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Full text of "Municipal history of Essex County in Massachusetts"

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ALDHRHAN UBRARY 



MUNICIPAL HISTORY 

OF 

ESSEX COUNTY 

IN 

MASSACHUSETTS 



TERCENTENARY EDITION 



A classified work, deyoted to the Countsr's remarkable 

growth in all lines of human endeavor; 

more especially to within a 

period of fifty years 



BENJ. F. ARRINGTON 
Editor-in-Chief 



VOLUME III. 



1922 
LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



F 



in 



r -n A Ca 

y,3 



COPYRIGHT 
LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING CO. 

1922 









/i;/;?^;/?.-. ^ 



ESSEX COUNTY 



/[^/^M;rc^Ca;:z^J.^MY 



ESSEX COUNTY 



RT. RBV. ARTHUR JOHN TBBLINa D.D.» 
L.P.Pv V. F. — For moze than half a century the 
Right Rev. Arthur John Teeling has been minister- 
ing to the needs of Tsrions parochial charges, build- 
ing his strength and his ability into the organiza- 
tions which he served, and into the lives of the 
people to whom he ministered. He is now pastor of 
St. Mary's Roman Catholic Chnrdi, of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Father Teeling is descended from a family which 
has always been devoted to the interests of Ireland, 
and which has at all times contributed to the 
strength of the various efforts made to free the 
suffering Motherland from her difficulties and her 
sufferings. Especially during the struggle for self- 
government which occuired in 1798, did the family 
freely sacrifice personal interests in the cause of 
Irish freedom. Rev. Arthur J. Teeling was bom in 
Dublin, Ireland, December 10, 1844, son of Ben- 
jamin and Mary Jane (Roberts) Teeling, and came 
to this country with his parents in 1847. From that 
time until the beginning of his coUege course he 
lived in the immediate vicinity of Boston, attendng 
the public school, and also, for a short time, the 
Chapman School at East Boston. When he vms 
twelve years of age he entered the Jesuits' School, 
which was situated first on Hanover street, Boston, 
but was afterward located at the comer of Fort- 
land and Traverse streets. For four years he i«- 
mained in this school, displaying an ability which 
was clearly recognized by the authorities of the 
school, who encouraged his entrance into the Uni- 
versity of Lavelle, at Quebec, of which Rev. Tas- 
chereau (later Cardinal Taschereau) was director. 
He continued his studies here for a period of three 
years, winning for himself high rank in scholarship, 
and at the end of that time, as his friends had ex- 
pected, decided to enter the priesthood. Accord- 
ingly, in September, 1864, he entered the Provincial 
Seminary at Troy, which had just been opened* that 
year, he being one of a group of ten from the Bos- 
ton diocese. This was the first group to matricu- 
late in the seminary, and of that group Father 
Teeling is now (1922) the only surviving member. 
Here, as at Quebec, and in his eariier school course, 
his ready sympathy and willingness to serve, won for 
him the esteem and the affection of his fellow stu- 
dents, while his ability as a student seemed for 
him the admiration and esteem of both faculty and 
student body. He was ordained June 6, 1868, by 
Bbhop McFarland, of Hartford, since deceased, and 
his first mass was celebrated the foUowing Sunday 
at East Boston, where his parents then x^dod. He 
then for a few months served as assistant to Rev. 
Father Sheridan, then pastor of St. Vincent's Church 
on Purchase street, Boston, later, toward the end 
of the year, being sent to assist Rev. John O'Brien, 



pastor of St. Patrick's Church, of Lowell. Here he 
was most active in organising a temperance so- 
ciety, which was the means of accomplishing much 
good. In August, 1871, he became pastor of the 
Church of the Immaculate Conception, of Newbury- 
port, a task of no small importance, since the church 
was practically in its infancy, possessed neither a 
burying ground for its dead nor a bell to call its 
people to worship, and was somewhat in debt. 
Father Teeling took hold of the work with an ear^ 
nestness, ability, and energy which brought large re- 
sults. One of the first injunctions placed upon him 
by Bishop (later Archbishop) Williams waa ''Gret a 
burying place for your dead.'* Father Teeling se- 
cured the old training ground of the militia at New- 
buryport, and in the early summer of 1876 the ceme- 
tery was consecrated by Archbishop Williams. Of 
the twenty-three acres contained in the tract a 
large proportion was, through the energy and fore- 
sight of Father Teeling, converted into a nursery, 
for which purpose he imported ten thousand seed- 
lings of Norway spruce and four hundred Scotch 
pine. When these were grown, the church and 
property grounds were decorated with them and the 
remainder sold for seven hundred dollars, which 
sum was placed to the credit of the church. A 
chapel for the use of the Sunday school and the 
various societies of the church was secured, and 
the site for a "Female High School," and then, in 
1878, Father Teeling took his first well earned 
vacation, traveling through Europe, Egypt, and the 
Holy Land. Sailing from New Yoric eariy in April, 
1878, he went directly to Liverpool, thence to Paris 
and to Venice, thence he sailed to Alexandria in 
Egypt, arriving there the thirtieth of May. Here 
he was Joined by his friend, Rev. John Swift, of 
Troy, New York, now deceased, who had traveled 
by way of California and the Pacific. Together 
they Visited the pyramids of Egypt and the Holy 
Land. They then visited all the principal cities of 
Europe, and at Rome had an audience with Pope 
Leo XIII. They also visited the principal cities of 
the British Isles, prolonging their stay in Ireland, 
in which country Father Teeling remained for a 
period of eight weeks. Upon his return he took 
up the task of freeing the church from debt, and 
so heartily did the congregation enter upon the 
carrying out of his plans that on June 24, 1879, the 
church was solemnly consecrated (a service which 
is not permitted while there remains one cent of 
debt upon Catholic property). Rt. Rev. Archbishop 
Williams was the celebrant and Rt. Rev. Bishop 
O'Reilly, of Springfield, delivered the sermon,, and 
tiiey congratulated the church and congxegiiUon 
upon the fact that they were the first in the prc^^t 
archdioeeee of Boston so to consecrate a diux^ 
building. To the work of educating the young. 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Father Teelinip devufced his energy sad ability in 
large ;ineasiire^ /withholding no service that might 
promote that cause and secure for his people the 
best possible educational advantages. In the Irish 
question he has taken a deep and abiding interest 
by speaking, organizing societies, and in many ways 
forwarding the activities of the various groups both 
in Newburyport and in other places. He greatly 
sympathized with and admired Michael Davitt^ the 
''Father of the Land League/' and took an active 
interest in the parliamentary fund collected in 1886. 
His interest in this project is evidenced by the fol- 
lowing, printed in the Boston "Pilot," March 20, 
1885: 

The following letter from Father Teeling, the 
respected pastor of Newburyport, to Mr. John Boyle 
O'Reflly, tells its own honorable and hopeful stoxy: 

Newburyport, Mass., March 16, 1886. 
My Dear Friend: — ^By personal solicitation I have 
collected to the i>resent date |260 for the $6 Parlia- 
mentary Fund. I have on my list, paid subscrip- 
tions, fEfty of the most prominent Protestant gentle- 
men of the dty of Newburyport, city officials, bank 
officers, etc My list thus far is composed of Prot- 
eetant gentlemen only. Next Wednesday night (St. 
Patridrs) I will put the question of subscription 
to the Parliamentary Fund to the members of my 
own congregation, as on that evening we are to have 
an entertainment in the Hall for the benefit of the 
schools. When I have completed my work for the 
$5 Parliamentary Fund, I will send you all the 
money and the names. I think, from the present 
outlook^ that Newburyport will have the honor of 

Sying for one mei|&ber in the British House of 
»mmo|s to advocatf Home Bule. 
Yours very truly, 

ABTHUB J. TEELING. 

It is not only to the affairs of Ireland, however, 
that Father Teeling gives his interest, his time, and 
his loyal support He is earnestly devoted to the 
eountry of his adoption and is a loyal, public spirit- 
ed American citizen. In the local affairs of his 
community he takes an active interest, and is often 
one of the speakers on public occasions whita the 
city is host or when groups from both Catholic and 
Protestant congregations are the participants. He 
was one of the speakers at Newbiny's two hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary, celebrated June 10, 1886. 
He is a ready and a forceful speaker, and a tren- 
chant writer. In Newburyport he was a membor of 
the Humane Society, of the Association for the 
Establishment of the Old Men's Home^ of the cor- 
poration of the Institution for Savings, and of nearly 
every society organized for the advancement of the 
best interests of the community. He is also a jue- 
tice of the peace for commonwealth of Massadiu- 
eetts, having been first appointed May 8, 1888, by 
Governor Benjamin F. Butier, after havbig served 
for sevtad years pyevious as justice of the peace 
for 'E$$fix county, Qirougfa appointment of Gover- 
nor Al^nader H. Btce. On the eth of April, 1898, 
Father Teding^becalie pastor of St Mary's Boman 
Catholic Chur^ of Lyiin, Massachusetts, and since 
tittt time he has been ttMMXLy and efficiently nin- 
latering to the needs of tiuit chuge. Always 



structive, his woric is accomplishing lar^e rwmlts 
good in the latter field, and there, as in Ne-wbu 
port» he is recognised as one of the building ^ox^ 
of the community. The following extract from 
tribute paid to him in the Newburyport "Gerz 
while written of his work in that plstce appi: 
equally well to his woric in Lynn: 

^Apart from the labors of the school, the pull 
and uie altar. Father Teeling has ezerciBed a kino 
care for all the families and persons in the pazis 
* * * He may well be proud of what he has doi 
and when invited to other fields replies : 'These m 
my people and from them I cannot be divided.' " 

PHILIP EMERSON holds a unique place in tt 
field of education. For twenty-five years principfl 
of Central Junior High School of Lynn, Massachn 
setts, his specialty has been geograi^y and tti 
methods of teaching it, and he is a much sougrht lee 
turer and instructor by coUeges and institutes oi 
the various aspects of geographical subjects. Foi 
many years he has been an effective speaker in th< 
Anti-Saloon Leagrue, and is widely known as an 
author, not only on temperance matters, but even 
more by his printed works of an educational nature. 

Silas Gassett and Frutilla (Wakefield) Emerson, 
parents of Philip Emerson, were both descendants 
of early Puritans of Massachusetts, except that one 
of the father's ancestors was Henri Gachet^ a 
French Huguenot, who fied from New Rochelle be- 
fore 1700. Another ancestor was the first child bom 
in Lynn, a Newhall. Silas G. Emerson was a farm- 
er, respected and loved by neighbors as one whose 
life always squared with his Christian profession. 

Philip Emerson was bom at Reading, Massachu- 
setts, May 7, 1865. He received his preparatory edu- 
cation in the district and high schools of his home 
town, being graduated in 1880. He graduated from 
the four years' course in the Bridgewater Normal 
School, Massachusetts, and later pursued courses 
in 'Cornell University, New YoriL, and the graduate 
school of Harvard University. After a ^ort busi- 
ness career he became a teacher, and almost im- 
mediately was given a principalship. For eight 
years he was in charge of various schools, and was 
then called to Lynn, Massachusetts, where he has 
been for twenty-five years at the head of the Abbet 
Grammar School and its successor, the Central 
Junior High SchooL His scholastic attainments 
have taken him to fields wider than local. Trained 
under Professor William' M. Davis, of Harvard, and 
Professor R. S. Tarr, of Cornell, his native abilities 
have been so developed and expanded timt their 
greater ouUet has been found as an instractor in 
geography and methods for its teaching at the sum- 
mer normal sessions of Cornell University, Amherst 
Agricultural College, University of Vermont, and at 
State Institutes of New England. 

An author, his published works indnde ''The New 
England States"; ''Geography Through the Stereo- 
seope''; "The School Garden Book"; and "Prob- 
lems in New England Geography." He is a con- 
tributor to educational journals and other pobUea- 
tiofis, mainly on tearhing of geognphy aad nature 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



8 



stady and on the management of schools, but also 
has written brilliantly on a wide range of topics. 
When the saloon interests attempted and all but 
succeeded in overthrowing prohibition in Maine, Mr. 
Emerson was editor writer on the Portland ''Ex- 
press", and by his incisive, clear-headed articles had 
much to do with the victory won. He has been a 
leader in temperance efforts for fifteen years; is 
now a member of the headquarters committee of 
the Massachusetts Anti-Saloon League, and was 
chairman, at one time, of the advisory board of two 
hundred citizens to the Lynn No-License League. In 
addition to his spedidized endeavors, Mr. Emerson 
has found time to be a helpful member of the Lynn 
Chamber of Commerce and its working boards ever 
since it was organized, and of the executive com- 
mittee of the Lynn School of Religious Education. 
A devout communicant of the First Congregationaj 
Church, Lynn, he is also one of its deacons. 

Mr. Emerson married, January 14, 1891, at Read- 
ing, MassachusetU, M. Evelyn Dewey, daughter of 
Edgar Osman and Elizabeth Davis (Kemp) Dewey, 
her father a son of Francis O. Dewey, first cousin 
to Admiral Dewey, her mother a daughter of 
"Father Kemp,'' who was the originator of the 
first old folks concert troupe. They are the pair 
ents of the following children: Dorothy, bom July 
80, 1893, supervisor of girls' clubs in Sussex county, 
Delaware; Beatrice, bom July 81, 1901, teacher of 
physical education; Edith Alden, bom July 11, 1905. 

EUGENE BARTLETT FRASBR — In standing 
among the foremost men of the dty of Lsnui, and 
looked upon as a figure of growing significance to 
the State of Massachusetts, Eugene B. Eraser is 
broadly active in civic, commercial and financial cir- 
cles in Essex county. Mr. Eraser is a son of WiU- 
iam A. and Maria A. (Collyer) Eraser, who were 
among the early residents of Lynn as a municipal- 
ity. William A. Eraser came to Lynn as a young 
man and engaged in the bakery business at a time 
when the baker's wagon, delivering freshly baked 
goods from door to door, was a common sight in 
every large community. He responded to Lincoln's 
call for volunteers, and went to Ihe front from Lynn 
as a member of Company D, 8th Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry. Upon his return from 
the Civil War, William A. Eraser beesme identified 
with the shoe industry in Lynn, and was thus en- 
gaged until his death. He was a native of Boston, 
but his wife was bom in Lynn, and both died in the 
latter dty. 

Eugene BarUett Eraser was bom in Lynn, Febru- 
ary 19, 1869. His formal education was limited to 
the advantages of the public schools, induding the 
grammar grades. The knowledge gained there, 
however, is only the least part of the broadly com- 
prehensive fund of information which an acquisitive 
mind and retentive memory have placed at Mr. Era- 
ser's disppsal. He has made every experience a 
means of education and has delved deeply into 
books, as well,.as keeping: in touch with the eurrcnt 
progress in sdence, invention and trade. As a lad 



he was ambitious to strike out for himself, and at 
the age of fourteen years left school and secured a 
position in a grocery store, where he was active for 
two years. He then entered the employ of the First 
National Bank of Lsnui, as a messenger, and from 
the beginning showed mariced adaptability in this 
work. Rising step by step, and constancy giving: 
the closest attention to detail, Mr. Eraser eventually 
became teller of this institution. During the six- 
teen years of his connection with the First National 
Bank, he gained valuable experience and made a 
wide cirde of friends among the business and pro- 
fessional men of this city and vicinity. In 1901 a 
vacancy occurred in the executive force of the Lynn 
Gas and Electric Company through the death of 
Colonel Charles C. Fry, long treasurer of that con- 
cern. The position was tendered to Mr. Eraser, and 
he resigned from the bank to accept it. He has 
now been treasurer of the Lynn Gas and Electric 
Company for twenty-one years, and is counted 
among the broadly significant men of the day in 
Lynn. He is interested also in a number of enter- 
prises of various nature, being a director of the Sag^ 
amore Trust Company, the Campbell Electric Com- 
pany, the Nut House of Massachusetts, Inc., the 
Lynn Manufacturers' and Merchants' Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, and of the Morris Plan Com- 
pany, all of Lynn, and he is also a director of the 
F. & E. Belt Company, of MarUehead. 

A Republican by political affiliation, Mr. Eraser 
has always been deeply loyal to the prindples and 
polides of the party, and has for many years been a 
leader in its progress. For twenty years he has 
served as a member of the Republican City Com- 
mittee, during sixteen years of that period holding 
the office of treasurer. One of the beiEit known men 
in the Republican ranks in Lynn, he is widdy known 
throughout Essex county, and through his work as 
a member of the Constitutional Convention beoune 
a man of note in state affairs. Now, in 1922, Mr. 
Eraser is considered by his many Mendir the logiod 
candidate for the Republican nomination for gov- 
ernor's council from the Fifth Essex District, and 
has been brought forward in this capadty. Always 
a man to whom personal ends are of slight impor- 
tance, Eugene B. Eraser is esteemed as espedally 
fitted for the responsibilities connected with public 
service of this nature, as his entire career has been 
such as to give him, in the highest sense, breadth 
of vision and practical judgment in the handling of 
large affairs. 

In the various dvic and popular movements which 
have from time to time engaged the people of Lynn, 
Mr. Eraser has always given his cordial support to 
every worthy cause. During the Worid War he 
served on many committees in connection with the 
different drives, entering into the work with whole- 
souled enthusiasm. He has long given his assist- 
ance to various charitable and benevolent enter- 
prises in Lynn, and takes particular pride in his as- 
sociation, in the capadty of treasurer, with the Lynn 
Home for Aged Men» deeming this trust an honor. 
In the fraternal worid Mr. Fraeer is alav wdl knofwn. 



ESSEX COUNTY 



being a member of all the Masonic bodies except 
the Consistory, and a member of Aleppo Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
of Boston, also of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Improved Order of Red Men, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Loyal Order of Moose, and 
the Lynn Lodge of Elks, now being treasurer of the 
Elks' Building Association. He is a member of the 
Lynn Rotary Club, and has served on its board of 
directors, and of the Oxford Club, the Park Club, 
and the East Lynn Social Club. He attends the 
First Universalist Church of Lynn^ and is liberal in 
the support of its work. 

JAMBS COTTER, one of the best known real 
estate and insurance men of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
has been identified with the insurance business for 
many years in various capacities, beginning as an 
agent for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 
of Brooklyn, New York, and rising through various 
promotions to the office of district superintendent. 
He has now for many years been engaged in the real 
estate and insurance business for himself, in Lynn, 
Massachusetts. 

Mr. Cotter is of Irish birth, the Cotters being a 
family of shoemakers in Ireland, where Patrick Cot- 
ter, father of Mr. Cotter, followed the trade when 
shoes were made entirely by hand. He came to the 
United States when his eldest son, William J., was 
a lad about fourteen yeai*s of age, and after remain- 
ing in this country for about a year, working in a 
shoe shop, returned to Ireland with, as his friends 
said, ''Yankee ideas," and established a general 
store, provisions, and a livery business, which was 
very successful. He is now retired, at the age of 
eighty-six, and his wife, Johanna (Creedon) Cotter, 
is still living, sharing with him the fruits of the 
long years of well-directed labor which secured the 
marked success of his business venture. William 
J. Cotter, the son, who came to this country with 
Patrick Cotter, remained in this country, where he 
became the superintendent of a large shoe factory. 
His health failing later, however, he returned to 
County Cork, where he died. Patrick Cotter mar- 
ried Johanna Creedon, and they were the parents of 
thirteen children, nine sons and four daughters. 
Five of the sons came to this country, but all of the 
daughters remained in Ireland. Among the sons 
who settled in the United States was James, the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

James Cotter was bom in County Cork, Ireland, 
February 28, 1862, and received his education in the 
National and in the Brothers' schools in Ireland. 
At the age of sixteen, he left school and until he 
was eighteen employed himself in doing odd Jobs for 
his father. He then came to the United States, and 
learned the trade of lasting, this being in the old 
days of manufacturing shoes by hand, he being em- 
ployed in the shoe factory of Cotter & Harney, his 
unde, John Cotter, being a member of the firm. 
As machinery was beginning to take the place of 
haad work At this period, thus rendering idle' thou- 
sands of those who had wrought in the old wa3r» Mr. 



Cotter turned his attention to other fields and looked 
about for a different line of work. In 1885 he went 
to Brooklyn, New York, and followed his trade in 
the employ of Maurice Ryan. This connection he 
maintained for a period of eight years, during which 
time he was made foreman of the shops. He then 
found an opportunity to enter a different line of 
work, and it waa at this time that he became agent 
for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, of 
Brooklyn, New York. After serving as agent for 
one year he was promoted to the office of assistant 
superintendent, and later was transferred to Os- 
sining. New York, where he took charge of the office. 
In 1908 he was again promoted, this time being made 
district superintendent in charge of the Middletown, 
New York, district, where he remained untQ 1907, 
meeting with marked success. During all these 
years, however, he was hoping for an opening which 
would permit his return to Lynn, Massachusetts, 
where his relatives were located. Accordingly, in 
1907, he severed his connection with the Metropoli- 
tan Life Insurance Company, and returning to Lynn» 
opened an office on his own account and engaged in 
general insurance and real estate business. This 
business venture was notably successful, and since 
that time the concern has been steadily growing and 
prospering, until Mr. Cotter has come to be one of 
the best known real estate and insurance men of 
Lynn. Mr. Cotter, however, has not given the whole 
of his time and energy to his business. As a pub- 
lic-spirited dtixen, sincerely interested in the wel- 
fare of the community in which he lives, he has 
given freely of his ability and his means for the ad- 
vancement of the public welfare. 

During the World War he served upon various 
committees and gave effective aid in the various 
campaigns and drives. He was made president of 
the Lynn Real Estate Exchange, and was a volun- 
teer worker for the war work insurance, in which 
capacity his thorough knowledge of the insurance 
business in general, especially of the rates, enabled 
him to give valuable assistance to the '^oys" in ser- 
vice, in the matter of getting out their war risk 
policies. After the drafting of men began, he served 
on the legal advisory board, and was later awarded 
a medal for his valuable services in this field, re- 
ceiving many yetters from the heads of the various 
departments in connection with which his work was 
done. Mr. Cotter is a director of the Knights of 
Columbus Building Association, and he is carman 
of the board of directors of the Knights of Colum- 
bus School, in charge of a work which is being more 
appreciated each year. He is president of the Lynn 
Board of Underwriters, and was one of the incor- 
porators of the Master BuUders' Association, which 
was incorporated in 1888, Mr. Cotter having at that 
time been a member of the Lasters' Protective As- 
sociation for one year. He also is a member of the 
St. Vincent de Paul Society, of which he was for 
several years treasurer. 

On September 30, 1889, James Cotter married 
Catherine E. Scott, who was bom in BrooklyB, New 
York, daugfatmr of Jdhn and MatOda (Lambert) 



l^^^^fOTyt^ ^-?^Z . 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Scott» and they are the parents of six children: 
Mary, who married William P. Welch, and has a 
dan^ter, Helen Clair; Kathleen, who married Ralph 
E. Camphell; Helen, who in the early years of her 
beautiful young womanhood, died, in August, 1919; 
James J., who is associated with his father in the 
real estate business; Mildred, who is attending 
school; and Dorothy, who is also attending school. 
All of these were bom in Brooklyn, New York, ex- 
cept the youngest, Dorothy, who was bom in Lynn, 
Massachusetts. 

The famfly are members of St. Mary's Roman 
Catholic Church, and reside at No. 3 Chester Place. 
Mr. Cotter is a self-made man, and while not weal- 
thy as wealth is estimated in these days, is still rich 
in the knowledge that he has lived a useful and suc- 
cessful life, contributing to the welfare of those 
about him, and enjoying in full measure those things 
which are the immaterial but the real wealth of a 
human life. 



WINFIELD SCOTT NEVINS— In many 
branches of progressive endeavor in Essex county 
the name of Winfleld Scott Nevins will long be re- 
membered. Author, journalist and historian, famil- 
iar with the records of the past, and looking upon 
the activities of his day with the vision of the ideal- 
ist, he was nevertheless broadly practical, and bore 
a pjart in those civic aifairs which most closely have 
to do with the daily welfare and comfort of the 
people. 

Mr. Nevins was a native of the State of Maine, 
and a son of Amos Harris and Mary A. Nevins. The 
father was a teacher in early life, and followed that 
profession for some years, later being engaged in 
farming until his death. He was a man of consid- 
erable prominence in his home community, for many 
years. New Gloucester, Maine, serving on the board 
of selectmen of that town. His scholarly tastes 
were a lifelong habit, and he kept his interest in 
literature and educational aflFairs until his death, 
one of the significant memorials of New Gloucester 
being the free public library which he founded. 

Winfleld Scott Nevins was bom in Bronswick, 
Maine, December 6, 1850. His early education was 
acquired in the public schools, but he later covered 
a comprehensive course in letters at Gorham Acad- 
emy, Maine, and there the talents, inherited from 
his father and augmented by his affluent nature, 
gained the impetus which carried him far in the pro- 
fession of his choice. Coming to Salem in his 
youth, Mr. Nevins was for many years connected 
with the daily press of this city and of this section, 
in one capacity or another, and his writings later 
were given more permanent form. He contributed 
innumerable articles and some fiction to the maga- 
zines, and a number of his more significant wox^ 
were published in book form. He was the author 
of "Old Naumkeag," an historical sketch of Salem 
and the surrounding towns; the "North Shore," a 
local guide; "The Intervale," a sketch of the White 
Mountains; "Education and Salem Schools," etc., 
etc Probably his most permanently important work 



was "Witchcraft in Salem Village," on which sub- 
ject he was -a recognized authority. In a footnote 
to his article on "Witchcraft in Massachusetts," 
posthumously published in the "Americana" maga- 
zine (First Quarter, 1922), Mr. Nevins said, in re- 
gard to that article, and broadly in regard to his 
writings on witchcraft: 

* * I make no claim to originality of material. 
That was exhausted years ago by the many writers 
on this subject. 

Nevertheless, Mr. Nevins brought to his work in 
this field not only the perspective of a later century, 
but the intimate insight into motives and the keen 
discrimination in determining values which only a 
mind of rare breadth can compass. Mr. Nevins also 
won considerable note on the lecture platform, treatr 
ing a wide range of subjects, both with and without 
accompanying stereopticon illustrations. 

The practical side of Mr. Nevins' nature was con- 
tinually evident in his civic and business relations. 
He was for many years proprietor and manager of 
the Salem "Evening Telegram," for thirty-four years 
an active member of the Essex Institute, of Salem. 
President of the School Board during the first four 
years of its existence, his membership in that body 
covered a period of eleven years and embraced much 
constructive activity. He was one of the original 
members of the Salem Sewage Commission, and for 
several years was identified with the Salem Plan- 
ning Board. His work in these various capacities 
was not that of the novice. Mr. Nevins had trav- 
eled much, both in the United States and abroad, 
having made nine trips to Europe. These subjects 
of vital civic import had for years been his study 
during his travels, and he accumulated information 
the comprehensive and exact nature of which was 
of the greatest assistance to various Salem bodies 
having these matters in charge. In fraternal circles 
Mr. Nevins was very prominent. He was at one 
time president of the Loyal Protective Association 
of Boston; was past grand master of the Grand 
Lodfi^e of Massachusetts, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and past noble grand of Fraternity Lodge, 
of Salem, in the same order, and was twice an ap- 
pointive officer of the Sovereign Grand Lodge of Odd 
Fellows. He was a member of Starr King Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and for a number of 
years was manager of the famous "Ye Honorable 
Boarde," a social club, of which he was a charter 
member. He was a man of deep religious convic- 
tions, and a member of the Universalist church. 

Mr. Nevins married, in Salem, June 22, 1881, Maxy 
Elizabeth Leavitt, daughter of Israel P. and Eliza- 
beth A. Leavitt. Mrs. Nevins still survives him and 
resides in Salem. 

The death of Mr. Nevins occurred on October 28, 
1921, and in his passing, the city of Salem, as well 
as the large circle of personal friends of which he 
was the center, has sustained a loss which will be 
felt for many years to come. He has left the worid 
richer for Ms interpretations of various phases of the 
past and the time of which his activities formed a 
significant part. 



6 



ESSEX COUNTY 



EDMUND C. WBNTWORTH, who is one of tha 
leading dtixens of Hayerfaill, presidex^ of the Na- 
tional Paper Box Manufacturers' Association for 
the years 1920-1921, vice-president of the Granite 
State Spring Water Company, treasurer and gen- 
eral manager of C. H. Hayes Corporation, director 
of some Haverhill banking institutions, and active in 
many phases of some Haverhill banking institutions, 
and active in many phases of the business and dvic 
affairs of Haverhill, was bom in Plaistow, New 
Hampshire, February 27, 1877, the son of Nathaniel 
A. and Isabella (Hayes) Wentworth, both now de- 
ceased. The father was bom in Denmark, Maine, 
and the mother was bom in Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Edmund C. Wentworth received his early school- 
ing in Plaistow, New Hampshire, and later attended 
school in Haverhill, Massachusetts. After a year in 
the Haverhill High School, he resolved to enter 
upon a business life without further delay, and 
therefore, in 1892, became an employee in the plant 
of C. H. Hayes. The business had been originally 
developed by George Wentworth, who sold to 
Messrs. Vamey and Hayes in 1881, that partnership 
continuing until 1892, when Mr. Vamey retired, Mr. 
Hayes being thereafter in control. Young Went- 
worth started at the bottom, but in four years had 
become foreman of the paper box department, and 
was a capable executive. In 1899, he accepted a 
position as general manager with the Lynn Box 
Company, at Lynn, Massachusetts, and continued in 
that responsibility until 1902, when he xetumed to 
Haverhill, and aga^ took up connection with the 
C. H. Hayes Corporation. He was appointed super- 
intendent of the plant, and elected vice-president of 
the company in that year, and held those offices 
until 1916, then became treasurer and general man- 
ager. By-the-way, it is interesting to note that at 
one time the power and light used in the city of 
Haverhill was generated in the C. H. Hayes Cor- 
poration plant. 

Mr. Wentworth has manifested an active, helpful, 
public spirit; he has been prominent in many pub- 
lic movements, especially those bearing on the in- 
dustrial progress of the city. He holds active mem- 
bership in the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce and 
Rotary Club, and in 1916 was the president of the 
former, and is now treasurer and director. During 
the time of national stress, when the World War 
drew into war work persons in the home sectors 
and civilian life almost as thoroughly as those who 
actively were enrolled into the armed forces, Mr. 
Wentworth co-operated notably in the more im- 
portant local activities, taking part in all the cam- 
paigns for war funds, the Liberty Loans, Red Cross, 
and other drives. He is a director of the Havei^ 
hill Trust Company, the Haverhill Morris Plan 
Bank, and the City Five Cent Savings Bank. He 
has been prominently identified with State Masonic 
bodies; is a Mason of thirty-second degree, Knights 
Templar, and past master of the Merrimack Lodge, 
Haverhill. He also is the district delegate of the 
Tenth ?^asonic District. Socially, he belongs to 
the Pcnlucket and Agawam dubs. Religiously, he 



attends the North Congregational Church, of Havet^ 
hilL 

Mr. Wentworth married, October 26, 1898, Flor- 
ence P. KimbaU, daughter of A. Perley and Ellen 
(Coffin) Kimball, the former originally of Chester, 
New Hampshire, and the latter of Newbury, Mas- 
sachusetts, but both in later life residents of Haver- 
hill, where their daughter, Florence P., married Mr. 
Wentworth. Mr. and Mrs. Wentworth have two 
children: Edward K. H., bom in 1900; and Nor- 
man P., bom in 1902. 



CHARLES HACKER PINKHAM— The story of 
the business side of the medicine known the world 
over as Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 
is one of absorbing interest, and well worth the 
telling. The business was started through force of 
circumstances, and grew out of the local success 
attending the use of a prescription or recipe Lydia 
Pinkham possessed, a botanic remedy for the dis- 
eases of women. She, without a thought of money 
making, used to prepare this medicine from the 
herbs which she steeped over the old fashioned 
stove, and gave it freely to such of her neighbors 
as she thought it would benefit. This she did for 
years, and liie fame of the remedy spread over a 
wide territory. People who called were given free- 
ly and without pay, for a period of perhaps ten 
years, when the family became very poor, through 
the father's losses. The wife, calling her children 
around her, discussed ways and means, the decision 
being that an attempt should be made .to maricet 
the medicine which had heretofore been given away, 
and the distribution of the vegetable compound as 
a commercial transaction was begun. 

Lydia (Estes) Pinkham was of ancient family, 
early Massachusetts pioneers, the site of the first 
Friends' meeting house in Lynn having been a gift 
from an Estes. Lydia was the daughter of William 
Estes, bom January 29, 1768, died in Lynn, March 
3, 1848. He married, July 8, 1806, Rebecca Chase, 
bom January 20, 1781, died February 11 1862, 
daughter of Benjamin and Eunice (Reed) Chase, 
granddaughter of Samuel Chase, son of William 
Chase, son of William Chase, the American ances- 
tor. William and Rebecca (Chase) Estes lived on 
a farm near Lynn, and in time the city absorbed 
the farm for building purposes. Lydia Estes passed 
through school with honor and chose teaching as 
her profession. In her studies on economic and 
social problems she^ became interested in the ques- 
tion of slavery and eventually took strong position 
with the opponents of that system. She was for 
years secretary of the "Freeman's Society," formed 
for the purpose of aiding the slave, some of her 
fellow members being Whittier, Garrison and 
Lowell, all Abolitionists. Lydia Estes married, 
September 8, 1843, Isaac Pinkham (as his second 
wife); he having a daughter, Frances EUen, bom 
March 11, 1838, by a previous marriage, who be- 
came the wife of Samuel Lane, of New Bedford, 
Massachusetts. Isaac Pinkham was bom in Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, December 26, 1816, died in 
Salem, Massachusetts, February 22, 1889. He inaiv 



-^^^ ./^ /W^.^^.^.^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



zied (lint), Mary Shaw, (second), Lydia Estes, as 
stated above. He was a grandson oi a Bevolution- 
ary soldier and of good family connection. The 
Pinkhams settled in Lynn, Massachusetts, where, 
during the next two decades, four children were 
bom to them, a fifth! at New Bedford, Massachu- 
setts, as follows: Charles Hacker, of whom fur- 
ther; Daniel Rogers, bom in 1847, died in 1849; 
Daniel Rofirers, second, bom November 19, 1849, 
served in the Massachusetts Legislature, but was 
stricken with a fatal disease, and died October 12, 
1881 ; William Henry, bom December 20, 1863, took 
an active part in the management of the business 
with his brother Charles H., but two years after his 
marriage to Emma Frances Barry, he contracted 
tuberculosis, and died December 8, 1881, two months 
after his brother; Aroline Chase, bom in Bedford, 
Massachusetts, June 17, 1857, married William 
Henry Gove. 

Just before the Civil War, the family moved to 
Bedford, Massachusetts, three years later returning 
to L3^n, taking a house on the outskirts of Lynn. 
Isaac Pinkham was a real estate dealer and over- 
speculated in houses and farms, thus tying up his 
cash and reducing his commissions by having to 
pay interest charges. The Pinkhams became '^and 
poor,'' but, true to her Quaker training, Mrs. Pink- 
ham helped in true wifely fashion, and the children 
were all kept in school until graduated from high 
school. All aided in the family support, even when 
young, the boys as peddlers of pop com and as 
"chore boys" for the neighbors. The eldest son 
enlisted in the Union Army, returning uninjured, 
and until the final crash of the family fortune in 
1873 they were a comfortably housed, happy, and 
fairly prosperous family. Then came the ''panic" 
days, and of that period the biographer of Isaac 
Pinkham has written: "When the crisis of 1878 
burst upon the city of Lynn, Isaac Pinkham had 
been for years one of the best known builders and 
real estate dealers in the city, and he had built up 
a large part of Wyoma, where he then lived. The 
length and severity of this strain was too great for 
anyone extensively interested in land to remain sol- 
vent, so great was the depression. In 1876 his limit 
was reached, and everjrthing he owned was lost, 
even their home, and they went out again into the 
world without a cent. Himself too old to battle 
again with life, he was fortunate in having three 
active sons and a daughter, the latter a teacher in 
the public schools; and these all combined their 
forces to restore to their parents that which they 
had lost. Looking about to see what they could 
best take up, the 'Pinkham Boys,' as they were 
called by the neighbors, decided to undertake the 
manufacture of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound. The great success which they achieved filled 
with joy the last days of Isaac Pinkham and his 
wife, and demonstrated that the zeal, wit and 
sturdy valor of the Pinkham ancestor had lost none 
of its strong life and helpfulness." 

After the decision to go into business as manu- 
facturers of the compound was anived at between 



the mother and her children, a small advertising 
campaign was begun, all bearing a hand. Later, 
when a little "ad." in a Boston newspaper brought 
an eighteen dollar order for the compound, a special 
holiday was decreed. The compound was still pre- 
pared by Mrs. Pinkham in her own kitchen, and for 
seven years she with her children fought on until 
finally the tide tumed. She lived to see the sale 
of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound spread 
over a wide domain, and as all had labored, so all 
the family shared in the prosperity that came to 
the Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Company. The 
death of her two sons in the fall and winter of 1881, 
and the death of a daughteivin-law, told heavily on 
Mrs. Pinkham's health, and on May 17, 1888, at the 
age of sixty-four, she passed away. 

Those who knew Mrs. Pinkham describe her 
as a woman of tall, slender, graceful figure, with a 
kindly, attractive face, which bespoke grace and 
beauty of character. Devotion to her family was 
her ruling trait, and to the last she preserved a 
remarkable alertness of mind. At the age of fifty- 
seven she was the winner of an old fashioned siiell- 
ing bee, spelling down every competitor. The last 
one to go down before her was a young man, who 
later became her son-in-law and manager of the 
business which bears her name. In her business 
she grave advice free to all inquirers, a department 
that grew to such proportions that in one year she 
and her staff of women assistants received and 
answered one hundred thousand letters. 

Charles Hacker Pinkham, eldest son of Isaac and 
Lydia (Estes) Pinkham, was bom in Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, December 9, 1844, and died November 
10, 1900. He was educated in grade and high schools 
at Lynn, and after school years were over, became 
a worker and aided his brother and father in pro- 
viding for the family. He enlisted in the Lynn City 
Guards, Company F, Eighth Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Infantry, and served a three months' 
and a nine months' term of enlistment. After the 
war he was a clerk with his father for a time, then 
was with the Boston & Lynn railroad, collecting 
fares between Lynn and Swampscott. He contin- 
ued his contributions to the family fund for several 
years, aiding his mother in getting a little business 
inaugurated after the father's failure in business in 
1878, and when a start had been made became man- 
aging head. 

In association with his brothers, Daniel R. and 
William H., he organized an advertising campaign, 
and made Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 
known ever3rwhere. The compound, originally made 
over the kitchen stove in the Pinkham home, now 
boasts of a laboratory home occupying many thou- 
sands of square feet of fioor space, and at the 
time of the death of Charles H. Pinkham four hun- 
dred people were therein employed. After the death 
of his two brothers, in 1881, he was in sole control 
of the Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Company, as 
president and general manager. Two years later his 
mother died, and he and his sister were the last 
survivors of those who founded the great business. 



8 



ESSEX COUNTY 



He was a wise, aggressive and progressive man of 
affairs, and to his able management the great suc- 
cess of the company is due. He was one of the 
most libend advertisers of his day, and left behind 
him a record of great achievement. 

A Democrat originally, Mr. Pinkham later acted 
with the Republican party. The only office he would 
ever accept was that of park commissioner. He 
was very charitable, deeply devoted to his family, 
and highly esteemed wherever known. He was a 
member of the First Universalist Church, the Grand 
Army of the Republic, Golden Fleece Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Sutton Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; Olivet Commandery, Knights Templar; 
Lafayette Lodge of Perfection, Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite. His clubs were the Park, Oxford, 
Lynn, Republican, and Press, all of Lynn; the 
Sphinx, of New York, and the Article, of Boston. 

Charles H. Pinkham married, September 11, 1878, 
Jennie Barker Jones, bom in Lynn, September 27, 
1866, daughter of John A. and Lucy R. (Barker) 
Jones. Mr. and Mrs. Pinkham were the parents of 
six children: Arthur Wellington, bom December 9, 
1879, (q.v.) ; Lucy Emery, bom June 26, 1883, mar- 
ried Charles Amos Bumham; Marion Frances, bom 
June 20, 1886, married Hermon Emerson Smith, of 
New York; Elsie Barker, bom February 6, 1891, 
married S. Earle Haines, of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania; Daniel Rogers (8), bom January 15, 1899, 
married Olive C. White, of Providence, Rhode Is- 
land; Charles Hacker (2), bom September 6, 1900. 

The ancestry of Charles Hacker Pinkham, tracing 
as it does to Richard Pinkham, of Dover Neck^ New 
Hampshire, 1640, to Matthew Estes, bom in Dover, 
England, 1645, to William Chase, the Puritan, and 
to Revolutionary sires, is not more honorable than 
his own life and deeds. ' As the eldest son he bore 
the heavier burden of establishing and developing a 
new commercial enterprise, and after the death of 
his brothers, he carried the responsibility alone for 
nearly two decades. He left sons who worthily bear 
the name and they, the ninth generation of Pink- 
hams in New England, have taken the place in the 
business life of New England formerly occupied by 
their honored father. 



ARTHUR WELLINGTON PINKHAM— Now ex- 
ecutive head of the business founded by his grand- 
mother and developed by lus father, Arthur W. 
Pinkham carries on the great business their genius 
created, and upon the foundations they laid and 
built he has helped add until a perfect commercial 
superstructure has been reared that will forever 
perpetuate the name. Other business enterprises 
have claimed Mr. Pinkham, and he is one of the 
men prominent in the commercial worid, a manu- 
facturer and financier, a citizen public-spirited and 
progressive, and in every department of city life, 
church, fratemal, and social, he isi well known, use- 
ful and popular. He is of the ninth American gen- 
eration of Pinkhams, a son of Charles Hacker and 
Jennie Barker (Jones) Pinkham, and grandson of 
Isaac and Lydia (Estes) Pinkham (q.v.). 



Arthur Wellington Pinkham was bom in Lynn, 
Massachusetts, December 9, 1879. He was educated 
in the public schools of the city, a graduate of San- 
bom grammar school in 1894, Classical High School, 
class of 1898, and a student at Brown University, 
1898-1901, when he left the university to take the 
place in the business world made vacant by the 
death of his honored father. In June, 1921, he was 
enrolled as a graduate of his class of 1902 and grant- 
ed the degree of Ph.B. out of course. While the 
responsibilities he was called on thus eariy to as- 
sume were both numerous and weighty, he quickly 
settled under the load and has developed into the 
strong, self reliant man of affairs, a fine executive 
manager, wise in council and strong in action. 

Mr. Pinkham is president of the Lydia Pinkham 
Medicine Company; president of the National City 
Bank of Lynn; director of the Bartlett Somers Shoe 
Company; the Ronton Heel Company, and the Lynn 
Gas and Electric Company. To these purely busi- 
ness enterprises he gives himself with energy and 
enthusiasm, but they, by no means, measuref the ex- 
tent of his activity. He is chairman of the Lynn 
Independent Industrial Shoe School; chairman of 
the Home Rule Committee; a membor of the board 
of trustees of Lynn Hospial. In all of these pub- 
lic activities he takes a deep interest and gives to 
his official duties the same close scrutiny and at^ 
tention as to lus private affairs. In politics Mr. 
Pinkham is a Republican, and in 1902-03 served as a 
member of the Lynn School Committee. In May, 
1904, he began a five years' term as park commis- 
sioner under appointment of the mayor. He is a 
member and treasurer of the First Universalist 
Society; a member of Essex Chapter, Sons of the 
American Revolution; a member and an ex-president 
of the Oxford Club of Lynn; and in Masonry has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite. 

Mr. Pinkham married, November 11, IMl, Ruth 
Marie Griffith, of Glens Falls, New Yprk, and they 
are the parents of two children: Charles Hacker 
(8), and Richard Griffith. 



REV. JOHN P. SULLIVAN, A. B.— In ecclesias- 
tical circles in Essex county. Rev. John P. Sullivan 
is a figure of prominence, having rounded out thirty- 
three years of ceaseless activity in the priesthood. 
Among the people of those churches which he has 
served as pastor he is deeply beloved, and it is fit- 
ting that the review of his life should stand on the 
permanent records of this county. A native of this 
State, he is a son of John and Bridget (O'Day) Sul- 
livan. His father, who is now deceased, was a vet- 
eran of the Civil War, and a brother died while 
serving in the Spanish- American War. 

Father Sullivan was bom in Rockland, Massachu- 
setts, August 6, 1863. He received his early educa- 
tion in the schools of his native place, and was 
graduated from the Rockland High School in the 
class of 1881. From early youth his life was dedi- 
cated to the priesthood, and for his course in the 
arts and letters he entered Boston University, from 
which he was graduated in the class of 1885. His 



^^-7^"^^ \^yV^^^<>^<^^^<-^^ 



I 

i 



(%it-iTa-«.„^.*-v^ ~^ ■ 'A^»y fw^-o'^iri^^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



9 



theological studies were pursued at St. John's Semi- 
nary, New Brighton, Massachusetts, and there he 
was ordained on June 22, 1889. His first appoint- 
ment was as assistant at St. Michael's Church, Hud- 
son, Massachusetts, where he served for sixteen 
months. He was then appointed assisl^t at the 
Church of the Immaculate Conception, Marlboro, in 
this State, where he remained from 1890 until 1909. 
He was then made pastor of the Sacred Heart 
Church, Middleboro, and for two years led this 
congregation in spiritual and material growth. In 
October, 1911, he was appointed to the Church of 
the Immaculate Conception, Salem, and has now 
been a factor in the religious advance of this com 
munity for nearly eleven years. He has improved 
and beautified the church property during his resi- 
dence here, and has added very considerably to the 
membership of the church, teaching, comforting and 
admonishiniBr the people, and inspiring them to rer. 
higher leveb of spiritual attainment He has won 
the esteem of all the people of Salem, without re- 
gard to differences of (;reed, and has done especially 
significant work in the various branches of organized 
endeavor, which are fostered or endorsed by the 
church. He is chaplain of the Fourth Degree, 
Knights of Columbus, Father Druillet Assembly, 
also of Lynn Particular Council, St Vincent de 
Paul, the Father Conway Court of Foresters; Di- 
vision 5, Ancient Order of Hibernians, and also the 
Ladies' Auxiliary of that division. He also serves 
as chaplain of St Mary's Guild, the Father Mathew 
Total Abstinence Society, St Mary's School Asso- 
ciation, the Ladies' Catholic Benevolent Associa- 
tion, and the Catholic Charities Centre. Father 
Sullivan finds scant leisure from his multitudinous 
duties, his chief recreative interest being golf, and 
he is a member of the Homestead Golf Club. 



PREEBfAN PUTNEY, a retired educator of 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, has given more than four 
decades of his life to teaching. Hundreds are the 
wiser and better by reason of their contact with his 
personality and instruction in classroom and out 
Bom in Bow, New Hampshire, August 23, 1847, after 
a preliminary schooling at home he entered Hopkin- 
ton Academy, Hopkinton, New Hampshire. Upon 
graduating he went to the New London Literary and 
Scientific Institution, being graduated in 1867, and 
he is a Bachelor of Arts of Dartmouth College, 1878. 

Upon the completion of his studies he inmiediate- 
ly began teaching and continued in educational work 
throughout a period of forty-two years, up to his 
retirement in 1916. For twenty-seven years he had 
the supeiintendency of the Gloucester schools, and 
most of the expansion and success of the educational 
system of Gloucester has had its inception and guid- 
ance from him. _..,.^__^^^__^__ 

REV. ALFRED MANCHESTER, for mora than 
a quarter century, has figured prominently in the 
community life of Salem, Massachusetts. In the re- 
ligious movements, the benevolent activities and the 
literary and social circles of the city, he has always 
been a leader. The son of George and Phebe 



Taber (Coggeshall) Manchester, of Portsmouth, 
Rhode Island, he was bom at Portsmouth, Novem- 
ber 16, 1849. His father was originally a carpentM*, 
but latw his interest in politics brought him vari- 
ous ofilces in this county, and he was sheriff of 
Newport county, Rhode Island, at the time of his 
death. 

Rev. Alfred Manchester is a graduate of the pub- 
lic schools of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, Pawtucket 
(Rhode Island) High School, Boston School for the 
Ministry, and of the Harvard Divinity School, class 
of 1872. He took up his work as minister on Janu- 
ary 1, 1873, with the Unitarian church of Fairhaven, 
Massachusetts, and remained there four years. 
Other pastorates followed at Providence, Rhode Is- 
land, Olney Street Church, January 1, 1876, to April 
80, 1893; Barton Square Church (Unitarian) Salem, 
Massachusetts, May 1, 1898, to September 80, 1897, 
and the Second Church (Unitarian), of Salem, Octo- 
ber 1, 1897. He is also secretary of the Commis- 
sion of the Unitarian Ministerial Union on Hie sup- 
ply of pulpits in New England. Mr. Manchester is 
the author of "In Memorian," an appreciation and 
biographical sketch of Rev. Caleb Davis Bradlee, 
D.D., published in 1897. 

His prominence and ability have brought him 
into many activities outside of the church. He is 
president of the Salem Massachusetts Relief Asso- 
ciation, president of Home Service of the Red Cross 
Society, director of Associated Charities, Salem, 
Massachusetts, and in the world of fraternities, 
holds many ofiices. He affiliates with Masons, being 
raised in Concordia Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Fairhaven, Massachusetts, in 1874; was 
master of Mount Vernon Lodge, Providence, Rhode 
Island, and now (1922) honorary member of the lat- 
ter lodge and of the Essex Lodge, Salem, Massa- 
chusetts. He has been chaplain in Fairhaven, Mas- 
sachusetts; Providence, Rhode Island; and for fif- 
teen years in Salem, Massachusetts. He is a mem- 
ber of What Cheer Lodge, and Narragansett En- 
campment, Providence, Rhode Island, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and has been grand chaplain 
of Rhode Island. For twenty-seven years he has 
served ^s chaplain of the Salem Light Infantry 
Veteran Association. His clubs are the Salem Ma- 
sonic and Salem Harvavd. 

The Rev. Alfred Manchester was married by Rev. 
Caleb Davis Bradlee, D.D., at Boston, Massachu- 
setts, April 29, 1878, to Sarah Adelaide Peckham, of 
Newport, Rhode Island. They have two children: 
Ethel Bradlee, bom in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, 
February 18, 1874, who married Frank Staniford 
Perkins, June 2, 1897; and Grace Tingley, bom in 
Providence, Rhode Island, August 8, 1882, who be- 
came the wife of Waldo Emerson Berry, Novem- 
ber 28, 1900. 

BENJAMIN F. RAYMOND, long active in the 
business life of Essex, Massachusetts, has recently 
sold his drug business, and in the real estate busi- 
ness is winning another substantial success and still 
bearing his part in the progress of his community. 

Mr. Raymond is a son of Benjamin Conant Ray- 



10 



ESSEX COUNTY 



mond, and grandson of James Giles and Sally (Con- 
ant) Raymond, tracing lineally through these two 
lines to John Raymond, who came to Beverly, Mas- 
sachnsetts, about 1654, and to Roger Conant, who 
came to Plymouth in the ship "Ann," in 1628. The 
Conant line from Roger Conant is through his son, 
Lot; his son, John (1) ; his son, John (2) ; his son, 
John (8) ; his son, John (4) ; his son, John (6) ; his 
daughter, Sally, wife of James Giles Raymond. In 
the Raymond line descent is traced from John Ray- 
mond, of Beverly, and his wife, Judith (Woodbury) 
Raymond, (widow of William (2) Woodbury); 
through their son, Nathaniel; their son, George; his 
son, David; his son, James Giles Raymond, and his 
wife, Sally (Conant) Raymond; their son, Benjamin 
Conant Raymond, and his wife, Sarah Woodbury 
(Ray) Raymond; their son, Benjamin F. Raymond, 
of Essex, Massachusetts. 

There is another line leading to these two an- 
cestors, Roger Conant and John Raymond. Lot 
Conant, son of Roger Conant, had a daughter, Re- 
becca, who married Nathaniel Raymond, son of John 
Raymond. Both Lot Conant and Nathaniel Ray- 
mond are ancestors of Benjamin F» Raymond, of 
Essex, and thus his title is clear. 

Roger Conant, shortly after his arrival at Bos- 
ton, made his home at Conant's Island in Boston 
Harbor, now known as Governor's Island. About 
1624 he established a fish business at Gloucester, and 
that year was chosen governor of the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony. Miles Standish disputed his rights in 
the fishing business at Gloucester, and in the inter- 
ests of peace, Roger Conant surrendered his rights 
and moved to Salem in 1626, and was followed there 
by his friends, Lyford, Gardiner, and Balch. In 
1628 John Endicott was sent from England to super- 
sede Roger Conant as g^ovemor of the colony, but 
he continued strong in the esteem of the people. 
He was the first deputy from Salem to the Gen- 
eral Court, and in 1637 Roger Conant and William 
Hathom were appointed judges of the Quarterly 
Court at Salem. The ''Book of Grants" in the rec- 
ords of Salem are in Roger Conant's handwriting. 
In 1637 he built a home on Balch street, at what 
later became Beverly. He built the first fort in 
Salem, and his son, Roger (2) Conant, was the first 
white child bom in Salem. This fact was recog- 
nized by the town by granting to him thirty acres 
of good land. 

John and William Raymond, brothers, came to 
Beverly, Massachusetts, about the year 1654, and 
William Raymond, with Rev. John Wise, of Che- 
bacco Parish (now the town of Essex), had the 
honor of being imprisoned as a result of the fight 
against Governor Andros to maintain the principles 
of ''no taxation without representation." This is 
said to be the first movement against England in 
the interest of civil liberty. 

John Raymond, ancestor of Benjamin F. Ray- 
mond, of Essex, married (first) Rachel Scruggs, 
daughter of Thomas Scruggs, deputy to the General 
Court, 1635-36. In June, 1666, he married (second) 
Judith Woodbury, widow of William Woodbury, Jr. 
Their son, Nathaniel Raymond, was bom March 



15, 1670. After his marriage, John Raymond movvd 
to a house on Balch street, Beverly, and there a 
Raymond has lived in each generation until the 
present, the 1921 occupant being the heir of Colonel 
John W. Raymond, of Civil War fame. 

Benjamin Conant Raymond married Sarah Wood- 
bury Ray, and they were the parents of Benjamin 
F. Raymond, of Essex. Sarah Woodbury (Ray) 
Raymond was a great-granddaughter of Ebeneser 
Ray, who enlisted in 1778, at the age of fifteen, 
and was stationed with the American troops in New 
Jersey. Later he entered the navy and was cap- 
tured and made to serve as seaman, and after some 
interesting and trying experiences he was finally 
released from custody in May, 1782. Woodburys 
and Rays have served their country valiantly in 
every war, and have played well their parts in times 
of peace. Benjamin Conant Raymond, of the sixth 
generation, was a wholesale and retail dealer in ice 
until his death in 1887. His widow, Sarah Wood- 
bury (Ray) Raymond, survived him until 1890. 

Their son, Benjamin F. Raymond, was bom in 
Beveriy, Massachusetts, July 25, 1856, and there 
was educated in the public schools. He began busi- 
ness life with the Price Drug Company, of Salem, 
and remained with that company six years, becom- 
ing thoroughly familiar with the drug business. In 
1878 he established a drug store in Essex, Massa- 
chusetts, and conducted it successfully for forty 
years. He sold his drug interests in 1918, and re- 
tired from mercantile life and has since opened 
a real estate office. Mr. Raymond was long since 
sought by the people of Essex for the public sex^ 
vice, and served as town treasurer for twenty-two 
consecutive years, from 1890 to 1912. He is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, and of the Con- 
grefi^ational church, and is president of the Choate 
Bible class. 

In 1882 Mr. Raymond married Leila A. Story, 
and they are the parents of five children: Judge 
Frank E.; Leila, now a resident of Salt Lake City; 
Charles A., assistant superintendent of the large 
gas works at Everett, Massachusetts; Lydia, a 
school teacher in Beverly public schools; and Nellie, 
who died in 1915. 



HAROLD FERDINAND BLAKE— Harold Fer- 
dinand Blake looks back on an existence full of 
work and pleasure, effort and success. He has seen 
life through the eyes of the farmer, the carpenter, 
the manufacturer, the business man and the author, 
and has written about it in book, magazine and 
newspaper in a mellow, humorous, manly style that 
has endeared him to many and is inspiring to aU. 
He is the son of Ferdinand Lewis Blake, of Ken- 
sington, New Hampshire, who in early life was a 
farmer and in later years a manufacturer of shoes, 
and at one time postmaster of his city. Three years 
of the father's life were spent in the United States 
army during the Mexican War (1846-7-8), and at the 
breaking out of the war between the States he was 
chosen unanimously by his townsmen for appoint- 
ment as recruiting officer to enlist such men for war 
as might be available. He was so appointed and 



JhiAj)^ti^ 9:A{th 



^^.C^^^idJL:^^' 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



11 



after two years of service was a bandmaster 
tliitniffhottt 1868-4-6. Mrs. Mary Nesbit (Chase) 
Blake* the mother, is described as a woman of 'Mg^ 
orous^ forceful intellect, with a tenacious memory, 
a gift of mimicry, and a splendid story teller," 
which abilities have evidently been passed on to 
her son. 

Harold Ferdinand Blake was bom December 22, 
1853, at Kensington, New Hampshire. His educa- 
tion came from the conmion schools of this town, 
one year in Kingston Academy and the hard school 
of experience. He was only eleven years old when 
by a queer twist of circumstance he was made the 
private messenger of the Western Union Telegraph 
Company to President Lincoln and his cabinet and 
acted as sucht from September 26, 1864, to the time 
of Lincoln's death, April 24, 1866. The war over, 
he returned to the farm and carpenter shop, but 
soon branched out as a shoemaker, shoe manu- 
facturer, leather dealer and became eventually a 
business organizer and manager. 

Gifted with the ability to express the things he 
saw and thought and felt he has written much and 
well. Although written for private circulation 
amon^ his friends in Kensington, New Hampshire, 
his ''Re-told Tales" has had a much wider vogue. 
This book is a small historical work giving a brief 
history of Kensington's part in the Indian, Revo- 
lutionary, War of 1812, Mexican and Civil Wars. 
Besides this he is author of over eighty half humor- 
ous but wholly truthful tales about men, things, and 
events seen during the days of old fashioned and 
successful farming in New England. He has also 
written more than one hundred articles on the 
''Evolution in the Making of Leather and Shoes — 
and Other Things"; and is considered an authority 
on the art of shoe and leather making as carried 
on in both ancient and modem times. 

Politically, Mr. Blake is a thorough Democrat and 
has served as trustee of the public library and jus- 
tice of the peace. He is a member of the Haver- 
hill Historical Society and Massachusetts Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. Among 
his clubs are the New Hampshire Press Club, the 
Essex Press Club, and the Canadian Railway Club 
of Montreal, Canada. He has been a regular at- 
tendant of the First Congregational Church, George- 
town, Massachusetts, for more than thirty years. 

At Haverhill, Massachusetts, April 13, 1886, he 
was married to Mary Ella Killam, daughter of 
Hosea Chauncey Killam and Mary Jane (Spofford) 
Killam. There are no children. 



HON. ALBERT LEROY BARTLETT, author, 
teacher and lecturer, and long a member of the 
municipal g^ovemment, is one of the notable citizens 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts. His many-sided abil- 
ity and interesting personality not only have made 
him eminent in the educational world, but have 
brought him into prominence in civic affairs. The 
son of Thomas and Patience (Hawkins) Bartlett, 
he was bom at Haverhill, Massachusetts, June 1, 
1852. 

After a preparatory education in the public and 



high schools, Mr. Bartlett attended Dartmouth Col- 
lege, Hanovei^ New Hampshire, and was graduated 
in 1872, with the degree of A.B., and for post- 
graduate work was made an A. M., in 1875. Taking 
up teaching as his profession, he was master of the 
Sherbom Academy, Massachusetts, in 1872, and of 
the Bradford High School, Massachusetts, from 1878 
to 1882, and was from 1882 to 1888 sub-master of 
the Haverhill (Massachusetts) High SchooL He 
then became the superintendent of public instruction 
of the city, serving until 1897. His ability as a lec- 
turer was called into activity about this time, and' 
during the years from 1895 to 1897 he lectured on 
the English language and literature before the New 
Hampshire Summer Normal School, and for two 
years, 1900 and 1901, at the Marty's Vineyard 
(Massachusetts) Summer Normal School. He also 
gave a course of lectures before the Vixiginia Nor- 
mal School in 1901. 

Mr. Bartlett has taken active part in all matters 
of civic interest, and has been prominent in the 
g^ovemment of Haverhill, having been the commis- 
sioner of public safety from 1912 to 1914 and from 
1919 to the present time (1922), the mayor from 
1915 to 1916, executive secretary of the Commit- 
tee on Public Safety, 1917, and a member of the 
Municipal Council for many years, up to and in- 
cluding the present (1922). He has been a trustee 
of the Public Library since 1889. He was a mem- 
ber of the Park Commission and its chairman until 
1912, and he has been chairman of the Forum Com- 
mittee since its formation in 1917. The beautiful 
Albert L. Bartlett School was built in 1907 on land 
given by him, and was named in his honor. 

He has been a voluminous writer on English and 
local history. Besides contributions to various 
magazines, he is the author of: "History of 
Haverhill Academy and High School," 1890; "First 
Steps in English," 1900; "Essentials of Language 
and Grammar," 1900; "A Golden Way," 1902; "The 
Construction of English," 1903; "The Elements of 
English Grammar," 1907; "Some Memories of Old 
HaverhiU," 1915; "Haverhill 1640 to 1915," an his- 
torical address, 1915. His language books, have had 
the distinction of translation into Spanish, and of 
adaptation for use in the Dominion of Canada. 



ALBERTO H. STOCKBRIDGE, M. D.— In the 

annals of medical science in Essex county, and in- 
deed over a far wider regfion, the name of Alberto 
H. Stockbridge, M. D., holds marked significance, his 
record of successfully combatting the wartime epi- 
demic of influenza having been equalled by few 
throughout the country. Dr. Stockbridge comes of 
very old New England antecedents, both paternal 
and maternal lines being very ancient and dis- 
tinguished, and he is a son of Horatio and Ellen 
Frances (Stone) Stockbridge. 

Dr. Stockbridge was bom in Cochituate, Middle- 
sex county, Massachusetts, August 8, 1875. His ele- 
mentary and high school courses were covered in his 
native town, and while still a young lad he began 
earning his own way in life. From high school days 
he was employed as a bookkeeper in a shoe fac- 



12 



ESSEX COUNTY 



tory for a time, then later entered upon the mann- 
faetnre of boxes, handing an independent business in 
a smaU way. During these years, however, he never 
permitted himself to lose sight of his early pur- 
pose, a professional career. Keeping up his studies, 
he was eventually successful in covexing the neces- 
sary preparatory work and matricidating for the 
medical course at Tufts College, Boston, from which 
he was graduated in 1905, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. Serving one year of intemeship at 
the Union Hospital, at Lynn, Dr. Stockbridge then 
opened his office for the practice of medicine in 
this city, at No. 32 City Hall Square, later remov- 
ing to his present location at No. 69 Park street, 
where he also resides. From the beginning of his 
professional activities Dr. Stockbridge has com- 
manded the confidence of the people, and has 
handled a steadily increasing practice. Having at- 
tained high standing in the profession, the influ- 
enza epidemic plunged him at once into the thick 
of the fight During the seven months when the 
scourge was raging its worst. Dr. Stockbridge treats 
ed more than twelve hundred cases, and the records 
show that he lost but four or five of his patients. 
His treatment was by hot applications, the direct 
opposite of the cold in general use. This aroused 
much comment in the medical fraternity, as well as 
among lay circles, but the doctor's success was a 
brilliant vindication of his wisdom and Judgment. 
Dr. Stockbridge is a member of the Lynn Medical 
Association, and fraternally holds membership in the 
various Masonic bodies, including the Commandery, 
and also Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member, also, 
of the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and of the Improved Order of Red 
Men. 

Dr. Stockbridge married Lillian Parker. 

H. ASHLEY BOWBN— In professional circles in 
Eastern Massachusetts the name of H. Ashley 
Bowen is well known, and his reputation has now 
reached throughout the neighboring states. Mr. 
Bowen was bom in Lynn, Massachusetts^ May 23, 
1881, a son of J. Herbert and Caroline (Rea) Bowen, 
long residents of this city. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of Lynn, Mr. Bowen later entered Harvard Univer- 
sity, and was admitted to the bar in 1902. Return- 
ing at once to his native city, he established his 
office here, and has since conducted the general 
inractice of law with grattfjring success. His activi- 
ties have not, however, been confined to this im- 
mediate neighborhood, but his practice covers all 
the New England States, as well as several of the 
Western states. For ten years, from 1905 untfl 1915, 
Mr. Bowen acted as counsel for the town of Swamp- 
scott, in this county, but the demands of his prac- 
tice tompelled his resignation. Mr. Bowen is a mem- 
ber of the Essex County, Massachusetts, and Ameri- 
can Bar associations; of Mount Carmel Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, the Lynn and the Swamp- 
scott Chapters; the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion; the Oxford Club, Swampscott Masonic Club, 



and the Swampscott Club. He and his family at- 
tend the Congregational church of Swampscott. 

On June 12, 1905, Mr. Bowen married Harriet 
L. Bean, daughter of Everett J. and Abbie Bean, 
of Lynn. 

WILLIAM CHARLES FORD, LL.B.— For the 
past twenty-two years actively engaged in the prac- 
tice of the law in the city of Lawrence, William C. 
Ford, senior partner of the law firm of W. C. & 
E. J. Ford, has attained an enviable position in the 
professional world of Essex county as a successful 
and always progressive attorney and counsellor-at- 
law. Mr. Ford comes of a pioneer family of Law- 
rence, his parents, John and Mary Jane (Quinn) 
Ford, having been identified with the early history 
of this community as. a municipality. 

William Charles Ford was bom in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, October 5, 1875. His education was be- 
gun in the public schools of his native place, and 
he was graduated from the Lawrence High School 
in the class of 1894. This was followed by courses 
at Georgetown College, and at Harvard University, 
after which Mr. Ford took up the study of his 
chosen profession at Boston University Law School. 
He was graduated from that institution in 1900 with 
honors. Shortly after his graduation, Mr. Ford es- 
tablished his office in Lawrence, and soon took a 
significant place in professional circles. He has 
been very successful. In 1906 he received into 
partnership his younger brother, Edmond John Ford, 
whose sketch follows, and together they have built 
up a very extensive and prosperous practice. Mr. 
Ford keeps broadly in touch with the general ad- 
vance, but the exactions of his profession command- 
ing his time, he has never been active in public 
affairs. He is a member of the Massachusetts Bar 
Association, the Essex Bar Association and the 
Lawrence Bar Association, and he is a member of 
the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and his religious affiliation is with 
the Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Ford married, November 1, 1905, Mary A. 
Mahony, daughter of D. D. and Catherine (Don- 
ovan) Mahony. Mr. and Mrs. Ford have one 
daughter, Helen Marie, bom June 12, 1914, and now 
a pupil in the Lawrence schools. 



EDMOND JOHN FORD, LL.B. — In Uie legal 
profession in Essex county, Edmond J. Ford is wide- 
ly known as a member of the firm of W. C. & E. 
J. Ford, of Lawrence. Bom smd reared in this dty, 
Mr. Ford prepared for his career in the educational 
institutions of his native State, and is a son of John 
and Mary Jane (Quinn) Ford, early residents of 
Lawrence. 

Edmond John Ford was bom in the city of Law- 
rence, November 5, 1880. His education was be- 
gun at St. Mary's Parochial School, and he was 
graduated from the Lawrence High School in the 
class of 1901. His course in the arts and letters 
was pursued at Harvard University, from which he 
was graduated, cum laude, in 1905. His profes- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



13 



donal studies were covered at Harvard University 
Law School, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1907, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Within the year Mr. Ford became associated in the 
practice of law with his brother, William C. Ford, 
and a member of the above) named firm, and is still 
thus engaged. He has attained a position of dig- 
nity and prominence at the bar, and is counted 
among the broadly successful men of the day in 
the professional world of Lawrence. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Bar Association, the Massa- 
chusetts! Bar Association, serving as a member of 
the executive committee of the latten body, a mem- 
ber of the Lawrence Bar Association, and chairman 
of the Lawrence Law Library Association. In fra- 
ternal and social circles Mr. Ford is well known, 
being a member of the Knights of Columbus, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, president 
of the Lawrence High School Alumni A^ssociation, 
and is prominently identified with Harvard Alumni 
activities. Secretary of the Harvard Club, of Law- 
rence, he is a delegate from Lawrence (1922) to the 
New England Federation of Harvard Clubs. Mr. 
Ford's interest in athletics has been very keen from 
boyhood, and reaches all outdoor sports. He was a 
star track man at Harvard, for years has been a 
champion tennis player of Lawrence, and is now 
president of the Lawrence Athletic Advisory Coun- 
ciL He takes particular interest in the encourage- 
ment of athletics among the younger people, and 
has generously given much of his time to the de- 
velopment of the high school track team. He is 
widely sought as a referee in various athletic 
events. Always delighting in water sports, he has 
long been a member of the Lawrence Canoe Club, 
and its commodore. He is a member of the Roman 
Catholic church, and president of St. Mary's Cath- 
olic Association. 

Mr. Ford married, in Boston, September 12, 1911, 
Grace Daly, daughter of Timothy and Katherine 
Daly. Mr. and Mrs. Ford are the parents of four 
sons: John, bom September 28, 1915; William 
Dudley, bom January 12, 1917; Edmond, bom Janu- 
ary 28, 1918; and Robert, bom May 29, 1921. 



ELISHA MORSE STBVBNS— Prominent in pro- 
fessional circles in Essex county, Elisha M« Stevens 
has for years stood among the foremost attorneys 
of this section, and is widely known as a member 
of the firm of NUes, Stevens, Underwood & Mayo, 
of Lynn. A native of the State of Maine, Mr. Ste- 
vens' earlier years were spent in the West, but he 
has now for twenty-six years practiced in the city 
of Lynn. He is a son of Rufus Stowell and Sarah 
King (Morse) Stevens, formerly of Oxford county, 
Maine, and later of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Elisha M. Stevens was bom in Sooth Paris, Maine, 
January 6, 1864. His early education was acquired 
in the public schools of Minneapolis, and he there- 
after attended the Northwestem Preparatory School 
at Evanston, Illinois, from which he was graduated 
in 1880. His course in the arts and letters was be- 
gun at the Noxthwestera University, Evanston, but 
was corai^eted at Amherst College, Amherst, Mas- 



sachusetts, from which institution he was graduated 
in the class of 1886. He thereafter pursued his pro- 
fessional studies at Harvard University Law School, 
1887 to 1890, in which year he was graduated with 
the degrees of L.L.B. and A.M. First admitted to 
the bar in Massachusetts, Mr. Stevens soon returned 
to Minneapolis to practice, and was active in that 
city from 1891 until 1896. In the latter year he 
came East, locating permanently in Lynn, and has 
practiced continuously here since. As a member of 
the above firm he has gained a high place in the 
legal fraternity. He is a Republican by political 
afiiliation, but has always declined tfie honors of 
elective office. Mr. Stevens was appointed a special 
justice of the district court of Southern Essex, 
Lynn, in 1907, and still serves in this capacity. He 
is a member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, and of 
Phi Beta Kappa, Amherst chapter. His religious 
afiiliation is with the First Universalist Church, of 
Lynn, of which he is one of the Board of Stewards, 
and he is a member of the Oxford and Kiwanis 
clubs of Lynn. 

Mr. Stevens married (first), September 14, 1892, 
in Lynn, Mary Felton La Croix, daughter of Ed- 
ward and Eliza Walker (Felton) La Croix. She 
died, leaving one son, Rufus La Croix, bom May 22, 
1897. Mr. Stevens married (second), December 14, 
1904, in Needham, Helen Lucas Fuller, daughter of 
Albert and Marianna (Gay) Fuller. They have a 
son, Alvin Gay, bom September 80, 1906; and a 
daughter, Marion Fuller, bom August 29, 1909. 
The family home is at No. 7 Outlook road, Swamp- 
scott, Massachusetts. 



MEYER WINER, D.M.D.— Having been engaged 
in the active practice of his profession since 1912, 
Dr. Winer is familiar, and most favorably so, to a 
majority of residents of Salem. During these years, 
he has become thoroughly identified both as a den- 
tist and a citizen with the progressive element of 
the community. 

Dr. Winer was bom in Salem, Massachusetts, 
January 8, 1890, the son of Max Winer, a merchant 
of Salem, and of Bessie (Dembo) Winer, his wife. 
The elementary education of Meyer Winer was ob- 
tained in the public schools of his native place, 
after which, having decided upon the profession of 
dentistry for his career, hef entered the dental de- 
partment of Harvard College, from which he was 
graduated, with the degree of Doctor of Medical 
Dentistry, in 1912, and passed the State board ex- 
aminations that same year, after which, in 1915, he 
opened an ofilce at No. 60 Washington street, Sa- 
lem, where he has since been engaged in the active 
practice of his profession and has won a distinction 
which might wdl be the envy of a much older man. 

On January 28, 1918, Dr. Winer was commission- 
ed first lieutenant in the Officers' Reserve Corps of 
the dental section of the United States army. He 
is a member of the American Dental Association, 
the Northeastern Dental Association, the Massachu- 
setts Dental Association, the Essex County Dental 
Society, the Harvard Odontological Society, the 8a* 
lem Golf aub, the Harvard Club of Uie North 



14 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Shox«, the New Century Clob of Boston, the Young 
Men's Christian Association, Philhannonics Hour 
Orchestra, in which he played the violin for many 
years, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Harvard 
Dental Alumni. He also is a member of the visit- 
ing staff of the Forsyth Dental Infirmary. 

HAROLD W. POOLS— In the shoe industry in 
Lynn the name of Poole has long been familiar in 
connection with certain branches of production, and 
Harold W. Poole is now associated with George A. 
O'Shea, conducting the business which was founded 
many years ago by. his father, and has since fol- 
lowed a special line of activity. 

John W. Poole, Mr. Poole's father, was a native 
of the State of Maine, and came to Lynn from 
Portland as a young man. He wa^ for many years 
engaged with W. and E. W. LaCroiz, shoe-counter 
manufacturers, of Lynn. NaturaUy of an inventive 
turn of mind, he saw the possibilities of improving 
then existing machinery, and even of supplanting 
it with improved machinery of his own devising. He 
invented what has since become known as the Poole 
Box Toe Skiving Machine, and, instead of placing 
it on the market, established the Poole Skiving Com- 
pany, in partnership with I. F. SpindeU, operating 
his own machines and placing his product on the 
market. The business was first located at No. 23 
Central avenue, in Lynn, where the Security Trust 
Company building now stands, but was later re- 
moved to Willow street, and thence to its present 
location at No. 48 Oxford street. The founder of 
the business died in 191811 He married Alvaretta 
Bain, whose death proceeded his own by some 
yean. 

Harold W. Poole was bom in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, October 9, 1886. His education was received 
in the public schools of his native dty and the 
English High School, and while still a young lad 
he began working with his father. He learned the 
business in all its branches, and upon the death of 
his father took over its management. In 1919 Mr. 
Poole received into partnership George A. O'Shea, 
also an experienced man in the same field, and the 
business is still being carried on successfully under 
the original name of the Poole Skiving Company. 
About fifteen employes are kept constantly busy, 
the product finding a ready miirket in the New Eng^ 
land district and also in more remote shoe centers. 
Mr. Poole is weU known fraternally as a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd FeUows, and he 
is a member of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. 

Harold W. Poole married Maude A. Lang, and 
they are the parents of five children: John W., 
Robert, Frederick, Ernest, and Wamn. The fam- 
ily reside at No. 19 Clayton street, Lynn. 



KIMBALL QLEA80N COLBY— Colbys date in 
Massachusetts from the year 1680, when Anthony 
Colby came in Governor Winthrop's fleet from the 
eastern coast of England. He married Susannah 
Sargent, in 1682, and settled in Cambridge, but in 
1684 moved to Salisbury, thence in 1647 to what is 
now Amesbury, yfhm he died February 11, 1661. 



He left sons, John, Samuel, Isaac and Thomas, and 
is the American ancestor of a numerous family, 
Colbys being found in every generation down to the 
present, prominent in every walk of life. Through 
the marriage of Joseph Kimball Colby to Mary Ada 
Gleason, their son, Khnball 6. Colby, derives descent 
from Thomas Gleason, who was bom in England in 
1611, died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1686. 
The line of descent from Thomas and Susannah 
Gleason is traced through their son, William Glea- 
son, and his wife Abial; their son, Isaac Gleason, 
and his wife Mary; their son, Captain Isaac Glea- 
son, a captain in the Continental army, and his wife, 
Sarah (Harrington) Gleason; their son, David Glea- 
son, and his wife, Phoebe (Carleton) Gleason; their 
son, Kimball Carleton Gleason, and his wife Mary 
Esther; their daughter, Mary Ada Gleason,, and her 
husband, Joseph Kimball Colby; their son, KimbaJl 
G. Colby, editor and publisher of the Lawrence 
"Telegram." 

Joseph Kimball Colby, bom in New Hampshire, 
October 18, 1840, and his wife, Mary Ada (Gleason) 
Colby, bom in Methuen, Massachusetts, May 19, 
1849, ara both living in Northern Massachusetts, 
(1921). 

Kimball Gleason Colby was bom in Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, February 9, 1873. After graduation from 
Phillips Andover Academy in 1891, he entered Am- 
herst College, whence he was graduated A.B., class 
of 1896. He spent a year at Harvard, then entered 
the field of journalism and became a member of the 
staff of the Lawrence ^Telegram," then owned by 
John N. Cole. In 1907 he purchased the Cole in- 
terest in the ''Telegram," of which he is the pres- 
ent owner, editor and publisher. The ^Tdegram" 
is a daily paper. Republican in its sympathies and 
devoted to the interests of Lawrence. The circula- 
tion has steadily increased until it is the largest of 
any Republican paper of the city. Mr. Colby is a 
dear, incisive writer, firm and courageous in defend- 
ing his opinions, but always fair hi treating with 
men or measures appealing for support from the 
voten. 

While Mr. Colby is devoted to the interests of 
the "Telegram," he has other business engagements 
of importance. He is a director of the Bay State 
National Bank, a trastee of the Broadway Savings 
Bank, a director of the Lawrence Morris Plan Bank, 
and a diractor of the National Bank of Methuen. 
He is an ardent Republican, and in addition to the 
strong support he renden the party through the 
columns of the "Telegram," he has rendered per^ 
sonal service on the Methuen School Board, serving 
six years, also on the Methuen Board of Water 
Commissioners. In 1920 he was a' delegate to the 
Republican National Convention. During the Worid 
War period, 1917-18, he was a member of various 
loan and drive committees, and did his "bit" in every 
possible way. He is a member of John Hancock 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, Bethany Com- 
mandery, of Lawrence, and has attidned the thirty- 
second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, His college fraternity is Chi Psi, his dubs 
the Methuen, Merrimack Valley Countiy of Law- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



15 



raice, UnivenHy and Athletic of Boston, the Te- 
deseo Country Clob of Swampscott, and the Country 
Clnb of North Andover. In religious faith he is a 



FRED H. BATON — In the names of James H. 
Eaton and Fred H. Eaton, public service to Law- 
lence, Massachusetts, stands in the records of al- 
most three-quarters of a century. In public office 
and in private capacities this service has continued. 
Fred H. Eaton, present day representative of an 
honored family, senior member of the law firm of 
Eaton & Chandler, is known as lawyer and financier, 
a prominent ^gure among the city's men of afFairs. 

Fred H. Eaton is a son of James H. and Elizabeth 
F. ( Jenness) Eaton, his parents both natives of New 
Hampshire, his father bom in Candia, his mother in 
Deerfield. They came to Lawrence in the 50's and 
James H. Eaton was for two terms mayor of Law- . 
lence. He was also for a number of years treas- 
urer of the Essex Savings Bank, and a man of large 
usefulness to his time. Both he and his wife are de- 
ceased. 

Fred H. Eaton was bom in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, September 6, 1874, and after attending the 
public schools entered Phillips Academy at An- 
dover, Massachusetts, there preparing for profes- 
sional study, which he pursued in the Boston Uni- 
versity Law School, being graduated in 1897 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admit- 
ted to the bar in the same year, and began prac- 
tice in association with Judge Charles U. Bell, under 
the title of Bell & Eaton. This connection endur- 
ed until 1899, and in the following year the firm 
of Eaton & Chandler was formed, figuring in much 
important litigation, and with a splendid clientele, 
this firm has come into reputation as one of the 
leading legal associations of the city, and their prac- 
tice is extensive in court work and in advisory re- 
lations. Mr. Eaton is a member of the Lawrence 
Bar Association, the Essex County Bar Association, 
and the American Bar Association. 

His business interests are widespread. He is 
president of the Bay State National Bank, trustee 
and member of the board of investment of the Essex 
Savings Bank, and a director of the Lawrence Co- 
operative Bank. Mr. Eaton was, in 1901, a member 
of the Board of Aldermen of Lawrence, and has long 
held a position of responsibility in his community. 
He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and 
his clubs are the Menimac VaUey Country and the 
North Andover Country. He is a communicant of 
Christ Episcopal Church, of Andover, maintaining 
his residence at No. 66 Central street, in that town. 
Fred H. Eaton married, August 24, 1897, in Law- 
rence, Abbie Maud Sherman, daughter of Judge 
Edgar J. Sherman. They are the parents of James 
H^ Alma S., and Elizabeth F. 

WALTER IRVING BURROWS — Among the 
families which can clearly trace their lineage back 
to the beginnings of New Eni^and history is Walter 
Irving Burrows, son of WiQiiiin Henry and Alice M. 



(Ingalls) Burrows, whose maternal ancestor was one 
of the group who accompanied Governor Endieott 
to Salem in 1628. The Engalls or Ingalls family 
was an old one in England generations before New 
England was settled, and bore a coat-of-arms de- 
scribed as follows: 

Arms — Gules, three bars gemelle or, on a can- 
ton, argent, five billets en solire sable. 
Crest — ^A lily springing from a crown. 
Motto— HumiUs ex corona. 
Edmund Ingalls, the immigrant ancestor of the 
Ingalls family in this country, was bom in England, 
in 1598, ten years after the historic defeat of the 
Spanish ''Armada." He went to Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, in 1629, settled at Goldfish Pond in 1680, mar- 
ried Ann, and among their children was Robert, bom 
about 1621, died in 1698, who was a planter, and 
married Sarah Harker. Among their children was 
Nathaniel, bom at Lynn, Massachusetts, about I66O9 
died in 1787, married AJtme. Among their children 
was Jacob, (tied in 1791, married November 17, 1787, 
Mary Tucker. Among their children was Jacob, 
bom at Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1747, died in 1828, 
was a sergeant in Captain Farrington's Company 
during the Revolution. He married, in 1772, Martha 
Lewis, and had children, among them Jacob, bom 
May 23, 1786, died in 1884, married Rebecca Brown. 
He was a shoe manufacturer of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, prominent in the afFairs of the city, and repre- 
sented his district in the State Legislature for six- 
teen years. Among his children was Horatio, bom 
October 25, 1824, died October 28, 1898,* married, 
in December, 1862, Harriet G^ FoUet, bom in Lynn, 
Massachusetts, June 1, 1838, died February 12, 1868. 
Among their children was Alice M., bom Septem- 
ber 13, 1863, married February 28, 1876, William 
H. Burrows, of Lynn, Massachusetts, and had chil- 
dren, among them, Walter Irving Burrows. 

On the paternal side, Egbert Burrows, of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, grandfather of Walter Irving Bur- 
row, was a retail shoe dealer, bom August 27, 1848, 
married Betsy Johnson Alley, granddaughter of 
Joseph Alley, Jr., who served during the Revolution, 
and of Betsy (Johnson) Alley, bom November 10, 
1815. Their children were: Rebecca A., bom Janu- 
ary 6, 1845, died same year; Helen T., bom Feb- 
ruary 13, 1846; Elizabeth Campbell, bom March 1, 
1848; Joseph Egbert, bom February 5, 1850; Charies 
J., of Manchester, New Hampshire; and William 
Henry, the father of Walter Irving Burrows. 

Walter Irving Burrows was bom in Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, May 14, 1880. He attended the grammar 
and high schools of his native city, and then be- 
came associated with Burrows and Sanborn, in 1899, 
which connection is continued to the present time 
(1921). Fraternally, Mr. Burrows is a Mason, and 
in club circles he is well known, being a member of 
the Oxford Club, the Tedesco Club, and the Boston 
City Club. He is also a member of the Lynn His- 
torical Society and of the Chamber of Commerce. 
On April 19, 1920, at Lynn* Massachusetts, Mr. 
Burrows married Etiiel May Leggett, daughter of 
Robert LjBggett, late State Senator from iim Man- 



16 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Chester district of New Hampshire, and of his wife, 
Louise Leggett. No children have been bom to 
this marriage. 

ANDREW A. HAIG, M. D.— With the advantage 
of excellent preparation and very wide experience, 
Dr. Haig, of Essex, Massachusetts, has built up a 
large practice in this city and vicinity. 

Dr. Haig was bom in Potsdam, St. Lawrence 
county, New York, May 4, 1858, and is a son of 
John and Ellen (Atchison) Haig, of Waddington, 
in that county. As a boy Dr. Haig attended the 
public schools of Potsdam, and also of Madrid and 
Massena, in the same county, then having chosen 
the profession in which he wished to carry forward 
his career, he entered the University of Michigan 
Medical School, at Ann Arbor, then completed his 
professional studies at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons at Baltimore, Maryland, from which in- 
stitution he received his degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. During the early years of his practice the 
doctor was in New Hampshire, first at Hancock for 
a year and a half, then at Peterboro for three years 
and a half, then practiced for eight years at Spring- 
field, Vermont. In 1901 Dr. Haig went on a trip 
around Cape Horn on the ''Dirigio'S one of the first 
steel vessels biult by Arthur Sewill, of Bath, Maine. 
For one hundred and seventy-three days the boat 
did not touch land, then the doctor stayed in Cali- 
fornia from May 18th until the following October, 
thereafter returning to Boston for a short time. 
Later, with a party of sixteen others. Dr. Haig went 
up the western coast of the Continent to Arctic City, 
Alaska, where he remained for about a year and 
a half. Betuming thereafter to Massachusetts, he 
began practice at Somerville, continuing for two 
3rears. He then came to Essex, where he is still 
located, and has developed a successful practice. 

Dr. Haig is a member of St. John's Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Springfield, Vermont. In 
Essex he has taken the interest of the progressive 
citizen in public affairs, and has served for six years 
on the school eommittee. He is a member of the 
Universalist church, of Essex. 

Dr. Haig married, in 1906, Mrs. Ella (Adams) 
EUs, daughter Of John and Jane (Gibson) Adams, 
of Berkshire county, England. 

HARRY E. MERRILL, manufacturer, was bom 
in Lewiston, Maine, June 20, 1862, son of William 
E. and Sarah E. (Crockett) Merrill, of Lisbon, 
Maine. His father was identified with the shoe in- 
dustry and farmed to some extent. In his boyhood 
Hairy E. Merrill attended public school in his native 
place, and for a short while after leaving school 
worked in the HiU Cotton Mill. In 1888 he came 
to Haverhill, Massachusetts, and for the next six 
years found employment there at the shoe business. 
In 1889, he esUblished a shoe trimming business 
which he conducted for a number of years, and to 
v?liich, in 1906, he added the manufacture of die 
Mocks, maUets, ceiling Uocks, and other forms of 
wooden Modes used in the manufactore of shoes. 
In 1908 Mr. Merrill sold Uiat business to M. E. 



lam, of Lynn, but in 1908 he repurehaaed it from 
Mr. KlUam and moved from the original location at 
No. 112 Phoenix Row to No. 208 River street In 
1910 Mr. Merrill added the manufacturing of wooden 
heels to the business, taking in as a partner Lyman 
W. Cole, a man of long experience in that business. 
The business since then has been conducted under 
the firm name of The United Die Block Wood Heel 
Company. By July 1, 1915, it was necessary to take 
more commodious quarters, and the plant was re- 
moved to No. 118 Essex street comer of Locke 
street, there remaining until February 1, 1921, idien 
another removal became necessary, for a like rea- 
son, the company having added the manufacture of 
brush handles. A three-story factory building was 
secured at No. 140 Hale street, which is the main 
factory, handling the business of the Eastern States 
for the company's products. The manufacture of 
brush handles has so satisfactorily developed that it 
became necessary, in 1916, to utilize a branch fac- 
tory, formerly used a§ a covering department for 
wood heels, to adequately care for the Western 
trade. This branch establishment is located in St. 
Louis, Missouri, and is devoted exclusively to the 
requirements of the western maricet. 

Mr. Merrill gives close attention to his business 
affairs, which indeed demand most of his time, but, 
being of an old New England family, he is interest- 
ed in the patriotic and historical societies. He is a 
member of the Pilgrim Fathers, of the Pentucket 
Club, and of the Lewiston Zouaves of Maine. 

In 1901 Mr. Merrill married (second) Jennie Col- 
ligan, daughter of James and Agnes (Bradley) Col- 
ligan, of New York State. By a first marriage Mr. 
Merrill has three children: Elisabeth B.; William 
E.; and Pearl M. 

LYMAN W. COLB, manufacturer, partner in the 
United Die Block and Wood Heel Company, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, November 12, 1878, son of Albert S. 
and Eva F. (Prescott) Cole, the former originally of 
Wentworth, New Hamp^re, a painting contractor, 
and the latter, now deceased, of Eppin, of that 
Stote. 

Lyman W. Cole was educated in the public schools 
of Atkinson, New Hampshire, and at Atkinson Acad- 
emy. After leaving school, he learned the painter's 
trade under his father^s instruction. After four 
years spent in house painting, he entered the em- 
ploy of a manufacturer of wooden heels for shoes, 
and became foreman of the Pentucket Wood Heel 
Company, remaining wi^ that corpontion for seven 
years. A further seven years he was with the 
Slipper City Company, in like capacity, and for three 
years was with the F. W. Mears Wood Heel Com- 
pany. Coming to Haverhill, in 1908, he became 
associated with Harry E. Merrill, manufacturer of 
dies, blocks and wooden forms used in shoe manu- 
facturing, and in 1910 became partner with Mr. 
MerriU in the United Die Block and Wood Heel 
Company, of Haverhill, manufacturers of wood heels 
and cutting blocks* In 1915 the conpany^a plant 
was moved to No. 118 Essex str ee t , to more com- 



C— ^■«'-« rfmteti. u^ , 



<..Ar*-*-Y 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



17 



modipus quarters, and on February 1, 1921, when 
brush handles of every description were added to 
the company products, a stOl greater space was 
needed, and a three-story factory at No. 140 Hale 
street, Haverhill, was secured. In 1916 a covering 
department for the wood heel business of the West- 
em States was established at St. Louis, Missouri, 
that factory also handling the brush handle busi- 
ness of the Western States since the establishment 
of that department. Mr. Cole is a member of the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics, the 
local grange of the Patrons of Husbandry, the Ma- 
sonic order, Merrimac Valley Country and Pen- 
tucket dubs. 

Mr. Cole was married, in 1900, at Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, to Cora E. Day, daughter of Charles L. 
and Mary E. (Wildes) Day, of Kennebunk, Maine. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cole are the parents of four children: 
Eva May, Charles A., Mildred C, and Joseph M. 



JOSEPH FRANCIS DOYLE— Among the young- 
er professional men who are taking high rank in 
Essex county is numbered Joseph F. Doyle, of Sa- 
lem, who is also connected with one of the leading 
attorneys of Lynn. Mr. Doyle is a member of an 
old and prominent Salem fanuly, and is a son of 
Michael J. and Ellen T. Doyle. The elder Mr. Doyle 
has for many years been an influential citizen of 
Salem, a member of the Common Council and Board 
of Aldermen, having served for twenty-five years 
in such capacity, a record unequalled in the history 
of Salem. 

Joseph Francis Doyle was bom in Salem, Decem- 
ber 19, 1888. His early education was received in 
the public schools of this city, and his preparatory 
and classical studies were pursued at Fordham Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in 1912. Then 
entering Upon the study of law at Harvard Univer- 
sity Law School, he was graduated from that insti- 
tution in the class of 1916. Shortly afterwards ad- 
mitted to the bar, Mr. Doyle took up the practice 
of his chosen profession in his home city, and has 
won his way to marked success. Several years ago 
he became associated, also, with James W. Sullivan, 
a prominent lawyer of Lynn, and his Lynn practice 
is now an important part of l)is professional inter- 
ests. He is a member of the board of trustees of 
the Young Men's Catholic Temperance Society, of 
Salem, and former advocate for Veragua Council, 
Mo. 76, Ejiights of Columbus, also of Salem. He is 
a. member of the Roman Catholic church. 



THOMAS BUTLER FEENEY--In the business 
world of Lynn, Massachusetts, Thomas B. Feeney 
has for many years held a position of significance, 
and his work along one of the most practical ave- 
nues of economic advance — ^insurance — ^has contrib- 
uted in no small degree to the individual and com- 
munity prosperity. Mr. Feeney is of Irish nativity 
and comes of highly respected farming people, being 
a son of Edward F. and Julia (Butler) Feeney. 
Edward F. Feeney was a prosperous farmer, owning 
his home and thirty-five acres of land under culti- 



vation near Tipperary, Ireland. He died when 
Thomas was only four years of age, leaving five 
children, of whom the eldest was eleven years old 
and the youngest two. The mother carried on the 
farm as best she could, with the help of the older 
children, but she only survived her husband five 
years, and then the children were left alone. Unable 
to secure' suitable help, the management of the fann 
soon proved too much for the children, and eventual- 
ly they were compelled to abandon the home of 
their birth. 

Thomas B. Feeney was bom on the home farm 
in Tipperary, County Tipperary, Ireland, March 20, 
1870. Receiving his education in the national schools 
of his native country, he left school at the age of 
twelve years to do his part in the struggle to keep 
the family together. At that time his f oimal edu- 
cation ended, but Mr. Feeney is a man of unusual 
mental calibre, and has made every source of in- 
foimation a means of education, his rare memory 
placing his fund of knowledge ready for instant 
service. He has not only become widely self-edu- 
cated in a general sense, but has mastered several 
languages, and speaks French fluently. Mr. Feeney 
came to the United States with a brother and sister 
in 1886, then being about sixteen years of age. Com- 
ing at once to Lynn, he secured a position as 
errand boy in the employ of John J. Jeffries, a 
broker, with offices on Beacon street, in Boston. 
Mr. Feeney worked for Mr. Jeffries both at the 
Boston offices and in his summer home at Swamp- 
scott, 'and continued with him for two years. He 
then became identified with the morocco leather 
industry, serving a regular apprenticeship in the 
employ of Eugene Berry, a morocco leather manu- 
facturer of that time, and was active in this con- 
nection until 1899. On March 20 of that year, Mr. 
Feeney entered the field in which he has since met 
with such marked success, becoming associated with 
the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company at their 
Lynn office. He began as an agent, soliciting insur- 
ance by the ordinary method of house to house in- 
terviews. His record quickly marked him as a man 
of larger possibilities, and thirteen months after 
entering their employ the Metropolitan made him 
assistant superintendent of their Lynn office. On 
May 9, 1904, he was again promoted, being then 
made manager of the Nashua, New Hampshire, dis- 
trict. His f amiliwity with the French language wa» 
there a strong asset in his favor, as that locality 
has a large percentage of French people, and after 
upwards of three years in Nashua, Mr. Feeney was 
returned to Lynn, on January 7, 1907. On that date 
he became manager for the Metropolitan Life In- 
surance Company, of the Lynn district, one of the 
most important districts in New England, and this 
position he still holds. He has gathered about him 
a corps of associates well fitted for their respon- 
sibilities, and the marked progress which the Lynn 
office has made during the trying period, of the war 
and the subsequent readjustment of conditions is 
largely due to the discriminating judgment and 
forceful personality of Thomas B. Feeney. 



:— 2—2 



18 



ESSEX COUNTY 



In the various affairs of general interest, civic, 
fraternal, social and political, Mr. Feeney keeps 
broadly in touch, although he is in no sense a poli- 
tician. He cast his first vote for Cleveland, but 
since attaining his majority he has entertained in- 
dependent convictions, giving his endorsement to the 
party or candidate he believed best fitted to serve 
the public good, and neither seeking nor desiring 
public honors for himself. Fraternally Mr. Feeney 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus, of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. He has been active in 
the world of finance, having been one of the found- 
ers of the State National Bank of Lynn, of which 
he is still a director. One of his favorite recreations 
is travel, and in 1913 he crossed the ocean, accom- 
panied by his son, Thomas B. Feeney, Jr., si>ending 
some weeka in Ireland, visiting his birthplace and 
many points of interest in the Emerald Isle. Mr. 
Feeney has a large circle of personal friends in 
Lynn and vicinity, and is a member of the Kiwanis 
Club. His religious faith is that in which he was 
reared, and with those of his family who are still 
at home he belongs to St. Joseph's Church, of Lynn. 

Mr. Feeney married, September 4, 1892, Delia 
Leonard, who came to the United States from Ire- 
land with her parents when she was still a child. 
She is a daughter of Michael and Bridget Leonard, 
both now deceased, who spent the last fifteen years 
of their lives at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Feeney, 
and had many friends in the church and in the so- 
cial circles in which the faiAily moves. Mr. and Mrs. 
Feeney are the parents of three sons and one 
daughter: Leonard, Thomas B., Jr., Eileen Mary, 
and John F. Leonard Feeney, the eldest son, is a 
priest of the Jesuit Order, and a teacher at Cani- 
sius College, in Buffalo, New York; Thomas B. Jr., 
is studying for the priesthood, of the Jesuit Order 
at St. Andrew-on-the-Hudson, at Poughkeepsie, New 
York; Eileen Mary is a kindergarten teacher at 
Cambridge, Massachusetts; and John F., the young- 
est son, is a student at Boston College, class of 1924. 
The family home is at No. 73 Lewis street, Lynn, 
Massachusetts. Of Mr. Feeney's brothers and sis- 
ters the eldest brother went to Australia, where he 
met accidental death in a mine disaster, and the 
others are now all residing in this country. 



HARRIS STARR POMEROY, M. D.— Among the 
best known of Peabody's physicians must be num- 
bered Dr. Harris Starr Pomeroy, who has been a 
resident of this community since 1901, and is of high 
standing as a citizen no less than as physician. 

Harris Starr Pomeroy was bom June 30, 1875, in 
Willimantic, Connecticut, the son of Charles and 
Mary (Palmer) Pomeroy. Charles Pomeroy was 
sheriff of Windham county for twenty-seven years, 
and always took an active part in the affairs of the 
community. Dr. Pomeroy spent his childhood in 
his native place and attended the local schools there. 
After graduating from the Willimantic High School, 
he entered the Bristol Academy at Taunton, Con- 
necticut, where after completing a preparatory 



course he matriculated at Yale, after which he en- 
tered the medical department of the New York 
University, from which he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1900. After serving 
an internship of one year at the Bellevue Hospital, 
he came to Peabody, Massachusetts, and opened an 
office at No. 93 Main street. This has been his 
headquarters ever since, and for the past few years 
he has devoted himself almost entirely to the sur- 
gical branch of the profession, in which he has 
achieved a gratifying measure of success. He is a 
member of the American Medical Association, the 
Massachusetts Medical Association, and is a mem- 
ber of the. surgical staff and visiting surgeon of the 
L. B. Thomas Hospital of Peabody. He affiliates 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; the 
Knights of Pythias; Jordan Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Peabody; and also is a member 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. In politica 
he is a Republican, and served on the Peabody 
Board of Health for six years. Dr. Pomeroy also 
holds membership in the Peabody Doctors' Club. 

On May 10, 1918, Dr. Pomeroy was commissioned 
first lieutenant in the Medical Corps of the United 
States army and was ordered to Camp Greenleaf, 
Georgia, subsequently being sent to Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi, where he served on the surgical staff 
at the Base Hospital, and later was ordered to 
Camp Oglethorpe, Georgia, where he received his 
honorable discharge, January 8, 1919, when he re- 
turned to Peabody and resumed his practice. 

Dr. Harris Starr Pomeroy married, June 22, 1910, 
Frances C. Chandler; they have no children. 



FRED HAMMOND NICHOLS, prominent busi- 
ness man, has been connected with the printing 
trade of Lynn, Massachusetts, for more than forty 
years, and is perhaps best known, aside from his 
post office service, as the treasurer and manager 
of that important company, "The Nichols Press," 
His father, Thomas Parker Nichols, was an em- 
ploying printer, and his mother was Caroline 
(Smith) Nichols. 

Fred H. Nichols was bom in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, November 25, 1861. He received his educa- 
tion in the Shepard Grammar School, and Lynn 
Classical High School, from which he was gradu- 
ated, after three years study, with the class of 1880. 
He began at once to learn the printing trade in his 
father's establishment, and acquired a thorough 
knowledge of its various branches. In June, 1898, 
the appointment was given him as assistant post- 
master of the Lynn post office, and he served under 
two postmasters until June, 1905. Twice during 
this period, on account of deaths, he was acting 
postmaster, carrying on the work without the aid 
of any assistant. He became a partner with his 
father and brother in the printing business under 
the name of Thomas P. Nichols & Sons. On the 
death of his brother in 1911, the company was re- 
organized and incorporated as ''The Nichols Press" 
with himself as manager and treasurer. Mr. Nichols 
is a member of the Corporation of Lynn Institution 



-1 



rv oL^^t-<^ ^ \r t^.^c^-'t-^^pMy 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



19 



for Savings, and the Lynn Five Cents Saving Bank. 
In the years 1889 and 1890 he was on the Common 
Conncil, City of Lynn, serving on the committee of 
accounts and the committee of drainage. 

Fraternally he is a Mason, raised in 1889 in 
Motmt Carmel Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, acting as worshipful master in 1902 and 
1908, and was appointed district deputy grand mas- 
ter of the Seventh Masonic district for 1904-05. In 
1907 he was elected secretary of the lodge, holding 
the office at the present time (1922). He is also a 
member of Sutton and Swampscott chapters, Royal 
Arch Masons; Zebulon Council, Royal and Select 
Masters; Olivet Commandery, No. 36, Ejiights 
Templar, and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. His clubs and societies 
are: Oxford Club of Lynn, Swampscott Masonic 
Club, and Sons of the American Revolution, and he 
is president of the Northeastern Massachusetts 
Typothettt, and recording secretary of the Lynn 
Young Men's Christian Association. He is a com- 
municant of the First Universalist Church, and 
chairman of its board of management. 

Mr. Nichols was married by the Rev. James M. 
Pullman, D.D., May 25, 1886, to Annie Louise Att- 
will, daughter of Isaac Mead and Harriet (Sanger) 
Attwill. They have two children: Miriam Cecelia, 
bom in Lynn, May 15, 1888; Thomas Attwill, bom 
in Lynn, April 22, 1891. 



Union of Beverly, Massachusetts. With his family 
he attends the Old South Parish Church. 

At Beverly, Massachusetts, October 1, 1908, Dr. 
Bumham was married to Lydia Sleeper Richards, 
daughter of Chauncey Sleeper and Alice (Gage) 
Richards, of Danvers, Massachusetts. Dr. and Mrs. 
Bumham reside at No. 187 McKay street, Beverly, 
Massachusetts. 



CHARLES BOARDMAN BURNHAM is a well 
known dentist of Beverly, Massachusetts. His 
twenty-five years in the practice of his profession 
has brought him a large clientele and an intimate 
knowledge of the city. A native of Beverly, he was 
bom on Christmas Day, 1873, son of Charles Lang- 
ley and Augusta (Prince) Bumham. Charles Lang- 
ley Bumham was an alderman of Beverly, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1897, and was the originator of the 
"Bumham Pleasure Excursions." 

After study in the public grammar school, he 
entered and was graduated from the Beverly High 
School. He then completed a business course in 
Comer's Commercial College, and later in the Har- 
vard Dental School, from which he received his de- 
gree. His business career was begun by a connec- 
tion with the Graves Elevator Company, Boston, 
Massachusetts, but he soon found his proper voca- 
tion, and since 1898 has practiced dentistry at Bev- 
erly with increasing success and popularity. Dr. 
Bumham has been successively second lieutenant, 
first lieutenant, and captain of Company E, Eighth 
Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, and 
during the World War served on the medical ad- 
visory board. 

Dr. Bumham is fraternally a Mason, affiliated with 
Liberty Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; Amity 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; St. George Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar. He also fraternizes 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is 
a member of the American Academy of Dental 
Science, Massachusetts Dental Society, and the 
North Eastern Dental Society. His club is the 



CHARLES E. HARWOOD— Throughout a long 
and active lifetime Charles E. Harwood has been 
identified with the industrial and civic progress of 
the city of Lynn, Massachusetts, which has been his 
home since infancy. His energies, directed first to 
the establishing of his own success in the business 
world, later also advanced many enterprises and 
movements which have meant to the people of this 
city added comfort and greater economic security. 
Mr. Harwood comes of an old and honored family 
of the State of Maine, where his parents were bom. 
His father, Jesse Harwood, a grocer by occupation, 
came to Massachusetts as a young man, and after 
residing for a few years in Charlestown, removed 
to Lynn, where the greater part of his life was 
spent. He married Mary A. Lidston, and both are 
now long since deceased. 

Charles E. Harwood was bom in Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, March 6, 1851. He was an infant of 
six months when the family came to Lynn, and as a 
boy he attended the public schools of this city, ac- 
quiring a thoroughly practical, if limited, education 
in preparation for the future. Entering the indus- 
trial world while still a young lad, Mr. Harwood 
began the upward climb by which he achieved his 
present prominence in the business and financial 
affairs of the time. His first employment was in 
a heel shop, and through his experience there he 
gained the knowledge of the shoe industry which 
was later definitely useful in his independent busi- 
ness ventures. On November 25, 1869, Mr. Har- 
wood established what became the nucleus of one 
of the large manufacturing plants in this field, 
opening a heel shop in a very small way on Pearl 
street. This place was later burned out, but the 
young man had made a promising start, and had 
faith in the future, as well as courage to back his 
faith. He began again on Union street, later re- 
moving to Stewart street, where he carried on his 
business for a period of twenty years. The present 
factory of the Harwood Company, of which he is 
president, was erected in 1911, and is a fine, modem, 
fire-proof structure, housing one of the most im- 
portant industries in the trade. This organization 
has been built on the foundation of quality and fair 
dealing, and its present standing has largely been 
brought about by Mr. Harwood's wise management, 
discerning judgment and ceaseless endeavors. He 
now leaves much of the active management of the 
business in the hands of his associates, but is regu- 
lariy at his desk in the spacious offices of the con- 
cern. 

But it is i>erhaps not in the business world that 
Mr. Harwood is best known to the people generally. 



20 



ESSEX COUNTY 



He became interested many years ago in the pro- 
gress of finance in Lynn, and was welcomed, as a 
practical, far-sighted business man, in the original 
organization of the Lynn Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, which was founded in 1887, and of which 
he was a charter member. He was the third vice- 
president of this institution, and has since been 
active in the administration of its affairs, serving 
as vice-president until 1918. At that time Mr. Har- 
wood was elected president of the trust company, 
to succeed the late John McNair, and he is still 
identified with the concern in this capacity. His 
time is largely devoted to his responsibilities in this 
connection, and his comprehensive view-point, in re- 
trospect over the rise and passing of a generation 
which has outstripped its predecessors in high at- 
tainment, gives him a sane as well as a courageous 
outlook upon the future. Mr. Harwood's construc- 
tive work in the early history of this institution was 
recognized by leaders of civic affairs of that day, 
and he was early brought forward into the public 
service. A Republican by political affiliation, he 
served as alderman for some years, and for a long 
period was a member of the Common Council, serv- 
ing on many of the important committees. He was 
elected mayor of Lynn in 1894, and served for two 
terms of one year each, declining renomination on 
account of the multiplicity of other affairs insis- 
tentiy demanding his attention. He has since, how- 
ever, until very recentiy, devoted much time and 
attention to public affairs, serving as chairman of 
the overseers of the poor for fourteen years, as one 
of the custodians of the Lynn Sinking Fund, and 
as a member of the Public Library Board. He is 
now for the first time in many years unidentified 
with public life. Mr. Harwood was for many years 
vice-president of the Lynn Five Cent Savings Bank, 
of which he is still a director, and he is a member 
of the Lynn Historical Society. Fraternally, he is 
prominent in the Free and Accepted Masons, of 
which he has been a member for forty-nine years, 
and he is also a member of the Aleppo Temple, of 
Boston, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He has been a member of Bay State Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows for the past 
fifty years, and is a member of the Universalist 
church, of Lynn. 

Mr. Harwood married, at the age of nineteen years, 
Nellie I. Blaisdell, daughter of Joshua Blaisdell, 
and they are the parents of two children: Charles 
W.; and Bertha A., wife of Dr. Arthur E. Harris. 
The family home is at No. 104 High Rock street, 
Lynn. 

GEORGE A. LYONS, A.B., M.D.— In the medi- 
cal profession in Essex county. Dr. Lyons hold a 
position of prominence, his success as a specialist 
carrying his reputation far beyond the bounds of 
the city of his residence, Lynn. Dr. Lyons is a son 
of Michael E. and Mary A. (Keane) Lyons, old 
residents of Winchester, the father now deceased, 
but the mother stUl living, at the age of eighty- 
three years. 

Dr. Lyons was bora in V^chester, Massachu- 



setts, December 15, 1884* He attended the public 
iind high schools of his native city, then for his 
course in arts and letters entered Boston College, 
firom which he was graduated in 1905, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. He then entared Har- 
vard University Medical School, in addition to the 
regular course, taking special work on the eye, ear 
nose and throat. He was graduated from that in- 
stitution in the class of 1909, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. Thereafter Dr. Lyons spent 
about two years in hospital work, first at Carney 
Hospital, then at the Massachusetts Charitable Eye 
and Eax' Infirmary, and later at the Children's Hos- 
pital and the Massachusetts General Hospital. In 
this connection he gained invaluable breadth of ex- 
perience, which has been the foundation of his sub- 
sequent success. In December, 1911, Dr. Lyons 
took up his practice in Lynn, and from the first took 
high rank in the profession. He is now (1922) wide- 
ly sought in his specialties, his time being thus filled 
to the exclusion of general practice. He is a mem- 
ber of the Lynn Medical fraternity, the Essex 
County Medical Society, and the New England Oto- 
logical Society. The general interests of the city 
claim a share of Dr. Lyons' attention, and he holds 
membership in the Knights of Columbus, the Te- 
desco Club and the Oxford Club, and is a member 
of both the Boston and Lynn Harvard dubs. He 
belongs to St. Mar3r's Roman Catholic Church. 

Dr. Lyons married Alice M. Mack, of Salem, 
Massachusetts, daughter of John J. and Alice 
(Dolan) Mack, her father one of the prominent 
building contractors of Salem. Dr. and Mrs. Lyons 
have two children: Alice, six years of age; and 
Jeanne, aged four. Dr. Lyons' office and residence 
are at No. 161 North Common street, Lynn. 



JOHN BERNARD FRANCIS FEBHAN— In the 
business world of Lynn, Massachusetts, the name of 
Feehan stands for all that is progressive and worthy 
in the field of plumbing and heating, Mr. Feehan's 
long experience and strict business integrity having 
placed him among the leaders in this branch of en- 
deavor which involves so closely the public health 
ajid comfort. 

Mr. Feehan comes of sturdy North-of-Ireland 
stock, being a son of Bernard Feehan, who was born 
in County Armagh, Ireland, and came to the United 
States as a young man. Bernard Feehan served in 
the Union army in the Civil War as a member of 
the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Infantry, under General Butier. Later he was 
engaged for many years in the morocco leather in- 
dustry, but spent the last years of his life as a 
merchant in old Beach street, now known as Wash- 
ington street, in Lynn. Well known and highly es- 
teemed in this city, he lived to the age of seventy 
years. He married, after coming to America, Brid- 
get Collins, who was bom in the city of Boston, 
and lived to the age of seventy-eight years. They 
were the parents of seven children, five sons and 
two daughters, of whom John Bernard Francis Fee- 
han was the finrtrborn. 

John B. F. Feehan was born in Lawrence, Massa- 



^ — \M?iii^ Co^ e/. ^t^u^i^ 



it 

is 



w 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



81 



chusetts, April 24, 1865» mnd emnm to Lynn ^th hii 
mother, aa an infant He attended the public schools 
of this city up to the sixth gnde, bvt is sometimes 
heard to remark that he completed his education in 
the ''school of experience." His first employment^ 
while stiU a very joung lad, was in a shoe factory. 
RemaininiT ^ ^bat connection for only a time, how- 
ever, he then learned the dyeing business, in the 
employ of Frank Johnson, now deceased, who at 
that time was well known as the owner of a dean- 
insT and dyeing establishment. Later on, Mr. Feehan 
took up the plumber's trade, serving a regular ap- 
prenticeship at plumbing, heating and tin-smithing. 
Having mastered his trade, the young man went 
to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he was em- 
ployed for about fifteen months with Alonso Jones, 
of that city. His work at Philadelphia took him to 
many different parts of the country, and he was 
travelling the greater part of the time, but he even- 
tually returned to the home of his boyhood, in 
Lynn, and entered the employ of Reardon Brothers 
Company. Mr. Feehan remained with this concern 
for a period of twenty-one years, during which time 
he rose to the position of foreman. With the fore- 
going valuable and practical experience, Mr. Feehan 
started out for himself in the plumbing and heat- 
ing business in Lynn. He began in a very modest 
way, Ids headquarters being in his own home. But 
being a highly skilled workman, and going forward 
by the most approved methods, and also conducting 
his business on good business principles, he pros- 
pered from the fint. Soon after starting he opened 
a shop on Oxford street, then, in 1906, removed to 
the deorge Grossman Box Company's buflding, on 
Washington street, where the Grossman buOding 
now stands. Three years later the building burned, 
but Mr. Feehan reopened his business in the old 
Sagamore Hotel building, where the Strand Theatre 
is now located, on Union street. Again a period of 
only three years elapsed before he was again forced 
to move, this building being torn down to make way 
for the new theatre. He then secured his present 
location in the building owned by Walter L. Libby, 
at No. 471 Union street. Notwithstanding these 
many vicissitudes^ the business prospered and grew, 
and in 1916 it was incorporated, under the name of 
John B. Feehan, Inc., Mr. Feehan being president 
and treasurer, John A. Woodman, secretary, and Ed- 
ward Feehan a director. The concern handles steam 
and hot water heating contracts, and does plumbing 
and gas fitting, also wholesaling and retailing the 
various supplies incident to these activities, and they 
take rank with the leaders in their field in Essex 
county. Mr. Feehan is a member of the Lynn 
Chamber of Commerce^ the Massachusetts State As- 
sociation of Master Plumbers, of which he was 
formeriy president; and the Sanitary Club, of Mas- 
sachusetts. Politically he supports the Democratic 
party, but is by no means a politician, taking only 
the progressive citisen's interest in public affairs. 
He is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
of the Rotary Club; his religious afilliation is as a 
member of the Roman Catholie ehnrdL 



Mr. Feehan married, on April 28, 1898, Almeta 
Varaey, who died April 18, 1910. 



EDWARD A. RUSSELL, who has been post- 
master at Lynnfield, Massachusetts, since 1916, and 
has spent the whole of his life in that vicinity, was 
bom in Lynnfield, Massachusetts, January 26, 1878, 
son of Charles W. and Carrie L. (Derby) ^issell, 
both still living, the former a native of Lynnfield, 
and the latter of Wakefield. The &ther of Edward 
A. Russell has been connected with the Massachu- 
setts shoe industry throuj^out his life, and the fam- 
ily iB one of the best known in that neighborhood. 
Edward A. Russell is, in fact, a direct descendant 
of the old family of Russell recorded among the 
pioneers of that part of Massachusetts. 

Edward A. Russell was educated in the schools of 
Lynnfield, Massachusetts, and is of the class of 1895 
of the Peabody High School. He also has to his 
credit one year of study at Bryant and Stratton's 
Business College, at Boston. After leaving school, 
he became a telegraph operator, continuing as such 
for ten years. For a further three years he was 
in the employ of Charles E. Pierson. Later, he bo- 
came connected with George M. Roundy, of Lynn- 
field Center, and has worked with him in the store 
ever since. He also holds the position of post- 
master in his native place, having been appointed 
by President Wilson in 1916. 

Fraternally, Mr. Russell is identified with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and with the An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons, Blue Lodge, being 
also a member of the Royal Arch Masons and of 
the Knit^ts Templar. He also is a member of the 
Grange, and is widely known. 

He was married, in 1912, to Ludnda, daughter of 
Orin and Mary (Green) Blanchard, both Canadian 
bora, and both still living. Mrs. Russdl's mother 
was of Prince Edward Island, and her father is a 
farmer in the Province of Quebec, Canada. Mr. and 
Mrs. Russell have two children: Ireta Louise, bora 
in 1918; and Elbridge E., bora in 1916. 

CHARLES RALPH TAPLEVS life-long experi- 
ence in Mb business has made him one of the best 
known and most substantial insurance brokers in 
Boston, Massachusetts. A dtiaen of Danvers, Mas- 
sachusetts, he is a member of a family long resident 
of that town, and prominent since Revolutionary 
times. He traces his ancestry from the famous Lieu- 
tenant Gilbert Tapley of that period, and his wife, 
Phoebe (Putnam) Tapley. 

Charles Ralph Tapley was bora in Danvers, Mas- 
sachusetts, October 29, 1870, the son of Charles and 
Mary A. (Underwood) Tapley. After receiving his 
education in the local public schools, he attended the 
Brjrant and Stratton Commercial School of Boston, 
Massachusetts. He eariy became interested in the 
insurance business, and from 1895 has conducted 
agencies in Boston and Danvers, being head of the 
firm of C. R. Tapley A Company. 

Besides his activities as an insurance agent and 

• broker, he has found time to be treasurer of the 

H^ten Cemetery Corporation; a member of the 



i 



22 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Boston Chamber of Commerce; the Insurance So- 
ciety of Boston; Massachusetts Brokers' Association; 
and the Insurance Federation of America. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican, and fraternally a Mason, 
Odd Fellow, and a Red Man. His clubs are the 
Danvers Masonic, and Danvers Odd Fellows, and he 
is an attendant of the Congregational church. 

At Danvers, Massachusetts, June 22, 1898, Charles 
Ralph Tapley was married to Lillie Sutherland, 
daughter of John D. and Kate F. Sutherland, of 
Danvers. Mr. and Mrs. Tapley are the parents of 
one son, Charles Sutherland Tapley, bom May 16, 
1899. 

JOHN J. MANGAN, M. D.— Prominent in the 
professional and public life of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
and bearing a part in the progressive activities of 
the day. Dr. John J. Mangan, of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, is one of those men who count constructively 
in any branch of human endeavor. 

Dr. Mangan was bom in Preston, England, in the 
year 1857. Coming to America with his parents in 
early childhood, the boy received his early education 
in the public schools of Fall River, Massachusetts, 
where the family located. Ambitious to enter a pro- 
fessional field, and enjoying the full sympathy of his 
parents in this regard, he entered Holy Cross Col- 
lege, in Worcester, Massachusetts, from which he 
was graduated in 1883. Later, he studied at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, from which 
he was graduated in 1891. He then began the gen- 
eral practice of medicine in the city of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts. Meanwhile, he took a post-graduate 
course in medicine, at Harvard Medical School, from 
which he was graduated in 1904. With this splen- 
did preparation for his career Dr. Mangan made a 
substantial success in his chosen field, and has now 
for thirty years held a leading position in the medi- 
cal profession in Essex county. 

Dr. Mangan is attending physician at the Lynn 
Hospital. He is a member of the American Medical 
Association, of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
of the New England Pediatric Society, and of the 
Lynn Medical fraternity and is held in the highest 
esteem by his contemporaries in the profession, as 
well as by the general public. 

Personally, Dr. Mangan is broadly interested along 
fraternal and social lines. He is a prominent mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus, and holds member- 
ship in many other clubs and societies. Along with 
his professional and other interests, he has found 
time for considerable writing, and is the author of 
"Life of Erasmus," ''Life of Rev. Jeremiah Shep- 
ard'^ thii-d minister of Lynn, and of various other 
writings. «^__«,^.._— «. 

PRANK ELMBR TUCKBUR, business man of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, member of the fijrm of 
Frank E. Tucker & Son Company, was bom in 
Nashua, New Hampshire, May 17, 1846, son of John 
A. Tucker, of Bath, Maine, and Lucy Watson (How) 
Tucker, of Asbury, New Hampshire. 

Frank E. Tucker attended school in Nashua, New 
Hampshire, and Biddeford, Maine, and soon after 



leaving school offered his services in the Civil War, 
being discharged in 1864 after two and one-half 
years' service. He enlisted in Company K. Twenty- 
first Massachusetts Infantry, and during his service 
participated in the following battles: South Moun- 
tain, Antietam, siege of Knoxville, Spottsylvania, 
battle of the WUdemess, battle of Cold Harbor, and 
St. Petersburg. 

Soon after returning to his home, Mr. Tucker 
learned the trade of moulder, and worked at this 
occupation for the Saco Water Power Company at 
Biddeford. In 1874 he left that place and went to 
Newton, Massachusetts, following the same trade 
for four years, resigning at the end of this time to 
enter business on his own account as a dealer in 
furniture, under the firm name of Vaughn & Tucker, 
the partners being Mr. Tucker and J. J. Vaughn. 
For a quarter of a century the location remained at 
Nos. 132 and 134 Merrimac street, where it was 
originally founded, and in 1886 Mr. Vaughn sold his 
interests to Mr. Tucker and the name was sub- 
sequently changed to Frank E. Tucker Company, 
continuing until 1898, in which year Joseph Elmer 
Tucker, son of Mr. Tucker, was admitted as a part- 
ner, and the firm name changed to Frank E. Tucker 
& Son Company, under which name the business is 
now carried on. In all, this firm has been establish- 
ed in Haverhill for forty-one years, and has estab* 
lished also a fine prestige for a high grade of furni- 
ture and upright methods of doing business. While 
a resident of Newton, Mr. Tucker served a« police- 
man and constable, and is a member of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce at Haverhill. He is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, Post, No. 47, of 
that city, and of Merrimac Lodge. 

Mr. Tucker married, in 1875, Mary Ella Chap- 
man, of Deerfield, New Hampshire, and her death 
occurred in 1915. Their children were: Joseph 
Elmer, now associated with hia father in business; 
Lucy Belle Tucker. The family attend the Brad- 
ford Congregational Church. 



ROLLIN £. MORTON— The business of the 
Morton Motor Equipment Company, of Lawrence, 
Haverhill, and Lowell, Massachusetts, is probably 
the largest of its kind in Essex eounty. Its success 
has been notably rai^d, the company only being 
formed in 1916, by William J. Morton and his two 
sons. 

RoUin E. Morton, son of William J. and Maiy J- 
(Sawyer) Morton, was bom in Lowell, Vermont, on 
July 24, 1886. His boyhood and youth were spent 
mainly in Maiden, Massachusetts. There he went 
to school, eventually (in 1906) graduating Ax>m the 
high school. Soon, thereafter, he secured employ- 
ment as private secretary for Jeremiah Williams, of 
Jeremiah Williams and Company, and in that deri* 
cal capacity learned much about commercial aflUrs 
and operation in general, and about the wool busi- 
ness in particular. Later he went West, and did 
not return tof the East and Massaehnsetts for three 
years. When he did return, he took up work in 
Maiden, thMi with the United States Tire GMipany 
at Providence, Rhode Island, in the capacity of 



(MUnJy^i^^^^P^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



28 



salesman. In 1916 he Joined his father and brother 
in establishing the business of the Morton Motor 
Equipment Company, which has rapidly grown, and 
now has good stores and much business in Law- 
rence, Haverhill, and Lowell. The main store is in 
Lawrence, and that store provides about 4,000 square 
feet of floor space. It is} stated to be the largest 
and most modem store in Lawrence in that line, 
and the branch stores both carry comprehensive 
stocks. The vulcanisdng department of the Law- 
rence store is not bettered anywhere in the city. 
The business is the outgrowth of that originally 
begun by the father, William J. Morton, who in the 
first years of its operation was a dealer in and re- 
pairer of bicycles. With the evolution of vehicular 
means, change came in the business, motor cycles 
entering more and more into the operations. Even- 
tually, the present large business was develoi>ed, 
and it reflects credit upon the three principals, the 
father and two sons, who have shown commendable 
business aptitude and enterprise. 

Rollin E. Morton is somewhat prominent in Ma- 
sonic bodies, being a member of Phoenician Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Mt. Sinai Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence Council, Royal and 
Select Masters; Bethany Commandery, Knights 
Templar; Massachusetts Consistory; and Aleppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He also belongs to Maiden Lodge, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. By re- 
ligious belief a Congregationalist, he. attends the 
Trinity Church of that denomination. His member- 
ship in the local Rotary Club and Chamber of Com- 
merce brings him into co-operation in local move- 
ments that aim to bring good to the city. 

Mr. Morton married, in 1920, Mildred L. Colby, of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, daughter of Arthur E. 
Colby, who died in 1918; he was a funeral director 
in Lawrence. Her mother, Florence ( Atwood) Colby, 
was of a Haverhill family; she also died in 1918. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rollin E. Morton reside at No. 16 
Summit avenue, and they have a wide circle of 
friends in Lawrence, and also in Haverhill. 



CHARLES W. HARWOOD— Among the fore- 
most names in the shoe and leather trades in Essex 
county must be numbered that of Harwood, and 
Charies W. Harwood, son of the founder, is now 
vice-president and general manager of the great 
plant in Lynn, which is the home of the Harwood 
Counter Company. Mr. Harwood is a son of 
Charles E. Harwood, who founded the present! busi- 
ness in the basement of a house on Pearl street, 
in the year 1869. 

Charles W, Harwood was bom in Lynn, Septem- 
ber 6, 1871. Receiving bis early education in the 
public schools of his native dty, he thereafler at- 
tended Chauncey Hall Preparatory School, then 
started in the riioe supply business at the bendi. 
Gomg throui^ all the dUTereiit departments, the 
young nan teamed the shoe supply buaiBess from 
every angle, and woridiif aide by side with his 
father, the expeiieiice of the elder nan countinf 



largely in their progress, Mr. Harwood has caxiied 
the enterprise, started on so small a scale, to a point 
where now the concern owns and operates one of the 
finest and most complete factories in the trade. 
This great building is of the most modem and ap- 
proved factory construction, having one thousand 
windows, and is fully equipped in the most scien- 
tific manner for producing their specialty, counters. 
Having made extensive preparations for the com- 
fort, health and well-being of their employees, they 
in turn gain from them tiie most loyal service, no 
slight factor in excellence of product. After fifty 
years and more of experience, the company is at the 
head in the productior of counters of every kind in 
demand in the shoe trade, and they stand very high 
in the esteem of their contemporaries. Mr. Har- 
wood has other business and financial affiliations in 
Lynn, being president of the Lynn Grease Extract- 
ing Company, which takes the grease from small 
pieces of scrap leather, the by-products being used 
for the manufacture of heels; and treasurer of the 
Lynn ilve Cent Savings Bank. He is also vice- 
president of the Ronton Heel Company, with fac- 
tory located in the same building. They do ex- 
tensive exporting, their product going in great vol- 
ume direct to all foreign countries. He is also vice- 
president of the Lynn Safe Deposit Bank. He keeps 
in touch with all public advance, is a member and 
one of the directors of the Lynn Chamber of Com- 
merce, and a director of the Boy Scout Movement 
for this district; a member of the board of man- 
agers of the Lynn Hospital; and a director of the 
Red Cross Society. Fraternally, he holds member- 
ship in all Masonic bodies, including the Aleppo 
Temple, Shrine, and the Masonic Club. He is also 
a member of the Oxford Club, of Lynn, and of the 
Lynn Rotary Club, of which he was formerly a direc- 
tor, and which he represented as a delegate at the 
Los Angeles, California, Convention of Rotary Clubs 
in 1922. 

Mr. Harwood married, in 1899, in Lynn, Nellie S. 
Morse, daughter of Dexter and Emma (Seabrook) 
Morse. Her father, who is a native of Maine, is 
one of the long established shoe manufacturers of 
Lynn. The mother was bom in Buffalo, New York. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harwood have two children: Marian 
L., bom December 1, 1900, now the wife of Harold 
Harvey, and a resident of Swampscott; and Charles 
E., second, bom February 15, 1904, now attending 
preparatory school in Boston. 



EDWARD MALCOM HOYT, M. D.— In the pro- 
fessional worid of Essex county Dr. Hoyt holds hi|^ 
standing, and he is also widely known in the social 
circles of Georgetown and vicinity. He comes of 
one of the fine old New England families which 
were represented in the straggle for American in- 
dependence, his grandfather, Abner Hoyt, having 
fou^ with Goieral Stark in the Battle of Benning^ 
ten. Dr. Peter Livingstone ffoyt, sen 4f Abajer 
Hoyt, was for m6re than thirty years %*leadi(^g 
phyriidaB of Wcaitworth» New Hampshire^- 4iid jiiis 
deatli, iMdk oecttired in 1870, dosed an e^e»l|y 



24 



ESSEX COUNTY 



osefol career. He married Elisabeth Aspinwall, 
daughter of Rev. Increase Sumner Davis of that 
town. 

Edward Malcom Hoyt» son of Peter Livingston 
and Elisabeth (AspinwaU) Hoyt» was bom in Went- 
worth. New Hampshire, March 81, ie58. His edu- 
cation was begun in the public schools of his native 
place, and was continued in Maiden, Reading and 
Boston, Massachusetts. In 1876 he went to Wake- 
field, Massachusetts, to study medicine and phar- 
macy with Joseph D. Mansfield, M. D., a retired 
physician of that town. After following the busi- 
ness of pharmacy for some years, he determined to 
fulfil a life-long desire to practice medicine, and to 
that end entered Harvard University Medical School 
in 1888, and was graduated from that institution fn 
the class of 1892. Following his graduation Dr. 
Hoyt went to Dublin, Ireland, for a term of ser- 
vice in the Rotunda Hospital, and at its completion 
went to the Royal Infirmary, in Edinburg, Scotland, 
for a practical course in medicine. With this un- 
usuaDy comprehensive preparation for his chosen 
profession, Dr. Hoyt, upon his return to George- 
town, entered the general practice of medicine, hav- 
ing been called to the practice left vacant by the 
death of Dr. Ralph C. Huse, a physician beloved 
in this community for many years. For three de- 
cades Dr. Hoyt has now been professionally active 
in Georgetown, and has won an enviable position 
among his contemporaries. He is a member of the 
Harvard Alumni Association, the Massachusetts 
Medical Society, and the American Medical Associa- 
tion. During this period Dr. Hoyt has also become 
more of less prominently identified with matters of 
dvic and benevolent import, to which he has de- 
voted himself so far as the duties of an extensive 
medical practice have permitted. He is one of the 
oldest members of tiie local literary dub, is a trus- 
tee and the secretary of the Periey iVee School Cor- 
poratiion, and gives his cordial endorsement to every 
movement which he believes calculated to advance 
the public welfare. 

Dr. Hoyt married, in January of 1894, at Wobum, 
MasMuehusetts, Helen L., daughter of Alexander and 
Anne (Murray) Brown, of that dty. Their home 
is one of the old-time Colonial houses, filled with 
raze and interesting furnishings of that eariy period. 
Here the Doctor and his wife have always given 
unstinted hospitality to their many friends, and 
strangers are often made ddightfully at home with- 
in their gates. ___^ 

BERNARD OALLAOHBR— For more than fifty 
years the head of an industrial i^ant In Lynn, Ber^ 
nard Gallagher is still actively engaged in the man- 
agement of his business, which has now become an 
Important interest. 

Mr. Gallagher was bom In Ireland, In April, 1844, 
and Is m son of Danid and Ellen (Maguire) Gal- 
la^er. . Crossing' the ocean with his family whfle 
1^ a diild, Mr.' Gallagher was reared on this side, 
and edtkcatM In the public schools of New Bnms- 
wtdc Later he took up the study of law and medl- 
ctee, but eivehtnally reMngnUted a prefessimMl 



career and learned the machinist's trade. Serving 
an apprenticeship with the Harris & Allen Company, 
of New Brunswick, he continued with that concern 
for six years aft^r he had mastered the trade, his 
connection with them covering eleven years in all. 
At the end of that time he came to Lynn and estab- 
lished himself in business. This was late in tiie 
year 1870, and he manufactured clamp skates, a 
line which he followed, however, for little more than 
a year. He was the original inventor of this type of 
skate, but in 1872, having decided that the more 
practical branches of mechanical work offered great- 
er opportunities for success, he started a. small 
machine shop. He began with a capital of three 
five-dollar bills, but he perdsted in a campaign of 
advance, and with the passing of the years has 
achieved large success. His business now is valued 
at $150,000, and is one of the leading concerns 
in this line in Essex county. Mr. Gallagher has 
had 108 patents granted in the United States and 
in f oreigfn countries, on his various inventions, one 
of the most noted of which is his railroad track 
drill. He is also the inventor of the original rotary 
cutter, a machine widdy used for trimming the heels 
and edges of boots and shoes. 

Mr. Gallagher is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and is interested in every 
brandi of public progrees. In 1878 he married 
Catherine Gray, of St. John, New Brunswick, and 
they were the parents of four children, of whom 
three are living, Thomas A., Alice and Catherine A. 
Bernard died at the age of one year. Mrs. Gal- 
lagher died in 1885, and Mr. Gallagher married (sec- 
ond), in 1898, Mary Frances Jordan, of Bangor, 
Maine. ___^_____ 

GEORGE H. VOSB— For well over fifty years 
George H. Vose, assistant superintendent of the 
United Shoe Machinery Company, has been activdy 
identified with the industrial worid of Essex county, 
and is widdy known in the shoe machinery trade. 

Mr. Vose learned the trade of machinist with Bax- 
ter D. Whitney, of Winchendon, Worcester county, 
Massachusetts, beginning his apprenticeship, April 
80, 1868. Ten years later he left to go to Boston, 
where he entered the employ of Charies Holmes, a 
manufacturer of fire ladders. During his connec- 
tion with this house he was for sevmal months at- 
tached to the New York Fire Department, with the 
regular duties of a fireman, in the course of his 
demonstration of the Shaw fire ladders. Later Mr. 
Vose was employed in the locomotive shops of the 
Boston A Albany railroad, in Boston. In 1888 he 
became associated with the National Heeling Ma- 
chine Company, whose offices were on Congress 
street, Boston, and at the time of the great fire In 
Lynn he was superintendent of the factory. In 1896, 
when this eoncexn was absrobed by the McKay- 
Bigdow Heding Madilne Company, Mr. Vose con- 
tinued with the new c<Hieem in the capadty of 
assistant superintendent at the new plant in Win- 
chester. Through the two subsequent changes In 
the concern Mr. Vose has stood by its Interests and 
materially aaslsfeed fai its Avdopment and prosper- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



26 



ity. As the McKay Metallic Fastening Association 
the concern covered a continually widening Held, 
then was ultimately merged with the United Shoe 
Machinery Company. In 1905, when the new Bev- 
erly plant was ready for occupation, Mr. Vose and 
thzee men from the experimental department were 
the first machine workers here. Mr. Vose still con- 
tinues to he active in the wide reaching interests 
of the United Shoe Machinery Company. 

In many organized branches of endeavor Mr. 
Vose is constructively interested. He is a director 
of the Massachusetts Chamber of Commerce, the 
Beverly Chamber of Commerce, succeeding the 
Beverly Board of Trade, a director of the Beverly 
Hospital, and has served as its president. He is 
president of the United Shoe Machinery Relief 
Association, and is also interested actively in the 
affairs of the Athletic Association composed of em- 
ployees of the concern. He is a member of the 
Free and Accepted Masons, of the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, and many other societies of a 
fraternal or sodal nature. He is broadly interested 
in the work of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, of which he has long been a member, and is 
chairman of the committee on instruction of the 
Beverly Industrial School, having been elected to 
that office at tiie organization of this institution, in 
the year 1909. During the World War he was very 
active in the committees of all the Liberty Loan 
drives. He is an attendant of the Washington Street 
Congregational Church. 

On June 18, 1877, Mr. Vose married Lizzie A. 
Whitcomb, of Boston, and their three children are 
MB follows : Edwin W., who has been connected 
irith the work of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
cjatfon, as general secretary, for more than twenty 
years; Herbttt L., who is prominent in the real 
estate and insurance business in Beveriy; and Helen 
F., the wife of Harry M. Hillory, who is connected 
with the Forbes Lithograph Company, of Revere 
and Boston. 



and of the Lynn Medical fraternity. He attends the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

On October 6, 1898, Dr. Clarke married Sarah 
Alice Cooper, daughter of Henry and Sarah Cooper, 
%iid they reside at No. 183 North Common street* 
where his office is also located. 



HARRY CARVER CLARKE, M. D.— After very 
comprehensive preparation for his career. Dr. 
Clarke, as a young man, came to Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, and entered upon the practice of medicine, 
and is now one of the leading practitioners of this 
city* 

Dr. Clarke was bom in Berkley, Massachusetts, 
June 24, 1878, and is a son of Henry D. and Stella 
Porter (French) Clarke. Receiving his eariy edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native place, he 
also covered the high school course in the East, 
then entered the Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 
of CaHf omia, and took a four years' classical course. 
Then returning East, he entered Harvard University 
Medical School, from which he was graduated in 
1910, with tilie degree of Doctor of Medicine. After 
■ervbig an internship in the Long Island Hospital, 
he established his practice in Lynn in 1911, and has 
developed a wide and lucrative practice, now holding 
a prominent position in the profession. 

Dr. Claike is a member c^ the American Medical 
Association, of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 



FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL— The name of Bout- 
well has for two generations, and in different fields 
of activity, been a prominent one in Andover, Mas- 
sachusetts. Bom and reared in Andover, Frederic 
S. Boutwell has long held a position of trust in the 
community. 

Mr. Boutwell is a son of Samuel H. and Alice J. 
Boutwell, both now deceased. The elder Mr. Bout- 
well was long a leading citizen of Andover, serving 
the town as selectman for a period of thirty years. 
He was a farmer by occupation, and interested in 
all public progress. He was a trustee of the high 
school for years, and in recognition of his services 
to the community he was twice elected, at different 
times, to represent the town' in the State Legisla- 
ture. 

Frederic S. Boutwell was bom in Andover, Octo- 
ber 80, 1865. Receiving his early education in the 
public schools of the town, he also attended the 
Punchard High School, from which he was gradu- 
ated in due course, thereafter taking a business 
course at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy. His first position was in the capacity of derk 
in the institution of which he is now treasurer, the 
Andover Savings Bank. Entering the bank on AiHril 
1, 1890, he later rose to the position of assistant 
treasurer, then in 1904, upon the resignation of Mr. 
J. F. Kimball, whose failing health forbade his con- 
tinuing tiie duties of treasurer, Mr. Boutwell was 
elected treasurer to succeed him, and this office he 
still holds. 

Mr. Boutwell is a member of the American 
Bankers' Association, and of the Massachusetts 
Bankers' Association. He has served as member of 
the Board of Park Commissioners, and is now a trus- 
tee of both the high school and the public library. 
During the World War he was on the finance end of 
the Committee of Public Safety. His more personal 
interests include membership in the Andover Club, 
ahd he attends the West Congregational Church, 
of Andover. 

A sister, Alice, makes her home with Mr. Bout- 
well, who is single. He has three brothers, all 
prominent in this vicinity: Arthur, a chemist, with 
Smith A Dove; Chester, who conducts the home- 
stead farm; and Winthrop, a carpenter. 



DANIEL C. MANNING— In Salem, the dty of 
his birth, and in Peabody, Massachusetts, Mr. Man- 
ning has practiced law ever since his admission to 
the Massachusetts bar a decade and a half ago. The 
years have brought him a full share of the honors 
and rewards of his profession, the culmination of 
these honors coming in 1921 with appointment to 
the presiding Judgeship of the District Court of 
Peabody. He is a son of Daniel J. and ElizabeUi 
E. Manning, his father a restaurant owner. 



26 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Daniel C. Manning was bom in Salem* Massachu- 
setts, July 17, 1881, and completed public school 
study with graduation from Peabody High School. 
He then entered Harvard University, and after com- 
pleting classical courses he pursued professional 
study in Harvard Law School, receiving his degree 
in 1906. He at once began the practice of law in 
Salem, and later in Peabody, and has attained honor- 
able standing as a lawyer of skill and ability. In 
1916 he was appointed assistant district attorney for 
the Eastern Massachusetts district, and for three 
years he filled that position with credit, then re- 
turned to private practice. He was again called into 
the public service in 1921 as judge of the Peabody 
District Court, a position he is ably filling. 

Judge Manning is a Republican in politics, and in 
1918-14 represented his district in the Massachu- 
setts House of Representatives. For ten years he 
has been a member of the Peabody Republican City 
Committee, and has always supported with voice, 
influence and vote the candidates of his party. He 
is an ex-president of the Salem Bar Association; 
member of Essex Institute; Harvard Chapter Delta 
Upsilon; Ancient Order of Hibernians; Essex Club, 
(secretary) ; Homestead Golf Club, and the Roman 
Catholic church. 

On April 25, 1911, Judge Manning married Miriam 
T. Kerans, daughter of Charles P. and Elizabeth E. 
Kerans. 



WILLIAM D. T. TRBFRY— One of the names 
which the town of Marblehead has always delighted 
to honor, and which will long be remembered in 
the community, is that of William D. T. Trefry, who 
for many years ably filled positions of public trust 
in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and was a 
leader in many circles in his native town. Mr. 
Trefry came of antecedents distinguished in the 
history of early American development, his mater- 
nal ancestors dating back to early Colonial times, 
and being noted for signal patriotism in the Revolu- 
tionary War. He was a son of Samuel Stacey and 
Rebecca (Wormstead) Trefry. 

William D. T. Trefry was bom May 10, 1852, in 
Marblehead, Massachusetts, and throughout his life- 
time was identified with the progress of his native 
town. His early education was received in the pub- 
lic schools of Marblehead, and after his graduation 
from Tufts College, in 1878, he returned to his home 
and became a permanent resident of this community. 
For several years he read law in the offices of Ives 
A Lincoln, and in the year :^882 was admitted to the 
Essex county bar. From that time forward Mr. 
Trefry was called to broad activity in the public 
service. First elected to the School Board of 
Marblehead, he was repeatedly re-elected, and for 
five of his ten years of service in this connection 
was chairman of the board. By political convic- 
tions a staunch Democrat, he was held in the most 
rineere respect by both parties. Chosen as Demo- 
cratie candidate for State auditor in 1889, 1890, and 
1891, he was elected on his second candidacy^ this 
being on the ticket with Governor WiUiam E. Rus- 
•dlv and Mr. Trefry thereby became the only Demo- 



crat elected to a minor office in the State Govern- 
ment within a generation. In his third candidacy 
he was defeated by General John W. Kimball. 

His services to the people in the office of auditor 
resulted in Mr. Trefiys appointment by Governor 
Russell, in 1892, as his term approached its dose, as 
savings bank commissioner, succeeding Edward P. 
Chapin. Seven years later, in 1899, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Wolcott tax commissioner and 
corporation commissioner. Reappointed in 1902 by 
Governor Crane, and by later gubernatorial execu- 
tives through idl changes of administration, Mr. 
Trefry was retained in these offices untQ the winter 
of 1920-21, when his approaching disqualification on 
account of age forbade the completion of another 
term of service. Mr. Trefry's record was one of 
brilliant achievement and utter devotion to the pub- 
lic good. During his long service the revenue of the 
State from taxation increased from 14,000,000.00 to 
the sum of $35,000,000.00. His efforts were con- 
stantly toward the equitable distribution of public 
costs among those enjoying to the largest degree 
the advantages of public progress and economic se- 
curity. He was instrumental in placing upon the 
statutes of the State of Massachusetts the direct in- 
heritance tax law, the individual income tax law, 
and the law bringing corporations under the prin- 
ciple of the income tax. In all his work for the 
people Mr. Trefry was one of them. His attitude in 
this regard can best be set forth in his own words 
to a contemporary: 

"From the outset of my work as a public servant 
it has been my settled policy to mi^ myself as 
accessible to the people as it was possible for me 
to do. My latchstring was always out and it has 
always beoi as easy to see me at my office as it has 
been to see any of my clerks." 

In every public office, and particularly in that of 
State tax commissioner, Mr. Trefry was not the 
seeker but the sought. His original appointment by 
Governor Wolcott was tendered by that official en- 
tirely without solicitation on the part of Mr. 
Trefry or his friends, and in spite of different 
party afiUiations. It was the man, not the politician, 
who assumed the responsibilities of office, and 
through the twenty-one years of his tenure of the 
office as tax commissioner, he held the interests 
of the people a sacred trust. 

Among other circles than those of a political na- 
ture Mr. Trefry is remembered with sincerest regret 
and esteem. He possessed the rare distinction of 
holding the thirty-third degree in the Masonic order, 
and was Uie oidy man in Marblehead during his 
life who could claim that honor. He was a member 
of Philanthropic Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, 
and had passed through all the degrees of the York 
Rite. He was prelate of Winslow Lewis Command* 
ery. Knights Templar, at the time of his sudden 
death, on Tuesday, April 12, 1921, and was past 
master of his lodge. He had served as district dep- 
uty grand master of the Eighth Masonic District, 
and subsequently had served as deputy grand master 
of the Masonic organisation of the State, 

Mr. Trefry was honored by hie abna mater in 
1908, the institution conferring upon him the de- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



27 



gree of Master of Arts. His college fraternity was 
the Phi Beta Kappa. He always kept broadly in 
touch with all advance in his native place, and for 
many years was a trustee of Abbot Public Library, 
of Marblehead. He was senior oi&cer of St. Mich- 
aePs Episcopal Church, this office, which he had held 
for nearly twenty years, being next in rank to that 
of the rector, and he had, as usual, collected the 
offering at the Sunday evening service just prior 
to his death. He was a very close friend of Rev. 
Lyman B. Rollins, rector of St. Michael's, who col- 
lapsed at the news of Mr. Trefry's death. 

Mr. Trefry married Maria T. A. Gardner, and 
Mrs. Trefry survives him, also three brothers: Sam- 
uel S., Benjamin B., and Walter C, and two sis- 
ters, aJl residents of Marblehead. 



HORACE KENDAL FOSTER, M. D.— During 
forty years the residents of Peabody, Massachu- 
setts, have grown into a knowledge and appreciation 
of Dr. Horace Kendal Foster, who came to Peabody 
in 18S2, and has given himself in continuous service 
to his townspeople. 

Bom in North Andover, Massachusetts, December 
5, 1864, son of John Plummer and Sarah Ann (Pea- 
body)' Foster, his education began in the schools of 
North Andover, and he was graduated from the 
high school in 1872. In preparation for college he 
went to Phillips Andover Academy, for the next 
three years, and, upon finishing his studies there, 
entered Dartmouth College in 1876, being gradu- 
ated A. B. from the collegiate department in 1879, 
and from the Medical School in 1882, with the de- 
gree of M. D. After a summer of leisure he began, 
in October, 1882, his present medical practice in Pea- 
body. In the forty years that have followed. Dr. 
Foster has not only attained eminence as a physician, 
but has become a vital part of the life and vigor of 
the city. In 1896 he was appointed medical examiner 
of the Eighth Essex District, and has continued in 
office up to the present time (1922) . He is also vice- 
president of the Warren Five Cent Savings Bank. 
Dr. Foster is a Republican in politics, a member of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society, the Massachu- 
setts Medico-Legal Society, and the American Medi- 
cal Association. He is a Mason, fraternizing with 
Jordan Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Peabody; Washington Chapter, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons, of Salem; and Winslow Lewis Commandery, 
Knights Templar. His dub is the Peabody. He is 
a member of the South Congregational Church. 

Dr. Foster married, December 19, 1889, at Pea- 
body, Massachusetts, Florence Kendal Peabody, 
daughter of Stephen and Lavina (Hart) Peabody. 
Their children are: Kendall Peabody, bom January 
10, 1891; Chandler Hunting, bom April 4, 1893; 
Rachel, bom December 26, 1896. 



originally from England, where the name is found 
in registers of the thirteenth century. There were 
seven of the name that were early settlers in New 
England: Alexander, of Portsmouth; Rev. Stephen, 
of Lynn; Henry, of Ipswich; Joseph, of Salem; 
John, of Salem; William of Charlestown; and John, 
of Watertown. It is from the Rev. Stephen Batch- 
elder that the subject of this sketch is descended. 

Henry M. Batchelder, of the Salem branch, son of 
Samuel Lang and Mary (Brown) Batchelder, was 
bom in Salem, Massachusetts, February 11, 1862, 
and there was educated, finishing with graduation 
from Salem Classical and High School, class of 1870. 
School days over, he entered the banking business in 
1870, and served in different capacities untfl 1888, 
when he was made cashier of the Merchants' Na- 
tional Bank, of Salem. For eighteen years he served 
that institution as cashier, 1883-1901, then was elect- 
ed president, a high office he has now filled for 
twenty-one years. He is also a member of the 
board of investment of the Salem Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank; a vice-president and member of the 
finance committee of Essex Institute and Home for 
Aged and Destitute Women; director of Holyoke 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, of Salem; and 
member of its finance committee. He was one of 
the original promoters of the Salem Electric Light- 
ing Company in 1881, and was its treasurer for 
twenty-eight years. He was the first president of 
the Massachusetts Bankers' Assodationt 1906-06. 
He is a member of the Second Unitarian Church 
and Salem Club. 

Mr. Batchelder married, in Salem, June 6, 1877, 
Martha Osgood Horton, daughter of Nathaniel 
Augustus and Harriet M. Horton. Mr. and Mrs. 
Batchelder are the parents of four sons, bom in 
Salem: Samuel Henry, of Salem, bom February 
19, 1878, now of the law firm of Peabody, Amold, 
Batchelder A Luther, Boston; Nathaniel Horton, 
bom June 18, 1880, now head master of the Loomis 
Institute, Windsor, Connecticut; William Osgood, 
bom June 12, 1888, now of the General Electric 
Company, (Chicago) ; and Roland Brown, bom July 
81, 1891, now with the General Motors Acceptance 
Company, Chicago. 



HENRV M. BATCHBLDBR— For half a century 
Henry M. Batchelder, president of the Merchants' 
Matioiial Bank, of Salem, Massachusetts, has been 
cemiected with banking as a bwdness* and for 
tii«Bty-oiie years has held his present responsible 
pMitloii. He comes of an ancient Colonial family. 



FRANCIS HASBLTINE, who prepared the de- 
scription of the public schools of Lynn for this com- 
pilation, has been a schoolmaster since his twen- 
tieth year, and a resident of Essex county the most 
of his life. Bom May 26, 1864, the son of Amos 
Haseltine, Jr. and Wealthy Jane (Foster) Hasel- 
tine of Ayers Village, Haverhill, Massachusetts, his 
forbears include abo the West Havtthill Baileys 
and Websters, by which latter famUy h^ had direct 
descent from Hannah Duston through Thomas Dus- 
ton's ""well beloved son'' (in law), Nathaniel Web- 
ster. 

When about fifteen years of age, living at home 
on the farm, his active participation in the village 
debating and literary dub aroused in hhn the de- 
sire for a better education, leadiug him to do what 
no other boy in all the West Parish was doing at 
the tine, vis., attend the HaverhiD High School. 



28 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Tranaportfttion was a difflciilty» Ayen Village being 
five miles from the center of the city, and the trol- 
leys cars not then invented. The first two months 
he rode to school on the back of a recently broken 
Texan mustang, the rest of the four years he made 
the daUy trip on ''shank's mare/' school keeping 
six days in the week. During those years there was 
never another high school boy living along that 
whole stretch of country road. 

A valuable by-product of his weekly sixty-mile 
hike was a good physique. Needless to say, a boy 
who cared that much for his schooling made the 
most of his opportunities. He graduated in 1884, 
the president of his class, which numbered two 
other boys in its total of eighteen members. His 
excellent teachers, whom he always remembered 
with grateful appreciation, included Clarence E. Kel- 
ley, Albert L. Bartlett, and the Bartlett sisters, 
''Miss Mary and Miss Mira." 

He had felt the call to be a school teacher, but 
various committee-men turned him down because he 
lacked experience. How could he get experience un- 
less some one gave him a Job? He couldn't get into 
his new boots until he had worn them around a 
while to stretch them out. The oldtime district 
schools of New Hampshire gave him his chance, 
and at last he secured his first position to teach in 
the little red brick schoolhouse in the Greeley dis- 
trict of Londonderry. Here he lived in the old farm- 
house where Horace Greeley used to visit his boy- 
hood cousins during his summer vacations. 

The school had twenty-three chUdren, of all ages, 
and the weekly salary was |6.50, out of which he 
paid 13.00 for board. Almost as remunerative as 
being the janitor of the Ayers ViUage school house, 
where he had earned %1J2B per week for sweeping its 
two rooms and tending the fires. But in London- 
derry he was getting his experience and it was good. 
The short term of five weeks ended with its closing 
ordeal of "Exhibition Day" successfully passed to 
the satisfaction of visiting parents and school com- 
mittee. His written testimonials safely stowed in 
his pocket, he came home to face the Massachusetts 
committees again. 

Then came a Teacher's Institute, held in Haver- 
hill by the State Board of Education. The announce- 
ment came to the teachers present that Dr. Stevens, 
of Boxford, wanted a teacher for his village school, 
to teach forty to fifty children, of all ages, from A, 
B, C's to ^gebra, bookkeeidng and Fx«nch, all 
for 110.00 a week. WhUe the other teachers pres- 
ent were commenting upon the large requirements 
and smidl compensation of the position, this novice 
was hurrying from the hall and hunting up Dr. 
Stevens. Result: The remaining six months of the 
year spent teaching in the beautify country town 
of Boxford, mingling in the cordial home life of its 
people in the days when Professor Palmer and Alice 
Freeman Palmer spent their summers in its village. 
So there came more experience of a sort which 
no college or normal school has ever been able to 
provide. 

This woric was then varied by spending all next 
year in Millville in the town of Blackstone* There 



the employees of the Woonsoeket Rubber Company 
were on strike, and their children had become tur- 
bulent in the schooL A man was needed to restore 
discipline, and he did, having three other rooms be- 
sides his own under his care. Then he again packed 
his trunk and moved on, the richer by every faUure 
or success. Now he begins stopping longer in each 
new position, three years being spent among the 
seafaring folk of Hull, where he varies th» profes- 
sional activities of pedagogy by going fishing with 
his boys on Saturdays, or hauling lobster pots out- 
side Boston Light with his committee man, or in 
winter spearing eels through the ice. Then another 
jump takes him to the extreme western end of the 
State among the Berkshires, where three years are 
spent in the manufacturing town of Adams. Here 
he began housekeeping, taking with him from Hull 
his life-partner, Grace, daughter of Edward G. and 
Lizzie (Adams) Knight, their first home being at 
the foot of the Hoosacs, with Mount Graylock look- 
ing down upon them, the scenery and people all so 
different from those of Hull. In Adams he for- 
tunately was intimately associated with two sterling 
educators, Charies Herbert Howe, later principal 
of the Wakefield High School, and Dr. Walter P. 
Beckwith, afterward at the head of the Salem Nor- 
mal School, their infiuence being of great value in 
fitting him for his next promotion. 

In Lynn, Henry L. Chase was for many years 
principal of the Ward Four Grammar School. When 
Master Chase died, Mr. Haseltine was elected his 
successor in the Wluting School with its 600 puiuls, 
a position he continued to hold untfl within a few 
months of the twenty-seven year record of his pre- 
decessor. Then Lynn reorganized her schools, com- 
bining the upper grades in junior high schools, and 
the Whiting was changed to an elementary school, 
Mr. Hasteltine's services being recogidsed by pro- 
moting him to his present position of principal of 
the Western Junior High SchooL So hi his forty 
years of teaching, the fidd of usefulness has 
broadened from that first little red school house wiUi 
twenty-three children to this modem school with 
twenty-five teachers and more than 700 pupils. 

This schoolmaster is principal, too, of the Lynn 
summer schools, a unique educational factor, in 
which he has exerted a guiding infiuence for more 
than a dozen years. More than 600 pupils, of all 
grades, including some from neighboring towns, pay 
$5.00 apiece for the privilege of attending these 
schools six weeks, three hours a day, in July and 
August. Grouped in classes averaging twenty pupOs 
to a teacher, they are able to get strength for next 
year's work or a trial promotion or a double pro- 
motion, or to remove conditions or earn credits for 
promotion to higher grades, thus saving a year's 
time in their schooling or advancing a grade farther 
before they leave schooL 

Apart from school work, Mr. Haseltine has been 
an active member of the North Congregational 
Church, some years its superintendent of Sunday 
school, and many years its parish treasurer and 
chairman of finance committee. In civic affairs, his 
greatest aetivity was in local option times when he 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



29 



was a prominent leader in the stroggle for No- 
License. Lynn made a notable record for years in 
fighting the saloon, perhaps uneqnaUed by any dty 
of her size in the nation. His part in this warfare, 
in the councils of the league, on the stump during 
the campaign, and as chairman of his precinct dur- 
ing the 'Canvas, often drew the fire of the enemy, 
who claimed that schoolmasters had ''no right to 
meddle in political matters.*' He was on the firing 
line, but escaped being ''fired," solely because the 
saloon forces could not get control of the school 
committee. 

One more field of social usefulness remains to be 
mentioned, the Lynn Educational Association, an 
organization by which, during more than a quarter 
of a century, Mr. Haseltine has been providing for 
the public of Greater Lynn a course of monthly 
entertainments, including concerts, lectures, and re- 
citals, clean in character and making for refinement 
and culture. Mr. Haseltine calls himself the gen- 
eral secretary of the L. E. A., but his friends joking^ 
ly say that he is the L. E. A. The permanent mem- 
bers of this organization, 700 in number, pay a 
dollar for their annual course ticket to these gather- 
ings held in Classical High School Hall, nine or 
more programs being arranged, such as ordinarily 
cost from five to ten times as much. The purpose 
is to make the course safely self-supporting without 
taxing culture to make a profit, providing within the 
means of all a course that is uplifting as well as 
popular. With many such interests and activities 
under his care, it will be seen that this schoolmaster 
has never found time to be a "joiner" of fraternal 
organizations. 

WILLIAM E. DORMAN, Esq.—Holding an as- 
sured position in the legal fraternity of Essex county 
and the Commonwealth, Mr. Dorman has long been 
prominent in public activities as well as in his per- 
sonal practice. Mr. Dorman was bom in Lynn, 
June 23, 1875, and is a son of Benjamin Hallowell 
and Abby (Dupar) Dorman, both his parents also 
having been bom in Lynn. In every line of descent, 
Mr. Dorman goes back to the first settlers of Essex 
county. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of his native city, Mr. Dorman prepared for college 
at Chauncey Hall School, graduated from Harvard 
College in 1898, and from the Harvard Law School 
in 1901. Shortly after his graduation, Mr. Dorman 
opened an office in Lynn, entered upon the general 
practice of the law, in which he has been more then 
usually successful, and continued until 1916, when 
he was offered the position of counsel to the State 
Senate by the present vice-president of the United 
States, Calvin Coolidge, then president of the Sen- 
ate, who had served with Mr. Dorman in the Legis- 
lature and was familiar with his aptitude in draft- 
ing legislation. Mr. Dorman served as chairman of 
the Lynn School Board in 1905 and 1906, and in 
1907 he was elected to the State Legislature, his ser* 
vice covering the years 1907, 1908 and 1909, where 
he served on important committees and acquired a 
position of infiuence and leadership. His present 



position of counsel to the State Senate is unique. 
Massachusetts is among the foremost states on the 
high quality of her legislation. The State has just 
established a system whereby the counsel to the 
Senate and House of Representatives, in addition 
to their usual services, are to have charge of the 
continuous consolidation of State legislation. Mr. 
Dorman is also just completing the index to the 
recent revision of 'the statutes. He is a past master 
of Mount Carmel Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; the East Lynn Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd FeUows; the Lynn Historical Society, of which 
he was secretary for many years; the Sons of the 
American Revolution; the Swampscott Masonic 
Club, and the Massachusetts and the American Bar 
associations. He is a resident of both the northerly 
and southerly ends of Essex county, having a sum- 
mer estate of some forty-five acres in Georgetown. 
On August 28, 1905, Mr. Dorman married Estelle 
£. Herrick, of Georgetown, Massachusetts, daughter 
of Samuel E. and Ella F. (Welch) Herrick. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dorman are the parents of five children, 
as follows: Benjamin Hallowell, Samuel Herrick, 
Friscilla Bradstreet, Lois Putnam, deceased, and 
William E., Jr. 

GEORGE ELDEN Mac ARTHUR, M. D., came 
to Ipswich, Massachusetts, from the l^te of Maine, 
his home at Camden on the shores of Penobscot bay. 
The years that have intervened since his coming and 
the present have brought him high professional 
standing and the warm esteem of the community 
in which for thirty-seven years he has been minister- 
ing to the physical needs of so many in the homes 
comprising that community. He is indeed the "be- 
loved physician," and it would seem that his services 
were indispensable. His work in the schools and 
for the public health has been most valuable, and if 
his entire life of private professional service were 
obliterated his splendid record of public service 
would mark him as a most useful and valuable cit- 
izen. 

George Dennis MacArthur, a veteran of the Civil 
War, serving in the Nineteenth Regiment, Maine 
Volunteer Infantry, married Mary Adaline Hosmer, 
and to them was bom a son, George Elden Mac- 
Arthur, whose name furnishes the caption of this re- 
view. George Elden MacArthur, M. D., now and 
since 1888 a practicing physician of Ipswich, Mas- 
sachusetts, but prior to that year located in Boston 
and Winthrop, Massachusetts, his medical diploma 
bearing date of 1883. 

George E. MacArthur was bom in Camden, Maine, 
June 14, 1858, and he there attended public schools. 
He prepared at Waterville Classical Institute for 
admission to Bowdoin College, entering the Medical 
School of that college after studying under the 
direction of Dr. O. W. Stone, of Camden. He com- 
pleted his medical courses at the University of Ver- 
mont, receiving his degree, M. D., with the gradu- 
ating class of 1888. Since that year he has been a 
dose student of matters pertaining to his profession, 
and in the hospitals of London and Paris has pur- 
sued courses of clinical and professional study. He 



30 



ESSEX COUNTY 



began the practice of his profession in Winthrop, 
Massachusetts, in 1883, there continuing until 1887, 
when he moved to Boston, spending a year in that 
city before finding a permanent location in Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, in 1888. 

During the near three and a half decades which 
have since elapsed, Dr. MacArthur has been con- 
tinuously in practice in Ipswich and has won high 
standing as a physician of learning and skill. He is 
now, in addition to his large private practice, attend- 
ing physician to Benjamin Stickney Cable Memorial 
Hospital, and is physician to Ipswich public schools. 
For two years he served with the rank of captain 
in the Medical Corps of the Massachusetts National 
Guard, serving in the military hospitals during the 
influenza epidemic of 1918 and through the strike of 
the police of Boston in 1919. Other public service 
rendered by Dr. MacArthur includes membership on 
the Ipswich School Committee for twenty-five years, 
and on the Board of Health for twenty years, he 
having been chairman of both boards. He is a 
member of the Masonic order, the Elnights of Py- 
thias, and the Protestant Episcopal church. He also 
serves on the Ipswich Playground Commission and 
on the Community Service Board. 

Dr. MacArthur married, in Newton, Massachu- 
setts, June 9, 1886, Isabel Gilkey Saiford, who died 
January 27, 1919, daughter of James Philbrick and 
Mary (Gilkey) Safford. 



HORACE HALE ATHERTON— At Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, the city of his birth, Horace H. Ather- 
ton continues his residence, being regrister of pro- 
bate and insolvency for the county of Essex, an 
office he has most capably filled for a full decade of 
years. He is the second of his name in Lynn, being 
a son of Horace Hale and Hannah Preston (Oliver) 
Atherton, both now deceased, his fattier a business 
man of Lynn, formerly an official of the town of 
Saugtts, representative, State Senator, member of 
the Executive Council, and a trustee of Danvers In- 
sane Hospital. 

The Athertons of New England trace descent 
from General Humphrey Atherton, who came from 
England in 1635 in the ship "James" with wife, 
Mary (Wales) Atherton; and three children. Gen- 
eral Atherton is buried in the old Dorchester Cem- 
etery, this his epitaph: 

Here lies our Captain & Major of Suffold was 

withal, 
A goodly magistrate was he, and Major General, 
Two troop horse with him here comes. Such worth 

his love did crave 
Two companies of foot also mourning march to his 

grave, 
Let all that read be sure to keep the faith as he 

has done 
With Christ he now lives crowned, his name was 

Humphrey Atherton. 

The Atherton family of England has its seat in 
Lancashire, the town of Atherton, ten miles north- 
west of Manchester, lying within their armorial es- 
tate. The family had immense possessions and was 
of the wealthiest commoners of England. 



Anns — Gules, three sparrow hawks argent. 
Crest — ^A swan argent. 

These arms hang in the parish church of Lei^ in 
the family vault. 

Horace Hale (2) Atherton was bom in Lynn, 
Massachusetts, December 24, 1872. After gradua- 
tion from Saugus High School, he entered Bryant 
A Stratton Commercial School, Boston, there pur- 
suing full courses to graduation. He began his 
business career as court stenographer for the '^Bos- 
ton Advertiser A Record," later being private secre- 
tary to William E. Barrett, congressman, and hold- 
ing similar position with Ernest W. Roberts, of 
Massachusetts. From 1894 to 1905 he was the 
Washington correspondent for the ''Boston Adver^ 
tiser A Record," and from 1905 until 1912 assistant 
postmaster of the Lynn postal district. In 1912 he 
was elected register of probate and insolvency for 
Essex county, was re-elected and is now (July, 
1922) the incumbent of that office. He is a director 
of the Saugus Co-operative Bank, and a trustee of 
the Lynn Five Cents Savings Bank. 

Mr. Atherton has been duly admitted to the Mas- 
sachusetts bar, and is a member of the Lynn and 
of the Essex County Bar associations. During the 
World War period, 1917-18, he was chairman of the 
Legal Advisory Board of Massachusetts, District 
No. 27. He is a Republican in politics, has served 
on finance and school Committees of the town of 
Saugfus, and as secretary of the Massachusetts Re- 
publican State Committee. He is a trustee of Essex 
Agricultural Society; member of the Essex Insti- 
tute; an ex-president of Old Essex Chapter, Sons 
of the American Revolution, the largest chapter in 
the United States; member of Lynn Historical So- 
ciety; Patrons of Husbandry; Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks; Knights of Psrthias; Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows; and of the Masonic 
order. His clubs are the Essex County Press, of 
which he is president, and The Salem. He is secre- 
tary of Ancient Sirloin Lodge, a dining organiza- 
tion. 

Mr. Atherton married, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
November 80, 1898, Edith Elizabeth Hall, who died 
November 8, 1920, daughter of Frank Hezekiah and 
Elizabeth C. (Henderson) Hall. Children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Atherton: Edith Rutledge, bom August 
80, 1899; Roger Morse, bom November 17, 1901; 
Horace Hale (3), bom January 29, 1912. 



MICHAEL RICARD DONOVAN, M. D.— Lynn, 
Massachusetts, has always been noted for the dis- 
tinction of its physicians, and one of the most emi- 
nent of these is Michael Ricard Donovan. For near- 
ly two decades he has been a member of the medi- 
cal fraternity, and is recognized by his fellow- 
practitioners as one of their ablest and most skillful 
associates. His medical career has been coeval with 
the improvement of the health conditions of Lynn. 
From 1886 until the present year, 1922, he has been 
connected with the Health Department of the city, 
either intimately as its head or influentiaUy. As a 
practicing physician he has a large clientele, and a 
host of friends. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



SI 



Dr. Donovan is a native son of hynn, Massachu- 
setts, bom in 1860. His first schooling was gained 
in the Whiting Grammar School, and was continued 
in the Lynn High School, from, both of which he is 
a graduate. He matriculated in Georgetown Col- 
lege, Washington, D. C, in 1876, and was graduated 
with the degree of A. B., in 1880. For scientific 
training in his future profession he went to Har- 
vard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, and 
won his medical degree in 1883. After a summer 
vacation he settled down to the arduous work of 
the practicing physician, and has continued in his 
field for thirty-nine years. He had advanced with 
his times, never being too wise to need no more 
study nor too old to learn. An outstanding feature 
of his career in Lynn has been his wholehearted ser- 
vice to the Health Department of his city. He was 
city physician from 1886 to 1892, on the Board of 
Health for a like number of years, and has been on 
the Commission of Public Health since 1918. He 
has also been a United States pension examiner, 
and during the World War acted on the exemption 
board. Division No. 1, Lynn, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Donovan has wide fraternal connections, 
among which are: The Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, Lodge No 117, Lynn, of which he 
is the exalted ruler; Knights of Columbus, Val- 
ladolid Council, No. 70, being the grand knight; 
Harvard Massachusetts Medical Association; Lynn 
Medical fraternity; Harvard Medical Alumni; Mas- 
sachusetts Society of Examining Surgeons; George^ 
town Aluinni of New England, of which he is presi- 
dent; and the Lynn Historical Society. Dr. Donovan 
is a member of the Park Club. He is a communi- 
cant of the Catholic church, of Lynn. 

Dr. Donovan married, in 1888, at Chelsea, Mas- 
sachusetts, Anna Theresa MuUoy, and they are the 
parents of four children: Michael R., Frank H., 
Isabelle and Marie V. 



HEZSKIAH O. WOODBURY, president and gen- 
eral manager of the Woodbury Shoe Company of 
Beverly, one of the largest concerns in this vicinity, 
with factories in this city and Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, is one of the best known residents of Bev- 
erly. 

Mr. Woodbury is a Beverly bom boy, and since 
early manhood has been instrumental in the build- 
ing of the large and successful shoe manufacturing 
business of which he is the head today. When quite 
a young man he, with his two brothers, Rufus H. 
and Thomas Woodbury, started the manufacture of 
shoes in one of the little shops so conmion in those 
days. All the work was done by hand, the women 
binding and fitting the uppers and the men finishing 
the shoe. The firm of Woodbury Brothers was 
started January 17, 1869, in one of the little shops 
mentioned above, 10x14 feet H. O. Woodbury did 
the selling end of the business; and their first cus- 
tomer was the firm of Lindsay & Gibbs, of Pearl 
street, Boston. Mr. Woodbury took with him a 
sample of the shoe they had started to manufacture, 
wrapped it in a piece of paper, carried it ta Boston 
in his pocket, and was successful in placing an order 



for one case. The Boston concern is now the Pil- 
grim Rubber Company, and Mr. Woodbury con- 
tinued to sell them shoes as long as they handled 
them. Some years later the firm, having outgrown 
the capacity of the little shop, moved into a larger 
building. Mr. Woodbury took three samples with 
him, the concern having started the manufacture of 
two othez' styles, and asked his mother if she had a 
bag that he could carry them to Boston in. She 
replied she had one, but it was a large one, but Mr. 
Woodbury took it and put in his three samples, al- 
though it was large enough to hold twenty-four. 
He took his three shoes to the American House, 
Boston, then the headquarters for the visiting shoe 
buyers. He noticed two men who appeared to be 
watching him intently. Finally one of them asked 
him what he had in the bag, and he replied "shoes," 
and took out the three samples. Then one of the 
men asked him where his other samples were and 
he said that was all he had. After a little further 
conversation, he started for the door with the re- 
mark, ''111 sell you yet." One of the men called 
him back, and after a bit of jollying, gave him an 
order for three cases. The man who did most of 
the talking was Mr. Grimling, of the firm of Grim- 
ling, Spalding A Company, of Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. 
Woodbury continued to sell him as long as he lived, 
and the namel of the firm is still on the books of 
the Woodbury Shoe Company. 

The Woodbury Shoe Company is one of the big^ 
gest shoe manufacturing concerns in this vicinity. 
Mr. H. O. Woodbury is the only member of the 
original firm, one of the brothers, Rufus H. Wood- 
bury, having died, and the other, Thomas Wood- 
bury, has retired. 

Hezekiah O. Woodbury is one of the best known 
citizens of Beverly, always ready to lend assistance 
to anything that is of benefit to city or community. 
He has always been much interested in the Beverly 
Young Men's Christian Association, is a past presi- 
dent of that organization, and was largely instru- 
mental in raising the funds and in the construction 
and furnishing of the present splendid building. He 
is an active member of the Washington Street Con- 
gregational Church, now holding the office of dea- 
con. He has an attractive home* on Ober street. 



JOHN HOOPER GOODWIN, D. D. S.— In pro- 
fessional circles in Marblehead, Dr. Goodwin is 
counted among the progressive and successful den- 
tal surgeons of the day, and his practice, which is 
constantly widening, is among the leading people of 
this vicinity. He comes of a family long identified 
with the development and progress of Essex county, 
and is a son of William and Rebecca Ann (Stevens) 
Goodwin, his father for many years one of the lead- 
ing druggists in Marblehead. 

Dr. Goodwin was bom in Marblehead, Massachu- 
setts, August 10, 1878. His early education was 
gained in the public schools of his native place, and 
having chosen his field of professional endeavor, he 
entered the University of Pennsylvania, from which 
he was graduated in th6 class of 1902, with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Within the year 



82 



ESSEX COUNTY 



he entered upon the practice of his profession in 
Marbleheady and has continaed until the present 
time» derelopinsr an extensive and lucrative prac- 
tice, and stiU being thus engaged. Dr. Goodwin en- 
Joys exceUent standing in the profession, is a mem- 
ber of the Northeastern Massachusetts Denial So- 
doty, the Essex Dental Society and the Lynn Den- 
tal Society. Fraternally, he holds membership in 
Philanthropic Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, 
and Atlantic Lodge, No. 55, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and is a member of the Delta Sigma 
Delta fraternity. Politically, Dr. Goodwin endorses 
the principles and policies of the Republican party, 
although he has never sought public honors. He is 
af&liated with St. Michael's Episcopal Church. 

Dr. Goodwin married, April 26, 1905, in Marble- 
head, Maria Power Enowland, daughter of William 
Crowninshield and Miriam Girdler (Power) Know- 
land. Dr. and Mrs. Goodwin have two sons: John 
H., Jr., bom May 3, 1906; William Knowland, bom 
August 23, 1908. 

HERMAN H. PSTZOLD— Among the younger 
generation of business men in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, and one who has already made a name for 
himself in his particular line of business which might 
well be the envy of a much older man, is Herman 
H. Petzold, architect. He is the son of Emil and 
Minnie Petzold, the former now retired from active 
business life. 

Herman H. Petzold was bom in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, May 25, 1898. He was educated in the 
schools of his native city and district. Having in the 
meantime decided to become an architect, he de- 
voted himself to study along this line, and was sub- 
sequently employed as draftsman in offices of local 
architects for five years following. In May, 1915, 
he opened offices on his own account, and thus con- 
tinued successfully until February, 1918, when he 
enlisted in the United States Army. He was first 
sent to Camp Devens, and later to Camp Upton, 
where he remained for one month, when he became 
attached to Company E, 305th Regiment of the Sev- 
enty-seventh Division, and was sent overseas, where 
he took part in most of the important engagements 
until September 25, 1918, when he was severely 
wounded by five machine gun bullets whicH went 
through his right knee, severing the lower part of 
the leg from the rest of the body. He was captured 
and sent to a German hospital in Brussels, and later 
to Trevess, where he was released on December 11, 
1918. He arrived in this country, April 14, 1919, 
and was discharged from the Walter Reed Hos- 
pital, Washington, D. C, October 25, 1919. Return- 
ing to Lawrence, Massachusetts, immediately, he 
lost no tim& in re-establishing himself in hia chosen 
profession, and on November 1, 1919, was again at 
work. Mr. Petzold also teaches mechanical draw- 
ing in the Lawrence High School evenings. He 
afiUiates with Grecian Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
the American Legion; and the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars. 

Mr. Petzold married, September 28, 1921, Ellen 



Alberta Bowden, bom in Kittery, Maine, daughter 
of Albert Ellsworth and Georgia May (Femald) 
Bowden. They reside at No. 2 Milk street, Methuen» 
Massachusetts. 

JOHN GILL— The Gills of this review are an 
English family of long standing, but seated in 
Salem, Massachusetts, since 1912, where John Gill 
is now president and general superintendent of the 
Gill Leather Company. Like his father and grand- 
father, Mr. Gill has been in the leather trade from 
boyhood, he having been actively connected with 
tanneries in England, India, and the United States. 

Mr. Gill was bom in Wrexham, England, January 
3, 1876, and was there educated in the publie 
schools. He entered the leather trade as an ap- 
prentice with the firm of J. Meredith Jones A Sons., 
Wrexham, England, a company that started manu- 
facturing leather in the year 1775. It was in this 
factory that the first roller leather used in cotton 
spinning was made, more than one hundred years 
ago, for Sir Richard Arkwright, the inventor of the 
first cotton spinning machine, and it was here 
that Mr. Gill laid the foundation of his knowledge 
of roller leather manufacturing, a branch of the 
trade in which he specializes today. Beginning in 
the pullery, he steadily advanced through every de- 
partment, finally attaining the position of factory 
superintendent; studying also the technical side of 
leather manufacturing, he became, after a series of 
examinations, an associate of the International As^ 
sedation of Leather Trade Chemists. In 1909 Mr. 
Gill was offered and accepted the general superin- 
tendency of a shoe factory and tannery in India. 
He remained there three years, re-organising the 
factories and teaching the natives more modem and 
up-to-date methods of leather manufacture, himself 
gaining valuable knowledge and having many un- 
usual and interesting experiences while a resident in 
that country. 

After leaving India, Mr. GiHl entered the United 
States, locating in Salem, Massachusetts, which is 
yet (1922) his home and the seat of his business. 
His first position in Salem was with the Helbum 
Thompson Company. He introduced and made a 
success of the manufacture of roller leather in that 
company — having entire control of the department. 
While connected with this company, Mr. Gill made a 
trip around the world in their interests, visiting 
Japan, Korea, China, Malaya, India, Egypt and 
Europe. Resigning his position in the above com- 
pany in January, 1920, Mr. Gill, together with Mr. 
Hall and Mr. Max Weinfeld, formed the Gill A HaU 
Company, Leather Manufacturers, Salem, Massachu- 
setts. In November 1921, Mr. Gill and Mr. Hall 
took over Mr. Weinfeld's stock in the company and 
continued in business together until September, 1922, 
when the company was dissolved, Mr. Gill taking 
over the factory and all the assets and forming a 
new company known as the Gill Leather Company, 
of Salem, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Gill married, in 1902, Maud Jones, of Wrex- 
ham, England. They have four children: Theresa 
M., John E., Maud J., and Mona C. Gill. 



irLQji^ 



j^jOFw «--^_|^-^ ■ _«ii >•_■*- ^ ■ Vi 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



33 



CHARLES HORATIO CUNNINGHAM— In the 
construction world of Essex county the firm name 
of C. H. Cunningfham & Son Company stands for 
high achievement in this field of endeavor, and 
Charles H. Cunningham, now the president and 
manager of the concern, is one of the leaders in 
the group of younger men who are identified with 
the physical progress and growth of the city of 
Lynn. 

Mr. Cunningham was bom in Hillsborough, New 
Hampshire, September 13, 1898, and is a son of 
Charles Sumner and Carrie E. Cunningham, former- 
ly of Hillsborough, but for the last twenty-three 
years residents of L3mn. The family removing to 
Lynn when Mr. Cunningham was a child of five 
years, it was in the public and grammar schools 
of this city that he received his early education, 
later becoming a graduate of Burdett College and 
also spending two years at Colby Academy. Mean- 
while the elder Mr. Cunningham had founded and 
brought to a high point of efficiency the present 
business in contracting and building, and when 
the younger man became twenty years of age he 
became associated with the concern, beginning at 
the bottom, as a brick mason, and gaining practical 
experience in every branch of the business for which 
hi technical training had fitted him. Three years 
later he was made president of the concern and 
manager of its affairs, his father retiring from his 
active management of the business. The high 
standards which have always embodied the poli- 
cies of the house have been carried forward with 
its progress since, and Mr. Cunningham stands 
among the leaders in the business. A few of the 
many noteworthy structures which have gone up 
under his hand are the Security Trust building, 
the Branch Bank of Lynn, and the Peabody High 
School. 

Mr. Cunningham is broadly interested in every 
phase of advance, but has little leisure outside his 
business and takes no leading part in public affairs. 
He holds the thirty-second degree in the Masonic 
order. On June 20, 1916, Mr. Cunningham married 
Mildred J. Johnson, daughter of Edward Johnson, 
of Pittsfield, New Hampshire, and granddaughter of 
Clarence Johnson, who for many years was chief 
clerk of the United States Senate at Washington. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham have one little daughter, 
Pauline Eva, bom April 20, 1918. 



RICHARD BARRY—Many citizens of Peabody, 
Massachusetts, recall with the most sincere regret, 
the passingof Richard Bany, who, in both busi- 
ness enterprise and public endeavor, was a man of 
great mental stature— one of those men whom no 
community can afford to lose, whose place may be 
taken, but cannot be filled. 

Mr. Barry was a son of Patrick and Mary (Keefe) 
Barry, natives of County Cork, Ireland, sturdy pio- 
neers of the late sixties, no less adventurous than 
those of an earlier day, who came to the Land of 
Opportunity to build a home for their children. 

Essex — 2 — 8 



Patrick Barry was a leather worker, and while 
never gaining great wealth, he left to his children 
the nobler heritage of mental capacity and spiritual 
power. Of his three sons, John, James and Rich- 
ard, only James is now living. 

Richard Barry was bom in County Cork, Ireland, 
on January 9, 1859, and died at Peabody, Massa- 
chusetts, on November 27, 1909. Gaining a limited 
education in the National schools of his native land, 
the boy came to America with his brothers, John 
and James Barry, all joining their parents who had 
preceded them to prepare for their coming. Richard 
had little opportunity to enjoy the advantages of 
further formal education, but he was a student by 
nature, and every phase of life was to him an open 
book, with lessons of value on every page. He 
learned the leather business with his father, and 
became identified with the production of the finest 
grades of leather and morocco. He was for many 
years employed in the morocco leather business of 
the Pembertons, whom he later succeeded in the 
business. 

Beginning the manufacture of leathers on his own 
account, Mr. Barry purchased what was known as 
the Daniel Woodbury Morocco plant, and enlarged 
it to suit the requirements of his plans. He organ- 
ized the George A Barry Company, of which he was 
president. The magnificent success which he 
achieved was built upon the stable foundations of 
honor and integrity. Mr. Barry believed in a 
''square deal," and no man approached him with 
any business matter without finding him open- 
minded and eminently fair. His success was never 
gained over another's defeat, but rather through 
the perspicacity and rare judgment which were dis- 
tinguishing characteristics of the man. He was 
fearless to advance, once his conclusions were 
reached, but they were never reached by guess- 
work. He would often decide like a flash, but only 
when familiar with the ground and certain of his 
premises. Up to the last, even to the day before 
his death, Mr. Barry gave his personal attention to 
his extensive business interests. For several months 
his health had been less vigorous than usual, but 
the end was not anticipated so soon, and it was a 
great shock to the people of Peabody, and especially 
to the factory force throughout all the depart- 
ments, when the message of his death was re- 
ceived. 

Outside his individual interests Mr. Barry had 
long home an active part in the interests of the 
town of Peabody. In the nature of the case a man 
of his abOity would be sought for different offices 
of the public trast, and of benevolent endeavor, 
and it is entirely possible that if he had spared 
himself in the many services he rendered the pub- 
lic, he would have been among his friends longer. 

Mr. Barry took an active interest in the public 
affairs of the town of Peabody, and for many years 
was a member of the Committee on Finance. His 
voice was always on the side of economy in the 
conduct of its affairs, so far as economy was con- 
structive, rather than penurious. He was the chair- 



34 



ESSEX COUNTY 



man of this committee for a number of years. He 
was considered a force for progress in the financial 
world of Peabody, and was elected a director of 
the Warren National Bank, which office he still 
held at the time of his death. 

In his personal benevolences Mr. Barry was 
broadly liberal, although the story would never 
have been made public through his own declarations. 
He was particularly interested in the young men of 
his acquaintance, and to him many young men 
owe the privilege of a college education. He early 
espoused the temperance cause, and when a young 
man enrolled himself as a total abstainer. He join- 
ed the St. John's Catholic Total Abstinence Asso- 
ciation in 1876, was at one time its president, and 
for sixteen years was its treasurer. 

Mr. Barry was a charter member of the John 
Bertram Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
of Salem; a member of Division 11, Ancient Order 
of Hibernians, of Peabody; of Verague Council, 
Knights of Columbus, of Salem, later being trans- 
ferred to Leo Council, of Peabody. He was an in- 
fluential member of the Essex Institute. Mr. Barry 
was a devout Catholic, and a consistent member 
of St. John's Church, of Peabody. 

On November 26, 1884, Mr. Barry married Han- 
nah J. Sullivan,, daughter of William and Mary 
(O'Connell) Sullivan, and they were the parents of 
five children: Mary Agnes; James Joseph, who 
married Grace M. Gannon; Ellen; William Richard, 
and Alice Louise. The oldest daughter, Mary 
Agnes Barry, was graduated first from the Pea- 
body High School, then, later, took a Normal course 
at Burdett College, at Lynn, and Simmons College, 
Boston, and is now a teacher in the Commercial 
Department of the Sharon (Massachusetts) High 
School. The elder son, James Joseph Barry, is a 
graduate of the Peabody High School, and the Sa- 
lem Commercial School, and is now on the office 
force of the Salem Gas Company. The second 
daughter, Ellen, died at three years of age. The 
younger son, William Richard Barry, is a graduate 
of the Peabody High School, and also of St. John's 
Preparatory College, at Danvers, Massachusetts, 
and also of the Georgetown University, at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, from which latter in- 
stitution he was graduated in the class of 1918. 
He was on the faculty of St. John's College as 
professor of English, French, Church History, and 
also Secular History; he is now sub-master at Salem 
High School. He married, on April 21, 1919, Grace 
Emily Hewitt, daughter of Frederick and Adelina 
(Henneick) Hewitt, of Washington, District of 
Columbia. They have an infant daughter, Grace 
Patricia, bom on March 4, 1920, and a son, Rich- 
ard Hewitt, bom August 1, 1921. The youngest 
daughter, Alice Louise, is a graduate of Peabody 
High School, and Trinity College for Women, at 
Washington, District of Columbia, and is now teach- 
ing at Peabody High School. 

With his family about him, and the business 
career in which he had been so successful at its 
height, there was a peculiar sadness in the death 



of this man of many interests and of innumerable 
good deeds. His loss is one which will long be felt 
among his associates in every branch of endeavor 
which claimed his attention. Mr. Barry departed 
this life on November 80, 1909. In the Salem 
"News" of November 80, the Tuesday following, 
a memorial by a close friend was published, signed 
only by the initials, T. P. F.: 

Richard Barry passed peacefully from this tran- 
sitory pilgrimage to his Eternal Abode prepared by 
his Creator, last Saturday afternoon at his late resi- 
dence, 80 Washington street, Peabody, surrounded 
by his faithful wife, loving children, and other 
members of his family, after an illness of a few 
hours' duration. Bom of humble parents, on the 
Emerald Isle, forty-nine years ago, and coming to 
this country in tender childhood, it may be well 
said of him, ''he was one of Ireland's staunchest 
supporters, and America's model citixens." Starting 
at the foot of the ladder of life, with no asset other 
than a determination to succeed in his humble voca- 
tion by earnestness, zeal and endeavor, he succeeded 
in reaching a pinnacle of fame seldom attained Vy 
man. His endeavors in the interests of others of 
mankind, and his labors on all matters pertaining 
to the welfare of his country, state, and his home 
town of Peabody, have won for him the respect 
and esteem not alone of those of his own religious 
beliefs, but the admiration of all true mwnkind who 
hold all different religious views, but respeet men 
for what they are and what they do for themselves 
and others. A staunch Catholic, true to his beliefs, 
he set an example that all men might do well to 
emulate. 

He served the town in many capacities to the 
last, with credit to his church, his town, and him- 
self. He leaves a wife, four children, and two 
brothers, who have the sympathy of his vast circle 
of friends in this time of affliction. Those who 
know him best believe that he has but gone to 
take his place with those who, during this earthly 
probation, prove true to their wives and families, 
as well as all other duties assigned to them, in order 
that they may merit that place prepared by man's 
Creator, where trials and tribulations are unknown 
and where joy and bliss abound for all Eternity. 

T. P. F. 

MICHAEL LEO SULLIVAN— A successful at>- 
tomey, deeply loyal to the city chosen for his resi- 
dence and also for his professional field, and a lead* 
er in every movement for the good of humanity, 
Michael Leo Sullivan, of Salem, Massachusetts, is 
broadly representative of that Americanism which 
is satisfied, so far as personal activity is concerned, 
with nothing short of constructive, wide-reaching 
forward-looking endeavor. Mr. Sullivan was bom 
November 9, 1872, and is a son of Owen P. and 
Elizabeth (Sheedy) Sullivan, both of whom are now 
deceased. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of Salem, Mr. Sullivan entered the Boston Univer^ 
sity Law School, from which he was graduated, 
class of 1892. Full of the ideals and enthusiasms 
of young manhood, he entered upon the profession 
which is his life work, and as is too seldom the 
case, has clung to these ideals and entiiusiasmB, and 



^i>xMi, ft ^R^:tjuv 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Z6 



made them m coBstractiye force behind all his work. 

Mx. SuUivaa was admitted to the Suffolk county 
bar in the year of his graduation, and practiced for 
a time in Boston, also haying an office in Salem. 
Later, as he became identified with various inter- 
ests in Salem, he foresaw the future of the city, 
and detnmining to cast in his lot with the public 
interests of Salem, and bear a part in its develop- 
maty he discontinued his Boston office and devoted 
all his time to his Salem practice. Aside from ids 
extensive individual interests of a professional nat- 
ure, he has become a leading figure in the public 
life of this city. 

Mr. Sullivan has served as city solicitor of Salem 
since 1914, when he was elected by the City Coun- 
cil, later, in 1918, being appointed to this office by 
MsQror Sullivan. After the disastrous fire of 1914, 
which placed such a stupendous problem before the 
city, he was a member of the re-building commits 
tee, and labored wOmn^y for tSie rehabilitation of 
the stricken community. During the World War he 
was chairman of the War Savings Stamp drives, 
and gave lavishly of his time and energies in sup- 
port of our forces overseas. He was in charge of 
all the work of the Amerdan Protective League in 
and about Salem, and spoke many times as "Four 
Minute Man.'' 

Politically Ms. Sullivan has always been affiliated 
with the Democratic party, and as if by universal 
consent, has been called upon to take a leading part 
in the affairs of the party. He was made delegate 
to the National Democratic Convention in Balti- 
more, was chairman of the Massachusetts Delega- 
tion to the St. Louis Convention, and was delegate 
to the San Francisco Convention in 1920. 

In many activities Mr. Sullivan takes a prominent 
part He is president of the Essex County Bar As- 
sociation; is a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
of the Father Mathew Total Abstinence Society, 
holding an influential position in all these organiz- 
ations. 

On April 80, 1895, Mr. Sullivan married Mary E. 
Crouse, daughter of William E. and Mary E. (Carr) 
Crouse. They are the parents of two children: 
Grace E., bom 1899, and George A., bom December, 
1902. The famOy are all members of the Church 
of the Immaculate Conception. 



ALFRED T. LE BOBUP, M. D.— Dr. Alfred T. 
Le Boeuf, of Salem, Massachusetts, is one of 
the well-lmown professional men of that city, a skil- 
led physician and surgeon. Dr. Le Boeuf is a son 
of Thomas and Emma (Paris) Le Boeuf, and was 
bom in Ashland, Massachusetts. His father is a 
blacksmith by trade, but has lived retired from ac- 
tive work foi' the last sixteen years. The five chil- 
dren of Thomas and Emma (Paris) Le Boeuf are: 
Joseph G.; Philip J.; Victor A., the prominent 
Salem dentist, a sketch of whose life appears else- 
where in this woric; Alfred T., of whom extended 
mention follows; and Josephine E. 

The family moved to Worcester, Massachusetts, 



when the doctor w&s a young lad, and there he 
received his early education at the public and high 
schools of that city. He decided upon the medical 
profession for his career, and entered the medical 
school of the University of Maryland, at Baltimore, 
from which institution he was graduated in 1908. 
He spent one year as an interne at the Maryland 
General Hospital, then passed the examinations of 
the Massachusetts State Medical Board, in 1909, and 
opened an office in Salem, for the general practice 
of medicine and surgery. This is the barest out- 
line of facts in a useful life. The doctor is still a 
young man, but commands a wide and ever broad- 
ening practice. He enjoys the esteem and confi- 
dence of the people of Salem and vicinity^ and has 
an enviable outlook for the future. 

Dr. Le Boeuf married, June 6, 1911, Elmina L. 
Nadeau, daughter of Fred E. and Angel (Martin) 
Nadeau« Mrs. Le Boeuf was a graduate of Salem 
Normal School, and a successful school teacher be- 
fore her marriage. They are the parents of five 
children: Jeannette Marie, George Henry, Alfred T. 
Jr., James Henry, and Margaret J. 

Outside of his professional and home life. Dr. 
Le Boeuf is a man of broad and far-reaching in- 
terests. He is a member of the Salem Grolf Club, 
and takes much needed relaxation on the links. 
He is a member of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, and active in all its work. He is a Re- 
publican by political affiliation, but while never 
seeking nor accepting office, he is devoted to the 
principles of the party. He gave largely of his time 
to the welfare work in connection with the recent 
Worid War, particularly in the Y. M. C. A. drives. 
Dr. Le Boeuf is a member of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society, and of the American Medical As- 
sociation; he is a member of the Catholic Order of 
Foresters, of which he is examining physician; a 
member of the Washington Associates; the Artix- 
ans; and St. Jean le Baptiste; being examining phy- 
sician also, of the two latter. He is on the staff 
of the Salem Hospital. The Le Boeuf family have 
always been devout members of the Roman CathoUe 
church. 



GEORGE WBLTON PITMAN— In the worid of 
construction the breadth of opportunity is limitless, 
and in Salem, Massachusetts, the Pitman it Brown 
Company, contractors and builders, are placing the 
stamp of high achievement on the visible records 
of progress. 

George Welton Pitman, the head of this great 
concern, is of English descent, and is a son of 
George Trefy and Elixa (Welton) Pitman. The 
elder Mr. Pitman was bom in Yarmouth county. 
Nova Scotia, and his wife was bom in Annapolis 
county, Nova Scotia. Both are now deceased. 

George Welton Pitman was bom in Yarmouth 
county. Nova Scotia, on October 26, 1856. Edu- 
cated in the public schools of Yarmouth, and com- 
pleting his studies at the age of sixteen years, he 
began woric at the carpenter's trade, and thor- 
oughly mastered its details. But from childhood 



86 



ESSEX COUNTY 



the boy had possessed a love of adventure, and at 
nineteen years of age he accomplished the realiza- 
tion of a long-chezished dream, by going to sea. 
He started before the mast, then later became ship's 
carpenter, and studying navigation, finally became 
first mate. He followed the sea for three years, 
during which time he was in the Western Ocean 
and West India trade. At the end of this time he 
married, and his people persuaded him to relinquish 
the roving and hazardous life of the sea. 

In the year 1879 Mr. Pitman came to Salem, 
Massachusetts, aiid became associated with the firm 
of Hamilton & Balcomb, contractors and builders, 
Mr. Hamilton being Mrs. Pitman's uncle. Here he 
worked at his trade as journeyman, and gradually 
worked up until he held the position of foreman and 
superintendent. It was under Mr. Pitman's man- 
agement as superintendent that the firm of Hamil- 
ton A Balcomb built the new Salem Court House, 
the Salem Jail, and the Peabody Town Hall. Mr. 
Pitman's association with this company continued 
for a period of ten years, and in thstt time he 
gained a wealth of experience which he later found 
of the utmost value. 

In April, 1889, Mr. Pitman started in the line of 
contracting and building for himself. But although 
he was beginning as an independent contractor, he 
was prepured for important work by his experience 
with the other concern. His first job was the Win- 
negan Hotel, at Baker's Island, in Salem Harbor, at 
that time considered the leading hotel of its kind in 
this vicinity. In August of the same year Mr. 
Charles W. Brown was admitted to the firm, and 
for a number of years it was continued as a part- 
nership. 

The mill and yard, during the early years of the 
firm's history, were located on Derby street. Their 
facilities were limited, and they did only the car- 
penter work, subletting the masonry and other 
branches of construction. But Uiey grew rapidly, 
and soon began to buy lumber in car load lots. 
They added machinery and milling equipment, and 
began building their own doors and windows and 
producing all their mill work. Later they broad- 
ened the scope of their work, and handled every 
branch of construction except the plumbing and 
electrical installation. The growth of the business 
was steady as well as rapid, and the firm long since 
became a power in this field of endeavor. It was 
incorporated in 1905, and felt the impetus of the 
new form of organization going forward to ever 
increasing success. 

But the history of the Pitman & Brown Company 
was not without its period of disaster and discour- 
agement. Their first location, at 249 to 255 Derby 
street, was in the path of the terrific conflagration 
of 1914, and the plant was completely wiped out. 
Relocating immediately, at 40 Bridge street, the 
company made this calamity a means of further 
growth and development. In rebuilding they in- 
creased their facilities to include the manufacture 
of all lines of builders' materials, and extended their 
scope, and now they handle paint, roofing, cement. 



lime, and all other materials that go into the con- 
struction of a modem building. At the yard and 
mill plant they now employ more than seventy-five 
men, and at the office and salesroom, which is lo* 
cated on Washington street, an office force is em- 
ployed which numbers seventy-five more people, 
men and girls. In 1919 Mr. Pitman purchased the 
holdings of Mr. Brown, but the firm name remains 
the same. Mr. Pitman is now president and treas- 
urer of the company. 

The part which the Pitman A Brown Company 
has borne in the growth and development of Salem, 
and in fact, of the county of Essex, is one in which 
they may well take pride. The long list of indus- 
trial buildings to their credit, includes factories at 
Salem, Beverly, Peabody, and Danversport, in Es- 
sex county, others at Revere and Waltham, in ad- 
jacent counties, and still others as far away as Win- 
chester, New Hampshire. They have erected many 
of the most important business structures in and 
about Salem, including the Rogers building, Bever- 
ly, with its imposing street front, the attractive 
mercaatfle establishment of Daniel Low A Company, 
with fixtures complete, the splendid building of the 
Naumkeag Trust Company, the Gifford-Padcard 
Block, and very many others. Among the note- 
worthy structures of varied character, should be 
mentioned the Masonic Temple at Salem, the main 
lodge room of which is said to be one of the 
most beautiful lodge rooms in the country, the 
Massachusetts State Armory, at Salem, and the 
Witch and Plaza theatres. It would be impossible 
to do justice to their work in any review of tliia 
compass. 

One of the recent developments in the construc- 
tion line which the Pitman Sl Brown Company is 
featuring, is the standardized dwelling, of which 
the company is building hundreds. They are made 
in two types, small single family houses, and larger 
houses designed to accommodate two families. 
They are of standardized construction, and all the 
lumber ia cut at the mill, and delivered by( motor 
truck ready to set up in place. This minimizes 
waste and economizes time. The houses are of a 
substantial type, and are designed by a Boston aiv 
chitect whose experience muSces them models of 
convenience and comfort They are bidng built 
everywhere within reach of the companir's plant, 
a recent trip of delivery taking one of the trucks 
thirty-one hours' run out of Salem. 

As the head of this great business, Mr. Pitman 
is, of necessity constantly in the public eye, and 
has been called upon many times to lend his ability 
to some cause which involved the public welfare. 
During the World War the entire plant of the com- 
pany was turned over to the Government for the 
manufacture of all wood parts of airplanes. At 
that time Mr. Pitman was a member of the Salem 
Committee in charge of labor conditions, securing 
labor for the industries of the city, and after the 
war, finding work for discharged men. 

Mr. Pitman is vice-president and one of the di- 
rectors of the Morris Plan Bank, and also a director 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



87 



of the Salem Co-Operative Bank. He was a mem- 
ber of the Common Council of Salem, and is now 
a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

In fraternal and social circles Mr. Pitman is wide- 
ly known. He is a member of all the Masonic 
bodies, in which order he holds the Thirty-eecond 
degree. He is also a member of the Ancient Arabic 
Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and of the 
Masonic Club. He is a member of the Salem Club, 
of the Colonial Club, and of the Rotary Club. 

Mr. Pitman married Ettie Meade Allen, daughter 
of William and Fannie (Hibbard) Allen, of Yar- 
mouth county. Nova Scotia. They had three chil- 
dren: Mabel; Oscar; and George; all of whom were 
lost in the diphtheria epidemic. They adopted a son, 
George Melvin, now seventeen years of age and a 
student at the Salem High School. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pitman are members of the Lafayette Street Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, of Salem, of which society 
Mr. Pitman is a trustee. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SPINNEY— After a 
long and useful life in manufacturing and financial 
worlds of Essex county, Massachusetts, Benjamin 
^tenklin Spinney is now retired from all direct par- 
ticipation in business aifairs, but is often sought in 
an advisory capacity by thei interests in which he 
was so long an active factor. 

Mr. Spinney was bom in Taunton, Massachusetts, 
September 1, 1832, and is a son of Benjamin and 
Mary B. Spinney, both long since deceased. His 
father was one of the early shoe men of that sec- 
tion. As a boy Mr. Spinney attended the public 
schools of Taunton, also Bristol Academy of that 
city, and the Taunton High School. Undoubtedly 
his father's business had its influence in governing 
the trend of his career, for when his education 
was completed the young man entered the shoe 
business as a manufacturer. He continued thus 
without interruption until year 1918, about seven- 
ty years of activity in one of the most practical 
avenues of effort Retiring in 1918, Mr. Spinney 
has lived in retirement, although he has still held 
an interest in various enterprises. But the manage- 
ment of all his interests he has turned over into 
other hands. 

For many years Mr. Spinney has been an honored 
officer of various financial institutions. He was a 
director in the First National Bank of Lynn, now 
the Essex Trust Company, for sevezal years, and 
also trustee and vice-president for several years of 
the Lynn Institution for Savings. He was one of 
the organizers, and for nearly thirty-five years 
president, of the National Security Bank of Lynn, 
and its successor, the Security Trust Company, 
retiring therefrom in 1917. Mr. Spinney is a mem- 
ber of the Oxford Club and many minor clubs, and 
is a member of the First Universalist Church of 
Lynn. 

On November 2, 1858, Mr. Spinney married 
Sarah Caswell, daughter of Samuel and Nancy Cas- 
well, and their only child, Frank Caswell Spinney, 
who was bom December 14, 1864, is now reftetd* 



DEERY BROTHERS — The firm Deeiy Brothers 
was started in 1907, for the manufacture of all kinds 
of split leather, the partners being John A* and 
Edward F. Deery. ^The original plant of the com- 
pany was located on Goodue street, Salem, and for 
fourteen years the business haa been located at the 
same address. The firm is a member of Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, and has won a secure posi- 
tion in the business world. The Deery Brothers 
are sons of John Deery, of Salem, Massachusetts. 

John A. Deery was bom June 26, 1886, in Salem, 
Massachusetts, was educated in Salem public 
schools, and there has ever resided. He is a partner 
of Deery Brothers of Salem, a director of the Fed- 
eral Trust Company of Boston, director of the 
Farmington'Shoe Company of Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, and is a member of the Trust Fund Com- 
mission of the city of Salem. 

Edward F. Deery was bom in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, April 10, 1888, and was there educated in the 
public schools. He is a member of St. James Rom- 
an Catholic Church, and of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, and Ancient Order of Hibernians. The brothers 
are successful business men, and are popular soci- 
ally. In politics they are Democrats, and interested 
in public affairs. 



WILLIAM F. GERRY, of Lynnfield, son of El- 
bridge F. Gerry, comes of one of the New England 
families of distinguished Revolutionary and early 
Republican record. Perhaps the most noted of this 
name, but not of this direct line, was Elbridge Gexry 
(1744-1814), who became vice-president of the 
United States. This distinguished man was bom 
in Massachusetts, was a membeir of the Massachu- 
setts Colonial House of Representatives from 1772 
to 1775, and a delegate to the Continental Congress 
from 1776 to 1780, and from 1788 to 1785. He 
signed the Declaration of Independence and aided 
in framing the Constitution, but refused to sign it, 
believing that too great powers were delegated to 
the National Government. He was elected a repre- 
sentative from Massachusetts to the first U. S. Con- 
gress in 1789 and served till 1798. He was a spec- 
ial commissioner to France in 1797 with Pinclmey 
and Marshall, and was elected governor of Massa- 
chusetts in 1810, serving for two years. He was 
elected vice-president of the United States in 1812, 
as a Democrat, and served until his death in 1814. 
There are many branches of the old Gerry family of 
Massachusetts. To one of the branches belongs the 
present United States Senator Peter G. Gerry, of 
Rhode Island. The branch to which William F. 
Gerry belongs has held residence in Massachusetts 
throughout the generations. Elbridge F. €rerry, 
father of William F., was born in Lymifleld, Mass., 
in 1850, and in 1872 established a business in Lynn- 
field which is still conducted. Since 1872 Elbridge 
F. Gerry has operated his cider and vinegar mill 
there, and tiie firm of E. F. Gerry Company, manu- 
facturers of apple juice and dder vinegar, is widely 
known throughout New England. In fact, the com- 
pany's products go to almost all parts of the United 



38 



ESSEX COUNTY 



States, and the £• F. Gerry Company is said to be 
one of the largest producers of eider vinegar and 
kindred products in the East. Elbridge F. Gerry 
established his cider mill on Hhe site of the old 
woolen and grist mill at Lynnfield. This property 
gives the company control of the water rights of 
Filling's Pond, a dam having been erected in 1848 
directly in the rear of the present mill, and from it 
the water is supplied to the present plant for power. 
At one time, the Gerrys did business in Barberry 
root, which was gathered extensively for tanning 
purposes, but the business in this root was discon- 
tinued soon after aniline dyes came into use by 
tanners. Elbridge F. Gerry, though now in his 
seventy-second year, still maintains an active inter- 
est in the cider mill. He married Jennie F. Won- 
son, of East Gloucester, Mass. She died in 1907. 

William F. Gerry was bom in Lynnfleld, 
Massachusetts, on April 18, 1881, and began his 
education in the public schools of his native 
place. He graduated in 1900 from the Wakefield 
High School, soon after becoming a student at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating 
in the class of 1904. He gained fmether engineer- 
ing knowledge during the eighteen months be spent 
in the Baldwin Locomotive Works, at Philadelphia, 
Pa., whither he went soon after graduating. 
In 1906, however, he returned to Lyimfield, and 
became associated with his father in the vinegar 
manufacturing enterprise the latter had brought to 
such dimensions. The two have been associated in 
the business ever since. The company was incor- 
porated in 1910 under the name of the £. F. Gerry 
Company, Wm. F. Geny, president, E. F. Gerry, 
treasurer, £. H. Gerry, clerk, and while the father 
still is comparatively active in the business, the 
burden of it has probably been assumed during 
recent years by the sons. At all events, the enter- 
prise is a growing one, and while the old woolen, 
grist and cider mill is a familiar landmark in Lynn- 
field and leads thoughts backixnEird, the business con- 
ducted by the Gerrys is still one of the chief indus- 
tries of the town. 

William F. Gerry has shown a great interest 
in the public affairs of his native place. His 
brother, Elbridge H., has for the past six years 
been trustee of Lynnfleld Public Library. He is 
identifled with the Masonic order, belonging to the 
local Blue Lodge, and to the Eastern Star. He also 
m ai n ta in s membership in the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology Alumni Association. 

He was married on January 29, 1909, to S. Ethel 
Haynes, of Danvers, Mass., daughter of Joseph W. 
and Emma P. (Ordovan) Haynes. The mother of 
Mrs. Gerry is still living, and was originally of a 
Newburyport, Mass., family; her father, Joseph W. 
Haynes, was of Charlestown. He was a CivU War 
veteran, and died in 1917. Mr. and Mrs. William F. 
Gerry have two children: Elbridge F., 2nd, who 
was bom in 1911; and Roger H^ bom in 1916. 

EUGENE MALCOLM DOLLOFF, M. D.— Dr. 
DoUoff has by years of arduous devotion to the ad- 



vancement of the medical profession and tixdess en- 
deavor for the relief of suffering humanity placed 
himself in the front rank of the city's physidans. 
His record forms part of the medical annals of 
Lynn. 

Eugene Malcolm DoUoff was bom in Lebanon, 
New Hampshire, September 9, 1867, the son of John 
E. and Rowena Maria (Holbrook) Dolloff. His pre- 
liminary education was obtained in the public 
schools of St. Johnsbury, Vermont, after v^ch he 
entered St. Johnsbury academy where he prepared 
himself for college, and from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1886. Having at first decided to adopt the 
law as a profession he matriculated in the law de- 
partment of Boston University where he remained 
for but one year when he decided to change to the 
medical profession and accordingly entered the med- 
ical department of this university, from which he 
was graduated wiUi the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in the class of 1898. Immediately after gradu- 
ation he went to Rockport, Massachusetts, where he 
engaged in the practice of his chosen profession for 
three years, subsequently coming to Lynn, where 
since tiiat time he has continued in the practice of 
medicine, holding the high esteem of his professional 
brethren and gaining for himself an ever increas- 
ing clientele. He is a member of the Lynn Medical 
fraternity. 

Upon our entrance in the World War Dr. Dolloff 
enlisted in the medical cozps of the United States 
army. He was commissioned flr^ lieutenant and 
was first stationed at Fort Strong, then at Fort 
Warren, but later was transferred to the Common- 
wealth armory at Boston, Massachusetts. On De- 
cember 12, 1918, he was ordered to Camp Devens, 
where he received the commission of captain and 
was honorably discharged from the service in June, 
1919, with the rank of major in the Reserve Corps. 
In religion Dr. DoUoff is a Methodist and attends 
St. Paul's Church of this denomination at Lynn. 

On September 25, 1889, Eugene Malcolm Dolloff 
was united in marriage with Mary Elisabeth Grow, 
daughter of T. R. Grow, a physician at Roclqiort. 
To Dr. and Mrs. Dolloff have been bom three chil- 
dren: Vema Haxel, who married Howard C. Rogers, 
an officer in the service of the merchant marine; 
Irving Holbrook, who served overseas during the 
World War, with Field Hospital, third division; 
Malcolm H. G., deceased. 



GEORGE HENRY PLUMMBR— With his life- 
long business interest allied with the shoe trade, 
George H. Plummer, of Lynn, Massachusetts, stands 
now as one of the successful men of this city. 

Mr. Plummer was bom in Lynn, July 20, 1861, 
and is a son of George H. and Susan E. (Harris) 
Plummer. His father was bom in Salenu Receiv- 
ing his education in the schools of his native city, 
Mr. Plummer, while still a young man, entered the 
field in which he has made so marked a success, the 
manufacture of paper and wood boxes for the shoe 
trade. Beginning in a modest way» he has devel- 
oped a very extensive interest, and now has a large 



Cugene 3^. ©olloff 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



39 



plant, equipped with all the modem devices for turn- 
ing out the work in hand. In connection with this, 
hid leading interest, Mr. Plummer is also a director 
of the Bartlett & Somers Company, one of the lead- 
ing concerns in the manufacture of shoes in Lynn. 
Mr. Plummer is also a director of the Manufactur- 
ers' Bank, of which institution he was one of the 
founders. 

Mr. Plummer, in company with the late William 
Littlefield, built the Lynn Theatre. They also 
bought the Music Hall and were identified with 
amusement enterprises in these two houses for over 
twenty years. The Lynn Theatre has since been 
taken over by other parties and is now known as 
the Waldorf Theatre. Mr. Plummer and Mr. Little- 
field were also business partners in several success- 
ful enterprises, being associated with each other for 
a great many years. Mr. Plummer is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd FeUows, and is a 
member of the Oxford Club. 

Mr. Plummer married Susan M. Moulton, daugh- 
ter of Frederick A. Moulton, a prominent Baptist 
minister. Mrs. Plummer is a leader in Lynn social 
circles. To Mr. and Mrs. Plummer a son was bom, 
Henry E., who married Ethel Harmon, of Boston, 
and they are the parents of three daughters: Pris- 
cilla, Catharine, and Elizabeth. They all reside with 
their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Plununer. 
Henry E. Plummer is a thirty-second degree Mason. 



GEORGE H. STACKPOLE ^ For forty-seven 
years at the head of one of the most prominent ice 
concerns in Lynn, Massachusetts, George H. Stack- 
pole has for an even longer period been a force for 
progress in the business and civic life of Lynn. 

Mr. Stackpole was bom in Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, September 7, 1843, and is a son of Timothy 
and Elizabeth G. (Hurd) Stackpole. Receiving a 
very limited education in the public schools, the boy 
entered the world of industry at the age of eight 
years. His first work was sewing shoes, at Emery 
Mills, Maine, where the family lived at the time. 
Remaining there for three or four years, they re- 
turned to Dover, then, in 1859, the family came to 
Lynn, the boy accompanying them, and he has since 
made his home in this dty. It was as a young man 
of twenty that he enlisted in defense of the Union 
and served throu^ the Civil War. Returning to 
Lynn after the cessation of hostilities, he continued 
as a shoe worker until 1872, when he started as a 
manufacturer of shoes. In 1874 he permanently re- 
tired from this field of endeavor and was one of 
seven men to start the old Lynn Ice Company, of 
which he has been president for the past twenty- 
five years. The North Shore Ice Company was or- 
ganized in 1913, Mr. Stackpole being its president 
from the start, and so continues, actively interested 
in the management of the company's affairs, al- 
though nearly seventy-eight years of age. 

In the public life of the dty Mr. Stackpole has 
long been prominent, and although never seeking 
public honors, was twice persuaded to accept office, 
once in the city government, where he served for a 



period of three years, and as representative to the 
State Legislature for two years, 1900 and 1901. Mr. 
Stackpole has been a member of the Bay State 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, for fifty 
years. He is a member of Post' No. 5, Grand Army 
of the Republic, one of the few left to recaU the 
struggle between the North and South. He is also 
a member of the Park Club. 

On December 7, 1865, Mr. Stackpole married 
Mary A. Harwood, daughter of David Harwood, and 
they are the parents of two children: Charles Vas- 
sar; and Mabel E., now the wife of Prescott New- 
hall. 

STEPHENSON & OSBORNE— Since 1911 this 
firm, manufacturers of women's cut soles, has been 
among Lynn's successful industries. It was found- 
ed in that year by William R. C. Stephenson and 
Jackson W. Osborne (see sketch following), both 
with many years of experience in the cut sole busi- 
ness. 

William R. C. Stephenson, the senior member of 
the firm, Stephenson & Osborne, was bom Septem- 
ber 12, 1868, at East Orange, New Jersey, son of 
Edward H. and Charlotte M. (Beers) Stephenson, 
and was educated in private schools at Orange. At 
the age of sixteen years he went to work as an 
office boy in New York City with leather mer- 
chants, and in 1898 came to Boston^ removing 
thence to Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1902. From the 
latter year until 1911, the year in which the com- 
pany was formed, Mr. Stephenson was a salesman 
for leather merchants. 

Mr. Stephenson married, November 13, 1910, Sarah 
E. Clough, of Lynn, daughter of Micajah and Har- 
riet (Kelley) Clough, and their children are: Sarah 
E., bom September 18, 1911; and Eleanor B., bom 
December 9, 1912. Mr. Stephenson's clubs are the 
Tedesco and the Algonquin, and he is also a mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce. 



JACKSON W. OSBORNE, junior member of the 
firm of Stephenson & Osborne, was bom in Ro- 
chester, New York, April 20, 1882, son of Edward 
and Sarah Jane (Hicks) Osbome. He attended the 
public schools and at the age of fifteen years was 
employed in a leather store, where he continued for 
a year. In the fall of 1898 he came to Boston and 
was employed as a salesman for a merchant deal- 
ing in leather and cut^soles. After six years, Mr. 
Osbome became associated with a Lynn manufac- 
turer, where he remained until 1911, in which year 
the partnership with Mr. Stephenson (see preceding 
sketch) was formed and which has successfully con- 
tinued since that time. 

Mr. Osbome is a member of Hiram Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Menotomy, Royal Arch 
Chapter; the Winchester Country Club; the Nashua 
Country Club; the Middlesex Sportsmen's Associa- 
tion; and the Lynn Chamber of Commerce. With 
his family Mr. Osbome attends the Episcopal church 
of Arlington. 

Mr. Osbome married, October 29, 1902, Jane L. 



40 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Stentiford, daughter of Frederick H. and Mary 
(Wales) Stentiford» and their children are: Dolores, 
bom November 28, 1903; and Elizabeth J., bom No- 
vember 25, 1909. 



THE HYGRADB LAMP COMPANY— Of the 
many industries which go to make up the present 
business supremacy of Salem, Massachusetts, one 
of the most rapidly growing concerns Is the Hy- 
grade Lamp Company, manufacturers of incandes- 
cent lamps. The personnel of this company com- 
prises a group of men who have built- out of noth- 
ing the progressive industry which has become a 
significant factor in the prosperity of this city: Mr. 
E. J. Poor, president and sales manager; Mr. F. A. 
Poor, treasurer and general manager; Mr. W. E. 
Poor, assistant general manager, and Mr. J. H. Poor, 
director. 

The beginnings of this industry were of the small- 
est and most uniiromising. The capital amounted 
to three thousand five hundred dollars, obtained 
from the sale of a hay and grain business which 
Mr. Frank A. Poor had conducted for a few years 
theretofore, on the comer of Front and Central 
streets, in Salem. This money he invested, in 1901, 
in ^e original project, in Middleton, Massachu- 
aetts, under the name of the Merritt Manufacturing 
Company, with Matthew Meiritt as one of the 
owners of the company. The business of this com- 
pany was the refilling or renewing of carbon in- 
candescent electric lamps, and the processes used 
had been originated and developed by Mr. Merritt, 
the pioneer of this idea in Essex county. With 
the eadsting facilities the work handled amounted 
to only about five hundred lamps a day, and those 
of inferior quality. At this point most men would 
have dropped the idea, counting himself fortunate 
to have lost no more. Not so the man who has 
since vindicated his faith in himself and in the fu- 
ture. Mr. Poor bought Mr. Merritt's interests, re- 
moved the plant to Danvers, in this county, and 
changed the name to the Bay State Lamp Company. 
The location he secured was an old shoe factory 
on Hobart street. 

Alone now, as head of the enterprise, with a 
working force of about fifteen individuals, Frank 
A. Poor carried along all the duties which now 
require twenty ofiicers and department heads — ^from 
president to shipper. Struggling for footing in 
an indifferent market, with inferior equipment and 
inefficient processes, the young man, who had only 
recently reached majority, hung on. After months 
he ventured to allow himself a salary of ten dol- 
lars per week. 

The gains were desperately slow. By 1904 the 
output had grown to about a thousand lamps a day, 
and the force had increased to twenty people, the 
financial limitations of the concern enforcing an 
annual shut-down of some months during the dull 
season. At this point Edward J. Poor, Mr. Poor's 
brother, who had just been graduated from the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, came in to 
help out. He relieved Mr. Poor of the rougher 



work, such as unpacking' and sorting buzned-oiit 
lamps, and packing the finished product, then as 
winter came on, acting as fireman, and starting the 
old, erratic gasoline engine which furnished the 
power, when it could be persuaded to perform this 
function. 

The years of struggle, which hold a certain grim 
humor in retrospect, eventually carried the gallant 
little enterprise to a secure foundation. Mr. Poor's 
efforts improved the product, and expansion be- 
came feasible, although a severe illness had kept 
his brother out of active participation in the buai* 
ness for a long time. Up to 1909 the business had 
been along repair or renewing lines exclusively, and 
Mr. Poor fdt that the orignial production was a 
field which would give greater returns for effort, 
and in many ways be far better worth while. 

Accordingly, in 1909, Mr. Poor began the manu- 
facture of new carbon lamps. To avoid the pos- 
sibility of mistaken inferences on the part of the 
public, a new name was chosen for the new ven- 
ture, and the Hygrade Incandescent Lamp Company 
was formed, with its trademark duly protected. Ex- 
pert help was added to the working force, and the 
factory enlarged, the fioor space being nearly 
doubled. Mr. E. J. Poor's health, meanwhile, had 
permitted his return, and prosperity became an 
assured fact, even though still in a modeet degree. 
Then Mr. Joseph H. Poor, who had retired, after 
thirty years in the leather business, dropped in upon 
his sons occasionidly, finally joining them. Soon 
after, Mr. Walter E. Poor, another brother, having 
comiideted a course in Electrical Engineering, at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, came into 
the company. 

This, in a way, marked an era in the progress 
of the company. Walter E. Poor took charge of 
the manufacture of the tungsten lamps, which were 
now becoming a revolutionary factor in the elec- 
tric lighting world. His advoca,cy of limited pro- 
duction and superior quality was adopted as a 
permanent and inviolable policy, and the refilling 
of old lamps was discontinued. Walter £. Poor's 
activities along the line of development of the 
tungsten lamp placed the Hygrade name in its rights 
ful place on the market. From one point in New 
York City, on Tunes Square, nearly thirty-thousand 
Hygrade lamps were visible, in 1912, in electric 
signs. A little later the manufacture of carbon 
lamps was discontinued. The production had now 
reached 7,500 lamps per day, all tungsten, vacuum 
and gas-fiUed types. With the unsettled conditions 
In Europe and the impossibility of obtaining the 
tungsten filament wire, experts were added to the 
force, and this wire became a part of the regular 
product of the plant, and proved to be of a quality 
superior to any foreign make. 

All these steps spelled progress. The sales force 
had become an organization in itself, and one com- 
posed of the best men in that line of endeavor. 
The constantly increasing demand for the Hygrade 
product necessitated more commodious and mod- 
em quarters. In 1915 a site was chosen in Salem, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



41 



and a factory built to plans especially adopted to 
the requirements of this concern, and on Friday 
niflrht, of the 19th of Febroary, 1916, the work of 
transfer was begun. This date was utilized on ac- 
count of the holiday on the following Monday. On 
Tuesday morning, at the usual starting hour, the 
Mount Department, the first moved, was in full 
operation, and its production for the day was the 
largest then on record. Another department was in 
full operation at noon, and thereafter, each day 
during that week a department was moved, in 
most cases the operators leaving their machines 
at night in Danvers, and finding them ready for 
operation in Salem the next morning. The actual 
production loss for the month of February in that 
year, was not more than one 6ay*B work. 

In 1916 the Hygrade lamps were tendered a 
most flattering endorsement in being chosen for 
the entire lighting equipment of the new six mil- 
lion dollar buildings of the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, in Boston. In 1917 it became neces- 
sary to secure more space, and a two-story brick 
storehouse was erected on land adjoining the plant. 
With even this addition the plant is rapidly becom- 
ing unequal to the demands of production, and more 
land has been purchased for future expansion. 

During the War the Hygrade people gave their 
quota in men and money, to the great Cause of 
Humanity. Although the exigencies of the time 
caused more or less occasion for roidjustment, 
every emergency has been met, and the production 
has not suffered materially in volume, nor has it 
suffered one whit in quality. 

The company has grown to the production of 
twenty-five thousand lamps a day, with an ulti- 
mate capacity of about thirty-two thousand, and 
these number two hundred and fifty-two types. The 
process of manufacture is an interesting story in 
itself, which must, however, so far as &is review 
is concerned, be relegated to the realm of the tech- 
nical, for it is of men and their achievements, that 
the biographer makes record. 

And the personal side of this story is its most 
interesting and significant side. Between the man- 
agement and their force of nearly four hundred 
employees, the most cordial relations exist. Every 
advantage which modem science has devised, is 
given to the employees. Their health, safety, com- 
fort and happiness are the constant care of the 
management. The buildings are constructed with 
the most modem system of ventilation and every 
possible provision for the comfort and safety of 
the workers. There is an Employees' Association 
having a membership of 94.4% of the employees, 
which pays a death benefit of $500.00, and a sick 
benefit of ten dollars weekly. This organization also 
provides many social and other diversions. A res- 
taurant is maintained, which is patronized by fully 
eighty per cent, of the employees, there is a com- 
modious hospital and rest room, in charge of a 
competent nurse, and the employees are encouraged 
to bring even the slightest injury or accident to 
the ho^tal for treatment. 



Perhaps the greatest factor in cementing rela- 
tions between the workers and the employers is 
the handsome little magazine, called the ''Hygrade 
Triangle," which is published once each month, for 
distribution among the employees and a few in- 
terested friends. The employees themselves con- 
stitute the editorial and reportorial force, and are 
contributors, and through this organ the manage- 
ment keep in touch with the live issues of the day 
in the production departments. Through it also the 
management solicits suggestions which will in any 
way advance the efficiency of the force, or add to 
their comfort. 

In short, while the Hygrade Incandescent Lamp 
Company is one of the younger of the more impor- 
tant industries of Salem, it is exemplifying, in its 
daily progress, all those principles of ovganiaed 
effort and industrial progress which count so far 
toward civic . betterment, the safeguarding of the 
Commonwealth, and enduring National security. 



WALTER GRAY PHIPPm^, M. D.— Broad- 
ly active in many branches of medical science, and 
one of the most successful physicians of the day hi 
Essex county, Massachusetts, the history of Dr. 
Walter Gray Phippen, is of great interest to all, 
who give even passing attention to the progress 
of thmpeutics. 

Dr. Phippen was bom in Salem, Massachusetts, on 
December 25, 1876, and is a son of Arthur H. and 
Mazy E. (Chamberlin) Phippen. Mr. Phippen is a 
director of the Merchants' National Bank of this 
city, and prominent in financial affairs. 

As a boy Dr. Phippen attended the public schools 
of Salem, and prepared for college at the Salem 
High School, from which he was graduated in 1900. 
Thereafter he entered Harvard Medical School, 
from which he was graduated in 1904, with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. Beginning his hos- 
pital experience at the Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital, in Boston, he acted as surgeon interne for 
two years. In 1906, after his marriage, the doetor 
went abroad, and spent one year in study at the 
Vienna Medical University. Returning to SUeniy he 
entered upon the general practice of medicine In 
1907. Since the beginning of his practice the doc- 
tor has been connected with the Salem Hospital, 
first on the out-patient staff, and later, since 1914, 
as visiting surgeon. 

After the devastating fire which swept the dty 
of Salem in 1914, Dr. Phippen was chairman of 
the sub-committee on health, an auxiliary branch 
of the Salem Board of Health. The work of this 
committee .comprised the oversight of the great 
number of homdess families for whose accommoda- 
tion, hundreds of tents had been erected. Under 
these abnormal living conditions on such a large 
scale, the problem of keeping the people in health, 
and avoiding the possibility of epidemics, held the 
attention of the foremost physicians of the day in 
Salem, and their work in this connection, under Dr. 
Phippen's leadership, carried the city through this 
crucial period. 



42 



ESSEX COUNTY 



In 1907 Dr. Phippen became interested in the anti- 
tubercular work in Salem, and he baa since assisted 
.greatly in this crusade. He is associated with the 
Medical Tubercular Dispensary and Camp at ''The 
Willows/' and is also a member of the executive 
committee of the Massachusetts Tubercular League, 
"with which he has been connected for a number of 
years. He is visiting physician at the North Shore 
Baby Hospital, and is consulting surgeon of the 
Cable Memorial Hospital. He is a member of the 
American Medical Association; of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society; and has been president of 
the Essex South District Medical Society. He is 
mlso a member of the Aesculapian Club, of Boston, 
t>ne of the leading medical dubs of that city. 

In his more personal interests. Dr. Phippen's 
tastes are clearly revealed. He is a fellow of the 
College of Surgery and the American Colonial So- 
ciety, is a memlMnr of the Union Club of Boston, 
and of the Salem Club, of which he is also ex- 
president. He is a member of the Salem Golf Club, 
and of the Laurentlan Club, a Canadian hunting 
and fishing dub. Besides the doctor's channing 
home in SiUeniy he has a country place at Oster- 
viUe, Massachusetts, in the f^unous Barnstable 
county, which he has named ''Wyndway.'' 

In 1906 Dr. Walter Gray Phippen married Ethel 
Arnold Patch, daughter of Moiris B. Patch and 
Emily (White) Patch, of Buffalo, New York. Their 
adopted son, Robert Jardaine Phippen, was bom on 
August 81, 1916. Dr. Phippen is a member of the 
Tabemade Society, and Mrs. Phippen is a member 
of Gitice Church. 

ROBERT WILLIS CAVBRLY was born in Straf- 
ford, New Hampshire, on October 21, 1875, son of 
Seth W. and Asenath A (Boody) Caverly of that 
place. Seth W. Caverly was a farmer in New 
Hampshire and later a builder in Massachusetts. 
He died in 1905, his wife surviving him for thir- 
teen years, her death coming in 1918. For many 
years prior to their death they had resided in Lynn, 
and their children, three boys and three girls, with 
the exception of Robert W., were mainly educated 
in New Hampshire schools, Robert W. passing 
through the Lynn Classical High School, graduating 
with the class of 1893. Thereafter, for nineteen 
years, he was identified with the grocery trade, dur- 
ing that time being connected with several firms of 
wholesale grocers. In 1912, Mr. Caverly organised 
the Caverly-Plummer Company. At the outset the 
company seemed to mainly deal in specialties of the 
preserved products branch of wholesale groceries, 
but the company in reality originated in the wish 
of Mr. Caverly to market a leavening powder which 
he had invented. In course of time this product, 
which was put on the market branded with an "R" 
endosed in a drde, came into wide demand, and 
in time the volume of business done in drde R com- 
pound tartar made it clear that all other lines 
handled by the company should be eliminated, and 
aU efforts concentrated on the manufacture of tar- 
tar. The company's business place at first was on 



Union street, Lynn, but on June 1, 1919, larger 
quarters were taken at No. 16 Federal street, Lynn, 
which has since been the company's address. 

Mr. Caverly has shown much interest in the 
public affairs of Lynn, and has manifested definite 
powers of initiative. He has been among the lead- 
ers in several public movements in Lynn during re- 
cent years, and he has become distinctly popular, 
especially among members of the local Rotary Club, 
of which he is president. In that organization of 
business men he ranks high, not necessarily because 
of his present official position, but probably be- 
cause he is recognized as a man of action, up-toniate 
and sound in matters of business. His personality 
also is genial and entertaining. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Oxford Club. 

Mr. Caverly married, in 1904, Maude E. Nichols, 
daughter of John H. and Clara (Libby) Nichols, of 
Lynn. Mr. Nichols died in 1907, and his widow in 
1918. Mr. and Mrs. Caverly have one child, a son, 
Donald B., who was bom in 1907, and now is a high 
school junior. 

WALTER EVERETT SYMONDS, vwhose death, 
April 4, 1906, deprived his native State, Massachu- 
setts, of one of its most prominent dtizens, and a 
foremost figure in the industrial world, was a mem- 
ber of a family which from a very early date has 
been identified with the history of Essex county. 
The Symonds family originated in Hampshire, Eng- 
land, and the immigrant ancestor, John Symonds, 
was bom there in 1616, and died in 1671, at Salem, 
Massachusetts. He sailed in 1636 in the ''Peter 
Bonaventure," and two years later joined the Salem 
Church, being made a freeman the same year. By 
occupation he was a carpenter, and the Christian 
name of his wife was Elizabeth. 

His descendant, Walter Everett Symonds, was 
bom at Boston, August 18, 1844, son of Stillman 
and Olive G. (Lovell) Symonds, and until he was 
twdve years of age, he attended the Boston public 
schools. At that time his parents removed to Lynn, 
and there young Symonds attended the high school, 
and his first business position was in the dry goods 
store owned by Henry Carleton. From there he 
went to work for Benjamin Doak it Company, shoe 
manufacturers, in the capacity of bookkeeper, and 
so well did he perform his duties that in due course 
of time he was admitted to the firm, continuing until 
1889, in which year the buUding was destroyed by 
fire. 

In June of the following year Mr. Symonds was 
elected derk and treasurer of the Institute for Sav- 
ings at Lynn, and he also held the office of vice- 
president of the Five-Cent Savings Bank. Other 
finandal interests of Mr. Symonds induded a direc- 
torship with the Security Deposit and Trust Com- 
pany and director of the Essex Trust Company. In 
1891 he was dected a member of the Board of 
Aldermen, and served as clerk and inspector of Pre- 
cinct 1, Ward 4, and was also dvil service examiner. 

From 1882 to 1888 he was a trustee of the Lynn 
Library; was trustee of the Lynn Home for Aged 



I- 




-iU'U^^ 



'-^A-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



43 



Women; treasurer of the Lynn Hospital; for thirty- 
five years was treasurer of the First Universalist 
Church, and for a similar period was librarian of the 
Sunday school. He was a member of the Lynn 
Historical Society, and his clubs were the Chapin 
Club, the Park Club, and the Oxford Club, of which 
he was idce-president. 

Mr. Symonds married (first) November 9, 1870, 
Anna Maria Warren, bom August 17, 1848, died 
July 19, 1901, daughter of Asa and Cynthia P. 
(Breed) Warren. He married (second) January 12, 
1903, the sister of his first wife, Mary A. Warren, 
bom March 8, 1866. By the first marriage there 
were two children: 1. Anna Louise, bom Decem- 
ber 2, 1871; married, October 6, 1899, Charles A. 
CoUins, she the mother of a child, Helen, bom April 
20, 1918, and they also have an adopted daughter, 
Annay whom they love as their own. 2. Warren L. 
Symonds, bom July 2, 1875, who resides in New 
York City. 

JAMBS J. DONOHUS— For many years identi- 
fied with the leather industry in Essex county, 
James J. Donohue has for the greater part of his 
career been the head of the widely known firm of 
Donohue Brothers, manufacturers of chrome tanned 
calfskins. 

Mr. Donohue was bom in Ireland, September 20, 
1866, and is a son of John and Eleanor Donohue. 
Receiving his early education in his native land, 
and coming to Lynn as a boy of thirteen years, in 
1879, he made a thorough preparation for hit 
career, attending the. Whiting grammar school, then 
the English high school, then taking a practical 
course at the Lee Hall Commercial School, of 
Lynn. In 1885 he entered the employ of Donohue 
A White, leather dealers, in the capacity of sales- 
man, continuing with this concern for ten years. 
He then became affiliated with the firm of Donohue 
Brothers, and was later made president of the con- 
cem, which office he still ably fills. Mr. Donohue 
is an influential member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. In connection with his other interests Mr. 
Donohue serves as president of the State National 
Bank. He is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, of the Knights of Columbus, 
and of the Boy Scouts, and takes a deep interest 
in the progress of these organizations. 



JOHN WILSON TRASK, M. D.^One of the 
many unwritten chapters in the tale of the World 
War which the future has yet to pen is that of 
the physicians who gave their services so freely. 
When the United States entered the strife she 
found that before she could call a great soldiery 
and house them in great camps she must have a 
great body of medical men to examine them for 
fitness and afterwards to care for their health. 
It is one of the marvels of that time that so many 
freely gave up their practice, their homes, and their 
family life in answer to the nation's call. And this 
was but the beginning of sacrifice, for from the first 
this set of professional men were ill-cared for them- 



selves and constantly overworked. They were too 
few, the problems they had to meet were novel and 
difficult, and, as was to be expected, epidemics came. 
It is a fine thing to work and gain appreciation, 
but it is a far finer thing to labor unregarded, and 
often criticized, uttering no complaint, as did these 
men. 

Dr. John Wilson Trask saw service in two of this 
country's most difficult camps. He stood the hard- 
ship and work as though boni to military life. He 
won honors in the army, and when, with military 
duty done, he took up again his medical practice 
in Lynn, he received well-deserved honors from his 
community. 

Dr. Trask is a native of Philadelphia, bom there 
October 17, 1880, his father, Stephen WiUon Trask, 
and his mother, Emma Frances (Thompson) Trask, 
both of old New England families, Mr. Trask of 
Massachusetts, and Mrs. Trask of New Hampshire. 
Stephen W. Trask was a veteran of the Civil War. 
He was connected with the shoe industry all his 
life. 

The early life of Dr. Trask was spent in Lynn, 
Massachusetts, where he received his elementary 
education and graduated from the high school in 
1898. In further preparation for the profession he 
now graces he entered the University of Vermont 
and was graduated with the class of 1904. He soon 
afterward took up the practice of medicine in Lynn, 
and early rose to prominence in his profession. He 
was and is (1921) visiting physician to the Lynn 
Hospital. 

Upon the entrance of the United States into the 
World War he enlisted and served as captain in the 
Medical Department, United States army, at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, and later at the Base 
Hospital, Camp Sevier, South Carolina. Fraternally, 
Dr. Trask is affiliated with Mount Carmel Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, Lynn, Massachusetts. 
He also belongs to the Boston City and Swamps- 
cott Masonic clubs. 

On November 6, 1907, at Arlington, Massachu- 
setts, he was married to Annie Ross, daughter of 
Donald and Annie (McKay) Ross, of Nova Scotia. 
They have one daughter, Isabel Trask, bom August 
23, 1910. 

OLIVER RAYMOND HOWE — A prominent 
figure in the business life of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
since 1889 is Mr. Howe. The welfare and advance- 
ment of the city has always been uppermost in 
his mind, and from the time of his coming here he 
has espoused and given his earnest support to all 
measures calculated to advance business develoV 
ment. He is a business man of keen ability and has 
attained a high degree of success. 

Oliver Raymond Howe was bom in Andover, 
Massachusetts, September 15, 1851, the son of 
0!liver S. and Ruth Maria (Alley) Howe. Oliver S. 
Howe was for many years previous to his death, 
which occurred in 1867, a Methodist minister. The 
early education of the boy, Oliver Rasrmond, was 
obtained in the schools of the various cities where 



44 



ESSEX COUNTY 



his father preached, but later he entered Wesleyan 
Academy, at Wilbraham, Massachusetts, and was 
graduated from this institution with the class of 
1871. He was class secretary, and it is interesting 
to note here that he has continued to hold this 
office through these many years, and in June, 1921, 
arranged for the fiftieth reunion of the class. His 
first employment in the business world was with 
C. H. Delnow. Here he remained for four years, 
resigning at the end of that time and accepting a 
position with Charles O. Beede, with whom he re- 
mained for fourteen years. One week after the 
great fire which practically destroyed the city of 
Lynn, in December, 1889, Mr. Howe established 
himself in business in a small way at a temporary 
location outside of the fire ruins. In 1891 he came 
to Central Square, which has continued to be the 
location of his business throughout these many 
years. Success has attended his efforts, and at the 
present time, 1921, handles an extensive line of 
rubber clothing, footwear, rubber sundries and 
sporting goods. For these many years he has been 
the exclusive representative for one brand of rub- 
bers. Unswerving honesty and fairness has won 
for him not only the respect but the admiration of 
^his competitors, his success being in every sense of 
the word self-nmde— the result of his own indef atig^ 
able effort and his own unfailing belief in his abil- 
ity to succeed. Mr. Howe aflUiates with the Ma- 
sonic order, being a member of Mt. Carmel Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Sutton Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; and Olivet Commandery, No. 86, 
Knights Templar. He is a member of the First 
Methodist Church, and has always taken an active 
part in its affairs. He har served as a member of 
the local school board and for forty-eight years was 
one of the members of the Park Square Male Quar- 
tette. 

Oliver Raymond Howe married, May 14, 1879, 
Olive A. Guilford, daughter of Samuel Guilford, a 
lumber merchant of Lyrm. Mr. and Mrs. Howe are 
the parents of one child, Edward Raymond, bom 
February 17, 1880, who is now associated with his 
father in business, and is also a teacher of piano. 
He married Meinzie A. Strout, and resides at Beach 
Bluff. ^ 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS PEVEAR— In the leath- 
er business in Lynn the name of Pevear has long 
been prominent. Henry Augustus Pevear was the 
head of the old and well known firm of Pevear & 
Company, for many years standing high in the 
molrocco business, and William Augustus Pevear, his 
son, now retired from active business, was associ- 
ated with his father and later succeeded him. 

Henry Augustus Pevear, besides being a power in 
the leather world, was for many years president of 
the National City Bank of Lynn. He was also in- 
terested in other industrial organizations, and was 
president of the Thompson - Houston Company, 
whose plant was purchased by the General Elec- 
tric Company. Mr. Pevear was one of the group 
of five men who were instrumental in bringing the 



General Electric Company to Lynn. For years his 
brother, George K. Pevear, was associated with 
him in the morocco business. 

William Augustus Pevear was bom in Lynn, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1858, and received his early education in 
the public schools of the city, attending until he 
was twelve years of age. Then he attended Chaun- 
cey Hall, later entering Colby Academy, from which 
he was graduated in 1876. He was first employed 
in his father's plant, while the firm was composed 
of his father and uncle. Later, in 1888» Henry 
Augustus Pevear, and his three sons, William A., 
H. Theodore, and Frederick S., formed a new com- 
pany, and erecting a large, new factory, began the 
importation of goat skins, from which they manu- 
factured fine leathers for the shoe trade. While 
thus engaged they also conducted a large store on 
High street, in Boston. With this multiplicity of 
interests William A. Pevear had charge of the 
manufacturing end of the business, which he con- 
ducted very successfully. In 1899 the business was 
closed up, and the building leased, father and sons 
all retiring from active business interests. The 
father died in 1912, and H. Theodore Pevear died 
in 1916. 

In public progress and all civic advancement Mr. 
Pevear has always taken a deep interest, and while 
a supporter of the Republican party, he has never 
been a politician. He is a member of the Oxford 
Club and the Tedesco Country Club. 

Mr. Pevear married (first) in Peabody, Massa- 
chusetts, Annie E. Johnston, who died in 1899. They 
were the parents of three children: Jessie S., E]i»> 
abeth F., and Theodore, F. In 1908 Mr. Pevear 
married (second) Adaline Sweetser Tufts, daughter 
of A. Merrill and AUce V. (Barton) Tufts. Mr. 
Tufts is a taxidermist, of Lynn. Mrs. Tufts is of 
Boston birth. Mr. and Mrs. Pevear have three 
children: Barton Tufts, bom June 8, 1906; Henry 
Augustus, bom December 10, 1911 ; and Sarah Allen, 
bom September 25, 1916. 

MAURICE ALVAH STEVENS— For ahnost fifty 
years identified with the business world of eastern 
Massachusetts, Maurice A. Stevens has spent the 
greater part of his career in the coal business and 
is now a member of one of the leading coal firms 
of the city of Lynn. 

Mr. Stevens was bom in Marshfield, Massachu- 
setts, May 7, 1857, and is a son of Peleg and Eliza 
M. (Torrey) Stevens, old residents of Plymouth 
county, now deceased. As a boy Mr. Stevens at- 
tended the public schools of the day in his native 
place, then at an early age, (fifteen years,) was em- 
ployed by the Old Colony Railroad on section work. 
In 1878 he accepted the position of station agent 
at Seaview, Massachusetts, on the same railroad, re- 
maining for about two years. He then went to 
Middleboro to leam the jewelry business, but found 
it of slight interest to him personally, and resolving 
to waste no more time in this field, a year later went 
to Marlboro, where he was offered a desirable posi- 
tion as clerk in a dry goods store, which position 




Sf-i-t-<4^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



45 



he held for three years. He then came to Lynn, 
where he entered the employ of R. A. Spanlding, a 
leading dry goods merchant, as floor man and sales- 
man. In 1883, the firm of Ward & Merritt having 
been dissolved, Mr. Stevens became associated with 
Mr. Henry A. Ward, and under this partnership 
they became the leading hatters of the city, the 
arrangement enduring for eleven years. In 1895 Mr. 
Stevens entered the field of mercantile activity in 
which he has since been continuously active, the 
coal business, forming a partnership with Frank M. 
Breed, under the firm name of Breed & Stevens. 
Four years later, Mr. Breed withdrawing, the firm 
became Stevens & Newhall, and so continued for a 
period of eleven years. Then in 1910 a consolida- 
tion of interests was entered upon, and the cor^ 
poration since has been known as the Sprague, 
Breed, Stevens & Newhall. Mr. Stevens, as vice- 
president of the concern, has been active in its 
progress, and still holds that office. 

Mr. Stevens is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and his clubs are the Ro- 
taiy, the Oxford and the Park. On June 19, 1883, 
Mr. Stevens married Gertrude Wright Abbott, 
daughter of Frederick and Martha (Hay) Abbott, 
of North Reading, Massachusetts, and tiiey have 
one daughter, Lillian Wright, bom October 29, 
1889. 

JOHN ALVIN BALCOM, M. D., Ph. D.^For 
many years a successful physician of Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, and now holding a leading position in the 
medical profession in Essex county. Dr. Balcom is 
highly esteemed in this city as a citisen and a pro- 
fessional man. 

Dr. Balcom was bom in Marlboro, Massachusetts, 
October 26, 1869, and is a son of John H. and Ad- 
die (Champion) Balcom. Attending high school at 
Ashland, Massachusetts, he entered Boston Univer- 
sity, and was graduated in 1892 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy, then, in preparation for his 
chosen profession, he entered the Medical School 
of the same university, and was graduated in 1895, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Beginning 
practice in Haverhill, Massachusetts, he remained 
there one year, then came to Lynn, establishing bis 
practice here on February 15, 1897. Now, for near- 
ly twenty-five years, Dr. Balcom has successfully 
carried on the general practice of medicine, winning 
a prominent position in the profession. 

Dr. Balcom is a member of the American Insti- 
tute of Homoeoi>athy, the Massachusetts Homoeo- 
pathic Society, the Massachusetts Surgical and 
Gynecological Society, the Boston Homoeopathic 
Medical Society, and the Lynn Medical Society. He 
is ex-president of the Lynn Hospital Board, and was 
active in the Volunteer Medical Corps during the 
World War. Fraternally, Dr. Balcom is affiliated 
with North Star Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Ashland, Massachusetts, and he is a mem- 
ber of the Homestead Golf Club. He is prominent 
in the work of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, and is a member of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Church of Lynn. 



Dr. Balcom is married, and has one daughter, 
Harriet (Balcom) Nichols, who was bom Septem- 
ber 19, 1895. 

RUSSELL BOWDEN is a son of Thomas Jeffer- 
son Bowden, long prominent in the vicinity of 
Marblehead, who conducted a wood-working shop 
here for a great many years. He died in 1911, leav- 
ing the business to his son. 

Russell Bowden was bom in Marblehead, on Feb- 
ruary 12, 1858, and here received his education in 
the public schools. At the age of sixteen years he 
became associated with his father in the wood- 
working shop, learning the trade. It was in 1874 
that Mr. Bowden entered this business, and he 
worked with his father continuously until the death 
of the latter, in 1911, and since that time has 
been the head of the business. 

But Mr. Bowden's conduct of this business has 
not been confined to the merely mechanical effort 
connected with the production of the work in hand. 
His inventive genius has found expression, and the 
world is better for the results. Among the im- 
portant inventions which he has placed upon the 
market are a machine for cutting spring heels, which 
has been adopted by all the leading shoe manu- 
facturersr of the day; a machine for cutting glue in 
glue factories; a machine for cutting potato chips, 
and also an adjustable bench for dinking blocks. 
Aside from these varied activities, Mr. Bowden 
has also acquired a reputation for excellence in 
the manufacture of violins. 

Outside his business Mr. Bowden has few inter- 
ests, but is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of Marblehead, and of tiie Mugford 
Association. He has for a number of years been 
a member of the Old North Church, of Marble- 
head. 

In 1880 Mr. Bowden married Mary E. Shaw, of 
Marblehead, and they are the parents of: 1. Thomas 
R., who was bom in Marblehead, in 1891. He re- 
ceived a practical education in the public schools 
of this city, then entered the profession of tuning, 
handling both organs and pianos. He was located 
first at No. 6, Mount Vernon street, and later re- 
moved to Salem, reorganizing the business under 
the firm name of Bowden & LeBlanc. He mar- 
ried, in June, 1920, Charlotte Edmonds, of Newton, 
Massachusetts. 2. Alice D., who was bom in 
Marblehead, and was educated also in the public 
schools, after which she became a teacher of the 
pianoforte in Marblehead. In 1915 she married 
Arthur Phippen, of Salem, who is engaged in the 
leather business in that city. 



GEORGE B. HUMPHREY— For half a century 
active in the industrial world of Marblehead, and 
since his retirement from this line of work broadly 
interested in shipping, George B. Humphrey, a life- 
time resident of this town, is still contributing to 
the prosperity of the community. 

Mr. Humphrey was bom in Marblehead, on 
August 23, 1833, and received a limited, although 
practical education in the public schools of the day. 



46 



ESSEX COUNTY 



When he had completed his studies he entered the 
employ of one of the early shoe manufacturers of 
Marblehead, where he remained for about fifty 
years. During all this time Mr. Humphrey felt the 
keenest interest in the shipping which has always 
been so large a part of the activities of the place. 
Having left the shoe shop, he entered this field of 
endeavor as agent, also as owner of a large num- 
ber of the sailing vessels which go out from this 
port. He has been more than successful in this ven- 
ture, and is now a power in the maritime world of 
Marblehead. 

Mr. Humphrey is a member of the Auditing 
Committee of Marblehead, and he was a member of 
the Columbian Society of Marblehead. 



convictions place his membership with the Epis- 
copal church. 

On January 2, 1902, Mr. Mitchell married Ethel, 
daughter of George and Nellie (Rose) Knower, of 
Lynn. They have two children: Marjorie E., bom 
July 15, 1906, and Elizabeth, bom December 6, 1909. 



REUBEN HENRY MITCHELL— One of the 
leading names in the shoe industry in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, is that of Reuben Henry Mitchell, who, as 
head of the Mitchell-Caunt Company, stands high 
in the manufacturing world of Essex county. 

Mr. Mitchell was bom on March 13, 1879, in the 
city of New Britain, Connecticut, and is a son of 
Reuben H. and Jane (Cowlam) Mitchell. Gaining 
the foundation of his education in the public schools 
of his native city, the young man also covered the 
High School course there. Planning a business 
career, the young man entered Huntsinger's Busi- 
ness College, in Hartford, Connecticut, and was 
graduated in due course. His first employment was 
with the P. it F. Corbin Company, large manufac- 
turers of hardware in New Britain, and he con- 
tinued in their office as clerk, for one year. There- 
after he was in the office of the New York, New 
Haven A Hartford railroad, as derk, for a period of 
six months. His next position was with North & 
Judd, another big hardware firm in New Britain, 
where he remained for one year as clerk. 

In 1899 Mr. Mitchell came to Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, and entered the employ of the Joseph Caunt 
Company, prominent shoe manufacturers of this 
city. He set about to make himself familiar witn 
every department of the shoe industry, learning both 
the production and the commercial end of the busi- 
ness. Eventually he took over a large interest in 
the company, and the business was reorganized un- 
der the name of the Mitchell-Caunt Company, shoe 
manufacturers, which association still continues. 
The company is one of the most important in the 
city of Lynn, and does an immense business. 

Mr. Mitchell has many interests outside his busi- 
ness, of various kinds. He is a director of the Es- 
sex Trust Company, and is vice-president of the 
Lynn Shoe Manufa<fturers' Association, and is an 
influential member of the Chamber of Commei^e. 
He is a member of Mount Carmel Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Swampscott Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, Aleppo Temple, Mystic Shrine, and of 
Olivet Commandery, Knights Templar, of Lynn. 
He is a popular figure among the clubs of this sec- 
tion, and is a member of the Oxford Club, the 
Tedesco Club, the Swampscott Masonic Club, and 
the Boot and Shoe Club of Boston. His religious 



WILLIAM PATRICK CONNBRY, one of the 
most public-spirited citizens of the city of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, was bom there October 15, 1855, son 
of Patrick and Bridget (Clancy) Connery. Patrick 
Connery was a native of Tipperary, Ireland, and 
his wife came from Limerick. William P. Connery 
was educated in the schools of Lynn, and among 
his teachers was Miss Hannah Pickering, for whom 
the Pickering School is named. At the age of fif- 
teen years, Mr. Connery went to work, first in the 
shoe shop of Samuel Bubier. Strange enough, 
theatrical life brought an appeal to him at about 
this time, and leaving his home ties, he followed 
this profession for three years, returning at the 
end of this time to Lynn, fully satisfied with his ex- 
periences in stage life. Mr. Connery was destined 
for higher and greater responsibilities as he was 
soon to learn. Again he entered the shoe business, 
working for the P. P. Sherry Company for almost 
two years. This brings us to the year 1879, when 
Mr. Connery started in the coal business on a most 
modest scale, with only one team and delivering 
the coal himself. Through his upright business 
methods Mr. Connery won a place for himself and 
soon was known throughout Lynn for his reliabil- 
ity. His business increased and gradually it became 
necessary to add more teams until there were nine 
in all. In 1915 he disposed of the business to 
Sprague, Breed & Newhall, and at the same time 
retired from active business, although he has never 
for a moment relaxed his deep interest in the pub- 
lic affairs of Lynn. 

One of the most ardent Democrats, Mr. Connery 
has supported that party ever since he cast hia 
first vote for Samuel J. Tilden in 1876. Mr. Con- 
nery has been called upon several times to hold 
public office and in the performance! of the duties 
incumbent on these offices he has always fulfilled 
the predictions of his constituents. He has high 
ideals of good citizenship and his efforts for the 
public welfare have always been sane and prac- 
tical ones. 

Mr. Connery was a delegate to the St. Louis Con- 
vention which nominated Judge Alton B. Parker 
for the Presidency; he went to the convention in 
favor of William Jennings Bryan. For four years 
Mr. Connery was a member of the Democratic State 
Central Committee. In 1901 he was elected alder- 
man, and in 1910 was placed in the highest offices 
within the power of the voters of Lynn — ^mayor of 
the city, which office he held for two years. He 
was the first mayor of Lynn to be elected under 
the commission form of government. 

Relative to Mr. Connery's activities in temperance 
matters, the following is quoted from the Lynn 
''Evening News" of Apzil 21, 1915: 



X^^^--*^^— W- ^^!^:^ES€£^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



4T 



As an advocate of temperance, he is known all 
over the country. He has been for thirty-eight years 
a total abstainer. He joined the Father Matthew 
Temperance Society the first time in 1873, after that 
be joined again in 1877, and has been a member ever 
since. He was one of the founders of St. Joseph's 
C. T. A. and has been active in all temperance 
movements and for the benefits of all individuals 
whenever he thought he could be of assistance to 
them. He was one of the pioneers to advocate mo 
licenses in the Commonwealth. 

Other aflUiations of Mr. Connery are: Charter 
member of the Knights of Columbus of Lynn; and 
member of the Irish-American Historical Society 
since 1884. 

In 1882 Mr. Connery married Mary Theresa 
Haven, of Tipperary, Ireland, daughter of Lawrence 
and Mary (Murphy) Haven. The children of this 
marriage were: Mary Aquinis; William P., Jr., who 
enlisted in 1917 with the 101st Infantry as private 
and at the time of his discharge in April, 1919, was 
regimental color sergeant; Anna L.; Josephine C; 
Lawrence J., who served on the border in 1916 with 
the 9th Massachusetts Regiment and held the rank 
of corporal; in the World War he was sergeant with 
the 101st Infantry, and saw service in France; in 
1919 he was discharged with the commission of 
second lieutenant; and Margaret L. Mr. Connery 
and his family are regular attendants of St. 
Joseph's Church of Lynn and are active in its sup- 
port. In summing up the career of Mr. Connery it 
might be said that his success has been due to his 
habit of thoroughness which he cultivated from his 
youth. 

DWIGHT HERBERT GRAHAM, 8R., one of the 
well known manufacturers of Ljmn, Massachusetts, 
has for many years been identified with the pro- 
gress of this city. Mr. Graham was bom in Brook- 
field, Connecticut, December 10, 1851, and received 
a thoroughly practical education in the public 
schools of his native town. 

Coming to Lynn as a young man, he engaged in 
the manufacture of hats, beginning in a small way, 
but developing a large and prosperous business in- 
terest. Of late years he has gone into the retail end 
of the hat business, and his attractive store, at No. 
109 Monroe street, is a favorite shop among par- 
ticular people. Mr. Graham has attained wide promi- 
nence in his long business activity here, and holds 
the distinction of having been a member of the Lynn 
Chamber of Commerce from its organization. He 
is also a member and director of the Retail Mer- 
chants' Board. 

Fraternally, Mr. Graham is very prominent. He is 
a member of Mount Carmel Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; of William Sutton Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; of Zebulon Council, Royal and Select 
Masters; of Olivet Commandery, Knights Templar; 
and is also a member of Aleppo Temple, of Boston, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; 
and of the Swampscott Masonic Club. He is a mem- 
ber of Regis Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star; 
of Lynn Lodge, No. 117, Benevolent and Protective 



Order of Elks; and of the Edwin Forest Club. He- 
and his family hold membership in the First Con- 
gregational Church of South Norwalk, Connecticut. 
On September 28, 1871, Mr. Graham was married 
in Port Chester, New York, to Augusta Minerva 
Brown, who was bom in Vista, Westchester county. 
New York, in September, 1852, and is a daughter of 
Webster A. Brown, long a carpenter of that place. 
Mr. and Mrs. Graham are the parents of six chil- 
dren: Maud, bom July 8, 1872; George Herbert, 
bom March 20, 1874, died April 18, 1919; Dwight 
Homer, bom February 14, 1876; Frederick Webster,^ 
bom in 1882, in Brooklyn, New York; May, bom 
December 14, 1887, who died on December 24, 1889; 
and Ralph Brown, bom April 20, 1892. 



VINCENT SWAIN PETERSON— Among the 
men who have been identified with the physical 
growth and development of the city of Salem, Essex, 
county, Massachusetts, Vincent Swain Peterson is 
one of the leaders. Long active in constructive 
lines, he is still an important factor in this line of 
endeavor, also in finance. 

Mr. Peterson was bom in Salem, Massachusetts, 
om February 8, 1867, and is a son of Joseph and 
Harriet A. (Pope) Peterson, both of Massachusetts 
birth. 

Receiving a practical education in the public, 
schools of Salem, Mr. Peterson entered the world 
of industry at an early age, in the employ of Par- 
son & Peterson, masons and contractors, the junior 
member of the firm being Mr. Peterson's brother^ 
The first position he held with this firm was as. 
driver of a tip-cart Later he became an appren- 
tice with the same concern, and still later worked, 
as a journeyman in the same line. In 1896 Mr^ 
Peterson became a partner with his brother, Joseph 
N. Peterson, and this association continued untile 
the death of the latter, on October 8, 1918. Since 
that time Mr. Peterson has held the full manage- 
ment of the business. 

Since Mr. Peterson's connection with this firm 
they have built many of the most important build- 
ings in Salem and the adjacent territory. Among 
these are the Atheneum, the Harmony Grove Chapel, 
the Merchants' Bank, the Young Men's Christian. 
Association building, the Massachusetts State Nor-^ 
mal School, the Masonic Temple, the Naumkeag 
building, which is now known as the Newmark buUd-- 
ing, the Webber building, the Lawrence (Massachu- 
setts) Court House, and the Public Library at 
Lawrence, and has iilso remodeled the court house, 
at Salem. 

The terrible fire of 1914, which affected more or 
less closely every interest of whatsoever nature in 
the city of Salem, was vitally significant to every 
firm in the contracting business. After the fire Mr. 
Peterson built many residences for those who had 
been rendered homeless by the destroying element. 
Among these residences were those of B. Parker 
Babbridge, Charies S. Chase, and others. They also 
built the extensive storehouses of Cressy, Dockham. 
it Company, in the devastated area. It was the 



48 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Peterson firm which had built, before the fire, the 
Salem Electric Li^ht and Power plant, the building 
in the fire district which withstood destruction. 

In the public and financial life of the city, Mr. 
Peterson is a man of broad influence and respon- 
sibility. He is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and during the World War he was a member 
of the Public Safety Committee of the War In- 
dustrial Board, on the Priorities Division. 

Mr. Peterson has won a high position in the finan- 
cial world. He is now president of the Roger Con- 
ant Co-6peratLve Bank, of Salem, and a member of 
the Exchange Board of the Morris Plan Bank, of 

Fraternally, Mr. Peterson is also prominent. He 
is a member of Essex Lodge, Free, and Accepted 
Masons; of Winslow Lewis Commandery, Knights 
Templar; and is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. Politically, he has always been 
affiliated with the Republican party. He was a 
member of the old Coggswell Club, a Republican 
club now gone out of existence, which was com- 
posed of Republicans of the old school. 

Mr. Peterson's brother, Joseph N. Peterson, whose 
death in 1913 was a loss to the community, was 
three times mayor of Salem, and was once ejected 
by the largest vote ever given to a mayor in this 
city. 

Mr. Peterson married Carrie L. Langmaid, daugh- 
ter of George W. and Lucy (Wheeler) Langmaid. 
Mrs. Peterson was bom in New Hampshire. 



FRANK A. MITCHELL, M. D. — One of the 

rising young physicians of Lynn is Dr. Frank 
A. Mitchell, whose office is located at No. 164 Essex 
street. Dr. Mitchell is a son of Edmund J. and 
Mary F. (Atkins) Mitchell, and was bom in Lynn, 
May 5, 1895. 

Gaining his early education in the public schools 
of Lynn and of New York City, Dr. Mitdhell, with 
the family's change of residence, covered his high 
school course in the city of Chicago. Then enter- 
ing the University of Chicago, he studied there for 
two years, after which he came east and entered 
the Boston University School of Medicine, from 
which he was graduated in 1917, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. He thereafter served as in- 
terne at the Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital, 
and also at the John Haines Memorial Hospital for 
Contagious Diseases, at Brighton, Massachusetts, 
then came to his native city and enlisted in the 
Medical Corps for service overseas. Commissioned 
first lieutenant, he was stationed at Camp Green- 
leaf, Georgia, where he remained for two months, 
then was transferred to Camp Meade, and assigned 
later to the Twenty-eighth Engineers at Camp Bally 
McElory, in Occoquan, Virginia. Two months later 
' he saUed for France with Company £, of that regi- 
ment, and was stationed first at the Verdun, front, 
then in the Argonne, then at St. Mihiel, where he 
remained until after the armistice was signed. In 
March, 1919, the doctor went to London, England, 



for a course in surgery in a London hospital, re- 
maining until July of that year, then returning to 
Brest, France, for a time. He sailed for the United 
States, landing on this side August 12, 1919. On 
the nineteenth of the same month he received his 
honorable discharge from the service at Ccunp 
Devens, Massachusetts, and returning to Lynn, en- 
tered upon the general practice of medicine in this 
city. He has already won his way to the confidence 
and esteem of the people, and is considered one 
of the rising young men of the day in his profes- 
sion. 

Fraternally Dr. Mitchell holds membership with 
the Knights of Malta, the Ancient Order of United 
Woikmen and the New England Order of Protec- 
tion. He is a member of the American Institute of 
Homceopathy, and of the Alpha Sigma Medical fra- 
ternity. He is a member of the American Legion, 
and is a member of the Essex street Baptist church 
of Lynn. On November 7, 1917, Dr. Mitchell mar- 
ried Edith M. Lister, daughter of Allan C. and 
Elizabeth M. Lister, of Lynn. They have three 
children: Allen L., bom December 30, 1918, and 
twins, bom September 28, 1920, Mary Frances and 
Jeanie Preston. 



WILLIAM STEVENS FELTON— Prominent in 
the financial world of Massachusetts, Mr. Felton is 
also active in many branches of public endeavor. 
He was bom in Salem, Massachusetts, July 2, 1872, 
and has been a lifelong resident of this city. Re- 
ceiving his education in the public and high schools 
of Salem, he began his business career as a clerk 
in the Salem National Bank. Later, he entered the 
field in which he has since gained an assured posi- 
tion, and has for some years been the sole pro- 
prietor of the William S. Felton Company, invest- 
ment bankers, real estate and insurance brokers. 
This business has developed extensively, and is 
one of the leading firms in this section. 

In connection with his individual enterprises, Mr. 
Felton is associated with some of the leading finan- 
cial institutiona of Eastern Massachusetts. He is 
director or trustee of the Liberty Trust Company, 
of Boston; of the Business Men's Codperative Bank, 
of Boston; of the Salem Five Cent Savings Bank; 
the Carr & Daley Shoe Company, of Salem; of the 
Roger Conant Codperative Bank, of SsJem; and of 
the Salem Morris Plan Company. Mr. Felton is 
also director or trustee of the Massachusetts State 
Chamber of Conunerce; of the Tidewater Portland 
Cement Company, of Baltimore, Maryland; of the 
Dedham & Hyde Park Gas and Electric Company 
Voting Trust; and president of the Massachusetts 
Real Estate Exchange. 

In the Republican party Mr. Felton is a leader. 
He is chairman of the executive committee of the 
Republican State Committee, and has been presi- 
dent of the Salem Common Council, president of the 
Salem Board of Aldermen, and of the Salem Board 
of Trade. 

In the general advance of all worthy objects Mr. 
Felton is broadly interested. He is chairman of 



JFranft 2L. fl@ttcl)eu, fl@. W. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



49 



the Massachusetts International Exposition Com- 
mission; and is president of the Leagrue of the 
Friends of Greece in America, and in recognition 
of his services to this cause has received from King 
Alexander, of Greece, the Golden Crown of a Knight 
of the Royal Order of Our Saviour. 

Fratenudly, Mr. Felton is a member of Star 
King Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Salem. 
He is a member of several well known clubs, in- 
cluding the Twentieth Century Club, of Boston, 
the Appalachian Mountain Club, the Salem Club, 
the Now and Then Association, of Salem; and the 
Massachusetts, Middlesex, and Essex Republican 
clubs. 

Mr. Felton married Ethel M. Adams, and they 
attend the services of the North Unitarian Church. 



CHARLBS BREED HILTON, one of the promi- 
nent business men of Lynn, Massachusetts, a man 
of broad interests and progressive activities, is re- 
membered in many circles of his native dty, al- 
though nearly two decades have gone down into 
history since his passing, in the prime of life, at 
the age of forty-four years. 

Mr. Hilton was descended from an old New Eng- 
land family prominent for many years in Essex 
county. John Hilton, his grandfather, lived on Mar- 
ket street, in Lynn, and owned very extensive hold- 
ings in real estate. He conducted the first express 
business ever inaugurated in the city of Lynn. 
John H. Hilton, son of John Hilton, and Charles B. 
Hilton's father, was bom in Lynn, Massachusetts, 
and was for many years foreman in the Bubier 
Shoe Factory; he died in 1884. He married Celista 
A. Bacheller, a daughter of Breed Bacheller, and a 
descendant of one of the oldest and best known 
families of Lynn. John H. and Celista A. Bachel- 
ler) Hilton were the parents of two children: 
Charles B., of whom extended mention follows; and 
Laura E., now Mrs. Towne, who has one daugn- 
ter. Hazed C, now Mrs. Charles R. Ernst, who 
has two children, Marjorie Etta, and Reda Baker. 

Charies B. Hilton was bom at No. 89 Summer 
street, Lynn, Mass., in 1859, and died May 27, 1908. 
As a boy he prepared for his business career in the 
educational institutions of Lynn, his native city. 
When he had completed his studies, he entered the 
employ of his uncle, Mr. Hathaway, and for a num- 
ber of years was associated with him in the flour 
and grain business. Later, he engaged in the com- 
mission business for himself in Boston, his of&ces 
and storehouses being located on Congress street. 
He followed this line of endeavor for many years, 
then, several years before his death, retired from 
active business, and devoted his time to looking 
after his interests in Lynn, in the way of real estate 
and other affairs, and was thus engaged until his 
death. He was a member of the Boston Chamber 
of Commerce from the age of twenty-one until the 
time of his death. 

Mr. Hilton was always alert to the movement of 
the times in every field of human endeavor, and 
gave of his time and means to advance every worthy 



cause. He was a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and of the Park Club, but 
although deeply interested in public affairs, never 
took a leading part in politics nor allowed his name 
to be brought forward as a candidate for public 
office. 

Mr. Hilton married, June 12, 1893, Annie Hath- 
away Goss, daughter of George and Caroline (Gut- 
terson) Goss, her father being a native of Marble- 
head, Mass., and her mother of Lynn. Mr. Goss 
was a leading stove and hardware merchant of Lynn 
for many years, having his store on Exchange 
street. 

CHARLBS CABOT JOHNSON— In the public 
life of Nahant, Massachusetts, Chailes Cabot John- 
son is one of the leading figures, having served.the 
community in one or more public offices ever since 
he attained his majority, a period of twenty-four 
years. He is also broadly active in the real estate 
and insurance business. 

Mr. Johnson was bom in Nahant, December 9, 
1876, and is a son of Charles F. and Pauline T. 
Johnson, old residents of tMs place. As a boy Mr. 
Johnson attended the publie schools of bis native 
place, later entering the Bryant ft Stratton Business 
College, of Boston, Mass., from which he was grad- 
uated in due course. At the age of twenty-one years 
he became town dezk of Nahant, and served in 
that capacity for a period of six years. Meanwhile, 
the fbllowing year (1898), he was made collector 
and treasurer of the town of Nahant, and these 
offices he still holds, having filled them acceptably 
for twenty-three years. In 1906-7-8 Mr. Johnson 
served the town of Nahant as representative in the 
Massachusetts State Legislature, and was elected 
to the State Senate from his district for the term 
of 1912-18. He was the Republican candidate for 
Congress in 1914 and 1918, and in 1916 acted in the 
capacity of presidential elector. Mr. Johnson is a 
fearless advocate of Republican party principles 
and never loses sight of the ultimate good of the 
people. In connection with his wide activities in 
political affairs, he conducts an extensive business 
in real estate and insurance, his office being located 
in the Security Trust building in Lynn. 

Mr. Johnson is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, of the Knights of Pythias, 
and of the Loyal Order of Moose, and is also a mem- 
ber of the Father Matthew Total Abstinence So- 
ciety, and the Kiwanis Club, of Lynn. 

On March 24, 1898, Mr. Johnson married Esther 
A. Curran, daughter of Thomas and Ellen Curran, 
and they have three sons: Harold, Charles, and 
Thomas. . 

ALVAH P. THOMPSON— In the leather business 
of Essex county, Massachusetts, Alvah P. Thomp- 
son, of Salem, is a leading figure. Broadly capable 
as an executive, he is a part of that great aggregar 
tion of prosperous industrial achievement which is 
holding Essex county at the head of the line of 
progpress. 

Mr. Thompson is a son of Erastus and Delia B. 



EMex— 2— 4 



50 



ESSEX COUNTY 



(Burden) Thompson. The elder Mr. Thompson was 
connected with the New York, New Haven & Hart^ 
ford Railroad Company for more than forty years. 
Alvah P. Thompson was bom in Searsmont, Maine, 
on January 3, 1878. The family removing to Nor^ 
wood, Massachusetts, it was there that he received 
his education in the public schools. He entered the 
business world in the employ of the same railway 
system with which his father was connected, but re- 
mained in this connection for only a short time. 
The world of production held for him a stronger 
appeal, and he went into the Winslow Brothers' Tan- 
nery to learn the business. After he had mastered 
the details, he remained with this company for a 
considerable time, in aU about twelve years. 

At the end of that time Mr. Thompson became 
associated with the Morrill Leather Company, short- 
ly being made assistant superintendent of the com- 
pany, and remaining with them for about two years. 
Thereafter he was with the A. C. Lawrence Leather 
Company for two years in the same capacity. He 
then became identified with the Helbum Leather 
Company, and it was under Mr. Thompson's direc- 
tion that operations were begun in the construction 
of his former plant, and six years ago the present 
up-to-date plant was erected. The site of this plant 
was purchaised from the American Hide & Leather 
Company, and the entire plant was equipped in the 
most thoroughly modem way. It is carried on in 
conjunction with two other plants, owned by the 
same company, which are located at Fulton, New 
York. The company is composed of Julius Helbum, 
president; A. P. Thompson, vice-president, and J. 
W. Helbum, treasurer. 

Mr. Thompson, as one of the leading executives 
of this important interest, stands high in the manu- 
facturing world of Essex county. His belief in the 
future of Salem, and his active participation in one 
of the principal industries of the city, place his 
name high on the list of the prominent citizens of 
Essex county. 

On November 24, 1896, Mr. Thompson married 
Charlotte, daughter of Theodore Wellington, of 
Norwood, Massachusetts, and they have one son, 
Richard, bom on December 26, 1908. The family 
are members of the Tabernacle Church, and are 
prominent in aU the social and benevolent activities 
of the society. 

HAMLIN P. BENNETT, M. D.— Advancement 
in any of the learned professions is not so much the 
result of fortuitous circumstance or of influence 
as it is the result of individual merit, application 
and skill. When these are combined with ambition 
and a fixed determination to achieve success, the 
desired result is inevitable. Dr. Bennett, of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, has already achieved this enviable 
reputation in the most difficult of professions and 
is fairly on the way to even greater distinction. 

Hamlin P. Bennett was bom in Farmington, New 
Hampshire, March 27, 1881, and obtained his ele- 
mentary education in the public schools of his na- 
tive place. After graduating from the Farmington 
High School in 1899, he matriculated at Dartmouth 



College, where he pursued a literary course and was 
graduated A. B., class of 1908. In the meantime 
he had decided to adopt medicine as a profession, 
and with this end in view he entered the Medical 
Department of Dartmouth College, from which in- 
stitution he received the degree of Doctor of Med- 
icine in 1906. He then served an intemeship in the 
Lying-in Hospital in New York City, and the Bos- 
ton City Hospital, after which he came to Lynn and 
spent two years in Dr. Gray's private hospital. In 
1909, equipped with a thorough practical knowledge 
which was the result of many months of tireless 
energy devoted to the profession, be established 
himself in private practice. Here he has since re- 
mained, acquiring a large and steadily growing cli- 
entele and carving out for himself a place in the 
front rank of the city's physicians. He is a mem- 
ber of the Essex County Medical Society and the 
Lsrnn Medical fraternity. He has had charge of the 
Lsrnn Tuberculosis clinic and is gynscologist for the 
out-patient department of Lynn Hospital. Dr. Ben- 
nett served as dty bacteriologist from 1907 to 1919. 
He affiliates with the Masons, and belongs to St. 
Stephens Church. 

On September 22, 1909, Dr. Bennett was united 
in marriage with May J. Snow, and to them have 
been bom two children: Roger H., bom March 4, 
1918, and Gordon P., bom May 21, 1915. 

It is sometimes said of a man, the early part of 
whose career is indicative of more than usual prom- 
ise, that '^e will be heard from later." Dr. Bennett 
has already been hefurd from, and Lynn thinks that 
he will be heard from again and for many years to 
come. 



GEORGE HENRY JACKSON— For many yean 
active in the printing business, and a resident of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, for more than thirty years, 
Geoige H. Jackson is one of the representative men 
of the city. 

Mr. Jackson comes of a very old fkmily, and is 
the ninth in lineal descent from James Jackson, 
who settled in Durham, New Hampshire, in 1687, 
eight generations of this line having been bom in 
Durham, he being the first bom elsewhere. He is a 
son of John Page and Melissa (Staples) Jackson, 
formerly of Lowell and Haverhill, Massachusetts. 

George Henry Jackson was bom in Lowell, Mas- 
sachusetts, March 9, 1866, and, his parents remov- 
ing to HaverhOl when he was five years of age, it 
was here tiiat he attended the public schools, lay- 
ing a practical foundation for his career. In 1881 
he left school, and entered the employ of the Hav- 
erhill "Gazette'' as an apprentice, learning the prin- 
ter's trade. In 1883, desiring to see something of the 
world, he went to Maine, where he worked at his 
trade during that and the following summer, then 
went South. Setting type in Florida and Louisianai 
he afterwards struck North again, and was in Chi- 
cago, Illinois, for a time, then in Montreal, Province 
of Quebec. Eventually returning to Haverhill, he 
has since remained in the old Bay State. In 1890, 
after remaining in Haveriiill for about five years, 
Mr. Jadcson came to Lynn, where he became 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



51 



fled -with the Lynn "Item." After a time, however, 
he entered the printing business for himself, in 
partnership with Ralph W. Prentiss, of Swampscott, 
this county, the firm becoming Jackson A Prentiss, 
Inc., their place of business being located at No. 
615 Washington street, Lynn. This business has 
grown and developed very widely and is now one 
of the leading printing establishments of Essex 

county. 
I Since becoming a resident of Lynn, Mr. Jackson 
I has been brought to the front ranks in public af- 
fairs. He was elected to the Common Council of 
the city in 1898 and 1899, and to the Board of Al- 
iermen in 1900 and 1901. First elected in 1902, he 
>erved the city of Lynn as. representative in the 
State Legislature for five successive terms. Not 
only was this signal honor accorded him by the vote 
of his own city, but following his service in the 
House of Representatives, he was elected for five 
successive terms to the State Senate, his public ser- 
Tices ending in 1919. 

Mr. Jackson is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Rebekahs, the Knights of Pyth- 
ias, the Sons of Veterans, and other benevolent and 
fra^mal orders. 

In 1886 Mr. Jackson married, in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, Esther Gertrude Blood, of Methuen, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Benjamin and Abigail 
(Frost) Blood. Their children are as follows: Her- 
bert Edwin, bom in Groveland, this county, in 1887, 
died in infancy; Alice Gertrude, bom in Haverhill, 
in 1888; Morris Charles, bom in Lynn in 1890; 
Everett Eugene, bom in Lynn, in 1896; George Ar- 
thur, bom in Lynn in 1898; and Elmer Ellsworth, 
bom in Lynn, in 1909. 

« ^^^ 

RICHARD THOMAS COLE— In the business 
world of Marblehead, Massachusetts, the more prac- 
tical branches of mercantile endeavor are in the 
hands of a group of men who are carrying the town 
forward, in the best sense of the word. Richard 
Thomas Cole is prominent in the lumber, building 
materials and coal business of Marblehead. He is 
a son of John and Sarah Cole, natives and long resi- 
dents of Marblehead. John Cole was a prominent 
wood and coal merchant in Marblehead until his 
death in 1902. 

Richard Thomas Cole was bom in London, Eng- 
land, on January 6, 1870, but received his education 
in Ihe public schools of Marblehead, Massachu- 
setts. He was employed by the American Radiator 
Company, and later was connected with the E. T. 
Burrows Screen Company, of Portland, Maine. With 
this latter company he remained for about fifteen 
years, but upon the death of his father he took over 
his business, and has been the leading factor in its 
development, the firm doing bu9iness under the name 
of the Gilb^ & Cole Company. This is now one 
of the leading houses in its line in Marblehead, and 
Mr. Cole holds a position of dignity and influence 
as the manager of the business. Mr. Cole has few 
interests outside of his business. He is a member of 
the Unitarian church, of Marblehead. 



On October 23, 1898, Mr. Cole married Jane G. 
Wilson, daughter of Francis B. and Mary J. Wilson, 
of Marbleh^td. 

JOHN GREENOUGH GOODRIDGE, dentist of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, was bom in that city. May 
1, 1894, son of George and Ruth (Greenough) Good- 
ridge, and a scion of a family long established in 
that section of Massachusetta 

Dr. Goodridge was educated in the public 
and high schools of Lyim and there prepared him- 
self for college. In 1917 he graduated from Tuffs 
Dental College with his degree, and soon afterward 
engaged in the practice of his profession. For 
eighteen months he was associated with a promin- 
ent Boston dentist and then opened an ofilce in 
City HaU Square, Lynn, later removing to the of- 
fice in the Lynn Women's Club House, comer of 
Nahant and Broad streets. 

Dr. Goodridge's fraternal affiliations are with the 
following: he is a member of the Golden Fleeee 
Lodge, A. F. ft A. M.; Sutton Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; Zebulan Council, R. S. M.; Olivet Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar; Aleppo Templet 
A. A. O. N. M. S.; Lynn Chapter, Eastem Star; 
Kearsage Lodge, I. O. O. F.; Palestine Encamp- 
ment, I. O. O. F.; Asoka O. O. H. ft P. In the in* 
terests of his profession Dr. Goodridge is a mem- 
ber of the Metropolitan Dental Society; the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society; the Northeastern Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society; the National Dental Asso- 
ciation. He is also a member of the Delta Sigma 
Delta fraternity, and of Tuffs College Alumnae As- 
sociation. His clubs are the Oxford Club of Lynn 
and the Swampscott Masonic Club. 



THE L. B. SOUTHWICK COMPANY— The L. 
B. Southwick Company, one of the old established 
tanning industries of Essex county, is now one of 
the largest independent concerns in this branch of 
endeavor in the United States, producing many var- 
ieties of stock under the general trade insignia of 
''Golden Fleece" sheep leathers. 

More than forty years ago this business was 
founded by J. B. Thomas and L. B. Southwick. Mr. 
Thomas, in the course of his business career, had 
been identified with various enterprises, among 
which were numbered the wholesaling of meats» 
the slaughtering of sheep, and wool pulling. It was 
in an effort to find a more profitable outlet for bis 
principal by-product, sheep pelts with the wool re- 
moved, that he became interested in the fa>Bi*ii*g 
industry. Mr. Southwick had previously been in- 
terested in a tannery on Lowell street, in this city, 
in association with his brothers. In fact the South- 
wicks might well have been termed a fkmily of tan- 
ners, and Mr. Southwick was especially fitted for 
executive responsibility in this industry. Mr. H. A. 
Southwick, his brother, was one of the original 
founders of the tannery which today comprises the 
A. C. Lawrence Leather Company of Peabody. 

Entering upon their new project under the name 
of L. B. Southwick Company, the founders of 
business took over the old Jarvis wool shop en 



62 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Foster street, and this property formed the nudeus 
for the extensive holdings of the present organiza- 
ion. In the early days the tannery was considered 
of minor importance by Mr. Thomas, in comparison 
with his other interests, and valuable only as a 
means of conservation. Owing to his death in 1898, 
he never realized the possibilities of this industry, 
but Mr. Southwick survived him for ti^elve years, 
and saw the business take a leading place among 
the large leather producers of a new generation. 

In the early history of the concern antiquated 
methods obtained, and the daily output of the plant 
did not reach beyond fifty dozens skins, these re- 
stricted to practically one tannage, and a limited 
number of finishes. In the years following the 
death of Mr. Thomas, a few of his former associates 
became interested in the tannery, and gaining a full 
insight into the possibilities of the industry, brought 
to bear the force of their executive ability, won 
from long experience in business matters of large 
import, in the support of Mr. Southwick in his 
plans for expansion and development. The leader 
of this group, Elliott L. MacDonald, gave to the 
concern, in its years of struggling advancement, an 
untiring energy, a keen perception, and a construc- 
tive power which gave the enterprise a rare impetus. 
He is still displaying these same qualities in his 
position as president and general manager of the 
concern, the duties of the office of general manager 
having been taken up by him upon its incorpoxation 
in 1906, and that of president upon the death of Mr. 
L. B. Southwick, who was elected president at the 
time of incorporation. At that time Elmer B. 
Thomas was made treasurer, and Prentice H. 
Thomas, secretary, both relatives of Mr. J. B. 
Thomas, the founder, and each a trained executive 
in his special line of work. Clarence W. Barnes 
was made derk. In 1908 Maurice C. Hallett was 
made vice-president, and this group of men have 
carried the business forward to its present stand- 
ing. The death of Mr. Southwick, who passed away 
suddenly in 1910, removed the only surviving mem- 
ber of the original firm, but the efforts of another 
brother, Mr. A. E. Southwick, long, prominent in 
the sales force, have counted far for progress. He 
is still active in his branch. 

The executives of the concern confer upon the 
heads of the various production departments, gener- 
ous measure of praise for their efficiency and loyal- 
ty. These veterans of the practical activities, John 
O'Brien, Marshall Haines, Michael Murphy, Lars 
Larsen, Dennis O'Connor, and Thomas Tolan, are 
all deans of the tannery, and among their faithful 
assistants and lieutenants also, are many valuable 
men. 

On the approximately ten acres of contiguous land 
which comprise the present site of the plant, not a 
vestige of the original buildings or equipment re- 
mains. The property is situated about a quarter 
of a mile from the center of Peabody. The main 
factories contain about 100,000 square feet of floor 
space in brick construction, and about 150,000 in 
wood. They have their own power-house, store- 



houses and spur track, also separate office building. 
Their holdings indude further, several dwelling 
houses and miscellaneous buOding^. 

From the original output of about fifty dozen 
per day, for limited requirements, the plant has 
expanded to a production of one thousand dozen 
skins per day, in a great variety of finishes and 
colors, suitable for evexy requirement of the trade. 
The product consists of a large and varied line of 
sheep leather, not alone destined to reach the shoe 
trade, but absorbed by the novdty and specialty 
trades as well. The capacity of the plant is such 
that it can readily be adapted to turn production 
into the avenues of greatest demand. In normal 
times about five hundred men are employed, exdus- 
ive of the office force, and the position of this in- 
dustry in the economic fabric of Essex county is 
one of deep and broad significance. 



GEORGE HERBERT BREED— For many years 
identified with the industrial world of Lynn in an 
executive capacity, George Herbert Breed now holds 
a prominent position in business circles here, and 
is also connected with some of the leading financial 
institutions of the dty. 

Mr. Breed comes of one of the oldest and most 
prominent families of Essex county, leaders in pub- 
lic affairs in the early history of the Colonies, and 
active in the eariy industrial and civic progress of 
the city of Lynn. He was bom in Lynn, April 2, 
1869, and is a son of William N. and Caroline A. 
(Horton) Breed. Receiving his early education in 
the public schools of his native dty, he afterwards 
attended Moses Brown's School, of Providence, 
Rhode Island, then took a practical course at 
French's Business College, in Boston. His first em- 
ployment was in the capacity of derk with the Wil- 
liam N. Breed Company, of Lynn, with whom he 
has since continued uninterruptedly in the various 
changes of the firm up to the time of the present 
corporation of Sprague, Breed, Stevens ft Newhall, 
Incorporated. He has worked his way from the or- 
iginal subordinate position, through various higher 
positions, until he now has long held the office of 
vice-president of the concern and is active in its 
management. He is also a director of the Security 
Trust Company, and serves on the board of the 
Lynn Institute of Savings. 

Fraternally Mr. Breed holds the thirty-second de- 
gree in the Free and Accepted Masons, and is a 
member of the Sons of the American Revolution. 
He is a member of the Oxford Club, which he has 
served as president, and is a member of the Tedesco 
Golf Club. He is vice-president of, and on the board 
of the Home for Aged Men and also of the Lynn 
Hospital, and is a member of the First Universalist 
Church. 

On December 8, 1895, Mr. Breed married Edith 
H. Gove, of Nahant, Massachusetts, daughter of 
George and Isabella (Johnson) Gove, and they are 
the parents of three children: Helen M., wife of 
Malcolm Thomson, of Swampscott, has one child, 
George Breed Thomson; Edith S., wife of Harold 



(pecvW £.7 



-'^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



58 



barren, of S^monpscott, has one child, Mary John- 
son Warren; and William Johnson Breed, now at 
Moses Brown's School. 



SAMUEL A. GBNTLE£ ft SON— In mortuary 
interests in Beverly, Massachusetts, the undertaking 
firm of Samnel A. Gentlee ft Son are leaders. As 
the head of this firm, Samuel Augustus Gentlee has 
long been prominent. Mr. Gentlee is a son of Sam- 
uel and Lucy Ann (Nichols) Gentlee. Samuel Gent- 
lee was bom in Beverly in 1824, and was a shoe- 
maker by trade. He died many years ago. The 
mother died when Mr. Gentlee was a child of five. 
Samuel Augustus Gentlee was bom in Beverly, Oct- 
ober 25, 1847. He received a practical education 
in the public schools of tihe day, then learned his 
father's trade, as shoe-maker, wmch he followed for 
many years. During this time he added to his in- 
come, by acting as janitor of the Baptist church of 
Beverly, ^Bing this position for a period of fifteen 
years. At an age when most men feel that their 
destiny has been settled, whether by their own 
choice or otherwise, Mr, Gentlee determined upon 
a forward step in the business world. He entered 
the Massachusetts College of Embalming, and train- 
ed for the work which he is now doing, under Pro- 
fessor Qaxk, then a noted authority in this work. 
Mr. Gentlee was graduated in 1894, and started in 
business at once, in Beverly. He started, of course, 
with horse equipment, but with the passing of the 
years he has kept pace with the times, and now has 
a complete motor equipment, including two Hudson 
limousines. His headquarters are handsome and 
richly appointed, and fitted up with evexy facility 
for the work, and include a funeral parior and every 
customary department Mr. Gentlee is still actively 
engaged in the business, but for a number of years 
past, his son, Curtis Haskell Gentlee, has been his 
able assistaint, and carries a large share of the bur- 
den. Mr. Gentlee was searody more then a child 
at the outbreak of the Civfl War, but shortly before 
its close managed to enlist in the Second Massa- 
chusetts Unattached Infantry, which later became 
the Eighth Division. He served for a few months, 
but much to his disappointment, never f aw active 
service in battle. He has for very many years 
been a member of Post No. 89, Grand Army of the 
Republic For twenty years Mr. Gentlee has filled 
the office of marshal of Liberty Lodge Masons. 

In the year 1868, Mr. Gentlee married Adelaide 
Haskell, daughter of Josiah A* and Martha Jane 
(Larcom) Haskell, of Beverly Farms, Massachu- 
setts. Mrs. Gentlee's father was town assessor for 
a great many years. Mr. and Mrs. Gentlee are the 
parents of one son and one daughter, of whom the 
daughter is the elder, Stella F^rances, who was bom 
March 18, 1871, and is now the wife of William H. 
Carr, the founder and present owner of the City 
Shoe Manufacturing Company, of Beveriy. 

Curtis Haskell Xrentlee, the only son, was bom 
May 18, 1886, and is now associated with his father 
in business. He married, September 22, 1908, Helen 
Frances Powers, daughter of Benjamin and Mary 



Powers, of Gloucester, Massachusetts, and they have 
one daughter, Madeleine, who was bom September 
16, 1911. 

Mr. Gentlee and his son are rarely congenial in 
their outside interests as well as in their business 
association. Both support the Republican party ji 
political matters; both hold the Thirty-second De- 
gree in the Masonic order, and are members of the 
Ancient Ambic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
Samuel A. Gentlee is a member of Commandery, 
Knights Templar, and both are members of the Ox^ 
der of the Eastern Star, Curtis H. Gentlee being 
past patron of Diana Chapter, No. 101. Both are 
members of the Masonic Club. Both the elder and 
the younger Mrs. Gentlee are past patrons of the 
Eastern Star. The father is a member of Bass 
River Lodge, No. 141, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Beveriy, and the son is a member of 
Com Silk Lodge, No. 188, and also of Summit En- 
campment, No. 41, of the same order. The funily 
have always been members of the Baptist church 
of Beveriy. 

DR. OLIVER EDWARD BIXBY— Dr. Bizby, 
who is taking a prominent position among the lead- 
ing specialists of Essex county, comes of one of the 
old Massachusetts families which date baek to 1620, 
mention being made of this imaaiy in the eariy 
records of Ipswich. The immigrant ancestor, Jos- 
eph Bixby, came from Wallingfield, Suffolk, Eng- 
land. In direct line Amos Cyren Bizby, the doctor^s 
grandfather, was bom in Fayston, Vermont, April 
22, 1886, and served with honor in a regiment of the 
Vermont Volunteer Infantry. 

Charies Freeman Bixby, son of Amos Cyren Bix- 
by, was bom in Vermont in 1856^ and resided in 
that State and New Hampshire for many years, 
later coming to Massachusetts and locating Id Hai^ 
exhill, where he is now prominently identified with 
the shoe iudustry as a manufacturer. He married 
Nellie Cora Gage, who was bom in Vermont in 
1861, and is also still living. They are the pannts 
of two sons, OUvsr Ed<«rurd, whose name heads 
this review, and Forrest Dwii^t, who is eonneeted 
with the shoe business in association with his fiither. 

Dr. Oliver Edward Bixby was bom in Manchester, 
New Hampshire, April 18, 1886, and received his 
eariy education in the public and hi|^ sehools of 
his native town, being a graduate of the letter in 
the class of 1994. Entering the University of Vet^ 
mont, College of Medicine, at Buriington, he was 
graduated from that institution in the class of 1908. 
Acting as intesne at the Massachnsetts State Hos- 
pital for one year, he began the practice of med- 
icine in Saugtts, in this county, remaining there for 
four years. During this period he covered a poo^ 
graduate course at Harvard University Medical 
School, in children's dis ea s eS i Be was connected 
with the Children's Department of the Massachu- 
setts General HosiHltal, during the year following, 
then in 1913 came to Lynn, and has since practiced 
here as a specialist in pediatrics. He is now on the 
staff of the Lynn Hoi^tal (children's department) 



54 



ESSEX COUNTY 



is pediatrician at the Union Hospital of Lynn, is as- 
sistant physician to out-patients of the Children's 
Medical Department of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, and also is assistant superintendent of 
Union Hospital of Lynn. His private practice is 
restricted entirely to his specialty, and he has a fine 
suite of offices in Lynn, on Broad street, and an- 
other office in/ Salem, this county, at No. 383 Essex 
street. 

In the profession Dr. Bixby stands high, and holds 
membership in the American Medical Association, 
the Massachusetts State Medical Society, the Essex 
county Medical Society, the New England Pediatric 
Society, and the Lynn Medical fraternity. During 
the historic epidemic of influenza the city of Lynn 
opened two emergency hospitals, and Dr. Bixby 
was placed in full charge of one of these hospitals. 
Fraternally Dr. Bixby is a member of William Sut- 
ton Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Saugus, 
and of Cliftondale Lodge No. 193, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows. He is a member of the Mas- 
onic Club of Swampscott, and of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, of Lynn. Politically be sup- 
ports the Republican party, although be takes only 
the interest of the dtixen in public affairs, and he 
attends the First Methodist Episcopal Church of 
East Saugus. On June SO, 1916, Dr. Bixby married 
Adeline Jane KeUough, daughter of William and 
Charlotte Kellough. Dr. and Mrs. Bixby are the 
parents of two children: Ardell Chariotte, bom 
July 6, 1917; and Alvera Helen, bom December 1, 
1918. 

JOB F. HURLBURT— One of the familiar names 
in construction work in and about Beverly, Massa- 
chusetts, is that of Job F. Hurlburt Mr. Hurlburt 
is a son of Albert T. and Maria J. (Crosby) Hurl- 
burt, both natives of Nova Scotia. Albert T. Hurl- 
burt was connected with the shipping interests of 
Yarmouth during his lifetime. After his death, in 
1892, his wife came to Beverly, where she has since 
resided vnth her sister, Mrs. Richard Patch. 

Job F. Hurlburt was bom in Yarmouth, Nova 
Scotia, October 21, 1874. After completing the com- 
mon school course in the public schools of his 
native country, Mr. Hurlburt came to Beverly, en- 
tering the employ of George Swan, then a promin- 
ent carpenter in this section. Remaining in this 
connection for about three years, he then went to 
Nahant, and was there associated with J. T. Wilson 
for about fifteen years. At the end of that time 
he returned to Beverly, and established himself in 
the contracting business. From the first he has 
been very successful, and a large part of his work 
has been the erection of summer residences in this 
vicinity, of which he has built many. Interested in 
every branch of public progress, Mr. Hurlburt has 
scant leisure to devote to any matters outside his 
business, but is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. 

On June 29, 1909, Mr. Hurlburt married Edna 
Eaton, of Auburn, Maine. Mrs. Hurlburt is a 



daughter of John F. and Lucy (Haskell) Eaton, 
both bom in Auburn. Mr. Eaton was engaged in 
the grocery business in that city for many years. 



THOMAS D. SNOW— Identified for the greater 
part of his life with the construction worid of Mar- 
blehead, Massachusetts, Thomas D. Snow is still ac- 
tive in the management of his interests as a lead- 
ing contractor and builder. 

Mr. Snow was bom in Marblehead, October 12, 
1867, and is a son of Gamaliel and Hannah (Clout- 
man) Snow, both his parents also having been bom 
in Marblehead. Securing his education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town, Mr. Snow was first 
employed by J. S. Doane, a) prominent carpenter 
of the day, and with him learned tiie carpenter's 
trade. He became exjiert in this Work, and for a 
time acted in the capacity of foreman for Mr. 
Doane. Later he left his employer to enter a sim- 
ilar field for himself, and has since been success- 
fully engaged in genc^ contracting in Marblehead. 

In all public progress Mr. Snow takes a deep in- 
terest, and was at one time a member of Company 
C, 8th Regiment, M. V. M. 

Mr. Snow married Amy Graves, daughter of John 
M. and Mary (Smith) Graves, of Marblehead. Her 
mother was a native of Bevoiy, Massachusetts. 



EVBRSTT K. MURPHY— In the eminently prac- 
tical field of hardware, Mr. Murphy, of Marbl^iead, 
Massachusetts, is making an individual success, and 
also filling the needs of a large group of citizens. 
A record of the present activities of this city would 
be incomplete without his name. 

Mr. Murphy is a son of Mekar and Jessie (Mc- 
CouUough) Murphy, both of whom were bom in 
Nova Scotia. Melzar Murphy came to Marblehead 
in his youth, and spent the greater part of his life 
here. He followed the trade of carpenter, in the 
employ of the J. A. Steel Company, of MaiU^ead, 
for a great many years. 

Everett K. Murphy was bom in Marblehead on 
December 30, 1889, and rec^ved his education in 
the public schools of this place. When he had com- 
pleted the regular course, he entered the business 
world in the employ of W. A. Brown, the hardware 
merchant, at No. 14 School street, Marblehead. Ho 
was then sixteen years of age, and he has since 
continued in this business uninterruptedly, remain- 
ing in Mr. Brown's employ for neariy nine years, 
then striking out for himself. In September, 1919, 
Mr. Murphy bought out Mr. Brown, and has since 
conducted the business himself, under the name of 
E. E. Murphy, dealer in hardware. He has thus 
far been most successful, and the business is grow- 
ing and developing, and promises large future possi- 
bilities. 

On June 5, 1917, Mr. Murphy Joined the United 
States navy as quartermaster. He was called for 
service on March 5, 1918, and was detailed to Nor- 
folk, Virgima, remaining there until his discharge, 
on February 8, 1919. He is now a member of the 
American Legion. Mr. Murphy is popular in frat- 




^^^xZ-r-ziCutr^z^i^t^^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



55 



emal circles, and is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Mugford Associ- 
ation, of Marblehead. 



FLOYD LYMAN GOODWIN— Four generations 
of last making in one of the great shoe centers o\ 
the world is the record of the Goodwin family of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, and one of the active man- 
agers of the business at the present day, is Floyd 
Lyman Goodwin. 

This business was founded in a little factory on 
what is now Olive street, in East Lynn, in the year 
1820, by Richard Richards, the pioneer of America 
in the last industry. From his small beginning the 
business grew and prospered, and the founder wta 
succeeded by his son-in-law, Albert T. Goodwin, the 
great-grandfather of Floyd T. Goodwin, the present 
manager. In 1848 Albert T. Goodwin dropped the 
name of Richards from the firm name, and there- 
after carried on the business under his own name. 
LymsLXk T. and Daniel W. Goodwin, sons of Albert 
T. Goodwin, entered the factory early in life, learn- 
ed the business, and were eventually received into 
partnership. After the great Lynn fire the plant 
was reestablished on Spring street, im Lynn, and in 
1867, the father having turned the business over 
into their hands, the brothers formed a company 
under the name of Goodwin Brothers. The business 
developed so rapidly that it became necessary to 
seek new quarters, and a commodious factory was 
built on Oxford street, which became the permanent 
home of the industry. In 1900 Lyman T. Goodwin 
and his son, Geoi*ge L. Goodwin, took over the busi- 
ness. In 1911 the business was incorporated, the 
parties being Lyman T. Goodwin, George L. Good- 
win, Frank W. Goodwin, Martha H. Goodwin, and 
Floyd L. Goodwin. The business was then carried 
on under the name of Goodwin Brothers Company, 
Incorporated. In 1915 Geoi*ge L. Goodwin died, af- 
ter many years of constructive activity in this busi- 
ness, and left his share of the business to his son. 
In 1916 the corporative form was discontinued, and 
the partnership form was resumed, the personnel of 
the firm remained the same until April, 1920, when 
the Great Reaper gathered to his fathers, Lyman T. 
Goodwin, the revered head of the firm, and pioneer 
of the last business, then eighty-four years of age. 
His son, Frank W. Goodwin, retired from the firm 
on January 1, 1921, at which time Floyd L. Good- 
win acquired his interest. The present partnership 
consists of Floyd L. Goodwin, and Martha, widow 
of Geoi^ge L. Goodwin, the name remaining un- 
changed. 

During all the long and eventful history of this 
business, the standards of the house have remained 
the same— the highest. Progress, development, and 
the crystallizing of experience into further progress, 
greater development, these are the forces which 
have given the firm of Goodwin Brothers the posi- 
tion in the shoe industry which they hold today. 

As the head and active manager of this important 
interest, Floyd Lyman Goodwin is a leading figure 
in the shoe industry in Essex county. Mr. Good- 



win was bom in Lynn, on August 26, 1892, and re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools of 
the city. He thereafter entered Bryant & Strat- 
ton's business college, in Boston, from which he 
was graduated in 1918. Fov the next few years he 
handled general office work in the last factory, and 
since 1917 has been an active executive, and closely 
identified with the growth and constant forward 
movement of the business. 

Mr. Goodwin is a member of the Lynn Chamber 
of Commerce, and of the Associated Industries of 
Massachusetts. He is widely known socially, and is 
a member of the Tedesco Country Club, and of the 
Oxford Club, of Lynn, and Masonic order. He is 
a member of the Unitarian church. On November 
8, 1914, Mr. Goodwin married Florence Amick, of 
Lynn. ^ 

HORACE POIRIBR, M. D.— The long roll of 
Salem's professional men would be incomplete^ 
without the name of Dr. Horace Poirier, whose 
office is at No. 197 Lafayette street. Dr. Poirier 
was bom in St. Cyrille, Canada, January 4, 1878; 
and is a son of Leopold and Louise (Niquette) 
Poirier. Leopold Poirier is a man of excellent edu- 
cation, having chosen the profession of medicine, 
and having prepared for it, but without under- 
going the strictiy technical course. He has the de- 
gree/ of Bachelor of Arts. Other inducements led 
him to abandon his plans for a professional career, 
and he has been for many years successfully en- 
gaged in large lumber mill interests, from which 
he is now about to retire, so far as active participa- 
tion in the business is concerned. He is now jus- 
tice of the peace, at Drummonville, Canada. 

Dr. Poirier received his intermediate education 
in the grammar schools of his native city, then eik- 
tered Nicolet College, of Quebec, Canada, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts. Later he took a medical course at 
Laval University, of the city of Quebec. He was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, 
June 10, 1902. He served as interne at the Emer- 
gency Hospital at Salem, Massachusetts, for one 
year, then passed the examination of the Massa- 
chusetts State medical board, in May, 1903. He 
opened his own office in July of that year, for the 
general practice of medicine. He rapidly built up a 
substantial practice, and a few years later built the 
handsome residence, which he now occupies, with 
office rooms in the same building. 

Dr. Poirier, besides enjoying the confidence of 
a large proportion of the people of this vicinity, 
is recognized by his colleagues as a leading member 
of the medical profession. He is a member of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society; is PTAfwirimg physi- 
cian for several fraternal orders: the Artizans, the 
Canadian Francais Union, St. Jean de Baptiste, For- 
esters of America, and Forestiers Franco-Ameri- 
cains. He is also examining physician for the John 
Hancock and Metropolitan Insurance companies. In 
political preference Dr. Poirier is a Republican, and 
is a staunch supporter of the policies of that party. 



56 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Dr. Poirier married^ October 15, 1912, Louise H. 
Hayes, daughter of Abraham Hayes. She was a 
graduate nurse of Salem Hospital. Dr. Poirier is a 
member of St. Joseph's (French) Roman Catholic 
Church. The doctor has little time for social re- 
laxation, always at the command, as he is, of his 
extensive practice. He acknowledges one hobby, a 
great fondness for all dumb animals. 

F. NORRIS OSBORNE— Successful in his own 
chosen line of endeavor, and prominent in the public 
life of the town, F. Norris Osborne, of Marble- 
head, Massachusetts, represents a group of thor- 
oughly progressive men, in whose hands the busi- 
ness interests of the community move constantly in 
the right direction. 

Mr. Osborne was bom in Marblehead, on Decem- 
ber 26, 1877. He received a practical education in 
the public schools of the town, and at an early age 
entered the world of industry. His first position 
was with the Clark & Macintosh Company, of 
Marblehead, as shoemaker, and he remained with 
this company for about three years. He next went 
to J. C. Nicholson, of Swampscott, also shoe manu- 
facturers, and was with them for about two years, 
later returning to Marblehead, and entering the em- 
ploy of A. Stevens & Sons. A year there, then a 
year with Frank Carroll, also of Marblehead, and 
Mr. Osborne severed his connections permanently 
with the shoe business. He became associated with 
S. H. Cole, in the provision business, with whom he 
remained for about eleven years. He then estab- 
lished a meat and provision business for himself, un- 
der the name of the F. N. Osborne Market. Along 
this line he was very successful, the business de- 
veloping into an important interest. In 1914 he 
formed a partnership with Mr. Lewis, and while 
this endured, the firm name was the Osborne & 
Lewis Company. In 1915, however, he purchased 
the interest of Lewis Bragdon and incorj>orated 
the business. The name then became the F. N. 
Osborne Company, and still continues thus. The 
business now is one of the leaders in its line in 
Marblehead. 

Mr. Osborne's prominence in the business life of 
the town brought him much before the public eye, 
and he was very naturally sought for public office. 
For one year he served as a member of the Board 
of Overseers, and was for some time a member, and 
also chairman of the "Live Wire Committee,** of 
Marblehead. 

In fraternal circles, Mr. Osborne is well known, 
being a member of Philanthropic Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; of Washington Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; of the Improved Order of Red Men; and of 
the ELnights of Pythias. 

On January 1, 1901, Mr. Osborne married Anna C. 
Blaney, of MarblehoEKl, and they have four chil- 
dren: Bowden G., EcUth B., Frank N., Jr., and 
Elizabeth M. 

BENJAMIN W. TRBFRY was bom in Marble- 
head, Massachusetts, June 16, 1866, aAd there at- 



tended the public schools. At the age of fourteen 
years, he became a shoe factory worker, and for 
twenty-five years was so employed in different posi- 
tions. In 1894 he engaged in the shoe business in 
Marblehead, but in 1900 again made a change, and 
from 1900 until the present, 1921, he has been in 
business for himself as a contractor. He is a ceme- 
tery commissioner for Marblehead, and a man of 
good business capacity. 

Mr. Trefry married, in Marblehead, in November, 
1910, Almira B. Phillips, bom in Marblehead, Octo- 
ber 6, 1860, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and 
Elizabeth (Stone) Phillips, her father bom October 
22, 1829, died in January, 1919, her mother bom iP 
Marblehead, April 30, 1830, died February 21, 1920. 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillips are the parents of nine chil- 
dren: Addie, married Charles Simmons, of Marble- 
head; Eliza, married Benjamin F. Brown, of Marble- 
head; William, died in Marblehead; Sarah J., nuu> 
ried Joseph Walsh, of Peabody, Ifassachusetts; Al- 
mira B., married Benjamin W. Trefry, of Marble- 
head; Susie G., married John Greffy, of Essex; 
Annie M., married Fred Shampine, of Maine; 
Thomas J., died in Marblehead; and Joseph. 



. FRANK HERRICK SANGER— The leather busi- 
ness, one of the leading industries of Essex county, 
Massachusetts, commands the attention of a very 
large group of efficient, progressive men. Among 
these men, Frank Hemck Sanger, of the Nathan 
H. Poor and Company at Peabody, is a prominent 
figure. 

Mr. Sanger is a son of Charles Albert and 
Catherine S. (Wright) Sanger, of Peabody, Massa- 
chusetts. Charles A. Sanger has for many years 
been well known in the life insurance btudness in 
this section. 

Frank Herrick Simger was bom in Peabody, on 
October 27, 1873. Beginning Us education in the 
public schools of ib% town, b« continiied through 
grammar scihool, than covj^r^ qiie year in high 
school. As a young man hc^ followed varioos lines 
of endeavor. Becoming ^imecM with the. Nathan 
H. Poor Leath^ Connpai^y aa cled^ on Deoember 11, 
1899, hf^ was a stodf]u>ld«r one year later, and 
since Januaiy 1, 191Q, h^s htan, half QWBer of the 
business, lix. Suraer apw bmrs. a imMronant piart 
in the mansiig^m^t of the. affairs qf the business. 
Besides his indivi<Hwl hmpiMsa inteest in tha Na- 
than H. Poor ajul C<mpany, which has been the 
name of the fiyni sin^ Deeemher 28, 1MB. Mr. San- 
ger is a director o{ tlM. Bi»Ji>Qdy Cofin^rative BaiEik. 

The call of public responsibility reached Mr. San- 
ger some y^ars ago, and waa not denied. Ha was 
appointed to the finance committee of the town of 
Peabody, in which connection ha anrvad for a period 
of five yeftrs. He served as a tniatea of the Pea- 
body Institute for six years, and he is president of 
the Chamber of Commerce, having long been a 
member of that body, a director for two years, and 
was made its president in 1921. Mr. Sanger served 
in the Second Coxps Cadets, Massachusetts State 
Militia, of Salem, for six yean. 



c^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



57 



In fraternal circles Mr. Sanger is widely known. 
He is a member of Jordan Lodge, Free and Accept- 
ed Masonsy of Peabody; of the Salem Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; of the Salem Council, Royal 
and Select Masters, and of the Winslow Lewis Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar, of Salem. He is also 
a member of Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Boston; and is a 
member of Peabody Lodge, No. 1409, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of EUcs, of which he is the 
treasurer. 

In social circles Mr. Sanger is popular, and he is 
a member of the most prominent clubs of this sec- 
tion. He holds membership in the Rotary Club, No. 
9, of Peabody, in the Peabody Club, the Homestead 
Golf Club, of Danvers, Massachusetts, the Salem 
Club, and the Colonial Club, of Salem, the Corin- 
thian Yacht Club, of Marblehead, and the Boston 
Athletic Association. 

Mr. Sanger has not declined to identify himself 
with religious work, and is active in the support of 
the Congregational church, and he is a member of 
the parish of the Universalist church. 

Mr. Sanger married (first) on February 28, 1900, 
Lena Mabel, daughter of Frank and Urilda (Put^ 
nam) Newhall, of Lynnfield, Massachusc^tts, and to 
that union was bom a son, Richard Herrick Sanger. 
Mr. Sanger married (second) Gertrude Goddard 
Eames, daughter of Jonathan Goddard and Car^ 
rie Elizabeth (Perry) Eames, and they have on^ 
son, John Alden Sanger, bom on August 12, 1910. 



CARLISLE ROYAL GOULD, U. D.^Among the 
brilliant group of professional men of Salem, Massa^ 
chusetts, Carlisle Royal Gould, M> D. is a representa- 
tive individual. Dr. Crould was bom in Biddeford, 
Maine, May 14, 1890. Descended from an old Maine 
family, he is a son of Royal and Elizabeth (Nicker- 
son) Gould. BfiyiJ Goqhi ^'Wt a prombittlt^ attm- 
ney of Biddeford^ & m^ of dignitgr, m^d higjUy t^ 
speeted in the. comia^^, 

The dfictor received his eariy edueaftioii in the 
public schools of Biddeford, then entered PMHipe- 
Exeter Academy. He teished l^e course tl|ere in 
1909, but wajp not graduated* For his technical 
training he entered Bowdpip K<M)i.cai SchQOl« from 
which he W9^ g^n^f^i in ljpi% H|j, begao, i». 
mediat^y won his hfc^m trfOniWi <maing to tfef. 
Salem Qospiua J^. h 191% Thm te rwitead 
until November 1, WIU tlian toojL up g^^^ p^l aadi- 
cal practice in the cityi of Salem. Ahhoufl^ stjll 
one of the younger members of the, medical fra- 
ternity in this section, he is building up ^. practice, 
which clearly indicates the f^^ H^ h^ hfts fb^nly 
established himself in the confidence of the public. 
Dr. Crould is not oinly a prolesaiimal man; he is lor 
terested in eveiry branch ofdvio vnJfare; and reeog> 
nises the responsibility of every man to the gea^ 
eral good. He was an associate member of the 
Draft Board during the European War, and is iden- 
tified with such movements as make for public pro- 
gress. He was city physician of Salem, from June 
1, 1917, to June 1, 1920. He is a member of the 



Essex County Medical Society, and of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. 

Dr. Gould married, November 5, 1913, Gladys 
Loring, daughter of Nesmith Loring, of Yarmouth, 
Maine. They have one daughter, Elizabeth, bom 
August 20, 1915. 

WALTER T. ROCHEFORT— Having established 
himself in the practice of his chosen profession at 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, his native city; in 1906, 
Walter T. Rochef ort has for the past fourteen years 
identified himself closely with all that makes for 
civic betterment, and at the same time has met with 
the consistent success professionally which is the 
result of the possession of those sterling qualities^ 
energy and integrity, linked together with public 
spirit and a broad vision. 

Walter T. Rochef ort was bom in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, March 1, 1888, the son of Matthew B. R* 
and Mary (Gilson) Rochef ort. His parents came 
to Lawrence in 1865, where for many years hie 
father was engaged in the tea and coffee busi- 
ness. Walter T. Rochefort attended the publie 
schools of his native city, and after graduating from 
the Lawrence High School, matriculated at Har- 
vard College, where he was graduated in 1903, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then entered 
th Law School of Harvard University and won from 
this institution the degree of Bachdor of Laws in 
1906. Passing his bar examinations that same year 
he returned to Lawrence and immediacy establish*- 
ed himself in the practice of his profession. He 
opened an ofiiee in the Bay State building and this 
has remained his headquarters ever since. He has 
built up an excelleut practice and has handled many 
important cases up to the present, proving himself 
to be most efilcient in hid particular Une. 

Mr. Rochefort is a member of the Essex County 
Bar Association, the Lawr^ce City Bar Association, 
the Chamber of Commerce, and is vice-chairman of 
the local schpol board, serving his second term as 
a member. He amUates with the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, St Mary*^ Romw Catholic Church, and 
also holds membership in the Lawrence Catholic 
Ouh. 

On Jun^ 28, 1911, at Lawrence, Walter T. Roche- 
fort was united in marriag|^ with Maxy Elizabeth 
C^arroU. They are the parents of one child, Mary» 
bom A^ 18, 19}2. The f^unily resides at No. 10 
Yale street. 

JABfBa B. ROBIiltON^A member of the Robin- 
sonr.Tooh^ Company^ of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
Jamas B^ RohiBsoM steads high in the mezeantUe 
world of Essex county. With splendid show rooms 
and an efficient service station at Nos. 10 to 20 
Winter atee#t, ia Lanmnee, tUe Ham is conceded 
to be the largest in New England' outside the dty 
of Bostan ia the. line of motMr distnbiition and ser< 
vice* 

Mr. Robinson was boza in Deeifteld, New Hamp* 
shire, September 22, IMl, and is a son of James 
and Eliza (White) Robinson. The famfly came to 
Lawrence in 1870, and the elder Mr. Robinson for 



58 



ESSEX COUNTY 



many years had charge of BeUeidew Cemetery. Both 
parents are now deceased. 

Having began his education in the schools of 
his native town* Mr. Bobinson completed his studies 
in the Lawrence public schools, then entered the 
business world in the employ of C. A. Metcalf, a 
prominent hardware dealer of that day» in the spring 
of 1884. Four years later, upon the death of Mr. 
Metcalf, Mr. Bobinson, in association with Ed. M. 
Sanborn and M. E. Austin, took over the business, 
the firm name becoming Sanborn, Austin & Bobin- 
son. This was the beginning of the present im- 
portant business. Changes, in the nature of the 
case, took place from time to time, but each change 
counted for growth and development. In 1887 Mr. 
Austin withdrew from the firm, which continued 
as Sanborn & Bobinson, remaining thus until the 
withdrawal of Mr. Sanborn in 1907 Then J. L. 
Toohey, still a member of the firm, was received in 
partnership, also M. T. Doyle, and the business was 
continued under the name of the Bobinson Hard- 
ware Company. Mr. Dojde retiring from the firm 
in 1914, the name became the Bobinson-Toohey 
Company, no further change having been made 
since that time in the personnel or name. 

During all these years the hardware business was 
a constantly growing interest, but in the past de- 
cade the automobile department has so far out- 
stripped the regular hardware business in import- 
ance that in 1919 the hardware business was dis- 
continued and the automobile business very largely 
increased. This places the Bobinson-Toohey Com- 
pany in the lead in a very extensive territory in the 
distribution of motor vehicles. They handle the 
Cadillac, the Durant, and the Nash cars. Their 
service station is a model of convenience and mod- 
em equipment, and in the two departments they 
keep fifty-five employees busy. 

The first location of this business, in the early 
days of its history, was at No. 327 Essex street, 
where the original business was founded in 1862. 
In 1900 a building was purchased at the comer of 
Essex and Amesbury streets, the firm taking posses- 
sion the following spring. In August, 1919, the 
business having outgrown these premises, the pres- 
ent large, handsome building was purchased, and as 
soon as tlie necessary interior alterations were com- 
pleted the business was removed to its new location. 

Mr. Bobinson is a member of the Lawrence Cham- 
ber of Commerce. He is a member of Phoenician 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; of the Merri- 
mack Valley Country Club, and of the North An- 
dover Country Club. He resides at No. 79 Johnson 
street,. North Andover. 



CHARLES HENRY BEAN— The passing of 
Charles Henry Bean, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
was deeply regretted, for he had endeared himself 
to a very large circle of friends by his upright, 
manly life and for close adherence to high standards 
of business ethics and private morality. Industry 
and thrift marked his life and he accomplished much 
through persevering effort, coupled with marked 



business ability^ He was the architect of his own 
fortunes, and when at the end of life his record 
was closed, there was neither blot nor blemish in 
the name he bore, a name brought to New England 
by John Bean, who settled in Exeter, New Hamp- 
shire, not later than 1660, he being one of the com- 
mittee appointed to run the boundary lines be- 
tween Exeter and adjoining towns. Men of hid 
name have served their country in every war from 
the days of King Philip and the ''Swamp Fight" to 
the forests of the Argonne, and their citizenship has 
been of the quality to endure eveiy test of war or 
peace. 

Charles H. Bean, a descendant of the American 
ancestor, John Bean, and son of Elkanah F, and 
Charlotte (Evans) Bean, was bom in Franklin, New 
Hampshire, July 17, 1840, and died at his home on 
Lowell street, Lawrence, Massachusetts, November 
18, 1914. The first twelve months of his life were 
spent in Franklin, then the family moved to Lowell 
for a short time, but later, in 1852, coming to 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, and that city was ever 
afterwards his home. He attended the public schools 
of both Lowell and Lawrence, and to that equip- 
ment added a course of study at Comers Comma^ 
cial College. After school years were over the 
young man entered business life and continued ac- 
tively engaged in commercial enterprises until his 
retirement in 1901. He worked his way upward in 
the business worid, being at the time of his retire- 
ment senior member of the firm of Bean & Pooler 
lumber dealers, of Lawrence, a business to which 
the sons of the partners succeeded. 

Another interest with which Mr. Bean was iden> 
tified for many years was the Merchants' Trust 
Company, a connection recognized by the board of 
directors of that institution in the following reso- 
lution of respect: 

On Wednesday, November the eighteenth, 1914, 
after a brief illness, Charles Henry Bean died at his 
home on Lowell street, Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Bean became identLAed with the banking inter- 
ests of the city in 1889 as a member of l£e first 
board of directors of the Merchants' National Bank, 
and in 1911, when the bank was consolidated with 
the Lawrence National Bank by the formation of 
the Merchants' Trust Company, he was elected a 
director of the new institutions, serving upon the 
board up to the time of his death. Mr. Bean's high 
character and conscientious fidelity in the discharge 
of his duties and responsdbilities which he undertook 
make his death a distinct loss to the dty. We 
wish to record our due appreciation of the honesty 
of purpose, business abili^ and uprightness of char^ 
actor of Mr. Bean, and regret at the loss of his 
presence from among us. 

An estimate of Mr. Bean's character cannot be 
formed without taking into consideration his re- 
lation to the church. For many years he was a 
member of Lawrence Street Congregational Church, 
but later he became a member of the United Con- 
gregational Church. He was particularly useful in 
his latter years, and his Christian life was sincere 
and earnest. He was a member of €rrecian Lodge, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



69 



Free and Accepted Masons; and he was keenly 
alive to the duties involved in American citizen- 
ship. He always declined all offers of public office 
for himselfy except one term as councilman, but 
be worked zealously for his friends if they were 
candidates for an office. In his business dealings 
he was just and upright, and in disposition, genial 
and agreeable. His friends were legicm and he was 
loyal to every obligation friendship imposes. 

Mr. Bean married (first) November 20, 1867, Jen- 
nie M. Simonds, daughter of Oliver Plympton and 
Mary Angelina (Cone) Simonds, both of Peru, 
Vermont. Mrs. Jennie M. Bean died January 16, 
1877, the mother of three children, all bom in 
Lawrence: Mary E., Cyrus E., and Jennie S., the 
last-named dying in infancy. Mr. Bean married 
(second) March 22, 1881, Martha Ellen Osgood, 
daughter of Ira and Sarah Bumham (Parsons) Os- 
good, her father bom in Loudon, her mother in Gil- 
manton. New Hampshire. Mr. Bean was essentially 
a home man, here, amid home environment, he was 
happiest and at his best. Mrs. Martha E. (Osgood) 
Bean died May 22, 1920. 



CHARLES EUGENE FABENS— Four genera- 
tions of Fabens were vessel owners and shipping 
merchants of Salem, Massachusetts, Charles Eugene 
Fabens being the fourth in direct line, the business 
having been inaugurated by his great-grandfather, 
WHliiun Fabens, who established trade by shipping 
between Salem, Massachusetts, and Cayenne, French 
Guiana, South America, in 1816. The business then 
established continued through four generations, 
with offices in Salem until they were removed to 
Boston, and in 1877, by Charles Eugene Fabens, to 
whose memory this review is dedicated. He was a 
man of unusual quality and obtained his high dis- 
tinction as merchant before reaching the prime of 
bis powers, at the age of thirty-nine. 

Although bom in Cayenne, Charles Eugene Fa- 
bens was brought to Salem an infant, and was deep- 
ly attached to that city and its people. So strong 
was his sentiment toward Salem, the headquarters 
of the fleet of vessels connected with the Fabens' 
business, that at great inconvenience to his firm, 
and long after the once extensive foreign commerce 
of the port had ceased to exist, Mr. Fabens con- 
tinued to have his vessels arrive and depart from 
Salem. It was with deep regret that in 1877 he 
gave the orders to move the business to Boston, and 
with genuine sadness on his part that the advertise- 
ments were posted offering for sale the wharves 
and buildings which had been so long in the family 
name. Theirs was a family business and as there 
were resident heads in Cayenne, as well as in Salem, 
many Fabens were concerned in this great shipping 
house. 

Charles Eugene Fabens was a son of Charles 
Henry Fabens, of Salem, and Marie Euphrasia 
Fabens, daughter of Samuel and Marie Euphrasie 
(Mathey) Fabens, of Cayenne, French Guiana, and 
her husband's cousin. At the time of his birth, 
March 27, 1845, the parents of Charles E. Fabens 



were living in Cayenne, French Guiana, but two 
months later they came to Salem, Massachusetts, 
although only for a few months. They then re- 
turned to Cayenne, which was the family home 
until 1848, when they came again to Salem, which 
was ever afterward the home of Charles E. Fabens, 
the home in Lafayette street being abandoned in 
1866 for the Chestnut street residence. The lad, 
Charles E., attended the private schools in Salem, 
taught by Miss Robinson, Miss Pierce, Mr. Fits 
Waters and Oliver Carlton, these being really a sue- 
cession of grades. He finished with a business 
course in a Boston commercial college. 

In 1862, at the age of seventeen, he entered the 
employ of his father, Charles Henry Fabens, then 
at the head of the Fabens shipping house, and was 
assigned to the New York office of the house. No. 17 
Broadway, where he was bookkeeper and assistant 
to the manager in chartering and dispatching ships 
to Cayenne. On the death of Samuel Eugene Fa- 
bens, his mother's brother and resident head of the 
house at Cayenne, Charies E. Fabens was at once 
sent out by his father to settle his affairs and take 
charge of the business in Cayenne. In 1869 Charles 
Henry Fabens died and was succeeded by his two 
capable sons, whom he had trained for tlieir posi- 
tions as he had been trained by his father, and he 
by Mb father, the founder of the business in 1816. 

When these sons, Charles Eugene and Benjamin 
H. Fabens, succeeded to the shipping business of the 
Fabens, they formed a partnership and traded under 
the firm name C. E. St B. H. Fabens, with offices at 
211-213 Derby street, Salem, from 1869 to 1879, and 
at No. 1 Commercial Wharf, Boston, and Atlantic 
avenue, Boston, at the head of T whaif . Both men 
were prominent in the business world, Charles Eu- 
gene always remaining loyal to the Fabens' shipping 
house, Benjamin H. beuog at his death, present 
of the Naumkeag Bank of Salem. The fiim owned 
a fleet of vessels, including the three brigs, ^Lisde 
Bigelow," ''Mary E. Dana," and "Anna MitcheU"; 
schooners, ''Juno," "Golden City," "Cayenne," and 
the "Charles H. Fabens," and were part owners in 
numerous other vessels. 

Charles E. Fabens was a man of fine physique, 
genial manners, lively disposition and cultivated 
tastes. On his mother's side he traced to French 
ancestry and he spoke French so weU that he was 
occasionally called upon to act as interpreter in 
court. He possessed a rich deep bass voice and 
was prominent in Salem's musical life. He was a 
charter member of the Salem Oratorio Society and 
ever retained his membership and his interest, being 
the central figure in the operetta given in aid of 
the society the year preceding his death. He sang 
in the Grace Episcopal Church choir for two de- 
cades, he and his family being communicants of that 
church. He was president of the Salem Schubert 
Club from its beginning, took leading parts in all 
their concerts and entertainments, and his death 
was a stunning blow to the club. 

This many-sided man was not only an able, influ- 
ential business man, a talented musician, and an 



60 



ESSEX COUNTY 



escellent citixen, but was also great-hearted, and 
among his philanthropies was the Old Ladies' Home 
of Salem, which he served for years as a member 
of its board of management. He was a Democrat 
in politics, but never accepted a political office, al- 
though never unmindful of his duty as a citizen. 
On the contrary he was most public-spirited and 
helpful in all movements to aid Salem interests. 
All who knew him respected and loved him and his 
acquaintance was large. In addition to his shipping 
interests he was a trustee of Salem Savings Bank 
and a director of Naumkeag National Savings Bank, 
an institution of which his brother Benjamin H. 
Fabens was president, as was Eugene Jerome Fa- 
bens, whose sketch follows, both these men now, 
too, gone to join the "great majority." 

Charles Eugene Fabens married Bessie Hannah 
Dyer, of Eastport, Maine, daughter of Charles H. 
and Hannah Elizabeth (Stevens) Dyer. Children, 
all bom in Salem, Massachusetts: Charles Henry, 
bom at No. 10 Chestnut street, in 1870, died in 
1874; Marie Euphrasie, bom at No. 44 Chestnut 
street, November 21, 1874; Bessie Dyer, bom at No. 
44 Chestnut street, in 1880; and Eugene Jerome, 
(q.v.). The father of these children, Charles Eu- 
gene Fabens, died in Salem, Massachusetts, at his 
home at No. 10 Chestnut street, January 22, 1886, 
in his fortieth year. 
^ ■ 

BUOENE JEROlffE FABENS— The foregoing 
record of the parents and connections of Eugene 
Jerome Fabens, now gone to join the ^great cara- 
van," explain how at the age of twenty-five, he was 
a National bank president, the youngest man ever 
to hold that high honor in all New England. He 
was a son, grandson, great-grandson and great- 
great-grandson of strong-bodied, strong-minded and 
able business men, and in him the lines of business 
ancestors, paternal and maternal, converged. He 
was one of the strong men of his day in the business 
world, and though stricken in the prime of his 
youth, his thirty-five years had been so fruitful and 
so wdl improved that he had reached a position of 
honor and importance that few men ever attain, 
and then only at a much greater age. He was the 
youngest of the children of Charies Eugene (q.r.) 
and Bessie Hannah (Dyer) Fabens. 

Eugene Jerome Fabens was bom at the family 
home, No. 10 Chestnut street, Salem, Massachusetts, 
September 15, 1888, died in Salem Hospital, stricken 
with pneumonia, September 26, 1918. He was edu- 
cated in Salem grade and high schools and Mr. 
Stone's School, the old stone school on Chestnut 
street, Boston, and while he might have had a 
college training had he so desired, he was anxious 
to begin his career and chose fiiumce as his field 
of activity. He first worked in the office of the 
Peavey Elevator Company at Minneapolis, then en- 
tered the brokerage firm of Lee, Higginson A Com- 
pany, of Boston, and was at once marked as a young 
man of great ability and ambition, bound to rise. 
He was well connected, but that only hastened his 
rise; he needed no fortuitous aids for he was fully 



equipped and could not be kept down. After a. 
series of promotions he was elected president of 
the Naumkeag National Bank, the second of tho 
Fabens name to hold that office, his uncle Benjamin 
H. Fabens being the first. While Eugene J. Fabens 
was filling the office, the Naumkeag National Bank 
was merged with the Mercantile National Bank of 
Salem and the Asiatic National Bank, the consoli- 
dated banks incorporating as the Naumkeag Trust 
Company. Mr. FaheuB was chosen president of that 
company and until his death was its able and 
efficient executive head. He was also a director of 
the Hood Rubber Company of Boston, a trustee of 
Salem Hospital, the Ropes Memorial, and Bertram 
Home for the Aged, and interested in many of 
Salem's activities. Following the destructive Salem 
fire of 1914, he was appointed a member of the re- 
building committee, and was chosen by the com- 
mittee as its first inresident. About the same time 
he became a member of the firm of Edgeriy and 
Crocker, of Boston, which firm Blake BroUiers later 
took over, and for a year prior to his passing was 
head of the New York branch. 

Mr. Fabens married, June 17, 1907, Katherine 
Patrick Williams, daughter of Wiley Cook and Sarah 
(Egbert) Williams, of Frankfort, Kentucky. The 
four children of Eugene Jerome and Katherine P. 
(Williams) Fabens were all bom in Salem, Massa^ 
chusetts, except the youngest, who was bom in New 
York City: Charles Eugene, bom August 11, 1908; 
Katherine, bom October 17, 1909; Sarah, bom April 
28, 1914; and Benjamin Henry, bom February 24, 
1918. 

When stricken with pneumonia Mr. Fabens was 
taken to Salem Hospital and within a week suc- 
cumbed. When his death was announced, the fiags 
on the city hall and on the buildings of the differ- 
ent corporations were lowered to half mast as a 
mute token of esteem to the memory of this gifted 
native son whose life, so full of promise and achieve- 
ment, had been cut short almost at its very thres- 
hold. 

DR. PBTBR LBON McKALLAGAT was bom at 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, on February 18, 1888, and 
is a son of Richard and Catherine (Curraa) Mc- 
Kallagat. His grandfather was John McKallagat, 
who was bom in Ireland, and lived at Lawrence duiv 
ing the greater part of his life, where he was en- 
gaged in the tracking business. His son, Richard 
McKallagat, was bom at Ballaxd Vale, Massachu- 
setts, in 1848. He was engaged in the hat busi- 
ness during the greater part of his life. He was a 
man of a very retiring disposition and never took 
part in politics or othor public concerns. He mar- 
ried Catherine Curran, who was bom in Ireland in 
1858. ' He died in 1915, survived by his wife and son. 
Mrs. Catherine (Curran) McKallagat is still living 
and makes her home at Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

Dr. McKallagat received his eariy education in 
the public schools of Massachusetts and graduated 
from the Lawrence High School in 1902. l^m high 
school he proceeded to Columbia College, New Toric 
City, where he took up the study of medidne. He 



Eugene jnome Jfahtns anb Charles £ugrne mi Kalhrrfne f abens 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



61 



j^radiiated from Columbia in 1906, with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine, and entered Saint Vincent ^ 
Hospital in New York City shortly afterwards. At 
Saint Vincent's, Dr. McKallagat followed the sur- 
gical course, ending his intemeship in 1908. During 
the summer of the same year, 1908, he had charge 
of Saint John's Guild Floating Hospital in New 
York City. 

On October 18, 1908, Dr. McKallagat returned 
to his native city of Lawrence and established him- 
self in the practice of medicine, with offices on 
the sixth floor of the Bay State building, where he 
still remains. He hac^ built up a successful general 
practice, but specializes in surgery. During the 
years 1916 to 1920 he served as assdstant dty physi- 
cian, and in 1921 he was made city physician and 
assumed full charge of the Municipal Hospital. This 
office he still occupies. He was a member of the 
Lawrence Board of Health during the year 1910, and 
at the present time serves on the board by virtue 
of his position as city physician. 

During the World War Dr. McKallagat was a 
member of the Volunteer Medical Corps but was 
not called into active service. He is a member of 
the American Medical Association; the Massachu- 
setts Medical Association; the Essex North Medi- 
cal Association; and he is physician for the Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles. 

Dr. McKallagat married Marguerite G. Conlon, 
of Lawrence, on October 15, 1918. Mrs. McKal- 
lagat was bom at Lawrence in 1889, and is a 
daughter of Daniel B. and Margaret (Sullivan) Con- 
lon, her father a native of New York. Mr. and 
Mrs. McKallagat have two children: Daniel Leo, 
who was bom May 29, 1915; and Marguerite C, 
who was bom on July 24, 1916. 



W. N. PIKE ft SONS, INC.— In the construction 
world of Lawrence, Massachusetts, this firm holds 
a leading position. William N. Pike, the founder of 
this concern, was born in England, on June 17, 
1846. He came to this country when a youn^ man, 
and located in Lawrence about 1866, working first 
as a stone mason, and later as a builder. He be- 
came associated with E. A. Peabody at an early 
date, and the contracting business, which was con- 
ducted under the name of Peabody & Pike, was a 
leading interest of the time. William N. Pike start- 
ed for himself in the year 1882, and carried the 
business forward for a number of years alone, plac- 
ing it in the front rank in this line of effort He is 
now retired from active participation in its manage- 
ment, and resides at Andover, Massachusetts. He 
married Emma Neate. 

Albert W. Pike, elder son of William N. and 
Emma (Neate) Pike, and president of the above 
corporation, was bom in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
on January 6, 1874. Receiving a practical educa- 
tion in the public schools of Maiden, he began work 
with his father in the contracting line thirty years 
ago. This association has endured continuously, and 
now Mr. Pike is at the head of the corporation 
which stiU bears the name of its founder. This 
company does a very extensive contracting business. 



constructing buildings of every description, public 
buildings, industrial and residential structures, and 
is constantly identified with important building en- 
terprises in this district. The firm was incorpor- 
ated on March 16, 1917. 

In various interests in Lawrence, Mr. Pike is 
well known.- He is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce, and of the Lawrence Master Builders' 
Association, and is president of the Master Builders* 
Association of Haveihill, and vice president of the 
Associated Contractors of Massachusetts. He is a 
prominent member of the Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, being a member of all the various bodies of 
that order, including Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arable 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He resides in 
Columbia Park, Haverhill. 

W. E. Pike, the younger son of William N. and 
Emma (Neate) IMke, was bom in Methuen, Massa- 
chusetts, in September, 1876. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Maiden, Massachu- 
setts, then completed his studies, in preparation for 
a business career, in a commercial school in Boston. 
He became associated with his father and elder 
brother in business about twenty-eight years ago, 
and has alvrays been active in the affairs of the 
concern. Upon the incorporation of the business 
he became treasurer of the company. 

W. E. Pike married, in Andover, Massachusetts, 
on January 12, 1918, Cynthia E. Flint, of that dty, 
and they have one son: Walter Nathan!^. The 
family resides in Andover, and attends the Baptist 
church. 

FREDERIC WILLIAM HOUSTON — Mankind 
expects much of the men who are bankers. Money 
means so many things in the minds of its owners 
that they scrutinize with great intentness, not only 
the institution in which they place it, but especially 
the men who handle it. The man who passes this 
scrutiny with approval, receives an honor higher 
than a king can confer. Should you ask the many 
patrons of the Lawrence Trust Company, the 
largest trust company in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
what they think of Frederic William Houston, its 
treasurer, they will snule and give the terse reply: 
"He is all right." It is their way of summing up 
the man whose all around ability, wisdom and con- 
fidence-inspiring character has brought so many of 
them to the companjr's doors. 

Mr. Houston was bom in the city of Lawrence. 
December 5, 1885, and there has spent the most of 
his life. The graded and high schools gave him his 
education, and he was graduated from the latter in 
190S. Upon leaving school he secured a position in 
the Arlington National Bank and was with that 
institution for eight years. The ability shown, to- 
gether with the training in banking during these 
eight years, fitted him for the larger opening that 
came a year or so after the organizing of the 
Lawrence Trust Company, November 23, 1910. This 
concern, even before its formation, had been 
searching for yoxmg men who could come up to its 
high standards in the many qualities required by its 
business, and, in 1912, were fortunate in securing 



62 



ESSEX COUNTY 



the services of Mr. Houston. Startinsr a£ paying^ 
and receiving clerk he rose rapidly until in August. 
1920, he was elected its treasurer. Although only 
eleven years old, the Lawrence Trust Company la 
the largest, strongest and most important banking 
institution in Essex county and all who have had 
a share in its marvelous growth are ranked with 
the highest of the city's professional and business 
men. Mr. Houston's close attention to his work 
has precluded many of the activities in civic and 
political life for which he is so amply fitted. He 
finds outlet for some of his out-door tastes through 
membership in the Country Club, and is also a 
member of the Caledonian Club. Fraternally he is 
a member of Tuscan Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons of Lawrence, a member of the Con- 
sistory, and of Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Noble of the Mystic Shrine, of Boston. 

On August 16, 1916, he was joined in marriage 
to Florence Blake, daughter of Herbert E. Blake, 
a well known native of New Gloucester^ Maine, 
engaged in the mercantOe trade, and his wife, Mary 
L. (Holmes) Blake, also of Maine. Mr. Houston's 
father was of Scottish birth but coming early to 
this country, from the neighborhood of Glasgow, 
was for years a printer at the Padflc mill of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts. His mother, Margaret (Grant) 
Houston,) also came from the same neighborhood in 
Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Houston reside in 
Lawrence and are highly appreciated members of 
the Congregational church. 



THOMAS MATTHEW BARRY, M. D.— One of 

the most prominent of the younger members of 
the medical fraternity in Lynn, is Dr. Barty, who in 
the few years since he came here to practice has 
attained an enviable reputation as 'a specialist in 
diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

Dr. Barry was bom in Lynn, September 28, 1892, 
and is a son of Michael and Margaret (Healy) 
Barry, long residents of this city. Acquiring his 
early education in the public schools of the city, 
he was graduated from the classical high school in 
the class of 1910, entered Tufts College, and was 
graduated from the medical department of that in- 
stitution in the class of 1914, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. Then Dr. Barry began a rare- 
ly comprehensive course of hospital experience, 
first becoming interne at St. John's Hospital, at 
Lowell, Massachusetts. Next he spent six months 
at the Providence (Rhode Island) City Hospital, 
after which he was at the Nose and Throat Hos- 
pital for two years and a half, and the Throat and 
Nose Hospital in New York City, making an ex- 
haustive study of these organs, in which he has 
since specialized. Coming to Lynn in 1918, Dr. Barry 
has already won an assured {position in these 
branches of surgery, and has very little time for 
any general practice. He is a member of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, and of the Lynn 
Medical fraternity. 

On November 9, 1919, Dr. Barry married Ethlyn 
M. Oliver, daughter of Thomas and Ethlyn Oliver. 



Dr. and Mrs. Bazry have two sons: John D., bom 
September 12, 1920; and William F., bom August 
22, 1921. 

JOSEPH MICHAEL HARQBDON— Only during 
more recent years has the idea become prevalent 
that the lawyer should be one with whom we are 
on a friendly basis and not some one we consult 
only when in trouble. We are thoughtless in what 
we do or promise, make careless contracts, indite 
wills that are more than useless, and then some 
legal light is called in to clear up and settle the 
difficulty. There is a growing desire, however, to 
ward off trouble before it comes, and to be on such 
cordial terms with a lawyer that we can go to 
him freely before we act. There is no question 
that the profession is meeting this desire more than 
half way. There is an ever increasing body of 
lawyers who are approachable, friendly men who 
readily win confidence and are worthy of it. It is 
not, however, any deliberate selfish intention that 
has made Joseph Michael Hargedon one of this 
class. He simply cazmot help being the cordiaI« 
pleasant, sociable fellow that he is. It may come 
from his Irish blood, or his naturally big heart, or 
from the many other sides of his character; wha^> 
ever the cause, certainly he has drawn to himself 
a large clientele of those who consult him as their 
friend and attorney. His well known legal knowl- 
edge and ability, the vigor with which he makes 
his clients' cause his own, and hid steadfastness 
in holding out for that which is right, has made him 
distinguished with his professional associates and 
clients. 

Peter J. Hargedon, father of Joseph M. Hargedon, 
bom in 1867, came from Ireland to America in 
1879, and is now resident in Newton, Massachusetts. 
His wife, Honora, also of Irish birth, was bom In 
that country in 1860. 

Joseph Michael Hargedon, son of Peter J. and 
Honora Hargedon, began life in Newton, Massachu- 
setts, December 18, 1890. He went to the public 
schools of his town and spent some time in high 
school and Boston College. Later matriculating at 
Boston University, he was graduated from the law 
department in 1919, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. Previously (1918), he had been admitted to 
the bar at Boston. His first practice of law was in 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, in the office of James A. 
Donovan and Walter Coulson. This became the firm 
of Donovan, Coulson & Hargedon on December 1, 
1919, and it has a large suite of offices in the Bay 
State building, where they conduct a very large 
general law practice. 

Mr. Hargedon has other important outside inter* 
ests, more particularly at Salisbury Beach, where he 
is a member of the Board of Trade. He is secre- 
tary of the Salisbury Beach Pavilion Company; 
director and clerk of the Salisbury Athletic Assoda^ 
tion, and president and director of the Stoeher St 
Pratt Dodgem Corporation, a large and growing 
company that is establishing itil funmaking device 
throughout the amusement parks of the United 
States. He bdongs to the Essex County and Law- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



63 



rence Bar Associatloiis, and is a member of the 
Lawrence Chamber of Commerce. He finds ath- 
letic enjoyment with his many friends at the Merri- 
mac Country Club. His fraternal associations are 
with the Knights of Columbus, and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks as a member of Lodge 
No. 65, of which he is inner guard. Mr. Hargedon 
is religiously affiliated with St. Mary's Roman 
Catholic Church. 



ROBERT WILLIAM McKAY— Taking a promi- 
nent place in his chosen field of endeavor entirely 
through his own initiative, Robert William McSLay, 
of Cliftondale, Massachusetts, is making the force 
of his personality count far in the progress of 
Essex county. 

Mr. McKay was bom in Lynn, Massachusetts, on 
March 10, 1898, and is a son of Robert and Maude 
L. (Montgomery) McKay, long residents of that 
city. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of Lynn, ^e boy early developed an ambition to 
enter the field of Joumidism. He secured a position 
on the staff of the Lynn ^Item" at the age of fifteen 
years, while he was still studying, and was gradu- 
ated from the English High School in 1918. Later 
he was connected with the Lynn ^News,*' and still 
later with the Boston '^Posf 

In March, 1913, Mr. McKay fonned a coxpozBr 
tion, himself holding the offices of president, secre- 
tary and treasurer, and took over the Saugus ''Her^ 
aid." This newspaper was founded in 1887 by 
James A. Halliday, who was succeeded as owner 
by Isaac Newton. When Mr. McKay took posses- 
sion of the plant the paper was a small sheet, of 
indifferent circulation. He has built it up to a 
circidation of over 8,300 copies; it is progressive 
in its editorial policy, and handles a large amount 
of local and general advertising. Mr. McKay has 
also taken up the publication of a general Hne of 
commercial and other work, and handles a con- 
siderable amount of job printing. The plant is 
equipped with linotjrpe machines, and all the most 
modem machinery. 

Mr. McKay married, in March, 1914, Mabel G. 
Martin, daughter of Walter and Mabel (Russell) 
Martin, of Manchester-by-the-Se& Mr. and Mrs. 
McKay are the parents of one daughter, Audrey, 
who was bom on October 29, 1916. 



WESLEY PENCE MITCHELL— Descended from 
an old Maine family, and engaged in the auto- 
mobile service and sales business, Wesley Pence 
Mitchell, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, is prominent 
In this city. 

Mr. Mitchell is a son of Robert Edwin and Ruth 
Esther (Ewell) Mitchell. Robert E. Mitchell was 
bom in Portland, Maine, being a direct descendant 
of Nathaniel I. Mitchell, an early dry goods mer- 
chant of Portland. Coming to Boston about 1875, 
Robert E. Mitchell was there engaged as a dry 
goods merchant for many years, but he and his wife 
are both now deceased. The mother was a native 
of Prospect, Maine. 



Wesley P. Mitchell was bom in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, July 31, 1876. Receiving his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of that city, he later 
took a course at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, and further prepared for his future 
with private study. For many years Mr. MitcheU 
acted as manufacturers' agent, with headquarters in 
Boston, handling a large variety of merchandise in 
the field of women's apparel. In 1918 Mr. Mitchell 
made a definite change in his business, coming to 
Lawrence, where he became associated with a local 
automobile firm in the capacity of salesman. After 
one year of experience along this line, he opened 
a service and sales station, at No. 848 Broadway. 
He has been most successful and ia doing a con- 
stantly growing business. He handles the Olds- 
mobile, and now owns the building in which he is 
located. 

Prominent in the business interests of the city, 
Mr. Mitchell holds a seat in the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Fraternally he is a member of Tuscan 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; and is a mem- 
ber of Lodge No. 1171, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He attends the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Mitchell married, in New York City, Alice 
Martin, of Manchester, Massachusetts, and they 
have one chOd, Beverly E. The family resideB at 
No. 383 Haverhill street, Lawrence. 



MIAL WOODBURY CHASE— As treasurer of 
the North Shore Ice Delivery Company, Mr. Chase 
holds a prominent place in the business circles of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, for not only is Mial Wood- 
bury Chase influentially interested with the busi- 
ness interests of the city, but as a citizen he is 
ever ready to do all ini his power to promote her 
best and truest welfare. 

Mial Woodbury Chase was bom at Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, August 27, 1867, the son of Zachariah J. 
and Harriett (Moon) Chase, the former a native 
of Maine, the latter of Lynn. The elementary edu- 
cation of the boy Mial W. was obtained in the 
public schools of his native city and after gradu- 
ating from the Lynn Classical High School he en- 
tered Black River Academy, at Ludlow, Vermont, 
where he took a post*graduate course, and it is 
interesting to note that here he was a classmate of 
Calvin Coolidge, vice-president-elect of the United 
States (1920). After completing his course at the 
academy, he returned to Lynn and became associ- 
ated with his father in business under the name of 
Z. J. Chase & Company, ice dealers. Here he re- 
mained until 1913, when he became treasurer of th» 
North Shore Ice Delivery Company, which position 
he holds at the present time. 

Mr. Chase has always taken an active interest 
in politics. He is a member of the Constitutional 
Convention, is a Representative of the Massachu- 
setts Legislature, and has served on the Lynn School 
Committee for many years. He is prominent in 
Masonic circles, having attained the thirty-second 
degree, and afi)liates with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Improved Order of Red Men,, 
and the Knights of Pythias. He is also vice-presi-^ 



64 



ESSEX COUNTY 



dent of the Young Men's Christian Association, and 
attends the Maple Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Lynn. Mr. Chase is a Rotarian. 

On October 29, 1893, Mial Woodbury Chase was 
united in marriage with Maud D. HoUis, daughter 
of Alonzo and Carrie (Bush) Hollis, of Lynn. 

By long identification with the life of the city 
which was his birthplace, Mial Woodbury Chase 
has by his fairmindedness and goodwill as a private 
citizen, and as a representative of the government, 
won for himself a permanent place in the hearts of 
the people of Lynn. 



REV. PETER M. PIEMONTE— It is peculiarly 
fitting, in a work of this nature, to record the his- 
tories of met) who are giving their lives to the ser- 
vice of God. Rev. Peter M. Piemonte of Salem, 
Massachusetts, is doing the work of a missionary 
among the people of his native land who have be- 
come residents of that city. 

Father Piemonte was bom in Udine, Province of 
Venice, Italy, on December 11, 1862, and received 
his early education in the public schools of that 
city. Devoutly trained, and always a sincere wot- 
shipper, he early recognized the call of God which 
pointed the way to a Hfe of devotion and sacrifice. 
He entered Udine Seminary, in Venice, Italy, and 
was graduated in the year 1884. He was ordained, 
May 80, 1885, by Monsignor Berengo. Then be- 
gan his service as curate, which lasted for five years. 
For seventeen years thereafter he was parish priest 
at St. Cansciano Church and School, at Prato, 
Italy, Then desiring a period of quiet and retire- 
ment to prepare himself for further activities, he 
entered into the Congregation of the Stigmatinl 
Fathers, remaining one year on probation. At the 
close of this period he began preaching in Trient, 
Italy, and continued there for two years. 

Father Piemonte's next move was to cross the 
seas and take up his church in the United States. 
This was in 1910, and he came to Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania, where he stayed for one year as associate 
pastor of the St. Lucia Italian Chuixh in that city. 
He then was called to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he officiated for one year as assistant pastor 
of the Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Next 
he was assistant pastor of the Sacred Heart Church, 
in Boston, then for one year was assistant pastor 
of St. John's Church at Swampscott, Essex county. 
Massachusetts. 

It was on November 1, 1914, that Father Piemonte 
began the good work which he is carrying forward 
to such success in Salem. On that date he start- 
ed St. Mary's Italian Mission in temporary quarters 
at No. 27 Front street. Beginning in a humble way, 
but sparing neither time nor strength, he has gather- 
ed about him in the little mission room, large con- 
gregations of his fellow country people, instructing 
and admonishing them, and at the same time com- 
forting and encouraging them in case of need or 
adversity. This Mission has shown a most grati- 
fying growth and is a genuine power for good 
among the Italian-American residents of Salem. 
Through his indefatigable labors. Father Piemonte 



has raised sufiicient money and bought land for a 
new church; and it is safe to predict a future of 
great usefulness for this church society. The par- 
ish now counts two hundred devoted Italian families, 
and, with Father Piemonte at its head, the new 
church edifice will soon be an accomplished fact. 

ORA WENDELL BOOTHBY — The Boothby 
family is one of great antiquity and can be traced 
to an early period. It is believed to have descended 
from a Danish tribe, Bobi, which was settled early 
in Britain. The ancestor of the family, Henry 
Boothby, was bom in England, and in 1720 settled 
at Kittery, Maine. His brother, Thomas Boothby, 
accompanied him to New England and settled at 
Wells, Maine. Henry Boothby had a son, Thomas, 
who settled at Scarboro, Maine. 

The family came to Livermore, Maine, at an 
early date, and the first cabinet maker of that 
vicinity was Samuel Boothby, undoubtedly a des- 
cendant of the immigrant. An Ichabod Boothby 
drove the stage between Portland and Boston for 
many years. 

The father of Mr. Boothby, Charles H. Boothby, 
was bom in Livermore, and was a manufacturer of 
shovel handles and scythe snathes. In his later 
years he retired to his farm and foUowed agricul- 
tural pursuits. He was bom February 6, 1821, and 
died January 26, 1889. He married Betsey Wheeler 
Hescock, born February 10, 1833, died August 3, 
1894. 

Ora Wendell Boothby, son of Charles H. and 
Betsey W. (Hescock) Boothby, was bom in Liver- 
more, June 13, 1876. He attended the public schools, 
the Hebron Academy, and the Greenwood Com- 
mercial College of Boston. Following his formal 
education Mr. Boothby took a course in mechanical 
engineering from private tutors. In October, 1898, 
he came to Lawrence, Massachusetts, and became 
identified with the International Textbook Company 
as division superintendent. He made his head- 
quarters at Lawrence, and had branch ofiices at 
Lowell, HaverhUl and Newburyport, Massachusetts; 
and Manchester, Exeter and Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire. In March, 1909, Mr. Boothby resigned his 
position with this company and engaged in his pres- 
ent business under the fiim name of the Boothby 
Press. The ofilce and shop are located at No. 307 
Essex street, and a general business in engraving, 
printing and manufacture of stationery is carried 
on. 

Mr. Boothby is a member of the Rotary Club, 
the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce, and is a 
thirty-second degree Mason. He is a member of 
Phoenician Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
which he is past master; member of Mt. Sinai Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence Council, Royal 
and Select Masters; of which he is past thrice 
illustrious master; Bethany Commandery, of which 
he is past commander; the Massachusetts Consis- 
tory, and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

On June 12, 1901, Mr. Boothby married, at Law- 
rence, Ella May Sugatt, and they are the parents 



(f.Vi.Otj. 



'71-^ 



P 



# ' 



<V 



i^M,^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



66 



of a son, Everett Wendell Boothby, of Los Angeles, 
California, bom September 20, 1902. The family 
attend and aid in the support of the Trinity Con- 
gregational Church of Lawrence. 

CHARLES PRBSCOTT— The office of post- 
master of Beverly, Massachusetts, is ably filled by 
a man of unusual breadth of experience and ex- 
ecutive ability— Charles Prescott, whose individual 
activities have taken him to many parts of the worid 

Mr. Prescott was bom in Bay Verte, New Bruns- 
wick, Canada, on February 16, 1846, and is a son 
of Charles and MatUda (Madden) Prescott, of that 
place, both of whom are long since deceased. 

Receiving his education in the common schools of 
that day, the boy left school at the age of four- 
teen years, and took up a sea-faring life. Fond of 
adventure, and absolutely fearless, he won his way 
through all the hardships to become, eventually, 
master of a ship. This life carried him practically 
all over the world, the only exception, as it chanced, 
being the East Indies. He finally gave up the sea 
as a calling, but stiU traveled much in the course of 
his work, for twelve years being in the employ of 
the Anglo-American Cable and Telegraph Company. 
In this connection he was stationed at different 
times at many different points, including Sydney, 
Nova Scotia, Heart Content, Newfoun<Uand, and 
many interesting points. Thereafter, Mr. Prescott 
became associated with railroad interests, and came 
to Beverly, Massachusetts, in the year 1886, to fill 
the position of station agent. He continued thus 
until six years ago, when he was appointed post- 
master of Beverly, which position, he still fills most 
acceptably to the general public. 

In various activities in Beveriy Mr. Prescott is 
a familiar figure. He is a member of the Free an i 
Accepted Masons, and of thd Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is a member of St Peter's Epis- 
copal Church, and active in the woric of the Men's* 
Club of the church. 

It is perhaps as commodore of the Jubilee Yacht 
Club that Mr. Prescott is best Imown, and will long- 
est be remembered. He is an honored and popular 
member of this organisation, and his reminiscences 
of sea life often form an interesting feature of an 
evening at the club house. 

Mr. Prescott married, in 1870, Lucy A. Clough, 
daughter of Thomas Clough, of Prince Edward Is- 
land. Their three children are as follows: Annie 
Maud; Charles, deceased; and Myrtie J., the wife 
of L. R. Jenkins, now a resident of Pachuca, in tho 
State of Hidalgo, Mexico. 



MICHAEL S. CBRIBN, an attorney, with offices 
in the Bay State building, occupies a prominent 
place in the professional and business circles of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, his native city. His iden^ 
tification with the life of this community is com- 
plete through associations in many and diverse fields, 
commercial, fraternal and social, and as alderman he 
has rendered public service of merit and value. 

M i chael S. O'Brien was bom in Lawrence, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1888, the son of Timothy and Mary (Kel- 



leher) O'Brien, both deceased. He attended the 
public schools of his native city, and after finishing 
the prescribed course at the local high school, ma- 
triculated at Dartmouth College, from which in- 
stitution he was graduated in 1906, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. He then entered the law 
school of Harvard University and three years later 
won from there the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Returning immediately to his native city, he estab- 
lished himself in legal practice and since has en- 
joyed a large and lucrative practice. 

Mr. O'Brien has always taken a keen and active 
interest in public affairs and no man has more at 
heart the welfare and true progress of his home 
city. He was elected alderman of Lawrence i/i 
1912, and also was director of public propezty and 
public works at that time. 

Mr. O'Brien has alvrays been ardentiy devoted to 
outdoor sports, and it is interesting to note here 
that while attending Dartmouth College he was 
captain of the baseball team, playing left field. 
He is a member of the Menimae Valley Country 
Club, and here he spends much of his spare time 
in his favorite recreation, golf. He is a member 
of the Lawrence City Bar Association, and the 
Theta Delta Chi fraternity, and the Casque and 
Gauntiet, senior society, of Dartmouth College. He 
is also a member of the Harvard Club and Dart- 
mouth Club. In politics he is a Republican. 

On July 26, 1911, Michael S. O'Brien was united 
in marriage with Helen M. Sawjrer, a native of Law- 
rence, and to them have been bom three children: 
William Smith, Frederick Sawyer, and Helen Marie. 
The family attend St Patrick's Roman Catholic 
Church, and reside at No. 200 Bailey street, Law- 
rence. 

JOHN A. PBABODY— In the construction world 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, one of the most im- 
portant firms is that of E. A. Peabody & Son, the 
oldest business organization in this line of en- 
deavor. This firm has kept step with the times 
through the passing of the years and has always 
held a position a littie in the lead of the van. John 
A. Peabody, the present head of the firm, stands 
high in many interests which have to do with the 
progress of the city. 
Ephraim A. Peabody, Mr. Peabody's father, found- 
ed this business about 1860, and was a prominent 
figure in construction circles during that long period 
of rapid growth in all manufacturing centers 
throughout New England, which followed the re- 
adjustment of industrial conditions after the Civil 
War. He was a pioneer contractor in this district, 
and a man of great force of character. He was 
bom in Dracut, Massachusetts, about 1880, and died 
in Lawrence, on March 7, 1916. 

John A. Peabody vras bom in Salem, New 
Hampshire, in 1868, and received his education 
there in the public schools. In 1896 he went to the 
nearby city of Lawrence, just over the Massachu- 
setts line, and became associated witii his father 
in the conti;acting business, which was becoming a 
very large interest. Togetiier, father and son de- 



—8^6 



66 



ESSEX COUNTY 



veloped the business to a still more important and 
extensive interest, and since the death of his father, 
John A. Peabody has carried on the business alone, 
without, however, changing the firm name — E. A. 
Peabody & Son. 

This concern, whose office is now in the Bay 
State building, in Lawrence, has to its credit a very 
large number of the finer buildings in Lawrence, in- 
cluding industrial plants, and commerical and resi- 
dential structures. Their business is by no means 
confined to Lawrence, but reaches into New Hamp- 
shire, Vermont, and to distant parts of Massachu- 
setts. Many of the most noteworthy structures in 
this section are their work. They designed and built 
the Lawrence Savings Bank; they built the Bay 
State Bank building, the St. Lawrence Church, the 
Young Men's Christian Association building, the 
Home Club building, the Gleason building, and the 
Lawrence Savings Bank. They built the Bright* 
wood Mills, complete, and many of the most beauti- 
ful residences of this city and its environs are the 
work of this concern. At this time (1921) the firm 
is constructing a new Masonic Temple in Law- 
rence, which will cost $225,000. 

John A. Peabody, as head of this far-reaching 
business, is one of the leading men of this city to- 
day. He is interested in two of the leading finan- 
cial institutions of Lawrence, being a director of the 
Bay State National Bank, and a trustee of the Essex 
Savings Bank. He is a director in the Lawrence 
Chamber of Commerce, and a member of the Civics 
Committee of that body. 

During the World War, 1917-18, Mr. I^abody was 
district chairman of the Emergency Help and 
Equipment Board, for Essex county. His duties 
included the organizing of all builders and construc- 
tion firms, and appointing assistant chairmen to 
cover this work in the following territory: Law- 
rence, Lowell, Haverhill, Georgetown, Reading, and 
all points north of Salem, Massachusetts, in Essex 
county. These firms held themselves prepared to 
repair without delay, and give first aid to bridges, 
buildings, and all structural work damaged or 
destroyed through acts of war fanatics. 

Personally, Mr. Peabody is prominent in fraternal 
circles, being a member of Greadan Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Lawrence Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; Lawrence Council, Royal and Select 
Masters; Bethany Commandery, Knights Templar; 
and also of Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He holds the thirty- 
second degree in this order. 

Mr. Peabody married, in Salem, New Hampshire, 
in 1896, Cora W. Wood, and they have one daugh- 
ter, Gladys E. The delightful family residence is at 
No. 32 Dartmouth street, Lawrence, and the family 
attend the Church of Christ, Scientist. 



BENJAMIN P. SYLVESTER— For three genei> 
ations identified with the industrial world of Essex 
county, the name of Sylvester holds special sig^ 
nificance in Danvers. Benjamin F. Sylvester, a man 
of broad public spirit, was long prominent hiere as 



the owner of the rolling mill, and with his death 
the town lost a useful, valued citizen. 

Benjamin F. Sylvester was bom in Hanover, 
Massachusetts, in 1833, and was educated in the 
schools of that town. In his young manhood he 
removed with the family to Danvers, the father, 
John Sylvester, purchasing the rolling mill at Dan- 
vers, about 1858. This property consisted of a 
foundry on the farther side of the dam, and a roll- 
ing mill on the nearer side, also the water front 
and tide privileges. John Sylvester was an expert 
anchor maker, and had spent his lifetime as an 
iron and steel worker. He forged the first cranks 
for locomotives in this country. Compared with the 
great mills of the present day this was a small plant, 
five tons capacity, but for the time it was a large 
and important mill and a large business was done. 
Here the young man became associated with his 
father, eventually assuming the ownership. Prior to 
John Sylvester's coming, naUs had been manufac- 
tured here, also anchors, and it was throus^ his 
occupation as an anchor maker that John Sylvester 
came to locate in Danvers. The iron rolled then 
was imported from Norway and Sweden. After a 
few years he sold this property, and going to Somer- 
ville, Massachusetts, operated the spike works 
there, residing in Waverly, when he died. 

The independent business career of Benjamin F. 
Sylvester began in 1880, when he returned to Dan- 
vers. Entering into a partnership with a Mr. Sias, 
they purchased the rolling mill, and conducted It 
for several years. Thereafter A. G. Tompkins 
bought the property, retaining Mr. Sylvester as 
superintendent, the arrangement continuing until 
Mr. Tompkins' death. At that time Benjamin Syl- 
vester and his brother, John, purchased the mill. 
These changes, in the course of the years, went 
hand in hand with development and growth^ the 
mill becoming a very important interest. In 1906 
occurred the death of John Sylvester, the brother, 
and the business was incorporated, becoming the 
Sylvester Company. A further change was made at 
this time, the capacity being increased to forty tons 
per day. Tide water docks having been a part of 
the plant for many years, the company also did a 
considerable coal business, unloading on their own 
docks. During the World War the mill handled 
contract work for the United States Government, 
and in 1920 the plant was sold to the Massachusetts 
Iron and Steel Company. This is tcKlay the only 
rolling null in the State. 

During all his residence here in Danvers, Ben- 
jamin F. Sylvester took a deep interest in the 
progn^ss and well-being of the community, although 
in political matters he took no leading part He 
attended the Baptist diurch, and was active in the 
work of the church society. His death, in January, 
1914, brought home to the people of Danvers the 
significance of a worthy life as a factor in public 
advancement, and not only the business associates 
who had known him so well and the friends to 
whom his mature counsel was a valued assistance, 
but also the general public, mourned his passing. 



/^ a"^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



67 



In 1865, 1ST, Sylvester married Maiy A. Upton, 
and they were the parents of two sons: George, a 
giaduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, now a mining engineer in Tennessee, who 
married Bessie Stanley, of Danvers; and Herhert 
W., who was educated in the public and high schools 
of Danyers, and at the age of twenty years became 
associated with his father at the mill. Herbert W. 
Sylvester, was for fifteen years, superintendent of 
the mill, after which it was taken over by its present 
owners. «..^_____ 

KALPH B. STONE, M. D.^Broadly active in the 
medical professon. Dr. Ralph E. Stone, of Beverly, 
Massachusetts, is contributing materially to the 
health and well being of the people. 

Dr. Stone was bom in Shirley, Massachusetts, on 
July 29, 1877, and is a son of Stephen Henry and 
Elizabeth S. (Stoddard) Stone. Stephen H. Stone 
was bom in Boston, Massachusetts, and was a bro- 
ker by occupation. Mrs. Stone was bom in Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 

As a boy the doctor began his education in the 
public schools of Shirley, later attended Phillips An- 
dover Academy. His choice of a profession made, 
he entered Harvard University Medical School, 
from which he was graduated in the class of 1908, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He has 
since practiced medicine in Beverly, achieving a 
marked degree of success. In connection with his 
private practice. Dr. Stone handles much institu- 
tional woric. He was director of the Beverly Board 
of Health Dispensary for four years, and is now 
consultant of the dispensary, and chairman of the 
Medical Advisory Board, Division No. 26. He is 
president of the Beverly Public Health Associa- 
tion; is a member of the staif of the Beverly Hos- 
pital; is on the staff of the Gable Memorial Hos- 
pital, of Ipswich, Massachusetts, and of the North 
Shore Baby Hospital; and is consulting physician 
of the New England Industrial School for the 
Deaf. He is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Beverly; of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation; the Massachusetts Medical Society; the 
National Tuberculosis Association; and Harvard 
Club of the North Shore. 

Dr. Stone married, in 1908, Lucy Wheatley, of 
Baltimore, Maryland, daughter of WOliam and 
Kate Wheatley, of that dty, Mrs. Stone's father 
being a prominent insurance dealer there. Dr. 
and Mrs. Stone are the parents of four children: 
Katherine E., fourteen years of age (1922) ; Ralph 
E., Jr., thirteen; Constance S., eight; and Bar- 
bara, who died June 27, 1911. 



SIMEON B. J. LeGBNDRE— Returning to his 
native city of Lawrence, Massachusetts, immedi- 
ately after graduating in 1911, Mr. LeGendre es- 
tablished himself in the practice of his chosen 
profession at No. 816 Essex street The years 
have brought him professional success, and he is 
well known throughout the community and is held 
in the highest esteem by his brethren of the pro- 
fession who accord him fuU recognition. 



Simeon E. J. LeGendre was bom in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, February 18, 1886, the son of 
Azarie and Virginia (Couillard) LeGendre. Azarie 
LeGendre came to Lawrence in 1868 from Lot- 
bini^re, Province of Quebec, and for many years 
was employed by the Boston & Maine railroad. 
The boy, Simeon E. J., attended the schools of his 
native city and after graduating from the local 
high school, having in the meantime determined to 
adopt the law as a profession, he accordingly ma- 
triculated at Boston University Law School and 
won from that institution the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in the class of 1911. Subsequently return- 
ing to Lawrence, he established himself in the 
practice of his profession at his present location. 
He is a member of the Essex County Bar Associa- 
tion and the Lawrence City Bar Association. 

Mr. LeGendre has always been exceedingly ac- 
tive in the aif airs of the community, and has hrid 
Several important offices. He is trustee of the 
sinking fund of the city of Lawrence, president 
of the La Caisse Populaire de Lawrence Credit 
Union, and president of the Social Naturalization 
Club, Inc. He affiliates with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, Lawrence Lodge, No. 65. 
He is a Roman Catholic in his religious belief, 
and attends the Sacred Heart Church of this 
denomination. 

On February 14, 1912, Simeon E. J. LeGendre 
was imited in marriage with Georgiana Pellerin, 
a native of Lawrence, and daughter of Ludger 
Pellerin, and to them have been bom three chil- 
dren: Rita, Simeon E. J., Jr., and Alain A. J. 
The family home is at No 849 South Broadway, 
Lawrence, Massachusetts. 



RICHARD A. HALE — Of the engineering prob- 
lems which aifect the public prosperity in New 
England communities, there are few of greater 
weight than the matter of hydraulics. In Law- 
rence, Richard A. Hale is an authority on this sub- 
ject, having won his way to his present position 
through long experience with, and the successful 
handling of the development of hydraulic power. 

Mr. Hale was bom in Lowell, Massachusetts, 
December 8, 1852, the son of Bemice S. and 
Sophia (Kiddei*) Hale. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public and high schools of that city, 
having been graduated from the latter in 1869. 
Entering the engineering field in a subordinate 
capacity in the office of Hiram F. Mills, then a 
prominent hydraulic engineer of Boston, he was 
there for only a short time when Mr. Mills was 
appointed chief engineer of the Essex Company 
and he made Mr. Hale his assistant engineer at 
Lawrence. This company controls the water 
power of the Merrimac river at Lawrence. Until 
1878 Mr. Hale was engaged in general hydraulic 
work, and in that year, as a preparation for larger 
responsibilities, he entco^ the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, taking a four years' course, 
and working with his company during the sum- 
mer vacations. He was graduated in 1877, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Science, and thereafter 



68 



ESSEX COUNTY 



retomed to the offices of the Essex Company, eon* 
tinning in the capacity of assistant engineer until 
1886, when he became principal assistant engi- 
neer. In this office he succeeded J. R. Freeman, 
a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, class of 1876, who at that time became 
consulting engineer with the Boston Manufac- 
turers' Insurance Company. 

In the course of his duties Mr. Hale had the 
oversight and maintenance of dams, canals, locks, 
etc., governing the distribution of water among 
the mills along the river, a vital matter to the 
industries depending upon water power to any 
considerable degree, each plant presenting its own 
problem to the man at the head. In connection 
with this hydraulic work the company has always 
handled much business in the sale of mill and 
residence sites, involving street construction and 
all the attendant problems. 

Mr. Hale's work has not by any means been 
confined to Lawrence. He has investigated and 
advised upon water powers throughout New Eng- 
land, New York and Delaware, has solved par- 
ticularly important problems for the Bellows Falls 
Company, and the Turners Falls Company on the 
Connecticut river, and has appeared before the 
legislatures of New York, New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont, Massachusetts and Connecticut on affairi 
relative to the development of water powers and 
other hydraulic matters. He has also served as 
chairman of commissions, by court appointment, 
in cases of disputed water rights, and has served 
as expert in the awarding of damages, many of 
these cases involving State rights. Of reeent 
years Mr. Hale's work has been largely in a con- 
sulting capacity, and for years he was resident 
engineer of the Essex Company, in practical 
charge of the work until October, 1921, when 
upon the death of H. F. MiUs, Mr. Hale became 
chief engineer of the company. 

In connection with his other responsibilities, Mr. 
Hale served for twelve years . on the Lawrence 
Park Commission, during the latter half of that 
period being chairman of the commission^ He re- 
signed in 1906, on account of the pressure of other 
matters. He has written extensively for engineer- 
ing journals on topics relating to hydraulic power. 

By way of relaxation from the exacting duties 
of his profession, Mr. Sale some years ago turned 
to golf. He also takes great interest in photo- 
graphy, and is well posted on various outdoor 
sports. He is a member of the Appalachian Moun- 
tain Club, and has served in the capacity of coun- 
cillor of topography. He is a member of the 
American Forestry Association, and has served on 
the executive committee of the Massachusetts For- 
estry Association. He is a member of the Ameri- 
can Society of CivU Engineers; of the Boston 
Society of Civil Engineers, which he has served 
as director and president; and of tibe New Eng- 
land Water Works Association; the National 
Geographic Society; the American Civic League; 
the Massachusetts Civic League; the Menimac 
Valley Technology Club, of which he is ex-pi^si- 



dent; the Engineers' Club^ the Memmac Valley 
Country Club; the Lawrence Canoe Club; which 
he has served as director; the Lawrence Boys' 
Club, of which he is secretary; and the Monday 
Night Club. His church affiliation is as a member 
of Grace Episcopal Church. 

On October 28, 1880, Mr. Hale married Arabella 
Johnson Plummer, of Lawrence, daughter of Frank 
Plummer, and granddaughter of Rev. Henry Plum- 
mer, of Haverhill; and their six children are as 
follows: Helen Plummer, bom August 7, 1881; 
Frank Bemice, bom July 4, 1888; Marguerite Eliz- 
abeth, bom February 23, 1885, died March 23, 
1903; Elliott Kidder, bom September 9, 1887, nuuv 
ried Geraldine Rideout, of Beverly, and has one 
son, Richard Augustus (3) ; Eleanor Johnson, bom 
October 14, 1894; and Richard Augustus, Jr., bom 
July 21, 1898. 

JAMES EDWARD BYRNE— For more than a 
decade Mr. Byrne has been a factor in the pro- 
gress of the city of Lynn, Massachusetts, in the 
field of real estate and insurance, but for many 
years previously he was identified with the indus- 
trial world of Essex county. 

Mr. Byrne was bom in Middlebury, Vermont, 
October 31, 1868, and is a son of Jeremiah and 
Mary J. Byrne. The subsequent removals of the 
family to TOton, Franklin Falls, and Manchester, 
New Hampshire, brought about his school attend- 
ance in these three places, and in the changes he 
learned a certain adaptability which has been of 
great value to him in his subsequent career. Leav- 
ing school at the age of fourteen years, Mr. Byrne 
entered the employ of the Manchester Print Works, 
one of the most celebrated manufacturers of cot- 
ton printed fabrics in New Eni^and, where he 
remained for about two years. He then came to 
Massachusetts, and locating in Saugus, this county, 
was employed for about one year in the card 
room of a woolen mill. Then he became a resi- 
dent of Lynn, where he has since remained. Here 
he was first employed, in the capacity of clerk, 
in the Folsom crockery store, then later was in 
Allen & Boyden's box shop for about one year. 
Following that, Mr. Byme learned the barber's 
trade, which he followed for a period of twenty- 
four years. Then seeing larger opportunities and 
broader interest in his present field, he entered 
the real estate and insurance business about 1910, 
and is still actively engaged along this line, hav- 
ing handled many important deals in connection 
with the development oi the city. 

Mr. Byrne's ofilces are located in the Security 
Trast building, and he resides at No. 49 East Park 
avenue. He is a member of the Masonic order, 
the Improved Order of Red Men, and of the 
Knights of Pythias. 

On October 28, 1891, Mr. Byme married Lizzie 
E. Skerry, and they are the parents of two sons: 
Leroy R., bom April 21, 1898; and Chester E., 
bom January 29, 1895. Leroy R. Byme, the elder 
son, is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, and during the World War, 1917- 



^'/^^ ^ff&^^C::; 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



69 



18, served in the United States navy, with the 
rank of ensign. 

WILBUR K. EATON— As a prominent resident 
and successful manufacturer of Lynn, Wilbur K. 
Eaton is still remembered in the circles in which 
he moved, although a decade and a half have 
now passed since he joined the great majority. 

Mr. Eaton was bom in Warren, New Hampshire, 
January 1, 1857, and died in Lynn, Massachusetts, in 
July, 1906. As a boy he attended the public schools 
of Ills native town, but was more interested in a 
business future than the professions, and left 
school at the age of fifteen years, coming to Lynn, 
where for a time, he was employed by his uncle 
in the shoe business. In 1882 Mr. Eaton became 
associated with Everett L. Hobbs, in the manu- 
facture of popcorn and popcorn confections, first 
as a summer enterprise at Coney Island, and later 
as a growing and, eventually, very successful in- 
dustry in Lynn. Beginning in this city on Boston 
stieet, outgrowing these quarters and removing to 
Washington street, the concern finaUy built their 
own factory on Western avenue, purchasing land 
for the purpose, and erecting and equipping a fine 
modem plant for its business, both . the building 
and machinery being especially designed to meet 
its requirements. With retail places at Salem Wil- 
loiKs, Beverly Beach rnd Nahant Beach m Essex 
county, and at Asbury Park, New Jersey, they 
sell their product largely through these channels, 
in the form of com confections, com brittle and 
crispettes, an attractive variety of. the favorite 
popcorn confections being on their list. Mr. Eaton 
was the head and moving spirit of this business 
as long as he lived, and after his death Mrs. 
Eaton retained an interest in the business, the 
firm name continuing the same. 

Mr. Eaton was a man of unusual personal 
charm, who achieved his own success, building up 
on the foundations, which he himself laid, an un* 
imposing but substantial and significant success. 
He was not a man to pose before the public gaze, 
his chief pleasure, when not occupied by the com- 
mands of business, being in the home circle. Be- 
yond his duty as a citizen he took no part In 
public affairs, but kept informed of the movements 
of the times, and supported the Republican party. 
He attended the Methodist Episcopal church, of 
which his family were members. 

In the year 1885, in Lynn, Mr. Eaton married 
Hattie S. Breed, of Lynn, a descendant of one of 
the oldest families of this city. The Breed family 
name is identified with the earliest beginnings of 
community interest which were the nudeus of the 
present city of Lynn. The immigrant ancestor of 
this family, Allen Bread, came to the New World 
with John Winthrop, in 1630, and was one of the 
fifty Puritans of that party who settled in ''Sau- 
gus,'' now Lynn, the original grant of two hundred 
acres still being known as "Breed's End.'' With 
the birth of the third or fourth generation in the 
new country (about 1700), the spelling of the name 
became Breed, and in aU the subsequent history 



of the Colonies and the young Republic the name 
has been widely known and as widely honored. 
Many members of the family scattered to vari- 
ous parts of the country, representatives now re- 
siding in practically every State in the Union, but 
a considerable gn^up of the descendants of Allen 
Bread have remain^ in the spot where he first 
established his home. In public life the name has 
always been familiar here, Andrew Breed being 
the fifth mayor of Lynn. The family has always 
patronized the arts and sciences, and has made 
many bequests for benevolent purposes. Early 
members were afiiliated with the Society of 
Friends, later with the Congregational and other 
churches. The spirit of patriotism has burned high 
in every generation, giving many men to every 
struggle of the nation — ^f or independence, for union, 
and recently for humanity. The name of Breed 
was connected with the first beginnings of the 
shoe industry, the first cotton print works, the 
first salt works, the first gas company, the first 
bank, and a Breed brought the first coal into 
Ljrnn, becoming the first dealer in that eommodity. 
Throughout the history of the city the family hat 
been in the forefront of educational progress, and 
in response to the public sentiment of the city 
one of the finest public schools of Lynn was named 
the Breed School. A tablet in honor of the im- 
migrant ancestor of the family, erected by descen- 
dants of Allen Bread, was unveiled with appropri- 
ate ceremonies, December 29, 1920, its position 
being on the Hood street front of the building. 
It reads thus: 

ALLEN BREAD 

zeoman 

Bom in England 1601 

Emigrated to Lynn, then called Saugus, 

In 1680, and settled near Breed's Square, 

Received 200 acres 

In division of town lands 1688. 



One of the founders of 

Southampton, Long Island, New York, 1640. 

Returned to Lynn about 1650. 

An infiuential and religious citizen. 

Died 1690-1. 



So far as known all the Breeds of 

America have descended from him. 

Breed's HiU, 

Where the Battle of Bunker Hill was 

fought, was named for Ebenezer Breed. 

Allen Bread's descendants served in all 

the wars of the Colonies and Republic 

and have been prominent in 

the professions and in public life. 

Erected 1920. 

Asa Breed, bom in Lynn, was prominent in thia 
city three generations ago. He owned a great deal 
of property in the section now traversed by Breed 
and Nichols streets, which he cut and largely devel- 
oped. He was very active in all pubh'c interests 
and served on the city council for one temti. His 
son, Sidney I. Breed, served as Janitor of one of 
the public schools for more than forty years. He 



70 



ESSEX COUNTY 



married Martha E. Mudge» daogrhter of Daniel 
Madge, and granddaughter of Daniel L. Madge, 
one of the first large shoe manofacturers of Lynn. 
Mr. Mndge huilt the first brick house in Lynn and 
owned considerable property there. The Madge 
family also dates back to the early history of 
Essex county, and the name is prominently identi- 
fied with the industries and the professions in this 
and other states. 

Hattie S. Breed, daughter of Sidney I. and Mar- 
tha E. (Mudge) Breed, married the late Wilbur 
K. Eaton, as above noted, and they are the par- 
ents of four children: Sidney Breed; Irving W., 
who married (first) Nellie M. Lear, deceased, and 
(second) Lavinia Smith; Clarence W., who married 
Minnie Godfrey; and MOdred H., at home, now a 
student at Burdette College. The family resides 
at No. 103 Franklin street, Lynn. 



MYRON HENRY DAVIS, M. D.— One of the 

leading medical practitioners of Saugus, Massachu- 
setts, is Dr. Myron Henry Davis, whose work in 
connection with the influenza epidemic brought hij 
name into prominence. 

Dr. Davis is a son of Amasa B. and Lucy Jane 
(Tisdale) Davis. Mr. Davis was an extensiye land- 
owner of Belchertown, Massachusetts, and con- 
ducted important farming and real estate opera- 
tions, also handling very considerable financial in- 
terests in the way of loans. He was bom in Bel- 
chertown, March 12, 1830, and died in Belcher- 
town. Mrs. Davis was bom in Guilford, Windham 
county, Vermont, March 28, 1832, and was a 
daughter of True Tisdale, a Methodist minister 
in his later years. 

Dr. Davis was bom in Belchertown, Febroary 
20, 1862, and, beginning his education in the pub- 
lic schools of that town, completed his high school 
course there also. He then entered Hitchcock 
Free Academy, at Brimfield, Massachusetts, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1881. There- 
after, he entered Harvard Medical University, and 
was graduated in 1885, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. 

Beginning practice in Palmer, Massachusetts, in 
1886, he continued there until 1891, when he re- 
moved to Hardwick, Massachusetts, practicing 
there untU 1911. In that year he came to Saug^us, 
where he has since continued in the general prac- 
tice of medicine. While Dr. Davis is not con- 
nected with any hospital in an official capacity, 
he attends the various institutions in and about 
Boston. During the influenza epidemic he was 
very active in relief work, and the Boston Hospi- 
tal placed two physicians under his direction as 
assistants. He is a member of the Lynn Medical 
fraternity. 

Dr. Davis served for several years on the School 
Board of Palmer, and was also a member of the 
Board of Health of that city. Fraternally he is a 
member of Mount Zion Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Barre, Massachusetts, and of Saugus 
liOdge, Knights of Pythias. 

Dr. Davis married, in 1886, Mary Louifre Walker, 



daughter of James Harvey and Saiah (MeCUn- 
tock) Walker, both of Massachusetts families. 
Mr. Walker was a prominent real estate dealer 
and private banker of Hardwick. Dr. and Mrs. 
Davis have three children: 1. Robert Walker, bom 
in Palmer, October 15, 1887, who served with the 
29th Evacuation Hospital Corps for about four^ 
teen months overseas in the Worid War. 2. Clar- 
ence McClintock, bom February 22, 1889, who 
married, on May 18, 1918, Charlotte Ta>ior, of 
Nahant, Massachusetts, and has one chUd, Elinor 
Louise. 3. Susan Walker, bom November 26, 1891, 
now Mrs. Francis C. Henderson. The family have 
always been members of the Congregational 
church. 

BDWARD F. FLYNN— Among the younger at- 
torneys of Essex county, who are carrying their 
profession forward with the movement of the 
times, is Edward F. Flynn, of No. 14 Central ave- 
nue, Lynn, Massachusetts, son of John F. and 
Mary F. flynn, old residents of this city. 

Mr. Flynn was bom in Lynn, January 13, 1898, 
and received his early education in the public 
schools of the city, after which he entered Boston 
College, studying for two years at that institution, 
then entered Boston University Law School, takr 
ing the full three yeaics' course, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was 
admitted to the Essex county bar in 1916, and 
has since practiced in Lynn, having now attained 
a gratifying measure of success. He is now assist- 
ant district attomey of Essex county. 

Enlisting in the World War, Mr. Flynn was 
commissioned second lieutenant of infantry, and 
served in various camps, but to his disappoint- 
ment, did not see active service. Like so many 
other young men, he was awaiting orders to go 
overseas when the armistice was signed. 

Mr. Flynn is a member of the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, and was the first commander of the 
American Legion in Lynn. He is a member of 
St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church. 

On June 12, 1918, Mr. Flynn married Mary Mc- 
Donald, of Revere, Massachusetts. 



HENRY C. ATTWILL, chairman of the Board 
of Public Utilities of Massachusetts, is among the 
most prominent citizens of Lynn. He was bom 
there, March 11, 1872, son of Isaac M. Attwill, 
and the public schools of his native town aiforded 
him his early education. In 1898 he received his 
degree of LL.B. from the Boston University, and 
the same year was admitted to the Suffolk county 
bar. Subsequently he was associated with Will- 
iam D. Turner, attomey for the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commission, remaining there until 1895, 
in which year he was elected to the Massachu- 
setts Legislature, being at the time the youngest 
member of the House of Representatives. Mr. 
Attwill also served in the Senate during the years 
1899, 1900 and 1901, and in the latter year he 
was appointed chairman of the Judiciary Commit- 



3ame« iaeeD 



m/iB^^mmtt^sJss 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



71 



tee. A singular point of interest of his service in 
the Senate is that in 1899 he was also the young- 
est member of that body. 

In 1905 he was appointed assistant district at- 
torney for the Eastern District of Massachusetts, 
and ably discharged the duties of this office for 
a period of sue years, and at the end of this time 
he was unanimously nominated by the Republican 
conyention for the office of district attorney, being 
re-elected in 1913, which in itself was sufficient 
warrant of his ability. 

At the expiration of his term in 1915, Mr. Att- 
will was elected Attorney General, which office he 
resigned in 1919 to accept the appointment of 
Public Service Commissioner by appointment of 
Vice-President Calvin Coolidge, who was at that 
time GoYemor of the State of Massachusetts, and 
at the present time (1921) Mr. Attwill is chair- 
man of the Board of Public Utilities. 

Mr. Attwill married, June 30, 1906, Augusta 
Harris, daughter of Samuel Harris, and they re- 
side in Lynn. 

FRANK SVBRT WRIGHT, whose position as 
a manufacturer of fine leathers places him in the 
leading industrial circles of Essex county, was bom 
in Lynn, Massachusetts, November 10, 1881, and 
has spent practically all of his business career in 
the leather industry. 

Mr. Wright is a son of Frank Eugene and Al- 
berta (Clark) Wright. Frank Eugene Wright was 
bom in Charlestown, Massachusetts, in 1849, and, 
coming to Lynn in his boyhood, was thereafter 
always a resident of that city. For about thirty 
years he was employed in the Charles E. Har- 
wood factory, and died in 1913. His wife was 
bom in Lynn. 

Attending first the public schools of Lynn, Frank 
Eyert Wright was graduated from the English 
High School with the class of 1900. Entering at 
once the field of industry, he was employed for 
one year as shipping clerk for the New England 
Structural Company. He then became connected 
with the Charles E. Harwood Company, remain- 
ing with this concern for about five years in the 
capacity of clerk. His next step was indicative of 
the character of the man. In 1906 he made an 
independent start in the leather business as a job- 
ber, and continued along this line for four years. 
Making this only a step upward, he thereafter be- 
gan the manufacture of leather, his location being 
on Fayette street, in Lynn, for about a year, after 
which he spent a year in a Salem tannery. About 
1912 he located permanently in Peabody, as a 
manufacturer of a variety of leather products, in- 
cluding a special chrome leather, technically known 
as ''splits,'' and the best velvet ooze, in all colors. 
He also makes an imitation grain leather. He 
employs about thirty-five people, and sells all his 
products at his store in Boston, located at No. 717 
Atlantic street. Up to 1913 the business was a 
partnership, but upon the death of his father it 
was incorporated,. Mr. Wright being the sole 
owner. 



Mr. Wright is a member of the United States 
Chamber of Commerce, and of the Peabody Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and in connection with his 
leather business, is also interested in a shoe manu- 
facturing business in Lynn. 

Fraternally, Mr. Wright is prominent, being a 
member of all the Masonic bodies, and of the 
Knights of Pythias. Politically he supports the 
Republican party, and his religious faith is that 
of the Universalist. His dubs reveal his tastes, 
and include the Tedesco Golf Club, the Boston 
Athletic Club, and the Park Club. 

In 1906 Mr. Wright married (first) Grace Os- 
good, a well-known Lynn school teacher, daughter 
of John C. and Evelyn (Harvey) Osgood; she died 
in 1915. Their three children are: Kenneth Os- 
good, bom December 2, 1910; Joan, bom March 
6, 1913; and Frank £., Jr., bom April 10, 1914. 
Mr. Wright married (second), in 1918, Virginia 
Woodworth, who was bom in Virginia. Mrs. 
Wright's parents are both deceased. 



JAMES REED— The term ''self-made,'' often 
misapplied, may be justly used in connection with 
James Reed, of the well-known firm. Reed St Cos- 
tello, coal dealers of Lynn, Massachusetts, who, 
in 1916, ended a career which covered a period of 
sixty-six years. He lost his father when a child 
of six years, and from a very early age was self- 
supporting. When he started the barge line be- 
tween Nahant and Lynn, he had but five dollars 
capital, yet so good was his reputation that he 
secured a horse and an old barge on credit. And, 
through energy and native business ability, he 
made the line a great success, only withdrawing it 
when the electrics came. He was truly a self- 
made man, and, realizing the difficulties he had en- 
countered, he was always ready to extend a help- 
ing hand to others. Considering the few advan- 
tages Mr. Reed had in his youth, and knowing the 
business success he attained, no boy or young man 
need feel disheartened or doubtful of his future, 
for he proved that "where there is a will there is 
a way," and that honesty, energy and integrity 
will win in any contest. 

James Reed was bom in Lynnfield, Massachu- 
setts, in 1850, and died in Lynn, November 19, 
1916. He came to Lynn a poor boy, fatherless 
and dependent upon himself for a living. He found 
employment in a shoe factory, and there contin- 
ued until one day he announced to his friends that 
he was going to have a business of his own. True 
to his resolution, he left the factory, and shortly, 
with one horse and a barg^ bought on credit, he 
was operating between Nahant and Lynn. He 
made the line pay, and barge after barge was 
added until he had nine in operation and was do- 
ing a very profitable business. When the trolleys 
came he abandoned the barge line, and for ten 
years was a member of the firm of Rood & Wade, 
coal dealers. Later he was engaged in the same 
business as a member of the firm of Reed & Cos- 
tello. They built a wharf for a coal depot and 



72 



ESSEX COUNTY 



were one of the first firms to build a railroad for 
handling: their coal on the wharf. 

Mr. Reed was very popular in Lynn, was high- 
ly esteemed as a business man, and was a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, Knights of the Golden Eagle, 
the Prospect Club, Lynn Yacht Club, and the 
Chamber of Commerce. He gave liberally to 
charity and all good causes, was public-spirited 
and progressive and a good citizen. In politics ho 
was a Republican. 

James Reed married (first) Adell Douset, of 
Nova Scotia. He married (second) Jeannette S. 
Estes, widow of William A. Estes. William A. 
Estes was bom in Lynn, and there died in No- 
vember, 1906, aged fifty-two. He was the son of 
Ezekiel F. and Elizabeth (Ingalls) Estes, both 
bom in Lynn, both of ancient and honorable New 
England family. Ezekiel F. Estes was one of the 
first manufacturers of shoes in the city of Lynn, 
the firm being Philips & Estes. Later, William 
A. Estes bought Mr. Phillips out and the busi- 
ness, at No. 50 Suffolk street, was continued under 
the firm name of W. A. Estes ft Company. The 
original firm made Congress gaiters only. Will- 
iam A. Estes spent his entire adult life in the 
shoe manufacturing business, W. A. Estes ft Com- 
pany making custom shoes only. He was a thirty- 
second degree Mason, and was highly respected in 
the community. Mrs. Reed survives her husband 
and continues her residence in Lynn, her home be- 
ing at No. 66 Newhall street. 



On July 14, 1903, Mr. Shaw married Mary A. 
Drinan, of Calais, Maine, daughter of William J. 
and Mary (Doyle) Drinan, and they now reside at 
No. 107 Eastern avenue, Lynn« 



FREDERICK BVBRBTT SHAW, A.B., LL.B.— 
Having long since attained an assured position in 
the legal profession in Essex county, Massachu- 
setts, Frederick Everett Shaw is now esteemed one 
of the leading attorneys of this section. 

Mr. Shaw was bom in Troy, Waldo county, 
Maine, June 11, 1872, and is a son of Samuel 
Francis and Julia A. (Estes) Shaw. The family 
removing to Lynn after Mr. Shaw had completed 
his common school course, in 1889, he attended 
the Classical high school of this city for a term, 
then .entered the Cobum Classical Institute, of 
Waterville, Maine. Thereafter he entered Dart- 
mouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire, from 
which he was graduated in 1897, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, then prepared for his profes- 
sion at Boston University Law School, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1901, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws. Within the same year 
Mr. Shaw entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession in Lynn, handling a general practice, and 
from the first meeting with success, which has 
constantly grown wider and more substantial. He 
now stands in an enviable position in the profes- 
sion. 

Mr. Shaw served in the Lynn City Council in 
1908-04. He is a member of Bay State Lodge, No. 
40, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and at- 
tends the Church of the Holy Name at Swamp- 
8cott» Massachusetts. 



PHILEMON BVELETH, M. D.^In the chroni- 
cles of every city are names which the people de- 
light to place in permaneat records, names that 
have meant much to the daily lives of the citizens, 
and which are stiU remembered, although years 
have gone by since their passing. Such a name 
is that of Dr. Philemon Eveleth, for thirty-two 
years a successful medical practitioner in Marble- 
head, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Eveleth was bom September 27, 1845, in 
Essex, Massachusetts, and was a son of Edward 
and Lucy (Mears) Eveleth, of that city. Begin- 
ning his education in the public schools of Essex, 
and taking a course at Exeter Academy, the young 
man entered Harvard University Medical School, 
later completing his studies at Dartmouth Colleffe, 
and receiving from the latter institution his de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine. During the long 
course of his professional career hie bore a signifi- 
cant part in the progress and well-being of Mar- 
blehead, the scene of his activities during the en- 
tire thirty-two years of his practice. His stand- 
ards of professional attainment were of the high- 
est, and his endorsement of every forward move- 
ment most cordial. He was a member of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, and for nineteen 
years was a member of the School Board of Mar- 
blehead. 

In fraternal circles. Dr. Eveleth was widely 
known, through his membership with the Free and 
Accepted Masons, the Knights of Pythias, and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was a 
devout member of the Congregational church. 

Dr. Eveleth married, in 1871, Eleanor Davis 
Wonson, of Gloucester, Massachusetts, and they 
were the parents of four children: Edward Smith, 
bom January 21, 1876, of Washington, D. C; 
Dr. Charles Wonson, bom May 21, 1878, of New 
York City; Dr. Samuel Chester, bom March 13, 
1888; and Lucy Mears, bom September 10, 1890. 

On May 14, 1900, Dr. Eveleth passed fjrom a 
life of great and unceasing usefulness in a noble 
profession. Other hands took up the burdens he 
had carried, but in the hearts of those who knew 
him best there was no one to take his place. 



ARTHUR R. KIMBALL is one of the keenest, 
most alive business men in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts. Men know and appreciate his many other 
fine qualities; they value his counsel and leader- 
ship in any undertaking, but they admire most of 
all his abOity to see and foresee the many sides 
of a business situation and the promptness with 
which he states or actal on his conclusions. He is 
general manager and treasurer of one of the old- 
est and most important shoe manufactories of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, and of the one which 
specializes most on shoes for the Southern and 
West Indian trade. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



73 



His father, Alfred Kimball, was bom in Merri- 
mac, Massachusetts, NoYember 21, 1887, and his 
mother, Mira B. Chesley, June 18, 1885. Alfred 
Kimball, at the age of eighty-four, is one of those 
men who will not grow old, being an active dir- 
ector of the Merrimac National Bank of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, an ardent Republican, and was one 
of the first to organize the Masonic order in his 
city. He holds membership in the Universalist 
chnrch, to which he has given great aid and ser- 
vice. 

Arthur R. Kimball, bom January 15, 1878, re- 
ceived the rudiments of his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Haverhill and Dean Academy, and 
his higher training at Tufts CoUege, Massachu- 
setts, from which he was graduated in 1901, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Straight from 
college he went into his father's shoe factory in 
Lawrence to get the education that no school can 
give, that in life and work. 

The concern with which he started is one of 
the oldest, being founded before the Civil War by 
Alfred and Warren Kimball, and was called the 
Kimball Brothers Shoe Company. They began 
operations in Haverhill, Massachusetts, but in 1889 
moved to Kennebunk, Maine, where they continued 
the making of shoes until 1898, when they again 
moved, this time to Lawrence, Massachusetts. It 
was while the firm was at this dty that Arthur 
R. Kimball set out to learn the trade. January 1, 
1919, the company was reorganized under the cor^ 
poration laws of Massachusetts with the following 
men as its parts: Alfred R. Kimball, president; 
Arthur R. Kimball, treasurer and general manager; 
and C. E. W. Grinnell, and J. S. Larrabee. The 
company is a large manufacturer of men's, boys' 
and youths' Goodyear welt shoes, averaging more 
than 10,000 pairs of shoes a week. Their 1919-20 
business amounted to more than one and one-half 
millions of dollars. The average number of em- 
ployees on the pay roll is over 850. For the 
proper distribution of their large output a store 
is maintained in Boston, at No. 54 Lincoln street. 
Most of the company's shoes find their final destin- 
ation in the South and West, or Cuban ports. 

Mr. Kimball married, Febraary 5, 1908, Ella 
Parker, a native of Lynn, Massachusetts. Of this 
imion have come four sons: Alfred, Warren, Har- 
vey Russell, and Parker Chesley. The family are 
active members of the Universalist church, and 
make their home in Reading, Massachusetts. 



IRVING ADDISON HADLBY— The legal pro- 
fession is represented in the city of Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, by a group of men whose progressive 
work along their chosen line of endeavor reflects 
credit upon the community. Irving Addison Had- 
ley is a leader in this profession, and one of the 
forward-moving attorneys of the Essex county bar. 

Mr. Hadley is a grandson of Ethan Hadley, a 
noted figure in Eastern Massachusetts history of 
the early part of the nineteenth century, and a 
descendant of early Colonial families of this State. 



Darius Hadley, father of Irving A. Hadley, was 
bom in Peterboro, New Hampshire. He was a 
man of brilliant mental capacity, and well educated 
as well as widely read. For forty years he taught 
school in the city of Boston, and placed the im- 
press of a fine and manly character upon the youth 
of his day. He resided at different times in 
Everett and Wakefield, and in both places acted 
as town moderator for several years. He was a 
man of pronounced convictions of a personal nat- 
ure, but broadly tolerant in his judgment of other 
men. He was one of the early disciples of the 
Church of Christ Scientist. Serving with signal 
honor in the Civil War, he was later the first 
commander of Post No. 56, Grand Army of the 
Republic, of Everett. He died on February 11, 
1916, in Lynn. He married Mercy Emma Snow, 
who was bom in Chatham, Massachusetts, and in 
early life taught school in her native town. 

Irving Addison Hadley, son of Darius and Mer- 
cy Emma (Snow) Hadley, was bom in Everett, 
Massachusetts, on August 29, 1878. Receiving his 
early education in the public schools of his native 
town, he also covered the high school course, then 
attended the Burdette Business College, in Boston. 
With this preparation the young man entered the 
world of industry well up on the ladder of success, 
in the capacity of manager of the Whitten St Las^ 
cell needle factory. This position he held for a 
period of two years, and then established the 
needle factory of Kimball & Hadley, in which he 
held a considerable interest, and bore an active part 
in the management. 

But the industrial world could not. hold a man 
of Mr. Hadley's tastes and talents. Professional 
fields offered greater opportunities more in line 
with his ability, and Mr. Hadley chose the law. 
His brother, Everett H. Hadley, had made a prom- 
ising start in this profession, so Mr. Hadley took 
up the study of law in his brother's office. Later 
he entered the North-Eastem College. He was 
admitted to the Massachusetts bar in August, 1908, 
and on April 4, 1916, was admitted to practice in 
the United States Supreme Court Mr. Hadley 
located in Lynn in 1908, and has built up a very 
wide and successful practice here. He has won 
the confidence and esteem of the people of Essex 
county, and bears a progressive part in the ad- 
vancements of the public interest. 

Broadly active in the public affairs of the city, 
and a leading member of the Republican party, 
Mr. Hadley always declines public honors, and will 
accept no office. He is a prominent member of 
the City and County Bar associations. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hadley is widely connected. 
He is a member of Paul Revere Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, of which order he is past chancellor; of 
Glenmore Lodg^e, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; of Manatahqua Lodge, Improved Order of 
Red Men, in which order he is past sachem, hav- 
ing been the first sachem; and also a member of 
Damascus Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Majestic Lodge, New England Order of Protection* 



74 



ESSEX COUNTY 



in which order he is past warden; of Evangeline 
Lodge, Daughters of Rebekah; and of Paul Re- 
vere Temple, Pythian Sisters. 

Mr. Hadley married, on November 27,. 1901, Ef- 
fle B. Titos, daught^ of Joseph C. and Hettie 
(Darcy) Titus, farming people of Centreville, Nova 
Scotia, where both they and their daughter 
were bom. Mr. and Mrs. Hadley have one son, 
Irving D., of Ljrnn High School, class of 1922. 



ALBERT PORTER WADLEIGH, State Senator 
and a prominent business man, of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, was bom November 7, 1886, at Merrimac, 
Massachusetts, and comes of distinguished ancestry 
on both the maternal and paternal sides. His 
father, D. Porter Wadleigh, was a native of Merri- 
mac and followed the trade of caniage trimmer; 
he was a great-grandson of Benjamin Dean Wad- 
leigh, of Amesbury, who was gunner's mate on the 
privateer "Decatur'' in the War of 1812, and a dir- 
ect descendant of Robert Wadleigh, governor of 
New. Hampshire about 1700. Mr. Wadleigh'<i 
mother was Cora L. Godsoe, of the Maine family 
of Godsoe, whose members were active participants 
in the War of the Revolution. 

The public schools of Merrimac and the high 
school were the sources of Mr. Wadleigh's early 
education and from a boy of ten years he was 
accustomed to work during those hours when he 
was not in school, thus forming at this early age 
the ambition to succeed with thd passing years 
which has been a large factor in his success. He 
worked as a ''printer's devU" and utility man in 
the printing office of the Merrimac ''Budget" dur- 
ing vacation periods for nine years and then en- 
tered the Haverhill Business College where he 
completed the business course in eight months, 
receitring his diploma at the end of this time. 

His next employment was with the Dutra Tobac- 
co Company, an old established firm and the larg- 
est wholesale distributor of tobacco in Northeast- 
em Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire, 
and at the time ■ Mr. Wadleigh entered their em- 
ploy, January 4, 1907, as bookkeeper, the sole 
owner of the business was Alfred E. Lyons, and 
three years later Mr. Wadleigh was admitted to 
the finn with Mr. Lyons, this arrangement con- 
tinuing until 1917, in which year Mr. Lyons died. 
In October of the same year Mr. Wadleigh formed 
a partnership with Fred W. George, of Merrimac, 
on an equal basis, to continue the business of the 
Dutra Tobacco Company, they having jointly pur- 
chased the Lyons interests, and the business id 
still continued under its original name. 

Mr. Wadleigh's interest in public matters is a 
natural one considering his firm belief in the suc- 
cess and necessity of constitutional representative 
government, and from the time he was twelve 
years of age, when he acted as messenger and 
errand boy of political committees and conven- 
tions, he has been keenly interested in all that 
I>ertains to the public welfare. A year after at- 
taining his majority Mr. Wadleigh was elected 
town auditor of Merrimac and served very capa- 



bly in this office from 1909 to 1911. In 1913 he 
was elected library- trustee and is now chairman of 
the board. Since 1916 he has been chairman of 
the Republican Town Committee, and during 1918 
and 1919, served as representative from the Firs^. 
Essex District in the Massachusetts Legislature. 
He was recently elected to the MassachusettJ 
State Senate to serve in the sessions of 1921 and 
1922, and is chairman of the committee on .' ::ate 
House and of the committee on Counties and i ;ri- 
culture. Mr. Wadleigh has also representee his 
town many times before the Massachusetts Public 
Utilities Commission on street railway rate cases 
and other matters of this nature. In the offices 
he has held Mr. Wadleigh has always kept the in- 
terests of his constituents at heart and the manner 
in which he has discharged the duties incumbent 
on him has been such tibat it has brought great 
satisfaction to those citizens he represents. 

His fraternal activities are many, and at present 
he is past master of Bethany Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Merrimac; past councillor and 
present National representative of the State Coun- 
cil of Massachusetts, Junior Order United Ameri- 
can Mechanics; past councillor of Enterprise 
Council No. 1, of HaverfaiU, Junior Order United 
American Mechanics; past master of Merrimac 
Grange; past master and past lecturer of Essex 
County Pomona Grange. His memberships in- 
clude: Bethany Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Pentucket Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Haverhill 
Council, Royal and Select Masters; HaverhiU 
Commandery, Knights Templar; York Rites; Mer- 
rimack Valley Lodge of Perfection, Scottish Rites; 
Princes of Jerusalem; Rose Croix; Consistory at 
Boston; Aleppo Temple, Order of the Mystic 
Shrine; Riverside Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; Merrimac Grange; American Acad- 
emy of Political and Social Science; National Geo- 
graphic Society; Massachusetts Republican Club; 
Essex County Republican Club; Roosevelt Club; 
and the Board of Trade and other civic bodies. 
He is a member of the Pilgrim Congregational 
Church in Merrimac. Mr. Wadleigh's father died 
in 1911, and he makes his home with his mother 
at Merrimac 

PERLEY L. SANBORN, M. D.— The Sanbome 
(Sanborn) family early came to New Hampshire. 
John William and Stephen Sanbome, sons of an 
Englishman, supposedly William, of Brimpton, and 
his vidfe, Anne BachOer, daughter of Rev. Stephen 
Bachiler. Anne Bachiler's husband died about 
1630, and her three sons are said to have come 
to New England with their Grandfather Bachiler 
in 1632, Rev. Bachiler becoming a prominent 
preacher. There is no tracie of the sons until 
1639, and then in Hampton, New Hampshire. De- 
scendants of these sons of Anne (Bachiler) San- 
bome now number a multitude, many of them 
leaders of men and filling positions of honor, 
trust and profit, worthy successors of the men who 
transformed the New England wilderness and 
made it to blossom as the rose. The medical 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



75 



profesflion has attracted many Sanboms, and this 
review deals with one of tl^t name and profes- 
sion* Dr. Perley Lewis Sanborn, of Maxblehead, 
Massachusetts. 

Perley Lewis Sanborn was bom in Unity, New 
Hampshire, September 7, 1861, and there attended 
public schools. He completed his studies at Colby 
Academy, New London, New Hampshire, then 
entered Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New 
York City, whence he was graduated M. D., class 
of 1877. After graduation he was for a time con- 
nected with a New York City dispensary, then, in 
1878, he opened an office in Marblehead, Massa- 
chusetts, and began the practice of his profession. 
Forty-three years have since elapsed and the good 
doctor is still ministering to the bodily ills of the 
people of Marblehead, his original patients in some 
instances, and to their children and their grand- 
children. In the final estimate of a human life 
the question is not what he has gained, but what 
he has given; not what he has acquired, but what 
he has bestowed; not the pain he caused, but the 
pain he has assuaged; not the wounds he has inflict- 
^, but the wounds he has healed; not the applause 
he receives, but the social works of mercy he has 
done. Measured by these standards, the world is 
better for the life Dr. Sanborn has lived in 
Marblehead. He has devoted himself exclusively 
to the general practice of medicine and has few 
interests outside his profession. 

Dr. Sanborn married, in Camden, Maine, in 
April, 1880, Octavia Porter, bom in that town. 
Dr. and Mrs. Sanborn are the parents of a son, 
Tracy L. Sanborn, a graduate of Dartmouth Col- 
lege, class of 1912, now in business in Boston, but 
a resident of Marblehead. 



IRVING WILDER SARGENT— One of the 
most widely known and highly esteemed law firms 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, is that of Sweeney, 
Sargent & Sweeney, and Mr. Sargent has borne 
a significant part in its progress. His genial spirit 
and helpful attitude towards any advance move- 
ment endear him to his associates. His clear- 
headed appraisal of fact and his wit and power 
in argument have carried him to high standing in 
his profession. 

The Sargent family has been prominent in Law- 
rence for several generations. Seneca Sargent, 
Mr. Sargent's grandfather, came from New Hamp- 
shire in 1846, and practiced medicine in this city 
for many years. With the outbreak of the Civil 
War he entered the service of his country as con- 
tract surgeon, and was in the Virginia Campaign 
of 1862, under General McClellan. He was a 
member of Grecian Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Lawrence, and his death, which 
occurred in 1878, made a rift in other social and 
fraternal organizations. He married Mary WUder, 
also of New Hampshire birth and rearing. 

Dr. George Woodbury Sargent, their son, and 
Mr. Sargent's father, was bom in Concord, Ver- 
mont, in 18S4, and eariy in life came to Lawrence 
with his parents* His public school course was 



completed in the schools of this city, and he pre- 
pared for his career in the Albany Medical Col- 
lege. He was in active practice in Lawrence when 
the Civil War broke out, and in 1864 became as- 
sistant surgeon in ttke Sixth Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Infantry, his headquarters being 
at Fort Delaware. Later returning to Lawrence, 
he became one of its distinguished physicians, and 
died in 1893. He married Marietta Bancroft, who 
was bom in Merrimac, Massachusetts, in 1888, and 
who still survives her husband, residing in Law- 
rence (1921). Of their children. Dr. George B. 
Sargent is the third generation in this family to 
win prominence in the medical profession, being 
now a representative physician of Lawrence. 

Irving WUder Sargent, son of Dr. George Wood- 
bury and Marietta (Bancroft) Sargent, v^as bom 
in Lawrence, August 8, 1879, and eariy detemiined 
upon the profession of the law as his field of 
future effort Upon the completion of his gram- 
mar course in the Lawrence schools, he entered 
Phillips Academy, at Andover, Massachusetts, a 
member of the dass of 1896. Thereafter entering 
Harvard University, he was graduated from that 
institution in the dass of 1900, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. His professional course in 
Harvard Law School was finished in 1903, and 
receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws, bis ad- 
mission to the bar followed before the close of 
the year. Mr. Sargent's first professional associ- 
ation was with the noted law firm of Svreeney, 
Dow & Cox, composed of John P. Sweeney, the 
present head of the firm, Harry R. Dow, judge 
of the probate court since 1908, and Louis S. Cox, 
who was appointed Judge of the superior court in 
1918. Mr. Sargent became a member of the firm 
in 1916, the firm name then becoming Sweeney, 
Cox & Sargent. In 1918 Mr. Cox withdrew from 
the firm upon his elevation to the bench, and the 
firm was reorganized as Sweeney, Sargent & 
Sweeney, the junior partner being .Arthur Sween- 
ey, son of John P. Sweeney, the senior partner. 
With this group of associates Mr. Sargent is carry- 
ing forward a general law practice, and stands 
among the foremost men in the profession in Essex 
county. 

Endorsing all public advance, Mr. Sargent be- 
longrs to the Chamber of Commerce, and is a mem- 
ber of the school committee. Politically he sup- 
ports the Republican party, but has never ac- 
cepted the honors of office. To the Red Cross 
Drive during the Great War he gave his best 
energies, and was a convincing Four-Minute Man, 
also serving as registrar for the draft board. He 
was chairman of the committee on relief fo^ 
soldiers' families, and still serves on the execu- 
tive committee of the local branch of the Red 
Cross. He is a trustee of the White Fund, and 
as such is a trustee of the Lavn:«nce Library. A 
member of the bar associations of the State of 
Massachusetts, and of both Lawrence and Essex 
county, Mr. Sargent serves the last mentioned as 
a member of the executive committee. He is one 
of the corporators of the Lawrence Savings Buik. 



76 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Fraternally he is widely connected, being a mem- 
ber of Monadnock Lodge, Independent Order ox 
Odd Fellows; Phoenician Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; and his clubs include the Har- 
vard clubs of both Lawrence and Boston, the 
Salem Club, the Monday Night Club, and the 
Merrimac Valley Country Club. He attends the 
Episcopal church. 

Mr. Sargent married, at Lawrence, in 1906, 
Helen Stanley, who was bom in Lawrence, May 
27, 1881, and died in this city April 12, 1919. 
Mrs. Sargent was a daughter of Charles R. and 
Nellie M. (Swett) Stanley, of Portland, Maine. 



FRANK LEO CAREY— The debt which Ameri- 
ca owes to its citizens of Irish ancestry is widely 
recognized and is past computation. Characterized 
by ambition, industry, thrift and sound morality, 
immigrrants of this sturdy race, cherishing the 
same ideals of freedom, religious, political and per^ 
sonal, as brought the Pilgrims and Puritans to our 
shores, have never needed to be assimilated; they 
are naturally one with us. Of such stock comes 
Frank Leo Carey. 

This branch of the Carey famOy was established 
in America by our subject's grandparents, Martin 
and Ann (Sheedy) Carey. Martin Carey was bom 
in Limerick, Ireland, in 1848. Coming to Massa- 
chusetts with his wife and oldest child, he located 
in Lawrence, where husband and wife still (1922) 
reside. For the greater part of his active life 
Martin Carey engaged in the livery business. 

John T. Carey, son of Martin and Ann (Sheedy) 
Carey, and the father of Frank L. Carey, was 
bom in Lawrence, November 26, 1865. After pur- 
suing the upual courses of study in the public and 
parochial schools of his native city, John T. Carey 
learned the trade of painter and decorator. Fol- 
lowing this trade as a journeyman until about 
1904, he then embarked in business on his own 
account as a .contracting painter and decorator, 
doing all kinds of interior and exterior work in 
that line. His square business methods and the 
sincerity with which he carries out the spirit of 
his contracts have won for him an enviable repu- 
tation. He is a member of the Knights of Col- 
umbus, but is a man of essentially domestic tastes, 
finding his chief interests, outside of his business, 
within the famUy circle. He married Mary Fitz- 
patrick, bom February 17, 1867, daughter of Den- 
nis Fitzpatrick, of Lawrence. From this union 
four children have been bom, all of whom are 
now living in Lawrence: Frank Leo, of further 
mention; William J.; Anna L., who is a teacher 
in the Lawrence public schools; and Louis C. The 
family are all members of St. Mary's Roman Cath- 
olic Parish. 

Frank Leo Carey, who is more particularly the 
subject of this sketch, was bom in Lawrence, 
February 27, 1892. He attended the public 
schools, graduating from the high school in 1909. 
Soon after his graduation he entered the employ 
of the John Franklin Company, dvil engineers. 
Four years in their employ convinced him that 



the engineering profession would not prove con- 
genial as a life-time vocation. No experience is 
ever lost, however, to the thoughtful man, and the 
knowledge of men and things, gained in those . 
first years of his working life, has already proven 
of value in his law practice and will continue to 
pay dividends during the coming years. 

In 1918 Mr. Carey matriculated in the law de- 
partment of Boston University, from which he was 
graduated in 1916 with the usual Bachelor of 
Laws degree. He was admitted to the bar at 
Boston in the same year, and began the practice 
of his profession in the office of J. C. Twomey, 
of Lawrence, in December, 1916. 

The entrance of America into the World War 
soon cut short his professional activities. The 
urge of patriotism and love of country were too 
great to be resisted, and it cannot faU to be a 
source of increasing satisfaction for him to recall, 
as the years go by, that he was among the first 
New Englanders to enlist in the conflict on the 
side of justice and democracy. On May 11, 1917* 
he enlisted as a private in the One Hundred and 
Second Field Artillery and saw service overseas 
for two years. He was mustered out as a first 
lieutenant, his promotions through the various 
grades to that rank being the strongest testimony 
to his qualities of thoroughness, faithfulness, in- 
telligence and bravery. His genial personality and 
uniform courtesy, while not yielding an iota of 
the demands of discipline, won for him the esteem 
and ni^fftilifig loyalty of the men under his com- 
mand. 

Upon his return to civil life, Mr. Carey became 
a partner in the law firm of Mahoney St Haverty, 
the name of the firm being changed to Mahoney, 
Haverty & Carey. Their offices are in the Bay 
State building. This is said to be the day of the 
young man, that is to say, the man who is for- 
ward-looking and who yet has the adaptability to 
conform to the new conditions brought about by 
the evolutionary changes, political, sodal and econ- 
omic, through which we are so rapidly passing. 
The firm of which our subject is a member has 
already established itself in an enviable position 
by the careful attention it gives to its clients' in- 
terests. The same qualities that won promotion 
for Mr. Carey in the army are pushing him foiv 
ward in the legal profession. His sincerity, care- 
ful judgment and loyalty are winning a constantly 
crowing clientele. 

Mr. Carey is a member of the Lawrence Bar 
Association, the American Legion, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, and the Knights of Columbus. A 
Republican in political affiliation, Mr. Carey be- 
lieves that the citizen's duty to his community is 
measured by his ability to serve it; and he is ready 
at all times to further, in any way that he can, 
any movement that makes for the public good. 
He was elected a member of the school board in 
1916, but resigned when he enlisted in the amy. 

On June 22, 1920, Mr. Carey married MadaMne 
E. Mahoney, daughter of Maurice J. Mahoney, a 
sketch of whom appears in this woric, and Ellen 



J^etmon C. flgacJlSeil 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



77 



(Hollahan) Mahoney. Mr. Carey and his wife 
have fv daughter, Marie Eleanor, who was bom 
April 9, 1921. 

WESTON P. EASTMAN-^The name of East- 
man is a very well known one in New England 
and elsewhere and has been for a number of gen- 
erations, and there have been many prominent 
representatives among them. The earliest known 
record of the ancestry of the Eastmans of this 
country is the will of John Eastman of Ramsey, 
Coimty of Southampton, England, dated September 
24, 1602. The numerous family of this name, 
which has spread throughout New England and 
many of the middle and western States, is the 
progeny of a pioneer of Salisbury, Massachusetts, 
and many of the later generations in New Hamp- 
shire are descended from the first of that name 
in Concord who was the principal settler of that 
town. 

Fred Eastman, father of W. F. Eastman, al* 
though of New England ancestry, was bom in 
Madison, Wisconsin, August 8, 1856. He early 
settled in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and in 1880 
established the firm of Eastman & Blyth, painters 
and decorators, which has become since then a 
very large and prosperous concern. The mother, 
Mary J. (Blyth) Eastman, is a native of Lawrence 
and was bom October 22, 1859. 

Weston F. Eastman was bom in Lawrence, Aug- 
ust 6, 1888. After getting all the education the 
graded schools could give him he attended Phillips 
Academy at Andover and was graduated in 1901. 
Even at this early date he showed his taste and 
abilities for the banking business in which he was 
so successful later, and, encouraged by those who 
knew him best, he sought a position along that 
line. This he secured readily in the Lawrence 
National Bank, starting as derk. On April 1, 1902, 
he found improved conditions and a wider opening 
for advancement in the Merchants' National Bank, 
No. 264 Essex street. Here for a while he was book- 
kee^^er. When the Lawrence National and the 
Mecrchants' National banks consolidated in 1911, 
forming the Merchants' Trust Company, Mr. East- 
man was made paying teller and, when later the 
Pacific National Bank was absorbed by the Trust 
Company, he became note teller. On October 1, 
1920, the Trust Company established him as the 
assistant treasurer and manager of their Broadway 
oiBce at No. 590 Essex street, which position he 
now holds (1921). Mr. Eastman has seen a great 
gn>wth in Lawrence and in banking, but has grown 
oven faster himself in banking ability, business 
acumen and aptitude for finance. He looks out 
on a future big with possibilities. During the war 
Poriod he took his place with other bankers and 
^d a large share in the success of the various 
Liberty Loan Drives and other war time activities. 

Mr. Eastman has confined his fraternal interest 
to the Masonic order and is a thirty-second de- 
^^"^ Mason, afUiating with Phoenician Lodge. 
Ancient Free and Aecepted Masons; Mt. Sinai 
^^'^Pter, Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence Council, 



Royal and Select Masters; Bethany Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Massachusetts Consistory of 
Boston; Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, 
Nobles of the Mystic . Shiine. He attends and sup- 
ports the UniversaUst church. 

On December 12, 1917, he was united in mar- 
riage, at Lawrence, to Rachael Elizabeth Dean, of 
Lawrence, daughter of William W. Dean« for 
some time treasurer of the Lawrence Lumber 
Company, and Rebecca (Sager) Dean, a native 
of Rhode Island. Mr. and Mrs. Eastman have 
one son, Weston Dean Eastman, bom February 
6, 1919. 

HBRMON C. MacNBIL — Prominent in the 
manufacturing world of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
Hermon C. MacNeil is bearing a part in the prog- 
ress > of the great shoe industry, of which Lynn 
is one of the leading centers of the world. 

Mr. MacNeil is a son of Caleb Henry MacNeil, 
of Chelsea, Massachusetts, whose mother, a Pratt, 
was a direct descendant of the Pratta who set- 
tled in Chelsea, Massachusetts, in 1638. He was 
a man of broad abUity, and was engaged in the 
contracting business in Chelsea until his death, 
which occurred May 25, 1896. Caleb Henry Mac- 
Neil married Josephine Charlotte Wahlgren, of 
Everett, Massachusetts. 

Hermon C. MacNeil, son of Caleb Henry and 
Josephine Chariotte (Wahlgren) MacNeil, was 
bom in Chelsea, Massachusetts, April 16, 1891, 
and received a practical preparation for the bat- 
tle of life in the educational institutions of that 
city. His first business experience was with the 
Harry Hartley Company, Incorporated, wool top 
manufacturers of Boston, and with them he re- 
mained for two years. He then became asso- 
ciated with George A. Carpenter, a leading real 
estate dealer of Boston, as superintendent of 
buildings, continuing in this connection for a sim- 
Oar period. Thereafter he became purchasing 
agent for the Shoe City Novelty Company, re- 
maining in that capacity until January 2, 1911. 
This company was incorporated in 1910, the per- 
sonnel of the company being as follows: Presi- 
dent, Warren Stetson; vice-president, Albert L. 
Howes; treasurer, Frank O. Stetson; and secre- 
tary, Charles S. Clinch, the firm purchasing the 
interests of Mr. Oakes and Charles S. Clinch, 
theretofore the owners of the business. In Sep- 
tember, 1912, the corporation assigned, and Charles 
S. Clinch, formerly part owner, rebought the busi- 
ness from the assignees. In May, 1918, he re- 
ceived as a partner John T. Rogers. At that 
time Mr. MacNeil was again made purchasing 
agent for the plant, and was also given charge 
of the sales. He then made his first trip on the 
road. Within nineteen months Mr. Clinch suffered 
a breakdown which threatened permanently to 
impair his health, and the business was purchased 
by Mr. MacNeil, in association with Nellie R. 
Lowe, August 1, 1914. There was no further 
change until August 1, 1919, when Mr. MacNeil 
purchased the interest of Mrs. Lowe, and the 



78 



ESSEX COUNTY 



firm name became The MacNeil Company, Mr. Mac- 
Neil being sole owner. With his experience and 
natural adaptability to adnunistratiTe interests, Mr. 
MacNeil is going forward constantly, and is achiev- 
ing a good measure of success. 

Mr. MacNeil is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce of Lynn, and interested in the prog- 
ress of every branch of civic activity. He is a 
member of Wayfarers Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He is a member of the 
United Conmiercial Travelers, of Lynn, and of the 
Rotary Club. 

In February, 1915, Mr. MacNeil married Inez 
Elizabeth Sylvester, of Chelsea, Massachusetts, and 
they have two little daughters, Jean and Doris. 



JUDGE FRBDBRIC N. CHANDLER, although 
in the prime of life with its ever widening pros- 
pects for future attainment^ can still look bacK 
on many years of accomplishment that have 
brought not only great personal success, but also 
the merited aifection and plaudits of his fellows. 
Genial, open-hearted, and always ready to help, 
his friends are legion. Able, talented, with a 
judicial mind and broad legal training, his asso- 
ciates in the law do him honor. In civic, state and 
national affairs, his capacity for organization, the 
facility with which he secures an enthusiastic fol- 
lowing, and the vigor and efficiency with which he 
pushes through any movement for the betterment 
of the city, state or country, has won for him 
a more than local fame. 

His father had many of the same interesting 
traits that characterize the son. Henry F. Chand- 
ler was bom in Andover, Massachusetts, in 1835, 
and was long engaged in the wholesale paper 
business. Like others of his time his venture- 
some spirit and courage took him to the gold fields 
of California and it was while he was there that 
the Civil War suddenly broke upon this country. 
Dropping his interests as they were, he immedi- 
ately set out for home and, upon arrival, enlisted 
for service in the Fifty-Ninth Regiment, Massar 
chusetts Volunteers. It was not long before he 
was in the midst of fighting, and during the later 
years of the war he served on the firing line in 
most of its greatest battles: The ''Wilderness," 
"Spottsylvania," "Cold Harbor," "Petersburg, ' 
"Weldon Railroad"; one great fight followed the 
other and he was in the forefront of them all. 
Three times was he wounded, the first on De- 
cember 8, 1863; on recovery he rejoined his regi- 
ment only to fall again in the warfare around 
Petersburg, Virginia, June 17, 1864. Again as 
soon as the surgeons would let him, he was back 
with his comrades only to be shot again at Pop- 
lar Grove Church, September 80, 1864, and this 
time he was hurt so badly that he was sent home 
to recover and it was a long time before he was 
able to be about. In 1866 he received his honored 
and "honorable discharge." During his service 
under General Bumside he received the much 
prized Congressional Medal for bravery in action. 



Judge Chandler is a worthy son of a worthy 
father, although his work has been one o( peace 
rather than of war. His birthplace was Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, the time August 1, 1870. 
He prepared for college in the graded and high 
schools of the community and completed the pre- 
paration in 1889. He was the first winner of the 
Valpey Medal, in a speaking contest held in high 
school. He then entered Dartmouth College from 
which he was graduated in 1893 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Letters. The next four years were 
very busy ones, for during that time he was not 
only a professor of mathematics and Latin in Law- 
rence High School, and principal of Lawrence 
Evening High School, but he completed the law 
course in Boston University, graduating with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in the class of '97. 
He was admitted to the Bar at Salem, Massachu- 
setts, in 1896, before completing his law course. 
During his principalship of the Lawrence Evening 
High School which extended from 1898-1902, in- 
clusive, he entirely reorganized its methods and 
system and so increased its popularity and effec- 
tiveness that the number of teachers and pupils 
was greatly augmented. 

The same month, June, that saw him gradu- 
ated from Boston University also saw his en- 
trance upon the practice of law in the oflices of 
the Hon. Charles A. DeCourcey, now (1921) Asso- 
ciate Justice, Massachusetts Supreme Court. Here 
he remained up to the end of the year 1898, when 
he opened an ofiice for himself in the Essex 
Bank building. On November 1, 1899, he entered 
into a partnership with Fred H. Eaton of Law- 
rence, the president of the Bay State National 
Bank, of which Judge Chandler is a director. 
When the bank put up the magnificent building 
to which it has given its own name, one of the 
first tenants was the law firm of Eaton & Chand- 
ler. 

Judge Chandler is a member of both the Essex 
County, Lawrence and Massachusetts Bar associa- 
tions. He was city solicitor in 1910, and is special 
justice, Lawrence District Court In 1910 he was 
elected president of the Lawrence Board of 
Trade, a body so weak that many thought he 
had been chosen so that he might preside at its 
obsequies. President Chandler promptly brought 
about a reorganization, ''gave the dog a new 
name," and, as the "Chamber of Commerce," it is 
a lusty, hustling body of eleven hundred members 
and one of the most conspicuous factors in the 
advance of the city. Judge Chandler was cho- 
sen president of this new society and his resigna- 
tion from official position three years later was 
g^reatly regretted by the whole organization. He 
is stiU, however, one of its most wide-awake mem- 
bers. He is a Republican as regards political 
faith, finds pleasure in the out-of-doors, and in 
the meeting of his many friends at the Merrimac 
Valley Country Club. Fraternally he belongs to 
the Alpha Delta Phi and Casque & Gauntlet 
Senior Society. He also affiliates with Lawrence 
Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



7» 



and is a thirty-second degree Mason, belonging to 
Grecian Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; Royal Arch Masons; Royal and Select Mas- 
ters; Bethany Commandery, Knights Templar, of 
Lawrence; Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of Boston. 

During the World War he was very promi- 
nent and active on the many committees that 
arose at that time. His wide acquaintance with 
business men, and influence over them, made him 
one of the most distinguished leaders in the Red 
Gross, Liberty Loan and other campaigns. He, 
with his family, are aflUiated with the South 
Congregational Church of Andover, Massachusetts. 

Judge Chandler was married, in Collinsville, 
Illinois, October 9, 1901, to Genevieve Chandler, 
daughter of Nathan W. Chandler, bom in An- 
dover, Massachusetts, and one time postmaster 
of Collinsville, Illinois, and Clara L. (Berkey) 
Chandler, a native of Collinsville. From this union 
there is a son Gordon Henry, bom July 1, 1908, 
a graduate of Punchard High School, Andover, 
and now a student at Taber Academy, Marion, 
Massachusetts. 

WILLIAM WARREN HENNESSEY, M. D.— 
Although young in years. Dr. Hennessey, a native 
of Salem, Massachusetts, and a well known physi- 
cian of this community, has already gained a dis- 
tinction in his profession which might well be the 
envy of a much older man. His efforts have been 
so discerningly directed along well-defined lines 
that his may already be called a successful life in 
the true sense of the word. 

William Warren Hennessey was bom in Salem, 
Massachusetts, June 17, 1884, the son of the late 
James F. and Mary (Ryan) Hennessey. He ob- 
tained his elementary education in the public schools 
of his native city and then, having decided upon the 
profession of medicine for his career, he matri- 
culated in the Medical Department of Tufts College, 
where he was graduated in 1906, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, after which he passed the 
Massachusetts Board examinations and then served 
an intemeship of one and one-half years at the 
Carney Hospital in Boston, subsequently entering 
the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, where he spent another one and one-half 
years, after which he returned to Salem and opened 
an office, specializing in diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose and throat. Success has attended his ^orts 
and he is now in possession of a large and increas- 
ing clientele. 

Dr. Hennessey is on the staff of the Salem Hos- 
pital, being eye, ear, nose and throat specialist there, 
and is also surgeon at the Camey Hospital at 
Boston. He is a member of all the leading medi- 
cal associations, among them being the American 
Medical Association, the New England Medical As^ 
sociation, the Massachusetts M^ical Society, and 
the Alpha Kappa Kappa medical fraternity. On 
October 25, 1918, during the World War, Dr. Hen- 
nessey enlisted in the Medical Corps of the United 
States army, where he received the commission of 



first lieutenant, and was placed in charge of the eye^ 
ear, nose and throat department of the Base Hos- 
pital at Camp Devens, where he remained until 
April 29, 1919, when he received his honorable dis- 
charge. 

On September 10, 1911, William Warren Hen- 
nessey was united in marriage with Margaret A. 
Bailey, of Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. and Mrs. 
Hennessey have no children. They reside at No. 
338 Essex street, Salem. 



PETER A. SIM — From Dumbarton, Scotland, 
came Peter Sim, a lad of but fourteen years, but 
most capable and self-reliant. He found a home 
and employment in Peabody, Massachusetts, there 
became a leather worker, remaining in that busi- 
ness in Peabody and Salem so long as he lived* 
He married Mary J. Steele, of St. Andrews, New 
Brunswick, Canada, but whose life was largely 
spent in Peabody, Massachusetts. Both were 
members of the Congregational church. 

Peter A. Sim, son of Peter and Mary J. (Steele) 
Sim, was bom in Peabody, Massachusetts, May 
16, 1868, and there was educated in the public 
schools. His father was a tanner of morocco 
leather, head of Peter Sim & Sons, of Salem, and 
when school years were over, he took his son into 
the business, and until 1885 he remained in his 
father's employ. In that year he was admitted to 
the firm of Peter Sim & Sons, and upon the death 
of Peter Sim, March 1, 1897, his three sons con- 
tinued the business under the firm name, Peter Sim 
& Sons. The business has been conducted under 
the Sim name and in the same location for forty- 
five years, no other firm in the city being able to 
show such a record. 

Peter A. Sim is a member of the Knights of 
Malta; is a Republican in politics; and a member 
of the Congregational church. 

Mr. Sim married, in 1888, Evelyn A. Goldwaite,. 
of Peabody, Massachusetts, and they are the par^ 
ents of a daughter, Mildred E., wife of Edward £. 
Jewett, of Gloucester, Massachusetts. Mr. Sim is. 
a man of energy and strong ability, sound in 
judgment, and during his years of business activ- 
ity has been very successful in his undertakings. 
He is highly esteemed in his community and wide- 
ly known. 

WILLIAM J. BARRY— In a field of effort which 
directly bears upon the economic security of the 
community, — the insurance business, William J. 
Barry has long been active in Lynn, Massachusetts, 
and is still carrying forward the tide of prog^ress 
along this line. 

Mr. Barry was bom in Lynn, July 15, 1872, and 
is a son of Richard P. and Mary Ann (Griffin) 
Barry. The father was formerly a member of the 
State Board of Conciliators. As a boy Mr. Barry 
attended the public schools of his native city, then 
took a course at Harvard University. After com- 
pleting his education he became identified with the 
firm of Baker, Marshman & Baker, in the insurance 
and real estate business, and this partnership en- 



80 



ESSEX COUNTY 



dnred for five years. Upon ita di)9solQtion Mr. 
Barry entered the same field independently^ and 
is still thus engaged, being now one of the leading 
insurance and real estate men in the city. 

Mr. Barry is a member of the Lynn Board of 
Fire Underwriters, and of the New England In- 
surance Exchange. Fraternally he holds member- 
ship in the Knights of Columbus, he is a mem- 
ber of the Oxford Club, of Lynn, and of the Lynn 
Historical Society. He is a member of the Chari- 
table Irish Society, and of St. Mary's Roman Cath- 
olic Church. 

On June 14, 1906, Mr. Bairy married Jennie 
B. Baxter, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Evans) Baxter, and a descendant of a vezy old 
Massachusetts family. Mrs. Barry is a member of 
the Daughters of the Revolution, of the Colonial 
Daughters, and of the Mayflower Descendants. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bany have two children: William 
Paul, bom April 6, 1907; and Elisabeth Evans, bom 
January 11, 1909. 



MBLBOURNB D. SKINNBR, who is connected 
with the shoe industry of Lynn as a manufacturer 
of heels, was bom in Kings county. Nova Scotia, 
March 1, 1869. He is a son of David and Rebecca 
(Moore) Skinner. David Skinner was bom in Nova 
Scotia, and engaged in the heel business the greater 
part of his life. He died in 1906, at the advanced 
age of seventy-seven years. His wife was a native 
of Kings county. Nova! Scotia. 

Receiving his education in the public schools 
of Nova Scotia, Melbourne D. Skinner later came 
to Lynn, and here founded the business known as 
the Skinner Heel Company, in partnership with F. 
A« Gordon, of Lynn. The venture was very suc- 
cessful and developed to gratifying proportions. 
The partnership continued until 1919, when the 
business was reorganized as a corporation, the of- 
ficers of the company being elected as follows: 
president, M. D. Skinner; secretary, Miss Harney; 
and treasurer, F. A. Gordon. With this change in 
the form of organization, the name became the 
Skinner Heel Company, Incorporated. As the head 
of this constantiy growing interest Mr. Skinner is 
prominent in the business worid of Lynn, and is a 
member Qf the Chamber of Commerce. He was a 
member of Company I, Eighth Infantry, Massa- 
chusetts National Guard, from 1887 until 1904. 

Mr. Skinner married Edith M. Morse, and they 
are the parents of two daughters: Irene Pearl, 
who became the wife of Harold Davis, of Lynn, and 
has a daughter, Edith; and Alice M., wife of Fred- 
erick Grove, of Wells Depot, Maine, and has two 
children, Frederick and Mary. 



JOHN SARGENT MASON, who has been con- 
nected with Haverhill business for more than 
twenty years, and is widely known among the lead- 
ing business men of that section of Massachusetts, 
was bom in Lawrence, Massachusetts, on January 
9, 1870, son ef Eugene J. and Susan F. (Sargent) 
Mason. His mother was bom in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, and was of the old Colonial family of 



that patronymic, the American generations of the 
Sargent family reaching back into the seventeenth 
century, to the first decade^ of tiie Massachusetts 
colony. His father, Eugene J. Mason, was a mer- 
chant in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he died 
in 1880, John S. being then only ten years old. 

John S. Mason received the v^ole of his acad- 
emic education in the public schools of Lawrence, 
and was fortunately able to remain in school until 
he had graduated from the high school, which he 
did in the class of 1890. For five years after leav- 
ing school John S. Mason was connected with the 
wholesale drygoods house of F. A. Foster, at Bos- 
ton, and for a further four years was with the 
Robinson Hardware Company, at Lawrence. In 
1899 he came to Haverhill and formed a business 
partnership with W. E. Ellis. They established the 
firm of Ellis & Mason, and for five years conducted 
a good business in cut soles and other branches 
of the leather industry. In 1904, however, Mr. 
Mason saw that it was to his advantage to with- 
draw from the partnership and join the sales force 
of the Treat Hardware Company, of Lawrence. 
This he did, but it was not long afterwards before 
he entered into association with another Haverhill 
business man, Urban W. Leavitt, for the purpose 
of acquiring tiie Hanscom Brothers Hardwiare Com- 
pany^ a business which was established in Haverhill 
so far back as 1866, and which has been elsewhere 
referred to in this work. Messrs. Mason and Lea- 
vitt were successful, and organized in corporate 
form another company, the Hanscom Haidware 
Company, Inc.', in 1906. Mr. Mason was elected 
president and Mr. Leavitt treasurer, and in these 
capacities they have continued to control and di- 
rect the company's operations ever since. The 
business has grown immensely, their main quarters, 
at No. 80 Main street, having a floor space of 45,000 
square feet, and embracing three buildings. They 
manufacture the brand of hardware known as ^Sag- 
gahew,'' and they sapply the trade over a wide 
area. The Hanscom Hardware Company, Inc., is 
said to be by far the largest hardware company in 
this section of Massachusetts. 

Outside his business activities Mr. Mason is well 
and favorably known in Haverhill because of his 
interest in the city. He has actively co5perated in 
several movements which endeavored to bring 
Haverhill more into line with larger cities of 
Massachusetts, and he has not stinted support to 
several local philanthropic objects. He is one of 
the corporators of the Five Cent Savings Bank, and 
is a director of the Essex National Bank of Haver- 
lull. He is a Knight Templar of the Masonic or- 
der, and member of the Pentucket Club. He is a 
Congregationalist, being a member of the North 
Congregational Church, and a member of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

Mr. Mason married, June 22, 1910, Eva F. Chase, 
daughter of David E. and Harriet (Potter) Chase, 
of Haverhill. The former was a ranch and mine 
owner, and died in 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Mason have 
two children: Virginia, bom in 19}4; and Dor- 
othy, bom in 1917. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



81 



THOMAS FRANCIS HBNRY, M. D.— The medi- 
cal profession is represented in the city of Salem, 
Massachusetts, by a group of men in whom any 
city might well take pride, and among them Dr. 
Thomas Francis Henry holds a leading position. 

Dr. Henry was bom in Salem, and has grown up 
among its people. He attended its elementary 
schools and prepared for his technical education in 
the grammar and high schools. His father, Patrick 
Henry, was a resident of Salem, by occupation a 
leather worker, an industrious man, respected by all 
who knew him. He retired ten years before his 
death, living to see his son a successful physician. 
Dr. Henry's mother, Bridget (Cunney) Henry, is 
also deceased. 

Being graduated from Tufts College in 1906, with 
the degree of M. D., Dr. Henry became interne at 
St. Vincent's Hospital, of Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, where he remained for fifteen months. He 
passed the examinations of the State Medical Board 
in 1905. Opening an office at Salem, he began the 
general practice of medicine and surgery, yery soon 
winning recog^tion, and as time passed he forged 
rapidly ahead until now he stands in the foremost 
ranks of the medical profession in this vicinity. He 
is a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
and is on the staff of the Salem Hospital. He was 
city physician from 1906 to 1909, inclusive. In po- 
litical convictions Dr. Henry is an Independent, de- 
claring himself for no party unreservedly. 

Dr. Henry married, on November 11, 1915, Jen- 
nie F. Moore, daughter of Thomas and Jane 
(Dwyer) Moore, both now deceased, of Wobum, 
Massachusetts. Mrs. Henry was educated at Elm- 
hurst Academy, in Providence, Rhode IslaAd, and, 
taking a special Perry kindergarten course, taught 
for two years in Boston. Mr. Moore was a veteran 
of the Civil War, and was for years a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. Dr. and Mrs. 
Henry have two children: Barbara Moore, and 
Robert The family are members of St. James' 
Roman Catholic Church. 



REV. FREDERICK ARTHUR WILSON, pastor 
emeritus of the Free Christian (Congregational) 
Church of And'over, Massachusetts, has achieved 
much success in the many years he has labored in 
the service of the people. He was bom April 23, 
1852, at Orono, Maine, son of Nathaniel Wilson, Jr., 
who was bom at Haverhill, New Hampshire, Sep- 
tember 18, 1807, and died at Orono, January 23, 
1892. He was a IsLwyer, and prominent in public life. 
In his earlier days he was a member of the Whig 
party and subsequently a Democrat. He was the 
representative of his party during a term in the 
State Legislature, and served many years on the 
school committee. Nathaniel Wilson, Jr., married 
at Orono, April 17, 1889, Abigail A. Colbum, bom 
at Orono, November 23, 1818, died there, March 27, 
1896, daughter of Jeremiah and Susan (Graves) 
Colbum. 

Nathaniel Wilson, Sr., father of Nathaniel Wil- 
son, Jr., and grandfather of the Rev. Frederick A. 
Wilson, was bom May 14, 1777, at Pelham, New 



Hampshire, and died September 1, 1807; he was a 
blacksmith by occupation. He married, iB 1803, 
Sarah E. Pearson, who was bom April 2, 1781, and 
died January 13, 1866, at Orono, Maine. 

Jesse Wilson, father of Nathaniel Wilson, Sr., and 
the great-grandfather of Rev. Frederick A. WUson, 
was bom January 20, 1740, and died July 27, 1810. 
He served as captain in the Revolutionary War, and 
married for his second wife Ruth Merrill; they made 
their home in Pelham, New Hampshire. 

Rev. Frederick A. Wilson, son of Nathaniel, Jr., 
and Abigail A. (Colbum) Wilson, was educated in 
the public schools of Orono and the Hampden Acad- 
emy. He was a member of the class of 1869 of the 
Waterville Classical Institute, and four years later 
was graduated from Bowdoin College with the B. A. 
degree, and in 1882 from the Theological Seminary 
at Bangor, Maine. During the years betwe^i 1878 
and 1875 Mr. Wilson was princii>al of the Frye- 
burg Academy at Fryeburg, Maine, and from the 
latter year to 1879 he was instructor in mathematics 
and natural science at the HalloweU Classical Insti- 
tute of Hallowell, Maine. 

The first pastorate of Rev. Mr. Wilson, after his 
ordination to the ministry in 1882, was as pastor of 
the Orthodox Congregational Church at Billerica, 
Massachusetts, from 1882 to 1889. He was then ap- 
pointed to the pastorate at Andover, which he held 
untU 1919, when he was made pastor emeritus of 
the church, the Free Christian (Congregational). 
During his years at Andover Rev. Mr. Wilson has 
endeared himself to his jMuishioners, and is one 
of the most beloved citizens of his community. A 
new church was erected dtuing his pastorate, which 
is said to be one of the finest examples of Old Colo- 
nial architecture in New England. 

Rev. Wilson has served many years as trustee of 
the Memorial Hall Library, and as president of the 
Andover Christian Civic League. He was also vice- 
president of the Andover Natural History Society 
for some years, and has been a director of the An- 
dover Guild since its origin. While a student at 
Bowdoin College Mr. Wilson became a member of 
the fraternities Alpha Delta Phi and Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

Rev. Wilson married, September 10, 1889, Flor- 
ence Nightingale Nason, bom March 11, 1857, at 
Natick, Massachusetts, daughter of Rev. Elias and 
Mira (Bigelow) Nason. The former was a minister 
of the Congregational church and a well known 
author and lecturer. Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson were 
the parents of the following children: 1. Mira Bige- 
low Wilson, bom January 13, 1893, educated at pub- 
lic schools of Andover, and at the Abbot Academy. 
She was graduated in the class of 1914 from Smith 
College, and four years later from the Boston Uni- 
versity Divinity School. She is now an instructor 
at her alma mater. 2. Frederick Colbum Wilson, 
bom October 21, 1894; he was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and Phillips Andover Academy, and was 
graduated from Harvard University in 1917, with 
the degree of A. B. He served as a Y. M. C. A. 
secretary at Camp Devens, and later Joined Com- 
pany C, 301st Field Signal Battalion, and was in 



82 



ESSEX COUNTY 



France for eleven months. He married Esther R. 
Greg^ory, daughter of Rear- Admiral L. A. Gregory, 
of Washington, D. C, and is in the class of 1922 at 
Union Theological Seminary. 



GEORGB W. MUNSEY, JR., attorney of Haver- 
hill and president of the Board of Aldermen of that 
city, 1920-21, was bom in Exeter, New Hampshire, 
August 17, 1888, son of George W. and Grace M. 
(Langley) Munsey, the former for many years con- 
nected with the Exeter, Hampton & Amesbury rail- 
road. George, in his boyhood, attended the grammar 
school of Exeter, subsequently passing through 
Exeter High School and afterwards taking a course 
in the Phillips Academy in Exeter. His general 
schooling then closed, and he took up law studies 
under District Attorney Eastman, of Exeter, New 
Hampshire. He was admitted to practice at the 
bar of Bristol county in February, 1912, and prac- 
ticed in New Bedford until December, 1916, when 
he came to Haverhill. Since that time his law office 
has been in Haverhill and his practice has been 
chiefly in the courts of Essex county. 

He was not long in Haverhill before it became 
evident that he had a special interest in, and aptitude 
for public aifairs, and in December, 1917, he was 
elected alderman. Two years later he was re-elected, 
and for the year 1920-21 was president of the Board 
of Aldermen. He has also served for three years as 
Commissioner of Health and Charity, and the year, 
1921, as Commissioner of Public Property. 

Mr. Munsey is a member of the Haverhill Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and is affiliated with several fra- 
ternal orders, among them the local bodies of Elks, 
Red Men, Junior Order of American Mechanics, and 
Knights of Pythias. Socially, he is a member of the 
Wachusett and Agawan dubs. He is a Congrega- 
tionalist, and attends the Bradford church of that 
denomination. 

He was married, in 1909, to Fannie M. Bishop, 
daughter of E. B. Bishop, of Haverhill, former 
county commissioner. They have one child, Edward 
Bishop Munsey. 

WILLIAM BALCH, treasurer of the Newbury- 
port Institution for Savings, is a lifelong resident of 
Essex county, and has long been active in the public 
service as well as in the business life of the section. 

Mr. Balch was bom in Groveland, Massachusetts, 
August 18, 1869, and is a son of Hiram T. and Mary 
S. (Morse) Balch, Gaining his education in the 
public schools of his native town, Mr. Balch was 
first employed, at age of sixteen yeiprs, as clerk in 
the office of the Newbur3q)ort city treasurer, con- 
tinuing in this capacity for three years. He then 
became a bookkeeper in the First National Bank of 
Newburyport, filling this position for six years, re- 
signing from that institution in 1894. He then ac- 
cepted a bookkeeper's position with the Newbury- 
port Institution for Savings, holding that situation 
until 1907, when he was elected treasurer of that 
bank, an office he has now held for fourteen years. 

Mr. Balch served on the Newbursrport Common 
Council in 1900, and on the Board of Aldermen in 



1901-02. In 1906 he was elected city auditor, and is 
ttill holding that office. He is a member of the 
Dalton Club, t>f the American Yacht Club, and an 
attendant of the Unitarian church. 

On January 15, 1891^ Mr. Balch married Nellie B. 
Stevens, daughter of Benjamin W. and Louisa (Gad- 
dis) Stevens. They are the parents of three chil- 
dren: Raymond T., of further mention; Marguerite, 
wife of Philip P. Cole, who is the son of John N. 
Cole; and Ruth S. 

Raymond Tenney Balch, only son of William and 
Nellie B. (Stevens) Balch, was bom in Newbury- 
port, Massachusetiis, December 8, 1894. While in 
service during the World War, he fell to his death 
in his aeroplane at Castle Bromwick, near Birming- 
ham, England, May 26, 1918. He was educated in 
the public scho<^ of Newburyport and Phillips An- 
dover Academy, and entered the business world with 
the American Trust Company of Boston, and later 
was with Blake Brothers, brokers, of Boston. He 
was a member of the City CouncO, Newburyport, at 
the time of his enlistment. Later he entered Massa- 
chusetts Naval Cadet School, whence he was gradu- 
ated March 24, 1917, with the rank of ensign. He 
was shortly afterward ordered to duty with the 
Ninth Deck Division, but a slight physical defect 
prevented his going into active naval service in the 
war against Germany. 

When thus disappointed in his hopes, he joined the 
Royal Flying Corps at Toronto, and after training 
at Bayside and at Fort Worth, he was commissioned, 
November 28, 1917, as second lieutenant, and in De- 
cember, 1917, was sent overseas. He trained for 
service in England, and in February, 1918, was li- 
censed a first class air pilot, and on April 1, follow- 
ing, was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant. 
On April 26, 1918, just two days before he expected 
to fly across the channel for combat duty in France, 
his aeroplane collapsed while he was at aerial tar^ 
get practice, and he fell to his death. 

He was a member of the Dalton Club and the 
American Yacht Club, and a young man greatly be- 
loved. He was of that fine, manly type, honorable 
and devoted to duty, modest in manner, but with the 
courage to face any test coming in the line of duty. 
Long may his memory be kept green, this young 
man who died for others, the supreme test of man- 
hood. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS HAYES, M. D.— In the 
professional world of Essex county, Massachusetts, 
the standards are of the highest, and progress is an 
animate force. Dr. Hayes is one of the leading 
members of the medical profession. He is a son of 
Dennis Cormack Hayes, who was bom in George- 
town, Massachusetts, and died in Maiden, three 
years ago (1919), at the age of fifty-eight years. 
He had been for many years prominent in the shoe 
business in Georgetown. He married Sarah Jane 
Murphy, who was of Vermont birth and rearing. 

Dr. Hayes was bom in Georgetown, Massachu- 
setts, on October 18, 1882. He received his early 
education in the Parley Free Academy, at George- 
town, then entered Tufts College. He was gradu- 



-^^^yry^.^ 9r /l'-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



88 



ated from the academic department in 1906, then 
from the medical department in 1909, with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine. Dr. Hayes' hospital 
training was far more comprehensive than usual, 
and he spent nearly three years in the hospitals- 
Maiden General Hospital, Boston City Hospital, and 
St. Mary's Infants' Hospital. After this splendid 
training Dr. Hayes came to Beverly, Massachusetts, 
in 1911, and entered upon the general practice of 
medicine. He has huilt up a very large practice, 
and is considered one of the most successful physi- 
cians hereabouts. While following no particular line 
as a specialty, he has been unusually successful 
along the line of obstetrics. 

In the profession Mr. Hayes stands high. He is a 
member of the American Medical Association, of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, Essex South dish 
trict; and he is on the staff of the Beverly Hospital. 

During the World War, 1917-18, Dr. Hayes vol- 
unteered for the medical service, but was never 
called for active duty. His interest in public af- 
fairs is only that of the progressive citizen, and he 
supports the Republican party. He is a member of 
the Roman Catholic church. The Doctor's college 
fraternity is the Alpha Tau Omega, and while in 
college he was a member of the Glee Club and of 
the Mandolin Club. He is now a popular member 
of the Men's Singing Club, of Beverly. 

Dr. Hayes married, on July 12, 1911, Luetta 
Frances, daughter of Everson G. and Martha (Soke- 
forth) Howes. Mr. Howes was a prominent farmer 
in Liberty, Maine, owning and operating large acre- 
ages. He is now deceased. 



CHARLES THURLOW— For many years promi- 
nent in financial circles in Essex county, Massachu- 
setts, Charles Thurlow is now president of the Five 
Cent Savings Bank, of Newburyport. Mr. Thurlow 
was bom in Newbur3n;>ort, March 26, 1846, and is a 
son of Charles and Lydia S. (Pettengill) Thurlow. 
As a young man his education comprised the usual 
grammar school course and two years at high school. 
He then began work, at the age of fifteen years, be- 
ing first employed at sewing shoes for a shoemaker 
in Newburyport At the age of seventeen years he 
became a clerk in the Mechanics Bank, and for 
eleven years continued with this institution, work- 
ing up to the position of cashier. His health fail- 
ing in 1874, he was sent West by the bank, and for 
a considerable period was interested in cattle 
ranches, recovering his health by outdoor life. In 
1890, locating in Denver, Colorado, Mr. Thurlow 
became president of a bank in that city, and then, 
in 1897, returned East, and was associated with the 
Merchants' National Bank of Newburyport. From 
1897 until 1907 he acted as director, then, in the 
latter year, became trustee and vice-president. In 
1908 Mr. Thurlow was elected president of the Five 
Cent Savings Bank of Newburjrport, which office he 
still holds. 

Mr. Thurlow is a member of the Dalton Club, of 
Newburyport, and also the Newbursrport Yacht Club. 
He is a member of the Unitarian church. 

In July, 1877, Mr. Thurlow married Meniam A* 



Woodward, and they have six children: 1. Merriam 
Mclntyre, who resides at Silver City, New Mexico. 
2. Florence Williams, who resides in Newburyport, 
where she is associated with the Community Ser- 
vice. 8. Annie, who is the wife of Lawrence Dodge. 
4. Charles, who served as an aviator with the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces in the World War. 6. 
John W., who married Gretel Urban, and they re- 
side in New York City. 6. Adelaide, who is the wife 
of John Rogers, and they reside in Chicago, Illinois. 



CARLTON CHBSLEY WITHAM, descendant of 
a Colonial New England family, is one of the suc- 
cessful business men of Essex county, and his most 
recent enterprise promises to be distinctiy success- 
ful. He was bom in Newbury, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 5, 1876, son of Samu^ M. and Charlotte A. 
(Wentworth) Witham, and grandson of Elcana 
Witham, who was a native of York, Maine, and later 
a farmer there. Samuel M. Witham, father of Carl- 
ton C, was bom in York, Maine, January 14, 1848, 
and died June 7, 191L He was a carpenter and 
building contractor for the greater part of his life» 
and was a poet of no mean quality; in fact, he was 
listed in ^Local and National Poets of America" as 
one of the foremost poets of his time. He married 
Charlotte A. Wentworth, of Newbury, Massachu- 
setts. She was bom December 81, 1888, and died 
October 16, 1916. They were married July 22, 1866, 
and their children were Sanford H., bom July 8# 
1866, and Cuiton C, of whom further. 

Carlton C. Witham received his academic educar 
tion in the public schools of Newbury and Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, but long before leaving school he 
was somewhat adept in carpentiy. Since he was 
six years old he had been gradually instructed in the 
trade by his father, and, bearing this in mind, it is 
somewhat singular that he did not take up carpentry 
and building for a living untQ after he had been in 
other lines for many years. And it was not until 
he became a building contractor that he began to 
be distinctiy successful in business. After leaving 
school, he worked for several shoe factories for a 
period of eight years, lei^ving them to take up farm- 
ing on a property he had in Merrimac. On the farm 
he specialized in poultry and worked hard, but gave 
up farming in 1910, went to Hampton Beach, New 
Hampshire, and there became a building contractor, 
with some success. In 1911 he returned to Merri- 
mac, Massachusetts, and opened a contracting shop 
there, entering largely into building operations dur- 
ing the next decade. He was apt in matters of con- 
struction; in fact, he built a house when he was only 
nineteen years old, and, although it was not as well 
built as the home he erected for himself in 1918, it 
would not discredit him as a house-builder. He was 
in business in Merrimac, as a building contractor, 
from 1911 to 1920, and during that time carried 
through successfuUy some of tiie largest construc- 
tion projects let during those years in that part of 
Massachusetts. However, in 1920, he became in- 
terested in the automobile business, and saw oppor- 
tunity for good returns in car-body building. He 
went to Amesbury and took over the old Bowell fae- 



84 



ESSEX COUNTY 



tory thiere, adapting it to his purpose, and forming 
the company later known as the G. G. Witham Body 
Gompany, of which he has tliroughout been the sole 
owner. He has specialized in the building of an 
amusement car, known as ^The Dodger/' and he has 
had quite noteworthy success. During the past year 
his company has shipped cars to almost all states 
of the United States, to Ganada, Mexico and Eng- 
land, and the demand, in the concrete shape of or- 
ders now on the books, even comes from South 
America, Jai>an and India. The G. G. Witham Body 
Company finds steady employment for fifty men, but 
there is every probability that the number will be 
materially increased. Mr. Witham knows his busi- 
ness. It is said that when he first undertook the 
construction of this car, it was of a very crude de- 
sign, but now is near to perfection. It is a unique 
business, for the G. G. Witham Body Gompany is 
the only manufacturer building that type. He is 
also engaged in manufacturing automobile bodies of 
the closed tjrpe, and has recently designed a special 
body for moderately priced cars, which has proved 
very successful, some very complimentary orders 
having been received. 

Mr. Witham has shown a very active interest in 
the public affairs of Merrimac, where he resides. 
For four years he was chief of the Merrimac Fire 
Department, and during his administration the ex- 
isting fire-alarm system was installed. In operation 
it proved so efficient that Amesbury and Haverhill 
have since both adopted the same system. Politi- 
cally Mr. Witham is a Republican. Fraternally, he 
belongs to the Riverside Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and his Masonic connections in- 
clude Ghapter, Council, Commandery and Shrine. 
He is at present senior warden of Bethany Lodge 
of Masons, Merrimac. 

During the war Mr. Witham was recommended 
for appointment to the post of chief engineer of one 
of the large government shipyards, but he was then 
in poor health and was unable to accept. He, how- 
ever, enrolled in the State Guard organized in 1817, 
to take the place of State National Guard troops 
mustered into the United States Army for war ser- 
vice, and! as a member of Gompany D, Sixteenth 
Regiment of Massachusetts State Guard, he served 
during the time of emergency, 1917-1919, in the 
grade of private. 

Mr. Witham is a member of the Haverhill Gham- 
ber of Gommerce, and in religious belief is a Ghris- 
tion Scientist, member of the Ghristian Science 
Ghurch of Boston. 

He was married, in 1895, to Melissa A. Yeaton, 
of Alton, New Hampshire. 



high school there, graduating in 1888. He then 
tered Boston University^ from which he was gradu- 
ated in due course, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws, ''summa cum laude," class of 1894. He was 
admitted to the Suffolk county bar in 1894, and the 
bar of the United States Gircuit Gourt in 1898. Mr. 
Parsons began practice at once in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and has since won a position of prominence 
in the profession. 

Mr. Parsons is a life member of Mount Garmel 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and a member of 
William Sutton Ghapter, Royal Arch Masons. He is 
a charter member of the Wayfarer's Lodge, of 
Swampscott, and a member of the Swampscott Ma- 
sonic Glub, the Homestead Golf Glub, Boston Gity 
Glub, Boston Bar Association, and the Massachu- 
setts Republican Glub. 

Mr. Parsons married (first), in 1896, H. Alberta 
Wharff, who died in 1902; he married (second), in 
1905, Florence B. Nourse, daughter of James H. and 
Ellen (Silsbee) Nourse, and they attend the Uni- 
tarian church of Lynn. 



BIRNEY CLEAVES PARSONS, one of the 
prominent men in legal circles in Essex county, is 
also widely known in fraternal and club circles. Mr. 
Parsons was bom in Salem, Massachusetts, Decem- 
ber 22, 1870, and is a son of Allen and Adelia A. 
(Gleaves) Parsons. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of his native city, Mr. Parsons also attended the 



JOHN F. HOGAN— In Lawrence there are some 
names which stand out from among the rank and 
file with especial prominence, names of men whose 
activities have counted far towards the constant ad- 
vancement of the interests of the community, and 
names which, in passing, have left behind a sense of 
loss among more than Uieir immediate eirde of busi- 
ness or social acquaintances. One of these names is 
that of John F. Hogan, whose career as soldier, 
textile manufacturer and philanthropist was coinci- 
dental with the remarkable development of the dty 
during the latter half of the nineteenth century, and 
whose later years of leisure covered nearly two 
decades of the twentieth, filled with charitable and 
religious work. 

Mr. Hogan was bom in North Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, September 19, 1841, and was a son of 
George E. and Ann (Riley) Hogan, the first Gath- 
olic settlers in the town, and both long since de- 
ceased. Creorge E. Hogan died in Lawrence, April 
27, 1919. 

As a boy Mr. Hogan received a practical educa- 
tion in the schools of his day, then, in 1857, at the 
age of sixteen years, entered the world of industry 
in the employ of the Stevens Mill, in North Andover. 
As a young man of only twenty years, he enlisted in 
the cause of the Union, but after three months of 
drilling the company was disbanded without entering 
the service. He re-enlisted in Gompany I, 6th Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Infantry, and served for nine 
months in Virginia, when he was honorably dis- 
charged. Thereafter returning to his native town, 
he became overseer in the Sutton Mills, where he re- 
mained for three years. With his savings as capital, 
and the backing of his mother, who had eonfldwice 
in the sincerity and practical ability of her son, Mr. 
Hogan formed a partnership with Henry H. Wy- 
man and William McNamara in the manufacturing 
business in Pelham, New Hampshire. After four 
years of successful operation, the plant was de»- 



(W-^ . J~ ^--pc-^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



85 



troyed by fire, and as the insuxance on the prop- 
erty was inadequatey they did not continue the 
businesfi. 

In 1870 Mr. Hogan came to Lawrence* and with 
his brother, the late Georg'3 E. Hogan, formed a 
partnership to engage in the milk business. After 
two years Mr. Hogan sold out his interest to his 
brother, George E. Hogan, and went into the retail 
grocery business on Common street, on the site 
now occupied by the telephone exchange. This 
property was then owned by the parents of Mr. 
Hogan. This venture proved so successful that in 
1875 Mr. Hogan admitted his brother, George E. 
Hogan, to partnership, this arrangement continuing 
with ever-increasing success until 1890, when Mr. 
Hogan sold out his interest to his brother, George 
E., and so closed his career as a merchant. 

It was impossible, however, for a man who had 
from early youth led such an active life to pass 
his days in idleness. Having become possessed of 
considerable real estate, it was quite natural that 
from looking after these interests he should de- 
velop quite a business along these lines, and 
should become known as an active dealer in resi- 
dential property. 

Mr. Hogan also found time to take an active 
interest in public affairs, believing that a man's 
civic responsibility is measured by his capacity to 
serve his community. He served in the Common 
Council in 1886 and 1887, and was a member of 
the Democratic City Committee, as well as an 
overseer of the poor. At the time of the cyclone 
in 1890 he was appointed by Judge De Courcy as 
one of the committee of five to appraise properties 
that were demolished. To him many residents 
were indebted for their homes in those trying 
times, for when what seemed to be unfair dis- 
crimination was shown by others, Mr. Hogan 
fought for justice to the poor unfortuhates, and 
won. 

Mr. Hogan was a member of Needham Post, 
No. 89, Grand Army of the Republic, of which 
he was a past commander; Relief Committee for 
the Post, of which he acted as treasurer for many 
years; trustee of Needham Hall Department Staff, 
and was delegate to Grand Army of the Republic 
conventions for years. He was also a vice-presi- 
dent of the Lawrence Real Estate Association. 

Always a devout member of the Roman Cath- 
olic church, Mr. Hogan seemed to feel that suc- 
cess only laid upon him a greater burden of res- 
ponsibility to his church and his fellowmen. He 
took a very active interest in the affairs of St. 
Patrick's Parish, to which he belonged, especially 
after his retirement from business in 1900, when, 
as a man of leisure and wealth, he liberally contri- 
buted, both in money and time, to all the benevo- 
lent and charitable works of the church. He was 
the founder (1895) and organizer of St Patrick's 
Charitable Aid Society, was the first president 
of the organisation, and served as treasurer for 
twenty years, the luuid of death relieving hii9 of 
this labor of love. He was also a member of the 
Orphans' Guild for many years. 



Mr. Hogan married, in 1901, Josephine F. Mc- 
Carty, who was bom in Westbrook, Maine, in 1867, 
and iB a daughter of Joseph C. and Margaret (Dil- 
worth) McCarty. Mrs. Josephine F. (McCarty) 
Hogan came to Lawrence with her parents at the 
age of six months; then the family removed, in 
1876, to Lowell, Massachusetts, where Mr. Mc- 
Carty was superintendent of the Richmond Paper 
Company, the family returning to Lawrence in 
1888, where they have since resided. Mr. Hogan 
is survived by his widow and six children: 
1. Francis X., for some years principal of the 
John R. Rollins Grammar School in Lawrence and 
now (1922) director of the Continuation School. 2. 
Agnes R., a teacher in the Saunders School, in 
Lawrence. 8. John J., a member of the faculty 
of Lawrence High School; during the World War 
he trained at Camp Devens, and while there was 
promoted from private to sergeant-migor; he was 
sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, where he was com- 
missioned second lieutenant, and was then stationed 
with the 9th Training Brigade, 154th Depot Brig- 
ade, at Camp Meade. On December 4, 1918, he 
received his discharge. 4. Mary P., married Joseph 
A. Flynn, and resides at home. 5. George E., who 
died in October, 1918, when about to enter his 
third year at Holy Cross College. 6. Margaret, 
now (1922) a student at St. Ma^s SchooL 

Few citizens of Lawrence have had such an im- 
posing funeral, for his sterling charter and gener- 
ous nature had endeared John F. Hogan to a wide 
circle of friends. In his death the city of Law- 
rence lost a public-spirited citizen, whose activities 
had always beoi constructive as weU as progre»» 
sive, whose spirit had been sturdily practical as 
well as courageous and optimistic He left a var 
cant place in every circle in which he was accus- 
tomed to move, but while his passing away will 
long be regretted by those who knew him well, 
the good work with which his long life was so 
filled will carry down through the years benefits 
incalculable, and his name will long be cherished 
among the people of the dty. 



WILLIAM THOMAS O'NEIL— In professional 
practice in his home town, both before and after 
giving military service during the World Wari 
Dr. William Thomas O'Neil, graduate of Tufts 
Dental College, is developing satisfactory connec- 
tions in Amesbury, Massachusetts. He was bora 
there January 17, 1891, son of William Thomas 
and Rose A. (Conlin) O'NeU. His father was 
bora in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, August 15, 1856, 
and eventually removed to Amesbury, where he 
has for many years been in good business, as a 
hatter. Dr. O'Neills mother was of a Bath, Maine, 
family, and was born there August 29, 1855. 

In his boyhood and youth Dr. O'Neil attended 
the Amesbury public schools and was eventually 
graduated from the high school. Having resolved 
to enter the dental profession if possible, he be- 
came a student at Tufts Dental College, Boston, 
and was successful in graduating in the class of 
1914. Soon thersafter he began to practice den- 



86 



ESSEX COUNTY 



tifltry in Mattapan, remaining there for about a 
year, after which he returned to his native place, 
and immediately opened an office there. In 1917 
came the upheaval of all personal affairs and 
plans because of the national emergency caused 
by the state of war into which the nation had 
entered. Dr. O'NeU enlisted in the United States 
Army, November 27, 1917, receiving a commission 
in the grade of firat lieutenant, £rom President 
Wilson. He was assigned to duty at Penniman, 
Virginia, as an officer of the Dental Corps, and 
in his professional capacity he served there until 
January 22, 1919, when he was honorably dis- 
charged. He soon resumed his private practice 
at Amesbury, and it must be stated that his army 
service was advantageous to him, professionally, 
giving him much wider opportunities for practice 
than he would have had in the eariy years of a 
private practice. 

He is well and favorably known in Amesbury. 
By religious belief a Catholic, he is a member of 
the St. Joseph's Catholic Church* of Amesbuiy, and 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus of that place. 
He is of course a member of the American Le- 
gion, and also belongs to the North East Dental 
Society and the Amesbuiy Club. Politically, Dr. 
O'Neil is a Republican. 

On December 80, 1918, a few weeks before be- 
ing released from militazy service. Dr. O'Neil was 
married to Theresa E. Cunnningham, of Dorches* 
ter, Massachusetts. She was bom in that town. 
May 6, 1891, daughter of Peter A. and Mary E. 
(Hays) Cunningham. They have one chUd, Elinore 
Mary, bom December 28, 1919. 



ORLANDO N. DANA — In April, 1919, the 
Emery- Dana-Tucker Company of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, was incorporated, Orlando N. Dana be- 
ing made president, Harry R. Emery, vice-presi- 
dent, and Arthur P. Tucker, treasurer. The com- 
pany manufacture a line of ladies' high grade 
turn shoes, and are becoming well established in 
public favor. In 1920 Harry R. Emery died, and 
his wife, Mary Emery, succeeded him as vice- 
president. Orlando N. Dana, president of the com- 
pany, is a son of Charles Dana, of Brighton, Mas- 
sachusetts, who was engaged in the wholesale meat 
business until his death in 1894. He married Isa- 
belle W. Hastings, of Waltham, Maine, who died 
in 1910. 

Orlando N. Dana was bom in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, April 14, 1868, and was educated in grade 
and high schools, and Phillips Andover Academy, 
leaving college to engage in the wholesale meat 
business with his father. After two years in that 
business he transferred his services to Denham 
A Howland, shoe jobbers, and remained with that 
firm for three years as buyer. He then spent two 
years in New York City as salesman with Edwin 
Clapp ft Company, and then, for fifteen years, was 
with Strong ft Carroll, of East Weymouth, manu- 
facturers of shoes. After that he accepted a posi- 
tion with the Charles Fox Company of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, where he remained for seven years. 



then went with the Emery, Marshall Company, re- 
maining with them until 1919, when he entered 
the shoe manufacturing field as president of the 
Emery-Dana-Tucker Company of Haverhill. 

Mr. Dana is a member of the Pentucket Club, 
the Old Colony Club, and of the Church of Chzist 
(Scientist) of New York. He is a member and 
past master of Ancient Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Triune Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; and 
Palestine Commandery, Knights Templar. 

Mr. Dana married, in 1886, Ella HorsemaUt of 
Schenectady, New York, and they are the parents 
of a daughter, Margaret W., wife of Dennison D. 
Dana, of New York City. 



EMILE W. BAILLY was bom in Paris, France, 
August 80, 1866, and is a son of Alexander and 
MatUde L. (Vildea) Bailly. His father, Alexander 
Bailly, who was a manufacturer of wood heels, was 
also bom in Paris. He came to tha United 
States and settled in New York City, where he 
built up a prosperous business, manufacturing 
wood heels, and died in 1906. Mr. Baill/s mother, 
Matilde L. Bailly, was also French by birth. 

Mr. Bailly received his early education in the 
schools of France. He continued his studies in 
the public schools of New York City after hin 
arrival in the United States with his father. When 
his studies were completed, he entered his f ather^s 
business and became a manufacturer of wood heels. 
Upon his entrance into the business, the firm 
name was changed to Alexander Bailly ft Son. 
The association continued until the elder Mr. 
Bailly*s death, when Mr. Bailly assumed full con- 
trol of the business, adopting the firm name of 
Emile W. Bailly. He had, in 1898, moved to 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, in order to direct the 
work of the company to better advantage. The 
company's factory was for ten years located at 
Lynn, Massachusetts. Among other enterprises, 
Mr. Bailly organized the Pentucket Wood Heel 
Company, whidi he afterwards sold to its present 
proprietors. Having come to Haverhill in 1898, 
Mr. Bailly may weU be considered the pioneer of 
the wood heel manufacturing industry there. He 
retired from active participation in the manage- 
ment of the company's affairs June 19, 1920, and 
his two sons, Raymond George, and George Dewey 
Bailly, whose sketches follow, now conduct the 
business under the firm name of Bailly Brothers. 
Their factory is at 465 Hilldale avenue, at the 
comer of Emery street, Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
It has a capacity of five hundx«d dosen wood 
heels a day in the finishing room, and one thou- 
sand dozen wood heels a day in the wood room. 
It occupies about ten thousand square feet of 
fioor space and is one of the best-equipped and 
most modem factories at HaverhilL 

Mr. Bailly is a Catholic. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, and belongs to the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, and to the Loyal 
Order of Moose. 

He married Elizabeth Seeney of New York City 
in 1886. She is a daughter of Peter E. and Eliza- 



«^ 



•^ 



ES 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



87 



beth Seeney, and was bom at Ticoiideit>ga» New 
York. Both of her parents were Canadians by 
birth. Her father, who was engaged in the shoe 
manufacturing industiy, died in 1911. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bailly have six children: Violet Mary, bom in 
1888; Mabel Lenney, bom in 1892; Rene E., bom 
in 1893, served in the heavy artillery, United States 
army, in the World War; Raymond George, a sketch 
of whom follows; Greorge Dewey, a sketch of whom 
follows; and Charles Lester, bom in 1902. 



RAYMOND GBORGB BAILLY was bom in 
Nova Scotia, November 26, 1896, and is a son of 
Emile W., whose sketch precedes, and Elizabeth 
(Seeney) Bailly. He received his early education 
in the public schools of Haverhill and graduated 
from the Haverhill High School with the class of 
1911. After his graduation, having decided to fol- 
low the occupation to which both his father and 
grandfather belonged, he entered his father's em- 
ploy in order to learn all the details connected 
with the manufacture of wood heels. He spent 
three years in his father's seivice and then ob- 
tained a position with the Wason Wood Heel Com- 
pany. He woiked for this firm for two years, ac- 
quiring experience in the different methods em- 
ployed in the manufacturing of wood heels. At 
length, fully equipped by knowledge and experi- 
ence, he entered into partnership with his brother, 
George Dewey Bailly, whose sketch follows, and, 
June 19, 1920, assumed the direction of his father's 
business, the elder Mr. Bailly having decided to 
retire. Under the firm name of Bailly Brothers, 
Mr. Bailly and his brother conduct the business 
which is now located at 465 Hilldale avenue, at 
the comer of Emery street, Haverhill. 

Mr. Bailly enlisted in the United States Army, 
Aeroplane Coips, First Division, in 1917. He en- 
listed at Haverhill, was sent overseas after a 
period of training, and was stationed at Paris 
during the greater part of the war. Among other 
engagements in which he saw active service, was 
the famous battie of Chateau-Thierry. At length, 
after eighteen months of service in France, he 
received his discharge. May 20, 1919. Mr. Bailly 
is a Catholic and a member of the Knights of 
Columbus. 

* He married NelHe O'Neill, of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1920. Mrs. Bailly is a daughter of 
James and Nora (Curtin) O'Neill of Haverhill. 
Her father is engaged in the hat manufacturing 
industry. Mr. and Mrs. Bailly have one son, Ray- 
mond, Jr. 

GEORGE DEWEY BAILLY was bom at Hav- 
erhill, Massachusetts, November 4, 1899, and is 
a son of Emile W. and Elizabeth (Seeney) Bailly. 
He received his early education in the public 
schools of Haverhill and after his graduation, de- 
cided to enter the wood heel manufacturing in- 
dustry with which both his father and grandfather 
had been connected. He therefore entered his 
father's employ in order to leam the business in 
all its details. He afterwards woriced for the 



Merrimac Wood Heel Company in order to acquire 
a wide experience in the different methods of 
manufacturing employed in his chosen industry. 
Still later he accepted a position with the Wason 
Wood Heel Company, which he served as foreman 
for a year and a half. Having thus acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the business, he entered 
into partnership with his brother, Raymond 
George, whose sketch precedes, June 19, 1920. 
Under the firm name of Bailly Brothers, Mr. Bailly 
and his brother assumed full control of their 
father's business, from the management of which 
the elder Mr. Bailly then retired, and which they 
still conduct. Mr. Bailly is a Catholic and a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus. 

He married Irene Frances Quirk, of Haverhill, 
In 1921. Mrs. Bailly is a daughter of Comdius 
Quirk of County Cork, Ireland, who is engaged 
in the leather industry, and his wife, Margaret 
(McCarthy) Quirk, who is also a native of Coun- 
ty Cork, Ireland. 

DANIEL J. MURPHY— Every life is lived in 
three realms: that of business, that of dvic pro-' 
gress, and that of the home. The people of Law- 
rence have recognized in Daniel J. Murphy, 
through his well-balanced interests in these thnso 
realms, a man whose life is at once symmetrical 
and forceful, and with confidence in his probity 
have placed important responsibilities upon him. 

Mr. Murphy is of Irish parentage, his fathw, 
James D. Muiphy, having come to the Ujiited 
States in 1865, and his mother, Mary (O'Leary) 
Murphy, being still a resident of Lawrence. Dan- 
iel J. Murphy was bom in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, November 16, 1875. After the usual public 
school training he eontinued through high school, 
and was graduated in 1897. Entering Harvard 
University, he was graduated from that institution 
in 1901, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
is a Phi Beta Kappa man. In 1903 he graduated 
from Harvard Law School, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, having previously been admit- 
ted to the Massachusetts bar. Returning to Law- 
rence, Mr. Murphy entered upon his professional 
activities, practicing alone for a time, with offices 
in the Central building. He then formed an asso- 
ciation with two partners, continuing practice as a 
member of the firm of Knox, Coulson A Murphy. 
In 1907 the withdrawal of Mr. Knox from the firm 
changed the name to Coulson A Murphy, and for 
about two years this firm continued. In 1909, 
however, Mr. Murphy resumed his original method 
of working independently, and has since then follow- 
ed this plan, with offices in the Bay State building 
and with an ever multijdying list of clients. Mr. 
Murphy's public services date back to 1906, when 
he was made city solicitor of Lawrence, and in 
the fifteen years and more which have since 
elapsed he has filled that office ably and well. Co- 
incidental with the above was his appointment as 
town counsel for Andover, Massachusetts, which 
office he also still holds. Mr. Murphy served as 
counsel for the commission appointed to build the 



88 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Central Bridge, in Lawrence, the magnificent stnic- 
tore now spanning the Merrimac river in the 
center of the city. This is the finest and largest 
of the bridges of Lawrence, and five years were 
required for its construction. Mr. Murphy stands 
high in his profession, and is a member of the 
Lawrence, Essex Coxmty and the Massachusetts 
Bar associations. 

In 1905, at Andover, Massachusetts, Mr. Murphy 
married Mary T. Curran, daughter of Maurice J. 
and Theresa (Keating) Curran. Mr. Curran was 
bom in Palmer, Massachusetts, but now (1922) 
resides in Andover. For many years he was the 
head of Curran A Joyce, of Lawrence, but retired 
from this firm several years ago and has since 
been entirely occupied with business affairs in 
Boston. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy have three child- 
ren: Marie Elizabeth, bom in 1907; Daniel J., Jr., 
bom in 1910; and Edwin Curran, bom in 1916. 



HENRY NEWHALL BERRY— Admitted to the 
Massachusetts bar in 1896 as an attomey-at-law, 
Henry Newhall Bezry has for many years been 
continually in the public eye and has won leader- 
ship in flnancial affairs, also in business and 
public life. He possesses those steriing qualities, 
energy and integrity, which, with public-spirit and 
broad vision, have made his many years in the 
practice of his chosen profession years of con- 
spicuous success. 

Henry Newhall Berry was bom in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, September 2, 1870, the son of Benjamin 
and Sarah Catherine (Newhall) Berry. After ob- 
taining a preliminary education in the Hopkinson 
T. Berkley School, he prepared himself for college 
at Chauncey Hall. Graduating from Harvard Uni- 
versity with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1898, he entered the law school and three years 
later won from this institution the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws. That same year he passed his bar 
examinations and then established himself in Bos- 
ton in the practice of his profession, subsequently 
forming a legal partnership with Charles C. Buck- 
man, under the firm name of Berry A Buckman« 
corporation lawyers, in which he still continues. 

As a citizen with exalted ideas of good govern- 
ment and civic virtue, Mr. Berry stands in the 
front rank, and whenever substantial aid will fur- 
ther puUic progress, it is freely given. He is no 
office seeker in public life, but ever by his vote and 
infiuence gives his loyal support to all measures 
calculated to promote public welfare. His civic 
spirit and rapidity of judgment enables him in the 
midst of incessant professional activity to give to 
the affairs of the communilir effort and counsel of 
genuine value, and his penetrating thought has 
often added wisdom to public movements. The 
thorough business qualifications of Mr. Berry have 
always been in great demand, also on boards of 
directors of various institutions, and hif public 
spirit has led him to accept of many such trusts. 
He is director of the Central National Bank, of 
Lynn; trustee of the Lynn Five Cent Savings 
Bank, and one of the vice-presidents and a mem- 



ber of the Investment Committee; director of the 
Lynn Gas and Electric Company; vice-president 
and director of the Richmond Lace Works; vice- 
president and director of the Lace Selling Com- 
I>any, of New York City; director of the A. E. 
Little Shoe Company, of Lynn; director of the 
A. Sidney Davidson Coal Company, of New York 
City; director of the Old Colony Coal Mine Com- 
pany; president and treasurer of the Fells Land 
Company, of New York City; treasurer of the 
Nassau Terrace Company, of New York City; vice- 
president and director of the Midlynnton Cori>ora- 
tion, of New York; and president of the Lynn 
Remedial Loan Society. He is a member of the 
Sons of the American Revolution; Sons of Col- 
onial Wars; and chairman of the Lynn Chapter 
of the American Red Cross. Of social nature, Mr* 
Berry holds membership in the following dubs: 
Oxford; Tedesco; Algonquin; Exchange; Harvard^ 
of Boston; Harvard, of New York City; Univer- 
sity; Massachusetts Automobile; Salem; City Club, 
of Boston; Massachusetts Episcopalian; Neighbor- 
hood, of Swampscott; and the Vesper Country, 
of Lowell. 

On October 24, 1900, Henry Newhall Berry was 
united in marriage with Mabel L. Breed, and to 
them have been bom four children: Henry New^ 
hall (2); Katherine Berry; Joseph Breed; and 
Mabel Lavinia. Mr. Berry stands today in the 
regard of his associates as one of the most highly 
respected figures of the community, a man who 
consistently stands for the best and most worthy 
things of life, and the substantial position that 
he has come to occupy In the community is the 
obvious and appropriate reward of application and 
mental qualifications of a high order. 



RAY H. PALMER, dentist and ex-service man 
of Haverhill, was bom in that city, Aprfl 22, 1893, 
son of Alvah B. and Lillian B. (Huntress) Palmer, 
both of Haverhill, the former a clothier, tiie latter 
now deceased. Ray attended the Haverhill public 
schools, graduating eventuaUy from HaverhiU High 
School, with the class of 1912. Having resolved 
to take up professional work, he became a student 
of Tufts Dental School, Boston, in 1914, and 
graduated in 1917, receiving tiie degree of Doctor 
of Dental Medicine. He immediately began to 
practice his profession in Haverhill, but soon gave 
up dvil practice to enlist in 1^ army for service 
during the World War. He was commissioned in 
the grade of first lieutenant, and assigned to pro- 
fessional duty in Camp Devens, first with the One 
Hundred and First Depot BrigEule, and later with 
the medical detachment of the Thirty-sixth In> 
fantry. His army practice in dental surgery was 
iraluable and extensive, and wf^ fitted him for 
private practice. He was discharged from military 
service on July 28, 1919, and immediately returned 
to Haverhill and restored private practice. At 
first he did residential work, but before the end of 
1919 he opened an office in the Pentucket building, 
where he still is. 

Dr. Palmer has reached hii^ rank in Muitmry^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



89 



He belongs to the Menimac Lodge, to the Pen- 
tucket Chapter; Haverhill Commandery» No. 14, 
Elnights Temi^; &nd Aleppo Temple, Mystic 
Shrine. He is also affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias and the Junior Order of American Mech- 
anics. He is a member of the Haverhill Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and of the Universalist church. 
He still holds connection with military work, 
being a member of the United States Veterans' 
Bureau. 

Dr. Palmer was married, in 1918, to Miss Mar- 
garet Williams, of Newton, Massachusetts. They 
have one child, Constance Rae, bom July 13, 1919. 



WILLIAM P. McLaughlin— It is quite an 
honor in a town famous for the m<>.Tring of shoes 
to be probably the oldest continuous shoe manu- 
facturer. This honor is held in Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, by William P. McLaughlin, who was bom 
in Newburyi>ort, Massachusetts, October 11, 1856. 
His father was bom in Ireland, but was taken to 
England when two years old, and spent his early 
years there. Seeking wider opportunity, however, 
he migrated to the United States when but a 
young man. He married Winifred Agnes Burke, 
and died in 1872. 

William P. McLaughlin completed his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, and started right in from sdiool 
to learn the shoe trade. At that time the busi- 
ness of shoe manufacturing lacked many of its 
present day improvements. The cutting of uppers, 
for instance, was done by hand, and required 
much speed and skiU. It was at this work that 
he began bis business career. In 1879 he came to 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, and soon founded a busi- 
ness of his own on Washington street. Since that 
time Mr. McLaughlin has seen many come and go, 
and has watched many changes take place in the 
process of making shoes on Washington street, 
but while occasionally changing the location of 
his business, he has never left the street where 
he began his career as a manufacturer. Besides 
being the manufacturer with the longest continu- 
ous location on Washington street, he is conceded 
to be the oldest continuous manufacturer of shoes 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts. His present estab- 
lishment (1921) is at No. 98 Washington street, 
where he manufactures McKay shoes. Mr. Mc- 
Laughlin is a director in the Haverhill National 
Bank. He is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. Mr. McLaughlin and family are 
members of the Roman Catholic church. 

On September 24, 1890, at Haverhill, Mr. Mc- 
Laughlin married Rose Carter, daughter of Felix 
and Rose (Murther) Carter, both deceased. Of 
this union five children were bom: 1. William H., 
bom July 26, 1891; he was educated at St. John's 
Academy. He enlisted in the United States navy 
as a seaman, studied at Bumkin Island, passed his 
examination and went to Harvard, where he grad- 
uated as an ensign. After the ^ipiration of the 
World War he was honorably discharged and re- 
turned to Haverhill and resumed his duties in as- 



sociation with his father. He married Rachel Mc- 
Guire, of Haverhill, and they have one chUd, Wil- 
liam H., Jr. Mr. McLaughlin is a member of the 
Knights of Columbus, and attends the Sacred 
Heai^jb Catholic Church. 2. Ruth, bom August 15, 
1892, now the wife of Raymond McNamara, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, a shoe manufacturer of 
Haverhill; they have one child, Adrian C» Mr. Mc- 
Namara is a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
and attends St. James' Roman Catholic Church. 
8. Adrian C, bom in 1895; he was educated in 
St. John's Academy, Danvers, Massachusetts. He 
and his brother, William H., were learning the 
shoe manufacturing business with their father, who 
intended to leave the McLaughlin establishment 
to the sons, when the World War broke out and 
the United States became engaged. Immediately 
upon the declaration of war by this country he 
enlisted in the Motor Transport Division, United 
States army, and was shortly sent to Florida for 
training. He rose to be corporal while in service 
in France, but while overseas he was stricken with 
pneumonia and died, October 20, 1918, at Dijon. 
Letters from his captain show that had Adrian C. 
been more ready to pay attention to his own 
needs instead of giving himself so unselfishly to 
the duties and interests of the service, he might 
still be living. 4. Raymond Vincent, bom SeiH 
tember 17, 1900; he was educated in Haverhill 
public and high schools. He married, in Septem- 
ber, 1921, Helen Deneau. He is now (1922) asso* 
dated with his father in business. He is a memr 
ber of the Knights of Columbus, and attends St. 
James' Roman Catholic Church. 6. Helen, bom 
September 18, 1905; she was educated in the 
Haverhill Grammar School, and is now attending 
Wellesley Academy. 



THS BLANCHARD FAMILY, of New England, 
one branch of which is that headed by Frederic 
William Blanchard, of Merrimacport» Massachu- 
setts, is one of the oldest Colonial familiee, hav- 
ing been resident in Massachusetts since the year 
1689. The progenitor of all American branches 
was Thomas Blanchard, who came from Penton, 
Hampshire, Eilgland, in that year, and settled in 
New England. He brought with him four sons: 
George, who died in Massachusetts in 1699 or 
1700; Thomas, who died in 1650 or 1651; Samuel, 
who removed from Chariestown to A^dover, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1679; fmd Nathaniel, who went to 
live in Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 1658. The 
Blanchard family, though from England, was of 
French origin. Thomas Blanchard and his 
sons were bom in France, and being Huguenot in 
faith, had to seek refuge in England, llie direct 
line from Thomas Blandiard to Frederic William 
Blanchard of the present generation is as follows: 

Samuel Blanduurd, son of Thomas Blanchard, 
was bom August 6, 1629, and came to New Eng^ 
land June 28, 1689. He married (first) Mary 
Sweetser, daughter of Seth Sweetser, of Charles- 
town, Massachusetts, January 8, 1654-55. She died 
February 20, 1668. He married (secend) Hannah 



90 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Doggett, daughter of Thomas Doggett, of Marsh- 
field, Massachusetts, June 24, 1678. Samuel Blan- 
chard died April 22, 1707, in his seventy-eighth 
year. His widow lived until July 10, 1725, death 
occnrring in Andover, Massachusetts. His children 
by the first marriage were: Samuel, bora Sep- 
tember 29, 1656, died 1667-68; Sarah, born Febru- 
ary 15, 1657-58; Mary, born April 18, 1659; Joshua, 
bom August 6, 1661; Jonathan, born May 
25, 1664; and AbigaU, born March 5, 1668. There 
were four children by his second marriage: Thom- 
as, of whom further; John, born July 81, 1677; 
Samuel, born June 4, 1680; and Hannah, born Sep- 
tember 26, 1681. 

Thomas Blanchard, son of Samuel and Hannah 
(Doggett) Blanchard, was born in Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, April 28, 1674. He mazxied (first) 
Rose Holmes, of Marshfield, Massachusetts. She 
died August 27, 1714, and on September 21, 1715, 
he married (second) Widow Hannah Gowen, of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, who died June 26, 1724. On 
February 21, 1726, he married (third) Mrs. Judith 
Hill, of Maiden, Massachusetts, who survived him, 
her death occurring December 1, 1767. Thomas 
Blanchard died at Andover, Massachusetts, March 
17, 1759. His children by his first wife were: 
Thomas, born January 16, 1699-1700; Joseph, of 
whom further; Isaac, born September 20, 1702, 
died January 25, 1721-22; Josiah, born August 16, 
1704; Elizabeth, born March 25, 1706; Hannah, 
born May 6, 1708; Rose, born January 12, 1709-10, 
died November 22, 1724; Deborah, born April 18, 
1712; Lydia, born August 22, 1714. His children 
by his second wife were: Mehitable, born Oc- 
tober 8, 1716; Nathaniel, bom February 2, 1718-19; 
Isaac, bom October 23, 1723. 

Joseph Blanchard, son of Thomas and Rose 
(Holmes) Blanchard, was bom in Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, February 19, 1700-01. He married Sarah 
Abbott, of that place, on April 4, 1722. Their 
children were: Sarah, bom July 25, 1723; Eliza- 
beth, bom July 17, 1726; Hannah, bom October 
8, 1728; Joseph, bom February 9, 1781; Jeremiah, 
of whom further; Daniel, bom July 15, 1735; 
John, bom July 19, 1737; Phoebe, bom November 
8, 1741. 

Jeremiah Blanchard, son of Joseph and Sarah 
(Abbott) BlanchardL was bom in Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, in June, 1788. He married (first) Doro- 
thy Smith, May 17, 1759. After her demise he 
married Susanna Martin, of Andover, Massachu- 
setts, in August, 1772. He served in the French 
War, 1755-58; was taken prisoner at the siege of 
Fort William Henry, but escaped. He was also 
eventuaUy a soldier of the Revolution, serving as 
lieutenant. Later he removed to Weston, Vermont, 
where he died on January 27, 1826. Children by 
his first wife: Jeremiah (2), of whom further; 
Peter, bom Aufifust 12, 1768; Eber, bom Janu- 
ary 14, 1769. Children by second wife: Henry, 
bom July 25, 1773; Sarah, bom November 2, 1774; 
Dolly, bom November 2, 1776; Judith, bom Octo- 
ber 5, 1778; Henry, bom March 30, 1781; John, 
bom November 26, 1782; Hannah, bom March 27, 



1785; William* bom February 10, 1788; and Aaron, 
bom July 20, 1791. 

Jeremiah (2) Blanchard, first-bom of Jeremiah 
(1) and Dorothy (Smith) Blanchard, was bom at 
Dunstable, New Hampshire, September 17, 1760. 
He married (first) Susannah Pearson, of Newbury- 
port, December 13, 1784. Later, on January 14, 
1810, he married Sarah (Bartlett) Allen, widow of 
Jahpen Allen. Jeremiah (2) Blanchard was a sol- 
dier of the Revolution. His name is on the rolls 
as a "minute-man"; he served for three years in 
Captain Amos Lincoln's comi>any of artillery, Paul 
Revere commanding. He was discharged May 9, 
1780. After he was discharged from the Continen- 
tal army he enlisted on the brigantine "Rover,'* a 
privateer commanded by Captain Adam Willman. 
He was captured and taken to Halifax, and was 
among those prisoners the English attempted to 
try for piracy. Eventually his release came by ex- 
change. Soon afterwards Blanchard enlisted on the 
brig "Haskett and John,'' a privateer. He was 
again captured and this time taken to England, 
where he was incarcerated in the Dartmoor and 
Old Mill prisons, and not liberated until peace was 
declared. He returned to America on the ship 
''Havre de Grasse," and settled in Newburyport. 
He followed maritime occupations for many years 
afterwards, however, death coming on September 
13, 1845, at Newbuxyport His children by his first 
wife were: Polly, bom February 14, 1786, died 
March 4, 1808; Dolly, bom January 12, 1789; Jere- 
miah, bom December 16, 1790, and lost at sea in 
1815; Lois, bom March 2, 1793; Rebecca, bom 
February 15, 1796; Fanny, bom April 19, 1798; 
James Pearson, bom Augpist 29, 1801; and William 
and Susanna, twins, bom February 24, 1805, the 
former dying on March 14, and the latter on 
March 15, of the same year. His children by his 
second yriie were: Mary, bom April 16, 1813, died 
in November, 1814; Susan, bom February 11, 1817; 
Frederick, of whom further. 

Frederick Blanchard, son of Jeremiah (2) and 
Sareih (Bartlett- Allen) Blanchard, was bom in 
Newburyport, October 26, 1810. He married (first) 
Abby W. Hickocks, of Newburyport, in February, 
1838; she died September 11th of the same year. 
On AufiTUst 5, 1840, he married (second) Mary Jane 
York, at Lee, New Hampshire, and their children 
were: Abbie Jane, bom Augrust 17, 1841; Mary 
Choate, bom April 4, 1843; Jacob Stickney, bom 
January 25, 1846; Rebecca Chapman, bom Febru- 
ary 6, 1847; Susan Lowell, bom September 3, 1850; 
Jeremiah, bom July 19, 1853, died in August, 1853; 
Frederic William, of whom further; Nellie Com- 
fort, bom June 6, 1858. 

Frederic William Blanchard, son of Frederick 
and Mary Jane (York) Blanchard, was bom at 
Lee, New Hampshire, October 31, 1854. He was 
educated in public schools in the vicinity of Boston, 
Massachusetts, and took a further course under 
Professor Hubert, of the Berlitz' School of 
Langruages, in addition to which he was privately 
tutored by Professor John Collins. Afterwards he 
learned a trade, that of decorating. He worked in 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



91 



Boston for the Warner Bailey Company for six 
yearsy leaving their employ to enter into . business 
for himself. Four years later he became a travel- 
ing salesman, his line mechanical hardware. He 
represented one house in that line for ten years, 
the Frank J. Scott Company. He next worked for 
the Belcher & Loomis Company, of Providence, 
Rhode Island, for one year; for a similar period 
he was with the R. G. Dun Company, but from 
that time until 1909 he was a member of the sales 
force of the Cutter, Wood A Stevens Company. 
For the next nine years he represented the A. J. 
Wilkinson Company, and in 1918 assumed charge 
of the office and paint department of the Merri- 
mac Lumber Comi>any, staying with that com- 
pany until 1921, when he be<^tme associated in 
business with W. H. Franklin, Jr., of Merrimac, 
Massachusetts. His business career has thus been 
an active one. 

Politically, Mr. Blanchard is a Republican; fra- 
ternally he is a Mason, member of Mount Vernon 
Lodge, of Maiden; religiously, he is a member of 
the Unitarian church. He served for one enlist- 
ment as a private in Battery B, Second Massachu- 
setts Artillery. 

Mr. Blanchard married, November 14, 1900, 
Marie Adele Dumont, of Boston, Massachusetts. 
She was bom on March 20, 1864, at Boston, daugh- 
ter of Louis and Constance (Dubeau ) Dumont 



LEONARD ORDWAY PHILBRICK, one of the 
most prominent citizens of Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, was bom there January 1, 1867, son of Isaac 
H. and Sarah E. (Ordway) Philbrick, and of the 
tenth generation in direct descent from Thomas (1) 
Philbrick, of Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1630, 
through his son James, of Hampton, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1640. 

With the exception of three years, he has resided 
continuously in his native city, and there attended 
the public schools, Cannon Commercial College of 
Lawrence, where he took a course in bookkeeping 
and banking, graduating in 1884. Soon after this 
time he became identified with the shoe business, 
and gradually entered the manufacturing end of 
this business. Mr. Philbrick held various positions 
with the different firms, working sometimes in 
the office and at other times in the factories, 
thereby learning all the details of the wcrrk and 
the business. He was identified with many of the 
older shoe firms, such as Cluff A Gale, Miller & 
Foster, F. H. Huss, and Fitts & Weeks. It is be- 
lieved that Mr. Philbrick was the first salesman 
to carry a line of women's welt boots, which 
were made in Haverhill, "on the road"; and this 
was at a time when he was salesman for W. H. 
Nason. 

At the time of the financial panic in 1898, Mr. 
Philbrick was office manager and assistant superin> 
tendent of the factory of WUbur H. Davis A 
Company, and to his great credit, he held his or- 
ganization and kept up a production of 6,000 pairs 
per day without putting out a pay-roll for over 
five weeks. Later, when the money was obtainable 



from the banks, the employees were paid in full 
and this was one of the very few factories to keep 
running during that time. The Davis plant was 
removed to Richmond, Virginia, soon after this 
time, Mr. Philbrick gQing also and starting opera- 
tions there; upon his return to Haverhill, he entered 
the employ of James W. White, in the business of 
shoe findings and supplies, as accountant and credit 
man, which position he has held to the present 
time. 

There is perhaps no other man in Haverhill with 
a broader knowledge or longer acquaintance with 
the shoe industry. He has a diploma of the Na- 
tional Association of Bookkeepers and Accountants, 
and in addition to his regular work, often audits 
the books of various business houses. 

In politics Mr. PhObrick is a Republican, and as 
an ardent worker in the interests of this party, he 
is known throughout the State. During 1901-02 Mr. 
Philbrick was a member of the Conmion Council 
from Ward Six, and also was a member of the Re- 
publican City Committee for many years. He has 
been a member of the various Republican clubs since 
the organization of the first "Brother Jonathan's" 
in 1884, and is at present a vice-president of the 
Essex Club, the county organization; member of the 
Massachusetts Republican Club; and the Repub- 
lican League of Massachusetts. Mr. Philbrick is 
also very active in other public affairs of the city, 
and is always seeking to advance the general wel- 
fare. He organized the Haverhill Choral Society 
and served as its vice-president; the Worid War 
handicapped this work considerably. Other member- 
ships, of Mr. Philbrick include: The Haverhill 
Camera Club; the Haverhill Historical Society;. 
president of the Haverhill Archseological Society; 
and his business memberships are with the Chamber 
of Commerce and the Rotary Club, having served 
for three years as secretary of the latter. 

Mr. Philbrick married Carrie B. Osgood, a native 
of Groveland, and they are the parents of a son, 
Arnold Dodge. With his family Mr. Philbrick at- 
tends the North Church, being treastirer of the 
society, and is a member of the Men's Club of that 
chmrch. 

ROLAND W. BOYDBN, LL. D.^For many years 
prominent in the legal profession and in all civic 
advance, Roland W. Boyden, of Boston and Beverly, 
Massachusetts, has of recent years been an inter- 
national figure. 

Mr. Boyden was bom in Beverly, October 18, 
1863, and is a son of William Cowjier and Amy 
Lydia (Hoag) Boyden. Educated in Beverly and 
Salem high schools, Phillips Exeter Academy, and 
Harvard University, he was graduated from the 
latter institution in 1885. After teaching school 
for a short time, he entered Harvard University 
Law School, from which he received his degree upon 
his graduating in 1888. His first legal experience 
was with Henry P. Moulton, a prominent Salem 
attorney. Then, for a i>eriod of two years, Mr. 
Boyden was associated with H. W. Chaplin, of Bos- 
ton, thereafter entering into partnership with 



92 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Charles I. Gidding, of Boston. Mr. Gidding's death 
occtured in 1898, and one year later Mr. Boyden 
became a member of the distingaished law firm of 
Ropes, Gray & Loring, now Ropes, Gray, Boyden & 
Perkins. Gaining prominence in his profession in 
New England, Mr. Boyden was chosen for National 
honors in 1917, when he was made a member of the 
legal staff of the United States Food Administra- 
tion at Washington, D. C, as director of prosecu- 
tions under the food laws. He served on the gen- 
eral executive committee under Mr. Hoover, hav- 
ing charge of the enforcement of all decrees and 
regulations given out by the food administration, 
and filling this exacting position for a year and a 
half. 

Later Mr. Boyden was accorded the greater 
honor of acting as the representative of the United 
States of America on the Reparations Commission 
of the Peace Conference, by appointment of Presi- 
dent Wilson, subsequenUy being reappointed by 
President Harding. As a delegate he was an "un- 
official" member of the commission, since his gov- 
ernment declined to ratify the treaty of Versailles. 

For a number of years Mr. Boyden has been 
widely interested in the industrial as well as in the 
professional activities of this section. He is presi- 
dent of the Beverly Savings Bank, a director of 
the Beverly National Bank, is also a director of the 
First National Bank, of Boston, and of the Quincy 
Market Cold Storage and Warehouse Company. 
He has served on the Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce as a director, as a member of the executive 
committee, and as chairman of its special commit- 
tees on both the State budget system and a move- 
ment towards thrift. He also served as a member 
of the State Committee of Public Safety. He served 
for several years as chairman of the School Com- 
mittee of Beverly, and is a director of the Ameri- 
can Unitarian Association. 

In college, and later, Mr. Boyden was noted as 
an athlete, and still takes the keenest interest in 
all athletic sports. He was prominent on the dia- 
mond, playing as pitcher and center fielder on the 
Harvard basebaU teams of 1886 and 1887, and was 
a half-back on the football teams of those years. 
After graduation his interest continued, and he 
was a member of the famous Beacon nine of Bos- 
ton, and played football with the Boston Athletic 
Association, of which he was long a member. He 
has traveled extensively, and owns a farm in 
Tamworth, New Hampshire. 



EUGENE M. GALE, M. D., now in practice in 
Merrimac, Massachusetts, was bom at Amesfoury, 
Massachusetts, August 4, 1891, son of Eugene L. 
and Nellie M. (Manson) Gale, the former a hatter 
and for many years superintendent of a hat factory 
in Amesbuiy. 

As a boy Eugene M. Gale attended the public 
schools of Amesbury, graduating eventually from 
high school there, after which he took the prepara- 
tory course at Tufts College. From there he pro- 
ceeded to the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Boston, and became a medical student, graduating 



ultimately with the class of 1914, and thus gaining 
his professional degree of M. D. The next two 
years were spent in hospital woric; he was interne, 
or house physician, at Boston Ci^ Hospital until 
1916, and during that time had considerable prac- 
tice. In 1916 he went to Ipswich, Massachusetts, 
and opened an office for private practice in that 
neighborhood. The next year, 1917, however, 
brought that National emergency which altered the 
plans of millions of young men. With the entry of 
the United States into the World War, all phases 
of America's manhood had to set aside personal af- 
fairs, and give precedence to National. Dr. Gale, 
in September, 1917, enlisted in the Medical Corps 
of the United States army, and as a sergeant of 
that corps, was soon afterwards assigned to overseas 
duty at Base Hospital No. 44, situated at Pougues- 
les-Eaux, France. He served at that post through- 
out the war, and returned to this country in May, 
1919, being then, honorably discharged, with the 
grade of sergeant. Soon afterwards he again enter- 
ed into civil practice of medicine, establishing him- 
self at West Warren, Massachusetts, where he re- 
mained only about a year, however, then came to 
Merrimac, where he has since practiced. His record 
during the years since 1914, when he graduated 
from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, in- 
dicates that he has a wide knowledge of medicine. 

Dr. Gale holds membership in several profes- 
sional associations; they include the American Medi- 
cal Association, the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
and the Pentucket Medical Association. He is far 
advanced in. Masonic degrees, belonging to Warren 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Amesbury; 
Enoch Lodge of Perfection; Zerubbabel Council, 
Princes of Jerusalem; Evergeen Chapter, Rose 
Croix; Colwell Consistory, Sovereign Princes of the 
Royal Secret. He is a member of the Oxford Club, 
of Merrimac; Boston City Hospital Alumni Associa- 
tion; and is also a member of the American Le- 
gion. 

Dr. Gale married, in 1917, Florence M. Woodward, 
of Amesbury, Massachusetts, daughter of Welling^ 
ton R. and Etta (McLion) Woodward, the former 
an automobile body manufacturer at that place. 
Dr. and Mrs. Gale attoid the Congregationsd 
church of Merrimac. 



HENRY T. MOODY— It is almost seventy years 
since Henry T. Moody, inventor of the Moody 
hangars, was bom in Newburyport, Massachusetts, 
the date of his birth being July 6, 1862. Thirty 
years later he made the first public demonstrations 
with his hangar, this taking place at the Mechanics' 
Fair in Boston, and during the remaining almost 
forty years, up to the present time, he has con- 
tinued to manufacture them, as well as many other 
devices of his invention. Even today his firm finds 
almost constant employment for forty people of 
Newburyport 

Mr. Moody is a son of Henry T. and Harriett E. 
(Bartlett) Moody, the former bom in Comville, 
Maine. He was a blacksmith by trade, and died 
in 1876. Harriett E. (BartleU) Moody was of a 




^'T-i^Z/o-^*-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



98 



Newburyport family, and lived a mdowhood of more 
than ten years, death coming in 1887. They had 
eax children, four of whom were sons, Henry T. 
Jr., being the eldest The home of the famOy was 
in Newbmyport, and there the children went to 
school. After his schooldays were over, Henry T. 
Jr., learned the blacksmith's trade under his father, 
working in his smithy for nine years, after which 
for four years he lived in MoultonvOle. Returning 
to Newburyport in 1876, he formed a partnership 
with his brother, the trading being done under the 
name of Moody Brothers. His shop was situated 
in the rear of the Library building, and also for 
two years he was on Liberty street. In 1882 he 
established the Victor Manufacturing Company, and 
equipped a plant on Water street, which has been 
the address of the company ever since. Mr. Moody 
had for some years prior to the organization of the 
Victor Manufacturing Company experimented on 
certain devices he had designed, and with the inven- 
tion of the Moody hangar, which was first demon- 
strated in 1882, he had a specialty which f bund favor 
and brought steady business to his company. The 
Moody hangars are used throughout the United 
States, Canada and Australia. Mr. Moody has not 
been content with his original invention, but has 
been constantly improving and perfecting it to meet 
the changing conditions of the time. The Moody 
type of hangar is known to most persons connected 
with hardware in that part of the country, and the 
business it has brought to the Victor Manufactur- 
ing Company, together with other excellent devices 
invented by Mr. Moody, has been sufficient to keep 
Mr. Moody constantly in his home town. The Vic- 
tor Manufacturing Company was the first to manu- 
facture its own fusable links, and quite a large 
trade was built up. 

Personally, Mr. Moody is esteemed in his home 
town, and he is well known throughout the county 
and State among people in his line. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Yacht Club, but does not 
seem to have many other connections that would 
be likely to draw him from his business affairs. He 
apparently has not at any time manifested a de- 
sire to enter actively into public affairs, though he 
has furthered most of the worth-while public move- 
ments in his own town. 

Mr. Moody married, October 17, 1877, Nellie A. 
Huntington, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, daughter 
of David and Clarissa (Osgood) Huntington. Mrs. 
Moody's mother died in 1878, eight years after the 
death of her husband, who was of a Massachusetts 
family, bom in Pleasant Valley, that State, and for 
the greater part of his life a mason. Three children 
have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Moody: Gertrude, 
who died at the age of five and one-half years; 
Harry; and Arthur, who is also deceased. Mrs. 
Moody passed away January 12, 1921. 



to the earliest settlers of New England who were 
prominent in the building up of the colonies. Mr. 
Allen attended the public schools and the high 
school, and when twenty-one years of age was 
engaged in the leather business with Breed & Clapp, 
of Boston and Lynn. He followed this line of 
business until 1906, in which year he had an op- 
portunity to engage in business for himself as a 
broker in stocks and bonds. He has been very 
successful a^d has built up a large and thriiHng 
business, with headquarters in Boston. Mr. Allen 
is a member of the Chamber of Commerce of Bos- 
ton, and of the Boston Athletic Association. 

Mr. AUen married Doris Johnson, daughter of 
Harry Johnson, and they are the parents of three 
children: Phyllis, Bryce, and Maijorie. With 6is 
family he attends the Episcopal church of Lynn, 
where they make their home, and he is also active 
in the dvic affairs of that city. 



JOHN E. ALLEN, a prominent citizen of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, and a well known business man, was 
bom December 22, 1879, in Swampscott, Massachu- 
setts, son of Daniel and Harriet (Chase) Allen. 
On both the paternal and maternal sides he traces 



DANIEL S. JORDAN — ^The recent passing of 
Daniel S. Jordan, removed from the city of Law- 
rence one of her oldest residents, a man whose 
life had contributed to the welfare of the people and 
the progress of the conununity. 

Mr. Jordan was a descendant of old New England 
stock, in direct line from Rev. Robert Jordan, the 
immigrant ancestor of this family in America, who 
came from England and settled in Maine very early 
in the history of the Colonies. He cared for the 
spiritual needs of the people over a wide district, 
from the Casco settlement to Saco. He was fear- 
less in his denunciation of witchcraft, and it was 
largely through his labors that the practices in 
connection with this idea fell into disuse, through 
the section in which he preached and taught. The 
sturdy qualities of the old pioneer forebear, came 
down tlurough several generations to Ichabod Jor- 
dan, Mr. Jordan's father. Ichabod Jordan was bom 
in Biddeford, York county, Maine, February 2, 1782, 
and died August 7, 1874. In early life he con- 
ducted a country store, prospering and becoming a 
leading man in the community. Later in life, with 
dignity and position secured, he represented the 
district in the general court at Boston. He was for 
many years deputy sheriff of York county, Maine. 
He married Betsey Nason. 

Daniel S. Jordan, son of Ichabod and Betsey 
(Nason) Jordan, was bom in Biddeford, Maine, 
July 28, 1824, and died in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
January 2, 1921, in the ninety-seventh year of his 
age. Daniel S. Jordan was educated in his native 
town, and worked with his father until he had at- 
tained his majority. In 1845 he left Biddeford, and 
struck out for himself, coming to Massachusetts, and 
locating in Charlestown, where he foimd employ* 
ment in a grocery store. Remaining there until 
1847, he then came to Lawrence, which became his 
permanent place of residence. At first he worked 
as a grocery clerk, but he was ambitious to gain 
a foothold on the road to success, and through 
hard work and thrifty habits, acquired a little cap- 
ital. In. 1860, in association with his brother, A. S. 
Jordan, he entered the grocery business, under the 



94 



ESSEX COUNTY 



firm name ''A. S. Jordan & Company." The venture 
proved very successful, grew and prospered, and 
for eighteen years the brothers continued together. 
The firm as originally established, comprised A. S. 
Jordan and G. H. Gilmore, under the name of A. 
S. Jordan & Company. In 1850 Daniel S. Jordan 
who had been associated with W. H. Bridgman, 
bought Mr. Gilmore's interest, and the brothers 
worked together with imtiring zeal and marked suc- 
cess. The enterprise started at a site on Common 
street between Union and Newbury streets in 
1848, and in 1863 the present site was purchased, 
where now stands the substantial brick building 
erected in 1896 by Daniel S. Jordan, bearing his 
name and still owned by his estate. Then in 1869 
the death of A. S. Jordan left Daniel S. Jordan 
sole proprietor, and for years he carried on the 
business alone. The firm name was then changed 
to D. S. Jordan & Co., and so remained until 1872, 
when Mr. Jordan disposed of his business to Messrs. 
Eastman & BueU. During its entire history the 
business was located at the comer of Newbury and 
Common streets. In 1873 Mr. Jordan retired from 
the grocery business, and when he turned it over 
into other hands, this was one of the most im- 
portant interests in the city of Lawrence, in this 
field of mercantile endeavor. 

For a number of years prior to his retirement, 
Mr. Jordan had acquired very considerable holdings 
of real estate, and from that time on, he occupied 
himself with the management and development of 
the various properties in which he was interested. 
He also built a beautiful and spacious home at No. 
184 East Haverhill street, in Lawrence, and taking 
up his residence there in 1876, spent his declining 
years in the house which represented the summit of 
his success. 

Of a quiet, retiring nature, a lover of home and 
intellectual pursuits, Daniel S. Jordan lived to an 
age now rare in the history of a hurrying, pro- 
gressive world. Although for many years prac- 
tically retired, he kept in touch with all public ad- 
vance, and took great pride in the growth and pros- 
perity of the city of his adoption. He was a mem- 
ber of the Unitarian church, but for several years 
before his death was unable to attend any church. 
Broadly interested in every branch of forward en- 
deavor, he will long be remembered in Lawrence 
as a worthy citizen, and a prog^ressive, high-minded 
man. 

Daniel S. Jordan married, December 29, 1869, 
Alicia Parham, of Tyngsboro, who is his sole sui> 



vivor. 



PAUL LYNCH, dentist, of Amesbury, Massachu- 
setts, was bom at Waltham, that state, October 15, 
1875, son of Michael and Ellen (Mullen) Lynch. 
He was educated in the public schools and high 
school, graduating from the latter institution in 
1895. Subsequently he attended Tufts College for 
two years and then attended the University of 
Maryland where he received his degree of Doctor 
of Dental Science in 1907. For a short time he 



was located in Boston, having charge of an office 
there, and in 1909 opened his own office at Vineyard 
Haven where he remained for two years. Since 1911 
he has been located in Amesbury, Massachusetts^ 
continuously engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. 

During the World War, Dr. Lynch offered his 
services to his government and was overseas for 
seventeen months. He was in charge of dental sur- 
gery for the Red Cross interests and was stationed 
at Paris the greater part of the time. He was com- 
missioned lieutenant and later captain, being dis- 
charged in July, 1919. Dr. Lynch is affiliated with 
£he Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
the Amesbury Club. He is also a member of the 
Essex County Dental Society and the Massachu- 
setts Dental Society, and is an attendant of St. 
Joseph's Church. 



JAMBS BDGAR BARNES, who holds an assured 
position in the Essex county bar, is a descendant, 
through both his paternal and maternal lines, of 
early Colonial pioneers who landed at Plymouth 
shortly after 1620. Both families were represented 
in the eariy progress of the colonies and in the 
Revolutionary War. He is a son of Charles £. and 
Mary Susan (Schellinger) Barnes, and his father, 
who was a shoe worker during the greater part of 
his life, was connected with the General Electric 
Company in his later years, and died in Lynn, De- 
cember 80, 1916. 

James Edgar Bames was bom in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, May 14, 1869, and received his eariy edu- 
cation in the public schools of the city. His musi- 
cal education was begun at an early age, and while 
stiU very yoimg he played professionally, also teach- 
ing the violin. At the age of thirty-six years he 
took up the study of law under private tutors, and 
was admitted to the bar in February, 1909. He has 
since practiced in this city very successfully, and is 
now esteemed one of the leading men of Lynn. He 
is a member of the Lynn Bar Association and of 
the Essex County Bar Association. He is also a 
member of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
and of the Lynn Historical Society. 

On October 17, 1892, Mr. Bames married Jennie 
Lambert Murkland, daughter of Robert and Mary 
(Derby) Murkland; her father at one time was con- 
nected with the Noble Stove Company, of Lynn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bames are the parents of three chil- 
dren: Jean Lambert, bom December 2, 1893; Ed- 
gar Schellinger, bom March 20, 1895; and John 
Murkland, bom May 22, 1898. Both sons served in 
the World War, Edgar S. Bames enlisting in the 
101st Engineers, 21st Division, and served in many 
battles overseas, losing, partially, the sight of his 
right eye. He was mustered out at Camp Devens, 
Massachusetts, about March, 1919. He is now in the 
engineering department of the Boston and Maine 
railroad. John Murkland Bames served in the 
Naval Reserve, and is now attending the Boston 
University Law School. Mrs. Bames is a member 
of the "1884" Club, of Lynn. 



^^J^-^.'^.^'-^-JLjtc^WjLx^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



95 



ARTHUR W. BECKFORD, of Danvers, Massa- 
chusetts, has for many years been active in the mer- 
cantile life of the town, and is still engaged in the 
line of business in which he started, the fnmiture 
business. He was bom in Topsfield, Massachusetts, 
on November 23, 1864, and is a son of Samuel and 
Julia A. (Dodge) Beckford. Samuel Beckford was 
bom in Topsfield on October 26, 1836, and was a 
shoemaker. They were the parents of two children: 
Arthur W., of whom further; and Otis, who was 
bom in 1868. 

Attending the schools of his native town, Mr. 
Beckford came to Danvers at the age of eighteen 
years, and here entered the employ of J. Frank 
Porter, then a leading furniture dealer here. After 
ten years in Mr. Porter's employ, Mr. Beckford be- 
came a partner in the business, and about ten years 
thereafter, bought Mr. Porter's interest, and became 
sole owner of the business. This transaction occur- 
red in 1903, and Mr. Porter is still a leader in this 
section in this branch of mercantile endeavor. 

Mr. Beckford has attained prominence in various 
civic and fraternal interests. He was a trustee of 
the Peabody Institute from 1916 to 1922. From 1904 
to 1917 he was water commissioner of the town of 
Danvers, and he has been a trustee of the Danvers 
Savings Bank since 1905. Politically he supports 
the Republican party. He is a member of the Uni- 
versalist church, and has been a trustee of the 
church organization, his period of service in this 
capacity being from 1895 to 1908. 

In the Masonic order Mr. Beckford is very 
prominent, and holds the thirty-second degree. He 
is a member of Mosaic Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and from 1898 to 1899 was past master of 
the order; during 1896-97 he was high priest of 
Holton Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and past 
grand king of Grand Chapter. He was a charter 
member of St. George Commandery, Knights Temp- 
lar, and during 1904-05 was eminent commander of 
this body. In 1910 Mr. Beckford was district dep- 
uty grand master of Masonic lodges, and was also 
grand lecturer of Grand Commandery. 

Mr. Beckford married, in 1890, Harriette Putnam 
Bell, of Danvers, and they had one son, Arthur 
Courtenay, who was bom June 4, 1896. 



JOHN T. CARROLL— In business circles in Dan- 
vers, Massachusetts, the name of John T. Carroll 
has long been well and favorably known, and in the 
public life of the town he has become a force for 
progress. He is a son of Samuel B. and Caroline 
(Phillips) Carroll. Samuel B. Carroll was bom in 
Marblehead, in 1833, and was a hard working man, 
both sailor and shoemaker. He was drowned in 
1858. They were the parents of two children: 
Samuel B. Jr., bom September 19, 1855, and John 
T., of further mention. 

John T. Carroll was bom in Stoneham, Massachu- 
setts, June 30, 1858. Receiving his early education 
in the public schools of Marblehead and Danvers, 
he later attended a private commercial school, in 
preparation for his business career. After com- 
pleting his studies he started a business enterprise, 



combining the sale of periodicals and men's fur^ 
nishings, locating in Danvers for this purpose. He 
was successful from the first, and continued this 
store for a period of twenty-seven years. It was 
founded in 1878, and until 1905 it was his prin- 
cipal interest. In the latter year Mr. Carroll dis- 
posed of the long established business and entered 
the field of real estate and insurance. His long ex- 
perience and thorough familiarity with the town 
and its vicinity were of great value in the new 
venture, and he soon became a power in the field 
which he had chosen. He has been identified with 
many important deals in this section, and is still 
going forward. Mr. Carroll was one of the men 
who built the old skating rink, which later was sold 
and constructed into the fine armory now occupied 
by Company E, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Mr. Carroll has been a member of the Board of 
Trade of Danvers for the past seven years, and for 
a much longer period has been prominent in the 
public affairs of the town. He has served as asses- 
sor for sixteen years, and was chairman of the 
board of assessors for ten years. He served as 
sealer of weights and measures for six years, and 
as selectman for five years. He also served as a 
trustee of the Peabody Institute for three years. A 
staunch supporter of the principles of the Repub- 
lican party, he was treasurer of the Republican 
Town Committee for ten years. He was for many 
years sergeant of Company K, Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Militia, of which he was one of the or- 
ganizers. He also was a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic drum coxps. 

Personally, Mr. Carroll is widely known in the 
fraternal world. He is a member of Mosaic Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; of Holton Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; of Salem Council, Royal and 
Select Masters; and of Salem Commandery, Knights 
Templar. He is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen; and has been a member of the 
Improved Order of Red Men for twenty years. He 
attends the Universalist church. 

Mr. Carroll married Cora I. Griffin, of Haver^ 
hill, and they have one son, Arthur E., who was 
bom in 1888, and is now associated with his father 
in business; he married Irene B. Briggs, now de- 
ceased, and they had one child, Winston B. 



J. FRANKLIN BATCHELDfiR, lawyer, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom December 24, 
1870, in West Amesbury, now Merrimac. Horace 
Jackson Batchelder, his father, was bom Septem- 
ber 6, 1829, at Raymond, New Hampshire, and has 
been and is now engaged in the building of auto- 
mobile bodies at Amesbury, Massachusetts. He 
married Helen Adaline Merrill, bom May 16, 1835, 
in South Hampton, New Hampshire. Mr. Batchel- 
der's father and mother have been married over 
sixty years, and both are now living. 

Mr. Batchelder was educated in the public schools 
and graduated from the high school at Amesbury 
in 1888. He was admitted to the Boston bar on 
October 2, 1896, and in 1897 he received his B. A. 



96 



ESSEX COUNTY 



degree from Boston Law School. He engaged in 
the practice of his profession at Haverhill and so 
continues to the present time. Mr. Batchelder is 
very prominent among the legal fraternity of the 
Essex County Bar Association, and has also taken 
an active part in the public affairs of Haverhill. 
From 1898 to 1900 he was a member of the Com- 
mon Council of Haverhill, and in 1901 and 1902 
represented his party, the Republican, in the Massa- 
chusetts State Legislature. For three years he was 
a member of the Republican State Committee and 
has also served as chairman, secretary and treasurer 
of the Republican City Committee. 

Mr. Batchelder is a member of Sagahew Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Pentucket Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; Haverhill Council, Royal and 
Select Masters; Haverhill Commandery, Knights 
Templar; Princes of Jerusalem; Rose Croix; Boston 
Consistory, and is a member of Aleppo Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He has attained the thirty-second degree in Ma- 
sonry. Other fraternal affiliations of Mr. Batchelder 
include membership in Mlzx>ah Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is past grand; 
Grecian Lodge, No. 154, Knights of Pythias. He is 
a member of the Haverhill Historical Society; of 
the Haverhill Chamber of Commerce, and the Pen- 
tucket Club of Haverhill. 

During the World War Mr. Batchelder devoted 
much of his time to aiding those making out the 
questionnaires, and in common with many other 
prominent lawyers throughout the country, this 
service was gratis. 

Mr. Batchelder married, June 19, 1901, at Haver- 
hill, Bessie Louise Howe, daughter of James and 
Sarah (Walker) Knowles Howe. Mrs. Batchelder 
is a member of the Haverhill Historical Society and 
the Women's City Club. Mr. and Mrs. Batchelder 
attend the North Congregational Church of Haver- 
hill, of which he was the clerk for twelve years, de- 
clining reflection in 1922. 

Mr. Batchelder is a director in several corpora- 
tions, and trustee of several large estates. 



SAM CROSSLAND-— One of the attractive mer- 
cantile establishments of Danvers, Massachusetts, 
is the jewlery store at No. 6 Maple street, of 
which Sam Crossland is the proprietor. Mr. Cross- 
land was bom in Bradford, England, on Septem- 
ber 21, 1875, and is a son of John E. and Levina 
(Akroid) Crossland. John E. Crossland is of Eng- 
lish birth, and for many years has been a mas- 
ter mechanic in the ipdustrial world of Cali- 
fornia. John E. and Levina (Akroid) Crossland 
are the parents of seven children: Mrs. S. E. 
Webster, of Canton, Massachusetts; J. E. Cross- 
land, of Arlingrton, Massachusetts; Firth A., of 
Los Angeles, California; Sam, of whom extended 
mention follows; Blanche C, and Burmont C, 
also of Los Angeles; and Mrs. M. C. Hall, of 
Utica, New York. 

Sam Crossland came to the United States when 
only six years of age, with the family, and gain- 
ed his education in the public schools of Law- 



rence. After completing his studies he became a 
carpenter and millwright, and continued in this 
field of endeavor until he was thirty years of 
age. Thereafter he was on the road for seven 
years, setting up machines for the Dillon Machine 
Company. In the course of his duties along this 
line he worked for J. H. Horn & Sons, Davis & 
Furber, the Lawrence Machine Shop, HoUingnvorth 
&• Vose, the General Electric Company, and the 
United Shoe Machine Company, also, for a period 
of fourteen years, having charge of their clocks. 
In 1920 Mr. Crossland went into business for him- 
self, establishing a Jewelry store in Danvers, also 
founding the Crossland Company, which is lo- 
cated in the Walker building, in Boston, for the 
sale of electric clocks. He has made a most prom- 
ising beginning, and in the short period which 
has since elapsed, has developed the business re- 
markably, his future success thus being assured. 

In various activities Mr. Crossland is promi- 
nent. He is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
also of the Encampment and the Rebekahs, and 
of the Manchester Unity Odd Fellows, of which 
order he has been past grand for the last 
twenty-two years; and the Loyal Order of Moose. 
He is a member of the Get Together Club, and 
was formerly treasurer of that organization. Politi- 
cally he supports the Republican party, and he at- 
tends St. Peter's Episcopal Church, of Beverly. 

Mr. Crossland married Caroline E. Gribben, of 
Boston. 

JOHN B. LEONARD, a dental surgeon of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom in that city on 
August 10, 1881, son of Seraphin and Melende 
(Prevost) Leonard, both of whom were of Can- 
adian birth, the former of Montreal and the lat- 
ter of St. John's. Seraphin Leonard was for the 
greater part of his life identified with the shoe 
industry, and for many years with the Massachu- 
setts shoe industry. They lived in Haverhill for 
many years, and the son, John B., has spent al- 
most the whole of his life in it. 

John B. Leonard was educated in Haverhill pub- 
lic schools, passing from the graded to the high 
school, and graduating from the latter with the 
class of 1899. Some time later he decided to enter 
the dental profession, and with that object in view, 
became a student in the Baltimore Medical College, 
dental department, in 1902, and in due course re- 
ceived his professional degree, being graduated in 
the class of 1905. Soon, thereafter, he took up 
the practice of dentistry in his native place, and 
has had an office in Haverhill ever since, experi- 
encing satisfactory development in practice, both 
in extent and workmanship. 

Dr. Leonard has taken close interest in public 
affairs, but has not been able to take as active a 
part as he would have liked, his professional duties 
restricting his opportunities in that connection. 
Still, he is a member of the Haverhill Chamber of 
Commerce, and for three years has been a mem- 
ber of the Haverhill School Board. Fraternally, he 



' 'iS-Cv.^ctif^^-^^i:^^^^:^-^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



97 



belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, of which he is past exalted mler; and the 
Knights of Columbus. His professional afSliatiLons 
include membership in the Haverhill Dental Society, 
and the Northeastern Massachusetts Dental So- 
ciety, of which orgamzation he is a vice-president. 
Socially, he belongs to the Wachuaett and Island 
Golf dubs. 

Dr. Leonard married, in 1914, Alice G. Donovan, 
of Newburyport They are devout Catholics, and 
attend St. Joseph's Catholic Church of HaverhiU. 



FRANK LSSLIE SIMPSON— Simpson is one of 
the Scotch-Irish names which has been identified 
with New Hampshire from a very early Colonial 
period, and people by that name were active and 
prominent in the development of Northern Ireland 
a century before the transplanting of the name to 
New England. The name is derived from Simpson 
or Simon, a good old Bible name. Simpsons were 
conspicuous in the settlement of Londonderry, New 
Hampshire, and early appeared in that part of an- 
cient Portsmouth which is now Greenland, and is 
found in other sections of the State. Representa- 
tives of the Portsmouth branch settled in Windham, 
New Hampshire, and this review deals with a des- 
cendant of that ancient family. 

Frank Leslie Simpson, son of Charles Edward 
and Sarah Abbie (Clark) Simpson, was bom in 
South Barnstable, New Hampshire, March 19, 1875. 
He prepared in the public schools, and after gradua- 
tion from the Classical High School, of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, entered Boston University, whence he 
was graduated A. B., class of 1893. Later,. deciding 
upon the profession of law, he prepared, in Boston 
University Law School and was graduated LL.B., 
sununa cum laude, in 1903. After graduation he 
continued at the law school as an instructor, 1903- 
1907, when he was advanced to an assistant pro- 
fessorship, and since 1910 has been professor of law. 
He is an editor of "BigeloVs Cases on Bills and 
Notes," also of ''Simpson's Cases on the Law of 
Tort." He maintains offices in Boston and conducts 
a private law practice. 

Professor Simpson is a member of lodge, chapter, 
council, commandery, consistory of the York and 
Scottish Rites of Masonry, and is a noble of Aleppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is a member of Phi Delta Phi frater- 
ity; an. honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa; and a 
member of the Boston Art Club. 

Professor Simpson married Mabel Elizabeth 
White, September 20, 1906, and they have a son, 
Donald Robert _.....__^ 

JOHN BAKBR PEARSON, a lifelong resident of 
Essex county, Massachusetts, has been fanuliar with 
the business worid of Lynn for thirty-three years, 
and has long been prominent in the insurance busi- 
ness here. 

Mr. Pearson was bom in Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts, December 30, 1864, and is a son of John G. 
and Ruth A. (Thuriow) Pearson. Receiving a lii 



ited, but thoroughly practical education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native place, Mr. Pearson, as a 
boy of fourteen, came to Lynn. He began life as 
paper boy, filling in his time by selling lunches in 
a shoe factory. In 1887 he secured a position as 
clerk in the men's furnishing store conducted then 
by Henry H. Green, and was thus employed for 
about two years, after which he started in business 
for himself in the same field. This business he 
conducted for about twenty years very successfully, 
then entered the insurance business, not long there- 
after receiving his son into partnership, and carry- 
ing on the business under the name of John B. Pear- 
son & Son. This concern is located at No. 44 
Central Square, in Lynn, and is still carrying on a 
prosperous and steadily increasing business. 

Mr. Pearson is a member of the Lynn Chamber 
of Commerce, and served as secretary of the Re- 
tail Bureau for a number of years. He served for 
two years on the Lynn School Board. For about 
fourteen years he has been a member of Damascus 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. He is a mem- 
ber of East Lynn Lodge, Independent Ordec of Odd 
FeUows, which he has served as financial secretary 
for twenty-five years, and also is a member of 
Lynn Encampment of the same order. He is a 
member of St. Stephen's Church. 

Mr. Pearson married, in 1886, Maud R. Cook, 
daughter of Philip Cook, and they havd two chil- 
dren: Edward C, bom September 26, 1893; and 
Ruth A., bpm August 15, 1902. 



CHRISTOPHBR H. ROQBR3— The legal pro- 
fession is represented in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
by a group of the leading attorneys of the State. 
One of the prominent members of this group is 
Christopher H. Roger^i, who for twenty-five years 
has practiced law in Massachusetts. 

Mr. Rogers is a son of William M. and Caroline 
(Howe) Rogers, the former bom in Newbury, Ma»- 
sachusetts. He taught school for a time in Milf ord 
and East Haverhill, but later became a widcdy- 
known attorney and trial justice at Methuen, this 
covering a period of fifty years. He was a Repub- 
lican in politics, and represented that town in Legis- 
lature. He was a member of the Masonic order 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Christopher H. Rogers was bom in Methuen, 
Massachusetts, on May 6, 1871. Receiving his early 
education in the public schools of his native town, 
and continuing through the high school there, he 
eariy made the decision to foUow in his father's 
footsteps and to make the legal profession the field 
of his career. He entered Amherst College, and 
upon his graduation from that institution in 1893, 
with the B. A. degree, entered Boston University 
Law School, from which he was graduated in 1896, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, cum laude. 
In the same year he was admitted to the Essex 
county bar. Mr. Rogers began the practice of law 
in Gloucester, Massachusetts, where he remained 
for two years. Coming thereafter to Lawrence, he 
entered into a partnership with Wflliam J. Brad- 



Emcz— 2—7 



98 



ESSEX CX)UNTY 



ley» and for eight years Bradley & Rogers was one 
of the leading law firms in this district. Since 1905, 
when this partnership was dissolved, Mr. Rogers has 
carried on his practice alone, with most gratifying 
success. He handles a general practice of law, 
and has been justice of the peace for about twenty- 
five years and a notary public for many years. 

Mr. Rogers stands high in the profession, is a 
member of the Massachusetts Bar Association, of 
the Essex County Bar Association, and of the 
Lawrence Bar Association. He is also a member 
of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce. For some 
yearn he has been a director of the Nevins Home 
for the Aged. 

Fraternally, Mr. Rogers is a member of John 
Hancock Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. His 
college fratenoities are the Phi Delta Theta, at 
Amherst, and the Phi Delta Phi, at Boston Univer^ 
sity. He is a member of the Methuen Club. For a 
number of years he was chairman of the Methuen 
Republican Town Committee and also served on the 
Sdiool Committee. 

In December, 1905, Mr. Rogers married Alice P. 
darky who died in December, 1908. They wtm the 
parents of one son, Francis Clark Rogers. Mr. 
Rogers resides in Methuen and his office is in the 
Bay State Bank building in Lawrence 



FREDERICK E. SWEETSER, M. D., who has 
been in practice in Merrimae, Massachusetts, for 
more than thirty years, was bom in Saco, Maine, 
November 11, 1866, son of Steven E. and Mary V. 
(Knight) Sweetser. His father was originally of 
Buxton, Maine, and until his retirement in 1911 a 
machinist by trade, and his mother, originally of 
Waterboro, Maine, died in 1911. Steven E. Sweetser 
served through the Civil War, and was a member 
of the Lowell, Massachusetts, post of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. His son, Frederick E., re- 
ceived his general education in the public schools 
of Saco, Maine, graduating ultimately from the 
high school of that place. With a view to qualify- 
ing in medicine, he became a student at the Port- 
land, Maine Medical School, and took further medi- 
cal instruction at the Bowdoin Medical College, 
graduating in medicine therefrom with the class 
of 1888, and then receiving the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. He took spedal graduate study at 
the New York Post Graduate Medical School, but 
soon after he had graduated he entered upon gen- 
eral practice in Merrimae, which has been his centre 
ever since. He has a wide practice, and is general- 
ly esteemed. During the war period (1917-19) he 
acted as a member of the Medical Advisory Board 
to the Draft Board at Newburyport, and he has 
had many professional affiliations. He is an ex- 
president of the Essex North District Medical Asso- 
ciation, and is a member of the American Medical 
Association, Massachusetts Medical Association, and 
the Haverhill Medical Club. Socially, he belongs 
to the Home Club. 

During his long residence and professional ac- 
tivity in Merrimae, Dr. Sweetser was necessarily 
drawn into much public work, espedally in educa- 



tional matters. He has been a member of the 
Menimac School Boaxd for twelve years, and has 
fostered many local movements of public class. He 
is also a director and vice-president of the First 
National Bank of Merrimae. Fraternally, Dr. Sweet- 
ser is a Mason and Odd FeUow. Of the former, 
he belongs to the Bethany Lodge of Merrimae, the 
Trinity Chapter of Amesbury, and the Haverhill 
Commandery, Knights Templar. 

He was married, in 1894, to Grace Holbrook, of 
North Adams, Massachusetts, daughter of William 
and Frances (MitcheU) Holbrook. Her fkther was 
of British birth, bom in Manchester, England, was 
a brick manufacturer, and died in 1886. Her mother, 
who died in 1894, was of a North Adams, Massa- 
chusetts, family. Mrs. Sweetser enters much into 
church and social work in Merrimae, and is an 
ex-president of the Women's Club of that place. 
Mrs. Sweetser is a member of the Congregational 
church of Merrimae They have two chlldxiNi, Vir* 
ginia and Frederick Nelson. 



JOHN E. PITMAN — ^For many years pronmient 
in Andover, Massachusetts, as a builder and con- 
tractor, John E. Pitman has been identified with a 
great deal of the construction work of the past 
three decades which has counted for the progress 
and development of the town- 
Mr. Pitman was bom in Lower Baztlett, New 
Hampshire, August 22, 1852, the son of Joseph and 
Sarah (Charles) Pitman. Joseph Pitman was bom 
in 1822, at Lower Bartlett, New Hampshire, and 
died, aged eighty-seven years. He was first a 
school teacher, later a surveyor and land lawyer. 
He was a Democrat and served as selectman, county 
commissioner and representative to the Genertd 
Court. He was a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows in North. Conway. 

John E. Pitman received his education in the 
public schools of his native town, then learned the 
trade of carriage builder, at Cornish,- Maine. Fol- 
lowing this trade for several years, he thereafter, 
at the age of twenty-five years, went to Fryeburg, 
in Oxford county, of the same State, and there 
entered the carriage business. After carrying on 
this business for about twelve years, Mr. Pitman, in 
1889, came to Andover, working here for different 
contractors until 1895. In that year, in association 
with Adam C. Richardson, Mr. Pitman established 
a contracting business under the name of Richard- 
son & Pitman, builders. Three years later, upon 
the withdrawal of Mr. Richardson from the firm, 
Mr. Pitman carried on the business as sole owner, 
under his own name. He has been most successful, 
and has handled many important contracts in this 
vicinity. About three years ago he established a 
side line in the retailing of lumber, and this in it- 
self is a thriving interest Mr. Pitman still pez^ 
sonally continues the oversight of the business, 
although his son is his able assistant. His business 
location adjoins his residence at No. 45 Whittier 
street, Andover. 

Fraternally, Mr. Pitman is well knovm, being a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 



—<^, ^y^ /ti-.-,-w-^.^.v.^-- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



99 



and of the Knights of Pythias. He attends the ser^ 
vices of the Unitarian church. 

Mr. Pitman married, in 1876, in North Fryeburg, 
Maine, Ada M. Wiley, of that place, and they have 
three sons: Eben N., bom October 22, 1877, who 
died December 14, 1900; Benjamin W., a resident 
of Danvers, Massachusetts, and a carpenter by 
trade, who was bom November 10, 1879; and Joseph 
I., bom January 29, 1881, who is now superintendent 
and manager of his father's extensive business. 



ARTHUR A. FORNBSS has been a resident and 
business man of Beverly, Massachusetts, for more 
than a quarter of a century, coming to that dty from 
Salem, Massachusetts. Mr. Fomess started his busi- 
ness career as a druggist, but after twelve years 
amid drugs and medicines he chose the healthful 
business of a real estate dealer and flxe insurance 
agent and in that line has gained healtii, reputation 
and fortune. 

Arthur A. Fomess is a son of Augustus A. and 
Maigaret (Gray) Fomess, his father a morocco 
leather manufacturer of Peabody, Massachusetts, 
and a man of local influence. 

Arthur A. Fomess was bom in South Danvers, 
Massachusetts, November 12, I860. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and at the age of sixteen 
secured a position in a drug store at Saiem, Massa- 
chusetts, and for twelve years continued in the 
drug business there. In 1888 he retired from the 
drug business and entered the real estate and in- 
surance business in Salem, continuing in that line 
until 1895, when he bought the real estate and in- 
surance agency of Samuel Porter, at Beverly, Mas- 
sachusetts, and there has since continued its suc- 
cessful operation, having now been its owner and 
managing head for twenty-six years (1895-1921). 

Mr. Fomess has other business interests of im- 
portance. He is vice-president and member of the 
Investment Committee of the Beverly Savings Bank; 
is a director of the New Ware Theatre, Inc., and 
director of the Beverly Chamber of Commerce. He 
is well known in fraternal circles, being a member 
of the Masonic order; the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, of which he is past exalted ruler of Beverly 
Lodge; and a member and an ex-president of the 
Union Club. He is a member of and for thirteen 
years was treasurer of the First Unitarian Church 
of Beverly; and in politics is a Republican. 

Mr. Fomess married Jennie L. Lummus, daugh- 
ter of Judge Lummus, of Danvers, Massachusetts. 



RALPH H. TAYLOR is one of those lawyers of 
whom men think, after they have had the pleasure 
of meeting him, "That is the man I am going to 
consult if ever I have a need in law." His very 
presence inspires confidence and his manner dis- 
closes skill and power. Mr. Taylor is a native of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, being bom there Decem- 
ber 17, 1879. His father, Levi L. H. Taylor, bom 
in 1854, was also of this dty, but the mother, Laura 
Abbie (Dodge) Taylor, was of Nen^ Hampshire 
stock, being a native of Raymond, New 



Mr. L. L. H. Taylor is a prominent real estate 
operator in Haverhill and vicinity. 

Ralph H. Taylor had ample preparation before 
entering the law. His earliest study was in the 
public schools, finishing with high school in the 
year 1899. Entering college he was graduated from 
Dartmouth, New Hampshire, in 1902, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. The year 1905 saw the 
completion of the law course in Harvard, from 
which college he gained the degree of Bachidor of 
Laws. He was admitted to the Bar of Massachu- 
setts in 1905 and the United States Bar in 1909. 
During the years 1905 to 1911 he was associated 
with R. A. Jordon in Boston, Massachusetts, and 
still handles all matters of law for this fiim in 
Essex county. Mr. Taylor has his offices at 14 
Water street, to which place he moved in 1914* 
Here, without partners, he is conducting a success- 
ful general law practice and is much consulted by 
an ever-increasing clientele. Mr. Taylor is Re- 
publican in his politics. During the World War be 
served on the legal advisory board* He is a mem* 
her of both the Essex County Bar Association and 
the Haverhill Bar Association, and also belongr 
to the Pentucket Club. He and his f^uooily are well 
known attendants of the First Methodist Church 
and make their home at 88 Highland avenue Haver- 
hill. 

On June 80, 1910, he was marxied to Eva Lillian 
Sears, daughter of Wflliam H. and Sarah (Robinson) 



CLARENCE F. BBNNER— As the present head 
of a long-established business in Lynn, Clarence F. 
Benner is bearing a part in the progress of this 
city. He is a son of Frank R. Benner, the founder 
of the firm of F. R. Benner A Company. The 
business, established about 1886, in a small way, 
long since became an important interest, and the 
elder Mr. Benner held the active management until 
1919, when he turned it over to his son. Frank R. 
Benner married Susie L. Nash, of Warren, Maine. 

Clarence F. Benner was bom December 7, 1882, 
in Thomaston, Maine. Educated in the public 
schools of Eddington and Trenton, New Jersey, he 
completed his preparation for a successful career 
at the Rider, Moore A Stewart Business College. 
He began life in the employ of the Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Company, of Trenton, with whom 
he remained for a period of eight years. Thereafter 
he came to Lynn, representing the Metropolitan 
and also the John Hancock Mutual Life Insur> 
ance Company, of Boston, and was an I. C. S. 
railroad man for nine states and provinces. 

In 1919 Mr. Benner took over the management 
of his father's business in Lynn, and is carrying 
forward that long successful business to the suc^ 
cess which is the logical outcome of its growth and 
development. Under the name of Benner Awning 
and Tent Company, Incorporated, the concern is 
making and distributing everything in canvas, the 
greatest volume of their production being in awn- 
ings, tents, truck covers, etc. 

Mr. Benner was formerly petty officer of Com- 



100 



ESSEX COUNTY 



pany E, Second Regiment, New Jersey National 
Guard, and was later a member of Company D, 
Eighth Regiment, Massachusetts State Militia. Mr. 
Benner is a member of Everett Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, of the National Tent and Awning Manu- 
facturers' Association, and of the Lynn Chamber of 
Commerce. He is also a member of the Oxford 
Club, and attends the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
On August 31, 1905, Mr. Benner married Bertha 
A. Geary, daughter of C. H. and Amelia (Fitz) 
Geary, of Lynn, the mother being a native of Prince 
Edward's Island. Mr. and Mrs. Benner have two 
children: Clarence F. Jr., and Bertha L. 



DR. EDWARD FRANCIS RYAN, a dental sur- 
geon of Amesbury, Massachusetts, and a World 
War veteran, was bom in Amesbury, on May 16, 
1893, son of Daniel and Fannie (Murphy) Ryan, 
and grandson of Patrick and Hannah (Flynn) Ryan. 
His grandparents were bom in County Cork, Ire- 
land, his grandmother in 1840. Patrick Ryan en- 
gaged in manual labor until retirement in 1901. 
The grandmother almost reached octogenarian age, 
her demise not occurring until 1919, a year after the 
death of her son, Daniel, father of Edward F. 
Daniel Ryan was bom in County Cork, Ireland, in 
1861, but lived the greater part of hia life in the 
United States. His wife, Fannie (Murphy) Ryan, 
was a native of Amesbury, bom there in 1865. The 
Ryan famOy settled in Amesbury, where Daniel 
Ryan was engaged in the automobile business until 
Mb death in 1918. Both parents of Edward F. Ryan 
were well known and respected in Amesbury. 

Edward F. Ryan grew to manhood in Amesbury. 
He attended the local schools, graduating from 
the high school, after which he eata?ed Exeter 
Academy. Having decided to take up professional 
work, he next was a student at Tufts Dental Col- 
lege, graduating in dental surgery with the class 
of 1917, and thus gaining the degree of D. M. D. 
Very soon after graduating. Dr. Ryan enlisted in 
the United States army, for service during the 
Worid War. He was commissioned in October, 
1917, in the grade of first lieutenant, and ordered 
to Camp Devens, Massachusetts, there remaining 
until February 4, 1918, when he was transferred 
to Washington, D. C. He was there only tempor- 
arily, however, for on March 26, 1918, he sailed 
overseas, and saw service in France with the 20th 
Engineers, being stationed near the Swiss border. 
His military work was in his profession, and he 
had opportunities for much wider practice in den- 
tistry than would probably have oome to him dur- 
ing his first years of private practice. After the 
aigmng of the armistice he letomed to this country 
with his unit, and was discharged, as first lieuten- 
ant of Dental Corps, on June, 1919. Soon, there- 
after, he returned to Amesbury, and took up private 
practice in his native city, where he is well known, 
and is succeeding. 

Politically, Dr. Ryan is a Republican, though he 
takes no part in political work. Fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Knights of Columbus, and to the E. 
E. P. fraternity of Exeter Academy. He is a mem- 



ber of the local post of the American L^on* and 
is evidently popular with ex-service men, for he 
filled the position of commander of Amesbury Post 
in 1919 and 1920. He is a member of the North- 
eastern Massachusetts Dental Association, Tufts 
Dental Association of Boston, and the Amesbury 
Club. He is a sincere Catholic, member of St 
Joseph's Catholic Church, of Amesbury. Dr. Ryan 
is unmarried. ________ 

GEORGE H. PERKINS— Identified for many 
years with the business life of North Andover, 
Massachusetts, and for thirty-two years town treaa- 
urer, George H. Perkins is broadly representative 
of the progressive citizenship of Essex county. 

Mr. Perkifis was bom in North Andover, May 
10, 1868, the son of ApoUos L. and Mary E. (Phe^) 
Perkins. He received a thorough grounding in the 
essentials of education in the public schoids of his 
native place, then, upon entering the business world* 
he chose a useful occupation, that of a druggist. 
For four years he was in the employ of E. J. Kelly, 
at that time a prominent druggist of Lawrence, and 
there, by diligent study, learned the business. In 
1888 he started in the drug business for himaeli in 
North Andover, and for many years held a lead- 
ing position in this line of endeavor there. He is a 
member of the New England Druggists' Associar 
tion, and of the National Association of Retail 
Druggists. 

In his prominent position in business drdes Mr. 
Perkins was much in the public eye, and at the 
age of twenty-six years was elected town treasurer. 
This office he has ably filled for thirty-two years. 

Mr. Perkins is a past master of Cochiciiewick 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and served as 
district deputy grand master. He is also a member 
of the Massachusetts Consistory; Bethany Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar; and Aleppo Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
During the Worid War Mr. Perkins was active in 
the many movements in support of the Allied forces, 
and was a member of the Public Safety Committee. 

Mr. Perkins married, in April, 1889, Lillian Berry, 
of North Andover, and they have one son, Lyman 
G., a graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy, and of 
Dartmouth College, class of 1916. In both institu- 
tions he was prominent in social and athletic circles. 
He was captain of the varsity base ball -team at 
Dartmouth. He is a member of Delta Kappa Ep- 
silon fraternity, and. the Sphinx Club. The family 
attend the Congregational church. 



GEORGE W. HAMBLBT— The industries of Es- 
sex county, Massachusetts, bear a broad dmnificance 
outside this immediate vicinity, and perhaps one of 
the most far-reaching is the Hamblet Machine Com- 
pany, of which George W. Hamblet is proprietor, 
whose specialty, paper cutting machines, goes to 
many parts of the worid. 

Mr. Hamblet was bom in Dracut, Massachusetts, 
May 4, 1865, and is a son of Warren C. and Helen 
F. (Clement) Hamblet Warren C. Hamblet was 
for a period of many years engaged in the bobbin 



^^.,^,.^^ ^-^-^^ ^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



101 



business in Lawrence. Both parents are deceased. 

Aoqnizing his early education in the public sehools 
of Lawrence, G. W. Hamblet thereafter entered the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, pursuing a 
course in mechanical engineering, from which he 
was graduated in 1888, with the degree of B. S. 
For nine years, thereafter, he served as instructor 
in mechanical engineering in the same institution. 
At the end of that time he purchased the present 
business, which consists in part of the manufacture 
of iron castings, and also a specialty of paper cut- 
ters for paper mills. A large amount of jobbing is 
also handled. The business has increased broadly 
under Mr. Hamblet's management, and now the 
plant exports paper cutters to Canada, Japan, South 
America, and for about a dozen years exported to 
many European coimtiies. They employ between 
eighty and one hundred skilled mechanics. During 
the World War their facilities were largely devoted 
to the production of special machinery for war pur- 
poses. 

As head of this industry Mr. Hamblet holds a 
prominent position in Lawrence. He is a director of 
the Merchants' Trust Company; also of the Morris 
Plan Company. He is a trustee of the Broadway 
Savings Bank, and a member of the Committee on 
Investments of that institution. He is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce, and of the Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

In January, 1893, Mr. Hamblet married Kate M. 
Clark, of Lawrence, daughter of William P. and 
Elizabeth A. (Gage) Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Hamblet 
have six children: Helen E., who was engaged 
for some time in relief work for the dty of Law- 
rence; Marian C; Theodore C; Katherine G.; 
George Warren; and William P., the four younger 
children being still in school. The family reside at 
No. 606 Lowell street, Lawrence, and attend Trin- 
ity Congregational Church. 



FRANK W. McLANATHAN— In the business, 
financial and social circles of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, Frank W. McLanathan is bearing a share in 
many branches of constructive endeavor. Mr. Mc- 
Lanathan was bom in Lawrence, September 12, 
1886, and is a son of Frederick W. and Elberta H. 
(Hemenway) McLanathan. 

Frederick W. McLanathan was bom in 1847, and 
died May 6, 1909. He became a bookkeeper in the 
employ of Edward Page, a belting manufacturer, in 
1867 or 1868, and in 1878 embarked independentiy 
in this line, purchasing the belt manufacturing busi- 
ness of E. W. Colcord and establishing his plant 
at No. 541 Essex street, the present site of the Fair^ 
field block. ShorUy thereafter, probably in 1874, 
he moved his plant to No. 18 Broadway, and two 
years later he was located at the comer of Methuen 
and Franklin streets. About 1881-2 he discontinued 
the making of belting and gave his entire attention 
to covering rolls until about 1890, when he resumed 
the manufacture of belting, since which time both 
lines have been, carried on. In 1898-4 larger quar- 
ters at No. 656 Common street were occupied; 



about 1895 another move was made to No. 620 Es- 
sex street, and about six years later. No. 168 Broad- 
way, comer of Lowell street, became the firm's lo- 
cation. The present plant of the company, a mo- 
del, finely equipped factory, was erected about 1905. 

Frederick W. McLanathan was a man of great na- 
tural modesty, who sought to avoid any appearance 
of ostentation in his unselfish service to his fellow- 
men. It was written of him at his death that ^as a 
citizen Mr. McLanathan was a man of the old 
school, who had the welfare of the dty at heart and 
who was at all times ready to lend a helping hand 
where the good of the community was concerned. 
As a business man he was numbered among Law- 
rence's most successful manufacturers, and his 
square disposition and upright character won for 
him the respect of all with whom he had business 
relations. He married, in Framingham, Massachu- 
setts, Elberta Harriet, daughter of Elbert Hemen- 
way, and they were parents of one son, Frank W., 
of whom further; and a daughter, Rebecca Watson* 

Frank W. McLanathan wss educated in the pub- 
lic sdbools of Lawrence, and became associated with 
his father in 1905, becoming thoroughly conversant 
with the business of which he is now head. Upon 
the death of his father he took over the active man- 
agement, and has since developed it broadly. 

Mr. McLanathan is interested in every phase of 
public progress, and is an active participant in vari- 
ous forward movements. He is president of the 
Atlantic Co6perative Bank, and is a trustee of the 
Lawrence Savings Bank. He has long been inter- 
ested in the work of the Young Men's Christlaii 
Association, was for a number of yean chairman 
of the boy's division, and is now a director of the 
association. He is also a director of the Boys' Club» 
and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

FratemaUy, Mr. McLanathan is prominent, being 
a member of John Hancock Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Methuen; —Chapter, Bo3ral 

Arch Masons of Lowell; Massachusetts Consistory 
of Boston; and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and also of 
Monadnock Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of Lawrence. His club affiliations include 
membership in the Merrimac Valley Country Club, 
and the Episcopalian Club, of Massachusetts. He 
is a member and junior warden of Grace Episcopal 
Church, of Lawrence. 

On May 25, 1915, Mr. McLanathan married, at 
Oak Park, lUkiois, Helen Barton Kennedy, daugh- 
ter of David J. Kennedy, and they have two chU- 
dren: Richard Barton, and Frank Watson, Jr. The 
family resides at No. 9 Pleasant street, Methuen. 



ELIAS BBBN GRIMB&-The firm of Bride, 
Grimes & Company, steam fitters, plumbing contrac- 
tors and dealers in mill supplies, of Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, was founded in 1869 by W. F. Butter 
and conducted by him as W. F. Butter ft Company 
until 1908, when the business was reorganised un- 
der the present name. Bride, Grimes ft Company. 
Mr. Grimes has been connected with the business 



102 



ESSEX COUNTY 



since 1888, has been a partner since 1897» and is 
now (1922) Tery active in tlie business which he 
entered as a young man of twenty-two. He is a 
lifelong resident of Lawrence, his parents moving 
to that city in 1866, the year of his birth. 

Mr. Grimes is a son of Guy Carlton and Mary 
Aline (Woodbury) Grimes, his father a successful 
merchant, who departed this life in 1878, and is yet 
(1922) survived by his widow, who continues her 
residence in Lawrence. 

Elias Eben Grimes was bom in Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, September 13, 1866, in which year his 
parents moved to the nearby dty of Lawrence, as 
before stated. He was educated in the public 
schools, obtaining a good education. Having been 
left fatherless at the age of seven, he was early 
thrown upon his own resources. After leaving 
school he was variously employed, but finally was 
attracted to the plumbing business, and in 1888, 
fizBt formed an association with W. F. Rutter, 
steam fitter and plumber of Lawrence. He con- 
tinued in Mr. Butter's employ until 1897, when 
he was admitted to a partnership in the firm of 
W. F. Rutter A Company. This old business, 
started in Lawrence more than a half century ago 
(1869), has prospered and expended until the con- 
tracting operations of the firm extend beyond the 
limits of its home dty, and they are well known 
over a large section of New England as rdiable 
contractor of steam fitting and plumbing, and 
dealers in mill supplies. In 1908 the firm under- 
went reorganization owing to death, and has since 
operated as Bride, Grimes A Company. 

Mr. Grimes is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce; Phoenician Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Mt. Sinai Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 
all bodies of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish 
Rite (in which he holds the thirty-second degree) ; 
Aleppo Temple, Andent Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine; Lawrence Lodge, No. 65, Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Lawrence 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; the 
Home Club; Merrimac Valley Country Club; and 
the City Mission. 

On December 18, 1888, Mr. Grimes married Car- 
rie M. Rutter, daughter of W. F. Rutter, of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, and they are the parents of 
three daughters: Bertha A.; Mildred L., wife of 
Arthur Sweeney, of Lawrence; and Caroline R. The 
family are members of Trinity Congregational 
Church, of Lawrence, Massachusetts. 



CORA ELIZABETH ABBOTT— The first wo- 
man judge to adorn the bench in a court of gen- 
eral jurisdiction in dvU and criminal cases, has 
said: "A woman's place is as much in the law as 
in the home. The entrance of woman into other 
fields of activity can but demonstrate that her 
latent capabilities are unmined gold, that the world 
can not afford to be without." The legal profes- 
sion of Lawrence, Massachusetts, in March, 1920, 
welcomed the coming of a share in the "mined 
gold" of womanhood in the person of Miss Cora 



Elisabeth Abbott, for during that month she quietly 
began the practice of law in that city. Those who 
know her are expecting great things, for she has 
the legal mind, the personality and vigor, the many 
sided ability that makes for success. 

Miss Abbott was bom at Andover, Massachu- 
setts, November 12, 1897, the second of seven chil- 
dren. Her parents were Freeman R. Abbott* a 
native of Marshalltown, Nova Scotia, Canada, bom 
February 10, 1867, and Isabella Sellers (Graham) 
Abbott, bom in Manchester, New Hampshire, Janu* 
ary 18, 1871. They were farmers, and perhaps it 
ia partly due to that f^tct that Miss Abbott had 
that force and strength that carried her up the 
steps to her chosen work. Her eariy education came 
from the graded schools and high school ftrom 
which she watf graduated in the class of 1918. En- 
tering the law department of Boston Umversity, 
she spent three years there, and was graduated in 
1919 with the d^;ree of Bachelor of Laws. The 
next year saw h^ admitted to the Massachusetts 
Bar at Boston and almost at once she began the 
conducting of a general law practice in Lawrence. 
She located her headquarters in tJie Bay State 
building, Lawrence^ sharing the ofilces of Cregg ft 
Cregg. The peculiar fitness she has shown in the 
settlement of certain legal difAcultieSy the dieimt^ 
ness and efficiency with which she attacks any 
problem, and her womanliness without sentimental- 
ity, have won for her high standing among her 
associates. 

Besides being a member of the Essex County and 
Lawrence Bar associations she is active as an alum- 
nus of the Boston Law School. She belongs to the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the American Legion, and 
to the Crystal Rebekah Lodge, No. 85, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically she is a 
Republican, and in March, 1922, was a candidate 
for selectman in the town of Andover. Her re- 
ligious affiliations are with the Congregational 
church. She resides in Andover, Massachusetts. 



RICHARD B. LARKIN, prominent dentist of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom at Greorgetown, 
May 10, 1886, son of Charles O. and Josephine 
(Kehoe) Laridn. The former was engaged in the 
painting business until his death in 1917. Mrs. 
Kehoe was a native of Medford, Massachusetts. 

Richard B. Larkin attended the public schools 
and prepared for Tufts College, where he gradu- 
ated in 1912. Immediately he engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession in Haverhill and has almost 
completed his first decade of a successful profes- 
sional career. 

FratemaUy, Dr. Larkin is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, and of the Agawam Club. 
During the Worid War, 1917-18, he v^as in active 
service and participated in seversd of the important 
Liberty bond. Red Cross and Y. M. C. A. drives. 

In 1910 Dr. Larkin married Greta Morse, and 
their children are: Thelma L., and Bainbridge M. 
Larkin. They are attendants of the First Baptist 
Church of Georgetown. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



103 



HARRY CLIFFORD NORTHROP— WeU known 
throusrhout the city as an expert accountant, Harry 
Clifford Northrop abo holds a prominent place 
in the public regard as a citizen who is ever willing 
and ready to give his aid to whatever pertains to 
the welfare of the community. 

Harry Clifford Northrop was bom in New Ha- 
ven, Connecticut, his birth having occurred there 
April 8, 1887. He is the son of Edwin N. and 
Edith (Richards) Northrop, the former superin- 
tendent of the Boys' Club of Lynn. When Harry 
C. Northrop was very young he was brought by 
his parents to Worcester, Massachusetts, and here 
he pursued his studies in the local grammar schools, 
subsequently removing to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
where he was graduated from the East Division 
Hi|^ School, with the class of 1905. He then 
matriculated at the University of Wisconsin, where 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts, subse* 
quently becoming associated with the Milwaukee 
''Sentinel,'' and later with the Duluth "Tribune," 
but this was only a means to an end and in 1913 
he came to Lynn, where he took a course at the 
Lynn branch of the Buidett Business College in 
bookkeeping, accounting and law. At the comple- 
tion of this course he was appointed an instruc- 
tor of mathematics and bookkeeping at the Thibe- 
deau Business College of Fall River, Massachu- 
setts, but resigned one year later to accept a posi- 
tion as head of the commercial department of the 
Winchester High School, of Winchester, Massachu- 
setts, and while teaching here, took courses even- 
ings at the Northeastern College of Boston in ac- 
counting and law. 

In April, 1917, at the outbreak of the World 
War, Mr. Northrop was appointed secretary and 
business manager of the Army Young Men's Chris- 
tion Association and was stationed at Camp Greene, 
North Carolina. Here he remained until Decem- 
ber, 1917, when he enlisted as a private in the 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry and was subsequent- 
ly transferred to the intelligence department and 
soon promoted to battalion sergeant-major. Receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge from the service in 
March, 1918, Mr. Northrop was appointed auditor 
in the income tax department of the Internal Rev- 
enue at Washington and was here until January, 
1920, when he resigned. Returning immediately to 
L3nin, he opened an office on his own account in 
the Talbot building, but a short time later, how- 
ever, he formed a partnership with Frank A. Le- 
gro (see following sketch). 

Mr. Northrop is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce. He affiliates with Bethlehem Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Beloit Chapter, No. 
9, Royal Arch Masons; Old Essex Chapter, Sons 
of the American Revolution; Post No. 6, American 
Legion; Acacia fraternity; and is a steward in the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church of Lynn. He is 
also deputy commissioner of the Boy Scouts of 
hyrm, and his clubs are the Oxford and the Swamp- 
scott Masonic. 

On September 10, 1919, Hairy Clifford Northrop 
was united in marriage with Bertha C. Christen- 



bury, daughter of Dr. Sidney J. and Frances (Can- 
non) Christenbury, of Davidson, North Carolina. 
Mr. and Mrs. Northrop are the parents of one 
child, Frances Edith, bom October 11, 1920. 



FRANK ALBERT LEGRO, a member of the firm 
of Northrop & Legro, public accountants and tax 
advisors, with offices at No. 383 Union street, Lynn* 
Massachusetts, was bom at Lynn, August 4, 189L 
the son of Frederick W. and Mary (Elizabeth) 
Legro, both natives of Lynn. 

The elementary portion of the lad's education 
was obtained in the public schools of hia native 
city, and after graduating from the local high school 
he entered the Salem Commercial School where he 
took a course in law and accounting. Immediat^y 
after graduating, he secured a position with the Sor- 
osis Shoe Company as bookkeeper, but resigned 
from this position the following year and beoune 
associated with the Consolidated Electric Lamp 
Company of Danvers, Massachusetts, as manager. 
He remained with this concern for fkv% years and 
during this time was transferred many times, once 
to the position as manager of the Western ter- 
ritory, covering the ground from the Mississippi 
river to the Pacific Qcean and to Northwestern 
Canada. His connection with this company ter- 
minated at the beginning of the Worid War, when 
he became senior cost accountant under civil ser- 
vice in the bureau of aircraft production. But he 
was not destined to remain at this post long, for 
his efficiency h&ng readily proven, he was appointed 
special assistant to the United States District Aud- 
itor of the Shipping Board and the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation. At the expiration of the war he 
secured a position as auditor for the Garfield A 
Procter Wholesale Coal Company of Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, subsequently resigning to establish 
himself as a public accountant. He opened an 
office on Union street, Lynn, having in the mean- 
time determined to begin his private business career 
in his native city, but he later discontinued this 
and engaged in partnership with Harry C. North- 
rop, under the firm name of Northrop & Legro (see 
preceding sketch). 

Mr. Legro is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and as a citizen is held in the highest re- 
gard by the community. He is a charter member 
of the Lynn Kiwanis Club, and also affiliates with 
Ark Lodge, No. 176, of Minnesota, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Royal Arch Chapter, No. 53, Royal 
Arch Masons; the Swampscott Masonic Club; and 
Victory Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, of 
Swampscott. 

On July 26, 1915, Frank A. Legro was united in 
marriage with Edith T. Haines, daughter of Robert 
and Hannah (Trefry) Haines, of Marblehead, Mas- 
sachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Legro are the parents of 
three children: Mary Elizabeth, bom October 16, 
1916; Edith Haines, bom December 22, 1917; Wil- 
mer Somers, bom April 18, 1919. 



ARTHUR E. LEACH, city auditor, and former- 
ly associated with the Haverhill "Bulletin," was 



104 



ESSEX COUNTY 



bom in Hayerhill, Massachusetts, November 25, 
1856, the son of James and Ellen (Carlton) Leach, 
both originally of Derry, New Hampshire. His 
father, who died in 1890, was identified with the 
shoe manufacturing industry, which connection ex- 
plains why the family took up residence in Haver- 
hill, where Arthur E. was bom, 

Arthur E. Leach attended the common schools 
of Haverhill, and eventually the high school, which 
after passing through he seems to have decided 
upon a pharmaceutical career. For three years he 
was employed in a local drug store, but then be- 
came connected with the local newspaper, the 
Haverhill ''Bulletin." He leamed the printer's 
trade, and for twelve years was foreman of the 
'^Bulletin'* plant. He vms elected auditor and assist^ 
ant city clerk in 1892, holding these positions until 
1896, when the offices were divided and he has 
held the office of auditor ever since. 

Fraternally, Mr. Leach is affiliated with the 
local lodge of Red Men, and religiously is a Congre* 
gationalist, a member of the Congregational diurch 
of Haverhill. 

Mr. Leach married, in 1880, Annie M. Slanders, 
daui^ter of Burton and Mary Elisabeth (West) 
Flanders, of Haverhill. They have two children: 
Roland E., and Harland E. 



HSRBBRT W. MANAHAN, M. D., for the past 
twenty-eight years a prominent physician of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, has attained a leading posi- 
tion in the medical profession of Essex county. 

Dr. Manahan was bom in Lawrence, on February 
11, 1868, and is a son of Mark and Emily Manahan. 
Mark Mapahan was bom in Deering, New Hamp- 
shire, and lived there until he was about twenty 
years of age. He was reared on a farm, but later 
engaged in the grocery business on his own ac- 
count in Lawrence, being thus engaged from 1866 
until he retired in 1884. He died May 31, 1921, 
aged eighty-six years. In his earlier years he took 
an active interest in politics; he was a Republican, 
and served in the City Council in 1869 and 1870. 
His wi£e, Emily Manahan, now (1922) resides in 
South Lawrence. 

Beginning his education in the public schools of 
his native city, Dr. Manahan later entered Harvard 
University Medical School, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1893. He began the 
general practice of medicine in the same year at 
his present address, and has practiced continuously 
there since, with excellent success, now holding a 
prominent position in the profession, as well as 
enjoying the confidence of the people. 

Dr. Manahan is a member of Phoenician Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, and the Lawrence Medical 
Club. He is senior visiting surgeon at the Law- 
rence Creneral Hospital. 

Dr. Manahan ilnds his greatest relaxation in 
music. For three years after leaving high school 
he studied the organ and related subjects at the 
New Eni^and Conservatory of Music at Boston. 
He has been church organist for more than thirty*' 



four years, now serving the South Congregational 
Church of South Lawrence in that capacity. He is 
the author of "Four Sacred Songs." During the 
World War Dr. Manahan served on the Draft Board 
in District No. 1. 

On September 18, 1893, Dr. Manahan married 
Wilhelmina Hanson, daughter of Jacob Hanson, of 
Wolfboro, New Hampshire, and they have one son 
and one daughter: Ralph, who is a student at the 
Museum of Fine Arts in Boston; and EmOy, now a 
high school student in Lawrence. 



HARRY RHBBSB LAWRBNCB is a self-made 
man of the sort that is the life blood of a com- 
munity. The fact of being self-made may mean 
little, as file job done may be the work of a poor 
artisan; but when one, having simply the advantages 
of a public school training, so educates himsdf as 
to be fitted to teach in tiie schools of his youth, 
when a boy, who has no high school preparation, 
yet prepares himself for a university graduation 
and degree, and when a man, by sheer grit and 
persevering use of his own native abili^, becomes 
a distinguished lawyer, a leader of men, a power 
for uplift and good fellowship throughout a State, 
then esteem and honor must be, and is, given to 
this self-made man. 

Mr. Lawrence had a father of whom he may be 
justly proud and from whose life no doubt he 
drew inspiration in his own career. His mother, 
Mary Farwell (Patterson) Lawrence, who was bom 
in South Merrimack, New Hampshire, and died in 
1915, was one of those ilne homelovers whose quiet 
influence means so much in the lives of their chil- 
dren. His father, Charles Alva Lawrence, bom in 
Claremont, New Hampshire, August 9, 1829, and 
dying in 1894, was interested in the photographic 
profession in Lawrence, Massachusetts. He was a 
well known veteran of the Civil War, having en- 
listed at its very beginning in the Seventh New 
Hampshire Infantry. He saw active service almost 
from his enlistment, for the regiment was hurried 
into line and Mr. Lawfence fought in the majoi^ 
ity of the great battles of the war. He rose step 
by ste pto the rank of captain, and how dashing a 
leader of his men he was, may be judged from the 
fact that the most noted possession of Needham 
Post, No. 89, Grand Army of the Republic, of the 
city, is the enemy flag taken by Mr. Lawrence at 
the time of the assault at Wagner. On the far 
south battlefleld of Olustee, Florida, he was in 
command of the regiment that covered the Union 
retreat, having less than flfty men of his own regi- 
ment when he got in that night. Before Peters- 
burg, he received a wound in his left hand that 
nearly incapacitated him. Recovering, however, he 
was in until the end, being mustered out at Con- 
cord, New Hampshire, in 1866, Captain of Company 
D, 7th New Hampshire Infantry. He was also 
wounded on two other occasions. 

Harry Rheese Lawr^ice was bom at Nashu^ 
New Hampshire, November 18, 1878, and received 
his schooling in the public schools of Lawrence. 
The greater part of his education* however, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



105 



the self-taught one that came later. To 80ch good 
end did he educate himself, that f^m 1897 to 1900 
he was a teacher in the evening schools of his 
dty. From 1894 to October, 1897, he was con- 
nected with the editorial department of the Law- 
rence "Sun," and continued with that paper until 
1901. Meanwhile he was making ready for his real 
aim in life, that of practicing law, and the year 
1897 found him in Boston University, from which 
he wafl( graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in 1900. Admitted to the Bar at Boston in 
1900, he opened an office in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, the same year, later changing his offices to 
the Bay State building. Mr. Lawrence, in the years 
that followed, built for himself a constantly en- 
larging practice by his many-sided abilities, his 
strict integrity and conscientious devotion to the 
cause of his clients. 

He is a member of the Bar associations of Essex 
county and Lawrence. Mr. Lawrence is weU known 
throughout the State by reason of his interest in 
the Knights of Pythias. He is not only a member 
of the Black Prince Lodge, but is grand chancellor 
for that organixation for the State of Massachu- 
setts. This is not, however, the limit of his fra- 
ternal interests as he belongs to Phoenician Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Mi. Sinai 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence Council, 
Royal and Select Masters; Bethany Commandery, 
Slnights Templar; and Aleppo Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Some 
of his other memberships are in The Home Club 
and the Lawrence British Society. He was chair- 
man of Republican City Commission for a year, was 
a member for a number of years, and also served 
as its secretary. He also served on the commis- 
sion to assess taxes on the Essex county dam — the 
first time it was ever taxed. He with his family 
are members of the Baptist church. During the 
World War he served on the legal advisory board 
and did the work of a stalwart as one of the famous 
''four-minute" speakers who did so much to give, 
and make clear, truths and facts needed by the 
people. 

In 1908 Mr. Lawrence married Cora B. Smith, 
daughter of Charles Henzy and Clara Belle 
(Knowles) Smith. All are natives of Lawrence and 
for many years Mr. Smith has been in the express 
business there. ____^__^ 

ARTHUR DBXTER FOWLER, of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, whose law practice is demanding constant 
attention, was bom in Salem, September 26, 1897, 
and is a son of Arthur B. and Carrie (Ashby) Fow- 
ler. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of his native city, he was graduated from the Salem 
High School in the class of 1915, then entered Bos- 
ton University, from which institution he was grad- 
uated in 1918, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Admitted to the bar in 1919, he immediately there- 
after became associated witii Hannigan it Fox, a 
prominent firm of attorneys in Boston, in the prac- 
tice of law, with offices at Barristers Hall, later, 



however, taking up practice in Salem, at No. 256)6 
Essex street, the firm name being Coffey Sc Fowler. 

In May, 1918, Mr. Fowler enlisted in the United 
States navy, receiving his discharge before the end 
of the same year. He was stationed on Submarine 
Patrol Boat No. 581. 

Mr. Fowler is a member of Essex Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and of the Now and Then 
Club, of Salem. He finds his favorite relaxation in 
music, and his religious faith is the Universalist. 



HARRY B. THOMAS--One of the leading manu- 
facturers of shoes in the great shoe center of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, is Hairy B. Thomas, of the widely- 
known firm of V. K. A I. H. Jones A Thomas Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Thomas was bom in Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, September 24, 1876, and is a son of John H. 
and Mary (Tyler) Thomas, long residents of that 
dty. 

Gaining a practical education in the public schools 
of his native place, and the English High School of 
Boston, Massachusetts, Mr. Thomas chose the shoe 
industry as his field of endeavor, and started to 
learn the business. He was employed first as office 
boy in a shoe factory, then went into. the packing 
department, and one after another mastered the 
problems of each department by the method of ac- 
tually handling the work. Thereafter, he spent 
ten years as a shoe salesman, following this experi- 
ence with fifteen years in association with the A. E* 
Little Company, having been a director in this com* 
pany. 

With this comprehensive and thorough training 
Mr, Thomas became a member of the present firm 
in 1920, and is taking an active part in the man- 
agement of the long established and constantly 
growing business. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Thomas is prominent, be- 
ing a member of many bodies of the Masonic order. 
He is also a member of the Swampscott Masonic 
Club. His religious convictions place his member- 
ship with the Universalist church. 

On June 16, 1902, Mr. Thomas married Ruth A. 
Medlar, daughter of James and Elizabeth Medlar, 
of Fockford, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have 
three children: Russell P., bom August 16, 1906; 
Norman C, bom February 8, 1910; and Harriet, 
bom February 7, 1914. 



CHARLES SUMNER BATCHELDER^Work- 
ing up to a position of broad responsibility in the 
financial world of Peabody, Massachusetts, Charies 
Sumner Batchelder has become one of the solid men 
in the banking field, and a leading citizen of this 
town. 

Mr. Batchelder is a son of Cyrus Tucker and 
Clarissa Batchelder, long residents of Essex county. 
He was bom on May 22, 1858, and received a prac- 
tical education in the public schools of Salem, his 
birthplace. Looking forward to a business career 
since early boyhood, he started life as dexic at the 
Wanen National Bsjik of Peabody. He entered the 



106 



ESSEX COUNTY 



employ of this institution in 1874, when only six- 
teen years of age, and is now cashier of this bank. 

Thus briefly is a life-history outlined, but in such 
a review the sterling qualities which go into the 
structure of success may not always be set forth in 
detailed estimate. Tenacity of purpose, clarity of 
judgment, tireless industry, unimpeachable integ- 
rity, all these are the elements of success by which 
the ambitious youth achieves a position of honor 
and trust, and as i^ man of mature years, holds the 
respect and esteem of his associates and the public 
at large. Since 1905 cashier of the Warren Na- 
tional Bank, the institution in which he has spent 
his lifetime, Mr. Batchelder is looked upon in Pea- 
body as one of the leading financiers of the day. 
As such he was some years ago elected director of 
the Peabody Co-Operative Bank, one of the most 
progressive institutions of this nature in Essex 
county. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Batchelder is well known. 
He la a member of the Free and Accepted Masons 
and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Batchelder married Mabel S. Pierce, dan|^- 
ter of George and Almira G. Pierce, of Peabody. 
Mr. and Mrs. Batchelder have four children, two 
sons and two daughters: Arthur P., now a certi- 
fied public accountant, of Boston; Alice, the wife of 
Tracy Thomas, wholesale produce dealer of Lynn, 
their two children being Ruth and Charies Batchel- 
der; Harold Porter, now in the employ of the Gor- 
ham Manufacturing Company, of Providence, 
Rhode Island; and Ruth, at home. 



JAMES KIRTLAND SBLDEN was bom on Jan- 
uary 1, 1894, at Lawrence, Massachusetts, and ib a 
son of George Lord Selden, the founder of the Sel- 
den Worsted Mills, and Mabel (Kidder) Selden. 
George Lord Selden was bom at Hadlyme, Connec- 
ticut, on August 12, 1845. He served as an officer 
of the United States navy for a period of six years. 
Upon his retirement from the navy he became as- 
sociated with the management of the Amoskeag 
Mills at Manchester, New Hampshire. He later be- 
came connected with the Arlington Mills as super- 
intendent of the worsted department, and in 1903 
established the Selden plant at Methuen, Massachu- 
setts, for the manufacture of high grade worsted 
cloth. He died at Andover in 1919. He was a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order at Norwich, Connecticut, 
and a member of the Army and Navy Club of New 
York City. 

James Kirtland Selden received his eariy educa- 
tion in the public schools of Massachusetts. He 
proceeded to Phillips Academy at Andover, and 
from there to Harvard University. He graduated 
from Harvardd in 1916, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. After leaving the university Mr. Selden 
joined the First Massachusetts National Guard. In 
1916 he enlisted in the Fifth Field Artillery, United 
States army, and was sent to the Mexican border, 
where he served under General Pershing. When his 
service in the artillery came to an end he spent a 
year at the Lowell Textile School. During the 



World War, he served as an instructor in the Army 
Aviation Corps for two years. He was assigned to 
duty in the United States, and was not sent over- 
seas. 

In 1918 Mr. Selden became connected with the 
Selden Worsted Mills, of which he became treasuirer 
shortly afterwards, and also takes an active part in 
the management of its affairs. Mr. Selden is a 
member of the American Legion; and St. Matthews 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Andover. 
Mr. Selden married Ann Helton Everett, daaghter 
of Edward Everett, of Bennington, Vermont 



JOHN P. STEVENS— Among the leading shoe 
manufacturers of Massachusetts must be included 
John P. Stevens, of the firm of Burley A Stevens, 
of Newburyport, the plant of which company finds 
employment for about four hundred of the people 
of that place, and which plant is distinctive for an- 
other reason. In addition to, or perhaps because 
of, its being one of the most modem factories in 
New En^^and, it is stated that the woridng condi- 
tions therein cannot be surpassed by those of any 
other shoe factory in Essex county, light and air 
and congenial woridng conditions bdng the aim of 
the management and extreme cleanliness the motto 
of all employees at the Buriey A Stevens plant. 

Mr. Stevens was bom in Peabody, Massachusetts, 
on June 8, 1867, son of Jacob B. and Elizabeth S. 
(Burley) Stevens, both of Wakefield, New Hamp- 
shire. The father was a farmer, and died in 1917, 
but the mother is still living. 

John P. Stevens spent his eariy life in Peabody, 
there attending elementary school, and later enter- 
ing Dummer Academy for a period of two years. 
Soon thereafter he found employment in the shoe 
factory of his uncle. The plant was originally at 
Milton, New Hampshire, and when established was 
a partnership, the trading name being Buriey & 
Usher. After Mr. Usher withdrew the firm name 
became Burley & Stevens. Mr. Stevens was ad- 
mitted into the firm in 1890, and the plant was then 
removed to Newbursrport. In 1906 the company 
was reorganized, then taking corporate powers, Mr. 
Burley becoming president and Mr. Stevens treas- 
urer. Thus constituted, the company continued op- 
erations until 1909, when Mr. Burley died. His 
place as president of the company was taken by 
Jacob B. Stevens, father of John P. Stevens. A 
further change became necessary eight years later, 
in 1917, when Jacob B. Stevens died. The elections 
then made have held to the present, John P. Ste- 
vens being president and treasurer; Charles A. 
Morin, vice-president; and George N. Foster, assist- 
ant treasurer and secretary. 

The plant is one of the largest in Essex county, 
having a capacity production of 3,500 pairs of shoes 
a day and an estimated floor space of 100,000 
square feet. The company specializes in men's and 
girls' welt shoes, and, as before stated, the condi- 
tions that prevail between employers and employees 
at that factory are as co-operative and congenial as 
they can be made. 



<^*r:^^-^JCe., 



litct^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



107 



Mr. Stevens haa given clear indication that he 
is a business man of enterprise and ability, and of 
late years his place as a capitalist has brought him 
into connection with several other enterprises. He 
is a director of the First National Bank of New- 
buryport, and of the following named Boston com- 
panies: The Cotton and Woolen Mutual Insurance 
Company; the Industrial Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany; and the Rubber Manufacturing Company. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, a member of all bodies 
up to and including the Shrine. 

Mr. Stevens gives close attention to business af- 
fairs, but he nevertheless finds time to devote to 
'Other matters. His main hobby is the breeding of 
blooded cattle. He owns a valuable herd, and finds 
{Measure in following that hobby. The incentive 
probably came to him from his father, who years 
«go was a well known cattle dealer. 



GBORGB N. FOSTER has for more than twenty- 
five years been responsibly connected with a lead- 
ing shoe manufacturing concern of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, and has made many friends in that 
place. 

Mr. Foster was bom on December 18, 1868, at 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, the son of John F. and 
Mary A. (Norris) Foster, of that town, and his 
genealogy connects with the famous Foster family 
of that seafaring center. 

John F. Foster, father of George N. Foster, was 
also a man of worthy Civil War record. Bom in 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, he naturally foUowed 
maritime occupations, both before and after the 
Civil War. He was a captain of a Gloucester ves- 
sel for many years prior to his death, which came 
in 1886. Since the battle of Fredericksburg, in 
1862, he had to get along as well as he could with 
only one arm, his right arm being amputated at the 
shoulder soon after that battle. He was wounded 
while valiantly stepping into the breach to act as 
color bearer in place of the regimental bearer, who 
had turned up missing. In later life he was well 
known and esteemed in Gloucester, and he and his 
wife were the parents of eight children, seven of 
whom were sons, George N. being the sixth-bom. 
Their mother survived her husband for more than 
thirty years, death not coming untO 1918. 

George N. Foster was educated in the public 
schools of Gloucester. After leaving school, how- 
ever, he seems to have had no inclination for the 
sea. For four years after leaving school he worked 
for Preston Friend, a grocer of Gloucester, after 
which he went to Brockton, Massachusetts, and en- 
tered a shoe factory. There for a year he worked 
for Howard Rainolds, and for two years for W. L. 
Douglas. For a further two years he was foreman 
in the plant of F. M. Hoyt, at Raymond, New 
Hampshire. After a year as foreman for N. B. 
Thayer, at Milton, New Hampshire, he came to 
Newburyport. That was in 1895, and he has re- 
mained in the town ever since, being associated for 
the whole of the time with the firm of Burley & 
Stevens (see preceding sketch of John P. Stevens) , 



first as foreman, later as superintendent, and even- 
tually as secretary and assistant treasurer, which 
are his present capacities. He is a man of strong 
reliability, and has many firm friends among those 
who know him well. He does not enter much into 
public affairs, but he is identified with a couple of 
fraternal orders, the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Foster married, in 1899, Angeline Knight, of 
a South Elliott, Maine, family, the daughter of Al- 
bert J. and Adeline (Dixon) Elnight, the former 
bom in 1829, died in 1911; the latter bom in 1832, 
and died in 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Foster have two 
children: George Norris, Jr., bom in 1902; and Gor- 
don, now deceased, bom in 1903, died in 1910. 



DR. MATTHIAS V. BRIDGES was bom in New- 
ark, Nebraska, April 23, 1888, the son of Jacob A. 
and Arvilla (Ferris) Bridges. He attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native place until he was nine 
years of age, when he moved with his parents to 
Foxboro, Massachusetts, where he continued his 
education, and subsequently, after graduating from 
the high school, matriculated at the Massachusetts 
College of Pharmacy, Boston, graduating in the 
class of 1906. That same year he removed to Prov- 
idence and established himself in the drug business 
there, but two years later sold out this enterprise 
and removed to Bristol, Rhode Island, where he 
opened another drug store and continued here with 
success until 1916. Having in the meantime be- 
come greatly interested in osteopathy, he deter- 
mined to adopt that profession, so, accordingly, he 
sold out his business and went to Kirksville, Mis- 
souri, where he entered the American School of 
Osteopathy, and three years later, having completed 
his course, he was graduated with the degree of 
D. O., in 1918. He then entered the Des Moines 
College of Osteopathy, where he remained for one 
year, specializing in proctology, and diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat. That same year, 1920, 
he returned to Providence and established himself in 
the practice of his profession, but he did not re- 
main long at this location, leaving in June of that 
year and coming to Lawrence, and it is here, at his 
present location, No. 351 Essex street, that Dr. 
Bridges has continued to practice. He is ardently 
devoted to his profession, and that he has chosen 
wisely is proven by the fact of the large clientele 
whose confidence he has gained. He is now giving 
much of his time to the organizing of an osteopathic 
society in Lawrence. He is affiliated with the Amer- 
ican Osteopathic Association, the Knights of Py- 
thias, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

On Augn^st 24, 1910, Dr. Bridges was united in 
marriage with Virginia R. Hodges, a native of Med- 
way, Massachusetts, and the daughter of John S. 
Hodges, who is proprietor of large nurseries at 
Medway. Dr. and Mrs. Bridges are the parents of 
two children: Russell Howard, bom September 9, 
1911; and Greorge Albert, born September 19, 1921. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bridges are members of the Con- 
gregational church. 



108 



ESSEX COUNTY 



JOHN H. O'NEIL — ^Among the younger men in 
the legal profession m Essex county, Mapsachu- 
settSy John H. O'Neil, of Danvers, is going forward 
to success. Mr. O'Neil was bcm in Danvers, in 
1889, and is a son of Eugene O'Neil, who was eon- 
nected with the Danvers Gas Company for many 
years prior to the removal of the gas works to 
Beverly, Massachusetts. 

Beginning his education in the public schools of 
Danvers, the young man attended Worcester Acad- 
emy, then, having chosen the law as a field of 
effort, he entered Harvard University, where he 
continued for a year and a half, then completed his 
studies at Boston University Law School, from 
which he was graduated in 1918. He was immedi- 
ately thereafter admitted to the Massachusetts bar, 
and later licensed to practice in the United States 
District courts. 

The war, however, deferred Mr. O'Neil's pez^ 
manent entrance into the field of his chosen work. 
He enrolled at Boston, passed the examinations for 
a commission at Annapolis, and was made pay- 
master in the United States navy. He served for 
four years at Bay Ridge, New York, and on the 
U. S. S. ''Don Juan de Austria,'' a navy gunboat. 

Returning to his native city, Mr.- O'Nefl began 
the practice of law in Danvers, and is now a force 
for progress in the profession in this city. He is 
a member of the Massachusetts Bar Association, 
of the Essex County Bar Association, and of the 
Salem Bar Association. He is interested in every 
phase of public progress, and is a member of the 
finance committee of the town of Danvers. He 
also is a member of the Knights of Columbus. 

On June 80, 1920, Mr. O'NeO married Kathleen 
Sullivan, a graduate of Raddiffe College, class of 
1917. 

FRED H. HYDB, a progressive citizen of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, was bom August 28, 1876, at 
Hampstea-1, New Hampshire, son of George H. and 
Annie E. (Knight) Hyde. The former was a na- 
tive of Durham, New Hampshire, and was engaged 
in the shoe iiidustry. His wife was also of New 
Hampshire, bom in Atkinson. 

Fred H. Hyde attended the schools of his na- 
tive place and then went to work on a farm. After 
a few years he came to Haverhill, where he worked 
in the shoe factory of F. E. Levitt £ Company. 
Soon after he began to auctioneer, as leisure time 
permitted, and this work developed rapidly. In 
1909 he established himself in business under the 
name of Fred H. Hyde, real estate agent and auc- 
tioneer. Mr. Hyde has now passed several very 
successful years and is well esteemed among his 
fellow-citizens. He is a member of the Junior Or- 
der United American Mechanics; the Loyal Order 
of Moose; Ancient Order United Workmen; and 
the Wachussett Club. From 1905 to 1906 Mr. 
Hyde served as a member of the City Council and 
was nominated for alderman in 1907. He married, 
in 1898, Nellie J. Hooke, daughter of Charies B. 
and Helen F. (Morrill) Hooke. Mrs. Hyde'a father 



was bom on the "Old Marshall Farm," at Ma*^ 
shall's Comer, Brentwood, New Hampshiirey later 
moving to Exeter, New Hampshire. After having 
been graduated from Phillip's Exeter Academy be 
was affiliated with his father in the Exeter Brass 
Foundry. Mrs. Hyde's mother was a Maasaehu- 
setts girl, bom in Amesbury. 

Mrs. Nellie J. (Hooke) Hyde was bom in San- 
down, New Hampshire, receiving her education in 
the public schools of Derry, New Hampahiret, fin- 
ishing at Pinkerton Academy. For the past twelve 
years she has conducted a successful insurance busi- 
ness, with offices in the Academy of Music build- 
ing, Merrimack street, Haverhill, Massachusetts. 
She succeeded to the business of Amos W. Down- 
ing & Company, Amos W. Downing havin^^ b^ 
Queathed the business to her at the time of his 
death. Mrs. Hyde is a member of the Mooseheart 
Legion, the auxiliary to the Loyal Order of Moose, 
and of the Daughters of America, auxiliary to the 
Junior Order United American Mechanics; and of 
Minnewawa Council, No. 22, Degree of Pocahon- 
tas. Before taking up active business Ufe Mrs. 
Hyde was prominent in musical circles. She was 
one of the first ladies of Haverhill to enter into 
politics, having been a candidate for the nomina- 
tion of alderman in 1920 and 1921. 

The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Hyde» Eaxl C. 
Hyde, was bom in Haverhill, Massaehusetts, in 
1900. He enlisted in the Aviation Corps during the 
World War; was graduated from Haverliill Hi|^ 
School in 1919, and from Westbrook Sleminary, 
Woodfords, Maine, class of 1920. He is now a 
student of New Hsmpshhe State College. 



FREDERICK HUNTLEY MAGI80N, one of 

the foremost lawyers of Essex county, Ifaasschii- 
setts, was bom June 26, 1880, in Mooers, Clinton 
county, New York, son of James C. and Lueretia 
(Huntley) Magison of that place. James C. Magi- 
son, a farmer by occupation, was a member of 
the Fifth Vermont Volunteer Infantry* Sixth 
Corps, serving all through the Civil War, taking 
part in twenty-six battles, and was wounded twice 
in action; he received his discharge in 1865 with 
the rank of corporal. He was a member of !• L- 
Rock Post, No. 49, Grand Army of the Republic 
Mr. Magison died in 1911, his wife surviving him 
for seven years. 

The history of Frederick H. Magison is ^^ 
history of a self-made man and therefore inter- 
esting. He attended the public schools and after 
leaving school came to Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
where he found employment in shoe factories, and 
during this time went to night schooL In 1900 
he went to Montreal and there attended the Mon- 
treal Business College, where he graduated in 1902. 
Returning to Haverhill, Mr. Magison obtained a 
position as stenographer with the Boston A Maine 
Railroad Company, remaining there until 1904, at 
which time he became cashier of the railroad in 
Haverhill. In 1906 he began to study law at the 
Young Men's Christian Association Law School 



~i^^^,j-L^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



109 



in Boston* doing this in the evenings, continuing 
to hold his position with the nulroad» and four 
years later he receired his degree and was ad- 
mitted to the Massachusetts bar. UntU the fall of 
the same year he continued to hold his position 
with the railroad, resigning at that time to devote 
his entire attention to his legal work. He entered 
Harvard University to take a post-graduate course 
in the class of 1911, and after completing it, en- 
tered the office of Walter I. Badger, where he re- 
mained for two years. In 1916 he engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Haverhill, entering 
into partnership with the already established firm 
of Peters it Cole. Later, upon the death of these 
men, Mr. Magison continued alone to carry on the 
linn's business and in this he has been admirably 
successful. He enjoys an enviable reputation 
among his legal brethren, and is a prominent 
member of the Haverhill bar. 

It is to be expected that a man of his attain- 
ments would be prominent in public life, and sev- 
eral times Mr. Magison has capably filled respon- 
sible offices. During the years 1914 and 1915 he 
was a member of the Legislatuze of Massachu- 
setts, and in 1916 was elected city solicitor, which 
office he continues to hold to the present time. 
Fraternally, Mr. Magison is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias of Haverhill; a member of 
tiie Pentueket Club; the Men's Club of the Center 
Congregational Church; the Haverhill Bar Asso- 
ciation, and the Essex Bar Association. 

Mr. Magison married, in 1911, Eleanor Rowell, 
of Hiaverhill, and they attend the Center Congre- 
gational Church, aiding in its support 

BENJAMIN F. SARGENT, prominent business 
man and banker of Amesbury, Massachusetts, was 
bom in West Amesbury, November 5, 1858, son 
of Benjamin F. and Julia W. (Williams) Sargent. 
The public schools of his native town afforded 
him his early education and he later attended 
Phillips- Andover Academy. At the age of twenty- 
two years he started to learn the trade of carriage 
making, serving his apprenticeship and working his 
way up rapidly in this business, and eventually 
becoming part owner of E. S. Fletch it Company, 
builders of fine carriages. He continued with this 
firm until 1919 in which year it was dissolved. At 
this same time Mr. Sargent became a director 
of the Pawow River National Bank of Amesbury 
and was elected president of this institution in 
1920; which office he now holds. He is also a direc- 
tor of the Electric Light Company. 

On October 21, 1883, Mr. Sargent married Marie 
W. Fletch, daughter of Elbridge S. and Mary 
(Currier) Fletch, and they are parents of a son, 
Benjamin F., bom in 1885. 



died in 1920, was originally of Prince Edward Is- 
land, and for the greater part of his life a carri- 
age manufacturer; his mother was of a Chelsea, 
Massachusetts, family. 

The Oxley family took up residence in Haverhill 
when John H. was in early boyhood, and conse- 
quently he spent most of his school days in local 
public schools, after leaving which he took a 
course in a business college. 

Entering business life, young Oxley worked for 
Hazen B. Goodrich, of Haverhill, for three years, 
and then entered the employ of the Noyea Paper 
Company, with which company he stayed until 
1917, when he decided to enter into business for 
himself. He opened a store at No. 14 Washing- 
ton street, his lines being office and factory sup- 
plies and equipment. The great National emer- 
gency, however, came in that year, and he threw 
aside his personal interests and entered the mili- 
tary service of the United States, enlisting in the 
Ordnance Department. He was assigned to duty 
at Boston headquarters in December, 1917, and 
there was kept because of his executive and ad- 
ministrative usefulness and aptitude, until the end 
of the World War. He was honorably discharged 
in December, 1918, and again took up his Haver- 
hill business, incorporating as Oxleys, Inc. He is 
developing a good business, his company already 
needing two floors, with tiie possibility of soon 
occupying the third floor also. It is evident, there- 
fore, that Mr. Oxley is a man of aggressive char- 
acteristics. He is a member of the Pentueket and 
Agawan clubs, and by religious conviction is a 
Universalist, member of the local church of that 
sect. 

Mr. Oxley married, in 1916, Janet Brown, of 
Canada, daughter of Henry G. and Janet (Mac- 
Kellar) Brown, originally of Scotland. 



JOHN H. OXLEY, merchant and ex-service 
man 'of Haverhill, Massachusetts, principal owner 
of the firm of Oxleys, Inc., was bom in Menimac, 
Massachusetts, June 7, 1889, the son of Alexander 
and Mary (McKeigue) Oxley. His father, who 



WILBUR B. ROWELL— In the legal fratendty 
of Essex county are numbered men whose work 
in their chosen profession is counting far from the 
general advance. Holding an assured position in 
this group is Wilbur E. Rowell, of Lawrence, 
whose offices are located at No. 301 Essex street, 
in this city. 

Mr. Rowell was bom in Merrimac, Massachusetts, 
August 28, 1862, and is a son of Charles E. and 
Judith M. (Gile) Rowell, both members of old 
New England families, and the father prominent 
for many years in Amesbury and Merrimac. He 
served as selectman of both towns, and was, for 
many years, postmaster at Merrimacport. He was 
a Republican in politics. As a lad W. E. Rowell 
attended the public schools of his native place, 
laying a practical foundation for the future. En- 
tering Wilbraham Academy for his classical stud- 
ies, Mr. Rowell was graduated from that institu- 
tion in the class of 1881. He then attended Wes- 
leyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, gradu- 
ating in the class of '85, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Thence he entered Harvard 
University Law School, was admitted to the bar at 



110 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Salem in 1888, and began the practice of law in 
the city of Lawrence. He i£ a Phi Beta Kappa 
man and a member of the Psi Upsiloii. From the 
beginning Mr. Rowell's rise has been steady, his 
natural ability being seconded and sustained by 
that ceaseless vigilance upon which all success de- 
pends, and the closest attention to every relevant 
detail, however seemingly insi^^nificant. Mr. Row- 
ell has now for many years been senior member 
of the well-known law firm of Rowell A Clay, and 
is esteemed a leading man in the profession today. 
He has been Special Justice of the Lawrence Dis- 
trict Court for many years. Mr. Rowell is also 
actively interested in various financial and industrial 
organizations in Lawrence, amon^ which is in- 
cluded the Broadway Savings Bank, of which he 
is president. He is also a director of tht Merchants' 
Trtist Company, the Beach Soap Company, George 
H. Woodman, Incorporated, and the Selden Wor- 
sted Mills. He has been trustee of the White 
Fund, and educational endowment, for twenty- 
three years. A Republican in politics, he has ser- 
ved two terms on the Lawrence School Commis^ 
sion. He is a member of Trinity Congregational 
Church and has been deacon for about twenty-five 
years. He is also a member of the Meirimac 
Valley Country Club. 

Mr. Rowell married (first) Mary A. Rand; and 
(second) Lillian W. Bridges, daughter of Daniel 
T. and Frances (Wadsworth) Bridges. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rowell reside at No. 96 Sounders street, 
Lawrence. -..«___^_— ^— _^_» 

PERCY BOARDMAN SPOFFORD, a promi- 
nent citizen of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom 
there, October 10, 1883, son of Daniel H. and EUen 
A. (Carter) Spofford. Daniel H. Spofford is widely 
known as a follower of the Christian Science teach- 
ings, and he is the only man still living in this 
country who has been tried for witchcraft His 
wife, Ellen A. (Carter) Spofford, was a daughter 
of Thomas A. Carter, a well known finisher and 
joiner of Newburyport in his day. 

Mr. Spofford obtained his education in the pub- 
lic schools, and soon after his graduation from the 
high school in 1901, he accepted a position with 
the Pacific National Bank of Lawrence, where he 
remained for six years, and at the end of this 
time entered the employ of the Haverhill National 
Bank, remaining f on two years. StOl following the 
banking business and with eight years' experience 
to his credit, Mr. Spofford accepted a place with 
the Essex National Bank; after four years there 
he resigned to travel as credit man for some of the 
larger factories, continuing this work until 1918, in 
which year he became associated with the Haver- 
hill Mercantile Agency, the largest independent 
collection agency in Eastern Massachusetts. His 
many years of experience in banking and other 
financial matters made him peculiariy well-fitted for 
this work and he continued successfully until the 
outbreak of the World War, 1917-1918, when he 
immediately offered his services to the Finance 



Division of the War Department at Washington^ 
D. C, remaining until the signing of the Armistiee 
and tiien returning to his former work. 

Mr. Spofford takes more than a passive interest 
in public matters and is always willing and amdous 
to share in civic matters. Fraternally he has many 
Masonic and other aifiliations, among them being: 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shzine; and the Massachusetts Consis- 
tory. 

Mr. Spofford married, at Exeter, New Hamp- 
shire, JiJy 12, 1907, Clara Belle Towle, of Law^ 
rence, and they are the parents of the following 
children: Daniel H., 2d, Pauline Eaton, and Eleanor 
Janet. With his tunHly, Mr. Spofford is a member 
of the First Universalist Church of Haveiliill and 
he is active in its works and charities. 



MAURICE E. CONNORS, dentist of Newbuzy- 
port, Massachusetts, was bom in Leominster, Mas- 
sachusetts, son of Michael and Elisabeth (Bagl^) 
Connors. He was educated in the public schools, 
preparing himself for- the Baltimore Medical Col- 
lege. He graduated in 1910 with the degree <a 
Doctor of Dental Surgery, and then became associ- 
ated with Dr. H. H. Wsfd, in Leomhister, remain- 
ing for two years. In 1912, he came to Newbury- 
port, where he has since continued, and engaged in 
practice on his own account, holding the respect 
and esteem of his fellow citisens. 

Dr. Connors is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks; fourth degree member of 
the Knights of Columbus; the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians; president of the Essex County, Masear 
chusetts and Northeastern dental associations; and 
is a member of the National Dental Association* 
He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, a 
chairman of the committee on streets and side- 
walks, and takes an active interest in the public 
affairs of Newburyport In 1919 he was a member 
of the City Council. He attends the Immaculate 
Conception Roman Catholic Church of Newbury- 
port. 

FRED HBRRICK SARGENT was bom August 
19, 1871, at Lawrence, Massachusetts, and is a son 
of Charles H. and Georgiana (Littlefield) Sargent. 
He is a grandson of Moses Sargent, who was bom 
at Sunapee, New Hampshire, in the year 1800, and 
his wife, Susan (Osborne) Sargent Moses Saxgent 
was a mason contractor. Mr. Sargenf s father was 
bom at Haverhill, in the year 1846, and is still liv- 
ing. He has been connected with the Lawrence 
Gas Company for many years. Mr. Sargent's 
mother was bom at Lawrence in 1852, and died in 
1901. She was a daughter of George Littlefield, a 
brick mason and plasterer, who served as alderman 
of Lawrence. 

Mr. Sargent received his early education inihe 
public schools of Lawrence, and after spending 
three years in high school, entered the service of 
the Lawrence Gas Company. This company was 
established in the year 1846, and has grown stead- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



111 



ily in power and influence. It is incorporated for 
more than two and a half million dollars, and 
serves heat and power to the municipalities of 
Lawrence, South Lawrence, Methuen, Andover, 
North Andover and Boxford. Its business exceeds 
two million dollars a year. The company's execu- 
tive offices and display rooms are situated on Es- 
sex street in the heart of Lawrence. At the pres- 
ent time (1922) it has three hundred salaried em- 
ployees. When Mr. Sargent entered the company's 
service in November, 1889, he was detailed for work 
at the gas plant. He was promoted to the position 
of foreman and subsequently was made superin- 
tendent. On July 1, 1919, he was made the com- 
pany's agent, and became vice-president of the com- 
pany, January 1, 1920, which office he stOl holds. 

Mr. Sargent is a director of the Merchants' Trust 
Company of Lawrence. He serves as a member of 
the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce, and, in poli- 
tics, is a Republican. He is a member of the Uni- 
versalist church. He was not called upon for ac- 
tive service during the World War, but gave his 
fullest support to the government in its measures 
for the successful prosecution of the war. Mr. 
Sargent is a Mason of the thirty-second degree. 
He is a member of Grecian Lodge, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, since 1898; Mt. Sinai Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence Council, Royal 
and Select Masters; Bethany Conunandery, Knights 
Templar; Massachusetts Consistory, of Boston; and 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member of 
the Monomodock Lodge of that order. He also be- 
longs to Lodge No. 66, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, since 1896, and is a member of the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. He belongs to the 
Merrimac Valley Country Club, the Home Club, 
the Methuen Club, the Andover Club, the Lawrence 
City Mission, and the Engineers' Club of Boston. 
He is also a member of the New England Gas Asso- 
ciation, American Gas Association, Gas Guild, Na- 
tional Electric Light Association, and the Illumi- 
nating Engineering Society. 

Mr. Sargent married Laura Tefft, January 23, 
1901. Mrs. Sargent was bom at Brewer, Maine, 
and died at Lawrence in June, 1910. She was a 
daughter of Dr. Henry F. and Maria Teflft, the 
former a dentist of Bangor, Maine. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sargent had no children. Mr. Sargent has one sis- 
ter, who is now Mrs.. Bertha S. Kirk, of Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. 



ALEXANDER G. PERKINS— The Perkins Lum- 
ber Company, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, 
seems clearly to be the largest as well as the old- 
est firm of lumber dealers in Newburyport and 
vicinity. The Arm was established almost fifty 
years ago (in 1873) by Edward Perkins, father of 
the present principals, Alexander G. and Edward G. 
Perkins. The father died in 1921, but the business 
is being ably continued, indeed has been expanded, 



by the two sons, Edward G. being president, and 
Alexander G. treasurer. The company was incor- 
porated in 1897, and, in addition to the ordinary 
scope of a general lumber business, has been added 
a box factory, which is now quite an important 
department of the company's operations. 

The Perkins family, in both paternal and ma- 
ternal connections, is quite well known in Essex 
county, both parents being natives of Newburyport. 
Edward Perkins married Mary S. Graves, who died 
in 1918, and seven children were bom to them, five 
being sons. 

Alexander G. Perkins, the first-bom of Edward 
and Mary S. (Graves) Perkins, was bom in New- 
buryport, August 28, 1869. He was educated in the 
public schools of that place, and after leaving school 
entered his father's office, and in course of time 
leamed the lumber business. He was twenty-eight 
years old when the war with Spain came, and waa 
one of those who early volunteered. He eventuaUy 
saw active war service in Cuba, as a captain of 
United States Volunteers under Colonel Pew, and 
came through the experience without bodily im- 
pairment. After being mustered out of mHitary 
service, Mr. PezkinB returned to Newburyport, and 
again became connected with the family business. 
As the years went by, he became of increasing 
value to hia father in matters of business, and lat- 
terly the affairs of the Perkins Lumber Company 
were almost wholly directed by him, and hia 
brother Edward G., a sketch of whom follows. 
Their father, Mr. Edward Perkins, the founder of 
the Perkins Lumber Company, waa a man of logi- 
cal mind and sound business reasoning, and car^ 
ried the company steadily through the early years; 
it does not detract from his vital part in the com- 
pany's development to state that much of the later 
success that has come to the company should be 
credited to the enterprise and business acumen of 
the two sons, Alexander G. and Edward G. Per^ 
kins. Mr. Alexander G. Perkins belongs to local 
lodges of the Masonic and Odd Fellow orders, being 
a Knight Templar of the former. He is esteemed 
in the city, is a trustee of the Newburyport Public 
Library, and for two years was a member of the 
City Council. 

He was married in 1892 to Edith E. Taylor, of 
Newburyport, and the following children have been 
bom to them: Carlton L., William F., Elizabeth 
A., Robert P., Ruth E., and Eunice N. 



EDWARD GRAVES PERKINS, second chfld of 
Edward and Mary S. (Graves) Perkins, (see pre- 
ceding sketch) was bom in Newburyport, October 
27, 1874. After passing through the public schools 
of Newburyport and graduating from the high 
school in the class of 1891, he took a business 
course at Conner's Commercial School. Thus 
equipped for a business life, he entered his father's 
office and has ever since been connected with the 
business, being, strictly, an employee until 1916, 
when he was admitted into the firm. He has had 



112 



ESSEX COUNTY 



good part in the davelopmant of the company's op- 
erations during the almost three decades he has 
been connected with it. 

Mr. E. G. Perkins is well known to the business 
people of the district, and is looked upon as an 
alert* enterprising, reliable man of business— one 
with broad, effective and modem ideas of business, 
and an intelligent helpful interest in the general 
progress of the city. He has taken a prominent 
part in public affairs. Politically a Republican, Mr. 
E. G. Perkins has for several years been a, member 
of the Republican City Committee, and for ten 
years has been a member of the City Coundl. Fra- 
ternally, he is a Mason. He is an active member 
of the American Yacht Club, and his church is the 
First Congregational Church, of Newburyport. 

In 1896 Mr. £. G. Perkins was married to Clara 
A. Goodman, of Ipswich, Massachusetts, daughter 
of Ephraim and Dolly E. (Pickens) Goodman, of 
that place. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins have three chil- 
dren: Florence Amelia, who was bom in 1897; 
George King, bom in 1902; and Albert G., bom in 
1904. 

CHARLES O. BROSTROM — Coming to this 
country in 1892 with nothing more Uian a stout 
heart and a wealth of ambition, Chanes G. Bros- 
trom, founder of the C. G. Brostrom Company, 
manufacturers of shoe machinery, has successfully 
eUmbed the ladder of success. Today his name is a 
by-word in his particular linet of industry and many 
successful patents of his will stand in the years to 
come, as a monument to his application to what 
he selected as his life's occupation. Success is 
attained only by dint of great effort, and Mr. Bros- 
trom may well look back upon the years of his 
youth when, without the usual time allotted to the 
growing boy for play, he began to build up a fu- 
ture that today stands far and away ahead of 
those who were satisfied to take life as it came. 
Backed by a brilliant and creative mind he stands 
today in the heyday of his career. The future 
holds nothing but greater success, and Mr. Bros- 
trom has surrounded himself with an organization 
composed of men who assume part of the respon- 
sibility which rests upon his shoulders. 

Charles Gustavo Brostrom was bom in Koping, 
Sweden, March 16, 1872. He is the son of Andrew 
Gustavo and Matilda (Berg) Brostrom, the former, 
previous to his death, having been superintendent 
of an iron and steel rolling mill at Koping for 
many years. The boy Charies attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native place until he was fifteen 
years of age, when he terminated his studies and 
entered his father's mill, where he served an ap- 
prenticeship to the machinist's trade, and even at 
this early age his shrewdness in the trade was 
commented upon. In 1892, when he had reached 
the age of twenty years, he expressed a desire to 
reach out into the world, so, with this end in view, 
he set sail for the United States. Upon landing in 
this country he went immediately to Hartford, 
Connecticut, where he secured a position as machin- 



ist with the Pape Manufacturing Company, sub- 
sequently resigning from this concern and becoming 
identified with the Cushman Chuck Company of 
Hartford. In 1893 he came to Lynn and until 1912 
worked successively for the following concerns in 
the capacity of machinist: the General Electric 
Company, Bresnahan Shoe Machine Company, and 
the T. C. Rowen Company, manufacturers of shoe 
machinery. In 1913 he founded the C. G. Brostrom 
Company which has met with unbounded success, 
the shoe machinery which the organiiation manu- 
factures being shipped to all parts of the world. 
During the World War the plant ran night and day 
in its manufacture of sights for large French guns 
and gauges. Mr. Brostrom is well read and in all 
that pertains to his craft is an authority. His 
knowledge of mechanical drawing, pattern mak- 
ing and machinery, combined with his practical 
knowledge of the business, make for him an un- 
usually strong equipment. Besides being identified 
with this concern Mr. Brostrom is also president 
of the Micas Consolidated Company, Incorporated, 
and vice-president of the Beacon Folding Machine 
Company, both concerns being located in Lynn. 
He is also a member of the local Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

In everything pertaining to the welfare and ad- 
vancement of Lynn he has taken, a keen and active 
interest and no good work, done in the name of 
charity or religion, appeals to him in vain. He is 
prominent in the fraternal organizations of the dty, 
being afiUiated with East Lynn Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; Moody Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, of which he is past chancellor; Paul Revere 
Council, Uniform Rank Knights of Pythias; the 
Pythian Sisters; and Poquanum Tribe No. 105, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. He attends the Luth- 
eran church. 

In May, 1894, Charies Gustavo Brostrom was 
united in marriage with Emma Hagerstrom, who 
died in 1900. To them were bom two children: 
Huldah Matilda, bom June 13, 1895; Andrew Gus- 
tavo, bom June 11, 1898. Mr. Brostrom married, 
(second) in November, 1910, Elisabeth May Ever^ 
ett, daughter of Hezekiah and Elizabeth May 
(Irish) Everett, of Poland, Maine. 

Such is the life of Charles Gustavo Brostrom, a 
self-made man, starting in this country poor in 
finances, but rich in shrewdness and foresig^^ 
traits which go to make a man among men. Quick 
to grasp the necessity of mingling with the xia- 
tion's successful men, he adapted himself to cir- 
cumstances and took advantage of every oppcrr- 
tunity which would bring him in contact with the 
worth-while things in life. Today he stands as one 
of the most prominent and respected business men 
in Lynn, a product of Democracy's free institutions. 



CHARLES A. GREEN— One of the younger 
members of the legal profession in Essex eounty, 
Massachusetts, and interested in every phase of 
public progress, Charies A. Green is going forward 
to success. 



CHAS. G. BROSTROM AND VIRGINIA MAY BROSTROM 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



113 



Mr. Green T^as bom in Salem, July 19, 1889, and 
is a son of James F. and Margaret (Reagan) Green. 
The elder Mr. Green was for many years engaged 
in the great shoe industry in Salem, continuing in 
this connection until the time of his death, which 
occurred December 6, 1907. 

Gaining his early education in the public schools 
of Salem, Mr. Green then studied law under Mc- 
Sweeney A McSweeney, leading Salem attorneys, 
then completed his studies at the law school of 
Charles H. Innes, in Boston. Admitted to the bar 
September 15, 1918, Mr. Green soon established 
himself in his chosen field of endeavor, and is now 
considered one of the promising men of the day 
in legal circles. His office is located on Essex 
street, in Salem. On December 24, 1918, Mr. Greoi 
was appointed a master in chancery, of Massachu- 
setts. He is also a justice of the peace. 

Mr. Green is a member of the Salem and of the 
Essex County Bar associations, also a member of 
the Legal Advisory Board of Salem. Fraternally 
he is prominent in the Knights of Columbus and 
the Father Mathew Society. He is a Roman Cath- 
olic, a member of the Immaculate Conception 
Church at Salem. During the World War he was 
appointed a "four-minute man," and spoke through- 
out the county for various drives during the war. 



REV. EDWARD TILLOTSON, rector of the 
Church of the Holy Name, in Swampscott, Massa- 
chusetts, is widely known, not only as rector of one 
of the most beautiful churches in New England^ 
but as a worker in many branches of public effort. 

Rev. Mr. Tillotson was bom in the historic old 
town of Farmington, Connecticut, on July 2, 1874, 
and is a son of Charles Edward and Cornelia 
(Cowles) Tillotson, the former also bom in Farm- 
ington, in 1842. 

Receiving his eariy education in the public and 
high schools of New Haven, Connecticut, Edward 
Tillotson early in life chose the Christian ministry 
for his future field of effort. He entered Yale 
University, from which institution he was graduated 
in 1897, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. There- 
after entering Beikeley Divinity School, in Middle- 
town, Connecticut, he was graduated in 1900, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. 

Mr. Tillotson's first church was St. George's, at 
Newburgh, New York; from there he went to St. 
Paul's, in Boston, which is now a cathedral. He 
came to Swampscott, Massachusetts, on October 1, 
1906, as rector of the Church of the Holy Name. 
This church, which is Protestant Episcopal, is of 
local interest as a memorial erected by Mrs. Joy 
to the memory of the late Charles S. Joy and Enoch 
Reddington Mudge, her father. But the church is 
of general interest as a rarely beautiful stmcture, 
and one of the points of interest along the north 
shore. The church was built after the plans of 
the famous architect, Henry Vaughn. It is Gothic 
in design, and its charming setting, as it stands on 
the old Mudge estate, Just back from the ocean, 
reveals its beauty even to the most casual observer. 



Mr. Tillotson has heard tourists from aU parts of 
the world admire it, and say that they never saw a 
more beautiful church One of the most beautiful 
features of the edifice is comprised in the five me- 
morial windows brought over from England, made 
at the studio of the celebrated firm of C. E. Kempe, 
of London. The church was consecrated on Sep» 
tember 28, 1893. The first rector was Rev. Arthur 
B. Papineau; the second. Rev. Henry C. Braddon; 
then followed Rev. William Gardner, and his suc- 
cessor, Rev. Richard E. Armstrong, was Mr. Tillot- 
son's predecessor. The rectory of the church was 
btplt in 1907, and the fine parish house, in the same 
design as the church, was built in 1920, and is 
known as the Remick MemoiiaL 

During the World War, 1917-18, this church, 
under Rev. Tillotson's leadership, bore an active 
part in the various movements in support of the 
American Expeditionary Forces. Fifty-two men 
enlisted from this parish. Mr. Tillotson engaged 
in welfare work, three days in each week, at the 
Bridges Company plant, manufacturers of air- 
planes, and was also active in Red Cross work. 

Rev. Mr. Tillotson is chairman of the school com- 
mittee of Swampscott, and is deeply interested in 
every phase of public progress. He supports the 
principles of the Republican party. He is a mem- 
ber of the Clerical Club of Boston, a club of twenty 
clergymen, and is a member of the Swampscott 
Club. 

In 1905 Rev. Tillotson married, in Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, Alice Lethbridge Duer Sawyer, daugh- 
ter of Enos D. and Elizabeth (Smith) Sawyer. Mr. 
Sawyer is an extensive dealer in lumber in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. Rev. and Mrs. Tillotson 
have one daughter, Cornelia Duer, bom on August 
27, 1915. 

HARRY S. CLARK, B. S., D. M. D.— In profes- 
sional circles in Danvers, Massachusetts, the name 
of Dr. Harry S. Clark stands for the most ap- 
proved methods in modem dental science, and has 
come to hold a leading place. 

Dr. Clark is a son of Sylvester and Laura M. 
(Towle) Clark, his father being a skilled mechanic 
The family formerly resided in Rochester, Vermont, 
later removing to Randolph, Vermont. There were 
two sons: Fred, now deceased; and Harry S., of 
whom further. 

Harry S. Clark was bom in Rochester, Vermont, 
July 22, 1877, and his education was begun in the 
public schools of his native town. At the age of 
thirteen years, the family then becoming residents 
of Randolph, Vermont, the boy continued his 
studies there. He entered Dartmouth College, and 
was graduated from that institution in the class of 
1901; then, having chosen the dental profession, 
took up that course at Harvard University, and 
was graduated in 1904. His B. S. degree was con- 
ferred upon him at Dartmouth, and the D. M. D. 
at Harvard. Coming to Danvers in 1904, Dr. Clark 
established an ofSce and began the practice of his 
profession. He has since continued, with ever in- 



114 



ESSEX COUNTY 



creasing success, and is now a leading practitioner 
in this yidnity. 

Dr. Clark is a member of the National Dental 
Association^ of the Metropolitan Massachusetts 
Dental Society, and of the Essex Dental Society. 
He is also a member of the Harvard Alumni Aaso* 
dation, Harvard Odontological Society, and of the 
Northeastern Massachusetts Dental Society. He 
has been instructor at the Harvard Dental School 
since 1905. In the Masonic fraternity Dr. Clark is 
prominent. He is past master of Amity Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; of Holton Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; Lodge of Perfection; and 
holds the office of deputy grand marshal of the 
Ninth Masonic District. He is also a member of 
the Masonic Club. Politically Dr. Clark supports 
the Republican party. He is a member and trustee 
of the Maple Street Congregational Church. 

In 1905, Dr. Clark married Louise Hastings, of 
Randolph, Vermont. 



FRANCIS EDMUND INGALLS, who for many 
years was identified with the shoe and silk indus- 
tries, and is now retired from all active business, is 
a descendant of Edmund Ingalls, one of two broth- 
ers, Francis and Edmund Ingalls, who came to 
Essex county, Massachusetts, in 1629, and were the 
first settlers of Swampscott, spending the remainder 
of their lives in this community. 

From Edmund Ingalls, the original immigrant an- 
cestor of this branch of the family in America, Mr. 
Ingalls is directly descended through six intervening 
generations, as follows: Robert, son of Edmund; 
Nathaniel, son of Robert; Joseph^ son of Nathaniel; 
John (1), son of Nathaniel; John (2), son of John 
(1); and Ephraim, son of John (2), Ephraim being 
the father of Francis Edmund. 

John (2) Ingalls was a fisherman, and prospered 
in this business, also, with the thrift and industry 
characteristic of his day, made shoes in winter, this 
being before the days of shoe machinery. He mar- 
ried Martha Blaney, of Swampscott 

Ephraim Ingalls followed his father's calling, that 
of fisherman, which was, indeed, the occupation of 
each succeeding generation from the time of their 
settling here, and also manufactured shoes all his 
life, living to see something of new methods and in- 
creased production which resulted from them. He 
married Elizabeth Cloon, of Marblehead^ Massachu- 
setts, who was the daughter of a sea captain. 

Francis Edmund Ingalls, son of Ephraim and 
Elizabeth (Cloon) Ingalls, was bom in Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, that part which is now Swampscott, in 
1848. Educated in the schools of that day, and 
trained in the traditions of the shoe industry, he 
was for thirty-seven years a representative of man- 
ufacturers of shoe findings, and also represented a 
Boston silk agency, travelling throughout New Eng- 
land for these two concerns until his retirement in 
1918. He was also broadly active in civic and re- 
ligious progress, and was a member of the board of 
selectmen of Swampscott for one year. For twelve 
years he served on the school board, for twenty- 



five years on the library board, and for a long peaiod 
on the building committee. In 1877 he helped to 
organize a Universalist Sunday school in the town 
hall, and served as superintendent of this Sunday 
school from its organization until 1920, when he re- 
signed. He assisted largely in the building of the 
Universalist church edifice, and is still active in the 
work of this church society. 

Francis Edmund Ingalls married Marrietta Ban- 
croft Nowell, of Chelsea, Massachusetts, and they 
were the parents of two children: Bessie, who be- 
came the wife of Herbert L. Rideout, and has one 
child, Miriam; and Nowell, of further mention. 

Nowell Ingalls was bom in Swampscott, Massa- 
chusetts, September 6, 1878, and received his early 
education in the public schools of his native place. 
Later entering Tufts College, at Medford, Massa- 
chusetts, he was graduated from that institution 
in the class of 1900, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. Immediately thereafter, he became identified 
with the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Association 
at Boston, and for many years held an executive 
position in their main office in that city. He is still 
connected with the same concern, and now has 
charge of their interests in the Lynn district. 

Mr. Ingalls is a member of the Lynn Chamber of 
Commerce. He is broadly interested in the work 
of the Young Men's Christian Association and is a 
member of the organization. His college fraternity 
is the Delta Tau Delta, and he is a member of the 
Universalist church. 

On June 8, 1904, Mr. Ingalls married Kate Smith, 
daughter of Charles R. and Hannah B. Smith. Mr. 
and Mrs. IngaUs have two children: Francis Ed- 
mund (2), and Katharine Smith. 



GEORGE JOHN GODSLAND— In the industrial 
worid of Salem, Massachusetts, the name of Gods- 
land is familiar. As owner and manager of the 
Salem Brass Foundry, George John Godsland bears 
a construdtve part in the manufacturing interests 
of the city. 

Mr. Godsland was bom in Exeter, on the River 
Exe, in England, January 28, 1849, and is a son of 
Thomas and Mary Godsland. His parents never 
made their home in this country, although his father 
came here and remained for a short time. Gaining 
his education in the national schools of his native 
land, and there learning the trade of brass moulder, 
Mr. Godsland turned his face across the Atlantic, 
as a young man of twenty-three years. He located 
first in Portland, Maine, but vrishing to see more of 
this country before locating permanently, spent the 
next three years in Boston and Cambridge, then 
spent two years in Cleveland, Ohio, thence going 
to the oil country of Pennsylvania, being interested 
mostly in contract work for the Standard OU Com- 
pany, at Oil City. He then returned East to in- 
dustrial interests in Salem, having loaned money to 
a firm of brass moulders there. This was about 
the time of the death of President Garfield, in 1881, 
when the confidence of the country was more or 
less disturbed by the inevitable changes in the ad- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



115 



mfinistration at Washingrton* and this firm of brass 
m€>iilder8 failed to make a success of the business. 
To protect himself Mr. Godsland was obliged to 
take oyer the business, and in his hands it has 
Igrown and developed, until it long since became an 
important part of the industrial life of Salem, and 
a profitable enterprise for the owner. Thus Mr. 
Godsland's permanent location was not entirely of 
liis own choice, but he has become one of the lead- 
infif men in the industrial circles of Salem. His 
-vroxk is largely along the line of contracts with the 
General Electric Company, the United Shoe Ma- 
chine Company, and the Salem Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Godsland is a member of the Salem Chamber 
of Commerce. He holds the thirty-second degree in 
the Masonic Order, is a member of Winslow Lewis 
Commandery, Knights Templar, and is also a mem- 
ber of Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, No- 
bles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of the 
Rotary Club and of the Sons of St. George. 

Mr. Godsland married Elizabeth Jackson, of Wo- 
btim» Massachusetts, who died about ten years ago. 
They had one son, Frederick T., bom January 12, 
1876. Beceiidng his education in the public^ schools 
of Salem, he learned the trade of brass moulder 
with his father, and has been associated with him 
in business ever since, of late years becoming active 
in the management of the affairs of the plant. He 
married Madeline Douglas, and has one son, George 
Frederick. Frederick T. Godsland is also a mem- 
ber of the Free, and Accepted Masons, and promi- 
nent in the social and business life of Salem. 



HSNRY M. FOX, D. D. S., who is among the 
younger generation of practicing dentists in Pea- 
body, Massachusetts, where he has been active since 
the year 1915, is a native of Clinton, Massachusetts, 
his birth having occurred there July 8, 1886. He is 
a son of Michael and Mary (Fay) Fox, like himself 
natives of Clinton. Michael Fox for many years 
was a civil engineer in his native city. He served 
in the Civil War. To Mr. and Mrs. Fox were bom 
six children: George T., a physician at Bristol, 
Pennsylvania; Henry M., of further mention; Mary, 
a teacher in Clinton; Florence, a teacher; Charles, 
a dentist, in practice at Lynn, Massachusetts, and 
Joseph. 

The ckdldhood of Henry M. Fox was passed in 
his native place, and it was there that his prepara- 
tory education was receive^. He attended the gram- 
mar and the high schools there, and after gradua- 
tion matriculated at the Dental Department of the 
University of Pennsylvania, having decided to make 
that profession his career. He took the usual den- 
tal course, graduating with the class of 1916, with 
the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Since that 
time he has made his headquarters in ofSces at No. 
10 Peabody Square, where he has developed a laige 
and high class practice, so that he is alieady re- 
garded as among the leaders of his profession. 

Besides his professional activities. Dr. Fox is an 
energetic participant in the public life of Peabody, 



and is well known in many departments of its af- 
fairs. In politics Dr. Fox is an Independent, and 
has not identified himself with any political party, 
preferring to remain free from all partisan influ- 
ences in the exercise of his own judgment on pub- 
lic issues. He affiliates with the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, and Peabody Lodge, No. 1409, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce. In religion he is a Roman 
Catholic, and prominent in the aifairs of St. John's 
Roman Catholic Church, which he attends. 

Henry* M. Fox was united in marriage with Mary 
Madeline Norton, April 6, 1920. Mrs. Fox is the 
daughter of Michael and Annie (McDonald) Norton. 



FRED J. CLOUTMAN — Among the representa- 
tives of the legal profession in Salem, Massachu* 
setts, Fred J. Cloutman is a leader in the younger 
group. Broadly interested in public progress, he is 
throwing his influence on the side of all advance. 

Mr. Cloutman was bom in Peabody, Massachu* 
setts, September 11, 1894, and is a son of Frederick 
W. and Mary A. (Donovan) Cloutman, both of 
Salem, Massachusetts. Gaining his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Salem, and deciding 
upon the law as his fleld of future effort, he entered 
the Northeastern College of Law in Boston, and 
was graduated from that institution in 1918. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in the same year, he began the 
practice of law in Salem at once, and has made a 
most promising start. 

Deeply interested in civic matters, Mr. Cloutman 
is now serving the public as a member of the school 
board, having been elected for a period of three 
years. Mr. Cloutman is a member of the Essex 
County Bar Association, and of the Salem Bar As- 
sociation. He served as clerk of the Probate Court 
from 1913 to 1918, and was for one yekr connected 
with the Old Colony Trust Company, of Boston. 

Fraternally Mr. Cloutman is prominent in the 
Knights of Columbus and the Young Men's Cath- 
olic Temperance Society, of Salem. He is a mem- 
ber of St. James' Catholic Church, of this dty. 



RBV. FREDERIC WILLIAMS PERKINS, D. D. 
— Since his ordination to the ministry of the Uni- 
versalist church in 1894, Dr. Perkins has served 
but three charges, the last being the First Church 
of Lynn, Massachusetts, over which he has been 
pastor since 1906, a period of sixteen years. He 
has merited the honors of his profession bestowed 
upon him, and has worthily borne the responsihili- 
ties which attach to the sacred calling. He is a 
son of Francis Blake and Maiy Elisabeth (Will- 
iams) Perkins, his father a mechanical engineer and 
a Union veteran, serving with the 35th Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and wounded at 
the battle of Fredericksburg. 

Frederic Williams Perkins was bom in Boston, 
Massachusetts, June 16, 1870, and at the age of 
seventeen was graduated from Roxbury Latin 
School. He then entered Tufts College, and was 



116 



ESSEX COUNTY 



graduated A. B., 1891. He then punned 
study at Tufts Divinity School, receiving his B. D. 
and A. M., class of 1894, and in 1908 received from 
his alma mater the degree of D. D. In 1894 he was 
ordained to the Uniyersalist ministry, and called to 
the Church of the Redeemer at Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, there remaining seven years, until 1901. From 
1901 until 1906 he was pastor of the First Univer^ 
salist Church of Haverhill, Massachusetts, and in 
1906 accepted a call from the First Universalist 
Church of Lynn, Massachusetts, his present pas- 
torate (1921). 

During the years 1912-18-14, Dr. Perkins was lec- 
turer on Theology in Tufts Divinity School; was a 
trustee of the Universalist General Convention, 
1909-17; president of the Lynn Associated Chari- 
ties; director of Lyniv Inter-Church Union; and 
ehairman of the Civilian Relief Committee, Lynn 
Chapter of the American Red Cross. He is a mem- 
ber of the Phi Beta Kappa and Theta Delta Chi 
fraternities, and of the Oxford and Rotary cIqIm, 
of Lynn* 

Dr. Perldns married, at Somerville, Maaaachu- 
ietts, June 21, 1894, Mary Sherman Thayer, drai^ 
ter of Edward Francis and Nancy Jane (Sherman) 
Thayer, of Somerville. Dr. and Mrs. Peikina are 
the parents of a son, Sherman Thayer Perkins, bom 
Januaxy 21, 1899. 



feet, and, from a start with twelve employees, th&y 
have increased this number to 140. 

Mr. Hopkins is a Knight of Pythias in fraternal 
affiliations, and is a member of the Pentucket 01^; 
he is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Hopkins married, in 1900, Rosalie B. Segmn* 
of Rock Island, Province of Quebec, and they are 
the parents of a son, Nathaniel A. Hopkins. 



NATHANIEL B. HOPKINS, senior member of 
the shoe manufacturing company of Hopkins A 
Ellis, was bom in Hebron, New Hampshire, April 
19, 1887, son of Eldridge S. and Melanie (Muszy) 
Hopkins. Eldridge S. Hopkins was bom in Cam- 
den, Maine, went to Lawrence, Massachusetts, for 
about two years, then to Hebron, New Hampshire, 
and from there to New Hampton, New Hampshire, 
where he has resided for the past thirty-five years, 
and where he is engaged in farming. His wife died 
in 1904. He enlisted in the Second Maine Cavalry 
as corporal, serving from 1861 to 1866, and is a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic Post at 
Bristol, New Hampshire. 

The education of Nathaniel B. Hopkins was ob- 
tained in the public schools of his native town, and, 
as was customary with many boys of his vicinity, 
engaged in farm woric after leaving school. Soon 
after this time he became interested in the shoe 
industry and went to work for a manufacturer, con- 
tinuing until 1914, learning the method of manu- 
facture and other details connected with the busi- 
ness, so that/ in the above mentioned year he was 
able, from both a financial and business standpoint, 
to engage in this business on his own account. He 
formed the Hall A Hopkins Company, and they 
were in business for three years. In 1917 Mr. Hop- 
kins sold his interest to Mr. Hall and formed a new 
company, taking as a partner Charles Ellis, and the 
firm name became Hopkins A Ellis. Their start 
was made at No. 100 Phoenix Row, and owing to 
the increase in business, larger quarters were neces- 
sary, so that, in 1919, they removed to No. 241 Win- 
ter street, having quarters containing 20,000 square 



JAMBS P. ROULISR, M. D.«-Beyond doubt, one 
of the most conspicuous figures in the life of Salem, 
Massachusetts, is Dr. James P. Roulier, whose long 
career as physician has been consistently devoted 
to the welfare of his fellow dtiiens, with a snceeaa 
achieved by but few. 

James P. Roulier was bom in the Province of 
Quebec, Canada, September 29, 1860. He received 
the preliminary part of his education in the public 
schools of his native place, after which he entered 
the Assomption College, where he took the pre> 
scribed classical course. At about this time his 
attention was turned forcibly to the profession of 
medicine, and he decided to make it his eareer in 
life, and with this end in view he matriculated at 
Victoria College, fh>m which he was graduated with 
the Degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1889. Imme- 
diately after graduation he went to Tumen Falls, 
where, after passing the Massachusetts State Board 
of Examinations, he practiced for about three years. 
He subsequently removed to Salem, where he has 
since been engaged in the active practice of his pro- 
fession, with headquarters at No. 2 Federal street 
In addition to his medical practice Dr. Roulier oper- 
ated a drug store on Harbor street, South Salem, 
until 1914, when the building was completely de- 
stroyed by fire. He then spent three years in Bev- 
erly, Massachusetts, where he served as president 
of the commission that built the first French Cath- 
olic church, St Alphons Church, in Beveriy. 

Dr. Roulier has always been keenly interested in 
the affairs of the community of which he is a mem- 
ber. He is affiliated with the Foresters of America, 
the Knights of Columbus, and St. Jean Baptists 
of America. In his religious belief he is a Roman 
Catholic and has attend^ St Joseph's Roman Cath- 
olic Church for many years. He has been active 
in the work of the church and was one of the dele- 
gates to organize the St Joseph's Roman Catholic 
Church at Beveriy. 

On May 19, 1890, Dr. Roulier was um'ted in mar- 
riage with Annie Page, of Turners Fklls, who died 
in March, 1897. To them were bom three children: 
Rene, Mary Jane and Mary Annie. Dr. Roulier 
married (second) Eva Smith Fkrham, and to them 
have been bom five chfldren: CecQe, Bemard, Jean, 
Madeline and Jeannette, deceased. 

In all the years that Dr. Roulier has been active 
in his profession, a large percentage of his nights 
have been spent at the bedside where a new soul wae 
to be ushered into the world, or upon more sad oc- 
casions, where one was about to depart Rain or 
shine, summer or winter, the doctor has always re* 
sponded cheerfnUy to all calls. 




2r- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



iir 



CHARLES JOHN POWELL— In the legal pro- 
fession in Essex county, Massachusetts, Charles 
John Powell, of Peahody, is now taking a promi- 
nent place as a member of the firm of Donnell & 
Powell, and also as clerk of the District Court of 
Peabody. 

Mr. Powell is a son of William and Mary J. Pow- 
ell, long residents of this section. William Powell 
was bom in Ireland, and came to America at the 
SLge of seventeen years, locating in this county, and 
for many years was engaged in the manufacture of 
leather in Salem and Peabody. His wife, whom he 
married in Lowell, Massachusetts, was bom in In- 
dia, of English parents. 

Charles J. Powell was bom in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, June 24, 1889, but removed to Peabody at the 
age of seven, where he received his early education 
in the public schools. He was graduated from the 
Peabody High School in the class of 1908. In 1907, 
during afternoons and at odd times out of school, 
he was employed by S. Howard Donnell, long a 
prominent lawyer of Peabody, and now district at- 
torney of Essex county, as a stenographer and 
clerk, meanwhile studying law, and was admitted to 
the Essex county bar on February 21, 1918. He is 
now Mr. Donnell's partner, and their suite of offices, 
on Lowell street, in the business center of Peabody, 
are spacious and well appointed. 

Mr. Powell was appointed clerk of the District 
Court of Peabody by Govemor Samuel J. McCaU, 
May 22, 1918, for a term of five years. He is a 
member of the American Bar Association, also the 
Essex County and Salem Bar associations. He is a 
membo: of the Association of Clerks of the Police, 
District and Municipal courts. 

Fraternally and sodaUy Mr. Powell is also well 
known. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and a 
Knight Templar, and also is a member of Hohen 
Lodge, No. 104, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Peabody, and of Peabody Lodge, No. 1409, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is a 
member of the Now and Then Association of Salem, 
and of the Peabody Club, of Peabody. 

ALDEN S. MOORS, manufacturer, and for very 
many years identified with the Massachusetts shoe 
industry, was bom in Candia, New Hampshire, 
September 22, 1851, the son of Samuel G. and Ruth 
(Taylor) Moore, of that place, the former a shoe 
worker. 

Mr. Moore was educated in the public schools of 
his native place, and for a numbor of years after 
leaving school woiked for icimhfti] Brothers. 
Eventually he came to Groveland, Massachusetts, 
and established a workshop, or factory, where he 
did contract work for Haverhill shoe manufactur- 
ers. So employed, he passed many years, but ulti- 
mately took up another branch of the shoe industry, 
the n^anufacture of wooden heels, in which business 
he was associated with his son, Elmer A., until they 
disposed of same. During these years he has held 
closely to business, and has never souj^t public 
office. He is a member of Protection lA^ge, Inde- 



pendent Order of Odd Fellows; and Georgetown 
Lodge, Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
Mr. Moore married, in 1870, Ella F. Walsh, 
daughter of Ardis and Sarah (Tumer-Nunn) 
Walsh, the former English-bom, but his wife a 
Nova Scotian. To Mr. and Mrs. Moore were bom 
three children: Lowella M.; Elmer A., a sketch of 
whom follows; and Harry. 



ELMER A. MOORS, manufacturer of wooden 
heels, formerly owner of a substantial plant at 
Groveland, Massachusetts, was bom in that place 
on August 7, 1883, son of Alden S. and Ella F« 
(Walsh) Moore (see preceding sketch) « formeriy of 
New Hampshire, but then of Groveland, where the 
father was in business as shoe manufacturer and 
contractor. The mother was originally of Lowell, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Ardis and Sarah (Tur- 
ner-Nunn) WsJsh. 

Mr. Moore received the whole of his academie 
schooling in the public schools of Groveland, and 
when old enough, began to work, his first mnjlojet 
being C. K. Fox, shoe manufacturer, whose factory 
was on Duncan street, and with whom he remained 
for three years; a further three years he spent in 
the plant of H. Guptill. After that general experi- 
ence, he took up another branch, entering the Eagle 
Wooden Heel Company's factozy on Washington 
street, having an interest in the business. Later, 
however, he went into the Emery and Marshall 
building, but eventually moved to Phoenix Row» 
where he operated a business in wooden heels for 
three years, selling the business to advantage. He 
then established a factory in Groveland, and in 
1919 opened the plant on Lincoln avenue. He es- 
tablished another plant on Sumner street, with a 
fioor space of three thousand square feet, and which 
turned out about three hundred dozen wooden heels 
a day, for local and export tiade. Mr. Moore has 
lately disposed of his business. 

Mr. Moore is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and of the American Mechanics, 
fraternal orders, and has very many close friends 
in shoe circles of Haverhill district. 

Mr. Moorie married, in 1911, Elsie M. Gale, daugh* 
ter of Perly and Mary Elizabeth (Hewitt) Gale, the 
former of Plaistow, New Hampshire, and the latter 
originally of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Mr. and Mrs. 
Elm^ A. Moore have one child, a son, Alden Periy 
Moore, now six years old. 



GEORGE E. KERRIGAN, a prominent lawy«r 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts, has practiced his pro- 
fession in such widely separated states as Califoiv 
nia and New Hampshire, and with success in each. 
He was bom in Haverhill, Massachusetts, July 24, 
1872, of good old Irish blood. His father, Henry 
Michael Kerrigan, was one of those whtf followed 
the shoe trade. His mother, Elizabeth, came from 
the "Green Isle of Erin.** 

Creorge E. Kerrigan prepared for college in the 
dty schools, graduating from Haverhill High in 
1890. Entering Holy Cross College, he gained the 



118 



ESSEX COUNTY 



degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in 1896 took his 
Master's degree at Georgetown University. While 
in attendance at Holy Cross, a college noted al- 
most as much for the high class of its baseball 
teams as for its distinguished scholastic qualities, 
he became one of its famous baseball players; he 
was president of the athletic association. His 
course in law was taken in the Law College at 
Georgetown, District of Columbia, where he acquir- 
ed the degrees of Bachelor of Law and Master of 
Laws in 1899. 

Returning to Haverhill, Mr. Kerrigan was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Massachusetts at Salem and 
began the practice of law. He was just taking a 
conspicuous place among the legal lights of Haver- 
hill when ill health overtook him, and in 1907, go- 
ing to California for physical betterment^ he de- 
cided to stay there and practice his vocation. He 
was admitted to the bar of California in 1908, and 
before returning to Haverhill, in 1911, had been 
for two years attorney for the Southern Pacific 
railroad, the Shasta Bank, and a number of other 
corporations. Taking up again in 1911 the prac- 
tice of law in his native city, he met with success 
from the start, which continues to follow him 
through the passing years. In 1912 he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of New Hampshire. 

Mr. Kerrigan is a member of the Essex Bar Asso- 
ciation and the Haverhill Bar Association. Outlet 
for his athletic inclinations has been found in mem- 
bership in the Iseland Golf Club. In politics he is 
a Republican; in religion, a Roman Catholic Mr. 
Kerrigan has one son, John, bom July 18, 1906. 



JAMES CASSEY— In the optical field in Lynn, 
James Cassey holds a leading position and has been 
very successful. Mr, Cassey is a son of James Cas- 
sey, who was for many years manager of a large 
concern manufacturing iron and tin ware in £ng^ 
land. He died in 1919, at the advanced age of 
ninety years. Early in life he married Mary Ann 
Wright, and they were the parents of ten children, 
of whom Mr. Cassey of Lynn was the second 
child. 

James Cassey, the son, was bom in Birmingham, 
England, September 7, 1849, and was educated in 
the public schools of his native city, this being the 
extent of his formal school attendance, although in 
later life he broadened his education materially. 
Learning the trade of watchmaker in England, and 
following it there for some years, he came to the 
United States, with lus brother Charles, in 1878. 
His first position in this country was in the employ 
of James H. Connor, on the same site which he 
now occupies. He remained with Mr. Connor for a 
period of eight years, then purchased the business^ 
which he has carried on independentiy ever since. 
Many years ago he prepared for the profession of 
optidan, making a thorough study of optics, and 
has since won a high place in this profession, hav- 
ing been very successful in the treatment of the 
eyes through the fitting of glasses. In the public 
life of his adopted country Mr. Cassey takes great 



interest, but only as a progressive citizen, support- 
ing the Republican party, taking no lectdins' part 
in political affairs. He is a member ot tlie Uni- 
tarian church. 

On April 24, 1872, Mr. Cassey married, in Eng- 
land, Clara C. Darby, daughter of Fred, and Ann 
(Holmes) Darby. Their children, of ^^hom those 
now living fill useful positions in life, are as follows: 
Marian, wife of Edward L. Dickason; James 
Charles, died at the age of thirty-two; Sydney, elec- 
trical engineer in Elizabeth, New Jeraey; Lillie; 
Ernest Alfred, civil engineer, with the Ifevr Yoik 
Central railroad, at Chicago; Jane, wife of J. C. 
Welsh, of Lynn; Thomas E., electrical eng^eer in 
the employ of the United States Government in 
Washington, District of Columbia. 



FRSD B. MARSTON— With lifelong experience 
in the great shoe industry, and for the past eigh- 
teen years actively engaged in an execative ca- 
pacity as a shoe manufacturer, Fred B. Marston, of 
Danvers, Massachusetts, is a representative man of 
Essex county. 

Mr. Marston was bom in New Hampshire, May 
80, 1872, and was educated there in the public 
schools. As a young man he became a shoe worker 
in a Farmington, New Hampshire, factory, where 
he remained for eleven years. In that time he 
familiarized himself with the different departments, 
and by the practical method of doing the work, pre- 
pared himself for the efficient fulfillment of execu- 
tive responsibilities. His next step was -upward, to 
the superintendency of Gale Brothers shioe factory, 
at Exeter, New Hampshire, where he remained for 
two years. In 1908 Mr. Marston came to Danvers, 
becoming treasurer of the Marston & Tapley Shoe 
Company, then a growing concern, and now a lead- 
ing factor in the shoe industry of this county. 

In connection with the foregoing principal busi- 
ness interest Mr. Marston is also treasurer of 
Marston's Express Company, doing business over a 
wide territory, with headquarters at Danvers. He 
is also a director of the Salem Trust Company, and 
is a member and director of the Salem Chamber of 
Commerce. In the trade he is widely known, and 
is president of the North Shore Shoe Manufactur- 
ers' Association. 

Fraternally Mr. Marston is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, and is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Marston married Ester A. BwonperB, of 
Turner, Maine, and they have one son, Frank H. 



BENJAMIN F. ARRINGTON, journalist, was 
bom in Leominster, Massachusetts, July 6, 1866, re- 
moving with his parents to Lynn in 1859. He learn- 
ed the printer's trade in the office of the Lynn 
''Semi- Weekly Reporter," beginning in his sixteenth 
year, and became foreman before attaining his mar 
jority. Self-taught in phonography (Isaac Pitman 
system) during reporterial work, he finally qualified 
as a verbatim reporter. This led to an invitation 
in the 80's to join the staff of a shorthand bureau 






l-^^cL4^^-eu/ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



119 



in Boston, for court and special stenographic woric 
The lure of newsi)aperdom» however, prevailed. 
When the Lynn ''Daily Bee" was started, with the 
''Reporter^' as the weekly edition, he was for two 
years its business manager, contributing mean- 
while to the news and editorial columns. He was 
then called to the Salem "Evening News" as editor- 
in-chief, an4 here labored under happy auspices for 
more than thirty-seven years, broken only by a 
year's absence in Springfield, Massachusetts, as 
editor and general manager of a local daily, of 
which he was one of the promoters. Feeling the 
need of a respite, he resigned on the 29th of May, 
1920, being at the time of retirement the senior 
editor in point of service in Essex county. 

He is a student of French, and has ''Englished" 
a number of short stories and sketches, in addition 
to special writing for a few outside publications. 
Travels in this country and in Canada were follow- 
ed by two extensive voyages to Europe, on each 
occasion opportunity being afforded for a p<v"?i>g 
glimpse of life in the Azores, at Gibraltar, Funchal, 
Madeira, and Algiers. For many years a Free 
Mason, he is particularly interested in Blue Lodge 
Masonry, and is a past master and honorary mem- 
ber respectively of Mount Carmel and Damascus 
Lodges of Ljrnn, being a charter member and the 
first master of the last-named; was secretary for 
Mount Carmel Lodge for eight years, and at present 
is rounding out his fourteenth year of like service 
in Damascus Lodge. He is married, and, with his 
wife, is a member pf the Unitarian church of Lynn, 
in which he has served as parish clerk, and in 1915 
was elected to the board of trustees, of which he 
is now chairman. 



ALBERT N. BLAKE— In the shoe and leather 
trades, particularly in Essex county, Massachusetts, 
the name of Albert N. Blake is well known as an 
executive, both in personal enterprises and in the 
organized advancement of the industry. 

Mr. Blake was bom in Danvers, Massachusetts, 
December 13, 1870, and is a son of J. Albert and 
Abbie D. (Hyde) Blake. Gaining the fundamen- 
tals of education in the public schools of Danvers, 
he completed his studies at Phillips- Andover Acad- 
emy, at Andover, Massachusetts. As a young man 
he became interested in the shoe industry, his 
father and uncle being engaged in the manufacture 
of shoes in HaverhilL Therefore he turned to this 
branch of industry as a field of effort, and entering 
the factories, familiarized himself with every de- 
partment of shoe making by modem factory meth- 
ods. Beginning at the bottom, Mr. Blake leamed 
the shoe business by the practical method of experi- 
ence as a shoe worker, spending only the time re- 
quired to master the details in each department. In 
1911 he came to Lynn, and became associated with 
the Watson Shoe Company, as president of the 
concem. In the intervening decade he has placed 
himself in a position of more than local promi^ 
nence. 

As a director of the National Boot and Shoe 



Manufacturers' Assoeiation, Mr. Blake is widely 
known. He is also president of the National Shoe 
and Leather Exposition and Style Show. He is a 
director of the New England Shoe and Leather 
Association, and is a member of the board of gover- 
nors of the Boston Shoe Trades Club. He is a 
director of the Essex Trust Company of Lynn; and 
a trustee of the Lynn Independent Industrial Shoe- 
making SchooL 

Mr. Blake is prominent fraternally as a member 
of the Free and Accepted Masons, and his dubs 
are: The Tedesco, Oxford, Neighborhood, and Ma- 
sonic He is a member of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church of the Incarnation. 

On November 14, 1895, Mr. Blake married Mabel 
Welch, daughter of William and Marjoria (Doane) 
Welch, and they have one daughter, Marjorie Doane 
Blake. 



STARR PARSONS— As piesident of the Essex 
County Bar Association, thus holding one of the 
most important positions in the gift of the legal 
profession and bringing the strength of his position 
to bear in the advance of industrial intetests 
throughout his district, Starr Parsons is a man of 
unusual prominence in his chosen field of action, 
and of more than ordinary significance to the pub- 
lic. 

Mr. Parsons was bom in Lynnfield, Massachu- 
setts, on September 4, 1869, and is a son of Eben 
and Mary A. (Dodge) Parsons. Receiving a thor- 
ough grounding in the essentials of education at 
the public schools of his native town, he later took 
a course at the Boston Latin School, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1887. Having 
from boyhood planned a career in the legal pro- 
fession, he entered Harvard University, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1891, having been 
one of the first twenty-five in his class. 

Admitted to the Essex county bar in 1892, Mr. 
Parsons became associated with Walter H. South- 
wick, a prominent attomey of that day, in the law 
firm of Southwick A Parsons, which gained a high 
reputation in the county, and continuied for some 
years. During his early experience he assisted John 
R. Baldwin, then city solicitor of Lynn, in his work 
pertaining to this ofllce. On the death of Mr. Bald- 
win in 1897, Mr. Parsons was elected to succeed 
him in the ofllce. Later he resigned fh)m this 
office, and was in turn succeeded by Arthur G. 
Wadleigh. The partnership of Southwick A Par^ 
sons was dissolved in 1902, and the foUowing year 
Mr. Parsons became associated with H. Ashley 
Bowen, under the firm name of Parsons A Bowen. 
Ia the January following they admitted to the firm 
Charles D. C. Moore, the firm name becoming Par- 
sons, Bowen A Moore. Later this partnership was 
^o dissolved and the present association formed. 
The firm is now Parsons, Wadleigh A Crowley, and 
their commodious oflices are located in the Gross- 
man building. 

The firm makes a specialty of corporation law, 
and among their clients are many of the most im- 



120 



ESSEX COUNTY 



portant industrial and commercial concerns in this 
part of the State, as well as a great number of in- 
dividuals. Mr. Parsons is most highly esteemed in 
every one of the many circles of his acquaintance. 
He is counted one of the best jury trial lawyers in 
the State of Massachusetts, and was elected presi- 
dent of the Essex County Bar Association on Janu- 
ary 8, 1916, and is also a prominent member of the 
Lynn Bar Association. 

In fraternal circles Starr Parsons is also promi- 
nent, being a member of Peter Woodland Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, of which order he is past chan- 
cellor. 

In many branches of public endeavor Mr. Par- 
sons has always taken a deep interest, alsof in those 
interests which make up the wholesome activities of 
youth. He is particularly interested in athletics and 
was for years a stockholder and director of the 
Lynn Baseball Association. 

On June 26, 18d4, Mr. Parsons married Minnie 
C. Bickford. On March 10, 1896, his son, Eben 
Parsons, was bom. He graduated from Harvard 
College in the class of 1918. He was an ensign in 
the Naval Aviation Service during the World War 
and is now identified with the firm of Parsons, Wad- 
leigh A Crowley. 



EDGAR W. JOHNSON— While the great war 
period, 1914-1918, brought hard problems for the 
American people to solve, the young man between 
twenty-one and thirty had one peculiarly his own, 
for upon him fell the great problem involving all 
the others and even life itself. It was a young 
man's war, and nobly they responded to the leader- 
ship of an inspired President. War was declared 
by the United States against Germany in May, 1917, 
and in July Edgar W. Johnson had solved his prob- 
lem, and was wearing the khaki as a private of the 
101st Regiment, Field Artillery, United States army. 
Then came nineteen months of overseas duty with 
the American Expeditionary Forces, during which 
he fought in those desperate engagements that 
proved the American soldier the peer of any and 
the superior of every German he met on the land, 
in the air or under the sea. Thence he returned 
to private life again in his native Salem, and to the 
position with the Salem Savings Bank, which he 
had resigned to carry out his solution of the prob- 
lem which in 1917 every young man in the country 
had laid before him. 

Edgar W. Johnson was bom in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, September 5, 1895, son of E. Frank and Julia 
(Barrows) Johnson, his father the greater part of 
his life engaged in amusement enterprises. After 
completing grade and high school courses in Salem 
public schools, Edgar W. Johnson entered the em- 
ploy of the Salem Savings Bank in 1914, and there 
remained until July, 1917, when he resigned to 
enter the military service of his country. 

Mr. Johnson entered the army in July, 1917, and 
was honorably discharged in April, 1919. He went 
overseas with the Twenty*Sixth Division of the 
American Expeditionary Forces and saw nineteen 



months' service in France, being engaged at Cha- 
teau, Demoles, Toul Sector, Chateau-Thierry, St 
Mihiel and Verdun. He escaped injury of a seri- 
ous nature and returned to Salem after receiving 
his discharge. 

In Salem he was returned to his old position with 
the Salem Savings Bank and there eontinues; he is 
also representative in Salem for the State Mutual 
Insurance Company of Worcester, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Johnson is a member of Essex Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; a Republican in politics; and a 
member of the Unitarian church. 

Mr. Johnson married, June 15, 1920, Mildred Lou- 
gee, daughter of Arthur L. and Anna (Call) Lougee, 
her father general sales manager of Haywaid 
Brothers & Wakefield, of Boston, 



REV. WILLIAM INGLI8 MORSR— There is no 
way by which the value of a life to a community 
can be estimated, and especially is this true of the 
life of a minister of the Gospel. When Rev. Wil- 
liam Inglis Morse accepted a call in 1905 fh>m the 
Protestant Episcopal Church of the Incamatioo, the 
congregation was small, but today the communi- 
cants of the parish number iU>out three hundred, 
and the parishioners, twelve hundred. The ehnreh 
was organized in 1885, the chapel being erected that 
year. In 1909, four years after Rev. William Inglis 
Morse became its rector, the new extension which 
had been built was freed from debt and vested in 
the hands of the trustees of donations of the Mas- 
sachusetts diocese. The present church was con- 
secrated by Bishop Lawrence, February 2, 1918, and 
the property adjoining the church was purchaaed 
for parochial purposes in 1915; an endovnnent fund 
also exists for the maintenance of the parish. These 
are but tangible evidences of the value of his 
rectorate, and constitute but a small part of the 
real benefit his leadership has meant to the church 
he has served so long and devotedly. The spirit 
tual advancement cannot be measured or told; only 
the great record will ever reveal what the life of 
this eloquent, devoted divine has meant to his own: 
people and to his city. 

William Inglis Morse was bom at Paradise, Nova 
Scotia, June 4, 1874, the son of Joseph and Almixa 
(Phinney) Morse. His ancestor, Samud Morse, son 
of Rev. Thomas Morse, rector of Foxearth, Essex 
county, England, came to Plymouth, Massachusetts, 
in 1631. Descendants settled in Annapolis, Nova 
Scotia, in 1760. After spending several years in 
preparation at the public schools of his native place 
he entered Acadia University, Nova Scotia, whence 
he was graduated with honors, A.B., class of 1897. 
He then took courses in theology at the Episcopal 
Theological School at Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
and received the degree of Bachelor of Divinity 
from this institution in 1900, after which he took a 
post-graduate course in Philosophy at Harvard Post 
Graduate School, and was ordained a priest of the 
Episcopal church by Rt Rev. William Lawrence, 
D.D., bishop of Massachusetts, May 22, 1901. From 
1900 to 1902 .Rev. Mr. Morse was ehaplain of the 



n^ UM >n^<rt^. ■^■. ^a. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



121 



Westminster School at Simsbury, Coimecticiit» and 
from 1902 until 1905, when he came to Lynn» he 
"was assistant at St. John's Episcopal Church, Stam- 
ford, Connecticut. The enthusiasm with which he 
came to this parish has given way to earnest set- 
tled purpose and mature judgment, rendering him 
valuable in counsel and leadership. 

Rev. Mr. Morse was elected a member of the 
Canadian Society of Authors on March 15, 1906, at 
Toronto, Canada. He is the author of ''Acadian 
Lays" (1908, Briggs, Toronto); ''Lady Latour" 
(1920, Ryerson Press, Toronto); and "Seeing Eur- 
ope Backwards" (1922, Boston). He is a member 
of the Tedesco GoU Club, Swampscott; Hartford 
Golf Club, Hartford, Connecticut; and Summer 
Subscriber at Manchester, Essex county, Massachu- 
setts. He is also a life member of the Nova Scotia 
Historical Society, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

On June 15, 1905, Rev. Mr. Morse married Susan 
A. Ensign, daughter of Ralph Hart Ensign (presi- 
dent of the Ensign, Bickford Company of Simsbury) 
and Susan (Toy) Ensign, daughter of Joseph Toy, 
esquire, of Camborne, England, who migrated to 
America in 1839, where he started the manufacture 
of safety fuses on this side of the Atlantic. They 
are the parents of one daughter, Susan Toy Morse, 
bom in Simsbury, July 4, 1905. The family at 
present reside at No. 170 Ocean street, Lynn. The 
Rev. W. I. Morse will complete his seventeenth 
year as rector of his parish this coming July, 1922. 



JANE SMITH DEVERSAUX, M. D., received 
her degree and began the practice of medicine in 
her native MarUehead, Massachusetts, in 1880, the 
woman phj^cian at that time not being looked 
upon with the same fitvor as at the present day. 
That was true of aU professions, and Dr. Devereaux 
met with no unusual hardships in the way of 
prejudice against the entrance of women into the 
professions. Forty years have since elapsed and 
she is still in practice, her skill and value having 
been so fully demonstrated that her place in the 
life of Marblehead could not easily be iUled. 

Dr. Devereaux is a daughter of Samuel and Han- 
nah W. (Smith) Devereaux, her father bom in 
Marblehead, May 28, 1886; her mother, also bom in 
Marblehead, June 22, 1886, died there, February 22, 
1908. They were the parents of four children: 1. 
Robert Devereaux, bom in Marblehead, February 
20, 1856, now a resident of California. 2. Jane 
Smith, of further mention. 8. Anna W., a sketch 
of whom follows. 4. Crertrude M., bom Deeember 
2, 1870, now the wife of Gardner R. Hathaway, a 
prominent real estate dealer of Marblehead. They 
have four children: Anna, the wife of Richard D. 
Sanders, of Salem; Alden L., of Marblehead; Sam- 
uel D., of Norfolk, Virginia; and Daniel R., of 
Marblehead. 

Jane Smith Devereaux, eldest daughter of Samuel 
and Hannah W. (Smith) Devezmux, was bom in 
Marblehead, Massachusetts, February 11, 1868. She 
prepared in Marblehead public schools, decided 
upon a professional career, and was gnuiuated from 



the Medical School of the University of Boston, 
with the degree of M.D., class of 1880. She at once 
began the practice of her profession in Fall River, 
in June, 1880, then in December, 1880, came to 
Marblehead, where she has a record of forty years' 
successful practice. She is a member of the Mas- 
sachusetts Homoeopathic Medical Society; the Mas- 
sachusetts Surgical and Gyniecological Society; the 
Marblehead Woman's Ciuh; and the Congregational 
church. Dr. Deyereaux is highly regarded in 
Marblehead, both for her professional ability and 
her fine, womanly quality. She is devoted to her 
profession, and is an earnest laborer in the cause 
of sanitation and better and more healthful living 
conditions. -_^.-.^_^^_ 

ANNA WHITE DBVBRSAUX, second daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Hannah W. (Smith) Devereaux 
(see preceding sketch), was bom in Marblehead, 
Massachusetts, and died there June 16, 1919. The 
following review of her valuable life and touching 
tribute to her memory is from the pen of Miss Anna 
J. McKeag, a co-worker in the cause of education: 

^Miss Anna White Devereaux, well known to Wel« 
lesley people as director of the Page Kindeigurten 
and lecturer in the Department of Education of 
Welleslev College, died at her home in Marblehead, 
on Monday morning, June 16, 1919. 

^'Miss Devereaux, who was one of the best known 
Idndergartners in this country, received hor train- 
ing in Boston at the Anne Page Noraud Kindnr- 
garten Training School. For twenty years she was 
engaged in kindergarten work in Lowell, having 
been during fourteen years of this period in charge 
of the kindergarten training dass of the State Nor- 
mal School in Lowell. 

^ A few years ago Miss Devereaux came to Welles- 
ley to take ehaxve of the newly-established Anne 
Page Memorial SJndeigarten and to direct the 
theoretical and practical woric of graduate students 
of Wellesley College who were being trained aa 
Idndergartners. Miss Devereaux also gave lectures 
each year to undergraduate students of education 
on the subject of the kindergarten. 

'^In the course of her busy life and varied profes^ 
sional interests. Miss Devereaux had found time 
also to write several books on kindergarten theory 
and practice, and to give addresses at noteworthy 
educational conventions. 

''In her work with the children of Wellesley at 
the Anne Page Memorial Kindergarten, Miss Dever- 
eaux had the respect and confidence of the parents 
and the strong affection of the children. To her 
the kindergarten was no mere place of child activ- 
ity; it was a centre of si^tuaf growth for the lit- 
tle lives entrusted to her care. No one who has 
seen the ''morning drde" can forget the spirit of 
good-will, the eagerness, the Joy of the members of 
the little group gathered about their beloved Mi'«g 
Devereaux, learning from her, through song and 
story, the great lessons of helpfulness, of duty, of 
reverence. Each child was to her a special sub- 
ject of study; his physical, mental and moral nature 
received her earnest consideration and she gave to 
each her best self. It is hiuxl to give an adequate 
estimate of all that the devoted service of this 
noble woman has meant to the children of Welles- 
ley. 



ESSEX COUNTY 



**Ab a lecturer at the colleire, WA Deyereanz was 
interestiiii: and inspiring. Students gained from 
her a new respect for the possibilities of child niu> 
tore and treSh inspiration in their educational 
studies. Her personality was one of unusual at- 
tractiveness. Radiant, buoyant in spirit, enthusi- 
astic always, she diffused a spirit of hope and joy 
among her colleagues and her pupils. Her fkith in 
human nature, her unselfish devotion to the welfare 
of others, and her beautiful Christian character 
will be an abiding memory in the hearts of those 
who knew her. Kindergartners over the whole land 
will mourn the going of one of their number, wide- 
ly known and higluy esteemed* and the town of 
Wellesley will miss one who has given so much of 
hersdf to the best interests of the conmiunity." 

NATHANIEL B. RANKIN, one of the success- 
ful attorneys of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and a 
man who has made a name for himself in the pub- 
lic life of this region, is a native of Taunton, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he was bom September 12, 1874. 
He is a son of WDliam H. and Catherine A. (Mc- 
Mahon) Rankin. His father was bom in Kenne- 
bunk, Maine, and has always been a textile manu- 
facturer. Fpr thirteen years he was a dyer at the 
Lower Pacific Mills, in Lawrence. After periods in 
Manchester, New Hampshire, and Columbus, Geor- 
gia, he went to Waltham, Massachusetts, as agent 
of the Boston Manufacturing Company. 

Nathaniel E. Rankin received the elementary 
portion of his education at the public schools of 
Lawrence. After graduating from the local high 
school he entered Phillips Academy at Andover, 
where he prepared himself for college, having in 
the meantime determined to adopt the law as a 
profession. He accordingly matriculated at the law 
school of Boston University and pursued the pre- 
scribed course with the class of 1900. Throughout 
his school and college years he had proved himself 
an intelligent student, and at the close, came to 
the opening of his career unusually well equipped 
both with natural gifts and a training that was the 
result of conscientious effort. Immediately after 
graduating, he passed his bar examinations and es- 
tablished himself in the practice of his chosen pro- 
fession, first in Boston, where he remained for two 
years, returning subsequently to Lawrence, where 
he formed a partnership with Archie N. Frost. 
That continued until 1914, but since then he has 
practiced alone. He has built up an excellent prac- 
tice, for as a lawyer with a broad comprehensive 
grasp of all questions that come before him, he has 
proven himself to be well fitted for affairs requir- 
ing administrative ability. He is clerk of the Dis- 
trict Court, having been appointed January 1, 1917, 
and is a member of the Essex Countyi Bar Associa- 
tion and the Lawrence Bar Association. 

Besides his legal activity, Mr. Rankin has inter- 
ested himself in the conduct of public affairs in 
the community and has come to be regarded as one 
of the leaders of the local organization of the Re- 
publican party. He& was a member of the Repub- 
lican City Committee for some years, and later 
was, for five years, a member of the Republican 



State Committee, doing a good deal of speech- 
making for the cause. During the Worid War he 
was a member of the local draft board, having al- 
ways, in a public-spirited manner, discharged every 
obligation of citizenship, never shrinking any duty, 
public or private. Mr. Rankin attends the Tower 
Hill Congregational Church; he aflBiliates with the 
Masonic order, being a member of Tuscan Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons. 

On November 4, 1908, at Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, Nathaniel E. Rankin was united in marriage 
with Elizabeth M. Speirs, daughter of Alexander 
Speirs, of Lawrence. Mr. and Mrs. RankJTi are the 
parents of two children: Elizabeth and Catfaezine. 
The family home is at No. 645 Lowell street. 



RBV. MICHAEL J. COFFEY— In caring for 
the spiritual needs of the people of the parish, Rev. 
Michael J. Coffey, pastor of the Church of the Holy 
Sacrament, in Cliftondale, Massachnaetta^ has 
greatly broadened the usefulness of the chnreh in 
many practical ways, and has increased the ma^ 
terial prosperity of tiie church. 

Father Coffey was bom in Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts, April 11, 1872, and is a son of Michael 
and Margaret (Buckley) Coffey, who came to this 
country from Ireland in their youth. Reeeiviiig his 
early education in the parochial schools of New- 
buryport, Father Coffey was graduated in 1888. 
Thereafter he studied under a special tutor for a 
period of four years, then entered St. John's Semi- 
nary, at Brighton, Massachusetts, where he pursued 
his theological studies. Ordained on Decsember 16, 
1897, he began his service as curator of the church 
in East Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1898, and re- 
mained in that capacity for ten years. In 1908 he 
was appointed assistant at St. Mary's Church in 
Brookline, and in 1917 was appointed pastor of the 
Church of the Holy Sacrament, at Cliftondale, in 
the outskirts of Saugus. 

Father Coffey found his present parish burdened 
with a mortgage of $6,000, which they had carried 
for upwards of ten years. The eight hundred mem- 
ber of the church were in a state of discourage- 
ment, but his activities soon changed the prevailing 
conditions. Within the first year of his pastorate 
Father Coffey wiped out the entire indebtedness. 
He has since added to the church property a hand- 
some parochial residence, which he now occupies, 
and has furthermore accumulated a large sum oi 
money, which now rests in the church treasury* 

These sweeping improvements have diBveioped in 
connection with a deep spiritual awakening among 
the people of the community. From the member- 
ship above noted the church has increased to a 
membership of thirteen hundred or more. Father 
Coffey gathering in many who had hitherto be^ 
considered out of reach of the ministrations of this 
church or any other. This he accomplished through 
an organized campaign of development in jitney 
service at such hours as the holy services of the 
church called the people together. 

This church, under Father Coffey's ministrations, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



128 



has taken an active part in many branches of com- 
munity progress, particularly in the work in sup- 
port of the American Expeditionary Forces during 
the period of the World War. The church gave 
to the cause of humanity, in that terrible struggle, 
one hundred, men, who bore a noble part in the 
service in France. 



SHBRMAN HENRY MARSHALL, shoe manu- 
facturer, and founder and treasurer of the Emery 
MarshaU Company, Inc., probably the largest 
manufacturers of women's medium-grade turns and 
welts in the Haverhill district, was bom in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, December 5, 1870, the son of 
Joseph A. and Mary A. (Manser) Marshall, both 
of Nova Scotia originally. 

Mr. Marshall's education was obtained in the 
common and high schools of Haverhill, and after 
passing through the latter he started a business 
life in the cutting room of the shoe factory of 
Knipe Brothers, in whose employ he remained for 
about a: year. Then followed a like period in the 
packing room of W. F. and J. A. Blake, after which 
he entered the employ of Spaulding A Swett. Even- 
tually he became superintendent of the plant, hold- 
ing that responsibility in a plant at Wolfboro, New 
Hampshire, for thirteen years. In 1898 he was 
made a member of the firm, and four years later 
located in Lowell, Massachusetts. Coming to Haver- 
hill, he acquired an interest in the predecessor of 
the present Emery Marshall Company, Inc. He 
formed a partnership with Mr. Emery in 1908, un- 
der the trading name of Emery & Marshall Com- 
pany, the company specializing in women's medium- 
grade turns and welts. The business was incor- 
porated in 1912 and has grown to such an extent 
that today it is stated to be the largest in Haver- 
hill in its line, the output being 4,000 pair a day. 

Mr. Emery retired from the business in 1918, and 
Mr. Marshall's son, Frederick S., is now president 
and assistant treasurer of the company, his father 
being treasurer. Sherman H. MarshaU also controls 
the financial direction, as treasurer, of the Granite 
State Shoe Company, and the Sample Shoe Com- 
pany (retail store business) of Boston. He also is 
prominently identified with other business enter- 
prises and financial institutions, being president of 
the HaverhiU Coal Supply Company, treasurer of 
the Prescott Power Company, and director of the 
Merrimack National and Morris Plan banks of 
Haverhill. 

Mr. Marshall has taken part in much public 
work in his native city, particulariy during the re- 
cent World War period, and especiaUy in connec- 
tion with the Liberty Loan and Red Cross cam- 
paigns. He is a director of the Haverhill Young 
Mat's Christian Association, and president of the 
Pentucket Club. Fraternally he is a thirty-second 
degree Mason; religiously, he is a Methodist, a 
member of Grace Church, of Haverhill. 

Mr. Marshall married, in 1889, May W. Phil- 
brick, daughter of Creorge H. an4 Carrie E. (Bunk- 
er) Philbrick, of Kittery, Maine, the latter original- 



ly of Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall have 
one child, a son, Frederick Sherman, a sketch of 
whom follows. 

FREDERICK SHBRMAN MARSHALL, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, president and assistant 
treasurer of the Emery MarshaU Company, Inc., 
also of the Granite State Shoe Company, director 
of the Sample Shoe Company, of Boston, and of 
the Prescott Power Company, is a native of Haver- 
hill, bom in that dty on February 24, 1890, son of 
Sherman Henry and May W. (Philbrick) Marshall 
(see preceding sketch). 

Frederick S. Marshall was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Haverhill, and after passing through 
high school, entered his father's factory, there thor- 
oughly learning the shoe business. For three years 
he worked in the shipping department, and for an- 
other five years he was in the sole leather de- 
partment, after which practical experience he was 
taken into the general offices and given charge of 
production and detail work. In 1912 he became a 
member of the firm, the Emery Marshall Company, 
Inc., and later was elected assistant treasurer. 
When Mr. Emery retired in 1918 he became presi- 
dent. He is now president and assistant treasurer, 
his father being treasurer. While this is his main 
business, Mr. Marshall also is president and assist^ 
ant treasurer of the Granite State Shoe Company, 
and a director of the Sample Shoe Company, of 
Boston, as above mentioned. 

During the World War Mr. Marshall was in 
military service, being commissioned a second lieu- 
tenant, and assigned to a Machine Gun Company. 
That he is an expert in shoes may be inferred from 
his National work during the stress of the World 
War, when leading manufacturers and executives 
were asked to put their own affairs secondary to 
the National interest, and take up the direction of 
business departments for the government in the 
great emergency. During the World War, Mr. 
Marshall was in charge of the Shoe Supply Depart- 
ment of the Boston District. He is a director of 
the Prescott Power Company, and was one of the 
incorporators of the Pentucket Savings Bank. 

Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree Mason; 
and a member of the Junior Order United Ameri- 
can Mechanics. He also belongs to the Pentucket 
and Agawan dubs. His church is the Universalist, 
being a member of the First Universalist Church 
of Haverhill. 

Mr. Marshall married, in 1908, Creorgia Lillian 
Page, daughter of Henry and Mary (Hughes) Page, 
the former of Haverhill, and the latter originaUy 
of Creorgetown, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
shall have three children: Kenneth Sherman, who 
was bom in 1909; Richard Donald, who was bom 
in 1916; and Barbara Page, bom in 1919. 



THE MERRIMACK NATIONAL BANK, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, is the oldest banking in- 
stitution of Haverhill. It received its charter from 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1814, by 



124 



ESSEX COUNTY 



special act of the Senate and House of Represen- 
tatives '^in general court assembled,'' and by that 
act Charles White, David How, Jr., Leonard White, 
Daniel Haddock, Robert B. Willis, Bayley Bartlett, 
James Howe, James Duncan, Jr., Peter Osgood, 
Thomas R. Appleton, Moses Gale, Jr., John Dow 
€uid Ebenezer Gage, and successors, were ''created 
a corporation by the naming of the president, direc- 
tors, and company of the Merrimack bank." The 
bill, passed by both houses to be enacted on June 
14, 1814, was signed by Alden Bradford, Secretary 
of Commonwealth, on Jime 23rd. "Upon the pas- 
sage of the act of incorporation, the proprietors of 
the bank met at the house of William Greenleaf, 
innholder, on Tuesday, July 5, 1814, at 4 o'clock, 
when Charles White was chosen clerk. Bayley 
Bartlett, Esq., was chosen moderator, and the seven 
directors chosen were David How, Esq., Bayley 
Bartlett, Esq., Ebenezer Gage, Esq., James Howe, 
Peter Osgood, Robert B. Willis and Charles White." 
On July 9th the directors ''voted to purchase the 
store belonging to Leonard White, Esq., for a bank- 
ing house, together with the land, for $1,000." Two 
days later David How was elected president, and 
Leonard White, cashier. Mr. How was a soldier 
of the Revolution, was representative to the Gen- 
eral Court of Massachusetts for twelve years, and 
was one of the first to engage in the manufacture 
of shoes on a wholesale scale in Haverhill. He 
was president of the Merrimack Bank until 1826. 
Leonard White, first cashier, was prominent in the 
local administration, town derk and treasurer for 
many years. State Representative and later Na- 
tional Congressman from that district (1811-18). 
He was cashier of the bank for twenty-two years. 
The original home of the bank stiU stands at the 
comer of Water and Stage streets. 

Nathaniel Hill was second president, serving until 
1881. David Marsh, Jr., succeeded him in that 
year. James H. Duncan was president from 1888 
to 1845, and from 1847 to 1849, Dr. Rufus Longley 
serving from 1846 to 1847, and from 1849 to 1855. 
Hon. E. J. M. Hale was president for twenty-three 
years, 1855 to 1878. 

The bank was a State institution until 1864, then 
becoming a National bank. On September 22, 1879, 
the store at Nos. 22-24 Washington street was 
purchased from George A. Greene for $12,000. 
Fortunately, the directors expended $4,000 in "a 
double-lined vault and burglar-proof safe." Two 
years later the great fire in Haverhill rased the 
bank building with others, but it was found, how- 
ever, that the vault withstood the flames. 

Charles W. Chase was president from 1878 to 
1891. He was succeeded by Dudley Porter, and he 
in turn by the present incumbent, Charles W. 
Arnold, who became chief executive of the insti- 
tution in 1905. 

When the Merrimack National Bank opened for 
business in 1814, the trading can not have been 
very appreciable, because the valuation of the whole 
of the city was then only about $85,000, but the 



bank has gone steadily forward through the de- 
cades, as its reports will show. 

CHARLES W. ARNOLD, president of the Merri- 
mack National Bank of Haverhill, (see preceding 
sketch), and olie of Massachusett's leading leather 
merchants, was bom in Hampstead, New Hamp- 
shire, May 24, 1858, son of John W. and Mary A. 
Arnold, the former a lumber merchant, and a man 
of sterling character. Charies W. Arnold was rear- 
ed in the wholesome environment of a New Eng- 
land home of independent responsibility without 
affluence, and he therefore developed a sturdy^ 
steady character. He was educated in the public 
schools, and for eighteen months was able to attend 
the Connecticut Literary Institution, which was of 
a preparatory collegiate class. But he was only 
sixteen years old when his father died, and It then 
became necessary for him to at once begin to earn 
money. So he entered the employ of T. Noyes and 
Company, of Haverhill, in the humblest capacity, 
and there learned the leather business, with which 
he has ever since been identified. His steadiness 
and reliability soon became evident. It is said that 
for seven years he "never lost an hour firom his 
day's work." To-day he is among the leading 
leather merchants of Massachusetts. What may 
his success be attributed to? Earnestness, eon*- 
sdentiousness, and application. Mr. Arnold's com- 
mon sense doctrine is: "To attain true success in 
life, give close application to whatever one is en- 
gaged in, with honesty and hard work. Above all, 
whatever one does, whether work or play, do it 
well." Production cannot come without applica- 
tion, but complete success will not come out of 
poor workmanship. 

Mr. Arnold has followed business closely, but 
what time he has been able to give to other mat- 
ters has been thoroughly given. He is manifestly 
well-read, takes recreation strenuously, and is of 
record in many public activities. He has served in 
the city administration, being alderman in 1892 and 
1898, the latter year being chairman of the board. 
He has been identified with military organisations, 
being a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company of Massachusetts. He also has 
been prominent in the functioning of fralwmal 
bodies, being a thirty-second degree Mason; emi- 
nent commander of Haverhill Commandery, 
Knights Templar; and his love of the outdoors 
finds expression in driving, fishing, motoring and 
golf. He is a former president of the Island Golf 
Club of Haverhill, and the Pentucket Quh. He at- 
tends the Universalist church of Haveihill, and 
politically is a Democrat. 

On September 16, 1882, at Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, Mr. Arnold was married to Mildred Fletcher, 
daughter of Raymond and Julia Fletcher, of 
Haverhill. To them have been bom five children, 
two sons and three daughters, as follows: Claude 
M., Blanche M., Charles W., Jr., Marjorie, and 
Nathalie. 



4 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



125 



ARTHUR L. COLS— Among the reliable and 
entetpiiaing business men of Lawrence* Massachu- 
setts, is Arthur L. Cole, a stationer. His business 
has steadily grown until it now is the best in that 
line in Lawrence; indeed it is stated that his store 
is one of the show places of Lawrence. 

Mr. Cole was bom in Waybridge, Vermont, on 
May 26, 1867, son of Jamea S. and Mary (Winters) 
Cole, his father being of Middlebury, Vermont, and 
his mother of Stockholm, New York. His father, 
who was a farmer, died in 1912; his mother died 
twenty-two years earlier, in 1890. They were the 
IMurents of six children, Arthur L. being the young- 
est of their four sons. He was educated in public 
schools in his native place, and later at the Bee- 
man Academy, New Haven, Vermont. After leav- 
ing school he found employment with George Har- 
ris, at Clinton, Massachusetts. He remained in 
this employ for twelve years, then came to Law- 
rence to enter into business for himself. He 
opened a stationery store at No. 282 Essex street, 
and by persistent and consistent effort developed it 
to its present enviable standing. 

Mr. Cole is widely known in the district. He be- 
longs to the Home Club, the Country Club, and the 
Methuen Club, and also is a member of John Han- 
cock Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Methuen, 
and of the Boston Stationers' Association. He was 
president of the Chamber of Commerce for one 
term. By religious faith he is a Congregationalist, 
attending Trinity Congregational Church, of Law- 
rence. 

Mr. Cole married, in 1897, Edith L. Gibbs, of 
Clinton, Massachusetts, daughter of William H. and 
Marcia (Lawrence) Gibbs, of Clinton. The former 
is a manufacturer of harness and reeds at that 
place, but he has been a widower since 1908. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cole were the parents of one child, a son, 
William H., who was bom in 1900. 



RBID & HUGHES COMPANY--This company, 
which is located at Nbs. 225-285 Essex street, Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, is one of the leading stores 
of the city, embodying as it does twenty-eight de- 
partments, carrying every kind of women's wear 
and household furnishings. "The Boston Store," 
as it is familiarly known to the shopping public of 
Lawrence, is most favorably regarded not only in 
the city itself, but also in the surrounding terri- 
tory adjacent to Lawrence. The business was 
founded by Thomas Simpson and William Oswald, 
who bought out the dry goods business of A. 
Sharpe, at No. 218 Essex street, and oi)ened under 
the firm name of Simpson A Oswald. As time went 
on and the business srrew, it was removed to its 
present quarters. Mr. Oswald purchased Mr. 
Simpson's interests some time later and continued 
alone until 1893, when he sold out to the Reid ft 
Hughes Company. Ten years later, according to 
a previous agreement, Mr. Oswald bought back the 
business and fbrmed the William Oswald Company^ 
but owing to ill health he again sold to the Reid ft 
Hughes Company, which was a new corporation at 



this time, consisting of Adam Raid, James J. 
Hughes, Etigene T. Adams and Leonard £. Ben- 
nink. In 1905 James J. Hughes died, in 1907 came 
Mr. Reid's death, and in 1914 George F. Hughes, 
who was later admitted to the firm, passed away. 
This left the interests of the last two named in 
the hands of Leonard £. Bennink and Eugene T. 
Adams. In 1918 the interests of the James J. 
Hughes estate were acquired by Leonard E. Ben- 
nink, which gave him a large majority control, and 
he became president and treasurer of the concern; 
radical improvements were made, and at the present 
time, 1921, there is no more modem store in Essex 
county. The establishment has a frontage of 105 
feet on Essex street, is 85 feet deep, and three 
stories high, with an extensive basement in addi- 
tion. The present ofilcers are: Leonard E. Ben- 
nink, president and treasurer, a sketch of whom 
follows; Donald C. Bennink, assistant treasurer; 
and Frederic N. Chandler, secretary. 



LBONARD B. BENNINK, president and treas- 
urer of the Reid ft Hughes Company, above men- 
tioned, was bom in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
January 8, 1855. He was the son of Gerrett Jan 
and Maatje (Van Setten) Bennink, both natives 
of Holland. After finishing his education in the 
public schools of his native city, the business of life 
began for the boy at fifteen years of age, and from 
its inception he has been engaged in the dry goods 
business, having been thus employed both in Bos- 
ton and Brockton previous to his identification with 
the Boston store. 

Mr. Bennink, in addition to his duties as directing 
head of the Reid ft Hughes Company, has been one 
of the most active and well known public-spirited 
citizens of this community, his activities having 
found expression in his being secretary of the Old 
Merchants' Association, president of the Merchants' 
Association, director in the Chamber of Commerce 
as it is constituted today, director in the Bay State 
National Bank and Morris Plan Bank, besides be- 
ing chairman of the Water Commission of Law- 
rence, and a member of practically every important 
committee for civic betterment in the last decade. 
In the great 1912 textile strike, Mr. Bennink was a 
member of the Citizens' Conm:iittee which did suc- 
cessful work in those trying times. He Was the 
first president of the association which drafted the 
present Lawrence City Charter and was one of the 
fathers of the project. During the World War he 
was tireless in his efforts as an ofilcial 'four-min- 
ute man," and a member of the Massachusetts 
Committee of Public Safety. 

Leonard E. Bennink is also prominent in Ma- 
sonic circles, being a member of all the Masonic 
bodies through the thirty-second degree, and is 
affiliated with many other organizations, as follows: 
Lawrence Lodge, No. 65, Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks; ex-president of the Lawrence 
Anti-Tuberculosis League; Home Club; Merrimac 
Valley Country Club; president of the Men's Club 
of the Universalist church; treasurer of the Law- 



126 



ESSEX COUNTY 



rence Newsboys' Protective AModation and a 
trustee from its inception; and a member of the 
executive committee of the Republican Club of 
Massachusetts. 

On April 13, 1881, Leonard £. Bennink was 
united in marriage with Katherine A. Crone, a 
native of Boston, Massachusetts, and the daughter 
of Captain Louis E. and Augusta A. Crone, the 
latter a native of Peterborough, New Hampshire. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bennink are the parents of two chil- 
dren: Bertha, who married Charles Ernest Curran, 
of Lawrence, and lives at No. 43 Pearl street. 2. 
Donald C, who is assistant treasurer of the firm 
of the Reid & Hughes Company, is a graduate of 
the Lawrence public schools and Dartmouth Col- 
lege, having graduated from the latter institution 
in the class of 1915. He served in the United 
States army during the World War from May 12, 
1917, until March 4, 1919, in the grades from pri- 
vate to first lieutenant, and was discharged a cap- 
tain in the reserve corps. He is a member of Gre- 
cian Lodge of Masons, of Lawrence; Mt. Sinai 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; La¥n:ence Council, 
Royal and Select Masters; and is affiliated with 
Lawrence Lodge, No. 66, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; and Lawrence Post, No. 15, Ameri- 
can Legion, of which he is past commander. Mr. 
Bennink also holds membership in the Home Club, 
Merrimac Valley Country Club, and was formerly 
commanding officer of Company D, First Supply 
Train, Massachusetts National Guard, of Lawrence. 
Donald C. Bennink married, on June 12, 1920, 
Elizabeth Scott Jeffrey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
WiULam S. Jeffrey, of Lawrence, and they have one 
son, Leonard E. Bennink, 2nd., bom May 16, 1921. 



HARRY £. JACKSON was bom at Salem, Mas* 
sachusetts, the son of Eben and Lupyra S. (New- 
begin) Jackson, the former bom in Madison, New 
Hampshire, March 10, 1834, the latter in Newfield, 
Maine, June 17, 1843. They now reside in Dan* 
vers during the summer, but spend their winters in 
Plymouth, Florida. Eben Jackson grew up on a 
farm, but from the age of eighteen to twenty-one 
years was a seaman on a whaling trip to the Arctic, 
then was a shoemaker in Lawrence. Later he went 
to Salem and entered the grocery and provision 
business, being a partner of the late Franklin 
White. He returned in 1882 to a small farm in 
Danvers. 

Harry E. Jackson received his early education 
in the public schools, graduating from the Salem 
Grammar School and the Danvers High School. 
He proceeded to the Boston University Law School, 
where he graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in 1894. 

Mr. Jackson began to practice law with John 
M. Raymond, of Salem, in 1894, and remained in 
Mr. Raymond's office until he was admitted to the 
bar and established his own office. Mr. Jackson 
has been eminently successful in his profession and 
is well known in Massachusetts. He has been coun- 
sel for the town of Danvers for the past ten years 



and acts as a special justice of the Ipswich Dii 
Court He is vice-president of the CodperatiTe 
Bank of Danvers, and also acts as attorney for 
the bank. For about nine years he served a0 a 
member of the School Board of Danvers, and also 
served as chairman of the School Committee. 

Mr. Jackson was formerly president of the Salem 
Bar Association, and is now a member of the board 
of directors of that association. He is director of 
the Massachusetts City Solicitors' and Town Coun- 
sels' Association. In politics he is a Republiean. 
and was for several years chairman of the Repub- 
lican Town Committee of Danvers. He belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has 
held all the chairs of the lodge of that organiza- 
tion in Danvers. He is a Mason of the thirty- 
second degree, and belongs to the Knights Templar. 
He is a member of the Masonic Club, and served as 
district deputy of the Ninth Masonic District. He 
belongs to the Blue Lodge, in which he has held 
all the chairs; and he is a past master of Amity 
liodge. 

Mr. Jackson married Fanny M. Freind» of Dan- 
vers, and they are the parents of one daughter, 
Hilda Jackson. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson reside at 
No. 34 Poplar street, Danvers. The law office of 
Jackson & Jackson, in Salem, is at No. 81 Washing- 
ton street. 

ALBERT WARREN ROGERS, a practicing den- 
tist, of Newburs^ort, Massachusetts, was bom in 
West Newbury, Massachusetts, in 1876, son of 
George C. and Lydia (Furington) Rogers. His boy- 
hood was spent in that town, and there he attended 
the public schools. He ent<ured the Boston Dental 
School, where in 1898 he received his degree, spend- 
ing the ensuing year in East Weymouth, Massa- 
chusetts. He ^en succeeded Dr. Emeiy in New- 
bur3n[M>rt and has successfully continued to the 
present time. 

Fraternally, Dr. Rogers is a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows; and also is a mem- 
ber of the American Yacht Club; the North East- 
em Dental Society; and the Essex County Dental 
Society. With his family he attends the Firsti Con- 
gregational Church. 

Dr. Rogers married, in June, 1901, Dai«y Moses* 
daughter of Chauncey B. and Mary J. Moses, and 
their children are: Marjorie, bom April 12, 1902; 
Edith, bom June 80, 1904; Rachel, bom May 1, 
1909. 

WILBBRT J. SMITH— As head of the Smith 
Motor Car Company, at No. 166 Essex street, 
Lawrence, Mr. Smith fills a responsible position 
with both energy and ability. The salesroom and 
offices of the company are modem in every par- 
ticular and the plant of the Smith Motor Car Com- 
pany is an addition to the street. 

Wilbert J. Smith was bom at Nictaux South, An- 
napolis county. Nova Scotia, Canada, January 11, 
1880, there attended public schools and resided until 
nineteen years of age, when he came to Lawrence, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



127 



Massachusetts. His first position was with his 
uncle, John D. Morehouse, who was in the retail 
grocery business in Lawrence, where he remained 
for about four years. He was then, until 1910, en- 
gaged as salesman in Yarious lines. In that year 
he entered the automobile field by opening a sales- 
room and service station. Since 1912 he has hand- 
led the Buick, and for about two years the Chevro- 
let and Cole cars, the G. M. C. trucks, and a full 
line of tires, parts and accessories. He also main- 
tains a branch of his business at Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Mr. Smith is a member of the Lawrence Cham- 
ber of Commerce, the Home Club, and the Merri- 
mac Valley Country Club. He also belongs to the 
Masonic order, being a member of Phoenician 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Lawrence; 
Mt. Sinai Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence 
Council, Royal and Select Masters; Bethany Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar; Massachusetts Con- 
sistory; and is a noble of Aleppo Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a 
member of Monadnock Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Smith married, in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
in September, 1909, Grace E. Sampson, daughter of 
Fred Sampson, of that dty. Their home is in An- 
dover, Massachusetts. 



WILLIAM DAVID HARTSHORNE, C. E.— 
While Mr. Hartshome is above aU else the pro- 
fessional man, and devoted to his profession, he is 
none the less the able business man and financier 
at the head of and connected with the directorates 
of National, Trust and Savings banks of Methuen 
and Lawrence, Massachusetts. He came to the 
Lawrence district in 1879, and since has served the 
textile industry as superintendent and agent, but 
since 1913 he has acted in the capacity of consult- 
ing engineer. 

William D. Hartshome was bom in Brighton, 
Maryland, January 18, 1858, son of Isaac and Anna 
Elizabeth (Stabler) Hartshome, his father a dmg^ 
gist and landowner. The boy, William D., attend- 
ed the public schools of Brighton, prepared at 
Westtown Boarding School (a famed Friends' 
School of Chester county, Pennsylvania), then en- 
tered Haverford College, in the fall of 1867, remain- 
ing two years. The next two years were spent 
at home as his father's assistant, following which 
he entered Lehigh University, whence he was grad- 
uated, with the degree of Civil Engineer, class of 
1874. At Lehigh he pursued special courses in 
chemistry and mine engineering, his university edu- 
cation being broad and comprehensive. After 
graduation, he spent two years in the service of the 
Lehigh Valley railroad, engaged on the construc- 
tion of the Musconetcong tunnel, under Henry S. 
Drinker, who was in charge of the building of that 
important work, 1872-76. 

After his service with the Lehigh Valley rail- 
road, Mr. Hartshome accepted a position as profes- 



sor of mathematics and physics at the Howland 
School, Union Springs, New York, remaining there 
two years. In the fall of 1878 he was placed in 
charge of a party of government engineers, station- 
ed at Vicksburg, gauging the flow of the Missis- 
sippi river in search of needed data. He retired 
from that position in July, 1879, and for a few 
months was engaged in special study in certain 
branches of chemistry. 

In the fall of 1879 he entered the service of the 
Arlington Mills, at Lawrence, as chemist, but a year 
later he was placed in charge of the dyeing and 
finishing departments of the mill. In the winter of 
1882-83 he was appointed superintendent of the 
worsted department, remaining in that position until 
1900, then, until 1918, filled the oflSce of agent. In 
that year he resigned the agency and during the 
following summer visited Europe. Upon his re- 
turn, he opened an office and has since acted pri- 
vately as consulting engineer, textile mill conditions 
a specialty. He is highly regarded in his profes- 
sion, has written extensively on technical subjects, 
and on certain phases of engineering is a recognized 
authority. 

Mr. Hartshome is located in Methuen, Massa- 
chusetts, two miles from Lawrence, and takes a 
deep interest in his town. He is a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce; member of the American 
Society for Testing Materials; Boston Society of 
Civil Engineers; American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers; American Chemical Society; life member and 
past president of the National Association of Cot- 
ton Manufacturers; and member of the New Eng^ 
land branch Society Chemical Industry. He is affili- 
ated with John Hancock Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; attends the Congregational church 
of Methuen; and in politics is a Republican, serving 
for twelve years on the Methuen School Commit- 
tee. He has most important business connections 
outside his profession, being president of the Na- 
tional Bank of Methuen, Massachusetts, an office to 
which he was elected in 1905; is a director of the 
Merchants' Trust Company of Lawrence, and a trus- 
tee of the Broadway Savings Bank of Lawrence. 

Mr. Hartshome married, in 1877, in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, Eliza Cutler, of that dty, and they 
are the parents of four children: Elsie Cutler; 
Miriam; Isaac, who is an oculist of New York City; 
and Hugh Hartshome, a professor in Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, New York City. The family 
home is in Methuen, Massachusetts. 



CHARLES A. CLIFFORD— In the city of Law- 
rence, Massachusetts, one of the prominent mem- 
bers of the legal profession is Charles A. Clifford, 
who is also interested in various branches of activ- 
ity. 

Mr. Clifford is a son of James H. and Mary (Le- 
han) Clifford. The elder Mr. Clifford, bom in St. 
John, New Brunswick, came to Lawrence in 1847, 
and for f orty^onsecutive years was a familiar figfure 
in the business life of the city. He died in Janu- 



128 



ESSEX COUNTY 



aiy, 191Q»» He established the decorating business 
now conducted under the name of the James H. 
Clifford Company. 

Charles A. Clifford was bom in Lawrence, on 
October 81, 1888, and received his eaiiy education 
in the public schools of this city. Later he at- 
tended the Phillips-Andoyer Academy, then entered 
Boston University, from which he was g^raduated 
in the class of 1904, with the degreef of Bachelor of 
Laws. In the sam<e year he was admitted to the 
bar, and then began practice in Lawrence, where he 
has since continued. He has won his way to a posi- 
tion of success and dignity. Outside of his im- 
mediate practice in Lawrence, he is city solicitor 
for Methuen. 

Mr. Clifford is a member of the Lawrence Bar 
Association, and also of the Essex County and tho 
Suffolk County Bar associations. He is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce of Lawrence, and in- 
fluential in the deliberations of that body; is a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
Elks, and the Home Club of Lawrence. 

Aside from his professional practice, Mr. Clifford 
is interested in one of the leading mercantUe houses 
of Lawrence, the James H. Clifford -Company, in- 
terior and exterior decorators, established by his 
^ther. This concern does a large business in rugs, 
wall paper, electric floor and table lamps, and their 
ofllce and show rooms, at No. 480 Essex street, 
occupy an entire building of five floors. 

Mr. Clifford married, in Lawrence, in 1906, Mary 
I. Garry, daughter of John Garry, of Methuen, 
Massachusetts, and they have three children: John 
Garry, James Henry, and Charies A., Jr. The 
charming famUy residence is in Methuen, and the 
family attends St. Margaret's Roman Catholic 
Church. 

ARTHUR G. FROTHINGHAM, Jr., was bom in 

Salem, Massachusetts, December 18, 1886, and there 
educated in the public schools. After leaving school 
he enrolled for a course of instruction with the 
Society of Automobile Engineers of New York City, 
and idfter leaving that institution, organized the 
Cadillac Private Renting Service, of New York City, 
and for seven years, 1913-1920, conducted a very 
prosperous business. He then sold his interest in 
the business to Alfred G. Kraft, of New York City, 
and removed to Salem, Massachusetts. In Salem, 
Mr. Frothingham organized the Federal Leather 
Company, Inc., later known as the Frothingham 
Tanning Company, Inc., Arthur G. Frothingham, 
Jr., president; Arthur G. Frothingham, Sr., tr^s- 
urer; and Joseph E. Mulford, of Boston, and Frank 
Hathaway, of Lynn, Massachusetts, directors. The 
company has made a very successful career and is 
a well managed concern. 

Arthur G. Frothingham, Jr., is a member of the 
Masonic order, a thirty-second degree Mason, and 
a noble of the Mystic Shrine. He is a Republican 
in politics, and a member of the Universalist 
church. Arthur G. Frothingham, Sr., is also a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order. 



Arthur G. Frothingham, Jr., married, March 10, 
1919, Ada KeUy, of New York City. 



HUGH E. McGLBW— Quite interesting State 
history is contained in the record of one of the 
industrial companies of Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. The McGlew Brothers Company is a con- 
tinuation of a business established in 1846 by the 
grandfather of Hugh E. McGlew, the latter the 
present owner, and while it now makes all kinds of 
open f orgings, springs, tires, and such-like iron and 
steel work, it holds basically to blacksmithing, 
which was the main occupation of the founder. It 
Is interesting to note that Hugh McGlew, the grand- 
father, was superintendent of the Eastern Stage 
Coach Company that pioneered the stage coach ser- 
vice between Boston, Massachusetts, and Portland, 
Maine, and that the ironwork for the first stage 
coach to run over that route was all made in the 
smithy of Mr. McGlew, at Newburyport An inter- 
esting detail also is the statement that all the men 
employed in making that coach were taken as free 
passengers in the initial trip of the first coach to 
run over that route to Portland. The McGlew fam- 
ily comes into eariy records of Newburyport, four 
generations of McGlews having lived in it, and 
four generations have had connection with, the 
operation of the historic iron-Working plant. 

Hugh E. McGlew was bom in Newburyport, Mas- 
sachusetts, on November 7, 1868, son of Hugh and 
Lydia (Lewis) McGlew. The famUy is of Irish 
origin, the grandfather having been bom on that 
island, in County Meigh. Hugh McGlew, father of 
Hugh E., was bom in Salem, Massachusetts. He 
died in Newburyport in 1888, and the greater pert 
of his adult years were spent at his trade, black- 
smithing and iron-working, in the McGlew smithy 
at Newburyport. Lydia (Lewis) McGlew, mother 
of Hugh E., died in 1892; she was bom in the State 
of Maine. 

Hugh £. McGlew was educated in the public 
schools of Newburyport, and after his schooldays 
were over, began to help his father in the iron- 
working plant. He associated with his father in 
that business until 1880, when he and his brothers 
acquired the business from their father. For the 
next twenty years the plant was run under the name 
of McGlew Brothers, and satisfactory business was 
done. In 1900 Hugh E. McGlew became sole own- 
er, and from that year the company has been 
known as the McGlew Brothers Company. It is one 
of the old, solidly-established industrial concerns 
of Newburyport, and throughout the seventy-slz 
years it has been operated, has ^ound steady em- 
ployment for quite a number of men of the district. 
Mr. McGlew is aflUiated with the order of Elks, and 
the Catholic Order of Foresters. 

Mr. McGlew niiarried, in 1881, Julia Sheehan, who 
was bom in County Cork, Ireland, daughter of 
Timothy and Julia (Shannon) Sheehan. Mr. and 
Mrs. McGlew have had nine children: Edward E.; 
Catherine; Mary; Hugh E. (2) ; Thomas G.; Robert; 
Lydia; Henry, and Anna. Two of the sons, Robert 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



129 



and Henry, axe veterans of the World War; they 
enlisted in the United States navy during the war, 
Henry being assigned to the Coast Guard Service, 
and Robert to the U. S. S. "Nebraska," which ship 
he joined as first class fireman, and had reached 
the grade of machinists's mate before the war end- 
ed. Both received honorable discharge from the 
service eventually. 

ADELBBRT D. SPRAGUE — A worthy father 
usually begets a worthy son, at least one can often 
imderstand traits in the son by studying the father. 
Adelbert D. Sprague is a worthy son of a worthy 
father, Daniel Forest Sprague, bom August 8, 1861. 
The father was at one time a shoe manufacturer 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts, but in later years was 
called to an important position with the govern* 
ment. He was appointed by President McKinley an 
appraiser of merchandise at the custom house in 
Boston. This was a very responsible position and 
called for much specialized knowledge. He was re- 
appointed at the beginning of Theodore Roosevelt's 
administration. He was always very active with 
the Republican party of his State. On February 
18, 1908, while spending his later days in that win- 
ter home of so many of the aged and successful — 
Florida, the hand of death touched him. Mrs. Lola 
Caroline (Daggett) Sprague, his wife, bom in 
Haverhill, is one of those who, steadfast always, 
has lived and still resides in the place of her birth. 

Adelbert D. Sprague received his education in the 
public schools, g^ing from school to school until 
he had passed through them all. He is a member 
of the class of 1894, Haverhill High School. Being 
attracted towards the profession of law, he sought 
for the best place in which to lay the foundations 
for it and found that place in the office of Mellin A. 
Pingree, the well known jurist of Haverhill. The 
years of association and study with Judge Pingree 
not only amply fitted him for admittance to the 
Essex county bar in 1908, but aided greatly in his 
later successful career. Mr. Sprague soon estab- 
lished himself in a law practice of his own, with an 
office on Merrimack street, in Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts. He holds membership with the Haverhill Bar 
Association. Like his father, a Republican in poli- 
tics, he has been interested more particularly in its 
local aifairs. In 1904-05 he served his city as a 
member of the City Council. Mr. Sprague has al- 
ways had and shown a helpful interest in civic af- 
fairs, and IB much sought by those who know him 
best for his counsel and aid in everything concern- 
ing civic righteousness. He has two chil<^n: Jean- 
nette A., bom July 6, 1916; and Summer Daggett, 
bom December 11, 1917. 



Boston, died February 28, 1922. Jeremiah J* and 
Margaret E. (Gill) Qrowley had six children, three 
sons and three daughters, Joseph H., being their 
third-bom. 

Joseph Henry Crowley was educated in the ele* 
mentary and high schools of Charlestown, Massa* 
chusetts, graduating from the latter in the dass of 
1918. Having decided to enter the dental profes- 
sion, he sometime thereafter became a student at 
Tufts Dental College, graduating, eventually, in the 
class of 1919. His college course was not, how- 
ever, pursued continuously, for the World War, in 
which the United States became involved in 1917, 
brought serious national responsibilities to all patri- 
otic young Americans. Dr. Crowley enlisted in the 
Dental Corps, ai^d was assigned to Base Hospital 
No. 7, where he remained stationed until long after 
the termination of hostilities. He did not receive 
his discharge from military service until December 
11, 1919. Entering civilian practice. Dr. Crowley 
at first associated with Dr. King, of Newburypprt, 
but. in April, 1921, opened an office for himself at 
No. 19 State street, Newburyport It is of course 
hardly possible yet to state that definite success 
will come to him in his endeavor to practice in. 
Newburyport, but the indications are promising, 
and Dr. Crowley in his work shows a skilled hand 
and a desire to give good service. 

Dr. Crowley is a member ot several fraternal or- 
ders, including the Benevolent and Protective Order 
Elks, Knights of Columbus, and the Catholic Order 
of Foresters. His fraternity is Psi Omega, and he 
belongs to the Louis Pasteur Club. Also, by rear 
son of his war service, he has membership ia the 
American Legion. Dr. Crowley is unmarried.. 



JOSEPH HSNRY CROWLBY, ez*service man, 
and now a dental surgeon, with ai growing practice, 
in Newburyport, Massachusetts, was bom in.. 
Charlestown, Massachusetts, on July 10, 1895, son 
of Jeremiah J. and Maigaret E. (Gill) Crowley. 
His mother was originally of Waltham, Massachu- 
setts, and died in 1909, but his father, wh^ was of 

Emcz— 2 — ^9 



WALTER B. HOPKINSON, merchant and presi- 
dent of Delano, Potter ft Company, Inc., of Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, was bom in Newburyport, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he now makes his home, August 
28, 1866, son of William N. and Laura E. (Whit- 
tier) Hopkinson. In the public schools of his na- 
tive town he obtained his education, and at an? eariy 
age entered the business world as a clerk in the 
office of John Currier, Jr., of Newburyport. After 
two years he became assocktted with Howard W. 
Spurr ft Company, wholesale grocers, and found 
this work particularly to his liking, and after four 
years, with a knowledge of the business acquired 
by strict attention to business and details, he be- 
came a salesman for Delano, Potter ft Company, 
Inc., of which firm he is now president. 

Mr. Hopkinson has continued to make hi» home 
in Newburyport, with his business interests in Bos-. 
ton, and he has always been keenly interested in 
all matters of public interest. A Republican in poli- 
tics, he was a delegate to the National Convention 
which nominated WOliam McKinley in 1900, and 
also served in this capacity at the nomination «f : 
Theodore Roosevelt in 1904. During^ the ^wM 
War, Mr. Hepkini^on served as mayor .efNewtaty- ^ 
port* 

Mr. Mo^idMmm married, in 1900,.. Bleaaev^JME^in-* 



180 



ESSEX COUNTY 



8011, daughter of Iphn C.«nd iCary £^ RolKiii8on» and 
they are Ihe parents of a' daughter, Elisabeth B., 
bom June 6,- 1901. 



WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON BRIGG8, M. 
D. — ^For A physician to be a successful general 
practitioner requires much study and experience. 
To become a specialist, one must have special abil- 
ities and sufficient time to gain the specialized 
knowledge,' and after that he must get that knowl- 
edge known and appreciated by others. To find the - 
two, often opposed, professions combined in one 
person is not bnly rather unusual, but definitely 
marks that person among his fellow-men. 

Dr. William Henry Harrison Briggs, bom in Free- 
dom, Waldo county, Maine, February 16, 1861, has 
not only a large general medical practice, but also 
is one of the most distinguished specialists in iiatfaol- 
ogy and gynecology in this part of the State; he 
also finds .time and has the ability to engage in 
many other interests. His early days were spent on 
the wide acres of the farms owned by his parents, 
Samuel B. and Matilda Blanchard (Cookson) 
Brigge, both of whom were bom in Maine, and there 
spent most of their Uves. Beginning preparation 
for his later profession, he entered first the public 
schools, then, from 1876 to 1878, he taught school, 
later attending the Eastern Maine State Noraud 
School, of Castin^v Maine, from which he gradu- 
ated in 1880. After several years of study and 
teaching he was s^raduated from Bowdoin College, 
Brunswick, Maine, in Jpne, .1887, after which he 
entered DartmoutfaP College, Hanover, New Hamp- 
shire, from which institution he received his medi- 
cal degree. After spending a short time as a gen- 
eral medical practitioner, he gave that up, tem- 
porarily, to gain training as a specialist. He went 
to New Yoric City and entered what was, and is 
now, one of the most famous hospitals in the United 
States, Bellevue Hospital, where he gained that 
training in gynecology and pathology which has 
made him a distinguished specialist. Dr. Briggs did 
not nei^ct.the general practice of medicine for his 
specialty, with the result that he is a much sought 
and very busy physician. Besides hia practice in 
Haverhill, he is connected with Dr. Hart's Hos- 
pital in Roxbuiy, Massachusetts; is a registered 
druggist of Maine; and has seen long service as 
secretary of the United States Pension Examinfag 
Board, which is located at Winn, Maine. 

Duxing his residence in Springfield, Maine, he be- 
came very much interested in schools and education 
there, with the result that he wasisoon busily en- 
gaged in their itnixrovement and upbuilding. He 
became ch air m an/ ^af the Board of Education, and 
for an extended ^riod* was the esteemed superin- 
tendent of the pid>]ic schools of that place; also 
held neariy all oi^lihe local '^offices of that d^, in- 
duding: chairmatt^ef tlie h^lfad of directors of the 
Springfield Normal Sehool; superintendent of 
sdioola; member of the Board of Health; and 
United States Pendon Examiner. Dr. Briggs also 
is a sMmher of tha Amerieas Modieal Aasodatien; 



the Boston Modicai Association; the Penobscot 
Medical Association; and the Maine Medical Asso- 
dation.' Politically he supports the Republican 
party. Fx^temaUy he is a prominent Mason, bal- 
ing gone through all branches of the order, and 
now having the distinguished honor of beings a 
thirty-third degree Mason. He also is a member of 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine, and holds membership in the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Dr. Bri^rgs, 
with his family, are attendants of the CongregSL- 
tional church of their dty. 

At Portland, Maine, May 28, 1909, Dr. Briggs 
married Grace Lee Johnson, daughter of Frank 
Henry Johnson, the latter bom in Maine, Septem- 
ber 12, 1856, and Sude S. Johnson, also bom in 
Maine, in 1855. Dr. and Mrs. Briggs are the par- 
ents of one daughter, Zelma» bom at Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, February 26, 1911. Dr. Briggs now 
has one of the finest homes in the best residential 
sections of Haverhill. 



OSCAR H. NELSON, lawyer, of Newbuiyport, 
Massachusetts, was bom in West NeiHmry, August 
• 81, 1876, son of Charies W. and Mary £. (Howe) 
Nelson. He was educated in the public schools and 
the Dummei* Academy, graduating from the New- 
buryport High School in 1895. Three years' later 
Mr. Nelson entered the Boston Law School and 
passed the bar examinations in 1900. Immediately 
he began the practice of his profesdon in Newbury- 
port and has met with dgnal success; he is assod- 
ate Justice of the District Court in Newburyport 
He represented his dty in the Massachusetts House 
of Representatives in 1918; was dty solidtor in 
1916-1917; and has also served as alderman and as 
a member of the Common Council, and during and 
since these dates he has conducted many important 



Fraternally Mr. Nelson is a member of St. John's 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; King Cyras 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Newburyport Com- 
mandery, Kni^^ts Templar; and Aleppo Temple, 
Andent Arabic Order NoUes of ^e Mystic Shrina 
He also is a member of the Dalton Club, and of the 
Unitarian church. 

On October 15, 1904, Mr. Ndson married Cas- 
sine H. Brown, daughter of John Brown, of Nan- 
tucket, Massachusetts, and they were the parsnts 
of the following children: David and Robert, bora 
April 6, 1906, both deceased; Mary C, bora Octo- 
ber 17, 1909; Charies B., bom December 1, 1915; 
and John E., bom May 81, 1919. 



JAMBS N. QURDY, preddent of the Jersey lee 
Cream Company, at No. 44 Bay State road, La^^- 
rence, Massachusetts, was bmn in Fairvlew, Iowa, 
December 16, 1861. He is a son of Benahr B. and 
Martha McClure (Spaulding) Gurdy, the fomer.a 
steam fitter and machinist prior to his death. He 
had charge of piping tlie first poA packing house 
buUt in Chicago, lUiiiois. Mattha MeClnie (8p*«l- 
ding) Guvdy was a dlieet descettdaat ef Put 8>mh 



.^•^^M'^M.i^^ , .^M 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



181 



dingy of ReYoliitioiutry fome. J. N. Gurdy attended 
public school in Bridgewater, New Hampshire, and 
in 1875 was in Lawrence, Massachusetts. The year 
1876 he spent in the West, and then returned to 
Lawrence, where on March 1, 1879, at the age of 
eighteen years, he opened a retail fruit store at Nos. 
409-411 Essex street, and at that location remained 
twenty-seven years. To his original line, that of 
fruit, a coal and wood department was added. After 
a new block was built, the fruit business was 
given up and confectionery and ice cream were 
added. The handling of ice cream in his confec- 
tionery department led to his becoming a manu- 
facturer of that commodity, which has now become 
a necessity to American life. The business was 
carried on under the firm name, Jersey Ice Cream 
Company, but in March, 1907, the firm became a 
corporation, James N. Gurdy, president; George W. 
Kennison, treasurer, and Thomas E. Gary, secre- 
tary. In 1912-13 a large, specially-designed plant 
was erected at No. 44 Bay State road, and the com- 
pany operates a branch plant at Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, employing about fifteen men. About seventy- 
five people are employed in the Lawrence plant, 
which is a large and prosperous one. Including Bos- 
ton, there is no plut in Northern New England 
that does a larger business. Their trade extends 
all over New England, except Connecticut. Mr. 
Gurdy is a member of the Lawrence Chamber of 
Commerce, and attends the Central Methodist 
Church. 

James N. Gurdy married (first) in Lawrence, in 
1882, Harriet O. Colcord, daughter of Charles and 
Sarah (Clark) Colcord, of Exeter, New Hampshire. 
She died October 15, 1916, leaving three children: 

1. Harriet O., who married George W. Kennison. 

2. Irene M. 8. Elbert O., who is engaged in busi- 
ness with his father; on April 18, 1921, he married 
Edna Ruth Schueler, of Lawrence. Mr. Gurdy mar- 
ried (second) Margaret M. Burnley, of Lawrence. 
The family home' is at No. 88 Nesmith street, Law- 
rence, Massachusetts. 



EDSON B. HOYT--The firm of G. H. Hoyt A 
Son is the oldest and one of the largest manufac- 
turers of paper and wood boxes in Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts. Its record for business integrity is with- 
out a blemish. For nearly fifty yean of ups and 
downs, panics and failures, good times and bad, it 
has never failed to meet its obligations to the last 
penny. 

Edson B. Hoyt, of the third generation in the 
company, is now its sole owner. He was bom in 
Brentwood, New Hampshire, June 8, 1875, which is 
the same year in which the firm was founded. He 
was educated in the public schools and Peekskill 
Military Academy, Peekskill, New York. The call 
of trade was strong, however, and when seventeen 
he entered the box-making plant and began what 
was to be bis successful career. This company had 
been started in 1876 at Brentwood, New Hamp- 
shire, by his grandfather, George H. Hoyt, and his 
father, George H. Be(yt» Jr., ander the ftm name 



of George H. Hoyt, ft Son, Box-makers. They 
moved to Haverhill, Massachusetts, in 1878, locat- 
ing on Phoenix Row$ after four years they re- 
moved to Wingate street, where they remained for 
twenty-five years. In 1912 they settled at No. 266 
River street, where they now (1921) have a large 
factory, employing over seventy-five hands. Many 
of the employees have been with the house for 
more than forty years. 

George H. Hoyt, Jr., retired from the firm in 
1907, leaving the complete ownership and manage- 
ment to Edson B. Hoyt. Under the latter^s control 
the business has made very rapid and solid progress, 
being now one of the largest of its kind in Haver- 
hill, and rated exceedingly high in every respect. 
Their principal products are paper and wood boxes, 
which they make and distribute entirely to the 
local shoe trade. 

Mr. Hoyt's parents, George H. and BeUe (Silli- 
way) Hoyt, have been a great inspiration to him 
in his endeavors. His father since his retirement 
has been very active in Haverhill club life. His 
grandfather, George H. Hoyt, was for years not 
only identified with the South Christian Church, but 
was especially conspicuous in Christian work and in 
all movements for the betterment of HaverhilL 

Edson B. Hoyt, following in the footsteps of 
those before him, is a prominent club and fraternity 
man, and leader in all good works. He is a mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce and the Massa- 
chusetts Republican Club. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, being a member of Haverhill Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar, also Aleppo Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
of Boston, Massachusetts. He is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery of Boston. Among 
his dub memberships are those in the Agawam 
Club, the Wachusett Club, and the Island Golf 
Club, of Haverhill, also the Webhammet Golf Chib 
of Kennebunk Beach, Maine, his summer home. 

During the World War Mr. Hoyt was very nctlve 
and efficient in Red Cross work, accomplishing tux 
more than could be asked of so busy a man. He is 
also a director and trustee of that so often nei^ect- 
ed philanthropy, the Salvation Army Home. He 
haa for years given freely not only of his money, 
but what is more valuable, he has given himself 
personally, and many a former derelict has been 
saved and rehabilitated through his efforts. 

Mr. Hoyt is married and lives in his splendid 
home at No. 125 Kenosa avenue, periiaps the finest 
residential section of Haverhill. 



WALTER L PBRRY, one of the prominent ex- 
ecutives in the shoe industry in Essex county, Mas- 
sachusetts, with factories at Newburyport, was bom 
in Danvers, Massachusetts, January 4, 1869, and is 
a son of Jonathan A. and Sarah M. (Adams) Perry. 

Receiving a practical education in the public 
schools of Newburyport, Mr. Perry began work, on 
January 4, 1886, in the office of one of the large 
shoe nanufturturiag plants of that day, where 



132 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ladies' tum-sole, low-cut shoes were made. Later 
on he became associated with Charles A. Bliss in 
the same business, and in 1907 became a member of 
the Dodge» Bliss & Perry Company. The original 
firm was incorporated in 1892, as the N. D. Dodge 
& Bliss Company, and not long after the change 
as outlined above, on December 17, 1907, the com- 
pany was again reorganized, becoming the Bliss & 
Perry Company, and has continued thus until the 
present time. Mr. Perry is now president and gen- 
eral manager of this extensive business. 

Fraternally Mi;. Perry is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias; he attends the Congregational church. 

On March 15, 1891, Mr. Perry married May W. 
Welch, and they have three children: Donald I., 
who is now (1922) a student of aviation at the Cor- 
nell Aviation School; Beatrice C, and Norman. 



WILLIAM SRWIN GOLDSMITH, D. M. D., of 

Newburyport, Massachusetts, was bom at Boston, 
same State, September 27, 1897, son of Samuel and 
MoUie (Levin) Goldsmith. He was educated in the 
Phillips Brooks School in Boston and the Newbury- 
port High School, following which he attended 
Tufto Dental College, graduating in 1918, with the 
degree of D. M. D., and soon after this time en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession in Newbury- 
port, continuing until the United States entered 
the World War. Dr. Goldsmith enlisted at this 
time and was examining dental surgeon at Went- 
worth Institute duiing the war. He is now located 
at No. 12 State street. One of the younger pro- 
fessional men, he is rapidly taking his place among 
the progressive and aggressive dtisens of his city 
and is actively interested in all that pertains to its 
welfare. 

JAY B. DAY was bom on March 28, 1884, in the 
State of Wisconsin. His grandfather, George H. 
Day, was a prominent manufacturer of Danvers, 
Massachusetts, about the time of the Civil War. 
He was connected with the business of manufac- 
turing bricks, which is one of the oldest industries 
at Dttnvers, and in 1860, acqujred a property on 
Liberty street, Danvers, where he carried on his 
business for fifteen years. In 1875 he sold the 
brickyard on Liberty street to his two sons, George 
H. Day, Jr., and Edwin Day, the father of Jay E. 
Day. In the same year he acquired a brickyard, 
situated off Endicott street at Danvers. This he 
continued to operate until 1898, when he sold it 
to his son Edwin, and retired from active participa- 
tion in business affairs. 

Edwin Day, father of Jay E. Day, retained active 
control of the brickyard on Endicett street, ^x^ch 
he httd purchased from his father in 1898, until the 
day of his death in 1906. Mr. Day then assumed 
the management of it, and it is now the only brick- 
yard m operation at Danvers. 

Mr. Day also is treasurer of the Miller Shoe 
Company, manufacturers o< infants', children's, anid 
misses' shoes, located at Salem. He started this 
business with H* A. MiUer in 1917; E. J. Cullen is 



vice-president and H. A. Miller, president. 

Mr. Day is a member of the Masonic order, and 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
For the past two years, he has served as commis- 
sioner of roads. 

Mr. Day married Sarah Persis Abbott, of Dan- 
vers. They have one daughter, Caroline Abbott 
Day. 

CLEMENT CHARLES DESAULNISRS— The 
profession of the law is represented in Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, by a group of men whose work is count- 
ing far for the progress of the community. Among 
these men, Clement Charles Desaulniers is a leading 
figure. 

Mr. Desaulniers was bom in Salem, on March 
18, 1891, and is the son of Charles and Delima 
(Marchessault) Desaulniers, long residents of the 
city of Salem, Massachusetts. He received his early 
education at .St. Joseph's Parochial School in this 
city, attending for a period of eleven years. He 
then entered Nicolet Seminary, in the Province of 
Quebec, Canada, remaining at this institution for 
three years. Next, for a period of two years, he 
was at Sherbrooke Seminary, also in the Provinoe 
of Quebec. He was graduated from the Salem 
Commercial School in 1908, and from the Boston 
Young Men's Christian Association Preparatory 
School in 1912. Then he took up his legal studies 
at the Northeastern College School of Law, from 
which he was graduated in 1914. 

With this exhaustive preparation for his life 
work> Mr. Desaulniers was admitted to the Essex 
county bar in February, 1916, and began the prac- 
tice of law in Salem in March of the same year. 
He has been successful from the beginning, and is 
rapidly making his way to the forefront of the pro- 
fession in Essex county. He has given much 
thought and tame to the study of income taxes. 
Mr. Desaulniers is taking a deep interest in the 
public aifairs of the town; he was aj^ointed a 
member of the School Committee in the faU of 1921. 
He was local attorney for the Red Cross during 
the World War. PoUtically he is a R^ublican. 

When quite young Mr. Desaulniers lost his left 
arm through an accident, but he has always, never- 
theless, been an expert athlete. He holds medals 
for swimming, diving, skating, running and tennis. 

On September 21, 1917, Mr. Desaulniers mar- 
ried Norma Benet, daughter of Lorenzo P. Benet, 
of Winchester, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. De- 
saulniers are members of St. Joseph's Roman Cath- 
olic Church. Their daughter, Anne Margaret, was 
bom on September 26, 1918, and a son, Benet, was 
bom February 25, 1921. The charming family resi- 
dence is located at Salem Willows. 



THE A. LSS COMPANY, INC., of Lawnsce, 
Massachusetts, a pioneer concern in the United 
States in the manufactura of indigo produets, has 
been established in this city f<»r forty-ive years, 
and is one of the big industries of Baeex eowsty, 

AshtoA Lee, Siv, the fdmidcr of tUa Iwirineai, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



1S3 



was bom in Bradford, England, March 21, 1846. 
Gaining: a thorough education in the public schools 
and coUegre of his native city, he became interested 
in the work which his father was carrying on, the 
mantif acture of chemicals and dye stuffs. Entering 
the factory, which was located in Bradford, he 
familiarized himself with every detail of the busi- 
ness. In 1876 Mr. Lee came to America, and locat- 
ing: in Lawrence, Massachusetts, founded the pres- 
ent business and began the manufacture of chemi- 
cals and dye stuffs here, on a very small scale, but 
the products now are shipped over a wide tenitory. 
From the beginning the venture prospered, and 
under Mr. Lee's management its development wi^s 
steady and its growth permanent. The location, in 
a tc£xtile manufacturing city, and in one of the 
most active manufacturing sections of the country, 
proved advantageous, and the business was soon an 
assured success. For a time the founder had as a 
partner a brother, Frank William Lee, from 1890 
until 1917. In 1900, the son, Ashton Lee, Jr., was 
received into partnership. In 1901 the business was 
incorporated under its present name, and since the 
death of Mr. Lee, Sr., his son has been the head of 
the concern. The works are located on Chelmsford 
street, and cover three acres of ground. The pro- 
duct consists of chemicals for the textile trades, 
and dye stuffs for woolen, worsted, cotton, paper, 
and other mills, and they make a specialty of indigo 
products. 

In the manufacturing world of this section Mr. 
Lee held a position of more than usual prominence, 
and at one time represented the Massachusetts 
Board of Trade at the Hague Conference. 

Ashton Lee, Sr., married Mary Kane, daughter of 
John Kane; she was bom in Dublin, Ireland, on 
August 10, 1862. They were the parents of four 
children: Ashton, Jr., of further mention; Carrie; 
May; and Smith, who is also connected with the 
business. 

In the death of Ashton Lee, Sr., which occurred 
March 21, 1914, not only the concern of which he 
was' the founder sustained a great loss, but the city 
of Lawrence, and the industrial world of Essex 
county lost a man whose ability counted for public 
progress, as well as for individual success. 

Ashton Lee, Jr., son of Ashton and Mary (Kane) 
Lee, was bom in Methuen, March 6, 1884. Receiv- 
ing a practical education in the public schools of 
the city, he became associated with his father in 
business in 1900, first employed in the factory, later 
as travelling salesman. Upon the death of his 
father, Mr. Lee was elected president of the cor- 
poration, also assistant treasurer. In 1917 he was 
elected treasurer, stQl filling the office of president. 

Ashton Lee, Jr., is a member of the Lawrence 
Chamber of Commerce, and interested in all that 
pertains to the industrial progress of the dty. He 
is a member of the Merrimac Valley Country Club, 
of the Boston City and the Boston Yacht clubs, 
and of the New York Athletic Club. 

In October, 1917, Mr. Lee married, in Methuen. 
Anna Sullivan, daughter of William F. Sullivan, of 



Haverhill, Massachusetts, and they have three 
daughters: Bartmra, Jane and Janet, twins. 



GBORGE ALBERT WANING, a shoe manufac- 
turer, and head of the firm of Waning A Company, 
Inc., of Haverhill, Massachusetts, is a native of 
Haverhill, and has spent practically his whole life 
in the city. He was bom on January 12, 1892, the 
son of Frank Wilson and Nancy (Demerest) Wan- 
ing. His father was originally of Maine, and his 
mother of Biddeford. His father, who still lives, 
has been in the shoe industry for the greater part 
of his business life, and it was that connection 
which brought the family into Massachusetts, and 
to Haverhill, where George Albert was bom. The 
latter received the whole of his academic education 
in Haverhill schools, and when ready to enter upon 
a business career, he became associated with his 
father in business. The firm was known as F. W. 
Waning & Sons in 1911, and then had its factory at 
No. 112 Phoenix street. They were contracting 
shoemakers, and the output of the plant was not 
inconsiderable. In 1918 the business was sold to 
the C. B. Edwards Company, of Haverhill, soon 
after which the firm of Harriman A Waning was 
established, the firm setting its plant originally at 
No. 82 Locke street, Haverhill. Several changes in 
address were necessary, as is the general experience 
in the expansion of an active business, and after 
some time spent at No. 78 Fleet street, the factory 
was removed to No. 495 Lincoln avenue, where it 
has since remained. In November 1, 1920, a re- 
organization of the company became necessary, 
and the firm of Waning & Company, Inc., was 
founded. Its specialty is high-grade women's 
shoes, and the capacity of the plant is one thou- 
sand pairs a day. An indication is thus conveyed 
of the importance of the enterprise. 

Mr. Waning is a popular Mason, being a member 
of Merrimac Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
h6 is also a member of the Superintendent and 
Foremen's Association, and is past officer of the 
Loyal Order of Moose. He is of military record, 
being president of the State Guard Veterans' Asso- 
ciation. In church affiliation he is a member of the 
First Universalist Church of Haverhill, and of the 
Universalist Men's Club. 

Mr. Waning married, at Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
January 22, 1912, Jessie M. Mcintosh, daughter of 
Dan and Edith (Kimball) Mcintosh, of Haverhill, 
the former originally of Nova Scotia, and the latter 
of Salem, New Hampshire. They have two chil- 
dren: George Albert, and Edith Elizabeth. 



HON. WILLIAM A. SHEA was bom at Salem, 
Massachusetts, about 1869, and is a son of John 
and Mary (Foley) Shea. His father, who was bom 
in Ireland, was brought to the United States when 
he was but two years old. John Shea was engaged 
in the leather industry, and spent most of his life 
at Salem, where he died. His widow, Mary (Foley) 
Shea, still lives in the old Shea residence at Salem, 
where Mr. Shea was bom. 



134 



ESSEX COUNTY 



William A. Shea received his early edacation at 
the Bowdich Grammar School of Salem. After hav- 
ing completed, his stadies, he obtained employ- 
ment in the leather industry and acquired a thor- 
ough knowledge of the methods employed in the 
various branches of that industry. He spent some 
time as a hand-finish leather worker, and his knowl- 
edge was practical as well as theoretical. While 
he was still quite young, Mr. Shea engaged in the 
hand-finished leather business as an independent 
manufacturer, but adverse circumstances brought 
about the failure of the venture, and Mr. Shea 
lost both the profits of the business and the capital 
he had invested in it. 

Undismayed by his losses in the leather business, 
Mr. Shea entered the service of the Salem Electric 
Bailway Company. He spent some time in the em- 
ployment of the Railway Company and when the 
Salem- Willows trolley line was opened, it was Mr. 
Shea who collected the fares on the first trip made 
over the new road« After a time, however, he left 
Salem and moved to Peabody, Massachusetts, where 
he found employment in a fruit store and lunch 
room that stood on the site of the present post 
office. Some time later, in 1893, Mr. Shea bought a 
lunch room* which is still being conducted suc- 
cessfully under his name. As the proprietor of the 
little restaurant, Mr. Shea also conducted a re- 
tail tobacconist's stand. The tobacco business 
aroused Mr. Shea's interest, and he gradually gave 
up his other interests in order to devote all his at- 
tention to it. He is now the proprietor of a whole- 
sale tobacco business, which is constantly increasing 
in size and which is widely known throughout 
Essex county and along the north shore of Mas- 
sachusetts. The annual volume of business tran- 
sacted by Mr. Shea and his associates' amounts to 
about $1,000,000. On October 12, 1915, Mr. Shea 
opened a fine new store in Peabody, Massachusetts, 
where the local business of the tobacco company is 
transacted. 

In addition to his evei^increasing business inter- 
ests, Mr. Shea has concerned himself with public 
afPairs. He served for several years as overseer of 
the poor. Later he acted as sewer commissioner, 
before the abolition of that office. At the time 
when the town of Peabody became a city, Mr. Shea 
was serving as selectman. When the first City 
Council of Peabody was formed, Mr. Shea became 
its president. In May, 1920, Mr. Shea was elected 
mayor of Peabody. Although his election was op- 
posed by various newspapers of the vicinity, Mr.. 
Shea, standing upon his record as a public servant 
and a private individual of unimpeachable char- 
acter, was elected by one of the largest majorities 
in the political history of the city. As a business 
man and a public-spirited citizen, Mr. Shea is de- 
voting all his energies to the task of administering 
the city's affairs in an efficient and honorable man- 
ner. In political matters Mr. Shea is a supporter 
of Republican ideals. 

Mr. Shea and his family are Catholics, and belong 
to St. John's Catholic Church. He is a member of 



the Knights of Columbus and belongs to the fourth 
degree of that order. He also belongs to the An- 
cient Order of Hibernians; the Loyal Order of 
Moose; the Fraternal Order of Eagles; the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks; and the Penny 
Ade. 

WiUiam A. Shea married Alice Crouse, stt Salem, 
Massachusetts. Mrs. Shea was very well known as 
a concert singer, being gifted with true musical 
feeling and with a thorough technical training, she 
died about nineteen years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Shea 
were the parents of two children: Alice C.» and 
William G. During the Worid War, William G. 
Shea served as a truck driver in the United States 
army. While on active service in France he was 
the victim of a gas attack. His injuries, however, 
were not serious and in course of time he recovered 
from the effects of the poison gas. After his re- 
turn from France he married Agnes £. Gordon, and 
settled at Nahant, Massachusetts. 



CLIFTON. LEON BUCK, M. D. — Among the 
progressive members of the medical profession in 
Essex county, Massachusetts, is Dr. Buck, of Dan- 
vers, whose unusually broad hospital experience has 
given him advantages of especial value. 

Dr. Buck was bom in Boston, September 10, 1882, 
but received his early education in Maine. After 
completing the public school course he attended 
Wilton Academy, and was graduated in 1906. Then 
entered Tufts College, in the Medical Department, 
he was graduated in 1911, receiving his degree of 
Doctor of Medicine from that institution. Follow- 
ing his graduation. Dr. Buck served as house officer 
on the Boston Floating Hospital, later was con- 
nected with the Boston Dispensary, then for a time 
was at Carney Hospital, as interne, after which he 
served as interne at the Boston City Hospital for 
a period of eighteen months, then, for two years, 
was assistant resident physician at this hospital. 
Coming to Danvers in 1914, Dr. Buck established 
an office for the general practice of medicine, and 
during the time which has since elapsed, has built 
up an excellent practice, and now takes a leading 
place among the medical practitioners of this com- 
munity. 

Dr. Buck is a member of the' American Medi- 
cal Association, and of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society. He is visiting physician at Beverly Hos- 
pital. He also is a member of the Danvers Board 
of Health, and a leader in such civic activities as 
tend to promote the welfare of the people. Politi- 
cally he supports the principles and policies of the 
Republican party. His fraternal affiliations include 
membership with the Free and Accepted Masons, 
and his college fraternity is the Alpha Kappa 
Kappa. 

Dr. Buck married, in 1915, Grace M. Marston, in 
Danvers, Massachusetts. 



JOHN AUGUSTUS TBAGUE— In the financial 
circles of Peabody, Massachusetts, there are many 
names which are held in the highest esteem, names 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



185 



which bear the deepest dgniilcaiice to the welfare 
of the people. Some of these names have become 
only a memory, but the name of John Augustas 
Teague is a memory which will long be cherished, 
not only by his associates, but by every one who 
enjoyed the privilege of his acquaintance. To the 
biographer it is more than a passing gratification 
to commemorate such a life of usefulness and de- 
votion to high purpose. 

John Augustus Teague was a son of Theodore 
Paricer and Louise Ann (Marston) Teague, and was 
bom on July 9, 1870. He died at his home on 
Lowell street, in Peabody, on March 17, 1920. As 
a boy Mr. Teague attended the public schools of 
Peabody, where he was always an apt scholar, and 
a popular exhaustive student. He preferred a busi- 
ness career, and in his younger days he was a 
traveling salesman. Later, for many years, he was 
identified with the office of the United Shoe Ma- 
chinery Company at Boston. Then, upon the death 
of Harry F. Walker, in January, 1909, Mr. Teague 
succeeded him as secretary and treasurer of the 
Peabody Co-operative Bank, Mr. Walker having 
held that position since the incorporation of this 
institution. 

During the years which Mr. Teague served in this 
capacity the development of the bank was most re- 
markable. At the time he took charge the assets 
of the institution were only about $500,000, and at 
his death, in a period of eleven years, they had 
grown to the amount of $2,000,000. This was large- 
ly due to Mr. Teague's efficient management. He 
was a man of rare discretion, a keen judge of men 
and affairs, and his work became so much a part 
of his existence, and so near to his heart, that he 
may well be said to have lived for it. Certain it is 
that his deep interest in it prolonged his life. For 
the sake of his work he fought off for many months 
the insidious malady which was undermining his 
health for years, and the end was postponed far 
beyond the expectation of his physician and those 
who were familiar with his case. The Peabody 
Cooperative Bank owes much to the untiring labor 
and constant devotion of John Augustus Teagfue. 

Mr. Teague married, on April 14, 1897, Nancy 
Poor Osbom, daughter of Franklin and Sally Bat- 
chelder (Wheeler) Osbom. His wife, who had 
been his constant help through his long illness, died 
a few months before him, passing away on Feb- 
ruary 14, 19i20. Their daughter, Sally Wheeler 
Teague, survives him. 

Not alone in banking circles, but in every branch 
of civic endeavor Mr. Teague was a force for 
progress. Quiet and unassuming, his activities were 
unheralded, but none the less constructive. His 
death, was a loss to the entire community, and it 
will be long before his place is filled. 



FRED E. TWISS— There is no man in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, more active in the affairs of that 
town than Fred E. Twiss, paymaster and purchas- 
ing agent of the Everett Mills, of Lawrence. Mr. 
Twiss was bom April 3, 1867, at North Andover, 



Massachusetts, son of Alfred E. Twiss, of Antrim, 
New Hampshire, who died in 1875. The latter is 
survived by his wife, Sarah E. Goodwin, of Merri- 
mack, New Hampshire. 

Mr. Twiss attended the public schools and the 
Lawrence Commercial College, and his first posi- 
tion- was with the George Armstrong Company, 
dry goods merchants, where he remained a year and 
then entered the employ of the Pacific Mills Com- 
pany, as runner boy. After three years there he 
was employed for a time by A. E. Mack, who was 
in the insurance business and at one time mayor 
of the city, and in March, 1886, Mr. Twiss entered 
the employ of the Everett Mills as a general clerk. 
Four years later he was made assistant paymaster, 
and ten years from the time he. entered the em- 
ploy of this company he was appointed paymaster, 
which position he has held to the present time, and 
for several years has held the- position of pur- 
chasing agent in. connection with his other duties. 
Mr. Twiss has the unique distinction of holding this 
office of paymaster longer than any other individual 
in Lawrence. 

Besides discharging the duties incumbent on his 
positions, Mr. Twiss is very active in Americaniza- 
tion work, particularly among the foreigners em- 
ployed in the mills. He has established several 
community clubs in different sections of the city, 
and each time that he comes in contact with the 
men he never loses an opportunity to instill into 
their minds a love and reverence for the country 
where they earn their living and where their chil- 
dren are being educated. Mr. Twiss is so imbued 
with patriotism and love of country that it is an 
easy matter for him to impress those whom he ad- 
dresses. Naturally, along these lines, Mr. Twiss 
has been interested in the defenses of the country, 
and from 1886 to 1898 was connected with the 
militia, retiring with the rank of senior sergeant. 
He is a member of Company E and M, and Bat- 
tery C, Veteran Association. 

During the World War, 1917-18, in recognition of 
his zealous services, he was appointed clerk of the 
Exemption Board of the First District, and later 
enlisted in service and was commissioned first lieu- 
tenant of the Emergency Men, known as Engine 
Company, No. 6, Emergency Police, of the city of 
Lawrence. He personally equipped a company of 
one hundred and fifty men in this division and this 
company was not only the largest, but it was the 
only company to remain intact, and it is still in 
existence, with Mr. Twiss as its captain. 

Fraternally, Mr. Twiss is a member of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men; and Monadnock Lodge, 
Eearsarge Encampment of Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, serving for a quarter of century as de- 
gree master through various branches of the order. 

Mr. Twiss married, in 1896, Isabella F. Strout, of 
Belfast, Maine, and they are the parents of a 
daughter, Dorothy, bom in 1902, and who passed 
away in 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Twiss are regular at- 
tendants and members of the Universalist church, 
and Mr. Twiss is a member of the Men's Club. He 



136 



ESSEX COUNTY 



la alsi preddexice of the board of director of Belie- 
vue Cemetery of the city of Lawrence. 

ARTHUR B. JOSLYN, B. S., A. M., M. D.— One 

of the leading physicians of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
Dr. Joslyn has had an unusual breadth of prepara- 
tion for his professional career. He is a son of 
Everett Osgood Joslyn, who was bom on the home- 
stead farm in Seneca township, McHenry county, 
Illinois, and has followed farming throughout his 
active lifetime. He is now retired, and resides in 
Marengo, in that State. He married Ella Laura 
Burritt, who was bom in Wauconda, Lake county, 
Illinois. Their four children are: Dr. Arthur E. 
Joslyn, whose name heads this review; Dr. Leslie 
B. Jodyn, a successful practitioner in Maywood, 
Illinois; Flora Mabel, now Mrs. Fisher, of Evanston, 
Illinois; and Gladys Irene, instructor in the Uni- 
versity of the State of Washington, in Pullman, 
Washington. 

Dr. Joslyn was bom in Seneca township, Illinois, 
on 'the same farm which was his father's birthplace, 
on March 13, 1881, and remained on the farm until 
he was twen^ years of age, acquiring his early edu- 
cation in the nearby schools, then assisting with 
the farming operations. Thereafter he entered 
Northwestern University, in Chicago, Illinois, from 
which he was graduated in 1903, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science, then, in 1904, he was grad- 
uated from Harvard University, with the degree 
of Master of Arts. For two years following he 
was instructor in mathematics at the Armour In- 
stitute of Technology. Between 1907 and 1916 Dr. 
Joslyn taught in various high schools, during that 
period studying medicine, and receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine from Harvard University in 
1911. He is now a member of the staff of the 
Union Hospital Corporation, of which he has also 
been clerk since Octaber of 1920. 

During the World War, 1917-18, Dr. Joslyn volun- 
teered for service. He was commissioned captain 
of the Medical Corps October 23, 1918, and was 
discharged February 5, 1919. The doctor is a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association, of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, and of the Lynn 
Medical Fraternity. Politically he supports the 
Republican party. His religious convictions place 
his membership with the Maple Street Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Dr. Joslyn married, June 28,. 1905, in Winchester, 
Massachusetts, Clare Jean Allen. They resided in 
Chicago, Illinois, until 1907, when they returned 
East. They have four children: Jean, bom May 6, 
1906, in Chicago; Arthur Everett, bom April 19, 
1911, in Winchester, Massachusetts; Emerson AUen, 
bom December 18, 1912, in Lynn, Massachusetts; 
and EUeva, bom December 15, 1916, also in Lynn. 



WILLIAM FREDERICK MUNROE— The life 
of William F. Munroe was a comparatively short 
one, covering a period of but forty-eight years, yet 
it was of great usefulness and business success. He 
came of an ancient Scotch family, eariy settled in 



Massachusetts, and from worthy ancestors inherited 
strong elements of character which made him a 
man of force in both business and civic life. He 
was a descendant of William Munroe, who was 
of the Scotch clan Munroe, who were overthrown 
by Cromwell, the Munroes being adherents of the 
Stuarts. 

(I) William Munroe, bom in Scotland in 1625, 
came to New England in 1662, and was a property 
owner in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1667. In 
1660 he settled in Cambridge Farms (now Lioxing- 
ton), his farm on Wobum street, near the Wobum 
line. He was admitted a freeman in 1690, was 
married three times, and although forty years of 
age when first married, reared a family of thir- 
teen children. His sons lived at the home farm 
after they reached manhood, and he made many 
additions to his house to accommodate the families 
of his sons. He died January 20, 1717, and in his 
will names five sons and five daughters. His first 
wife, Martha, bore him four children; his second 
wife, Mary, nine children; his third wife, Elizabeth 
Wyer, died childless, aged almost eighty years. The 
line of descent to William F. Munroe was through 
George Munroe, the fourth child of William Mun- 
roe and his first wife Martha. 

(II) Greorge Munroe was bom in Lexington, 
Massachusetts, and there died, January 17, 1749. 
He was generally known as Sergeant Creorge Mun- 
roe, was tithingman in 1719, and selectman in 1728. 
His wife, Sarah, died December 4, 1752, the mother 
of nine children, the eighth a son, Andrew, head of 
the third generation. 

(III) Andrew Munroe was bom in Lexington, 
Massachusetts, was there baptized June 4, 1718, and 
died September 16, 1766. He served in the Colonial 
wars of 1758-59-60, and accumulated an estate that 
was settled by his widow. He married. May 26, 
1763, Lucy, widow of Daniel Simonds, her maiden 
name Mixer. They were the parents of two sons, 
descent being traced through the eldest, Andrew 
(2). 

(IV) Andrew (2) Munroe was bom in Lexing- 
ton, Massachusetts, March 80, 1764, died in Dan- 
vers, Massachusetts, August 7, 1886. He married, 
in Burlington, Massachusetts, March 22, 1785, Ruth 
Simonds, bom in Wobum, April 18, 1763, died in 
Danvers, January 29, 1840, and was laid with her 
husband in the Old King burying ground at Pea- 
body, then a part of South Danvers. Ruth (Sim- 
onds) Munroe was of early Wobum family and re- 
lated to Count Rumford. Her ancestor William 
Simonds, is mentioned in Wobum records as eariy 
as 1644. He was one of the proprietors of the 
town, owned land about a milef and a half from the 
centre of the town, and during the Indian wars 
his home was used as a garrison house. He mar- 
ried Judith (Phippen) Hayward, widow of James 
Hayward, both she and her first husband coming 
from England on the ship ''Planter" in 1635. The 
line of descent was through James Simonds, sixth 
son of William and Judith (Phippen-Hayward) 
Simonds, and his wife, Susanna Blodgett; their son. 



JT.'.j^a:>~~^^,i^t:>^c^i^^y^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



187 



James (2) Simonda, and his wife, Mary Fowle; their 
son, Caleb Simonds, and his first wife, Susanna 
Confers; their daughter, Bath Simonds, married 
Andrew (2) Munroe, and they were the parents of 
eleven children, the last six bom in Danyers, Mas- 
sachusetts. Descent in this branch is through the 
youngest of these children, Luther. 

(V) Luther Munroe was bom in Danvers, Mas- 
sachusetts, May 10, 1805, and there died, Decem- 
ber 23, 1861. He married, at Reading, Massachu- 
setts, September S, 1826, Olive Flint, bom, in Read- 
ing, July 27, 1805, daughter of John and Phebe 
Flint, granddaughter of Jonathan (2) Flint, son of 
Jonathan (1) Flint, son of Captain Thomas Flint 
(wounded in the Swamp Fight with King Philip's 
Indians, builder of the first meeting house in. Salem 
Village), son of Thomas (1) Flint, of early record 
in Salem, Massachusetts, who died in 1663. Luther 
and Olive (Flint) Munroe were the parents of six 
children, the third a son, William Calvin, being the 
head of the sixth generation in this branch. 

(VI) William Calvin Munroe was bom in Salem, 
Massachusetts, December 21, 1833, died there Aug- 
ust 10, 1891, and was buried in Monumental Ceme- 
tery, Peabody, Massachusetts. He came in early 
life with his parents from Salem to Peabody, and 
there ever afterward resided, his death occurring at 
his summer home in Salem. He first engaged in 
the milk business in Peabody, and later began in a 
small way a local express business. During the 
Civil War he, with his brother-in-law, John H. 
Grout, established an express business, and they 
were the first to carry express matter over the 
railroad from Peabody, securing a contract from 
the old Eastern railroad, (now Boston & Maine). 
They shipped their express goods over the railroad 
to East Boston, their own teams then delivering 
them in Boston. This business was dissolved by 
Mr. Munroe selling his interest to his partner, but 
later he bought it back and with Frank T. Arnold 
continued the business as the Munroe & Arnold 
Express Company. Moses Shackley, some time 
afterward, vras admitted a partner, but the old firm 
name was retained. In 1872 Mr. Shackley retired 
from the firm, Messrs. Munroe & Arnold continuing 
until the death of Mr. Munroe, August 10, 1891, his 
place in the firm being taken by his son William 
F. Munroe. 

William C. Munroe married (first) November 26, 
1859, in South Danvers, Massachusetts, Adeline 
Bradley Jones, bom in Hampstead, New Hamp- 
shire, February 28, 1835, died in Peabody, Massa- 
chusetts, April 23, 1864, daughter of Justus and 
Sophronia (Wood) Jones. Two sons were bom to 
Mr. and Mrs. Munroe: William Frederick, who 
died young; and William Frederick (2), head of 
the seventh generation in this branch of the Munro^ 
family. Mr. Munroe married (second) in Salem, 
Massachusetts, July 28, 1865, Jane Wood Jelly, bom 
in Salem, Massachusetts, February 12, 1837, daugh- 
ter of Charles and Mary (Hammond) Jelly. Wil- 
liam C. and Jane W. (Jelly) Munroe have an only 



child, a daughter Jennie, who married Dr. Hazry 
Delano Kennard. 

(VII) William Frederick Munroe, son of Wfl- 
liam Calvin Munroe and his first wife, Adeline B. 
(Jones) Munroe, was bom in Peabody, Massachu- 
setts, March 31, 1864, there spent his life in honor- 
able usefulness, and died June 10, 1912. He was 
educated in Peabody schools, and the Bryant & 
Stratton Business College, then began his business 
career with his father, f otmder of the express busi- 
ness which was so long known as the Munroe & 
Arnold Express Company. At the death of his 
father, William C. Munroe, he succeeded him as 
head of the business and conducted it for the benefit 
of the Arnold estate. In 1904 the Munroe & Ar- 
nold Express Company bought the old-established 
express business of David Merritt, and in 1905 ac- 
quired the J. H. Moulton Express Company, o^ 
Salem, and both those companies were merged witli 
the Munroe & Arnold Express Company. On Sep- 
tember 1, 1905, the business was incorporated under 
the Massachusetts laws as the Munroe-Amold- 
Merritt Express Company, William F. Munroe 
president, a position he held until his passing seven 
years later. 

In civic affairs Mr. Munroe was the interested, 
patriotic citizen. In politics a Republican, he 
served as member of the party town committee for 
ten years; in 1896 was elected a trustee of Peabody 
Institute; member of the School Committee and 
chairman of the board until ids death; and in 1910 
represented Peabody in the Massachusetts Legis- 
lature. He was held in the highest esteem by his 
townsmen, and at the spring election preceding his 
death, he was re-elected to the School Committee to 
serve three years. He was a director of the War- 
ren Five Cents Savings Bank, a member of the 
Investment Committee, and deeply interested in 
these duties as he was in all the business and other 
organizations with which he was connected. He 
was a Master Mason of Jordan Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; a companion of Washington 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; a sir knight of Win- 
slow Lewis Commandery, Knights Templar, all of 
Salem; past noble grand of Holten Lodge, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows; a member of Abbott 
Council, Order of United American Mechanics; 
Peabody Board of Trade; Danvers Golf Club; Co- 
lonial Club of Salem; and was active in the affairs 
of the Universalist church. 

Mr. Munroe married, June 2, 1892, Clara BaUey 
Mansfield, bom in Wakefield, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 14, 1868, daughter of Edward Galen and Re- 
becca Stacey (Breed) Mansfield, granddaughter of 
Edward and Clara (Bailey) Mansfield. Edward 
Galen Mansfield was bom in Brighton, Massachu- 
setts, in July, 1842, died July 26, 1875. Rebecca 
Stacey (Breed) Mansfield, bom January 15, 1841, 
died Jtme 8, 1880, was a daughter of Captain Hub- 
bard Breed an old-time deep-water master of ships. 
Edward Mansfield was bom April 18, 1813. Clara 
(Bailey) Mansfield was bom September 15, 1813, 



1 

I 



188 



ESSEX COUNTY 



and died November, 1898. Nine children were bom 
to William F. and Clara BaOey (Mansfield) Mnnroe, 
aeven in Peabody, and two in Salem. 1. Eleanor 
Vinton, bom March 26, 1898, died October 18, 1897. 
2. Ruth, bom June 15j 1894, a graduate of the Mas- 
sachusetts State Normal School at Framingham, 
1915; married, January 15, 1916, Charles H. Went- 
worth, and has two daughters, Clara Munroe, bom 
January 15, 1917, and Virginia Alan, bom June 28, 
1920. 8. Alice Hubbard, bom November 11, 1895, a 
graduate of Burdett College, class of 1915; married, 
June 26, 1920, Samuel Oliver King. 4. Marjorie, 
bom November 27, 1898; married, Febraary 9, 1915, 
Ralph E. Raymond, atfd has two children: John 
Munroe, bom July 19, 1916, and Eleanor Wilson, 
bom November 11, 1918. 5. Allen Breed, bom 
March 11, 1900; he entered the United States ser- 
vice in March, 1918, and was honorably discharged 
in September, 1919. He was in training at the 
United States Radio Station at Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, prior to entering the service, being in the 
navy. He crossed the ocean three times and saw 
active service. Since the war he attended Eastern 
Radio Institute at Boston, Massachusetts, as a stu- 
dent, is now a radio operator, first class, and 
has again crossed the ocean tluree times. 6. Wil- 
liam Calvin, bom May 20, 1902, a student at Brown 
University, class of 1928. 7. Edward Mansfield, 
bom March 9, 1904, a student at high school. 8. 
John Vinton, bom August 6, 1905, a student at high 
school. 9. Frederick Galen, bom July 4, 1910. The 
family home was in Peabody, but a summer home 
was maintained in Salem many years. Mrs. Clara 
Bailey (Mansfield) Munroe survives her husband, 
and continues her residence in Peabody, Massachu- 
setts, at No. 25 Orchard street. 



SAMUEL HOOPER (2) STONE— Two men 

have borne this name in Beverly, Massachusetts, 
Samuel Hooper Stone, mariner and later merchant, 
long since gathered to his fathers, and his son, 
Samuel Hooper (2) Stone, the well known real es- 
tate and insurance broker, now located at No. 164 
Cabot street, where he conducts a business which 
he established forty-four years ago (1877) in a room 
over Hill's jewelry store at No. 160 Cabot street. 
The business has remained in that locality all the 
years which have since intervened, and is housed 
in the building next door to the one in which it had 
its birth. 

Samuel Hooper Stone, the elder, was bom in 
Manchester, Massachusetts, July 15, 1826, died Sep- 
tember 7, 1881. He followed the sea in his earlier 
life, then engaged in the shoe business in Beverly, 
Massachusetts, where he died. He married Caroline 
Augusta Dodge, bom in Beverly, September 17, 
1830, and there died. May 5, 1881, daughter of 
Azor Dodge, whose home was the old Batch home- 
stead, the oldest house standing in Beverly. 

Samuel Hooper (2) Stone, son of Samuel Hooper 
(1) and Caroline Augusta (Dodge) Stone, was bom 
in Beverly, Massachusetts, January 26, 1852, and 
there yet resides, sixty-nine years later. He was 



educated in the public schools and was variously 
engaged until the age of twenty*five, then, on April 
1, 1877, began his long and successful career as a 
real estate and insurance agent. He opened his 
first office in a room over Hill's jewelry shop at 
No. 160 Cabot street and from the beginning met 
with gratifying success. He has continued in the 
same lines and has built up a strong agency. His 
real estate operations and dealings have been ex- 
tensive and he may be given credit for a great deal 
of the expansion and improvements which in the 
last half century Beverly has experienced. The 
strongest and best companies are represented in his 
insurance department, and it is a conservative state- 
ment to say that in his business operations Mr. 
Stone has registered success. The business was 
incorporated August 1, 1917, under the name of the 
Samuel H. Stone Company, Inc., Roy K» Patch and 
Creorge W. Barron being associated with Mr. Stone. 
He was one of the founders of the Beverly Board 
of Trade in 1888, has continuously held an import- 
ant office, and never missed a board meeting dur- 
ing the entire period of twenty-nine years, which 
has elapsed since its organization. Since 1889 he 
has been secretary of the Beverly Building Associa- 
tion. He is Beverly's representative on the Salem 
"News", and a citizen, public-spirited and progres- 
sive. 

Mr. Stone is a member of Liberty Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Diana Chapter, Order of 
the Eastem Star; Bass River Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; and Friendship Lodge, 
Daughters of Bebekah. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and a member of Dane Street Congregational 
Church. Now nearing his seventieth birthday, Mr. 
Stone is hale and hearty, and is daily at his busi- 
ness. He is widely known as a genial, generous 
soul, upright andd honorable in all things, a man 
both trusted and loved. 

Mr. Stone married Nellie M. Hussey, a daughter 
of Frank H. and Augusta P. Hussey. 



GBORGE DRAPER — With long experience in 
the manufacture of leather, George Draper, of 
Peabody, Massachusetts, is carrying forward to a 
successful future the business which he has estab- 
lished in this city. 

Mr. Draper was bom in Peabody, March 18, 
1880, and is a son of Edward and Jane (Tresilian) 
Draper. The father was bom in Ireland, and the 
mother in Maine. 

Receiving a thoroughly practical education in 
the public and high schools of this city, Mr. Draper 
first entered the industrial world in the employ of 
the A. C. Lawrence Company, the well known 
Peabody leather manufacturers. Here he worked 
in the shipping department for four years. He 
then became connected with the Morrill Leather 
Company, of Salem, Massachusetts, as foreman, and 
remained with them in that capacity for fifteen 
years. He then went to Brooklyn, New York, 
where he was with the Richard Young Company, 
leather manufacturers, for three years. Following 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



189 



this he went to the O. H. Oppenheimer Companyf 
of Newark, New Jersey* with whom he was asso- 
ciated for one year as superintendent. Thereafter 
returning to Peabody, he became superintendent of 
the C. P. Osborne Company's plant, filling this posi- 
tion for a period of fiye years. * 

Through these various changes, Mr. Draper gain- 
ed a fund of experience, and a familiarity with 
modem methods in different plants, which he is now 
finding invaluable. In 1919, in association with 
Ruric A. Chilson as partner, he founded the busi- 
ness which is now progressing most satisfactorily. 
Located on Walnut street, in Peabody, the firm 
are manufacturing sock linings for McKay turned 
shoes, and are handling the splitting of leather on 
contract, manufacturing sheep skins. They are 
building up an extensive business and taking a posi- 
tion of prominence in the manufacturing world. 

Mr. Draper is a member of the Peabody Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and politicaUy supports the Re- 
publican party. In fraternal circles he is well known, 
being master of Jordan Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and also a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. He is a member of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, of which he is also warden. For thirty- 
five years, ever since his childhood, he has sung in 
different church choirs. 

Mr. Draper married, in Peabody, Massachusetts, 
Emma L. Osborne, daughter of Calvin P. and 
Louise V. (Jones) Osborne, Mr. Osborne being Mr. 
Draper's recent employer. 



FREDERICK PENFIELD LIBERTY— The busi- 
ness record of Frederick Penfield Liberty, of Merri- 
mac, Massachusetts, shoe manufacturer, defurly in- 
dicates his measure as an organizer and executive. 
He has had part in the formation and development 
of several important shoe manufacturing corpora- 
tions, as will be seen. His record also includes im- 
portant administrative duties accomplished in mili- 
tary capacity during the World War. 

Frederick P. Liberty was bom on June 9, 1885, 
at Renovo, Pennsylvania, son of Magloire and Al- 
phonsine (Normand) Liberty. His father was bom 
in Pigeon City, Pennsylvania, on July 26, 1862, and 
for the greater part of his life was a lumber mer- 
chant in Pennsylvania. His mother was bom in 
Lakeport, New Hampshire, on June 7, 1865. Their 
children were: Frederick P., of whom further; 
Marie Louise; Elodie; and Ernest. 

The family seems to have settled in Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, early in the boyhood of Frederick 
P., for he received his elementary education in the 
public schools of that place. He later was a stu- 
dent at the Sacred Heart College, Arthabaska, Can- 
ada. After graduating therefrom, he entered busi- 
ness life without delay. His first work was in the 
retail clothing store of Warren Emerson, in Haver- 
hill, where he remained for about eighteen months, 
then left to work in New Bedford, Massachusetts, 
for the Haskell & Tupp Company of that place. 
He was only twenty-two years old when he re- 
turned to Haverhill and ventured into business for 



himself. He formed business asBodatiLon with 
Ernest C. Peabody, and the two, as partners, con- 
ducted the firm of Ernest C. Peabody & Company, 
leather trimmers, from 1907 to 1910, when Mr. Lib- 
erty acquired a half-interest in the business of Ed. 
E. Sullivan, of Haverhill, the firm with the change 
of ownership becoming Ed. E. Sidlivan & Company. 
The partnership continued for four years, until 
1914, and an appreciable volume of manufacturing 
of high grade turned shoes for ladies had been de- 
veloped; but in 1914 Mr. Liberty saw an advantage 
in retiring from the company to organize the Lib- 
erty-Durgin Corporation, and did so. The prin- 
cipal incorporators were Bernard L. Durgin, Fredeiv 
ick P. Liberty, and William S. Starkey, and these 
became the president, treasurer, and vice-president 
of the corporation when chartered. Seeing that 
nowadays most of the manufacturing is done by 
the Rex system, it is interesting to note that the 
Liberty-Durgin Corporation was the first company 
ito manufacture shoes under the Turn Rex system. 

During the next few years a great expansion 
came, and when in 1917 the government had to en- 
ter into many phases of manufacture to meet the 
requirements of the nation at war, the plant of the 
Liberty-Durgin Corporation was important enough 
to be one of those sought for and turned over. 
During the war the plant manufactured textile 
equipment exclusively for the government, and was 
very efficiently managed. It is said that the fac- 
tory had the distinction of having the greatest out- 
put per machine at the least expense, notwithstand- 
ing that it had the highest paid operators during the 
period in which it was devoted to government con- 
tracts; and a further distinction, which is treasured, 
is a citation from the United States Government 
as to its valuable service to the nation in war, it 
being stated that the Liberty-Durgin Corporation 
was the only company engaged in government con- 
tracts that was not delinquent in filling orders. 
The company continued in government work until 
the close of the World War, and then reverted to 
shoe manufacturing, and to the making of Good- 
year welt women's shoes. In the same year Mr. 
^Liberty acquired the controlling interest in the 
Austin H. Perry Shoe Company, the name being 
then changed to the Cooper, Liberty, Thompson 
Company, the company continuing to manufacture 
on an extensive scale, having two plants, one at 
Marlboro and the other at Haverhill. In 1920 Mr. 
Liberty became chairman of the Shoe Manufactur- 
ing Association, acting also as manager, capacities 
he still holds. Recently, in 1921, he became con- 
nected with the George B. Leavitt Corporation, 
large shoe manufacturers, and was elected presi- 
dent and appointed general manager. It will there- 
fore be seen that Mr. Liberty has been quite active 
in his connection with the Massachusetts shoe 
manufacturing industry. 

During the World War he volunteered his ser- 
vices to the nation, in military capacity, though of 
course beyond draft age. He enlisted in the United 
States army in March, 1918, and was commissioned 



140 



ESSEX COUNTY 



in the grade of cmptain by President WUson, on May 
1, 1918. He was assigned to daty at Boston* Mas- 

aaehosettSt under the district chief of ordnance, 
Levi H. Greenwood, and had charge of production 
«f ordnance equipment. In August, 1918, he was 
transferred from the Ordnance Department to the 
Quartermaster Corps, and in this assignment was 
the officer in charge of the manufacturing branch 
of the department in the Boston district He was 
not discharged from military service until June, 
1919. Immediately, thereafter, he resumed his full 
connection with the shoe industry. 

Mr. Liberty is necessarily well known in the 
Haverhill district. He is a member of the Haver- 
hill Chamber of Commerce, was a director of it 
for two years, and also was a member of the 
Haverhill Rotary Club. He belongs to the Island 
Golf, Agawam, and Merrimac Valley dubs. 

Mr. Liberty married, January 4, 1905, Sarah Isa- 
belle Page, who was bom in Haverhill, March 26, 
1885, daughter of George H. and Mary Jane 
(Hughes) Page, of Haverhill. George H. Page 
was bom In Amesbury, Massachusetts, December 1, 
1860, and was a hotel proprietor in Haverhill until 
he died, August 4, 1907. His wife was bom in 
Georgetown, Massachusetts, August 6, 1859, and 
they were married July 3, 1879. Their children 
were: Flora Edith, bom Febraary 6, 1881; Charles, 
bom in August, 1882, died in 1888; Sarah Isabelle, 
who married Frederick P. Liberty; Elzo B., bom 
June 21, 1886; George L., bom October 7, 1890; 
Huth A., bom October 8, 1892; Jennie M., bom May 
7, 1894; and Doris, bom April 6, 1898. Frederick 
P. and Sarah Isabelle (Page) Liberty had children 
«s follows: Normta D. Page, bom September 2, 
1906; Jane Louise, bom October 26, 1908; Ruth, 
bom November 16, 1910; Frederick P., Jr., bom 
January 8, 1913 ; George Currier, bom July 29, 1915, 
died July 12, 1917; James Sherman, bom July 1, 
1917; and Franklin, bom July 22, 1919. 



Mr. Davis married, in 1901, Mary Adams, daugh- 
ter of Dr. John F. Adams, and they have two sons: 
John F. A., bom October 19, 1904, and Harrison 
M. Jr., bom April 19, 1908. 



HARRISON MERRILL DAVIS, a member of 
the law firm of Dunbar & Rackemann, Room 75, 
Ames building, Boston, Massachusetts, was bom in 
Salem, Massachusetts, December 17, 1867, and is a 
son of Abner H. and Mary L. (Merrill) Davis, both 
of New England families. 

In the public schools of Portland, Maine, Mr. 
Davis laid the foundation for his education, then 
spent two years at Olivet College, Michigran. Re- 
turning East, he thereafter read law in the offices 
of Holmes & Payson, of Portland, Maine, and was 
admitted to the Maine bar in 1888. He was admit- 
ted to the Massachusetts bar in 1896, and has since 
^carried on a general practice, being associated since 
1896 with the firm of attorneys formerly known as 
Balch & Rackemann, and more recently Dtmbar & 
Rackemann, having been admitted to the firm in 
1908. 

Mr. Davis is a member of the Salem Billiard 
Club, the Salem Golf Club, and the Eastern Yacht 
Club. He is also a member of the Salem Club, and 
of the St. Botolph Club of Boston. 



HARRIS J. PHIPPS was bom at Hopkinton, 

Massachusetts, in 1880, and is a son of Appleton 
and Sarah J. (Metcalf) Phipps, of Hopkinton. His 
father was a carpenter and builder. 

Mr. Phipps received his early education in the 
public schools at Watertown, Massachusetts. After 
completing his preliminary studies, he proceeded to 
Harvard University and graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in 1903. Having decided to 
adopt the profession of teaching, Mr. Phipps ac- 
cepted a position as teacher at Cumberland, Mary- 
land, where he remained for two years. He next 
spent three years as a teacher at the Allen School 
for Boys, at West Newton. From there he' went to 
the Maiden High School, where for three years he 
was professor of mathematics and science. When 
his connection with the Maiden High School came 
to an end, Mr. Phipps became the principal of the 
Oliver Ames High School, at North Easton. At 
the end of four years of service in this position 
Mr. Phipps became the superintendent of schools 
at Easton, a position which he held for three years. 
At length, after having been connected witii the 
Oliver Ames High School at North Easton for 
seven years, Mr. Phipps decided to accept a new 
position, and became the superintendent of schools 
at Walpole,. where he remained for one year. From 
Walpole he came to Danvers, where for the past 
two years he has been superintendent of schools of 
the town. 

Mr. Phipps is an active member of the Maple 
Street Congregational Church. He served as a 
member of the State Guard during the period of the 
World War, from 1917 to 1920. He is a Mason and 
a past master of the Grange. He is also a member 
of the Massachusetts High School Association; the 
Massachusetts School Masters' Club; and the Mas- 
sachusetts Superintendents' Association. 

Mr. Phipps married Alice Cox, of Watertown, 
Massachusetts, and they are the parents of four 
daughters: Virginia, Gwendolyn, Miriam, and Jean 
Phipps. 

DEAN K. WEBSTER, the present head of the 
H. K. Webster Company, of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, has for years carried forward in ever widening 
scope a business built upon one of the everyday 
needs of the people. 

Henry K. Webster, the founder of this concern, 
was bom in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Janu- 
ary 18, 1835, and was educated in the schools of 
that city. As a young man he worked on his fath- 
er's farm, then, in 1858, came to Lawrence. Here 
he entered the em|/4oy of a local grain dealer, re- 
maining in this connection until 1868, when he en- 
listed in the 12th Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Infantry, serving until the end of the war. 
Returning to Lawrence in 1866, Mr. Webster re- 



— I 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



141 



sQincd the cfuties of his old position and continued 
^th the same firm until 1868. During his employ- 
ment in this business he had learned thoroughly the 
relation of this branch of mercantile endeavor to 
the trade \vhich it supplied, and with the originality 
which was characteristic of the man» devised a 
plan for developing the business in such a manner 
as to be of mutual advantage to both the dealer and 
the consumer. Starting in business for himself in 
1868, he built up a very large interest by milling 
grains and preparing feeds for the special require- 
ments of the different groups into which the mar- 
ket is naturally divided. Carrying this idea through 
all his experience as head of the business, it be- 
came the fundamental principle of the concern, and 
has been developed to a point where the company 
mills and manufactures a large variety of grain 
products, including com meal, cracked com, ground 
oats, and many special lines of mixed feeds for 
stock and poultry, all under the brand of the ''Blue 
Seal Grain Products." They make a specialty of 
distributing assorted car lots of grain and feed to 
points on the Boston & Maine railroad in this and 
other States. They sell at both wholesale and retail 
and do a large business. Prior to 1904 the firm 
was known as the H. K. Webster Co., and then, be- 
ing incorporated, it has since been the H. K. Web- 
ster Company. 

Henry K. Webster became widely prominent in 
various circles in Lawrence, and was honored by 
the people by election to public office. He was long 
a member of the Common Council, and served as 
president of that body in 1878-79. In 1881 he was 
elected mayor of the city of Lawrence, and served 
with dignity and wisdom. For many years he was 
president of the Lawrence National Bank, and after 
its consolidation with the Merchants National, as 
the Merchants Trust Company, he was chairman 
of its board of directors until his death. He was a 
member of Tuscan Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; of Mount Sinai Royal Arch Chapter; of 
Lawrence Council, Royal and Select Masters; and 
of Bethany Commandery, Knights Templar. He 
died February 28, 1920. 

On September 7, 1861, Henry K. Webster married 
Elsie A. Johnson, who died in 1909. They were 
the parents of three sons: Burt G., now of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts; Neal W.; and Dean K., of fur- 
ther mention. 

Dean E. Webster was bom in Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, May 10, 1870, and received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of the city. Covering 
the high school course, he thereafter attended com- 
mercifd school, and also studied law in the office of 
a Lawrence attorney. While never taking up the 
practice of law professionally, he has found this 
knowledge a useful budneas adjunct. Becoming 
associated with his father in 1891, he was received, 
into the firm as a partner in 1896, and upon the 
death of his father became president and treasurer 
of the eonceniy in which oflice he is still active. 

In 1907 Mr. Webster was selected by the Grain 
Dealers' AssociatioB of New Engiaiid to head the 



organization of the Grain Dealers' Mutual Fiie In- 
surance Company, of Boston, Massachusetts, since 
which time he has served as its president. From 
this beginning three other mutual insurance com- 
panies have grown, of each of which Mr. Webster la 
the active head: Automobile Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, Automobile Mutual Liability Insurance 
Company (called The Twin Mutuals), and the 
Beacon Mutual Fire Insurance Company. These 
are all Massachusetts corporations, with offices at 
No. 40 Central street, Boston. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Webster is widely promi- 
nent. He is a member of Tuscan Lodge^ Free and 
Accepted Masons, being a past master of the lodgOw 
He is a past high priest of Mount Sinai Royal Arch 
Chapter; is past illustrious master of Lawrence 
Council, Royal and Select Masters; is a past com- 
mander of Bethany Commandery, No. 17, Knights 
Templar. He is past district deputy grand master 
of the Grand Lodge, is past district deputy grand, 
high priest, and past grand king of the Grand 
Chapter, also past grand principal conductor of the 
work, and at the present time is most illustrious 
grand master of the Grand Council^ Royal and 
Select Masters, of Massachusetts. He is a member 
of Lowell Lodge of Perfection, Scottish Rite, and 
is past sovereign prince of Lowell Council, Princes 
of Jerusalem. He is past second lieutenant com- 
mander of Massachusetts Consistory, Ancient Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite, with the thirty-second de- 
gree, and has been crowned with the honorary 
thirty-third degree. He is a member of Aleppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Boston. 

Socially, Mr. Webster is well known, and is a 
member of the Rotary Club„ and also of the Merri- 
mac Valley Country Club. He is a member of the 
Lawrence Chamber of Commerce. 

On May 81, 1894, Mr. Webster married Clara^ 
bell Hatch, of Lawrence, and they have two sons: 
Dean K., Jr., associated with his father in business; 
and Walter N., a student of the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. The family resides at No. 
19 Wyman street, and attends the Central Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. They also lutve a charm- 
ing country home at White's Pond, Pdham, New 
Hampshire. _____^^__ 

GEORGE jHARiaSGN ALLEN— A lifelong resi- 
dent of Essex county, and now, at nearly eighty-one 
years of age, at his desk daily, George Hanison 
Allen is a noteworthy example of the business ex- 
ecutive who is still alert and active far beyoaidd the 
allotted span of life. 

Mr. Allen comes of one of the eldest families, in 
New Eng^nd, and is a sen of Jacob AKa AlLuft^ 
who was bom in Beverly, Massachusetts, March 6, 
1810. Jacob A. Allen was a member of the firm of 
Wilson A Allen, a lei^sentative Arm of Essex 
county of a day gene Vy, cowlecting a inrosperous 
planing mill and a box fiicterit; He eontiniied lonit 
in this business, his sen being identified with its 
progress from Us feotlk HmA A. Allen metried 



142 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Pradoice Hire» who was bom in Middlebmy, Ver- 
mont, November 5, 1807. Both are long since de- 
ceased. 

George Harrison Allen was bom in Manchester, 
Massachusetts, on Jnne 21, 1840. Obtaining a prac- 
tical education in the public schools both of Man- 
chester and Methuen, he began his business career 
in his father's planing mill, shoveling shavings. 
About 1867 Jacob A. AUen and Captain James Boy- 
den formed a partnership, and coming to this city 
began making wooden boxes in Lynn and Beverly. 
George H. ^en, then twenty-seven years of age, 
and a veteran of Civil War, joined them in the ven- 
ture. Two years later Captain Boyden died, and 
they received into partnership his half-brother, 
■William Boyden. The business continued to prosper 
in their hands, and although they had the mis- 
fortune of seeing the larger factory bum to the 
ground, they replaced it with a larger, finer and 
better equipped plant, and continued, undismayed. 
This arrangement continued until about 1891, when 
Mr. AUen purchased the interest of the Boyden 
heirs. George H. AUen conducted both plants until 
January 1, 1920, when he sold to the Hoague- 
Sprague Corporation, retaining, however, an inter- 
est in the concern. 

Mr. AUen has seen the different changes and de- 
velopments of box manufacturing, in which branch 
of industry his father was a pioneer. He has seen 
the introduction of fiber and paper boxes from the 
standpoint of one of the largest producers of the 
day, and is stiU as keenly interested, although past 
eighty years of age, as when he entered the field as 
a young man, with his future before him. He is 
remarkably active, and the business which he han- 
dles daUy would do credit to a much younger man. 

In the CivU War Mr. AUen served in the Third 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, also acting as 
wardmaster in the hospital. He served in North 
Carolina, under General Foster, for nine months, 
in the 18th Army Corps, in the Regimental Field 
Hospital, and through aU the exigencies of the 
time was fortunate enough to suffer no wounds. 

By political aiBliation a RepubUcan, Mr. AUen 
has often been sought as a candidate for pubUc 
office, but has always declined the honor. In finan- 
cial circles he holds high standing, having been 
clerk of the board of directors of the Manufactur- 
ers' National Bank, which office he stiU holds, his 
period of service now having covered twenty-eight 
years. He is also president and trustee of the Com- 
monwealth Bank of Lynn, 

FratemaUy, Mr. AUen is widely known. He is a 
member of Golden Fleece Lodge, Free and Accept- 
ed Masons, of which lodge he has been treasurer 
for about twenty-seven years; a member of Sutton 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; of GUes F. Yates 
Coundl, Royal and Select Masters; of Lateyette 
Lodge of Perfection, of Boston; of Mount OUvet 
Chapter, Massachusetts Consistory, Ancient Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite, and holds the thirty-thinl de- 
grte in this order. Ha is also a member of Aleppo 
Teni^ Ancieat Arable Order Nobles of the Mywtic 



Shrine; and is treasurer and trustee of the Masonic 
Fraternity, of Lynn. He was formerly a member of 
United Brothers Lodge, No. 66, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of Lawrence, and of Palestine En- 
campment of Lynn, and is past high priest of Pal- 
estine Encampment. His clubs are the Oxford and 
the Masonic, of Swampscott. 

On December 26, 1864, Mr. AUen married (first) 
Sarah Luella Mclntyre, daughter of Eben and Tem- 
perance Mclntyre, of Lancaster, New Hampshire, 
who died in 1901. Eben Mclntyre was a highly re- 
spected farmer of that section. Mr. Allen married 
(second) Effie Sophia Spinney, who was bom in 
Argyle, Nova Scotia, of seafaring ancestors, resid- 
ing later in Gloucester, Massachusetts. They haye 
two children: LueUa Spinney, bom September 21, 
1904; and George Harrison, Jr., bom October 6, 
1905. 



JOHN O^NEIL, attorney, of Amesbury, Massa- 
chusetts, was bom in that town July SI, 1890, the 
son of the late John and Mary J. O'NeO. He re- 
ceived his early education in St. Joseph's Parochial 
School, and later at the Amesbury High School, 
from which he was graduated in 1908. For two 
years following graduation he was enga(^ in news- 
paper work, abandoning that in the fall of 1910 to 
enter Harvard College. He was graduated from 
Harvard College in 1914, and in the fall of the 
same year entered the Law School of Harvard Uni- 
versity. Concluding his law course in June, 1917, 
he was admitted to practice law in Massachusetts 
during the summer of that year. 

During the World War, 1917-18, Mr. OTIefl 
served in the army, being attached to the Intelli- 
gence Service. He was honorably discharged Janu- 
ary 31, 1919. He was later associated with the law 
office of William A. Morse, of Boston, and eventu- 
ally opened offices in Amesbury, where he has since 
been engaged in the work of his profession and hss 
built up a fine practice. 

Mr. O'Neil has been very active in the community 
work of Amesbury, and there have been few com- 
munity efforts of recent years in which he has net 
taken an active part. He is at present a director 
of the Amesbury Hospital Association and the 
Amesbury Chamber of Commerce; trustee of the 
Scholarship Funds of the Amesbury High School 
and of the Athletic Injury Fund of the same in- 
stitution. 

Mr. O'Neil has been prominent in Ameriesn Le- 
gion circles, and has held several offices. At pres- 
ent he is chairman of the executive committee of 
Amesbury Post. Fraternally he has been prond- 
nent in the Knights of Columbus, and now holds 
the office of grand knight of Amesbury Council of 
that order. In politics Mr. O'Neil is % Democrat He 
has been the party candidate for the Senate in the 
Fourth Essex District and for Representative in the 
First Essex District, and has been prominent in the 
councils of the party in this section of the State. 

Mr. OTfeil is unmarried, and resides with his 
brother at No. 86 Gteenwood streeit^ Aueeboiy* 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



143 



WALTER M. LIBBEY— Allied with the sreat 
shoe industry in the mannfactore of soles and 
leather, Walter M. Libbey is an active executive 
in the trade as president of J. L. Libbey H Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Libbey is a son of Jeremiah L. Libbey, long 
the head of this business, which still' bears his name, 
and Elizabeth (Sisson) Libbey. Jeremiah L. Lib- 
bey was bom in Lynn, Massachusetts, and reared in 
this city, which was even then a widely recognized 
center of shoe manufacturing. He founded the 
present business June 1, 1864, in association with a 
partner, R. E. Hilliard, who later, in 1870, retired 
to go into business for himself. 

Walter M. Libbey was bom in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, on April 27, 1858, and educated in the public 
schools of that dty, later spending one year at 
Wilbraham Academy. Entering his father's fac- 
tory, he learned the business in all its departments, 
and on June 1, 1879, was received as a partner. 
From that time until the present Walter M. Libbey 
has been closely identified with the business in an 
executive capacity. Walter M. Durgin was made a 
partner in 1892, and in 1918 Mr. Libbey's son, Wal- 
ter S. Libbey, became a member of the firm. For 
fifty-seven years J. L. Libbey & Company has been 
a 'factor in the shoe industry in Essex county, and 
for the past thirty years the plant has occupied its 
present location on Union street, Lynn. Walter M. 
Libbey, as president of the company, is prominent 
in the business world of Lynn. 

In financial circles, also, Mr. Libbey is identified 
with large interests. He was one of the founders 
of the Manufacturers' National Bank of Lynn, and 
is vice-president and director of that institution. He 
is also a member of the Lynn Chamber of Com- 
merce, and director of the Lynn Mutual Insurance 
Company. Fraternally, Mr. Libbey is a member of 
aU the Masonic orders, including the Ancient Ara- 
bic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also 
a member of Lynn Lodge, No. 117, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of EDcs; and of Providence Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd FeUows. His clubs are 
the Oxford, of Lynn, and the Masonic, of Swamp- 
scott 

Mr. Libbey married (first) Jessie B. Sawye, who 
died in November, 1891. They were the parents of 
two children: Beatrice M., who is now Mrs. Robert 
J. Kissock» of New York; and Widter S., who is a 
member of the above-named firm. Mr. Libbey mar- 
ried (second) Sanh E. Delano. 



JAMES KIN8BLLA— One of the younger attor- 
neys of Salem, Massachusetts, James Einsella is 
building up a successful practice, although his ser- 
vice in the World War came as an interruption in 
his career. Mr. Kinsella was bom in Salem, in 1888, 
and is a son of James F. and Margaret (Savage) 
Kinsella, of this dty. His father has for many 
years been active as a carpenter and builder in 
Salem and its vicinity. 

After attending the parochial and high schools 
of 8aleai» Mr. Ehweila entered BoeUm College, in 



the class of 1911. He later took up the duties of 
clerk of the Probate Court of Essex county, and 
remained in this capacity until 1916. At that time 
he oi>ened an office and entered upon the practice 
of law, having been admitted to the bar in Febru- 
ary, 1918. He had built up a very considerable 
practice when, in May, 1918, he enlisted in the 
Ordnance Supply School, at Fort Slocum, New 
York, for service during the World War. In Au- 
gust of the same year he sailed for France, where 
he took an active part in the Mouse- Argonne of- 
fensive and in the Toule Sector, and was discharged 
July 24, 1919. 

Returning to Salem after his discharge, Mr. Kin- 
sella resumed his practice, and in the comparatively 
short period which has since elapsed, has established 
himself once more in the profession of his choice. 
Mr. Kinsella is a member of the Roman Catholic 
Church of the Immaculate Conception, and is a 
prominent member of the Knights of Columbus. 

EDWIN B. HALL— A native of Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts, a graduate of Dartmouth College, and 
for many years among the responsible executives 
of the Haverhill shoe industry, Edwin B. Hall comes 
deservedly into the Essex county record. Edwin 
Bowley Hall was bom in Haverhill on August 4, 
1878, son of George A. Ball by his first wife, Mary 
G. Bowley, of Haverhill, daughter of Edwin Bowley, 
who was an early resident in Haverhill, and one 
who aided appreciably to bring Haverhill into a 
good place among the incorporated places of that 
part of Massachusetts. He was a large owner of' 
real estate in the dty^ and was one of the most in- 
fluential citixens of his day. 

The Hall famOy was originally of New Hamp- 
shire, Thomas Hall, grandfather of Edwin B., hav- 
ing been bom in Plaistow, that State. He was a 
Protestant, and had a farming estate, the working 
of which he made his main occupation. He had 
seven children, four of whom were sons, among 
them George A., father of Edwin B., of whom 
further. 

George A. Hall was bom in 1848, was twice mar- 
ried, and was a prominent business man of Haver- 
hill. His line was real estate, and he probably as- 
sociated with his father-in-law in many big reid es- 
tate transactions. He was respected and popular 
in the conmiunity; so much may be inferred from 
the fact that for several years he was the repre- 
sentative of Haverhill in the State Legislature. By 
religious aflUiation he was a Congregationalist, and 
a good supporter of the local churches. His first 
wife, Mary G. (Bowley) Hall, bore him one dhildt 
Edwin B., of whom further; by his second wife, 
Helena Clarkson, he had two children: Harold and 
Isabelle, both of whom, however, are deceased. 

Edwin B. HaU received elementary and high 
schooling in Haverhill public schools, and took the 
preparatory collegiate course at the Hopldnson 
School at Boston, proceeding from there to Dart- 
mouth College, from which he was graduated with 
the dass edP 1902. Soon thereafter, he entered hwi- 



144 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ness life aa an employee of the firm of Payne & 
Webster, Boston brokers, with which firm he re- 
mained for four years. He left them in order to ac- 
cept an appointment with the Winchell Company. 
He was one of the directors of the company, and for 
twelve years had charge of the office and sales force. 
In 1918 he Was the principal organizer of the Baker 
Shoe Company, Inc., of Haverhill, and has since 
given his time wholly to its direction. He is presi- 
dent of the company; F. Baker Hall, treasurer; and 
B. H. Taylor, secretary. Their plant is at No. 280 
River street, and its capacity production is 2,000 
pairs of their specialties, ladies' boudoir shoes and 
a line of sandals. The factory uses 16,000 square 
feet of floor space, and finds steady employment for 
about one hundred persons. ' 

Mr. Hall is placed well among the leading busi- 
ness men of Haverhill, but he does not seem to 
enter much into public life. He has never held pub- 
lic office, and belongs to none of the local socie- 
ties or fraternal orders. Socially he is a member of 
the Pentucket Club, and his church is the North 
Congregational, of Haverhill. 

Mr. Hall married, in Haverhill, on April 30, 1902, 
Florence B. Gould, who was bom in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1888, daughter of Wilbur H. and 
Mercy (Baker) Gould, the former a shoe manufac- 
turer. Mr. and Mrs. Hall have three children: 
Eleanor, who was bom in 1908, and graduated from 
the Haverhill High School in the class of 1921; 
Barbara, bom in 1905, and now (1922) a Haverhill 
High School junior; and Natalie, bom in 1910, and 
now in the eighth grade of the Fox Grammar School 

WINPIELD B. KNOWLTON was bom at Low- 
ell, Massachusetts, on May 18, 1877, and is a son 
of George Winfleld and Etta Frances (Watson) 
Knowlton. His father was bom at Newmarket, 
New Hampshire, where he was engaged in the bank- 
ing business for about forty years, until 1906, when 
he retired from active participation in business af- 
fairs. He died in 1907. His wife, who was bom at 
Lowell, Massachusetts, died in 1914. 

Winfleld B. Knowlton received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Lowell. He graduated 
from the Lowell High School as a member of the 
elass of 1896, and proceeded to the Lowell Textile 
School. When he had completed his technical 
studies he obtained employment with the Kitson 
Machine Company, of Lowell. After spending two 
years in the service of the Kitson Machine Com- 
pany, Mr. Knowlton was offered a position as 
draftisman with the Tremont and Suffolk Mills, of 
that city. He remained in this position for a year, 
and then, in 1899, formed a connection with the 
American Woolen Company, of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts. His flrst position at Lawrence was that 
of draftsman, but he was steadily promoted, until 
he attained his present position, which is that of 
supervising mechanical engineer. 

Mr. Knowlton is a member of the Congregational 
church of Andover. He is a member of Phoenician 
Lodgt, Free and Accepted Masons; Mount Sinai 



Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Lawrence Conn 
Royal and Select Masters; Bethany ComxnAnde 
Knights Templar; and Aleppo Temple, Ancii 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He sl 
is a member of the American Society of Meclia 
ical Engineers of New York; the Merrimac Vall 
Country Club; the Meadowbrook Country Club; ti 
Home Club of Lawrence; and the Youn^ Mei 
Christian Association of Lawrence. In politics ] 
is a Republican. 

Mr. Knowlton married, in 1903, Minnie Arundal 
daughter of Joshua Arundale, of Lawrence. Mr 
Knowlton was bom on April 21, 1882. They hsL\ 
one daughter, Marjorie Knowlton, who was box 
on January 6, 1909. 



SAMUEL R. BAILEY— An ex-service man, an 
of good civil record, Samuel R. Bailey, a native o 
Amesbury, is now associating with his father in tfa< 
management of the Bailey Manufacturing Company 
of Amesbury, Massachusetts. He is a young max 
of good technical knowledge, and is an expert in 
some branches of electrical work. 

Samuel R. Bailey was bom in Amesbury, Massa- 
chusetts, on January 17, 1894, son of Edwin W. N. 
and Lydia (Crowell) Bailey. His father was bom 
in East Pittston, Maine, and his mother in, Beveriy, 
Massachusetts. As a boy he attended the Ames- 
bury schopls, graduating eventually from the high 
school. Soon, thereafter, he proceeded to Pratt 
Institute, at Brooklyn, New York, and there grad- 
uated in the class of 1916. He found employment 
with the Edison Company, at Orange, N. J., work- 
ing in the battery testing department for two 
months. Showing aptitude for responsibility, he 
was made night foreman of the research department 
of the Edison plant, but only fiUed that office for 
a short time, being transferred to the more impor- 
tant repair department, where he remained for six 
months as assistant foreman. He had by this time 
acquired quite a comprehensive knowledge of the 
business, and might have gone much further in the 
Edison works, but he left the Orange plant to 
take a position in the New York office of the Walker 
Vehicle Company. For that company he went to 
Chicago, Illinois, and there for a time represented 
them, returning eventually to New York City, where 
he became city sfdesman for the company. He was 
thus engaged when the nation entered the World 
War, in April, 1917. Mr. Bailey did not wait many 
weeks before enlisting, being probably in the first 
ten thousand* enlisted of the four million men even- 
tually brought into the United States anny during 
the war. He voluntarily enlisted on April 20, 1917, 
and was assigned to the Fifteenth Company, of the 
Ninth Coast Defence Command, of New York. He 
passed the examination as electrician sergeant, first 
class, on June 9, 1917, was mustered into Federal 
service on July 5, 1917, and was assigned to duty 
at Fort Hancock, Sandy Hook, New Jersey. In 
April, 1918, he was transferred to the Fourth Ofli- 
cers' Training Camp^ at Fortress Monroe, VizginiB, 
and there was promoted to the grade «f engineer 



minftelti IB. I^notolton 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



145 



on June 6, 1918, being commissioned in the rank of 
second lieutenant soon afterward, on June 26, 1918. 
He was reassigned to the Coast Defence Service 
at Sandy Hook, but shortly afterwards sailed over- 
seas, as signal officer of the Fifth Trench Mortar 
Battalion. On January 10, 1919, he returned to this 
country from France, and on the 20th of that month 
was honorably discharged, in the rank of second 
lieutenant, at Fort Hamilton, New York. 

Soon after leaving militiury service Mr. Bailey 
resumed his connection with the Walker Vehicle 
Company, and continued to work for them in New 
York until June 15, 1920, when he came to Ames- 
bury to join his father in the Bailey Manufacturing 
Company, of Amesbury, and they have since been 
associated in business. The World War service of 
Samuel R. Bailey was not his only military experi- 
ence. He served one enlistment term in the State 
Militia, enlisting in June, 1912, as private in Cofn- 
pany F, of Haverhill, and was discharged in the 
same grade in June, 1916. 

Politically, Mr. Bailey is a Republican; religious- 
ly, he is an Episcopalian, a member now of the 
Amesbury church; and fraternally he is a Mason, 
belonging to Warren Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Amesbury, of which he holds one of the 
lesser chairs. He also is a member of the Amesbury 
Post of the American Legion. On March 13, 1922, 
he was elected to the Board of Selectmen of the 
town of Amesbury. 

On June 26, 1917, Mr. Bailey married Helen Jack- 
son, of West&eld, New Jersey. She was bom on 
February 19, 1894, and they have two children: 
Helen, bom June 6, 1918; and Samuel R., bom 
December 10, 1919. 



GEORGE A. STICKNEY, M. D.— No mention of 
the medical fraternity of Essex county, Massachu- 
setts, would be complete without the name of Dr. 
George A. Stickney, who since 1882 has been num- 
bered among the progressive representatives of the 
medical profession. Dr. Stickney has always com- 
bined with his professional activities those of a 
public-spirited citizen, associating himself intimate- 
ly and influentially with the leading interests of his 
native city, Beverly. 

Dr. Stickney was bom in Beverly, Massachu- 
setts, October 5, 1867. There he attended the pub- 
lic schools until 1871, when he entered the Haver- 
hill High School; finishing with graduation in 1875. 
He then matriculated at Harvard College, subse- 
quently entering the Medical Department of Har- 
vard University, where he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine, class of 1882. Dr. 
Stickney immediately returned to his native city 
and established himself in the practice of his chosen 
profession on Thomdike street, later moving to his 
present location. No. 68 Lathrop street, where he 
has a pretentious home, pleasantly situated, over- 
looking the bay. He is a member of the American 
Medical Association, the Massachusetts Medical So- 
ciety, and the Essex County Medical Society. He is 
medical examiner of the Seventh District of Essex 



county; president of the North Shore Pension 
Board, which is located at Salem, Massachusetts; 
physician-in-charge of the United Shoe Machine 
Corporation plant; and is on the staff of the Bev- 
erly Hospital. He also holds membership in the 
Beverly Historical Society, the Union Club, and 
during the World War the Home Medical Reserve 
Corps. In religion he is a Baptist; in politics, a 
Republican. 

Dr. Stickney married, December 4, 1884, Harriett 
W. Cole, daughter of Israel D. and Alice (Ware) 
Cole. Israel D. Cole was for many years in the 
tailoring business in Beverly, but in later years 
moved to Rutland, Vermont. Dr. and Mrs. Stick- 
ney are the parents of three children: Esther, who 
married Walter Alley, of Beverly, and they have a 
daughter, Constance S.; Robert C., who is a grad- 
uate of Dartmouth and Harvard colleges, and is 
now associated with his father in practice; G. Hor* 
ton, who is assistant manager of the United Shoe 
Machinery Company, of Beverly; he married Paul- 
ine Klink, and they have one child, a daughter, 
Nancy Lee. 

FREDERICK W. CHANDLER— As vice-presi- 
dent of the Nathan D. Dodge Shoe Company, Fred- 
erick W. Chandler, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, 
is actively engaged in the manufacture of shoes, 
the leading industry of Essex county. 

Mr. Chandler was bom May 10, 1888, and is a son 
of James H. and Carrie (Lake) Chandler. Receiv- 
ing his early education in the public schools, he 
thereafter took a four years' course at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, from which he 
was gn^aduated in the class of 1906. 

Beginning his career as secretary of the company 
with which he has since been associated, Mr. Chand- 
ler has risen, since 1907, to the office of assistant 
general manager and vice-president, and is an active 
factor in the progress of this concern, one of long 
standing in this county, and now the largest plant 
in the United States devoted exclusively to the 
manufacture of ladies' turn low shoes. 

Mr. Chandler is a. member of St. John's Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; of Newburyport Com- 
mandery. No. 8, Elnights Templar; and of Aleppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. He is a member of the Dalton Club, 
and the Golf Club. 

Mr. Chandler married Adelaide P. Dodge, daugh- 
ter of Nathan D. and Matilda (Hinsdale) Dodge, 
(q.v.), and they have two children: James D., and 
Matilda. The family attends the Central Congre- 
gational Church. 

JOSEPH MONETTE — In the legal profession in 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, Joseph Monette, whose 
offices are in the Central building, is a successful 
practitioner of the day. 

Mr. Monette was bom in Montreal, Canada, on 
December 11, 1869. Receiving his early education 
in the public schools of his native town, the young 
man became ambitious to enter one of the profes- 



146 



ESSEX COUNTY 



sions, and ultimately decided upon the law. He 
entered Laval University, at Montreal, Canada, 
from which he was graduated in 1891, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, then coming to the United 
States, he entered Harvard University Law School, 
from which he was graduated in 1896, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws. In the same year he 
was admitted to the bar, and opened an office in 
Lowell, Massachusetts. He was induced, however, 
to remove to Lawrence two years later, and located 
permanently there in 1898. He has since built up a 
large practice, and is now well known in the pro- 
fession in Essex county and elsewhere about the 
State. 

Mr. Monette is a member of the Lawrence Bar 
Association, and of the Essex County Bar Associa- 
tion. Besides his extensive private practice he is 
counsel for the Massachusetts State Department of 
Labor and Industries. 

Mr. Monette married, in 1900, in Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, Ubaldine Landry, and they have three 
children: Lucille, Claire, and Joseph, Jr. The 
family reside in Methuen, and attend St. Ann's 
Roman Catholic Church. 



ALBERT HENRY CHAMBERLAIN— The suc- 
cess of Albert Henry Chamberlain, the well known 
professional and business man of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, is recognized as richly merited. He has 
earned what he has gained. In earlier years a pros- 
perous lawyer, he was one of that exclusive set of 
lawyer-business men who hold such high rank in 
the world of commerce. 

His father, Volney R. Chamberlain, was a Ver- 
monter, bom in Weathersfield of that State. He 
died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1887. He was 
in the produce trade in Boston for many years. 
His wife, Lucia Woodruff (Lincoln) Chamberlain, 
was bom in Windsor, Vermont, in 1840, and at 
present resides in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Albert Henry Chamberlain is a native of Boston, 
Massachusetts, bom December 9, 1872. After the 
customary study in graded and high schools of 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, he matriculated at 
Harvard University in 1892 and was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1894. After en- 
gaging in business for two years he entered the 
Harvard Law School and graduated in 1899 with 
the degree of LL.B. After admittance to the Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, bar, 1899, he spent the follow- 
ing five years in the practice of law with William 
A. Munroe, a prominent attorney of Boston. From 
1898 to 1900 Mr. Chamberlain had his own law 
offices in Boston. About this same time he enter- 
ed the employ of William Whitman & Company, 
who were selling agfents for various textile mills, 
with offices in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia 
and Chicago. This association eventually brought 
him in touch with the Arlington Mills, makers of 
woolen and worsted goods, whose plants are lo- 
cated at Lawrence and North Adams, Massachu- 
setts. This is one of the largest companies along 
these lines in the United States. It was founded 



and incorporated in 1865, and is today capitalized 
at $12,000,000; there are about 7,600 employees, and 
it has always been an important factor in the pros- 
perity of the two cities. In 1918 he was made 
treasurer of the Ariington Mills, which position he 
holds at this present time (1922). He is a member 
of the National Association of Wool Manufactoxers; 
belongs to the American Bar Association and the 
Bar Associations of Boston and Massachusetts. He 
is a director of the Merchants' Trust Company, 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, and a corporator of the 
Essex Savings Bank. Politically he ia a Republi- 
can, but has little taste for public office, although 
serving in 1905 and 1906 on the Common Council 
of Cambridge, Massachusetts. His social and out- 
of-door interests are reflected in his memberships in 
the Harvard and the Colonial clubs, Boston, and 
in the North Andover and the Merrimack Valley 
Country clubs. He is a member of Dunster Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Cambridge, and 
Mizpah Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. 

In 1913 Mr. Chamberlain was married to Annie 
Robinson Hooper, daughter of George and Emily 
(Towle) Hooper, of Exeter, New Hampshire. To 
them have come two children: Albert Henry, Jr., 
bom November 24, 1915; and Barbara, bom June 
25, 1918. The family home is in Methuen, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

LAWRENCE AUGUSTUS FORD— A member 
of one of the leading law firms of the city of Bos- 
ton, and a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts, Law- 
rence Augustus Ford is widely prominent in the 
public affairs of both places, and a force for pro- 
gress. 

Mr. Ford was bom on September 21, 1874, and 
is a son of WUliam Henry and Bridget (Mahan) 
Ford, formerly of Newton, Massachusetts. The 
family removing to Beverly when Mr. Ford was a 
child of two years, it was here that he received his 
early education, in the public schools. He was 
graduated from the Beverly High School in the 
class of 1891. Ambitious to enter a profession, the 
young man went to the Holy Cross College, at 
Worcester, Massachusetts, and was g^raduated from 
that institution in 1895, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. He then entered Harvard University Law 
School, from which he was graduated in 1898, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and was admitted 
to the bar on February 12, of the same year. Mr. 
Ford entered upon the general practice of law in 
Boston, with the firm of Gaston, Snow, Saltonstall 
& Hunt, in September, 1898, and this assodalion 
still continues, Mr. Ford having been admitted to 
the firm in 1912. This is one of the most noted 
firms of attorneys in the city of Boston, and Mr. 
Ford is taking a constructive part in the prog^ress 
and success of the extensive law business which 
they handle. 

Mr. Ford is a member of the American Bar 
Association, the Massachusetts Bar Association, the 
Boston Bar Association, and also the Essex County 



/T\^UU-^U-^c^^ ^ ^ •«7Vy^£_^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



147 



Bar Association. In various directions outside his 
I»rofes8ion> Mr. Ford is active. He has been a trus- 
tee of the Beverly Public Library. During the 
recent World War he was very prominent in Red 
Cross work. He is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus, and of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and is also a member of the Har- 
vard Club, of Boston. 

ANSON B. AYER, box manufacturer, head of 
the Haverhill firm of Ayer & Webster, and owner 
of the factory in which he has worked for more 
than forty years, is a well known and respected 
business man of Haverhill. He was bom in Hamp- 
stead. New Hampshire, in 1862, the son of Albert 
and Lydia M. (Hoyt) Ayer, of Hampstead, New 
Hampshire, the former a hatter by trade. 

Anson B. Ayer received his education in the 
local schools, but was not very far advanced in 
nonage, or teenage, when he began to work. He 
first worked five years for the G. H. Hoyt & Son box 
factory, before working for M. A. Howe. This 
Haverhill factory was originally established by M. 
A. Howe, and for many years conducted by her. 
Later, the business passed to Morse & Hoyt, and 
still later the trading name became C. M. Hoyt. 
To him Anson B. Ayer was related, through his 
mother. For forty years, without break, Mr. Ayer 
has worked in this factory, and of course with the 
years was given increasingly responsible position 
in its affairs, until eventually he became one of the 
firm. In 1911, the trading name was again changed, 
becoming Ayer & Webster, with Mr. Ayer as prin- 
cipal owner. As such the factory has since been 
steadily operated, having good connections for its 
products, shoe boxes. Mr. Ayer is a member of the 
local lodge of Odd Fellows, and belongs to the An- 
cient Order of United Workmen, also to the Haver- 
hill Grange. Socially, he holds membership in the 
Pentucket Club. 

Mr. Ayer married, in 1882, Fannie Dias, of Haver- 
hill, daughter of Robert and Hattie (Bly) Dias, the 
former a Scot by birth. They have three children: 
Forest D., George H., and Marion F. 



GEORGE H. W. HAYES— One of the most 
prominent professional men of Ipswich, Massachu- 
setts, is George H. W. Hayes, attorney, whose ac- 
tivities embrace many branches of public endeavor, 
as well as a successful private practice. 

Mr. Hayes was bom in Georgetown, Massachu- 
setts, on March 16, 1871, and is a son of John and 
Catherine (Mahoney) Hayes^ Laying the founda- 
tion for a broad education in the public schools of 
his native place, Mr. Hayes continued there through 
the grammar grades and the high school, then en- 
tered Boston University Law School, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1895. Passing the 
examinations for admittance to the Massachusetts 
bar in the same year, he came to Ipswich in 1896, 
and since that time has carried on the general prac- 
tice of law here. Mr. Hayes' prominence in various 



branches of the public service form a just appraisal 
of his success. 

Mr. Hayes is a member of the Essex County Bar 
Association and of the Salem Bar Association, be- 
ing a member of the executive committee of the 
latter organization. He was appointed special jus- 
tice of the Third District Court of Essex county 
in 1906, serving until 1915, with the exception of 
such periods as his duties of a public nature called 
him out of town. In 1915 he was appointed justice 
of the Third District Court of Essex county by 
David I. Walsh. During the World War he served 
as chairman of the Local Exemption Board, District 
No. 21, State of Massachusetts. He specializes in 
real estate and probate law. 

In the civic activities of Ipswich Mr. Hayes has 
long been a leader. He served as town counsel 
from 1900 to 1913. He was a member and chair- 
man of the Ipswich School Committee from 1905 to 
1914, and was a member of the Electric Light and 
Water Commission from 1904 to 1919. In 1913 his 
services to the town were recognized by his election 
as representative to the Massachusetts State Legis- 
lature, and while a member of that body he served 
on the Committee on Legal Aifairs. 

Among his other interests it should be noted that 
Mr. Hayes is attorney for the Ipswich Savings Bank 
and for the Ipswich Co-operative Bank. He is a 
member of the Essex County Republican Club, of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
of the Knights of Columbus. 

On April 30, 1901, Mr. Hayes married Helen F. 
O'Brien, daughter of William F. and Sai*ah (Dunn) 
O'Brien. Mr. and Mrs. Hayes have four children: 
Althea V., bom June 13, 1902; WilUam F., bom 
February 15, 1904; Zelda. M., bom May 25, 1905; 
and George M., bom July 19, 1907. 



HUGH LEWIS MOORE, D. D. S., of Newbury- 
port, Massachusetts, was bom November 19, 1894, 
in Taunton, Massachusetts, son of Hugh Joseph and 
Mary Elizabeth (Maher) Moore. He attended the 
public schools of Boston, and was' graduated from 
Tufts Dental College in 1914. For the subsequent 
three years Dr. Moore worked in association with 
Dr. Kelley, of Boston, then came to Newburyport 
in 1917, when he engaged in practice for himself. 
His practice is a general one, specializing in oral 
surgery. Dr. Moore is a member of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks; the Knights of 
Columbus; and the Newbury Golf Club. 



ROBINSON Y. RUSSELL— Long active in jour- 
nalism in Lynn, Massachusetts, and now manufac- 
turing paper boxes extensively, with a plant at 
Chelsea, Massachusetts, Robinson Y. Russell is a 
representative man of the day. 

Mr. Russell was bom and educated in Manchester, 
New Hampshire, and came to Lynn as a young man 
to enter the world of industry, having learned the 
printer's trade in his native State. For a time he 
followed job printing, as he was able to avaO him- 



148 



ESSEX COUNTS 



•elf of defirable opportunities. Lfttcr he was con- 
nected with the "Bee/' then a leading newspaper of 
Lynn* With the comprehensiye development of this 
section, and the multiplicity of manufacturing inter- 
ests, Mr. Russell saw the opportunity in producing 
small paper boxes, which were in universal demand. 
Accordingly, he purchased the plant and interests 
of Weeks A Company, theretofore manufacturers in 
this line, in Saugus Center. Under the name of R. 
Y. Russell he continued this business, and so ap- 
preciably increased it that more commodious quar- 
ters became an imperative necessity. The most de- 
sirable location was found in West Lynn, hence 
the removal from Saugus Center. The business 
continued to grow, particularly after its incorpora- 
tion as Russell's Sons' Company, and further ex- 
pansion became necessary! Again the securing of a 
satisfactory location involved a change of address, 
and the business has since been one of the progress- 
ive manufacturing interests of Chelsea, although 
the greater part of its history has been identified 
with Essex county. The concern manufactures all 
kinds of small paper boxes, and in connection with 
the factory, operates a printing plant. Mr. Russell 
has for many years been a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, and is a member of the Congregational 
church. 

Over fifty years ago, in Lynn, Mr. Russell married 
Frances Adelaide Rowell, daughter of Joseph M. 
Rowell, who was for many years a customs house 
officer in Lynn. They were the parents of three 
children: Harlow, Waldo, and Harriet, the latter 
now the wife of Fred V. Hart Mr. Hart was born 
in Hope Valley, Rhode Island, in 1875, and was edu- 
cateil at Taunton and Lynn, specialising in drawing 
at night schools, and prepared for the profession 
of electrical engineer. He is now associated with 
the E. E, Winkley Company, of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, and also teaches drawing in the public schools 
of the city at night. Mr. and Mrs. Hart have three 
children: Annabelle and Miriam, twins, and Esther. 
Mrs. Hart is broadly active in the public movements 
of the day, and a moving spirit in the women's 
clubs of Lynn. She is at present (1921) vice-chair- 
man of the Republican City Committee, and is also 
a member of the school board of Lynn, and an ear- 
nest worker for progress in all branches of endeavor. 



JOHN FRANKLIN JORDAN, M. D.— Among 
the many professions that of medicine is the most 
ennobling and helpful to mankind, and the mem- 
bers thereof should be men of hi|^ character and 
integrity, capable of sacrifice and of the utmost de- 
votion to the interests of their feUow men. These 
traits are prominent in the character of Dr. John 
Franklin Jordan, whose usef^ career has gained 
for him a liberal patronage. 

Dr. Jordan was born in Poland, Maine, Septem- 
hcr 9, 1867, the son of Joseph H. and Ellen A. 
(Bnch^'lder) Jordan, the former a native of the 
5^Utr of Maine, the latter of New Hampshire. 

The e.uly eluMliood of John Franklin Jordan was 



passed in his native place until his parents brought 
him to Haverhill, Massachusetts, where in the pub- 
lic schools of that dty he obtained his elementary 
education. After graduating from the high school 
he worked for several years, and then, having chosen 
the profession of medicine for his life work, he 
matriculated at the University of Michigan, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1900. That same year he passed the 
Massachusetts State Board examinations, and then 
established himself in the active practice of his 
profession in Haverhill, where he remained for 
about three years, subsequently removing to his 
present location, at No. 76 Lynn street, Peabody. 
Dr. Jordan is a member of the American Medical 
Association, the Massachusetts State Medical As^ 
sociation, and the Peabody Doctors' Club. In every- 
thing pertaining to the welfare of the city which 
he has chosen for his home he takes an active in- 
terest and has been chairman of the building com- 
mittee; trustee of the Peabody Institute; and is now 
a director of the Warren Five Cent Savings Bank of 
Peabody. He has served the city as school physi- 
cian, and was also a member of the school committee 
for many years. He affiliates with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias. 
In religion he is a Congregationalist and attends the 
Second Church of that denomination. 

On May 26, 1894, Dr. Jordan was united in marr 
riage with Mary A. Marble, of Haveriiill, and they 
are the parents of six children: Esther, wife of Rus- 
sell A. Walker, of Peabody; Wendell F., a mechani- 
cal engineer, of Lynn, Massachusetts, who manied 
Louisa Montgomery, and during the Worid War 
was an ensign in the United States navy; Arthur 
C, a student in the Medical Department of Har- 
vard University; Agnes, Eugene* and Dora E. 



ASAHEL HUNTINGTON was a descendant in 
the seventh generation from Simon Huntington, 
who, while on passage to New England from Eng- 
land in 1633 with his wife and five children, died at 
sea. Three of these children later acquired homes 
in Connecticut, among them Christopher Huntings 
ton, the second son, who was one of the patentees 
of the town of Norwich. Christopher (2) Hunting- 
ton, son of Christopher (1) Huntington, owned a 
farm in Franklin, upon which his descendants long 
lived. Barnabas Huntington, son of Christopher 
(2) Huntington, was the father of Rev. Asahel 
Huntington, who was graduated with high honors 
from Dartmouth CoUege in 1786, and in 1789 was 
ordained pastor of the church at Topsfield, where 
he continued his ministerial service untQ his death 
in April, 1813, aged fifty-two. He was a true type 
of the New England pastor, a type that is unknown 
to the present generation, but was known to the 
poet. Goldsmith, as the villaga preacher. 
^A man he was to all the country dear. 
And passing rich, with forty pounds a year." 

He, Hke others of his profession, tani^t the vfl- 
lage school and had private pupils wiioin he fitted 



:a0at)el I^untington 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



149 



for, college, and aJeo cultivated a small farm. One 
of his pupils was Nehemiah Cleveland, LL.D., the 
elegant scholar and accomplished gentleman who 
long presided over that ancient institution, Dummer 
Academy. Rev. Asahel Huntington married Ale- 
thea Lord, one of the five daughters of Dr. Elisha 
Lord, of Pomfret, Connecticut, ''a good physician 
and a good man." She is described as a lady of re- 
markable dignity and gentleness, prepossessing in 
appearance; of exceeding kindliness and disinter* 
ested devotion to others, and of beautiful piety. 
She died August 81, 1860, surviving her husband, 
and most fondly cherished by her sons till her death 
at the age of eighty-four. There were six in thjs 
family, the eldest, Lieutenant-Governor Elisha 
Huntington, M. D.; the second son, Asahel, whose 
memory is herein commemorated; the third son, 
Hezekiah, who died in Vermont in 1828. The other 
children were daughters, all of whom died young. 

Asahel Huntington, second son of Rev. Asahel 
and Alethea (Lord) Huntington, was bom at Tops- 
field, Essex county, Massachusetts, July 23, 1798, 
died at Beverly, Massachusetts, September 5, 1870, 
and was buried with his parents and kindred m the 
cemetery at Topsfield. His education began under 
his scholarly father, whom he lost when fifteen 
years of age, was continued at Phillips Andover 
Academy, which he entered in 1818, and in the fall 
of 1815 he entered Yale College, whence he was 
graduated in course, class of 1819. President Wool- 
sey, who was one class behind him, testifies that 
the younger students considered Asahel Huntington 
as the leading man of his class, although his gradu- 
ation rank was second. He was president of his 
class in his senior year, and in the literary society 
the recognized class leader. 

After leaving college, Asahel Huntington began 
the study of law under John Scott, of Newburyport, 
and for a year resided in the ^mfly of Asa D. 
Wildes, whose place he supplied . for one year as 
teacher in the high schooL That interruption 
lengthened his law course, and it was not until four 
and one-half years later that he was ready for ex- 
amination. He had, in the meantime, early in 1822, 
moved to Salem, and there becamel a law student 
under Judge Cummins, and a fellow-student with- 
Rufns Choate. He passed his bar examinations with 
honor, and was admitted in March, 1824. He at 
once began practice, and had as competitors a num- 
ber of gifted young lawyers who later became fa- 
mous. These included Messrs. Choate, Rantoul, 
Gushing and others, but Mr. Huntington was not to 
be denied, and he quickly won popular confidence 
and a practice. 

As a lawyer, the strength of Asahel Huntington 
was as a prosecutor, and of him in that capacity it 
could be said, as of Burke, that ^as an accuser he 
was terrific.'' In attack he used all weapons at his 
command, and used them with tremendous energy. 
He managed his own case with great skill, and in 
addressing a jury he had a wonderful power to 
awaken that subUe» sympatiietie reqwnse in their 



minds which wins more surely than weight of argu- 
ment But this by no means implies that his suc- 
cess was limited to criminal practice, for he had an 
extensive general practice, and was retained in 
many of the more important civil causes of his day. 
He was perhaps best known to his brethren of the 
profession as clerk of the courts of Essex county. 

In 1830 Mr. Huntington was appointed county 
attorney, an office that was superseded by that of 
district attorney, the district embracing Essex and 
Middlesex counties. To this new office he was ap- 
pointed and he held it continuously until 1845, when 
he resigned. Middlesex county was detached from 
the district, and in 1847 Mr. Huntington accepted 
the office for Essex county. In April, 1851, he was 
appointed by the Supreme Judicial Court, clerk of 
the courts of Essex county, and with his acceptance 
his private practice of law ceased. The office was 
at first appointive, but later was made dective, and 
he was chosei^ to it by the people, was twice re- 
elected, and was holding the office at the time of his 
death, September 5, 1870. 

As early* as 1827 Mr. Huntington was elected to 
represent Essex county in the Massachusetts Legis- 
lature, and he could have been returned but for his 
opposing the incorporation of Salem Theatre. In 
1858 he was a member of the Massachusetts Consti- 
tutional Convention, and Mayor of Salem. From 
1*827 to 1829 he was a member and clerk of the 
Salem School Board, and also served the foUowing 
years: 1830-1832, 1840-1842, 1846-1847, 1857-1858, 
making thirteen years of school board service, which 
may stand as competent evidence as to his interest 
in the cause of public education. His interest in 
those institutions of which he had been a student 
was lifelong. When in 1865 Phillips Andover 
Academy met with a severe fire loss, Mr. Hunting- 
ton made quick response to the call made upon the 
alumni for aid, and was interested in a class bene- 
faction to Yale College whilei chairman of a class 
meeting held in 1865. For twenty-four years, 1846- 
1870, he was trustee of Dummer Academy, and from 
May, 1861, to May, 1865, he was president of the 
Essex Institute in Salem. He was president of the 
Salem Dispensary Association; an official member 
and staunch friend of Massachusetts Temperance 
Alliance; honorary member of the American Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign Missions; and a gen- 
erous contributor to many good causes. He had 
business interests in Salem which resulted in his 
becoming president of the Naumkeag Steam Cotton 
Company, the largest manufacturing corporation in 
Salem, and he was a director of the Holyoke Insur- 
ance Company. 

Mr. Huntington's religious convictions were very 
decided, and he warmly cherished the faith of his 
fathers. He was a most exemplary worshipper, 
rarely being absent from his seat in the church on 
the Sabbath day. While he never made public pro- 
fession nor joined any church, his liberal spirit in 
that respect was not inconsistent with the positive 
opinions he held. The fundamental thing witli him 



150 



ESSEX COUNTY 



was his eonvietion of the Divine authority of the 
Scriptures as a rule of faith. 

Asahel Huntingrton married, in Augpist, 1842, Mrs. 
Caroline Louisa (De Blois) Tucker, widow of 
Charles C. C. Tucker, of Boston, Massachusetts, 
and mother of a son, Richard D. Tucker, then a lad 
of nine years, who later became a partner of Peele, 
Hubbell & Company, at Manila. The Huntington 
home in Salem was an abode of generous hospital- 
ity and of rare domestic happiness. Mr. and Mrs. 
Huntington were the parents of three children: 
William De Blois, Sarah Louisa, and Arthur Lord, 
of whom only the two younger survived their 
fkther. 

The Essex Bar Association, at a special meeting 
held September 6, 1870, took appropriate action 
upon the death of Asahel Huntington, and on Mon- 
day, September 9, 1870, in the Superior Court, then 
in session in Salem, Judge Pulnam presiding, trial 
was suspended that a memorial prepared by the bar 
might be presented to the court. After the reading 
of the memorial by Alfred A. Abbott, several mem- 
bers spoke in eulogy of their dead comrade, Judg^e 
Pulnam closing with an eloquent tribute to his 
friend. The Essex Institute adopted a series of 
resolutions upon the death of their former presi- 
dent, which acknowledged the indebtedness of the 
institute to his interest, and the City Council, 
through its Board of Aldermen and Common Coun- 
cil, paid fitting tribute to their former chief magis- 
trate, Asahel Huntington. The directors of the 
Naumkeag Steam Cotton Company expressed their 
appreciation of the life and character of their late 
president in resolutions most cordial and apprecia- 
tive. From Dummer Academy, from the Holyoke 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and from Essex 
South District Temperance Union, came similar 
resolutions of respect and appreciation, while Essex 
Institute held a special meeting, at which a lengthy 
memorial address was delivered by Otis P. Lord. 

There were incidents of interest in the life of 
Asahel Huntington to which reference might be 
made. His devotion to his widowed mother, who 
survived her husband neariy forty years, was most 
touching. Several years after her death, at the age 
of eighty-five, he thus refers to her: •'She has been 
the delight and charm of my life, and I will cherish 
her memory in all honor and with the highest filial 
love." But the life of Mr. Himtington did not con- 
sist of here and there a brilliant exhibition; an oc- 
casional exploit; no extraordinary effort to startle 
or enchant. "There was rather a daily beauty 
which everywhere and at all times gave a charm to 
his life, developing a well-formed and symmetrical 
charactei^— of active duty, kindly and faithfully 
done; of constant sympathy flowing in continuous 
benevolence; and unfailing integrity, seeking to be 
right rather than to be brilliant, dealing justly and 
truly in all conditions of life.** 

JAMES J. OWBN8, box manufacturer, head of 
the firm of John O'^rens & Company, of Haverlifll, 
Massachusetts, is a native of that i^ce, born Feb- 



ruary 28, 1880, the son of John and Catherine 
(Duffe) Owens, the former originally of Prince 
Edward Island, Canada, and the latter of Lowdl, 
Massachuaetta. 

James J. Owens received his academic education 
in Haverhill public schools, and went to Boston for 
a commercial course in the Bryant & Stratton Com- 
mercial School. After graduating therefrom he as- 
sociated in business with his father in the manu- 
facture of wooden and paper boxes for the shoe in- 
dustry in particular, and in course of time devel- 
oped one of the largest manufacturing buafnosses in 
Haverhill in that line. John Owens died February 
4, 1916, and since that time his son* James J^ has 
been in control of the company's operations. The 
factory is situated at No. 402 River street, and an 
indication of its importance and volume of trading 
is conveyed by its extent, the plant having capacity 
of 26,000 square feet, and employing more than 
sixty persons. In addition, Mr. Owens is the treas- 
urer and one of the principal owners of the Newton 
Box Company, of Haverhill. 

Mr. Owens holds industriously to business, and 
has sought no office in the public administzation, 
though he takes a helpful interest in the public af- 
fairs of the community. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and of the Knights of Columbus. Socially he be- 
longs to the Pentucket Club, and finds healthful ex- 
ercise on the links of the Island Golf Club occa- 
sionally. 

Mr. Owens married, in 1906, Mary J. Pettingall, 
daughter of William and Margaret (McGrath) Pet- 
tingall, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, the former 
a sea captain. They have one child, a son, James 
J., Jr. 

CHARLES A. MORIN— After an abaenee of 
quite a few years, Charles A. Morin again came to 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1916, and ^ery soon 
gave indication that he bad a right to be placed 
among the leading shoe executives of Essex eounty* 
When he came to Newburyport, in 1916, to take 
charge of the shoe plant of the Buriey & Stevens 
Company, in the capacity of general manager, he 
put into operation a system whieh he bad long been 
convinced would be effeetive, and he soon peeved 
that it was. Indeed, it is said that the syston he 
instituted completely xevolutioniaed the making of 
shoes there, and established for the Builey ft Ste- 
vens product a reputation for excellence which bss 
materially benefited the company. Formeriy tbey 
specialised in giris', boys' and ladies' shoes, but 
under Mr. Morin's management the specialty be- 
came men's shoes, and upon that line their reputa- 
tion has since been built By the way, the pressat 
is not the first connection Mr. Moxin has had with 
the company. The history of the company is else- 
where reviewed in this department of Essex Coaaty 
History, but Mr. Moxin's former connection with 
it was in the old days, prior to the recoastruetioD, 
when it was op«ated as Barley & Usher. . It is in- 
texesting to note a resolution Mr. Morin made when 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



151 



he left the company. He determined that he would 
not again come nnder the company's employ until 
he was offered the place once held by Mr. Biizley» 
the general manager of the plant. He achieved hie 
ambition, being now general manager, also vice- 
president, though his place is of course not quite 
that held by the late Mr. Burley, who was the prin- 
cipal owner. However, Mr. Morin has the actual 
management of the company's operations, just as 
Mr. Burley once had,^ and he has shown his value 
to the company during the last five years. When it 
is stated that the Newburjrport plant of the Burley 
& Stevens Company finds employment for about 
four hundred people, it will be realised that it is 
one of the important industrial plants of the place. 
The output is about 8,500 pairs of shoes a day, 
when working at full capacity, and the factory has 
about 150,000 square feet of floor space. Since Mr. 
Morin has been a member of the firm, the chief ofll- 
dals of the corporation have been: John P. Stevens, 
president and treasurer; Charles A. Morin, vice- 
president and general manager; George M. Foster, 
assistant treasurer and secretary. 

Charles A. Morin was bom in Stoneham, Massa- 
chusetts, on August 15, 1871, the son of David and 
Mary A. (Hulin) Morin, he being the eldest of six 
children, three sons and three daughters, bom to 
his parents. His mother, who died in 1894, was of 
a Stoneham, Massachusetts, famfly, but his father 
was of Quebec, Canada. He is still living and ac- 
tively engaged in business, being superintendent 
of a shoe factory. 

Charles A. Morin was educated in the public 
schools of Stoneham, Massachusetts, and later' at- 
tended business college. His first two years of busi- 
ness life were given to his father, who then owned 
a livery stable business at Stoneham. However, 
after two years, Charles A. left his father and 
went to L3mn, Massachusetts, where for a year he 
worked for a wholesale leather merchant of that 
place. Then came his introduction to the Burley 
& Usher Company. He worked for that company 
at their Milton, New Hampshire, plant, for three 
years, and then was transferred to the Newbury- 
port plant, where he worked for ten years, at the 
end of that time severing his connection with the 
company and going to Springvale, Maine, where he 
became at once foreman for the W. R. Usher A 
Son Shoe Company. There he remained for four 
years, leaving then to enter into business for him- 
self at East Weymouth. He organised and incor- 
porated a company known as the Lewis Shoe Com- 
pany, Inc., and was president and general manager 
of it, but eighteen months later he disposed of his 
interest in it, and acquired a one-third interest in 
the Cass A Daley Shoe Company, of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts. He took active part in the functioning of 
that company until 1916, when he again became con- 
nected with the Newburyport Company, Burley A 
Stevens, being appointed its general manager, and 
elected viee-preddent, capacities he has since held. 
He thus achieved the main ambition of his Ufe. 

Mr. Morin is wid^ known among shoe men, and 



is well regarded in Newburyport by those who 
know him. He is a Mason, belonging to all ordeirs 
up to the Shrine; is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias; the Colonial Club, of Salem; and the 
Homestead Golf Club. 

Mr. Morin married, in 1891, Grace M. Downs, of 
Milton, New Hampshire, daughter of Albert F. and 
Dora M. Downs, the former a contractor at that 
place. Mr. and Mrs. Morin have two children: 
George D., who was bom in 1898; and Ruth E., 
bom in 1895. 

JAMBS PATRICK MAHONBY, LL. B.^Among 
the younger attorneys of Essex county, Massachu- 
setts, the records of the legal profession of Lynn 
would be incomplete without the name of James P. 
Mahoney, whose ofiices are located at No. 81 Ex- 
change street. 

Mr. Mahoney was bom August 17, 1896, and is 
a son of James and Mary A. Mahoney, of Lynn. 
Acquiring his early education in the public schools 
of this city, Mr. Mahoney was graduated firom'the 
Lynn Classical High School in the class of 1915. 
Thereafter entering the Boston University Law 
School, he was graduated from that institution in 
the class of 1919, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws, and was admitted to the bar in the fall of the 
same year. Meanwhile, Mr. Mahoney enlisted for 
service in the World War, in September, 1917, 
was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Bal- 
loon Service, and stationed in the Toule sector in 
France. After many months of service he was 
honorably discharged, in February, 1919, and re- 
turned to Lynn, where he began the practice of 
law, and has since carried on a general practice in 
his chosen profession. 

Mr. Mahoney is a member of the Knights of Co- 
lumbus, and of the American Legion. He was the 
first delegate from this city to the national conven- 
tion of the Legion, held at Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



ORVILLB A. MARTIN, president of the Thomp- 
son-Martin Company, Inc., of Haverlull, Massachu- 
setts, is among the enterprising and active young 
business men of Haverhfll. He was bom in Bay 
City, Michigan, on April 10, 1890, son of Nye C. 
and Christine (Olson) Martin, of that place. His 
father was an enfi^ineer at Bay City, and died in 
1918. 

Orville A. Martin was educated in the puUic 
schools of Bay City, but was not yet twelve years 
old when he began to work. For about three years 
after leaving school he was in the employ of the 
Slater Quarry Company, of Graniteville, New York. 
In 1904 he came into Massachusetts, and for the 
next four years lived in Franldin, Massachusetts, 
the years being passed in auto repair work. In 
1908 he went to Norwood, Massachusetts, and there 
opened a garage, which he conducted in addition to 
the one he had established in Franldin. Aboul^five 
years later he gave up the garage buslneM and be- 
came a salesman and subsequently manager ft^ H. 
J. Collins, of Haverhill, whose autonobite- boiteeee 



152 



ESSEX COITNTY 



coTsred the garafe, fervice, repain and snpplias 
lints. BvantQaUTf oiT April 25, 1921* Mr. Martin, 
witib Fiad J. 'Hiompiton, Jr., acquired the whole 
business from Mr. Collins, and formed the firm of 
the Thompson-Martin Company to conduct the 
same. The service station is at No. 62 Elm street, 
Haverhill, and is well situated for good business. 
Mr. Martin is president of the company, and gives 
most of his time to his affairs. 

Mr. Martin married, in 1914, Bertha W. Penney, 
of Newark, Ohio, daughter of John Penney (now 
deceased), of Ohio, a florist by trade. Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin have one child, a daughter, Esther Chris- 
tine, who was bom in 1915. 

HENRY £. CHASE — Prominent in various 
branches of public activity, and a successful 
business man, Henry E. Chase, of Cliftondale, 
Massachusetts, is taking a part in the general 
progress of the community, as weU as carrying 
forward his own personal interest. 

Mr. Chase is of lvalue birth, but of Massachu- 
setts ancestry. Luke Chase, his grandfather, left 
Massachusetts with an ox team in 1826, and be- 
came one of the early settlers of Paris, Maine, 
his son, Nathan, being eleven years old at that 
time. Nathan Chase was bom at Paxton, Massa- 
chusetts, and was a lifelong farmer; he married 
Mary A. Thayer. 

Henry £. Chase, son of Nathan and Mary A. 
(Thayer) Chase,' was bom in Paris, Maine, on 
March 10, 1853. Receiving his early education 
in the public schools of his native place, the 
young man took a course at the Oxford Normal 
Institute, and spent a few years teaching. Then, 
in 1892, he came to Lynn, Massadiusetts» and 
entered the leather business. Starting in a mod- 
est way, he began the manufacture of heels and 
counters, on Washington street, in Lynn. He re* 
mained in this business for eighteen years, but 
as time passed he became deeply interested in 
the development of the city of Lynn as an in- 
dustrial and residential center. Giaining a gen- 
eral familiarity with the real estate fidd as an 
opportunity in a business way, he sold out his 
manufacturing interests and entered the real es- 
tate business, locating in Cliftondale. At the 
same time he took up the insurance business, al- 
lying himself with the leading companies of this 
cohntry. He has been most successful in this 
new line, and is now one of the leading men ia 
this vicinity in real estate and insurance circles. 

In political affiliation Mr. Chase is a supporter 
of the Republican party. He ably fills the ofiloe 
of notary public, and is now serving his second 
term in. this capacity. Fraternally, Mr. Chase is 
a member of Mt. Necca Lodge, No. 17, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, of Paris, Maine; and 
was mas^ of tiie Qadoicd (bounty Pomona Grange 
for manjf yearsU- Ht has long been a member of 
the First . Methodist ijpiscopal Church, of CUf- 
tgndalot and for four years has been treasurer of 
this sedetgr; he also served in the same capacity 



in the Lynn Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Chase married, in 1877, in Paris, Maine, 
Lucetta E. Penley, daughter of JaoAOs F. and 
Lodiska (Swan) Pcoiley, of that town. Mr. Pen- 
ley spent his lifetime in agricultural pursuits. 
Mr. and Mrs. Chase have one daughter, Mabel 
Lodiska, who was bom on November 26* 1878, 
and is now the wife of Frank A. Carter, for- 
merly consulting engineer for the Boston Ele- 
vated railway, but now an invalid from overwork. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carter have two children: John A., 
who was bom on April 19, 1898, and is now a 
salesman in Boston; and Ruth A., bom on Janu- 
ary 21, 1900, who is jnow a student at the Bos- 
ton University. 

WALTER HEMAN SARGENT, deceased, was 
widely known and much respected by residents 
in the Amesbury and Merrimac districts of Massa- 
chusetts. He was a descendant of one of the 
oldest Massachusetts families, the ancestor of this 
family coming over in the ''Mayflower," and was 
one of the seamen on the ship. The line traces 
back to Richard Sargent, an oflicer of the Royal 
navy of Great Britain, who was in tbe Virginia 
colony early in the seventeenth centuiy, and came 
into Massachusetts about 1834, settling for 
two years in Ipswich, Massachusetts, and there- 
after being recorded as of Salisbury, Massachu- 
setts. There are sevwal branches of the old 
Colonial family, and some of the scions have 
given distinguished service to the State and Na- 
tion. The branch to which the Saxgents of Ames- 
bury and West Amesbury belong have fanned 
ancestral estates for many generations. 

Orlando iSargent, great-great-grandfather of 
Walter Heman Sargent, was bom in West Ames- 
bury, April 21, 1728, and farmed there for the 
greater part of Jus life. He died on April 8, 1808. 
He was twice married; his first wife, Sarah Balch, 
of Groveland, Massadiusetts, was bom in 1788, 
married on DecemUor 26, 1751, and died im Dec- 
ember 10, 1763. On January 9, 1765» Orlando 
Sargent married (second) Betsy Barnard, of West 
Amesbury, She was bom in 1782, and died on 
November 8, 1808. One child was bom to the 
first marriage, Abigail, bom January 22, 1758 
(death not given). To the second marriage 
eleven children were bom: Sarah, bom December 
14, 1755, death not given; Moses, of whom far- 
ther; Jonathan* bom February 25, 1759, death 
not given; Betsy, bom January 19, 1761, died 
August 16, 1761; Tabitha, bom July 4, 1768, death 
not given; Jonathan, bom July 14, 1765, died May 
20, 1795; Ichabod B., bom December 27, 1766, died 
May 1, 1849; Orlando, who was bom in 1769, and 
died August 1, 1850; Betsy, bom March 10, 1771, 
death not given; Molly, bom June 12, 1772, died 
July 21, 1781; and Bhoda, bom July 29, 1776, 
date of death not given. 

Moses Sargent* son of Orlando and Betsy (Bar* 
nard) Sargent, of West Aaeshury, Massachu- 
setts, was bom there en July 4, 1767, and died 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



158 



February 18» 1886. He was a fanner, and mar- 
ried Dolly Sargent, of West Amesbiuy, on June 

I, 1780. She was bom on July 16, 1768, and died 
January 8, 1839. Their children were: Betsy, bom 
November 24, 1784, death not given; Jonathan, 
of whom further; Sally, bom June 18, 1789, death 
not given; Rhoda, bom August 9, 1792, died in 
1860; Orlando (2), bom October 11, 1794, death 
not given; Dolly, bom July 13, 1797, died August 
ao, 1831; Moses, bom May 12, 1801, died Febm- 
ary 16, 1862. 

Jonathan Sargent, son of Moses and Dolly (Sar- 
gent) Sargent, was bom at West Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, August 20, 1787, and died there 
on October 2, 1869. He followed farming, and 
was married (first) to Betsy Sargent, of the same 
place, on December 24, 1817. She was bom Dec- 
ember 6, 1794, and died May 16, 1846. On April 

II, 1846, Jonathan Sargent married (second) Eliza 
Kelly, of West Amesbury. She was bom March 
14, 1806, and died July 29, 1866. The children, both 
by the first wife, were: George W., of whom 
further; and Mary E., bom July 80, 1824, died 
March 6, 1898. 

George W. Sargent, son of Jonathan and Betsy 
(Sargent) Sargent, was bom in West Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, November 26, 1819, and died April 
26, 1904. He was engaged in farming and lum- 
bering, and married, on December 81, 1864, Myra 
Sargent, of West Amesbury, now Merrimac, bom 
April 10, 1832, died May 14, 1907, the daughter of 
Richard W. and Sally (Sargent) Sargent, the 
fomier bom in West Amesbury, March 4, 1800, 
died there October 28, 1862, a farmer, the latter 
bom January 8, 1803, died January 16, 1879. She 
was a granddaughter of Orlando and Hannah 
(Welch) Sargent, the former bom in West Ames- 
bury, January 20, 1769, and died August 1, 1860, 
a farmer; his wife, Hannah (Welch) Sargent, was 
bom May 6, 1770, died July 13, 1866. Four chil- 
dren were bom to Creorge W. and Myra (Sargent) 
Sargent, as follows: Walter Heman, of whom 
further; Homer Roscoe ( q. v. ) ; Edgar Porter 
(q.v. ); and George Allen (q.v.). 

Walter Heman Sargent, eldest child of Creorge 
W. and Myra (Sargent) Sargent, was bom in West 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, November 1, 1866. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native 
place, and eventually graduated from the high 
school. After leaving school he gave his time to 
farming and lumbering, in association with his 
father. He continued active connection with those 
industries untO his death, which occurred on Sep- 
tember 17, 1902. 

Mr. Sargent married, September 24, 1894, Lizzie 
I. Huntington, daughter of Benjamin Franldin and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Sawyer) Huntington (see Hunt- 
ington line). To Mr. and Mrs. Sargent was bom 
one child, a son, Franklin Huntington Sargent, who 
was bom in Merrimac, Massachusetts, on January 
24, 1900. He attended the public schools at Ames- 
bmy, also the Essex County Agricultural School. 



He married* September 14» 1921, Iva Mae Johnson, 
of Bradford, Massachusetts, a daughter of Marion 
and Ellen (Durgan) Johnson, the former a marble- 
cutter by trade. 

(The Huntington Line) 

The Huntington family is among the old families 
of New England, and its branches are numerously 
spread throughout the eastern States. It has given 
many distinguished men to the nation, among them 
Samuel Himtington (1732-96), a signer of the De- 
claration of Independence. He was of a Connecticut 
branch. One of the Massachusetts branches is that 
to which Mrs. Lizzie Israella (Himtington) Sar- 
gent, widow of Walter Heman Sargent, of Ames- 
bury, Massachusetts, belongs. Her great-great- 
grandfather was John Huntington, who was 
bom in Amesbury, Massachusetts, August 16, 1737. 
He was a fanner, and married Hannah Weed, of 
Amesbury. Their children were: Jacob, bom Sep- 
tember 28, 1768, died in 1779; Benjamin, bom April 
24, 1760, death not given; Moses, of whom further; 
John, bom August 26, 1766, died July 6, 1863; he ' 
was a soldier of the Revolution, member of Captain 
John Currier's company, and later of Captain 
Simeon Brown's company, of Colonel Jacob Gar^ 
rish's regiment, during the war; he enlisted August 
11, 1776, and was discharged July 3, 1778; Hannah, 
bom August 23, 1768, died September 10, 1841; 
Mary, bom in 1769, died about 1814; David, bom 
May 13, 1770, died March, 1841; Sarah no dates 
given; Judith, bom April 2, 1773; died June 19, 
1861; Abigail, no dates given. 

Moses Huntington, third son of John and Hannah 
(Weed) Huntington of Amesbury, was bom in 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, May 26, 1768, and died 
Januar3f(. 16, 1864. He was a farmer, and married 
Hannah Page, of Berwick, Maine. Their children 
were: Enoch, bom December 27, 1794, died in 
December, 1884; John, bom September 7, 1797, died 
October 27 1888; Ruth, bom in 1799, died in 1800; 
Jacob, of whom further; Philip^ bom May 22, 1808, 
died September 8, 1880; Donald, bom March 17, 
1806, died January 24, 1887; Moses, bom May 6, 
1809, died April 11, 1899; Lydia Jones, bom May 14, 
1812, died December 29, 1868; Ephraim, bom July 

16, 1816, died May 17, 1877. 

Jacob Huntington, fourth child of Moses and 
Hannah (Page) Huntington, of Amesbury, was bom 
there on January 16, 1801, and died May 4, 1892. 
He was a farmer, and married (first) Elizabeth 
Huntington, of Hennecker, New Hampshire, on 
October 31, 1834. She was bom March 29, 1813, 
and died September 16, 1838. On June 20, 1842, he 
married (second) Hannah Peasley, of Pittsiield, 
New Hampshire. To Jacob and Elizabeth (Hunt- 
ington) Huntington was bom one child, a son, Ben- 
jamin Franklin, of whom further. To Jacob Hunt- 
ington, by his second wife, Hannah (Peasley) Hunt- 
ington, was bom a daughter, Elizabeth, on May 

17, 1844, and a son, John Warren, on August 10 
1868. 

Benjamin Franklin Huntington, only child of 



154 



ESSEX COUNTY 



Jacob and Elizabeth (Himtmgtoii) HimliiigtoBt was 
bom in Amesbnry, MassacliiiflettSy on September 7, 
1888. He died May 10, 1907, having farmed in 
Amesbury for the gn^ater part of his life. He nuu> 
ried Sarah Elizabeth Sawyer, of West Newbury, on 
December 2, 1863. She was bom on September 27, 
1842, and died July 29, 1914. Their children were: 
Lizzie Israella, who was bom on October 26, 1864, 
and married Walter Heman Sargent, September 24, 
1894, (see Sargent); Ellen Augusta, bom October 
2, 1869; Mabel Sawyer, bom February 9, 1878, died 
June 15, 1878. 

HOMER ROSCOB SARGENT, who has been in 
farming and lumbering business in and near Merri- 
mac, Massachusetts, for the greater part of his life, 
and has for many years taken a prominent part in 
the public affairs of that place, was bom in West 
Amesbury, December 14, 1857, the son of George W. 
and Myra (Sargent) Saxgent (see preceding sketch). 

Homer Roscoe Sargent was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of West Amesbury, and at the Menimac 
High School. After leaving school he took to the 
farming work with energy, and has ever since held 
to it, with the success that comes only by persistent 
effort. He has gained for himself a good place in 
the esteem of the people of the community. He 
has entered much into public affairs; was a select- 
man of Merrimac for six years, and chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen for three years; he has 
been trustee of the cemetery, overseer of the poor, 
and a member of the Board of Health commission- 
ers. He is also trustee of the Merrimack Savings 
Bank, and fraternally belongs to the Riverside 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has 
been especially active in the operation of the local 
Grange, being overseer, past master, and secretary 
of it. He also has at various times lectured in the 
Grange. 

Mr. Sargent married (first) at West Newbury, 
Massachusetts, June 17, 1891, Lydia A. Hoyt, of 
that place. She was bom on October 16, 1867, and 
died on December 10, 1908. On February 15, 1911, 
Mr. Sargent married (second) Annie E. Knight, of 
Haverhill, Massachusetts. She was bom in Lee, 
New Hampshire, on August 16, 1869. There was 
issue of the first marriage, the children of Homer 
R. and Lydia A. (Hoyt) Sargent being: Richard 
E. (q.v.); George Leonard (q.v.); Frederick H. 
(deceased), bom October 18, 1897, died December 
24, 1914; Porter R. (deceased), bom July 11, 1900, 
died December 10, 1904; and Walter H., bom March 
21, 1904. 

EDGAR PORTER SARGENT, president of the 
Merrimac Savings Bank, belongs to the Sargent 
family of Colonial record. The family has been 
resident for many generations in the Amesbury part 
of Essex county, and the ancestral estate is still in 
the possession of the family. Genealogical record 
is given in a previous sketch of his brother, Walter 
Heman Sargent 

Edgar P. Sargent was bom in West Amesbury, 



en August 6, 1861, son of George W. and li 
(Sargent) Ss^rgent (q.v.) both of West Axnesli 
He grew to manhood in the paternal koine, 
after attending school in his native place ant! 
Merrimac, where he was a high school stadent; 
associated with his father in farming and Inmbe! 
until the latter^s death. Agriculture has been 
main occupation since, though he has given tim^i 
several other responsibilities of public or semi-ii 
lie character. He has been for many years idei 
fied with the Merrimac Savings Bank, of which 
is now president; and he is a past master of 
Amesbury Grange. Politically, he gives support; 
the Republican party. By religious conviction 
is a Congregationalist, as have been members 
the Sargent family for some generations. £d^ 
P. Sargent is a valued member of thei Pilgrim C«i 
gregational Church of Merrimac 

Mr. Sargent married Mrs. Amy (Palmer) Eva: 
of Kensington, New Hampshire, on June 16, 19< 
She is the daughter of Daniel Ellery and Mart 
(Brown) Palmer, of Kensington, New Hampshii 
Mr. and Mrs. Sargent have one child, a son, Ed^ 
Palmer Sargent, who was bom on June SO, 1911 
and there is a daughter, Gertrude L. Evans, by Mr 
Sargent's first marriage. 



GEORGE ALLEN SARGENT, son of George VI 
and Myra (Sargent) Sargent, and brother of Wai 
ter Heman Sargent (q.v.), was bom in West Ameii 
bury, Massachusetts, on February 18, 1864. B 
was educated in the public school of West Ameti 
bury, and also attended the schools of the town o; 
Merrimac, eventually entering the Merrimac Hig!! 
School. When his schooldays were over he assistei 
his father in the work of the home feim, and in th^i 
somewhat extensive lumbering operations conducted I 
by the father. He has followed these lines evei! 
since, being well known in the district, and a re- 
spected member of the Merrimac Grange. Political- 
ly, Mr. Sargent is a Republican. And for very 
many years he has been a member of the Pilgrim 
Congregational Church, of Merrimac 

Mr. Sargent married, June 11, 1908, Jeanette M. 
Hatch, of South Hampton, New Hampshire, daugh- 
ter of Lemuel O. and EmOy F. Hatch. 



RICHARD EMERY SARGENT, eldest son of 
Homer Roscoe and Lydia A. (Hoyt) Sargent (q.v.), 
was bom in Merrimac, Massachusetts, June 29, 1898. 
In his boyhood and youth Richard £• attended the 
schools of Merrimac, and after graduating from the 
Merrimac High School, went into his father's lum- 
ber business in Merrimac, and has continued in 
that line to the present. 

Richard E. Sargent is a member of Riverside 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and of 
Pilgrim Congregational Church, of Menimac 

Mr. Sargent married, in 1917, Aima H. Rodigrass, 
of Bradford, Massachusetts, daughter of deoige W. 
and Roxcy (Hopkinson) Rodigrass, of that j^aoe; 
tfhe passed away December 1st, 1921, The father 
of Mrs. Richard E. Sargent is well kno^m in Brad- 



<Btoxst Wl. Siaraent 



/^ir^^^XA^^^M^^^e^ 



a. 



166 



ESSEX COUNTY 



yoar. For the iMzt thna jmn he was dental sur- 
geon at Forsythe Infirmarsr* there doing dental 
surgery for dentists in and around Boston, Massa- 
ehnsettSy and in 1917 came to Peabody, where he 
opened his present office, in the O'Shea building, at 
No. 28 Main street, which has been his headquarters 
erer since. Here he has been devoting himself to 
the surgical branch of the profession and is speed- 
ily winning the confidence of the people, consequents 
ly a large and valuable practice is now at his com- 
mand. 

On March 4, 1918, Dr. Bugler enlisted in the 
Medical Department of the United States army and 
was commissioned first lieutenant and assigned to 
Gamp Jackson, South Carolina, where he received 
his honorable discharge December 15, 1918, and is 
now in the Reserve Corps. He fraternizes with the 
American Legion, the Knights of Columbus, and the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians. Dr. Bugler is a trus- 
tee of the Peabody Public Library Board, and in 
connection with his profession, is United States Pub- 
lic Health Examiner for veterans of the World War. 
Jn politics he is an Independent, preferring to vote 
for the man regardless of party label. His re- 
ligious affiliations are with the Roman Catholics, 
and he is a devout member of St. John's Roman 
Catholic Church of Peabody. Dr. Bugler is un- 
married. 

PATRICK A. McSWSBNEY— For many years 
the name of McSweeney in Salem, Massachusetts, 
has been identified with private enterprise and pub- 
lic endeavor. Patrick A. McSweeney is now one 
of the leading real estate dealers of this city. He 
was bom in Salem, on August 11, 1878, and is a 
son of Dennis and Mary (Dempsey) McSweeney^ 
natives of County Cork, Irdand. 

Receiving a practical education in the public 
schools of Salem, the boy went out eariy into the 
world of industry, beginning life in a shoe fkctory^ 
where he remained for seven years. But he was 
ambitious to achieve something more in life than a 
round of drudgery in the shops, and at the end of 
this time started out in a modest way, in the real 
estate business. Possessed of genuine business abil- 
ity, resourceful to an unusual degree, and deeply in- 
terested in the progress of his native dty, the 
young man found his way quickly to the high road 
of success. An element of fearlessness entered into 
his makeup, and when the crucial period came in 
the real estate business in Salem, Mr. McSweeney 
was prepared to make history. This was in 1914, 
when the great fire had destroyed a large part of 
the city, and left thousands of people homeless. 

At this time Mr. McSweeney organised the Lor- 
ing Realty Company, their property comprising the 
Loring form, of thi«e hundred and twenty, acres. 
This properly was named Pickering Park, and al- 
most over night new homes began to go up for 
those whose homes had been destroyed by five. 
This property was wall outside the devastated dia* 
trict, and is now a chamiag satarb. ThlB radically 
and beneficently construetlve c^etatioa imrolved a 



deal of between $200,000 and $800,000 and waa 
handled by Mr. McSweeney, who was made presi- 
dent of the Loring Realty Company. This placed 
him in the forefront of the realty interests in 
Salem, and he has continued to go forward in his 
chosen line of endeavor. 

Mr. McSweeney is interested in every phase of 
public progress. He was treasurer of the Father 
Mathew Total Abstinence Society, and is a member 
of the Catholic Order of Foresters. He is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus, and is secretary 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On June 21, 1900, Mr. McSweeney married Mary 
E. Regan, of Peabody, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Michael and Mary (Barrett) Regan, also natives 
of County Cork, Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. McSweeney 
have three childm: Mary L., who is now employed 
in the Internal Revenue Department in Boston; 
William H. (2), in school; and Morgan. The fam- 
ily are members of the Church of the Immaculate 
Conception. 



MORGAN J. McSWBBNEY, son of Dennis and 
Mary (Dempsey) McSweeney, and a younger bro- 
ther of Patrick A. McSweeney (see preceding 
sketch), is a prominent attorney of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, and is clerk of the District Court of 
Essex county. He was bom in Salem, on Novem- 
ber 9, 1876, and received a limited education in 
the public schools of the dty, being obliged to 
leave school very early on account of the death 
of his parents. He was only ten years of age 
when his father died, and his mother passed away 
five years later. Thus he worked with his older 
brother in the shoe factory, and together they cared 
for the family, giving the younger brother the op- 
portunities denied them. Nevertheless Morgan J. 
McSweeney held to his cherished purpose in life, 
which was the practice of the law. He studied at 
home nights until he was relieved of the responsi- 
bilities courageously borne, and finally, in 1904, at^ 
tended the law school conducted by Charies H. 
Innes, of Boston. 

MeanwhUe, his younger brother, William H., had 
concluded his studies and was admitted to the bar. 
For a time Mr. McSweeney studied in his bzother's 
office, then, in 1907, was admitted to the bar of 
Essex county. His success has been such as would 
reflect credit upon any man, even without the han- 
dicap with which he began. In 1912 Mr. Mc- 
Sweeney was appointed cleric of the First District 
Court of Essex county, and has served continu- 
ously in that capacity ever since. 

In 1901 he was a member of the. Board of Health; 
in 1900-01 a member of the Common Council; and 
in 1904 was appointed License Commissioner, which 
position he filled until 1910. He is a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
of the Father Mathew Total Abstinence Society. 
He is also a member of the Rotary Club. He has 
never manried, and is a member of the Church of 
the Immaculate Conception. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



i; 



167 



WILLIAM HBNRY McSWEBNBY, son of Den- 
nis and Mary (Dempsey) McSweeney, and the 
youngest brother of Patrick A. and Morgan J. 
McSweeney (see two preceding sketches) , was bom 
in Salem, Massachusetts, on February 26, 1878. 
He received his early education in the public 
schools of the city, and continued at St. Mary's 
Educational Institute of Salem. Choosing the pro- 
fession of the law, he pursued. his studies in the 
office of M. L. Sullivan. On October 8, 190D, Mr. 
McSweeney was admitted to the bar, then began 
the career in which he is winning gratifying suc- 
cess. In 1907 he formed a partnership with his 
brother, Morgan J., and the firm is now one of the 
leading law firms in Essex coimty. 

William Henry McSweeney has always been 
broadly active in the public interest. He was 
president of the City Council for a period of eight 
years, was a member of the Board of Aldermen 
for three years, and of the Common Coimcil for 
five years. He was appointed assistant district at- 
torney in 1916, and served for one year in that 
capacity under the Hon. Lewis S. Cox. He is now 
a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

During the World War, 1917-18, Mr. McSweeney 
was a leader of the "four-minute men," his ability 
as a public speaker counting far in the various war 
activities. He is a member of the Father Mathew 
Total Abstinence Society, of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and of the Knights of 
Columbus.. 

William Henry McSweeney married, on Septem- 
ber 25, 1907, Frances K. McGlew, daughter of 
Michael and Mary (McDonough) McGlew. Mr. 
and Mrs. McSweeney are members of the Immacu- 
late Conception Roman Catholic Church. 



CHARLES D. C. MOORE, one of the successful 
attorneys of Lynn, Massachusetts, and a man who 
has already made a name for himself in his chosen 
profession, is a native of Brockton, Massachusetts, 
where he was bom October 20, 1883. He is a son 
of Frank R. D. and Helen L. (Bradbury) Moore. 
When but a year old he removed with his parents 
to Lynn and here received the elementary portion of 
his education. Upon his graduation from the Lynn 
English High School in 1903, having in the mean- 
time determined to adopt the law a^ a profession, 
he accordingly matriculated at thcj University of 
Maine, where he obtained his legal education, and 
was admitted to the Bar in 1906. Throughout his 
school and college years he had proved himself an 
intelligent and painstaking student, and at the close 
came to the opening of his career unusually well- 
equipped both with natural gifts and a training that 
was the result of long conscientious effort. Im- 
mediately after graduating, he returned to Lynn, 
where he passed his bar examinations and establish- 
ed himself in the practice of his profession, associat- 
ing himself withj the lawi firm of Parsons, Bowen & 
Moore. When the firm of Parsons, Wadleigh & 
Crowley was formed. May 1, 1919, Mr. Moore be- 
came associated with them, being taken in as a mem- 



ber May 1, 1921. He has handled many important 
cases up to the present time, proving himself to be a 
most capable and conscientious attorney. 

Besides his legal practice Mr. Moore has inter- 
ested himself in the conduct of public affairs in 
the community, and in everything pertaining to the 
welfare and advancement of the community, he 
takes an active interest. He was a member of the 
Constitutional Convention of 1917-19. He is affili- 
ated with the Masonic order and the Knights of 
Pythias. In religion he is a Baptist. 

On September 29, 1909, Charles D. C. Moore was 
united in marriage with Hazel Burt, daughter of 
George C. and Anna I. (Crane) Burt, of Milton, 
Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Moore are the par- 
ents of two children: Charles Dana, bom Septem- 
ber 22, 1915; and Loring Burt, bom October 11, 
1917. 

J. ALEXANDER LODGE— A resident of Man- 
chester, Massachusetts, since boyhood, J. Alexander 
Lodge, editor and owner of the "North Shore 
Breeze," conducts a printing and publishing businesi 
which is a prosperous and rapidly growing interest. 

Mr. Lodge was bom in Newfoundland, on Feb- 
ruary 26, 1880, and is a son of Charles A. and 
Catherine Margaret (Morris) Lodge, of Manchester. 
His brother, Charles A. Lodge, Jr., is engaged in 
agricultural work in Colfax, State of Washington; 
he has two sisters, Mrs. Roy Wilfong, of Elkins, 
West Virginia; and Mrs. E. Russell Lloyd, of Pal- 
ermo, California. 

Coming to Manchester, Massachusetts, with his 
parents, at twelve years of age, Mr. Lodg^e attended 
the local public schools, then later went to Lewiston» 
Maine, for his collegiate course, where he was 
graduated from Bates College in 1902. He then 
went to Boston, where he was in the employ of the 
Boston '^Journal" for a year and a half. In May, 
1904, Mr. Lodge founded the "North Shore Breeze," 
of which paper he has since been editor, and through 
which he has achieved a position of wide usefulness. 
In connection with the paper a small printing busi- 
ness immediately sprung up, and this has developed 
to become a large and constantly growing concern, 
of which Mr. Lodge is president. 

Mr. Lodge is widely known fraternally. He is a 
member of Liberty Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Beverly, and also of the Manchester Lodge. 
He is a member of Amity Chapter, Roj^l Arch 
Masons, of Beverly; of Salem Council, Royal and 
Select Masters, of Salem; of St. George Comman- 
dery. Knights Templar, of Beverly; of Sutton Lodge 
of Perfection; of Jubilee Council, Princes of 
Jerusalem ; and Emanuel Chapter of Rose Croix, the 
latter three all of Salem. He is also a member of 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine, and of Massachusetts Consistory, 
both of Boston. In other fraternal orders Mr. 
Lodge also is prominent. He is a member of Mag- 
nolia Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; of 
Liberty Lodge of Rebekah; of Conomo Tribe, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men; and of Masconomo 
Council, Degree of Pocahontas, all of Manchester, 



168 



ESSEX C50UNTY 



He is a member of Gape Ann Lodge, Loyal Order 
of Moose, of Gloucester, and is a member of tbe 
Young Men's Ghristian Association of Beverly. He 
holds a seat in the Ghamber of Gommeree, of SaleiUt 
and is a member of the Massachusetts Press Glub, 
and of the Manchester Glub. The trend of his taste 
is revealed by his membership in the Horticultural 
Society, of Manchester. His church membership is 
with the Gongregational denomination. 



DR. JOHN E. VAN SCIVER, M. E., of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, was bom in Burlington, New Jer- 
sey, on February 9, 1875, and is a son of John E. 
and Margaret (Gunningham) Van Sciver. The elder 
Mr. Van Sciver was a prominent shoe manufac- 
turer of New* Jersey, but is now deceased. 

Dr. Van Sciver received his early education in 
the public and high schools of his native city, then 
learned the shoe and leather business. But he was 
not content to look forward to a business career, 
and spent every spare moment in study along vari- 
ous lines of scientific research and invention. He 
was particularly interested in medical and surgical 
topics, and became thoroughly familiar with all 
available data on the X-ray, eventually designing an 
X-ray cabinet himself which met the commenda- 
tions of the profession. He then became connected 
with the experimental department at the Gampbell 
Electric Gompany's plant, at Lynn, Massachusetts, 
and also sold X-ray machines, becoming an expert 
in the use and manufacture of these machines. He 
entered the Indiana National GoUege of Electro- 
Therapeutics and Physics, from which he was grad- 
uated with the degree of M. E. in 1914. He has 
had seven years' training under Dr. Eastman, the 
world-famous authority in this science. Dr. Van 
Sciver opened an office in Lynn in 1914, and has 
become a significant factor in this branch of the 
city's economy. He does work for the leading physi- 
cians and surgeons, and is now studying for the 
degree of M. D. 

Dr. Van Sciver is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, and of the Improved Order of Red Men. 
Politically he stands for everything that makes 
toward progress, acknowledging frankly convictions 
that are in line with the higher theory of Socialism. 
He believes in a constant and systematic effort to do 
all the good he can, but is a member of no religious 
organization. 

Dr. Van Sciver married Annie McNinney, of New 
Jersey, and they have one daughter, Dorris Helen. 



EDWARD SHIPPEN UNDERWOOD— A promi- 
nent Essex county attorney, successful in his pro- 
fession, and widely known, Mr. Underwood, of L3rnn, 
Massachusetts, is also broadly active in the social 
and benevolent organizations of the city. He is a 
son of William A. and Annie G. Underwood. 

Mr. Underwood was bom in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in September, 1876. The family removing 
from that State when he was still a child, he re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools of 
Hampstead, Rockingham county, New Hampshire, 
then coming into Essex county, this State, he at- 



tended the schools of Newburyport. Taking a pre- 
liminary classical course at the Boston University, 
he thereafter entered Boston University Law School* 
from which he was graduated in 1899, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws. Admitted to the bar in 
the fall of 1899, he came directly to Lynn, and here 
became identified with the firm of Niles & Garr. 
leading attorneys of that day in this city. Later, 
in 1906, with the reorganization of the firm, Mr. 
Underwood was admitted to the firm, which has 
since conducted a general practice of law under the 
name of Niles, Stevens, Underwood & Mayo, hold- 
ing a leading position in the profession. 

Mr. Underwood is a member of the Lynn Gham- 
ber of Gommeree and served as president of that 
body in 1917-18. He is a director of the Security 
Trust Gompany; his clubs are the Oxford, the Te- 
desco Gountry, and the Whiting, the last-named 
being a literary club. During the World War Mr. 
Underwood organized the Greater Lynn War Ghest 
Association, for the help and encouragement of the 
boys overseas, and was its first president. He was 
very active in the Red Gross campaigns, and still 
holds membership in that order. He is deeply inter- 
ested in the work of the Boys' Glub, and active in 
its support, and is a member of the Universalist 
church. 

On October 14, 1902, Mr. Underwood married 
Maude B. Johnson, daughter of William A. John- 
son, ex-mayor of Newburyport, Massachusetts. 
They are the parents of two children: Beulah J., 
bom June 1, 1907, died February 3, 1920; and Ed- 
ward S., Jr., bom April 20, 1915. 



LORD & COMPANY, INC.— This company was 
founded in 1875 by Daniel W. Lord, father of the 
present official of the company, George H. Lord, 
treasurer and general manager, he entering the 
business in 1898 and succeeding to its management 
in 1904. Daniel W. Lord, the founder, came to 
Lawrence from England at an early date, and there 
both his sons were bom. 

George H. Lord was bom in Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, August 5, 1874, and educated in the city 
public schools. For a few years after leaving school 
he was employed in the print works of the Pacific 
Mills, but in 1898 became associated with his father 
in his music store, and in 1904 succeeded him as 
manager of the business, which consisted of the sell- 
ing of pianos, phonographs and genersd musical 
goods and supplies. Lord & Gompany, Inc., also 
have a store in Boston at No. 757 Boylston street. 

Mr. Lord is a member of the Lawrence Ghamber 
of Commerce; the Home Glub; Tuscan Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; all bodies of the Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite, in which he holds the thirty- 
second degree; and Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Lord married, March 18, 1892, Ella E. Clark, 
of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and they are the par- 
ents of three sons: Walter F., of further mention; 
Herbert, who resides in Boston; and Raymond, of 
Lawrence. The family are members of the United 
Congregational Church; the family residence is at 



Bity, 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



169 



No. 41 Pearl street^ Lawrence. 

Walter F. Lord, eldest son of George H. Lord, 
was bom in Lawrence, Massachiisetts, July 24, 1894, 
and was educated in the public schools, finishing 
with graduation from high school, class of 1913. 
His first business engagement was with the Chal- 
mers Motor Company, in Detroit, Michigan, where 
he continued until 1916, when he returned to Law- 
rence and became manager of Lord & Company, 
Inc. 

On May 24, 1917, he enlisted in the United States 
army for service in the war with Germany, going 
to France, in August, 1917, with the First Engi- 
neers. In the fall of 1917 he was transferred to 
General Headquarters, and drove a Cadillac car for 
the Secret Service, continuing in that service while 
overseas, and was honorably discharged June 10, 
1919. The business of Lord & Company, Inc., is 
conducted at No. 34 Lawrence street, Lawrence. 



EDWIN JOHNSON GRAVES — Massachusetts 
has many historic families, but none go much far- 
ther back in American generations than those that 
come into the genealogy of Edwin Johnson Graves, 
of Amesbury. A native of Lynn, Massachusetts, his 
paternal descent is from Samuel Graves, who set- 
tled in Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1630, having come 
into the Massachusetts colony from Gravesend, 
England; and the maternal descent of Edwin J. 
Graves is directly from the Alden family, the most 
conspicuous member of which was perhaps John 
Alden (1599-1687), the hero of LongfeUow's "Court- 
ship of Miles Standish," and the youngest of the 
PUgrims. Susan Emerton, mother of Edwin J. 
Graves, was a direct descendant of Mary Alden, who 
also came on the "Mayflower," with her brother 
John. 

Edwin Johnson Graves was bom in Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, on August 9, 1858, son of Isaiah and Susan 
(Emerton) Graves. He was educated in the Lynn 
public schools, graduating from the high school in 
the class of 1875. He later took a business course 
at Comer's Commercial College, of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and thus fitted for a business life, he as- 
sociated with his father, a grocer, for several years, 
concurrently acting as correspondent for the Lynn 
journals, the "Item" and the "Bee." He became 
much interested in newspaper work, and was apt 
as a writer; therefore, eventually, in 1889, he was 
induced to cast other work aside and enter the 
literary profession. He joined the staff of the Lynn 
"Dafly News," and in the fall of the next year left 
his native place to become editor of the Amesbury 
"Daily News." He has been editor of that journal 
eyer sdnce, and in that capacity has had an influen- 
tial part in moulding public opinion in that part 
of Massachusetts, and of furthering Amesbury pro- 
jects in particular. He is now one of the veteran 
editors of Essex county. The main details of his 
business career are that he, in 1902, in association 
with Thomas F. Coffin, acquired the plant and busi- 
ness of the Amesbury "Daily News," and formed 
the Amesbury Publishing Company, under which 



name the publishing and printing business of the 
partnership has since been transacted. In addition 
to the ever-present work that is represented in the 
daily publishing of a news medium, the company 
has developed a large job printing business, which 
probably has been more lucrative than the news- 
paper. But Mr. Graves has been a leader in Ames- 
bury mainly through his capable handling of his 
newspaper, and the common sense and farsighted- 
ness he has shown in his editorial policy on public 
and local questions. He has been interested in all 
matters affecting the community, but especially in 
educational matters. For four years he was a mem- 
ber of the Lynn School Committee, and for nine 
years served on the Amesbury Board of Education. 
He is a director of the Amesbury Chamber of Com- 
merce, and for several years was its president. He 
has been. much interested in agriculture, as will be 
seen by the fact that for twenty years he has 
been a director of the Amesbury and Salisbury Agri- 
cultural Society. Fraternally, Mr. Graves belongs 
to Warren Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; Trin- 
ity Chapter, Roynl Arch Masons; to Amesbury 
Council, Royal and Select Masters; to Friendship 
Chapter, Order of Eastern Star; and to the Ames- 
bury Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
of which body he was recorder for thirteen years. 
He is a Methodist, and has undoubtedly been active 
in that connection, being one of the trustees of the 
local Methodist church, its treasurer, and superin- 
tendent of its Sunday school. Mr. Graves has been 
active in the Amesbury Hospital Association, being 
a director for many years and its vice-president. 

Mr. Graves was married, June 15, 1882, to Julia 
A. Nichols, of Lynn, Massachusetts. They have 
three sons, two of whom are veterans of the World 
War. Ralph I. became a major, and Warren E. a 
lieutenant. Both continued in Federal service later, 
Warren E. with the River and Harbor Division, 
and Ralph I. with the Railroad Administration. The 
third son, William H., is now a foreman in the auto 
body plant of the Biddle & Smart Company, Ames- 
bury. Mr. and Mrs. Graves have two grandchil- 
dren: Hilda, and William H., Jr. 



JOHN KELLY SARGENT, of Merrimac street, 
Merrimac, Massachusetts, is a member of the old 
Colonial Massachusetts family of that patronymic. 
The record goes back even to the Virginia colony, 
to which came, early in the seventeenth century, 
Richard Sargent, an ofiicer in the Royal navy of 
Great Britain. He was the son of William Sargent, 
of England, and the first of that house to come 
to America. Richard Sargent came into the Mas- 
sachusetts colony about 1634, and settled at Ips- 
wich. Two years later he removed to Salisbury, 
Massachusetts. Several references appear else- 
where in this volume to the Sargent family, which 
is one of the oldest in the Amesbury part of Mas- 
sachusetts. 

John E. Sargent, grandfather of his namesake of 
the present generation, was bom in West Amesbury 
in 1802, was a farmer until old age, and reached 



160 



ESSEX COUNTY 



the extreme age of ninety-five years, death not com- 
ing until 1897. He married his relative, Elizabeth 
Sargent, also of West Amesbury; she also died in 
1897. 

Charles N. Sargent, son of John K. and Elizabeth 
(Sargent) Sargent, of Groveland, Massachusetts, 
was bom on August 15, 1887, and died April 1, 1899. 
He married, on November 12, 1873, Rebecca K. 
Bixby, who was bom at Boxford, Massachusetts, on 
March 17, 1841, and died on June 4, 1918. 

John K. Sargent, son of Charles N. and Rebecca 
K. (Bixby) Sargent, was bom in West Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, February 2, 1875. His education whs 
obtained in the public schools of that place, and 
included the high school course. After leaving 
school he secured emplojnnent in the store of G. 
G. Kimball, of Bradford, Massachusetts, following 
the grocery business for about eighteen months. 
Next he worked for Charles Bisbee, of Bradford, 
Massachusetts, a market gardener. With him he re^ 
mained for about a year, and then entered the em- 
ploy of Armour & Company, at their Boston branch. 
A year and a half later, however, he took a farm, 
and since then has held to agricultural pursuits, 
owning a good farming property. 

Mr. Sargent is a Republican in National politics, 
and for many years has taken an active part in 
local affairs. He has been a selectman of the town 
of Merrimac for seven years, and was an assessor 
for four years. He is widely known and obviously 
popular and esteemed. Twice he has been master 
of the local Grange; and he also belongs to the 
Knights of Malta, and the Junior Order United 
American Mechanics. Religiously he is a Congre- 
gatlonalist, a member of the Pilgrim Congregational 
Church, of Merrimac. 

In 1902, at Haverhill, Mr. Sargent was married 
to Nellie B. Chapman, ot that place, but a native 
of Merrimac, where she was bom on November 5, 
1877, the daughter of Samuel W. and Anna Fran- 
cis (Webster) Chapman. The Chapman family also 
is an old New England family, Mrs. Sargent's great- 
grandfather being Eliphalet Chapman, who was 
bom in Tamworth, New Hampshire, in 1778, and 
died in 1863. He was a farmer, and married Peg^gy 
Kennison, of Tamworth. They had nine children: 
Penelope, bom February 9, 1804, died September 8, 
1826; Andrew, bom April 25, 1806, died in 1890; Eli- 
phalet, bom April 6, 1808, died July 22, 1873; Ben- 
jamin Franklin, bom April 16, 1810, died December 
10, 1890; Lucinda, bom Marth 12, 1812, died April 
30, 1843; Elona, bom December 3, 1815; Joseph, 
bom June 29, 1817; Timothy, bom June 26, 1821, 
died 1890 ; John, bom September 19, 1825, died 1852. 
Andrew Chapman, the second child, was bom in 
Tamworth, New Hampshire, and passed his life in 
farming there. He married Mary Woodman, of 
Deerfield, New Hampshire, in November, 1827. She 
was bom February 10, 1805, and died April 8, 1863. 
Their only child, Samuel Woodman Chapman, was 
bom in Tamworth, New Hampshire, on February 1, 
1839, and died at Haverhill, Massachusetts, in July, 
1909. For the greater part of his life he was con- 



nected with the Massachusetts shoe mannfRctorinir 
industry. On October 28, 1871, he manied Anna 
Francis Webster, of Salisbury, Massachusetts, where 
she was bom on April 9, 1839, died July 20, 1919. 
Their children were: Annie Mary, bora February 
17, 1873; George Webster, bom March 7, 1876; and 
Nellie Belle, bom November 5, 1877. The last- 
named married John K. Sargent, of Merrimac, as 
above stated. Mr. and Mrs. Sargent have tfazee 
children: Bemard C, bom November 28, 1907; Mar- 
jorie A., bom January 17, 1911 ; and Esther R., bom 
December 10, 1912. 



WILLIAM I. PORBLL, dentist, of 
Massachusetts, was bom April 29, 1892, in Springr- 
vale, Vermont, son of William John and Mary V. 
(Pichette) Porell. The public schools of HaveriuU 
prepared Dr. Porell for entrance to Tufts Dental 
College from which he graduated in 1915. He im- 
mediately engaged in the practice of bis profession, 
and in the few years since passed has gained suecesa 
and recognition; he is also one of the youngest 
dentists in Haverhill. In addition to his private 
practice, Dr. Porell is dental examiner of the Pub- 
lic Health Service. On May 80, 1918, he enlisted 
in the Dental Corps, Newport News, and was com- 
missioned first lieutenant; on September 20, 1918» 
he went into service and served for eleven months, 
until July 29, 1919, attaining the rank of captain in 
reserves. He is a member of the Foresters; the 
Knights of Columbus, and of the Agawam Club. 

Dr. Porell married, in 1918, Corinne B. Leonard, 
of Haverhill. 

GUY NEWHALL, one of the successful attor- 
neys of Lynn, Massachusetts, and a man who has 
already made a name for himself in the profession, 
is a native son, his birth having occurred here June 
17, 1877. He is a son of Edgar P. and Elizabeth 
(Vickary) Newhall). 

Mr. Newhall received the elementary portion of 
his education at the public schools of his native 
place. After graduating from the Cobbet Grammar 
School, he entered the Lynn Classical High School 
and here prepared himself for college. In 1894 he 
matriculated at Harvard ColFege, from which he 
graduated in 1898, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He had in the meantime determined to adopt 
the law as a profession and, accordingly, matri- 
culated at the law school of Harvard University. 
After completing the prescribed course, he grad- 
uated with the class of 1901, receiving the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. Throughout his school and 
college years he had proved himself an intelligent 
and painstaking student, and at the close came to 
the opening of his career unusually well-equipped 
both with natural gifts and a training that was the 
result of long and conscientious effort. Inmiediately 
after graduating from Harvard Law School he re- 
turned to Lynn, where he passed his bar examina- 
tions and established himself in the practice of his 
chosen profession. He opened an office at No. 88 
Exchange street, this city, and this has remained 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



161 



his headquarters ever since. Mr. Newhall has hult 
up an excdlent practice and has handled many im- 
portant cases up to the present, proving himself a 
most capable and conscientious attorney. 

Besides his legal activities, Mr. Newhall has in- 
terested himsdf in the conduct of public affairs in 
the community, and in the years of 1907 and 1908 
served his city as councOman. He affiliates ^th 
the Masons, and the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, and also holds membership in the Lynn His- 
torical Society and the Oxford Club of Lynn. 

Mr. Newhall manied, in 1907, Ethel Mary New- 
hall, daughter of Joseph Warren and Mary (de 
Laski) Newhall, and they are the parents of two 
children: Rosalind Frances, bom April 18, 1908; 
and Edward Bradford, bom May 26, 1916. 

JOHN B. WOODBURY, a prominent merchant 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom in Methuen, 
same State, August 22, 1870, son of Austin and Su- 
san Jane (Murray) Woodbury. The former was 
a native of Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, and he 
was engaged in the wheelwright business until his 
death in 1888. Mrs. Woodbury was also a native of 
Nova Scotia, bom in 1836, and died in 1906. 

John E. Woodbury attended the public schools 
off Ayers Village and at Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
and subsequently pursued a special course in gram- 
mar. He then entered the employ of the Goodrich 
& Porter Company, shoe manufacturers, in their 
stitching department, remaining for three years, and 
then worked for his brother, W. H. Woodbury, as 
assistant foreman, and later foreman of the stitch- 
ing room. His enlistment in the United States army 
in 1891 made it necessary for him to resign from 
his work, and the succeeding five years were spent 
in military activities. He enlisted in Company F, 
Eighth Regiment, Massachusetts State Guard, and 
was stationed at Haverhill from 1888 to 1891, at 
which time he was discharged from the State militia 
as a corporal, and immediately re-enlisted in the 
Begular United States army and was sent from 
Boston to David's Island, now Fort Slocum, and 
there was a member of the Company D Instruc- 
tion Company, where he remained for five months, 
at the end of which time he was sent to Fort Sill, 
Indian Territory, remaining for a year and a half, 
when he went to Fort Reno, remaining there for 
the same period. During this time Mr. Woodbury 
was selected as one of three men to attend the 
opening of the Cherokee land strip, and after this 
was finished he went East, and was stationed at 
Governor's Island, where he remained until his 
discharge in 1896. In this same year he entered the 
employ of F. M. Hodgson & Company, as trimming 
cutter, and remained there until 1901, in which year 
he associated himself in business with E. J. Hodg- 
son. After four successful years Mr. Woodbury 
withdrew to enter a partnership in a similar busi- 
ness, with an additional line of talldng machines, 
with Mr. McLeody under the firin name of Wood- 
bury A McLeod, in HaverhlU, and they are among 
. the leading merchants in that city. Mr. Woodbury 



is also a director of the Haverhill Coal Supply 
Company. 

Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic order, being 
axmember*of Menimac Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Pentucket Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 
the Benevolent Protective Order Elks; the New 
England Order of Protection; and the Junior Order 
of United American Mechanics. His clubs are the 
Agawam and the Haverhill Rifle, and he is a mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce and of the Red 
Cross organization. 

Mr. Woodbury married, in 1901, Lillian H. Bean, 
daughter of Arthur and Harriet (King) Bean, of 
Haverhill, and their children are: Dorothy Rowena, 
Prisdlla Murray, and John Edward, Jr. 

JAMBS F. LANIGAN— In the manuf^turing 
world of Lawrence, Massachusetts, the name of 
James F. Lanigan is one of unusual prominence, he 
being the head of three leading manufacturing en- 
terprises, all long-established industries. 

Coming to this country from Ireland in his child- 
hood, Mr. Lanigan, when he reached the age to be- 
come interested in his future, chose the world of 
action, and apprenticed himself to the Davis Foun- 
dry Company. This was in August, 1862, and be- 
ginning the climb at the bottom, he worked his 
way up until he was made superintendent of the 
plant. May 24, 1875. In 1892 he became owner of 
the entire plant, which he still holds. This foundry 
manufactures castings of every description, no job 
too large and none too small, and as head of this 
concern, Mr. Lanigan became a power in manufac- 
turing circles. In 1902 he purchased the Emerson 
Manufacturing Company, of which he became presi- 
dent. The product of this concern is largely paper 
machinery, although they list many lines of ma- 
chinery. In October, 1909, Mr. Lanigan purchased 
the Lawience Machine Company, one of the most 
important manufacturers of centrifugal machinery 
in New England, and he is sole proprietor of this 
interest. He has recently built a large plant at No. 
858 Market street, of modem construction, and fully 
equipped with the most approved and up-to-date 
machinery, and one of the largest foundries in 
Northern New England. 

Mr. Lanigan is a member of the Lawrence Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and is a director of the Ariing- 
ton Trust Company. He is a member of the Home 
Club, and of the Merrimac Valley Country Club; 
he resides at No. 289 Andover street. 

Mr. Lanigan married Annie McDonald, daughter 
of James McDonald, of Lowell, Massachusetts, and 
they are the parents of nine children, six of whom 
grew to maturity: James, deceased, married, but 
left no children; Joseph, deceased, unmarried; Mary; 
Edward, married Lena Donovan, and has two chil- 
dren, Mary and Edward; William, deceased, un- 
married; and Charles. 



HARRY W. HALE, wholesale merchant in Merri- 
mac, Massachusetts, since 1900, was bom in West 
Amesbury, Massachusetts* July ^ 1878, son of Frank 



Em«x— 2— 11 



162 



ESSEX COUNTY 



E. and Jiili% A. (Borne) Hale, the latter of George- 
town, BiiBBJt me f mner of Newbnryport, Massachu- 
aettSy wtiercT'the Aale family had long been set- 
tled. Deacon Ezra Hale, of Newburyi>ort» was a 
grandfather of Harry W., and was bom in Newbury- 
port in 1804, farmed there all his life, and died in 
Rowley, Massachusetts, in 1891. Frank E. Hale, 
father of Harry W., was a carriage maker until he 
retired in 1911, and is well known in the district. 

Harry W. Hale was educated in the public schools 
of his native place, and at Merrimac, which educa- 
tion was supplemented by a commercial course he 
took at Burdett's Business College, Boston, Massa^ 
chusetts. After graduating therefrom, he entered 
the employ of John H. Cleary, a grocer of Merri- 
mac. He worked for him, as clerk, for nine years, 
at the end of which time he went to Boston, and 
there worked for the F. M. Morrel Company, deal- 
ers in butter, eggs and cheese. A year later he re- 
turned to Merrimac, and went into business for 
himself, as a whole merchant in confectionery. He 
soon developed a good connection, and the business 
has grown considerably during the twenty-one years 
he has owned and conducted it. 

Politically, Mr. Hale is a Republican, and while 
he has not prominently entered into national poli- 
tics in his district, he has taken an active interest 
in the public affairs of Merrimac. He was tax col- 
lector for two years, and was on the Board of Fire 
Engineers for three years. As a man of substan- 
tial standing, he has been brought into connection 
with local* banking institutions; he is a director of 
the First Na^onal Bank of Merrimac, and member 
of the Jnifestfnent'^ Committee of the Merrimac Sav- 
ings Bank, and vice-president of the Merrimac Sav- 
ings Bank. He belongs to several fraternal or- 
ganizations, holding membership in the Bethany 
Lodge of Masons, Riverside Lodge of Odd Fellows. 
the.Rebekah Lodge of Merrimac, and the United 
Commercial Travelers' organization of Haverhill. 
That he is popular in Merrimac is evidenced by his 
connection with the Oxford Club, of which he was 
president from 1910 to 1920. 

Mr. Hale married, in 1908, Minnie S. Cook, of 
Haverhill, daughter of Thomas R. and Caroline 
Cook, oiifijbially of Guysboro, Nova Scotia. The 
former was a contractor, and in business until his 
death, which occurred in 1918. Mr. and Mrs. Hale 
have one child, a daughter, Dorothy Elaine, who 
was bom on November 1, 1912. 



HOWARD T. CLARK, ex-service man, president 
of the Fellows Hardware Company, of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, is one of the very active young busi- 
ness men of Haverhill. He was bom in the city on 
January 28, 1892, the son of Charles H. and Mary 
Louise (Bancnoiid) Clark, of HaverhiU. The pater- 
nal line conxiects with a Pennsylvanian family, and 
the matemaf line. Hammond, was of Beverly, Mas- 
sachusetts. tJhaqFes H. Clark was a merchant, and 
Is treasurer (if thi^ Fellows Hardware Company, Inc., 
but he is not actively in business. 

Howard T. Clark passed throu^ the Haverhill 



public schools, being of the high school class of 1910. 
In the following year he graduated from the Bryant 
ft Stratton Business College, and began a commer- 
cial career as a clerk for the Haverhill Gas Light 
Company, remaining with that firm for three years. 
His father was connected with the firm of Fellows 
Hardware Company, Haverhill, and soon after the 
death of Corydon Fellows, in 1914, the company was 
reorganized, and of the new company, Howard T. 
Clark became president, and his father treasurer. 
That connection has held to the present, though the 
son has latterly been the active executive. The Fel- 
lows Hardware Company is one of the historic busi- 
ness houses of Haverhill, the oldest in that line. 
It was established in 1861 by Samuel Fellows, and 
continued by his son until the latter's death in 1914, 
which made it necessary to reorganize, as before 
stated. The firm occupies the entire building at 
No. 31 Merrimac street, and does considerable busir 
ness throughout Essex county. 

During the World War, Mr. Clark was in mili- 
tary service, enlisting in the Ordnance Department 
on December 16, 1917, and for service anywhere. 
He happened to be assigned to duty at the Port 
of Embarkation, Hoboken, New Jersey, and because 
of his executive ability and business experience, was 
held to administrative duty at that point until the 
end of the war, being honorably discharged on Janu- 
ary 6, 1919p when he returned to his native place 
and resumed his civilian occupations. 

Mr. Clark has been quite prominent in many 
phases of Haverhill affairs. Possessed of a good 
voice, he has come into notice locally during the 
last ten years in the capacity of tenor soloist in 
local churches, and this talent probably was what 
brought him into association with the theatrical 
events of local amateurs. He has been one of the 
leaders of Agawam productions, and in several other 
ways has helped toward the success of Haverhill 
social functions. He is a member of the Pentucket 
and Agawam dubs, and is also a Mason of the 
thirty-second degree. He is a member of Aleppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Nobles of the Mystic Shrine» 
and is lieutenant of the Arab Patrol. He is un- 
married. 



JAMES SILVER NEWHALL— One of the names 
most deeply worthy of commemoration in the per- 
manent records of the city of Lynn, Massachusetts, 
is that of James Silver Newhall, who was bom in 
Lynn, August 18, 1848, and died there September 
21, 1918. He was a son of Judge Thomas B. and 
Susan Silver (Putnam) Newhall, his father being 
very prominent in the Lynn of a generation gone by. 

Mr. Newhall prepared for his career in the edu- 
cational institutions of his native city. As a young 
man he went tor Salem, in this county, to engage in 
the leather business with his maternal grandfather, 
Jacob Putnam. While residing there he was a mem- 
ber of the Salem Cadets, and took a broad interest 
in the public affairs of the day. Later he returned 
to Lynn, and during his mature years was identifled 
with various business interests of his native dty» 



^A-u.^.^ f^c 



CA^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



19& 



bxinging to bear upon their progress the influence 
of ripened judgment and acute perceptions. For a 
period of ten years he was president of the Lynn 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company. 

At the time of his death Mr. Newhall was vice- 
president of the Lynn Five Cent Savings Bank; a 
director in the Central National Bank of Lynn; a 
member of the Lynn Historical Society, and the 
Lynn Home for Aged Men Corporation. He was a 
member of Olivet Commandery, Knights Templar; 
of Old Essex Chapter, Sons of the American Revo- 
lution; the Society of Colonial Wars; the Red 
Cross; and the Whiting and Oxford clubs. He was 
a member of the Unitarian church of Lynn, and in 
earlier life served for a period of twenty-seven years 
as treasurer of the church society. 

Mr. Newhall married Marion Wentworth Clarke, 
who with two daughters, Mrs. Larkin E. Bennett, 
of Wakefield, Massachusetts, and Mrs. William G. 
Keene, of Lynn, survive him. 

WALTER EDWARD PARKER— More than four 
decades ago Walter E. Parker came from Woon- 
socket, Rhode Island^ to Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
to accept a position with the Pacific Mills, and 
while that position is now a vastiy more important 
one, the association thus formed has never been 
interrupted for an instant (January, 1922). The 
Pacific Mills have greatiy increased in size and im- 
portance as a factor in the textile market, and for 
thirty-five years, 1887-1922, Mr. Parker has been 
agent for the Pacific Mills Corporation, and as 
such has been the great contributing factor to this 
increased prosperity. Were this his life work it 
would entitie Mr. Parker to a permanent place in 
the manufacturing and commercial annals of Law- 
rence, but his interests are wide, varied and im- 
portant, and he is well known in financial as well as 
in textile circles, and in civic as well as in business 
life. 

This branch of the Parker family is traced to 
Thomas Parker, bom in England in 1609, who came 
to New England in the ''Susan and Ellen" with the 
Sir Richard Saltonstall party, leaving London March 
11, 1686. Thomas Parker settied at Lynn, later at 
Reading, where he was a deacon, a man of ability 
and substance. He died in 1688, aged seventy-four 
years, his wife Amy surviving him until 1890. 
They were the parents of sons and daughters, and 
from them Walter Edward Parker descends in the 
ninth American generation. 

The name Parker is an ancient one, and Danes, 
Saxons, and Normans used some form of the word 
as a surname from a very early date. The name 
Parker is derived from the Latin, "parcarius,'' mean- 
ing "park keeper" or "shepherd," and both "parous" 
and "de parco" are found in Domesday Book. 

The descent from Thomas and Amy Parker to 
Walter E. Parker is in unbroken line through their 
son. Lieutenant Hananiah Parker, and his wife Eliz- 
abeth (Browne) Parker; their son, John Parker, and 
his wife. Deliverance; their son* Andrew Parker, 
and his wife Sarah (Whitney) Parker; their son, 
Thomas Parker, a patriot of the Revolution, and his 



wife, Jane (Parrot) Parker; their son. Deacon 
Ebenezer Parker, a "minute-man" of the Revolu- 
tion, and his wife Dorcas (Munroe) Parker; their 
son, Ebenezer Parker, and his wife, Hannah B. 
(Merriam) Parker; their son, George Parker, and 
his wife, Emily R. (Collar) Parker; and their son, 
Walter E. Parker, to whom this review is inscribed. 

Reading, Lexington and Princeton were famOy 
homes for the heads of this branch, and in each 
generation the heads were men of prominence in 
church or town, frequentiy both. George Parker, 
of the eighth generation, was bom in Princeton, 
Massachusetts, February 1, 1818, died at East Black- 
stone, Massachusetts, January 20, 1893. He mar- 
ried, September 14, 1841, Emily R. Collar, daughter 
of Rev. Hezekiah and Rhoda (Robblns) CoUar, of 
Northfield, Massachusetts. They were the parents 
of two sons: Walter E., of further mention; and 
Herbert, bom April 28, 1850, who died, unmarried, 
January 28, 1873. 

Walter E. Parker was bom at Princeton, Massa- 
chusetts, September 27, 1847, and in 1856 was taken 
to Illinois by his parents, but four years later he 
returned to Westboro, Massachusetts, the family 
moving to Woonsocket, Rhode Island, in 1868. The 
lad, Walter E., attended the public schools during 
these years, but upon reaching the age of sixteen 
he entered the employ of the Social Mill, at Woon- 
socket, as counting room clerk, but continued school 
attendance during the first two years of his service. 
He then gave all of his time to his duties at the 
mill with the exception of a few months spent in 
drawing school in Boston. The Social Mill was his 
business university, and for thirteen years he con- 
tinued with that miU, working his way upward to 
responsible position. He developed strong ability, 
and with energy and persistency, pursued his way 
to better position. When the mill was enlarged he 
made the plans and aided in carrying them forward 
to completion. He deemed it wise to make a 
change later, and on October 27, 1876, became 
superintendent of the Globe MOl of Woonsocket. 

From October 27, 1876, until April 1, 1881, Mr. 
Parker was superintendent of the Globe Mill of 
Woonsocket, and there he greatiy increased his tex- 
tile manufacturing knowledge. His reputation had 
gone beyond the confines of his own dty, and in 
1881 he received an offer from the Pacific Mills Cor- 
poration to become manager of the cotton manu- 
facturing department of the Pacific Mills at Law- 
rence, Massachusetts. That was too good an offer 
to trifle with and was soon accepted, he going to 
Lawrence April 1, 1881. Nearly six years later, 
January 1, 1887, he was appointed agent for the 
same corporation and mills, a position he is yet 
holding, January 1, 1922. He is one of the strong 
men of the textile business, and in 1889-90-91 was 
president of the New Englimd Cotton Manufac- 
turers' Association; is a trastee of the Lowell Tex- 
tile School; one of the founders of the Textile Club 
and its second president; a member and a vice- 
president of the Home Market Club of Boston. 

Prior to coming to Lawrence, Mr. Parker be- 
came Interested in dty banking^ and from 1878 until 



164 



ESSEX COUNTY 



1892 was a director of the Producers' National Bank 
of Woonsocket. In 1886 he was appointed trustee 
of the estate of Charles Nourse, and is still ad- 
ministering the trust with greatest fidelity. When 
the Merchants' National Bank of Lawrence was or- 
ganized in 1889, he was elected director and vice- 
president, and after he had served the Essex Say- 
ings Bank for several years, he was elected presi- 
dent; for two decades he has successfully guided 
the destines of the Lawrence Lumber Company; 
and was a former director of the Lawrence Gas 
Company. To this honorable record of business 
activity, extending over half a century of business 
life in two cities, but principally in Lawrence, Mr. 
Parker adds a record of splendid civil usefulness as 
president of the City Mission; chairman of the ad- 
visory board of the Lawrence General Hospital ; 
as trustee with two others of the White Fund, and 
by virtue of that office as trustee of the Lawrence 
Public Library; as trustee of the Lawrence Home 
for Aged People; and as trustee of Tufts College 
and chairman of the finance committee. 

In politics Mr. Parker is a Republican, and in 
1877 was president of the Woonscket Town Coun- 
cO. As he did not become a voter until 1868, he 
can safely be called a life-long member of that party, 
founded in 1850. He was a member of the first 
commission appointed in Lawrence to control the 
granting of licenses, and in 1904 was an alternate 
delegate to the Chicago National Republican Con- 
vention that nominated President Roosevelt for a 
second term, and was a delegate to the convention 
that nominated William H. Taft for President He 
is a Universalist in religious faith, a member of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd. He was made a 
Mason in 1869, and is a past master of Morning 
Star Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of 
Woonsocket; is a Companion of Woonsocket Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons; and a past eminent com- 
mander of Woonsocket Commandery, Knights Temp- 
lar. He is a member of the Boston Society of Civil 
Engineers; of the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, and of the Society of Arts, London, 
England. 

Mr. Parker married (first) October 12, 1870, Anna 
Augusta Elliott, who died February 4, 1875, daugh- 
ter of Nathaniel and Olive A. (Jenks) Elliott. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Parker was bom a son, Herbert 
S., bom October 18, 1874. Mr. Parker married 
(second) May 2, 1877, Alida Charlotte Willis, bom 
at North Dana, Massachusetts, January 26, 1849, 
died September 9, 1885, daughter of Rev. John H. 
and Charlotte (Gleason) Willis, of College Hill. 
To Walter E. and Alida C. (Willis) Parker a daugh- 
ter Helen was bom, Juy 27, 1878. Mr. Parker mar- 
ried (third) January 1, 1888, Mary Bradley Beetle, 
daughter of John and Harriet (Brown) Beetle, of 
Nantucket, Massachusetts. 

MARTIN FRANCIS CONNELLY— For the last 

six years Martin F. Connelly, a Boston lawyer, has 

also practiced in his native place, Amesbury, Mas- 

. sachusetts, where he has a wide circle of friends, 

and is generally well regarded. He has given much 



time since that year to matters of law in Ames- 
bury, and also to public affairs of that community, 
but has nevertheless maintained his Boston prac- 
tice. 

Martin Francis Connelly was bom in Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, on June 15, 1884, son of James and 
Ellen (Burke) ConneUy,, who were both bom in 
County Galway, Ireland, the father in Kilgevrin in 
1849, and the mother in Kilconly in 1851. 

Mr. Connelly first went to St. Joseph's Parochial 
School of Amesbury, graduating from that school 
and then entering Amesbury High School in 1898, 
a member of the class of 1902. He took the col- 
legiate course at the Holy Cross College, gradu- 
ating with the degree of A.B. in 1906. The next 
three years were spent at the Georgetown Univer- 
sity Law School, at Washington, D. C, where he 
gained the degree of LL.B. in 1909. While taking 
the law course, he was fortunately able to act, con- 
currently, for at least a part of the time, as secre- 
tary to United States Congressman Needham. He 
then took up post-graduate work at the law school, 
holding his secretarial position until the fall of 
1910, when he returned to Massachusetts. Mr. Con- 
nelly was admitted to practice at the bar of Mas- 
sachusetts in February, 1911, then opened a law 
office in the city of Boston and there continaed to 
devote his whole time to that purpose until Janu- 
ary 1, 1915, when he came to Amesbury and de- 
cided to practice law in his home town also. He 
opened an office in Amesbury, and has since main- 
tained the two offices, his Boston address being at 
No. 1 Beacon street. He spends the greater part 
of his time in Amesbury, and also has entered some- 
what into public work. Since 1916 he has been 
town counsel for Amesbury. 

As a man of Irish antecedents, he might have 
been expected to take active part in movements 
affecting that people. That he has done so may be 
inferred by some of his affiliations. He is identified 
with the Charitable Irish Society of Boston; with 
the Ancient Order of Hibernians, and the Knights 
of Columbus, of Amesbury. By religious faith he 
is a Catholic, a member of St. Joseph's Roman 
Catholic Church of Amesbury. Politically a Repub- 
lican, socially a member of the Amesbury Club, and 
for general civic helpfulness a member of the 
Amesbury Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Connelly has 
given indication that he is one of the active men 
of that place. 

Mr. Connelly married, in 1917, Nelle M. Quinn, 
who was bom in Amesbury, Massachusetts, on Octo- 
ber 16, 1884. Tjiey have one child, a daughter, 
Frances, bom December 9, 1918. 



HERBERT H. MERRILL— For many years in 
business in Amesbury, Massachusetts, and for some 
years a director of the Amesbury Chamber of Com- 
merce, Herbert H. Merrill is well known in business 
circles in that district. He is a native of Essex 
county, Massachusetts, bom in Georgetown, on July 
16, 1876, the son of George W. and Margaret (Hoyt) 
Merrill. The family for several generations has 
lived in Georgetown. George W. Merrill, father 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



165 



of Herbert H., was bom there, and was active in 
public work there almost ontil death. Especially as 
a musician did he come into prominence, and he 
was one of those who come into honorable national 
record, being a veteran of the Civil War, through 
the greater part of which he served as a member 
of Company K, Fiftieth Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry. 

Herbert H. Merrill was educated in the public 
schools of his native place, eventually graduating 
from the high school. Perhaps it was due to his 
father's activity in musical circles that Herbert H., 
after leaving school, became a salesman for F. W. 
Feabody, who had a general music store in Haver- 
hill. He served that company in that capacity from 
the time he left school until October 1, 1905, when 
he was appointed manager of their Amesbury 
branch. He did well in that responsibility, and in 
1910 was given the work of opening another branch 
store at Newburyport, and of managing both the 
branches. Mr. Merrill has been manager of the 
Amesbury and Newburyport stores ever since. In- 
deed, as the years have passed, his connection has 
become even closer. He is an authority on piano- 
fortes, understands their construction from begin- 
ning to end, and is an expert maker himself, being, 
indeed, well recognized as such. On May 1, 1919, 
he formed a business association as manager with 
F. W. Peabody for the purpose of entering into the 
manufacture of Peabody pianos, and that enterprise 
has been successfully prosecuted ever since, the 
piano being known as the Peabody & Lake instru- 
ment. On May 1, 1921, the William Bourne & Sons 
Company was moved to Amesbury, and there the 
Bourne pianos have since been made. In all, Mr. 
Merrill is adding appreciably to the industrial im- 
portance of Amesbury. He is interested in all mat- 
ters pertaining to the place, is a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, and has a seat on its direc- 
torate. Politically he is 'a Republican; fraternally 
a Mason, a member of Charles C. Dame Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Georgetown; also belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; a mem- 
ber of Protection Lodge of Georgetown; and socially 
he belongs to the Amesbury Club. He is an at- 
tendant of the Baptist church of Amesbury. 

Mr. Merrill married, in 1905, Martha U. Lord, . 
who was bom in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1879. 
They have one child, a daughter, Margaret Eliz- 
abeth, who was bom on June 27, 1909. 

FRANK H. HOWARD — Now in independent 
business in Amesbury, Massachusetts, and for four 
or five prior years connected with one of the 
best hardware businesses in that place, Frank H. 
Howard, latterly treasurer and manager of the 
Howard Hardware Company, and director of the 
local Chamber of Commerce, is coming forward 
prominently in Amesbury business circles. 

Frank H. Howard was bom in Hardwick, Ver- 
mont, on June 11, 1891, son of Orlando J. and 
Sarah Edith (Burbank) Howard. In both paternal 
and maternal descent he comes from Vermont fam- 



ilies, his father having been bom in Beebe Plain, 
and his mother in Irasburg, Vt. Bis father was a 
contractor and builder in Vermont, but Frank H. 
was barely three years old when his mother died. 
She was bom in 1860, and died in 1894. 

Frank H. Howard was educated in the public 
schools of his native place, and at Barton Academy. 
After graduating from the academy he entered 
upon a commercial career, and for the first two 
years was connected with a mercantile business in 
Orleans, Vermont. He next was, for a similar 
period, in a hardware store at Whitefield, New 
Hampshire, leaving that place to take position as 
manager of the E. E. Griffin store at Derry, New 
Hampshire. He remained there for three years, after 
which he traveled for two years as a salesman for 
the Batchelder, Gallant Company, of Boston. How- 
ever, in 1915, he came to Amesbury to take up the 
management of the branch store of the Hanscom 
Hardware Company, of Haverhill. For the next five 
years he was connected with that company in that 
capacity, leaving their employ in January, 1920, so 
that he might venture into business for himself in 
Amesbury. He formed the Howard Hardware Com- 
pany, Inc., and has been the principal owner of it 
since that time, his official capacities being those of 
treasurer and manager. He has fitted up a most 
complete and modem store, carries a comprehen- 
sive stock, and has shown himself to be alert and 
enterprising. 

Politically a Republican, he does not enter much 
into politics. However, he follows local affairs with 
interest, and is active in the Chamber of Com- 
merce. He is a g^od Catholic, a member of St. 
Joseph's Roman Catholic Church of Amesbury, and 
of the Knights of Columbusi of that place. Socially 
he is a member of the Amesbury Club. For three 
years he actively interested himself in naval affairs, 
being a member of the Naval Reserve Forces of 
Boston. 

Mr. Howard mariied, in 1917, Helena M. Quinn, of 
Sharon, Massachusetts, who was bom on March 27, 
1891. They have two children: Ruth Ann, who 
was bom January 29, 1919; and Eileen Elizabeth, 
bom September 1, 1920. 



BENJAMIN ANDREW, one of the leading busi- 
ness men of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and a promi- 
nent citizen of the suburban town of Methuen, Ben- 
jamin Andrew, proprietor of the Lawrence Bindery 
Company, holds a place among the successful men 
of Essex county. 

Mr. Andrew was bom May 15, 1852, in Man- 
chester, England, son of Francis and Ann (Cryer) 
Andrew, the former being engaged in textile pur- 
suits; both parents are now deceased. 

The education of Benjamin Andrew was obtained 
in public and private schools at Manchester, and 
when twenty years of age he came to America, 
July 3, 1872. In England he had worked for some 
years in the cotton mills, and had gained some ex- 
perience in textile work, and naturally he located 
in the new land in a city where this occupation pre- 



166 



ESSEX COUNTY 



dominated, Lawrence, Massachusetts. Mr. Andrew 
first worked in the Arlington Mills at Lawrence, re- 
maining with this company until 1902, in which year 
he became identified with the Lawrence Bindery 
Comi>any, of which he is now the owner. 

This company was established by Thomas An- 
drew, a brother of Benjamin, in 1902, and the former 
died in 1916, at which time the sole interest in the 
business passed to our subject. In 1904 they ac- 
quired the printing plant of James Ward, and since 
tiien a business of general commercial printing has 
been carried on, as well as paper-ruling and pamph- 
let and book binding; they also manufacture com- 
mercial stationery, and employ about twelve people 
on an average. Through the high quality of their 
work this firm holds a leading place among the 
business houses of this kind in Lawrence, and sur- 
rounding towns. Their present building was com- 
pleted in 1912, and is modem in every way. 

Mr. Andrew is active in public and fraternal or- 
ganizations; he is one of the members of the Law- 
rence Chamber of Commerce; is a member of Tus- 
can Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons., being past 
master of this lodge; is also a member of Mt. Sinai 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of which he is past 
high priest, and was for three years, 1893-94-95, dis- 
trict deputy grand high priest of the Sixth Capi- 
tular District; member of the Lawrence Council, 
Royal and Select Masters; member of Bethany 
Conmiandery, Knights Templar, of which he was 
commander in 1888 and 1889;' and a membei^ of the 
Massachusetts Consistory of Boston. 

On May 6, 1879, Mr. Andrew married Mary A. 
Cort, daughter of Martin Cort, of Lawrence, and 
they are the parents of the following children: 
Frank M., who married Lillian Wightman, they the 
parents of three children: Lillian, Marian and Eliz- 
abeth; Thomas Edwin, who married Burma Keller, 
and they have one son, Thomas E., Jr.; and Alice, 
who married Walter C. Wilson, of Lawrence; they 
the parents of two children, a daughter, Jean, and a 
son, Andrew B. Mr. Andrew and his wife attend the 
Church of Christ (Scientist). 



GEORGE FOX HOGAN— One of the successful 
attorneys of Lynn, Massachusetts, and a man who 
has made a name for himself in the public life of 
this region, is a native of Annapolis, Nova Scotia, 
where he was bom March 29, 1867. He is a son 
of WOliam R. and Mary (Webb) Hogan. 

Mr. Hogan received the elementary portion of his 
education in the public schools of Nova Scotia. He 
came to Lynn at the age of nineteen years, and 
here took a course in the high school. Having de- 
termined to adopt the law as a profession, he ac- 
cordingly, after graduating from the Lynn High 
School, matriculated at Suffolk Law School, and was 
graduated in 1916, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. Passing his bar examinations, he established 
himself in his chosen profession at Lynn, which 
has remained his headquarters ever since. He has 
built up an excellent practice, handling many im- 
portant cases up to the present, and proving himself 



to be a most capable and conscientious attorney. 

Besides his legal activity, Mr. Hogan has intez^ 
ested himself in the conduct of public affairs in the 
community. He is strongly n favor of Prohibition, 
and on account of this was nominated as a candi- 
date for Congress for the Seventh Congressional 
District. He is a lawyer of marked ability, being 
a professor of Practice and Pleading at the Suf- 
folk Law School, of Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. 
Hogan has been active in the affairs of the Young 
Men's Christian Association for many years; in his 
religious affiliations he is a Baptist. 

On October 2, 1898, George Fox Hogan was united 
in marriage with Anabel Wilcomb, daughter of 
Charles A. and Anna (Bell) Wilcomb, both residents 
of Chester, New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Hogan 
are the parents of three children: Roland, bom 
March 30, 1895; Albion L., bom January 12, 1897; 
and Eleanor F., bom May 18, 1899. 



HENRY E. GUILD — Among the active business 
men of Amesbury, Massachusetts, one known to al- 
most all of the leading people of the town and 
vicinity, is Henry E. Guild, of the firm of Guild A 
Cameron, commercial printers and publishers of that 
place. 

Mr. Guild was bom in Walpole, Massachusetts, 
on February 8, 1882, son of Julius and Mary Ella 
(Pillsbury) Guild. His mother was of a New 
Hampshire family, bom in Dublin, New Hampshire, 
in 1854, but his father, Julius Guild, was a native 
of Walpole, Massachusetts, bom there in 1850, 
After he had reached manhood, Julius Guild gave 
many indications in his public work that he was a 
man of strong character and superior intellect. By 
occupation a farmer, he nevertheless found time to 
undertake much public work. He was postmaster 
at Walpole for eight years; selectman of that town 
for twenty years; and his capability, as well as 
popularity, can be readily gauged by the fact that 
for foui' years he was elected to the State Legis- 
lature. 

Henry E. Guild grew to manhood in his native 
place, and after having been well educated in the 
local grammar and high schools, and Worcester 
Academy, he gave his time for about nine years to 
his father, who because of physical injury was un- 
able to continue to conduct his wholesale and re- 
tail milk business. ,When there became no further 
need by his father of his assistance, Henry E. en- 
tered another line. He became connected with the 
Amesbury Commercial Press, and began at the bot- 
tom to learn the printer's art. _ Eventually he be- 
came one of the partners of the company, that 
status continuing" until 1914, when he took over the 
business for himself. There was no further change 
until 1916, when he took as a business partner Colin 
J. Cameron (a sketch of whom follows), the firm 
name then becoming Guild & Cameron. The part- 
ners are energetic men, and turn out a high grade 
of work, and they have no reason to be dissatisfied 
with the amount of business they do. 

Mr. Guild is a member of the Amesbury Cham- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



167 



ber of Commerce, and of the Congregational church 
of Walpole. Fn^temally he is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows; of Reliance 
Lodge, No. 187, of Walpole; and of the King's 
Mountain Encampment, same place. His political 
inclination is with the Republican party. 

Mr. Guild married, in 1911, at Walpole, Margar^ 
etta Knobel, who was bom in Dedham, January 2, 
1882, daughter of Edward and Frances L. A. W. 
(Mahn) Knobel. Her mother was bom in Roxbury, 
Massachusetts, in 1849, but her father was bom in 
Germany in 1889; he died in 1909. He was a man 
of much abUity, learned in the sciences, a naturalist, 
A capable writer, and gifted artist. Mr. and Mrs. 
Guild have four children: Louise P., who was bom 
on September 6, 1912; J. Edward, bom May 12, 
1914; Eleanor M., bom August 3, 1915; and John 
H., bom October 20, 1917. 



COLIN J. CAMERON— Having to his credit a 
wide experience as a practical printer, Colin J. 
Cameron, printer and publisher of Amesbury, Mas- 
sachusetts, has of late years entered actively into 
business affairs in that town and also into public 
matters of that district. He is well and favorably 
known among business men, and is interestedly 
working for the advancement of the place, being 
director and also vice-president of the Amesbury 
Chamber of Commerce, at the time of writing 
(1922). 

Mr. Cameron was bom in KenzieviUe, Nova Sco- 
tia, on August 24, 1879, son of Edward and Cather- 
ine J. (McKemsie) Cameron, both of KenzieviUe, 
where the mother was bom in 1846, and the father 
in 1836. Edward Cameron was a farmer and car- 
riage-maker for the greater part of his life; he re- 
tired in 1900. What academic education Colin J. 
Cameron had was obtained in the elementary schools 
of Amesbury. Family circumstances were such that 
he had to begin to work at the age of fourteen, 
though his first year of employment did not material- 
ly swell the family purse. He began his business 
career in the printing plant of the Amesbury Pub- 
lishing Company, at the outset receiving only two 
dollars a week for his services. He was connecte ■ 
with that plant for fifteen years, the last seven 
years being foreman of same. It was in that cap- 
acity that he next became connected with F. N 
Whitney, who owned a printing and publishing busi- 
ness in Northfield, Vermont, the seat of Norwich 
University. There Mr. Cameron remained until th*^ 
death of Mr. Whitney, when he went to Boston, 
Massachusetts, and there took a position as assist- 
ant foreman of the George H. Ellis Printing Com- 
pany, one of the largest plants in New England. 
However, in a short while, he returned to Ames- 
bmry, and associated himself with Henry E. Guild 
(see preceding sketch), who had acquired the print- 
ing business with which he had first been connected 
in Amesbury. Soon Mr. Cameron formed a busi- 
ness partnership with Mr. Guild, and since 1916 the 
firm has been known as Guild A Cameron, Mr. Cam- 
eron seemingly having direction of the practical 
end and Mr« Guild of the commerciaL 



Politically Mr. Cameron is independent; frater- 
nally he belongs to the DeWitt Clinton Lodge of 
Masons, of Northfield, Vermont; to the Powow 
River Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
and to the Eastern Star of Amesbury. His religious 
belief is Unitarian. 

Mr. Cameron married, in 1908, Delia Blanche Win- 
gate, who was bom in Lawrence, December 1, 1880, 
daughter of Charles S. and Harriet H. (Woodman) 
Wingate, the former bom t)ecember 9, 1856, in 
Somersworth, New Hampshire, and in later life a 
painter by occupation. The mother was also a 
native of Somersworth, bom there in August, 1857. 
She died in May, 1886, in Amesbury. Mr. i^id Mrs. 
Cameron have one child, a daughter, Catherine, who 
was bom November 21, 1909. 



F. LESLIE VICCARO, lawyer, of Amesbury, 
Massachusetts, was bom in Maiden, same State, 
September 21, 1891, son of James S. and Jennie A. 
(Morrison) Viccaro. The former was bom in Buenos 
Aires, South America, in 1871, but spent the greater 
part of his life in the United States, and was a 
citizen. Latterly he was in the real estate business 
in Massachusetts, where he died in 1912. His wife 
was bom in Calais, Maine, in November, 1866. 

F. Leslie Viccaro was educated in the public and 
high schools of Merrimac, Massachusetts, and hav- 
ing decided to take up the profession of law at the 
Suffolk Law School, graduated therefrom in the 
class of 1918, with the degree of LL.B. After leav- 
ing law school, he entered the law office of Spauld- 
ing, Baldwin & Shaw at Boston, and was associated 
in practice with that firm for more than five years. 
However, he came to Amesbury in 1919, and opened 
a law office there. He is a member of the Amesbury 
Bar Association, and has practiced mainly in Ames- 
bury since opening his office there. 

Mr. Viccaro has entered somewhat actively into 
public affairs. Politically a Republican, he is the 
secretary of the district body of the Republican 
League of Massachusetts; is chairman of the Merri- 
mac School Committee; president of the Merrimac- 
port Library Association; treasurer of the Town Im- 
provement Society; vice-chairman of the Merrimac 
Red Cross Executive Committee; and vice-president 
of the Amesbury Chamber of Commerce; and for- 
mer secretary of the School Superintendency Union. 

Fraternally he is a member of Bethany Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Riverside Lodge, No. 
174, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; past patron 
of Bethel Chapter, Order of Eastern Star; member 
of the Men's Club ; and Suffolk Law School Alumni 
Association. 

Mr. Viccaro was in the United States army during 
the World War, being a member of Company F, of 
the Seventy-third Infantry, Twelfth Division, and 
with that unit was stationed at Camp Devens, 
Massachusetts, from July 24, 1918, to January 17, 
1919, then receiving honorable discharge in the grade 
of private, first class. He is now a member of the 
local post of the American Legion. He is a Meth- 
odist, and is active in the Methodist Episcopal 
church of Merrimacport, being a trustee and mem- 



168 



ESSEX COUNTY 



ber of the quarterly conference of that church. 

Mr. Viccaro married* October 12» 1917, Miss Agones 
O. Olsen, of Rochester, New Hampshire. 



BVERBTT MITCHELL, shoe manufacturer, 
founder and treasurer of the Fellows Shoe Com- 
pany. Inc., of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was bom 
in Bowdoinham, Maine, January 28, 1872, the son 
of Hiram S. and Elizabeth (Ridley) Mitchell. His 
father, who died in 1904, was in the ministry, and 
through his mother he descends from one of the 
pioneer families of Maine. 

Everett- Mitchell was educated in the public 
schools of his native place, and for three years 
after entering business life was employed in a saw*- 
mill, then, for a similar period, he worked in the 
Maine stone quarries of Booth Brothers. He came 
to Massachusetts and to Haverhill in 1896 and or- 
ganized the Haverhill Scrap Leather Company. 
With that company he was identified for eighteen 
years, leaving them in 1919 to open in business for 
himself on Locke street. He did well in independent 
business, and on January 1, 1920, organized the 
Fellows Shoe Company, Inc., establishing a plant 
for the manufacture of shoes at No. 29 Beech street, 
Haverhill. Its capacity is seven hundred and fifty 
pairs of shoes a day, not an inconsiderable output. 
Mr. Mitchell directs operations, and is treasurer of 
the corporation. 

Mr. Mitchell does not enter much into public 
affairs, having no time to spare from his business 
affairs, but he is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Mitchell married, in 1902, Annie HinchcliiFe, 
daughter of George and Sophia (Hearst) Hinch- 
cliffe, people of English birth, and residents of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts. 



ASA FREDERICK HOWB— The life story of 
Asa Frederick Howe, of Creorgetown, Massachusetts. 
covers activities in many fields, his versatility being 
remarkable. He is a veteran of the Civil War, has 
been a worker on shoes, a teacher, grocer, farmer, 
legislator, constable, justice of the peace, and pro- 
bation ofiicer. He is a twin with Dr. George W. 
Howe, a dentist living in Danvers, Massachusetts. 
These twins recently celebrated their seventy-sev- 
enth birthday, and they believe they are the cham- 
pion old-age twins of the State of Massachusetts. 
They are sons of William F. and Susan Eliza (Pot- 
ter) Howe, the father a mazket gardener of Row- 
ley, Massachusetts, the mother bom in Bridgfton, 
Maine, both long deceased, the father dying in Octo- 
ber, 1874. 

Asa Frederick Howe was bom in Rowley, Mas- 
sachusetts, January 31, 1846. He was educated in 
the public schools of Rowley and Ipswich, and when 
his schooldays were over, entered a shoe factory, 
remaining there two years, but with the outbreak 
of the Civil War he entered the military service of 
his country, enlisting in Company M, Fourth Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. That regi- 
ment campaigned in Maryland and Virginia, and 
Howe was in the detail sent out to search for Booth 



after his assassination of President Lincoln in 1865. 
He was honorably discharged from the United States 
service in June, 1865, and for the next four years 
pursued his trade in the Danvers shoe factory of 
Sears ft Putnam. In 1869 he was appointed a 
teacher in the old State Reform School, where he 
remained until 1873, and during this period held at 
different times almost all the offices of the school, 
and was teacher and leader of the school band. 
In 1873 he returned to Rowley, and for the next 
three years engaged in merchandising there that he 
might be near his parents. Before the death of his 
father in 1874, Asa F. took over the working of the 
ancestral farm, and eventually took active part in 
local public affairs. He served a period as constable 
of Rowley, and became chief of police, also chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen and Board of Asses- 
sors. In 1877 he was elected from his district to 
the State Legislature. In 1878, however, he de- 
cided to go West, and for the next two and a half 
years was in Lincoln, Nebraska, there engaged in 
the cattle business, and in general farming. Return- 
ing East in 1881, he took up his residence and oc- 
cupation in Georgetown, Massachusetts, entering 
the store of Samuel Poor, grocer of that place. 
Later he opened the same business independently in 
Georgetown, his store being situated near the pres- 
ent site of the bank. After a while, however, he 
decided to again take up educational woric and was 
appointed master and military instructor at the Ly- 
man School for Boys at Westboro, and there, in 
that capacity, spent the next eight years. Coming 
again to Georgetown, he acted as parole offi<;er for 
about a year, then returned to Westboro and again 
became master. When the probation department 
was created by law he was its first officer under the 
superintendent, and he served in that capacity for 
about fourteen years, and then, after State service 
covering twenty-five years, he applied for retire- 
ment, which was granted by Governor Guild. Dur- 
ing his connection with State woik he also served 
as justice of the peace. He also was for a time an 
officer in the Ipswich House of Correction and in 
the Lawrence Jail. 

During his long association with the district he 
has gained general respect, and has always shown 
an inclination to help in the responsibilities of good 
dtizenship. He has been a trustee of the public 
library, and has held other public offices; is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order, affiliated with lodge and 
chapter; a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; and is senior vice-commander of Everett 
Peabody Post, Grand Army of the Republic. By 
religious conviction he is a Baptist, and a member 
of the local church. 

Mr. Howe married, August 19, 1876, Emma M. 
Perley, of Lewiston, Maine, the daughter of Luther 
L. and Maria Conant (Vining) Perley, her father 
bom in Harrison, Maine. He was a tinsmith by 
trade, but later a farmer at Harrison, Maine, where 
he died, March 26, 1859. Maria Conant (Vining) 
Periey was bom in Durham, Maine, and died June 
1, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Howe have two children, 
daughters: 1. Josephine Eldred, a graduate nurse 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



169 



of the New Ensrland Hospital at Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts; married Leroy Herbert Clough, a con- 
tractor and buUder, and they are the parents of two 
children: Leroy Herbert, Jr., and Frederick Earl 
Clough. 2. Alice Marjorie, a graduate of Haver- 
hill Business College, now receiver for the North- 
eastern Street Railway Company at Haverhill, Mas- 
sachusetts. Miss Howe is a graphologist of repute, 
quite well known for character readings from hand- 
writings. 

Mrs. Emma M. (Perley) Howe was educated in 
the grade and high schools of Lewiston, Mame, and 
when her husband was appointed master at West- 
boro, Mrs. Howe was appointed matron, a positioYi 
she most capably filled for eight years. She then 
became superintendent of the bakery connected 
with the schools at Westboro and Berlin, Massa- 
chusetts, filling that office for two years. She was 
president and is now vice-president of the Ladies' 
Aid Society of the Baptist church, is a member 
of the Daughters of Rebekah, and has been presi- 
dent of the Woman's Relief Corps. 

Mr. Howe has written poems without number, 
many of which have been printed. On his recent 
celebration of his seventy-seventh birthday he wrote 
a poem entitled "Ego,'' ending as given below: 

I have livedo in the North, the South and the West, 
But surely I love Old New England the best, 
For seventy-seven years I have hoed my row, 
And yet, I am not old, oh no! oh no! 

My locks may be white and my form bending low, 
I may shuffle along and my gait may be slow, 
But I am within. Ego tells me so, 
And Ego tells me that I am not old, oh no I oh no. 

Mr. Howe has officiated at Memorial Day services 
as speaker, and has held nearly all offices of Everett 
Peabody Post, Grand Army of the Republic. He is 
one of Georgetown's "grand old men," and is held 
in high esteem by all who know him. 



SIDNEY C. BAKER— The business of making 
shoes, with its many subsidiary industries, while 
peculiarly American in its inception and growth, 
has drawn many from England into its folds. One 
of the best known of these English-bom leaders is 
Sidney C. Baker, bom August 22, 1870, who left 
London, England, in 1900, and came to the United 
States. Educated in the public schools of this coun- 
try, he had found employment in various vocations 
for many years, but being ambitious for some- 
thing better, he came to find it in a newer land. 
Three years after his arrival he went to Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, and engaged in the making of wood 
heels. Ten years later, increasing trade made it 
necessary to enlarge his business so he sought and 
found a partner in Leon O. Ross. 

Mr. Ross was at that time an active member of 
the contracting and building firm of Charles O. Ross 
A Son, but withdrawing, he gave his time and en- 
ergy to making with Mr. Baker a going concern of 
the new company. They took the name of Ross & 
Baker, manufacturers of wood heels for women's 
shoes, and started in the smallest way, with very 



little capital. Locating first at No. 100 Phoenix 
Row, they remained but a short time before re- 
moving to No. 141 Washington street. After a year 
at this place they found, in 1914, quarters that 
suited them better at No. 68 Fleet street, where 
they now are (1921). Although starting in a very 
small way, they have bit by bit built up' a strong 
organization and now have about forty-five oper- 
ators. The products of the factory are sold directly 
to the shoe trade. 

Mr. Baker is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, Haverhill, and president of the Wood Heel 
Manufacturers' Association of that city. He be- 
longs also to the Agawam Club. During the World 
War he put his energy into the Red Cross and War 
Loan drives, and many remember his successful ac- 
tivities. 

In 1906 Mr. Baker married Luella M. Moore, 
daughter of Alden S. and Ella F. (Walsh) Moore, 
both natives of Haverhill, Massachusetts. Mr. 
Moore is a maker of wood heels in the city. Of this 
marriagre one child was bom, Arline Baker, bom 
January 11, 1909. Mr. Baker and his family are al- 
ways genial hosts at their pleasant residence, No. 
24 Chandler street, Haverhill. 



JAMES T. FITZGERALD, lawyer, of Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, was bom in that city, October 1, 
1884, son of James H. and Mary A. (O'Brien) 
Fitzgerald. His father was engaged in the leather 
business, in Haverhill, until his death in 1919, and 
his mother died in 1905. Mr. Fitzgerald attended 
the St. James' Parochial School, the Haverhill High 
School, graduating with the class of 1904, and the 
Boston University Law School, receiving his de- 
gree in 1912. The same year he waa admitted to 
the Essex county bar, and he located in his native 
city to engage in the practice of his profession. He 
is among the well-known citizens of HaverhiU and 
has built up a very satisfactory clientele. Mr. Fitz- 
gerald is a member of the Chamber of Conmierce 
and of the Historical Society of Haverhill. Fra- 
temally he is afiiliated with the Knights of Colum- 
bus and Father Mathews Society. 

He married, in 1915, Maguerite M. Goodwin, of 
that city, and they are the parents of a daughter, 
Rita Fitzgerald. The family attend and support the 
St. James' Catholic Church. 



ABRAM W. COLBY, manufacturer, part owner 
of the Haverhill firm of Colby A Towne, manufac- 
turers of wood heels, is a well-known business man 
of Haverhill, having been bom in the city, and in it 
passed more than fifty years. He was bom No- 
vember 3, 1870, the son of Wallace and Georgianna 
(Hall) Colby, the former a shoe manufacturer, orig- 
inally of Madison, New Hampshire, and the latter 
a native of Haverhill. 

The Colby family settled in Haverhill, and there 
Abram W. received all of his schooling. After pass- 
ing through the local public schools, he began to 
work for Chester & Rugg, shoe manufacturers. 
With that firm he remained for twenty-one years. 
For another three years he was in the employ of 



170 



ESSEX COUNTY 



P. N. Wadleigh, but at the end of that time he 
formed a businesa partnership with Mr. Haseltine, 
the two opening in the manufacturing business un- 
der the trading name of Haseltine & Colby. Their 
original plant was situated at No. 62 Washington 
street, but they moved it later to Essex street. The 
partnership was dissolved in 1918. Shortly after- 
wards, however, Mr. Colby formed association ¥dth 
Edwin G. Towne, and began to manufacture wood 
heels for shoe manufacturers, their trading name be- 
ing Colby A Towne, and their plant being at No. 11 
Stage street. So they have continued to the pres- 
ent, their present plant covering 4,500 square feet 
of floor space, and having a capacity of 800 dozen 
heels a day. It is therefore an appreciable business 
enterprise. 

Mr. Colby married, in 1912, Belle (Davis) Hasel- 
tine, daughter of Amaril and Adelia (Fuller) Davis, 
both originally of Appleton, Maine. Her father, 
who was a shoe manufacturer, died in 1892; her 
mother in 1881. She was the widow of Hasel- 
tine, and resided in Haverhill before her marriage 
to Mr. Colby. 



EDWIN G. TOWNE was bom in Newburyport, 
Massachusetts, March 1, 1888, a son of Sydney F. 
and Ellen M. (Pickard) Towne. His father and 
mother were residents of Newburyport. His father, 
who was engaged in the railroad business, died in 
1892, leaving Edwin G. an orphan at the age of four 
years. 

Edwin G. Towne received his early education in 
the public schools of Massachusetts. When his 
school days came to an end, he decided to enter the 
shoe manufacturing business and associated himself 
with the Slipper City Wood Heel Company, in order 
to learn the details of the industry. After leaving 
the Slipper City Wood Heel Company, he worked for 
various other firms in order to gain experience. In 
1905 he entered the service of O. A. Martin, a local 
manufacturer. He remained with Mr. Martin for 
two years, during which he perfected his practical 
knowledge of the details of manufacturing wood 
heels by machinery. He then became foreman for 
A. R. Wade, and after three years' service at the 
Wade factory, became manager of Cunningham & 
Wilde's factory. Later he became manager of the 
Excel Wood Heel Company, and foreman of the 
Blackburn & Haseltine Company. In 1919 he 
formed a partnership with Abram W. Colby, and 
under the firm name of Colby & Towne opened a 
factory with a manufacturing capacity of 300 dozen 
wood heels a day, and they have an enviable repu- 
tation in the business world. Mr. Towne is a mem- 
ber of the Junior Order of American Mechanics, the 
Enights of Malta, the Improved Order of Red Men, 
the Sons of Veterans, and the Superintendents' and 
Foremen's Association of Haverhill. 

Mr. Towne married Mabel Batchelder, of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, in 1905. Mrs. Towne is a daugh- 
ter of Orrin T. Batchelder, of Northwood, Massa- 
chusetts, and his wife, Ada M. (Ayer) Batchelder, 
of Haverhill, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Towne 
have one son, Edwin G., Jr., bom in 1906. 



HUBERT CLINTON THOMPSON, attorney, 
member of the Harvard University Law School, 
class of '14, and now in practice in Haverhill and 
Essex county, has given indication of aptitude for 
public affairs and law. He was bom in Danvers- 
port, Massachusetts, November 15, 1889, the son of 
William O. and Agnes J. (Doty) Thompson, both 
of New Hampshire families. 

Hubert C. Thompson passed through the elemen- 
tary public schools of his native place, and after fur- 
ther preparatory tutoring entered Clark University, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1911. 
Having resolved to become a lawyer, he then be- 
clune a student at the Harvard University Law 
School, the standing of which is probably the high- 
est of any in the United States. While an undei^ 
graduate, he was a member of the 'Varsity Debating 
Club. He was admitted to the bar of Essex county, 
Massachusetts, in February, 1915, and entered at 
once into practice in Haverhill. He was elected a 
delegate to the Constitutional Convention of Massa- 
chusetts and appointed to the Committee on Codifi- 
cations. 

The great World War, 1917-18, necessarily intei^ 
fered with his professional and dvil plans. He set 
aside his personal affairs and became a member of 
the United States Merchant Marine, and until the 
end of the war gave national service at sea, as quar- 
termaster, his ofRcial rank being A. B. S. After the 
war was over, he resumed his practice of law. He 
is unmarried. 



DR. RALPH ROY MOULTHROP.— A scion of 
one of the oldest New England families. Dr. Moul- 
throp's ancestry can be traced to a very early period, 
and in New York State a branch of his family were 
also among the first settlers. It was there, at Ken- 
oza Lake, Sullivan county. New York, that he was 
bom, June 28, 1889, son of Elroy B. Motdthrop, 
grandson of Gideon Moulthrop, and great-grandson 
of Nathan and Jane Moulthrop. 

The latter were among the earliest settlers in Sul- 
livan county, and their son, Gideon, was bom there 
in 1833, and died in 1909; he was a farmer and a 
member of the Methodist church. His son, Elroy B. 
Moulthrop, was bom in September, 1858, and was a 
merchant at Binghamton, New York. His wife was 
Martha Amelia Miller, daughter of Georg^e and 
Amelia Miller; she was bom in 1860, and died in 
1920. 

Ralph R. Moulthrop attended school at Bingham- 
ton, and prepared for college at the Central High 
School in that city; he graduated from Cornell Uni- 
versity in the class of 1914, having specialized in the 
study of veterinary medicine and surgery. Subse- 
quent to his graduation he was in the employ of 
the United States Government at Washing^ton for 
one year, and in 1915 engaged in practice at Law- 
rence, where he is now located, engaged in business 
with Dr. Ray S. Youmans (see following sketch), 
under the firm name of Moulthrop & Youmans. He 
is a leader in his profession there, and is also the 
city veterinarian of Lawrence and Methuen. While 
at college. Dr. Moulthrop became a member of the 




\^:^Er7r* 



^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



171 



Omega Tau Sigma fraternity. 

Dr. Moulthrop mamed, September 15, 1916, at 
Norwich, New York, Genevieve Rose Moulton, 
daughter of Will and Ruby C. Moulton. The for^ 
mer is the secretary of the Sherman Gasoline Cor^ 
poration of New York City. Dr. Moulthrop and 
his wife attend the Trinity Congregational Church 
of Lawrence. 



Rev. Nathan Matthews married Etta Cabell, of 
Virginia, and they are the parents of one living 
child, Patrick C. Matthews, now a student in the 
grammar school at Danvers. Rev. Matthews is 
at present pastor of Calvary Episcopal Church, 
at Danvers, Massachusetts. 



DR. RAY S. YOUMANS, of the firm of Moul- 
throp & Youmans, proprietors of the Veterinary 
Hospital, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, was bom 
March 18, 1892, in Wellsbridge, New York, and 
there attended school. In 1914 he was g^raduated 
from the Veterinary College of Cornell Univer- 
sity, with the degree of D. V. M. 

Subsequent to his graduation, Dr. Youmans was 
in the employ of the United States Government 
at Buffalo, New York, as meat inspector, which 
position he held for six months. The outbreak 
of the World War at this time, and the urgent 
need of men specially trained, caught Dr. Youmans 
in its train and he was engaged in transporting 
horses for the English Government, having charge 
of the horses en route. 

After the war he came to Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, and formed a partnership with Dr. Moul- 
throp (see preceding sketch) to conduct a Veter- 
inary Hospital. At the hospital there are ac- 
commodations for boarding animals, and there is 
a well-equipped hospital for small animals. 

Dr. Youmans married, July 80, 1919, Sarah E. 
Springall, at Dexter, Maine. Mrs. Youmans was 
a native of Maiden, Massachusetts. They are the 
parents of two children: Elizabeth, bom Novem- 
ber 16, 1920; and Jane, bom March 23, 1922. Dr. 
and Mrs. Youmans are attendants of the Univer- 
salist church. 



REV. NATHAN MATTHEWS, of Danvers, 
Massachusetts, was bom in Newfoundland, the 
son of John and Fannie (Dix) Matthews, the 
former, commissioner of fisheries for many years. 
Mr. Matthews attended the public schools, and 
later came to Boston, where he was employed for 
almost two years. He then resumed his studies 
at the Virginia College, and in 1900 was gradu- 
ated from the Virginia Episcopal Theological Sem- 
inary. For fourteen years he labored as a mission- 
ary on the west coast of Africa, and after his re- 
turn to the United States, spent a year in Ten- 
nessee under Bishop Gaylor. The following year 
he was stationed in North Carolina, under Bishop 
Guerry, and during the World War Mr. Matthews 
served nine months as civilian chaplain at Camp 
Sevier, South Carolina. 

Rev. Matthews, is a member' of the various 
Masonic bodies, including the Lodge, Chapter, and 
Council at Rockhill, South Carolina; Commandery 
at Chester, South Carolina; Omar Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at 
Charleston, South Carolina; Lodge of Perfection; 
Princes of Jersusalem; Rose Croix, at Salem; and 
Massachusetts Consistory at Boston. 



CHARLES HOYT MORSE, civil engineer, of 
Haverhill, associated with Henry N. Chase in con- 
sultant practice as civil, architectural and land- 
scape engineers, with offices in Haverhill, Boston 
and Plymouth, Massachusetts, is a native of Brad- 
ford, Massachusetts, bom lf(ay 2, 1887, son of 
Scott Herbert and Harriet Elizabeth (Hoyt) Morse. 
His father, who died in 1903, spent most of his 
life in Haverhill; his mother, who died in 1891, 
was of a Hampstead, New Hampshire, family. He» 
himself, came especially into public notice a few 
years ago because of his military service during 
the war, reference to which will later herein be 
made. 

Charles Hoyt Morse was reared in Bradford and 
Haverhill, and in due course passed through the 
local public schools, after which he took a pre- 
paratory course at Mitchell's Military School, Bil- 
lerica, Massachusetts. This education he supple- 
mented by taking special and private tuition to 
fit him for the engineering profession. He gave 
close study to mathematics and to engineering sub- 
jects after leaving school, and obtained a post 
under Nelson Spofford, of Haverhill, former en- 
gineer for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Later he was with Ralph D. Hood, with whom 
he was associated until he went into the United 
States Government service in 1914, in the Depart- 
ment of the Interior. He was in federal civil ser- 
vice for a year, his work being in the Rocky 
Mountains and National Parks on road and bridge 
design and construction. When he left in 1915 it 
was to accept appointment as assist