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Full text of "Moving image review"

NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

=LM 



Moving image Review 

ISSN 0897-0769 



Winter 1988 - winter 2007 



Karan Sheldon 
6 Frothingham Street 
Milton, MA 02 186 
207 266-0477 



Northeast Historic F i { m 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



A Personal Welcome 
To Our Readers. 

Moving Image Review, published twice a 
year, will provide news and information 
about projects and ideas designed to 
preserve northern New England cultural 
heritage on film and videotape. We hope 
you will enjoy the newsletter, will con- 
tribute to it, and join in Northeast Historic 
Film's mission of learning and preserving. 

Working with NHF in the past year as 
President of the Board, I have been visited 
by some welcome ghosts from my Maine 
childhood. During the winters of 1945 and 
1946, 1 harvested ice on Lake Pen- 
neseewassee in Norway, Maine. A recent 
donation to NHF of an ice harvesting film 
shows the viewer that other world, those 
other times. I found I could recite the 
names of the tools, and probably could 
even do the work again. But then I 
remembered the temperature and the 
wind. 

Recently, we have been looking at some 
wonderful footage shot in Cherryfield in 
1938. One by one, individuals face the 
camera, some bold, some shy. The people 
are backed by the town's gas station, its 
grocery store, houses, schools and vehicles. 
At first, the film evokes an album of still 
photos, then as the images build with 
unexpected intensity, they involve you 
with the town's heroes and its hopes for the 
future. 

In the six minutes of this film there is 
an immense amount of information about 
the life of a small Maine town. Why the 
film was made is not yet known, but we 
hope to learn more about it and to locate 
other similar films worthy of study and 
contemplation. 

My role as President of the Board of 
NHF is a gratifying one for me. I'm pleased 




at the chance to participate in preserving 
our past and bringing back to life moving 
images that would otherwise be lost and 
forgotten. I welcome you as a friend of 
NHF, and hope that your involvement 
with our organization will be equally 
rewarding for you. 




David C. Smith 



David C. Smith is Professor of History and 
Cooperating Professor of Quaternary Studies 
at the University of Maine, Orono. Dr. Smith 
is a Maine native whose recent work includes 
the Yale Univ. Press biography of H.G. 
Wells, Desperately Mortal, a book in pro- 
gress on World War II letters and in 1988, a 
project on Rudy Vallee. 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
'Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Winter 1988 



Local TV Collections Go National p. 2 

Passamaquoddy Tribe Sees Long-Lost Film. p. 3 
Executive Director's Report p. 4 

IRS awards tax-exempt status to NHF 
Maine State Museum's New Video 
Installation p. 5 

A talk with museum director Paul Eivard 
Arts Commission Awards Grant p. 6 

Funds for conservation of a film collection 
Silent Film Fills "The Grand" p. 8 

Reconstructed Way Down East premieres 

in New England 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue Hill 
Falls, Maine 04615. David S. Weiss, executive 
director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 




photo: WAB1 

Election Night at WABI in 1962: First an NBC 
and now a CBS affiliate, WAEl has seen 
continuous ownership by the Hildreth family; 
it's now a member of the Diversified Com- 
munications Group. The general manager is 
George Gonyar. 

Two Decades Of 
TV Film To Be Preserved: 

Maine's largest and oldest broadcast 
collection. 

WABI-TV, the Bangor Historical Society 
and NHF are cooperating to save and 
make accessible to the public an estimated 
300 hours (roughly 650,000 feet) of uni- 
que 16mm film containing news, sports 
and commercials. The film was shot by 
Maine's first TV broadcaster, WABI-TV in 
Bangor, between 1953 and 1974. 

The footage had not been seen since it 
was put onto reels after airing on nightly 
news broadcasts. It has recently been 

(continued on pg. 2) 
Page 1 



:e 



National Conference 

Held for 
Local Television 
News Archives. 

The American Film Institute's National 
Center for Film and Video Preservation 
in October, 1987, sponsored the first 
national conference on local television 
news. It was attended by representatives 
from more than 50 archives, historical 
societies and television stations. 

The conference was hosted by the 
State Historical Society of Wisconsin 
and funded by the National Historical 
Publications and Records Commission. 

David Weiss, executive director of 
Northeast Historic Film, represented 
NHF's Bangor Historical Society/ 
WABI-TV Collection. Other New 
England archives present were WGBH- 
TV Boston, Boston University and the 
Christian Science Monitor. 

The conference was organized 
around the concepts of the ideal and 
the real. Presenters proposed ideals for 
preservation and cataloguing. Par- 
ticipants countered with their ex- 
perience in the real world. Sessions 
were oriented toward practical matters 
such as film and videotape preserva- 
tion, newsgathering technologies, 
copyright and inventory control. 

The value of archival TV. George 
Talbot, director of the State Historical 
Society of Wisconsin, stated in the con- 
ference's keynote speech that "local 
television is a vast mass of ordinariness. 
Therein lies the biggest threat to its 
preservation, and the most important 
reason why it must be preserved." Local 
TV portrays an accurate picture and 
valuable record of the ordinary texture 
of life in our society. 

The October conference marked a 
beginning in more clearly defining an 
archival field. Now, fundamental ques- 
tions must be answered such as how 
much television material exists and how 
to encourage preservation of today's 
broadcasts. H 




(WABl-TVcontinued 'from pg. 1) 

transferred to NHF's temperature and 
humidity controlled vault, and is the sub- 
ject of a preservation effort with major 
materials costs and countless hours of 
detailed cataloguing. 

Widespread public use expected. The 
potential for enjoyment, educational and 
even commercial use of this resource is 
enormous. Towle Tompkins, WABI-TV 
program manager, predicts: "\bu'll find 
University of Maine students utilizing the 
collection for projects, and not just jour- 
nalism or broadcasting students." He ex- 
pects commercial use of film footage as 
well, for example, inclusion in documen- 
taries and corporate productions. 




photo: V'ABI 



Cultural significance cited. Robert 
Croul, president of the Bangor Historical 
Society, stresses the cultural significance 
of the film. He presided at a gala event 
sponsored by the Society in November, 
"Memories Made in Maine," highlighting 
the post-war years. NHF's 15 -minute 
compilation of television clips from the 
50s fascinated viewers who watched Presi- 
dent Eisenhower receive a Penobscot 
salmon, the WABI-TV studios 30 years 
ago, jets at the now closed Dow Air Force 
Base, and commercials, one of them 
advertising blouses for $2.99! 

WABI-TV donates video transfers. 
WABI-TV has generously committed 
staff and technical services for the 
transfer of the film footage to videotape. 
Towle Tompkins stated that the station is 
pleased to donate its resources. "As 
television stations become more aware of 
the history of their medium, they will 
try to preserve it and educate audiences 
about it," he commented. H 



NHF Conducts Search EDI 
Maine-Made Motion Pictures. 

Northeast Historic Film is undertaking 
the first comprehensive survey of profes- 
sional and significant amateur film and 
videotape shot in Maine. We are collect- 
ing information on all works known to 
have been filmed or taped in the state, 
whether or not they physically exist today. 
This information will be made available 
to researchers, educators and filmmakers, 
and will result in a significant gain in 
knowledge, and awareness, ultimately 
leading to further preservation. 

The earliest known surviving Maine 
motion picture film shows 15 seconds of 
a man standing in a dory pulling lobsters 
out of a trap. It was made in 1902 by the 
American Mutoscope and Biograph 
Company, and is preserved at the Library 
of Congress. 

From the time this fragment of mo- 



' 







Page 2 



tion picture history was shot to tonight's 
television news, thousands of film and 
videotape records by and /or about 
Maine people have been made in the 
state, and are of interest to the region. 
Dramatic, industrial, informational and 
amateur, they are stored in libraries, 
closets, attics, garages, barns and 
basements. Some are available for ex- 
hibition, most are long forgotten. 

By gathering information about film 
and videotape, NHF can begin to piece 
together the moving image history of this 
region, and make strides in ensuring the 
preservation and physical accessibility of 
footage that still exists. 

If you have information about film or 
videotape that you believe should be in- 
cluded in our survey, please return the 
form on page 7, or call NHF at (207) 
374-2736. H 



NHF Gratefully 
Acknowledges Support. 

Two executives with a personal interest in 
New England and regional film preserva- 
tion have taken the lead in supporting 
NHF. 

Paul Gelardi, president of Shape 
Video Inc. , Biddeford, Maine, one of the 
country's largest producers of injection 
molded products and videocassettes, 
donated videotape stock. NHF uses the 
tape for reference copies. 

Rick Nopper of Beckett Corporation, 
Lionville, Pennsylvania, donated im- 
printed archival labels for film cans and 
videotape boxes. Beckett's archival labels 
are used by, among others, the Library of 
Congress and the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion's Human Studies Film Archives. 

In addition to these donations in 
kind, many hundreds of individuals 
made financial contributions at NHF 
summer 1987 screenings. We would like 




to thank all those who helped us get off 
to such a great start, and special thanks 



to: 



The celebration of Maine's centennial in 1920 in Deering Oaks Park, Portland, was covered by 
an as yet unknown cinematographer, and also in this photograph from the collections of the 
Maine Historical Society. 



Maine Arts Commission 

Maine Humanities Council 
Corporate donors 

Bar Harbor Banking and Trust 
Company 

Boston Light & Sound, Inc. 

M.A. Clark Florist 

The Knowles Company 
and to: 

The Ellsworth Historical Society 

Marilyn Gass 

Mrs. Phyllis Hodgkinson 

Robert L. Jordan 

Ed and Sally Lupfer 

Dr. and Mrs. Ned Kendall 

Mr. and Mrs. PH. Sellers. 



Passamaquoddy Tribe Sees 
Long-Lost Film. 

Penobscot and Passamaquoddy Indians 
dance in traditional dress in a unique, 
high quality 1920 film recently returned 
to Maine. 

Wayne Newell, a planner with the 
Passamaquoddy tribal government, says 
that the film is a very valuable record of 
activities and artifacts of more than 60 
years ago. 

Newell is undertaking the task of an- 
notating the film with information 
gathered from area residents. Besides the 
interest of today's costume makers, "the 
children are fascinated by it," he 
discovered. His own teenagers, all of 
whom are dancers and participate in 
traditional dances, were very interested to 
see the 1920 event. "They've never seen 
anything that old," said Newell, "not 
about us, anyway." 

A single nitrate print of the film was 
discovered in storage at John E. Allen, 
Inc. , in New Jersey. In order to preserve 
the film during the summer of 1987, 
Northeast Historic Film made ar- 
rangements to transfer the film to safety 
stock and return a copy to Maine in time 
for a screening at Portland's Maine 
Festival in August. H 



Pag 



Executive Director's Report. 

IRS awards NHF tax-exempt status. 

During 1987, the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice declared NHF a non-profit 
organization serving the public welfare 
with its mission of preserving and mak- 
ing available northern New England 
film and video. The continuation of this 
tax-exempt status, however, and thus the 
continuation of NHF itself, depends on 
NHF's ability to demonstrate that it is a 
"publicly supported organization." This 
means that at least one third of our 
operating budget must come from in- 
dividual contributions. 

The exemption from Federal income 
tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Inter- 
nal Revenue Code makes NHF eligible 
to apply for grants from charitable 
foundations. 

In addition, individuals and cor- 
porations are notified that, in the 
unmistakable prose of the IRS: "Donors 
may deduct contributions as provided in 
section 170 of die Code. Bequests, 
legacies, devises, transfers or gifts are 
deductible for Federal estate and gift tax 
purposes if they meet the applicable pro- 
visions of sections 2055, 2106, and 2522 
of the Code." 

Because we do not have a develop- 
ment office, NHF is unable to make ex- 
tensive calls or send out mass mailings 
requesting support. We depend on our 
Moving Image Review readers to con- 
tribute generously and to pass the word 
along to interested friends and 
acquaintances. 




David S. Weiss 
II 



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photo: Daniel M. Maher, Jr. 

The young Daniel Maher, Sr.'s, International 
Newsreel I. D. card, 1924. Maher covered 
events for various newsreel companies all over 
Maine and eastern Canada. 





Mary Astor in her second film, a Holman Day production. From outtakes in the Everett Foster collects 

NHF Collections Grow 
Steadily During 1987. 



Increasing awareness of NHF goals and 
efforts resulted in a gratifying flow of 
motion picture contributions. Through- 
out 1987, materials came in by the single 
can and by the diousands of feet. 

Major donations include the Everett 
Foster Collection, with two 1920-21 two- 
reelers made in Maine by novelist and 
filmmaker Holman Day, as well as 
Foster's own productions made over a 15 
year period in die state. NHF also re- 
ceived the nitrate film of Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Maher, Jr. , produced by Daniel 
Maker, Sr., one of Maine's newsreel 
pioneers between 1919 and 1933. 

A sampling of other additions to our 
archives includes: 

16mm family films from Philip J. 
Abbott oi Eastport, Maine, which in- 
clude summer colony life in Harpswell 
(1926-28). 

The Robert M. Hume, Sr., Memorial 
Collection, 23 reels of 16mm film from 
1930 to 1950, was donated by James B. 
(Ben) Hume of Dover-Foxcroft. Hume 
was superintendent of the Great North- 
ern Paper Co. mill, and his footage 
depicts early logging technology. 



A film of Cherryfield in 1938 came 
from the Cherryfield-Narraguagus 
Historical Society. NHF is preserving the 
original 16mm footage, and has made 
copies of this local record available for 
Cherryfield residents to study and enjoy. 

Everett Johnson of South Pordand 
contributed his 16mm b&w film, Cut- 
ting Ice, which shows ice harvesting in 
what is now an urban area adjacent to 
Rte. 295 in Pordand. 

A rare 1915 Hearst-Selig newsreel 
story, which shows a saboteur's attempt 
to blow up the Vanceboro bridge con- 
necting die U.S. and Canada, was 
donated by Elizabeth low. Cooperative 
preservation is taking place with the 
University of California, Los Angeles. 

Constance Seavey donated film of 
Mt. Desert Island activities, winter and 
summer 1926, and other film from her 
father's collection. Her father ran several 
theaters on Mt. Desert in the 1920s. 



Page 4 



1916 Bluebird Film 
Found in Barn 

The Musem of Modern Art Department 
of Film, New York, recently received the 
only surviving copy of the 1916 Bluebird 
feature, The End of the Rainbow, 
directed by Lynn Reynolds, who later 
directed Tom Mix films. 

Alice Witham Boothby of Sebago 
Lake, Maine, discovered the five reels in 
her house's corn chamber an attached 
barn while preparing the property for 
sale. 

Boothby 's father, Harold G. 
Witham, an inventor and electrical 
engineer, owned and operated theaters 
in Sebago Lake Village, Steep Falls, 
Hiram, and East Sebago between 1915 
and 1929. 

NHF, as part of its effort to assist in 
preservation of film in the region, 
handled the Maine appraisal of the film 
and delivered the nitrate to New York for 
preservation in October, 1987. 

Eileen Bowser, curator of the MOMA 
Department of Film, noted the impor- 
tance of inter-institutional cooperation 
and suggested that Maine audiences 
might enjoy seeing the film once the 
safety copy was made. 

Mrs. Boothby 's recollections of her 
father's business were useful to NHF, as 
we seek information on film exhibitors 
from relatives, collectors and anti- 
quarians who can shed light on film 
distribution and audiences in the region. 
Written records are of particular interest. 



Further Reading. 



Q. David Bowers, Nickelodeon Theatres 
and Their Music, Vestal, NY: The Vestal 
Press, 1986 

Jay S. Hoar, Small Town Motion Pictures 
and Other Sketches of Franklin County, 
Maine, Farmington, Me: Knowlton & 
McLeary, 1969 

David Naylor, Great American Movie 
Theaters, Washington, D.C.: The Na- 
tional Trust for Historic Preservation, 
1987 



Paul Rivard, 

director of 

the Maine State 

Museum. 




Maine State Museum 

Creates Moving Image 

Exhibit. 

In an interview with Paul Rivard, direc- 
tor of the Maine State Museum, Karan 
Sheldon, vice president of Northeast 
Historic Film, gathered information 
about the museum's new logging exhibit 
which features a 4 ' x 5 ' video screen 
showing woodsmen in action. A motion 
sensor triggers the video system when 
museum visitors enter the exhibit. 

Sheldon: 

Is this the first time you have used this 
technology for moving image in an open 
exhibit area? 
Rivard: 

It's the first time that we have done 
anything with videotape that is this 
large. 

Sheldon: 

Are you following a model? 
Rivard: 

We're not following a model, but I'd 
be very surprised if it were unique. I am 
certain it's been done, but ours is not 
derivative of anything we've seen. 

Sheldon: 

There was some concern that the film 
would distract viewers and cause traffic 
problems. 
Rivard: 

It has not been a problem. In fact, I 
think it's terrific. Very definitely a great 
asset. The maintenance so far has been 
excellent, and we're having very little 
difficulty with it. 



Black and white 16mm film from the collections of the Maine State Museum 
(including Pete Sawyer film), Fogler Library Special Collections, and NHF was 
transferred to 1" videotape, and edited at VP Studios, South Portland. Exhibit 
planner was Norman Payne, the display system was designed by Ayer Elec- 
tronics, and the results can be seen at the Maine State Museum in the cultural 
building, Augusta. 



photo: Greg Hart 



Sheldon: 

What do moving images add to an 
exhibit? 
Rivard: 

If you have an artifact, and you want 
to express how it runs or what it does or 
how it was used, the label copy can be 
too complex for anyone to bother to 
read. If you can show the thing visually 
then you have expressed the idea. Mov- 
ing images interpret the use of an ar- 
tifact and you don't have to express it 
verbally. Second, they allow you to have 
people in the scene in a way that you 
can't in the exhibit. And third, if you're 
using historic footage, then the footage 
itself is a form of artifact. It's a great suc- 
cess and we're very happy we've done it 
and we'll be doing it again, that's for 
sure. 



Page) 




photo: Museum of Modem Art/ Film Stilts Archive 

Aboard a schooner in New Harbor, Maine, Richard Barthelmess embraces Louise Huffjor Henry 
King's The Seventh Day (1921). Maine was one of King's favorite locations; he shot four films in the 
state, on the coast and inland. 



Film Exhibition In 1987. 

NHF's screenings in 1987 surpassed our 
hopes for public attendance and en- 
thusiasm. Our cosponsors and funders 
were exceptionally pleased, which bodes 
well for the future of historic film and 
video exhibition. 

We feel that the purpose of film 
preservation is public education and enjoy- 
ment. We hope that our successful season 
of showings in 1987 will encourage other 
groups to become involved as well. 

On January 21, 1987, the Maine 
Maritime Museum winter lectures in 
Bath opened with an evening on the ice 
industry. Curator Nathan Lipfert's pro- 
gram featured NHF's newly preserved 
16mm film, Cutting Ice. Preservation 
funds came from the Maine Humanities 
Council and the Maine Maritime 
Museum . 

On July 10, NHF and the Pemaquid 
Historical Association sponsored a screen- 
ing in Bristol, Maine of Henry King's 
The Seventh Day, attended by 800 peo- 
ple. Donations at the door helped to 
underwrite the cost of obtaining the 
print. The film had been brought to our 
attention by Wayne Reilly of the Bangor 
Daily News; his father remembered the 



filming in New Harbor in 1921, and had 
seen the film in Bristol when last shown 
in 1925. 

D.W. Griffith's Way Down East was 
shown at The Grand Auditorium in 
Ellsworth, Maine on August 7. Excellent 
publicity in local papers as well as in 
Down East magazine and Maine Times, 
helped to ensure standing room only for 
the two and half hour silent film accom- 
panied by live music. The Hancock 
County Auditorium (The Grand), a non- 
profit community organization, assisted 
with the event which was funded by the 
Maine Arts Commission (National En- 
dowment for the Arts) and Bar Harbor 
Banking and Trust Company. 

NHF competed for and won a spot at 
The Maine Festival, August 21-23, an arts 
event in Deering Oaks Park, Pordand. It 
was the first use of NHF's booth, de- 
signed for festivals and fairs. Besides a 
display showing different film gauges, 
NHF distributed printed materials and 
continuously screened more than a dozen 
different films, from Billy Bitzer's 1906 
fishing at Rangeley Lakes to a Maine 
Alliance of Media Artists anthology. 



NHF Receives First 
Arts Commission Grant! 

Alden Wilson, executive director of the 
Maine Arts Commission, informed NHF 
of its first grant award for "Conservation 
of a Maine Film Collection." The com- 
mission noted the importance of having 
an in-state archives for film and video 
collections. 

The grant is helping make protection 
copies of unique, original or best surviv- 
ing material from the Everett Foster col- 
lection, specifically the Holman Day 
and Walter Mitton films. 

Holman Day, poet, novelist and 
filmmaker, founded a production com- 
pany in Augusta in 1919 and with ac- 
tor/director Edgar Jones produced up- 
ward of two dozen two-reelers. 

Walter Mitton captured a different 
Maine. A professional engineer, Mitton 
was a talented amateur filmmaker who 
recorded unembellished views of the 
state's communities from the 1930s to 
the 1950s. 




A production still from one of Holman Day's 
films, Everett Foster Collection, NHF. 



Page 6 



Preservation Services 
Offered By NHI 

NHF offers preservation services in- 
cluding climate-controlled storage and 
technical advice to individuals and 
organizations. A donation or deposit can 
be arranged through a written agree- 
ment between the owner of the film or 
videotape and NHF. Often a copy of the 
material is provided by NHF to the 
donor at no charge. We encourage 
climate-controlled storage, critical to the 
life of film and videotape, and offer our 
vault as a repository for regional 
material. 

Donation or deposit, however, is by 
no means a prerequisite for working with 
us. We're also happy to work on a con- 
sulting basis with organizations retain- 
ing physical control of their material. In 
the past year we consulted with, among 
others, the Ellsworth Historical Society, 
Acadia National Park, the North Woods 
Arts Center and The Peary-MacMillan 
Arctic Museum at Bowdoin College. In 
return for technical assistance, we learn 
more about film made in the region, 
and establish new professional working 
relationships. 

By way of general advice, we strongly 
discourage the projection of any film 
which may be a sole surviving copy. We 
also encourage owners to contact NHF or 
any other motion picture archives before 
disposing of film thought to be on 
nitrate stock. Misconceptions about 
cellulose nitrate abound. With extreme- 
ly rare exceptions, 16mm film is not 
nitrate-based. If you have any questions 
about your films, please contact us. H 



Wanted: Obsolete Equipment! 

BMHMlMBIM^MHMMMMMH^^HMiHBMi^P^^MBBBi 

NHF is always on the lookout for film 
and video equipment. Recently, we were 
lucky to find a l / 2 " open reel videotape 
player in superb shape. 

Projectors, splicers, sound- 
readers 16mm equipment of all 
kinds is gathering dust in many schools 
and libraries. The same applies to 
videotape equipment. 

As technology changes, it is im- 
perative that we obtain and maintain 
outdated technologies. If you have or 
know of unwanted equipment, please 
contact us. Donations are tax deductible. 

NHF Statement Of Purpose. 

The purpose of Northeast Historic Film is to 
preserve, and make available to the public , historic 
film /videotape of the northern New England 
region. This purpose will be carried out by ac- 
tivities including, but not limited to, a comprehen- 
sive survey of moving picture resources of interest 
to the people of northern New England , the preser- 
vation of historic film /tape through restoration, 
duplication, providing of technical guidance, and 
vault storage; a touring program to bring historic 
films to audiences throughout the area; and the 
establishment of a study center, including resource 
materials and reference copies of motion picture 
films and videotapes. 




Board of Directors _ 

President: Dr. David C. Smith, professor of history, 
University of Maine, Orono. 

Vice President and Executive Director: David S. 
Weiss, Blue Hill Falls, Maine. 

Treasurer: Pamela Winde, acting director, Human 
Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian 
Institution, Washington, D.C 



Karan Sheldon, vice president 
Gretchen Volenik, office manager 




D I would like to help support NHF's Moving Image Review. Enclosed is a \ 
donation for publication and distribution in 1988. 



D Here is my additional contribution to support NHF's programs. $. 
Donations are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. 

D I have information about film /videotape made in Maine. 
Please send a survey form. 



Name_ 

City 

Phone 



Address. 



_State_ 



_Zip_ 



D Please check if this issue was incorrecdy addressed, and fill in correct address above. 



Do you know someone who might like to receive Moving Image Review? If so, please list names and 
addresses. 



Silent Film Fills 
The Grand." 

August, 1987, Grand Auditorium, 
Ellsworth, Maine: Northeast Historic 
Film presented the first New England 
screening of Way Down East, D.W. Grif- 
fith's classic drama, reconstructed by the 
Museum of Modern Art's Department of 
Film. 

Presenting live musical accompani- 
ment was one of the challenges and 
achievements of the event. With the 
Library of Congress's reconstructed score, 
preparation and rehearsal proved a sum- 
mer's work for pianist Elizabeth Beatty. 

Beatty's performance was awarded a 
standing ovation by a packed house at 
the Grand Auditorium. She was accom- 
panied by her daughter, Betty Beatty, 
soprano, and Bill Schubeck and Heidi 
Daub on fiddle and guitar. 

Another major element of the exhibit 
was arranging for silent speed projec- 
tion. With equipment from Boston 
Light & Sound, Inc., David Parsons, 
owner of the Milbridge Theatre, per- 
suaded sound speed Simplex projectors 
to run at silent speed. 

Lillian Gish, who starred in the 1920 
film, sent her congratulations to the 
musicians and NHF after the perfor- 
mance. She wrote: "It is of course vital 
that silent film be shown at the proper 
speed; otherwise it is laughable in all the 
wrong ways. And there is no such thing 
as silent film. The non- talking pictures 
were always accompanied by music 
from a piano to a full symphonic or- 
chestra." 

Way Down East was a sellout well in 
advance and NHF regrets that many of 
our friends were unable to obtain tickets. 
This and other silent film screenings, 
new to the area in the 1980s, are attract- 
ing large audiences and seem to have a 
wide appeal for old and young. 

Additional thanks for making this 
presentation possible go to sponsors the 
Maine Arts Commission, Regional Arts 
Program and Bar Harbor Banking and 
Trust Company. 




photo: Roy Zalesky, The Ellsworth American 



Lillian Gish looks out at Betty Beatty, who plays from D.W. Griffith's score, Way Down East. Northeast 
Historic Film sponsored the first New England screening of the reconstructed film. 




NORTHEAST HISTORIC FILM 

I BLUE HILL Ml IS. MAINT. 1'SA 04615 (207) .174-2736 | 



NONPROFIT ORG. 
US POSTAGE PAID 
Blue Hill Falls, Maine 
04615 
Permit *2 



ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



Page 8 



Northeast Historic Fil 



m 



MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 




i u ?n ?n e r 



Executive Director's Report p.2 

Why not Project Fragile Film? p.2 

by Pamela VC'mlle, Smithsonian 

Institution. Human Studies Film Archives 
TV Film Preservation Project 

Boosted hy Major Contributions p. 3 

Grants in Action 

Manic Arts (.ommission 

Maine Library (Commission 

Meet the NHF Board of Directors p.4 

The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum p.5 

Unii/Hc- Exploration Film at Bou-doin 

Calendar of Events p.6 

New England Ice Industry Films p.8 



P._- 

M 




Moving Image Review is a semiannual publication 
of Northeast Historic Film, Blue Hill Falls, Maine 
04615. David S. Weiss, executive director, Karan 
Sheldon, editor. 



Northeast Historic Film and the Museum 
of Modern Art Department of Film of 
New York are cooperating on a project to 
reconstruct the English intertitles from 
Henry King's silent feature, The Seventh 
Day, a romantic comedy filmed on the 
Maine coast in 1921. Soon, audiences will 
be able to enjoy the film with new inter- 
titles, and an original score assembled by 
the Bagaduce Music Lending Library. 

The film, which is preserved at the 
Museum of Modern Art, contains Czech 
intertitles. This is because in the 1920s 
The Seventh Day was distributed in 
eastern Europe where American film, 
particularly comedy, was very popular. 
The only copy to survive that era was a 
print found at the Czech Film Archives. 

With partial funding from the Maine 
Arts Commission, a translation was 
undertaken and English speakers will no 
longer be faced with "Jak krasna lod!" 

Scholars agree that The Seventh Day 
is not well known and suffers when com- 
pared with the film which made Henry 
King's reputation , Tol'able David. 

However, the two films share some 
significant qualities, particularly a love for 
the American landscape. The Seventh 
Day was shot on the central Maine coast 
in the fishing village of New Harbor. 
Beautiful scenes of sailing schooners, a 
190 ft. steam yacht, the town and its sur- 
roundings are the perfect setting for a 
romantic comedy. 

The story is about a yachting party of 
city people who, in their encounters with 




a small Maine town, discover innocence 
and godliness. When the New York 
Times reviewed The Seventh Day in 
1922, its overt moralizing was severely 
criticized. Today, however, audiences are 
captivated by a certain charm, as NHF's 
July 1987 screening in Bristol, Maine, 
proved. Shown without music or English 
intertitles, The Seventh Day entranced its 
audience with spectacular scenery and 
frivolous flappers. 

However enthusiastic this audience 
may have been, NHF was certain that 
with English intertitles and musical ac- 
companiment future screenings would 
be even more pleasurable. 

To date no one has been able to locate 
a 1920s score or cue sheets. (See Further 
Reading, page 7.) The lack of original 
music proved an irresistible opportunity 
for a new score. 

This past winter Tony Downer and 



photo: Museum of Modem Art I film Stt/h Archive 

Mary Cheyney Gould of the Bagaduce 
Music Lending Library, Blue Hill, Maine, 
searched die library's collection of period 
parlor music, silent film themes and 
Maine-composed popular songs for music 
to enhance the film's mood and action. 
The result is an evocative early 1920s 
experience. 

With readable titles and a well- 
crafted accompaniment, the film is cer- 
tain to take its place as a Maine classic. 

The Seventh Day will be available on 
16mm and 35mm film at silent speed 
under the auspices of Northeast Historic 
Film and the Museum of Modern Art 
Department of Film . Contact either 
organization for information. 

The first public exhibition will be 
August 18 and 19, 7:30 p.m., at the Mid- 
coast Arts & Media Center, Main Street, 
Waldoboro, Maine. To reserve tickets, 
please call 207 832-6373. 

Page I 



A recent letter from Arthur March, the 
curator of the New England Ski Museum 
in Franconia, New Hampshire, asked me 
to clarify our organization's geographical 
range. While NHF has clearly defined its 
moving image preservation mission, we 
intentionally left the geographical range 
open, stating only that we are concerned 
with "northern New England." 

For now, as we are based in Maine, 
our primary focus is here. As our re- 
sources expand, so will our services and 
the area to which we can supply them. 

Cooperation with other organizations 
will always be our key to success. As one 
of our goals is to foster awareness of cur- 
rent moving image collections in New 
England, I'd like to introduce to you a 
few of the colleagues in New Hampshire 
with whom we share material and exper- 
iences. 

Larry Benaquist's film studies pro- 
gram at Keene State College, Keene, and 
his compilation film, Through the Eye of 
the Camera: the Changing Rural World 
of New Hampshire in the Thirties, in- 
troduce students and the public to area 
archival film. 

Mary Beth Stock at the Southeastern 
Regional Education Service Center in 
Deny is preparing a videodisc of stills 
and archival footage of New Hampshire 



The New England Ski Museum's film 
collection documents nordic skiing from 
the 1930 to 1960s. This is teacher Hannes 
Schneider, founder of Cranmore 
Mountain. 




for school use. If you have or know of 
material that might be useful to this proj- 
ect, please call 603 432-9442. 

Shaler McReel ofde Rochemont 
Films, inc. in Newington is helping NHF 
list and locate Louis de Rochemont 's New 
England productions, which began with 
a 1915 Maine newsreel and include the 
1949 feature Lost Boundaries with Mel 
Ferrer, made in Kennebunk, Kittery and 
Portsmouth. 

John Bardwell at the University of 
New Hampshire Department of Media 
Services is identifying and cataloguing a 



photo: New England 'Ski Museum 

large collection of New Hampshire and 
Maine logging footage, which includes a 
film on woods work, King Spruce, which 
is available on videotape. 

Our common work moves us all 
along the road to saving and learning to 
use northern New England's moving im- 
age heritage. 




David S. Weiss 



Why Not Project Fragile Film? 

by Pamela Wintle, Archivist 
Smithsonian Institution Human Studies Film Arhives. 



Scenario: In a trunk in your aunt 's attic 
you find some rolls of 8mm film. She 
remembers that they were filmed by 
her father in the 1940s, and the projec- 
tor broke twenty years ago. The films 
have not been shown since. A friend 
loans you a projector and the family is 
called together. The lights are turned 
out, the first image flickers on the 
screen it is a family picnic. 

Afterwards, when the lights are 
turned on, family members reminisce 
and laugh over the antics of relatives. 

Realistically, however, chances are 
greater the scenario ended sadly, with 
the projector severely damaging the 
film, possibly so badly that the screen- 
ing concluded abruptly. 

Even new projectors subject film to 
stress. As every school audiovisual spe- 



cialist, film librarian and distributor 
knows, films wear out. An old, poorly 
maintained projector and an inexperi- 
enced operator are a ruthless combi- 
nation . 

Film ages. It becomes less flexible 
and it shrinks. Depending on the 
storage history of the film, these prob- 
lems can range from minor to severe. 
Other problems caused by mishandling 
include broken and torn film, 
shredded perforations, burns, separa- 
tion of emulsion from the base and 
bad splices. "Repairs" are sometimes 
made with paper clips, surgical 
adhesive tape, scotch tape, masking 
tape and staples. All of these can cause 
further irreversible damage to the film. 

Severe perforation damage and 
tearing make it very difficult, if not im- 




possible, to make copies. If that film or 
section of film is unique, it is lost for- 
ever. 

(continued on pg. 7) 



Major Contributions 

Fundraising for the Bangor Historical 
Society/WABI Preservation Project is off 
to a strong start with three leadership 
gifts. 

These were announced by the Preser- 
vation Project's Advisory Board, a group 
of 15 area citizens representing business, 
broadcasting, historical preservation and 
education. 

Diversified Communications' presi- 
dent, Horace A. Hildreth, Jr., on behalf 
of the board, has donated $5,000. With 
their station WABI's gift of the original 
film and the donation of film-to-video- 
tape transfers valued at over $15,000, 
Diversified Communications' support has 
been critically important in getting the 
project started. 

The Maine Library Commission has 
awarded a matching grant of $5,000 to 
preserve "unique state historical and 
library research material." 

Paul Gelardi of Shape, Inc. donated 
videotape stock to the Bangor Historical 
Society/WABI project, a value of approxi- 
mately $7,000. 

The Advisory Board, which convened 
in February 1988, is seeing early success 
in its drive to promote public awareness of 
the material and raise funds. Two work- 
ing committees, one for finance and the 
other for education, will be helping make 
the preservation project a reality. 

The project, to save and make avail- 
able 650,000 ft. of 16mm film from 
Maine's first television station (covering 
1953-1974), includes transferring the 
original film to videotape, cataloguing 
the stories and circulating videotapes for 
reference, production and classroom use. 

The Advisory Board's education com- 
mittee has launched a pilot project which 
will give teachers the opportunity to use 
the material in the fall of 1988. Video- 
tapes, organized into topics such as state 
government, Cold War issues, transporta- 
tion and urban renewal, will be tested 
and evaluated. 

Pat Sirois of Bangor High School, 
chair of the committee, made it clear that 
teachers are hungry for moving images, 
especially those which can contribute to 
Maine Studies. Advisory Board member 
Walter Taranko, Maine State Library 
media consultant, concurs with the group 
that the collection contains "topics 




educators are interested in." 

Cash and in-kind donation to date 
total $25,000 toward the project's first- 
year goal of $60,000. To reach the goal 
donors are needed at all levels, from ma- 
jor corporate and foundation contributors 
to members of the $100 Save-a-Reel Club 
and $5-$10 well-wishers. Those interested 
in donating are invited to use the form 
on page 7 or telephone NHF. H 



The Bangor Historical Society/ WABl Preservation 
Project Advisory Board at work; some members of 
the education committee meet at the University of 
Maine College of Education. From left to right: 
Pat Sirois, Bangor High School; Scott Grant, 
Maine Dept. of Education; Anne Pooler, Assistant 
Dean of Education, Univ. of Maine; James 
Cowan, former Superintendent of Schools, Dist. 
20; Constance Carlson, Professor Emerita, Univ. of 
Maine. 



irnnrs In Action 



In May, 1988, the Maine Library Com- 
mission awarded a grant of $5,000 for 
first-year preservation work on NHF's 
Bangor Historical Society/WABI 
collection. 

Under the conservation grants pro- 
gram mandated by a 1986 Maine legisla- 
tive act, members of the Maine Library 
Commission may recommend support in 
annual grants of up to $5 ,000 for conser- 
vation of unique state historical and li- 
brary research materials. 

The Library Commission recognized 
the unique research value of the television 
film collection and their recommendation 
for funding was approved by Eve Either, 
Commissioner of the Department of 
Educational and Cultural Services. 

The 1987 Maine Arts Commission 
grant for work on the Everett Foster col- 
lection provided funding which allowed 
NHF to make available reference copies 
and study material on works by Maine 
filmmakers Holman Day and Walter 
Mitton. 

NHF completed cataloguing on the 
two Holman Day two-reelers, Cupid, 
Registered Guide and Knight of the Pines 
as well as 1,500 ft. of outtakes from other 
Holman Day works. 

Everett Foster's extensive research in 
the 1970s into the Holman Day and 



Edgar Jones studio (active in Augusta 
between 1919 and 1921) provided a base 
for a list of Holman Day films. This 
research was supplemented by documen- 
tation from George Pratt's notebooks via 
Jan-Christopher Horak at George 
Eastman House. 

Meanwhile, the British Film Institute 
National Film Archives, which holds 
copies of the only two other known sur- 
viving Holman Day films, My Lady o' the 
Pines and Brother of the Bear, has agreed 
to supply copies to NHF, contingent on 
NHF sponsorship by an American mem- 
ber of the International Federation of 
Film Archives. This was kindly provided 
by Eileen Bowser of the Museum of 
Modern Art Department of Film. 

The 1987 Maine Arts Commission 
grant also provided funding for NHF to 
catalog and make video reference copies 
of the Walter Mitton amateur 16mm 
film. The material was found to contain 
views of towns including Rockland, Ston- 
ington and Brewer (1939-1948) and 
should be of use to town planners, preser- 
vationists and local historians. 

A 1988 grant from the Maine Arts 
Commission was received for reconstruc- 
tion of intertitles and creation of cue 
sheets for Henry King's The Seventh 
Day, as reported on page 1. H 



Page 3 



The Northeast Historic Film 
Board of Directors 




David C. Smith 

President. Professor of History and 
Cooperating Professor of Quaternary 
Studies at the University of Maine, 
Orono. 

"The traditional documents of history 
manuscripts, stamps, art objects, material 
culture have been enhanced in this century by 
moving images. Amateur film, "home movies," 
will allow us to know even more about 
ordinary life. Northeast Historic Film is a 
wonderful way to save, preserve and make 
available these documentary sources to those in- 
terested in the past. Moving images of the past 
bring us even closer to our Time Machine. " 




David S. Weiss 

Cofounder and Executive Director of 
Northeast Historic Film. Previously 
media producer in Boston after gradu- 
ating in film and semiotics from Brown 
University. 

"New England moving image, has the potential 
for being one of the most exiting of our cul- 
tural resources however, it's scattered, mis- 
understood and thus at risk. All too typically 
someone stumbles across a rusty unlabeledcan 
when they 're in the attic throwing things away. 
Our mission is to make people understand that 
such a discovery is cause for rejoicing not a 
reason to go to the dump." 




Pamela Wintle 

Treasurer. Archivist, The Smithsonian 
Institution's Human Studies Film 
Archives, Washington, D.C. 

"There is a need for people who are responsible 
for culture and tradition; without them 
materials will be lost forever. An archives' role is 
to preserve the material for generations to come 
and to make it available for learning, teaching, 
illumination and amusement. What we save 
allows people to reflect on who they are and 
where they come from and lead to thoughts 
about the future. It gives people a reflection of 
themselves, a moving image of a culture and 
tradition. A context." 







Paul Gelardi 

President, SHAPE Optimedia, Inc., 
Sanford, Maine. 

"An accurate record of history is increasingly 
essential to a complex, modern society 's 
understanding of itself. Moving image materials 
capture history in a visually holistic manner, 
whether the subject is nature, society, industry, 
sports or the arts. With so much already lost, it 
is imperative that we locate as much as possible 
and accelerate our efforts to preserve this ir- 
replaceable record before it is too late. If a pic- 
ture is worth a thousand words, then a moving 
picture must be worth a million." 




Robert Saudek 

Chief, Division of Motion Picture, 
Broadcasting and Recorded Sound, 
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 
Founding president of the Museum of 
Broadcasting in New York City. 

"As a lover of the Northeast and a part-time 
sailor, how could 1 not be interested in preserv- 
ing northern New England moving images? 
Recorded media dominate this century and we 
can't do without them any more. To preserve 
the moving image is to save the eyes and ears of 
the 20th century. Northeast Historic Film is in a 
period of growth and needs special cultivation. 
Preservation and public exhibition are its chief 
priorities." 




Karan Sheldon 

Vice President. Cofounder of NHF. 
Previously at WGBH-TV Boston for 
more than three years on the documen- 
tary series Vietnam: A Television 
History. 

"Everybody who loves northern New England 
has a role to play in the success of this 
organization from people who produce or 
have moving image materials, to writers and 
publishers who will help spread the word about 
our mission, to people who will help financially 
in large and small ways. " 



Page A 



Unique Exploration Film 

At The Peary-MacMillan 

Arctic Museum 

Dr. Gerald F. Bigelow, curator of The 
Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and 
Arctic Studies Center at Bowdoin College 
in Brunswick, Maine, talked with Karan 
Sheldon about moving images of the 
Arctic. 

Sheldon: 

What is the Arctic Museum? 
Bigelow: 

It is a unique institution for educa- 
tion and research into Arctic exploration, 
ecology, natural history and anthropolo- 
gy. We serve the public, a large scholarly 
community and regional elementary 
schools. The Museum and Arctic Studies 
Center is trying to educate people about 
issues of modern economic and social 
development in the Arctic; we have a 
circumpolar emphasis. 

Sheldon: 

How is the museum related to 
Bowdoin? 
Bigelow: 

Robert Peary and Donald 
MacMillan were alumni of Bowdoin, and 
that's why the museum is here. 
MacMillan was chosen by Peary as an 
assistant on Peary's 1908-09 expedition to 
northern Greenland and the North Pole. 

Sheldon: 

How does moving image come to be 
in the collection? 
Bigelow: 

Donald MacMillan was a pioneer in 
the use of motion picture in the Arctic. 
He made several large-scale expeditions 
in the early 1900s to 1920s and later 
sailed the schooner Bowdoin with 
students and scientists. His last voyage to 
the Arctic was in 1954. 

As early as 1913 he took an Akeley 
35mm movie camera on the Crocker 
Land expedition. The Akeley camera is 
on exhibit at the museum. Between 1913 
and 1917 he took thousands of feet of 
motion pictures in the Arctic. The 
MacMillan material still hasn't been fully 
inventoried. Some nitrate film had to be 
destroyed in the 1970s but we have 
anywhere from 130,000 to 160,000 ft. , 
both 16mm and 35mm safety. Some of 
the nitrate film may have been trans- 



Donald MacMillan and the Akeley camera on the 
1923-25 expedition in northern Greenland. 




ferred, so the collection potentially goes 
back to 1913 and it is certain that we have 
1920 footage. 

Sheldon: 

Why was MacMillan filming? 
Bigelow: 

MacMillan was a very careful re- 
corder of the work he did, both in 
writing and through photography. He 
was very interested in recording the native 
people the Inuit he worked with in 
Greenland, Baffin Island and Labrador. I 
think he realized those cultures were 
changing and that recording them was 
important. 

Sheldon: 

How do you see the MacMillan films 
relating to your mission of education and 
research? 
Bigelow: 

They can be an extremely powerful 
tool for explaining adaptations of native 
people in the Arctic. They're really im- 
portant because they encompass such a 
long period; from the early 1920s to 1954 
was a time of enormous change in the 
Arctic. 

For instance, before 1913 the Inuit in 
the northwestern part of Greenland pri- 



photo. Peary -MacMtllan Arctic Museum. Bowdoin College 

marily met explorers and whalers. In the 
course of the next 50 years, and especially 
during World War II, there was a great 
influx of people. Eventually one of the 
world's largest airforce bases was built 
right where many of the films were taken. 

Sheldon: 

What are your plans for the film in 
the future? 
Bigelow: 

The main responsibility is to make 
sure the film is being stored under condi- 
tions that limit deterioration. We need to 
set up priorities for copying the film. 
That's something I've learned coming 
into this field: with a few exceptions the 
integrity of still photos is not threatened 
by viewing them. That's not true of mov- 
ing images. 

We are now devising a protocol so 
researchers will have access. The 
MacMillan collection is closed now. But 
there is tremendous interest in it, and 
ideally we expect to be able to open it for 
use in two to three years. 

Sheldon: 

Are there any other individuals whose 
film you have? 



(continued) 



Page 



The ochcr major ponion of our col- 
lection is a series of films taken by a 
cameraman named Reginald Wikox who 
worked for the Warner Pathc news service. 
He took these films on the expeditions of 
Robert Hart Int. another former assistant 
to Robert Prary. who also became an im- 
portant Arctic explorer in north and cast 
Greenland. 

It is largely 35mm nitrate film. It is 
unstable and needs to be copied. This is 
our primary preservation project right 
now. There is also Wikox 16mm film 
it's difficult to tell how much because we 
don't have a detailed inventory, but we 
estimate there is 150.000 to 170,000 ft. of 
33mm and 16mm film in the collection. 

Wilcox. like MacMillan and Bartlett. 
fell in love with the Arctic and really 
wanted to educate people about it. It was 
a golden age of film for the dissemination 
of mass information. 

People such as MacMillan's former 
students have also been generous in 
donating other films to us, to make sure 
that they are preserved for study. 
Altogether we have an excellent record of 
Arctic exploration. 




upport. 



Thanks for financial support from: 
Maine Arts Commission 
Maine Library Commission 

Corporate Benefactor: 

Diversified Communications 
and to : 

Alice Boothby 
David Bowen 
Joyce Butter 
James Campbell 
Rick Denison 
Andrew Graham 
Ernest and Katkryn Gross 
Michael Halle 
Cynthia Howard 
Diane Kopec 
Gene Libby 
Donald Lockhart 
Jenny Lyon\ 
Valene Felt McClead 
Ingnd Menken 
Virginia Morgan 
Skip Sheldon 
Allen Ualcoit 
Mary Ann Wallace 



Exhibition Calendar 



"Work I ). .u ii East" Progrum 
Including Cutting Ice 

and 
from Stump to Ship: A 1930 Liggmg film 

July Hand 13. 7:30 p.m. 

Midcoast Arts & Media Center. Main St. . Waldoboro. Maine 
207-832-6373 



From Stump to Skip: 
A 1930 lagging him 



Northeast Historic Film Booth 
Showing Selections from the Archives 

August 12. 13. 14. Noon to 10: 30 p.m. 

Maine Festival 
Deering Oaks Park. Portland, Maine 

T/M- Vi ruth / >./) 

Premiere of English interfiles and piano accompaniment, 
musk selected by the Bagaduce Musk Lending Library- 
Reserved tkkcts 

August 18 and 19. 7:30 p.m. 

Midcoast Arts & Media Center. Main St. . Waldoboro. Maine 
207-832-6373 



Northeast Historic Film Booth 
Showing Selections rrom tin \nliiws 

October 2 through y 
Frycburg Fair. Fryeburg. Maine 

The .V -n-nth Day 
and Hoi man Day Program 

October, dates to be announced 

Railroad Square Cinema. Waterville. Maine 

207-873-6326 



(Fragile Film continued from pg. 2) 

To avoid such a tragedy, unique 
film of any value should not be pro- 
jected. 

If for some reason, projection is 
unavoidable, take steps to help film 
pass safely through a projector. What 
follows are guidelines, not a guarantee. 

First, wind through the film manual- 
ly and check for damage. 

Make necessary repairs. 

Attach several feet of leader to the 
headof the film. Most damage occurs 
in the beginning, and with sufficient 
leader, improper threading or projec- 
tor malfunctioning will be detected 
before the image reaches the rollers. 

Check the working condition of the 
projector and clean it. 

Someone who is experienced in 
threading a projector should be in 
charge. 

Always stay attentive to the sound of 
the projector and the film running 
through it. Any odd sound or change 
should be attended to immediately. 

Film that is so shrunken that it does 
not fit properly on the sprocketed roll- 
ers must not, under any circumstances, 
be run through a projector. 

Handled carefully, film will delight 
and inform us and the generations after 
us with its powerful magic. 

For information and assistance 
regarding the care of moving image 
materials, please contact Northeast 
Historic Film. H 



^^^^i 



r the r..- R c a J i n 

Silent Film Music Snttrcea 



NHF Statement of Purpose. 

The purport- ot Nonhc.ist Historic him is tci 

, and make available to th< public, historic 

film /videotape of the northern New iingland 

Ilm purpose will he i .imeci out In .u 

'IK killing, hut not limited to. aiomprehen- 

innving puture n 

totlx-p them New England, th> 

v-jtion nl historic Hint/tape through KM. 
duplication, providing of technical guidance, and 

vaultM MI to Ininr 

films to audiem es throughout the urea: and the 
establishment ol astud\ i enter, i minding K 
materials an piiture 

film- 



Music for SUent Films (1894-1929): 
A Guide. 

Compiled and edited by Gillian 
Anderson, Library of Congress. This 
book will be available from the Govern- 
ment Printing Office in the fall. It con- 
tains over 50 illustrations, a long histori- 
cal introduction by Gillian Anderson 
about the presentation of silent film and 
lists silent film music at the Library of 
Congress; Museum of Modern Art; 
George Eastman House in Rochester, 
NY; New York Public Library; Arthur 
Kleiner Collection at the University of 
Minnesota; and FIAF in Belgium. 

The Society for the Preservation of Film 
Music, 10850 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 
770, Los Angeles, CA 90024, is a 
membership organization with a news- 
letter, Cue Sheet. 




A Powers 6A projector on loan to NHF as a result 
of our request for obsolete equipment. Our thanks 
to everyone who contacted us with items to do- 
nate, trade or lend. We always appreciate hearing 
from you, andare^ especially in need of funds for 
cleaning and re pair of equipment for use and 
exhibition. 



CH I would like to help support NHFs Moving Image Review. Enclosed is a $10 donation for 
publication and distribution in 1988. 

CH 1 would like to support NHF's work on the Bangor Historical Society/ WABI Television Film 
Preservation Project. Please send more information. 

EH Here is my additional contribution to support NHF's programs. $ 

Donations are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. 



D 1 have information about film /videotape made in northern New England. Please send a 
survey form. 



Name_ 
City_ 



Address. 



_ State. 



.Zip_ 



Phone_ 



CD Please check if this issue was incorrectly addressed, and fill in correct address above. 

Do you know someone who might like to receive Moving Image Review? If so. please list names and 
addresses. 




The Eangor Ice Co. , 
harvesting ice in Bangor, Maine. 



photos: William Simmons Tyler, Bangor Historical Society 




NORTHEAST HISTORIC FILM 

I BLUK Ull. I. f AI.I.S. MAIM . I :SA 04M5 (207) 174-2^16 I. 



NONPROFIT ORG. 
US POSTAGE PAID 
Blue Hill Falls, Maine 
04615 
Permit #2 



A brief mention of Northeast Historic 
Film in the March 1988 issue of Yankee 
magazine resulted in a flurry of mail. 
Respondents were particularly interested 
in adding to NHF's information on ice 
harvesting. 

Ice harvesting flourished commercial- 
ly in New York, New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont and Maine in the 19th century. 
Huge ice houses were built along the 
Hudson, Connecticut and Kennebec 
Rivers, but most were made obsolete by 
artificial refrigeration before the advent of 
motion picture. 

While the giant commercial ice 
businesses melted away, ice harvesting for 
local use continued to be a common 
wintertime occupation. As we learned 
from readers of Yankee, the tradition is 
still very much present in their memories. 

Like many everyday activities that 
seem worthy of study only after out- 
moded by technological change, cutting 
ice on ponds and rivers was usually con- 
sidered too ordinary to be filmed. 

Besides a lost Edison drama called A 
Romance of the Ice Fields (1912) in which 
an evil foreman pushes a worker on an ice 
block out into the Kennebec River cur- 
rent, ice harvesting film known to us 
includes: 

The Library of Congress Paper Print 
Collection's Edison Co. films, a total of 
about 150 ft. taken in Groton, 
Massachusetts in 1902: Cutting and 
Canaling Ice; Circular Panorama of Hous- 
ing the Ice; loading the Ice on Cars. 

The Bangor Historical Society's 8mm 
William Simmons Tyler Ice Harvest, 
Bangor (1936) on Kenduskeag Stream, 
and from the same year and place, 
Daniel Maher's Universal Newsreel 
Harvest Bumper Crop of Ice. 

Larry Benaquist's ice cutting from New 
Hampshire in the early 1930s in his 
Through the Eye of the Camera. 

In the NHF Collection, Everett 
Johnson's 16mm Cutting Ice, from South 
Portland (1943). 

Also, in the NHF Collection, Herbert 
Kenney's 16mm views of ice cutting on 
Upper Hadlock Pond in Northeast Har- 
bor, Mt. Desert Island in 1926. 

We would be grateful for news of 
more. H 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



TV Film Project 
Leaps Ahead 



"What do you know about civil de- 
fense?" Beth Dunning asked her llth 
grade Hermon High School history 
students this question before playing a 
videotape of the 1955 evacuation of 
Bangor, Maine. "People wouldn't do 
that today," responded one student, as 
she saw a stream of cars rounding the 
corner, headed out of town on Broad- 
way. "Where are they going?" asked 
another. "If a disaster really did happen, 
where could they go?" 

The students are participating in a 
pilot project using Northeast Historic 
Film's television film collection. As a 
history teacher, Beth Dunning tries to 
relate the past to her students' 
environment to give more meaning to 
both past and present. 

Her students found videotapes of 
civil defense drills particularly interest- 
ing. They were able to connect images 
which would have been familiar to their 




parents to current Soviet-American rela- 
tions and to their own perceptions of 
arms control. 

This pilot project to test the use of 
television film material in Maine class- 
rooms demonstrates that students read- 
ily, and with some sophistication, re- 
spond to material from their own region. 
Teachers indicate that the archival TV 
material will provide useful content for 
studies in U.S. history, Maine history, 
civics, economics and government from 
elementary school to 12th grade. 

In November 1988, Maine teachers 
in schools from St. Agatha to 
Westbrook began using videotape copies 
of stories from the Bangor Historical 
Society/WABI television film collection 
which includes footage shot by WABI- 
TV Bangor between 1953 and 1974. 

The project's advisory board helped 
select participating teachers, define the 
goals of the pilot project, and create the 
three tapes currently in use. The 
subjects of the tapes are Transportation, 
Cold War Issues and TV Commercials. 

The classroom tests are part of a 
joint NHF/ Bangor Historical Society/ 
WABI project to preserve and make 
available news, sports, local 
programming and commercials. WABI- 
TV is Maine's oldest television station, 



History Class: Beth Dunning 's Hermon High 
School llth grade uses NHF's Bangor Historical 
Society/WABI TV collection. 



Winter 1989 

Executive Director's Report . . 

Grants In Action 

100 Years Ago 

by Stephani Boyd 

Collections Growth 

The Strand 

by Valerie Felt McClead 

Exhibition Report 

Further Reading 



p. 2 
p. 2 

p. 3 

p. 4 
p. 5 

p. 6 
p. 7 



Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue Hill 
Falls, Maine 04615. David S. Weiss, executive 
director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769 



and this film collection is the largest 
known surviving in Maine. 

To fund the project, $175,000 will 
need to be raised over three years. The 
project has received $63,380, including 
$33,720 in donated and pledged services 
and products. Major gifts came from 
Sawyer Management Services, $10,000; 
Diversified Communications, $5,000; 
the Maine State Library, $5,000; 
N.H. Bragg & Sons, $3,000; Amoskeag 
Co., $900; Bangor & Aroostook RR, 
$900; Prentiss & Carlisle, $750; the 
Bangor Daily News, $500; and from 
individual contributors. 

To complete the project, Northeast 
Historic Film must raise $111,620 from 
corporate and individual donors, 
government and private foundations. 
Members of the advisory board would 
be happy to talk with anyone interested 
in further information. Call David 
Weiss, executive director of Northeast 
Historic Film, 207 374-2109. 




Pag 



Executive Director's Report 
NHF Welcomes Members 



The board of directors voted in August to 
open membership in Northeast Historic 
Film to the public. Since founding in 
1986, NHF has both served and been 
supported by the public. Now, by becom- 
ing a full-fledged membership organiza- 
tion, we believe we are opening the door 
to further participation by supporters, 
colleagues, and individuals with an inter- 
est in New England culture. 

In the earliest days of NHF, as the 
founders tested what seemed a radical 
new concept for an organization an 
archives dedicated to northern New 
England moving images the possibi- 
lity seemed remote that members would 
be found in quantity. Now, however, the 
many people who have responded to 
NHF programs, who have sought out 
NHF and used its services, and who sup- 
port cultural preservation suggest that pub- 
lic membership is an appropriate step. 

There are six categories of member- 
ship, each designed to suit a particular 
constituency of NHF and to support the 
mission of the organization: 

Regular Members, $25 per year, will 
receive a subscription to Moving Image 
Review, notice of screenings and events, a 
special telephone number for access to 
the moving image databases, and discount 
on purchase and rental of materials dis- 
tributed by NHF. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 per 
year, receive all regular membership bene- 




Fairgoers stop by the NHF booth at the Maine Festival, Portland in July, 1988. 



fits. This category is open to those in- 
volved in teaching or enrolled in school at 
any level. One of NHF's chief goals is to 
encourage the use of moving image mate- 
rials in teaching, and to support students 
interested in film and videotape in many 
areas of study. 

Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year, 
will receive all regular benefits of mem- 
bership, plus additional copies of Moving 
Image Review on request, and reduced 
rates for consultation and professional 
services. 

Friends of NHF, $250 per year, will 
receive all benefits of regular member- 
ship and, in addition, a privilege card 
which will admit two people to any NHF- 
sponsored screening or event, plus listing 
in the roster of friends. 

Corporate Members, $100 per year, will 
receive the benefits of regular members 



and, in addition, will receive a business 
listing in Moving Image Review and in all 
programs. 

Founding Member, the premiere cate- 
gory of membership, is $1,000. Founding 
Members share our belief that moving 
images of northern New England are a 
valuable resource. They are willing to 
make a major commitment to help NHF 
ensure the preservation and use of this 
resource. This inner circle of supporters 
of the organization receives all benefits of 
regular membership, and is invited to 
special previews. 

Membership at any level is an oppor- 
tunity to become involved with the pres- 
ervation and enjoyment of our moving 
image heritage. I encourage you to join us 
by filling out the enrollment form at the 
end of this issue. H 



Grants In Action 



In the second half of 1988, NHF re- 
ceived two grants, including NHF's first 
American Film Institute/National 
Endowment for the Arts preservation 
program grant. 

The AFI/NEA grant for 1989 in 
the amount of $1,000 will go toward 
transfer of nitrate film shot around 
Maine by newsreel photographer 
Daniel Maher in the early 1920s and 
1930s. Included is footage of a 1933 
Bangor, Maine, National Recovery Act 
parade. It represents a visual census of 
area businesses, as proprietors and their 



employees pass in review carrying signs 
identifying shops, restaurants, groceries, 
insurance companies, clubs, along with 
decorated floats, one of which carries 
Mr. Depression and Miss Prosperity. 
Also to be preserved is a 1920 aerial 
survey of Portland, Maine's largest city, 
and its environs; Maine Catholics 
(1924); Lucerne winter and summer 
(1928); and Gordon Silver Black Fox 
Ranches (1924). 

The second grant NHF received 
was from the Maine Community 
Foundation's Maine Expansion Arts 



Fund. The award of $3,000 will go 
toward a project called "The Movie 
Queen: The Art of Community 
Expression in Film." The project will 
focus on two films made in 1936 with 
the identical title: The Movie Queen. 
Both were made in coastal Maine: one 
in Lubec, the other in Bar Harbor. Both 
versions of The Movie Queen have the 
same plot: a young woman arrives by 
boat, tours the town and receives gifts, 
is the subject of kidnap attempts and is 
eventually rescued. The roles are all 
played by local people. For this project, 
NHF will obtain oral histories of 
participants, as well as preserve the 
films and carry out screenings in the 
respective communities. H 



Page 



One Hundred Years Ago 
The Moving Image 

by Stephani Boyd, Archives Manager 

Northeast Historic Film 
How did motion picture come to be? 
What kind of entertainment did it 
replace? In celebration of the centennial 
of the projected motion picture, Moving 
Image Review will regularly offer a look 
at film technology and the regional con- 
text of popular culture a century ago. 

The last five generations grew up 
with the motion picture actuality, doc- 
umentary, short subject and home 
movie. At Northeast Historic Film, we 
believe that the familiarity and accessi- 
bility of film conspired to let the pres- 
ent generations take the medium for 
granted. In fact, one hundred years of 
motion picture history could be entirely 
lost without the preservation field's 
archivists and activists, who in turn 
depend on an interested and involved 
public. 

The year is 1889, and Rochester 
inventor George Eastman announces 




The Houlton Opera House in the 1890s. 



photo: Frank Dunn 







HAYMARKET THEATRE 

let WC*T MADISON Sr 

CHICAGO 



photo: Franklyn Lenthtll, Boothbay Theatre Museum 

]ames O'Neill appeared on stage in Portland in 
The Count of Monte Cristo in 1889. His perfor- 
mance in the play was captured by Edwin S. Porter 
in 1912 and that film can be found in the Paper 
Print Collection at the Library of Congress. 



that the roll film he's worked on for five 
years is available for sale. 

In Menlo Park, New Jersey, photo- 
grapher William Kennedy Laurie Dick- 
son convinces his boss Thomas Edison 
to place his first order for Eastman film. 

Dickson works on film projection 
and sound synchronization experiments 
while Edison vacations over the 
summer. In October, Dickson presents 
"The Wizard" Edison with a sound- 
synchronized film projected on a screen. 
Edison will ultimately abandon Dick- 
son's Kinetophonograph system, dis- 
missing sound and projection as frills. 

While projected film is said to have 
been born in 1889, its exact birthdate, 
birthplace and parentage are actually 
uncertain. Much of Edison's claim to 
fathering the form must be shared with 
Dickson and many others throughout 
the world whose work with moving 
images was advancing during the same 
years. 

Thomas Armat of the United States 
and the Lumiere brothers of France are 
just a few of the others film historians 
will honor as originators of the motion 
picture. Likewise, scholars continue to 
debate which year deserves to be called 



the 100th birthday of the motion 
picture. 

Meanwhile . . . 

in Northern New England 
Cut to Maine in 1889. Here, as else- 
where, vaudevillians and variety acts are 
making the rounds of community halls 
and opera houses. The Bangor Opera 
House season includes acts such as 
General Tom Thumb and the Royal 
Alhambra Variety Company. The 
McGibeny Family of Portland, Oregon 
perform music and character sketches in 
Maine halls including the Portland 
Theater and the Alameda in Bath. 

American and British road compa- 
nies bring stage plays such as Dr. Jekyll 
and Mr. Hyde. It plays at the Houlton 
Opera House and is "not liked" by the 
Aroostook Times. A production of 
Uncle Tom's Cabin plays to good 
reviews at Norombega Hall in Bangor. 
According to a newspaper advertise- 
ment, its attractions include, 
"Moving Steamers from the Mississippi 
River," "Cotton Picking Scenes," "A 
Pack of Bloodhounds," and "A Trick 
Donkey." 

(continued on pg. 7) 



Page 3 



Our Collection Grows 



Hundreds of hours of film and video- 
tape, plus dozens of equipment dona- 
tions arrived at NHF in the last half- 
year. Many thanks to the more than 40 
individuals, organizations and families 
who furthered the cause of moving 
image preservation with donations, de- 
posits and loans. 

Here are some samples: 

From the Bangor & Aroostook 
Railroad: a 1956 film in 16mm, 
Assignment in Aroostook, which was 
coproduced with the Limestone Air 
Force Base, showing the life of a family 
transferred there. This look at 
Limestone was particularly interesting 
given the concern this fall that the base 
might face closure as part of the 
national cutbacks. The B&A collection 
includes preprint materials and copies 
of other locomotive footage: Big Muscle 
and Giants of the Roundhouse. 

From Tom Nelson at Prentiss & 
Carlisle: Modern Logging Operations at 
Tombegan Forest, (1958) in 8mm. 

From Robert Chaffee, stepson of 
Westbrook Van Voorhis (the voice of 
The March of Time): 16mm prints of a 
number of March of Time titles, 
significant to NHF because producer 
Louis de Rochemont was a New 
England native. 

From the Instructional Systems 
Center, University of Maine: a number 
of Maine-related films not otherwise 
held in the collection, including River 
Run, Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, 
Maine at the Big E, It's the Maine 
Sardine. 

From Henry Barendse and the 
family of Meyer Davis: a significant 
home-movie collection on deposit. 
Meyer Davis, the well-known band- 
leader, was active with his camera 
from 1926 to 1974. The family is 
shown in Bar Harbor, Newport, Lake 
Placid and Jamestown. Perhaps most 
interesting are the scripted and inter- 
titled amateur dramas. They document 
a type of recreation that preceded the 
motion picture culture as sometimes 
elaborate amateur theatricals and 
tableaux. 

From the National Film Archives 
at the British Film Institute: new 
35mm prints of two Holman Day 



two-reelers, My Lady O' the Pines and 
Brother of the Bear (both featuring 
the young Mary Astor), along with a 
1909 Vitagraph one-reel film, starring 
Jean the Vitagraph Dog, The Sailor's 
Sacrifice. Ours are the only copies of 
these works on this side of the 
Atlantic. 

From the independent filmmaker 
Abbott Meader: samples of his work 
from the 1970s and 1980s, including 
prints of Spem in Alium, Stretching 
Out, Portrait of Harriet Matthews, 
and Deep Trout. 

From Maine's Washington County: 
16mm film shot by Dr. Howard Kane 
between 1929 and 1945, on deposit 
from James Marsh of Prout's Neck. 

Also from Washington County: 
1930s 16mm home movies from 
Joanne Willey of Cherryfield. 

From Earle Fenderson, projection- 
ist and retired film directo at Port- 
land, Maine TV station WGAN: sev- 
eral 16mm films of Portland and a 
35mm nitrate film of a football game 



between the University of Maine and 
Bowdoin College produced by the Port- 
land Evening Express. 

Fenderson donated equipment, as 
did Howard Peabody, the School for 
International Training, and Tony 
Jonaitis. 

NHF was able to assist two fellow 
archival organizations by passing on 
film finds that did not conform to 
NHF collection criteria. With the help 
of Susan Dalton of the American Film 
Institute, a number of boxes were sent 
to the Archives of the Factual Film in 
Ames, Iowa. 

And staffer Tony Jonaitis located 
two unique, unpreserved films, The 
Romany Rye, written and produced by 
Stanner Taylor, and In the King's Ser- 
vice (1915), written by Conyers Con- 
verse, produced by the Selig Polyscope 
Co., with Thomas Santschi. These two 
films were received for preservation 
by curator Eileen Bowser of the 
Museum of Modern Art, New York. H 




Jean the Vitagraph Dog stars in the The Sailor's Sacrifice, directed by Lawrence Trimble in 1909. 
This film was shot on the Maine coast and is remarkable because (a) it is the earliest drama made 
in Maine in our collection, and (b) the dog digs clams. 



Page 4 



The Strand, 
East Corinth, Maine 

Valerie Felt McClead's grandparents ran 
the Strand Theatre in East Corinth, 
Maine, from 1916 to 1932. In 1974, 
with the help of her grandmother, Ida 
Adair McGraw, who became the 
Strand's pianist when she married John 
McGraw in 1920, Ms. McClead wrote a 
history of the town and the theatre. 
McClead's sources included more than 
30 people who had attended the 
Strand (in three successive buildings), 
the business records of her grandfather, 
and her grandmother's letters and 
memoirs. What follows are excerpts 
from "A History of The Strand Theatre 
in East Corinth, Maine 1916-1932," 
M.A. Thesis, University of Maine, 
Orono, copyright Valerie Felt McClead. 

East Corinth, a farming community, 
was relatively self-sufficient during the 
early 1900s due in part to geographical 
remoteness and limited methods of 
transportation. For the most part, 
recreation was membership-oriented in 
such organizations as the Grange, Odd 
Fellows, Masons, Rebeccas, Epworth 
League and Ladies' Social Circle. 

The structured discipline of the 
churches in East Corinth, through the 
years, had solidified a unification of atti- 
tudes and beliefs that were handed 
down from one generation to the next. 
Pearl Buswell: "Churches didn't 
approve of silent movies. Probably 
attributed to the fact that their parents 
didn't attend the movies, and therefore 
they didn't. The movies were 
condemned." 

When the United States entered 
World War I in 1914, lifestyles of many 
American families were altered consid- 
erably because of financial hardships. 

John H. McGraw, who was to 
become the manager of the Strand 
Theatre, carefully weighed both the pos- 
itive and negative aspects of entering 
the movie exhibition business. On Janu- 
ary 13, 1916, it was reported, "H.B. 
Morison has leased his building known 
as the Free Baptist Church to the 
McGraw Bros., who will open a moving 
picture house the last of the month. The 
pictures will be held twice a week." 

The success of the regular shows 
hinged on the punctuality of the 
Penobscot Central Railroad. If the trol- 






BOOKD 

KfHOPKAN \NI> AMl;mrA> AT I'HAl: I II INS 



Sret 0tatf Amusement 

ENTtRPRISES 
EXCLUSIVE STATE RIGHT KKA I 

B BU1LDINC;. PORTI.AM 




pholoi: Vtlerie Fell McClead 

Ida Adair McGraw andjohn McGraw, 
around 1916, and business corres- 
pondence from a supplier to the 
Strand, East Corinth, Maine. 



Portland, Lt. Apr. 23rd. 1J17. 

*r, 

Bat Corlnu , 
Dear Sir:- 

We are In receipt of your Aheft* for amount $125.00 (One Hundred 
and Twenty-fire Dollar*) a part payment on #5A Power's Moving 
Flctuee Inrlune (new). 






Your WA Bashine will ^o forward then.Truetlns e-rorythlns will be 



ley was late, the movies were not 
shown, for generally the exchange 
shipped the films to East Corinth on 
the day they were to be exhibited. 

By 1925, the Strand was in a build- 
ing built expressly for showing films, 
complete with projection booth, balcony, 
a furnace in the cellar, 260 folding theatre 
chairs, one Powers 6A moving picture 
machine, and an upright piano. Ben- 
jamin McGraw operated a single lane 
bowling alley in the basement of this 
theatre and a candy concession in the 
lobby opposite Fred Clement's barber 
shop, also in the same building. In the 
event the films did not arrive as adver- 
tised for a particular evening, dances or 
boxing and wrestling matches were 
organized as substitute forms of 
entertainment. 

From 1916 to 1924 a significant 
change occurred in the variety and types 
of films exhibited at the Strand. The 
management became more eager to 
contract the costlier, higher quality 
popular films, and also films of an edu- 
cational nature. With the addition of 
weekly newsreels, a visual and descrip- 
tive up-to-date commentary was shown 
on world and national events. 



Ida McGraw. "People learned from 
the movies because they saw how other 
people lived and that is always educa- 
tional. The newsreels gave them news 
about different parts of the country. 

"Many of the films of from 1916 to 
the 1920s gave the people, especially the 
younger group, a desire for better 
things. An urge to make something of 
their lives, as they saw the results of 
some of the mistakes made by others. 

"In the films shown there was as a 
rule the good side of the story as well as 
the bad side, and the results. Seeing is 
believing . . ." 

Almost forty years after the theater 
closed, a regular moviegoer spoke to Ms. 
McClead about the way in which the 
outside world was brought to East 
Corinth. 

Ivan Willett: "They had pictures of the 
jungle and war pictures. I remember see- 
ing one picture on the war in the Philip- 
pines, and the first machine gun that 
they ever had. . . They had a few pictures 
on the African pygmies. . . they visited 
the headhunters in some of the films; 
of course, they were the headhunters 
that had reformed. 

(continued on pg. 6) 



Pag 



Exhibition Report 



Northeast Historic Film's mission to 
promote broad public exposure to the 
many kinds of film and videotape made 
in northern New England puts NHF 
staff members in a variety of exhibition 
settings. Throughout the summer of 
1988 David Weiss, Karan Sheldon and 
Tony Jonaitis held screenings at Rotary 
meetings, workshops, historical society 
gatherings, arts and agricultural fairs, 
. . . and even in cinemas. 

For the second year, NHF was 
invited to participate in the Maine 
Festival in Portland, where, despite 
record-breaking heat, the NHF booth 
gained exposure to an estimated 5,000 
people over a three-day period. A 
Holmes projector and Pathe camera 
from the Daniel Maher collection, and a 
tripod on loan from Mrs. Thomas 
Clements attracted visitors. Many stayed 
to watch selections from the archives 
and talk about regional moving image. 

The newly renovated Midcoast Arts 
and Media Center, in Waldoboro, 
Maine, was the site of two screenings. 
In July, NHF ran a program of 16mm 
industrial and documentary films called 
Working Down East. And in August, 
Henry King's 1921 feature, The Seventh 
Day, premiered with English intertitles 
translated from the Czechoslovakian 
and piano accompaniment by Karen 
Dickes of Ellsworth. 

The Seventh Day is a drama 
about New York City flappers who 
come to Maine on a steam yacht. The 
only surviving copy had the original 
English intertitles translated into Czech. 
In a project with the Museum of 
Modern Art Department of Film, with 
funding from the Maine Arts 
Commission and the Knowles 
Companies, NHF translated the 
intertitles back into English. 

A 16mm workprint was shown for 
the first time in July at the East Bluehill 
home of Mrs. Frederic E. Camp, who 
hosted the preview for friends. The 
score was performed by Fritz Jahoda 
and compiled by the Bagaduce Music 
Lending Library of Blue Hill from their 
extensive collection of silent film music, 
the Maine music collection, parlor music 
and popular song. 

Temperature extremes seemed to be 
the norm in 1988, and in October, NHF 




staff endured icy blasts at the Fryeburg 
Fair on the Maine-New Hampshire 
border. This is one of the largest 
agricultural fairs in New England. 
Enthusiastic, if chilly, visitors stopped 
by NHF's semi-open space adjacent to 
the fair's museum to watch material 
ranging from 1920s industrials to works 
in progress. Especially popular were: 
1906 Trout Fishing, Rangeley Lakes 
from the Paper Print Collection, Library 
of Congress, several ice cutting films 
from Maine donors, and From Stump to 
Ship: A 1930 Logging Film. 

In October, Railroad Square 
Cinema in Waterville, Maine, hosted 
two nights of silent Maine films which 
included the first public screening of 
Holman Day's My Lady O' the Pines 
and The Sailor's Sacrifice. The feature 
was The Seventh Day, accompanied by 
Mary Cheyney Gould, Bagaduce Music 
Lending Library founder and music 



director. 

Each event provided an opportunity 
for NHF staff to meet the public, and tc 
collect information for an ongoing 
research project on Maine theaters. 
Many people annotated a list of cinemas 
in Maine, from Addison to York. The 
list now identifies over 300 cinemas 
known to have operated in the state. 
The database is being compiled from 
many sources: business registers, direc- 
tories, photos and postcards. 

NHF is grateful to Franklyn Len- 
thall of the Boothbay Theatre Museum 
for his generous loan of images. The 
accuracy of the theater database depends 
on such help. NHF welcomes personal 
recollections of the cinema experience 
as well as business records, programs, 
posters and flyers. We are particularly 
interested in information from family 
members of theater owners and 
managers. M 



THE STRAND (continued from pg. 5) 

"In the war films people learned 
something of what war was like. Some 
of the pictures of the Civil War and the 
Spanish War we'd get a glimpse of 
what they were like and from reading 
. . . had a pretty good idea of what war 
was like. 

"There was a lot of loose living 
shown in the movies after the war but 
the idea was to educate the people to 
what was going on ... ." 

As he draws the Civil War and the 
Spanish American War together in a 



single sentence, Willett seems to indi- 
cate that film whether drama, docu- 
mentary or newsreel was most signifi- 
cant in its ability to bring home issues 
and situations foreign to the everyday 
life of East Corinth. 

In exploring the role of the theater 
in the community and the meaning of 
motion picture to the people in and 
around a small town, Valerie McClead 
extends our appreciation of the medium. 
Too few such studies have been 
undertaken. H 



Page 6 



100 YEARS (continued from pg. )) 

Yankee theater, which focused on 
regional character, has flourished since 
the Civil War. Lewiston Music Hall 
presents a "New Comedy Drama of 
Realistic Yankee Life Down East." The 
play, Old Jed Prouty, revolves around 
the colorful title character who hails 
from Bucksport, Maine. 

Just as so-called Yankee theater is 
popular in the south, Civil War plays 
emphasizing the Old South are popular 
in the Northern states. An advertise- 
ment in the Aroostook Times warns, 
"Do Not Be Misled. Watch and Wait 



NHF Gratefully 
Acknowledges Support 

Thanks for financial support from: 

American Film Institute/ National 
Endowment for the Arts 

Maine Community Foundation/ 
Maine Expansion Arts Fund 

Corporate Sponsors: 
Amoskeag Co. 
Bangor & Aroostook RR 
Bangor Daily News 
N.H. Bragg & Sons 
The Knowles Companies 
Prentiss & Carlisle 
Sawyer Management Services 

and to: 

Ted Bermingham 

Dorothy Bromage 

Mrs. Frederic E. Camp 

William Cross 

Mrs. German H. H. Emory 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Foulke 

Nina Gormley 

Robert Jordan 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Lupfer 

Mary Martin 

Robert Mclntire 

Howard Peabody 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rabineau 

Christopher R.P. Rodgers 

Mr. and Mrs. P.M. Sellers 

Richard Shaw 

Dr. and Mrs. David C. Smith 

Wayne Travis 

jack Wiggins 

Patricia Winter 






for the Supremely Big Show. The Only 
Colored Dramatic Company in Exis- 
tence! Fresh from their Halifax and St. 
John Triumphs. The Hyers Sisters 
Comedy Company in their Successful 
Moral Comedy, Out of Bondage. Not- 
withstanding the Extraordinary expense 
incurred for this engagement, prices will 
be 25, 35 and 50 cents." 

Tickets for these types of live shows 
generally range from 35 to 70 cents. 

Fast Forward 

Penny Peep Shows and Nickelodeons 
The first films will cost from a penny 



to a nickel in Maine and throughout 
the country. This will be far cheaper 
than live entertainment, and images 
such as dancing girls and battling box- 
ers can be seen again and again. 

The proliferation of nickelodeons 
in 1910 will overlap with the decline 
of live entertainment, especially 
vaudeville. In fact, some penny arcades 
featuring entertainment will become 
known as "Automatic Vaudeville." 

The Bangor Opera House has been 
showing motion pictures since 1899. 
The city's first movie theater, The 

(continued on pg. 8) 



Further Reading 
Entertainment and Early Film 

Before Hollywood: Turn-of-the-Century 
American Film, edited and published by 
John Anbinder, texts by John L Fell and 
others. New York: Hudson Hills Press 
in Association with the American Fed- 
eration of Arts, 1987. The book includes 
a variety of essays and programs from 
an exhibition curated by Jay Leyda and 
Charles Musser. 

The Movies Begin: Making Movies in 
New Jersey, 1887-1920, Paul Spehr, 






Newark: Newark Museum, 1977. A his- 
tory of early filmmaking, focusing on 
the work of Edison and others in New 
Jersey. 

Film History: Theory and Practice, 
Robert C. Allen and Douglas Gomery, 
New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985. 
Pages 193-212 cover local film history 
with an emphasis on community 
resources for research. 



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Moving Image Review unless we hear from you. 

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P * g* 7 




photo: Maine Historic Preservation Commission 



The Gaiety, Vaudeville and Motion Pictures, Bangor, Maine, ca. 1909. 




NORTHEAST HISTORIC FILM 

[ BLUE HILL FALLS. MAINE. USA 04615 (207) 374-2736 | 



NONPROFIT ORG. 
US POSTAGE PAID 
Blue Hill Falls, Maine 
04615 
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ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 





100 YEARS (continued from pg. 7) 

Nickel, will be built and opened in 
1906. The Gaiety Theatre in Bangor 
will combine live vaudeville with short 
films, as will theaters throughout the 
nation. In 1911, the Bangor fire will 
destroy these two theaters, but three 
others the Graphic, the Gem and 
the Union will take their place. 

Films are shown in northern New 
England by the turn of the century, 
and producers send crews here to 
shoot feature films. But it will be 
many more years before any motion 
picture production company, most of 
which are centered in the New York 
area, will trickle down east and make 
Maine home base. By the early 1920s, 
more films will be made and shown 
here, and some of the halls which 
have only occasionally shown films 
will be converted to movie theaters. 

Vaudevillians and variety per- 
formers will try to make the change 
into motion pictures. Although few 
ultimately succeed, the early forms of 
popular entertainment will contribute 
talent and narrative material to the 
fledgling film industry. 

Maine will serve as a location for 
North Woods films, a genre of lum- 
berjacks, hunting guides, Canadian 
mounties and Yukon miners, borrow- 
ing heavily from two of the stage's 
most popular dramatic forms: melo- 
drama and farce. The Edison Company 
and others such as Pine Tree Pictures, 
the Holman Day Company and Dirigo 
Pictures reenact the old forms in 
scenic Maine locations to create short 
films and features that are distributed 
worldwide. 

In 1989, with film's beginnings 
100 years behind us, Maine remains 
the setting for a variety of motion pic- 
ture projects. However, the northern 
New England community audience, once 
brought together in storefront theaters, 
is now for the most part dispersed. H 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Maine's TV Time Machine 



Executive Director's Report p. 2 

Louis de Rochemont p. 3 

by James Petrie 
100 Years Ago: Vermont p. 4 

by Stephani Boyd 

Paul Atwood p. 5 

Fast Rewind Conference p. 5 

Exhibition Calendar p. 6 

Membership and Order Information p. 7 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine 04615. David S. Weiss, 
executive director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769 



A sample from the Bangor Historical 
Society /WABI television preservation 
project is now available on VHS video- 
tape. The tape, called Maine's TV Time 
Machine, offers a glimpse of Maine life 
from 1953, when TV first came to the 
state, through the early 1960s. 

Overview of the collection 

Designed to introduce the collec- 
tion to the public, the tape contains 
segments from local programs, inter- 
views, news stories, sports and com- 
mercials. It includes such notables as 
Senator Edmund Muskie, President 
Eisenhower receiving the first Penob- 
scot River salmon of the 1953 season, 
and Richard Nixon campaigning in 
Maine. 

Fascinating local footage 

There is footage of a soap box 
derby, dancing at a pre-dawn hunter's 
breakfast, and civil defense drills. 

Commercials for Life Pack survival 
rations for the family bomb shelter, the 
Kelvinator Food-a-Rama and the 
Gadget Master salesman recorded live 
in the WABI-TV studio in 1955 will 
beguile you. 

"The collection is an important 
resource for both the serious historian 
and the resident of the region with an 
interest in the development of the 
community," says Robert Croul, 
president of the Bangor Historical 




fbolo: WABI-TV 

Do you remember TV in the 1950s? Relive the 1950s and early 60s with the WABI Television 
Preservation Project. Order your videocassette copy of the first compilation now for just $24.95. 
Or, call to arrange a presentation and have the behind-the-scenes story of the preservation project 
related by a member of the NHF staff. 207374-2736. 



Society, which will also be distributing 
the tape. "These films are a vital supple- 
ment to the artifacts and documents at 
the Bangor Historical Society." 



Proceeds from the sale of the half- 
hour tape will support the preservation 
of the original 16mm television film. 
To order, see page 7. 



Executive Director's Report 

NHF Distribution News 



NHF Gratefully Acknowledges Support 
Join this illustrious group Become a Member of NHF! 



This summer's issue of Moving Image 
Review brings news of significance to 
Northeast Historic Film, and we 
hope to you. For the first time, we are 
putting major resources into the distri- 
bution of northern New England 
material on videocassette. 

Why? Because NHF is a small or- 
ganization with a large mission, not just 
to collect and preserve moving images 
of the region, but also to make our 
collections available to you. You've told 
us you want New England videotapes 
you can enjoy at home. "May I have a 
copy of your catalog? What else do you 
have available?" are the questions we 
hear most often in person, by letter and 
on the phone. 

Region Needs Outreach 

We feel that a grassroots distribu- 
tion approach is needed in northern 
New England one that makes viewing 
possible in homes, schools, museums 
and historical societies. The region is 
too vast and sparsely populated to 
attract huge audiences to public show- 
ings. One option for increasing out- 
reach is to take advantage of videotape 
technology. Creators of the material 
will benefit from increased awareness of 
their work, and so will our users. 

Distribution Just Starting 

At present, the list of programs 
NHF distributes is short. With your 
support, the list will grow. Your con- 
tributions will help us locate, and make 
available, films and videotapes that 
would otherwise be impossible to 
obtain. 

This effort won't happen overnight. 
To duplicate and package even one title 
takes capital, and NHF, a two-year-old 
nonprofit organization, doesn't have a 
lot of that. 

Northeast Historic Film is not a 
production house. We're not a video 
store or a circulating film library. Think 
of us as an "activist archives." We 
provide preservation services, and then 
make the results of our work available 
to you to be seen, enjoyed and used. 

Stay in Touch, Join NHF 

We hope to hear from you. And if 
you haven't already, do join NHF now. 



Corporate/Associate Members 

Astro Electric Co., Roy Gauthier 
Ernest and Kathryn Gross 
Max Media, Orono, ME, 

Robert Mclntire 
Virginia Morgan 
Howard B. Peabody 
Resolution Video, Audio & Film 

Production, Burlington, VT, 

William Schubart 
VPFilm & Tape, Portland, ME, 

Dan Osgood 

Dr. and Mrs. Stewart Wolff 
WoodenBoat Magazine, Brooklin, ME, 

Jon Wilson 

Regular Members 

Linda J. Albert 

Joan Amory 

Jean Barrett 

Deirdre Barton 

Henry Becton, Jr. 

Curtis Beach 

Lynne Blair 

Michel Chalufour 

Valerie Cunningham 

Eric Flower 

Richard A. Hamilton 

Margery J affray 

Jeffjaner 

Robert L. Jordan 

Dr. Susan. A. Kaplan 

John J. Karol, Jr. 

Stephen Lindsay 

Betty Ann and Donald Lockhart 

Michael Mathiesen 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell C. McGregor 

Bruce Meulendyke 

John O'Brien 

James A. Phillips 

Sally Regan 

One of the many benefits of member- 
ship is a 15% discount on purchases. 
Another benefit is the knowledge that 
you are contributing directly to the 
development of NHF cultural 
preservation activities. 




David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



Dr. and Mrs. Edward Kendall 

Bernard F. Roscetti 

Mr. and Mrs. P.M. Sellers 

Shan V. Sayles 

Jennifer Sheldon and Ian Gersten 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Stein 

Robert and Kathryn Suminsby 

Philip Veilleux 

Vern and Jackie Weiss 

Virginia W. Whitaker 

Wendy Wincote 

Betty Winterhalder 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Abbe Museum 

Bangor Historical Society 

Cherry field-Narraguagus Historical 

Society 

Cole Family Foundation 
Alicia Condon and Bill Gross 
Indiana Historical Society 
Maine Film Commission 
Maine Medical Center 
Maine State Library 
New Hampshire Historical Society 
Prime Resource Center 

Educator/Student 

Daisy Kelley 
Sanford Phippen 
Susan Stires 
Joan Sullivan 
Virginia W. Whitaker 



NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of 
moving image resources of interest to 
the people of northern New Eng- 
land; the preservation of film/tape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
vault storage; a touring program to 
bring materials to audiences through- 
out the area; and the establishment of 
a study center, including resource 
materials and reference copies of 
motion picture films and videotapes. 



Louis de Rochemont 
in New England 



by James Petrie 



James Petrie, who first worked for Louis 
de Rochemont in 1947, donated equip- 
ment to NHF which was used by the de 
Rochemont and Petrie production 
companies, including a "bug-eye" 
Moviola editor and a Moviola UD 20 
CS. NHF commends Petrie for the 
scrupulous manner in which he main- 
tained the equipment, and for his 
kindness in donating and documenting 
the equipment. Here are some excerpts 
from his narrative. 

James Petrie: 

The unprecedented format of The 
March of Time, in which "reenact- 
ments" of news events were used, is 
said to have originated in Portland, 
Maine, in 1915, when the young self- 
appointed newsreel cameraman, Louis 
de Rochemont, persuaded a U.S. 
Marshal to reenact the recent jailing of a 
German saboteur. This unique film 
footage was sought after by the major 
newsreel companies and thus launched 
Louis de Rochemont into the business 
of filmmaking. 

NHFs Copy of 1915 FUm 

In 1987, Elizabeth Low gave NHF the 
only known surviving copy of any film 
of the German saboteur, including the 




railroad bridge he attempted to destroy 
in Vanceboro, Maine. From here, our 
interest in de Rochemont took off. It is 
not known whether the Low version 
was shot by de Rochemont or a camera- 
man from a rival newsreel company. 

de Rochemont's Feature Films 

In later years, de Rochemont made a 
number of feature films, some of which 
could be described as didactic real-life 
fiction. He used New Hampshire set- 
tings because, he said, they gave credi- 
bility to his stories. Lost Boundaries 
(1949) introduced race issues in the story 
of a black doctor who passed as white. 
Whistle at Eaton Falls (1951) is a tale 
about union and management in a 
small-town plastics factory. 

James Petrie: 

The bug-eye and the UD 20 CS editing 
machines were used during the de 
Rochemont years of film-making, quite 
a number of which pertained to New 
England itself. 

The bug-eye was from LdeR's base- 
ment workroom at Blueberry Bank, 
Newington, New Hampshire. This 
machine and its accessories came to 
light when it was offered to me for the 
assembling of workprint footage filmed 
in Portland in 1953. This machine had 
been previously used by LdeR for 
working on dailies and picture assem- 
blies long before my time with de 
Rochemont. 

It was not until LdeR formed his 
East Coast production organization, 
Louis de Rochemont Associates, in 




This Moviola donated by 
James Petrie is in excellent working condition. 
An electric motor and leather belts power the 
35mm tabletop machine. 



New York City in 1947, that I became 
affiliated with him, being taken into the 
fold as locations scout for the making of 
The New England Story. 

Although I did not have occasion to 
witness his use of the bug-eye during 
this time, I am sure he may have done 
so, for he was known to have kept an 
open eye on the doings and perform- 
ances of his cohorts in the field. 
Whether he supervised from Newing- 
ton or New York City, one was quite 
aware that whatever had been done 
would be seen through the Moviola 
viewing glass. 

This would also be true pertaining 
to the series of 36 geography films, The 
(continued on page 5) 



Further Reading 

Louis de Rochemont and non-fiction film 



photo: Virginia de Rochemont 

Louis de Rochemont ca. 1914 in Winchester, 
Mass. 



The March of Time, 1935-1951, 
Raymond Fielding, New York: Oxford 
University Press, 1978. Background to 
de Rochemont's career, with useful 
bibliography, filmography and index. 

The American Newsreel, 1911-1967, 
Raymond Fielding, Norman: Univer- 
sity of Oklahoma Press, 1972. Over- 
view of newsreels, including an account 
of the de Rochemont Vanceboro bridge 



exploit. 

The Historian and Film, edited by Paul 
Smith, King's College, London, 
Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press, 1976. Essays on film, including 
William Hughes on "The evaluation of 
film as evidence," and Jerry Kuehl with 
a producer's point of view on historians 
and documentary. 



Page 3 



One Hundred Years Ago 
The Moving Image in Vermont 



by Stephani Boyd, Archives Manager, 
Northeast Historic Film 



How did motion picture come to be? 
What kind of entertainment did it 
replace? In celebration of the centennial 
of the projected motion picture, Moving 
Image Review regularly looks at film 
technology and the regional context of 
popular culture a century ago. 

In 1889, a few months after Thomas 
Edison and his assistant William 
Dickson were experimenting with pro- 
jected images, the residents of Burling- 
ton, Vermont crowded into the Opera 
House to watch projected still images of 
Pennsylvania's Johnstown flood. 

This vivid advertisement in the 
Burlington Free Press suggests the 
audience's anticipation: 

100 Realistic Dissolving Views or 
SIGHTS AND SCENES in this Valley of 
Death and Destruction illustrating better 
than tongue or pen can describe the ruin 
and desolation the like of which is unpar- 
alleled in history since the destruction of 
Herculaneum and Pompeii. 

Remember these pictures are not the 
work of imagination, but actual photo- 
graphs taken on the spot, before during 
and since the flood, and are shown by a 
2000 Candle Power Light, through a 
double oxyhydrogen stereopticon upon a 
screen 20 feet square. 

A graphic and thrilling description will 
be given by A RESIDENT who will tell 
his thrilling story in his own way. 

Full orchestra will be in attendance to 
enliven the entertainment. 

Ticket prices were 15, 25, and 35 cents. A 
review of the event the next day said "a 
number of our citizens" had attended, 
and that the entertainment was a "very 
interesting" one. 

By 1 897, some presentations at the 
Howard Opera House were accompa- 
nied by Edison Vitascope short films 
such as Runaway in Park, Tribulations 
of Love, and Bathing at Rockaway 
Beach. Tickets were 10, 20 and 30 
cents cheaper than play tickets. 

The road show and the projected 
image were again combined in Stereop- 
ticon shows such as the one by Profes- 
sor Henry P. Van Liew, Pd. M., called 

"Flashlight Revelations" in Burlington #** ws a*** (MM* 

in 1900. Segments included Slums of Interior of the Howard Opera House, Burlington, Vermont, circa 1890. 



New York by Flashlight, "a chaste, 
thrilling, realistic presentation of all- 
night slum rescue work" that "could 
not be described on paper." 

The moving image's appearance in 
Vermont, as elsewhere, was foreshad- 
owed by theatre productions which 
were made into films a few years after 
the technology became available. Uncle 
Tom's Cabin, a book and play includ- 
ing a Vermont setting, was made into a 
film in 1903. Its author, Harriet Beecher 
Stowe, lived in Vermont in her later 
years. 

From Plays to Movies 

Popular productions of plays helped 
"set the stage" for presentations of 
movies in the theaters that- had once 
been for live entertainment exclusively. 
Many early films were adaptations of 
stage plays, and proprietors hoped that 
fans would go to the filmed versions. 

Movies were shown at the Barre 
Opera House, the Harte Theatre in 
Bennington, the Chandler Music Hall 
in Randolph and others. 

Vermont Film Production 

Although little research on the first 
Vermont films is available, and we 
suspect there were far earlier produc- 
tions, we know that there was activity 
by at least 1916 when the Progressive 
Party in Vermont produced A Vermont 



Romance with local actors as a way to 
raise funds. 

The film was shot in Burlington by a 
New York cameraman, Ernest Powell. 
Actors hailed from Waterbury, Middle- 
bury, Manchester, Lyndonville, Ben- 
nington, Richford, Burlington, Hard- 
wick and Barton. The film premiered at 
Burlington's Majestic Theater. 

Moving Image Studies 

Regional film history is significant 
for understanding the role of moving 
images as the most powerful media of 
our century. Film history is not just 
New York or Hollywood. It is in every 
town and state that movies touched, 
whether through production or exhibi- 
tion. 

Much of New England's rich 
cultural heritage has been captured by 
film, video and broadcast television. 
And much is known about the develop- 
ment of media technology. But there 
are "miles to go" and years of research 
are needed before the field can claim 
knowledge of moving image history, or 
of entertainment and the audience in 
New England or in America as a whole. 

Thanks to: 

Q. David Bowers, Wolfeboro, New 

Hampshire 
Professor George Bryan, Royall Tyler 

Theatre, University of Vermont 
Franklyn Lenthall, Boothbay Theatre 

Museum, Boothbay, Maine 
Michael Sherman and Peggy Abbott, 

Vermont Historical Society 
Nadia Smith, Special Collections, 

Bailey-Howe Library, University 

of Vermont. 




Paul Atwood: Fiddling 
for The Birth of a Nation 

Paul Atwood of Brewer, Maine, barn- 
stormed with The Birth of a Nation in 

( 1918-19. "We played all over the state," 
he recalls, "including Orono, Houlton 
and Augusta." The other orchestra 
members are all gone now, but included 
Francis Shaw on drums, Knute Ring- 
wold on piano, and Fred Bowman on 
clarinet. 

"In the 1920s our orchestra opened 
the new Bangor Opera House, and 
played there the first two weeks. We 
were in the pit and there were five acts 
of vaudeville plus three reels of moving 
pictures." 

Atwood's memory of films in 
Bangor goes way back. "The first pic- 
ture I saw that had music was George 
Washington 's Minstrels. It was a movie 
with a talking machine mounted behind 

. the screen." 

The musician's union, he said, was 
against canned music, and against 
Victrola parties, but what could you 
do? "We didn't think too much about 
it, it was just a way of life. I played six 

. nights a week for dances and social 
gatherings. 

"Around 1917, the manager of 
Bangor's Bijou, Stephen Bogrett, had a 
wife who was a soprano. She came out 
on stage between reels after the an- 

. nouncement, 'One minute please for a 
change of reels.' People used to go 
down just to hear her sing." 

Recalling playing for The Birth of a 
Nation, Atwood says the scores were 
complicated. "A great many of them 




"Fast Rewind" 
Conference 



were presented in script. The scenes 
were numbered with cues, and it was 
quite a job to keep an eye on the screen 
and watch the conductor. 

"The drummer in particular had a 
tough job," he stated, "with all the 
battlefield music and guns firing." Nev- 
ertheless, everyone was paid the 
same a fixed union rate, plus expenses. 

Some of the theaters Atwood played 
were as memorable as The Birth of a 
Nation, which, according to Atwood, 
"filled the house every night." Atwood 
remembers, "That theater in Presque 
Isle was named after a horse. The 
Braden was named after John R. 
Braden, a famous race horse. I went up 
there in 1923-24, and they brought the 
horse right out on stage that night." 



LOUIS DE ROCHEMONT (continued from pg. 3) 



Earth and Its Peoples, two of which 
were filmed in the local New England 
environs: Maine Harbor Town, in 

' Camden, Maine, and A US. Com- 
munity and its Citizens, Milford, 
Connecticut. 

There were eight March of Time 
stories made in New England, including 
Summer Theatres, Skowhegan, Maine, 

' October 18, 1935; Fisheries, March 13, 
1936; Passamaquoddy, September 2, 
1936; and New England's Eight Million 
Yankees, Exeter, New Hampshire, July 
1941. 



James Petrie's Work 

Petrie's career with Louis de Rochemont 
included screen credits on Lost Bounda- 
ries, Whistle at Eaton Falls, Walk East 
on Beacon, Windjammer and other 
films. He was a partner in the produc- 
tion company Potter, Orchard & Petrie, 
Inc. Petrie's filmmaking career began in 
the U.S. Navy. He went on to become 
director of photography, editor, director 
and producer. 



Academics and archivists gathered in 
Rochester, New York, for a conference 
called "Fast Rewind: the Archaeology 
of Moving Images," May 4-7, 1989. 

Organized by Bruce A. Austin, 
Wm. Kern Professor in Communica- 
tions at Rochester Institute of Technol- 
ogy, the conference covered technol- 
ogy, preservation and the use of moving 
images from the points of view of 
teachers, researchers, producers and 
archivists. 

Northeast Historic Film cofounder 
Karan Sheldon and Stephani Boyd, 
archives manager, attended. 

Importance of Amateur Film 

Sheldon participated in a panel 
called "The Family Movie," with Brian 
Lewis of the CBC, Jeffrey Ruoff, 
University of Iowa, Robert Wagner, 
Ohio State and filmmaker Alan Berliner 
of New York. Sheldon explained NHF 
collection criteria for amateur film. The 
NHF collection contains amateur 
material from 1916 on, with particular 
strength in 16mm b&w film from the 
1930s. 

Inside View of Our Culture 

Home movies by northern New 
England creators, she said, can reveal an 
otherwise elusive "inside" view of the 
culture over time. 

NHF Seeks Amateur Film 

NHF seeks donations of northern 
New England material with the 
following characteristics: 

A single creator covering a long span of 
time with surviving annotation such as 
the Meyer Davis Collection (1926-1974). 

A single community filmed by multiple 
creators offering a varied perspective, 
such as the various portraits of 
Cherryfield (pop. 986). 

Rare ethnic or cultural coverage. 

Business, crafts or professions covered in 
depth. 

The work of an individual whose home 
movies can be annotated, and whose 
moving image work would not otherwise 
be archived. 

Call or write NHF for information on 
preserving amateur film and videotape. 



Pa 



Exhibition Calendar 



T*1 



NHF Presents: 



Woodsmen and River Drivers 

Premiere, with discussion. 



Saturday, June 10. 

Kimball Hall 

Univ. of Maine, Machias 

Showings on the hour, 2-5 p.m. 



The Seventh Day 

A presentation in honor of moviegoers, projectionists and accompanists. Danny 
Patt, who first accompanied silent films here in 1922, will play the Bagaduce Music 
Lending Library score. 

Wednesday, August 2, 7:30 p.m. 

Town Hall 

Union, Maine. 



Selections from the Archives 

August 12-14 

Maine Festival 

Deering Oaks Park 

Portland, Maine. 



Way Down East 

D.W. Griffith's 1920 masterpiece. Reconstructed by the Museum of Modern Art 
with live musical accompaniment. For tickets in advance call 207 667-8919 or 
207 374-2736. 

Sunday, August 20, 7:30 p.m. 

The Criterion Theater 

Bar Harbor, Maine. 



Archiving Workshop 

September 8 
Catamount Arts Center 
St. Johnsbury, Vermont 
Call Deborah Sessions, 802 223-8742 



Selections from the Archives 



September 22-24 
Common Ground Fair 
Windsor Fairgrounds 
Windsor, Maine 



Selections from the Archives 




October 1-8 

Fryeburg Fair 

Fryeburg, Maine 

photo: American Heritage Center, 
University of Wyoming 

Miss Lillian Gish in Way Down East 



The purpose of NHF is to preserve, 
and make available to the public, 
moving images of the northern New 
England region. 



All But Forgotten: 

Holman Francis Day, Filmmaker 

Chronicles career of 1920s Maine author 
and film producer Day, whose credits 
include 
Northwoods 
dramas such 
as My Lady 
of the Pines 
with Mary 
Astor. Pro- 
duced in 1977 
by Everett 
Foster under 
a Maine Arts 
Commission grant; won a silver medal at the 
International Film & TV Festival of NY and 
aired on the PBS system. Narrated by film 
historian James Card. 30 minutes. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95. 

The How and Why of Spuds 

A detailed look at 1920 potato farming in 
Aroostook County, Maine, when the pri- 
mary power was horses. Produced by the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture. 
10 minutes. 

$20/NHF members $17. 

From Stump to Ship: 
A 1930 Logging Film 





The most complete look at the long-log 
industry includes felling trees in winter with 
cross-cut saws, the spring river drive, and 
work in a steam-powered mill. Original 
1930 script spoken by humorist Tim 
Sample. Project won the American Associa- 
tion for State and Local History award of 
merit. 28 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 



Page 6 



ieocassettes Now Available 



Researchers, teachers and students 
are invited to request reference 
copies, .uul to visit NHI ; to work 
with hundreds of hours of film, 
videotape .uid associated materials. 



NHF reaches many people through 
public presentations. And now, our 
outreach includes New England 
moving images on videotape for 
home and school use. 



Cberryfield, 1938 

Springtime views of a small Washington 
County (Maine) community. A short, but 
complete and affecting view which includes 
the businesses, the school, and many 

:cics such as cutting wood, 
training oxen. 6 minutes. 

$20/NHF members $17. 



Woodsmen and River Drivers 

'Another day, another era. " 



WABI-TV 

STUDIOS 




Unforgettable individuals who worked for 
the Machias Lumber Company before 1930 
share their recollections of a hard life. 
Completed in 1989, a project of Northeast 
Archives of Folklore and Oral History with 
funding from the Maine Humanities 
Council and Champion International. 
30 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 



Earliest Maine Films 
Drawing a Lobtter Pot ( 1 901 ) is the 

earliest surviving moving image known to 
have been shot in Maine. 
Logging in Maine ( 1 906) shows men 
working to prevent a logjam on a river. 

Trout Fishing, Rangeley Laket (1906) 
shows arrival by train and steamer and 
guests in three-piece suit* catching trout, 
minutes total. 

$20/NHF members $17. 



IT 
Sh 



Maine's TV Time Machine 

A compilation, just completed, from the 
Bangor Historical Society /WABI collection from Maine's oldest TV station. Sample* from 
the 1950s and early 1960s: television news, sports and local commercial*. Narrated by 
veteran radio and TV journalist George Hale. 34 minutes. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 



All But Forgotten 


24.95 


19.95 






The How and Why of Spuds 


20.00 


17.00 






From Stump to Ship 


29.95 


24.95 






Cherryficld, 1938 


20.00 


17.00 






Woodsmen and River Drivers 


29.95 


24.95 






Earliest Maine Films 


20.00 


17.00 






Maine's TV Time Machine 


24.95 


19.95 






Merchandise total 
Check method of shipment 

D c . . _ , _. Tax: ME residents add 5% 
Special Fourth Cuss mail: no charge 

D First Class Mail: add $2.40 per tape Shipping and handling' 
1 1 Overnight: add $12.50 per tape Videotape Total 













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LJ Yes! Please enroll me as a member. LJ Please note my order above. 

Annual Due* 

D Regular Member $25 Q Corporate/ Associate Member $100 

D Educator/Student $15 D Friend of NHF $250 

D Nonprofit Institution $35 Q Founding Member $1000 



D I would like to give a gift membership at the 



level. 



(Please write 'gift * and the recipient 's name and address in the blank space belov. ) 



Name _ 
Address 

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Please tout videotape order, membership and gift (as applicable). Make check payable to: 
Northeast His tone Film and tend check to: 
Northeast Historic Film, Blue Hill Falls, Maine USA 04615 

NHF it a tax-exrmpi Ml (t) ()) orfamj triem Dmes a*4 (MfrifcrtMi art JffuctM* to ikt 



P * g e 7 




photo: Tom Stewart 



Newell Beam: *l am proud I'm a woodsman. Yes, I know what to do in the woods. ' 




NORTHEAST HISTORIC FILM 

1 BLUE HII.L FALLS. MAINE. I'SA 0461 5 (207) 374-3736 



NONPROFIT ORG. 
US POSTAGE PAID 
Blue Hill Falls, Maine 
04615 
Permit *2 



ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



Woodsmen and River Drivers 
"Another day, another era." 

"When I first went into the woods up 
Machias River, I was 1$. Oh, that's 65 
years ago when I was up there. First 
year I didn 't know too much about the 
logging woods. I soon learned. " 

The intensity of life working in the 
Maine woods before 1930 is shared by 
Newell Beam and other veterans of the 
Machias Lumber Company. They are 
the last of many generations of New 
England woods workers who used 
hand tools, horses and water power to 
turn trees into lumber often sent to 
New York and other urban areas. Beam 
and his colleagues appear in Woodsmen 
and River Drivers, a documentary 
presented by Northeast Historic Film. 

The woodsmen are vivid communi- 
cators, conveying the viewer into a van- 
ished way of life. Consider spending 
the winter with 30 men in a remote 
woods camp with no electricity, work- 
ing from pre-dawn until after dark, six 
days a week. 

The program grew from a recon- 
struction of a 1930 amateur film by the 
president of the Machias Lumber 
Company, who spent a year recording 
his business. 

The reconstruction, From Stump to 
Ship: A 1930 Logging Film, was quickly 
accepted as a part of the Maine history 
curriculum from elementary school to 
university level. The film has been dis- 
tributed widely and won the award of 
merit from the American Association 
for State and Local History. 

To add to the original resource, Dr. 
Edward (Sandy) Ives, director of the 
Northeast Archives of Folklore and 
Oral History, gathered the recollections 
of more than 25 woodsmen and river 
drivers. The stories of selected individu- 
als are told in Woodsmen and River 
Drivers. 

A project of Northeast Archives of 
Folklore and Oral History, Dept. of 
Anthropology, Univ. of Maine, funded 
by the Maine Humanities Council and 
Champion International Corp., Woods- 
men and River Drivers is available on 
videocassette from Northeast Historic 
Film (see page 7). Call 207 374-2736 for 
information on a presentation for your 
historical society or other organization. 



I Northeast Historic I i I m 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Winter 1990 



Executive Director'* Report . 
History and Home Movies, 

Patricia Zimmcrmann.... 
100 Yean Ago: New Hampshire 

by Strpham Boyd 

Summer Events 

Grant* in Action 

The Movie Queen _. ____. 



p.2 

P3 
P< 

,p.5 
,p.6 

,p.8 



Archiving Home Movies 



Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Him, Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine 0461 S. David S. Weiss, 
executive director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769 



A regional archives collects and pre- 
serves material that is significant to its 
geographical area. From the start, 
Northeast Historic Film has taken on 
the task of preserving amateur films and 
videotapes that record the life of the 
Northeast in detail and from 
perspectives nowhere else available. 

A New Field 

Amateur moving image material has 
not been widely collected in the U.S., so 
there arc few people curating it. No 
wonder it presents many diffi- 
culties to the intrepid curator. 
Physical preservation is difficult, 
because many film and tape for- 
mats arc obsolete and laboratory 
facilities are scarce and expensive. 

Direct to Computer 

NHF in 1990 will become one of the 
first film archives to catalog directly 
onto computer, generating paper rec- 
ords from printouts. There arc no field- 
wide standards for describing home 
movies. We describe film by geograph- 
ical location and visual content with a 
growing list of terms including children, 
boats and boating, logging, dancing, 
religion, agriculture and holidays. The 
terms come from Library of Congress 
subject headings with some regional 
adaptations, for example, addition of 
the term "maritime." 



Fascinating Content 

NHF has been able to find and safe- 
guard a significant amount of amateur 
film, going back to the early teens. 
There's wide variety, from plays, pic- 
nics and outings to records of passenger 
rail, steamships, fishing (seining, dip- 
ping, hand lining, fly casting), and 
family and institutional activities grand 
and humble. 



The Public as Source 

Not surprisingly, the public has not 
thought much about the value of home 
movies, and individuals usually haven't 
regarded their own films as of potential 
interest outside the immediate family. 
Increasingly, they arc, and NHF en- 
courages the submission of amateur 
material for evaluation. 




.\mtttnr film 
trnvet At \ortbeAU 
Hulonc Film in 
gAft>Agt cjnt Jtnd tagtr 
CAnnttn. thopping fart, four* of All 
kindt, *nd bAtitrti The (Urn thtt Arm-et 
in these conuinen it Aging, fragile And 
ituuiUy *npro/ettjl>lr Such film it nnuiUy 
HnttfHt nd frrterved novhrrr rlsf U> think the 
many people tt-fco *ndrn:*nd it) tmporuncr And 
donAtt film And funds for in prttervAnon. 



Executive Director's Report 



Join These New Members of NHF! 
See Page 6 for Details. 



Management Study 
Over the summer, the University of 
Maine's Bureau of Public Administra- 
tion undertook a detailed evaluation of 
NHF's management and planning. We 
are grateful for their expertise. The 
study is part of our strategic planning 
process, and has proved both reinforc- 
ing of past decisions and helpful in 
defining tomorrow's goals. 

As we look to the future we see 
further building of the collections, 
continued interaction with educators, 
preservation professionals, producers 
and others and more participation by 
volunteers. We will continue to work to 
safeguard our moving image heritage 
and make it available, not just for future 
generations, but for you. 

Volunteer Program 

One way to make preservation work 
for you is to become a volunteer. The 
program is designed to encourage parti- 
cipation, even by those who can't come 
to Blue Hill. There are openings for 
volunteers to: 

Q Review tapes and films and help 
catalog them. 

3 Assist planning and preparation 

for public events. 
Q Record recollections on audiotape 

and/or transcribe audio into type. 

Q Help care for NHF's growing 
equipment collection. 

Q Use computer skills for word 
processing and data entry. 

For more information on how you can 
get involved, call 207 374-2736. 

Our Third Anniversary 

With this issue of Moving Image 
Review we mark the third anniversary 
of Northeast Historic Film. We wel- 
come a seventh board member to 
Northeast Historic Film, Lynda Tyson, 
of Northeast Harbor and Tyson & 
Partners of Bangor. Charlie Tyson, her 
husband and partner, joins the program 
committee. His able hand has helped 
guide Moving Image Review since its 
first issue. 

Thanks to the many members who 
joined in 1989, our first membership 
year. In 1990 we are offering a selection 



Founding Members 

Paul & Deborah Gelardi 
Karan Sheldon & David Weiss 

Friends of NHF 

Milbridge Theatre, David & Sue Parsons 
Ed Pert 

Corporate/Associate Members 
Hammond Lumber Company, 

Donald C. Hammond 
Tyson & Partners, Lynda & Charles Tyson 
Mrs. Joanne Van Namee 
Allene& Joel White 

Regular Members 

Peter Anderson 

James E. Austin 

Paul & Mollie Birdsall 

Richard Bock 

Bob & Dot Broadbent 

Lynn Cadwallader 

Mrs. Frederic E. Camp 

Robert Carnie 

Gary Cobb 

Art Collier 

Celeste DeRoche 

Clarence R. DeRochemont 

Ann-Marie Duguay 

Carroll Faulkner 

John Gfroerer 

Jim Goff 

Nancy Gray 

Charles Hesse 

Stanley Howe 

Douglas H/Ilsely 

Thomas F. Joyce 

Ernest Knight 

Rep. Theone Look 

Lily Marston 

William Materne 

Andrew Mazer 

Francis S. Moulton, Jr. 

Lee Murch 

Richard Obrey 

Guy & Dianne Poirier 

Robert Porter 

Charles Pritham 

of NHF postcards to all new and 
renewing members. They're an ideal 
way to stay in touch with friends while 
helping spread the word about NHF. 




5 



David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



M. Prittie 

Karen Rhine 

Chris Roy 

Nancy Sheldon 

Sally Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Thompson 

Mrs. Henry Walter 

Seth Washburn 

Robert Whitney 

Carter Wintle 

Frank A. Wood, PhD 

Karen Wyatt 

Harry Zinn 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Calais Free Library, Marilyn Diffm 
City Theater Associates, Keith Peeler 
Curtis Memorial Library 
George Stevens Academy, Bonnie Copper 
Harvard Film Archive, Vlada Petric 
Mantor Library, David Olsen 
University of Maine, Augusta, Library 

Educator/Student Members 

Miss Rosemary Anthony 

Phil Gonyar 

Cora Greer 

Kevin Hagopian 

Scott Herring 

Dr. T. Johnson 

Sharon Merrill, Guy E. Rowe School 

Alan Morse 

Dr. David Richard 

Paige Roberts 

William Taylor 

Carla Turner, Windham Real School 

Dr. Richard E.G. White 

Carolyn Wiley I 

NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of 
moving image resources of interest to 
the people of northern New Eng- 
land; the preservation of film/tape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
vault storage; a touring program to 
bring materials to audiences through- 
out the area; and the establishment of 
a study center, including resource 
materials and reference copies of 
motion picture films and videotapes. 



Page 



History and Home Movies: 
An Interview with Patricia Zimmermann 



Patricia Zimmermann is associate 
professor of cinema and photography, 
Roy H. Park School of 
Communications, Ithaca College, 
Ithaca, New York. 



Zimmermann: The history of home 
movies is a history of technological 
diffusion from a very specialized mar- 
ket in the early part of the century, 
widening over the decades to a more 
consumer-oriented family market. 

Who made home movies? 

Z People who had expendable 
income, with access to equipment 
and processing. The largest concentra- 
tion has been in urban areas, partic- 
ularly in the Northeast. People got 
information about home movies from 
camera stores in the downtown urban 
areas in the 1920s and '30s. And from 
The New York Times, where home 
movies were written about in the 
society pages. 

What is the relationship of home 
movie-making to travel? 

^ Generally speaking there are two 
principal uses of amateur film: 
Amateur photography increases with 
the birth of a child, and the other usage 
is travel. There is a long tradition of 
using photography and film to record 
travel to other places. You'll see lots of 
shots taken from cars, pans of the ocean 
or the mountains, and there's a real 
sense of collecting images as though 
they're souvenirs as though the 
camera can get more of it than you 
could. 

Travel film coincides with the rise of 
the automobile, and the two technolo- 
gies mix together: The automobile gave 
people mobility and increased 
vacationing. 

People tend to film what I call "the 
exotic other." For example, I would 
guess in Maine people filmed lobster 
traps and lobstermen from a distance. 
"The exotic" is an indicator that you 
were somewhere and life was different. 



Who is preserving amateur film, and 
what are they collecting? 

ZLast year I was a research fellow at 
the Smithsonian Institution in the 
Human Studies Film Archives. They 
archive ethnographic film and amateur 
film of places that have changed for 
example, home movies shot in Cam- 
bodia, evidence of people and places 
you couldn't see any longer. Their 
collection spans 1900 to the present. 

That archives collection is an 
incredible record of the third world, 
and the way first world people of 
certain wealth and power image the 
third world. 

Who else is archiving amateur 
material? 

I've done research at George 
Eastman House. They have an 
enormous document archives, including 
amateur and trade magazines. Eastman 
House in the last few years has in- 
creased its interest in saving travelogues, 
and when amateur material comes their 
way they attempt to keep it. 

The Bishop Museum in Hawaii has 
apparently initiated a campaign to get 
more amateur film because there was 
quite a lot shot there during World War 
II. They're trying to document 
Hawaiian life. 

What's sad, I believe, is that more 
archives aren't involved, because this 
material will just be lost. Most archives 
have limited space and they have other 
priorities. 

What do you think of regional 
archiving? 

Much of it has to be regional 
because I think that what is inter- 
esting about amateur photography and 
film is how regionally based it is. It's 
about people in a particular time and 
socioeconomic place. 

Where do you think film scholarship 
is going? 

The range of people interested in 
media is bigger than anyone ever 



Pl Print Plainl, 




16mm film boxes like this one were sent for 
processing and returned to home movie-makers 
all over America. Where are your family films? 

imagined. People are studying industrial 
films, as well as amateur production and 
all the regional film production that no 
one knew about. 

There is a movement among cultural 
historians to look at history from 
below. This has meant looking at the 
history of women and labor unions and 
farmers. And there's been a move 
toward regional history. 

People Making History 

In film history there's been a similar 
shift toward examination of American 
media culture beyond the dominance of 
TV and Hollywood film. Study of 
home movies is an aspect of this, look- 
ing at the way normal everyday people 
who aren't trained make their own 
history. Home movies are powerful 
documents of the way people lived at a 
certain point in history. 

Consider women's history and 
questions like, "What were women's 
lives like in the 18th and 19th centu- 
ries?" To answer, historians went to 
archives and looked at letters. 

Equivalent of Diaries 

The 20th-century equivalent is 
home movies. I think of them as private 
family documents. They are the visual 
equivalent of diaries, and that's one 
reason I think they need to be 
preserved. 

Further Reading 

Reel Families: A Social History of the 
Discourse on Amateur Film, 1897-1962. 
Patricia R. Zimmermann. In press. H 



Pag 



One Hundred Years Ago: 
The Moving Image in New Hampshire 

by Stephani Boyd, Archives Manager, 
Northeast Historic Film 



How did motion picture come to be? 
What kind of entertainment did it 
replace? In celebration of the centennial 
of the projected motion picture, Moving 
Image Review regularly looks at film 
technology and the regional context of 
popular culture a century ago. 

One hundred years ago, an arguably 
short-sighted decision by Thomas 
Edison resulted in the temporary 
primacy of coin-operated peep shows 
over movies projected onto screens. 
Eighteen-ninety was the year between 
the first known projection of film onto 
a screen by Edison's assistant William 
Dickson, and Edison's patents applica- 
tions for his Kinetograph camera and 
Kinetoscope peephole viewer in 1891. 

Edison decided that small, individu- 
ally operated viewers provided greater 
image clarity than did projection onto 
large screens, one reason for the estab- 
lishment of coin-operated viewing 
machines throughout the United States 
in the 1890s. 

Whereas in 1990 we have "home 
entertainment centers" complete with 
our own machines for movie viewing 
and music listening, in the 1890s and 
early 1900s people had to go out to 
view moving images. Thus the creation 
of arcades in commercial areas and 
transportation hubs. 

Automatic Vaudeville 

One example of this phenomenon 
was Canobie Lake Park in Salem, New 
Hampshire. It was built in 1902 by the 
Massachusetts North East Railway Co. 
to encourage the public to use its street- 
cars on weekends. The development 
included an "Automatic Vaudeville" 
building, which probably contained 
peep show machines. 

Among the peep show machines the 
park still owns and runs is the Muto- 
scope, a machine that competed with 
Edison's Kinetoscope. The machine has 
a hand-cranked rotating drum with 
photo cards mounted on it that flip in 
sequence, providing the illusion of a 
moving image. 



Women and Snakes 

Park marketing director Wayne 
Ulaky says sequences available for 
viewing in 1990 include a beautiful 
woman sashaying through a room, and 
a snake eating a rodent. 

Jim Blanco, manager of the loka 
Theatre in Exeter, New Hampshire, has 
seen the machines in action. "You used 
to put pennies in them, and now you 
put in dimes," he said. "Even teenagers 
who listen to AC/DC like them." 

By 1915, many coin-operated 
moving image machines were replaced 
by chairs when entrepreneurs realized 
they could make more money by 
operating only one machine at a time 
for a roomful of paying customers. So 
much for Edison's 1890 assumptions. 

From Mutoscopes to Multiplexes 

In 1990, Mutoscopes are still being 
built and operated as novelties, but 
movie theaters are endangered as 
resources are directed toward the 
production and distribution of home 
videotapes and VCRs. Movie theaters 
are being demolished, converted or 
replaced by new theaters devoid of 
ornament or character. 

Images in use throughout the 100 
years of motion picture history are 
being lost as is their context, i.e., the 



ftrcade 

- 



environments in which they were seen. 

Going, Going, Gone 

According to Jim Blanco, four New 
Hampshire theaters were lost in the last 
year or so: the Amherst Street and 
Vitaphone theaters in Manchester and 
part of the Colonial in Portsmouth 
became parking lots, and the Latchis in 
Keene was gutted for condominiums. 

Exeter's loka Theatre, which Blanco 
manages, was built in 1915 as a movie 
and vaudeville house. It is scheduled to 
close soon, largely because film dis- 
tributors would rather book multiple 
films into multiscreen theaters than one 
film into an independent theater. 
Package booking practices make it 
harder for small theaters to get popular 
films, and therefore, large audiences. 

A group from local Phillips Exeter 
Academy has tried to rally support for 
the theater, but no adequate solution 
has yet been found. 

Blanco believes that much more 
than architecture is lost when a theater 
is destroyed. "Anyone who has seen 
Ben-Hur only on television has seen 
about 40 percent of it," he said. "It's 
like looking at the world through a 
window from 20 paces back." 

In 100 years, has the art of 
moviegoing come and gone? 
Thanks to: 

Jim Blanco, Exeter, NH 
Q. David Bowers, Wolfeboro, NH 
David Cook, Games Manager, Canobie Lake 

Park, Salem, NH 

Wayne Ulaky, Marketing Director, Canobie 
Lake Park, Salem, NH 




photo: Q. David Bovert, 



Canobie Lake Park exhibition hall, ca. 1902. 



Page 4 



Summer Events * 1989 



Silent Film 
Returns to Union 

The Union Historical Society hosted 
screenings of Henry King's 1921 feature 
The Seventh Day in the old town hall in 
Union, Maine, on August 2, 1989. 

In the afternoon Dr. Richard Kahn, 
a member of the Maine Humanities 
Council, chaired a retrospective session 
with members of the Union community 
who had participated in the showing of 
silent films in the hall. Danny Patt, who 
grew up in Union, shared his recollec- 
tions along with Ross Howes, projec- 
tionist, and more than half a dozen 



Danny Patt, pianist, 
began hii career in the 
early 1920s accom- 
panying silent film. 




1 \- 



individuals who remembered attending 
the films with family and friends. 

Community at the Movies 

The discussion gathered valuable 
information on the community's rela- 
tionship to film. Movie-going was 
regular and important in Union, almost 
to the exclusion of other group activi- 
ties, including church. Isabel Abbott 
recalled having to act ill to get out of 
going to a film showing one Christmas 
Eve so that she could stay home and 
play with a new doll. 

Accompanist Danny Patt 

In the evening, Patt played the piano 
for two screenings of The Seventh Day, 
with selected Pathe newsreel stories. 
The house was full for both shows. 

In 1924, at the age of 12, Patt had 
taken the job of accompanist for the 
weekly films. He also played once a 
week in Warren and Thomaston, 
Maine. 

The 1989 audience was diverse and 
enthusiastic. Many young people had 




Projectionist Ross Howes and moviegoer Jesse 
Hilt meet by the original Powers projector at 
Union town hall for The Seventh Day, a 
presentation in honor of moviegoers, 
projectionists and accompanists. 

never before seen a silent film, and 
some of their elders remembered having 
fun pelting Danny Patt with peanuts 
before the sound era put the town hall 
movie show out of business. 

The Historical Society was an excel- 
lent and well-organized host, supported 
by many local sponsors and the Maine 
Humanities Council. 




Dr. Edward Ives, internationally known 
oral historian, (left) greets woodsman 
Newell Beam on June 10 at the University of 
Maine, Machias premiere of Woodsmen 
and River Drivers. The 1989 documentary, 
produced and distributed by NHF, was 
introduced by project director Ives. 



The NHF booth at the Maine Festival For k 
the third straight (and rainiest) year, NHF W 
appeared at this popular arts event. 




Way Down East, reconstructed by the Museum of Modern Art, was shown to a 
crowd of over iOO on August 20 at The Criterion Theater in Bar Harbor, Maine. 
The event was sponsoredby the Bar Harbor Banking and Trust Company. NHF 
board member Pam Wintle talks with pianist Glenn Jenks ofCamden, who is in 
a dramatic mode following his performance of the score. 



At the Great Cranberry 
Library, filmmaker David 
Westphal (left) speaks with 
Robert Browning. Westphal 
organized the August 
screening of a 1930s home 
movie. The detailed look at 
island life, starring Mr. 
Browning, was warmly 
received by a full house. 




r\ 



(conttmttd on page 6) 
Page } 



Summer Events 



(continued from pg. 5) 



Archival to Agricultural 

NHF gave an archiving workshop 
for the Vermont Historical Records 
Advisory Board with funds from 
NHPRC at Catamount Arts Center, St. 
Johnsbury, Vermont in September. 
From October 1-10 staff occupied ex- 
hibit space close to two oxen at the 
Fryeburg Fair in Fryeburg, Maine, 
showing videotapes in the Farm Mu- 
seum to several thousand visitors to the 
largest agricultural fair in Maine. 

Other events: in July, screenings of 
Woodsmen in Blue Hill and Rockport, 
Maine, and a preview from the Maher 
Collection in Lucerne, Maine; Septem- 
ber, presentations in Kennebunkport 
and Bangor; October, events at the 
Abnaki Ski & Outing Club in 
Augusta, the Women's Literary 
Union, Portland, and at Bates College, 
a screening of The Seventh Day with 
accompaniment by Danny Patt. 




At the Common Ground Fair in Windsor, 
Maine, the NHF booth occupied a space in the 
exhibition hall and was awarded a blue ribbon 
for most educational exhibit by a jovial 
gentleman in a top hat. We appreciated the 
award and the friendly crowds. 



Grants in Action 



NHF is grateful to these public and 
private granters in the state who make 
our work possible: 

The Maine State Library's incen- 
tive matching grant program for preser- 
vation of unique state historical and 
library research material donated $5,000 
for continued preservation work on the 
Bangor Historical Society /WABI 
project. The television film preservation 
project has raised $92,000 to date, and is 
gaining visibility with educators, 
business people, producers and archi- 
vists. Revenue from the introductory 
videotape, Maine's TV Time Machine, 
supports the project. The tape, available 
by mail from NHF, is selling well at 
area retailers including Mr. Paperback 
and Shop 'N Save stores. 

The Joan Whitney and Charles 
Shipman Payson Charitable Founda- 
tion, in its first year of operation, gave 
$2,000 to NHF toward the preservation 
of maritime-related material in the 
BHS/WABI collection. 



The Maine Arts Commission 
Regional Arts Program gave $250 
toward the exhibition of Way Down 
East at the Criterion. 



The Maine Community Founda- 
tion's Maine Expansion Arts Fund 

awarded $3,000 for the planning phase 
of Ralph Stanley, A Reverence for 
Wood, a film to be produced by David 
Westphal and Gunnar Hansen. Further 
funding is needed in preparation for 
their film on the work of the Southwest 
Harbor wooden-boat builder. 



Final reports have been submitted or 
are in progress for these 1988/89 grants: 
the Maine Arts Commission-funded 
preservation and outreach work on The 
Seventh Day; the Expansion Arts- 
funded project The Movie Queen (see 
page 8); and the American Film Insti- 
tute/National Endowment for the 
Arts preservation grant for work on the 
Daniel Maher collection. H 



Join 
Northeast Historic Film 

New in 1990! A gift packet of postcards 
for all new members and renewals. It 
contains striking images from regional 
motion pictures: 1920 Maine Centen- 
nial, The Seventh Day, The Rider of 
the King Log and Bozo! Eight post- 
cards, two of each. 

Q Regular members, $25 per year, 
receive a subscription to Moving 
Image Review, notice of screen- 
ings and events, and discounts on 
materials distributed by NHF. 

Q Educator/Student Members, 
$15 per year, receive all regular 
membership benefits. This cate- 
gory is for teachers and students at 
any level. 

Q Nonprofit Organizations, $35 
per year, receive all regular bene- 
fits of membership, plus additional 
copies of Moving Image Review 
on request and reduced rates for 
consultation, presentations and 
professional services. 

Q Associates (Individuals) and 
Corporate Members, $100 per 
year, receive the benefits of 
regular members, and in addition, 
special recognition in Moving 
Image Review and programs. 

Q Friends, $250 per year, receive all 
benefits of regular membership 
and, in addition, a privilege card 
which will admit two people to 
any NHF-sponsored screening or 
event, plus listing in the roster of 
Friends. 

Q Founding Members, $1,000 per 
year, the premier category of 
membership. These members are 
making a major commitment to 
ensure the preservation and use of 
the NHF resource, and receive all 
benefits of regular membership 
and invitations to special previews. 

Look for announcement of special 
items in 1990, including new T-shirts 
and videotapes. Membership at any 
level is an opportunity to become 
involved with the preservation and 
enjoyment of our moving image 
heritage. 

Your dues are tax-deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 



Page 6 



Videotapes of New England Life 



The purpose of NHF is to preserve, and make available to the public, moving 
images of the northern New England region. NHF reaches many people 
through public presentations. Researchers use database information and ref- 
erence copies of film and tapes in our growing collection of unedited material. 
And now, we offer New England videotapes for home and school use. 



All But Forgotten: 

Holman Francis Day, Filmmaker. 

Career of 1920s Maine author and film producer 
Day, whose work included Northwoods drama 
My Lady of the Pines with Mary Astor. 30 
minutes. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95. 



Around Cape Horn 

Capt. Irving Johnson aboard the Peking in 1929. 
37 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 



Cherryfield, 1938 

Springtime views of a small Washington County 
(Maine) community. A short, but complete and 
affecting view. 6 minutes. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95. 

Earliest Maine Films 
Drawing a Lobster Pot (1901) 
Logging in Maine (1906) 
Trout Fishing, Rangeley Lakes (1906) 
Total 22 minutes. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95. 



From Stump to Ship: 
A 1930 Logging Film 

The most complete look at the long-log industry. 
28 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 

The How and Why of Spuds 

A detailed look at 1920 potato farming in 
Aroostook County, Maine. 10 minutes. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95. 



Legends of American Skiing 
1849-1940 

Archival footage and modern interviews com- 
prehensively define the sport. 78 minutes. 

$39.95/NHF members $34.95. 

Maine's TV Time Machine 

A compilation of TV from the 1950s and early 
60s from the Bangor Historical Society /WABI 
collection. 34 minutes. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95. 

Mt. Washington 1852-1908, 
Among the Clouds 

Life at the top: the hotels, newspaper and 
building of the cog railway. 30 minutes. 

$24.95/Sorry, no member discount. 



An Oral Historian's Work 
with Dr. Edward Ives 

Skills and techniques of a successful oral history 
project demonstrated by a world's authority. 30 
minutes. 

$60/NHF members $47.50. 

Ride the Sandy River Railroad 

Newly transferred, silent (with titles) from early 
1930s two-foot-gauge railroad. 30 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 



The Ways at Wallace and Sons 
and The Bank Dory 

Coasting schooner/o^n F. Leavitt and her New 
England shipbuilders. The Bank Dory docu- 
ments the building of a Nova Scotia dory. Total 
58 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 



Woodsmen and River Drivers, 
"Another day, another era" 

Unforgettable individuals who worked for the 
Machias Lumber Company before 1930 share 
their recollections of a hard life. 30 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 



Yachting in the 30s 

Weetamoe, a 1930 film of the Herreshoff-built J 
boat in the 1931 transatlantic and Fastnet races 
and other short films. Total 45 minutes. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95. 



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Page 




The Movie Queen of Lubec, Maine, and the hero were reunited for an evening of film and 
recollection in September 1989 through a project underwritten by the Expansion Arts Fund of the 
Maine Community Foundation. Thanks to coordinator Helen Burns, shown here between heroine 
Evangeline Morrison and hero Jimmy Simmonds. Inset: The Orange River Jazz Band. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 




BLUE HILL FALLS MAINE 
USA 0461 5 (207)374-2736 



ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



The Movie Queen 

Community Art/ 

Group Memory 



In August 1936 twenty-year-old 
Evangeline Morrison played the role of 
a young woman returning from Holly- 
wood to her coastal Maine hometown. 
Her performance was captured in The 
Movie Queen, Lubec. 

Fifty-three years later, Morrison's 
recollections prompted a Lubec 
audience to talk about the old Eagle 
Theatre, "dish night," and actresses 
who stashed silver dollars in their 
stockings. Such recollection was further 
evoked by the screening and by the 
music performed by the Orange River 
Jazz Band. 

Itinerant Director 

Mrs. Morrison and Jimmy Sim- 
monds, the hero, often participated in 
community theatricals and were happy 
to be selected by an itinerant director, 
Miss Margaret Cram of Boston. Cram 
visited Bar Harbor, Eastport and Lubec 
in the summer of 1936, in each town 
staging a musical and shooting a short 
film of local merchants and a comic 
kidnapping story. 

Social History Value 

Although the technical quality of 
The Movie Queen, twenty minutes of 
16mm film, makes widespread distri- 
bution unlikely, the Lubec and Bar 
Harbor films are important visual 
records for those interested in social 
and economic change. Unfortunately, 
the Eastport film is still lost. 

The project, formally subtitled "The 
Art of Community Expression in 
Film," fit NHF's archiving and research 
missions well, incorporating physical 
preservation of unique 16mm films with 
oral histories focusing on entertain- 
ment, community discussion and public 
exhibition. Preservation work was done 
by John E. Allen, Inc., Park Ridge, NJ. 

The Lubec audience was enthusias- 
tic about the screening and discussion, 
reinforcing our belief at NHF that film 
is one of the best mechanisms for look- 
ing at a community and promoting 
discussion of the past and present. 



ft Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Summer 1990 



- 



Executive Director's Report p.2 

The Film Foundation: 

Interview with Robert Rosen p.3 

100 Years Ago p.4 

The Collections p.5 

Our Lives in Our Hands p. 8 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine 04615. David S. Weiss, 
executive director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769 



Going to the Movies 



Going to the Movies is a project of 
Northeast Historic Film which begins 
in the summer of 1990. It focuses on 
how films were seen in Maine in the 
silent era, before 1930. It is the first 
project to engage a broad public aud- 
ience statewide in the experience, 
research and analysis of the social 
history of motion pictures. 

National Film Scholarship 

In August, NHF, with nationally 
known film scholars, will open a series 
of silent film screenings accompanied 
by live music in places where silent 
films were shown in Maine. Advance 
tickets are suggested for all events call 
(207) 374-2736. 

August Events 

The City Theater in Biddeford on 
August 3 is the first stop. Tom Gun- 
ning, whose award-winning PhD dis- 
sertation was on Biograph films, will 
introduce and moderate the program, 
which will include a cartoon, newsreel, 
and Henry King's Maine-made 1921 
feature, The Seventh Day. 

On August 4, there will be two one- 
hour shows at the Maine Festival, 
Cumberland Fairgrounds, emulating 
the earliest itinerant exhibitors. 

Film & History 

Professor Douglas Gomery of the 
University of Maryland will present the 
program on August 16 at the Camden 



Opera House and on August 18 at the 
Lincoln Theatre, Damariscotta. Gom- 
ery's book, Film History: Theory and 
Practice, provided a basis for construct- 
ing this project around the role of 
movies in communities. He says, 
"Going to the Movies offers a wonder- 
ful blend of historical analysis and audi- 
ence participation, and will foster a 
greater understanding of the humanities 
through film and history." 

continued on page 3 

Acme Theatre and Pavilion. Wimhrop. Me. 



Going to the Movies: A Social History of 
Motion Pictures in Maine Communities, 

funded by the Maine Humanities Council, 
grew out of the Union Historical Society 
screenings and community oral histories 
and from the reconstruction and scoring of 
The Seventh Day with support from the 
Museum of Modern Art and the Maine 
Arts Commission. 

Sponsors: The Knowles Companies, 
Resolution, Inc., The Bangor Daily News. 




fholo: Lcnthall Collection, NHF 

"Going to the movies was more than simply watching films. The movie theater was a social center 
that provided a unique, often neighborhood, atmosphere. This is an aspect of film history that has 
only begun to penetrate the history hooks. " -Tom Gunning, film historian 



Page 1 



New President Elected 



NHF Members 



At the April annual meeting Dr. David 
C. Smith, Bird & Bird Professor of His- 
tory, University of Maine, was warmly 
thanked for his service as founding 
president from 1986 to 1990. NHF's 
newly elected president is Paul Gelardi, 
president of E Media, Kennebunk. "I 
accept the appointment with pleasure," 
says Gelardi. "My two years as a board 
member have been rewarding and fun. 
My whole family has enjoyed it as they 
have become involved in the fruits of 
NHF's labor. 

"I applaud the current efforts of 
Hollywood to preserve feature films," 
he continues. "However, unless we 
want to be defined purely by what is 
expressed in features, we must commit 
to preserving images and sound of real 
life captured by amateurs, independ- 
ent artists, educators and the television 
camera." 

Executive Director's Report 

There are many people to thank for the 
continued existence of NHF, especially 
these volunteers: Judy McGeorge, who 
assisted with Franklyn Lenthall's book 
collection and with various software 
quandaries; Keith Goodrich, who is 
graduating from College of the Atlantic 
and saw us through another busy 
summer; Lucille MacQuinn, computer 
whiz; and Tony Jonaitis, long-distance 
volunteer. Special thanks to past and 
present staff members Stephany Boyd, 
Mark Austin and Libby Rosemeier. 

Members Count 

Since the beginning of the year, 
members of NHF have been sending in 
their renewals, and I'm pleased to re- 
port a high rate of renewal, along with 
much-appreciated words of 
encouragement. 

Among our new members 
we note geographical breadth and a 
growing number of educators and 
libraries. The interest of archivists, 
educational media specialists and 
librarians is essential as we plan pro- 
grams and distribution. 

All our members help the continued 
growth of NHF. We look forward to 



As an independent nonprofit organiza- 
tion, NHF depends on its members. 
You help us set priorities, you pass the 
word about the significance of cultural 
preservation, and your dues help keep 
us operating. Please join and renew! 

Founding Members 
Deborah 8c Paul Gelardi 
Karan Sheldon & David Weiss 

Friends of NHF 

Robert A. Mclntire, MaxMedia 
David & Sue Parsons 
Ed Pert 
Robert Saudek 

Corporate/ Associate Members 

Ernest & Kathryn Gross 

Donald C. Hammond, Hammond Lumber 

Company 
Virginia Morgan 
Mr. & Mrs. Howard Peabody 
Peter & Ann Sheldon 
Dr. David C. Smith 
Thomas Hammond & Son 
Lynda 6c Charles Tyson 
Mrs. Joanne J. Van Namee 
WCVB Creative Services 
Joel & Allene White 
Pamela Wintle 
Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 

Regular Members 

Philip J.Abbott 

Joan Amory 

Peter Anderson 

Larry Audet 

James E. Austin 

Jean Barrett 

Deirdre Barton, Weatherbird 

Rev. & Mrs. Curtis Beach 

James Bezanson 

Paul & Mollie Birdsall 

Lynne K. Blair 

Richard Bock 

Richard Bradley 

Bob & Dot Broadbent 

Frederick E. Bryan III 

Raymond Burnham 

Lynn Cadwallader 

Mrs. Frederic E. Camp 

providing the programs you want and 
need: regional moving images that 
teach, entertain and inspire. 




5 



Robert J. Carnie 

Michel Chalufour 

Gay Cobb 

Art Collier 

Cecil Crosse 

Clarence R. deRochemont 

Peg Dice 

Ann-Marie Duguay 

Carroll Faulkner 

Joseph Filtz 

Roy Gauthier, Astro Electric Company 

Ian Gersten & Jennifer Sheldon 

John Gfroerer 

Jim Goff 

Nancy Gray, Harraseeket Inn 

Charles Hall 

Susan Henry, Resolution Video 

Charles Hesse, College of the Atlantic 

C.A. Porter Hopkins 

Stanley Howe 

Douglas Ilsely 

Margaret L. Jaffray 

Hillary Stowell James 

Jeffjaner 

Robert Jordan 

Thomas F. Joyce 

Dr. Susan A. Kaplan, The Peary-MacMillan 

Arctic Museum 
John J. Karol, Jr., Apertura 
Ernest Knight, Raymond Casco Historical 

Society 

Stephen Lindsay 
Betty Ann & Donald Lockhart, Perceptions, 

Inc. 

Rep. Theone Look 
Valerie Felt McClead 
Lily Marston 
William M. Maternc 

Member list continues on page 6 



NHF Statement of Purpose 



David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of 
moving image resources of interest to 
the people of northern New Eng- 
land; the preservation of film/tape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
vault storage; a touring program to 
bring materials to audiences through- 
out the area; and the establishment of 
a study center, including resource 
materials and reference copies of 
motion picture films and videotapes. 



Page 2 



The Film Foundation: 
An Interview with Robert Rosen 



by Jean T. Barrett 
a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer and NHF member 



Robert Rosen is Director of the UCLA 
Film and Television Archive in Los 
Angeles. This year, he was named Chair 
of the Archivists Advisory Council to 
the Film Foundation. The Film Founda- 
tion is an alliance of eight filmmakers 
President Martin Scorsese and members 
Woody Allen, Francis Coppola, Stanley 
Kubrick, George Lucas, Sydney Pollack, 
Robert Redford and Steven Spielberg 
united to further the cause of film 
preservation. 

What is the state of moving image 
preservation as we enter the 90s? 
ID osen: There's good news and 
-*-V. there's bad news. The bad news is 
that there's a crisis, if you look at the 
scope of the preservation task, with 
more than one hundred million feet of 
unique nitrate film in the vaults of 
archives, plus materials that are being 
held by production companies. We also 
have vast problems to confront with 
film color fading, video preservation, 
television news preservation, as well as 
local materials. 

The good news is the producers 
have become increasingly conscious of 
the importance of preservation, because 
they've come to realize that their film 
vaults hold corporate assets, of use in a 
whole array of ancillary markets. 

Moreover, with the public, the word 
"preservation" has become much more 
favorably viewed, as a result of the 
high-profile restorations of such films 
as Napoleon, Becky Sharp and 
Intolerance. 

A third reason for optimism is the 
creation of the Film Foundation the 
creative community taking a much 
more active, militant role on behalf of 
preserving the moving image heritage. 

Tell us about the Film Foundation. 

The goals of the Film Foundation 
are several. One is to serve as an 
intermediary between the major nitrate- 
holding archives and the media indus- 
try, in order to get preservation work 
done, and in order to find the financial 
support for that partnership. Secondly, 
it will deal with general preservation 
issues, including color film restoration, 



independently produced film, and 
others. The Foundation also has an 
interest in helping to dramatize the im- 
portance of preservation by supporting 
high-profile public events that celebrate 
the completion of preservation work. 

What are the most urgent tasks of the 
Film Foundation right now? 

J The initial thrust is around the 
A^. area of commercially produced 
feature films. However, the Film 
Foundation's members are enthusiastic 
supporters of all areas of preservation, 
including television and local archives, 
and hope to work in a coordinated way 
with those in the field involved in many 
areas of preservation. 

How does the Film Foundation set 
priorities? 

1) The Board of Directors members 
-^. are activists; they're not just 
names on a letterhead. But they also 
know that they have to take their lead 
from the field. In establishing priorities, 
in deciding how the work will be 
accomplished and what standards of 
preservation are appropriate, they are 
looking toward the Archivists Advisory 
Council, which consists of admini- 
strators from the five major nitrate- 
preserving archives. 

How will the Film Foundation be 
funded? 

Initially, much of the funding will 
come from the commercial film 
studios. But we are here to help the 
preservation field, not to compete with 
the field in looking for money. We're 
not out to pre-empt already existing 
activities, but to complement them. 

Do you see encouraging signs for the 
future of moving image preservation? 

TJ I am very encouraged by the 
J^. springing up, all across the 
country, of specialized archives reflect- 
ing the region, and reflecting special 
kinds of audiovisual materials, such as 
local television news. I'm also encour- 
aged by their desire to work together, 
as reflected by the amazing growth of 
the Film and Television Archives 




Advisory Committee. What was a 
handful of institutions only a few years 
ago, now is nearly 100 entities that 
gather together for conferences. 
When people ask if there's an 
American national archive, like the 
Swedish Archive in Stockholm or the 
Soviet Archive in Moscow, the answer 
is that the American national archive is 
not in one place. It consists of a plural- 
ity of geographically dispersed and 
philosophically diverse organizations 
that work in concert and cooperation 
with one another. The American 
production of moving images is so vast 
that it's only by all of these organiza- 
tions finding their appropriate role and 
working together that it will be saved. 

What can NHF members do to 
support moving image preservation? 

~n The members can do the most for 
J^^. preservation by taking on the 
preservation of the products made in 
their region, because if they don't, no 
one else will! 



Qoing to the Movies 

continued from page 1 
Gomery and Gunning are joined by 
project scholars Robert Branham, who 
teaches film at Bates College; Kevin 
Hagopian, University of Wisconsin 
PhD candidate in film and history; Juris 
Ubans, professor of art at the Univer- 
sity of Southern Maine; and Glenn 
Uminowicz, executive director of the 
Victoria Society of Maine. 

Free Audience Guide 

An audience guide including essays 
by the scholars and by accompanist 
Danny Patt will be distributed free of 
charge at the screenings. 



Page 3 



One Hundred Years Ago: The Vitascope in Maine 



This article appeared in the Bangor 
Daily Commercial, Monday, September 
21, 1896. The Vitascope was used in 
Portland, Maine, in June 1 896 just 
two months after the much-publicized 
showing at Koster & BiaPs vaudeville 
hall in New York. 

The column reprinted here demon- 
strates the interaction between print 
and motion picture from the earliest 
days; promoters understood the power 
of newspaper coverage. What happened 
to the Phantascope, advertised but not 
reviewed the week before? 

The young woman's role is of great 
interest her presence signified the 
appropriateness of the entertainment 



for women. Did she have a future as a 
motion picture exhibitor? 

And the details of the seven-film 
program are important, as is the report- 
er's emphasis. One film, The Irwin- 
Rice Kiss, is well known even today. A 
barroom fight in Portland, Maine, is 



QUICKER THAN SIGHT. 

The Vitascope Beats the Eye and Doesn't 

Half Try Manager Richardson Shows 

the Machine to Newspaper Writers. 

"You think you've got a pretty good eye, 
don't you," asked Manager Richardson of 
the vitascope, on Sunday night, as he in- 
troduced a Commercial man to the great 
machine with pride in his face. 

The reporter modestly allowed that he 
had that reputation around this part of 
creation. 

"Well," replied the manager with more 
pride, "You may have; but I've got something 
here that can beat you all to pieces. That's 
the vitascope." 

This is truth. The vitascope is a good deal 
swifter than the human eye. It beats sight on 
a kiteshaped track. It knocks vision out be- 
hind the distance flag. It is quicker than 
sight. 

On Sunday night a party of Bangor news- 
paper men went to the opera house on invi- 
tation of Manager Owen of that popular es- 
tablishment, and saw the vitascope. The 
"thing" stood up in the balcony to the rear of 
the rows of empty seats that looked lone- 
some in the half-light that fell from the one 
solitary jet in the ceiling; Manager Richard- 
son was there, in the little coop of boards 
that sheltered the machine and kept the 
powerful light from breaking out into the 
audience and spoiling the effect of his pic- 
tures. His wife and daughter were there too; 
the latter is his assistant and she knows more 
about electrical appliances than a good 
many men who advertise to know a lot. . . . 

When you look at the vitascope all you see 
is an iron frame supporting a set of wheels 
like those upon which a typewriter ribbon 
runs. ... A great lens, as big as your head, 



now the earliest film known to have 
been shot in Maine; however, one 
should exercise scepticism, as the piece 
could have been a barroom fight any- 
where. Perhaps Richardson felt Bangor 
audiences would enjoy the imputations 
against the southerly city. 



Opera House, Upper Main Street. Bangor. Maine. 




The Opera House, Bangor 

collects the particles of light from the lamp 
and concentrates them upon a little metal 
frame in front; in front of this frame again is 
the muzzle of the machine and excepting a 
small battery underneath that runs the 
mechanism, that's all there is to it. 

"Now get out a picture," said Mr. 
Richardson to his charming daughter, who 
presently produced a long thing that looked 
like a starched grey ribbon, with a satiny 
finish. This was the spool of picture. It was 
one long celluloid strip, an inch and a quar- 
ter wide and many feet long. On the cellu- 
loid was the gelatine which had been used to 
take the picture. The celluloid had been 
passed through a camera at tremendous 
speed, and a little shutter working like mad 
as it passed had taken a photograph on every 
inch of it. Thus when the strip was applied to 
the vitascope and again spun before the eye, 
the eye saw it go. . . . 

On Sunday night Manager Richardson 
showed seven pictures to the newspaper 
men who had been invited to see the won- 
derful invention. There was a picture of a 



Photo: Richard Shaw 



bucking broncho, with cowboy rider and a 
cheering crowd in the background, a dance 
by Loie Fuller with delicious glimpses of La 
Loie through the fleecy folds of her many- 
colored wings, a scene from Charlie Hoyt's 
"A Milk White Flag," a dance by a couple of 
agile and trim-limbed young women, a very 
moving sort of a kiss between the famous 
May Irwin and Actor John Rice, a bar-room 
fight in Portland, Maine, and a sea scene, 
with big white and blue breakers smashing 
out onto the beach. This last scene was fairly 
wet. It was the crowning triumph of the 
night. Mr. Richardson has many other 
scenes and he will show them this week at the 
opera house. Every night until Saturday and 
every afternoon after Monday the vitascope 
will show its wonders and as the admission 
has been placed at 25 and 35 cents owing to 
the brevity of the perfomance compared 
with the average theatrical presentation. 

The vitascope is wonderful and should be 
seen. 

It cannot be described. 

Source: Bangor Public Library, Reference. 



The Collections 



The vault is bulging with donations and 
deposits of film and videotape. Many 
thanks to the individuals, organizations 
and families who furthered the cause of 
moving image preservation with 
donations, deposits and loans. 

Thanks also to the donors of intan- 
gibles; live broadcasting left many 
memories with the audience and no 
recorded programs for future genera- 
tions. NHF has begun to interview 
some of New England's pioneers of live 
broadcasting and thanks the first gen- 
erous subjects: Dave Astor, who orig- 
inated the Dave Astor Show, which 
showcased student talent in Portland 
and Bangor until 1971, and Mike 
Dolley, who played Bozo on WABI in 
Bangor between 1961 and 1968. 

Broadcast Collections 

A television collection, thought lost, 
surfaced in two gifts: the John White 
Collection of 16mm film from WGAN, 
now WGME Portland, Maine, consists 
of news, commercials 
and interviews from 
the late 1950s to the 
early 1970s; and the 
Andy Graham Collec- 
tion, also WGAN 
16mm, is primarily 
commercials. 

Also received were: 
Q Clif Reynolds's 
WCSH Portland 
feature series 
People, Places and 
Things, 3/4" mas- 
ters from 1970s and 
80s; and the J. Don 
MacWilliams Col- 
lection of sports 
films and scripts 
from WCSH. 

Q From the Maine 
Public Broadcasting 
Network, 16mm, 2" 
and 3/4" masters of 
programs not other- 
wise preserved, 
including Reflets et 
Lumiere, Franco- 
American culture 
series produced by 
John Greenman 
(1979-1981). 



Institutional Collections 

NHF is working with the film of 
Central Maine Power, the utility that 
owns railroads, dams and numerous 
electric installations around the state. 
CMP archivist Judy Franke has been an 
excellent contact. 

Thanks to Mary Anne Wallace of 
Westbrook College for 3/4" videotapes, 
including a number of unique copies of 
Portland-produced public affairs 
programs from the 1970s and 1980s. 

Home Movies 

Amateur film and videotape came 
from many sources, including Mrs. 
Thomas Clements and Mrs. Frederic 
Camp of Blue Hill, Robert Taylor of 
Hanover, NH, and James Marsh of 
Prout's Neck, ME. 

Q Joan Branch of Caratunk, Maine, 
donated film of Pleasant Pond and 
Bingham. The creator, Forrest 
Colby, was Maine Forest 




Commissioner for many years; he 
recorded woods operations in the 
years 1929- 1938. 

Q Sheila Denny-Brown donated 3/4" 
master copies of Hancock, Maine, 
films from the late 1920s showing 
excellent summer views of the Mt. 
Desert ferry and the Bar Harbor 
express train. 

Q Priscilla Osgood of Bangor, Maine, 
donated 16mm film from her 
father's guiding business in Brown- 
ville, including a client's amateur 
story film of a young girl's sporting 
day titled The Little Log Cabin in 
the Northern Woods (1929). 

Factual Film & Documentaries 

Q Huey, Portland independent film- 
maker, donated reference copies of 
his film Grace: A Portrait of Grace 
de Carlton Ross (1983), the story of 
a dancer and silent movie actress. 

Q From the Museum of Modern Art, a 
^^^KB^HM 16mm copy of a 1906 
American Mutoscope 
and Biograph film, 
Canoeing in Maine. 
Q Robert Saudek 
donated a reference 
copy of A Maine 
Lobsterman, written 
and narrated by E.B. 
White, from the 1954 
Omnibus television 
series. 

Equipment & Books 

Thanks to donors of 
equipment used to 
document moving 
image technology: The 
Maine Medical Center, 
Elaine Solesky; Maine 
Public Broadcasting 
Network; and WGME. 
Franklyn Lenthall, a 
Boothbay Harbor 
friend, donated his film 
book collection and 
valuable images of 
Maine's theaters. 



The John White Collection, WGAN, arrives in unlabeled boxes, representing hundreds 
of hours of cleaning, repair and cataloguing. 



Pag 



Grants in Action & Awards 



Please Join 



The National Alliance of Media Arts 
Centers gave a $3,780 grant from their 
NEA-funded Management Assistance 
Program. Under this grant, develop- 
ment professional Denis Thoet of Bath, 
Maine, is working with the NHF board 
and a corps of volunteers. The program, 
based on the extensive strategic plan- 
ning of NHF, will assist in communi- 
cating the goals of the organization to 
funders and board prospects. 

The Maine State Library's 
incentive matching grant program for 
preservation of unique state historical 
and library research material donated 
$5,000 to the Bangor Historical 
Society/WABI project. The support is 
for the third of three years of core 
preservation work. 



The Maine Humanities Council 
gave a major grant, $17,600, for the 
program Going to the Movies. 

The videotape Woodsmen and River 
Drivers won a gold medal at the Inter- 
national Film & TV Festival of New 
York in January. Woodsmen, which 
uses archival footage and present-day 
interviews, was produced by David 
Weiss and Karan Sheldon for Northeast 
Archives of Folklore and Oral History, 
Dept. of Anthropology, University of 
Maine, under a grant from the Maine 
Humanities Council and Champion 
International. In May the program won 
a certificate of merit for cinematic 
excellence from the Movies on a 
Shoestring festival, Rochester, NY. 



,. 



More NHF Members 



Regular Members (cont'd from p. 2) 
Andrew Mazer 
AlanJ McClelland 
Franklin & Phyllis Mellen 
Bruce Meulendyke 
Irvine H. Millgace 
Betty & Hugh Montgomery 
Francis S Moulton Jr. 
Lee Murch 
John A. O'Brien 
George R. O'Neill 
Richard Obrey, Three East Video 
Dan Osgood, VP Film and Tape, Inc. 
James A. Phillips 
Guy and Dianne Poirier 
Robert Porter 
Charles H. Pritham 
M.A. Prittie 
Sally Regan 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward Rendall 
Karen Rhine 
Michael Roy 
Shan Sayles 

Mr. & Mrs. P.H. Sellers 
Nancy Sheldon 
Sally Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. Julian Stein 
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Taylor 
Robert & Julia Walkling 
Mary Anne Wallace 
Mrs. Henry Walter 
Seth H. Washburn 
Vern& Jackie Weiss 
Robert H. Whitney 
Wendy Wincote 
Carter Wintle 

Karen Wyatt, Karen Wyatt Film & Picture 
Research 



Mr. & Mrs. Harry Zinn 

Nonprofit Organizations 

D.B. Averill, Instructional Resource 

Center 

Barbara Austen, New Hampshire Historical 

Society 

Bagaduce Music Lending Library 
Blue Hill Historical Society 
Jack Boynton, Maine State Library 
Mrs. Margery Brown, Cherryfield 
Narraguagus Historical Society 
Marianne Buehler, Jackson Memorial Library 
Bonnie Copper, George Stevens Academy 
Curtis Memorial Library, Brunswick 
Marilyn Diffin, Calais Free Library 
Stephen Fletcher, Indiana Historical Society 
Lea Girardin, Maine Film Commission 
Bill & Alicia Gross 
Diane Kopec, Abbe Museum 
Keith E. Leavitt, Prime Resource Center 
Kathleen Lignell, Sea Grant Communications 
J. Gary Nichols, Maine State Library 
David Olsen, University of Maine, 

Farmington 

Keith Peeler, City Theater Associates 
Vlada P. Petric, Harvard Film Archive 
Bernard F. Roscetti, MPBN 
Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College 
Elaine Solesky, Maine Medical Center 
University of Maine, Augusta, Library 
Diane Vatne, Bangor Historical Society 

Educator/Student Members 

Miss Rosemary Anthony 

Alvina Cyr, Dr. Lewis S. Libby School 

Charles Ellis 

Bernadette Friel, Schenk High School 

Phil Gonyar, Waterville High School 



All new members and renewing mem- 
bers receive a gift packet of eight post- 
cards with striking images from 
regional moving pictures: 1920 Maine 
Centennial, The Seventh Day, The 
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catching color graphics and the NHF 
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Sharon L. Merrill, Guy E. Rowe School 

Al Morrison 

Alan Morse 

Tim O'Keefe 

Sanford Phippen 

Dr. David Richard, Rollins College 

Paige W. Roberts 

Susan Stires 

Joan Sullivan, The Brick Store Museum 

William Taylor, Plymouth State College 

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John Ware, Jr. 

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Pag 



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Videotapes of New England Life 

NEW LOW PRICES CALL OR WRITE FOR FULL CATALOG 

The purpose of NHF is to preserve, and make available to the public, moving 
images of the northern New England region. NHF reaches many people 
through public presentations. Researchers use database information and ref- 
erence copies of film and tapes in our growing collection of unedited material. 
All tapes are fully guaranteed. 




A Century of Summers 

A portrait of the residents and summer people of 

Hancock, Maine. 43 minutes. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 

Albert Collins of South Blue Hill 

Lobsterman, craftsman, painter, fiddler, poet. 

60 minutes. $24.95/NHF members $ 1 9.95 



Ride the Sandy River Railroad 

Comprehensive silent (with titles) from early 1930s 
two-foot-gauge railroad. 30 minutes. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 

Earliest Maine Films 
Drawing a Lobster Pot (1901); Logging in 
Maine (1906); Trout Fishing, Rangeley Lakes 
(1906). Total 22 minutes. 

$16.95/NHF members $14.95. 

Gold Medal Winner! 
Woodsmen and River Drivers, 
"Another day, another era" 

Maine woodsworkers active before 1930 share 
recollections. 30 minutes. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95. 



Our Lives in Our Hands 

The story of the Micmac Indian basketry coopera- 
tive. 40 minutes. $29.95/NHF members $24.95 
Note: This videotape is available from NHF for 
home use only. Schools and libraries please 
contact DER at (617) 926-0491. 

Norumhega: Maine in the Age of 
Exploration and Settlement 

A fast-paced introduction to early Maine history. 
14 minutes. $24.95/NHF members $19.95 



Maine's TV Time Machine 

A compilation of TV from the 1950s and early 60s 
from the Bangor Historical Society /WABI 
collection. 34 minutes. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95. 

The Ways at Wallace and Sons 
and The Bank Dory 

Schooner John F. Leavitt and her New England 
shipbuilders; and building a dory. Total 58 minutes. 
$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 

Award-winning project! 

From Stump to Ship: 

A 1930 Logging Film 

The most complete look at the long-log industry. 28 

minutes. $24.95/NHF members $19.95. 



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Our Lives in Our Hands 

The life of Micmac Indian baskctmakcrs 
in Maine was recorded in a film by 
Harald Prins and Karen Carter. Our 
Lives in Our Hands shows the persis- 
tence of a traditional native craft in the 
Canadian-American border region, and 
illuminates an off-reservation commun- 
ity of artisans and seasonal laborers 
facing the challenges of a changing 
world. 

National Screenings 

The film premiered at the Native 
American Film and Video Festival at 
the American Museum of Natural 
History and has been shown widely at 
festivals including the Festival of Amer- 
ican Folklife at the Smithsonian. Harald 
Prins, an anthropologist and filmmaker 
who has taught at Colby College and 
Bowdoin, toured the film in Maine, and 
it was broadcast on the public broad- 
casting system. However, it has not 
been widely available for home viewing. 

Now on Home Video 

Our Lives in Our Hands is now 

available to individuals on VHS video- 
tape from Northeast Historic Film as 
part of an effort to locate and make 
available material relating to regional 
culture. 

With limited resources, NHF is try- 
ing to add titles such as this one to its 
catalog, and make them known to its 
members and friends. 

The filmmakers and the original 
distributor, Documentary Educational 
Resources, understood NHF's goals 
and entered an agreement permitting 
the nonprofit to distribute to the public. 
DER retains exclusive rights to 
distribute to institutions. 

Distribution Changes 

The National Alliance of Media Arts 
Center's annual meeting in Boston in 
May addressed the distribution of film 
and videotape. There are no easy an- 
swers for compensating artists, reaching 
the public with an unfamiliar product, 
and staying ahead of falling prices. 

NHF wants to meet these distribu- 
tion challenges. Let us know what you 
think. 



m Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 




Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Winter 1991 



Executive Director's Report p. 2 

Archival Notes p. 3 

100 Years Ago p. 4 

Interview: David Bowers p. 6 

Small Town Movies p. 7 

Fryeburg Fair p. 12 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine 04615. David S. Weiss, 
executive director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769 




New England 
Broadcast Histories 



The History of Broadcasting in Maine: 
The First Fifty Years, recently published 
by the Maine Association of Broadcast- 
ers, tells the story of the corporations 
and individuals often several genera- 
tions of families who ran the state's 
broadcasting enterprises. 

Fred Thompson, president of 
WCSH-TV Portland and WLBZ-TV 
Bangor, introduces the book in his role 
as chair of the Maine Association of 
Broadcasters' history committee. Of 
the radio and television pioneers de- 
scribed in the book, he says, "Their 
story is full of tremendous foresight and 
horrible decisions, humor and tragedy, 
brilliance and dumb luck." 

The Maine book describes the pio- 
neers of local programming and is illus- 
trated with evocative photographs. Fred 
Thompson says that the discovery of 
photos spurred the publication of the 
book. He wrote the book's coda on 
Thompson Guernsey, a Maine inventor 
who established experimental station 
WIXG-TV in Boston, which broadcast 
an hour every day between 1940 and 
1945. The Tremont Street viewing room 
beckoning "See the Tellies" and "Dem- 
onstration Inside" suggests just how far 
the medium has come. 

Ellie Thompson (no relation to Fred 
Thompson) wrote the Maine history 
following her 1989 Voices from the 
Hills: 70 Years of Vermont Broad- 
casting. 



The Vermont book is available for 
$10 from the Vermont Association of 
Broadcasters, Box 4489, Burlington, 
Vermont 05406. The History of Broad- 



casting in Maine is available in many 
Maine bookstores and can be ordered 
through Northeast Historic Film. 




photo: Maine Association of Broadcast t- 



WIXG-TV Boston viewing room in the early 1940s. 



Executive Director's Report 

NHF is a Member, Too. 

We take pride in our association with 
other organizations. I felt it would be 
worthwhile to reflect on how our 
relationships help us in our mission of 
moving image preservation. 

Through the Maine Historical 
Society, New Hampshire Historical 
Society, and the American Association 
for State and Local History, NHF 
learns how to integrate moving image 
history into the broader historical 
picture of the region and to advocate 
the importance of moving images. 

The Boston Film/Video Foundation 
(BF/VF) and the National Alliance of 
Media Arts Centers (NAMAC) allow 
us to share experiences in media pro- 
gramming and to improve our ability to 
assist independent media producers. 

The new Maine Association of 
Museums, the Society of Maine Archi- 
vists, New England Archivists and the 
Maine Library Association connect us 
with regional cultural organizations. 

Nationally, the Association of 
Moving Image Archivists, AMIA 
(which until October 1990 was called 
F/TAAC), is polling its constituents on 
whether and how to organize. I hope 
that we will next convene as a formal 
organization. This is an important de- 
velopment for moving image preserva- 
tion across the country. AMIA can be 
an effective advocate, directing atten- 
tion and resources to the organizations 
caring for moving images. 

Being a responsible member takes 
time and commitment, but the returns 
are significant. The organizations that 
NHF supports through membership 
and participation have enlightened and 
strengthened us. 



Join These 
NHF Members! 




David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



As an independent nonprofit 
organization, NHF depends on its 
members. You help us set priorities, 
you pass the word about the 
significance of cultural preservation, 
and your dues help keep us operating. 
Please join and renew! 

Founding Members 

Paul & Deborah Gelardi 
Karan Sheldon & David Weiss 

Friends of NHF 

Robert Mclntire, MaxMedia 
David & Sue Parsons 
Ed Pert 
Robert Saudek 

Corporate/ Associate Members 

Marcia Fenn 

Ernest & Kathryn Gross 

Donald Hammond, Hammond Lumber 

Company 

Thomas Hammond & Son 
Edgar & Sally Lupfer 
Virginia Morgan 
Mr. & Mrs. Howard Peabody 
Peter & Ann Sheldon 
Dr. David Smith, History Dept., UM 
Lynda & Charles Tyson 
Mrs. Joanne Van Namee 
WCVB Creative Services 
WLBZ 

Joel & Allene White 
Pamela Wintle 
Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 

Educator/Student Members 

Miss Rosemary Anthony 

Michelle Branigan 

Carol Bryan 

Richard Burns, Ocean Park Association 

Alvina Cyr, Dr. Lewis S. Libby School 

Rudolph Deetjen, Jr. 

Charles Ellis 

Bernadette Friel, Schenk High School 

Phil Gonyar, Waterville High School 

Joe Gray 

Cora Greer 

Kevin Hagopian 

Scott Herring 

Dr. T. Johnson, Johnson Associates 

Richard Judd 

Janice Kasper, Penobscot Marine Museum 

Daisy Kelley, Adirondack Museum 

Susan Kirlin, Pemetic School 

Robbie Lewis 

Library, Stonington Elementary School 

Dean Lyons 

Sharon Merrill, Guy E. Rowe School 

Al Morrison, SUNY 

Alan Morse 



Tim O'Keefe 

Sanford Phippen 

Dr. David Richard 

Ms. Paige Roberts 

Debbie Rollins, Fogler Library, UM 

Mrs. Rowell, Fogler Library, UM 

Susan Stires 

Joan Sullivan, The Brick Store Museum 

William Taylor, Plymouth State College 

Daniel Towner 

Carla Turner, Windham Real School 

John Ware, Jr. 

Dr. Richard E.G. White, Queens College 

Steve & Peggy Wight, Sunday River Inn 

Caroline Wiley 

Wendy Wincote 

Regular Members 

Philip Abbott 

Joan Amory 

Peter Anderson 

Tom Armstrong 

David Astor 

Larry Audet 

James Austin 

Jean Barrett 

Deirdre Barton, Weatherbird 

Rev. & Mrs. Curtis Beach 

James Bezanson 

Paul & Mollie Birdsall 

Lynne Blair 

Richard Bock, WGBH 

Nat Bowditch 

Donna Boyles, Pownal Scenic & Historical 

Soc. 
Richard Bradley 

More members, page 9 



NHF Statement of Purpose 



The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of 
moving image resources of interest 
to the people of northern New Eng- 
land; the preservation of film/tape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
vault storage; a touring program to 
bring materials to audiences through- 
out the area; and the establishment of 
a study center, including resource 
materials and reference copies of 
motion picture films and videotapes. 



Pave 2 



Archival Notes: 
Vinegar Syndrome 



The purpose of an archives is to pre- 
serve material for the future. Herein lies 
the archivist's great challenge: it is not 
possible to know what physical changes 
will take place in the collections over 
time. 

Until now, film archives have tried 
to duplicate 35mm nitrate materials 
first, since it was believed that nitrate 
was subject to instability and deteriora- 
tion far exceeding other film stocks. 

But emerging information leads 
archivists to question the longevity of 
"safety" stock. 

At the Film and Television Archives 
Advisory Committee annual conference 
in November 1990, a presentation 
chaired by Bill Murphy, Chief of the 
Motion Picture, Sound, and Video 
Branch of the the National Archives, 
clearly outlined the chemical prognosis. 
Moving image archives of all sizes are 
facing the deterioration of acetate film 
decades or even centuries before it was 
expected. Bill Murphy: 

Many of us are familiar with the 
process of deterioration of cellulose 
nitrate motion picture film, the 
staple of the film industry from the 
1890s until 1951 when Eastman 
Kodak stopped manufacturing it. 

Long known for its chemical insta- 
bility and high degree of flammabil- 
ity, nitrate film is typically given the 
very highest priority for conversion 
in film archives. 

This has given rise to a certain 
amount of complacency about the 
longevity of cellulose acetate or 
safety film, which generally receives 
a much lower priority for preserva- 
tion and restoration. However, this 
complacency is not justified. 

Murphy outlined the results of 
studies undertaken in the U.S. and 
overseas between 1987 and 1990, which 
concluded that the longevity of acetate 
film is seriously compromised by 
humidity, metal cans and lack of air 
circulation. Acetic acid, the source of 
the "vinegar" smell, is a product of the 
film's degradation, and once produced 
promotes further deterioration, particu- 
larly in a humid environment and in the 
presence of iron in metal containers or 




"Vinegar" odor, extreme curl and acetic acid crystals indicate deteriorating 16mm film that must 
be isolated from the rest of the collection. 



from the oxides in magnetic-stripe 
sound film. Bill Murphy again: 

There are some measures that 
archivists can take to minimize the 
loss of archival images that may be 
in danger of chemical deterioration. 

Acetate collections, like nitrate 
collections, must be inspected from 
time to time. Films emitting strong 
odors or showing crystalline deposits 
should be isolated from the collec- 
tion and scheduled for copying. 

Polyester film, used currently for 
projection prints, may have a more 
optimistic archival life. It is not, how- 
ever, without liabilities, e.g., splices 
must be tape or ultrasonic. Murphy 
says, "Some have questioned the 
permanence of the adhesion of emul- 
sion to base," an ominous situation. 

As a regional archives, Northeast 
Historic Film collects moving images of 
interest to the people of northern New 
England, across all genres from home 
movies to industrials, features to 
television commercials. The sources are 
equally diverse: material shot in Maine, 
New Hampshire and Vermont is 



dispersed worldwide. While some 
incoming collections have had climate- 
controlled lives, a portion has been in 
tropical garages, urban attics and moldy 
basements. 

Videotape is short-lived, and diace- 
tate film (the stock used for NHF's 
earliest home movie collections) is often 
brittle and shrunken. NHF, like many 
other archives, is now faced with a 
growing collection on threatened 
triacetate stock. 

What can be done? The first lines of 
defense are inert containers and tem- 
perature and humidity control, along 
with inspection for incipient deteriora- 
tion. Although the news presented in 
this paper was not encouraging, it is 
important to share. The fall conference 
is one of the few ways North American 
moving image archives of all sizes can 
exchange information important to 
daily life in the archives and to the 
survival of the visual history of the 20th 
century. | 

Excerpts from William T. Murphy, "The 
Vinegar Syndrome: An Archival Response 
to the Deterioration of Cellulose Triacetate 
Motion Picture Film. " 



One Hundred Years Ago: 
The Development of Yankee Comedy 



by Richard Sweterlitsch 
Assistant Professor of Folklore and English, University of Vermont 



In 1912 the Philadelphia-based film studio, the Lubin Manu- 
facturing Company, sent a crew to Maine. Motion Picture 
World, a trade paper, reported that 31 people from Lubin 
spent 14 weeks in a fishing village near Portland, Maine. 
Because a 1914 fire destroyed the company's earliest work, 



Northeast Historic Film never expected to see the results of 
this 1912 visit. However, a 16mm copy of one of the films did 
turn up and was donated to the archives. The one-reel 
comedy, Just Maine Folks, provides information on the comic 
use of Yankee stereotypes. 



The plot oijust Maine Folks 
revolves around two older male 
figures competing for two women, a 
neighbor widow and a hearing-impaired 
spinster, while a younger couple tries to 
court. The setting is in the country, and 
the story unfolds in a single 24-hour 
period. 

The phrase "Just Plain Folks" means 
simple, rural people salt of the earth. 
In this film, it has a ribald connotation. 

Courting in the Hay 

The rural scene is essential to the 
flavor of the film and to its comedy. 
Setting the action in a hayfield con- 
veys the rural nature of the piece and 
allows the couples to interact. Hay- 
time was traditionally a time for 
romance. The scene evolves from 
"sparking" to physical humor: the 
young woman hides flirtatiously, 
is chased by her counterpart, and 
then the other characters are 
drawn into a slapstick hay-pitching 
fight. 

The intertitle that follows indi- 
cates a corn-husking bee. Although 
this scene is missing, husking was 
another traditional time for court- 
ship, an important social event in 
the 19th and beginning of the 20th 
century. 

Roots of the Comic Yankee 

Courting an old deaf woman is a 
motif that occurs in Yankee humor, al- 
though its presentation in a silent drama 
is somewhat peculiar and might indicate 
non-film origins. 

Comic courtship was a common 
theme in Yankee drama, going back to 
Royall Tyler's play, The Contrast 
(1787). Jonathan, the backwoods 
Yankee, is a servant who mirrors his 
master's courtship. 

It's an important theatrical conven- 



tion masters and servants in romantic 
situations, as in Shakespeare's comedies. 
In a sense we get that in Just Maine 
Folks with the noble, youthful couple 
doing what young couples ought to 
do taking advantage of the husking 
bee. Their appropriate behavior is set 
against the farce of the older people 
acting out of place. 




Dress & Action: Familiar Types 

The older male characters in Just 
Maine Folks are broadly drawn, rotund 
country bumpkins. One is Squire Lang, 
a landholder. "Squire" as a title occurs 
frequently in traditional New England 
drama, as with Squire Bartlett in Way 
Down East. Lang's rival, Bart Collum, 
would be below him on the social 
ladder. Their status is reinforced by 
costuming: the squire's citified belt, 
Collum's down-home suspenders. 

The young hero has a stalk of grass 



hanging from his mouth, denoting a 
"hayseed" character. The women wear 
what would have been typical haying 
costumes, long aprons, partially open in 
the back, over cotton dresses. 

The physical actions include classic 
stage bits, part of the actor's standard 
repertory. To indicate his pleasure as he 
leaves the porch of the widow, Collum 
does a little dance, clicking his heels, 
then leaping up in the air. 

Rural and City 

Rural people seeing such broad 
gestures might respond, "We don't act 
like that. They dress like us, maybe, but 
their actions are exaggerated." Urban 
people might have believed in the 
stereotype. 

The Newhart show on television 
indicates the same phenomenon: 
Vermonters could look at Larry, 
Darryl and Darryl and say, "That's 
not us." The character George 
represents Just Plain Folk; he is 
exaggerated enough that Ver- 
monters can laugh at him while 
city folk think that's what Ver- 
monters are like. 

Background to the Yankee Figure 

By 1912, when Just Maine Folks 
was made, a strong stereotype had 
evolved around the Yankee. Popu- 
lar notions of the comic Yankee and 
Down East figures were based upon 
costume and to a great extent on 
dialect. Stage predecessors advanced 
and solidified the portrayal of comic 
Yankee figures. Many of these plays 
became movies: 

Qln the 19th century, George H. 
Hill's famous Yankee accent was 
heard in The Green Mountain Boy 
(1833). 

Q The Old Homestead (1886) takes 
place around Keene, New Hamp- 



n - 



Winter-Spring Calendar 



Winter tour of Northeast Historic 
Film's Going to the Movies series, 
silent films with live piano accompani- 
ment by Danny Patt. Series funded by 
the Maine Humanities Council and 
Expansion Arts, Maine Community 
Foundation. 

January 25, Biddeford City Theatre, 
show starts at 8 pm. The Iron Horse 
(1924), directed by Portland-born John 
Ford. One of the greatest westerns, an 
epic story of the railroad. Part of the City 
Theatre's Winter Festival. 

January 27, Farmington, Univ. of Maine 
Lincoln Auditorium (Room C-131) 2 pm. 
Timothy's Quest (1922), a charming story 



by Kate Douglas Wiggin, filmed in Maine. 
Sponsored by the Farmington Historical 
Society. 

January 29, Caribou, VFW Hall, 7 pm 
Timothy's Quest. Sponsored by the 
Caribou Historical Society. 

February 3, Rumford, Acadia Theatre, 
(VFW, Waldo Street) 2 pm. The Seventh 
Day (1921), a made-in-Maine feature 
starring Richard Barthelmess. Sponsored 
by the Acadian Society and the Rumford 
Historical Society. 

February 10, Lincoln, Lincoln Theatre, 
1:30 pm. The Iron Horse. Sponsored by 
the Lincoln Historical Society. 




photo: Tom Stewart 



Danny Patt, silent film accompanist, began his career in 1924 in Union, Maine. 



Dyer Library, Saco, Maine, lunchtime 
video series of Maine subjects: 

January 15, Joyce Butler's The 1947 Fires. 

January 29, Sins of Our Mothers, directed 

by Matthew Collins. 

February 12, Claws, featuring Maine 

humorist Tim Sample. 

February 26, Mysteries of the Red Paint 

People, an archaeological exploration of 

Maine and the circumpolar region. 

March 12, Jane Morrison's Master Smart 

Woman and A White Heron. 

March 26, Woodsmen and River Drivers, 

lives of Maine woodsworkers. 
Dyer Library, 207 283-3861. 

March 3 at 2 pm the Portland Museum 
of Art, Congress Square, will present 
Way Down East in 16mm with accom- 
paniment by Danny Patt. The film is 
being offered in conjunction with an 
exhibition of Southern photographs by 
Walker Evans and William Christen- 
berry focusing on a sense of place. 
Portland Museum of Art, 207 775-6148. 

March 9 at the University of New 
Hampshire in Durham, Rick Sowash of 
Gambier, Ohio, will play the piano for 
Buster Keaton's The General. 

March 23 at 8 pm at the Great Falls 
School, Auburn, Maine, the Androscog- 
gin Valley Community Orchestra will 
accompany Buster Keaton's The Boat 
and D.W. Griffith's Orphans of the 
Storm. For more information call Greg 
Boardman 207 777-5320. 



shire; Denman Thompson spent 
many years on stage as the central 
character, Uncle Josh. There were 
numerous film versions, including 
one directed by James Cruze. 
"Uncle Josh" was widely franchised, 
showing up in Edwin S. Porter films 
in 1900-02. 



Acres (1892) was set in La- 
moine, Maine, with land speculation 
as the plot device. The play was by 
James A. Herne, who also played 
"Uncle Nat Berry" for a number of 



years. Rex Ingram directed a 1920 
film. 

Q David Harum (1900), a play about a 
small-town banker, was produced 
by Charles W. Frohman. James 
Cruze, again, directed a 1934 
feature. 

LlHome Folks (1904) opened in New 
York starring William S. Hart. Al- 
though set in the Midwest, the play 
contains much hayseed business a 
squire and other details fitting the 
New England stereotypes. H 





Figures 



Further Reading 

Yankee & Down East Comic Figures 
"The Question of Folklore in a New 
Nation," American Folklore and the 
Historian, Richard Dorson, Chicago, 
1971, pp 94-107. 

American in Legend, Richard Dorson, 
Pantheon, 1973. 

The Small Town in American Drama, 
Ima Honaker Herron, Dallas, Southern 
Methodist University Press, 1969. 
American Humor, Constance Rourke, 
New York, 1931. 



Pag 



The Collector: 
An Interview with Q. David Bowers 



David Bowers lives in Wolfehoro, 
New Hampshire. He is author of 
Nickelodeon Theaters and their 
Music and over three dozen other 
books on various subjects. 

Bowers: My interest in historical 
motion pictures emerged in 1957 
when I was a teenager. In Philadelphia, 
on Pine Street, I bought for $5 each a 
bunch of one-sheet silent film posters 
discarded by Harvard University. 
Among these I bought a Mary Pickford 
poster, which I still have. 

Why do you collect film posters? 

BI enjoy researching something 
that has not been done in depth 
before film, the two decades from 
1895 to 1915, has been described by one 
researcher as the archaeological era of 
filmmaking. There is little documenta- 
tion of this period in standard reference 
books. 

As I collect posters, trade magazines 
and film fan magazines of this era I am 
able to piece together the progress of a 
studio, how it developed, what it did, 
what were the joys and sorrows and 
successes and failures of the time. 

Have you anything in your collection 
relating to northern New England? 

Bin the autumn of 1910 a tent 
show exhibiting motion pictures 
travelled through New England. 
Apparently, it met its demise in Bethle- 
hem, New Hampshire, in late 1910. I'm 
sure they experienced financial rever- 
sals. This show had been travelling 
through New England under a canvas 
with organizers setting up chairs and a 
projector. It was a popular method of 
exhibition in those days. About 20 
posters mounted on cardboard were left 
to a person in Bethlehem and went 
through a succession of hands. I ac- 
quired them from an antique dealer 
there about 10 years ago. 

There were Thanhouser posters, a 
number of Independent Moving Picture 
of America posters (that was Carl 
Laemmle, who later founded 
Universal), and some from lesser- 
known studios, including Yankee. 




Poster display ca. 1916. 

What do posters tell you about the 
film business? 

BA film company called Monopol 
put out a version of Carmen 
based on the opera. Around 1912 they 
hired Marion Leonard at a salary of 
$1,000 a week, they claimed in their 
ads. They had nationwide publicity 
saying that Marion Leonard was the 
highest-paid movie actress in the world. 
In 1991, who has heard of Monopol or 
Marion Leonard? My poster of Carmen 
serves as a link with this forgotten era. 

Carmen was filmed because it was a 
familiar story? 

BFrom 1908 through 1912 many 
different studios were being 
formed. Companies were looking for 
subjects, and it was logical to use ones 
the public already knew: operas, the 
novels of Charles Dickens, Shake- 
speare's plays. 

How was a well-known subject like 
Carmen promoted? 

B Before 1915 posters usually gave 
just the name of the film and the 
producing company. They were very 
colorful, and the illustration alone had 
to draw the person in. Artistically, they 
were better than later posters. 

They very rarely mention the actor 
even if he or she might have been well 
known. Early posters of Mary Pickford, 



photo: Q. David /tai 



of which I have a number, do not men- 
tion her. 

Today a typical movie poster men- 
tions the name of the studio, the actors 
in careful order (in an arrangement 
managed by their publicity directors 
and their attorneys), the author of the 
screenplay and the book. Looking at a 
movie poster today is like looking at a 
legal notice. 

How were the posters distributed and 
used? 

B Posters were given away by the 
film distributors or studios, or in 
some instances were loaned stamped 
on the back "property of so-and-so and 
must be returned." 

A typical poster was one sheet in 
size (27 x 41"), vertical, and was dis- 
played in front of a theater, either on an 
easel, or tacked on the walls of the 
entryway, right by the ticket booth. It 
was common to see posters on tele- 
phone poles or on the walls of buildings 
as you approached the theater. 

Posters were very ephemeral: dam- 
aged by rain, torn, clipped, posted, 
tacked and pasted very few of them 
survived. Once a film was shown, a 
typical poster got thrown in the waste- 
basket, to be replaced, if the film was 
ever shown again, with a new poster. 

I have a lot of posters in my collec- 



n - 



tion that I've never seen elsewhere. 
That doesn't mean they're valuable. The] 
typical motion picture poster in my col- 
lection from 1908 to 1915 probably cost 
me about $100 to $200. 

The lobby card came into use 
around 1914, and typically was issued in 
sets of 6 or 8 cards showing scenes from 
the film. 

Some of the studios, Biograph, 
Lubin, Solax and others, issued what 
could be called bulletins, which were 
black and white, and a little larger than 
a sheet of typewriter paper. They 
included a scene from the film, the title, 
and a paragraph on the plot. 

You have written a book about the 
Thanhouser Company? 

Bit's a series of three volumes, 
entitled ThanhoHser Films: An 
Encyclopedia and History, to be pub- 
lished by the Vestal Press. The first 
volume will be a narrative history of the 
Thanhouser Company, which was 
active from 1910 through 1917, with a 
studio in New Rochelle, New York. 
The second volume will be a filmogra- 
phy listing every Thanhouser film and 
plot, the cast, and contemporary 
reviews. The third volume will contain ) 
detailed biographies of approximately 
1,000 people associated with Than- 
houser Company. 

In June 1991 at the Wolfeboro Public 
Library, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, I 
will be mounting an exhibition of silent film 
posters. It will run all month. There. will be 
Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, other 
well-known and lesser-known names, all 
with accompanying historical descriptions. 
Wednesday, June 19, and Wednesday, June 
25, we will present a program of silent films ': 
free of charge at the library. For tickets or 
information, write to Louise Gehman at the | 
Wolfeboro Public Library, Wolfeboro, 
New Hampshire 03894. Telephone 
603569-2428. 

NHF is collecting information on 
moviegoing before 1930, using a 
survey workbook, available free of 
charge. The completed workbooks 
will be archived at NHF. Valeric Felt 
McClead at University College, 
Bangor, and Robert Branham, Bates 
College, Lewiston, are involving 
their students in the interview 
process. Educators at all levels are 
invited to join the project. 



>mall Town Movies 



Going to the Movies, NHF's social 
history project with funding from the 
Maine Humanities Council and Expan- 
sion Arts, Maine Community Founda- 
tion, is touring five Maine communities 
with silent films accompanied by live 
music in January and February 1991. 

The program includes The Iron 
Horse (1924), John Ford's epic western. 
Ford, horn in Portland, Maine, was an 
experienced director at 29 when this 
film was made. Timothy's Quest 
(1922) is a feature based on an 1890 
story by Kate Douglas Wiggin, author 
of Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. It was 

There was plenty of entertainment 
in that little town, population 
1,200, when everyone was awake. The 
social life was family-oriented people 
would play the piano and sing. Outside 
the home, it was centered around 
existing organizations such as the 
Grange, church-affiliated organizations 
and school functions. 

We had silent movies once a week in 
the grange hall during the fall, winter 
and spring. They ceased in the summer 
because it was a farming community 
and there was plenty to do during the 
summer and not much energy left. 
Movies were held in the grange hall 
upstairs with seats for 200-300 people. 




photo: Matnf Women Wnrrrj Collection, 
Urs/tvooX 1 College 

Kate Douglas Wiggin, author of Timothy's 
Quest (1922), with the film's child stars. 



directed in Hollis and Bridgton, Maine, 
by Sidney Olcutt, whose career went 
back to a 1907 one-reel version o/Ben 
Hur. 

Since the project began in June, 
NHF has heard from individuals -who 
attended silent films in more than 30 
communities in Maine, and the database 
of places that regularly showed movies 
has grown to over 600 sites. 

Neil Sawyer shared his childhood 
memories of Easton, in Aroostook 
County. His interview illustrates that 
motion picture attendance was part of 
the fabric of small-town society. 

I was born in 1916, so my early 
recollections about the movies would 
be 192122. It was a successful proposi- 
tion at that time. There was a projection 
booth, which was asbestos-protected 
because they were using nitrate film. 
There was one projector the old 
carbon arc manually adjusted type. I re- 
member the machine because I wanted 
to get up in the booth and see it work 
and have the man explain it to me. 
Eventually I got to turn the crank. 

Etta Corey played the piano for 
every show. She did a wonderful job. I 
still remember the melody hne of the 
music she played for chase scenes. 

During the week we played cow- 
boys and Indians. I sent to Sears 
Roebuck or Montgomery Ward to get 
an Indian costume with colored feath- 
ers. I was absolutely thrilled with it. I 
also got a cowboy outfit with a funny 
hat and chaps, and a fireman's costume. 

In silent movies they spent quite a 
bit of time showing firemen in action 
and disasters and policemen clubbing 
people or pursuing people. 

I don't remember before Prohibi- 
tion. I remember hearing my folks talk 
about rumrunners. Liquor was forbid- 
den in the household. The town was 
absolutely dry. But there were several 
drunks in town they were easily iden- 
tified. Some would come to the movies 
with a bottle of vanilla. I remember one 
individual in particular, a leathery old 
guy whose trade was making snow- 
shoes. He would come in and we could 
and then look for him. 



Grants in Action 



Join 
Northeast Historic Film 



The Maine Community Foundation, 
Expansion Arts Program (National 
Endowment for the Arts funds), gave 
$5,000 toward the touring program of 
Going to the Monies. With these funds 
the series is able to reach northern and 
western Maine communities in January 
and February 1991. 

The Maine Arts Commission's 
Touring Artists program, which helps 
arts programmers by contributing one- 
third of artists' fees, selected Danny 
Patt, silent film accompanist, and 
Northeast Historic Film as touring 
artists for the 1991 season. 

The National Alliance of Media 
Arts Center's $3,780 grant from the 
NEA-Fundcd Management Assistance 
Program has resulted in consultancy 
with Denis Thoct of Bath, Maine, over 
the summer of 1990, completion of a 
development publication, and drafting 
of a guide for board members and 
volunteers. 



High Water Video 

Howard Frank Mosher's short story 
High Water is about a Vermont family 
in 1959. A teen-aged boy, his sister and 
father live on a farm. The boy has a race 
car. The story begins with his truck, 
carrying the race car, falling through 
the farm's bridge while the creek waters 
rise. 

Catamount Arts Center, St. Johns- 
bury, Vermont, made the story into a 
16mm film in 1988. Jay Craven, direc- 
tor, and Bess O'Brien, producer, have 
toured Vermont with the film pre- 
senting it to 50 schools and community 
halls. 

Now a videotape of High Water is 
available in a package with a half-hour 
documentary on the making of the in- 
dependent drama, and a 65-page study 
guide. The guide contains the full text 
of the short story (5 pages), the screen- 
play (20 pages), and questions intended 
to stimulate discussion about the film. 
Also included is a great deal of material 
on the nuts and bolts of producing the 
film, including the seven-day shooting 
schedule and a diary of that experience. 



All new members and renewing mem- 
bers receive a gift packet of eight 
postcards with striking images from 
regional moving pictures: 1920 Maine 
Centennial, The Seventh Day, The 
Rider of the King Log and Bozo! 

NHF sold out the first run of t-shirts! 
You, too, will be proud to have one. It's 
got eye-catching color graphics and the 
NHF logo on the front, and on the 
back, complete date code symbols from 
1916 to 1993. $12 each, $10 for mem- 
bers. Associate, corporate, friends and 
founding members receive one shirt 
free of charge. 

Q Regular members, $25 per year, 
will receive a subscription to Mov- 
ing Image Review, notice of 
screenings and events, and discounts 
on materials distributed by NHF. 

3 Educator/Student Members, $15 
per year, receive all regular member- 
ship benefits. This category is for 
teachers and students at any level. 

Q Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per 
year, receive all regular benefits of 
membership, plus additional copies 
of Moving Image Review on 
request and reduced rates for 



consultation, presentations and 
professional services. 

Q Associates (Individuals) and 
Corporate Members, $100 per year, 
receive the benefits of regular 
members, and in addition, special 
recognition in Moving Image 
Review and in programs. 

Q Friends, $250 per year, receive all 
benefits of regular membership and, 
in addition, a privilege card which 
will admit two people to any NHF- 
sponsored screening or event, plus 
listing in the roster of Friends. 

Q Founding Members, $1,000 per 
year, the premier category of mem- 
bership. These members are making 
a major commitment to ensure the 
preservation and use of the NHF 
resource, and receive all benefits of 
regular membership and invitations 
to special previews. 

Membership at any level is an oppor- 
tunity to become involved with the 
preservation and enjoyment of our 
moving image heritage. 

Your dues are tax-deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 




photo: Catamount Arts 



For more information on the pack- 
age, contact Bess O'Brien, Catamount 



Arts, P.O. Box 324, St. Johnsbury, VT 
058 1 9. Telephone 802 748-2600. 1 



P a P c 



More Members (continued from page 2) 



Bob & Dot Broadbent 

Frederick Bryan III 

Raymond Burnham 

Lynn Cadwallader 

Mrs. Frederic Camp 

Mary Grace Canfield 

Robert Carnie 

Michel Chalufour 

Martha Chandler 
} Gary Cobb 

Art Collier 

Cecil Crosse 

Wallace Cunningham 

Darwin Davidson 

John Davis 

Peter DeAngelis 
' Clarence deRochemont 

Peg Dice, Bodacious Films 

Ann-Marie Duguay 

Holly Hock Dumaine 

John Ellingwood 

Carroll Faulkner 
) Joseph Filtz 

Robert Foster 

Peter Gammons, Jr. 

Roy Gauthier, Astro Electric Company 

John Gfroerer, Creativideo, Inc. 

Jim Goff, WPBC-FM 

Douglas Gomery 
9 Henry Grandgent 

Nancy Gray, Harraseeket Inn 

Rynard Gundrum 

Charles Hall 

Pat Harcourt 

Mark Henderson, VP Film & Tape 
I Eric Herndon, Granite Hall Store 

Charles Hesse 

Wendell Hodgkins 

C. A. Porter Hopkins 

John Howard 

Stanley Howe 

David Huntley 
I Douglas Ilsely 

Margaret Jaffray 

Hillary Stowell James 

Jeff Janer 

Shirley Johnson 

Robert Jordan 
Thomas Joyce 

Dr. Susan Kaplan, The Peary-MacMillan 
Arctic Museum 

John Karol Jr., Apertura 

Donald King 

James King 

Ernest Knight, Raymond-Casco 
I Historical Soc. 

Diane Lee 

Stephen Lindsay 

Betty Ann & Donald Lockhart, Perceptions, 
Inc. 



Rep. Theone Look 
Lily Marston 
William Materne 
Wendy Matthews 
Andrew Mazer 
Valerie Felt McClead 

Alan McClelland, Owls Head Transportation 
Museum 



MANY 
YEARS 

S. 




Have you ordered your shirt? 

' ,/ 

Judith McGeorge 

Patricia McGeorge 

Carl McGraw 

Charles Ray McKay 

Franklin & Phyllis Mellen 

Bruce Meulendyke 

Irvine Millgate 

Betty & Hugh Montgomery 

Francis Moulton Jr. 

Lee Murch 

John O'Brien 

George O'Neill 

Richard Obrey, Three East Video 

Dan Osgood, VP Film and Tape, Inc. 

Tom Pears 

James Phillips 

Guy and Dianne Poirier 

Robert Porter 

Charles Pritham 

M. Prittie 

Sally Regan 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward Rendall 

Karen Rhine 

Michael Roy 

Charles Ryan 

Dewitt Sage 

Shan Sayles 



Bill Schubart, Resolution Video 

Mr. & Mrs. P.H. Sellers 

Jennifer Sheldon & Ian Gersten 

Nancy Sheldon 

Gail Shelton 

Ms. Pat Sherman 

Sally Smith 

Mr. & Mrs. Julian Stein 

Lynda Sudlow 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Taylor 

Dawn Thibodeau 

Denis Thoet 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Thompson 

Amy Turim 

Robert & Julia Walkling 

Mary Anne Wallace 

Mrs. Henry Walter 

Seth Washburn 

Vern & Jackie Weiss 

Robert Whitney 

Bonnie Wilson, Minnesota Historical Society 

Jon Wilson & Sherry Streeter, Woodenboat 

Carter Wintle 

Brian Wood 

Cynthia Wood 

Karen Wyatt 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Zinn 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Barbara Austen, New Hampshire Historical 

Soc. 

D. Averill, Instructional Resource Center 
Blue Hill Historical Society 
Jack Boynton, Maine State Library 
Mrs. Margery Brown, Cherryfield 

Narraguagus Historical Society 
Marianne Buehler, Jackson Memorial Library 
Bonnie Copper, George Stevens Academy 
Curtis Memorial Library 
Jacques Cyr, JC Roofing and Chimney Co. 
David De Turk, Maine Osteopathic Ed Fdn. 
Marilyn Diffin, Calais Free Library 
Stephen Fletcher, Indiana Historical Society 
Lea Girardin, Maine Film Commission 
Mrs. Mary Cheyney Gould, Bagaduce Music 

Lending Library 
Bill & Alicia Gross 
Diane Kopec, Abbe Museum 
Keith Leavitt, Prime Resource Center 
Kathleen Lignell, Sea Grant Communications 
J. Gary Nichols, Maine State Library 
David Olsen, Mantor Library 
Keith Peeler, City Theater Associates, Inc. 
Vlada Petric, Harvard Film Archive 
Bernard Roscetti, MPBN 
Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe 
Elaine Solesky, Maine Medical Center 
Diane Vatne, Bangor Historical Society 
University of Maine at Augusta Library 
Waldo Theatre Inc. 



Pag 



Videotapes of New England Life 



Each is carefully selected because it portrays an aspect of 
New England culture. All tapes guaranteed. Some b&w, 
some silent, something of value for everyone. If any tape is 
not what you expected, it's returnable for refund. 



From Stump to Ship: 
A 1930 Logging Film 

The most complete look at the long-log industry includes 
felling trees in winter with cross-cut saws, the spring river 
drive and work in a steam-powered mill. 28 minutes, b&w, 
sound. $24.95/NHF members $19.95 



Ride the Sandy River Railroad 

From the 1870s to 1935, the Sandy River Railroad was one of 
the best two-foot-gauge railroads in the U.S. Very clear and 
complete views of the Sandy River Line with engines, 
railbuses and snowplows. 30 minutes, b&w, silent with titles. 

From the original 16mm made in the early 1930s by railroad enthusiasts Linwood 
Moody and Newell Martin. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95 



Earliest Maine Films 

Logging in Maine (1906) shows men working to prevent a 
logjam on a river. 13 minutes. 

Drawing a Lobster Pot (1901) is the earliest surviving film 
known to have been shot in Maine. 15 seconds. 
Trout Fishing, Rangeley Lakes (1906) shows sports 
arriving by train and steamer, a typical Rangeley camp and 
guests in three-piece suits catching trout from Rangeley 
boats. 9 minutes. All b&w, silent. 

$16.95/NHF members $14.95 



Norumbega: 

Maine in the Age of Exploration and Settlement 

The history of the region 
called Norumbega, from the 
first voyages of European ex- 
ploration in the late 1400s to 
the establishment of the state 
of Maine in 1820. Originally a 
multi-image slide show used 
in statewide public programs, 
this video is a fast-paced in- 
troduction to early Maine 
history. 16 minutes, color, 
sound. 





Woodsmen and River Drivers: 
"Another day, another era" 

Unforgettable individuals 
who worked for the Machias 
Lumber Company before 
1930 share their recollections 
of a hard life. 30 minutes, 
color and b&w, sound. 

A project of Northeast Archives of 
Folklore and Oral History with 
funding from the Maine Humanities 
Council and Champion International. 

$24.957 
NHF members $19.95 




The How and Why of Spuds 

A detailed look at 1920 potato 
farming in Aroostook County, 
Maine, when the primary 
power was horses. Includes a 
variety of farm machinery and 
techniques. 13 minutes, b&w, 
silent with titles. 



$16.95/NHF members $14.95 

Maine's TV Time Machine 

A compilation from the Bangor Historical Society /WABI 
collection from Maine's oldest TV station, WABI-TV. The 
1950s and early 1960s: television news, sports and local com- 
mercials. A view of regional culture in the Cold War period 
never before possible. Includes 12-page booklet identifying 
each story. Lesson plans also available. 34 minutes, b&w, 
sound. $19.95/NHF members $16.95 



$24.95/NHF members $19.95 



Videos from Mystic Seaport 

Around Cape Horn 

Capt. Irving Johnson's 1929 voyage aboard the massive 
bark Peking. 37 min, b&w, sound. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95 

The Ways at Wallace and Sons and The Bank Dory 

The building of the John F. Leavitt and of a Nova Scotia 
dory. 58 min, color, sound. $29.95/NHF members $24.95 

Yachting in the 30s 

Weetamoe, a 1930 film of the Herreshoff-built J-boat and 
other short films. 45 min, color and b&w, sound. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 



P a 



10 



A Century of Summers 

The impact of a summer colony on a small Maine commu- 
nity. 45 minutes, b&w and color, sound. 

This production was sponsored by the Historical Society of the town of Hancock, 
Maine, and made possible by a major grant from the Maine Humanities Council. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 



Our Lives in Our Hands 

The story of the Micmac Indian basketry cooperative. Facing 
vanishing demand, members of the Aroostook band of 
Micmac Indians 
have formed a co- 
operative to find 
wider markets for 
their native craft. A 
compelling docu- 
mentary of life in 
Aroostook 
County. 50 min- 
utes, color, sound. 

Note: This videotape is available from NHF for home use only. Schools and 
libraries please contact DER at (617) 926-0491. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95 




Additional Titles Available 
All But Forgotten 

Career of 1920s Maine author and film producer Holman 
Francis Day. 30 min, color and b&w, sound. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

Hap Collins of South Blue Hill 

An informal visit with the lobsterman, painter and poet by 
Jeff Todd Titon. 56 min, color, sound. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 

Legends of American Skiing 

Archival footage and modern interviews comprehensively 
define the sport. 78 min, color, sound. 

$39.95/NHF members $34.95 

Mount Washington 1852-1908 

Life at the top: the hotels, newspaper and building of the cog 

railway. 30 min, color, sound. 

$24.95/Sorry, no members discount 

An Oral Historian's Work with Dr. Edward Ives 
Skills and techniques needed for an oral history project 
demonstrated by a world's authority. 30 min, color, sound. 

$59.95/NHF members $47.50 



Books 

Our Lives in Our Hands, by Bunny McBride and Donald The History of Broadcasting in Maine, by Ellie Thompson, 

$10.95 published by the Maine Association of Broadcasters, paper- 
back. $15.95 



Sanipass, paperback. 



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Page 11 



Fryeburg Fair 




Friendly oxen share space at the Farm Museum with Northeast Historic Film. 



NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

=LM 



PLU; HILL HALLS -MAINE 
USA 0401 i (207) 374-2730 




ADDRESS CORRECT/ON REQUESTED 



The Fryeburg Fair takes place the first 
week in October. It is an enormous 
agricultural fair that has run for 141 
years near the Maine-New Hampshire 
border on the edge of the White Moun- 
tains. 

Fryeburg is shooting distance from 
Conway, New Hampshire, known 
widely for its outlet shopping. During 
the Fair, however, the crowds are all on 
the midway, in the exhibition halls and 
around the track. 

For the last three years, Northeast 
Historic Film has had an exhibit at the 
Fryeburg Fair's Farm Museum. Tucked 
between two friendly oxen and the 
Greene family's woodstove cookery, 
NHF staff spends 10 days 9 am to 9 
pm talking with thousands of fairgo- 
ers about traditional New England 
culture. 

Operating on an "interactive" basis, 
NHF programs videotapes according to 
the desires of the crowd. Sometimes 
individuals stay for two or three hours, 
a long time considering the area is 
unheated and snow usually falls at least 
once during the fair. 

NHF thanks the fair officials, 
especially Phil Andrews, the Eaton 
family and the volunteers of the Farm 
Museum, Mrs. Hardcastle, board 
member Pam Wintle and volunteers 
Judy McGeorge and David Williams. 

Thanks also to the many individuals 
who take time to stop and share recol- 
lections that enrich the moving image 
record-. Fairgoers have added dozens of 
notes to the database of Maine theaters, 
and added to understanding of many 
things: Mt. Washington, skunk trap- 
ping, the Sandy River Railroad and 
cutting ice. 

In 1991 look for the NHF booth at 
these other Maine fairs: Full Circle Fair, 
Blue Hill; the Maine Festival; and the 
Common Ground Fair, Windsor. 



Northeast Historic F i I 



m 



MOVING 

IMAGE 

' REVIEW 



Reference By Mail 



Northeast Historic Film is pleased to 
announce a new service: Reference by 
Mail. Members can now borrow from a 
list of VHS videotapes. 

"It's our hope that this will 
provide a way to 
make more of the 
collections acces- 
sible," says David 
S. Weiss, NHF 
executive director. 
"It's an important 
addition to the 
services already 
offered to our mem- 
bers." 

Access to Collections 

NHF has more than 100 named 
collections ranging in size from 
a single title to thousands of 
individual news stories. 
These films and videotapes 
describe northern New 
England life in detail with 
images and sound of rural 
and urban environments. 
"NHF preserves and 
makes accessible a record 
which defines and interprets the en- 
during and endangered characteristics 
of northern New England life," says 
David Weiss. "We've developed pro- 
grams to reach public halls, schools and 
fairs, and distributed thousands of 
videotapes to people in North America 
and a dozen other countries. 





"But most of our materials didn't fit 
these programs. For example, nobody 
had a chance to see Margaret Chase 

Smith announce for 
the presidency or 
a drama about a 
lobster coopera- 
tive. We wanted 
to make more of 
this diversity 
known to more 
people." 

Easy 
Borrowing 

Members of 
Northeast Historic 
Film can now borrow from a 
list of 30 titles including 24 
Hours, a professional dramati- 
zation of firefighting in Port- 
land, Maine; and John F. 
Kennedy's October 1963 visit 
to Orono, Maine. 
There will be tapes 
on subjects including 
woods work, Franco- 
American culture and 
fisheries. The list will 
be added to regularly. 
Please see page 6 for the current circu- 
lating reference tape list and how you 
can participate. 

Thanks to NHF board president 
Paul Gelardi and E Media for making 
this project possible. 




Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Summer 1991 



Executive Director's Report ........,.. p. 2 

Archival Notes p. 3 

Motion Picture Chums p. 4 

Interview: Margaret Byrne p. 5 

Tales of Wood and Water p. 8 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine 04615. David S.Weiss, 
executive director, Karan Sheldon, edi 
ISSN 0897-0769 



Stump T-shirt 

From Stump to Ship: A 1930 Logging 
Film is a 16mm introduction to long- 
log lumbering in Maine. 

Perhaps because it succinctly sum- 
marizes an era that is long gone, From 
Stump to Ship has been popular not 
only in Maine but with people around 
the world interested in North American 
forests and worklife. 

Fans of Stump can help support 
further moving image preservation by 
covering their chests with a brand-new 
T-shirt sporting the original From 
Stump to Ship art. 




The reconstruction of From Stump to Ship was 
a project of The University of Maine, Orono, 
and Northeast Archives of Folklore and Oral 
History, with funding from the Maine 
Humanities Council and Champion Inter- 
national. Drawing by Mike Mardosa. 



Executive Director's Report 

Phone Log 

The phone rings all day with requests 
from researchers. We found Penobscot 
River life for a class of fourth-graders; 
supplied footage of a set of triplets; 
located Bowdoin College in the 1930s; 
and came up with a Moosehead Lake 
steamer. 

But sometimes, it's just not possible 
to help yet. I confess that recently we 
failed to come up with pre-1918 circus 
footage and color film of out-of-shape 
football players. 

On Stage 

The winter 1991 Moving Image Review 
mentioned a play called Shore Acres, a 
Yankee comedy. NHF received a call 
from New York City for footage to be 
used in connection with development of 
an updated production of Shore Acres. 
The Everett Foster Collection con- 
tained suitable scenes of the Maine 
coast. 

Fish Stories 

Oregon Public Broadcasting completed 
a one-hour production for Frontline, 
the public broadcasting service's public 
affairs series, which includes shots of 
Maine fisheries. 

Fuji-Sanke Communications in Japan 
requested early lobstering footage. 

Home and Away 

A history of Portland, Maine's "Million 
Dollar Bridge" got 1920 aerial footage. 
A videotape of Ed Sullivan Show 
excerpts called for home movies of 
Christmas to serve as an opener. 
A new United Airlines national adver- 
tisement includes a single shot of potato 
harvesting in Aroostook County, 
Maine. 

Ken Burns's Florentine Films is looking 
for baseballs in action. 
Academic and commercial use of archi- 
val footage judging from the calls 
seems to be growing. A wider audience 
will help foster awareness of the cul- 
tural and historical value of the material 



we preserve 



Summer/Fall Calendar 




NHF will be at the Ocean Park Asso- 
ciation in Ocean Park, Maine (near 
Saco) on Wednesday, June 26, at 7 p.m. 
with Danny Patt on the piano accompa- 
nying the silent film The Seventh Day. 
Henry King directed the 1921 feature 
about New Yorkers in the fishing 
village of New Harbor. It stars Richard 
Barthelmess and costars a 190-ft. steam 
yacht and a Portland-built fishing 
schooner. The Seventh Day will be 
shown in The Temple, where the asso- 
ciation has shown movies since 1919. 



Look for Northeast Historic Film at 
the WERU Full Circle Fair in Blue 
Hill, Maine, at the fairgrounds on 
Sunday, July 14. 




David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



NHF distribution coordinator Libby Rosemeier 
at the Full Circle Fair. 



On Thursday, August 22 at 7 p.m. 
Danny Patt will play the piano for the 
Maine-made silent film Timothy's 
Quest at Ocean Park in the Temple. 
The event coincides with the Maine 
Writers Conference meeting at Ocean 
Park. The film is from a story by Kate 
Douglas Wiggin; Patt has created an 
excellent score of period music. For 
more information contact Dick Burns, 
program superintendent, 207 934-5034. 




photo: Ocean Park Assoc. 



The Temple, Ocean Park 



From Sunday, September 29 to Sun- 
day, October 6, Northeast Historic 
Film will be at the Farm Museum, 
Fryeburg Fair, in Fryeburg, Maine. 

On Tuesday, October 8 at 7 p.m. the 
Old Town Public Library will host "A 
Century of Maine Movies," a program 
prepared by NHF of film and videotape 
made in Maine. The Old Town Public 
Library has just opened a new building; 
the event is being hosted by the Friends 
of the Library. For more information 
contact Valerie A. Osborne, Library 
Director, 207 872-3972. 



NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of mov- 
ing image resources of interest to the 
people of northern New England; 
the preservation of film/tape through 
restoration, duplication, providing of 
technical guidance and vault storage; 
a touring program to bring materials 
to audiences throughout the area; 
and the establishment of a study 
center, including resource materials 
and reference copies of motion 
picture films and videotapes. 



Grants in Action 



Muskie Archives 



The final report was submitted to the 
Maine Humanities Council for Going 

I to the Movies, a project on the social 
context of movie exhibition in Maine. 
Accompanist Danny Patt prepared 
musical scores for a program of silent 
films; there were ten screenings from 
Biddeford to Caribou, Maine, with 

) introductions and public discussion. 
More than 175 pre-1930s movie- 
goers' surveys were completed with the 
assistance of students from elementary 
school through college. The project 
published an audience guide with essays 

> and held additional screenings for more 
than 1000 elementary-school students. 

The National Alliance of Media 
Arts Centers received NHF's final 
report for the $3,780 grant from the 
NEA-funded Management Assistance 
\ Program. I 

Archival Notes: 
New England Archivists 

1 ~ 

New England Archivists, the regional 
organization for archival professionals, 
held its annual meeting in Boston at the 
Massachusetts Archives on April 26. 
Jim Farrington, Wesleyan Univer- 

> sity music librarian, led off an opening 
workshop titled "Light and Sound: The 
Preservation of Films, Videotapes, and 
Sound Recordings" with an introduc- 
tion to the many kinds of sound record- 
ing media. 

Moving Image Issues 

Northeast Historic Film staff followed 
Farrington with a presentation of issues 
in physical safeguarding, appraisal and 
outreach of moving images. 

I The session was attended by 40 

archivists from institutions such as 
Boston University, the Archdiocese of 
Boston, and the Sheldon Museum in 
Middlebury, Vermont. 

The people attending the workshop 

H were concerned about vinegar syn- 
drome, the rapid deterioration of cellu- 
lose acetate. They also raised questions 
on the lifespan of videotape and on the 
establishment of guidelines for access 
and fees for use. 



Northeast Historic Film is completing a 
project for the Edmund S. Muskie 
Archives at Bates College, Lewiston, 
Maine. 

The Archives hold the personal and 
office papers, audiovisual materials and 
memorabilia of Muskie and are one of 
the largest non-presidential political 
collections in the nation. 

Ed Muskie grew up in Rumford, 
Maine, and practiced law in Waterville. 
He was governor of Maine (1955-59), 
U.S. senator (1959-80), and secretary of 
state (May 1980-January 1981). The 
Archives also document his 1968 vice- 
presidential race and bid for the 1972 
Democratic nomination. 

Almost 200 cans of film made their 



way to the archives from his offices and 
home. NHF cleaned, repaired and 
transferred the film to 3/4-inch video- 
tape. Reference VHS tapes were made 
for the Muskie Archives with duplicate 
copies to serve Northeast Historic 
Film's researchers. 

In addition to the films, the Muskie 
Archives sound recording collection 
contains over 400 cassettes and 600 
reel-to-reel tapes of speeches, inter- 
views and campaign commercials. 

For more information on the 
Muskie Archives, contact the director, 
Christopher M. Beam, Muskie Archives, 
Bates College, Lewiston, Maine 04240. 
207 786-6354. 



Machias High School Projects 



Students of Machias High School in 
Washington County, Maine, created a 
videotape called The Batteau Machias. 
Batteaus were used on the Machias 
River to help move the logs that had 
been cut in the woods down to the mill. 
Members of the river-driving crew 
traveled in them with their food and 
supplies. 




Students studied and measured 
examples, helped cut huge planks at a 
local mill and became boatwrights in 
their shop class with instructors Karl 
Kurz and Chris Wright. "At first the 
project wasn't very exciting . . . but 
then as the boat started getting built up 
everyone started getting more excited. 
When we finally got to see our finished 
product we were really pleased," re- 
ports a student. 



With the help of independent film- 
maker Huey, the tape was planned, 
shot, written and edited by students. 
The narration is by Charlie Koch; 
editing by Cathy Tower. Advisor Cora 
Greer assisted with locating archival 
footage through research at Northeast 
Historic Film. Footage of batteaus in 
the 1920s and 1930s is included in The 
Batteau Machias, an outstanding ex- 
ample of a student video. 

Baseball, Too 

Machias students also undertook a 
videotape 
oral history 
interview 
with Carlton 
Willey of 
Cherryfield, 
Maine, a 
professional 
baseball 
player who 
was 1958 
rookie of the 
year. These 
videotapes 

are being archived at Northeast His- 
toric Film and are available through 
Reference by Mail. 




One Hundred Years: Motion Picture Chums 



Youth genre fiction like the Rover Boys 
and the Tom Swift adventure series 
includes two moving-imagerelated 
series, The Moving Picture Boys, adven- 
tures of young men who make movies 
(in the jungle, in earthquake land) and 
The Motion Picture Chums, about 
setting up photoplay houses. 

The series were the work of the 
pseudonymous Victor Appleton, 



'CT A 7 hat do you say to starting a motion 

V V picture show?" 

The effect of Frank Dunham's an- 
nouncement on Pep Smith was electrical. 
The latter sprang to his feet, his face beam- 
ing with excitement. 

"Say, that's a great idea!" he cried, 
enthusiastically. "You mean a moving pic- 
ture show right here in Fairlands?" 

'Just that," replied Frank. "Will it go?" 

"Go? When whole crowds take the 
trolley down to Chester just to see the 
movies? " 

At the Pioneer Film Exchange: 
"Because a motion picture show makes you 
think of gilt fronts and flaring lithographs 
and piano music, you mustn't think it's an 
easy and interesting pathway to fortune. 
The business is by no means 'soft,' and a 
show doesn't operate itself. It's not all rose- 
hued. You want to go into it just as you 
would if you were dealing in groceries or 
dry goods." 

that's just what Frank has told us," 
vouchsafed the irrepressible Pep. 

"To succeed in a motion picture show," 
resumed the man, "you must have capable, 
intelligent, alert management. You must 
have the glitter to attract trade, but above 
all you must have the right class of films. It's 
studying what kind just suits your patrons 
that pays. You want to advertise, and you 
want to learn just how to go about it. In the 
small one-show town like Fairlands, with 
over a thousand inhabitants, the business 
can be made to pay if it is conducted on the 
right basis." 

They set up the theater: 

Frank hadjust completed gilding the mold- 
ing running around the sides of the room. 
The boys had been most fortunate in se- 
curing a vacant store. . . . 

The landlord had plastered up the 
breaks in the wall and had the room nicely 
kalsomined. Outside of that, he had re- 
fused to make any repairs. The boys had 
scrubbed up the floors until they shone. 



created by the Edward Stratemeyer 
syndicate, which plotted and assigned 
the writing of hundreds of books. 

NHF's interest in the moviegoing 
experience led us to The Motion Picture 
Chums' First Venture, published in 
1913 by Grosset & Dunlap. Within the 
boys' adventure formula, the book 
gives a detailed contemporary account 
of establishing a theater in a rural area. 



Then each set to work to do his share 
towards beautifying the place. . . . 

The front of the new Wonderland burst 
into a dazzling flood of radiance.The big- 
gest and best electric sign in Fairlands 
presented its face of fire to the public, 
glowed, was blank, flashed up again, and 
began its mission of inviting and guiding 
the public to the motion picture show. . . . 



MOTION PICTURECHOMS 
FIRST VENTURE 




The fictional Wonderland Theater's 
Maine counterparts, 1913 storefront 
theaters in towns of 2,000 or less, can 
be found in the Pastime Theaters of 
Northeast Harbor, Boothbay and 
Brownville. For the record, Maine had 
four Wonderlands: Houlton, Keegan, 
Old Orchard and Rockland. 



Fairlands had never had a motion pic- 
ture show before, and the town board had 
never made any restrictions as to over- 
crowding and the like. Frank, however, 
had gone to one of the selectmen the week 
previous. He had shown him the usual 
rules adopted in city photoplay houses. 
The official had agreed with Frank that 
some system as to sanitation and safety 
should be enforced. . . . 

Frank had selected only first-class films 
for the opening night. . . . Most fortunately, 



the motion picture chums had been able 
to secure a film showing the mishaps of a 
city chap. He had wandered from the sum- 
mer resort he was visiting, among the sur- 
rounding farm community. 

The funny things that happened to 
him were very comical. They brought in a 
milking scene, a haymow, the farmer's 
dogs, a mad bull, a runaway horse, and a 
dive into a duck pond. The film reeled off 
not only striking scenes, but action, spice 
and variety. Nearly a dozen rural families 
were represented in the audience. It did 
Pep's heart good to hear the bluff "haw- 
haws" of the old farmers, and note their 
wives laugh till the tears ran down their 
cheeks. . . . 

"Won-won-Wonderland! The place for you! 
Wonderland, great and grand! Rah! rah! rah! 

And thus we leave the three motion picture 
chums, happy, prosperous and successful, 
to tell about their further trials and tri- 
umphs in the photoplay house line in the 
second volume of this series, to be entitled, 
"The Motion Picture Chums at Seaside 
Park; or, the Rival Photo Theaters of the 
Boardwalk." 

Further Reading 

The Motion Picture Chums at Seaside Park; 
or, the Rival Photo Theatres of the Board- 
walk, 1913. 

The Motion Picture Chums on Broadway; 
or, the Mystery of the Missing Cash Box, 
1914. 

The Motion Picture Chums' Outdoor 
Exhibition; or, the Film That Solved a 
Mystery, 1914. 

The Motion Picture Chums' New Idea; or, 
the First Educational Photo Playhouse, 
1914. 

The Motion Picture Chums at the Fair; or, 
the Greatest Film Ever Exhibited, 1915. 
The Motion Picture Chums' War Spectacle; 
or, The Film That Won the Prize, 1916. 



Pave 



The National Moving Image Database: 
An Interview with Margaret Byrne 



The National Moving Image Database 
(NAMID), a project of the National 
Center for Film and Video Preservation 
at the American Film Institute, is di- 
rected by Margaret Byrne. She received 
her PhD in film studies from the Uni- 
versity of Southern California and has 
served as a research and strategic plan- 
ning consultant to both international 
and U.S. media clients, including many 
of the major Hollywood studios. NHF 
caught up with Margaret when she and 
colleague Henry Mattoon were in New 
York to work with NAMID participants. 



What is NAMID? 

Byrne: NAMID is a project to build a 
national database of moving im- 
ages: film, television, video, kinescopes. 
We've identified certain streams: fea- 
ture fiction films, shorts, television, 
independent film and video, news. 
Initially, we'll be working with a con- 
stellation of databases which eventually 
will be combined. 

Who will use the NAMID database? 

BOne of our mandates is to serve 
preservation experts so they can 
make informed decisions. To preserve 
a film you need to find the highest 
quality original materials. It is a night- 
mare job to try to piece together the 
highest-quality fragments from various 
locations. So NAMID will provide a 
centralized database with the locations 
of physical holdings as well as film- 



ographic information to facilitate their 
work. 

Who else does NAMID serve? 

BOur second mandate is to serve 
cataloguing experts. Through 
coordination and centralization we 
hope to reduce duplication of catalogu- 
ers' efforts. Many archives hold the 
same titles, although not necessarily the 
same physical elements. We also have a 
third mandate to be a resource for 
scholarly research. 

What does a NAMID record look like? 

BThe record structure is broken 
into four parts: the filmographic 
data (title, cast and credits, summary, 
etc.); the location (where materials are 
housed); the physical elements (descrip- 
tive information on printing elements 
such as negatives and fine grains); and 
the actual condition of the materials, for 
example, whether they're pristine or 
hockey pucks. 

The first tier, filmographic or video- 
graphic, should be identical for all 
institutions holding that title. The last 
two tiers are proprietary and security 
coded. 

If NAMID can accomplish that first 
level of cataloguing and then distribute 
it to participating archives we can free 
up cataloguers' time to focus on de- 
scription of the physical elements. 

That sounds like a lot to accomplish. 
What are your resources? 

B Right now we are a small office 
of just three people. We all an- 




swer the phone and do our own photo- 
copying. Someday we will be able to 
pull together enough unique materials 
of public interest that we will be able to 
serve more than just the specialists. 

What does NAMID mean for the public? 

B Imagine if in 100 years our 
children's children could not see 
the first walk on the moon, or Martin 
Luther King's delivery of those inspir- 
ing dreams, or Disney classics? If his- 
tory is this great net of human culture, 
imagine huge tears in the net if moving 
images are lost; holes in our sense of 
cultural identity. 

I personally believe the moving 
image is the most important communi- 
cation art form of this century. To lose 
these images from our cultural memory 
is to lose an essential part of ourselves. 
We have to preserve them. I 




: Mrs. H.G. Howe 



In the Moosehead Lake area around 1920: Harris B. Coe at mealtime 
in the woods (third from left) with his friends and Akeley camera. 



Harrie B. Coe worked for the Maine Publicity Bureau 
producing motion pictures in the 1920s and 1930s. Recently, a 
fragment of his work in the form of a 16mm reduction print of 
two state promotional films came to NHF. 

Coe produced, wrote and edited short segments on Maine 
life: blueberries, sheep farming, Portland, Rangeley resorts. 

His intertitles add an odd personal style to the promotion: 
"Where the subways got the idea of packing 'em in" leads off a 
shot of a hand holding a can of sardines, concluding an excel- 
lent sequence of dories filled to the gunwales with fish. 

Coe's concept of touristic interest is likewise idiosyncratic: 
he leads with a Rockland lime quarry, which is of spectacular 
depth but could hardly be considered a first-rank attraction 
compared with the salmon fishing later in the reel. 



P a 



S e 



Reference by Mail Collection 



Members of Northeast Historic Film 
may borrow from the newly established 
circulating reference collection of VHS 
videotapes. 

Each member is invited to borrow 
one tape free of charge. Associate and 
Corporate members can borrow five 
tapes at no charge; Friends of NHF can 
borrow ten tapes at no charge. For all 



members additional tapes are just $4.00 
per tape. 

The borrower is responsible for 
return postage to NHF via First Class 
mail or UPS. Tapes must be in the mail 
on their way back to NHF five days 
after they are received. 

Videotapes listed here are offered as 
a reference service.Where possible, 



public performance rights are included. 
Please be sure to check each tape's 
status. 



Note: PERF means public performance 
rights are included. Where there is no 
PERF, the tape is for home use only 
and may not be shown to a group. 




City Life 

24 Hours, a profes- 
sional dramatization 
with music and 
narration of fire 
fighting in Portland, 
Maine. 1963. 27 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 



Country Life 

The Batteau Machias, a student project depicting 
construction of a traditional river-driving boat. 
1990. 22 mins., col., sd. PERF 

A Century of Summers, the impact of a summer 
colony on a small Maine coastal community. 
1987. 45 mins., b&w and col., sd. PERF 

Cherryfield, 1938, a home movie about rural 
spring. 6 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Ice Harvesting, a compilation of newsreel and 
home movies demonstrating human-, horse- and 
gasoline-powered ice gathering. 20 mins., b&w, 
si. PERF 

The Movie Queen, 
Lubec, a pretend 
movie queen visits her 
home town in down 
east Maine. 1936. 28 
mins., b&w, si. 



Early Film 

All But Forgotten, documentary on silent film- 
making by the Holman Day film company in 
Maine. 1978. 30 mins., col. and b&w, sd. PERF 

Cupid, Registered Guide, a silly rwo-reeler set on 
a Maine lake by Holman Day. 1921. 20 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

Earliest Maine Films, lobstering, trout fishing, 
logging, canoeing in Moosehead Lake and potato 
growing, from 1901 to 1920. 44 mins., b&w, si. 

PERF 

Just Maine Folks, a bawdy hayseed one-reeler. 
Poor image quality. 1913. 8 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

The Knight of the Pines, another North Woods 
adventure by Holman Day. 1920. 20 mins., b&w, 
si. PERF 




To Purchase 

Videotapes of New England Life 
Call or Write for Catalog 

Tales of Wood and Water, a 1991 
documentary on wooden-boat build- 
ing and sailing on the coast of Maine 
(60 mins.) is $29.95, or $24.95 for 
NHF members. Purchase only. 

For additional maritime titles and 
other videotapes for sale including 
the gold-medal-winning Woodsmen 
and River Drivers, please call Libby 
Rosemeier at 207 374-2736. 



Fisheries 

Basic Net Mending, how to repair fish nets. 1951, 
16 mins., col.', sd. PERF 

Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, fisheries including 
shrimp, cod and lobster. 1968. 28 mins., col., sd. 

PERF 

Turn of the Tide, drama about formation of a 
lobster cooperative; from the Vinalhaven Histori- 
cal Society. 1943. 48 mins., col., sd. 

Franco- American Life 

Reflets et Lumiere: Porte Ouverte sur les Arts, a 
program on the arts from an MPBN television 
series on Franco-American culture in Maine. 
1982. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Reflets et Lumiere: Porte Ouverte sur I'Assim- 
ilation, a program on Franco-American accul- 
turation in New England. 1982. 30 mins., col., sd. 

PERF 

There are more titles in this series. Please ask. 

Geography 

Assignment in Aroostook, life at Loring Air Force 
Base: the woman at home, the sergeant at work, 
the family at play in northern Maine. 1956. 27 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Norumbega: Maine in the Age of Exploration 
and Settlement, an introduction to early Maine 
history, based on maps. 1989. 16 mins., col., sd. 

PERF 




Winter Sports in the White Mountain National 
Forest, skiing, sledding and snowshoeing in New 
Hampshire. 1934. 28 mins. b&w, si. PERF 

Oral History 

Hap Collins of South Blue Hill, Jeff Titon's oral 
history interview with some in-the- field footage 
of a lobsterman, painter and poet. 1989. 56 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

An Oral Historian's 
Work with Dr. 
Edward Ives, a "how 
to" illustrating a 
successful oral history 
project by a world's 
authority. 1987. 30 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

I 

Carlton Willey, major-league baseball pitcher, 
1958 rookie of the year, interviewed in a high 
school project. Unedited interview from VHS 
master. 1990. 39 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Performing Arts 

Grace: A Portrait of Grace DeCarlton Ross, 
independent filmmaker Huey traces Ross' silent 
film and dance careers. 1983. 50 mins.,' col., sd. 

PERF 



Political Discourse 

Margaret Chase Smith 
Speech, declaration of 
intention to run for 
President, includes 
Q&A. 17 mins. 1964, 
b&w, sd. PERF 



John F. Kennedy Speech on the anniversary of the 
Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1963 at Univ. of 
Maine homecoming. 30 mins., b&w., sd. PERF 
Sent with full transcript of speech. 

Television 

Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1950s and early 
60s in news, sports and local commercials from 
the Bangor Historical Society /WAB I collection. 
1989. 34 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 




NHF Membership 



Woods 

In the Public Interest: The Civilian Conservation 
Corps in Maine, the federal work program from 
Acadia National Park to Cape Elizabeth. 1987. 58 
mins., col. and b&w, sd. PERF 

From Stump to Ship, complete look at long-log 
industry from forest to shipboard. 1930. 28 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 

King Spruce, harvesting pulpwood, includes 
horses and mechanical log haulers, ca. 1940. 23 
mins., col., sd. 

Little Log Cabin in the Northern Woods, ama- 
teur film of a young woman's hunting trip near 
Brownville, Maine, with a professional guide, ca. 
1930. 13 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Woodsmen and River Drivers, "Another day, 

another era," unforgettable 

individuals who worked for 

the Machias Lumber 

Company before 1930. 

1989. 30 mins., col. 

and b&w, id. PERF 

Photos: 

Mike Daicy, Portland 

Fire Dept. 

Lubec Historical Society 

Margaret Chase Smith Library Center 

Newell Beam by Tom Stewart 




As an independent nonprofit organiza- 
tion, NHF depends on its members. 
You help us set priorities, you pass the 
word about the significance of cultural 
preservation, and your dues help keep 
us operating. Please join and renew! 

Q Regular Members, $25 per year, 
receive a subscription to Moving 
Image Review, notice of screenings 
and events, loan of one reference 
tape at no charge, and discounts on 
materials distributed by NHF. 

Q Educator/Student Members, $15 

per year, receive all regular member- 
ship benefits.This category is for 
teachers and students at any level. 

Q Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per 
year, receive all regular benefits of 
membership, including loan of one 
reference tape at no charge, plus 
additional copies of Moving Image 
Review on request and reduced 
rates for consultation, presentations 
and professional services. 



Q Associates (Individuals) and Cor- 
porate Members, $100 per year, 
receive the benefits of regular mem- 
bers and loan of five reference tapes 
at no charge. 

Q Friends, $250 per year, receive all 
benefits of regular membership and, 
in addition, loan of ten reference 
tapes at no charge. 

Q Founding Members, $1,000 per 
year, the premier category of mem- 
bership. These members are making 
a major commitment to ensure the 
preservation and use of the NHF 
resource, and receive all benefits of 
regular membership and unlimited 
access to reference tapes at no 
charge. 

Membership at any level is an opportu- 
nity to become involved with the pres- 
ervation and enjoyment of our moving 
image heritage. 

Your dues are tax deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 



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Credit card signature . 



Page 7 




photo: Robert White Collection, frame blowup by John E, Allen, Inc. 



The Doris Hamlin, Harrington, Maine, 1919. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 



BLUE HILL FALLS MAINE 
USA 0461 5 (207) 374-2736 




ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



Tales of Wood and Water 

Wooden-boat building and sailing have 
many devotees on the coast of Maine. 
In 1991 David Clark completed a one- 
hour documentary on Maine's wooden 
boat culture. 

The film visits boatyards large and 
small, as well as allied businesses such 
as WoodenBoat magazine and two boat- 
building schools. A student remarks, 
"Boatbuilding is like house building, 
only rounder and upside down." 

Elements of wooden-boat culture 
all portrayed in the film include 
yacht design, sailmaking, half-model 
building and old and new construction 
techniques. 

A fleet of windjammers gathers in 
Eggemoggin Reach, and Clark visits 
them by water and air, going aboard 
Doug and Linda Lee's Heritage. Chil- 
dren are brought up on the water: the 
Lee's 7- and 9-year-old daughters have 
been sailors all their lives. 

A man and woman who offer day 
sails in their Friendship sloop chat in 
their cockpit; Andy Chase, captain of 
the schooner Bowdoin, travels to La- 
brador and meets Inuit elders who had 
come aboard half a century earlier when 
the Bowdoin was under the command 
of Donald MacMillan. 

Modern cold-molding techniques 
for constructing a mahogany speedboat 
and an elegant yacht contrast with 1919 
footage from Northeast Historic Film's 
Robert White Collection, the launching 
of the four-masted schooner Doris 
Hamlin in Harrington, Maine. After 
the boat hits the water, Miss Hamlin of 
Boston beams at the camera while 
grasping a huge bouquet. 

NHF is very pleased to distribute 
Tales of Wood and Water. 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Moviegoers/ME, NH, VT 



Northeast Historic Film received a 
$15,700 grant from the National En- 
dowment for the Humanities Division 
of Public Programs to plan a traveling 
exhibition entitled "Going to the Mov- 
ies: 100 years of Motion Pictures in 
Northern New England." 

The purpose of the exhibition is to 
use moviegoing as a way to understand 
the twentieth-century history of the 
northeast United States, the states of 
Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. 
The project's focus is the concept of 
community and an examination of 
cultural values and activities enforced 
and changed by movies. 

Ten scholars of New England his- 
tory, North American social history, 
music and popular culture and cinema 
studies are participating, along with 
exhibition professionals. These men and 
women are based in New York, Wash- 
ington, Toronto, Montreal and around 
New England. 

The project builds on the 1990-91 
Maine Humanities Council-funded 
silent film tour and gathering of pre- 
1930 audience oral histories. 

Why an Exhibition? 

The format of an exhibition of three- 
dimensional artifacts (rather than a film 
or lecture series) was chosen in order to 
present historical evidence in the form 
of technological and architectural arti- 



facts, manuscripts, advertising, photo- 
graphs, moving images and sound. 

Research has taken NHF staff and 
scholars through the three states, dis- 
covering traces of more than 1,100 
places where movies were seen. 

Readers are invited to share infor- 
mation and artifacts that might be rel- 
evant to preparation of the exhibition. 

Who is the Audience? 
"Going to the Movies" seeks a diverse 
audience. The movie spectator is in 
large part the topic of the exhibition, 
and visitor input as past and present 
moviegoers is actively sought. 

The show should illuminate aspects 
of regional life, such as its strong Franco- 
American culture, that differentiate it 
from the rest of the nation. H 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



'inter 1992 




Executive Director's Report p. 2 

Itinerant Movie Exhibitors 

by Kathryn H. Fuller p. 4 

Interview: James Henderson p. 5 

Dead River Rough Cut p. 8 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine 04615. David S.Weiss, 
executive director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769 



Posters, Postcards & Books 
Given to NHF 

Posters for D.W. Griffith's The Battle 
(1911) and AMobawk's Way (1910) 
along with three other original litho- 
graphed movie one-sheets were grate- 
fully received by Northeast Historic 
Film in a 1991 gift from Q. David 
Bowers of Wolfeboro, NH. 

Reference books, including Erno 
Rapee's 1924 Motion Picture Moods for 
Pianists and Organists and the 1911 
two-volume Cyclopedia of Motion- 
Picture Work, are part of the gift, along 
with over 100 postcards of Maine and 
New Hampshire movie theaters. They 
are a much-valued resource for the 
"Going to the Movies" project. H 



The Bristol Theatre, Bristol, NH, was a center 
of community life in the 1940s and 1950s. 

photo: QDB/NHF Collection 




Executive Director's Report 

Collections Descriptions 
In 1991 we made major strides in de- 
scribing Northeast Historic Film indi- 
vidual collections in a sharable form. 

Graduate Student Intern 

Crystal D. Hall, a student in the gradu- 
ate program in Library and Information 
Science at Florida State University in 
Tallahassee, devoted herself to this 
project from May to December 1991. 

NHF has 130 named collections, 
now described in our ProCite computer 




Association of Moving 
Image Archivists 

The first annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) 
was held in New York from November 
5-9. A total of 140 people attended the 
conference with a full agenda including 
sessions on news archiving, responsible 
use of archival materials, vinegar syn- 
drome, videotape restoration, screen- 
ings and visits to facilities in the area. 

NHF Represented 

Northeast Historic Film staff was 
represented by David Weiss, Crystal 
Hall and Karan Sheldon, 
who is serving a two-year 
term as treasurer on 
AMIA's executive board, 
along with president Wil- 
liam Murphy of the Na- 
tional Archives; vice 
president Jan-Christopher 
Horak, George Eastman 
House; and secretary Gre- 
gory Lukow, National 
Center for Film and Video 
Preservation. 



Join These 



Home Movies Panel 

NHF helped organize a 
catalog. Each record provides physical panel, "Home Movies and Amateur 



AMIA conference, NY. 



and content descriptions, based on 
MARC (machine-readable cataloguing) 
fields such as title statement, terms 
governing use, and provenance. 

New Cataloguing Tools 
Crystal also compiled and put into use 
cataloguing tools including a list of 
genre terms used by the archives such 
as educational/cultural works and home 
movies to describe collections. 

Genre terms, geographical terms, 
and summary notes about the contents 
of the collections will make the work of 
staff and researchers much easier. 

Without Crystal Hall and technical 
support for her from the staff of the 
National Moving Image Database this 
progress wouldn't have been possible. 
We wish Crystal well as she goes back 
to Florida for her final semester of 
graduate work, and look forward to her 
return to Maine. 




David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



Footage," with a presentation by NHF 
board member Pamela Wintle of the 
Human Studies Film Archives, Smith- 
sonian Institution. Karan Sheldon began 
the session with an introduction from 
film scholar Patricia Zimmermann, 
Ithaca College. 

Stephen Gong, Pacific Film Archives; 
Karen Ishizuka, Japanese American 
National Museum; and Micheline 
Morisset, National Archives of Canada, 
showed excellent footage from their 
archives, and provided analysis and 
suggestions to the field. 

To Join AMIA 

AMIA is a professional association estab- 
lished for individuals concerned with 
the collection, preservation, exhibition 
and use of moving image materials. 
To become a charter member of 
AMIA, to receive the AMIA newsletter 
and the proceedings of the November 
meeting, contact Greg Lukow at the 
National Center for Film and Video 
Preservation, 213 856-7637; fax 213 
467-4578. 



Founding Members 

Paul & Deborah Gelardi 

Del Keppelman & Skip Sheldon 

Karan Sheldon & David Weiss 

Friends of NHF 

Robert Mclntire, MaxMedia 

David & Sue Parsons, Milbridge Theatre 

Ed Pert 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Saudek 

Dr. David C. Smith 

Sylvia Smith 

Lynda & Charles Tyson 

Corporate/ Associate Members 

John Bragg, N. H. Bragg & Sons 

Dr. Constance Carlson 

Darwin Davidson 

Marcia Fenn 

Ernest & Kathryn Gross 

Donald C. Hammond, Hammond Lumber Co. 

James Henderson, Maine State Archives 

Franklyn Lenthall 

Edgar & Sally Lupfer 

Patricia McGeorge 

Virginia Morgan 

Henry H. Moulton 

John Mucci, GTE Service Corp. 

Richard Obrey, Three East Video 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Peabody 

Peter & Ann Sheldon 

Mrs. Joanne Van Namee 

Eric von Hippel 

Joel & Allene White 

Pamela Wintle 

Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Abbe Museum 

Bangor Historical Society 

NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of mov- 
ing image resources of interest to the 
people of northern New England; 
the preservation of film/tape through 
restoration, duplication, providing of 
technical guidance and vault storage; 
a touring program to bring materials 
to audiences throughout the area; 
and the establishment of a study 
center, including resource materials 
and reference copies of motion 
picture films and videotapes. 



Page 2 



NHF Members! 



Blue Hill Historical Society 

Calais Free Library 

Cherryfield Narraguagus Historical Society 

City Theater Associates, Inc. 

College of the Atlantic Library 

George Stevens Academy 

Bill & Alicia Gross 

Historic Preservation Program, Univ. of 

Vermont 

Indiana Historical Society 
Instructional Resource Center, Bangor Schools 
JC Roofing and Chimney Co. 
Jackson Memorial Library 
MPBN 

Maine Film Commission 
Maine Medical Center 
Maine Osteopathic Education Fdn. 
Maine State Library 
New Hampshire Historical Society 
Northeast Harbor Library 
Prime Resource Center 
Sea Grant Communications, Univ. of Maine 
Simmons College Library 
Sultan Technikon Library 
Union Historical Society 

Regular Members 

Philip Abbott 
Sieglinde Alexander 
Joan Amory 
Tom Armstrong 
David Astor 
James Austin 
Jean Barrett 
Deirdre Barton 
Helen Beach 
Rev. Curtis Beach 
Henry Becton, Jr. 
Paul & Mollie Birdsall 
Lynne Blair 
Richard Bock 
Deborah Boldt 
Nat Bowditch 
Q. David Bowers 
Donna Boyles 
Richard Bradley 
Ben & Joan Branch 
John M. R. Bruner, M.D. 
Raymond Burnham 
Lynn Cadwallader 
Mrs. Frederic Camp 
Mary Grace Canfield 
Robert Carnie 
Michel Chalufour 
Martha Chandler 
Wallace Cunningham 
John Davis 
Peter DeAngelis 
Clarence deRochemont 
Josephine H. Detmer 
Peg Dice 
JeffDobbs 



Broadcast Notes 



A half-hour program on Maine's Mt. 
Katahdin and Baxter State Park pro- 
duced by Art Donahue aired on 
Chronicle, WCVB TV Boston. It was the 
highest-rated show for the November 
ratings period. The program contained 
footage from Northeast Historic Film 
of Governor Percival Baxter in 1920 in 
his state house office, and views of 
typical fishing camps. 



Earliest Maine Films 
Erratum 

Thank you to the rail fans who pointed 
out that the jacket of a collection of 
short Maine films transferred to video 
contains an error. The train in Trout 
Fishing, Rangeley Lakes (1905) arriving 
in Bemis, Maine, is not narrow gauge. 
The tender of the locomotive is lettered 
"Portland and Rumford Falls," a stan- 
dard-gauge line. H 




Members, Your renewal date appears on the mailing label. 
Not yet a Member? Please use form on page 7! 



Robert Eggleston 
John Ellingwood 
Mrs. Anna Mary Elskus 
Carroll Faulkner 
Joseph Filtz 
Janet Forbes 
Joseph Foster 
Robert Foster 
Eugene Fuller 
Kathy Fuller 
Peter Gammons, Jr. 
Roy Gauthier 
Christopher Glass 
Jim Goff 
Douglas Gomery 
Henry Grandgent 
Terry Grant 
Nancy Gray 
Rynard Gundrum 
Jim Hamlin 
Pat Harcourt 
Mark Henderson 
Eric Herndon 
Charles Hesse 
Wendell Hodgkins 
C. A. Porter Hopkins 
John Howard 
Stanley Howe 
David Huntley 
Douglas Ilsley 
Ann Ivins 
Margaret Jaffray 
Jeff Janer 
Shirley Johnson 
Robert Jordan 
Thomas Joyce 
Dr. Susan Kaplan 



John Karol, Jr. 

Richard Kimball 

Donald King 

James King 

Diane Lee 

Stephen Lindsay 

Bill Lippincott 

Betty Ann & Donald Lockhart 

Howard Lowell 

Mrs. Russell MacGregor 

Lily Marston 

Wendy Matthews 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Alan McClelland 

Judith McGeorge 

Carl McGraw 

Charles Ray McKay 

Franklyn & Phyllis Mellen 

Bruce Meulendyke 

Hillery Mongelli 

Betty & Hugh Montgomery 

Francis Moulton, Jr. 

John O'Brien 

George O'Neill 

Kathryn J. Olmstead 

Dan Osgood 

Tom Pears 

William Petrie 

James Phillips 

Guy & Dianne Poirier 

Robert Porter 

Sandra Pottle 

Charles Pritham 

Elvie Ramsdell 

Sally Regan 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward Rendall 

More members on page 6 



Page 3 



One Hundred Years: The Cook and Harris High-Class Moving Picture Company, 

Itinerant Exhibitors in New England 

by Kathryn H. Fuller, 
PhD candidate, History, The Johns Hopkins University 



Before the nickelodeon era, small 
northern New England communi- 
ties got their movie entertainment from 
itinerant exhibitors like the Cook and 
Harris High-Class Moving Picture 
Company. B. Albert "Bert" Cook and 
his wife, Fannie, of Cooperstown, NY, 
travelled between villages in upstate 
New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, 
Maine and Quebec from 1904 to 1911 
with a variety show format, featuring a 
mix of brief films, music, sound effects 
and song. 

Bert Cook was a talented singer and 
phonograph and magic lantern opera- 
tor. Like other mechanically inclined 
young entrepreneurs at the turn of the 
century, he entered show business 
through this new entertainment ma- 
chinery. Fannie Shaw Cook was a 
pianist and aspiring actress who was 
willing to trade middle-class respect- 
ability for the excitement of show 
business. 

By the fall of 1904, Bert and Fannie 
saved enough money from performing 
with other groups to purchase a Powers 
film projector and "a nice lot of films." 
They formed the Cook and Harris 
High-Class Moving Picture Company, 
with Bert as manager and projectionist; 
Fannie as musical director, ticket seller 
and treasurer; her brother George Shaw 
as assistant projectionist and behind- 
thc-screen sound effects creator; a 
pianist; and an advance agent. 

In 1905 their two-hour program 
consisted of as many as 25 brief films, 
such as Indians and Cowboys, Drama 
in Mid- Air, Water Falls of the Rhine, 
The Lost Child, Burglars at Work and 
Fireworks in Color. Bert performed 
songs "illustrated" with lantern slides at 
intervals to break what they called "The 
Monotony of a Whole Evening of 
Motion Pictures." Ticket prices were 35 
and 25 cents, with 10 cent admission for 
children at matinees. 

The advance agent travelled ahead 
of the company to secure show dates 
along the routes of railroad lines. The 
agent approached each small town's 
lodges, school- and church-groups to 



sponsor the movie show, so as to win 
the Cook and Harris Company local 
acceptance. In return the supporting 
organization could keep 30 to 50 per- 
cent of the show's proceeds. As many 
as half of the performances gained such 
genteel sponsorship. 

TO-NIGHT 




HIGH CLASS EXHIBITION 




T 



HE HIGHEST GRADE EXHIBITION OF MOVING 
PICTURES EVER PRESENTED. 



photo: Library, New York Slate Historical Association, 
Cooptrstown, NY 

The Cook and Harris show was 
primarily a family-oriented program for 
conservative towns. When some prize- 
fight films requested by a lodge in 
Attica, NY, failed to materialize, the 
organizer wrote, "We are just as well 
satisfied as there would no doubt be 
some objections in as small a town as 
this to an exhibition of this kind and as 
you know our Order will not stand for 
anything that is not strictly O.K." 

In six weeks of a typical winter tour, 
the company played at opera houses or 
lodge halls in 35 towns in Vermont and 
New Hampshire. Local sponsors in 
Vermont included Fairhaven's high 
school seniors who were raising money 
for a class trip to Washington, DC; 



Proctor's baseball team; and the Ver- 
mont National Guard. 

The itinerant business was not easy. 
Timid advance agents took "no" for an 
answer too often from skeptical spon- 
sors or opera house managers. They 
faced competition from at least half a 
dozen other itinerant showmen, and 
Bert's expensive-to-purchase films 
became outdated rapidly. An advance 
agent complained to Bert from Middle- 
bury, VT, in 1907, "I have no paper 
[posters] to show the society and the 
minute they see the San Francisco Fire 
they give me a wise look, put their 
tongue in their cheek and say no I guess 
not. I lost Vergennes on account of not 
having paper and the "S.F. Fire" [film 
released May, 1906] has been there by 
both [rival exhibitors] Howe and Fos- 
ter." 

On a personal level, the itinerant life 
for Bert and Fannie Cook meant leaving 
their young daughter with her grand- 
mother in Cooperstown, living from 
hand to mouth between profitable play 
dates, and being labeled "show people" 
by polite society. But the Cooks thrived 
on their varied experiences, making 
many friends along the way. 

A family friend from Groveton, NH, 
anticipated the future of film exhibition 
in a note to Fannie after a 1907 appear- 
ance, "Please tell Mr. Cook that I hear 
nothing but words of praise for the 
entertainment. One young man said, 'I 
would go every night if it was here.' * 

By 1910 itinerant show people in 
New England villages of even 500 to 
1,000 people faced competition from 
local movie shows. Like most other 
traveling exhibitors, Bert and Fannie 
Cook in 1911 retired from the road and 
operated nickelodeons in the Coopers- 
town, NY, area until 1917. They re- 
mained in the movie business into the 
1940s. 

The itinerant movie show of 1900 to 
1910 represents a link between 19th- 
century traveling entertainments and 
the ubiquitous movie theater. Its legacy 
in northern New England was the 
establishment of an enthusiastic audi- 



/> .r 



The Maine State Archivist: 
An Interview with James Henderson 



Jim Henderson beads the Maine State 
Archives, a bureau within the Depart- 
ment of Secretary of State. He chairs the 

' Maine Historical Records Advisory 
Board and the Local Government 
Records Board. A Ph.D. in political 
science, he has been a professor at the 
University of Maine and a member of 
the Maine Legislature. He currently 

) chairs the Steering Committee of the 
State Historical Records Coordinators 
for the United States. 

What is a public archives? 

Henderson: It's the place where the 
permanently valuable records of 
the government are kept, to document 
how that government has executed its 
public trust and to guarantee access by 
the people to those documents. 

fc What's the function of the Maine 
State Archivist? 

HThe State Archivist has the 
responsibility for determining 
which official State records are perma- 
nently valuable, insuring that those 
I records are not destroyed, preserving 
those deposited in the State Archives, 
and assuring public access to such 
records. 

Are there misconceptions about what 
a historical record is? 

I T T Yes! There are confusions about 
JL JL media and time. The usual image 



ence for the hundreds of nickelodeons 
that dotted Vermont, New Hampshire 
and Maine from 1910 to 1930. 



Further Readin 



"Shadowland: Middle Class Audiences and 
the American Movie-Going Experience, 
1900-1930," Kathryn H. Fuller, PhD disser- 
tation, Johns Hopkins University, 1992. 

"The Cook and Harris High-Class Moving 
Picture Company," Courtney Burns, M.A. 
thesis, SUNY Oneonta, Cooperstown Pro- 
gram, 1988. 

"Edwin J. Hadley, Traveling Film Exhibitor," 
Edward Lowry in John Fell, ed., Film Before 
Griffith, 1983. 

High-Class Moving Pictures: Lyman H. 
Howe and the Forgotten Era of Traveling 
Exhibition, 1880-1920, Charles Musser in 
collaboration with Carol Nelson, 1991. 



is the old paper document or book. 
Some might concede photographs. But 
all documentary material must be 
considered: motion picture film, micro- 
film, audio and videotape, laser disks, 
computer tapes and disks. 

A "historical record" is one that is 
"permanently valuable" because of its 
informational content. The computer- 
ized court docket updated today is 
already a historical record since it 
contains permanently valuable informa- 
tion not readily available elsewhere. 

What is the significance of electronic 
records and image media, and what 
preservation problems do they pose? 

H Electronic records are totally 
dependent on the technology 
with which they are associated. 

Given the continuing changes in 
technology, archivists are beginning to 
concentrate on "migrating" the infor- 
mation to new media, thereby preserv- 
ing the information with less emphasis 
on preserving the media. 

What statewide activities have you 
been involved with? 

HThe State Archivist should, I 
believe, support efforts involving 
historical records in the broader 
community. During the past several years, 
the Archives have taken a leading role 
in establishing the Society of Maine 
Archivists, conducting the Maine His- 
torical Records Assessment Project, and 
coordinating the Statewide Preservation 
Planning Project funded by the NEH. 

What is the 1991 Historical Records 
Assessment Report? 

HThe Report, funded by the Na- 
tional Historical Publications 
and Records Commission (NHPRC), 
documents the condition of historical 
records in Maine, based on survey 
responses from over 200 historical 
societies, libraries, museums and local 
governments and an assessment of State 
government records. 

Essentially, it concludes that records 
held by small organizations and gov- 
ernments are frequently stored in con- 
ditions with little fire protection or 
physical security. While most of the 
custodians are highly motivated, they 




are hampered by 
other duties, lack 
of resources and 
little training. 

A few larger 
organizations 
have a substantial 
portion of all the 
state's historical 
records. While 
they have professional staff and better 
physical conditions, they are often 
overwhelmed by demands of research- 
ers and by the sheer volume of material. 

The reports also focus attention on 
new media. The preservation of elec- 
tronic records, especially computer 
records, is, in my opinion, an emerging 
crisis. 

What resources are available for 
individual preservation projects? 

HThe NHPRC funded the assess- 
ment to provide a basis for award- 
ing grants for the preservation and 
archival management of historical 
records in Maine. 

The keys to a good proposal include 
documenting the historical importance 
of the records; assessing their condition; 
and employing archival expertise in the 
development of the project. 

The report and guidelines for apply- 
ing for NHPRC grants are available from 
the State Archives, Cultural Building, 
Station 84, Augusta, ME 04333. 

What statewide actions would you 
like to see in the near future? 

HThe NEH-funded planning proj- 
ect, in conjunction with statewide 
associations of archivists, museums, 
librarians and others, can provide the 
basis for coordinated activities. 

The current economic climate has 
been very difficult for the cultural 
community. Advocacy for restored 
funding for preservation will be essen- 
tial during 1992 so that in the future, as 
funds are returned to various programs, 
preservation requirements will not be 
overlooked. H 



Reference by Mail Collection 



Members of Northeast Historic Film 
are invited to borrow from the circulat- 
ing reference collection of VHS video- 
tapes. 



New titles are being added all the 
time. Call or write for an updated list! 
Here are samples from the more than 
40 titles available. 



Note: PERF means public performance 
rights are included. Where there is no 
PERF, the tape is for home use only 
and may not be shown to a group. 



City Life 

24 Hours, a professional dramatization with 
music and narration of fire fighting in Port- 
land, Maine. 1963. 27 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Country Life 

Ice Harvesting Sampler, five short silent 
films showing a near-forgotten New England 
industry. 26 mins., b&w, si. with titles. PERF 

The Movie Queen, Lubec, a pretend movie 
queen visits her home town in down east 
Maine. 1936. 28 mins., b&w, si. 

Early Film 

All But Forgotten, documentary on the 
Holman Day silent film company in Maine. 
1978. 30 mins., col. and b&w, sd. PERF 

Cupid, Registered Guide, a silly two-reeler 
by Holman Day. 1921. 20 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 

Fisheries 

It's the Maine Sardine, catching, packing and 
eating Eastport fish. 1949. 16 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 



Turn of the Tide, drama about a lobster 
cooperative; from the Vinalhaven Historical 
Society. 1943. 48 mins., col., sd. 

Franco* American Life 

Reflets et Lumiere: Pone Ouverte sur les 
Arts, a program on the arts from an MPBN 
television series on Franco- American culture 
in Maine. 1982. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 
There are more than a dozen titles available 
in this series. 

Geography 

Assignment in Aroostook, Loring Air Force 
Base in northern Maine will close in 1994. 
This orientation film shows the woman at 
home, the sergeant at work, the family at 
play. 1956. 27 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Political Discourse 

Margaret Chase Smith Speech, declaration of 
intention to run for President. 1964. 17 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 

John F. Kennedy Speech on the anniversary of 
the Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1963 at 



Univ. of Maine. 30 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 
Sent with full transcript of speech. 

Television 

The Cold War; Transportation; TV Commer- 
cials, three compilation tapes of stories from 
the Bangor Historical Society/WABI collec- 
tion. 40 to 50 mins. each; b&w, si. and sd. 
PERF 

Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1950s and 
early 60s in news, sports and local commer- 
cials from the Bangor Historical Society/ 
WABI collection. 1989. 34 mins., b&w, sd. 
PERF 

Woods 

In the Public Interest: The Civilian Conser- 
vation Corps in Maine, the federal work 
program from Acadia National Park to Cape 
Elizabeth. 1987. 58 mins., col. and b&w, sd. 

Little Log Cabin in the Northern Pines, 
amateur film of a young woman's hunting 
trip near Brownville, Maine, with a profes- 
sional guide, ca. 1930. 13 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 



More NHF Members 



Windsor Robinson 

Charles Ryan 

DeWitt Sage 

Shan Saylcs 

Ronald Schliessman 

Mr. & Mrs. P. H. Sellers 

Jennifer Sheldon 

Nancy Sheldon 

Gail Shelton 

Ms. Pat Sherman 

Harold Si Janet Simmons 

Benjamin Bigelow Snow 

Betty Stookey 

Noel Stookey 

Lynda Sudlow 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Taylor 

William Taylor 

Dawn Thibodeau 

Denis Thoet 

Mr. &: Mrs. Charles Thompson 

Amy Turim 

Robert Tyler 

Robert &: Julia Walkling 



Mary Anne Wallace 
Peter Wappler 
Seth Washburn 
Vern & Jackie Weiss 
Bonnie Wilson 
Jon Wilson 
Carter Wintle 
Brian Wood 
Cynthia Wood 
Bob Woodbury 
Waldo Theatre, Inc. 

Educator/Student Members 

Albert Belanger 
Jon Bragdon 
Michelle Branigan 
The Brick Store Museum 
Carol Bryan 
Prof. William Burgess 
Richard Burns, Ocean Park Assoc. 
Robin Clay 

Carnegie Library, Good Will- 
Hinckley 



Dr. Richard Condon, Univ. of 

Maine, Farmington 
Joseph Conforti, Univ. of Southern 

Maine 
Alvina Cyr, Dr. Lewis S. Libby 

School 

Rudolph Deetjen, Jr. 
Charles Ellis 
Bernadette Friel, Schenk High 

School 
Phil Gonyar, Waterville High 

School 
Joe Gray 
Cora Greer 
Hanna Griff 
Kevin Hagopian 
Scott Herring 
Thomas Wayne Johnson, Chico 

Folklore Archive 
Richard Judd 
Janice Kasper, Penobscot Marine 

Museum 
Robbie Lewis 



Dean Lyons 

Sharon Merrill, Guy E. Rowe 

School 
Tim O'Keefe 
Sanford Phippen 
Harald Prins 
Jo Radner 
Paige Roberts 
Mrs. Rowell, Fogler Library, Univ. 

of Maine 
Linda Seavey 
Stonington Elementary School 

Library 
Juris Ubans 
Dr. Richard E. C. White, Queens 

College 
Steve & Peggy Wight, Sunday 

River Inn 
Wendy Wincote 



Page 6 



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tion, NHF depends on its members. You 
help us set priorities, you pass the word 
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teachers and students at any level. 

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in addition, loan of ten reference 
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year, the premier category of mem- 
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Membership at any level is an opportu- 
nity to become involved with the pres- 
ervation and enjoyment of our moving 
image heritage. 

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allowed by law. 



To Purchase 

Videotapes of New England Life 
Call or Write for Catalog 



Dead River Rough Cut, shot in 
the backwoods of Maine with two 
woodsmen-trappers. Described on 
page 8. (55 mins.) $29.95/NHF 
members $24.95. 

Tales of Wood and Water, an out- 
standing new documentary on 
wooden-boat building and sailing 
on the coast of Maine (60 mins.) 
$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 

To learn about other videotapes 
available for purchase Huey's 
Bonsoir Mes Amis on two Franco- 
American musicians; Ice Harvesting 
Sampler; the new edition of Earliest 
Maine Films; and King Spruce, a 
1940 pulpwood harvesting 
documentary please call Libby 
Rosemeier at 207 374-2736. 




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Page 7 





NORTHEAST 
HISTORIC 

=11 M 




ME 04*1* 



41MUJ 







Dead River Rough Cut 

"Look How Bcavemh that Water 
Looks Down in There" 

"We lived nut like everybody else . . . 
He just got plain skk of it and I did, of 
the way people do things, that's all * 

At first. Bob Wagg and Walter 
u.: 



and would visit each other, drink a b*er 
and shoot the breese. As winter settled 
in. they became inseparable compan- 
iciu in a partnership full at hard work, 

Since Nonhcast Historic Film's 



^ ^ fouixling in 1986 DC*/ /truer /tog* 
^ CM has been the most requested and 



most eusive title. Now it is available 
on videotape. 

Work of Maine Independent* 
It is an important example of work by 
regional independent filmmakers Rich- 
ard Searis and Stu Silverstetn. 

To nuke what they call "A Woods 
Film" they joined the men as they 
shouldered pack baskets, took up nflcs 
and trap* to travel the Maine landscape 
on MOW shoes, snowmobiles, and 



Wagg and Lane demonstrate con- 
ventional and unlikely woods skills of 
trappers: setting and emptying traps, 
feeding wild birds, getting water, build- 
ing a portable fire on the back of a 
snowmobile. 

Life and Death 

The trappers share trenchant commen- 
taries on life and death. This story is 
told with scruffy poignancy: "I had a 
dream the other night about these 

beaver Here I had two of these 

great big beaver I'd caught out of a 
(towage and one little kitten. There was 
two or three more in the flowagc and 
they looked at me and they was all 
pointing at me 'He's the one, he's the 
one that caught our Mama and Daddy 
and our little brother. He's the one!' 
Oh. it made me fed so bad I woke up 
and said I'd not trap any more beaver." 
Dt*JRn*r Ro*gb Caf is a valuable 
observation of rough backwoods life, 
full of visual and verbal poetry and 
some actual verse, too, in the form of a 
recitation of The Cremation of Sam 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

' REVIEW 



The Alamo 



Northeast Historic Film 
P.O. Box 900, Main St. 
Bucksport, ME 04416 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Summer 1992 



Executive Director's Report p. 2 

Archival Notes: Accessions p. 2 

Summer/Fall Calendar p. 4 

One Hundred Years: Seaside Idyls .... p. 4 
The Movie Queen, Middlebury p. 8 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine 04615. David S. Weiss, 
executive director, Karan Sheldon, editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769 



The Alamo Theatre in Bucksport is one 

~ of Maine's oldest standing structures 
built as a cinema. At NHF's annual 
meeting on May 2, board members 
discussed the building's potential as a 
headquarters for the archives. 

Executive director David Weiss sum- 

~ marizes, "NHF has reached the point 
where a larger, integrated facility is 
necessary. The Alamo has many of the 
characteristics we seek: fireproof con- 
struction, size and public accessibility." 
The theater building is just off 

_ coastal Route 1 on the Penobscot River 
20 miles south of Bangor. 

In May 1916, O. J. Hussey bought 
land on the corner of Main and Elm 
Streets. He and May Hussey erected a 
90-foot-long brick building and called it 

~ the Alamo Theatre. 

What Kind of Name is That? 
The original Alamo, a mission in San 
Antonio, Texas, has popular culture 
resonance beyond its religious and mili- 
tary history. There have been many 

) movies about the 1836 battle at the 
garrison, one of which, The Immortal 
Alamo (1911), was made in Texas by 
the Melies Company. "It would be a 
stolid audience indeed that failed to 
respond to the thrilling scene inside 

I the Alamo" (June 1911 review, 
Motography). 

There were Alamo Theaters in 
Illinois, Georgia and Washington DC, 
where, says the Theatre Historical 



Society of 
America, a 230- 
seat Alamo 
built in 1911 
lasted until 
1964. 

Cinema 
Heyday 

In 1924 Arthur 

Rosie bought 

the Bucksport 

Alamo and 

continued to 

run it with his 

family as a 

movie theater. 

Bob Rosie, 

Arthur's son, 

was four when 

his father moved 

the family into the theater. He took 

over the business after his father's 

retirement. 

Bob Rosie and his wife, newly mar- 
ried in 1945, lived for six months in the 
second-floor offices facing Main Street. 
"We had matinees for kids with 14-cent 
tickets," he recalls. "Fifteen-cent tickets 
had a tax on them. The last movie we 
showed was Godzilla in May 1956." 

The auditorium had a floor that could 
be angled for movies and cranked down 
flat for dances. Bea Spurling of Castine 
played the piano. "I played for dances 
on that big floor. Afterward we'd go 
across the street and have ice cream." 




In the years since, the Alamo was by 
turns a grocery store, fitness center, bar 
and videotape store. 

Bucksport Today 

Now, its facade unchanged, the Alamo 
gutted and silent faces the Penob- 
scot River awaiting a new life. As Bob 
Rosie says, "I think it would be fun if 
somebody did something with it." 

It is 20 miles from NHF's present 
location, and for several years staff has 
had an interest in the building and its 
history. The property is scheduled for a 
bank foreclosure auction on June 1 1 . 



Executive Director's Report 

A curatorial manual for the administra- 
tion of television newsfilm and video- 
tape collections is being edited by Steve 
Davidson of the Louis Wolfson II Media 
History Center, Miami, and Larry 
Viskochil of the Chicago Historical 
Society. 

The manual will be written by 
archivists from the field including Alan 
Lewis, National Archives, on a history 
of news-gathering formats, processes 
and technologies; and Helene Whitson, 
San Francisco State University, on 
the arrangement and description of 
collections. 

Northeast Historic Film is contrib- 
uting a section on outreach, which will 
explore the philosophy and practice of 
making collections known to various 
publics. 

The handbook has been made pos- 
sible by a grant from the National 
Historical Periodicals and Records 
Commission. 

Recent Users 

The Nickelodeon cable service used 
Bangor Historical Society/WABI foot- 
age to promote a kids' time capsule 
project. Country Kitchen, the Lewiston 
bakery, ran a New England bread 
commercial using footage from the 
same collection. 

The Chronicle series at WCVB TV 
Boston produced a program on the 
grange movement in Maine. NHF sup- 
plied agricultural footage for Art 
Donahue's excellent piece about the 
programs and buildings of the grange, 
which drew on a photography and 
history project by Rose Marasco and 
Elspcth Brown. 

Computers 

NHF is microcomputer dependent, 
using word-searchable descriptions of 
the collections that allow us to find 
"time capsules" and other terms. Until 
now we've existed solely in the DOS 
world. 

We're about to enter the world of 
Macintosh computing, converting the 
Bangor Historical Society/WABI data to 
ProCitc for Mac files, which will be 
available at the Bangor Historical Soci- 
ety, providing further access and added 
flexibility for users. 



Archival Notes: 
Accessions 



This is a small selection of the film and 
videotape that has recently come to the 
archives. 

The Maine Department of Inland 
Fisheries and Wildlife donated 16 mm. 
film from the 1960s and 1970s. Subjects 
include the Allagash River, Narraguagus 
salmon, waterfowl and large mammal 
conservation. 

More outdoor footage came in a 
collection of sports and hunting films, 
Outdoors with Bob Edge, which in- 
cludes a moose hunt. A delightful piece 
of unrelated ephemera accompanied 
this collection a 1928 demonstration 
of The Automatic Hamburger Machine. 

NHF members John and Betty 
Howard donated 1930s home movies of 
summer on Lake Winnepesaukee, New 
Hampshire, Camp Bonheurand Camp 
Bonte. 

The Knox County Camera Club 
amplified the collection of 16 mm. film 
with original notes from the production 
of Knox County on Parade. This color 
portrait of the Maine county was made 
in and around Rockland in 1940 and 
exhibited that year. It's an outstanding 



Happy Birthday, 
Danny Patt 

Proud to be an octogenarian! Danny, 
who began his career as a silent film 
accompanist in 1924, has been selected 
by the Maine Arts Commission for 
their Touring Artists program, which 
subsidizes performances for Maine 
nonprofit arts presenters. Contact the 
Maine Arts Commission, State House 
Station 25, Augusta, ME 04333 for the 
new Touring Artists directory. 



In addition, a soon-to-be-acquired 
laptop will help us bring our data on the 
road for school and library research and 
demonstrations^ 




amateur work including interiors and 
people at work in the bank, newspaper 
office and police station, as well as 
excellent aerial views, street scenes and 
railway-station footage. 

In a 90-minute videotape transfer and 
compilation, Bill Cross, Bob Monroe 
and Jim Moore of the Knox County 
Camera Club, with producer Peter Piik 



KNOX* corny 



DOCKLAND. MAINE 

^-Orp 




David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



organized and narrated the material 
so that it can be enjoyed by today's 
audience. H 



NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of mov- 
ing image resources of interest to the 
people of northern New England; 
the preservation of film/tape through 
restoration, duplication, providing of 
technical guidance and vault storage; 
a touring program to bring materials 
to audiences throughout the area; 
and the establishment of a study 
center, including resource materials 
and reference copies of motion 
picture films and videotapes. 



Pag 



Music to Everyone's Ears 



Making moving images accessible to the 
public is one of Northeast Historic 
Film's responsibilities and greatest joys. 
Videotape distribution is an important 
source of revenue for the organization. 

Video Advisory Board 

NHF has an active video advisory board, 
helping to select material to distribute. 
The board looks for quality, relevance 
to NHF's mission, and for content and 
creators not otherwise covered in NHF's 
list. 

We're offered productions that are 
really exciting. The board has reviewed 
and selected videotapes like BonsoirMes 
Amis by Huey, about two Maine musi- 
cians, Our Lives in Our Hands by Karen 
Carter and Harald Prins, and Tales of 
Wood and Water by David Clark. 

Music Woes 

Our video advisory committee has 
encountered difficulties on occasion 
and has had to turn away tapes when 



an otherwise worthy work about north- 
ern New England life contains music 
that the producer did not obtain the 
rights to use. 

If the producer "borrows" music 
from records, tapes and CDs or re- 
records songs without permission from 
the publisher, the advisory board must 
turn down the work. 

Get Permission, Please . . . 

So, if you're a producer or compiler 
(amateur or professional) and intend to 
distribute your work, it's imperative to 
have permission to reuse music that has 
been previously recorded. And if you 
decide to record any piece of music not 
in the public domain you must seek 
permission from the composer and/or 
the music publisher. 

In the May 1992 issue of The Inde- 
pendent, attorney Robert L. Seigel 
outlines basic music rights and how to 
go about obtaining them: synchroniza- 
tion rights for adding music to your 



piece; and performance rights for the 
right to use it before an audience. 

. . . Or Else 

If your budget does not allow paying 
for music licensing, consider alterna- 
tives such as commissioning original 
music from a composer; obtaining 
easily licensed music from recording 
studios which usually maintain libraries 
of such recordings; or using environ- 
mental sounds or silence. 



ding 



The Independent is a publication of the 
Foundation for Independent Video and 
Film, Inc., 625 Broadway, New York, NY 
10012. 212 473-3400. Single issues may be 
purchased for $3.50 plus postage. 

This Business of Music, Sidney Shemel and 
M. William Krasilovsky, Billboard Publica- 
tions, Inc., 1985. 

Media Law for Producers, Philip Miller, 
Knowledge Industry Publications, Inc., 1990. 



Broadcast Series 
Wide Angle: Maine Film and Videc 



A series of programs by Maine produc- 
ers is airing weekly May 9 through June 
27 on WCBB Lewiston. 

WCBB staff producer Mark Ireland 
put the series together for its second 
year motivated by a recognition that 
there were many different kinds of 
work being done in the state that could 
receive a wider audience. 

To be selected, programs must fit 
into a half-hour format. Some produc- 
ers have chosen to present selection 
from longer works, while short films 
are often combined with other work, 
sometimes by another producer. The 
pieces are tied together by field wrap- 
arounds with host Martin Andrucki. 

Students and Others 

The 1992 season opened with Women, 
Children and AIDS by Tim Sorel, de- 
picting rural women at risk for con- 
tracting HIV. 

Peg Dice, an independent filmmaker 



from Brunswick who began her career 
in film when she was in her 50s, pro- 
duced Fence in the Water. 

Rudy Burckhardt, a still photogra- 
pher, artist and filmmaker now living in 
New York, contributed Slipperella, a 
fairytale of moccasins that journey to 
Maine. Independents Yvonne Hanne- 
mann and Don Moore are represented 
with ethnographic work and a piece 
about Maine 
ghosts. 

Students 
are featured as 
subjects and 
producers: 
The Univer- 
sity of Maine 
made avail- 
able three 
stories about 
students and 
alumni/ae; 
character- 




Peg Dice, independent 
filmmaker 



driven pieces about Maine artists were 
produced by students at the Rockport 
International Film and Television 
Workshops. 

The series will conclude with the 
work of Bates College students Fawn 
Johnson and Julie Morrison and profes- 
sor Robert Branham Ella Knowles: A 
Dangerous Woman, about a Bates 
graduate, leading nineteenth-century 
activist for women's suffrage, who was 
the first woman lawyer in Montana. 

WCBB-MPBN Merger 
On July 1, 1992, WCBB in Lewiston 
will merge with MPBN Bangor, the 
state's other PBS affiliate. The combined 
entity, MPBC (Maine Public Broadcast- 
ing Corporation), will provide a state- 
wide audience for next year's Wide 
Angle: Maine Film and Video. Work 
to submit for the 1993 season? Call 
Mark Ireland at 207 783-9101. 



Pas. 



One Hundred Years: Seaside Idyls 



"Let's go to Beach Plum Point. " 

"Where is that?" asked Helen. 

"It is down in Maine. Beyond Port- 
land. And Mr. Hammond and his com- 
pany are there making my Seaside Idyl. 

"Oh, bully!" cried Helen, repeating 
one of her brother's favorite phrases, and 
now quite as excited over the idea as he. 
"I do so love to act in movies. Is there a 
part in that Idyl story for me?" 



The Summer 1991 Moving Image 
Review contained a "One Hundred 
Years" column about the Motion Picture 
Chums. The chums are male. Gregory 
Sanford of the Vermont State Archives 
in Montpelier called us to task for not 
mentioning the Motion Picture Girls. 



RUTH FIELDING 
DOWN EAST 




Well, indeed he's 
right. There is a Motion 
Picture Girls series, 
published by the same 
Edward Stratemeyer 
syndicate. And there's 
Ruth Fielding Down 
East, too, in the Ruth 
Fielding series from 
which the quote above is 
taken. In this 1920 
novel, brought to our 
attention by Kathy 
Fuller, we read about 
the theft of the youthful 
screenwriter's scenario. 



Summer Filming 

Come summer, many 
production companies head for seaside 
spots. In Maine, cameras rolled in recent 
years for Pet Sematary in Hancock; Bed 
and Breakfast in Cape Neddick; Signs 
of Life around Stonington and Blue 
Hill; and Whales of August on Cliff 
Island. 

An earlier seaside idyl was Queen of 
the Sea, a 1918 Fox Special starring 
Annette Kellerman as a Little Mermaid 
type offered mortal form if she rescues 
four humans including Prince Hero. 
Kellerman rehearsed daring aquatic 
feats near Bar Harbor, thrilling the Mt. 
Desert Island population. Directed by 
John Adolfi, no copies of the film are 
now known to exist. 

The Motion Picture World reported 
in 1912 that the Lubin Company sent 
31 people for 14 weeks (summer, nat- 
urally) to a fishing village . . . Cape 
Elizabeth, near Portland. 

Earlier still the Vitagraph Company 




The Sailor's Sacrifice 

led by director Lawrence Trimble pro- 
duced a number of short films in 1909 
and 1910 starring Jean the Vitagraph 
Dog at Cape Shore, near Portland. One 
of these, The Sailor's Sacrifice (1909), 
leaves traces of what may have been 
an off-camera summer idyl for the 
players but on screen they suffered 
the indignity of flying buckets of water 
representing a rudimentary storm at 
sea. 

Summer Reading 

NHF is always happy to receive dona- 
tions of books and periodicals relating 
to moving image media. Thanks for 
recent gifts to John Stilgoe, Kathy 
Fuller, Douglas Gomery and Q. David 
Bowers. 

We're particularly interested in 
receiving fan magazines, scrap books, 
clippings and other printed material 
relating to movie exhibition. B 



Summer/Fall Calendar 



June 13 at 7:30 p.m. at the Saco River 
Grange Hall, Bar Mills, Maine: Timothy's 
Quest (1922), directed by Sidney Olcutt 
from a story by Kate Douglas Wiggin. 
With piano accompaniment by Danny 
Patt. The hall was once the Riverside 
Theater. Renovated by Patricia Packard, 
it contains a 40-foot painted advertising 
curtain, which is itself worth the trip. 
Call 207 929-6472. 



July 8 at the Weld Historical Society, 
Weld Maine: 16 mm. screening of From 
Stump to Ship: A 1930 Logging Film. 

July 23 at 8:30 p.m. at the Claremont 
Hotel, Southwest Harbor, Maine: The 
Seventh Day (1921), directed by Henry 
King, starring Richard Barthelmess. 
With piano accompaniment by Danny 
Patt. Call 207 244-5036. 



August 6-9 at the Maine Festival, 
Thomas Point Beach, Brunswick. Look 
for us in the Maine Enterprise tent. 

September 25-27 at the Common 
Ground Fair, Windsor, Maine. Archives 
selections will be shown in the annex, 
next to the biggest pumpkin exhibit. 

October 3-10 at the Farm Museum, 
Fryeburg Fair. B 



The Maine Folklife Center: 
An Interview with Mary O'Meara 



A native of Ellsworth, Maine, O'Meara 
became associate director of the Northeast 
Archives of Folklore and Oral History, 
University of Maine, in the fall of 1990 
and has been working with its director, 
Dr. Sandy Ives, in developing the Archives 
as the Maine Folklife Center. She received 
her M.Phil, from Columbia University, 
where she is completing a doctorate in the 
Department of Anthropology. Her field- 
work experience includes work with refu- 
gees and also the basketmaking traditions of 
Penobscot and Passamaquoddy Indians. 
O'Meara chairs the Traditional Arts Panel 
of the Maine Arts Commission. 

What is the Maine Folklife Center? 

O'Meara: It represents a merger of 
two of Maine's oldest and most 
prominent folklife organizations, the 
Northeast Archives of Folklore and 
Oral History, and the Northeast Folk- 
lore Society, both founded in the 1950s 
by Dr. Edward D. "Sandy" Ives at the 
University of Maine. 

Like Northeast Historic Film, the 
Maine Folklife Center collects, pre- 
serves and has a public service mission. 

What is folklore? 

O Folklore and folklife encompass a 
very broad range of expressive 
phenomena that have to do with tradi- 
tionality. The making of folklore is an 
ongoing creative process that counters 
a popular conception of folklore, that 
it is concerned only with the study of 
disappearing traditions and passing 
ways of life. In Maine we have strong 
oral and artistic traditions associated 
with Native peoples, descendants of 
Colonial and immigrant populations, 
and newcomers from such places as 
Southeast Asia. 

Maine's distinctive occupational 
and regional traditions contribute to 
our wealth of folklife. At the Maine 
Folklife Center we hope to make the 
public aware of the diversity of folklife 
traditions which shape the collective 
identities of Maine people today. 

What media do you preserve? 

We archive one of the largest and 
most comprehensive assemblages 
of regional folklife in North America: 
tape recordings, transcripts of tapes, 
manuscripts and photographs. The col- 



lections are based on the tape-recorded 
interview the primary means of record- 
ing oral history and the documentary 
photograph. 

What do they contain? 

OThe accessions comprise a wide 
range of historical and cultural 
subject matter relevant to Maine and 
the Maritime Provinces of Canada. 
Special collections include folk songs, 
traditions of the Maine lumberwoods, 
Native American legends and beliefs, 
traditional medicine, women in the 
Depression and World War II, labor 
history, vernacular architecture, coastal 
and maritime occupations and tradi- 
tional arts and artists. 

Students and other researchers par- 
ticipate, and you collect and preserve. 
How do you benefit the public? 

OOur public programming wing 
provides numerous opportunities 
for making the archival materials acces- 
sible to a broad public audience in 
Maine and beyond through exhibits, 
lectures, workshops, video and audio 
tapes and festivals. 

We hope to play a more active role 
in focusing public attention on the 
plurality of expressive traditions that 
exist within Maine's borders and adja- 
cent regions. Our recent radio series 
on Maine's diverse musical traditions 
and our approaching exhibit of Maine 
women textile artists and folk art forms 
reflect this priority. 

A three-year National Endowment 
for the Arts grant allowed us to hire 
Teresa Hollingsworth as a Folklife 
Coordinator. We have been able to 
expand our instructional, reference and 
consultancy services to the public and 
are particularly interested in increasing 
our resources to schools, libraries, 
historical societies and other local 
organizations in Maine. 

What about publications? 

OOur journal, Northeast Folklore, 
is now in its 29th volume. Our 
quarterly newsletter's next edition in 
August will be the first to come out 
under its new name, Maine Folklife 
Center Newsletter. 



Are there 

similar 

organizations? 

We are 



O 




very 

fortunate to 
have close ties 
with a number 
of folklife pro- 
grams else- 
where in Maine. We enjoy a close 
partnership with the Traditional Arts 
Program of the Maine Arts Commission 
under state folklorist Kathleen Mundell. 
Our statewide folk arts survey is being 
conducted under the NEA grant. 

The recent establishment of the 
Acadian Archives/archives acadiennes 
at the University of Maine, Fort Kent, 
has already begun to have a profound 
impact on the celebration and study of 
Maine's French heritage. 

This summer we will sponsor a Folk 
Arts Tent at the Maine Festival. 

Our cosponsorship of the film From 
Stump to Ship launched our movement 
into public programming in 1985, and 
we feel privileged to carry on our rela- 
tionship with the staff of Northeast 
Historic Film through the continuing 
popularity of Stump and the other 
folklife videos distributed by NHF. 

How can people join the Folklife 
Center? 

UFor information about member- 
ship, call or write. The Maine 
Folklife Center is largely a self-support- 
ing unit within the University. One of 
the most important sources for generat- 
ing operating revenues is through the 
support of our members. 

All current members of the former 
Northeast Folklore Society will auto- 
matically become members of the Maine 
Folklife Center. Members receive our 
annual journal; the quarterly newsletter 
that focuses on folklife activities in 
Maine, the Maritimes and elsewhere in 
New England; invitations to events; and 
discounts on some of our audio and 
videotapes. B 

The Maine Folklife Center, S. Stevens 
Hall, University of Maine, Orono ME 
04469.207581-1891. 



Reference by Mail Collection 



Members of Northeast Historic Film 
are invited to borrow from the circulat- 
ing reference collection of VHS video- 
tapes. Here is a sample of the titles 
available. For the full list of over 40 



videotapes, please call or write. 
Note: PERF means public performance 
rights are included. Where there is no 
PERF, the tape is for home use only 
and may not be shown to a group. 



Country Life 

A Century of Summers, the impact of a 
summer colony on a small Maine coastal 
community. 1987, 45 mins., b&w and col., 
sd. PERF 

The Movie Queen, Lubec, a pretend movie 
queen visits her home town in down east 
Maine. 1936, 28 mins., b&w, si. 

Early Film 

Earliest Maine Films, logging, lobstering, 
canoeing and more. 1901-1920, 44 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

Knight of the Pines, a North Woods Adven- 
ture by Holman Day. 1921, 20 mins., b&w, 
si. PERF 



Fisheries 

Turn of the Tide, drama about formation of a 
lobster cooperative, from the Vinalhaven 
Historical Society. 1943, 48 mins., col., sd. 

Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, fisheries 
including shrimp, cod and lobster. 1968, 
28 mins., col., sd. PERF 



Franco- American Life 

Reflets et Lumiere: Porte Ouverte sur les 

Arts, a program on the arts from an MPBN 
television series on Franco-American culture 
in Maine. 1982, 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 
There are more than a dozen titles available 
in this series. 



Television 

Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1950s and 
early 60s in news, sports and local 
commercials from the Bangor" 
Historical Society /WABI collection. 
1989, 34 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Margaret Chase Smith Speech, 
declaration of intention to run for Presi- 
dent. 1964, 17 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 



Woods 

From Stump to Ship, a complete look 
at the long-log industry from forest to 
shipboard. 1930, 28 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

King Spruce, harvesting pulpwood, includes 
horses and mechanical log haulers. Ca. 1940. 
23 mins. col., sd. 



To Purchase 

Videotapes of New England Life 
Call or Write for Catalog 

Tales of Wood and Water, an out- 
standing documentary on wooden- 
boat building and sailing on the coast 
of Maine (60 mins.) $29.95/NHF 
members $24.95. 

Dead River Rough Cut, shot in the 
backwoods of Maine with two 
woodsmen-trappers. (55 mins.) 
$29.95/NHF members $24.95. 




illustration: Rob Groves 



Welcome, New Members! 



Maine Historical: 
Punchy Lunch Events 

This winter the Maine Historical Society 
in Portland took advantage of NHF's 
Reference by Mail'service to run a 
February lunchtime screening series in 
the library. 

Cindy Murphy, the society's mem- 
bership secretary, reports, "It went very 
well. We sent out a mailing to members 
and about twenty people came for each 
session. They especially enjoyed Maine's 
TV Time Machine. It was a blast from 
the past, and something they could 
relate to." 

Winter was a good time to do the 
series, she felt. "It was a fun activity at 
lunch time." B 




Nonprofit Organizations 
Border Historical Society 
United Methodist Men 

Regular Members 
Kathleen Bean 
Daniel Donovan 
W. Fowler 
Randal Grant 
Sherman Howe, Jr. 
John D. Lewis 
John Mcllwaine 
Alphonse Martin 
Betsy Montandon 
Robert Schyberg 
Waldo J. Williams, Sr. 
Edith Wolff 

Educators/Student Members 

George Sarns 
Todd Mclntosh 
James Morris 



NHF Membership 



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help us set priorities, you pass the word 
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From Stump 
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Page 




pholo: Thr SktUon M*Km 



Middlebury, Vermont 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

: ILM 

fU.UH HILL KALIS MAINE 
USA 04615 C07) 574-27)6 



ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 






The Movie Queen, 
Middlebury 

Yet another film entitled The Movie 
Queen has been found! Polly C. Darnell 
at The Sheldon Museum in Middlebury, 
Vermont, contacted Northeast Historic 
Film recently with news of a 16 mm. 
film with that title. 

Shot in the fall of 1939 to be shown 
with a three-act play and sponsored by 
the Middlebury Chamber of Commerce, 
the film captures many of the local 
citizens and activities of the town, 
including a roster of churches. 

Like the Movie Queen films made in 
coastal Maine, it is a combination of a 
tour of the town, followed by a kidnap- 
ping plot, all starring local people. 

We do not yet know whether this 
film was made by the same itinerant 
filmmaker, Margaret Cram, who came 
to Lubec, Eastport and Bar Harbor, 
Maine, in 1936. 

Female Villain 

While similarly constructed, this film 
concentrates more on close-ups of 
people and offers a new twist the 
villain of the kidnapping plot is a woman, 
"Marlena Slarbo," a jealous movie star 
who leads a crowd of local businessmen 
intent on removing the hometown 
Movie Queen. Unlike the Maine films, 
this one has campy intertitles, including 
Slarbo's "Ha! Ha! Proud Beauty, you 
are in my power." 

Home Town Highlights 

Featured are the Middlebury train sta- 
tion (where the Movie Queen descends 
from train with press agent in white silk 
scarf and monocle); interiors of local 
businesses including demonstrations of 
a refrigerator and high-tech ice cube 
tray; the College Restaurant, where a 
waitress in wire rim spectacles takes 
orders; and a Middlebury-Norwich 
collegiate football game with a superb 
white-sweatered male cheerleader 
dwarfed by his megaphone. 

Embedded in the film are indica- 
tions that the Movie Queen is coming 
home to the land of milk and honey: a 
truck full of milk cans heads up Main 
Street, and the Mraz apiary vehicle's 
parade banner declares "She's Our 
Honey." 



Northeast Historic F i I 



m 



MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Members Buy Historic Building 
for Archives 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 



Winter 1993 



Executive Director's Report p. 2 

One Hundred Years: Island Music p.4 

Archival Notes p. 5 

Winter Calendar p. 7 

Videos of New England Life 
Catalog p.9 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, P.O. 
Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. David S. 
Weiss, executive director, Karan Sheldon, 
editor. ISSN 0897-0769. 



Responding to an urgent appeal, more 
than 85 members and friends of North- 
east Historic Film helped buy the 
moving image archives its own building. 
The Bucksport, Maine structure, built 
as The Alamo Theatre in 1916, was 
purchased at a foreclosure auction in 
June, 1992. 

The archives' successful bid of 
$37,500 for its first bricks and mortar 
won about 150,000 bricks, enclosing 
10,000 square feet of space. As one 
member said, "$37K looks like an 
incredible buy for anything today." 

Moving Day 

The departure from Noel Paul Stookey's 
Henhouse in South Blue Hill marked 
six years' growth from a lO-ft.-square 
office to two rooms with an unbeatable 
view of Blue Hill Bay, now occupied by 
WERU community radio staff. 

It was not easy for NHF to say 
goodbye to friends in the building at 
River Music, Neworld and WERU, and 
to possibly the world's best post office, 
captained by Dolly Robertson. 

But the frontier called, and the last 
week of September saw George Rolles- 
ton and Bob Rosie heaving file cabinets 
up and down stairs. 

Here We Are 

Northeast Historic Film is on Main 
Street, Bucksport, just off route 1. It is 
about 20 miles from the airport in 



Bangor, from Ellsworth and from 
Belfast. 

Bucksport is 120 miles north of 
Portland, Maine. The post office is next 
door; Federal Express and UPS come 
every day. 

Plans for the Building 

Phased renovation will convert the 1916 
cinema building into a home for the 
collections and programs of northern 
New England's only moving image 
archives. 



While the auditorium was gutted in 
1956 to make room for an A&P, the 
faade is intact, as are the original 
manager's offices, the fly space and 
projection room. 

Archival storage for the growing 
collections occupies a portion of the 
first floor, while administrative func- 
tions take place upstairs. 

Plans include public screening 
facilities with 16 mm. and video in a 
temporary space this winter. I 




Executive Director's Report 

The purchase of the Alamo Theatre 
building is perhaps Northeast Historic 
Film's biggest step since founding in 
1986. A culmination of growth and 
development to date, it's also a new 
beginning. 

Gifts Are Crucial 

I am tremendously grateful that our 
membership responded to the purchase 
opportunity. The $30,000 given or 
pledged virtually overnight made the 
acquisition possible in two ways: 

1) NHF could not afford to take on 
debt to buy the building without 
donations and pledges. 

2) Gifts from more than 85 members 
and friends are a vote of confidence, 
saying that NHF is worth support- 
ing and its mission deserves to be 
realized. 

Three- Year Debt 

To supplement the $30,000 in donations, 
the board authorized me to borrow an 
additional $25,000 from the Union 
Trust Bank in a three-year loan. This 
allowed us to pay the winning bid of 
$37,500, meet closing costs of $2,500, 
and budget $15,000 for immediate 
repairs including a new roof. The 
board is confident that the extra $25,000 
can be raised. The first principal pay- 
ment of $10,000 is due in July 1993. 

Next on the List 

We have heat, lights, a new film vault, 
and a roof guaranteed for 20 years. But 
there's a staggering amount left to do: 
interior walls, exterior masonry, and 
painting must be tackled soon. 

Tons of film, video, books and equip- 
ment need to be placed on scores of 
shelving units which we don't have. 

Our collections of film, videotape, 
books and artifacts continue to grow. 
If you doubt the urgent need for our 
services, look at recent accessions. Before 
we were officially moved in, NHF 
received two new major collections. 
We'll report on these and other devel- 
opments in the next Moving Image 
Review. 

A Chance for the Future 

NHF took a chance at the auction. We 
stretched because real estate seemed at 



Grants in Action 



The Betterment Fund, created by the 
will of William Bingham 2nd, has made a 
grant of $5,000 toward the purchase of 
equipment for the transfer of film to video- 
tape. The Transfer Independence Project 
helps NHF make 16 mm. film to 3/4-inch 
and VHS videotape transfers at 15 frames 
per second and add electronic titles. 

This will permit creation and anno- 
tation of reference copies of late 1920s 
and 1930s home movies. The archives 
holds more than 20 collections of home 
movies of this era camera original 
film containing important details of 
home and work life. 

A planning project for a traveling 
exhibition, "Going to the Movies: 100 
Years of Motion Pictures.in Northern 
New England," submitted its final 
report to the National Endowment for 
the Humanities, public humanities 
projects, in June. 

Film scholar Tom Gunning com- 
mented, "The project is on the cutting 
edge of scholarly pursuits in film his- 
tory and is not only educating the 
public, but at the same time uncovering 
new research materials." 

The followup proposal for imple- 
menting the exhibition, to interpret a 
century of moviegoing from a social 
history perspective, was rejected for 
funding by the NEH in September. 

Ten outstanding scholars partici- 
pated in the planning process, demon- 
strating notable commitment to the 
scholarship, topic and form of "Going 
to the Movies": 

an all-time low. But to make the chance 
pay off, we have to develop. 

Our board needs to double; the level 
of support from the board and mem- 
bership must increase. Foundation and 
corporate giving needs to accelerate, 
along with earned income. 

NHF has grown and won your sup- 
port, yet all our efforts to date are small 
compared to the real preservation and 
public programming needs. Thank you 
for the chance to pursue NHF's vision. 



David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 




Gillian Anderson, music, Library of 

Congress 

Jere Daniell, history, Dartmouth College 
Yves Frenette, history, Glendon College, 

York University 
Kathryn Fuller, history, Hampshire 

College 
Andre Gaudreault, history of art, 

Universite de Montreal 
Douglas Gomery, film studies, University 

of Maryland 

Tom Gunning, film studies, SUNY Pur- 
chase 
Chester Liebs, history, University of 

Vermont 
John Stilgoe, visual and environmental 

studies, Harvard 
Ronald Walters, history, 

The Johns Hopkins University 

Tevere MacFadyen, Main Street Design 
Duncan Smith, Duncan Smith Associates 
Darwin Davidson, photography 
Judy McGeorge, computer consultant 

Karan Sheldon, project director 

Products of the planning process in- 
clude more than 1000 records relating 
to places where movies were shown in 
Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont; 
written testimony from more than 200 
silent-era moviegoers; audiotapes, photo- 
graphs and other artifacts relating to th< 
changing social history of moviegoing 
in northern New England communities, 

The future of the project is under 
consideration. I 

NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of mov- 
ing image resources of interest to the 
people of northern New England; 
the preservation of film/tape through 
restoration, duplication, providing of 
technical guidance and vault storage; 
a touring program to bring materials 
to audiences throughout the area; 
and the establishment of a study 
center, including resource materials 
and reference copies of motion 
picture films and videotapes. 



The Auction Honor Roll 



These members and friends gave 
generously to the fund that allowed 
I Northeast Historic Film to buy the 
Alamo Theatre building at a fore- 
closure auction on June 11, 1992. 

Norris & Margaret Austin 

John D. Bardwell 
) Henry Barendse 

Otis J. Bartlett 

Lynne K. Blair 

Q. David Bowers 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin C. Branch 

Dr. & Mrs. John M. R. Bruner 
' Mrs. Frederic C. Camp 

Dr. Constance H. Carlson 

Michel Chalufour 

Bill Cross 

Richard & Bonnie D'Abate 
I Darwin & Jacqueline Davidson 

Peter Davis 

John & Peg Dice 

Carroll & Ann Holland Faulkner 

Kathryn H. Fuller 

Peter T. Gammons, Jr. 
) Deborah & Paul Gelardi 

Faith Getchell & Glenn Jenks 

D. Lea Girardin 

Douglas Gomery 

Green Hill Farm 

Cora Coggins Greer 

Jeanne H. & Randolph C. Harrison 

Charles T. Hesse 

Porter Hopkins 

Stanley F. Howe 

Edward D. & Barbara Ann Ives 
I Robert L. Jordan 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Judd 

Del Keppelman & Skip Sheldon 

Richard A. Kimball, Jr. 

Diane Kopec 

Franklyn Lenthall & James Wilmot 
* Chester Liebs 

Ed & Sally Lupfer 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Alan McClelland 

Patricia F. McGeorge 

John T. Mcllwaine 

Maher's Oil Burner Service, Inc. 

Maine Osteopathic Association 

Joan F. Meserve 

Elizabeth J. Miller 



Elizabeth B. & Hugh Montgomery 
Richard E. Nopper, Beckett 

Corporation 
John A. O'Brien 
Kathryn J. Olmstead 
Alice H. Palmer 
David & Sue Parsons 
Howard B. Peabody 
Ed Pert 
James Petrie in Memory of 

Louis de Rochemont 
James A. Phillips, Jr. 
Sanford Phippen 
Prelinger Associates 
Joan Radner 
Connie & Ned Rendall 
Windsor C. Robinson 
Richard & Anna Roelofs 
Robert & Venetia Rosie 
DeWitt Sage 

Robert & Elizabeth Saudek 
Pat & Tom Schroth 
Elliott & Dorothy Schwartz 
Wendy Wincote Schweikert 
Peter & Ann Sheldon 
Noel & Betty Stookey 
Lynda L. Sudlow 
Suzanne & Samuel Taylor 
William L. Taylor 



Amy Turim & Larry Hershman 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Tyson, Jr. 

Juris Ubans 

Robert & Julia Walkling 

Allene& Joel White 

Drs. Sheila & Richard White 

Steve & Peggy Wight 

David S. Wildes 

John Wilmerding 

Pamela Wintle & Henry Griffin 

Cynthia Wood 

and Anonymous Givers 

The urgent request for money to pur- 
chase the building was answered within 
days. Gifts ranged from $10 to $3,000 
and came in the form of cash and three- 
year pledges. 

The auction of the building was 
conducted on behalf of Casco Northern 
Bank by the Keenan Auction Company 
of Kingfield, Maine. NHF executive 
director David Weiss noted, "The bank 
understood the value of our nonprofit 
cultural mission. Casco Northern 
showed support for the community 
and our goals, and they showed a 
willingness to engage in a constructive 
negotiation and guide us through the 
process." B 




Sold! Outdoor foreclosure auction. 



Page 3 



One Hundred Years: Island Movie Music 



As part of our ongoing interest in how 
movies were seen in northern New 
England, we look at the history of 
community interaction with motion 
pictures, artistic participation by local 
people, and the transportation that 
made moviegoing possible. 

Vinalhaven Island, Maine, (pop. 
2,000) presents an outstanding example 
of the significance of moviegoing to 
community life. In the 1920s movies 
were shown five days a week at Memo- 
rial Hall. Fortunately for historians, 
logbooks from 1914 to 1922 document- 
ing the films shown and the theater 
manager's accounts. 

Island theaters were common in this 
period, a time when steamers made 
islands as accessible as mainland com- 
munities. There were regular movies on 
Peak's Island, Swans Island and 
Islesboro. The Vinalhaven Historical 
Society put Northeast Historic Film in 
touch with Mr. Calderwood, now a 
resident of Orinda, California. 




Neil Calderwood in 1927. 

You asked how I came to play for the 
movies. The short answer is I was the 
most versatile pianist available on the 
island at that time. 

Music Education 

Vinalhaven was a very musical town 
and had three piano teachers, all gradu- 
ates of the New England Conservatory 
of Music. I took lessons from Linda 
Jones, who was also the town librarian. 



by Neil M. Calderwood 

I was schooled in the classics but also 
played popular music, and had the 
knack of improvising and playing by 
ear. I started in 1918 when I was eight 
and my grandfather paid Linda fifty 
cents for the weekly lesson until 1922. 
By that time I had accumulated an 
extensive library of Etude music maga- 
zines, sheet music, classical volumes, 
hymns, but no specialized theater 



music. 



The Manager Comes Calling 

Viv Drew, manager of the Memorial 
Theatre, came up to the house one day 
in 1922 and said that Arthur Brown, his 
current pianist, was leaving town to 
work at a bank in Boston; Would I be 
interested in the job? The $7 a week 
salary (later $9) was too good to turn 
down and I accepted. I remember 
playing "Song of India" and a Clementi 
sonatina for him and then asking if they 
would be suitable for the movies. He 
agreed and I was hired at the ripe age 
of 12 years. 

A short time later I took the steamer 
Gov. Bodwell to Rockland to buy some 
music. Arthur Brown was aboard on 
his way to Boston and I spent most of 
the trip across Penobscot Bay quizzing 
him on what to play. His advice was to 
play something fast for the serials and 
cowboys, something slow for the love 
pictures, marches for the newsreels and 
popular music for the comedies. This 
was the extent of my training in theater 
music. 

The program at the Memorial 
Theatre in those days was as follows: 
Monday and Tuesday two reels of a 
serial plus five or more reels of a fea- 
ture. Wednesday and Thursday two 
newsreels plus a feature. Friday and 
Saturday two reels of comedies plus the 
feature. The show started at 7 and 
lasted somewhere between 8:30 and 9. 
There were no matinees. Viv had only 
one projector and there was a pause 
when he changed reels. 

Special Requests 

For the first year or so I followed 
Arthur's advice. It must have been 
pretty awful, but there was no TV and 



only crystal radio, and the customers 
were hungry for any kind of music. I 
can remember people stopping me on 
the street and saying they were going to 
the movies tonight and would I please 
play "Till We Meet Again" or "Let the 
Rest of the World Go By," or some 
other current favorite. 

One Tuesday night Viv came down 
behind the screen shielding the piano 
lamp from the audience and gave me 
something called a cue sheet for the 
feature the following evening. It con- 
tained lines of script from the screen 
followed by lines of music to set the 
mood of the action. I had very little of 
the music recommended, but plenty of 
substitutes. Hence I was introduced to 
the art of fitting the music to the action. 
The problem was I could never depend 
on having a cue sheet. Sometimes they 
arrived a week after the feature had 
been shown, occasionally a day ahead, 
but much of the time not at all. This 
forced me to memorize a vast reper- 
toire of mood music which I could call 




photo: VinaUjavfn Historical Society, Kim Smith 

Memorial Hall, Vinalhaven 

upon at a moment's notice as the action 
changed. 

Difficulties & Adventures 
Sometimes the lack of a cue sheet was 
embarrassing. I can remember in The 
Covered Wagon a banjo player played 
"Oh Susanna" many times. This was 
one of the folk songs I did not know. I 
improvised some banjo-sounding music 



Page 4 



and no one ever knew the difference as 
far as I could tell. 

Viv used to run the show rain or 
shine as long as the boat brought the 
film from Rockland. I can remember 
one winter evening when a blizzard 
piled the snow several feet high in the 
streets. I made my way on snowshoes 
through the drifts for the half mile or 
so to the theatre and arrived on time. 
Two hardy souls were in the audience 
and the show went on amid the howling 
gale. 

Musical Influences 

Sometime in the early 1920s vacuum 
tube radios arrived on the island and I 
invested in a Crosley 51, complete with 
ear phones. I used to listen to the dinner 
music from the Boston and New York 
hotels just before I left for the movies, 
and frequently I would hear a selection 
being introduced which I could use in 
the feature that night. 

I recall hearing "In a Little Spanish 
Town" introduced for the first time at 
the Hotel Roosevelt in New York. The 
feature that night was cast in Mexico 
and I used the number as a love theme. 
Thus the audience in Vinalhaven heard 
the latest popular introduction on the 
same evening as the New Yorkers. 



Another recollection was the dilem- 
ma of the Stars and Stripes waving in 
the breeze which constantly occurred in 
the newsreels of the day. The music 
called for was obviously "The Star 
Spangled Banner." If I played it the 
audience was obliged to rise. Rather 
than wearing them out getting up and 
down I substituted "My Country 'Tis 
of Thee." 

Our Community Life 

The movies were very well attended in 
those days and the audiences were 
well mannered. Much applause if they 
liked the show but I never remember 
hearing boos. Snacks were not sold in 
the theatre, but several shops on Main 
Street near the Memorial Hall sold 
popcorn and candy bars which were 
very popular. 

During the summer several traveling 
acting groups would visit the island to 
sample the seafood and put on reper- 
tory plays. I remember the Gladys 
Clark group in particular. Some of the 
dramas were excellent. 

On special occasions the seats of 
the main floor would be moved to the 
side and dancing would take place after 
the show to the tunes of the Orion 
Orchestra. 



Archival Notes 




photo: Imai E. CtUtrwaod, The Saga of Hod 

Horse and wagon, steamship convey film between theater and mainland. 

The Movies 

The Vinalhaven Historical Society is 
recording interviews with other people 
connected with film exhibition on the 
island including Cleo Shields, daughter 
of manager O. V. Drew, and accompa- 
nists Leola Smith and Marguerite Adair. 
The interviews will be recorded on audio- 
tape and on 8 mm. videotape. Copies will 
be donated to Northeast Historic Film. 



Here are a few movies that made a par- 
ticular impression: The serials, Eddie Polo 
in Lure of the Circus, The Mexicans, 
Liberty, the Harold Lloyd and Charlie 
Chaplin features, The Covered Wagon, 
and many Douglas Fairbanks features. 
The most boring one I remember was If 
Winter Comes. It went on interminably 
and never seemed to make its point. 



Silent Speed 

Member Bruce Meulendyke, a licensed 
projectionist, attended the Saco River 
Grange Hall screening of Timothy's 
Quest, a silent film (projected at 16 
frames per second), and offered to 
write a primer for NHF members on 
the differences between silent-speed 
projection and sound-speed projection. 
His letter is excerpted here. 

We all know that moving pictures, 
whether projected onto a screen or 
seen on the picture tube of a televi- 
sion set, are a succession of still 
pictures. These are shown so rapidly 
in sequence that action appears to be 
moving. The eye is fooled. 

As long as both the camera and 
projector show these separate frames 
at the same rate, the picture appears 
normal. In the early days, this speed 
was [often] 16 frames per second. 
When sound pictures were introduced, 
the camera and projector speeds were 
increased to 24 frames per second. 
So whenever silent films were shown 
with a sound projector, the action 
was speeded up. Any motion which 
should take one minute now took 
only 40 seconds, a very significant 
difference. 

When television came on the scene, 
there was another change in film 
speed. The projection speed for the 
TV camera and receiving set was, in 
effect, 30 frames per second. Again, 
as long as the camera and TV set 
were operating together, there was 
no problem. 




The Elmo 16mm-to-videotape transfer 
system purchased under the Bingham 
grant transfers silent film at 15 frames 
per second (two video frames for each 
film frame). This electronic projector 
does a relatively inexpensive and 
compared with standard 24 fps machines 
relatively more accurate job of repre- 
senting the action originally recorded 
by silent-speed cameras. 



Page 



Thank you, Current Members! 



Check your mailing label. Your mem- 
bership expiration date should appear 
there. Save NHF a tedious and costly 
mailing by sending your renewal check 
now! Visa and Mastercard renewals are 
welcome. If there's no date on the 
address label, please turn to page 11 
and join. 



Friends 

Ed Pert 

Robert Saudek 

Dr. David & Sylvia Smith 

Lynda Tyson 

Corporate and Associate Members 

John Bragg, N. H. Bragg & Sons 

Ben & Joan Branch 

Darwin Davidson, Darwin K. Davidson, Ltd. 

Marcia Fenn 

Ernest & Kathryn Gross 

Donald Hammond, Hammond Lumber 

Company 

Miriam Hansen, Univ. of Chicago 
James Henderson, Maine State Archives 
Franklyn Lenthall 
Larry Lichty 
Edgar & Sally Lupfer 
Patricia McGeorge 
Robert Mclntire, MaxMedia 
Virginia Morgan 
Charles & Charlotte Morrill 
Henry Moulton 
John Mucci, VisNet East, GTE 
J. Gary Nichols, Maine State Library 
Richard Obrey, three east communications, 

inc. 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Peabody 
Nancy Sheldon 
Peter & Ann Sheldon 
Eric von Hippel 
Joel & Allene White 
Pamela Wintle 
Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Abbe Museum, Diane Kopec 

Bangor Historical Society 

Border Historical Society, Ruth Mclnnis 

Calais Free Library, Marilyn Diffin 

Cherryfield Narraguagus Historical Society, 

Mrs. Margery Brown 
City Theater Associates, Inc., Keith Peeler 
College of the Atlantic, Marcia Dworak 
George Stevens Academy, Bonnie Copper 
Historic Preservation Program, 

Univ. of Vermont, Chester Liebs 
Indiana Historical Society, Stephen Fletcher 
Instructional Resource Center, Bangor, 

D. Averill 



JC Roofing and Chimney Co., Jacques Cyr 
MPBN, Bernard Roscetti 
Maine Film Commission, Lea Girardin 
Maine Historical Society, Elizabeth Miller 
Maine Medical Center, Elaine Solesky 
Maine Osteopathic Education Fdn., 

David & Kathryn De Turk 
Maine State Library, Jack Boynton 
New Hampshire Historical Society, Barbara 

Austen 

Northeast Harbor Library, Polly Cote 
Prime Resource Center, Keith Leavitt 
Simmons College Library, Periodicals 
Sultan Technikon, Mr. A. Raju 
Union Historical Society, Alison Metcalfe 
United Methodist Men 
Vinalhaven Historical Society 

Regular Members 

Philip Abbott 

Sieglinde Alexander 

Joan Amory 

Tom Armstrong 

James & Esther Austin 

Jean Barrett 

Deirdre Barton 

Rev. & Mrs. Curtis Beach 

Phyllis & Bob Beallor 

Kathleen Bean 

Henry Becton, Jr. 

Paul & Mollie Birdsall 

Esther J. Bissell 

Lynne Blair 

Richard Bock 

Deborah Boldt 

Nat Bowditch 

Q. David Bowers 

Donna Boyles 

John M. R. Bruner, M.D. 

Raymond Burnham 

Lynn Cadwallader 

Mrs. Frederic Camp 

Mary Grace Canfield 

Dr. Constance Carlson 

Robert Carnie 

Michel Chalufour 

Alicia Condon & Bill Gross 

Clarence deRochemont 

Josephine Detmer 

Peg Dice 

JeffDobbs 

Daniel Donovan 

Bob Eggleston 

John Ellingwood 

Mrs. Anna Mary Elskus 

Carroll Faulkner 

Joseph Filtz 

Kent & Janet Forbes 

Joseph Foster 

Robert Foster 

W. Fowler 



Eugene Fuller 

Kathy Fuller 

Peter Gammons, Jr. 

Roy Gauthier 

John Gfroerer 

Christopher Glass 

Jim Goff 

Martha Goldner 

Douglas Gomery 

Henry & Gail Grandgent 

Randal Grant 

Terry Grant 

Nancy Gray 

Jim Hamlin 

Pat Harcourt 

Roy V. Heisler 

Rand Herbert 

Eric Herndon 

Charles Hesse 

C. A. Porter Hopkins 

John Howard 

Stanley Howe 

Sherman Howe, Jr. 

David Huntley 

Douglas Ilsley 

Ann Ivins 

James Jaffray 

Jeffjaner 

Robert Jordan 

Thomas Joyce 

Dr. Susan Kaplan 

John Karol, Jr. 

Richard Kimball, Jr. 

James King 

Ernest Knight 

John Lewis 

Stephen Lindsay 

Bill Lippincott 

Betty Ann & Donald Lockhart 

Howard Lowell 

Alphonse Martin 

Wendy Matthews 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Alan McClelland 

Judith McGeorge 

Carl McGraw 

John Mcllwaine 

Charles Ray McKay 

Franklin & Phyllis Mellen 

Bruce Meulendyke 

Faith Moll 

Hillery Mongelli 

Betsy Montandon 

Betty & Hugh Montgomery 

Francis Moulton, Jr. 

John O'Brien 

George O'Neill 

Kathryn Olmstead 

Glenn & Joy Olson 

More members on page 8 



Honors and Awards 



Winter Calendar 



Folklorists Choose Program 

The American Folklore Society selected 
I Woodsmen and River Drivers: "Another 
day, another era" for public screening 
during the annual meeting of the soci- 
ety in Jacksonville, Florida, October 15. 

The half -hour program, distributed 
by NHF, was written and produced by 
I NHF staff for the Maine Folklife Center, 
University of Maine. It was funded by 
the Maine Humanities Council and 
Champion International Corp. 

PBS Air, Coast to Coast 

The production was selected for air on 

| more than 80 public television stations 
nationwide beginning in May 1992. 

Response to the program has come 
from viewers far and wide, indicating 
that the program has resonance for 
people interested in forest heritage from 

| one end of the country to the other. 

One letter opened, "Greetings from 
Spokane: Having experienced the thrills 
and hardships of river driving and 
having seen your superb video I am 
desirous of obtaining a copy. . . . My 

) river work was done in the state of 
Washington, but what I saw in the 
video convinced me that river driving is 
much the same anywhere." 

The letter went on, "Our local TV 
station is again showing that great video 

\ and I plan to watch it again. In it I can 
see in my mind's eye, myself and my 
father, who was a Wisconsin river driver 
and woodsman." Walter A. Carriveau. 

History Award 

The New England Historical Association 
' honored the program with its annual 
Media Award, presented on October 
17 at Rhode Island College. Susan D. 
Pennybacker, department of history, 
Trinity College, chaired die NEHA Media 
Awards Committee. 

I The award this year is shared with 

The Massachusetts 54th Colored Infantry, 
produced and directed by Jacqueline 
Shearer for the WGBH TV series The 
American Experience. 

Producers of Woodsmen and River 
> Drivers are honored to be selected for 
recognition by the regional organiza- 
tion of academics, teachers, students 
and independent scholars whose work 
lies in the discipline of history. 



November 7, Society of Maine Archi- 
vists meeting at University of Maine, 
Lewiston, 1:15 p.m. As part of a pro- 
gram on documenting and preserving 
Maine's ethnic heritage, NHF will 
make a presentation on film and video 
preservation. For more information, 
Dianne M. Gutscher, curator of Special 
Collections, Bowdoin College Library. 
207 725-3288. 



November 15, Loranger School, Old 
Orchard Beach, 2 p.m. Organ recital 
and film accompaniment by Danny 
Part: newsreels and Cupid, Registered 
Guide. Pine Tree Chapter, American 
Theater Organ Society. Dorothy 
Bromage, 19 Union St., Biddeford, 
Maine 04005. 



November 16, Yarmouth Historical 
Society, 7:30 p.m. "A Century of Maine 
Movies," a video summary of the state's 
moving image history. Marilyn Hinkley, 
Yarmouth Historical Society, Main 
Street, PO Box 107, Yarmouth, Maine 
04096. 207 846-6259. 




January & February, Northeast 
Historic Film, Main Street, Bucksport, 
Maine, Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. Pro- 
gram themes will include the sea, for- 
estry, comedy, serial adventures and 
politics. Feed: A Comedy about Run- 
ning for President (1992), Kevin 
Rafferty & James Ridgeway's behind- 
the-scenes look at the candidates in the 
New Hampshire primaries, will be one 
of the films in an informal screening 
program. Thank you Kevin Rafferty 
and Tom Prassis, Original Cinema for 
helping us inaugurate our building. For 
the full schedule, contact NHF. 



January 14, Gould Academy, Bethel, 
Maine, 7:30 p.m. Timothy's Quest 
(1921), silent film made in Maine with 
live accompaniment by Danny Part. 
Gould Performing Arts Series, PO Box 
860, Bethel, Maine 04217. 207 824-3575. 



February 16, Maine State Museum, 
Augusta, 7 p.m., "The Baxters of Maine," 
lecture by Neil Rolde will include 
footage of Governor Percival Baxter 
appearing in a 1920 
dramatic film from 
NHF's Everett Foster 
Collection. 

March 2, Maine 
State Museum, 
Augusta, 7 p.m. Way 
Back Home (1932) 
comedy with Bette 
Davis. For more 
information, Denis 
Thoet, Maine State 
Museum, Augusta, 
Maine 04333. 
207289-2301. 



photo: Everett Fatter Collection 



Gov. Percival Baxter appears in a Holman Day production. 



More NHF Members 

continued from p. 6 

Dan Osgood 

Patricia Packard 

Hilda Paul 

William Petrie 

James Phillips 

Sandra Pottle 

Charles Pritham 

Elvie Ramsdell 

Sally Regan 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward Kendall 

Windsor Robinson 

George Rolleston 

Charles Ryan 

Dewitt Sage 

Shan Sayles 

Ronald Schliessman 

Wendy Wincote Schweikert 

Robert Schyberg 

Mr. & Mrs. P. H. Sellers 

Jennifer Sheldon 

Gail Shelton 

Harold & Janet Simmons 

Benjamin Bigelow Snow 

John S. Stillman 

Betty & Noel Stookey 

Lynda Sudlow 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Taylor 

William Taylor 

Denis Thoet 

Cathy & Charles Thompson 

Robert Tyler 

Mrs. Joanne Van Namee 

Waldo Theatre Inc. 

Robert & Julia Walkling 

Mary Anne Wallace 

Peter Wappler 

Seth Washburn 

Vern& Jackie Weiss 

Lisa Whitney 

Mr. Waldo Williams, Sr. 

Bonnie Wilson 

Jon Wilson 

Carter Wintle 

Edith Wolff 

Brian Wood 

Cynthia Wood 

Bob Woodbury 

Educator/Student Members 

Albert Belanger 

Jon Bragdon 

Michelle Branigan 

The Brick Store Museum 

Carol Bryan 

Prof. William Burgess 

Richard Burns, Ocean Park Association 

Carnegie Library, Good Will-Hinckley 

School 

Gwendolyn Clancy 
Robin Clay 



People Who Helped 



Amos Wilder, a student at New England Alamo building, and bartending for the 



College, Henniker, NH, interned over 
the summer, 
assisting with 
cataloguing, 
cleanup at the 





August 22 open house. 

Denise Eames and Christy Seekins, 
participants in Summer Youth Education 
and Training, came to NHF through the 
Training and Development Corporation 
summer program. They waded into 
renovation work through the rough- 
est part of the debris removal. 

Jim Austin, Mark Austin, Judy 
McGeorge, David Williams, Bob 
Rosie, Dana Leighton, Harold Gray 
and many others helped get the 
building ready for October 1 . 



Robert and Venetia Rosie, happy to 
see NHF in the building they ran as 
a theater. 



Dr. Richard Condon, Univ. of Maine at 

Farmington 
Joseph Conforti, New England Studies, 

Univ. of Southern Maine 
Alvina Cyr, Dr. Lewis S. Libby School 
Rudolph Deetjen, Jr. 
Bernadette Friel, Schenk High School 
Francis Frye ' 
Charles Ellis 
Joe Gray 

Gray-New Gloucester Middle School Library 
Cora Greer 
Hanna Griff 
Thomas Wayne Johnson, Chico Folklore 

Archive 
Richard Judd 

Janice Kasper, Penobscot Marine Museum 
Jim Laukes 
Robbie Lewis 
Dean Lyons 
Todd Mclntosh, Rockland District Middle 

School 

James Morris, Pocono Mountain High School 
Tim O'Keefe 
Sanford Phippen 
Jo Radner 
Ms. Paige Roberts 

Mrs. Rowell, Fogler Library, Univ. of Maine 
George Sarns, Traverse City Area Public 

Schools 
Linda Seavey 
John Somerville 
Juris Ubans 

Dr. Richard E. C. White, Queens College 
Steve & Peggy Wight, Sunday River Inn H 



Like a library, Northeast Historic Film 
cares for reference materials, primarily 
films and videotapes, and makes them 
available to the public. 

Founded in 1986, NHF safeguards more 
than 3 million feet of film and thousands 
of hours of videotape. 

Northeast Historic Film is a nonprofit 
organization. It is supported by indi- 
vidual and institutional members, 
corporate donations, grants, and fees 
for programs and services. 

Individuals and organizations are in- 
vited to join NHF to help support the 
preservation of the region's culture and 
history. 



Last year Mrs. James F. Jaffray of 
Blue Hill gave a party a dinner at 
her house and a screening from 
NHF collections to introduce some 
of her friends to Northeast Historic 
Film. One of our first members, her 
kindness and enthusiasm for NHF's 
enterprise buoyed our efforts. Margie 
Jaffray passed away in September and 
will be much missed. 



Page 8 



Videos of New England Life 



Railroads! Traditional Crafts! Sailing! 
Lumbermen! Agriculture! Rural Life! Early TV! 





Dead River Rough Cut 

Shot in the backwoods of 

Maine over the course of a 

year, this film documents the 

lives and harsh philosophies 

of two woodsmen-trappers, 

rough language and all. It 

evokes the harmony between 

their lifestyles and the natural 

beauty of their surroundings. A film by Richard Searls and Stuart 

Silverstein. 55 min., color, sound. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 

Woodsmen and River Drivers: 
"Another day, another era" 

Unforgettable individuals who 
worked for the Machias Lumber 
Company before 1930 share 
their recollections of a hard life. 
An intimate view of camp life 
and the dangers and discomforts 
of life in the woods and on the 
rivers. Winner, International 
Film & TV Festival gold medal 
and New England Historical 
Association Media Award. 30 
min., color and b&w, sound. 




$19.95/NHF members $16.95 



Legends of American Skiing 

This video is a documentary of ] 
the history of North American 
skiing, bringing together still 
photos, period music, and film 
dating back to 1916. Authentic 
thrilling footage that preserves 
the birth of one of America's 
greatest sports. 80 min., color 
and b&w, sound. 




$29.95/NHF members $24.95 



All But Forgotten 

Career of 1920s Maine author and film producer Holman Francis 
Day. 30 min., color and b&w, sound. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 



Tales of Wood & Water 

Documentary on Maine's wooden boat culture visits boat yards 
large and small. 
Modern cold-molding 
techniques for con- 
structing a mahogany 
speedboat and an 
elegant yacht contrast 
with 1919 footage of 
the launching of the 
four-masted schooner 
Doris Hamlin in 
Harrington, Maine. 




60 min., color, sound. 



$29.95/NHF members $24.95 




Earliest Maine Films 

Drawing a Lobster Pot 

(1901) is the earliest surviving 
film known to have been shot 
in Maine. (15 sec.) 
Trout Fishing, Rangeley Lakes (1906) shows sports arriving by 
train and steamer, a typical Rangeley camp and guests in three- 
piece suits catching trout. (9 min.) 

Canoeing in Maine (1906) shows a Moosehead Lake canoe trip, 
with steamboats, fishing, and lake and river canoeing. (9 min.) 

Logging in Maine (1906) shows men working to prevent a 
logjam on a river. (13 min.) 

The How and Why of Spuds, techniques and equipment of 
potato farming in Aroostook County in 1920. (13 min.) 

Total length 44 min., b&w, silent with titles. 

$16.95/NHF members $14.95 




From Stump to Ship: 
A 1930 Logging Film 

The most complete look at the 
long-log industry includes fell- 
ing trees in winter with cross-cut saws, the spring river drive and 
work in a steam-powered mill. Original 1930 script spoken by 
humorist Tim Sample. Project won the American Association for 
State and Local History award of merit. 28 min., b&w, sound. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 



An Oral Historian's Work with Dr. Edward Ives 

Skills and techniques of an oral history project demonstrated by a 
world's authority. 30 min., color, sound. 

$39.95/NHF members $34.95 



Page 





Ride the Sandy River Railroad 

From the 1870s to 1935 the 
Sandy River Railroad in Maine 
was one of the country's best 
two-foot-gauge railroads. Very 
clear and complete views of the 
Sandy River Line with engines, 
railbuses and snowplows. 
30 min., b&w, silent with titles. 
$24.95/NHF members $19.95 



Around Cape Horn 

In 1929 the last great days of 
commercial sail were passing. 
During that year Capt. Irving 
Johnson sailed aboard the 
massive bark Peking. He filmed 
the crew's daily activities and 
spectacular scenes from high 
aloft during a storm rounding 
Cape Horn, and narrated the 
film. 37 min., b&w, sound. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 



Bonsoir Mes Amis 

A video by Huey, this film is a portrait of the lives of two of 
Maine's finest traditional Franco-American musicians, Ben 
Guillemette and Lionel "Toots" Bouthot. 46 min., color, sound. 

$29.95/NHF members $24.95 

Our Lives in Our Hands 

Micmac tribespeople in 
Aroostook County have 
relied on basketmaking and 
migrant seasonal labor for 
subsistence since the mid- 
1800s. Members of the 
Aroostook band of Micmac 
Indians have formed a 
cooperative to find wider 
markets for their native 
craft. 50 min., color, sound. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 

Note: This videotape is available from NHF for home use only. Schools and other 
institutions needing public performance rights please contact DER at (617) 926- 
0491. 



Mount Washington 
among the Clouds 

An early history of Mt. Wash- 
ington, 1852-1908. A portrayal 
of life at the top: the hotels, 
newspaper, and building of the 
cog railway. 30 min., color, 
sound. 

$24.95/sorry, no member discount 





Yachting in the 30s 

Weetamoe, a 1930 film of the Herreshoff-built J-boat and other 
short films. 45 min., color and b&w, sound. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

King Spruce 

A circa 1940 look at pulpwood harvesting and river driving. 
23 min., color, sound. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 

A Century of Summers 

Alternating between old footage and modern interviews, this 
video explores the lives of both summer and native residents of 
the town of Hancock. 45 min., color and b&w, sound. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

The Ways at Wallace and Sons and The Bank Dory 

The building of ihejohn F. Leavitt and of a Nova Scotia dory. 
58 min., color, sound. 

$24.95/NHF members $19.95 

Ice Harvesting Sampler 

Five short silent films from the 1920s-1940s showing a near- 
forgotten New England industry. 26 min., b&w, silent with titles. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 



Norumbega: Maine in 
the Age of Exploration 
and Settlement 

This videotape examines the 
history of the region called 
Norumbega, from the first 
voyages of European exploration 
in the late 1400s to the establish- 
ment of the state of Maine in 
1820. Originally a multi-image slide show used in statewide 
public programs, this video is a fast-paced introduction to early 
Maine history. 14 min., color, sound. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 



Maine's TV Time Machine 

A compilation from 
Maine's oldest TV 
station, WABI-TV, in- 
cluding television news, 
sports and local com- 
mercials from the 1950s 
and early 1960s. A view 
of regional culture in the 
Cold War period never 
before possible. Nar- 
rated by veteran radio and TV journalist George Hale. Includes 
12-page booklet identifying each story. Call for information on 
lesson plans! 34 min., b&w, sound. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 





Page 10 



The Essential Library of 
Videos of New England Life 

Nonprofits, build your collection. Buy 6 or more 
tapes and get 50% off the regular price. 

Choose from all 21 of NHF's titles. A sample 
selection: 

Q From Stump to Ship $9.98 
Q Earliest Maine Films $8.48 
Q Dead River Rough 

Cut $14.98 
Q Legends of American 

Skiing $14.98 
Q Woodsmen and River 

Drivers $9.98 
Q Around Cape Horn $12.48 

Join Northeast Historic Film 

as a nonprofit member for just $35. 

Buy 6 tapes and save! 

Your membership brings big 
savings and 

other benefits: 

Q newsletters 

a technical services 
a Reference by Mail 



NHF Membership 




As an independent nonprofit 
organization, NHF depends on its 
members. You help us set priori- 
ties, you pass the word about the 
significance of cultural preserva- 
tion, and your dues help keep us 
operating. Please join and renew! 

Regular members, $25 per year, 
receive a subscription to Moving 
Image Review, notice of screenings 
and events, loan of one reference 
tape at no charge, and discounts on 
materials distributed by NHF. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 
per year, receive all regular member- 




Offer good through Mrch 31, 1993 



Reference by Mail 

Members of Northeast Historic 
Film are invited to borrow from 
the circulating reference collec- 
tion of Videos of New England 
Life. For the list of over 40 
videotapes, please call or write. 
Many organizations histor- 
ical societies, libraries, schools 
use tapes from the Reference by 
Mail collection for public 
programs. 



ship benefits. This category is for 
teachers and students at any level. 

Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per 
year, receive all regular benefits of 
membership, including loan of one 
reference tape at no charge, plus 
additional copies of Moving Image 
Review on request and reduced rates 
for consultation, presentations and 
professional services. See offer at left 
for big videotape savings. 

Associates (Individuals) and Corpo- 
rate Members, $100 per year, receive 
the benefits of regular members, 
special recognition in Moving Image 
Review, and loan of five reference 
tapes at no charge. 

Friends, $250 per year, receive all 
benefits of regular membership and, 
in addition, loan of ten reference 
tapes at no charge. 

Membership at any level is an 
opportunity to become involved 
with the preservation and enjoy- 
ment of our moving image 
heritage. 

Your dues are tax deductible to the 
extent allowed by law. 



Membership and Order Form 

Ordered by 



Northeast Historic Film, P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, ME 04416 USA 



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Q Special Fourth Class mail: add $2.00 Subtotal 
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Page 11 




From 1920s film in the Michael J. Bernard Collection 

Potato Barrels Transported from Farm to Town in Presque Isle, Maine. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

-LM 




BUCKSPORT, MAINE, USA 
04416-0900 (207) 469-0924 



ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



Northern Maine Movies 

Aside from a single title at the National 
Archives, surviving film of northern 
Maine's rural economy before 1930 has 
been unknown. 

In September, a Presque Isle, Maine 
theater owner, Michael J. Bernard, 
donated two reels of Aroostook County 
agricultural life to Northeast Historic 
Film. 

Potato and Apple Harvest, and 
Hunting contains horse-drawn carts 
carrying potato barrels to in-town 
storage, and fields under cultivation and 
harvest. Intertitles increase the values of 
the views by identifying places and 
activities, e.g., "Riverside Farm, largest 
seed farm in Maine, produces 50,000 
bushels annually, Hoyt and Wheeler, 
props." 

Orchard footage of men and women 
participating in the Aroostook County 
apple harvest is followed by street 
scenes in Presque Isle. 

The reel concludes with promotion 
for hunting lodges including the Daunt- 
less and Shamrock Camps with guides, 
sports and their dogs. 

A second reel, Northern Maine Fair, 
Presque Isle, 1928, was locally produced 
by the Frontier Film Co., Fort Fairfield, 
Maine, with photography by C. W. 
Benjamin. The film features Governor 
Brewster and fair exhibits. Automobile 
transportation was a cause for pride, as 
views of parked cars are marked by the 
tide, "How's this for a parking ground?" 
Nitrate deterioration has claimed por- 
tions of the reel. 

The 35 mm. films are slated for copy- 
ing to safety stock. The lab work alone 
will cost around $4,000. Funds in support 
of this preservation work will be sought 
from state and federal grant programs. 
At least 50% in matching funds from 
other sources will be required. 



I Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation of 
Northern New England 
Motion Picture 

Summer 1993 



Executive Director's Report -p. 2 

Summer Calendar p. 3 

One Hundred Years: The Concord 

Theater, NH ..p. 4 

New Reference by Mail Videos p. 6 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual pub- 
lication of Northeast Historic Film, P.O. 
Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. David S. 
Weiss, executive director, Karan Sheldon, 
editor. ISSN 0897-0769. 



Film and Video Collections Update 



Donations received in the last few 
months ranged from two 190607 
Pathe films, Aladdin and Sambo as 
Footman, to a 1993 Hi-8 videotape of 
Partridge Drug Store's last day. 

The collections since the start of the 
year represent 265,000 ft. of film and 
220 hours of tape. 

The Pathe tides, projected outdoors 
in a Manchester, NH, neighborhood, 
relate to NHF's community movie- 
going research and will be preserved 
by a major archives. The other acces- 
sions are part of NHF's mission to 
collect northern New England moving 
images. 

Known for Public Programs 

To make these moving images accessible 
many of the organization's resources go 
toward public programs: community 
screenings, and workshops, videotape 
distribution (sales and loan to members 
through Reference by Mail), and 
research services. 

Exciting New Building 
Since July 1992, when NHF purchased 
the 1916 Alamo Theatre building as a 
headquarters, the board, staff, volun- 
teers and members have been helping 
plan the long-term future of the organi- 
zation. The building was an abandoned 
shell. Envisioning it as a lively regional 
center for the century's media requires 
imagination and a new level of strategies 
and resources. 



Collections, the Heart of NHF 

While maintaining public programs 
and upgrading the headquarters have 
been recent priorities, NHF's film and 
video collections the heart of the 
organization are no less interesting 
or demanding. Television film, home 
movies and independent productions 
reflecting the life of the region are 
sheltered, organized and annotated 
at the archives. Some of the newest 
acquisitions: 



i The WAGM-TV Collection, 100,000 
ft. of 16 mm. film, all that is known 
to survive of newsfilm from the 
Presque Isle, Maine, station. The 
texture of everyday life is a large 
part of the WAGM-TV collection: 
public affairs programs on such 
topics as local construction of public 
housing in the early 1970s including 
interiors of housing deemed sub- 
standard and duly demolished, 

continued on p. 2 




Respect for home movies and implication of their long-term value can be seen in the sturdy wood 
case with leather comers and handle by Bell & Howell. The case, containing 16 mm. amateur film 
from the 1920s and early 1930s, was donated by Leon Tebbetts of Hallowell, Maine. Photo by 
Darwin K. Davidson, Deer Isle, Maine. 



Executive Director's Report 



Collections 



A year ago we pried the plywood off 
the Alamo Theatre building and moved 
in. We hoped the building would give 
us space for growing collections and 
activities and that it would be a base for 
services to the community. 

On our first anniversary I'm pleased 
to report the building is living up to its 
expectations. Office space is sufficient, 
and storage spaces are shaping up. We're 
testing a temperature- and humidity- 
controlled vault more than twice as big 
as the original vault in Blue Hill. 

Architect Christian Fasoldt has 
drawn up plans for renovations to the 
building including sealing the basement 
and creating exhibition space and a 
public screening area. 

We've submitted grants to obtain 
funding for the next phase. With luck, 
and $125,000, we can start construction 
over the coming winter. 

Community Activities 

Right away we became involved with 
the community by co-hosting a free 
screening series with HOME Coop in 
January and February, and holding 
events for the Bucksport Historical 
Society, Orland Historical Society, and 
the Bucksport Senior Citizens group. 
We helped high-school students with 
access to video-editing equipment and 
donated videotapes to the Buck Memo- 
rial Library. 

This summer Bucksport indepen- 
dent filmmaker Diane Lee will produce 
a short 35mm film, Who Will Say 
Kaddish for Shapiro? out of the Alamo. 
We're putting together, with help from 
the Maine Humanities Council, an 
exhibition and screening area for sum- 
mertime visitors. 

All these activities indicate a greater 
interest and wider range of possibilities 
than we had dared to hope for. 

The local response has encouraged 
us to expand the size and scope of 
public performance and exhibition 
space as well as research and study 
center areas in the renovation plans. 

New Board Members 
I am excited to report the election of 
two new members to Northeast His- 
toric Film's board of directors: 



Richard Rosen, 1977 University of 
Maine graduate with a degree in busi- 
ness finance, a life-long resident of 
Bucksport, third-generation owner of 
Rosen's Department Store, vice presi- 
dent of the board of the Bucksport 
Regional Health Center, co-founder 
and past president of the Bucksport 
Bay Area Chamber of Commerce and 
board member of the Private Industry 
Council. We count on his sound advice 
to give us a clear perspective on the 
Bucksport area. 

Alan McClelland lives in Camden and 
first came to our attention in his role as 
volunteer manager of the Owls Head 
Transportation Museum archives. At 
the NHF board meeting in May he 
was elected Treasurer and named chair 
of the Long Range Planning commit- 
tee. Careful fiscal policy and a well- 
conceived strategic plan are essential to 
the organization at this time of chal- 
lenging growth and change. We're 
grateful that Alan has agreed to provide 
leadership in these important areas. 



5 



David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to preserve, and make avail- 
able to the public, film/videotape of 
the northern New England region. 
This purpose will be carried out by 
activities including, but not limited 
to, a comprehensive survey of mov- 
ing image resources of interest to the 
people of northern New England; 
the preservation of film/tape through 
restoration, duplication, providing of 
technical guidance and vault storage; 
a touring program to bring materials 
to audiences throughout the area; 
and the establishment of a study 
center, including resource materials 
and reference copies of motion 
picture films and videotapes. 





continued from p. 1 

agriculture, the arrival of a fair, 
which then included "red hot exotic 
girls." 

The 20-year mark invokes thoughts 
of preservation to many moving- 
image creators. 1970s donations: 

Maine Public Broadcasting, 150 
hours of public affairs, music, com- 
edy and outdoor life programs; 

Ben Levine's 70 hours of Maine arts 
and culture including the first Com- 
mon Ground Fairs; 

Stu Silverstein's documentary, 
Donald Bakes Bread. 

And more recent material: 

WCSH-TV, Portland, 46 videotapes 
relating to Maine student Samantha 
Smith, known worldwide for her 
interest in world peace; 

WABI-TV, Bangor, hundreds of 
political commercials of the 1992 
campaigns. 

Equipment 

Besides the original Simplex projectors, 
which left the Alamo Theatre in 1956 
for the theater at the Bangor Mental 
Health Institute and were returned to 
their home this year, here is some of the 
equipment NHF received: an RTI Cine- 
scan and film chain from WPXT-TV; 
three RCA quad videotape machines 
from MPBN; a video camera and other 
equipment donated by Earle Fenderson; 
a video camera and tripods from Keith 
Davison; a Powers Cameragraph pro- 
jector and stand from the 
Harrises family 
of Manches- 
ter, New 
Hampshire, 
thanks to a 
referral by 
the Manchester 
Historic Asso- 
ciation; 8mm 
equipment from 
John D. Knowlton; 
and a camera and 
projectors from Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin 
Blodget of Bucksport. 




Grants in Action 



Summer Calendar 



The National Trust for Historic 
Preservation made a grant of $1,500 to 
help plan for the future of NHF's build- 
ing, one of northern New England's 
oldest structures built as a cinema. 

Architect Christian H. Fasoldt of 
Camden, Maine, was retained because 
of experience on historic preservation 
projects including the Belfast Opera 
House and the Rockport Opera House. 
With the National Trust funds, Fasoldt 
produced a report, "Review and Analy- 
sis of the Alamo Theatre Building," a 
first step in planning renovations. 
The Maine Humanities Council made 
grants totaling $6,200 for "Preparing a 
Strategy for Future Uses of 16 mm. 
Film Circulating Collections," a project 
to investigate the future of the Humani- 
ties Resource Collection, once available 
through the Maine State Library. 

NHF hired film consultant Audrey 
Kupferberg, who has worked at the 
American Film Institute and directed the 
Yale Film Study Center. She assessed 
the existing collection and will partici- 
pate in establishing a new circulating 
film and video program to be adminis- 
tered by NHF staff. 

National Video Resources made a 
grant of $14,750 for "Videos of New 
England Life: A Regional Distribution 
Initiative" to develop the identity, of 
NHF's line of videotapes, upgrade 
business procedures and place point- 
of-purchase displays in retail locations. 

The effort will realize the synergistic 
benefits of a recognizable product line, 
wider exposure and a base for expand- 
ing the line. 

David Weiss reports, "We're thrilled 
at the support of National Video Re- 
sources. This was a competitive process 
with 50 applicants and only 1 8 grants 
given. Revenues from video sales are 
crucial to the archives' operating bud- 
get. Regionally focused material has 
great potential and we're pleased to be 
developing an area that helps our bot- 
tom line and benefits cultural awareness 
and preservation." 

The Grace Jones Richardson Founda- 
tion gave $27,000 towards production 
of Diane Lee's 35 mm. independent 
film. 




EXHIBIT & SCREENING HOURS 

NHF's open house hours during the 
summer will be Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday from 9 am to 3 pm. 

ARTS & CULTURE 

August 5-8 at the Maine Festival, 
Thomas Point Beach, Brunswick. 
Northeast Historic Film will be in the 
Maine Enterprise tent and a presenter 
in the new Arts & Community Organi- 
zations program. 

This is NHF's sixth year at the 
Maine Festival, an event celebrating the 
artistic and cultural traditions of Maine 
at a beautiful waterfront park. 

August 13 the Bethel Historical Soci- 
ety, Bethel, Maine, will host Timothy's 
Quest (1922), a made-in-Maine feature 
film written by Kate Douglas Wiggin 
and directed by Sidney Olcott. 

With a piano score of period music 
compiled and performed by Danny 
Patt, whose career as a silent-film 
accompanist began in 1924. Contact 
Stanley Howe, director Bethel Histori- 
cal Society, 824-2908. 

August 17 the Vinalhaven Historical 
Society will present Charlie Chaplin's 
Tittie's Punctured Romance. Contact 
Roy Heisler, 863-4318. 



THE FAIR SEASON 

September 3-6 NHF will have its own 
tent on the fairgrounds at the Blue Hill 
Fair, Blue Hill, Maine. 

September 19 the NHF booth will try 
the Farmington Fair in Farmington, 
Maine. 

September 24-26 a return engagement 
at the Common Ground Fair, Windsor, 
Maine, in the film building (turn left 
inside the main gate). The screening 
schedule is printed in the 1993 Fairbook. 

September 29-October 6 the Farm 
Museum at the Fryeburg Fair, one of 
northern New England's largest agri- 
cultural fairs, hosts NHF's booth. 

NATIONAL CONFERENCES 

The Fast Rewind III Conference in 
Rochester, NY. July 24 Karan Sheldon 
will participate in "Talking Histories: 
Producers, Exhibitors and Audiences 
Share their Perspectives." 

In October, the Association of 
Moving Image Archivists will meet 
in Chicago, hosted by the Chicago 
Historical Society. 

In January 1994 David Weiss will 
participate in a panel on the use of 
archived materials when the American 
Historical Association meets in San 
Francisco. 



One Hundred Years: In New Hampshire, 



As part of our interest in the century of 
northern New England interaction with 
motion pictures, we ask, Who runs the 
theaters? Who goes to them? 

Theresa Cantin operates the Con- 
cord Theater on Main Street in New 
Hampshire's state capital, Concord. 

Cantin remembers Lottie Pierce 
Merchant, owner and manager of 
Manchester's Lyric Theater in the early 
1920s. Mrs. Merchant, who took tickets 
every day in her theater, was more 
welcoming to children than other Man- 
chester theater managers. She was said 
to have $150,000 in the bank collected 
in change from young moviegoers. 

Mrs. Merchant's audience is long 
gone. Miss Cantin, 60 years after the 
opening of her theater, keeps her doors 
open two shows a night. She talked to 
Eithne Johnson, past editor o/The 
Velvet Light Trap and assistant editor 
of the Journal of Film and Video, and 
videographer Sanjeev Chatterjee. Pans 
of the interview are reproduced here. 



I started in 1933; my father was half- 
owner with another man. I started 
as the cashier and bookkeeper. We 
were three sisters and we worked here 
at the theater together from 1947. 




Matinees 

I had a lot of variety. Weekends we had 
Roy Rogers, Gene Autrey, the Bowery 
Boys, the Stooges, we used to have 
standing room all the time. The chil- 
dren were the afternoon. The second 
show 200 more kids waiting to come in. 
The Star Theater was the same way. 
And the Capitol used to pack. I'm 
telling you things have changed. 

We had ushers. We were very strict 
and the children behaved because the 
ushers were right there in case of any 
disturbances. We were babysitters. 

Keeping the Peace 

Everybody behaved very nicely here 
because if they didn't behave we'd ask 
them to leave and then not let them in 
for six months to come. One of them 
had brought a little liquor and had 
indulged and we noticed it and we had 
to put her out. 

Concessions 

I went to the bank and borrowed money 
to put the concessions in in 1948. It is 
the same popcorn machine now. We 
did have to get a new kettle once upon 
the time, along the way. Popcorn and 
candy. Popcorn was a real good item, 
five cent bag. 

The Program 

We used to change twice a week. The 
good pictures would be on Sunday, 
Monday, Tuesday. 

The Star Theater 
[around the corner] used 
to change three times a 
week. Then I decided that 
I wanted to change three 
times a week. Wednesday 
and Thursday I repeated 
after the Capitol, Betty 
_ Grable and all those 

strong pictures that they 
used to play. Friday and 
Saturday, two days only, were 
my small pictures: Monogram, 
Republic. 

We had 500 seats and I 
figured we could pack my 
house just the same. 

Double features on the 

weekends. A western with 

another variety like either an 



action picture or a mystery or some- 
thing different. 

Short Subjects 

We had the Three Stooges and all 
kinds of small comedies, 15 minutes or 
so. The Three Stooges were very pop- 
ular with both [children and adults.] 
The newsreels, cartoon, serials. When 
we had a serial we would not play a 
comedy. We'd have a serial and every 
week we'd continue the serial. That 
was very strong at the start. Then 
when it faded away I started with the 
comedies. 

Amenities 

We are air conditioned. I put it in my- 
self along the way. Can't remember the 
year. We need it. 

Cinemascope was 1954, that's when 
I put in the big screen. We used to have 
such a small screen and except for the 
Shea Circuit nobody else had it. 

The people prefer the big screen. 
Everywhere you go now it's all small 
screens, except in Keene, the Colonial 
has a huge screen, beautiful. It's a big 
house. 

Projection 

We had union men [for projection] 
when our partner was there. And then 
when I took over it was still union. My 
brother had gone to Boston to learn 
how to become a projectionist because 
the union here would never have shown 
him how to run the machines. They 
were protecting their jobs. 

He taught my sister Laurie how to 
run the machines and she ran the ma- 
chines for almost 40 years. We've been 
running without union for years and 
years. Now we have a platter [projec- 
tion system] installed two or three 
years ago. 

The Customers 

It was always the same customers, they 
just walked in. Years ago people didn't 
care what you were playing, they just 
walked in. 

They used to go to the Capitol, they 
used to come here and they used to go 
to the Star. They used to go to all the 
pictures in the city. 

When we first opened it was 1 
cents for the children, 20 cents in the 



Theresa Cantin's Concord Theater 



MADE ! AMERICA 
WHOOP1 GOLDBERG 




afternoon for the adults and I think it 
was 25 cents or 30 cents at night. 

Lawyers, doctors, white-collar 
people, lower class, in between, all 
mixed. Depending on the pictures. 
Years ago it was always the same faces. 
But today they come from all over. 

Concord has not grown very much, 
we're only 36,000 people. Depending 
on the picture, if it's a teenage picture 
you get the teenagers, if it's an art 
picture you get the people that care for 
the arts. 

You don't see [older people] any 
more. It's all a new generation. 

A lot of young people come and say, 
"My father and mother remember 
you." They say they used to come here 
all the time. 

Drive-Ins 

In 1951 the Star Theater closed. In 1952 
the Concord Drive-In came in. So much 
competition that it was very hard to 
keep going. 



We had pictures but the attendance 
wasn't good. Everybody went to the 
drive-ins. Even the Capitol was almost 
knocked cold, and they had a big house. 

The drive-ins were something new. 
Drive in, sit in your car. People used to 
bring lunches. They had a concession 
if you didn't have your lunch you could 
go to the concession. 

A lot of people used to bring their 
own beer, their own liquor. In other 
words they were having a fiesta at the 
same time as watching the movies. The 
mosquitoes would eat you alive. 

Trade Meetings 

I never bothered to mingle. I was a 
woman. A lot of people used to go to 
Boston to these meetings. They were 
mostly men that were running the 
movies, the exhibitors were mostly men 
and I never bothered. Not the meetings. 
I used to go for films. 

We used to go to Boston every two 
weeks or so. I used to go and see the 



branch managers. After a while I knew 
them all. I did some business and then 
we'd take in a ballet or take in a movie 
or opera. 

Women Managers in Manchester 
The Empire in Manchester once be- 
longed to a woman. She took over and 
she couldn't make a go of it. 

She used to say to me, "Why don't 
we go to Boston? Don't you want to 
learn anything?" I don't think there was 
anything to learn there. All you have to 
learn is your pictures and what you put 
on the screen. She had to close up in no 
time. 

A Mrs. Merchant on Hanover Street 
in Manchester ran the Lyric for years 
and years. She was very successful. She 
only had 275 seats and she'd pack them 
every night. The Shea Circuit would 
play first runs, she'd play second runs 
and the Rex Theater played third runs. 
They all made money, and she made 
really a lot of money. 

She retired when she was very old, 
never had any children but helped a lot 
of college boys through school. Her 
husband used to be very friendly with 
the bankers but he didn't do much 
work. He didn't have to she was 
making enough money. 

Childhood 

I belong to St. Anthony's parish in Man- 
chester. I went to school there up to ten 
years old. Then ten to fourteen years 
old I was at the convent in Boscawen, 
New Hampshire. I stayed there as a 
boarder. I felt as if I was in jail. But 
today I realize the good that it did me. 

Audience Relations 
I don't know how many people say, "Hi, 
Theresa," "How are you, Theresa?" I 
don't even know their names. But they 
know mine. 

Just a few months ago I did have a 
woman who walked out with her hus- 
band, the language was very bad. They 
showed sexy scenes, you know. She 
walked out. She said, "I didn't think 
that they showed things like that on the 
screen." And I looked at her and I felt 
like saying, "Where do you come from?" 
But I didn't. I said, "I'm so sorry, we 
don't make them you know." 



Reference by Mail 



Here are some of the newest additions 
to Reference by Mail. The complete list 
of VHS videotapes contains many more 
titles and other topics including Woods 
Work, Early Film, Franco-American 
Life, Television and Oral History. 

Return Instructions 

The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be in the mail on their 
way back to NHF five days after they 
are received. 

Public Performance 

Videotapes listed here are offered as a 
reference service. Where possible, 
public performance rights are included. 
Please be sure to check each tape's 



Members of Northeast Historic Film 
are invited to borrow from the circu- 
lating reference collection of Videos of 
New England Life. For the list of over 
60 videotapes, please call or write. 

See order form for details. 



status: PERF means public performance 
rights are included. If you have a par- 
ticular date in mind, call ahead to en- 
sure availability. Where there is no 
PERF, the tape is for home use only 
and may not be shown to a group. 

Videos for Sale 

Many of these tapes are available for 
purchase through NHF; tapes that may 
be bought are listed with a check mark. 



City Life 

Roughing the Uppers: The Great Shoe Strike 

/of 1937, a documentary by Robert 
Branham and students of Bates College 
about the ClO-organized shoe strike in 
Lewiston & Auburn, Maine. 1992. 55 mins., 
col., sd. 



Country Life 

Ben's Mill, a documentary about a Vermont 

/water-powered mill. 60 mins. col., sd. 
PERF 

Dead River Rough Cut, the lives and philoso- 

/phies of two woodsmen-trappers, rough 
language and all. A film by Richard 
Searls and Stuart Silverstein. 1976. 55 mins. 
col., sd. 

Down East Dairyman, produced by the Maine 
Dept. of Agriculture to demonstrate work in 
a dairy, including beginning a herd and 
processing milk. 1972. 14 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Sins of Our Mothers, presents the hearsay and 

/legends of Fayette, Maine, as living 
things. 60 mins. col., sd. PERF 

Fisheries 

The Maine Lobster, lobster fisheries and 
consumption with unusual footage including 
the assembly of frozen lobster TV dinners, 
ca. 1955. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Tuna Fishing off Portland Harbor, Maine, 
off-shore fishing with a Maine sea and shore 
warden and intertitles, e.g., "Oh Boy! This is 
a small one, but look what he did to the har- 
poon iron!" ca. 1930. 10 mins., b&w, si. PERF 



Geography 

Mount Washington Among the Clouds, a 

/history of the hotels, newspaper and cog 
railway, 1852-1908. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Mysteries of the Unknown: A Documentary 
about our Community, an outstanding 
student video about Bucksport, Maine, with 
original music. 1990. 30 mins., col., sd. 



Performing Arts 

Bonsoir Mes Amis, a portrait of two of Maine's 

/finest traditional Franco-American 
musicians, Ben Guillemette and Lionel 
"Toots" Bouthot. By Huey. 1990. 46 mins., 
col., sd. 



Political Discourse 

Jerry Brown Speaks in New Hampshire, from 
the 1992 presidential campaign. 28 mins., col., 
sd. PERF 

Ella Knowles: A Dangerous Woman, a video 
documentary on a leading 19th-century 
suffragist & Bates College graduate by 
Robert Branham and students. 1991. 25 mins., 
col., sd. 



Transportation 

Around Cape Horn, Captain Irving Johnson 

/aboard the bark Peking films everyday 
activities and spectacular storms round- 
ing the Horn. 1929. 37 mins., b&w, sd. 

Ride the Sandy River Railroad, one of the 

/country's best two-foot-gauge railroads. 
1930. 30 min., b&w, si. with intertitles. 



Welcome, New Members! 



NHF is pleased to welcome 70 new 
members. Thank you all for taking a 
special interest in the work of the orga- 
nization, and for helping us succeed. 

Corporate and Associate Members 
Lewis & Malm, Don Lewis 
Modular Media 
Clare Sheldon 

Nonprofit Organizations 

The American Experience, WGBH-TV, 

Eileen Mulvey 
Boothbay Railway Village, 

Maureen Stormont 
Coastside Parks & Recreation, Inc., 

Ken S. Lundie 

Ellsworth Public Library, Patricia R. Foster 
Essex Shipbuilding Museum, 

Diana H. Stockton 

Farmington Public Library, Jean Oplinger 
Farnsworth Museum, Deborah Vendetti 
Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, 

Art Cohn 
Margaret Chase Smith Library Center, 

Gregory Gallant 
Market Square Health Center 
Pemetic Elementary School, Ellen Gilmore 
Pittsfield Public Library 
Reiche School, Judd Evans 
Vassalboro Public Library, Betty Taylor 
Vinalhaven Historical Society 
Wiley House Treatment Center, John Waters 
Wilton Historical Society 
Yarmouth Historical Society, 

Ms. Marilyn Hinkley 

Regular Members 

Herb Adams 

Kathy Anderson 

Esther Jones Bissell & Roy V. Heisler 

Ben & Jeannette Blodget 

Neal & Betty Butler 

Charles S. Commiskey 

David & Dani Danzig 

Peter Dickey 

Neal C. Dow 

Calvin W. Dow 

Lynn Farnell 

Steven Feia 

Ann & Everett Foster 

Yves Frenette 

Terry Hoffer 

Ned Johnston 

Audrey & Larry Kolloff 

Mark Letizia 

Roy Lockwood 

Eugene Mawhinney 

Lewis Nichols 

Ruth & Bill Pfaffle 

Annie Proulx 

Ken Quimby, Jr. 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles Reid 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Rosie 

Dr. Marshall Smith 

Pat & Roy Snell 

Drs. L. & M. Temeles 

Ethel B. Turner 

Arthur C. Verow 

Nola Wass 

Tappy & Robin Wilder 

Educator/Student Members 

Mark L. Anderson 

Scott Andrews, Chewonki Foundation 

Thomas Boelz 

Patricia Conant, Dirigo High School Library 

Eithne Johnson & Eric Shaefer 

Carol King, Wells Jr. High School Library 

Jim Laukes 

AJex Silverman 

Michelle B. Stevens 

Gifford Stevens, Hampden Academy 

Richard & Laura Stubbs 

D. Tibbetts, Lincoln Middle School 

Seth Wigderson, Univ. of Maine, Augusta I 



Available for Purchase 
by Institutions Only 



Ben 's Mill, a film by Michel C haluf our and John 
Karol. In Barnet, Vermont, Ben Thresher runs a 
waterpower mill, a link between the age of craft 
and the industrial age. Using an amazing array of 
tools, Ben makes a wooden tub for watering 
cattle and a horse-drawn sled. Without Ben, 
recycler and hoe-handle fixer, "there's going to 
be a lot of people who'll say where they hell are 
we going to get this work done?" 60 mins., col., 
sd. $59.95 includes public performance rights. 

Sins of Our Mothers, written and directed by 
Matthew Collins. "Every small town in Maine 
has its legends, some of them true." This is the 
story of Emeline, who went to the Lynn textile 
mills at the age of thirteen and suffered a 
shocking fate. Her story, told only in whispers in 
the tiny town of Fayette, is retold here by people 
of the town and its landscape. It gives insight into 
the taboos and punishments of women's lives in 
the past. 60 mins., col, sd. $59.95 includes public 
performance rights. 

Other titles available for purchase by individuals 
and groups. Call or write for complete list. 



NHF Membership 

As an independent nonprofit organiza- 
tion, NHF depends on its members. 
Please join and renew! 

Regular members, $25 per year, receive a 
subscription to Moving Image Review and 
discounts on materials distributed by NHF. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 per year, 
receive all regular membership benefits. 
This category is for teachers and students at 
any level. 

Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year, 
receive all regular benefits of membership, 
additional copies of Moving Image Review 
on request and reduced rates for consulta- 
tion, presentations and professional ser- 
vices. 

Associates (Individuals) and Corporate 
Members, $100 per year, receive the ben- 
efits of regular members, special recogni- 
tion in Moving Image Review. 

Friends, $250 per year, receive all benefits 
of regular membership and a hug. 



Membership and Order Form Northeast Historic Film, P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, ME 04416 USA 
Free Reference by Mail! 

Educator/Student Members, Regular Members and Nonprofit Orga- 



nizations may borrow a total of THREE tapes (one shipment in any 
one membership year) without any charge. Includes free shipping! 

Associates (Individuals) and Corporate Members may borrow a total 
of 15 tapes (five shipments of up to three tapes each) without charge. 



Friends may borrow a total of 30 tapes (ten shipments of up to three 
tapes each) without charge. 

Tapes in addition to those allowed free with your annual membership 
may be borrowed (up to three at a time) for a $5 shipping and han- 
dling fee to cover each shipment. 



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Way Back Home 



Phillips Lord plays the whiskered Seth Parker in Way Back Home. Thanks to Basil Seguin of Bryant 
Pond, Dr. David A. Taylor of the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, and James 
Phillips and Michael Fiori of Bangor, Northeast Historic Film has opened a file on Phillips Lord. 



NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 



BUCKSPORT, MAINE, USA 
0-1410-0900 (207)469-0924 




ADDRESS CORRECT/ON REQUESTED 



Check your mailing label. Your membership 
expiration date should appear there. Visa and 
MasterCard renewals are welcome. If there's 
no date on the address label, please turn to 
page 7 and join. 



In the 1920s Phillips Lord of Ellsworth, 
Maine, left Bowdoin College and went 
to New York where on NBC radio he 
created a folksy Down East character, 
Seth Parker, ostensibly drawn from his 
experiences as a boy in rural Maine. 

Lord's mission was to deliver "sto- 
ries based on country life designed to 
heal the jaded souls of New Yorkers." 

Lord marketed spinoff books: the 
Seth Parker Hymnal, the Seth Parker 
Album, Seth Parker's Sunday Evening 
Meeting and Uncle Hosey, the Yankee 
Salesman, followed by phonograph 
albums and a motion picture. 

RKO Radio Pictures produced Way 
Back Home (1931) starring Lord and 
the ingenue Bette Davis. 

Seth Parker, the radio sage, is shedding a 
rather appealing sweetness and light. . . . 
His Maine sketches, authentic and 
amusing studies of the Down East 
farmers, have made an original contribu- 
tion to the entertainment of the air. . . . 
The twangy speech, the homely wit, the 
barn dances, taffy-pulling gatherings, 
singing bees all the real and mellow 
phases of Yankee village life are shown 
humanly and without the elephantine 
burlesque that might have killed the 
illusion. 

New York Times, 16 January 1932. 

NHF Looks at Maine Myths 
The archives asks whether Lord's 
Maine sketches bear any relation to 
Yankee village life. 

Down East film comedy and its 
reception deserve investigation. To our 
eyes, "elephantine burlesque" is essen- 
tial: spinster, bumpkin, lovable farm 
boy. Griffith's Way Down East con- 
tained the same elements with senti- 
mental songs, a moral dilemma, and 
uncouth farmyard comedy. 

Way Back Home, and the City 

Twentieth-century regional loyalty 
(honored at a distance) and geographic 
mobility are at play. Shuttling between 
country and city, one can more readily 
accept myths about "home." Many of 
the players came and went from Maine, 
trailing stories from their other lives: 
Phillips Lord claimed a Maine heritage, 
perhaps built primarily on years at a 
prestigious private college. | 




Northeast His tor it Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Deditated to the Preservation 
of Northern New England 
Motion Pictures 

Winter 1994 



Executive Director's Report p. 2 

One Hundred Years: Illustrated 

Lectures p.-* 

Library of Congress Film Study p. 5 

New at the Archives p. 11 

All Our Members p. 12 

Membership Info p.15 



Moving Image Review ISSN 0897-0769 is a 
semiannual publication of Northeast His- 
toric Film, P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 
04416. David S. Weiss, executive director, 
Kara* Sheldon, editor. 207-469-0924 



The Archives, Briefly 



Northeast Historic Film is 
a nonprofit organization 
founded in 1986 for the 
purposes of cultural pres- 
ervation and education. 
Like a library, Northeast 
Historic Film cares for 
research materials, prima- 
rily films and videotapes, 
and makes them available 
to the public. 

Moving Image Collections 

NHF safeguards more 
than 3 million feet of film 
and thousands of hours 
of videotape, a deep and 
varied record of the 
region's culture. 

Paper Documents and 
Other Materials 
In addition to moving 
images, the archives col- 
lects information on film 
and video, oral histories, 
books and periodicals and 
related documents. 

Independent and Publicly 
Supported 

Northeast Historic Film is 
supported by donations 
from individual and insti- 
tutional members, corpo- 
rate donations, foundation 
grants, and fees for services. 




INSPIRATIOM PICTURES. IMC 



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Individuals and organiza- 
tions are invited to join 
NHF to help support the 
preservation of the region's 
culture and history. 

This issue of Moving Image 
Re-view is the longest ever. 
It reflects increased activi- 
ties both in Bucksport with 
community involvement 
planning and renovating 
NHF's home in the Alamo 
Theatre building, and in 
the wider world, partici- 
pating in the national film- 
preservation plan and 
regional arts and culture 
initiatives. 



This one-sheet Poster was 
acquired at the end of 1993, the 
first poster for a Maine film in 
the collections. Thank you, Q. 
David Bowers and the Maine 
Humanities Council Northeast 
Historic Film is interested in 
posters and lobby cards from 
these films: Lost Boundaries, 
Timothy's Quest, Way Down 
East, Carousel, Peyton Place, 
Deep Waters, Rider of the King 
Log, Way Back Home, The 
Whales of August and other 
regional titles. 



Executive Director's Report 



A BIG Mess 

Renovations to the Alamo Theatre 
building are progressing well, as many 
people saw at our holiday open house. 
A "peanut gallery" window looked 
over the back half of the building. 
Visitors enjoying cider and cookies 
looked into the auditorium space where 
the first and second floors have been 
mostly removed, revealing the dirt 
basement that will be sealed in prepara- 
tion for the new public space. We are 
still on track to have the mess cleaned 
up so that we can hold events in the 
space this summer. What would you 
like to see: film, video, music, dramatic 
readings, vaudeville? Drop me a line, 
call or try. . . . 

Electronic Mail 

NHF's e-mail address is 

OLDFILM@aol.com 
Our long-range planning committee is 
grappling with defining what kinds of 
services we will be able to provide as 
new technologies arrive. A goal for the 
not-so-distant future is to provide on- 
line access to our databases. Eventually 
we will be able to provide images. In 
the meantime, if you have an e-mail 
address, let us know. 

What's With This Handle? 

OLDFILM? There are a couple of 
reasons. Northeast Historic Film is too 
long, NHF is too opaque. We wanted 
something that represented our mis- 
sion. Film deserves the chance to be- 
come old film. NHF is trying to make 
this a reality for northern New England 
by safeguarding surviving film that fits 
our collections criteria. The alternative 
is GONEFILM. See page 5 of this 
issue, the Library of Congress Film 
Preservation Survey, for a look at how 
real that option is. 

Bulletin Boards 

The Maine State Archives has a com- 
puter bulletin board called the Maine 
Archives INformation Exchange (or 

MAINE). To subscribe, use your mo- 
dem to dial 207 287-5797. It's a 24-hour 
free service. MAINE allows you access 
to many of the Maine State Archives 
databases including information on 
6,000 photographs and 5,000 maps. You 



can also get information and notices 
from the Maine Society of Archivists, 
the Maine Association of Museums, the 
Cultural Resources Information Cen- 
ter, and more. E-mail addressed to 
Oldfilm will reach us. 

The Celebration Shop bulletin 
board (run from Noel Paul Stookey's 
henhouse building, NHF's home until 
1992), will have monthly reports from 
the archives. To subscribe to Celebra- 
tion Shop, call 207 374-5161. You can 
explore it at no charge. If you sign up 
the charges are very modest. E-mail to 
Oldfilm reaches us there too. 

Information on bulletin boards 
related to independent media appears in 
"The Art of the Internet" by Luke 
Matthew Hones in the January /Febru- 
ary issue of The Independent. 

Newest Board Member 

Shan Sayles is the newest member of 
NHF's nine-member board of directors. 
Shan is a resident of Carmel-by-the- 
Sea, California, and Cape Rosier, Maine. 
He has more than 40 years' experience 
in the film-exhibition business. 

Our long-range plan, with many 
thanks to committee chair Alan 
McClelland, directs the board to con- 
tinue growing from 9 to 1 1 members 
this year. I look forward to reporting 
additions to the board in the next 
Moving Image Review. And please, if 
you have an interest in serving on the 
long-range planning committee, on the 
video advisory committee, or becoming 
involved as a volunteer in another 
capacity, we would be delighted to hear 
from you. 

Lost Friends 

We mourn the recent deaths of mem- 
bers, donors to the archives and friends 
Earle Fenderson, Benjamin Bigelow 
Snow, Otto Siebert and Reverend 
Curtis Beach. 



5 





David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



Alamo Gatherings 
for Volunteers and Friends 



On the third Wednesday of every 
month NHF will hold "Open Alamo" 
evenings from 5:30 P.M. to 8:30 P.M. 
The public is invited. 

Many Activities Offered 

There will be screenings of recent 
additions to the archives, tours of 
changes to the building and discussion 
of upcoming public programs. Dinner is 
pot luck. Coffee and cider are provided 
by NHF. Families are invited. 

It will be a time for people of all 
ages to talk with NHF staff about plans 
and to share their own interests. 

Opening the Doors 

"Open Alamo" came about because of 
the success of Wednesday-night com- 
munity screenings in 1993. Even though 
there is less space for public screenings, 
the staff, board and community advi- 
sors wanted to keep the doors open and 
to involve more people in the archives' 
activities. 

Volunteer Sign-Up 

People who are interested in volunteer- 
ing at the archives can sign up for orien- 
tation and training sessions in collections 
care, office help and clean-up. 



NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but are not 
limited to a survey of moving pic- 
tures of northern New England; 
Preserving and safeguarding film 
and videotape through restoration, 
duplication, providing of technical 
guidance and climate-controlled 
storage; Creation of educational 
programs through screenings and 
exhibitions on-site and in touring 
programs; Assistance to members of 
the public, scholars and students at 
all levels, and members of the film 
and video production community, 
through providing a study center, 
technical services and facilities. 



mty, 

iter, 

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Grants in Action 



W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle 
Creek, Michigan, made a grant of 
$20,000 to assist in renovating the 
Alamo Theatre building. "We are 
pleased to be able to play a major part 
in this important project," wrote Dr. 
Joel J. Orosz, Coordinator, Philan- 
thropy and Volunteerism. The Kellogg 
support will help with the demolition, 
basement preparation, concrete slab 
and construction. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation was 
established in 1930 "to help people to 
help themselves." As a private grant- 
maker, it provides seed money to orga- 
nizations that have identified problems 
and designed action programs aimed at 
solutions. Most foundation grants are 
awarded in the areas of youth, leader- 
ship, philanthropy and volunteerism 
and rural development. 

Davis Family Foundation 

The Davis Family Foundation provided 
$10,000 to help create a public-program 
space in the first floor of the building. 
} The project will help restore a signifi- 
cant and centrally located structure to 



use, creating a cultural focal point for 
the area. 

The Davis Family Foundation was 
founded in 1986 by Mr. & Mrs. H. 
Halsey Davis of Falmouth, Maine, to 
support educational institutions, hospitals 
and organizations promoting the arts. 

Maine Arts Commission, 
Rural Arts Initiative 

$10,000 was received from the Advance- 
ment Grant Program, Rural Arts Initia- 
tive, of the Maine Arts Commission. 
This amount, matched three to one, will 
help establish a space for public events 
beginning in the summer of 1994. 

The grant was recommended by the 
commission's interdisciplinary review 
panel. The panel found that NHF had 
shown steady growth, had widespread 
membership and specifically articulates 
its goals. 

A grant of $1,500 was also awarded 
by the Maine Arts Commission for 
work with independent filmmaker 
Gabriel Coakley in the production, 
presentation and preservation of a 
documentary film about Deer Isle 
sculptor George Hardy. 




American Film Institute/National 
Endowment for the Arts film-preser- 
vation program granted $2,900 for lab 
work on 2,000 ft. of 35mm film discov- 
ered at the Braden Theater in Presque 
Isle, Maine, that conveys the social and 
economic life of Maine in the early 20th 
century. The film was donated by 
Michael Bernard and contains Aroos- 
took County agricultural activities. 
Sequences were composed with 
attention to the landscape and the 
human figures. Presque Isle downtown 
footage is the only coverage of any 
town in this northernmost (and largest) 
Maine county. 

The National Trust for Historic 
Preservation 

A final report was submitted for the 
grant of $1,500 to help plan for the 
future of the Alamo building, one of 
northern New England's oldest struc- 
tures built as a cinema. Architect Chris- 
tian H. Fasoldt of Camden, Maine, 
wrote a report, "Review and Analysis 
of the Alamo Theatre Building." 

In-Kind Services 

Long Distance North of Burlington, 
Vermont, donated $1,200 in free long- 
distance phone service. This company 
provides a toll-free number used by 
members and people ordering video- 
tapes. 

E-Media Manufacturing, Sanford, 
Maine, donated 1,000 blank VHS video- 
tapes thanks to NHF president Paul 
Gelardi. 

Matching Programs 

Current employees and retirees can 
make their gifts to NHF go further, 
sometimes doubling or tripling the gift, 
by using corporate matching-gift pro- 
grams. 

In 1993 NHF benefited from a num- 
ber of corporate matching gifts thanks 
to people who knew about and used 
their company's programs. Cash matches 
were received from IBM, New England 
Electric Company, AT&T Foundation 
and Time Warner. 

Renovations on the Alamo Theatre building are 
bringing the ground floor back down to its 
original level for a 120-seat auditorium. Photo: 
Alan McClelland 



One Hundred Years: 
THE ORMAN B. HUMPHREY ILLUSTRATED LECTURES 



Advertising slides once used by manager 
Robert Rosie in the Alamo Theatre, 
Northeast Historic Film's home, were 
donated to the archives by Herbert 
Silsby of Ellsworth, Maine. Glass slides 
were part of the program in many 
theaters, often used before shows and 
between reels. 

Slides were also used as entertain- 
ment, to illustrate songs performed on 
stage. NHF's friend Samuel Taylor of 
East Blue Hill, Maine, remembers 
helping sell sheet music as a child in San 
Francisco. Attired in a tuxedo, he sang 
along with "songslides," colored photo- 
graphic illustrations alternating with 
type verses. 

Many rurn-of-the-century lecturers 
used slides. The Orman B. Humphrey 
Illustrated Lectures: Paris-Versailles, 
India, Westminster Abbey and other 
"speech support" slides were donated 
to NHF by the Maher family. 

The Orman Humphrey slides are a 
type of informative entertainment 
supplanted by motion pictures. The 
lectures included the cultural highlights 
suggested by the titles above, local 
views, and dramatic colonial events: 
Boers hurrying to the front, 1899; views 
of the Philippines. 



GOSSARD 

june ^Beauty 



\j4n exQuisitt princess 
combination of rose* 
beige lace, satin taut 
hand-loomed elastic 




J/'ry Goods 



Advertising slide used in the Alamo Theatre. 

Humphrey's promotional literature 
stressed "oriental splendors and reck- 
less extravagance." One offering was 
100 hand-colored views of Asia pro- 
duced by Underwood & Underwood. 

Along with about 800 slides, the 
Maher family donated Lantern-slide 



projection equipment including a Stereo- 
motorgraph Model C made by the 
Charles Beseler Corp., NY. These rare 
examples of technology help demon- 
strate the evolution of projected presen- 
tations in the region. 




A White auto (191 1-1912); Main Street, Bangor. Photo: Maher Collection, "Paris, Horse Butcher Shop," T. H. MacAllister, NY. Photo: Maher 
NHF. Collection, NHF. 



i 



Library of Congress Report on Film Preservation 



Last summer the Librarian of Congress 
submitted Film Preservation 1993, A 

II Report on American Film Preservation 
in the Film Industry and Public/Non- 
profit Organizations as pan of the devel- 
opment of a national film-preservation 
program. The national program's goals 
are to help coordinate public and private 

U activities in the field, increase awareness 
of the need to preserve motion pictures, 
and promote accessibility of films for 
educational purposes. 

The multi-volume study contains a 
summary report, transcriptions of 

u National Film Preservation Board 

hearings held in Washington, D.C., and 
Los Angeles, and written submissions 
from scores of individuals and institu- 
tions around the country. For archivists 
it provides insight into the expressed 
priorities of many of their colleagues. 
Note: This is a Film study electronic 
media are not included. 

The report signals some directional 
changes in the field since Northeast 
Historic Film entered it seven years 
ago. For example, film-storage condi- 
tions are gaining importance, and the 
impermanence of safety film stock is 
causing more concern. 

A reading of the report is recom- 
mended for those interested in learning 
more about the present state of film 
preservation. From it one can learn some 
of the thorny issues, and discover who 
are individuals and institutions with 
interesting perspectives on the problems 
and possible solutions. It is available 
from the U.S. Government Printing 
Office for $47, order number 030-000- 
0251-2. GPO Order Desk, 202 783- 
3283 or FAX 202 5 12-2250. 
Three excerpts follow. 

Preservation is a Process 

In practice and in casual language, preser- 
vation has usually been synonymous 
with duplication. The archival rallying 
slogan for the last two decades has been 
"Nitrate Won't Wait," and the primary 
preservation task still far from accom- 
plished has been to copy unstable, 
nitrate-base film without significant loss 
of quality onto more durable "safety" 
stock. For a variety of reasons, this def- 
inition of preservation is being rethought 
and broadened to include the costly issue 



of storage conditions, as well as the 
apparently contradictory issue of public 
access. Preservation is increasingly being 
defined less as a one time "fix" (measur- 
able in footage copied) than as an ongoing 
process. 

Storage Conditions are Crucial 

Vinegar syndrome [a form of safety-film 
deterioration], color fading, and the 
retention of nitrate after copying have 
conspired to give a new prominence in 
current preservation practice to storage 
conditions. The combined effect of 
lowered temperatures and lowered 
relative humidity in retarding both 
vinegar syndrome and color fading is 
startling and increasingly well docu- 
mented. The one encouraging finding 
about these deterioration processes is 
how significantly both can be slowed by 
the right storage conditions. 

Towards a National Program 

As the over 100 submissions to this 
study have made clear, motion pictures 
have become popular memory, art form, 
historical document, market commodity, 
anthropological record, political force 
and medium for disseminating American 
culture around the world. A narrow 
"entertainment" definition of film no 
longer matches the diverse concerns of 
scholars, students, advocacy groups, 
social planners, ethnic communities, and 



the broader American society. To best 
serve the public interest, a national 
program must recognize the evolving 
applications for American film as well as 
current needs of users, copyright hold- 
ers, and the many types of institutions 
throughout the United States that have 
motion pictures of cultural and historical 
significance. . . . The current level of 
support a patchwork of federal money, 
foundation grants, and donations only 
chips away at the problem. 

Task Forces 

Between now and June, task forces 
consisting of groups of individuals from 
the film industry, archives and educa- 
tion who participated in the film preser- 
vation study, will work on a planning 
document to be completed over the 
summer and then made available for 
public comment. These groups include 
a special funding committee from the 
National Film Preservation Board and 
task forces on Redefining Preservation, 
Public Access and Educational Use, 
Public-Private Cooperation and Public 
Awareness. 

For more information on the task 
forces contact Steve Leggett, National 
Film Preservation Board Assistant, at 
the Library of Congress, 202 707-5912; 
FAX 202 707 2371. 



30% 



CO 

M 



a 

o 
O 



25% - 
20% 
15% 
10% 

5% 

0% 



25% 



22% 23% 



17% 



nm HIM 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



'14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19 '20 '21 '22 '23 '24 '25 '26 '27 '28 

Year of Release 

Survival Rate of American Feature Films, 

based on working lists of holdings in U.S. and foreign archives 

Fewer than 20% of the feature films of the 1920s survive in complete form. This 
graph from the report, Film Preservation 1 993, makes clear why it is not surprising 
that Holman Day's Rider of the King Log (1921) and the Annette Kellerman 
Queen of the Sea (1918) are not known to exist. 



Northeast Historic Film's Collections Criteria 






Technical Services 



Excerpt from Northeast Historic Film's Operational Policies 

with thanks to board member Pam Wintle of the Human Studies Film Archives. 

Acquisition and accessioning of films, priority for acceptance; footage 



videotapes and related materials into 
Northeast Historic Film (NHF) shall 
proceed according to criteria which 
are intended to maximize usefulness 
through preservation and for research 
purposes. NHF does not as a point of 
policy purchase film/ tape from orga- 
nizations or individuals, recognizing 
that such purchase would place the 
archives in a position of assigning a 
monetary value to unique historic and 
cultural materials which would be 
otherwise unavailable to the public. 
Where possible as outlined below, 
NHF will accept donation or deposit 
of moving image and related material. 

Criteria for Acceptance 

of Films/Tapes 

High priority will be given to film/ 

videotape having the characteristics 

listed below, although these measures 



answering few or none will have low 
priority. 

a. Related to the northern New En- 
gland region through location, 
subject, maker, source or other 
connection. 

b. Unique, or inaccessible to the 
northern New England population. 

c. Otherwise likely to be damaged or 
lost. 

d. As close to the original film or tape 
generation as possible and is of 
good picture quality. 

e. Well-documented, and where 
possible accompanied by related 
non-motion-picture references 
such as notes, still photographs, 
audiotapes. 

Low priority will be assigned to 
widely distributed finished films/ 
tapes, to material preserved elsewhere 



will not be mechanically applied in 

determining whether or not to accept and to film/tape requiring donor 

footage. Generally film/tape meeting copies and/or severely restrictive 

many of these criteria will have high conditions. 



Northeast Historic Film is interested in 
moving-image documents that describe 
people and their environment. NHF 
archives dramatic film, newsreels, 
works of independents, industrial films, 
television material of all kinds, and 
amateur footage. 

If it was made in northern New 
England, we'll consider it. 

Amateur Footage: Elusive Perspectives 

One area in which NHF has further 
refined its collections criteria is amateur 
footage. 

Amateur creators record their envi- 
ronment motivated by their own inter- 
est, and therefore capture an otherwise 
elusive personal view of our culture. 
When a regional archives gathers ama- 
teur material together, we begin to see a 
source of valuable comparative data: 
select an era, a socioeconomic group or 
a particular location. Scholarship has 
yet to catch up with the immense po- 
tential of this primary source material. 



Because of the latency of scholarly 
interest in the material, NHF has set 
some standards with consideration for 
an unknown future. One of these stan- 
dards is that where possible the goal is 
to keep a home movie collection intact 
as a whole document. Thus a collection 
might include summer and winter homes, 
travel, and other material that on its own 
would not fit NHF's collections criteria. 

Collections Characteristics 

The NHF collections contain amateur 
material from 1916 on with particular 
strength in 16 mm. black and white film 
from the 1930s. NHF seeks amateur 
film with these characteristics: 
1. A single creator covering a long span 
of time, particularly if the material 
has been or could be annotated by 
the creator and/or close family 
members. An example of this is the 
Meyer Davis Collection, shot by 
the band leader between 1926 and 
1974; another example is the David 



NHF will transfer 16 mm. film to video- 
tape using Elmo equipment at 24 frames 
per second or 1 5 frames per second. 
Also available, 8 mm. and Super 8 mm. 
transfers to videotape for reference; 
evaluation of film's physical condition; 
perforation repair and appraisal. 

These services, using NHF staff's 
expertise and on-site equiment, help 
support the organization by providing a 
revenue source. Some equipment acqui- 
sition is the result of a generous gift 
from the Betterment Fund. 




Soule Collection shot in Portland, 
Maine, between 1938 and 1966. 

2. A single community documented by 
multiple creators offering a varied 
perspective such as several portraits 
of a town called Cherryfield. 

3. Rare ethnic or cultural coverage. 

4. Business, crafts or professions 
covered in depth, and film that 
reflects the creator's vocation. 

5. The work of an individual with ties 
to the region whose home movies 
can be annotated and whose mov- 
ing image work might not other- 
wise by archived. 

NHF is interested in safeguarding ama- 
teur material because it is almost always 
unique camera original, it is inaccessible 
and unknown, and it's extremely likely 
to be lost. The archives accepts motion 
picture cameras and projectors when 
they are offered and is interested in the 
technology and how it was used. | 



Community Advisory Group 



A community advisory group has 
convened to focus on plans for NHF's 
role developing useful public space and 
programs in Bucksport. 

There were several meetings in early 
November. Meetings began with a tour 
of the back half of the building. Phil 
Yates, in charge of the demolition, 
confirmed that the previous construc- 
tion had not been safe. Beams had not 
been anchored, and the ceiling was 
ready to fall. Yates and Jim Fletcher 
removed the unsafe structures and were 
beginning to reveal the theater's origi- 
nal floor level. 

Suggestions 

Discussions determined that Bucksport 
needs cultural activities and a place for 
community meetings. 

A regular music series would be 
excellent for the community and could 
draw from a number of towns. The 
high school has no auditorium other 
than the gym. 

NHF can be responsive to people 
who want to use the building and, with 
their help, can develop a flexible space. 

Everyone feels it is important to 
keep the building open to the public 
during the renovation period to allow 
for maximum community involvement. 

Santa at the Alamo 

NHF held a holiday open house, coordi- 
nated with the Bucksport Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Santa visited the Alamo on Decem- 
ber 11. Parents went away with video- 
tapes of their children talking with the 
jolly fellow. 

Many people helped with prepara- 
tion, decorations and refreshments: Phil 
Yates, Libby Rosemeier, Lynne Blair, 
Esther Austin, Lisa Whitney, Jim 
Fletcher, Judy McGeorge. 

Alamo Gatherings 

The third Wednesday of every month is 
"Open Alamo" from 5:30 to 8:30 P.M. 
This time is for people to stay abreast 
of project development, archival acqui- 
sitions, and see where they can lend a 
hand. 

Community Group Members 
Teeter Bibber, Alamo neighbor for 12 
years. A parent of three school-age 




Richard Rosen, Teeter Bibber, Phil Yates, David Weiss, Elsie Good, Judy McGeorge and George 
MacLeod discuss the Alamo Theatre building's future. 



children, she regards NHF's presence 

as a cultural opportunity. 
I Jim Campbell, board member of 

WERU-FM community radio, is a 

partner in Modular Media, across the 

street from the Alamo. 
I Elsie Good is the director of Senior 

Citizens programs in town; many of 




her clients came to see movies here 
years ago. 

I Bill Grady, public relations director, 
Champion International Corporation 
paper mill in Bucksport. 

I Barbara Larson, a volunteer at 
H.O.M.E. Coop in Orland, serving 
low-income people in the area, helped 
run H.O.M.E./NHF's screenings. 

I Judy McGeorge, a board member of 
WERU-FM community radio, a partner 
in Modular Media, Bucksport. 

I George MacLeod, owner of 
MacLeod's Restaurant, Bucksport, is 
involved in many business and civic 
activities. 

I Alan McClelland, treasurer of NHF, is 
chairman of membership for the 
Society of Maine Archivists and 
active at the Owls Head Transporta- 
tion Museum. 

I Richard Rosen, third-generation 
owner of Rosen's Department Store, 
Bucksport. Parent of school-age 
children, and a board member of 
NHF. 

i Denis Thoet, director of Friends of 
the Maine State Museum, was once a 
commercial fisherman in the area. 

I Lisa Whitney, Bucksport town coun- 
cil member and member of the 
town's Economic Development 
Committee. 



Planned Giving 



The idea began with 1,000 feet of silent 
film recording the last days of a Maine 
lumber company. That film and its 
original script were used to produce 
From Stump to Ship in a University of 
Maine-sponsored project. People were 
fascinated by moving images of a life 
that is gone. 

Northeast Historic Film was 
founded shortly after Stump to find, 
preserve and distribute moving images. 
In 1992, NHF acquired the Alamo, once 
a movie theater. With your support, 
this will be a unique facility: a small 
theater, a museum, archival storage 
space and a study center. It will be a 
center for preservation and distribution 
of our region's history as portrayed in 
moving images. 

People who care about preserving 
what evidence remains of a unique 
regional heritage have made significant 
contributions to the work of NHF. Our 
members' annual fees are indispensable, 
as are the generous donations some of 
you have made in response to specific 
appeals. 

Now, we are asking you to help 
build our future in a new facility. 

Ways to Give 

Every contribution is an important one, 

Penobscot River, Bucksport. 
Photo: Gretchen Gaffney. 



for we have a lot to accomplish. You 
may want us to use your gift to support 
the ongoing work of NHF; or you may 
direct that it be used in the restoration 
of the Alamo. Indeed, you may want to 
underwrite a particular part of the 
building, its furnishings or equipment, 
which may then bear your name or that 
of someone you wish to remember. 

What to Give 

Because NHF is a nonprofit organiza- 
tion, a gift has important tax advan- 
tages. When considering the tax and 
estate-planning implications of a dona- 
tion, it is always wise to consult your 
lawyer or tax advisor. 

Cash A check is a convenient and 
useful way to contribute to NHF. A 
cash gift qualifies as a charitable contri- 
bution for federal income-tax purposes. 

Securities Gifts of securities held 
long-term (stocks, bonds and stocks in 
closely-held companies) are an excel- 
lent way to make a donation. NHF 
maintains a brokerage account to 
receive such gifts. By transferring the 
securities to NHF you may avoid 
capital-gains tax, while securing an 
income-tax deduction for the full 
current fair market value of the gifted 



securities equaling up to 30% of ad- 
justed gross income in the year of the 
gift- 
Real Estate As in a gift of securi- 
ties, a gift of real estate whose value has 
appreciated enables you to take a deduc- 
tion for the full fair market value of the 
property and avoid capital-gains tax. 

Gifts to the Museum Collection 

Some gifts of objects may have a mon- 
etary value, and may thus qualify as a 
charitable contribution for federal 
income-tax purposes. 

Bequests Remembering NHF in 
your will with a gift of cash, securities, 
real estate or artifacts of value to the 
collection will help forward the work of 
Northeast Historic Film in years to 
come. 

Matching Gifts Many companies 
will match employee gifts to NHF. If 
your company is one of them, please 
take the necessary steps to get the match. 

If you would like to discuss giving 
strategies in detail, NHF's executive 
director would be pleased to talk about 
these and other options. 




Video Preservation 



Things We Need 






The longevity of videotape has been 
receiving attention from mainstream 
press and archival communicators. In 
November the New York Times ran a 
piece, "Memories Linger but the Tapes 
Fade." 

The article, datelined Redwood 
City, California, home of Ampex 
Recording Systems Corporation, 
also featured Jim Lindner of Vidipax, 
a New York company that does 
videotape restoration and archival 
consulting. 

A six -step program for the videotape- 
owning public outlined ways to get 
longer life from videotapes, including: 

1. Keep videotapes consistently cool 
and dry and away from small chil- 
dren and electromagnetic fields. 

2. When taking tapes from a cold to a 
warm place allow them to reach 
room temperature over two hours 
or so before playing them. 

3. Exercise tapes by rewinding and 
fast-forwarding them to the end at 
least once every six months. 

4. View tapes at least once a year, and 
at the first sign of degradation have 
a copy made professionally. 

5. Label your tapes. 



6. Make sure the VCR works properly 
before playing a tape. 

A Media Alliance Publication 
Video Preservation: Securing the Fu- 
ture of the Past by Deirdre Boyle and 
Media Alliance (1993) is the result of a 
survey of video collections and a sym- 
posium on video preservation primarily 
focused on independent video. It in- 
cludes a bibliography and a directory of 
facilities dealing with video and people 
knowledgeable about it. The 66-page 
book is available from Media Alliance, 
212 560-2919. 

Electronic Communications 

The Association of Moving Image 
Archivists' electronic bulletin board, 
AMIA-L, is serving as a forum for, 
among other things, discussion of video 
issues. To subscribe to the bulletin 
board, send a message to 

LISTSERV@UKCC.UKY.EDU. 

In the message field type your name 
preceded by 

SUBSCRIBE AMIA-L. 

Tom House at the University of Ken- 
tucky set up this discussion list. He can 
be reached at 606 257-8372, or 

TMHOUSE01@UKCC.UKY.EDU. 



Volunteers' area 

IBM Selectric typewriter Correcting or 

not, for labeling jobs and other odd typing. 

Microwave oven For leftovers and cold 

coffee. 

Hot water heater For handwashing. 

Collections and Administration 

File cabinets Four-drawer preferred. 
Could use half a dozen. 
Rugged steel shelving 

Office chairs This is being written from a 
1975 Hon chair with broken plywood and 
dead foam rubber. 

Work tables Folding or otherwise. Every 
surface is chronically full. 

Technical Services 

Film editing table 

Small monitor For the video editing sys- 
tem. The present monitor is on its last legs. 

Video projector NHF has rented various 
video projectors, and otherwise relies on a 
workhorse 27-inch monitor on a stand. For 
traveling shows and in-house events, a very 
good video projector is needed. 

Auditorium 

Theater seats 120 excellent ones, for 
audiences starting this summer. Otherwise 
it's standing room only. 
An elevator There are three stories to the 
top of the fly, currently accessible by 
ladder. 



Maine Touring Artist 



The Maine Arts Commission, Augusta, underwrites a 
number of valuable program for arts organizations 
throughout Maine. One of these is the Maine Touring 
Artist program. It is a way to help bring performers to 
communities by helping presenters underwrite a 
portion of their fees. 

Danny Patt, a silent-film accompanist who 
began his career playing for films in Union, Maine, 
in 1924, is a Maine Touring Artist. The Arts Com- 
mission will underwrite one third (one half in some 
cases) for programmers interested in having Danny 
play for silent films a school program, or screen- 
ing for the public. Contact Northeast Historic Film 
for information. Applications to the Maine Arts 
Commission for Touring Artist support must be 
submitted at least two months in advance of the 
date of the performance. 




School Programs 



Volunteer Activities 



^ 






/I 

\L*Am J 



Sixth-grader Jason Tourtellottc was one 
of 60 students from the Center Drive 
School, Orrington, who wrote letters 
after their visit to NHF in September. 
The students watched videos containing 
lobstenng, ice harvesting and Bangor 
television stories from the 1950s. The 
trip was organized by Judy Clough and 
Pam Flood. 

The letters focused on many of the 
issues NHF staff encounters every day 
such as cataloguing, preservation and 
archival appraisal. Beverly Flood made 
cataloguers happy by noting the advan- 
tages of detailed descriptive records. "I 
learned a lot about Maine and old 
movies . . . the computer was neat, too. 
I liked how you could just put in a 
subject and get a whole report on it. 
Good luck on the movie theater!" 

Another student asked about the 
curatorial decision-making process. 



"Thank you for giving us a tour of 
your building. . . . Have you ever 
found a film (still on the reel) too 
worn out, and fragile to play? If so 
what do you do with it? Do you 
keep it or do you throw it away? 
Sincerely, Abby." 

Film arriving at the archives can 
range from pristine original to severely 
damaged prints with no perforations or 
fused nitrate requiring a chisel to re- 
move damaged portions from the sal- 
vageable sections (see photo). 

One of the goals of the archives is 
to offer students an opportunity to 
become involved in the process, includ- 
ing assisting with accessions, viewing 
and helping to describe the contents 
of collections. In February George 
Stevens Academy senior Azariah Aker 
will arrive for his independent study 
project. | 



Lynne Blair, Paul Greenlaw, Prudy 
Heilner, Barbara Larson, Chuck Matson, 
Judy McGeorge, Robert Rosie, Pam 
Smith, Vern Weiss and Phil Yates all 
put in valued volunteer time in the last 
year helping with public programs, 
curatorial activities and office work. 

New volunteers Clarence Thomp- 
son, Faith Young and Gretchen Gaff- 
ney have stepped up to bat. Faith 
Young has been helping with adminis- 
trative activities and is mastering the 
shrink-wrap system for videocassettes. 
Gretchen Gaffney has printed frame 
enlargements, made internegatives 
from glass slides, and most recently 
set out on snowshoes with two large- 
format cameras and a tripod in sub- 
zero weather to shoot the Bucksport 
bridge (page 8). Clarence Thompson's 
enthusiasm for classic films and west- 
erns is being expanded with work on 
16 mm. collections. 




10 



New at the Archives 



50 "ANNIVERSARY 
( Tilotion fli 




PEOPLE OAZED INTO THE FIRST 
MOVING PICTURE MACHINE 



mitfU'H 

FIRST DAY I'! |jf ;-i jlj'" 

^ ^ISSUEV! 

... ,;- 



THOMAS AlVA EDlSON 



Four hundred thousand feet of film and 
250 hours of videotapes were received 
in the last year in 115 accessions, rang- 
ing from the briefest look at the Orland 
Great River Raft Race, 1976 (30 ft. of 
fine b&w footage) to a 9.5 mm. projector 
and film from Pam Smith of Bucksport. 

Elizabeth Woodman Wright bought 
a Kodak 16 mm. camera in 1928. She 
filmed her family's summer activities 
around Paris, Maine, with an eye for 
character and agricultural detail. Accord- 
ing to Walter Woodman Wright, donor 
of the footage, much of the film was 
taken on Uncle El's farm. Ellsworth 
Thayer grew shell beans and corn, 
which helped pay the taxes. The farm 
had been in the family since 1 800. There 
is outstanding footage of mowing with 
a horse in the apple orchard, and haying, 
and spectacular views of the White 
Mountains. 

The footage is an affectionate look 
at family activities over several sum- 
mers, including the "last" birthday 
celebrations of a very elderly woman 
. . . several times. 

The Janet and Tim Fogg Collection 
consists of 13 reels of 16 mm. home 
movies, from 1930 to 1950. The con- 
tent includes Commander MacMillan 
on the schooner Bowdoin. 

Blanche Geer PhD Memorial Collec- 
tion, home movies of O. P. Gccr, is 17 



reels of 16 mm. home movies from the 
1930s. Geer, a member of the Amateur 
Cinema League, summered in Boothbay 
Harbor. Film from the early 1 930s 
depicts East Coast travels (Washington, 
D.C., New York, the Adirondacks), the 
commuter's life between Montclair, NJ, 
and Manhattan, and Maine seaside 
summers. Geer records himself in his 
living room preparing to project his 
1932-34 reels; father and daughter 
target practice, shooting bottles in the 
surf; a color tour of Boothbay Harbor; 
a color Esso gas station sequence with 
good close-ups, ca. 1939. 

Wohelo-Luther Gulick Camps, Casco, 
Maine, deposited 16 mm. girls' summer 
camp footage: The Luther Gulick Camps 
1926, Sebago-Wohelo, and Luther 
Gulick Camps, 1926, Little Wohelo. 
"Such a lovely shallow beach! Even 
Mildred and Barbara can play with 
safety here," reads one intertitle pre- 
ceding views of little girls building sand 
castles and wading in the lake. Film of 
uniformed campers was used to pro- 
mote the camps, which are still operat- 
ing, among urban parents during the 
winter. 

Video accessions include the Women 



America Goes 
to the Movies 

The National Association of Theatre 
Owners, a trade group, has released the 
book America Goes to the Movies: 100 
Years of Motion Picture Exhibition by 
Barbara Stones. The volume includes 
exhibitors' reminiscences and is very 
well illustrated, but does not include 
either stories or images from any north- 
ern New England theaters. 

Over the century, Maine, New 
Hampshire and Vermont have had 
more than 1,000 places that showed 
movies from palaces to art houses to 
drive-ins. For some reason they have 
not been making it into the mainstream 
histories. 

The book is available from NATO, 
800843-5860. 



Works Collection from Karen Saum, 
3/4-inch video copies of productions She 
Knew a Phoenix, about poet and Maine 
resident May Sarton, This Land: The 
Story of a Community Land Trust and 
a Co-op Called H.O.M.E., and others. 

Books and Other Things 

Pamela Wintle donated film reference 
books including Peter Bogdanovich's 
John Ford and Producing Industrial 
Films by Jack DeWitt. John Greenman, 
Audrey Kupferberg and Diane Lee also 
added to the research library. 

Rod Hook sent a first-day cover, 
"50th Anniversary of Motion Pictures." 

Video Display 
for Retailers 




Photo: Darwin Davidson 

Videos of Life in New England is a 
selection of programs that shows impor- 
tant, often vanished, ways of life. Avail- 
able in a counter-top stand, the videos 
are an ideal product for bookstores, gift 
stores and museum shops. Included is 
Tales of Wood and Water, a documen- 
tary on Maine's wooden boat culture, 
and Mt. Washington: Among the Clouds, 
an early history of life at the top. 

Thirteen titles are available at whole- 
sale prices. The point-of-purchase 
stand is included free of charge. For 
an illustrated catalog and order form 
describing the complete Videos of Life 
in New England line, call 800 639-1636 
and ask for Libby Roscmcier. 



Members 



Friends 

Alan & Eleanor McClelland 
Robert & Elizabeth Saudek 
David C. Smith 
MacKay Wolff 

Corporate and Associate Members 

John Bragg, N.H. Bragg & Sons 

Darwin Davidson, Darwin K. Davidson, Ltd. 

Marcia Fenn 

Nancy Gray, Harraseeket Inn 

Ernest & Kathryn Gross 

Donald Hammond, Hammond Lumber 

Company 
Miriam Hansen 

Mark Henderson, VP Film & Tape 
Robert Jordan 
Don Lewis, Lewis & Malm 
Larry Lichty 
Edgar & Sally Lupfer 
Patricia McGeorge 
Modular Media 
Charles & Charlotte Morrill 
John Mucci, VisNet East, GTE 
Richard Rosen, Rosen's Department Store 
McKie Wing Roth, Jr. 
Clare Sheldon 
Nancy Sheldon 
Peter & Ann Sheldon 
Noel & Betty Stookey 
Lynda Tyson, Tyson & Partners, Inc. 
Eric von Hippel 
Joel & Allene White 
Pamela Wintle 
Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Abbott Memorial Library 

The American Experience, WGBH-TV, 

Eileen Mulvey 

Bangor Daily News, Mrs. Joanne Van Namee 
Bangor Historical Society, Pamela McTigue 
Boothbay Railway Village, George McEvoy 

and Maureen Stormont 
Calais Free Library, Marilyn Diffin 
Cherryfield Narraguagus Historical Society, 

Mrs. Margery Brown 
Coastside Parks & Recreation, Inc., Ken 

Lundie 

College of the Atlantic, Marcia Dworak 
Dirigo High School Library, Patricia Conant 
Ellsworth Public Library, Patricia Foster 
Essex Shipbuilding Museum, Diana H. 

Stockton 

Farmington Public Library, Jean Oplinger 
Farnsworth Museum, Deborah Vendetti 
Alicia Condon & Bill Gross 
H.O.M.E. Inc. Learning Center 



Indiana Historical Society, Stephen Fletcher 
Kidspeace New England, John Waters 
Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Art 

Cohn 
Maine Forest & Logging Museum, Susan 

Jenssen 

Maine Historical Society, Elizabeth Miller 
Maine Medical Center, Elaine Solesky 
Maine Public Broadcasting System, Bernard 

Roscetti 

Maine State Library, J. Gary Nichols 
Margaret Chase Smith Library Center, 

Gregory Gallant 



Thank you, Current Members! 

Check your mailing label. Your 
membership expiration date should 
appear there. Save NHF a mailing 
by sending your renewal check 
now! VISA and MasterCard renew- 
als are welcome. If there's no date 
on the address label, please turn to 
page 15 and join. 

Special Thanks to All 
Our First Members 

Eighty members from 1989, the first 
year of membership, are still with 
us! Our "longest surviving mem- 
ber," Windy Wincote Schweikert, 
who joined Northeast Historic 
Film on February 3, 1989, is the 
recipient of a free NHF sweatshirt. 

An NHF sweatshirt, not otherwise 
available, will be awarded to all 
members upgrading their member- 
ship level from Regular ($25) to 
Associate ($100) between now and 
June 1. 



Market Square Health Center 

Northeast Harbor Library, Polly Cote 

Orland Historical Society, William Larkin 

Pemetic Elementary School, Ellen Gilmore 

Prime Resource Center, Keith Leavitt 

Reiche School, Judd Evans 

DeWitt Sage 

Harold & Janet Simmons 

Simmons College Library 

Sultan Technikon Library, A. Raju 

Pittsfield Public Library 

South Portland High School Library 

Sumner Memorial High School, Caroline 

Allen 

Union Historical Society, Alison Metcalfe 
Vassalboro Historical Society, Betty Taylor 



Vinalhaven Historical Society 

Waterville High School Media Center, Dan 

McCarthy 

Wilton Historical Society 
Women Unlimited, Dale McCormick 
Yarmouth Historical Society, Marilyn 

Hinkley 

Regular Members 

Herb Adams 

Joan Amory 

Kathy Anderson 

Tom Armstrong 

James & Esther Austin 

Jean Barrett 

Phyllis & Bob Beallor 

Henry Becton, Jr. 

Mark Belisle 

Paul & Mollie Birdsall 

Esther Jones Bissell & Roy V. Heisler 

Lynne Blair 

John Blitzer 

Ben & Jeannette Blodget 

Richard Bock 

Nat Bowditch 

Q. David Bowers 

Benjamin & Joan Branch 

Julie Bressor 

John M.R. Bruner 

Fred Buechner 

George Buehler 

Neal & Betty Butler 

Mrs. Frederic Camp 

Mary Grace Canfield 

Dr. Constance Carlson 

Robert Carnie 

Michel Chalufour 

Brenda Condon 

Charles S. Cummiskey 

Wallace Cunningham 

David & Dani Danzig 

Dave 8c Ginny Davis 

Clarence DeRochemont 

Josephine Detmer 

Peg & John Dice 

Peter Dickey 

Daniel Donovan 

Calvin W. Dow 

Neal C. Dow 

Shirley Dutton 

Bob Eggleston 

Lloyd Ekholm 

John Ellingwood 

Mrs. Anna Mary Elskus 

Lynn Farnell 

Carroll Faulkner & Ann Holland 

Steven Feia 

Joseph Filtz 



12 



Ann & Everett Foster 

Yves Frenetic 

Eugene Fuller 

Kathryn H. Fuller 

Peter Gammons, Jr. 

H. William Geoffrion 

John Gfroerer 

Julia Gilmore 

Lea Girardin 

Jim Goff 

Martha Goldner 

Douglas Gomery 

Terry Grant 

Mr. & Mrs. Clarence Hamilton 

Jim Hamlin 

Francis Hatch 

George Hatch 

Fred & Prudy Heilner 

Rand Herbert 

Charles Hesse 

Terry Hoffer 

C.A. Porter Hopkins 

John Howard 

Sherman Howe, Jr. 

Stanley Howe 

David Huntley 

Douglas Ilsley 

Ann Ivins 

Jeff Janer 

Ned Johnston 

Thomas Joyce 

Susan Kaplan 

John Karol, Jr. 

Ron Kiesman 

Richard Kimball, Jr. 

Nancy King 

Ernest Knight 

Audrey & Larry Kolloff 

Diane Kopec 

Mark Letizia 

John Lickerman 

Stephen Lindsay 

Bill Lippincott 

Betty Ann & Donald Lockhart 

Roy Lockwood 

Bonnie Lounsbury 

Howard Lowell 

Mr. & Mrs. George MacLeod 

Wendy P. Matthews 

Eugene Mawhinney 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Judith McGeorge 

Carl McGraw 

John Mcllwaine 

Charles Ray McKay 

Franklin & Phyllis Mellen 

Bruce Meulendyke 

Faith Moll 



Betsy Montandon 

Betty & Hugh Montgomery 

Henry Moulton 

Francis Moulton, Jr. 

Lewis Nichols 

John O'Brien 

George O'Neill 

Kathryn Olmstead 

Glenn & Joy Olson 

Patricia Packard 

George Paquette 

Ed Pert 

Ruth & Bill Pfaffle 

James Phillips, Jr. 

Annie Proulx 

Ken Quimby, Jr. 

Elvie Ramsdell 

Sally Regan 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Reid 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward Rendall 

Windsor Robinson 

George & Barbara Rolleston 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert E. Rosie 

Charles Ryan 

Harriet H. Sands 

Shan Sayles 

Ronald Schliessman 

Wendy Wincote Schweikert 

Mr. & Mrs. P.H. Sellers 

Jennifer Sheldon 

Dr. Marshall Smith 

Thomas Smith 

Pat & Roy Snell 

Gifford Stevens 

John Stillman 

Lynda Sudlow 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Taylor 

William Taylor 

Drs. L. & M. Temeles 

Denis Thoet 

Charles & Cathy Thompson 

Ethel B. Turner 

Robert Tyler 

Arthur C. Verow 

Mrs. Barbara Wakeman 

Robert 8c Julia Walkling 

Mary Anne Wallace 

John Ware, Jr. 

Seth Washburn 

Nola Wass 

Vern & Jackie Weiss 

Lisa Whitney 

Tappy & Robin Wilder 

Johff Wilson & Sherry Streeter 

Bonnie Wilson 

Carter Wintle 

Edith Wolff 

Cynthia Wood 



Bob Woodbury 
Roger York 

Educator/Student Members 

Mark L. Anderson 

Scott Andrews, Chewonki Foundation 

Miss Rosemary Anthony 

Albert Belanger 

Deborah Belyea 

Thomas Boelz 

Michelle Branigan 

Brick Store Museum 

Carol Bryan 

Prof. William Burgess 

Richard Burns 

Carnegie Library, Good Will-Hinckley 

Patricia Conant, Dirigo High School Library 

Dr. Richard Condon, Univ of Maine, 

Farmington 

Joseph Conforti, New England Studies, USM 
Alvina Cyr, Dr. Lewis S.Libby School 
Rudolph Deetjen, Jr. 
Elaine Gardner 
Christopher Glass 
Joe Gray, Mid-Coast Audubon 
Gray-New Gloucester Middle School 

Library 
Cora Greer 

Eithne Johnson & Eric Shaefer 
Thomas Wayne Johnson, Chico Folklore 

Archive 
Richard Judd 

Janice Kasper, Penobscot Marine Museum 
Carol King, Wells Jr. High School Library 
Jim Laukes 
Robbie Lewis 
Dean Lyons 
Todd Mclntosh, Rockland District Middle 

School 

Tim O'Keefe, NRM Department 
Sanford Phippen 
Joan Radner 
Paige Roberts 

Mrs. Rowell, Fogler Library, Univ of Maine 
George Sarns, Traverse City Area Public 

Schools 

Gladden Schrock, Bennington College 
Gail Shelton 
Alex Silverman 
John Somerville 
Michelle B. Stevens 
Richard & Laura Stubbs 
D. Tibbetts, Lincoln Middle School 
Juris Ubans 

Dr. Richard E.G. White, Queens College 
Seth Wigderson, Univ. of Maine, Augusta 
Steve & Peggy Wight, Sunday River Inn 



13 



Reference by Mail 



New Title for Sale 



Members of Northeast Historic Film 
are invited to borrow from the circu- 
lating loan collection, Reference by 
Mail. For the full list of over 60 video- 
tapes, please call or write. 



The complete list of VHS videotapes 
contains other topics including Woods 
Work, Early Film, Franco-American 
Life, Television and Oral History. 

Many organizations historical 
societies, libraries, schools use tapes 
from the Reference by Mail collection 
for public programs. 

Each NHF member is invited to 
borrow a shipment of up to THREE 
tapes free of charge, including free 
shipping! Additional tapes may be 
borrowed (up to three at a time) for 
a $5 fee to cover each shipment. 



Associate and Corporate members 
can borrow up to fifteen tapes at no 
charge; Friends of NHF can borrow 
thirty tapes at no charge. 

Return Instructions 

The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be in the mail on their 
way back to NHF five days after they 
are received. 

Public Performance 

Videotapes listed are offered as a refer- 
ence service. Where possible, public 
performance rights are included. Please 
be sure to check each tape's status: 
PERF means public performance rights 
are included. If you have a particular 
date in mind, call ahead to ensure avail- 
ability. Where there is no PERF, the 
tape is for home use only and may not 
be shown to a group. 



Selections from 60 Titles 
Available on Free Loan 



Many of these tapes are available for 
purchase through NHF; a check mark 
(/) identifies tapes that may be bought. 

City Life 

Roughing the Uppers: The Great Shoe Strike 

j of 1937, a documentary by Robert 
^T Branham and students of Bates College 
about the ClO-organized shoe strike in 
Lewiston & Auburn, Maine. 1992. 55 mins., 
col., sd. 

24 Hours, a professional dramatization of fire 
fighting in Portland, Maine, with music and a 
memorable narration. A fascinating views of 
the city and its people by Earle Fenderson. 
1963. 27 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Country Life 

Paris 1929 and other views, the home movies 
of the Wright family in Paris, Maine. Includes 
excellent agricultural scenes: haying, mowing 
an orchard. 1929-30s. 80 mins. b&w, si. 

Dead River Rough Cut, the lives and philoso- 

- phies of two woodsmen-trappers, 
^T rough language and all. A film by 

Richard Searls and Stuart Silverstein. 
1976. 55 mins. col., sd. 



Fisheries 

The Maine Lobster, lobster fisheries and 
consumption with unusual footage including 
the assembly of frozen lobster TV dinners, 
ca. 1955. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Performing Arts 

Bonsoir Mes Amis, a portrait of two of 

/Maine's finest traditional Franco- 
American musicians, Ben Guillemette 
and Lionel "Toots" Bouthot. By Huey. 
1990. 46 mins., col., sd. 

Geography 

Assignment in Aroostook, Loring Air Force 
Base in northern Maine closes this year. This 
orientation film shows the woman at home, 
the sergeant at work, the family at play. 1956. 
27 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Mount Washington: Among the Clouds, a 

/history of the hotels, newspaper and 
cog railway, 1852-1908. 30 mins., col., 
sd. 

Check "Reference by Mail List" on the 
order form, or call, to receive the full 
list of videos for loan. 




The Maple 
Sugaring Story 
for young 
viewers, 
interweaves 
the legend, 
science, 

history and geography of the sugar- 
maple industry. Produced by Betty Ann 
and Donald Lockhart of Charlotte, 
Vermont. The Lockharts have Masters 
of Science degrees in Education. 

Winner CINE Golden Eagle. 

28 mins. col., sd. Public Performance 
Rights included. $29.95/NHF members 
$24.95 



COMPANION BOOK 

The Maple Sugaring Story: 
A Guide for Teaching and Learn- 
ing about the Maple Industry, 
includes pre-Kindergarten to Grade 
6 lessons, recipes and a resource 
guide. 80 pages, $4.50 



Fifth Anniversary 
Members' Special 



FREE VIDEO PROGRAM! 

If you renew your annual member- 
ship, or become a new member, or 
give a gift membership, between 
now and May 1, 1994, you can 
select one free video from this list: 
From Stump to Ship, Woodsmen 
and River Drivers, Earliest Maine 
Films, Ice Harvesting Sampler, 
Maine's Television Time Machine. 
Just write "Member Offer" on the 
order form when you send in your 
renewal, new membership or gift 
membership. 



14 



In Video: The Year's 
Best Sellers 

Videotape distribution helps moving 
images of northern New England reach 
homes and institutions all over North 
America and overseas. Revenues from 
videotape sales support the NHF cura- 
torial program. 

In 1993 Northeast Historic Film's 
top ten best sellers were: 

1 . From Stump to Ship 

2. Woodsmen and River Drivers 

3. Dead River Rough Cut 

4. Earliest Maine Films 

5. King Spruce 

6. Around Cape Horn 

7. Ice Harvesting Sampler 

8. The Robert McCloskey Library 

9. Ride the Sandy River Railroad 

10. Mt. Washington: Among the Clouds 
Check "Video Sales Catalog" on the 
order form, or call, to receive a list of 
tapes for sale. H 



NHF Membership 



As an independent nonprofit organiza- 
tion, NHF depends on its members. You 
help us set priorities, you pass the word 
about the significance of cultural pres- 
ervation, and your dues help keep us 
operating. Please join and renew! 

Regular members, $25 per year, receive 
a subscription to Moving Image Review, 
notice of screenings and events, loan of 
one reference tape at no charge, and dis- 
counts on materials distributed by NHF. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 per 
year, receive all regular membership 
benefits. This category is for teachers 
and students at any level. 

Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year, 
receive all regular benefits of member- 
ship, including loan of one reference 
tape at no charge, plus additional copies 
of Moving Image Review on request 



and reduced rates for consultation, 
presentations and professional services. 

Associates (Individuals) and Corporate 
Members, $100 per year, receive the 
benefits of regular members, special 
recognition in Moving Image Review, 
and loan of five reference tapes at no 
charge. 

Friends, $250 per year, receive all 
benefits of regular membership and, in 
addition, loan of ten reference tapes at 
no charge. 

Membership at any level is an oppor- 
tunity to become involved with the 
preservation and enjoyment of our 
moving-image heritage. I 

Your dues are tax-deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 



> 



Membership and Order Form Northeast Historic Film, P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, ME 04416 USA 

207 469-0924 
. . . FAX 207469-7875 

Join How! 

Free Gift Tape! 

free Reference by Mail! 



Ordered by 



Name 



Address 
City _ 
State _ 



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Name 



Zip 



Address 
City _ 
State _ 



Zip 



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Qty. 


Total 
































Purchases: Subtotal 
~~\ Special Fourth Class mail: add $2.00 
plus $1 each additional item Tax: ME residents add 6% 

Q Priority Mail: add $3.50 Shipping and handling 
plus $1 each additional item 

n UPS: add $3.50 plus $1 each 
additional item 











D Please send Video Sales Catalog! 
d Please send Reference by Mail list! 

Payment Method 

\ I Check or money order make check payable to Northeast Historic Film 
DviM D MasterCard Credit card* 

Questions? Call Libby Rosemeierat (207) 469-0924 



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Orders Call toll free 800 639-1636 Thanks to Long Distance North, Burlington, Vermont 




Holman Day Productions, a Maine film company, made more than twenty 2-reelers in 1919-1920. 
Photo: Everett Foster Collection, NHF. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 




RUCKSPORT, MAINE, USA 
04416-0900 (207) 469-0924 




ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



Looking Into the Future 

An archives has to look both ways at 
once. While researchers look back into 
the past at turn-of-the-century textile 
mills, early automobiles, World War II 
home front, Jewish family life in the 
1950s and many other retrospective 
topics . . . people responsible for the 
collections and administration have to 
look into the future. 

For Generations To Come 

As a public institution, Northeast 
Historic Film is responsible for build- 
ing the archives for future generations. 
David Weiss addressed the issue of 
archival appraisal (the art of judging 
what to save and where to spend lim- 
ited resources) in a presentation at the 
American Historical Association's 
annual conference in January. 

Historically Important 

Weiss called for more attention from 
historians to moving-image acquisitions 
policies around the country. While 
many archives like NHF try to respond 
to users' needs in the moment, they also 
need to look over the horizon to estab- 
lish long-term goals for collecting and 
making material available. Weiss noted 
that there are few forums for discussing 
what makes moving images "histori- 
cally important." 

Farsighted Donors 

Archives are dependent on uncommonly 
farsighted donors who understand the 
significance of saving moving-image 
material for the future. 

People who saved film over the 
years before donating it to groups like 
NHF are doing something important for 
the future. So are people who help plan, 
gather resources and build an archives' 
curatorial and outreach functions by 
donating time, money and expertise. 



Northeast Mrsfor/r Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedi<ated to the Preservation 
of Northern Hew England 
Motion Futures 



Summer 1994 




Executive Director's Report p. 2 

One Hundred Years: Millennial 

News by Rick Prelingcr p. 4 

New York Film Collections by Kcnn 

Rabin p. 5 

New Members p. 8 

Reference by Mail Videos p. 9 

Calendar p. 10 



Moving Image Review ISSN 0897-0769 is a 
semiannual publication ot Northeast His- 
toric Film, P.( ). Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 
04416. David S. Weiss, executive- director, 
Karan Sheldon, editor. 207 469-0924 



Vision of the Future 



The Alamo Theatre building on Main 
Street in Bucksport, Maine, is a 1916 
cinema, now home to Northeast Historic 
Film. When the theater closed in 1956 the 
600-seat auditorium was gutted for an 
A&P grocery. Moviegoers in Bucksport 
and a dozen surrounding towns have 
since had to drive half an hour north to 
Bangor, south to Belfast or east to 
Ellsworth. 

NHF will be returning community 
moviegoing to the area in the historic 
building with a new 120-seat theater. The 
theater is a part of a renovation project 
creating space to carry out Northeast 
Historic Film's integrated mission of 
preservation, education programs and 
outreach. 

Space for All Functions 

Serving the local community is one goal. 



The auditorium incorporates a stage and 
will be made available for many types of 
events: movies, live music, lectures and 
meetings. The moving image collections 
are the heart of the organization. Climate- 
controlled storage is set aside in the 
building. Technical services and film/ 
video distribution serve the curatorial 
and outreach functions and are a source 
of operational revenue. Research and 
interpretive space furthers the educational 
goals of NHF. All areas will welcome 
continuing volunteer participation at 
many levels including students and seniors. 

The A Team 

The team responsible for the building 
plan is Roc Caivano of Bar Harbor, 
Maine, with Terry Rankine of South 
Thomaston, Maine, and Cambridge, 
Mass., acting as design and planning 




consultant. Rankine was one of the 
founding principals of the well-known 
architectural firm of Cambridge Seven 
Associates, and has considerable experi- 
ence in architecture, planning and exhibit 
design. 

Project Has it All 

Rankine is intrigued by this project to 
bring the Alamo back to life. "Once 
again it will be an important part of the 
world of film," he said recently. "It 
brings together the restoration of a build- 
ing that gave so much to the life and 
culture of the area, with the need to 
preserve the visual records of the North- 
east. It has it all. The kind of project that 
one can really get into." 

Roc Caivano has been a College of 
the Atlantic faculty member; his work 
can be seen on the COA campus and 
many other Mount Desert Island loca- 
tions. Caivano was recently joined by 
John Gordon, project manager, who lives 
with his family in Bucksport. Gordon 
says, "This project will help Bucksport 
continue to mend the fabric of its down- 
town and further realize the potential this 
town possesses." 



Perspective view of proposed theater 
drawn by John Gordon. 



Executive Director's Report 



This has been a time of great energy and 
progress for the archives with an expanded 
team and new cooperative efforts on many 
fronts. 

Over the last several months we have 
been working with an increasing number 
of organizations providing technical 
services and consulting. 

Harvard University Archives 
Recently Roberta Kovitz, assistant cura- 
tor at the Harvard University Archives, 
contacted us about evaluating their mov- 
ing image collections. 
Kovitz reports, 

Over the years the Harvard University 
Archives has collected a wide variety of 
moving image formats. We needed 
someone fully versed in the medium, 
with the equipment to view it, and 
capable of evaluating the collections 
from the perspective of preservation and 
user needs. David brings together all 
these attributes, in addition to being a 
patient teacher. Working with the data- 
base designer from the Harvard Univer- 
sity Library Preservation Office, David 
helped us develop a survey instrument 
to provide a basis for dealing with our 
moving images. 

Staff Support 

Lori Lovell is our new office manager, a 
Bucksport resident who has worked at 
the Training & Development Corp., 
Bucksport, and University of Maine 
College of Education, Orono. 

Volunteer Corps 

Broad-ranging volunteer involvement at 
NHF has been essential to our program on 
every front. Terry Rankine has been work- 
ing pro bono directing our building plan. 

Curatorial and outreach activities 
have been enhanced by work of Yvette 
St. Peter several times a week, by Jim 
Phillips's projection services and prints, 
William McKinley's wonderful collec- 
tions, and by such talented folks as Phil 
Whitney who saw a need our silent Ice 
Harvesting Sampler and provided a 
wonderful narration. Tim Emerson lent a 
hand with construction. Contributors at a 
distance include the researchers men- 
tioned in the update on Phillips Lord (see 
page 9). 

Phil Yates has continued to be a 
stalwart and much-appreciated team 



member, contributing 
countless hours of 
volunteer time. Lynne 
Blair has also volun- 
teered on top of her 
regular schedule. The 
Community Advisory 
Board helped plan the 
next Alamo renova- 
tion phase. We all 
enjoyed monthly 
potlucks and screen- 
ings this winter and 
thank all who contrib- 
uted to the good cheer. 

I'm pleased to introduce two new 
board members, Michael Fiori and James 
Henderson, who generously bring their 
experienced voluntary leadership to the 
organization. 

The Board of Trustees 

Michael J. Fiori, Bangor, Maine President 
and COO, Downcast Pharmacy Inc., a Maine- 
based chain specializing in geriatric and long- 
term care. CEO of ODV, Inc., South Paris, 
Maine, manufacturers and distributors world- 
wide of narcotic identification and forensic 
equipment. Director/Trustee Bangor Histori- 
cal Society. ' 

Paul Gelardi, Cape Porpoise, Maine 
PRESIDENT President, Electronic Media 
International, Kennebunkport. Entrepreneur 
and international consultant whose specialty 
is manufacturing and electronic media; his 
company, Global Zero, produces video- 
cassettes in Westbrook, Maine. 

James S. Henderson, Orr's Island, Maine 
Maine State Archivist, administrative head of 
the State Archives with fifteen staff members. 
Education includes PhD in political science, 
Emory University. From Skowhegan, Maine. 
Interest in Maine history, politics 8c arts. 

Alan J. McClelland, Camden, Maine 
TREASURER Retired defense electronics 
executive from Ford Aerospace and Gilfillan 
In. Volunteer archivist and photographer, 
Owls Head Transportation Museum, Owls 
Head, Maine. On executive board of the 
Society of Maine Archivists. Interested in 
video, photography and computer technology. 

Richard Rosen, Bucksport, Maine 
VICE PRESIDENT Owner, Rosen's Depart- 
ment Store, Bucksport, third-generation. V.P. 
board of Bucksport regional health center 
and cofounder, Bucksport Bay Area Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Active in Republican state 
politics. 




David Weiss, executive director (left), and Terry Rankine, architect, 
go over plans for the NHF building renovation. The current plans are 
on page 6. 



Robert Saudek, Washington D.C. and 
Boothbay Harbor, Maine Retired Chief, 
Library of Congress Motion Picture, Broad- 
casting and Recorded Sound Division, Wash- 
ington, D.C. More than 40 years in television. 
Board, Marlboro Music Festival, Vermont. 

Shan Sayles, Carmel by the Sea, Calif, and 
Cape Rosier, Maine More than 40 years' 
experience in the film-exhibition business. 
Active in California film exhibition. Arts and 
AIDS philanthropy. Summer and winter 
visitor to Cape Rosier. 

Karan Sheldon, Blue Hill Falls, Maine 
Staff, NHF. Cofounder of NHF, previously at 
WGBH-TV Boston. Serves on Library of 
Congress task force on public access and 
educational use of film. 

Dr. David C. Smith, Bangor, Maine Prof, 
of History, University of Maine, Orono. Bird 
8c Bird professor of history and cooperating 
professor of quaternary studies; at the Uni- 
versity of Maine for 25 years. Author of 
books on World War II. 

David S. Weiss, Blue Hill Falls, Maine 
Executive Director and cofounder of NHF. 
Previously media producer in Boston. Degree 
in film and semiotics from Brown University. 
Past chair of Media Arts review panel, Maine 
Arts Commission. Serves on Maine's Histori- 
cal Records Advisory Board. 

Pamela Wintle, Washington D.C. Founder, 
Smithsonian Institution Human Studies Film 
Archives. One of the country's authorities on 
the physical care and preservation of 16 mm. 
archival film, as well as anthropological film 
study. Family roots in Skowhegan, Maine. 




5 



David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



Projection 



Where the Rivers Flow North 



There isn't as much 16 mm. film being 
projected as there used to be. Still, many 
independent filmmakers create and 
distribute work on 16 mm. NHF has 
publicly screened documentaries includ- 
ing Ned Johnston's beautiful film about 
African desert life, Mauritania The 
Wealth of Blood, and Kevin Rafferty and 
James Ridgeway's funny political picture, 
Feed. 

Gorgeous Prints . . . Or Garbage 

There's nothing like a beautiful new print. 
A ruined print is a heartbreak. Scratches, 
dirt and torn perforations are a waste of 
an increasingly scarce resource. 

Because at many institutions 16 mm. 
projection occasions are infrequent, fewer 
people are familiar with equipment and 
procedures. Three guidelines are of utmost 
importance: 1) Projectionists must be 
trained; 2) The projectionist must not 
leave the projector; 3) Damage occurring 
in projection should be reported without 
delay to the lender of the film. 




The torn perforations occurred because the 
projectionist was not paying attention. 

NHF Statement of Purpose 



The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape ot interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but arc not 
limited to a survey of moving pic- 
tures of northern New England; 
Preserving and safeguarding film 
.ind videotape through restoration, 
duplication, providing of technical 
guidance and climate-controlled 
storage; Creation of educational 
programs through screenings and 
exhibitions on -site and in touring 
programs; Assistance to members of 
the public, scholars and students .it 
all levels, and members of the film 
and video production community, 
through providing a study center, 
technical services and facilities. 



Howard Frank Mosher's Vermont novel 
is now an independently produced and 
distributed feature film shot on location 
in Vermont and New Hampshire. Set in 
1927, the film tells the story of a woods- 
man (played by Rip Torn) who refuses to 
sell his timberland to the power com- 
pany. His companion, Bangor (Tantoo 
Cardinal, who had lead roles in Dances 
with Wolves and Black Robe), is a strong 




woman as Cardinal says, "She didn't 
sweat the small stuff." 

Where the Rivers Flow North is about 
these characters and about logging, river 
driving and cultural change. "Moderniza- 
tion is a sub-text," states Jay Craven in 
his director's notebook. 

It all ends in a movie theater. 

Caledonia Pictures of Barnet, Vermont, 
802 633-3220, 
plans a barn- 
storming tour of 
the film through 
northern New 
England. They 
are also distrib- 
uting an educa- 
tional package 
including video- 
tapes and cur- 
ricular print 
materials. The 
videotape will be 
available from 
Northeast His- 
toric Film. 



Main Street, St. Johnsbury, Vermont. Photo: Joseph Mehling/ Caledonia 
Pictures. 



Maine Humanities Resources 



Maine Humanities Resources, with a new 
service called "Ideas to Go," has been 
established by the Maine Humanities 
Council, a private, nonprofit foundation 
affiliated with the National Endowment 
for the Humanities. Ideas to Go consists 
of a circulating film/video collection, 
traveling exhibits for loan, and reading 
and discussion programs. 

Film/Video 

Northeast Historic Film is administer- 
ing the film and video programs from 
its offices in Bucksport. Nonprofit 
organizations in Maine may borrow 
from a collection emphasizing current 
productions including Anchor of the 
Soul on African-American life in Maine. 
Humanities Council-supported 16 mm. 
films are also available. Many videotapes 
complement the Council's latest state- 
wide initiative, The Century Project: 



Modern Times in Maine and America, 
1890-1930. 

Traveling Exhibits 

Twenty exhibits on subjects including 
Wordsworth and the Age of English 
Romanticism and Martin Luther King, 
Jr. are available. All exhibits are low 
security and contain no artifacts. They 
are administered by Lynne Blair, also in 
NHF's building. 

Let's Talk About it in Maine 

Maine libraries can create reading and 
discussion programs using book sets from 
Ideas to Go in cooperation with the 
Maine State Library. Twenty themes are 
available including The Journey Inward: 
Women's Autobiography. 

To request the Ideas to Go brochure 
call 469-6912 or write to Maine Humani- 
ties Resources, PO Box 1026, Bucksport, 
ME 04416. 



One Hundred Years: 
Jumping on the Millennial Bandwagon, Archives Await End of Century 



Five years before the year 2000, the media 
race to portray the last hundred years is 
on. These projects are planned for release 
by 1997, leaving an open window for 
other shows not yet envisioned when the 
thousands digit actually rolls over. 

Archives & Researchers at Work 

This flurry of millennial interest promises 
to consume the efforts of archives and 
archival researchers over the next few 
years. It also promises increased income 
for stock-footage libraries and copyright 
holders. With a warning that things can 
change rapidly in the media world, here's 
a brief rundown of some 20th-century 
projects: 

ABC News is producing an ambitious 
series currently known as The 20th 
Century Project in partnership with 
Japan's publicly funded NHK network. 
ABC's contribution, slated to air monthly 
beginning in January 1997, consists of 
twelve programs formatted to fit a two- 
hour commercial time slot. Each show 
will be set in a particular U.S. city or 
town and will draw on personal stories. 
NHK and ABC are mounting a worldwide 
research effort for the series. 

The British Broadcasting Company 
(BBC) and Boston's public TV station 
WGBH are coproducing The People's 
Century. Of 26 total hours, WGBH is 
producing eight and BBC eighteen. A 
topical series depending heavily on archi- 
val footage, the theme is "mass movement 
and the common man." Episodes may, 
for instance, cover how sport lost its 
elitist nature. 

Although not a formal wrap-up of the 
century's events, Walter Cronkite's TV 
series The Twentieth Century is being 
revived by CBS News Productions, pick- 
ing up in the mid-1950s (roughly where 
Cronkite left off). Most airtime in the 
series will be composed of CBS News 
archival footage plus CBS News reporting 
(e.g., coverage of events by correspon- 
dents). Hosted by Mike Wallace, the 
series includes 22 hours that will initially 
air on the Arts and Entertainment Net- 
work this fall. 

In collaboration with CBS News 
Productions, Grinker and Company is 



by Rick Prelinger 

now producing a four-hour series called 
The Century That Made America Great, 
scheduled to air beginning in January 
1995. The series is composed of archival 
footage (mostly drawn from the CBS News 
Archives) and interviews. 

Turner Broadcasting (TBS Productions) 
has commenced production on a ten-hour 
series tentatively titled Century. Under 
the direction of executive producer 
Jonathan Taplin, Turner's twist involves 
the participation of feature-film directors 
and producers such as Paul Schrader, 
Philip Kaufman and David Puttnam. 
Each episode deals with a topic whose 
treatment will be up to the individual 
director; a Turner spokesperson indicated 
that some episodes may include historical 
reenactments. 

TBS Productions is creating other 
documentary series relating to this cen- 
tury, including A Century of Women, 
which aired in early June and featured 
dramatized sequences; The Native Amer- 
icans; and Driving Passion, on the history 
of the American automobile. 

The Voyager Company, a producer 
of interactive software and laserdiscs, 
plans to release Rick Prelinger's Our 
Secret Century in early 1995. This CD- 
ROM project includes twelve discs, each 
an anthology of ephemeral films, film 
clips, text and graphic materials relating 
to a different 20th-century subject or 
preoccupation. The first two discs, 
Capitalist 

Realism, on 
American labor 
and industry, 
and The Rain- 
bow is Yours, 
on design and 
consumerism, 
are in produc- 
tion. In col- 
laboration with 
Kathy High, 
Prelinger has 
begun to pro- 
duce a feature 
film with the 
same title. 



Germany's ZDF plans a 12-part series 
for worldwide distribution entitled A 
Century Takes Off. Producer Dieter 
Franck will examine the first 30 years of 
this century in the context of issues 
important to us today such as the envi- 
ronment, the status of women, migration 
and emigration. 

Cronkite/Ward and Company (New 
York and Washington) will soon an- 
nounce a ten-hour series for worldwide 
broadcast, cable and other media, includ- 
ing new media, for presentation at the 
end of 1995. 

Chance to Present Unseen Images 

With a profusion of media outlets and 
five more years before 2000, this report is 
surely incomplete. But even as the list 
grows, most archivists will see these 
programs as a chance to place unseen and 
provocative images before the public and 
to present history as more than simple 
nostalgia. The ultimate success of these 
projects, and possibly the way the 20th 
century is finally remembered, will rest 
on the creativity of their producers. 

Rick Prelinger has lived through two- 
fifths of the twentieth century, the last ten 
years as an archivist of advertising, indus- 
trial and educational films in New York. 
He is publisher of Footage 91: North 
American Film and Video Sources and 
currently Director of Archival Develop- 
ment at Home Box Office in New York 
City. 




Eleanor Roosevelt from A Century of Women, Turner's 6-hour documentary 
series. Photo: Archive Photos. 



Changes in New York 
Film Archives 



Grants in Action 




by Kenn Rabin 

Radical changes have been occurring in 
the New York archival scene, the home 
of many of the largest privately owned 
historic film collections in the country. 
Though the shifting of these assets, which 
constitute a vital record of our society, 
may mean in some cases increased acces- 
sibility, in one case at least, we may all 
suffer a tremendous loss. 

Grinberg 

Grinberg Film Libraries, which operates 
in New York and Los Angeles, represents 
the ABC News Collection, Paramount 
and Pathe newsreels, and various smaller 
collections. Last month Grinberg was sold 
to Sequent Communications, the real- 
estate company that owns the Charles 
River Studios in Boston. Bernie Chertok, 
who has run Grinberg/New York for 
over 35 years, is serving as a transition 
consultant but will be leaving to start his 
own stock-footage research agency. As 
well, Linda Grinberg, daughter of the 
original founder, has stepped down on 
the West Coast. The staff librarians, who 
know the collection intimately, will 
remain in place for now, and ABC News 
will (at least for the present) continue 
their association with the archives.' 

Prelinger 

Prelinger Archives, which is the best 
source of sociologically oriented material 
from the 1920s on, will soon be repre- 
sented by another New York library, 
Archive Films, though collector Rick 
Prelinger will retain actual ownership. 
This will free him up to concentrate on 
building the best collection he can by 
unburdening him of day-to-day business, 
and, through Archive, researchers will 
have increased access to the collection. 
Patrick Montgomery, owner of Archive 
Films, has always been sympathetic to 
independent filmmakers and has empha- 
sized computerized cataloging and direct 
access to screening materials. A major 
new cataloging effort is already underway 
at Prelinger in anticipation of the change. 

Fox Movietone 

Potentially the most disastrous event in 
the New York shuffle is the closing of the 



Fox Movietonews collection on June 30. 
From 1919 to 1963 Fox was the most 
comprehensive theatrical newsreel in the 
country. In addition to newsreels and 
their outtakes, the archives includes count- 
less theatrical shorts and travelogues, and 
therefore constitutes one of the largest 
privately owned collections of American 
historical audiovisual materials. Fox Inc. 
has recently underwritten a major effort 
to transfer the collection to digital video- 
tape, but some of the transfers have been 
quite poor. Luckily, the film masters will 
be retained, contrary to earlier reports. 
Many believe Fox will close its doors to 
the public permanently next month and 
will be available exclusively to 20th 
Century Fox features, television, interac- 
tive, and cable. 

In the 1970s and 1980s studios such as 
Universal received large tax write-offs in 
exchange for donating their collections. 
When the Universal newsreels were given, 
unrestricted, to the National Archives, 
the American people benefited, getting 
unprecedented access to their own audio- 
visual history. However, changes in the 
tax code later in the 1980s rendered 
donating disadvantageous, as Fox discov- 
ered when it tried to donate its collection 
to the University of South Carolina some 
years ago. 

The Fox situation reminds us of the 
dark side of copyright ownership that, 
in fact, the public can be deprived of its 
own historical record if finances warrant 
it. We will continue to watch the New 
York events unfold with great interest. 

Kenn Rabin is the founder of Fulcrum 
Media Services and has been nominated 
for two Emmy Awards for his archival 
film research. He has developed produc- 
tion archival systems for many series, 
including Eyes on the Prize, Vietnam: A 
Television History, and Kevin Conner's 
500 Nations. Rabin teaches workshops on 
the production of compilation documenta- 
ries and consults with multimedia produc- 
ers in the San Francisco Bay area. 415 
459-4429, e-mail 74064.1351 
@compuserve.com. 



Maine Arts Commission, 
Rural Arts Initiative 
The Advancement Grant Program, Rural 
Arts Initiative, of the Maine Arts Com- 
mission made a second grant of $10,000 
in support of developing public space and 
programming in the Alamo Theatre 
building. This amount, for use between 
July 1994 and June 1995, will be used for 
technical consulting for stage, projection, 
lighting and sound systems; and for 
accessibility plans, arts management 
expertise and initial programs. 

The organization's strengths noted by 
the reviewing panel include NHP's long- 
range planning process, understanding of 
the community and cooperative projects. 

Thanks to the Commission staff for 
their continued support, to the panel, and 
to letter writers Jackson Gillman, Stand- 
up Chameleon; Glenn Jcnks, Bonnie 
Banks Productions; Melba C. Wilson, 
Executive Director, Arcady Music Festi- 
val; Roger Raymond, Bucksport Town 
Manager; Lisa Whitney, Bucksport Town 
Council member. 

Aroostook Project 

The Expansion Arts Fund of the Maine 
Community Foundation gave $1,500 to 
support "Aroostook County Film and 
Music Performance," which will bring 
film to the county in cooperation with 
people in Presque Isle, Fort Fairfield and 
Fort Kent. 

Presque Isle's Braden Theatre donated 
the only surviving 35 mm. nitrate him 
made by the Frontier Film Co., a visual 
catalog of some of the County's primary 
economic and social activities: Main 
Street, potato farming, apple growing, 
hunting and tourism. The Braden Theatre 
closed in December 1994 following the 
opening of a New York-owned eight- 
screen facility in the town. The Braden's 
owner has agreed to assist with screenings 
this fall even though his vintage theater 
will not otherwise be open for business. 

Matching Programs 
Current employees and retirees of many 
companies can make their gifts to NH1 go 
further, sometimes doubling or tripling 
the gift, by using corporate matching-ptt 
programs. 






Plan for the Alamo Theatre Building 



The Alamo Theatre, which fronts on Main Street (at the bottom of this space, now the theatrical fly, will offer storage. The basement will hold a 

page), will use all four levels for public and archival functions. The first climate-controlled vault for archival storage. Linking the floors is an 

floor will hold a theater and public exhibition space. The second floor elevator and stairway planned for the Alamo's parking lot area (at the top 

includes offices, technical services and reference materials. The third floor of this page). 




First Floor 



Main Street 



Second Floor 



Library of Congress 
Film Preservation Plan 

The National Film Preservation Public 
Access and Educational Use task force 
met May 23 in Los Angeles. NHF co- 
founder and task-force member 
Karan Sheldon participated in the 
meeting, the first face-to-face session 
after a series of conference calls. Recom- 
mendations from this and other task 
forces will result in a national film preser- 
vation plan to be released by the Librarian 
of Congress. The plan will be available 
for public comment for 60 days beginning 
in early August. 

Public Access 

Increasing availability of film prints for 
exhibition has been a task-force concern. 
The scope of the repertory exhibition 
market was one topic. A recommenda- 
tion is a "print bank" from which other- 
wise unavailable films can be loaned to 
exhibitors. Making information on 
existing sources for 35 mm. and 16 mm. 
prints more easily available was also 
discussed. 

Proposed Legislation 
The film preservation plan may lead to 
proposed legislation to establish a Film 
Preservation Foundation supported by 
federal appropriations and private match- 
ing funds. The foundation will assist the 
effort to save America's film heritage and 
bring it before the public. 




Film ID Card 

There's a pile of old film cans up in the 
attic. What the heck is in them? You 
know we don't have that old projector 
any more. . . . 

For those unlabeled cans and boxes, 
and for the times you can't quite re- 
member the difference between 16mm. 
and Super 8 because Uncle Ed didn't 
tell you what was going through his 
camera consult Northeast Historic 
Film's FILM ID CARD. 

The card identifies key dates and film 
stocks with brief helpful notes. The 
card is useful for small nonprofits and 
people with family film. It's free. Just 
call NHF. 



Your Comments Needed 
For a copy of the national film preserva- 
tion plan contact Steve Leggett, National 
Film Preservation Board Assistant at the 
Library of Congress, 202 707-5912; FAX 
202 707-2371. 



Regional Grant Opportunities 



EARNEST (Exchange of Arts Resources 
among the New England States) is a New 
England Foundation for the Arts program 
that makes funding available to presenters 
who engage New England artist groups 
based outside the presenter's home state. 
The artists engaged must be members of 
their own state's touring roster. So New 
Hampshire and Vermont sponsors could 
book Maine silent-film accompanists 
Danny Patt (Portland) or Glenn Jenks 
(Camden). Maine and New Hampshire 
sponsors could book Peter Tavalin (Put- 
ney), also an accompanist for silent film. 
The deadline is September 1 for events 
beginning after December 1. Call for the 



New England Foundation for the Arts 
guide to programs, 617 492-2914. 

Maine Historical Records Advisory 
Board Regrant Program is funded by 
the National Historical Publications and 
Records Commission to provide modest 
funding for projects to adopt proper 
archival planning and management tech- 
niques to preserve and improve access to 
important historical records. This in- 
cludes manuscripts, photographs, movie 
films, video or audio recordings. February 
1, 1995, is the next deadline. Call Janet 
Roberts at the Maine State Archives, 207 
287-5791. 



New at the Archives 

'Significant 16 mm. collections have been 
coming to the archives, including the life 
work of Archie Stewart, a 92-year-old 
photographer. His granddaughter, Mary 
Kelly, describes how Stewart "lovingly 
filmed his subjects hunting, fishing, 
canoes and canoemanship, Maine guides 
ca. 1926 on and scrupulously docu- 
mented his films." The preservation 
project is in partnership with the Maine 
Folklife Center at the University of 
Maine. 

Amateur collections documenting the 
region directly fit the archives' collecting 
mission. NHF has another function, 
which is to assist with the preservation of 
footage that would otherwise be lost. 
Unpreserved nitrate film continues to be 
of concern and arrives at the archives 
thanks to alert friends. 

Teens Films Found 

In May NHF member James Phillips 
found five reels of 35 mm. film from the 
teens. One reel of International Newsreel 
(1919) contains footage of returning 
World War I troops and a Gregory 
LaCava animated short by T. A. Dorgan. 
It was donated to the UCLA Film Archive, 
accepted by newsreel preservationist 
Blaine Bartell and curator Eddie Rich- 
mond. A copy will be available for pre- 
sentation to NHF's audiences. 

From the same collection, four one- 
reel comedies were donated to the Inter- 
national Museum of Photography at 
George Eastman House. James Phillips 
studied in Rochester and was glad that 
the archives agreed to preserve the films. 
The comedies include the 1915 Vitagraph 
Co. The Professor's Painless Cure with 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew, best known 
for A Florida Enchantment. GEH curator 
Dr. Jan-Christopher Horak will research 
an unidentified Lubin comedy with an 
epistolary hook penned by a British 
fellow, "Your American girls have no 
charm for me, they are too mannish." 

Film books, sheet music relating to 
movies, including Evangeline, and film- 
advertising materials were received from 
Michael Fiori, Kathryn Fuller, Douglas 
Gomery, Pam Wintle and Sam Taylor 
among others. Many thanks! 



American Memory: 
Multimedia Historical Collections from the Library of Congress 



New means of access to historical records 
including moving images are being 
created. One example is the American 
Memory project at the Library of Con- 
gress. Conceived as a way to help Library 
collections reach new audiences, more or 
less unmediated, the project has had a 
pilot period and is awaiting further 
funding before wider distribution. 

Interactive Future 

According to information put out by the 
Library, "Future researchers will be able 
to visit an American Memory workstation 
at a local library or school and search 
through collections, view interactive 
exhibitions that introduce specific collec- 
tions, and electronically 'copy' data for 
further study." 

While the Library is investigating 
digital motion-picture technology and 
on-line delivery, moving images are 
available on analog (CAV) laserdisc. One 
project still in production is The Ameri- 
can Variety Stage, 1870-1920. LeeEllen 
Friedland, who is working on preparing 
this collection, says, 

A librarian in the motion picture divi- 
sion, Gene DeAnna, and I did a survey 



of all the Paper Print films. We made a 
selection focusing on vaudeville, bur- 
lesque and musical revue. We found 
many vaudeville bits just like you would 
have seen on stage: trained dogs, contor- 
tionists, comedy vignettes. There were 
dance performances, short dramas and 
tableaux. 

American Memory drew from many 
divisions of the Library. Variety Stage 
was the first example that was explicitly 
an anthology, drawing from several 
special collection divisions film, sound, 
photos, manuscripts. The pilot project 
brought attention to collections that 
needed processing and preservation. 
American Memory has always tried to 
dovetail with ongoing preservation and 
be a catalyst for it. 

For research access, "We will make 
our own item-level records for the Paper 
Print films which will be part of the on- 
line collection." 

A two-year test-site evaluation, 
conducted in 44 schools and libraries 
across the country, has been completed. 
To give American Memory a test drive, 
visit the Library of Congress motion- 
picture reading room. 



New Members 



Corporate and Associate Members 

Beverly Bibber & Charles G. Tetro 
Catie Marshall & Nelson Bakerman 
Sky Dog Productions 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Graves Memorial Library, Kennebunkport 
Jay-Niles Memorial Library, North Jay 
York Institute Museum 

Regular Members 

Coco Adams 

I .im is Ames 

John Brooks 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Buffington 

Paul Cady 

James Carter 

Dennis Ekberg 

Austin Goodyear 

Eric Handley 

Lorraine Hanson 

Charles Hoag 

Glenn Jenks & Faith Getchell 

Mary Kelly 

JohnMacFadyen 

Kenn Rabin 



William Rand 

Bill Robertson 

Pat & Tom Schroth 

Evelyn Snell 

Philip P. Thompson 

Danna Ware 

Heather White 

Frank & Catherine Wiers 

Educator/Student Members 

D. Blanchard, Jordan Small School 

Tom Rankin, Center for Southern Studies 

Tony Smith 

Peggy Wiles 

Windham School Department 

Renewal Time? Members! 

Check your mailing label. Your member- 
ship expiration date should appear there. 
Save NHF a mailing by sending your 
renewal check now! VISA and MasterCard 
renewals are welcome. If there's no date 
on the address label, please turn to page 
11 and join. 



Further Information 

Carl Fleischhauer, Coordinator 
American Memory, Library of Congress, 
Washington, DC 20540-1300 
202 707-6233. 

Moving Images in American Memory 

The Life of a City: Early Films of New York, 

1897-1906 

Paper Print Films of President William McKinley 

and the Pan-American Exposition, 1901 

On videodisc but not yet searchable in American 
Memory: Early Films of San Francisco Before and 
After the Great Earthquake, 1897-1907 
Collections in production: The American Variety 
Stage, 1870-1920 
Early Films of the Westinghouse Factory, 1904 

Video Preservation 



Jim Lindner of VidiPax, New York, 
likes to help people with video restora- 
tion issues. Lindner has been an active 
contributor to AMIA-L, the Association 
of Moving Image Archivists computer 
bulletin board. 

The Worst Cases 

An article he wrote for the AMIA news- 
letter called "Confessions of a Videotape 
Restorer" focuses on differences in design 
of videotapes and machines. He notes that 
some of the worst problems his company 
has encountered "are caused in production 
long before storage has occurred. What 
single restoration solution could handle 
the abuse given by a well-intentioned 
crew member who placed a tape inside a 
sandwich bag (that apparently previously 
held a sandwich), where it remained for 
20 years? Some of my personal favorites 
include the tape that broke in production 
and was taped together with duct tape, and 
the tape that had paper "bookmarks" to 
mark where an important scene started. 
And of course there have been tapes that 
have been visited by living creatures over 
the years, some microscopic and some 
generally characterized as 'vermin.'" 

Jim Lindner's VidiPax helpline is 
800 653-8434. E-mail will reach him at 
VIDIPAXJIM@delphi.com. 

Lindner describes himself as "the guy 
who used to be in your high school and 
run the projector, but is now 40 years old 
and 6' 7" tall." 



Reference by Mail 



Members of Northeast Historic Film are invited to borrow 
from the FREE circulating loan collection, Reference by Mail. 
Return Instructions 

Borrowers are responsible for return to NHF via First Class 
mail or UPS. Tapes must be on their way back to NHF five days 
after they are received. 

Public Performance 

Videotapes are offered as a reference service. Where possible, 




public-performance rights are included. Please check each tape's 
status: PERF means public performance rights are included. If 
you have a date in mind, call ahead to ensure availability. Where 
there is no PERF, the tape is for home use only and may not be 
shown to a group. 

Videos for Sale 

Many of these tapes are available for purchase through NHF; 

tapes that may be bought are listed with a check mark. 



Artists and Authors 

/ NlViBerenice Abbott: A Viewofthe Twenti- 
eth Century, life and work of one of America's 
most significant photographers; she lived in 
Maine into her 90s. 1 992. 56 mins., col., sd. 
/ Bonsoir Mes Amis, portrait of two of 
Maine's finest traditional Franco-American 
musicians. By Huey. 1 990. 46 mins., col., sd. 
NEW Master Smart Woman, Maine novelist 
Sarah Orne Jewett (1850-1909) by Jane 
Morrison. 1 984. 28 mins., col., sd. 
NEW May Sarton: She Knew a Phoenix, the 
poet reads and talks at home. Produced by 
Karen Saum. 1 980. 28 mins., col., sd. PERF 

City Life 

/ NWNAnchorol the Soul, African-American 
history in northern New England through 
the story of a Portland church. 1994. 60 
mins., col., sd. 

NEWCon / Cet Therefrom Here? Urban Youth, 
families, work, homelessness in Portland, 
Maine. 1981. 29 mins., col., sd. PERF 
/ Roughing the Uppers: The Creat Shoe Strike 
ol 1937, documentary by Robert Branham 
and Bates College students about CIO shoe 
strike in Lewiston & Auburn, Maine. 1992. 
55 mins., col., sd. 

24 Hours, fire fighting in Portland, Maine, 
with memorable narration. The filmmaker, 
Earle Fenderson, died this year at age 90. 
1 963. 27 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Country Life 

The Batteou Machias, studen t project on con- 
struction of a traditional river-driving boat. 
1 990. 22 mins., col., sd. PERF 
/ Ben's Mill, a documentary about a Ver- 
mont water-powered mill by NHF members 
Michel Chalufour and John Karol. 60 mins 
col., sd. 

/ A Century ol Summers, the impact of a 
summer colony on a small Maine coastal 
community by Hancock native and NHF 
member Sandy Phippen. 1987. 45 mins., 
b&w and col., sd. PERF 
/ Cherryfield, 1 938, a terrific home movie 
about rural spring. 6 mins., b&w, si. PERF 
/ Dead River Rough Cut, lives and philoso- 
phies of two woodsmen-trappers by Richard 
Searls and Stuart Silvers tein. 1 976. 55 mins., 
col.,sd. 

Down last Dairyman, produced by the Maine 
Dept. of Agriculture. 1972. 14 mins., col., 
sd.PERF 

/ NEWGiont Horses, draft horses and their 
drivers. 28 mins., col., sd. 
/ Ice Harvesting Sampler, five short silent 
films showing a near-forgotten New En- 
gland industry. 26 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 
The Movie Queen, Lubec, pretend movie 
queen visits her home town in down east 
Maine. 1 936. 28 mins., b&w, si. 



Nature's Blueberry/and, Maine's wild blue- 
berries. 1 3 mins., col., sd. PERF 
Paris, ! 92 9 and other views, home movies of 
the Wright family in Paris, Maine, haying, 
mowing, picnics. 80 mins., b&w, si. 
Part- Time Farmer, promotes agriculture as an 
after-hours pursuit, ca. 1 975. 1 7 mins., col., 
sd.PERF 

/ Sins of Our Mothers, girl who went to the 
Massachusetts textile mills from Fayette, 
Maine. 60 mins., col., sd.PERF 

Early Film 

/ All But Forgotten, documentary on the 
Holman Day silent-film company in Maine. 
1 978. 30 mins., col. and b&w, sd. PERF 
Cupid, Registered Guide, a two-reel North 
Woods comedy by Maine writer Holman 
Day. 1 921 . 20 mins., b&w, si. PERF 
/ Earliest Maine Films, lobstering, trout fish- 
ing, logging, canoeing on Moosehead Lake 
and potato growing, from 1 901 to 1 920. 44 
mins., b&w, si. PERF 

lust Maine Folks, a bawdy hayseed one-reeler. 
Poor image quality. 1913.8 mins., b&w, si. 

PERF 

The Knight of the Pines, another North Woods 
adventure by Maine writer Holman Day. 
1 920. 20 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Ecology 

/ NEW Rachel Canon's Silent Spring, her 
1963 book about pesticides helped raise 
ecological consciousness. 1993. 60 mins., 
col., sd. 

Fisheries 

8os/c Net Mending, how to repair fish nets. 

1951.16 mins., col., sd. PERF 

It 's the Maine Sardine, catching, packing and 

eating Eastport fish. 1 949. 1 6 mins., col., sd. 

PERF 

Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, fisheries includ- 
ing shrimp, cod and lobster. 1 968. 28 mins., 
col., sd.PERF 

The Maine Lobster, lobster fisheries and con- 
sumption with unusual footage including 
the assembly of lobster TVdinners. ca. 1 955. 
30 mins., col., sd.PERF 
Tuna Fishing off Portland Harbor, Maine, off- 
shore fishing with a Maine sea and shore 
warden, ca. 1930. 10 mins., b&w, si. with 
intertitles.PERF 

Turn of the Tide, drama about formation of a 
lobster cooperative; from the Vinalhaven 
Historical Society. 1 943. 48 mins., col., sd. 

Franco-American Life 

Reflets et Lumiere, three seasons of a televi- 
sion series on Franco-American culture pro- 
duced by the Maine Public Broadcasting 
Network (MPBN). The programs aired from 
1979 to 1981. Sound and image quality 
varies. PERF 



Potato Harvest Northern Maine. Interview 
and poetry reading by Norm Dube in 
Bedford, NH. 1979, 39 mins. 
Acadian Villages Acadian history interview 
with Guy Dubay of Madawaska, Maine. Visits 
to the Acadian Village near Van Buren, Maine, 
and le Village Acadien in Carquet, New 
Brunswick, Canada. A short visit to Quebec 
City. 1979. 27 mins. 

Lowell Mills Irene Simoneau, Franco-Ameri- 
can historian on the role of women in the 
mills. Roger Paradis of Fort Kent, Maine, 
about Franco-American folklore and music. 
1979. 29 mins. 
Many more . . . call for the complete list. 

Geography 

Assignment inAroostook, Loring Air Force Base 
in northern Maine closes this year. Mom at 
home, the sergeant at work, the family at 
play. 1 956. 27 mins., col., sd. PERF 
</ Mount Washington Among the Clouds, a 
history of the hotels, newspaper and cog 
railway, 1 852-1 908. 30 mins., col., sd. 
Mysteries of the Unknown: A Documentary 
about our Community, an outstanding stu- 
dent video about Bucksport, Maine, with 
original music. 1 990. 30 mins., col., sd. 
/ Norumbega: Maine in the Age ol Exploration 
and Settlement, early Maine history, based 
on maps. 1 989. 1 6 mins., col., sd. PERF 
NEW This Land: The Story of a Community 
Land Trust and a Co-Op Called H. O.M. E., Karen 
Saum's documentary on Orland, Maine, or- 
ganization. 1 983. 26 mins., col., sd.PERF 
A Quiet Frontier, produced for the City of 
Bangor to promote economic development 
during urban renewal. 1 969. 30 mins , col 
sd. 

Winter Sports in the White Mountain National 
Forest, skiing, sledding and snowshoeing in 
New Hampshire. 1934. 28 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 

Oral History 

/ Hap Collins ol South Blue Hill, |eff Titon's 
oral history interview with field footage of a 
lobsterman, painter and poet. 1989. 56 
mins., col. .sd.PERF 

/ An Oral Historian's Work with Dr. Edward 
Ives, "how to" illustrating an oral history 
project by the founder of the Maine Folklife 
Center. 1987. 30 mins., col., sd.PERF 
Corlton Willey, baseball pitcher, 1 958 rookie 
of the year, interviewed in a high school 
project. Unedited interview from VHS mas- 
ter. 1 990. 39 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Political Discourse 

lerry Brown Speaks in New Hampshire, from the 
1 992 presidential campaign. 28 mins., col., 
sd. PERF 

lohn f. Kennedy Speech, anniversary of the 
Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1963 at the 



Univ. of Maine homecoming. 30 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF. Sent with lull transcript of 
speech. 

Margaret Chase Smith Speech, declaration of 

intention to run for President, includes Q&A. 

1 964. 1 7 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

[Ha Knowles: A Dangerous Woman, video on a 

suffragist & Bates alumna by Robert 

Branham & students. 1991. 25 mins., col., 

sd. 

Television 

The Cold War/Transportation/TVCommercials. 
three compilation tapes from the Bangor 
Historical Society/WABi collection. 40 to 50 
mins. each; b&w, si. and sd.PERF 
J Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1 950s and 
early 60s in news, sports and local commer- 
cials. 1 989. 34 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Transportation 

/ AroundCape Horn, Captain Irving Johnson 
aboard the bark Peking. 1929. 37 mins, 
b&w, sd. 

/ Ride the Sandy River Railroad, one of the 
country's best two-foot-gauge railroads 
1930. 30 min., b&w, si. with intertitles. 

Woods 

In the Public Interest: The Civilian Conservation 
Corps in Maine, the federal work program 
from Acadia National Park to Cape Elizabeth 
1 987. 58 mins., sd., col. and b&w. 
/ From Stump to Ship, complete look at the 
long-log industry from forest to shipboard 
1 930. 28 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

S King Spruce, harvesting pulpwood, in- 
cludes horses and mechanical log haulers ca 
1940. 23 mins., col. ,sd. 
Little Log Cabin in the Northern Woods, ama- 
teur film of a young woman's hunting trip 
near Brownville, Maine, with a professional 
guide ca. 1 930. 1 3 mins., b&w, si PERF 
Our White Pine Heritage, how the trees are 
harvested for use in construction, papermak- 
ing, etc. 1948. 16 mins., b&w, sd 
Pilgrim Forests, about Civilian Conservation 
Corps work in New England Acadia Na- 
tional Park and White Mountain National 
Forest, ca. 1933. 10 mins , b&w, si. PERF 
/ Woodsmen and River Drivers. "Another day, 
another era, " unforgettable individuals who 
worked for the Machias Lumber Company 
before 1 930 1 989 30 mins., col and b&w, 
sd.PERF 

Women's Issues 

NEW Working Women ol Waldo County: Our 
Heritage, documentary basketmaking, 
farming and other work 1979 26 mins., 
col., sd.PERF 
Also in this series. Today and Her Story 



Calendar 
and Call for Volunteers 

Passes are available for people who would 
like to enjoy the fair season and help run 
the booth at the Blue Hill, Common 
Ground and Fryeburg Fairs. It's a great 
way to participate as an insider! Call 469- 
0924 for details. 

A special film event will be held on 
August 29 at the Neighborhood House in 
Northeast Harbor, Maine. Call Crystal 
Hall at 207 288-4947 for more information. 

July 28 Bristol, Maine, The Seventh Day 
(1921) with piano accompaniment by 
Danny Patt, hosted by the Damariscotta 
River Assoc. and the Pemaquid Water- 
shed Assoc. Call Carolyn Landau, 207 
563-8645. 

August 17 Vinalhaven Historical Society, 
Vinalhaven Island, Maine, sponsors The 
Seventh Day (1921) with piano accompa- 
niment by Danny Patt. Call Roy Heisler, 
207 863-4318. 

August 21 Saco River Grange Hall, Bar 
Mills, Maine, silent films with Danny 
Patt. Call Pat Packard, 207 929-6472. 

September 1-5 Blue Hill Fair, Blue Hill, 
Maine, visit NHF's booth on the midway. 

September 23-25 Common Ground 
Fair, Windsor, Maine, in the film building 
(turn left inside the main gate). The 
screening schedule is printed in the 1994 
Fairbook. 

October 2-9 Farm Museum at the 
Fryeburg Fair, NHF is in residence at one 
of northern New England's largest agri- 
cultural fairs. 

November 15-19 The Association of 
Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) annual 
conference will meet at Boston's Omni 
Parker House, organized by the WGBH 
Educational Foundation and the National 
Center for Jewish Film. The New England 
Archivists (NEA) meeting, focusing on 
audiovisual records, will follow. AMIA 
will provide two days of training during 
the NEA meeting. Call Mary Ide at WGBH, 
61 7 492-2777 ext. 2368. 



Ice Harvesting Sampler 
with Narration 



and Other New Videos 




SPECIAL, now through January 1 , 1 995 ! 
NHF members may return their silent 
Ice Harvesting Sampler videotape and 
receive a narrated copy FREE. Non- 
members, $5 handling fee for trade-ins. 



Philip C. Whitney, pictured here at work, 
has narrated an annotation to NHF's Ice 
Harvesting Sampler, bringing his knowl- 
edge of the tools and the process to the 
existing images. 

The narration turns the moving images 
into a vivid cultural-preservation and 
education tool, showing how things were 
done and aurally presenting what is not 
visually evident. 

Phil, president of the New England 
Tool Collectors Association, lives in 
Fitchburg, Mass. He specializes in living 
history field demonstrations of ice 
harvesting, grain flailing, millstone dress- 
ing, making shingles and scarecrows. 

His ice-exhibit trailer tours New 
England and New York every winter. 
Whitney Historic Programs, 508 342-1350. 
Ice Harvesting Sampler 26 mins., b&w., 
sd. $16.95/NHF members $14.95 

Berenice Abbott: A View of the 20th 
Century, One of the greatest American 
photographers of the century. From Paris 
portraits in the '20s to her Maine life, age 
90. 60 mins., col., sd. $49 for Home Use/ 
$99 to Institutions/Sorry, no member 
discount. 

Rachel Carson 's Silent Spring, the 1 963 
book about environmental poisoning 
helped raise ecological consciousness. 60 
mins., col., sd. $69.95 Institutions Only/ 
Sorry, no member discount. 



Phillips Lord: Maine Comic 



The Summer 1993 Moving Image Review 
reported on Phillips Lord, a Maine come- 
dian whose one movie, Way Back Home 
(1931), invokes rural Maine icons reel 
after reel: the saintly orphan, lovely 
farmgirl, hilarious bumpkin, woman 
who went wrong in the city, and sharp- 
tongued spinster, surrounded by the 
wrong-headed but educable townspeople. 
Led by, of course, the wise old Maine 
farmer Seth Parker played by Phillips 
Lord. 

David A. Taylor of the Library of 
Congress American Folklife Center 
worked on a Phillips Lord bibliography, 



while retired broadcaster Norman Gal- 
lant put out the word for recordings of 
Lord's radio shows. Darrell Anderson of 
Renton, Washington, crossed the country 
with three 78 rpm recordings and a copy 
of a Seth Parker and His Jonesport Folks 
lobby card. Virginia Whitney of Blue 
Hill, Maine, shared recollections of the 
family. Her father and Phillips Lord were 
first cousins in a close family. "All of the 
tribe couldn't wait to get out of Maine 
and make their fortunes," she said. "Then 
they couldn't wait to get back." 

Way Back Home is available from 
NHF on videocassette for $19.95. 



10 



For Sale 



NHF Membership 



Anchor of the Soul 

African-American history and race rela- 
tions in northern New England. Story of a 
Portland, Maine, church spiritual home, 
community center and leader in fight for 
racial equality. 60 mins., col., sd. 
$24.95/NHF Members $19.95 




Giant Horses 

Documentary on draft horses and the 
relationship between humans and domes- 
tic animals. 30 mins., col., sd. 
$19.95/NHF Members $16.95 W 




As an independent nonprofit organiza- 
tion, NHF depends on its members. You 
help us set priorities, you pass the word 
about the significance of cultural preser- 
vation, and your dues help keep us oper- 
ating. Please join and renew! 
Regular members, $25 per year, receive 
a subscription to Moving Image Review, 
notice of screenings and events, loan of 
three reference tapes at no charge, and 
discounts on materials distributed by NHF. 
Educator/Student Members, $15 per 
year, receive all regular membership 
benefits. This category is for teachers and 
students at any level. 
Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year, 
receive all regular benefits of member- 
ship, including loan of three reference 
tapes at no charge, plus additional copies 



of Moving Image Review on request and 
reduced rates for consultation, presenta- 
tions and professional services. 
Associates (Individuals) and Corporate 
Members, $100 per year, receive the 
benefits of regular members, special 
recognition in Moving Image Review, 
and loan of five reference tapes at no 
charge. 

Friends, $250 per year, receive all benefits 
of regular membership and, in addition, 
loan of ten reference tapes at no charge. 
Membership at any level is an opportu- 
nity to become involved with the pres- 
ervation and enjoyment of our moving 
image heritage. 

Your dues are tax deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 



Technical Services 



NHF transfers 16 mm. film to videotape 
using Elmo equipment at either sound or 
silent speeds. Also available, 8 mm. and 
Super 8 mm. transfers to videotape for 
reference; evaluation of film's physical 
condition; perforation repair and appraisal. 



These services, using NHF staff's 
expertise and equipment, help support 
the organization by providing a revenue 
source. Some equipment acquisition is 
the result of a generous gift from the 
Betterment Fund. 



Membership and Order Form 

Ordered by 



Northeast Historic Film, P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, ME 04416 USA 



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plus $1 each additional item Tax; ME residents a jd 6% 
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11 




Evangeline 



Longfellow's famous poem, the hope and despair 
of thousands of school children and their 
elders has again been brought to the screen, 
this time with Dolores Del Rio as the Acadian 
maiden. 

New York Times, 29 July 1929 



Thanks to Madeline Matz, Library of Congress 
M/B/RS for research on Evangeline; and to 
Eddie Richmond, Bob Gittand Charles Hopkins, 
UCLA Film and Television Archive, photo: 
Museum of Modem Art, Film Stills Archives. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

: LM 



Nonprofit Org. 

1 .stage 

PAID 

ill Falls, 

ME 046 15 
Permit 






AI'DKl-NN CORRECTION REQUESTED 



Dolores Del Rio starred in the 1929 
feature film Evangeline, produced and 
directed by Edwin Carewe. The film was 
released with music and effects on disc, 
including Del Rio singing a French 
chansonnette. Variety said, 

Allowing for the great beauty of produc- 
tion, fine quality and appeal of the great 
American love epic, the picture carries 
with it the handicap of being somewhat 
an educational (sic). Commercially it 
looks a bit doubtful; artistically it is a 
credit to everybody concerned. 

The film has lain quietly awaiting 
restoration. NHF's attention was drawn 
to it by people of Acadian heritage in 
northern Maine whose French-speaking 
ancestors were driven out of Nova Scotia 
by the British. Evangeline is a vehicle for 
examining the mythification of Acadian 
history, according to Lisa Ornstem, 
director of the Acadian Archives/Ar- 
chives acadiennes at the University of 
Maine, Fort Kent. Once it is preserved, 
screenings will be a chance to focus on 
the "historical development of the adop- 
tion of Evangeline as a cultural icon." 

Barry Jean Ancelet, who teaches 
French and Folklore at the University of 
Southwestern Louisiana, studies the 
culture, language and history of the 
Louisiana Cajuns (Acadians) and the 
effect of Evangeline mythology on Cajun 
self-image. Ancelet says, 

Longfellow's heroine was once so popu- 
lar among American readers that she 
came to represent an acceptable symbol 
among the Cajuns who were then going 
through a rather brutal Americanization 
process. Consequently she came to 
replace actual history. People felt she 
was a safe bet, and didn't wonder any 
further about their own real past. 

The Acadian Archives/Archives 
acadiennes, Ancelet and Carl Brasseaux 
from the University of Southwestern 
Louisiana, and the Universite de Moncton, 
New Brunswick, will examine Evangeline 
in context after film preservation from 
the complete picture negative planned by 
the UCLA Film and Television Archive. 
Preservation Officer Bob Gitt says he 
looks forward to preserving the film next 
year. I 



Hortheast Historit film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Ded'uated to the Preservation 
of Northern Hew England 
Motion Pictures 

Winter 1995 



Executive Director's Report p.2 

One Hundred Years: 

TV Survey by Samuel Suratt p.4 

Collections Guide 

by Patricia Burdick p.5 

Changes in London Archives 

by Jane Mercer p. 7 

Archival Notes p. 10 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Film, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. 
David S. Weiss, executive director, Karan 
Sheldon, editor. ISSN 0897-0769. 



Social History of Moviegoing 
Receives National Endowment for the Humanities Award 



The National Endowment for the 
Humanities awarded a grant of $145,000 
to Northeast Historic Film for a social 
history project, "Going to the Movies: 
A Century of Motion Picture Audiences 
in Northern New England." 

The funding supports an interpretive 
exhibition examining Maine, New 
Hampshire and Vermont communities 
and their moviegoing audiences. The 
exhibition will be installed in the Alamo 
Theatre building in Bucksport, Maine, 
in 1996 and will tour northern New 
England reaching a broad public audi- 
ence in shopping malls and other loca- 
tions. 

An associated film and lecture series 
will tour the three states. 

Twenty project scholars in the fields 
of history, North American studies, 
music, film history, art, religion, litera- 
ture and education have been involved 
in the planning first supported by an 
NEH planning grant in 1992. The com- 
mitment of the team is summed up by 
historian Kathryn H. Fuller: 

The commitment to the highest quality 
of research and interpretation in this 
'cutting edge' area of academic film and 
historical studies audiences and media 
reception is reinforced with an 
equally strong commitment to be 
accessible to the public. Visitors and 
scholars alike will learn a great deal. The 
exhibit and programs will demonstrate 
how social, cultural and economic 
factors in northern New England have 




The Alamo Theatre's auditorium, built in 1916, seated 600 people for movies, traveling shows, and 
local events such as town meeting and graduation. Photo: Robert Rosie Collection. 



continually shaped what "going to the 

movies" means to its people. 
Support from NEH's Division of Public 
Programs includes the offer of an addi- 
tional matching grant on top of the 
$145,000 in outright support. Northeast 
Historic Film has the opportunity to 
receive a further $40,000 in Endowment 
funds on receipt of $40,000 from one or 
more donors. NHF is actively seeking 



corporate sponsors, individual donors 
and foundation support to unlock the 
matching funds. 

Besides the NEH-related funding, 
Northeast Historic Film's board has 
made a commitment to raise an addi- 
tional $75,000, bringing total funding 
for the Going to the Movies project to 
$300,000. 



Executive Director's Report 

Successful Pledge Completion 

The more than 80 friends of NHF who 
helped buy the Alamo Theatre at auction 
have completed their donations. The 
Alamo Auction Honor Roll appears on 
page 6. Thank you all for your generos- 
ity! With your help we're bringing the 
building into its eighth decade in style. 

New Board Member 

The building is taking shape inside and 
out, thanks to our active board, joined in 
October by Terry Rankine, a founding 
partner of Cambridge Seven Associates, 
an internationally known architecture 
firm. Terry, a resident of South Thom- 
aston, Maine, is helping us integrate our 
activities and dreams within the Alamo's 
brick walls. With assistance from acous- 
tical engineer Bill Cavanaugh, we're 
planning an acoustically effective audito- 
rium for movies and live performances. 

Staff Members Join Us 

Patricia Burdick, cataloguer and regis- 
trar, has joined the staff working with 
Karan Sheldon and Crystal Hall on the 
Collections Guide as she describes on 
page 5. 

Trisha Terwilliger and Yvette St. 
Peter join the staff in front-office posi- 
tions. Trisha answers the telephone and 
keeps loan materials circulating. Yvette 
assists Libby Rosemeier with distribu- 
tion projects, as well as working on the 
front desk. 

Volunteer Helpers 

Paul Flynn from Toronto is a new 
volunteer assisting with viewing and 
describing films. Eleanor and Alan 
McClelland from Camden have taken 
on some descriptive cataloguing and are 
using E-mail for exchanging data. 



5 



David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 






"Town Hall Tour" of Where the Rivers Flow North 
and Premiere of The Beans of Egypt, Maine 



Volunteer Paul Cady of Hulls Cove was 
point person for a community screening 
of Where the Rivers Flow North in 
Northeast Harbor, Maine, on August 29. 
The independently produced feature was 
on a Town Hall Tour taking a 35 mm. 
print and projector around northern 
New England. 

For NHF's event, Cady put together 
a team of volunteers including Chris 
Vmcenty (projectionist), Lisa Burton, 
Crystal Hall, Pancho Cole, Martha 
Davis and Kris Donohue. Anna Durand 
and her staff at Bar Harbor's Morning 
Glory Cafe provided a delicious supper 
served by the volunteer kitchen team to 
a capacity crowd at the Neighborhood 
House before the screening. 

NHF also brought the film to Blue 
Hill's renovated Town Hall, a structure 
built in 1896, the year movies first came 
to Maine. The audience of over 200 filled 
the hall, and unfortunately 50 more 
people had to be turned away. Libby 
Rosemeier kept the popcorn flowing 
thanks to Mary Ellen Duym's loan of 
her popcorn machine. 

In Bucksport a planned outdoor 
screening was rained out. The Middle 
School loaned their gym, thanks to 
principal Carl Lusby and custodian Ray 
Bishop. The intrepid exhibitors led by 
Phil Yates constructed a scaffolding for 
the projector. Bucksport High School 
loaned chairs. Volunteers Lynne Blair, 
Yvette St. Peter and visiting film histori- 
ans Eithne Johnson and Eric Schaefer 
helped with concessions. 

Caledonia Pictures, producer and 
distributor of the Vermont-made fea- 
ture, wrote after the events, "Wow! 
What an incredible success our three 
dates in Maine were. The Maine dates 
were the end of our Town Hall Tour, 
and it was great to end on such a high 
note." 

On October 2 a benefit premiere of 
The Beans of Egypt, Maine from Car- 
olyn Chute's celebrated novel raised 
money for Northeast Historic Film at 
Portland's newly renovated movie 
palace, the State Theater. Nearly 500 
people attended. NHF is indebted to 
director Jennifer Warren, board member 
Shan Sayles, Steve Bailey and his staff at 
The State. 



Carolyn Chute signs her books. Photo: Guy 
Gannett Publishing Co. 

A catered reception before the screen- 
ing was an opportunity for friends of 
NHF to meet and see The State. Carolyn 
Chute signed books with the assistance 
of Nick Sichterman and Mariah Hughs 
of Blue Hill Books. 

The film, distributed by I.R.S. Re- 
leasing Corp., had been shown at the 
Seattle and Boston film festivals prior to 
the Maine premiere. Martha Plimpton 
stars as Earlene Bean with a compelling 
performance. The film was released 
November 23. H 



NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but are not lim- 
ited to a survey of moving pictures of 
northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
climate-controlled storage; Creation 
of educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 
members of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production commu- 
nity, through providing a study cen- 
ter, technical services and facilities. 



Grants in Action 



The LEF Foundation of Cambridge and 
San Francisco made a grant of $4,000 to 
support renovations to the Alamo The- 
atre facade. In Bucksport, a community 
where businesses are closing (Brown 
Appliance and Grant's Gifts closed at 
the end of 1 994), the effort to create a 
presence on Main Street is a crucial 
morale-builder and economic statement. 
NHF's direction is running against a 
strong tide. Support from the LEF 
Foundation is helping the archives' 
commitment to Bucksport. 

Corporate In-Kind Donations 

Beckett Corporation, Lionville, 
Pennsylvania, one of the country's 
premier manufacturers of archival 
labels, donated a several-year supply 
of labels. Thanks to president Rick 
Nopper, honorary Mainer. 

Cablevision, Bangor, Maine, donated 
more than 250 %-inch videocassettes, 
high-quality stock for use in creating 
reference copies. Thanks to Kelli 
Manigault. 




The Alamo Theatre auditorium down to the ground, and then some. More than 60 truckloads of 
earth were removed and a new drainage system installed. Photo: Thomas R. Stewart. 



The Theater 

Work on the Alamo Theatre auditorium 
has been supported by the W. K. 
Kellogg Foundation; the Davis Family 
Foundation; the Maine Arts Commis- 




sion, Rural Arts Initiative; the National 
Trust for Historic Preservation; and the 
board and members of Northeast His- 
toric Film. 



The Beans of Egypt, Maine. Earlene Bean, 
played by Martha Plimpton, marries Beat Bean 
(Patrick McGaw) while Roberta Bean (Kelly 
Lynch) looks on. Photo: I.R.S. Releasing. 



One Hundred Years: 
Television Heritage, the Mirror of Our Society 



In celebration of the centennial of the 
projected motion picture, Moving Image 
Review's "One Hundred Yean" column 
looks at the past and future of moving- 
image media. 



Do you ever wonder what happens 
to all the television shows? Do 
they just die in outer space or is 
there some great recording organization 
that captures and catalogs them for 
future generations to wonder at or 
despair over? 

In the United States there are over 
1000 TV stations and countless cable 
channels, each of them transmitting 
television for approximately 7000 hours 
a year. Much of it is network program- 
ming that will continue to be recycled ad 
infinitum, ad nauseam. But a great deal 
of the output of television and cable 
channels is unique and possibly the only 
record of local and regional history. 

Will Programs be Preserved? 

How many of these millions of hours of 
television exist in some form of record- 
ing? What deserves preserving, how do 
we preserve it and who should do this 
monumental job? 

In 1 992 Congress passed the National 
Film Preservation Act, which funded a 
study, to be done by the Library of 
Congress and the National Film Preser- 
vation Board, on the state of American 
motion picture preservation. This Act 
also mandated that a plan be drawn up 
that would assure the preservation of 
movies in the future. The resulting docu- 
ment, Redefining Film Preservation: A 
National Plan, made a concise series of 
recommendations. 

One page of the Plan dealt with 
"Television and Video Preservation," 
recommending that the Library of Con- 
gress seek legislation, similar to that 
which funded the study of motion picture 
preservation, to embark on a study of 
the dimensions and problems of preserv- 
ing television. 

This past autumn, David Francis, 
head of the division that oversees the 
collection and preservation of motion 
pictures and television at the Library of 
Congress, stated that no Congressional 



by Samuel Suratt 

authorization was necessary for a study 
of television, and that funding under the 
American Television and Radio Archive 
legislation would suffice. 

What Will a Survey Find? 

Assuming that funding is available to do 
a survey of television programming, 
what will the surveyors find? 

If television had never changed from , 
black and white to color, there would be 
far fewer preservation problems facing 
us now. But that would be like saying "if 
we only had horses for transportation, 
pedestrians would be safer." 

In the days of black and white TV the 
method of recording was the kinescope, 
which was simply a black and white 
motion picture made of the orthicon tube 
or television screen. Although grainy, the 
kinescope had the advantage over video- 
tape, because black and white film is the 
most stable long-term storage medium 
and the technology has not changed for 
almost a century. Videotape has a ques- 
tionable longevity, and its technology 
changes every five to ten years. 

Lost and "Lost" Programs 

Many of the early black and white tele- 
vision programs no longer exist, mainly 
because the cost-conscious management 
of networks and Hollywood studios 
junked thousands of kinescopes to 
recover the silver from the films' emul- 



sion. 



But a good number of the early 
dramatic and comedy series still exist in 
vaults and are periodically "discovered" 
as "lost episodes." Virtually none of the 
early soap operas has survived, the soap 
manufacturers, which owned them, 
being even more parsimonious than the 
networks which broadcast them. 

Series Survival 

Almost all color strip shows (i.e., situa- 
tion comedies, action/adventure series, 
etc., that were produced for prime time 
television) are alive and well and living 
on your local cable channel. Likewise, 
many mini-series and quality dramatic 
programs are preserved by the networks, 



the studios, UCLA, the Library of 
Congress, or other archives. 

Sports Programming 

The professional leagues and networks 
have been keeping low-quality tapes of 
sporting events for the last 15 years or 
so, and NFL Films has been preserving 
professional football since before TV 
began covering it. 

Network News 

The most complete collections of televi- 
sion programs are to be found in the 
network news divisions, where millions 
of feet of film and thousands of hours of 
videotape document what the national 
news networks decide to cover. Com- 
plete runs exist of memorable programs 
such as See it Now, Person to Person, 
Victory at Sea and The Twentieth Cen- 
tury, preserved by the network news 
divisions. 

The Vanderbilt University news 
archive has been taping nightly network 
news broadcasts since 1968, and the 
National Archives and Library of Con- 
gress have thousands of news broadcasts 
from the early 1970s to the present. 

Local and Regional Gap 

The largest gap in preserving television 
programming will be found in local and 
regional broadcasts of news and public 
affairs. Many local and regional archives, 
including Northeast Historic Film, have 
established programs to collect newsfilm 
and tape from local television stations, 
but many areas of the country are not 
included and many local programs are 
not taped by the broadcasting station. 

Arrangements need to be made 
between local TV stations and local 
archives to tape certain programs off the 
air and store them for future reference 
by the communities. 

After the Survey 

Once the survey is done, the real work 
begins. National, regional and local 
policies must be established saying what 
programs need to be preserved and who 
will do what. 

Funding of this multi-level approach 
will be very difficult to achieve, and the 
costs of archiving audiovisual materials 
are staggering. Each videotape must be 




HOW DO I IDENTIFY FILM? 



Do Not Project It! 

' All film shrinks with age and becomes fragile. Projecting shrunken film risks 
permanent damage by ripping sprocket holes, stressing splice.; and scratching 
the image. You may have unique, irreplaceable film. Most home movie 
footage is camera original, which means that the film has no negative and 

) there may be no other copies. 

Careful Hand Inspection Is OK 

It is possible to carefully unwind the first few feet of the film and learn quite 
' a bit from inspection with a magnifying glass. Handle the film by the edges 
only, preferably using clean cotton gloves. 

Record the Following Information 

What is on the can or container? Are there any notes accompanying it? 
P Check the condition of the film is it brittle, do the edges curl, is there 

obvious damage? 

Are there titles or credits? 

Is the film negative or positive? Color or black & white? 

Are there sprocket holes on one side or both (single or double 
perforations)? 

I Is there sound? Magnetic sound is usually a brown stripe along one 

side; optical sound is a black wavy pattern. 
Remember that the film may be wound "tails out" and you could be 
looking at the end. Remember also that the head and tail are usually 
more worn than the rest. 

Some Date Clues 

1923 First 16 mm. camera for amateurs 

I early 1930s 8 mm. film available 

1931 16mm. sound film 

1933 Technicolor 

1 935 Kodachrome color 1 6 mm. 

early 1950s 35 mm. safety film in wide use 

1965 Super 8 available 

How Should I Store Film? 

Film benefits from constant low temperature and low humidity conditions. 
' Frequent changes in temperature and humidity cause irreversible damage. 
Store film in clean cans laid flat. 

Nitrate Film 

Up to the early 1 950s 35 mm. film was almost always made on a cellulose 
nitrate base, which is highly unstable and flammable. Inspect it regularly 
and store in an appropriate location. In cases of advanced deterioration, 
nitrate film is subject to spontaneous combustion. 

' Vinegar Syndrome 

16 mm. film is not nitrate based. However, it is subject to deterioration. One 
of the signs is acetic acid, the source of a vinegar smell. Humidity and rusty 
metal containers accelerate the process. Films with strong vinegar smell or 
visible acetic acid crystals must be isolated from other films and copied 
before it is too late. 

If you have any questions please call 207 469-0924. 

1 994 Northeast Historic Film 




NORTHEAST HISTORIC FILM 

TO BOX 900, MAIN ST., BUCKSPORT, ME 04416-0900 I 



Film and video give people a reflection of themselves, 
a moving image of culture and tradition, a context. 

-Pom Wintle, NHf founding board 
member, film archivist, Smithsonian 
Human Studies Film Archives. 

Northeast Historic Film (NHF) collects, preserves and makes 
accessible dramatic, industrial, informational and amateur film and 
video. The nonprofit organization is located in the 1916 Alamo 
Theatre building. NHF holds thousands of hours of videotape and 
more than three million feet of film including three large TV film 
collections from Maine, along with videotape from WCSH-TV, 
Portland, and the Maine Public Broadcasting Corporation. The 
archives is one of the country's foremost collectors of home movies, 
a significant record of everyday life, with particularly strong 
coverage in the 1930s. 

Services 

Consulting and technical services: stock footage research, transfers 

from film to videotape, and preservation planning advice. 

Free loan of videos to members of NHF through the Reference by 

Mail service. 

Videos of Life in New England: a line of videotapes for sale to book 

and gift stores and direct to individuals and organizations. 

Presentations: workshops and film and video screenings at schools 

and other organizations. 

Supported by the Public 

NHF is a nonprofit organization supported by its members, board 
of directors, and tax^deductible contributions from individuals, 
companies and foundations. Members and volunteers are key. 
Moving image preservation is an important, expensive, long-term 
undertaking. 

Who Benefits? 

We all benefit from the preservation of our motion picture heritage. 
Moving images are an important element of education and arts 
programs. Preservation and access to moving images helps teachers, 
librarians, museums, historical societies, public service and trade 
organizations, state agencies, producers and individuals. 

The Big Picture 

NHF is an active member of the North American professional 
organization, the Association of Moving Image Archivists. Staff 
members have served on its executive committee and helped found 
the working group on amateur moving images. NHF participates in 
the Library of Congress national film preservation planning effort 
and serves on the Maine Historical Records Advisory Board. 

We Need Your Help! 

NHF accepts film and video for preservation from individuals and 
organizations. Your financial donation will help NHF save this 
region's film and video heritage and make it accessible to everyone. 



Collections Guide Made Possible 
by The Betterment Fund 



by Patricia Burdick 

While NHF has a well-maintained data- 
base of information describing its film 
and video holdings, the archives has 
never had a published guide to its archi- 
val holdings. 

With a grant from The Betterment 
Fund approved in early 1994, plans were 
laid to complete NHF's first Collections 
Guide, a document of about 50 pages 
including concise descriptions of the 
moving-image holdings for use by the 
public. 

Long Trail of Decisions 

A presentation on the Guide project to 
the New England Archivists' fall meet- 
ing raised questions from colleagues who 
have considered, but never attempted, 
this type of work. It is easy to see why 
other institutions do not embark on a 
similar path. 

Writing a guide requires many deci- 
sions on all levels: everything from the 
fundamental document concept, to 
format options underlining versus 
italics must be discussed and resolved. 
Creating a Guide demands patience, 
organization, and a sense of humor. 

The work commenced around Labor 
Day, when 130 records in the NHF 
"Collections" database were copied into 
a "Guide" database, a working document 
for records revision. Streamlined records 



copied every 10 to 15 years in order to 
keep it in a format that can be played 
back. This means that every archives' 
costs will double (plus inflation) during 
each successive ten-year period. 

Which brings us to the heart of the 
matter. Although everyone watches 
television, no one is watching over the 
preservation of television! And no single 
agency has the kind of money it will take 
to do the job. 

Money must be found in the televi- 
sion industry, in private foundations and 
at every level of government if our tele- 
vision heritage, the mirror of our society, 
is to be preserved. H 

Samuel Suratt has been a historian, 
archivist of the Smithsonian Institution 
and Archivist of CBS News. 




Amphibian Plane, Grand Lake, Maine, ca. 1939. Archie Stewart Collection. 



became the actual Guide entries after 
final text clean-up using WordPerfect 
software. 

The initial group of 130 records has 
grown to 200 descriptions as new collec- 
tions have been entered with assistance 
from Crystal Hall, an experienced free- 
lance cataloguer and indexer in Bar 
Harbor. Marsha Maguire, a professional 
moving-image cataloguer in Kirkland, 
Washington, was essential to the pro- 
cess, providing resources and advice on 
many issues including Library of Con- 
gress subject headings, moving-image 
physical description formats, and Guide 
entry organization. 

Guide Arrangement 

The term "collection" is used by NHF to 
designate a body of materials with the 
same provenance, or source. For in- 
stance, an independent filmmaker who 
donates several reels of film, a projector, 
and spiral-bound logbooks is considered 
the creator of this collection of disparate 
items, all of which are interrelated. 

A collection of moving images can 
contain all gauges and generations of 
film as well as video materials, with 
other factors such as silent or sound, and 
black/white or color thrown in. Given its 
eclectic nature, a collection description 
can be presented in a variety of ways. 

NHF's Collections Guide is orga- 
nized by "predominant genre," namely 
the one type of moving image in each 
collection that generally represents the 
collection. 



Categories 

We developed a list of six predominant 
genres defined in the introduction text: 
Independent Works, Amateur Works, 
Television, Industrial Works, Dramatic 
Works, and Other Nonfiction Works. 
Upon entering the genre sections, Guide 
users will find detailed entries arranged 
alphabetically by collection name. 

Each entry supplies basic information 
necessary for understanding the nature 
of the collection: accession number (a 
unique, NHF-assigned identifier); title 
statement including collection name, 
creator of the materials, and date; physi- 
cal description; summary of film and/or 
video contents; biographical or historical 
notes; finding aid notes; secondary genre 
descriptors; geographical locations 
(where the film or video was shot); and a 
short list of subject headings. There are 
nine "fields" of descriptive information 
for each collection. 

The Guide is available from North- 
east Historic Film and may be ordered 
by phone or by using the order form on 
page 1 5 of Moving Image Review. 

Pat Burdick completed her archival 
degree in 1992 through the M.L.S. pro- 
gram at Simmons College. While in 
Cambridge she finished internships at 
the Harvard University Archives, the 
Houghton Library and Widener Library. 
Since moving to Maine she has worked 
on various archival projects. She joined 
the NHF staff in August 1994. 



Progress on The Alamo 

Construction supervisor Phil Yates 
reports that the auditorium renovation 
moved forward rapidly in the last few 
months of 1994 thanks to a dedicated 
crew. Concrete was poured before 
Christmas, and drainage and footings are 
in place. 

"Chris Lee and Paul Little are really 
great workers. Anybody who can pick 
up a shovel and dig for ten hours in a 
mudhole without complaining or watch- 
ing the clock deserves a lot of credit," 
says Yates. 

Little is a carpenter from Bradford 
referred by staff member Pat Burdick. 
Lee graduated from the University of 
Maine, Orono, with a degree in mech- 
anical engineering in May 1994. M 



Alamo Auction 
Honor Roll 




Executive Director David Weiss, photographed 
by David Rodgers of the Portland Sunday 
Telegram, for a story by staff writer Greg 
Gadberry. Photo: Guy Gannett Publishing Co. 



Three-year pledges to help buy the 
Alamo Theatre were completed in 1994! 

John D. Bardwell 

Henry Barendse 

Otis J. Bartlett 

Lynne K. Blair 

Q. David Bowers 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin C. Branch 

Dr. and Mrs. John M.R. Bruner 

Mrs. Frederic E. Camp 

Constance H. Carlson 

Michel Chalufour 

Richard & Bonnie D'Abate 

Darwin & Jacqueline Davidson 

Peter & Karen Davis 
John & Peg Dice 

Carroll Faulkner & Ann Holland 

Kathryn H. Fuller 

Peter T. Gammons, Jr. 

Deborah & Paul Gelardi 

Faith Getchell & Glenn Jenks 

D. Lea Girardin 

Douglas Gomery 

Green Hill Farm 

Cora Coggins Greer 

Jeanne H. & Randolph C. Harrison 

Charles T. Hesse 

Porter Hopkins 

Stanley F. Howe 

Edward D. & Barbara Ann Ives 

Robert L. Jordan 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Judd 

Del Keppelman & Huntington Sheldon 

Richard A. Kimball, Jr. 

Diane Kopec 

Franklyn Lenthall & James Wilmot 

Chester Liebs 

Ed & Sally Lupfer 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Alan & Eleanor McClelland 

Patricia F. McGeorge 

John T. Mcllwaine 

Maher's Oil Burner Service, Inc. 

Maine Osteopathic Association 

Joan F. Meserve 

Elizabeth J. Miller 

John A. O'Brien 

Kathryn J. Olmstead 



Alice H. Palmer 
David Parsons 
Howard B. Peabody 
Ed Pert 

James Petrie in Memory of Louis de 

Rochemont 
James A. Phillips, Jr. 
Sanford Phippen 
Prelinger Associates 
Joan Radner 
Connie & Ned Rendall 
Windsor C. Robinson 
Richard & Ann Roelofs 
Robert & Venetia Rosie 
DeWitt Sage 

Robert & Elizabeth Saudek 
Pat & Tom Schroth 
Elliott & Dorothy Schwartz 
Wendy Wincote Schweikert 
Peter & Ann Sheldon 
Noel & Betty Stookey 
Lynda L. Sudlow 
Suzanne & Samuel Taylor 
William L. Taylor 
Amy Turim & Larry Hershman 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Tyson, Jr. 
Juris Ubans 

Robert & Julia Walkling 
Drs. Sheila & Richard White 
Steve & Peggy Wight 
David S. Wildes & Cynthia Wood 
John Wilmerding 
Pamela Wintle & Henry Griffin 
and Anonymous Givers | 



Nancy Sheldon, a member of NHF's 
community advisory board, passed 
away on July 15, 1994. Sheldon grad- 
uated from Vassar College and worked 
at the Ford Foundation. She was a 
chairman of the Film Forum in New 
York and a member of the advisory 
committee on film and television of 
the Asia Society. Sheldon participated 
in NHF's National Alliance for Media 
Arts Centers-funded management 
evaluation and assisted with valued 
arts contacts in Maine and New 
England. 



National Film Registry Tour 



by Steve Leggett 
Library of Congress, M/B/RS Division 

The Library of Congress is launching a 
tour to celebrate American filmmaking 
by showcasing a selection from the 
National Film Registry. 

The tour will enable audiences to 
experience historically, culturally and 
aesthetically significant American films 
as they were intended to be seen: as good- 
quality prints in public theaters. Planned 
in cooperation with copyright owners 
and archives, the tour will present the 
preservation work of many organizations. 

The National Film Preservation 
Board will use the tour as the center- 
piece in a campaign to alert the public to 
the diversity of American film produc- 
tion and to draw attention to the na- 
tional preservation plan, released by the 
Librarian of Congress and the National 
Film Preservation Board in August 1994. 

Thirty Feature Films 

Approximately 30 feature films and 
selected shorts from the National Film 



Registry will be offered as either four 
separate programs or two marathon 
programs, which can be individually 
booked. The full program will showcase 
a broad range of film types, dates, and 
filmmakers and will showcase many 
special events, including guest speakers 
from throughout the film community. 

Where? 

The tour will begin by visiting nine cities 
in mid- 1995: Chicago, Dallas, Denver, 
Detroit, Houston, Lexington, Minne- 
apolis/St. Paul, Omaha and Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

The plan given sufficient funding- 
is to extend the tour to one city in each 
of the 50 states and possibly special 
additional sites. 

The screenings will last for three to 
six nights at each location. Theaters will 
be selected in consultation with the 
National Association of Theater Owners 
and will include historic theaters. Special 
measures will be taken to assure that the 
film prints are properly handled and 
projected. 



TV Coverage 
of Archival Activities 

WLBZ TV Bangor visited the Alamo 
theater renovation in progress and 
offered a news report statewide in Maine 
reported by David Ahlers and video- 
grapher Bill Mason. A lunchtime visit 
with Helen Gott at the Bucksport Senior 
Citizens Center gathered recollections 
of picking blueberries with friends to 
earn movie-ticket money. 

Art Donahue of Boston's WCVB TV 
Chronicle, a half-hour nightly New 
England program, visited Bucksport for 
a look at the archives' activities. Donahue 
went to John E. Allen, Inc., the film 
laboratory and archives, to talk about 
their work transferring film from NHF's 
Pierce Pearmain Collection showing 
Boston's Faneuil Hall in the 1920s. The 
Chronicle broadcast also featured a 
report from the 1994 Association of 
Moving Image Archivists conference. 



When? 

It is anticipated that the tour will start in 
May 1995 and run through 1996. H 



Changes in London Archives 



by Jane Mercer 

The Federation of Commercial Audio 
Visual Libraries, Ltd. (FOCAL) reports 
on recent changes in London. FOCAL 
was formed in 1985 as an international 
professional trade association to represent 
commercial film/audiovisual libraries, 
professional film researchers, producers 
and others working in the industry. 

There is a distinct wind of change in the 
world of audio-visual libraries in the UK. 
To quote Fred Astaire, it seems to be a 
case of "Change partners and dance with 
me." 

For many years the community of 
footage sources and their clients have 
lived with an established order of liaisons: 
Independent Television News Ltd. (ITN) 
and Worldwide Television News Corp. 
(WTN), the BBC and Visnews (Reuters 
Television). Recently, however, old 
alliances have been severed and new 
ones are in the air. The split between 



ITN and WTN was signaled by their 
physical separation. 

Reuters appears to be moving away 
from its close relationship with the BBC 
newsgathering operation and into part- 
nership with ITN, sharing central London 
premises as a prelude to providing a 
combined research and newsfootage 



service. 



Simultaneously, rumor has it WTN is 
moving toward a closer relationship with 
the BBC for whom its overseas network 
will presumably act as a similar backup 
to that supplied by Reuters. 

Two of the UK's best-known librar- 
ies have had major facelifts. British 
Pathe has refurbished and extended its 
central London office at Balfour House. 
At the other end of town, the Huntley 
Archives moved into a converted lace- 
making factory off Newington Green, 
providing storage space for the films and 
display space for a part of the Archives' 
collection of film equipment and memo- 
rabilia. 



Another welcome change is the 
handover of the television rights for ten 
of Charlie Chaplin's post- 191 9 films 
from the Dutch-based company, Film- 
verhuurkaantoor, to a British company. 
The films, which include City Lights, 
The Gold Rush, The Great Dictator and 
Modern Times, will be handled exclu- 
sively by Delta Ventures, a new company 
in which the BBC 
is understood to 
be a 20% 
shareholder. 
For anyone 
who has tried 
to acquire a 
Chaplin clip in 
recent years 
only to be driven 
back by a flat no or a dazzling display of 
noughts, this is (it is hoped) good news. 

For more information contact FOCAL 
Ltd., PO Box 422, Harrow, Middlesex 
HA1 3YN, England. Phone and FAX, 081 
423-5853. 




AMIA at Work and Play 



The Association of Moving Image Archi- 
vists met in Boston on November 15-19, 
1994, hosted by WGBH TV. The confer- 
ence program included technically 
ambitious and successful presentations, 
among them Film-Digital-Film chaired 
by Grover Crisp, Sony Pictures Enter- 
tainment, and Navigating the Internet 
live online with Rick Prelinger at the 
keyboard. 

The working group dedicated to 
amateur footage, Inedits, held several 
working sessions and sponsored a 
panel, From Living Room to Screening 
Room, chaired by Karen Ishizuka of the 
Japanese American National Museum 
with participants Tom Treadway of 
Brodsky and Treadway showing 8 mm. 
film transferred by her company, and 
Orlando Bagwell of Roja Productions 
discussing excerpts from several of his 
productions. 

Environmental Storage Session 

Northeast Historic Film executive 
director David Weiss participated in a 
panel chaired by Milt Shefter on Strate- 
gies for Preserving the Moving Image. 
The session was devoted to consider- 
ations of preservation planning: needs 
analysis, economic parameters, storage 
environments, and construction options. 
Northeast Historic Film, in early stages 
of planning new climate-controlled 
storage, was used to demonstrate phases 
of the planning process under the queries 
of Shefter and engineer Alan Locke. 

National Endowment for the Arts 

A special session was held on the sus- 
pension of the National Endowment for 
the Arts Media Arts Sub-Grants. The 
American Film Institute/NEA Film 
Preservation Program, approximately 
$355,000 annually, represented the fed- 
eral government's only ongoing grant 
support specifically for film preservation. 
AMIA participants in the session dis- 
cussed the meaning of the suspension 
and possible actions to be taken. 

In the evening screening at the John 
F. Kennedy Library, Northeast Historic 
Film screened an excerpt from the new 
35 mm. print of Aroostook County 
1920s, preserved with assistance from 
the AFI/NEA Film Preservation Program. 



Nitrate vs. Day Rate? 

Conference participants discussed the 
serious issues facing the field, with 260 
attendees sharing a range of problems 
and successes. As evidenced by the 
following, the archival world is not 
entirely a somber crew. Thanks to 
Francine Taylor, Colin Preston, Bill 
O'Farrell, Jeanette Kopak, and Peter 
Bregman, rumored to be creators of a 
document reproduced here in part. 

Concerns Expressed at AMIA Conference 

Devising a sound policy for silent 
film. 

Funding for preservation of Bris 
home videos cut short. 

Why is nitrate film preservation so 
much more expensive than day rate? 

Archivists not good with their hands 
concerned about digital technology. 



The Next Conference 
The 1995 AMIA Conference will be held 
in Toronto, Ontario, from October 10- 
14 at the Crowne Plaza. The Toronto 
conference will provide a special oppor- 
tunity for AMIA to commemorate the 
centennial of the motion picture. 

For more information on the Asso- 
ciation of Moving Image Archivists or to 
join the Association and receive its 
newsletter, contact the AMIA Secretariat 
c/o National Center for Film and Video 
Preservation, the American Film Insti- 
tute, P.O. Box 27999, 2021 North West- 
ern Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90027. FAX 
213 467-4578. 

To engage in on-line dialog with AMIA 
members, try AMIA-L, the electronic 
discussion list of the organization. To 
subscribe, address an electronic message 
to LISTSERVE@UKCC.UKY.EDU. 
In the message area type your name, 
preceded by SUBSCRIBE AMIA-L. 



The Century Project to Go 

by Richard D' Abate 

Associate Director, 

Maine Humanities Council 

What's bigger than all of us, starts in 
1 995, and has a stockpile of special films, 
videos and exhibits that organizations 
throughout Maine can get for free? It's 
the Century Project: Modem Times in 
Maine and America, 1890-1930, the 
Maine Humanities Council's new state- 
wide initiative. 

Designed to help Mainers take stock 
of their place in the twentieth century, 
the project looks back at the crucial 
early years the origin of so many of 
the changes and tensions that came to 
shape the modern world. Components 
of the project include a community 
history grant program, symposia, read- 
ing and discussion programs, a comput- 
erized archiving project, and an exhibit. 
To expand the educational impact of 
all these activities, the Council has 
created a collection of Century Project 
films, videos and exhibit resources. They 
are available right now from Ideas to 
Go, the Council's new media take-out 
service, managed by Northeast Historic 
Film. 

Ideas to 
Go has 
exhibits on 
European 
immigra- 
tion and the 
rise of 
department 
stores; early 
amateur and 
feature 
films of 
Maine; 
pioneering 
works by 
women and 
black filmmakers; and documentaries on 
many subjects: the Great War, rum 
running and air races, the arts, Teddy 
Roosevelt and Jane Adams, Franco- 
American culture, and more. For a free 
Ideas to Go catalog and programming 
ideas call 207 469-6912. 




IDEAS TO Go 

FILM & VIDEO 
EXHIBITS 

READING & 

DISCUSSION 
SPEAKERS 



Railroad Square Cinema 
Rises from the Ashes 

by Ken Eisen 

Railroad Square Cinema in Waterville, 
Maine, a popular independent cinema, 
was devastated by a fire in October. The 
partners have started construction of a 
new theater complex. The new building, 




located directly across from the old 
theater, will house three screens and an 
adjoining cafe. The screens, seating 150, 
90, and 60 patrons, will be "interlocked" 
so that larger audiences can see the same 
film in more than one room. The target 
opening date is late spring or early 
summer. 

Following the world premiere benefit 
screening of Nobody's Fool at the Water- 
ville Opera House in December, contri- 
butions topped $80,000 toward the fund- 
raising goal of $275,000. Other benefit 
events are planned. 

Contributions can be sent to PO Box 
945, Waterville, ME 04903. For informa- 
tion about making sizable donations, 
contact the Friends of Art and Cinema 
at 207 474-3085; or to learn about the 
cinema opening and to make other 
contributions, call 207 873-6526. 



Aroostook County, 1920s 



The Michael Bernard Collection, 35 mm. 
film from Maine's northernmost county 
in the 1920s, returned to Aroostook 
County in January with help from many 
people. 

Bernard, who found the reels in the 
basement of the Braden Theatre, is first 
credited with recognizing the importance 
of the film, which was made on the oc- 
casion of Presque Isle's centennial in 
1920. 

Preservation of the original film and 
its presentation have been supported by 
the American Film Institute/National 
Endowment for the Arts Film Preserva- 
tion Program and the Maine Community 
Foundation's Expansion Arts program. 
Local sponsors include the Presque Isle 
Area Chamber of Commerce, Rotary 
Club of Presque Isle, Presque Isle Ki- 
wanis, Kinney's Clothing, Presque Isle 
Historical and Genealogical Society, and 
Ron Coffin, First Atlantic Corporation. 

Aroostook Centre Cinemas Free 
Screenings 

NHF offered Presque Isle schools free 
screenings of the film at the Aroostook 
Centre Cinemas, thanks to the generos- 
ity of R&H Theaters. There was great 
enthusiasm especially from Maine history 
teachers. School events were coordinated 
by Carolyn St. Pierre, Pamela Hallett 
and Judy Cronin. 




Typical "Our Town" Film 
Aroostook County 1920s, besides being 
shown in free screenings, is available on 
VHS videocassette. Fifty complimentary 
copies are being given to Aroostook 
County educators; individuals may also 
order the tape from NHF. 

It is a portrait of a bustling Presque 
Isle. Downtown, horse-drawn carriages 
and Fords pass on Main Street. Green's 
dry goods and F. B. Thompson's monu- 
ment store share the spotlight. Patrons 
emerge from the Opera House. 

Area highlights include hunting camps, 
Grand Falls, and an apple orchard. The 
Aroostook Valley Railroad electric 
trolley approaches the camera and pro- 




Photo: Blanche Beckwith 

ceeds through the Aroostook country- 
side, through fields and over bridges. 

Presque Isle Friends 

Among the many people who helped 
figure out the significance of the film are 
Mr. and Mrs. Lisle Wheeler, whose 
Riverside Farm appears in it; Dick and 
Angie Graves who first got the Centen- 
nial connection; Blanche Beckwith; and 
Mrs. Charles Eber. 

Many thanks also to people generous 
with their time and resources who helped 
secure needed local funding: Marcus Bar- 
ressi, Paul Kinney, Connie Sandstrom, 
Linda Smith, Claudia Stevens, board 
member Michael Fiori, and many others. 
And thanks again to the Aroostook Cen- 
tre Cinemas for the screen. 



Presque Isle celebrated its centennial in 1920. Photo: Dick and Angie Grave* 



Archival Notes 




Oliver Hardy, the undergraduate boxer. Frame enlargement courtesy George Eastman House. 



James Phillips, Jr., and Rita Phillips con- 
tinue their support of the archives with 
their delightful presence at the monthly 
potluck-screening nights and with a 
stream of gifts. The most significant of 
these from a national perspective is a 
collection of one-reel films, among them 
the earliest-known appearance of Oliver 
Hardy in The Simp and the Sophomores. 
The films were donated by NHF to 
George Eastman House, where they join 
the archives' strong collection of Ameri- 
can silents. Curator Jan-Christopher 
Horak, before leaving GEH, identified a 
Lubin one-reeler as The American Girl, 
also a unique and unpreserved film. 

Also donated by the Phillipses is a 
flyer for An Evening with Seth Parker 
(1931) at Portland City Hall: 

Each Sunday night over 3,500,000 
make up the audience invisible and hear 
Sunday Night at Seth Parker's over 
WEAF of NBC and 39 associated stations. 
The program leads all other sustaining 
programs in the entire radio field. And 
has done much toward heralding a 



'tolerant religion' that the Youth of 
today is seeking. 

Monica C. Reed donated a three- 
sheet poster from a 1917 Paramount 
film, A Roadside Impresario. The stone- 
lithographed image is of a heartbroken 
woman; in the foreground a man, appar- 
ently about to hit the road, addresses a 
black bear, "Good-bye, Bruno! Be good 
to Mama." Thanks to Q. David Bowers 
for the connection. 

Miss Julia Remick added to NHF's 
Alamo Theatre-related artifacts with a 
Hopalong Cassidy poster from the 
Alamo's run of Heart of the West (1936). 
The creator of Hopalong, Clarence E. 
Mulford, was a Fryeburg, Maine, resi- 
dent from 1926 to his death. 

Mr. George Candage donated a 
postcard of The Alamo, 1916. 

Forest Carmichael, manager of sev- 
eral northern New England theaters 
including The Grand in Ellsworth, 
donated a scrapbook with detailed docu- 
mentation of his exhibition strategies 



along with other materials including 
programs from Fantasia and Gone with 
the Wind. 

Sheet Music 

Take Your Girlie to the Movies (If You 
Can 't Make Love at Home), a number 
performed by Danny Patt and vocalists 
in Maine Touring Artists performances, 
came from Richard D'Abate. 

Books and Periodicals 

Nancy and Bill Lippmcott donated 
Behind the Motion Picture Screen by 
Austin C. Lescarboura, 1919, a reference 
book of particular interest because it 
came from the library of Daniel Maher, 
the Maine newsreel photographer de- 
picted in NHF's logo. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bowden do- 
nated issues of Kodakery, 1925-1926, 
including the special Amateur Motion 
Picture issue. 

Deborah Felder donated a 1945-46 
University of Maine Film Service catalog 
documenting instructional 16 mm. film. 
Previously unknown titles to look out 
for: New England Fisheries, Cod and 
New England Fishermen. 

Bucksport resident James Sweet 
donated many film reference works. 
Tony Jonaitis III sent Way Down East, 
Timothy's Quest and The Innocent Eye. 
Robert Jordan contributed Biograph 
Bulletins, 1908-1912. 

Technology 

New England-made projection equip- 
ment came from several sources. Mr. 
John Carroll donated a portable 35 mm. 
projector, a Keystone Moviegraph. 
Dorothy Lake donated a Radioptican 
made by the H. C. White Co., North 
Bennington, Vermont. 

Furniture 

NHF members helped with functional 
furniture, too. Frank and Catherine 
Wiers donated two exceptional ma- 
hogany office chairs currently used by 
the curatorial staff; Ed and Sally Lupfer 
gave a sofa for the library. 

New Film and Video Collections 
The Archie Stewart Collection, men- 
tioned in the last issue of Moving Image 



10 






Northeast Historic Film's Members, 
Thank You One and All! 



Review, is being processed. The 174 
reels of 16 mm. film from 1928 to 1985, 
and 19 videotapes, are proving to be a 
very significant collection. Ninety-three- 
year-old Stewart donated a log and 
autobiographical writings. 

The film records Stewart's life in 
Newburgh, NY, and regular trips to 
Grand Lake Stream, Maine, as well as 
travels around the country. Stewart's 
lifelong connection with aviation and 
with the Maine woods is a strong com- 
ponent of the footage. His worklife as a 
second-generation automobile dealer is 
extremely well documented. Stewart, a 
member of the Amateur Cinema League, 
is skillful with the camera and a commit- 
ted recorder of twentieth-century life. 
The archives thanks his granddaughter, 
Mary Sauls Kelly. 

The WLBZ Collection, 600,000 ft. of 
16 mm. television newsfilm from 1975 to 
1980, arrived at the archives in Septem- 
ber, accompanied by nine volumes of 
station logs. WLBZ is an NBC affiliate in 
Bangor, Maine, sister station to Port- 
land's WCSH. 

The Suzanne Massie Collection, a 
feature film called Better to Light a 
Candle by Leningrad Documentary 
Films, arrived at the archives in Septem- 
ber. Massie, co-author of Journey, is the 
subject of the film, set in Russia and in 
Deer Isle, Maine, including the Fourth 
of July parade in Stonington in 1991. 
This 35 mm. copy is the only English- 
language print; the archival holdings also 
include two reels of outtakes. 

Other new collections include addi- 
tions to The GTE Collection; from 
Maine Public Broadcasting, 72 reels of 
public service announcements; and 21 
videotapes from the Maine Humanities 
Council's 1988 AIDS conference. The 
Rick Johnston Collection contains views 
of Rockland's Samoset hotel before it 
burned; Charles, John and Mary Ranlett 
in Bangor and Lucerne, 1938; The Will- 
iam Rand Collection, intertitled recre- 
ation footage; from Lawrence Dolby, 
footage of Saco River river-driving and a 
copy of Then it Happened (1947); Con- 
stance Richardson's Finest Kind (1975); 
and 16 mm. from the Natural Resources 
Council of Maine including Voices from 
Maine (1970). 



Friends 

Paul & Deborah Gelardi 

Del Keppelmen and Skip Sheldon 

Edgar & Sally Lupfer 

Alan & Eleanor McClelland 

J. Gary Nichols 

Ed Pert 

Rita & James Phillips 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Saudek 

Dr. David C. Smith 

Nat & Peggy Thompson 

David Weiss & Karan Sheldon 

MacKay Wolff 

Associates 

Mrs. Frederic E. Camp 

Marcia Fenn 

Michael Fiori 

Ernest & Kathryn Gross 

Miriam Hansen 

Robert L. Jordan 

Larry Lichty 

Catie Marshall 8c Nelson Bakerman 

Charles &c Charlotte Morrill 

Terry Rankine 

Charles R. Ryan 

Clare Sheldon 

Peter & Ann Sheldon 

Noel & Betty Stookey 

Charles G. Tetro 8c Beverly Bibber 

Joel & Allene White 

Pamela Wintle & Henry Griffin 

Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 




Archie Stewart with ammo belt and camera, 
1920, Archie Stewart Collection. 



Corporate Members 
N.H. Bragg & Sons 
Darwin K. Davidson, Ltd. 
Harraseeket Inn 
Lewis & Malm 
Modular Media 
Rosen's Department Store 
SkyDog Productions 
Tyson 8c Partners, Inc. 
VisNet East, GTE 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Abbott Memorial Library 

The American Experience, WGBH-TV 

Bangor Historical Society 

Boothbay Railway Village 

Calais Free Library 

Cherryfield Narraguagus Historical Society 

Coastside Parks and Recreation, Inc. 

College of the Atlantic Library 

Dirigo High School Library 

Ellsworth Public Library 

Essex Shipbuilding Museum 

Farmington Public Library 

Farnsworth Museum 

Fisher Museum of Forestry, Harvard Forest 

Friend Memorial Libary, Brooklin 

Fryeburg Historical Society 

Graves Memorial Library, Kennebunkport 

H.O.M.E., Inc. Learning Center 

Indiana Historical Society 

Jay-Niles Memorial Library, North Jay 

KidsPeace New England 

Lake Champlain Maritime Museum 

Maine Forest 8c Logging Museum 

Maine Historical Society 

Maine Medical Center 

Maine Public Broadcasting System 

Margaret Chase Smith Library Center 

Market Square Health Center 

Morrill Historical Society 

Northeast Harbor Library 

Orland Historical Society 

Pemetic Elementary School 

Pittsficld Public Library 

Prime Resource Center 

Rangeley Public Library 

Reiche School 

Simmons College Library 

South Portland High School Libary 

Sumner Memorial High School 

Union Historical Society 

Vassalboro Public Library 

Vinalhaven Historical Society 

Waterville High School Media Center 

Wilton Historical Society 

Women Unlimited 

Yarmouth Historical Society 

Regular Members 
Coco Adams 



More NHF Members 



Herb Adams 

Richard C. Alden 

Mel Allen 

Lauris Ames 

Joan Amory 

Kathy Anderson 

Tom & Rachel Armstrong 

James & Esther Austin 

Dan & Cedar Backus 

Emerson Baker 

Jean Barrett 

Otis Bartlett 

Henry Becton, Jr. 

Mark A. Belisle 

Paul & Mollie Birdsall 

Lynne & Farnham Blair 

John Blitzer 

Benjamin Blodget 

Richard Bock 

Nat Bowditch 

Q. David Bowers 

Benjamin & Joan Branch 

Marcia Brazer 

Julie Bressor 

John Brooks 

Faye Brown 

John M.R. Bruner 

Fred Buechner 

George V. Buehler 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald C. Buffington 

Patricia Burdick 

Neal & Betty Butler 

Lynn Cadwallader 

Paul Cady 

Mary Grace Canfield 

Clayton Carlisle 

Dr. Constance Carlson 

Robert J. Carnie 

James Carter 

Andrea Cesari 

Michel Chalufour 

Abel L. Chase 

Peter & Betsy Coe 

Brenda J. Condon 

Dr. Richard Condon 

David & Dani Danzig 

Dave 8c Ginny Davis 

Megan G. Davis 

James & Leila Day 

Joan Decato 

Jeannette S. Dennison 

Clarence R. Derochemont 

Josephine H. Detmer 

Peg & John Dice 

Peter Dickey 

Daniel Donovan 

Calvin W. Dow 

Neal C. Dow 

Shirley Dutton 

Marion W. Eaton 



Reference by Mail 

New videos for members to borrow! 
Call or write for more information 
on NHF's free loan service. 

Donald Hall and Jane Kenyan: 
A Life Together 

New Hampshire poets read their 
poetry. Moving conversations about 
mortality and community; living in 
northern New England, living as 
mates and being poets. Hall and 
Kenyon read to neighbors in their 
small-town grange hall. 1994. 
60 mins. col., sd. 

Then it Happened 
A record of the 1 947 forest fires that 
devastated Maine. Produced by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture 
focusing on aftermath of the fire in 
southern Maine. 20 mins., col., sd. 



Dennis Ekberg 

Lloyd Ekholm 

Mrs. Anna Mary Elskus 

Lynn Farnell 

Carroll Faulkner & Ann Holland 

Joseph Filtz 

Ann & Everett Foster 

Carlton G. Foster 

Jim Freeman 

Yves Frenette 

Marian J. Fretz 

Eugene W. Fuller 

Kathy H. Fuller 

Peter & Linda Gammons 

H. William Geoffrion 

John Gfroerer 

Julia Gilmore 

Lea Girardin 

Jim Goff 

Douglas Gomery 

Austin Goodyear 

Henry & Gail Grandgent 

Terry Grant 

Bill Gross & Alicia Condon 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Clarence A. Hamilton 

Jim Hamlin 

Donald C. Hammond 

Eric W. Handley 

James Hanna 

Lorraine Hanson 

Pat Harcourt 

Francis W. Hatch 

George W. Hatch 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Heilner 

Roy V. Heisler & Esther Bissell 



Charles Hesse 

Charles Hoag 

Terry Hoffer 

C.A. Porter Hopkins 

John C. & Betty Howard 

Stanley R. Howe 

Sherman Howe, Jr. 

David Huntley 

Douglas H. Ilsley 

Ann Ivins 

Jeff Janer 

Glenn Jenks & Faith Getchell 

Ned Johnston & Sophia Ibrahim 

Thomas F. Joyce 

Richard & Patricia Judd 

Susan A. Kaplan 

John J. Karol, Jr. 

Arlene Keith 

Mary S. Kelly 

Ron Kiesman 

Richard Kimball, Jr. 

Nancy S. King 

Diane Kopec 

Mark Letizia 

Jon Lickerman 

Stephen Lindsay 

Bill Lippincott 

Betty Ann 8c Donald Lockhart 

Roy Lockwood 

John R. Long 

Bonnie Lounsbury 

Howard P. Lowell 

John MacFadyen 

George MacLeod 

Wendy P. Matthews 

Eugene Mawhinney 

Leo & Meri McCarthy 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Judith F. McGeorge 

Patricia F. McGeorge 

Carl McGraw 

John T. Mcllwaine 

Charles Ray McKay 

Phyllis Mellen 

Bruce Meulendyke 

Phoebe Milliken 

Ellen Mitchell 

Betsy Montandon & Keith Davison 

Betty & Hugh Montgomery 

Francis S. Moulton, Jr. 

Henry H. Moulton 

Lewis Nichols 

Nick Nugent 

John A. O'Brien 

Kathryn J. Olmstead 

George R. O'Neill 

Patricia 8c Andrew Packard 

Constance Page 

George A. Paquette 

Larry &: Nancy Perlman 



12 




Every NHF Member 
Gets All These Benefits 

i Moving Image Review, the only periodical with infor- 
mation on northern New England film and videotape 
research, preservation and exhibition. 

Advance notice of screenings and events, such as the 
premiere of The Beans of Egypt, Maine. 

Discounts on more than 30 Videos of Life in New 
England. 

Discounts on the new line of feature films. 

Free loan of videotapes through Reference by Mail. 
Each NHF member may borrow a shipment of up to 
THREE tapes free of charge, including free shipping! 
Additional tapes may be borrowed (up to three per 
shipment) for a $5 fee to cover each shipment. 

Membership Levels and Benefits 

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All benefits listed above. 

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For teachers and students at any level 
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* 

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Three free shipments (up to nine tapes) of Reference by 
Mail videos; 
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All benefits of Associate Membership. 

Friends, $250 per year 

All benefits of regular membership, plus: 

Five free shipments (up to 15 tapes) of Reference by Mail 

videos; 

Free NHF Sweatshirt 

Membership at any level is an opportunity to become 
involved with the preservation and enjoyment of our 
moving image heritage. 

Your dues are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. 



NHF Membership Application 

J new J renewal 






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Phone 





Please enroll me as a member at the level indicated below: 
D Regular $25 
CJ Educator/Student $15 
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v" 



Ruth & Bill Pfaffle 

John Potter 

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Annie Proulx 

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Kenn Rabin 

Elvie M. Ramsdell 

William Rand 

Sally Regan 

Charles Reid 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward Rendall 

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Windsor C. Robinson 

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Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Rosie 

Mckie Wing Roth, Jr. 

Roy, Beardsley 8t Williams 

DeWitt Sage 

Harriet H. Sands 

Shan Sayles 

Ronald Schliessman 

Pat & Tom Schroth 

Wendy Wincote Schweikert 

Mr. & Mrs. P.H. Sellers 

Richard Shaw 

Jennifer Sheldon 

Harold & Janet Simmons 

Dr. Marshall Smith 

Sandra Smith 

Thomas Smith 

Evelyn Snell 

Pat & Roy Snell 

John S. Stillman 

Lynda L. Sudlow 

Samuel T. Suratt 

Philip &i Dorothy Symanski 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Taylor 

Drs. L. & M. Temeles 

Denis Thoet 

Charles & Cathy Thompson 

Philip P. Thompson 

Edith M. Tucker 

Ethel B. Turner 

Robert Tyler 

Mrs. Joanne J. Van Namee 

Arthur C. & Frances Verow 

Mrs. Barbara S. Wakeman 

Robert & Julia Walkling 

Mary Anne Wallace 

Danna Ware 

Richard Warren 

Lynwood Warriner 

Seth H. Washburn 

Nola Wass 

Mick Waugh 

Lee Webb 

Vern & Jackie Weiss 

Heather White 

Frank 8c Catherine Wiers 



Tappy & Robin Wilder 

Jon Wilson 8c Sherry Streeter 

Carter Wintle 

Edith Wolff 

Cynthia J. Wood 

Bob Woodbury 

Roger York 

Educator/Student Members 

Mark L. Anderson 

Miss Rosemary Anthony 

Deborah Belyea 

Bennington College, Gladden Schrock 

Thomas L. Boelz 

Brick Store Museum 

Carol Bryan 

Bucksport Middle School, Judy Arey 

Prof. William Burgess 

Richard Burns 

California Polytech, Tim O'Keefe 

Carnegie Library, Good Will-Hinckley 

Center for Southern Studies, Tom Rankin 

Chewonki Foundation, Scott Andrews 

Chico Folklore Archive, Thomas Wayne 

Johnson 
Crossroads Alternative School, Penny 

McGovern 
Laurie Cyphers 
Rudolph H. Dectjen, Jr. 
Deborah Ellis 

I-'ogler Library, University of M; 
Joseph E. Foster 
Elaine & John Gardner 
Christopher Glass 
Martha Goldner 

Gray-New Gloucester Middle School 
Cora Greer 
Kevin Hagopian 

Hampden Academy, Gifford Stevens 
Eithne Johnson & Eric Schaefer 
Jordan Small School, D. Blanchard 
Dr. Lewis S. Libby School, Alvina Cyr 
Robbie Lewis 
Dean Lyons 

Mid Coast Audubon, Joe Gray 
New England Studies, USM, Joseph A. 

Conforti 
Mary O'Meara 
Penobscot Marine Museum 
Sanford Phippen 

Queens College, Dr. Richard E. C. White 
Joan Radner 
Paige W. Roberts 
Rockland District Middle School, Todd 

Mclntosh 
Chris Saunders 
Gail Shelton 
Tony Smith 

Richard & Laura Stubbs 
Sunday River Inn, Steve & Peggy Wight 



Collections Guide 

NHF's New Collections Guide due 
spring 1995. 

Special Offer! 

NHF's Friends, Associates 

and Corporate Members FREE 

All other Members $4.95 

Non-members $9.95 







. :- 



The Sailor's Sacrifice, a 1909 Vitagraph film 
shot in southern Maine. Frame enlargement 
from the collections of Northeast Historic Film. 



Traverse City Area Public Schools, George 

Sarns 

Juris Ubans 

Valley Jr. and Sr. High School, Lynn Lister 
Wells Jr. High School Library, Carol King 
Westbrook High School Library 
Seth Wigderson 
Peggy Wiles 

Windham School Department 
York School Department, Jeanne Gamage I 



13 



Hollywood! Northern New England! Hollywood! 



Hollywood films relate to northern 
New England in different ways. NHF 
has devised a key to let you know 
our opinion of the relationship. 

1 A good bit shot in northern 
New England 

2 Issues of interest to the region 

3 Artist(s) connected with the 
region 

4 No discernible legitimate 
connection 



Carousel 1 

Timeless Songs 

Shirley Jones and Gordon MacRae 
star in a romantic fantasy that spans 
heaven and earth in the Rodgers & 
Hammerstein musical. Free audio- 
cassette of the soundtrack for bellow- 
ing along accompanies the videotape. 
1956. 128 mins., col. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

The Man Without a Face 1 

Well, Haifa Face 

Mel Gibson, in his directorial debut, 
stars as a schoolteacher with a past. 
"Justin McLeod has been an outsider 
since the day he arrived in Cranes- 
port, Maine." 1993. 115 mins., col. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 



Peyton Place l f 2 f 3 

Small Town Scandals 

Nominated for nine Academy 
Awards, Peyton Place is the story 
of coming of age in a small New 
England village whose peaceful 
fagade hides passion, scandal and 
hypocrisy. From the novel by Grace 
Metalious, starring Lana Turner and 
Hope Lange. 1957. 157 mins., col. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 

Prophecy 1, 2 

New England Eco-Monsters 

Directed by John Frankenheimer 
with Talia Shire and Armand Assante. 
Fabulous duel between chainsaw- 
wielding forester and axe-bearing 
Indian and many other mercury- 
loaded treats. 1979. 95 mins., col. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

A Summer Place 4 

Desire & Tumult! 

Troy Donahue and Sandra Dee find 
love at A Summer Place. "The yacht 
sails toward the elite Maine resort of 
Pine Island and young Molly Jorgen- 
sen peers through binoculars for a 
close-up view. 'There's a boy there 
watching me!' she exclaims." 1959. 
130 mins., col. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 



Sunrise at Campobello 1, 2 

Sincere! Well Acted! 

Ralph Bellamy plays Franklin Delano 
Roosevelt in Dore Schary's long- 
running play and this film. Greer 
Garson is Eleanor. Co-starring Hume 
Cronyn. Exteriors filmed at Campo- 
bello. 1960. 144 mins., col. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

Way Back Home 2, 3 

Yankee Humor & Pathos 

Seth Parker and His Jonesport Neigh- 
bors in a downcast comedy starring 
Phillips Lord. Bette Davis plays the 
ingenue farm girl in the first screen 
role she thought did her justice. The 
film recapitulates many Maine 
sketches and characters. 1932. 81 
mins., b&w. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

The Whales of August 1,3 

Sixty Summers on a Maine Island 
Stars Bette Davis and Lillian Gish, 
two of Hollywood's longest-reigning 
leading ladies. Lindsay Anderson 
directed them together on screen for 
the first time. With Vincent Price and 
Ann Sothern. 1987. 91 mins., col. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 

These videotapes are offered for private, 
in-home viewing only. 



New Titles for Sale & BIG Savings on Video Set 



Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine 
A documentary using archival photographs, 
prints, period music and personal accounts 
tells the story of Maine's Civil War hero 
from Bowdoin theology professor to 
Major General. 55 mins., b&w, sd. 

$19.95/NHF members $16.95 

On Board the Morgan: America's Last 
Wooden Whaler 

Mystic Seaport's celebration of the last 
sailing American whaleship. The whaling 
industry supplied oil for light and manu- 
facturing, as this program explains for 
young audiences. Includes archival foot- 
age, a tour of the Morgan and excerpts 
from Herman Melville's Moby Dick. 23 
mins., col. & b&w., sd. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 



Aroostook County 1920s 

Maine's northernmost county is known 
for agriculture, outdoor recreation and 
congenial towns. Footage shot for Presque 
Isle's centennial in 1920 shows downtown, 
Riverside Farm (famous for its seed 
potatoes), the Aroostook Valley Railroad 
(the electric trolley) and many other sights. 
With period music. 20 mins., b&w, sd. 

$14.95/NHF members $12.95 

King Spruce 

Around 1940 the New England forest 
employed thousands of skilled woods- 
workers. This is a detailed account of 
spruce-wood harvesting. Scenes include 
winter cord-cutters and yarding crews, 
teamsters with their horses and batteaus 
moving logs downriver. 23 mins., col., sd. 
$14.95/NHF members $12.95 



MAINE HISTORY COLLECTION 

A set of six videos for only $89.95. Save 
more than $25! Includes some of the most 
popular titles: Norumbega, Joshua Cham- 
berlain, Anchor of the Soul, Ice Harvest- 
ing, From Stump to Ship and On Board 
the Morgan. A superb starter collection 
for you, or a library or school. For a 
descriptive 
flyer or to 
order your 
set call 
800 639- 
1636. 




14 



Reference by Mail- 
The Most Popular Videos of 1 994 

NHF lends videotapes by mail,/ree of 
charge, to members. More than 60 titles 
are available for loan. In 1994 the most 
frequently circulated videos were 

1 . Acadian Villages (Reflets et 
Lumiere) 

2. An Oral Historian's Work 

3. Around Cape Horn 

4. From Stump to Ship 

5. Ice Harvesting Sampler 

6. Mount Washington: Among the 
Clouds 

7. Norumbega: Maine in the Age of 
Exploration and Settlement 

8. Rachel Carson's Silent Spring 

9. Ride the Sandy River Railroad 

10. Sins of Our Mothers 

1 1 . Woodsmen and River Drivers 
Call or write for your list of Reference 
by Mail titles. 



NHF Membership 



As an independent, nonprofit organiza- 
tion, NHF depends on its members. 
Annual dues are as low as $15! 

Your dues are tax-deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 per 
year, for teachers and students at any level 

Regular Members, $25 per year 

All members receive many benefits 
including: 

Moving Image Review. 

Advance notice of events. 

Discounts on more than 30 Videos 
of Life in New England. 

Discounts on the new line of feature 
films. 

Free loan of videotapes through 
Reference by Mail. 



Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year 
All listed benefits plus: 

Reduced rates for technical services 
and presentations 

Additional copies of Moving Image 
Review on request 

Associates (Individuals), $100 per year 
All listed benefits plus: 

Three free shipments (up to nine 
tapes) of Reference by Mail videos 

Free NHF T-shirt 

Corporate Members, $100 per year 

All benefits of Associate Membership 

Friends, $250 per year 

All benefits of regular membership, 

plus: 

Five free shipments (up to 15 tapes) 
of Reference by Mail videos 

Free NHF Sweatshirt 



Membership and Order Form Northeast Historic Film, P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, ME 04416 USA 

207 469-0924 



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1} 




Flynn Theatre for the Performing Am, Ltd. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 




BUCKSFORT, MAINE. USA 
04416-0900 (207) 469-0924 



ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



The Flynn Theatre 
Burlington, Vermont 

by Ray Zirhlis, M.S., 

University of Vermont, 

Historic Preservation 

The Art Deco-style Flynn Theatre, now 
a nonprofit community-based perform- 
ing arts center, was built in 1930 by John 
J. Flynn, who owned several Vermont 
theaters. 

The Flynn seated 1,452, cost $400,000 
to build, and in the 1940s was still the 
most modern of Burlington's theaters. 

Site for Going to the Movies Project 
The Flynn, participating in NHF's Going 
to the Movies social history project, will 
focus on life in Burlington in the 1940s. 
We are looking at many types of histori- 
cal records including oral histories, maps, 
photographs, business records and other 
documents. 

War-Time Vermont 
The state of Vermont got into World 
War II, at least on paper, by declaring 
war on Nazi Germany months before 
the United States government. By 1942 
Burlington theaters like the Strong, the 
Majestic, the Orpheum and the Flynn 
were swept up in the home-front effort. 
They sponsored war-bond drives and 
scrap collections and offered the fare 
patriotism, propaganda and entertain- 
ment that made up wartime moviegoing. 

Uniformed Moviegoers 

Infantry troops training at Fort Ethan 
Allen and Army Air Corps enlistees in 
flying school at Burlington airport could 
catch a show at the Flynn, free to those 
in uniform. 

Vermont's museums and archives are 
beginning to collect materials related to 
World War II. As regards the Flynn, 
wonderful artifacts and stories are 
emerging. The Flynn log book for the 
war years, which records day by day the 
films shown, tickets sold and free admis- 
sions to servicemen, has been located. 

Oral-history possibilities abound. 
One woman recalls from the early 1940s 
that the girls in Burlington High School 
were assembled by a teacher and lectured 
not to date the soldiers. "But of course," 
she notes, "we did anyway." 



Northeast Hit tor it Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 






Capital Campaign 



Northeast Historic Film has planned a $1.5 
million campaign for the renovation and ex- 
pansion of the Alamo Theatre building. The 3- 
year goal is a facility that effectively supports 
NHF's preservation and outreach programs. 
The funds raised will enable NHF to achieve 
aims in the following areas: 

Preservation 

Construct a 3-story climate-controlled storage 
building. 

Improve technical services facilities. 

Access 

Complete and equip an auditorium with excel- 
lent sightlines and acoustics for film, video 
and live performances. 

Education 

Complete an interpretive exhibition on the 
history of moviegoing in the region. 

Improve facilities for researchers, interns and 
volunteers. 

With $350,000 already in hand, leadership 
gifts are currently being sought. The formal 
campaign kick-off will be announced in the 
coming months. 

For more information about pledges, 
named-gift opportunities, planned gifts, or gifts 
of securities, please call the executive director, 
David Weiss, at 207 469-0924, or E-mail 
OLDFILM@aol.com. 



Northeast Historic Film provides educational 

resources for students and the public. 

Elementary school students from Surry, Maine, 

took this bus to the Alamo Theatre to edit 

a video with media educator Huey. 



Deditated to tho Preservation 
of ttorthern Mow England 
Motion futures 



Summer 1995 




Executive Director's Report p. 2 

Archives Abroad by Samuel Suratt .. p. 5 

Alamo Centerfold p.6,7 

Reel Families p. 8 

Archival Notes p. 9 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Film, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 044 16. 
David S. Weiss, executive director, Karan 
Sheldon, editor. ISSN 0897-0769. 




Executive Director's Report 

Libby Rosemeier, our distribution 
coordinator, leaves us this fall after 
seven years. Libby was responsible for 
developing video distribution from a 
single VHS (and Betamax) video title to 
a line of more than 40 Videos of Life 
in New England sold to 100 retail 
accounts. 

A highly respected photography 
teacher at George Stevens Academy in 
Blue Hill, Libby is pursuing a degree in 
human ecology at the College of the 
Atlantic, Bar Harbor. She will graduate 
with teacher certification for high-school 
social studies. 

Officer Elections 

At the May 1 annual meeting NHF board 
members elected 1995 officers. Richard 
Rosen of Bucksport is president, James 
Henderson of Orr's Island is vice presi- 
dent, and Alan McClelland of Camden 
is treasurer. 

Richard Rosen is the owner of Rosen's 
Department Store in Bucksport. He is 
vice president of Bucksport Regional 
Health Center and cofounder of the 
Bucksport Bay Area Chamber of 
Commerce. 

James Henderson is Maine State 
Archivist. He holds a PhD from Emory 
University. 

Alan McClelland is a retired defense- 
electronics executive, and volunteer 
archivist and photographer. He serves 
on the executive board of the Society of 
Maine Archivists. 

Heartfelt Thanks 

On behalf of the board and staff, many 
thanks to our outgoing president, Paul 
Gelardi. Heartfelt thanks also to 
retiring director Robert Saudek, who 
joined the fledgling board in 1988. 



5 



Collections Guide: 
A Personal Introduction 




David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



1 THREAD MY MIND'S EYE projector 
with images of summer vacations 
spent on my grandparents' Maine 
farm on the White School House Road 
between Madison and Clough's Corner 
turn right to go to Skowhegan, turn 
left to go to Lakewood. 

I see Grammie stoking the wood 
stove attached to the electric range, the 
milk delivery man bringing coconut- 
covered donuts, us kids in an old black 
buggy hitched to Grampie's horse, a 
small red tractor which was his pride 
and joy, eggs being taken from beneath 
a hen that pecked at Grammie's leathery 
skin, newly picked blueberries in a white 
dipper trimmed in red, Skowhegan 
Methodist church picnics in the pine 
grove, and more. I revisit these images 



frequently as a way of staying connected: 
connected to people I loved, to my 
personal history, to a regional history I 
have grown to cherish, to a complex 
and dynamic national history, and even 
to an international history a story of 
immigrants. 

Individuals' stories give form to our 
present and shape our future. My mater- 
nal grandparents, children of immigrants 
from the British Isles, were links to the 
nineteenth century. I instinctively under- 
stood this as a child and was all the more 
intrigued by them. Perhaps this is why I 
have long been fascinated with amateur 
film and believe it to have been shame- 
fully neglected. Home movies are per- 
sonal histories that can be used to help 
us understand the past. 



This passage is from Pamela Wintle's 
preface to Northeast Historic Film's 
new Collections Guide. Wintle, from 
the Human Studies Film Archives, 
National Museum of Natural History, 
introduces the Guide, which contains 
detailed information on nearly 200 
collections of film and videotape avail- 
able for research at Northeast Historic 
Film. The Guide has historical and 
biographical notes on home movie 
collections, television film from the 



Summer Intern 



Scott Elliott, an Amherst College stu- 
dent, is our summer intern. His season 
began with a full-throttle initiation: a 7 
a.m. departure for Humanities Day at 
the Maine State House in Augusta, 
where Elliott assisted Lynne Blair set- 
ting up Maine Humanities Resources 
displays. The day was rounded out with 
several successful hours of microfilm 
research at the Maine State Library 
pursuing documentation on second-run 
appearances of The Birth of a Nation in 
Lewiston, Maine. Proving himself an 
able (and lucky) researcher, Elliott will 
be seeing more of the state's libraries. 
He will also be working on 16 mm. 
collections care. 



region, drama, independent and indus- 
trial works. 

The Guide is useful for researchers, 
librarians, teachers, historians and any- 
one interested in northern New England 
history and culture. 

Patricia Burdick, Crystal Hall Cole 
and Karan Sheldon wrote the Guide, 
which was supported by a generous 
grant from The Betterment Fund. It is 
available for $9.95. For a special mem- 
bership offer, see page 10. 



NHF Statement of Purpose 



The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but are not lim- 
ited to a survey of moving pictures of 
northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
climate-controlled storage; Creation 
of educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 
members of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production commu 
nity, through providing a study cen- 
ter, technical services and facilities. 



New Film & Video Collections 



Notable Givers 



The archives continues to receive inter- 
esting material from comedy to poli- 
tics. Collections build on material 
already accessioned (works of indepen- 
dent filmmakers, home movies); and 
begin new areas, such as the video 
documentation from Jay, Maine. 

What Do We Ask For? 

Asked how the archives finds film and 
video, David Weiss replied, "Whenever 
I talked to a group I would say, 'There 
is film in your attics, basements and 
garages." " Now, with over 400 collec- 
tions at the archives and a new climate- 
controlled vault to be constructed as 
soon as funds are in hand, Weiss draws 
his listeners' attention to another preser- 
vation resource dollars. "Please be gen- 
erous with your donation to help build 
and maintain climate-controlled storage 
to preserve your cultural heritage." 

A Few New Collections 
Additions to the Jane Morrison Collec- 
tion: production materials from her 
bilingual film, Two Worlds ofAngelita, 
and other films including The White 
Heron and Master Smart Woman, thanks 
to her mother, Dorothy Morrison. 

Drama 

A 35 mm. amateur 1927 Our Gang 
comedy, winner of a New England 
Theaters Operating Corp. contest. The 
film was donated by Charles Denning 
through Art Donahue. 

Video Labor Record 
Peter Kettman donated 120 hours of 
videotape recording the 1987-88 Inter- 
national Paper Company strike in Jay, 
Maine. 

1930 Northern Maine Aviation 
Philip Peterson loaned a 35 mm. film 
documenting "the first aerial double 
wedding," Caribou, Maine, 1930. 

Home Movie Collections 
Hancock Point resident Harrison Bell 
donated 21,000 ft. of 16 mm. family 
film. Shaw Sprague deposited 28 mm. 
amateur footage, with a 16 mm. reduction 
negative. Paul Domincovich donated 
boys' summer camp and urban life 



(1928-1930), including wonderful foot- 
age of children playing, with a detailed 
annotation. 

Television 

Mike Savage donated 179 political 
commercials from the 1994 campaign 
season in Maine on 1-inch, Beta and 34- 
inch tape, representing political candi- 
dates, referenda and bond issues. It adds 
to similar donations from 1988, 1990 
and 1992. 



Special Recognition 
for Volunteers 



John and Betty Howard have spent 
many hours watching new acquisitions 
and recording catalog information. 
Nancy Blomquist has reviewed video- 
tapes, written press releases and proof- 
read. Teeter Bibber helped get the store 
space ready, painting shelves. 

Jim Phillips spearheaded program 
planning and instituted surveys to deter- 
mine upcoming activities. Thanks also 
to the chefs who provided potluck 
suppers, and to Esther Austin and Lisa 
Whitney for their baking, enjoyed at the 
Alamo Theatre Store grand opening. 




Michael and Anna Marie Fiori gave a 
dinner party on May 12 to introduce 
Bangor-area people to Northeast His- 
toric Film's activities. 

Michael Fiori, an NHF board member, 
made a personal appeal to the guests to 
help make a difference to older and 
younger generations, echoing his own 
philosophy as a political activist and 
business person. Many people who were 
at the party joined Northeast Historic 
Film you will find their names on the 
New Members list on page 10. 

Donors 

Michael and Anna Marie Fiori made a 
generous financial contribution to the 
archives' capital campaign, leading the 
board's 100% commitment to the drive. 

Financial contributions were re- 
ceived recently from the following 
donors: 

Roc Caivano Associates 

Crosby's Drive-In 

Darwin K. Davidson, Inc. 

Gamma Chapter, Alpha Delta Kappa 

Paul & Deborah Gelardi 

Robert Jordan 

Suzanne Massie 

Eleanor & Alan McClelland 

Judy McGeorge 

Ed Pert 

James & Rita Phillips 

Terry Rankine 

Richard Rosen 

Robert & Elizabeth Saudck 

Wendy & Ken Schweikert 

Dr. H. Sheldon 

Karan Sheldon & David Weiss 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter L. Sheldon 

Sylvia & David C. Smith 

Thomas A. Stewart 

Cathy & Charles Thompson 

Nathaniel P. Thompson 



Dave Denis, Bucksport Fleet Bank manager, 
lend* a hand on the Alamo Theatre renovations. 



One Hundred Years: 
The Pickford Piper of Summertown 



In celebration of the centennial of the 
projected motion picture, Moving Image 
Review 's "One Hundred Years" column 
looks at the past and future of moving 
image media. This issue's selection, from 
the July 1917 issue of Motion Picture 
Classic, spoofs the impact of movies on 
rural life while vividly capturing a 
rusticator's ideal summer vacation. 

This light look at the seductive appeal 
of darkened movie houses within a north- 
ern New England context, is one of 
historian Kathryn Fuller's contributions 
to our NEH-funded social history project, 
"Going to the Movies: A Century of 
Motion Picture Audiences in Northern 
New England. " 



Ilive at a summer resort. In the sum- 
mer, that is. I have relatives who own 
a cottage. That is why I live there. At 
this summer resort is a lake a beautiful, 
large lake, a lake large enough to cover 
the State of Maine to a depth of oh, 
ever so many feet, in spite of the drought. 

There is a beach adjacent to this lake 
a wide, clean beach with shimmering 
sands. The shimmering sands slide out 
under the large lake so gently that the 
most timid bather can wade almost out 
of sight before the water comes up to 
his tummy. For bathing one could not 
find a better or wetter lake, large or 
small. There are boats on this lake 
little boats, big boats, sail-boats, motor- 
boats, row-boats flocks, squadrons of 
boats. 

All around this summer resort where 
I live are wooded glens and bosky dells, 
except on the lakeside. These wooded 
glens and bosky dells are lovely retreats 
where coodlers may coo and communers 
may commune with Nature. 

Beyond the wooded glens and bosky 
dells are vast orchards where ripen the 
choicest of fruits in season. There is a 
dog or two in these orchards. Some say 
rock salt in the owner's shotgun. But the 
fruits are there for the spry. 

There are beautiful summer homes 
at this summer resort artistic summer 
homes with architecture ranging from 
Kickapoo to Cuckoo Clock. There is an 
airy, spacious inn with much cuisine. 
There is a Pally de Danse pagoda hung 



by Hi Sibley 

over the large lake. Moonlight sparkles on 
the wavelets lapping the feet of the pagoda 
sparkling, lapping synchronously with 
the dulcet thrum-turn of the ukulele. 

There is a golf course at this summer 
resort where I live a velvety, undulat- 
ing golf-course, swept by the gentle, 
cooling zephyrs from the large lake. 
There are tennis-courts of virgin clay 
torn from Mother Earth. There are 
croquet arenas for the lame, the halt 
and the blind. 

There is a mighty river gnawing at 
the off corner of this summer resort. 
There are great fishes in this river 
many fishes voracious, aggressive 
fishes. One has to stand behind a boat- 
house to bait his hook. 

It is an alluring summer resort a 
delightful, captivating summer resort. 
From the murky, madding 
city come the throngs tired 
men, nervous women, obstrep- 
erous offspring. Some one 
else's offspring, that is. Here 
is peace, here is rest, here is 
surcease from the noise- 
bound, nerve-racking, soot- 
begrimed city surcease from 
the tawdry, vapid amusements 
of the city. -Here is beautiful 
Nature in her best duds. 
But- 
Near this summer resort is 
a village an ancient village, 
a decrepit, ingrowing village. 
In the ancient village is a 
street. In the street is a cow 
a leisurely, cogitating cow; a 
dog a somnolent, flea- 
pestered dog; grass grass 
here, there, everywhere in the 
street. There are buildings on 
the street one, two, six, nine 
buildings. They are dejected 
buildings feeble, frame 
buildings with lean-to's. Here 
and there the main buildings 
lean, too. 

There is paint on one of 
the buildings that does not 
lean on the street, or one of 
the buildings on the street that 



does not lean. There is a sign on the 
painted, leanless buildings. The sign on 
the painted, leanless building reads: 



FRANCIS X PICKFORD 

Three Reels 

Change of Bill Daily 

Matinee and Evening All This Week 



It is morning at the summer resort. 
Three hundred souls are in the summer 
resort. It is morning in the village. 
Twenty-seven souls are in the village. 

It is afternoon at the summer resort. 
Nought souls are in the summer resort. 
Three hundred and twenty-seven souls 
are in the village. 

Evening, same 

Tuesday, same 

Wednesday, same 

Thursday, same 

Friday, same 

Saturday, same. 




The Wonderland Theatre in "the pretty town of Fair- 
lands." Frontispiece, The Motion Picture Chums' First 
Venture, or Opening a Photo Playhouse in Fairlands, by 
Victor Apple ton, 1913. 











35 mm. 



16 mm. 



8 mm. Super 8 



HOW DO I IDENTIFY FILM? 









Do Not Project It! 

All film shrinks with age and becomes fragile. Projecting shrunken film risks 
permanent damage by ripping sprocket holes, stressing splices and scratching 
the image. You may have unique, irreplaceable film. Most home movie 
footage is camera original, which means that the film has no negative and 
there may be no other copies. 

Careful Hand Inspection Is OK 

It is possible to carefully unwind the first few feet of the film and learn quite 
a bit from inspection with a magnifying glass. Handle the film by the edges 
only, preferably using clean cotton gloves. 

Record the Following Information 

What is on the can or container? Are there any notes accompanying it? 

Check the condition of the film is it brittle, do the edges curl, is there 
obvious damage? 

Are there titles or credits? 

Is the film negative or positive? Color or black & white? 

Are there sprocket holes on one side or both (single or double 
perforations)? 

Is there sound? Magnetic sound is usually a brown stripe along one 
side; optical sound is a black wavy pattern. 

Remember that the film may be wound "tails out" and you could be 
looking at the end. Remember also that the head and tail are usually 
more worn than the rest. 

Some Date Clues 

1923 
early 1930s 

1931 

1933 

1935 
early 1950s 

1965 






First 1 6 mm. camera for amateurs 

8 mm. film available 

16mm. sound film 

Technicolor 

Kodachrome color 1 6 mm. 

35 mm. safety film in wide use 

Super 8 available 

How Should I Store Film? 

Film benefits from constant low temperature and low humidity conditions. 
) Frequent changes in temperature and humidity cause irreversible damage. 
Store film in clean cans laid flat. 

Nitrate Film 

Up to the early 1 950s 35 mm. film was almost always made on a cellulose 
nitrate base, which is highly unstable and flammable. Inspect it regularly 
and store in an appropriate location. In cases of advanced deterioration, 
nitrate film is subject to spontaneous combustion. 

i Vinegar Syndrome 

1 6 mm. film is not nitrate based. However, it is subject to deterioration. One 
of the signs is acetic acid, the source of a vinegar smell. Humidity and rusty 
metal containers accelerate the process. Films with strong vinegar smell or 
visible acetic acid crystals must be isolated from other films and copied 
before it is too late. 

If you have any questions please call 207 469-0924. 

D C 1994 Northeast Historic Film 




NORTHEAST HISTORIC FILM 

| PO BOX 900. MAIN ST.. BUCKSPORT. ME 04416-0900 | 



Film and video give people a reflection of themselves, 
a moving image of culture and tradition, a context. 

-Pam Wintle, NHF founding board 
member, film archivist, Smithsonian 
Human Studies Film Archives. 

Northeast Historic Film (NHF) collects, preserves and makes 
accessible dramatic, industrial, informational and amateur film and 
video. The nonprofit organization is located in the 1916 Alamo 
Theatre building. NHF holds thousands of hours of videotape and 
more than three million feet of film including three large TV film 
collections from Maine, along with videotape from WCSH-TV, 
Portland, and the Maine Public Broadcasting Corporation. The 
archives is one of the country's foremost collectors of home movies, 
a significant record of everyday life, with particularly strong 
coverage in the 1930s. 

Services 

Consulting and technical services: stock footage research, transfers 

from film to videotape, and preservation planning advice. 

Free loan of videos to members of NHF through the Reference by 

Mail service. 

Videos of Life in New England: a line of videotapes for sale to book 

and gift stores and direct to individuals and organizations. 

Presentations: workshops and film and video screenings at schools 

and other organizations. 

Supported by the Public 

NHF is a nonprofit organization supported by its members, board 
of directors, and tax-deductible contributions from individuals, 
companies and foundations. Members and volunteers are key. 
Moving image preservation is an important, expensive, long-term 
undertaking. 

Who Benefits? 

We all benefit from the preservation of our motion picture heritage. 
Moving images are an important element of education and arts 
programs. Preservation and access to moving images helps teachers, 
librarians, museums, historical societies, public service and trade 
organizations, state agencies, producers and individuals. 

The Big Picture 

NHF is an active member of the North American professional 
organization, the Association of Moving Image Archivists. Staff 
members have served on its executive committee and helped found 
the working group on amateur moving images. NHF participates in 
the Library of Congress national film preservation planning effort 
and serves on the Maine Historical Records Advisory Board. 

We Need Your Help! 

NHF accepts film and video for preservation from individuals and 
organizations. Your financial donation will help NHF save this 
region's film and video heritage and make it accessible to everyone. 



Archives/Archivists Abroad 



Last winter I saw the world's oldest 
moving image. I speak of the Bayeux 
Tapestry, known for centuries as a 
primary source of information about 
how people lived in Middle Ages. 



The difference between this eleventh- 
century scenario and those of the twen- 
tieth century, is that the viewer moves 
instead of the image. 

This "moving image" (what we 
archivists call film and television these 
days) is permanently preserved in the 
Norman town of Bayeux, France. It 
commemorates William the Conqueror's 
invasion and occupation of England in 
1066, and has survived the other great 
invasion that of Normandy in 1944. 

Who wrote the script and who 
directed this tapestry is not known, but 
the craftsmanship is exquisite and de- 
serves Academy Awards for scenic and 
costume design, color cinematography, 
leading actors, stunts, and editing for ca. 
1100. 



Why do I think this is the world's first 
moving image or motion picture, even 
though it does not move? Until this 
tapestry was created all pictorial art was 
static first with no text, and then with 
the picture surrounded by text. 

This is the first instance of a narra- 
tive series of pictures with supra-tjtles 
(as opposed to sub-titles), that tell a 
complete story in a continuous fashion, 
interrupted only by stylized trees that 
indicate a passage of time (a fade or 
dissolve). The tapestry tells its story in 
several "reels." Made of colored wool 
sewn onto linen, the total tapestry is 



by Samuel Suratt 

A column devoted to the international 
moving-image archives, or, in this case, 
impressions of archivists while traveling 
abroad. 

Samuel Suratt has been a historian, 
archivist of the Smithsonian Institution 
and archivist of CBS News. 

over 230 feet long and approximately 
two feet high. 

Among the many remarkable things 
about this 900-year-old "film" of the 
Norman invasion of England, are the 
brilliant colors and the depth of field of 
the scenes of horses and men in battle; 
as well as the "cartoons" and "short 
subjects" that appear above and below 
the "feature." 



The highly dramatic historic storyline 
of the tapestry is that of the aging King 
of England, Edward the Confessor, 
sending Prince Harald to Normandy to 
tell William that he is the successor to 
the throne of England. Harald does so 
and pledges loyalty to William, only to 
return to England and, after Edward's 
death, seize the crown for himself. 

The tapestry depicts battles with 
scenes worthy of The Longest Day, 
political intrigue rivaling All the Pres- 
ident's Men, and several pornographic 
short films. Had Senator Dole been 
around in 1066, he would be railing 
against the artists of Bayeux! 

The tapestry reminded me of going 
to the movies on a Saturday afternoon. 
It has everything: news, cartoons, and a 
real slash 'em up feature. So, when you 
are in France, spend a Saturday afternoon 
at the movies, in Bayeux. 



The Bucksport-Havana Connection 

The executive director of Northeast 
Historic Film picked up the phone 
one afternoon in May. Alberto 
Martinez Martinez from the Insti- 
tute Cubano de Radio y TV was 
calling to say that he appreciated 
receiving Moving Image Review, 
and he wished to get the phone 
number of Sam Suratt, who had sent 
him the newsletter. Which proves 
that moving-image archivists can 
communicate anywhere, and that, 
after almost 40 years of a severed 
relationship between our two coun- 
tries, the mail and phones still work. 

International Television and Sound 
Archives to Meet in Washington 

From September 17-21, the Inter- 
national Federation of Television 
Archives (FIAT), the International 
Association of Sound Archives, and 
the Association for Recorded Sound 
Collections will have a joint meeting 
in Washington, D.C. 

There will be sessions on the 
legal and copyright issues of the 
"new technologies," cataloging and 
bibliographic concerns raised by 
these products, and the preservation 
of audio and video materials, par- 
ticularly in tropical climates. There 
will be a one-day post-conference 
seminar on Emergency Preparedness 
and Disaster Recovery of Audio, 
Film and Video Materials. 

Anyone interested in attending 
this meeting or obtaining a copy of 
its proceedings should contact Ger- 
ald Gibson by fax at 202 707-6449, 
or E-mail gibson@mail.loc.gov. 




Built in 1916, the Alamo Theatre in Bucksport, Maine, 
is Northeast Historic Film's Home. 






' 

MJEBENCE 




A Cross Section of The Alamo Theatre 



The ground floor of the theater will hold 
a museum exhibition, "Going to the 
Movies: A Century of Motion Picture 
Audiences in Northern New England." 
Visitors entering from Main Street will 
meet exhibit panels and artifacts inter- 
preting northern New England commu- 



nities and moviegoing. Main Street 
Design of Cambridge, Mass., is respon- 
sible for the exhibit design, sketched here 
by architect Vincent Sansalone. Visitors 
will be able to look into the projection 
booth as they enter the auditorium. 
Inside the 120-seat theater will be a 



mural interpreting changes in theaters 
over the years; on the facing wall is a 
gallery of movie posters with text linking 
films and film genres with exhibition 
themes. A large door allows egress onto 
Elm Street from the theater. 

On the second floor are offices and 



The brick structure is a center dedicated to preserving, studying 
and enjoying the moving-image Heritage of northern New England. 






COOLI NG 
















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PROPOSED VAULT ADDITION 



Section ky John Garden 



technical services. Not shown in this 
perspective are two 40-foot spaces at the 
second-floor level on either side of the 
auditorium, housing research facilities 
and distribution. 

The third level used to be the fly 
space for lights and backdrops above the 



original stage. It will be used for storage 
and offices with a terrific view of the 
Penobscot River. 

The proposed vault addition behind 
the auditorium on the north side of the 
building is climate-controlled storage for 
film and video collections. An elevator 



and stairs in this structure will provide 
access to all levels of the original build- 
ing, and to the new storage structure. 
H. W. Austin Sons of Penobscot is 
constructing the auditorium interior; 
over the summer the theater will open 
for films and live performances. 



Reel Families, A New Book on Amateur Film 



Seniors Needed! 



Reel Families, A Social History of the 
Discourse on Amateur Film by Patricia 
R. Zimmermann has just been published 
by Indiana University Press. It is the 
first historical study of amateur film, 
perhaps the most pervasive and yet 
derided form of media. 

Patricia Zimmermann charts the 
history of the medium from 1897 to the 
present, examining how ideological, 



YOUR OWN MOTION PICTURES 

At the Touch of a Button 



What You S You Gel wiA ih 

and perpetuate for AUTOMATIC 



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From the NHF library. 



technical and social constraints have 
stunted the potential of amateur film to 
extend media production beyond corpo- 
rate monopolies and into the hands of 
everyday people. She draws on an array 
of sources camera manufacturers, 
patents, early film and photography 
technical journals, amateur-filmmaking 
magazines, and family-oriented popular 
magazines to investigate how the 
concept of amateur film changed within 
evolving contexts of technology, aes- 
thetics, social relations, and politics. 

Professor of Cinema and 
Photography 

Zimmermann is a professor in the De- 
partment of Cinema and Photography 
at Ithaca College. Her book is part of 
the series "Arts and Politics of the 
Everyday" at Indiana University Press, 
601 North Morton Street, Bloommgton, 
Indiana 47404-3797. 

At the AMIA Conference 
In Toronto on Friday, October 13, from 
8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Patricia Zimmermann 
will give a presentation to a plenary 
session of the Association of Moving 
Image Archivists entitled "A Short His- 
tory of Home Movies." Zimmermann, 
who says she feels deeply indebted to 
many AMIA members for their help, will 
be using North American amateur foot- 
age in the presentation. 



Calendar Highlights 



July 21 Romance in the Parking Lot, Love Stories from Prelinger 

Archives. Presented by Rick Prelinger, outdoor movies at the 
Alamo. Bring your lawn chair! 8:30 p.m., Fleet Bank parking 
lot. Rain date, July 22. 

September 22-24 Common Ground Fair, Windsor, Maine. Video programming 
includes the Vermont feature Where the Rivers Flow North. 

October 1-8 Fryeburg Fair, Fryeburg, Maine. Videos at the Farm Museum. 

May 29, 1996 State Theatre, Portland, Maine. Charlie Chaplin's comedy 
The Circus (1928) with live music conducted by Gillian 
Anderson; Lawrence Golan, first violin. 

May 31, 1996 Flynn Theatre, Burlington, Vermont. Charlie Chaplin's 
comedy The Circus. 

Call for additional dates and details. 



Life Experience Helps Archivists 
with Television Newsfilm 

by Harry Sweet, 

Film-Archive Productions, 

Sacramento, California 




photo by Oven Brewer, Sacramento Bee 

Television newsfilm collections com- 
prise the largest and fastest-growing 
constituency within the U.S. moving- 
image archiving field. These collections 
contain unique materials of enormous 
value in documenting local, state and 
national history and all aspects of the 
American experience. 

To properly archive a collection of 
news footage, a retrieval system should 
be a priority. 

News Rookie 

As a rookie television cameraman in 
1953, 1 was the first TV cameraman in 
the Sacramento Valley in California. 
KCCC-TV Channel 50 was a UHF station, 
locally owned and operated. I filmed 
many stories for nearly four years at 
Channel 40. I transferred to the NBC 
station, KCRA-TV Channel 3, and con- 
tinued filming. I was responsible for 
archiving 18 million feet of the station's 
newsfilm for the next 32 years. 

Life Experience Needed 
People like me, with technical expertise, 
and senior citizens with life experience 
are needed to assist in archives. 

Seniors can knowledgeably relate to 
past events, and help provide the identi- 
fication of people, places and things that 
is needed in the database record for 
retrieving individual stories. Try it. 
You'll love the work. H 




Every NHF Member 
Gets All These Benefits 

i Moving Image Review, the only periodical with infor- 
mation on northern New England film and videotape 
research, preservation and exhibition. 

Advance notice of screenings and events, such as the 
premiere of The Beans of Egypt, Maine. 

Discounts on more than 30 Videos of Life in New 
England. 

Discounts on the new line of feature films. 

-- ' J- 

Free loan of videotapes through Reference by Mail. 

Each NHF member may borrow a shipment of up to 
THREE tapes free of charge, including free shipping! 
Additional tapes may be borrowed (up to three per 
shipment) for a $5 fee to cover each shipment. 

Membership Levels and Benefits 

*~~ ,_ / i 

Regular Members, $25 per year 
All benefits listed above. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 per year 

For teachers and students at any level 
All benefits listed above. 

Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year 
All benefits listed above, plus: 

Reduced rates for technical services and presentations; 
Additional copies of Moving Image Review on request. 

Associates (Individuals), $100 per year 

All benefits listed above, plus: 

Three free shipments (up to nine tapes) of Reference by 

Mail videos; 

Free NHF T-shirt 

Corporate Members, $100 per year 

All benefits of Associate Membership. 

l! " 

Friends, $250 per year 

All benefits of regular membership, plus: 

Five free shipments (up to 15 tapes) of Reference by Mail 

videos; 

Free NHF Sweatshirt 

Membership at any level is an opportunity to become 
involved with the preservation and enjoyment of our 
moving image heritage. 



Your dues are tax -deductible to the extent allowed by law. 






NHF Membership Application 



I I new I I renewal 

1C", 

Name 



Street 



City State Zip 

Phone 

Please enroll me as a member at the level indicated below: 

D Regular $25 



I I Educator/Student $15 

LJ Nonprofit Organization $35 
LJ Associate (Individual) $100 
CD Corporate $100 
D Friend of NHF $250 



D Please charge my credit card: D MC D VISA 
Account # Lxp. date- 
Signature of cardholder 



LJ My check is enclosed. Please make checks payable to Northeast 
Historic Film. 



Gift Membership 

I would like to give a gift membership at the 
level to: 



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Return application to: 



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P.O. Box 900 
Bucksport, ME 04416 






Membership fees and contributions are tax-deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 



New Women in Maine: 
The Edison Co.'s Mary Fuller 



The Edison Company made short films 
in Maine in 1913, including episodes from 
the series Who Will Marry Mary? star- 
ring Mary Fuller as a New York heiress. 
The series, like its predecessor, What 
Happened to Mary (1912), was produced 
in collaboration with McClure's Ladies' 
World, gathering a huge reading as well 
as moviegoing audience. 

According to the Edison Kinetogram, 
in the series' last episode Mary's horse 
ran away, leaving her "alone and help- 
less in the midst of a deserted wilder- 
ness." After wandering in the woods she 
emerged, "and to her astonished delight, 
Captain Bradford dropped unexpectedly 
out of the sky in an aeroplane." Mary 
realized "she had found the one man to 
whom her money meant nothing. And 
so Mary, long sought by dukes and dons 
of proud name, knelt humbly before the 
man she loved, and asked him to marry 
her." 

Stills Survive & One Movie 
George Tselos at the Edison National 



Historic Site kindly provided copies of 
production stills from Edison films 
including A Proposal Deferred and A 
Proposal from Mary, both episodes from 
the Who Will Marry Mary? series. The 
only known surviving film from the 
series is the first episode, A Proposal 
from the Duke, at the Nederlands Film- 
museum in Amsterdam. 

Ben Singer in Camera Obscura 
(January 1990) discusses "Female Power 
in the Serial-Queen Melodrama" focus- 
ing on gender roles at the turn of the 
century. He says, "The New Women's 
trademarks energy, self-reliance, 
direct contact with the extra-domestic 
world are clearly the terms of a revised 
femininity celebrated and exaggerated in 
the serial-queen melodrama." The 
character played by Mary Fuller, alone 
at a Maine camp in 1913, places the New 
Woman in Maine, but resolves the role 
with a domestic choice and return to 
urban life. 




1C Site. 
US Department of the Interior, National Park Service. 

Benjamin F. Wilson and Mary Fuller filmed two episodes of the Edison Co. series Who Will 
Marry Mary? in Maine. Before returning to New York they converse in a Wright Flyer, a type of 
plane made from 1908 to 1913. Identification by Terry Rankine. 



Moving Images 
Cataloguing Survey 

by Patricia Burdick 

As a member of the Association of 
Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) Cata- 
loguing and Documentation Committee, 
NHF has been following the documenta- 
tion procedures used in the moving- 
image field. 

Recently NHF participated in a 
survey that will provide information to 
help revise the basic reference work, 
Archival Moving Image Materials: A 
Cataloguing Manual, commonly known 
asAMIM. 

As Committee Chair Linda Tadic 
says in her survey cover letter, "The 
responses we receive will help AMIM 
become a better document, relevant to 
all kinds of moving image materials." 
The Cataloguing and Documentation 
Committee's survey project began last 
fall following the AMIA conference in 
Boston. NHF, along with numerous 
other institutions, returned a prelimi- 
nary survey form in December that 
indicated which genres (types) of mate- 
rials were collected and how much 
AMIM was used in current cataloguing 
procedures. 

The second stage of the project in- 
volves more detailed inquiry about each 
participating institution's cataloguing 
practices. Tadic encouraged participants 
to return the survey forms with "as 
many cataloguing records that illustrate 
the questions as you can." 

The Committee's goal is to gather 
various documentation approaches used 
by moving-image archivists. NHF re- 
turned attachments with our survey 
forms, including the field definitions 
used to develop our archival database, 
our Thesaurus of Index Terms, and 
sample database records that illustrate 
both item-level and collection-level 
description. 

Participation in the survey projects 
has mutual benefits: the professional 
field can improve its procedures by learn- 
ing about member institutions' practices, 
and each moving-image archives can 
learn from colleagues. 



New Videos for Sale 



Wabanaki: A New Dawn 

On behalf of the Maine Indian Tribal- 
State Commission, independent film- 
maker David Westphal of Mount Desert 
has produced a new documentary, 
Wabanaki: A New Dawn. It presents 
the survival and revival of the Wabanaki 
of Maine and Maritime Canada. The 
Wabanaki, whose name means "the 
People of the Dawn Land," have lived 
in the region for 11,000 years. Accom- 
panied by flute music and drumming, 
the songs, prayers and dances of the 
Wabanaki are shown as a heritage of 
great spiritual strength. 
25 min., col., sound. 

Call for price. 




George Hardy at work, photo by Gabriel Coakley 




New Members 



Friend 

)orothy Morrison 
ssociates 
arlos Cuellar 
vight Dementi, Jr. 
loosehead Historical Society 
>'endy Wincote Schweikert & Ken Schweikert 

arporate Members 
llue Hill Books 

rosby's Drive In 
1 Him c\ Tape, Inc. 

Nonprofit Organizations 

\ic.ulv Music Society, Melba Wil 

matheque queb<- : < aine LeBlanc 

.Hot Historical Society 
llsworth Historical Society 
lie Farm School, Benjamin Holmes 
ric-nds of Woodstock Winters, Sherman 
Howe 
He Films 

lainc Folklife Center 
Stanley Museum, Inc. 

Regular Members 
James Bishop 

Nancv & Donald Blomquist 

Gregory Bottone 

Richard & Elizabeth Coakley 

Deborah Joy Corey 

Donald Crist 

Charlie Crooker 

Catherine Cutler 

Elizabeth Duncan 

Albert Eaton 

Phil Elkin 

Sandra Erlebach 

Marion Foss 

Pauline Giancol; 



Bob & 1 farrict Griffith 

Mary I later 

Pat Hardy 

Richard Holmes 

Huev 

Dr. Fdward Ives 

Teddjohansen 

John i 

Bob Marggraf 

Sux.anne M 

Caren McCoun 

Mrs. Milton < >peno 

Patrick & Devon Phillips 

James Rockefeller, Jr. 

Lynanne Rollins 

Anne Sauls 

Edward Schneider 

Miriam Stern 

Archie Stewart 

Allyn Storer 

David Taylor 

Sanford Warren 

Tinky Weisblat 

Althea Wharton 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Yates 

Educators 
William Baker 
Claudia Lynn Bonsey 
Michael Deren 
Peter Edge 
M. Giguere 
Jay Hoar 
Shirley Mattson 
Roberta Muse 
William Pfaff 
Gerald Sabatino 
Stephen Smith 
avid Swi 




Portrait of George Hardy, 
The Deer Isle Folk Artist 

George Hardy, who made his living as a 
mason, began carving birds and animals 
when he was 60. This video paints a 
provocative picture of the relationship 
between a self-proclaimed folk artist 
and those who buy his works. 

"God makes the trees and I make the 
animals," says Hardy, as he creates 
brightly painted porcupines, tigers, foxes 
with huge teeth, howling coyotes, sea 
gulls and songbirds. 

Hardy, who cares for his adult 
disabled son, talks about his art, life 
Down East and loneliness. The program 
is poignant; it also makes audiences 
laugh, and is an excellent starting point 
for discussions of folk art and the art 
market. Produced by Gabriel Coakley 
of Sedgwick, Maine. Winner of a 1995 
Cine Golden Eagle Award. 

30 min., color & b&w, sound. $19.95 



free 12-page catalog! 

The award-winning video Anchor of 
the Soul and many other Videos of 
Life in New England are described 
in Northeast Historic Film's new 
catalog. Anchor of the Soul won a 
1995 community choice award from 
the National Black Programming 
Consortium. 




Collections Guide 
Membership Special 

New and Renewing Members at any 
level, Save $5! 

One copy of the 64-page Collections 
Guide will be sent to you for just $4.95, 
in return for your new membership or 
renewal by check or credit card. 



Questions? Comments? 
Give us a Call! 

Northeast Historic Film Staff 

David Weiss 

executive director 
Karan Sheldon 

public services 
Phil Yates 

technical services 
Pat Burdick 

staff archivist 
Lynne Blair 

marketing & membership 
Libby Rosemeier (to 8/15/95) 
Jane Donnell (after 8/15/95) 

distribution coordinator 
Heather White 

research & stock footage 

Yvette St. Peter 

distribution assistant 
Samantha Boyce 

reception 
P. J. Klenowski 

building maintenance I 



NHF Membership 



As an independent, nonprofit organiza- 
tion, NHF depends on its members. 
Annual dues are as low as $15! 

Your dues are tax-deductible to the extent 
allowed by law. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 per 
year, for teachers and students at any level 

Regular Members, $25 per year 

All members receive many benefits 
including: 

Moving Image Review. 

Advance notice of events. 

Discounts on more than 30 Videos 
of Life in New England. 

Discounts on the new line of feature 
films. 

Free loan of videotapes through 
Reference by Mail. 



Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year 

All listed benefits plus: 

Reduced rates for technical services 
and presentations 

Additional copies of Moving Image 
Review on request 

Associates (Individuals), $100 per year 
All listed benefits plus: 

Three free shipments (up to nine 
tapes) of Reference by Mail videos 

Free NHF T-shirt 

Corporate Members, $100 per year 
All benefits of Associate Membership 

Friends, $250 per year 

All benefits of regular membership, 
plus: 

Five free shipments (up to 15 tapes) 
of Reference by Mail videos 

Free NHF Sweatshirt 



Membership and Order Form Northeast Historic Film, P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, ME 04416 USA 

207 469-0924 



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Free Reference by Hail! 

k Ordered by 
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plus $1 each additional item Tax 
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tapes with free shipping. 









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To order call toll free: 800 639-1636 



11 




All revenues from the sale of hats, 
bags and T-shirts all products sold in 
the Alamo theatre Store and by mail 

support the archival mission 

of Northeast Historic Film. 





NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

= LM 




iVlRT. MAINE, t 'iv\ 
'JO C07) 4; 



.ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



The Alamo Theatre Store 

The grand opening of the Alamo Theatre 
Store was Maine Museum Day, June 10. 
The Store had been planned by Libby 
Rosemeier and Lynne Blair. 

Videos of Life in New England, the 
line of videotapes sold to book and gift 
stores around the region, is available at 
the store. Visitors can also buy video- 
tapes of Hollywood films with a north- 
ern New England connection for fog- 
bound vacation days; children's videos, 
for when the kids get up at 5 a.m.; gifts 
and toys, T-shirts, and hats all great 
souvenirs and house gifts. 

We'll Stop Traffic 

The Alamo Theatre Store, half a mile 
down Main Street from Route 1, is a 
place people can stop to learn about 
Northeast Historic Film's work. 

For Bucksport, it's a much-needed 
active storefront. The 1916 theater 
fagade says "Welcome" to townspeople 
and visitors, displaying newly repaired 
brick, colorful banners, and a new 
double-glazed UV-blocking window. 
The Alamo looks terrific, thanks to a 
grant from the LEF Foundation. 

Developing Young People 

The store is also a training and develop- 
ment site for young people. Bucksport 
High School student Samantha Boyce 
used to work at McDonald's. Now her 
skills benefit a nonprofit cultural organi- 
zation, and she is helping other students 
and volunteers work with the public. 
Samantha says, "I'm looking forward to 
my summer selling lots of videos, hats 
and T-shirts to help support the efforts 
of Northeast Historic Film." 

Come on In 

The store is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Monday through Saturday during July 
and August. It will be open Monday 
through Friday the rest of the year. 




* Northeast His tor it film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

' REVIEW 



Deditated to the Preservation 
of Northern How England 
Motion Pittures 



Winter 1996 

Executive Director's Report p. 2 

Interview with Samuel Taylor 

by Michael Taylor p.3 

Reference by Mail p.5 

One Hundred Years: Candy Dept p.9 

Archival Notes by Patricia Burdick .. p.10 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Film, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. 
David S. Weiss, executive director, Karan 
Sheldon, editor. ISSN 0897-0769. 
e-mail OLDFILM@aol.com 
Web http://www.acadia.net:80/oldfil 



Going to the Movies Exhibition to Open 



What have people learned at the movies How 
to behave on a date? News from the front? What 
was it like before movies had soundtracks? What 
about drive-ins who went, and what did they 
do there? 

Going to the Movies: A Century of Motion 
Picture Audiences in Northern New England, 
an interpretive public history exhibition, opens 
at the Maine Mall in South Portland on May 4. 
Following a week in the center court, it opens 
on May 14 at the Burlington Square Mall in 
Burlington, Vermont, and will tour Maine, New 
Hampshire and Vermont throughout 1996. 

What is the history of Going to the Movies? 
This exhibition is about people and communities. 
It is about how we, as audience members, experi- 
enced this century. Movie theaters were commu- 
nity centers, often housing live shows, contests, 
and meetings. While the form of community has 
changed, cinemas still bring us together. 

This entertaining exhibition is accessible to 
everyone. Thought-provoking questions link 
today's experience with the past, highlighting 
cultural changes. Each panel asks a question such 
as, "Could you get to a movie today without 
using an automobile?" 

Screenings, lectures and other public activities 
are scheduled to involve people of all ages. 
Teacher guides and other publications are avail- 
able. For more information call 207 469-0924. 

Going to the Movies is a project of North- 
east Historic Film, designed by Main Street 
Design, Cambridge, Mass., and funded by the 
National Endowment for the Humanities. 




Theater employees, like audiences, reflect a region's ethnic heritage. Leo St. Pierre, 
Alexis Foamier and Johnny Peabody were ushers at the Cumberland Theatre, 
Brunswick, Maine, in 1931. Photo: Murch Scrapbook, courtesy Michael fieri 



Executive Director's Report 

Campaign Progress 

We recently received the engineering 
drawings and plans from the architect 
and are poised to commence the next 
phase of construction. The scope and 
timing of the work depend on funding. 
In the next several months we will be 
reaching out to members and friends for 
the most important fundraising effort 
since the drive to buy the Alamo. 

New Board Member 
We welcome to our board Deborah 
Corey, author of Losing Eddie, winner 
of the Smith Books First Novel Award. 
Losing Eddie has been dramatized and 
broadcast on CBC radio; the National 
Film Board of Canada is producing it as 
a feature film. Corey lives in Castine 
with her husband, Wilson (Bill) Zildjian, 
and daughter Georgia. A native of New 
Brunswick, Deborah lived in Toronto 
and Boston before moving to Maine. 

Action in the Auditorium 

The theater is roughed in and winterized, 
allowing our Heartwarming Films at 
the Alamo Theatre series to take place 
despite subzero temperatures outdoors. 
"It's a wonderful feeling to hear a live 
laugh track," said a recent visitor. 

Events and performances fill the 
schedule as we take part in the cultural 
and civic life of the community. Decem- 
ber 9 was the Bucksport Bay Area 
Chamber of Commerce Spirit of the 
Holidays celebration, in which Santa 
arrived by train at the Alamo, accompa- 
nied by more than 100 children. 

Among other recent events, October 
25 was Candidates Night for local 
political hopefuls, chaired by NHF 
board president Richard Rosen; on 
December 12, students from Maine 
Maritime Academy, Castine, presented 
information on Bucksport town marina 
sites. 



r\ 




David S. Weiss 
Executive Director 



Volunteers at Work 

Jane Beal, archivist at the WGBH Boston 
resource center, has been traveling to 
Bucksport to lend her cataloguing 
expertise. 

Selena Kimball, a student at the 
Rhode Island School of Design, is a 
cataloguing assistant. She says, "As a 
visual artist, I've become increasingly 
drawn to film for its potential to doc- 
ument vision, literally and metaphori- 
cally. Cataloguing for 
NHF has allowed me an 
unprecedented oppor- 
tunity to observe the 
personal world of New 
Englanders witnessed 
through their own 
camera lenses. It also 
provides me with a 
perspective on this area, 
which is my home." 

Betty Howard 
provides valuable exper- 
tise in our library, at the 
Alamo Theatre Store 
and for community 
events. 

Art Donahue braves 
the field, bringing in 
incomparable coverage on WCVB, Bos- 
ton. He recently completed an Edison 
Home Kinetoscope transfer from film 
to videotape, thanks to Alan Kattelle. 

Pancho Cole put us on the World 
Wide Web through his association with 
Acadianet in Bar Harbor. See URL 
below. Jim Campbell at Modular Media, 
Bucksport, compressed sound and 
pictures for the web page. 

Kati MacLeod made a carrot cake 
for the Alamo Birthday; it became an 
integral part of Jackson Gillman's per- 
formance. 

George MacLeod was a most effec- 
tive and appreciated community leader 
in obtaining thirteen sponsors for the 
winter film series (see page 12). 

Eithne Johnson and Eric Schaefer 
went way out of their way to help with 
the Going to the Movies script. Many 
people have been astonishingly generous 
to the exhibition. But that's a story for 
next time. 

Our Home Page on the World Wide 
Web http://www.acadra.net:80/oldfilm 



Grants in Action 



The Betterment Fund provided $12,600 
for editing equipment so that the archives 
is able to create publicly accessible 
programs from archival materials. 
Improved in-house editing capability 
cuts out-of-pocket expenses and speeds 
the time between the arrival of new 
materials and their availability to the 
public. 

The Maine Arts Commission's Rural 
^B Arts Initiative 

provided $8,000 for 
the third phase of 
establishing the 
Alamo Theatre as a 
public programming 
facility. 

The funds are 
being used through 
June 30, 1996, to 
help Northeast 
Historic Film reach 
and maintain a 
broad local audi- 
ence. Arts consult- 
ant Bruce Hazard, 
director of Maine 
Arts, Inc. from 1989 
to 1993, is leading 
workshops with staff and board to help 
define a future one most likely with- 
out Maine Arts Commission grants. 



NHF Statement of Purpose 




The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but are not lim- 
ited to a survey of moving pictures of 
northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
:limate-controlled storage; Creation 
jf educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 

lembers of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production commu- 
nity, through providing a study cen- 
ter, technical services and facilities. 



Interview with Samuel Taylor 



Samuel Taylor was born in Chicago and 
raised in San Francisco. He is best known 
for his plays The Happy Time, Sabrina 
Fair, The Pleasure of His Company 
and No Strings; and the films Sabrina, 
The Pleasure of His Company, The 
Eddy Duchin Story, Vertigo, Topaz 
and Goodbye Again. 

A member of the Academy of Motion 
Picture Arts and Sciences, he has lived on 
the coast of Maine for the past 25 years 
with his wife, Suzanne. 

The remake of Sabrina, directed by 
Sydney Pollack, has just opened, some 
40 years after the original. Pollack 
came to see you in Maine last spring. 
Tell us about that visit. 

Taylor Pollack flew his own jet plane 
into the Bar Harbor-Trenton airport 
and I brought him home for lunch. He 
said he had to remake the story of 
Sabrina and he was a little unsure about 
bringing it up to 1 995. He wanted to be 
sure he was making it plausible and 
realistic. 

I think he succeeded, in terms of the 
picture he was making. I challenged him 
to change the story and make it more 
his own, but he said he wasn't going to 
be allowed to the powers that be 
wanted a modern remake of the original 
picture and therefore his hands were 
tied. 

The picture had been very successful 
very big internationally and it 
played on television in the United States 
all the time. Paramount wanted a remake 
of that picture. So we talked about it. 
After lunch, he got back in his plane and 
took off because he had to be back on 
the Pacific coast for dinner. 

What other notable people from the 
film world have visited you in Maine? 

T Alfred Hitchcock and his wife, 
Alma, came and spent a weekend. 
This was in 1966, at the time of the world 
premiere of Torn Curtain in Boston. 
Hitchcock invited Suzanne and me 
down for the premiere, then they came 
back to Maine with us for the weekend. 
It was very pleasant and we didn't let 
anybody know he was here, except that 
we invited all the village children to come 
and meet him, and they all loved that 



by Michael Taylor, a reporter 
for the San Francisco Chronicle 

very much. He spent most of the time 
sitting outdoors and reading. 

Then Richard Rodgers and his wife, 
Dorothy, came for a long weekend 
while we were working on the musical 
No Strings, nearly 35 years ago. Marga- 
ret Sullavan came here in 1954 when she 
was playing Sabrina, and we were com- 
pletely isolated by a hurricane. 

Tell us about your travels out of Maine 
your teaching stint at the Univer- 
sity of California at Los Angeles, for 
example, and your frequent trips to 
Europe. 

TI taught at UCLA for the winter 
semester, in the Graduate School of 
Theater, Film and Television, around 
1989. I'd never taught before and it was 
very interesting. 

I went out there under the illusion 
that I was going to teach playwriting; 
but the grad students were much more 
interested in screenplay writing. I found, 
unfortunately, that their level of literacy 
was disappointing. They didn't have the 
story sense you derive from wide read- 
ing in literature. That is probably a mark 
of graduate film schools all over the 
country. They teach them how to use 
their tools very well, but as far as imagi- 
nation and creative instincts go, schools 
do not do much. 

I usually go to London every year or 
every other year because my plays get 
done over there quite often revivals of 
Pleasure of His Company, a new pro- 
duction of A Touch of Spring, and there 
was going to a production of a new play 
called Flying Colors, but the star, Nigel 
Patrick, died just before rehearsals. 

By living on the coast of Maine you're 
far from California. How do you stay 
in touch with the film business? 

TThe telephone and the fax machine. 
I would go out to California to 
write a film, but I would only be there 
for about three months. 

One studio head told me, "the smart- 
est thing you ever did was to live on the 
coast of Maine." He meant that by not 




Suzanne and Samuel Taylor celebrate their 
fortieth wedding annivertary. photo: Michael 
Taylor. 

living in Los Angeles, I was not caught 
up in the day-to-day politics of film- 
making, something which can be detri- 
mental to creative facility. 

Tell us a little about how movies were 
made one or two generations ago and 
how they are made now. 

TThe old studio system was a series 
of fiefdoms, in which the head of 
the studio was all-powerful and every- 
body worked for the studio. I started 
writing pictures towards the end of the 
studio system, but still I got to know 
some of the famous studio heads like 
Harry Cohn, Sam Goldwyn, Louis B. 
Mayer and Jack Warner. They all turned 
out around 50 pictures a year and there 
wasn't a college degree in the lot. And 
there were some great pictures. 

These days, all the heads of studios 
are college graduates many have law 
degrees and MBAs. They're making 
money beyond their wildest dreams, 
and the idea of film as art is almost 
completely gone. Why? Because making 
pictures now is so expensive, and they're 
so deeply concerned with making a 
profit that they try not to take chances. 
The studio heads don't give a damn 
what the picture is about as long as they 
make money. 

In the old days, pictures didn't cost 
much to make and they knew, by the law 
of averages, with so many pictures each 
year, they were going to do well. Also, 
the studios had all the writers, actors and 
directors under contract, and so they 
could keep working these people. Clark 
Gable would do a picture, they'd give 

continued on p. 11 



Exemplary Collections 
Donor James Petrie 

Filmmaker James Petrie is an extraordi- 
narily organized person, and a generous 
one. In July he donated 16mm. film- 
editing equipment and supplies, along 
with film prints and editorial outtakes of 
films shot in Maine, New Hampshire 
and Massachusetts, from the 1940s 
through the 1960s. 



Last Summer Was Some Summer! 




James A. Petrie on location in Exeter, New 
Hampshire, in 1947. 

Petrie arranged and paid for ship- 
ment, over 1,000 pounds, from his home 
in Harvard, Massachusetts, to Bucks- 
port. The film editing table with rewinds, 
viewer, sound reader, synchronizer and 
splicers, are all useful for daily work at 
the archives. 

Meticulous documentation includes 
production information and location 
stills. Petne's care in preparing the 
donation is an excellent example for any 
potential donor. 




A production still from New England Story, 
1947. 

The films in the collection, such as 
New England Story (1947), A Faire 
Towne [York, Maine] (1950), Partner 
Perkins (1949), and Lost Boundaries 
(1949), help document his career making 
films with Louis de Rochemont and as a 
partner in Potter Orchard & Petrie. 



Rick Prelmger presented Romance 
in the Parking Lot, Love Stories 
from Prelmger Archives on July 
21. People brought lawn chairs 
and rocking chairs to hear Rick 
interpret six short films capturing 
inter-gender relations in the 
Fifties. After Are You Popular? 
and More Dates for Kay many 
people said they understood their 
parents better. Some were scared. 

Winners from the prize draw- 
ing that night were Anne Leonard 
for the raft trip; Jeff Siegel, Alamo 
Theatre T-shirt and Northeast 
Historic Film baseball cap; Brian 
Barnard, From Stump to Ship 
video. 

On August 2-4 the Alamo went into 
fast-forward, readying the auditorium 
with rented seats and imported projec- 
tion equipment, to show Champion 
International Corporation's History Is 
Always Being Made at Bucksport. 
The corporate-history 
video was hosted 
by Dave Johnson, 
vice president and 
operations manager 
at the mill. Many 
people who appear in 
the video, telling the 
history of the paper 
plant, were present over 
the three days. 

The town of Lamoine, Maine, cele- 
brated its 125th birthday on August 12 
NHF staff projected a silent-film pro- 
gram, while Clayton Smith played the 




photo: Rick Prelinger 





Jackson Oilman, The Standup Chameleon, 
performed at the Alamo Theatre. 



piano. "The spirit of the event was 
outstanding," said David Weiss, NHF 
executive director. The Maine Humani- 
ties Council helped underwrite the 
event. 

Moosehead Historical Society hosted a 
staff retreat for Northeast 
Historic Film on August 
16. A tour of the histor- 
ical society and carriage 
house renovation was 
followed by lunch and 
a boat ride on the 
Katahdin, generously 
provided by the society 
and its director, Everett Parker. 
The trip was also a retirement party for 
Libby Rosemeier. 

Alamo Festival 

On September 1 the Alamo Festival 
began with a standing- room-only crowd 
for a premiere of Diane Lee's short film 
Who Will Say Kaddishfor Shapiro? Lee 
says the film is "the story of the last night 
in the life of a self-alienated middle-aged 
bachelor." From the stage she answered 
questions and described creating an 
independent film with much local talent. 

On following evenings, Glenn Jenks 
played ragtime piano music; Danny Patt 
played the piano for The Seventh Day, 
the 1921 romantic comedy film made in 
Pemaquid, Maine; and Jackson Gillman 
entertained families with a birthday- 
themed show. The Re-Birth of the 
Alamo Festival was presented with the 
support of the Maine Arts Commission. 




Reference 
by Mail 



embers of Northeast Historic Film 
are invited to borrow from the FREE 
. circulating loan collection, Reference 
by Mail. There is never any charge for 
borrowing. We even pay for shipping the 
first time you borrow (up to three tapes in 
this first shipment)! After that there is just 
a $5 shipping charge for each loan. 

Return Instructions 
The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be on their way back to 
NHF five days after they are received. 



Public Performance 

Videotapes listed here are offered as a 
reference service. Where possible, public 
performance rights are included. Please be 
sure to check each tape's status: PERF 
means public performance rights are 
included. If you have a date in mind, call 
ahead to ensure availability. Where there 
is no PERF, the tape is for home use only 
and may not be shown to a group. 

Videos for Sale 

Many of these tapes are available for 
purchase through NHF. Please call for a 
catalog of Videos of Life in New England. 



American Indians 

New Wahanaki: A New Dawn, cultural 
survival and revival of Wabanaki of Maine 
and Maritime Canada. Interviews, music, 
dance, locations. Produced on behalf of 
Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission. 
1995. 25mins., col., sd. 

The Mystery of the Lost Red Paint People, 
archaeology of the circumpolar region, in- 
cluding coastal New England. 1987. 60 
mins., col., sd. 

New Our Lives in Our Hands, Micmac 
Indian basketmaking cooperative in north- 
ern Maine. 50 mins., col., sd. 

New Where the Rivers Flow North, see 
"Feature Films," below. 

Artists and Authors 

Berenice Abbott: A View of the Twentieth 
Century, life and work of one of America's 
most significant photographers; she lived in 
Maine into her 90s. 1992. 56 mins., col., sd. 

Bonsoir Mes Amis, portrait of two of 
Maine's finest traditional Franco-Ameri- 
can musicians. By Huey. 1990. 46 mins., 
col., sd. 



New Donald Hall and Jane Kenyan: A Life 
Together, New Hampshire poets read from 
their works at home and in the grange hall. 
1994. 60 mins., col., sd. 

Grace: A Portrait of Grace DeCarlton Ross, 
independent filmmaker Huey traces Ross' 
silent film and dance careers. 1 983. 50 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Master Smart Woman, Maine novelist Sa- 
rah Orne Jewett (1850-1909) by Jane 
Morrison. 1984. 28 mins., col., sd. 

May Sarton: She Knew a Phoenix, the poet 
reads and talks at home. Produced by Karen 
Saum. 1980. 28 mins., col., sd. PERF 
New Portrait of George Hardy, examina- 
tion of the relationship of a woodcarver 
with those who buy his works. Strong 
vision of life down east. Winner of 1 995 Cine 
Golden Eagle. 30 mins., col. & b&w, sd. 

Boats and the Sea 

Around Cape Horn, Captain Irving 
Johnson aboard the bark Peking. 1929. 37 
mins., b&w, sd. 

Marine Mammals of the Gulf of Maine, 
field guide to whales and seals. The Allied 



Whale program at College of the Atlantic. 
24 mins., col., sd. 

On Board the Morgan: America's Last 
Wooden Whaler, whaling archival pho- 
tographs, rare film footage. 23 mins., col. 
and b&w, sd. 

Tales of Wood and Water, visits to boat 
builders and sailors up and down the coast 
of Maine. 1991. 60 min., col., sd. 

Yachting in the 30s, compilation of J Boat 
footage from various sources. 1930s. 45 
mins., b&w and col., sd. 

City Life 

Anchor of the Soul, African- American his- 
tory in northern New England through the 
story of a Portland church. 1994. 60 mins., 
col., sd. 

Can I Get Therefrom Here? Urban Youth, 
families, work, homelessness in Portland, 
Maine. 1981. 29 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Roughing the Uppers: The Great Shoe 
Strike of 1937, documentary by Robert 
Branham and Bates College students about 
CIO shoe strike in Lewiston & Auburn, 
Maine. 1992. 55 mins., col., sd. 

24 Hours, fire fighting in Portland, Maine, 
with memorable narration. The filmmaker, 
Earle Fenderson, died recently at the age of 
90. 1963. 27 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Civil War 

New Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th 
Maine, Maine Civil War hero: Fredericks- 
burg, Gettysburg, Appomattox. 1994. 55 
mins., col. & b&w., sd. 

Country Life 

New Aroostook County, 1920s, agriculture 
potato growing with horse power. 
Downtown Presque Isle. Aroostook Valley 
Railroad electric trolley. With period piano 
music. 1920 and 1928. 20 mins., b&w, sd. 
(piano.) PERF 

The Batteau Machias, student project on 
construction of a traditional river-driving 
boat. 1990. 22 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Ben 's Mill, a documentary about a Vermont 
water-powered mill by NHF members 
Michel Chalufour and John Karol. 60 mins., 
col., sd. 

A Century of Summers, the impact of a 
summer colony on a small Maine coastal 
community by Hancock native and NHF 
member Sandy Phippen. 1987. 45 mins., 
b&w and col., sd. PERF 



Reference by Mail 



Cherryfield, 1938, a. terrific home movie 
about rural spring. 6 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Dead River Rough Cut, lives and philoso- 
phies of two woodsmen-trappers by Rich- 
ard Searls and Stuart Silverstein. 1976. 55 
mins., col., sd. 

Down East Dairyman, produced by the 
Maine Dept. of Agriculture. 1972. 14 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Giant Horses, draft horses and their drivers. 
28 mins., col., sd. 

Ice Harvesting Sampler, five short films 
showing a near-forgotten New England in- 
dustry. Narration by Philip C. Whitney 
explains process and tools. 26 mins., b&w, 
sd.PERF 

Maine Summer Festival, role of agricultural 
products in summer fairs. 1970. 12 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

The Movie Queen, Luhec, pretend movie 
queen visits her home town in down east 
Maine. 1936. 28 mins., b&w, si. 

Nature's Blueberryland, Maine's wild blue- 
berries. 13 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Paris, 1929 and other views, home movies of 
the Wright family in Paris, Maine, haying, 
mowing, picnics. 80 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Part-Time Farmer, promotes agriculture as 
an after-hours pursuit, ca. 1975. 17 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Sins of our Mothers, girl who went to the 
Massachusetts textile mills from Fayette, 
Maine. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Early Film 

All But Forgotten, documentary on the 
Holman Day film company (1920-1921) in 
Maine. 1978. 30 mins., col. and b&w, sd. 
PERF 

Cupid, Registered Guide, a two-reel North 
Woods comedy by Maine writer Holman 
Day. 1921. 20 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Earliest Maine Films, lobstering, trout fish- 
ing, logging, canoeing on Moosehead Lake 
and potato growing, from 1901 to 1920. 44 
mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Just Maine Folks, a bawdy hayseed one- 
reeler. Poor image quality. 1913. 8 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

The Knight of the Pines, another North 
Woods adventure by Maine writer Holman 
Day. 1920. 20 mins., b&w, si. PERF 



Ecology & Energy 

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, her 1963 
book about pesticides helped raise ecologi- 
cal consciousness. 1993. 60 mins., col., sd. 
New Passamaquoddy Tidal Power Project, 
documentary with intertitles on construc- 
tion of worker housing at Quoddy Hill, 
dam building (with rail) at Pleasant Point 
and Treat Island, ca. 1936. 30 mins., b&w., 
si. PERF 

New Voices from Maine, "Is economics in- 
compatible with nature?" A 1970s discus- 
sion of development versus quality of life. 
Scratched. 1970. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Feature Films 

New Where the Rivers Flow North, shot on 
location in Vermont and New Hampshire. 
Woodsman (Rip Torn) and his American 
Indian companion (Tantoo Cardinal) in a 
story about timberland and water power. 
1994. 105 mins., col., sd. 

Fisheries 

Basic Net Mending, how to repair fish nets. 
1951. 16 mins., col., sd. PERF 

It's the Maine Sardine, catching, packing 
and eating Eastport fish. 1949. 16 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, fisheries in- 
cluding shrimp, cod and lobster. 1968. 28 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Maine Lobster, lobster fisheries and 
consumption with unusual footage includ- 
ing the assembly of lobster TV dinners, ca. 
1955. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Tuna Fishing off Portland Harbor, Maine, 
off-shore fishing with a Maine sea and shore 
warden, ca. 1930. 10 mins., b&w, si. with 
intertitles. PERF 

Turn of the Tide, drama about forming a 
lobster cooperative; from the Vinalhaven 
Historical Society. 1943. 48 mins., col., sd. 

Franco-American Life 

Reflets et Lumiere, a television series on 
Franco-American culture produced by the 
Maine Public Broadcasting Network 
(MPBN). The programs aired from 1979 to 
1981. Sound and image quality varies. PERF. 
Programs listed below: 
Potato Harvest, Northern Maine. Inter- 
view and poetry reading by Norm Dube in 
Bedford, NH. 1979, 39 mins. 



St. Mary's Hospital, St. Mary's Hospital in 
Lewiston, Maine roots in the early 1800s. 
Teachers from New Hampshire on the Ca- 
nadian American Institute. 1979. 27 mins. 

The Catholic Church, Amedee Proulx, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Portland, Maine, and 
Raymond LaGasse, a married priest from 
Concord, NH. An interview about Holy- 
oke, Mass. 1979. 28 mins. 

Social Clubs, Old social clubs of Lewiston, 
Maine; the drinking establishments of 
Madawaska, Maine. A portion of a slide 
presentation from New Hampshire, "I Too, 
am New Hampshire." 1979. 28 mins. 

Acadian Villages, Acadian history inter- 
view with Guy Dubay of Madawaska, 
Maine. Visits to the Acadian Village near 
Van Buren, Maine, and le Village Acadien in 
Carquet, New Brunswick, Canada. A short 
visit to Quebec City. 1979. 27 mins. 

Organizers, Franco-American organizers 
and their success at motivating people to 
action. "Assimilo," a spoof exploring 
Franco- American stereotypes. 1979. 27 



mins. 



Festivals, Franco-American festivals in 
Lewiston, Maine; Lowell, Mass.; Old 
Town, Maine. Franco-American studies in 
Waterville, Maine. Arts and crafts fair in 
Manchester, NH. 1979. 27 mins. 

Lowell Mills, Irene Simoneau, Franco- 
American historian, on the role of women 
in the mills. Roger Paradis of Fort Kent, 
Maine, about Franco-American folklore 
and music. 1979. 29 mins. 

Many more . . . call for the complete list. 

Geography 

Assignment in Aroostook, Loring Air Force 
Base in northern Maine closed in 1994. This 
is a look at its heyday: Mom at home, the 
sergeant at work, the family at play. 1956. 27 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Mount Washington Among the Clouds, a 
history of the hotels, newspaper and cog 
railway, 1852-1908. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Mysteries of the Unknown: A Documentary 
about our Community, an outstanding stu- 
dent video about Bucksport, Maine, with 
original music. 1990. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Norumbega: Maine in the Age of Explora- 
tion and Settlement, early Maine history, 
based on maps. 1 989. 1 6 mins., col., sd. PERF 



Reference by Mail 



This Land: The Story of a Community Land 
Trust and a Co-Op Called H.O.M.E., 
Karen Saum's documentary on the Orland, 
Maine, organization. 1983. 26 mins., col., 
sd.PERF 

Oral History 

Hap Collins of South Blue Hill, Jeff Titon's 
oral history interview with field footage of a 
lobsterman, painter and poet. 1989. 56 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

An Oral Historian's Work with Dr. Edward 
Ives, "how to" illustrating an oral history 
project by the founder of the Maine Folklife 
Center. 1987. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Carlton Willey, baseball pitcher, 1958 
rookie of the year, interviewed in a high 
school project. Unedited interview from 
VHS master. 1990. 39 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Political Discourse 

Jerry Brown Speaks in New Hampshire, 
from the 1992 presidential campaign. 28 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

John F. Kennedy Speech, anniversary of the 
Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1963 at the 
Univ. of Maine homecoming. 30 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF Sent with full transcript of 
speech. 

Margaret Chase Smith Speech, declaration 
of intention to run for President, includes 
Q&A. 1 964. 1 7 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Ella Knowles: A Dangerous Woman, video 
on a suffragist & Bates alumna by Robert 
Branham & students. 1991. 25 mins., col., 
sd. 

Sports 

Legends of American Skiing, footage of 
early skiing, including Dartmouth Outing 
Club, Tuckerman's Ravine, Toni Matt. 
1982. 80 mins., col. and b&w., sd. 

Winter Sports in the White Mountain Na- 
tional Forest, skiing, sledding and snow- 
shoeing in New Hampshire. 1934. 28 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

Television 

The Cold War I Transportation I TV Com- 
mercials, three compilation tapes from the 
Bangor Historical Society/WABI collec- 
tion. 40 to 50 mins. each; b&w, si. and sd. 
PERF 

Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1950s and 



early 60s in news, sports and local commer- 
cials. 1989. 34 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Transportation 

Moving History: Two-foot Rail Returns to 
Maine, antique trucks haul the Edaville 
Railroad trains to Portland. 1993. 48 mins., 
col., sd. 

Ride the Sandy River Railroad, one of the 
country's best two-foot-gauge railroads. 
1930. 30 min., b&w, si. with intertitles. 

Woods 

In the Public Interest: The Civilian Conser- 
vation Corps in Maine, the federal work 
program from Acadia National Park to 
Cape Elizabeth. 1987. 58 mins., sd., col. and 
b&w. 

From Stump to Ship, complete look at the 
long-log industry from forest to shipboard. 
1930. 28 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

King Spruce, harvesting pulpwood, in- 
cludes horses and mechanical log haulers, 
ca. 1940. 23 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Little Log Cabin in the Northern Pines, 
amateur film of a young woman's hunting 
trip near Brownville, Maine, with a profes- 
sional guide, ca. 1930. 13 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 



Our White Pine Heritage, how the trees are 
harvested for use in construction, paper- 
making, etc. 1948. 16 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Pilgrim Forests, about Civilian Conserva- 
tion Corps work in New England Acadia 
National Park and White Mountain Na- 
tional Forest, ca. 1933. 10 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 

Hew Then it Happened, 1947 forest fires 
that devastated Maine. Focuses on after- 
math in southern Maine. 1947. 20 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Woodsmen and River Drivers, "Another day, 
another era," unforgettable individuals who 
worked for the Machias Lumber Company. 
1989. 30 mins., col. and b&w, sd. PERF 

Women's Issues 

Working Women of Waldo County: Our 
Heritage, documentary basketmaking, 
farming and other work. 1979. 26 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Also in this series, Today and Her Story. 



any organizations historical societ- 
ies, libraries, schools use tapes from 
. the Reference by Mail collection for 
public programs. 



New Publication! 




Collections Guide 

To the Moving Image Collections of 
Northeast Historic Film. 

Detailed information on 195 collections of 
home movies, television newsfilm and com- 
mercials, sports, dramas, independent works 
and industrial material relating to northern 
New England. The guide has historical and 
biographical notes and is indexed by subject. 
Patricia Burdick, Crystal Hall Cole and Karan 
Sheldon wrote the guide, which contains a 
preface by Pamela Wintle, archivist of the 
Human Studies Film Archives, National 
Museum of American History. 



Publication of the guide was made possible by a grant from 
the Betterment Fund. The cost is $9.95 plus shipping and 
handling. To order call 1-800-639-1636. 




Reference 
by Mail 

Favorite Titles 

In 1995 the ten videos most frequently 
circulated were 

1 From Stump to Ship 

2 Around Cape Horn 

3 Ice Harvesting Sampler 

4 Aroostook County 1920s 

5 King Spruce 

6 Eeriest Maine Films 

7 Maine's TV Time Machine 

8 Mt. Washington: Among the 
Clouds 

9 On Board the Morgan 

10 Woodsmen and River Drive 




New Titles for Sale 
Videos of Life in New England 



Vermont Memories 

Moving images, photographs and interviews with 
Vermonters who remember when steamboats crossed 
Lake Champlain, and the country fair was the big event 
of the year. Includes 1930s tourist promotion film 
Seeing Vermont with Dot and Glen, and interviews 
with its stars, now in their eighties. 

57 mins., color and b&w, sound. $24.95 

Wabanaki: A New Dawn 

The quest for cultural survival by today's Wabanaki: 
the Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot 
people. Members from each tribe discuss their heritage, 
beliefs and hopes as they join together at Mt. Katahdin. 
With flute music and drumming, songs, prayers and 
ceremonial dances. 

28 mins., color, sound. $24.95 

Modern Times in Maine and America, 1890-1930 

The early years of the century: Maine's paper mills, 
hydroelectric power, potato farming, fisheries, immi- 
grants, the National Park system, trains and trolleys, 
woolen mills, shoe factories, and the tourist industry. 
30 min., color and b&w, sound. $24.95 



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One Hundred Years: 
Centennial Observances, Candy Department 



While joining the international celebra- 
tion of the centennial of motion pictures, 
we might observe milestones in the 
movie-candy business. 

Nineteen ninety-six is the centennial 
year for Tootsie Roll Industries, one of 
the country's largest candy companies, 
with net sales nearing $300 million. 
Their products include Dots, Junior 
Mints, Sugar Daddies, Licorice Crows, 
Charleston Chews and Tootsie Rolls. 

The company was first listed on the 
New York Stock Exchange in 1922. Ellen 
R. Gordon, the current president, is the 
second woman to be elected president 
of a company on the Exchange. 

During World War II Tootsie Roll 
was one of the few candies in produc- 
tion because it kept well and was used in 
G.I. rations. 

Watch with Your Mouth Full 

For motion-picture exhibitors, food sold 
to ticket buyers is a primary source of 
revenue, whether the dollars come from 
traditional lines like popcorn, soda, and 
candy, or the newer gourmet coffee, 
beer, and Ben and Jerry's ice cream. 

Northeast Historic Film's Going to 
the Movies history project has investi- 
gated changes in the audience experience 
of motion pictures including conces- 
sions. Apart from the economic impact 
on exhibitors and moviegoers, changes 
in concessions point to transformations 
in the social role of theaters. Do kids 



We have just 

celebrated the 50th anniversary of Dots. 
According to a company press release the 
candy "is recognized as a movie favorite by 
consumers around the country. " 

save up for a treat at the movies? Do 
couples meet friends for dinner nearby? 
Does the family have hot dogs at the 
drive-in? Do they munch on super-size 
popcorn instead of a meal? 

Northern New England's largest 
movie chain, Hoyts, is a national innova- 
tor with bulk candy similar to Nickel- 
odeon-era sales of loose candy; the 
company has developed a sophisticated 
understanding of concession sales. 

First Candy, then Dinner 

Today larger theater chains offer more 
dinner food in big entertainment centers. 
The region's small independent exhibi- 
tors also receive important revenue from 
meals. Excellent dining can be found at 
Maine movie houses: The Third Rail Cafe 
at Railroad Square Cinema, Waterville, 
and Reel Pizza Cinema, Bar Harbor. 




AMIA at Work and Play 

The Association of Moving Image 
Archivists met in Toronto November 
10-14, hosted by the Canadian Broad- 
casting Corporation. The CBC's planning 
and facilities were outstanding thanks to 
the planning chairs, Jeannette Kopak 
and Elaine Brown. 

AMIA president Eddie Richmond 
balanced details with overview, never 
overlooking the feelings of the people 
involved. The conference was the first to 
have significant corporate sponsorships, 
and offered more in-depth sessions from 
a technical symposium, The Reel Thing, 
to a Selection Criteria Workshop. 

Karan Sheldon co-chaired the pro- 
gram committee with Grover Crisp, 
Sony Pictures Entertainment. The buzz 
on the conference has been, "There 
wasn't enough Diet Coke, and it was 
hard to decide which concurrent sessions 
to attend." More, and less, next year? 

The conference, headlined Preserv- 
ing the First 100 Years, featured four 
Centenary Lecturers: Hugh Taylor from 
British Columbia; Sumiko Higashi, 
SUNY-Brockport; Raye Farr, U.S. 
Holocaust Museum; Peter Morris, York 
University. Their talks will be published 
for AMIA members. 

Of particular interest to Northeast 
Historic Film was a plenary session by 
Professor Patricia Zimmermann, author 
of Reel Families: A Social History of 
Amateur Film. Her lecture, which will 
be included in the Centenary Lecture 
publication, was illustrated by film and 
videotape from AMIA archives partici- 
pating in the Inedits Working Group, 
the special interest section devoted to 
amateur footage. 

The 1996 AMIA Conference will be 
hosted by CNN in Atlanta, Georgia, in 
December. 



Thomas I nee 's film Civilization (1916) was 
promoted with a coast-to-coast motorcycle 
trip. Does anybody know if these riders 
arrived in Maine? 
photo: Gift of Richard D' Abate. 



Archival Notes 
The Collections Guide Process: Understanding Who We Are 



Have you seen our newly published 
Collections Guide? Resulting from a 
project made possible by The Betterment 
Fund, the Guide is helping us increase 
awareness about the great variety of 
genres and subjects represented within 
NHF's archival holdings. The Guide 
project is reaching its goal of improving 
intellectual access, and yielding other 
benefits as well. 

More Understanding 
of Our Collections 

Access to archival collections includes 
outreach presentations at schools, refer- 
ence services, and distribution of finding 
aids such as the Collections Guide. A 
basic level of intellectual control is 
required before access activities begin. 
The Guide project refined our under- 
standing of materials stored in our two 
vaults, forcing us to state more precisely 
the materials, formats, and subject 
matter contained in each of the 1 95 
collections selected for inclusion in the 
Guide. 

This increased level of intellectual 
control was the first of several benefits 
yielded by the Guide project, and it 
marked an important attainment in 
institutional maturation. 

Discovering Loose Ends 

The opportunity to evaluate archival 
procedures comes rarely; it is hard to 
find time to step back and see how things 
are going. The pressure is unrelenting. 

As we examined the collections and 
their donor files in detail, we discovered 
unresolved issues such as unreturned 
deeds of gift, materials misshelved in the 
vaults, video reference copies that had 
yet to be made. 

In order to stay focused and com- 
plete the publication in time we opted 
to keep a list of undone tasks and to 
postpone resolution of some issues until 
after the Guide became available. 

We were able to greatly improve 
our accessioning and record-keeping 
processes by midsummer as the lists we 
made showed us which loose ends 
needed to be tied. 

Integrating Collections Information 

With stronger archival procedures in 



Curatorship 

Archival materials 
donated or deposited. 



by Patricia Burdick 

place, we are able to take intellectual 
control to another level in order to meet 
increasing demands resulting from 
growing stock-footage activities. 

Stock-footage sales an essential 
source of revenue for NHF as well as a 
great outreach opportunity requires a 
repository to have its act together: you 
have to know not only what you've got 
but also who owns copyright, whether 
there are video reference copies for 
previewing, and how much time is 
required to supply the client with copies 
if the footage is selected. 

To improve our ability to handle 
stock-footage re- 
quests, we started an 
internal archival 
survey at the end of 
the summer. Focusing 
first on the 195 Guide 
collections and build- 
ing on our knowledge 
of them gained 
through the Guide 
project, we designed 
an inventory sheet to 
be filled out for each 
collection. The sheet 
summarizes which 
formats constitute 
NHF's archival origi- 
nals, where the mate- 
rial is stored, if the 
originals are accu- 
rately labeled, if there 
are restrictions con- 
cerning ownership 
and copyright, if video reference copies 
are available. 

Completing inventory sheets for a 
multi-genre collection can take several 
hours, not counting the verification trips 
into one or both vaults. The survey is 



Greater institutional understanding 
is following close behind the intellectual 
understanding that is ostensibly the goal 
of the survey. We appreciate more fully 
the balance we have developed among 
curatorship, distribution, stock footage, 
technical services, and membership. 

Seeing the Big Picture 

People get to know NHF in a variety of 
ways. Some may order videos from Jane 
Berry Donnell; others call for stock 
footage and speak to Heather White; 
members borrow videos through the 
Reference by Mail, talking with Trisha 
Terwilliger. People visit the Alamo to 
discuss film-to-video transfers with Phil 
Yates in Technical Services. Potential 



Distribution 




Videos of Life in New England, 
a carefully selected line, furthers 
acccess, supports independent 
producers, creates revenue. 



Moving-image materials are made 
accessible for study and reuse, 
depending on rights. Technical 
services provides reference copies 
and transfers for outside clients. 



Among other benefits, NHF members 
borrow video copies of archival footage 
for home, classroom, public programs. 
Members support curatorial and access 
activities. 



One way to picture interrelationships at NHF is as intersecting 
circles, each circle representing the footage that is involved in each 
area of responsibility. 



donors talk with me as they investigate 
how to donate amateur or professional 
footage to NHF. 

A single person or family may see 
only one or two facets of NHF. Indeed, 
it is hard for staff members to see the 



still in progress, and we plan to extend it big picture on a day-to-day basis. How- 
to the non-Guide collections. The time ever, as the Collections Guide project is 
is well spent, an investment in the stabil- showing, we are connected in important 
ity and quality of our institution. ways. 



Clarifying Our Interrelationships 

Although the inventory project arose in 
the curatorial sector of NHF, it came to 
involve every department in the archives. 



Patricia Burdick completed her archival 
degree in 1992 through the M.L.S. 
program at Simmons College. She joined 
the NHF staff in August 1994. 



Samuel Taylor Interview 

continued from p. 3 

him a week off, then they would assign 
him to another picture. 

What function of Northeast Historic 
Film is the most interesting to you? 

Tit's the fact that it has been finding 
film, over a period of years, that 
never would have been discovered. It is 
documenting ways of life in the North- 
east that would otherwise be forgotten 
for example, interviews with old 
loggers and lobstermen, similar to oral 
history. 

By asking people to look into their 
attics, and consulting other archives, 
they have been able to find silent theat- 
rical films that everybody thought had 
disappeared. It's amazing how much 
they've been able to put away in their 
archives. 

They are preserving a way of life that 
100 years from now would be difficult 
to uncover. 



NHF Membership 



Join by calling 
207 469 0924 

or use form opposite page 9 



Questions? Comments? 
Give Us a Call! 

Northeast Historic Film Staff 

David Weiss 

executive director 
Karan Sheldon 

public services 
Phil Yates 

technical services 
Pat Burdick 

staff archivist 
Jane Donnell 

distribution coordinator 
Heather White 

research & stock footage 
Trisha Terwilliger 

membership 
Samantha Boyce 

reception 



As an independent, nonprofit organization, NHF 
depends on its members. All members get 15% 
off at the Alamo Theatre Store. 

Educator/Student Members, $15 per year, /or 

teachers and students at any level 

Regular Members, $25 per year 

All members receive many benefits including: 

Moving Image Review. 

Advance notice of events. 

Discounts on Videos of Life in New England. 

Set of NHF postcards. 

Free loan of videotapes through Reference 

by Mail. 

Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per year 
All listed benefits plus: 

Reduced rates for technical services and 
presentations 

Additional copies of Moving Image Review 
on request 

Contributing Members, $50 per year 
All listed benefits plus: 

NHF lapel pin 

Associates (Individuals), $100 per year 
All listed benefits plus: 

Three free shipments (up to nine tapes) of 
Reference by Mail videos 

Free NHF T-shirt 
Corporate Members, $100 per year 
All benefits of Associate Membership 
Friends, $250 per year 

All benefits of regular membership, plus: 

Five free shipments (up to 15 tapes) of 
Reference by Mail videos 

Free NHF totebag 

New and "Improved" Members 

Members who have joined since June 1995, and 
those who have generously moved from one 
level up to an even better level. 

Please consider upgrading your membership, 
too! Membership dues help the preservation and 
outreach mission of Northeast Historic Film. 
Friends 
Lillian Rosen 
Associate 
Donald Ahern 
Corporate Members 
Bill Gross & Associates, Long Island City 
The Enterprise, Bucksport 
Robert Wardwell & Sons, Bucksport 

Contributors 

Stewart & Jean Doty 

George & Barbara Rolleston 

Mr. & Mrs. Roland Yates 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Neal & Betty Butler 

Megan Davis 

Friends of Woodstock Winters 

Nashua Public Library 

John Stark Regional High School 

York School Department Media Services 



Regular Members 

Timothy Allison-Hatch 
Paul & Katherine Arthaud 
Patricia & William Bell 
Patricia & Thomas Berry 
Helen Burns 

William Carpenter & Donna Gold 
Martine Cherall 
Brian Clough 
Charles Delaware 
G. Malcolm Denning 
Mrs. John Farr 
Gardiner-Johnston Family 
Roland Grindle 
Clifford Haskins 
Francis Hatch 
Franklin Kennedy 
Joanna Cappuccilli Lovetti 
Maude March 
Henry Mattson, Jr. 
John Mi 1 1 ..UK- 
James & Dorothy McMahan 
Megan McShea 
George Miller 
Maria Morgan 
David Outerbridge 
Chellie Pingree 
Patricia Ranzoni 
A.W. Richmond 
Joan Roth 
Daisy Russell 
Betty Schloss 
Constance Seavey 
Milt Shefter 
Gary Smith 
Jerrie Smith 
Jerome Storm 
Eve & Albert Stwertka 
John Wasileski 
Mrs. Frederick Whitridge 
Elizabeth & Frank Wiswall 

Educator/Student Members 

Raymond Ballinger 

Peggy Stevens Becksvoort 

Claudia Lynn Bonsey 

Armand Chattier 

Ann Cohen 

Katherine Crawford 

Joel Eastman 

David Ellenberg 

Lawrence Gisetto 

Beverly Huntress 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Johnson 

Ann Ogilvie 

Elaine Park 

D.A. Richmond 

Marguerite Ridgway & William T. Sachak 

Melinda Stone 

Richard Valinski 

Ann Whiteside 

George Wildey H 




High School, a. documentary film by Frederick Wiseman. 



Series Sponsors 

Maine Arts Commission Rural Arts 

Initiative 

Bucksport Regional Health Center 
Bucksport True Value Hardware 
Champion International 



Caroline Crocker 
Crosby's Drive-In 
MacLeod's Restaurant 
Shop'n Save 
Robert Wardwellfc Sons 



Rosen's Department Store 
Fellows, Kee & Tymoczko 
The Gateway 
Key Bank of Bucksport 
White's Exxon 



NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

=LM 



BUCKSPORT. MAINE, USA 
04416-0900 (207)469-0924 





ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 






Heartwarming Films 
at the Alamo 

A film series is being held at the Alamo 
to introduce people of all ages to the 
theater, with family matinees and 
"movie dates" for people who would 
rather leave the kids at home. 

Volunteers Diane Lee, Jay Davis, 
Deborah Corey and Heather White 
selected the films including two by 
eminent documentary filmmaker Fred- 
erick Wiseman. The series began in 
December with A Christmas Story and 
It's a Wonderful Life. 

Friday, January 5 7:30 p.m. 
Theodora Goes Wild (1936) 
Story by Mary McCarthy. Adventures 
of a New England woman who writes 
a racy Peyton Place-type best seller. 

Friday, January 12 7:3 p. m. 
Lost Boundaries (1949) 
Louis de Rochemont's dramatized true 
story of a black doctor in New Hamp- 
shire who concealed his heritage from 
his family and the town. 

Saturday, January 20 2 p. m. 
Strangers in Good Company (1990) 
Eight women stranded in the country- 
side; produced by the National Film 
Board of Canada. 

Friday, January 26 7:30 p. m. 
Essene (1972) 

Frederick Wiseman's life in a Benedic- 
tine monastery the conflict between 
personal needs and the priorities of the 
community. Courtesy of Zipporah 
Films, Inc. 

Saturday, February 3 4 p.m. 
High School (1968) 
Life in high school during the Vietnam 
War, by Frederick Wiseman: deten- 
tions, the guidance counselor and gym 
class. Courtesy of Zipporah Films, Inc. 

Friday, February 9 7: 30 p.m. 
Sabrina (1954) 

The original, starring Audrey Hepburn, 
Humphrey Bogart and William Hoi- 
den, from the play Sabrina Fair, writ- 
ten by Samuel Taylor. 

Saturday, February 17 4p.m. 
Way Out West (1937) 
Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy in a 
comedy Western; Ollie makes Stan eat 
his hat. 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAG 






REVIEW 




Dedicated to the Preservation 
of Northern New England 
Motion Pictures 

Summer 1996 

Evangeline, by Lisa ()rnvein 3 

Reference by Mail 7 

Archival Notes, by Hetiihrr White 12 

The Movie Queen 13 

Moving Image Review is .1 semiannual 

publication ol Northeast Historic Rim, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. 
David S. Weiss, executive director, K.ir.m 
Sheldon, editor. ISSN 0897-0769. 



E Mail OLDI-ILM@acadia.net 
Web http://www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ 



4io. 
C.iran 

' 



Collecting, Preserving and Making Accessible 

Ten Years at Northeast Historic Film 



Northeast Historic Film was found- 
ed in 1 986 at Hale and Hamlin's 
law offices in Ellsworth, Maine. Board 
members Pamela Wintle of the Human 
Studies Film Archives and David C. 
Smith of the University of Maine were 
present with staff David S. Weiss and 
Karan Sheldon. 

Two babies were also there 
Elizabeth Griffin and Catherine Weiss. 
The babies have had their tenth birth- 
days; Northeast Historic Film is about to 
celebrate ten years as an independent 
nonprofit organization. 

The Field Changed, Too 

Moving image archiving has changed in 
this decade. Resources are not more 
available for preservation than they were 
then: the American Film Institute/ 
National Endowment for the Arts film 
preservation program, once the only 
designated federal money for film 
preservation, no longer exists. 

But in many ways the field is more 
collegia!: in 1986 there was no 
Association of Moving Image Archivists, 
no listserve for computer communica- 
tions among colleagues, no E-mail for 
staying in touch. 



Maine Guide Earl Bonnets was videotaped for 

the documentary Woodsmen and River 

Drivers in 1986. Northeast Historic film 

distributes the program and holds production 

materials including Bonness' interview outtakes. 

He also appears in 1960s footage in the Archie 

Stewart Collection. Photo: Thomas R. Stewart. 



A Shared Responsibility 

"It's a shared responsibility between the 
public and the archives," said Pam 
Wintle of preservation. And NHF would 
not have reached its tenth year without 
recognition from funders, from col- 
leagues, from people who join the 
organization, and from those who 
participate in activities from feature film 
screenings to classroom talks. 

Many more people recognize the 
urgency of moving image preservation 
perhaps in part because of the impending 
turn of the century. 

Priorities 

The notes for the first meeting of the 
NHF board of directors registered an 



important preservation issue: "How to 
establish priorities?" First, NHF has had 
to consider material in physical peril as 
too many institutions had no space for or 
interest in moving images. Then, 
appraisal through inspection, savvy and 
imagination to divine if the material 
might have an audience in the future. 

The priorities, iterated in collections 
policies and implemented daily in 
curatorial decisions, have allowed NHF 
to build a collection for northern New 
England. Does the public respond? Yes 
from scholars to schoolchildren, when 
people see and hear their own history, 
they are engaged. 

Please support Northeast Historic Film 
for the challenges of the next ten years. 9 




Executive 
Director's Repoi 

I am pleased to report that James 
Phillips, Jr., was elected to Northeast 
Historic Film's board of directors at the 
annual meeting in May. He will serve as 
treasurer, joining president Richard 
Rosen and vice president James 
Henderson. 

Jim and Rita Phillips have been long- 
time supporters of NHF; besides gen- 
erosity, good judgment and enthusiasm, 
Jim's the sleuth who came up with the 
oldest known Oliver Hardy film 
reported on page 1 2. 

Building the building 

Summer has arrived. It's the season when 
a number or Old friends stop by. These 
visits give us a chance to share fresh 

>m people who haven't 
been in the building for a while. 

U antidote to my inclination to 
wonder why everything takes so long and 
why :o make so little pi 

So it's great when... Fd Pert is pleased to 
see new work-space wings in progress 
the theater... 1 -ster last 

backhoe mired in basement muck where 
the theater seats are now located... 
Michel Chalufor was impressed to li; 
third floor of steel and . high up 

in the Hy s| 

There's still plenty to do, but \u 
making progress. \\liv don't you make a 
point of coming by and telling us what 
you think? 

Volunteers Help with Windows 

Currently underway Champion Inter- 
national volunteers are helping finish the 
west theater wing, including windows, 
sheetrock and paint. We'll also get the 
east wing ready to serve as our vault. This 
will free up space downstairs to reorga- 
nize the Going to the Movies exhibition. 
Next we are seeking funding to sheetrock 
the auditorium itself and to get a new 
heating system in place before winter. 



Grants in Action 

On the Road with Going to the Movies 




From May 4 to May 31, 1996, NHF's 
traveling exhibition, Going to the 
Movies: A Century of Motion Picture 
Audiences in Northern New England, 
toured nontraditional exhibit sites with 
funding from the National Endowment 
for the Humanities. 

The Maine Mall in South Portland had 
over 250,000 visitors Mothers Day week. 
It was an ideal time to open, with a 
Sunday matinee performance of Charlie 
Chaplin's The Circus (1928), Gillian 
Anderson conducting The Cinema 
Century Orchestra in the first known 
presentation of silent film with live music 
in a North American shopping mall. 

On May 8 UCLA Film and Television 
Archive's restored print of Edwin 
Carewe's Evangeline ( 1 929) received its 
premiere at the Hoyts Nickelodeon in 
downtown Portland, in association with 
the Maine Humanities Council. (See 
opposite.) A musical ensemble comprised 
of Elliott Schwartz, Tom Myron, and 
Dan Bodoff accompanied the film where 
the original sound-on-disc soundtrack 
was missing. 

The twenty-four panel exhibition of 
images, graphics and text was in center 
court with speakers including Eric 
Schaefer addressing the mall-walkers 
group, Henry Jenkins, Chester Liebs, and 
Garth Jowett. Jowett also spoke at the 
Portland Museum of Art with Rebel 
Without a Cause. "I was extremely 
pleased to see so many new faces in the 
Museum and to hear their enthusiastic 
endorsement of the program," said 
museum director of education Dana 
Baldwin. 

On May 13 the exhibit moved to 
Burlington Square Mall in Burlington, 
Vermont, a 60-store plaza on the city's 
pedestrian thoroughfare. Speakers 
included Denise Youngblood, University 
of Vermont film scholar; Glenn Andres, 
Middlebury College art historian; and 
independent filmmaker Jay Craven. A 
number of the Going to the Movies talks 
may be borrowed on videotape through 
Reference by Mail. 

On Friday, May 31, Gillian Anderson 
again conducted The Cinema Century 
Orchestra with The Circus in The Flynn 



Theatre, a 1 930 art-deco arts center. The 
evening was attended by 1,100 people. 
Newspaper critic Dan Wolfe wrote, "I 
would guess that The Flynn has not rung 
with laughter like diat in all its years. And 
the laughers were of every age." Anderson 
led a discussion following the film. 

Enthusiastic comments and letters 
from audience members at Evangeline 
and The Circus capture the audience 
point of view. "An original print, restored 
so well, and shown on a large screen, 
makes an incredible difference. We were 
all overwhelmed," wrote Patricia Bezalel. 

"It would be an awful shame to lose 
this and other such cultural treasures to 
neglect. We applaud this use of public 
funds to restore, sustain and make 
available the cultural history of our 
peoples," wrote Nancy C.B. Wright and 
Steven C. Lidle. 

For more on the project see page 
14. And be sure to visit the Going to the 
Movies exhibition at the Alamo Theatre 
in Bucksport this summer. H 



NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE 



HUMANITIES 



NHF Statement of Purpo 







The purj -nrtheast Historic 

Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 
Activities include but are not limited 
to a survey of moving pictures of 
northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
climate-controlled storage; Creation 
of educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 
members of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production 
community, through providing a 
study center, technical services and 
facilities. 



Evangeline, an Enduring Symbol of Acadian Identity 



by Lisa Ornstein, Director 

Acadian Archives/Archives acadiennes, 

University of Maine at Fort Kent 

Prepared for the premiere showing of the 
newly restored film Evangeline (1929) in 
Portland, Maine, on May 8, 1 996. 

When Henry Wadsworth Long- 
fellow's poem Evangeline was 
published in 1 847, it was an 
instant success and a major literary event. 
Five editions of 1 ,000 copies each sold 
out in the first year; over the next 100 
years, the poem went through at least 
270 editions and some 1 30 translations. 

Critics hailed the epic as the quintes- 
sence of American literature, and 
generations of school children read the 
poem. American and Canadian histori- 
ans rushed to study the long-neglected 
Acadian diaspora. In short, Evangeline 
became one of North Americas best- 
known and best-loved literary characters. 

This once immensely popular work 
has gradually slipped into obscurity. 
Today it clearly belongs to a bygone 
literary age: an epic poem cast in hexam- 
eters, celebrating self-denial and heroic 
virtue, is a far cry from our postmodern 
preoccupation with the "moral 
dilemma" of survival. Evangeline has 
faded from the American collective 
consciousness, much as the "forest 
primeval" has become a dimly remem- 
bered opening line of otherwise forgotten 
verses. 

For Acadians, however, Evangeline 
remains an enduring powerful symbol, 
one which they have used in a variety of 
ways to represent themselves both to 
outsiders and to each other. 

I want to look very briefly at the 
different ways Evangeline was adopted by 
three Acadian settlement areas: the 
Canadian Maritime Provinces, south- 
western Louisiana, and Maine's St. John 
Valley. 

When Evangeline was published, most 
of the Acadians who had managed to 
return to their homelands in the 
Canadian Maritimes after years of 
dispersion and exile were living in small, 
isolated communities surrounded and 
dominated by an English-speaking 
majority. 

During the latter half of the nineteenth 



century, a small Acadian religious and 
intellectual elite began searching for a 
new vision of Acadian identity, a quest 
resulting in the collective transformations 
in perspective, self-awareness, and 
institutions known as the "Acadian 
Renaissance." For this elite, Longfellow's 
epic provided a prestigious and ready- 
made vehicle for telling the Acadian story 
and for encouraging a new sense 
of national identity and pride. 

Maritime Provinces 

The first Acadian newspaper, Le 
Moniteur Acadien, distributed 
French translations of Evangeline 
with its early issues, and editorial 
writers referred to the poem for 
illustrations of Acadian unity. A 
second major Acadian newspaper 
was actually entitled L'Evangeline, 
and the translated poem 
appeared in serial form on its 
pages. Translations were adopted 
for use in the classes at St. Joseph, 
the first Acadian college in 
Memramcook, New Brunswick. 
The name "Evangeline," which 
was unknown before Longfellow, 
began to appear on birth certifi- 
cates and baptismal records. 

By the end of the nineteenth 
century, Longfellow's epic had 
become a symbol for Acadian 
Renaissance patriotic sentiment. 
Through the poem, Acadians could relate 
to the Deportation not through the 
complex ambiguities of historical 
accounts but rather through the immedi- 
ate emotional appeal of a noble heroine's 
poignant tale. 

As an origin myth, it was perfect: it 
evoked the tragedy of the Deportation 
without focusing on defeat, underscoring 
instead the virtues of faith, loyalty and 
perseverance in the face of adversity. 

Louisiana 

At about the same time in southern 
Louisiana a quite different story was 
emerging. As elsewhere in the United 
States, generations of Louisiana school 
children had learned that Evangeline was 
thinly veiled history. In 1 907 Judge Felix 
Voorhies, a respected jurist and play- 
wright of Acadian and Creole parentage, 



wrote a novelette entitled Acadian 
Reminiscences: The True Story of 
Evangeline. In an effort to inspire ethnic 
pride among Acadians, Voorhies wrote 
that Evangeline and Gabriel were histori- 
cal figures whose "real" names were 
Emmeline Labiche and Louis Arsenault 
and whose tragic romance reached its 
culmination not in Philadelphia but in 




St. Martinville, Louisiana (which just 
happened to be Voorhies's home town). 

Even though the narrative was histori- 
cally inaccurate and the principal 
characters never existed, Acadian 
Reminiscences was an instant local success. 
Southwestern Louisianians were already 
fascinated with Evangeline and predis- 
posed to identify her closely with the 
region. Judge Voorhiess community 
stature and his public insistence that his 
fiction was based on authentic family 
tradition ensured Acadian Reminiscences 
popular currency and complete credibility. 

By the 1 920s an elaborated version of 
the Emmeline Labiche/Louis Arsenault 
story was firmly ingrained in south 
Louisiana, both as local history and as a 
marketable commodity. St. Martinville's 
supposed association with the "real" 
Evangeline had turned it into a tourist 



attraction, and when plans for the film 
were announced, local chambers of 
commerce launched a successful public 
relations campaign to bring director 
Edwin Carewe, his cast and crew to 
southwestern Louisiana where, they said, 
"the story was founded." 

Carewe filmed the bayou scenes in the 
St. Martinville area and the cast heard a 
poignant retelling of the Emmeline 
Labiche story, learning that her remains 
were actually interred along the northern 
wall of St. Martinville's Catholic church. 

Dolores Del Rio, who starred as 
Evangeline in the film, was so moved 
that she pledged funds for a statue to 
mark the supposed burial site and agreed 
to have it cast in her likeness. The now 
famous statue was unveiled in 1931 with 
some 15,000 people attending the 
ceremonial addresses by Governor Huey 
Long and a flock of Louisiana and 
Maritimes Acadian politicians. 

St John Valley 

In Maine's St. John Valley, the publica- 



tion of Evangeline was overshadowed by 
more immediate concerns resulting from 
the recent settlement of Maine's north- 
east boundary dispute. The poem went 
to press only five years after the Webster- 
Ashburton Treaty of 1 842 established the 
St. John River as an international 
boundary between Maine and New 
Brunswick. The boundary line made 
economic sense, but it split in half a 
close-knit, culturally homogeneous 
community that traced its origins both to 
Acadia and French Canada. 

In the years that followed, those 
whose homes happened to lie on the 
U.S. shore struggled to meet the chal- 
lenge of reconciling their ties to Canada 
(and their Canadian relatives) with their 
new American identity. Ultimately, they 
chose to identity themselves with their 
Acadian rather than their French- 
Canadian ancestors, and Evangeline 
became an important symbol for empha- 
sizing this connection. 

Since the early 1900s, Evangeline 
has been used extensively by St. John 



Shop New England 

by Jane Berry Donnell, distribution coordinator 



If you like to travel and shop, Videos of 
Life in New England are available at 
the Vermont Country Store in Weston, 
Vermont, the New Hampshire Historical 
Society in Concord, and at Borders 
Books, Music & Cafe in South Portland, 
Maine. 

Need a good video in the middle of the 
night? L.L. Bean offers our videos 24 
hours a day at their store in Freeport, 
Maine. 

Visiting? Remember a House Gift! 

Traveling up the Maine coast? You can 



find Videos of Life in New England in 
any Bookland or Mr. Paperback along 
the way. 

If you're headed to Acadia National 
Park, stop and shop in Bucksport at the 
Alamo Theatre Store and be sure to say 
hello to us at Northeast Historic Film. In 
the summer we're open Monday through 
Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., right on 
Main Street, half a mile from Route 1. 

For the names of stores that carry 
Videos of Life in New England, or to 
order direct, please call me at 800 639- 
1636. H 





Valley community leaders, teachers and 
festival organizers as a symbol for cultural 
identity and as a vehicle for teaching 
Acadian history. Until quite recently, two 
elementary schools were named 
"Evangeline," and "Acadia," and school 
children throughout the Valley have 
studied the poem both as literature and 
as the history of their ancestors. 

New Brunswick Acadian Renaissance 
composer A.T. Bourque's 19 10 song 
Evangeline is still commonly sung at 
school assemblies and public ceremonies 
honoring local history and culture. And 
for many years costumed Evangelines 
and Gabriels have greeted the audience at 
the opening ceremonies of the Acadian 
Festival. 

Symbol of Acadian Identity 

As I've tried to show in these brief 
descriptions, Acadian communities in the 
Maritimes, in Louisiana, and in Maine- 
each in its different way have enthusi- 
astically adopted Evangeline, and she 
continues to be the most popular symbol 
of Acadian identity. 

Present-day Acadian sentiment about 
Evangeline, however, is by no means 
unanimous. Many contemporary 
Acadian scholars and leaders feel frustrat- 
ed by the way the poem's oversimplified 
account of the Acadians has overshad- 
owed the more complex historical and 
social realities. As one of our local 
historians put it, "If you want to know 
what we think of Evangeline, ask the 
Iroquois what they think of Hiawatha." 
Many contemporary Acadian intellectu- 
als and artists believe that Evangeline 
symbolizes a passive, culturally inaccurate 
Acadie, and they are working to replace 
her with what they feel are more positive, 
active, and authentic role models. 

Next year, Evangeline will be 1 50 years 
old. With a career ranging from promot- 
ing Acadian nationalism to promoting 
hot sauce and ladies' underwear, Long- 
fellow's literary heroine has had a busy 
time of it. The poem's rich history, its 
wide-ranging symbolic associations, and 
the present-day controversy over its rele- 
vancy provide plenty of opportunity for 
lively anniversary discussion. I am looking 
forward to next year. Carewe's Evangeline 
should be a wonderful vehicle for bodi 
celebration and reconsideration of 
Evangelines enduring symbolic power. B 



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Shaw's Hall, the theater in Greenville, 

Maine, in 1921. The film if The 

Rider of the King Log, from a story 

by Maine writer Holman Francis Day. 

Note the film shipping case on the 

theater steps the feature is now lost. 

Photo: Moosehead Historical Society. 



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continued on page 11 




American Indians 

The First Mainers, Passamaquoddy 
Indians of Pleasant Point and Indian 
Township. 1975. 22 mins., col., sd. 

The Mystery of the Lost Red Paint People, 
archaeology of the circumpolar region, 
including coastal New England. 1987. 
60 mins., col., sd. 

Our Lives in Our Hands, Micmac Indian 
basketmaking cooperative in northern 
Maine. 50 mins., col., sd. 

Wabanaki: A New Dawn, cultural 
survival and revival of Wabanaki of 
Maine and Maritime Canada. 1995. 25 
mins., col., sd. 

Where the Rivers Flow North, see "Feature 
Films," next page. 

Artists and Authors 

Berenice Abbott: A View of the Twentieth 
Century, life and work of one of 
America's most significant photogra- 
phers; she lived in Maine into her 90s. 
1992. 56 mins., col., sd. 

Bonsoir Mes Amis, portrait of two of 
Maine's finest traditional Franco- 
American musicians. By Huey. 1990. 46 
mins., col., sd. 

Donald Hall and Jane Kenyan: A Life 
Together, New Hampshire poets read 
from their works at home and in the 
grange hall. 1994. 60 mins., col., sd. 
Grace: A Portrait of Grace DeCarlton Ross, 
independent filmmaker Huey traces 
Ross silent film and dance careers. 1983. 
50 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Master Smart Woman, Maine novelist 
Sarah Orne Jewett (1850-1909) by Jane 
Morrison. 1984. 28 mins., col., sd. 

May Sarton: She Knew a Phoenix, the 
poet reads and talks at home. Produced 
by Karen Saum. 1980. 28 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 



Reference 
by Mail 



Members of Northeast Historic Film 
are invited to borrow from the 
FREE circulating loan collection, 
Reference by Mail. There is never any 
charge for borrowing. We will even pay 
for shipping the first time you borrow 
(up to three tapes in this first shipment)! 
After that there is just a $5 shipping 
charge for each loan. 

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The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be in the mail on their 
way back to NHF five days after they are 
received. 



Public Performance 

Videotapes listed here are offered as a 
reference service. Where possible, public 
performance rights are included. Please 
be sure to check each tape's status: PERF 
means public performance rights are 
included. If you have a date in mind, call 
ahead to ensure availability. Where there 
is no PERF, the tape is for home use only 
and may not be shown to a group. 

Videos for Sale 

Many of these tapes are available for 
purchase through NHF. Please call for a 
catalog of Videos of Life in New England. 



Portrait of George Hardy, relationship of a 
woodcarver with his customers. Strong 
vision of life Down East. Winner of 1995 
Cine Golden Eagle. 30 mins., col. & 
b&w, sd. 

Boats and the Sea 

Around Cape Horn, Captain Irving 
Johnson aboard the bark Peking. 1929. 
37 mins., b&w, sd. 

Marine Mammals of the Gulf of Maine, 
field guide to whales and seals. The 
Allied Whale program at College of the 
Atlantic. 24 mins., col., sd. 

On Board the Morgan: America's Last 
Wooden Whaler, Whaling archival 
photographs, rare film footage. 23 mins., 
col. and b&w, sd. 

Tales ofWoodand Water, visits to boat 
builders and sailors up and down the 
coast of Maine. 1991. 60 min., col., sd. 

The Ways at Wallace 6- Son, ill-fated 
coasting schooner John F. Leavitt. 1984. 
40 mins., col., sd. PERF (no admission 
charge permitted) 

Yachting in the 30s, compilation of J 
Boats footage from various sources. 
1930s. 45 mins., b&w and col., sd. 

City Life 

Anchor of the Soul, African-American 
history in northern New England 



through the story of a Portland church. 
1994. 60 mins., col., sd. 

Can I Get Therefrom Here? Urban Youth, 
families, work, homelessness in Portland, 
Maine. 1981. 29 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Roughing the Uppers: The Great Shoe 
Strike of 1937, documentary by Robert 
Branham and Bates College students 
about CIO shoe strike in Lewiston & 
Auburn, Maine. 1992. 55 mins., col., sd. 

24 Hours, fire fighting in Portland, 
Maine, with memorable narration. The 
filmmaker, Earle Fenderson, died 
recently at the age of 90. 1963. 27 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 

Civil War 

Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine, 
Maine Civil War hero: Fredericksburg, 
Gettysburg, Appomattox. 1994. 55 
mins., col. & b&w., sd. 

Country Life 

Aroostook County, 1920s, potato growing 
with horse power, Aroostook Valley 
Railroad electric trolley. Period piano 
music. 1920 and 1928. 20 mins., b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Ben's Mill, a documentary about a 
Vermont water-powered mill by NHF 
members Michel Chalufour and John 
Karol. 60 mins., col., sd. 



Reference by Mail 

A Century of Summers, the impact of a 
summer colony on a small Maine coastal 
community by Hancock native Sandy 
Phippen. 1987. 45 mins., b&w and col., 
sd. PERF 

Cherryfield, 1938, a terrific home movie 
about rural spring. 6 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Dead River Rough Cut, lives and philoso- 
phies of two woodsmen-trappers by 
Richard Searls and Stuart Silverstein. 
1976. 55 mins., col., sd. 

Down East Dairyman, produced by the 
Maine Dept. of Agriculture. 1972. 14 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Giant Horses, draft horses and their 
drivers. 28 mins., col., sd. 

Ice Harvesting Sampler, five short films 
showing a near-forgotten New England 
industry. Narration by Philip C. Whitney 
explains process and tools. 26 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 

Maine Summer Festival, role of agricul- 
tural products in summer fairs. 1 970. 1 2 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Movie Queen, Lubec, pretend movie 
queen visits her hometown in Downcast 
Maine. 1936. 28 mins., b&w, si. 

Nature's Blueberryland, Maine's wild 
blueberries. 13 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Paris, 1929 and other views, home movies 
of the Wright family in Paris, Maine, 
haying, mowing, picnics. 80 mins., b&w, 
si. PERF 

Part- Time Farmer, promotes agriculture 
as an after-hours pursuit, ca. 1975. 17 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Sins of our Mothers, girl who went to the 
Massachusetts textile mills from Fayette, 
Maine. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Early Film 

All But Forgotten, documentary on the 
Holman Day film company (1920-1921) 
in Maine. 1978. 30 mins., col. and b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Cupid, Registered Guide, a two-reel North 
Woods comedy by Maine writer Holman 
Day. 1921. 20 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Earliest Maine Films, lobstering, trout 
fishing, logging, canoeing on Moosehead 
Lake and potato growing, from 1901 to 
1920. 44 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Just Maine Folks, a bawdy hayseed one- 
reeler. Poor image quality. 1913. 8 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

The Knight of the Pines, another North 
Woods adventure by Maine writer 
Holman Day. 1920. 20 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 



The Simp and the Sophomores, Oliver 
Hardy plays Prof. Arm-Strong. 1915. 14 
mins., b&w, si. 

Ecology & Energy 

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, her 1 963 
book about pesticides helped raise 
ecological consciousness. 1993. 60 mins., 
col., sd. 

Passamaquoddy Tidal Power Project, 
construction of worker housing at 
Quoddy Hill, dam building (with rail) at 
Pleasant Point and Treat Island, ca. 1 936. 
30 mins., b&w., si. PERF 

Voices from Maine, discussions of devel- 
opment versus quality of life. Scratched. 
1970. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Feature Films 

Where the Rivers Flow North, shot on 
location in Vermont and New Hampshire. 
Woodsman (Rip Torn) and his American 
Indian companion (Tantoo Cardinal) in 
a story about timberland and water 
power. 1994. 11 mins., col. sd. 

Fisheries 

Basic Net Mending, how to repair fish 
nets. 1951. 16 mins., col., sd. PERF 

It's the Maine Sardine, catching, packing 
and eating Eastport fish. 1949. 16 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, fisheries 
including shrimp, cod and lobster. 1968. 
28 mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Maine Lobster, lobster fisheries and 
consumption with unusual footage 
including the assembly of lobster TV 
dinners, ca. 1955. 30 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Tuna Fishing off Portland Harbor, Maine, 
off-shore fishing with a Maine sea and 
shore warden, ca. 1930. 10 mins., b&w, 
si. with intertitles. PERF 

Turn of the Tide, drama about formation 
of a lobster cooperative; from the 
Vinalhaven Historical Society. 1943. 48 
mins., col., sd. 

Franco-American Life 

Reflets et Lumiere 

Series on Franco-American culture 
produced by Maine Public Broadcasting 
Network (MPBN). The programs aired 
from 1979 to 1981. Sound and image 
quality varies. PERF. 

The Catholic Church, Amedee Proulx, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Portland, Maine, and 
Raymond LaGasse, a married priest from 
Concord, NH. An interview about 
Holyoke, Mass. 1979. 28 mins. 



Acadian Villages, Acadian history- 
interview with Guy Dubay of 
Madawaska, Maine. Visits to the Acadian 
Village near Van Buren, Maine, and le 
Village Acadien in Carquet, New 
Brunswick, 1979. 27 mins. 

Organizers, Franco-American organizers 
and their success at motivating people to 
action. "Assimilo," a spoof exploring 
Franco-American stereotypes. 1 979. 
27 mins. 

Lowell Mills, Irene Simoneau, Franco- 
American historian on the role of women 
in the mills. Roger Paradis of Fort Kent, 
Maine, about Franco-American folklore 
and music. 1979. 29 mins. 
Many more... write for the complete list. 

Geography 

Assignment in Aroostook, Loring Air Force 
Base in northern Maine closed in 1 994. 
Its heyday: Mom at home, the sergeant at 
work, the family at play. 1956. 27 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

History is Always Being Made at 
Bucksport, history of Champion 
International paper mill and the town. 
1995. 23 mins., col., sd. 

Mount Washington Among the Clouds, a 
history of the hotels, newspaper and cog 
railway, 1852-1908. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Norumbega: Maine in the Age of 
Exploration and Settlement, early Maine 
history, based on maps. 1989. 16 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Road to the Sky, The Mt. Washington 
Auto Road. 1991. 25 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. 

This Land: The Story of a Community 
Land Trust and a Co-Op Called H.O.M.E., 
Karen Saum's documentary on Orland, 
Maine organization. 1983. 26 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Vermont Memories I, includes 1930s 
promotional film Seeing Vermont with 
Dot and Glen. 1994. 57 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. 

Vermont Memories II, post World War II. 
Television comes to Vermont and other 
things. 1995. 57 mins., col. and b&w, sd. 

Humanities Council 

Modern Times in Maine and America, 
1890-1930, interviews, stills and moving 
images; introduction to Council project. 
1995. 30 mins., col. & b&w, sd. PERF 

Oral History 

Hap Collins of South Blue Hill, JefFTiton's 
oral history interview with field footage 



of a lobsterman, painter and poet. 1989. 
56 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Maine Survivors Remember the Holocaust, 
eight Maine survivors talk about World 
War II. 1994. 43 mins., col., sd. 
An Oral Historian's Work with Dr. Edward. 
Ives, "how to" illustrating an oral history 
project by the founder of the Maine Folk- 
life Center. 1987. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Political Discourse 

Jerry Brown Speaks in New Hampshire, 
from the 1992 presidential campaign. 28 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

John F. Kennedy Speech, anniversary of the 
Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1963 at 
the Univ. of Maine homecoming. 30 
mins., b&w, sd. PERF Sent with full 
transcript of speech. 

Ella Knowles: A Dangerous Woman, video 
on a suffragist & Bates alumna by Robert 
Branham & students. 1991. 25 mins., 
col., sd. 

Muskie vs. Monks: The Final Round, the 
third debate between Senator Muskie 
and Bob Monks on accountability. 1976. 
58 mins., col., sd. 

Margaret Chase Smith Speech, declaration 
of intention to run for President, includes 
Q&A. 1964. 17 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Sports 

Legends of American Skiing, footage of 
early skiing, including Dartmouth 
Outing Club, Tuckerman's Ravine, Toni 
Matt. 1982. 80 mins., col. and b&w., sd. 

Winter Spans in the White Mountain 
National Forest, skiing, sledding and 
snowshoeing in New Hampshire." 1934. 
28 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Student Work 

The Batteau Machias, student project on 
construction of a traditional riverdriving 
boat. 1990. 22 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Best of Fifteen Years: The Maine Student 
Film and Video Festival, compilation 
directed by video educator Huey. 1993. 
58 mins., col., sd. 

Mysteries of the Unknown: A Documentary 
about our Community, an outstanding 
student video about Bucksport, Maine, 
with original music. 1 990. 30 mins., 
col., sd. 

Places of Interest in the Bucksport Area, a 
student project. 1989. 60 mins., col., sd. 

Carlton Willey, baseball pitcher, 1958 
rookie of the year, interviewed in a high 
school project. 1990. 39 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 



Television 

The Cold War / Transportation / TV Com- 
mercials, three compilation tapes from 
the Bangor Historical Society/WABI 
collection. 40 to 50 mins. each; b&w, si. 
and sd. PERF 

Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1 950s and 
early 60s in news, sports and local com- 
mercials. 1989. 34 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Transportation 

Moving History: Two-foot Rail Returns to 
Maine, antique trucks haul the Edaville 
Railroad trains to Portland. 1993. 48 
mins., col., sd. 

Northern Railroads, steam era footage, 
stories by railroaders and historians. 
1995. 60 mins., col. and b&w. sd. 

Ride the Sandy River Railroad, one of the 
country's best two-foot-gauge railroads. 
1930. 30 min., b&w, si. with intertitles. 

Woods 

In the Public Interest: The Civilian 
Conservation Corps in Maine, the federal 
work program from Acadia National 
Park to Cape Elizabeth. 1987. 58 mins., 
sd., col. and b&w. 

From Stump to Ship, complete look at the 
long-log industry from forest to ship- 
board. 1930. 28 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

King Spruce, harvesting pulpwood, 
includes horses and mechanical log 
haulers ca. 1940. 23 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Last Log Drive Down the Kennebec, 
documentary about Scott Paper's last log 
drive. 1976. 30 mins., col., sd. 



Little Log Cabin in the Northern Woods, 
amateur film of a young woman's 
hunting trip near Brownville, Maine, ca. 
1930. 13 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

The Maple Sugaring Story, children's 
video with teacher workbook. 1 989. 28 
mins., col. sd. PERF 

Our White Pine Heritage, how the trees 
are harvested for use in construction, 
papermaking, etc. 1948. 16 mins., b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Pilgrim Forests, about Civilian Conser- 
vation Corps work in New England- 
Acadia National Park and White 
Mountain National Forest, ca. 1933. 
10 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Then it Happened, 1 947 forest fires that 
devastated Maine. Focuses on aftermath 
in southern Maine. 1947. 20 mins., 
col., sd. 

Woodsmen and River Drivers, "Another 
day, another era", unforgettable individu- 
als who worked for the Machias Lumber 
Company. 1989. 30 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. PERF 

Womens Issues 

Working Women of Waldo County: Our 
Heritage, documentary basketmaking, 
farming and other work. 1979. 26 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Also in this series, Today and Her Story. 



Many organizations historical 
societies, libraries, schools UM.- 
from the Reference by Mail collection 
for public programs. 



tapes 
ection 

^^BH^^^HB 



Going to the Movies Talks 

available through Reference by Mail 



Glenn Andres, Middlebury College, 
places for community entertainment in 
Vermont. 33 mins. 

Dona Brown, University of Vermont, vaca- 
tioning at the turn of the century. 35 mins. 

Martha Day, University of Vermont, 
Vermont documentary films. 29 mins. 

Kathryn Fuller, Virginia Commonwealth 
University, rural moviegoers and Uncle 
Josh. 24 mins. 

Kathryn Fuller, Virginia Commonwealth 
University, dish nights and other promo- 
tional gimmicks. 39 mins. 

Leger Grindon, Middlebury College, 
boxing films. 34 mins. 

Henry Jenkins, MIT, Star Wan & fan 
culture. 33 mins. 



Garth Jowett, University of Houston, 
movie audiences in the 1950s. 44 mins. 

Garth Jowett, University of Houston, the 
moviegoing experience. 24 mins. 

Susan Kennedy-Kalafatis, University of 
Vermont, who we area mapping ances- 
tries in northern New England. 18 mins. 

Chester H. Liebs, drive-ins. 18 mins. 

Andre Senecal, University of Vermont, 
Franco- Americans and the movies. 17 
mins. 

Tom Streeter, University of Vermont, 
new technologies over the years. 40 mins. 

Denise Youngblood, University of 
Vermont, movie theaters before 1918. 
44 mins. 



Reference by Mail 

The Jane Morrison Collection 

Children of the North Lights, children's book 
creators Ingri and Edgar d'Aulaire. 1976. 20 mins., 
col., sd. 

In the Spirit of Haystack, noted craft school in 
Deer Isle, Maine. 1979. 10 mins., col., sd. 

Lipstick, young woman putting on makeup, 
getting dressed. 1974. 6 mins. col., sd. 

Los Dos Mundos de Angelita/The Two Worlds of 
Angelita, a Puerto Rican family's move to the Lower 
East Side of New York. 1982. 73 mins., col., sd. 

Master Smart Woman, Maine novelist Sarah Orne 
Jewett (1850-1909) by Jane Morrison. 1985. 28 
mins., col., sd. 

Muscongus Pond, a Potter's Place, Connie Romero 
talks about her work. 1979. 5 mins., col., sd. 

Rocks, Nudes and Flowers, Maine-based painter 
Henry Strater. 1975. 20 mins. col., sd. 

Uncle Blaine, cowboy on a ranch. 12 mins. col., si. 



New Titles for Sale 

Videos of Life in New England 



The White Heron, a young girl's choice between 
friendship and a creature she loves. Story by Sarah 
Orne Jewett. 1978. 26 mins., col., sd. 



Vermont Memories II 

Cultural change in Vermont in the 1940s and 1950s, the automo- 
bile, Burlington's movie theaters, the coming of television. Edward 
R. Murrow interviews Vermont citizens about being the last of then 
48 states to get TV. Produced by Vermont ETV in 1996. 
57 mins., col. $24.95 
Also available, Vermont Memories I. 

Northern Railroads 
Vermont and Her Neighbors 

The vam and transition to diesel. Stories told by railroaders, 

townspeople and historians. New 1 hmpshire's Crawford Notch. 

and todu -ion lines. Produced by Vermont 

m 1995. 
60 mins., col. $24.95 

New Hampshire Remembered, II 
with Fritz Wetherbee 

Trolleys from Hampton to Hampton Beach, Irwin's Winnipesaukee 

ski jumping in Berlin, the Mount Washington Hotel. 
d by Frit/. Wetherbee, a twelfth-generation New Hampshire 
native. Produced by New 1 lampshire Public Television in 1995. 
60 mins., col. 
Also available, New Hampshire Remembered, I. 



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continued fiom page 6 

Amy Squibb 

Miriam Stern 

Archie Stewart 

John Stillman 

Allyn Storer 

Jerome Storm 

Albert & Eve Stwertka 

Barbara Sullivan 

Bill & Jacquie Sullivan 

Samuel Suratt & Judith Hole 

David Taylor & Leellen Friedland 

Samuel Taylor 

Denis Thoet 

Charles & Cathy Thompson 

Robert Tyler 

R. Bruce Underwood 

Joanne Van Namee 

Arthur & Frances Verow 

Robert & Julia Walkling 

Dr. Sanford Warren 

Seth Washburn 

John Wasileski 

Althea Wharton 

Mrs. Frederick Whitridge 

Tappy & Robin Wilder 

Elizabeth Wiley 

Betty Winterhalder 

Anne Wirkkala 

Elizabeth & Frank Wiswall 

Edith Wolff 

Bob Woodbury 

Educator/Student Members 

Mark Anderson 
Rosemary Anthony 
Harold Arey 
Judy Arey 
William Baker 
Raymond Ballinger 
Adrienne Baum 
Peggy Stevens Becksvoort 
Arnold & Riva Berleant 
James Bishop 
Deborah Blanchard 
Thomas Boelz 
Prof. Robert Branham 
Dona Brown 
Lawrence Budner 
Richard Burns 
Armand Chartier 
Joanne Clark 
Ann Cohen 
Joseph Conforti 
Sheila & Bill Corbett 
Kathleen Kavarra Corr 
Katherine Crawford 
Alvina Cyr 

Rudolph H. Deetjen, Jr. 
Celeste DeRoche 
Thomas Doherty 
Joel Eastman 
David Ellenberg 
Deborah Ellis 
Charles Emond 
Bob England 




One Hundred Years 

Stanley Davenport Puts Film Into a Basket 



A t the Maine Mall in May, Shirley 
r\Corse from the Scarborough 
Historical Society brought Northeast 
Historic Film an original sketch by 
Stanley Davenport entitled Movies 1897. 
Davenport, an apprentice mechanic, 
toured with an early motion picture 
projectionist. In 1 964 Stanley Davenport 
gave his drawing to the Brookes family in 
Maine. 



It is a delightful rendering of a trau- 
matic moment for any projectionist. 
Notes on the back of the sketch say "Blue 
Ribbon Hall, Tottenham, England. 
Cinematograph show. Bioscope manu- 
factured by concern Stanley worked for. 
Film: Queen Victoria Jubilee Parade. 
Actual film 1 /< mile long. It broke from 
the heat and Stanley is on his knees 
putting the film into a basket." H 



Carlton G. Foster 
Joseph Foster 
Lawrence Gisetto 
Christopher Glass 
Randy Grant 
Joe Gray 
Cora Greer 
Douglas Hatfield 
Prof. Jay Hoar 
Beverly Huntress 
Zip Kellogg 
Rev. Shirley Mattson 
Todd Mclntosh 
Martha McNamara 
Dana Mosher 
Betty Neals 
Mary O'Meara 
Ann Ogilvie 
Elaine Park 
Kenneth Peck 
Sanford Phippen 
Jennifer Pixley 
Sarah Prescott 
Joan Radner 



Tom Rankin 

D.A. Richmond 

Marguerite Ridgway 

Don Ritz 

Gail Shelton 

Natalie B. Smith 

Stephen Smith 

Renny Stackpole 

Gifford Stevens 

Melinda Stone 

Richard & Laura Srubbs 

David Switzer 

Kathy Tweedie 

Juris Ubans 

Richard Valinski 

Mary Webber 

Dr. Richard E.G. White 

Ann Whiteside 

Philip & Shirley Whitney 

Seth Wigderson 

Steve & Peggy Wight 

George Wildey 

Catherine Wood 

C.Bruce Wright 



11 



Archival Notes 



by Heather White, research & stock footage 

Since the last newsletter Northeast 
Historic Film has received several 
new collections of amateur film, bringing 
the number of collections containing 
primarily amateur footage to near 1 50. 

Following presentations to Rotary 
Clubs, fairs, and festivals, people often 
approach NHF staff to say they have 
home movies. One step toward preserva- 
tion is to see that the original film is in 
climate-controlled storage and that 
reference copies are made so that the 
original material does not have to be 
projected for viewing. 

Increasingly we have found that film 
researchers, historians, and documentary 
filmmakers are interested in amateur 
footage. The images from these films 
show what it was like to live during a 
particular period. 

ABCNEWS is currently producing 
The 20th Century Project, a twelve-part 
documentary series on the twentieth 
century using archival film and contem- 
porary interviews. We provided 
researchers with footage of a family doing 
the Twist around the Christmas tree from 
the Gladys Steputis Collection. While the 
producers could select broadcast material 
of teenagers doing the Twist for their 
program on 1960-1963, they are consid- 
ering using this more intimate represen- 
tation of popular culture. 

Besides the home centered material, we 
are also seeing more travel footage. We 
recendy received a collection shot between 
the 1930s and the 1960s, the Samuel 
Horovitz Collection. Horovitz traveled 
the world giving lectures on Workers 
Compensation law and took home 
movies along the way. Many open with 
the title "Sam-o-grams." There is 
everyday footage of New England in the 
1 930s; it also includes Eleanor Roosevelt, 
Henry Cabot Lodge, and Sonja Henie at 
Boston Garden. Travel footage encom- 
passes Norway, Sweden, South Africa, 
Uganda, Nigeria, Ethiopia, 
Mozambique, Kenya, Egypt, Greece, 
Turkey, India, Japan, Philippines, 
Lebanon, China, Argentina, and Brazil. 

Attention Sports Fans 

Janice Bird Smith of Quincy, Massa- 
chusetts, donated home movies this 



winter. The 8 mm. reels contain her 
childhood in the 1 950s, and sports 
history for baseball fans. Janice credits 
her mother, "an avid shutterbug," with 
capturing the memories. Charlie Bird, 
Janice's father, was a minor league 
baseball pitcher known for his under- 
hand the "Submarine Pitcher" threw 
batting practice for Ted Williams. 

Sheepscot River 

The home movies of Gertrude Jane Hay 
Eustis are a significant addition to our 
archives about 1 8 hours, shot from 
1927 to 1970, partially on the Isle of 
Springs in the Sheepscot River, Maine, 
where the Eustis family spent their 
summers. The creator of the Susanne 
Bogart Collection had a steady hand and 
fine focus; Susanne Eustis Bogart says 
that 99% of the family's film was shot by 
her mother, Gertrude Jane Hay Eustis. 

The Jane Morrison Collection 

Northeast Historic Film recently assisted 
the Portland Museum of Art's third 
annual Women's Film and Video Festival. 
A highlight of the festival this year was a 
retrospective of Jane Morrison's work. 

Thanks to Dorothy Morrison, Jane's 
mother, NHF is the repository for her 
work as an independent filmmaker. 
In addition to short films made in 1979, 
In the Spirit of Haystack, Muscongus 
Pond and Commitment to Clay, 
Morrison made two films inspired by the 
Maine author Sarah Orne Jewett. Master 
Smart Woman (1985) is a biography of 
the author, while The White Heron 
( 1 978) is a dramatic film based on Jewett s 
short story by the same name. 

Morrison moved to New York City in 



1974 where she became president of the 
Association of Independent Video and 
Filmmakers. In New York she completed 
Los Dos Mundos de Angelita/The Two 
Worlds ofAngelita (1982) about the lives 
of a family moving from Puerto Rico to 
New York's Lower East Side. It received 
awards from the American Film Festival 
and the Biarritz Festival in Paris. 

Morrison taught at Columbia Univer- 
sity as an adjunct professor in the 
graduate film program. By the mid 
1 980s she was giving lectures and 
workshops in Zimbabwe, Trinidad, and 
Kenya. She suffered a fatal case of 
cerebral malaria in Kenya in 1987. 

Reference copies of her work are 
available on videotape through Northeast 
Historic Film's Reference by Mail service. 

Earliest Oliver Hardy 

As reported in the Winter 1995 Moving 
Image Review, James Phillips, Jr. and Rita 
Phillips donated one-reel films to 
Northeast Historic Film including The 
Simp and the Sophomores, an Edison 
comedy starring Oliver Hardy copyright- 
ed in August 1915 and reviewed in 
Moving Picture World on September 18, 
1915. The film was passed on to George 
Eastman House for preservation. 

A news report from the U.K. recendy 
announced "the oldest surviving film of 
comedian Oliver Hardy was saved from a 
bonfire." This exciting news about Some- 
thing in Her Eye (reviewed in Moving 
Picture World on November 27, 1915) 
leads to the conclusion that Jim Phillips 
found in Bangor, Maine, a unique and 
even earlier appearance of Oliver 
Hardy. A reference videotape is available 
on loan through Reference by Mail. H 



12 




The Simp and the Sophomores, 
Oliver Hardy plays Prof. Arm- 
Strong, a physical culture 
exponent. Frame enlargement 
courtesy George Eastman House. 



The Mystery of Mary McCarthy 

In January as part of the winter series 
called Heartwarming Films at the Alamo 
the 1 936 Columbia Pictures film 
Theodora Goes Wildv/as shown as an 
example of a film contrasting New 
England country life with the sophistica- 
tion of New York. Irene Dunne carries 
the film in an amusing dual role as the 
author of a scandalous novel who 
maintains a wholesome identity in her 
home town. 

The film was of local interest because it 
was from a story by Mary McCarthy. 
Not far from Bucksport is the town of 
Castine author Mary McCarthys home 
for many years. She is perhaps best 
known for her novel about Vassar 
women, The Group. 

Eve Stwertka, a literary executor for 
McCarthy, attended the January 5 
screening and was interested in Theodora 
Goes Wild's depiction of a woman who is 
wholesome Theodora Lynn in the little 
town of Lynnfield, and the couture- 
apparelled booze-drinking author 
Caroline Adams in the city. 

As Stwertka prepared an essay about 
the feminism revealed in the film, she 
checked with Mary McCarthy's brother, 
Kevin, who said, "That story wasn't 
written by our Mary." 

The credits "Screenplay by Sidney 
Buchman, based on a story by Mary 
McCarthy," are as yet mysterious. Do 
they conceal another dual identity? The 
evidence is not yet in. While Columbia 
Pictures' files record Mary E. McCarthy 
as the story author, the Castine, Maine, 
resident was Mary Therese McCarthy. 

But wait, is it a coincidence, or a clue, 
that Sidney Buchman was the screen- 
writer for the film of The Group (1966)? 
Help solve the mystery of Theodora. H 



Lillian Rosen 



Lillian Rosc-n, mother of hoard president 
Richard Rosen, passed away in |n 
She was a generous friend to Northeast 
I listoiK Him, with an interest in the 
Alamo Theatre and its meaning to the 

voung woman, 

Lillian Rosen was the first female em- 
ployee of Budksport's paper mill, now 
Champion International Corporation. 
Mrs. Rosen uas an t levant pi 

is Department Stoic, and will he 
ninth missed in her Community. 




The Movie 
Queen 

Farnham "Mike" Blair's newest volume 
of poetry is entitled The Movie 
Queen and Other Poems, (Pucker- 
brush Press, Orono, Maine). The title 
poem of the collection is drawn from a 
1936 film at Northeast Historic Film, shot 
by an itinerant director, Margaret Cram. 

Blair creates a world of coastal Maine 
in seven parts: The Town, The Director, 
Arrival, First Selectman, The Director, 
The Script, The Movie Queen. 

The historical director, Margaret 
Cram, made short films called The Movie 
Queen in Eastport, Lubec, and Bar 
Harbor, Maine, and Middlebury, 
Vermont. Dr. John M.R. Bruner recendy 
discovered that another one was shot in 
Groton, Massachusetts, in 1 939 
directed by Margaret Cram Showalter. 

She approached local sponsors to 
underwrite a 20-minute 16 mm. film 
about "the movie queen," a young 
woman returning to her town, visiting 
local shops, being kidnapped by baddies 
and rescued by a young hero. The films 
were shown in association with a stage 
show using local and professional actors. 

In 1 990, with funding from the Maine 
Community Foundation, Northeast 
Historic Film had film copies of The 
Movie Queen, Lubec made by John E. 
Allen, Inc. for screening in Lubec in 
association with oral history sessions with 
participants in the 1 936 production. 



#2 The Director 

Whispering, 

they circle her, 

shoes squeaking on the wet gray deck of 

the town landing. 

Youths, tradesmen, 

women with baby carriages, 

and here and there, 

yellow knots 

of oilskinned fishermen, 

jabbing elbows and smirking 

at this curious, buxom woman 

with her short hair 

and hard twill jodhpurs. 

She opens a fist 

to reach for the red megaphone. 

"Don't show your teeth," 

she bellows. 

"You are not 

posing for a snapshot. 

This is a motion 

picture." 

She nods towards her assistant, 

who is hurriedly winding 

the chromium drive lever 

on the thick black camera. 

"You must move. 

You must emote. 

You must 

worship. 

For this young woman 

about to step off the ship 

and walk among you, 

this angel 

has shut the mouths 

of the lions of Hollywood. 

She returns to you in triumph. 

She has left your town 

a commoner, 

and she comes home 

a movie queen." 



13 



Public Comments 

Going to the Movies exhibit at the Maine Mall, South Portland 



A young fan participates in a 

performance of music far silent film 

by Danny Pan at the Maine Mall. 



"We really loved Danny Part playing 
along with Cupid, Registered Guide. 
The whole exhibit was great." 

Edith Pennock, Kezar Falls, Maine 

"Museum/archives outreach into the 
community is tremendously important 
and this is an ingenious way to accom- 

Robin A.S. Haynes, Bath, Maine 

"Outstanding great visual display 
most helpful personnel." 

Anne Powell, Gorham, Maine 





"Enjoyed the exhibit and the perfor- 
mance and especially liked seeing 
my fathers picture as a young boy and 
his quote about how proud he was of 

my grandmother." 

Tory Tyler-Millar 



Robert Tyler, Farmington, 
Maine, with the panel called 
Community Standards. He 
recalls the Congregational 
minister protestingWhul Price 
Glory in 1927 and his mother 
taking him to see the movie 
anyway. 



"It's wonderful to see such a passionate 
devotion to the preservation of our 
cultural history through film. It is truly 
the art form of die century and your 
work is vital and much appreciated." 

Christopher]. Colucci, 
Portland, Maine 

"This is a fabulous project an excel- 
lent way to put people in touch with 
our cultural history. It should serve as a 
model for public education initiatives 
on both a regional and national level." 

Eric Schaefer, 

Division of Mass Communication, 
Emerson College, Boston 

"Great exhibit thanks for all the time, 
research and love that went into diis 
presentation. A quality one. The radio 
ads were especially enticing." 

Jennifer West, Nipomo, California 

"Wonderful to see an arts exhibit at the 
Mall! Bring more arts and education to 

M 

Rita Guidowski, 
South Portland, Maine 

"Excellent work. Beautiful in appearance, 
superb content!" 

Tad Baker, Biddeford, Maine 



Denise Youngblood, University of Vermont film 

historian, speaks at Burlington Square Mall. Her 

listeners include Alicia Anstead, a Master's history 

student at the University. Anstead was an excellent 

volunteer interpreter for the exhibit. 



14 




Audience Reaction 

Evangeline restoration by UCLA Film and Television Archive 
Premiere at Hoyts Nickelodeon, Portland, Maine 



"Evangeline pictorial quality was beautiful" 

Gary Frederick, 
Portland, Maine 

"Everything was lovely, very professionally 

presented." Evangeline L. Bourgoin, 

Waterville, Maine 

"I loved Evangeline. The soprano who 
sang was sensational. Am looking 
forward to more of this type of movie." 
Mary Hamel, Portland, Maine 



"Enjoyed the movie Evangeline very 
much. Had never sat through a silent 
film before and found it very enjoyable. 
The restoration was beautifully done. I 
enjoyed the history of the Acadian 
deportation, and the musicians' 
accompaniment, also." 

Linda Carroll, Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

"It kept you so interested every minute. 
All seats taken." v- irginia Weeland( 

Cape Elizabeth, Maine 



At the Burlington Square Mall 



As a child, Mary Louise 

Varricchione-Lyon went to 

theaters in the Burlington 

neighborhood where the mall 

now stands. Television 

coverage of the exhibition 

included this interview by arts 

reporter Deborah Ncttune. 





Questions? Comments? 
207-469-0924 

David S. Weiss 

executive director 

Samantha Boyce 

office assistant 

Patricia Burdick 

staff archivist 

Jane Berry Donnell 

distribution coordinator 

Karan Sheldon 
publii 

I leather White 

research <S: stock footage 

Phil Yates 
technical seni. 





NHF Membership 

As an independent nonprofit org.i 
tion, N'H1 ; depends on its inenil 
All members get 15% oft" at the Alamo 
Theatre Si 

Please join and renew! 

It's simple: Call 800 639-1636. 

Or use the order form on page 10. 

Regular members, $25 per \ 

All members receive many benefits 

including: 

Moving Image Review. 
.dvance notice of events. 

iscounts on Videos of Life in New 

England. 

t of NHF postcards. 

loan of videotapes through 
Reference by Mail. 

Educator/Student Members, $ 1 5 per year. 

All regular membership benefits for 
teachers and students at any level. 

Nonprofit Organizations, $35 per \\ 

All listed benefits plus: 

Reduced rates for technical sen-ices and 

presentations. 

Additional copies of Moving Image 
Review on request. 

Contributing Members, $50 per 

All listed benefits plus: 
Two NHF lapel pins. 

Associates (Individuals), $100 per year. 
All listed benefits plus: 
Three free shipments (up to nine tapes) 
of Reference by Mail \ u 
\'HI ; T-shirt. 

Corporate Members, $100 per year. 
All benefit iate Membership. 

Friends, $250 per yt 

All benefits ot regular membership plus: 
Five tree shipments (up to 15 tape 
Red Mail vide. 

: >ag. 

ubership at any level is an opportuni- 

involved with the p 
tion and enjoyment of our moving ii: 
heritage. Your dm. Icductible 

the extent allowed bv law. 



15 




Dorothy Lamour, war loan bond drive, 
Boston, 1942. Courtesy Museum of Modem 
Art/Film Stills Archive. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 

P.O. Box 900 
Bucksport, ME 04416 




Address Correction Requested 



Going to the Movies 
Documents with Comments 

Documents drawn from topics 
researched to prepare the traveling 
exhibition, with commentaries by project 
scholars, are available as part of the 
Going to the Movies project. 

The four-page Documents with 
Comments provide substance for class 
discussion, and may be used to help 
prepare visits to the exhibition or prompt 
research following a visit. They present a 
range of historical sources from a 
government report, to a 1915 newspaper 
story, to a humorous essay by E.B. 
White. 

1896, You Should See the Vitascope, 

essay by Douglas Gomery, University of 
Maryland. An article from a daily 
newspaper announcing "living, breath- 
ing, pulsating scenes" caught by the 
camera and shown on the Vitascope 
projector. 

1914, Trolley Car Trips, essay by John 
R. Stilgoe, Harvard University. A guide 
to Portland and vicinity: leisure, com- 
mercial enterprise and mobility. 

1915, The Birth of a Nation, essay by 
Marcus Bruce, Bates College. A newspa- 
per article stating that the film "extols 
lawlessness and stirs up race prejudice." 

1927, The Yankee Clipper, essay by 
Gillian Anderson, musicologist. A music 
cue sheet for a feature film indicating the 
musical selections to be played. 

1928, Methods of Dealing with 
Delinquent Children, essay by Kathryn 
H. Fuller, Virginia Commonwealth 
University. The case of Mildred E., who 
was committed to the State School for 
Girls for a sex offense. 

1942, Bond Rally, essay by Garth Jowett, 
University of Houston. E.B. White's 
account of Dorothy Lamour's appearance 
at a Bangor, Maine, bond rally, "a 
sprawling, goofy, American occasion." 

ach publication contains the text of the 
Kumt-nt, an approximately 1,500-wor 
say, and an illustration. The set of 

is available for $5. Use the order 
>rm on page 10. 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVIN 

IMAG 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation 
of Northern New England 
Motion Pictures 

Winter 1997 

Archives: Serving Donors 3 

Reference by Mail 7 

Reuse: William Cohen 1 1 

NHF Membership 15 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Film, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. 
David S. Weiss, executive director 
Stephany Boyd, writer and editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769. 

E Mail OLDFILM@acadia.net 
Web http://www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ 



Facets of the Archives Community and Business Asset 



This issue of Moving Image Review is 
devoted to giving Northeast Historic 
Film's many far-flung members and 
friends a closer look at facets of the 
archives they otherwise might not 
encounter. 

Yes, NHF is a non-profit organization 
dedicated to collecting, preserving, and 
providing access to northern New 
England moving images. 

It's also a highly visible member of the 
community of Bucksport, Maine (pop. 
5,000), where its Alamo Theatre head- 
quarters on Main Street is widely 
recognized as a landmark. 

It's an employer of workers from the 
Bucksport region, and therefore, a 
contributor to the economy. 

It's a resource providing unique 
materials for teachers and researchers, for 
productions, and for the public. 

Perhaps to the majority of its home 
constituency, it's a place where individu- 
als and families from throughout the area 
gather year-round for events ranging 
from film screenings to visits with Santa. 

We hope these pages will impart a 
fuller sense of NHF in its many roles. 



A the new kid on the block, NHF 
needed help finding sponsors for 
its film series. In short order, a 
restaurant owner from down the street 
had drummed up more than a dozen 
financial supporters. 

Such was the warm welcome NHF 
found upon relocating to Bucksport, an 
early indicator of the win-win relation- 
ship the archives and historic coastal 
community enjoy today, four years later. 
"NHF was obviously an asset to the 
community," says self-styled salesman 
George MacLeod. "In order for our big 
picture to develop in this town, we need 
some anchors, some sound operations 
like NHF that are in it for the long 
haul." 

As proprietor of MacLeod's Restaurant 
on Bucksport's Main Street, MacLeod 
has long monitored the progress of 
the small downtown business district. 
Faced with competition from malls 
and discount superstores, the area has 
struggled to maintain its existence, as 
have its small-town counterparts nation- 
wide. 

Given that backdrop, local business 



people viewed the archives' choice of 
Bucksport for its new location as a very 
good sign for the town, MacLeod says 
now. In his words, NHF helps to create 
the kind of balance the town needs to get 
away from its "just a mill town" image. 

When the town adopted a new 
development strategy in 1995, planners 
agreed that Bucksport must court more 
small business and visitors from outside. 
As a respected cultural organization 
recognized well beyond the city limits, 
NHF can play a leading role. 

Tourist & Traveller Destination 

"NHF is bringing out-of-towners to 
Bucksport as a destination point," says 
MacLeod. "That seems to be one key to 
economic development, rather than our 
just trading amongst ourselves. I'm very 
hopeful about their prospects, and I 
think their coming here is as positive a 
thing as could happen to Bucksport." 

That sentiment is echoed by local 
resident Richard Rosen, whose family has 
run Rosen's Department Store on 
Bucksport's Main Street for three 
generations. continued on page 6 



Bucksport, Maine, on 
the Penobscot River. 
Photo: Bangor Daily News. 




Executive 
Director's Report 

What good is preservation without 
access? Northeast Historic Film has col- 
lected a large and ever growing resource 
of moving images. Our mission is to 
protect that resource and ensure to the 
best of our ability that it is safe a year 
from now and 100 years from now. But 
what good is it if no one sees it? Not 
much! That is why our full mission is to 
preserve the resource and make it acces- 
sible. 

We have worked very hard to make 
our film and videotape available through 
a variety of programs since NHF was 
founded. We have a commitment to 
making reference copies that can be 
watched without compromising the orig- 
inal materials. We produce videotapes for 
sale or free loan to members, visitors and 
researchers. We have presented scores of 
programs in towns from Fort Kent to 
Kennebunk; Bethel to Burlington and 
Boston. Audiences range from nursing 
homes to college classes to day care cen- 
ters. Perhaps the biggest audiences, how- 
ever, are those who see television programs 
with footage from our collections. 

New National and International 
Agreement 

To increase our ability to market our col- 
lections for reuse I am pleased to announce 
that NHF has signed a representation 
agreement with Hot Shots/Cool Cuts, 
Inc. of New York. 

Hot Shots/Cool Cuts is one of the 
largest stock footage companies in the 
world, and together with their research 
arm, Second Line Search, employs over 
50 people. Our collection of northern 
New England footage, rich in home 
movies and rural life, adds a new dimen- 
sion to the collections they already 
represent. 

Researchers seeking footage from our 
collections to be used in national and 
international productions will now con- 
tact Hot Shots at 212 799-1978. 

It is important to note that only mater- 
ial to which NHF has the broadest set of 
rights will be available under this agree- 
ment. 

The decision to enter into a representa- 
tion agreement was not undertaken 




lightly. Our board began discussing the 
possibility more than a year ago, as part 
of our extensive management assessment 
process. Rick Cell, president of Hot 
Shots/Cool Cuts, visited us last spring; 
staff members from both companies have 
since had many discussions to fully 
understand our mutual concerns. 

As a pioneering organization with great 
pride in our staff and in our excellent 
donor relations, we are pleased to go 
forward, offering our outstanding col- 
lections to a much broader audience. 

Continuing to Serve Northern 
New England 

We felt it was important to continue to 
serve requests for reuse by producers in 
northern New England from our office 
in Bucksport. 

Researchers from Maine, New Hamp- 
shire, Vermont, and most of Massachu- 
setts, will still call Heather White at 207 
469-0924. Our continuing commitment 
to producers in this region gives us the 
ability to be as responsive as ever, sharing 
our knowledge of our holdings, while 
Hot Shots/Cool Cuts takes responsibility 
for expanding access to our collections to 
others farther afield. 



The Seven Star Grange Hall in Troy, 

Maine, was the site of "Preserving Family 

Treasures, "a workshop funded by the 

Maine Humanities Council and organized 

by the Troy Historical Society in September 

1996. Conservators from various fields 

gave presentations. A number of workshop 

participants had questions for NHF staff 

about home movies and videotape. 





NHF Statement of Purpose 



The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but are not 
limited to a survey of moving pictures 
of northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
climate-controlled storage; Creation 
of educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 
members of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production 
community, through providing a 
study center, technical services, and 
facilities. 



Archives: Serving Donors 



M III K-n Martha Unobskey Goldner 
fMV decided to donate her prized 
W W family footage to NHF four 
years ago, it was the first step in what she 
envisions as an enduring relationship 
with the archives. 

"It was sort of like coming home," 
she says of the donation process. "They 
were very receptive, and embraced die 
same feeling I have diat although these 
were home movies, because we had such 
a large participation in eastern Maine 
this was a piece of history." 

The 5,800 feet of 16 mm. silent, black 
and white film documents three decades 
in the lives of die Unobskeys, a promi- 
nent Jewish family descended from 
Russian immigrants diat settled in Calais, 
Maine, in die 1 920s. 

Goldner's father, Arthur, was a 
charismatic businessman who became 
the family's most well-known patriarch. 
A tireless organizer of civic improve- 
ment and economic development 
projects, even at the state level, Arthur 
Unobskey also placed himself at the 
center of the city's small yet vibrant 
Jewish community. 

Goldner believes die Unobskey 
Collection of films is relevant not only 
for students of Jewish settlement in 
Maine, but for anyone interested in 
immigration, in economic change in the 
20th century, or in small-town life. 

She admits to some initial doubts 
about making private family footage 
available for others' viewing. "It doesn't 
always show die very best of every- 
thing it's not just happy dialogue," she 
says. 

Still, any qualms regarding making 
the films available were outweighed by 
her belief in their inherent value, and in 
die realization that the Unobskeys were, 
above all else, an intensely public family. 

"Wherever we went, my fadier made a 
point to get to know both newcomers 
and oldcomers. I always felt when I was 
living in Maine that I was related to 
everybody," says Goldner. 

Drawn away for reasons both personal 
and professional, surviving members of 
die Unobskey family have scattered. 
Goldner's brother Sidney lives in San 
Francisco, where he retains a keen 
interest in Maine's future. 



A Nashville, Tennessee, resident 
since her marriage, Goldner continues 
die family tradition of civic leadership. 
She and her husband, a practicing 
internist, have devoted countless hours to 
local projects including a community 
health initiative, and a science museum 
geared to families. That in addition to 
dieir deep involvement with the city's 
Jewish community, which Goldner 



continues to document in her taped 
interviews with Holocaust survivors. 

Living so far from her childhood 
home, Goldner takes comfort in know- 
ing her family history will be preserved at 
NHF. "As a home base, the archives is a 
wonderful place to be," she says. "The 
films will be there for future reference, 
which I hope will bring more of our 
family back to Maine." H 




Frame enlargements: Martha Unobskey GoUner 



Employer: 

Engaging Work, Interesting Workers 

Numbered among the NHF staff, dubbed The 
Magnificent Seven by an in-house film buff, are a 
Bucksport native whose ties to the area go back many 
generations, and a college freshman seeking a more 
secure future for herself and her daughter. 



Karin Bos, Meriden Studio 



Karin Bos, Meriden Studio 




Jane Berry Donnell A 

Lifelong Bucksport resident Jane Berry 
Donnell was hauling heavy loads with a 
forklift at the Champion International 
mill before an encounter with NHF 
changed her plans. 

While studying sociology at the 
University of Maine, Donnell had heard 
that the archives held footage of her 
father playing high-school basketball in 
the 1950s. Upon viewing the film, she 
learned that the head cheerleader on the 
sidelines was none other than her own 
mother. 

Donnell was fascinated to see her 
parents as teenagers preserved on film at 
NHF. "I couldn't ask enough questions. I 
got really excited," she recalls. 

Libby Rosemeier, NHF s distribution 
coordinator at the time, was impressed 
by Donnell's deep roots and connections 
in the area. As a millworker whose 
husband and father also work at 
Champion, Donnell could serve as a 
liaison between the mill and the archives, 



Samantha Boyce ^ 

Seated in her ticket booth-turned-office 
adorned with vintage movie posters, all- 
around staffer Samantha Boyce says her 
work involves a broad array of jobs. 
Those range from providing membership 
services, to answering the phone, to 
selling gift shop items, to leading tours 
through the historic Alamo Theatre. 

As a single mother, the 1 995 
Bucksport High School graduate must 
juggle working four days a week with the 
challenges of child care and college. "It's 
real hard, but I like the variety of coming 
here and then going home," says Boyce, 
who lives only a few blocks from work. 

Boyce's baby daughter Ashley was a 
familiar face at the archives during her 
infancy. Having celebrated her first 
birthday in November, Ashley is now 
cared for by Boyce's best friend while 
Samantha is at work. 

Boyce learned of NHF through a 




work-study program at Bucksport High 
School; she took a crash course in the 
archives' mission by reading brochures 
and asking a lot of questions. 

"It's a lot better than McDonalds," 
says the franchise's former employee, who 
has replaced her fast food uniform with 
sweaters and jeans. "I like it here because 
I have a lot of responsibility." 

Boyce thinks it's "great what we do 
here." With her primary interests 
centering around NHF's daily opera- 
tions, the tasks she enjoys most involve 
accounting and bookkeeping. 

"I've learned a lot here that's helped 
me," says the young mother. "A lot about 
how to run my own house, bank 
account, and things." 

Her studies in office management at 
Beal College in Bangor will be helpful for 
her job at Northeast Historic Film, as 
well as for administering a household. H 



4 



Rosemeier realized. 

With the legacy of a grandfather 
whose law office was in the Alamo 
Theatre building her ties to the commu- 
nity were well established. 

And as a graduate of the local school 
system, Donnell could provide a link 
between the archives and teachers 
interested in using NHF materials in the 
curriculum. 

When Rosemeier decided to leave 
NHF to return to college, she 
approached Donnell, who, by then, had 
been laid off a number of times from her 
job at the mill. 

"I never thought I could work an 
office job that's why I drove a forklift," 



says Donnell, who replaced Rosemeier at 
her post more than a year ago. "But I like 
to work with the public that's my 
thing." 

The community liaison role suits 
Donnell well. She has represented NHF 
at meetings of the Bucksport Historical 
Society, and has joined a local 
committee trying to develop a paper 
museum in town. 

When not managing wholesale 
accounts and filling orders for the 
multitude of videotapes that NHF 
distributes, Donnell raises American 
Paint horses at the home she shares with 
her husband on Bucksport s scenic River 
Road. 



Resource: Old & Young Users & Technologies 



Browse the shelves of a northern New 
England library, school or college, 
and chances are you'll find NHF 
materials among the holdings. Ditto at 
many health-care facilities and nursing 
homes. Educators and activities directors 
alike have learned the value of using 
moving images for instruction and 
entertainment. 

Whereas a teacher might use the 
videotape From Stump to Ship to enliven 
the history of Maine's logging industry, a 
recreation director could use the same 
video to evoke memories of a bygone 
way of life for a care facility's elderly live- 
in population. 

Barbara Malm, a teacher at the Blue 
Hill Consolidated School, used NHF 
tapes on rural industries in conjunction 
with a unit on die Laura Ingalls Wilder 
book, Farmer Boy. 

Although the book describes rural life 
in New York rather than Maine in the 
1860s, NHF videotapes such as Ice 
Harvesting Sampler and The Maple 
Sugaring Story were a perfect fit with 
chapters the 3rd and 4th-graders focused 
on, says the teacher. 

"They certainly are useful depending 
on what you're studying. We're only 
really beginning to discover them," says 
Malm. 

Health Care Center Activities Focus 
At Marshall's Health Care Facility in 
Machias, Maine, the NHF-distributed 
logging videotape Woodsmen and River 
Drivers is often shown to the resident 
"men's club," says activities director 
Linda Beverly. 

Beverly first became acquainted with 
the tape during a special showing for 
former resident Frank Dowling, a 100- 
year-old veteran woods worker inter- 
viewed in the production, which chroni- 
cles wood harvesting and log driving in 
the Machias River Valley using 1 930s 
lumber company footage and contempo- 
rary interviews. 

Dowling, now deceased, was "very 
proud" of his participation in the project, 
Beverly says, as was fellow facility 
resident Newell Beam, who also appeared 
in Woodsmen. Now, when the tape is 
shown, it sparks a round of fond reminis- 
cence for the days when working in the 



woods was a preferred way of life for 
many rough-hewn Mainers, who 
harvested wood with hand tools and 
moved logs downriver using little more 
than their own mettle and a Peavey. 

New History Teaching 

An assistant professor of history at the 
University of Maine, Martha McNamara 
is incorporating NHF archival footage on 
the state's tourism culture into a set of 
multimedia presentations for classes in 
Maine and American history. 

"To bring audio and visual materials 
into the classroom, you really need to go 
to a computerized format," believes 
McNamara, who prefers to avoid the 
more labor intensive nature of traditional 
teaching aids such as slide presentations. 

For that reason, she and University of 
Maine history professor Paula Petrik are 
having NHF footage digitized into a 
format suitable for transfer onto a disk 
intended for use in a Macintosh Power- 
Book computer. The material will then 
be displayed using projection devices. 



Evangeline 150th Anniversary 



"It's pretty exciting, actually," says 
McNamara. "It's a way to teach students 
who familiar with MTV and the Internet 
using a medium they know." I 

Frank Dowling at Marshall's Health 
Care Facility, Machias, Maine. 




This year marks the 1 50th anniver- 
sary of Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow's Evangeline, an epic poem 
inspired by the expulsion of French- 
speaking Acadians from Canada. Lisa 
Ornstein, director of the Acadian 
Archives /Archives acadiennes at the 
University of Maine, Fort Kent 
(UMFK), has announced "Acadian 
Explorations: A Presentation Series on 
Acadian History and Culture," bringing 
guest speakers to the St. John Valley in 
northern Maine. The series is cospon- 
sored by UMFK, the Maine Humanities 
Council, the National Park Service, the 
Jonathan and Dawn S. Moirs Memorial 
Fund, and the Acadien du Haut Saint- 
Jean Bilingual Education Program. 

Antonine Maillet, an Acadian author 
and one of Canada's most celebrated 
writers, will speak on May 1 1 at UMFK 
on "Longfellow's Evangeline and its 
Influence on my Career as a Writer." 
Deborah Robichaud, an Acadian 
historian working at the Canadian 
Conservation Institute, will speak on 



June 20-21. She is preparing a traveling 
exhibit on Evangeline. 

Restored Film to Screen 

On June 25, the 1929 feature film, 
Evangeline, starring Dolores Del Rio, 
will be shown at the Fox Theatre in 
Madawaska, and later that week at the 
Plourde Century Theatre in Fort Kent. 
Stephen Vonderheide will provide live 
musical accompaniment. 

In 1 996 the film was restored by the 
UCLA Film and Television Archive with 
funds from the Mary Pickford 
Foundation, the Maine Humanities 
Council, and Tom Murray. 

For more information on Evangeline 
activities in northern Maine including 
speakers, curriculum initiatives, EduKits, 
performances, and film presentations, 
contact the Acadian Archives, 207 834- 
7536. 

An Elder Hostel program will be held 
July 27-August 2. Call UMFK Office of 
Lifelong Learning, 207 834-7562. 



continued from page 1 

"For one thing, people who remember 
when the Alamo was a theater are thrilled 
to see the building occupied by a group 
that has a lot of affection for it. Others 
are simply intrigued by what's going on 
there," says Rosen, president of NHF's 
Board of Directors. 

Revitalizing Downtown 

As a member of Bucksport's downtown 
development committee, Rosen is one of 
many local residents working to broaden 
the town's economic base, which will 
include a new marina this summer, and 
eventually, a revitalized downtown and 
possibly a paper museum. 

For now, the Champion International 
paper mill still dominates the view on 
Main Street. The mill is the largest 
employer in town, and in Hancock 
County. Whereas local graduates once 
took the availability of mill jobs for 
granted, those jobs increasingly require a 
college degree and high-tech training, 
and are much harder to come by. 

That realization has fueled Bucksport's 
ongoing project to modify its image and 
develop its economy, efforts that NHF's 
presence has enhanced, says Rosen. 

Apart from purely economic considera- 
tions, Rosen says it's been exciting to see 
crowds turn out for NHF screenings 
including new work by local filmmakers. 
"Yes, maybe they went out for dinner 
here before the show, or for an ice cream 
after. But it was just terrific seeing people 
come to town to have some fun." 

A recent analysis the town commis- 
sioned suggests that more commuters 
and tourists passing through town would 
stop given suitable incentives. 

Champion Partnerships 

Happily, the relationship between NHF 
and the Champion mill has flourished 
since the mid-1980s, when archives co- 
founders Karan Sheldon and David 
Weiss worked on the restoration of From 
Stump to Ship: A 1930 Logging Film, 
archival footage from the Machias River 
valley area, a project underwritten in part 
by Champion. 

One mutually memorable collabora- 
tion in more recent years was NHF's 
screen ing of the 1995 "world premiere" 
of a Champion documentary on the 
Bucksport mill's history. The tape 
blended new interviews of veteran 



Holiday festivities at 
The Alamo for all ages. 
Photo: '. 'he Enterprise. 




millworkers with historic footage from 
NHF and other sources. 

By all accounts, History is Always 
Being Made at Bucksport was a tremen- 
dous hit, particularly with old-timers 
whose own relationship with the mill 
dates back to decades ago. 

"It was amazing to watch their faces," 
recalls Dolly Sullivan, a mill spokes- 
woman. "I think maybe I got the most 
enjoyment listening to them tell their 
stories." 

Most recently, the Champion Fund for 
Community Service donated $2,000 to 
purchase construction materials and 
many hours of volunteer labor from 
employees toward the renovation of 
NHF's Alamo facility, says Sullivan. 

"I really enjoy going there, especially 
during Christmas Spirit Days, when 
NHF hosts visits with Santa, and 
screenings of It's a Wonderful Life? says 
Sullivan. "It's such fun seeing people on 
Main Street." 

Open Doors for Community Groups 

As both a mother and Bucksport's mayor, 
resident Lisa Whitney may have spent 
more time than anyone assessing NHF's 
impact on the town. "They've opened 
their doors to a multitude of organizations 
who've wanted to use their facility. And 
culturally, they've contributed by having 
such a wide spectrum of films," she says. 
But for Whitney, the most gratifying 
aspect of the NHF "phenomenon" has 
been seeing the Alamo, which had 
housed everything from a video store to a 



bar, return to its original use as a theater. 
"Every time I go to an event there, 
whether it's a candidate's night or a film 
screening, someone says, 'I love smelling 
that popcorn again. It reminds me of 
when I was a child.'" 

Young people of all ages continue 
to visit the Alamo. A group of 8th- 
graders from Fred Almquist's technology 
education class at Bucksport Middle 
School recently interviewed Weiss, 
NHF's executive director, for a 30-second 
videotaped promo they will produce on 
the archives. 

"NHF was a real eye-opener for the 
kids. There's a great deal more to it than 
they realized," says Almquist. "It's a 
wonderful resource to have in town." H 

SERIES SPONSORS 

1995 Heartwearming Films 

Bucksport Regional Health Center, 
Bucksport True Value Hardware, Champion 
International, Crocker Insurance, Crosby's 
Drive-In, MacLeods Restaurant, Shop 'n 
Save, Robert Wardwell & Sons, Rosens 
Department Store, Fellows, Kee & 
Tymoczko, The Gateway, Key Bank of 
Bucksport, White's Fjcxon. 

1996 Saturday Matinees 

Bucksport True Value Hardware, 
Bucksport Veterinary Hospital, Champion 
International, Crosby's Drive-In, Fellows, 
Kee & Tymoczko, MacLeod's Restaurant, 
Ramsdell's Auto Supply, Rosens 
Department Store, Shop 'n Save. 




Educators are among the many 
members of Northeast Historic 
Film discovering the value of the 
Reference by Mail program. The circulat- 
ing videotape collection includes 120 
titles, many suited for use in subject areas 
such as Maine Studies, history, science, 
political science, and media studies, at a 
variety of grade levels. 

A tape such as The Maple Sugaring 
Story, which comes with a teacher 
workbook, is geared specifically toward 



Reference 
by Mail 



children in the elementary grades, and 
has been used in 4th-grade Maine 
Studies classes. By contrast, the content 
of Wabanaki: A New Dawn is relatively 
advanced, making the tape more 
appropriate for older students and 
adults. 

We welcome comments and sugges- 
tions from teachers and others who have 
used die tapes. 

NHF members may borrow any of the 
videotapes listed here by mail. There is 
no fee for the service, and we will pay for 
the shipping of up to three tapes the first 
time you borrow. After that, there is just 
a $5 shipping charge per loan (maximum 
three tapes per loan). 



Return Instructions 

The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be shipped to NHF 
five days after they are received. 

Public Performance 

Videotapes listed are offered as a refer- 
ence service. Tapes whose descriptions 
include the PERF designation may be 
presented as part of a public event. All 
others are for home use only. To ensure 
availability for a specific date, call 
Samantha Boyce at 207 469-0924. 

Videos for Sale 

Many tapes are available for purchase 
through NHF. Please call for a catalog of 
Videos of Life in New England. 



American Indians 

The Pint Mainers, Passamaquoddy 
Indians of Pleasant Point and Indian 
Township. 1975. 22 mins., col., sd. 

The Mystery of the Lost Red Paint People, 
archaeology of the circumpolar region, 
including coastal New England. 1987. 
60 mins., col., sd. 

Our Lives in Our Hands, Micmac Indian 
basketmaking cooperative in northern 
Maine. 50 mins., col., sd. 

The Silent Enemy, see "Feature Films," 
next page. 

Wabanaki: A New Dawn, cultural 
survival and revival of Wabanaki of 
Maine and Maritime Canada. 1995. 25 
mins., col., sd. 

Where the Rivers Flow North, see "Feature 
Films," next page. 

Artists and Authors 

Berenice Abbott: A View of the Twentieth 
Century, life and work or one of 
America's most significant photogra- 
phers; she lived in Maine into her 90s. 
1992. 56 mins., col., sd. 

Bonsoir Mes Amis, portrait of two of 
Maine's finest traditional Franco- 



American musicians. By Huey. 1 990. 46 
mins., col., sd. 

Donald Hall and Jane Kenyan: A Life 
Together, New Hampshire poets read 
from their works at home and in the 
grange hall. 1994. 60 mins., col., sd. 

Grace: A Portrait of Grace DeCarlton Ross, 
independent filmmaker Huey traces 
Ross silent film and dance careers. 1983. 
50 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Master Smart Woman, Maine novelist 
Sarah Orne Jewett (1850-1909) bvjane 
Morrison. 1984. 28 mins., col., sd. 

May Sarton: She Knew a Phoenix, the 
poet reads and talks at home. Produced 
by Karen Saum. 1980. 28 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Portrait of George Hardy, relationship of a 
woodcarver with his customers. Strong 
vision of life Down East. Gabriel Coakley 
won a Cine Golden Eagle. 30 mins., col. 
& b&w, sd. 

Boats and the Sea 

Around Cape Horn, Captain Irving 
Johnson aboard the bark Peking. 1929. 
37 mins., b&w, sd. 



Marine Mammals of the Gulf of Maine, 
field guide to whales and seals. The 
Allied Whale program at College of the 
Atlantic. 24 mins., col., sd. 

On Board the Morgan: America's Last 
Wooden Whaler, whaling archival 
photographs, rare film rootage. 23 mins., 
col. and b&w, sd. 

Tales ofWoodand Water, visits to boat 
builders and sailors up and down die 
coast of Maine. 1991. 60 min., col., sd. 

The Ways at Wallace 6- Son, ill-fated 
coasting schooner John F. Leavitt. 1984. 
40 mins., col., sd. PERF (no admission 
charge permitted) 

Yachting in the 30s, compilation of J 
Boats footage from various sources. 
1930s. 45 mins., b&w and col., sd. 

City Life 

Anchor of the Soul, African-American 
history in northern New England 
through the story of a Portland church. 
1994. 60 mins., col., sd. 

Can I Get Therefrom Here: 1 Urban Youth, 
families, work, homelessness in Portland, 
Maine. 1981. 29 mins., col., sd. PERF 



Reference by Mail 

Roughing the Uppers: The Great Shoe 
Strike of 1937, documentary by Robert 
Branham and Bates College students 
about CIO shoe strike in Lewiston & 
Auburn, Maine. 1992. 55 mins., col., sd. 

24 Hours, fire fighting in Portland, 
Maine, with memorable narration. The 
filmmaker, Earle Fenderson, died 
recently at the age of 90. 1963. 27 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 

Civil War 

Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine, 
Maine Civil War hero: Fredericksburg, 
Gettysburg, Appomattox. 1994. 55 
mins., col. & b&w, sd. 

Country Life 

Aroostook County, 1920s, potato growing 
with horse power, Aroostook Valley 
Railroad electric trolley. Period piano 
music. 1920 and 1928. 20 mins., b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Ben's Mill, a documentary about a 
Vermont water-powered mill by NHF 
members Michel Chalufour and John 
Karol. 60 mins., col., sd. 

A Century of Summers, the impact of a 
summer colony on a small Maine coastal 
community by Hancock native Sandy 
Phippen. 1987. 45 mins., b&w and col., 
sd. PERF 

Cherryfield, 1938, a terrific home movie 
about rural spring. 6 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Dead River Rough Cut, lives and philoso- 
phies of two woodsmen-trappers by 
Richard Searls and Stuart Silverstein. 
1976. 55 mins., col., sd. 

Down East Dairyman, produced by the 
Maine Dept. of Agriculture. 1972. 14 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Giant Horses, draft horses and their 
drivers. 28 mins., col., sd. 

Ice Harvesting Sampler, five short films 
showing a near-forgotten New England 
industry. Narration by Philip C. Whitney 
explains process and tools. 26 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 

Maine Summer Festival, role of agricul- 
tural products in summer fairs. 1970. 12 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Movie Queen, Lubec, pretend movie 
queen visits her hometown in Downcast 
Maine. 1936. 28 mins., b&w, si. 

Nature's Blueberryland, Maine's wild 
blueberries. 13 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Paris, 1929 and other views, home movies 
of the Wright family in Paris, Maine, 
haying, mowing, picnics. 80 mins., b&w, 
si. PERF 



Part-Time Farmer, promotes agriculture 
as an after-hours pursuit, ca. 1975. 17 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Sins of our Mothers, girl who went to the 
Massachusetts textile mills from Fayette, 
Maine. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Early Film 

All But Forgotten, documentary on the 
Holman Day film company (1920-1921) 
in Maine. 1978. 30 mins., col. and b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Cupid, Registered Guide, a two-reel North 
Woods comedy by Maine writer Holman 
Day. 1921. 20 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Earliest Maine Films, lobstering, trout 
fishing, logging, canoeing on Moosehead 
Lake and potato growing, from 1901 to 
1920. 44 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Just Maine Folks, a bawdy hayseed one- 
reeler. Poor image quality. 1913. 8 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

The Knight of the Pines, another North 
Woods adventure by Maine writer 
Holman Day. 1920. 20 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 

The Simp and the Sophomores, Oliver 
Hardy plays Prof. Arm-Strong. 1915. 14 
mins., b&w, si. 

Ecology & Energy 

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, her 1 963 
book about pesticides helped raise 
ecological consciousness. 1993. 60 mins., 
col., sd. 

Passamaquoddy Tidal Power Project, 
construction of worker housing at 
Quoddy Hill, dam building (with rail) at 
Pleasant Point and Treat Island, ca. 1 936. 
30 mins., b&w., si. PERF 

Voices from Maine, discussions of devel- 
opment versus quality of life. Scratched. 
1970. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Feature Films 

Evangeline, the Acadian experience inter- 
preted by Longfellow and Hollywood, 
starring Dolores Del Rio. Start is silent, 
the rest has music from original discs 
preserved by UCLA. 1929. approx. 90 
mins., b&w, si. and sd. 

The Silent Enemy, a drama shot on loca- 
tion in winter starring Penobscot Indian 
Molly Spotted Elk. 1930. 121 mins., 
b&w, silent with music. 

Where the Rivers Flow North, shot on 
location in Vermont and New Hampshire. 
Woodsman (Rip Torn) and his American 
Indian companion (Tantoo Cardinal) in 
a story about timberland and water 
power. 1994. Ill mins., col. sd. 



Fisheries 

Basic Net Mending, how to repair fish 
nets. 1951. 16 mins., col., sd. PERF 

It's the Maine Sardine, catching, packing 
and eating Eastport fish. 1949. 16 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, fisheries 
including shrimp, cod and lobster. 1968. 
28 mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Maine Lobster, lobster fisheries and 
consumption with unusual footage 
including the assembly of lobster TV 
dinners, ca. 1955. 30 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Tuna Fishing off Portland Harbor, Maine, 
ofF-shore fishing with a Maine sea and 
shore warden, ca. 1930. 10 mins., b&w, 
si. with intertitles. PERF 

Turn of the Tide, drama about formation 
of a lobster cooperative; from the 
Vinalhaven Historical Society. 1943. 48 
mins., col., sd. 

Franco-American Life 

Reflets et Lumiere 

Series on Franco-American culture 
produced by Maine Public Broadcasting 
Network (MPBN). The programs aired 
from 1979 to 1981. Sound and image 
quality varies. PERF. 

The Catholic Church, Amedee Proulx, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Portland, Maine, and 
Raymond LaGasse, a married priest from 
Concord, NH. An interview about 
Holyoke, Mass. 1979. 28 mins. 

Acadian Villages, Acadian history- 
interview with Guy Dubay of 
Madawaska, Maine. Visits to the Acadian 
Village near Van Buren, Maine, and le 
Village Acadien in Carquet, New 
Brunswick, 1979. 27 mins. 

Organizers, Franco-American organizers 
and their success at motivating people to 
action. "Assimilo," a spoof exploring 
Franco-American stereotypes. 1 979. 
27 mins. 

Lowell Mills, Irene Simoneau, Franco- 
American historian on the role of women 
in the mills. Roger Paradis of Fort Kent, 
Maine, about Franco-American folklore 
and music. 1979. 29 mins. 
Many more... write for the complete list. 

Geography 

Assignment in Aroostook, Loring Air Force 
Base in northern Maine closed in 1994. 
Its heyday: Mom at home, the sergeant at 
work, the family at play. 1956. 27 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

History is Always Being Made at 
Bucksport, history of Champion 



International paper mill and the town. 
1995. 23 mins., col., sd. 
Mount Washington Among the Clouds, a 
history of the hotels, newspaper and cog 
railway, 1852-1908. 30 mins., col., sd. 

New Hampshire Remembered I, Pine 
Island Park's roller coaster, a movie at the 
State Theatre, and Benson's Wild Animal 
Farm. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF (no 
admission charge permitted) 
New Hampshire Remembered II, trolleys, 
ski-jumping, and the Mount Washington 
Hotel. 1995. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF 
(no admission charge permitted) 
Norumbega: Maine in the Age of 
Exploration and Settlement, early Maine 
history, based on maps. 1989. 16 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Road to the Sky, The Mt. Washington 
Auto Road. 1991. 25 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. 

This Land: The Story of a Community 
Land Trust and a Co-Op Called H.O.M.E., 
Karen Saum's documentary on Orland, 
Maine, organization. 1983. 26 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Vermont Memories I, includes 1930s 
promotional film Seeing Vermont with 
Dot and Glen. 1994. 57 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. 

Vermont Memories II, post World War II. 
Television comes to Vermont and other 
things. 1995. 57 mins., col. and b&w, sd. 

Going to the Movies Talks 

Glenn Andres, Middlebury College, 
places for community entertainment in 
Vermont. 33 mins. 

Dona Brown, University of Vermont, vaca- 
tioning at the turn of the century. 35 mins. 
Martha Day, University of Vermont, 
Vermont documentary films. 29 mins. 
Kathryn Fuller, Virginia Commonwealth 
University, rural moviegoers and Uncle 
Josh. 24 mins. 

Kathryn Fuller, Virginia Commonwealth 
University, dish nights and other promo- 
tional gimmicks. 39 mins. 

Leger Grindon, Middlebury College, 
boxing films. 34 mins. 

Henry Jenkins, MIT, Star Wars & fan 
culture. 33 mins. 

Garth Jowett, University of Houston, 
movie audiences in the 1950s. 44 mins. 

Garth Jowett, University of Houston, the 
moviegoing experience. 24 mins. 

Susan Kennedy-Kalafatis, University of 
Vermont, who we are mapping ances- 
tries in northern New England. 18 mins. 



Chester H. Liebs, drive-ins. 18 mins. 

Andre Senecal, University of Vermont, 
Franco- Americans and the movies. 17 
mins. 

Tom Streeter, University of Vermont, new 
technologies over the years. 40 mins. 

Denise Youngblood, University of Vermont, 
movie theaters before 1918. 44 mins. 

Humanities Council 

Modern Times in Maine and America, 
1890-1930, interviews, stills and moving 
images; introduction to Council project. 
1995. 30 mins., col. & b&w, sd. PERF 

Morrison, Jane Collection 

Los Dos Mundos de Angelita/The Two 
Worlds ofAngelita, a Puerto Rican family's 
move to the Lower East Side of New 
York. 1982. 73 mins., col., sd. 

Master Smart Woman, Maine novelist 
Sarah Ornejewett( 1850- 1909). 1984. 
28 mins., col., sd. 

The White Heron, a young girl's choice 
between friendship and a creature she 
loves. Story by Sarah Orne Jewett. 1989. 
26 mins., col., sd. 

For more titles in this collection, please call 
or visit website www. acadia.net/oldfilm/ 

Oral History 

Hap Collins of South Blue Hill, JeffTiton's 
oral history interview with field footage 
of a lobsterman, painter and poet. 1989. 
56 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Maine Survivors Remember the Holocaust, 
eight Maine survivors talk about World 
War II. 1994. 43 mins., col., sd. 
An Oral Historians Work with Dr. Edward 
Ives, "how to" illustrating an oral history 
project by the founder of the Maine Folk- 
life Center. 1987. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Political Discourse 

Jerry Brown Speaks in New Hampshire, 
from the 1 992 presidential campaign. 28 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

John F. Kennedy Speech, anniversary of the 
Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1963 at 
the Univ. of Maine homecoming. 30 
mins., b&w, sd. PERF Sent with full 
transcript of speech. 

Ella Knowles: A Dangerous Woman, video 
on a suffragist & Bates alumna by Robert 
Branham & students. 1991. 25 mins., 
col., sd. 

Muskie vs. Monks: The Final Round, the 
third debate between Senator Muskie 
and Bob Monks on accountability. 1976. 
58 mins., col., sd. 



Margaret Chase Smith Speech, declaration 
of intention to run for President, includes 
Q&A. 1964. 17 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Sports 

Legends of American Skiing, footage of 
early skiing, including Dartmouth 
Outing Club, Tuckerman's Ravine, Toni 
Matt. 1982. 80 mins., col. and b&w., sd. 
Winter Sports in the White Mountain 
National Forest, skiing, sledding and 
snowshoeing in New Hampshire. 1934. 
28 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Student Work 

The Batteau Machias, student project on 
construction of a traditional riverdriving 
boat. 1990. 22 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Best of Fifteen Years: The Maine Student 
Film and Video Festival, compilation 
directed by video educator Huey. 1993. 
58 mins., col., sd. 

Mysteries of the Unknown: A Documentary 
about our Community, an outstanding 
student video about Bucksport, Maine, 
with original music. 1990. 30 mins., 
col., sd. 

Places of Interest in the Bucksport Area, a 
student project. 1989. 60 mins., col., sd. 
Carlton Willey, baseball pitcher, 1 958 
rookie of the year, interviewed in a high 
school project. 1990. 39 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Television 

The Cold War I Transportation I TV Com- 
mercials, three compilation tapes from 
the Bangor Historical Society/WABI 
collection. 40 to 50 mins. each; b&w, si. 
and sd. PERF 

Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1 950s and 
early 60s in news, sports and local com- 
mercials. 1989. 34 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Transportation 

Moving History: Two-foot Rail Returns to 
Maine, antique trucks haul the Edaville 
Railroad trains to Portland. 1 993. 48 
mins., col., sd. 

Northern Railroads, steam era footage, 
stories by railroaders and historians. 
1995. 60 mins., col. and b&w. sd. 
Ride the Sandy River Railroad, one of the 
country's best rwo-foot-gauge railroads. 
1930. 30 min., b&w, si. with intertitles. 

Woods 

Cut and Run, health and safety in the 
woods in the era of mechanization. 
A film by Richard Searls. 1980. 40 mins , 
col.,sd. PERF 



Reference by Mail 

In the Public Interest: The Civilian 
Conservation Corps in Maine, the federal 
work program from Acadia National 
Park to Cape Elizabeth. 1987. 58 mins., 
sd., col. and b&w. 

From Stump to Ship, complete look at the 
long-log industry From forest to ship- 
board. 1930. 28 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

King Spruce, harvesting pulpwood, 
includes horses and mechanical log 
haulers ca. 1940. 23 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Last Log Drive Down the Kennebec, 
documentary about Scott Paper's last log 
drive. 1976. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Little Log Cabin in the Northern Woods, 
amateur film of a young woman's 
hunting trip near Brownville, Maine, ca. 
1930. 13 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

The Maple Sugaring Story, children's 
video widi teacher workbook. 1 989. 28 
mins., col. sd. PERF 

Our White Pine Heritage, how the trees 
are harvested for use in construction, 
papermaking, etc. 1948. 16 mins., b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Pilgrim Forests, about Civilian Conser- 
vation Corps work in New England- 




So You Want to be a 
Woodsman? Photo: 
Brown Company 
Collection, Institute for 
New Hampshire Studies, 
Plymouth State College 



Acadia National Park and White 
Mountain National Forest, ca. 1933. 
10 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

So You Want to be a Woodsman? compila- 
tion of 1940s training films including 
Use and Care of a Bucksaw and Twitching. 
58 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Then it Happened, 1 947 forest fires that 
devastated Maine. Focuses on aftermath 
in southern Maine. 1947. 20 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Timber is a Crop, pulpwood harvesting in 
the 1940s- 1950s, from the Brown 



Company Collection, Berlin, NH. 66 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Woodsmen and River Drivers, "Another 
day, another era", unforgettable individu- 
als who worked for the Machias Lumber 
Company. 1989. 30 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. PERF 

Women's Issues 

Working Women ofWaldo County: Our 
Heritage, documentary basketmaking, 
farming and other work. 1979. 26 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Also in this series, Today and Her Story. H 



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Reuse: Broadcast and History 
William S. Cohen 



William Cohen in Washington in 1974. 
Photo: Bangor Daily News. 




s writer-producer of the television 
news special Bill Cohen: Voice of 
on, Pat Callaghan of WCSH- 
TV, Portland, Maine, relied largely on 
NHF's collections of newsfilm footage to 
complete his assignment. 

A three-term Republican senator, 
Cohen had surprised everyone in January 
1 996 with his announcement that he 
would not seek re-election. 

Compounding the sense of anticipa- 
tion was President Bill Clinton's 
December 5 nomination of the Senate 
Armed Services Commitee veteran as 
Secretary of Defense, only days before 
Callaghan s show was set to air. 

Having researched a similar project 
on former senator George Mitchell two 
years ago, Callaghan knew just where to 
go to find stock footage. He knew NHF 
was the most extensive repository of 
1950s, 1960s and 1970s Maine TV 
newsfilm in the state, holding vast 
collections from both his own station, 
and from WABI-TV in Bangor. 

"The only other place we had as a 
significant source was Cohens office 
itself," he says. 

In need of footage from virtually 
every phase of Cohen's career, the 
producer actually found more material at 
die archives than he could use. 

NHF executive director David Weiss 
says the archives' collections of the two 
stations' TV newsfilm, as well as several 
hundred political commercials broadcast 
in Maine, are a valuable resource for 
students of the political process. 

"The way people get elected these days, 
is in large part, through TV," says Weiss. 
"NHF's collections provide the ability to 
go back and examine most of the 
commercials that were broadcast in this 
region." 

Callaghan's search process started with 
a phone call to NHF, where a staff 
member described the scope of material 
available. On-site researcher Heather 
White reviewed the archives' computer 
catalog records of Cohen footage, as well 
as pointing Callaghan to written docu- 
mentation accompanying the collections. 

Finally, the producer spent most of a 
day at the archives, screening the film 
himself. 



The resulting 30-minute 
production chronicles 
Cohen's career from its local 
beginnings in the late 1 960s, 
to his recent nomination as 
defense scretary. Along the 
way, the viewer sees Cohen 
not only in his familiar role 
as statesman, but also as a 
young husband and father, 
relaxing at home with his 
family. 

For starters, there's Cohen's 
election to Bangor's city 
council and school board 
circa 1970. It isn't long 
before the son of a Bangor 
baker hits the campaign trail 
again this time, in jeans 
and shirtsleeves as he walks 
650 miles from one end of 
the state to the other. 

Having won his 1972 bid 
to represent Maine's Second 
District in Congress, Cohen 
next is captured in a lighter 
moment, recalling the 
grueling aspects of that first 
campaign. 

In footage shot just a few 
months later, the subdued- 
looking congressman 
describes the Watergate 
scandal as casting a dark 
shadow on the administra- 
tion of Richard M. Nixon, 
whom he once supported. A 
clip from an interview by TV 
journalist Sam Donaldson is 
followed by Cohen speaking 
from the floor of Congress, 
wondering aloud at the 
leader's fall from grace. 

In all, Cohen was to serve three terms 
each in the U.S. House and Senate 
before his recent retirement. 

Having followed Cohen's career for 
many years, Callaghan says that while no 
startling revelations awaited him in the 
archival footage, there was one striking 
realization. 

Whereas virtually all of the footage 
presents the even-tempered Cohen as 
remarkably poised through the years, the 
visible exception was during his service 




on the House Judiciary Committee 
investigating Watergate. "You watch his 
body language, and you see it was 
stressful for him," says the producer. 

Callaghan says Cohen's anxiety was 
understandable, since his casting of one 
of the first GOP votes to impeach the 
Republican president could have 
destroyed his own career. Instead, says 
the producer, Watergate made Cohen a 
"political star," one that continues to rise 
in the firmament. W 



11 



New Titles for Sale 

Videos of life in New England 



Amber is a Crop 

Pulpwood harvesting in the 1940s and 1950s 



Sweatshirt 

Super heavyweight cotton 
sweatshirt with unique 
five-color embroidered 
"King Spruce" design 
Peavey and caulk boot. 
Forest Green, Heather 
Gray, and Garment-dyed 
Coral. Sizes L, XL, 2X. 
$35. 



This tape contains three informational films describing the 
pulp and paper industry of 50 years ago. 

Pulpwood for Today and Tomorrow explores the history of 
timber harvesting and how we can ensure its future. 

Timber is a Crop offers a detailed account of the pulpwood 
process from seed to inside the pulp mill. 

The Forest and the Woodsman discusses the impact of new 
tools and equipment on the cutting and transportation of logs 
in the Northeast. 

66 min., color and b&w, sound. $16.95 

So You Want To Be a Woodsman? 

A collection of pulpwood industry training films of the mid-1 940s 

( Her an hour of helpful hints and practical suggestions for 
the aspiring woodsman in five short films: It Pays to be Trained, 
Helpful Hints in Preparing Pulpwood, Use and Care of a 
Bucksaw, I witching, and Your Cord of Wood. How to use 
hand tools and horses and other lost arts. 
58 min., color and b&w, sound. $16.95 





Reference by Mail 

The Most Popular 
Videos of 1996 

From Stump to Ship 

Ice Harvesting Sampler 

Wabanaki: A New Dawn 

Woodsmen and River Drivers 

Earliest Maine Films 

Dead River Rough Cut 

Around Cape Horn 

Giant Horses 

Joshua Chamberlain 

Mount Washington Among the Clouds 

Where the Rivers Flow North 



The Reference by Mail videotape library 
travelled to the Common Ground Fair 
in September 1996. The audience, 
interested in recycling, liked the idea of 
borrowing tapes instead of buying them. 



George Rolleston 

NHF bookkeeper George Rolleston 
remembers his early years in 
Paterson, New Jersey, when people 
would drop everything to watch silent 
movies projected on a bedsheet hung 
from the side of a building. In his multi- 
ethnic neighborhood, "everyone" would 
come out to watch a movie, which made 
it a lot of fun, he recalls. 

That's the kind of long view the 64- 
year-old Rolleston brings to his job at 
NHF. And its only one of the reasons the 
staff will miss him when he retires in 
February after more than seven years with 
the archives. He will miss them, too. 

According to Rolleston, the best part 
of working at NHF has been the people. 
He also takes pride in the archives' 
mission of preserving regional film. "I 
just need to slow down a little," says the 
bookkeeper, whose schedule includes a 
dizzying array of community activities. 
In part, it's that involvement that's made 
him such an asset from the time when 
NHF was still headquartered in the 
Henhouse in Blue Hill Falls. 

A Blue Hill resident for more than 20 
years, Rolleston serves as president of 
Central Hall, a historic meeting place 
near his home. Run by the Ladies Public 
Improvement Society, the recently 
renovated hall, built in 1901, has hosted 
potluck suppers, craft fairs, yard sales, 
and film screenings by NHF. 

Rolleston also serves on die board 
of die Blue Hill Fair, one of the oldest and 
most popular agricultural fairs in Maine. 
When die fair's former horse racing 
director was forced to retire following an 
accident, Rolleston took over, despite a 
lack of hands-on knowledge of horses. As 
such, he tries to stick to die administrative 
aspects of the event, he says. 

In his "spare time," Rolleston volun- 
teers for the Blue Hill Fire Department, 
where he helps with the books. He also is 
treasurer of the First Congregational 
Church in Ellsworth, which he and his 
wife joined shortly after moving to 
Maine from Michigan. 

With retirement only weeks away, 
Rolleston insists he will not disappear 
from the archives completely. He says he 
will continue to be a member, may 
volunteer from time to time, and intends 
to stay up on NHF goings-on. I 



Connecting to the Water Main 



The Alamo Theatres sprinkler system calls i< h pipe 

from Bucksport's water main into the building. 

Di. iss Main Streci I with the 

labor required to breach the 80-year-old buildii ---like 

foundation. A team worked almost two days using the hi 
dmv drill bits to net throuiih the 32-inch subterranean wall. 




Film Premiere, Symposium & Exhibit 



A Midwife's Tale: The Discovery of 
Martha Ballard, produced by 
Laurie Kahn-Leavitt, will premiere at the 
Civic Center in Augusta, Maine, on 
Friday, March 7. Keynote speaker is 
historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, author 
of A Midwifes Tale, based on a diary 
written by Martha Ballard in Hallowell, 
Maine, from 1785 to 1812. 

Ballard's story is compared with 
Ul rich's, leading viewers to understand 
how the historian's skills were able to 
transmit the immediacy of Ballard's 
diary. 

On March 8, a symposium, "Health 



and Community in a Time of Transition: 
Maine Two Hundred Years Ago and 
Today," will be held at the Augusta Civic 
Center, with a screening of A Midwife's 
Tale. 

An exhibit, including midwife Martha 
Ballard's original diary, will be in the 
Atrium at the Maine State Museum. 
Participants in the events are Augusta 
200, Friends of the Maine State 
Museum, Fort Western, the Maine State 
Library, and Hubbard Free Library. For 
more information and to register, contact 
the Maine Humanities Council in 
Portland at 207 773-505 1 . 



13 



New Members and Members Renewed at a Higher Level 



Friends 

Caroline Crooker 
Richard Prelinger 
Clare H. Sheldon 

Associates 

James & Esther Austin 

David G. Mathiasen 

Dorothy Schwartz 

Corporate Members 

Archive Films 

Bucksport True Value Hardware 

Bucksport Veterinary Hospital 

Champion International Corp. 

The Colorado College 

Fellows, Kee & Tymoczko 

J. Gordon Architect 

MacLeod s Restaurant 

Maine State Archives 

Margaret Chase Smith Library Center 

Ramsdell Auto Supply 

Shop 'n Save 

Households (Contributors) 

Henry Becton, Jr. 

Esther Bissell & Roy V. Heisler 

Laura L. Bittinger & Edward L. Ritchey 

Dr. Constance H. Carlson 

Joseph F. Condon 

Miriam Hansen & Michael Geyer 

Judith Hole & Samuel T. Suratt 

Richard A. Kimball, Jr. 

Judith F. McGeorge 

George Neal 

Spiros Polemis 

Mrs. John F. Porter 

Betty Schloss 

Charles S. Thompson & Catherine Gross 

Joel & Allene White 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Blue Hill Consolidated School 

Blue Hill Public Library 

Bridgton Historical Society 

Camden Public Library 

Cape Elizabeth Historical Preservation 

Society 

Kingdom County Productions 
Portland Water District 
Individuals (Regular Members) 
Paul D. Allan 
William H. Allen, III 
Orland & Donna Bean 
Chris Blanchard 
Joan H. Bromage 
Gregory N. Brown 
Robert E. Burgess 



New Categories in 1997 




Individuals, $25/year; Households, $50/year; Patrons, $l,000/year. 
Use your Visa or MasterCard, call 800 639-1636. 



A membership in Northeast Historic Film is a wonderful gift! 



7 C 



Donna Cassidy 

Maureen Cheney 

Mr. & Mrs. Reginald R. Clark 

Ray Cooley 

Judy Davis 

Leon J. Doucette 

Rev. Douglas W. Drown 

Richard L. Duval 

Samuel Fuller 

Lindy Gifford 

Thomas R. Girard 

Dayton Grandmaison 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Grant 

Gus P. Gregory 

W.A. Haviland 

Dr. Bill Hersey 

Rev. David Hersey 

John Hoffman 

Deborah Howard 

Tom Hulce 

James Hunnewell 

Ron Huston 

Barry J.Kelley 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert O. Kellogg 

George E. Kent 

Frances V. Knox 

Hannah Leader 

Robert Legg 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Mason 

Gertrude L. McCue 

Robert W. Merritt 

David Mishkin 

Barbara & Darrold Mitchell 

Sumner E. Moulton 

Margaret W. Myers 

L.P. Ohman 

Robin Parmelee 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert H. Pawle 

Paula Petrik 

Geoff Phillips 

Mr. & Mrs. Wesley Pipher 

Alice W. Price 

Alan Rhoades 

Jaylene B. Roths 

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Rundlett 



Red Sarna 

Connie Jan Sears 

Harry Tyler 

Lucie Tyler 

Jean Ulman 

Phil A. Whitney 

Jane Whitten 

Deborah Williams 

Richard Willing 

Marguerite Y. Zientara 

Educator/Student Members 

Timothy Barton 

Marisa Bebris 

Eric Benke & Frances Merritt Thompson 

Frank Bisher 

Chris D. Burns 

Richard Crampton 

Mr & Mrs Phillip G. Dow, Sr. 

Beth Dunning 

Melinda A. Duval 

Linda Dygert 

Nancy Fenney 

Ed Friedman 

Ann Gallagher 

Suzanne Goulet 

Richard D. Jenkins 

Paula Johnson 

Donald McDougal 

Betty A. Morris 

Dhyan Nirmegh 

Carol M. Petillo 

Dave A. Pride 

David Raymond 

ArrJiur Stolpestad 

Adelia Thurston 

Thomas Walker 

Dan Weaver 

Phyllis Wheaton 



14 



Northeast Historic Film Staff 

David S. Weiss 
utive director 

Robert Atwood 
custodian 

Samantha Boyce 

member services & office assistant 

Patricia Burdick 

stall archivist 

Jane Berry Donnell 

distribution coordinator 

Karan Sheldon 

marketing & board liaison 

Heather White 

research & stock footage 

Phil Yates 

technical services 



Alan McClfUand, NHF board member and co-chair of the Long Range 
Planning Committee, enjoys moving images in the Mutoscope. Loan from Q. 
David Bowers, part of the Going to the Movies exhibition. 



Questions? Comments? 

Give us a call 207469-0924 OLDFILM@acadia.net 




NHF Membership 

As an independent nonprofit organization. NHF 
depends on its members. All members get 1 5% off 



at 



Please join and renew! 
Call 800 639- 1636. 

Internet access? 
http://www.acadia. net/oldfil m/ 

i membership signup torm. 

Individual Member, $25 per year. 
All members receive many benefits 

including: 

Review 

Advance notice of events. 
I )iscounts on Videos of Life in New 

Fngland. 
Discounts on events at the Alamo Theatre. 

I Nl 11 ; postcards. 
l ; iee loan of videotapes through Reference 

by Mail. 

Educator/Student Member, SI 5 per vc.u. 
All individual membership benefits for 
teachers and students at am level. 

Nonprofit Org.mi/aiion, s i-> per ye.u. 
All individual membership benefits plus: 
Reduced rates for technical sauces and 

presentations. 

Additional copies i Im.igt- R, 

on request. 





Household Members, $50 per year. 
All listed benefits for the members of a 

household, plus: 
Discounts for the entire household 

Alamo Theatre events, 
two Nl IT lapel pins. 

Associate, Si 00 per year. All listed 
benefits plus: 
Three free shipments (up to nine tapes) 
of Rcfcrenic by Mail videos. 
I, in. 

Corporate Member, SI 00 per year. 
All benefits ol Associate Membership. 

Friend, $2 M) per year. 

All listed benefits of membership plus: 

liipments (up to 1 5 up. 
Refciciuc by Mail vid, 
MIT up. 

Patron, SI, 000 per year. 

All listed benefits of membership plus: 

Unlimited Refereiue by Mail vid 

1 'mn Restaiirai 



Can You See Into the Future? 

Join or renew with a multi-year 
membership. Your two- or three- 
year dues check or credit card charge 
will save NHF real money in staff time, 
materials, and postage. Skip a few 
annual reminders: sign up now at the 
highest level you can afford, for as many 
years as you can. 

After all, NHF is an archives we've 
made a long-term commitment, and 
you can too! Your generosity makes a 
huge difference. 

Membership at any level is an opportu- 
nity to become involved with the 
preservation and enjoyment of our 
moving image heritage. Your dues are 
tax deductible to the extent allowed 
by law. 



15 



HIM & H1SIOEY 




The Flaherty: 



l-cnir IK, J.lcs 



Further Reading 



Film and History, Volume XXI, 
May/September 1991; papers pre- 
sented at a Conference of the Media 
Studies Project, Woodrow Wilson 

<T, focusing on Barnouw's contri- 
butions to the field and subsequent 
scholarship. Selected bibliography and 
filmography. New Jersey Institute of 
(Technology, Newark. 



The Flaherty, Four Decades in the C.aine 
of Independent Cinema, ed. Erik 
Barnouw and Patricia Zimmermann, 

Wide Angle, I 995. 

Media Marathon: A Twentieth Century 

'ioir, Erik Barnouw, Duke 
University Press, 1996. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 

P.O. Box 900 
Bucksport, ME 04416 




Address Correction Requested 



.& V 




Erik Barnouw 

Vermont's Media Master 






Marathon: A Twentieth 
Century Memoir is a remarkable 
chronicle of one person's encounters with 
virtually all the century's communication 
forms magazines, commercial radio, 
documentary film, international cinema, 
and TV broadcasting. 

Erik Barnouw, now a resident of Fair 
Haven, Vermont, was born in 1908 in 
the Netherlands. Perhaps best known as 
the autJior of the three-volume work, A 
History of Broadcasting in America, he has 
been an inspiration to more than one 
generation of media historians. 

In 1937 while on vacation in Marana- 
cook, Maine, he was contacted by Colum- 
bia University with an offer to teach 
radio production; he is presently Colum- 
bia Professor Emeritus of Dramatic Arts. 

He has long been involved with the 
Flaherty Film Seminars, a fertile ground 
for filmmakers and scholars. The Flaherty, 
Four Decades in the Cause of Independent 
Cinema, edited by Barnouw and Patricia 
Zimmermann, contains articles, pho- 
tographs, and a filmography from 1955 
to 1994. 

He has been both spokesperson for 
archivists, and ardent researcher in 
archives. In 1978 he was appointed the 
first chief of the Motion Picture, 
Broadcasting and Recorded Sound 
Division at the Library of Congress. His 
many books would not be possible 
without archivists' efforts from Library 
of Congress staff who assisted with The 
Magician and the Cinema ( 1 98 1 ), to the 
many people in India who assisted with 
Indian Film (1%3). 

Reading Media Marathon one is struck 
by Barnouw's openness to so many ideas 
and experiences. The book is a challenge: 
what are the commitments, accomplish- 
ments, and adventures possible in our 
own lives? H 



Northeast Historic Film 



MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 

^^^^^H 



Dedicated to the Preservation 
of Northern New England 
Motion Pictures 



Summer 1997 




New Advisory Board 
Political Commercials 
Using the Archives 
Calendar of Events 
Reference by Mail Update 


2 
5 
7 
12 
14 


Moving Image Review is a semiannual 



publication of Northeast 1 listorii Film, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. 
David S. Weiss, executive director 
Stephany Boyd, writer and editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769. 



i Mail OLDFILM@acadia.net 
Veb http://www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ 




Expanding Views 

The last issue of Moving Image Review 
featured Northeast Historic Film in 
its community-centered role as employer, 
educational resource, and gathering 
place. 

This issue shifts focus, showing NHF s 
expanding reach. The emphasis is on 
moving images' growing significance as 
a cultural resource. 

Our cover story on summer camp 
footage highlights an experience essential 
to many peoples perception of northern 
New England. For Americans of all 
stripes, summer camp claims as tenacious 
a hold on the psyche as does first love. 

We profile a northern California 
mail-order entrepreneur whose fascina- 
tion with forests and the people who 
work in them has forged a connection 
with NHF, helping our videotapes be 
seen worldwide. 

We talk to a Canadian TV news 
producer who used NHF footage td 
illustrate an ongoing dispute between her 
home nation and the U.S., each of whom 
lays claim to treeless Machias Seal Island. 

We showcase NHF s flourishing 
relationship with other moving-image 
professionals by profiling our new 
Advisors group. 

We hear from acclaimed filmmaker 
Alan Berliner, who will travel from New 
York to NHF in August for a screening 
and discussion. His films have been 
lauded for their depiction of family life, 
described by one critic as "heartbreak- 
ingly universal." 

It's all about NHF and our growing con- 
stituencies. Please let us hear from you. H 



Summer Camp Time 



Each year, boys and girls reenact a 
time-honored warm weather 
tradition descending on summer 
camps in droves. 

For decades, camps dotting the lakes 
and mountains of western Maine have 
drawn thousands of children each 
summer, as have their counterparts along 
the coast. 

The summer camp phenomenon goes 
back a long way, as camp veteran David 
Sanderson of West Newbury, Mass., can 
attest. He recently donated 40 reels of 
newly discovered footage to NHF, 
chronicling nearly half a century of 
summers at Birch Rock Camp in 
Waterford, Maine. 
The footage starts shortly after the 

Naturalist George Howe engages campers at Birch 
Rock Camp. Photo courtesy David Sanderson. 



camp's founding in 1925, and continues 
through the 1960s. According to 
Sanderson, a member of Birch Rock's 
governing board, the films transferred to 
videotape at NHF were a big hit at the 
camp's recent 70th anniversary celebra- 
tion. 

"There were folks there from all eras of 
the camp, and it was wonderful to see 
them enjoying their memories through 
those images," says Sanderson, whose 
grandfather in 1 925 sold the plot of 
family land on which Chief and Onie 
Brewster founded Birch Rock shortly 
thereafter. 

Aside from his personal connections to 
the camp affectionately known as "The 
Rock," Sanderson believes the films serve 
a larger purpose in documenting a Maine 



tradition. 



continued on page 6 




Executive 
Director's Report 

The Jackhammers of Summer 

At the Alamo Theatre we seem to 
welcome warm weather with the sound 
of Jackhammers. This tradition, presag- 
ing new openings and structural 
improvements, has its drawbacks but I 
prefer it to the silence of no progress. 
We'll continue to feel lucky to hear the 
Jackhammers of spring for another 
couple of years. 

Please Patronize Us 

We are pleased to announce Northeast 
Historic Films new membership level 
Patron and even prouder to announce 
we already have several generous mem- 
bers in the new category. A membership 
level that requires a $ 1 ,000 per year 
donation is not for everyone, but it does 
broaden the range of annual giving 
options. 

Our membership is growing both in 
numbers and in importance to the 
organization. This year for the first time 
the dues received will exceed $20,000. 
These funds directly support our mis- 
sion, helping purchase preservation 
supplies and fund our talented and 
committed staff. 

Sincere thanks (and a free dinner for 
four at MacLeods Restaurant) to all who 
have stepped up to that level: 

Helen & Sidney Epstein 

Rita & James Phillips 

Kimberlee & Richard Rosen 

Del Keppelman & Skip Sheldon 

Co-founder's New Role 

As NHF grows its sphere of responsibili- 
ties as an independent nonprofit organi- 
zation changes, and so too do our 
individual roles. 

Co-founder Karan Sheldon decided 
that NHF will be best served by her 
focus on the board of directors and 
planning. She has resigned from the staff 
to put more time into work with board 
members and supporters. Her pan in 
developing and implementing our Long 
Range Plan will ensure that her vision 
for NHF's future continues to guide us. 



Answering the Call 

The Archives' New Advisory Board 




/ 



u^&^& 



Call diem the Dear Abbys of die 
archives. The Advisors of 
Northeast Historic Film are 
individuals widi an interest in 
the work of die archives as an organiza- 
tion with a vision for film, video, and 
digital preservation and a commitment 
to broad public access. 

The establishment of the Advisors 
group is based on NHF's need to move 
into new territory for archival storage 
and public programs. 

Advisors' leadership will assist the staff 
and board in making decisions and 
connections toward achieving these goals. 
The Advisors, many of whom have a 
longstanding relationship with NHF, 
make a commitment to share their 
expertise with the organization, so as to 
ensure success within the archives and 
to help build a model for other archives 
and cultural organizations. 

One of the Advisors is Samuel Suratt, 
who in recent years has unofficially 
advised the archives on matters such as 
planning construction of a three-story 
vault for film and videotape storage. 

Formerly an archivist for CBS News, 
from which he retired after 25 years, the 
New York-based Suratt now consults for 
media-related companies and organiza- 
tions. He formerly was an archivist of the 
Smithsonian Institution, and taught 
history at the university level. He was a 
founding member of the International 
Federation of Television Archives, and 
remains an honorary member. 

With that breadth of experience, Suratt 
says he can offer assistance in many areas, 
such as formulating policy on television 
collections, and updating NHF on 
developments in foreign TV archives. 

Suratt applauds NHF's decision to seek 
a variety of advisors in differing special- 
ties. "When two people say the same 
thing there must be something to it. 
That's the nature of good advice," he 
says. 

Beyond his offering of guidance, Suratt 
lightheartedly lists heavy lifting among 
his qualifications, having helped schlep 
film containers from one vault to another 
on one of his more memorable visits to 
the archives. 



The first Advisory Board members 
include Samuel Suratt, and 

Gillian Anderson, musicologist, conduc- 
tor, and author of Music for Silent Films 
1894-1929, A Guide. Washington, D.C. 

Q. David Bowers, Author of Nickelodeon 
Theaters and Their Music, a history of the 
Thanhouser Company, and many other 
books. Wolfeboro, N.H. 

Peter Davis, Author of If You Came This 
Way: A Journey Through the Lives of the 
Underclass, and director of the documen- 
tary feature Hearts and Minds. Castine, 
Me. 

Alan D. Kattelle, Author of a forthcom- 
ing history of amateur film, and cine- 
matographic researcher. Co-founder of 
The Movie Machine Society, member of 
SMPTE, and the Association of Moving 
Image Archivists. Hudson, Mass. 

Robert W. Wagner, Ph.D., Emeritus 
professor of history and audiovisual 
communication with an interest in 
amateur film, archiving, and nontheatri- 
cal film. Arlington, OH, and Readfield, 
Me. 



NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 
Activities include but are not limited 
to a survey of moving pictures of 
northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
climate-controlled storage; Creation 
of educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 
members of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production 
community, through providing a 
study center, technical services and 
facilities. 



Meet the Filmmaker: 

Alan Berliner Sunday, August 24 



For years, New York filmmaker Alan 
Berliner combed garage sales and 
flea markets, buying castoffhome 
movies. There he found footage for his 
first feature, The Family Album (1986). 
His two more recent films, Intimate 
Stranger ( 1 99 1 ) and Nobody's Business 

1 (1996), blend his own family movies 
with archival footage. 

As a trilogy, the films have been 
described as "wholly original" and 
"poignantly universal." Winner of 
prestigious awards, Nobody's Business 

> aired in June on the P.O.V. series of 
outstanding nonfiction independent 
films on PBS. It was funded in part by 
ITVS. 

That film's subject is Oscar 
Berliner, the filmmaker's irascible father, 
who insists throughout the hourlong 
production that his life is nothing special, 
and in any case, nobody's business. The 
dialogue between probing, prodding son 
and his feisty refusenik of a fadier is 
punctuated by stock footage from a 

i boxing match, a pungent metaphor for 
the pair's standoff. 

On August 24, at the archives' Alamo 
Theatre, Berliner will show and discuss 
the films he considers a labor of love. 

Common Poetry of the Human Family 

Berliner speaks with passion on the value 
of home movies, which he says "reflect 
the common poetry of the human family. 
They're windows and mirrors through 
which anyone implicated in family, 
which is everyone, can reflect on them- 
selves. Anyone can see a father and 
daughter sharing an intimate moment 
and empathize with that." 

Luckily, Berliner's forebears shot all 
sorts of family gatherings and holidays. 
Years later, Berliner uncovered additional 
footage of his grandfather, the subject of 
Intimate Stranger, through the patri- 
arch's many friends and colleagues in 
Japan. 

Woven together, each strand of family 
footage adds texture to the film's portrait 
of Joseph Cassuto, a Palestinian-born Jew 
who emigrated to Egypt to work with the 
Japanese textile firm that made his career. 
With the advent of World War II, 




Filmmaker Alan Berliner will show his work at The Alamo Theatre 
in Bucksport on August 24, 1997. Photo by Cori Wells Braun. 



Cassuto reluctantly left it all behind to 
make a new home with his family in 
Brooklyn. 

Unable to adjust to American culture 
or his lessened status, Cassuto ultimately 
moved without his family to Tokyo. Off 
camera, a relative recalls never having 
met a person who disliked Cassuto... out- 
side of his own family. 

The home movie sequences in 
Berliner's films transcend the genre's 
potential idealization of family experi- 
ence, especially when the films' multiple 
narrators contradict the images seen 



onscreen. 



Despite their tendency toward dogged 
optimism, home movies represent, as 
Berliner says, "history in the purest 
sense," recording daily activities and 
ritual events marking ordinary people's 
lives that otherwise would be ignored. 
If anything, home movies grow more 
valuable with time, he adds. 

"I designed The Family Album to be 
timeless, and I hope I succeeded. Time is 
only moving forward, and images, I'd 
like to think, get more and more 
poignant." 



Educating the Community 

But for archives trying to preserve such 
material, time moving forward is a 
challenge. 

"The motion picture is a very frail 
medium. Obviously there has to be money 
spent toward transferring fragile film to 
videotape so it can be studied, examined 
and used. That's a big project," he says. 

After years of researching in archives, 
the filmmaker says NHF, probably the 
largest repository of amateur film in 
North America, is unique. 

"I don't know too many places that do 
what they're doing, that take responsibil- 
ity for the history of a region. Part of 
what they're doing is educating the 
community, so that when people are 
ready to part with a document, they 
know there's a place with open arms ready 
to receive it. 

"It's hard to prioritize what's going to 
be saved and it's a never-ending job. But 
nothing should ever be thrown out. 
That's for sure." 

Berliner has generously provided video- 
tape copies of The Family Album for NHF's 
Reference by Mail free loan service. H 



Northeast Historic Film Members 

A Membership and Order Form is on page 1 5. Use your Visa or MasterCard, call 
/~\800 639-1636. A membership in Northeast Historic Film is a wonderful gift! 

Don't see your name here? Perhaps your renewal has not reached us yet. You can 
join or renew on the internet at our website, http://www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ 



Patrons 

Helen & Sidney Epstein 
Rita & James Phillips 
Kimberlee & Richard Rosen 
Skip Sheldon & Del Keppelman 
David Weiss & Karan Sheldon 

Friends 

Paul Cady & Christine Bowditch 

Caroline Crocker 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Gelardi 

Mr. & Mrs. Edgar B. Lupfer 

Alan & Eleanor J. McClelland 

Dorothy Morrison 

Ed Pert 

Richard Prelinger 

Clare H. Sheldon 

Champion International Corporation 

Nathaniel & Margaret Thompson 

Associates 

James & Esther Austin 

George V. Buehler 

David & Joyce Chaplin 

Thomas & Katherine Clements 

Carlos Cuellar 

Darwin & Jackie Davidson 

Michael Fiori 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Gross 

Dr. Parker F. Harris 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 

C.A. Porter Hopkins 

Edward & Barbara Ann Ives 

Robert L. Jordan 

Don Mac Williams 

Robert & Janet Marville 

David G. Mathiasen 

Henry H. Moulton 

Mr. & Mrs. Terry Rankine 

Charles R. Ryan 

Dorothy Schwartz 

Peter & Ann Sheldon 

Dr. David C. Smith 

Charles G. Tetro & Beverly Bibber 

Pamela Wmtle & Henry Griffin 

Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 

Corporate Members 

Archive Films 

Thomas Bakalars Architects 

Bucksport True Value Hardware 

Bucksport Veterinary Hospital 

The Colorado College 

Crosby's Drive In 

The Enterprise 

Fellows, Kee & Tymoczko 



Hammond Lumber Company 

J. Gordon Architect 

Bill Gross & Associates 

Lewis & Malm 

MacLeod's Restaurant 

Maine Crafts Association 

Maine State Archives 

Modular Media 

Owls Head Transportation Museum 

Ramsdell Auto Supply 

Shop 'n Save 

Margaret Chase Smith Library Center 

Sparkling Clean Cleaning Service 

Tyson & Partners, Inc. 

Vidipax 

VisNet East GTE 

Robert Wardwell & Sons 

Households 

Erik & Betty Barnouw 

Henry Becton, Jr. 

Laura L. Bittinger & Edward L. Ritchey 

Gregory Bottone 

Norman & Marcia Beal Brazer 

Dr. Constance H. Carlson 

Joseph F. Condon 

Dwight B. Demeritt, Jr. 

Peg & John Dice 

Miriam Hansen & Michael Geyer 

Roy V. Heisler & Esther Bissell 

Mark R. Henderson 

Huey & Judith Wentzell 

Ned & Sophia Johnston 

Richard A Kimball, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Lockhart 

John & Mary MacFadyen 

Morton K. & Barbara J. Mather 

Judith F. McGeorge 

Betty & Hugh Montgomery 

George Neal 

John A. O'Brien & Linda Long 

Spiros Polemis 

Mrs. John F. Porter 

Ned & Connie Rendall 

William & Karen Rogers 

George & Barbara Rolleston 

Dewitt Sage 

Elizabeth Saudek 

Mr. & Mrs. Reginald G. Sauls IV 

Betty Schloss 

Nick Sichterman & Mariah Hughs 

Samuel T. Suratt & Judith Hole 

Dr. Philip P. Thompson 

Charles S. Thompson & Catherine Gross 



Vern& Jackie Weiss 
Joel &Allene White 
Betty Winterhalder 
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Yates 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Abbe Museum 

Bangor Historical Society 

Beatley Library, Simmons College 

Paul & Mollie Birdsall 

Blue Hill Consolidated School 

Blue Hill Public Library 

Bridgton Historical Society 

Neal & Betty Butler 

Calais Free Library 

Camden Public Library 

Cape Elizabeth Historical Preservation 

Society 

Center for the Study of Southern Culture 
Cherryfield Narraguagus Historical Society 
Chichester Town Library 
Cinematheque Quebe'coise 
Eliot Historical Society 
Ellsworth Public Library 
Farmington Public Library 
Figures of Speech 

Fisher Museum of Forestry, Harvard Forest 
Friends of Witherle Memorial Library 
Fryeburg Historical Society 
H.O.M.E. Inc. 
He Ife Films 

Indiana Historical Society Library 
Industry Historical Society 
Island Nursing Home 
John Stark Regional High School 
Kingdom County Productions 
Maine Film Office 
Maine Folklife Center 
Maine State Library 
Maine State Museum 
Moosehead Historical Society 
Morrill Historical Society 
Nashua Public Library 
New Sharon Historical Society 
Newport Historical Society 
Northeast Harbor Library 
Orland Historical Society 
Penobscot Marine Museum 
Plymouth State College, Social Science Dept. 
Portland Water District 
Rangeley Public Library 
Saco River Grange 
The Stanley Museum 
Thorndike Library, College of the Adantic 
Vinalhaven Historical Society 
Waterville High School, Media Center 
Serena H. Whitridge 
Wilton Free Public Library 

Individual Members 

Corajane J. Adams 
Richard C. Alden 
Kate Alexander 
Paul D. Allan 

continued on page 10 



Political Commercials: Preserving History 



Each time WABI-TV staffer Mike 
Savage hands over another year's 
worth of political commercials, he 
is pleased knowing they'll be saved for 
posterity. 

Since 1 986, Savage has been the man 
at Bangor's largest TV station to gather 
die spots for donation to Northeast 
Historic Film. The practice began after 
WABl's first general manager George 
Gonyar agreed that donating die material 
for preservation was preferable to 
destroying it. 

The Heat of an Election 

For Savage, donating the material means 
that, 20 years from now, citizens and 
researchers can turn to it as a resource. "I 
think it will be extremely valuable for 
people such as political historians, who 
will get a real sense of die heat that went 
on during an election," he says. 

He recalls the 1 990 Maine gubernator- 
ial contest between John "Jock" 
McKernan and Democratic challenger 
Joseph Brennan as a particularly con- 
tentious race. "That was a really bad 
time" in terms of negative campaigning, 
he says. 



As traffic coordinator for the station, 
Savage is responsible for previewing any 
spots WABI intends to air. First he must 
catalog the piece, view it for quality 
standards, and make sure it adheres to 
laws regarding identification of the 
sponsors and their address. 

Savage says it's surprising how many 
local and state candidates and political 
organizations try to bend those rules- 
about 20 percent, he estimates. By the 
time a spot is broadcast, it must be in 
conformance. 

By federal law, a station must keep 
spots for 90 days after dieir airing. Unless 
a candidate or producer requests their 
return, WABI is free to do widi the 
material what it will. 

In the past, Savage had either disposed 
of the tapes, or recycled them. Now he 
turns them over to NHF each February. 

I Remember That 

Happily for the archives, few candidates 
ask to have dieir spots returned. The 
collection at NHF even includes a few 
diat never aired, when, for instance, soon 
after the spot's production, the candidate 
altered his or her position in response to 



an opponent, choosing not to run die 
piece after all. 

Other spots were only aired a couple 
of times for similar reasons when die 
candidate or organization felt the need 
to continually update a position on an 
issue. 

Generally speaking, "die hotter an issue 
or race," the more spots are produced, 
says Savage. He noted Maine's forestry 
referendum in 1 996 as a perfect example, 
in which each of three political camps 
vied to outdo the odiers with their 
advertising. 

Savage envisions the day when selected 
spots could be compiled as pan of a 
production on Maine political history. In 
the meantime, they remain available to 
researchers looking for insight or hind- 
sight. 

Once an election is over people tend 
to forget just how intense it was, says 
Savage. "Watching the spots will bring 
it back. You'll say, 'Jeez, I remember 
that.'" 

The Mike Savage Collection of political 
commercials spans the years from 1988 to 
1997 and includes about 2,500 spots. 



Awaiting 1962 election 

returns in the studio at 

WABITVinBangor, 

Maine. Photo: WABI TV 




Summer Camp Time, continued from page 1 

Effects on the Economy 

According to a camp brochure from the 
late 1920s, an estimated 5,000 campers 
converged each year on a small corridor 
of the lakes region in western Maine 
from Fryeburg east to Poland, and from 
Bethel south to Windham. By 1928, 
there were 80 children's camps in the 
area, pouring tens of thousands of dollars 
into the region's economy. 

"You put 5,000 kids into Oxford 
County in the summer, and add up all 
the milk, eggs, chickens and the like 
bought locally. For that time, in that 
area, it was important stuff," says 
Sanderson. 

What once was an easy alliance 
between Maine communities and 
summer camps has become more 
complex. Catering primarily to urbanites 
and out-of-staters, the camps tie up large 
tracts of prime real estate, yet are exempt 
from paying local property taxes. 

Critics complain that the federal 
non-profit tax exemption subsidizes 
urban parents' urge to give their kids a 
whiff of country air. Such policy doesn't 
always sit well in a rural state where local 
people must scramble year-round to 
make a living. 

Of course, the whole point for 
campers is to leave their worries behind 
to make friendships and memories to 
last a lifetime. For many, the summer 
sojourns are their first connection with 
Maine, a place that becomes their second 
home. 

Unearthing Birch Rock 

For Sanderson, unearthing the Birch 
Rock films felt a bit like going home. 
Two years ago, he was going through a 
family member's box of memorabilia and 
other items, when he found two small 
reels of 16mm. film from Birch Rock at 
the bottom. "I'd have had no idea they 
ever even existed," he recalls. 

Tempted to project die films, but 
fearful of doing damage, he had NHF 
transfer them to videotape, getting 
multiple copies for family members and 
the camp's owner. It turned out there was 
a trunk load more where those had come 
from. 

It took a while to organize and ship the 
additional films to NHF, but there 
proved to be enough footage to fill a half- 
dozen videocassettes, says Sanderson. 



In viewing the films, Sanderson 
spotted himself at age 3, as well as his 
grandfather as a much younger man. Pat 
Brewster, the camp founders' son, also 
saw himself as a child, along with other 
dearly remembered family members. 

Jean Hard, a woman now in her 70s, 
saw scenes of her father, Buck, head 
counselor at Birch Rock in the 1930s and 
40s. 

Naturalist George Howe 
Some of the Birch Rock community's 
favorite sequences include beloved camp 
naturalist George Howe of Norway, 
Maine. Howe was a member of the old 
school of gentleman naturalists, who 
insisted on wearing proper attire a vest 
and tie even on forays into the woods. 

By all accounts, veteran campers 
were delighted to see the kindly white- 
haired Howe captured on film. "You can 
virtually hear him speak from his body 
language," says one. 

With another camp season now in full 
swing, Sanderson will travel back and 
forth from West Newbury to Waterford, 
spending time at Birch Rock when he can. 



"I'm stuck making a living in Massa- 
chusetts, mostly," says the fiddler and 
storyteller, who makes his living as a 
computer services contractor. He'd like to 
write a book on the Maine camp experi- 
ence, or compile a video of various 
camps' footage. 

Sanderson says film may represent the 
best preservable history of the summer 
camp phenomenon. "You'll never get all 
the paperwork and stills together, and 
time's a-wasting. The first generation of 
campers has gone, and the second 
generation's going to be going." 

The Only Way to Save It 
Convinced there must be a storehouse of 
film kicking around Maine's summer 
camps, he urges his counterparts to see to 
its safekeeping. "It's the only way it's 
going to be saved," he says. 

At the end of each summer at Birch 
Rock since 1926, campers have had their 
names carved in wood, to be mounted 
on the main lodge wall for posterity. 
Thanks to archival preservation, 
Sanderson believes the film record of 
"The Rock" will prove as enduring. H 



iummer camp footage at the archives is found in a variety of amateur and 
professional films including: 



Anonymous Collection, 1931. Camp 
Moosehead; Moosehead Lake region, 
Maine. 

Susanne Bogart Collection, ca. 1940s, 
Camp Madeline Mulford, New Jersey. 

Brick Store Museum Collection, 
1935-39. Unidentified girls' camp at 
lake shore; Maine. 

Central Maine Power Collection, ca. 
1931-38. Kimball Camp, Moosehead 
Lake region, Maine. 

Paul Domincovich Collection, ca. 
1 928-30. Flying Moose Lodge camp 
founder, East Orland, Maine. 

Margaret D. Hall Collection, ca. 
1940s, 50s. Camp Snipatuit, 
Rochester, Mass. 

Earl Hodgkins Collection, 1959-63. 
Camp Natarswi, Millinocket, Maine. 

Howard, Kimball and Young 
Collection, 1930-40. Alice A. Kimball 
camps, Moultonborough, New 
Hampshire. 



Katahdin Area Council Boy Scouts of 
America Collection, ca. 1934-50s. 
Boy Scout Jamboree footage, Maine. 

Neal Collection, ca. 1932-34. 
Camping footage, West Lebanon, 
Maine. 

William Pfaffle Collection, ca. 1950s. 
Various summer camps, Maine. 

Pine Tree Society Collection, 1940s- 
50s. Pine Tree Camp, Belgrade Lakes, 
Maine. 

Harrie B. Price Collection, ca. 1930s- 
1 960s. Flying Moose Lodge boys' 
camp, East Orland, Maine. 

David Sanderson Collection, ca. 
1927. Camp Me Wain girls' camp, 
Waterford, Maine. 

Clare Sullivan Collection, ca. 1950. 
Camp Mishannock; Kingston, Mass. 

Wohelo, The Luther Gulick Camp 
Collection, 1919-26. Luther Gulick 
camps, Sebago Lake, South Casco, 
Maine. 




Using the Archives: On the Border 



W; 



Robert Saudek, 

Past Board Member 

Robert Saudek, board member of 
Northeast Historic Film from 
1989 to 1995, passed away in 
March 1997. Throughout his tenure he 
provided committed support and 
direction. In a letter to the founders, he 
said, "It was flattering to be invited to be 
a member of your fledgling Board, and 
to see it grow from a dream to a reality, 
well-defined, nurtured, and responsive to 
your hopes." 

Saudek's stature in film and 
broadcasting was immense. He was a 
member of the original Carnegie 
Commission on Educational Television, 
which created public broadcasting. He 
served as president and CEO of the 
Museum of Broadcasting, now the 
Museum of Television and Radio, and 
was chief of the Motion Picture, 
Broadcasting and Recorded Sound 
Division of the Library of Congress until 
1991. 

His benediction to Northeast Historic 
Film: the organization will "recall our 
past and will preserve that elongating line 
of history." 



Spot the Arctic trrn on 

Machias Seal Island. 

Photo: Danger Daily News. 



[hen reporter-field producer 
Elizabeth Chiu of Canadian 
Television called NHF for 
stock footage, she had a pretty 
good idea of what she wanted. Her 
object was to find film that would give 
viewers a sense of just how long a certain 
border dispute over an offshore island 
had been going on. 

Chiu recalled recendy, "I found just 
die shot I needed." 

Contested Territory 

Her assignment was to produce a news 
feature on the conflict over 1 5-acre 
Machias Seal Island, a treeless expanse 
that lies about an hour by boat off the 
village of Cutler on the Maine coast. For 
decades, both the U.S. and Canadian 
governments have claimed ownership of 
the island, which is best known for its 
breeding colony of puffins. 

The prime interview subject for Chiu's 
production was Captain Barna Norton, a 
well-known fixture of the small Maine 
fishing village of Jonesport. For years he 
has taken charter groups on boat excur- 
sions to see the island. 

According to Norton, the island has 
belonged to Canada since at least Civil 



War times. As evidence of his views, he 
notes that it is Canadians who have 
staffed the 19th-century lighthouse. 

Among Norton's most memorable 
characteristics to his passengers is his 
habit of carrying along on the boat a 
large umbrella, which opens up to 
display, in Chiu's words, a "not small" 
American flag. 

As a journalist, Chiu strived to show 
both sides of the story with the light touch 
appropriate to features. Unable to find the 
historic clips she needed at her provincial 
archives, she was referred to NHF. 

The producer ended up using amateur 
film footage of the island from NHF's 
James Marsh Collection, featuring a wide 
shot of the island with fishing boat. It 
was made available through Hot 
Shots/Cool Cuts, a New York firm NHF 
has retained to represent footage nation- 
ally and internationally. 

The resulting piece aired last winter on 
a news magazine show entitled W5, 
produced by the Canadian network 
channel CTV. 

"The footage was enormously helpful," 
Chiu said in hindsight. "We'd been 
talking about needing historical footage, 
and NHF had the shot." 




New England Feature Film List 



Surely somebody's done this," is a refrain heard 
around the archives. Isn't there a list of feature 
films with New England-related themes? We were 
recently asked to contribute to The Endyclopedia of New 
England Culture (University of New Hampshire/Yale 
University Press). So we started a list. Please peruse this work 
in progress and contact us with suggestions and any 
published writings on these films. Thank you to the 
American Film Institute Catalogs, Rob Edelman, Kathryn 
Fuller, Eithne Johnson, Audrey Kupferberg, John Lowe, Eric 
Schaefer, John Skillin, and other early contributors. 



Ah, Wilderness, 1935 

Alices Restaurant, 1969 

All the Brothers were Valiant, 

1953 

American Buffalo, 1996 
As the Earth Turns, 1 934 
Baby Boom, 1987 
The Beans of Egypt, Maine, 1994 

(video=Forbidden Choices) 
Bed and Breakfast, 1992 
Beetlejuice, 1988 
Behind Masks, 1921 
Biography of a Bachelor Girl, 

1935 

Blown Away, 1994 
Boomerang, 1947 
The Boston Strangler, 1968 
The Bostonians, 1 984 
Bringing Up Baby, 1938 
Brown of Harvard, 1926 
The Brinks Job, 1978 
Gappy Ricks, 1921 
Captain January, 1936 
Captain Salvation, 1927 
Captains Courageous, 1 937 
Carnal Knowledge, 1971 
Carousel, 1956 
Casper, 1995 
Celtic Pride, 1996 
Charlottes Web, 1973 
Christmas in Connecticut, 1945 
City of the Dead, 1960 
The Coast Patrol, 1925 
The Comeback, 1916 
The Conflict, 1921 
Creepshow2, 1987 
The Crucible, 1996 
Dangerous, 1935 
David Harum, 1915,1934 
Dead Men Tell No Tales, 1 920 
Dead Poets Society, 1989 
Deep Waters, 1947 
A Delicate Balance, 1973 



Desire Under the Elms, 1958 

The Devil and Daniel Webster, 
1941 

Dolores Claiborne, 1995 

Down to the Sea in Ships, 1 922 

Ethan Frome, 1993 

Ever in My Heart, 1933 

Fear Strikes Out, 1957 

Federal Hill, 1995 

Feed, 1992 

The Firm, 1993 

The Friends of Eddie Coyle, 

1973 

Funny Farm, 1988 
The Good Mother, 1988 
The Good Son, 1993 
Graveyard Shift, 1990 
The Great Moment, 1 944 
H.M. Pulham, Esq., 1941 
Head Above Water, 1996 
Hearts of Oak, 1924 
Here Comes the Groom, 1951 
The Hotel New Hampshire, 

1984 

The House of the Seven Gables, 

1940 

HouseSirter, 1992 
Huddle, 1932 
Hush, 1921 
I am the Cheese, 1983 
I Married a Witch, 1942 
The Inkwell, 1994 
It Happened to Jane, 1959 

(alt. Twinkle and Shine) 
Jaws, 1975 

Jazz on a Summer's Day, 1959 
Johnny Tremain, 1957 
Jumanji, 1996 
The Last Hurrah, 1958 
The Late George Apley, 1947 
Leave Her to Heaven, 1945 

The Lighthouse by the Sea, 
1924 



Litde Women, 1919, 1933, 

1949, 1996 
Long Day's Journey Into Night, 

1962 

Lost Boundaries, 1949 

Love Story, 1970 

Maid of Salem, 1937 

Make a Wish, 1937 

Malice, 1993 

The Man in the Net, 1959 

Man With a Plan, 1995 

The Man Without a Face, 1993 

The Matchmaker, 1997 

Mermaids, 1990 

Miloha, 1987 

Moby Dick, 1930, 1956 

Mother Carey's Chickens, 1938 

Mrs. Winterbourne, 1996 

Mystery Street, 1950 

Mystic Pizza, 1988 

The Nature Man, 1915 

Never Met Picasso, 1996 

A New Leaf, 1971 

The Offenders, 1924 

The Old Homestead, 1915, 

1935, 1942 
Old Ironsides, 1926 
Oleanna, 1994 
On Golden Pond, 1981 
One Crazy Summer, 1 986 
Other Peoples Money, 1991 
Our Town, 1940 
The Paper Chase, 1973 
Parrish, 1961 
The Pearl of Love, 1925 
PetSematary, 1989 
Peyton Place, 1957 
Portrait of Jennie, 1948 
Pretty Poison, 1968 
The Price of Success, 1925 
Private Number, 1936 
Prophecy, 1979 
Queen of the Sea, 1918 
Rachel, Rachel, 1968 
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, 

1938 

Reckless, 1995 

The Reincarnation of Peter 

Proud, 1975 
The Resurrected, 1992 
Reversal of Fortune, 1990 
Riddle: The Woman, 1920 
The Rider of the King Log, 1921 
The Russians are Coming! The 

Russians are Coming! 1966 
The Scarlet Letter, 1909, 1917, 

1926, 1934, 1995 
Scenes from a Mall, 1 99 1 



School Ties, 1992 
Sci-fighters, 1996 
The Sea Beast, 1926 
Second Sight, 1989 
A Separate Peace, 1972 
The Seventh Day, 1922 
Shadows, 1922 
The Shocking Miss Pilgrim, 

1947 

The Shuttered Room, 1967 
Signs of Life, 1989 
The Singing Kid, 1936 
A Small Circle of Friends, 1980 
The Spitfire Grill, 1996 
Splash, 1984 

Squanto: A Warriors Tale, 1 994 
The Stepford Wives, 1975 
A Stolen Life, 1946 
Strange Interlude, 1932 
The Strange Woman, 1 946 
The Stranger, 1 946 
Summer Holiday, 1 948 
Summer Magic, 1963 
A Summer Place, 1959 
Sunrise at Campobello, 1 960 
That Darn Cat, 1997 
That's My Boy, 1932 
Theodora Goes Wild, 1936 
The Thomas Crown Affair, 1 968 
Those Galloways, 1 965 
Timothy s Quest, 1921, 1936 
Titicut Follies, 1967 
The Trail of the Law, 1924 
The Trouble With Harry, 1955 
True Lies, 1994 
The Verdict, 1982 
Vermont is for Lovers, 1992 
Walk East on Beacon, 1952 
Warlock, 1989 
Way Back Home, 1931 
Way Down East, 1920 
Welcome Stranger, 1947 
The Whales of August, 1987 
Where the Rivers Flow North, 

1992 

Where are the Children, 1986 
Whispering Winds, 1929 
Whistle at Eaton Falls, 1951 
White Christmas, 1954 
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? 

1966 

The Witches of Eastwick, 1987 
With Honors, 1994 
Winter Carnival, 1939 
The Wizard of Loneliness, 1988 
The Working Man, 1933 
The Yankee Clipper, 1 927 fj 




Clarity by Design 



Volunteer Enters Film Biz 

A high school student has parlayed his 
NHF experience into a role as prod- 
uction assistant on a feature film. 
Former volunteer film cataloguer Alex 
FJias finds himself running interference 
on the set of Dark Jules in the Maine 
fishing village of Stonington this sum- 
mer, as he awaits entering film studies in 
New York this fall. 

Aware of his interest in film through 
her contacts with NHF, independent 
filmmaker and casting agent Diane Lee 
gave Alex a call. He won his new job 
after interviewing with representatives for 
Plus Films of New York, producers of the 
mystery thriller to be filmed entirely on 
location. 

Contacts and Context 

According to Alex, volunteer work at 
NHF last summer gave him not only 
contacts, but context, for the job. 

"1 picked up a lot about the medium of 
film and handling it. They also have a 
great library of books about film and 
filmmaking," of which he took advantage. 

The Surry teenager graduated from 
George Stevens Academy in nearby Blue 
Hill, and will enter the School of Visual 
Arts in New York City to focus on film 
production this fall. 

Less than two weeks into the film 
business, Alex already is steeped in 
insider lingo, such as working "24-7 " 
referring to his all-day, all week schedule 
on die set. 

As far as "20-20 hindsight" goes, he 
recommends the volunteer gig to like- 
minded peers. "I think the real world 
stuff is much better than anything you 
do in school. You learn a lot more in a 
situation like NHF." I 



If, as you turn these pages, a contrast 
or contour catches your eye, graphic 
designer Lindy Gifford can probably 
take the credit. She's behind die clean, 
uncluttered yet distinctive look readers of 
Moving Image Review and odier NHF 
publications have come to recognize. 

A design professional for a dozen 
years, Gifford enjoys playing widi die 
subtleties of visual elements in creating a 
certain feel. "A lot of design is very 
subconscious," she says. 

Archeological Past 
Attention to detail has long been an 
element in Gifford s job description. 
Formerly an archeologist, she worked on 
sites in Belize, Peru, Sardinia, Montana, 
and Boston. A specialist in field and 
object photography, Gifford has always 
had a "visual take on things," she says. 

While living in Massachusetts, she 
began taking graphics courses at the Mass- 
achusetts College of Art, and eventually 
was hired by a Boston design firm. 

Nine years ago, Gifford moved to 
Belfast in mid-coast Maine. She became 
art director first of Seafood Business 
magazine in Rockland, and then of 
WoodenBoat Magazine in Brooklin. 

Gifford eventually decided to work 
freelance to devote more time to her two 
small children. She divides her time 
between part-time work designing books 
for WoodenBoat Publications, and projects 
for other clients such as NHF s newslet- 
ter and catalogs. 

Her project mix may be changing as 
she and two partners form the Penobscot 
Publishing Group, a full-service firm 
designed to take publications 
assignments from the idea phase 
to the finished product. 

Over the 1 2 years she has 
worked in the graphics field, 
Gifford's aesthetic has continued 
to evolve. As a designer, she says 
she aims for simple, straightfor- 
ward communication, though 
not without a sense of style. 

Cranberry Historian 

In working with NHF, she also 
can indulge an affinity for history. 
While still in Massachusetts, she 
and her husband received a 



National Endowment for the Human- 
ities grant to study the state's cranberry 
industry. As part of the project, they 
conducted oral history interviews and 
documented their research. 

With that background in cultural 
preservation, Gifford can appreciate 
NHF's mission of collecting and saving 
moving images. "I love film. If I rent 
movies, I'm as likely to get an old one as 
a recent release. I just think it's great to 
see how things used to be. It's like you've 
stepped back in time for a moment." 

Her first contact with NHF was as a 
customer. A number of years ago, she 
bought her husband, then a historian, a 
copy of Earliest Maine Films. Then she 
bought her brother-in-law Maine's TV 
Time Machine, a video compilation of 
1950s and 60s news and commercials, 
"because it's a hoot." 

Now, as she designs the NHF catalogs 
showcasing such merchandise, she is 
careful to conjure up a period feel. In one 
publication, she used a 1930s-style 
typeface to evoke a Hollywood aura, and 
beige, orange and sepia tones. 

As she puts it, "It's going to subcon- 
sciously say 'movies' to readers, whether 
they think it does or not." 



Chariic Chaplin's 

The Circus 

with live ordiotn 





continued from page 4 

Carol Allen 

Mel Allen 

William H. Allen III 

Joan Amory 

Kathy Anderson 

Carter & Linnea Andersson-Wintle 

Bob Andrews 

Thomas M. Armstrong 

Marilyn M. Ashley 

Peter D. Bachelder 

Prof. William J. Baker 

Althea Ballentine 

Jean Barrett 

Otis Bartlett 

Phyllis & Bob Beallor 

Orland & Donna Bean 

William & Patricia Bell 

Patricia & Thomas Berry 

Lynne K. Blair 

Chris Blanchard 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin Blodget 

Nancy & Donald Blomquist 

Richard Bock 

R.J. Bonini 

Q. David Bowers 

Joan Branch 

Joan H. Bromage 

Evelyn Brown 

Gregory N. Brown 

Dr. & Mrs. John M.R. Bruner 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald C. Buffington 

Patricia Burdick 

Robert E. Burgess 

Helen M. Burns 

Charles Burwell 

Lynn Cadwallader 

Sara Cairns 

Roc Caivano 

Mary Grace Canfield 

Clayton Carlisle 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Carnie 

James Carter 

Donna Cassidy 

Mike Caswell 

Michel Chalufour 

Maureen Cheney 

Ted Clapp 

Mr. & Mrs. Reginald R. Clark 

Brenda J. Condon 

Dr. Richard Condon 

Ray Cooley 

Chester & Phyllis Cooley 

Deborah Joy Corey & Bill Zildjian 

Dr. & Mrs. Donald R. Crist 

Catherine E. Cutler 

Polly Darnell 

Judy Davis 

Melissa Davis 

James & Leila Day 

Orville B. Denison, Jr. 

Sally & Malcolm Denning 

Jeannette S. Dennison 

Clarence R. Derochemont 



Josephine H. Detmer 

Ernest Dick 

Jefferson Dobbs 

Daniel Donovan 

Leon J. Doucette 

Neal C. Dow 

Rev. Douglas W. Drown 

Richard L. Duval 

G. Clifton Eames 

Albert Eaton 

David Ellenberg 

Anna Mary Elskus 

Elaine Emery 

Lynn Farnell 

Mrs. John Farr 

Kevin Fellows 

Joseph F. Filtz 

David Folster 

Fogler Library 

Marion C. Foss 

Ann & Everett Foster 

Karen Frangoulis 

Yves Frenette 

Marian J. Fretz 

Kathy H. Fuller 

Samuel Fuller 

Liz Fulton 

Peter T. Gammons, Jr. 

Janet & Marty Garrell 

Lindy Gifford 

Thomas R. Girard & Deborah Howard 

Martha U. Goldner 

Douglas Gomery 

Sidney & Roberta Gordon 

Dayton Grandmaison 

Terry Grant 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Grant 

Gus P. Gregory 

Mr. & Mrs. Roland W. Grindle 

Arnold Grindle 

Ernest H. Groth 

Mary S. Hafer 

Charles & Christina Halsted 

Clarence & Beatrice Hamilton 

Eric W. Handley 

James Hanna 

W.A. Haviland 

Dorothy Hayes 

Rev. David Hersey 

Dr. Bill Hersey 

Marilyn Hinkley 

Wendell Hodgkins 

John Hoffman 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Howard 

Stanley R. Howe, Ph.D. 

Tom Hulce 

James Hunnewell 

Ron Huston 

Douglas & Heidi H. Ilsley 

Ann Ivins 

Jeffrey Janer & Maggie Sanftleben 

Glenn Jenks & Faidi Getchell 

Mike Jennings 



Tedd Johansen 

Eithne Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Johnson 

Thomas F. Joyce 

Richard & Patricia W. Judd 

Dr. Susan A. Kaplan 

John J. Karol, Jr. 

Alan Kattelle 

Barry J.Kelley 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert O. Kellogg 

George E. Kent 

Marshall Kinney 

Frances V. Knox 

Beulah & Garry Larrabee 

Hannah Leader 

Robert Legg 

Paige Lilly 

Bill Lippincott & Nancy Raich 

Bonnie Lounsbury 

Joanna Cappuccilli Lovetti 

Howard P. Lowell 

Edward C. Lynch 

Harold L. Malloch 

Maude & John March 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Mason 

Suzanne Massie & Seymour Papert 

Prof. Eugene Mawhinney 

Valerie Felt McClead 

Caren McCourtney 

Gertrude L. McCue 

George H. McEvoy 

Patricia F. McGeorge 

John T. Mcllwaine 

Linda McLain 

Robert W. Merritt 

Joan F. Meserve 

Bruce Meulendyke 

George Miller 

David Mishkin 

Barbara & Darrold Mitchell 

Ellen Mitchell 

Kate Monahan 

Betsy Montandon & Keith Davison 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. Morrill 

Sumner E. Moulton 

Margaret W. Myers 

Mr. & Mrs. Nickolas J. Nugent 

George O'Connell 

George R. O'Neill 

L.R Ohman 

Kathryn J. Olmstead 

Woodard D. Openo 

David E. Outerbridge 

Jeff Palmer 

Robin Parmelee 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert H. Pawle 

Adam Peck 

Larry & Nancy Perlman 

Paula Petrik 

Geoff Phillips 

Pat & Devon Phillips 

Mr. & Mrs. Wesley Pipher 

John Potter 



10 



Alice W. Price 

E. Annie Proulx 

Joseph L. Quinn 

Elvie M. Ramsdell 

William Rand 

Patricia Ranzoni 

Sally Regan 

Charles & Dorothy Reid 

Alan Rhoades 

Marguerite Jan Ridgway 

Sundae & Ernest Robbins 

Paige W. Roberts 

Windsor C. Robinson 

James & Marilyn Rockefeller, Jr. 

Lynanne M. Rollins 

Robert & Venetia Rosie 

Jaylene B. Roths 

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Rundlert 

Harriet H. Sands 

Red Sarna 

Carol Schaefer 

Eric Schaefer 

Ronald Schliessman 

Edwin & Justine Schneider 

Wendy Wincote Schweikert & Ken 

Schweikert 
Connie Jan Sears 
Peter & Lucy Sellers 
Bernard Shea 
Milt Shelter 
Harold B. Simmons 
Gary Smith 
Charles B. Smith 
Dr. & Mrs. Marshall Smith, Jr. 
Pat & Roy Snell 
Albert Snowden 
William S. Souza 
Amy B. Squibb 
Miriam G. Stern 
Archie Stewart 
John S. Stillman 
Albert & Eve Srwertka 
Lynda L. Sudlow 
Barbara Sullivan 
Bill & Jacquie Sullivan 
David A Taylor & Leellen Friedland 
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Taylor 
Denis Thoet 
Little Tree 
Harry Tyler 
Lucie Tyler 
C. Robert Tyler 
Jean Ulman 
R. Bruce Underwood 
Joanne J. Van Namee 
Louise Gulick Van Winkle 
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur C. Verow 
Robert Waite 
Robert & Julia Walkling 
Dr. Sanford E. Warren 
Seth H. Washburn 
Ginia Davis Wexler 
Virginia W. Whitaker 



Christopher & Susan White 

Phil A. Whitney 

Jane Whitten 

John Wight 

Steve & Peggy Wight 

Tappy & Robin Wilder 

Elizabeth Wiley 

Deborah Williams 

Richard Willing 

Bonnie Wilson 

Wilton Historical Society 

Elizabeth & Frank Wiswall 

Edith Wolff 

Bob Woodbury 

George Worthing 

Aagot C. Wright 

Marguerite Y. Zientara 

Educator/Student Members 

Timothy W. Allison-Hatch 

Mark L. Anderson 

Miss Rosemary Anthony 

Brick Store Museum 

Judy Arey 

Henry Barendse 

Timothy Barton 

Adrienne M. Baum 

Marisa Bebris 

Eric Benke & Frances Merritt Thompson 

Arnold & Riva Berleant 

Frank Bisher 

James J. Bishop 

Deborah Blanchard 

Dona Brown 

Cindy Bufidiis 

Richard Burns 

Chris D. Burns 

William Carpenter & Donna Gold 

Armand Chartier 

Terry Christy 

Joanne D. Clark 

Judith & Brian Clough 

Ann Cohen 

Dr. Joseph A. Conforti 

Richard Crampton 

Alvina Cyr 

Thomas Doherty 

Elizabeth D. Dore 

Bruce Doughty 

Mr. & Mrs. Phillip G. Dow, Sr. 

Beth Dunning 

Melinda A. Duval 

Linda Dygert 

Dr. Joel W. Eastman 

Ian Eddy 

Deborah Ellis 

Charles Emond 

Bob England 

James Fastook 

Nancy Fenney 

Carlton G. Foster 

Joseph E. Foster 

Joanne Frecker 

Ed Friedman 



Ann Gallagher 

Elaine & John Gardner 

Lawrence Gisetto 

Christopher Glass 

Suzanne Goulet 

Randy Grant 

Joe Gray 

CoraGreer 

Pam Harmon 

Douglas I l.ii lii-lil 

Bob Hayes 

Jay Hoar 

K.it Hudson 

Beverly Huntress 

Richard D. Jenkins 

Paula Johnson 

Polly Kaufman 

Gaylen Kelley 

Zip Kellogg 

Karol R Kucinski 

Yvon I .ililn'- 

Rose Marasco 

Rev. Shirley Mattson 

Donald McDougal 

Todd Mcintosh 

William McKinley 

Martha McNamara 

Betty A. Morris 

Dhyan Nirmegh 

Kenneth Peck 

Carol M. Petillo 

Sanford Phippen 

Jennifer C. Pixley 

Sarah G. Prescott 

Dave A. Pride 

Joan Radner 

David Raymond 

Don Ritz 

Pat & Tom Schroth 

Aran Shetterly 

Stephen C. Smith 

Miss Natalie B. Smidi 

Renny Stackpole 

Gifford Stevens 

Arthur Stolpestad 

Melinda Stone 

Janet Stratton 

Adelia Thurston 

Kathy Tweedie 

Juris Ubans 

Richard C. Valinski 

Abigail A. Van Slyck 

Thomas Walker 

David H. Waiters 

Dan Weaver 

Mary Webber 

Tinlcy Weisblat 

Phyllis Wheaton 

Dr. Richard E.G. White 

Philip & Shirley C. Whitney 

Seth Wigderson 

George Wildey 

C.Bruce Wright 



11 



Getting It Right 



NHF Board of Directors 



Fiction needn't be false. Eager to 
make her piece believable, author 
Deborah Joy Corey did her home- 
work, viewing NHF materials for 
background on the logging industry. 
Now, amidst work on a novel and 
screenplay, the multimedia veteran makes 
time to serve on NHF s Board of 
Directors. 

"Of all the things I'm involved in, diis 
is one I really enjoy. Their pursuit is a 
wonderful thing," she says of the 
archives. 

Primarily a novelist, Corey apportions 
part of her time at home in Castine, 
Maine, to writing a screenplay based on 
her 1 993 book, Losing Eddie. The book 
won a Canadian award for best first 
novel. A sequel is in the works. 

Avant-Garde Fashion 

Having begun her career as a fashion 
model, Corey found other ends of the 
industry more compelling. By the late 
1980s, she owned a Toronto company 
producing avant-garde fashion shows for 
designers and retailers, and other special 
events. 

Over the years, her theatrical bent has 
found a variety of outlets, such as writing 
radio drama for the Canadian Broad- 
casting Corporation. She's learned there's 
a fine line between fiction and documen- 
tary: they're both about storytelling. 

That helps explain why she found the 
archives so useful for research. "They 
have home movies. They own people's 
history in a sense." 

Welcome Martha McNamara 

As head of the NHF board's Nominating 
Committee, Corey welcomes the board's 
newest member, Martha J. McNamara, 
of Orono, Maine, and Boston. 

A cultural historian at the University of 
Maine, McNamara earned her Ph.D. in 
American and New England Studies 
from Boston University. She serves as 
Director of the Society of Architectural 
Historians, New England chapter; and as 
board member of the Maine Historic H 
Preservation Commission. 



Deborah Joy Corey, Castine, Maine. 

Author of Losing Eddie, winner of 
Canadian best first novel award; drama- 
tized and broadcast on CBC radio. Was 
owner of Toronto modeling agency. Board, 
Witherle Library, Castine. 

Michael J. Fiori, Readfield, Maine. 

President and COO, Downcast Pharmacy, 
Inc., specializing in geriatric and long-term 
care. CEO of ODV, Inc., manufacturers 
and distributors of narcotic identification 
equipment. 

Paul Gelardi, Cape Porpoise, Maine. 
President, E Media, Kennebunk, specializ- 
ing in manufacturing technologies and 
electronic media. 

Vice President 

James S. Henderson, Orr's Island, Maine. 

Maine State Archivist, administrative head 
of the State Archives. Directs Maine's 
Historical Records Advisory Board. 
Education includes a Ph.D. in political 
science from Emory University. 

Alan J. McClelland, Camden, Maine. 
Retired defense electronics executive from 
Ford Aerospace and Gilfillan ITT. 
Volunteer archivist and photographer, 
Owls Head Transportation Museum. 
Executive board, Society of Maine 
Archivists. 

Maltha McNamara, Orono, Maine, and 
Boston, Mass. 

University of Maine, Orono, historian. 
Ph.D. in American & New England 
Studies from Boston University. Director 
of the Society of Architectural Historians, 
New England chapter. Commission 
member, Maine Historic Preservation 
Commission. 



Treasurer 

James A. Phillips, Bangor, Maine. 
Co-founder of Trio Software Corporation, 
and an independent properly assessment 
consultant. Was staff producer and director 
at WMTW TV; studied film at George 
Eastman House. 

Terry Rankine, South Thomaston, Maine. 
Founding principal of Cambridge Seven 
Associates, Inc. Work includes architectural 
design, urban design, and planning for 
worldwide projects: educational and 
exhibition facilities. 

President 

Richard Rosen, Bucksport, Maine. 

Owner, Rosens Department Store, 
Bucksport third generation owner. Vice 
President of the board of Bucksport Regional 
Health Center and co-founder, Bucksport 
Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. 

Karan Sheldon, Blue Hill Falls, Maine. 
Co-founder of NHF. 1997 program 
committee for the Association of Moving 
Image Archivists annual conference, 
alternate on the National Film Preservation 
Board, Library of Congress. 

David S. Weiss, Blue Hill Falls, Maine. 

Executive Director, Northeast Historic Film 
and co-founder of NHF. Previously media 
producer in Boston after graduating in film 
and semiotics from Brown University. Serves 
on Maine's Historical Records Advisory 
Board. 

Pamela Wintle, Washington D.C. 
Founder, Smithsonian Institution Human 
Studies Film Archives. Co-chair, 
Association of Moving Image Archivists' 
amateur film group, Ineciits. Family roots 
in Skowhegan, Maine. H 



Calendar Highlights 



12 



At the Alamo Theatre, 
Bucksport 

July 18, 7:30 p.m. 

Downcast Center Ring Circus Band 

Concert. $5 adults, $2 children. 

August 24, 7 p.m. 
Filmmaker Alan Berliner will 
introduce, screen, and discuss his 
documentary films Intimate 
Stranger and Nobody's Business. 
Tickets now available: $ 1 for 
NHF members, $12 for others. 

September 12-13, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Penobscot River Festival, open 
house. 



In Windsor, Maine 

September 19-21 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Common Ground Fair. Northeast 
Historic Film's Videos of Life in New 
England shown each day, free with 
admission, in the Film Building. NHF 
staff will answer questions and loan 
Reference by Mail videos free to members. 

In Fryeburg, Maine 

September 28-October 5 8 a.m. to 8 
p.m. Fryeburg Fair. Northeast Historic 
Film's Videos of Life in New England 
shown daily, free with admission, at the 
Farm Museum. NHF staff will answer 
questions and loan Reference by Mail 
videos free to members. 



World's Woodsworkers 



Improbably enough, a specialty 
emporium located in the northern 
California town of Laytonville (pop. 
1 133) is one of NHF's biggest 
customers. 

Bailey's may not be a household name 
but to aficionados of forestry and logging 
practices, it's a standby. "We sell to the 
woodsmen of the world," founder 
William G. "Bill" Bailey says with 
discernible pride. 

Established in the founder's 
hometown in 1975, Bailey's bills itself as 
the "world's largest mail order woodsman 
supplies company." The cover of its latest 
catalog depicts logging by helicopter. 

A Really Big Buyer 

Baileys sells everything from logging 
supplies and seedlings to clothing, books, 
and videotapes. According to NHF 
distribution coordinator Jane Berry 
Donnell, Bailey's is among the highest- 
volume buyers of NHF's videotapes. 

As a longtime woodsman and logger, 
Bill Bailey thinks he knows why. Having 
observed wood harvesting operations 
worldwide, Bailey appreciates the fact 
that each region does things a little 
differently, in the U.S. and elsewhere. 

To his way of thinking, it's those 
unique practices that lend the field such 
fascination, particularly with the passing 
of the old ways as technology has 
continued to change. 

Bygone Ways in Action 
Bailey thinks it's the prospect of watching 
bygone ways in action that make NHF 
tapes such as Woodsmen and River 
Driven and From Stump to Ship of 



nearly universal interest to his customers. 

"It's pretty unique the way they did 
those river drives," says Bailey, explaining 
that in California, the tree stock was too 
large to ever maneuver down rivers and 
in any case, river driving is a thing of the 
past. 

These days, some transport of 
California's massive timber is done using 
cable-car type equipment suspended high 
above the ground. 

When it comes to wood harvesting, 
Bailey knows whereof he speaks. Now 
54, his enchantment with woodlands is 
rooted in his childhood. Like many of his 
classmates in redwood country, Bailey 
quit high school to work in the woods. 
In his case, the ethic of giving 
back to the land was planted early. He 
says he learned not only to harvest, but 
to replant and refurbish. 

As a merchant, Bailey applies a similar 
ethic to his company's inventory. To 
keep it fresh, he regularly weeds out any 
merchandise that fails to hold his 
customers' interest. He says the video- 
tapes he orders from NHF are among 
the more long-lived of his catalog's 
offerings. 

Europe, Asia, and the U.S. 
As for his clientele, the store's typical 
customer lives in small-town America, 
although the catalog has shipped orders 
as far as Europe and Asia. Bailey says he 
will continue to sell NHF products as 
long as interest stays high. 

Meanwhile, his latest enthusiasm is 
distributing the company's new wood 
business card to anyone who will take 
one. M 




The business card 
really is red cedar. 




Mail Order Woodsman Supplies 
at Discounted Prices 

Smell me-I'm Two Ply Red Cedar 




New Catalog, FREE! 



N 



ortheast Historic Film Presents 
Videos of Life in New England 
carefully selected to show important and 
often vanished ways of life. 

The catalog of videos for sale is 
available free of charge. It features many 
wonderful titles for the classroom, 
library, and living room, including these 
new selections. 

Gee Bee Airplanes 

A look into the history of the super 
sportsters that made a spectacular 
entrance upon the aviation scene in the 
early 1 930s. No other single model in 
air-racing history has attained such a 
dominant place in the memory and 
affection of racing enthusiasts. 
60 iiiin., b&w and color, sound. $19.95 

Man With A Plan 

Fred Tuttle, a 77-year-old retired dairy 
farmer runs for Congress after he 
realizes that it's the only way that a 
person with a tenth-grade education 
and no references can make $ 1 29,000 a 
year. As Fred says simply, "I've spent my 
whole life in the barn, now I just want 
to spend a little time in the House." He 
represents a vanishing way of life in 
Vermont. He'll make you laugh: Fred 
Tuttle, the Man with a Plan. H 

90 min., color, sound. $19.95 



13 



Reference b 
Mail 



NHF members may borrow the video- 
tapes listed here by mail. A list of 120 
more circulating videos is also available. 
There is no fee for the service, and 
NHF will pay for the shipping of up to 
three tapes the first time you borrow. 
After that, there is just a $5 shipping 
charge per loan (maximum three tapes 
per loan). See opposite for membership 
information. 

Return Instructions 

The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be shipped to NHF 
five days after they are received. 




Public Performance 

Videotapes listed are offered as a refer- 
ence service. Tapes whose descriptions 
include die PERF designation may be 
presented as part of a public event. All 
others are for home use only. To ensure 
availability for a specific date, call 
Samantha Boyce at 207 469-0924. 

Videos for Sale 

Many videos are available for purchase 
through NHF. Please call for a free 
catalog of Videos of Life in New England. 



American Indians 

Earth Medicine, an eight-pan series on use 
of plants and herbs by LitdeTree, now a 
Vermont resident. From open-reel half- 
inch videotape. Two VHS videotapes. 
1975. Total 240 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Children 

Big Horse, two horses, Spike and Smitty, 
talk about their lives as working animals. 
1996. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Ecology and Energy 

Wyman Station, Central Maine Power 
film on the construction of Wyman 
Station on the Kennebec River, with 
Daggettville, the workers' town. 1928. 
30 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Feature Films 

The Family Album, Alan Berliner's look at 
family life, from birth to death, through 
home movies and sound from many 
sources. 1986. 60 mins., b&w, sd. 

Long Day's Journey Into Night, Sidney 
Lumet directs Eugene O'Neill's drama 
about his family in New London, 



Connecticut. With Katharine Hepburn 
and Jason Robards. 1962. 174 mins., 
b&w, sd. 

Lost Boundaries, produced by Louis de 
Rochemont. An African-American 
physician's experiences with discrimina- 
tion in the south and in New 
Hampshire. 1949. 99 mins., b&w, sd. 

Man with a Plan, Fred Turtle, a retired 
Vermont dairy farmer, runs for Congress 
in this comedy. By John O'Brien. 1996. 
90 mins., col., sd. 

Moby Dick, Gregory Peck plays Captain 
Ahab, New Bedford whaler. Script by 
Ray Bradbury, Norman Corwin, and 
John Huston, from Herman Melville's 
novel. 1956. 1 16 mins., col., sd. 

Our Town, Thornton Wilder's New 
Hampshire village and its inhabitants. 
With a score by Aaron Copland. 1940. 
90 mins., b&w., sd. 

Theodora Goes Wild, Theodora Lynne, 
played by Irene Dunne, wrote a scan- 
dalous novel in a small Connecticut 
town and went to New York. 1936. 94 
mins., b&w, sd. 



14 



Fisheries 

Fence in the Water, weir fishing for 
herring in Penobscot Bay, Maine, by 
independent filmmaker Peg Dice. 1980. 
45 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Our Fishing Heritage, Grand Banks dory 
fishing, stop-seining mackerel and 
herring, and early lobstering. 1996. 60 
mins., b&w and col., sd. 

Underwater, Out of Sight, an ecosystem 
case study shows how underwater life is 
drastically changing because of the 
fishing industry. 15 mins., col., sd. 

Geography 

From Dreamland Sent, history of the 
1893 Maine State Building now in 
Poland Spring, Maine. 1995. 25 mins., 
b&w, sd. 

Great Cranberry Island, amateur film by 
Robert Browning of a young boy on 
Cranberry Isles, Maine, learning about 
island life. ca. 1930. 60 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 

The Trees Still Grow, Berlin, New 
Hampshire's history as a mill town. 
1994. 30 mins., b&w, sd. 

Wohela, 1919, a promotional film of girls' 
camp activities on Sebago Lake, Maine. 
10 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Oral History 

From the University of Maine Distin- 
guished Visitors series of interviews. 

William Kienbusch, artist. 1968. 30 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

R. Buckminster Fuller, architect and 
visionary. 1968. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Russell Wiggins, newspaper publisher and 
diplomat. 1968. 30 mins., b&w, sd. 
PERF 

Technology 

Bryant Pond, The Last Ringdown, 
America's last magneto telephone 
company, in Bryant Pond, Maine. 
Produced by GTE Visnet. 1982. 12 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Transportation 

Gee Bee Airplanes, the sport planes that 
made a fabulous entrance into the 
aviation scene in the early 1 930s. 1 992. 
60 mins., b&w and col., sd. 

Woods 

Forest Wars, "Can we have our wood 
products and our forest too?" 1996. 72 
mins., col., sd. PERF B 



NHF Membership 



Northeast Historic 
Film Staff 

David S. Weiss 

executive director 

Samantha Boyce 

member services & office 
assistant 

Patricia Burdick 

staff archivist 

Jane Berry Donnell 

distribution coordinator 

Heather White 

research &: stock footage 

Phil Yates 

technical services 



As .111 independent nonprofit organi/ation, 
\'l II depends on its members. All mem- 
ct 15% off at the Alamo Theatre Store. 

Please join and renew! Call 800 639-1636. 
Internet access? http://www.acadia.net/old- 
film/ has a membership signup form. 

Individual Member, $25 per year. 

All members receive many benefits including: 

Moving Image Review. 

Advance notice of events. 

1 )iscoimts on Videos of Life in New 
England. 

1 )iscounts on events at the Alamo Theatre. 

Set of NHF postcards. 

Free loan of videotapes through Reference- 
by Mail. 

Educator/Student Member, $ 1 5 per year. 
All individual membership benefits for 
teachers and students at any level. 
Nonprofit Organization, $35 per year. 
All individual membership benefits plus: 



Reduced rates for technical nd 

presentations. Addition '-wing 

Household Members, 

All listed benefits for the member 

household, plus: Discounts for the entire 

household at Alamo Theatre events. Two 

Nl 1I ; lapel pins. 

Associate, $100 per year. 

All listed benefits plus: Three free shipments 

(up to nine tapes) of Reference by Mail 

videos. Free Nl II T-shirt. 

Corporate Member, $ 1 00 per year. 

All benefits of Associate Membership. 

Friend, $250 per year. 

All listed benefits of membership plus: 

free shipments (up to 15 tapes) of Reference 

by Mail videos. Free NHF cap. 

Patron, $ 1 ,000 per year. 

All listed benefits of membership plus: 

Unlimited Reference by Mail videos. Dinner 

for four at MacLeod's Restaurant. 



Membership and Order Form 

Join Now! Free Reference by Mail! 

Ordered by: 



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City 



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Zip 



Phone 



Ship to: (if different from above) 



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D Please send Video Sales Catalog! 



Northeast Historic Film, P.O. Box 900 

Bucksport, ME 04416 USA 

207 469-0924 FAX 207 469-7875 




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Up to $25.00 S 4.50 Sales tax Maine residents add 6% 




$25.01 to iMj.Ou ib.uu CL . . j i_i ji- / L \ 
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A fifty-foot steel I-beam was threaded through the Alamo Theatre to support 
the auditorium's new projection booth. Photo Sharon Bray, The Enterprise. 





P.O. Box 900 
Bucksport, ME 04416 



Address Correction Requested 



A Vote of 
Confidence 

HF was honored as "New 
Chamber Business of the Year" by 
the Bucksport Bay Area Chamber 
of Commerce. At a ceremony on 
April 24 attended by Chamber members 
and Governor Angus King, Chamber 
founder Richard Rosen presented the 
award to archives co-founders David 
Weiss and Karan Sheldon. 

Rosen asked audience members to 
picture themselves as teachers of Maine 
Studies, a required subject in the state's 
public schools. "You've covered the 
Missouri Compromise. All the students 
have memorized the names of the 
counties, and now you want them to 
discover, somehow, what life was like 80 
or 1 00 years ago in Maine. To show the 
students what ice harvesting was like, or 
what a log drive looked like." 

Home to Amateur Footage 

In addition to collecting and safeguard- 
ing extensive holdings of feature and 
commercial films, television news 
footage, and documentaries, NHF also 
has become the largest repository for 
amateur film in North America, said 
Rosen. 

But perhaps more important to 
members of the local community was 
NHF's hosting of 26 events in 1996, 
amidst its building's ongoing renovations, 
he said. 

As a longtime downtown merchant 
and Bucksport native, Rosen said NHF's 
decision to purchase the Alamo Theatre 
in 1992 is a good fit for the archives and 
community. 

Accepting the award, executive director 
Weiss recalled the warm welcome NHF 
received from the first day, when 
passersby "cheered as we pried plywood 
off the front windows." 

As Weiss noted, the capital campaign 
going forward this year will enable the 
construction of a facility which will 
ensure cultural resources for many 
generations. 

"We still have our work cut out for 
us," said Weiss. "I see this award as a vote 
of confidence." 



Northeast Historic Film 



MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation 
of Northern New England 
Motion Pictures 

Winter 1998 



Maxim Collection 
Reference by Mail 
NHI- Membership 
The Vitak, by Alan Kattelle 
Theater Mural 



1! 
11 



Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Him, 
I'O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 04416. 
David S. Weiss, executive director 
Doug Hubley, writer and editor. 
ISSN0897-07( 

E Mail OLDFlLM@acadia.net 
Web http://www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ 



Champion Gift 

Champion International of Stamford, 
Connecticut, has announced a 
$50,000 gift to Northeast Historic 
Film. The international woods products 
company owns the paper mill in Bucks- 
port and is the area's largest employer. 

"Northeast Historic Film is in a 
position to provide major benefits to 
Greater Bucksport. At Champion we 
want to help build a strong community 
which provides a full range of opportuni- 
ties to its citizens. NHF has shown a 
commitment to community which 
makes us confident that they can be a 
cultural anchor for the business district 
and the area at large. Their continued 
growth and success will add a much- 
needed dimension to die Bucksport 
area," said Fred Oettinger, Vice President 
and Operations Manager. "We would 
like to see even more community 
involvement in the future so we have 
included a $25,000 matching gift to 
encourage new members and increase 
membership giving." 

NHF Board President Richard Rosen 
accepted both the gift and the challenge 
to increase membership by saying, "The 
Board of NHF is extremely pleased to 
accept this gift and feels that its impor- 
tance goes beyond the fact that it is the 
largest corporate gift ever received by the 
organization. This grant goes a long way 
toward demonstrating to other area and 
national flinders that Northeast Historic 
Film has the strong support of its com- 
munity. With more than $1 million still 
to raise it is crucial to be able to point to 
commitment from our local area." H 



Exceptional Efforts in Cooperation and Outreach 



All year, Northeast Historic Film has 
reached out to students with new 
activities relating to our region's 
culture and moving-image heritage. 

In January, pianist Danny Part accom- 
panied silent films at the Fred R Hall 
Elementary School in Portland. Pan, now 
in his mid-80s, charmed the children 
with a skill he first acquired at age 12. 
Independent filmmaker Jay Craven, 
fresh from completing the feature A 
Stranger in the Kingdom, agreed to add a 
high school "master class" to his Maine 
engagement. Held at the Alamo Theatre, 
the after-school session used excerpts 
from Plungerman, a video produced by 
George Stevens Academy (GSA) students. 
Teachers and students from Bucksport, 
Orono, GSA, FJlsworth High School, 
Foxcroft Academy, and Hampden 
Academy attended the workshop. 



Outreach activities based on the 1929 
film Evangeline culminated in a screen- 
ing at The Grand, in Ellsworth the first 
showing of a film with live music in the 
530-seat cinema in nearly a decade. 
Northern Maine music educator Steve 
Vonderheide, commissioned by the 
Acadian Archives/ Archives acadiennes to 
score the film, accompanied the screening. 

During the autumn, NHF staff worked 
on Bucksport's Arts in Education Project, 
helping produce a videotape with students. 

As these and many other interactions 
with students and teachers show, NHF 
takes its educational mission to heart. 
Such activities are typical of the excep- 
tional efforts by staff and board 
members, volunteers, donors, col- 
leagues, funders, and artists that make 
NHF a leader in cultural preservation 
and access. H 




Danny Pott with students of the Fred P. Halt Elementary School, Portland. 



Executive Director's Report 



The year 1 997 has been a pivotal year 
for Northeast Historic Film full of 
challenge, excitement, and promise. 
It was a year of change in many impor- 
tant ways; primarily it has been a year of 
preparation. There was business as usual, 
too, with an ever-increasing number of 
wonderful and significant collections 
coming to the archives, well-received 
public events, educational activities, 
participation in regional and national 
initiatives, and expanded distribution. 

Staff Evolves 

For die staff it was a year of evolution. 
Staff archivist Patricia Burdick has moved 
on to new challenges. Pat helped us out 
of the dark ages and established proce- 
dures and systems that will serve us as we 
grow. Headier White, in charge of 
research and stock footage, moved back 
to New York City. She will still have a 
connection with NHF, as she joins the 
staff of Hot Shots/Cool Cuts, our 
national and international representative. 
We added pan-time cataloger James 
Sweet, a native Bucksporter with a 
marvelous descriptive flair, who is 
enhancing access to the collections. We 
have also been joined by Daniel Gottlieb 
working in archival services (see page 6). 



Divide and Conquer 

On the second floor a window sheds 
light on a newly-constructed 1 ,000- 
square-foot area. Last spring, old inade- 
quate floors on both levels came out 
creating a chasm in the center of the 
building. Working back up from the 
basement we constructed a stronger first 
floor. We then added a concrete platform 
for the new projection booth. A projec- 
tion window opens into the booth area, 
which is ready to be finished out. Steel 
beams topped off the booth area and 
support the replacement second floor, 
eventually the new home of technical 
services. Along the second floors east 
wall the temporary vault area has been 
nearly doubled. We added new dehumid- 
ification and are pleased with the results. 
This storage expansion was badly needed, 
as the existing space was close to full. 
The theater now has walls; they are 
freshly painted and adorned with a 40- 
foot mural depicting cinemas as 
described on page 16. We are ready for 
the next phase to make the theater fully 
operational with 35mm projection 
equipment, a new sound system, carpet- 
ing, acoustical surfacing, and lighting. I 
will not miss walking over to click off 
portable work lights to start each show. 









Northeast Historic Film Staff 

David S. Weiss 

Executive director 
nhf@acadia.net 

Samantha Boyce 
Office assistant 
refbymail@acadia. net 

Jane Berry Donnell 

Distribution coordinator 
nhfvideo@acadia. net 

Dan Gottlieb 

Archival services 
oldfilm@acadia.net 

PhilYates 

Technical services 
oldfilm@acadia.net 



Board of Directors 

Deborah Joy Corey 
Michael J. Fiori 
Paul J. Gelardi 
James S. Henderson 
Alan J. McClelland 
Martha McNamara 
Frederick Oettinger 
James Phillips 
Terry Rankine 
Richard Rosen 
Karan Sheldon 
David S. Weiss 
Pamela Wintle 



Advisors 

Gillian Anderson 
Q. David Bowers 
Peter Davis 
Alan Kattelle 
Robert W. Wagner 




Future Vision 

In August NHF held a Board retreat, led 
by Mort Mather, hosted by Paul and 
Deborah Gelardi at their home in Cape 
Porpoise, Maine. The entire Board was 
present, and all appreciated the Gelardis' 
hospitality. The Board spent the beautiful 
summer day discussing the organization's 
mission and future direction. Mort 
Mathers report said, "From the retreat I 
came to the conclusion that NHF's 
greatest strength is its excellent, well- 
deserved reputation. And its greatest 
weakness is timidity in trumpeting its 
excellence." 

At the retreat, the Board elected to its 
membership Frederick Oettinger of 
Penobscot, Maine. Oettinger is the 
manager of Champion International 
Corporation's Bucksport mill. I am 
writing this column immediately after 
our December board meeting it is my 
pleasure to share with you the strong 
sense that we have a most experienced 
and committed board. 




NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Northeast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but are not limited 
to a survey of moving pictures of 
northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
climate-controlled storage; Creation of 
educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 
members of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production com- 
munity, through providing a study 
center, technical services and facilities. 



Regional Culture: 

Downeast Humor 

"Well, if you can't tell me how to get to 
Alfred, you can at least tell me if there's a 
gas station nearby. " 

"I don't know. " 

"You don't know much, do you?" 

"No, hut then again, I ain't lost. " 

^^^he preservation and release on 

videotape of A Downeast Smile-In, 

B comprising three episodes of a 
1970 television show by the late humorist 
Marshall Dodge, will have a profound 
resonance for longtime Mainers. 

For all the ways Maine has changed 
since a hit-and-run driver killed Dodge 
as he rode his bike on a Hawaiian 
vacation, the past 1 5 years might as well 
have been 50. Most affected by these 
changes have been the people of the 
world that Dodge depicted in his wry 
stories: the Mainers who work the sea, 
the woods, the farms. 

The video packs a double punch, not 
only reminding us how good Dodge was 
at his work, but also briefly resurrecting 
lifestyles that have largely gone the way 
of Maine's groundfisheries, its woods, 
and its agrarian economy. 

Dodge was the New York native who 
in the 1950s fired up his tape recorder 
and, with fellow Yale student Robert 
Bryan, recorded the first of five "Bert and 
I" albums. The records became cult 
favorites nationwide. For many, they 
defined Maine humor. 

"Marshall and Bob Bryan had no idea 
what they'd done," says Dodges half- 
brother Fred. "They were just a couple of 
college kids. They loved the humor and 
they loved the people." 

Honorary Native 

Dodge eventually moved to Maine, 
became one of the states best-known 
entertainers and founded the annual 
Maine Festival, now in its third decade. 
(Bryan rarely performed with Dodge, 
although he remained Dodge's partner in 
recording and business.) 

A Downeast Smile-In was one of 
several broadcasts featuring Dodge 
produced by Maine Educational 
Television (now part of the Maine Public 
Broadcasting Network). Others in the 
NHF collection include In the Kitchen, 




a series that also featured such Maine 
humorists as Joe Perham. 

NHF had the original broadcast tapes 
on hand in late summer 1 996, when the 
restoration began. A seal in the cases used 
for the 2-inch videotape stock had begun 
to crumble, coating the tapes and 
delaying their viewing. Preservation 
copies were eventually made at VidiPax 
in New York. 

Meanwhile, a donation of the same 
programs from Fred Dodge expedited 
the compilation, as Dodge had the shows 
on %-inch stock, which NHF used for 
preproduction. 

Fred Dodge encouraged NHF to 
request a grant from the Marshall Dodge 
Memorial Fund for restoring the video- 
tapes. The foundation, which supports 
the Maine Festival and other causes in 
the state, will benefit from the sale of A 
Downeast Smile-In. 

Master of the Slow Build 

The three half-hour episodes are "Aunt 
Mehitabel's Funeral," consisting of sea 
stories; "The Woods," and "Mr. Perkins' 
Privy," which looks at farm living. The 



film crew caught Dodge in live perfor- 
mance and in a variety of Maine locations. 

Close-ups of Dodge on stage are a 
revelation. His mastery of storytelling is 
complete, from his command of accents 
and sound effects to an exquisite sense 
of phrasing and timing qualities 
essential to this brand of humor, which 
relies on a slow build and an under- 
stated punch line. 

Bits range from the classic "Banger 
Packet" story, whence the "Bert and I" 
tag line came, to a rendition of a train 
conductor calling out each station 
between Bucksport and Vanceboro. It's 
hard to explain exacdy why the latter is 
so funny. 

Perhaps it speaks to a distinct flavor of 
the absurd that permeates so much of 
this humor and that, maybe, was what 
it took to get through a lifetime in the 
old Maine. I 

A Downeast Smile- In may be borrowed 
free of charge by Northeast Historic Film 
members through NHF's Reference by Mail 
service. The 90-minute video is for sale at 
$24.95. Call 800 639- 1636. 



Archives: Jay Strike/Community Record 

Peter Kellman Leads Preservation Effort 

"You take someone's $10-an-hour job for 
$8, there's a $6 crowd waiting for you." 



Ten years ago last June, respond- 
ing to company demands for 
wage and work-rule concessions, 
1 ,267 production workers struck die 
International Paper (IP) mill in Jay, 
Maine. The strike's anniversary last 
summer hardly surfaced in the media 
surprisingly, considering die impact of 
the 16-month walkout. 

Raymond Ouellette, a third-generation 
IP worker and a striker, videotaped 
countless hours of union meetings and 
events. "I figured someday someone 
would probably want [the tapes] and do 
something with them," Ouellette says. 
After all, he points out, people in Jay are 
still talking about the paperworkers' 
strike against IP in 1921. 

Peter Kellman, a North Berwick 
resident who coordinates the Maine 
chapter of the Program on Corporations, 
the Law, and Democracy, worked with 
the striking locals as an AFL-CIO 
strategist. Kellman copied Ouellette's 
videotapes, donating the copies to NHF 
two years ago. 

This year, Ouellette donated his 
original tapes, enabling NHF to make 
archival copies from first-generation 
footage. Kellman raised nearly $2,000 to 
fund the video preservation effort. 



Chlorine Spills, Sing-alongs 

The tapes depict a conflict that ulti- 
mately broke the striking locals, cost 
some paperworkers their jobs, turned 
others into scabs, brought out-of-state 
workers into the mill and violence to the 
streets. The strike ended when the 
national union leadership withdrew its 
support for the walkout. 

The videotapes now at NHF include 
TV news spots, union rallies, group 
sings, clashes on the picket line, environ- 
mental problems related to the strike, 
statements and speeches. 

Ouellette hopes that the tapes will offer 
a lesson for young people. "Maybe 
somebody will learn from our mistakes," 
he says. "Labor is a great part of this 
country. And if people know what 
companies can do and what unions can 
do, I think it would help them. Unions 
are going down, and that's a bad thing, 
because if it wasn't for the unions, people 
wouldn't be making the money they are." 

Ouellette cites an episode captured on 
tape: Jesse Jackson's speech to the strikers 
in October 1987. While Jackson obvi- 
ously has the 1988 presidential campaign 
in mind, he nevertheless speaks to the 
situation: "The scab must understand 
about the weakness of 'scabism'," he says. 




Bridging a Gap 

Ouellette's videotapes are part of a 
collection of documentation Peter 
Kellman assembled and indexed during 
and after the Jay strike. The strike papers, 
including letters, union documents, and 
more than 1 ,000 newspaper clippings, 
Kellman donated to the University of 
Maine. 

He aimed to address a gap in the 
annals of earlier labor negotiations. 
"There was so much missing in terms of 
the actual strikers and the people who 
participated telling their story," Kellman 
says. "There are newspaper articles, but 
very little oral history or anything else." 

"I felt a responsibility to have the 
record for future generations. And so 
completing that was a big relief for me. It 
feels good to know that this stuff is 
someplace now, and available for people 
to look at." 

"Most people will probably tell you it 
was one of the most dramatic and 
important events in their lives," Kellman 
says. "I don't think there's any majority 
about how people feel about things I 
think there's a lot of different ways 
people feel." 

Additional Resources 

Kellman's collection is part of a broad 
effort to interpret the Jay strike. In 1989, 
videographer David Riker brought his 
documentary, Many Faces of Paper: Jay, 
Maine, Fights Back, to Jay. 

Due for 1998 publication are two 
histories of the strike. Pain on Their Faces, 
a book put together by two strikers, will 
be published by the Bureau of Labor 
Education at the University of Maine. 
Cornell University Press will publish a 
history of the event by Professor Jack 
Getman of the University of Texas Law 
School. 



Ray Ouellette behind the camera. 
Photo courtesy United Paperworkers 
International Union Local 14. 



Collections: Hiram Percy Maxim 
and the Amateur Cinema League 



In real estate it's location, location, 
location. In film preservation, its 
timing, timing, timing. 

That was true in the case of a donation 
of family films to NHF in August. The 
films were shot in the 1920s and 1930s 
by Hiram Percy Maxim, founder of the 
Amateur Cinema League (ACL) in 
effect, a founder of home moviemaking. 

The Maxim Collection includes more 
than 30 reels of 16mm film documenting 
family interests and activities from nature 
scenes to a European trip. These films 
came to Bucksport as a result of one 
woman's generosity, another's curiosity, 
and some good timing. 



Hiram Maxim and 

Percy Maxim Let 

in 1920. 

Photo courtesy 

Percy Maxim Lee 

and Hamilton Lee. 



'Mag the Hag,' in Drag 

The films were donated by Hiram Percy 
Maxim's daughter, Percy Maxim Lee, of 
Mystic, Connecticut. Her grandfather, 
H.P. Maxim's father, was Sir Hiram 
Stevens Maxim, a Maine native and an 
engineer whose inventions included the 
first practical machine gun. 

H.P. Maxim (1869-1936) inherited 
diat bent for engineering. Always at 
technology's leading edge, he built an 
early electric car, delved into radio and 
aviation, and in 1908 established a gun- 
silencer factory. 

When home-movie cameras became 
available in the mid- 1920s, he started to 
make films. Percy Lee, now nearly 92, 
recalls that her father's camera was a 
constant. "He was enamoured of die 
moviemaking business, and he was 
forever making us do things so he could 
take pictures of us," she says. 

For their day and genre, the films are 
elegant. Compositions are thoughtful. 
Such devices as intertides and ACL- 
supplied leaders, with their animated 
sunbeams, lend a professional gloss. 

While most document the family and 
surroundings, Mag the Hag (1925) was a 
"dripping melodrama" written by H.P.M. 
and starring his daughter Percy as a 
young swell named Percy. This hapless 
fellow defies his upper-crust family to 
woo a country lass, with the aid of a 
mysterious talisman. 

"My family now, my great-grandchil- 
dren even, are astonished" at some of die 




old films, Percy Lee says. "It really is 
quite interesting, as a child, to look at 
pictures of your great-great-grandfather." 
Or your great-great-great grandfather. 
One film, made during a visit to 
London, includes images of Sir Hiram 
Maxim himself. It is now in Bucksport. 

In Blew Glynn 

One day last summer, "a young woman 
blew in here and said she was looking for 
material on the Amateur Cinema League 
did I have any?" Lee recalls. "And I 
said, Tm sorry, I don't have, but I have 
an awful lot of film.'" 

The young woman was archivist Karen 
Glynn, from die Southern Media 
Archive at the University of Mississippi. 
In July, she toured small-format film 
archives on die East Coast studying their 
operations and archival practices. 

One stop was NHF, where she spent 
more than a week working widi archivist 
Patricia Burdick and technician Phil 
Yates. In her free time, Glynn researched 
the Amateur Cinema League. Founded 
by H.P. Maxim in 1926, die organization 
published "how-to" books and a monthly 
journal called Movie Makers, ran compe- 



titions, and provided other services to 
members. A Maine historian, Charles 
Swain, provided die connection to Percy 
Maxim Lee. 

Ms. Lee invited Glynn to visit her in 
Mystic on her return trip south. Lee picks 
up the story. "About a mondi before, my 
oldest son and I had been down in die 
storage room here, looking at diis massive 
amount of films," she says. "What were 
we going to do with them? 

"When she said, 'I know what you can 
do with them,' it was a godsend. She 
packed them up and shipped diem off, 
and I was absolutely delighted." 

Glynn couldn't have picked a better 
moment. Lee, she says, is "in the process 
of cleaning out her house, and making 
sure that diings of value, of emotional or 
personal or historic value, are given to 
the appropriate people." 

"Then I showed up and knew what to 
do widi it, so it really was just great 
timing." 

Longstanding Public Service 

Percy Maxim Lee's donation continues a 
notable record of public service. Among 



continued on next page 



Maxim, continued from previous page 

other accomplishments, she was a 
founder of the progressive Renbrook 
School in West Hartford, and of the 
Farmington (Conn.) Land Trust. Also in 
Connecticut she served on a judicial 
review board under Governor Ella Grasso. 

On the national level, Lee was presi- 
dent of the League of Women Voters in 
the 1950s, and served on a consumer 
advisory panel under presidents Kennedy 
and Johnson. 

Saving the films after her father's death 
was a personal act, done for the family. 
"It never occurred to me that there was 
any value in any of this at all," she says. 
"And I never would have known it if this 
young woman hadn't turned up looking 
for the ACL stuff." 

Yet Lee is delighted to have another 
opportunity to perpetuate her father's 
work and memory. "Since he started this 
amateur movie business pretty much 
throughout the country," she says, "I 
think it is a credit to him that these 
things have been saved and can be 
enjoyed by others." 

And a credit to her also? "Maybe it is, 
maybe it isn't," she laughs, with typical 
modesty. "I didn't know what else to do 
with them." B 



Staff Portrait: Dan Gottlieb 



Archival services staff person since 
June, Dan Gottlieb brings to the 
Alamo a background in documen- 
tary filmmaking. 

This 35-year-old Bar Harbor resident 
has recorded Europe's largest open pit 
mine and documented the journey of a 
humanitarian aid caravan in Cuba. He's 
a believer in film's power to further a 
good cause. 

He's also one of the most genteel 
conversationalists you'll ever meet, 
someone who can convincingly say 
"most certainly" instead of "yeah." 

Film history is a core issue for Dan. 
"I feel that film is in a dangerous 
purgatory, a transitional stage," he says, 
"as larger institutions that previously 
relied on film as a primary medium of 
information find themselves switching 
to video." As the technology changes it 
makes the role of archives like NHF 
"extraordinarily important." 

Family film is a particular interest. 
"The way people approached family life 
with film was very different from the 
way people approach family life with 
video," Dan believes. "That aesthetic 
itself is worthy of note." 

Videotape is inexpensive and video 




results are immediate, so the camcorder 
is often used indiscriminately, Dan 
explains. But with film, because of high 
cost and the time for processing, the 
average home moviemaker couldn't 
afford to be too casual. Therefore, "the 
shot selection is much more careful and 
results in a completely different aes- 
thetic." 

Emotional Process 
One of Dan's first assignments was to 
catalog a collection from a Freeport, 
Maine, family. This, he says, was "an 
extraordinarily emotional process of 
watching a family's whole life in a 
couple of days." 

"Suddenly at the end," he recalls, "I 
was really moved to see signs of the end 
of that generation of the family. For 
instance, each year the mother and 
father would return to the University of 
Maine for their reunion, and each year 
the gatherings would get smaller. 

"Early on they would stage plays and 
funny skits. Later on, as they got older 
and their numbers diminished, it was 
increasingly sad to watch the older 
people gathering without the vitality I'd 
witnessed but a few hours earlier." 

Making People Aware 

NHF's outreach mission also works for 
Dan, a 1992 College of the Adantic 
graduate with an interest in alternative 
education. Ushering at a screening of 
the newly preserved feature film 
Evangeline in Ellsworth, Dan happened 
to chat with people he knew from Bar 
Harbor. He says that some were amazed 
to learn about the tragic Acadian 
expulsion. 

He adds, "I think it was additionally 
enlightening in that it was an example 
of a lot of films made about this region's 
culture that people are not generally 
aware of." 

"I think that's important, just to make 
people aware of the history of filmmak- 
ing, and perhaps to encourage people to 
pursue filmmaking in the state today." 
Most certainly! H 



Reference 
by Mail 




What is Reference by Mail? 

Members of Northeast Historic Film are 
invited to borrow from the FREE 
circulating loan collection, Reference by 
Mail. There is never any charge for 
borrowing. We will even pay for shipping 
the first rime you borrow up to three 
tapes in this first shipment! After this 
there is just a $5 shipping charge for each 
loan. 

Member Information on page 8. 
Order Form on page 9. 



Public Performance 

Videotapes listed here are offered as a 
reference service. Where possible, public 
performance rights are included. Please be 
sure to check each tapes status: PERF 
means public performance rights are 
included. No admission should be 
charged for events where Reference by 
Mail videos are being shown. Where there 
is no PERF, the tape is for home use only, 
or face-to-face classroom instruction. 

If you have a date in mind, call 
Samantha Boyce at 207 469-0924 to 
ensure availability. 



Maine Humanities Resources 

This list incorporates videotapes that 
were acquired for Ideas to Go, the Maine 
Humanities Resources loan service. 

Videos for Sale 

Many of diese tapes are available for 
purchase through NHF. Please call for a 
catalog of Videos of Life in New 
England, or check our website at 
www.acadia.net/oldfilm/. 

Return Instructions 

The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be in the mail on their 
way back to NHF five days after they are 
received. 



American Indians 

Earth Medicine, an eight-pan series on 
use of plants and herbs by Little Tree, 
now a Vermont resident. From open-reel 
half-inch videotape. Two VHS video- 
tapes. 1975. Total 240 mins., b&w, sd. 
PERF 

The First Mainers, Passamaquoddy 
Indians of Pleasant Point and Indian 
Township. 1975. 22 mins. col., sd. 

Our Dances, Penobscot Indian Island 
School documentary that demonstrates 
traditional and tribal dances. 1997. 30 
inin., col., sd. 

Our Lives in Our Hands, Micmac Indian 
basketmaking cooperative in northern 
Maine. 1988. 50 mins., col., sd. 

The Silent Enemy, see "Feature Films" 
section. 



Wabanaki: A New Dawn, cultural 
survival and revival of Wabanaki of 
Maine and Maritime Canada. Interviews, 
music, dance. Produced on behalf of 
Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission. 
1995. 25 mins., col., sd. 

The Mystery of the Lost Red Paint People, 
archaeology of the circumpolar region, 
including coastal New England. 1987. 
60 mins., col., sd. 

Where the Rivers Flow North, see "Feature 
Films" section. 

Artists and Authors 

Berenice Abbott: A View of the Twentieth 
Century, life and work of one of 
America's most significant photogra- 
phers; she lived in Maine into her 90s. 
1992. 56 mins., col., sd. 

Bonsoir Mes Amis, portrait of two of 
Maine's finest traditional Franco- 
American musicians. By Huey. 1990. 46 
mins., col., sd. 



Grace: A Portrait of Grace DeCarlton Ross, 
independent filmmaker Huey traces 
Ross' silent film and dance careers. 1983. 
50 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Donald Hall and Jane Kenyan: A Life 
Together, New Hampshire poets read 
from their works at home and in the 
grange hall. 1994. 60 mins., col., sd. 

William Kienbusch, see "Oral History" 
section. 

Master Smart Woman, Maine novelist 
Sarah One Jewett (1850-1909) by Jane 
Morrison. 1984. 28 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

May Sarton: She Knew a Phoenix, the 
poet reads and talks at home. Produced 
by Karen Saum. 1980. 28 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 



Reference by Mail 

Portrait of George Hardy, examination of 
relationship of a woodcarver with those 
who buy his works. Strong vision of life 
Down East. Winner of Cine Golden 
Eagle. 1995. 30 mins., col. & b&w, sd. 

Renascence: Edna St. Vincent Millay, poet 
Edna St. Vincent Millay, one of Maine's 
most famous writers. 1993. 58 mins. 
PERF 



Boats and the Sea 

Around Cape Horn, Captain Irving 
Johnson aboard the bark Peking. 1929. 
37 mins., b&w, sd. 

Marine Mammals of the Gulf of Maine, 
field guide to whales and seals. The 
Allied Whale program at College of die 
Adantic. 1991. 24 mins., col., sd. 



On Board the Morgan: America's Last 
Wooden Whaler, whaling archival 
photographs, rare film footage of 
whaling. 23 mins., col. and b&w, sd. 

Tales ofWoodand Water, visits to boat 
builders and sailors up and down the 
coast of Maine. 1991. 60 min., col., sd. 

The Ways at Wallace and Sons/The Bank 
Dory, footage of boatbuilding, seafaring 
and maritime skills. 1984. 58 mins., col., sd. 



Your Membership Supports NHF 



J 



As an independent nonprofit organization, NHF depends 
*^on its members for financial support. 

All members get 1 5% off at the Alamo Theatre Store-and 
enjoy the satisfaction of knowing they support the archives' 
work. 

Please join and renew! Call 800 639-1636. Or find us on 
the internet at www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ where you can 
access our secure server to join and renew using your Visa or 
MasterCard. 

We have some great new membership premiums. A mem- 
bership in Northeast Historic Film makes a wonderful gift 
for an individual or an organization you care about. Please 
maintain your membership at die highest level you can 
afford! And don't forget that a multi-year membership saves 
everyone time and effort. Many dianks. 

Individual Member, $25 per year. 

All members receive many benefits including: 

Moving Image Review. 

Notice of special events. 

Discounts on Videos of Life in New England. 

Discounts on events at the Alamo Theatre. 

Free loan of videotapes through Reference by Mail. 

Your choice of one of these premiums: 

Postcard set (6), NHF mug, NHF pen, NHF lapel pin. 

Educator/Student Member, $ 1 5 per year. 
All individual membership benefits for teachers and stu- 
dents at any level. 

Nonprofit Organization, $35 per year. 

Publications, discounts, and Reference by Mail. Additional 

copies of Moving Image Review on request. 

Household Members, $50 per year. 
Publications, discounts for the entire household at Alamo 
Theatre events, and Reference by Mail. 
Your choice of one of these premiums: 
NHF Collections Guide (a 64-page illustrated guide), 






postcard set (12), NHF mouse pad, 2 NHF lapel pins, or 
a Video of Life In New England: Aroostook County 1920s, 
Earliest Maine Films, Ice Harvesting Sampler, King Spruce, 
or Maine 's TV Time Machine. 







Associate Members, $ 1 00 per year. 

Publications and discounts plus three free shipments (up 

nine tapes) of Reference by Mail videos. 

Your choice of one of these premiums: 
Alamo T-shirt in white or black, or a Video of Life in New 
England: Big Horse, Bryant Pond: The Last Ringdown, A 
Downcast Smile-In, From Stump to Ship, May Sarton: She 
Knew a Phoenix, Norumbega, On Board the Morgan, 
Shingles Made in Maine, So You Want to be a Woodsman?, A 
Tale of Two Fisheries, Timber is a Crop, Underwater, Out of 
Sight, Woodsmen and River Drivers. 

Corporate Membership, $100 per year. 
All benefits of Associate Membership. 

Friend, $250 per year. 

Publications, discounts, and five free shipments (up to 1 5 

tapes) of Reference by Mail videos. 

Your choice of one of these premiums: 
Embroidered NHF T-shirt in mocha, blue granite, moss 
green, iris, brick; or NHF hat in moss green, blue granite 
or brick; or a Video of Life in New England: A Century of 
Summers, Gee Bee Airplanes, Giant Horses, Joshua 
Chamberlain, Man with a Plan, Marine Mammals in the 
Gulf of Maine, Mount Washington Among the Clouds, Our 
Fishing Heritage, Roughing the Uppers, Yachting in the 30s. 

Patron, $ 1 ,000 per year. 

Publications, discounts, and Reference by Mail. 

Your choice of one of these premiums: 
Embroidered NHF sweatshirt, dinner for four at 
MacLeod's Restaurant in Bucksport, Ticket to Paradise 
book, a Maine History Video Set (six titlessee catalog), 
or any one Video of Life in New England, except titles 
restricted to "institutions only." 








Yachting in the 30s, compilation of J 
Boats footage from various sources. 
1930s. 45 mins., b&w and col., sd. 

Children 

Big Horse, two horses, Spike and Smitty, 
talk about their lives as working animals. 
1996. 30 mins., col., sd. 

The Maple Sugaring Story, see "Woods" 
section. 

The Robert McCloskey Library, five 
beloved stories with McCloskey's illustra- 
tions: Lentil, Make Way for Ducklings, 
Blueberries for Sal, Time of Wonder, 
Bun Dow: Deep- Water Man, and 
Getting to Know Robert McCloskey. 



City Life 

Anchor of the Soul, African-American 
history in northern New England 
through the story of a Portland church. 
1994. 60 mins., col., sd. 

Can I Get There From Here? Urban Youth, 
families, work, homelessness in Portland, 
Maine. 1981. 29 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Roughing the Uppers: The Great Shoe 
Strike of 1937, documentary by Robert 
Branham and Bates College students 
about CIO shoe strike in Lewiston & 
Auburn, Maine. 1992. 55 mins., col., sd. 

24 Hours, fire fighting in Portland, 
Maine, with memorable narration. 
Produced by Earle Fenderson. 1963. 27 
mins., b&w, sd. PERF 



Civil War 

Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine, 
Maine Civil War hero: Fredericksburg, 
Gettysburg, Appomattox. 1994. 55 
mins., col. & b&w., sd. 

Country Life 

Aroostook County, 1920s, agriculture 
potato growing with horse power. Down- 
town Presque Isle, Maine. Aroostook 
Valley Railroad electric trolley. 1920 and 
1928. 20 mins., b&w, (piano) PERF 

The Batteau Machias, student project on 
construction of a traditional river-driving 
boat. 1990. 22 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Ben's Mill, a documentary about a 
Vermont water-powered mill by NHF 
members Michel Chalufour and John 
Karol. 1982. 60 mins., col., sd. 



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Reference by Mail 

A Century of Summers, the impact of a 
summer colony on a small Maine coastal 
community by Hancock native and 
NHF member Sandy Phippen. 1987. 45 
mins., b&w and col., sd. PERF 

Cherryfield, 1938, a terrific home movie 
about rural spring. 6 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 

Dead River Rough Cut, lives and philoso- 
phies of two woodsmen-trappers by 
Richard Searls and Stuart SUverstein. 
1976. 55 mins., col., sd. 

Down East Dairyland, produced by the 
Maine Dept. of Agriculture. 1972. 14 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Giant Horses, draft horses and their 
drivers. 1991. 28 mins., col., sd. 

Ice Harvesting Sampler, five short films 
showing a near-forgotten New England 
industry. Narration by Philip C. Whitney 
explains process and tools. 26 mins., 
b&w, sd. PERF 

Maine Summer Festival, role of agricul- 
tural products in summer fairs. 1970. 12 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Movie Queen, Lubec, pretend movie 
queen visits her home town in Down 
East Maine. 1936. 28 mins., b&w, si. 

Nature's Blueberryland, Maine's harvesting 
of wild blueberries. 13 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Paris, 1929, and other views, home 
movies of the Wright family in Paris, 
Maine, haying, mowing, picnics. 80 
mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Pan-Time Farmer, promotes agriculture 
as an after-hours pursuit, ca. 1975. 17 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Sins of Our Mothers, girl who went to the 
Massachusetts textile mills from Fayette, 
Maine. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF 



Early Film 

All But Forgotten, documentary on the 
Holman Day film company (1920-1921) 
in Maine; by NHF member Everett 
Foster. 1978. 30 mins., col. and b&w, sd. 
PERF 

Cupid, Registered Guide, a two-reel North 
Woods comedy by Maine writer Holman 
Day. 1921. 20 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Earliest Maine Films, lobstering, trout 
fishing, logging, canoeing on Moosehead 
Lake, and potato growing, from 1901 to 
1920. 44 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Just Maine Folks, a bawdy hayseed one- 
reeler. Poor image quality. 1913. 8 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

The Knight of the Pines, another North 
Woods adventure by Maine writer 
Holman Day. 1920. 20 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 

The Simp and the Sophomores, Oliver 
Hardy plays Prof. Arm-strong. 1915. 14 
mins., b&w, sd. 

Ecology & Energy 

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, her 1 963 
book about pesticides helped raise 
ecological consciousness. 1993. 60 mins., 
col., sd. 

Passamaquoddy Tidal Power Project, 
documentary with intertitles on con- 
struction of worker housing at Quoddy 
Hill, dam building (with rail) at Pleasant 
Point and Treat Island, ca. 1936. 30 
mins., b&w., si. PERF 

Voices from Maine, "Is economics 
incompatible with nature?" A 1970s 
discussion of development versus quality 
of life. Scratched. 1970. 30 mins., col., 
sd. 

Wyman Station, Central Maine Power 
film on the construction of Wyman 
Station on the Kennebec River, with 
Daggettville, the workers' town. 1928- 
1930. 30 mins., b&w, si. PERF 



Feature Films 

Evangeline, the Acadian experience 
interpreted by Longfellow and 
Hollywood, starring Dolores Del Rio. 
Opening reels silent, the rest has music 
from original discs preserved by 
UCLA. 1929. Approx. 90 mins., b&w, 
silent with music. 

The Family Album, Alan Berliner's look at 
family life, from birth to death, through 
home movies and sound from many 
sources. 1986. 60 mins., b&w, sd. 

Long Day's Journey Into Night, Sidney 
Lumet directs Eugene O'Neills drama 
about his family in New London, 
Connecticut. With Katharine Hepburn 
and Jason Robards. 1962. 174 mins., 
b&w, sd. 

Lost Boundaries, produced by Louis de 
Rochemont. An African-American 
physician's experiences with discrimina- 
tion in the south and in New 
Hampshire. 1949. 99 mins., b&w, sd. 

Man with a Plan, Fred Tuttle, a retired 
Vermont dairy farmer, runs for Congress 
in this comedy by John O'Brien. 1996. 
90 mins., col., sd. 

A Midwife's Tale, Martha Ballard's 18th 
century journals of Maine life, a period 
drama and a documentary of historian 
Laurel Ulrich's work by writer-pro- 
ducer Laurie Kahn-Leavitt and director 
Richard Rogers. 1996. 89 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Moby Dick, Gregory Peck plays Captain 
Ahab, New Bedford whaler. Script by 
Ray Bradbury, Norman Corwin, and 
John Huston, from Herman Melville's 
novel. 1956. 1 16 mins., col., sd. 

Our Town, Thornton WJder's New 
Hampshire village and its inhabitants. 
With a score by Aaron Copland. 1940. 
90 mins., b&w, sd. 

Prophecy, horror: couple investigates 
terrifying eco-events in Maine. 1988. 
102 mins., col., sd. 



10 



The Seventh Day, romantic comedy 
places a group of New Yorkers in a 
coastal Maine village and has diem work 
out dieir cultural differences. 1922. 65 
mins., b&w, music. 

The Silent Enemy, a drama shot on 
location in winter, starring Penobscot 
Indian Molly Spotted Elk. 1930. 121 
mins., b&w, music. 

Theodora Goes Wild, Theodora Lynne, 
played by Irene Dunne, wrote a scan- 
dalous novel in a small Connecticut 
town and went to New York. 1936. 94 
mins., b&w, sd. 

Timothy's Quest, Kate Douglas Wiggins 
story of two orphans in die Maine 
countryside. Scenes of horse-drawn 
wagons, shoeing oxen, and odier rural 
activities. 1922. 90 mins, b&w, music. 

Way Back Home, Maine native Phillips 
Lord's only film. Also stars Bette Davis. 
1931.81 mins., b&w, sd. 

Where the Rivers Flow North, shot on 
location in Vermont and New 
Hampshire, directed by Jay Craven. 
Woodsman (Rip Torn) and his American 
Indian companion (Tantoo Cardinal) in 
a story about timberland and water 
power. 1994. Ill mins., col. sd. 

Fisheries 

Basic Net Mending, how to repair fish 
nets. 1951. 16 mins., col., sd. PERF 

It's the Maine Sardine, catching, packing 
and eating Eastport fish. 1949. 16 mins., 
col., sd. PERF 

Fence in the Water, weir fishing for 
herring in Penobscot Bay, Maine, by 
independent filmmaker Peg Dice. 1980. 
45 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Maine's Harvesters of the Sea, fisheries 
including shrimp, cod, and lobster. 1968. 
28 mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Maine Lobster, lobster fisheries and 
consumption widi unusual footage 
including die assembly of lobster TV 
dinners, ca. 1955. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 



Our Fishing Heritage, Grand Banks dory 
fishing, stop-seining mackerel and 
herring, and lobstering. 60 mins., b&w 
and col., sd. 

A Tale of Two Fisheries, fishermen tell a 
tale of two fisheries in Maine. 1997. 16 
mins., col., sd. 

Tuna Fishing off Portland Harbor, Maine, 
off-shore fishing with a Maine sea and 
shore warden, ca. 1930. 10 mins., b&w, 
si. widi intertides. PERF 

Turn of the Tide, drama about formation 
of a lobster cooperative; from die 
Vinalhaven Historical Society. 1943. 48 
mins., col., sd. 

Under Water, Out of Sight: An Ecosystem 
Case Study, shows how underwater 
marine communities are changing as a 
result of ever-growing fishing pressures. 
1996. 15 mins., col.,sd. 

Franco-American Life 

Emigration: A Franco-American 
Experience, traces French immigration to 
North America and documents die 
history and culture of die Franco- 
American community in New England. 
1981. 30 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Evangeline's Quest, documentary exam- 
ines the mythology of Evangeline and its 
relation to Acadian history. 1996. 53 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Reflets et Lumiere 

Three seasons of a television series on 
Franco-American culture produced by 
the Maine Public Broadcasting Network 
(MPBN). The programs aired from 1979 
to 1981. Sound and image quality varies. 
Programs listed below: 

Potato Harvest, Northern Maine, inter- 
view and poetry reading by Norm Dube 
in Bedford, NH. 1979. 39 mins. 

St. Mary's Hospital, St. Mary's Hospital in 
Lewiston, Maine roots in the early 
1 800s. Teachers from New Hampshire 
on the Canadian American Institute. 
1979. 27 mins. 



The Catholic Church, Amedee Proulx, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Portland, Maine, and 
Raymond LaGasse, a married priest from 
Concord, NH. An interview about 
Holyoke, Mass. 1979. 28 mins. 

Social Clubs, old social clubs of Lewiston, 
Maine; the drinking establishments of 
Madawaska, Maine. A portion of a slide 
presentation from New Hampshire, "I 
Too, Am New Hampshire." 1979. 28 
mins. 

Acadian Villages, Acadian history 
interview with Guy Dubay of 
Madawaska, Maine. Visits to the Acadian 
Village near Van Buren, Maine, and le 
Village Acadien in Carquet, New 
Brunswick, Canada. A short visit to 
Quebec City. 1979. 27 mins. 

Organizers, Franco-American organizers 
and their success at motivating people to 
action. "Assimilo," a spoof exploring 
Franco-American stereotypes. 1979. 27 
mins. 

Festivals, Franco-American festivals in 
Lewiston, Maine; Lowell, Mass.; Old 
Town, Maine. Franco-American studies 
in Waterville, Maine. Arts and crafts fair 
in Manchester, NH. 1979. 27 mins. 

Lowell Mills, Irene Simoneau, Franco- 
American historian on the role of women 
in the mills. Roger Paradis of Fort Kent, 
Maine, about Franco-American folklore 
and music. 1979. 29 mins. 

Geography 

Assignment in Aroostook, Loring Air Force 
Base in northern Maine closed in 1 994. 
This is a look at its heyday: Mom at 
home, the sergeant at work, the family at 
play. 1956. 27 mins., col., sd. PERF 

From Dreamland Sent, history of the 
1 893 Maine State Building now in 
Poland Spring, Maine. 1995. 25 mins., 
b&w, sd. 

Great Cranberry Island, amateur film by 
Robert Browning of a young boy on 
Cranberry Isles, Maine, learning about 
island life. 1930. 60 mins., b&w, si. 
PERF 



11 



Reference by Mail 

History is Always Being Made at 
Bucksport, history of Champion 
International paper mill and the town. 
1995. 23mins., col., sd. 

Mount Washington Among the Clauds, a 
history of the hotels, newspaper and cog 
railway, 1852-1908. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Mysteries of the Unknown: A Documentary 
About Our Community, an outstanding 
student video about Bucksport, Maine, with 
original music. 1990. 30 mins., col., sd. 

New Hampshire Remembered I, Pine 
Island Parks roller coaster, a movie at the 
State Theatre, and Benson's Wild Animal 
Farm. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF 

New Hampshire Remembered II, trolleys, 
ski-jumping, and die Mount Washington 
Hotel. 1995. 60 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Norumbega: Maine in the Age of 
Exploration and Settlement, early Maine 
history, based on maps transferred from a 
slide tape. 1989. 16 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Places of Interest in the Bucksport Area, a 
student project. 1989. 60 mins., col., sd. 

Road to the Sky, the Mount Washington 
Auto Road. 1991. 25 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. 

This Land: The Story of a Community 
Land Trust and a Co-Op Called 
H.O.M.E., Karen Saum's documentary 
on Orland, Maine organization. 1983. 
26 mins., col., sd. PERF 

The Trees Still Grow, Berlin, New 
Hampshire, history of a mill town. 30 
mins., b&w, sd. 

Vermont Memories I, includes 1930s 
promotional film Seeing Vermont with 
Dot and Glen. 1994. 57 mins., col. and 
b&w, sd. 

Vermont Memories II, post World War II. 
Television comes to Vermont, and other 
things. 1995. 57 mins., col. and b&w, sd. 

Vermont Memories HI, seldom-heard 
stories which may surprise you. 1996. 60 
mins., col. and b&w, sd. 



Wohelo, 1919, a promotional film of girls' 
camp activities on Sebago Lake, Maine. 
10 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Going to the Movies Talks 

Glenn Andres, Middlebury College, 
places for community entertainment in 
Vermont. 33 mins. 

Dona Brown, University of Vermont, 
vacationing at the turn of the century. 35 
mins. 

Martha Day, University of Vermont, 
Vermont documentary films. 29 mins. 

Kathryn Fuller, Virginia Commonwealth 
University, rural moviegoers and Uncle 
Josh. 24 mins. 

Kathryn Fuller, Virginia Commonwealth 
University, dish nights and other promo- 
tional gimmicks. 39 mins. 

Leger Grindon, Middlebury College, 
boxing films. 34 mins. 

Henry Jenkins, MIT, Star Wars & fan 
culture. 33 mins. 

Garth Jowett, University of Houston, 
movie audiences in the 1950s. 44 mins. 

Garth Jowett, University of Houston, the 
moviegoing experience. 24 mins. 

Susan Kennedy-Kalafatis, University of 
Vermont, who we are mapping 
ancestries in northern New England. 1 8 
mins. 

Chester H. Liebs, drive-ins. 18 mins. 

Andre" Senecal, University of Vermont, 
Franco-Americans and the movies. 17 
mins. 

Tom Streeter, University of Vermont, 
new technologies over the years. 40 mins. 

Denise Youngblood, University of 
Vermont, movie theaters before 1918. 44 
mins. 

Humor 

A Downeast Smile-In with Marshall 
Dodge, three episodes on one videotape 
of the storyteller's original series, first 
broadcast on Maine Educational 
Television in 1970. 90 mins., col., sd. 

Way Back Home, see "Feature Films" 
section. 



Morrison, Jane Collection 

Children of the North Lights, children's 
book creators Ingri and Edgar d'Aulaire. 
1976. 20 mins., col., sd. 

In the Spirit of Haystack, noted craft 
school in Deer Isle, Maine. 1979. 10 
mins., col., sd. 

Los Dos Mundos de Angelita/The Two 
Worlds ofAngelita, a Puerto Rican family's 
move to the Lower East Side of New 
York. 1982. 73 mins., col., sd. 

Master Smart Woman, see "Artists and 
Authors". 

The White Heron, a young girl's choice 
between friendship and a creature she 
loves. Story by Sarah Orne Jewett. 1989. 
26 mins., col., sd. 

Oral History 

Carlton Willey, baseball pitcher, 1958 
rookie of the year, interviewed in a high 
school project. Unedited interview from 
VHS master. 1990. 39 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Hap Collins of South Blue Hill, JeffTitons 
oral history interview with field footage 
of a lobsterman, painter and poet. 1989. 
56 mins., col., sd. PERF 

R. Buckminster Fuller, architect and 
visionary; University of Maine 
Distinguished Visitors interview. 1968. 
30 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

William Kienbusch, artist; University of 
Maine Distinguished Visitors interview. 
1968. 30 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Maine Survivors Remember the Holocaust, 
eight Maine survivors talk about World 
War II. 1994. 43 mins., col., sd. 

An Oral Historian's Work with Dr. Edward 
Ives, "how to" illustrating an oral history 
project by the founder of the Maine Folk- 
life Center. 1987. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Russell Wiggins, newspaper publisher and 
diplomat; University of Maine 
Distinguished Visitors interview. 1968. 
30 mins., b&w, sd. PERF 



Political Discourse 

Jerry Brown Speaks in New Hampshire, 
from the 1992 presidential campaign. 28 
s., col., sd. PERF 



John E Kennedy Speech, anniversary of the 
Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1 963 at 
University of Maine homecoming. 30 
mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

Ella Knowles: A Dangerous Woman, video 
on a suffragist & Bates alumna by Robert 
Branham & students. 1991. 25 mins., 
col., sd. 

Muskie vs. Monks: The Final Round, the 
third debate between Senator Muskie 
and Bob Monks on accountability. 
1976. 58 mins., col., sd. 

Radio Fishtown, one-man radio station in 
the country battles corporate avarice and 
an FCC Goliath who threaten his 
broadcast license. 1991, 28 mins., col., 
sd. 

Margaret Chase Smith Speech, declaration 
of intention to run for President, 
includes Q&A. 1964. 17 mins., b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Sports 

Legends of American Skiing, footage of 
early skiing, including Dartmouth 
Outing Club, Tuckerman's Ravine, Toni 
Matt. 1982. 80 mins., col. and b&w., sd. 

Winter Sports in the White Mountain 
National Forest, skiing, sledding, and 
snowshoeing in New Hampshire. 1934. 
28 mins., b&w, si. PERF 

Student Work 

Best of Fifteen Years: The Maine Student 
Film and Video Festival, compilation 
directed by video educator Huey. 1993. 
58 mins., col., sd. 

Technology 

Bryant Pond, The Last Ringdown, 
Americas last magneto telephone 
company, in Bryant Pond, Maine. 
Produced by GTE Visnet. 1982. 12 
mins., col., sd. PERF 



Television 

The Cold War I Transportation I TV 
Commercials, three compilation tapes 
from the Bangor Historical 
Society/WABI collection. 40 to 50 mins. 
each; b&w, si. and sd. PERF 

Maine's TV Time Machine, the 1950s and 
early 60s in news, sports and local 
commercials. 1989. 34 mins., b&w, sd. 
PERF 

Transportation 

The Bangor rJrAroostook Railroad, a 
documentary on Maine railroads. 1991. 
30 mins., col., sd. 

Gee Bee Airplanes, the sport planes that 
made a fabulous entrance into die 
aviation scene in the early 1 930s. 60 
mins., b&w and col., sd. 

Moving History: Two-foot Rail Returns to 
Maine, antique trucks haul die Edaville 
Railroad trains to Portland. 1993. 48 
mins., col., sd. 

Northern Railroads, steam era footage, 
stories by railroaders and historians. 
1995. 60 mins., col. and b&w., sd. 

Ride the Sandy River Railroad, one of die 
country's best two-foot-gauge railroads. 
1930. 30 min., b&w, si. with intertides. 

Womens Issues 

Working Women ofWaldo County: Our 
Heritage, documentary basketmaking, 
farming, and other work. 1979. 26 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Also in this series, Today and Her Story. 

Woods 

Cut and Run, health and safety in die 
woods in die era of mechanization, by 
Richard Searls. 1980. 40 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Forest Wars, "Can we have our wood 
products and our forest too?" 1 996. 72 
mins., col., sd. PERF 



From Stump to Ship: A 1930 Logging 
Film, complete look at the long-log 
industry from forest to on board a 
schooner bound for New York. 1930. 28 
mins., b&w, sd. PERF 

In the Public Interest: The Civilian 
Conservation Corps in Maine, the federal 
work program from Acadia National 
Park to Cape Elizabeth. 1987. 58 mins., 
sd., col. and b&w. 

King Spruce, harvesting pulpwood, 
includes horses and mechanical log 
haulers, ca. 1940. 23 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 

Last Log Drive Down the Kennebec, 
documentary about Scott Paper's last log 
drive. 1976. 30 mins., col., sd. 

Little Log Cabin in the Northern Woods, 
amateur film of a young woman's 
hunting trip near Brownville, Maine, 
with a professional guide, ca. 1930. 13 
mins., b&w, si. PERF 

The Maple Sugaring Story, children's 
video with teacher workbook. 1989. 28 
mins., col., sd. PERF. 

Our White Pine Heritage, how the trees 
are harvested for use in construction, 
papermaking, etc. 1948. 16 mins., b&w, 
sd. PERF 

Pilgrim Forests, Civilian Conservation 
Corps work in New England Acadia 
National Park and White Mountain 
National Forest, ca. 1933. 10 mins., 
b&w, si. PERF 

River Run, Machias River watershed and 
the log drive, ca.1951. 15 mins., col., sd. 

So You Want to be a Woodsman? compila- 
tion of 1940s training films including 
Use and Care of a Bucksaw and Twitching. 
58 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Then It Happened, 1947 forest fires that 
devastated Maine. Focuses on aftermath 
in southern Maine. 20 mins., col., sd. 
PERF 



13 



Reference by Mail 

Timber is a Crop, pulpwood harvesting in 
the 1940s- 1950s, from the Brown 
Company Collection, Berlin, NH. 66 
mins., col., sd. PERF 

Woodsmen and River Driven, "Another 
Day, Another Era, " unforgettable individ- 
uals who worked for the Machias 
Lumber Company. 1989. 30 mins., col. 
and b&w, sd. PERF 

Maine Humanities Council 

Tides from Maine Humanities Resources 
that do not fit into sections above. 

All Quiet on the Western Front, German 
recruits in WWI, passage from idealism 
to disillusionment. 1930. 132 mins. 

America and Lewis Hine, America's 
pioneer social photographer Lewis Hine, 
who recorded die development of 
industrial America. 1984. 56 mins. 

America's First Women Film Makers, four 
complete works from die silent eras two 
most accomplished women directors, 
Lois Weber and Alice Guy Blache\ 1913, 
1921. 114 mins. 

The Congress, Ken Burns explores the 
history and promise of this American 
institution. 1988. 90 mins. 

The Crash of 1929, history of die stock 
market crash widi a great rendition of 
"Blue Skies." 1990. 60 mins. 

Demon Rum, portrait of Prohibition 
along the Canadian border with a focus 
on the small town of Ecorse, Michigan, a 
center of cross-border smuggling. 1989. 
60 mins. 

Forging a National Government, 200 years 
of Congress, the Presidency, and the 
Judiciary. 1989. 

The Great Air Race of 1924, Army Air 
Service pilots in an around-rhe-world 
race in biplanes with no radios or 
directional equipment. 1989. 60 mins. 



The Great War, 1918, compilation 
documentary film with testimony from 
participants including a female Navy 
recruiter who went to theaters and 
addressed audiences. 1989. 60 mins. 

Heartland, a Western set in 1910 tells the 
story of a widow who takes a job with a 
rancher. 1979. 96 mins. 

Hull House: The House that Jane Built, in 
1 889 in the slums of Chicago, pioneer 
social worker Jane Addams opened Hull 
House to aid the poor, largely immigrant 
residents of die neighborhood. 1990. 57 
mins. 

The Indomitable Teddy Roosevelt, three- 
part biography comprising The Rise to 
Power, America Spreads its Wings, A 
Different World. 1983. 93 mins. total. 

Journey to America, immigration to 
America between 1890 and 1920. 1989. 
60 mins. 

A Little Rebellion Now and Then, 
Massachusetts farmers' uprising Shays 
Rebellion. 30 mins. 

Mr. Sears' Catalogue, for decades, the 
most widely read writer in the U.S. was 
Richard Warren Searls. He wrote every 
word of the Sears, Roebuck and Co. 
catalog. 1990. 60 mins. 



Modern Times in Maine and America, 
1890-1930, interviews, stills and moving 
images; introduction to a Council 
project. 1995. 30 mins. 

One Woman, One Vote, in 1848 the 
Seneca Falls Convention protested that 
women had no rights to their own 
property, or even their own children. 
1995. 106 mins. 

The Scar of Shame, drama with an 
African American actors. 1926. 80 mins. 

Story of Teddy Roosevelt, the Presidency. 
Part 1 , 33 mins. Part 2, 30 mins. 

Talk To Me: Americans in Conversation, 
what does it mean to be an American? 
Where's our common ground? 1996. 57 
mins. 

The Twenties: A Walk Through the 20th 
Century with Bill Mayers, the decade of 
booming business and industry, and 
finally, the collapse of the stock market in 
1929. 1984. 55 mins. 

Within Our Gates, earliest surviving 
feature film directed by an African 
American. 1919. 79 mins. 

The Wobblies, International Workers of 
the World, called "The Wobblies," a union 
that organized unskilled labor. 1979. 89 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 

P.O. Box 900 

Bucksport, ME 04416 




Address Correction Requested 



14 




The Vitak Projector 



The Vitak Projector was designed and patented 
(April 9, 1907) by Enoch J. Rector. 



by Alan Kattellc 

Alan KatteUe, an NHF Advisor, is a retired 
engineer who has been collecting and 
writing about amateur motion picture 
equipment for 25 years. He is currently 
completing a book titled The Home 
Screen, a history of the amateur motion 
picture industry in the United States. 

At first I wasn't sure if I had heard 
David Weiss correcdy. My wife 
Natalie and I had just arrived at 
Northeast Historic Film, looking forward 
to renewing our friendship with David 
and Karan Sheldon, NHF's co-founders, 
and seeing the progress since our first 
visit, several years ago. 

After the pleasantries, I thought I 
heard David say that someone had just 
called to say they had a Vitak projector, 
and David wondered if I was familiar 
with that machine? 

Encountering the Pterodactyl 

Well, yes, of course, the name instandy 
evoked an image, just as if someone says 
"pterodactyl" you have an immediate 
image, even though you have never seen 
one. And so it was with the word 
"Vitak." Up to that point it was just an 
image from a 67-year-old article in a 
long-defunct magazine, describing the 
genesis of home-movie machines and 
listing the Vitak as the first home-movie 
projector. 



But in 25 years of studying and 
collecting such apparatus, I had never 
seen a Vitak, nor expected to see one. I 
told David I was interested. I made an 
appointment with the owners, fortu- 
nately in a nearby town. 

There was no question that it was the 
real thing, missing only the original 
carbide lamp. There was the Vitak logo, 
painted on the cardboard snout. An offer 
was made and accepted. The owners were 
unable to tell us anything of its previous 
history, just diat it had been in the 
family. They seemed genuinely pleased to 
see the projector go to someone who 
knew what it was. 

The original Vitak consisted of a small 
carbide lamp, a "lamphouse," lens 
support and film advance mechanism, all 
mounted on a thin pine board, 24 inches 
long. The film supply reel was mounted 
on a vertical rod arising from the base 
near the film gate. There was no take-up, 
as the film passed through a slot in the 
base into a basket or bag beneath the 
table. 

The film was 17.5mm wide, center- 
perforated, one oblong perforation 
between each frame. The film base was 
probably nitrate, and the proximity of a 
lamp flame to a loose pile of nitrate film 
makes one shudder! 



First Family Projector 

The source of the films is not known, but 
a contemporary advertisement for a 
similar projector (Sears Roebuck 1905 
catalog) lists 3 1 tides, undoubtedly 
reduction prints from commercially 
produced short subjects. 

All we know about the Vitak is 
contained in the aforementioned article, 
"The First Thirty Years," by Merritt 
Crawford, which appeared in the 
December 1930 issue of Movie Makers. 
This was the monthly journal of the 
Amateur Cinema League, an organiza- 
tion of amateur cinematographers 
founded in 1926 by Hiram Percy 
Maxim, a member of the inventing 
Maxim family. (See this issue, page 5.) 

Merritt Crawford (1880-1945) was 
one of the motion picture industry's first 
historians, and he paid attention to the 
history of the amateur motion picture 
field. His brief article in Movie Makers 
gives an excellent summary of the efforts 
made between 1900 and 1930 to bring 
the tools of diis new art to the non- 
professional. Crawford describes and 
illustrates ten different amateur film 
gauges, and describes and illustrates 
eleven early home cameras and projec- 
tors, including the Vitak: 

In America, it is believed, the first 
individual projector using nonstandard 



continued on next page 

15 




Auditorium Takes Shape: 

Mural of the Century 



Natalie and Alan Kattelle with Vitak projector. 



Vitak, continued from previous page 

film and manufactured strictly for non- 
professional use appeared about 1902 
(sic). It was called the Vitak and was 
brought out by William Wardell (now 
it is said, an employee of the Fox Film 
Corporation) as a mail order article and 
widi the idea of advertising other 
products. The machine cost only $2.00 
at wholesale, being made mostly of tin 
and scrap wood. It ran film one-half 
standard size, 17.5mm wide, again with 
a single central perforation between 
frames. The reels were of fiber on a 
wooden spool. In appearance it looked 
not unlike a torpedo. 

Mr. Wardell offered to give "320 
pictures that move, absolutely free" 
with each machine, "scenes and events 
from all over the world, stirring horse 
races, exciting prizefights, pictures of 
President Roosevelt in church, great 
earthquakes" and many other things in 
his colorful advertisement of the Vitak. 
It does not appear however that he 
received any great call for this pioneer 
home projector for about the only 
record now left of die Vitak is die 
rather frayed advertisement from which 
the above is quoted and illustrated on 
die facing page. 

The reference to William Wardell is a 
tantalizing lead, but so far my efforts to 
track him down have come to naught. 
But anodier door has just appeared. 
Thanks to Charles "Buckey" Grimm, 
film historian, I have just learned that die 
Merritt Crawford Papers are preserved at 
the Museum of Modern Art in New York 
City. I can hardly wait to open that door! 



16 



Art really can transport you. In 
minutes, a 40-foot mural 
recendy installed in the Alamo 
Theatre auditorium zips visitors back 
through the century. 

The mural, dominating the audito- 
rium, depicts seven cinematic venues 
from the 1 890s onward, starting with a 
seaside casino and ending with an 
example of the multiplexes that prevail 
today. 

They're all in northern New England, 
including the Empire movie palace in 
Lewiston, the loka Theatre in Exeter, 
N.H., and the area's first multiplex, the 
Maine Mall Cinema in South Portland. 

Through the images and interpretive 
texts, the piece not only reminds visitors 
that movies have been around for 100 
years, but points up the role of the movie 
house as a symbol of changing times. 
"The places where we see movies reflect a 
large part of our social experience," says 
NHF's Karan Sheldon, who directed the 
mural project. 

"When movie houses were on Main 
Streets and in neighborhoods, we 
stopped in casually and often," she says. 
"In the early days of moviegoing the 
screen was often in an entertainment 
center such as a waterfront casino, pan of 
a festive excursion. Today an outing to 
the mall for a movie can be a big deal, 
too, particularly in northern New 
England where the drive can be 20 miles 
or more." 

Main Street Design 

The mural was created as part of NHF's 
interpretive history exhibition, Going to 
the Movies: A Century of Motion Picture 
Audiences in Northern New England. 
Conceived in 1994 and installed last 
October, the mural is the product of a 
team that included Portland artist Toni 
Wolf and Polly Baldwin of Main Street 
Design, based in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. Specializing in interpre- 
tive exhibit design, Main Street's other 
clients have included the National Park 
Service and the Smithsonian. The firm 
has been involved not only in the mural 
design but also in the planning and 
design of the entire Going to the Movies 



project, which includes a permanent 
display at the Alamo. 

Mural Artist Toni Wolf 

Wolf, a Pennsylvania native who moved 
to Maine 20 years ago, has painted 
several public murals in Portland and 
elsewhere, and was master scenic artist on 
a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles film. Yet 
she may be best known for exhibitions of 
her own work, at the Dead Space Gallery, 
the Barn Gallery and elsewhere in Maine 
and beyond. Her recent paintings are 
intensely colored self-portraits that 
explore dream imagery. 

An important source for the mural was 
a collection of movie-theater post cards, 
donated by NHF Advisor Q. David 
Bowers. From these and other images, 
Sheldon developed a database and a 
typology indicating changes in structure 
and function. 

Once buildings representing different 
eras in moviehouse evolution were 
selected, Wolf, NHF, and Main Street 
embarked on the design process. 

Engaging Chalk Talk 
The buildings, rendered in chalky white 
and yellow against a gray background, 
are depicted in a style that conveys form 
with the detail of an architectural 
drawing, but in a looser, friendlier style. 

For one visitor, reporter Jeff Hope 
from the Bangor TV station WABI, that 
freehand drawing style is key to the 
mural's appeal. "The hand-drawn look 
makes it much more interesting to me," 
Hope says. "It makes it seem animated." 

But Hope, who produced a piece on 
the mural for WABI TV, adds that the 
drawing style is just part of an effective 
design. A number of techniques engage 
the viewer. He applauds the simplicity of 
the layout and the chalk-like appearance, 
which suggests the classroom look here 
and you'll learn something. 

The mural dominates the auditorium 
through its size, vigor, and the fact that, 
until the movie or performance starts, 
there's nothing much else to look at. 
"You can't help but be drawn to it," 
Hope says, "and at least start thinking 
about it, and start to ask questions." H 



Special Events: 

Alan Berliner Reception and Screening 



On August 24, in its ongoing 
effort to promote independent 
filmmaking, NHF welcomed 
Alan Berliner to the Alamo for a screen- 
ing of two of his works, Intimate 
Stranger and Nobody's Business. Where 
many documentary filmmakers look to 
politics, history, or sweeping social issues 
for subject matter, Berliner examines 
American family life including his 
own. 

In his first feature, The Family Album 
(1986), Berliner meticulously pieced 
together found home movies and audio 
to trace family life from infancy to old 
age. 

Berliner looked closer to home for die 
subject of Intimate Stranger. It profiles 
his maternal grandfather, an Egyptian- 
Jewish textile merchant who loomed 
large in the lives of international business 
colleagues, but, as the tide indicates, 
remained a remote and mysterious figure 
in his family's eyes. 

Nobody's Business, Berliner's latest, 
depicts his father, a retired sportswear 
manufacturer who retains a vital spark 
and orneriness despite having entered 
what one reviewer calls "a brokenhearted, 
reclusive old age." The work won this 
years International Film Critics 
Association Award at die Berlin 
International Film Festival. 

Intimate and Ironic 

"What Alan does, which no other 
documentary filmmaker that I've seen 
does, is to be intimate and ironic at the 
same time," said Peter Davis, a Castine 
resident, author and himself an Academy 
Award-winning filmmaker (Hearts and 
Minds). Speaking to the Bangor Daily 
News, Davis continued, "This is an 
amazing and magical trick that novelists 
do, but diat nonfiction writers and 
nonfiction filmmakers can't manage." 

Davis, who has known Berliner since 
1993, welcomed about 60 people to a 
pre-screening party for the New Yorker 
and his wife, Anya, at his home. 
Photographer Patrisha McLean and 
author Deborah Joy Corey were Davis' 
co-hosts. 

"Alan is really unassuming, really 



open, and no New York attitude," says 
McLean. "He seemed really pleased to 
be there." 

A secondary goal for die event was to 
introduce NHF to Castine, and most of 
those attending the Berliner event are 
now new members and supporters. 

Despite acoustic problems in the 
theater, where sound-absorbing materials 
have yet to be installed and the sound is 
still a litde "live," Berliner and his films 
were a solid hit. 

Enthusiastic Audience 

"It was a very responsive audience," 
Davis reports. Viewers ranged in age 
from the teens to the 80s; the latter 
group included one particularly discern- 
ing member, writer Samuel Taylor, whose 
credits include the screenplay for Vertigo 
and both die stage play and original 
screenplay for Sabrina. 

"He told me how enthusiastic he was," 
Davis says, adding, "The non-profes- 
sional crowd, which of course was most 
people, thought diese were two terrific 
films." 

The intermission and the Q&A session 



that followed the films revealed the 
provocative power of Berliner's work. 
"Everybody was talking a lot, because his 
movies were so insightful," McLean says. 
"They were personal to him, but they 
brought up different issues with every- 
body. It caused a lot of conversation and 
comments, so it was really stimulating." 

"People were just captivated by these 
lives he was exploring," says Corey. "He 
has an unusual approach, an ability to get 
under the skin." 

In particular, Nobody's Business seemed 
to touch many viewers. Corey told 
Berliner how lucky he is to have such a 
father. "It's so rare to have that ability to 
be completely frank in a father-son or 
father-daughter relationship," she says. "I 
think that's a gift." H 

The Family Album, on videocassette, may 
be borrowed free of charge by Northeast 
Historic Film members through NHF's 
Reference by Mail service. Thanks to Alan 
Berliner. 

Milestone Film and Video, 212 865-7449, 
distributes Alan Berliner's work. 




Peter Davis, far right, and Alan Berliner, seated, with 
guests at the August reception in Castine, Maine. 



17 



New Members and Members Renewed at a Higher Level 



Patrons 

Fred Oettinger 
Ed Pert 

Friends 

Joan & David Maxwell 

Associates 

Joseph F. Condon 

Peter Davis 

Richard Kimball, Jr. 

Morton K. & Barbara J. Mather 

Don & Patrisha McLean 

Neil D. Novello 

Corporate Members 

Acadia Pictures, Inc. 

Households 

Richard C. Alden 

Brian & Carole Barnard 

Mr. & Mrs. Lester Bernstein 

William & Marianne Buchanan 

Michaela & JeffColquhoun 

Ruth & Joel Davis 

James & Leila Day 

G. Clifton I MIIK-S 

Gerald & Rosemary Garland 

Wendell Hodgkins 

William Irvine 

Susan & Chip Kimball 

Karen Koos 

Jim & Lisa Lawsing 

Elizabeth Lowell 

John & Katie Mankiewicz 

Kenneth & Cheri Mason 

Suzanne Massie & Seymour Papert 

Barbara & Geoff Neiley 

Brian & Marjorie Olivari 

Ron & Carol Perry 

Sharyn & Taylor Pohlman 

Nathaniel Porter & Stephanie Sala 

David & Mary Lou Pugh 

Miriam Reeder 

Mr. & Mrs. James Rogers 

Ruth & Ken Scheer 

Robert B. Shetterly, Jr. 

Karen & Jeffery Siegel 

Irving & Nancy Silverman 

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Swan 



18 



Nonprofit Organizations 

Bangor Public Library 

Brooksville Historical Society 

Buck Memorial Library 

Fryeburg Historical Society 

Polly Kaufman 

Katahdin Area Chamber of Commerce 

Limington Historical Society 

Marine Patrol, Lamoine State Park 

Marriner Library 

New England Museum of Telephony 

Oak Grove Nursing Care Center 

Thornton Oaks 

Tremont Historical Society 

Waterville Public Library 

Individual Members 

Richard Atkinson 

Scott Atkinson 

Joyce Bethoney 

Robert Blake 

Maureen Block 

Victor Brooks 

Rev. Charles T. Brown 

Richard & Elizabeth Burby 

Jodi S. Burke 

Sheree Chase 

Barbara Croswell 

Hank Croteau 

Sheila Cyr 

Dr. Peter DeCarlo 

Paul M. Densen 

Frank & Althea Drewniany 

John G. Edgerly 

Bill Elwell 

Edwin Emerson 

Tom Finson 

Betty Fraumeni 

John Garbinski 

Neal Goodwin 

Gail Graumnitz 

Joe Gray 

Kimberly L. Green 

Thomas Hall 

Margaret Hallett 

Charles W. Harmon 

Ivory & Janice Heath 

Arlene Hellerman 

Susan Herlihy 

Karen Hopkins 

Diane Huning 

Pearl & Cyndiia Hunt 

Mary B. Jessup 

Victoria Johnson 

Dena Kleiman 

George & Melissa Knowles 

Karen Kristoff 



Margaret M. Lacombe 
Betty & Ernie Larson 
Dorothy C. Liscombe 
Patrick T. McSherry 
Catherine McDowell 
Douglas Monteith 
Anne Phillips 
Eddie Potter 
Dr. Lloyd F. Price 
David Raymond 
Joyce A. Reed 
Steve D. Reynolds 
Frederick Reynolds 
David Sanderson 
GregSchaaf 
Laurie Schoendorfer 
Robert M. Schwier 
Jennifer L. Shallenberger 
Joan Sheldon 
Wesley Shorey 
Alex Stevens 
Don Tirabassi 
Jonathon Titcomb 
Steve Trimm 
Alston C. Turtle 
Pete Van Note 
Sheila Varnum 
Lucy Webster 
Donald Wilken 
Bruce Wmde 

Educator/Student Members 

John Baxter 
Alice Bissell 
Dolly Bolduc 
Richard Brucher 
Dorothy Carter 
Paul A. Cyr 
Luke Fernandez 
Joseph Hanley 
Judi Hetrick 
Marcia Howell 
Richard & Sue Jagels 
Walt Krauser 
Shirley LaBranche 
Bev Laplant 
Nancy MacKnight 
Paula Maker 
Margo Merrill 
Rene Roy 
Michael Sacca 
Mark R. Shibles 
Shirley Spencer 
St. Denis 
Nancy Tarpinian 
Alan C. Truax 



Calendar: 

A Workshop on Preserving Home Movies 



Our Stories 



March 14 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

1 1 a.m. Screening of examples in Remis 
Auditorium. 

1:30 p.m. Panel discussion in Riley 
Seminar Room. 

Museum of Fine Arts ticket office 
617 369-3770 

A workshop will be held at Bostons 
Museum of Fine Arts on Saturday, 
March 14, on the preservation and use of 
home movies and other non-commercial 
films. Presenters will speak about ways to 
identify, use, store, and preserve film 
gauges including 16mm, 8mm, Super 
8mm, and such rarities such as 9.5mm 
and 28mm. 

Alan Kattelle, immediate past President 
of die Movie Machine Society, is an expert 
on amateur film technology. (See article 
on the Vitak, page 15.) He will demon- 



strate types of hardware used to record 
and project film through the decades. 

Karan Sheldon, co-founder of 
Northeast Historic Film, will discuss film 
storage ideals and realities, and share 
examples of cooperative curatorial and 
outreach activities. 

Toni Treadway, of Brodsky & 
Treadway, is co-founder of the 
International Center for 8mm Film in 
Rowley, Massachusetts. She will talk 
about identifying old film, looking for 
signs of deterioration, preventing damage 
in handling, where to get help, and 
preservation options. 

Home movies benefit from attention 
to their condition, proper storage and 
handling, detailed labeling, and planning 
for permanent archiving. Simple steps 
taken by families and community 
institutions can result in extending the 
life of this irreplaceable record of daily 
events in the region. 



Saturday, April 11 

Alamo Theatre, Bucksport 

Maine Public Television will present a 
new documentary series, Our 
Stories, at the Alamo Theatre, 379 Main 
Street, Bucksport, on April 1 1 . The series 
is funded by the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

In each 60-minute documentary 
program, one of four Maine families will 
show how they have survived and 
adapted in rural Maine. Members of the 
families will be present at the screening. 

There is no charge. For more informa- 
tion call Bob Libbey (Maine) 800 884- 
1717; (from outside Maine) 207 783- 
9101 ; or email him at blibbey@mpbc.org. 
Information is available on the web at 
www.mpbc.org. 



In Memoriam 

We remember Joel White, who, 
with his family, donated 1 6mm 
projection equipment and film 
of family life. 

And we remember Gretchen Garrhey, 
who did lab work and shot photos for 
NHF, including the bridge across the 
Penobscot River. 

The board and staff of Northeast 
Historic Film express gratitude for these 
memories, and condolences to the 
families of Joel White and Gretchen 
Gaffney. 




19 




Jay Craven, Isaac Kestenbaum, and Myles Poland at The Alamo Theatre. 
Photo courtesy The Ellsworth American. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 

P.O. Box 900 
Bucksport, ME 04416 




Address Correction Requested 



Film Director Works 
With Students 

Vermont filmmaker Jay Craven, 
director of the new feature A 
Stranger in the Kingdom, held a 
workshop for high school students 
December 4 at The Alamo Theatre. 

Myles Poland and Isaac Kestenbaum, 
juniors at George Stevens Academy in 
Blue Hill, Maine, projected excerpts 
from their videos Plungerman and 
Plungerman //as a basis for discussing 
character development and action. 

The students planned the event. 
Craven, an experienced teacher and 
mentor, crossed diree states to lead the 
class. Volunteers Jill Knowles and Valerie 
Felt McClead helped make it happen 
and MacLeod's Restaurant provided 
supper. 

Many Schools Participated 

The auditorium's 125 seats held students 
from Bucksport, Hampden, Dover- 
Foxcroft, Ellsworth, Bangor, Orono, and 
Deer Isle. Also present were arts, social 
studies, and English faculty. 

Stuart Kestenbaum, Director of 
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, 
says, "This event was a wonderful way to 
inspire students, and a great use of a 
resource like Northeast Historic Film. It's 
the kind of program that lets kids know 
that diey are not alone in their art, and 
that diey have peers with similar inter- 
ests. Hearing a committed professional 
like Jay Craven talk about his films and 
filmmaking was inspirational." 

The students proceeded to The Grand 
in Ellsworth for the preview of A 
Stranger in the Kingdom, followed by a 
question and answer session on the 
challenges of independent production. 
Craven talked about die collaboration 
widi author Howard Frank Mosher. 

A Stranger in the Kingdom is die 
center of a trilogy based on books by 
Mosher, starting with Where the River 
Flows North (1994), and culminating in 
Disappearances set on the Canadian 
border during Prohibition. H 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation 
of Northern New England 
Motion Pictures 

Summer 1998 

National Film Preservation Fdn. 4 

TB Sanatorium 7 

John & Francis Ford in Maine 9 

Study Center 1 1 

Reference by Mail Update 14 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Film, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 044 1 6. 
David S. Weiss, executive director 
Doug Hubley, writer and editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769. 

E Mail OLDFILM@acadia.net 
Web http://www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ 



Campaign Progress What is a Regional Moving-Image Archives? 



NHF's capital campaign is gaining 
momentum in its goal to raise 
$2.4 million for building renova- 
tion, archival storage space, preservation 
technology, and to create a public study 
center. As the Board and staff move 
from the quiet stages of the campaign to 
an increasingly public phase, Moving 
Image Review will include updates on 
fundraising, and on progress at the 
Alamo Theatre. 

Bucksport Town Council 
Answers $64,000 Question: Yes! 
In a 6-0 vote, the Bucksport Town Council 
in May included $64,000 for the Alamo 
Theatre in the town's supplemental capital 
improvement budget. If approved after a 
hearing, the funds will be disbursed over 
two years and will help prepare the 
125-seat theater for public programs, 
enabling NHF to start an exciting series 
of events in the fall. Acoustic panels, 
carpeting, safety rails, lighting, and 
sprinkler systems will be installed over 
the summer. 

Camden National Bank Makes Pledge 
After opening its Bucksport branch, 
Camden National Bank didn't waste a 
moment before pledging $5,000 to NHF. 
In presenting the first installment, leaders 
of the Maine-owned bank emphasized 
their interest in supporting projects that 
benefit the local community. H 



A 35mm nitrate negative requiring preservation 

a record of work in northern New England. 

Cory Maple Sugar Company, Philippe Beaudry 

Collection. Frame enlargement by Karin Bos. 



This issue attempts to define regional 
moving-image archiving with topics 
representing our collections and activities. 
Some show connections between the 
regional and national spheres, such as 
glimpses of homegrown luminaries John 
and Francis Ford, and at the national 
preservation movement. Other topics look 
within the region at some unexpected 
history represented in the collections, and at 
valued links with people such as volunteer 
Jane Beal and Advisor Eric Schaefer. 

^^H"he United States has no single 

national film archives. Instead, the 
I national collection, as archivists 
call the aggregate of moving images in 
this country, exists in many collections, 
each with its own focus and institutional 
structure. Many have a regional mission. 



Three areas of service stand out: 

Preserving and providing access to 
moving images of regional interest; 

Teaching about moving-image preser- 
vation in the region; 

Helping films and related materials 
reach repositories whose missions 
match the content, thus ensuring 
maximal preservation and accessibility 
(see sidebar, Page 5). 

There has been virtually no federal 
financial support for those regional 
organizations that, on their own, help 
preserve the memory of the American 
people in moving images and sound. 
Recognition comes more often from 
producers and their audiences who find 



continued on Page 5 





Executive Director's Report 



I am pleased to report that Nathaniel 
Thompson has joined the NHF Board. 
Nat has spent most of his career, so far, 
working at WCSH-TV 6 in Portland, 
Maine. He brings to the Board much- 
needed expertise in matters pertaining to 
our television holdings. Nat and his wife 
Peggy have been appreciated supporters 
of the archives. Welcome, Nat! 

New Horizons in Education 
Over the last few months many exciting 
ideas about the educational use of our 
collections have been emerging. 

Board member Martha McNamara has 
been spearheading thought and action on 
our educational mission. Close to home, 
we've had a series of meetings with 
Bucksport Superintendent of Schools 
Marc Curtis, Curriculum Development 
Director Elaine Emery, Miles Lane 
School Principal Carol McRae, and 
during a stimulating in-service day 30 
members of die Bucksport High School 
faculty. 

The result has been a clearer under- 
standing of how to make the facilities 
and collections of Northeast Historic 
Film most useful for die schools. These 
efforts will help us develop a range of 
offerings that will ultimately benefit 
schools throughout the region. We look 



forward to nurturing an exploration of 
areas such as visual literacy, media 
history, and cultural history, as they relate 
to a regional archives. On Page 1 1 you 
can read more about our developing 
study center. 

Danny Patt and The People's Century 
Silent film accompanist Danny Patt is 
featured in the motion picture episode of 
the new PBS documentary series The 
Peoples Century. Part, a Maine resident, 
has worked with NHF since 1989 to 
boost the appreciation of die art form (he 
is shown with elementary school students 
in Moving Image Review's Winter 1 998 
cover photo). The series looks at signifi- 
cant developments in die century from a 
global perspective. Danny Patt's inclusion 
is an appropriate tribute to a talented 
musician and a caring performer. 

Picture Perfect 

As we go to press, posters of feature films 
with New England themes, a gift of John 
Lowe, are ready for installation along the 
east wall of die auditorium. Stop by for a 
look at these evocative posters of Holly- 
wood films made or set in New England, 
including Little Women, The Whales of 
August, Mermaids, Dolores Claiborne, 
and The Man Without a Face. 



The Movie Queen visits a Newport, Maine, grocery 
in 1936. Frame enlargement by Karin Bos. 



Thanks to Board, Advisors, and Members 

I'd like to thank NHF's Board for its 
support in recent months, in helping to 
advance the capital campaign. Each one's 
advocacy is immensely important to the 
organization. 

Thanks also to our growing group of 
Advisors. They have contributed in many 
ways, and it's always a joy to be with 
them. 

And I'd like to personally thank each 
member for new or continuing support. 
You are vital to communicating our 
goals, and NHF would not exist without 
you there, offering encouragement, using 
the collections, and enjoying the archives. 

Fred Oettinger, a Board member, told 
recently of sharing film of ice harvesting, 
once an important regional industry, with 
his children. His kids, like many people, 
thought ice comes only from refrigera- 
tors. There is nothing like the immediacy 
of actuality film for showing how different 
things were, not so long ago. 




/ 




NHF Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of Nordieast Historic 
Film is to collect, preserve, and make 
available to the public, film and 
videotape of interest to the people of 
northern New England. 

Activities include but are not limited 
to a survey of moving pictures of 
northern New England; Preserving 
and safeguarding film and videotape 
through restoration, duplication, 
providing of technical guidance and 
climate-controlled storage; Creation of 
educational programs through 
screenings and exhibitions on-site and 
in touring programs; Assistance to 
members of the public, scholars and 
students at all levels, and members of 
the film and video production com- 
munity, through providing a study 
center, technical services and facilities. 



Collections: 

Turn of the Tide 



"Cooperation, that's what we need on the 
coast. But we've got to learn to pull together. " 

^^iose words from a film in the Vinal- 
I haven Historical Society Collection 
I at NHF ring as true today as they 
did in 1943, when Turn of the Tide was 
released. 

Back then, the problem was artificially 
low prices at the dock for lobster. Today, 
it's the complex issue of fisheries manage- 
ment not only for lobster, whose 
current population boom seems to belie 
warnings of a crash, but for species like 
haddock and cod, where die crash has 
come. 

Then and now, cooperation among 
people who fish is a huge first step. In the 
1 990s, the creation of lobster councils 
under Maine law is giving meaningful 
representation in the management of die 
resource. In die 1 940s, as Turn of the 
Tide illustrates, lobstermen gained 
financial stability and new clout in the 
marketplace by forming credit unions 
and odier cooperative associations. 

Fascinating Continuity 
"I diink people in the industry would be 
fascinated by it," says Robin Alden, of 
Stonington, Maine. Alden was commis- 
sioner of die Maine Department of 
Marine Resources in die King administra- 
tion until last November, and was found- 
ing editor of Commercial Fisheries News. 

"My husband Ted and I watched it, 
and we loved it," Alden says. Ted - 
Ames, a Vinalhaven native, is a lifelong 
fisherman. "It amazed us how similar 
so many of the expressions and ways 
people operated are to [those] now," 
she adds. 

Shooting in Port Clyde, producer 
James McPherson and writer Mary 
Ellicott Arnold cast Maine lobstermen 
and dieir families in all the roles. They 
were instructed to act for die camera 
with dialogue to be dubbed in later. If 
the plot is melodramatic and the acting 
self-conscious, the images of the coast 
and its people are pure gold. 

Harmon Foundation Work 

The film was created under the auspices 




Ernest Malonty, Birger Magnuson, and other participants in Turn of the Tide, from the publication Maine 
Cooperatives Along the Coast, January 1943. Courtesy Vinalhaven Historical Society. 



of the Harmon Foundation, a socially 
progressive organization founded in the 
1 920s and perhaps best known for 
creating die Harmon Collection of 
African-American art at the National 
Portrait Gallery. Another fimder was the 
Cooperative League of the U.S.A., 
forerunner to today's National 
Cooperative Business Association. 

The film depicts a lobstering culture 
brought to the brink by dealer pricing 
that doesn't even meet the workers' 
expenses. The central character, Herm, is 
the stereotypical stubborn Mainer, who 
holds hard grudges and rejects any 
notion of cooperative effort. 

Co-ops Continue 

The community's precarious existence is 
exemplified by one character, Milt, who 
tries to solve his financial problems with 
one desperate trap-setting run. Milt's 
tragic end and the collapse of lobster 
prices galvanize the community into 
forming a credit union. 

Finally just before a parade of 
vignettes representing the real-life success 
stories of the cooperative movement 
Herm sees the folly of his ways and 
plunks his quarter down with the other 
founding depositors. 

"Many of those co-ops survive to this 
day," says Alden. 

The film's message has particular reso- 
nance now, "as we change the governance 
structure in lobster and form these lobster 
councils," Alden explains. "Its a pioneer- 
ing new type of management, and the 



whole issue of whether fishermen can 
have the group work together for the 
benefit of their fishery is what people are 
thinking about right now." 

If pricing is no longer a front-burner 
issue thanks in part to the cooperative 
movement it's an issue still. In part 
because lobster populations are so high 
that a lot of new dealers have pumped a 
lot of new money into the business, "lob- 
stermen aren't at the mercy of dealers the 
way they were back then," Alden says. 

But a handful of big dealers can 
continue to set basic prices, because of 
the perishable nature of the product. 
Lobsters are hungry that is, most 
catchable after they molt, and so the 
summer molting season creates "this 
huge pulse of lobsters that starts in the 
south and moves east along the coast," 
Alden explains. 

"Those lobsters are weak, they're 
relatively soft-shelled and they don't keep 
well, and lobstermen have to get rid of 
them. And so they're really captive at that 
point. There are some very large players 
in the lobster market that pretty much 
dictate what the price is. You can watch 
the lobster prices along the coast move in 
unison up and down." 

Lobster catchers and dealers remain 
locked in an embrace of mutual depen- 
dence and dislike, Alden says. If, as Turn of 
the Tide tells us, the value of cooperation 
is timeless, so is something a fisherman 
once said. " 'Every time a dollar changes 
hands, you've got different interests,' " he 
told her. "And that's absolutely true." B 



National Film Preservation Foundation 

Meet Director Annette Melville 



It's not news that film stock deteriorates 
over time. What may be a surprise, 
though, is that American films are 
disappearing faster than film archives can 
preserve them. Now preservation 
organizations like Northeast Historic 
Film have a new ally in the race to 
preserve America's film heritage. 

Mandated by a 1996 Act of Congress, 
with Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy 
playing a lead role, the National Film 
Preservation Foundation (NFPF) will be 
active by autumn. The NFPF is poised to 
be a significant new funding source for 
preservation projects, and just as impor- 
tant, will serve as a facilitator and public 
proselytizer for such efforts. 

Public education is central to die 
foundation's mission, all the more 
because of the types of film projects the 
NFPF will concentrate on. It will focus 
on "orphan" films, those works unpro- 
tected by any commercial interests and 
therefore dependent on public support. 

High-tech restoration jobs on 
Hollywood classics have received plenty 
of ink, says NFPF Director Annette 
Melville. "You go to the video store, and 
you see how the word "restoration" adds 
a cachet to materials in re-release." 

But in a nation full of filmmakers, 
Hollywood represents just the tip of die 
cinematic iceberg. 

"That's really what our Foundation is 
about," says Melville, "to try to show the 
breadth of American filmmaking and 
the diversity and richness of materials 
that were made throughout die United 
States and not just in the studios." 

Scorsese and Odier Angels 
The Foundation was created in response 
to two industry-wide studies initiated by 
the National Film Preservation Board of 
the Library of Congress, coordinated by 
Melville, who combines expertise in library 
science and public policy, and her hus- 
band, film scholar Scott Simmon. The 
studies can be accessed through the NFPF 
website, at www.filmpreservation.org/index. 

Film Preservation 1993 documented 
the crisis. Of all American movies made 
before 1950, the researchers found, only 
half survive. Fewer than 20 percent of 



feature films from the 1920s exist in 
complete form. For the previous decade, 
it's 10 percent. 

A key recommendation in the second 
study, Redefining Film Preservation: A 
National Plan (1994), was the establish- 
ment of a national, non-profit charitable 
organization to spearhead preservation 
efforts. Congress legislated the NFPF 
into existence in October 1 996, but 
denied it access to public money until 
the fiscal year 2000, when it becomes 
eligible for federal matching funds. 

Startup gifts came from director 
Martin Scorsese, an NFPB board mem- 
ber, and from the Film Foundation, a 
filmmakers' group that Scorsese started 
in 1 990 to address this issue. Additional 
support came from the Foundation of the 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences and the Association of Moving 
Image Archivists. 

The Foundation got to work in 
November 1997, with Washington, 
D.C., lawyer Eric Schwartz as pro bono 
executive director and Melville, based in 
San Francisco, as director. Along with 
Scorsese, the NFPF board includes 
Chairman Roger Mayer, president and 
COO of Turner Entertainment, actor 
Laurence Fishburne, and, ex officio, 
Librarian of Congress James Billington. 

"We see our programs focused in three 
areas," says Melville. "There will be a 
direct grant program for physical preser- 
vation, access and education projects. 
Second, we want to work as facilitators 
for group actions, helping archives work 
as consortia," to apply for major support. 

Third, she explains, the Foundation 
will commission projects, including 
publications, symposia, and other 
outreach and education efforts. 

The Foundation's fundraising success 
continues, with more than a quarter of a 
million dollars coming into the coffers 
since December 1997. Central to the 
mission are in-kind gifts coming from film 
preservation labs across the country, dona- 
tions the Foundation hopes to make 
available by autumn. These gifts, valued 
at more than $50,000 per year for three 
to five years, are especially valuable in view 
of the high cost of film preservation. H 



Grants in Action 

^^wo film preservation grants within 

I recent months benefit NHF's 
curatorial and outreach programs. 
Funds were also received from a labor 
union to support preservation of their 
history in moving images. 

Maine Community Foundation 

The Maine Community Foundations 
Expansion Arts Fund gave a grant of 
$3,500 to support "Evangeline in Maine: 
Musical Performance and Film Preserva- 
tion." The projects purpose is to com- 
mission a new print for the archives from 
the 1929 Evangeline, starring Dolores 
Del Rio, recently restored by the UCLA 
Film and Television Archive. 

The Acadian Archives/ Archives 
acadiennes and Northeast Historic Film 
requested the grant to support presenta- 
tions of the film with live music. 

The Maine Community Foundation is 
located in Ellsworth, Maine. Its website 
is www.mainecf.org. 

AFI/NEA 

The American Film Institute's National 
Center for Film and Video Preservation, 
with matching funds from the National 
Endowment for the Arts, awarded 
$2,780 to preserve two 1 6mm films, The 
Movie Queen, Lincoln, and The Movie 
Queen, Newport. 

They were shot by Margaret Cram, a 
member of the Amateur Theater Guild 
of Boston. She traveled through northern 
New England and New York with a 
camera and a troupe of actors. Cram 
made arrangements with local merchants 
to sponsor a production that included 
production and screening of a film 
invariably called The Movie Queen, and a 
stage show. 

UPIU Local 14, Jay, Maine 

In May, United Paperworkers Inter- 
national Union, Local 14, in Jay, Maine, 
made a contribution of $1,170 for the 
preservation of videos of the 1987 strike 
against International Paper Company. 
This project, reported in the winter 1998 
Moving Image Review, consists of more 
than 200 hours of documentation of a 
community and an industry. H 



continued from Page 1 

in the regional archives a great source for 
interpreting cultural history. 

L Northeast Historic Film collects, 

preserves, and makes available to the 
public film and videotape of interest to 
the people of northern New England. 
NHF focuses on Maine, New Hamp- 
shire, Vermont, and to some extent 

. Massachusetts. 

Concerned with the shared culture of 
this region, NHF forges links with people, 
within the region and beyond, who care 
about preserving the Northeast's heritage. 

Archival Structures Vary 
Are there other places like Northeast 
Historic Film? Yes, although few are 
independent nonprofits. More com- 
monly a regional archives belongs to 
another institution. This arrangement 

. affords an established constituency and 
institutional security. But there may be a 
downside, such as budgets determined by 
other priorities and vulnerability to the 
politics of a larger institution. 
In Canada, provincial archives repre- 

. sent the geography of moving-image 
archiving. Although the United States 
has no such system, several state archives 
and universities have taken on moving- 
image collections among them the 
Mississippi Department of Archives and 



History, the University of Kentucky, and 
the West Virginia Division of Culture 
and History. 

The National Co I lection & Shared Storage 

The national collection is a work in 
progress. The national moving-image 
preservation plans cited by Annette 
Melville on Page 4 prescribe steps for 
securing this heritage, including the 
initiation of regional study and storage 
centers. 

NHF plans a 3,000-square foot wing 
intended as a shared storage facility, and 
seeks partner institutions desiring 
improved climate control and curatorial 
care for their film and video. A consortial 
arrangement will lower the cost for 
individual institutions and raise the 
common standard of storage. The facility 
will demonstrate how sharing develop- 
ment and maintenance costs in a not-for- 
profit sphere can benefit die public. 

New Service for Regional Archives 
A similar principle would apply on a 
larger scale. While all archives are 
distinctive, all could benefit from a 
common voice expressing shared goals 
and needs. A moving-image interest 
group is needed to speak for regional 
archives. 



Dolora Del Rio as 

Evangeline in 1929. 

Courtesy of the Academy 

of Motion Picture Arts 

and Sciences. 




This is particularly urgent in the area 
of television preservation. There are far 
too few local and regional TV archives, 
and most of those are dismally under- 
funded. So little is known about local-TV 
preservation that on a map of the nation 
"here lie dragons" would say it all for the 
areas with virtually no connection to the 
moving-image archival community. 

The Association of Moving Image 
Archivists is launching an interest 
group for regional archives, led by Lisa 
Carter of die University of Kentucky 
(lisac@pop.uky.edu). The AMIA website, 
found at www.amianet.org, will feature 
links to regional archives and an online 
discussion list. 

Sharing Our Discoveries 

Film is often offered to the archives. 
Much of it relates to northern New 
England. But other material, too, reaches 
NHF's door, including dramas, news- 
reels, animation shorts, and comedies 
that are important because in die era 
represented very little survives. Here are 
some examples: 

The End of the Rainbow ( 1 9 1 6), a 
Bluebird five-reel film. Very litde survives 
of Bluebirds output. 

The Simp and the Sophomores (1915), 
the earliest surviving film appearance of 
Oliver Hardy. 

Aladdin (1907), and Sambo as Footman 
(1909), Pathe, the latter a viciously racist 
film. 

These and other films have been trans- 
ferred to institutions including the 
Museum of Modern Art, UCLA Film 
and Television Archive, George Eastman 
House, and the Human Studies Film 
Archives. 

NHF serves as an intermediary 
between, on the one hand, its most 
important supporters the interested 
public and on the other, the established 
public archives from which NHF has 
learned so much. 

Regional archives are essential. They 
enrich the national holdings and die 
public understanding of diem and they 
deserve increased financial support from 
corporations, foundations, and state and 
local rimders. I 




Volunteer Portrait: Jane Beal 



E 



Archie Stewart in 1985. Photographed by Rex Sauls 

at the wedding of Archie's granddaughter, Mary Kelly. 

Courtesy Mary Kelly and the Stewart family. 

In Memoriam: 

Archie Stewart 

Thomas Archibald Stewart died on 
March 11, 1998, at home in 
Newburgh, New York. He was born 
in 1902. His local paper called him a 
man who gave with "amazing foresight, 
leadership, fairness, generosity, devotion 
and love to the community." 

This describes his relationship with 
film preservation, too. His life work on 
16mm film and video, which he and his 
family donated to Northeast Historic 
Film, is one of the outstanding moving- 
image records in the archives. His 
foresight in helping see these materials 
preserved sets a standard for service to 
future generations. 

Archie Stewart was delightful to work 
with. Answering the phone, he would 
say, "Old Man Stewart here." 

In 1 937 Stewart wrote an article for 
Movie Makers, the magazine of the 
Amateur Cinema League, titled "A talkie 
movie maker speaks." In it he recounts 
his experiments with amateur sound. "I 
have a friend, a Maine guide, who is, in 
his pan of the country, as celebrated a 
story teller, humorist and droll character 
as was Will Rogers to the rest of the 
world. I made a four hundred foot sound 
reel of some of this friend's tales and 
jokes, that our group loves so much." 

Stewart's film of the guide's stories is 
invaluable. But so too are his film and 
sound experiments at home with mem- 
bers of his family. He filmed everyday 
things like a children's tea party and a 
toddler dancing with die television's 
Romper Room. In such scenes there is 
magic and real life. H 



ii ^ xtraordinary" describes both the 
1 commitment and the abilities 
i of Jane Beal, the NHF volun- 
teer who is cataloging the Archie Stewart 
Collection. 

Once a month Jane makes the nine- 
hour round trip to Bucksport from her 
home in Cambridge, Mass., to spend a 
day on the Stewart Collection, donated 
in 1994 by a prolific amateur filmmaker 
from Newburgh, N.Y. (see companion 
story). 

Jane, 43, is well suited to the job: She 
works in die Film & Video Resource 
Center at Bostons WGBH-TV, a major 
producer of documentaries for public 
television "television as it should be," 
she says. The Resource Center is a 
regional archives of national significance, 
so to speak, holding some 340,000 
videotapes and 10,000 film tides. 
Outside producers can buy footage 
ranging from WGBH's own acclaimed 
programs to general subjects recorded on 
public domain and house footage. 

Jane is a film researcher, casting a 
global net for all manner of images. "It's 
very fun," she says. "They pay me to look 
at films and photos." 

One Man's Vision 

Her work at the Alamo is the same but 
different: instead of scouring the world 
for images on every topic, she's seeing the 
world through images made by one man. 

Jane is adding visual descriptions to the 
records for the Stewart Collection a 
collection that includes 175 reels of 
16mm film, shot between 1926 and 
1985, and 1,200 minutes of VHS 
videotape, shot between 1989 and 1993. 
Her descriptions enhance Stewart's own 
remarkably thorough notes. 

Jane is currently immersed in the film, 
which has been transferred to videotape 
for reference. Each cassette contains three 
16mm reels, about an hour's worth; 
generally she can process three tapes a 
day. 

While WGBH has equipped Jane well 
for the job, NHF s requirements are 
different. For a WGBH project she 
mounts "a very targeted attack at a very 
huge amount of material," she explains. 
"We tend to list literally every shot on a 
tape. I had to learn and I still struggle 



with it every time to cut that back a bit." 

Jane has been intrigued by Stewarts 
technical progress through the years, as 
he experimented with new technologies. 
Newsreels in the collection add historical 
context. "I'll come across the Hindenburg 
disaster or a fight between a cobra and a 
mongoose," she laughs. "You never know 
from one reel to the next what you're 
going to encounter." 

A Graceful Aging 

But what's most appealing as Jane sits 
through these scenes from a life is the 
change over time. The people, things 
they do, places they go, all recur and 
recur but they do not, naturally, remain 
the same. 

"People age, and particularly grace- 
fully," Jane says. "Its a family that 
seemed to enjoy living their life in front 
of the camera, and that is obviously an 
interesting thing particularly for [an 
observer] who has a few decades under 
her belt. You're a bit more attuned to the 
stages of life." 

"There are moments that just res- 
onate," she continues. "There's one film 
that I got a kick out of fairly early on, of 
one of Archie's two daughters feeding a 
bird from her hand. It just reminded me 
of hours my sister spent training a 
chickadee to eat from her hand." 

Hence the value of amateur film. Until 
this century, Jane points out, history has 
generally been recorded by the wealthy, 
the rulers, the winners. "But 20th- 
century technology has allowed individu- 
als to capture their story in an immediate 
way that can be shared with people." 

Preserving work like Stewart's goes to 
the heart of a regional archive's mission. 
It's in knowing how the material relates 
to its time and place, Jane explains. 
"There's an understanding of the people 
and the places and the activities, 
imparted just by being pan of that 
environment." 

"From a purely selfish perspective of 
someone seeking footage, when I'm 
throwing out a broad net, I naturally 
look in the regions where the activities 
occurred, hoping to find some gems," 
she adds. "Places like Northeast Historic 
Film give me a really good starting 
point." H 



Collections: IB Social History in Film 



NHF's mission directs it to illumi- 
nate the present in the light of the 
past, and sometimes that happens 
in unexpected ways. Such is the case with 
the Talbot and Barbara Hackett 
Collection. 

The five 16mm reels donated by the 
Hacketts, of Warren, Maine, were shot in 
1 934 at the Western Maine Sanatorium, 
in Hebron. Even as tuberculosis threatens 
a resurgence, it's intriguing to visit that 
institution and the philosophy behind it. 

Decades after tuberculosis exited from 
everyday reality, its stereotypes stay with 
us. The dying beauty made exquisite by 
her pallor. Kafka feverish over his pages. 

The persistence of such romanticized 
images is a measure of TB s impact. Such 
histories as Sheila Rothmans Living in 
the Shadow of Death show how evolving 
treatments for TB, once America's most 
serious health threat, wrought dramatic 
social change. 

Fresh Air vs. Bacillus 

Witness the sanatorium movement. 
Once people realized how the tubercle 
bacillus spread, isolation was the order of 
the day. The sanatoriums tried their best 
to support the patient s own recuperative 
powers, but their real contribution lay in 
getting the afflicted away from the 
healthy. 

The Hackett films make the best of the 
situation. Writer-producer Bill Sinclair 
and cameraman E.O. Irish concentrated 
on festivities a Fourth of July celebra- 
tion and a day of winter frolics virtually 
all filmed outdoors. (Film speed also deter- 
mined the choice to film in natural light.) 

"It was the idea of fresh air," explains 
Marge Anderson. Anderson is head of 
library services at Mercy Hospital, in 
Pordand, Maine. A historian, she owns 
the Western Maine Sanatoriums paper 
records. 

Tuberculosis was thought to be a 
product of dirty, crowded cities, 
Anderson says. "They believed that fresh 
air, sunshine and a healthful way of living 
would protect the people who already 
had tuberculosis, and enable them to 
cure themselves." 



Western Maine Sanatorium patients in 1934. 

Talbot and Barbara Hackett Collection. 

Frame enlargement by Karin Bos. 



Fate and the Flea Market 
Anderson and Dr. Richard Kahn, of 
Union, discovered the sanatorium 
materials at the Hacketts' flea market. 
One of four sanatoriums in Maine, the 
Hebron facility opened in 1901. 

Dr. Lester Adams, longtime director, 
kept many of the records when the 
facility closed in 1959. He died in 1971, 
survived by his wife, Violet. The 
Hacketts purchased the contents of the 
Adams household, in Thomaston, 
following Mrs. Adams' death in 1991. 

They didn't know what to do with the 
sanatorium records and the films, says 
Mrs. Hackett. "The ordinary person 
wasn't going to buy them," she says. 
"They said, 'If you want them, take 
them,' " Anderson recalls. 

Dr. Kahn noticed the films as he and 
Anderson were leaving the market. He 
suggested that the Hacketts consider 
donating them to NHF, with which, as 
program chair for the Union Historical 
Society, he has a longstanding relation- 
ship. 

The Hacketts wanted to ensure that 
the films went where they would be 
wanted. "The films might do someone 
some good someday, but it had to be the 
right person," says Mrs. Hackett. 

From Compulsion to Suggestion 

Tuberculosis, around the turn of the 
century, brought the public health 
establishment into being, says Anderson. 
Today, as our views of individual rights 
have evolved, the public health systems 
role has become one of providing 
information and guidance. In view of 



contemporary pandemics, that role is not 
always considered adequate. In 1 934, the 
system was accepted as being appropri- 
ately authoritarian. 

"The public health system was able to 
march in with tuberculosis, take charge, 
isolate the people, treat them, track down 
anyone who was in contact with them, 
discover if they'd been infected, and treat 
them," Anderson says. 

In addition, in view of the wayTB has 
been romanticized by people who haven't 
had to live with it, the films' role as pure 
historical record shouldn't be underesti- 
mated. "This is pretty unusual, it seems 
to me, seeing people in a sanatorium," 
says Dr. Kahn. 

TB s Real Face 

The films are thought provoking as 
much for what they don't show as for 
what they do. There are glimpses of the 
buildings on a lovely site in Maine's 
western hills, and views of patients on 
the screen porches. One emaciated, 
bedridden woman with a dazzling smile 
puts a real face on the situation. 

But mostly we see activity: sports, 
parades, roughhousing. Who'd have 
thought that there'd be so much energy 
at a sanatorium? Moreover, so few of 
these activities remain in our repertoire. 

The Fourth of July festivity includes 
such archaic games as potato races and a 
rolling pin toss. (A dummy in male 
clothing is the target.) A skit depicts a 
shotgun wedding. A parade through the 
grounds includes a blackface minstrel 
band. More has changed than how we 
treat disease. 




Northeast Historic Film Members 



Please join and renew. 

Thank you for your generosity! 

Patrons 

Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Epstein 
Fred Oettinger 
Ed Pert 

James & Rita Phillips 
Richard & Kimberly Rosen 
Dr. & Mrs. H. Sheldon 
David Weiss & Karan Sheldon 
Nathaniel & Margaret Thompson 

Friends 

Caroline Crocker 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Gelardi 

Edward & Barbara Ann Ives 

Edgar & Sarah B. Lupfer 

Mr. & Mrs. George MacLeod 

Joan & David Maxwell 

Alan & Eleanor J. McClelland 

Dorothy Morrison 

Richard Prelinger 

Clare H. Sheldon 

Dr. & Mrs. Stewart Wolff 

Associates 

Henry Becton, Jr. 

Paul Cady & Christine Bowditch 

Thomas & Katherine Clements 

Joseph F. Condon 

Darwin & Jackie Davidson 

Peter Davis 

Dwight B. Demeritt, Jr. 

Ernest & Kathryn Gross 

Dr. Parker F. Harris & Dr. Ellen J. 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis W Hatch 

C. A. Porter Hopkins 

Robert L. Jordan 

Richard A. Kimball, Jr. 

Don MacWilliams 

Robert & Janet Marville 

Morton K. & Barbara J. Mather 

David G. Mathiasen 

Don & Patrisha McLean 

Martha McNamara & Jim Bordewick 

Henry H. Moulton 

Kathryn J. Olmstead 

Charles R. Ryan 

Betty Schloss 

Dorothy & Elliott Schwartz 

Wendy Wincote Schweikert & Ken 

Schweikert 
Peter & Ann Sheldon 
Dr. David C. Smith 
Charles G. Tetro & Beverly Bibber 
Vern & Jackie Weiss 
Pamela Wmtle & Henry Griffin 

Corporate Members 

Acadia Pictures, Inc. 

Archive Films 

Thomas Bakalars Architects 




L. Ritchey 






Bucksport Veterinary Hospital 

Crosbys Drive In 

The Enterprise 

Fellows, Kee & Tymoczko 

J. Gordon, Architect 

Bill Gross & Associates 

Hammond Lumber Company 

Lewis & Malm 

Maine Crafts Association 

Modular Media 

Ramsdell Auto Supply 

DL Sage Productions 

Margaret Chase Smith Library Center 

Sparkling Clean Cleaning Service 

Tyson & Partners, Inc. 

Vidipax, Inc. 

Robert Wardwell & Sons 

Households 

Richard C. Alden 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Allen 

Brian & Carole Barnard 

Lester Bernstein 

Patricia & Thomas Berry 

Laura L. Bittinger & Ed' 

Marcia Beal Brazer 

Joan H. Bromage 

Michaela & Jeff Colquhoun 

Deborah Joy Corey & Bill Zildjian 

Ruth & Joel Davis 

James & Leila Day 

& John Dice 
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G. Clifton Eamcs 
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Gerald & Rosemary Garland 
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Roy V. Heisler & Esther Bissell 
Wendell Hodgkins 
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Eithne Johnson & Eric Schaefer 
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Judith F. McGeorge 
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Virginia Morgan & Alan Walcott 
Barbara & Geoff Neiley 
John A. O'Brien & Linda Long 
Mr. Brian & Dr. Marjorie Olivari 

/^'''' 




Audrey & Berwin Peasley 

Larry & Nancy Perlman 

Ron & Carol Perry 

Sharyn & Taylor Pohlman 

Spiros Polemis 

Mary Ann Porreca 

Nathaniel Porter & Stephanie Sala 

David & Mary Lou Pugh 

Mr. & Mrs. Terry Rankine 

Miriam Reeder 

Ned Rendall 

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Mr. & Mrs. James Rogers 

William & Karen Rogers 

George & Barbara Rolleston 

Mrs. Elizabeth Saudek 

& Ruth Scheer 
Robert B. Shetterly, Jr. 
Nick Sichterman & Mariah Hughs 
Karen & Jeffrey Siegel 
Irving & Nancy Silverman 
Samuel T. Suratt &. Judith H 
Mr. & Mrs. William H. Swan 
Suzanne & Samuel Taylor 
Charles S. Thompson & Catherine Gross 
Dr. Philip P. Thompson 
Elizabeth & Frank Wiswall 

Nonprofit Organizations 

Abbe Museum 

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Buck Memorial Library 
Calais Free Library 
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Society 

Cherryfield Narraguagus Historical Society 
Chichester Town Library 
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Figures of Speech 

Fisher Museum of Forestry, Harvard Forest 
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He Ife Films 

Indiana Historical Society Library 
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Island Nursing Home 












continued on page 12 



&! 




John Ford and his family, photo by Melbourne Spurr, Hollywood. 
Courtesy George Eastman House Motion Picture Film Stills. 



John and Francis Ford in New England 

"Frank Feeney, known in the moving 
picture world as Francis Ford, one of the 
country's leading emotional actors of the 
movies, a Portland boy, is home for his 
first vacation in many years, visiting his 
parents, Mr. And Mrs. John A. Feeney of 
Sheridan street." 

Portland Sunday Press dr Portland 
Sunday Times, Nov. 14, 1915 

Feeney's vacation was hardly restful. 
Well-established as a director and 
actor for die Universal Film Co., 
Feeney spent his break from 
Hollywood writing, casting and shooting 
two movies in Maine. 

Though Chicken Hearted Jim is now a 
lost film, and The Yellow Streak was 
apparendy never released, Feeney's 
productive homecoming resonates gendy 
through die Northeast 83 years later. As 
the weeks of Maine location work for die 
Costner-Newman film Message in a 
Bottle have shown, it's still no trifle for 
Hollywood to visit New England. 
Aldiough the contrast in working styles is 
noteworthy: Feeney shot the rwo-reeler 
Chicken Hearted Jim in three days. 

More interesting, in view of a celebra- 
tion taking place in Portland this sum- 
mer, are Feeney's personnel decisions. For 
Jim, in which he also starred, his cast was 
entirely local, including his parents, two 
sisters, two nieces, die local police chief, 
and a herd of Elks. 

At die top were Feeney and his brother, 
2 1 -year-old Jack, then a year into a film 
career that would end with 1 36 films, six 
Oscars and an enduring reputation as 
one of die world's greatest directors. 

Born in Cape Elizabedi, youngest of 
13 children, John Martin Feeney grew up 
in Portland, earning the nickname "Bull" 
through his aggressiveness in high school 
sports. Adopting his brother's professional 
surname and occupation, John Ford 
went on to eclipse Francis, whose film 
career had dwindled to occasional charac- 
ter roles by the time he died, in 1953. 

From July 6-12, Portland celebrates 
John Ford with a film retrospective and 
the dedication of a statue at Gotham's 
Corner, near where Feeney pere opened a 
pub in 1 897. (Like many other historic 
sites in Portland, the location at Center 
and Fore streets is now a parking lot.) 



Linda Noe Laine, once a close friend of 
Mary Smith Ford, the director's wife, is 
primary donor for the statue. At a press 
conference in March, celebration director 
Jack Dawson said that Laine offered her 
support after learning that Portland lacked 
a permanent Ford memorial a discov- 
ery, Dawson said, that "appalled" her. 

Which goes to show that underesti- 
mating the regional voice in film is a 
two-way street. Apart from a 1 970 Ford 
film festival in Maine, Portland till now 
has had litde to say about him despite 
the fact that this son of a major seaport, a 
town 1 5 percent Irish in die year 1 900, 
proclaimed his complex heritage in ways 
large and small. 

The Irish aspect dominates, and it's 
true that Ford made many fewer 
Easterns than Westerns, but he did 
reveal other dimensions of his origins. 
He covered Longfellow for Fox with the 
1922 interpretation of The Village 
Blacksmith. The 1924 feature Hearts of 
Oak (like most of Ford's silents, now 
lost) is a tale of New England seafarers. 
Ford was briefly one of those, playing 
hooky to work on a Portland tugboat 
for 10 days. Dr. Bull, a 1933 comedy- 
drama starring Will Rogers, paints an 



unflattering picture of New England 
village life. 

Like New Winton, the gossipy home 
of Dr. Bull, Portland has finally learned 
its lesson in the treatment of its talented 
offspring. Next months tribute, complete 
with appearances by Ford film actors and 
other colleagues, comes better late than 
never. 

For information about the John Ford 
Celebration, call the Convention & 
Visitors Bureau of Greater Portland, 207 
772-5800. 



Where Are 
They Now? 



J 



Iohn Ford's "lost" films, and 
other titles of interest to the 
region, may still be out 
there. For information on several 
titles NHF would very much like 
to find, please check the website 






Staff 



Advisors 



10 



David S. Weiss, Executive Director 

nhf@acadia.net 

Samantha Boyce, Member Services 
refbymail@acadia. net 

Jane Berry Donnell, Distribution 
Coordinator 

nhfvideo@acadia.net 

Dan Gottlieb, Archival Processing 

oldfilm@acadia.net 

Paige Lilly, Collections Manager 
oldfilm@acadia.net 

James Sweet, Cataloging 
oldfilm@acadia.net 

Phil Yates, Technical Services 

oldfilm@acadia.net 

NHF Board of Directors 

Deborah Joy Corey, Castine, Maine. 
Author of Losing Eddie, winner of 
Canadian best first novel award; drama- 
tized and broadcast on CBC radio. Was 
owner of Toronto modeling agency. 
Board, Witherle Library, Castine. 

Michael J. Fiori, Keadfield, Maine. 
President and COO, Downcast 
Pharmacy, Inc., specializing in geriatric 
and long-term care. CEO of ODV, Inc., 
manufacturers and distributors of 
narcotic identification equipment. 

Paul Gelardi, Cape Porpoise, Maine. 

President, E Media, Kennebunk, special- 
izing in manufacturing technology and 
electronic media. 

Vice President 

James S. Henderson, Orr's Island, Maine. 

Maine State Archivist, administrative 
head of the State Archives. Directs 
Maine's Historical Records Advisory 
Board. Education includes a Ph.D. in 
political science from Emory University. 

Alan J. McClelland, Camden, Maine. 

Retired defense electronics executive 
from Ford Aerospace and Gilfillan ITT. 
Volunteer archivist and photographer, 
Owls Head Transportation Museum. 

Martha McNamara, Orono, Maine. 
Assistant Professor of History, specializ- 
ing in Cultural History and the History 
of New England, University of Maine, 
Orono. Ph.D. in American & New 
England Studies, Boston University. 
Director of the Society of Architectural 



Historians, New England chapter. 
Commission member, Maine Historic 
Preservation Commission. 

Frederick Oettinger, Penobscot, Maine. 

Champion International Bucksport Mill, 
Vice President and Operations Manager. 
Lives in Penobscot with family. 

Treasurer 

James A. Phillips, Bangor, Maine. 

Co-founder of Trio Software 
Corporation, and an independent 
property assessment consultant. Was staff 
producer and director at WMTW TV; 
studied film at George Eastman House. 

Terry Rankine, South Thomaston, Maine. 
Founding principal of Cambridge Seven 
Associates, Inc. Work includes architec- 
tural design, urban design, and planning 
for worldwide projects educational and 
exhibition facilities. 

President 

Richard Rosen, Bucksport, Maine. 

Owner, Rosen's Department Store, 
Bucksport third generation owner. Vice 
President of the board of Bucksport 
Regional Health Center, and past 
president of the Bucksport Bay Area 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Karan Sheldon, Blue Hill Falls, Maine. 

Co-founder of NHF. Board, Maine 
Folklife Center and Friends of Fogler 
Library, University of Maine. Co-chair, 
Committee on the US National Moving 
Image Preservation Plans. 

Nathaniel Thompson, South Portland, 
Maine. 

Television professional, 1983-1998 with 
Maine Broadcasting Company. Member 
of the family-owned media group that in 
1998 sold NBC affiliates WCSH and 
WLBZ to Gannett Broadcasting. 
Connecticut College graduate. 

David S. Weiss, Blue Hill Falls, Maine. 
Executive Director and co-founder of 
NHF. Previously media producer in 
Boston after graduating in film and 
semiotics from Brown University. Serves 
on Maine's Historical Records Advisory 
Board. 

Pamela Wintle, Washington, D.C. 

Founder, Smithsonian Institution 
Human Studies Film Archives. Co-chair, 
Association of Moving Image Archivists' 
amateur film group, Inedits. Family roots 
in Skowhegan, Maine. 



The Advisors of Northeast Historic Film 
are individuals who have an interest in 
the work of the moving image archives as 
an organization with a vision for film, 
video, and digital preservation, with 
broad public access. 

The establishment of die Advisors 
group is based on the archives' need to 
move into new territory for public 
programs, archival storage, and educa- 
tional outreach. Advisors' leadership is 
needed to assist the staff and board in 
making decisions and connections in 
order to achieve these goals. 

Gillian Anderson, musicologist, conduc- 
tor, and author of Music for Silent Films, 
1894-1929. Washington, D.C, and 
Bologna, Italy. 

Q. David Bowers, author of Nickelodeon 

Theaters and Their Music, a history of the 
Thanhouser Company, and other books. 
Wolfeboro, NH. 

Peter Davis, author of If You Came This 
Way: A Journey Through the Lives of the 
Underclass, and director of the documen- 
tary feature Hearts and Minds. Castine, 
Me. 

Alan Kattelle, author of a forthcoming 
history of amateur film and cinemato- 
graphic researcher. Hudson, Mass. 

Eric Schaefer, Assistant Professor, 
Department of Visual and Media Arts, 
Emerson College, Boston. Author of 
"Bold! Daring! Shocking! True": A History 
of Exploitation Films, 1919-1959 (Duke 
University Press). 

Samuel Suratt, Archivist for CBS News 
for 25 years. Archivist of the Smithsonian 
Institution. Founding member of 
International Federation of Television 
Archives. New York, NY. 

Robert W Wagner, Ph.D. Emeritus 
professor of history and audiovisual 
communication with an interest in 
amateur film, archiving and nontheatrical 
film. Arlington, Ohio, and Readfield, Me. 



The Study Center: 

Film Scholar Eric Schaefer 



Yi 



ii % ^i 1 1 1 can have the world's 

greatest archives, but if you 
have no way for people to use 
the material, then you're not really 
serving your function," says Dr. Eric 
Schaefer, a film historian and new 
member of the Northeast Historic Film 
Board of Advisors. 

Creating an NHF Study Center, 
Schaefer believes, is a way of saying, 
" 'Our doors are open, come in, make 
use of our material.' And that's important 
for any kind of an archives." 

"At least, die bones are there," says 
NHF co-founder Karan Sheldon: the 
videos, the books and other documents, 
the finding aids and viewing facilities at 
the Alamo, all available for research use. 
"So we're open as a no-frills center. But 
we need to complete the space, add staff, 
build the library, and acquire more tech- 
nology." Ultimately, she hopes, the NHF 
Study Center will offer a variety of activ- 
ities and even formal study opportunities. 

The participation of a scholar/advisor 
like Schaefer is key to planning and 
operating the envisioned Study Center. 
An assistant professor in the Visual and 
Media Arts Department at Emerson 
College, Schaefer brings to NHF an 
impressive resume that includes the forth- 
coming book "Bold! Daring! Shocking! 
True": A History of Exploitation Films, 
1919-1959 (Duke University Press). 

Schaefer was a consultant to the Going 
to the Movies exhibition project and gave 
a talk in 1996 at the Maine Mall, in South 
Portland. In die NHF's video archives is 
a 1993 interview with Theresa Cantin, 
who owned and ran a theater in New 
Hampshire for 60 years, that Schaefer co- 
produced with his wife, Eithne Johnson. 

What's a Scholar to Do? 
In the realm of film history, "it seems to 
me that one of the really big areas left 
untouched is regional film," says 
Schaefer, "and the history of regional 
movements and regional exhibition. 
NHF is well-situated as interest grows." 
What is a scholar's role in developing 
the Study Center? First, Schaefer's 
experience as a moving-image researcher 
will inform the design and outfitting of 



the center. As a potential user of 
the center, "I'm able to give some 
guidance into what scholars are 
looking for when they roll up to 
an archive," he says. That could 
encompass a "wish list" of refer- 
ence materials, and practical sug- 
gestions for layout and equipment. 

A second role for the scholar 
involves acquisitions: evaluating, 
authenticating, filling in the his- 
torical context and even supplying 
leads to potential donations. In 
fact, Schaefer spent a few rainy 
days last summer helping assess a 
donation of materials by fellow 
NHF Advisor Q. David Bowers, 
of Wolfeboro, N.H. 

Bowers' donation includes 
books, musical scores for silent 
films, promotional stills dating 
from the silent era through the 
1 950s, movie magazines and 
scholarly journals, and business records 
from a theater in New Hampshire a 
"treasure trove," as Schaefer describes it, 
for students of regional film exhibition. 

Not for Experts Only 
Finally, and not surprisingly, Schaefer 
also foresees a scholarly role in guiding 
educational direction and programming 
for the Study Center. While the Study 
Center will serve academic, historical and 
industry researchers, it will also embrace 
local students, as NHF's outreach efforts 
have done for years. 

"NHF is well-positioned in New 
England to act as an interface between 
the public and scholars to really help 
people understand their relationship with 
movies," he says. "I hope that I'll be able 
to help in that respect, helping to develop 
educational programs." 

Schaefer adds, "At the junior high and 
high school levels, often students are not 
encouraged to think about film or about 
television in a serious way even though, 
clearly, they're such important facets of 
our culture." Because it's entertainment, 
he says, it's not examined closely or 
thoughtfully. 

"Kids, in particular, need to start 
thinking about it in a more serious way 




Amateur Movie Makers, a journal of the Amateur 

Cinema League, "Heralding the Motion Picture of 

Tomorrow. "Q. David Bowers Collection, NHF. 

at an earlier age," he continues. "That 
doesn't necessarily mean taking the run 
out of it, but acknowledging what a 
central role movies play in the way we 
use our time, in the way in which we 
construct our identity, in the films we 
like and watch." 

Schaefer sees the NHF Study Center 
pioneering such exploration. "We will 
begin to reach out to the schools in a way 
which you don't see happening in other 
parts of the country. That could serve as 
a model for other regional archives, as 
well as large repositories across the 
country. They could begin to open 
themselves up to a whole new class of 
interested users." B 

Board member Martha McNamara, 
Assistant Professor of History specializing in 
cultural history and the history of New 
England at the University of Maine, Orono, 
chairs the education committee of the NHF 
Board. She will meet over the summer with 
Eric Schaefer and other interested educa- 
tors, culminating in a roundtable at the 
Teaching History in Maine conference at 
the University of Maine, Orono, tentatively 
scheduled for October 16. For more 
information contact McNamara at 
mcnamara@maine.maine.edu. 



11 




& continued from page 8 

Katahdin Area Chamber of Commerce 
Kennebunkport Historical Society 
Limington Historical Society 
Maine Film Office 
Maine Folklife Center 
Maine State Library 
Maine State Museum 
Marine Patrol Division #2 
Moosehead Historical Society 
Morrill Historical Society 
Nashua Public Library 
New England Museum of Telephony, Inc. 
New Sharon Historical Society 
Newport Historical Society 
Northeast Harbor Library 
Oak Grove Nursing Care Center 
Orland Historical Society 
Otisfield Historical Society 
Owls Head Transportation Museum 
Penobscot Marine Museum 
Rangeley Public Library 
Scarborough Historical Society 
Simmons College Library 
South Parish Congregational Church 
Stanley Museum 

Thomas College, Marriner Library 
Thomaston Historical Society 
Thornton Oaks Retirement Community 
Tremont Historical Society 
Vinalhaven Historical Society 
Waterville High School, Media Center 
Waterville Public Library 
Serena H. Whitridge 
. Wilton Free Public Library 

I'' AnneWirkkala 
Women Unlimited 
York Public Library 

Individual Members 

Corajane J. Adams 
Paul D. Allan 
William H. Allen, III 
Joan Amory 
*"^^ Kathy Anderson 

Carter Andersson-Wini 
Bob Andrews 
Thomas M. Armstro 
Scott Atkinson 
Richard Atkinson 
Peter D. Bachelder 
Prof. William J. Baker 
Victoria Ballard 
Althea Ballentine 
Raymond Ballinger 
Erik Barnouw 
Jean Barrett 
Otis Bartlett 
William Bell 
Arnold Berleant 
Joyce Bethoney 
Lynne K. Blair 
Robert Blake 
Maureen Block 
Benjamin Blodget 

12 







Richard Bock 
R.J. Bonini 
Gregory Bottone 
Q. David Bowers 
Joan S. Branch 
Victor Brooks 
Rev. Charles T. Bro' 
Gregory N. Brown 
John M.R, Bruner 
Lynwood Bryant 
Donald C. Buffington 
Richard Burby 
Patricia Burdick 
Robert E. Burgess 
Jodi S. Burke 




Neal Butler 
Sara Cairns 
Mary Grace Canfield 
Clayton Carlisle 
Robert J. Carnie 
L othy Carter 

iomas J. Cash 

ichel Chalufour 

icree Chase 
Ted Clapp 
Joanne D. Clark 
Reginald R. Clark 
BrendaJ. Condon 
Dr. Richard Condon 
Chester & Phyllis Cooley 
Barbara Croswell 
Hank Croteau 
Richard E. Curran, Jr. 
Sheila Cyr 
Larry Dakin 
Polly Darnell 
Judy Davis 
Melissa Davis 
Dr. Peter DeCarlo 
Orville B. Denison, Jr. 
Sally Denning 
Jcannette S. Dennison 
Paul M. Densen 
Clarence R. Derochemont 
Josephine H. Detmer 
Ernest Dick 
Jefferson Dobbs 
Mary Dolan 
Leon J. Doucerte 
Neal C. Dow 
Frank Drewniany 
Albert Eaton 
John G. Edgerly 
Jonathan Ellsworth 
Anna Mary Elskus 
BUI Elwell 
Edwin Emerson 
Elaine Emery 
Charles Emond 
Lynn Farnell 
Kevin Fellows 





Joseph F. Filtz 
Tom Finson 
Richard Fitz 
Fogler Library 
David Folster 
Marion C. Fos 
Ann Foster 
Karen Frangoulis 
Betty Fraumeni 
Ann M. Frenkel 
Marian J. Fretz 
Ed Friedman 
Samuel Fuller 
Kathy H. Fuller 
Liz Fulton 

Peter T. Gammons, Jr. 
John Garbinski 
Phyllis Gardiner 
Lindy Gifford 
Martha U. Goldner 
Paul Goodwin 
Neal Goodwin 
Henry Grandgent 
Dayton Grandmaison 
Terry Grant 
John W. Grant 
Gail Graumnitz 
Joe Gray 

Kimberly L. Green 
Harry Greenfield 
Arnold Grindle 
Noelle Grunelius 
Mary S. Hafer 
Thomas Hall 
Mike Hall 
Margaret Hallett 
Clarence Hamilton 
EricW. Handley 
James D. Hanna 
Robert E. Hardy 
Charles Harmon 
Elizabeth C. Harmon 
William A. Haviland 
Dorothy Hayes 
Ivory Heath 
Arlene Hellerman 
Mark Henry 
Susan Herlihy 
James L. Hills 
Karen Hopkins 
John C. Howard 
Stanley R. Howe, Ph.D. 
Doug Hubley 
Tom Hulce 
Diane Huning 
James Hunnewell 
Pearl Hunt 
Douglas H. Ilsley 
Ann Ivins 
Jeffrey Janer - 
Mary B. Jessup 
Victoria Johnson 
Gerald Johnson 






p 







Thomas F. Joyce 
Richard W. Judd 
JohnJ. Karol.Jr. 
Barry J. Kcllcy 
Dr. Robert O. Kellogg 
Mary Kelly 
Marshall Kinney 
Dena Kleiman 
George Knowles 
Karen Kristoff 
Dale W. Kuhnert 
Margaret M. Lacombe 
Percy Lee Langstaff 
Beulah Larrabee 
Betty Larson 
B. E. Larsson 
Bill Lippincott 
Dorothy C. Liscombe 
Little Tree 
Bonnie Lounsbury 
Edward C. Lynch 
Rob Lyon 
Harold L Malloch 
Eugene Mawhinney 
Patrick T. McSherry 
Caren McCourtney 
Gertrude L. McCue 
Catherine McDowell 
George H. McEvoy 
John D. McEwan, Jr. 
John T. Mcllwaine 
Linda McLain 
Jim Meehan 

^M^ 1 

Joan F. Meserve 
Bruce Meulendyke 
Gerald E. Michael 
Clifford Miner 
Ellen Mitchell 
Douglas Monteith 
Charles B. Morrill 
Alva Morrison 
Geer Morton 
Sumner E. Moulton 
Margaret W. Myers 
George Neal 
Nicholas J. Nugent 
George O'Connell 
George R. O'Neill 
Woodard D. Openo 
David E. Outerbridge 
Robin Parmelee 
Mrs. Robert H. Pawle 
Patrick Phillips 
Anne Phillips 
Geoff Phillips 
Court Piehlcr 
Wesley Pipher 
Mrs. John F. Porter 
John Potter 
Fxldie Potter 
Alice W. Price 
Dr. Lloyd F. Price 
Joseph L Quinn 






Elvie M. Ramsdell 
William Rand 
Patricia Ranzoni 
David Raymond 
Joyce A. Reed 
Charles Reid 
Frederick Reynolds 
Steve D. Reynolds 
Paige W. Roberts 
Windsor C. Robinson 
Lynanne M. Rollins 
Robert Rosie 
David Sanderson 
Red Sarna 
Eddie Sawyer 
GregSchaaf 
Ronald F. Schliessman 
Edwin Schneider 
Laurie Schoendorfer 
Pat Schroth 
Robert M. Schwier 
Peter Sellers 

Jennifer L. Shallenberger 
Frank F. Shanton, III 
Richard Shaw 
Bernard A. Shea 
Milt Shefter 
Joan Sheldon 
Wesley Shorey 
Harold B. Simmons 
Charles B. Smith 

O. Smith 
Dr. Marshall Smith, 
Pat Snell 

William S. Souza 
ly B. Squibb 

lex Stevens 

Irs. Thomas A. Stewart 

>hn S. Stillman 

Stwertka 
Barbara Sullivan 
Cyndiia Taplin 
Don Tirabassi 
Jonathan Titcomb 
Steve Trimm 
Alston C. Tuttle 
Lucie Tyler 
C. Robert Tyler 
Bruce Underwood 
Joanne J. Van Namee 
Pete Van Note 
Louise Gulick Van Winkle 
Sheila Varnum 
Arthur C Verow 
Robert Waite 
Robert Walkling 
Seth H. Washburn 
Lucy Webster 
Jean Webster 
Ginia Davis Wcxler 
Virginia W. Whitaker 
Christopher White 
Heather White 




Phil A. Whitney 
Jane Whittcn 
Steve Wight 
John Wight 
Tappy Wilder 
Donald Wilken 
Bonnie Wilson 
Wilton Historical Society 
Betty Winterhalder 
Bruce Wintle 
Edith Wolff 
Bob Woodbury 
George Worthing 
Aagot C. Wright 
Marguerite Y. Zientara 
Richard P. Zvingilas 

Educator/Student Members 

Mark L. Anderson 
Rosemary Anthony 
Judy Arey 
Henry Barendse 
Timothy Barton 
John Baxter 
Stephanie R. Beck 
Joyce Bell 
Eric Benke 
Frank Bisher 
Alice Bissell 
Deborah Blanchard 
Dolly Bolduc 
Brick Store Museum 
Richard Brucher 
Cindy Bufithis 
ichard Burns 
William Carpenter 
Armand Chartier 
Terry W. Christy 
Judith Clough 
Ann Cohen 
Phil Cotty 
Paul A. Cyr 
Devon Damonte 
David Dean 
St. Denis 

Dr. Elizabeth D. Dore 
Bruce Doughty 
Melinda A. Duval 
Dr. Joel W. Eastman 
Ian Eddy 
David Ellenberg 
Deborah Ellis 
Edward R. Ellis, Jr. 
Bob England 
James Fastook 
Luke Fernandez 
Cariton G. Foster 
Joanne Frccker 
Fryeburg Academy Library 
Ann Gallagher 
Dan Gandin 
Lawrence Gisetto 
Christopher Glass 
Cora C. Grcer 



Joseph Hanley 
Pam Harmon 
Douglas Hatfield 
Judi Hetrick 
Prof. Jay Hoar 
Marcia Howell 
Beverly Huntress 
Scott Jacqmin 
Richard Jagels 
Richard D. Jenkins 
Polly Kaufman 
Zip Kellogg 
Walt Krauser 
Kami P. Kucinski 
Yvon Labbe 
Shirley LaBranche 
Bev Laplant 
Robbie Lewis 
Douglas V. Luden 
Barbara A. MacEwan 
Richard MacKinnon 
Nancy MacKnight 
Paula Maker 
Rose Marasco 
Peter Mascuch 
Rev. Shirley Mattson 
James Mckee 
William McKinley 
Margo Merrill 
Mary F. Meskers 
Dana Mosher 
Peggy Muier 
Andrew Mullen 
Narragansett School 
Kenneth Peck 
Sanford Phippen 
Joan Radner 
Michael Rondeau 
Libby Rosemeier 
Rene Roy 
Michael Sacca 
Aran Shetterly 
Mark R. Shibles 
Natalie B. Smitli 
Shirley Spencer 
Renny Stackpole 
Gifford Stevens 
Melinda Stone 
Janet Stratton 
Dr. David C. Switzer 
Nancy Tarpinian 
Alan C. Truax 
Juris Ubans 
Richard C. Valinski 
Abigail A. Van Slyck 
Tinky Weisblat 
Dr. Richard E.G. White 
Philip C. Whitney 
Seth Wigderson 
C. Bruce Wright 




13 



Reference by Mail Update 



Members of Northeast Historic 
Film are invited to borrow from 
the FREE circulating loan 
collection, Reference by Mail. There is 
never any charge for borrowing. We will 
even pay for shipping the first time you 
borrow up to three tapes in this first 
shipment! After this there is just a $5 
shipping charge for each loan. 

Member Information and Order Form 
opposite. For an 8-page Reference by 
Mail list call 800 639-1636. Or check 
our website. 

Videotapes listed here are offered as a 
reference service. Where possible, public 
performance rights are included. Please 
be sure to check each tape's status: PERF 
means public performance rights are 
included. No admission should be 
charged for events where Reference by 
Mail videos are being shown. Where 
there is no PERF, the tape is for home 
use only, or face-to-face classroom 
instruction. If you have a date in mind, 
call Samantha Boyce at 207 469-0924 to 
ensure availability. 

Videos for Sale 

Many of these tapes are available for 
purchase through NHF. Please call for a 
free catalog of Videos of Life in New 
England, or check our website at 
wuw.acadia. netloldfilmJ. 

Return Instructions 

The borrower is responsible for return 
postage to NHF via First Class mail or 
UPS. Tapes must be in the mail on their 
way back to NHF five days after they are 
received. 



Feature Films 

No performance rights. 

Desire Under the Elms, Eugene O'Neill s 
play with Tony Perkins as the good son, 
and Sophia Loren as an Italian waitress who 
married his tough old dad to acquire the 
form. 1957. 1 1 1 mins., b&w., sd. 

The Inkwell, the African-American summer 
community in Oak Bluffs, Martha's 
Vineyard, in the 1970s. Coming-of-age 
comedy, directed by Matty Rich. 1994. 1 12 
mins., col., sd. 



^ ^ ^ ^ 

Leave Her to Heaven, Ben Ames Williams' 
story of the jealous Ellen Berendt (Gene 
Tierney), who drowns her young brother-in- 
law in Deer Lake, Maine. Vincent Price plays 
the Sussex County district attorney. 1945. 
Ill mins., col., sd. 

Rachel, Rachel, Elementary school teacher 
Joanne Woodward lives with her mean 
mother over the funeral parlor in a small 
New England town. Directed by Paul 
Newman. 1968. 102 mins., col., sd. 

Strange Interlude, Eugene O'Neill's play, 
with Norma Shearer at the center of family 
secrets and hidden thoughts revealed to the 
screen. 1 1 1 mins., b&w, sd. 

Shadows, Lon Chancy as Yen Sin in the 
fictional coastal towns Urkey and Infield, 
Maine. Prejudice and deceit among small- 
town people. 1922. 68 mins., b&w, music. 
The Trouble with Harry, Alfred Hitchcock's 
weird comedy, set in Vermont, starring 
Shirley MacLaine and John Forsythe. 1955. 
100 mins., col., sd. 

A Stolen Lift, with Bette Davis as a twins (good 
and evil, of course), with an island refuge 
and handsome but naive lighthouse keeper 
Glenn Ford. 1946. 1 10 mins., b&w, sd. 

Young People, vaudeville stars Shirley Temple 
and her adoptive parents Jack Oakie and 
Charlotte Greenwood retire to the hostile 
little town of Stonefield. 1940. 78 mins., 
colorized video, sd. 

Art and Artists 

Gayleen, Jay Craven's portrait of grassroots 
Vermont artist Gayleen, "holy green light 
clock," and her Raimbilli Cousins. 1984. 30 
mins., col., sd. 

Country Life 

The Movie Queen, Lincoln, a pretend movie 
queen visits her hometown in Lincoln, Maine. 
Parade, visit to garage, lake, playtime, appliance 
store, bus arrives at hotel. Kidnap drama. By 
Margaret Cram. 1936. 37 mins., b&w, si. 
The Movie Queen, Newport, a pretend movie 
queen visits her hometown in Newport, Maine. 
Parade. Visits to shops, Oxbow Cabins. The 
kidnap and rescue by hero on bicycle. By 
Margaret Cram. 1 936. 35 mins., b&w, si. 



Fisheries 

Fence in the Water, weir fishing for herring in 
Penobscot Bay, Maine. By Peg Dice. 1980. 
45 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Live Lobster: Maine Lobsterman, Phil Alley 
shows how he catches lobsters, and you learn 
about the lobster's annual cycle. By Peg Dice 
1976. 24 mins., col., sd. PERF 




Seining Maine Herring. Photo by John Dice. 



Geography 

New Hampshire Remembered III, boxing 
championships in Manchester, the Concord 
Railroad depot, Portsmouth's Theater by the 
Sea, and summer camp. 1996. 60 mins 
col., sd. PERF 

Oral History 

Maine's Golden School Days, 1890-1930, a 
project of The Phillips-Strickland House, 
Bangor. Interviews and still photos. A project 
of 8th graders from the Caravel Middle 
School. 1996. 30 mins., col., sd. PERF 

Student Work 

Traveling Through the Dark: A Day in the 
Life of Scott Grindle, portrait of a blind 7th- 
grader by his schoolmates at the Blue Hill 
Consolidated School. 1997. 14 mins., col , 
sd. PERF 

TV Drama 

Meet the Victim Series, narrated short TV 
dramas produced in New England by John 
Potter. Ill Wind, The Man on the Beach, 
Trigger Man, The Wall, The Fatal Story, The 
Fabulous Pearl. Never Go Back, the last in 
color, set on Cape Cod. 1952. 1 10 mins. 
total, b&w and col., sd. 



Woods 

Shingles Made in Maine, the process of 
cutting and installing white cedar shingles in 
East Corinth, Maine. 1990. 30 mins , col 
sd. PERF 

Videos for Sale New Catalog 

Bigger and better than ever! New Vermont 
titles. More than 50 featured Videotapes of 
Life in New England. Free catalog, call 800 
639-1636. 



MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 



Every NHF member gets all these benefits: 

Moving Image Review, the only periodical with information 
on northern New England film and video research, preserva- 
tion, and exhibition. 

Advance notice of most screenings, events and new products. 

Discounts on admissions to many Alamo Theatre and NHF 
sponsored events. 

1 5% discount on more than 50 Videos of Life in New 
England; and on moving-image related merchandise from 
the catalog and Alamo Theatre Store. 

Free loan of more than 200 videos through Reference by 
Mail. Each NHF member may borrow shipments of up to 
three tapes at a time. The first shipment is always free, 
including shipping! Depending upon your membership level, 
a $5 shipping charge may apply to shipments thereafter. 

Several premiums ranging from postcards and T-shirts to 
Video History Sets and free dinners are available depending 
on your level of membership. Each level offers a choice of 
fine premiums, which will be explained in detail after you 
join. 

Membership Levels and Benefits Please check one: 

H Individual Member, $25 per year. All benefits listed above. 

H Educator/Student Member, $15 per year. All benefits listed 
above for teachers, homeschoolers and students at any level. 

D Nonprofit Organization, $35 per year. All benefits listed 
above, plus additional copies of Moving Image Review upon 
request. 

H Household Members, $50 per year. All benefits listed above 
apply to everyone in your household. 

ID Associate Members, $100 per year. All benefits listed above 
plus two more free shipments of Reference by Mail videos. 

H Corporate Membership, $100 per year. All benefits of 
Associate Membership. 

U Friend, $250 per year. All benefits listed above plus four 
extra free Reference by Mail shipments. 

H Patron, $1,000 per year. All benefits listed above plus a wide 
choice of select premiums. 



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Return application to: Northeast Historic Film 
P.O. Box 900 
Bucksport, ME 044 16 

Your dues are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. 

Membership at any level is an opportunity to become 
involved with the preservation and enjoyment of our moving 
image heritage. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 



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The Movie Queen, Lincoln. Frame enlargement by Karin Bos. 




NORTHEAST 

HISTORIC 

FILM 

P.O. Box 900 
Bucksport, ME 0441 6 




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Calendar Highlights 

July 18, Railroad Square Cinema, 
Maine International Film Festival, 
Waterville, Maine 
The Movie Queen, 1936, "our town" 
films made in Maine by Margaret Cram. 
Live music performed by Steve 
Vonderheide. Screenings made possible 
by the AFI Preservation Challenge with a 
matching grant from the National 
Endowment for the Arts, and by the 
Maine Humanities Council. 207 861- 
8138. 

September 10, Hoyts Cinemas, L/A Arts, 
Auburn, Maine 

Evangeline, a 1 929 feature film starring 
Dolores Del Rio as the Acadian maid. 
Screening supported by the Mary 
Pickford Foundation, Milestone Film 
and Video, UCLA Film and Video 
Archive, Hoyts Cinemas, and a grant 
from the Maine Community Foundation 
Expansion Arts Fund. 207 782-7228. 

September 27, Alamo Theatre, Come 
See What's Cooking in Hancock 
County Tour, Bucksport, Maine 
Woodsmen and River Drivers, an award- 
winning history program, then presenta- 
tion on Fort Knox by George MacLeod. 
Dinner following at MacLeods 
Restaurant. 207 469-0924. 

October 2, Local Ingenuity: Engaging 
Cultural Traditions Conference, 
Portland, Maine 

Documenting the Work panel discussion. 
Regional conference sponsored by the 
New England Foundation for the Arts 
and the National Endowment for the 
Arts. 617 95 1-0010. 

October 4-11, Fryeburg Fairgrounds, 
Fryeburg, Maine 

Videos of Life in New England shown 
daily, free with admission, at the Farm 
Museum. NHF staff will answer 
questions and loan Reference by Mail 
videos free to members. 

December 7-11, Association of Moving 
Image Archivists Conference, Miami, 
Florida 

Includes sessions on academics and 
archives, amateur collections, amateur 
film technology, and the national moving 
image preservation plans. 310 550- 
1300. 



Northeast Historic Film 

MOVING 

IMAGE 

REVIEW 



Dedicated to the Preservation 
of Northern New England 
Motion Pictures 
Winter 1999 

Amateur Film 3 

John Grant Memorial 4 

Advisors Join NHF 5 

New Members 12 

Miracle Man 16 

Moving Image Review is a semiannual 
publication of Northeast Historic Film, 
P.O. Box 900, Bucksport, Maine 044 1 6. 
David S. Weiss, executive director 
Doug Hubley, writer and editor. 
ISSN 0897-0769. 

E Mail OLDFlLM@acadia.net 
Web http://www.acadia.net/oldfilm/ 



Thanks a Million! 

NHF has reached a milestone 
in the effort to renovate its 
Bucksport home into a first-class 
archival and public performance space. 
An anonymous gift of $50,000 this 
fall, triggered by the town of Bucksport's 
generous appropriation of $64,000, puts 
the $2.4 million campaign over the $1 
million mark. 

"We have completed planning the 
facility and will have a great theater and 
community performance space," says 
Executive Director David Weiss. "There 
are many challenges ahead but this 
achievement takes us beyond the concept 
and lets us point to something real. We 
made it this far thanks to our Board, long- 
time supporters, and the local commu- 
nity. Now it's time to broaden our appeal 
and commence the next phase." H 



The River of Light 



Space-filled, reflecting the seasons, 
the folk-lore 

Of each of the senses; call it, 
again and again, 

The river that flows nowhere, like a sea. 
Wallace Stevens 

In preparing this issue we recognize an 
archives' relationship with time. We look 
three ways at once: At the past, our raw 
material; at the future, whose needs we 
serve; and at the present, the fast-moving 
river in which we stand. 

Can we meet the test of time? It takes 
wisdom, imagination, and generosity of 
spirit. And success requires solidarity 
wade in with us! 

In the moment, we must make wise 
choices. Some are formidable, such as 
weighing the cultural significance of 



amateur films in the face of finite resources. 
How can we determine which films will 
have the most to tell in yean to come? 

Others come more easily. The family of 
cinema manager John Grant, upon his 
passing, saw an opportunity to honor his 
memory and sustain a legacy. 

Finally, as you'll see below, it's not nostal- 
gia that drives Boston Light & Sound to 
maintain its expertise in vintage projection 
gear. It's