
the student is limited to three units total. Arrange with instructor. 
Prerequisite: At least one college-level course in literature. 

ENG 94 Communication Skills Laboratory (1-3) 

Individual instruction in communication skills — reading, writing, 
listening, speaking. Not transferrable towards Bachelor's degree at 
Chalon. May be repeated for credit with a maximum of 6 units 
towards A. A. degree. 

ENG 95 Special Studies in College Writing (1) 

Intensive experience in expository writing with emphasis on logical 
development of ideas and effective style. Prerequisite: C or better in 
ENG 10 A or ENG 10B, or equivalent. Strongly recommended for A. A. 
students transferring to four-year colleges. Required for A. A. stu- 
dents who have completed ENG 10A or B and who are transferring 
to Chalon. A. A. students transferring to Chalon and who have 
completed only ENG 10A or B and not ENG 95 at Doheny are 
required to take ENG IB at Chalon. 

ENG 96/196 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

ENG 100/200 English Linguistics (3) 

A diachronic and synchronic approach to the linguistic analysis of 
English; special focus on problems in the history and structure of the 
English language relevant to teachers in bilingual and cross-cultural 
programs. Prerequisite: Demonstration of competency in traditional Eng- 
lish grammar. 

ENG 101 History of the English Language (3) 

Study of the history and development of the English language with 
special emphasis on the phenomena operative in language change. 

ENG 102/202 Structure of Modern English (3) 

Introduction to varieties of contemporary linguistic theories and 
their application to modern American English; study of transforma- 
tional grammar. 

ENG 105 Advanced Composition (3) 

Developing practice in clear prose exposition; study of style and the 
basic structure of the language. 

ENG 106 Creative Writing (1-6) 

Exercise in creating short stories and poems from experience and 
observation. May be repeated for credit up to a total of six units; at 
least two units required of English majors. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

ENG 107 Writing for Television (3) 

Study of the broad field of television writing; practice in the areas of 
drama and comedy; occasional opportunities to meet and discuss 
their craft with working writers. 

ENG 134 Children's Literature (3) 

Wide reading of children's books: study of critics in the field, and of 
artist illustrators. 

ENG 142 Literary History of England and America (3) 

Overview of the literary culture of England and America from the 
beginnings to the present, focusing on the relationship between 
social conditions and literary production. Critical examination of the 
"historical approach" to literature. 



ENG 143 English Literature from the Beginnings to 1660 (3-6) 

Major works of the medieval and renaissance periods studied in the 
light of their historical contexts. May be repeated for credit up to a 
total of six units. 

ENG 144 English Literature from 1660 to 1914 (3-6) 

Major works of the Enlightenment, Romantic, and Victorian periods 
studied in the light of their historical contexts. May be repeated for 
credit up to a total of six units. 

ENG 145 American Literature from the Beginnings to 1914 (3-6) 

Major works of colonial, early federal, and nineteenth-century 
America studied in the light of their historical contexts. May be 
repeated for credit up to a total of six units. 

ENG 146 English and American Literature from 1914 to the 
Present (3-6) 

Study of major works of modem England and America; considera- 
tion of how the literature reflects the condition of society after the 
outbreak of World War I. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 
six units. 

ENG 154/254 Selected American Writers (3) 

In-depth critical reading of a few American writers, selected to give 
insight into the literature and ideas of a significant period or move- 
ment in American culture. Prerequisite: ENG 2, ENG 26, ENG 54, 
ENG 126 or ENG 145. May be repeated for credit. 

ENG 171 Dante, "The Divine Comedy" (3) 

A close reading and explication of the Comedy as a supreme work of 
art; focus on its major structural principle. 

ENG 172 Chaucer (3) 

Readings in the poetry of Chaucer, principally the Canterbury Tales 
and Troilus and Criseyde, with reference to the minor works. 

ENG 173 Shakespeare (3-6) 

Appreciation of Shakespeare's range and art as a playwright 
through study of works from different periods of his development; 
combination of in-depth and background study. Prerequisite: ENG 2, 
ENG 63, or ENG 73. May be repeated for credit up to a total of six 
units. 

ENG 181 Theory and Criticism (3) 

Advanced study in methods of examining and discussing literature. 
Practice in literary analysis. Consideration of selected major critical 
theories and documents. 

ENG 182 Television Today (3) 

Analysis and criticism of current television programs and profes- 
sional television criticism; a broad study of administrative, produc- 
tion, and creative processes in television; occasional visits to televi- 
sion programs in production. 

ENG 190 Internship (1-6) 

Students are placed and supervised in business or administrative 
positions that make use of the skills developed in the major study. 
Usually taken in final term of residence. Prerequisites vary and are 
determined in consultation with the departmental coordinator. 

ENG 191/291 Directed Study (1-3) 

Study in a field of special interest, under the direction of a depart- 
ment member. May be repeated for credit. 

ENG 192/292 Special Studies (3) 

In-depth exploration of special interest areas in the study of lan- 
guage and literature; interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary 
studies; investigations into literature and ideas. May be repeated for 
credit. 



88/Courses of Instruction 



ENG 199 Senior Paper (0-1) 

Senior English majors must complete a critical, research, or creative 
essay under the direction of a department member; they enroll in 
ENG 199 during the term in which they complete the work. Occa- 
sionally an outstanding paper earns one unit of credit. 

ENG 204 Comparative Bilingual Studies (3) 

Provides the academic background and practical experience for 
making contrasting analyses on the levels of phonology, morphol- 
ogy, syntax, and graphology. Special attention is given to relating 
the techniques and results of such analyses to bilingual and English 
as a second language teaching situation. Prerequisite: ENG 100 or 
ENG 200. 

English As A Second Language 

ESL 7J Beginning English as a Second Language (0) 

Intensive basic English for foreign students. 

ESL 8J Intermediate English as a Second Language (3) 

Intermediate drill in English language skills for foreign students; 
grammar, composition, reading. Prerequisite: ESL 7] or instructor's 
signature. 

ESL 9J Advanced English as a Second Language (3) 

Advanced English language study for foreign students: grammar, 
composition. Prerequisite: ESL 8]. 

ESL 103J Studies in Language and Communication (3) 

A multi-dimensional approach to language: listening, speaking, 
reading, writing. 

ESL 104J Bilingual Comparative Studies (3) 

Systematic analysis of English and Spanish language patterns. Pre- 
requisite: ESL 9]. 

ESL 105J, ESL 106J Advanced Composition for Foreign 
Students (3-3) 

Development of writing skills; style of written English. Prerequisite: 
ESL 9]. 

ESL 125J Approaches to Literature (3) 

Study of a selection of great works; experience in critical and creative 
reading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ESL 9). 

ESL 128J, ESL 129J Introduction to Literature for Foreign 
Students (3-3) 

Reading in English and American literature; vocabulary, com- 
prehension. Prerequisite: ESL 9}. 

French 

FRE 1, FRE 2 Elementary French (3-3) 

Develops fundamental skills: speaking, reading, understanding, 
writing. Use of language laboratory is required. Classes feature 
active practice and exchange in French. 

FRE 3 Intermediate French (3) 

Continues the development of all four language skills, emphasizing 
vocabulary building, perfecting pronunciation, increasing fluency. 
Language laboratory use is required. Class conducted in French. 

FRE 4AB Intermediate French (3-3) 

Continues the development of the four language skills. Selected 
literature and culture readings discussed and analyzed in French to 
enrich vocabulary and improve writing ability. 

FRE 8 Phonetics and Conversation (3) 

Concentrates on the fundamentals of phonetics, vocabulary build- 
ing and conversation at the intermediate level with emphasis on 
correct intonation and pronunciation. Prerequisite: FRE 3. 



FRE 25 Advanced Grammar (3) 

A thorough review of the structure of the language with concentra- 
tion on the more complex points of French grammar; exercises in 
prose composition. Prerequisite: FRE 4AB. 

FRE 32/132 History and Civilization of France (3) 

A background course for the study of French literature. Historical, 
social, and cultural development of France with emphasis on con- 
temporary aspects of French civilization. Prerequisite: FRE 4AB. 

FRE 94/194 Study/Travel (1-6) 

FRE 101 Stylistics and Composition (3) 

Exercises in rhetoric, stylistic analysis; original compositions. Pre- 
requisite: FRE 25. 

FRE 112AB Introduction to the Study of French Literature (3-3) 

An introduction to poetry, prose fiction and drama, tracing the 
development of each genre from the middle ages to the end of World 
War II. Special attention given to literary theory and criticism of 
works studied. 

A. From the Middle Ages through the French Revolution. 

B. From the French Revolution to World War II. 
Prerequisite: FRE 4AB. 

FRE 123 Literary Expression of Medieval and Renaissance 
Thought (3) 

Themes, ideas, and forms of medieval and renaissance literature as 
an expression of the life, thought and attitudes of the times. Poetry, 
prose, drama, Prerequisite: FRE 112A. 

FRE 125 Masterpieces of the 17th Century: Prose and Poetry (3) 

Study of the different trends in prose and poetry with analysis of the 
major works. Prerequisite: FRE 112 AB. 

FRE 126 The Classical Theatre: Corneille, Racine and Moliere(3) 

A study of French Classicism as it is exemplified in the tragedies of 
Corneille and Racine, and the comedies of Moliere. Prerequisite: FRE 
112AB. 

FRE 127 The Age of Enlightenment (3) 

A study of the artistic and intellectual trends of the eighteenth 
century as revealed by the major poets, dramatists, and prose writ- 
ers of the period; the intellectual origins of the French Revolution. 
Prerequisite: FRE 112AB. 

FRE 129 The Literary Genres of the Nineteenth Century (3) 

A study of the artistic and intellectual currents of the nineteenth 
century as revealed by the major poets, novelists and dramatists of 
the period. Interpretation and analysis of selected works. Prerequi- 
site: FRE 112 AB. 

FRE 134 Twentieth Century Literary Trends (3) 

Intensive study of the different trends of contemporary poetry, 
theater and novel with analysis and interpretation of selected 
works. Prerequisite: FRE 112AB. 

FRE 190AB Special Studies (3-3) 

Courses designed to investigate in-depth areas of special literary 
interest: genres, authors, themes. Internship program in areas re- 
lated to French. 

FRE 191 Senior Thesis (1) 

French majors must complete a senior thesis in literature under the 
direction of a department member. They enroll in FRE 191, Senior 
Thesis, during the term in which they complete the work. Upon 
acceptance of the paper by the department, the student receives one 
unit of credit and no grade. 

FRE 199AB Independent Studies (1-3; 1-3) 

Directed readings and research. For qualified students with the 
approval of the department. 



Courses of Instruction/89 



German 

GER 1, GER 2, GER 3 Elementary German (3-3-3) 

Develops fundamental skills in understanding, speaking, reading 
and writing. Intensive use of the language laboratory. 

GER 4, GER 5 Intermediate German (3-3) 

Conversation stressed. Introduction to culture and civilization of the 
German-speaking peoples. Prerequisite: GER 3 or equivalent. 



History 



HIS 1AB Western Civilization (3-3) 

An historical study of the major elements in man's heritage de- 
signed to introduce the student to the ideas, attitudes, and institu- 
tions basic to western civilization. 

HIS 5/105 European Leaders and Ideas in Ferment and Flux 

A study of the major people and forces which shaped European 
culture and institutions from the mid-19th century to the present. 

HIS 7ABC American Civilization — Colonial and Revolutionary 
Traditions (1-1-1) 

This course will spotlight the colonial and revolutionary traditions 
as well as trace their contributions to the thought and values in 
American character. Emphasis on the Puritan tradition, pre- 
Revolutionary America, and constitutionalism in a new nation. 

HIS 7DEF American Civilization — 19th Century (1-1-1) 

This offering will feature three developments in the 19th century 
which shaped American society and its values. The areas selected 
will be the multi-faceted Jacksonian period, the slave system in 
Southern culture and the development of business enterprise in the 
post-Civil War era. 

HIS 7GHI American Civilization — 20th Century (1-1-1) 

This course is aimed at in-depth examination of three pivotal epochs 
in modern American development: the progressive Reform Era, the 
New Deal Economic changes and the post-World War II foreign 
policy revolution. Each part will focus on the dominant themes and 
currents which shaped American values. Fulfills CPE requirement. 

HIS 17 Trends in American History and Institutions (3) 

The constitutional problems of the American Revolution, the found- 
ing of the American Republic, the later crises brought on by sec- 
tionalism and slavery, the socio-economic implications of these 
crises, the evolution of the presidency since 1900, the changing 
relationships of the federal government to the economy, and the 
growth of executive power. 

HIS 22/122 Europe: Knights, Monks, Monarchs, and Merchants (3) 

The high middle ages; Church and State; rise of the feudal monar- 
chies; the dynamics of medieval culture as reflected in literature, art, 
education, law, science, and philosophy. 

HIS 25/125 Cultural and Historical Geography (3) 

A survey of the basic cultural elements of geography, of their corre- 
lation with the physical elements, and of the geographic factors 
basic to the study of history and the social sciences. 

HIS 27 U.S. History and Institutions for Foreign Students (3) 

The constitutional problems of the American Revolution, the found- 
ing of the American Republic, the later crises brought on by sec- 
tionalism and slavery, the socio-economic implications of these 
crisis, the evolution of the presidency since 1900, the changing 
relationships of the federal government to the economy, and the 
growth of executive power. Limited to foreign students. Fulfills CPE 
requirement. 



HIS 42/142 Europe: Politics and Theology in the Age of Reforma- 
tion (3) 

An examination of the currents and influences of religious disunity, 
the Reformation, dynastic wars, and the counter- Reformation. 

HIS 75/175 U.S. The Twentieth Century (3) 

A studv of the twentieth century aspects of American life, national 
and international problems; the place of the United States in world 
affairs. Fulfills CPE requirement. 

HIS 76/176 The American Democratic Republic (3) 

This course emphasizes the historical development of the United 
States as illustrated in the federal and state constitutions, the courts, 
and the legislature; the power of the executive as policy maker; the 
development of foreign policy. Fulfills CPE requirement, not gener- 
ally accepted as part of the history major. 

HIS 93/193ABCD Studies in Selected Historical Problems/ 
Topics (3-3-3-3) 

The course will reflect special areas of research by various faculty 
members and visiting lecturers. The particular area of study will be 
announced in the semester schedules. 

HIS 101 The Writing of History (3) 

An examination and practice of the methods of modern research and 
the particular tools of history: chronology, analysis, and interpreta- 
tion. Attention is given to the craft of working with different sources 
and the development of style. This course will include a research 
paper. 

HIS 112 Economic History of Europe (3) 

The rise and spread of commerce and capitalism in Western Europe; 
a critical evaluation of the concept of the Industrial Revolution; the 
economic development of the modern European state; the process 
of economic cooperation and integration. 

HIS 113 Economic History of the United States (3) 

See ECO 113. 

HIS 121 The Early Medieval World (3) 

Heirs of the Roman Empire, Byzantium, Western Europe, and Is- 
lam, Carolingian Europe and new invasions; feudalism; territorial, 
economic, and religious frontiers. 

HIS 124AB History and Civilization of the Near East (3-3) 

A. Islamic Civilization: From Mohammed to the 18th century. A 
history of the revelation received by Mohammed and of the Arab, 
Iranian and Ottoman Turkish societies based on the Koran. The 
contact of Christian Islamic soldiers, merchants, philosophers, ar- 
chitects and artists studied through events such as the Crusades and 
the fall of Constantinople and by means of the literature and visual 
arts of the age. B. Muslim, Christian and Jewish nations: From the 
decline of the cosmopolitan Ottoman Turkish and Iranian empires 
in the 18th century to the emergence of the contemporary nation 
states. Persia and Egypt as examples of Islamic nationalism versus 
European imperialism; the background of Turkish-Christian and 
Arab-Jewish conflict. 

HIS 141 Europe: The Age of Transition (3) 

An examination of the transition from medieval to early modern 
European society with emphasis on theological, humanistic, and 
cultural achievements. 

HIS 143 Europe: The Old Regime and the Enlightenment, 1660- 
1789 (3) 

The European search for security and the effort to reconcile the Old 
Regime with the New Science of the Enlightenment. An examina- 
tion of the attempts to maintain the political balance and growth of 
forces leading to the modern world. 



90/Courses of Instruction 



HIS 146 Europe: The Age of Revolution and Nationalism, 1789- 
1871 (3) 

A studv of class conflicts, culture and nationalism in the period from 
the beginning of the French revolution to the unification of Italy and 
Germany and the Commune of Paris. The intellectual and artistic 
achievements of figures such as Goya, Beethoven, Stendhal, Dar- 
win, Marx, and Wagner will be treated in relation to the political, 
social and cultural trends of this period. 

HIS 147 Europe: The Age of Imperialism and Totalitarianism, 

1871-1945 (3) 

The history of Europe in the German era from the establishment of 
the Second Reich to the collapse of the Third. A study of soceity and 
culture in nations preparing for and conducting total war. The 
intellectual and artistic achievement of figures such as Nietzsche, 
Freud, Mann, Nijinsky, Orwell, and Picasso will be treated in rela- 
tion to the political and intellectual currents of the period. 

HIS 148AB History of Russia (3-3) 

A. Russia to 1860. A survey of the political, economic, and social 
developments, and of foreign relations in the Kievan, Muscovite, 
and St. Petersburg periods. 

B. Russia from 1860 to present. Reform and radical movements, 
international politics, the era of revolutions in Russia, and the for- 
mation. Internal developments and foreign relations of the Soviet 
Union. 

HIS 160 The Social History of Spain (3) 

The course deals with the period since the Reconquest, with em- 
phasis on the crises in religious life, regional integration and class 
relations, culminating in the civil war of the 20th century. 

HIS 162AB History and Civilization of Latin America (3-3) 

A. Latin American Civilization 

A survey of pre-Columbian and Latin American social and cultural 
history, with stress on the values and institutions which have 
created modern society in the Latin American world. 

B. Latin American Nations 

A study of selected major nations of topical interest and of the role of 
the revolution, military dictatorship, and reform as vehicles of mod- 
ernization. May be repeated with the consent of the instructor. 

HIS 165AB/265AB History of the Spanish-Speaking Peoples of the 
United States (3-3) 

A. Latin American Culture 

A survey of the indigenous civilizations, the influence of Spain and 
of the modern impact of the United States, with stress on the social 
and cultural changes in Mexico which have caused migration 
northward. Reference to the history of other nations which have 
representation in Southern California. 

B. The Spanish-Speaking in the United States 

A study of the Spanish-speaking peoples in the United States today. 
The history, contemporary status, and emerging future of the Mexi- 
can Americans, with attention to the Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and 
other communities of importance to Southern California. 

HIS 170 The Expanding Atlantic Community: The Colonial Era (3) 

The study of the founding and of the political, social, and economic 
history of the thirteen colonies and their neighbors, with attention to 
European backgrounds. 

HIS 171 U.S.: Revolutionaries and Constitutionalists (3) 

The American Revolution, Confederation, and union under the 
Constitution; the social, economic, and cultural development of the 
United States to 1800. 



HIS 172 U.S.: Jeffersonianism and Jacksonianism (3) 

The political and social history of the United States from 1801 to 
1850; political developments, western settlements, territorial expan- 
sion, economic developments, and the roots of intersectional con- 
flict. 

HIS 173 U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction Era (3) 

Concentration on the causes underlying the outbreak of the conflict 
between the North and South; the formation of the Confederate 
States; the war years; reconstruction and its effect on American 
civilization. 

HIS 174 U.S. Industrialism, Populism and Progressive Reform (3) 

A study covering the rise of American industrialism in the 1860's 
through labor trends, the Populist Revolt, Imperialism, and 
Progressive Reforms of Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson. 

HIS 178 Diplomatic History of the United States (3) 

A survey of the factors entering into the formation and the carrying 
out of American foreign policy, with emphasis on twentieth century 
developments and post World War II problems. 

HIS 179 Constitutional History of the United States (3) 

The evolution of the fundamental characteristics and trends in 
American Constitutional development with emphasis on contem- 
porary problems. Fulfills CPE requirement. Consent of instructor 
necessary for non-majors and non-minors. 

HIS 181 The American West (3) 

A consideration of the special problems in American history result- 
ing from the impact of civilization on an open frontier. The Turner 
thesis is examined and the particular characteristics and contribu- 
tions of the fur-trading, mining, cattle, and farming frontiers are 
studied. 

HIS 188 California History (3) 

The social, economic, cultural, and institutional development of 
California through the Spanish, Mexican, and American periods; 
the influence of the development of the Pacific Coast on the United 
States, nationally and internationally. 

HIS 190 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

HIS 197 ABC Readings in Historical Literature (1-3) 

Individual programs of reading on significant historical topics or 
fields. Designed to acquaint the student with pertinent books of the 
past and present. Limited to majors in history. 

HIS 198 Historiography (3) 

An introduction to the most significant hisorians and historical 
works. Evaluation of representative historians, including their (1) 
philosophy of history, (2) methods of gathering information, (3) use 
and criticism of sources, (4) credibility, and (5) artistic presentation. 
Required of history majors in the senior year. 

HIS 208ABCD Seminar: Selected Historical Problems or 
Topics (3-3-3-3) 

Particular area or subject announced in the schedule. 

HIS 254ABCD Seminar: Selected Areas of European History 

(3-3-3-3) 

HIS 262AB Seminar: Latin American History (3-3) 

HIS 270ABCD Seminar: U.S. History (3-3-3-3) 

HIS 293 Problems in Methods and Techniques of teaching History 
and the Social Sciences (3) 

Required for MAT in history. Includes methods and techniques but 
emphasizes comprehension, organization and presentation of 



Courses of Instruction/91 



materials together with bibliography, with attention to integrated 

role of the social sciences in the teaching process. 

HIS 295 Guidance and Preparation for the M.A.T. Examination (0) 

Human Services 

HSP 94/194 Gerontology Seminar (2) 

An examination of the current issues and trends operative in society 
today with an emphasis on their effects on the quality of life of the 
aging American. 

HSP 196 Thanatology Seminar (3) 

A multi-discipline approach to death and dying. Some foci will be 
literary themes and philosophical and religious questions which 
deal with personal and cultural attitudes toward death, and the 
biological aspects of the dying process. 



Interdisciplinary 



INT 4/104ABCDEFGH Civilization and Culture (Each module 
IV2-IV2) (12) 

Each self-contained module explores a cultural age or epoch using a 
dominant figure, idea or social movement as the focal point. Each is 
an interdisciplinary offering bringing together the appropriate dis- 
ciplines from art, economics, history, literature, music, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, sociology, and theology. 

Ancient World to 500 A.D. 

A. The Age of Pericles: The Golden Age of 5th Century B.C. A study 
of fifth century B.C. Athens in the time of Pericles. Examination of 
the achievements and failures of democracy and its extraordinary 
cultural contributions to world civilization. 

B. The Age of Augustus in Rome. A study of imperial Rome in the 
time of Caesar Augustus. Examination of conditions in the Empire 
during the Pax Romana and the cultural achievements of this Golden 
Age in world civilization. 

Medieval and Renaissance, 500-1600 

C. The Age of Aquinas in the 13th Century. "The Age of Aquinas" or 
"How to be Really Gothic!" involves a survey of the twelfth- 
thirteenth centuries from the viewpoint of gothic style and its influ- 
ence on structure and content in philosophy, literature, music, art 
and society. 

D. The Age of the Renaissance. This module attempts to understand 
"the Renaissance man" in a time extraordinarily rich in culture and 
in influence on modern history. 

Early Modern World, 1500-1800 

E. Age of Louis XIV in 17th Century France. This is a study of French 
institutions and culture in the reign of the "Sun King." Both the 
golden age of French culture and the social attitudes of the lower 
classes are the focus of this historical period. 

F. The Industrial Revolution. The factors which led to the industri- 
alization in England as well as its cultural and institutional influ- 
ences are the basis for this eighteenth century economic investiga- 
tion. 

The Modern World, 1800 to Present 

G. The Age of Romanticism. The literary figures of the early 
nineteenth century are the center for interpreting the multi-faceted 
aesthetic and cultural aspects of the Romantic Movement. The pri- 
mary focus is on English and German developments. 

H. The age of Dictatorship — Nazi Germany. The rise of authorita- 
rian role in the twentieth century — Germany in particular — is the 
main thrust of this historical study. The social and economic pat- 
terns that brought this development about and later supported the 
Nazi regime are the central themes for analysis. 



INT 20/120 Mythology (3) 

An introduction to the study of mythology; the historical and social 
significance of mythology in various cultures. 

INT 31/131 Focus I (2) 

A seminar for women returning to higher education designed to 
focus personal goals and academic options, to provide supportive 
discussion of the problems of "re-entry" and to consider the risks 
and rewards of reassessment and growth. The course seeks to 
heighten one's ability to see, power to act more resolutely, wisdom 
to accept both the consequences and the continuing questions. 

INT 32/132 Focus II (2) 

A seminar for women returning to higher education designed to 
focus the problem of knowledge: the process, its extent and limits, 
its power and responsibilities, its application to problems in con- 
temporary society. The question is approached from an interdiscip- 
linary point of vie w with a panel of guest faculty present at each class 
meeting. 

INT 94/194 Study/Travel: Seminar (1-6) 

INT 95/195 Study/Travel: European History and Culture (1-6) 

INT 180 Seminar in Ideas and Culture (3) 

An interdisciplinary seminar in a selected period or movement in 
European or American civilization; emphasis on historical, literary, 
and philosophical sources. Specific topics will be announced in 
semester schedules. May be repeated for credit. 

Italian 

ITA 1, ITA 2, ITA 3 Elementary Italian (3-3-3) 

Develops fundamental skills in understanding, speaking, reading 
and writing. Intensive use of the language laboratory. 

ITA 4, ITA 5 Intermediate Italian (3-3) 

Stress is laid on conversational Italian; culture and civilization are 
introduced. Prerequisite: ITA 3 or equivalent. 



Journalism 



JRN 8AB/108AB Journalism (3-3) 

Instruction and practice in various forms of journalistic writing: 
news, interpretation, features, opinion. 

JRN 9/109 Journalism Workshop (1-3) 

View practicum; not applicable to English major. 

Mathematics 

MTH 1 College Algebra (3) 

Set language and notation, real and complex numbers, fundamental 
operations, inequalities; polynomial, exponential, and trigonomet- 
ric functions and their graphs; permutations, combinations, bino- 
mial theorem. 

MTH 3AB Mathematical Analysis I (3-3) 

Differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with as- 
sociated analytic geometry; techniques and applications. Prerequi- 
site: Three to four years of high school mathematics including trigonometry 
and a full year of advanced algebra or the satisfactory completion of MTH 1 , 
College Algebra. Students having some deficiencies in formal high school 
courses may qualify by obtaining the consent of the department andlor 
passing an examination. 

MTH 4AB Mathematical Analysis II (3-3) 

Improper integrals, polar and spherical coordinates with applica- 
tions, series, multivariable calculus, elementary differential equa- 
tions. Prerequisite: MTH 3B. 



92/Courses of Instruction 



MTH 9/109 Introduction to Computer Processes (3) 

An introduction to computer processes for the non-mathematics 
major. Description of the computer, its logical structure and func- 
tioning, input-output and storage, peripheral equipment, the data 
processing cycle, programming using the Basic language. 

MTH 10/110 Mathematical Ideas (3) 

Topics in mathematics chosen to illustrate the mathematical way of 
thinking and to acquaint liberal arts students with mathematics as 
an art and science. This course is intended primarily for non- 
mathematically oriented students; those having a strong 
background in mathematics need the consent of the instructor be- 
fore enrolling. 

MTH 19 Machine Language Programming (3) 

Base conversion, arithmetic in other bases, complementary arithme- 
tic; programming of jumps, decisions, loops, subroutines, and mac- 
ros in machine language; applications in related disicp lines. Prereq- 
uisite: MTH 9. 

MTH 20 Advanced Programming (3) 

Advanced programming and computation of elementary mathemat- 
ical functions; Fortran language, single and multi- dimensional ar- 
rays, functions and subroutines, declarative statements; evaluation 
of polynomials by synthetic division, derivatives, integrals in one 
and two dimensions, determinants, Gaussian reduction. Prerequi- 
sites: MTH 3 A and MTH 9. 

MTH 35/135 Introduction to Biostatistics (3) 

An introduction to methods of statistical analysis with special atten- 
tion to biomedical applications. Topics include sampling, distribu- 
tions, tests of hypotheses, significance and confidence levels. Not 
open for upper division credit to mathematics majors. 

MTH 38/138 Elements of Probability and Statistics (3) 

Elementary probability theory, properties of distributions, sampl- 
ing, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation. Not open for upper 
division credit to mathematics majors. 

MTH 50/350 Modern Mathematics (3) 

Sets, numeration systems, properties of integers, rational and real 
numbers, elementary number theory. This course is intended 
primarily for elementary teachers. 

MTH 51/351 Modern Geometry (3) 

Intuitive geometry of lines, planes, and space; congruence, similar- 
ity, measurement, geometric constructions; elements of spherical 
and coordinate geometry. This course is intended primarily for 
elementary teachers. 

MTH 99 Special Studies in Mathematics (1-3) 

Independent or group studies in mathematics. Course may be re- 
peated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval of the department and consen t of 
the instructor. 

MTH 102 Advanced Calculus (3) 

Set theory, real numbers and their topology, limits, continuity, 
differentiation and integration theory. Prerequisite: MTH 4B. 

MTH 103 Linear Algebra (3) 

Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, 
determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MTH 3B. 

MTH 105/205 Complex Analysis (3) 

Complex numbers and functions, analytic functions, integration, 
conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MTH 102. 

MTH 111 Abstract Algebra (3) 

Numbers and number systems, groups, rings, fields; homomorph- 
ism and isomorphism theorems. Prerequisite: MTH 3B. 



MTH 113/213 Probability and Statistics (3) 

Probability as a mathematical system, random variables and their 
distributions, limit theorems, statistical applications, hypotheses 
testing. Prerequisite: MTH 3B. 

MTH 128/228 Numerical Analysis (3) 

Curve fitting, interpolation, numerical integration, solution of 
algebraic and transcendental equations, numerical solution of dif- 
ferential equations. Prerequisite: MTH 4B. 

MTH 133 Systems Analysis and Operations Research (3) 

Cost-benefit analysis, mathematical economics, linear program- 
ming, dynamic programming, analysis of algorithms, and graph 
theory. Prerequisite: MTH 3B. 

MTH 137 Information Systems Seminar (3) 

Topics chosen from logic design, switching theory, data structures, 
computer architecture, theory of computation, and programming 
languages. Prerequisites: MTH 3B, MTH 20. 

MTH 199/299 Special Studies in Mathematics (1-3) 

Independent or group studies in mathematics. Course may be re- 
peated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval of the departmen t and consent of 
the instructor. 

Music 

MUS 1AB-CD/101AB-CD Musicianship I (4-4) 

(Harmony — 3; Solfege — 1) Lecture and laboratory, five hours each 
week for two semesters. A functional study of the theoretical aspects 
of music including scales, modes, intervals, two- and three-part 
counterpoint, and elements of harmony up to the chord of the 
seventh. Development of aural, visual, singing, writing and playing 
skills in notation, scales, modes, rhythm, and melodic and harmonic 
intervals. 

MUS 2AB-CD/102AB-CD Musicianship II (4-4) 

Harmony (3); Solfege (1). Lecture and laboratory, five hours each 
week for two semesters. Continuation of Musicianship I, including 
ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords, chromatic harmony and 
modulation. Development of aural, visual, singing, writing, and 
playing skills in compound intervals, chromatic and atonal 
melodies, chromatic harmonies, modulation, and more complex 
meters and rhythms. 

MUS 3AB/103AB Creative and Theoretical Concepts of Music (4-4) 

A. A functional approach to the theoretical aspects of music includ- 
ing development of skills in the singing, playing, and writing of 
scales, intervals, chords, and elementary harmony. Designed for 
music minors and other non-music majors. 

B. A functional exploration of counterpoint, analysis and orchestra- 
tion for music minors and other non-music majors. 

MUS 4/104 Guitar Class (1) 

Class instruction in the basic technique and performance of the 
guitar, development of music reading skills and appropriate reper- 
toire. Students must provide their own instrument. Class is open to 
both music and non-music majors on beginning and intermediate 
levels. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 5ABCD Music Literature Repertoire (yz-Wi-lVz-Vi) 

Study of the masterpieces of music through performances, coach- 
ing, concert attendance, lectures, and systematic guided listening. 
Required of all lower division music majors. 

MUS 6 Introduction to the Art of Music (3) 

A course which explores the art of music from a variety of avenues in 
order to heighten awareness, understanding and appreciation of 
this art. Study of the stylistic, creative, and theoretical aspects of 
music for the non-music major. 



Courses of Instruction/93 



MUS 7/107 Voice Class (1) 

Study of fundamental techniques of breath control, tone produc- 
tion, diction, and interpretation. Development of appropriate reper- 
toire. Open to both music (other than voice major) and non-music 
majors. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 8/108 Piano Class (1) 

Class instruction in the development of fundamental keyboard 
skills. Performance and interpretation of piano compositions in 
styles suitable to grade level. Classes are open to both music and 
non-music majors on beginning and intermediate levels. May be 
repeated for credit. 

MUS 9/109 Organ Class (1) 

Class instruction in fundamental techniques, registration and per- 
formance. Prerequisite: Sufficient piano technique to play Bach Two-Part 
Inventions and easier Mozart and Beethoven Sonatas. May be repeated 
for credit. 

MUS 10/110 Gregorian Chant (1-2) 

Study of the rhythm, modes, chironomy and interpretation of Gre- 
gorian chant. Survey of its history and liturgical use. 

MUS 12/112 Music and Worhsip (3) 

An introductory course in Church music aimed at educating for 
leadership in the area of pastoral service. Repertory, curriculum, 
legislation, and techniques for the use of music in worship. 

MUS 13/113 Applied Music (1-3) 

Private instruction — instrumental or vocal. For non-music majors. 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 15/115 Applied Music (1-4) 

Private instruction — instrumental or vocal. For music majors. May 
be repeated for credit. 

MUS 16/116 Development of Jazz (1-2) 

An introduction to the nature, process, and history of jazz. 

MUS 19/119 Chorus (1) 

Study and performance of masterpieces of choral literature from all 
periods. Open to all college students, and to qualified high school 
students with senior standing. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 20/120 Mount Community Orchestra (1) 

Study and performance of symphonic literature of all periods. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 21/121 Mount Singers (1) 

Study and performance of masterpieces of choral literature from all 
periods. Open to college students by audition and to qualified high 
school music students with senior standing by audition and recom- 
mendation of high school music instructor. May be repeated for 
credit. 

MUS 22/122 Ensemble/Coaching (1) 

Study and performance of significant keyboard and vocal ensem- 
bles. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor . 

MUS 23/123 Chamber Music (1) 

Study and performance of chamber music for various instrumental 
and/or vocal combinations. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. 

MUS 24/124 Musical Style Through the Ages (3) 

The development of musical style through each period of history 
from ancient Greece to the present day. Study of selected master- 
pieces of music and their composers in historical context. 

MUS 25/125 Women's Chamber Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of masterpieces of music for small ensemble 
of women. May be repeated for credit. 



MUS 26/126 Brass Instruments: Introductory Techniques (1) 

Elementary instruction and techniques, care of instruments and 
survey of methods. 

MUS 27/127 Woodwind Instruments: Introductory Techniques(l) 

Elementary instruction and techniques, care of instruments and 
survey of methods. 

MUS 28/128 Percussion Instruments: Introductory Techniques (1) 

Elementary instruction and techniques, care of instruments and 
survey of methods. 

MUS 29/129 String Instruments: Introductory Techniques (1) 

Elementary instruction and techniques, care of instruments and 
survey of methods. 

MUS 30/130 Creative Music Experience (3) 

An introduction to the conceptual structure of music. Emphasis is 
placed on rhythm, melody, creativity, style, and harmony. This 
course serves as basic preparation for the elementary and inter- 
mediate school instructor. It includes instruction on melodic and 
percussion instruments, observation and participation, and pro- 
grammed instruction in fundamentals. Prerequisite: MUS 6 or 
adequate background. 

MUS 31/131 Music for the Young Child (3) 

An introduction to the conceptual structure of music and the initial 
preparation for the instruction of children eight years and younger. 
Emphasis is placed on rhythm, melody, style, movement, use of 
instruments, and the relation of music to the different stages of child 
development. 

MUS 64/164 Music and Life (3) 

Music, as it contributes to the quality of life and continued personal 
growth of the aging adult. Prerequisite: MUS 6. 

MUS 94/194 StudyfTravel (1-6) 

MUS 105 Music Literature Repertoire (V2) 

Study of the masterpieces of music through performance coaching, 
concert attendance, and occasional lectures on special subjects and 
topics of current interest. Required each semester of all upper divi- 
sion B.M. majors. 

MUS 111 Master Class Sessions in Interpretation (1) 

The interpretation of great literature under the guidance of artist 
teachers. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 114 Voice Literature (2) 

Survey of selected masterpieces of music written for solo voice 
throughout the centuries. 

MUS 117 Vocal Development (2) 

Study of various approaches to vocal technique. Demonstration of 
various timbres and voice qualities. Survey of vocalises and song 
literature for the developing voice. Fundamentals of stage presence. 

MUS 118 The Musical Theater Repertoire (1-3) 

Study and performance of works from the musical theater reper- 
toire. Brief history of the American musical theater. Open to music 
majors and non-music majors with the consent of the instructor. 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 132AB Counterpoint (2-2) 

A. Writing and analysis of pieces in eighteenth-century style for two 
and three voices. 

B. Continatuion of the above. Four and five voices, canon, and 
fugue. Private instruction. 

MUS 133 Music Analysis (2) 

Detailed analysis of the music forms found in the literature of the last 
five centuries. 



94 /Courses of Instruction 



MUS 134AB Orchestration (2-2) 

A. Designed to provide facility in writing for various instrumental 
combinations. Techniques, analysis and use of the orchestra by the 
composers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Includes ranges, 
tonal possibilities, technical limitations. 

B. Advanced orchestration to be taken in private sessions with 
instructor. 

MUS 135 Composition (1-3) 

Analysis and composition of music in various styles, forms, and 
instrumental and/or vocal combinations. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 136 Technique of Arranging (2) 

Study of arranging techniques for various choral and instrumental 
ensembles, including accompaniments, descants, special effects, 
choral style voicing, contrapuntal and mixed voicing. Prerequisite: 
MUS 1ABCD, MUS 132 A, MUS 133. 

MUS 137 Diction for Singers (2-3) 

The fundamentals of phonetics and sound production in Italian, 
French and German as applied to singing. 

MUS 138 Advanced Musicianship (2) 

Analysis and techniques used in contemporary music. Comprehen- 
sive study of twentieth century harmony, and writing of music in 
contemporary style. 

MUS 139AB Instrumental Conducting (2-2) 

A. Study of baton technique, score reading, and interpretation of 
orchestral literature. 

B. Special problems in the interpretation of instrumental literature. 

MUS 140AB Choral Techniques (2-2) 

A. Study of baton technique, score reading and interpretation of 
choral literature of various styles. 

B. Special problems in the interpretation of choral literature from the 
sixteenth century to the present. 

MUS 141 Music History: Ancient, Medieval, Early Renaissance (3) 

The history of music from Hellenic times to the death of Josquin. 
Elementary principles of performance practice; the evolution of 
notation and musical theory. 

MUS 142A Music History: Renaissance and Baroque (3) 

The history of music from the early sixteenth century to the death of 
J.S. Bach. Stylistic idioms; vocal and instrumental performance 
practices. 

MUS 142B Music History: Analysis (1) 

Detailed analysis of selected renaissance and baroque works. Con- 
current with MUS 142A. 

MUS 143A Music History: Classical and Romantic (3) 

The history of music from pre-classicism through the nineteenth 
century to Wagner. 

MUS 143B Music History: Analysis (1) 

Detailed analysis of classical and romantic works. Concurrent with 
MUS 143A. 

MUS 144A Music History: Post-Romantic and Twentieth Cen- 
tury (3) 

The history of music from the post-romantic era to the present. 
Developments in theory and aesthetics, folk influences, "neo" 
movements, new definitions of music. 

MUS 144B Music History: Analysis (1) 

Detailed analysis of post-romantic and twentieth century works. 
Concurrent with MUS 144A. 



MUS 145AB Seminars in Music History and Literature (3-3) 

Special studies in a single formal genre, historical periods, or repre- 
sentative composers. 

MUS 146 Special Projects in Music (1-3) 

A. Vocal Literature 

B. Instrumental Literature 

C. Music History and Literature 

D. Church Music 

E. Theory and Composition 

F. Music Education 

G. Musicianship 
H. Chamber Music 
I. Choral Music 

J. Music Therapy 

K. Conducting 

L. Special Subject 

MUS 147 ABC Seminar in Music Education (3-3-3) 

Overview of the organization of music in the schools. Scheduling, 
length, and content of music offerings. Consideration of general 
music classes, chorus, glee clubs, orchestras, bands, ensembles, 
theory, music literature, and humanities. Observation and some 
supervised teaching. 

A. Emphasis on the total school music program. 

B. Emphasis on the Elementary School music program. 

C. Emphasis on the Secondary School music program. 

MUS 148 Collegium Musicum (1) 

Study, discussion, and informal performance of music from selected 
periods through the early eighteenth century. 

MUS 149 Research Projects in Music Education (1-3) 

Investigation of specific areas chosen by the student and related to 
music teaching in the schools. 

MUS 150 Accompanying (1) 

Study of the art of accompanying instrumentalists and vocalists as 
soloists and in small and large ensembles. May be repeated for 
credit. 

MUS 151A Creative Piano Teaching (2) 

MUS 151B Creative Voice Teaching (2) 

MUS 151C Creative Teaching — Instrumental Area (2) 

Analysis and comparison of various procedures for beginning and 
intermediate instruction. Approaches to the art of teaching. Review 
of materials. Guided teaching incorporated. 

MUS 152 The Arts in Western Civilization (3) 

Comparative history of musical, artistic, and literary forms and 
styles as they develop and interrelate throughout the civilizations of 
the West from the ancient Greeks to the present time. 

MUS 154 The Art of Teaching Choral Music (1-2) 

Organizational aspects of choral groups in church and schools. 
Study of rehearsal and performance techniques, voice production 
and repertoire for various groups. 

MUS 155 Teaching Music Theory (2) 

The study, practice, and evaluation of various pedagogical ap- 
proaches to music theory. Evaluation of text and teaching materials. 

MUS 156 Teaching Music Literature (2) 

The study, practice, and evaluation of various pedagogical ap- 
proaches to music literature. Evaluation of texts and teaching mate- 
rials. 

MUS 157 Seminar in Church Music (2) 

Historical perspectives of sacred music and its use in various litur- 
gies. Current trends and repertoire. 



Courses of Instruction/95 



MUS 158 The Art of the Harpsichord (1-3) 

The mechanism and technique of the harpsichord. Overview of 
selected music from the masters of the harpsichord. 

MUS 159 Music of Women Composers (1-2) 

An overview of "herstory" in music from the twelfth century to the 
present. Includes a study of the lives of women composers, educa- 
tional and sociological barriers affecting women's contributions to 
music, and pertinent scores and recordings. 

MUS 160 Interpretation of Renaissance Choral Music (1-2) 

Study, analysis, and performance of choral literature from the 
golden age of polyphony. 

MUS 161 Experiments in the Arts (1-3) 

Current trends and developments in the fine arts; emphasis on 
music. 

MUS 162 Folk Music of Europe and America (2) 

Exploration of the treasury of folk music from selected European 
countries and America. 

MUS 163 American Music: From Imitation to Creation (3) 

A survey of the development of American music as it reflects the 
time and place of its creation. 

MUS 165 Business in Music (3) 

A seminar explaining music merchandising, radio and television 
industry, publishing, performance management, recording, and 
other areas of the music industry. 

MUS 166 Music in Non-Western Cultures (2) 

A survey of music in the life and culture of the non-western world; 
examination of theoretical aspects of non-western music, instru- 
ments, forms, and performance. 

MUS 190 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 



Nursing 



NUR 5 Orientation to Nursing (2) 

An introduction to concepts underlying the philosophy of nursing, 
the role of nursing in society, an understanding of the person as a 
bio-psycho-social being, and an assessment of well persons, using 
the Roy adaptation model of nursing. Prerequisite: PSY2, Psychology 
of Communication . B.S. program. 

NUR 20 Introduction to Medical Science (3) 

Theory basic to diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of persons 
with common biophysical pathology. Concepts of health and dis- 
ease as related to the stages of (a) disease foundation and predisease 
factors, (b) presymptomatic disease conditions, (c) symptomatic 
diseases, and (d) irreversible conditions. Pathology is studied as a 
disruption in the body's structure, function, and regulatory 
mechanisms. Pharmacology is taught as related to each pathological 
process. A. A. program. 

NUR 21A Nursing Science Theory I (2) 

Lecture, 2 hours. An introductory study of the concepts underlying 
the Roy adaptation model of nursing, the role of nursing in society, 
interpersonal relationships, and the understanding of the 
physiological need areas of man. Offered in the fall semester of the 
freshman year. A. A. program. 

NUR 21B Nursing Science Theory I (2) 

Lecture, 2 hours. The continued use of the Roy adaptation model of 
nursing to identify nursing problems, and its use in selected inter- 
ventions in physiological, self-concept, interdependence modes 
and role function. Prerequisite: NUR 21 A. Offered in the spring 
semester of the freshman year. A. A. program. 



NUR 24AB Nursing Practicum I (4-4) 

Laboratory, 12 hours. The development and application of the pro- 
cess of assessment, intervention and evaluation using the Roy adap- 
tation model in the care of adult patients who have common health 
problems. The principles and practice of nursing skills utilized in the 
plan of therapy, including medications. Selected experience in 
health agencies. Covers two semesters, Freshman Year. Taken con- 
currently with NUR 21AB. A. A. Program. 

NUR 30ABCD Medical Science (1 Vz-l V2-I V2-I V2) 

Lecture, IV2 hours. The continued study of the theory basic to 
prevention of disease, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. Spe- 
cial emphasis on (A) Childbearing Cycle (B) Children (C) Complex 
Medical or Surgical Disruptions (D) Mental Health. Pharmacology is 
taught as related to each pathological process. Offered Fall/Spring, 
Sophomore Year. Taken concurrently with NUR 31 ABCD and NUR 
33ABCD. Each semester the student must enroll in NUR 33A&B or 
NUR 33 C&D. A. A. Program. 

NUR 31ABCD Nursing Science, Theory II (1-1-1-1) 

Lecture, 1 hour. The focus is the bio-psycho-social impact of the 
health-illness problems related to (A) Childbearing Cycle (B) Chil- 
dren (C) Complex Medical or Surgical Disruptions (D) Mental 
Health. The Roy adaptation model is used in the assessment, inter- 
vention and evaluation process. Offered Fall/Spring, Sophomore 
Year. Each semester the student must enroll in NUR 31A&B or NUR 
31C&D. A. A. Program 

NUR 33ABCD Professional Practicum (2V2-2V2-2V2-2V2) 

Laboratory. Clinical experience is offered in a variety of settings 
using the Roy adaptation model in dealing with health problems. 
Offered Fall/Spring, Sophomore Year. Each semester the student 
must enroll in NUR 33A&B or NUR C&D. A. A. Program. 
NUR 33 A Practicum: 

Childbearing Cycle. Provides clinical experience in prenatal, deliv- 
ery, and postnatal care, study of the parenting roles, and the health 
needs of the emerging family groups. 

NUR 33B Practicum: 

Care of Children. Provides clinical experience in the health-illness 
problems encountered in the care of children and their families. 
Growth and development from infancy through adolescence in 
terms of the Adaptation Theory of Nursing. 

NUR 33C Practicum: 

Care of the Adult. Provides clinical experience in the care of adult 

patients with more complex medical or surgical disruptions. 

NUR 33D Practicum: 

Mental Health. Provides clinical experience in the application of 

principles and concepts related to psycho-social problems. 

NUR 34 Sophomore Seminar (2) 

A study of nursing as a profession. Emphasis is on the historical 
development of nursing, nursing legislation, organizations, profes- 
sional problems in education and practice, and the nurse's role in 
health care services. Concepts of team nursing are taught in this 
course. A. A. program. 

NUR 40 Introduction to Roy Adaptation Model 

A course designed for LVNs who meet admission requirements of 
the department and wish to challenge the first year nursing classes. 
Course content deals with the Roy adaptation model and its applica- 
tion in the clinical setting. Selected experiences in clinical practice 
are required. Course work is equivalent to 6 units of academic credit 
and is utilized as challenge examinations for receiving credit for 
N21 AB and N24 AB. This course precedes the sophomore year. 
Ordinarily offered during summer session. A. A. program. 



96/Courses of Instruction 



NUR 98/198 Independent Studies (1-3) 

Independent investigation of significant problems in nursing. Pre- 
requisite: consent of the instructor. 

NUR 99/199 Special Studies in Nursing (1-3) 

Selected problems: offered as a course or seminar on current issues 
in nursing. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

NUR 100 Introduction to Professional Nursing 

A course offered to registered nurses (graduates of accredited hospi- 
tal diploma or associate degree programs) enrolled in the basic 
program leading to a baccalaureate degree. An introduction to the 
concepts underlying the philosophy of nursing, the process of as- 
sessment and intervention, and the Roy adaptation model as ap- 
plied to nursing practice. Selected experiences in clinical practice are 
required. Course work is equivalent to 6 units of academic credit and 
is utilized as challenge examinations for receiving credit for N005 
and N121 AB. This course precedes the senior clinical nursing 
courses. Ordinarily offered during summer session. 

NUR 111A Nursing Science (9) 

Lecture 4 hours; laboratory averaging 15 hours (increasing with the 
progress of the student's competence from 8 to 18 hours). A study of 
the concepts underlying the philosophy of nursing in society, inter- 
personal relationships, and an understanding of man as a bio- 
psycho-social being. An introduction to the process of assessment 
and intervention, the concept of adaptation, and the principles and 
practice of basic nursing skills in a variety of situations. Clinical 
experience in selected health agencies. Offered in the fall semester 
of the junior year, concurrently with NUR 120. B.S. program. 

NUR 111B Nursing Science (10) 

Lecture 4 hours; laboratory 18 hours. A continuation of the study of 
the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems on families 
and individuals of all ages. Emphasis is on the Roy Adaptation Level 
Theory and the assessment of the immediate and environmental 
factors affecting these levels. Methods of nursing intervention are 
stressed and developed. Clinical experience is provided in a variety 
of community health agencies, concurrent with the theoretical 
course content in the areas of maternity nursing, nursing of chil- 
dren, and medical- surgical nursing. Given in the second semester of 
the junior year. Prerequisites: completion of NUR 111A and NUR 120A. 
B.S. program. 

NUR 120AB Medical Science (3-3) 

Theory basic to diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of persons 
with common biophysical pathology. Concepts of health and dis- 
ease as related to the stages of (a) disease foundation and predisease 
factors, (b) presymptomatic disease conditions, (c) symptomatic 
diseases, and (d) irreversible conditions. Pathology is studied as a 
disruption in the body's structure, function, and regulatory 
mechanisms. Pharmacology is taught as related to each pathological 
process. B.S. program. 

NUR 121A Nursing Science (8) 

Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory averaging 15 hours (increasing with 
progress of student's competence from 8 to 18 hours). This course 
introduces the student to the principles and practice of basic nursing 
skills, the methodology for patient assessment, and the problem- 
solving approach to intervention, based on the Roy adaptation 
model. Clinical experiences in selected acute care agencies focus on 
the mastery of simple to complex nursing skills. Offered in the fall 
semester of the junior year, concurrently with NUR 120A. B.S. 
program. 



NUR 121B Nursing Science (9) 

Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 18 hours. A continuation of the study of 
the bio-psycho-social impact of health-illness problems on families 
and individuals of all ages. Utilization of the nursing process allows 
the student to assess facts relating to the person's position on the 
health-illness continuum. Methods of nursing intervention are 
stressed and developed. Clinical experiences are provided in a 
variety of acute care agencies specializing in maternal and child care. 
Offered in the second semester of the junior year concurrently with 
NUR 120B. B.S. program. 

NUR 131AB Nursing Theory (2-2) 

A study of the person's biophysical and psychosocial adaptation to 
the environment including causative factors and psychosocial reac- 
tions. Pathology is studied as a disruption in the body's structure, 
function, and regulatory mechanisms. Pharmacology is taught as 
related to each pathological process. Taken concurrently with NUR 
133AB in the senior year. B.S. program. 

NUR 133AB Nursing Practice (10-10) 

Lecture, 3 hours, laboratory 21 hours, for two semesters. A senior 
year course consisting of the study of nursing intervention for pa- 
tients and families with complex nursing problems. The role of the 
nurse in leadership, group dynamics, and health care planning is 
emphasized. Clinical experience is provided in a variety of health 
agencies in the areas of medical-surgical, psychiatric and commu- 
nity health nursing. Prerequisites: Senior standing and the completion of 
NUR 120AB and NUR 121 AB. B.S. program. 

NUR 134AB Issues in Health Care (3-3) 

A modular course examining selected issues in health care, focusing 
on the role of the professional nurse. Topics include: varieties of 
health care delivery, bioethics, nursing research, developments in 
nursing, legislation, and professionalism. Taken concurrently with 
NUR 131AB and NUR 133AB. B.S. program. 

NUR 301 Continuing Education (1-3) 

NUR 302 Inservice Education (1-3) 

NUR 303 Workshop in Nursing (1-3) 

Philosophy 

PHI 5 Logic: Structures of Reasoning (3) 

An introduction to the structures of correct deductive arguments; 
definitions, interpretations, truth, and validity; practice in the criti- 
cal evaluation of arguments occurring in everyday life. 

PHI 15 Challenges in Philosophy (3) 

An introduction to the basic problems and methods of philosophic 
inquiry; philosophy as the means for addressing fundamental ques- 
tions about the meaning of human existence. 

PHI 21 Moral Values and Ethical Decisions (3) 

An examination of the human person as free and responsible, the 
decision-making process concerning moral problems, and various 
philosophical theories of morality and their implications. 

PHI 24/124 Problems of Ancient Philosophy (3) 

An introduction to the origin of philosophical problems through 
readings from the ancient philosophers with special attention to the 
pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. 

PHI 62/162 Eastern Thought (3) 

An analysis and critical evaluation of the major religions of the Far 
East — Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism — based on 
central scriptures and writings of each. Prerequisite: 2 lower division 
courses. See RST 621162. 



Courses of Instruction/97 



PHI 125 Problems of Medieval Philosophy (3) 

An historical introduction to some philosophical problems and sys- 
tems in Western thought from the fifth to the fourteenth century. 

PHI 126 Problems of Modern Philosophy (3) 

The development of modern views on the relationship of reality and 
knowledge: the tension of reason and experience in classical modern 
rationalists and empiricists and the synthesis of Kant. Prerequisite: 2 
lower division courses. 

PHI 128 Contemporary Analytic Philosophy (3) 

An examination of the contemporary British-American tradition of 
philosophy focusing on problems concerning language: meaning, 
our ability to communicate, ordinary and artificial languagues. Pre- 
requisite: 2 lower division courses. 

PHI 130 Existential Thinkers (3) 

An examination of the existentialist trend in philosophy from Kier- 
kegaard to the present; the meanings of concepts such as alienation, 
anxiety, authenticity, and freedom in both philosophical and liter- 
ary works of existentialists. Prerequisite: 2 lower division courses. 

PHI 134 American Thought (3) 

An analysis of puritanism, rationalism, romanticism, and prag- 
matism and their effects in American civilization and culture. Pre- 
requisite: 2 lower division courses. 

PHI 136 Major Philosophers (3) 

A series of studies of the thought and philosophic context of one 
philosopher or group of philosophers: Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, 
Kant, the Enlightenment philosophers, French, Spanish, or English 
philosophers. Prerequisite: 2 leaver division courses. 

PHI 150 Metaphysics (3) 

An inquiry into the nature of reality, the possibility of metaphysical 
knowledge, the ramifications of metaphysics on questions about 
religion and morality. Prerequisite: 2 lower division courses. 

PHI 152 Theory of Knowledge (3) 

An examination of the nature and possibility of human knowledge: 
objectivity, perception, truth, self-knowledge and the knowledge of 
other minds, the conditions of justified belief. Prerequisite: 2 lower 
division courses. 

PHI 155 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Deductive methods in sentential and quantifier logic; formal lan- 
guages: formation rules and derivation rules; techniques on logical 
proofs; axiomatic methods. 

PHI 158 Philosophy of Science (3) 

An examination of the basic concepts and assumptions underlying 
scientific inquiry: the nature of explanation, theory, observation, 
and evidence in the natural and social sciences. Prerequisite: 2 lower 
division courses. 

PHI 160 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

An analysis of the grounds for belief and disbelief in God's existence 
in an historical context; rational arguments, religious experiences, 
religious language, and faith. Prerequisite: 2 lower division courses. 

PHI 168A Contemporary Moral Problems (3) 

A problem-oriented study of current moral issues. Prerequisite: PHI 
21. SeeRST168A. 

PHI 168B Bioethics (2-3) 

A study of the ethical, social and legal issues involved in contempo- 
rary developments in biology and medicine such as generics and 
birth, behavior control, euthanasia, experimentation, sterilization, 
allocation of scarce medical resources. Prerequisite: PHI 21 . See RST 
168B. 



PHI 168CDE The Individual and the Common Good (1-1-1) 

C. Individual Rights (1) 
An examination of individual rights in relation to the common good; 
emphasis on cases of conflict arising from recent developments in 
technology. 

D. Freedom of Inquiry and Freedom of Action (1) 
An examination of the relationship between freedom of thought/ 
action in relation to individual rights and the social good. 

E. Laic and Morality (1) 
An examination of the implications and effects of legislating moral 
standards. 

PHI 170 Social and Political Philosophy (3) 

An examination of the nature of man and of society, the nature and 
justification of government, political rights and political obligation, 
justice and equality. Prerequisite: 2 lower division courses. 

PHI 172 Marxism (3) 

An examination of some of the key works of Marx, Engels, and other 
writers in the Marxist tradition; consideration of the application of 
Marxist ideas to selected contemporary issues. Prerequisite: 2 lower 
diviswn courses. 

PHI 174 Aesthetics (3) 

A philosphical study of art in its various forms and/or theories 
concerning the nature of art, aesthetic experience, and art criticism. 
Prerequisite: 1 lower division course. 

PHI 176 Philosophy in Literature (3) 

A study of some of the important philosophical issues dealing with 
the meaning and value of life as presented in great works of litera- 
ture. Prerequisite: 1 lower division course. 

PHI 178 The Experience of Revolution (3) 

An examination of the meaning, history, and impact of revolutions 
in modern human culture; how political, social, scientific, and artis- 
tic revolutions differ from the evolution of political entities, 
societies, the sciences, and the arts; what we mean by revolutions in 
thinking. Prerequisite: 1 lower division course. 

PHI 180 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

PHI 195 Directed Readings (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

PHI 198 Special Problems (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

PHI 199 Senior Seminar (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

Physical Education 

See Special Programs. 

Physical Science 

PHS 1/101 Scientific Concepts (3) 

A course in the basic principles of chemistry and physics with 
particular emphasis on the application of these principles to con- 
temporary concerns. 

PHS 4/104 Elementary Environmental Studies (3) 

An introduction to the study of man's physical resources and envi- 
ronment leading to a consideration of the problems of conservation 
and pollution. Prerequisite: PHS 1. 

PHS 5/105 Selected Topics in Physical Science (3) 

Prerequisite: PHS 1. 



98/Courses of Instruction 



PHS 190/290 Workshop 

May be repeated for credit. 



(1-3) 



Physics 

PHY 1A Introductory Physics (3) 

Lecture, three hours. A study of motion including force, conserva- 
tion laws, vibratory motion, and wave motion; an introduction to 
light, field theory, electricity, magnetism and quantum mechanics. 
Prerequisite: Facility with algebraic manipulations. 

PHY IB Intermediate Physics (4) 

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. A study of the prop- 
erties of matter, thermodynamics, electrical circuits, optics, topics in 
astronomy and relativity. 
PHY 105AB Topics in Physics (1-3) 

Political Science 

POL 1/101 American Government and Institutions (3) 

An introduction to the principles and problems of government, with 
particular emphasis on the formation and development of the 
national and state administrative, legislative, and judicial systems 
and processes. Fulfills CPE requirement. 

POL 2/102 Comparative Politics (3) 

An investigation of the concepts and techniques which enable the 
student to compare divergent political systems, focusing upon both 
traditional and innovative concepts such as power, ideology, deci- 
sion making, elitism, and the structural- functional approach. Par- 
ticular attention is devoted to political systems. 

POL 10 Political Concepts (3) 

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the scope and 
techniques of political science by relating major concepts in political 
theory to current problems and issues. Major political theorists such 
as Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Hobbes, Hegel, and Marx are the focal 
point of analysis. In this way the contribution of political science to 
the understanding and clarification of political phenomena can be 
exemplified. 

POL 31/131 International Relations (3) 

A general survey of the institutions, considerations, and ideologies 
involved in the formation and execution of foreign policy within a 
world context. Special attention is placed upon international agen- 
cies, including the United Nations. 

POL 35/135 Selected Problems in International Organization (0-5) 

Particular emphasis is placed on the role of international organiza- 
tions and the maintenance of world peace. 

POL 70/170 American Party Politics (3) 

The development, organization and character of the American party 
system. Fulfills CPE requirement. 

POL 75/175AB Selected Topics in the American Political 
Structure (3-3) 

Specific area will be announced in the term schedules. Fulfills CPE 
requirement. Consent of instructor necessary for non-majors and 
non-minors. 

POL 103 Scopes and Methods in Political Science (3) 

An examination of the techniques and tools of analysis as well as the 
particular inquiries distinguishing political science from the other 
social sciences. Required of majors. 

POL 107 Political Economics (3) 

See ECO 107. 



POL 108 American Constitutional Law (3) 

See HIS 179. Fulfills CPE requirement. Consent of instructor neces- 
sary for non-majors and non-minors. 

POL 112 Contemporary Political Theory (3) 

A study of the major contributors to political theory from Marx to the 
present day, including such theorists as Dewey, Russell, Weber, 
Mosca, Pareto, Nehru, Maclver, Becker, Laski, Cole, et al. The 
normative approach will be deemphasized in favor of the descrip- 
tive and analytical approach. 

POL 113 American Political Theory (3) 

A critical examination of the contributors to the formation and 
sustenance of the consensual framework within which American 
government, politics, and society operate, with special attention to 
the great constitutional crises of the past 150 years. 

POL 116 Democracy and Democratic Theory (3) 

A critical examination of the major theorists of democracy in the 
twentieth century with emphasis upon both the justifications and 
preconditions of democratic government and society; in particular, 
insights derived from psycholgoy and sociology are utilized. Con- 
sent of instructor necessary for non-majors and non-minors. 

POL 117 World Political Theory (3) 

The history of man's attempt to explain the relationship of a man to 
governmental institutions with particular emphasis upon the values 
to be implemented by society. The time period spans the develop- 
ment of Greek political theory to the middle of the nineteenth 
century. 

POL 119 Concepts in Political Theory (3) 

Selected concepts to be dealt with in depth. Specific concepts noted 
in term schedule. 

POL 125 Foreign Relations of the United States (3) 

See HIS 178. 

POL 134 International Organization (0-5) 

An examination of the origins, structure, and practices of interna- 
tional agencies with special attention to the United Nations. The 
primary technique in this approach is an attempt at role-playing by 
virtue of participation in the Model United Nations. 

POL 146 Public Opinion and Propaganda (3) 

A study of the techniques utilized by professional public relations 
experts in the manipulation of public opinion as well as the 
strategies of electoral victory available to the political participant for 
the maximization of particular goals. 

POL 155 Comparative Politics of Selected Areas (3) 

An examination of the government, political practices, per- 
sonalities, and problems of selected areas. Specific area designated 
in the term schedule. 

POL 180 State and Local Government (3) 

A study of state political systems, including their administrative and 
local sub-systems; intergovernmental relationships; policy outputs. 
Fulfills CPE requirement. Consent of instructor necessary for non- 
majors and non-minors. 

POL 181 Political Participation (1) 

A course in which the student actively participates in a current 
political campaign. Seminars and informal discussions attempt to 
relate student experiences to the literature in the field. 

POL 185 Public Personnel Administration (3) 

The process of formulating and administering public personnel 
policies; concepts and principles utilized in selected governmental 
personnel systems. Special emphasis on collective bargaining in 
public employment. 



Courses of Instruction/99 



POL 186 Introduction to Public Administration (3) 

The executive function in government; principles of administrative 
organization, personnel management, financial administration, 
administrative law, and problems and trends in government as a 
career. 

POL 187 Organizational Theory and Governmental Manage- 
ment (3) 

Organizational structure, human factors in organization, dynamics 
of organizational change, internal adaptability to external environ- 
ment; problems, limitations, and trends in governmental organiza- 
tion and management. 

POL 190 Internship (3) 

Students in political science serve as interns working in the Los 
Angeles offices of public officeholders. 

POL 191 Internship in Government Service (3) 

Students in the public administration program serve as interns 
working in government offices in the Los Angeles area. 

POL 192 Plays and Politics (3) 

See ENG 192. 

POL 193ABCD Selected Problems and Projects in Political 
Science (1-4), (1-4), (1-4), (1-4) 

Subject announced in term schedule. 

POL 196 Experience-Oriented Courses in Political Science (3) 



Psychology 



PSY 1 General Psychology (3) 

An introduction to psychology as a scientific study of behavior. 
Focus on issues in learning, motivation, perception, personality 
development, and psychopathology". 

PSY 2 Psychology of Communication (2-3) 

A study of the use of communication as a two-way process of 
giving-receiving data, interpreting verbal/nonverbal behavior in a 
variety of interpersonal and group situations. 

PSY 12 Developmental Psychology (3) 

Theories of personality development and a review of current re- 
search; study of physical, mental, social, and emotional growth 
throughout the entire human life span; focus on factors that facilitate 
growth. 

PSY 13 Early Child Development (3) 

Study of the early years in human development. Focus on prenatal 
life and early childhood years as influential factors on the child's 
learning ability. Study of infant care and family life as these forces 
affect psychophysiological, emotional, social, motor, and mental 
development. Observation of children and experience in designing 
learning activities for young children in pre-school and elementary 
classrooms. 

PSY 33 Adjustment and Mental Health (3) 

A survey of the concepts of personal and community mental health 
including: the psychological principles contributing to mental 
health, the interaction of personality and environment, and an 
overview of human services agencies available in the community to 
individuals of all ages. 

PSY 40 Statistics (3) 

Collection and interpretation of statistical data, with emphasis on 
decision -making and limits of inference. 

PSY 77 Language Development of the Child (3) 

Introduction to theories of language learning and development. 



Study of normal verbal and non-verbal patterns as well as com- 
munication disorders. Methods and materials that enhance lan- 
guage development are studied and developed. Students are re- 
quired to observe and participate in a pre-school setting. 

PSY 99 Special Problems (1-3) 

Individual study of problem of interest. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

PSY 106 Experimental Psychology (3) 

Analysis and evaluation of published literature; design of experi- 
ments; use of experimental and statistical methods; survey of labora- 
tory apparatus; use of case study and naturalistic observation. Em- 
phasis on human experimental psychology. 

PSY 109 Movement Psychology (3) 

Exploration of human movement patterns in relation to personality. 
Therapeutic use of movement, integrating recent findings from 
kinesiology, dance, and mime. Study of the relationship between 
human skeletal adjustments and psychosomatic correlates. 

PSY 113 Child Development and the Learning Process (3) 

Application of child development principles to children aged four 
through twelve years. Curriculum design of elementary-aged chil- 
dren based on knowledge of their social, emotional, mental, and 
physical attributes. Prerequisite: PSY 1. 

PSY 123 The Adolescent and the Learning Process (3) 

A study of the developmental and behavioral characteristics of the 
adolescent. Emphasis on how individual characteristics and con- 
cerns influence the adolescent's ability and motivation to learn and 
how these factors affect the content and presentation of curricula. 
Prerequisite: PSY 1. 

PSY 125 Introduction to Counseling (3) 

A survey of the major methods of psychological counseling with 
emphasis on the underlying theoretical framework. Included will be 
consideration of both traditional and contemporary individual and 
group methods. Demonstrations and limited practical experiences 
will focus on paraprofessional applications. 

PSY 127 Psychology of Development and Aging (3) 

Study of behavioral development throughout the adult life span; 
exploration of attitudes, values, and motivation insofar as they 
affect and are affected by environmental and biological changes 
associated with aging. Course, conducted as a seminar, includes 
field work. 

PSY 132 Personality (3) 

Comprehensive study of the structure and dynamics of personality 
as viewed by various theorists. Implications of theoretical formula- 
tions. 

PSY 133 Psychology of Disability and Adjustment (3) 

An exploration of the effects of physical disabilities on mental 
health. Conditions fostering personality development and con- 
tinued personal growth in the physically disabled will be investi- 
gated, with an emphasis on the special problems of disabilities 
among the aged. Course includes field work. 

PSY 134 Learning (3) 

A comprehensive and critical examination of major psychological 
theories of learning and related research. Practical applications of 
learning principles are also discussed. 

PSY 135 Group Dynamics (3) 

A preliminary experiential and theoretical study of the nature, de- 
velopmental stages, interpersonal communication patterns and role 
dynamics manifested in group situations. Students will have the 
opportunity to participate in a variety of structured and unstruc- 
tured group exercises. 



100/Courses of Instruction 



PSY 137 Culture and Personality (3) 

A study of the relationships between cultures and personalities, 
including the "technocratic" personality of the industrial culture. 
Also focuses on language and personality, minority consciousness 
and the encounter group culture. 

PSY 145 Social Psychology (3) 

Theories of social psychologists; the influence of social structure on 
social character; the socialization process in forming the self and the 
person; institutional and cultural influences on role behavior; social 
control. See SOC 145. 

PSY 148 Personnel and Consumer Psychology (3) 

Study of the psychological principles and techniques used in a 
business setting. Topics include the psychology of work, personnel 
selection, appraisal, job analysis, placement training, production 
efficiency, and consumer behavior. 

PSY 152 Physiological Psychology (3) 

A study of the relationship of nervous, skeletal, muscular, glandu- 
lar, and circulatory systems to behavior. Introduction to theories of 
perception, motivation, and emotion and their physiological con- 
comitants. 

PSY 155 Psychological Testing (3) 

An introductory investigation of the field of psychological testing 
including an examination of history, theory, and construction of 
tests as well as a survey of principal individual and group tests of 
intelligence, personality, interest, and ability currently used in clini- 
cal and research settings. Special attention will be placed on the 
development of skills for evaluating the reliability, validity, and 
ethics of psychological tests and their applications. 

PSY 168 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Study of the concepts of mental health and mental illness. Introduc- 
tion to the different psychopathological entities and 
psychotherapeutic techniques. 

PSY 190 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

PSY 192 Clinical Practicum (3) 

Experience-oriented course designed to enable the student to apply 
the principles of psychology in real life settings. Field work options 
include areas of school psychology, gerontology, mental retarda- 
tion, emotional disturbances, learning disabilities, or probation 
work. Course includes weekly seminar oriented towards integrating 
experiences with theory. 

PSY 199A Special Problems (1-3) 

Individual study of problem of interest. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

PSY 199B Special Problems (1-3) 

Individual study of problem of interest. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

PSY 200 Research Methodology (3) 

Methodology of research; includes techniques of research, theory of 
research, experimental design, gathering data, and interpreting 
data. 

PSY 224 Dynamics of Individual Behavior (3) 

A study of the development and organization of the individual's 
personality structure as he perceives himself in his universe. 

PSY 225 Counseling Theory and Procedures (3) 

An in-depth exploration into the theory and methodology of coun- 
seling for the pupil personnel worker with emphasis on the profes- 
sional application of skills and theory. Students will participate in 



counseling practica experiences under the supervision of the in- 
structor. Prerequisite: PSY 125 or its equivalent. 

PSY 230 Measurements: Theory and Procedures (3) 

An advanced course in the evaluation, use, and interpretation of 
individual and group tests of intelligence, personality, interest, and 
achievement. Prerequisite: MTH 381138. 

PSY 235 Group Dynamics: Theory and Procedures (3) 

An investigation of group processes for individuals who have al- 
ready had experience working with groups. The emphasis will be on 
the concepts of group facilitation, productivity, evaluation and the 
application of group methods in teaching, counseling, and adminis- 
trative work. 

PSY 271 Appraisal of Exceptional Children (3) 

A study of the use of tools for assessing exceptionalities in children: 
statistical concepts in measuring abilities, principles of assessment- 
methods of administration and interpretation; assessment instru- 
ments; and the relationship of the results of assessment to the total 
evaluation of the child. See EDU 271. 

PSY 272 Disturbances in Child Development (3) 

Includes a study of the learning and behavioral development charac- 
teristics of the five major groups of exceptionality as they arise from: 
genetic and hereditary, neuro-physical traits, prenatal and neonatal 
development, nutritional factors, disturbances in sensory-motor, 
language, auditory and visual development, learning and 
problem-solving, social and emotional development, physical, 
locomotor, disease, physical injury, etc., and other specific effects of 
environmental and developmental processes. See EDU 172/272. 

PSY 273 Development of Programs for Children with Specific 
Learning Abilities (3) 

Provides the opportunity for the candidate to use the outcomes of 
assessment to plan specific programs of remediation or amelioration of 
basic psychological functioning, and enables him to participate in 
the actual implementation of these various plans through work with 
individual or small groups of children in the various categories of 
exceptionalities. See EDU 273. 

PSY 274 Counseling and Guidance of Exceptional Children (3) 

Primarily a study of human relationships, which provides the basis 
for the effective working relationships, both interpersonal and in- 
terprofessional, involving the complex situation of persons interact- 
ing with one another at all levels of the organizational social struc- 
ture. The student develops the ability to relate effectively with 
pupils, parents, co-workers, and resource personnel; becomes 
aware of legal and personal nature of this work; and learns to 
appreciate the sensitivity of the materials being used. This course 
also helps the student develop the ability to work harmoniously and 
effectively with all personnel, a necessary condition for the success 
of the staff toward a common goal of promoting the learning of 
children. See EDU 174/274. 

PSY 277 Language and Speech Disorders (3) 

Designed to acquaint the candidate in special education with normal 
language development, and with the causes, characteristics, and 
remediation of speech disorders and defects in the handicapped 
child. Includes observation, evaluation, and participation in pro- 
grams of speech development and therapy. See EDU 277. 



Religious Studies 



RST 4/104 Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (3) 

A study of the methods of modern biblical scholarship building on a 
consideration of revelation and inspiration; a consideration of 
selected themes of the Hebrew Scriptures. 



Courses of Instruction/101 



RST 5/105 Introduction to the Christian Scriptures (3) 

An examination of the synoptic gospel accounts, Johannine litera- 
ture, the Acts of the Apostles, and certain Pauline letters. 

RST 7/107 Introduction to the Study of Religion (3) 

The search for ultimate meaning in a technological age. 

RST 12/112 Catholicism (3) 

Catholicism's contributions to Christianity's traditions: for Catholics 
a reacquaintance, for others an introduction. 

RST 17/117 Education for Justice (3) 

An experience-oriented course which aids students to identify and 
examine critically their values and stereotypes by providing 
fieldwork with persons and groups who are working toward the 
creation of a just society. 

RST 20/120 Christian Ethics (3) 

An introduction to the study of moral decision-making from the 
perspective of Christian faith: the sources and nature of moral obli- 
gation, personal and social responsibility, freedom and sinfulness. 

RST 22/122 Bible as Literature (3) 

The Bible as art, shaped by human artifact in which the characters 
come alive through the storyteller's techniques of plot, theme, im- 
ages, voice, progress toward change. 

RST 35/135 The Sacraments (3) 

The Christian's individual and corporate response to God as seen in 
the sacramentality of Christ, the Church, and its worship. 

RST 62/162 Eastern Thought (3) 

See PHI 62/162. 

RST 78/178 Death and Dying: Religious Aspects (3) 

A treatment of the process of dying as it affects and is affected by a 
person's religious convictions; pastoral concerns about ministry to 
dying persons and major religions' teachings regarding such con- 
cepts as God and the afterlife. 

RST 92/192 Christian Fantasy (3) 

A search for beauty and the God who is immanent via the writings of 
20th Century authors, such as C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams, Susan 
Cooper and others. 

RST 93/193 Prayer and Poetry (3) 

Introduction to various techniques of prayer using the world around 
and the insights of poetry and Scripture. 

RST 99/199 Special Studies (1-3) 

May apply to any of the three areas of study, depending on subject 
matter; may be repeated for credit. 

RST 121 Theology of Liberation (3) 

A study of the essential freedom which is the Christian vocation, 
together with an examination of contemporary social issues and the 
possibilities for liberating others. 

RST 130 God: Yahweh, Christ, and Spirit (3) 

Theological bases and implications of affirming that God is Three- 
in-One. 

RST 131 Christology (3) 

Introduction to the classical and contemporary approaches to the 
person and mission of Jesus Christ. 

RST 132/232 The School as a Faith Community (3) 

Identifies the characteristics of a faith community and assists 
teachers and administrators in discovering and developing within 
themselves those qualities which promote such a community. 



RST 133 Christian Spirituality (3) 

An investigation of the Spirit's operation in our lives; the life of grace 
and prayer. 

RST 136 Ministry in the Church (3) 

An examination of the history of ministry in the Church and practice 
in methods of current participation in the ministry of Christ in our 
day: hospital, youth, parish. 

RST 137 Liturgy (3) 

The meaning, purpose, forms, and history of communal worship in 
the Church. 

RST 141 Prophetic Literature in the Hebrew Scripture (3) 

Introduction to the theology of prophecy and the writings of 
selected prophets. 

RST 142 Wisdom Literature (3) 

Selected books from the wisdom of Israel, showing the religious 
philosophy and insight into human nature of the pre-Christian era. 

RST 144 Synoptic Gospel Accounts (3) 

Origin, distinction, character, and exegesis of the works of 
Matthew, Mark, and Luke. 

RST 145 Johannine Literature (3) 

The Gospel according to John, the Book of Revelation, and the 
Johannine letters. 

RST 146 Pauline Literature (3) 

A study of the letters attributed to Paul, as well as the portion of Acts 
which deals with his mission. 

RST 155 Jewish Religious Thought (3) 

An investigation into contemporary Judaism. 

RST 160 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

See PHI 160. 

RST 168A Contemporary Moral Problems (3) 

See PHI 168A. 

RST 168B Bioethics (2-3) 

See PHI 168B. 

RST 170 Theology in Literature (3) 

An interdisciplinary investigation of themes in literature which de- 
monstrate the human search for the transcendent. 

RST 177 A Theology of Marriage (3) 

Judaeo-Christian impact on the human phenomenon of marriage. 

RST 179 Sociology of Religion (3) 

See SOC 195. 

RST 180 Practicum (1) 

Directed and supervised experience to provide students with at- 
titudes, skills, and competencies required in an area of ministry, 
e.g., hospital, parish, school, etc. 

RST 185 Senior Seminar (3) 

A course designed to provide for integration of the other aspects of 
the religious studies program: content, methods, and practicum. 

RST 190 Workshop (1-3) 

RST 195 Directed Reading (1-3) 

RST 272 A Philosophy and History of Christian Education (3) 

The history of the Judaeo-Christian educational tradition from its 
beginnings, through Western European influences, into contempo- 
rary United States. Specific attention to the influence of American 
pluralistic values and determinations of Vatican Council II regarding 
the role of the laity in the Church on such a tradition. 



102/Courses of Instruction 



Sociology 



SOC 4 The Family (3) 

The study of the family as a primary group and as an institution. 
Varieties of family patterns, pre-marital and marital behavior, 
child-parent relationships, and family disorganization and reor- 
ganization are considered. 

SOC 5 Sociological Perspectives (3) 

A basic course presenting the vocabulary of sociology; its concepts; 
the varied aspects of social structure and function of the rural-urban 
shift; with special emphasis on problems of minorities and of popu- 
lation increase. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division 
sociology courses. 

SOC 65/165 Development of Social Thought (3) 

An examination of selected types of social thought from primitive 
speculation to early modern scientific inquiry. 

SOC 104/204 The Family (3) 

The structure of the family as institution. Change as it affects the 
structure of the family, the functions it performs, and the definition 
of member roles. Involves a comparison of types of family systems. 

SOC 110/210 Deviant Behavior: Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

An analysis of basic theoretical orientations to social and personal 
disorganization of the juvenile in twentieth century American socie- 
ty. Special emphasis on contemporary problems and movements of 
the youth scene. 

SOC 111/211 Deviant Behavior: Criminology (3) 

An analysis of basic theoretical orientations to social and personal 
disorganization of the adult in twentieth century American society. 
An examination of the various types of individual and group de- 
viance. 

SOC 117 Research Methods (3) 

Study of the techniques and methods used in sociological research 
with a critical analysis of research studies. 

SOC 125/225 Comparative Social Structures (3) 

An examination of the basic social structures of society. A study of 
the similarities and differences between societies, including a com- 
parison of primitive and modern cultures. A special emphasis will 
be placed on the dominant American culture as contrasted with the 
subcultures in today's society, primarily, the Spanish-speaking 
sub-cultures. 

SOC 137 Culture and Personality (3) 

A study of relationships between culture and personality with a 
cross-cultural approach to determine what is universal and what is 
unique among peoples of the world. The processes of socialization, 
enculturation, cultural transmission and aging will be examined 
along with language and personality, minority consciousness, na- 
tional character and the technocratic personality in the industrial 
society. 

SOC 145 Social Psychology (3) 

See PSY 145. 

SOC 152 Group Processes (3) 

Systematic study of the formation, structure, and functioning of 
groups; analysis of group processes and group products from a 
variety of theoretical viewpoints. 

SOC 153 Sociology and Literature (3) 

A discussion of the usefulness of literature in the study of sociology. 
Particular emphasis on selected works that bring to life or actualize 
certain specific sociological theories. 



SOC 161/261 Dynamics of Majority-Minority Relations (3) 

A study of majority policies toward minorities and of alternative 
minority responses to prejudice and discrimination. Special em- 
phasis given to American minorities (racial and cultural) and to the 
impact of differential treatment upon minorities-within-minorities: 
e.g. children vis-a-vis the school, adults and employment oppor- 
tunities, and the aged in a youth-oriented society. 

SOC 166/266 Contemporary Sociological Theory (3) 

A critical evaluation of major contemporary sociological theorists as 
representative of various schools of sociological inquiry and 
analysis. 

SOC 175/275 Urban Sociology (3) 

A study of the change from rural to urban societies and the problems 
of adaptation created by this change. Major emphasis on the history 
or urbanization, demographic changes, the anti-urban bias, and 
social problems related to urbanization. Analysis of such problem 
areas as education, race, housing, poverty, welfare, taxation, etc. 

SOC 180/280 Social Stratification (3) 

An examination of systems of class and caste, with special attention 
to the United States; and exploration of such elements of stratifica- 
tion as status, occupation, income, and others; a thorough examina- 
tion of the style of life of minorities, the poor, the elite, and the 
middle class. 

SOC 185/285 Political Sociology (3) 

A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of 
the organization of power and an analysis of the social basis of 
power and political institutions. This understanding of politics is 
used to analyze political behavior, political bureaucracies, political 
movements, interest groups, and social change. A review of some 
cross-cultural research is included. 

SOC 189ABC The Sociology of Aging (1-1-1) 

A. Sociological Approaches to Aging (1) 
An exploration of the sociological definitions of aging, the demog- 
raphy of the aged and role changes, particularly from work to 
retirement. 

B. Social Stratification (1) 
Class and caste and the effects of social status upon the quality of life 
of the elderly. 

C. Economic Components (1) 
An emphasis on employment opportunities, financial resources, 
dependency and public layers of protection through programs of 
insurance and assistance. 

SOC 190 Social Change (3) 

An examination of the areas of social change in American society 
with an emphasis on understanding the past in order to project 
expected changes in the future. Attention is paid to the influences of 
internal and external factors upon social structures as well as the 
effect those changes have upon various segments of our society over 
the life-cycle. 

SOC 195/295 Sociology of Religion (3) 

Religious belief and religious behavior as they influence other di- 
mensions of social behavior. Social conditions as they influence 
belief and action. 

SOC 197 Applied Sociology (1-4) 

An opportunity to apply the principles of sociology to an area of 
special student interest. Directed study under the auspices of com- 
munity agencies. Prerequisites: three courses including Sociological 
Perspectives; Methods of Research; and one upper division sociology course. 
Permission of the instructor is required. 



Courses of Instruction/103 



SOC 198 Readings in Sociology (1-6) 

Intensive and independent study in a field of special interest at the 
culmination of one's sociological work. 

SOC 199 Special Studies (1-6) 

A more advanced or specialized treatment of an area covered in the 
regular course list. 

SOC 212 Contemporary Social Issues (3) 

An explication and analysis of the institutional disjunctions, the 
conflict between value systems, and the stresses between majority 
and minority groups in contemporary society. Special emphasis on 
America's largest minorities with Spanish-speaking minorities as 
cases in point. 



Spanish 



SPA 1, SPA 2 Elementary Spanish (3-3) 

Develops fundamental skills in speaking, reading, understanding, 
writing. Use of the language laboratory is required. Classes feature 
demonstration, active practice and exchange in Spanish. 

SPA 3 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Continues the development of all four language skills, emphasizing 
vocabulary building, perfecting pronunciation, increasing fluency. 
Language Laboratory use is required. Class conducted in Spanish. 

SPA 4AB Intermediate Spanish (3-3) 

Continues the development of the four language skills. Selected 
literature and culture readings discussed and analyzed in Spanish to 
enrich vocabulary and improve writing ability. 

SPA 8 Phonetics and Conversation (3) 

Concentrates on the fundamentals of phonetics, vocabulary' build- 
ing, and conversation at the intermediate level with emphasis on 
correct intonation and pronunciation. Prerequisite: SPA 3. 

SPA 9AB Spanish for the Medical Worker (3-3) 

Essential Spanish vocabulary and phrases for a variety of medical 
situations including admitting, taking case history, emergency 
room, delivery room, inhalation therapy, outpatient care and pre- 
paring for surgery. Patient and medical worker role-playing is stres- 
sed. 

SPA 10 Spanish for Business (3) 

Essential Spanish for all secretarial procedures, writing business 
letters, making introductions, conducting interviews, managing of- 
fice public and personnel relations. 

SPA 25AB Advanced Grammar (2-2) 

A thorough review of the structure of the language with concentra- 
tion on the more complex points of Spanish grammar; exercises in 
prose composition. Prerequisite: SPA 4AB. 

SPA 42/142 History and Civilization of Spain (3) 

A background course for the study of Peninsular literature. Histori- 
cal, social and cultural development of Spain. Prerequisite: SPA 4AB. 

SPA 44/144 History and Civilization of Spanish America (3) 

A background course for the study of Spanish- American literature. 
Historical, social and cultural development of Spanish America. 
Prerequisite: SPA 4AB. 

SPA 94/194 Study/Travel (1-6) 

SPA 103 Morphology and Syntax (3) 

Patterns of the Spanish language: verbs, word structure and word 
distribution. 



SPA 109 Stylistics and Composition (3) 

Analysis of basic stylistic elements of each of the genre. Readings 
and oral written and oral analysis of selected masterpieces. Prerequi- 
site: SPA 25 A. 

SPA 112AB Introduction to the Study of Spanish Literature (3-3) 

An introduction to poetry, fiction and drama tracing the develop- 
ment of each genre from the Middle Ages to the present. Special 
attention given to literary theory and criticism for appreciation of 
works studied. 

A. From the Middle Ages to 1700. 

B. From 1700 to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 4AB. 

SPA 115/215 Applied Linguistics: Spanish as a Second Language (3) 

The linguistic approach to the teaching of Spanish. 

SPA 118/218 Historical Grammar; Spanish as a First Language (3) 

Origins and development of the language to modern times. 
Suggested for teachers. 

SPA 123 Literary Expression of Medieval Thought (3) 

Themes, ideas, and forms of medieval literature as an expression of 
the life, thought and attitudes of the middle ages: poetry, prose and 
drama. Prerequisite: SPA 112 A. 

SPA 124/224 Golden Age Literature (3) 

The development of Renaissance and Baroque writing from Gar- 
cilaso to Calderon. Interpretation and analysis of selected poems, 
plays and novels. Prerequisite: SPA 112 A. 

SPA 130/230 Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature (3) 

Romanticism, Realism and Naturalism as manifested in the works of 
representative authors. Detailed study and analysis of selected 
works. Prerequisite: SPA 112B. 

SPA 132/232 Studies in the Generation of 1898 (3) 

The spirit of the Generation of '98 as reflected in the works of major 
representative authors. Intensive analysis of selected works. Prereq- 
uisite: SPA 112B. 

SPA 135/235 Peninsular Literature of the Twentieth Century (3) 

Major trends in peninsular poetry, theater and prose fiction from 
1898 to today. Intensive study of specific authors and critical 
analysis of selected works. Prerequisite: SPA 112B. 

SPA 138/238 The Literature of Colonial Spanish America (3) 

Examines pre-conquest, conquest and colonialization of the 
Spanish-speaking New World in documents, chronicles, letters, 
fiction, poetry and theater. Prerequisite: SPA 441144. 

SPA 140/240 The "Modernista" Poets (3) 

A study of the literary significance of "Modernismo" in Spanish- 
American poetry through an intensive study of its most representa- 
tive poets. Characteristics of the movement, its culmination and 
decadence. Interpretation and analysis of selected poems. Prerequi- 
site: SPA 112 AB. 

SPA 141/241 The Spanish American Novel from 1910 to the 
Present (3) 

After a brief consideration of the development of the Spanish- 
American novel, a detailed study of the genre of the early twentieth 
century, its social and literary significance. Interpretation and criti- 
cal analysis of representative works. Prerequisite: SPA 112B. 

SPA 143/243 The Spanish American Short Story (3) 

A study of representative short story writers of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries through critical analysis and interpretation of 
selected works. 



104/Courses of Instruction 



SPA 147 Literary Analysis (3) 

Introduction to the study of literary devices, figures of speech and 
the differentiation of literary genres. 

SPA 190AB Special Studies (3-3) 

Courses designed to investigate areas of special literary interest: 
genres, authors, themes. Internship program in areas related to 
Spanish. 

SPA 191 Senior Thesis (1) 

Spanish majors must complete a senior thesis in literature under the 
direction of a department member, enrolling in SPA 191, Senior 
Thesis, during the term in which they complete the work. Upon 
acceptance of the paper by the department, the student receives one 
unit of credit and no grade. 

SPA 199AB Independent Studies (1-3, 1-3) 

Directed readings and research. For qualified students with the 
approval of the department. 

SPA 227 El Quijote (3) 

The meaning of Cervantes' masterpiece is sought through a careful 
study of its form and content. Past and current interpretations are 
examined. 

SPA 272AB Peninsular Literature Since the Civil War (3-3) 

Analysis of the principal literary and ideological characteristics of 
post-Civil War Spanish letters through study of (a) the novel, 
selected examples, and (b) the theater from Buero Vallejo's early 
works to the present. 

SPA 290 Directed Independent Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and acceptance by the department. 

SPA 299AB Independent Studies (1-3; 1-3) 

Directed readings and investigation. For qualified students with the 
approval of the department. 

SPA 331 Spanish for School Personnel, Level I (3) 

Develops the most fundamental conversational Spanish skills for 
the classroom as well as reading, understanding, and writing 
abilities. Language lab, active class practice, and exchange in 
Spanish. 

SPA 332 Spanish for School Personnel, Level II (3) 

Continues progress of basic Spanish conversational skills for the 
teacher. Stress is on participation in class conversation as well as on 
developing skills in reading, understanding, and writing. Language 
lab every session. 



Special Programs 



Academic Programs 

A maximum of six non-required units in this area may be 
counted towards the baccalaureate degree without 
permission of the Dean. 

Physical Education 

PED 7 Aesthetics of Dance (1-3) 

Study of the technical aspects of moving, creation of dances 
(choreography), philosophy and history of the dance, and critical 
appraisal and evaluation of professional dance performers. May be 
repeated for credit. 

PED 8 Dance Workshop (1-6) 

Application of techniques of dance with the opportunity for original 
performance. 

PED 9 Physical Education (V2-I) 

May be repeated for credit. 



Special Courses 

SPR 1 Personal Typewriting (1-2) 

Introduction to the basic typewriting skills; knowledge of the 
keyboard, letters, tabulation, vertical and horizontal centering, 
manuscripts, and business forms. Students expected to attain a 
minimum speed of 25-30 wpm. Only students with no typing 
knowledge or very minimal typing experience are eligible to register 
for this course. May not be counted toward the baccalaureate de- 
gree. 

SPR 11/111 Seminar (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 12/112 Studies in Humanities (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 13/113 Studies in Contemporary Society (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 14/114 Independent Study (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 15/115 Workshop (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 16A Leadership Seminar I (1) 

An introduction to the theory and issues of leadership, with particu- 
lar emphasis on the application of these principles to women in 
higher education. 

SPR 16B Leadership Seminar II (1) 

An investigation of the concepts and techniques of leadership which 
enables the student to assess individual leadership skills. Particular 
attention is devoted to the study of and participation in leadership 
skill-building workshops. 

SPR 18/118 Career Planning Seminar (1-2) 

Training in how to analyze one's needs, interests, skills and values; 
application to decisions about work, leisure time, choice of major 
and academic planning. Introduction to the most accurate sources of 
career information and traditional and non-traditional ways of find- 
ing a job, with special emphasis on resume writing and interviewing 
skills. Special topics such as integration of a career with family lfe 
may be discussed according to class needs. 

SPR 19 Personal Awareness (1) 

An application of Abraham Maslow's theory of a hierarchy of needs 
to the life of the student. It will explore what these needs are, how 
the resources of the college can help in meeting these needs, and 
how to be more successful and efficient in meeting these needs. 

SPR 20 Reading and Academic Study Techniques (3) 

An analytical method to strengthen reading efficiency: includes 
theory and practice to strengthen habits of systematic listening, 
notetaking, and techniques for handling related study problems: 
reference books, literary works, textbooks, and current academic 
readings. Credit for SPR 20 may not be counted toward the bac- 
calaureate degree. 

SPR 60A OUTREACH: Social Action (1-3) 

A multi-faceted community action program geared to help people in 
need. Approximately twenty- five hours of volunteer work under 
supervision in an approved agency or center and a weekly seminar 
required. May be repeated for credit. 

SPR 60B OUTREACH: Fieldwork (1-3) 

Consists of fieldwork related to a particular course or program. It 
extends the instructional process and awareness beyond the cam- 
pus in order to have career-related experience, to derive meaning 
from real-life situations, and to give community service. 



Courses of Instruction/105 



SPR 60C OUTREACH: Term (3) 

An interdisciplinary focus on a "problem" and its complexities 
either on or off campus. 

SPR 80 Group Experience 0) 

Intended to assist students in orientation to college by providing 
each student with the opportunity to make her own choices, recog- 
nize her own values, and set her own goals in a group situation. 
Each group member has the opportunity to (1) find meaning in her 
college studies and related experiences; (2) develop a greater under- 
standing of herself and others; (3) develop constructive feelings 
about herself; and (4) develop positive forms of behavior. 

SPR 98 Special Experience (1-3) 

This course has variable title, content, and credit It is designed to 
give students the opportunity to obtain credit for an experience 
obtained prior to or concurrently with their regular classes. The 
specific course title and description is prepared when the student 
enrolls in the course. A student may enroll in this course no more 
than three times. 

SPR 99 Special Experience: Independent Study (1-3) 

This course has variable title, content, and credit. It is intended to 
allow a student to engage in independent study un der the direction 
of a faculty member. The specific course title and description is 
prepared when the student enrolls in the course. A student may 
enroll in this course no more than three times. 

Extension Programs 

Units in this area are for enrichment and will be accepted 
toward degree only on an individual basis . 

Great Books Programs 

EXT 365 Great Books — Leadership Training Course (3) 

This course demonstrates the basic techniques for the selection, 
appreciation, and understanding of good literature for young 
people. It is designed for in-service teachers, business men and 
women, civic lay and professional groups. This is a three part 
course; all three parts must be successfully completed before credit 
is granted. 



Speech and Drama 



SPE 10/110 Public Speaking (3) 

Exercises in speaking before an audience; developing techniques of 
persuasive public utterance. 

SPE 13/113 Oral Argument (3) 

Techniques of organizing, constructing, and delivering oral argu- 
ment; group discussion and platform practice. 

SPE 15/115 Drama in Action (3) 

Training in performing and production aspects of the theater; occa- 
sional opportunity to discuss drama with work; ag artists, and visits 
to local dramatic productions. Course culminat s in public dramatic 
production. May be repeated for credit. 

SPE 191/291 Directed Study (1-3) 

Study in a field of special interest, under the direction of a depart- 
ment member. May be repeated for credit. 

SPE 192/292 Special Studies (3) 

In-depth exploration of special interest areas in the study of speech 
and drama. May be repeated for credit. 



Administration and Faculty 



108/Administration and Faculty 



Board of Trustees 

Sister Grace Ann Loperena, Chairman 

Sister Anita Joseph Aragon 

Sister Magdalen Coughlin 

Mr. James F. LeSage 

Sister Kathleen Mary McCarthy 

Sister Cecilia Louise Moore 

Dr. Frank R. Moothart 

Dr. Foster H. Sherwood 

Administrative Officers 

Sister Magdalen Coughlin, Ph.D., President 

Reverend Matthew S. Delaney, Ph.D., Dean fo: Academic Development 

Cheryl Mabey, J.D., Dean for Student Development 

Robert S. Geissinger, B.A., Director of Resource Development 

Reverend Sylvester D. Ryan, M.A., College Chaplain 

Sister Margaret Anne Vonderahe, M.Ed., Dear cf Associate in Arts Program 

Barbara A. Becker, Ph.D., Assistant to the Pre: ic.ent for Planning and Development 

Regents Council 

Mr. Daniel J. Gayton, Chairman 

Mr. Richard T. Aldworth 

Mr. Charles F. Bannan 

Mr. Jerome C. Byrne 

Mr. John L. Cecil 

Mr. Gordon Cooper 

Mr. William S. Culp 

Mr. William Dozier (Inactive) 

Mr. Jimmy Durante (Inactive) 

Mr. M. A. Enright 

Mr. Jerome E. Farley 

Mr. Thomas E. Fuszard 

Mrs. William Goodwin 

Mrs. Sally Snow Halff 

Mr. J. W. Hawekotte (Inactive) 

Mrs. Joseph L. Hegener 

Mr. James L. Hesburgh 

Mrs. Eleanore Kalmus 

Mrs. Peter Keller 

Mr. J. W. Kennedy, Jr. 

Mr. James F. LeSage 

Mrs. James F. LeSage 

Mrs. Lola McAlpin-Grant 

Mrs. Lawrence O. Mackel 

Mrs. Gregory J. Melanson 

Dr. Frank R. Moothart 

Dr. James B. Peter 

Mr. Gene N. Pruss 

Mr. Richard F. Schmid 

Dr. Foster H. Sherwood 

Mr. Edward J. Spillane 

Mrs. Edward J. Spillane 

Mr. William H. Steurer 

Mr. C. J. VerHalen 

Judge Richard L. Wells 

Mr. Harry L. White 



Administration and Faculty/109 

Academic and Student Development Staff 

Sister Jeanne Anne Cacioppo, M.A., Assistant Director of Financial Aid, Doheny Campus 

Sister Barbara Cotton, M.A., Director of Residence, Chalon Campus 

Sister Ruth Ellen Daly, M.S., Director of Learning Assistance Program 

Sister Mary Magdalene Digneo, M.A., Associate Dean for Student Development, Doheny Campus 

Sister Patricia Mary Dugan, B.A., Registrar; Director of Academic Counseling Center (January 1979) 

Sister James Marien Dyer, M.A., Associate Director of Residence, Chalon Campus 

Sister Joyce Marie Gaspardo, B. A., Campus Minister 

Mary Kathryn Grant, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Services 

Helen Hawekotte, B.A., Director of College Relations and Acting Director of Admissions 

Audrey Kelley, R.N., Health Service Coordinator 

Sister Catherine Therese Knoop, Ph.D., Director of Institutional Research 

Jane Melom, M.A., Consultant for Academic Advisory Services 

Mary Ann O'Brien, M.S., Director of Financial Aid 

Sister Helen Oswald, M.A., Registrar, Chalon Campus (January 1979) 

Laurence Press, Ph.D., Coordinator of Computer Services 

Lynda Sampson, M.L.S., Assistant Librarian, Doheny Campus 

Mary Anne Sterling, B.A., Assistant Director of Recruitment and Admissions, Doheny Campus 

Julia Surtshin, M.S., Assistant Director of Residence, Chalon Campus 

Sister Joseph Wilson, M.A., Assistant Registrar, Doheny Campus 

Sister Patricia Zins, B.A., Director of Residence, Doheny Campus 

Business Management and Development Staff 

William Blundell, Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds, Doheny Campus 

Sister Rosanne Bromham, Assistant to the Business Manger, Doheny Campus 

Sister Teresa Dunbar, Coordinator of Printing and Graphics 

Carlota Estrada, Bookstore Manager, Doheny Campus 

Deborah Fritz, Bookstore Manager, Chalon Campus 

Arlene Garvey, Associate Director of Development 

Katherine Korman, Director of Personnel 

Meryl Longenecker, Coordinator of Purchasing 

Sister Rose de Lima Lynch, Director of Alumnae Relations 

Sister Rose Bernard McCabe, Assistant Director of A" umnae Relations 

John Manning, Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds, Chalon Campus 

Sister Adrienne Clare Pereira, Coordinator of Facility Improvement and Planning, Chalon Campus 

Ata Shafiyoon, Director of Food Services 

Sister Anne Marie Sheldon, Director of Press Relations 

Sister Marie Bernadette Walsh, Director of Accounting and Business Office Manager 

Faculty 

-rSabbatical, 1978-1979 
*On leave, 1978-1979 

Alzobaie, Patricia Lei Lecturer in English 

B.A., California State University, Los Angeles; M.S., M.A., Ed.D. (Cand.), Univers ty of Southern California. 

Arnold, Sister Mary Frederick Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Ph.D., Loy <la University, Chicago. 

Bennett, Daphne Nicholson Professor Emeritus of English and Speech 

B.A., M.A. (Reg) Diploma in Dramatic Art, University of London; M.A., Ph.D., University of London; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Southern California; postdoctoral stu dy, University of Oxford, Shakespeare Institute, University of Birm- 
ingham. 

Bernhardt, Robert Lecturer in Music 

B.A., Union College, Schenectady, New York; M.M., University of Southern California. 



110/Administration and Faculty 

Bero, Francesca Instructor in Education 

B.A., Sacramento State University; M.A., San Francisco State University; Ph.D.,(Cand.), Claremont Graduate School. 

Block, Thomas Lecturer in Physical Sciences 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

tBonino, MaryAnn Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

Borchard, Sister Margaret Clare Academic Resource Personnel II 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.Ed., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Bower, Sister Annette Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Creighton University; Ph.D., University of Arizona, Tucson. 

Brosterman, Ronalee Lecturer in Dance 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Buck, Marjorie Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., University of New Mexico; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Bundy, Hallie F. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

Calloway, Sister Rose Gertrude Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Ph.D., Catholic LTniversity of America. 

Casey, Catherine Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N., Certified Midwife, England; B.S.N., California State University, Los Angeles; M.N., University of California, Los 
Angeles. 

Cho, Joan M. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N., M.S.N. , Indiana University. 

Clark, Alfred T., Jr. Lecturer in Education 

M.S., University of Southern California. 

Clifford, Sister Rose Catherine Associate Professor Emeritus of History 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Collette, Sister Mary Louise Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., University of California. Los Angeles. 

Cremins, Sister Pancratius Academic Resource Personnel I 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College. 

D'Agostino, Sister Imelda Instructor in Education 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., California State University, Northridge. 

Daily, Mary Instructor in Business/Consumer Studies 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.S., University of Missouri, Columbia. 

Delahanty, James Professor of Political Science 

B.S., M.A., Rutgers University; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of California, Los Angeles. 

Delaney, Matthew S. Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Immaculate Heart College; M.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Digges, Sister Laurentia Professor of English 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of America. 

Doan, Sister Rebecca Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Catholic University of America; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Doran, Matt Professor of Music 

B.A., B.M., M.Mus., D.M.A., University of Southern California. 

Driscoll, Sheila Instructor in Nursing 

B.S.N. , California State University, Los Angeles; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 



Administration and Faculty/111 

Dumont, Sister Michele Therese Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., California State University, Long Beach; Ph.D. (Cand.), Boston University. 

Dunne, Patrick J. Adjunct Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., California State College, Dominguez Hills; Certified Respiratory 
Therapist. 

Dyer, Sister James Marien Instructor in History 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Edwards, Sister Dorothy Mary Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., California State University, Northridge. 

Edwards, Sister Joseph Adele Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., University of Southern California. 

Ellison, Margaret D. Lecturer in Nursing 

B.S.N., University of Iowa; M.S.N., Yale University. 

Esbensen, Leonard Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., M.F.A., University of Colorado. 

Espinosa, Sister Teresita Associate Professor of Music 

B.M., Mount St. Mary's College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Southern California. 

Flynn, Sister Mary Evelyn Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., University of Southern California. 

Fors, Bonnie D. Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Lake Forest College; M.A., Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago. 

Frick, Eugene G. Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 

B.A., University of Dayton; M.A., Ph.D., Marquette University. 

Frostig, Marianne Professor of Special Education 

B.A., New School of Social Research, New York; M.A., Claremont College; Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

Gerber, Sister Aline Marie Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., University of California, Los 
Angeles. 

Gerber, Sister M. Hildegarde Academic Resource Personnel II 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), University of California, Los Angeles. 

Giardina, Mary Anne Academic Resource Personnel II 

B.A., Pacific Oaks College; M.S., Pepperdine University. 

Gilson, Jake Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Humboldt State University; M.F.A., Arizona State University. 

Grant, Mary Kathryn Lecturer in English 

B.A., Mercy College, Detroit; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Handley, Paul Lecturer in Biological Sciences 

B.A., La Verne College; M.S., California State University, Los Angeles. 

*Hanson, Brenda Instructor in Nursing 

B.S.N., M.S.N., California State University, Chico; Maternal Nurse Practitioner, University of California, San Francisco. 

Hanson, Joan Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of Michigan; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Harris, Doris Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., University of Southern California. 

Henehan, Sister Joan Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., M.A.S., University of San Francisco. 

Hicks, Mary E. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.P.H., University of Michigan. 



112/ Administration and Faculty 

Hoffman, Ruth Professor of Sociology 

B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 

Howard, Mary L. Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N. , Cornell University; M.S.N., Vanderbilt University. 

Jagla, Betty Lecturer in Nursing 

B.S., California State University, Long Beach; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Kauffman, Kathy C. Lecturer in Art 

B.A., University of Washington; B.A., University of Nevada; M.F.A., University of California, Irvine. 

Kristian, Mary Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Texas; M.A., Northwestern University; graduate study, University of Wisconsin, L' Universite de 
Geneve. 

Larkin, Sister Miriam Joseph Lecturer in Music 

B.M., Mount S. Mary's College; M.M., University of Southern California; graduate study, Oxford University, London; Pius 
X School of Liturgical Music, Fontainebleu, France. 

*Larkin, Sister Miriam Therese Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame; graduate study, Regina Mundi, Rome; University of 
California, Los Angeles. 

Leahy, Sister M. Gerald Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.S., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame; post- 
doctoral study, Harvard University. 

Leese, David Assistant Professor of English and American Studies 

B.A., Amherst; J.D., Northwestern University; Member, California Bar; M.A., Ph.D., Brandeis University. 

Levenson, Linda Lecturer in Nursing 

B.S., University of California, San Francisco; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Liederbach, Sister Mary Lynn, S.N.D. Lecturer in Economics 

B.A., Notre Dame College, Cleveland; M.A., Catholic University of America; M.L.S., Western Reserve University School of 
Library Science. 

Lingel, John J. Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Lawrence University; M.S., University of Southern California; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Lira, Gloria Lecturer in Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Concepcion, Chile; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), University of California, Los Angeles. 

Lubberden, Verle D. Adjunct Professor of Education 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern California. 

Lynch, Sister Margaret Academic Resource Personnel I 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., University of Southern California; European Study, Vergilian Academy, Rome. 

Lynch, Sister Rose De Lima Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Southern California; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; graduate study, Regina Mundi, 
Rome. 

Malone, Sister Elizabeth Anne Assistant Professor of Business 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., University of California, Los Angeles. 

McDonald, Sister Mary Leogene, S.N.D. Lecturer in History 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Loyola-Marymount University. 

McGinness, Rodger Assistant Professor of Business/Consumer Studies 

B.S., University of Colorado; M.B.A., Loyola-Marymount University. 

McKnight, Marilyn R. Lecturer in Special Education 

B.A., Stanford University; M.A., University of Cincinnati. 

Mescall, Sister Eloise Therese Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; graduate study, Sorbonne, Paris; Leval University, Quebec; 
University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Visiting Professor, University of Louvain, Belgium. 



Administration and Faculty/113 

Miller, Anne Marie Lecturer in Special Education 

B.A., Occidental College; M.Ed., Tufts University. 

Moore, Sister Marie Therese, S.N.D. Lecturer in Foreign Languages 

B.A., California State University, Northridge; graduate study, Mount St. Mary's College. 

Munch, Sister Paulanne Assistant Professor of Consumer Studies 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., St. Louis University; Internship, St. Louis University Hospitals. 

Murray, James Associate Professor of Art 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Art Center College of Design, Los Angeles. 

Nestor, Leo Cornelius Lecturer in Music 

B.A., California State University, Hayward; M.M., University of Southern California. 

Oard, Ronald J. Professor of History and Political Science 

B.A., Regis College; M.A., Creighton University; M.P.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., St. Louis University. 

O'Brien, Reverend George Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., St. John's College; M.A., Loyola-Marymount University; Ed.D., University of Southern California. 

Ols, Sister Mary Cornelius, S.N.D. Lecturer in Psychology 

B.S.E., St. John College, Cleveland; M.Ed., Loyola-Marymount University. 

Parnell, Patty Kay Lecturer in Education 

B.A., University of Arts and Sciences of Oklahoma; M.S., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California. 

Parolise, Anthony M. Lecturer in Special Education 

B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., University of Northern Colorado. 

Parsons, Sister Maura Jean Academic Resource Personnel II 

B.Ed., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Mount St. Mary's College; graduate study, University of Southern 
California. 

Pascale, Mario Adjunct Professor of Special Education 

B.A., Montclair State College, New Jersey; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Pena, Hilario Lecturer in Education 

B.A., M.A., Pasadena College; Ph.D., University of Madrid; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Perret, Sister Anne Louise Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Pettid, Sister Mary Helen Lecturer in English 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., University of California. Los Angeles. 

Pondozzi, Sister Jeannine Lecturer in English 

B.A., College of St. Rose; M.A., State University of New York at Albany. 

fPoush, Mary T. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.A., M.S., California State University, Los Angeles. 

Prickel, Donald Lecturer in Special Education 
B.A., B.S., Xavier University; M.S., Mount St. Mary's College. 

Rambo, Beverly Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., M.A., California State University, San Diego; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Reyzer, Margaret Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Purdue University; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Robbins, Sister Mary Reginna, S.N.D. Lecturer in Religious Studies 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; Diploma, Regina Mundi, Rome; M.A., Gregorian University, Rome; M.A., Loyola- 
Marymount University. 



114/ Administration and Faculty 



"Roberson, Marsha Instructor in Nursing 

B.S.N. , Public Health Certificate, University of California, Los Angeles. 

Roy, Sister Callista Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Royer, James S. Lecturer in Education 

B.F.S., M.S., M.Ed., University of Southern California; Ed.D., Brigham Young University. 

Ryan, Lawrence J. Associate Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.A., John Carroll University; M.A., East Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Windsor, Canada. 

Ryan, Reverend Sylvester 

B.A., St. John's Seminary; M.A., Immaculate Heart College. 

Salazar, Sister Regina Clare 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

Sampson, Lynda Marie 

B.A., Scripps College; M.L.S., University of Southern California. 

Sanders, Sister Marie Loyola 

B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.A., Catholic University of America. 

*Sawchuk, Mariette T. 

B.A., Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Schellin, P. Israel 

B.F.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Oregon. 

Schembri, Sister Dolores Cecile 

B.M., Mount St. Mary's College; M.M., University of Southern California. 

Schmitz, Mary 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., Arizona State University. 

*Schofield, Ann M. 
B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.S., University of California, San Francisco Medical Center. 

Schwab, Norman W. Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., M.A., California State University, Los Angeles. 

Sedgwick, Mary Academic Resource Personnel II 

B.A., M.A., California State University, Long Beach; M.A. in L.S., Immaculate Heart College. 

Servonsky, Jane Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Old Dominion University; M.S., California State University, Los Angeles. 

Sexton, Sister Mary Patricia Associate Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., University of California, Los Angeles; graduate study, Stanford; research and study 
of Dante's Divine Corned]/ in Florence and Rome. 

Shimotsuma, Sister Francis Xavier 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.F.A., Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles. 

Siebert, Eleanor 

B.A., Duke University; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Simson, Mimi A. 

B.A., Wilson College; M.A., University of Louisville. 

Sloper, Mary 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles 

Smythe, Emily E. M. 

B.S.N., Cowell University; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Snow, George E. 

B.A., Rockhurst College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder. 



Lecturer in Religious Studies 

Lecturer in Education 

Academic Resource Personnel I 

Assistant Professor of Business 

Assistant Professor of English 

Lecturer in Art 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Instructor in Nursing 

Associate Professor of Nursing 



Assistant Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Lecturer in Nursing 

Instructor in Nursing 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 



Administration and Faculty/115 

Stevens, Delores Lecturer in Music 

B.M., University of Kansas; Concert artist. 

Supple, Sister Michael Patrick Academic Resource Personnel II 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.L.S., University of Maryland. 

Taguchi, Patricia A. Lecturer in Nursing 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College. 

Taylor, Nancy S. Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Thimester, Renate Lecturer in Business 

B.A., University of London, Victoria College; Degre Superieur, University of Paris, Sorbonne; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Alabama. 

Thomas, Andrea Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., California State University, Los Angeles; M.N., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Turner, David A. Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Quincy College; M.A., Incarnate Word College; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. 

Upmeier, Sister Mary Joel, S.N.D. Lecturer in English 

B.A., Notre Dame College, Cleveland; M.A., Loyola-Marymount University. 

Uyidi, William T. Lecturer in Special Education 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

Vail, Marilyn I. Lecturer in Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

tVairo, Sharon A. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B:S.N., Wayne State University; M.S., University of Colorado. 

Van Landingham, Sister Joyce Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles. 

*Vaughan, Sister Judith Marie Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., California State University, San Diego. 

Vaughan, Sister Kieran Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.S., Mount St. Mary's College; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Veatch, Rita R. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

*Williams, Sister Mary Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of St. Catherine; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University; graduate study, University of Poitiers, France. 

Young, F. Roman Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., St. John's University, Toledo; B.S., Ed., Toledo Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Zeuthen, Marie Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles. 

Teacher Education Program — Cooperating Staff 

Sister Eileen Mary Connors, Principal, and Staff of St. Martin of Tours School 

Jack S. Furumura, Principal, and Staff of Coliseum Street School 

Josephine Jemenez, Principal, and Staff of Hamilton High School 

Florence Itkin, Principal, and Staff of Kenter Canyon School 

Angelene Kasza, Principal, and Staff of Norwood Street School 

Sister Eleanor Marie Ortega, Principal, and Staff of St. Vincent School 

Victor Placero, Principal, and Staff of Cortez Street School 

Lorna Round, Principal, and Staff of Brentwood School 

Robert F. Simpson, Principal, and Staff of Pasteur Junior High School 



116/Administration and Faculty 

Applied Music Faculty 

Piano: Mary Ann Bonino, Sara Compinsky, Eva Cooper, Leah Effenbach, Sister Teresita Espinosa, Mario Feninger, Sister 

Nancy Fierro, Joanna Graudan, Johana Harris, Robert Hunter, Sister Miriam Joseph Larkin, Randal Lawson, Maribeth 

Levine, Alice Rejito, Goldie Rodgers, Sister Dolores Cecile Schembri, Delores Stevens, Robert Turner, Reginald Stewart, 

Aube Tzerko, Earl Voorhies, Eugenee Ward 

Organ: Elfreda Baum, Harold Daugherty, Jr., Marcia Farmer, Sister Maura Jean Parsons 

Voice: Maurice Allard, Marjorie McKay Anwyl, Ruth M. Chamlee, Margrete Eddy, Helena Sundgren Fulton, John 

Guarnieri, Gaylan Lurwin, Peggy Bonini Kendel, Ruth Michaelis, Margaret Minks, Doris Leslie Niles, Vincent Pirillo, 

LeNore Porter, Florence Riggs, Seth Riggs, Anthony Scott, Gloria Toplit, Nolan Van Wey 

Harp: Dorothy Remsen, Dorothy Victor 

Harpsichord: William Neil Roberts 

Violin: Israel Baker, Manuel Compinsky, Glenn Dicterow, Shirley Marcus, Sybil Maxwell, Paul Shure, Henri Temianka 

Viola: Manuel Compinsky, Louis Kievman, Joseph Reilich, Sven Reher 

Cello: Joseph Di Tullio, Gretchen Geber, Raphael Kramer, Cesare Pascarella Victor Sazer 

Bass: Milton Kestenbaum. 

Flute: Burnett Atkinson, Louise Di Tullio, Matt Doran, Susan Greenberg, Arthur Hoberman, Luella Howard, Sheridan 

Stokes 

Oboe: William Criss, Terry Row, Gordon Schonberg, Salvatore Spano, Barbara Winters 

Clarinet: David Atkins, Kalman Bloch, Edmond Chassman, Gary Gray, Norman Herzberg 

Bassoon: Norman Herzberg 

Saxophone: Milton Hall, David Sherr 

French Horn: Vincent De Rosa, Ralph Pyle, Gale Robinson, Henry Sigismonti 

Trumpet: John Clyman, Stewart Rupp, James Stamp 

Trombone: Miles Anderson, John Daley 

Tuba: John Johnson 

Percussion: Thomas D. Raney, Kenneth Watson 

Recorder, Viol: Shirley Marcus 

Classical Guitar: Laurindo Almeida, Vincent Macaluso, Richard Pattie 

Nursing Program: Cooperating Agency Staff 

Gail Anderson, Associate Director of Nursing Education, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center 

Kaye Daniels, Executive Director, Hospital-Home Health Agency, Torrance 

Diana Downs, Assistant Administrator, Nursing Service, Daniel Freeman Hospital 

June Dyche, Inservice Director, Kaiser Foundation Hospital (Sunset) 

Mary Dee Hacker, Coordinator of Nursing, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles 

Mary Ann Hillyard, Assistant Director, Nursing Service, UCLA Center for Health Sciences 

Millie Holland, Director of Nursing, San Fernando Health Center, County of Los Angeles, 

Department of Health Services 
Naomi McGuinness, Supervisor of Inservice Education, Orthopedic Hospital 
Clara McKellar, Director of Nursing, Hollywood- Wilshire Health Center, County of Los Angeles, 

Department of Health Services 

Noreen Meinhart, Director of Staff Development, Dr. David M. Brotman Memorial Hospital 
Charlotte Meyers, M.D., Medical Staff, San Fernando Health Center, County of Los Angeles, 

Department of Health Services 
Lillian O'Brien, Executive Director, Visiting Nurse Association of Los Angeles 
Jean Presbery, Director of Nursing, Southwest Health Center, County of Los Angeles, 

Department of Health Services 
Marie Randolph, Educational Coordinator, St. Vincent's Medical Center 
Janet Spiller, Director of Nursing Education, Kaiser Foundation Hospital (West L. A.) 
Mary Tender, Director of Nursing Education, St. John's Hospital, Santa Monica 
Gwen Van Servellen, Assistant Director, Nursing Services, UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute 
Mary Waldron, Director of Nursing Service, Centinela Valley Community Hospital 
Marjorie Wells, Director of Nursing Education, Kaiser Foundation Hospital (Panorama City) 
Jo Wiseman, Director of Nursing, Hawthorne Community Hospital 



Index/117 



Index 



Academic Calendar 

Graduate and Extended Day, 5 

Undergraduate Program, 4 
Academic Counseling 

Associate Degree, 11, 13 

Bachelors Degree, 30 
Academic Course Fees, 5-7 
Academic Petitions 

Associate Degree, 16 

Bachelors Degree, 34 

Graduate Degree, 63, 64 
Academic Policies 

Associate Degree, 12-16 

Bachelors Degree, 27 

Graduate Degree, 63-65 
Acceleration Program for 
High School Students 

Associate Degree, 14 

Bachelors Degree, 32 
Accreditations, 3 
Add/Drop Period, 4-5 
Administrative Officers, 108 
Admissions 

Associate Degree Program 

Conditional Admission, 12 

"Freshman Requirements & 

Procedures, 11 

Special Admission, 12 

Transfer of Credit, 12 

Transfer Requirements & 

Procedures, 11-12 

Bachelors Degree 

Conditional Admission, 27 

Freshman Requirements & 

Procedures, 26 

Special Admission, 27 

Transfer of Credit, 27 

Transfer Requirements & 

Procedures, 26-27 

Graduate Program 

Acceptance, 62 

Application, 62 

Policies, 62 
Advanced Placement 

Associate Degree Program, 14 

Bachelors Degree Program, 32 
Aerospace Studies, 31, 72 
Alumnae Association, 8 
American Studies 

Bachelors Degree Program, 37 

Courses, 72 
Art Program 

Associate Degree, 18 

Bachelors Degree, 38 

Bachelors of Fine Art, 38 

Courses, 73-74 
Anthropology, 72 



Application for a Degree 

Associate Degree, 15 
Bachelors Degree, 33 
Graduate Program, 63 
Associate Degrees 

Art, 18 

Business, 18-19 

Liberal Arts, 19 

Nursing, 19-20 

Physical Therapy Assistant, 20-21 

Pre-School Teaching, 21-22 

Respiratory Therapy, 22-23 
Associate Degree Program 

Academic Policies, 12-16 

Admission Requirements and 

Procedures, 11, 12 

Classification of Students, 15 

Credit, 14 

Degree Application, 15 

Degree Requirements, 12 

Grading Policy, 15-16 

Honors, 13-14 

Learning Resources Center, 12-13 

Overview, 10 

Placement and Acceleration, 14 

Specializations 

Art Program, 18 

Business Program, 18-19 

Liberal Arts Program, 19 

Nursing Program, 19-20 

Physical Therapy 

Assistant Program, 20-21 

Pre-School Teaching Program, 21-22 

Respiratory Therapy Program, 22-23 

Student Development, 17 

Withdrawal, Probation, Dismissal, 16 
Attendance 

Associate Degree Program, 15 

Bachelors Degree Program, 33 
Audit of Courses 

Associate Degree, 6 

Bachelors Degree, 6 

Fees, 6 
Baccalaureate Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts 

American Studies Major, 37 

Art Major, 38 

Biological Sicences Major, 39-40 

Business Major, 40-41 

Chemistry Major, 42 

Child Development Major, 42 

Diversified Major, 43-44 

English Major, 44-45 

French Major, 45 

Gerontology Major, 45-46 

History Major, 46 

Mathematics Major, 47-48 

Music Major, 48-52 

Philosophy Major, 53-54 

Political Science Major, 54 

Physiobiology Major, 55 



Psychology Major, 55 

Religious Studies Major, 56 

Social Science Major, 56-57 

Sociology Major, 57-58 

Spanish Major, 58-59 

Bachelor of Science 

Biochemistry Major, 39 

Biological Sciences Major, 39-40 

Chemistry Major, 42 

Consumer Studies Major, 42-43 

Health Services 

Administrative Major, 46 

Home Economics Major, 46-47 

Nursing Major, 52-53 

Physical Therapy Major, 54 

Psychobiology Major, 55 

Bachelor of Music 

Music Major, 50-52 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Art Major, 38 
Bachelors Degree Program 

Academic Counseling & Services, 30 

Academic Policies, 27 

Admission Requirements & 

Procedures, 26-27 

Classification of Students, 33 

Declaration of Major, 33 

Degree Application, 33 

Degree Requirements, 27 

Educational Alternatives 

Program, 30-31 

General Studies Program, 27-28 

Grading Policies, 34 

Honors, 31-32 

Independent Study/Directed Study, 30 

Learning Assistance Center, 30 

Placement and Acceleration, 32 

Programs, See Baccalaureate 

Degrees 

Student Development, 35-36 

Withdrawal, Probation, 

Dismissal, 35 
Billing/Payment Policy, 5-7 
Biochemistry 

Bachelors Program, 39 
Biological Sciences 

Bachelors Program, 39-40 

Courses, 74-76 
Board of Trustees, 108 
Business 

Associate Degree Program, 18 

Bachelors Degree Program, 40-41 

Courses, 77-78 
Calendar, Academic 

Graduate and Extended Day, 5 

Undergraduate, 4 
Campuses, 2-3 
Career Planning, 11-36 
Change of Majors, 33 
Characterization of College, 2-3 



118/Index 



Chemistry 

Bachelors of Arts Degree, 42 

Bachelors of Science Degree, 42 

Courses, 78-79 
Child Development Program 

Bachelors Degree, 42 
Campus Ministry, 36 
Classification of Students 

Associate Degree, 15 

Bachelors Degree, 33 
College, Location and Objective, 2 
Conditional Status 

Associate Degree, 12 

Bachelors Degree, 27 
Consumer Studies 

Bachelors Degree, 42-43 

Courses, 79-80 
Continuing Education, 63 
Counseling 

Associate Degree, 11, 13 

Academic, Bachelors Degree, 30 

Career, 11, 36 

Personal 

Associate Degree, 11, 17 

Bachelors Degree, 35 

Placement Planning 

Associate Degree, 11, 13 

Bachelors Degree, 30 
Course Examinations 

Associate Degree, 15 

Bachelors Degree, 33 
Courses of Instruction, 72 
Course Classification, 33, 63 
Credit by Examination 

Associate Degree, 14-15 

Bachelors Degree, 32-33 

Fee, 6 

Graduate Degree, 64 
Credit/Non-credit 

Associate Degree, 15-16 

Bachelors Degree, 34 
Credit for Non-traditional 

Learning, 14-15, 32-33 
Credit, Transfer of, 12, 27 
Change of Registration 

See AddlDrop 
Dean's List 

Associate Degree, 13-14 

Bachelors Degree, 31-32 
Declaration of Major, 33 
Degree Application 

Associate Degree, 15 

Bachelors Degree, 33 
Degrees Conferred 

See: Associate Degree 

Baccalaureate Degrees 

Graduate Degree 
Degree Requirements 

Associate Degree, 12 

Bachelors Degree, 27 

Graduate Degree, 65-69 



Dismissal 

Associate Degree, 16 

Bachelors Degree, 35 

Graduate Degree, 65 
Diversified Major 

Bachelors Degree Program, 43-44 
Downpayment, Tuition, 5-7 
Drama 

See Speech 
Economics Courses, 80 
Educational Alternatives Program, 30-31 
Education Courses, 80-86 
Employment, Student 

Associate Degree Program, 17 

Bachelors Degree Program, 36 
English 

Bachelors Degree Program, 44-45 

Courses, 86-88 
English as a Second Language 

Courses, 88 

Program, 43-44 
Examinations 

Credit By: 

Associate Degree, 14-15 

Bachelors Degree, 32-33 

Graduate Degree, 64 

Placement 

Associate Degree, 14 

Bachelors Degree, 32 
Executive Secretary, 19 
Expenses 

See Fees, 5-8 
Extension Programs, 105 
Faculty Listing, 109-116 
Family Rights and Privacy Act, 3 
Fees 

Academic Course Fees, 5-7 

Auditing, 6 

Billing/Payment Policy, 5-7 

General College Fee, 6 

Residence, 7 

Special Fees, 6 

Tuition, 5 

Examinations, 6 

Refunds, 7 

Interterm, 7 
Financial Aid, 8 
Foreign Languages 

French, 88 

German, 89 

Italian, 91 

Spanish, 103-104 
Foreign Language Requirement, 30 
Foreign Students 

Associate Degree Program, 11, 12 

Bachelors Program, 26, 27, 30 

Graduate Program, 62, 63 
French 

Bachelors Program, 45 

Courses, 88 



Freshman 

Admission Requirements and 

Procedures 

Associate Degree, 11 

Bachelors Degree, 26 
Fulltime Students 

Associate Degree Program, 10-23 

Bachelors Degree Program, 26-60 
General Studies Program, 27 
German Courses, 89 
Gerontology 

Bachelors Degree Program, 45-46 
Grading Policies 

Associate Degree, 15-16 

Bachelors Degree, 34 

Graduate Degree, 64 
Graduate Certificate Programs 

Graduate Certificate for 

Personnel in Catholic Schools, 69 

Graduate Certificate in Teaching 

English as a Second Language, 69 
Graduate Credential Programs 

Services Credential 

Administrative Services, 67-68 

Bilingual/Cross-Cultural, 68 

Early Childhood, 68 

Pupil Personnel Services, 68 

Special Education, 69 
Graduate Degrees 

Master of Arts in Teaching, 65 

History Major, 65 

Spanish Major, 65 

Master of Science in Education, 65 

Administrative Service, 66 

Bilingual/Cross-Cultural, 66 

Early Childhood, 66 

Individually Designed Programs, 66 

Pupil Personnel Services, 67 

Special Education, 67 
Graduate Program 

Academic Policies, 63-65 

Acceptance, 62 

Application and Admission, 62-63 

Candidacy, 62-63 

Commencement, 63 

Continuing Education, 63 

Credit Limit, 63 

Grading Policies, 64 

Leave of Absence, 63 

Overview, 2 

Programs, 62 

See: Graduate Certificate Program 

Graduate Credentials Program 

Graduate Degrees 

Residence, 63 

Summer Session, 63 
Graduation 

Petition 

Associate Degree Program, 15 

Bachelors Degree Program, 33 

Graduate Degree Program, 63 



Index/119 






Requirements 

Associate Degree Program, 12 
Bachelors Degree Program, 27 
Graduate Degree Program 
With Honors 

Associate Degree Program, 14 
Bachelors Degree Program, 32 
Great Books Program, 105 
Grievance Procedure, 65 
Health Services for Students 
Associate Degree, 17 
Bachelors Degree, 36 
Fee, 6 
Health Services Administration 
Bachelors Degree Program, 46 
History 

Bachelors Program, 46 
Courses, 89-91 
Home Economics 

Bachelors Program, 46-47 
Honors 

Associate Degree, 13-14 

Bachelors Degree, 31-32 

Honor Societies, 32 

Human Services Courses, 91 

Human Services Program, 47 

Physical Therapy Assistant (A. A.), 20-21 
Respiratory Therapy (A. A.), 22-23 
Medical Secretary (A. A.), 19 
• Gerontology (B.A.), 45-46 
Health Services Administration (B.S.), 46 
Physical Therapy (B.S.), 54 
Incomplete (Grade) 

Associate Degree Program, 16 
Bachelors Degree Program, 34 
Graduate Degree Program, 64 
Independent Study 
Associate Degree, 13 
Bachelors Degree, 30 
Individually Designed Program 

Graduate Program, 66 
Insurance, 6 

Interdisciplinary Courses, 91 
Interterm 

Associate Degree, 13 
Bachelors Degree, 31 
Italian Courses, 91 
Journalism Courses, 91 
Junior Year Abroad, 31 
Leave of Absence 

Graduate Program 
Learning Assistance Center, 30 
Learning Resource Center, 12 
Legal Responsibility of the College, 3 
Legal Secretary, 19 
Liberal Arts 

Associate Degree Program, 19 
Loans, Student, 8 
Major 

Declaration, 33 
Change, 33 



Mathematics 

Bachelors Program, 47-48 

Courses, 91-92 
Medical Secretary, 19 
Music 

Bachelors of Art Program, 48-49 

Bachelors of Music Program, 50-52 

Courses, 92-95 
Nondiscrimination Policy, 3 
Nursing 

Associate Degree, 19-20 

Bachelors Degree, 52-53 

Courses, 95-96 
Office of Career Planning, 36 
Parents Confidential Statement, 8 
Part-Time Students 

Associate Degree Program, 15 

Bachelors Degree Program, 33 
Pass/No Credit Option 

Associate Degree, 15 

Bachelors Degree, 34 
Personal Counseling 

See: Counseling, Personal 
Philosophy 

Bachelors Program, 53-54 

Courses, 96-97 
Physical Education Courses, 104 
Physical Science Courses, 97-98 
Physics Courses, 98 
Physical Therapy 

Bachelors Degree Program, 54 
Physical Therapy Assistant 

Associate Degree, 20-21 
Physiobiology 

Bachelors of Arts Program, 55 

Bachelors of Science Program, 55 
Placement 
Associate Degree, 14 

Bachelors Degree, 32 
Political Science 

Bachelors Degree Program, 54 

Courses, 98-99 
Post Degree Students 

See Continuing Education 
Pre-Dental Program, 39 
Pre-Law Program, 55 
Pre-Medical Program, 39 
Pre-School Teaching 

Associate Degree Program, 21 
Probation 

Associate Degree, 16 

Bachelors Degree, 35 

Graduate Degree, 65 
Psychology 

Bachelors Degree Program, 55 

Courses/99-100 
Refunds, 7 
Regents Council, 108 
Registration, 4-5 



Religious Studies 

Bachelors Degree Program, 56 

Courses, 100-101 
Repetition of Courses 

Associate Degree, 16 

Bachelors Degree, 34 
Residence Life 

Associate Degree, 17 

Bachelors Degree, 36 
Residence Rates, 7 
Residence Refund Policy, 7 
Residency Requirements 
Associate Degree, 17 
Bachelors Program, 36 

Graduate Program, 63 
Respiratory Therapy 

Associate Degree Program, 22-23 
ROTC, 31 
Scholarship, 8 
Senior Status 

Bachelors Program, 33 
Social Science 

Bachelors Degree Program, 56-57 
Sociology 

Bachelors Degree Program, 57-58 

Courses, 102-103 
Spanish 

Bachelors Degree Program, 58-59 

Courses, 103-104 
Special Programs 

Courses, 104-105 
Speech and Drama Courses, 105 
Student Placement Office 

Associate Degree, 17 

Bachelors Degree, 36 
Student Development 

Associate Degree 

Associated Students of 

Mount St. Mary's College, 17 

Counseling Services, 17 

Delta Service Organization, 17 

Health Service, 17 

Insurance, 17 

Leadership Program, 17 

Religious Opportunitites, 17 

Residence Life, 17 

Student Nurses Association 

of California, 17 

Student Placement Services, 17 

Bachelors Degree 

Campus Ministry, 36 

Counseling Service, 35 

Health Services, 36 

Residence Life, 36 

Student Activities, 35 

Student Placement Office, 36 
Student Services 

Academic Counseling 

Associate Degree, 11, 13 

Bachelors Degree, 30, 35 



120/Index 



Developmen tal Services 

Associate Degree, 10-11 

Bachelors Degree, 27 

Financial Aid, 8, 17, 36 

Health Services 

Associate Degree, 17 

Bachelors Degree, 36 

Learning Assistance Center, 30 

Learning Resources Center, 12-13 

Living On Campus 

Associate Degree, 17 

Bachelors Degree, 36 

Personal Counseling 

Associate Degree, 11, 17 

Bachelors Degree, 35-36 

Placement and Career Planning, 36 
Summer Session 

Graduate Study, 63 

See Calendar 
Teacher Education Program, 59-60 
Transcripts 

Associate Degree, 16 

Bachelors Degree, 34 
Transfer Program 

Admission 

Associate Degree, 11-12 

Bachelors Degree, 26-27 

Transfer Credit Policy 

Associate Degree Program, 12 

Bachelors Degree Program, 27 

Graduate Program, 64-65 

From Doheny Campus, 23 
Tuition, 5-7 

Tuition Downpayment, 5-7 
Tuition Refund Policy, 7 
Withdrawal 

From Classes 

Associate Degree, 16 

Bachelors Degree, 34 

Graduate Degree, 64, 65 

From College 

Associate Degree, 16 

Bachelors Degree, 35 
Writing Competency, 28, 29, 30 




Mount St. Mary's College • Chalon Campus: 12001 Chalon Road, Los Angeles, California 90049, (213) 476-2237 
Doheny Campus: 10 Chester Place, Los Angeles, California 90007, (213) 746-0450 



DesignConcept: Van Noy & Company, Los Angeles Copy: Terry McFadden Photography: Tom Zimberoff, Jim Van Noy Printing: Penn Lithographies