(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Muncie of today : its commerce, trade, and industries : descriptive and historical"

Gc 

977.202 
M92m 
1628797 



REYNOLDS HJSTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



lllllllhlll|lll|llllllllllllllMi:il>lll 

3 1833 02293 2799 



A"^^ Bmaa faesfna 



OIE^ 






■IT^ 



MMERCE. TRnDE SNG INDUSTRIES, 



DESCRIPTIVE AND HISTORICAL. 



The MrxciK Timks 

I yQ5 . 



1628797 



THE WONDERFUL GROWTH OF THF: ^L\GIC CFFY 



THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE. 



^I'CII lias been said and written within the past six ^cars concerning the wonder- 
ful growth and manufacturing development of the city of !Muncie. It is not 
difficult to form in the mind a distinct picture of Muncie as it ^vas prior to the 
discovery of natural gas, in the fall of i8S6. At that period there were not to exceed 
5,000 souls in the city, dependent chietiy upon an area of 400 square miles of rich agri- 



'^ 












T7P, IL^ 



UA 



P 



'■fi vm. 









s 



cultur- 
al soil, 
w li i c h 
yic 1 d e d 
bo u n t i - 
fully and 
io r m e d 
c li i e ll y 
the only 
reven u e 
of the 
count y. 
Vov fifty 
}ears the 
businc s s 
in teres t s 
of the 

city de- main street looking east. 

until the discovery of natural gas did the transformation from a staid old 
agricultural county seat to a manufacturing centre really begin. Rut tew it any 
cities in the State are so favorably located as Muncie. Its present site was 
laid out as early as 1S27, and its altitude above the banks of White River im- 
presses one with the especial fitness of the location for a large city. The early 






■mi 



h.--^^^-»*irl-- 



't-. 




uai 



MUNCIE OF TO-DAV. 



pioneers of the city and county were mainly of New England origin, and to them the 
agricultural facilities of the soil in Delaware county atVorded opportunities not attained 
in the East, and for half a century our population and growth kept pace with the devel- 
opment of the farm. However, with the discovery of natural gas in iSS6 a new era of 
prosperity was opened to view. ?\ew life and activity was t.tken on. y\s one man our 
people saw the possibilities for tlie future of Muneie as a manufacturing center, and 
from that hour to the present the grand work of tr;inslormation has been steadily going 
Ibrward. From an auriciiltural cirv of 3.000 souls in 1SS6 we have to-day jj.jS^ 



^f:u 






/ 






lUi 



■ \r—^ 






\i^^i. 



K-^. 



act u a 1, 
b o n a - 
fide res- 
idents of 
the citv, 
as cnu- 
m c r at- 
cd a n d 
sh o w n 
by t h e 
Pub 1 i c 
Sell o o 1 
authori- 
ties and 
also b\' 
the City 
Di r c c- 
tory and 

(^^y^Cl- FIRST I'KESBVTERrW fHlI.TII. 

of natural gas. The thrift, energ)-, enterprise, and stability that have character- 
ized the history of Muneie since 1SS6, .and during the financial cataclysm which 
has passed over the country during the past two years, have astonished cwn 
our own people. Whh eaci; succeeding year came a steady growth, and addiflonnl 
evidences of business and manutacturing prosperity, and to-day we find the mn-^t 
sanguine expectations of our citizens realized. This in a measure is accouiueii 
for by the fact that Muneie occupies a trade center, both in manutacturing and .-igii- 
culture. The citv has the largest gas tleld from which to draw fuel supply to run her 
factories of anv city in the great Indiana gas belt. The value of this position to the 
city can not be estimated; but to give the reader some idea of the benefit to Muneie we 
cite the increase of $5,615,600 in the propcrtv valuation of the city since the year iNMo. 
and an increase of over 17.000 in her population. 



^-^^S^ 



Vr - 
f 



3 6-:^^ 







iliv 



leer just 
publish- 
ed. 

Mun- 
eie as 
seen to- 
da\- is a 
mar \- e 1 
to those 
ac(]uain- 
tetl with 
Mime ie 
a d e c - 
a d e of 
V ears 
ago, and 
pi ior to 
the dis- 
cov e r V 



MUNXIE OF TO-DAY. 7 

]->oni the foregoing figures it can be readily iintlerstuod what Muncie is to-dav. 
Her values are staple, business prospeiuus, and growth steady and satisfactory. Another 
important factor contributing to the growth of Muncie is our sliipping facilities, -with 
the C. C:. C. A: St. L., (Big Four) extending to Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and 
other large cities to the East, and Indianapolis, St. Louis, Chicago, and cities of tlie 
West; the L. E. and Western, running from I'eoria, Illinois, to Sanduskv, Ohio, 
crossing the States of Indiana and Illinois, and connecting our trade with Lakes Michigan 
and Erie and the Ft. Wayne, Cincinnati and Louisville furnishing North and South 
connections with the northern pineries and Lakes, and with Southern trunk lines. Tm'o 
other roaqls are now in course ot construction, the Chicago and South Eastern, which 
runs from Muncie as at present contemplated, to Chicago. Work is now progressing 
on this line; the other contemplated line is the Indiana and South Western, which when 
completed connects Muncie direct with the Indiana coal fields. Only about twentv 
miles of tliis line remain to be finished, upon which most of tlie grading has been done 
and had it not been for the panic of 1S93 '^ would no doubt nov,- be in operation. In 
addition to the present shipping facilities, the city has belt-road accommodations reach- 
ing to the factory- districts. 

OUR PLHI.IC SCHOOLS. 

From the old log school house that stood on the banks of White River fifty years 
ago, we now look out and see twelve school buildings, si.x of which are large brick 
structures of modern architecture and convenience with a perfect arrangement for heat- 
ing, ventilation, and lighting. No greater triumph has been chronicled in the historv of 
any city, or placed to the credit of any people in school advantages, than are now afforded 
the citizens of Muncie. There are employed in these schools at this writing seventy- 
six teachers, giving instruction in all branches of Common School Education, in- 
cluding Algebra, (Geometry, Trigonometry, Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry, Latin, Book- 
keeping, Rhetoric, Literature, Music and History. Students graduating from the High 
School of the city are admitted to the Freshman class of the State Universitv without 
further examination, which fact alone establishes beyond question the high standard and 
excellency of the Muncie schools. 

A conservative estimate-of the value of the public school property of .Muncie to-day 
is $296,000. Of this sum $120,000 is in\ested in the High School building and grounds. 
These values will be increased more than one-half in a very few years, from the fact 
that every school building in the city is located on a full block, which affords a nice park 
of over one acre in connection with each building. The school population of the city 
as shown by the last enumeration, taken in May 1S94, is 5,620. The increase in our 
population during the past year will add several hundred more to the enumeration of 
last May. 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT. 



"(' 






fllE growth and development of cities very generally indicate the business manage- 
ment of Municipal Government. Muncie has been most tortiinate in this important 
matter during the years of her rapid growth and increase in population. Men of 

known business integrit\' and qualifications have been called to administer public affairs, 

and consequently no scar.dals or corrupt practices which too often affect the interests of 

tlie people have entered into the history of Muncie's Municipal Government. The city 

is di\"id- 

e d i nto 

6 wards 

with 2 

c o u n - 

c i i men 

f r o m 

each, 

thereby 

g i v i ng 

all parts 

o f t h e 

c i t V an 

equal 

r e p r e- 

s e n t a- 

tion and 



',i 1.? 



,-.^=t*^"- ■■ -^5;? 



ili 






•S^"'^ 

..'^l/:^ 



1 5)!,!^ 











:«>y.~^-:t^Ml^tejafer 



voice in *^' 

the ad- i^xss^v. _ _ 

'"'"'S" COlT>T HOUSE. 

cure in representation the same rights and consideratior. accorded the central and dense- 
i_V populated districts, thus securing alike the welfare ot the whole people. 

The ofHcers of the city are the Mavor, Citv Clerk and 'JVeasurer, who are elected by a 
popular vote of the people. These offices like those of Councilmen have for years been 
filled by men of known capability and integrity. The city school Trustees or Commission- 
ers, the Citv Civil Engineer, the Street Commissioner, Chief of Fire Department, the Su- 
perintendent of the City's Electric Lighting Plant, and City Librarian, are all selected by the 
City Council and hold their several positions subject at all times to competent and faithful 



MLJXCIE OF TO- DAY. 



9 



service in the discharge d the cluties nf their utiiee.s. The City Huilding in wliich are 
located the Mayor's 0!rK:e, Council Chamber. Coiuinittee rooms. Public Libraiy, the 
City Clerk s and Trcasuier's oflices, and I'lre Deparlment Xo. i, and Firemen's Rooms, 
is a modern two-story brick strnctnrc, ceiUially located and suitably arrangcil ior 
the purposes intended. h'ire Department Xo. j is locateil in th.e southern portion ot" the 
city the building and groinul> bcion-ing to the cit\-. 'J'hese stations arc connected with 



all parts ul the 
c i t y b y the i 
Cjamewell fi r e ' 
alarm telegraph. : 
and with a paid 
fire depaitm.Mit : 
on dutv daN' and '; 
niglit, alTording , 
ijuick and et- j 

lective ser\"ice. > 

i 

Munciecan just- I 
!\' claim to be i 
one of the best , 
protected cities | 
in the count r\- i 
against losses 
irom t h e tl r e 
fiend. 

'1 he F^lectrlc 
Lighting Plant 
owned hv the 
cit\- is motler.i 
in all its appoint- 
ments through- 
out, an d h a s 
been construct- 







'Wf^V 



J. 



/^-- 






■*^, 



cd and equipped 
with a view ot^ 
supplying t h e 
city wit h t h e 
best possible 
ser\ i c e. A v c 
lights arc plac- 
ed at every al- 
ternate st r e e t 
crossing 
ihioughoiit the 
citv at^or ding 
alike the same 
advantag e s to 
residents of all 
sections ot the, 
city. 

'J'he city libra- 
ry was estab- 
lished in Janu- 
a r y, i ^ 7 5- 
From a small 
beginning it has- 
steadily grown, 
until there are 
now (}.-(- o vol- 



MAYOll G. W. CKO.MEi:. 

limes of useful and standard works t)f the leading authors of the countr\-. Miss- 
Katherine A. Wilson, in charge, is an accomplished lady and highly qualified for the im- 
portant position of Librarian. The l>ibrary Board of Directors are Dr. G. W. H. 
Kemper. President: Mrs. Maggie l^riscoll. Secretary: Dr. U. M. Winans. Treasurer; C. 
F. W.Xeely, Mrs. ^La^y E. Goddard, Mrs. M. Kucchmann and Mr. N. b\ l^th.ell. , 
Beech Grove Cemetery, a beautiful and artistically improved plat of thirty acres, is 
owned and cared for by the citv government. In this lact the purchasers ot cemetery 



MUNXIE OF TO-DAY. 



lots ;irc nssurod tor all tiiiK- that proper care and maintenance of the city of the ilead 

is an important duty of the cit\- government. 

'l"hc poHce regulations of the cit\' are under the 
management of tiirce Pohce C\)mmis;iioners, aiipoint- 
cd by the Governor of the State. Tiie commi.-,>iiin- 
ers are \'ernon Davis, J. V. Ciilbert and \V. K. Ilitcli- 
cock, nil well known business men of the city. The 
force is composed of twelve Patrolmen dividet! 
equally between the political parties, with a Chief in 
command. The Board is also divided politicall\- and 
being thus constituted under the Metropolitan Police 
laws of the State, the matter of political tavors is 
not probable in the administration of the law. L'pon 
efficient and faithful service the tenure of positions 
rests, hence the faithful discharge of duty. It is 
impossible to speak of all the advantages possessed 
by IMuncie in its municipal government. A refer- 
ence to those who have been called to administer its 
F. X. KLiton. riTV CLETK. affairs is a sutricicnt guarantee that the business ot 

the city is conducted on sound business princijiles. 'J'hey are ucll known business 

men, some of whom are our heaviest tax-payers. 

They are: 





.-*'=.. -^ 






^^^^ 






1 


- 




t1 ^^ Vi&E.- 


, '^^ 




\^ <>»x^ 


'-^ 




' 


v* 




V*' 


<>. 




-^- 






4 A/ 


' 1- 


■m: 


1 


%r ■■ - 


'■' 


:l 
i 


;' 


^ H-^*^ 





jl/ayor, 
GEO. W. CROMER. 

Treasurer^ 
T. II. BARTOX, 



Clerk, 
F. A. ELROD. 
Cily Civil Eiio-i/ieer 
W. II. WOOD. 



Council men. 



James Boyce, 
II. C. Uaymoxii, 
Milton Gray, 
Geo. L. Lenox, 
J. Q^ Mitchell, 
Joseph Porter, 



O. \V. Crakus, 
J. C. Jc:»iixsoN, 
T. H. KiRHY, 
A. E. Lyman, 
J. B. Moreland, 
T. L. ZooK. 




t. h. Bvuro.v, cirv trevsl'Rer. 



MUN'CIE Ol'' TO-I)A^'. 



1 1 



rT7lll£ most ini[5ort;uU interest to the city is our public school goveninient. Rccoi^ni/.iti^- 
this tact, the best known ability lias always been selected to look after our sclioo' 
ntfairs. The Seho 1 Board, as now constituted, consists of Joseph A. Goddard, the 
Wholesale Grocerynian, as President; A. L. Kerwood, late President of the Citizens" Na- 
tional Bank. Treasurer; and J. M. Kirb\, Wholesale Lumber Dealer. Secretary 'J'liesc 
gentlemen tor years have given much of their time and best aljilit\- to forward the Public 
School interests ot the cit)-, and none haN'c a greater pride in their grand work than the 
hundreds ot gratluates hom our Ili^h Scho<ji LJuiing these \ear.N. In this connection 
it is tit- P r o f. 



ting that 
mention 
sho u 1 d 
be made 
of Prot' 
William 
R. Sny- 
der, the 
etHcien t 
and tal- 
e n t e d 
Superin- 
lende n t 
o i our 
niagni t- 
i c e n t 
Public 
Schools. 



\ 













-\'-M 









.■■£.<!»■£■■■. 



Ul.1 



m 



v"^^^ 



r-i.S'-i^^^ 



WAJAL'T STREET LOOKING SOUTH. 



Sn}d e r 
is a na- 
tiv e o f 
P e n n - 
sylv a n~ 
ia, born 
in the 
V e a r 
1S50, in 
the his- 
t o r i c 
city of 
Getty s- 
b II r g ; 
the pro- 
f e s s o r 
gr a d u- 
ated i n 



the schools of Gettysburg in the class of 18- ;, and it is safe to sav that the college 
of that city never sent out a more successhd educator than Prof. Snyder, Alter 
teaching a short time in Ohio tlie professor came to Indiana, and for two years was 
Principal of the Graded Schools at Waldron, Shelby countv, Indiana. For the next two 
years we tind Mr. Snyder in charge of the Public Schools at Acton, Indiana. After this 
he again returned to Shelby county, where he took charge as principal of the High 
School of Shelb_\ ville, where he remained continuouslv for five ^•ears. In 1SS3 Prof. 
Snyder came to Muncie, on solicitation of the Schoul Board and took an Assistant's 
position in the High Schoi_)l of the city and later, in 1SS4, became Principal of the same 
for three years. At the end of this efficient service he was tendered and acceptetl the 
responsible position of Superintendent of the entire Public Schools of the city. During 
his administration there have been m.anv chaniies in the schools of the citv. The number 



Burl H. Whitcley, President. George F. McCuHcch, Vice President. Elmer J. White ley. Secretary. 



Whiteley Malleable Castings Co, 

MUNCIE, IND. 



1-^ ,'fT" •-- - -^^ 



:, . - '-: '~-- — -*-ss=^ 



tL 



:~- L, 



■% \ 









'">;.- 



5^::^^ 



til- 



'^'^M£ 






DF^GGRIPTION. 



FLOOR SPACE. 

Moldiiii^ Dcpartiiiciit 6j^g4(^ .<q. ft. 
Core Dcpar/iiienl 6,8S6 sq.ft. 
Afiiicaliiig l>epart/n:>il 2S.6o:> sq. ft. 
Po-xcr-IIousc^ Boiler Hooms, ct-r., ./.~p6 sq. ft. 
Fire-proof Pattern Safe J ^552 sq. ft. 
Tlic larg^cst and most complete vioderti Malleable 
Iron Plant in America. 



FLOOR SPACE. 

Milling.^ I'ickli)irr and Assorting Department 

'5^597 ''^]- ft- 
Pattein I^Iakiig aid S],ifji7:g Department 

15,316 sq. feet. 
Storage Wareliou.^es for Flask Matches, Mdteriah 

and Supplies l'j.,lSd sq. ft. 
Office, Barn and Wagon House iJ.JQi ^] ft- 
Fm'iracing Ten a'- res oj Lin I -.vith a floor space 

equal to J--'^ ■ 



G. W, II. Ke.mi'i:r, Pics. C. E. Shii-lilY, \'iee Prcs. C. M. Ti.knkr. C.ishirr. 

- LARGEST AXl) OLDliST HANK IX Df^LAWARl: COl'XTY. 



Directors :~-W. W. SHIRK. J. J. HARTLEY. C. E. SHIPLEY. J. H. V/YSOR, 

G. W H. KEMPER. WILLIAM ABBOTT. C. M. lURNER. 



JOHN J. HARTLEY'S 

ROOM 3, BOYCE BLOCK, MUNCIE, IND. 



We give our uxdivided .\ttf.ntiox to Sellixc, Real Testate and exchanging it. On 
our large list ot" Real l<>state for sale we alu-a\s have a few 






FACTS FOR THE PEOPFE. 



Dry Goods and 
Notion Depiirtnient. 



Basemeiit 

Department. 



^V(J call your attcnlion to the Superior Stock of 

press Goo«lsj NoiioiiSj 

arjcl poi)iesiics« 

We alv/ays keep in stcck CLOAKS and FUES in the 
Seas:n. SPRING WRAPS in great variety. 

Such a \a;ietv of Goods, and all are I)AI<c;.\ixs: 

Wood G T) W are jj Q I's ee j] s We re 5 

All Styles and Prices. We Vv^ill WOT be 
Undersold in anv Department 



N.H Coriier 
Jackson c^ Walnut 



JOHNSON'S 



Ofld Fellows' Hlock. 



BRANCH & BRO. 

Will ever stri\e to hold first place among the 

Dry Goods People of Muncie, 

By carrying such goods in their line as is consistent in price with good values. 

See us for 

Cloaks, Carpets, Lacs Curtains, 

and General Dry Gccds. 

OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. 

BRANCH & BRO. 

Jvist East cf Ocurt :i:Zo\xzs. 



About 



earmQ"|r- 



!r>'. 



Apparel. 



"\ Y /JlEX you are in need of anything reliable to rcplen- 
ish your wardrobe, whether it be for yourseh", your 
boy or child, it is well to consider first how much you 
wish to spend, where you can get the best value, and 
where you can obtain the nicest goods, latest stj'les and best 
fitting garments for the money. 

The keynote to the ditTicult problem is to go to the 
most reliable dealer, who is always abreast of the times 
with a new and well-assorted line of everything necessary 
to dress well, at prices to suit the fastidious or most 
economical buyer. 

Fifteen years continuous straightforward dealing with 
the Delaware county and Muncie public warrants the sug- 
gestion that the place to look tor is the old reliable one- 
price 



BOYCE BLOCK, 



214 & 216 Easl Main Street. 




jV\imcic, mo. 



]6 MUNCIE OV 'J"0-DA^'. 

of teachers has iiicreasetl from twents' to sevent\'-si\, and the eiuuneratiua from less 
than J,ooo to (jver 6,000. Thus it will be seen I hat tiiis eminent etlucator lias been with 
us in the work ot all work — that ot education and under his atlniinistrati(jn the Public 
Schools of Muncie are second to none in our State. In this relation our people point 
with commendable pride to the manv magniticcnt school buildings and parks sur- 
rounding the same and the wondertul success and adwincement made in the cause of 
education. 

Another important educational institution is 'I'he St. Lawrence Parochial School, 






- ^<5 



^<isS=tJA^£^ ^U .M .P ^U^nO^ff-^-K-fi .Jli!^-'..^. 



INDIANA IRON AND STEFI, WORKS. 

ccntrall\- located. This school has a large and commodious building, and an able corps 
of teachers, who are doing a grand work along educational lines. 

We also have two Business Colleges that stand secejud to none in the matter of im- 
parting a business education. 

oir< CMUKCiii:?. 

It has been said and trulv that the mark of enterprise and intelligence ot any people 
may be determined upon b\- the size, number and geneial appearance ot their Churches 
and School Houses. Kstimated from this standpoint Muncie to-day is in the Iront 
rank. The Piesln'terian, Methodist, Baptist, Catholic, Universalist, Christian, i'Vientls, 



L. A. COBB, Pres. GEO. O. CROMWELL, Vice Free. GEO. M. BARD, S»c'j. 

Jhe iNDmNa Iron (^a, 



maxufacturf:ks of 



Ihf Ifoi) ai|fl Bleel. 



In addition to the regular MERCHA.KT BAR IRON 
we manufacture special qualities for 

^rldoed^ S/iaffh^fJ^ Carriaoe Makcr^^ 

Kut^, Car^^ Sfafj ^BolU, Efc,^ Etc, 

Also s)3ecial shapes and sizes. 

Inquiries and Orders solicited. 



f4liT AIS/p POI-T PHPA^TMeNT. ... 

ASK FOR CATALOGUE. Nuts, Hot Pressed, Nuts Tapped, Bolts, 
Machine, Carriage, Track, Guard, Plow, Bridge, Bolt Ends, Washers 
Coach or Lag Screws. GIMLET-POINTED COACH SCREWS 
superior quality and finish. Also Bolts and Nuts for Special Purposes. 



WE desire to call especial attention to our facilities for COLD STRAIGHTENING 
Round Iron and Steel and furnishing same with ends either Sawed or LATHE CUT 
and CENTERED for SHAFTING, IMPLEMENT AXLES and other purposes 
where it is an object to have such material absolutely straight and otherwise of superior 
quality and finish. .. 



iS 



MUNCH-: OF TO-DAY. 









Mclhodist-PiotL-stant, Episcopal, Curiijrc'^Tatioiial, Church of (Jod, En^^dish Lulhcran, 
Calvin Baptist. Cjernian Evangelical, I'nitcd Presbvtcrian, and Spiritualists, arc all repre- 
sented b)' nineteen church edifices representing in cash value $310,000 and a total mem- 
bership of over 10,000 souls. There arc manv notable church buiklings in the citv, the 
old-fiishioncd square unadorned and unsightly brick structures of former years, so sug- 
gestive of cold formality, are being replaced with edifices of great architectural beautv 
and handsome interior adornment. Perhaps the most attracti\'e of these modern 
church edifices are the Presbyterian, Methodist, Catholic, First Christian, and Baptist, 
which represent a property value of over ^^200.000. In connection with each church 
organization we have all the forms of worship, church work and church societies known 
to the organizations here represented. 'J lius it \\ ill be seen that those who 

voice o 1 

p r a ise i: 

th a n k s- 

giving 

is ever 

! - pre sent 

' w i t h a 

c h r i s- 

tian civil- 

;, iza t i o n. 

Akin 

to the 

. .^ , """^^itsi;,';:?:-; .; .; r,*; i' -'/ "'■ churches 

are the 

MtrLAND STEKL WOKKS. 
BENEVOLENT AND ?OC[y\L ORGANIZATIONS. 

• The time may have been when our neighbors of the East looked upon us as being on 
the frontier of civilization. In those days we were called "Hoosiers," which to the 
"Yankee" signified the '"shakes" and liberal doses of quinine between chills. These con- 
ditions if they ever existed have all passed away and the early trials and hardships en- 
dured by our forefathers have given place to a social condition that is the pride of a 
progressive citizenship, and which insures to the newcomer pleasant social relations m 
some one of the many benevolent and social organizations of the city. Among the most 
important of these societies are the Masonic fraternity, including the Chapter, Council 
and Commandery; there are six of these organizations and they have some of the 
finest lodge rooms connected with the order in the State; the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows have four lodges in the city, including the Encampment and Patriarchs 



come 




among 


^f:'f\r" 


us w i 1 1 
find the 
churches 




of Mun- ,- 




cie equal • 




an d w e 


■ - . ..„,,>"■-'•' 


bcl i e V e 




superi r 




to citi e s 




of much 




larger 
po p u 1 a- 


"^^1^ 


tion. The 





.li< 



-^^■' 



rvJmLaN'D gTEBIj (^0M?nm, 



z^^-crn^Tox::^, zzsthd. 



-MiNrFACTUllVKS OK- 



Mxm^^-T^ A.^WT%s 






-.— ^— .,A 'Ssi-'' ^tx^-A <-^^ ^'O O 



CAPALl'J'Y 



PER ANNUM 






30,000 GROSS 






TONS. 



Fine Cold Rolled or Pickled ana Cold Rolled Sheet Steel, 



Stamping Steel, 
Electric Steel, 

Stove Body Steel, 
Ferrule Steel, 

Coal Hod Steel, 

Armature Steel, 
Spoon Steel, 

Range Steel, 

Tack Steel, 

Steel Circles. 



Tinning Sheets. 

Japanning Sheets, 

Enameling Sheets, 
Polished Sheets, 

Galvanizing Sheets, 

Wind Mill Sheets, 
Milk Can Sheets, 

Plating Sheets, 

Elbow Sheets, 

Sheet Bais. 



Deep Drawing Steel for Press work our Specialty. Blue Annealed Plate Steel, smooth, 

soft and level. 

pox AMMeALEP SJiEET ai)£l FL.ATE STEEL. 

List cf 3iz2s Sent \J'-pi:^TL ^A-pplicaticn. 



-Long Distance Telephone No. ..171.- 



MUNXIE OF TO-DAY. 



Militunt with lodge rooms and baildinj^s in keeping with the progress ot tlie cit}'; tlie 
Dau'Thtcrs of Rebekah ha-'e two lodges and a large menlber^hip and the ladies of these 
or<'ani/,ations are doing a good work in benevolence; the Improved Order ol Kcd Men 
have three tribes numbering over 1203, and the ladies two Pocahontas organizations 
numbering- nearly 400 who are also devoted to the upbuilding of social order, literary 
work and dispensing charit\-; the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks have an 



elegantly f u r- 
n i s h e d lodge 
room and have 
a large mem- 
ber s h i[); the 
Knights oi' Py- 
thias have two 
lodges with a 
Uniform Rank 
and are s e v- 
eral hundred 
strong; Knights 
of Honor, 
Knights and 
l^adies of Hon- 
or, Rathbone 
Sisters, Grand 
Arm}- of t he 
Republic 300 
strong. Sons of 
Veterans, Wo- 
man's Relief 
Corps, Ancient 
Orderof Hiber- 
nians. Ancient 
Orderof Ignited 



11=. 



^?=*^ 







mm 






■/'"■^iV ^"' "'~r "". ! '■"^^^ 


'f^ll 


- ' \il:\\ ji,. •,;«'■; :■ 


i_^:. 




i "^i 


-■ ' i 


■-^m' ri :J\: :nr^.f;-,r U.~J- ■ 


^.'. i 


' 1 ill -^^^ T:- - i i6ii """'"^i. 


'^''\' 


tt /.^ N>..^-...;^-^:c-.. V— 




[.-•:. _ V'-'- v-^...^7 \\^. . 




t ~~ r~~.'- - - — . .' ' ^ ( - 




S;- ..->■■' .v" ,J. _ 










'-'~'m0^^S;fSSat:-- -jSSSSSSS 



Workmen, Na- 
tional Union, 
junior Order 
United Ameri- 
can Mechanics, 
National F r a - 
te r nal Union, 
Blue Ribbon 
Society, Tem- 
perance Union, 
Missionary and 
Social Societies 
mutual to all 
church organ- 
izations, the 
Catholic B e - 
n e v o lent Le- 
gion, the Hu- 
mane Society, 
W' o m a n ' s 
Clubs, Ladies' 
Musical, Chil- 
dren's Home 
Society, Horti- 
cultural S o c i - 
ctv,lMechanical 



RESIDENCE OF CHARLES BOLDT. 

and Agricultural Society, Apollo CluH. and the German Harmnv Singing Society, 
with many other organizations the writer cannot novv' recall. In atldition to these we 
ha\'e manv labor organizations representing all branches of labor from the Amalgamated 
Association of Iron and Steel Workers ot the United States down to Journeymen 
Barbers' International I'nion of America with a combined mem'iersliip of 6,000. And 
last but not least we have a chartered Commercial Chib of 200 members, composed 



-IH^VS. BOLDT, IV.S. n. F. IMMOHR. Tioo Pre^. ISAAC HUMPHREY, Supt. CH.\3. F. KOONTZ, Sec. 



t MiJH 









MANUIWCTURERS OF 



I 



>-5S?-'-:?jsr- 



:"i: y-^-'; s:r^ r ^^ ,._ 









^^ ^^^i'"CK^. 



--^■ 



■.'^'-il- : .V' ■- " ,--^^^^54\ -^^ ■-■'* B " * ' '"^--'''^5^ \' ' ' -'"'■!■'-"'■_'■ 'TTt!* J 



■~ «(*rrD----r;-'r^.-rT 






?_¥ 



A GENERAL LINE 



o:e^ 



BESI I <il'nilH«lllll IITlIK-l I 






.z^nsrxD 



Wrmm (mmwm^fm 



Uu I'll lb iu 



p' 




3 




S 


d 


*j 


;^ 


a 


o 






r 


7^ 


O 
U 






a 


M 


> 


O 


u 


^ 


o 


w 




w 


h 


Ui 


^ 


^ 


<D 


w 


fl 


CQ 


CS 


o 


a 


g 
g 


c 
o 


O 


> 


O 


Ui 


0) 


"o 



c3 <p 



tM ^ 



> ® 



' ^ .- -^ ' '>" ^ ^^^^^^^i^^ii-V ^ ^v •-'- •'sT ■■ ^ 



\ 



i 





5 0) 



!3 


r> 


fi 


r- 


rt 




B 


-d 


H 
6d 








<D 


D 


d 
.»-( 


>> 


> 




O 


<p 


55 






o 


Tl 




n 





^TtriE.' 









BTEEl, 



^ fraMe 



j^l\r 



MANUFACTURED EITHER AS A 



HILL DE.OP OB A COMBINED PLANTEH 



'JUST AS YOU LIKE IT" 



M 



m 



3€-.H 




PY THE 



Coninioii Sense Ena 



nsA^crisrciE:, iiNriDi.^isr.A.. 



This cut shows our new C^onimon Sense Champion witli center dri\e, new spring 
chain tightener, double acting tongue spring, and our new hand drop lever. It is the 
farmer's favorite, handsome in design, constructed on correct mcchai.ical principles, and 
only needs to be seen to be fully appreciated. 



24 



MUxNCIE OF TO-DAY 



of business men and enterprising citizens ot' the citv. The club is not so much a social 
organization as it is one of business. The work of the club is mainly devoted to all 
questions of public interest to the citizens of Muncie and" the advancement of her in- 
dustries and the prosperity of her people. Through the club several important indus- 




lay |4,"| I /I 



?» •> 



U' 



lT>?"''^^HWH 



!f 



• r 



K 3 U. ' 



% 




MUNCIE CASKET COMPANY'S FACTORY. 

tries have sought and been located in Muncie in the past, and lasting and important 
benefits rendered the public. The club was organized for work and right royaily is it 
lulfilling its mission. We now invite the attention of the reader to Muncie's 

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

As they exist to-dav. In attempting to reach a fair conception of what we may expect 
for the future of any city, with almost a certainty it can be predicated upon a given state 
of facts. History to a certain extent repeats itself, if like conditions are maintained antl 
where, as in the history of Muncie, under known conditions, her pojuihition has increased 
over 16,000 and her assessable valuation over f 6.000,000 in eight years, what can those 
say who reason from cause to effect, for the future growth and devekipment of tlie cityr 
If ei^ht years of natural eras has done so much what will th.e next decade bring to Mun- 



J p. c.-((-)EM^KtR, PresiotNT MILTON GRAY. Sfcretary. A E. WHITNF Y. Tr^A'^urer. 






CIE . CASKET . CO. 



EST^^iBiLzs^^iziD, iseo. 



HUILDIXGS I.ARGH AXl) WtLL EOIJIPPI:!) \V[TH IMPROVED MACHIXF.RY, 



Heal, Light and Power Produced by Natural Gas. 



NEW CATALOGUE JUST OUT. 

ILLUSTFIAIMK'G A COMPLETE LINE OF ■ . ■ . . . 

CO\'ERKl) CASKETS, METALLIC CASKETS. 
\'ARNLSHED CASKETS AND CASES, 
COPl'ER AND ELEC'J'RO-PLATED LININGS, 
UNDERTAKERS' HARD warp:, SL^TS, WRAPPERS, 

robes, casket linings, 

sl'rall silk and satin pillows and mat'iresses, 
pedestals, stools. door crepes, arm badges, gloves, 
e:mbalming tables, instruments, fluids. 

In Fact, Everything Known to the Profession, 



stale Caskets, "SENATOR" and "WEBSTER," are Superior in Design and Quality 
New "PRIKCE.SS" Coich Casket is a Marvel of Beauty and Workmanship. 



New Catalogue and Price List Expressed Prepaid to Responsible Funeral Directors 
promptly on Application. 



r^ClE CASIIET Ci 



26 



MUXCIE OF TO-DAV. 



. P-fe. — ■ 



■SITS .- 

P IS 18 





- 


.'.i! 


pffl 







cic.- Wc are pionc to -,tiuly the past unwittingly and without a tliuii_<,'ht of the future, 
as it relates to tlie growth of cities and their increasing ' advantages. Experience has 

tauglit ture wc 

u s til at 
c i t i e s, 
like bus- 
i n e s s 
a V o ca- 
tions, 
are an- 
swe r a- 
b 1 e t o' 
the gcn- 
e r a 1 
hiws o f 
t r a d e 
and 
c o m - 
mer c c , 
a n d t o 
force as t 

the 1 n- '-MINNETKISTA,'— F. C. BALLS RKSIHEXCE. 

may be more full\' informed of the extent of Muncie's leading industries and the impor- 
tance of the citv as a manufacturing center, we will give in detail a list of our factories, 
the capital investments, and the annual output in these various lines of industry during 
the past year, which, it maybe said, was far from an encouraging year in the se\eral lines 
of business enumerated, owing, in part, to the universal disturbances in labor circle^, but 
in greater measure to the general business depression, and what has been aptly termed 
'•the mone\' panic" of 1S94. The list ^vhich tbllows is as nearly complete as can be 
made and is fair, but not too liberal in the statement of capital em[ilo}ed and annua' 
product: 




IXDL'STRIES. 

Ball Brothers' Glass Works, 
Nelson Glass Company, 
llemingrays' Glass Works, 
Maring-IIart (ilass Company, 
Muncie (ilass Company, 



CAI'ITAI.. 

$:;6o.ooo 

60,000 

70,000 

220,000 

I_jO,ooo 



VAi.ii: 

AXNIAI. I'UOOI cr 

J 1 ,6So,ooo 
2<So,ooo 
240,000 
6.)o.coo 

2 10,000 



r. C. BALL, Pres. E, B, BALL. Vice Frcs. G. A. BALL, m. k Tras. W. c; BALL, Mgr. MM BraBCh. 

BA_LL BROS. GLASS MANUFAC TURING fO. 






\^€saci'^~~ 



' " ~ >^"^ Ti>''' "'^ "^^^^^ "'"u*"'* l^■v■-^ .- - - " "^'-7^'* ;*V ■""'Ht^^S'S-afccZJ - ' 



F&IjITjM2S,FI^SKS, BOTTLES, 



GROeEilS' OIL T^M{S. 



mmwm©, el y. - - - nsiBa^s^ mm. 



!8 



MUNCIE OF TO-DA^'. 



INDUSTRIE>. 

C. II. Over, Wir.clow Glass. 

iSluncie Ice Company. 

Boyce Handle Factor}-, 

F'our Brick Manufactories, 

Two Carria<xe Works, 

Five Cigar Factories, 

Two Flouring Mills, 

Two Hub and Spoke Factories, 

Indiana Bridge Company, 

Bartlett Heading Factory, 

Muncie Casket Company, 

Muncie Hominy Company, 

Muncie Rolling Mill. 

Muncie Pulp Company, 

Muncie Skewer Company, 

Five Planing Mills, 

Port Glass Works, 

Three Rooting Works. 

Whitelev Malleable Castings Company. 

J. H. Smith iS: Co., Bending Works, 

Two Saw Mills. 

Architectural Iron Works. 

Four Washing Machine Factories, 

Wysor, Haines & Co., 

Common Sense Engine Company. 

Gill Bros. Pots. etc.. 

Knitting Mill, 

Indiana Iron Company. 

John Mc\'oy &; Company. 

Midland Steel Company, 

Muncie Wheel Company, 

Tappan Shoe Compan\-. 

White River Steel Company, 

Consumers' I'aper Company. 

Bell Stove Works. 

Patton Hollow \Vare Works. 

Muncie Iron and Steel Company. 

Ontario Silver Company, (Now building), 



/ .■> 



,000 



40.000 
35,000 
25,000 

20,00f) 

35'OOo 
40,000 

25,000 

165,00" 

30,0011 

35,00.. 

30,000 

40,000 

320,000 

30,000 

40,000 

90,000 

12,000 

200,000 

180,000 

60,000 

75.000 

50,00.. 

60. 0( 

80,000 
30.000 
30,000 

70,000 

360,000 

75.000 

60.000 

80.000 

160.000 

75.000 

1 10,000 

120,000 

lOO.Ono 



\AI.LE I'KOIlLCT 

530,000 

130,000 

22,000 

40,000 

60,000 
170,000 

75,000 

360,000 

- 60,000 

80,000 

80,000 
100,000 
640.000 

80,000 
120,000 
270,000 

40,000 
800.000 
325.000 
175,000 
280.000 
150,000 

I So. 000 
230.000 
80,000 
75,000 
860.000 
140,000 
980.000 
200,000 
140.000 
200.000 
320,000 
220.000 
195,000 
350.000 



Total 



$4.667.. 



1 I,()62.0ti< 



MUNCIE OF 'J"0-DAY. 



2V 



In addition to these we have a number of smaller factories, incident to a city the si/.e 
of Mnncle, which c-mplo_v skilled labor, and which produce annually over $100,000 in 
manufactured products. \\'e cannot pass this important feature in our city, as seen to- 
da)', without calling the attention of the reader especially to (jur iron industries. It will 
be seen that these factories produced during the past year four million, six hundred and 
ti f t V _ _ to be 



th ou s- 
and dol- 
lars ot 
m a n u- 
factured 
iron. 
T here 
are n o 
b e 1 1 e I- 
equip- 
ped iron 
p rod uc- 
ing in- 
d ustries 
in the 
U n i ted 
States 
than are 


















C^SSiS^ji 



;7 









: -i t?a' 



^' - ----- 






seen i n 
M uncie. 
and the 
only til el 
used i s 
n a t ural 
g '1 s — 
which in 
one i n— 
stance 
a 1 o n e 
s a \' e d 
the pro- 
p rietors 
last year 
o \' e r 
$ 40,000 
in the 




our own citiizens from vear to year, and its retention at home 
the cit\-, is one of the features of Muncie to-day of inestimable consideration to her 
propcrtv owners, manufacturers, and business interests, and which guarantees the rapid 
increase ot growth .and prosperity in the future. 

WAGE EARNERS. 

e so manv varied industries labor will also be found to a proportionate 



Where there are sc 



MUNCIF, OF '1"0-DAV. 



de<^rce. We cannot give ihc exact number ol this class ot clii/.enship in Muncic, but can 
speak accirately of tliose employed in our maiuit'acluriiig industries. Ot these we 
have in Muncie to-day 6,020, tlie majoritv of whom are skilled mechanics, and all ol 
whom find emplovmcnt in tiieir various lines ot trade at remunerative wages. In this 
statement many small industries are not included, which w\\\ add nearly joo more to the 
fi<Tures of tliose emplo\ed. The n:ost reliable inlbrmation tliat can be obtained shows 
that the dailv pav roll of the employes of our citv, iii our various industries, is $12,000. 
It is also a notable 
and highly crcdlnt- 
ble fact, that as a 
rule, the wage 
earners ot Muncie 
arc home owners 
and are prominent 
citizens and tax- 
pavers of the city, 
and fully idcntilied 
with its advance- 
ment and growth, 
in all tliat goes to 
make up the enter- 
prise of her people. 
Possibly no citv in 
the State, or of its 
size in the countrv, 
can show so exten- 
sive a labor popula- 
tion as Muncie to- 
day, and this fact 
alone is suflicient \ 
evidence o t" her = 
prosperity. Labo 



isking — -laborpro- t 
duces the wealth of 




the country. 

11NANCIAJ-. 

In the financial 
strength of our 
commu1iit\' we are 
led to lorm opin- 
ions of its Cfjndi- 
tion and probable 
future. B y this 
stantlard Muncie is 
willing to be meas- 
ured. Prior to the 
disco\"erv o( natural 
gas we li a d t w o 
banking houses 
with a capital stock 
o t $ 100.000. I n 
those days bank de- 
posits rarely ex- 
ceeded $;TOO,oro. 
This condition has 
changed. We now 
have four banking 
oneia- 



HEATH BL(JCK — BLISS i KELLER. 



nouses, al 
ting ur.der the Na- 
tional Banking 



Laws of the I'nited States, with a combined capital of one-halt million dollars. I lie 
deposit account of these National Banks, as shown by their last statements, was ^c)i~,- 
000, witli a combined reserve fund of $,:;77,ooo. In this showing and the change smcc 



BLISS & KELLER, 
. Reliable Clothing, 

Hats and Furnishino-s. 

o 

ONE PRICE. 

MUNCIE, INDIANA. 



!U^ ai)d. piilli 



-IN- 



Lots from $joo to $300. 
Only $1.00 per week required. 
Gas furnislicd at $1.00 per montli. 

HATHAWAY INVESTMENT CO., 

No. 5 LITTLE BLOCK, H^^XJISrCZ^:, XX^ID. 



C. V. tW3r.n33. ?res. i:i Z:^± l?.ni.-. 



3E0..r^lt:"I.L;:E, VicsFrn. 



."HIT K. KAKSH, :ec. i:i Caief Eigiteer. 



INDIANA BRIDGE CO. 










-MANUFAGTURKHS OF 



WROUGHT IRON AND STEEI 



1^ 



!,-€ i ) /I 




Xi tiacasia 



Sub-Structures, 



Viaducts, 



AWD Roofs 



MUXCIE OF 'J'O-DAV 



33 



the use of l;;is as a fuel, in hom'- .-md factory, \vc see one of the most satisfactory eviden- 
ces of wliat Muncie is tf"-dav. In this connection it is fitting to speak of our Buildin" 
and Loan Associations. These associations arc the " Peoples' Banks.'' Through tiieni 
hundreds of homes have been erected by the wage earners ot" Muncie, who have come 
to us to better their condition, and wherever you turn to-day, you can tind men ol this 
class, whom tiicse associations made it possible to own their own homes. ^Ve ha\e 
three of these loan associations in Muncie, with combined assets ol $6X0,000. nearly 
all of which has gone into homes which are being paid ibr by the owners monthlv, 
at rental value. The association, trul}-, has illustrated the old adage of " Poor Richard," 
a month's rent saved by paying f >r a home, ami hundreds of such homes to be seen in 
and throughout Muncie aiul suburbs are the hiyhlv sat;sfact(>rv result. 



HOMIC, llKAr/l'H. AND SANITARY. 

Under this head we shall treat of Mimeie as seen to-da\' lV(Hn the standpoint of the 
home. As a city, Muncie occupies a special and particularh' faxorable location as to sani- 
tary conditions. There is nothing in it> surroundings to cau^e disease or sickness. The 

\v i t h 
good 
m acad- 
a m i/.ed, 
or turn- 
p i k e 
roads, 
r e a c h - 
ing out 
fro m 
Muncie, 
^ the seat 
of coun- 
ty gov- 
e r n - 
ment, to 



e n t 1 re 
c o unt\', 
w h i c h 
c o n sti- 
t u t e s 
t o u r 
hunr e d 
s (] u are 
miles, is 
rolli n g. 
well 
drained, 
a n d a 
s u cces- 
sion o t 

cult i- 
V a t c il 
t a r m s, 
count\-. 









.^^, 










1: . 


'■',■:'■■ ^ '[ . '"■■ ' - ^ 


, ■"'^- " - 




- 






(.. ■ 


■ :'■ - ' ■ 








-'"■^. 



Ti 



J^i??»i 




all parts 
of t h e 



J. A. GODDAliU & CD., UHOI.KSALK GitOCEKS. 

The city is located on the banks ot White River, which crosses the county from 
the oast to the west, with good banks and bottom. The main outlet sewer of the city, 
\vhich was constructed at a cost of f 90, 000, empties into the river beyond the western 
boundary of the city, and trom thence extends through the heart of the city to a point 



M%^JL 



L/lr . wU. 



^'-^-■--'-^'^^-- 



OFFICE, 132 r»1lJLPEI^IlY STRfZET, NeW YORI^ CITY. 



M'AU 






^g-^jt^-r^^r.'M 



3Vr^.l3-'0.'ro.Ot-LXX"01-S Ol" 



cMepIIcal Woop PliL 



CAPACITY, 80.000 Lbs DAILY. 



Mrxcii-: ui-^ •r()-]>A^'. 



162873^ 



within onc-lialf iniic ot' tlu- river cast ol the cil\-, ;ind when extended to the ii\er, 
Avi-.ich will be d(jne in \'eais to co;ne, will artoi'd tliisliing laeilities not jiosse^sed b\- an\' 
cit\' in the \vest. A complete .swsteni ot cross or intersectinL;' sewers tra\'erse tlie i-it\' in 
all directions. tro;n the main outlet sewer, thus a;lbidin|j; the most perlect ilisposuiun of 
sewerage and deleterious matter which is carried far lievond th.- city to tlie river. Sup- 
plementing this excellent system of sewerage, we ha\e a tine svstem ol" water works and 
tire protection to all parts of the citv. The supph" of water for tliese works is derived 



who 1 1 y 
ironi ar- 
t e s i a n 
wells, 
local e d 
out of 
the cit\- 
I i m i ts. 
T ii c s e 
w ells 
arc over 
350 feet *: 
d e e p , 
a n d in 
this fact 
and the 
p u r i t\- 
of t h e 
w a t e r 






% 






=n 









iks. 



r i ? 






:^.'-^l 






■f^"?^ 



*>-h 



f%' 



supplietl 
our citi- 
/.ens, 
t li e y 
a \' o i d 
the risk 
ot cou- 
tamin a- 
t i o n 
ih.rouidi 
ini|ni r e 
^\• a t e r, 
o n e ot 
thccliiet' 
sourc e s 
o( ill lec- 
tion lor 
propa- 
L' a t ing 



W.W. SHIKKS RESIDENCE. 

disease. To this, mainly, can be attributed the showing of the health reports, which 
class Muncie as one of the healthiest cities in the I'nited States. Typhoid and kindred 
diseases are almnst unknown in this city, andentirel\- so where artesian water only is in 
use. In noting these health advantages we must also include the element ol natural 
gas as another great promoter of health and comtort. In its regLiIated use, the power is 
always the same when applied to machinery, the gi ate or the stove, and by this a steady 
heat, at any desired temperature, is maintained day and night, which, under all circum- 
stances, promotes surroundings favorable to health throughout tlie year. 'J'hen agam. 
where soot, dust, ashes, coal and wood abide, worry, vexation, colil teet and chill}- rooms 
keep compan\-, and too often at the sacrifice of liealth. Natural gas has put a \eto upon 
these conditions in .Muncie, and to tliat extent is conduci\-e to headth and sanitary con- 



II. W. Streetfjv'. Pies. 



}. \V. Poiri', Sec'v. and Trc.-is. 



mm ttjbts msMm 'simm. 



iyr-cr2>7Ci:E], xi<tjdx^^i<t.^^. 






MANUFACTURERS OF 



4. 
1 






rl^ 



i Qm wit Vi^ 






y ML 









^fift d 



»,-. \{ ^ r v3 t «»i •«' ft [i '■*=-i r''™ f^ 



I PotE. 

I Kettles, 

I Tea Kettles, 

I Spiders, 

I Scotch Bowls, 

I Yankee Bowls. 



Maslin Kettles, 

"TriumpK" HollovvarE I ^'^^'i 






and Eeguhr. 
Sauce Pans, 
Ecund Broilers. 
Oval Broilers. 
Stew Pans, 
Gl-ae Pots, 

Bread Pans. 



ZPa-ttorrL 2X/<Ca,r:L"ULf^ct "curings Co-^ 

MfNCIE. IND., . , ILAEGESTIN THE WORLD 1 J K F FE RSO N V I I.LI;, IXD. 

Founders and Enamelers or 

STOVH HOLLOW WARL AM) LIGHT GRAY IRU.X CASTINGS JOB WORK A SPECIALTY. 

I Griddles, I | Cuspadors, 

I Broad Top, 
I Self-Righting, 

I Pegulc-r, 

Prices ai)d Catalogues. I Self nighting, 

I Octagon. 

I New Styles. 



I Beep Heaters. | |Jpoj) AppMcatioi) 



Shallow Heaters, 
Long G-riddles, 
Waffle Irons. 

Gem Pans. 



MUN'CII-: OF TO-DAY. 



ditions. AVlien the poet sang ot' " Ilonic. Sweet Home,"" inethinks the writer had in 
his mind's eye a iiome in Muncie, \vhere the millennium of eomHjrt and cleanliness is at 
hand. A home where the old coal bucket stands gilded and tllletl witli some rare tlow- 
ers, and the fire shovel is decorated and hung on the wall ; where the ash heap has disai)- 
peared, and the wood pile no longer adorns the back yard to tempt less thrift\- neigh- 
bors, and where you light a match and turn a kev to secure heat and light in parlors, din- 
I " 



1 n g rooms, 
kitchens a n d 
bed rooms, 
which go on 
a n d o n a t 
pleasure, at a 
cost of $25 per 
a n n u m . In 
such a h o m e 
the poet could 
find the ideal 
of comfort, and 
Munc i e has 
thou sands of 
such homes in 
the lull en)o\- 
ment o i n a- 




ture s greatest 
blessing. Hut 
what of the 
streets and 
sidewalks upon 
which t ii e s e 
homes are lo- 
cated } 'J'hey 
crmnot be sur- 
passed in any 
city o f t h e 
populatio n o f 
Muncie in the 
I'nion. Last 
\ear one and 
one-half miles 
of asphalt was 



IlKJH StKEET METtKJDIST CHIRCH. 

laid on two of the principal streets ot the citv. "^J'wentv blocks more will be put down 
on business and residence streets, to take the place of the present macadam- 
ized and graveled streets. The entire city iias as tine and well constructed streets, all at 
uniform and established grades, as it is possible to construct fron) stone and gra\'el. As to 
sidewalks we now have forty miles of sawed stone, cement and brick sidewalks andgra\eled 
walks on all streets not thus improved. The streets in the central portion of the citv, or 
rather that part of the city existing prior to the discovery of natural gas, are all well 
shaded with desirable forest trees, and in the growth of Muncie the beautifying and im- 
pro\'ements of the streets ha\'e kept pace with the enterprise of home seekers and home 
builders. With the improved and established grades of streets and sidewalks it is timelv 
also to note that we have another great promoter of the healthy condition of the citw 
Surface water readily tinds its way to the catch basins and to the sewers, relieving the 
streets of deleterious substances and insuring cleanliness. As a home cit\', as a healthy 
city, Muncie of to-day has a record in the health reports surpassing any city in the 
- country. 






^;; 






a 















\' 



:t: i^ 






'^^r^^' 



i/Tit |!!i-:r 



I -^--v 






'v^jvyi 






■nil 



|z 

iC 

N 

i> 

iH 
'C 

:o 
rn 

X 



Ci 



^Av^ 



^^^ 



<"- 



S*" 



O 

o 



^ 





> 


::^ 


^ 


"Z 


— r— 
1 


o 




5 


o 


u 


o 


> 




z 




> 





'. MrNClE OF TO-DAY. ' ; ' -^c, 

EORGE W. CROMER, Mayor of Muncie, was born May ] ], iS^j, in Madison 

"County, Indiana. ' lie came to Delaware county while quite a \oun'^^ man, and lived 

with his lather, Josiah Cromer, on a farm in Salem township, until he iiad ^Muwn to 

manhood. His education was not neirlected, his com- 
mon school education beini,^ supplemented bv a col- 
legiate course in the State Uni\erslt\- at BloomiiiL^ton, 
Indiana, graduatinn; in the literary iK-partment oC that 
college with the degree of A. B. in iS-ij. Thus equip- 
ped with a good education, he lias reakl and practiced 
law ever since, except during a period of six months 
in 18S3, when he edited the Muncie Times. 

In May, 1894, he was elected M.iNor of Muncie by 
a large majority over his opjHinent for the term of four 
years. In politics he is a Republican, and has served 
his part}' faithfully and energetically tor the jiast four 
)ears as a member of the Republican State Centra! 
Committee. He is sociable anil agreeable to all, and 
takes considerable interest in fraternities. While in 
college he joined the Beta Theta Pi, a Greek Iraternity 
of high standing with college men. He is an enthusi- 
astic and consistent member ot' the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elk^; of the Improved (J)rder of 




^^■?r. 



U. \V. M'/VR-)':. CorVTV AUDl'loR 

Red .Men; of the Independent Order of O-Ll Fellows 
and of the Knights ot" Pvthias. 



TERSELY STATED, ^^■ 

MUNCIE HAS 

2l.'.2S5 pijpulRtii)n to-day. .Three Trnnk Ijine railroads. On« Belt Line 
railroad. .An excellent syslem of Water Work^, sajiplii-d from Artesian 
Weill. .A thoroui^h system of Seweraire. K lirft-class sy.-stem of Eiectric 
Street Railway. .A -splendidly ec| a i [i pad Fire Department. The Game wt 11 Fire 
Alarm Teleijrarih System. .An Eiectric Licrlitinsj plant. Arc and Incandescent. 
A Free Public Library and Reading Room. A City Bn'IdinK and two Fire 
Department Stations. Eighty mile... .Asphalt and .\Iaoadaniized streets. 
Fifty miles sawed stone, brick and cement sidewalks. Free Mail Delivery 
throai;h )nt the city. A maguitioent giound rioor Opiera Honse. A beanti- 
fal |;2.i0.ono Coart House built of stone and iron, ijne morning and two 
evening daily newspapers. Four National Banking Honscs. Twenty 
Churchts n aintair.ing regular Sabbath services. Fonr first-class Hotels. 
Public and denominational School Buildings to accommodate 7.000 pupils. 
Two Business Colleges. Lodk'es. Clubs. Literary. Social and Benevolent 
Societies of every I )rder. Fifty-two large Factories that employ 7.2l)0 oper- 
atives. A factory fund of .■?100,OoO yet unexpended. Four wealthy Land 
Companies interested in the location of factories. Four hundred square 
miles of gas territory from which to obtain cheap fuel. M ire capital em- 
ployed in nianufacturiug industries than any other city in the State of Indi- ' 
ana More Iron Factories than all the cities in the gas belt put together. [■ 
K largo and rich .Vgricnltural country tn draw from as a trade center. Has 
thirteen Free Turnpikes or .Macadamized roads, centering in Muncie, with a 
net-work of intersecting pikes reaching all parts of the county. Has the 
larg«st Malleable and Gray Iron Castings Works in the west, and uses only j 
natural ga.-i for fuel. His a Cimmarcial EUctrie Lighting Company and | -- ! 

Telephoae system coraraensnrate with the buiines? and popilation of the " 

eitv. Has a well appointed Metropolitan Police system and an economical 
and bu.siness administration of the city government. 







r , (1 




r* 




f 


Av 




G.W.SHEPP, CHIEF FIRE DErARTMKNT. 



r m 



"W^ 



irr?\ 






^^'W^ 



r^-"'^-"7^"^:v- :■-■-"": 


-■^"■■■,.;- 


- - -* ■ 




^%x 




■^ 




^-^i ,-? 




#/. 








' C^' K 




'!-<'" t'^> 


■"^ih^ 


^/^/ 


"1 







yyifflyyil yy yy^yi^i 



Proprif.tors, 



423 East Jackscn Street. 




]\'}ici/ you -:cnif your clo/J'u's 'ccaslicc! di'on, 

M'/it'ii yon zviinf yoiii- clofhcs ~lVl'II s/h/'c/zcc/, 

]\'hc)! yoif '■:aiit your riofhcs Ji'i'/I ironed^ 

II hcii yon iva)/! your \:a^liiiii^- done (ji/iokly. 



Call up till 



NE"^A^ ERA LAUNDRY, 



Teleplxme ISTc. 233. 



and iJuy -:iU call for ycur clothes and return them elegantly done up. 



Ldiliey Sfdrf K(ii,)f^ 



ire )ieat and comfortable and look loiely IF -■:ashed and ironed profei h 
We do both. Try us if you have not and you z:ill never regret it. 



•Xeleplicne ISTC. 25C 



NEW ERA LAUNDRY. 



OUR ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY, 






NE of the most successful enterprises, :ind one perhaps, wliicli will have more to do 
with the future growth of Muncie than any other, is the present system of Street 
Railways. 

The Citizens' Street Railway Company operates a complete system of Electric 
Street Railroads with ab(^at sixteen i^.iiles of single track. 'J'he lines reach all portions of the 
city and suburbs and atford quick, convenient and cheap transporlaiion to the population. 
cave the Court House, or Public Square, in the center of the business poitiou 

the lines, 
enabling 
them to 
t r a \' e 1 
from a II V 
starti n g 
poin' to 
an\' des- 
tinati o n 
f o r one 
fare. 

T h e 
C o m - 
p a n y is 
b r o a d , 
liberal 
and pop- 
u 1 a r in 
its man- 
airement 



• --i'-^^'S^TuV^Wv;:^ 



r'«- .riv'.^' 



.J-k 



Ca^^ 
of t h e 
city, up- 
o n all 
the lines 
e %• e r }• 
fi f t e c n 
minutes, 
fro rii 6 
o'c lock 
in the 
morning 
until 1 1 
o'cl o c k 
at night. 
P assen- 
gers are 
give n 
t r a n s- 
lers up- 
on all OFFICES, POWER HOL'SE AND CAR BARNS OF STREET RAH. ROAD COMPANY 

It owns and maintains a large pleasure park at the terminus ot its West Side Line, also 
owns and maintains a large tabernacle with a seating capacity of 5,000 people, located in 
the County Pair Grounds, and reaches with its lines Ilcekin I^aik on the South Side, and 
Wood Park on the North Side of the city. All of the-;e re-o-ts are largely frequented 
by the population during the summer season, and atfoid, m.t only enjoyable recreatioii 







^ 3 /^ - -. — 



' H'- 






MUNCIE 






Im FBckiim ^ Prof Islom G 



<7h<^ 



£_^EZ; WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



i" 



Dressed Beef, Mutton and Porl 







IV. 


ill 



FULL LIFE OF SMOKED GOODS AND PROVISIONS. 



-TRY OUR- 



^^ Si)oi^ Flake ^s prand FUre Ileitis l^endereel Lard, 

E.rami/ic Our Cccler. f'te Mcjf Comphfe in Minn-ic jcr IldiuHhnj Friofi Matfo. 



104 N. Vl^alnut Street 



Telephone 237. 



R. MEEKS & SONS 



ALL KINDS OF 



<ii» 



fl oo 



H 









'Ir M 



Undertakino a Sjiecialfij 



115 EA ST mm STREET . MLlNciE^ ll^lo, TELEPHONE: \' ^^l^^..o. 



MUNXIE OF TO-DAY. 



43 



and amusement to tlic people, bur a prufitable re\'enue to tlic R;ul\vay Company. 'I he 
regular service is prompt and reliable, and the ability of the Company to handle large 
crowds of people has several times been tested. Twenty thousand six hundred passen- 
gers liave been handled bv the Company in one da}-, and troni tiiteen to twenty th(ius;ind 
passengers have been handled during one day on several oeeasions without an aecident 
or mishap of any kind. The conductors and motormen are all unirormed, and the man- 
agement and discipline of the men is efficient. 

The Compan3's Power House, a cut of wln'ch appears in this book, is a commodious 
brick structure, located within one and one-hall" blocks of the Court House. It is fitted 
thioughout with the most modern machiner\- and appliances. 'I'he power is turmshed 
b}' three Ideal 150-II. P. Engines, and three loo-M. P. Generators in duplicate, two ol 
\vhich furnish sutlicient power to operate the entire road under any conditions. Steam is 
supplied from a battery of three large boilers. The fuel is natural gas, which is intro- 
duced under the boilers in a most approved manner at a \ery low pressure. 

The arrangement of the gas supply and the method of burning it, was recently de- 
signed and constructed by E. B. Phillips, the well known gas engineer and expert, to 
wdiom credit is due for having designed and constructed a s\-stem that under carelul and 
accurate test has proved to be the most economical and etlicicnt yet in use. 

The offices of the Conipan\- are in the Power House, and the Machine Shops, Car 
Barns, etc., are immediately in its rear. 

The Company owns twenty-seven cars, fourteen of which are motor cars, and are ol 
the St. Louis Car Company's standard make. The entire electrical apparatus and appli- 
ances arethe most modern General Electric Company make. All new and first class. 

During the year 1S94 the streets in the entire business portion of the Cit}- of ^Muncie 
were paved with asphalt, and the Street Railway Company renewed its track construc- 
tion throughout for about one and a half miles. This track construction is a model ot 
excellence. The rail used is the Johnson Company's patent grooved rail, 86 pounds to the 
yard, and all of the curves, switches and special work are the best standard make ot the 
Johnson Compan^ . 

The entire plant, equipment and rolling stock, is new, modern, substantial, and of tiie 
very best manutacture, and the cit\- is justly proud of its Street Railway system, and 
shows its appreciation bv the liberal patronage of its public. 

Nothing so adds to the importance and growth of a city as a thoroughly constructed, 
well equipped, etTiciently and liberally managed Electric Street Railroad. This Muncie 
certainly has. 



HICKMAN BROS. 



^^ 



* tnEsAp* W^ Jim tJffl ^ssb^HT ni<= Vlj«»' W*/ V^ kLo f <s^ ■ 



S P^ 



^ M 



qiJeeMsWam 



South-east corner Walnut anl Adams, 



MUNCIE. IND. 



" ■ ■'■ 










./" -J •"--'■ 


./* *'- .% 


^^ 


y-"' ■ .^ . ■ " . 


/ ■ . - . 'j^C 






JJ '■-^^■^•': ^ J^^ 


\ 


■^:x • " ■ 


- ^,R -, -A-- 




^ f 


^1 4 ■ 






- ": . i 


^ 


./ "^ "-■' 


<^ 


'- 






k. 






V 






"^-H..... 



H 



>^ 



H 



4J 
O 
.H 
H 

S 

<1 .,^ 

H •:< 

H -^ 

O (I 



I 



MUNCIE AND NATURAL GAS. 



rT7ME Indiana gas field is the largest in the world. In truth it is larger than all the aas- 

"^ producing territory known to civilization. The present gas belt comprises tuent\- 

six hundred square miles, and e\"ery foot of this vast era is gas producing. Four 

hundred sijuD-rc miles of this territory constitutes Delaware County, on\y one-third of 



which has yet 
been developed 
and is in use for 
fuel purposes. 
The magnitude 
of this territory 
and its benciits 
to Muncie to- 
day and in the 
future can be 
the better ap- 
preciated i n a 
candid an d 
truthful s t ate- 
ment of facts : 
Acres of land 
in D e 1 a w a r e 
Conn t V, .?53.- 
ooo. One well 
to ever\' fort\' 
acres of 1 a n d [ 
can safelv be 
relied u ]■> o n . 
Total wells, 




6,375. Average 
cubic feet daily 
out-put, 2,000,- 
000. T o t a 1 
daily cubic feet 
gas, 12,750,- 
000,000. Cubic 
feet ofgas 
necessary to 
displace one ton 
of coal. 20,000. 
Tons of coal 
displaced dail\-, 
-^JAUj 737,000. Value 
of coal at $1.50 
per ton, J955,- 
000. Total 
\'alue for 300 
working davs, 
$275,6 5 0,00 o. 
I As w e h a \ e 
said, not to ex- 
^^^^ ceed one-thiid 
of this territorv 



HICKMAN BROS. BIG CASH GROCERY STORE. 

is being drawn upon, after eight years, since the discovery of this precious fuel. These 
are well known facts to our people, and to these facts are due our rapid and fast increas- 
ing growth as a city. While we lay no claim to wondrous scenery, lakes, cliffs, and 



|. K. RlTTER. J- I'- R^''^>-'- 

1.22 S. ^s7;7-.^X.l>T-U-ar ST^^iSEI?, 
Onij Fhi.i-ows' Bj.ock. Ml'nc:ie, Lxn. 



^l^v/ /n: 







Special Optical Department. New .Method uf Testinu; Eyes. 

Fine l;no;ravinn; and Watchwork a Specialty, 



r^*"^-*^ 




.\ MiCHi.M: that absolotfly dcies the work and pleases all who hny them. Nearly 

ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND 

Now in use. Price within reach of nil. Exclu.sive territory to agents. For 
Prices and farther infurniatiou address the proprietor and manufacturer. 

THE BALL WRINGER. 

.A. WrinKer that has stood the test for Seven Yeabs and still grows m favor. 
Every one warranted. Agents wanted. Descriptive circulars sent on application. 



The I)oii!)le Tank Thermometer Churn. 

With this Churn yon can make '-Gilt Edgfp" Butter at all seasons of the year. 
The secret of this Chnrn i^ its Tuo Tanks; one insntej inside of and restinJ with 
ils upper rim upon the other, the inner one of which contains the cream. There is 
a chamber or water space between ihe two Tanks. The cream is made either warmer 
or cooler by pnttinc; hot or cold water in the chamber. Soon as the desired temper- 
ature is obtained the water is drawn off through the spile. This Churn is not com- 
plicated, but can be made ready for Churning as readily and easily as the old fash- 
ioned dash Churn. Price within reach of all. .Agents wanted. Send for descrip- 
tive booklet and our treatise on butter making, which will be mailed free to all on 
application. .\lso Manufacturers of the 

Bess Fire Eindler_"and'Lightniiig Can Opener. 




T.^:SEiT .A.S'.A.Ea'X. 



MUXCIK OF TO-DAY. 



47 



mountains, \'ct \vc ri\";il all these and more, when it comes to the acK'anta^es in tlie race 
of life, the race that makes towns and cities great for Uicir thritt, enterprise, and oppoi- 
tunities. It is business that moves the world. V7e cannot live on sceneiy, the pictur- 
esque or the iK-autlful. The bread of lile, the opportunit}' to acquiie life's comforts and 
the lorward advance in business pursuits, are the aims o[ all true Amciicans. These 
alms'^'took thousands to the gold fields of the tar West. With this aim in \ iew the iron 
fields of the .South were developed: with these aims ever before the human mind, the 
footsteps of man have ke[U time to the advance ol civilization from the earliest period ol" 
our histor) to the present time. ^Vhatever may have been our experience, tlie fact still 



remains that the 
growth of popu- 
lation, stability 
in values and op- 
portunities to ac- 
cumulate prop- 
erty, is where 
legitimate busi- 
ness investments 
to the fullest ex- 
t e n t, o c c u p }■ 
commercial and 
manufac t u ri n g 
opport unities. 
Muncie t o-d a v 
owes all to these 
fac t s. Every 
dollar inves t e d 
in manufacturing 
and other lines 




A: 






^Mi 



■y ■ V 






e\ei V da\"s moi k 
] given b}- the me- 
1 chanic, artist :;nd 
d a y 1 a borer in 
such a cit\- brings 
its reward. Our 
steady growth in 
the past insures 
a healthy growth 
in the future. 
According to the 
census reports of 
the United States 
in iSSo, we had 
a population of 
5,208 ; in I 89 o 
the population as 
.»:«-ifci»i.^ s h o w n b}- the 
same reports had 
increase d to 
1 1,339, a gain 






of business, j. j. iurvlevs kesiuenck. 

since the disco\-ery of natural gas in 1886, ot 6,13 i, more than double. In 1891, a little over 
one year from the taking of the census, our population had increased to 13,858 souls. In 
January, 1895, a period of four years, we had increased in population, as shown by the 
Census Directory and (lazetteer of the cit\-, to 22,285 souls. '•■^''' additional and convinc- 
ing evidence of Muncie's rapid growth may be seen in the census taken under the laws 
of the State, requiring the listing of all male inhabitants in the State over twenty-one 
years of age every six years. The census taken under the law in April, 1S89, showed 
2,785 male residents of the city over twent\"-one years of age. The census taken April, 



Joseph Bell, Pres. & Treas. E. Smell. Vice Pres. E. A. Dufrcne. Sec. T. E. Silkey. Mcjr. 

Joseph gELL ^tove ani^ !{aNGE (^o., 






MANUFACTIRKRS 






v/ 



f 4^3s.:^^:^ 






s: a r: ' vv^ 



THE j}:>- 



-V.' 



-^^ n .-r||^?^-p?^r:;: 



j: I^ ^U' 



6? " y- 









j&Q^^ 






fiays^ 







MUNCIE, 



INDIANA. 



"J .-i^H 



MUNXIE OF TO-DAY. 4y 

1895 showed an increase ot 5,165, making the total male inhabitants of the city over 
twenty-one, 7,950. If we multiply these figures by three, a low and safe calculation to 
arrive at the actual population of Muncie, the result is, 2^5,850, which exceeds by !.:;(")- 
the figures given in Emerson's Gazetteer and Business Directory, published in January 
last, which showed a population of 22.285 souls. Another forcible illustration of the devel- 
opment of Muncie is to be tbund in the freight handled by our railroads. For the month 
of March 4,300 car loads of materia! for manulacluring and manufactured products were 
received and handled by our railroads lor Muncie manufacturers alone. Add to this 
648 car loads of freight handled for the businc-s public, aside froni the factories and 

theread- , --. —. — -1 vantage 

to bede- 
r i v e d 
frcni the 
u s e o f 
n a t ural 
gas for 
1 a ctorv 
p u I pos- 
es. T o 
begin 
with, no 
fircm a n 
is r e - 
q u i r ed 
f o r the 
e n g inc. 
'J'hehcnt 



THE \:i BALL ! 



BUSIKtSS ;r; COLLEGF i. 



■: 5CH001 



" ShJ'!'*-^ 






a 1 



■;»;1— - 



.II££l^HkL£F'''^^^^' ^^'- '■ 




jSHiCK'SBOOK 5:1 









■ i 5 

•1 .• 









, ^-r 



is per- 
fect I y 
im iform 
at all 
times, 
a n d 
only ad- __ sterling cash GRot ei.y. there is 

less wear and tear upon machiner\' lIuis operated. The (.lecided advantages of natural 
gas are possibly more apparent in the manufacture of glass and iron than in other lines, 
especially is it highlv prized in edge tool factories and as a fuel in the grav and mal- 
leable iron productions its use surpasses all o'<.her fuel known to luan. Its convenience 



W. H. Sumption, 
Sec. &, TueAS. 



D. A. McL A 1 N. '"■'■";=... 

i ■ ■ ' " 



Residence. 4:'.2 West Huwakh St. 



nL.T'v:H]:EE"s- :s.^:eb::lti 



No. 225 N. Walnut St. Mi'ncie, Imj. 



rrEi_.E:E=E£cisf32 5: 



PEALER8 IN 



Ol'Gll ^ DRliSSIil) LUMBHR, 



I.atli, Shini^les, Doors, Sash, Blinds, and all 
Kinds ol BuildinLi.- Material. 



IOern.ta.1 Ofif5.ce: 



No. 117>-, E. -Jackson St. 



Cor Mulberry Street 
AN D Bi gFour R. R 







m ■■i'xi 









H 1-6 






U3J: 



MuNCiE, Ind. 



X complete Mu>io Sb.>re. Standard Makes of 

PIAI^OS AND ORGANS. MANDOLINS, 

GUITARS AND VIOLINS. 

In fact, anjtbiu" von may wish in the music line. AU latest sheet mnsic in stock. Tuning and Repairing a .specialty. 

THE MUNCIE MUSIC STORE, 

DENNIS & DETERLING, Proprietors. 

307 EAST MAIN STREET, - • - - MUNCIE, INDIANA. 



M UNCI p. OF TO-DA^'. 



5' 



^■ss^-i. 



■<p^-«i»^^^ 



for continuei' runniiiL,^ dav aiu! niL:,Iit, the readiness with which it is taken to an\- part of 
the factory or building ; no cart.iue, no liandling-, and no t'ailure in supply determines its 
worth to trie factory operator. Witli tlie sanie number ot' hands, under such conditions, 
double the amount ot work can be turned out. Herein lies the great secret of increased 
shipments noted abo\e, and herein lies the great iuture of Muncie. To t\irther show 
the growth of Muncie Irom a business point of view, tiie annual receipts of the Muncie 
p o s t o Ifi c e 
bear indisput- 
able evidence. 
r' r o ni $6,621 
per a r. n um, 
prior to thedis- 
covery of nat- 
ural gas and 
its application 
to fa ctories, 
the increase in 
receipt s has 
s t e a d ily ad- 
vanced f r o m 
year to y e a r 
until they now 
reach $29,000 
per annum. In 
1S92 the net 
receipts of the 
office for the 
fi s c a I year 
closing Tune L 

30th, was $19- 

151. And thus 

The additions ot 
side, Wvsor Ileiirhts 








IB-- 


m. 




fr.> 






fr -- 


■ -IE 




h:,:-:.^ 








',''' r?< 




¥. . - •■.■- 


; •■ '.-sl 


-"-^.-^ 


i-"^'- ' 






fi?--.:. 






^^^-i 


Tfi ' ■ ""'' 


:...V-^ 


I- i? " * 


J ft *■ ' 


> t c 




1 g -• ? 


^S-^TSi^ 


■| i 


il i: 


i^lM 



Vi - ■ - 












^^^.i-':X: 









i3 ;; \^ 



lis 

-.3«+<^iSc-,-w.." 



v"r- i-rj .-■ :^v^-'^ 



iar this year, 
should the 
same ratio of 
increaseobtain 
to the close of 
the liscal year, 
the increase of 
receipts over 
the year 1892 
will be in ex- 
cess of $10,- 
coo. The car- 
rier system, or 
fiee mail de- 
livery, has also 
come with the 
growth f) f 
iNIuncie, and 
n o w prevails 
throughout the 
business a n d 
resident p o r- 
t i o n s of the 
city. 



MUNCIE KIGH SCHOOL Bfll-DING. 

)i)\ceton. Congerville. Avondale, Forest Park, Westside, Ri\er- 
.nd Whitely, also constitute much ot" the growth and development 
of the citv in the past four vears and are built up with from five to eight room dwellings 
by mechanics who find dai'\' emplo_\ment in the numerous factories of the city. In the 
original site of the city, when containing 6. ceo population, the residence' prcipert}' is 
owned and occupied bv the older residents, and as in the case of all rich and prosper- 
ous cities, the residences ot" this portion of Muncie are magnificent and irodern in de- 
sign, architecture and apimintnicnts. 



m PEOPLES' BANK 



THE MuNCiE Sayings and Loan 

COMPANY- ■ 
incorporated April 15, 1889. Witu >^l,000,000 Capital. 

S/iarr.i K((vf,, .S200.<'<>. 

Weifflij Vaijinoif I. 'Joe. Pi r Sf/'/rr. 

Tirdf Mcrfuituc L<:uii.), S;iO0,OO(). 



V\l A, SAMPSON & SON, 

... .\(.1:N l.S FOK.... 

HEEKIN PARK CO.'S 

GALLIHER SUB-DIVISION 

ill Siiuili-east .lunriur of city. 

AVONDALE ADDITION 

in Soutli-wc-st uQiirtt-r of city. 



\\ t II A\K 



HOUSES AND LOTS 



The affairs of the Company are controlled by the following 
Board of Directors: 



,• A. W. CI1.\PM.\X, 
D. CAM MACK, 
J. W. KE.VM, 
W. L. DAVIS, 



r. H. ClllRCH. 
•J C. WOllI), 
\V. E. HITi'HCdCK, 
R. ('. GKIFFILH, 



A. C.SILVERBURG. 

Of whom A. W. Chapman is President. D. CHmmack Vice- 
President, J. \V. Ream Secretary. W. Ij Davis Assistant Sec- 
retary, C. H. Church Treasurer. R. C. GritSth .\tioruey. 



, VACANT LOTS FOR SALE 

! ... ov . . 

i WEEKLY OR MONTHLY PAYMENTS. 

I fi Fsaroe ]j,' z'. o;' i'louses for Vy-'-'- 

Muncis, Ind. 



iH. H. HIGH LAN DS.f 

Ll ,c -. ,, T 




WHOLES.\LE DEALER IN 



iiiim 



1 ti i U 

FIXTURE FITTINGS 



■^nHlili:- MISCELLANEOUS GOODS. 







44nrpi 



1 



b.J;^^ 






Plu!>abing, Gas I Steam FiriiNO. 



811 and 313 South Walnut 

MUNCIE, - - - INDIANA. 



MUN'CII-: OF TO-DA^\ 



53 



"^T^AljPIl S. G!\.E(i'OR"S', is ;i pioneer aniuiii; tlie citizens of MLincie. His pictui e, unci 
also that ot his home, appear in this \-olunie. lie was horn l-\-bruarv 2Sth, iS.pS 
upon the old Imnie hirni near this eitw He was about tifteen yeai's of age when 
he entered the schools of Miineie, and alter eonipletiny tlie course of studv laid down 
in the schools of that day, he entered Wabash Collcire, and afterwards completed his 



collegiate course 
at Asbur}- I'ni- 
versity, now the 
famous DePauw 
University, with 
honors, in the 
class of '67. He 
enli s te d as a 
private sold i e r 
in Company B, 
84th Indiana In- 
fantr}-, August 
8th, 1S62, and 
was discharged 
for failing health 
at Shell Mound, 
Tennessee, with 
the rank of Or- 
derly Sergeant, 
having serv c d 
two years. He 
■was supcrintcn- 
d e n t of the 
II u n t i n g t o n 
Public Schools 
during the years 
i86S-6-y ; was 
school examiner 
and Superinten- 
dent of the Pub- KA.LPH S. GKKGORV 
sovereign is the citi/.en. He is a lav.-yer by profession ; was admitted to the bar at Mun- 
cie in 1S69. He has an extensive practice an the Supreme. Federal and State Courts, 
and is the senior member of the well known firm of Gregorv & Silverburg. He has won 
great distinction in the profession. In the preparation and management of cases he is 
a master, and no adversary ever misjudged him in a legal controversy As an advocate 
he has few equals. His diction in oratory is a model in logic, reasoning, simplicity, and 
beauty. Mr. Gregory has grown with Muncie, and gathered his share of this \\orId"s 
goods. He is married and has two children, Walter L. and Florence M. They, to- 
gether with himself and wife, are seen in the picture on the veranda of his home. 




I i c Schools o t" 
this (Delaware) 
county, in iS-o. 

I I e has a] \va\s 
been and is now 
a firm behever 
in and adxocale 
of t h e public 
school system. 
He believes that 
system of et!u- 
cati on w li i e h 
tenders tn all 
children, v/ i t h- 
out reference to 
birth, wealth, 
social position, 
color or a n y 
otherconditions, 
past or present, 
the best that can 
be adopted for 
the liberal, uni- 
versal education 
of the masses, 
and exactl\- in 
harmony w i t h 
our f o r m o f 
government. I le 
believes the 



\V. r,. DIS'N". 



1! W. IH'N'N'. 



Dunn Lime and Sewer Pipe Co., 



■Cl^.liM:ili^ss 



\M> PEAI FH 



■ ■""■"■" ^'■"'•°' " ^ ^ krm, Mm, km hh 

LIMB, HAIR.CHMHNT. ' '" ' 



j Fire Brick, j^ 
i Firs Chy, f 
I hm in \ 



Harkcci i i 
J Iro?, ani §::h '■ Whips. Harness and Robes, 

\ lilin?, Et:, j j • . 



212 East Main St., 



Cornsr Frar.k'.in and Drmcnt Streets, 
MUNCIE. - - - INDIANA. | 

TELEPHONE 123 1 MUNCIE, - - INDIANA. 



Q^j'T^ ooepg ^ceccje ? gs ; e 3 e e ; S' e "oo e e c c ~ a c 3 g s a e a e^^ 



EAGLE SHOE STORE. 



.r- 



f 



f"\()l'H'l"KF,X year~ mK" tlic E:i<rli- Sluirt- Store madi-its bow t<. tlit- [.ulilic anil lined up for hu.- 
iiie^s. It >tarti-d out with honesty iipriolit ))u~iiie.---; jirini-iplcs ; Imw well it lias adhered to 
"^^^ them in the Jiast years, the general jiublie knows. The '-Eagle" l)e<;aiiie at once ijojiular 
'^[p with the trade, and its "growing success cannot help but be flattering to us. We look with 
J J pardnnaljle pride ujion the growing business which wc have built uji Ijy our industry, and 
■^ we are glad to know that our eH'orts to jih-ase have been appreciatetl. 

It shall be our aim in the future as in the past to give an honest dollar's worth of goods for 
lOO cents. We want to .stand solidly upon our merits. We hanille nothing but goods of standard 
(luality, made expressly for us by the world's best iiiait/ifactiircrs. Our experience has lieeu ^u<•ll 
that we know ic/icit manufacturers make the best goods, also -chat goods are best for tliis market. 
A\'e watch our stock very chisely anvl always have the very latest styles and lasts on hand as soon 
as the manufacturers turn them out, so that our line of Hoots, Shoes and Kulibersis most c(Uiiplete. 
The firm is composed of Will U. Monland and Allen A. Wilkinson. Will M.u-eland. who ha- 
active <-harge of the business, has re-ided in Delaware (ounty for seven years, and was formerly 
in the l>iy (ioods trade. .\l. \\'ilkin-on. as he is famiiiaily known, although not paying excdusive 
attention to the Shoe liu>ines- a( [ir(— ent. ha- ho~ts (d' friends who have traded with him ever since 
he first opened U]i the •• Ivigle,"" fourteen years ago. ^\'e thank y(Ui sincerely for your jiatronage 
in the pa~t and ho])e foi- more of it in the future. W t- as^ureyou at all times honest, courteous 
treatment, ('all in aiul ,-ei- u-. We will do you good. Y<uirs truly, 

r20 ICast Main Street, Boyce Block, 



> i > 



, i '■ . V i ' ' 



MUNCIK OF TO-DAY. 

MUNCIE NEWSPAPERS, 



55 



""T has been said and truly, that the tlirilt, enterprise and the inteihg-ence of any coni- 
munitv ot' people can he lairly measured by its ehurch.es. schools, libraries and news- 
papers. The cit\' of Muncie is highly lavored in church and school as the reader 

may see in these columns. In newspaper publications we liave three daily papers, two 

evenings and one morning. The Daily Times, Herald and Morning News, are all well 

edited and up to d;ite as newspapers, and would be a credit to any cit)- with live times 

the {population of Muncie. The Muncie Weekly Times, '!"he Muncie Weekly Ileiald, 

S a tti 1- 

d a >• 

Pink, 

\' a n - 

gu a r d. 

and the 

Weekly 

N e w s, 

are a 1 1 

w e ekly 

publica- 

t ions 

a n d 

have an 

e.x t e n- 

sive cir- 
culation 

in the 





V- i 


■'M(m :■' ..■,'.,•.: *1 






mmM/mi 




\ . '^ ^■■'\'v~ •* '-'■■'i -■ " - 


■Z\ ■;••' ' ' '-'. f' ' \'<'\> \ ' 


, 


^^.^A^-V^^^v■V«:•K 


i' )*'■ :■■:'■■ .. ■.- .:■' vJ--'- -.-..' '■ ', i , 




■-- H .'■';^u!>::^\ . .., 


; v : v';- / .,:-..■ ■ ■•• " . .1 






. S« • - :••.■-■'■•■.-■-'■••■-■--..■ i i 'i 






■■p'^v7l-^^''-''^'-i>-^^ 




•■ ..._,' V,<^.'.v, \-.,^ 


-^}K''^o'-:t-^'^" ^ 




■ •"• '-» ^r ^-^ / , J ~V"' V , 






■ .' ''■ ', N--." ■ - "■■ / , !~o'>;- *, ~: ' 


'"■' -^ ■■'->■■" -■-■". -:'*.' — - ^ - . ' - • ^'^^ 
















,^-Ti ^-'•r-',-,^ ■^Ovi^l'^i ;' 


' ■ ,/ ■ ■ . v: /;)'_■ " .-.;; . - - ij 




,,V "srrs -l^-,-; . ' -' ■■ . 


■ ?V . . . .'-i] • i ["'; ' I 


-•,- • -, 




?"'•;■■' '■■-■■:■:'.,■ '■ ■ -^ iCJ-' i 


4 ' - ' 


*' .y,_^_.;,-.' 


1 '.' . ■ '". ,' ■■■ ■ ■ • -: ^ , , U---' -'' i 


* 


' • \"-i ''--■;' 1 ' '=■' 


•'r"--v^''"'-^'-,- '-^S v'v'u- 1 


■* 




"n-f •„«.':'"■;'*'' '-.^'T' ."' ■"■'.''' ' ', 3 


^ 


'">■' • - -^ ■ ; ' 


■i ■' ,^ ^';.,J.^. ^ "(■"•'■*. -LjiJ 






•,-.^. — .,._ — -■ ^..„.---~ » ,,-. •. . .^-^-^--^- ^ 


— 


_ _ - • ' 






. " 1 






h 

_- • a 



tlir"u-:h- 
out t h e 
s u r - 
I' o mul- 
ing ter- 
r i t o ry. 
T li e 
p e o pie 
ot Mun- 
cie have 
a pride 
in their 
n e \v s - 
A pajiers 
andgive 
the m a 
liberal 
and de- 
s c r \' e d 
suppoi't. 



<^''^y '^'"'" K S. GlCKiiiiRVS RESIUliXCIi. 

Among the recent impro\'ements on North Walnut st'eet is the Tinics block, designed 
and erected by Messrs. Wildman ^: McCIung in iSq;,, as a permanent home ibr the Times 
Book and job Printing establishment. It is a handsome two-stoiy iron front building, 
2ol X So feet in the clear, cost about $4,700, and is well adapted to the purposes lor which 
it is used. Their large and increasing business demands more room, h wever, and the 
building of an addition of 30 feet is already contemplated. 

In no direction has greater progress been shown in Muncie than in her newspaper 
and job printing plants. There are four exclusive job printing otFices, all well equipped 
and apparently protitabh' operated. No town in the State is better supplied than Muncie 
with the needed material for the execution of all classes oi book and Job printing. 



[ ':f. 



THE BALL BUSINESS COLLHGL, 

MUNCIE, INDIANA. 



t&} 



^Y^T IS WITH A FEELING OF JUST PRIDE THAT 

S\ the manatjement of the Ball Business CoUejj;e place 

'^^'-\ before the public a short history of the school nnd a 

brief outline of the work thai is beiug done -within 

itswiiUd. Toward the rlois of the year Eighteec 

©it^ Hnndred and Ninety-two. a ffw of the enter] rising 

'i' citizens and public benofactors of Muncie, realizing 

^ the need of a first-class Business Collf^e in this city, 

began making preparatious to establish what has since de- 

velopod into what is now the popular Ball Business College, 

of >inncie, Indiana. 

It vrr.5 ou tho first day oC rebruary. IS'.IS. that the doors 
of tlii newly-born institution were ihrov.n open to all those 
r^hose rppirafions lead thoni to e hi).rher plane of useful 
knowledge. Like any othe.r enterpri-^e or institution that 
mounts npward to succt'ss. its gronlh was not rapid, bat 
steady; until now it has reached a point where success is no 
longer a ijuestion. 

Our curriculum embraces four distinct courses, 

Business, Short-hand, Fen Art and Telegraphy 

with a thorough and practical teacher at the head of each 
department. We are daily demonstrating to the world that 
we have the most reliable school of its kind in Eastern Indi- 
ana. Young men and young women are conlinnally going 
oat into tho world far better prepared for the duties of life, 
for having attended the •' B. B. C." 

Onr Students are our best recommendations. The 
school is under the direct management of 

J. 'W. HOOKE. Pres. 



A 



STEWART & STEWART, 






Drugs, Boob 
PictiiK 



•AND- 



rallies. 



n-.J Mmn_A. MUNCIH.IND. 






Carry a Complete 



IT Ui> ii' J. _o Jli^ i) 
aii(L\Vcll Selected Stock of 



POf 



4 FIRST CUSS FURNITURE, 

In the Latest Styles, and Alv/ays Take Pleasure 
in Showing Customers Through. 

w. ca„_A:<„ s„,,|,!y ^vjudow Shadcs, Carpets, Pillows, &c., 

.. .^..^^AT LOW PRICES ^— — 



W£ GIVE SPy.Cl.\l. ATTENTIO.V TO 



OUR LIN'L or 

BABY CABS 

IS S'JRFassed by mone ;.n the ClTlf. 

POTTER, MOFFITT & CO, 



UNDERTAKING I EMBALMING. 

■hV.i PrDmjtly At'.er.iei Z'-j or N;:-ht. in Ci'.y cr Ccur.try. 

i.'is.HT .VAr; ::; Z7t:sz. free A:.:5'JLAr;cE. 



MUNCIE OF 'J'O-DAY. 

HOME OWNERS. 



57 



m 



'HERE arc nianv home-owners iii Muncic. It is a commendable fact that a ver\' 
L'\r<:(c majoritv of the skilled mechanics, hiboiers and factory workers ol the citv 
own hind and occupy their own homes. We liave beyond all question one of the 

such 



prettiesthome 
dwellingcities 
in the coun- 
try, the more 
desirable 
lVo.il the fict 
that our facto- 
ries are all 
built and lo- 
cated outside 
of the city 
limits an d 
residence por- 
tion, forming 
a belt radiat- 
ing some two 
miles from the 
Court House 
and business 
center. With 



\A 



i- 

p 3 bj ; 



t^! 



t^ 



^i^ 






i !'■ 






■im^^s 



s u r - 
roundin<„';:^ and 
n:'lu r al gas 
l<'ir heat and 
light, the com- 
lort and ad- 
vantages pos- 
sessed b}- the 
home owners 
o f ]M 11 n c i e 
o \' e r cities 
outside of the 
gas belt, are 
a p parent. 
W cask the 
home - seeker 
to come and 
see, and like 
the Qiieen of 
Sheba, he will 



FIRST CHRISTIAN CntRCH. 

exclaim, "J5ehold, the half was not told me." At this writing over one hundred new 
homes are in the course of construction in Muncie. and before the close of the building 
season we can safelv predict the erection of one hunJred more. 



1879. 



OHN M, KIRBY;*^=t 



1895. 



Sii,c.>>"t to Kirh; BrOf.,) 



L^kr, li, ^lirifks, \m\ %i\% Msiip|i, ii 



A^D GENERAL BUILDING MATERIAL 

SOUTH LIBERTY STREET, ONE 5QU3RE WEST BIG 4 DEPOT. 

E-®°- EstlmatEs FttrnisliEiI 03 Large anl Small Bills. -< — -. 



TELEPHONE NO. 39. 

MUNCIE, IND. 



p. T. KING & CO. 



M I^EW TDHK WmilM, \^ 



214 South \7Vahiut Street, 

MUMCIE, INDIAWA, 



DEAI.KrtS 1\. 



orelciii # Doipesllc DfiI G®p^^«s 



cloaks, FUrs, lJrjii®»*^^ea'*s l^osiery 



^J 



Clot/esy JTriiyi^iTiings, Noiiorjis, Etc., Ett 



r^ W IT ^ir 



MEAT MARKET. 



flL^LM^ JL 




DEALER IN 









<^v ^^ 



ill South Walnut Street, 



aiungtj:, 



ini>ia>;a. 



<5^ 



.-^^^ 



o<^- 



Fresh, Salt ana Smoked Meats, ^' .N>' ^^^p" «^ 






.V^ 






^^ r 



Cash M fsr Ps'jlifj ari hi& 



:.\^^ 



d 



. AND I 












W; ^ ,^ '-^ ^' 

CONTAINS 

m GisLep.oFoeFi. 

SAFE anil EFFECTIVE 

OLD atid YDOf^O. 
COUGHS, GOLDS, CHOOP, 

WHOOPING COUGH, HOARSENESS, 

BRONCHITIS, SORE THROAT, 

and all diseases of the 

THROAT 4 hm ^ mm. 



nXK.liCXIO>i!*. 

UK ADri.TS.^A tiiisi.noiilulfvorvi 
I h.iilrs. ai-cordlMfT tu ,-(>nf:h In Tik.'. 
iv,Li.-il r:isi.s till- (l...-a- ?h.,ulil 1.,. re- 
Ltiil iver.\ li:iif hour uiilil ilIU-vi',). 
UK CHILDKEX.-flive ui-cordinf.- to 
-. --tronvlli ami riinditiiin. Fur u child 
loiillisold. 5to t<dnM)s; 1 year old. into 
Irol.ji; -' to4 ye:ir-^ old. 1!) to :5U drO|>s; 
J s years old. ij teaspoorifill. 



PRICE, m^ CENTS. 



MANL'FACTUKKU ONLY HV 

Uncle SAM'S Medicine Co.. 

MUNCIE, INDIANA. 




[4 H 



f«a 







MUNCIE, 



DRUGGISTS. 



INDIANA. 



,T\0. S. REID. 



CARY W. REID. 



^IIE Ig]3 



V7 



MANUFACTUH^ RS OF 



CDoj 



fS(? BOX^S. 4'^^ 



AND 

Fackacfes 





our Fa^ei)i 

¥/ire ai)d 

CUshioi) 

ackage 
A Speciaiii]. 






^c'JG^ 



4??? 
^>^ 
te^ 



-^^>. 



Agents FOR-==i^ — ■ 

SpaUleiing's 



Alhteiic Good £5. H''''^ [K'^J ^ • i^^d^ ' '"'. 
-'"""^ REPAIRING. ^.k0^!(]0fj 



BICYCLE 



PancLj Hardware, 

NotiorjSj 

pirci Cages, 

paskciB, 

Glins, tXcVoJvers, 



\ j^-y?^^ 



.-.--^^^- '->«=^^^* ' 




sfo\7T^tsJg GOOPS. 
203 EAST MAIN ST., 



|2 MUNCIE. IND. ^n&^^^ 



IJ 



Gto. W. r«LMrB. 



WHOLESALE AND BKTAIL DEILEKS IN 

Frcdh, Scdf and 

Sin fad Meiif<]. 

300 East Main St. and 125 W. Jackson St. 



320-323 SouTh Walnut Street, 
MUNCIE, IND., 



DEALKUS IN 



CO! 



/^ 



'\ 






WE HANDLE 



Strictly Home Dressed Meats. 




bo xA 

rj EH 

■H t5 

.H r^ 

K. 

11 tr 



P. P. Buscii. 



Dlncax Russki.l. 



BUSCH& RUSSELL, 

STONE 
(JONTRaCTORS SNI) gUIblDERS. 

Gat Stoi^e vl oy\ a Speci^ltv]. 

Ofi'ice aijii Vard i 

DUMONT STREET & L. E. & W. E. R. 



WlLF.EK MuNEOE, 

Muncie, InJ. 



Tom. Monbok, 

Pliiladelphia, Pa. 



,..rf M O N ROE B ROS.cl< 



MANUFArXUKEKS AGENTS 






P' 



M 'v....; (^^ ii 



Ifi 



Vv/ HOLES ALE 



We.stern Home of the Famon? 



m 



ry' 



7 I 






:e :sta,"bli£l.>.ed^l. S B_5 , 

Bayer and Shipper of 

Western Grain, @ © 

# # SEED AND 

• *. LIVE STOCK, 

710 South Liberty Street, 

€ja.r Lois a SpeciaUy- 



(20^4P?iMy. 






MANUl-AClUBBP.e OK AND UKALEES IN 

QUMN_Cin_WASHE_RS 

And Household Novelties. 
B. F. HOVv^ELL, Manager. 

MdjSlC^Es IMP- 



RT ,^^ 



*T^ 



EE»T,KBt. IN 



LUMBER, LATH, 

SHINGLES, SASH, 

MOULDINGS, 
DOORS, ETC. 

Corner "Walnut and Second Streets. 

MUisJciH, Iislp. 

PHONE 109 



T. J. AULT. 

N. a.— Pot.itOfS. Apples, and \V: 



K. W. AULT. 
•loiis in Car I.n.s a Srfri^lly. 



GENERAL -«s^ 

Commission Merchants 

MD Produce Dealers. 

Corner of Dumont and High St?. 



a.IL. mAWIM^% NICKEY'S DRUG STORE 

coo PER AC; H "" \ f A N l" F ACTU R HR I ^^^, 'un. of : : 



Kiln Dried Slack llirrcl Headin«j 



OAK AND ELM A SPECIALTY. 



Wall Paper 



AND 



East End Afiarjs Sireet, L, E. H Bis 4 Tracks, 
MUNCIE, IND. 



Decorations 

r\_HASTFKN' IXIHAXA. 
Omji are Onr Prices 

Taper Hanger- Furnished. 



Xele-clicne 2S©. 



bij 



PC 

o 

s i ^ s 

S 



o 
o 






F==; 



> 





• 


/' ' '--- Sr^l',^- - 




".'^, -'.'V ^ -^J, 


.^j---.i 


..- --- ^ 


\ ->^.^^^v.. 






"St. 









Also Manufacturer All Kinds of Brass and Iron Castines to Order 



/ V 1^' 



it; • If 



3295